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Occupational diseases in British Columbia : frequency, distribution and implications for prevention Husman, Kaj Risto Henrik 1983

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OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA: FREQUENCY, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREVENTION By KAJ RISTO HENRIK HUSMAN M.D., 1970, Ph.D., 1980, The University of Helsinki, Finland A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Department of Health Care and Epidemiology) We accept this thesis as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA June 1983 ©Kaj Risto Henrik Husman, 1983 In presenting t h i s thesis i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t of the requirements for an advanced degree at the University of B r i t i s h Columbia, I agree that the Library s h a l l make i t f r e e l y available for reference and study. I further agree that permission for extensive copying of t h i s thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the head of my department or by his or her representatives. I t i s understood that copying or publication of t h i s thesis for f i n a n c i a l gain s h a l l not be allowed without my written permission. Department of The University of B r i t i s h Columbia 1956 Main Mall Vancouver, Canada V6T 1Y3 Date St*? (3/81) - i i -ABSTRACT The main o b j e c t i v e o f t h i s s t u d y was t o a s s i s t i n t h e p r e v e n t i o n o f o c c u p a t i o n a l d i s e a s e s (OD 1 s ) i n B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a by p r o v i d i n g i n f o r m a t i o n c o n c e r n i n g a c c e p t e d w a g e - l o s s c l a i m s f o r OD 's i n B .C . To a c h i e v e t h i s o b j e c t i v e , d a t a i n the W o r k e r s ' Compensa t i on B o a r d ' s OD R e g i s t e r was a n a l y z e d by e x t r a c t i o n , c l a s s i f i c a t i o n and t a b u l a t i o n o f a c c e p t e d w a g e - l o s s c l a i m s f o r OD 's d u r i n g the p e r i o d 1978-1982 , by d i a g n o s i s , number o f c a s e s , r a t e , t y p e o f e x p o s u r e , a g e , s e x , i n d i v i d u a l y e a r and i n d u s t r i a l s u b c l a s s . A l s o , a model f o r r e g u l a r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g o f r e g i s t e r e d OD 's i n B . C . was d e v e l o p e d . To c o l l e c t and a n a l y z e t h e d a t a , an upda ted e x p o s u r e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n was d e v e l o p e d . I t was o b s e r v e d t h a t OD ' s c aused by p h y s i c a l f a c t o r s such as u l t r a v i o l e t r a d i a t i o n , r e p e t i t i v e m o t i o n , n o i s e and f r i c t i o n and p r e s s u r e were most common i n B . C . , r e p r e s e n t i n g 63% o f t h e t o t a l o f 19 ,622 OD c a s e s d u r i n g 1978-1982 . Among t h e t o p t e n c a u s e s o f OD's a r e a l s o c h e m i c a l and b i o l o g i c a l a g e n t s ( " c l e a n i n g compounds " , " o t h e r c h e m i c a l s " , " o t h e r a l k a l i e s " , " a n i m a l s and i n s e c t s " , " a c i d s " and "cement and m o r t a r " ) . The OD r a t e s p e r 1,000 manyears o f employment were i n c r e a s i n g d u r i n g 1978-1981 and t h e s m a l l d rop i n 1982 i s p r o b a b l y r e l a t e d t o t h e economic d e p r e s s i o n i n B .C . The h i g h e s t OD r i s k i n d u s t r i e s (measured by OD i n c i d e n c e r a t e / 1 , 0 0 0 manyears ) w e r e : " c o n s t r u c t i o n and r e p a i r o f s m a l l v e s s e l s " ( 3 9 . 8 ) , " s h i n g l e and shake m i l l s " ( 3 7 . 5 ) , and " b a k e r i e s and m a n u f a c t u r i n g o f f o o d p r o d u c t s " ( 1 7 . 6 ) . - i i i -I t was c o n c l u d e d t h a t t h e s e r e s u l t s i n d i c a t e d c l e a r l y t h a t p r e v e n t i v e a c t i o n s s h o u l d be improved i n B . C . t o d e c r e a s e t h e number o f w o r k e r s who a n n u a l l y s u f f e r f r o m O D ' s . I t i s s u g g e s t e d t h a t o c c u p a t i o n a l h e a l t h s e r v i c e s (OHS) w o u l d h e l p t o a c h i e v e t h i s g o a l , t h r o u g h e x p a n d i n g and mak ing more e f f i c i e n t and e f f e c t i v e e d u c a t i o n , r e g u l a t i o n and s e r v i c e s c o n c e r n i n g OD p r e v e n t i o n . - iv -TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page ABSTRACT i i LIST OF TABLES vi LIST OF FIGURES v i i i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix I INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Background of the Study 1 1.2 Objectives of this Study 2 II LITERATURE REVIEW . 4 2.1 Compensation Legislation in British Columbia 4 2.2 Principles of Prevention of Occupational Diseases 7 2.3 Occupational Health Legislation in Canada and Some Other Countries 8 III MATERIAL AND METHODS ' 10 3.1 B.C.'s Workers' Compensation Board's Occupational Disease Register 10 3.2 Changes in Coding for this Report 15 3.3 Data Analysis 17 v -TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont'd) Chapter Page IV RESULTS 20 4.1 Occupational Diseases in 1978-1982, Totals 20 4.2 The Top Ten Causes of Occupational Diseases in 1978-1982 20 4.3 Causes of Occupational Diseases in General in 1978-1982 21 4.4 Occupational Diseases by Subclass 22 4.5 Occupational Diseases by Subclass (Rates) 22 4.6 Occupational Diseases by Diagnosis and Exposure 23 4.7 Sex and Age Distribution of Occupational Diseases 24 4.8 Detailed Breakdowns of Occupational Diseases by Subclass, Exposure, Year and Diagnosis 27 4.9 Occupational Cancers in 1978-1982 29 4.10 Direct Costs of Occupational Diseases in 1978-1982 29 4.IT Disallowed Occupational Disease Claims 30 V DISCUSSION OF RESULTS 31 5.1 General Discussion 31 5.2 Further Studies 35 5.3 Conclusions and Recommendations 35 REFERENCES 39 APPENDICES 42 I Schedule B 42 II WCB's Forms for Employee, Employer and Physician to be Submitted with Occupational Disease Claim 47 III Code List for Occupational Diseases 51 IV WCB's Classification of Industries 54 V Figures and Tables 66 - V1 -LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1 Jhe Top Ten Causes of Occupational Diseases 1n B.C., 1978-1982 69 2 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 70 by Exposure and Year, Al l Subclasses, 1978-1982 3 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 73 by Subclass and Year, Al l Diagnoses, 1978-1982 4 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 75 by Exposure and Diagnosis, Al l Subclasses, 1978-1982 5 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 78 by Subclass, Sex and Average Age, Totals and Rates for j 1978-1982 (Cases per 1,000 Manyears of Employment) 6 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 80 by Sex, Exposure and Average Age, Al l Subclasses, 1978-1982 7 The Five Subclasses with Highest Occupational Disease Rates, 83 1978-1982 8 The Five Subclasses with Smallest Occupational Disease Rates, 84 1978-1982 9 Estimated Average Manyears of Employment, by Subclass, 1979-1981 85 10 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 86 by Exposure, Year and Subclass, Al l Diagnoses, 1978-1982 11 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 140 by Exposure, Diagnosis and Subclass, 1978-1982 - v i i -LIST OF TABLES (cont'd) Table Page 12 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 197 by Exposure, Year and Subclass, A l l Diagnoses, 1978-1982 13 Number of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, 199 by Exposure, Diagnosis and Subclass, 1978-1982 14 Age and Sex Distr ibut ion of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for 201 Occupational Diseases, A l l Subclasses, 1978-1982 15 Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Cancers, by 202 Diagnosis, Exposure, Subclass of Exposure and Occupation, 1978-1982 16 The Distr ibut ion of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational 203 Cancers, by Subclass of Exposure, 1978-1982 17 Costs of Occupational Disease Claims and the Total Cost of A l l 204 Occupational Disease and Injury Claims in 1978-1982 18 Rejected or Disallowed Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases in 1981 205 - v i i i -LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 The Annual Distribution (percentage of total) of Accepted 67 Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational Diseases, by Exposure, All Subclasses, 1978-1982 2 Annual Rates of Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for Occupational 68 Diseases per 1,000 Manyears of Employment, All Subclasses, 1978-1982 Flow Chart 1 Methods of Occupational Disease Claim Registration in B.C. 13 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would l ike to thank the members of my Thesis Committee: Dr. J.W. Anderson, Chairman of the Thesis Committee, for his encouragement, patience, and valuable advice during the course of completing this thesis; Professor D. Protti for his valuable comments and for editing the final draft; Dr. William Whitehead who helped me in many different ways throughout the study. My sincere gratitude is due to Mr. Keith Mason, M.Sc , for his help in the use of WCB's Occupational Disease Register, planning the changes in c lass i f icat ion and help in analyzing the data and preparing the tables. My thanks are due to the staff of WCB's Stat ist ical Services Department, who did the recoding and offered their help in various tasks during the study. My thanks are due to Mr. Ron Dennis, B .Sc , whose valuable comments helped me in developing the exposure c lass i f icat ion system. My cordial thanks are due to Robert Kohn, Ph.D., who encouraged me during my study and who corrected my English in the f inal draft. My special thanks are due to the Workers' Compensation Board of Brit ish Columbia for lett ing me do the study and placing the f ac i l i t i e s of the WCB at my disposal and also for f inancial ly supporting the study. My thanks are due to Judith MacLeod, Glenda Troup and Heather Gribling who sk i l l f u l l y and quickly typed my numerous drafts of the thesis. The author wishes the readers to take into account that his mother tongue is not English. VANCOUVER, 15 JUNE 1983 KAJ HUSMAN, M.D., Ph.D. CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background of the Study Occupational diseases (OD) are the negative outcome in workers who have been exposed to harmful physical , chemical, b io logical and other "stress" factors at work. 'There were 4,480 cases of OD's in B r i t i sh Columbia (B.C.) in 1981 (19) for which claims were accepted. According to the Annual Reports of Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) of B.C., the number of accepted wage-loss claims has been increasing annually over the past ten years (6, 19). One important method of preventing OD's in the work place i s organizing preventive occupational health services (OHS) at the work place. The ultimate goal of OHS, according to the World Health Organization, i s " to promote conditions at work which maximize the qual ity of l i f e by: protecting workers' health; enhancing physical , mental and social well-being; preventing i l l health and accidents." (27) This def in i t ion i s operationalized by adding: "To achieve this goal medical, industr ia l hygienic and related expertise Is required". In most B.C. work places there are no organized preventive OHS, and only very few doctors in B.C. are working as ful l-t ime OH physicians (2). By organized preventive OHS, the author means that there are doctors, nurses, industr ia l hygiem'sts and other personnel doing pre-employment and periodical health examinations, work s i t e v i s i t s etc. for workers and work places where exposure to harmful agents ex is ts . "Compre-hensive" or " h o l i s t i c " OHS pol icy does not ex is t generally in B.C. industr ies , at least not in the sense of the above-quoted WHO's def in i t ion (9, 27). The Workers' Compensation Board of B.C. (WCB) has presented in i t s Health and Safety Regulations a proposal to start OHS in certain industr ies , where workers are exposed to heavy metals (lead - 2 -and mercury), dusts (silica, asbestos), excess heat and high atmospheric pressure. This proposal (Section 78 in WCB's Health and Safety Regula-tions) has never been promulgated. To plan a preventive OHS for B.C. and the prevention of OD's in general, the data concerning existing OD's and trends in their incidence and prevalence is of primary interest. The WCB has compensated OD's as well as injuries since 1917, and the WCB has had a computerized register of accepted wage-loss claims for OD's since the 1960's and also of rejected claims since June 1981; but WCB has done only few systematic detailed analyses of these registered OD's (e.g. of noise-induced hearing losses). WCB publishes a short table of "Accepted Wage-Loss Claims for OD's" in its Annual Report (19). Data on most registered OD's have never been published in detail. One study was done in 1982, in which a comparison of registered OD's between B.C. and Finland was explored (6). Data of registered OD's are available in some other countries. Finland publishes annually a very detailed analysis of OD's (14), while Sweden, Norway and U.S.A. have less detailed annual reports of OD's (16, 11). In Canada's other provinces, data on OD's are published in one small separate table for OD's only in Ontario. In other provinces, OD's have one or two columns in tables, which show injury statistics in WCB's annual reports; and the published OD data in those reports vary also because there is no common, accepted Canadian classification system for either OD's or classes of Industry. All WCB's use their particular classification system, which is based to some extent on the Canadian National Work Injury Program's recommendation (5). 1.2 Objectives of this Study The main objective of this study is to assist in the prevention of OD's in B.C. by providing information concerning OD's in this province. This information is useful at the following levels: - 3 -a) Strategic planning and pol icy formation — Health Min is t ry , B.C. Medical Associat ion, WCB, workers' and employers' associations for sett ing and/or evaluating objectives, and determining the acqu is i -t ion and a l locat ion of resources. b) Management control — effect ive and e f f i c i en t u t i l i z a t i o n of resources aimed at preventing OD's at the corporate l e ve l . c) Operational control -- ef fect ive and e f f i c i en t u t i l i z a t i o n of resources in ident i f i ca t ion and contro l l ing exposures which cause OD's at the work s i te l e v e l , for safety committees, management, union representatives, WCB of f ices (1, 13). The speci f ic objectives of the study are: a) To study the frequency and d is t r ibut ion of accepted wage-loss claims for OD's i n d i f ferent B.C. industries during the period 1978-1982, by diagnosis, number of cases, rate, type of exposure, age, sex, individual year and industr ia l subclass. b) To provide a model for regular annual reporting of OD's i n order to develop an information system concerning registered OD's in B.C. c) To ident i fy p r i o r i t y areas for preventive action. - 4 -CHAPTER II  LITERATURE REVIEW 2.1 Compensation Legis lat ion i n B r i t i sh Columbia In B.C. and in other Canadian provinces, as well as in some other countries, one can obtain information of compensated OD cases on request (6, 16). However, there i s no systematically col lected information of other OD's v i z . of OD cases in which no claim has been made for compensation. Compensation of OD's i s based on l eg i s l a t ion in each j u r i s d i c t i o n ; in B.C., i t i s the Workers' Compensation Act (18). Section 1 of the Workers' Compensation Act of B r i t i sh Columbia (18) defines occupational disease as " industr ia l disease", which i s " . . . any disease mentioned in Schedule B and any other disease which the Board by regulation or otherwise may designate or recognize as an industr ia l disease and 'disease' includes disablement result ing from exposure to contamination". Subsequently, in th is report, the term occupational disease i s used because i t has broader implications. The term " i ndus t r i a l " has narrower focus, usually not including e.g. services, c l e r i c a l work, salespersons, and many other blue- and white-collar employees. Section 6(1) of the Workers' Compensation Act provides for payment of compensation for occupational disease where "the disease i s due to the nature of any employment in which the worker was employed". There are therefore two s ign i f i cant requirements to be sa t i s f i ed before a claim i s accepted. The f i r s t i s that the condition i s c l a s s i f i ed as an "occupational disease" and the second i s that i t must be caused by the claimant's work. - 5 -Schedule B (Appendix I) i s the f i r s t place where one usually looks to determine i f the disease i s an occupational disease.' However, the l i s t of diseases in that schedule i s not exhaustive, as one can see in Appendix I c i t ed above. Therefore, according to the Workers' Compensa-t ion Act , diseases other than those l i s t e d in Schedule B may also be compensated as occupational diseases. Thus, the omission of a disease from Schedule B does not necessarily mean that no compensation i s payable. There are bas ica l ly two ways in which the Board recognizes occupational diseases other than under Schedule B. One method i s for the Board to adopt a regulation specifying a disease as an " industr ia l disease". Such a regulation applies to a l l claims made by workers with that disease. According to the Board's published decisions in the Workers' Compensation Reporter ser ies , there were seventeen diseases recognized in th is way which are l i s t e d in Decision No. 93 (21). Decision No. 94 (22) also describes a procedure for recognizing further diseases by this method. This procedure was followed, for example, in Decision No. 128 (23) by which bronchit is and emphysema were recognized as " industr ia l diseases" in certain s i tuat ions. The second method i s for the Board to recognize a disease in a part icu lar case. A claim may be accepted for any disease by th is method, but the recognition does not normally extend beyond the part icular claim in which i t took place. It i s also important to d i f ferent iate between occupational accident (or injury) and occupational disease. The main difference i s usually the length and nature of the exposure: occupational accident i s in general a traumatic incident of sudden onset (exposure time i s from parts of a second to a few seconds), whereas OD's are usually caused by exposures which l as t weeks, months or years but which can sometimes l as t only a few hours. Typical examples of the former type OD's are: noise-induced hearing losses, pneumoconiosis, Farmers' Lung, lead poisoning. Examples of OD's caused by re la t i ve l y short exposure are poisonings caused by a few hours' exposure to organic solvents or respiratory i r r i t a t i o n cases - 6 -caused by a few minutes to several hours of exposure to ammonia, sulfur or chlorine. Exceptions to the general rule are e.g. welders' flash and chemical burns, both of which are caused by an exposure of some seconds, but are c lass i f ied as an occupational disease. Thus, there is no clear distinction between occupational accident (or injury) or disease; one has to see this grouping as a result of natural development, in which work related sicknesses are c lass i f ied case by case. For example, tenosynovitis can be c lass i f ied as occupational injury or disease, depending on i ts or ig in: " in jury" , i f tenosynovitis i s caused by a contusion (hit) and "disease", i f i t is caused by repetitive motion. However, in this example, the general rule of length of exposure applies in that, in the f i r s t case, the length of exposure is parts of a second, in the lat ter case, i t i s hours, days or weeks. Tradit ional ly, OD's are c lass i f ied by their etiological agent and by the exposure which has caused each particular disease (28, 29). B.C.'s Schedule B describes only OD's which are caused by physical, chemical or biological agents, which is the internationally used exposure c l a s s i f i -cation (18, 28, 29). In recent years, there has been much discussion of work-related diseases caused by mental stress, but these diseases do not show up in l i s t s of compensated OD's in B.C. or elsewhere. The reason might be that diseases caused by stress are d i f f i cu l t to prove as being caused by stress specif ical ly at work, not somewhere else. However, B.C.'s Workers' Compensation Act does not exclude diseases caused by this "fourth dimension" agent, mental stress; i t i s , however, a matter of showing that a particular disease is caused by the claimant's work. In B.C., diseases where the exposure at work is not the main cause of the disease, but where this exposure aggravates symptoms of a pre-existing disease, compensation can also be received. For example, i f an asthmatic worker is exposed to dust, which does not in i t se l f speci f ical ly cause asthma, but aggravates asthmatic symptoms in this worker, i t is compensated as an OD. Usually, however, exposure at work actually causes the asthma, e.g. isocyanates, dust of western red cedar or flour dust (Appendix I, 20). - 7 -2.2 Pr inc ip les of Prevention of Occupational Diseases The most important means in prevention of OD's i s el imination of the cause of the disease, namely the harmful exposure at work, e.g. noise, lead, dust, etc. or at least reducing the exposure to a "safe" l e ve l . In pract ice, th is may be d i f f i c u l t to achieve and, therefore, other means are also needed in OD prevention. Use of protective equipment, e.g. respirators, ear muffs, i s a " f i r s t a id " type solut ion. Even the "safe" exposures can be harmful to workers who have a pre-existing condition (30, 28, 29), i .e . to workers who are more susceptible than the average worker or who do not use the proper protective equipment or do not use i t correct ly . Examples are asthmatic workers in dusty work places, where non-asthmatics can work safely but asthmatics .cannot. S imi la r l y , those who are more susceptible to respiratory a l le rg ies ( a l v e o l i t i s , asthma) and are exposed to organic, other al lergenic dusts, such as f lour dust, flour-dust-induced asthma (Bakers' asthma) react more readily than do average workers. Regulation i s often needed to achieve "safe" working conditions to prevent OD's, but regulation alone may not be enough, as pointed out above. Even in ideal "safe" working condit ions, there are individuals who can get an OD. Besides regulation, there i s a need to ident i fy harmful exposures at work, to ident i fy susceptible workers, and to ident i fy those workers who already have early stages of an OD. Education of workers and management i s needed to ident i fy the harmful exposures and early symptoms of OD's, and so are services, to ident i fy both harmful working conditions and OD's. Occupational health services (OHS, see ea r l i e r , WHO's def in i t ion) can help in achieving these objectives. Doctors, nurses and industr ia l hygienists help at the work place level by ident i fy ing hazardous working condit ions, informing management and workers of these, planning how to eliminate these hazards and protect the workers. In preplacement examinations, the workers are informed of hazards at the i r spec i f ic work - 8 -s i t e s , susceptible indiv iduals are ident i f i ed and in periodic health examinations Information i s repeated, and thus possible OD cases can be ident i f i ed as early as possible (9, 27, 28, 29). Therefore, OHS bas ica l ly aim at primary prevention (el imination of the exposure) more than at secondary prevention (case f inding at an early stage of OD, to prevent i t from becoming worse). 2.3 Occupational Health Legis lat ion in Canada and Some Other Countries In Ontario, there i s new leg i s l a t ion concerning occupational health and safety in the work places (8). This i s included in B i l l 70, "The Occupational Health and Safety Act " , which took effect in the province from the beginning of 1979 (8, 10). This Act i s quite comprehensive and i t i s comparable with the l eg i s l a t i on in Sweden and in Finland (8, 10, 27). The Ontario Act brought together the occupational health and safety provisions from a variety of statutes and amalgamated in the Ministry of Labour the administrative and regulatory functions concerning occupational health and safety. A lso , i t stated the framework of preventive occupational health a c t i v i t i e s by l eg i s l a t ing workers' and managements' part ic ipat ion in these a c t i v i t i e s at the work place l e ve l . The Ontario Act can be considered to be a c lear , l eg i s l a t i ve statement of occupational health and safety po l i cy , but in spite of i t s many improvements, i t i s s t i l l not a policy for occupational health services (OHS) in terms defined ea r l i e r of preventive OHS (see Introduction). One can conclude from the above, i f even the la test occupational health and safety l eg i s l a t ion does not include an OHS po l i cy , one cannot expect i n any other Canadian province or te r r i to ry comprehensive l eg i s l a t ion concerning a preventive OHS (4). Alberta and Saskatchewan have l e g i s l a -t ion regarding medical examinations (pre-employment and periodical ) of workers exposed to some speci f ic harmful agents. Ontario also has a proposal concerning medical examinations in spec i f ic exposures, but i t has not been promulgated jus t as B.C.'s Section 78 in WCB's Health and Safety Regulations (4, 25). - 9 -Another problem 1n B.C. i s that there are many government agencies involved i n occupational health and safety because of the scattered l e g i s l a t i o n : WCB and the Ministr ies of Labour, Mines, Health and Environment (McKenzie, WC Act ) . These various government agencies contribute to the fragmentation and redundancy of occupational health pract ice, e.g. preplacement and periodic health examinations and ident i fy ing health hazards at individual work places, which are the central preventive a c t i v i t i e s of OHS. From the international perspective, i t i s worth mentioning that , in soc i a l i s t countries, OHS are more or less an integral part (statutory) of health services in general ( in the Soviet Union, OHS are integrated into the whole HS-system for the adult population, including both diagnostic and treatment services). In Finland, France, the Federal Republic of Germany and I ta ly , there are comprehensive, preventive OHS Acts in ef fect (15, 27). The OHS l eg i s l a t ion in these l a t t e r countries i s quite new (except in France, 1946), start ing from Germany's Act in 1974 and ending with I t a l y ' s in 1980. The emphasis in the OHS l e g i s l a -t ion in these countries i s on the prevention of OD's, although some diagnostic and treatment a c t i v i t i e s at the primary care level are made possible or recommended in connection with the OHS and are to be provided by the OH personnel. - 10 -CHAPTER III  MATERIAL AND METHODS 3.1 B.C.'s Workers' Compensation Board's Occupational Disease Register There are d i f ferent categories of claim decisions in the WCB: "Medical aid only" means that a claimant has no time-loss from work, and compensation i s paid for medical expenses, e.g. doctor's and hospi ta l ' s b i l l s . "Wage-loss" means that compensation i s paid for time-loss from work (minimum one working day). "Permanent d i s a b i l i t y " , when the worker cannot continue working, means that pension i s paid depending on his medical d i s ab i l i t y percentage. In case of a death from OD, pension i s paid to the surviving dependents. "Disallowed claim" means the disease i s covered by the WC Act but, in this instance, was not considered to arise out of the worker's employment. "Rejected claim" comes from a worker who i s not covered by the WC Act at the time of injury or inception of the disease. Another fact to keep in mind i s that the Act does not cover a l l industries in B.C. (or did not cover during the study period, l i k e farming, which has in fact been covered since 4 Apr i l 1983). The main industries not covered during the study period are: insurance, banking, theatre and sports, farming, social service agencies, accounting and placement services. "Not covered" industries represented 10-11% of the -11 -tota l work-force of B.C. during the study period. It i s possible, however, for these Industries to voluntar i ly request and get compensation coverage from WCB. This study does not show s t a t i s t i c s on claims that were accepted for medical expense only but involved no time loss from work or for claims that were not accepted. Claims with medical expense only represented about 20% of tota l accepted wage-loss claims, and claims not accepted represented about 5* of total accepted wage-loss claims in 1978-1982. Diseases that had not been reported to the WCB were, of course, not included. Therefore, th i s report does not normally re f l ec t the true incidence of OD's, and one can only guess as to what percentage registered OD's represent the true OD incidence. This relat ionship can be expressed as a formula: h = ! A + JR + he Ij = True OD incidence 1^ = Accepted claims incidence ; I R = Rejected claims incidence IN C = No claims made incidence Since the 1960's, a l l accepted wage-loss claims for OD's have been registered in the WCB's computerized OD register . Also, since June 1981, disallowed and rejected claims have been registered. WCB's s t a t i s t i c a l department has taken care of the registrat ion process during th is period. In Flow Chart 1 i s presented the process of how claims are entered into the WCB's OD register . The process may start from the work place, where workers exposed to harmful agents develop symptoms of OD and i n i t i a t e claims themselves, or through union representatives. However, i t i s usually the physician who f i r s t sends a claim to WCB. In some cases, i t i s the employer. After a claim arrives at WCB, in a l l cases, no matter - 12 -who originated the c la im, information i s asked from a l l three par t ies : worker, employer and physician, using standard forms (Appendix I I ) . These forms have been the same during 1978-1982. Af ter a l l these forms have arr ived, the claim i s adjudicated in the WCB and the decision i s made; i .e . the claim i s accepted or disallowed. WCB's Adjudicators make th i s decision and they consult doctors of the WCB's Occupational Health Department, i f the decision i s not obvious. In pract ice, in most OD cases (as d i s t inc t from simple injury cases), the doctor i s consulted. Also, in some cases, a consultation concerning the claimant's exposure i s made by an Industrial Hygienist (WCB's), usually at the request of the WCB doctor. Consultation reports are attached to the claimant's f i l e . FLOW CHART 1 Methods of OD Claim Registration in B.C. Work Place Worker with OD x) F i r s t Aid Supervisor (Employer) Family Physician --(Usually not fami l ia r with OD's or exposures at work) referral Spec ia l i s t ~ (Usually not fami l iar with OD's or exposures at work) Reports received at WCB and claim established: 1. Physician's diagnosis and major f indings; 2. A worker's description of incident. Employer i s required to send report within three days — confirming work incident. If needed, WCB asks for more information of employer and physician and claimant. f OD — registered, i f accepted (and i f not accepted, since June 1980). x) Claim i n i t i a t ed by: 1. Worker himself or union representative 2. Employer 3. Physician - 14 -After the decision has been made and the claim accepted or rejected, the f i l e comes to WCB's s t a t i s t i c a l department, where certain data of each claim are coded and entered into the computerized OD register . The year for which claims are coded i s the year when compensation of wage-loss was f i r s t paid. Each claim i s registered only once. If needed, other data are added la te r . If the claimant confronts a new OD l a te r , caused by some other exposure, i t i s registered as a new case. The following data are registered into the OD register (main entries only) : ident i f i ca t ion number age sex occupation class of industry: 1. WCB's c l a s s i f i c a t i on (24); 2. United Nations' International Standardized Industrial C lass i f i ca t ion of Economic Ac t i v i t i e s (7) year of registrat ion causal agent = exposure duration of exposure (acute -< 24 hrs or chronic s t 24 hrs) l o c a l i t y of work place diagnosis (WCB code and since 1981 ICD code) (26) duration of sick leave compensation For th is study, the WCB industr ia l c l a s s i f i c a t i on was chosen, because i t i s commonly used in B.C. industry, in di f ferent government branches, WCB, management and unions in B.C., rather than the United Nations' International Standard Industrial C lass i f i ca t ion (7). However, the author strongly suggests that , l a te r on, the industr ia l c l a s s i f i c a t i on should be changed to the UN's c l a s s i f i c a t i on in a l l Canadian provinces, to achieve comparability between other Canadian provinces and other countries. Occupation was not included in this analys is , because i t i s - 15 -often misleading; i t does not t e l l the ea r l i e r occupations (= ea r l i e r exposures). This i s true with the industry too, but to a much lesser extent. If the latency period i s long, the employee may have changed his occupation before he had been diseased and, therefore, the recorded occupation might not have any relat ionship with the part icu lar OD. Also, the same occupation can have many di f ferent exposures, e.g. a carpenter in construction i s not exposed to asbestos, but a carpenter in a shipyard might have, at least in the past, quite often been exposed to this carcinogen. Also, from the prevention point of view, i t i s more important to know the subclass, where the exposure and the diseased employee have been located, than the exposure by occupation. The routine coding i s done by ful l-t ime coders in the WCB's s t a t i s t i c a l department. "Clear" cases are coded by one coder, and for problem cases the supervisor decides the code or a contact physician from the Occupa-t ional Health Department i s consulted. The information i s col lected from a l l the data available in each f i l e , which i s not always su f f i c i en t for systematic data co l l ec t ion . When a claim i s disallowed and the claimant appeals to the board of review or to the Medical Review Panel, and the decision i s changed to acceptance of the claim, i t w i l l be coded as an accepted claim to the f i l e of the year f i r s t paid. 3.2 Changes in Coding for th is Report For coding the exposures (the causes of OD), there i s no widely accepted international code. Finland, for example, uses i t s own c l a ss i f i c a t i on (17). In B.C., a modification of exposure c l a s s i f i c a t i on originated in the U.S. (1962) has been used based on the recommendation of the Canadian National Work Injury Program (5). During another study (6), i t became apparent that this exposure c l a s s i f i c a t i on should be updated to include more d e t a i l , especial ly of chemical exposures, to correspond with today's needs for the prevention of OD. The coding system was - 16 -therefore modified based on suggestions by the author, through the combined ef for ts of three WCB departments: Occupational Health, Industrial Hygiene, and S ta t i s t i ca l Services. The new code i s mainly a more detai led breakdown of the old code, and, i f needed for compara-b i l i t y purposes, a breakdown can also be given by using the old code (some other Canadian WCB's use the old U.S. c l a s s i f i c a t i on system). The new code for OD's i s shown in Appendix III and the added exposure categories are marked with an aster isk. After new classes in the OD coding system had been agreed to , i t became apparent that to complete th is study, which covers a five-year period from 1978 to 1982, the old claims (1978-1981), which had codes according to th is new detai led coding, should be recoded. The recoding process was planned and implemented with col laboration between the WCB's S ta t i s t i ca l Services and the author. The recoding process was as fol lows: a) A l l the claims which had an old code which had been changed to th is new more detai led coding (N = 2,003 claims) were recal led to S t a t i s t i ca l Services for recoding to S ta t i s t i ca l Services. The total number of accepted wage-loss claims for OD's in 1978-1982 was 19,622. b) A l l eight coders involved in the recoding were trained in the new coding and they practiced i t before s tar t ing . c) Each claim was coded by one coder, no cross checking was done. d) When the coder f e l t there was a problem, the supervisor decided the appropriate code or consulted the author and/or a physician from the Occupational Health Department. e) Before the new codes were entered into the computer, the author col lected a random sample of or ig ina l f i l e s and checked the c l ass i f i ca t ions made. The sample s ize was 100. The error was 2%. In both cases, the error was due to insu f f i c i en t information given i n the claim f i l e s ; there were no c lear exposure data given, and the coder had made a wrong guess without consulting the supervisor, the author or the physician from the Occupational Health Department. Out of the 2,003 claims which required recoding, 1,967 were found, 36 (1.8%) had disappeared. Some of them had burnt in one of the WCB's regional o f f i ces and others were "active cases" under review by Claims Adjudicators. Data Analysis After recoding, the data were analyzed by extract ion, c l a s s i f i c a t i on and tabulation of accepted wage-loss claims for OD's (19,622 claim f i l e s ) during 1978-1982 by: a) type of exposure, grouped in three major categories: physical , chemical and biological agents. b) age and sex. c) diagnosis, using WCB's own c l a s s i f i c a t i on of OD's. Over the whole study period, this was the only poss i b i l i t y . The World Health Organization's ICD code has been used by the WCB since 1981 (26). A lso , the terms or categories in th is c l a s s i f i c a t i on are exactly those used in the WCB's c l a s s i f i c a t i on which i s based, as the exposure coding, on the Canadian National Work Injury Program Coding Standard, developed by the provinces and S ta t i s t i c s Canada in 1962 (5). - 18 -Seven diagnoses/classes were chosen because they represent the most important categories based on frequency and severity of OD's. Two important categories were f e l t to be c lea r l y and d i rec t l y related to exposure: (1) noise-induced hearing losses and (2) welding-induced con junc t i v i t i s , which together comprise 78% of the "other diagnosis" category. d) c lass of industry. The WCB's own c l a ss i f i c a t i on (24) was chosen instead of United Nations' International Standard Industrial C l a s s i -f i ca t ion code for reasons explained ea r l i e r . The WCB grouped the industries into a hierarchical c l a s s i f i c a t i o n , which w i l l be used in th is report (see Appendix IV). The major groups are "c lasses" ; the next category i s "subclass", and the most detai led category i s " industry" (Appendix IV). It was decided that "subclass" level was a suitable breakdown. "Industry l e ve l " was too detailed and, for pract ical purposes, also too long to publish in th is thesis . I t i s used once a year when the WCB sends to each company a breakdown of i t s OD and injury cases during the previous year. e) tota l annual cost of OD's related to the total costs of a l l claims paid each year, including wage-loss and pension reserves. f) OD rates were calculated by subclass using the total number of OD's and the total number of manyears of employment over f ive years in each subclass. One manyear of employment means, for example: - 1 f u l l year of employment - or 2 half years of employment - or 4 quarter years of employment This OD rate/1,000 manyears of employment i s therefore a comparable r isk figure over di f ferent subclasses of industry. It i s an overestimate, because the denominator i s too small in terms of real persons exposed, which i s greater than th is manyear concept used. In many subclasses, there have been many employees working and exposed to whatever harmful - 19 -agents there were part of the year; these indiv iduals are counted and related to the combined number of months (e.g. 4 exposed have worked 3 months each = 1 manyear of employment). However, as a r isk indicator , the error i s the same for a l l subclasses and therefore comparable. Relative Risk (RR) has also been calculated for comparative purposes. RR in th is case could be considered as a Standardized Morbidity Ratio, because i t has been calculated i n re lat ion to the average r isk rate of a l l subclasses, including the subclass under invest igat ion. Six subclasses with less than f ive OD cases per f i ve years were excluded from the analysis. These cases are included in Tables 3, 5, 10 and 11 in the "other" category. - 20 -CHAPTER IV  RESULTS 4.1 Occupational Diseases i n 1978-1982, Totals Figure 1 shows the annual d is t r ibut ion and incidence of reported OD's in B.C. in 1978-1982. There has been a c lear ly increasing trend in total number of OD's and also in rates/1 ,000 manyears of employment, as Figure 2 points out, up to 1981. In 1982, there was a drop in OD tota ls and in the incidence rate as well (Figures 1 and 2) . This might be explained by the economic recession, when the less experienced workers have been l a i d o f f , leaving the more experienced workers who have fewer 0D's/l,000 manyears of employment. The decrease in OD total might be due to fewer manyears and possibly the more experienced workers remaining (14). Figure 1 shows that the decrease in absolute numbers of OD's i s about 14%, which i s roughly the same as the unemployment percentage in B.C. i n 1982. In Figure 2, the decline in OD rate i s less than half of the former, which strengthens the conclusion drawn above. The d is t r ibut ion of major exposure categories (Figure 1) has changed but l i t t l e over the years. Physical agents have caused 64-67% of a l l OD's each year, chemical agents 28-31% and biological agents were responsible for causing 3-5% of the OD t o t a l ; the residual percentage rate remaining constant at 1%. 4.2 The Top Ten Causes of Occupational Diseases in 1978-1982 The total number of accepted wage-loss claims for occupational diseases in B.C. in 1978-1982 was 19,622. The top ten causes are shown in Table 1. The basis for select ion was only the frequency of OD's caused by these exposures, which altogether represent 77% of a l l OD's recorded - 21 -during the study period. The severity of OD's was not possible to estimate based on coded data, which might also be d i f f i c u l t to do even with the more detai led data in the claim f i l e . Physical agents constituted the majority (81%) of the top ten exposures, as one could expect from the d is t r ibut ion shown in Figure 1. "Repetitive motion", "UV-radiation" of welding, "noise" and "other physical agents" alone caused 63% of the OD t o t a l . Of chemical agents, "cleaning compounds", "other chemicals" and "other a l k a l i e s " , "acids" and "cement and mortar" represented 15% of the top ten causes of OD's. Only one biological agent, "animals", i s among the top ten. I t i s in 8th place and had caused 3% of OD's caused by the top ten exposures. "Animals" as an exposure category includes OD's caused mostly by insects (bites) and also mammals, such as dogs. 4.3 Causes of Occupational Diseases in General in 1978-1982 Table 2 shows the annual d is t r ibut ion and tota ls of exposures, which had caused OD's in B.C. during the study period. There were altogether 11 physica l , 75 chemical and 5 biological exposures, which caused OD's during 1978-1982 in B.C. A l l exposure categories with at least one case/5 years were counted. The category "other exposures" (272 cases) includes various groups of exposures which mostly have caused OD's after a very short exposure, usually less than one day. Examples are infected b l i s t e r s caused by "hand held too l s " , chemical burns by "molten metal", respiratory i r r i t a t i o n by "wood items, NEC" (not elsewhere c l a s s i f i ed ) , dermatitis due to "plywood" (actually due to glue used). In general, cases in most classes showed an increasing trend over 1978-1981 and a drop in 1982. Noise i s an exception to this rule showing a c lear ly decreasing trend from 579 cases in 1978 to 237 cases in 1982. This, maybe, i s due to the f i r s t hearing screening for hearing - 22 -loss ident i fy ing the old noise-induced hearing loss cases, which had been underdiagnosed previously, and in l a te r years (1979-1982) mainly new cases were detected. Occupational Diseases by Subclass Table 3 shows five-year annual breakdown of OD's by subclass (60 subclasses) and to ta l s . In four subclasses there were ^ 1,000 OD cases per f ive years: subclass 707 (foundries, some metal manufacturing, servicing of heavy machinery, galvanizing, see Appendix IV) leads with 2,382 cases. Subclass 105 (mostly sawmills) was second with 1,615 OD's, followed by subclass 706 (mainly bui lding and construction) with 1,510 OD's and subclass 602 ( l ight metal manufacturing) with 1,005 cases. The f i f t h subclass was 626 (hospitals for humans and animals) with 965 OD's during the study period. Altogether, these f i ve subclasses accounted for 38% of a l l OD's in 1978-1982. In 1978-1981, in four of the above-mentioned subclasses, the trend was r i s i n g ; in subclass 105, incidence had decreased from 1980. Maybe th is i s due to the fact that recession affected f i r s t the lumber industry. The 1982 incidences were lower than 19811 s in a l l these subclasses, as well as in other subclasses in general. Occupational Diseases by Subclass (Rates) Above, mostly the absolute numbers have been presented, because i t i s important to know from which subclasses most of the OD cases come; but i t i s important to know, as we l l , which subclasses have the highest r isk of OD's. This can be measured by using a standardized estimate, OD rate or OD incidence rate, which i s the same. I t i s calculated here as the number of OD cases per 1,000 manyears of employment in each subclass (see methods). It was not possible to calculate rates for each exposure category, because the number of exposed workers in each exposure category was not known. When pr io r iz ing preventive measures, one can choose between subclasses with highest to ta ls of OD's or with highest OD r i sks . - 23 -The average OD r isk rate in a l l subclasses in 1978-1982 was 4.1 OD cases per 1,000 manyears of employment. The highest OD r isk industry was subclass 721 (construction and repair of small vessels) where the annual incidence rate was 39.8, and the re lat ive r isk (RR) 9.7 compared to the total subclass average (Tables 5 and 7) . Almost the same incidence rate was observed in subclass 109 (shingle or shake m i l l s ) , 37.5 OD cases/ annum/1,000 manyears of employment. Third place was subclass 620 (bakeries and manufacturing food products) with a c lear ly lower rate of 17.6 -- which s t i l l had RR of 4.3 to the subclass average. Subclasses 906 (canning and processing of f i sh ) and 725 (construction of dams, tunnels, etc. ) took fourth and f i f t h place with rates 16.3 and 15.4 respectively, RR being again about 4 to the total subclass average. The category with the lowest r isk was subclass 747 (consulting engineer-ing or a rch i tec tura l ) , with an incidence rate = .3 per 1,000 manyears of employment (Tables 5 and 8 ) . Second was subclass 812 (ambulance service, car renta l ) , rate = .7 and th i rd was subclass 80 (telephone and radio operating), rate = .8 . Subclasses 811 (operation of bus l ines) and 654 (wholesale establishments) had incidence rates of .8 and . 9 , respectively. The subclasses with regard to low 0D r isk had RR's ranging from .02 to .22 compared to the average r isk rate. Even though the total numbers of OD's were re la t i ve l y small over f ive years, rates should be quite stable, because the i r industries had manyears of employment from 3,400 to 31 ,500 on average per year in 1978-1981 (Table 9) . Occupational Diseases by Diagnosis and Exposure Almost half of a l l OD's in 1978-1982 f e l l in the diagnostic category: b u r s i t i s , tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome, to ta l l i ng 8,376 cases (Table 4) . This category also includes some cases of la tera l ep icondy l i t i s . Repetitive motion had caused the majority of these cases (6,758) and f r i c t i o n , pressure and rubbing ( ) (see Appendix I) had caused 1,618 cases of b u r s i t i s . - 24 -Chemical burns were second in frequency with 2,668 cases, th i rd was conjunct iv i t i s caused by UV-radiat1on from welding (see "other" column in Table 4) and noise-Induced hearing loss was fourth with 1,917 cases over f i ve years (see row "noise" , column "other" in Table 4 ) . The f i f t h most frequent OD was dermatitis (1,614) over f i ve years; exposures which have caused these cases are distr ibuted over a l l main exposure categories. Most "respiratory i r r i t a t i o n " cases have been caused by "chemical agents", chlorine being the most frequent cause (189) followed by "cedar dust" (145), " f i r e , smoke and ashes" (111), "welding fumes" (78) and "su l fur compounds" (67). Animals had caused most poisonings (337, mostly insect bites) followed by" carbon monoxide (48), su l fur compounds (31), lead (28) and aromatic solvents (26). The pneumoconiosis category was comprised of the following causes: s i l i c a (70), asbestos (42) and "other dusts" (5), "welding of uncoated surfaces" (1) and "coal dust" (1). Contagious OD's had been caused by bacteria (95) and "other micro-organisms" (2) were mostly "food poisonings" (Table 4) . Sex and Age Distr ibut ion of Occupational Diseases Seventy-nine percent of a l l OD's had occurred in male employees (15,481 cases = 79%, Tables 5 and 6). The d is t r ibut ion by sex of the B.C. work-force in 1978-1982 was not avai lable, therefore, rates could not be computed. Females were a re la t i ve ly large proportion in some sub-classes: hospitals (#626) 81% of a l l cases, c l e r i ca l and service work (#621) 70%, hotels, restaurants, etc. (#627) 66%, bakeries, etc. (#620) 72%, canning of f r u i t , dairy production (#624) 50%, l i gh t manufacturing - 25 -(#602) 30%, f i s h canning, processing f i sh (#906) 59%, B.C. Railway (#1301) 42%. In the rest of the subclasses, females were below the average of 21%, or the numbers were too small to be meaningful (Table 5) . This d is t r ibut ion by sex obviously ref lected the d i s t r i bu -t ion of the work-force at least in the r i sk i es t jobs in subclasses. Table 6 shows sex and the average age d is t r ibut ion by exposure (figures are tota ls in 1978-1982). As noted e a r l i e r , men represented 79% of a l l OD cases. There were s ix exposure categories in which the proportion of female employees was more than half ( > 50%) of the category total (only categories with ^ 50 cases were taken into account); these categories are shown below: PERCENTAGE OF FEMALES/TOTAL EXPOSURE FEMALE MALE TOTAL # OF CASES Hairdressing Chemicals 59 10 69 86% Bacteria 190 63 253 75% Disinfectants 57 22 79 72% Viruses 74 33 107 69% Cleaning Compounds 356 219 575 62% Food Products, Other 82 83 165 50% Typical exposures where men are "over represented" compared to the i r average proportion are shown i n the fol1owi ng l i s t (only categories with > 50 cases and male proportion " > 90% of tota l are shown): EXPOSURE FEMALE MALE TOTAL PERCENTAGE OF MALE/TOTAL # OF CASES Fuel Oil 0 60 60 100% Noise 9 1,908 1,917 100% UV-Radiation/Welding 9 2,044 2,053 100% - 26 r PERCENTAGE OF EXPOSURE FEMALE MALE TOTAL MALE/TOTAL # OF CASES Cement, Mortar 4 387 391 99* Si 1ica 1 77 78 99% Cedar Dust 5 158 163 97% Sulfur Compounds 5 160 165 97% Welding/Fumes of 3 100 103 97% Coated Surfaces Lubricating O i l , Grease 4 106 110 96% F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 8 112 120 93% Ac i ds 33 402 435 92% Cold 19 197 216 91% Urethanes, Isocyanates 5 52 57 91% This l i s t shows the c lass ica l "male" exposure categories which are generally the r i sk i e r occupations. The average age of a l l the OD cases was 36 years, with subclass averages ranging from 25 to 46 years. Again, the average age by subclass total population was not avai lable for comparison. Table 14 shows that more than half of OD patients were 34 years of age or younger. The median age for both sexes was 33 years. Table 5 indicated that the average age of a l l OD cases in 1978-1982 was 36. The rest of OD cases were quite evenly distr ibuted over 5-year age categories from 35 to 59 years. Female employees showed the tendency to get OD at younger ages even more c lear ly (female age median was 31 years) . This emphasis on younger age groups i s related to the type of exposures. In the exposure categories (Table 6), " repet i t ive motion", "animals", "bacter ia" and in many chemical exposure categories, the - 27 -average age was less than 36 years, possibly re f lect ing the "acute" nature of the OD's caused by these exposures. As in i n ju r i e s , which even more c lear ly f a l l i n the younger age categories, young new employees are more susceptible to get th is kind of disease (14). If one observes OD's which need a long exposure time to develop, the opposite can be seen. For example, patients with noise-induced hearing loss (average age, 56 years) , v ibration white f inger disease (VWFD) (46 years) , s i l i c o s i s (59 years) and asbestosis (55 years) appeared to be in the older age groups when these diseases emerged. Detailed Breakdowns of Occupational Diseases by Subclass, Exposure, Year and Diagnosis Detailed breakdowns of OD's by subclass, exposure, year and diagnosis are shown in Tables 10 and 11 (see Appendix V), the intention was that they should be used together. Mostly these tables give information that should be useful to safety committee members, management and unions in each subclass. Some generally interest ing features are singled out below. In the two r i s k i e s t subclasses (see Table 7) , physical factors have contributed to most of the OD's over f i ve years (Tables 12 and 13). In subclass 721, welding-induced conjunct iv i t i s and noise-induced hearing loss cases represented 65% of the t o t a l , in subclass 109 "repet i t ive motion" had caused 75% of total number of OD cases. In both subclasses, the annual trend was quite s imi la r , except that welding had continually increased i t s share in subclass 721. Of other s ign i f i cant exposures worth mentioning was "cedar dust" in subclass 109 and "repet i t ive motion", " res ins" and "welding of coated surfaces" in subclass 721. Of the diagnostic categories, i t i s interest ing that the number of "respiratory i r r i t a t i o n " and "chemical burn" cases were re la t i ve ly high (65, 63) i n subclass 721 compared to "dermatitis cases" (13) i n th i s subclass. It would be expected that workers' skin would be exposed to many i r r i t a t i n g and sens i t iz ing chemicals in this subclass. - 28 -Looking at examples in Tables 12 and 13 simultaneously, one can get quite a c lear picture of the reported occupational health hazards of each part icu lar subclass of interest . In Appendix V there i s a complete set of these tables of each subclass (Tables 10 and 11). An example of how to use these tables i s to look at subclass 620 (bakeries) in Tables 10 and 11 (Appendix IV). F i r s t , one can observe that there were 475 cases to t a l l y over f i ve years in th is subclass, and that there has been a downward trend in total No. of OD's since 1979. Most cases f e l l into the diagnostic category, " b u r s i t i s , tenosynovitis and CTS", "dermat i t is" , "chemical burns" and "other" categories being about equal size (30-32-25 respectively) . By looking at the annual breakdown, one can observe that there have not been any major changes in OD numbers in d i f ferent exposure categories. The decreasing trend in tota ls i s obviously due to the repet i t ive motion category. Then, knowing OD l i te ra ture (12, 28, 29), one could expect to f ind many cases in the exposure category "grains and f lour" (Bakers' asthma) but there were only three cases in f i ve years, and one of these was under the "other diagnosis" category, therefore, there were only two respiratory OD's in this subclass. From Table 9, we can observe that the annual average population in th is subclass ( in 1978-1981) had been 5,800 employees. The prevalence of Bakers' asthma in the l i t e ra ture varies between 12-40%. Taking the lowest estimate and assuming that half of the employees in subclass 620 were exposed to f lour dust, the prevalence of Bakers' asthma should have been about 350 cases. Using formula P = I x D, where P = prevalence of the disease, I = incidence per year and D = duration, and assuming duration of 20 years, one can estimate that the incidence should be higher than observed in these s t a t i s t i c s (Tables 10 and 11), about 18 cases/year + those cases from ea r l i e r years, which have not made a claim. Therefore, there are probably tens of bakers being continually exposed to f lour dust and who have Bakers' asthma. Another explanation i s that B.C. bakeries have essent ia l ly better working conditions than those bakeries studied in ea r l i e r l i t e ra ture (12). - 29 -If one considers the 30 OD's caused by "food products" (Table 10), one can look at the diagnostic breakdown 1n Table 11, and see that they were mostly dermatoses (18) and "other" OD's (9). "Others" were, in th is case, infected b l i s t e r s and conjunct iv i t i s (see footnote 1n Table 4) . From Table 5, one can see that females had 72% of a l l OD's in subclass 620, and that the average age of a l l OD patients In th is subclass was 33 years (younger than the average age of a l l OD cases — 36 years) . 4.9 Occupational Cancers in 1978-1982 According to Table 15 there were 25 cases of occupational cancers caused by four di f ferent exposures: asbestos (23 cases), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), coal tars and fumes (1 case — mixed exposure) and polycycl ic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) (1 case). Interest ingly, in Schedule B, there are 21 speci f ic causes for occupational cancer l i s t e d , only 3 of them had caused compensated cancers during the study period. Table 16 shows c luster ing in some subclasses: in 721 (which was in general the r i sk i e s t subclass as we l l ) , nine cases, a l l caused by asbestos; in 705 (hardwood f loor laying and t i l e contractors), f i ve cases caused by asbestos. A lso, subclass 707 had four asbestos-caused cancers (Table 16). Occupations do not show c lear c lus ters , except for insulators (4 cases). Combining subclass and occupation data and knowing where asbestos i s used (Zenz), most of the cases were presumably caused by exposure to asbestos insulat ion work. 4.10» Direct Costs of Occupational Diseases in 1978-1982 Total costs of OD's have been continual ly Increasing during 1978-1981, and there was a c lear decrease of costs in 1982 (Table 17). As explained in the footnote for Table 17, these costs represent only - 30 -direct costs of wage-loss and pension reserves charged each year. Costs such as human suf fer ing, loss of qual i ty of so c i a l , recreat ional , family l i f e and the fu l f i l lment that work brings to dai ly l i f e are not counted. A lso , employer's costs such as loss of product iv i ty , increased costs in sick benefits and the added cost of retraining or replacing workers are not Included. The WCB's administration costs and "medical aid only" costs were excluded. The proportion of OD costs of tota l OD plus injury costs has varied between 5.3 and 6.1%, showing f i r s t a c lear ly increasing trend in 1979-80, a plateau in 1980-81 and a decrease in 1982. The cost per OD case was steadi ly increased from $l,938/case in 1978 to $3,280/case in 1982. 4 ' H Disallowed Occupational Disease C la i ms There were no s t a t i s t i c s concerning disallowed OD's avai lable from ear l i e r years of th is study (1978-1980), but 1981 d is t r ibut ion i s shown i n Table 18. Rejected or disallowed cases represented 4.1% of accepted OD claims in 1981, or 3.9% of tota l submitted claims. This f igure was probably s imi lar i n 1978 through 1980, since po l i c ies have not changed greatly during that time. A l l categories l i s t ed in Table 18 and having St 5 rejected claims, f a l l into diagnostic or exposure categories, which had a large number of claims. The reasons for disallowing these claims were not in the scope of the study, but, i n general, the reason was probably that the disease was not considered to ar ise out of and during the course of the claimant's employment. - 31 -CHAPTER V  DISCUSSION OF RESULTS General Discussion Even though compensated OD's may underestimate the true incidence of occupational diseases in B.C., in many categories i t probably gives a reasonably clear picture for pr io r iz ing preventive actions in order to deal with the actual health hazards at the work place. Of course, those OD's that have a long latency period, e.g. hearing loss , s i l i c o s i s , asbestosis, occupational cancers, vibration white f inger disease (VWFD), t e l l us largely of past exposures, which may or may not already be eliminated or reduced. However, even in these cases, OD s t a t i s t i c s stimulate checking these exposures at the work place, and in OD cases which have short exposure time, these s t a t i s t i c s very often re f lec t the current level of exposure. If one compares these OD s t a t i s t i c s to published l i t e ra ture of "new" OD's, one can easi ly f ind out i f there i s reason to suspect under-reporting of these "new" OD's. Therefore, the breakdowns used in th is report have been planned to ident i fy exposures also causing some "new" OD's; therefore, vinyl ch lor ide, isocyanates, formaldehyde, pyrolysis products have been included, even though there have not been many cases, yet. If and when OD's caused by these agents appear, there i s a ready code and thus a way of recognizing these OD's. If cases do not appear, i t gives an incentive to check the work places at r i sk , whether or not there are cases. Schedule B (see Appendix I) serves as an example of thinking prospectively in case of occupational cancers. There i s a l i s t of 21 speci f ic causes of occupational cancer, but only three of them have caused registered OD's in B.C. so far (Table 15). - 32 -Among the l imi ta t ions of th is study are, that the var iat ion between reported OD incidence and "true" incidence might be great between di f ferent subclasses of industry. This depends on the awareness of workers, management and unions of OD's and harmful exposures, as well as the level of knowledge of OD's of local family physicians and spec ia l i s t c l i n i c i a n s . If workers and management do not recognize the existence of potential OD hazards at their work place, i t i s unl ikely that claims are made in cases where i t i s not obvious that certain symptoms come from exposure at work. Examples are VWFD, f lour dust (Bakers') asthma, Farmers' lung, chronic intoxicat ion due to organic solvents (6). Often, even i f workers suspect that their symptoms are work re lated, i f the i r doctor does not recognize the l i n k , claims might never be sent to WCB (see Flow Chart 1). I t has been shown that in B.C. in general (9), there are not many doctors " i n the f i e l d " , who have special t ra in ing in occupational medicine. VWFD has been studied recently among tree f e l l e r s in coastal forests of B.C. (3) and that study showed that 51% of 146 f e l l e r s had symptoms of VWFD. Even i f the true prevalence i s c lear ly less than that, there s t i l l should be more VWFD cases (see exposure category " v ib ra t ion" , Tables 2 and 10, subclass 102) than a five-year tota l of 23 i n B.C. with 12 of those i n the logging subclass. VWFD serves as an example, where both workers and doctors may not have been aware of the health hazard. A lso, maybe workers knew but they did not do anything because of fear of losing the job. Compared to Scandinavian countries, where most work places have preventive OHS organized (27), i t i s to be expected that many OD cases remain undetected in B.C. because of the lack of OHS, and therefore of trained and experienced doctors, nurses and industr ia l hygienists. The exposure c l a s s i f i c a t i on i s arb i t rary , but i t i s as detai led as the author could create, together with WCB's experts to simultaneously achieve goals of a) p rac t i ca l i t y and b) being updated. This l im i t s the exposure findings, to categories shown in Appendix I I I . However, random samples of former categories were taken, claims reviewed and the exact - 33 -(when possible) exposure detected before planning the new exposure c l a s s i f i c a t i on breakdown; a l l these exposures received the new c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . These s t a t i s t i c s do not serve research in f inding new OD's where the exposure-disease relationship i s tiot known: by de f i n i t i on , only cases where th is relat ionship has been pointed out by satisfactory s c i en t i f i c evidence, are compensable (18); but for research on how to prevent OD's, what are the dose-effect re lat ionships, what are the "true" incidences of OD's, these data provide a start ing point. For example, one could learn from the exposure category "grains, f l ou r s " , that Bakers' asthma was almost certa in ly under-represented in B.C. in 1978-1982 according to the l i terature (12). It would be useful to examine bakers: i f there rea l ly are not more cases at the work places at r isk (bakeries) and ' i f there rea l ly are underdiagnosed cases. Measures to prevent the progression of this serious OD should be undertaken; conversely, there might be something rea l ly dif ferent in B.C. bakeries or in the workers, which would be helpful for prevention of Bakers' asthma elsewhere. It would be interesting to compare the d is t r ibut ion observed in th is study and the time trends of OD rates in B.C. to corresponding figures of some other j u r i sd i c t i on . This could reveal whether, for instance, B.C. increasing OD rates per 1,000 manyears of employment in 1978-1981 were "high" or "low" and what were the trends elsewhere. The author recently did a study comparing OD rates in B.C. and in Finland in 1975-1981 (6). The c l a ss i f i c a t i on of exposures was according to the Finnish c l a s s i f i c a t i o n , and of industry according to the United Nations' ISIC c l a s s i f i c a t i o n , both being dif ferent than those used in the B.C. s t a t i s t i c s . Also some diagnostic and exposure categories were eliminated because of lack of comparability. Therefore, the B.C. OD rates in the ea r l i e r study are d i f ferent to those in this study, but we can draw some conclusions concerning the above questions. - 34 -The comparison of 00 rates in B.C. and Finland (6) showed that i n Finland OD rates have plateaued during 1975-1981, while in B.C. there has been a c lear ly increasing trend. In 1975 B.C. started with 14 OD's/10,000 manyears {vs. 17 in Finland), in 1981 corresponding incidence rates were: B.C. 29, Finland 19. That study (6) concluded that i t i s very unl ike ly that the difference can be explained by chance — i t probably ref lects a real increase 1n the number of compensated OD's i n B.C. I f th i s i s a correct conclusion, i t points out that B.C. working conditions might have been more hazardous to exposed workers than i n F inland, therefore, prevention has been inadequate. A lso , i t i s possible that there was poor reporting of OD's i n Finland, but i t i s un l ike ly , because of organized OHS at most Finnish work places, which should make the case f inding more e f f i c i en t than in B.C. The same study showed some speci f ic exposure categories where there might be under-reporting of OD's in B.C.: v ibrat ion (VWFD), f lour dust (Bakers' asthma), formaldehyde and isocyanates, organic solvents, bacteria and moulds (Farmers' lung and other extensive a l v e o l i t i s ) , or the other explanation i s that in Finland the working conditions are poorer at the work places, where these exposures ex i s t . Again, th is i s , in general, un l ike ly , because of examples mentioned ea r l i e r , VWFD and Bakers' asthma. On the other hand, OD's caused by UV-radiation of welding had a re la t ive r i sk of 12:7 (B.C. vs. F inland, a l l industr ies ) , which means that the eas i ly preventable radiat ion conjunct iv i t i s i s c lear l y over-represented at some B.C. work places. Work places where these exposures ex is t should be studied, exposed workers informed of this health hazard, and preventive action/ case f inding i n i t i a t ed urgently. There are, therefore, indications that preventive actions could be improved in B.C. to decrease the number of workers who annually suffer from OD's. The r i sk i es t subclasses of industry have been pointed out (Table 7) as well as the most frequent causes (exposures) of OD's (Table 1) in B.C., 1978-1982. These could be used for p r io r iz ing the ef for ts in OD prevention by planners and administrators at the Health - 35 -Department, Industry, and WCB level and by workers, unions, management " i n the f i e l d " , where they are planning healthier and safer work places for B.C. workers. 5.2 Further Studies I t i s hoped that an ongoing benefit of th is study w i l l be an information system concerning s t a t i s t i c s of accepted wage-loss claims and trends for occupational diseases in B.C. to be annually published by WCB. The main tables of th is study in ef fect comprise the f i r s t issue of these s t a t i s t i c s . Publishing such a report annually w i l l be part of WCB's prevention program for OD's, making i t easier to plan, manage and evaluate health hazards at B.C. work places since one can ident i fy those s i tuat ions, where there has been fa i lu re in preventive measures, i .e . the workers have contracted preventable OD's. 5.3 Conclusions and Recommendations i In the l as t f i ve years, 1978-1982, a total of 19,622 workers in B.C. have been compensated at a total d i rect cost of 53.2 m i l l i on do l la rs . On the average, there were 4 cases of OD per 1,000 manyears of employ-ment at B.C. work places each year, the range varying from .3 to 37.5 OD's/1,000 manyears of employment. A lso, i t was observed that there was a continual ly increasing trend in total OD rates during the study period, except for a drop in 1982 (possibly related to the economic i recession and the laying off ofmore junior workers). There are, however, many kinds of preventive a c t i v i t i e s going on at the work places in B.C. There are di f ferent regulations issued under many di f ferent government branches concerning occupational safety and health. The WCB has Industrial Hygiene, Occupational Safety and Occupa-tional Health Departments' preventive a c t i v i t i e s . Unions, management organizations also play a role and, at individual work places, safety committees try to improve hazardous working conditions. A lso, some - 36 -preventive OH services are provided in a small number of B.C. work places. A l l these e f fo r t s , however, have had l i t t l e ef fect on the trend of increasing OD problems in B.C., as pointed out in th is study. For more e f f i c i en t and effect ive prevention of OD's, the following recom-mendations are made. They are divided into short-term and long-term actions and cover the areas of education, regulation and services. 1. Short-term act ions; consideration should be given to : a) Education A campaign concerning the prevention of health hazards of the most frequent causes of OD's should be started as a combined e f for t of WCB, management and unions: u l t rav io le t radiation of welding, repet i t ive motion and health hazards caused by chemicals should be chosen as f i r s t targets of prevention. b) Regulation Section 78 in WCB's "Health and Safety Regulations" should be promulgated, supplemented by regulations concerning the prevention of health hazards caused by repet i t ive motion, UV-radiation and acute and chronic exposure to chemicals. c) Services Promulgation of Section 78 would encourage the provision of OHS at the work places, where the aforementioned health hazards are par t i cu lar ly noticeable. Occupational health physicians and nurses, with the help of industr ia l hygienists (from the WCB, to start with) , could ef fect ive ly ident i fy the hazards, inform management and workers, ident i fy susceptible workers and those with early stages of OD's, and help to f ind ways of el iminating harmful working conditions. Also, appendixes in Section 78 - 37 -contain a l i s t of required standards concerning exposure to chemicals, which would help to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive measures at the work places. If the OH services were brought to the work places, information concerning health hazards and the importance of preventing them should lead to more effect ive prevention than regulations and inspections alone. As a short-term solution to f u l f i l l the above recommendations, a p i l o t project could be started in the subclasses with the highest OD rates (Table 7) , by evaluating the effectiveness and eff ic iency of occupational health education, regulations and service programs in th i s sett ing. 2. Long-term actions: Bas ica l ly , the same means of education, regulation and services should be considered in re lat ion to a l l known physical , chemical and biological harmful agents at work places. Education i s the basic step towards prevention: workers, management and the i r representatives should be aware of potential health hazards at their work places, otherwise, i t i s unl ikely that preventive actions are put into practice even though the regulations were up to date and comprehensive. Adequate data must be produced, analyzed, and presented in a readi ly understandable form to serve as the necessary information base. Bringing the services and simul-taneously an e f f i c i en t information system to the work places has already been shown to be e f f i c i en t in Scandinavian and some European countries by organizing preventive OHS. In B r i t i sh Columbia, through Section 78 (which should in forthcoming years be enlarged and made more comprehensive), WCB could create a covering preventive OHS system. - 38 -Also, i n B.C., the government should consider combining the occupa-t ional health and safety l eg i s l a t ion into a single Occupational Health and Safety Act, to provide more e f f i c i en t and ef fect ive education and services and to rea l ize the OHS system in B.C. w i l l create a need for trained occupational health physicians, nurses, industr ia l hygienists and other personnel. Training programs for OH physicians and nurses and industr ia l hygienists should be begun and/or expanded. In the long-term, these education programs should be rounded out by adding courses on occupational health to university programs of engineers, archi tects , and other planners who create the actual working conditions. Through these measures, recommended here as examples of preventive action needed in OD prevention, healthier working conditions in B.C. would be created to the benefit not only of exposed workers but also in the interest of more e f f i c i en t production and, in the long run, less total economic and social cost than created today by needlessly to lerat ing hazardous working conditions. - 39 -REFERENCES 1. Alexander, M.F. Information Systems Analysis, Theory and Applicat ions. Science Research Associates, 1974, pp. 1-16. 2. B r i t i sh Columbia Medical Association. General Assembly Reports 1983. B.C.M.A., Vancouver, 1983, 19 p. 3. Brubaker, R.L., Mackenzie, C.F.G., Eng, P.R. and Bates, D.V. Vibration White Finger Disease Among Tree Fe l lers in B r i t i sh Columbia. J . Occup. Med. 25, 1983, pp. 403-408. 4. Canadian Employment Safety and Health Guide. Volume I. Commerce Clearing House Inc., 1982, pp. 6001-6502. 5. Coding Standard Developed by Provinces and S ta t i s t i c s Canada for Use in the Canadian National Work Injury Program, 1962. 6. Husman, K. Registered Annual Incidence of Occupational Diseases in Different Classes of Industry in B.C. and in Finland in the Period 1975-1981 Inclusive. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia, 1982, 56 p. and append. 7. International Standard Industrial C lass i f i ca t ion of Economic A c t i v i t i e s . S ta t i s t i ca l Papers, Series M, No. 4, Rev. 2, United Nations, New York, 1968. 8. Malcolmson, P.E. Occupational Health: An Ontario Perspective. Occupational Health in Ontario, 3, 1982, pp. 206-217. 9. Mckenzie, H.S. Exploring the Current Role of Occupational Health Physicians in B r i t i sh Columbia. M.Sc. thes is , U.B .C, 1981, 136 p. - 40 -10. Occupational Health and Safety Act, Ontario, 1978. 11. Occupational Injuries and I l lnesses in the United States by Industry, 1978. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor S t a t i s t i c s , Bu l le t in 2078, 1980, 94 p. 12. Parkes, W.R. Occupational Lung Disorders. Second Edi t ion, Butterworths, London, 1982, 529 p. 13. Radford, K.F. Information Systems for Strategic Decisions. Prentice-Hal l , V i rg in i a , 1978, 239 p. 14. Saar i , F. Long-term Development of Occupational Accidents in Finland. Scand. J . Work Environ. Health 8, 1982, pp. 85-93. 15. The Finnish Occupational Disease Act (638/67). In: Vaaranen, V. and Vasama, M. The Finnish Occupational Disease Register 1977. Inst i tute of Occupational Health, He ls ink i , 1978. 16. Vaaranen, V. Suomer ammatt i tauturel i ister i in i lmoitetut ammattitaudit mosrea 1964-1974. In Finnish with English Summary (Occupational Diseases Listed in the Occupational Disease Register of Finland in 1964-1974). Academic Dissertat ion, He ls ink i , 1977, 228 p. 17. Vaaranen, V. and Vasama, M. The Finnish Occupational Disease Register, 1977. Inst i tute of Occupational Health, He ls ink i , 1978, 50 p. 18. Workers' Compensation Act of B r i t i sh Columbia. Queen's Pr inter for B r i t i sh Columbia, V i c to r i a , 1979, 61 p. 19. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia. 65th Annual Report for the Year Ended December 31, 1981. Finance and S t a t i s t i c s . WCB of B.C., 1982, 33 p. - 41 -20. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia. Reporter Series Re: Industrial Diseases, Decision No. 326, 1980, pp. 78-84. 21. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia. Reporter Series, Decision No. 93, 1974, p. 4. 22. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia. Reporter Series, Decision No. 94, 1974, p. 5. 23. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia. Reporter Series, Decision No. 128, 1975, 126 p. 24. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia. C lass i f i ca t ion and Rate L i s t 1980. WCB, Vancouver, 1983, 74 p. 25. Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i sh Columbia. Industrial Health and Safety Regulations. WCB of B.C., 1980. 26. World Health Organization. International C lass i f i ca t ion of Diseases. 9th Revision, Geneva, 1978, 660 p. 27. World Health Organization. Evaluation of Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene Services. Report on a WHO Working Group, Regional Off ice for Europe, WHO, Copenhagen, 1982, 34 p. 28. Zenz, C. (Ed.). Developments in Occupational Medicine. Year Book Medical Publishers, Chicago, 1980, 477 p. 29. Zenz, C. (Ed.). Occupational Medicine. Pr inciples and Pract ical Appl icat ions. Year Book Medical Publishers, Chicago, 1975, 944 p. - 42 -APPENDIX I SCHEDULE B Section 6(4) of Workers' Compensation Act of B r i t i sh Columbia Description of Disease Description of Process or Industry 1. Poisoning by: (a) Lead Where there i s an exposure to lead or lead compounds. (b) Mercury Where there i s an exposure to mercury or mercury compounds. (c) Arsenic or arsine Where there i s an exposure to arsenic or arsenic compounds. (d) Cadmium Where there i s an exposure to cadmium or cadmium compounds. (e) Manganese Where there i s an exposure to manganese or manganese compounds. (f) Phosphorus, phosphine or due to the anti-cholinesterase action of organic phosphorus compounds Where there i s an exposure to phosphorus compounds. (g) Organic solvents (n-hexane, carbon t e t r a -chlor ide, t r ichloro-ethane, t r ich loro-ethylene, acetone, benzene, toluene, xylene and others) Where there i s exposure to organic solvents. (h) Carbon monoxide Where there i s exposure to products of combustion, or any other source of carbon monoxide. ( i ) Hydrogen sulphide Where there i s excessive exposure to hydrogen sulphide, (j) Nitrous fumes ( i n -cluding s i l o f i l l e r ' s disease) Where there i s excessive exposure to nitrous fumes including the oxides of nitrogen. (k) N i t r i l e s , hydrogen cyanide or i t s soluble sa l ts Where there i s exposure to chemicals containing -CN group including certain pest ic ides. (1) Phosgene Where there i s excessive exposure to phosgene including i t s occurrence as a breakdown product of chlorinated compounds by combustion. (m) Other toxic sub-stances Where there i s exposure to such toxic gases, vapours, mists, fumes or dusts. - 43 -2. Infection caused by: (a) Ps i t tacos is virus (b) Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella organisms, Where there i s established contact with ornithosis-infected avian species or material . Hepatatis B v irus Employment where close and frequent contact with a source or sources of the infect ion has been established and the employment necessitates: (1) the treatment, nursing or examination of or interviews with patients or i l l persons; or (2) the analysis or test ing of body tissues or f l u i d s ; or (3) research into salmonellae, pathogenic staphylococci or Hepatit is B virus. (c) Brucella organisms (Undulant fever) Where there i s contact with animals, carcasses or animal by-products. (d) Tubercle bac i l lus Employment where close and frequent contact with a source or sources of tuberculous infect ion has been established and the employment necessitates: (1) the treatment, nursing or examination of or interviews with patients or i l l persons; or (2") the analysis or testing of body tissues or f l u i d s ; or (3) research into tuberculosis by a worker who: ( i ) when f i r s t engaged, or, after an absence from employment of the types mentioned in these regulations for a period of more than one year, when re-engaged in such employment was free from evidence of tuberculosis; and ( i i ) continued to be free from evidence of tuberculosis for s ix months af ter being so employed (except in primary tuberculosis as proven by a negative tuberculin test at time of employment). In the case of an employee previously compensated for tuberculosis, any subsequent tuberculosis after the disease has become inactive and has remained inactive for a period of three years or more shall not be deemed to have occurred as a result of the or ig inal d i s ab i l i t y for the purpose of the Act, unless the worker i s s t i l l engaged in employment l i s t e d above or the Board i s sa t i s f i ed that the subsequent tuberculosis i s the direct result of the tuberculosis for which the worker has been compensated. - 44 -Pneumoconiosis: (a) S i l i c o s i s Where there i s exposure to airborne s i l i c a dust including metall i ferous mining and coal mining. Where there i s exposure to airborne asbestos dust. (b) Asbestosis (c) Other penumoconioses Where there i s exposure to the airborne dusts of coa l , beryl l ium, tungsten carbide, aluminum or other dusts known to produce f ib ros i s of the lungs. Cancer: (a) Carcinoma of the lung when associated with asbestosis Where there i s exposure to airborne asbestos dust. (b) Mesothelioma (pleural or per i to -neal) Where there i s exposure to airborne asbestos dust. (c) Carcinoma of the larynx or pharynx associated with asbestosis Where there i s exposure to airborne asbestos dust. (d) Gastro-intestinal cancer (including a l l primary cancers associated with the oesophagus, stomach, small bowel, colon, and rectum (excluding the anus), and with-out regard to the s i te of the cancer in the gastro-in test ina l t ract or the histologica l structure of the cancer) Where there i s exposure to asbestos dust i f during the period between the f i r s t exposure to asbestos dust and the diagnosis of gastro-intestinal cancer there has been a period of , or periods adding up to , 20 years of continuous exposure to asbestos dust and such exposure represents or i s a manifestation of the major component of the occupational ac t i v i t y in which i t occurred. (e) Primary cancer of the lung Where there i s prolonged exposure to: (1) aerosols and gases containing arsenic, chromium, nickel or the i r compounds; or (2) bis(chl oromethyl )ether; or - 45 -(3) the dust of uranium, or radon gas and i t s decay products; or (4) part iculate polycycl ic aromatic hydrocarbons. (f) Leukemia or pre-leukemia Where there i s prolonged exposure to benzene or to ioniz ing radiat ion. (g) Primary cancer of the skin Where there i s prolonged contact with coal tar products, arsenic or cutt ing o i l s or prolonged exposure to solar u l t ra-v io le t l i gh t . (h) Primary cancer of the ep i the l ia l l i n ing of the urinary bladder, ureter or renal pelv is Where there i s prolonged exposure to beta-naphthylamine, benzidine, or 4-nitrodiphenyl. ( i ) Primary cancer of the mucous 1ining of the nose or nasal sinuses Where there i s prolonged exposure to dusts, fumes or mists containing nickel or the dusts of hard woods. (j) Angiosarcoma of the l i v e r Where there i s exposure to vinyl chloride monomer. 5. Heart injury or disease including heart attack, cardiac arrest or arrhythmia, disease of the pericardium, heart muscle or coronary arter ies Where the worker i s employed as a f i r e f igh te r . 6. Asthma Where there i s exposure to : 7. Extr ins ic a l l e rg i c a l v e o l i t i s (including farmers' lung and mushroom workers' lung) Where there i s repeated exposure to respirable organic (1) western red cedar dust; or (2) isocyanate vapours or gases; or (3) the dust, fume or vapours of other chemicals or organic material known to cause asthma. dusts. - 46 -8. Respiratory i r r i t a t i o n Where there i s excessive exposure to a gas, vapour, mist , fume or dust of a chemical or other material ord inar i l y causative of respiratory i r r i t a t i o n . 9. Metal fume fever Where there i s exposure to the fume of zinc or other metals. 10. Fluorosis Where thee i s exposure to high concentrations of f luor ine or f luorine compounds in gaseous or part iculate form. 11. Neurosensory hearing loss Where there i s prolonged exposure to excessive noise leve ls . 12. Burs i t i s Where there i s excessive f r i c t i o n , rubbing or pressure on the bursa involved. 13. Tenosynovitis, tend in i t i s Where unaccustomed and repet i t ive use of the affected arm, hand, leg or foot i s required. 14. Decompression sickness Where there i s exposure to increased a i r pressure. 15. Contact dermatitis Where there i s excessive exposure to i r r i t a n t s , allergens or sensi t izers ord inar i ly causative of dermatitis. 16. Vascular disturbances of the extremities Where there i s prolonged exposure to excessive vibrations at low temperatures. 17. Radiation injury or disease: (a) Due to ionizing radiat ion (b) Due to non-ionizing radiat ion: ( i ) con junc t i v i t i s , ke ra t i t i s ( i i ) cataract or other thermal damage to the eye Where there i s exposure to ionizing radiat ion. Where there i s exposure to u l t ra-v io let l i gh t . Where there i s excessive exposure to infra-red, microwave or laser radiat ion. 18. Erosion of inc isor teeth Where there i s exposure to acid fumes or mist. - 47 -A P P E N D I X I I k?8 Three forms of the Workers' Compensation Board of B r i t i s h Columbia, P h y s i c i a n ' s F i r s t Report, A p p l i c a t i o n f o r Compensation & Report of I n j u r y or I n d u s t r i a l Disease, Employer's Report of I n j u r y of I n d u s t r i a l Disease. Leaves ^ 8 - 5 0 oh coloured paper; not f i l m e d . f Q _ | WORKERS'COmPENSATION BOARD I MW OFFICE COVERING WORKER'S HOME AREA OF BRITISH COLUfTlBIA FORM 8 REVISED 1980 Claim No. DOCTOR - THIS COMPLETED REPORT NEEDS TO BE SUBMITTED ONLY WHEN: 1. The Worker will be disabled beyond the day of injury or, 2. If the claim is for Hernia, Back Condition, Shoulder or Knee Strain or Sprain, Industrial Disease, or, 3. If the Workers' Compensation Board has requested this report. IN ALL OTHER CASES, ONLY YOUR FINAL REPORT AND ACCOUNT (FORM 11 A) IS REQUIRED. EMPLOYER'S NAME Phone No. Mr. Miss Mrs. Ms. WORKER'S LAST NAME First Name(s) Address NO. STREET R/R CITY POSTAL CODE Full Address NO. STREET R/R Location of Plant or Project Occupation Postal Code Phone No 1. Date and Time of Injury or Industrial Disease. Date of Birth MONTH DAY Social Insurance No. 2. Who Rendered First Treatment? When Was First Treatment Rendered? 19 , at A.M./P.M. When Did You First Treat? 19 , at A.M./P.rV 3. Cause of injury or disease (worker's statement) 4. Describe injury or disability found at your first examination, (specify right or left) 5. Diagnosis (describe complications, if any) Is permanent disability probable? YES • NO •  6. Treatment, including any operative procedure and date Is treatment completed? YES • NO • Are dental services required? YES • NO • 7. Is there prior history of physical defect or disease? YES fj NO fj As a W.C.B. Case YES • NO • If yes, give details: y^ g a vv C B Case 8. Have you treated this worker before? YES f_] NO fj YES f j NO r j If yes, for what and when: 9. (a) Date of hospital admission or (b) Date of short stay hospital treatment Hospital name and address 10. How many calendar days do you think the worker will be off work? Doctor's Name (please print) Payee No. Address Phone No. Date Signature Please submit form within 3 days to avoid delay in processing benefits for worker. ® » WORKERS'COfTlPENSATION BOARD855?^ 6951 Westminster Highway. Richmond, B.C. V7C 1C6. Telephone 273-2266, Telex 04-357722 FORM 6 REVISED 1982 ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS ON THIS FORM IN INK, SIGN AND MAIL TO THE BOARD AT THE ABOVE ADDRESS. INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS MAY HAVETO BE RETURNED, RESULTING IN SOME DELAY IN PROCESSING YOUR CLAIM. USE REVERSE OF FORM OR SEPARATE LETTER IF NECESSARY. P L E A S E H H E H Y O U R F U L L N A M E , A D D R E S S . D A T E O F B I R TH A N D S O C I A L I N S U R A N C E N U M B E R IN T H E A R E A P R O V I D E D B E L O W IF IT D O E S N O T A G R E E A S S H O W N O N T H E R I G H T O F T H I S F O R M . WORKER'S NAME AND ADDRESS TYPE CLAIM NUMBER FIRM NUMBER |LOCATION| CLASS AND SUB-CLASS 3RD-I/P INJURY DATE LAST NAME (please print) Mr. Mrs. Miss-First Name(s) Full Address Street & No. City Postal Code °4 E c UJ 5 PLEASE ENTER MISSING OR INCOMPLETE INFORMATION ON THE LEFT OF THIS FORM Telephone No. Social Insurance No. Date of Birth Date of Birth Area of Injury Social Insurance Number Month Day Year Month Day Year Weight Height ft ins. Married • Marital Single • Status Other • . Occupation Employer's Telephone No. 1. Date and time of injury 19 A.M./P.M. 8. Name and address of physician or qualified practitioner who treated you. Include telephone number. OR period of exposure resulting in industrial disease FROM 19 ,TO 2. Injury was first reported to your employer on 19 .at A.M./P.M. • First Aid TO • Supervisor or 9. Were there any witnesses? If YES, list their names and addresses on reverse. • YES • NO 3. If employer was not notified immediately, give reason. 10. Did the injury occur on your employer's premises? If NO, explain on reverse giving exact location. • YES • NO 4. Describe fully what happened to cause the injury and mention all contributing factors: description of machinery, weight and size of objects involved, etc. OR in cases of industrial disease, describe fully how exposure occurred, mentioning any gases, vapours, dusts, chemicals, radiation, noise, source of infection or other causes. 11. Was anyone else responsible for your injury? If YES, give name and address on reverse. • YES Q NO 12. Are you a relative of your employer or a partner or |—| YES I—I NO principal in the firm? If YES. explain. I—I I I 13. Have you had any previous pain or disability in the area of your present injury? If YES, explain on reverse. • YES Q NO 5. Did you receive first aid immediately? If NO. explain on reverse. • YES • NO 14. Did you have any defect or disability before the injury (lost finger, blind eye, deafness, restriction of movement, etc.)? If YES, specify. YES r j NO 6. State ALL injuries received, indicating right or left if applicable. 7. Did you lose any time from work beyond the day of injury? If YES. complete questions 16-25 below. 15. Did you ever receive a cash award or pension from the B.C. Board? If YES. give claim number. (Do NOT include any wage loss payments.) • YES • N° NO 16. Your gross earnings at time of injury (enter one rate only), per hour $ per day $ per week $ per month $. 21. Are you working now? If YES, specify date and time of return. • YES • NO 19 .at A.M./P.M. 17. If free room and/or meals are supplied in addition to above earnings indicate daily value $ . . 22. Did you later attempt to work? If YES. specify dates and amount paid. • YES • NO 18. Do these earnings include rental of a vehicle or equipment? If YES, specify. • YES 23. Show normal working week by entering hours worked each day. Sun. Mon. Tue. 24. Enter normal working hours on day you last worked. From A.M./P.M. to Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat 19. Enter particulars of any payment or benefit made or to be made by employer for period of disability A.M./P.M. 20. Date and time you last worked. A.M./P.M. 25. Wages paid on day you last worked. $ I declare all the information I have given on this form is true and correct and I elect to claim compensation for the above mentioned injuries or disease. This will authorize the Board and boards of review to obtain or view, from any source whatsoever, including records of physicians, qualified practitioners or hospitals, a copy of records pertaining to examination, treatment, history and employment of the undersigned. It is a serious offence to knowingly make a false claim or to work and earn income while receiving workers' compensation. Date: Signed at. Signature in ink (do not print) . B.C. r ® WORKERS COfTlPENSATION /COLUfTlGIA OFFICE COVERING WORKER'S HOME AREA Firm No. Claim No. Loc. Class & Sub. Coded by ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS. SIGN AND MAIL TO BOARD OFFICE COVERING WORKER'S HOME AREA. USE INK OR TYPEWRITER, NOT PENCIL. USE REVERSE OF FORM OR SEPARATE LETTER IF NECESSARY. THE ACT RE-QUIRES THAT AN EMPLOYER COMPLETE AND SUBMIT A REPORT WITHIN 3 DAYS. FAILURE TO DO SO IS AN OFFENCE AND MAY RESULT IN THE EMPLOYER BEING CHARGED WITH PART OF THE COST OF THE CLAIM. Employers Name (As registered with the Board) Mr. Ms Mrs.MissI Worker's last name Mailing Address First name(s) City Postal Code Mailing Address Street & No. City Postal Code Location of plant or project where injury occurred? Date of Birth Mo. Day Year Social Ins. Number Telephone Number Type of business Telephone No. Occupation Marital Status Single Married. Other 1. Date and time of injury 19 A.M./P.M. 8. Were worker's actions at time of injury for the purpose of your business? If NO, explain. • YES • NO OR period of exposure resulting in industrial disease FROM 19 ,TO 19 9. Were they part of employee's regular work? If NO, explain. • YES • NC 2. Injury was first reported to employer on 19 ,at A.M./P.M 10. Did you have any reason to feel that injury did not occur as stated? If YES, explain. • YES • NC 3. Describe fully what happened to cause the injury and mention all contributing factors: description of machinery, weight and size of objects involved, etc. 11. Were there any witnesses? Do witnesses, if interviewed, confirm worker's statement. • YES • NC • YES • NC OR in cases of industrial disease, describe fully how exposure occurred, mentioning any gases, vapours, dusts, chemicals, radiation, noise, source of infection or other causes. (Use reverse if necessary) 12. Did worker receive first aid? If YES, attach form 7A. • YES • NC 13. Is worker a relative of employer or a partner or principal in firm? If YES, specify. • YES • NC 14. Was any person not in your employ to blame for this injury? If YES, give details and name and address of such person. • YES • NC 15. Are you aware of any previous pain or disability in the area ot the worker's present injury? If YES, explain. • YES • NO 16. Are you aware of any defect or disability of the worker prior to the injury (lost finger, blind eye, deafness, etc.) If YES, specify.  • YES • NO 4. State ALL injuries reported, indicating right or left if applicable. 17. Did worker attend a physician or qualified practitioner? If YES, name and address, if known. • YES •NC 5. Did the injury occur on your premises? If NO, explain giving exact location. (Use reverse if necessary)  • YES • NO 6. How long has worker How long at this been employed by you? particular job? 7. Do you expect the worker to be off work beyond the day of injury? If YES, complete questions 18-26 below. • YES • NO 18. Worker's gross earnings at time of injury: 23. Show normal work week by Sun. Mon. Tue. Wed. Thur Fri. Sat. per day $ per week $ per month $ entering hours worked each day. 19. If free room and/or meals are supplied in addition to above earnings, indicate daily value $ 24. Enter normal work hours on day of layoff. From A.M./P.M. to A.M./P.M 20. Do these earnings include rental of equipment? If YES, specify. • YES • NO 25. Date and time last worked. 19 A.M./P.M. 21. Will any payment be made by your firm for period of disability? If YES, specify. • YES • NO 22. Wages paid on day of layoff. $ 26. Is employee working now? If YES, specify date and time of return to work. 19 • YES • NC A.M./P.M DATE SIGNATURE: •A - 51 -APPENDIX III CODE LIST FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES EXPOSURE PHYSICAL AGENTS AIR PRESSURE* COLD HEAT NOISE PHYS AGENTS, OTHER RADIATD SUBST, NEC REPETITIVE MOTION SUN UV-EQUIPMENT UV-WELDING VIBRATION CHEMICAL EXPOSURES ACIDS ALCOHOLS ALIPHATIC SOLVENTS ALKALIES, OTHER ALUMINUM, DUST, FUME* AMMONIA* ANIMAL PRODUCTS AROMATIC CMPNDS, OTHR ARSENIC COMPOUNDS ASBESTOS* CARBON DIOXIDE CARBON DISULFIDE CARBON MONOXIDE CEDAR DUST CEMENT, MORTAR CHEMICALS, OTHER CHLOR-FLUOR CMPNDS* CHLORINE (DIOXIDE) CHROMIUM, DUST, FUME CLEANING COMPOUNDS CLOTHES COAL & PETR PROD, OTHER COAL TARS COAL, DUST COKE COPPER, DUST, FUME COTTON DUST* - 52 -APPENDIX III CODE LIST FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES (cont'd) EXPOSURE CHEMICAL EXPOSURES (cont'd) CRUDE OIL* CUTTING OILS* CYANIDES DISINFECTANTS DRUGS, MEDICINE DUSTS, OTHER* ESTERS* FIBREGLASS FIRE, SMOKE, ASHES FOOD PRODUCTS, OTHR FORMALDEHYDE* FUEL OIL* GASOLINE GLOVES, WET GRAINS, FLOURS HAIRDRESSING CHEM* HALOGENATED CMPNDS HYDROCARBON GASES KEROSENE KETONES* LEAD, DUST, FUME LUB OIL, GREASE MANUFACTURED GASES MERCURY, DUST, FUME METAL CMPNDS, OTHER* NITRO-GLYCERINE NITROGEN OXIDES NTRGN CMPNDS, OTHR* ORGANOPHOSPHORUS* PAH, TAR FUME* PCB, PBB* PCP, TCP* PESTICIDES, OTHER* PETROLEUM ASPHALTS PHENOLS* PLANTS, VEGETATION PLASTIC ITEMS PYROLYSIS PRODUCTS* RESINS RUBBER & COMPOUNDS - 53 -APPENDIX III CODE LIST FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES (cont'd) EXPOSURE CHEMICAL EXPOSURES (cont'd) SILICA SILICATES, OTHER* SULFUR, CMPNDS TETRACHLOROMETHAiME TEXTILE DUST, OTHER* TEXTILE ITEMS URETHANES, ISOCYAN* VINYL CHLORIDE* W, Co & HARD METALS* WATER BASE PAINTS WATER, OTHR LIQUIDS WELDFUM, COAT SRF* WELDFUM, UNCOAT SRF* WOOD DUSTS, OTHER* WOOL DUST* BIOLOGICAL AGENTS ANIMALS BACTERIA* FUNGI & MOLDS* MICRO-ORGAN, OTHER* VIRUSES* OTHER EXPOSURES1 1 Includes Physical , Chemical or Biological agents not l i s t e d in former categories. - 54 -APPENDIX IV CLASSES OF INDUSTRY A l l industries within the scope of the Workers' Compensation Act are divided into the following general c lasses: Class 1 Forest products industries Class 2 S i l i c o s i s Class 4 Mining; quarrying; manufacture of sand, rock, l ime, clay or cement products Class 6 Light manufacturing, service and trade industries Class 7 Heavy manufacturing, construction Class 8 Power and gas u t i l i t i e s , communications, motor-vehicle transportation, a i r transportation Class 9 Water transportation, wharf operations, f i sh ing and fish-packing Class 10 Canadian Pac i f ic Limited, Canada Pac i f i c Steamships Limited, Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway Company, Cominco Limited, West Kootenay Power and Light Company Limited, C P . A i r , Kootenay Engineering Company Limited Class 12 Canadian National Railways, A i r Canada, Via Rail Canada, Northern Alberta Railway Company Class 13 The Crown in r ight of the Province and any permanent board or commission of the Crown in r ight of the Province Class 14 Municipal corporations and agencies Class 18 Burlington Northern Inc. Following i s a detai led l i s t i n g and f u l l description of the various industries to which the Workers' Compensation Act applies. - 55 -SUBCLASSES* OF INDUSTRY Subclass Description 102 Logging, Log Salvage, Tree Spacing or Tree Thinning Log Hauling Log Booming or Sorting 104 Pulp or Paper M i l l 105 Sawmills Log Scaling as a Business Planing Mi l l s Wooden Box Works, Manufacture Wooden Pa l le ts Creosoting, Manufacturing Fence Posts, Wood Preserving and the Operation of Pole Manufacturing Plants when such operation i s conducted as a separate industry Booming Ground Operations when carr ied on by a tugboat company or as a business in i t s e l f not a l l i e d to any other operations in the forest products industries K i ln Drying Manufacture of Excels ior , Staves or Heads, Wooden Pa i l s or Tubs, Wooden Pipe, Wooden Barrels or Cooperage 107 Sash and Door Factor ies, Mouldings and other Lumber Remanufacturi ng Manufacture of Flakeboard, Hardboard, Plywood or Veneer Manufacture of Laminated Beams 109 Shingle or Shake M i l l s 203 S i l i c o s i s , Coal Mining 204 S i l i c o s i s , Metal l i ferous Mining 403 Gravel, Sand or Shale P i ts Stone Crushing or Quarrying Lime Quarryi ng Clay Mining Peat Digging or Processing Lime Ki lns Manufacture of Gypsum Manufacture of Cement Manufacture of Bricks Manufacture of Terra Cotta or T i l es Stone Cutt ing, Dressing or Shaping Monument Lettering or Setting Manufacture of Cement Blocks, Pre-Cast Concrete Blocks or other Cement or Concrete Products, N.E.S. Manufacture of Prestressed Concrete Beams 411 Asbestos Mining, Geophysical Contractors or Geological and Geophysical Service for the Mining Industry, Metal Mining (exclusive of S i l i c o s i s Rate), Ore Reduction, N.E.S., Prospecting on Staked Land, Tunnelling In or For Metal Mines. Prospecting on Unstaked Land (on request) Diamond D r i l l i n g (exclusive of S i l i c o s i s Rate) 418 Aluminum Smelter 430 Coal Exploration, Coal Mining (exclusive of S i l i c o s i s Rate), Tunnelling In or For Coal Mines * The f i r s t number(s) in the subclass code i s (are) the class number. - 56 -Subclass Description 602 Manufacture of Cans or s imi lar Tinware Products Manufacture of Paint , Putty, Varnish, Wood F i l l e r or A l l i e d Synthetic Resin Compounds Manufacture of Cardboard or P las t i c Boxes or Containers Manufacture of Boots or Shoes Assembly of Metal Scales, Precision Instruments or other Small Metal Products Manufacture of Candles, Soap or Cleaning Compounds including Synthetic Detergents, Bleaching Powder or L iqu id , Javel le Water, Laundry Bluing, Scouring Powders or Household Waxes, Polishes or Mucilage Manufacture of P l as t i c Pipe or Rubber Tires including Recapping or Retreading, Mats, Mouldings, Belt ing or Hose or s imi lar P las t i c or Synthetic Products Manufacture of P last ics or Synthetic Resins including Alkyd Resins, Phenolic Resins, Vinyl Resins, Thermoplastics, Transparent Cel lulose Film or Film from Synthetic Resins, Manufacture Fibreglass Insulation Manufacture of Matches Manufacture of Trunks, Bags, or Luggage Manufacture of Aluminum Windows, Bedsprings, Drapery Tracks, Iron Beds, Mattresses, Metal Furniture, Metal Venetian B l inds, Screen Doors, or Small Aluminum Products and Insta l la t ion of Drapery Tracks Manufacture and/or Dist r ibut ion of Compressed or L iqu i f i ed Gases such as Oxygen, Acetylene and Propane Manufacture of Batteries Sales and Service, Rental or Repair of Portable Light Machinery, Equipment or Parts including Boat Motors, Chain Saws, Lawnmowers, Portable F i re Extinguishers, Portable Toi le ts and Snowmobiles Armature Winding for Small Motors with no Ins ta l la t ion Work Exterminating, Fumigating or Pest Control Service Bridge Operation Assaying, Industrial Testing Laboratories or E lec t r i ca l Corrosion-Control Manufacture or Reconditioning of Glass Bottles or Jars Manufacture of F e r t i l i z e r s , N.E.S. Manufacture of Arsenical Products, Insect ic ides, Pest ic ides, or Weed Control Products, N.E.S. Operation of Greenhouses or Hort icultural Nurseries including Christmas Tree Cutt ing, Christmas Tree Farms, Tree Nurseries and Turf Nurseries (where not part of farming operation), Picking Greenery, Soi l Packaging, Tropical Plant Servicing Curing, Dressing and Trimming Hides or Wholesaling Raw Hides, Taxidermy or Operation of Tanneries Manufacture of E lec t r i ca l Control Panels, Lighting Fixtures or Transformers Manufacture of Paper Bags or P las t i c Bags Manufacture of Envelopes Manufacture of Stationery Manufacture of Cel lulose Insulat ion, Paper Products, N.E.S. Upholstering of Furniture or the Operation of Upholstery Shops Carpet or Linoleum Laying Glass Cutt ing, Grinding or Pol ishing or Manufacture of Mirrors or Glass Products, N.E.S. (This category includes ins ta l l a t i on of replacement window glass, etc. but does not cover construction of glass wa l ls , facades, etc. which i s part of the general building construction industry.) Manufacture of Abrasives, Asphalt Roofing, Asphalt Shingles, Asphalt T i l e , Asphalt S iding, Waterproof Roofing Fabric, Tar Paper or Tar Saturated Fe l t Roofing Ins ta l la t ion or Repairs of Bowling or B i l l i a r d Equipment Operation of Public Warehouses excluding Trucking or Cartage Manufacture of Acids, A l k a l i s , Salts or Chemicals, N.E.S. - 57 -Subclass Description Recycling Depot for Bott les , Cans, Paper or Glass where not part of other operations Manufacture of Tar Manufacture of P i tch Manufacture of Charcoal Sintering Tungsten Manufacture of Rock Wool Manufacture of Explosives Cold Storage Plants 603 Manufacture of Fur Goods Repair of Luggage, Handbags or Leather Goods Shoe Repairing Manufacture of Cosmetics, Drugs and Medicines, Perfumes and Colognes, Pharmaceuticals or To i le t Preparations Lens Grinding or Manufacture or Repair of Watches, Jewellery or Optical Goods Manufacture of Lamp Shades Manufacture or Repair of Adding Machines, Business Machines, Cash Registers, Computers, Electronic Equipment, Household E lec t r i ca l Appliances, Physiotherapy Equipment, Radios, Television Receivers, Typewriters, Vacuum Cleaners, Washing Machines, X-Ray Equipment, Manufacture, Repair or Servicing of Pianos or Harpsichords Dist r ibut ion and Servicing of Automatic Amusement, Music, Washing or Drying Equipment or other Vending Machines or Devices Picture Framing Manufacture of Rubber Stamps, Scale Models or Assembly of Small Rubber or P last ic A r t i c l es S i lverp lat ing or E lectroplat ing Ceramic F in ish ing, Manufacture of Clay, Plaster or Pottery Ornaments Manufacture of Ink Bicycle Rental or Repair Shop Furniture Refinishing, Furniture Stripping and French Pol ishing Furniture Appliance or Tool (hand held) Rental Locksmi thing Col lect ion or Processing of Used Photographic Film for Argent Recovery 604 Manufacture of Furniture (exclusive of Upholstering), Wooden Venetian Blinds or Stringed and Keyboard Musical Instruments (excluding pianos or harpsichords) Manufacture of Wooden Coffins and Caskets Manufacture or Repair of A r t i f i c i a l Limbs Manufacture of Brooms, Brushes or Mops Manufacture of Wooden Toys or Spokes Carpenter Shops or Woodworking Shops, Pattern Making, Manufacture of Hot Tubs, Saunas or Prefabricated or Pre-Cut Wood Frame Buildings Manufacture, Construction, or Repair of Aluminum, P l a s t i c , Fibreglass, Ferro Cement or Wooden Boats, Canoes or Rowboats Under 42 Feet in Length Manufacture and Repair of Mobile Homes Manufacture of Campers, Camper Vans, Fibreglass Pick-Up Truck Canopies, House T ra i l e r s , Mini Motor Homes, Motor Homes, Recreational Vehicles, Tent Tra i le rs or Conversion of Vans to Camper Units 605 Park Operations other than Municipal, N.E.S. Special Interest Bui ldings, Museums or Zoos (on request). Amusement Parks Horse Race Courses, Automobile Race Courses Ice Rinks or Curl ing Rinks Rol ler Rinks - 58.-Subclass Description Bowling Al leys or Arcades Dance Hal ls or Ballrooms as a Business B i l l i a r d Parlours 607 Manufacture of Non-Alcoholic Beverages, Soft Drinks other than F ru i t or Vegetable brinks 608 Manufacture of Alcohol ic Beverages including Beer, Cider and Wine 617 Manufacture of Awnings, Canvas Work, Sa i ls or Tents Manufacture of Ropes or Twines Knitt ing M i l l s Manufacture of Cloth, Weaving M i l l s or Spinning M i l l s Manufacture of Text i les , N.E.S. or Manufacture of Carpets 618 Manufacture of Buttons, Clothing, Cloth Window Bl inds, Cushions, Diving Suits , Draperies or Hats 620 Bakeries or Dist r ibut ion of Bakery Products Manufacture of Biscuits or Confectionery Manufacture of Delicatessen Products Manufacture of Sugar Poultry Processing or Dressing including a poultry hatchery where i t i s not part of a farming operation Manufacture of Food Products, N.E.S. including Cereal Products, Frozen Dinners, Macaroni, Meat P ies, Noodles or Spaghetti Coffee Roasting, Spice Packaging, Tea Blending or Manufacture or Miscellaneous Food Products including Peanut Butter, Soya Bean Paste, Flavouring Extracts, Syrups, Food Colourings, Gelatine Powders 621 Furniture Rental or Retail Stores Inter ior Designing and Consulting Microf i lming, Photography Studios, Photographic Film Processing, Recording Studios, Motion Picture or Video Tape Production or Edit ing Barber Shops Hairdressing Establishments or Beauty Salons Auctioneering Establishments Manufacture of Cigars Audiometric Testing, Chiropractors' Off ices , C l i n i c s , Medical Laboratories, Offices or Establishments for the practice of any of the Healing Arts or Sciences, N.E.S., Physiotherapy Offices (on request) Dental Laboratories Accounting Service, Actuarial Service, Addressing Service, Advertising Agency no pr in t ing , Appraisal Service, B a i l i f f s , Banks, Better Business Bureau, Business Consultants, Chambers of Commerce, Chartered Accountants, Col lect ion Agencies, Computer Programming Service, Credit Unions, Customs Brokers, Data Processing Service, Financial Inst i tut ions, Freight Forwarding (acting as an agent), Insurance Agency, Investment Dealers, Law Off ice , Mailing Service, Mortgage Brokers, Real Estate Agency, Security Brokers and Dealers or Stockbrokers, Telephone Answering Services, Translation Service or Travel Agencies (on request) Supplying Cler ica l Workers as a Business Employers' Associations (on request) Mobile Home Sales (where not incidental to manufacture and excluding Set-Up and Towing) Commercial Stock Audit 622 Operation' of Apartment Buildings Operation of Lodging House and Rooming House (on request i f fewer than ten bedrooms) Ski Schools where not a l l i e d with r e t a i l store or lodge (on request) - 59 -Subclass Description Operation of Cable Cars, Chair L i f t s , Gondolas, Ski-Tows or Tramways Boarding Car Operations, Industrial Catering or Mobile Catering Operation of Commercial Bui ldings, Commercial or Industrial Propert ies, Mini Warehouses or Shopping Centres Cemetery Operations or Crematories Heating Plants or Systems, N.E.S. Church Employees (on request) Strata Corporations, Townhouses or Condominiums (on request) Detective Agency, Industrial Patrols , Investigating Agency or Security Service 624 Canning or Packing of F ru i t or Vegetables, Manufacture of F ru i t or Vegetable Drinks Dair ies or Dist r ibut ion of Dairy Products, Manufacture of Ice Cream 625 Carpet and Rug Cleaning Establishment, Dry Cleaning or Dyeing Service, Laundromat Diaper Service, Laundry Service or Linen Supply and Uniform Service 626 Hospitals, F i r s t Aid Service Nursing Homes Animal Humane Societ ies , Kennels or Pet Grooming Establishments (on request) Veterinary Hospitals Community Care Homes or Rest Homes (on request i f fewer than ten bedrooms) 627 Hotel s Private Clubs, Health Clubs or Spas, Legions or Skating Clubs Discotheques, Licensed Public Houses or Lounges when operated by a separate company Auto Courts, Campgrounds, Motels, Resort Cabins, T ra i l e r Courts or other Tourist Resorts where not a part of a ranch operation Marina Operation Golf , Tennis or Lawn Bowling Clubs Catering, N.E.S. Food Concessions (permanent locations only) or Restaurants, N.E.S. Steam Bath Service 631 Land Surveying or Timber Cruising 632 Flour M i l l s , Manufacturing and/or Packaging of Dry Animal Feed or Suppl ements Grain Elevators Sale of Dry Animal Feed or Supplements, Farm Supply, Hay and Seed Dealers Rice M i l l i ng 636 Bulk OiT Depots, Oi l Refining or Distr ibut ion or Operation of Fuel Storage Tanks Operation of Oi l or Natural Gas Pipe Line Manufacture of Phenol or l i k e Petrochemicals, N.E.S. 637 Abattoirs or Meat Packing Stockyards Wholesale Meats Manufacture of Sausages or Sausage Casings Curing, Smoking or other Manufacture of Prepared Meat Products Canning of Meats Canning of Animal Foods - 60 -Subclass Description 639 Publishing when not accompanied by Pr int ing (on request) Pr int ing (includes Publishing when accompanied by Pr in t ing) , Lithography, Engraving, Bookbinding or Typesetting Showcard or Display Painting (Shop only) 643 Commercial F ish Farm, Grain Farming, Mixed Farming, Seed Farming, Vegetable Farming, Farming, N.E.S., Haying, Threshing Service (on request) Farm Labour Supply Apiary, Beekeeping or Hop Growing (on request) Mushroom Growing (on request) Berry Farms (on request) Orchards or Vineyards (on request) Animal Breeding Service, A r t i f i c i a l Insemination Stat ion, Dairy Farms, Feed Lots, Hog Farms, Horse Boarding and Training, Mink Farms, Poultry Farms, Rabbit Farms, Ranching, Riding Academy (on request) 646 Operation of Motion Picture Houses or Fi lm Distr ibut ion Operation of other Theatres 652 Ice Handling, Harvesting or D is t r ibut ion , Manufacture of A r t i f i c i a l Ice Wood/Coal Yards or Distr ibut ion Travel l ing Wood Saws Manufacture of Compressed Sawdust F i re Logs 654 Wholesale Establishments Phys ic ians ' , Dental, Beauticians' or Barbers' Supply Houses Manufacturers' Agents (stock of goods maintained in B.C.). Manufacturers' Agents when no stock of goods maintained in B.C. (on request) Other Wholesalers, N.E.S. 656 Labour or Trade Union 657 Lumber or Bui lders ' Supply Manufacture of Ready Mix Concrete Ice Handling, Harvesting or D is t r ibut ion , Manufacture of A r t i f i c i a l Ice Wood/Coal Yards or Dist r ibut ion Travel l ing Wood Saws Manufacture of Compressed Sawdust F i re Logs 658 Domestic or other Household Employees, Homemaker Service (on request) 659 Automobile, Motorcycle or Truck Sales or Repairs, including Glass Ins ta l l a t ion , Body Shop, Brake Shop, Car Wash, Muffler Shop, Pa int ing, Parking Lot, Radiator Repair Shop, Service Station or Gas Bar, Steam Cleaning, Towing, T ra i l e r Rental or Leasing, Transmission Repair Shop, Used Auto Parts Sales, Washing and Pol ish ing, Sales and Service of Campers, Camper Vans, House T ra i l e r s , Horse T ra i l e r s , Mini Motor Homes, Motor Homes, Pick-Up Truck Canopies, Recreational Vehicles, Stock T ra i l e r s , Tent Tra i le rs or U t i l i t y Tra i le rs Sales and Rental of A i r c r a f t , Repairs and Maintenance of A i r c r a f t , A i r c ra f t Services (where not an integral part of an a i r carr ier ) 705 Lathing Painting, ' Inter ior Decorating or Paper-Hanging including Highway or Parking Lot Line Painting Plastering or Stuccoing Insulation of Buildings or Insta l la t ion of Acoustic Board - 61 -Subclass Description Dry-Wall Contractors T i l e Contractors Terrazzo Laying Hardwood Floor Laying or Refinishing 706 Building Construction or Demolition, Crane Operation as a Business, Chimney Cleaning, Framing, Gutter Ins ta l l a t ion , Mobile Home Set-Up (excluding Sales and Towing), Overhead Door Assembly and Ins ta l l a t ion , Pool Insta l la t ion or Services, Roofing, N.E.S. or Siding Insta l la t ion Brick or Cement Block Laying or Masonry Work Household Maintenance, Non-Industrial, N.E.S. (on request) Reinforced Concrete Work or Cement Work, N.E.S. Erection or Insta l la t ion of Tanks Erection of Aer ia ls or Antennae Ins ta l la t ion or Removal of Bo i le rs , Engines or Machinery Insta l la t ion of Ornamental or s imi lar Metal Work Handling Scrap Metal or Junk Manufacture, Insta l la t ion or Repair of Elevators Non-Industrial Building Contruction, N.E.S. Supplying Workers (other than c l e r i c a l ) 707 Manufacture of Ammunition, Armaments, Automobile Springs, Bo i lers , Engines, Furnaces, Guns, Ornamental Iron Work or Stoves Steel Fabrication Shop or Steel Wholesale and Supply Manufacture of Lead Ar t i c l es or Babbitt Manufacture of Nuts, Bol ts , Na i l s , Spikes or Wire Extruding Manufacture of Metal Pipe and F i t t ings Die Casting or Making, Foundries or Machine Shops Blacksmithing and Horse Shoeing Welding Shops including Operation of Mobile Welders Saw Manufacture, Repair or Sharpening (excluding Chain Saws) Manufacture of Cable, Wire, Wire Fence or other Wire Products excluding those which involve Drawing Wire from Rods or other Extrusion Process Sales or Service or Rental or Repair of Heavy Machinery,. Equipment or Parts, Scaffolding Rental or Manufacture of a l l Machinery, Equipment or Parts Gas F i t t i n g , Insta l la t ion or Servicing of F i re Sprinkler Systems or Heating Equipment, N.E.S., Pipe F i t t i n g , Plumbing, Sanitation Service, Steam F i t t i n g or A i r Conditioning Contractors Manufacture of Refrigerators, Insta l la t ion or Repair of Refrigeration Equipment, N.E.S. Manufacture of Sheet Metal A r t i c l e s , Erection or Repairs of Sheet Metal, Tar or Gravel Roofing Galvanizing, Metal Enamelling, Tinning or Porcelain Enamelling Insta l la t ion or Maintenance of Radar Systems or Microwave or other s imi lar Communication System ' Manufacture of Flat-Deck T ra i l e r s , Goose-Neck Tra i le rs (exclusive of House T ra i l e r s ) , Horse T ra i l e r s , Stock T ra i l e r s , Truck Bodies or Tra i lers or U t i l i t y Tra i lers Rol l ing M i l l s 711 E lec t r i ca l Wiring of Bui ldings, Construction or Insta l la t ion of E lect r ic Lighting Systems, N.E.S., Armature Winding, N.E.S. or Insta l la t ion of Alarm Systems Insta l la t ion or Manufacture of Neon Signs or Illuminated Signs 713 Floor Cleaning or Waxing Service, Janitor Service, N.E.S., Rug and Carpet Cleaning using Portable Equipment Window Cleaning 721 Operation of a Marine Railway or Drydock Construction or Repair of Wooden, Aluminum, P l a s t i c , Fibreglass or Ferro Cement Vessels of 42 Feet or More in Length, N.E.S. - 62 -Subclass Description Construction or Repair of Own Vessel fo r Personal Use (on request) Construction or Major Repairs of a Fishing Vessel by a Commercial Fisherman or Minor Repairs to a Fishing Vessel where Workers are not Commercial Fishermen (on request) Construction or Repair of Steel Vessels or Barges 725 Construction of Dams, Flumes or Reservoirs Construction of Dry Docks, Piers or Wharves P i l e Driving Tunnell ing, N.E.S., D r i l l i n g , N.E.S. or Rock Tunnelling Construction of Training Walls to Deflect Water, Construction of J e t t i es or Causeways Construction of Bridges, Overpasses or Viaducts External Cleaning of Buildings including High Pressure Water, Sandblasting or Steam Steel Frame Erection or Repairs Steel Frame Painting Moving Buildings or House Raising 726 Road Making Land Clearing or Grading as an Industry, Land Development or Slashing for Line Cutting Airport Construction Construction or Repairs of Dykes Railway Construction or Demolition, N.E.S. Dredging Canals, Harbours, etc. Gravell ing or Surfacing of Roads, Runways or Sidewalks, Manufacture of Asphalt Paving Material Excavation Work as an Industry Insta l la t ion of Lawn I r r igat ion Systems, Landscape Gardening or Other Gardening as an Industry (exclusive of market gardening), Tree Service or Weed Control Service Construction or Operation of Waterworks or Water Treatment Plants or Systems, not Municipal Ins ta l l a t ion , Operation or Maintenance of Farm I r r igat ion Works Construction, Operation or Maintenance of Sewers or Sewage Disposal Plants or Systems, Septic Tank Service Construction or Inspection of Oil or Natural Gas Pipelines Construction or Removal of Transmission Lines or Ducts, Insta l la t ion of Transmission Line Appliances Water Well D r i l l i n g or Digging Blasting as a Business, Avalanche Control Bulldozer Operation as a Business Snow or Ice Removal as a Business, Street Cleaning Land Po l lu t ion Control Pine Cone P ick ing, Reforestation or Tree Planting 747 Consulting Engineering or Architectural Drafting and Designing (on request) 748 Oi l or Gas Producers, Explorers or Developers Exploration D r i l l i n g , Geophysical Contractors or Geological and Geophysical Service for the Oil and Gas Industry, Seismic D r i l l i n g O i l or Gas Well D r i l l i n g , N.E.S. Offshore Oil or Gas Well D r i l l i n g Servicing of Oi l or Gas Wells by means of Service Rigs Servicing of Oil or Gas Wells by means other than Service Rigs 801 Operation of E lec t r i c Light or Power Plants or Lines, Construction of E lec t r i c Light or Power Plants by an E lect r ic Light and Power Company for the purpose of i t s business Insta l la t ion or Maintenance of Cable Television Service - 63 -Description Operation of Natural Gas Distr ibut ion System (exclusive of Trans-Provincial Pipe Line Systems), Construction of Natural Gas Dis t r ibut ion System by a Natural Gas Distr ibut ion Company for the purpose of i t s business Operation of Telegraph Systems Radio or Television Broadcasting Operation of Telephone Systems Operation or Maintenance of Bus Lines, Bus Depots where not part of other operations or E lec t r i c Railways Operation of Chartered Bus Services including School Bus Service Ambulance Service (excluding Emergency Health Services Commission), Automobile Rental (without dr iver ) , Limousine Service, Taxicab Operation, Truck Rental (without dr iver ) , U-Drive Service Funeral Undertaking P i l o t Car Service Scheduled and Speci f ic Point Commercial A i r Services Operating Fixed Wing A i r c ra f t (includes Firms Operating in C.T.C. Classes 1, 8, 2, 9-2, 3, 9-3 and those Firms in C.T.C. Classes 4 and 9-4 using A i r c ra f t of more than 12,500 lbs . ) Charter and Specialty Commercial A i r Services Operating Fixed Wing A i r c ra f t (includes Firms Operating in C.T.C. Classes 6, 7 and those Firms in C.T.C. Classes 4 and 9-4 using A i r c ra f t of 12,500 l b s . or less) Helicopters (includes Commercial A i r Services Operating Rotating Wing A i r c ra f t in any C.T.C. Class) Armoured Car Service, Baggage Transfer Service, Cartage, Delivery Service, Freight ing, N.E.S., Garbage Col lect ion Service, Hauling, Messenger Service, Mobile Home Towing, Moving and Storage, Rubbish Removal, Trucking Guiding and Out f i t t i ng , River Expeditions or Trapping (on request) Harbour Pa t ro l , Operation of Boat Tours, Ferr ies , Ships, Tugboats or other Forms of Water Transportation, Navigation Services Marine Surveying (on request) Marine Salvage, Commercial Diving Service Marine Po l lu t ion Control Stevedoring, Wharf Operations or Grain Lining Canning or Processing F ish. Manufacture of Fish Oil or Fish F e r t i l i z e r , Fish Hatcheries, Fish Wholesaling, Oyster Co l lec t ion , Oyster Cu l t i va t ing , Kelp Col lec t ion , Salmon Enhancement (on request) Shipping Services, N.E.S. Fishing or Fish Co l lec t ion , Whaling Canadian Pac i f i c Limited and Associated Companies Railway Operation Water Transportation Express Light and Power Plant Operation - 64 -Subclass Description 1006 Mining and Smelting 1009 A i r Transportation 1011 Operation of Golf Association 1012 Trucking and Hauling 1013 Bui lding Construction 1200 Canadian National Railways and A i r Canada, and Northern Alberta Railway Company 1201 Via Rail Canada Inc. Government of the Province of B r i t i sh Columbia 1301 B r i t i sh Columbia Railway Company 1302 Government of B r i t i sh Columbia 1304 Liquor Administration Branch 1305 Workers' Compensation Board 1310 Provincial Emergency Programme 1312 Learners in Vocational Training School 1313 Dental Technicians' Board 1315 B r i t i sh Columbia Assessment Authority 1316 B r i t i sh Columbia Development Corporation 1317 Emergency Health Services Commission 1318 Rail west Manufacturing Company 1319 B r i t i sh Columbia Ferries Corporation 1320 B r i t i sh Columbia Building Corporation 1321 Br i t i sh Columbia Systems Corporation 1324 Employment Bridge Assistance Program 1401 Municipal Corporations including Construction Work and Municipal Volunteer F i re Brigades, Poundkeeping Municipal Parks Boards including Construction Work, Recreation Commissions Municipal Water Boards including Construction Work Municipal Cemetery Boards including Construction Work Improvement D i s t r i c t s or Regional D i s t r i c t s which carry on any Ac t i v i t y other than Planning and Financing, Volunteer F i re Brigades not operating under j u r i sd i c t i on of a Municipality Improvement D i s t r i c t or Regional D i s t r i c t (on request) Indian Band Operations on a Reserve excluding operations part of or a l l i e d to spec i f ic industr ies. Includes Social Service Functions carr ied on by an Indian Band on the Reserve (on request) - 6 5 -Subclass Description 1406 Colleges, Kindergartens, Private Academic Schools, School Boards, Trade Schools, Universit ies or Vocational Schools Library Boards Town Planning Boards Regional D i s t r i c t s which are engaged solely in Planning and Financing Music Schools (on request) Dance Schools, Driving Schools Social Service Agencies, includes Alcohol and Drug Centres, Community Service Organizations, Counselling, C r i s i s Centres, Friendship Centres, Group Homes, Half-Way Houses, Residences and Training Centres for Disabled or Retarded Individuals or for Young Offenders, Sheltered Workshops or Ac t i v i t y Centres and Social Rehabil i tat ion Centres (on request) Day Care Centres, Nursery Schools, Playschools or Preschools (on request) 1800 Burlington Northern Inc. 1900 Government of Canada - 66 -A P P E N D I X V F I G U R E S A N D T A B L E S Number Of Cases 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 Physical Agents j | Chemical Agents Biological Agents Others N=3,354 28/. 1978 Figure 1 N--3,803 1979 N-.4,142 1980 N=4,477 1981 1982 The annual distribution (percentage of total) of accepted wage-loss claims for occupational diseases by exposure, a l l subclasses, 1978 - 1982. Annual r a t e s o f a c c e p t e d wage-loss c l a i m s f o r o c c u p a t i o n a l d i s e a s e s p e r 1,000 man y e a r s o f employment, a l l s u b c l a s s e s , 1978 - 1982. - 69 -TABLE 1 - THE TOP TEN CAUSES OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES IN B.C. IN 1978-1982. TOTAL NO. OF OD'S EXPOSURE IN 1978-1982 1. Repetitive Motion 6,770 2. UV-Radiation from Welding 2,053 3. Noise 1,917 4. Other Physical Agents 1 1,618 5. Cleaning Compounds 575 6. Other Chemicals 477 7. Other A lka l ies 467 8. Animals 463 9. Acids 435 10. Cement and Mortar 391 Subtotal 15,166 2 Total No. of OD's 19,622 A l l are bu rs i t i s cases caused by f r i c t i o n , rubbing or pressure. This represents 77% of OD t o t a l . - 70 -TABLE 2 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE AND YEAR, ALL SUBCLASSES, 1978-1982. EXPOSURES 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 15 19 20 11 22 87 Cold 35 49 57 33 42 216 Heat 7 13 6 10 11 47 Noi se 579 454 331 316 237 1,917 Radiatd-Subst.Othr 2 1 3 3 0 9 Repetitive Motion 931 1,174 1,400 1,709 1,556 6,770 Sun 0 3 1 0 1 5 UV-Equipment 5 12 6 1 3 27 UV-Welding 290 415 453 505 390 2,053 Vibration 3 10 4 5 1 23 Phys Agents, Others 1 296 266 365 408 283 1,618 SUBTOTAL 2,163 2,416 2,646 3,001 2,546 12,772 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 79 76 114 98 68 435 Alcohol s 3 11 12 11 10 47 A l iphat ic Solvents 39 50 57 57 39 242 A lka l i e s , Other 66 90 109 102 100 467 Aluminum.Dust,Fume 0 0 1 1 0 2 Ammonia 12 19 16 18 8 73 Animal Products 1 1 3 4 2 11 Aromati compnd, Othr 28 37 36 36 39 176 Arsenic Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Asbestos 7 6 12 11 7 43 Carbon Dioxide 3 1 5 0 2 11 Carbon Monoxide 13 10 17 13 8 61 Cedar Dust 2 0 33 43 48 36 160 Cement, Mortar 79 70 79 104 59 391 Chlor-Fl uor Cmpnds 1 0 0 2 2 5 Chlorine (Dioxide) 76 58 50 43 90 317 Chromium.Dust.Fume 3 5 5 3 2 18 Cleaning Compounds 111 109 102 132 121 575 Clothes 6 9 15 7 4 41 Coal Tars 5 4 3 7 4 23 Coal&Petr Prod,Othr 19 10 20 9 .13 71 Coal, Dust 1 0 0 0 0 1 Coke 0 1 1 2 0 4 Copper, Dust, Fume 1 1 1 0 1 4 Crude Oil 0 0 1 0 0 1 - 71 -TABLE 2 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE AND YEAR, ALL SUBCLASSES (cont'd) EXPOSURES 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Cutting Oi ls 1 3 1 6 1 12 Cyanides 0 1 2 2 5 10 Disinfectants 12 20 13 18 16 79 Drugs, Medicine 0 2 3 5 1 11 Dusts, Other 14 14 10 7 7 52 Fibreglass 4 11 10 10 11 46 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 23 29 22 29 17 120 Food Products,Othr 33 32 42 33 25 165 Formaldehyde 2 1 1 5 2 11 Fuel Oi l 14 11 12 11 12 60 Gasoline 7 6 13 9 9 44 Gloves, Wet 2 8 5 3 4 22 Grains, Flours 7 2 5 8 6 28 Hairdressing Chem 10 19 17 14 9 69 Halogenated Cmpnds 13 15 22 22 13 85 Hydrocarbon Gases 5 6 7 3 2 23 Kerosene 2 2 4 4 1 13 Ketones J 9 4 5 7 7 32 Lead, Dust, Fume 3 3 7 9 7 29 Lub O i l , Grease 14 17 34 27 18 no Manufactured Gases 2 0 0 1 0 3 Mercury,Dust,Fume 4 0 4 1 1 10 Metal Cmpnds,Other 5 3 2 4 6 20 Nitro-Glycerine 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 Ni trogen jOxides 0 0 1 0 2 3 Ntrgn Cmpnds,Othr 1 1 1 1 0 4 Organophosphorus 1 3 0 3 4 11 PAH, Tar Fume 0 1 0 0 1 2 PCB, PBB 0 0 0 0 1 1 PCP, TCP 8 9 13 4 5 39 Pesticides,Other 10 8 15 10 5 48 Petrol eum.Asphal ts 2 0 2 1 0 5 Phenol s 0 0 1 1 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 7 18 8 16 4 53 P last ic Items 1 0 0 2 0 3 Pyrolysis Products 0 3 3 4 0 10 Resins 41 73 82 75 28 299 Rubber & Compounds 9 3 4 8 8 32 Si 1 ica 11 16 16 19 16 78 Sulfur , Cmpnds 16 33 37 43 36 165 Tetrachl orome thane 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 72 -TABLE 2 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE AND YEAR, ALL SUBCLASSES (cont'd) EXPOSURES 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Text i le Items 0 0 1 7 7 15 Urethanes, Isocyan 5 10 11 20 11 57 W.Co & Hard Metals 0 0 2 0 0 2 Water Base Paints 1 0 2 0 3 6 Water, Othr Liquids 1 7 15 4 11 38 Weldfum, Coat Srf 16 25 22 20 20 103 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 4 4 14 12 1 35 Wood Dusts, Other 0 2 5 3 5 15 Chemicals, Other 69 111 103 78 116 477 SUBTOTAL 942 1,137 1,303 1,278 1,079 5,739 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 64 121 87 82 109 463 Bacteria 82 42 39 38 52 253 Fungi & Molds 0 2 0 0 3 5 Micro/Organ, Other 7 1 0 0 0 8 Viruses 17 27 22 23 18 107 SUBTOTAL 170 193 148 143 182 836 OTHER EXPOSURES 79 57 50 55 34 275 TOTAL 3,354 3,803 4,147 4,477 3,841 19,622 A l l are burs i t i s cases. In 1978, cedar dust cases and other wood dust cases are shown with "other exposures". - 73 -TABLE 3 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY SUBCLASS AND YEAR, ALL DIAGNOSES, 1978-1982. SUBCLASS1 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL 102 136 175 148 118 95 672 104 96 88 78 92 85 439 105 394 378 363 329 242 1,706 107 77 111 100 110 74 472 109 96 84 94 91 53 418 403 27 34 31 40 24 156 411/204 81 114 87 96 91 469 418 10 4 7 11 10 42 430/203 11 16 11 15 13 66 602 171 172 244 250 168 1,005 603 16 24 29 35 25 129 604 62 100 81 117 55 415 605 2 3 1 2 4 12 607 8 5 9 7 9 38 608 9 24 18 21 29 101 617 0 1 4 1 2 8 618 2 5 5 5 1 18 620 75 138 117 82 63 475 621 121 138 171 189 199 818 622 9 18 12 22 19 80 624 49 49 71 60 70 299 625 5 10 7 9 13 44 626 171 167 183 231 213 965 627 86 93 107 143 113 542 631 3 9 4 7 3 26 632 9 6 9 14 15 53 636 10 8 13 12 10 53 637 29 38 60 52 56 235 639 12 19 19 19 21 90 643 6 3 7 7 5 28 654 23 26 30 30 34 143 657 12 15 12 24 13 76 658 0 4 6 5 6 21 659 70 73 83 114 95 435 705 59 35 68 83 85 330 706 204 209 330 422 345 1,510 707 363 478 545 587 409 2,382 711 26 22 33 34 35 150 713 6 12 14 15 17 64 721 125 153 167 185 201 831 725 54 36 32 39 45 206 - 74 -TABLE 3 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY SUBCLASS AND YEAR, ALL DIAGNOSES (cont'd) SUBCLASS1 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL 726 66 93 93 113 132 497 747 3 4 2 3 5 17 748 17 18 29 20 17 101 801 12 9 14 17 15 67 808 8 20 14 12 25 79 811 7 8 4 8 8 35 812 4 1 2 2 0 9 820 9 11 11 10 8 49 851 44 48 60 71 71 294 901 14 13 11 17 12 67 902 14 18 25 27 14 98 906 66 91 73 81 54 365 911 19 23 32 15 25 114 1001-1013 60 55 67 54 52 288 1200-1201 9 19 13 12 18 71 1301-1321 99 114 97 110 123 543 1401 123 114 113 99 104 553 1406 43 41 59 63 73 279 OTHER2 12 6 18 18 20 74 TOTAL , 3,354 3,803 4,147 4,477 3,841 19,622 1 Refer to Appendix I for a description of the subclasses. 2 Subclasses with less than six claims are not shown ind iv idua l l y , but are not included in the "OTHER" row. The federal government subclass i s not included in the table. - 7 5 -TABLE 4 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE AND DIAGNOSIS, ALL SUBCLASSES, 1978-1982. DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. 1 PNEU- CONTAG. BURS.1 CHEM. OTHER2 EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. 1 10C0N. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 86 87 Cold 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 215 216 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 35 47 Noi se 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,917 1,917 Radiatd-Subst.Othr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 6,758 0 0 12 6,770 Sun 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 27 UV-Wei ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 2,042 2,053 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 23 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 1,618 0 0 0 1,618 SUBTOTAL 0 2 0 0 8,376 12 11 4,371 12,772 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 3 16 0 0 0 17 396 3 435 Alcohol s 9 2 0 0 0 6 30 0 47 Al iphat ic Solvents 18 14 0 0 0 56 146 8 242 A lka l i e s , Other 5 14 0 0 0 14 432 2 467 Aluminum.Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Ammonia 6 23 0 0 0 2 42 0 73 Animal Products 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 3 11 Aromati cCmpnd,Othr 26 23 0 0 0 33 91 3 176 Arsenic Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 42 0 0 1 0 0 43 Carbon Dioxide 6 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 11 Carbon Monoxide 48 9 0 0 0 0 0 4 61 Cedar Dust 0 144 0 0 0 11 0 5 160 Cement, Mortar 0 i 8 0 0 0 43 327 13 391 Chlor-Fluor Cmpnds 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 Chlorine (Dioxide) 10 189 0 0 0 16 98 4 317 Chromium,Dust.Fume 0 4 0 0 0 14 0 0 18 Cleaning Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 397 172 5 575 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 40 41 Coal Tars 0 2 0 0 0 1 19 1 23 CoalSPetr Prod,Othr 1 0 0 0 0 10 58 2 71 Coal, Dust 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Coke 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 - 76 -TABLE 4 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE AND DIAGNOSIS, ALL SUBCLASSES (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS.1 CHEM. OTHER2 EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS TOTAL Copper, Dust, Fume 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cutting Oi ls 1 0 0 0 0 8 3 0 12 Cyanides 2 2 0 0 0 2 3 1 10 Di sinfectants 0 2 0 0 0 38 37 2 79 Drugs, Medicine 1 0 0 0 0 3 4 3 11 Dusts, Other 0 7 5 0 0 4 • 0 36 52 Fibreglass 1 7 0 0 0 24 4 10 46 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 2 H I 0 0 0 0 0 7 120 Food Products,Othr 12 1 0 0 0 106 7 39 165 Formaldehyde 0 6 0 0 0 2 3 0 11 Fuel Oi l 5 8 0 0 0 14 27 6 60 Gasoline 7 3 0 0 0 3 28 3 44 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 5 22 Grains, Flours 1 14 0 0 0 8 1 4 28 Hairdressing Chem 0 0 0 0 0 69 0 0 69 Halogenated Cmpnds 13 8 0 0 0 10 53 1 85 Hydrocarbon Gases 2 6 0 0 0 0 13 2 23 Kerosene 0 4 0 0 0 4 5 0 13 Ketones 6 3 0 0 0 4 19 0 32 Lead, Dust, Fume 28 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 Lub O i l , Grease 1 0 0 0 0 40 66 3 no Manufactured Gases 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 Mercury,Dust,Fume 0 5 0 0 0 2 1 2 10 Metal Cmpnds,Other 1 4 0 0 0 8 7 0 20 Nitro-Glycerine 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Nitrogen Oxides 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 Ntrgn Cmpnds,Othr 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 4 Organophosphorus 7 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 11 PAH, Tar Fume 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 PCB, PBB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 PCP, TCP 5 6 0 0 0 14 14 0 39 Pe st ic ides, Other 9 10 0 0 0 14 11 4 48 Petroleum Asphalts 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 5 Phenols 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 2 2 0 0 0 41 1 7 53 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 3 Pyrolysis Products 2 6 0 0 0 1 0 1 10 Resins 7 18 0 0 0 73 188 13 299 - 77 -TABLE 4 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE AND DIAGNOSIS, ALL SUBCLASSES (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS.1 CHEM. OTHER2 EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS TOTAL Rubber & Compounds 0 1 0 0 0 28 3 0 32 Si 1 ica 0 1 70 0 0 1 2 4 78 Sulfur , Cmpnds 31 67 0 0 0 7 49 11 165 Tetrachl orome thane 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 12 15 Urethanes, Isocyan 1 40 0 0 0 6 9 1 57 W,Co & Hard Metals 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Water Base Paints 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 6 Water,Othr Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 33 1 4 38 Weldfum, Coat Srf 18 78 0 0 0 1 1 5 103 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 4 28 1 0 0 0 2 0 35 Wood Dusts, Other 1 8 0 0 0 5 0 1 15 Chemicals, Other 21 61 0 0 0 106 248 41 477 SUBTOTAL 329 979 119 1 0 1,340 2,649 325 5,739 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 331 0 0 0 0 125 0 7 463 Bacteria 2 2 0 94 0 107 0 48 253 Fungi & Molds 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 Micro-Organ, Other 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 8 Viruses 0 0 0 103 0 1 0 3 107 SUBTOTAL 333 5 0 199 0 233 0 66 836 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 55 0 0 0 29 8 182 275 TOTAL 663 1,039 119 199 8,376 1,614 2,668 4,944 19,622 1 Includes carpal tunnel syndrome (= CTS). 2 Hearing loss and welding-induced conjunct iv i t i s constitute 78% of the 4,944 "OTHER" cases. The other main categories are: abrasions, other con junc t i v i t i s , infected b l i s t e r s , heat stroke, f ros tb i t e , radiat ion ef fects , v ibrat ion white f inger disease, cancer and heart attack. - 78 -TABLE 5 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY SUBCLASS, SEX AND AVERAGE AGE, TOTALS AND RATES FOR 1978-1982 (CASES PER 1,000 MANYEARS OF EMPLOYMENT). RATE AVERAGE (CASES PER 1,000 SUBCLASS' FEMALE MALE TOTAL AGE (MANYEARS)2 102 7 665 672 43 4.9 104 31 408 439 39 4.8 105 102 1,513 1,615 36 8.5 107 70 402 472 34 8.7 109 II 19 399 418 33 37.5 403 1 155 156 33 8.2 411/204 13 456 469 46 9.4 418 5 37 42 34 2.8 430/203 1 65 66 42 3.4 602 306 699 1,005 32 10.4 603 50 79 129 35 1.8 604 87 328 415 30 13.0 605 3 9 12 25 1.5 607 3 35 38 30 7.0 608 16 85 101 34 7.7 617 4 4 8 30 4.6 618 16 2 18 35 1.6 620 III 342 133 475 33 17.6 621 570 248 818 34 1.2 622 36 44 80 39 1.4 624 150 149 299 36 9.2 625 26 18 44 37 2.6 626 782 183 965 37 4.2 627 355 187 542 31 1.4 631 2 24 26 26 4.2 632 2 51 53 34 4.9 636 1 52 53 36 1.4 637 62 173 235 33 13.9 639 44 46 90 32 1.8 643 5 23 28 31 4.7 654 V 29 114 143 33 .9 657 4 72 76 34 2.2 658 21 0 21 44 1.4 659 29 406 435 31 2.6 705 9, 321 330 35 12.6 706 13 1,497 1,510 35 10.5 707 72 2,310 2,382 35 11.2 711 2 148 150 36 4.5 713 34 30 64 32 3.5 - 79 -TABLE 5 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY SUBCLASS, SEX AND AVERAGE AGE, TOTALS AND RATES FOR 1978-1982 (cont'd) RATE AVERAGE (CASES PER 1,000 SUBCLASS1 FEMALE MALE TOTAL AGE (MANYEARS)2 721 I 7 824 831 38 39.8 725 V 0 206 206 44 15.4 726 70 427 497 34 6.3 747 I 1 16 17 28 .3 748 4 97 101 25 6.2 801 4 63 67 42 1.1 808 III 37 42 79 35 .8 811 IV 2 33 35 36 .8 812 II 1 8 9 33 .7 820 11 38 49 32 2.7 851 6 288 294 37 3.4 901 1 66 67 41 4.0 902 0 98 98 44 4.5 906 IV 214 151 365 34 16.3 911 5 109 114 33 2.3 1001-1013 31 257 288 38 3.5 1200-1201 14 57 71 36 2.6 1301 230 313 543 37 1.7 1401 46 507 553 36 4.3 1406 123 156 279 42 .6 OTHER 10 155 165 TOTALS 4,141 15,481 19,622 36 4.1 Refer to Appendix I for a description of the subclasses. 2 Rates for 1978-1981 only. 3 Rates less than 0.5 are shown as 0. Roman numerals I to V refers to "Top Five Subclasses" (Table 7) and I to V "Small Risk Subclasses". - 80 -TABLE 6 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY SEX, EXPOSURE AND AVERAGE AGE, ALL SUBCLASSES, 1978-1982. NUMBER OF CASES  AVERAGE EXPOSURE FEMALE MALE TOTAL AGE PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 29 58 87 30 Cold 19 197 216 32 Heat 4 43 47 33 Noise 9 1908 1917 56 Radiadt-Subst, Othr 1 8 9 36 Repetitive Motion 2,273 4,497 6,770 33 Sun 0 5 5 30 UV-Equipment 7 20 27 33 UV-Welding 9 2,044 2,053 31 Vibration 1 22 23 46 Phys Agents, Other 182 1,436 1,618 38 SUBTOTAL 2,534 10,238 12,772 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 33 402 435 32 Alcohol s 7 40 47 32 A l iphat ic Solvents 28 214 242 33 A lka l i e s , Other 58 409 467 32 Aluminum, Dust, Fume 1 1 2 41 Ammonia 27 46 73 36 Animal Products 0 11 11 34 Aromatic Compounds, Other 34 142 176 32 Arsenic Compounds 0 1 1 21 Asbestos 0 43 43 55 Carbon Dioxide 5 6 11 38 Carbon Monoxide 10 51 61 35 Cedar Dust 4 156 160 37 Cement, Mortar 4 387 391 33 Chlor-Fluor Compounds 1 4 5 32 Chlorine, Dioxide 77 240 317 35 Chromium, Dust, Fume 3 15 18 41 Cleaning Compounds 356 219 575 34 Clothes 8 33 41 28 Coal & Petr Prod, Othr 5 66 71 29 Coal Dust 0 1 1 74 Coal Tars 1 22 23 29 Coke 0 4 4 28 Copper, Dust, Fume 0 4 4 24 Crude Oi l 0 1 1 57 - 81 -TABLE 6 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY SEX, EXPOSURE AND AVERAGE AGE, ALL SUBCLASSES (cont'd) NUMBER OF CASES  AVERAGE EXPOSURE FEMALE MALE TOTAL AGE Cutting Oi ls 1 11 12 36 Cyanides 0 10 10 34 Disinfectants 57 22 79 36 Drugs, Medicine 7 4 11 34 Dusts, Other 5 47 52 39 Fibreglass 4 42 46 29 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 8 112 120 36 Food Products, Other 82 83 165 32 Formaldehyde 3 8 11 33 Fuel Oil 0 60 60 35 Gasoline 5 39 44 29 Gloves, Wet 5 17 22 32 Grains, Flours 1 27 28 34 Hairdressing Chem 59 10 69 23 Halogenated Compounds 20 65 85 31 Hydrocarbon Gases 3 20 23 29 Kerosene 2 11 13 27 Ketones 2 30 32 28 Lead, Dust, Fume 0 29 29 34 Lub O i l , Grease 4 106 no 34 Manufactured Gases 0 3 3 31 Mercury, Dust, Fume 0 10 10 36 Metal Compounds, Other 2 18 20 34 Nitrogen Compounds, Other 0 4 4 36 Nitrogen Oxides 0 3 3 39 Nitroglycerine 0 1 1 23 Organophosphorus 4 7 11 36 PCB, PBB 0 1 1 54 PCP, TCP 1 38 39 33 Phenols 1 1 2 43 PAH, Tar Fume 0 2 2 29 Pest ic ides, Other 19 29 48 , 36 Petroleum Asphalts 0 5 5 31 Plants, Vegetation 8 45 53 33 P last ic Items 1 2 3 24 Pyrolysis Products 3 7 10 38 Resins 30 269 299 33 Rubber & Compounds 16 16 32 35 S i l ica 1 77 78 59 Sulfur , Compounds 5 160 165 34 - 82 -TABLE 6 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY SEX, EXPOSURE AND AVERAGE AGE, ALL SUBCLASSES (cont'd) NUMBER OF CASES EXPOSURE FEMALE MALE TOTAL AVERAG AGE Tetrachloromethane 0 1 1 45 Text i le Items 4 11 15 29 U re thanes, Isocyan 5 52 57 37 W, Co and Hard Metals 2 0 2 33 Water Base Paints 1 5 6 27 Water, Other Liquids 12 26 38 34 Weldfum, Coat Srf 3 100 103 38 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 0 35 35 36 Wood Dusts, Other 1 14 15 35 Chemicals, Other 95 382 477 35 SUBTOTAL 1,144 4,595 5,739 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animal s 158 305 463 32 Bacteria 190 63 253 33 Fungi & Molds 2 3 5 40 Micro-organ, Other 0 8 8 36 Viruses 74 33 107 31 SUBTOTAL 424 412 836 OTHER EXPOSURES 39 236 275 33 TOTAL 4,141 15,481 19,622 36 - 83 -TABLE 7 - THE FIVE SUBCLASSES WITH HIGHEST OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE RATES, 1978-1982. SUBCLASS1 TOTAL IN 1978-1982 RATE PER 1,000 MANYEARS2 I 721 II 109 III 620 IV 906 V 725 831 418 475 365 206 39.8 37.5 17.6 16.3 15.4 Total Number of Cases A l l Subclasses 19,622 Average Rate 4.1 Refer to Appendix IV for a description of the subclasses. Rates for 1978-1981 only. - 84 -TABLE 8 - THE FIVE SUBCLASSES WITH SMALLEST OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE RATES, 1978-1982. SUBCLASS1 TOTAL IN 1978-1982 RATE PER 1,000 MANYEARS2 I 747 II 812 III 808 IV 811 V 654 17 9 79 35 143 .3 .7 .8 .8 .9 Total Number of Cases A l l Subclasses 19,622 Average Rate 4.1 Refer to Appendix IV for a description of the subclasses. Rates for 1978-1981 only. - 85 -TABLE 9 - ESTIMATED AVERAGE MANYEARS OF EMPLOYMENT, BY SUBCLASS, 1979-1981. ESTIMATED MANYEARS ESTIMATED MANYEARS SUBCLASS ( in thousands) SUBCLASS ( in thousands) 102 29.6 656 2.8 104 18.3 657 7.3 105 40.3 658 2.6 107 10.8 659 33.0 109 2.4 705 4.9 403 4.0 706 27.7 411 10.1 707 43.9 418 2.9 711 6.3 430 3.7 713 3.4 602 20.2 721 4.0 603 14.9 725 2.6 604 7.4 726 14.6 605 1.3 747 9.5 607 1.0 748 3.4 608 2.4 801 11.4 617 0.3 808 17.0 618 2.7 811 8.6 620 5.8 812 3.4 621 125.4 820 3.8 622 11.2 851 16.6 624 6.2 901 3.5 625 3.0 902 4.7 626 44.9 906 4.8 627 74.4 909 0.9 631 1.4 911 9.8 632 2.0 1001-1013 17.1 636 7.4 1200-1201 5.1 637 3.2 1301-1321 . 60.2 639 9.6 1401 26.4 643 1.2 1406 88.8 654 31.5 1800 0.2 TOTAL ALL SUBCLASSES 947.80 - 86 -TABLE 10 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS1, ALL DIAGNOSES, 1978-1982. EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 102 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cold 9 2 4 1 4 20 Heat 0 4 0 2 0 6 Noi se 78 67 47 34 35 261 Repetitive Motion 17 39 39 43 27 165 UV-Wel di ng 0 6 8 6 1 21 Vibration 1 6 3 1 1 12 Phys Agents, Other 17 10 15 14 11 67 HEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 5 3 3 5 2 18 Alcohols 0 1 0 0 0 1 Al iphatic Solvents 0 0 2 0 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Ammonia 0 0 1 0 0 1 Animal Products 0 0 1 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide i 0 0 1 1 0 2 Cedar Dust 0 1 1 1 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 1 0 1 0 0 2 Clothes 0 2 3 0 0 5 Coal & iPetr Prod, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cutting Oi ls 0 0 0 1 0 1 Food Products, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 1 2 1 1 5 Gasoline 1 0 0 0 1 2 Gloves, Wet 0 1 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 2 1 0 0 3 Pest ic ides, Other 1 0 1 0 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 3 9 5 4 1 22 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 1 0 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 0 1 1 Wood Dusts, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 1 0 0 0 2 - 87 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals Bacteria Viruses 13 4 1 31 5 1 OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 136 175 148 1 118 0 95 2 672 SUBCLASS 104 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 1 1 Heat 0 0 0 2 1 3 Noise 26 20 11 20 13 90 Repetitive Motion 12 15 9 20 17 73 UV-Equipment 0 0 2 0 0 2 UV-Weldi ng 3 1 2 1 5 12 Vi bration 0 1 0 0 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 3 1 3 1 4 12 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 4 3 1 4 0 12 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 1 1 0 3 A lka l i e s , Other 12 11 15 15 12 65 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cement, Mortar 7 12 6 4 4 33 Chlorine (Dioxide) 20 14 11 9 20 74 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 1 1 Clothes 0 0 1 0 0 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 1 0 0 1 Gloves, Wet 0 0 1 0 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 1 0 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 0 2 1 1 4 Sulfur, Compounds 3 4 4 7 3 21 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 4 3 4 3 2 16 - 88 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals Viruses OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 0 0 0 96 1 0 0 88 0 1 3 78 0 0 2 92 0 0 0 85 1 1 5 439 SUBCLASS 105 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 4 5 5 0 2 16 Heat 1 2 0 0 0 3 Noise 149 95 64 56 43 407 Radlatd-Subst, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Repetitive Motion 156 186 185 189 140 856 Sun 0 1 0 0 0 1 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 2 2 UV-Welding 16 14 12 6 5 53 Phys Agents, Other 21 19 30 19 11 100 CHEMICAL AGENTS Adds 2 2 1 0 1 6 Alcohol s 0 0 0 2 1 3 A l iphat ic Solvents 1 0 3 3 0 7 A l ka l i e s , Other 1 1 0 0 1 3 Animal Products 0 1 2 1 0 4 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 1 0 0 2 Cedar Dust 0 20 21 24 15 80 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chromium, Dust, Fume 0 1 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 1 1 2 Clothes 1 0 1 0 0 2 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 1 1 0 0 0 2 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 2 2 0 0 4 Fuel 011 0 1 1 1 0 3 Gasoline 0 1 2 1 0 4 - 89 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Gloves, Wet 0 3 0 1 3 7 Halogenated Compounds 1 0 0 1 0 2 Lub 011, Grease 1 1 1 2 1 6 PCP, TCP 3 4 9 3 2 21 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Plants, Vegetation 1 0 0 3 0 4 Pyrolysls Products 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 1 1 4 0 6 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 1 0 1 2 Text i le Items 0 0 0 2 1 3 Water, Other Liquids 1 1 5 0 3 10 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 1 1 2 Wood Dusts, Other 0 0 3 2 2 7 Chemicals, Other 4 4 2 1 1 12 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 5 2 0 1 8 OTHER EXPOSURES 29 7 7 4 2 49 TOTAL 394 378 363 329 242 1,706 SUBCLASS 107 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold " 1 0 1 1 0 3 Heat 0 1 0 0 0 1 Noise 15 8 11 9 5 48 Repetitive Motion 27 56 44 64 49 240 UV-Equipment 0 10 0 0 0 10 UV-Welding 0 1 0 1 1 3 Phys Agents, Other 4 6 9 5 2 26 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 1 0 2 0 1 4 Alcohols 0 0 0 1 1 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 2 5 1 2 1 11 A lka l i es , Other 2 4 4 4 1 15 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 0 0 2 2 - 90 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Carbon Monoxide 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cedar Dust 0 2 5 7 6 20 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 2 0 0 0 0 2 Fibreglass 0 1 0 0 0 1 F1re, Smoke, Ashes 0 2 1 1 0 4 Formal dehyde 0 0 0 1 0 1 Fuel Oi l 2 0 0 0 0 2 Gloves, Wet 0 1 0 0 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ketones 1 0 1 0 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 1 0 0 1 PCP, TCP 1 0 1 0 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 1 0 0 0 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 8 9 15 8 0 40 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 1 1 Wood Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 3 2 1 4 2 12 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 2 0 0 0 3 Bacteri a 0 0 0 0 1 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 5 1 2 0 0 8 TOTAL 77 111 100 110 74 472 SUBCLASS 109 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 11 8 11 6 3 39 Repetitive Motion 64 67 72 69 43 315 UV-Welding 0 1 0 3 0 4 Vibration 0 0 0 1 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 10 3 3 6 0 22 - 91 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols Cedar Dust Fuel 011 Hydrocarbon Gases Lub 011, Grease Plants, Vegetation Rubber & Compounds Wood Dusts, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold Heat | Noise Radiatd-Subst, Other Repetitive Motion UV-Welding Phys Agents, Other '!, »' CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids Al iphat ic Solvents A l ka l i e s , Other Aromatic Compounds, Other Cement, Mortar Cleaning Compounds Dusts, Other Fuel Oil Hydrocarbon Gases Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 3 7 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 1 1 96 84 94 SUBCLASS 403 1 0 , 1 0 1 | 0 3 1 2 0 0 0 9 10 11 3 6 2 3 3 4 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 4 8 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 10 91 53 418 1 1 4 0 1 2 2 1 9 1 0 1 11 10 51 3 3 17 3 1 14 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 3 5 1 0 2 11 0 27 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 3 - 92 -TABLE TO - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Metal Compounds, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 1 0 1 S i l i c a 1 0 0 1 0 2 Chemicals, Other 1 0 0 2 0 3 i BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 0 0 0 0 1 1 Viruses 0 0 0 0 1 1 ' ! • OTHER EXPOSURES i 0 2 0 0 0 2 TOTAL 27 34 31 40 24 156 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold' Noise Repetitive Motion UV-Equipment UV-Weld1ng f ! Vibration Phys Agents, Other CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds Alcohol s Al iphat ic Solvents A lka l i es , Other Aromatic Compounds, Other Carbon Monoxide Cement, Mortar Chlorine (Dioxide) Chromium, Dust, Fume Cleaning Compounds Clothes Coal ft Petr Prod, Other Cyanides Disinfectants SUBCLASS 411/204 0 0 4 49 62 33 5 5 7 0 0 1 4 8 7 1 0 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 8 35 32 211 11 8 36 0 0 1 5 6 30 0 0 2 6 3 14 5 1 10 0 1 2 1 1 5 1 2 4 1 0 2 0 0 3 4 1 6 2 1 4 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 3 0 0 1 0 3 3 0 0 1 i - 93 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Dusts, Other 0 2 0 0 1 3 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 1 0 2 Fuel Oil 1 1 2 0 1 5 Gloves, Wet 1 1 0 0 0 2 Halogenated Compounds 0 1 0 1 0 2 Lead, Dust, Fume 0 0 0 0 1 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 1 0 1 0 2 Organophosphorous 0 0 0 1 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 1 0 1 S i l i c a 8 13 14 12 14 61 Sulfur, Compounds 1 3 3 1 0 8 Weldfum, Coat Srf 1 1 0 1 1 4 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 0 1 2 1 0 4 Chemicals, Other 0 3 2 0 10 15 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS > Animals 3 1 1 0 0 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 1 1 1 1 5 TOTAL 81 114 87 96 91 469 SUBCLASS 418 PHYSICAL AGENTS Heat 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 1 0 1 0 2 Repetitive Motion 1 0 1 2 2 6 UV-Welding 1 0 2 0 2 5 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 2 0 0 2 0 4 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 1 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 2 0 0 0 1 3 Coal Tars 0 0 1 0 2 3 Dusts, Other 2 1 0 0 1 4 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 1 0 0 1 - 94 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 1 0 Nitrogen Compounds, Other 0 1 0 0 0 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 Sulfur, Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 0 1 2 0 3TAL 10 4 7 11 10 42 SUBCLASS 430/203 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise Radiatd-Subst, Other Repetitive Motion UV-Welding Phys Agents, Other CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds Alcohol s Al iphatic Solvents Aromatic Compounds, Other Carbon Monoxide Chlorine (Dioxide) Cleaning Compounds Coal Coke Drugs, Medicine , Fuel Oi l | Halogenated Compounds Lub O i l , Grease S i l i c a Weldfum, Coat Srf Weldfum, Uncoat Srf Chemicals, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 2 2 2 2 12 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 3 6 1 1 4 3 2 •11 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 ' 1 1 4 0 6 0 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 - 95 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 2 3 TOTAL 11 16 11 15 13 66 SUBCLASS 602 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 3 7 3 4 17 Heat 0 0 0 1 0 1 Noise 4 2 4 1 0 11 Radiatd-Subst, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 70 79 101 128 86 464 UV-Welding 5 3 7 5 4 24 Phys Agents, Other 23 23 25 33 18 122 :HEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 14 4 18 5 10 51 Alcohol s 0 1 0 0 0 1 A l iphat ic Solvents 4 4 9 5 4 26 A lka l i e s , Other 6 7 5 1 1 20 Aluminum, Dust, Fume 0 0 1 0 0 1 Ammoni a 1 1 1 3 0 6 Animal Products 1 0 0 2 0 3 Aromatic Compounds, Other 2 1 3 2 1 9 Asbestos 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 1 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 1 1 2 2 0 6 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 8 4 1 0 14 Chromium, Dust, Fume 0 0 0 2 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 2 0 0 2 Cl othes 1 0 1 0 0 2 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 3 0 2 0 0 5 Cyanides 0 0 0 0 1 1 Disinfectants 1 0 0 0 2 3 Dusts, Other 1 1 1 0 0 3 Fibregl ass 0 1 1 1 1 4 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 0 1 0 1 Food Products, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Formal dehyde 0 0 0 2 1 3 - 96 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Fuel Oil 1 1 0 0 0 2 Gasol ine 0 0 1 0 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 3 3 5 10 2 23 Hydrocarbon Gases 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ketones 0 1 1 1 0 3 Lead, Dust, Fume 1 0 1 8 5 15 Lub O i l , Grease 2 1 3 2 1 9 Mercury, Dust, Fume 1 0 0 0 0 1 Metal Compounds, Other 0 6 0 1 0 1 Nitrogen Compounds, Other 1 0 1 0 0 2 Nitrogen Oxides 0 0 1 0 0 1 Organophosphorus 0 0 0 1 2 3 PCP, TCP 2 1 0 0 0 3 Pest ic ides, Other 1 2 6 1 1 11 Phenols 0 0 0 1 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 2 1 1 1 5 Pyrolysis Products 0 0 . 1 1 0 2 Resins | 5 4 6 5 2 22 Rubber & Compounds 0 1 0 1 0 2 S i l i c a 0 0 0 1 0 1 Sulfur , Compounds 3 2 3 1 1 10 Text i le Items 0 0 0 1 1 2 Urethanes, Isocyan 2 2 2 2 1 9 W, CO & Hard Metals 0 0 1 0 0 1 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 5 8 12 8 13 46 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 1 0 1 3 6 Bacteria 1 1 0 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 2 2 4 4 1 13 TOTAL 171 172 244 250 168 1,005 SUBCLASS 603 PHYSICAL AGENTS Heat 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 1 0 1 2 - 97 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Repetitive Motion 2 6 8 11 11 38 UV-Welding 2 1 0 1 2 6 Phys Agents, Other 4 1 4 2 1 12 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 2 2 7 2 13 Alcohol s 0 0 0 0 1 1 r Al iphat ic Solvents 0 2 0 0 2 4 A lka l i e s , Other 1 1 1 3 0 6 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 7 1 1 10 Chlor-Fluor Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chromium, Dust, Fume 0 2 1 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 1 0 1 0 1 3 Cutting Oi ls 0 1 0 4 0 5 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 0 1 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 1 0 2 0 0 3 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 1 0 0 1 Metal Compounds, Other 0 1 0 0 1 2 Pest ic ides, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 P las t i c Items 1 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 1 4 1 1 0 7 Rubber & Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 1 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 3 0 0 1 4 THER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 1 0 1 OTAL 16 24 29 35 25 129 SUBCLASS 604 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 1 0 1 Noise 1 2 0 2 0 5 Repetitive Motion 22 26 37 52 33 170 UV-Wel di ng 4 22 2 9 3 40 Phys Agents, Other 9 5 6 11 3 34 - 98 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 1 2 0 3 Al iphat ic Solvents 2 4 4 4 0 14 Ammonia 0 0 1 0 0 1 Aromatic Compounds, Other 4 5 5 1 3 18 Cedar Dust 0 1 1 3 3 8 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Fibreglass 2 5 0 3 1 11 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 0 0 1 1 Ketones 3 0 0 4 0 7 PCP, TCP 0 0 0 0 1 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 2 14 19 16 2 53 Sulfur, Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 1 1 2 U re thanes, Isocyan 1 1 0 1 0 3 Wood Dusts, Other 0 2 1 0 1 4 Chemicals, Other 3 9 3 4 2 21 OTHER EXPOSURES 9 3 0 1 1 14 TOTAL 62 100 81 117 55 415 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure Repetitive Motion SUBCLASS 605 CHEMICAL AGENTS Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 1 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 0 0 0 1 0 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals Bacteria TOTAL 12 - 99 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 607 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 1 1 2 Repetitive Motion 4 4 5 4 2 19 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 1 0 1 2 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 0 1 0 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 1 0 2 0 2 5 Ammoni a 0 1 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 1 0 0 0 1 2 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 1 1 3 TOTAL 8 5 9 7 9 38 SUBCLASS 608 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 1 0 1 0 0 2 Repetitive Motion 1 8 5 6 12 32 UV-Welding 1 0 0 0 3 4 Phys Agents, Other 1 0 0 3 1 5 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 1 4 2 1 2 10 Alcohol s 0 1 1 0 0 2 A l iphat ic Solvents 0 0 1 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 3 9 6 6 6 30 Ammonia 0 0 0 0 1 1 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Dioxide 1 0 0 0 1 2 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 1 1 - 100 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Resins 0 0 0 1 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 1 1 2 S i l i c a 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 1 0 1 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 9 24 18 21 29 101 SUBCLASS 617 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 1 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 1 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 1 1 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 2 0 0 2 Chemicals, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 TOTAL 0 1 4 1 2 8 SUBCLASS 618 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 2 2 2 3 1 10 CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 0 1 0 0 1 Formaldehyde 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 0 1 0 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 2 0 0 0 2 - 101 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 2 5 5 5 1 18 SUBCLASS 620 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 1 0 1 2 Noise 1 0 0 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 53 105 91 64 41 354 UV-Equipment 0 1 0 0 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 4 4 3 3 4 18 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 0 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 2 3 1 2 3 11 Ammoni a 0 0 1 4 0 5 Carbon Dioxide 0 0 4 0 0 4 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 2 6 2 2 2 14 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 1 0 0 1 Food Products, Other 10 7 6 2 5 30 Formal dehyde 0 1 0 0 0 1 Grains, Flours 0 1 0 0 2 3 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 1 1 Resins 0 1 0 0 1 2 Rubber A Compounds 1 0 0 0 1 2 Water, Other Liquids 0 1 1 0 0 2 Chemicals, Other 1 0 2 2 1 6 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 4 2 1 .0 7 Bacteria 0 1 1 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 2 0 1 0 3 TOTAL 75 138 117 82 63 475 - 102 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 621 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 - 1 1 Cold 0 3 2 1 0 6 Noise 0 1 0 0 0 1 Radiatd-Subst, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 63 61 86 114 136 460 UV-Welding 0 0 1 0 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 8 9 15 17 13 62 HEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 1 2 0 1 4 Alcohol s 0 0 1 0 0 1 A l iphat ic Solvents 2 2 1 1 1 7 A lka l i e s , Other 1 4 3 2 2 12 Ammonia 0 2 2 2 0 6 Animal Products 0 0 0 1 2 3 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 3 6 3 13 Cedar Dust 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cement, Mortar 0 1 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 2 1 3 0 3 9 Cleaning Compounds 7 4 10 8 6 35 Disinfectants 0. 0 0 1 1 2 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 1 0 0 1 0 2 Food Products, Other 4 2 5 2 4 17 Gasol ine 1 0 0 0 0 1 Grains, Flours 1 1 1 0 0 3 Hairdressing Chem 10 19 17 14 9 69 Halogenated Compounds 1 3 1 0 0 5 Kerosene 0 0 1 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 1 1 Organophosphorus 1 0 0 1 0 2 PCP, TCP 0 1 0 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 4 3 0 2 0 9 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 1 0 1 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 2 2 2 1 0 7 Rubber & Compounds 1 0 0 0 1 2 - 103 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Texti le Items 0 0 1 0 0 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 1 0 0 1 2 Chemicals, Other 3 8 5 0 8 24 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 4 5 4 4 18 Bacteria 6 1 3 1 0 11 Fungi & Molds 0 1 0 0 0 1 Viruses 0 2 0 4 0 6 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 0 1 4 1 7 TOTAL 121 138 171 189 199 818 SUBCLASS 622 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 1 0 1 0 2 Repetitive Motion 3 6 3 12 6 30 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 1 2 3 1 3 10 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 1 0 2 0 0 3 Alcohol s 0 1 0 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 1 0 0 1 2 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 0 . 1 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 2 1 1 4 Cleaning Compounds 1 4 1 4 5 15 Cl othes 0 0 0 1 1 2 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 1 1 Grains, Flours 0 0 0 1 0 1 Water Base Paints 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 2 0 0 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals • 1 1 0 0 0 2 Bacteria 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 9 18 12 22 19 80 - 104 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold Noise Repetitive Motion UV-Wel di ng Phys Agents, Other CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids Al iphat ic Solvents A lka l i e s , Other Amrooni a Aromatic Compounds, Other Carbon Monoxide Chlorine (Dioxide) Cleaning Compounds Clothes Disinfectants Dusts, Other Food Products, Other Hydrocarbon Gases Pest ic ides, Other Rubber & Compounds Sulfur, Compounds Water, Other Liquids Weldfum, Coat Srf Chemicals, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL SUBCLASS 624 2 2 2 0 1 2 30 28 40 2 2 2 1 0 2 2 0 4 0 '"" 0 0 4 3 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 4 0 1 1 2 2 1 49 49 71 0 0 6 0 0 3 35 46 179 1 0 7 5 2 10 3 2 11 1 1 2 5 3 19 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 3 2 4 10 4 1 9 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 4 6 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 4 11 -0 1 3 0 0 5 60 70 299 - 105 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 625 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 3 5 3 5 8 24 Phys Agents, Other 1 1 0 0 0 2 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 1 2 1 0 4 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 1 1 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 0 3 0 2 3 8 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Fungi & Molds 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 5 10 7 9 13 44 / SUBCLASS 626 PHYSICAL AGENTS Heat % / o 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 2 0 1 0 0 3 Repetitive Motion 27 25 29 49 51 181 UV-Equipment 0 0 2 0 0 2 UV-Welding 0 0 0 1 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 6 7 11 14 10 48 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 1 1 3 ... 0 5 Alcohol s 1 2 1 0 1 5 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 3 0 1 5 A lka l i e s , Other 5 5 3 6 7 26 Ammonia 0 0 0 1 1 2 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 0 3 1 4 Chlorine (Dioxide) 6 4 5 3 8 26 Chromium, Dust, Fume 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 53 35 29 50 43 210 - 106 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Disinfectants 9 10 7 8 9 43 Drugs, Medicine 0 2 1 3 1 7 Fibreglass 0 1 0 1 0 2 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 3 0 4 Food Products, Other 1 1 2 0 0 4 Formaldehyde 1 0 0 0 0 1 Gloves, Wet 1 0 2 0 0 3 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 2 2 0 4 PCB, PBB 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phenols 0 0 1 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 1 1 Resins 1 1 0 0 0 2 Rubber & Compounds 4 2 0 1 1 8 Si 1ica 0 1 0 , 0 0 1 Sulfur, Compounds 0 1 0 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 1 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 0 2 1 1 4 Chemicals, Other 3 7 8 8 10 36 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS i Animals 9 8 38 37 18 110 Bacteria 29 30 23 20 31 133 Fungi & Molds 0 0 0 0 1 1 Viruses 11 20 11 13 14 69 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 2 1 4 0 8 TOTAL 171 167 183 231 213 965 SUBCLASS 627 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 1 0 0 1 2 Heat 0 0 0 1 0 1 Repetitive Motion 12 22 36 66 49 185 Phys Agents, Other 5 7 8 9 7 36 - 107 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds Alcohols A l ka l i e s , Other Ammonia Aromatic Compounds, Other Cement, Mortar Chlorine (Dioxide) Cleaning Compounds Clothes Disi nfectants Drugs, Medicine F i r e , Smoke, Ashes Food Products, Other Grains, Flours Halogenated Compounds Hydrocarbon Gases Lub O i l , Grease Pyrolysis Products Resinsj i Water, Other Liquids Chemicals, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals Bacteria OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold Repetitive Motion Phys Agents, Other 4 1 3 3 5 16 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 4 10 9 7 32 1 1 1 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 4 9 5 3 5 26 18 33 28 28 25 132 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 4 0 1 0 6 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 4 3 4 3 5 1 16 1 0 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 1 1 6 1 2 2 1 2 8 1 0 1 2 0 4 29 0 3 10 1 43 0 1 0 2 1 4 86 93 107 143 113 542 SUBCLASS 631 0 1 0 2 0 3 0 3 4 2 2 11 1 0 0 1 0 2 - 108 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ammonia 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 1 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 0 i o 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animal s 1 2 0 1 1 5 Micro/Organ, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Vi ruses 0 1 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 3 9 4 7 3 26 SUBCLASS 632 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 1 0 4 2 6 13 UV-Welding 1 0 0 3 0 4 Phys Agents, Other 2 0 1 3 0 • 6 CHEMICAL AGENTS Al iphatic Solvents 0 0 0 0 1 1 A lka l i e s , Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ammonia 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 1 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 2 0 0 0 2 Dusts, Other 0 1 1 0 2 4 Grains, Flours 4 0 2 3 2 11 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 1 1 Organophosphorus 0 0 0 0 2 2 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 0 0 0 1 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 1 2 0 3 TOTAL 9 6 9 14 15 53 - 109 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 636 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 3 1 1 0 1 6 Noise 2 0 1 0 0 3 Repetitive Motion 1 1 2 1 1 6 UV-Wel di ng 0 0 1 0 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 2 0 5 0 1 8 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids o W.W-f, \ 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 1 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 1 0 3 0 4 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Carbon Dioxide 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 1 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 2 2 4 Gasoline 1 1 1 1 1 5 Manufactured Gases 0 0 0 1 0 1 Sulfur, Compounds 0 1 1 1 3 6 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 1 1. 3 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 10 8 13 12 10 53 PHYSICAL AGENTS SUBCLASS 637 Cold 0 0 0 0; 1 1 Heat 0 0 1 0 1 2 Noise 0 0 0 1 0 1 Repetitive Motion 17 21 35 ) 31 36 140 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Wel ding 0 0 2 ! t 1 0 3 Phys Agents, Other 1 1 4 ' 1 3 10 - no -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 1 0 3 1 1 6 A lka l i e s , Other 1 7 6 3 1 18 Ammonia 0 1 1 0 0 2 Cement, Mortar 1 1 0 1 0 3 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 0 0 2 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 3 2 1 2 4 12 Di sinfectants 0 0 0 1 0 ! Food Products, Other 1 0 3 3 4 11 Gloves, Wet 0 0 1 0 0 1 Grains, Flours 0 0 1 0 0 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 0 0 1 ! Ketones 1 0 0 0 0 ! Metal Compounds, Other T 0 0 0 0 ! Nitrogen Compounds, Other 0 0 *0 1 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 1 ! Water, Other Liquids , 0 0 1 1 0 2 Chemicals, Other 0 1 1 2 0 4 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 1 1 0 1 1 4 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 3 0 0 1 4 TOTAL 29 38 60 52 56 235 SUBCLASS 639 PHYSICAL AGENTS No i se 0 1 1 2 0 4 Repetitive Motion 7 13 9 12 14 55 UV-Welding 0 0 1 0 1 2 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 3 1 4 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 1 0 0 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 3 0 2 1 2 8 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 1 0 0 1 2 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 1 0 1 - I l l -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Cleaning Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 0 1 2 0 0 3 Resins 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 2 1 3 G 1 7 TOTAL 12 19 19 19 21 90 SUBCLASS 643 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 1 0 1 Repetitive Motion 0 1 1 3 3 8 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 1 0 1 0 0 2 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 2 0 0 0 0 2 Formal dehyde 0 0 0 1 0 1 Grains, Flours 1 0 0 1 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 1 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 1 0 1 2 Resins 0 0 1 0 0 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 0 1 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 1 1 0 3 Fungi & Molds 0 1 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 6 3 7 7 5 28 - 112 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 654 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 2 1 0 4 7 Noise 0 0 1 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 12 12 16 15 17 72 UV-Wel ding 1 1 1 1 1 5 Phys Agents, Other 2 1 7 5 2 17 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 2 2 1 2 0 7 Alcohol s 0 1 0 0 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 1 0 1 2 Alka l i e s , Other 0 2 2 0 2 6 Ammonia 1 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 1 o 0 0 2 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 0 0 1 1 3 Cleaning Compounds 2 1 0 1 0 4 Copper, Dust, Fume 0 0 0 0 1 1 Disinfectants 0 0 0 1 0 1 Drugs, Medicine 0 0 0 1 0 1 F i re , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 0 0 1 1 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 0 1 1 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 0 1 1 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 o. 1 1 Chemicals, Other 1 1 0 1 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animal s 0 1 0 0 1 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 o 1 0 2 TOTAL 23 26 30 30 34 143 SUBCLASS 657 PHYSICAL AGENTS • Cold 0 0 0 2 0 2 Heat 0 0 0 0 1 1 No i se 1 1 0 0 1 3 - 113 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Repetitive Motion 5 6 6 5 6 28 UV-Welding 1 2 0 2 0 5 Phys Agents, Other 1 1 1 2 0 5 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 1 3 4 1 9 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cedar Dust 0 0 . 0 2 1 3 Cement, Mortar 2 3 0 4 2 11 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 0 0 1 1 0 2 Hydrocarbon Gases 1 0 0 0 0 1 PCP, TCP 0 1 0 0 0 1 Urethanes, Isocyan 1 0 0 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 0 1 0 0 1 TOTAL 12 15 12 24 13 76 SUBCLASS 658 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 0 0 2 5 4 11 Phys Agents, Other 0 1 1 0 0 2 CHEMICAL AGENTS Cleaning Compounds 0 1 2 0 0 3 Disinfectants 0 1 0 0 0 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 1 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 0 0 0 1 1 Bacteria 0 0 0 0 1 1 Viruses 0 1 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 0 4 6 5 6 21 - 114 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 659 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 3 0 3 5 11 Noise 0 1 1 6 0 8 Repetitive Motion 11 9 11 26 19 76 UV-Welding 3 4 7 7 8 29 Phys Agents, Other 15 10 18 14 23 80 HEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 11 11 11 11 6 50 Alcohol s 0 1 0 2 0 3 Al iphat ic Solvents 6 6 4 9 5 30 Alka l i e s , Other 1 3 3 6 2 15 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 3 3 4 5 15 Carbon Monoxide 0 1 0 • 1 0 2 Cement, Mortar 2 1 0 0 0 3 Chlor-fluor Compounds 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cleaning Compounds 2 0 1 3 2 8 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 1 0 1 0 0 2 Coal Tars 0 2 0 0 0 2 Dusts, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 2 0 1 0 0 3 Gasol ine 3 1 4 2 6 16 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 1 Kerosene 1 0 1 o 1 3 Ketones 1 0 0 0 1 2 Lub O i l , Grease 3 2 8 5 2 20 Metal Compounds, Other 1 0 0 i 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 1 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 2 10 3 1 0 16 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 2 0 2 S i l i c a 0 0 0 1 0 1 Sulfur, Compounds 0 1 0 0 0 1 U re thanes, Isocyan 0 3 1 4 5 13 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 3 0 2 5 0 10 - 115 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 1 1 1 70 73 83 0 3 114 95 6 435 PHYSICAL AGENTS SUBCLASS 705 Heat 0 0 1 0 0 1 Noise 0 0 0 1 0 1 Repetitive Motion 22 10 24 28 36 120 UV-Wel di ng 0 1 0 3 0 4 Phys Agents, Other 11 8 14 15 10 58 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds Al iphat ic Solvents A lka l i e s , Other Aromatic Compounds, Other Asbestos Carbon Monoxide Cement, Mortar Chlorine (Dioxide) Chromium, Dust, Fume Coal Tars Dusts, Other Fibreglass Ketones Resins Urethanes, Isocyan Water Base Paints Water, Other Liquids Weldfum, Coat Srf Chemicals, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 3 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 8 6 8 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 5 5 6 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 59 35 68 0 2 5 1 2, 7 2 0 6 1 0 7 2 2 5 0 0 1 17 14 53 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 . 1 0 2 4 0 0 1 9 4 29 1 1 4 0 2 3 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 4 2 0 4 1 4 5 83 85 330 - 116 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold Heat Noise Repetitive Motion UV-Welding Vibration Phys Agents, Other CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds Alcohol s A l iphat ic Solvents A lka l i es , Other Aromatic Compounds, Other Asbestos Carbon Monoxide Cedar Dust Cement, Mortar Chlorine (Dioxide) Chromium, Dust, Fume Cleaning Compounds Clothes Coal & Petr Prod, Other Coal Tars Coke Cyanides Dusts, Other Fibreglass F i re , Smoke, Ashes Fuel Oil Gasol ine Halogenated Compounds Ketones Lead, Dust, Fume Lub O i l , Grease Ni tro-Glycerine Nitrogen Oxides SUBCLASS 706 1 2 6 1 0 0 26 27 23 64 74 126 19 23 33 0 1 0 28 21 42 2 8 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 2 4 0 3 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 4 4 27 16 35 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 3 3 6 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 •1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 12 0 0 1 21, 18 115 200 157 621 19 29 123 f 0 2 60 41 192 4 0 19 2 0 2 2 1 4 6 10 25 1 0 5 1 0 2 3 1 7 5 2 15 35 21 134 3 29 36 1 0 1 2 0 3 0 0 5 2 5 19 1 0 2 2 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 6 3 0 4 0 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 1 3 0 2 2 0 0 4 6 1 10 0 0 1 0 1 1 - 117 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL PAH, Tar Fume 0 1 0 0 0 1 PCP, TCP 2 0 2 1 0 5 Pest ic ides, Other 1 0 0 . 0 0 1 Petroleum Asphalts 1 0 1 0 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 1 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 Resins 0 2 2 4 4 12 Sulfur, Compounds 1 1 0 8 5 15 Water Base Paints 0 0 0 0 1 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 1 1 6 3 2 13 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 0 0 1 1 0 2 Chemicals, Other 3 4 8 5 6 26 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 1 1 6 2 14 OTHER EXPOSURES 6 6 6 10 3 31 TOTAL 204 209 330 422 345 1,510 SUBCLASS 707 PHYSICAL AGENTS Col d 4 3 4 2 4 17 Heat 0 0 1 2 1 4 No i se 63 50 34 40 20 207 Radiatd-Subst, Other 0 0 2 1 0 3 Repetitive Motion 47 66 91 107 97 408 Sun 0 1 0 0 0 1 UV-Wel ding 143 200 218 260 161 982 Phys Agents, Other 31 40 34 45 27 177 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 7 8 18 7 8 48 Alcohol s 0 1 3 0 0 4 A l iphat ic Solvents 6 9 9 16 4 44 A lka l i e s , Other 5 8 7 10 9 39 Ammonia 0 1 1 0 0 2 Aromatic Compounds, Other 8 9 5 6 12 40 - 118 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Asbestos Carbon Monoxide Cement, Mortar Chlor-Fluor Compounds Chlorine (Dioxide) Chromium, Dust, Fume Cleaning Compounds Cl othes Coal & Petr Prod, Other Coal Ta'rs Copper, Crude Oil Cutti ngi Cyanides Dusts, Fi bregl Dust, Fume Oi ls jDther lass F i r e , Smoke, Ashes Fuel Oi l Gasoline Gloves, Wet Grains, Flours Halogenated Compounds Hydrocarbon Gases i Kerosene Ketones Lead, Dust, Fume Lub O i l , Grease Mercury, Dust, Fume Metal Compounds, Other PAH, Tar Fume Pest ic ides, Other Resins Rubber & Compounds S i l i c a Sul fur , Compounds Text i le Items Urethanes, Isocyan W, CO & Hard Metals Water, Other Liquids 2 4 7 5 1 19 1 0 3 0 1 5 1 0 2 4 4 11 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 2 1 2 2 11 1 0 2 0 0 3 1 2 2 0 1 6 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 2 4 2 2 0 2 1 7 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 ' 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 4 0 1 1 0 0 2 3 3 4 0 0 10 1 2 3 2 2 10 0 1 1 .1 0 3 1 1 0 1 0 3 o ; 2 3 2 0 7 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 | 0 0 1 1 l 1 6 2 2 12 0 1 4 0 0 5 i 0 2 2 0 5 i 1 0 2 3 7 l 2 2 0 1 6 5 4 11 3 3 26 2 0 3 0 0 5 1 2 2 2 1 8 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 10 8 7 4 34 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 3 0 1 5 13 . 6 25 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 6 12 2 23 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 - 119 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Weldfum, Coat Srf 5 7 7 5 6 30 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 0 3 6 3 0 12 Chemicals, Other 7 11 14 11 14 57 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 3 0 1 0 4 Bacteria 0 0 1 1 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 9 6 4 4 24 TOTAL 363 478 545 587 409 2,382 SUBCLASS 711 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 2 0 2 Noise 1 1 0 1 0 3 Radiatd-Subst, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 9 7 11 13 10 50 UV-Equipment 1 0 0 0 0 1 UV-Wel ding 2 1 3 2 4 12 Phys Agents, Other 4 6 9 6 5 30 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 1 0 3 1 5 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 1 1 A l ka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 6 1 1 2 Cement, Mortar 1 0 2 1 1 5 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 5 6 Clothes 0 0 1 0 0 1 Copper, Dust, Fume 1 0 0 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 1 0 1 1 0 3 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 0 0 1 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 1 1 0 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 1 0 0 1 Metal Compounds, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 1 0 0 1 - 120 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Resins Sulfur, Compounds Urethanes, Isocyan Chemicals, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 26 22 33 0 1 34 0 1 35 2 4 150 SUBCLASS 713 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 4 2 2 5 7 20 Phys Agents, Other 0 V 2 2 0 5 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 o 1 1 1 3 Alka l i es , Other 0 1 2 1 1 5 Ammoni a 0 2 1 0 0 3 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 1 0 1 3 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 1 3 3 4 11 Di sinfectants 0 2 0 2 0 4 Dusts, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 0 1 1 1 2 5 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Viruses 1 1 0 0 0 2 TOTAL 6 12 14 15 17 64 - 121 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 721 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 1 0 1 Heat 1 6 0 0 0 1 Noise 41 24 16 12 17 110 Repetitive Motion 6 6 13 15 20 60 Sun 0 0 1 0 0 1 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 1 0 1 UV-Welding 40 73 96 112 111 432 Phys Agents, Other 15 12 6 9 10 52 HEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 2 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 4 1 3 3 12 A l ka l i e s , Other 2 1 0 1 6 10 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 4 1 2 2 9 Asbestos 1 2 1 1 2 7 Carbon Monoxide 0 6 0 0 1 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Clothes 0 0 0 0 1 1 Coal 4 Petr Prod, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Coal Tars 1 0 0 1 1 3 Dusts, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 0 2 0 1 3 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 4 1 1 3 9 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 2 1 3 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 2 0 0 0 2 Ketones 0 1 0 0 1 2 Mercury, Dust, Fume 1 0 0 1 1 3 Metal Compounds, Other 1 0 0 0 1 2 PCP, TCP 0 1 0 0 0 1 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 1 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 1 0 0 0 1 Resins 3 2 10 9 2 26 S i l i c a 0 0 0 0 1 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 1 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 1 1 - 122 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Weldfum, Coat Srf 8 11 9 6 6 40 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 1 0 4 5 1 11 Chemicals, Other 0 4 2 1 3 10 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animal s 0 0 1 1 0 2 Bacteria 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 1 1 0 1 4 TOTAL 125 153 167 185 201 831 SUBCLASS 725 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cold 0 0 0 0 1 1 No i se 30 20 11 9 8 78 Repetitive Motion 3 5 7 4 11 30 UV-Equipment 4 0 0 0 0 4 UV-Welding 2 1 6 14 3 26 Phys Agents, Other 4 2 5 6 3 20 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 1 0 0 0 1 2 A lka l i e s , Other 1 0 0 0 2 3 Cement, Mortar 5 2 1 1 1 10 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 1 1 0 2 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 1 1 0 0 1 3 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 2 0 2 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 0 1 0 1 Fuel Oil 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 1 1 0 3 5 Sulfur, Compounds 0 0 0 0 7 7 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 1 2 0 0 2 5 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals - 123 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold Heat No i se Repetitive Motion Sun UV-Welding Vibration Phys Agents, Other CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds Alcohol s A l iphat ic Solvents A lka l i e s , Other Carbon Monoxide Cement, Mortar Chromium, Dust, Fume Clothes Coal & Petr Prod, Other Coal Tars Dusts, Other F i r e , Smoke, Ashes Food Products, Other Fuel Oil Lub O i l , Grease PCP, TCP Pest ic ides, Other Plants, Vegetation Resins S i l i c a Sulfur, Compounds 0 1 0 54 36 32 SUBCLASS 726 0 2 1 1 4 0 16 15 16 17 31 40 0 1 0 6 10 6 0 1 0 9 7 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 5 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 39 45 206 1 0 4 0 2 7 14 11 72 57 82 227 0 0 1 10 6 38 0 0 1 7 3 34 2 4 7 1 2 3 1 1 2 1 0 4 0 1 1 5 4 21 0 1 1 2 1 5 0 0 4 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 2 2 2 0 4 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 - 124 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Text i le Items 0 0 0 1 0 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 2 0 0 1 1 4 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 7 6 3 7 27 Viruses 0 0 2 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 2 2 1 1 7 TOTAL 66 93 93 113 132 497 SUBCLASS 747 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 1 0 0 0 1 Cold 0 0 1 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 1 0 3 4 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 1 1 2 CHEMICAL AGENTS Micro/Organ, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 1 0 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 2 2 0 2 0 6 TOTAL 3 4 2 3 5 17 SUBCLASS 748 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 1 3 4 0 2 10 Heat 0 0 0 1 0 1 Repetitive Motion 1 2 1 1 1 6 UV-Welding 2 2 1 2 3 10 Phys Agents, Other 4 1 1 1 0 7 - 125 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Adds 1 0 1 3 0 5 Alcohols 1 0 1 2 0 4 A lka l i e s , Other 4 1 9 1 3 18 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cement, Mortar 2 4 1 2 0 9 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 1 Coal 4 Petr Prod, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 1 2 0 0 3 Halogenated Compounds 0 1 1 0 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 1 0 o 1 Nitrogen Oxides 0 0 0 0 1 1 Resins 0 0 1 1 0 2 Sulfur , Compounds 0 1 3 3 3 10 Chemicals, Other 0 1 2 0 2 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 0 0 1 1 3 TOTAL 17 18 29 20 17 101 SUBCLASS 801 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 2 0 0 0 0 2 Noise 0 1 2 1 2 6 Repetitive Motion 6 1 6 4 6 23 UV-Wel ding 0 1 2 1 3 7 Phys Agents, Other 0 1 3 6 2 12 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 2 1 0 0 0 3 Copper, Dust, Fume 0 1 0 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Fibreglass 0 1 0 0 1 2 Grains, Flours 0 0 0 3 0 3 Chemicals, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 - 126 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 12 14 17 15 4 1 67 SUBCLASS 808 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 1 0 0 1 Noise 0 0 1 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 4 10 8 9 19 50 UV-Equipment 0 1 1 0 0 2 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 2 2 2 2 8 CHEMICAL AGENTS A l ka l i e s , Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 2 0 0 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 0 1 0 0 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 1 1 0 0 1 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 2 0 1 1 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 8 20 14 12 25 79 SUBCLASS 811 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 1 0 0 0 0 1 Noise 1 0 0 0 0 1 - 127 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Repetitive Motion 2 4 3 3 5 17 Phys Agents, Other 0 2 0 3 0 5 CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols 0 0 1 0 1 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 0 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 1 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 3 0 0 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 0 0 1 0 1 TOTAL 7 8 4 8 8 35 SUBCLASS 812 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 1 0 0 1 Repetitive Motion 1 0 0 0 0 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 1 1 0 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 0 0 0 0 1 Gasoline 0 1 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 1 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Viruses 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 4 1 2 2 0 9 - 128 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 820 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 1 1 2 2 4 10 Noise 2 0 0 1 0 3 Repetitive Motion 0 1 1 3 2 7 Phys Agents, Other 1 0 2 0 0 3 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 2 1 0 0 3 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 3 , 1 0 0 4 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 0 ... 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chlor-F.luor Compounds 0 0 0 1 0 1 Di sinfectants 0 1 0 0 1 2 Fuel Oil 0 1 0 0 0 1 Ga sol i ne 0 0 0 1 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Kerosene 0 0 0 1 o 1 Ketones 1 1 1 0 0 3 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 0 2 0 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 1 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 1 0 0 1 TOTAL 9 11 11 10 8 49 SUBCLASS 851 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 5 1 0 2 8 Noise 4 7 5 4 4 24 Repetitive Motion 4 5 15 26 21 71 UV-Weldi ng 5 8 9 4 3 29 Phys Agents, Other 12 5 12 11 11 51 - 129 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 3 2 1 4 3 13 Alcohols 1 0 1 0 0 2 A l iphat ic Solvents 0 0 1 2 1 4 A lka l i e s , Other 1 1 5 3 3 13 Ammonia 0 0 0 1 2 3 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 1 0 0 0 2 Asb.estos 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cedar Dust 0 1 0 1 0 2 Cement, Mortar 2 2 2 5 5 16 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 2 0 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 1 0 0 1 1 3 Clothes 1 0 0 0 0 1 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 0 2 1 1 0 4 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Food Products, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 1 1 2 Gasoline 1 0 0 0 1 2 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 1 0 0 1 2 Manufactured Gases 1 0 0 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 1 0 0 1 2 Sulfur, Compounds 2 1 2 1 2 8 Chemicals, Other 3 2 2 2 5 14 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 2 0 0 3 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 1 0 2 0 4 TOTAL 44 48 60 71 71 294 SUBCLASS 901 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 1 2 1 0 2 6 Cold 0 1 0 1 0 2 Noise 4 5 6 3 2 20 - 130 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Repetitive Motion 2 1 0 2 4 9 UV-Welding 2 0 2 0 1 5 Phys Agents, Other 2 0 1 6 0 9 CHEMICAL AGENTS A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 2 0 0 . 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 1 0 0 1 2 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Food Products, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 1 0 T Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 1 1 Kerosene 0 1 0 1 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease " 0 0 1 .1 0 2 Te trac h1orome th ane 0 0 0 1 0 1 TOTAL 14 13 11 17 12 67 SUBCLASS 902 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 1 1 1 0 3 Heat 1 0 0 0 0 1 Noise 2 5 4 3 0 14 Repetitive Motion 1 3 3 5 7 19 UV-Welding 0 1 0 1 0 2 Phys Agents, Other 4 1 2 8 2 17 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 1 0 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 3 0 3 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 0 0 1 0 1 2 Cyanides 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 131 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Food Products, Other 1 0 1 0 0 2 Fuel 011 0 0 1 0 0 1 Gasoline 0 0 0 1 0 1 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 1 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 b 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 2 0 0 0 0 2 PCP, TCP 0 1 1 0 0 2 Pest ic ides, Other 0 1 2 0 0 3 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 1 1 Sul fur , Compounds 1 3 4 1 1 10 Chemicals, Other 1 0 2 1 0 4 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 14 18 25 27 14 98 SUBCLASS 906 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 1 3 1 3 0 8 Noise 1 0 0 2 1 4 Repetitive Motion 34 50 40 38 35 197 UV-Welding 9 4 1 4 3 21 Vibration . 0 0 0 1 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 1 1 4 1 1 8 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 3 0 2 0 5 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 1 0 0 1 A l ka l i e s , Other 1 0 1 2 0 4 Aluminum, Dust, Fume 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ammoni a 3 7 1 3 1 15 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 1 0 1 0 2 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 2 0 2 2 7 - 132 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Cleaning Compounds Clothes Coal & Petr Prod, Other Food Products, Other Gloves, Wet Hydrocarbon Gases Resins Rubber & Compounds Water, Other Liquids Chemicals, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals Bacteria OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure Cold No i se Repetitive Motion UV-Welding Phys Agents, Other CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds Carbon Monoxide Coal & Petr Prod, Other F i r e , Smoke, Ashes Food Products, Other Gloves, Wet Resins Chemicals, Other 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 11 14 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 o 1 1 4 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 66 91 73 SUBCLASS 911 2 4 10 2 0 3 1 1 2 5 5 8 3 3 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 3 1 0 2 0 1 1 16 5 57 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 9 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 4 81 54 365 6 6 28 1 1 7 1 2 7 3 8 29 0 0 7 2 5 10 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 7 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 - 133 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals Bacteri a Micro/Organ, Other Viruses OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure Cold Heat Noise Repetitive Motion UV-Weldi ng Phys Agents, Other CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids Al cohol s A l iphat ic Solvents A lka l i e s , Other Ammonia Aromatic Compounds, Other Arsenic Compounds Asbestos Carbon Dioxide Carbon Monoxide Cement, Mortar Chlorine (Dioxide) Cleaning Compounds Coal Tars Cutting Oi ls F i r e , Smoke, Ashes Food Products, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 19 23 32 SUBCLASS 1001-1013 1 3 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 22 12 8 5 7 13 4 5 3 2 6 3 6 8 8 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 3 15 25 114 0 2 8 0 0 2 0 0 2 13 10 65 10 12 47 1 4 17 3 6 20 5 6 33 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 3 1 0 5 0 0 2 6 1 10 1 0 1 0 0 1 .0 0 1 2 0 5 - 134 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Fuel Oil 1 0 0 0 2 3 Ketones 1 0 1 0 0 2 Lead, Dust, Fume 0 1 1 1 0 3 Mercury, Dust, Fume 0 0 1 0 0 1 Metal Compounds, Other 1 0 0 0 1 2 Resins 1 0 0 2 0 3 Sulfur , Compounds 4 5 . 5 4 1 19 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 0 0 0 1 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 1 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 1 5 2 4 13 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 1 b 0 0 0 1 Viruses 0 0 0 1 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 o 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 60 55 67 54 52 288 SUBCLASS 1200-•1201 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 1 5 2 1 3 12 Cold 0 1 0 0 0 1 Noise 1 3 1 2 1 8 Repetitive Motion 0 3 2 4 7 16 Sun 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Wel di ng 1 1 1 1 2 6 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 3 2 2 7 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 1 1 0 0 0 2 Al cohol s 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 0 •0 0 0 1 Alka l i es , Other 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 2 0 0 0 2 - 135 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL F1re, Smoke, Ashes 1 0 0 0 0 1 Food Products, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 1 0 0 0 1 Gasol ine 0 0 1 0 0 1 Sulfur , Compounds 0 1 1 0 1 3 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 2 0 0 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 1 0 0 1 TOTAL 9 19 13 12 18 71 SUBCLASS 1301-1321 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 2 1 0 1 0 4 Cold 2 3 4 1 1 11 Heat 1 0 2 0 1 4 Noise 7 7 2 4 2 22 Repetitive Motion 27 34 37 51 49 198 UV-Welding 2 2 2 3 3 12 Phys Agents, Other 6 7 10 8 9 40 HEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 1 1 4 3 1 10 Al iphat ic Solvents 2 2 1 0 1 6 A lka l i e s , Other 0 3 2 1 1 7 Ammoni a 0 0 0 1 1 2 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 1 0 2 1 4 Asbestos 1 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Dioxide 0 0 1 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 1 0 1 2 Cedar Dust 0 0 1 0 2 3 Cement, Mortar 0 1 1 0 0 2 Chlorine (Dioxide) 6 2 2 3 3 16 Chromium, Dust, Fume 0 2 1 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 8 3 2 8 10 31 - 136 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Clothes 0 2 2 0 0 4 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 2 0 o 1 2 5 Cyanides 0 0 0 0 1 1 Disinfectants 1 1 2 4 1 9 Drugs, Medicine 0 0 1 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 1 2 1 3 2 Food Products, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 1 0 o 0 0 1 Halogenated Compounds 0 0 0 4 o Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 . 1 0 0 1 Organophosphorus 0 1 0 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 1 1 2 1 1 6 PI ants, Vegetation 0 2 0 0 0 2 Resins 2 0 0 2 0 4 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 1 0 1 2 Sulfur , Compounds 1 3 1 0 1 6 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 0 0 0 1 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 1 0 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 1 0 1 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 3 6 1 1 2 13 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 11 22 6 0 10 49 Bacteria 8 2 0 2 12 24 Fungi & Molds 0 0 0 o 1 1 Viruses 0 1 3 3 1 8 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 0 2 2 1 6 TOTAL 99 114 97 110 123 543 SUBCLASS 1401 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 2 2 3 0 1 8 Cold 2 0 0 0 0 2 Heat 0 1 0 0 0 1 - 137 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Noise 5 3 1 2 1 12 Repetitive Motion 16 15 24 27 29 111 UV-Wel ding 0 4 6 6 3 19 Vibration 1 0 0 1 0 2 Phys Agents, Other 12 12 14 15 10 63 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 1 1 3 2 2 9 Al iphat ic Solvents 2 2 2 1 2 9 A lka l i e s , Other 3 0 1 0 0 4 Ammoni a 2 1 1 0 0 4 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 0 1 . 1 0 3 Carbon Dioxide 1 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 2 2 2 0 0 6 Cedar Dust 0 1 0 0 1 2 Cement, Mortar 5 3 5 2 0 15 Chlor-Fluor Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 14 5 3 6 5 33 Clothes 0 0 1 1 1 3 Coal & Petr Prod, Other 2 1 2 0 0 5 Coal Tars 1 0 0 1 0 2 Cutting Oi ls o 0 0 0 1 1 Cyanides 0 0 1 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 1 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 19 15 12 11 5 62 Food Products, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 Fuel Oi l 2 0 2 1 1 6 Grains, Flours 0 0 1 0 o 1 Halogenated Compounds 1 0 1 0 3 5 Kerosene 0 1 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 1 1 1 1 4 Manufactured Gases 1 0 0 0 0 1 Organophosphorus 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Petroleum Asphalts 1 0 1 1 0 3 Plants, Vegetation 0 1 1 2 0 4 Pyrolysis Products 0 2 0 0 0 2 • Resins 0 0 0 1 0 1 ubber & Compounds 0 0 1 . 0 0 1 - 138 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Sulfur, Compounds 0 4 0 0 1 5 Urethanes, Isocyan 1 o 0 0 0 1 Water Base Paints 1 0 0 0 0 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 1 0 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 2 6 3 3 4 18 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 12 24 12 12 28 88 Bacteri a 1 2 2 0 2 7 Micro/Organ, Other 4 0 0 0 0 4 Viruses 2 0 3 0 1 6 OTHER EXPOSURES 2 2 2 2 0 8 TOTAL 123 114 113 99 104 553 SUBCLASS 1406 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 1 0 0 0 0 1 Heat 0 0 0 1 0 1 Noise 3 0 0 1 0 4 Repetitive Motion 9 6 13 26 31 85 UV-Weldihg 2 2 1 2 1 8 Phys Agents, Other 4 9 6 7 5 31 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 3 0 1 1 0 5 Alcohol s 0 0 1 0 o 1 A l iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 1 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 2 3 3 0 8 Ammonia 2 0 2 0 2 6 Aromatic Compounds, Other 1 2 2 1 2 8 Asbestos 1 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 0 2 0 2 Cedar Dust 0 0 2 0 0 2 Cement, Mortar 1 0 2 1 0 4 Chlorine (Dioxide) 2 2 4 0 0 8 - 139 -TABLE 10 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL Chromium, Dust, Fume Cleaning Compounds Coal & Petr Prod, Other Di sinfectants Dusts, Other Fibreglass F i r e , Smoke, Ashes Food Products, Other Formal dehyde Gasoline Gloves, Wet Lub O i l , Grease Pest ic ides, Other Plants, Vegetation Resins Weldfum, Coat Srf Chemicals, Other BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals Bacteri a Viruses OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 0 0 1 4 7 7 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 2 5 2 1 0 3 2 0 0 3 1 0 43 41 59 0 0 1 4 9 31 0 0 1 0 1 3 2 0 2 0 1 1 1 2 3 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 1 2 4 10 1 11 21 2 0 6 2 1 5 2 1 7 63 73 279 See Appendix 1, Description of Subclasses. - 140 -TABLE 11 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS1, 1978-1982. DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 102 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 20 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 261 261 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 164 0 0 1 165 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 21 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 67 0 0 0 67 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 ,0 18 0 18 Alcohols 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Ammonia 0 1 0 0 0 0 o 0 1 Animal Products 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 1 0 0 0 0' 0 0 2 Cedar Dust 0 3 0 0 0 0- 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 o 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cutting Oi ls 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 5 Gasoline 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 2 " 0 0 0 0 17 0 3 22 Rubber & Compounds 0 . 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Water.Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 . 0 0 0 ; ' 0 0 1 Wood Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 - 141 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS i i POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 30 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 31 Bacteria 0 0 0 5 0 0 . 0 0 5 Viruses 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 TOTAL 34 8 0 6 231 32 29 332 672 SUBCLASS 104 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 90 90 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 73 0 0 0 73 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 UV-Wel di ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 12 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac 1 ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 . 0 12 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 A lka l i e s , Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 62 1 65 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 1 0 0 0 1 31 0 33 Chlorine (Dioxide) 4 60 0 0 0 T 7 2 74 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 •• 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Resins 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 Sulfur, Cmpnds 7 12 0 0 0 0 2 0 21 - 142 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 2 0 0 0 2 12 0 16 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Viruses 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 5 TOTAL 12 79 1 1 85 10 135 116 439 SUBCLASS 105 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 16 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 407 407 Radiatd-Subst,Other 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 856 0 0 0 856 Sun 0 0 0 0 0 0 : 0 1 1 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0" 0 2 2 UV-Weldi ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53 53 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 100 0 0 0 100 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 0 6 Al cohol s 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Al iphatic Solvents 1 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 7 A lka l i e s , Other 0 ' 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Animal Products 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 4 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cedar Dust 0 74 0 0 0 2 0 4 80 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chromium.Dust.Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 . o. 1 1 0 2 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 - 143 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CoalSPetr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 Fuel Oi l 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 Gasoline 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 2 7 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 6 PCP, TCP 3 5 0 0 0 7 6 0 21 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 4 Pyrolysis Products 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 6 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 V 0 2 3 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 10 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 Wood Dusts, Other 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 7 Chemicals, Other 0 3 0 0 0 1 8 0 12 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 23 0 0 0 9 1 16 49 TOTAL 16 118 1 0 956 59 45 511 1706 SUBCLASS 107 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 48 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 26 0 0 0 26 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 239 0 0 1 240 UV-Equipment 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 10 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 - 144 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 1 0 0 0 2 6 1 11 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 15 AromaticCmpnd,Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cedar Dust 0 19 0 0 0 1 0 0 20 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Formal dehyde 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 -o 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ketones 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 PCP, TCP 0 0 . 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 l 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 0 l 0 0 0 14 24 1 40 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Wood Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0- 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 1 2 0 0 0 3 5 1 12 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Bacteria 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 5 0 0 0 0 1 2 8 TOTAL 8 35 0 0 265 28 60 76 472 - 145 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 109 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 39 39 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 315 0 0 0 315 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 22 CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cedar Dust 0 16 0 o 0 3 0 0 19 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Wood Dusts, Other o. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 6 0 0 0 2 0 2 10 TOTAL 0 23 . 0 0 337 7 3 48 418 SUBCLASS 403 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Heat Q 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 Radiatd-Subst,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 50 0 0 1 51 UV-Wel di ng 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 14 - 146 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0- 0 0 0 5 0 5 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A l ka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Aromati cCmphd.Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 Cement, Mortar 0 1 0 0 0 4 20 2 27 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 P 1 0 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 o 3 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 , 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 S i l i c a 0 2 0 0 0 . 0 0 2 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 1 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 1 Viruses 0 0 0 1 o o 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 TOTAL 2 4 2 1 64 10 36 37 156 • SUBCLASS 411 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 211 211 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 36 0 0 0 36 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 30 30 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 I f - 147 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 10 Alcohol s 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 A l iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 5 A lka l i es , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Carbon Monoxide 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 6 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 Chromium,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cyanides 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Fuel Oi l 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 5 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Lead, Dust, Fume 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Organophosphorus 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 S i l i c a 0 0 57 0 0 0 0 4 61 Sulfur, Cmpnds 3 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 8 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 5 9 1 15 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 TOTAL 16 ' 14 58 0 50 18 44 269 469 - 148 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 418 PHYSICAL AGENTS Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 6 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Coal Tars 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 4 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ntrgn Cmpnds, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Sulfur , Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 p 1 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 4 TOTAL 3 5 0 0 7 5 6 16 42 SUBCLASS 430 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 Radiatd-Subst,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 o 6 0 0 0 6 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 11 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 - 149 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 . 0 1 Al cohol s 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 o 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds .0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Coal Dust 0 0 1 0. 0 Q< 0 0 1 Coke 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Drugs, Medicine 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 1 1 Fuel Oi l 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 ' 1 1 0 2 S i l i c a 0 6 6 0 0 0 0 0 6 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 0 2 0 0 0 d 0 0 2 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animal s 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 o : 0 3 3 TOTAL 2- 10 7 0 4 2 8 30 66 SUBCLASS 602 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 17 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Noise \ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 11 Radiatd-Subst,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 464 0 0 0 464 UV-Wel ding 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 24 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 122 0 0 0 122 - 150 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 2 5 0 0 0 2 42 0 51 Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 2 2 0 0 0 4 16 2 26 Alka l i e s , Other 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 0 20 Aluminum,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Ammonia 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 6 Animal Products 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 AromaticCmpnd,Other 1 • 3 0 0 0 0 . 4 1 9 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 0 .. 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 6 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 11 0 0 0 0 2 1 14 Chromium,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 CoaUPetr Prod,Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 5 Cyanides 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 1 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 Dusts, Other 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 4 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes ; o 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Formaldehyde 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 Fuel Oi l i 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Gasoline 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 4 2 0 0 0 1 15 1 23 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ketones 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Lead, Dust, Fume 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 Lub O i l , Grease 1 0 0 0 0 6 2 0 9 Mercury .Dust.Fume 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 0 0 0 0 ' 1 0 0 1 Nitrogen Oxides 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ntrgn Cmpnds, Other 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 2 0 2 Organophosphorus 1 • 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 PCP, TCP 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Pest ic ides, Other 2 0 0 0 0 3 5 1 11 Phenol s 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 151 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 5 Pyrolysis Products 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 Resins 1 0 0 0 0 4 16 1 22 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 S i l i c a 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Sulfur , Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 2 10 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Urethanes, Isocyan 1 3 0 0 0 2 3 0 9 W.CO & Hard Metals 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 3 3 0 0 0 6 29 5 46 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 Bacteria 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 10 13 TOTAL 43 37 2 0 586 57 193 87 1005 SUBCLASS 603 PHYSICAL AGENTS Heat .0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 38 0 0 0 38 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 12 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 13 Alcohols 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 ' 0 1 A l iphat ic Solvents 1 0 0 0 0 1 2' 0 4 A l ka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 6 AromaticCmpnd,Other 5 • 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 10 Chlor-Fluor Cmpnds 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chromium,Dust,Fume 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 - 152 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Cutting O i l s 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 5 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 Hydrocarbon Gases 1 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 1 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Pesticides,Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Resins 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 7 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 4 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 11 8 0 0 50 11 37 12 129 SUBCLASS 604 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 169 0 0 1 170 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 40 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 34 0 0 0 34 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Al iphat ic Solvents 3 0 0 0 0 1 10 0 14 Ammonia 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 A roma t i cCm pnd, 0 th er 3 5 0 0 0 : 5 5 0 18 Cedar Dust 0 7 0 0 o 1 0 0 8 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Fibreglass 0 • 2 0 0 0 4 1 4 11 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Ketones 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 0 7 PCP, TCP 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0. 1 - 153 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Pyrolysis Products 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 1 1 0 0 0 14 36 1 53 Sulfur, Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Wood Dusts, Other 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 3 16 2 21 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 8 0 0 0 2 0 4 14 TOTAL 9 30 0 0 203 33 79 61 415 SUBCLASS 605 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 CHEMICAL AGENTS Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 CoaliPetr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 2 0 0 1 3 0 2 4 12 SUBCLASS 607 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 19 Phys Agents, Other 0 . 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 - 154 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Ammonia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 TOTAL 4 0 0 0 21 0 11 2 38 SUBCLASS 608 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 32 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 . 4 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 5 b 0 0 5 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 0 10 Alcohols 1 0 0 0 0 o 1 0 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 o 1 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 1 3 0 0 0 1 25 0 30 Ammonia 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 AromaticCmpnd,Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Dioxide 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 S i l i c a 0 ' 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 155 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 0 0 37 41 2 1 101 SUBCLASS 617 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Aromati cCmpnd, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 TOTAL 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 2 8 SUBCLASS 618 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 10 CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Formal dehyde 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 - 156 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 0 0 0 0 10 4 2 2 18 SUBCLASS 620 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 353 0 0 1 354 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 18 0 0 0 18 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 . 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 9 0 11 Ammoni a 0 2 0 0 o 0 3 0 5 Carbon Dioxide 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 3 9 2 14 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 o 0 0 1 Food Products,Other 1 1 0 0 0 18 1 9 30 Formaldehyde 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Grains, Flours 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub Oi 1, Grease 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 • 0 2 0 2 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 '•1 0 1 2 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 '2 2 2 6 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 5 • 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 7 Bacteria 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 - 157 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 TOTAL 10 7 6 0 371 30 32 25 475 SUBCLASS 621 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 ,0 0 1 1 Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Radiatd-S'ubst, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 457 0 0 3 460 UV-Weldi ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 62 0 0 0 62 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 2 0 0 0 .0 4 0 7 Alka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 12 Ammonia 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 0 6 Animal Products 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 AromaticCmpnd,Other 2 0 0 0 0 7 4 0 13 Cedar Dust 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 o 1 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 1 7 0 9 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 21 14 0 35 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 •1 1 0 2 F i re , Smoke, Ashes 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 17 Gasol ine 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Grains, Flours 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 Hairdressing Chem 0 0 0 0 0 69 0 0 69 Halogenated Cmpnds 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 5 Kerosene 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Organophosphorus 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 PCP, TCP 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 - 158 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Pesticides,Other 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 3 9 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Resins 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 1 7 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 o 2 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Chemicals, Other 0 6 0 0 0 10 6 2 24 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 16 0 0 0 o 2 0 0 18 Bacteria 0 0 0 7 0 1 0 3 11 Fungi 4 Molds o 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Viruses 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 6 OTHER EXPOSURES 2 1 0 0 0 3 1 2 7 TOTAL 24 20 0 13 519 146 67 29 818 SUBCLASS 622 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 30 0 0 0 30 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 10 : 0 0 0 10 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 Alcohols 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Aromati cCmpnd, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 ' 13 2 0 15 Clothes 0 ' 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 2 2 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Grains, Flours 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 - 159 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Water Base Paints 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 2 3 0 1 40 18 12 4 80 SUBCLASS 624 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 179 0 0 0 179 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 10 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 11 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 19 Ammoni a 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 4 0 0 0 0 6 0 10 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 0 9 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Dusts, Other : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Food products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 6 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Pesticides,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Sulfur, Cmpnds 0 • 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 3 0 0 0 3 4 1 11 - 160 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals OTHER EXPOSURES TOTAL 3 0 0 0 O O O O 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 7 10 0 0 189 21 47 25 299 SUBCLASS 625 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 24 0 0 0 24 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 8^ 0 8 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Fungi & Molds 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 0 1 0 0 26 1 16 0 44 SUBCLASS 626 PHYSICAL AGENTS Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 181 0 0 0 181 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 UV-Welding 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 48 0 0 0 48 - 161 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 Alcohols 0 0 0 A l iphat ic Solvents 1 1 0 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 Ammonia 0 0 0 Aromati cCmpnd,Other 1 1 0 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 3 0 Chromium,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 Cleaning Compounds 1 0 0 Disinfectants 0 1 0 Drugs, Medicine 0 0 0 Fibreglass 0 0 0 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 4 0 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 Formaldehyde 0 0 0 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 Halogenated Cmpnds 1 0 0 PCB, PBB 0 0 0 Phenols 0 0 0 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 Resins 0 0 0 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 S i l i c a 0 0 0 Sulfur, Cmpnds 0 0 0 Text i le Items 0 0 0 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 Chemicals, Other 1 2 0 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animal s 4 0 0 Bacteria 0 1 0 Fungi & Molds 0 0 0 Viruses 0 0 0 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 • 1 0 TOTAL 9 14 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 2 3 0 5 0 0 1 2 o 5 0 0 2 24 0 26 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 4 0 0 7 16 0 26 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 172 36 1 210 0 0 23 17 2 43 0 0 3 4 0 7 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 3 0 1 4 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 2 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 8 0 0 8 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 4 0 0 13 17 3 36 0 0 105 0 1 n o 27 0 84 0 21 133 0 0 0 0 1 1 68 0 1 0 0 69 0 0 2 0 5 8 95 229 445 131 42 965 - 162 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 627 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 185 0 0 0 185 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 36 0 0 0 36 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 2 0 0 0 2 12 0 16 Alcohols 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 3 0 0 0 0 29 0 32 Ammoni a 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 4 0 0 0 4 18 0 26 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 90 42 0 132 Cl othes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 6 Drugs, Medicine 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 3 16 Grains, Flours 0 0 0 0 p 1 1 0 2 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 6 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 2 8 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 3 0 0 0 p 0 0 1 4 Bacteria 0 0 0 34 0 2 0 7 43 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 4 TOTAL 5 15 0 34 221 122 121 24 542 - 163 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 631 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 o 11 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 p 2 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ammonia 0 0 0 0 0 o 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Micro-Organ, Other 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Viruses 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 5 0 0 2 13 0 3 3 26 SUBCLASS 632 PHYSICAL AGENTS 13 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 UV-Wel di ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 6 CHEMICAL AGENTS A l iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ammonia 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Grains, Flours 0 6 0 0 0 3 0 2 11 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Organophosphorus 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Weldfum, Coat Srf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 164 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 TOTAL 3 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 Noise , 0 Repetitive Motion 0 UV-Wel ding 0 Phys Agents, Other 0 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac ids 0 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 A l ka l i e s , Other 0 AromaticCmpnd, Other 1 Carbon Dioxide 0 Cement, Mortar 0 Fuel Oi l 0 Gasoline 1 Manufactured Gases 0 Sulfur, Cmpnds 5 Chemicals, Other 0 TOTAL 8 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 Heat 0 Noise 0 O O O O 7 0 0 19 SUBCLASS 636 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 14 SUBCLASS 637 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 4 7 13 53 0 0 6 6 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 6 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 5 0 5 1 3 0 5 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 6 0 1 1 3 1 17 12 53 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 - 165 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 140 0 0 0 140 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 10 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 6 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 17 0 18 Ammonia 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 5 7 0 12 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 2 11 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Grains, Flours 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Ketones 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 0 0 0 p 1 0 0 1 Ntrgn Cmpnds, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Resins 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 P 1 1 0 2 Chemicals, Other 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 4 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 TOTAL 1 3 0 1 150 24 42 14 235 SUBCLASS 639 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 55 0 0 0 55 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 - 166 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS-EXPOSURE ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 0 0 0 5 2 0 8 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 CoaliPetr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 0 7 TOTAL 0 1 0 0 59 13 11 6 90 SUBCLASS 643 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 8 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 CoaUPetr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Formaldehyde 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Grains, Flours 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Pesticides,Other 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Fungi & Molds 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 6 3 0 0 9 3 5 2 28 - 167 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 654 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 72 0 0 0 72 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 17 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 7 Alcohols 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 6 Ammonia 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 4 Copper, Dust, Fume 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 1 0 1 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Drugs, Medicine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 F i re , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 0 0 b 1 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 TOTAL 4 4 0 0 89 2 29 15 143 - 168 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 657 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 Heat 0 Noise 0 Repetitive Motion 0 UV-Welding 0 Phys Agents, Other 0 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 Carbon Monoxide 1 Cedar Dust 0 Cement, Mortar 0 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 PCP, TCP 0 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 Chemicals, Other 0 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 TOTAL 2 PHYSICAL AGENTS Repetitive Motion 0 Phys Agents, Other 0 CHEMICAL AGENTS Cleaning Compounds 0 • Disinfectants 0 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 Q 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 33 SUBCLASS 658 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 28 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 5 0 9 0 9 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 1 8 1 11 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 21 13 76 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 - 169 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Bacteria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Viruses 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 0 2 0 1 13 4 0 1 21 SUBCLASS 659 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 11 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 76 0 0 0 76 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 29 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 80 0 0 0 80 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 1 48 1 50 Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 1 0 0 0 7 22 0 30 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 15 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 1 0 0 0 3 1Q 1 15 Carbon Monoxide 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Chlor-Fluor Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 3 5 0 8 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Fi bregl ass 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Gasoline 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1 16 Halogenated Cmpnds 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Kerosene 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 Ketones 0 ' 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 8 11 1 20 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 o 0 1 - 170 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Resins 0 2 0 0 0 4 10 0 16 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 S i l i c a 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Sulfur , Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 11 0 0 0 1 1 0 13 Weldfum, Coat Srf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 2 0 0 0 2 5 1 10 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 TOTAL 5 20 1 0 156 36 157 60 435 SUBCLASS 705 PHYSICAL AGENTS Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 120 0 0 0 120 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 58 0 0 0 58 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0 7 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 6 Aromati cCmpnd, Other 1 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 7 Asbestos 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 5 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 ,0 0 0 0 8 45 0 53 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Chromium,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Dusts, Other 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 4 Ketones 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 1 0 0 0 9 17 2 29 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 4 Water Base Paints 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 - 171 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 TOTAL 8 8 6 0 178 24 93 13 330 SUBCLASS 706 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 115 115 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 620 0 0 1 621 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 120 123 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 192 0 0 0 192 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 1 0 0 0 1 17 0 19 Alcohol s 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 A l iphat ic Solvents 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 4 A l ka l i e s , Other 0 2 0 0 0 1 22 0 25 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 5 Asbestos 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 Carbon Monoxide 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 Cedar Dust 0 14 0 0 0 1 0 0 15 Cement, Mortar 0 3 0 0 0 19 107 5 134 Chlorine (Dioxide) 3 32 0 0 0 0 1 0 36 Chromium,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 . 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 CoaliPetr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 4 14 1 19 - 172 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Coke 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 Cyanides 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 4 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 3 Gasoline 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 3 0 0 0 b 0 0 3 Ketones 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Lead, Dust, Fume 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 0 10 Nitro-Glycerine 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Nitrogen Oxides 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 PAH, Tar Fume 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 PCP, TCP 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 5 Pesticides 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Petroleum Asphalts 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 b 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 P 1 Resins 0 2 0 0 0 4 6 0 12 Sulfur, Cmpnds 5 6 0 0 0 1 1 2 15 Water Base Paints 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 Weldfum,Uncoat Srf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Chemicals, Other 2 4 0 0 0 3, 14 3 26 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 3 0 0 0 2 3 23 31 TOTAL 43 91 2 0 812 56 208 298 1510 SUBCLASS 707 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 17 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 4 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 P 0 207 207 - 173 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Radlatd-Subst,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 408 0 0 0 408 Sun 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Wel di ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 980 982 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 177 0 0 0 177 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 o 48 Al cohol s 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 4 A l iphat ic Solvents 4 0 0 0 0 10 28 2 44 A lka l i e s , Other 1 1 0 0 0 2 35 0 39 Ammonia 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Aroma t i cCmpnd, Other 6 3 0 0 0 9 22 0 40 Asbestos 0 0 19 0 0 0 0 0 19 Carbon Monoxide 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 2 9 0 11 Chlor-Fluor Cmpnds 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 Chromium,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 6 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Coal Tars 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 0 7 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Copper, Dust, Fume 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cutting O i l s 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 4 Cyanides 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Dusts, Other 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 7 10 Fibreglass 0 3 0 0 0 4 2 1 10 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 Gasoline 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 7 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Grains, Flours 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 2 2 0 0 0 1 7 0 12 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 • 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 5 Kerosene 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 5 Ketones 2 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 7 Lead, Dust, Fume 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 - 174 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS i POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 12 13 1 26 Mercury,Dust,Fume 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 1 0 0 0 3 4 0 8 PAH, Tar Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 2 2 0 0 0 6 22 2 34 Rubber & Compounds 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 S i l i c a 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 Sulfur , Cmpnds 6 13 0 0 0 1 4 1 25 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 20 0 0 0 1 1 1 23 W,Co & Hard Metals 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 o 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 5 23 0 0 0 0 1 1 30 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 Chemicals, Other 4 12 0 0 0 17 17 7 57 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 22 24 TOTAL 52 119 21 1 585 92 251 1261 2382 SUBCLASS 711 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Radiatd-Subst,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 50 0 0 0 50 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 10 12 Phys Agents, Other 0 ' 0 0 0 30 0 0 0 30 - 175 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 AromaticCmpnd, Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 o ^ 2 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 5 Chlorine (Dioxide) 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 6 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Copper, Dust, Fume 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Metal Cmpnds, Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 Sulfur , Cmpnds 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 6 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS An imals 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 TOTAL 8 7 2 0 80 5 21 27 150 SUBCLASS 713 PHYSICAL AGENTS • Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 20 0'. 0 0 20 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 5 6 0 0 5 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 5 Ammonia 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 - 176 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL AromatlcCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 10 1 0 11 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 4 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 5 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Viruses 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 TOTAL 0 0 0 2 25 23 13 1 64 SUBCLASS 721 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 No i se 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 no no Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 59 0 0 l 60 Sun 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i i UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i i UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 428 432 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 52 0 0 0 52 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 3 0 0 0 3 5 1 12 Alka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 10 Aromati cCmpnd .Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 0 9 Asbestos 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 7 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Clothes 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 - 177 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RtSP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IURIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 Fuel Oi l 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Ketones 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Mercury,Dust,Fume 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 .1 3 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 PCP, TCP 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 0 3 0 0 0 2 20 1 26 S i l i c a 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Water.Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 9 30 0 0 0 0 0 1 40 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 1 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 2 6 1 10 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 TOTAL 14 64 9 1 111 13 63 556 831 SUBCLASS 725 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 78 78 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 30 0 0 0 30 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 UV-Wel ding 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 26 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 20 - 178 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 " 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Cement, Mortar 0 1 0 0 0 1 7 1 10 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Dusts, Other 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 5 Sulfur , Cmpnds 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 0 7 Weldfum, Coat Srf 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 5 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 3 7 1 0 50 4 29 112 206 SUBCLASS 726 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 72 72 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 227 0 0 0 227 Sun 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Weldi ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 38 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 34 0 0 0 34 CHEMICAL AGENTS • Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 7 Alcohols 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 Al iphatic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 - 179 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 3 18 0 21 Chromium,DustFume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Dusts, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 Food Products, Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 PCP, TCP 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Pest ic ides, Other 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 4 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 S i l i c a 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Sulfur , Cmpnds 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Water.Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 4 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 Viruses 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 7 TOTAL 31 5 1 2 261 14 44 139 497 SUBCLASS 747 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cold 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 - 180 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 Micro-Organ, Other 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 6 0 0 1 6 1 0 3 17 SUBCLASS 748 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 10 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 6 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 10 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 7 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Alcohol s 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 18 AromaticCmpnd, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 9 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Nitrogen Oxides 0 0 0 0 0 0 . 1 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Sulfur, Cmpnds 2 2 0 0 0 0 4 2 10 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 TOTAL 3 2 0 0 13 2 52 29 101 - 181 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 801 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 23 0 0 0 23 UV-Wel di ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 12 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 Copper, Dust, Fume 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fi bregl ass 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 Grains, Flours 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 5 4 1 0 35 2 3 17 67 SUBCLASS 808 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 50 0 0 0 50 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 8 CHEMICAL AGENTS A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Aromati cCmpnd, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 - 182 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 5 2 0 0 58 3 5 6 79 SUBCLASS 811 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 17 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 5 CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A l ka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0. 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 2 4 0 0 22 1 4 2 35 - 183 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 812 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Gasoline 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Viruses 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 1 1 0 1 1 0 4 1 9 SUBCLASS 820 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 10 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 7 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 4 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 Q 1 0 0 Chlor-Fluor Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Ga so l i ne 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Kerosene 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 - 184 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Ketones 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 2 3 0 0 10 4 15 15 49 SUBCLASS 851 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 24 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 71 0 0 0 71 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 29 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 51 0 0 0 51 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 1 0 0 0 1 11 0 13 Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Al iphatic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 4 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 13 Ammonia 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 Aromati cCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cedar Dust 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 16 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Dusts, Other 0 ' 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Food Products,Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oi l 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Gasoline 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 - 185 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Manufactured Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Sulfur, Cmpnds 0 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 8 Chemicals, Other 0 2 0 0 0 2 9 1 14 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 4 TOTAL 6 13 1 0 122 11 75 66 294 SUBCLASS 901 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Col d 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 20 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 9 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 9 CHEMICAL AGENTS A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Food Products,Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Kerosene 0 • 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Tetrachl oromethane 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 2 5 0 0 18 2 6 34 67 - 186 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 902 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 Heat 0 0 0 Noise 0 0 0 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 UV-Welding 0 0 0 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 0 0 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 Cyanides 0 1 0 Food Products,Other 1 0 0 Fuel Oi l 0 1 0 Gasoline 0 0 0 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 PCP, TCP 0 0 0 Pest ic ides, Other 1 2 0 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 Sul fur , Cmpnds 0 2 0 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 • 0 0 TOTAL 4 8 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 14 0 19 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 17 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 1 10 0 0 1 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 36 7 20 23 98 - 187 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 906 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 197 0 0 0 197 UV-Weldi ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 21 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 8 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A l ka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Aluminum,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ammoni a 3 6 0 0 0 0 6 0 15 Aroma t i cCmpnd .Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 1 2 0 0 0 0 4 0 7 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 CoalSPetr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Food Products,Other 1 0 0 0 0 30 4 22 57 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 0 9 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Bacteria 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 TOTAL 7 9 0 0 205 41 38 65 365 - 188 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 909 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 SUBCLASS 911 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 27 28 Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 No i se 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 29 0 , 0 0 29 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 10 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 F i re , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Food Products,Other 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 7 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Bacteri a 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 Micro-Organ, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Viruses 0 0 0 1 0 0 o 1 2 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 TOTAL 3 3 0 1 39 3 5 60 , 114 - 189 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 1001-1013 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 65 65 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 46 . 0 0 1 47 UV-Weldi ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 17 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 20 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 1 0 0 0 4 28 0 33 Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Al iphatic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Ammonia 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 Aroma t i cCmpnd, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Arsenic Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Dioxide 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Carbon Monoxide 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1 10 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cutting Oi ls 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Food Pro ducts, Other 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 5 Fuel Oil 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 Ketones 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Lead, Dust, Fume 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Mercury,Dust,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 Sulfur , Cmpnds 2 • 14 0 0 0 2 1 0 19 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chemicals, Other 3 1 0 0 0 2 7 0 13 - 190 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Viruses 0 0 0 1 0. 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 12 23 1 2 66 28 59 97 288 SUBCLASS 1200 -1201 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 16 Sun 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Wel ding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 7 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Alcohol s 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A l iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Food Products,Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Gasoline 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Sulfur, Cmpnds 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 Chemicals, Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animal s 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 - 191 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 TOTAL 5 2 0 0 23 3 9 29 71 SUBCLASS 1301--1321 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 11 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 4 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 22 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 198 0 0 0 198 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0" 0 0 0 12 12 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 40 0 0 0 40 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 10 Al iphat ic Solvents 2 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 6 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0 7 Ammoni a 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 AromaticCmpnd,Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Dioxide 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cedar Dust 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 6 0 0 0 0 10 0 16 Ch romi um,Du st,Fume 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 16 15 0 31 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Cyanides 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 0 9 Drugs, Medicine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Dusts, Other 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fuel Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 192 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Halogenated Cmpnds 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 4 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Organophosphorus 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Pesticides,Other 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 6 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Resins 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 4 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 Sulfur, Cmpnds 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 1 6 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Weldfum.Uncoat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 5 0 0 0 1 6 1 13 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 44 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 49 Bacteri a 1 0 0 11 0 10 0 2 24 Fungi & Molds 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Viruses 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 8 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 6 TOTAL 56 33 1 19 238 50 75 71 543 SUBCLASS 1401 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Col d ' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Heat. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 n o 0 0 1 111 UV-Wel di ng 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 19 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Phys Agents, Other 0 . 0 0 0 63 0 0 0 63 - 193 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 2 0 0 0 0 7 0 9 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 2 9 A lka l i e s , Other 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 Ammonia 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 AromaticCmpnd,Other 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 Carbon Dioxide 0 0 0 0 • 0 0 1 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 Cedar Dust 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 Cement, Mortar 0 1 0 0 0 1 12 1 15 Chlor-Fluor Cmpnds 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 26 0 0 0 0 6 1 33 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 CoaUPetr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 5 Cutting Oi ls 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cyanides 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 59 0 0 0 0 0 3 62 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fuel O i l 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 6 Grains, Flours 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Halogenated Cmpnds 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 Kerosene 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 Manufactured Gases 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Organophosphorus 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Petroleum Asphalts 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 4 Pyrolysis Products 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Resins 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Sulfur, Cmpnds 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 Urethanes, Isocyan 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Water Base Paints 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Water,Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 3 4 0 0 0 2 8 1 18 - 194 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 81 0 0 0 0 5 0 2 88 Bacteria 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 3 7 Micro-Organ, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Viruses 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 6 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 TOTAL 94 106 0 8 173 20 71 81 553 SUBCLASS 1406 PHYSICAL AGENTS A i r Pressure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 85 0 0 0 85 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 31 0 0 0 31 CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 5 Alcohol s 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 A l iphat ic Solvents 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0 8 Ammonia 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 AromaticCmpnd, Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 8 Asbestos 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Carbon Monoxide 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cedar Dust 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 4 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 4 0 0 0 2 2 0 8 Ch rpmi um,Du st,Fume 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 22 9 0 31 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Dusts, Other 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 195 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE POIS-ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Formaldehyde 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Gasoline 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Gloves, Wet 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Pest ic ides, Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Resins 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 Weldfum, Coat Srf 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 1 10 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 16 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 21 Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 2 6 Viruses 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 5 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 7 TOTAL 24 21 0 6 116 45 44 23 279 SUBCLASS 1900 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 11 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 CHEMICAL AGENTS Ac i ds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 Ammonia 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Asbestos 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cement, Mortar 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Coal&Petr Prod, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 196 -TABLE 11 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL Disinfectants 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Food Products,Other 0 0 0 • 0 0 1 0 0 Formal dehyde 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Pest ic ides, Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Chemicals, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 TOTAL 4 4 1 0 13 4 9 10 See Appendix 1, Description of Subclasses. - 197 -TABLE 12 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS, ALL DIAGNOSES, 1979-1982.1 EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL SUBCLASS 109 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 11 8 11 6 3 39 Repetitive Motion 64 67 72 69 43 315 UV-Welding 0 1 0 3 0 4 Vibration 0 0 0 1 0 1 Phys Agents, Other 10 3 3 6 0 22 CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cedar Dust 1 3 7 4 5 20 Fuel Oi l 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 1 0 0 0 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 1 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 1 0 0 0 0 1 Wood Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 1 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 6 1 1 1 0 9 TOTAL 96 84 94 91 53 418 SUBCLASS 721 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 1 0 1 Heat 1 0 0 0 0 1 Noise 41 24 16 12 17 110 Repetitive Motion 6 6 13 15 20 60 Sun 0 0 1 0 0 1 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 1 0 1 UV-Welding 40 73 96 112 111 432 Phys Agents, Other 15 12 6 9 10 52 1 Table 12 i s an extract of Table 10, Appendix V. - 198 -TABLE 12 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, YEAR AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) EXPOSURE 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 2 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 1 4 1 3 3 12 A lka l i e s , Other 2 1 0 1 6 10 Aromatic Compounds, Other 0 4 1 2 2 9 Asbestos 1 2 1 1 2 7 Carbon Monoxide 0 0 0 0 1 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 0 0 0 1 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 1 0 0 1 Clothes 0 0 0 0 1 1 Coal 4 Petr Prod, Other 1 0 0 0 0 1 Coal Tars 1 0 0 1 1 3 Dusts, Other 0 0 1 0 0 1 Fibreglass 0 0 2 0 1 3 F i r e , Smoke, Ashes 0 4 . 1 1 3 9 Fuel Oil 0 0 • 0 2 1 3 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 2 0 0 0 2 Ketones 0 1 0 0 1 2 Mercury, Dust, Fume 1 0 0 1 1 3 Metal Compounds, Other 1 0 0 0 1 2 PCP, TCP 0 1 0 0 0 1 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 1 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 1 0 0 0 1 Resins 3 2 10 9 2 26 S i l i c a 0 0 0 0 1 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 1 1 Water, Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 1 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 8 11 9 6 6 40 Weldfum, Uncoat Srf 1 0 4 5 1 11 Chemicals, Other 0 4 2 1 3 10 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 0 0 1 1 0 2 Bacteria 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 1 1 1 0 1 4 TOTAL 125 153 167 185 201 831 - 199 -TABLE 13 - NUMBER OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS, 1978-1982.1 DIAGNOSIS POIS- RESP. PNEU- CONTAG. BURS. CHEM. EXPOSURE ONING IRRIT. MOCON. DIS. TENOS. DERMAT. BURNS OTHER TOTAL SUBCLASS 109 PHYSICAL AGENTS Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 39 39 Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 315 0 0 0 315 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 Vibration 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 22 CHEMICAL AGENTS Alcohols 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Cedar Dust 0 17 0 0 0 3 0 0 20 Fuel Oi l 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Lub O i l , Grease 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Plants, Vegetation 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Rubber & Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Wood Dusts, Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Bacteria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 2 9 TOTAL 0 23 0 0 337 7 3 48 418 SUBCLASS 721 PHYSICAL AGENTS Cold 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Heat 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Noise 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 110 n o Repetitive Motion 0 0 0 0 59 0 0 1 60 Sun 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 UV-Welding 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 428 432 Phys Agents, Other 0 0 0 0 52 0 0 0 52 1 Table 13 i s an extract of Table 11, Appendix V. - 200 -TABLE 13 - OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, BY EXPOSURE, DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASS (cont'd) DIAGNOSIS POIS-EXPOSURE ONING RESP. IRRIT. PNEU-MOCON. CONTAG. DIS. BURS. TENOS. DERMAT. CHEM. BURNS OTHER TOTAL CHEMICAL AGENTS Acids 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 Al iphat ic Solvents 0 3 0 0 0 3 5 1 12 A lka l i e s , Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 10 Aromati cCmpnd.Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 0 9 Asbestos 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 7 Carbon Monoxide 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Chlorine (Dioxide) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cleaning Compounds 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Clothes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Coal Tars 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Coal&Petr Prod,Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Dusts, Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Fibreglass 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 F i re , Smoke, Ashes 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 Fuel Oi l 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 Hydrocarbon Gases 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Ketones 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Mercury,Dust,Fume 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 Metal Cmpnds,Other 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 PCP, TCP 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 P las t i c Items 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Pyrolysis Products 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Resins 0 3 0 0 0 2 20 1 26 S i l i c a 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Text i le Items 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Water.Other Liquids 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Weldfum, Coat Srf 9 30 0 0 0 0 0 1 40 Weldfum,Uncoat Srf 1 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 Chemicals, Other 0 1 0 0 0 2 6 1 10 BIOLOGICAL AGENTS Animals 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Bacteria 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER EXPOSURES 0 ' 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 TOTAL 14 64 9 1 i n 13 63 556 831 - 201 -TABLE 14 - AGE AND SEX DISTRIBUTION OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES, ALL SUBCLASSES, 1978-1982. AGE GROUP MALE1 FEMALE2 TOTAL3 -19 938 325 1,263 20-24 3,004 837 3,841 25-29 2,511 > 646 3,157 30-34 2,163 534 2,697 35-39 1,447 406 1,853 40-44 1,152 387 1,539 45-49 1,026 381 1,407 50-54 1,091 313 1,404 55-59 943 215 1,158 60-64 845 90 935 65+ 361 7 368 TOTAL 15,481 4,141 19,622 Median age = 33 years. 2 Median age = 31 years. 3 Median age = 33 years. - 202 -TABLE 15 - ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL CANCERS, BY DIAGNOSIS, EXPOSURE, SUBCLASS OF EXPOSURE AND OCCUPATION, 1978-1982. ACCEPTED DIAGNOSIS EXPOSURE SUBCLASS2 OCCUPATION 1978 Mesothelioma Asbestos 1006 P ipe f i t t e r 1978 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 Plumber/pipefittei 1979 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 Painter, f iber-glasser boats 1979 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 P ipe f i t t e r ' s help Steamfitter's hel| 1980 Mesothel ioma Asbestos 705 Insulator 1980 Carcinoma, bladder PCB Sol . Coal tars and fumes 411 3 1406 E lec t r i c i an 1980 Pharyngeal cancer Asbestos 705 Insulator 1980 Mesothelioma Asbestos 706 Boilermaker 1980 Carcinoma Asbestos 721 Lagger 1980 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 Fitter/Joiner 1980 Nasopharyngeal carcinoma Charcoal s (PAH's) 627 Cook 1980 Mesothelioma Asbestos 105 Steamplant forem. 1980 Mesothelioma Asbestos 707 Boilermaker/ Insulator 1980 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 Lagger 1980 Mesothelioma Asbestos 707 Steamfitter 1980 Mesothelioma Asbestos 707 Machinist 1981 Adenocarcinoma Asbestos 705 F l o o r t i l e r 1981 Adenocarcinoma Asbestos 705 Insulator 1981 Cancer of Larynx Asbestos 705 Carpenter/Lather 1981 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 Welder 1981 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 Foreman's clerk/ Personnel o f f i ce r 19821 Mesothelioma Asbestos 707 Plumber 1982 Mesothelioma Asbestos 411 E lect r ic ian 1982 Mesothelioma Asbestos 721 Steamfitter 1982 Mesothelioma Asbestos 104 Weider TOTAL 1978-1982 = 25 OCCUPATIONAL CANCERS Backdated to 1981. Refer to Appendix IV for a description of the subclasses. A l l subclasses where there has been exposure are shown. - 203 -TABLE 16 - THE DISTRIBUTION OF ACCEPTED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL CANCERS, BY SUBCLASS OF EXPOSURE, 1978-1982. SUBCLASS2 NO. OF CASES 104 1 105 1 411 2 627 1 705 5 706 1 707 4 721 9 1006 1 1406 1 TOTAL 26 2 1 Refer to Appendix IV for a description of the subclasses. 2 One claim has been counted in two categories (411 and 1406, see Table 9). - 204 -TABLE 17 - COSTS* OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE CLAIMS AND THE TOTAL COSTS* OF ALL OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE AND INJURY CLAIMS IN 1978-1982. COSTS OF OD % OF TOTAL COSTS OF YEAR CLAIMS (C$ MILLIONS) TOTAL CLAIMS (C$ MILLIONS) 1978 6.5 5.3% 123 1979 8.7 5.9% 148 1980 11.8 6.1% 193 1981 13.6 6.1% 224 1982 12.6 5.4% 232 * Costs includes wage-loss, pension reserves. Costs includes costs charged in the year (claims from a l l years) . Costs excludes medical a id , administration. - 205 -TABLE 18 - REJECTED OR DISALLOWED WAGE-LOSS CLAIMS FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES IN 1981. Hearing Loss 39 Vibration White Finger Disease 0 Tenosynovitis 0 Carpal Tunnel Syndrome 0 Exposure to Cold 0 Exposure to Heat 1 Radiation Effect (including welding flash) 1 Poisoning 30 S i l i c o s i s 1 Asbestosis 3 Respiratory System I r r i t a t i on 43 Heart Attack/Stroke 16 Cancer 1 Tuberculosis 4 Other Infectious Diseases 43 Other 2 i TOTAL 184 

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