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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Five collections of lyra viol music published by John Playford Pullen, Ginger Lee 1979

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F I V E COLLECTIONS OF LYRA V I O L MUSIC PUBLISHED BY JOHN PIAYFORD by GINGER L E E PULLEN B.M.,  Ithaca College,  1968  T H E S I S SUBMITTED I N P A R T I A L F U L F I L L M E N T OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC  We a c c e p t t h i s to t h e  thesis  required  as  conforming  standard  THE UNIVERSITY OF B R I T I S H COLUMBIA June,  ©  1979  G i n g e r Lee P u l l e n ,  1979  In  presenting this thesis in partial  an advanced d e g r e e a t the L i b r a r y I further for  shall  the U n i v e r s i t y  make i t  agree that  this  thesis for  It  f i n a n c i a l gain shall  Department The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a 2075 W e s b r o o k P l a c e V a n c o u v e r , Canada V6T 1W5  Date  1  the requirements I agree  r e f e r e n c e and copying of  this  that  not  copying or  for  that  study. thesis  by t h e Head o f my D e p a r t m e n t  i s understood  permission.  of  B r i t i s h Columbia,  extensive  s c h o l a r l y p u r p o s e s may be g r a n t e d  written  E-6 BP 75-5 I E  of  freely available for  permission for  by h i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . of  fulfilment  or  publication  be a l l o w e d w i t h o u t  my  ABSTRACT John P l a y f o r d , the w e l l known E n g l i s h music p u b l i s h e r , published  a t l e a s t f i v e d i f f e r e n t volumes f o r the l y r a v i o l  tween the years musical  1651  and  1682.  T h i s was  a period of  a c t i v i t y among London's upper c l a s s e s .  p u b l i c a t i o n s were a p a r t o f P l a y f o r d ' s  The  intense lyra  abilities.  e n t i t l e d A M u s i c a l l Banquet, was  viol  output designed to meet  the amateurs' demands f o r i n s t r u c t i o n a l m a t e r i a l and geared to t h e i r i n t e r e s t s and  be-  The  f o r music  f i r s t edition,  a c o l l e c t i o n of v o c a l and i n -  strumental  music, o n e - t h i r d of which was  viol.  f o u r subsequent e d i t i o n s were e n t i t l e d Musicks Rec-  The  devoted to the  lyra  r e a t i o n and were made up e n t i r e l y o f m a t e r i a l f o r the l y r a A l l f i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s c o n t a i n i n s t r u c t i o n s and v i o l pieces. and  The  charming.  songs and  music, on the whole, i s l i g h t ,  instrument,  by the b e s t composers of P l a y f o r d ' s day, Coleman, W i l l i a m Lawes, Simon Ives and The able. prints.  body of music c o n t a i n e d  Despite The  similar titles,  musical  contents  John  popular  many o f the  such as  latter  Charles  Jenkins.  i n the f i v e e d i t i o n s i s s i z e -  the e d i t i o n s are not merely r e vary considerably.  Each  succes-  s i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n r e t a i n s a c e r t a i n number of p i e c e s the p r e v i o u s  lyra  unpretentious  There are l y r a v i o l arrangements of  o r i g i n a l dances f o r the  viol.  e d i t i o n ( s ) , but draws many new  p i e c e s from  from  outside  sources as w e l l .  A l l t o l d , the e d i t i o n s c o n t a i n 299  different  p i e c e s o f music. This thesis tions.  i s a study o f P l a y f o r d ' s f i v e l y r a v i o l  I t takes the form o f an h i s t o r i c a l commentary,  including  an a n a l y s i s o f the music, and a s e r i e s o f appendixes. mentary i s d i v i d e d i n t o f i v e c h a p t e r s .  edi-  The com-  I n the c h a p t e r s , the au-  t h o r surveys P l a y f o r d ' s c a r e e r and p u b l i c a t i o n s , p r e s e n t s a h i s t o r y o f the dates cusses  o f i s s u e o f the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , and  dis-  the i n s t r u c t i o n a l m a t e r i a l w i t h i n the e d i t i o n s , the types  of music the e d i t i o n s c o n t a i n , and the composers and a r r a n g e r s c o n t r i b u t i n g to the e d i t i o n s .  One o f the most i n t e r e s t i n g a s -  p e c t s o f the h i s t o r i c a l commentary appears i n the f i r s t  chapter  where some p r e v i o u s l y unknown f a c t s are p r e s e n t e d which l e a d t o a r e v i s i o n o f the commonly accepted  date o f i s s u e f o r the e a r -  l i e s t s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n o f Musicks R e c r e a t i o n . Six  appendixes f o l l o w the h i s t o r i c a l commentary.  there are t a b l e s o f contents f o r a l l the l y r a v i o l indexes  arranged  according to t i t l e  Here,  editions,  and composer of a l l the music  w i t h i n the f i v e e d i t i o n s , complete b i b l i o g r a p h i c d e s c r i p t i o n s of each s u c c e s s i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n , and f i f t y - o n e o f P l a y f o r d * s l y r a v i o l pieces i n transcribed versions. one  o f the most important  i n the t h i r d appendix. for  each o f the 299  A thematic  p a r t s o f the e n t i r e study,  catalogue, i s contained  The c a t a l o g u e , which c o n t a i n s an e n t r y  d i f f e r e n t p i e c e s i n the e d i t i o n s ,  ranged a c c o r d i n g to m u s i c a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s .  i s ar-  The catalogue i n -  d i c a t e s concordances  between the f i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s ,  cites  i n s t a n c e s where the l y r a v i o l p i e c e s appear i n o t h e r s e v e n t e e n t h c e n t u r y s o u r c e s , and g i v e s c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e s t o the o t h e r indexes and t a b l e s w i t h i n the t h e s i s . and a v a i l a b i l i t y ,  F o r reasons o f format, a c c u r a c y ,  t h i s c a t a l o g u e supercedes  iv  a l l earlier  studies.  -CONTENTS ABSTRACT  i i  LIST OF TABLES  vi  LIST OF EXAMPLES INTRODUCTION  v i i  .  1  CHAPTER I. II. III. IV. V.  7  BIOGRAPHY AND DATING THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL  26  CONTEMPORANEOUS ARRANGEMENTS . . . .  4l  THE LYRA VIOL DANCES THE COMPOSERS AND ARRANGERS  74 . . . . I l l  BIBLIOGRAPHY  142  APPENDIXES I. II. III. IV.  150  TITLE INDEX COMPOSER INDEX  . .  THEMATIC CATALOGUE WITH CONCORDANCES  IV.  170  TABLES OF CONTENTS (OF EACH LYRA 254  VIOL EDITION) V.  160  BIBLIOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTIONS . . . . SELECTED TRANSCRIPTIONS  v  276 286  _ Table I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII.  LIST OF TABLES  Tunings Used i n the L y r a V i o l E d i t i o n s B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d Ayres i n P l a y f o r d s Viol Editions  Lyra  1  T h e a t e r Music Editions  in Playford s 8  Lyra  52  Viol 57  Country Dance Music i n P l a y f o r d * s V i o l Editions  Lyra 63  P r o f e s s i o n a l F o l k Dance Tunes i n P l a y f o r d * s Lyra V i o l Editions Other Arrangements  i n the L y r a V i o l E d i t i o n s  Other D e s c r i p t i v e T i t l e s  IX. X. XI. XII. XIII.  .  71  73  D i v i s i o n s i n the L y r a V i o l E d i t i o n s Suites  69  i n Playford's  Lyra V i o l Editions VIII.  33  . . . .  . . . . .  i n the L y r a V i o l E d i t i o n s  101 104  Composers (or A r r a n g e r s ) i n the L y r a V i o l Editions Composers I d e n t i f i e d Through Concordant Sources  118  C o n f l i c t i n g Ascriptions within V i o l Editions  121  the  C o n f l i c t i n g A s c r i p t i o n s w i t h Other c e n t u r y Sources  vi  Ilk  Lyra 17th122  LIST 0? EXAMPLES Example 1. "An Example t o f i n d e your Notes both sharpe on the Basse V i o l . " 2.  f l a t and .  29  "The P l a c e s o f the L e t t e r s as they are s t o p t on the neck of your V i o l l . "  31  John Mosse, Almain, f i r s t s t r a i n (T# 72); Matthew Locke, F i f t h E n t r y I n t r o d u c t o r y Music, Cupid and Death .  47  4.  Anonymous, Maske, f i r s t s t r a i n  55  5.  John J e n k i n s , Ayre,  6.  John J e n k i n s , Almain, second s t r a i n ,  3.  f e d f h (T# 109*)  77 edfhf  (T# 123*)  81  7.  Anonymous, An Ayre,  e d f h f (T# 99)  8.  Coleman, Coranto,  9.  W i l l i a m Lawes, Saraband, i n c i p i t ,  i n c i p i t , edfhf  82 (T# 270)  . . . .  f e d f h (T# 233)  .  e d f h f (T# 288*). . . . . . . .  85 86 87  10.  Simon Ives, Corant,  11.  Anonymous, Saraband, i n c i p i t ,  12.  Simon Ives, Saraband, i n c i p i t ,  13.  C h a r l e s Coleman, Saraband, d e f h f (T# 188)  90  14.  Anonymous, Preludium,  93  15.  John W i t h i e , S u i t e 1 Preludium, i n c i p i t , e d f h f (T# 104); Almain, i n c i p i t , e d f h f (T# 101);  edfhf edfhf  (T# 291) . . . (T# 256)  . .  meas. 1^8, f d e f h (T# 2 ) . . .  Almain, i n c i p i t , e d f h f (T#124) 16.  Thomas Bates, A J i g , f d e f h (T# 184)  17.  C h a r l e s Coleman, Almain w i t h D i v i s i o n , beginnings of s t r a i n s A A' B B', e d f h f (T# 113*) Coranto, i r s t s t r meas. a i n , f e1-6, d f h f(T# W i l(T# l i a m111); Lawes, S u i t e : f Almain, e d f 278*) h  18.  • «  vii  90 90  94 96 99  108  INTRODUCTION John P l a y f o r d , the w e l l known E n g l i s h music published  a t l e a s t f i v e d i f f e r e n t volumes 1651  tween the years  and 1682.  publisher,  f o r the l y r a v i o l be-  The f i r s t e d i t i o n , e n t i t l e d A  M u s i c a l l Banquet, was a c o l l e c t i o n o f v o c a l and i n s t r u m e n t a l s i c , o n e - t h i r d o f which was devoted to the l y r a v i o l . subsequent e d i t i o n s were e n t i t l e d Musicks R e c r e a t i o n made up e n t i r e l y o f m a t e r i a l f o r the l y r a  mu-  The f o u r and were  viol.  A l l f i v e l y r a v i o l editions contain i n s t r u c t i o n a l material and l y r a v i o l p i e c e s .  The music, on the whole,  t e n t i o u s and charming. popular  is light,  There are l y r a v i o l arrangements o f  songs and o r i g i n a l dances f o r the instrument,  the l a t t e r by the b e s t composers  The b o d y o f music c o n t a i n e d  Jenkins,  i n the f i v e e d i t i o n s i s s i z e a b l e .  s i m i l a r or i d e n t i c a l t i t l e s ,  sicks Recreation  many o f  o f P l a y f o r d * s day, such as  C h a r l e s Coleman, W i l l i a m Lawes, Simon Ives and John  Despite  unpre-  the f o u r e d i t i o n s o f Mu-  are n o t merely r e p r i n t s .  While the i n s t r u c -  t i o n a l m a t e r i a l remains the same, o r n e a r l y so, i n a l l the e d i t i o n s , g i v i n g them a common i d e n t i t y , considerably.  Each s u c c e s s i v e  the m u s i c a l  vary  l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n retains a cer-  t a i n number o f p i e c e s from the previous  e d i t i o n ( s ) , but draws  many new p i e c e s from o u t s i d e sources as w e l l . e d i t i o n s c o n t a i n 299  contents  A l l t o l d , the  d i f f e r e n t p i e c e s o f music.  T h i s t h e s i s i s a study o f P l a y f o r d * s f i v e l y r a v i o l e d i -  1  2 tions.  I t takes the form of an h i s t o r i c a l commentary,  an a n a l y s i s o f the music, and  a s e r i e s of appendixes.  mentary i s d i v i d e d i n t o f i v e c h a p t e r s .  The  In the f i r s t  i s given.  com-  chapter,  P l a y f o r d * s c a r e e r and p u b l i c a t i o n s are d i s c u s s e d , and summary of h i s biography  including  an updated  Then the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s  are c o n s i d e r e d from the s t a n d p o i n t of t h e i r dates o f p u b l i c a t i o n . F o r t h i s s e c t i o n , some v e r y i n t e r e s t i n g f a c t s were which l e d to a r e v i s i o n of the commonly accepted for  the f i r s t The  date  of i s s u e  e d i t i o n of Musicks R e c r e a t i o n .  second c h a p t e r concerns  the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s . r i g h t and  unearthed  the i n s t r u c t i o n a l m a t e r i a l i n  The m a t e r i a l i s examined i n i t s own  i n c o n n e c t i o n w i t h the i n s t r u c t i o n a l m a t e r i a l i n  Playford*s other p u b l i c a t i o n s .  In a d d i t i o n , the m a t e r i a l f r e -  q u e n t l y forms a backdrop f o r comments on the E n g l i s h amateur s i c i a n i n the second h a l f of the seventeenth P l a y f o r d * s r o l e as t h e i r The  and  instructor.  l a s t three chapters d e a l w i t h the m u s i c a l p o r t i o n of  the e d i t i o n s . of  century,  mu-  Chapter  three d e a l s w i t h l y r a v i o l  arrangements  music which i s , f o r the most p a r t , o r i g i n a l l y non-instrumen-  tal.  The music i s d i s c u s s e d a c c o r d i n g to i t s type, such as  ayre, t h e a t e r song* and f o l k dance, and the v a r i o u s types viewed i n the c o n t e x t of seventeenth-century Chapter  f o u r concerns  ballad  are  society.  the l y r a v i o l dances. An  analytical  survey of the most common dance forms i n the e d i t i o n s i s g i v e n , preceded  by a d i s c u s s i o n of the l y r a v i o l idiom and  the  factors  which determine i t . In c h a p t e r f i v e , the i n d i v i d u a l s mentioned i n the e d i -  3  tions*  a s c r i p t i o n s , whether composers or a r r a n g e r s ,  T h e i r c o n t r i b u t i o n s to the e d i t i o n s are c o n s i d e r e d  are  discussed.  collectively,  then each composer and h i s music i s d i s c u s s e d . S i x appendixes f o l l o w the h i s t o r i c a l commentary. One pendix c o n t a i n s study»  one  a thematic  t i o n s , arranged  of the most important catalogue  ap-  p a r t s of the e n t i r e  of a l l the music i n the f i v e  a c c o r d i n g to m u s i c a l  characteristics.  edi-  The  cat-  alogue i n d i c a t e s concordances between the f i v e e d i t i o n s , c i t e s i n s t a n c e s where the l y r a v i o l p i e c e s appear i n other century and  sources,  and  g i v e s c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e s to the o t h e r  t a b l e s w i t h i n the t h e s i s .  have been s t u d i e d and has  Two  tions existt  t h e i r contents  i t e m i z e d or indexed,  of the music i n the l y r a  manuscript indexes of the contents one  indexes  While other P l a y f o r d e d i t i o n s  been no p u b l i s h e d catalogue  editions.  seventeenth-  by Frank T r a f i c a n t e * and  one  there viol  o f the  edi-  by Gordon J .  2 Dodd.  T r a f i c a n t e has  arranged  the contents  of the l y r a  e d i t i o n s on three s e r i e s of index cards without and Dodd has  compiled  a thematic  s a t i s f a c t o r y as the p r e s e n t out r e f e r e n c e  handlist.  study,  viol  cross-references,  N e i t h e r work i s as  f o r both were compiled  to the second p a r t of the  1682  edition.-'  with-  Thus  "A Thematic Index to the Music f o r L y r a V i o l Contained i n F i v e P u b l i c a t i o n s by John P l a y f o r d , " ( M a n u s c r i p t ) . 1  "A Thematic H a n d l i s t of the Music i n P l a y f o r d ' s F i v e Lyra V i o l E d i t i o n s , " (Manuscript). 2  •^The compilers e v i d e n t l y r e l i e d on the f a c s i m i l e of the 1682 e d i t i o n e d i t e d by N a t h a l i e Dolmetsch, who i n e x p l i c a b l y ^ n e g l e c t s to mention t h a t the second p a r t of the work was omitt e d (Henrichsen E d i t i o n L t d . , London, I960).  the  catalogue  i n this  thesis,  f o r reasons  and a v a i l a b i l i t y , s u p e r c e d e s e a r l i e r Besides indexes  the thematic  o f the music  arranged  by t i t l e  an a p p e n d i x o f t r a n s c r i p t i o n s , series  t h e t h e s i s p r o v i d e s two  lyra viol  a n d one a r r a n g e d  accuracy  studies.  catalogue,  i n Playford*s  o f format,  editions»  by composer;  itemized l i s t s  of bibliographical descriptions  one  there  is  also  of contents,  f o r each  lyra  viol  and a edi-  tion. V a r i o u s works proved v a l u a b l e  f o r the present study.  The  i n t r o d u c t i o n t o a n e d i t i o n o f P l a y f o r d ' s The D a n c i n g M a s t e r (1651) Die  by Margaret D e a n - S m i t h , ^ the a r t i c l e  Musik  i n Geschichte  two a r t i c l e s ners' the  und Gegenwart  on John P l a y f o r d i n  b y t h e same  author,and  concerning Playford's r e l a t i o n s h i p with  company b y N i c h o l a s T e m p e r l e y ^ w e r e  Playford biography  i n chapter  one.  the  statio-  extremely useful f o r  Two d i s s e r t a t i o n s ,  one 7  by R u s s e l l C . N e l s o n on P l a y f o r d a n d E n g l i s h a n d one b y Ramon M e y e r o n P l a y f o r d * s  amateur  theoretical  musicians,'  treatise, An  8 Introduction  to the S k i l l  of Musick,  c o n t a i n e d much t h a t was  ^Playford's English Dancing Master a n d Company, L t d . , 1 9 5 7 ) •  1651 ( L o n d o n 1  Schott  ^x, 13^-52. ^ " J o h n P l a y f o r d a n d t h e M e t r i c a l P s a l m s , " J o u r n a l o f the A m e r i c a n M u s i c o l o g i c a l S o c i e t y , X X V , N o . 3 ( 1 9 7 2 ) , 331-78; a n d " J o h n P l a y f o r d and the S t a t i o n e r s ' Company," M u s i c and L e t t e r s ,  LIV ( A p r i l ,  1973).  203-12.  "''"John P l a y f o r d a n d t h e E n g l i s h A m a t e u r M u s i c i a n , " l i s h e d P h . D . d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f I o w a , I966).  (unpub-  o  "John Playford*s An I n t r o d u c t i o n to the S k i l l o f Musick" (unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , F l o r i d a State U n i v e r s i t y , 1961).  5 u s e f u l , p a r t i c u l a r l y f o r the second  c h a p t e r of the  F i n a l l y , f o r the h i s t o r y , l i t e r a t u r e , andnnotation viol,  two  d i s s e r t a t i o n s , one  thesis. o f the  by John E. Sawyer,^ and one  Frank T r a f i c a n t e , ^ were of g r e a t value throughout  the  study, as they are the o n l y f u l l - l e n g t h s t u d i e s on the  lyra by  entire instru-  ment to date. C e r t a i n conventions  are used throughout  r e f e r e n c e s to e d i t i o n or composition and p u n c t u a t i o n are used out the a p o s t r o p h e ) .  t i t l e s , Playford's spelling  ( t h u s , Musicks  Recreation i s l e f t with-  and s t a n d a r d s p e l l i n g s f o r the dance  i n the thematic catalogue  almain, ayre, c o r a n t , saraband c a p i t a l i z i n g the composition thesis:  and  jig).  (i.e.,  prelude,  A s t a n d a r d scheme f o r  t i t l e s i s f o l l o w e d throughout  a l l nouns, pronouns, v e r b s , adverbs  capitalized.  In  However, modern s p e l l i n g s of composers'  names have been adopted, form t i t l e s are used  the t h e s i s .  the  and a d j e c t i v e s are  F i n a l l y , each r e f e r e n c e to a l y r a v i o l p i e c e i s  accompanied by i t s thematic number, an i n d i c a t i o n (an a s t e r i s k ) i f the p i e c e appears  i n the appendix of t r a n s c r i p t i o n s , and i t s 11  l o c a t i o n ( e d i t i o n , page and composition number viol  ) i n the  lyra  editions.  9"An Anthology of Music i n Oxford, B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y , Mus. Sch. MSS d 245-7" (Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y of Toronto, 1972). T h e M a n s e l l L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e , " (Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y of P i t t s b u r g h , 1965). 1 0 , ,  11 A c c o r d i n g to the f o l l o w i n g a b b r e v i a t i o n systems P82/12/18 means P l a y f o r d , Musicks R e c r e a t i o n , 1682, page composition numbered 18.  12,  6 In u n d e r t a k i n g is  indebted  a work o f t h i s n a t u r e ,  the author n a t u r a l l y  t o others f o r c o u n t l e s s a s s i s t a n c e s .  In p a r t i c u l a r ,  I wish t o thank my t h e s i s committee f o r t h e i r p a t i e n c e  and en-  couragement, the l i b r a r y s t a f f a t the U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Columbia f o r answering numerous q u e r i e s , and most o f a l l , a d v i s o r , John E . Sawyer, f o r h i s p a t i e n c e , u n d e r s t a n d i n g a d v i c e , a l l o f which were g r e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d .  my and  CHAPTER I BIOGRAPHY AND DATING John P l a y f o r d was born i n Norwich i n 1 6 2 3 , the son o f another John P l a y f o r d , a merchant. musical  t r a i n i n g as a c h i l d ;  He e v i d e n t l y  received  s i n c e h i s name does n o t appear  i n the r e g i s t e r s o f the Norwich grammar s c h o o l , he probablyattended the C a t h e d r a l p a r t o f the c u r r i c u l u m . in  s c h o o l where music was a  standard  Sometime a f t e r the death o f h i s f a t h e r ,  1 6 3 9 , the younger P l a y f o r d t r a v e l e d t o London where he began  a s t a t i o n e r ' s t r a i n i n g under John Benson, music p u b l i s h e r and b o o k s e l l e r i n S t . Dunstan's  Church-Yard, F l e e t S t r e e t .  he had completed h i s a p p r e n t i c e s h i p ,  in April,  When  1 6 4 ? , he s e t up  his  own b u s i n e s s " i n the Inner Temple, neare the Church Doore,"  and  from t h a t shop came v i r t u a l l y a l l o f London's music p u b l i -  1 c a t i o n s f o r the next three Curiously, Playford's but  and a h a l f decades. f i r s t p u b l i c a t i o n s are n o t m u s i c a l ,  are accounts o f the t r i a l and e x e c u t i o n  which he p u b l i s h e d Tyton.  5„n c o n j u n c t i o n  of King Charles  I  w i t h P e t e r C o l e and F r a n c i s  R o y a l i s t t r a c t s d i d n o t f i n d f a v o r w i t h the P u r i t a n  government, and a warrant was i s s u e d f o r the a r r e s t o f the """Margaret Dean-Smith, ed., P l a y f o r d ' s E n g l i s h Dancing Master (London: Schott.and Company, L t d . , 1 9 5 7 ) » PP« x i - x i i .  7  8 three men  i n November, 1.649.  I t i s u n c e r t a i n whether  was a c t u a l l y imprisoned, f o r there him u n t i l one y e a r l a t e r , an e n t r y  Playford  i s no f u r t h e r r e c o r d o f  when, i n November, 1 6 5 0 ,  he made  i n the s t a t i o n e r s ' r e g i s t e r f o r h i s f i r s t  publication  of music, The E n g l i s h Dancing Master, a book which was n o t 2 released  u n t i l the f o l l o w i n g March.  Very soon t h e r e a f t e r , P l a y f o r d turned almost e x c l u s i v e l y to music p u b l i s h i n g . which c o n t a i n e d  In 1651  he p u b l i s h e d  l y r a v i o l lessons,  A Musicall  Banquet,  two-part dances f o r t r e b l e  and bass v i o l , and catches and rounds f o r v o i c e , p r e f a c e d s e c t i o n on the rudiments of music.  by a  There i s evidence t h a t i n  the same y e a r he a l s o r e l e a s e d an e d i t i o n o f l e s s o n s  for cittern  and guitar.-' In 1653,  Playford received  an appointment as c l e r k to  the Temple Church, a p o s i t i o n which e n t a i l e d d i r e c t i n g the 4 . parish  clerks*  choir practices.  1653  a l s o was  the y e a r o f  h i s marriage to the daughter o f Benjamin and Hannah A l l e n , were p u b l i s h e r s  like  who  Playford.^  Near the b e g i n n i n g o f h i s c a r e e r ,  P l a y f o r d was  living in  Three Leg A l l e y , F e t t e r Lane, next door to the Red L i o n . ^ 2 3 I b i d . , p. x i i i . ^Loc. c i t . , 4 N i c h o l a s Temper-ley, "John P l a y f o r d and the M a t r i c a l Psalms," J o u r n a l of the American M u s i c o l o g i c a l S o c i e t y , XXV, No. 3 ( 1 9 7 2 ) , pp. 3 5 5 , 357. ^Dean-Smith, " P l a y f o r d , " Die Musik i n G e s c h i c h t e und Gegenwart, X, 1 3 4 5 . ^Dean-Smith,  Playford's  E n g l i s h Dancing Master, p. x i v .  .9 A l t h o u g h i t has over the  been claimed, t h a t P l a y f o r d and  shop i n the Temple Church c o u r t y a r d  marriage, i t now  h i s wife  lived  after their  appears t h a t the shop P l a y f o r d r e n t e d  did  7  not c o n t a i n l i v i n g q u a r t e r s . '  Perhaps P l a y f o r d and  r e s i d e d a t the Three Leg A l l e y address u n t i l 1655  his  wife  when they  o  bought a house i n I s l i n g t o n . Mrs.  They r e s i d e d a t I s l i n g t o n , where  P l a y f o r d kept a b o a r d i n g s c h o o l f o r g i r l s ,  i n 1679*  Then P l a y f o r d put  u n t i l her  death  the house up f o r s a l e and moved to q  a p r i v a t e house i n A r u n d e l S t r e e t , near the Thames s i d e . P l a y f o r d was  by then i n h i s l a t e f i f t i e s .  of h a r d work which h i s c a r e e r had t o l l on h i s h e a l t h .  He  The  many y e a r s  e n t a i l e d began to take  their  s u f f e r e d a prolonged i l l n e s s i n 1680  t h e r e a f t e r g r a d u a l l y withdrew from h i s p u b l i s h i n g H i s o n l y s u r v i v i n g son, Henry, who  had  and  activities.*  0  undergone a s t a t i o n e r ' s  t r a i n i n g , p r o b a b l y under John C a r r , worked j o i n t l y w i t h h i s .  11 f a t h e r from 1680  until  168^.  In t h a t year, i n the  preface  to Choice A y r e s and Songs, f i f t h book, P l a y f o r d announced he t u r7 n i n g over h i s b u s i n e s s to h i s son Henry and R i c h a r d C a r r 'Dean-Smith, "A John P l a y f o r d Advertisement," R o y a l M(son u s i c aolf Athe s s o cp iu a Ch b lt ii so hn e rResearch , John C a rr r o) n, i cplreo,m i No. s i n g 6 to(1966), overseep. t h2,e i r Dean-Smith, " P l a y f o r d , " c o l . 13^6. o Dean-Smith, P l a y f o r d ' s E n g l i s h Dancing Master, p. x i v . was  8  7  L . M. M i d d l e t o n , "John P l a y f o r d , " D i c t i o n a r y of Biography. XV, 1303. 1 0  National  11 C h a r l e s Humphries and W i l l i a m C. Smith, Music P u b l i s h i n g i n the B r i t i s h I s l e s (2nd ed.; Oxford: B a s i l B l a c k w e l l , 1970). p. 8.  10 work.  However, John P l a y f o r d e v i d e n t l y worked on two  volumes  12 a f t e r t h i s , f o r h i s name appears on t h e i r i m p r i n t s .  Further-  more, before  the  preparation  h i s death, P l a y f o r d may  have done most of  f o r another e d i t i o n , which was  released  i n Henry  P l a y f o r d ' s name. -' 1  The  exact  date of P l a y f o r d ' s  mined because h i s w i l l , was  which was  death has  never been  deter-  drawn up on November 5,  f o r some r e a s o n not proved u n t i l August, 1694.  The  tradi-  t i o n a l assumption i s t h a t P l a y f o r d d i e d towards the end s i n c e an  'elegy'  of  1686,  i n h i s honor by Nathan Tate, s e t to music 14  Henry P u r c e l l , appeared i n 1687. of death has  1686,  been suggested.  Recently  a more exact  1686,  when Henry signed  dend f o r h i s f a t h e r , and F e b r u a r y 7»  1687,  death  of  occurred  f o r a stock  divi-  when P l a y f o r d ' s  share i n t h i s s t o c k passed i n t o the hands of Throughout h i s c a r e e r ,  time  C e r t a i n items i n the r e c o r d s  the S t a t i o n e r s ' Company i n d i c a t e t h a t P l a y f o r d ' s between December 24,  by  another.^  P l a y f o r d appears to have been on  e x c e l l e n t terms w i t h E n g l i s h m u s i c i a n s , amateur and  professional,  17  Pepys f12r e q u e n t l y p a t r o n i z e d h i s shop, which was f a v o r a b l y These are The Dancing Master. (7th ed., 1686) and Catch t h a t Catch Can (1684). x  ^ T h i s i s An I n t r o d u c t i o n to the S k i l l of Musick (11th ed., 1687). See F r a n k l i n B. Zimmerman, An I n t r o d u c t i o n to the S k i l l of Musick, by John P l a y f o r d . The T w e l f t h E d i t i o n (New York: Da Capo P r e s s , 1972), p. 1914 1 4  M i d d l e t o n , "John P l a y f o r d , " p.  1303.  ^ T e m p e r l e y , "John P l a y f o r d and the S t a t i o n e r s ' Company," Music and L e t t e r s , LIV, No. 2 (1973). 208. F r a n k K i d s o n and W i l l i a m C. Smith, "John P l a y f o r d , " Grove's D i c t i o n a r y of Music and M u s i c i a n s , VI, 825. 7lbid. l 6  1  11 located  to a t t r a c t  o f E n g l a n d ' s most friends.  These  a godfather Purcell,  gentelmen eminent  from the  composers  Innw o f C o u r t .  were  Playford's  i n c l u d e H e n r y L a w e s , who,  to Playford*s  son Henry,  f o r whom money was s e t  1R  i n 1657,  Some  personal served  as  and J o h n Blow and H e n r y  aside  in Playford's  will  for  19 mourning  rings.  Playford  seems t o h a v e d e s e r v e d  m u s i c i a n s had f o r h i m . vation.  He f r e q u e n t l y  limited appeal,  the  P r o f i t was n e v e r  esteem E n g l i s h Playford's  sole  published music of high q u a l i t y  simply for  the  satisfaction  moti-  but  of a i d i n g i n  its  20 preservation.  Furthermore,  he was g r a c i o u s ,  acknowledged and e f f u s i v e l y p r a i s e d  the  f o r he  composers  readily  in a l l  his  21 publications. inent musicians  When he d i e d , and p o e t s were  several prompted  o f L o n d o n ' s most to p u b l i s h  prom-  expressions  22 of r e g r e t . The p a r i s h c l e r k s * g u i l d , a s w e l l , j o i n e d i n p u b l i c l y v o i c i n g t h e i r thanks f o r the l a b o u r P l a y f o r d had expended  on t h e i r  behalf,  to  improve t h e i r  execution  of  23 psalmody.  J  1R  Dean-Smith,  P l a y f o r d ' s E n g l i s h Dancing Master,  " ^ C y r u s L . Day and E l e a n o r B . M u r r i e ,  p.  xiv.  " E n g l i s h Song Books,  1651-1702, a n d T h e i r P u b l i s h e r s , " The L i b r a r y , 5 t h S e r i e s , XVI, N o . k (1936), p p . 37^-520 Temperley,  p p . 211-12. 2 1  Seep.  2 3  Temperley,  " J o h n P l a y f o r d and the  111-12.  2 2  Stationers'  Company,"  M i d d l e t o n , "John P l a y f o r d , " p.  " J o h n P l a y f o r d and the M e t r i c a l P s a l m s , "  1303. p.  257.  12 P l a y f o r d h e l d r o y a l i s t sentiments throughout h i s  life.  These sentiments appear t o have caused the only f r i c t i o n he encountered throughout h i s c a r e e r  i n h i s business  dealings.  D u r i n g the Commonwealth, these sentiments e v i d e n t l y i n f l u e n c e d h i s promotion i n the ranks o f the Company. ny's  A f t e r the R e s t o r a t i o n ,  negatively  Stationers'  although he secured the  compa-  commission t o p r i n t m e t r i c a l psalms, and was c a l l e d t o the  l i v e r y i n 1661,  f u r t h e r advancement i n , and b e n e f i t s from, the  company were slow t o m a t e r i a l i z e . company from 1669  A l e t t e r by P l a y f o r d t o the  shows h i s d i s s a t i s f a c t i o n , and o n l y  i n 1681,  a r e s u l t o f a r o y a l mandate, was he e l e c t e d t o the company's 24 court o f a s s i s t a n t s . Industry Playford's list  and sound b u s i n e s s sense were o b v i o u s l y  characteristics.  This  among  i s proven by the s i z e o f h i s  o f p u b l i c a t i o n s and the number o f e d i t i o n s which each o f  these enjoyed.  Two o f the most p o p u l a r o f these were  every few years throughout h i s c a r e e r ; Master, c o n t a i n i n g and An I n t r o d u c t i o n  reissued  they were The Dancing  country dance tunes and dance d i r e c t i o n s , t o the S k i l l o f Musick, a t h e o r e t i c a l p o t  p o u r r i which was a f o u n d a t i o n i n the m u s i c a l e d u c a t i o n o f s e v e r a l g e n e r a t i o n s o f Englishmen. cal  Playford's  editions of metri-  psalms, e n t i t l e d The Whole Book o f Psalmes (1661, 166?) and  Psalmes and Hymns i n Solemn Musick (1671), were a l s o w i d e l y used.  These three  p u b l i c a t i o n s remained i n c i r c u l a t i o n u n t i l  Temperley, "John P l a y f o r d and the S t a t i o n e r s ' Company,"  pp. 203-10.  13 well  i n t o the n e x t  c e n t u r y and are  of P l a y f o r d ' s publications Also very popular,  among t h e m o s t w e l l known  today.  enjoying s e v e r a l editions each,  c e r t a i n o f h i s c o l l e c t i o n s o f songs and c a t c h e s , M u s i c a l l A y r e s and D i a l o g u e s Catch Can  (1652),  later  (1652), ^ 2  (1673)  released  popular i n h i s day.  e d i t i o n for c i t t e r n alone,  (1666),  on the C i t h r e n Violins  (1655).  two e d i t i o n s sycon  later  Court Ayres  tutors released  editions  These  (I652)  entitled Musick's .  .  2  . of  Parts  .  (1684).  and  Delight for Viols  or HarpInstrumental  b y P l a y f o r d w h i c h w e n t t o many e d i t i o n s  are  Thomas G r e e t i n g ' s The P l e a s a n t C o m p a n i o n f o r t h e F l a g e o l e t 68), A p o l l o ' s  Banquet f o r the  R e c r e a t i o n on the various  surviving Playford  lyra viol.  divided  the  subject  of this  (1667/  and M u s i c k s  thesis  whose  e d i t i o n s w i l l now be d i s c u s s e d i n d e t a i l .  Five the  Lyra V i o l ,  (1669/70)  Treble V i o l i n  The e a r l i e s t ,  into three sections,  v i o l music.  p u b l i c a t i o n s c o n t a i n music  for  A M u s i c a l l Banquet  is  (1651),  o n l y one o f w h i c h c o n t a i n s  The s u b s e q u e n t f o u r p u b l i c a t i o n s , h o w e v e r ,  w h o l l y devoted to  2<•^Only x the  l y r a v i o l m u s i c and a r e ,  dates of the  first  in fact,  editions  are  or  (1662),  . for Virginals  a n d The D i v i s i o n V i o l i n  for  include  e n t i t l e d C o u r t l y Masquing Ayres  o f M u s i c k ' s Handmaid .  (I663, I678)  (1672),  (I675).  A B o o k e o f New L e s s o n s f o r t h e C i t h e r n a n d G i t t e r n a later  that  C h o i c e Songs and A y r e s  Besides these p u b l i c a t i o n s , P l a y f o r d every instrument  Select  John H i l t o n ' s Catch  (l653)i  and C h o i c e A y r e s and Songs  virtually  s u c h as  e n t i t l e d The M u s i c a l C o m p a n i o n  H e n r y L a w e s ' A y r e s and D i a l o g u e s  were  lyra are  successive  given.  14 (and d i f f e r i n g )  editions  a t i o n on the L y r a V i o l Way;.) 1682,  under  t h e same t i t l e ,  Musicks  Reere-"  ( o r Musicks R e c r e a t i o n on the V i o l ,  A s t h e s e were r e l e a s e d  at intervals  f r o m 166[5]  Lyra-  until  i s i s apparent that P l a y f o r d and h i s c l i e n t e l e had a  sustained  interest  i n such music throughout  h i s publishing  career. The l y r a v i o l runner  o f the l a t e r  Playford  s e c t i o n o f A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t was t h e f o r e lyra viol  i n the Preface  editions,  a fact  confirmed by  t o C o u r t A y r e s (1655).  t h a t he h a d r e s o l v e d t o " e n l a r g e  T h e r e he s t a t e s  each o f these t r a c t s [ i . e .  sections  o f A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t ! a n d t o P r i n t them i n s e v e r a l l  Bookes,"  a m a t t e r w h i c h h a d now b e e n a c c o m p l i s h e d w i t h t h e p r i n t -  ing o f Court Ayres.  T h u s , b y 1655, e a c h  section of A Musicall  Banquet had e v o l v e d i n t o a separate p u b l i c a t i o n . section,  the "Lessons  f o r the L i r a V i o l , "  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n on the Lyra V i o l copy),  the second p a r t ,  The f i r s t  was e x p a n d e d  (1652 o r l653»  into  no s u r v i v i n g  e n t i t l e d M u s i c a K a r m o n i a , became C o u r t  26 Ayres  (1655)  and the t h i r d p a r t ,  C a t c h t h a t C a t c h C a n (1652). rules  prefaced  Musick and M i r t h ,  Furthermore,  the short  became section of  t o A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t was t h e e m b r y o n i c f o r m o f  A B r e e f e I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l o f M u s i c k (1654). 26 An item i n an advertisement i n A B r e e f e . I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l o f M u s i c k ( 1 s t e d . , 1654) i n d i c a t e d t h a t P l a y f o r d o r i g i n a l l y c o n s i d e r e d t h e t w o - p a r t d a n c e s i n C o u r t A y r e s t o be a continuation o f Musicks Recreation. The a d v e r t i s e m e n t r e a d s "A S e c o n d P a r t o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n [ c o n t a i n i n g A l m a i n s , ] A y r e s , C o r a n t s , and Sarabands, f o r a t r e b l e and a basse v i o l , n e v e r b e f o r e p r i n t e d . . . [ i s ] S h o r t l y t o Come f o r t h . " Sometime b e f o r e i t s r e l e a s e P l a y f o r d must have changed i t s t i t l e t o Court Ayres•  15 Of the earliest title  four surviving editions  i s e n t i t l e d Musicks R e c r e a t i o n on the  was c h a n g e d  s l i g h t l y f o r the  M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n on the are  of Musicks Recreation,  printed  on the  title  Viol,  later  Dates  editions  of Musicks Recreation, Unfortunately,  the  i n the  case o f the  copies  I n the  a clear publication date.  the  final  reads  165[?]. '''  d i g i t o f the  2  I n the  date  final  as three  p u b l i c a t i o n dates are  neither  copy,  of publication  F o r the  s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n of Musicks Recreation, offers  to  pages o f each o f these e d i t i o n s ,  on a l l P l a y f o r d ' s p u b l i c a t i o n s .  a n d 1682.  The  three editions  Lyra-Way.  they are  I669  Lyra V i o l .  i s not  the  1661,  earliest o f the  existing  British  legible--the  Royal College of Music copy,  Library  date the  corner 28  of  the  title  page w h e r e  The c u r r e n t  the  accepted  d a t e was p r i n t e d  date o f p u b l i c a t i o n f o r the  s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n of Musicks Recreation i s 1652 i n n u m e r o u s  is missing.  recent sources,  It  1652.  s u c h as R e p e r t o i r e  des S o u r c e s M u s i c a l e s , The B r i t i s h  Union Catalogue  Mu . i c , D o n a l d W i n g ' s A S h o r t T i t l e  Catalogue  Traficante's  article  Sources." ^  The a u t h o r s a n d e d i t o r s  2  t h e y may h a v e  "Music f o r  examined the  the  edition  is  dated  International of  Early  and F r a n k  Lyra V i o l : o f the  earliest  The P r i n t e d  above w o r k s ,  personally,  do n o t  although  appear  ^ L i b r a r y c a l l number K . ^ . b . l l . Upon r e q u e s t , M r . 0 . W, N e i g h b o r , a s s i s t a n t keeper o f the music l i b r a r y , examined the d a t e o n t h e e d i t i o n ' s t i t l e page a n d r e p o r t e d t h a t i t i s n o t v i s i b l e even under u l t r a - v i o l e t l i g h t . 2 8  Library  2 9  The  c a l l number  I.F.14.  Lute S o c i e t y J o u r n a l , V I I I  (1966),  7-24.  to  have g i v e n any o r i g i n a l t h o u g h t t o indicates  the  title  authority  for  the  on e a r l i e r music  date  sources,  i n the  page's  The f i r s t edition  the  L i b r a r y , i n w h i c h the and the  on the  clear  spine  of Musicks Recreation  authors  relied  catalogue of d a t e 1652 i s  of which i s  occurs  none the  b i n d i n g o f the  assignment o f the  date;  or states  A p p a r e n t l y the  in a l l probability,  British  of Music,  edition's  lack of c l a r i t y ,  1652.  w i t h no q u a l i f i c a t i o n , College  the  i n the  given,  copy i n the  stamped  date  printed  Royal  "1652."  1652 t o British  this Library 30  c a t a l o g u e c o m p i l e d by B a r c l a y S q u i r e Squire  also  (1909).  but  c o m p i l e d the in this  and p u b l i s h e d  c a t a l o g u e o f the  c a t a l o g u e he a s s i g n e d  in  1912.  Royal College of no d a t e t o  the  edition.  The R o y a l C o l l e g e o f M u s i c c o p y h a d p r e v i o u s l y b e e n i n  the  library  the  entire  o f the  S a c r e d H a r m o n i c S o c i e t y u n t i l l 8 8 2 when  l i b r a r y was a c q u i r e d  Sacred Harmonic S o c i e t y library  i n 18?2  by the  issued  i n w h i c h the  the  Royal College of Music. final  catalogue of  copy o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n  Music  The  its was  30 Wm. B a r c l a y S q u i r e , C a t a l o g u e o f P r i n t e d M u s i c P u b l i s h e d b e t w e e n 148? a n d 1800 now i n t h e B r i t i s h Museum (2 v o l s . ; London: P r i n t e d by O r d e r o f t h e T r u s t e e s , 1 9 1 2 ) , I I , 2 8 2 . J  - ^ S q u i r e , C a t a l o g u e o f P r i n t e d M u s i c i n the L i b r a r y o f the R o y a l C o l l e g e o f Music (London: P r i n t e d by O r d e r o f the C o u n c i l , 1909), p . 248. I n a copy o f t h i s c a t a l o g u e i n the P a r r y Room o f t h e R o y a l C o l l e g e o f M u s i c , t h e d a t e 1652 h a s b e e n added i n i n k to the p r i n t e d e n t r y . T h i s was t h e w o r k o f M i s s B a r b a r a B a n n e r , c h i e f l i b r a r i a n o f t h e c o l l e g e , who a d d e d t h e d a t e s o m e t i m e d u r i n g W o r l d War I I . M i s s Banner confirms t h a t t h e s o u r c e o f h e r i n f o r m a t i o n was t h e d a t e s t a m p e d o n t h e s p i n e of the volume. ( I n f o r m a t i o n r e c e i v e d from M i s s L i t t l e John, a s s i s t a n t k e e p e r o f t h e P a r r y Room, R o y a l C o l l e g e o f M u s i c . )  17  tentatively  assigned  Squire rejected  this  t h e d a t e o f 1656. date.  from t h e n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u r y on t h e s p i n e rejected  this  a n d i f t h e d a t e "1652"  d a t e as w e l l .  However,  It  sometime  have been  1652.  then  No r e a s o n s f o r t h i s  c a n now be c o n c l u s i v e l y shown t h a t t h e e d i t i o n i n  Recreation  b e e n p u b l i s h e d i n 1655•  i n t h e l650's, t h e e a r l i e s t sometime  these conclusions  i n the period  edition,  1651-1653•"^  comes f r o m p r i n t e d  from t h e p r e f a c e  earliest  ca.  the i d e n t i c a l  Furthermore,  c a n be shown t h a t P l a y f o r d p u b l i s h e d two e d i t i o n s  works,  Squire  found.  q u e s t i o n must have f i r s t  appearing  stem  stamped  between  a n d 1912 h e saw f i t t o a s s i g n  L i b r a r y copy t o t h e y e a r  assignment  it  The b i n d i n g o f t h e c o p y may  was a d d e d a t t h e t i m e o f t h e b i n d i n g ,  1909 ( o r e a r l i e r ) British  F o r unknown r e a s o n s ,  now  o f Musicks lost,  The e v i d e n c e f o r  advertisements o f P l a y f o r d ' s  t o C o u r t A y r e s (l655)»  and from t h e  s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n o f Musicks Recreation.  W i l l i a m Henry Husk, Catalogue o f the L i b r a r y o f the Sacred Harmonic S o c i e t y . A New E d i t i o n , A u g m e n t e d ( L o n d o n , 1 8 7 2 ) , p . 1 7 5 , n o . 157*K J  • ^ E a r l i e r w r i t e r s a l s o b e l i e v e d t h a t t h e r e were t w o editions. W i l l i a m C . H a z l e t t (Handbook t o t h e P o p u l a r , P o e t i c a l and Dramatic L i t e r a t u r e o f Great B r i t a i n ILondon: J o h n R u s s e l l S m i t h , l 8 6 7 j ~ p p . 411, 4 6 2 ) l i s t s ~ a ~ 1 6 5 3 a n d a I656 e d i t i o n . Frank Kidson ( B r i t i s h Music P u b l i s h e r s , P r i n t e r s a n d E n g r a v e r s , p . 98) s p e a k s o f a 1652 e d i t i o n a n d a n o t h e r i n 1656. He n e g l e c t s t o m e n t i o n t h e 1656 e d i t i o n i n a l a t e r a r t i c l e , h o w e v e r ( " J o h n P l a y f o r d and S e v e n t e e n t h C e n t u r y M u s i c P u b l i s h i n g , " The M u s i c a l Q u a r t e r l y , I V , N o . 4 [1918], 5 2 4 ) . M i d d l e t o n , i n h e r a r t i c l e on P l a y f o r d i n the D i c t i o n a r y o f N a t i o n a l B i o g r a p h y m e n t i o n s a 1652 a n d a 1656 e d i t i o n , a s K i d s o n d o e s , a n d J e f f r e y P u l v e r d e c l a r e s t h e r e was a 1652 e d i t i o n w h i c h was r e p r i n t e d i n 1655 ( " M u s i c i n E n g l a n d D u r i n g t h e C o m m o n w e a l t h , " A c t a M u s i c o l o g i c a , V I , F a s c . 4 [1934], 176).  18 The  Evidence a.  The e a r l i e s t s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n . •. c o n t a i n s 103 p i e c e s o r " l e s s o n s . " P l a y f o r d , however, t h o u g h t t h a t i t c o n t a i n e d 102 l e s s o n s . The numbering o f the l e s s o n s c o n t a i n s many v a g a r i e s , a f a c t P l a y f o r d a l l u d e s t o on f o l i o A k o f the e d i t i o n where he s a y s : "Reader, t h r o u g h the o v e r s i g h t o f the P r i n t e r , the number of the Lessons are n o t f i g u r e d r i g h t , however you w i l l f i n d 102 Lessons i n t h i s Book." v  b.  1653 S e l e c t M u s i c a l l A y r e s . On f . I i 2 o c c u r s an a d v e r t i s e m e n t w i t h the f o l l o w i n g item: "Musicks R e c r e a t i o n c o n t a i n i n g 117 C h o i c e Lessons f o r the Lone Lyra V i o l l . " An entry f o r t h i s p u b l i c a t i o n occurs i n the r e g i s t e r s of the S t a t i o n e r s ' Company, d a t e d 22 Dec. 1653.3^  c.  [ 1 6 5 3 ? ] A C a t a l o g u e of a l l the Musick-Bookes . (Lbm, MS H a r l . 5936/421). T h i s s i n g l e s h e e t c a t a l o g u e o f E n g l i s h music books i s b e l i e v e d to have been p r i n t e d i n 1653.35 Under the h e a d i n g M u s i c Bookes l a t e l y P r i n t e d o c c u r s the f o l l o w i n g item: "Musickes R e c r e a t i o n , o r c h o i c e Lessons f o r the L y r a V i o l l to s e v e r a l l new t u n i n g s , composed by s e v e r a l l E x c e l l e n t M a s t e r s . "  d.  1655 C o u r t A y r e s . I n the p r e f a c e ( f . A2 ) . P l a y f o r d d i s c u s s e s the e x p a n s i o n o f the s e c t i o n s of A M u s i c a l l Banquet i n t o s e p a r a t e p u b l i c a t i o n s and says t h a t the lyra section "... [was expanded i n t o ] ' M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n , w h e r e i n i s 117 Lessons f o r the L y r a V i o l l . "  e.  1655 A n I n t r o d u c t i o n to the S k i l l of M u s i c k . A n a d v e r t i s e m e n t on f . E K c o n t a i n s the f o l l o w i n g i t e m : " M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n on the L y r a V i o l l , c o n t a i n i n g 102 L e s s o n s , w i t h i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r the l e a r n e r s t h e r e o n . "  f.  [ 1 6 5 5 ? ] There i s an a d v e r t i s e m e n t of P l a y f o r d p u b l i c a t i o n s bound w i t h the R o y a l C o l l e g e o f M u s i c copy of the e a r l i e s t s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n on M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n . This a d v e r t i s e ment i s n o t an i n t e g r a l p a r t o f the book, but a s i n g l e  v  V  v  ^ O f . t h e P l a y f o r d p u b l i c a t i o n s i s s u e d 1652-9. and p e r t i n e n t t o the p r e s e n t d a t i n g problem, o n l y S e l e c t M u s i c a l l A y r e s (1653) i s r e c o r d e d i n A T r a n s c r i p t of the R e g i s t e r s o f the W o r s h i p f u l Company of S t a t i o n e r s 1640-1708 A.D. (London: By the A u t h o r , 1913-14), ed. G. E. B r i s c o e E y r e . -'-'See W i l l i a m C. S m i t h , " P l a y f o r d , Some H i t h e r t o U n n o t i c e d C a t a l o g u e s , " The M u s i c a l Times. LXVII ( J u l y , 1926), 638, and Lenore C o r a l , "A John P l a y f o r d A d v e r t i s e m e n t , " R o y a l M u s i c a l A s s o c i a t i o n R e s e a r c h C h r o n i c l e , No. 5 (1965), 2~  19 s h e e t b o u n d a t t h e e n d o f t h e e d i t i o n . The a d v e r t i s e ment a p p e a r s t o h a v e b e e n p r i n t e d i n 1655 f o r t h e f o l l o w i n g reasons: i. t h r e e i t e m s m e n t i o n e d i n i t were r e l e a s e d i n 1655" C o u r t A y r e s , H e n r y L a w e s ' A y r e s a n d Dialogues and the second e d i t i o n o f A n I n t r o duction to the S k i l l o f Musick; ii.  t h e w o r k s l i s t e d a r e v i r t u a l l y t h e same a s those l i s t e d i n the advertisement i n An I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l o f M u s i c k (1655)•  The a d v e r t i s e m e n t l e a f a n d t h e e d i t i o n may h a v e b e e n i n i t i a l l y i s s u e d a n d b o u n d t o g e t h e r i n 1655. Their bound a s s o c i a t i o n c e r t a i n l y i s e a r l i e r t h a n t h e p r e s e n t , presumably nineteenth-century b i n d i n g , a f a c t suggested by t h e d e c a y , r e p a i r s a n d s t i t c h i n g h o l e s p r e s e n t . F i r s t , t h e d e c a y s t a r t i n g o n page 65 a n d e x t e n d i n g u p to and i n c l u d i n g the advertisement l e a f , i s u n i f o r m . S e c o n d l y , s t i t c h h o l e s from a n e a r l i e r b i n d i n g a r e i n evidence; throughout the e d i t i o n there are four o f these on every l e a f . W h i l e o n l y one i s v i s i b l e o n t h e a d v e r t i s e m e n t l e a f , r e p a i r s h a v e b e e n made t o t h e l e a f a t t h e e x a c t p l a c e s where t h e o t h e r t h r e e h o l e s w o u l d have been found.36 One o f t h e i t e m s i n t h e advertisement reads "Musicks R e c r e a t i o n on the Lyra • V i o l l c o n t a i n i n g 102'Lessons w i t h p l a i n e a n d e a s i e d i r e c t i o n s f o r yong b e g i n n e r s . " g.  1656 M a t t h e w L o c k e . H i s L i t t l e C o n s o r t o f Three P a r t s . On t h e i n s i d e b a c k ( o r i g i n a l ) c o v e r o f t h e B a s s u s t h e r e is an advertisement with the f o l l o w i n g item: "Musicks R e c r e a t i o n o n t h e L y r a V i o l , c o n t a i n i n g 102 L e s s o n s , w i t h p l a i n and easie D i r e c t i o n s f o r Tuning the V i o l , , and k e e p i n g T i m e . "  h.  1659 S e l e c t A y r e s a n d D i a l o g u e s . A n a d v e r t i s e m e n t o n f . A 2 contains the following item: V  "Musicks Recreation on the Lyra V i o l , C o n t a i n i n g 100 L e s s o n s , v i s . P r e l u d i u m s , A l m a i n s , C o r a n t s , S a r a b a n d s , a n d s e v e r a l new a n d p l e a s a n t T u n e s for the Lyra V i o l , with Instructions f o r beginners: p r i n t e d 1656." i.  1661 M u s i c k s Re r e a t i o n o n t h e V i o l , e d i t i o n c o n t a i n s 123 l e s s o n s .  Lyra-Way.  This  3 I n f o r m a t i o n r e c e i v e d from M i s s J o a n L i t t l e John, a s s i s t a n t k e e p e r , P a r r y Room, R o y a l C o l l e g e o f M u s i c , a n d D r . John Sawyer.  20  j.  1664 A B r e e f e I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l o f M u s i c k . On f . L s o c c u r s a n . ' a d v e r t i s e m e n t w i t h t h e f o l l o w i n g itemi " M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n on the L y r a V i o l , c o n t a i n i n g 100 C h o i c e a n d P l e a s a n t L e s s o n s , w i t h I n s t r u c t i o n s f o r Beginners." v  1666 A B r i e f I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l o f M u s i c k . On f . L i ( . o c c u r s a n a d v e r t i s e m e n t w i t h t h e f o l l o w i n g item: " M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n on the L y r a V i o l , c o n t a i n i n g 100 C h o i c e a n d P l e a s a n t L e s s o n s , w i t h I n s t r u c t i o n s f o r Beginners."  k.  v  1667 A B r i e f I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l o f M u s i c k . On f . LZjX o c c u r s a n a d v e r t i s e m e n t w i t h t h e f o l l o w i n g item: " M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n on t h e L y r a V i o l , c o n t a i n i n g 100 C h o i c e a n d P l e a s a n t L e s s o n s , w i t h I n s t r u c t i o n s f o r Beginners."  1.  In  Playford  o n l y once s p e c i f i e s  date o f p u b l i c a t i o n f o r an e d i t i o n o f  Musicks.Recreation:  1656  the  above e x t r a c t s ,  (item h ) .  the numbers  When t h i s  is considered i n conjunction with  of pieces mentioned,  it  appears  that  been t h r e e e d i t i o n s o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n i n the lessons  ( i t e m s b a n d d)  1655  103  lessons  (items e,  f,  1656  100  lessons  (items h ,  j , k,  evidence establishes  a n d g) and  l)  that there  two, and p r o b a b l y o n l y two, e d i t i o n s a p p e a r i n g  were in  1650's. The  with  102  three d e s c r i p t i o n s of an e d i t i o n o f Musicks R e c r e a t i o n lessons  While there are there end  l650's:  117  definitely  the  t h e r e may h a v e  1651-53  C l o s e r e x a m i n a t i o n o f the  a  t o be 102,  o f the  lessons  f i t the 103  surviving,  lessons  i n the  undated e d i t i o n e x a c t l y . latter,  Playford  thought  s i n c e he s p e c i f i e s t h i s n u m b e r i n a n o t e  preface.  This  is a significantly  from t h a t mentioned i n a d v e r t i s e m e n t s  at  the  d i f f e r e n t number o f from  1653  and  21 1655—117—and s t r o n g l y different  s u g g e s t s t h a t we a r e d e a l i n g w i t h t w o  editions.  The 103 l e s s o n e d i t i o n m u s t h a v e since It the  the e a r l i e s t  seems u n l i k e l y last  1655.  advertisement that  reference  f o r i t appears  i n that than  t o the 117-lesson e d i t i o n a l s o  i n Court Ayres.  I n the l a t t e r ,  a second e d i t i o n o f t h i s  Playford  year.  1655 f o r  occurs i n  discusses  section of A Musicall  a separate book, Musicks R e c r e a t i o n .  the  Banquet  into  I f he h a d a l r e a d y  published  b o o k he u n d o u b t e d l y w o u l d h a v e  mentioned  fact. The 1 1 7 - l e s s o n e d i t i o n m u s t h a v e  sometime after to  i n p r i n t b y 1655  i t was p u b l i s h e d e a r l i e r  evolution o f the l y r a v i o l  the  been  i n the p e r i o d 1651-53;  A Musicall  Banquet  i t i s i n 1653.3?  edition where  That  i s established  Playford  (1651),  states  first  w h i l e the e a r l i e s t  i t was, i n fact,  the f i r s t  the l y r a  reference lyra  viol  to Court Ayres,  section of A Musicall  Banquet e v o l v e d i n t o a s e p a r a t e book o f l y r a specifically,  published  i t was o b v i o u s l y p u b l i s h e d  a g a i n from t h e p r e f a c e that  been  lessons  with,  "117 l e s s o n s . "  • ^ N o e v i d e n c e h a s b e e n f o u n d s u p p o r t i n g 1652 a s t h e y e a r of p u b l i c a t i o n . There i s no e n t r y f o r A M u s i c a l l Banquet i n A T r a n s c r i p t o f the R e g i s t e r s o f the W o r s h i p f u l Company•of S a a t i o n e r s f r o m 1 W O ' l o i ?Q 6 _ A . D " w h i l e t h e e n t r y f o r S e l e c t M u s i c a l l A y r e s (1653) appears toward t h e end o f December, 1 6 5 3 ' Hence "both 1651 a n d 1653 a r e p o s s i b l e d a t e s o f p u b l i c a t i o n , j u d g i n g by t h e e v i d e n c e so f a r u n e a r t h e d . H o w e v e r , 1651 i s l e s s l i k e l y t h a n t h e two s u c c e e d i n g y e a r s u n l e s s a n i m m e d i a t e p o p u l a r i t y - o f 'A_J!ujicalJ _Ban^u5t s p e c i f i c a l l y the l y r a v i o l s e c t i o n , p r o m p t e d P l a y f o r d t o r a d i d l y a s s e m b l e a t l e a s t n i n e t y new l y r a pieces f o r Musicks Recreation. :  i  22 The  1 1 7 - l e s s o n e d i t i o n seems t o h a v e d i f f e r e d f r o m  103-lesson e d i t i o n n o t o n l y i n t h e number c f l e s s o n s in the  the absence  of instructional material.  earlier edition fail  hand,  a l l references  t e n t l y emphasize the  light  remarks  which a t l e a s t and  i n the preface  on the m a t t e r .  He r e f e r s  A s we h a v e s e e n ,  they c o n t a i n to t h i s  other  consis-  copies of  instructions.  e d i t i o n shed  to the e d i t i o n ' s  one w r i t e r assumes  to  On t h e  t o t h e 103 a n d 1 0 0 - l e s s o n e d i t i o n s  103-lesson e d i t i o n s u r v i v e ;  Playford's  but also  A l l references  to mention i n s t r u c t i o n s .  the i n s t r u c t i o n s .  the  t o be A M u s i c a l l  further  predecessor, Banquet,  says B e i n g now t o R e p r i n t t h i s Book o f L e s s o n s f o r t h e L o n e L y r a V i o l l , I t h o u g h t i t g o o d t o make a n A d d i t i o n o f many new a n d e a s i e L e s s o n s , f o r t h e b e n e f i t and encouragement o f yong L e a r n e r s : a n d a l s o t o adde a few B r i e f e and n e c e s s a r y D i r e c t i o n s , e s p e c i a l l y f o r y o n g b e g i n n e r s , who l i v e i n t h e C o u n t r e y , a n d f a r f r o m any M a s t e r o r T e a c h e r .  Playford  clearly refers  a n d he d e s c r i b e s easy p i e c e s  to a book, n o t a p a r t  the a d d i t i o n o f a d i f f e r e n t  designed f o r beginners--rather  the number o f l e s s o n s .  than an i n c r e a s e  seems  An engraving of a v i o l  ^ Traficante, S o u r c e s , " p . 21. 8  lessons  unlikely.  i s one more i n d i c a t i o n t h a t t h e e a r l i e s t  1651-53'  to  t h e number o f  e d i t i o n o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n was n o t p u b l i s h e d u n t i l period  in  s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n of Musicks Recreation  exceeds A M u s i c a l l Banquet, There  type o f p i e c e —  That P l a y f o r d would have f a i l e d  mention the a d d i t i o n o f s e v e n t y - s i x p i e c e s , by w h i c h t h e e a r l i e s t  o f an e d i t i o n ,  surviving after  the  a n d bow a p p e a r s o n t h e  "Music f o r the Lyra. V i o l :  The P r i n t e d  2  t i t l e page o f t h i s e d i t i o n .  3  A l o n g the f i n g e r b o a r d o f t h e v i o l  i s a s e r i e s o f l e t t e r s and numbers i d e n t i f y i n g t h e f r e t s and positions.  As t h e f i g u r e s a r e a t a n i n e t y degree a n g l e t o t h e  o t h e r p r i n t i n g on t h e page, i t i s a p p a r e n t t h a t t h e i l l u s t r a t i o n was d e s i g n e d f o r some o t h e r purpose.  The o r i g i n a l purpose  becomes c l e a r upon an e x a m i n a t i o n o f P l a y f o r d ' s e d i t i o n s released before  1655 ( t h e p r o b a b l e date o f t h e l y r a v i o l  the i l l u s t r a t i o n appears w i t h i n A B r e e f e S k i l l o f M u s i c k ( f i r s t e d i t i o n , 1654). p o s i t i o n opposite -ao Basse V i o l l . "  J y  I n t r o d u c t i o n to the Here i t i s i n u p r i g h t  the s e c t i o n of " p l a i n e d i r e c t i o n s f o r the Probably  t h e i l l u s t r a t i o n was d e s i g n e d f o r t h e  1654 I n t r o d u c t i o n and l a t e r i n c o r p o r a t e d edition.  edition):  i n t o the l y r a  viol  This i n d i c a t e s t h a t the e a r l i e s t s u r v i v i n g e d i t i o n o f  M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n was p r i n t e d i n o r l a t e r t h a n 1 6 5 4 . From t h e above d i s c u s s i o n , i t i s c l e a r t h a t t h e r e were a t l e a s t two e d i t i o n s o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n p u b l i s h e d  i n the lo50's.  That t h e r e was a t h i r d e d i t i o n w i t h 100 l e s s o n s p u b l i s h e d seems much l e s s p r o b a b l e .  i n I656  The d i f f e r e n c e i n t h e s t a t e d number  o f l e s s o n s — 1 0 2 and 100--can r e a d i l y be a s c r i b e d t o an e r r o r i n the composing o f t h e a d v e r t i s e m e n t i n S e l e c t A y r e s and D i a " l n t h e 1661, I669 and 1682 e d i t i o n s o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n the same i l l u s t r a t i o n appears w i t h t h e a d d i t i o n , i n t h e l a t e r two e d i t i o n s , o f a s t a f f showing t h e o p e n - s t r i n g bass v i o l p i t c h e s . L i k e t h e o t h e r f i g u r e s on the e n g r a v i n g , t h e s t a f f i s sideways on t h e page. S i n c e a s t a f f w h i c h shows t h e p i t c h e s o f a v i o l i n s t a n d a r d t u n i n g i s n o t a p p r o p r i a t e f o r volumes o f l y r a v i o l m u s i c , i t was s u s p e c t e d t h a t the i l l u s t r a t i o n had been a l t e r e d f o r some p u b l i c a t i o n w h i c h was r e l e a s e d between 1661 and I 6 6 9 . T h i s was indeed t h e c a s e , as f u r t h e r i n v e s t i g a t i o n o f e d i t i o n s o f the I n t r o d u c t i o n showed: t h e a l t e r e d i l l u s t r a t i o n f i r s t appeared i n A B r i e f e I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l of Musick (1664). J  24  (1659).  logues  I n the l a t e r  1667. t h e 1659 a d v e r t i s e m e n t ,  advertisements rather  was e v i d e n t l y u s e d a s t h e s o u r c e , of Musicks R e c r e a t i o n appeared, R a t h e r than produce  than an a c t u a l p u b l i c a t i o n ,  f o r i n 1661, a new e d i t i o n  with  123  lessons.  a new e d i t i o n i n 1656,  p r o b a b l y r e i s s u e d t h e 1655 e d i t i o n . t o t h e number o f p i e c e s ;  A p a r t from  t h e 1659 a d v e r t i s e m e n t  s u r v i v i n g 103-lesson e d i t i o n , f o r t h e l a t t e r lessons  and i n s t r u c t i o n s .  P l a y f o r d w o u l d have apart.  Such a s w i f t  Finally,  a mistake  Furthermore,  its  reference the  contains  b o t h new  i t seems u n l i k e l y  r e - e d i t i o n was u n u s u a l ,  the p o s s i b i l i t y  that  that  only a year  even f o r P l a y f o r d ' s  The D a n c i n g M a s t e r a n d A B r i e f  i n t h e 1659 a d v e r t i s e m e n t  advertisement,  Playford  suits  i n t r o d u c e d two new e d i t i o n s  two m o s t p o p u l a r s e r i e s , tion.  1664, 1666 a n d  of  Introduc-  t h e d a t e o f 1656 was s i m p l y c a n n o t be o v e r r u l e d .  In that  Catch t h a t Catch Can i s g i v e n the p u b l i c a t i o n  d a t e o f 1651 when i n f a c t  i t was p u b l i s h e d i n  Throughout the remainder o f t h i s  thesis  1652. i t i s assumed  Playford  p r o d u c e d two e d i t i o n s o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n i n t h e  1650's1  one i n t h e p e r i o d  1651-531  I656,  with a possible reissue  in  The s e c o n d e d i t i o n w i l l  be d a t e d  Whether P l a y f o r d  now l o s t ,  a n d one i n  o f w h i c h two c o p i e s  editions  Playford's  The w o r d i n g o f r e f e r e n c e s advertisements  new e d i t i o n , o r p e r h a p s and I678.  references.  of Musicks  a t i o n t h a n t h e ones w h i c h s u r v i v e and t h e l o s t f i r s t uncertain.  1655  remain.  l65[5] i n a l l f u r t h e r  published other  that  Recre-  edition is  to Musicks Recreation i n  s u g g e s t s t h a t t h e r e may h a v e b e e n a  a reprint,  i s s u e d b e t w e e n t h e y e a r s 1675  I n The M u s i c a l C o m p a n i o n (1673) a n d C h o i c e A y r e s  (1675)  25 there are with  advertisements  152 l e s s o n s :  Master  the  i.e.,  (l675)i  m e n t i o n i n g the  I 6 6 9  number  edition.  Playford's  before books are  I669  of lessons  contains,  I 6 7 8 ,  Then,in  passed  indicate  the  this .  ( 1 6 8 5 a n d 1686)  Additions."  on t o h i s  .  still  without  presumably  advertisement . newly  appears  reprinted  r e p r i n t i n g may h a v e  advertisements  e d i t i o n of Musicks Recreation. Banquet,  the  (1688)  i n the  this  author  i s s u e d by Henry P l a y f o r d ; ^  0  Instructions  British  The f i n a l occurs  the  entry  for  the  Library,  in  to  I69I  appears, .  second  there  with the  1682  edition of "Instrumen-  . The  book  mention of Musicks  I697,  in a  reads "Musicks  catalogue  Recreation,  Lyra-Viol."  MS H a r l .  and  Lyra-Viol  presumably r e f e r  f o r Henry P l a y f o r d .  for l y r a - v i o l . "  R e c r e a t i o n known t o  London,  of Music  newly r e p r i n t e d  Then,  adver-  shortly first  following reference  Music newly r e p r i n t e d  plainest  occurred  of Music,  a n d i n The B a n q u e t  v a r i e t y o f new l e s s o n s ,  after  Henry's  f o r " M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n on t h e  These  with directions  son Henry.  I n H e n r y ' s The T h e a t e r  advertisements  or the  Musicks Recreation  "Musicks Recreation  business  containing [a]  tal  it  I n The D a n c i n g  M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n saw a n o t h e r r e p r i n t i n g  I69I.  Apollo's  edition.  Recreation  additions."  Perhaps  tisements  the  Playford advertises  M u s i c k ' s Handmaid: with large  f o r an e d i t i o n o f M u s i c k s  5936/422-428.  in  CHAPTER I I THE  INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL  I t has ever been my opinion, t h a t i f a Man made any d i s c o v e r y , by which an A r t or S c i e n c e might be l e a r n t w i t h l e s s expence [ s i c ] of Time and T r a v e l , he was o b l i g e d i n common duty to communicate the knowledge t h e r e o f to o t h e r s . T h i s maxim has not been my o p i n i o n o n l y , but my p r a c t i c e . P l a y f o r d , Musicks Hand-maid. ( I 6 7 8 ) 1  1  P l a y f o r d ' s understanding  o f the m u s i c a l  i n t e r e s t s of  London's a f f l u e n t s o c i e t y u n d e r l i e s the l e n g t h y  success  of  2  h i s music p u b l i s h i n g b u s i n e s s .  Because o f h i s  and h i s m u s i c a l background, he was musicians  with  songs, c o u n t r y  the types dances and  d i r e c t i o n s on how  o f music they  An  with  I n t r o d u c t i o n to re-  P l a y f o r d ' s major e f f o r t  Many of P l a y f o r d ' s o t h e r e d i t i o n s ,  i n s t r u m e n t a l l e s s o n books, i n c l u d e  t h e o r e t i c a l information. ^ol.  desired—catches,  c o n t i n u a l l y r e v i s e d and  i s s u e d throughout h i s c a r e e r , was  and  amateur  short instrumental dances—and  the S k i l l o f Musick, which was  i h p a r t i c u l a r the  able to p r o v i d e  to perform the music.  i n the t h e o r e t i c a l v e i n .  understanding  Sometimes the  practical  information  A2.  o  R u s s e l l C l a i r e Nelson, "John P l a y f o r d and the E n g l i s h Amateur M u s i c i a n , " (unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y of Iowa, 1966), pp. 9. 13-  26  27 appears t o have been added as a d i r e c t r e s u l t o f requests from P l a y f o r d ' s customers. appear i n the f i r s t  F o r i n s t a n c e , no i n s t r u c t i o n s  e d i t i o n o f Musicks Hand-maid . . . f o r  V i r g i n a l s o r Harpsycon  (I663).  I n the second e d i t i o n  however, P l a y f o r d adds i n s t r u c t i o n s ,  (1678),  stating,  Many o f those t h a t bought o f the former Impression o f Musicks Hand-Maid were n o t w e l l s a t i s f i e d , (espec i a l l y such who dwelt i n the Country remote from an Able Master) because she brought n o t w i t h her some Rules and D i r e c t i o n s f o r p l a y i n g those Lessons c o n t a i n e d therein.3 Three types  o f i n f o r m a t i o n might appear i n h i s p u b l i -  c a t i o n s o f i n s t r u m e n t a l musict  1)  i n f o r m a t i o n on the n o t a 2)  i n f o r m a t i o n on  produces, and 3)  i n f o r m a t i o n on  t i o n used f o r the p a r t i c u l s r instrument, the p i t c h e s the instrument h a n d l i n g the instrument.  I n some o f P l a y f o r d ' s  instrumental  l e s s o n books, such as A Booke o f New Lessons f o r C i t h e r n and  (1652)  Gittern  he presents  and Musick's D e l i g h t on the C i t h r e n  a l l three types  of information.  as Musicks Hand-maid and Musicks R e c r e a t i o n he p r o v i d e s  o n l y the f i r s t  two t y p e s .  (1666),  In others,  such  on the L y r a V i o l ,  In a l l Playford's  i n s t r u m e n t a l l e s s o n books, h i s d i s c u s s i o n s o f the f i r s t two types  o f i n f o r m a t i o n f o l l o w the same p a t t e r n .  presents  F i r s t he  i n f o r m a t i o n which r e l a t e s to the instrument*  d i s c u s s e s terminology,  he  i l l u s t r a t e s the p i t c h e s the instrument  produces, d e f i n e s any ornaments used i n the e d i t i o n and, i n the case o f s t r i n g instruments,  3  Fol.  A . 2  gives tuning  instructions.  28 Next he d i s c u s s e s and  rhythm, e x p l a i n i n g the v a r i o u s note  time s i g n a t u r e s The  used i n the e d i t i o n .  complete d i s c u s s i o n takes a r e l a t i v e l y  number o f pages.  values  In nearly a l l Playford's  small  instrumental  l e s s o n books, the i n s t r u c t i o n a l m a t e r i a l , the t i t l e  page and  L the l e t t e r o f d e d i c a t i o n are r e l e g a t e d Since  almost a l l P l a y f o r d ' s  t o the f i r s t  instrumental  gathering.  l e s s o n books a r e  p r i n t e d i n quarto format,^ the space a t h i s d i s p o s a l was limited. A M u s i c a l l Banquet (1651), the f i r s t editions to contain l y r a v i o l lessons, few  i s prefaced  Rules and D i r e c t i o n s f o r such as l e a r n e  p l a y on the V i o l . " ^  of Playford's by "some  to sing, or to  To s u i t the v a r i e t y o f music i n A M u s i c a l l  Banquet ( l y r a v i o l l e s s o n s , two-part dances f o r v i o l s ,  catches  and  chiefly  r o u n d s ) , the i n s t r u c t i o n s are o f a g e n e r a l n a t u r e ,  devoted t o rudiments.  The d i r e c t i o n s which apply  t o the  instruments f o r which the e d i t i o n i s i n t e n d e d - - v i o l a da gamba, l y r a v i o l and v i o l i n — a r e v e r y b r i e f and are r e s t r i c t e d t o o n l y the most o b v i o u s l y n e c e s s a r y .  F o r the t r e b l e and bass  v i o l , P l a y f o r d simply mentions the p i t c h e s  o f the open s t r i n g s ,  then, on a t a b l a t u r e graph, i n d i c a t e s the p i t c h e s produced by  L O f t e n the advertisement, which P l a y f o r d n e a r l y always i n c l u d e s i n h i s e d i t i o n s , appears i n the f i r s t g a t h e r i n g as well. ^The e x c e p t i o n s appear t o be P l a y f o r d ' s two e d i t i o n s o f c i t t e r n music (A Booke o f New Lessons [1652] Musick's D e l i g h t [1666]) which are p r i n t e d i n octavo format. A l i s t of most o f P l a y f o r d ' s e d i t i o n s with the format d e s i g n a t e d appears i n Donald Wing's A S h o r t T i t l e C a t a l o g u e, 2nd ed., (New Yorks The Index S o c i e t y , 1972), pp. 58-59; unfortunately Wing's l i s t i s incomplete. a  6  Fol. Aj.  n  d  29 stopping  the  Example 1.  tO  C  •H  h -p to  ffl  0)  &  cd  •.  Q)  u +> g  W)  3  g  t>>  -p 0)  .c .c *: a>  •p  jz\  to  EH  d  to ' H  CH Q> o  s t r i n g s a t the v a r i o u s For  the v i o l i n , he  D A E C Gamut DD  indicated i n  simply mentions the  Eb.,.,.. E -J P, —Bb —,F F#..  F  r. r.  c# ... An „. G#— F.Eh  f r e t s , as  pitches  #  r  A "h  ^h P *  P  EE _  P V H  O  >  Example 1. "An Example to f i n d e your Notes both F l a t sharpe on the Basse V i o l . "  and  7  o  of i t s open s t r i n g s . gives  almost no  instructions.  devoted to the the  F i n a l l y , f o r the  lyra viol,  There i s only one  explains  the  two  l e f t - h a n d p i z z i c a t o , and  the  s l u r ) used i n the  Playford e x p l i c i t l y  states  'graces*  (the  i n s t r u c t i o n s he 'able Master.'  'thump', or 9 lessons.  i n a M u s i c a l l Banquet t h a t  beginner s h o u l d seek out a t e a c h e r f o r l e s s o n s .  of an  paragraph  instrument, i n which P l a y f o r d simply names  t u n i n g s and  of the  Playford  advises  At  the  the  close  h i s r e a d e r s to secure the  aid  Teachers were p l e n t i f u l i n London a t  the time, as many musicians had  l o s t t h e i r employment a t  c o u r t w i t h the overthrow of the m o n a r c h y P P l a y f o r d goes f a r as to l i s t the names of musicians l i v i n g i n London 8 Ibid. Fol. A . 7  V  2  9  Fol.  A . 2  N e l s o n , "John P l a y f o r d and M u s i c i a n , " p. 3 ° . 1 0  the E n g l i s h Amateur  so  who  30 might be c o n s u l t e d . * * Evidence Recreation  suggests  t h a t the f i r s t e d i t i o n o f Musicks  ( l 6 5 [ l , 2 o r 3])  lacked i n s t r u c t i o n s .  Perhaps  a f t e r the r e l e a s e o f the f i r s t e d i t i o n some p r o t e s t s were v o i c e d s i m i l a r t o those  from the d i s a p p o i n t e d people  bought the f i r s t e d i t i o n o f Musicks Hand-maid. may have come from people  ts  tions.  The p r o t e s t s  who l i v e d o u t s i d e London, s i n c e ,  i n the second e d i t i o n o f both t h a t c o u n t r y people  who  these works, P l a y f o r d mentions  had a s p e c i a l need f o r i n s t r u m e n t a l  instruc-  J  F o r the second e d i t i o n o f Musicks R e c r e a t i o n , P l a y f o r d compiled  a body o f i n f o r m a t i o n to s u i t the music.  These  d i r e c t i o n s serve w i t h v e r y l i t t l e m o d i f i c a t i o n f o r a l l the subsequent e d i t i o n s o f Musicks R e c r e a t i o n . ation (l65[5])»  P l a y f o r d ' s remarks p e r t a i n i n g t o the l y r a  v i o l c e n t e r around t a b l a t u r e and t u n i n g . the beginner  I n Musicks Recre-  F i r s t he a c q u a i n t s  w i t h the fundamentals o f t a b l a t u r e n o t a t i o n by  the use o f the i l l u s t r a t i o n i n Example 2.  He a s s i g n s the  numbers 1 through 6 to the v i o l * s s t r i n g s from h i g h e s t t o lowest,  the l e t t e r s  'b' through 'h' t o the f r e t s as they  ceed up the f i n g e r b o a r d , and the l e t t e r strings. these  pro-  'a', t o the open  Then he s t a t e s t h a t the l e t t e r s " b e i n g p l a c e d on  s i x e L i n e s doe answer t o the s i x s t r i n g s on your V i o l l . "  Next, P l a y f o r d e x p l a i n s f u l l s t o p s , the s l u r and the thump. A c c o r d i n g t o P l a y f o r d , f u l l stops are "the s t r i k i n g 1 1  F o l . Al*.  1 2  S e e P-  22.  *^See . 21, n. 3, and Musicks R e c r e a t i o n p  (l65f5l)» fol.A^  31 1-3  ro (9 to  c+  4  1 2  O  3  (D  5 6  o  a a a a a a  b b b b b b  e e e  d d d d d d  c c c c c c  f f f f f f  e e  e  h h h h h h  R R R & R  R  Example 2. "The p l a c e s o f the L e t t e r s as they are s t o p t on the neck of your V i o l l . " 1 ^ o f t h r e e or f o u r e s t r i n g s w i t h once drawing the bow" i n d i c a t e d by the l e t t e r s "mixt w i t h o t h e r L e t t e r s one another." dash (  S l u r s are r e p r e s e n t e d  and  are  under  i n l y r a v i o l t a b l a t u r e by a  ) under, the l e t t e r s and are " s t r u c k w i t h the drawing A thump i s r e p r e s e n t e d by the symbol S*  of one Bow."  and i s  "the s t r i k i n g of the s t r i n g onely w i t h the F i n g e r of your hand" ( i . e . , l e f t - h a n d p i z z i c a t o ) . * ' '  To the 1661  left  edition  P l a y f o r d adds d i r e c t i o n s f o r i n t e r p r e t i n g the l e t t e r s beyond the letter etc.  •h' f o r which t h e r e are no f r e t s — i , He  k, 1,  m,  n, o,  p,  s t a t e s "these [ l e t t e r s ] are to be s t o p t a c c o r d i n g to  the E x a c t d i s t a n c e s [determined]  by the J u d i c i o u s E a r of the  performer."*^ P l a y f o r d recommends the same method of t u n i n g the l y r a i n a l l the e d i t i o n s of Musicks R e c r e a t i o n and  claims, i n  viol  l65[5]t „17  t h a t t h i s method i s the one which i s b e s t f o r "yong beginners.' I t i s c a l l e d t u n i n g by unisons "making two  and  s t r i n g s agree i n one  i s based on the p r i n c i p l e  sound."  With t h i s method,  IKMusicks R e c r e a t i o n ( 1 6 5 [ 5 ] ) » f o l . A 3 . 15 I b i d . , f o l . A^v. *Slusicks R e c r e a t i o n ( 1 6 6 1 ) , f o l . A 2 . V  1 7  M u s i c k s Recreation (165[5])» f o l .  A3 . V  of  32 pitch i s not absolute. which  The p l a y e r begins w i t h the t o p s t r i n g  i s " r a i s e d up as h i g h as i t w i l l c o n v e n i e n t l y bear w i t h -  out  breaking."  the  d e s i r e d t u n i n g which  open s t r i n g s ,  Then, a f t e r c o n s u l t i n g a t a b l a t u r e graph o f i n d i c a t e s the i n t e r v a l s between the  the p l a y e r tunes the r e m a i n i n g s t r i n g s .  I n the  165[5] e d i t i o n , P l a y f o r d uses a t u n i n g c a l l e d "Lyra-Way" whose t a b l a t u r e graph i s  £ ^ —  to i l l u s t r a t e  the procedure.  & q £  He e x p l a i n s F i r s t s t o p F on your second s t r i n g and make him agree i n sound w i t h your f i r s t open* t h a t done, stop your t h i r d i n E , and make him agree i n sound w i t h your second open: then s t o p F on the f o u r t h , and make him agree w i t h the t h i r d open: then s t o p your f i f t h i n H and make him agree t o your f o u r t h open: Then stop your s i x t h i n F and make him agree i n sound w i t h your f i f t h open. T h i s e x a c t l y done your V i o l l i s tun'd.18 I t was important f o r the l y r a v i o l i s t  to know a sure  t u n i n g method because p l a y i n g 'lyra-way' e n t a i l e d f r e q u e n t changes  o f the i n s t r u m e n t s t u n i n g .  The music  i n Playford's  l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s r e q u i r e s s i x t u n i n g s , though n o t a l l a r e used i n every e d i t i o n . Sharp"  They are "Lyra-Way" ( f e f h f ) , "Harp Way  ( d e f h f ) , "Harp Way F l a t "  ( f d e f h ) , "High Harp Way F l a t "  ( e d f h f ) , "High Harp Way Sharp"  ( f e d f h ) and "Bag P i p e " ( f h n ) , a  n o v e l t y t u n i n g which uses o n l y f o u r s t r i n g s .  The f o l l o w i n g  t a b l e shows the d i s t r i b u t i o n o f the s i x t u n i n g s by e d i t i o n . In  the i n t r o d u c t i o n t o the l 6 6 l l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n ,  Playford  r e f e r s t o .the l a r g e number o f l y r a v i o l t u n i n g s a v a i l a b l e , and 1 8  Ibid.  33 TABLE I TUNINGS USED IN  THE LYRA VIOL EDITIONS  1651 Lyra-Way fefhf  (26)  1661  1682  I669  10  16  ••  • • •  • •  8  33  22  69  78  Harp Way defhf  Sharp  Harp Way edfhf  Flat  (201)  9  41  64  48  39  High Harp Way (39) fdefh  Sharp  • •  5  11  23  • •  High Harp Way (A-0) f e d f h  Flat  • •  7  21  12  • t  (6)  • •  1  5  •«  • •  Total  27  103  123  152  117  Bag Pipe fhn  (210)  165[5]  s t a t e s "There are many s e v e r a l v a r i e t i e s  of Tunings,  a c c o r d i n g to 19  the I n v e n t i o n s  of s e v e r a l A r t i s t s or Composers of the Lessons.  However, P l a y f o r d a p p a r e n t l y h e l d b e l i e f s Thomas Salmon and Thomas Mace, who ;  the use  of l y r a v i o l t u n i n g s .  experimentation  1 9  Fol.  of in  Salmon and Mace b e l i e v e d t h a t caused a g r e a t d e a l of  t h a t the b e s t tunings were a l r e a d y i n  20 existence.  to those  encouraged c o n s e r v a t i s m  w i t h v a r i a n t tunings  t r o u b l e to p l a y e r s and  similar  7  P l a y f o r d , i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  (1661),  declares  A3.  20 Frank T r a f i c a n t e , " L y r a V i o l Tunings\ been t r y e d to do i t , ' " A c t a M u s i c o l o g i c a , XLII  ' A l l Ways have (1970), pp. 193ff.  34 t h a t the l e s s o n s are s e t o n l y to the "most u s u a l " t u n i n g s , Harp Way Sharp, Harp Way F l a t , High Harp Way Sharp and High Harp Way Flat.  F o r the f i n a l l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n  2 1  (1682), P l a y f o r d  d e c l a r e s t h a t Harp Way Sharp and Harp Way F l a t are the most common tunings  and t h a t the " C o l l e c t i o n s o f Lessons i n t h i s 22  Book a r e o n l y t o those  two s e v e r a l Tunings."  About h a l f o f P l a y f o r d ' s i n s t r u c t i o n a l m a t e r i a l concerns rhythm.  P l a y f o r d c l a i m s to have presented  which i s n e c e s s a r y  f o r p l a y i n g the l e s s o n s  e d i t i o n s , and thus t o have spared  o n l y the i n f o r m a t i o n in his lyra  the reader  viol  unnecessary  labour.  He mentions t h a t i n l y r a v i o l t a b l a t u r e the rhythm symbols are p l a c e d "over the l e t t e r s , " he i d e n t i f i e s the v a r i o u s notes used i n the l e s s o n s J>  (semibreve ^  and semiquaver ^  , minim ^  , crotchet ^  , quaver  ) , he d i s c u s s e s the mensural moods which  govern the s u b d i v i s i o n o f the n o t e s ,  and he d e c l a r e s t h a t though  there a r e many moods i n use he w i l l e x p l a i n o n l y the two used i n the l y r a v i o l l e s s o n s * triple  time [ 3 ] .  Ayres,  etc."  common ( o r semibreve) time [  ] and  Common time was " u s u a l t o Pavens, A l l m a n s ,  T r i p l e time was " u s u a l t o Corants,  Sarabands,  Tunes o r J i g g e s . "  P l a y f o r d e x p l a i n s t h a t every b a r o f common  time has the value  o f one semibreve and every b a r o f t r i p l e  time, the value minims.  o f a " p r i c k minim" (i?*)  o r sometimes two p r i c k  F i n a l l y he e x p l a i n s the s u b d i v i s i o n o f beats i n these  two moods and the use o f dots o f augmentation. almost v e r b a t i m 2 1  Fol. k  y  T h i s m a t e r i a l appears  i n a l l e d i t i o n s o f Musicks R e c r e a t i o n 2 2  Fol.  ky  and i n a l l  35 P l a y f o r d ' s i n s t r u m e n t a l l e s s o n books. ' To the  1661  J  l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n , P l a y f o r d adds an  d u c t o r y paragraph about the instrument's  history.  intro-  In t h i s  graph he e x p l a i n s t h a t the word l y r a i s d e r i v e d from the word l e r o , which means harp, and,  i n the 1669  Latin  e d i t i o n s , he  t h a t l y r a " a l l u d [ e s ] to the v a r i o u s Tuning [ s i c ] ,  para-  adds  under the  24 name o f Harp-way, &c." •lyra-way* was  He  mentions t h a t p l a y i n g the  a r e c e n t i n v e n t i o n , which developed  i m i t a t e d the s t y l e of the l u t e and pandora.  He  F a r u n t , Alphonso Ferabosco and John C o p e r a r i o , composers to w r i t e f o r the l y r a v i o L and 25 lyra viol wire  i n v e n t e d by F a r u n t .  viol  when v i o l i s t s  cites  Daniel  three of the  d e s c r i b e s an  T h i s instrument  was  first  unusual strung with  s t r i n g s r u n n i n g through i t s body which were tuned i n u n i s o n  w i t h the o u t e r gut s t r i n g s and v i b r a t e d s y m p a t h e t i c a l l y w i t h latter.  the  Instruments of t h i s type were e v i d e n t l y f a s h i o n a b l e f o r 26  a while but by  1661  were not o f t e n seen.  F o r the f i n a l two i c a l paragraph was  e d i t i o n s o f Musicks R e c r e a t i o n the  revised.  I n 1669.  histor-  P l a y f o r d mentioned r e c e n t  composers f o r the l y r a v i o l of whom he named e l e v e n - - W i l l i a m Musicks R ck ri e na st ,i o nI v e(165[5])» f o Wi is t. h iA~ Lawes, Coleman, Je en s , Hudson, e ,-A,v, Bates,Musicks Lillie, R e c r e a t i o n (1661). f o i s . A3 -Aj., Musicks R e c r e a t i o n (1682) , f o i s . A^ -A4. 2 3  v  v  v  Pii,  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n 2  ^Musicks Recreation  (1669),  fol. A . 2  (1661), f o l . A . 2  26 Robert Donington, " L y r a V i o l , " Grove's D i c t i o n a r y of Music and M u s i c i a n s , V, 452.  Gregory, Moss and W i l s o n . have p i e c e s  A l l but one o f the l i s t e d  i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n .  P l a y f o r d omitted Coperario  27  composers  I n the 1682 e d i t i o n ,  the r e f e r e n c e s t o F a r u n t , Ferabosco and  and r e p l a c e d the names o f Bates and L i l l i e w i t h  those  28 of John E s t o and [ R o b e r t ] T a y l o r .  E s t o has music i n the l y r a  v i o l e d i t i o n s , b u t T a y l o r , a l y r a v i o l composer from the f i r s t 2° h a l f o f the c e n t u r y ,  7  has none.  Playford's l y r a v i o l  i n s t r u c t i o n s c o n t a i n o n l y one g e n e r a l  r u l e about p l a y i n g technique,  which a p p l i e s to any s t y l e o f v i o l  p l a y i n g ( i . e . plain-way o r l y r a - w a y ) .  He e x p l a i n s t h a t  lessons  t h a t b e g i n w i t h an a n a c r u s i s are t o be s t r u c k "drawing the Bow towards you" ( i . e . w i t h a down-bow) and l e s s o n s l a c k i n g an anac r u s i s are t o be s t r u c k "with p u t t i n g your bow forward" ( i . e . w i t h an up-bow).^° The  l a c k o f more p l a y i n g a d v i c e  i n the l y r a v i o l  t i o n s i s c u r i o u s , s i n c e P l a y f o r d i n c l u d e d such a d v i c e  instrucin his  p u b l i c a t i o n s f o r c i t t e r n (A Booke o f New Lessons and Musick's Delight).  Y e t both P l a y f o r d ' s e d i t i o n s which concern p l a y i n g  the v i o l — M u s i c k s Musick—lack  R e c r e a t i o n and An I n t r o d u c t i o n t o the S k i l l o f  d e t a i l e d playing advice.  t h a t music t e a c h e r s instructions  are n e c e s s a r y  P l a y f o r d uses h i s b e l e i f  as an excuse f o r the l a c k o f  i n h i s I n t r o d u c t i o n (1655).  In t h i s  P l a y f o r d s t a t e s the same g e n e r a l r u l e r e g a r d i n g 2 7  Fol. A . 2  2 8  Fol.  edition,  initial  up-bows  A . 2  % . H. Cummings, "Robert T a i l o u r , " Grove's D i c t i o n a r y o f Music and M u s i c i a n s , V I I I , 291. 2  3  °Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  (I65[5])  f  f o l . A^\  37 and  down-bows, but  declares  he w i l l give no  "the movements of the f i n g e r and downe i n words, but must be There i s no  Bow  done by  f u r t h e r advice  hand. . .cannot bee the  guiding  since  set  31 of a Teacher."-v  doubt t h a t P l a y f o r d wanted those who  used h i s  32 books a l s o to employ t e a c h e r s . emphatic on t h i s p o i n t . P l a y f o r d wrote the  In A M u s i c a l 1  Even c o u n t r y people, the  is  ones f o r whom  l y r a v i o l d i r e c t i o n s , must have seen t e a c h e r s  o c c a s i o n a l l y , s i n c e amateurs i n P l a y f o r d ' s upper c l a s s e s .  Banguet he  They had  day  were from  the  the means to t r a v e l to London f r e q u e n t l y . • 33  Indeed, they o f t e n spent the  e n t i r e s o c i a l season  there.  J J  A l t h o u g h P l a y f o r d put f o r t h o t h e r reasons, the r e a l r e a s o n why  he  o m i t t e d d e t a i l e d p l a y i n g advice  i n the  i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  e d i t i o n s of h i s I n t r o d u c t i o n which were r e l e a s e d  and  i n the  l 6 5 0 ' s , may have been h i s l i m i t e d knowledge of the i n s t r u m e n t . 34 P l a y f o r d was ability  a master p r i n t e r , not  a 'master' of m u s i c .  as a m u s i c i a n l a y more at the  author, h i s r o l e was P . 50. 3 1  amateur l e v e l .  p r i m a r i l y to i n t e r p r e t and  His  J  As  a musical  d i g e s t what  others,  32 A comment by Henry P l a y f o r d i n the p r e f a c e to A p o l l o ' s Banquet ( 1 6 9 0 ) , f o l . A 2 , shows t h a t people who d i d not employ t e a c h e r s were i n the m i n o r i t y . As p r o o f of the e x c e l l e n c e o f h i s f a t h e r ' s i n s t r u c t i o n s , which were p r i n t e d i n t h i s e d i t i o n without change, Henry s t a t e s t h a t he knew of s e v e r a l people who had " o n l y by these I n s t r u c t i o n s , a t t a i n e d to p l a y i n d i f f e r e n t l y well." J  -^Nelson, "John P l a y f o r d and pp.  the E n g l i s h Amateur  Musician,"  91-92.  - ^ S i r John Hawkins, A G e n e r a l H i s t o r y of the S c i e n c e P r a c t i c e of Music (London, 1 7 7 6 ) , I I , 7 3 6 .  and  38 more  skilled  than he,  Introduction  (1654),  work as  it  . . .  a l l my own, some p a r t o f i t was c o l l e c t e d o u t  of  i s not  had w r i t t e n . ^ he w i l l i n g l y  other men's w r i t i n g s . " - ^  (l655)i  he m e n t i o n s  I n the  two o f t h e  For instance,  admits  t h a t "the  in  the  second e d i t i o n o f the  sources  he made u s e  is  Introduction  of«  Butler's  The P r i n c i p l e s o f M u s i k i n S i n g i n g a n d S e t t i n g a n d M o r l e y ' s A Plaine  and E a s i e  instances  Introduction  to P r a c t i c a l M u s i c k e . - ^  were P l a y f o r d ' s p u b l i c a t i o n s  and c o n t e n t ,  Playford's cittern  instructions  blance  to W i l l i a m B a r l e y ' s i n s t r u c t i o n s  ture  .  .  . for Lute, Orpharion,  F o r the  and  In  appearance  bear a strong  i n A New B o o k e o f  Bandora.  instructional material  Playford e v i d e n t l y turned  for cittern.  Other  i n the  Tabli-  3 8  lyra viol  to e x i s t i n g sources  resem-  also.  editions, Two o f  sources  a p p e a r t o h a v e b e e n Thomas R o b i n s o n ' s The S c h o o l e o f  Musicke  . . .  f o r Lute, Pandora,  Orpharion,  and V i o l  a n d B a r l e y ' s A New B o o k e o f T a b l i t u r e . T h e  tuning  these  de Gamba method  3c  ^ F r a n k l i n B . Zimmerman, A n I n t r o d u c t i o n t o the S k i l l o f M u s i c k , b y J o h n P l a y f o r d The T w e l f t h E d i t i o n (New Y o r k » Da Capo P r e s s , 19?2~1, p . 11. •^Introduction  (1654),  preface.  - ^ ( L o n d o n , I636) a n d ( L o n d o n , 1597) r e s p e c t i v e l y . P l a y f o r d ' s I n t r o d u c t i o n (1655), f o l . A3.  See  ^ ^ ( L o n d o n , 1596). B e s i d e s B a r l e y ' s e d i t i o n , two o t h e r w o r k s were p u b l i s h e d a r o u n d t h e t u r n o f t h e c e n t u r y w h i c h c o n t a i n e d m a t e r i a l P l a y f o r d m i g h t have adapted f o r c i t t e r n s Thomas R o b i n s o n ' s The S c h o o l o f M u s i c k e ( L o n d o n , 1603) a n d R o b e r t D o w l a n d ' s V a r i e t i e o f L u t e L e s s o n s ( L o n d o n , 1610). See W i l l i a m S h e r m a n C a s e y ' s " P r i n t e d E n g l i s h L u t e I n s t r u c t i o n B o o k s 1558-1610" ( u n p u b l i s h e d P h . D . d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f M i c h i g a n , i960). -^(London,  I603) a n d  (London,  1596)  respectively.  P l a y f o r d advocates appears i n both these e d i t i o n s . explanation  o f the method i s a p p a r e n t l y  and P l a y f o r d ' s  Playford's  based upon Robinson's  statement t h a t t h i s i s the b e s t method f o r  n e r s appears i n B a r l e y ' s  edition.  begin-  M a t e r i a l i n B a r l e y ' s and  Robinson's e d i t i o n s r e g a r d i n g t u n i n g and l e f t - h a n d technique c o u l d be adapted f o r l y r a v i o l , but n e i t h e r e d i t i o n s explanations  contained  o f the f i n e r p o i n t s o f l y r a v i o l technique.  e d i t i o n s concentrate  Both  on the l u t e , and although Robinson c i t e s  the v i o l on the t i t l e page, he does n o t g i v e s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r p l a y i n g the v i o l .  Robinson merely r e f e r s h i s readers  e d i t i o n ' s s e c t i o n on l u t e  technique.  I t appears, then, t h a t P l a y f o r d ' s  instrumental i n s t r u c t i o n s  l a c k d e s c r i p t i o n s o f p l a y i n g technique u n l e s s  a p r i n t e d source  e x i s t e d from which he c o u l d draw the d e s c r i p t i o n s . knew o f no source f o r v i o l technique before Christopher  1659•  Simpson r e l e a s e d The D i v i s i o n V i o l i s t ,  wards P l a y f o r d ' s i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r p l a y i n g v i o l were made more d e t a i l e d .  42  o f Simpson's d i r e c t i o n s .  E v i d e n t l y he In t h i s year and a f t e r -  i n the I n t r o d u c t i o n  The 1660 e d i t i o n c o n t a i n s  to Simpson's work and the 1664 e d i t i o n c o n t a i n s version  t o the  a reference  a paraphrased  However, a f t e r the r e l e a s e  ^°Fol. C i j . ^ * T h i s i s B a r l e y ' s 24th r u l e : he e x p l a i n s the two methods of t u n i n g and s t a t e s t h a t the second, P l a y f o r d ' s method, i s b e s t f o r l e s s experienced p l a y e r s . 42 Ramon E . Meyer, "John P l a y f o r d ' s I n t r o d u c t i o n t o the S k i l l o f Musick" (Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , F l o r i d a S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y ,  1961), pp. 50-51.  40 of Simpson's work, and even a f t e r the p u b l i c a t i o n of Thomas 43 Mace's Musick's  Monument,  Playford's l y r a v i o l  J  which d e s c r i b e d v i o l  technique,  i n s t r u c t i o n s remained unchanged.  Perhaps  he b e l e i v e d the i n s t r u c t i o n s served t h e i r purpose j u s t as  they  were. C l e a r l y P l a y f o r d ' s aims f o r the l y r a v i o l were modest.  He  instructions  simply p r e s e n t e d a few n e c e s s a r y r u l e s as a  guide f o r amateur l y r a v i o l i s t s . these few p o i n t s was  S i n c e g a i n i n g mastery  over  n e c e s s a r y b e f o r e any p r o g r e s s on the  instru-  ment c o u l d be made, P l a y f o r d , by p u b l i s h i n g them, d i d a s e r v i c e both to s t u d e n t s , who and to t e a c h e r s , who p o i n t s f o r each new Although  c o u l d advance more q u i c k l y w i t h t h e i r no doubt found  use,  i t tiresome r e p e a t i n g these  student.  h i s aims were modest, P l a y f o r d s e l e c t e d a p p r o p r i -  ate m a t e r i a l and e x p l a i n e d i t w i t h c o n c i s e n e s s and c l a r i t y . c o m p i l i n g the l y r a v i o l  In  i n s t r u c t i o n s , P l a y f o r d s e r v e d amateurs  by p r e s e n t i n g m a t e r i a l i n a form which was  easily  understood,  and s e r v e d p r o f e s s i o n a l s by a i d i n g , r a t h e r than competing, w i t h them i n t h e i r t e a c h i n g .  On t h i s , a t l e a s t i n p a r t , P l a y f o r d ' s  r e p u t a t i o n as a f r i e n d to London's m u s i c a l community i s based. ^(London,  16?6).  CHAPTER  III  CONTEMPORANEOUS ARRANGEMENTS The M u s i c Sixteen years Banquet, of  the  release  C h a r l e s B u t l e r , the E n g l i s h  civil,  these  before  as  of Playford's A M u s i c a l l  theorist,  proposed a  opposed to e c c l e s i a s t i c a l , uses o f m u s i c .  set  One o f  was  t o r e c r e a t e t h e m i n d s o f i n d u s t r i o u s men, when t h e y a r e now w e a r y e d w i t h l a b o u r , c a r e o r s t u d d i . . . Thus i n o l d t i m e , w i t h s i n g i n g and p l a y i n g upon s t r i n g - i n s t r u m e n t s , d i d the w i s e and l e a r n e d P y t h a g o r e a n s , a f t e r i n v e n t i v e studdies, revive their s p i r i t s . 1 P l a y f o r d was f a m i l i a r w i t h B u t l e r ' s w o r k . t i o n to works  the  Skill  of Musick  (  1  6  5  5  )  ,  he c a l l s  i n E n g l a n d "worthy o f P e r u s a l l , " the  In An Introducit  other  one o f o n l y two being Morley's 2  A P l a i n e and E a s i e I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P r a c t i c a l M u s i c k e In his  a later  issue  of Playford's Introduction  own v e r s i o n o f B u t l e r ' s  Civil  Uses" of m u s i c .  ideas,  (  1  6  6  7  c a l l i n g them t h e  A c c o r d i n g to P l a y f o r d ,  (  )  ,  1  5  he  9  7  and  civil  u s e s o f m u s i c was The P r i n c i p l e s o f M u s i k i n S i n g i n g a n d S e t t i n g ( L o n d o n , I  6  3  2  (London,  6  )  1  6  5  p.  ,  5  )  .  1  1  fol. A-.  41  3  .  .  presents  "Divine  one o f t h e  )  52 f o r t h e S o l a c e o f M e n , w h i c h as [ m u s i c ] i s a g r e e a b l e u n t o N a t u r e , s o i t i s a l l o w e d b y God as a T e m p o r a l b l e s s i n g t o r e c r e a t e a n d c h e a r men a f t e r l o n g s t u d y a n d weary l a b o u r i n t h e i r v o c a t i o n s . 3 A l t h o u g h he b e l o n g e d t o t h e  generation  after  P l a y f o r d , Roger  North,  a very knowledgeable m u s i c a l d i l e t t a n t e ,  ideas,  and f u r t h e r m o r e  chords,  s u c h as  the  preferred  lyra viol,  instruments  for  held similar  which produced  relaxation.  W i t h r e s p e c t t o amusement, a n d r e l e i f o f a n a c t i v e m i n d d i s t r e s s e d e i t h e r w i t h too much, o r t o o l i t t l e i m p l o y m e n t , n o t h i n g u n d e r t h e s u n h a t h t h a t v e r t u e , as a s o l l o t a r y a p p l i c a t i o n to M u s i c k e . I t i s a medecine w i t h o u t any n a u s e a o r b i t t e r , and i s t a k e n b o t h f o r p l e a s u r e and c u r e . I t i s m o s t c o n d u c i n g t o use s u c h i n s t r u m e n t s as t o u c h t h e a c c o r d s , f o r t h e h a r m o n i e y i e l d s more p l e a s u r e t h a n a n y s i n g l e - t o n e d i n s t r u m e n t c a n doe, and the e a r b e i n g once accustomed t o t a s t e t h a t , c a n n e v e r have e n o u g h . 5 The i d e a i s a g r e e a b l e enoughs orating tonic for  i n c r e a s i n g o n e ' s e f f i c i e n c y i n the  more p r a c t i c a l e n d e a v o r s . the  m u s i c s e r v e s as a n  dary s t a t u s of music i n h i s  life  gious sentiments current  the  trolled  the  government  at  realm of  The i d e a i s e m i n e n t l y s u i t e d  s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y amateur m u s i c i a n .  at  the  and i n the time.  start  It  reflects  political  The P u r i t a n s ,  of Playford's  invig-  to the  and  seconreli-  who c o n -  career,  ap-  p r o v e d o f m u s i c when i t was u s e d as P l a y f o r d , B u t l e r a n d N o r t h 3  Fol.  A3V.  ^ J o h n W i l s o n , e d . , R o g e r N o r t h on M u s i c ( L o n d o n s Novello a n d Company L t d , 1959). p.. 257, q u o t e d i n T r a f i c a n t e , "The Mansell Lyra V i o l Tablature," (unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , The U n i v e r s i t y o f P i t t s b u r g h , 1965). p . 193- P e p y s was o f t h e same o p i n i o n as N o r t h a n d h i s d i a r y a b o u n d s w i t h r e f e r e n c e s t o p l a y i n g t h e l y r a v i o l f o r r e l a x a t i o n . ' See S a m u e l P e p y s , The D i a r y , e d . b y H e n r y B . W h e a t l e y (New Y c r k s C r o s c u p and S t e r l i n g C o . , 1900), q u o t e d i n T r a f i c a n t e , "The M a n s e l l L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e , " p p . 193-5.  43 suggested. it  O n l y when i t was p e r f o r m e d  accompanied rude or lewd b e h a v i o r ,  and dance h a l l s , All music's  d i d the  Puritans  many o f h i s  i n taverns,  object  to  s o o t h e and r e v i t a l i z e .  editions  emphasize  this  M u s i c k ' s H a n d - m a i d , The P l e a s a n t p a n i o n and M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n . w i t h the  type  o r when theaters  music.^  quality:  the music i n the  sion,  not  light  and p l e a s a n t ,  offers  a frustration,  to  lyra viol  just the  and r e q u i r e  i n g t o be a p p r e c i a t e d .  Finally,  interest  popular  tunes.  his  titles,  Delight,  editions  Com-  publications  solitary  relaxation.  is a l l  for  spared making complicated The m u s i c i s n o t  enough c h a l l a n g e  amateur.  are  a minimum o f a e s t h e t i c amateurs then,  tech-  t o be a  The p i e c e s  i n l e a r n i n g to p l a y f a m i l i a r p i e c e s ;  to t h i s  Musick's  Playford f i l l e d  for musical get-togethers.  demanding—it  very  C o m p a n i o n , The D e l i g h t f u l  s o l o l y r a v i o l — t h u s amateurs were preparations  By t h e i r  o f m u s i c t h a t v/as s u i t e d f o r  For instance,  terested  as  Sabbath,  o f P l a y f o r d * s c o l l e c t i o n s o f m u s i c c a p i t a l i z e d on  a b i l i t y to  nically  on t h e  diver-  short, understand-  as now, were Playford  in-  catered  b y i n c l u d i n g many l y r a v i o l a r r a n g e m e n t s o f  The  Arrangements  The l y r a v i o l m u s i c p u b l i s h e d b y P l a y f o r d c a n be d i v i d e d i n t o two g r o u p s , larger  group,  a d i v i s i o n not without  some o v e r l a p p i n g .  accounting for three-fourths  s i x r e g u l a r movements  o f the  dance s u i t e :  o f the  total,  prelude,  The comprises  almain,  ^ R u s s e l l C l a i r e N e l s o n , " J o h n P l a y f o r d and the E n g l i s h Amateur M u s i c i a n , " (unpublished P h . D . d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f I o w a , 1966), p p . 77-79.  44 ayre,  corant,  saraband  and j i g .  g r o u p a p p e a r s t o be o r i g i n a l ond  group c o n s i s t s  morris,  (rondeau).  i n other  pendent  o f the  predate the The  lyra  (or  the  present  'lyra  setting.  chapter  the  preludes')  T h a t few o f t h e  Murray Lefkowitz,  authors  the  simplified has  reasons inde-  the n o n - l y r a v e r s i o n s  versions.  and ' a r r a n g e m e n t s '  Lawes  from the  i.e. first  For convenient  c o n t r a s t i n g terms  lyra viol  William  few p i e c e s  'lyra viol will  be  referdances'  used.^  dances were f o u n d i n o t h e r  7  set  forth  i n two r e c e n t  and R u s s e l l C . N e l s o n ,  and the E n g l i s h A m a t e u r M u s i c i a n . " suggest  minuet,  i s concerned w i t h arrangements:  t i n g s was c o n t r a r y t o e x p e c t a t i o n s  Playford  with  for various  I n most c a s e s ,  i n alternate  two g r o u p s  viol  and tunes  a l s o b e l i e v e d t o have had e x i s t a n c e s  second group o f pieces p l u s  to the  rant,  (bourse),  bore  sec-  versions.  group which e x i s t ence  s u c h as  such as  this  The s e c o n d g r o u p c o n t a i n s many p i e c e s known  are  lyra  The s m a l l e r  and d e l i g h t ,  v e r s i o n s , w h i l e a f e w more p i e c e s ,  (such as t i t l e ) ,  the  trumpet,  o f i m p o r t e d dances  round-o  l y r a v i o l music.  of pieces h a v i n g song t i t l e s  march, f i g g a r y ,  titles  N e a r l y a l l o f the music i n  located simplified  I n both works  of popular instrumental music. arrangements  works:  "John  t h a t P l a y f o r d ' s p u b l i c a t i o n s were f i l l e d  arrangements  set-  o f some o f W i l l i a m  the  with Lefkowitz  Lawes'  i n s t r u m e n t a l consort music i n P l a y f o r d ' s Court Ayres  (1655).  ^ • A r r a n g e m e n t s ' w i l l a l w a y s be c o n t e m p o r a n e o u s P l a y f o r d ' s time unless otherwise i n d i c a t e d .  with  7 (London:  R o u t l e d g e and Kegan P a u l ,  (Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n ,  i960).  U n i v e r s i t y of Iowa,  1966).  and  55 Because C o u r t A y r e s c o n t a i n s  arrangements,  that other Playford  do a l s o .  the  editions  instrumental pieces  Lefkowitz  He s u g g e s t s t h a t many o f  a s c r i b e d t o Lawes i n P l a y f o r d ' s  were composed f o r d r a m a t i c p r o d u c t i o n s between Nelson expresses  dances  in this  editions  1635 a n d  a similar opinion s p e c i f i c a l l y  v i o l m u s i c i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (1682). most o f the  suspects  about  1652.  the  Nelson claims  9  lyra  that  edition  a r e p r o b a b l y arrangements from s u i t e s t h a t were e x t a n t from o t h e r p u b l i c a t i o n s or m a n u s c r i p t c o l l e c t i o n s . As he s o o f t e n d i d , P l a y f o r d a p p a r e n t l y g l e a n e d t h e s e p i e c e s f r o m l i t e r a t u r e t h a t was a l r e a d y k n o w n . G i v e n t h e n e c e s s a r y s o u r c e s , one c o u l d p r o b a b l y t r a c e many o f t h e s e t u n e s t h a t a p p e a r i n h i s c o l l e c t i o n s as anonymous.1° Research f o r t h i s claim nor Lefkowitz*s music.  W h i l e the  thesis  has  confirmed neither  Nelson's  suspicion concerning Playford's l y r a  scope o f the  concordance  s e a r c h was t o o  viol lim-  i t e d to permit a d e f i n i t e  c o n f u t a t i o n o f these c l a i m s , the  few  n o n - l y r a arrangements  found s t r o n g l y s u g g e s t s an overwhelm-  ing  predominance From the  of original  first  group,  l y r a v i o l music.** the  p i e c e s were found i n a l t e r n a t e w h i c h i s somewhat t e n u o u s title  i n some s o u r c e s  p.  'lyra viol versions.  (letter  so t h a t  ^ W i l l i a m Lawes, pp.  very  dances,"  only  H o w e v e r , one  b b e l o w ) , has  i t o v e r l a p s the  a  two  concordance,  descriptive  second  group.  19, 150 a n d 15?.  *°Nelson, "John Playford 2 6 6 , s e e a l s o p . 159.  and the E n g l i s h A m a t e u r M u s i c i a n , "  R e s e a r c h w i t h o r i g i n a l s o u r c e s was l i m i t e d t o t h e f i v e P l a y f o r d l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s p l u s a few s e l e c t e d l y r a v i o l manus c r i p t s and a d d i t i o n a l s o u r c e s . The s e a r c h f o r c o n c o r d a n c e s w i t h n o n - l y r a sources involved secondary sources: thematic i n d e x e s , modern p u b l i c a t i o n s o f s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y m u s i c and w o r k s s u c h as C l a u d e M . S i m p s o n ' s The B r i t i s h B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d a n d i t s M u s i c , (New B r u n s w i c k : R u t g e r s U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1966).  46 a.  An almain for l y r a v i o l  by J o h n J e n k i n s a l s o a p p e a r s  a s t a f f n o t a t i o n version i n a seventeenth-century script,  a source  c o n t a i n i n g both music f o r v i o l  in  manuand  12 violin.  Some o f t h e m a n u s c r i p t  marked f o r v i o l , eral pieces,  others,  meant f o r a s o l o v i o l stops;  t h a t the  tablature stops,  consistent  use  almain i s almost  bass v i o l ) .  on b o t h  i n the b.  staff  treble  notation version,  J  are  resembles  the  fifth  (an octave  composed by Matthew L o c k e ,  and  and  a  the triple  l o w e r on tablature  put an octave  suggesting  entry  two  i d e n t i c a l to  higher  transcription  of the l y r a v i o l p i e c e f o r the v i o l i n . A n a l m a i n f r o m t h e 1669 e d i t i o n , t h e r e a t t r i b u t e d 14 Moss,  were  double  clef  t h r e e n o t e s o f the 1*3  v e r s i o n which descend below g  indi-  o f the  i n c l u d i n g double  instruments  Significantly,  i s no  c l e a r from the  o f the  sev-  That they  i s t h e more p r o b a b l e  version of Playford,  feasible  is  clearly  there  intended.  or v i o l i n  Jenkins*  are  However, f o r  p r e s e n t one,  two was  violin  emerges from the p i t c h range.  for violin.  i n c l u d i n g the  c a t i o n o f which o f the  pieces  to  John  introductory music,  f o r S h i r l e y ' s grand  masque  T # 33. O x f o r d , B o d l e i a n MS M u s . S c h . f 573. n o . 4 4 . T h i s c o n c o r d a n c e was d i s c o v e r e d t h r o u g h t h e c a t a l o g u e o f t h e P l a y f o r d l y r a v i o l p r i n t e d m u s i c o f Commander G o r d o n J . D o d d . 1 2  ^ A s s u m i n g the s t r i n g s ( a n d t r a n s p o s e d up a n o c t a v e T#  72.  o f the v i o l are tuned d ' i n the t r a n s c r i p t i o n ) .  b g d G D  57 C u p i d and D e a t h . ^ s t r a i n o f the ( E x a m p l e 3),  The s i m i l a r i t y  two p i e c e s .  the m e l o d i e s o f the  C u p i d and Death are the  almost  first  i n the  lyra viol  identical,  display sequential  phrase o f the strain for  first  strain.  of Locke's piece  as  the  piece  Although  treatment  Perhaps  first  two m e a s u r e s  second measure the m e l o d i c s i m i l a r i t y  "both p i e c e s  and after  disappears, i n the  consequent  Moss u s e d the  basis  o f an  first  arrangement  Playford.  E x a m p l e 3.  John Moss, Almain,  -f  -ty  I n the  exists  H  -  r  —  first  strain  ~0-~  72).  -f—f-  -1  -0  i |> K  "^S^Hg  Tf w  > 1  Matthew Locke, F i f t h Death.  British  (T#  —  •--1  :  1  f fI -OBB-lS*  1  Entry introductory music, Cupid  L i b r a r y , A d d i t i o n a l MS 17799, d a t e d 1659.  and  48 Example  3—Continued,  «4h  5  2= Playford for  the  r e l i e d h e a v i l y on arrangements  s m a l l e r second group of p i e c e s  i n the  f o r the  lyra  editions.  viol  Much o f  t h i s m u s i c seems t o he p o p u l a r o r f o l k m u s i c , s u c h as b a l l a d . ayres ter  and c o u n t r y dances,  from d r a m a t i c p r o d u c t i o n s .  c o r d i n g to category, exclusive.  by b r o a d s i d e  and s o n g s ,  This music w i l l  a l t h o u g h the  categories  versa.  sung on s t a g e . T h u s ,  t u n e i n one o f t h e s e c a t e g o r i e s as w i l l  be s e e n i n t h e  ac-  are not m u t u a l l y  to c l a s s i f y  dance texts  In addition,  does n o t e l i m i n a t e  following  lat-  be d i s c u s s e d  P o p u l a r s o n g s w e r e f i t t e d w i t h new  p o e t s a n d became b a l l a d a y r e s .  l a d s were f r e q u e n t l y  others,  some o f t h e  F o r e x a m p l e , b a l l a d a y r e s were u s e d as c o u n t r y  tunes and v i c e  viol  or catches  bala  lyra  it  from  discussion.  Broadside Ballads B r o a d s i d e b a l l a d s were d o g g e r e l v e r s e s t o the masses by hack v e r s i f i e r s .  The p e r i o d o f t h e i r  p o p u l a r i t y was f r o m t h e m i d - s i x t e e n t h t o t h e teenth  pp.  century.  ^Simpson, xi-xiii.  w r i t t e n to  appeal greatest  end o f the  seven-  B r o a d s i d e b a l l a d s w e r e p r i n t e d on s i n g l e The B r i t i s h B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d a n d I t s  sheets  Music,  49 and were  sold  Their appeal ical,  i n the  streets  lay in their  m o r a l , amatory  c l a i m e d to have puted t r u t h .  the  Thus,  o f London and i n the  subject  matter, ic  or s e n s a t i o n a l . latest  B a l l a d vendors  polit-  all  events of  undis-  and i n p r o m o t i o n , b r o a d s i d e  l a d s p a r a l l e l l e d the modern newspaper B r o a d s i d e b a l l a d t e x t s were suggests the  w h i c h m i g h t be  stock which reported  i n content  countryside.  or scandal  bal-  sheet.  intended for s i n g i n g .  Evidence  t e x t s were c o n c e i v e d w i t h a p a r t i c u l a r melody  or  19 ayre i n mind. B a l l a d vendors would o f f e r to t e a c h the m e l o d i e s t o t h e i r c u s t o m e r s , b u t t h i s was n o t o f t e n n e c e s s a r y s i n c e t h e 7  20 m e l o d i e s were  selected  for their  familiarity.  o f m u s i c w h i c h was w e l l k n o w n , r e g u l a r would serve pieces  for a ballad.  a l l were  al  i n meter, songs,  broadside  were w e l l  s u c h as  "to  t i o n at  all.  and  repetitive  instrumental  k n o w n , no p a r t i c u l a r c a r e  sheet to r e c o r d the melody.  i n d i c a t i o n i s a s i m p l e tune d i r e c t i o n — " t o  olds A l l A-Row."  and  piece  used.  Since b a l l a d ayres t a k e n on the  Dance t u n e s ,  A l m o s t any  Many b r o a d s i d e s  a new p l a y h o u s e Only r a r e l y  g i v e vague  tune."  i s the  broadside sheet, w h i l e others are 17 ' I b i d . , pp. i x - x i .  Others  the tune  was  The m o s t  usu-  tune o f Cuckdirections,  g i v e no tune  a c t u a l ayre notated  direc-  on.the  headed w i t h a l i n e o f  pseudo-  H y d e r E . R o l l i n s , "The B l a c k L e t t e r B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d , " P u b l i c a t i o n s o f the Modern Language A s s o c i a t i o n o f A m e r i c a , XXXIV ( 1 9 1 9 ) , 2 6 5 . " 1 8  19Simpson,  The B r i t i s h  Broadside Ballad  and I t s  Music,  p. x i .  20  Rollins,  "The B l a c k L e t t e r B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d , "  p. 3 1 2 .  50 music n o t a t i o n ,  used simply f o r d e c o r a t i o n ,  and n o t the  actual  21 n o t a t i o n o f the ballad  ayre.  practice,  f o r which the  I n order to r e c o n s t r u c t  s c h o l a r s found i t necessary  b a l l a d s were  intended.  to  the  broadside  locate  the  ayres  Playford's editions—The  D a n c i n g M a s t e r , p a r t i c u l a r l y , and the i n s t r u m e n t a l l e s s o n books as w e l l — a r e r i c h s o u r c e s o f t h e s e a y r e s . Twenty-four  tunes i n the  lyra viol  e d i t i o n s are  arrangements 22  o f p i e c e s w h i c h h a d been u s e d as b r o a d s i d e majority  of these pieces  b a l l a d ayres,  from p r e v i o u s e d i t i o n s .  edition released  i n 1661 c o n t a i n s  ayres.  a d d e d o n l y two t o t h i s  Playford  only five earlier  o f the  D u r i n g the mongers  to the  The l y r a  fev/est b r o a d s i d e e d i t i o n and  viol  ballad  retained in  the  editions. Commonwealth, laws e x i s t e d f o r s e n d i n g b a l l a d 23  pillory  or whipping post.  c e r t a i n how s t r i c t l y t h e number o f b r o a d s i d e indicates  the  b u t most o f  twelve b a l l a d ayres which had appeared  lyra viol  in  M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (165[5] a n d 1669)  i n c l u d e a number o f b r o a d s i d e  t h e s e have been r e t a i n e d  The  a p p e a r i n A M u s i c a l l Banquet and  M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (1682). also  ballad ayres.  t h a t the  J  l a w s were e n f o r c e d .  b a l l a d ayres  i n the  However, i t Perhaps  1661 l y r a v i o l  r e p r e s s i o n a c t u a l l y decreased  is  the  unsmall  edition  t h e number o f  b a l l a d 2 1a y r e s i n c i r c u l a t i o n . S i m p s o n , The B r i t i s h B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d a n d I t s M u s i c , p. x i . 22 Dates o f r e g i s t r a t i o n f o r each t i t l e (sometimes a p p r o x i m a t e ) a r e g i v e n i n S i m p s o n ' s The B r i t i s h B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d a n d Its Music. 23 - ' L e s l i e S h e p a r d , The B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d ( L o n d o n : Herbert J e n k i n s L i m i t e d , 1962), p . 56.  51 Table I I presents the t i t l e s pieces with p r i o r broadside columnar e n t r i e s pieces  indicate  ballad associations.  later  lyra viol  lyra  viol  Additional  editions  i n which  the  appear. Theater  Music  Throughout the seventeenth element at  o f the t w e n t y - f o u r  i n English  court,  drama.  century,  m u s i c was a n  D u r i n g the f i r s t  a n d i n t h e 1650's i n p r i v a t e  important  t h i r d of the  establishments,  century  the  masque  2k  was t h e p r i m a r y v e h i c l e o f s p e c t a c u l a r i n s t r u m e n t a l m u s i c were as i m p o r t a n t were d a n c i n g , p o e t r y and a c t i n g .  expression.  facets  o f t h e masque  as  D u r i n g the Commonwealth, p u b l i c  s t a g e p l a y s were banned because o f p u r i t a n i c a l m o r a l but  V o c a l and  judgements,  i n 1656, d r a m a t i c p r o d u c t i o n s w h i c h w e r e s e t t o m u s i c ( i . e .  opera)  triumphed over the ban because o f a t e c h n i c a l i t y and t h e 2> C  a t e r doors were r e o p e n e d . lowed a g a i n ,  J  After  t h e R e s t o r a t i o n p l a y s were a l -  a l t h o u g h some m a j o r s e t - b a c k s  1660* s — t h e p l a g u e  i n 1665, t h e g r e a t f i r e 26  of the Dutch f l e e t  i n 1667.  attention 2k  o c c u r r e d i n the m i d i n 1666 a n d t h e  I n R e s t o r a t i o n drama 27  was f o c u s e d o n i n c i d e n t a l m u s i c .  attack  considerable  There were  instru-  Mtar nofdr eu dc t iBounks o faznedr , c M mental in o nucs li cu s ii onn st h et o Btahr eo q uv ea r iEoruas (New a c t s Yaonr kd» n u W. W. N o r t o n & Company, IncT, 1 9 4 7 ) , p p . 1 8 0 - 1 8 6 . 2 5  Ibid.,  p . 186.  ^ J a c k S t a n f o r d Bemis, " R e s t o r a t i o n Dramatic M u s i c , " (unp u b l i s h e d P h . D . d i s s e r t a t i o n , Eastman S c h o o l o f Music o f the U n i v e r s i t y o f R o c h e s t e r , 1 9 6 1 ) , p . 53« 2  ^ A l l a r d y c e N i c o l l , A H i s t o r y o f R e s t o r a t i o n Drama ( 2 n d e d . : Cambridge: C a m b r i d g e U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1 9 2 8 ) , p . 59« 2  TABLE I I BROADSIDE BALLAD AYRES IN PIAYFORD'S LYRA VIOL EDITIONS  T#  Title/Composer  21  G l o r y o f the West Nightengale A La Mode de France Bow B e l l s When the K [ i n g ] Enjoyes &c. C o l o n e l Gerards Time None S h a l l Plunder But I Over the Mountaines Blew Cap  55 67* 68 76* 96* 190 198*  209  41*  135 158  135 182  114* 159 163 185  1651  May Time Roome f o r Cuckolds Simon the K i n g  X X X  • •  X  X X X  • •  • •  • •  • •  X X X X X  X X  X X X X X  X X  • i  • • • • • •  1682  • •  X X  • • • • «*  • •  • •  • •  • •  • •  X X  • •  • •  • •  X  X  X X X  «•  • •  Simon  1669  X X X  •«  Hunt Is Up V i v e l a y Roy Ayr/[The B u i l d i n g ] : Ives The Merry Milkr-Maid Franklin The Kings D e l i g h t  X X X X X X X X X  1661  165[5]  • •  X X  • •  • •  • •  • •  • •  • •  • •  • •  • •  X  X  • •  • •  • •  • •  • •  •«  X  X  X X  TABLE I I — C o n t i n u e d  T#  141 166 194 195 222* 239*  Title/Composer Come B o y F i l l U s , & c . Mardike L e t O l i v e r Now Be F o r g o t t e n C u c k o l d s A l l A Row The H o b b y H o r s e Dance Farewell F a i r Armida  1651  165[5]  ••  1661  ••  I669  1682 X X X X X X  55 m e r o u s s o n g s and d a n c e s p e r f o r m e d became v e r y p o p u l a r w i t h t h e this  period.  There  d r a w i n g c a r d as  upper  i s evidence  the  d u r i n g the  acts.  Playgoing  and m i d d l e c l a s s e s  during  t h a t m u s i c was a s much o f  costumes and s c e n e r y ,  and t h a t  a  sometimes  28 music even r i v a l e d the Playford another source titled  turned  itself.  to the  popular melodies  of music f o r h i s  "A Masque,"  Simon I v e s ,  drama  editions.  o f the  A piece  i n the  later  three editions  as  variously  "The Queens M a s k " a n d " A n A y r e , "  appears  stage  ascribed  ento  of Musicks Rec-  29 reation. tion,  It  7  this  consists  composition includes  d i v i s i o n s were  omitted  d u c t i o n from w h i c h t h i s however,  o f two s i m i l a r s t r a i n s .  the  first  i n the  d i v i s i o n s on e a c h  1661  strain;  I669 a n d 1682 e d i t i o n s .  p i e c e was d r a w n h a s n o t  strain  I n the  of a piece which appears i n  identical 30  f o r keyboard^  a s t r o n g resemblance  (Example 4 ) .  haps the viol  the  lyra viol  piece  k e y b o a r d v e r s i o n was a m o d e l u s e d b y I v e s f o r  setting  i n Musicks Recreation  (  1  6  6  1  )  ,  pro-  discovered;  f o r m i n two s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y m a n u s c r i p t s to  the  The  been  edi-  bears Per-  the  lyra  transcribed  in  appen-  dix VI. The f i n a l  two e d i t i o n s  of Musicks Recreation  include  rangements o f music by,Matthew Locke from t h r e e operas  ar-  by  W i l l i a m D ' A v e n a n t s t a g e d d u r i n g t h e Commonwealth a n d e a r l y W i l l a r d T h o r p , Songs from the R e s t o r a t i o n T h e a t e r , (Princetons P r i n c e t o n U n i v e r s i t y Press, 1935), p. 1 . T# 51*. 2 8  2 9  ° N e w Y o r k P u b l i c L i b r a r y , MS D r e x e l 5 6 0 3 6 , a n d L o n d o n , B r i t i s h L i b r a r y , MS A d d i t i o n a l Rogers' V i r g i n a l Book, f o l . 2 4 . 3  v  9 1  , 0  fol. 3  3  2 7  9 ,  no. Elizabeth ,  1660's:  M a c k b e t h (1663), The H i s t o r y o f S i r F r a n c i s D r a k e  o r 59) a n d The C r u e l t y o f t h e S p a n i a r d s  i n P e r u (l658).3  addition,  (I669  thirteen of  both l a t e r pieces  the pieces  thor,  title,  "Theater  i  1  date)  i s known, a n d t h r e e ,  have been i d e n t i f i e d .  entitled area l l  composers  W i l l i a m T u r n e r a n d Thomas  and Henry P u r c e l l  pieces  The p i e c e s  but f o r several,  John B a n i s t e r ,  F a r m e r c o m p o s e d one e a c h , b e i n g among h i s f i r s t  editions,  Ten  information (au-  which are simply  a r e f r o m unknown p r o d u c t i o n s .  n  a n d 1682) c o n t a i n  o f i n c i d e n t a l music from R e s t o r a t i o n p l a y s .  i n the l y r a v i o l  Example 4 .  editions  a r e from p l a y s f o r w h i c h s p e c i f i c  Tune,"  anonymous  lyra viol  (1658  composed t h r e e ,  these  o f i n c i d e n t a l music f o r p l a y s .  Anonymous, Maske, f i r s t  strain.  a—^  2:  P  3=  f Since positions  i t was c u s t o m a r y  t o be u s e d  i n P l a y f o r d ' s d a y f o r p o p u l a r com-  i n v a r i o u s ways,  i t i s not surprising to  Rosamund H a r d i n g , c o m p i l e r , A T h e m a t i c C a t a l o g u e o f t h e Works o f M a t t h e w L o c k e ( O x f o r d : B . H . B l a c k w e l l L t d . , 1972), p p . 51, 78.  56find and  some l y r a v i o l  p i e c e s used both i n dramatic  as a y r e s f o r b r o a d s i d e b a l l a d s .  sitions  appear  i n the  "Bonny B r o w . " cause  It  lyra viol  At least  editions:  two s u c h c o m p o -  "Amarillis"  i s u n c e r t a i n whether P l a y f o r d  o f t h e i r p o p u l a r i t y as b a l l a d a y r e s  Each o f the  appeared  in lyra viol  chose  o r as  B o t h p i e c e s were sung i n p l a y s p r o d u c e d i n the ever, neither  productions  and them b e -  theater music. 1660's.  arrangement  tunes had broadside b a l l a d s attached  until  How-  3 2  1682.  t o them i n  the  33  intervening y e a r s .  T h u s , i t m i g h t h a v e b e e n t h e more  J J  current  b a l l a d a s s o c i a t i o n s which P l a y f o r d had i n mind. While rangements  i t remains a p o s s i b i l i t y  viol  lyra viol  ar-  o f t h e a t e r m u s i c m i g h t be c o n c e a l e d i n P l a y f o r d ' s  e d i t i o n s under the no p r o o f  that other  titles  o f i n s t r u m e n t a l dance  o f such arrangements  dances o f the  suite  has been d i s c o v e r e d .  movements,  Since  lyra  t y p e p u b l i s h e d by P l a y f o r d were p l e n t i f u l  in  32i  the seventeenth Playford  century,  to r e s o r t  i t p r o b a b l y was n o t n e c e s s a r y  to arranging e x i s t i n g l i t e r a t u r e  for  for other  media. In and  Table I I I ,  a l l the  t h e i r composers are  about the  pieces with t h e a t r i c a l  listed.  production is l i s t e d  c o l u m n s show t h e  later  When k n o w n , i n the  lyra viol  specific  t h i r d column.  editions  associations information Subsequent  i n which the  pieces  a p p e a32r . S i m p s o n , The B r i t i s h B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d a n d I t s M u s i c , J  366-67, 17-18. 3 3  Ibid.  34 J  Lefkowitz,  W i l l i a m Lawes, p .  152.  pp.  TABLE I I I THEATER MUSIC I N P I A Y F O R D ' S LYRA V I O L EDITIONS  T#  Title/Composer  Production  4l*  A M a s q u e / T h e Queens M a s k / An Ayre Simon I v e s  unknown  72  Almain J o h n Moss  ? James S h i r l e y , C u p i d and D e a t h (1653), 5th entry—Matthew Locke  114*  Ayre [See the B u i l d ing] Simon Ives  W i l l i a m Hemming, The J e w e s T r a g e d y (1662), 4th a c t  130  The S i m e r o n s D a n c e / Prince Rupert's Welcome [Matthew L o c k e ]  W i l l i a m D ' A v e n a n t , The History of S i r Francis D r a k e (1658 o r 59), 2nd entry  225  A Dance i n M a c k b e t h [Matthew L o c k e ]  William D'Avenant, M a c k b e t h (1663)  249*  P r e t h e Love T u r n t o Me Anonymous  W i l l i a m D ' A v e n a n t , The R i v a l s (1664?)  1661  1669  1682  X  X  X  • a  X  X  ••  X  X  •  X  X  X  X  X  • •  c  ••  TABLE  III—Continued  I669  1682  ••  X  •  t  X  • •  X  a •  X  W i l l i a m D ' A v e n a n t , The C r u e l t y o f the Spaniards i n P e r u (1658)  ••  X  Ah C r u e l B l o o d y F a t e The M i r t i e S h a d e Now t h e F i g h t ' s Done [ a l l three by Henry Purcell]  Nathaniel  • • •• • •  X X X  The J o y o f A l l H e a r t s [William Turner]  Thomas S h a d w e l l , t i n e (1675)  ••  X  T#  Title/Composer  Production  25  A S c o t c h Tune C a l l e d Sawney Anonymous  Thomas D u r f e y , The V i r t u ous W i f e (1679)  64  Bonny Brow Anonymous  Thomas D u r f e y , A F o n d H u s b a n d (1667)  69  Amarillis [John B a n i s t e r ]  Thomas P o r t e r , l a i n (1663)  71  S i t t i n g Beyond t h e Riverside [Thomas F a r m e r ]  Aphra Behn, S i r P a t i e n t F a n c y (1678)  155  The A p e s Dance i n the Opera [Matthew L o c k e ]  78 194 165  221  (1680)  1661  Lee,  The V i l -  Theodosius t  a  \  Liber-  TABLE  III--Continued  T#  Title/Composer  Production  51  T h e a t e r Tune Anonymous  Unknown  214  T h e a t e r Tune Anonymous  Unknown  X  299  T h e a t e r Tune Anonymous  Unknown  x  1661  1669  • •  • •  1682 X  60 C o u n t r y Dance T u n e s C o u n t r y d a n c i n g o r i g i n a t e d i n r u r a l a r e a s when g r o u p s o f people,  o f t e n whole communities, danced a t  village  celebrations  35  a n d May g a m e s .  ^  Long b e f o r e  was p o p u l a r w i t h ular fare  at  the  upper c l a s s e s .  c o u r t b a l l s d u r i n g the  t h e y were programmed a f t e r As time passed, increased, years  P l a y f o r d ' s "time c o u n t r y d a n c i n g C o u n t r y dances were reign of Elizabeth  t h e more f o r m a l ,  imported  I,  3  t h e number o f p e o p l e who d a n c e d c o u n t r y  P u r i t a n dominion n u r t u r e d the  dancing since, home, r a t h e r  during this  dances  C o u n t r y d a n c i n g became a common p a r t  The  popularity of  time, people sought  t h a n o u t s i d e where t h e i r  when  dances. ^  f o r t h e y w e r e t a k e n up b y t h e m i d d l e c l a s s .  o f the  reg-  country  entertainment  s a f e t y was  at  uncertain.  of everyday life—whenever 37  r e c r e a t i o n was d e s i r e d a n d someone h a d a n i n s t r u m e n t a t h a n d . Playford's t h a n 900  D a n c i n g M a s t e r , w h i c h i n c l u d e d o v e r the y e a r s  different  dances,  C o u n t r y dances dances, of  because  dancers  are  they are  execute  3 8  catered  quite  different  from b a l l r o o m  or patterns  couple The  groups  of steps w h i c h are  39  . -a*sI o tlhoe Am . uWs i cl l icaomnst ,i n Eu ne g peated s .l i s h F o l k S o n g a n d D a n c e L o n g m a n s , G r e e n a n d C o . , 1935). p . 135 3  more  to t h i s p o p u l a r i t y .  danced by groups o f p e o p l e .  'figures'  '  7  re-  (London:  - ^ C h a r l e s R e a d B a s k e r v i l l , The E l i z a b e t h a n J i g ( C h i c a g o : U n i v e r s i t y o f C h i c a g o P r e s s , 1 9 2 9 7 T r e p u b l i c a t i o n (New Y o r k : D o v e r P u b l i c a t i o n s , I n c . , 1965). p . 338. rial  • ^ M e l u s i n e Wood, M o r e H i s t o r i c a l D a n c e s ( L o n d o n : The ImpeS o c i e t y o f T e a c h e r s o f D a n c i n g I n c o r p o r a t e d , 1956), p . 102. 3 8  Williams,  E n g l i s h F o l k Song and Dance, p .  137.  Dean-Smith, P l a y f o r d ' s E n g l i s h Dancing Master (London: S c h o t t a n d Company, L t d . , 1957). p . x v i i i . 3 9  1651  61 C o u n t r y dances ballads» it  t h e same t y p e  tunes and v i c e  versa.  Several pieces  i n the l y r a v i o l  c o u n t r y dance  tunes;  often  serve  Thus  as c o u n t r y  editions are  arrangements  i n The E n g l i s h D a n c -  directions fitted  t o them.  Two o f  " A Symphony" a n d " C o u n t r y C o l l , " a r e u n u s u a l f o r P l a y f o r d ' s  arrangements Symphony" William the  and p o p u l a r . ^ °  they had appeared  i n g M a s t e r (1651) w i t h d a n c e these,  o f music as b r o a d s i d e  i s simple, repetitive  i s n o t s u r p r i s i n g that b a l l a d ayres  dance  of  music t h a t  require  because  they bear a t t r i b u t i o n s  t o composers.  "A  i s a s c r i b e d t o C h a r l e s Coleman and " C o u n t r y C o l l "  Lawes.  arrangers Titles  to  W h e t h e r C o l e m a n a n d Lawes a r e t h e c o m p o s e r s o r o f t h e two p i e c e s  o f a few o t h e r  with country dancing. w h i c h was f r e q u e n t l y  is uncertain.  lyra viol  Three p i e c e s  pieces  suggest  are c a l l e d  g i v e n t o c o u n t r y dance  a name c o u p l e d w i t h t h e t e r m ' d e l i g h t '  associations  delights,  tunes.  a term  Evidently  i n d i c a t e d the person f o r  whom t h e d a n c e was composed o r t h e d a n c i n g m a s t e r who  created  42 the  dance.  Another l y r a v i o l  piece  i s e n t i t l e d "Country  " D a n c e " a n d i s a s c r i b e d t o Thomas B a t e s . part  of a suite Ibid.,  o f dances  by Bates,  Because t h i s  and because,  piece  is  i n one o f t h e  p. xvi,  4l No i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t t h e c o n n e c t i o n o f C o l e m a n o r Lawes w i t h t h e two p i e c e s a p p e a r s i n D e a n - S m i t h ' s P l a y f o r d ' s E n g l i s h Dancing M a s t e r , although the e d i t i o n c o n t a i n s an annotated l i s t of concordances. She e v i d e n t l y was unaware t h a t " A Symphony" and " C o u n t r y C o l l " appear i n t h e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , and t h a t the two p i e c e s b e a r a s c r i p t i o n s t h e r e .  42  Douglas Kennedy, E n g l i s h F o l k D a n c i n g (London: a n d S o n s L t d . , 1964), p p . ' 85-88.  G. Bell  62 lyra viol  editions  lyra viol  dance.  it  is entitled "Jig,"  However, s i n c e  it  i t may be a n  abstract  i s known t h a t B a t e s w o r k e d  43 as a n a r r a n g e r , c o u n t r y dance  J  the  p i e c e may i n d e e d be a n a r r a n g e m e n t  t h a t was i n c o r p o r a t e d i n t o a  Table I V i n c l u d e s a l l the t r y dance  tunes and,  w h i c h have t i t l e s  editions  i n which the  seventeenth  which o r i g i n a t e d w i t h the elsi  Subsequent pieces  the  of counpieces  these are  ar-  columns i n d i c a t e  the  appear.  F o l k Dance T u n e s century, English folk r u r a l lower c l a s s , 44  1) s o c i a l r u r a l c o u n t r y d a n c e ,  i d a y s and c e l e b r a t i o n s on v i l l a g e pleasure,  arrangements  suggesting country dancing;  Professional I n the  suite.  p r e c e d e d by q u e s t i o n m a r k s ,  ranged a c c o r d i n g to e d i t i o n . later  lyra viol  of a  a n d 2) p r o f e s s i o n a l f o l k  dance,  or  dance  e x i s t e d on two l e v -  w h i c h was d a n c e d a t  hol-  g r e e n s b y men a n d women f o r dance,  w h i c h was a l s o  danced  on s p e c i a l o c c a s i o n s , b u t by s p e c i a l l y t r a i n e d male d a n c e r s 45 costume f o r s p e c t a c l e  or  entertainment.  The p r o f e s s i o n a l f o l k solo dances.  in  dances.were  either  team d a n c e s  Teams c o n s i s t e d o f s i x o r e i g h t d a n c e r s  dances were b a s e d upon f i g u r e s ,  like  d a n c e s w e r e d a n c e d b y one s k i l l e d ^ S e e p p . 120, 123.  country dances.  d a n c e r and were s t e p  and  or their  Solo dances  ^ A s opposed to urban c o u n t r y dance, or the v e r s i o n o f a c t i v i t y danced by L o n d o n ' s m i d d l e and upper c l a s s e s .  the  45 J o h n S t r e e t e r M a n i f o l d , The M u s i c i n E n g l i s h Drama (London! R o c k l i f f , 1956), p . 1 4 1 . The two l e v e l s s t i l l a p l y t o d a y and p r o b a b l y d i d l o n g b e f o r e P l a y f o r d ' s t i m e . Because f o l k d a n c i n g i s a n u n r e c o r d e d t r a d i t i o n , no d a t e o f o r i g i n a t i o n exists.  TABLE I V COUNTRY DANCE TUNES I N P I A Y F O R D ' S LYRA V I O L EDITIONS  1651  Title/Composer  T#  21 63*  G l o r y o f the West A Symphony/Charles C o l e m a n (1682) A L a Mode de F r a n c e Step S t a t e l y Blew Cap  67*  l 9 209 k  161* 186  ? Mr. Porter's Delight ? C o u n t r y D a n c e / Thomas Bates Country C o l l / William Lawes  197*  218  The B o a t m a n  185  ? The K i n g ' s  Delight  a  165[5]  1661  1669  1682  X X  X X  X X X  X X X  •• ••  X  ••  •• ••  X X  X X  X X  X X  ••  X  ••  ••  ••  ••  ••  X  X  ••  ••  • •  ••  X  X  X  X X  X  X  X  * •  ••  ••  ••  X  T # 185 a p p e a r s i n a n e d i t i o n o f The D a n c i n g M a s t e r , b u t n o t i n t h e s e c t i o n o f c o u n t r y dances; i t a p p e a r s i n a n a p p e n d i x o f t r e b l e v i o l i n p i e c e s w h i c h e v e n t u a l l y became A p o l l o ' s Banquet. a  TABLE  IV—Continued  1651  T#  Title/Composer  159 250  The M e r r y M i l k - M a i d ? The Queens D e l i g h t  ••  •• • «  195  C u c k o l d s A l l A Row  ••  ••  ••  165C5]  1661  1669 X X  • » ••  t  •  1682 •• ••  X  65 46 like  the h o r n p i p e and j i g .  teams?  sword dance  fered  i n the costumes  influenced  There were  and m o r r i s dance  teams.  and accoutrements  the dances  performed.  two t y p e s  The two t y p e s  they used,  Sword dancers  a n d wore b e l l s s t r a p p e d  dancing involved elaborate the  dancers,  the  belis.^  subsidiary part  the  fool  queen,  i n turn  Morris  to t h e i r legs.  interweaving with scarves  connecting of  who a c t e d a s w e l l as d a n c e d w e r e a  o f the p r o f e s s i o n a l f o l k  v a r i e d from v i l l a g e  or clown,  dancers  Their  a n d f o o t movements w h i c h m a x i m i z e d t h e e f f e c t  Groups o f c h a r a c t e r s  characters  which  dif-  carried knives  o r s w o r d s a n d b r a n d i s h e d them d u r i n g t h e d a n c i n g . c a r r i e d scarves  o f dance  dance  to v i l l a g e :  tradition.  The  stock figures  were  t h e m u s i c i a n , t h e mock m a y o r o r k i n g a n d  the hobby horse  ( a man i n h o r s e ' s  costume)  and the  trea-  48 surer.  Certain characters,  c l o w n , w e r e known f o r t h e i r a s o l o dance,  such as the hobby h o r s e  dancing a b i l i t y .  the clown might a l s o serve  nies  and comedian.  ence  i s " H e r e we b e , m a s t e r s ,  and the  Besides performing  as a master  o f ceremo-  ( H i s t r a d i t i o n a l opening remark to the a u d i -  t e a m ] a n d one d a n c e r  s i x f o o l s [he i n d i c a t e s  [he i n d i c a t e s h i m s e l f ] ! ^ ) 9  Other  the m o r r i s members  of  t h e 4g 6roup enacted s k i t s o r dramas, the m u s i c i a n p l a y e d f o r C e c i l J . S h a r p a n d H e r b e r t C . M a c i l w a i n e , The M o r r i s B o o k , P a r t I ( L o n d o n : N o v e l l o a n d Company, L t d . , 1912)", p . 4 8 . ^ Ibid., 7  pp.  Williams, ^Sharp  14-15. E n g l i s h F o l k S o n g a n d D a n c e , p p . 148-50.  and M a c i l w a i n e ,  The M o r r i s B o o k ,  I , 28.  66 the  d a n c e r s and the D u r i n g the  ing morris i n the  t r e a s u r e r passed the  nineteenth century,  f e s t i v a l took place  title  o f one  This Thames-side  o f the  box.-*  0  one p a r t i c u l a r l y  interest-  at Abingdon, a l o c a l i t y  lyra viol  town, e i g h t  money  mentioned  tunes—"Abington J i g . "  miles south  of Oxford, held a  three  51 day c e l e b r a t i o n  w h i c h began  on t h e n i n e t e e n t h d a y o f  The f e s t i v i t i e s  commenced w i t h t h e  w h i c h was f o l l o w e d b y a p a r a d e . b e a r e r who c a r r i e d  a pair  e l e c t i o n o f a mock m a y o r ,  The p a r a d e was l e d b y a  o f o x ' s h o r n s mounted  t o be f r o m a n a n i m a l r o a s t e d  June.  i n the  on a s t i c k ,  v i l l a g e i n the  The m a y o r f o l l o w e d i n s p e c i a l c o s t u m e ,  year  e x - m a y o r c a r r y i n g a wooden c h a l i c e w i t h a  heart bearing  the  the  s i x morris  twentieth the  o f June were  twenty-first.  of the the  mayor's  house.  the  i n w h i c h the  on E n g l i s h f o l k  fool,  Because  the  the  i n the  for  of  dancing,  began.  above  however,  At least  believes  the  and  in  front  through shops  dinner. description,  v i l l a g e r s at Abingdon claim t h i s  festivities  and  until  7 a.m.  in front  ^ ° W i l l i a m s , E n g l i s h F o l k Song and Dance, III  begin  dancers paraded  stopped  twice  at  box.  silver  nineteenth  dancing did not  way t o p e r f o r m  mentioned  1700.  the m u s i c i a n  dance t o o k p l a c e  After this,  a l o n g the  1700,  significant;  year  days,  u n t i l 4 p . m . when t h e y  The y e a r is  fast  The f i r s t  town s t o p p i n g  and h o u s e s ,  N e x t the  dancers appeared.  said  w i t h s w o r d a n d money  Then came t h e  d a t e 1700.  horn  one  is  the  authority  festivities pp.  may  148-50.  - ^ D e t a i l s a r e f r o m S h a r p and M a c i l w a i n e , The M o r r i s B o o k , ( L o n d o n : N o v e l l o and Company, L t d . , 1924), p p . 110-113.  67 e x t e n d back to an e a r l i e r date.-'  The e x i s t e n c e  " A b i n g t o n J i g " i n P l a y f o r d ' s 1682 l y r a support  this  viol  o f the  time  e d i t i o n seems  to  belief.  A l t h o u g h the  performances  were u s u a l l y a s s o c i a t e d w i t h tions,  the m o r r i s dancers  peared  at  other  times.  professional folk  their v i l l a g e ' s springtime  and c h a r a c t e r s  Just  A b i n g d o n was w i t n e s s e d i n  o f the  I783 b y  celebra-  t r a v e l e d about  such an appearance  o f the  dancers  and  ap-  team  from  F r a n c i s Godolphin Waldron.  He  wrote I n t h e summer o f 1 7 8 3 i t h e E d i t o r saw a t R i c h m o n d i n S u r r e y , a Company o f M o r r i c e - D a n c e r s f r o m A b i n g t o n , a c c o m p a n i e d b y a F o o l i n a m o t l e y j a c k e t , & c , who c a r ried i n h i s h a n d a s t a f f o r t r u n c h e o n , a b o u t two f e e t l o n g , h a v i n g a b l o w n - u p b l a d d e r f a s t e n e d t o one e n d o f i t w i t h w h i c h he e i t h e r b u f f e t e d t h e c r o w d t o k e e p them a t a p r o p e r d i s t a n c e from the d a n c e r s , or p l a y e d t r i c k s f o r t h e s p e c t a t o r s d i v e r s i o n . The D a n c e r s a n d t h e F o o l were B e r k s h i r e - H u s b a n d - m e n , t a k i n g an a n n u a l c i r c u i t , c o l l e c t i n g money f r o m w h o e v e r w o u l d g i v e them a n y : and ( I apprehend) h a d d e r i v e d the appendage o f the b l a d d e r from custom i m m e m o r i a l : n o t from O l d P l a y s o r t h e commentaries thereon.53 Cecil  Sharp wrote  o r t h r e e w e e k s when i t  o f a team t h a t w o u l d a l l o w an e x t r a came t i m e t o make t h e  harvesting  two  circuit  54 so t h a t t h e y c o u l d  j o u r n e y t o London t o dance.  spend s e v e r a l days  i n the  ferent  district.  responsible  o n e a c h one e n t e r t a i n i n g  .Just s u c h an i t i n e r a n t  f o r the  ^Williams,  city,  They w o u l d a  group m i g h t have  d i s s e m i n a t i o n o f " A b i n g t o n J i g " and  E n g l i s h F o l k Song and Dance, p .  difbeen  other  151.  - * B e n J o h n s o n , The S a d S h e p h e r d s o r a T a l e o f R o b i n H o o d ( L o n d o n , 1 7 8 3 ) , p . 255. Q u o t e d i n S h a r p ' s The M o r r i s B o o k , I I I , 3  113. 5 i +  Ibid. , I,  22.  68  tunes which appear i n l y r a v i o l  arrangements  in Playford's  pub-  lications . Playford's sides  editions  " A b i n g t o n J i g " whose  dance, are  lyra viol  o r more  titles  contain several pieces  s u g g e s t the  s p e c i f i c a l l y , the m o r r i s  two l y r a m o r r i s e s  of p r o f e s s i o n a l  folk  and a h o r n p i p e dance t u n e s .  who a c c o m p a n i e d  the  whose t r a d i t i o n a l Tune,"  team,  the  instrument  a piece which appears  The l y r a v i o l  was t h e  heart  a p p e a r s on the common  o f the  same page a s  s u g g e s t two  p i p e and  There  arrangements  pieces  "Hobby  characters musician,  t a b o r . " O x f o r d  i n Musicks Recreation  morris  folk  dance t r a d i t i o n .  hobby h o r s e and the  a l s o be a n a r r a n g e m e n t o f a m o r r i s t r i c t was t h e  professional  w h i c h m i g h t be  H o r s e Dance" and " I Have Been a P i p e r "  be-  dance t u n e .  (1682),  may  The O x f o r d  t r a d i t i o n and " O x f o r d  dis-  Tune"  "Abington J i g , " which suggests  a  source.  All  the  possible  dance t u n e s are  lyra  arrangements of p r o f e s s i o n a l  l i s t e d on t a b l e  folk  V.  Other Transcribed Music B e s i d e s the  pieces  already mentioned,  s e v e r a l more  ments o f m u s i c f o r o t h e r m e d i a a p p e a r i n the About h a l f  o f t h e s e a r r a n g e m e n t s were  ( s o n g s ansl; c a t c h e s ) by J o h n P l a y f o r d .  originally for  and a p p e a r i n o t h e r The r e s t  appear i n manuscript  lyra viol  apparently  settings for other  publications are  editions.  voice released  popular melodies  instruments.  "^Kennedy, E n g l i s h F o l k Dancing, p .  arrange-  98.  These  and ar-  TABLE V PROFESSIONAL FOLK DANCE TUNES IN P L A Y F O R D ' S LYRA V I O L EDITIONS  1651  Title/Composer P[rince]  Ruperts Morrice  165[5]  X  1661  ••  •  t  ••  •  t  X  f  •  M o r r i s / Coleman C a v a l i e r s Hornpipe  •• ••  X X  •• ••  213  I Have B e e n a  ••  ••  X  •• •• ••  •• ••  18  152* 222*  O x f o r d Tune Abington J i g H o b b y H o r s e Dance  •  t  1682  • *  93 219*  Piper  1669  •  t  ••  •• ••  ••  ••  •  0  ••  X X X  ?o rangements sources  are  listed  i n table V I ;  other  i n w h i c h t h e y a p p e a r may be f o u n d  seventeenth-century i n the  thematic  cat-  alogue . Playford the  lyra viol  p r o b a b l y d r e w more h e a v i l y o n a r r a n g e d m u s i c f o r e d i t i o n s t h a n the p r e c e d i n g d i s c u s s i o n s u g g e s t s .  Many more p i e c e s w i t h d e s c r i p t i v e t i t l e s Perhaps these,  too,  seventeenth-century be f o u n d  are  sources  i n other versions.  p i e c e s c o n t a i n e d i n the tive  arrangements.  titles.  appear  i n the  I f one w e r e t o  editions. consult  d i r e c t l y many o f t h e s e p i e c e s m i g h t Table V I I l i s t s a l l the r e m a i n i n g  lyra viol  e d i t i o n s w h i c h have  descrip-  TABLE VI OTHER ARRANGEMENTS IN THE LYRA VIOL EDITIONS  Title/Composer  Sources  60  P [ r i n c e ] Ruperts March/Anonymous  Lbm—2 s e t tings  26  G l o r y o f the N o r t h / Anonymous Gather Your Rosebuds/[William LawesJ A Boat, a Boat/' > [John J e n k i n s ] The I t a l i a n R a n t / [Giuseppino]  T#  70 220*  100* 164 168 2  3  2  ;  The S c o t s March/ Anonymous Parthenia/ Anonymous Come Jump t o My C o u s i n and K i s s / Anonymous  3-  1651 x  165[5]  1661  I  6  6  9  1682  ••  • •  • •  • •  PMD66, Lbm, NYpl PCG52,  X  ••  • •  • •  X  •  0  ••  •  0  PCC52, PMB51  X  ••  • •  •  0  PCG52,  • •  • •  X  X  PMH78 NYp3  • •  • •  X  X  NYpl  • •  ••  X  X  NYpl, Pel  ••  0  X  X  PSM52  PDM62-65,  •  TABLE V I ' — - C o n t i n u e d  T#  13 120 204*  239*  Sources  General Monk's March/ Anonymous C o u l d Man H i s W i s h 0btain/[James Paisible] Sweet J a n e / [ J o h n Banister] Farewell Fair Armida/ [Robert Smith]  PDM65 PCAS83,  The sources' 180-185.  a  pp.  Title/Composer  abbreviations  1651  1661  1669  * •  • •  • •  X  • •  • •  • •  X  • •  • •  • •  X  • •  t  • •  X  165[5]  1682  PPC83 PCC67,  PMC 7 3 PCAS73,75,  . .  •  76, PPC73  are e x p l a i n e d i n the i n t r o d u c t i o n to the thematic  catalogue,  TABLE V I I OTHER D E S C R I P T I V E T I T L E S I N P L A Y F O R D ' S LYRA V I O L EDITIONS  T#  29  39 56 171 191  211 216  37  40 43 52 110 147 180  210 259 6 22 57 73  215  Composer  Title Maydens R a n t Brangle Devilage The A p o l l o I r i s h Rant G i l l i Flower La Cloche L e s l e y e s March  Anon. Anon. Anon. Anon. Simon I v e s Simon I v e s Anon.  1651  165C5] X X X X X X X  1661  1669  1682  X  X X  X X  •*  ••  ••  ••  ••  •  X X  X X  X X  ••  ••  ••  X X X X  ••  ••  T o l l , T o l l Gentle B e l l The P l e a s a n t Dream La Cockley The P r i n c e o f C o n d i e s March The New F i g g a r y The M y r t l e G r o v e F o l l o w Me K a t e Montrosses March G l o r y of Hackney  Anon. Anon. Anon. Anon.  •• ••  Anon. Anon. Anon. Anon. Anon.  ••  The G r a n a d e e s M a r c h New M u t t a r Dragoons March M r . Farmers Trumpet The E a r l o f S a n d w i c h ' s Farewell  Anon. Anon. Anon. Anon. Anon.  •• ••  •• •• •• ••  •• •• ••  1  X X X X X  t  X X ••  X •• *• ••  X X X X X X  CHAPTER I V THE INSTRUMENTAL DANCES About t h r e e - q u a r t e r s Playford's  five  abstract music). rants  lyra viol  o f the l y r a v i o l editions  The m o s t n u m e r o u s  and sarabands.  pieces  contained i n  are instrumental types  dances ( i . e .  include almains, co-  I n a d d i t i o n , a few p r e l u d e s  and j i g s a p -  pear. * 2 The l y r a v i o l The f i r s t players the  i d i o m d e v e l o p e d as a r e s u l t  f a c t o r was t h e d e s i r e  f o r the l y r a v i o l  lute,  of three  factors.  on t h e p a r t o f composers and  to function i n a solo capacity,  r a t h e r t h a n a s a member o f a c o n s o r t . - '  Thus,  like lyra  A f e w o t h e r d a n c e t y p e s a p p e a r i n t h e e d i t i o n s , s u c h as . the minuet, bore ( b o u r e e ) , g a l l i a r d , c h i c o n a (chaconne) and c a n a r i e s , b u t , as t h e s e a r e n o t numerous, t h e i r m u s i c a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s w i l l n o t be d i s c u s s e d . 2  The member o f t h e v i o l f a m i l y c a l l e d t h e l y r a v i o l was s l i g h t l y l a r g e r t h a n t h e t e n o r v i o l , b u t was c o n s i d e r e d a v a r i a n t o f t h e b a s s s i n c e i t p l a y e d i n t h e same r a n g e . I t s bridge and f i n g e r b o a r d were o n l y s l i g h t l y c u r v e d t o f a c i l i t a t e p l a y i n g chords. O t h e r w i s e , i t was v e r y s i m i l a r t o t h e o t h e r members o f the v i o l f a m i l y . I t was n o t p h y s i c a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s w h i c h d e f i n e d the l y r a v i o l i d i o m , and p l a y i n g v i o l ' l y r a - w a y ' d i d n o t mean p l a y i n g o n t h i s i n s t r u m e n t o n l y . A n y member o f t h e v i o l f a m i l y c o u l d be p l a y e d ' l y r a - w a y . * The s t y l e , n o t t h e i n s t r u m e n t , was t h e i m p o r t a n t c o n s i d e r a t i o n . See J o h n S a w y e r ' s " A n Anthology o f Lyra V i o l Music i n Oxford, B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y , Mus. S c h . MSS d . 245-7," PP« 189-91. a n d F r a n k T r a f i c a n t e ' s " M u s i c for the Lyra V i o l s : The P r i n t e d S o u r c e s , " p p . 8-9. -%ee S a w y e r ' s " A n A n t h o l o g y o f L y r a V i o l M u s i c , " p . 51. a n d T r a f i c a n t e ' s " T h e M a n s e l l L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e , " p . 16.  74  75 v i o l music contains straight  b o t h c h o r d s and p o l y p h o n y , as  melodic style  of consort  playing.  r e s t r i c t i o n p l a c e d on the  the  p h y s i c a l l i m i t a t i o n s o f p l a y e r and i n s t r u m e n t . centered  o n b o w i n g as  chordal fingering. a s p e c t o f the  ecute the n o t e s  simultaneously,  o f the  the  by  limitaand  apparent  Unable to  sustain  p l a y e r o f t e n must  polyphony.  ex-  successively,  The l i s t e n e r m u s t a s s i m i l a t e  to perceive  p o l y p h o n y i s a mannered  the  various polyphonic parts  r a t h e r than simultaneously. and r i n g i n g p i t c h e s  The  t h e means o f t o n e p r o d u c t i o n  an a n g u l a r m e l o d i c l i n e .  more t h a n two p i t c h e s  was  polyphonic, or chordal, s t y l e  Bowing produced the most r e a d i l y  idiom,  the  A second f a c t o r  the  tions  opposed to  bowed  Thus l y r a  and e a s i l y r e c o g n i z a b l e element  viol  of  the  idiom. The p r o b l e m o f c h o r d a l f i n g e r i n g was one t h a t virtuosos.  Musicians with lesser  t h a t were v e r y f a r ficult, this  i f not  colorful  Violists,  ability  removed from the  insurmountable,  he s a i d , w e r e f a c e d  found p l a y i n g chords  t o n i c key an e x t r e m e l y  obstacle.  d e s c r i p t i o n o f the  challanged  problems  dif-  Thomas S a l m o n gave such p l a y i n g  presented.  with  the odd i n c o n v e n i e n t s i t u a t i o n o f the N o t e s . . . w h i c h w i t h t h e i r C o n c o r d s l i e so c r o s s l y , t h a t . . . [ t h e v i o l i s t ] i s f o r c e d to p l a y the s i n g l e Notes o n l y , o r e l s e undergo v e r y d i f f i c u l t stops. Variant tunings simplify  w e r e t h e means b y w h i c h v i o l i s t s a t t e m p t e d  chordal fingerings.  When t h e  open s t r i n g s  of a  to tuning  \ n E s s a y t o the Advancement o f M u s i c , quoted i n Traficante's "Lyra V i o l Tunings: ' A l l Ways h a v e b e e n t r y e d do i t ' , " p . 1 9 3 .  to  76 corresponded i n g became  to  less  the m a j o r i t y piece  the  complicated.  (or a l l )  simplified  tonic key.  frequently  the  used p i t c h e s  i n a piece,  finger-  E v e n t u a l l y i t was s e e n t h a t  o f the  open s t r i n g s  f i n g e r i n g of chords  S a l m o n was i n f a v o r o f t h i s .  to  the  key of  tuning  the  closely related  to  the  He w a n t e d t o p l a y  in  some p l e a s a n t L y r a t u n i n g , t h a t t h e m o s t f r e q u e n t N o t e s be a l w a y s s t r u c k o p e n , t h a t t h e i r C o n c o r d s may be t h e i r n e a r e s t n e i g h b o r s , and a t l a s t the whole V i o l , w i t h an u n s t o p * t f r e e d o m , may e c c h o f o r t h a f u l l C o n s o r t - s t r o k e , u s u a l l y the key o f the Lesson.-5 T h i s was t h e viol  editions  fortunately, the  b e s t s o l u t i o n f o r the  amateur,  t r i a d i c tunings  exert  harmonic adventuresomeness lyra viol  an i n h i b i t i n g  tendency  restrictions  the  Composers a t t e m p t e d sate f o r the  to  the  had to camouflage  the  frequent  to f i l l  It  out the  of chords  summation,  the  instrument's  and open  f o r m a x i m i z i n g the  ringing.  idiom  strings. to  compen-  polyphonic w r i t i n g .  finger  impression of down o n  strings  Thomas Mace, d i s c u s s e d t h e  i n h i s M u s i c k ' s Monument, and t e r m e d In  very  lyra viol  sound o f a p i e c e  c o n s i s t e d o f h o l d i n g the  which should continue nique  use  l a c k o f r e a l and s u s t a i n e d  P l a y e r s a l s o had a technique polyphony.  is  on  editions.  composers  with  Un-  influence  o f the m u s i c and t h i s  The t h i r d f a c t o r w h i c h c o n t r i b u t e s the  lyra  r e l y a l m o s t e x c l u s i v e l y on t r i a d i c t u n i n g s .  obvious i n the  is  and P l a y f o r d ' s  characteristics  it  the  o f the  tech-  'hold.'^  lyra viol  idiom  ^Ibid. ^ ( L o n d o n , I676), p . 250. The p l a y e r ' s c a n n o t h a v e h a d much e f f e c t o n t h e i d i o m .  technique,  however,  77 are  1)  an a n g u l a r m e l o d i c l i n e ,  harmonies,  a n d 3)  s e v e r a l or a l l unstopped  one o f P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l been chosen because  gree as any o f the the  it  pieces  tablature  the  use  o f chords  (known as lyra viol  pieces.  restricted  r i n g i n g sound caused by  frequent  strings  Example 5 i l l u s t r a t e s  per s t a f f ,  a tendency toward  an o v e r a l l r e s o n a n t ,  s y m p a t h e t i c v i b r a t i o n and the  has  2)  involving  "consort-strokes"). i d i o m as  An "Ayre"  i t appears  by John J e n k i n s  e x h i b i t s p o l y p h o n y t o as g r e a t a i n the  lyra viol  i s reproduced.  in  editions.  On t h e  de-  On t h e  lower s t a f f ,  upa  t r a n s c r i p t i o n appears which suggests the  composer's polyphonic  intentions.  lyra viol  apparent  A l l the  in this  jumping between 3 t h r o u g h 6, ic  scheme  the  the  dominant;  The a n g u l a r s t y l e ,  11,  i n the  and measure  to the  open s t r i n g s  16.  piece, which i s  s t r a i n d w e l l s on the the  o f the  appears  r e l a t i v e major,  bow measures harmon-  then concludes dominant,  the  tablature  and " c o n s o r t - s t r o k e s "  are  frequently  fedfh  are  i n a minor key.  A glance at  John Jenkins, Ayre,  in  A restricted  s e c o n d s t r a i n d w e l l s on t h e  tonic.  idiom  caused by the  various polyphonic parts,  is evident  first  E x a m p l e 5.  piece.  9 through  The  returns  constituents  (T# 109*).  reveals used.  then that  on  78 Example  5—Continued.  —b—[r—1  AA  C.  3 5 1  (7) •C5I  i  (JO)  3E  T  1  I  1  v  T  m  ^ 1  J-  f - l r  A  A  *n \\  -  ^  CL  A  (13) 31  r  J  A  i  J  £  T  79 Example  5—Continued.  1.  •  J>  JCV-  g «  iff  n A l m a i n s and A y r e s There are editions. Indeed,  These  the  seventy-five  a l m a i n s and a y r e s  i n these l y r a  two d a n c e s s h a r e many c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s  s i m i l a r i t y between a l m a i n s and a y r e s  t h a t P l a y f o r d h i m s e l f had d i f f i c u l t y the  same p i e c e b e a r s t h e 7 and " A y r e " m another.  title  is  i n common.  so  great  d i s t i n g u i s h i n g them;  "Almain"  i n one l y r a v i o l  I n h i s M u s i c k s M o n u m e n t , Thomas Mace d e s c r i b e d t h e 1  dances i n the  same p a r a g r a p h .  Almains,  he w r o t e ,  viol  often edition  two  are  L e s s o n s v e r y a y r e y , a n d L i v e l y ; a n d G e n e r a l l y o f two s t r a i n s o f t h e Common o r F l a i n e t i m e . Ayres are, or s h o u l d b e , o f t h e same t i m e , ( y e t many make them T r i p l a ' s , a n d c a l l them s o ; ) o n l y t h e y d i f f e r f r o m A l l m a i n e s , b y b e i n g commonly s h o r t e r , a n d o f a q u i c k a n d n i m b l e p e r formance. 8 G e n e r a l l y M a c e ' s comments two p o i n t s  require  7  This  8  P.  qualification.  occurred eleven  129.  suit Playford's pieces,  times.  F i r s t , Mace c a l l s  although  almains  80 • a y r e y and l i v e l y '  i n comparison w i t h  ments s u c h as p a v a n s , editions,  the  dances are  preludes  almains are  faster  still.  the  the  lyra viol  They are  pieces.  of P l a y f o r d ' s ayres  and ayress those o f the whereas  tics  is evident  s t r a i n lengths ayres  the  anao  sarabands. lyra  of almains tend to s t r a i n lengths  longest  strain  almains are  less  not  almains  regular  c o n s i s t o f odd numbers  of  length  Another difference,  in Playford's lyra viol  be  than  measures,  t y p i c a l l y are m u l t i p l e s of four  measures.  r h y t h m i c a l l y and t e x t u r a l l y , are  more o f d e g r e e t h a n o f k i n d .  b.  in  of  o f a l m a i n s and a y r e s  traits a.  strains  whereas  o f the  and o f t e n  those of ayres  Melodically,  the  i s twelve measures.  m e n t i o n e d by Mace,  cen-  b o r n out by the  Some a l m a i n s h a v e  s i x t e e n to eighteen measures,  ayres  i n m i n o r mode a n d b o t h h a v e no  indicates,  longer than those of ayres.  other  Both appear  i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e from P l a y f o r d ' s  A s he  move-  seventeenth  c o n t a i n o n l y two.  M a c e ' s comments r e g a r d i n g l e n g t h a r e viol  as h i s  triple-meter  second p a r t o f the  editions  regular  In Playford's  pieces,  Secondly, although  165[5] e d i t i o n , b o t h a r e  cruses.  less  and f a n t a s i e s .  the w e i g h t i e s t  may h a v e b e e n common i n t h e tury,  slower,  s i m i l a r , the  the  characteris-  differences  The f o l l o w i n g a r e  some  being typical  of almains. A l m a i n s a r e more p o l y p h o n i c t h a n t h e o t h e r m u s i c i n t h e editions. The a n g u l a r m e l o d i c l i n e d i s c u s s e d a s a p a r t o f t h e l y r a v i o l i d i o m i s v e r y much i n e v i d e n c e i n t h e s e pieces. T h u s , as a g r o u p , t h e y a r e t e c h n i c a l l y t h e m o s t demanding p i e c e s i n the e d i t i o n s . C h a r a c t e r i s t i c rhythms employed i n the 9  T#s 284 and  254.  almains  are  81  j . > ) . > . J JI J n  i . ym  m i  >J  KITH  b e i n g a l m o s t a s common a s u b d i v i s i o n o f t h e b e a t a s S i x t e e n t h n o t e p a s s a g e s a r e n o t common e x c e p t i n d i v i s i o n s upon the s t r a i n . A l m a i n s o f t e n e m p l o y m e l o d i c s e q u e n c e a s c a n be s e e n i n e x a m p l e 6. H e r e , t h r e e s e p a r a t e m o t i v e s r e c e i v e sequential treatment. E x a m p l e 6.  1 e«  John J e n k i n s ,  3^-  —  Almain,  f  :—  j  second s t r a i n ,  1  \.—r*~—Z-B  edfhf  (T# 1 2 3 * )  ^—i—j*  y.)  J-  i  5  £ T  i a  c. c\  c  2*  .*.  c a r  r 4  T  f  14  82 Example  6T-Continued.  <x  cA c  it  i l l  1  —<s —& =  iWlA f  O r The l y r a v i o l  mode,  are  editions, range  o,. *  less the  ayres,  homogeneous term ayre  the m a j o r i t y o f which are as  a group than the  encompasses  of technical d i f f i c u l t y  pieces  than the  They have  same r h y t h m i c c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s Others  are  similar,  p h o n i c and c h o r d a l , and f i n a l l y , most p u r e l y m e l o d i c w i t h a n anonymous " A y r e , "  o n l y the  > i. J>  somewhat  last  edfhf  (T#  almains.  less  same poly-  very simple, being a l -  occasional chord.  i s one o f t h i s  Anonymous, A n A y r e ,  J.  some a r e  the  and employ the  but  the  The m o s t  p r a c t i c a l l y i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e from  polyphonic devices.  In  disparate  term a l m a i n .  are  E x a m p l e 7.  almains.  o f a more  complex ayres the  i n major  E x a m p l e ,7,  type. 99).  1. J>  j.  > CK C  s  3^  * ° S e e e x a m p l e 5» p p . transcriptions.  77-79» o r T# 23  i n the  appendix of  83 Example  7—Continued.  J.  }  r  c x  i.  > i  «*  c  i  .  Xa  \  ,\ c  CA  r  3fc 55  J .  1.  >  —**•  J>  J Qi  i T Two o f t h e m e l o d i c a y r e s tions  have prose  of Musicks Recreation suggesting  signified  a piece  ballad ayre.  l l r  1 1  I # 40,  titles  t h a t the  in certain  term  sometimes  o n a v o c a l m o d e l s u c h as a p o p u l a r t u n e o r  A n i m b l e r , q u i c k e r performance "The P l e a s a n t  edi-  a  than that given  D r e a m , " a n d T# 43,  "La Cockley."  to  84 the  almains,  a s Mace s u g g e s t e d , Corants  and  would s u i t  these  pieces.  Sarabands  The two m o s t common t r i p l e - t i m e d a n c e s i n t h e editions  are  the  corants  r a n t s and f i f t y - s i x corants  and s a r a b a n d s .  sarabands.  Like  There are  the  lyra  Apparently Playford  found i t e a s i e r  and s a r a b a n d s  t h e r e are  editions  a l m a i n s and a y r e s ,  o n l y two p i e c e s  i n the  these t i t l e s  cothe  i n common.  to d i s t i n g u i s h the  o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n where  viol  forty-two  a n d s a r a b a n d s a l s o h a v e many c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s  since  12  corants different  have been  in-  13 terchanged.  y  I n h i s M u s i c k s M o n u m e n t , Thomas Mace r e l i e d u p o n  their  1  similarities, the  f o r he u s e d one as  a foil  against  which to  explain  other. C o r a n t s , he w r o t e , a r e Lessons o f a s h o r t e r c u t [ t h a n G a l l i a r d s ] and o f a q u i c k e r t r i p l e time; commonly o f two s t r a i n s , a n d f u l l o f s p r i g h t f u l n e s s , and v i g o u r , l i v e l y , b r i s k and c h e e r f u l . ^ 1  Sarabands, composers are  a newer dance  i n the  rant.  In h i s words,  time;  but  .  t a k e n up b y E n g l i s h  1 6 3 0 ' s when t h e y w e r e p o p u l a r  d e f i n e d b y Mace as a s o r t  .  apparently  i n court  of whimsical variant  sarabands are  " o f the  . more t o y i s h a n d l i g h t t h a n  shortest the  masques,15  on the  co-  triple  Corantoes;  com-  I n a d d i t i o n , t h e f o l l o w i n g a y r e s may be s e e n i n t h e a p pendix of transcriptionst T#s 1, 1 4 , 53. 83, 8 6 , 10? a n d 1 0 9 . 1 2  1 3  T # s 231  and 244.  14 M u s i c k ' s Monument, p .  129.  *-\Tean E l i z a b e t h K n o w l t o n , "Some D a n c e s o f t h e S t e w a r t Masque," (unpublished P h . D . d i s s e r t a t i o n , Indiana U n i v e r s i t y , 1966), p . 49.  85 v  m o n l y o f two  s t r a i n s . " 16  M a c e ' s d e s c r i p t i o n s p o i n t out o n l y the most r e a d i l y ent features rants ple,  of these dances.  and sarabands  polyphonic. simple,  b r i s k dances  Instead  they are  slow-moving bass l i n e  bass l i n e  octave,  often  s u c h as  are  E x a m p l e 8.  '  3E  are  editions.  similar  F o r exam-  dances,  i s r e a l i z e d by l a r g e  neither  leaps,  or over the  These l a r g e l e a p s ,  a part  of these  Coleman, C o r a n t o . i n c i p i t ,  type  ex-  is  edfhf  3 X X  1  E p i  129.  a  beats. an  bar l i n e ,  in  o f the  lyra  dances. (T#  270).  J as:  A 4-  very  o f more t h a n  J.Jj  J  u s i c k ' s Monument, p .  since  A s m i g h t be  s k e t c h e d i n on i m p o r t a n t  a c h a r a c t e r i s t i c feature  >  these,  co-  e i t h e r melodic or chorda! with  o c c u r i n g w i t h i n the measure  e x a m p l e s 8 a n d 9« idiom,  and sarabands  they s u i t the  i n t r i p l e m e t e r a n d h a v e two s t r a i n s .  pected of l i g h t ,  The  in Playford's lyra viol  P l a y f o r d ' s corants  both are  Nevertheless,  appar-  as viol  A  86 E x a m p l e 9.  W i l l i a m Lawes,  I n two r e s p e c t s saraband i s the  One r e g a r d s  and are  titles  "La C l o c h e . " to  1 7  s l i g h t l y longer than those  are  j u s t as  i n the  The  e x a m p l e , "The G l o r y o f Hackney"  r h y t h m i c a l l y and m e l o d i c a l l y .  ayre and s a r a b a n d ,  259.  ap-  music.  They use the r h y t h m consistently.  and  de-  and  were  both  i . J* J"l  and  The m a j o r i t y o f  i n major k e y s , and about t h r e e - q u a r t e r s have  T # s 211  other  e d i t i o n s , s o do c o n c o r d a n c e s  Perhaps both terms,  hemiola figures  of  c o n c o r d a n c e s t o some a y r e s b e a r  lyra viol  ayre,  t y p i c a l l y made up o f m u l t i p l e s  C o r a n t s t e n d t o be more c o m p l e x t h a n s a r a b a n d s ,  1 7  and  commonly c o n s i s t o f  instrumental versions of l i g h t vocal  corants are  233).  corant  ( e i g h t i s t h e m o s t common l e n g t h ) .  to c e r t a i n sarabands—for  plied  Corant strains  Saraband s t r a i n s  to t i t l e s  scriptive  (T#  same a s t h a t b e t w e e n t h e a l m a i n a n d t h e  strain lengthi,  of f o u r measures pertains  fedfh  the r e l a t i o n s h i p between the  odd n u m b e r s o f m e a s u r e s sarabands.  incipit,  i  3 S I  the  Saraband,  ana-  87 cruses. Example  5  E x a m p l e 10 i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e 10.  Simon I v e s ,  C  1  1 €.  c:  Corant, edfhf  g  of the  type.  18  (T# 2 8 8 * ) .  .  z±: 3L:  4  3E ... r  j  '  >  , j  r  ~  J.)  A  5  fcfc  T  of  w  I n a d d i t i o n , the f o l l o w i n g c o r a n t s appear t r a n s c r i p t i o n s : T#s 167, 238, 278 a n d 2 8 6 .  7 &  T  i n the  appendix  88  10—Continued.  Example 'J  )  J.  '  j">:> A W A  I r  fcfc JHR-  I  —"sac"  IT"  T  -  « . — « . —  *  l e a  k  u  h  T f  c  A f\ c  -h b y  ^J-  1 L  1  —i i — 4  •J- J J  T  -  !  i 1  —  f-  4-  —  j  >  1  L  J  3  - H — J  i  J 1  i  1 1 .  > g, A a -P ic^  e:  T  j-ri  J-  '  > r*.  >~_  A  e  f,  f.e.  89 Example  10—Continued.  s  r f r 111  f  Sarabands, rhythmically, are  i  9  being quicker than  corants,  a n d u s u a l l y move i n h a l f  of cases,  lack anacruses.  chordal,  whereas c o r a n t s are o f the  =ff  1  i i  o f one b a r .  complex  cadences and,  Sarabands are  often  less  and m i n o r k e y s ,  usually melodic.  saraband i s  harmonic rhythmic u n i t  are  and q u a r t e r n o t e s .  have p h r a s e s w h i c h end i n f e m i n i n e  structure  .  1—  majority  cal  \  1  about e q u a l l y d i v i d e d between major  often  .if  a  OL  a.  Further  they in  more  The c l e a r  emphasized  by a  emphasis  is  They  the  often metriregular achieved  through a.  h i g h l i g h t i n g the f i r s t b e a t o f each b a r by a c h o r d o r s k i p to the bass r e g i s t e r , and  b.  g i v i n g the second and t h i r d b e a t s the b o t h w i t h down b o w s .  Examples  11 a n d 12 i l l u s t r a t e  same p i t c h ,  a  playing  these f e a t u r e s , w h i l e example  13  19 is t y p i c a l of Playford's  lyra viol  sarabands.  7  ln a d d i t i o n , t h e f o l l o w i n g s a r a b a n d s may be s e e n i n t h e a p p e n d i x o f t r a n s c r i p t i o n s » T#s 1 4 2 , 1 ? 7 , 1 7 8 , 2 2 8 , 230, 2 6 3 , 280 a n d 2 9 8 . 7  90 Example  11.  Anonymous,  Saraband,  incipit,  edfhf  (T#  J  J —  C  A  c  c  r Example  291).  12.  r  Simon I v e s ,  Saraband,  c  «^*  incipit,  edfhf  tx a  C  a 1  (T#  256)  C ^  :  1  7 Example  r 13.  t  Charles  fX  c\  Coleman,  y  X  r  T  Saraband,  > J 12 ^  5  T  .  71  defhf  —fc—A  1  b  >  (T#  188).  i ?*s—1 Q  91 Example  13—Continued. J  _  % a  w  —•  J ^ B ^ — l  ^  —  -...  1  *  A  -  —  r  i  ^  c.  n  4 — —  $  >  1  r  c— c\  v>.  i —  i  <\  * —  ^  d  i  .  ****  #  —  1  •  *  J  ex  b  P  T  f  r  5  )  1  , , 1 1  r  >  Preludes Thomas M a c e ' s d e f i n i t i o n o f a p r e l u d e fused-wild-shapeless-kind  of i n t r i c a t e  as  a "piece  of  con-  play which introduces  a  20 set  of lessons"  i s a c t u a l l y too e x t r a v i g a n t  lyra v i o l preludes. O n l y one p r e l u d e 20, M u s i c k ' s Monument, p . 1 2 8 .  to  s u i t most  of  i n Musicks Recreation,  the a  92 p i e c e by Simon I v e s , f i t s t h i s (twenty>-six measures) piece  i n the  It  is fairly  and i s t e c h n i c a l l y the most  editions.  volving fifths  description.  After  and o c t a v e s ,  long  demanding  a s i m p l e s t a t e m e n t o f a theme  i t breaks  i n t o a medley o f  in-  tocatta-  21 like  passages w h i c h are There are  b o t h complex and  eight other  a l l much s i m p l e r t h a n t h e as a g r o u p , have duple meter,  preludes  attractive.  i n the  one b y I v e s .  These n i n e  certain characteristics  a l l l a c k anacruses  lyra viol  preludes,  i n common.  and n e a r l y a l l are  editions,  A l l are i n one  in  strain  22 only,  u s u a l l y o f an uneven number o f measures  t h e m o s t common l e n g t h ) . minor  S i x are  i n major,  (thirteen  and t h r e e are  being in  keys. The p r e l u d e s  are  mood a n d e s t a b l i s h t h e  f u n c t i o n a l movements, tuning of a suite  edition.  Two e l e m e n t a r y p r e l u d e s  w h i l e the  other  seven preludes  In a d d i t i o n , there are "Almain," suites  "Ayre"  serve  2 1  T#  the  four other pieces,  latter  the an  function,  suites  of  2 3  dances.  actually entitled  o r " L e s s o n , " w h i c h f u n c t i o n as p r e l u d e s  However, a l l f o u r have  set  or of a section of  a l l introduce  and have m u s i c a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s  named p r e l u d e s .  s e r v i n g to  similar  to those  two s t r a i n s ,  as  to of  the  opposed  10*.  22 Two p r e l u d e s a r e e x c e p t i o n s t o t h e o n e - s t r a i n s t r u c t u r e . T# 75 i s d i v i d e d i n t o two p h r a s e s o f 3/3/2/1/5 m e a s u r e s — a c t u a l l y a s e r i e s o f warm-up e x e r c i s e s ; T# 10* i s i n two s t r a i n s o f 9 a n d 17 m e a s u r e s i n two o f t h e e d i t i o n s , a n d i n one s t r a i n o f 26 m e a s u r e s i n a n o t h e r e d i t i o n . 23 ^ T h e s e a r e t h e o p e n i n g p i e c e s o f t h e 1669 a n d 1682 e d i t i o n s o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n , T#s 74 a n d 75.  93 Zh  to the  one-strain  structure  o f the  The two e l e m e n t a r y p r e l u d e s octaves viol.  and s e r v e The r e s t  to acquaint  o f the  W h i l e some a l s o e m p h a s i z e  consist simply of scales  the  preludes  preludes.  beginner with  and o c t a v e s ,  them i n t o a p l e a s i n g c o m p o s i t i o n , w i t h rhythms.  the n o t e s on  a r e m u s i c a l l y more  scales  E x a m p l e 14 i l l u s t r a t e s  this  they  type.  Its  incorporate  first  s i m p l y an e l a b o r a t i o n o f the D major  Example 14.  Anonymous, P r e l u d i u m , measures  i  £  e-  i _ — « ,  JL  C  C\ C  Ti SA  C O  scale.  1-8,  £  —  fdefh  j C I .  a:  C  6  S  £  £ C-  C <\  C P.  3 5 1  T  r  T#s  16,  82,  83* a n d  112.  T  and  eight  (T# 2)  J  *  the  interesting.  i n t e r e s t i n g melodies  measures are  TX ^  and  r  _  94  Others move i n a s e r i e s o f e i g h t h n o t e s , o f t e n t i n g m e l o d i c and harmonic ments o f the s u i t e .  incorpora-  ideas encountered i n subsequent move-  One such p r e l u d e i n t r o d u c e s a s u i t e by John  W i t h i e which appears i n the 1661 e d i t i o n .  The a n g u l a r s t y l e o f  the  p r e l u d e i s c l o s e l y r e l a t e d to t h a t o f the l y r a polyphony i n  the  two subsequent almains, as seen i n example  Example 15.  John W i t h i e , S u i t e .  Preludium, i n c i p i t , e d f h f (T# 104).  J  15.  95 Example  15—Continued. Almain.  i n c i p i t , edfhf  —, —  „ „, ,—c\  2"  *  ^  ^  "X,  -i ^  ±  ? >  w  (T'#  1  , g— t f^ j-p  = •ec  *  1  c— ^*  101).  A  —__  _  1—C\  C—Ok  -V  %W  1  0-  Almain.  i n c i p i t , edfhf  r  (T#  A  124).  S  '  a,  r-X-^  ' f 1  A "  £ } -  r  f  —  — — —  f '  Jiss Thirteen pieces "Jig."  Ten are  i n the  in triple  i n duple m e t e r . ^ 2  The t e n  lyra v i o l editions  o r compound-duple t r i p l e meter  are  meter,  entitled and t h r e e  j i g s , which are  the  are typ-  T h e t h r e e d u p l e m e t e r j i g s <T#s 20, 31 a n d 98*) resemble two o t h e r p i e c e s i n t h e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s c a l l e d " J i g A l m a i n s " (T#s 32 a n d 106). J i g A l m a i n s a p p a r e n t l y a r e v a r i a n t s on the almain form. They d i f f e r from a l m a i n s i n t h a t t h e y are c o n s i s t e n t l y d i v i d e d into JT^ and J*J=3 r h y t h m s . 2 5  96 ical  j i g s , w i l l be c o n s i d e r e d  chordal or polyphonic,  i n this section.  They a r e n o t  but are l i g h t t u n e f u l p i e c e s .  A l l are  i n two s t r a i n s , u s u a l l y o f e q u a l l e n g t h , which are made up o f multiples  o f f o u r measures,  b e g i n w i t h an a n a c r u s i s , punctuated by  J a  .  The m a j o r i t y  are i n major mode,  and have as t h e i r b a s i c rhythm  Occasionally,  are broken i n t o d o t t e d p a t t e r n s  such as J  , J  >  26  and the l y r a v i o l 27 16 i l l u s t r a t e s most o f these f e a t u r e s . '  Example 16.  Thomas Bates, A J i g , f d e f h  > :  j L  i J i ' I 1  *  f o r v a r i e t y , these rhythms J and J  l a t t e r rhythm sometimes encompasses a l a r g e upward l e a p t i v e o f the S c o t t i s h 'snap,*  J  idiom.  suggesExample  (T# 184).  y  X  i i i i  O  CK A  CL  '4 to  George S. Emmerson, R a n t i n ' Pipe and T r e m b l i n S t r i n g : A H i s t o r y o f S c o t t i s h Dance Music, (Montreal: McGill-Queen's U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1971), p. 144. 1  ^ I n a d d i t i o n , the f o l l o w i n g j i g s appear i n the appendix of t r a n s c r i p t i o n s : T#s 146, 152 and 235. 2  •J  , j  97 Example  16—Continued.  I  0  .  J  i  A  H —  P  i  J  i  i I  i  J  J  -  ?  e.  1  r.  * r  v  r.  r  F.  f - r - r - y  -C  f. K 4  g<r  98 16—Continued.  Example  •I  —  \  T~ ON  1  c\  >  »  Si-  T  Two  j i g s have t i t l e s which suggest a s s o c i a t i o n s w i t h f o l k 28 or country dance. One of these, "Abington J i g , " was d i s c u s s e d 29 i n chapter  three  as a p o s s i b l e m o r r i s  jig.  C e r t a i n of i t s  7  s i c a l f e a t u r e s suggest i t might "not be an a b s t r a c t dance.  instrumental  I t i s s l i g h t l y more complex r h y t h m i c a l l y than the  lyra viol  j i g and  i t i s n o t p a r t of a s u i t e .  The  other,  "Country Dance" i n the f i r s t f o u r e d i t i o n s of Musicks i s e n t i t l e d " J i g " i n the l a s t .  mu-  typical entitled  Recreation,  M u s i c a l evidence suggests t h a t  t h i s p i e c e , which i s a s c r i b e d to Thomas Bates, probably  is a  l y r a v i o l dance s i n c e i t concludes a s u i t e by Bates i n each o f the e d i t i o n s . 30 Divisions Tablature  n o t a t i o n c o u l d express the d i v i s i o n s t y l e  p l a y i n g , as w e l l as the c h o r d a l s t y l e , and Playford's 28, T#  i n t e r s p e r s e d among  l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s are s e v e r a l p i e c e s which  152*.  29,See  of  include  pp. 66-68.  ° T # 186. However, Bates i s known to have worked as an a r r a n g e r , and may have i n c o r p o r a t e d a f o l k tune i n t o a s u i t e . See 3  99 divisions. by  the  Division  i s a melodic technique  rhythmic values  of the  melodic elaboration. o c c u r on t h e strain  •A'  r e p r e s e n t s the  t i o n to are  of almains,  first  occurs  strain  lustration Example  o f the  editions,  as  and  i n the ' B ' , the  before  the  i n the  strain—ABB*. division  divisions  formula AA'BB*, second.  3 3  editions,  Its  an  two  strains Finally,  anonymous  i n which d i v i s i o n  E x a m p l e 17 p r o v i d e s  occurs a good i l -  style.  i  J  A  >  J  openings  J>  W i l l i Apel, " D i v i s i o n , " Harvard Dictionary of Music, (Cambridge: H a r v a r d U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1965), p . 214. 3  T# 113*  3 3  T # s 47 a n d 178*.  where  An excep-  17. C h a r l e s C o l e m a n , A l m a i n w i t h D i v i s i o n , o f - s t r a i n s A , A ' , B , B ' , e d f h f (T# 113*)•  J  Usually  divisions begin—ABA'B'.  lyra viol  where-  receiving  a y r e s and s a r a b a n d s .  and a s a r a b a n d by J o h n E s t o , second  subdivided,  i n one a l m a i n b y C o l e m a n . ^  two p i e c e s  o n l y on the  are  lyra viol  immediately v a r i e d ,  played through  there are ayre  is  this  I n the  strains  the  strain  of variation  100 Example  17—Continued.  WW  ^  |  <\  ' }  p  J>  J>  Although Playford's l y r a v i o l t i t l e s whether the p i e c e c o n t a i n s d i v i s i o n s t h i s i s not h i s consistant p r a c t i c e .  sometimes i n d i c a t e  (eg. "Almain w i t h D i v i s i o n " ) , Some p i e c e s , a p p e a r i n g i n  s e v e r a l e d i t i o n s , have such an e x p l i c i t t i t l e tion;  p  i n o n l y one  i n o t h e r s thay are c a l l e d by the form t i t l e  ("Almain").  edi-  alone  Other p i e c e s w i t h d i v i s i o n s are c o n s i s t a n t l y g i v e n  only the dance form t i t l e .  The f o l l o w i n g t a b l e l i s t s  a l l the  101 TABLE V I I I DIVISIONS IN THE LYRA VIOL EDITIONS  T# 11*  Title  Composer  Almain  John J e n k i n s  Ed./p,/no.  form/no. of meas.  P5[5]/68/75 P61/66/85  A 8  A« . B V B• 8 11 11  P69/90/119  Almain with Division  a  8  47  Ah A y r  Anon.  P69/21/34 P82/43/58  A 4  B 4  53*  An A y r  W i l l i a m Gregory  P69/35/51  A 4  A' B 4 4  B' 4  P5[5]/50/53  A 6  A' B 6 7  B' 8  102  Almane w i t h Division  John E s t o  P61/26/34 P69/72/IOI P82/76/26  113*  Almane w i t h Division  Coleman  P5[5]/36/49  A 6  B 6  140  Saraband  Jenkins  P69/96/124  A 8  A' B 8 8  178*  Saraband  John E s t o  P69/38/55  A 8  B 8  230*  Saraband  John W i t h i e  CO > 00 >  An Ayre Almain  B' 4  B 8 A' B 8 8  P5[5]/66/73 P61/82/82  Saraband w i t h Division  P69/I17/148  A* B ' 6 6 B' 8  B' 8  B' 8  F o r each p i e c e , o n l y when the t i t l e , composer o r form d i f f e r s from the f i r s t e n t r y i s f u r t h e r i n d i c a t i o n made. p i e c e s i n which d i v i s i o n s o c c u r .  S u i t e Grouping In P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s ,  the dance movements d i s -  102 cussed  i n t h i s chapter are f r e q u e n t l y grouped i n t o s u i t e s .  s u i t e s are p a r t i c u l a r l y common i n the f i r s t Musicks R e c r e a t i o n . t i o n , twenty-four  I669  edition. •3k  edition.  The  three e d i t i o n s o f  There are f o u r t e e n s u i t e s i n the l 6 5 [ 5 ] e d i -  i n the 1661 e d i t i o n , and twenty-four  i n the  By c o n t r a s t , o n l y f o u r s u i t e s appear i n the 1682  I n the f i r s t  three e d i t i o n s o f Musicks R e c r e a t i o n ,  the dances which appear o u t s i d e the bounds o f s u i t e s are d e f i n i t e l y i n the m i n o r i t y . and  t h i r t e e n ayres  F o r example, o f the t h i r t y - o n e  i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  the three ayres are n o t p a r t o f s u i t e s . there are about twice as many n o n - s u i t e are dances i n s u i t e s ; consideration.  (1661), o n l y f i v e  almains  In the 1682 e d i t i o n , dance movements as there  but another f a c t o r must be taken  into  I n t h i s f i n a l e d i t i o n , the t o t a l number o f dances,  whether i s o l a t e d o r p a r t o f a s u i t e , previous three.  almains  i s much s m a l l e r than  P l a y f o r d a l t e r e d the nature  i n the  o f Musicks Recre-  ,  a t i o n i n 1682 by d e c r e a s i n g c o n s i d e r a b l y the percentage o f standard cal  dance forms and i n c r e a s i n g t h a t o f arrangements o f vo-  music and o t h e r  types.  The m a j o r i t y o f P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l s u i t e s c o n s i s t o f three movements 1  an almain  Less f r e q u e n t l y , preludes  or ayre, a c o r a n t , and a saraband.  and j i g s are i n c l u d e d i n the s u i t e s , 35  framing  the core movements: P, A, C, S, 3 »  JJ  Some minor and  o c c a s i o n a l v a r i a n t s on t h i s b a s i c s u i t e d e s i g n are as f o l l o w s : N?here i s one l y r a v i o l s u i t e i n A M u s i c a l l Banquet. I t was n o t c o n s i d e r e d i n t h i s comparison beacuse o f the p r o p o r t i o n a t e l y s m a l l e r number o f l y r a l e s s o n s i n t h i s e d i t i o n . 3  3  J=jig.  ^ P = p r e l u d e , A=almain o r ayre, C=corant, S=saraband, and  103 1)  the presence  s u i t e , 2)  of a l e s s common movement, such as a r a n t , i n a  the d o u b l i n g of one  f o l l o w i n g formula:  of the core movements, as i n the  A, A, C, S, or 3)  the core movements:  "the o m i s s i o n of one  of  A, C, J , f o r example.  S i n c e most s u i t e s c o n t a i n movements a l l by the same composer, i t seems probable t h a t the composers, r a t h e r than P l a y f o r d (or ual  h i s e d i t o r ) , were r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the grouping o f items i n the s u i t e s .  certain.  But o n l y i n a few  individ-  instances i s t h i s  L a c k i n g e x t e r n a l evidence, thematic u n i t y becomes the  o n l y sure c r i t e r i o n f o r e s t a b l i s h i n g grouping by composers. i n o n l y a few  i n s t a n c e s i s thematic u n i t y i n e v i d e n c e .  On  And the  other hand, t h e r e i s evidence t h a t P l a y f o r d had a t l e a s t an occ a s i o n a l hand i n the grouping.  Some s u i t e s , composite  c o n t a i n the work of more than one  composer.  suites,  Other s u i t e s  from one e d i t i o n t o the next, but i n a l t e r e d form.  Both  these c o n d i t i o n s s t r o n g l y suggest a t l e a s t a p a r t i a l  pass of  editorial  grouping. All  t o l d t h e r e are twelve composite  lyra viol editions. ^ 3  s u i t e s i n the  Nine o f these appear as such on  five their  37  first,  and sometimes o n l y a p p e a r a n c e , t w o are the r e s u l t of 38  subsequent and one  i s the r e s u l t of a l t e r a t i o n s to an o r i g i n a l  suite. ^ 3  a l t e r a t i o n s to an o r i g i n a l l y composer u n i f i e d  As examples of the f i r s t  S u i t e s no. 6, 14, 15'. See t a b l e IX. 3 6  and  3 7  3 8  S u i t e s no.  6,  S u i t e s no. 33'  14, and  type, we may  16,  19.  22,  14*,  16,  19,  22,  32,  15'.  3 9  32, 34,  S u i t e no.  suite,  composite  c o n s i d e r two 3 , k  38,  38,  39,  and  39.  14*.  33',  D  104 TABLE IX SUITES IN THE LYRA VIOL EDITIONS  Ed.  Suite No.  1651  1  165C5]  1' 2 3 4 5  P  A  ••  10* 95  6 7  • •  8 9 10 11 12  1' 2 15 16 4' 8 17 9  10 11 18  6' 19  20  S  J  JA  66  217  131  ..  ..  66 12  217  131  46  122 113* 127 85 80 102 88 34 111  77 33 11*  14  1661  C  91* 48  13  10*  ..  95  3,  66 12 127 103* 90 122 88 115  79 91*  48  34 105* 86* 85 81  92 112  169 137 270 • •  288*  189 224 268 282 241  ..  .. 248  263*  ••  253  235*  172  • • • •  • • • •  •  0 •  199  208 278* 267 272 162  298* 186  233 230)  • •  •  * •  • •  • •  145  138  131  189 282 244  •• •• •• ••  • • • •  270  268  ••  •  285  241  238* 199 208 258  298* 172  217 169  • • • • • •  286* 288*  253  235* t  •  271 241  ••  •  ••  •  186  267  255  276  266  ..  •. • •  Esto Hudson Hudson Bates Lawes Withie . Jenkins 138-Ives  ..  •  •• •• •• 248  Ives Ives Coleman Coleman Coleman Ives 248-Gregory Esto  • •  • •  Composer  Ives  ..  ••  238*  0  ..  265  Ives Ives Coleman Young 103*-Lilly Coleman Esto Esto Hudson Hudson Bates Gregory Ives Jenkins 267-anon. Lawes  ,105 TABLE IX--Continued Ed.  1661  JA  Suite No. 21  104  22 14' 2  101 124 84 126 1* 11*  ••  3  1  1669  6  118  2  7  ••  28 1  ••  2  9  ••  3  0  ••  3  1  ••  3  2  33  15 3k 9  11 35 6  18* 37  lk' •  38  28 95 •• • • • • •• •• •• ••  2 ••  9  246  2  7  0  9  *  3  *  94* 82 119 41* 66 8 35 53* 44 24 7  9  0  91* 34 80 117 102  105*  87 11* 33 43  Withie  162  145  • •  ••  •. •  1  177*  • •  ••  • •  ••  t•  • •  Jenkins  t  ••  • •  Jenkins  • •  ••  • •  Withie  • •  ••  • •  Lawes  • •  ••  • •  S imps on  • •  ••  • •  Esto  • • • •  •• ••  • • • •  3  3  2  7  2  2  7  8  2  6  7  *  3  2  7  7  2  3  0  3  2  *  3  9  4  189  6  217  1  3  • •  ••  • •  9  280* 196  289  0  7  2  ••  2  5  1  247 281  1  ••  151  • •  ••  • •  153 157  175 144  • •  ••  • •  • •  I  8  3  20 193  192 282 291  31 • • • •  •• ••  • • • •  208  298* 186  • t  ••  • •  • •  ••!  • •  2  2  2  2  12?  108  2  Simpson 84-Goter Jenkins 1-Young Jenkins  •*  77 111  2  3  6  8  12 7  3  128  13'  2  11  2k 25  ••  Composer  2  9  244 2  3  8  7  *  9  252  286* 2  9  5  162 ••  7  4  263* 271 269 145 140  2  3  5  *  • •  ••  • •  248 98*  ..  ..  • •  ••  • •  • •  ••  • •  Ives Ives Hudson Gregory Ives Anon. 24-Hudson Moss Coleman Young 291-Ancn. Hudson Bates Esto Esto Gregory Moss Jenkins Jenkins 43-Anon.  106  Ed.  1669  p  Suite No. 39  ••  4  • t  0  41 42 2  IX—Continued  A  C  4 15 19 14*  ••  •• •• ••  7  2  3  82 119  ••  8  43  ••  77 89  28'  ••  41*  3  3  *  3  3  1  5  1  0  *  .  ••  '  95  1  J  JA  0  ••  ••  ••  148  ••  ••  2  ••  3  228*  184  139 2  1  3 2  0  9  0  2  9  4  2  7  2  2  3  0  ••  ••  2  ••  ••  ••  ••  ••  ••  ••  Withie  ••  *  Composer  Withie 4-Jenkins Bates Bates Moss Esto  5  2  3  242  264  • t  106  ••  Moss  167*  189  ••  ••  ••  Ives  •• 0  •• ••  •• ••  ••  ••  ••  Ives Moss 150-Anon. Coleman  2  r  S  179 2  '  1  1682  TABLE  0  6  66  217  7  2  2  2  7  2  131 192  9  282  •• 2  5  9  1  5  259-Anon.  The movements are l i s t e d by t h e i r thematic numbers. A s t e r i s k s a f t e r the thematic numbers i n d i c a t e the p i e c e s appear i n the appendix of t r a n s c r i p t i o n s .  107 suites  from  an a l m a i n ,  the  165[5] e d i t i o n .  a corant,  The f i r s t  suite  and a s a r a b a n d by I v e s ,  consists  of  and a j i g by  40 Gregory.  The s e c o n d c o n s i s t s o f two a l m a i n s , a c o r a n t ,  and a  41 saraband by J e n k i n s , f o l l o w e d by a j i g by I v e s . Two e x a m p l e s o f t h e s e c o n d t y p e o c c u r i n t h e 1682 e d i t i o n . One c o n s i s t s o f an a y r e ,  a corant,  and a s a r a b a n d b y M o s s ,  f o l l o w e d by an anon-  42 ymous j i g s  the  other  saraband by Coleman, ymous.  of a prelude,  f o l l o w e d by a n o t h e r  The s i n g l e e x a m p l e o f t h e  J  edition. ments  consists  Here the  suite,  a corant,  saraband,  third  type occurs  reappear eral  and a s a r a b a n d  i n a l t e r e d form but are are  i n the  1661  and  by J e n k i n s .  the most ambiguous cases o f a l l are  suites  anon-  o f an ayre by Young, 44  I n t r y i n g to d i s t i n g u i s h between e d i t o r i a l grouping,  this  and a  which i n l65[5] had c o n s i s t e d o f move-  b y J e n k i n s a n d I v e s , now c o n s i s t s  an a l m a i n ,  an a y r e ,  and composer  those  suites  which  s t i l l musically unified.  changed i n subsequent  Sev-  e d i t i o n s s i m p l y by h a v i n g  45 a movement o r two a d d e d o r s u b t r a c t e d . rearrangement i n the  occurs i n a suite  J  A more c o m p l i c a t e d  by Coleman which appears  first  165[5] e d i t i o n .  O r i g i n a l l y i t c o n s i s t e d o f a p r e l u d e , an 46 a l m a i n , a c o r a n t , and a s a r a b a n d . I n the n e x t e d i t i o n , these f o u r d a n c e movements r e a p p e a r i n two s e p a r a t e s u i t e s , b o t h b y  47 Coleman;  the  almain,  corant  and s a r a b a n d  f o r m one s u i t e ,  '  for  ^ ° S u i t e n o . 6. ^ S u i t e n o . 14. ^ S u i t e n o . 33 •. a n o t h e r , the p r e l u d e i s combined w i t h an ayre and a n o t h e r s a r a ^ Suite no. 3  15'.  ^ S u i t e s nos. ^Suite  n o . 4.  ^ S u i t e n o . 14'.  1', iy  , 18', 1 4 " , a n d 28*.  ^ S u i t e no.  4'.  108 48  band..*  0  F o r most compositions i n these s u i t e s , the m u s i c a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s are l a r g e l y c o n f i n e d to harmonic i n g by the i n c i p i t s ,  similarities.  o n l y a few s u i t e s d i s p l a y  Judg-  melodic resem-  49  b l a n c e s between c e r t a i n movements. resemblances  One  s u i t e i n which m e l o d i c  are p a r t i c u l a r l y n o t i c e a b l e  i s by W i l l i a m Lawes.^°  7  A l l movements o f t h i s s u i t e i n D minor two sarabands) and f g A.  are permeated  (an almain, a c o r a n t , and  by two t h r e e - n o t e p a t t e r n s :  In a d d i t i o n , there i s a correspondence  t i n c t melodic motives  i n the f i r s t  two movements.  d e f,  o f more d i s Example  18  p r e s e n t s the p o r t i o n s o f these two movements where the m e l o d i c resemblances Example 18.  are most e v i d e n t . W i l l i a m Lawes, S u i t e .  Almain, meas. 1-6,  y  A  >i -PU  f e d f h (T#  > . ) )J  >  111).  > ?  £  5  48  ;  49 50  S u i t e no.  15.  S u i t e s nos. 4, 12, 13, 14, 18, 21, 2?, and S u i t e no.  12.  15'.  .110  Example  1  18—Continued.  A  )  ^  A  C  J . )  J  ,  r  I  +'  ~k  . 1  ft"  f  >  —-*5  1  _^_!  j  ,  }  1*  V  <  •  U  CHAPTER V THE One  COMPOSERS AND ARRANGERS  can determine  who composed about t w o - t h i r d s o f the  pieces i n Playford's l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s . editions identify  A s c r i p t i o n s w i t h i n the  the composers i n most o f these cases.  The  a u t h o r s h i p o f s e v e r a l more has been a s c e r t a i n e d by o t h e r means, c h i e f l y through  concordant  sources.  This chapter w i l l  t r a t e upon the composers i d e n t i f i e d by the l y r a v i o l and  i n so doing, w i l l be i n d i r e c t l y concerned  concen-  ascriptions,  w i t h the i n s t r u -  mental dances,* s i n c e these a r e the p i e c e s f o r which the v a s t majority of Playford's l y r a v i o l ascriptions  occur.  In a l l h i s p u b l i c a t i o n s P l a y f o r d was n o t a b l y c o n s c i e n t i o u s about c r e d i t i n g t h e composers. from the p r e f a c e t o Choice A y r e s ,  The f o l l o w i n g q u o t a t i o n ,  i n d i r e c t l y pertains to t h i s .  Playford declares I s h a l l n o t a p o l o g i z e f o r [the p i e c e s ' ] E x c e l l e n c y , the Authors names, which you w i l l f i n d added t o most of them, are s u f f i c i e n t to d e c l a r e i t ; and f o r those t h a t want the R e p u t a t i o n o f t h e i r A u t h o r s , whose Names (through ignorance) are omitted, the Esteem g i v e n them by the most s k i l f u l M u s i c i a n s , supplies that defect.  *As opposed to l y r a v i o l t r a n s c r i p t i o n s o f songs, b a l l a d ayres and c o u n t r y dances. 2  C h o i c e Ayres  and Songs, (London, 11.1  I679).  112 From t h i s  quotation,  seems c l e a r ; did not well  Playford's policy regarding  he p r i n t e d  know t h e m .  known r e g a r d  tolling their  the  composers'  virtues.  (1651), he d e s c r i b e s  I n the  the  of M u s i c k . i n  1682), he l i s t s  Ke n e v e r  he is  simply Playford's  tired  d e d i c a t i o n to A M u s i c a l l  composers  the  quotation  composers.  o f the  Famous a n d E m i n e n t Men t h a t e v e r l i v e d Art  names u n l e s s  A l s o apparent i n t h i s for English  ascriptions  preface  lessons  in their  as  of  Banquet  "the  most  Time, f o r  to Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  ex-  the  (1-66-9 a n d  a b o u t a d o z e n " f a m o u s M a s t e r s " who a p p l i e d  their  L "excellent Similar  Inventions  comments  and S k i l l "  to w r i t i n g f o r  appear i n P l a y f o r d ' s e d i t i o n s  the  lyra  throughout  viol. his  career. Whether,  i n a d d i t i o n to p r a i s e ,  p o s e r s any f i n a n c i a l r e t u r n But,  at  the  close  o f the  for their  preface  P l a y f o r d gave labours  is  these  com-  uncertain.''  t o A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t he  did  ^A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t (1651), f o l . A . v  **Fols. A  2  and A  V 2  .  ^The o n l y t r a c e o f e v i d e n c e r e l a t i n g t o P l a y f o r d ' s f i n a n c i a l r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h t h e c o m p o s e r s whose w o r k s he p u b l i s h e d emerges from t h e d e d i c a t i o n i n H e n r y L a w e s ' S e l e c t M u s i c a l l A y r e s a n d D i a l o g u e s (1652). I n t h i s d e d i c a t i o n , H e n r y s t a t e s t h a t " t h e q u e s t i o n i s n o t w h e t h e r my s o n g s s h a l l be p u b l i c k , b u t w h e t h e r t h e y s h a l l come f o r t h f r o m me o r f r o m a n o t h e r hand." H e n r y i s r e f e r r i n g t o a p u b l i s h i n g p r a c t i c e , common i n h i s day, o f p r i n t i n g music w i t h o u t the composer's p e r m i s s i o n . The g a i n H e n r y r e c e i v e d b y h a v i n g t h e m u s i c i n S e l e c t M u s i c a l l A y r e s p r i n t e d by P l a y f o r d l a y i n o v e r s e e i n g the p r i n t i n g , r a t h e r than having f a u l t y copies of h i s compositions i n c i r c u lation. F r o m t h i s i t a p p e a r s H e n r y r e c e i v e d no f i n a n c i a l g a i n from P l a y f o r d f o r t h i s m u s i c , a c o n c l u s i o n r e a c h e d by F r a n k Kidson. (See " J o h n P l a y f o r d a n d S e v e n t e e n t h C e n t u r y M u s i c P u b l i s h i n g , " The M u s i c a l Q u a r t e r l y , I V , N o . 4 (1918), 523.) Howe v e r , w i t h e d i t i o n s s u c h as M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n , w h i c h p r o b a b l y w e r e more p r o f i t a b l e t h a n L a w e s e d i t i o n , c o m p o s e r s may h a v e been r e i m b u r s e d f o r t h e i r l a b o r s . 1  113  promote  the  business  o f work d u r i n g the  o f many f o r m e r  Interregnum  teachers for voice, v i o l Some o f t h e  and  composers  c o u r t m u s i c i a n s who w e r e  by p r i n t i n g a l i s t  Others,  although  lesser  stature  of pieces  i n the  Hudson, pieces  i n the  composers?  by t h e s e composers  constitute  a major  pieces,  lyra viol  John Moss,  were p r o l i f i c  lyra viol  t o t a l number editions)  editions,  John E s t o ,  but  output.  were  of  George  Some o f t h e  attractive,  day.  lyra  viol  the m a j o r i t y  lack  appears  However, the  to  better  i n a v a r i e t y of media.  Their  lyra  while interesting music, represent only a minor,  Table X l i s t s the  are  part of their  r e l a t i v e l y unimportant  within  editions,  Christopher  The l y r a v i o l m u s i c o f t h e s e c o m p o s e r s  known c o m p o s e r s viol  John J e n k i n s ,  J o h n W i t h i e a n d Thomas B a t e s .  inspiration.  lyra viol  Lawes, were h i g h l y esteemed i n t h e i r  prominant  as  London's  virginal.  s u c h as C h a r l e s C o l e m a n , S i m o n I v e s , Simpson and W i l l i a m  of  out  the  about the number  of t h e i r  total  names o f a l l t h e  editions.  of unique  is given.  part  pieces  After  output.  composers  each composer's  column i s d i v i d e d i n t o  name,  a s c r i b e d to him (from a l l  The s u b s e q u e n t c o l u m n s l i s t  of pieces  identified  i n the  two p a r t s ,  and  (b),  a  t h e n u m b e r o f p i e c e s w h i c h make t h e i r i n the p a r t i c u l a r e d i t i o n , and  b  t h e t o t a l number o f ^ p i e c e s particular edition.  by the  as  five  information  individual editions. (a)  the  Each  follows:  first  composer  appearance in  P i e c e s w h i c h may be anonymous i n t h e p a r t i c u l a r b u t w h i c h b e a r a s c r i p t i o n s i n a t l e a s t one o f t h e f i v e are i n c l u d e d i n t h i s number.  the  edition, editions  TABLE X COMPOSERS (OR ARRANGERS) MENTIONED IN THE LYRA VIOL EDITIONS  165[5]  1661  (a)  (a)  (b)  (a)  (b)  (a)  (b)  (a)  (b)  30  4  7  10  15  25  2  12  2  5  E s t o , John  25  • •  7  • •  7  15  6  14  5  10  Ives, Simon  24  4  12  16  2  16  6  14  12  • •  2  • •  1  1  • •  8  1  6  5  ••  • •  17  • •  3  ••  8  6  11  4  1651  Jenkins,  John  1682  1669  ( I v e s , Simon Junior)  2  • •  2  Coleman, C h a r l e s  17  2  14  Moss, John  17  Hudson, George  14  W i t h i e , John  12  3  6  9  3  9  Bates, Thomas  11  3  • •  3  8  11  Gregory, W i l l i a m  9  1  5  6  3  7  Lawes, W i l l i a m  9  6  3  7  Simpson, Christopher  7  ••  2  6  15  8  •v  7  J.  • •  2 • •  TABLE X — C o n t i n u e d  1682  1651  165[5]  1661  (a)  (a)  (b)  (a)  (b)  (a)  (b)  (a)  (b)  1669  Young, W i l l i a m  3  2  2  1  3  ••  2  • •  2  Lillie,  2  1  1  1  2  ••  2  • •  1  2  • •  • •  1  1  • •  John John  2  Paget, W i l l i a m  1  1  Alward  1  • •  Goter  1  Baptist  1  Banister,  1  1  ••  1  1 1  116 T h i s w r i t e r has  d i s c o v e r e d the composers of some anonymous  p i e c e s by a v a r i e t y of means. clues. ble  While many t i t l e s  personages (the K i n g ,  The  Farmer's Trumpet,"  7  composer, Thomas Farmer. wait and  sometimes p r o v i d e  i n d i c a t e known r o y a l , m i l i t a r y or the Queen, P r i n c e Rupert,  Monk, the Countess of E x e t e r , "Mr.  titles  e t c . ) , the t i t l e  probably  piece,  i n d i c a t e s the m u s i c i a n  a graduate of Cambridge.  i n the K i n g ' s music from 16?1  General  of one  Farmer (b. ?, d. 1688) He  until  played  1688.  no-  was  and  a London  the v i o l i n and  A l s o , he  sang  composed  mu-  o  s i c f o r eleven Restoration plays;  a p i e c e from one  c l u d e d anonymously i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  (1682).^  play i s i n -  I t appears  t h a t P l a y f o r d p u b l i s h e d a t l e a s t one more p i e c e by Farmer: Farmer's Magot," i n A p o l l o ' s Banquet.* p i e c e , " L e s l e y s March,"** may Lesley (or L i s t e r ) , was  The  title  of another  a l s o i n d i c a t e a composer»  a musician  mentioned i n the r e c o r d s  0  Norman  i n the s e r v i c e of C h a r l e s  of the  "Mr.  King's music i n 1612  I,  who  and  12 I625.  However, some u n c e r t a i n t y e x i s t s about t h i s .  to W i l l i a m C h a p p e l l , 7  T#  the t i t l e  According  r e f e r s to a m i l i t a r y f i g u r e ,  73-  ^ W i l l a r d Thorp, Songs from the R e s t o r a t i o n T h e a t r e , 9  T#  "the  71;  p.  95.  see a l s o t a b l e XI.  *°William H. Husk and A l f r e d Loewenberg, "Thomas Farmer," Grove's D i c t i o n a r y of Music and M u s i c i a n s , I I I , 3 « 2  **T# 216. * H e n r y C a r t De L a f o n t a i n e , The King's Musick, N o v e l l o and Company, L i m i t e d , [1909J), pp. 50, 59. 2  (London:  117 famous S c o t c h G e n e r a l i n the C i v i l W a r , " ^ p r e s u m a b l y Leslie, First  Earl  o f Leven.  Alexander  Perhaps one o t h e r t i t l e ,  "Fill  14 P o r t e r s Rant,"  i n d i c a t e s a composer, although no r e f e r e n c e t o  a s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y m u s i c i a n by t h i s name has been d i s c o v e r e d . Another means o f i d e n t i f y i n g  composers o f anonymous l y r a  v i o l p i e c e s was to examine concordant ers  so i d e n t i f i e d  in this  are l i s t e d  sources.  A l l the compos-  i n Table X I . A l l the p i e c e s  listed  t a b l e were v e r y p o p u l a r , j u d g i n g from the number o f  s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y sources i n which they a p p e a r . ^  A l l except  one were o r i g i n a l l y f o r o t h e r media and subsequently  transcribed  1  for lyra v i o l .  A p p a r e n t l y these p i e c e s , because o f t h e i r popu-  17 larity, viol  were f a i r game f o r a r r a n g e r s ' who s e t them f o r l y r a  and l e f t them anonymous.  Such i n s t r u m e n t a l arrangements  of p o p u l a r music (without acknowledgement) are p r o b a b l y an ext e n t i o n o f the t r a d i t i o n ,  common among E n g l i s h v i r g i n a l i s t s  from  the f i r s t p a r t o f the c e n t u r y , o f u t i l i z i n g p o p u l a r music i n ^ P o p u l a r Music o f the Olden Time, (London: Cramer, B e a l e , & C h a p p e l l , [ 1 8 5 9 ] , I I . 615. l 4  T # 161*.  ^See  appendix  I I I , the thematic c a t a l o g u e .  Thomas Ford's p i e c e , "A P i l l to Purge Melancholy," (T# 62)j though t h i s p i e c e was w r i t t e n f o r l y r a v i o l , an arrangement f o r P l a y f o r d ' s e d i t i o n i s i n v o l v e d , s i n c e , i n i t s o r i g i n a l form i t was s e t i n another t u n i n g f o r two l y r a v i o l s . lo  0 r f o r P l a y f o r d , who, s i n c e he wrote the i n t r o d u c t i o n s f o r the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , had s u f f i c i e n t knowledge o f l y r a v i o l t a b l a t u r e to do the arrangements h i m s e l f . 1 7  118 TABLE X I COMPOSERS I D E N T I F I E D THROUGH CONCORDANT SOURCES " 3  Composer Aldrich, Banister,  •i  HenryJohn  F a r m e r , Thomas F o r d , Thomas Gibbons, Orlando Gregory, William Giuseppino J e n k i n s , John Lawes, W i l l i a m Locke, Matthew •I  P e a s i b l e , James P u r c e l l , Henry II  ti  Smith, Robert" Turner, William W o o d s o n , Thomas  0  Title  T#  Oh t h e B o n n y C h r i s t - C h u r c h Bells Amarillis Sweet Jane S i t t i n g Beyond the R i v e r s i d e A P i l l to Purge M e l a n c h o l y Saraband J o c k e y Went t o t h e Woods The I t a l i a n R a n t A Boat, A Boat G a t h e r Your Rosebuds The S i m e r o n s D a n c e The A p e s D a n c e i n t h e O p e r a Mackbeth C o u l d Man H i s W i s h O b t a i n Ah C r u e l Bloody Fate The M y r t l e S h a d e Now t h e F i g h t ' s Done Farewell F a i r Armida The J o y o f A l l H e a r t s Saraband  30 69 204*' 71 62 201 136 100* 220* 70 130 155  225 120 78 165 156 239* 221 154  T h r e e more l y r a v i o l p i e c e s b e a r a s c r i p t i o n s i n c o n c o r dant sources: " T h e N i g h t e n g a l e " (T# 54), " C o l o n e l G e r a r d s T u n e " (T# 96), a n d " H u n t I s Up" (T# 134). The t h r e e p i e c e s a r e b a l l a d a y r e s w h i c h a p p e a r i n numerous seventeenth-century sources, u s u a l l y anonymously. I n i s o l a t e d i n s t a n c e s t h e names H e n r y L o o s e m o r e , Thomas H e a r d s o n , a n d R . C r [ e i g h t o n ] , r e s p e c t i v e l y , are a s s o c i a t e d w i t h these p i e c e s . A l l t h r e e names a p p e a r on k e y b o a r d v e r s i o n s o f the m u s i c . T h e i r names h a v e n o t been i n c l u d e d i n T a b l e X I because t h e y p r o b a b l y were a r r a n g e r s , n o t composers, o f the p i e c e s . ^ A n o t h e r p i e c e i n t h e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , " A S c o t c h Tune C a l l e d S a w n e y , " (T# 25), may h a v e b e e n c o m p o s e d b y F a r m e r , b u t some u n c e r t a i n t y e x i s t s a b o u t t h i s . See S i m p s o n ' s The B r i t i s h B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d a n d I t s M u s i c , p . 632. °An anonymous " P r e l u d i u m " (T# 2) i n t h e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s may a l s o be b y G i b b o n s . The r e s e m b l a n c e b e t w e e n i t s i n c i p i t a n d t h a t o f a p i e c e c a l l e d "The I t a l i a n G r o u n d " b y G i b b o n s i n a manuscript source i s c o n s i d e r a b l e . Whether the resemblance e x t e n d s beyond the o p e n i n g measures i s u n c e r t a i n , f o r the manus c r i p t was n o t a v a i l a b l e f o r i n s p e c t i o n . See R o b e r t L e e A d a m s , "The D e v e l o p m e n t o f a K e y b o a r d I d i o m i n E n g l a n d D u r i n g t h e E n g l i s h R e n a i s s a n c e , " I I I , 251.  119 1 ft  t h e i r own  compositions.  F o r a l l the p i e c e s l i s t e d anonymous.  For several  i n Table XI the a r r a n g e r s  o t h e r p i e c e s i n the l y r a v i o l  remain  editions,  i t appears the a r r a n g e r s are i n d i c a t e d by P l a y f o r d ' s a s c r i p t i o n s . In the seventeenth  c e n t u r y , musicians  were i n the h a b i t  of  i n g t h e i r names to t h e i r l y r a v i o l arrangements o f p i e c e s  signby  o t h e r c o m p o s e r s — e v e n when t h e i r arrangement amounted to n o t h i n g more than s e t t i n g the p i e c e i n t o a d i f f e r e n t t u n i n g . this practice  Proof  e x i s t s i n the Manchester l y r a v i o l t a b l a t u r e  the form of e n t r i e s by one  u n u s u a l l y honest  s c r i b e who  of in  signed  some p i e c e s i n the f o l l o w i n g manner--'Thomas Goodge or t r u l y e Will[ia]m  Lawes.'*^  t h a t some a s c r i p t i o n s  In P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , i n d i c a t e a r r a n g e r s i s o f two  a s c r i p t i o n s a p p e a r i n g on t r a n s c r i b e d conflicting An  evidence  typesi  l y r a v i o l pieces,  1)  and  2)  ascriptions.  example of the f i r s t  o f the b a l l a d ayre "See v i o l editions  type of evidence  the B u i l d i n g , "  e n t i t l e d simply "Ayre,"  i s the  ascription  which appears i n the l y r a and which i s a s c r i b e d  to  20 Simon I v e s .  S i n c e t h i s p i e c e was  Ives s i m p l y arranged  a b a l l a d a y r e , we  the l y r a v i o l v e r s i o n .  know t h a t  Perhaps he  arranged  the p i e c e s p e c i f i c a l l y f o r Musicks R e c r e a t i o n , f o r a l l the  other  l y r a v i o l s e t t i n g s of t h i s p i e c e examined d u r i n g the course of *^Manfred Bukofzer, Music i n the Baroque E r a , (New York: W. W. N o r t o n & Company, Inc., 1947), p. 72. MS  ^Manchester, Central Public 832 Vu 51, PP. 199 and 200. 2 0  T#  114*.  L i b r a r y , Watson C o l l e c t i o n ,  120 this  s t u d y d i f f e r e d from the  By the  one u s e d i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n .  same r e a s o n i n g , J o h n M o s s ,  t o o , may be a n a r r a n g e r ,  if,  22 a s was s u g g e s t e d  earlier,  his "Almain"  i s an arrangement  of  m u s i c from C u p i d and D e a t h by Matthew L o c k e . Examples o f c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s , the evidence,  are  ascriptions  listed  are  i n T a b l e s X I I and X I I I .  o f two t y p e s :  conflicting  concordances w i t h i n P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l and c o n f l i c t i n g  second type The  conflicting  a s c r i p t i o n s among  editions  (Table X I I ) ,  a s c r i p t i o n s between P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l  and c o n c o r d a n c e s w i t h t h e s e p i e c e s  of  i n other  sources  pieces  (Table  XIII). In cases o f c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s , supplementary mation i s necessary  to determine which s e t t i n g  v e r s i o n and w h i c h m u s i c i a n i s the most o f the  examples  composer.  i n t h e s e two t a b l e s ,  to date  is not  and the  arranged v e r s i o n .  is  the  the  w i t h some c e r t a i n t y t h a t t h e  "Ayre"  the  evidence  by B a t e s ,  for  obtained  original  c a n i t be  a s c r i p t i o n i n d i c a t e s an  21  original  Unfortunately,  s u f f i c i e n t to d i s t i n g u i s h between the  F o r o n l y one p i e c e ,  infor-  said  arranger.  F o r c o n c o r d a n c e s , see t h e t h e m a t i c c a t a l o g u e . These w e r e a l l a n o n y m o u s , e x c e p t f o r one i n t h e M a n c h e s t e r l y r a v i o l tablature a s c r i b e d to R [ i c h a r d ] S[umarte]. The M a n c h e s t e r t a b l a t u r e i s t h e o n l y s o u r c e known t o t h i s a u t h o r w h e r e S u m a r t e ' s name a p p e a r s . I n i t a r e some o f h i s c o m p o s i t i o n s , t h e q u a l i t y o f w h i c h shows h i m t o be a n a m a t e u r . A p p a r e n t l y he a r r a n g e d s e v e r a l p i e c e s f o r t h i s m a n u s c r i p t , among t h e s e " S e e t h e B u i l d ing." F o r i n f o r m a t i o n on the i d e n t y o f S u m a r t e , see J o h n M . Ward, "The L u t e Books o f T r i n i t y C o l l e g e , D u b l i n : I I : MS.D. 1.21 ( t h e S o - C a l l e d B a l l e t L u t e B o o k ) , " The L u t e S o c i e t y J o u r n a l , X ( 1 9 6 8 ) , 18, n . 6. 2 2  See  pp. 46-48.  2 3  T#  14*.  121  TABLE X I I CONFLICTING ASCRIPTIONS WITHIN THE LYRA V I O L E D I T I O N S  T# 3  103*  Composer  Title  George Hudson Anon. George Hudson Simon Ives  An A l m a i n Ayre Almain The E c c h o Almain  1651 165[5] 1669 1682  defhf  Lilly  An  1651  edfhf  1661 1669 1682  it it  Jenkins  Ayre Almain  Anon.  Ayre  165C5]  II  Almain II  n  w  II  12?  II  Jenkins Charles Coleman Anon. Esto Simon  241  n •I  n  Saraband Ives  Coleman John Jenkins  293  a  II  A Coranto II  Edition  165[5]  1661 (#24) 1661 (#31) 1669 1682 165L51  1661 (#48) 1661 (#65) 1651 I669  Tuning  11 11  11  11  M  edfhf 11  11  n edfhf 11  it  edfhf 11  T h e r e a r e c o n c o r d a n c e s t o t h r e e o f t h e s e p i e c e s (T#s 3, 103* a n d 293) i n t h e M a n c h e s t e r L y r a V i o l t a b l a t u r e . There t h e y a r e a t t r i b u t e d t o H u d s o n , L i l l y and C o l e m a n , r e s p e c t i v e l y . H o w e v e r , t h i s m a n u s c r i p t c a n n o t be c o n s i d e r e d a n a u t h o r i t y f o r d e t e r m i n i n g composers i n the case o f t h e s e c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s , f o r much o f i t a p p e a r s t o h a v e b e e n c o p i e d f r o m an e a r l y e d i t i o n o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n . a  122 TABLE  XIII  CONFLICTING A S C R I P T I O N S WITH OTHER 17th-CENTURY SOURCES  T#  14*  Composer  Title  Thomas  Ayre  Bates  Gregorie [Thomas Gregorie] Sumarte T[homas] G[regorie]  63*  Anon. H  n 11  Location Playford ed./MS(S)  11  1669 Dm LAuc  3-  Tuning  fedfh  i«  M r . Thomas Gregories Eights Almane Ayre  Mp WGb  A Symphony  1651  defhf  1661 1669 1682  n  n  •1  n  Coleman  11  R[ichard] S[umarte]  11  fhfhf n 11  11  165C5]  Mp  11  u  ffefh  A p o s s i b l e c o n s o r d a n c e t o one o t h e r p i e c e , "Saraband" b y C o l e m a n (T# 188), b e a r s a c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n . This a p p e a r s i n P c MS R e s . 1185, e n t i t l e d " A n A y r e " b y B e n j a m i n Cpsyn. The i n c i p i t s o f t h e s e p i e c e s r e s e m b l e one a n o t h e r , b u t t h e m a n u s c r i p t was n o t a v a i l a b l e f o r i n s p e c t i o n . See A d a m s , "The D e v e l o p m e n t o f a K e y b o a r d L i t e r a t u r e , " I I I , 214. a  ^ E x a c t l o c a t i o n s o f t h e p i e c e s ( i n c l u d i n g p a g e a n d number r e f e r e n c e s ) appear i n the thematic c a t a l o g u e , appendix I I I . D m = D u b l i n , A r c h b i s h o p M a r s h ' s L i b r a r y , MS Z 3.4.13. LAuc=Los A n g e l e s , U n i v e r s i t y o f C a l i f o r n i a , W i l l i a m Andrews C l a r k e M e m o r i a l L i b r a r y , The M a n s e 1 1 L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e . Mp=Manchester, C e n t r a l P u b l i c L i b r a r y , Watson C o l l e c t i o n , MS 832 V u 51, The M a n c h e s t e r L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e . WGb=Woodford G r e e n , E s s e x , The J o h n B r o w n B a n d o r a a n d L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e , i n the p o s s e s s i o n o f R o b e r t S p e n c e r .  123 TABLE X I I I - - C o n t i n u e d  122  Composer  Title  Coleman  Almain  Location  II  131  edfhf •I  Untitled  Mp  edfed  Anon. •i  Saraband it  1651 165[5] 1661 1669 1682  edfhf •i  n  il il  Anon. Thomas Bates S[imon] l [ v e s ]  Saraband  George Hudson  II II  •i  Mp ( V a r i a n t ) Mp  II  Simon Ives  The  165[5] 1661  Will[ia]m Young  Simon Ives  151  Tuning  II II  defhf  1669 Mp ( V a r i a n t )  II  p i e c e i s a t t r i b u t e d to Thomas Gregory,  •I  an o l d e r and more w e l l  known musician, ** i n numerous o t h e r l y r a v i o l s o u r c e s , and i n 2  most o f these s o u r c e s , d i f f e r e n t arrangements and a d i f f e r e n t t u n i n g are i n v o l v e d .  One i s drawn to the c o n c l u s i o n t h a t Bates  simply arranged Gregory's Playford's l y r a v i o l  piece, probably s p e c i f i c a l l y f o r  editions.  F o r the o t h e r examples, l e s s c l e a r evidence c e r t a i n p r o v i s i o n a l statements m u s i c i a n whose name appears  can be made.  e x i s t s , but  F o r example, one  i n the c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s w i t h  25 other seventeenth-century  sources  i s known t o be an a r r a n g e r .  2k  Sawyer, "An Anthology 2 5  S e e p. 120, n. 21  o f L y r a V i o l Music,"  p. 3, k  124 T h i s i s R i c h a r d Sumarte whose name appears on Gregory's and on "A Symphony."  "Ayre"  While i t appears t o be u s u a l t h a t one  a s c r i p t i o n i n d i c a t e s a composer and the o t h e r an a r r a n g e r ,  both  a s c r i p t i o n s f o r "A Symphony" e v i d e n t l y i n d i c a t e a r r a n g e r s .  For  the f o l l o w i n g reasons, Coleman, l i k e Sumarte, appears t o have arranged, n o t composed, t h i s p i e c e :  1) the p i e c e was v e r y pop26  u l a r and appeared i n numerous seventeenth-century of which, except  sources,  a l l  the one a s c r i b e d t o Sumarte, are anonymous.  These s e t t i n g s are f o r v a r i o u s media;  one i s f o r a c o n s o r t o f  v i o l s w i t h keyboard, two are f o r s o l o keyboard, one i s f o r l y r a v i o l duet, and the v e r s i o n a s c r i b e d t o Sumarte i s f o r s o l o v i o l in staff notation. setting;  A d i f f e r e n t t u n i n g i s used i n the l y r a  2) i n the f i r s t  anonymous.  viol  f o u r l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s the p i e c e i s  Coleman's name appears o n l y i n the f i n a l  edition.  I f he were the composer, h i s name p r o b a b l y would have appeared i n an e a r l i e r The  edition.  remaining  examples o f c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s ,  espe-  c i a l l y those o c c u r r i n g w i t h i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , are v e r y enigmatic.  U n l i k e the c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s w i t h o t h e r  seven-  t e e n t h - c e n t u r y s o u r c e s , f o r which d i f f e r e n t tunings o r d i f f e r e n t m u s i c a l s e t t i n g s r e i n f o r c e the i d e a t h a t arrangements a r e i n 27 volved,  ' the f i v e p i e c e s i n v o l v i n g c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s i n  the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s a r e m u s i c a l l y i d e n t i c a l .  One would be  tempted t o say t h a t p r i n t e r ' s o r p u b l i s h e r ' s e r r o r s 26 See 2 7  the thematic  catalogue.  T # s 122, 131, and 151.  caused  125 these i f the p i e c e s were not a l l p a r t s o f s u i t e s by the composers i n d i c a t e d i n each e d i t i o n i n which they appear.  (The  other  28 movements of the s u i t e s  differ.)  L a c k i n g any c o n c l u s i v e evidence, i t may  tentatively  be  suggested t h a t m u s i c i a n s of l e s s e r s t a t u r e arranged p i e c e s by more famous composers?  f o r example, Hudson, ^ B a t e s , 2  3 0  and  31 E s t o ^ p r o b a b l y arranged p i e c e s by Ives ( e s p e c i a l l y s i n c e Bates i s known to have arranged an almain by G r e g o r y ) , and L i l l y , 3 2  a p i e c e by J e n k i n s . The r e m a i n i n g examples couple Coleman's name w i t h of J e n k i n s and Young.  A l l three men  those  are w e l l known composers.  Perhaps Coleman, s i n c e h i s name i s coupled i n f o u r c o n f l i c t i n g 33 a s c r i p t i o n s , ^ ^ i s an a r r a n g e r .  This indicates that Jenkins  may  have composed the ayre and the corant, ** and Young, the almain. -* 3  Finally, criptions  3  the composers named i n P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l  (those l i s t e d  i n Table X)  as-  o b v i o u s l y were the ones  most d i r e c t l y connected w i t h the c o n c e p t i o n of the e d i t i o n s . ^ 28 T h i s may be v e r i f i e d i n Appendix IV, "Tables of Contents." 29 I t may be s i g n i f i c a n t t h a t the names Hudson and Ives are coupled twice i n the l y r a v i o l c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s (on T#s 3 and 151). The two p i e c e s appear s i d e by s i d e i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n (1669) among a group of p i e c e s a s c r i b e d to Hudson. I f Hudson d i d arrange the p i e c e s and Ives composed them, perhaps other p i e c e s i n t h i s group (T#s 8, 35» and 129) are by Ives as well. 3  7  3  ° T # 131.  3 3  T # s 63*.  3 5  T#  31  T#  122,  241. 127,  3 2  T#  and 293-  103*. 3  ^T#s 127  and  293.  122.  36 D  tified  As opposed to those l i s t e d i n Table XI, which were i d e n through concordant s o u r c e s .  126 It  appears P l a y f o r d obtained  tions  (chiefly,  directly.  After  from these  to the e d i t i o n s ,  f o r Lawes) and r e s i d e d  Thus P l a y f o r d c o u l d h a v e  their  deaths,  was g e t t i n g  contacted  presumably  the  died.  composers  John Jenkins to P l a y f o r d ' s  The e d i t i o n s  new o n e s a p p e a r i n g  i n which these t h e y were a l l  them  close  b y them a r e e x c e p t i o n a l . or other  7  i n d i r e c t sources,  Of a l l the  after  contributors  J o h n J e n k i n s was t h e m o s t  contain a total  i n each  ap-  I f Playford  c o n t i n u e d t o b r i n g o u t new p i e c e s  editions,  of thirty  to  personally. 3  (b. 1592, d . 1678).  lyra viol  composers  out o f the c o u n t r y , ' '  the music from m a n u s c r i p t ,  he w o u l d h a v e  ascrip-  i n , or reasonably  o r when t h e y w e r e  p e a r a n c e s o f new p i e c e s  lific.  dances)  c o n t r i b u t e d new p i e c e s  (except  London.  the i n s t r u m e n t a l  T h i s i s l i k e l y because d u r i n g the years  composers living  the l y r a v i o l music v/ith  pro-  of h i s pieces  with  edition.  T h o u g h J e n k i n s was e v i d e n t l y n o t r e s i d i n g i n L o n d o n d u r i n g the  1650's,  3 8  Playford s t i l l  may h a v e  from h i m p e r s o n a l l y d u r i n g t h i s friendships an eminent just  with English musicians composer  for this 3 7  As  time.  as J e n k i n s ,  obtained  lyra viol  Playford's well  doubtless  extended  a n d he may h a v e  sought  music  known to  such  him out  purpose.  i n the case o f W i l l i a m Young.  See p p . 137-38.  ^ P l a y f o r d d o e s n o t i n c l u d e J e n k i n s * name i n t h e l i s t o f London's music t e a c h e r s p r i n t e d i n A M u s i c a l l Banquet (1651). J e n k i n s enjoyed p a t r o n ' s support throughout h i s l i f e t i m e , and he p r o b a b l y was r e s i d i n g o u t s i d e t h e c i t y w i t h one o f t h e s e w e a l t h y f a m i l i e s d u r i n g the Commonwealth. See W i l l i a m H . H u s k and R o b e r t D o n i n g t o n , " J o h n J e n k i n s , " G r o v e ' s D i c t i o n a r y o f M u s i c and M u s i c i a n s , IV, 6 1 0 . 3  s -  '  12 7 If  P l a y f o r d was n o t  fifties,  it  Charles  II  i n contact with Jenkins  i s v e r y l i k e l y he was b y 1660. i n that year,  during  W i t h the  the  return  J e n k i n s resumed a p o s i t i o n a t  of  court  39 i n the  King's music.  T h i s u n d o u b t e d l y gave h i m c l o s e r  7  ties  w i t h L o n d o n , and g r e a t e r p r o x i m i t y t o P l a y f o r d ;  a large  of h i s pieces  time,  Recreation  a p p e a r , many o f them f o r  the  first  number  i n Musicks  (1661).  A talented  performer  on many i n s t r u m e n t s ,  Jenkins  was  known p a r t i c u l a r l y f o r h i s l y r a  viol playing.  music  i s n o more d e m a n d i n g t e c h n i c a l l y  than  i n the  lyra viol  that of other  a n d more  composers,  prolific  ( f l . 1651-1682).  contributors  few composers  lyra viol Playford figure,  his pieces  tend  t o be b o t h  i n t e r e s t i n g m u s i c a l l y than most p i e c e s  John E s t o  the  editions  over the and the  to Musicks R e c r e a t i o n ,  This points  years.  Thomas E s t e , may be t h e  publisher,  publisher's  throughout  to a close connection  c o n n e c t i o n c a n o n l y be  the  son),  editions.  John E s t o i s  Unfortunately, Esto  Percy Scholes ventured  i n the  is a very  39i T>e  4o, 'ibid.,  one  obscure  surmised.  and M i c h a e l E s t e ,  the  composer 41  b u t p r o v i d e d no e v i d e n c e .  i n A M u s i c a l l Banquet.  The K i n g ' s M u s i c ,  p.  to (who Esto occurs  He was  114.  p . 458.  4l Press,  The P u r i t a n s and M u s i c , 1934), p. 419.  of  with  t h a t E s t o m i g h t be a r e l a t i o n  of teachers  Lafontaine,  most  Playford's  was a m u s i c t e a c h e r d u r i n g t h e C o m m o n w e a l t h , f o r h i s name in Playford's l i s t  longer  B e s i d e s b e i n g one o f t h e  consistently represented  editions.  Although his  2 1 0  (London:  Oxford U n i v e r s i t y  12  8  a p p a r e n t l y n o t i n the King's  s e r v i c e e i t h e r b e f o r e o r a f t e r the  R e s t o r a t i o n , f o r h i s name does n o t appear i n the r e c o r d s . Playford l i s t s  him among the l y r a v i o l composers i n Musicks Re-  c r e a t i o n (1682). for  Perhaps the l y r a v i o l was the o n l y  instrument  which he composed, f o r no music a s c r i b e d t o him appears i n  other P l a y f o r d p u b l i c a t i o n s . E s t o ' s music i s among the most p l e a s a n t i n the l y r a - v i o l editions.  A l l h i s p i e c e s are dance movements, two o f which i n 42  elude  divisions.  One o f the most i n t e r e s t i n g f e a t u r e s o f  E s t o ' s music i s i t s p h r a s i n g .  He breaks h i s dance s t r a i n s  into  s m a l l e r u n i t s which are p l e a s a n t l y i r r e g u l a r i n l e n g t h , and d i s t i n c t from one another  i n motif.  manding, a f a c t t h a t suggests  H i s music i s t e c h n i c a l l y de-  a h i g h p e r s o n a l p r o f i c i e n c y on the  instrument. Simon Ives (fl.  1655-1669).  (b. 1600, d. 1 6 6 0 ) and Simon I v e s , J u n i o r Twenty-four p i e c e s i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s  are a s c r i b e d t o Simon Ives and two t o Simon Ives, J u n i o r . p i e c e s a s c r i b e d to Simon Ives occur those  i n the f i r s t  The  four e d i t i o n s ,  t o Simon I v e s , J u n i o r , i n the 165[5] e d i t i o n . There i s some c o n f u s i o n o f a u t h o r s h i p between the two Ives,  f a t h e r and son, i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s .  First,  a p i e c e which  appears i n f o u r e d i t i o n s ( l 6 5 [ 5 ] through 1682) bears the a s 43 c r i p t i o n "Simon Ives J u n i o r " o n l y i n the f i r s t two. In the J  4? T#s 102 and 178*. ^ T# 189. 3  12 9 final  two e d i t i o n s  the  a s c r i p t i o n i s changed to Simon  Secondly,  e i g h t new p i e c e s  the d e a t h  o f the  that after  a s c r i b e d to Simon Ives  e l d e r Ives  a composer's  (when i t was t y p i c a l  death,  few,  1660 m i g h t be t h e w o r k o f t h e  his father's  death,  the  son shed the  The e l d e r I v e s was r e s p e c t e d forming a b i l i t i e s . in  appear i n the  i f a n y , new p i e c e s  T h i s s u g g e s t s t h a t some o r a l l o f t h e p i e c e s Ives a f t e r  Ives. after editions appeared  a s c r i b e d to  son.  Perhaps,  Simon after  distinction, "Junior."  f o r h i s c o m p o s i n g and  H i s r e p u t a t i o n as  a c o m p o s e r was  per-  established  1633 when he a n d W i l l i a m Lawes c o - d i r e c t e d m u s i c f o r S h i r l e y ' s  masque,  The T r i u m p h o f P e a c e .  Before the  Interregnum,  a vicar  c h o r a l a t S t . P a u l ' s Church i n London,  Ives  was  and o r g a n i s t  at  UK  C h r i s t - C h u r c h , Newgate. " e x c e l l e n t on the vention."^  J  A c c o r d i n g t o A n t h o n y a Wood, he was  lyra viol,  and i m p r o v e d i t by e x c e l l e n t i n -  I n 1651 he t a u g h t  v o i c e and v i o l  privately in  London. Ives, for  S e n i o r , n o d o u b t was a v i r t u o s o o n t h e  some o f h i s p i e c e s  lyra viol  editions.  are  In particular,  A l l three pieces  7  e d i t i o n s and t h e r e f o r e ^See  pp.  appear  three pieces  abound i n  embellishments,  i n the  are most l i k e l y  first  or  divi-  three l y r a  the work o f I v e s ,  Q u o t e d i n S c h o l e s * The P u r i t a n s  viol Senior.  10*, 41* a n d 66.  Grove's Dictionary of  and M u s i c ,  the  six-  125-126.  ^ W i l l i a m H . Husk, "Simon I v e s , " M u s i c and M u s i c i a n s , I V , 560-61. 46  ^ ^ s  viol,  t e c h n i c a l l y the most demanding i n  t e e n t h - n o t e p a s s a g e s and w r i t t e n - o u t sions.^  lyra  p . 288.  ).  130 Since  one  piece  i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s which i s a s c r i b e d 48  to Ives was seen to be an arrangement, kg "A Masque" often f a l l  may  7  poser who,  too. so  category.  Coleman (b. ?,  like  are  be an arrangement, s i n c e d e s c r i p t i v e t i t l e s  into this  Charles  perhaps others  J e n k i n s and  the s t a r t of P l a y f o r d ' s  d. 1664). Ives, was  Colemen, a com-  well established  before  c a r e e r , made a s i z e a b l e c o n t r i b u t i o n to  the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s .  Seventeen p i e c e s are a s c r i b e d to  most o f them i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n Coleman's l i f e  Charles  (i65[5])«  i s q u i t e w e l l documented.  I as a l u t e n i s t , s i n g e r , and D u r i n g the Commonwealth, he  him,  He  served  Charles  composer of music f o r masques. taught p r i v a t e l y , earned a  doctorate  at Cambridge ( i n J u l y , 1651), and  composed stage music.  of h i s are  included  p u b l i c a t i o n s throughout  l650's and  e a r l y l660's.  i n Playford's  A f t e r the R e s t o r a t i o n ,  he was  Pieces the  appointed  to the King's s e r v i c e , f i r s t as a v i o l i s t , then as a composer. A l l his pieces except one,  i n the  l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s have dance t i t l e s  "A Symphony," a piece which Coleman e v i d e n t l y arranged  for Playford.  I t i s p o s s i b l e t h a t Coleman v/orked f r e q u e n t l y  as an a r r a n g e r ,  f o r h i s name i s i n v o l v e d 52 f l i c t i n g ascriptions.-^ ^ S e e pp. 8  119-120.  4  %  i n three  cases o f  con-  41*.  ^°Husk and Donington, "Charles Coleman," Grove's D i c t i o n a r y of Music and M u s i c i a n s , I I , 369, 5 l  T # 63*.  See  pp.  123-124.  5 2  S e e T a b l e s X I I , X I I I , and  p.  125.  1.31 Coleman's most m u s i c  l y r a pieces  i n the  r e l i e d more  editions,  on the  division  J o h n Moss ( b . more p i e c e s  ?,  d.  to a s i n g l e  other of Playford's  c o n t a i n more m u l t i p l e s t o p s and s e t  him a p a r t from I v e s ,  after  l68 ).  J o h n Moss  k  contributed  e d i t i o n of Musicks Recreation  lyra viol  reference  who  style.  composers;  him appear i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n The f i r s t  than  than  seventeen pieces  any by  (1669).  t o M o s s as  a musician occurs  i n 1663, 5 3  when some o f h i s In  1669.  the  keyboard pieces  same y e a r  Musicks Recreation,  appear i n Musicks Handmaid.  i n which h i s  lyra viol  Moss i s m e n t i o n e d  i n the  J  pieces  appear  in  records  o f the  King's  m u s i c i n a l i s t o f men t o be a p p r e h e n d e d f o r t e a c h i n g , p r a c t i c i n g and e x e c u t i n g m u s i c i n companies o r o t h e r w i s e , w i t h o u t the a p p r o b a t i o n or l y c e n c e o f the M a r s h a l l and C o r p o r a t i o n o f m u s i c k , i n contempt o f h i s M a j e s t y ' s a u t h o r i t y and the power g r a n t e d t o the M a r s h a l l and C o r p o r a t i o n . 5 k  N e i t h e r the Soon a f t e r w a r d s , of  cause n o r the in l6?l,  Moss r e l e a s e d  l y r a v i o l music published  Moss'  edition,  none o f t h e  entitled  same p i e c e s  Musicks Recreation.  outcome  of this  are  one o f t h e  last  i n England d u r i n g the  Lessons  for  the  books  century.  Basse V i o l ,  contains  1669 e d i t i o n  which appear i n the  T h o u g h M o s s was s t i l l  known.  active  as a  of  violist  -^Thurston Dart, "John Moss," Grove's D i c t i o n a r y o f Music and M u s i c i a n s , V , 9 1 0 . ^De  Lafontaine,  The K i n g ' s M u s i c k ,  p.  21?.  -'-'Frank T r a f i c a n t e , " M u s i c f o r the L y r a V i o l s : The Printed Sources," The L u t e S o c i e t y J o u r n a l , V I I I (1966), p. 22.  132 a n d c o m p o s e r i n 1682, s e r v i n g C h a r l e s I I he c o n t r i b u t e d n o new p i e c e s  from  1678 t o 1684,-^  to P l a y f o r d ' s f i n a l  lyra viol  edi-  tion. George Hudson (b. ? , o f the  lesser  d. before  known c o m p o s e r s r e p r e s e n t e d  contributed fourteen  George Hudson,  1672).  pieces which f i r s t  one  i n Musicks Recreation,  appeared  i n 1651, 165[5]  and I669. H u d s o n s e r v e d C h a r l e s I as a l u t e n i s t a n d s i n g e r D u r i n g t h e C o m m o n w e a l t h , he t a u g h t , for In  the  o p e r a The S e i g e o f R h o d e s  composed i n s t r u m e n t a l m u s i c  (1656), a n d s e r v e d  1660 he was a p p o i n t e d a c o m p o s e r t o C h a r l e s I I  became a member o f t h e h i m among t h e  twenty-four v i o l i n i s t s . ^ '  lyra viol  composers  Hudson's l y r a v i o l cally,  they are  pieces  among t h e  less  in his  are  i n 1642.  Cromwell.  a n d i n 1665, Playford  lists  1669 a n d 1682 e d i t i o n s .  a l l dance movements.  i n t e r e s t i n g pieces  i n the  Musieditions  to  Evidence mentioned earlier-^  indicates  w o r k e d p r i m a r i l y as a n a r r a n g e r  t h a t H u d s o n may h a v e  for Playford,  rather  t h a n as  a  composer. John W i t h i e unknown c o m p o s e r , editions.  ( f l . 1630-1669). l i k e E s t o , has  A l l that  John W i t h i e ,  twelve pieces  i s known a b o u t h i s  -*°Dart, "John Moss," c i a n s , V, 9 1 0 .  life  a relatively  i n the  i s t h a t he came  See  p.  125, n .  29.  viol from  G r o v e ' s D i c t i o n a r y o f M u s i c and M u s i -  A l f r e d Loewenberg, "George H u d s o n , " G r o v e ' s o f M u s i c a n d M u s i c i a n s , I V , 397. 5 8  lyra  Dictionary  133 a musical family,  59 7  and has music i n manuscript  s o u r c e s , some  60 of which date from the l630's.  H i s name i s n o t i n c l u d e d i n  the r e g i s t e r s of the King's music e i t h e r b r f o r e a r a f t e r R e s t o r a t i o n , and he  the  i s n o t l i s t e d as a t e a c h e r i n A M u s i c a l l  Banquet. W i t h i e ' s p i e c e s i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s are a l l dance 62 movements, one  o f which c o n t a i n s d i v i s i o n s .  Though t h i s p i e c e  appears i n t h r e e e d i t i o n s , the d i v i s i o n s are o n l y p r e s e n t i n the l a s t two.  T h i s i n d i c a t e s some c o l l a b o r a t i o n w i t h P l a y f o r d be-  tween 1669  and  1682.  Compared to the r e s t of P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l music, W i t h i e ' s i s n o t out of the o r d i n a r y . performing  Perhaps h i s fame r e s t e d more on h i s  than on h i s composing.^  3  Thomas Bates (b. ?, d. 1679). Thomas Bates c o n t r i b u t e d e l e v e n p i e c e s to Musicks R e c r e a t i o n (l65[5] and 1669) Little is 64 known about Bates  except  t h a t he served i n the R o y a l i s t army,  taught d u r i n g the Commonwealth, and was King's  p r i v a t e music from 1660  until  a violinist  1 6 7 9 I n  i n the  the 1669  lyra  J a n e t R i c h a r d s , "A Study of Music f o r Bass V i o l W r i t t e n i n England i n the Seventeenth Century," ( u n p u b l i s h e d B . L i t t . d i s s e r t a t i o n , Oxford U n i v e r s i t y , 1 9 6 l ) , pp. 136-37. ^°Sawyer, "An Anthology  of L y r a V i o l Music,"  p.  88.  ^However, R i c h a r d s b e l i e v e s he was among the m u l t i i s a l i i s to whom P l a y f o r d r e f e r s a t the end of the l i s t . See "A . Study o f Music f o r Bass V i o l , " p. 137. 6 2  T # 230*.  6 3  I b i d . , p.  151.  ^ * I n De L a f o n t a i n e ' s The King's Musick he as C a p t a i n Thomas Bates, p. 491. 6 5  I b i d . , p.  336".  i s r e f e r r e d to  134 v i o l e d i t i o n , P l a y f o r d i n c l u d e s h i s name i n the l i s t  of l y r a  v i o l composers.  f o r which  Bates  Perhaps t h i s  i s the o n l y instrument  composed, f o r he has no music i n any o t h e r o f P l a y f o r d ' s  editions. Bates' l y r a v i o l p i e c e s , which a l l are dance movements, are q u i t e o r d i n a r y .  He, and Hudson, as w e l l , may have been em-  p l o y e d by P l a y f o r d as a r r a n g e r s f o r the l y r a v i o l W i l l i a m Gregory (b. ?. d. a f t e r 1687). has n i n e  i n s t r u m e n t a l dances i n the f i r s t  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n .  was  W i l l i a m Gregory  three e d i t i o n s o f  Two seventeenth-century  name W i l l i a m Gregory.  editions.°^  musicians  had the  The Gregory i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s  the younger o f the two, and he composed f o r , as w e l l as 67  p l a y e d , the l y r a  viol.  He was t e a c h i n g i n 1651, served Cromwell d u r i n g the Commonwealth,  and C h a r l e s I I a f t e r the R e s t o r a t i o n as a v i o l i n i s t .  seventeenth-century  account  s k i l f u l a t the L y r a V i o l , "  d e s c r i b e s him as b e i n g  A  "eminently  and a t e a c h e r who shared w i t h h i s 68  students " a l l v a r i e t i e s o f r a r e t u n i n g s . " Gregory's songs, keyboard p i e c e s , and o t h e r i n s t r u m e n t a l music appear i n P l a y f o r d ' s e d i t i o n s from the l650*s to the I670's.°^ He was n o t a g i f t e d composer, however, and h i s l y r a S e e pp. 120 and 123. 6 6  J a m e s R i l e y , "The I d e n t i t y o f W i l l i a m Gregory," Music and L e t t e r s . XLVIII, No. 3 (1967). 240-44. 67  68 S c h o l e s , The P u r i t a n s and Music, p. 160, q u o t i n g B a t c h i l e r ' s biography o f Susanna Perwich ( c a . l 6 6 l ) . R i l e y , "The I d e n t i t y o f W i l l i a m Gregory," p. 240. 6 9  135 *  v i o l m u s i c d i s p l a y s no o u t s t a n d i n g W i l l i a m Lawes ( b . attributed  feature.  l602, d . 1 6 4 5 ) .  t o W i l l i a m Lawes i n t h e  There are n i n e  lyra viol  pieces  editions.  Of a l l  the  c o m p o s e r s who c o n t r i b u t e d a s i g n i f i c a n t number o f p i e c e s  the  editions,  Lawes was t h e  date o f the r e l e a s e  o n l y one t o d i e b e f o r e  of A M u s i c a l l Banquet.  R o y a l i s t a r m y , a n d was k i l l e d Perhaps the  Playford  at  the  siege  the  1651,  He f o u g h t  in  the  of Chester i n  1645.  o b t a i n e d Lawes' l y r a v i o l music from h i s  c o m p o s e r , H e n r y L a w e s , w i t h whom P l a y f o r d was o n  to  7 0  brother,"  intimate  71 terms.  W i l l i a m was v e r s a t i l e ,  masques a n d t h e Playford's obvious.  theater,  a n d a d m i r a t i o n f o r W i l l i a m Lawes  Many o f h i s p u b l i c a t i o n s f e a t u r e L a w e s ' m u s i c ,  (I652  lyra viol  for  a quarter  the  list  editions  too.  of a century,  of l y r a v i o l  The r e s p e c t  is  evident  c o m p o s e r s b o t h i n 1669 a n d 1682,  in  even  Perhaps this respect  t h o u g h W i l l i a m Lawes was i n d e e d a g i f t e d  to  composer.  ° M u r r a y L e f k o w i t z , W i l l i a m Lawes ( L o n d o n i R o u t l e d g e K e g a n P a u l , i960), p . 19. 7  dead  P l a y f o r d p l a c e s h i s name f i r s t  f r i e n d s h i p w i t h H e n r y Lawes f o s t e r e d  some d e g r e e ,  such  D e s p i t e Lawes h a v i n g b e e n  though t h e s e e d i t i o n s c o n t a i n no p i e c e s by h i m . Playford's  are  (1655), a n d  and 1657), C o u r t A y r e s  second p a r t of A M u s i c a l l Banquet.  i n the  for  and i n s t r u m e n t a l c o n s o r t m u s i c .  respect  as C a t c h t h a t C a t c h C a n the  composing songs, music  and  71 H e n r y Lawes was a g o d f a t h e r t o P l a y f o r d ' s s o n , H e n r y . See C y r u s L . D a y a n d E l e a n o r . B . M u r r i e , " E n g l i s h S o n g B o o k s a n d T h e i r P u b l i s h e r s , " The L i b r a r y , 4 t h S e r i e s , V o l . X V I , N o . 4  ( 1 9 3 6 ) , p p . 370, 375.  136 Lawes* music i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s i s noteworthy i n t h a t h i s s u i t e s are v i r t u a l l y the o n l y ones to d i s p l a y unity.  thematic  7 2  C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson (b. 1605. d. 1669).  Christopher  Simpson, the author o f the w e l l known t r e a t i s e The D i v i s i o n Violist  (I659), c o n t r i b u t e d seven p i e c e s t o the 1661 e d i t i o n o f  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n . One might wonder what prompted the appearance o f Simpson's p i e c e s i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , when Simpson's s p e c i a l t y was the d i v i s i o n s t y l e o f p l a y i n g , n o t the 'lyra-way.'  I t i s doubt-  f u l he was s e e k i n g r e c o g n i t i o n from h a v i n g the p i e c e s i n p r i n t ; h i s r e p u t a t i o n was w e l l e s t a b l i s h e d by 1661.  Simpson's  was such t h a t he, l i k e J e n k i n s , r e c e i v e d p a t r o n s ' out h i s c a r e e r .  skill  support  through-  Furthermore he r e c e i v e d an income from the s a l e  73 of h i s b o o k s . '  J  Perhaps P l a y f o r d secured f r i e n d s h i p w i t h Simpson.  the seven p i e c e s because o f a  A f r i e n d s h i p might have begun i n 1660,  when P l a y f o r d h e a r t i l y recommended Simpson's t r e a t i s e t o the 74 readers  o f h i s I n t r o d u c t i o n (1660).  Simpson's l y r a v i o l p i e c e s are i n t e r e s t i n g ;  some are im-  p r e s s i v e compared t o the o t h e r p i e c e s i n the e d i t i o n s .  They con-  s i s t o f two s u i t e s , one o f which e x e m p l i f i e s a f e a t u r e S e e pp. 10 8-110.  apparently  7 2  M a r g a r e t M e r e d i t h , " C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson and the C o n s o r t o f V i o l s , " (Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f Wales, 1969), p. . 74 An I n t r o d u c t i o n to the S k i l l o f Musick (London, 1660), p. 7 0 . 7 3  k  137 t y p i c a l of Simpson:  r e p e a t i n g movements o f the same type. -' 7  Oddly enough, none of h i s l y r a v i o l p i e c e s i n c l u d e d i v i s i o n s . One  o f h i s almains  uses some i m i t a t i o n i n t h a t the t r e b l e  bass a l t e r n a t e l y r e p e a t a rhythmic  motive. ^ 7  W i l l i a m Young (b. ?, d. 1671). of some note, tions.  1661  W i l l i a m Young, a composer  i s n o t h e a v i l y r e p r e s e n t e d i n the l y r a v i o l  There are o n l y three p i e c e s a s c r i b e d to him.  these were c o n t r i b u t e d to the 1651  and  Two  ediof  e d i t i o n , the o t h e r , to the  edition. A t the s t a r t of P l a y f o r d ' s c a r e e r , Young was e s t a b l i s h e d  as a composer and  i n s t r u m e n t a l i s t . Soon a f t e r w a r d ,  i n l653»  he r e c e i v e d a p o s t abroad, s e r v i n g Archduke F e r d i n a n d K a r l a t Innsbruck. natas.  While t h e r e , he p u b l i s h e d e l e v e n v i o l i n  I n 1661,  he r e t u r n e d to England,  chamber so-  t a k i n g up an  appoint-  77 ment a t c o u r t as a f l a u t i s t and  violinist.  Young's a b i l i t y as a composer i n s p i r e d Frank K i d s o n c a l l him  "the most important  before P u r c e l l . "  f i g u r e i n the p e r i o d  Given h i s a b i l i t y ,  7 8  no more compositions p a r t u r e f o r Innsbruck  must have stopped him  p i e c e s to Musicks R e c r e a t i o n (l65[5])« ^Meredith, p.  immediately  i t i s unfortunate  appear i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n .  to  that  Young's  from c o n t r i b u t i n g any  I t remains u n c e r t a i n  " C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson and  the Consort  T#  94*.  F r a n k Kidson, " W i l l i a m Young," Grove's D i c t i o n a r y of Music and M u s i c i a n s , IX, 386-7. 7 7  7 8  Ibid.  why  of V i o l s , "  37. 7 6  de-  138 he c o n t r i b u t e d  o n l y one more p i e c e  when he r e t u r n e d  to England after  One o f Y o u n g ' s p i e c e s , sic  in that  it relies  the  editions.'  Jenkins  Lilly  1660 and  (b.  ?,  d.  1678).  i n the  final  i s not  references  to  viol  editions  Restoration.  an a l m a i n , r e s e m b l e s  There  C o l e m a n ' s mu-  than  I678.  almain is  e d i t i o n of Musicks  a well  is  usual  in  point  to  o n l y two p i e c e s  records  a close  as-  an a l m a i n and  changed  to  John  Recreation.  known m u s i c i a n ,  to him i n the  These  are  editionst  lyra viol  The a s c r i p t i o n on t h e  i n the  merous  the  lyra  on m u l t i p l e s t o p s more  to John L i l l y  a saraband.  the  7  John L i l l y cribed  to  although  o f the  there are  K i n g ' s music  relationship  between  nufrom  him  Jenkins. Though L i l l y ' s  composers  name i s  in Playford's  i n Musicks Recreation  w o r k e x t e n s i v e l y as  a composer.  copyist,  on the  a virtuoso  lyra  (1669).  he  list  of l y r a  apparently  viol  did  He i s k n o w n p r i m a r i l y a s viol,  not a music  a n d a m u s i c i a n who was  pa-  80 t r o n i z e d by the Because music than  North  for  the  composing,  family. most p a r t ,  Lilly  worked i n o t h e r areas  a n d b e c a u s e he knew J o h n J e n k i n s w e l l ,  of the  81 hypothesis  presented e a r l i e r ,  that L i l l y ' s  "Almain"  is  an  ar-  90. A tendency toward a t h i c k t e x t u r e i s a p e r s o n a l t r a i t o f Young a c c o r d i n g to R i c h a r d s . See " A S t u d y o f B a s s V i o l Music," p. 221. fin Pamela W i l l e t s , "John L i l l y , Bodleian Library Record, VII (Feb., 8 l  See  p.  125.  M u s i c i a n and M u s i c C o p y i s t , "  1967). 307-9-  139 rangement o f a p i e c e "Saraband" since it  it  is  also  by J e n k i n s ,  seems l i k e l y .  Perhaps  a n a r r a n g e m e n t o f one o f J e n k i n s '  i s p a i r e d w i t h the  the  pieces  "Almain"  i n both e d i t i o n s  1625. d .  1679).  i n which  appears. John B a n i s t e r  edition There  is  are  the  (b.  o n l y one  i n the  edition.  B a n i s t e r was n o t  i n 1662.  d i s p u t i n g the  tuneful  lyra  viol  Banister.  pieces  ascribed  8 3  primarily a violist  leader  The f i n a l  i n c l u d e s music by John  lay i n other areas.  and was a p p o i n t e d lins  that  two t e c h n i c a l l y u n d e m a n d i n g ,  to Banister  H i s fame  ca.  or l y r a v i o l  composer.  F o r a t i m e he s e r v e d C h a r l e s  o f the  K i n g ' s band o f t w e n t y - f o u r  L a t e r he was d i s m i s s e d f r o m t h i s King's preference  for  Italian,  position  rather  than  II, vio-  for English,  mus i c . He c o m p o s e d f o r tions  i n the  the  s t a g e , w r i t i n g m u s i c f o r many  l 6 6 0 ' s and l 6 7 0 ' s .  today f o r h o l d i n g England's place  i n h i s home b e t w e e n  first  the  P r o b a b l y he  i s most  p u b l i c concerts, which  years  1672 and  T#  famous took  1678.  W i l l i a m P a g e t , M r . A y l w a r d , M r . G o t e r and M r . 8 2  produc-  Baptist.  262.  B e s i d e s t h e two a s c r i p t i o n s , t h e 1682 e d i t i o n c o n t a i n s two p i e c e s d i s c o v e r e d t o h a v e b e e n composed b y B a n i s t e r t h r o u g h concordant sources: " A m a r i l l i s " a n d " S w e e t J a n e " (T#s 69 a n d 204*). 8 3  ok  Edward G . R i m b a u l t , A l f r e d Loewenberg and B a r c l a y S q u i r e , " J o h n B a n i s t e r , " G r o v e ' s D i c t i o n a r y o f M u s i c and M u s i c i a n s , I , 400-1. ^ S c h o l e s , The P u r i t a n s a n d M u s i c , p . 4 6 . 8  140 I t appears the c o n n e c t i o n these musicians had w i t h P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s was s m a l l i f any e x i s t e d a t a l l .  The e d i t i o n s  c o n a t i n o n l y one a s c r i p t i o n to each composer. Paget's c o n t r i b u t i o n i s to A M u s i c a l l Banquet, to Musicks R e c r e a t i o n (l65[5])«  and Aylward's  F o r the f o l l o w i n g reasons these  two men are p r o b a b l y a r r a n g e r s , r a t h e r than composers.  First,  t h i s author i s aware o f no o t h e r r e f e r e n c e s to Paget, and o n l y 86 one t o Aylward,  as composers.  wealth, and both he and A y l w a r d  Paget taught d u r i n g the Common8 7  s e r v e d as v i o l i n i s t s  King's music a f t e r the R e s t o r a t i o n .  Secondly, the p i e c e  to Paget appears i n a l l f i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s . appears o n l y i n the l a s t e d i t i o n .  i n the ascribed  Paget's name  I f he were the composer, i t  seems a t l e a s t one o t h e r o f the e d i t i o n s would have i n c l u d e d h i s name. Mr. Goter, whose p i e c e appears i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n (1661), i s Jacques G a u l t i e r , the composer and l u t e n i s t who s e r v e d i n the King's music from  I637  to 1647.  Goter i s the a n g l i c i z e d form o f  88 h i s name. The a s c r i p t i o n to B a p t i s t i s on a minuet which appears i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n (1682).  Whether the a s c r i p t i o n  indicates  Lully o 86r D r a g h i , both o f whom had the C h r i s t i a n name B a p t i s t , i s The o t h e r a s c r i p t i o n t o Aylward appears i n G r e e t i n g ' s The P l e a s a n t Companion (l673)« T h i s assumes t h a t Aylward i s the same person as W [ i l l i a m ] Ayleworth [ o r A l e w o r t h ] , who i s l i s t e d i n the r e g i s t e r s o f the King's music. 8 7  00  T r a f i c a n t e , "The M a n s e l l L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e , " (Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f P i t t s b u r g h , 1965), pp« 155-56.  141 uncertain.  89 7  A s c r i p t i o n s t o a B a p t i s t and a B a p t i s t a appear i n  o t h e r P l a y f o r d e d i t i o n s , such as The P l e a s a n t and  Choice A y r e s  (I683).  tended, though again,  Companion (l6?3),  A p p a r e n t l y the same m u s i c i a n i s i n -  i t i s u n c e r t a i n which one.  Thus, the survey o f P l a y f o r d ' s  l y r a v i o l composers and the  e n t i r e study o f the f i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s i s c o n c l u d e d . A l though the p u b l i c a t i o n s  do n o t c o n t a i n music o f g r e a t  they are o f much i n t e r e s t today from many s t a n d p o i n t s : the  s o c i e t y which c a l l e d them i n t o e x i s t e n c e ;  who responded t o the s o c i e t y ' s a p p e t i t e music they c o n t a i n  a t t r a c t i v e pieces healthy  f o r music;  t h a t o f the and f i n a l l y ,  The e d i t i o n s , b e i n g c o l l e c t i o n s o f l i g h t ,  f o r amateurs, are f u r t h e r testimony t o the  s t a t e o f amateur music making i n P l a y f o r d ' s  c o n s i s t e n t l y high  that of  that of Playford  and the composers who wrote i t ;  t h a t o f the l y r a v i o l .  depth,  q u a l i t y of Playford's  day, to the  work, and t o the charm  of p o p u l a r music i n the second h a l f o f the seventeenth c e n t u r y . We are f o r t u n a t e  y  today to have the r e c o r d  John Manifold,  the e d i t i o n s  preserve.  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The M o r r i s B o o k . 2nd e d . 5 v o l s . London: N o v e l l o a n d Company, L t d . ,  1909-24.  Shepard, L e s l i e . The B r o a d s i d e J e n k i n s L i m i t e d , 1962. Simpson,  Christopher.  Ballad.  London:  The D i v i s i o n V i o l i s t .  Herbert  London,  1659•  Simpson, Claude M i t c h e l l . The B r i s t i s h B r o a d s i d e B a l l a d a n d I t s Music. New B r u n s w i c k ! R u t g e r s U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1966. S m i t h , W i l l i a m C . " P l a y f o r d , Some H i t h e r t o U n n o t i c e d C a t a logues." The M u s i c a l T i m e s , L X V I I ( J u l y a n d A u g u s t ,  1926), 636-39, 701-4.  S q u i r e , W. B a r c l a y , c o m p i l e r . Catalogue o f P r i n t e d Music i n the L i b r a r y o f the R o y a l C o l l e g e o f M u s i c . London: P r i n t e d b y O r d e r o f t h e C o u n c i l , 1909. , compiler. Catalogue o f P r i n t e d M u s i c F u b l i s h e d between 1487 a n d 1 8 0 0 . Now i n t h e B r i t i s h Museum. 2 vols. London: B y O r d e r o f t h e T r u s t e e s , 1912. .  "John P l a y f o r d . "  261-65.  Music and L e t t e r s ,  I V , N o . 3 (1923),  148  Temperley, N i c h o l a s . " J o h n P l a y f o r d and the M e t r i c a l P s a l m s . " J o u r n a l o f the A m e r i c a n M u s i c o l o g i c a l S o c i e t y . X X V , N o . 3 (1972), 331-78. . " J o h n P l a y f o r d and t h e S t a t i o n e r s ' C o m p a n y . " a n d L e t t e r s , L I V , N o . 2 ( A p r i l , 1973), 2 0 3 - 2 1 2 .  Music  Thorpe, W i l l a r d . Songs from the R e s t o r a t i o n T h e a t r e . Princeton: P r i n c e t o n U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1934. R e p r i n t e d , New Y o r k : Da Capo P r e s s , 1970. T r a f i c a n t e , Frank A . "Lyra V i o l Tunings: ' A l l Ways h a v e b e e n t r y e d t o do i t . ' " A c t a M u s i c o l o g i c a , X L I I (1970), 183205. _______ "The M a n s e l l L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e . 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" • B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y R e c o r d , V I I ( F e b . , 1967)1 3 0 7 - 1 1 . W i l l i a m s , l o l o A . E n g l i s h F o l k S o n g and D a n c e . L o n g m a n s , G r e e n a n d C o . , 1935• W i l s o n , John, e d . R o g e r N o r t h on M u s i c . Company L t d . , 1959. Wing,  Donald, compiler. A Printed in Scotland, and o f E n g l i s h Books 1700. 2 n d . e d . New  London:  London: N o v e l l o and  S h o r t T i t l e Catalogue o f Books I r e l a n d , W a l e s , and B r i t i s h A m e r i c a P r i n t e d i n Other Countries., l64lYork: The I n d e x S o c i e t y , 1972.  Wood, M e l u s i n e . M o r e H i s t o r i c a l D a n c e s . London: S o c i e t y of Teachers of Dancing Incorporated,  The I m p e r i a l 1956.  149 W o o d f i l l , W. L . M u s i c i a n s i n E n g l i s h S o c i e t y . P r i n c e t o n U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1953'  Princeton:  Zimmerman, F r a n k l i n B . , e d . An I n t r o d u c t i o n to the S k i l l o f M u s i c k , by J o h n P l a y f o r d . The T w e l f t h E d i t i o n . New York: D a C a p o P r e s s , 1972. . "Purcell*s Musical Heritage: A Study of M u s i c a l S t y l e s i n Seventeenth Century England." Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f S o u t h e r n C a l i f o r n i a , 1958.  APPENDIX I TITLE INDEX Introduction T h i s index i s arranged titles  a l p h a b e t i c a l l y a c c o r d i n g t o the  of Playford's l y r a v i o l pieces.  c l u d e d except titles:  A l l the p i e c e s are i n -  those simply b e a r i n g the f o l l o w i n g s i x dance form  p r e l u d e , almain,  ayre, c o r a n t . saraband and j i g .  In a d d i t i o n t o t i t l e s ,  the f o l l o w i n g i n f o r m a t i o n i s g i v e n  f o r each p i e c e : Column 1  Thematic number (see Appendix I I I ) .  2  L o c a t i o n ( e d i t i o n , page and composition number) i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , arranged c h r o n o l o g ically.  3  Title: the p i e c e i s c l a s s i f i e d a c c o r d i n g t o i t s t i t l e i n the e a r l i e s t l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n , u n l e s s , on i t s f i r s t appearance, i t bears one o f the s i x dance form t i t l e s mentioned above. When t h i s occurs, the c h r o n o l o g i c a l arrangement i n column 2 i s a l t e r e d , and the t i t l e by which the p i e c e i s c l a s s i f i e d appears f i r s t .  4  Composer, i f known. The name appears i n b r a c k e t s i f i t was d i s c o v e r e d through an o u t s i d e source.  I f one has no other i n f o r m a t i o n about a p i e c e than i t s title,  this  index may be used t o l o c a t e i t i n the l y r a v i o l  t i o n s , and, i f i t appears t h e r e , t o t r a c e i t t o the thematic catalogue where any f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n d i s c o v e r e d  150  appears.  edi-  151  APPENDIX  I  T I T L E INDEX  T# (1)  Ed./p./# (2)  Title (3)  152*  P82/54/74  Abington  67*  P51/3A P5[5]/V8 P61/3/6 P69/3/6  A L a Mode de  78  P82/20/28  Ah C r u e l Bloody Fate  [Henry  69  P82/51/69  Amarillis  [John  155  P82/11/16  A p e s Dance i n O p e r a , The  P5[5]/29Ao  Apollo,  209  P51/1/2 P5[5]/5/9 P69/3/5  Blew-Cap  220*  P5[5]/7/l4  Boat,  218  P61/93/96  Boatman,  64  P82/36/50  Bonny Brow  58*  P82/36A9  Bore  68  P51/10/12  Bow B e l l s  39  P5L51/77/86  Brangle  Composer  (4)  Jig  • •  France  P82/7/10  56  P6l/lo/l4 P69/20/32 P82/9/13  187  P5[5]/28/39  the  The  a Boat, A  Banister]  [Matthew  Locke]  •*  [John  The  Devilage  A French A y r Canaries  Puree11J  • •  Jenkins]  152 APPENDIX I--Continued (1) 219*  (2)  P69/24/38  (3)  (4)  C a v a l i e r s Hornpipe S c o t t i s h Hornpipe  203  P5[5]/17/26[A] P61/11/16  Chicona  Simon Ives  211  P5[5]/29/4l P61/11/15 P69/16/27  Cloche, La  Simon Ives  P82/34/47  Second Lesson w i t h a Thump Saraband  43  P82/52/71 P69/95/123  C o c k l e y , La An A y r  96*  P51/24/27 P5[5]/4o/51 P61/21/29 P69/54/77 P82/59/5  C o l o n e l Gerards Tune Gerard's M i s t r e s s  141  P82/56/76  Come Boy F i l l Us, etc.  232  P69/8/I6  Come Jump t o My C o u s i n and K i s s Come K i s s Me My Sweet Kate  P82/8/11  n 11  Coranto La V i n i o n e See " V i n i o n e , La"  120 85  P82/64/11  C o u l d Man H i s Wish Obtain  [James Peas ible]  P5[5]/46/57  Countess o f E x e t e r ' s Almane  Simon Ives  P61/48/63  197  P5[5]/10/18  Countrey C o l l  W i l l i a m Lawes  186  P5[5]/59/65  Countrey Dance  Tho[mas] Bates  P61/43/56 P69/67/95 P82/88/40  A Jigg  153 APPENDIX I — C o n t i n u e d (1)  (2)  195  P82/15/21  Cuckolds A l l A  225  P69/7/13 P82/10/15  Dance In Mackbeth, A Mackbeth  57  P82/39/53  Dragoons March  215  P82/32/43  E a r l o f Sandwich's F a r e w e l l , The  P82/26/37 P51/13/16 P5[5]/26/36 P6I/12/17  Eccho Almain, The An A l l m a n Ayre Almaine  P69/33A9  (4)  (3) Row  [Matthew L o c k e ]  Simon Ives George Hudson Anon. George Hudson  F a i n I Would See "May Time"  239*  P82/68/17  Farewel F a i r Armida  [ R o b e r t Smith]  F i g a r y , The See "New F i g a r y , The" F i l l P o r t e r ' s Rant See " P o r t e r s Rant" F i r s t Lesson, With a Thump See "Thumping Almaine, The" 180  P69/19/31  F o l l o w Me Kate  16  P69/17/29 P82/34/46  F o u r t h Lesson, With a Thump Ayre  P69/13/23 P82/44/60  Franklin A Tune  I63  French Ayr, A See "Brangle D e v i l a g e " 240  P69/57/81  Galliard,  The  ..  154 APPENDIX I — C o n t i n u e d (1)  (2)  (4)  (3)  70  P5[5]/7/13  Gather Your Rosebuds  [William Lawe s ]  13  P82/14/19  G e n e r a l Monk's March  • •  Gerard's M i s t r e s s See " C o l o n e l Gerards Tune" 191  P5[5]/77/85 P61/10/13 P69/23/37 P82/27/28[38]  Gilli-flower  259  P69/53/75 P82/59/4  G l o r y o f Hackney Saraband  26  P5[5]/8/l6  G l o r y o f the N o r t h  21  P51/16/19  G l o r y o f the West  Simon Ives  P69/54/76 P82/20/29  Granadees March, The  170  P69/IO/I8  Green Goose F a i r  222*  P82/14/20  Hobby-Horse Dance, The  134  P61/95/98  Hunt I s Up  213  P61/94/97  I Have Been a P i p e r  171  P5[5]/3/6  I r i s h Rant  100*  P69/51/73  I t a l i a n Rant,  P69/I10/140  J i g Almain, A  John Moss  106  P69/120/152  J i g Almain, A  John Moss  136  P82/19/27  Jockey Went to the Wood  [William Gregory]  221  P82/50/68  Joy o f A l l H e a r t s , The  [William Turner]  6  32  The  ••  [Giuseppino]  155 APPENDIX I — C o n t i n u e d (1)  (2)  (4)  (3) K i n g Enjoyes H i s Own, The See "When the K i n g E n j o y s &c."  185  P69/5/10 P82/4/7  King's D e l i g h t ,  216  P5[5]/12/20 P69/IO/19  L e s l e y e s March  194  P82/56/77  L e t O l i v e r Now Forgotten  The  Be  Mackbeth See "Dance In Mackbeth, A" P5C51/28/38 P69/7/14 P82/55/75  Maids  P82/42/56  Mardike  41*  P61/4/7 P 69/2 6/40 P82/23/33  Masque, A Queens Mask, The An Ayre  59  P5L5V1/1 P69/1/2 P82/2/2  May  251  P5[5]/l5/24  Merry Hogh, A  159  P69/I8/30  Merry M i l k - M a i d , The  176  P82/38/52  Minuet  226  P82/41/55  Minuet  207*  P82/63/10  Minuet  243  P82/65/12  Minuet  296  P82/66/13  Minuet  73  P82/40/54  Mr. Farmer's  29  166  Rant  Simon Ives  Time  F a i n I Would  Baptist  Trumpet  156  APPENDIX I--Continued (1)  (2).  (3)  (4)  Mr. P o r t e r ' s D e l i g h t See " P o r t e r s Rant" Montross March See " S c o t s March, The" P69/12/22  Montrosses March  ••  P5[5]/76/83  Morris  Coleman  147  P69/5 8/82  M y r t l e Grove, The  « •  165  P82/22/31  M y r t l e Shade, The  [Henry P u r c e l l ]  110  P82/70/20  New Bore, A  ••  P69/56/80 P82/61/7  New F i g a r y , The F i g a r y , The  200  P82/19/26  New Minuet  ••  160  P82/35/48  New Minuet  ••  22  P82/53/72  New M u t t a r  ••  210  93  27*  New Rant See " P o r t e r s Rant"  54  190  P51/8/11 P5[5]/l4/22 P69/24/39 P82/12/18  N ightengale  P51/15/18  None S h a l l P l u n d e r but I  P5[5]/13/21 P69/12/21  t  t  ••  P r i n c e Rupert's March  156  P82/22/32  Now the F i g h t ' s Done  [Henry P u r c e l l "  30  P82/18/25  Oh the Bonny C h r i s t Church B e l l s  [Henry Aldrich]  198*  P51/6/8 P5[5]/2/4 P69/2/3  Over the Mountaines  ••  APPENDIX  I—Continued  (3)  (1)  (2)  (4)  18  P82/54/73  Oxford Tune  168  P69/V7 P82/lo/l4  Parthenia  62  P5[5]/6/ll  Pill  40  P 69/11/20 P 82/2/3  P l e a s a n t Dream, The An Ayr  265  P61/50/66  Poll, A  161*  P5[5]/l6/25 P61/3/5 P69/6/11 P82/6/9  P o r t e r s Rant New Rant F i l l . P o r t e r ' s Rant Mr. P o r t e r ' s D e l i g h t  249*  P69/55/78  Prethe Love Turn to Me  52  P 69/14/2 4  P r i n c e of Condie's March, The  60  P51/5/6  to Purge Melancholy, A  [Thomas F o r d ]  Simon Ives  P [ r i n c e ] Ruperts March P r i n c e Pupert's March See "None S h a l l P l i n d e r but I"  17  P51/6/7  P [ r i n c e ] Rupert's Morrice P r i n c e Ruperts Welcome See "Simerons Dance, The"  250  P69/56/79  Queens D e l i g h t ,  The  Queens Mask, The See "Masque, A" 108  P61/60/77  Rant, A  135  P5[5]/5/l0  Room f o r Cuckolds  P61/96/99  John W i t h i e  158 APPENDIX I — C o n t i n u e d (1)  (2)  (3)  9  P82/42/57  Round 0, A  245  P82/68/16  Round 0, A  P82/l6/[22]  Scotch Tune C a l l e d Sawney, A  P69/9/17 P82/12/17  S c o t s March, The Montross March  25 164  (4)  S c o t t i s h Hornpipe See " C a v a l i e r s Hornpipe" Second Lesson, With a Thump See "Cloche, La" P 69/l/l  Short Prelude, A  130  P69/6/12 P82/5/8  Simerons Dance, The P r i n c e Rupert's Welcome  158  P5[5]/80/89  Simon the K i n g  74  [Matthew Locke]  P61/93/95 [Thomas Farmer]  P82/21/30  S i t t i n g Beyond the Riverside  149  P51/2/3  Step S t a t e l y  204*  P82/37/51  Sweet Jane  [John B a n i s t e r ]  P51/8/10  Symphony, A  Charles Coleman  71  63*  P5[5]/3/5  P5C51/9/17 P6I/16/22 P69/22/35 P82/l6/[23] 214  P82/62/9  Theater Tune  299  P82/66/14  Theater Tune  51  P82/67/15  Theater Tune  159 APPENDIX I — C o n t i n u e d (1)  (2)  231  P69/I6/28  P5C5W12 P82/33/45  50  P5L51/17/26 P51/1/1 P61/1/1 P69/15/26 P82/32/44  37  P69/14/25  (3)  (4)  T h i r d Lesson, With a Thump Coranto Saraband Thumping Almane, The An A l l m a i n e Almain F i r s t Lesson, With a Thump Almain T o l l , T o l l , Gentle Bell, etc. Tune, A See " F r a n k l i n " Banister  143  P82/52/70  182  P61/2/4 P69/5/9 P82/3/5  Vive l e Roy  287  P51/22/26  V i n i o n e , La  P5[5]/22/26 P61/23/32 P69/52/74 P82/60/6 76<  P51/4/5  P5[5]/4/7 P61/2/3 P69/4/8 P82/4/6  Tune  Coranto La V i n i o n e 11 11  La V i n i o n e When the K i n g Enjoyes &c. The K i n g Enjoyes H i s Own When the K i n g Enjoys H i s Own  Will[iam] Paget  APPENDIX I I COMPOSER INDEX Introduction T h i s index  i s arranged  a l p h a b e t i c a l l y a c c o r d i n g to  l a s t names of the composers mentioned i n P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a editions. to him,  viol  Under each composer's name, a l l the p i e c e s a s c r i b e d  and  any  o t h e r o f h i s compositions  i n the l y r a v i o l  t i o n s d i s c o v e r e d through o u t s i d e s o u r c e s , order.  the  are l i s t e d  Footnote commentaries i n d i c a t e the  in  edi-  thematic  i n s t a n c e s where p i e c e s  bear c o n f l i c t i n g a s c r i p t i o n s i n the v a r i o u s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s . F o r each e n t r y the f o l l o w i n g i n f o r m a t i o n appears? Column 1  Thematic number,  2  Titlet i f the composer was d i s c o v e r e d through an o u t s i d e source the a b b r e v i a t i o n "anon." appears a f t e r the t i t l e ,  3-7  L o c a t i o n (page and c o m p o s i t i o n particular lyra v i o l edition.  I f one this  i s d e a l i n g w i t h music by a p a r t i c u l a r composer,  index w i l l  c o n t a i n any the r e a d e r  number) i n the  i n d i c a t e whether P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s  of the composer's music, and to the thematic  catalogue  i f so, w i l l  where i n c i p i t s  f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n d i s c o v e r e d about the p i e c e 160  direct and  appear.  any  161  APPENDIX Composer  COMPOSER T#  Title  1651  II Index  165[5]  1661  I669  1682  AYLWARD Ayre  65 BANISTER 61 69 143 204*  78/87  John Ayre Amarillis (anon.) Tune Sweet Jane (anon.)  50/67 51/69  Minuet  63/10  52/70 37/51  BAPTIST 207* BATES, 14* 19 34 42 132 148 179 184 186 202 208  Thomas Ayr Ayr Ayre Almain Corant Saraband Corant A Jig Countrey Dance Saraband Coranto  58/63  42/54  59/65  43/56  58/64  104/134 IOO/129 65/93 102/132 105/135 102/131 101/130  IO6/136 67/95  87/39  88/40  42/55  103/133 66/94  16/22  22/35  I6/23  17/23  49/70  57/1  COLEMAN, C h a r l e s 46 63 93 95  Almane A Symphon Morris Preludium  30/42 9/17 76/83 33/45  162  APPENDIX  COMPOSER T#  Title  1651  II--Continued  165[5]  1661  1669  1682  (Coleman) 113* 116 122 127 137 188 224 236 254 268 270 282 293 ESTO,  115 117 119 178* 235*  no.  36/49  . •  74/81 34/46 38/50 31/43 .. 32/44 73/80 75/82 36/48 35/47 38/51 ..  .. 28/36 18/24 •• ..  50/71 •• 22/36  58/2  29/38 28/37 18/25  50/72  58/3  17/24  John  7 79 80 82 88 97 102  p.  Almane .. with Division Ayre .. Almane .. Ayrel .. Coranto .. A Saraband .. Saraband .. Jigge .. Ayre .. Saraband .. Coranto .. Saraband .. A C o r a n t o ^ 17/20  Almain Almane Almane Almaine Almane Ayre Almane w i t h Division Almane Almain Almain Saraband A Jigge  37/54 68/96 111/141  52/55  36/46 32/41 90/91 33/42  50/53  26/34  72/101  49/52  35/45 91/92 53/57  34/44  83/33 76/26 80/[30]  69/97 112/142 38/55 71/100  *This p i e c e appears a second time i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n 22, no. 31--ascribed to John J e n k i n s . T h i s piece also appears i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n I l l - - a s c r i b e d to John J e n k i n s .  74/24  (1661)--  (l669)--p.  82,  163  APPENDIX I I - - C o n t i n u e d  COMPOSER T#  Title  1651  165[5]  1661  48/59  37/48  53/56  34/43  51/54  27/35  1669  1682  73/102  78/28  (Esto) 241  252 253 257  263*  273 274 279 285 289 290 294  Saraband3 Corant Saraband Saraband Saraband Saraband Saraband Corant Coranto Corant Coranto Saraband  •  • •  74/103  »  » a  * •  36/47 92/93 92/94  71/99 70/98 113/143 114/144  77/27 79/29 85/36 75/25  GOTER 84 GREGORY,  53* 86* 105* 136  153 175 248 258  William An A y r Ayre Almain Jockey went t o t h e Woods (anon.) Corant Saraband A Jigge Coranto  44/[58] 44/57  48/60  47/62 45/59  35/51 75/104  19/27  36/52 36/53  78/107  t  •  •  •  T h i s p i e c e a p p e a r s a s e c o n d t i m e i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (l66l)-50, n o . 6 5 - - a s c r i b e d t o S i m o n I v e s . 3  p.  61/79  Almain  164  APPENDIX  COMPOSER T#  Title  II--Continued  1651  165[5]  1661  1669  47/61  77/107 76/106  1682  (Gregory)  271  286*  Saraband Coranto  • •  46/60  • •  HUDSON, G e o r g e  3 8  24  35  48  55 91* 129 151 172 181  199 238* 298*  An Allman^ An A y r Almain An Almain Almane An A y r Almane Saraband Saraband Saraband S araband Coranto Coranto Saraband  13/16  26/36  12/17  • •  42/62  • • • • • •  • a • •  14/17 • • • • • • • • • • • •  33/49  30/56  56/60  40/52  54/57 27/37  38/49 13/18  57/62  41/53  56/61 54/58 55/59  4o/[52A] 38/50 39/51  48/65  31/47  41/60  63/90 34/50 32/48  86/38 49/66  41/61 64/91  64/92  IVES, Simon  3 10* 20  41* ,44  66 85  A n Allman5  Preludium AJig A Masque An A y r A n A l l m a i n e 11/13 • • Countesse of E x e t e r s Almane  26/36 18/2 7  6/9 4/7  20/28 46/57  8/10  48/63  This piece a l s o appears i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n n o . 3 7 - - a s c r i b e d t o Simon I v e s .  40/59 26/40 39/56 28/43  26/37 28/39 23/33 30/40  ( l 6 8 2 ) - - p . 26,  " ' T h i s p i e c e a l s o a p p e a r s i n A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t (1651) a n d M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (1661 a n d l 6 6 9 ) - - p . 13. n o . 16; p . 12, n o . 17; a n d p . 33, n o . 49 r e s p e c t i v e l y - - a s c r i b e d t o G e o r g e H u d s o n .  165  APPENDIX  COMPOSER  Title  1651  II--Continued  165[5]  1661  I669  1682  60/86 29/45  84/35 31/42  (Ives) 10?* 114* 131 138 144 157 I67* I69 174 191 203 206 211 217 241 256 288*  Ayre Ayr Saraband A Jigge Saraband Corant Coranto Coranto Coranto Gilliflower Chicona Corant La Cloche Coranto , Saraband" Saraband Coranto  76/84 12/15  21/30 72/78  9/12  • •  12/14  23/32 24/34 22/31 77/85  5/8 14/21  17/26[A]  11/16  29/41 21/29  11/15 9/11 50/65 64/82 49/[64]  48/59 47/58  40/58 39/57  24/34 • «  • •  10/13  23/37  27/T38]  26/41 16/2? 29/44  25/35 34/47 31/41  61/87  86/37  27/42  25/36  IVES J U N I O R , S i m o n 12 189 JENKINS, 4 5 ;11* 33 36  p.  Ayre S araband  24/33 25/35  14/20 15/19  68/75  74/93 66/85  John Almain Ayre Almane w i t h Division Almane Ayre  97/125  66/74  70/88 [73]/[92]  90/119 94/122  ^ T h i s p i e c e appears a second time' i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n 37, n o . 4 8 - - a s c r i b e d t o J o h n . E s t o .  (l66l)  166  APPENDIX  COMPOSER T#  Title  1651  II—Continued  165[5]  1661  1669  1682  71/89 51/67 52/68  83/112  72/22  (Jenkins) 45 81 92 103* 109* 121 123* 125 127  • • Ayre Almaine • • Almaine An A l l m a i n ? • • • • Ayre • * Ayre Almane t* Ayre . 20/23 Ayre° a•  128 133 140 145 162 173 177* 220*  * • • Almain • • Coranto A Saraband •• .a Saraband Coranto aa Saraband aa Saraband a a A Boat, a a a Boat (anon.) Saraband 21/24 Coranto Saraband Corant Saraband Coranto Saraband A Coranto9 Coranto  237 247 255 260 277 281 283 293 297  42/53 44/55 38/50  71/77 70/76 7/14 45/56  76/75 22/30 24/32 30/39 18/24 22/31 77/76 72/90 69/87 68/86 75/94 72/91  73/23. a  •  a a  80/110  96/124 93/121 92/120  31/40 78/77 53/70  71/21  79/79 78/78 43/54  25/33  82/111 84/113  70/19  T h i s p i e c e a l s o a p p e a r s i n A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t (1651), a n d M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n ( 1 6 5 [ 5 ] . 1661 a n d l 6 6 9 ) ~ p . 22, n o . 25; p . 4 1 , no.52; p . 19, n o . 2 6 ; a n d p . 62, n o . 88, r e s p e c t i v e l y — a s c r i b e d to John L i l l y . 7  o  T h i s p i e c e a l s o a p p e a r s i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (I669 a n d 1682)-p . 5 0 , n o . 71; a n d p . 58, n o . 2 — a s c r i b e d t o C h a r l e s C o l e m a n . ^ T h i s p i e c e a l s o appears i n A M u s i c a l l Banquet 2 0 - - a s c r i b e d to C h a r l e s Coleman. no  (1651)—p.  17,  16?  APPENDIX  COMPOSER T# LAWES,  Ill 112 146* 197* 233 266 267 276 278 LILLY,  1661  1669  1682  Gather Your Rosebuds ( a n o n . ) Almane Almaine A Jigge Countrey Coll Saraband S araband Coranto Coranto Coranto  7/13 61/67 11/19 10/18 64/70 63/69 62/68  r  8  ^  8  3  [54]/71  86/86 [56]/73 85/85 55/72 84/84  Alimain10 Saraband  41/5:  19/26 64/83  62/88 62/89  John  23 28 31 32  no.  165[5]  John  103* 262  ]  1651  William  70  MOSS,  Title  II--Continued  72 87 89 98* 106  Almain Preludium A Jig A Jig Almain Almain Almain Almain A Jig A Jig Almain  *°This piece a l s o appears i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n 2 3 - - a s c r i b e d to J e n k i n s .  107/137 44/65 48/69 110/140 45/66 85/114 118/149 88/117 120/152  45/61  (1682)-—p. 73.  168  APPENDIX I I — C o n t i n u e d  COMPOSER T# (Moss) 192 223 228* 229 242 264 269 295 PAGET,  15 77 83* 101 104 108 124 139 205 230* 272 292  165[5]  1661  1669  47/68 1067138 109/139 46/67 119/150 120/151 87/H6 86/115  1682  46/62  Will[iam]  SIMPSON,  WITHIE,  1651  A Saraband A Corant Saraband A Corant Corant Saraband Saraband A Corant  287  94* 118 126 196 246 275 280*  Title  Coranto L a 22/26 Vinion  60/66  23/32  52/74  Christopher 88/88 87/87 62/81 90/90 62/82 63/82 89/89  Almaine Preludium Almaine Saraband Coranto Saraband Saraband John Ayr Almane Ayre Almaine Preludium A Rant Almaine Saraband Saraband Saraband with Division Coranto Saraband  65/71  81/81 [80]/80 58/75 57/74 60/77 59/176]  66/73  82/82  65/72  81/[81A] 60/78  98/126 115/146 114/145 79/108  99/127 100/128 117/148 116/147 80/109  60/6  169  APPENDIX  COMPOSER T# YOUNG, 1* 90 244  Title  II--Continued  1651  165L5]  1661  1669  1682  . . 18/21 19/22  .. 39/52 40/50  65/84 20/27 21/28  58/83 59/84  81/31 82/32  William Ayre Allmaine Saraband  APPENDIX I I I THEMATIC CATALOGUE WITH CONCORDANCES Introduction The  f o l l o w i n g thematic c a t a l o g u e c o n t a i n s e n t r i e s f o r  each o f the 299  d i f f e r e n t p i e c e s i n John P l a y f o r d ' s f i v e volumes  of l y r a v i o l music p u b l i s h e d between 1651 and 1682.  The purpose  of the c a t a l o g u e i s t o g i v e the student o f s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y music q u i c k access t o the c o n t e n t s o f these e d i t i o n s . purpose,  transcribed  incipits  o f a l l these t a b l a t u r e l y r a  p i e c e s are arranged a c c o r d i n g t o t h e i r m u s i c a l as i n d i c a t e d i n the f o l l o w i n g I.  viol  characteristics  outlinei  Duple Meter A. B.  II.  For this  M a j o r Mode M i n o r Mode  T r i p l e Meter A. B.  Major Mode Minor Mode  U s u a l l y , d e t e r m i n i n g the c a t a g o r i e s o f meter and mode i s s t r a i g h t forward.  The few ambiguous i n s t a n c e s i n v o l v e mode.  I n these  c a s e s , the predominant mode o f the i n c i p i t , r a t h e r t h a n t h a t o f the whole p i e c e , determines  the c a t a g o r y .  170  171 W i t h i n these l a r g e r d i v i s i o n s the arrangement i s a c c o r d i n g to melodic c o n t o u r .  (When t h e r e are chords i n v o l v e d the melody-  i s reckoned from the uppermost note.)  I n i t i a l l y the.order i s  determined by the s c a l e degree upon which the f i r s t bar b e g i n s . *  complete  P i e c e s which b e g i n on the t o n i c , o r f i r s t , those which b e g i n on the second degree  degree  are  first;  are  next, and so on, p r e c e e d i n g through the t h i r d , f o u r t h ,  s i x t h and seventh s c a l e  ( i f any) fifth,  degrees.  Subsequent arrangement i s by i n t e r v a l s between s u c c e s s i v e 2  notes o f the melody s t a r t i n g w i t h the f i r s t  complete b a r .  P i e c e s w i t h an i n i t i a l descent o f an octave appear f i r s t . are  f o l l o w e d by p i e c e s b e g i n n i n g w i t h a descending seventh, and  so on, up t o descending seconds, then a s c e n d i n g seconds subsequent  a s c e n d i n g i n t e r v a l s up t o an o c t a v e .  ing  w i t h i n each o f these groups  val,  u s i n g the above mentioned  ing  These  intervals.  and subsequent  J  and a l l  Further order-  i s a c c o r d i n g t o the second  inter-  sequence from descending t o ascend-  The same p r o c e s s i s then a p p l i e d to the t h i r d , i n t e r v a l s , as n e c e s s a r y .  Anacruses are i g n o r e d i n o r d e r i n g the i n c i p i t s . Sometimes a p i e c e c o n t a i n i n g an a n a c r u s i s i n one source l a c k s i t i n a concordant s o u r c e . Because o f t h i s , i g n o r i n g anacruses s i m p l i f i e s the use o f the c a t a l o g u e . 2  Repeated  p i t c h e s are i g n o r e d .  ^Compound i n t e r v a l s are grouped w i t h t h e i r simple  forms.  "*Only two i n c i p i t s (T#s 74 and 75) e x h i b i t no melodic d i v e r g e n c e . They are arranged c h r o n o l o g i c a l l y a c c o r d i n g t o the dates o f the e d i t i o n s i n which they appear.  1?2  The  first  s t e p towards d i s c o v e r i n g whether a p a r t i c u l a r  p i e c e i s c o n t a i n e d i n P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , i s to analyze i t s i n c i p i t a c c o r d i n g to t h i s c l a s s i f i c a t i o n system and c o n s u l t the c a t a l o g u e f o r an i d e n t i c a l e n t r y . i s not l o c a t e d by t h i s means,  melodic  I f the p i e c e  v a r i a n t s , which can change  a p i e c e * s l o c a t i o n c o n s i d e r a b l y i f they occur i n the f i r s t n o t e s , m u s t be c o n s i d e r e d .  There are two main f a c t o r s which  o c c a s i o n these melodic v a r i a n t s .  The  as a r u l e , h i g h l y e m b e l l i s h e d melodies  Playford's editions.  sources,  do not appear i n  I f the r e a d e r suspects he  i s dealing with  an ornamented v e r s i o n of a tune, he s h o u l d imagine  the  ornamentation  s t r i p p e d away, analyze the p l a i n v e r s i o n as o u t l i n e d above, c o n s u l t the c a t a l o g u e a g a i n .  may  f i r s t , w r i t t e n - o u t embel-  l i s h m e n t s , are more l i k e l y t o o c c u r i n the concordant for,  few  and  Secondly, melodic v a r i a n t s may  occur  because l y r a v i o l music c h a r a c t e r i s t i c a l l y c o n t a i n s many chords. From the s t a n d p o i n t of the p i e c e s ' i n c i p i t s , these chords most l i k e l y t o o c c u r on the f i r s t t o n i c harmony.  are  downbeat and to c o n s i s t o f a  Even though the p i t c h of the melody appears  to  be c o n t a i n e d w i t h i n the chord, the p i e c e i s c a t a l o g u e d a c c o r d i n g to  the uppermost p i t c h .  To l o c a t e t h i s type of v a r i a n t i n the  c a t a l o g u e , the r e a d e r must imagine on o t h e r p i t c h e s of the chord.  the n o n - l y r a melody b e g i n n i n g  F o r i n s t a n c e , a tune which begins  on the t h i r d o f a t o n i c chord and descends a second,  i n the  lyra  T h e c a t a l o g u e i s c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e d to accomodate concordant i n c i p i t s which vary s i g n i f i c a n t l y . See p . 1 7 , "Column J  k  173  v i o l e d i t i o n s , may a fourth.  Finally,  b e g i n on the f i f t h o f the chord and  descend  i f r e s u l t s are n o t o b t a i n e d by the above  means, e n t i r e a p p r o p r i a t e major d i v i s i o n s of the c a t a l o g u e  should  be c o n s u l t e d . F o r the purpose of t h i s c a t a l o g u e , the author has l o u s l y noted concordances w i t h i n the f i v e l y r a v i o l To t h i s end,  two manuscript  scrupu-  editions.  indexes of these editions,made  by  Frank T r a f i c a n t e and Gordon J . Dodd, were v e r y v a l u a b l e , ^ s e r v i n g as r e f e r e n c e s a g a i n s t which the p r e s e n t work c o u l d be I n a d d i t i o n , c o n s i d e r a b l e work was seventeenth-century sources.  expended l o c a t i n g as many o t h e r  concordances as p o s s i b l e through  The  the l i s t ,  nature  editions.  c a t a l o g u e p r e s e n t s a l l the i n f o r m a t i o n d e r i v e d from  the f i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s i n columnar format Columnar I n f o r m a t i o n .  as o u t l i n e d i n  Concordances i n o t h e r  c e n t u r y s o u r c e s , both l y r a v i o l and n o n - l y r a v i o l , and are p r e s e n t e d  ing  secondary  These concordances p r o v i d e d i n s i g h t s i n t o the  and make-up o f the l y r a v i o l  item.  checked.  seventeenthcommentary  s e p a r a t e l y , below the columnar e n t r i e s f o r each  These concordances and commentaries are c a t e g o r i s e d a c c o r d -  to numbering and a b b r e v i a t i o n systems as g i v e n i n the  Supplementary Concordances and Commentary, and  list,  i n the l i s t s  of  sources.  " T r a f i c a n t e , " A Thematic Index to the Music f o r L y r a V i o l Contained i n F i v e P u b l i c a t i o n s by John P l a y f o r d , " ( M a n u s c r i p t ) ; and Dodd, "A Thematic H a n d l i s t of the Music i n P l a y f o r d ' s F i v e Lyra V i o l E d i t i o n s , " (Manuscript).  17  Columnar  k  Information Column 1  Thematic number o f t h i s  Column 2  T i t l e as g i v e n by P l a y f o r d .  Column 3  Composer o r a r r a n g e r as g i v e n by P l a y f o r d . When there i s evidence t h a t the name i s t h a t o f an a r r a n g e r , t h i s evidence i s noted i n the commentary.  Column 4  L o c a t i o n i n the P l a y f o r d l y r a v i o l editions; the e d i t i o n s are l i s t e d chronologically. P6l/6/#9 means P l a y f o r d , John, Musicks R e c r e a t i o n on the V i o l , L y r a Way, 1661, p. 6, p i e c e numbered 9*  Column 5  Tuning, below.  Columns 2-5  See  catalogue.  the numbered l i s t  of tunings  The t i t l e , composer and t u n i n g a r e always g i v e n f o r the e a r l i e s t l y r a v i o l edition listed. When any o f these three items d i f f e r i n subsequent e d i t i o n s , the changed i n f o r m a t i o n i s g i v e n on the same l i n e as t h a t o f the subsequent e d i t i o n . When the i n f o r m a t i o n i s the same as the i n i t i a l e n t r y , the a p p r o p r i a t e space i s l e f t blank.  Column 6  Tablature  Column 7  Staff notation i n c i p i t . The c l e f i s t o be understood f o r each e n t r y ! the l i s t o f t u n i n g s , below, g i v e s the p i t c h e s adopted f o r each t u n i n g . A l i t e r a l t r a n s c r i p t i o n o f the t a b l a t u r e i s made; the p i t c h e s are g i v e n i n the ryhthm i n d i c a t e d by the t a b l a t u r e , w i t h no attempt t o suggest polyphony. When i n c i p i t s o f the same p i e c e vary i n d i f f e r e n t e d i t i o n s the i n c i p i t of the e a r l i e s t e d i t i o n i s always adopted. When the v a r i a n t s a f f e c t the placement i n the c a t a l o g u e , separate e n t r i e s a r e made. The e a r l i e s t v e r s i o n r e c e i v e s the thematic number, while the l a t e r v a r i a n t s a r e c r o s s referenced.  Columns 6-7  incipit.  Each i n c i p i t c o n s i s t s o f the p i e c e ' s f i r s t twelve notes i n c l u d i n g i t s anacrusis.  175 Supplementary  Concordances  and Commentary  Supplementary concordances and commentaries a r e l i s t e d a c c o r d i n g t o the numbers one through three t o i n d i c a t e the type o f i n f o r m a t i o n i n v o l v e d . 1.  Concordances  i n l y r a v i o l sources.  2.  Concordances  i n non-lyra v i o l sources.  3'.  Commentary.  A l l supplementary concordances were found through secondary s o u r c e s . Seventeenth-century s o u r c e s , except f o r one,? were n o t examined d i r e c t l y ; references to them were v e r i f i e d o n l y as c i r c u m s t a n c e s suggested and p e r m i t t e d . T h e r e f o r e , i n the c a t a l o g u e , the symbol f o r the secondary source i s g i v e n f i r s t , f o l l o w e d , i n parentheses, by the symbol f o r the primary s o u r c e ( s ) c i t e d i n the former. Thus, A9/212 (Lb/43 ") s i g n i f i e s secondary source A9, p. 212, which c i t e d a concordance i n primary source Lb", f . 43 . The number a f t e r the s l a s h r e f e r s t o a page o r f o l i o u n l e s s preceeded by the symbol #, i n which case the r e f e r e n c e i s t o a c o m p o s i t i o n numbering system. I f both page and compos i t i o n numbers are g i v e n , the page number appears f i r s t , then the c o m p o s i t i o n number, p r e c e d e d by the symbol #, as b e f o r e . Thus 1  r  PCC/45  means  Source PCC, page 45  PCC/#45  means  Source PCC, number 45  PCC/45/#45  means  Source PCC, page 45, number 45  In t h i s t h e s i s the author has been concerned w i t h exami n i n g John P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , and the sources f o r t h i s music. T h i s b e i n g the case, concordances w i t h sources l a t e r than 1687, the y e a r o f John P l a y f o r d ' s death, w h i l e v a l u a b l e i n themselves, were n o t r e l e v a n t to t h i s study, and thus were e x c l u d e d from the c a t a l o g u e . F o r each concordance, the t i t l e , composer, and t u n i n g ( i n l y r a v i o l sources) a r e g i v e n o n l y i f they d i f f e r from those i n P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s .  'John Moss, Lessons f o r the B a s e - V i o l , (London, 1671); t h i s e d i t i o n c o n t a i n e d no concordances w i t h P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l editions.  176 Tunings  Number  Chart  1 2  fefhf defhf edfhf fdefh fedfh fhn  5 6 Secondary  Sources  Name L y r a Way H a r p Way S h a r p H a r p Way F l a t H i g h H a r p Way S h a r p H i g h H a r p Way F l a t Bagpipe Tuning  P i t c h e s used in this catalogue e'b d'b d'b d'a d'a d'a  b  g d g d g d f#d f d d D  G G G A A  D D  D D D  8  F o r ease o f r e c o g n i t i o n w i t h i n the c a t a l o g u e , different a b b r e v i a t i o n systems are a p p l i e d to the v a r i o u s c a t e g o r i e s of sources. A b b r e v i a t i o n s f o r a l l the secondary s o u r c e s begin with a c a p i t a l i z e d l e t t e r • A . " Abbreviations for a l l Playford's editions begin with a c a p i l a l i z e d letter *P.' The l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , w i t h w h i c h t h i s c a t a l o g u e i s p r i m a r i l y concerned, are r e p r e s e n t e d s i m p l y b y t h e l e t t e r ' P ' f o l l o w e d b y t h e l a s t two d i g i t s o f the e d i t i o n ' s date o f p u b l i c a t i o n . Playford's other p u b l i c a t i o n s are r e p r e s e n t e d by the l e t t e r ' P * f o l l o w e d by c a p i t a l i z e d i n i t i a l s o f the i m p o r t a n t words i n the e d i t i o n ' s s h o r t e n e d t i t l e ( i . e . , PAB f o r A p o l l o ' s Banquet on the T r e b l e V i o l i n ) . Abbreviations for s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y m a n u s c r i p t e d i t i o n s employ both c a p i t a l i z e d a n d l o w e r c a s e l e t t e r s ( i . e . , Cfm f o r C a m b r i d g e , F i t z w i l l i a m Museum), and a b b r e v i a t i o n s f o r other seventeenth-century printed editions (non-Playford) b e g i n w i t h t h e l e t t e r '2.'  The i n c i p i t s o f t h e p r e s e n t c a t a l o g u e w e r e a l s o t h o r o u g h l y c h e c k e d a g a i n s t t h e f o l l o w i n g f o u r w o r k s , w h i c h c o n t a i n e d no concordances w i t h them. Andrew Ashbee, e d . , John J e n k i n s t C o n s o r t M u s i c o f F o u r P a r t s , v o l , 26 o f M u s i c a B r i t a n i c a , p u b l i s h e d f o r the R o y a l M u s i c a l A s s o c i a t i o n , (Londoni S t a i n e r and B e l l , 1951- )» t h r o u g h p e r s o n a l c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , D r . A s h b e e i n d i c a t e d he d i d n o t b e l i e v e J e n k i n s ' p i e c e s i n t h e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s were a r r a n g e m e n t s o f m u s i c by him f o r o t h e r m e d i a . Henry Leland C l a r k e , " J o h n Blow (1649-1698)i L a s t Composer o f an E r a , " V o l . Ills "Thematic Index" (unpublished P h . D . d i s s e r t a t i o n , H a r v a r d University, 19 7). M a r g a r e t M e r e d i t h , " C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson and the Consort of V i o l s , " V o l . II» " S u i t e s , Dances, D i v i s i o n s and M i s c e l laneous P i e c e s f o r V i o l s " (unpublished P h . D . d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f W a l e s , 1969)« A n d r e w J . S a b o l , e d . , S o n g s a n d D a n c e s f o r t h e S t u a r t Masque ( P r o v i d e n c e i B r o w n U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1959). K  177  Adams, Robert Lee. "The Development of a Keyboard Idiom i n England d u r i n g the E n g l i s h Renaissance." Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , Washington U n i v e r s i t y , S t . L o u i s , M i s s o u r i , I960. Volume I I I o f t h i s d i s s e r t a t i o n i s the "Thematic Index o f E n g l i s h V i r g i n a l Music." I t s a l p h a b e t i c a l arrangement a c c o r d i n g to composer, and then a c c o r d i n g to t i t l e i s not p a r t i c u l a r l y h e l p f u l . T h i s i s because almost h a l f the p i e c e s i n the c a t a l o g u e are anonymous, and a g r e a t many are u n t i t l e d . A m u s i c a l arrangement would have been better. C h a p p e l l , W i l l i a m . P o p u l a r Music o f the Olden Time. 2 volumes; London: Cramer, B e a l e , & C h a p p e l l , [1859]. .  , and Wooldridge, H. E l l i s . O l d E n g l i s h Popialar M u s i c . 2 volumes; London: C h a p p e l l & Co. L t d . , [1893].  Coxon, C a r o l y n . "John J e n k i n s : A C r i t i c a l Study o f h i s I n s t r u m e n t a l Music." Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f E d i n b u r g h , 1969. Volume I I i s an e d i t i o n o f J e n k i n s " music. The o n l y concordances found i n i t were among t h i r t y s i x ayres by J e n k i n s from the Manchester l y r a v i o l t a b l a t u r e . These concordances had been discovered already i n John Sawyer's c a r d index of the Manchester t a b l a t u r e (A13). Day, Cyrus L., and M u r r i e , E l e a n o r B. E n g l i s h Song Books, 1651-1702: A B i b l i o g r a p h y w i t h a F i r s t L i n e Index o f Songs. London: Oxford U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 19 0. k  Dean-Smith, Margaret, ed. P l a y f o r d ' s E n g l i s h Dancing Master 1651. London: S c h o t t and Company, L t d . ,  1937^  Dodd, Gordon J . "A Thematic H a n d l i s t o f the Music i n Playford's Five Lyra V i o l Editions." (Manuscript). T h i s h a n d l i s t , as a r e f e r e n c e to P l a y f o r d ' s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , i s not n e a r l y as comprehensive as the p r e s e n t c a t a l o g u e . I t does n o t i n c l u d e  178 i n c i p i t s or e x t e n s i v e o u t s i d e concordances. The arrangement of the e n t r i e s i s o n l y p a r t i a l l y t h e m a t i c a l l y c o n s i s t a n t , h a v i n g been undertaken without the r e a l i z a t i o n t h a t a second p a r t to the 1682 e d i t i o n e x i s t s . The e i g h t e e n p i e c e s which o n l y appear i n t h i s p a r t of the 1682 e d i t i o n are added to the end of the h a n d l i s t w i t h o u t r e g a r d t o t h e i r thematic c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . H a r d i n g , Rosamund. A Thematic Catalogue of the Works of Matthew Locke. Oxfordt B l a c k w e l l , 1972. Meyer, Ramon E. "John P l a y f o r d ' s An I n t r o d u c t i o n to the S k i l l of Musick." Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , F l o r i d a State University, 1961. Nelson, R u s s e l l C l a i r e . "John P l a y f o r d and the E n g l i s h Amateur M u s i c i a n . " Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y of Iowa, 1966. Sargent, George Quimbly. "An E d i t i o n o f E l i z a b e t h Rogers' V i r g i n a l Book (B.M. Add. MS 10337)." Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , I n d i a n a U n i v e r s i t y ,  1965.  Sawyer, John E. "An Anthology of L y r a V i o l Music i n Oxford, B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y , Mus. Sch. MSS d. 245-7." Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f Toronto, 1972. A thematic index of the l y r a v i o l c o n t e n t s of these - m a n u s c r i p t s i s c o n t a i n e d i n Appendix I I I . . "a Card Index of the Music i n the Manchester L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e (Manchester, P u b l i c L i b r a r y , Watson C o l l e c t i o n MS 832 Vu 51)." (Manuscript). . "A Card Index of the Music i n D u b l i n , A r c h Bishop Marsh's L i b r a r y , MS Z 3.5.13." ( M a n u s c r i p t ) . Simpson, Claude M i t c h e l l . The B r i t i s h Broadside B a l l a d and I t s Music. New Brunswick: Rutgers U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1966. Thorpe, W i l l a r d . Songs from the R e s t o r a t i o n T h e a t e r . P r i n c e t o n U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1934. T r a f i c a n t e , Frank. "The M a n s e l l L y r a V i o l T a b l a t u r e . " Unpublished Ph.D. d i s s e r t a t i o n , U n i v e r s i t y o f Pittsburgh, 1965.  179  P a r t 2 c o n t a i n s an e d i t i o n o f the c o n t e n t s o f t h i s manuscript, and a l i s t of concordances w i t h i t s music. A18  . "A Thematic Index to the Music f o r L y r a V i o l c o n t a i n e d i n F i v e P u b l i c a t i o n s by John Playford." (Manuscript). Because of i t s form ( i n d e x c a r d s w i t h o u t a numbering system), T r a f i c a n t e ' s index i s n o t as c o n v e n i e n t to use as the p r e s e n t c a t a l o g u e and i t i s n o t as a c c e s s i b l e . I t only l i s t s concordances w i t h i n the f i v e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , and* l i k e Dodd's h a n d l i s t , i t i s arranged w i t h o u t the p i e c e s which o n l y appear i n the second p a r t o f the 1682 e d i t i o n .  A19  Ward, John M. "Appropo The B r i t i s h Broadside B a l l a d and i t s Music." J o u r n a l o f the American M u s i c o l o g i c a l S o c i e t y T V o l . XX (1967). PP. 28-86.  A20  Zimmerman, F r a n k l i n B. Henry P u r c e l l 1659-1695» An A n a l y t i c a l Catalogue of h i s Music. Londont M a c M i l l a n & Co. L t d . , 1963.  Playford's Lyra V i o l Editions P51  A M u s i c a l l Banquet  . . . . The F i r s t P a r t  f o r the Lyra V i o l .  TZ5T,  . . .Lessons  RISM B : l 16516  separate symbol, PMB, i s adopted f o r the p a r t o f t h i s e d i t i o n , as i n d i c a t e d under Non-Lyra V i o l S o u r c e s ' ] .  [A  third 'Playford's  P5[5]  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n : On the L y r a V i o l . RISM B»l 1652/.9  P6l  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n , on the V i o l , Lyra-Way. RISM B«l l 6 6 l V  1661.  P69  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n on the V i o l , RISM B J I 1669°.  I669.  ^The date o f t h i s e d i t i o n i s u n c e r t a i n ; t h i s m a t t e r see pp.17-24.  165[5]»  Lyra-Way.  f o r a d i s c u s s i o n of  180  P82  Musick's R e c r e a t i o n on the V i o l , RISM B : l fo"8~2T:  Lyra-Way. 1682.  P l a y f o r d ' s Non-Lyra V i o l Sources While most o f P l a y f o r d ' s p u b l i c a t i o n s went through s e v e r a l e d i t i o n s , o n l y those e d i t i o n s mentioned i n the c a t a l o g u e are l i s t e d h e r e . References t o s p e c i f i c e d i t i o n s i n c l u d e the f i n a l two d i g i t s o f the year o f p u b l i c a t i o n a f t e r the source symbol. Thus, PDM57 r e f e r s t o the 1657 e d i t i o n o f The Dancing Master. PAB  P l a y f o r d , John. A p o l l o ' s Banquet f o r the T r e b l e Violin. 1 6 7 0 , i u 1677, i682, 1684, I 6 8 7 . RISM B t l 16877.  PCAS  • Choice Ayres and Songs. RISMVI B t l 1679''. 1681 , I 6 8 p .  I679, 1681, 1683.  L  . C o u r t Ayres . . . o f 2 Parts, f o r V i o l s or V i o l i n s ^ 1 6 5 5 . RISM B t l 1655^.  PCA PCC  H i l t o n , John.  PCG  . I  D  M  i u  ,  1658^,  1652, 1658,  I6636.  P l a y f o r d , John. A Booke o f New Lessons f o r C i t h e r n and G i t t e r n . 1652.  PCM P  Catch t h a t Catch Can.  RISM B i l I 6 5 2  1663.  '  0  T  2  8  r  C o u r t l y Masquing A y r e s .  1662. RISM B«1  .  The Dancing Master. 1651, 1652, 1657, supplement t o the t h i r d e d i t i o n c. 1662, 1 6 6 5 , 1670, 1 6 7 5 . 1 6 7 9 1 supplement t o the 1679 e d i t i o n ,  1686.  11  1685.  PDV  . The D i v i s i o n V i o l i n . lo^iOT" ~~~ ~  RISM B i l  PIM  . An I n t r o d u c t i o n t o the S k i l l o f Musick f o r Song and V i o l . 1655, 1660, 1662, 1664. RISM B i V I , pp. 657-8.  The p r e l i m i n a r y pages o f t h i s e d i t i o n are m i s s i n g ; - secondary sources date i t v a r i o u s l y as 1669 o r 1670, o r r e f e r t o i t as Dr. Rimbault's copy. **In the c a t a l o g u e , supplements are i n d i c a t e d by an * s ' a f t e r the e d i t i o n ' s symbol1 PDM62s, f o r example.  181 PMB  . A M u s i c a l l Banquet . . . The T h i r d P a r t . . V Choice Catches or Rounds"! 1651. RISM B«1 16516. " ' ~~~  PMC  . The M u s i c a l Companion. (A c o n t i n u a t i o n of H i l t o n ' s Catch t h a t Catch Can). 1667, 1672, 1673. supplement to the 1673 e d i t i o n , 1 2 1685.  RISM B i l I667 , 16725, 167T, 6  PMD  .  1685^'.  Musick's D e l i g h t on the C i t h r s n .  1666.  RISM B i l 1666^. PMH  . Musick's Handmaid V i r g i n a l s or Harpsycon.  T663V, I 6 7 8  6  .  . . . Lessons f o r 1663, 1678~ RISM B i l  PPC  G r e e t i n g , Thomas. The P l e a s a n t Companion f o r the Flageolet. 1672, 1673, 1680, 1682, 1683. RISM B i l 16735, 16827.  PSA  P l a y f o r d , John. Choice Songs and A y r e s . RISM B i l 1673^  PSM  .  S e l e c t M u s i c a l l Ayres and D i a l o g u e s .  RISM B i l 16520. Seventeenth-Century  I673.  Manuscript  1652.  ~ Sources  A b b r e v i a t i o n s f o r the s e v e n t e e n t h - c e n t u r y manuscripts use the l i b r a r y symbols adopted i n RISM ( i . e . c a p i t a l i n i t i a l ( s ) f o r the c i t y , lower case i n i t i a l ( s ) f o r the l i b r a r y ; when there i s no RISM symbol, one i s i n v e n t e d based upon the RISM system. Numbers are appended to the symbols to d i f f e r e n t i a t e sources housed i n the same l i b r a r y . Be  Bedford, County Record O f f i c e , MS D.D7/2.  cittern  Cfm  Cambridge, F i t z w i l l i a m Museum, MS Mu. Ms. 118.  v o i c e and viol  Ctc  Cambridge, T r i n i t y C o l l e g e ,  lute  MS 0.16.2. Cu  Cambridge, U n i v e r s i t y L i -  b r a r y , MS Dd.3.18. 1 2  S e e note  11.  "  182  Cul Cu2 Cu3 Cu4 Cu5 Cu6  Dm  Dml Dtc Dtcl  _, MS Dd.4.23. .  , MS , MS  Dd.6.48. Dd.14.24.  MS Nn.6.36.  , Hengrave D e p o s i t o r y , MS 77(1). Classmark MR 340 c 90 I, Anne Cromwell's Manuscript.  cittern lyra viol cittern lyra viol keyboard  D u b l i n , A r c h b i s h o p Marsh's L i b r a r y , MS Z 3.4.13 ( f i r s t p a r t of a s e t o f l y r a v i o l duos; the second p a r t i s l o s t ) .  lyra  Dublin, T r i n i t y College, MS D1.21, The B a l l e t Lute Book. , MS 412 (F.5.13).  l u t e and lyra viol  viol  , MS Z 3.5.13.  voice  Dw  Dundee, Wighton L i b r a r y , T r a n s c r i p t s from tv/o seventeenth-century l y r a v i o l manuscripts. (Manuscript).  lyra  En  Edinburgh, N a t i o n a l L i b r a r y of S c o t l a n d , Adv. MS 5.2.15. The Skene Manusci*i*p"b« . Adv. MS 5.2.17, The Agnes Hume M a n u s c r i p t . , Adv. MS 5.2.19, The Leyden M a n u s c r i p t , t r a n s , by G. F. Graham. (Manuscript) . , MS A c c . 2764, Edward M i l l a r ' s Manuscript. ' MS 3296, Margaret S i n k i e r ' s Manuscript. , Panmure MS 7.14  mandore  Enl En2  E n 3  En4 En5  viol  violin lyra  viol  lyra  viol  [unknown]*3 violin  -'The secondary source which c i t e d t h i s manuscript gave no i n d i c a t i o n of the media, and, to date, subsequent r e s e a r c h has not r e v e a l e d i t . 14 The Panmure manuscripts are on l o a n to the N a t i o n a l L i b r a r y o f S c o t l a n d from the E a r l of D a l h o u s i e .  183  En6  En?  Panmure MS 8, Lady Jean Campbell's Manuscript Book. , Panmure MS 11.  keyboard cittern  Eu  Edinburgh, University L i brary, MS D e l . 6 9 .  lAuc  Los Angeles, University of lyra viol C a l i f o r n i a , William Andrews Clarke Memorial L i b r a r y , The Mansell Lyra V i o l Tablature.  Lbm  London, B r i t i s h L i b r a r y , MS Add. keyboard IO337, E l i z a b e t h Rogers' Manuscript V i r g i n a l Book. . MS Add, 11608. voice . MS Add. 189^0-4. 4 v i o l s and keyboard MS Add. 31432. voice MS Add. 36661. keyboard MS Egerton 2046. lute  Lbml Lbm2 Lbm3 Lbm4 Lbm5  [unknown]  Mp  Manchester, Central Public lyra viol L i b r a r y , Watson C o l l e c t i o n , MS 832 Vu 51, The Manchester Lyra V i o l Tablature.  NHy  New Haven (Conn.), Library of the School of Music, Filmer MS A . l 6 . a .  voice  NYp  New York, New York Public L i b r a r y , MS Drexel 4257, John Gamble's Manuscript Commonplace Book. , MS Drexel 5609. , MS Drexel 5611. MS Drexel 5612.  voice  Oxford,. Bodleian L i b r a r y , Mus. Sch. D 245. , Mus. Sch. MS D 246. _ _ _ _ _ _ Mus. Sch. MS F 573.  lyra viol  NYpl  NYp2 NYp3  Ob Obi  0b2  0b3 0b4  , Mus. Sch. MS F 575. ', Mus. Sch. MS G 640.  Och  Oxford, C h r i s t Church, MS 431.  keyboard  v i o l (staff notation) lyra viol voice keyboard  184  Ochl 0ch2 Och3 Pc  MS MS MS  437. 1175. 1236.  keyboard 11  P a r i s , B i b l i o t h e q u e du C o n s e r v a t o i r e n a t i o n a l de M u s i q u e , MS Re's. 1185. MS Re's. 1186.  t  Pel PLp  Poulton-Laneelyn, Cheshire, P r i c i l i a Burnbury•s Manus c r i p t Book, i n the p o s s e s s i o n of Roger L a n c e l y n Green.  WGb  W o o d f o r d G r e e n , E s s e x , The J o h n Brown Bandora and Lyra V i o l Manuscript, i n the p o s s e s s i o n o f R o b e r t Spencer. Washington ( D . C . ) , F o l g e r S h a k e s p e a r e L i b r a r y , MS V . a . 1 5 9 (MS 448.16).  Ws  Other  (Non-Playford)  Seventeenth-Century  Printed  lyra  viol  lute  Sources  Zl  A C h o i c e C o l l e c t i o n o f 180 L o y a l S o n g s . . . to w h i c h i s added, the M u s i c a l Notes to each Song^ L o n d o n , 1685. RISM Bt1 1685°.  Z2  D [ a v i d s o n ] , T[homas]. C a n t u s , Songs and Fancies. A b e r d e e n , 1662. RISM B«l 1662?.  23 Z4  25  C a n t u s , Songs and F a n c i e s . RISM B s l 16663.  Aberdeen,  . C a n t u s , Songs and F a n c i e s . lolfe. RISM B « l 16825.  Aberdeen,  1666.  Ford,  Thomas. Musicke of Sundrie 1607. RISM F 1503.  Kinds.  London,  Thomas. M u s i c k ' s M o n u m e n t . RISM B i V I , p p . 523-4.  L o n d o n , I676.  v.  Z6  Mace,  Z7  Matthew,  Z8  Mennes, S i r John; S m i t h , James, and D r o l l e r y , J o v i a l Poems.  Richard.  1652],  1682.  The L u t e ' s A p o l o g y .  [London,  et a l . Wit ~j~London"J7~  185 Z9  R o b i n s o n , Thomas. New C i t h a r e n L o n d o n , 1609.  Lessons.  Z10  S a l t e r , Humphry. The G e n t e e l C o m p a n i o n . . . f o r the R e c o r d e r . London, I 6 8 3 . RISM  B t l LoFJT".  Zll  Starter, J. 1621.  J.  Z12  Taubman, M a t t h e w . A n H e r o i c Poem . . . w i t h Some C h o i c e S o n g s . L o n d o n , 1682. RISM B i l 1682&.  Z13  Van E y k , Jacob. Amsterdam,  Z14  Y o u t h ' s D e l i g h t on the |_ L o n d o n J , I 6 8 3 .  O t h e r Symbols Used i n t h i s the  Friesche  Lust-Hof.  Amsterdam,  Per Fluyten Lust-Hof. 1654. Flagelet  the  Second  Catalogue  /  not  same  as  lv  lyra  s  supplement  T#(s)  thematic number(s)  viol (see  p . 1 8 0 , n . 11). used  in this  catalogue  Part.  (1) I.  (2) Duple  A.  1*  W  (5)  (6)  (7)  Meter  Major  1.  (3) Mode  Tonic Ayre  W i l l i a m Young  Preludium 3.  Anon.  ft .to  P69/[89]/#li8  J . J >  S i m i l a r t o A l / 2 5 1 ( L b m V W # l 4 , The I t a l i a n Ground, G i b b o n s ) .  An A l m a i n Ayre Almain  George Hudson Anon. George Hudson  The Eccho Almain  Simon Ives  1. 3.  —  P6l/65/#84  IT  P51/13/#16 P5[5l/26/#36 P6l/12/#17 P69/33/#49 P82/26/#37  A13 (Mp/l27/#2, A l l m a i n , George Hudson) George Hudson may be the a r r a n g e r o f T# 3; see c h a p t e r V, pp.  Almain  John J e n k i n s  P69/97/#125  6Ca.-K  ^.—, -At—  CO.  aC  at  M  i  (1)  5  (2)  (3)  Ayre  John J e n k i n s  (4)  (6)  (5)  P6l/7V#93 ft  The Granadees March 3.  7  8  9  ^- ft c ft <x —  John E s t o  P69/37/#5  k  A14 ( D m l / 6 6 V # l , u n t i t l e d , anon.).  An Ayre  A Round 0  ft, ft  b ft  P82/20/#29 , — f t  See A15/279- Simpson b e l i e v e s T# 6 may be a d i s c a n t v e r s i o n t o the b a l l a d ayre " G r e n a d i e r ' s March."  Almain 1.  Anon.  (7)  George Hudson Anon.  P69/30/#46 P82/48/#65  Anon.  P82/42/#57  ft b  .C. ft Ito b C\ C  1—_——  4 <A a . c c a C a, a •  ft a  1  &  •3  Preludium  1.  Simon Ives  A7/#245 (0b3/20 ). v  P5[5l/18/#27 P6l/6/#9 P82/28/#39  v \ C £  s i>-  4 +  co  ft ftC  ^  C  C — I —  ^4410*  ©  a. I ...-.I—  C C \  3=  0  - 4 - •1—1 —  i  9s —i  -kl —  (1)  11*  (3)  (2)  (4)  John J e n k i n s  Almain  12  Ayre  (6)  P5[5]/68/#75  J  P69/90/#119 "«  lk*  Ayre 1.  Simon Ives J u n i o r  Anon.  -JrJ  P5[5]/2V#33  3 ^  P6l/lV#20  4^-  a  CO  £  P82/14/#19 1—  A 1 5 / 3 0 9 , n. 1 (PDM62sj  Thomas Bates  ex  PMH78). P69/l0V#13  k  k  A7/#P21-3 (WGb/4lr, T[homas] G [ r e g o r y ] , f h f h f ; £ 2—Dm/I5 , G r e g o r i e ) : A I 2 / 3 3 I , 333 (Ob/56/#2, Alman, d e f h f j a 2—Ob/153, f h f h f ; 2nd p t . O b l / 1 7 8 ) i A 1 3 (Mp/77/#6. Almane, Sumarte, f h f h f ) : A17/109 (IAuc/ 25V, Mr. Thomas G r e g o r i e s E i g h t s , f h f h f ) . The d i f f e r e n t t u n i n g and composer a t t r i b u t i o n s i n e a r l i e r sources suggest t h a t Thomas Bates simply arranged t h i s p i e c e i n a d i f f e r e n t tuning. v  3.  4 ^  ¥  r  G e n e r a l Monk's March 2.  1  A13 (Mp/l43/#8)t A7/#P243 ( O b 3 / 8 5 ) . A l t h o u g h the t i t l e s v a r y , both P 5 L 5 ] and P6l have d i v i s i o n s .  si 13  (7)  P6l/66/#85  Almain with Division 1. 3.  (5)  UJJ  1  %.—9—>  * &  >  1—4  )}  |<* « ft c« . <*  k  (1)  15  16  1?  (2)  Ayre  (3)  John W i t h i e  F o u r t h Lesson, With a Thump Ayre  Anon.  P [ r i n c e ] Ruperts Morrice  Anon.  (5)  (4)  P69/98/#126  (6)  I 4  s 1  P69/l7/#29  (7)  <»a c /Tar » to  C.g  1  „  ,  ,A  P82/3V# 6 k  &  18  Oxford Tune  Anon.  P82/5V#73  19  Ayre  Bates  P69/l00/#129  * 1  ft  1  M*  1  5^:  4  J J J  >  >  J J Ok  C.  £  C, X a, Simon Ives  TNto 1 '  r  »  J CD  a c  A Jig  .Jr-P  P5l/6/#7 CS.  20  tec  at  P69/W#59 a:  & 1ft  -VO  is  8 ;j  * f f# f f  11.  (1)  21  (3)  (2)  G l o r y o f the West  2. 3.  (4)  Anon.  (5)  P51/16/#19  3  P5[5]/8/#15 P69/5V#76  1 3  (6)  »  J  >  J  >  .  1  New M u t t a r  Anon.  ^  ^  ^  ^ «  P82/53/#72  b y  AT  3.  23  A7/#P210  Almain  Cu2/21 , Nue M u t t a r ) . r  John Moss  Almain  George Hudson  4H  f  m  o  P69/107/#137 4CV  24  • r  A6/79 (PDM51-86} PCG52; PMH78)» A15/ #161 (PMD66)i A19/44 (Z7/#4). A c c o r i n g t o Ramon Meyer, the statement i n A6 t h a t T# 21 appears i n PIM54 and l a t e r e d i t i o n s o f PIM i s i n c o r r e c t . See A9/57, n. 1. ^  22  \  (7)  5  P69/42/#62 ^  & to a  (1)  (3)  (2)  A S c o t c h Tune C a l l e d Sawney 2. 3.  26  (5)  k  P82/l6/#[22]  2  (6)  Anon.  P5[5]/8/#l6  (7)  i i i i ^  A 2 / I I , 618: A 1 5 / # M l (Cfm/3; PCAS8l/9$ PDM79s; PDM86; PAB87; Thomas Durfey, The V i r t u o u s Wife, 1697). A2 suggests t h a t Thomas Farmer may be the composer o f T# 25.  G l o r y o f the North 2.  Anon.  ()  CA  i-J*d* i i - i I  a /*—c—A A —  i  C  fc  C tA  £c a  cx  la.  J.»  >  J> i  - l - j — 1 — ^  \o I  A1/4? (NYpl/45/#67)« A 2 / I I , 422: A3/ I, 323: All/212 (Lbm/43 ; PMD66/16). r  27*  The New F i g g a r y The F i g a r y  Anon.  P69/56/#80 P82/6l/#7  .a  b<v 5  28  Preludium  John Moss  P6Q/44/#65  > RV>  29  Maydens Rant The Maids Rant  Anon.  P5[5]/28/#38 P69/7/#l P82/55/#75  n  C  fl.jp  i>  i  k  5 3 l  3  *_  is:  C A C £  i  r  192  1 IV  17  HI  ^11  2*  u  - 9 c =  \  <!  Jl  3  6<  CM  CA  CM  CA  O vA CM CO  *H CO  \o w g CAK O o —  CM  CO  g  w o  Go  P-.  d) 'H 113 H  CO \ ON NO  CM P H CA \ l 0 VAON  to to 0 S  0  VA CM  o  CO  4->  o O CA  CO CO O  s  CM  ON  ON V A N O N O CO PL, P-, p L , PL,  V A N O N O  P« PM PU •4-3-  CO  C  •rH  O  -3" CM  *~3  O  O  CO r-t rH  (1)  O PP  VA  \  O «H  cd  CM  •H •"3  •H  O x:  6-t  N  wCL,  < W)  O  to cd S  px,co  •H  iH  CO CD +> C<3 pq  CU  >-3  l O  .c  ON  NO  co=fe5tfcr»5  \ C M V A O I—T-^- N O C O  o  4: O J-i  pq  CACN \vTNONCA  o  PL.  CA  K co  >i—1  1  NO  ON NO  <A\ •H  cd 6  0)  >>  I  CM  CD u  >>  < CM CA  CA CA  CA  (1)  35  (2)  (3)  An A l m a i n  George Hudson  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  P69/31/#4? - h  3 * 36  37  Ayre  T o l l , T o l l , Gentle Bell 1.  38  John J e n k i n s  A7/#P200  Anon.  >  »1M  1—f i — * ^ -  P6l/65[73]/ #84[92J  i i J i i D J J  P69/W#25  ±  (Cu2/I5 ).  Ayre  JL  J > .  1  egg  vO  v  Anon.  i i  P82/4V#59  J>  i.>J  J  a:  39  Brangle D e v i l a g e  Anon.  A F r e n c h Ayre  k  0  The P l e a s a n t Dream An Ayre  Anon.  P5[5]/77/#86* P6l/10/#14 P69/20/#32 P82/9/#13  [2]  J  i  J  J  J  1  -H-  4 ±  P69/ll/#20 P82/2/#3 tea  tt4  (1)  4l*  (2)  A Masque The Queens Mask An Ayre 3.  42  (3)  Simon Ives  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  P6l/V#7 P69/26/#40 P82/23/#33  S i m i l a r i t i e s e x i s t between T# 41 and a keyboard p i e c e which appears i n NYpl/29/#36 (Maske, anon.) and Lbm/24v (Maske, anon.). See A1/65 and A l l / 1 8 8 .  Almain  Thomas Bates  P69/l02/#132  M  i  3, ft ft. £«>  43  An Ayre La C o c k l e y  Anon.  P69/95/#123 P82/52/#71  4  i j j ].».  1  A f t Q CUCS.  44  An Ayre  Simon Ives  at  A,4ft&^  Ayre  John J e n k i n s  f.C. fe. *5;  T  P69/39/#56 ft  45  l  P61/7l/#89 J2t  . .  A  (2)  (1)  46  Almain 1.  4?  (3)  Coleman A13  ALmain  49  A Prelude  50*  Anon.  P69/2l/#34 P82/43/#58  A7/#P2H ( C u 2 / 2 3 V ) .  48  2.  P5[5]/30/#42  (Mp/l3V#13).  An Ayre 1.  (4)  George Hudson  P5[5]/56/#60 P6l/40/#52  Anon.  P69/20/#33  Anon.  P5l/l/#l P5L5J/17/#26  Third  An A l m a i n The Thumping Almain (continued)  (5)  (6)  (7)  (1)  (2)  (3)  Almain F i r s t Lesson, With a Thump Almain 1.  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  P6l/1/#1 P69/15/#26 P82/32/W  A?/#P280 (Cu2/3V, d e f h f ; Ob3/89 , defhf)i A13 (Mp/71/#1, Thump, e f h f h ) v  51  T h e a t e r Tune  Anon.  P82/67/#15  52  The P r i n c e o f Condie's March  Anon.  P69/lV#24  2 A.  rTiF H = \ = - * — - — s * -i c # 4 =  ft  i i J > U>J fa: 5 1  53*  An Ayre  5  Nightengale  k  1.  W i l l i a m Gregory  Anon.  P69/35/51  P5l/8/#ll P5[5]/1V#22 P69/2V/39 P82/12/#18  A13 (Mp/21/#12, R [ i c h a r d ] S[umarte],  ,  (L  J  A  A, -A—OX.  1  ^  c  j — | ~w  —  v  \~~f«  (1)  (3)  (2)  (5)  (4)  (6)  (7)  efhfh). Al/270 (NYpl/l40/#l85» Henry Loosemore)» A10/266 ( Z 6 / I / 2 0 1 ) : A l l / 1 5 8 (Lbm/9 )s A15/#323 (NYp3/l47, 150; Pcl/35 » 62v, Henry Loosemore; Och3/l50; C u 3 / l 9 ; B c / l 6 ; En; PCG52/#6; PPC73/#3 Z12/I/33V and ZI2/II/33V), A19/59. / A6/53 (PDM51, C h i r p i n g o f the N i g h t ingale) . r  v  George Hudson  P69/ l/#60  55  An Ayre  56  The A p o l l o  Anon.  P5[5]/29/#40  57  Dragoons March  Anon.  P82/39/#53  k  fte.cicet^. ft ft  58*  Bore  Anon.  P82/36/#49  p  r  o  (1)  59  (2)  May Time Maying Time F a i n I Would 2. 3.  60  3.  61  62  Anon.  (4)  P5[5Vl/#i P69/l/#2 P82/2/#2  (5)  (6)  1 2 M  ex  ^  9 ex  N  ^  KA p  (7)  -  ft  "  1-  £  7  f— &  to  Al5/#306 (PCG52)* A19/58. / A15/#134 and 135. F a i n I Would i f I Could.  P [ r i n c e ] Ruperts March 2.  3.  (3)  Anon.  P5l/5/#6  A l l / 1 4 8 (Lbm/4r, P r i n c e Ruperts Martch and Lbm/32r, A S c o t t s Tuen). / A 6/49 (PDM51, P r i n c e Ruperts March).  i ) ) > i  i  2  Fifth  Ayre  Banister  A P i l l t o Purge Melancholy 1.  [Thomas Ford]  P82/50/#67  P5[5]/6/#ll  A12/326 (Cu4/l5 /#2; Dtc/39/#2 and v  P. I  ik  ft, <\  ICS  fct flal^—A — | -  —4  it  F  T  T  Vr  (1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  Dtc/57/#3; 2~0bl/34/#3; 2nd p t . Ob/3V#3i Z 5 / s i g . M2V#18, A P i l l t o Purge Melancholy o r Mr. R i c h a r d M a r t i n s Thumpe); A13 (Mp/43/#12, Thumpe, T[horaas] M a r t i n .  63*  A Symphony  Anon.  Coleman 2.  P5l/8/#10 P5C5]/9/#17 P6l/l6/#22 P69/22/#35 P82/l6/#[23]  ei  A6/62 (PDM51-86, Aye Me, o r the Simphony; PCG52--2 s e t t i n g s ; PMD66)1 A l l / 1 4 9 (Lbm/4v, One o f Y Symphonies): A7/#P230 (Lbm4/52 ; NYp3/27-» A Mask, v a r . ; Lbm2/lO , C h a r l e s Coleman; a 2 — Ob/211, u n t i t l e d ; 2nd p t . Obl/229; Mp/Il/4, R [ i c h a r d ] S [ u m a r t e l ; PCA/#188). The a t t r i b u t i o n i n A7 o f Ob/211 and O b i / 229 t o Ives i s d o u b t f u l , and the c l a i m t h a t T# 63 i s p a r t o f VJ. Lawes* music f o r The Triumph o f Peace i s i n c o r r e c t . e  r  v  3.  64  Bonny Brow 1.  Anon.  P82/36/#50  A15/#233 (Enl/#50; Dw/#80 and #94,  2 In  4.  j ! » . > J » J  (7)  (1)  2.  65  66  (3)  (2)  (6)  (7)  January L a s t ) . Al5/#233 (PAS79/46; PPC80; P A B 8 7 — t i t l e v a r i e s ; Thomas D'Urfey, A Fond Husband, 1667; Otway, F r i e n d s h i p i n F a s h i o n , 1678, Act I I I ) .  Aylward  Ayre  Anon.  An A l m a i n  Simon Ives Ayre 1.  (5)  O)  Anon.  P5[5]/78/#87  P51/11/#13 P5[5]/20/#28 P6l/8/#10 P69/28/#43 P82/30/#40  [2]  2  J . )  J  J>J>.->J.>  11  )  >  ro o o  J.)  A7/#P231 ( C u 2 / 2 7 , The G i l l i f l o w e r ; 0b3/21 )t A13 (Mp/l32-3/#10). r  v  67*  A L a Mode de France  1.  Anon.  P5l/3/#  k  P5[5W#8 P6l/3/#6 P69/3/#6 P82/7/#10  A15/#32? (Cu2/13, A l l the mode i n  1 2  l ^ r  &  > \  A  V  f  t  V  a  Pi 1 -  -f  a H >-  -4—SI fflitf a  (1)  (2)  2.  68  (3)  1.  (5)  (6)  Anon.  P51/10/#12  A13 (Mp/37/#2). A15/#4l (PCG52, 2 s e t t i n g s ; PMD66/#32; PMH78)« A19/31 (Z7/20).  i J.>J  69  Amarillis 2. 3«  70  [John B a n i s t e r ]  P82/5l/#69  ;  A15/#12 (PDM65-86/#4l; PMD66; PAB70; PPC73. J [ o h n ] B f a n i s t e r ] ; Thomas P o r t e r , The V i l l a i n . 1666, A c t I I ) . 4 A5/#l44, A m a r y l l i s t e a r t h y h a i r .  Gather Your Rosebuds 2.  (7)  A6/42 (PDM51-86): Al5/#327, Nonesuch (PCG52/#40 and #1; PMD66/#7).  Bow B e l l s  2.  (4)  [William Lawes]  P5[5]/7/#13  A5/#1109« A15/#155 (Lbm3/33 . W i l l i a m , Lawes' autograph; Eu/89; NYp/#l4l, i n £ meter; PCG52j PSM52, W i l l i a m Lawesj PIM55l PMD66; PCC67)« A19/44 ( E n 5 / l ) . k  J  >  ).  >  i U — 1r o - f e - i- ± — t , Ok V v\ « CA C ft ft •#«**"- A — B OL a. ^ ex.  .  m  .  rffl-r J  (1)  71  (3)  (2)  [Thomas Farmer]  S i t t i n g Beyond the R i v e r s i d e 2  .  A  5  /  #  2  (4)  9  9  2  i  (5)  6  7  8  )  (7)  P82/2l/#30  4u  A l 5 / # 4 3 3  Thomas  (PCAS79/35»  Farmeri Aphra Behn, S i r P a t i e n t Fancy, 1  (6)  .  See T# 59  P82/2/#2  ro o ro Almain An Ayre 3.  John Moss Anon.  P82/45/#6l  2  }}.>  T# 72 resembles A8/#59-22[a] and #146 (PCM62/#275» A y r e , Matthew Locke; Cupid and Death, 5 t h E n t r y I n t r o d u c t o r y Music, Matthew L o c k e ) .  P69/l/#2  See T# 59  73  P69A5/#66  Mr. Farmer's Trumpet  Anon.  P82/4o/#54  •2  2  ]  J)  i J i>  CK O.C.JX  i 3 ^  J  JJ>  (1)  74  (2)  (3)  A Short Prelude  Anon.  (4)  (5)  (6)  P69/l/#l  i-JJ  (7)  J  J  cvcre 75  76*  A Prelude of the Notes Ascending and Descending  When the K[ing] Enjoyes &c.  Anon.  P82/l/#l  a5= Anon.  P5[5W#7 P6l/2/#3 P69/V/8 P82/4/#6 1. 2.  J  1  P51/V#5  ">  2  A15/#511 ( C u 2 / 2 2 ) . c , A1/140 (NYpl/5/#10; Pc/252/#69)« A2/ 11/434i A3/l/210« All/151 (Lbm/5 )» A15/#5H (PGG52; PMD66). v  y  4.  77  Sixth  Almain Ayre  John Withie  P5[5]/65/#71 P6i/81/#81 P69/H5/#146  ^  d  b  ft  J> J  X"*"  m ro o  (1)  78  (2)  Ah C r u e l Bloody F a t e 2.  B.  (3)  O)  [Henry Puree11J  P82/20/#28  (5)  2  (6)  (7)  J>J>JJJJ>  - . • I f f iViuMTli  A5/#35« A15/#3 (PCAS81/29? PPC83; PAB87? Z7? Z8; N a t h a n i e l Lee, Theodosius, 1680, A c t V, Henry P u r c e l l ) : A20/#607.9.  Minor Mode 1. T o n i c  o 79  Almain  John E s t o  P6l/36/#46  80  Almain  John E s t o  P5[5]A9/#52  1.  81  A7/#P244(0b3/77 )« r  Almain An Ayre Almain  1.  A13 (Mp/ll9/#17)  John J e n k i n s  A13 (Mp/l25/#27).  P6l/32/#4l P69/68/#96 P82/7V#24  P6l/51/#67  P69/83/#H2 P82/72/#22  J  >  J  (1)  82  (2)  (3)  John E s t o  Almain  (5)  ( ) k  (7)  (6)  P6l/90/#91 P69/[lll]/#l l  ftC. e\  k  1.  A13  _CA_  A ft ft a  (Mp/153/#D.  P69/83/#U2 P82/72/#22  See T# 81  3 1 2 1  ro o 83  John W i t h i e  Ayre Almain  P6l/90[80]/#80 P69/llV#l 5 k  fX tX (X  ft  #  ft  ftl  84  Goter  Almain 1.  P6l/6l/#79  A13 ( M p / l l l / # 5 . P r e l u d i n , anon.)» A17/104 ( L A u c / 7 i G a l t i e r e ) . A 1 / 9 ( E n 6 / 5 / # 5 , anon.). r  2.  \ ftlX  ft. b  3:8£ft*ft-£.  3 z  I  v  1  85  Countesse o f Simon Ives Exeters Almain .  P5[5]A6/#57 P6l/48/#63  1.  A13 (Mp/l22/#22).  "  1)  86*  (2)  (3)  Ayre 1.  W i l l i a m Gregory  (6)  () k  (7)  P6l/44/#[58] f - f c f  A13 (Mp/120/#19, Almaine, v a r . ) .  ^  1  —  *  |  p ft  87  Almain  John Moss  P69/85/#ll  88  Almain  John E s t o  P5[5]/52/#55 P6l/33/# 2  J J.> J J J . H J • ft. ,  A13 (Mp/l2l/#20).  cH  89  90  Almain  John Moss  Almain  1/  W i l l i a m Young  A13 ( M p / l l 8 / # l ) . k  j  k  k  1.  f  P69/118/#l 9 k  P5l/l8/#21 P5[5]/39/#52 P6l/20/#27 P69/58/#83 P82/8l/#31  ,  —  —  *  £  *  ,  FiP  H  J J J  J J . »  - 1 - ^  "•^vp. 1  , - L,  b<i ft  —  H  J J —  S-  ttf- f k — R  1  - V —  (1)  91*  (2)  Almain  (3)  George Hudson  Ayre  92  Almain  Jenkins  (4)  (5)  (6)  P5[5]/54/#57 P6l/38/#49 P69/63/#90 P82/86/#38  P6l/52/#68 ft c  93  Morris  Coleman  (7)  P5[5]/76/#83  _c  A.<\A:  *  q  > i J  ro o rf b  94*  Almain  Christopher Simpson  Charles Coleman  P5[5]/33/#45 P6l/l7/#23 P69A9/#70 P82/57/#l  C ^  >  j. ftft.ec  3fe  c  v  ft  Preludium  -  4— • + - - f - f -  P6l/88/#88 ft .  95  PI  A<ft  i:  (1)  96*  (2)  (3)  C o l o n e l Gerards Tune Gerards M i s t r i s s e  1. 2.  Anon.  (4)  (5)  P5l/2V#2? 3  (6)  ))•>  (7)  '  >  J  P5[5]Ao/ ?51 P6l/2l/#29 P69/5V#77 P82/59/#5 7  A15/#158 ( C u 2 / I 8 ) . A1/260 (NYp2/50/#30, G e r r a r d s Tune, Thomas Heardson)t A15/#158 (Dtcl/104; PCG52—2 s e t t i n g s ; PMH?8)« A19/44 (Z7/#12).. v  ro o 00  97  Ayre  Esto  P82/83/#33  3  ).)>.) J J Ok  a  98*  A Jig  John Moss  j>.)  c A.  i-  I f  P69/88/#117  2 99  An Ayre  Anon.  P82/69/#18  J.> ^  . g g  H  A  £ * £ C Ow  1  T-W  1—1  0  r  4 - ^  J  *I T — ( —  f  —  —  *  ,  i t  (1)  £00*  (2)  (3)  The I t a l i a n Rant  2.  [Giuseppino]  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  P69/5l/#73  A15/527 (Pc/331/#H0, f f u g e ;  Barbara  MS, F u g g i f u g g i da questo c i e l o , Giuseppino; PCG52/6—-guitar s e t t i n g , Fugga, Fugga o r the I t a l i a n Rant;  PDM62s/#31; PDM65/#l4; PMH78/#29).  101  Almain  John Withie  . P6l/58/#75 P69/79/#108  J  > J  ex.  £.,  J* j .  1.. ^ j f l i l t f f l A •9T-  102  Almain with Division  John E s t o  P6l/26/^34 P69/72/#101 P82/76/#26  An Ayre Almain  103*  An A l m a i n Ayre Almain  P5[5]/50/#53  John L i l l y  Jenkins  1. A13 (Mp/ll8/#15,  P51/22/#25 P5[5]/4l/#52 P6l/l9/#26 P69/62/#88 P82/?3/#23  Lillie).  J  *  (X OV <x  f. /  i £  7 -  *  >[J]J cX  f* ]<xe\  ft./  1  |  --1-  4  4-—  1  T  ~T. CX CX  1 ,  «\c A<\  * l *  f  t  ]^  A  U  M4h  1 f^r  1^-  c  - -e  4'  ro o  VO  (1)  10  (2)  k  (3)  Preludium  John W i t h i e  (6)  ( ) k  P6l/57/#7  k  g105*  Almain  W i l l i a m Gregory  (7)  P6l/ /#57 P69/75/#10  a  lac  gfc,  >  kk  fpT  J  k  106  A J i g Almain  John Moss  ja a c S iS.e a, l i  P69/l20/#152 § 1  107*  Ayre  108  A Rant  Simon Ives  John W i t h i e  P5[5]/76/#8  a~\»  A az  k  AA a I  aA,*&  P6l/6o/#77 £ Aft V > a -"Q f> ttc  2.  Third  :  if. a  5  p  i  (1)  109*  (2)  (3)  Ayre  Jenkins  ()  (6)  (5)  k  (7)  P6l/?6/#75 «—  °-  110  A New Bore  Anon.  ,  L—l  It?  'P,,-  H  8h ?  A  P82/70/#20  1—it,—  111  Almain 1.  112  113*  P5[5]/6l/#6? P6l/83/#83  J . > J > . »  W i l l i a m Lawes  )>•>  cn  (Mp/165/#19).  Almain 1.  3.  A13  • W i l l i a m Lawes  •  , y  P6lA5[5 ]/#71 k  3  f-  T  8b  l ,  i r  i  <>  —  J  A13 (Mp/200/#4, Thomas T a y l e r o r t r u l y e W i l l [ i a j m Lawes, e d f e d ) .  m \  Fifth  Almain w i t h Division  Coleman  P5[5]/36/# 9 k  3  J — L  J R  B  A> 1  JJ> rt  J> ft  £  k^-l  —  1——  —J  -4-  —  t  f= ^  4-  r i  >  (1)  114*  (2)  (3)  Ayre 1.  2.  Simon Ives  (4)  P69/6o/#86 P82/84/#35  (6)  (5)  (7)  3 a t\-—3*.,  A13 (Mp/I19/#10, The B u i l d i n g s , R [ i c h a r d ] S[umarte], f f e f f , v a r . ) : A17/109 (IAuc/27r, The B u i l d i n g , anon., f h f h f ) : A12/333 (1 2—-Ob/154, See the B u i l d i n g , anon., f h f h f ; 2nd p t . Obl/178). Al/90 (0chl/4/#4, u n t i t l e d , anon.): A15/#4l4 (0ch/4 ; PLp/#21 and #30; Ctc/136; PCG52/#53; W i l l i a m Hemming, The Jewes Tragedy. 1662, A c t I V ) .  1 CX  CA  \  •  9^ -  tb-Zfrr^-:  :  1  j  1  (3  <>-  7 ^  v  ro ro  115  Almain  John E s t o  P61/35/#45  3  i GL £  <x  <K  116  Ayre  Coleman  P5[5]/74/#8l  ex exCAIC, ^ ^ CX ^ 1  §b t  I  <-  JE.  —i  #^  3  ^# 117  Almain  John E s t o  P69/69/#97 P82/80/#24[#30]  3 .  CA  — A  A  a  .  (1)  (3)  (2)  (5)  O)  (6)  (7)  *  118  Preludium  Christopher S impson  P6l/87/#87  5  J  J  -  g  —  i >  120  Almain Ayre  John Esto  Could Man His Wish Obtain  [James Paisible]  2.  121  P6l/9l/#92 P69/H2/#l42  —  1  Jenkins  Almain  Coleman  ^  P82/6V#H  H  +  1—1  r  »  1S» 0  4fl»  1 (ft  £.  C-  M  *V  3 A. ... ... ,  L.  A  1 ^ —  A5/#7^3« A15/#85 (Cfra/55; PCAS83, James Peasiblej PPC 83; PAB87; Z9).  Ayre  h  5  riSM A  V  1  1 \  -Hrr-5 1  ^ -  P6l/22/#30 <x a —A  122  r—-  hP>—-r o>  Ok.  119  J  P5[5]/3V#46 P6l/28/#36  1. A13 (Mp/198/#1, Will[ia]m Younge, edfed).  —  1  >  ft  a.  &  ft  0 a ^  J  3,  >  A  J  .  cxc  >  rb-  ^  J . )  —|H 1  ?-M 9 A  A-, r  Li  w 0  l  (1)  123*  (2)  (3)  Almain  Jenkins  1.  (5)  (4)  (6)  P5[5]A2/#53 P6l/2V#32 P69/80/#110  A12/  -4  (7)  <Ma ftft  _ftJL.  13  (Ob/202/#l, anon.; WGb/20 , A13 (Mp/ll2/#6, anon.)« A17/103 (IAuc/6 , u n t i t l e d , anon.). A7/#P259 (0b2/53» A y r e , anon.). r  5".  var.)t  v  2.  124  Almain  • John W i t h i e  P6l/59/#75[76]  3  J  J  ).)> j.) a,  125  1.  126  Jenkins  Ayre  P5l/20/#23 P5[5]/44/#55 P6l/30/#39  3  J «4 ft.  > * f. C \  e  j> J .Cfc_-_.  A13 (Mp/l24/#25).  Almain  Christopher Simpson  P6l/62/#81  4 f  Ap  ro  (1)  127  (2)  (3)  Ayre  Anon* Jenkins C h a r l e s Coleman  128  Almain  John J e n k i n s  (5)  ( ) k  (6)  (7)  P5r5]/38/#50 P6l/l8/#24 P6l/22/#31 P69/50/#71 P82/58/#2  P6l/77/#76  5  : J ) J i i J ) . > )  II. T r i p l e Meter A. Major Mode 1. Tonic  See T# 135  129  Saraband  P6l/96/#99  George Hudson Anon. George Hudson Anon.  1. A13 (Mp/l32/#9).  P5l/lV# 7 P5[5]/27/#37 P6l/13/#18 P69/3V/50 P82A9/#66 1  J J J  J  J  (1)  130  (2)  The Simerons Dance P r i n c e Rupert's Welcome 2.  131  (3)  [Matthew Locke]  P69/6/#12  (5)  2  (6)  Anon. Simon Ives Anon.  J  4  P82/5/#8  9 rf  r  — f t  P51/12/#15 P5[5]/2l/#30 P6l/9/#12 P69/29/#45 P82/3l/#42  2  ;ijjji 4  rl-  FF  1  4  f Q,  c  ro  J U >  ON  ,& 4  i  A13 (Mp/l3l/#8, Thomas Bates, v a r . ; Mp/135/#15. S[imon] l [ v e s ] ) . J  132  (7)  A1/69 (NYpl/l59/#213, Moncks c o u n t r y dance, anon.)» A8/#100, 150 (PCM62/ #179, Matthew Locke; PMH63/#38; PMH78/ #38; PDM65AV#33; PAB70/#51; W i l l i a m D'Avenant, The H i s t o r y o f S i r F r a n c i s Drakei 1658, 2nd E n t r y ) .  Saraband  1.  (4)  Corant  Thomas Bates  P69/l05/#135  JJJ  J.  J  3 133  Corant  John J e n k i n s  P6l/72/#90 5-*  J  (1)  13  k  (2)  (3)  Hunt Is Up  (4)  Anon.  136  k  t  Roome f o r Cuckolds  v  Anon.  k v  P5[5]/5/#10 P6l/96/#99  1 6  A15/#399. Room f o r C ompany (Ctc/132).  Jockey Went to the Wood 2.  P6l/95/#98  v  r  2.  (7)  A1/89 (NYpl/l 3/#182 u n t i t l e d ) i A15/ #205 (Pcl/59 » u n t i t l e d , R. Cr[eighton]j Ws/12**; Lbm5/32 ; Cu/4 and 13 ; C u l / ! Cu3/lirj PMD66; 29; Z l l ) .  2.  135  (6)  (5)  [William Gregory]  i . 0 .  P82/l9/#27  1 J.>J i l£»-*  1  J > J J.)  > 1—  • -  * — ^  |-c  —u  " 4 n  l  , ,1  ]  1  1  "ft  " S T .  J J> J  A15/#2 9 (PCAS79/12, William Gregory). k  T V  137  Corant 1.  138  A Jig  Coleman  P5[5]/3l/# 3 k  2  A13 (Mp/l3 -5/#l ). k  k  Simon Ives  33a P5[5]/72/#78  4 3 ^ 4^7  3  ro ->3  (1)  (2)  139  Saraband 1.  (3)  John Withie  (4)  P69/99/#127  (5)  (6)  4  - '''-All 3fc  ft  c, & to tt to  A13 (Mp/l46-7/#13» Coranto).  140  A Saraband  141  Come Boy F i l l Us, &c.  Jenkins  Anon.  (7)  P69/96/#124  4  P82/56/#76  2  i i i -  i J i  J . i i J J j  •rf-ft,*— C ft, i ,^  to fa  2.  142*  A5/#6lli  Saraband  Tune  ft ift  Anon.  P5[5]/79/#88  9  2  ^toft^ft>V*ft>  1  Banister  P82/52/#70  2  i  Saraband  Simon Ives  P69/4o/#58  2  *-  7 1 — 1 —  1  |.i|L_^_  ift^ftl b  1—f—  \  ) J J J J JJ<JJJ->J £  11  i  r t r  i.>ii  i)  I  ^  J*_ —(  a  ft  144  &  A15/#73 (PPC83; PAB87} Z12/8).  i  143  i i  ft ft ft <x  c  CA,  b l ft I*.  ftto  a  ft  iLilL  A  4-  (1)  (2)  (3)  See T# 131  (6)  (4)  P5[5]/21/#30 P6l/9/#12  (7)  t. a  4  -—9-  Saraband  1.  Jenkins  P5[5]/7l/#77  P6l/69/#87 P69/93/#121  A Jig  147  The M y r t l e Grove  148  Saraband  W i l l i a m Lawes  ft  Anon.  Thomas Bates  P69/58/#82  P69/l02/#131  0—  t> -'  [  „ -  A-  h-  T—^~  4  <-  JiJJJJ-JUJ J.) .  P5[5]/ll/#19  —  J 3 ) J '  J J J ' J J J  •' * i 146*  J* 1 — -  ,  —1—c*  A13 (Mp/149/#16).  « i  C  4V  145  e c  *t HI  ._L - i  -I-  ! —<?-  raj f-#-i  1  * o 3 1 hhf 4—  !* »  (i)  l 9  (2)  (3)  Step S t a l e l y  k  2.  ()  Anon.  (6)  (5)  k  P5l/2/#3 P5[5]/3/#5  i  (7)  J.Jj'j  J> <IA  A  A 6 / 8 (PDM51-86; PCG52, g u i t a r s e t t i n g } PIM62; PMD66)t A 1 5 / # 8 (PIM60). k  t i l i  150  A Jig  Anon.  P82/ 7/#6 k  iJJii J J  k  * £ Cft  . f t  .  £^  ..  A  151  Saraband 1.  George Hudson  P69/32/# 8 k  Abington J i g  153  Corant  Anon.  W. Gregory  P82/5 /#7 k  k  3 *  14-H 49  1  1 c 2  1 i->iJJ J.JJ  A3 Aha bAift  H).I. J i i  P69/36/#52  f  -  6  ^—H  Anon.  P5l/7/#9 P69/8/#15 P82/3/# k  1 2  i  & - &-> *. C  Saraband  >  2  -  k  !  1*1 1  A13 (Mp/136/#18, Simon Ives, v a r . ) .  152*  15  t=F R ±t  A  kk  J  &  a  1  &  it -  £ -«  -> M  J 1 >i J >JJ * rer-tt £ • i y»*\ \— — H~ifft ac ( a. if fc  H  • a  s  B  " -#--5  (1)  1. 3.  155  157  (5)  (6)  [Matthew. Locke]  P82/ll/#l6  2  (7)  J a.  A 6 / x x i v (PDM75/159, The Opera): A8/#l42 (PCM62/#27i, Matthew Locke; PDM65/38/#15. v i n . s e t t i n g ; PAB70/#93, v a r . ; W i l l i a m D'Avenant, The C r u e l t y of the Spaniards i n Peru. 1658, 6th E n t r y ) .  Now the F i g h t ' s Done 2.  (4)  A13 (Mp/3"l/#27i Thomas Woodson, f f e f f ) . In P51 and P69, the 2nd s t r a i n of T# 154 i s repeated with d i v i s i o n s . In P82, the d i v i s i o n s are omitted  The Apes Dance i n the Opera 2.  156  (3)  (2)  [Henry Purcell]  ;  P82/22/#32  Simon Ives  P69/39/#57  2  1 A 5 3  c  ft  i  -kit  ft  ft" A  A  ft  i%  1 .  1  j  3LJ  to  yvr-4—  w A u0 . 1 \ Ok X — «Q r3f—1 O Qi  J. p.  —Tr  —|—i-  J  ^  i J . J U J i  A  J.)  •gr  Al5/#333 (Ob4/39; PAS81/41I Z l / 6 2 ; Z l l / l O ; N a t h a n i e l Lee, Theodosius, 1680. a f t e r A c t I, Henry P u r c e l l ) : A20/#606.5 (214).  Corant  ft  a 0^  A  £  '»  1  1-,-  i  a >c -A_^ I A- -G.—1—  0' 1  4- ~  1  r  1"  •4—( •4-  1  (1)  158  (2)  Simon the K i n g 2.  159  3.  Anon.  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  P5[5]/80/#89 P6l/93/#95  A l 5 / # 3 ^ 7 Pc1/1/23; P D M 7 9 s , v a r ; PDM86; PDV85/#4, v a r . ; PAB87J Z 1 0 / 3 8 , v a r . ) .  The Merry M i l k Maid 1. 2.  160  (3)  Anon.  P69/l8/#30  New Minvet  v  Anon.  a  ftfl" ft fcg  A15/#309 ( C u 2 / l 4 ) . A6/29 (PDM51-86)-t A15/#309 (NYp3/l80j Pcl/36, A dance)* A 1 9 / 5 8 ( C u 6 A 2 - 3 l EnVlO). / C u 6 / 2 6 , The meiry Milke-Maide, a c c o r d ing to A 1 9 / 5 8 .  • -.1 ro ro ro  rV~s  P82/35/#48 C ft  ft C ftg,  3Z£ ft/'  161*  P o r t e r s Rant New Rant F i l l . Porter's Rant Mr. P o r t e r ' s Delight (continued)  Anon.  P5[5]/l6/#25 P6l/3/#5 P69/6/#ll P82/6/#9  ft  ft  1  a.  >-  si  (1)  (3)  (2)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  1. A7/#P3 (Cu2/l2V| Ob3/87 ). 2. A2/6l4t All/215 (Lbm/45 , P h i l l . Porters Lamentation). r  r  162  Jenkins  Corant  1. A7/#P101 (0b3/8 v), k  163  Franklin A Tune  Anon.  P5[5]/70/#76 P6l/68/#86 P69/92/#120  <\C£,  a  q%—-_v  2  2. A15/#l46 (PAB70/#67; 213, 0 hone); A19/41. 3. According to A15, T# 163 i s an ornamented version of the b a l l a d ayre, " F r a n k l i n i s F l e d Away;" see p. 232,  The Scots March Montross March 2.  Anon.  P69/9/#17 P82/12/#17  A1/50 (NYp3/ 48/#36, The Highlanders March).  «  2  •  H  -  1  r i  up  J. 4&E-fr  164  1'  «•  A13 (Mp/l46/#12)  P69/l3/#23 P82/44/#60  J . ) J  J  J  as  ^  A  ft  a a d ?i  =1^  ft  <U j . ) ) J . J A ai A  + 1  rH J -  0.  (1)  165  (2)  The M y r t l e Shade 1. 2.  166  168  Anon.  (6)  P82/22/#31  (7)  J J J.)J  ) J i <* A C a  a  ^  ft  a. C\  Pi  9  —  Simon Ives  Anon.  1 ii).^l.»).)J  P82/42/#56  P5[5]/23/#32 P6l/5/#8 P82/24/#34  P69/4/#7 P82/10/#14  TP ft  J 1  S'  I.  5  A:  2  I  S  A13 (Mp/l29/#5).  Parthenia 2.  (5)  A15/#304 (PDM62/#43, t r e b l e v l n . sett i n g ; PDM65/#20; PMD66; PAB70).  Corant  1.  [Henry Purcell]  (4)  A19/45 (En2/57). A15/#178 (PCAS81; Z9; Z13; N a t h a n i e l Lee, Theodosius, 1680, A c t I I I , Henry Purcell)i A20/#606.8 (210).  Mardike 2.  167*  (3)  2  Al/56 (NYpl/l60/#215, The Kings D e l i g h t ) .  J J)'JUi'.J.>Ui 1  ^Ml  "ft bl  6  •  (1)  169  170  (2)  (3)  Corant  Simon Ives  Green Goose F a i r  Anon.  (6)  (4)  P5[5]/24/#34 P6l/l4/#21  (7)  §5  P69/10/#18  5fe 3 ? 171  I r i s h Rant 1.  172  173  174  Anon.  P5[5]/3/#6  A7/#P11 (0b3/88 , 2 s e t t i n g s — and d e f h f ) .  Saraband  Saraband  Corant  v  George Hudson  John J e n k i n s  Simon Ives  fefhf  A£  a  ft  V  j  J  ft  P6l/75/#94  ft  2  i  £  ^  a * v  C  J  J.  g.  o\ a- o\  j.»  :J  5\C <A\ ft  a  r r ^ ^\ \ I 1  : — » — U1—n L—^  i  P5[5]/57/#62 P6l/4l/#53  P5[5]/22/#31  A« u  223  ±  f  ro ro  1  1  -j-  rH J < =  (1)  (2)  175  Saraband  (3)  W i l l i a m Gregory  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  a ,. CA  P69/36/#53  ***** »  176  Minvet  Anon.  P82/38/#52 a  177*  Saraband  John J e n k i n s  flltr:  C A1  5 >—*  P6l/72/#91 -Ok.  P69/2/#4  See T# 201  178*  Saraband  John E s t o  ~  i  A-  £3  m  J.J»J J  P69/38/#55 #7 SI  179  Corant  Thomas Bates  P69/l0l/#[l]30  4 ex g. < e. £ < cx  1  1  —  —  ro ro ON  (1)  (2)  (3)  180  F o l l o w Me Kate  181  Saraband  (4)  Anon.  P69/l9/#31  George Hudson  P69Al/#6l  (5)  (6)  j J i J i  .A-  182  Vive l a y Roy  Anon.  P6l/2/#4  P69/5/#9 P82/3/#5  J  (7)  J J i i i  1—^ a a  \  —i-i  -4-*-!  Ok. rtk  r  v  Saraband  Anon.  P69A3/#63  iijjji j j J . •WT 1 \'W\\\l\\  184  A Jig  Thomas Bates  P69/l06/#136  *4  4 ro ro  • J J J.JJJ . J  1. A7/#P28 (Ob3/89 ). 2. Al5/#489 (Lbm5/53 ; PCG52; PMD66).  183  r  4 f i > 4 f . ^c.g. 3*  (1)  185  (2)  (3)  The Kings Delight 1. 2.  Anon.  (5)  (4)  (6)  (7)  iJJJ J.WJJ1JJ.  P69/5/#10 P82/V#7  <X ft.  £2:  O.  A15/#265 ( C u 2 / l and 8^). Al/56 (NYpl/l57/#210)« Al5/#265 (PIM64, treble v l n . j PDM65/#32; PMD66? PAB70; PPC73; PMH78)t A19/56 (Enl/3 ). v  V  186  Countrey Dance  Thomas Bates  AJig  187  Canaries  Anon.  JJJjJJ  P5[5]/59/#65  ^  P6l/43/#56 P69/67/#95 P82/88/#40  P5[5]/28/#39  a  s£ A  o>  iJJ  » A, 4 A oo  • 2  ]  J . J > ] J ifi]  ma a, fA tj p, S •w a —a , 188  A Saraband 1. 3.  Anon. Coleman  P69/22/#36 P82/l7/#24  A7/#P30 (Ob3/89 ). Resembles A l / 2 1 (Pc/319/#101, An Ayre, Benjamin Cosyn). r  k  2  i  J . ) j j  „  J i J  (1)  189  (  2  (3)  )  Saraband  Simon Ives, Junior Simon Ives  (5)  (4)  P5[5]/25/#35  (6)  J J J J J  (7)  JJJ->  P6l/15/#19 P69/27/#42  P82/25/#36 1  190  .  A  1  3  Simon Ives Junior).  ( M p / 1 2 7 / # 1 ,  None S h a l l Plunder but I  Anon,  )  P51/15/#18  l>i J  j JJ  P69/12/#21  Prince Pupert*s March 2.  A15/#325 (PCG52/#35, var.; PMD66/#26, var.). 3. / A6/49 (PDM51, Prince Ruperts March)  191  Gilli-flower  Simon Ives Anon. Simon Ives  1.  192  P5[5]/77/#85 P6l/10/#13 P 6 9 / 2 3 / # 3 7  A Saraband  V  John Moss Anon.  r  AX  n  P82/27/#28[38]  (Cu2/4 ; 0b3/87 )i (Mp/137/#20).  A 7 / # P 7 5  r  v  A13  P69/47/#68 P82/46/#63  4 , f. . Qt  bA  QLE ftC_  (1)  (2)  193  A Jig  (3)  Anon.  (4)  (5)  P69A3/#64  2  (6)  (?)  liujiijjjjjj fl,Cft4  or 2.  194  Second  Let O l i v e r Now Be Forgotten 2.  195  Anon.  196  P82/56/#77 EC  A5/#1985« A15/#202, Let O l i v e r Now Be Forgotten or How Unhappy Is P h y l l i s i n Love ( Z l ; ZIO'i Z12/9).  Cuckolds A l l a Row  Anon.  2. A6/56 (PDM51-86; P C G 5 2 i Al5/#95.  3.  4-  Christopher Simpson  1  P82/15/#21  v.  guitar setting)«  Third  Saraband  I*-  P6l/90/#90  A  Al  a a  ft  t  C  ex  *a a'  l$  1  (1)  (2)  197*  Countrey 2.  198*  (3)  k  William Lawes  Coll  (5)  ()  (7)  P5[5]/l0/#l8  •s-a-  A6/67 (PDM51-86, anon.).  Over the Mountaines  (6)  Anon.  P5l/6/#8  1  P5[5]/2/#4 P69/2/#3  2  a A  »b A A 1  1  .  L__  *\ f  ft  1. A19/57 (En3/72). 2. Al/104 (NYpl/136/#l67) • A5/#2651  1*) i  r  ftl *p- S ^W-  5 )\  >  <  ro  (Z3/# 5): A15/#295. Love W i l l F i n d Out the Way (Bc/4; Ctc/135; PCG52, c i t t e r n s e t t i n g i n common time, g u i t a r s e t t i n g ; PMD66/#5. i n common time; 22/# 8; Z / k  k  #45)«  199  Corant  200  New Minvet  k  A19/57 ( E n 7 A l - l v ) . k  A*ftC,A  George Hudson  OL.b.  » 8  1:  Anon.  P82/l9/#26  2  it ftfc.a  .  17  (1)  (2)  201  Saraband  (3)  Anon.  CO  (6)  (5)  (7)  P6l/l'/#2 P69/2/#4 P82/8/#l  T# 201 s t r o n g l y resembles the f o l l o w ing: A1/122, 253. 256 (En6/7/#8, Gibbons; NYp2/llO/#68, Gibbons; 0ch2/ 6/#6, anon.; 0ch3/l9» Gibbons, w i t h divisions).  202  Saraband  Thomas Bates  P69/103/#133  CX  A—  A.  See T# 163  P82/44/#60  2  i J J- j..  J.J. a  CKC  ££,  ex ,  203  Chicona  Simon Ives  P5[5]/l?/#26[A]  P6l/ll/#l6 1  .  A  1  3 (Mp/133/#12).  2  *r  p-1  jr  1?1  i  ro ro  (1)  204*  (2)  Sweet Jane 2.  205  (3)  P82/37/#51  John Withy  2  (6)  (7)  j JJiU-WAJiij 1  a V »  A5/#3H9 PMC67/176-7. B a n i s t e r ; 97. B a n i s t e r ) .  Saraband 1.  [John Banister]  (5)  (4)  q - r # -  &-  PMC73/  P69/l00/#128  S  4-"K  C. C X „  A13 (Mp/139/#D.  33  \ 1•  4-# i t : 0 .  %—rt£ 3fc _0k_  .<&  ro  206  Corant 1.  207*  Simon Ives  P69/26/#4l P82/25/#35  2 JL>) JJ.> .UJ.>J <\ V> A A b a  A7/#P82 (0b3/88v).  Minvet  Baptist  P82/63/#10  1 J J yii cx Qs iacx  208  Corant  Thomas Bates  P5[5]/58/#64 P61/42//55 P69/66/#94  -44  (1)  (2)  209  Blew Cap  1. 2.  210  (3)  Anon.  (4)  (5)  P5l/l/#2  1  P5[5V5/#9 P69/3/#5  2  (6)  (7)  1 1 Jl-JJiU.. a a A  5  aft a c r y  A7/#P110 (Cu5/2l4, e f f f [ e ] ) . A6/7 (PDM51-86; PCG52, c i t t e r n setting): A15/#29 ,(NYp3/l81i En/1; NYp/#5l and #74; Bc/1).  Montrosses March  Anon.  P69/l2/#22  ac  4.  211  Fourth  La Cloche Second Lesson with a Thump Saraband 1.  5.  Fifth  Anon. Simon Ives Anon.  P5[5]/29/#4l P6l/il/#15  P69/l6/#27  P82/34/#47  A7/#P139 (Cu2/2v 0b3/l2r), A13 (Mp/ 133/#lli La Cloche, Simon Ives). ;  fe, a oi c •'• a— a  ee a.  v  44  (1)  212  (3)  (2)  Saraband  Anon.  (4)  (5)  (6)  P5[5]/l/#2 ex  213  I Have Been a Piper  Anon.  P6l/9V#97  214  Theater Tune  Anon.  P82/62/#9  215  The E a r l of Sandwich's F a r e w e l l  Anon.  P82/32/#43  2. 3.  (7)  A15/184 (PMH78/#75» Digby's F a r e w e l l ) . T# 215 i s n o t one ayres l i s t e d i n A15 f o r the b r o a d s i d e , "Digby's F a r e w e l l . " However, Simpson b e l i e v e s T# 215 (arid T# 239, "Farewel F a i r Armida") may be a l t e r n a t e ayres f o r t h i s b a l l a d ; see A15/184.  CX  etc.  ft^ft  stxex  ±6  (1)  216  Anon.  L e s l e y e s March 3.  217  (3)  (2)  Anon.  The Boatman 2.  219*  220*  A3/308;  2.  (7)  Anon.  Anon.  P6l/93/#96  1  ft  i s mentioned  ac: 3 g.  P i *  i i J AJJ ,  k  a  «/1. /0*  ft  p0.  to  1-H- -4  ~fl  it  6 ii J J JUiJi-W !  A 6 / 8 (PDM51-86).  C a v a l i e r s Hornpipe S c o t t i s h Hornpipe  A Boat, a Boat  (6)  P5[5]/l2/#20 P69/10/#19  P5l/l2/#l P5[5]/2l/#29 P6l/9/#ll P69/29/W P82/3l/#4l  Simon Ives  218  k  A tune by the same t i t l e i n A2/II/615.  Corant  (5)  ()  Anon.  P5[5]/l5/#23  P5[5]/7/#l  iJJl  <J-AiJ  A A a aA 4 A A a a \ o ? -  P69/2V#38  [John Jenkins  2  -— /"v.• k ,  4= -i— — H HH " r rf —  1  k  A5/#39l PMB51/7, J e n k i n s ; PCC52/71; PCC58; PCC63; PMC67; PMC72; PMC73; HVID66).  CA  ft ft,  ft  ft  «  ftftft  C  1  ro ON  237 ---<r<>  iJCJCid  6<Si A  f.  6*  CI 4  set  <  G  u)  0 0  a <  CM  CM  CM  CM  cd 00  O  co  VO  «s  O CM  >>H  O rH  00 I  o ocq  h> <i>  o \ CM  CM CO  o cd  CO P«  P4  ON  - -\  cd U  •H  0)  •H  3  3:  &H  iH <J <H  O  ra >>-P o  •-3 cd CO  co « J5  cn o-  t-l $-|VO  H d) r l  o  ON « - N O- S V A CO Cd CV O H H CM H  -  ^ 9J C ON ••H  co  (M Dl-P  cn-p  k  \ cd JO VT\ CO «H <J W IH* CM  .s  pp. Y/N. C^NO  \ v o CM P  < THVO ^•H  H  CM CM  CN. rH  00  o ON VO P,  to co  O  S  § o  -3-  *n  Li O  CM CM CM  Pr  H  ft  co a> - p +»  o  cd  O-  2  cn ja o  on ft  ON ON  ON 00  •s cn  § I  CM  O o  cn  CM CM  cd U cd CO  •H  rH  -4-> 0 J5  O Xi  •P co  44  P S O cd  3  -3"  CM CM  O  ca  O  CM CM  cO JO Q)  *  CO Pr  r H  >»  O o a  - p  ON VO  s  W  co  x :  \  i  s v O  a> ra co  Put  H  rH  rH  cn  i  v n  on  CM  o K  <D W  I  CM CM  P«  o-  (1)  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  .ting). 2. A8/#108, #114 (PMD66/#65, Matthew Locke; PPC72/#7, Matthew Locke; PPC8o/#7; PPC82/#7; W i l l i a m D'Avenant, Mackbeth,  1663).  226  227  Minuet  Saraband  Anon.  Anon.  P82/4l/#55  2  J  J  P5[5]/2/#3 A  228*  Saraband  John Moss  j J j.  a ftC.ft. .. cvfc,fc,,4-  P69/l09/#139  4  1  6.  Sixth  John Moss Anon.  P69/46/#67 P82/46/#62  /  ,  If *-  /J"l ro  co  4 -O  I*'  J . ) J J j>) j ! «>  A Corant  -Jjr—'""V  *n  \A  . ft c  I cx  V* ex y>toft^\<x~^ft  229  r  OL C.  I  *-  j J . > J > ).>>.)j> ftb  b  "lip?  1  4  (1).  230*  (3)  (2)  Saraband Saraband w i t h Division  John W i t h i e  (6)  (5)  ( ) k  5  P5[5]/66/#73 P6l/82/#82  m-  J  (7)  J->JJ Abo  J.>J —?f\  —C  7.  231  i n P5[5].  Seventh  Corant T h i r d Lesson w i t h a Thump Saraband 1. 'o3.  232  There are no d i v i s i o n s  ::: z  —4  P69/117/#148 3.  frF ==Ft -a—4--  P5[5]/6/#12 P69/l6/#28  1 2  P82/33/#45  iJ JiJ i A J : q a Ab» =#1~ c A—  k  Anon.  P69/8/#l6 P82/8/#ll  A l / 3 5 » 55 ( N Y p l / l 3 V # l 6 3 f  Dumpe a t my  2  *  1  11  A12/326 (Dtc/58, f e f h f ; a 2 ~ 0 b l / 3 / # 2 , f e f h f ; Z5/#17i A S n a t c h and away, f e f h f j 2nd pts.--0b/3V#2 and Z5/#17) • P 5 [ 5 ] c o n t a i n s a v a r i e d r e p e a t o f the 2nd s t r a i n which P69. P82 and Z5 l a c k .  Come Jump t o My C o u s i n and K i s s Come K i s s Me My Sweet Kate 2.  Anon.  J i J J J J J J J J->J ^  F.C.ik.  *  1  1  V  (1)  (2)  3.  B.  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  cozen; Pcl/7l/#125» Jump a t my cozen). / A5/#660, Come jump a t t h y c o u s i n and k i s s .  Minor Mode 1. T o n i c  233  Saraband  W i l l i a m Lawes  P5[5]/6V#70 P6l/86/#86  ro  4:  o  * l a AM.  I S  234  Corant  Anon.  P6l/52/#69  A  i *i  CX CX A f t ex  235*  AJig  John E s t o  Jig  Coleman  P5[5]/73/#80  ft  /a  r-—K— - v -  na 1) am  P5[5]/53/#57 P6l/3V#44  _A  P69/71/#100  236  e • •  3  CIE;  q.4 a  EE  9  gTTU] X  il  1  1—T*  -1—4-  1  1  —|  (1)  237  (2)  Jenkins  Saraband  1.  238*  (3)  (5)  P5l/2l/#24 P5[5]/45/#56 P6l/3l/#40  (6)  a.  A.  ,4 a  ja.  (7)  a c g .  E3S  A13 (Mp/l25/#28).  Corant  George Hudson Anon.  239*  (4)  Farewel F a i r Armida  [Robert Smith]  P5[5]/5V#58 P6l/38/#50 P69/6V#91  P82/68/#17  J  J J . >  3  j.>  .£,-£, flai  a. t  a. J J  . J  )  a ,446,,Ok  J  J  era .acT^Z  2. A5/#962i  A15/#118, Digby's F a r e w e l l (PPC73. The E a r l o f Sandwich F a r e w e l l ; PAB87, The E a r l o f Sandwich F a r e w e l l ; P S A 7 3 / I O , Robert S m i t h ) .  240  The G a l i i a r d  Anon.  P69/57/#8l  a,^  l  a  4 :  241  Saraband  1.  Anon. Esto Simon Ives  P5[5]/48/#59 P6l/37/#48 P6l/50/#65  A13 (Mp/l24/#26, Simon I v e s ) .  J a  ^  ^-"fe  v  J  a  b a  o &-  1->J o-c-a  1  c 1 —  frf*p- 9  011 --4-  1 •  i  (1)  242  (3)  (2)  Corant  John Moss  (4)  P69/119/#150  (5) ,  (6)  (7)  a. ft ft  243  Minuet  Anon.  P82/65/#l2  244  Saraband  Young  P5l/l9/#22 P5[5]/40/#50 P6l/2l/#28 P69/59/#84 P82/82/#32  Corant Saraband 1.  245  A13  A Round 0  Anon. W i l l i a m Young  )  J  ft  %3-  Anon.  P82/68/#l6  A  a  Corant  1—r JiJJJJ  ~g~~~~ ft c  •J ) •  /  rrH  0 V  «««  ^r  1  >  jft_  ro  o, ^  -6-9 ro  (Mp/I17/#13, Saraband, v a r . ) .  ft  246  »  —j—  Christopher Simpson  ft e.  A .  ft. A .  ft.  P6l/62/#82  -ft  L O-ro  f  1 9  ft I  r3  —h  * i—  2-"*  ©•  &  (1)  247  (2)  (3)  Corant  John Jenkins  (4)  P6l/78/#77  (5)  5  (6)  J  (7)  J J J J J . J i ]•)  C <\ C Q a, a£  A  a c a free*  {w:  -A,  248  A Jig  William Gregory  P5[5l/48/#60 P6l/47/#62 P69/78/#107  3 e £  I  CX  249*  Prethe Love Turn to Me  Anon.  IJJjJUcUiJj  P69/55/#78  2. A15/#315 (PDM65. °n the Cold Ground, t r e ble v i n . ; PMD66, On the Cold Ground; PAB70/#138; William D'Avenant, The R i v a l s . 1664, Act V).  250  The Queens Delight  Anon.  a  ex g C A CCA  A'MerryHogh  Anon.  ro  CX  LA  —C-  CX  — f * -  1—L. H M —  4-1—  P69/56/#79 g .  251  - t - W - r - r — i " P ' l *-0—t4*4 ^—  P5[5]/l5/#24  2  <\ X  e.  a g  £ I cx *HT,li>  J. J . j j j J. -w—ex.  p a P3-  9-  (1)  252  (2)  Corant 1.  253  (3)  John Esto  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  i  P69/73/#102 P82/78/#28  J.)  A13 (Mp/ll6/#ll).  Saraband  John Esto  P5[5]/53/#56 P6l/3V#^3  3  Uiii)->ii) CX  1. A13 (Mp/120/#18).  f-f-f-j  fc+">  n  ___|  i iJJ JJJ 254  255  Ayre  Saraband  Charles Coleman  Jenkins  P5[5]/75/#82  P6l/53/#70  257  Saraband  Saraband  Anon. Simon Ives  P6l/64/#82 P69/6l/#87 P82/86/#37  Esto  P82/77/#27  J- 1_ ro  t* cA  ± 3 =  A  . — f t  -t l> a  *  ex  256  -U  H-  Cfta t-  Aft  AO.  ft  J  ft a  g  C  A C A— 1  I  OT  a C.CA  ±  —rrr h —  £ r -  — /  c.  l.» J »  S^lcx  is:  ft.  _ji_c4 ftft fl I ex.  f  J.  ^  y. ^  "H—  —  1  (5)  (1)  (2)  (3)  ()  253  Corant  William Gregory  P6l/45/#59  259  The G l o r y o f Hackney Saraband  Anon.  P69/53/#75  k  3  3  (6)  (7)  )  J  J  J  -  ft  P82/59/#  C,ft  a r.ft  k  A.  A.  >  J  t>  C ft A.  p  P i s7 , I 5 . <J  =fc  260  Corant  Jenkins  P82/?l/#21  )  3  261  Corant  Esto  P82/8V#3  k  —  )  — f t  r.  1  262  Saraband  John  Anon. Lilly  P6l/6V#83 P69/62/#89  f  t  J.>J > J JJ.> *2t r  —  _  } .U J «vftc  e.jj  Saraband  John E s t o  )  J * A  -..A  ft a ft A .  A CV  »• J  "  •»  *c  •  * • ft •  u  V»tea a,,-b-b£ s ft ft ft <x A . A A  ft* —>J-  A  J'> J .  c F-« A/ /'ft A c a  A  263*  f  f. I A / r _A «  ft/  -  JiJ  J.» J> J.J>J £. 1 & c n . 1 . d,^ „  ^  A  L  J  ft  -»4—^ r  (1)  (2)  (3)  264  Saraband  265-  A Poll  John Moss  Simon Ives  (4)  P69/120/#151  (5)  (6)  5  I  ft, ft  (7)  C A ,  te  P6l/50/#66 4^  ft  1  "7<  —  iftc  A  266  Saraband 1.  267  W i l l i a m Lawes  P6l/66[56]/#73  A13 (Mp/200-l/#5, Thomas Goodge o r t r u l y e W i l l [ i a ] m , Lawes, e d f e d ) .  Corant  W i l l i a m Lawes  3  )•> i J. >  J  4 * 5IJS  P5[5]/63/#69 P6l/85/#85  f  3  ?+^^-  a  ^—*  ,  ft c. £ft  Cft (X  ft *  ft  268  Saraband  Coleman  269  Saraband  John Moss  P5[5]/36/#48 P6l/29/#38  -b ft  P69/87/#H6 ^  1  ft  ft  ftJL  Ax:  0  9,  ti 0 ,  ro ON  (1)  270  271  (2)  (3)  Corant  Saraband  Coleman  Anon. W i l l i a m Gregory  See T# 298  (5)  (4)  P5[5]/35/# 7 P6l/28/#37 k  P6l/ 7/#6l P69/77/#107 k  3  (6)  >  i  (7)  1 1 *-An 1 I P ' ,  J  J  272  1  P69/6V#92  1  <*  ft  V  C \' •  t -4-1  1°  Third  Corant.  Anon. John W i t h i e  P5[5]/65/#72 P6l/8l/#[8lA] P69/il6/#l 7"  5  .A c. AAA — A  .flft . f l f t  ..  v  rf-f  —  i3  k  1.  273  1  JJ-J  a. t ft  2.  '"' -  U  i  —*)  —  J  a  J  ^  A13 (Mp/163/#17).  Saraband  -  Esto  P82/85/#36  Jii J  -9—.ac.  A. 1  C ftft •  i •a.  > I  i f f  r If!  %  J *  CD  (2)  274  Saraband  (3)  John E s t o  (4)  P69/7l/#99  (5)  (6)  (7)  J<JJ iJ J » <U l a  1 C  A d f t t  rrrr  275  Saraband  Christopher Simpson  Corant 1.  W i l l i a m Lawes  cx 1  P6l/55/#72  A13 (Mp/l99/#3» Roger Read o r t r u l y e W i l l [ i a j m Lawes, e d f e d ) .  e.1  U>J.JJ.}J.J.>  John J e n k i n s  P6l/79/#79  JJ  c c  >•  —  o \  P6l/28/#37  ft  JJ  a  i See T# 270  $ ^3 c  ro  a . C £  a l tA  j Saraband  1  ^  1.  277  C  P6l/63/#82 <xi  276  1b \ j  J.J  a  J->  c"£ 3 ^  278*  Corant  W i l l i a m Lawes  P5[5]/62/#68 P6l/8V#84  > J;>Ji i .  /  ,  ftC.  , £ C C V ,  J. x:  fll-| rll.ffttTflT  00  (3)  (1)  (2)  279  Corant  3.  280*  (4)  John E s t o  P69/70/#98  Christopher S impson  P6l/89/#89  (5)  (6)  J  (7)  J . >  J J . > | >  C CQ  Fifth  Saraband  l i l J J il JJ A  „  ft  is  A13(Mp/l65/#20).  1.  t  ).)«}. 1  )A.i.> 281  282  Corant  Saraband  1. 3.  Jenkins  C h a r l e s Coleman  P5[5]/38/#51 P6l/18/#25 P69/50/#72 P82/58/#3  A17/102 ( l A u c / l ; 0b3/l91 » anon.). Dodd s t a t e s i n c o r r e c t l y t h a t T# 282 appears i n I A u c / 2 and 21**; see A7/#P78. v  v  r  L.  P6l/78/#78  ro  fit  £====? 3  )•' )•>; j f. g £  SBL.  4  <  r  3_ 21  (1)  283  (2)  (3)  Saraband  Jenkins  (4)  (6)  (5)  P82/70/#19  (7)  .ftft.-4- 4.AJ-Lb_Ae e Lft i<\ o>  A  a.  284  Ayre  Anon.  P5[5]/73/#79  3  i. > j i. >  > j  .4- . . .  f.gft  285  Corant  J . Esto  P6l/36/#47 CL  t C  ft  ,A .A_b-  r*V-fc  4  1  M  C  ft.  286*  287  Corant  W i l l i a m Gregory  La Vinione Coranto l a Vinione  Will[iam] Paget Anon.  La V i v i u o n e [ s i c ] 3.  P6l/46/#60 P69/76/#106  P5l/22/#26  3  JJ.J  J.J  i  w  1  1  J-i  —5 *  -  j j . i  C ft  3 iJJJJ.>JJJ J ft-.ft— ft-,  P5[5]/60/#66 P6l/23/#32 P69/52/#74 P82/6o/#6  P82 l a c k s a v a r i e d r e p e a t o f the 2nd s t r a i n c o n t a i n e d i n the f o u r previous editions.  ft ft C£ft ca  a  C\  a.  ft—  •  »—1  \*—1  9  1  —1  1  =H  —  (1)  288*  (2)  (3)  Corant  Simon Ives  (5)  (4)  P5[5]A7/#58 P6i/49/#44[64]  (6)  3 >•> J . J . U»Ji e, A c A  1. A13 (Mp/l22-3/#23).  -A3 289  Corant  John E s t o  P6l/92/#93 P69/ll3/#l 3  (7)  —i-ft  i f t C < i c n .a .ftC ft ATT Ok f.  . f-.-fV 1  _  k  .17  JU 290  Corant 1.  Esto  iiJi. J  P82/75/#25  A7/#P295 (Ob3/78 ). v  291  Saraband  Anon.  292  Saraband  John W i t h i e  P69/60/#85  J  J  J J J J  P82/62/#8  P6l/6o/#78  P69/80/#109  i i i ft  at t  J I A &~  i i  V? A  i 293  A Corant 1.  Coleman John J e n k i n s  P5l/l7/#20 P69/82/#lll  A13 (Mp/I17/#12, C h a r l e s Coleman).  ft  (1)  294  (2)  Saraband  (3)  John E s t o  (5)  ( ) k  - P6l/92/#9  -a  k k  John Moss  cAc  \|  P69/86/#115  Minvet  Anon.  r  ft  ft " * A C £  -ft  296  A  A  ft  1. A13 (Mp/162/#15).  A Corant  (7)  k  P69/llV#l  295  (6)  9  4-^  ft?!9-,  %  :  1  n  hf-/~  ^  Corant  John J e n k i n s  P5[5]A3/#5  J J . J.Ji  k  ft.A TAZ  P6l/25/#33 P69/8V#U3  298*  Saraband  See T# 256  George Hudson  ?5[5']/55/#59 P6l/39/#51 P69/64/#92  P82/86/#37  J'  J.  ,-&fie*  3  JJ.H  8*1  r  9 *.  *  a  \  n  rh -jr\-4  J•  ,J- AA jC b  1 A_  -'. 4+ M-H  n  ro .  to  T T e r *  297  ?-  ro  Jft* £ J4 J J.)  P82/66/#13  f,  **  H  fi—•  o>  liiiJ  -ft7g~  J- f t  J i t«J^  -ft.  A _  A •Aft  2X  a:  2!  (i)  4.  299  (2)  (3)  (4)  (5)  (6)  (7)  Seventh  Theater Tune  Anon.  P82/66/#l4  5X  A t :  ro  APPENDIX IV TABLES OF CONTENTS Introduction T h i s appendix p r e s e n t s  t a b l e s of contents  f o r the  lyra  v i o l p o r t i o n of A M u s i c a l l Banquet (1651) and f o r a l l the music i n Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  ( l 6 5 [ 5 ] through 1682).  F o r each p i e c e i n  every e d i t i o n , the f o l l o w i n g i n f o r m a t i o n i s given» Column 1  Thematic number,  2  L o c a t i o n (page and composition particular edition,  3  Title,  k  Composer a s c r i p t i o n ( i f any) i n the p a r t i c u l a r edition; i f the composer's name was d i s c o v e r e d i n one of P l a y f o r d ' s o t h e r l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , i t appears i n parentheses; i f a f u r t h e r , conf l i c t i n g , a s c r i p t i o n was d i s c o v e r e d i n the l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s , t h i s appears i n b r a c k e t s .  5  Tuning, Number 1 2 3 4 5 6  6-9  i n the p a r t i c u l a r  number) i n the  edition,  a c c o r d i n g to the f o l l o w i n g codei Chart fefhf defhf edfhf fdefh fedfh fhn  Name L y r a Way Harp Way Sharp Harp Way F l a t H i g h Harp Way Sharp High Harp Way F l a t Bagpipe Tuning  L o c a t i o n i n the other f o u r P l a y f o r d l y r a v i o l editions. Parentheses and square b r a c k e t s used i n these columns c o r r e l a t e the i n f o r m a t i o n i n column 4 w i t h the e d i t i o n from which i t was taken.  254  APPENDIX I V TABLES OF CONTENTS  T#  Title  P./#  A M u s i c a l l Banquet 50* 209 149 67* 76*  l/l 1/2 2/3 3/4 4/5  60 17 198* 154 63* . 54 68 66 217 131 3 129 190  5/6 6/7 6/8 7/9 8/10 8/11 10/12 11/13 12/14 12/15 13/16 14/17 15/18  21 293 90 244 125 237 103* 287  16/19 17/20 18/21 19/22 20/23 21/24 22/25 22/26  Composer  Tuning  l65[5]  1661  1669  1682  1/1  15/26 3/5  32/44  3/6 2/3  3/6 4/8  7/10 4/6  9/17 14/22  16/22  2/3 8/15 22/35 24/39  20/28 21/29 21/30 26/36 27/37 13/21  (8/10) (9/11) (9/12) 12/17 13/18  (1651)  An A l l m a i n e B l e w Cap Step S t a t e l y A L a Mode de F r a n c e When t h e K [ i n g ] E n j o y e s &c. P F r i n c e ] Ruperts March P[]rinceJ Ruperts M o r r i s Over the M o u n t a i n e s • • Saraband A Symphony (Coleman) • • Nightengale • • Bow B e l l s An A l l m a i n e (Simon Ives) (Simon Ives) Coranto S araband (Simon Ives) George Hudson An A l l m a n S araband GeoTrge] Hudson None S h a l l P l u n d e r but I G l o r y o f the West A Coranto Coleman Allmaine Young S araband Young Ayre Jenkins Saraband Jenkins An A l l m a i n Lilly La V i n i o n e W i l l [ i a m ] Paget  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  17/26 5/9  V>  4/8 V7  2/4  3/4 (l6/[23]) 12/18 • •  8/15 39/52 40/50 44/55 45/56 41/52 60/66  20/27 21/28 30/39 31/40 19/26 23/32  (28/43) (29/44) (29/45) 33/49 34/50 12/21  30/40 31/41 31/42 26/37 49/66  54/76 82/111 58/83 59/84  81/31 82/32  62/88 52/74  73/23 60/6  APPENDIX I V - - C o n t i n u e d  p./#  96*  Title  24/ 7 2  Musicks Recreation  59 212 227 198* 149  171 76* 67* 209 135 62 231 70 220* 21 26 63* 197* 146*  216 190 54  l/l 1/2 2/3 2/4 4/7 4/8 5/9  5/10 6/11 6/12 7/13 7/14  8/15 8/16 9/17 10/18 11/19 12/20. 13/21 14/22  C o l o n e l Gerards  Composer Tune  Tuning  3  (l65f5l) May Time Saraband Saraband Over the Mountaines Step S t a t e l y I r i s h Rant The K [ i n g ] E n j o y e s & c . A L a Mode d ' F r a n c e B l e w Cap Roome f o r C u c k o l d s A P i l l to Purge Melancholy Coranto G a t h e r Y o u r Rosebuds A Boat, a Boat G l o r y o f the West G l o r y o f the N o r t h Simphony (Coleman) Countrey C o l l W i l l i a m Lawes A Jigge W i l l i a m Lawes Lesleyes March ' None S h a l l P l u n d e r but I Nightingale  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  165C5]  1661  1669  1682  40/51  21/29  54/77  59/5  1651  1661  1669  1682  1/2  2/2  • •  * • • •  6/8 2/3  4/5 3/4 1/2  • •  to  2/3 2/3 3/6  96/99  ON  4/8 3/6 3/5  4/6 7/10  16/28  33/45  • •  • •  tt  • *  * •  54/76  16/19 • •  2 2 2 2 2  15/18  2  8/11  8/10  t•  16/22  22/35  (l6/[23]>  • • • •  10/19 12/21 12/18 24/39  APPENDIX  T#  p./#  219* 251 161* 50* 203 10* 66 217 131 174 167* 12 169 189 3  15/23 15/24 16/25 17/26 17/26QA] 18/27 20/28 21/29 21/30 22/31 23/32 24/33 24/34 '25/35 26/36  129 29 187 56 211 46 137 224 95 122 270 268 113*  27/37 28/38 28/39 29/40 29/41 30/42 31/43 32/44 33/45 34/46 35/47 36/48 36/49  Title  IV—Continued  Composer  C a v a l i e r s Hornpipe A M e r r y Hogh P o r t e r s Rant The T h u m p i n g A l m a n e Chicona Simon Ives Preludium Simon Ives Almane (Simon Ives) Coranto (Simon Ives) Saraband (Simon Ives) Coranto Simon Ives Coranto Simon I v e s Ayre Simon I v e s , J u n i o r Coranto Simon Ives Saraband Simon I v e s , J u n i o r Ayre (George H u d s o n ) / [Simon I v e s ] Saraband (George Hudson; Maydens R a n t Canaries The A p o l l o La Cloche (Simon I v e s ) Almane Coleman Coranto Coleman Saraband Coleman Preludium Coleman Almane Coleman •Coranto Coleman Saraband Coleman Almane w i t h Coleman Division  Tuning 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3  1651 • • • • • •  1/1 • a • •  11/13 12/14 12/15 • •  5/8  1661 • a • a  3/5 1/1 11/16 6/9 8/10 (9/11) (9/12) • *  • a  (13/16)  14/20 14/21 15/19 (12/17)  (14/17)  (13/18)  • •  • •  a a a a • •  (11/15) a a a a  •a  17/23 28/36 28/37 29/38 a a  1669 24/38 a a  1682 • a a a  6/11 15/26  6/9 32/44  (28/43) (29/44) (29/45)  28/39 30/40 31/41 31/42  a a a a  a a  24/34 a a • a  a  a  aa  a • a a a a  27/42 33/49  25/36 [26/37]  (34/50) 7/14  49/66  16/27  34/47  49/70  57/1  a a a a a a a a a a • •  a « a a • •  55/75 a a • a a a a a a a  a• • «  a  a a •  APPENDIX I V - - C o n t i n u e d  T# 1  P-/#  Title  127  38/50  Ayre  282 90  38/51 39/52 40/50  96* 103*  40/51  41/52  123* 297 125 '237 85  42/53 43/54 44/55 45/56 46/57  288*  47/58 48/59  244  241 248  80 102 263* 88 253 235* 91* 238 298* 48  199 172  48/60 49/52 50/53 51/54 52/55 53/56 53/57 54/57 54/58 55/59 56/60 56/61 57/62  Composer (Coleman)/ Jenkins] Coleman Young Young  Tuning  1651  1661 18/24  3 3 3 3 3 3  A Jigge Almane Almane w i t h Division Saraband Almane Saraband A Jigg Almane Coranto Saraband Almane Coranto Saraband  3 3 3  47/62  3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  Jo[hn] Esto Esto J o "hn" E s t o J o _hn" E s t o G e o r g e Vi.udson a . Hudson G. H u d s o n George Hudson George Hudson G. Hudson  (50/71)  1682 (58/2)  [22/31]  Saraband Almane Saraband Gerards M i s t r i s s e An A l i m a i n John L i l l i e / (Jenkins) Jenkins Almane Coranto Jenkins Ayre Jenkins Saraband Jenkins Countesse o f Simon Ives E x e t e r s Almane Simon Ives Coranto Saraband (Esto)/[lves]  W i l l [ i a m ] Gregory Jo hn E s t o . * J o_hn~ E s t o  1669  3 3 3 3 3 3 3  18/21 19/22 24/27 22/25  20/23 21/24  18/25 20/27  50/72  21/28  58/83 59/84  19/26  62/88  24/32  80/110 84/113  21/29  25/33 30/39 31/40  54/77  58/3 81/31 82/32 59/5 (73/23) ro  VjN  00  48/63  49/44[64] (37/48^  [50/65]  74/24  26/34  78/107 68/96 72/101  27/35  74/103  79/29  32/41  34/43 34/44 38/49  38/50 31/51 40/52 40/[52A] 41/53  71/100 63/90 64/91 64/92  76/26  86/38  APPENDIX  IV—Continued  T#  p./#  Title  Composer  34 208 186 287  58/63 58/64 59/65 60/66  111 278* 267 233 77 272 230* 33 11* 162 145 138 284 236 116 254 93 107* 191 39 65 142* 158  61/67 62/68 63/69 64/70 65/71 65/72 66/73 66/74 68/75 70/76 71/77 72/78 73/79 73/80 74/81 75/82 76/83 76/84 77/85 77/86 78/87 79/88 80/89  Ayre Tho _mas_ B a t e s Coranto Tho _mas_ B a t e s C o u n t r e y Dance Tho mas Bates Coranto La Vinione (W i l l i a m Paget) Almane W i l l i a m Lawes W i l l i a m Lawes Coranto W i l l i a m Lawes Coranto W i l l i a m Lawes Saraband Almane J Withie Coranto (John Withie) Saraband John W i t h i e Almane Jo hn J e n k i n s Almane J o hn" J e n k i n s Coranto Jenkins Saraband Jenkins A Jigge Simon Ives Ayre • a Coleman Jigge Ayre Coleman Ayre C h a r l e s Coleman Morris Coleman Ayre Simon Ives Gilli-flower Simon Ives Brangle Devilage • • Ayre Aylward Saraband a a a a Simon the K i n g  Tuning 3 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 "2" "2" "2" 6  1651  166-1  I669  1682  65/93 66/94 67/95 52/74  87/39  (22/26)  42/54 42/55 43/56 23/32  88/40 60/6  83/83 84/84 85/85 86/86 115/146 81/81 ( 8 l / [ 8 1 A ] ) (116/147) 82/82 117/148 70/88 94/122 66/85 90/119 68/86 92/120 93/121 69/87  10/13 10/14 93/95  23/37 20/32  27/28[38] 9/13  APPENDIX  p./# Musicks Recreation 50* 201 76*  1/1 1/2 2/3  182 161* 67* 41* 167* 10* 66 217 131 191 39 211 203 3  2/4 3/5 3/6 4/7 5/8 6/9 8/10 9/11 9/12 10/13 10/14 11/15 11/16 12/17  129 12 I69 189 63* 95  13/18 14/20 14/21 15/19 16/22 17/23  Title  IV—Continued  Composer  Tuning  1651  •165C5]  1669  1682  15/26 2/4 4/8  32/44 8/12 4/6  5/9 6/11 3/6 26/40  3/5  (l66l) • • Almain • « Saraband When t h e K i n g E n j o y s , Etc. • • V i v e l a y Roy • • New R a n t A L a Mode d ' F r a n c e • • A Masque Simon Ives Corant Simon Ives Preludium S. Ives Almaine Simon Ives Coranto Simon Ives S araband S imon I v e s Gillie-Flower Simon Ives • • Brangle Devilage La Cloche Simon Ives Chicona Simon Ives Almaine George H u d s o n / (Simon Ives) Saraband George Hudson Ayre Simon I v e s , J u n i o r Coranto Simon I v e s , J u n i o r Saraband Simon I v e s , J u n i o r A Symphony (Coleman) Preludium C h a r l e s Coleman  2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3  1/1  17/26 4/7  4/5 16/25 4/8  3A 11/13 12/14  12/15  23/32 18/27 20/28 21/29 21/30 77/85 77/86 29/4l _ 17/26[A] 26/36 r  13/16 14/17 •• 8/10  27/37 24/33 24/34 25/35 9/17 33/45  28/43 29/44 29/45 23/37 20/32 16/27 33/49 34/50 27/42  22/35 49/70  6/9 7/10 23/33 24/34 28/39 30/40 31/41 31/42 27/28[38] 9/13 34/47 (26/37) 49/66 25/36 (l6/[23]) 57/1  APPENDIX I V - - C o n t i n u e d  127 282  103*  P-/#  Title  18/24  Ayre Saraband A[n Alimain]  18/25 19/26  90  20/27  96*  21/29  244  21/28  127  22/30 22/31  287  23/32  121  ' 123* 297 102  263* 122  270 268  125 237 80  24/32 .  25/33 26/34  27/35  28/36 28/37  29/38 30/39  31/40 32/41  Composer  1  Almaine Saraband Gerards M i s t r e s s e Ayre.. Ayre Coranto La Vinione Almaine Coranto Almane w i t h Division Saraband Almaine Coranto S araband Ayre Saraband Almaine  (Coleman) Coleman John L i l l y / (Jenkins) Young Young  Jenkins Jenkins/ (Coleman) ( W i l l i a m Paget)  Tuning  3 3 3  1651  • • • •  22/25  18/21 3 19/22 3 3 c ,24/27 3 .„ •t 38/50 3  3  Jenkins Jenkins Jo[hn] Esto  3 3 3  Jo[hn] Esto Coleman Coleman Coleman Jenkins Jenkins Jo[hn] Jenkins  3 3 3 3 3 3 3  (22/26) • • t  •  • •  • • • • • •  20/23 21/24 • •  165C5]  1669  38/50  (50/71)  38/51  50/72  39/52  58/83 59/84  40/51  54/77  41/52  40/50 • •  62/88  • •  1682  (58/2) 58/3 (73/23) 81/31  82/32 59/5 § •  (50/71)  (58/2)  60/66  52/74  60/6  42/53 43/54  80/110  50/53  72/101  76/26  51/54  74/103  79/29  68/96  74/24  • »  84/113  34/46  • * * «  35/47 36/48  44/55  45/56  49/52  •••Note t h a t P 6 1 / 1 8 / 2 4 a n d P61/22/31 a r e t h e same p i e c e (T#127) and t h a t i n the v a r i o u s l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s t h i s p i e c e i s sometimes a s c r i b e d t o Coleman and sometimes t o Jenkins.  APPENDIX I V - - C o n t i n u e d  T#  p./#  88 253 235* 115 79 285 241 91 238* 298* 48 199 172 34 208 186  33/42 34/43 34/44 35/45 36/46 36/47 37/48 38/49 38/50 39/51 40/52 40/L52A] 41/53 ' 42/54 42/55 43/56  105* 86* 258 286* 271 248 85 288*  Title  Composer  Jo_hn_ E s t o Almaine Jo_hn_ E s t o Saraband J o h n " Esto A Jigg Jo_hn~ E s t o Almaine Jo[hnJ Esto Almaine J. Esto Coranto , Esto Saraband' George Hudson Almane George Hudson Coranto George Hudson Saraband George Hudson Almane George Hudson Coranto George Hudson Saraband Tho mas Bates Ayre Tho mas Bates Coranto Tho mas Bates Countrey Dance W. Gregory Almaine 44/57 W i l i r i a m ] Gregory 44/58. Ayre W i l l [ i a m J Gregory Coranto 45/59 W. Gregory 46/60 Coranto ( W i l l i a m Gregory) 47/61 Saraband W i l l i a m Gregory 47/62 A Jigg S imon Ive s The Countess o f 48/63 E x e t e r s Almaine Simon I v e s 4 9 / 4 4 [ 6 4 ] Coranto  Tuning 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  1651  165[5]  1669  52/55 53/56 53/57  71/100  48/59 54/57 54/58 55/59 56/60 56/61 57/62 58/63 58/64 59/65  1682  63/90 64/91 64/92  86/38  65/93 66/94  87/39  67/95  ro  88/40  75/104  48/60 46/57  ro  CN  76/106 (77/107) 78/107  47/58  Note t h a t P61/37/48 and P61/50/65 a r e t h e same p i e c e (T#24l) and t h a t i t i s v a r i o u s l y a t t r i b u t e d t o John E s t o and Simon I v e s .  APPENDIX  IV--Continued  T#  P./#  Title  241 265 81 92 267 255 112 276 266 104 101 124 108 292 84 126 246 275  50/65 50/66 51/67 52/68 52/69 53/70 45L54]/71 55/72 66L56]/73 57/74 58/75 59/75[76] 60/77 60/78 61/79 62/81 62/82 63/82  256 262 1 11 162 145 33 45  64/82 64/83 65/84 66/85 68/86 69/87 70/88 71/89  Simon I v e s Saraband^ Simon I v e s A Po[l] Jo[hn] Jenkins Almaine Jenkins Almaine • • Coranto Jenkins Saraband W i l l i a m Lawes Almaine W i l l i a m Lawes Coranto W i l l i a m Lawes Saraband John Withie Preludium John Withie Almaine John Withie Almaine John Withie A Rant John Withie Saraband Goter Almaine C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson Almaine C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson Coranto Chr[istopher] Saraband Simpson S i m o n Ives_ Saraband _ J o h n L illy_ Saraband W i l l i a m Y oung Ayre J o h n J e n k ins Almaine J e n k i ns Coranto J e n k i n s Saraband J o h n J e n k i n s Almain J o h n J e n k i n s Ayre  t  t  See n o t e 2.  Composer  Tuning 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4  1651  165C5]  1669  1682  83/112  72/22  48/59  1  t  79/108 80/109 ••  61/87 [62/89] 68/75 70/76 71/77 66/74  90/119 92/120 93/121 94/122  [86/37]  APPENDIX I V - - C o n t i n u e d  T# 133 177* 36 5 173 109* 128 247 281 277 83*  Title  P-/# 72/90 72/91 ••65[72]/ 84[92] 74/93 75/9k 76/75 77/76 78/77 78/78 79/79 90[80]/ fin t  ou  Composer  Tuning  1651  1*515^  Jenkins Jenkins Jenkins  4 4 4  Jenkins Jenkins Jenkins John Jenkins John Jenkins Jenkins John Jenkins John W i t h i e  4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5  John Withie John W i t h i e John Withie  5 5 5  65/71 65/72  W i l l i a m Lawes W i l l i a m Lawes W i l l i a m Lawes W i l l i a m Lawes Christopher Simpson C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson Chr[istopher] Simpson J . Esto J . Esto J . Esto  5 5 5 5 5  61/67 62/68 63/69 64/70  Coranto S araband Ayre  John John John  Ayre Saraband Ayre Almain Coranto Coranto Saraband Ayre  John John  77 272 230*  81/81 81/[81A] 82/82  111 278* 267 233 118  83/83 84/84 85/85 86/86 87/87  Almaine Coranto Saraband w i t h Division Almaine Coranto Coranto Saraband Preludium  94* 280* 196  88/88 89/89 90/90  Almaine Saraband Saraband  82 119 290  90/91 91/92 92/93  Almaine Almain Coranto  1669  114/145  66/73  115/146 116/147 117/148  5 5 5 5 5 5  [lll]/l4l 112/142 II3/143  1682  APPENDIX I V — C o n t i n u e d  T#  p./#  Title  294 158 218 213 134 135  92/94 93/95 93/96 94/97 95/98 96/99  Saraband Simon the K i n g The B o a t m a n I Have B e e n a P i p e r H u n t I s Up Room f o r C u c k o l d s  Composer J.  Esto  Tuning  1651  5 6 6 6 6 6  165[5] • •  1669  1682  114/144  80/89 • • • • • •  5/10  1651  165[5]  1661  1682  M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (1669) 74 59 198* 201 209 67* 168 76*  1/1 1/2 2/3 2/4 3/5 3/6 4/7 4/8  182 185 161* 130 225 29  5/9 5/10 6/11 6/12 7/13 7/14  A Short Prelude M a y i n g Time Over the Mountains Saraband Blew-Cap A L a Mode d ' F r a n c e Parthenia The K i n g E n j o y e s H i s Own V i v e l a Roy The K i n g s D e l i g h t F i l l . P o r t e r ' s Rant The S i m e r o n s Dance . A Dance i n M a k b e t h The M a i d s R a n t  2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 . . 2 2 2 2 2  t  •  • •  • •  •  t  • •  • •  2/2  6/8  2/4  • •  • •  1/2 3/4  5/9 4/8  3/6  • •  • •  4/7  2/3  4/5  • *  1/2 • •  2/4 • •  16/25  3/5  • • • *  28/38  8/12  • • • •  7/10 10/14 4/6 . 3/5 4/7 6/9 5/8 10/15 55/75  APPENDIX I V — C o n t i n u e d  T#  p./#  154 232  8/15 8/16  164 170 216 40 190 210 163 52  9/17 10/18 10/19 11/20 12/21 12/22 13/23 14/24  37  14/25  50*  15/26  211  16/27  231  16/28  16  17/29  159 180 39 49 47 63* 188 191  18/30 19/31 20/32 20/33 21/34 22/35 22/36 23/37  Title  Composer  A Saraband Come Jump t o My C o u s i n and K i s s The S c o t s M a r c h Green-Goose F a i r L e s h l e y ' s March The P l e a s a n t Dream Prince Rupert's March Montrosses March Franklin The P r i n c e o f C o n d i e ' s March T o l l , T o l l , Gentle B e l l , &c. F i r s t Lesson, with a Thump Second Lesson, w i t h Ives] a .Thump Third Lesson, with a Thump Fourth Lesson, with a Thump The M e r r y M i l k - M a i d F o l l o w Me K a t e A French A y r A Prelude An A y r A Symphony (Co A Saraband (Co The G i l l y - F l o w e r ( S i m o n  Tuning 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2  1651  165[5]  1661  3/4 8/11  7/9  12/17 a •  12/20 15/18  2/3  13/21  a a a a  ON  • a  1/1  2 2  17/26  1/1  [29/41]  [11/15]  a a  32/44 34/47  6/12  33/45 34/46  2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2  ro ON  44/60  2 2  1682  a a • •  8/10  77/86 • a a a  10/14 a a  9/17  16/22  (77/85)  (10/13)  9/13 43/58 (l6/[2 ]) (17/24) (27/[38]) 3  APPENDIX I V — C o n t i n u e d  Composer  T#  P-/#  Title  219* 54 41* 206 189 66 217 131 8 35 151 3  24/38 24/39 26/40 26/41 27/42 28/43 29/44 29/45 30/46 31/47 32/48 33A9  129 53* 153 175 7 178* 44 157 144 2o 55 181 24 183 193 28 72 229  3V50 35/51 •• 36/52 36/53 37/54 38/55 39/56 39/57 40/58 40/59 4l/6o • 41/61 42/62 43/63 43/64 44/65 45/66 46/67  S c o t t i s h Hornpipe The N i g h t e n g a l e The Queens M a s k Simon Ives Ives Corant Saraband Simon Ives Simon Ives Almain Simon Ives Corant Saraband Simon Ives George Hudson An A y r An Almain George Hudson Saraband George Hudson George Hudson/ An A l m a i n (Simon Ives) George Hudson Saraband W i l l i a m Gregory An A y r Corant W. G r e g o r y Saraband W i l l [ i a m ] Gregory John Esto Almain Saraband John Esto S i mon Ives An A y r Corant Simon Ives S araband Simon Ives Simon I v e s A Jig An A y r George Hudson Saraband George Hudson George Hudson Almain • • Saraband • • A Jig Preludium J o h n Moss John Moss Almain J o h n Moss A Corant  Tuning 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2  1651  8/11  165[5] 15/23 14/22  1661  4/7  1682  12/18 23/33 25/35 25/36 30/40 31/41 31/42 48/65  11/13 12/14 12/15  25/35. 20/28 21/29 21/31  15/19 8/10 9/11 9/12  13/16  26/36  12/17  (26/37)  14/17  27/37  13/18  49/66  45/61 46/62  APPENDIX IV--Continued  Title  T# 192 31 95 127  47/68 48/69 49/70 50/71  282 100* 287  50/72 51/73 52/74  259 21 96* " 249* 250 27* 240 147 90 244 291 114* 256 103*  53/75 54/76 54/77 55/78 56/79 56/80 57/81 58/82 58/83 59/84 60/85 60/86 61/87 62/88  262 91* 238* 298* 34 208  62/89 63/90 64/91 64/92 65/93 66/94  A Saraband A Jig A Prelude Ayr  Composer  John Moss J o h n Moss C h a r r l e s ] Coleman ChaLrlesI Colemar/ (Jenkins) Saraband C h a [ r l e s ] Coleman The I t a l i a n R a n t Corant L a v i n i o n (Will[iam] Paget) The G l o r y o f H a c k n e y The G l o r y o f t h e W e s t Gerard's Mistress P r e t h e L o v e T u r n t o Me The Queens D e l i g h t The New F i g g a r y The G a l l i a r d The M i r t l e G r o v e W i l l i a m Young Almain Corant ( W i l l i a m Young) Saraband Simon Ives Ayr Saraband (Simon Ives) Ayr John L i l l y / (Jenkins) Saraband John L i l l y Ayr George Hudson Corant ( G e o r g e Hudson) Saraband George Hudson Thomas B a t e s Ayr Thomas B a t e s Corant  Tuning  1651  2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  165[5]  1661  1682 46/63  33/45 38/50 38/51  17/23 18/24 £ 22/31) 18/25"  (22/26)  60/66  23/32  16/19 24/27  8/15 40/51  57/i  58/2 58/3 60/6 59/4  21/29  59/5 ••  61/7 18/21 (19/22)  22/25  39/52 (40/50)  20/27 (21/28)  41/52  64/82 19/26  54/57 (54/58) 55/59 58/63 58/64  64/83 38/49 (38/50) 39/51 42/54 42/55  81/31 (82/32) 62/8 84/35 (86/37) (73/23) 86/38  87/39  CN CO  APPENDIX I V — C o n t i n u e d  P./# 186 80 117 279 274 235* 102 252 262* 105* 286* 271 248 101 292 123* 293  67/95 68/96 69/97 70/98 71/99 71/100 72/101 73/102 74/103 75/104 76/106 77/107 78/107 79/108 80/109 80/110 .82/111  81 297 87 295 269 98* 2 11*  83/112 84/113 85/114 86/115 87/116 88/117 [89]/U8 90/119  162 145 33  92/120 93/121 94/122  Title  Composer  A C o u n t r e y Dance Thomas B a t e s John Esto Almain John Esto Almain Corant John Esto Saraband John Esto John Esto A Jig An A y r John Esto Corant John Esto Saraband John Esto W i l l i a m Gregory Almain Corant W i l l i a m Gregory Saraband W i l l i a m Gregory W i l l i a m Gregory J A Jig John Withie Almain Saraband John Withie Almain John Jenkins John Jenkins/ A Corant ( C h a r l e s Coleman) John Jenkins An A y r Corant John Jenkins J o h n Moss Almain J o h n Moss A Corant Saraband J o h n Moss J o h n Moss A Jig Preludium Almain with John Jenkins Division John Jenkins Corant John Jenkins S araband John Jenkins An A y r «  •  Tuning 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 4 4 4 4 4  1651  165[5]  1661  1682  59/65 49/52  43/56 32/41  88/40 74/24 80/24[30]  53/57 50/53  34/44 26/34  51/54  27/35 44/57 46/60 47/61 47/62 58/75 60/78 24/32  48/60 • •  (17/20)  42/53  76/26 78/28 79/29  VO  • •  43/54  51/67 25/33  68/75  66/85  70/76 71/77 66/74  68/86 69/87 70/88  ro  ON  72/22  APPENDIX  T#  P./#  95/123 43 96/124 140 4 97/125 98/126 15 99/127 139 100/128 205 100/129 19 101/130 179 102/131 148 102/132 42 202 103/133 14* 104/134 132 105/135 184 106/136 23 107/137 223 108/138 228* 109/139 110/140 32 82 [ l l l ] / l 4 l 112/142 119 290 113/143 114/144 294 83* 114/145 115/146 77 272 116/147 117/148 230* 89  118/149  Title An A y r S araband Almain Ayr Saraband S araband Ayr Corant Saraband Almain S araband Ayr Corant A Jig Almain A Corant Saraband A J i g Almain Almain Ayre Corant Saraband Almain Ayre A Corant Saraband w i t h Division Almain  IV—Continued  Composer  Tuning  Jenkins John Jenkins John Withie John W i t h i e John Withie Bates Tho _mas_ B a t e s Tho _mas" B a t e s Tho mas_ B a t e s Tho _mas_ B a t e s T iomas B a t e s Tho m a s ] B a t e s T iomas B a t e s J o h n Moss J o h n Moss J o h n Moss J o h n Moss John E s t o John Esto John Esto John Esto John Withie John Withie John W i t h i e John Withie  4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5  J o h n Moss  5  L  1651  165[5]  1661  1682 52/71  90/91 91/92 92/93 65/71 65/72 66/73  90[80]/80 81/81 8l/[81A] 82/82  v..  APPENDIX I V — C o n t i n u e d  242 264  106  P./#  Title  119/150 120/151 120/152  Corant Saraband A J i g Almain  Composer J o h n Moss J o h n Moss J o h n Moss  Tuning  1651  • • • • • •  5 5 5 1651  Musicks Recreation 75  l / l  59 40 154 182 76* 185 130 161* 67* 232  2/2  3/4 3/5 4/6 4/7 5/8 6/9 7/10 8/11  201 39 168 225 155  8/12 9/13 10/14 10/15 11/16  164  12/17  2/3  165[5]  165[5]  1661  1682  • • • • • •  • • • • • •  1661  1669  (1682) A P r e l u d e o f the Notes A s c e n d i n g and D e s c e n d i n g F a i n I Would An A y r A Saraband V i v e l e Roy The K i n g E n j o y s H i s Own The - K i n g ' s D e l i g h t P r i n c e R u p e r t ' s Welcome Mr. Porter's Delight A L a Mode de G r a n c e Come K i s s Me My S w e e t Kate Saraband A French Ayre Parthenia Mackbeth The A p e s Dance i n t h e Opera Montross March  ro  2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2  1/1  1/2  V7  2/4 2/3  7/9  V5 • •  3/i  16/25 4/8  3/5 3/6  77/86  1/2 10/14  11/20 8/15 5/9 4/8 5/10 6/12 6/11 3/6 8/16 2/4 20/32 4/7 7/13 9/17  APPENDIX  P-/# 54 13 222* 195 25 63* 188 30 200 136 78 6 71 165 156 41* 167* 206 189 3 191 10* 66 217 131 215  Title  IV--Continued  Composer  The N i g h t e n g a l e General Monk's March The H o b b y - H o r s e Dance C u c k o l d s A l l a Row A S c o t c h Tune C a l l e d Sawney A Simphony Coleman l6/[23] Saraband Coleman 17/24 Oh t h e B o n n y C h r i s t 18/25 Church B e l l s New M i n u e t 19/26 J o c k e y Went t o t h e Wood 19/27 Ah C r u e l B l o o d y F a t e 20/28 The G r a n a d e e s M a r c h 20/29 S i t t i n g Beyond the 21/30 Riverside 22/31 The M y r t l e Shade Now t h e F i g h t ' s Done 22/32 A n Ayre Simon I v e s 23/33 24/34 Corant Simon I v e s C o r a n t S imon I v e s 25/35 S a r a b a n d S imon Ives 25/36 The E c c h o S i m on I v e s / 26/37 Almain < ( G e o r g e Hudson) 27/28[38] The G i l l i f l o w e r Simon Ives Prelude Simon Ives 28/39 Ayre (Simon Ives) 30/40 Corant (Simon I v e s ) 31/41 Saraband (Simon Ives) 31/42 The E a r l o f S a n d 32/43 wich's Farewell 12/18 14/19 14/20 15/21 l6/[22]  Tuning  1651  2 2 2 2 2  8/11  2 2 2  8/10  ••  • a • a ••  165[5]  1661  14/22  24/39  a a • a a. a a  9/17  1669  • a « *  ••  a a.  16/22  22/35 22/36 a •  2 2 2 2 2  a • a a a  2 2 2 2 2 2 2  a •  2 2 2 2 2 2  23/32  4/7 5/8  25/35 26/36  15/19 (12/17)  77/85 I8/27 20/28 21/29 21/30  10/13 6/9 (8/10) (9/U) (9/12)  •a a  (13/16) ••  • a  11/13 12/14 12/15 • a  • a  a a  • a  a a a • a  26/40 a a  26/41 27/42 (33/49) 23/37 a •  (28/43) (29/44) (29/45) a a  APPENDIX  IV--Continued  P./#  Title  Composer  '50* 231 16 211 160 58* 64 204* 176 57 73 226 166 9 47 38 I63 72 229 192 150 8 129 61 221  32/44 33/45 34/46 34/47 35/48 36/49 36/50 37/51 38/52 39/53 40/54 41/55 42/56 42/57 53/58 44/59 44/60 45/61 46/62 46/63 47/64 48/65 49/66 50/67 50/68  69 143 43  51/69 52/70 52/71  Almain Saraband Ayre (Simon Ives Saraband New M i n u e t Bore Bonny Brow Sweet Jane Minuet Dragoons March M r . F a r m e r ' s Trumpet Minuet Mardike A Round 0 An Ayre Ayre A Tune ( J o h n Moss) An Ayre ( J o h n Moss) Corant ( J o h n Moss) Saraband • « A Jigg (George Hudson) An Ayre (George Hudson) Saraband Banister Ayre The J o y o f A l l Hearts Amarillis Banister Tune La Cockley  Tuning 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2  1651 1/1  165[5]  1661  17/26 6/12  l/l  (29/41)  (11/15)  1669 15/26 16/28 17/29 16/27  ••  ro  21/34 • *  (14/17)  27/37  (13/18)  13/23 (45/66) (46/67) (47/68) (30/46) (34/50)  95/123  APPENDIX I V — C o n t i n u e d  T#  p./#  Title  22 18 152* 29 l4l 194  53/72 54/73 54/74 55/75 56/76 56/77  95 127  57/1 58/2  282 259 96* 287 27* 291 214 207* 120  58/3 59/4 59/5 60/6 61/7 62/8 62/9 63/10 64/11  243 296 299 51 245 239* 99 283 110 260 81 103*  65/12 66/13 66/14 67/15 68/16 68/17 69/I8 70/19 70/20 71/21 72/22  New M u t t a r O x f o r d Tune Abington Jigg The M a i d s R a n t • • Come B o y F i l l U s , &c • L e t O l i v e r Now Be Forgotten A Prelude C h a r l e s Coleman An Ayre Coleman/ (Jenkins) Saraband Coleman Saraband Gerard's Mistress La Viviuone ( W i l l i a m Paget) The F i g a r y • • Saraband T h e a t e r Tune Minuet Baptist C o u l d Man H i s W i s h Obtain M inue t Minuet T h e a t e r Tune T h e a t e r Tune A Round 0 Farewel F a i r Armida An Ayre Saraband Jenkins. A New B o r e Corant Jenkins Almain Jenkins Almain Jenkins/  73/23  Composer  a  •  •  a  a  «  a  •  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  a  •  a  •  Tuning  1651  2 2 2 2 2 2  165[5]  •  1661  a  a  a  a  a  28/38 •• a  a  3 3  33/45 38/50  3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  38/51  17/23 18/24 (22/31) 18/25  a  a  3 3 3 3 3 3 3 .3 3 3 3 3  1669  24/27 (22/26)  (22/25)'  49/70 50/71  40/51 60/66  21/29 23/32  50/72 53/75 54/77 52/74 56/80 60/85  (41/52)  51/67 (19/26)  83/112 (62/88)  •  a  ro  APPENDIX I V — C o n t i n u e d  Title  T#  P./#  80 289 102 257 252 263* 117 90 244 97 261 114* 273 256 91* 34 186  Almain Corant 76/26 Almain Saraband 77/27 78/28 Corant Saraband 79/29 80/24[30] A l m a i n Almain 81/31 Saraband 82/32 A yre 83/33 Corant 84/34 Ayre 84/35 Saraband 85/36 S araband 86/37 An Ayre 86/38 An Ayre 87/39 A Jigg 88/40 74/24  75/25  Composer Esto Esto Esto Esto Esto Esto Esto W i l l i a m Young W i l l i a m Young Esto Esto Simon Ives Esto Simon Ives G [ e o r g e ] H[udson~ nomas ates homas ates  Tuning 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  1651  165[5]  1661  1669  49/52  32/41  68/96  50/53  26/34  72/101  • • • •  18/21 19/22  • • • •  51/54  27/35  39/52 40/50  20/27 21/28  • •  • •  • • • • • •  54/57 58/63 59/65  64/82 38/49 42/54 43/56  73/102 74/103 69/97 58/83 59/84 60/86 61/87 63/90 65/93 67/95  ^  APPENDIX V B I B L I O G R A P H I C A L DESCRIPTIONS 1.  A M U S I C A L L BANQUET.  London,  1651.  A / M u / i c a l l Banquet, / set f o r t h i n three choice V a r i e t i e s o f M V S I C K . / [ r u l e ] / The f i r / t P a r t p r e / e n t s y o u w i t h E x c e l l e n t new L e / / o n s f o r t h e L i r a V i o l , / e t t o V e v e r a l l / New T u n i n g s . / [ r u l e ] / The / e c o n d a C o l l e c t i o n o f New a n d C h o y c e A l l m a n s , C o r a n t s , a n d - S a r a b a n d s f o r one / T r e b l e a n d Ba/"/e V i o l , c o m p o / e d b y M r . W i l l i a m L a w e s , a n d o t h e r E x c e l l e n t A u t h o u r s / [ r u l e ] / The t h i r d P a r t C o n t a i n e s New a n d C h o y c e C a t c h e s o r Rounds f o r t h r e e o r foure / Voyces. To w h i c h i s a d d e d /ome f e w R u l e s a n d D i r e c t i o n s f o r / u c h as / l e a r n e t o / i n g , o r t o p l a y o n the V i o l . / [ r u l e ] / [ d e v i c e : a l u t e , an open book o f m u s i c , a v i o l a n d a bow w i t h i n a n o v a l b o r d e r b e a r i n g t h e w o r d s • LAETIFICAT COR M V S I C A , ' 37.5 x 48 mm.] / [ r u l e ] / LONDON, / P r i n t e d by T [ h o m a s ] H [ a r p e r ] f o r J o h n B e n / o n , a n d J o h n P l a y f o r d , and a r e t o be fold a t t h e i r Shops i n / Dunstans C h u r c h - Y a r d , and i n the I n n e r Temple, n e a r e the Church Doore, 1651. [Note: The s e c o n d a n d t h i r d s e c t i o n s h a v e t h e i r own s e c t i o n t i t l e pages, t r a n s c r i b e d below, but the f i r s t s e c t i o n , f o r the l y r a v i o l , does n o t . ] RT]  A-Dk « E -Gij, : H -l2 « v  v  v  v  v  [none] Treble [$ versos] Rounds o r C a t c h e s  Bassus [$ reversed for three Voyces.  rectos]  s e c t i o n t i t l e , E ] MUSICA HARMONIA: / OR, / C h o i c e A l m a n s , C o r a n t s , a n d S a r a b a n d s , f o r one T r e b l e & B a / / e , / B y t h a t R a r e and a c c o m p l i / h e d M a / t e r i n M u / i c k , / M r . W I L L I A M IAWES, D e c e a / e d : / And by / e v e r a l l o t h e r E x c e l l e n t M a / t e r s i n M u f i c k , now l i v i n g . / [same d e v i c e as o n t h e t i t l e p a g e ] / [ r u l e ] / LONDON, / P r i n t e d b y T [ h o m a s ] H f a r p e r ] f o r J o h n B e n / o n and J o h n P l a y f o r d , and a r e t o be /old a t t h e i r Shops i n / Dunstans C h u r c h - Y a r d , and i n the I n n e r Temple, n e a r e the C h u r c h D o o r e , / Anno Domini. 1651. s e c t i o n t i t l e , H ] M u / i c k a n d M i r t h , / PRESENTED / I n a c h o i c e C o l l e c t i o n o f Rounds o r C a t c h e s f o r t h r e e V o y c e s : / C o m p o / e d by / e v e r a l l E x c e l l e n t A u t h o u r s , and p u b l i / h e d f o r the C i v i l l R e c r e a t i o n / o f a l l L o v e r s o f MUSICK. / [ r u l e ] / [ m u s i c a l n o t a t i o n and t e x t f o r t h e r o u n d ' N o n  276  277 N o b i s D o m i n i . ' ] / [ r u l e ] / LONDON, / P r i n t e d b y T[homas H [ a r p e r ] f o r J o h n B e n / o n , a n d J o h n P l a y f o r d , a n d a r e t o be 7 o l d a t t h e i r Shops i n / Dunstans C h u r c h - Y a r d , and i n the I n n e r Temple, n e a r e the C h u r c h D o o r e , / Anno D o m i n i .  1651.  Colli 4° o b i . i A - l 3 ( _ i , i 3 ) [ $ 3 ( - A , E , H) s i g n e d : m i s p r i n t i n g D a s B ] , 34 l e a v e s * p p . [8] 1-24, 1-24,  1-12.  Contents! At title. A « [under a t r i p l e row o f ornaments] •To a l l L o v e r s o f t h e A r t o f M u / i c k . ' Signed, 'Your / e r v a n t to the utmost o f h i s poor Endeavours, / John Playford.* A2« [under a t r i p l e row o f ornaments] 'Directions. A2-A^ : the d i r e c t i o n s . Au vi 'The Table t o the f i r / t P a r t , * e r r a t a to the second p a r t , and 'The Table to the l a / t P a r t . ' B-D^ i the l y r a v i o l lessons. D ^ : [_half-way down t h e p a g e ] ' T h e / e v e r a l l Tunings / to the/e L e / / o n s . ' 'FINIS.' Et section t i t l e •MUSICA HARMONIA.• E v-Gu Yi the t r e b l e and bass v i o l lessons. G4 : 'FINIS.' H : s e c t i o n t i t l e ' M u / i c k and Mirth.' HV-I^v, the c a t c h e s . I » 'FINIS.' v  1  v  v  v  V  V  2  CW ( i n f i r s t g a t h e r i n g o n l y ) ] A E x a m p l e . [An Example] A The A3 E x a m p l e . A 3V T h e r e A u The I The I. 2  V  2  T y p i ( B - D ^ ) 4 t a b l a t u r e s t a v e s p e r p a g e , 125 (127.5) x l 4 l (156) mm. ( B ) . O r n a m e n t a l i n i t i a l s a r e used o n l y on f . A . The c a p i t a l * M ' o f ' M i r t h ' (H) a p p e a r s t o be a combination o f three type symbols: a ' V surrounded by two s t r a i g h t p i e c e s o f t y p e . A l l c a p i t a l i t a l i c ' J ' s ' i n the d e s c r i p t i o n f o r A M u s i c a l l Banquet, and i n the f o l l o w i n g b i b l i o g r a p h i c a l d e s c r i p t i o n s , are swash l e t t e r s . The d e v i c e u s e d o n t h e t i t l e and s e c t i o n t i t l e p a g e s o f A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t was q u i t e o l d i n 165.1. I t h a d b e e n u s e d o n Thomas C a m p i o n ' s A New Way o f M a k i n g C o u n t e r p o i n t ( L o n d o n , 1610). P l a y f o r d d e c o r a t e d the t i t l e pages o f A h I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e S k i l l o f M u s i c k w i t h i t u n t i l 1664, and a l s o used i t on v a r i o u s o t h e r e d i t i o n s . v  v  1  RISM I-1651 W i n g 2489  6  Location of copies: 1. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y (Douce H.H.203). F o l l o w i n g t h e f i n a l g a t h e r i n g of t h i s copy i s an a d v e r t i s e m e n t l e a f b e a r i n g the h e a d i n g ' M u / i c a l l Bookes / o l d by J o h n P l a y f o r d , a t h i s Shop i n  Margaret Dean-Smith, " P l a y f o r d , " Die Musik i n Geschichte und G e g e n w a r t , X , c o l . 1351.  278 the Inner Temple, neare the Church Doore, 2, One copy r e s i d e s i n the Henry E. Huntington L i b r a r y (14232). T h i s copy l a c k s the f i n a l g a t h e r i n g . 11  Variants: Huntington L i brary  Bodleian L i brary  C (p. 10) s t a f f 3, meas. 7 v  (p. 15 s t a f f 1, meas. 2  CL  J. ) J  V  (p. 16) s t a f f 1, meas. 2  W W ;c]) [J [s  W  4  On f o l . A o o f the Huntington L i b r a r y copy, the catchword •Example* appears to be m i s s i n g . However, t h i s i s n o t a v a r i a n t : a c l o s e examination r e v e a l s i t has been c u t off; the top of the c a p i t a l *E' i s v i s i b l e . Notes: P a r t I o f A M u s i c a l l Banquet c o n t a i n s 27 p i e c e s f o r l y r a v i o l which are s e t i n three t u n i n g s : fefhf, d e f h f , and e d f h f . Composers named i n the l y r a v i o l a s c r i p t i o n s are [ C h a r l e s ] Coleman, George Hudson, [ J o h n ] J e n k i n s , [ W i l l i a m ] L i l l y , W i l l [ i a m ] Paget and [ W i l l i a m ] Young.  2.  MUSICKS RECREATION. . . No  3.  s u r v i v i n g copies;  MUSICKS RECREATION ON  London, l65[2 .or 3].  n  see the d i s c u s s i o n on pp. 17-24. THE  LYRA VIOL.  London, l65[5].  Mu/icks R e c r e a t i o n : / ON THE / LYRA VIOL. / B e i n g a c h o i c e C o l l e c t i o n of New and E x c e l l e n t Le//ons f o r the L y r a V i o l , both e a f i e and d e l i g h t - / f u l l f o r a l l yong Practitioners. To which i s added /ome few p l a i n D i r e c t i o n s as a Guide / f o r Beginners. / [ e n g r a v i n g w i t h i n s i n g l e rules: a v i o l r e s t i n g on i t s s i d e w i t h a bow above i t ; on the f i n g e r b o a r d , the f r e t s are l e t t e r e d B-H and numbered 1-7, 68 x 127 mm.] / London, P r i n t e d f o r John P l a y f o r d , and are to be / o l d at h i s Shop i n the Inner  Temple,  l65[?].  279 Colli 4° o b i . : pp. [ 8 ] 1-80.  A-If*" [ $ 3 ( - A , A  2  ) signed],  44  leaves,  Contents: A , A : blank. A?: title. A 2 : blank, ky. launder a r o w o f o r n a m e n t s ] ' T o a l l L o v e r s a n d P r a c t i t i o n e r s i n M u / i c k . / A P r e f a c e b y way o f I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e Lyra V i o l . ' Ao-A^i the p r e f a c e , s i g n e d ' A Devoted Servant / J . P . ' A t f o o t ki± i errata. B-Ljj. : the l y r a v i o l lessons. L/+ : F I N I S . v  V  v  v  v  CW ( f i r s t g a t h e r i n g o n l y ) ] ki± F o u r t h l y , A ^ [none].  A ~ through  A o  v  [none]  v  Typ: 4 t a b l a t u r e s t a v e s p e r p a g e , 125 (133> x 175 ( 1 7 8 ) mm. ( B ) . The l e s s o n t i t l e s b e g i n w i t h o r n a m e n t a l i n i t i a l s or large black c a p i t a l l e t t e r s . S e e p p . 22-23 for a d i s c u s s i o n o f the t i t l e p a g e ' s i l l u s t r a t i o n . RISM 1-1652? Wing  See p p . l ? - 2 4 for a discussion of e d i t i o n ' s date of p u b l i c a t i o n .  the  2494  Location of copies: 1. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e B r i t i s h Library (K.4.b.ll). 2. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e R o y a l College of Music ( I . F . 1 4 ) . T h i s copy c o n t a i n s an a d v e r t i s e m e n t l e a f b o u n d a f t e r t h e l a s t page o f t h e t e x t . N e i t h e r c o p y ' s t i t l e page e x h i b i t s a c l e a r d a t e o f publication. Variants: British  Library  Royal College of Music  A2 ( t i t l e p a g e ) "for beginners"  s i t u a t e d on t o p o f the frame s u r r o u n d i n g the illustration  lying within the frame ( i . e . the i l l u s t r a t i o n i s h i g h e r on the page i n r e l a t i o n to the t e x t : implies a printing by d o u b l e i m p r e s sion  D3 ( p . 2 1 ) s t a v e s 1 and 2  both staves are normal  Some o f t h e f u r n i ture appears to h a v e come l o o s e . The t y p e i s d r o o p i n g on the l . h . s i d e o f the page; the t i t l e appears " ranto " the 2nd s t a f f i s out of a l l i g n m e n t , C o  a  ;  n  d  280 British G ( p . 45) s t a f f 1, m e a s . q  Royal College of Music  Library-  4  |J O  u j  J  |m>m>  K (p. 65) s t a f f 2, m e a s . 2  1  Notes: T h e r e a r e 103 l e s s o n s f o r l y r a v i o l i n M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (165[5])» 22 o f w h i c h a p p e a r i n A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t , as w e l l . The p i e c e s a r e s e t i n t h e f o l l o w i n g tunings: f e f h f , d e f h f , e d f h f , f d e f h , f e d f h and f h n . C o m p o s e r s named i n t h e e d i t i o n ' s a s c r i p t i o n s a r e [ W i l l i a m ] A y l w a r d , Tho[mas] B a t e s , C h a r l e s Coleman, J o [ h n ] E s t o , W i l l [ i a m ] G r e g o r y , George Hudson, Simon I v e s , Simon I v e s J u n i o r , J o [ h n ] J e n k i n s , W i l l i a m Lawes, John L i l l y , John W i t h i e a n d [ W i l l i a m ] Y o u n g . T h o u g h he i s n o t i d e n t i f i e d i n t h e e d i t i o n ' s i m p r i n t , Thomas H a r p e r , who p r i n t e d f o r P l a y f o r d b e t w e e n 1648 a n d 1656, p r e s u m a b l y i s t h e p r i n t e r o f M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (165[5])« I n s e v e r a l r e s p e c t s the p r i n t i n g r e s e m b l e s t h a t o f A M u s i c a l l B a n q u e t , w h i c h was done b y H a r p e r : the a d v e r t i s e m e n t l e a f i s p l a c e d a t the e n d , t h e r e a r e no r u n n i n g t i t l e s ( t h e l y r a v i o l l e s s o n s i n A M u s i c a l l Banquet had n o n e ) , and the f i r s t t h r e e l e a v e s of every g a t h e r i n g are s i g n e d . 4.  MUSICKS RECREATION ON THE V I O L ,  LYRA-WAY.  London,  1661.  [ w i t h i n d o u b l e r u l e s ] M u / i c k s R e c r e a t i o n / O N . / The V I O L , L y r a - w a y . / B e i n g A C o l l e c t i o n o f New LESSONS L y r a - w a y . To w h i c h i s a d d e d a P R E F A C E , / C o n t a i n i n g ome b r i e f R u l e s and I n / t r u c t i o n s f o r young P r a c t i t i o n e r s . / [ r u l e ] / _same i l l u s t r a t i o n as o n t h e l65[5] e d . , 68 x 127 mm.] / " r u l e ] / L o n d . P r i n t e d by W [ i l l i a m ] G [ o d b i d ] f o r J . P l a y f o r d , a n d a r e t o be / o l d a t h i s S h o p i n t h e T e m p l e . 1661. RT] A 2 - A ^ : I n / t r u c t i o n s f o r t h e LYRA V i o l .  f o r the  V  LYRA V I O L .  B-N4 * L e / / o n s V  Coll: 4° o b i . : A - N [$2 ( - A , C , D , G , H , M) s i g n e d ] , 52 l e a v e s , p p . [ 8 ] 1-53 45 55 66 57-72 65 74-79 90 81-96. k  Contents:  A: t i t l e .  1  A : blank. v  2  2  2  A * [under 2  2  a row o f  Dean-Smith, P l a y f o r d ' s E n g l i s h Dancing Master, S c h o t t a n d Company, L t d . , 1957). P« x x i i .  1651.  (London:  281  o r n a m e n t s ] ' T o a l l L o v e r s o f MUSICK. / [ r u l e ] / A P r e f a c e b y way o f I n t r o d u c t i o n . ' A 2 - A 2 1 : the p r e f a c e , s i g n e d ' A D e v o t e d S e r v a n t / to a l l L o v e r s o f MUSICK, / J o h n P l a y f o r d . ' Ai^x ' A C a t a l o g u e o f MUSICK B o o k s /old by J o h n P l a y f o r d at. h i s S h o p / i n t h e T e m p l e . ' / [ r u l e ] / [ i n two c o l u m n s ] •Books f o r V o c a l MUSICK. Books f o r I n / t r u m e n t a l MUSICK. / [rule]' B - N i , : the l e s s o n s . N J i ' [rule] / FINIS. • v  CW ( f i r s t g a t h e r i n g o n l y ) ] A2 F i r / t , A 2 Sometimes A3 T h i r d l y , A 3 The/e k i± [ n o n e ] A ^ [none]. V  v  V  Typi 4 t a b l a t u r e s t a v e s p e r page ( N 4 h a s t h r e e ) , 108 ( 1 2 1 ) x 149 ( 1 5 3 ) mm. ( B > . The l e s s o n t i t l e s b e g i n w i t h ornamental i n i t i a l s or large black c a p i t a l l e t t e r s . V  2  RISM 1-1661^ W i n g 2495 Location of Copies* 1. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e B r i t i s h Library (K.4.b.l2). The p a g e s o f t h e t h i r d g a t h e r i n g o f t h i s copy a r e o u t o f o r d e r , and t h u s the l e s s o n s a r e a l s o out of o r d e r . The p a g e s a r e n u m b e r e d 9 14 15 12 13 10 11 1 6 , a n d t h e l e s s o n s , 11 12 20 21 19 17 18 13-I6 2 2 . T h i s o r d e r p r o b a b l y r e s u l t e d f r o m one s i d e o f t h e f o r m b e i n g p r i n t e d u p s i d e down. 2. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e L i b r a r y o f C o n g r e s s , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . (M 1 4 2 . L 9 P ) . Variants:  British  D  2  ( p . 19)  piece "A"  D  2  ( p . 19)  t h e 6th l i n e o f •: staff is missing a piece of type; t h e 1st b a r l i n e has s h i f t e d to the l e f t between the 5th a n d 6th l i n e s  H ( p . 53) s t a f f 2 , meas. 3  is  Library entitled  L i b r a r y of Congress piece is "Ayre"  entitled  "page i s n o r m a l  j )[)];.  Jf Jt -h i>s eo.-.ff I n t h e B r i t i s h L i b r a r y c o pl) y o d i t i o n , there no number f o r t h e 5 8 t h l e s s o n ; i n the L i b r a r y o f C o n g r e s s c o p y , o n l y t h e number 8 a p p e a r s .  is  Notes: M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (l66l) c o n t a i n s 123 p i e c e s , 55 o f t h e s e a p p e a r i n g f o r t h e f i r s t t i m e . The p i e c e s  c:  282  are s e t i n the f o l l o w i n g t u n i n g s : defhf, edfhf, fdefh, f e d f h , and f h n . C o m p o s e r s named i n t h e e d i t i o n a r e T h o [ m a s ] B a t e s , C h a r l e s C o l e m a n , Joj_hn] E s t o , G o t e r [ G a u l t i e r ] , W i l l i a m G r e g o r y , George Hudson, Simon I v e s , Simon Ives J u n i o r , John J e n k i n s , W i l l i a m Lawes, John L i l l y , C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson, John W i t h i e and W i l l i a m Young. MUSICKS RECREATION ON THE V I O L ,  L o n d o n , I669.  LYRA-WAY.  [ w i t h i n d o u b l e r u l e s ] M u / i c k s R e c r e a t i o n / ON / The V I O L , L y r a - w a y . / B e i n g a new C o l l e c t i o n o f LESSONS L y r a - w a y . To w h i c h i s a d d e d a P R E F A C E , / C o n t a i n i n g / o m e B r i e f R u l e s and I n / t r u c t i o n s f o r y o u n g P r a c t i t i o n e r s . / [ r u l e ] / [same i l l u s t r a t i o n as o n t h e p r e v i o u s two e d i t i o n s , t o w h i c h a s t a f f s h o w i n g t h e o p e n s t r i n g p i t c h e s D G c e a d* h a s b e e n a d d e d , 68 x 128 mm. / [ r u l e ] / L o n d o n , P r i n t e d b y W [ i l l i a m ] G o d b i d , f o r J o h n P l a y f o r d , a n d a r e t o be S o l d a t h i s Shop i n the Temple. 1669. RT] A - A K ) I n / t r u c t i o n s f o r t h e LYRA V i o l .  f o r the  V  2  LYRA-VIOL.  (B-Q^)  Le//ons  Coll: 4° o b i . : A - Q [$2 ( - A ) s i g n e d ] , 64 l e a v e s , p p . 1-48 [ 4 9 ] 50-88 [89] 90-110 [111] 112-120 ( u n n u m b e r e d pages are p a r t t i t l e s ) . K  [8]  Contents: A: title. A : blank. A : [under a double row o f o r n a m e n t s ] ' T o a l l L o v e r s o f MUSICK. / [ r u l e ] / A P r e f a c e b y way o f I n t r o d u c t i o n . ' A -Azj.s t h e p r e f a c e . A t b o t t o m A ^ : s i g n e d ' Y o u r W e l l - w i / h e r , and H o n o u r e r o f a l l t r u e L o v e r s o f MUSICK, / J O H N PLAYFORD, P h i l o - M u / I c a e . ' A/+V; ' A C a t a l o g u e o f the l a t e P r i n t e d M u / i c k B o o k s . Sold by J o h n P l a y f o r d a t h i s Shop i n the Temple. / [2 c o l u m n s ] B o o k s f o r V o c a l MUSICK. B o o k s f o r I n / t r u m e n t a l MUSICK. [at b o t t o m ] B o o k s w h i c h a r e now f i t t e d f o r the P r e / s . ' B: ' S h o r t AYRS a n d TUNES f o r B e g i n n e r s . / H a r p w a y , s h a r p T u n i n g b y U n i s o n s ' H : ' [ r u l e ] / The S e c o n d P A R T . / The T u n i n g H a r p - w a y f l a t * N : ' [ r u l e ] / The T h i r d P A R T . The T u n i n g H i g h H a r p - w a y S h a r p ' P k t ' [ r u l e ] / The F o u r t h PART. / H i g h H a r p - w a y f l a t ' Q^ : 'FINIS.' v  ?  2  V  CW ( f i r s t g a t h e r i n g o n l y ) ] A F i r / t . A3 T h i r d l y , A3V The/e A ^ [none]. 2  A  V 2  Sometimes  Typ: 4 t a b l a t u r e s t a v e s p e r p a g e , 130 (144) x l ? i (179) mm. ( B ) . A l l t h e l e s s o n t i t l e s b e g i n w i t h o r n a m e n t a l initials. A d i s c u s s i o n o f the a d d i t i o n to the t i t l e p a g e ' s i l l u s t r a t i o n a p p e a r s o n p . 23 2  283 RISM 1 - 1 6 6 9 ° W i n g 2496 Location of copies: 1. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e B r i t i s h Library (K.l.c.2). 2. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y (Douce P.P.193). 3. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e H . E . Huntington L i b r a r y (81621). The b o t t o m r u l e o f t h e d o u b l e - r u l e frame s u r r o u n d i n g t h e t i t l e p a g e ' s i l l u s t r a t i o n has been c u t o f f i n the B r i t i s h L i b r a r y and the B o d l e i a n Library copies. Variants:  see  p.284.  Notes: M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (I669) c o n t a i n s 152 p i e c e s , 82 o f w h i c h make t h e i r f i r s t a p p e a r a n c e i n t h i s e d i t i o n . The p i e c e s are s e t i n the f o l l o w i n g t u n i n g s : defhf, edfhf, f d e f h , and f e d f h . The c o m p o s e r s named i n t h e e d i t i o n ' s a s c r i p t i o n s a r e Thomas B a t e s , C h a [ r l e s ] C o l e m a n , J o h n E s t o , W i l l i a m G r e g o r y , George Hudson, Simon I v e s , J o h n J e n k i n s , J o h n L i l l y , J o h n M o s s , J o h n W i t h i e , and W i l l i a m Y o u n g . M U S I C K ' S RECREATION ON THE V I O L ,  LYRA-WAY.  London,  1682.  [ w i t h i n d o u b l e r u l e s ] M u A c k ' s R e c r e a t i o n / ON / The V I O L , L y r a - w a y : / B e i n g a c h o i c e C o l l e c t i o n o f LESSONS Lyra-way. To w h i c h i s a d d e d a PREFACE , / C o n t a i n i n g /ome B r i e f R u l e s and I n / t r u c t i o n s f o r y o u n g P r a c t i t i o n e r s . / [ r u l e ] / The S e c o n d E d i t i o n , E n l a r g e d w i t h A d d i t i o n a l New LESSONS. / I r u l e | / 1 same i l l u s t r a t i o n as o n t h e 1669 e d i t i o n ] / [ r u l e ] / London, P r i n t e d by A [ n n e ] G [ o d b i d ] and J [ o h n ] P [ l a y f o r d , the y o u n g e r ] f o r J . P l a y f o r d , and a r e t o be S o l d a t h i s S h o p n e a r t h e Temple C h u r c h . 1682. RT] ( A - A i r ) I n / t r u c t i o n s f o r the L e / / o n s f o r t h e LYRA V I O L . v  2  Coll: 4° o b i . : [ 8 ] 1-88.  A-M^ [$2  LYRA-VIOL.  (-A) s i g n e d ] ,  (B -Ml> ) v  48 l e a v e s ,  v  pp.  Contents: A: t i t l e . A : blank. A : [ u n d e r a row o f o r n a m e n t s ] ' T o a l l LOVERS OF M U S I C K . / [ r u l e ] / A PREFACE b y way o f I n t r o d u c t i o n . ' A2-A4: t h e p r e f a c e . A t b o t t o m Alj.: ' Y o u r W e l l - w i / h e r , and H o n o u r e r / o f a l l t r u e L o v e r s o f MUSICK, / J . P . ' A j , : ~ 'MUSICK B o o k s P r i n t e d f o r J o h n P l a y f o r d , a t h i s Shop n e a r the T e m p l e Church, / [ r u l e ] . • B : [ u n d e r d o u b l e r u l e s 1 ' S h o r t and e a / i e L e s s o n s o r Tunes f o r t h e LYRA V I O L . / H a r p - w a y Sharp / T u n i n g . ' A t bottom H ^ : 'The End o f the F i r / t Part,' I i [ u n d e r d o u b l e r u l e s ] 'The S e c o n d PART. / Harp-way F l a t / T u n i n g . ' A t bottom M ^ : FINIS.. v  2  v  v  Variants  (Musick's R e c r e a t i o n British  ( p . ID 2 s t a f f 2, meas. 3  [l669])»  Library  Bodleian Library  C  Huntington L i b r a r y same as the B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y copy  iX  -J3>  C? ( p . 11) s t a f f 3. l i n e 2 meas. 1  a f t e r the time s i g n a t u r e , the l i n e c o n s i s t s of 2 short pieces of type  the l i n e c o n s i s t s of a s i n g l e l o n g piece o f type  V  same as the B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y copy  (P. 40) s t a f f 3, meas. 3  I (p. 58) s t a f f 3» meas  same as the B r i t i s h L i b r a r y copy  v  K ( p . 65) ascription K (p. 68) s t a f f 2, meas. 1 V  2  same as the B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y copy  George Hudson  )  same as the B r i t i s h L i b r a r y copy  Georga  Hudson  same as the B r i t i s h L i b r a r y copy  The f o l l o w i n g v a r i a n t s e x i s t i n r e g a r d to the numbering o f the l e s s o n s : i n the B r i t i s h L i b r a r y copy, the number 5 i s upside down? i n the B r i t i s h L i b r a r y and the B o d l e i a n L i b r a r y c o p i e s , the number 130 i s p r i n t e d as 30j and i n the Huntington L i b r a r y copy, the number 121 i s p r i n t e d as 21.  285  CW ( f i r s t g a t h e r i n g o n l y ) ] A F i r / t , 3 T h i r d l y A ^ The/e A ^ [nonej^  A  2  V 2  Sometimes  v  A  Typ: 4 t a b l a t u r e s t a v e s p e r page ( M ^ has 3), 126 (142) x 164 (172) mm. ( E ) . Ornamental i n i t i a l s are used f o r a l l the l e s s o n t i t l e s . v  2  RISM I-1682 W i n g 2497  9  Location of copies: 1. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e B r i t i s h Library (K.I.e.3). On t h e f l y l e a f o f t h i s c o p y a p p e a r s t h e n o t e , " T h i s c o p y b e l o n g e d t o T [ h o m a s ] O l i p h a n t , whose n o t e s a r e a p p e n d e d h e r e b e l o w , w i t h one o r two r e m a r k s by J [ u l i a n ] M [ a r s h a l l ] . " The i n s i d e f r o n t c o v e r b e a r s t h e b o o k p l a t e o f J u l i a n M a r s h a l l . The n o t e s a r e interl e a v e d t h r o u g h o u t the volume. 2. One c o p y r e s i d e s i n t h e Durham C a t h e d r a l L i b r a r y (MUS C 9 6 ) . A f a c s i m i l e o f P a r t I o f M u s i c k ' s R e c r e a t i o n (1682) h a s b e e n p u b l i s h e d by H i n r i s c h e n E d i t i o n , L t d . (London: i960). W i t h o u t e x p l a n a t i o n , the e d i t o r , N a t h a l i e Dolmetsch, c o n c e a l s the f a c t t h a t the r e p r o d u c t i o n i s n o t o f the complete edition. The f a s c i m i l e a p p e a r s t o be o f t h e Durham L i brary copy. Variants : C (p. staff  British  Library  9) 1, m e a s . 6  C ( p . 10) initial 'M' v  Durham L i b r a r y -X-  only traces visible  are  normal  J D ( p . 18) s t a f f 3, m e a s . 7 v  •s:  The l a s t two v a r i a n t s a p p a r e n t l y were c a u s e d b y i n s u f f i c i e n t a p p l i c a t i o n o f i n k t o the f o r m , r a t h e r t h a n by the use o f d i f f e r e n t type symbols. M u s i c k ' s R e c r e a t i o n (1682) c o n t a i n s 117 l e s s o n s , Notes: O n l y two t u n i n g s a r e u s e d : defhf 55 o f w h i c h a r e new. and e d f h f . A s c r i p t i o n s i n the e d i t i o n s n a m e t h e _ f o l l o w i n g composers: [ J o h n ] B a n i s t e r , B a p t i s t , T[homas] B [ a t e s ] , C h a r l e s Coleman, [ J o h n ] E s t o , G[eorge] H [ u d s o n ] , Simon I v e s , [ J o h n ] J e n k i n s , and W i l l i a m Y o u n g .  APPENDIX VI Introduction T h i s appendix c o n t a i n s  a representative  drawn from each of P l a y f o r d ' s  five  sampling of music  lyra viol editions.  are f i f t y - t w o compositions i n the appendix, r o u g h l y t o t a l number of p i e c e s  i n the e d i t i o n s .  pears i n a t a b l a t u r e v e r s i o n and In the  e x p l a i n the  10fo of  Each c o m p o s i t i o n  the ap-  in a staff transcription.  tablature reproductions,  u l a r i z e d and  There  the b a r r i n g has  obvious e r r o r s have been c o r r e c t e d . o c c a s i o n a l more e x t e n s i v e  been r e g -  Footnotes  a l t e r a t i o n , except f o r  composition, "A Masque" by Simon Ives from the  1661  one  edition.*  T h i s p i e c e was  s e l e c t e d because i t d i s p l a y s more ornamentation  than any  c o m p o s i t i o n i n the  nately,  other  the rhythm and  lyra v i o l editions.  barring i n Playford's  2 of e r r o r s .  Unfortu-  t a b l a t u r e are  . The  e r r o r s are so e x t e n s i v e  t h a t the f o o t n o t e s  q u i r e d to e x p l a i n e d i t o r i a l changes would be e x c e e d i n g l y some.  full  R a t h e r than r e s o r t to e x t e n s i v e  difficulties,  the  cumber-  f o o t n o t i n g f o r rhythmic  t a b l a t u r e f o r the p i e c e  p r i n t e d by P l a y f o r d .  re-  appears e x a c t l y  A l l changes made appear i n the  as  accompa-  nying t r a n s c r i p t i o n . *T#  41.  2 L u c k i l y , the p i e c e c o u l d be r e c o n s t r u c t e d by comparison to a concordance i n the subsequent l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n . The l a t e r v e r s i o n i s r h y t h m i c a l l y a c c u r a t e , but s t r i p p e d of i t s ornamentation. 286  ,  28?  For various  the  staff  tunings  are  transcriptions, the  same as  the  those  pitches  used  assigned to  i n the  thematic  the cat-  alogue i Chart fefhf defhf edfhf fdefh fedfh The  transcriptions  i n the  Name Lyra Harp Harp High High  Way Way S h a r p Way F l a t H a r p Way S h a r p H a r p Way F l a t  suggest  P i t c h e s used i n the t r a n s c r i p t i o n s e'b g d G D d'b g d G D d'bbg d G D d ' a f#d A D d'a f d A D  polyphony whenever  l y r a v i o l p i e c e s by the  use  it  appears  of d i r e c t i o n a l note  evident  stems.  238 Table  of  Contents  S q u a r e b r a c k e t s a r o u n d a c o m p o s e r ' s name i n d i c a t e t h a t i t was d i s c o v e r e d t h r o u g h a n o u t s i d e s o u r c e ; parenthes t h a t i t was d i s c o v e r e d i n one o f t h e l y r a v i o l e d i t i o n s A M u s i c a l l Banquet  (1651)  Anonymous, A n A l l m a i n e (T# 50) . . . A n o n y m o u s , When t h e K [ i n g ] E n j o y e s & c . (T# 76) ( C o l e m a n ) , A Symphony (T# 63) . . .  290 290 291  M u s i c k s R e c r e a t i o n (l65[5]) A n o n y m o u s , A L a Mode de F r a n c e (T# 67). [ J o h n J e n k i n s ] , A B o a t , A B o a t (T# 220) W i l l i a m L a w e s , C o u n t r e y C o i l (T# 197) . W i l l i a m L a w e s , A J i g g e (T# 146) . . . . C h a r l e s C o l e m a n , Almane w i t h D i v i s i o n (T# 113) J o h n L i l l y , A [ n A l l m a i n e ] (T# 103) . , G e o r g e H u d s o n , C o r a n t o (T# 238) . . . . W i l l i a m L a w e s , C o r a n t o (T# 278) . . . . S i m o n I v e s , A y r e (T# 107) A n o n y m o u s , S a r a b a n d (T# 142) . . . . , Musicks Recreation  296  298  299 300 302 303  (l66l)  A n o n y m o u s , New R a n t (T# 161). . S i m o n I v e s , A Masque (T# 41) J o h n J e n k i n s , A l m a i n e (T# 123) J o h n E s t o , A J i g g (T# 235) . . G e o r g e H u d s o n , S a r a b a n d (T# 298) W i l l i a m G r e g o r y , A y r e (T# 86) . S i m o n I v e s , C o r a n t o (T# 288) . W i l l i a m Y o u n g , A y r e (T# 1). . . J o h n J e n k i n s , S a r a b a n d (T# 177) J o h n J e n k i n s , A y r e (T# 109) • • C h r i s t o p h e r S i m p s o n , A l m a i n e (T# 94) C h r i s t o p h e r S i m p s o n , S a r a b a n d (T# 280) Musicks Recreation  292 293 294 295  304 305 306 309 309 310 312 314 316  317  318  321  (I669)  A n o n y m o u s , O v e r t h e M o u n t a i n s (T# 198) A n o n y m o u s , S c o t t i s h H o r n p i p e (T# 219) • • W i l l i a m G r e g o r y , A n A y r (T# 53) J o h n E s t o , S a r a b a n d (T# 178) [ G i u s e p p i n o ] , The I t a l i a n R a n t (T# 100) . A n o n y m o u s , P r e t h e L o v e T u r n t o Me (T# 249) S i m o n I v e s , A y r (T# 114) W i l l i a m G r e g o r y , A l m a i n (T# 105) . . . . W i l l i a m G r e g o r y , C o r a n t (T# 286) . . . .  322 323 324 325 327  328 329 331 332  289 Musicks Recreation  (1669)—Continued  J o h n M o s s , A J i g (T# 98) . . . J o h n J e n k i n s , A l m a i n w i t h D i v i s i o n (T# 11) . . Thomas B a t e s , A y r (T# 14) . J o h n M o s s , S a r a b a n d (T# 228) J o h n W i t h i e , A l m a i n (T# 83) J o h n W i t h i e , S a r a b a n d w i t h D i v i s i o n (T# 230) . Musick's Recreation  334 335 338 339 34l 342  (1682)  A n o n y m o u s , The H o b b y H o r s e Dance (T# 222). . . S i m o n I v e s , C o r a n t (T# 167) S i m o n I v e s , P r e l u d e (T# 10) A n o n y m o u s , B o r e (T# 58) [ J o h n B a n i s t e r ] , S w e e t J a n e (T# 204) A n o n y m o u s , A b i n g t o n J i g (T# 152) A n o n y m o u s , G e r a r d ' s M i s t r e s s (T# 96) A n o n y m o u s , The F i g a r y (T# 27) B a p t i s t , M i n u e t (T# 207) A n o n y m o u s , F a r e w e l F a i r A r m i d a (T# 239) . . . J o h n E s t o , S a r a b a n d (T# 263) G e o r g e H u d s o n , A n A y r e (T# 91)  344 345 347 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358  290 A M u s i c a l l . Banquet Anonymous, An A l l m a i n e , f e f h f  <g'  —  •  <*  (16.51)  (p. 1, no. 1 ) .  3.,  ^ — * ~ -  ^  T# 50  P i P-fefr*e  1  c A A c  |  S  a, i t% ffi <^  3S  <1r"1^-  r r t r'  s  i- >  J.  its:  H 1 J.  T Anonymous, When the K [ i n g ] Enjoyes & c , (p. 4, no. 5).  •31  =5  Hj  fefhf  T# 76  ~2T  T  0  291  A. C  353 a •EC a:  is:  34=H-tnni.j.> r n IJTT J " >  J > " >  " J  r ( C h a r l e s C o l e m a n ) , A Symphony,  <i  i  zip; *  it  j  j  I  fc.  C  <\  defhf  C  f  (p.  1  8, no.  G>-  C\  10).  \  rT# 6 3  <A.  r ^ f  1;  f  T  U  1 J  f  r  0  1  292 ft ft  J3 1  ^  T  C  - 9  (l65[5])  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  Anonymous, A l a Mode de F r a n c e , f e f h f  J  ,  J  A I—A  a, \p  t\ 1  3.  >  d,  c o>:  a  J  (p. 4, no.  J-  J  A i A  T#  8)  J  a V> d 1 $  j  J  £  1  7 &  F  1  r  v—c  -4  6?  293  J->J  I  J  J  J. >j  J  1 <*  rx  A  AO  to  .._  —  . ...  .  CX CA  Ox  o>  • ¥ * — J X  \  0  1 ]  _  |—1  *  IT  \=&=4  John J e n k i n s , A Boat, a Boat, f e f h f  J  m ht T3?  351  -CVCX  J  A  O-  cx  ex.  ^  J  J.  A  A  >  J j CX,  CK_  ^4 4 ^ r p  (p. 7, no. J  c \  J J  c x  5:  1  £  1  ft  A  <\  %  -A  TV—' ^_  c .  14)  T#  J  J  i-  c .  cx  -JCV-  c  c\:  220  294  W i l l i a m Lawes, Countrey C o l l ,  j  J i-  d e f h f (p. 10, no.  J 1  ^ 3  J-  Q.  UJ  rv  J  J .  J>  r»  -  1  J.JVJ  T#  J  J  197  J .  ta.  j. ex  18)  u  J  j jj  ha  £ *-  1  j  e. A f. n, •  A  a  r  T  t  3SI hiv*—i—a • 1 1 1 £>  1  =<  1  i  r  * • s~>  }  \—  —1 1  l  1  c ar  \r>  — - J — s  _^  f. , k  s c . -P  i*  1  C4.!  I  1  i  f  j.  a b <a_i b -flk j  ].H  i J J  /J J J  - f h  a.  M  to—_apr-2L o  1  R—«—^§  ——9  J  h  i  tir  «  — t — i  i=F=£  W i l l i a m Lawes, A J i g g e , d e f h f  ^—=1  (p. 11, no.  J J J J J . > J J J  J  q  A -C  T#  19)  J J  J. j> J i i  A""  4"  V?  A  I)  A  146  V>:  C  A.  1i J r  ;  j  j  j j j J J jJ J A  OS  J iJ  d  -Ov-  £  *  J  9  3E$ r  '  I a  _Lt  n  i  j  _^ J  X  -P A  A  * ** « »  c\  1  i  l_Ji  1—r-f' g  f f  ^ in ^  f>  r -  »• f  >j —  — I F — J -  296 J  J A CX -f  ^r——%r.—w  J.  J h  ,  ft a,  2  ^ 5  r—  )  >  J 1 1  J. j> " ' ] ' C- o>  A 111  f  ex  ^  r  T# 113  C h a r l e s Coleman, Almane w i t h D i v i s i o n , e d f h f (p. 36, no. 49).  -hHf  )  > I.  f^v  J  J>  J  J  J  >  £ CX  £  J " -g  ^  a  -•  ,  1  $  V  y a ,  A —  4'  J  J  J  w  G. A -f A -f A ^—.-^  •  C  J : f  -  a  •  «,n  i  .11.  3  i  1  v  T  1  ~  *  f  A  —  -  f  ft  —  c  _  297  A b A cx  e  >  <\  : ft  I  ft  ft  g\ g A O  —  c  ,  .————fc*—C  as. C £  > -f h  L  >-,  i  -ft_  _h. t g c. £  h  -P  ex Q  N f XJ~  f -f Kft_  n  ~i f~ it  UIIIHIIMII  1  . |  mta4  -P \  ~_  j  P4 i  > h - T  -1 f ^ 4)TTJ  - -  f.  A V?—ex  j . ._ fe tx^ _  1  e. - f  £ g. - T g ft  ft  fesw"  -P  9~  —  f  h  f  . f - f —  298 A  b  A.  c\ h ft  &  CI  CA,  f. C X-  _cx_  -^-s—P  P—n,—  f, -£  -f cx  John L i l l y , A [ n A l l m a i n ] , e d f h f  (p. 41, no.  T#  52)  33Z  t  4  ? i :  25  1  y  i IK-  ^\  .......  ^ .  c\ c. A_ o. I F,  3E  ~c5T  t  IT  •6—0-  103  299 J.  >  >  J- J .  > r.  £4  A t  i  a,  fc^  ...  *  5f^  George Hudson, Coronto, e d f h f J.  >  (p. 54, no.  j  ,  I  r  r—-—  > 1  k  *  "  j _a  £ c <*  CX  ? c  )^7L  fr*—H  b  A <\ c  ^  3  T# 238  58).  ^ T  ^  H  c5  y  J  <?k  *  ' f  1  k i t -  1  <^  C.  \  er~crT b  Iw.—f'  i ' >  ^ — H " ^ —  > A i c—c—e  i.'  >  J r  300  • -  J  J. >  >  J  J  ].  J>  3F=F=  ^ — —  1  *>  "  f  C  .  rx  4^-  J.  £  >  /x  r  K  JL  f J  r.  j"  :£ ft  o  IE  r  •  -OH-  W i l l i a m Lawes, Coranto, f e d f h  J  3  T# 278  (p. 62, no. 68).  ex  «- « \7LS  c . A c q .  I. >  h -P  i n  5 T  301  J ^  AS  u T  J  j. J  1  1  ;  J  y)  >  A  s  -  i  \r  \— —\—W-  1  5  J  c fe.  A  ]) IY  h-j  J  a.  f  —  »J. i ^ 1  1  1 -r  r i  J>  A  AV»  J  I Hi \  F  .  J> ...  .  \« A  i  i T  )  L .]_.. n 1  1S  .f.r;-  1  i_  flH I  A  *_  t-  f  1^—1  f  A  <A V» A v  flia  ^  - k  r 7  ^  »> A  /  H i  T-  l - l l  1  i  j.> J . i  j  3 0  >• J . y J .  v Cft.O-  F f f  -=r.  a  Ar..  r  V-  T# 107  Simon I v e s , A y r e , e d f h f (p. 76, no. 8 4 ) . J  h  J .  £—1 —j*—  - 4  >  U n  J .  )  U  J . >  %  1 £4—!  —p  -*  zt  Ok—AJSL—C  >  7  —  ^ r -  b  fc  y 0  r  A  r  A  r  A *  ' '  r  ' f T —  1,  ^  c ±  f.  Cv  e£  r  1  ft-f  fl  A  A  fA—TTr-  S 3  f  Ov  ^  j  f  t  -t  f  f  t  1  1  303 Anonymous, Saraband, d e f h f (p. 79, no. 88).  i  i  *1  -A  _  ^ — ex  ) • J)  £  a  \ . ^  :  _..  p  "1  >  . — ,  . <N  v—-  • i: J> J J.  v-,-—,—__.  c  i  1  L  „  i  H r L  I) • •  ft  Tf• ex.  b A —  . P  =  a  |p  ft  r  >  ^r  1 j>'~~  —» a *  h  j or  A  J J J  i -J  I-_  A  A  c.  * -  .  C  r. &  c.  $  i i s 14 A14-  c *  c\  ex  ij M i  L  . * C  CX £  C.  C\  r  —  <x  ]1i O -  | h  i  U j l  i.j>  >  t  f  j  i  C,  i n n n i i > \T±*=±=  i. M > .J " > J a » « — CA — —*——^ Ow a. f v * ^ »  J  ,- f — a cx \ ex  f  1 "  ^  ^-  T# 142  < "  ^  —  •f a cv.... ..  ex  c h  ]. > J > J Jv  , ...to  a ex  Pv  i b c\  <x ^ cx C ex cx • •  .  304 Musicks R e c r e a t i o n Anonymous, New  (\  •X  m  3  Rant, defhf  ft  t t,  (p. 3, no. 5).  ^  1.1  \  v  a  f  A  £  J ?  f  l  \ '  1-  i  O.  F.  ^  -  1  A  i  —  *  —  : n  i  t  f  n  il-  ft  161  ^  —\  |  it 1-—CJ  anil-  .  '-^1  I'frnif^  n  ^  '11  fcEU) H 1 1 1 ">  <K J i n .  "-A-JL*—4—  1  T#  C  n 11  11  (1661)  W—»  n _  11  =  b  305  Simon Ives, A Masque, d e f h f (p. 4, no. 7 ) . ]  > J .  J.  A  x)  A  P f  ^  g & & ^~A: c  it  3  H  >  >  q , ,C  .  > C  >  .  )  ]  •  >  >  J  Q>  11 P ^ ^ E  T ^  a_  ^  f  A, - f b A  f  QTT  5: >J J  *  f J- > >. >>. Ji J.  1. > •  a.-  A )p a>  A-  f  306  >) y <X  f . t  c  J .  *  (A  o\  > j J.)  -P  + ^  -£  J  J .  >  •P rx  h  J  >  r. m P. A p. <a  a  =£.  T  f  a  f - P h-P h^ft  cx-  ex.  r  John J e n k i n s , Almaine, e d f h f (p. 2k,  T# 123  no. 32).  J.>i. > J J J  >  J  i  IE  27 5  i '  _  J-  i  a f . c P . - F c ^ r g g. cX_  f )  . , P A  b cx c\  CX  * J. *  <»  A  T  *  __—o>  c.  —  *  p f  b  i  1  i/>  ,—A—=f—A—c—«X-  . i a  «  ~ T  -  307  J  >  y * * *  J  J . J>• J.  J r  •f, K  a.  ± = 6 :  J. J>  j  > J a — C  l b A  ] >  J >  3  f f c  «C fc.  1  A  c-  »  2  A  a.  ^ — ir  j 3cm  —^  **  ~F£  i  ~3  J > J>  J J>  J  J. te <\  J>  >  1  n —#  1  ~ _  i. > A <*.  3T  308  )V>.' A  a  •  *  A  >  *  |  r. o.  —c  i. j  f  • <c%  r — —  o  In  as  a.  <•  C  1  f  i  g5v5 f1 i-  "f  A /x,  J.  J  1 E  C «  a  I  AC  4  J  fc  3=  - i &  J J- >  J  1  1=  ~ K  a  K  7^  J) 1 {  ^—Y—  r  3?  r  ^  r  —  309 John E s t o , A J i g g , e d f h f  •  J  3  J£  J  (p. 34, no.  J  J .  J  1  ^  a  44).  T# 235  j  j ,  i  -j  J a  £  C  3 u  f j >  t}.  ex  \ 1  c  ex.  a  .  y  •  1  •  r1  a  T" i - ;>  j..>.  J. a  c <*•  J  >  c  f. c. a c  c CX  cx,  > '  T George Hudson, Saraband, e d f h f •J  -3  „  J. > i "•. ^  (p. 39, no.  i  >  1  b ^ A b c\  J  j e\  A.  =  T# 298  51).  J .  1.  1  > t  1 »  ' >  4-4^4-a—»  r  \  310  J  J  P  A.  J  J  I  J  J 1  1  \  "3—<*  Lf *  I —  V  V  *  1  i  \  *  :  =  «  W i l l i a m Gregory, A y r e , e d f h f (p. 44, no. [ 5 8 ] ) .  <}  i —f  >  -P  §  >  •  -P  F..  *  l  —  <  •  -P  fl,  >  111 V  1  ^  i  n  \  -n—^—*4— —  1.  T# 86  1  1"  t - L ( ^  i ? - ^ 11  H  -L-  f  1  =  —  > K  d W  1  — 1  ^ — ^  c\  t  f 1  -f  A  -p  h  5  *  *  i  A  cx  A  b  A_  A  T t  1  \  h  A  b  te  a  a.  U  f  .  , 1  L _ j a  •  311  i_  .  j  -j. )  j  &  -—j—\—  -  b  *  f  e  —  i". > > *.—V*— > '• >. y  h  M j 1 J .pq —% e— ^— i  'T  !  !  ,: 11  1  .  -4—f-4f  T  1  ,  ^—b CA  (()  A a. b  r  p  *  •  —  t  i  ex „ — c cx r - ...a  —  *  . A  p_  A  !  1 1  ex to j^..(h^-  f-p J.  *  c* m cx—  1  i  312  Simon Ives, Coranto, edfhf  (p. 49, no. 44[64]).  T# 288 i .  •*  ^  c  *1  1  J  h  -P A  a  J.  ^  -c  f  >  J-  J  ^  -CK-  -f , A  •4 i ^ j ; T  J.  J  ^  r  a  , 5Z£Z  r  CK  r  CA  1\  ACQ  Ok  A  A  J  f  T t f  313  -h  3 = f c  -P A  ) J j  >  >  J.  c  Ac. g , ,  A  J  1  f ,d a  icrcz  i  _A  ) V>  J  J  J  J  "  J  J>  1 if i.i n ^ n ^  \  j  A  f  -cv- • f.  CN.  A a ^"5:  it—^  •f f C ft f.  K  10  A c  i  c  -GL-  FT  cx c  I ex  f  £,  c\ c  £ 1  314  W i l l i a m Young, A y r e , f d e f h  J I V.'  >  ^  (p. 65,  no.  84).  JJ> 6  T#  J. A  .  o. £  1  J>  & +•  I  at r  r J  i  j>  J  3 f t  C  Pi  •f X  . c Jt  °>  i  . P  o* —a_  .  ft.  a.  . — O s — _ —  A  a—=~="  f?——  £  r  s  tTf  <1  £ C ay  o  315 :  c e o .  »  c.  o_,  g, <*-  -f  £•  C A  3 d  r  I  -P f.  f. E.  -e ^  r  ex.  r.  I ex. | g S  I „  le >  £  c  r £  g—S,  ^_CA  a  ^  ^  ^  a  .  1  r\  r o a  cx  1 -B- 6 0 -  i  O  <3>  cx  316  John J e n k i n s ,  Saraband, f d e f h (p. ?2, no. 91).  I  J  .  >  J  J  e g h k h - P e - P h c c ^ ,  ^  »^  —  1,  ^  4  '  1  •ii' h.  a  =-  >  j.  C  £  c.ft,„ L  , . —  !  i  - A  —  \-  J  f  A  j. a-  '11'  ^  -P  e. g  j  <V  rl* A l  fr)  J  T# 1??  h -P  , j ^  1 i \ — « f ^ ? — r r x — ^ — £ — - ^ - ^  ^>  Y  l  1 >A l f>' V J P W 1  1  J>  A —  ¥ k  ;  k — 1 — A  r  :  1  n£  -1^~~U—j ^ f s  f-^f  V  o  J J  t k I, k b  /  —  \  k  \  ~  * — = ^ t  '-  J J  1J  t r v  , —  % —  r  A  317  John J e n k i n s , Ayre, f e d f h (p. 76, no.  cV ,—A  C -ty-  Vi  c\  C  75).  f_c.  T# 109 c\  C\  tx  4  V — A  'c  ill  c\  £ g q  1  b  r C^w  cx.  J >  i. J  C ft .  ,  £  CX  fc.  cxr  i  1 IL  ^  ^*  ^  c^  ^  _£—„_4—fi. IS!  3  E — t  >  J.  J  *  cx,  1-  > > H J . A  ?  0  >.i  c  &  •  .  .  .  cx  CX  >  A  cx  —  f  \Vut  3  T  318  «wf—r  x ...  1  J .  >  A. c a .  <\ -c h c . — a -  a. c  A  1^  C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson, Almaine, f e d f h ( p . 88, no. 8 8 ) .  > . > > . * m >•>.') J I—a—8 " - " . i . + ^ t ^ * A  >. >  r  - J-^LjjJ 1  g  i  a, 1  f  Ht-^-  (J  a.  :  :  ;  A  h  J3_i  a  1  f  T# 94  ni  •£ A » c*-  319  cx_  6  cx  b  V» cx  t\  a  r u , a  >  A  b cxZ  i  ""J  r i.  t j -  p > A c cx  1  f  r  J  J>  h *  u  I  r  _t£  »  1  If  1  O Q,  cx  k  J A b A  f  ^  ft  320  A 2  ^  a.  +  a  J \  K -f A  h  A.  :>  i«  —  1  r r A  a a.  =£-—-r  -f h i  h.  1  r  -3  I  i .  4f  3  CK  -f  * — ^  l- r —  K  A  j  tH—F  ^  r  c. A, -f A,  ,  c  A -f  h c  it  TOT a  rrf  1 it  T  g  321  C h r i s t o p h e r Simpson, Saraband, f e d f h (p. 89, no. 8 9 ) .  J  ~3  J  Q  J  J  -t»  ^  J  J  c  J  . A  i  ej  <J  cx  T# 280  J A V>  c\  cx 5  i  —  11  k  1  ^  C  c  i.  j  ~ J J. A>  I, t *\  1  ^  J  >  ex. £  C  cx  I <£  c  y r~ -as-cr  55 r  ;  c  F n r  A  £ cx  IT  r  7  X T  , K  1 \1  r  4?  1  A1  A  f  322 (1669)  Musicks R e c r e a t i o n  Anonymous, Over the Mountains, d e f h f  (p. 2, no. 3).  T#  198  J cx,  1  f.  pro  p  A  cs,  A  cx  i  c  i  5  1—n:  c  cx  ex  r  —^  £  1  J  r  J.  >  J.  >  CX  cx  c  ^ "  &  Cc\  323  Anonymous, S c o t t i s h Hornpipe, d e f h f (p. 24, no. 38).  cX A  A  _a,  f  J " b  ^-Vv  J  J A  J  £  J  c—  —w  J  J  Q>1  |  ft  =4=  J  J  r  ^  ^  —  4  ^^  IX  F„ C —  C  '  — e  d  Q  — r  —c.  V  wj  j!  —  ;  ^  4  11 J i i U i . r i  <  J  r-  1—  J  =t=i=  I  J  J  E . C  C .  H  ^  i J. > J C . C  J  -  •  1  b  J .> J  C  — ^  ^—^—1  i  '  a  =1=F  rt-  £-~H-{  =r-?—H  = >  a,  A ,  ———  J  A  I  „c\..  T# 219  i  3  '  324  W i l l i a m Gregory, An Ayr,  d e f h f (p. 35,  C ~, Ol  £  no.  51).  o.  T#  *—V  g.  7  53  •  ?  >  J. •'} J. A,  r  A  Vv  cx  >  I 1  r  r  - -  —  *  c  f  ex.  cx  cx  f-  f  T  j. -» A C C X _ C —E.  C C  CX  CX  .  Ci  .  -  A C  d  .  A  J. c  e. a  >  J _cx_ cx f.  > C. >  <A V> CX  CA  hi  >  to  CX  j">.  >.>i. i  <\  -CX_  »~aC  r  1  r u  'J>  325  -ON.  ex  I  C  Ov  _£ C..  c\  CX_  -P  ro—X  SPSS  r c, -P  -P  A  TT f T  =F_  ex ex _cx  d  T  ; 5T  John E s t o , Saraband, d e f h f  J cx  (p. 38, no.  J  J.  J>  %  " K1  55).  T#  J 1  J 0  1  —  —  5  L  l i '  1  If  r  1. ) i  J 1  F.  -rT  f  178  -ft.  \  -f  \ O1  r  1*  F -f  11 ex.  c.  b  326  J  J.  J  cx  >  J.  J>  1  J  ISC  e.  cx  rr >  > 1  r x  c x  cx  1  W A  c X  CA  t-  CX  cx  — — 4.  p  x  a t  it  F*  r — r — t — r - i  y^agf —0  c  1  cx  1  I  \  \ r c\ r y  c{  _  N  fc  ft  b  •  c  -C  CX P £ 4- \  \  a -  cx  1 i  327 [ G i u s e p p i n o ] , The I t a l i a n Rant, e d f h f (p. 51. no. 73).  C  I  <l *P  T# 100  A  H H T T  £ C  o. <« A  g>  -F €  ^  A  J.  A  >J  PC  -A-  fc  C=5 3  wfc  w>  w%  a^j.  w»  ,  • » r  t-i.  r.  HE  R  °  c S  ft  U  )>.) > > • , , » f  —  j  t  J ?  J  >•  WuUUH  r.  i i . i «M i  >  1  " J >> J .  1  1  328  J  IJ >. ) ) i J  > . >  J  t!_ y.  ex  f  CK  Anonymous, Prethe Love Turn to Me,  78).  i  J  J  J  J -  e d f h f (p. 55»  no.  J.  J .  J  J  J  i  T#  J>  J  i  J  J  -4  cx  r J.  J  J  d  J  J<  ^ J  d' %  —  £  —  *  i-  «^  <J  C  CA  C  !  CX 1  1  •  1  1  -S  J-  >  — ^  J A  ^>J?  r  :  a  r Ck  P_ 1  1 .  Si  6—^—  g  \  1  <^  J  J '.  1  ?-r  — a  -*  h  *  *  »  j  j*_^L_  249  329  _^ 1 e  21 r  <x  &  ft  zee  -Ou-  i  5  T  Simon Ives, Ayr,  —  ,  edfhf  (p. 60,  86).  J.  i  i.  £  b_  J. J>  i  £  -f . jj,  3—  JTi  3  .  114  J  A  A  <\  1 pi'f J i. )h ^ i 1 E^tr—  &i—  -0  h  1  fey • • 1  \,  J.J>. On  1 7  T#  ]  <sM—6—  r  no.  [ J ]  J .  J  1  ] . >  1  1  330 - P -P  t|  —•  *f  P  a  P  c.  * *  •  T J.  >  -A  1 ^1'  J  il  J. h  > CK  £  h  j  i J ^ b, a -• A1 —  r - i  J>  UtlWIIIMIIW  J  ^  ^  -i—I—T ~tcr  * ft  i 1  c—r—a> W-  ) cx  m  u L 1  CA  1  -f f. -P  ^4r  331  10k),  W i l l i a m Gregory, Almain, e d f h f (p. 75. no.  1 ^  .  rr  i n  J .  T#  105  S Z E Z Z E :  is:  T T  a,  fx  1 A  c  J.  _fc>  J>  J  J> J  i:  t  lira —l  E E C  .—±  CK  a b  \  -£— C  &C  W SA  a  ~\ — f i \  b  C  a  332 fc-  C E ,  -Eg.  C  H I  <a  t  L  h  f  <2w  ^  ^  ^  j  n  ^  >).  >  I  I "ST  "27  .William Gregory, Corant, e d f h f (p. 76, no.  106).  T#  286  A.  J 4  1  fc  « w  J  -  333 .  •x.  _ _  £ CK  J j.  i 4-  -\. : it  j  j j  I  cx  J J. y —  r  1  J  J.  I  =£  A  J.  J  ,  jg_  J-  >  J  &  b-  ex  1 i-  ) E.  4  C  E.  c a  J  4L-C**  *Was  )  c CX  1  r  :K  i r  1  J  _J.  4t •  J. >  cx  .J  J  >  ^ r >  Is  cx  -—$ 1 ^1 i.  —  o\ \  CA J  5  j r — * i rK  1  .2.  J)  c a  33^  John Moss, A J i g , e d f h f  (p. 88, no.  ^  r  ^  :  -r-. :  i , —  &  >»  A  £  HTJJ  c  a  A.  ^  .A.  &  4  —  \  —  y  j>  s  •! •  V  — \ —  ^  A  98  «  - s  1  T#  11?).  3 _  - A -  f r [ f  f  1  _ck  _  _  cx  £. c » cx  a  e- ' e cx ex.  I  3 3 :  1  I  335  John J e n k i n s , A l m a i n w i t h D i v i s i o n , f d e f h no. 119).  ^ 3  L  £  .... s»  C_g  (p. 90»  r  C  1  <s*  T  jru  cjfc, g  A:  5 J.  %4  11  t-\ ore, \ %  g — ^  1^1  T#  1  ) tA  J  3SI  — 5  i  336  Q,  £t  Ox  a:  5fc  C  <x c 0 L  6  icx: fa..  -  c;  — *  r4—H—1—  )!  >  .  ft  i  C  g. -f  i-1  ^  £ „  .  "A  C  J>  ^ £ 4 - ^ f ^ —  CX  c c  or F. C  ^  337  >  A c  & c ty  i  J tx  A  BE J  i  Ou  1T—g  i  BE  f  ^  <x  C  £  £. f  J >  f. C. CX ^  "j  >  C.  i  hf. , £ OS  •f  T  £  c~ac  AI tcij'fttx  >  O  .  1  338  2 S  (p. 104, no. 134).  Thomas Bates, A y r , f d e f h  I =  ft  r-  T  ^  §  ,  1  c  \  J>  A  ,.  J.  Ok  £X  1  j  p  i "  h f  J  ii. c  *  J> 1  &  -7T  1.—1M—I—,  0r^3—-S ~  > r  ri  T# 14  —  —  i  :  —  ,  f-f—  T  >  -  ^  f  —  f  —  > i  r  T  c. <sz  a  c  E.  A X  a  T=crT  i . J> J  J>  —  1 1  r.  t  r  J  2  '•  ¥  1  i  T. I ? f ?  /John Moss, Saraband, f d e f h (p. 109, no. 139).  J. cx cx  I M  -A  —W^-  _ M — ^J—*  J>  £t»  j;  if  CX  |C  >>  >. >  15  e—»—  C  ^~r~"  I  228  ) J  A  \ CX -i  >,  P  *V  j, c  c  Z  ^  J  a  cx  &  i  T#  ,  r^-fT  ^ or r -  —  3^0  •3:  :  &  -A-  it*  X  c  c k  c A  (rt  c.  pn  ~ ••••Si  Li4  A. &  T C  cV  T  -f-  341  John W i t h i e , A l m a i n , f e d f h ^»  ^ a.  ±  (p. 114, no. ^  T# 83  145)  J  cx  c!. A C  351  :cx  r rr r C X  C  C X  cx  A  -JCX-  h  4  5  T c  tlx Acct  _  -CX_  C ft a  tf  32.  ^  ^  ^  J  i•  J)  J ZSx-  CX_  -XX-  r  cx  cx A.  342  >  J  J  J -<X-  c o,  ) ,  ret  1  f  O"  a  <\  c:  T  f  r  is:  r  r  John W i t h i e . Saraband w i t h D i v i s i o n , f e d f h no. 148).  J  V  1-  J  4  b  1  (p. 117,  'j Q\  r  J  J o.  35:  T#  J  i  J .  A:  c  a-  1  1  230  3^3  > -C?l—C  >  •—  A.—CX.  J.  C X — C X — c *  "J  n  J  J. 1  \  Cr  b  I  CL  T  T  /V  _,  c  x  <\  £  cx  rx  »  1  J 1 1 ,. I  i -f  3i  ft  C  h  -  f  i  h 0  , '  f  ,  -fin  A  CA J S C  1  4  T  T  344 J  r  J ^ — s i1 »  *  *  3 M  J  —*Z  i««  s w » — — b a — .1  a  c A, -£ A  A,  -F . A  Musick*s R e c r e a t i o n  *»A.  1—  —  1  J. > J J,) J  J  j  >—  f  £4.  C  CSk,  (1682)  Anonymous, The Hobby Horse Dance, d e f h f no. 2 0 ) .  J  =  »  A.  T#  (p. 14,  J  J <5k-  J  222  J J. > J c. a.  e  1  345  J 3J J <%. A <\  IS  CK  « ? - — -  j  j  j  J.  <r. g. c.  r r rri f f ^ |  S  c  c  *  U  1  A  1  n &  b*  t  J 1 —  4 — —  Simon Ives, Corant, defhf  (p. 24, no.  pi  1  '1  f j .  34).  T# 167 J  ^=5  J .  J  J  is:  5 ' r  346  |  W  ^  3  r'g'  ^  V  —fr_  4*—^4-4^  E k  -$r—c  A ^ _ .  ° > —  ;  -J—-4-+- —^—<J 1  j^J  J  J.J>  ——k—&  -^-4r^  -  ws»  J . ">  — a*  —^ i \ \—^Hi r ^  )  1}  J I2t  ^ J—*0  ^»—: ^  J.  IS  >  1 —  )  j:>"  VT A J g  ft  ——  i. > V <a>V ( ^  J  te:  i  —  i  —  .  J  —  3^7  3JC  IS.:  .j 1  4 X ^  1 1 |  1  ^  1  ^  1  1 1  cx  ^  j  ow  >) i . r  7T.  Simon Ives, P r e l u d e , d e f h f (p. 28, no.  39).  T#  10  > ) >J i  -r  Tim  1  WJ  a  <« & r  -w-  1>  348  >  Jl'  I  >  < & .< x  351  <v  -3-3f  J  >  1  — ^  f  \  \  Ji  4 » V l  Aa-'-C-iU.^Cfact.  ftca  349  } &es  Caress: 351  & &  >  > 3 A  •ft**.  -A.  C  g,  J  >  C  ;  I 47  f .  >  4 f.  Cff, -f  ^  X_ I-TZ  T  ft  4 4 —W  4-  350 A A A  e c  *  z:  < aoaeBBi •  bvraniiy  j  -6  -&~ArA.  WJanaasEH  C Ck  £.  jpnnquway  J . J J J  >  £5  r Anonymous, Bore, d e f h f (p. 36, no. 49).  JJJ  J . J J  a  -A  k  A  i -  J  4»  ft  -a,  1E  T# 58 l - >  J  J  J  1  San*"'  J  JJ  J-J J  -grgr  4a t  J  5*  -»w*-  f  £ -A  h  351  -tfw-  r<3  i ^  h  k e t ft •£  — ^  i t  St.  *;  1  —  [John B a n i s t e r ] , Sweet Jane, d e f h f (p. 37,  J -c 3  it  no.  J J J J J.JJ J J 1  33Z  a <\  51).  JTVJ  T#  204  352  i  § § 6 *  I  J * l  _X3>  (i  i  J a J i  ia|n r ~ g r  ^•'^•jl- I  JO*-  ft ft  j , J J J |.Ji ]  ^f^H-H  7  r  Anonymous, A b i n g t o n J i g , d e f h f (p. 54,  ^~HP" r A  V>  no.  74).  1 0  T# 152  t*. 3 3 :  353 - c  A - T K ^  I  A  -  *»  1  T JJ«S  J  J  j J i  K n li  J j  J  «A  J J J  ^  X £  j A  l»  a  1  -p ^  14 =  L^L  A  1  i  ft  -J—  -  < 4?  _JC^  1  L LJ f  _  —  —  A—I.  2T  Anonymous, Gerard's M i s t r e s s , e d f h f (p. 59. no. 5)•  zE=E£ _JSk  L  3:  T#  96  J*  X^ N  5*—;1 ,4 ' <3t  _  35*  t3t  '  4^  d-  — p — 7 * — ~ X X r A-—1——^ _ & r — — e * > c» K. t % i A  j  />——5s——\—f£—A C£ C. C i — j  J»-— A, 1 <-  ^ o_  r j .> > . > ) . > > - >  >  }.) y>  Anonymous, The F i g a r y , e d f h f (p. 61, no. 7 ) .  j  T# 27  I S I  S  F £4 W4  A-^hiUt.  3E  =3  % OL  •0^  ck  444A <*  ^A^>  355 A <y,  S 1  1  ' I  f  3E  4:  A  &  '9  —~£>  » u ^ 4 - x Mi-, - 1 - 4-^j=^  1  1  J  J. J-  iJi  J  J  J  3SI 3E-  ^  £  K L  1  i J U l l  1  H —11  i - = j  A y, a ^  A  3fc  BE  B a p t i s t , Minuet, e d f h f  J  J  (p. 63,  no.  T#  10).  J 3£  -rr T"  ^  207  3  I  5  6  JJ  \ <x •£  (L  A a, -A-  k ••  f —  J.)J J  J _  :  4 0 4 , i - -1 4=^  .  fc»  C.  C  T  1  C ft I  ^  i  j \>\  =  f a  =  > J J J.  JJJ C  \  L_  j  fy.  r  JJJ.J  C  C  a  f.  £L_C  1  c  c.  n  J  J  %  >  J  >  > J  & A £  f f  1 i-  ' r i ^ y  1  Anonymous, F a r e w e l F a i r Armida, e d f h f (p. 68, no. 1 7 ) .  J  et. £%  cx  rHl|Ut|JJ.i4^to 1  ~~  J—t  i  J  V  J  \  T# 2  J  J  .  —  » 3£  J  J->  J  J j jJ  •>  J pr-"  M#WVT-^J J i ft ft ft TT  3  J J 351  9  357  JJ>) :  }  79—A—!L £_ C C <Vjf  J  ) *  ££ 1 _  J  £. — A  :  ,  1  1  p  p  — — / »  *"4i  Pff—'—  —<VT—kj—uki—ft*  **•  I  1 T£4h —B  T John E s t o , Saraband, e d f h f (p. 79, no. "  J  J "  J.J.)  J  J.  J  v--  ^> tx •p*  <%.  J J . >  J  J JJ" J  J  LJ-Xi I  1  r  i  T# 263  29).  J)  ^  J.  I2t IS!  r  ±UJ\.\._ i?i-,M—w-j 5 ^  T  J  358 George'Hudson, An A y r e , e d f h f (p. 86,  _A_d  3 S I  no.  T# 91  38).  2fc  a: C!J-  3  ^  y  T  >  J' CI, ~  i b  c e t  C  >j  <X ft  J >  J.>  .  

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