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The apothecary by Joseph Haydn : a production thesis Henrikson, Steven 1975

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T H E , A P O T H E C A R Y BY JOSEPH HAYDN: A PRODUCTION THESIS by Steven Tracy Henrikson B. Mus., University of B r i t i s h Columbia, 1967 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC in the Department of Music We accept th is thesis as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA August, 1975 In p resen t ing t h i s t h e s i s in p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t o f the requirements f o r an advanced degree at the U n i v e r s i t y ,of B r i t i s h Columbia, I agree that the L i b r a r y s h a l l make i t f r e e l y a v a i l a b l e fo r re ference and s tudy. I f u r t h e r agree tha t permiss ion fo r ex tens i ve copying o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r s c h o l a r l y purposes may be granted by the Head of my Department or by h i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . It i s understood that copying or p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r f i n a n c i a l ga in s h a l l not be a l lowed wi thout my w r i t t e n pe rm iss i on . Department of M u s i c  The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Columbia 2075 Wesbrook P l a c e Vancouver, Canada V6T 1W5 Date October 1, 1975. ABSTRACT The following d i s s e r t a t i o n outlines i n d e t a i l the steps followed i n producing The Apothecary, an opera by Joseph Haydn, written i n 176 8. An opera had to be chosen that would meet the r e s t r i c t i o n s of an opera workshop: limi t e d number of singers, young voices, and s i m p l i c i t y of design. A t r a n s l a t i o n from the German text into a singable English t r a n s l a t i o n was f i r s t required. A rehearsal sched-ule was then drawn up. This had to accommodate a timetable involving other opera excerpts. Also needed was a break-down of the opera into a number of scenes for both musical and staging rehearsals. Time and research were given to the staging, designing of the set t i n g , and l i g h t i n g of the same. These were then put into e f f e c t . Conducting was also studied and applied as the f i n a l d i s c i p l i n e to co-ordinate the work for perform-ance . Joseph Haydn's The Apothecary met the l i m i t i n g require-ments of an opera workshop. The candidate also experienced the m u l t i p l i c i t y of problems met when producing an opera. The work presented a good challenge, and an excellent learn-ing s i t u a t i o n for future application. i i i TABLE OF CONTENTS I CHOOSING THE WORK 1 I I ORGANIZATION AND REALIZATION OF PROJECT 5 I I I CONSTRUCTION AND PLANNING OF SCENERY AND LIGHTING 21 IV MUSICAL REALIZATION 30 V FINAL APPRAISAL 37 BIBLIOGRAPHY 40 APPENDICES: I Scene Breakdown II Rehearsal Schedule I I I Coloured Photos of S e t t i n g IV L i s t o f P r o p e r t i e s V L i s t of Expenses VI L i g h t i n g Instrument Schedule VII Cue Sheet V I I I F l a s h - p o t Diagram IX Programme of Performance X Xerox Copy o f Score -Key t o symbols used i n Stage d i r e c t i o n XI S c a l e Drawing o f S e t t i n g (diagram) XII L i g h t i n g P l o t (diagram) 42 43 44 47 49 51 52 53 54 55 151 152) s-e^^vvCtb 15 3J ^ z k ^ i v LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Plate I I n i t i a l sketch A 14 Plate II I n i t i a l sketch B 15 Plate III Search for alternatives 16 Plate IV Perspective sketches IV Plate V F i n a l design concept, plan and elevation 20 CHAPTER ONE CHOOSING THE WORK The Apothecary, by Joseph Haydn, i s not o r d i n a r y f a r e i n the o p e r a t i c r e p e t o i r e . There was a f l o w e r i n g o f i n t e r e s t i n the work around the t u r n of the century w i t h the p u b l i c a -t i o n of the one-act v e r s i o n by Robert H i r s c h f e l d i n 1895, but today the work i s o n l y o c c a s i o n a l l y performed. The music, however, i s very charming; the s t o r y i s w i t t y and amusing. F u r t h e r , i t s one-act, one-scene format and modest res o u r c e s of f o u r s o l o s i n g e r s and s m a l l ending chorus make i t an• i d e a l choice f o r an opera workshop s i t u a t i o n . Opera workshops have some r a t h e r severe l i m i t a t i o n s . F i r s t l y , the s i n g e r s i n v o l v e d are seldom a " f i n i s h e d product", so the works chosen to be performed must p r e s e n t a c h a l l e n g e to those a t v a r y i n g stages of development, and y e t not over-tax those who are j u s t b e g i n n i n g t h e i r study of opera. Secondly, any chorus involvement should be s h o r t and r e l a -t i v e l y unimportant to the t o t a l scheme of t h i n g s because few s i t u a t i o n s have a f u l l , s e p a r a t e l y t r a i n e d chorus. Chorus members p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n an opera workshop are o f t e n good-natured v o l u n t e e r s who are a l s o i n v o l v e d i n a number of o t h e r p r o j e c t s . Best r e s u l t s are most o f t e n o b t a i n e d from such a group when the r e h e a r s a l s are very i n t e n s e , but 1 2 o c c u r r i n g over a s h o r t p e r i o d of time. Another f a v o u r a b l e p o s s i b i l i t y i s the choice o f an opera i n which the chorus work i n v o l v e s a s m a l l number of people, so s m a l l i n f a c t t h a t the e n t i r e chorus can be made up of s o l o i s t s i n the workshop who are not i n v o l v e d as s o l o i s t s per se i n the p a r t i c u l a r work chosen. In e i t h e r s i t u a t i o n , operas i n which the p l o t r e v o l v e s around l a r g e crowd scenes are b e s t avoided. Few workshops have a f u l l - t i m e back-stage s t a f f . There-f o r e , those who do the s i n g i n g must probably a s s i s t i n the b u i l d i n g and p a i n t i n g o f the scenery, and, as much as p o s s i b l e , i n the running of the p e r f o r m a n c e s — a r a t h e r demanding r e q u i r e -ment indeed! For these reasons, the c h o i c e o f an opera r e q u i r -i n g one b a s i c stage s e t t i n g w i t h few " e f f e c t s " o c c u r r i n g d u r i n g the performance i s a d e s i r a b l e one. A s m a l l o p e r a t i n g budget i s the f i n a l blow to those who dream about an over-extravagant stage s e t t i n g . A c l e v e r stage s e t i n c o r p o r a t i n g s i m p l i c i t y o f d e s i g n , c o n s t r u c t i o n , a minimum of b u i l d i n g m a t e r i a l s , and evoking l o c a l e and mood i s the most p r a c t i c a l s o l u t i o n . The t o t a l l e n g t h and nature of the work i s a l s o a neces-sary c o n s i d e r a t i o n . L e s s - e x p e r i e n c e d performers have d i f f i -c u l t y s u s t a i n i n g a long and slowly-paced work. A comedy wit h a quick-changing mixture o f s o l o s and ensembles, and of about one hour i n l e n g t h p r o v i d e s ample o p p o r t u n i t y f o r workshop p a r t i c i p a n t s to develop t h e i r b a s i c s k i l l s , and y e t not be d r i v e n beyond t h e i r immediate v o c a l and dramatic p o t e n t i a l . When, as i s o f t e n the case, no o r c h e s t r a i s a v a i l a b l e f o r opera workshop p r o d u c t i o n , the s i n g e r s must be accompanied by 3 piano d u r i n g the performances as w e l l as the r e h e a r s a l s . Most standard operas are p r i n t e d i n the p i a n o - v o c a l format, making adequate accompaniment m a t e r i a l s r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e . The excep-t i o n s are u s u a l l y those operas which are extremely r a r e , such as f o r g o t t e n h i s t o r i c a l works, or modern works t h a t e i t h e r have not been performed, or have not as y e t aroused s u f f i c i e n t pub-l i s h e r i n t e r e s t . Should an o r c h e s t r a be a v a i l a b l e , i t must be remembered t h a t the u n i v e r s i t y or music s c h o o l can a t b e s t o f f e r a student o r c h e s t r a . Much g r i e f i s spared i f h i g h l y v i r t u o s i c o r c h e s t r a l accompaniments r e q u i r i n g a number o f more e x o t i c instruments are avoided. A s s u r e d l y , a. core o f s t r i n g p l a y e r s w i t h a few added standard woodwinds, b r a s s e s , and p e r c u s s i o n can be assem-b l e d . Many operas have such an o r c h e s t r a l accompaniment and are, from the o r c h e s t r a l s t a n d p o i n t , l o g i c a l c h o i c e s . The choosing of H i r s c h f e l d ' s one-act v e r s i o n was made a f t e r g i v i n g c a r e f u l c o n s i d e r a t i o n to the t h r e e - a c t v e r s i o n , p u b l i s h e d i n 1970. T h i s v e r s i o n , e d i t e d by H. C. Robbins-Landon, i s a r e - c o n s t r u c t i o n of the remaining p a r t s o f Haydn's o r i g i n a l manuscript. While i t would be o f g r e a t value to produce the complete v e r s i o n , a number of f a c t o r s would have made the c h o i c e u n s u i t a b l e . To b e g i n w i t h , much o f the h i s t o r -i c a l i n t e r e s t of the o c c a s i o n would have been wasted because of the u n a v a i l a b i l i t y of an o r c h e s t r a f o r t h i s p r o d u c t i o n . A l s o , The Apothecary i s i n the s t y l e of opera t h a t was c u r r e n t i n the f i r s t p a r t of the e i g h t e e n t h century, i n v o l v i n g a l a r g e number of da capo "number" a r i a s . E x p erienced p r o f e s s i o n a l s 4 have d i f f i c u l t y s u s t a i n i n g the i n t e r e s t and v o c a l demands of t h i s s t y l e over the l e n g t h of a f u l l t h r e e - a c t opera; students would f i n d the task n e a r l y i m p o s s i b l e , and c o u l d e a s i l y s t r a i n t h e i r v o i c e s . The t o t a l c a s t of f o u r s i n g e r s i s too l i m i t e d f o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n of the work as a f u l l evening's e n t e r t a i n -ment. A s i g n i f i c a n t number i n the programme would not be pro-v i d e d w i t h r o l e s to s i n g . T h e i r needs are b e t t e r served by a performance embracing a combination of opera e x c e r p t s or s h o r t one-act operas. In t h i s way, each person would have o p p o r t u n i t y to prepare s e v e r a l d i f f e r e n t s t y l e s of s i n g i n g and a c t i n g . The one-act v e r s i o n of Haydn's The Apothecary f i t t e d w i t h -i n the b a s i c l i m i t a t i o n s a l r e a d y l i s t e d , and was t h e r e f o r e chosen as an i d e a l v e h i c l e f o r a t h e s i s p r o d u c t i o n to be pro-duced w i t h i n the U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Columbia opera workshop programme. CHAPTER TWO ORGANIZATION AND REALIZATION OF PROJECT Before any p l a n n i n g c o u l d b e g i n , a s i n g a b l e t r a n s l a -t i o n had to be c r e a t e d . S i n g e r s normally e n r o l l i n an opera workshop to l e a r n s t y l e s o f music and a c t i n g . Few, a t t h i s p o i n t , have mastered the s i n g i n g o f another language, and are most a t home wit h t h e i r n a t i v e tongue, E n g l i s h , i n t h i s case. Since the l e a r n i n g o f another language i s not the main o b j e c -t i v e , and time i s extremely l i m i t e d , i t i s an obvious d e c i s i o n to conduct r e h e a r s a l s and performances i n E n g l i s h . Only a German t e x t i s i n c l u d e d i n the U n i v e r s a l E d i t i o n o f Robert H i r s c h f e l d ' s one-act v e r s i o n o f The Apothecary. As no oth e r e d i t i o n i s a v a i l a b l e , p r e p a r a t i o n s began wi t h the c r e a t i o n o f a t r a n s l a t i o n . The task was f a c i l i t a t e d through having l e a r n e d i d i o m a t i c German phrases d u r i n g s e v e r a l years of p r o f e s s i o n a l s i n g i n g i n Germany and A u s t r i a . The t r a n s l a t i o n i s i n c l u d e d i n the accompanying Xerox copy of the s c o r e , Appendix X. C a s t i n g was a simple matter, w i t h two s i n g e r s f o r each p a r t being a v a i l a b l e through the enr o l l m e n t of the U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia opera workshop programme. The one excep-t i o n was the p a r t of the tenor. C o n s i d e r a b l e s e a r c h i n g was r e q u i r e d to e n l i s t the a i d o f one tenor who, f o r t u n a t e l y , was i d e a l f o r the p a r t . The tenor e v e n t u a l l y sang both perform-ances, a l l other p a r t s a l t e r n a t e d . 5 6 The proper a l l o c a t i o n o f r e h e a r s a l time was the next p r i o r i t y . The one-act opera was f i r s t broken down i n t o a l o g i c a l s e r i e s o f scenes to f a c i l i t a t e r e h e a r s a l s c h e d u l i n g of s p e c i f i c s e c t i o n s . Some scenes are more d i f f i c u l t than others because of the number of c h a r a c t e r s i n v o l v e d , or the complexity o f the music or a c t i n g , and so more r e h e a r s a l time had to be a l l o t t e d to them. The scene breakdown i s i n c l u d e d i n Appendix I. Rehearsal p l a n n i n g i s o f t e n made d i f f i c u l t because of i l l -ness which causes s i n g e r s to c a n c e l t h e i r p a r t i c i p a t i o n i n a r e h e a r s a l . F u r t h e r , the s i n g e r s i n v o l v e d were s i m u l t a n e o u s l y l e a r n i n g and s t a g i n g scenes from ot h e r operas, and t h e i r r e s u l t -i n g u n a v a i l a b i l i t y was another c o m p l i c a t i o n to s c h e d u l i n g . To a l l e v i a t e these d i f f i c u l t i e s , a p l a n o f a l l a c t i v i t i e s was r e a l i z e d , f l e x i b l e enough to rehearse o t h e r scenes when o r i g i n a l p lans had to be c a n c e l l e d . The r e h e a r s a l schedule of The  Apothecary can be seen i n Appendix I I . Most o f the work w i t h the chorus was managed i n the l a s t few r e h e a r s a l s . P l a n n i n g of the a c t i n g and movement onstage was compli-cated by the gre a t d i s p a r i t y of experience i n the c a s t . A l s o , the l i m i t e d r e h e a r s a l time d i d not al l o w f o r s p e c i a l s e s s i o n s to r a i s e the a c t i n g l e v e l o f the l e s s ex p e r i e n c e d to t h a t o f the more accomplished. The f o l l o w i n g approach was decided upon: develop a b a s i c concept of each of the fo u r c h a r a c t e r s of the drama; adapt and broaden the e x i s t i n g s k i l l s o f the p a r t i c i p a t i n g s i n g e r s to b e s t achieve the b a s i c concept. The 7 b a s i c c h a r a c t e r concepts were: V o l p i n o - age 30 f o p p i s h mannered (from c o u r t l i f e ) scheming Sempronio- age 55-60 e c c e n t r i c showing s i g n s o f s e n i l i t y as a r e s u l t of advancing o l d age G r i l l e t t a - age 18 y o u n g - g i r l type n a t u r a l l y innocent q u i c k - w i t t e d s i n c e r e i n t e l l i g e n t Mengone- age 21 q u i c k - w i t t e d s e l f - d o u b t i n g , fundamentally courageous i n t e l l i g e n t Using these concepts, the c h a r a c t e r s were developed a c c o r d i n g to the i n d i v i d u a l s i n g e r ' s a b i l i t i e s ; much of the s i n g e r ' s own p e r s o n a l i t y was thus p r o j e c t e d i n t o the i n d i v i d -u a l i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s . Since three o f the p a r t s were double-c a s t , i t was p o s s i b l e to see, u s i n g the same b a s i c concepts, how each a c t o r gave the p a r t a n a t u r a l l y d i f f e r e n t p o r t r a y a l . To i l l u s t r a t e , the two men chosen to p l a y Sempronio were of s i m i l a r h e i g h t , age, and v o i c e category. One had a c q u i r e d c o n s i d e r a b l e experience through opera workshop p r o d u c t i o n s , the other was d r a m a t i c a l l y and v o c a l l y l e s s developed. However, the p a r t was w i t h i n the grasp of both of them and both attempt-ed p o r t r a y a l s o f Sempronio's b a s i c c h a r a c t e r concepts as l i s t e d . The more experienced man was a robust, s t r o n g , p h y s i c a l type. He was p r e d i s p o s e d to quick and d e c i s i v e movements. Using these n a t u r a l a t t r i b u t e s , h i s p o r t r a y a l o f Sempronio 8 was t h a t of decaying s t r e n g t h , but s t i l l as a f o r c e to be reckoned w i t h . The o t h e r was a t a l l , lanky type; h i s move-ments slow and l a n g u i d . He was s u c c e s s f u l l y p o r t r a y e d as a f r a i l , p h y s i c a l l y - d e c r e p i t type, f e a r e d because of h i s p o s i -t i o n of power, but o u t d i s t a n c e d both p h y s i c a l l y and m e n t a l l y by the younger people. These d i f f e r i n g i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s a f f e c t e d the c h a r a c t e r of the" opera's c o n c l u s i o n as w e l l . The one a c t o r was seen as being o u t w i t t e d , and cornered by h i s own greed. The other was a l s o o u t w i t t e d , but caught i n a s i t u a t i o n t h a t had simply gotten out of hand. The more b a s i c s i d e o f s t a g i n g , the " b l o c k i n g " , i n v o l v e d p l a n n i n g the p u r e l y mechanical events and movements o f the opera. The work was c a r e f u l l y analyzed to determine the d i r e c -t i o n a l entrances and e x i t s of the p r i n c i p a l a c t o r s and the chorus, and t h e i r r e l a t i o n s h i p to the music. At t h i s p o i n t a b a s i c stage s e t t i n g was decided upon, the development of which w i l l be d i s c u s s e d l a t e r . Developing the a c t i o n s and p h y s i c a l placement of the c a s t a l s o n e c e s s i t a t e s keeping i n mind the v i s u a l p i c t u r e they p r e s e n t on stage. P l a c i n g a l l c h a r a c t e r s on one s i d e of the stage a t the same time would p r e s e n t an imbalance. Yet, hav-in g a l l c h a r a c t e r s s t a n d i n g i n rows or groups, immobile i n the c e n t r e stage area, i s v i s u a l l y u n i n t e r e s t i n g . A balanced v a r i -ety o f " p i c t u r e s " was developed a t s t a t i c p o i n t s of the opera f i n a l e , w i t h movement o f the c a s t and chorus between these " p i c t u r e s " guided by necessary stage b u s i n e s s : f i r s t o f a l l 9 p l e a d i n g w i t h Sempronio; and then the e n t i r e chorus "packing up" h i s shop. F u r t h e r v a r i e t y was made p o s s i b l e by chorus members l e a v i n g and r e t u r n i n g to the stage i n v a r y i n g numbers to f e t c h a r t i c l e s to be "packed up". P h y s i c a l placement must sometimes be c o n s i d e r e d f o r r e a -sons of s a f e t y . A g r e a t d e a l of a c t i v i t y occurs around the f i r e p l a c e on stage l e f t . Yet, when the f i r e p l a c e explodes i n the f i n a l scene, the c h a r a c t e r s were "blocked" w e l l away from the area, a l l o w i n g an ample margin of s a f e t y . The music must a l s o be c o n s i d e r e d i n p l a n n i n g movement on-stage. I t must be r e c o g n i z e d t h a t Joseph Haydn wrote h i s music i n support of the drama. To exemplify, t h r e e of the fo u r char-a c t e r s i n The Apothecary e x i t from the stage i n a very e x c i t e d s t a t e d u r i n g the l a s t s i x measures of music i n the f o l l o w i n g scene fragment (see example 1): Example 1. J . Haydn, Der Apotheker, p. 76," f i n a l s i x measures j _ = — >s y \ \ r-v 1—' klarl/ (Sempronio wiithend ab durchMie Mittelthiire 4 ' klar l ebenso Volpino, den Sempronio hinausstosst (•e$cf J Grilletta wurde von Sempronio in den Wohn klar! / raiim rechts durch die Thiire geschoben. •accci . Mengone entwischte dem Wiithenden und ri—0 1 1 1 —'—| ] r bleibt auf der Scene.' 10 The agitated nature of the music r e f l e c t s the mental state of the e x i t i n g characters, d r i v i n g r e l e n t l e s s l y on to the f i n a l A major chord. This suggests that the characters e x i t d i r e c t l y ; to have any one of them stop or hesitate would be against the nature of what the music suggests. In t h i s instance, the onstage action i s dictated by the character and form of the music. Some variety of mood was achieved by the i n c l u s i o n of two new p e r s o n a l i t i e s i n the form of non-singing "extras" during Mengone' s a r i a , "A headache can be p a i n f u l too. . This rather long and repetitious a r i a relates how Mengone mixes his medicines for customers. Since no actual stage movement i s indicated by the text of the a r i a , and since the singer involved had r e l a t i v e l y l i t t l e experience as an actor, the scene had a l l the p o t e n t i a l of being a disastrous bore, despite the charming music. This threat was overcome by having the two "extras", dressed as apprentices of the apothecary shop, con-duct a great deal of a c t i v i t y related to mixing medicines. This i n i t s e l f created much stage business, and provided the addi-t i o n a l bonus of portraying the actual workings of an h i s t o r i c apothecary shop. The scene had comic v i t a l i t y , momentarily r e l i e v i n g the dramatic tension, and making i t a highly success-f u l musical number. It was also necessary to keep the o v e r - a l l development and pacing of the action sharply i n focus. Contrasting points 1 Joseph Haydn, Der Apotheker (Lo Speziale) (Vienna: Universal E d i t i o n , 1895), p. 12. 11 of excitement and repose i n the drama created greater i n t e r e s t from the audience standpoint. These contrasts also allowed the director to b u i l d toward e f f e c t i v e minor and major points of climax i n the performance of the work. The opening scene of The Apothecary was purposely subdued, with Mengone simply s i t t i n g at his workbench, mixing medicines and musing to himself. The action and pacing gradually i n -2 creased to Volpino's presto a r i a , "Such arrogance unbounded..." . After a s l i g h t l u l l i n the following r e c i t a t i v e , the action developed into a yet greater peak i n the t r i o following, "Ah, 3 so many thousand p i l l s are here..." , as Mengone and G r i l l e t t a attempt to outwit Sempronio. After t h i s ensemble, the pace slowed considerably with only minor climaxes being reached i n the following r e c i t a t i v e s and arias by Volpino, Sempronio, and G r i l l e t t a respectively. In the t o t a l picture, t h e i r three arias created a period of repose between the opening numbers and the drive to the f i n a l e that begins with the r e c i t a t i v e , "Splendid! 4 The notary Mengone's ordered..." . Here, with the addition of each character, the tension builds; and a good climax i s reached i n the enthusiastic argument between Volpino, Mengone, Sempro- ' nio and G r i l l e t t a during the ensuing quartet, "Witnessed to-5 day are the stated intentions..." . Immediately following i s a quiet, l y r i c duet scene featuring G r i l l e t t a and Mengone. A l -though the stage movement slows to almost a s t a n d s t i l l , the 2 Haydn, Der Apotheker, p.22. 3 Ibid., p. 30. 4 Ibid., p. 62. 5 Ibid., p. 65. 12 emotional f e r v o r reaches a h i g h p o i n t as the two express t h e i r love f o r each o t h e r . The peace and s e r e n i t y of t h i s scene i s s h a t t e r e d by the entrance of Sempronio announcing the a r r i v a l of the Pasha's l e t t e r . The f i n a l e begins immediately, e r u p t -ing i n t o a f l u r r y of movement w i t h the entrance of the chorus and V o l p i n o , d i s g u i s e d as the Pasha. The f i n a l scene b u i l d s i n movement and excitement u n t i l the moment of the f i r e p l a c e e x p l o s i o n . T h i s coup de grace r e s u l t s i n the breakdown of Sempronio's s e l f - c o n t r o l , c a u sing him to accede to Mengone's demands. In t u r n , a quick end i s brought to the drama. I t i s f a i r l y obvious t h a t a g r e a t p o r t i o n of an opera's pacing i s pre-determined by the tempo and i n t e n s i t y of the music s u p p l i e d by the composer. The dramatic approach taken i n s t a g i n g The Apothecary was to work i n accordance w i t h the music, d e c i d i n g where the composer p l a c e d the m u s i c a l climaxes of the opera, then d i r e c t i n g the a c t i o n toward these p o i n t s , with the j o i n i n g r e c i t a t i v e s a c t i n g as t r a n s i t i o n s between the i n t e r v e n i n g m u s i c a l numbers. The a c t i o n was allowed to slow or b u i l d as.necessary w i t h i n t h i s framework. To the e n t i r e s t r u c t u r e was added t h e • d i r e c t o r ' s own c o n t r i b u t i o n of i d e a s , and very q u i c k l y the s t a g i n g was completed. The " b l o c k i n g " f o r t h i s p r o d u c t i o n of The Apothecary can be seen i n the Xerox copy of the s c o r e , Appendix X. A b a s i c concept of the s e t t i n g , or " s e t " , developed as men-ti o n e d above, d u r i n g the working out of the s t a g i n g . The f o l l o w -i n g sketches on p l a t e s I - IV, pages 14-17, i l l u s t r a t e the main ideas g i v e n c o n s i d e r a t i o n as s e t t i n g s f o r The Apothecary. 13 Plates I and I I , page 14 and 15, are variations of the f i r s t idea considered. Simple backing walls incorporated mini-mum e s s e n t i a l requirements for a l l the ideas considered; one main entrance from the street or courtyard; a doorway to Sem-pronio's l i v i n g quarters; another doorway to an offstage chemi-c a l storage room; a workbench and a desk for bookkeeping. The window was incorporated as a means of further breaking the wall surface, adding i n t e r e s t , and as a l o g i c a l source of l i g h t . Although nothing was b a s i c a l l y lacking i n t h i s f i r s t concept, i t was f e l t to be uninspired, lacking v i s u a l i n t e r e s t , and not expressing the inherent intimacy required by the story. Plate I I I , page 16, shows ideas that developed i n an e f f o r t to escape the problems inherent i n the i n i t i a l concept. Sketches A - C explored vaulted c e i l i n g s . While there was now v i s u a l i n t e r e s t , mammoth building and production problems were presented. Sketch D was an attempt to create the i l l u s i o n of a vaulted c e i l i n g through the use of f l a t walls with curved top edges to suggest a vaulted c e i l i n g ; but the proper i l l u s i o n was not created. Vaulted c e i l i n g s were at t h i s point abandoned as impractical. Up to t h i s point, the sketches A - D of Plate III were drawn i n perspective to approximate the appearance of the set-ting from the audience. With sketches E and F, perspective was explored as a device i n i t s e l f . Sketch G was the f i r s t attempt at a f u l l perspective "set". In t h i s sketch, the f i r e -place was added for further v i s u a l i n t e r e s t . In the e a r l i e r sketches, the f i r e p l a c e was considered as being offstage. 14 P l a t e I INITIAL SKETCH B S£ARCH FOR • ALTERM ATi VES : P l a t e I I I 17 H I PERSPECTIVE SKETCHES P l a t e IV 18 Sketch G was s i m p l i f i e d and developed into sketch H, Plate IV. With Plate IV, p.17, i t became obvious that a "raked", or sloping stage would be advantageous i n pursuit of perspec-t i v e . The overhead beams i n sketch H worked well to emphasize the perspective, but seemed an unnecessary building project i f perspective could be suggested by simpler means. The other disadvantage of sketch H was that the chemical storage room would have an imaginary doorway at downstage l e f t . This was inconsistent with the other actual doorways of the "set". The large area suggested by sketch H also seemed too expansive i n fe e l i n g for t h i s chamber work. Sketch I condensed the ideas of sketch H into a more i n t i -mate format, and re-introduced a l l doorways. B a s i c a l l y , t h i s "set" could work for a production of The Apothecary. I t had v i s u a l i n t e r e s t , an intimate set t i n g , and was functional i n s terms of the necessary doorways and playing areas. However, almost a l l of the a c t i v i t y occurring around the f i r e p l a c e and workbench would be obscured from the audience. Also, a set b u i l t on the scale of sketch I would be a major building pro-jec t , and beyond the means of the production budget. A re-thinking of a l l ideas led to the f i n a l concept of the setting for The Apothecary, Plate V, p.20. The simple, f l a t walls of Plate II were re-introduced. The v i s u a l l y i n t e r -esting p r i n c i p l e of perspective was retained from sketches E -I of Plates III and IV. The f l a t walls were broken v i s u a l l y by the projecting corner.doorway used on both sides of the stage i n sketch I. A window was placed on the stage r i g h t 19 " f l a t " ; the f i r e p l a c e was kept onstage, an i d e a o r i g i n a t i n g i n sketch G. L a s t l y , the exaggerated p e r s p e c t i v e added f u r -t h e r i n t e r e s t to the v i s u a l p i c t u r e , a m i l d l y zany element to the design, t h a t was to t i e i n w e l l w i t h the comic elements of the drama. An a d d i t i o n a l bonus t h a t r e s u l t e d by e x a g g e r a t i n g the p e r s p e c t i v e was the i l l u s i o n o f g r e a t e r space, making the a c t i n g area appear l a r g e r than i t a c t u a l l y was. T h i s f e a t u r e was important because development of the f i n a l d e s ign neces-s i t a t e d a very s m a l l a c t i n g area, and use o f normal perspec-t i v e would have made the a c t o r s appear l a r g e r than l i f e - s i z e w h i l e on the stage. The a c t i n g area was s m a l l because of a f i n a n c i a l d e c i s i o n to use an e x i s t i n g "raked" stage, r a t h e r than i n c u r r i n g the expense of a new, s l i g h t l y l a r g e r stage. Another r e s u l t o f the design was t h a t the converging l i n e s of the s t e e p l y angled w a l l s drew the eyes of the a u d i -ence to c e n t e r stage where the main a c t i o n took p l a c e . T h i s phenomena f u l f i l l e d a p r i n c i p a l aim of the s t a g i n g by concen-t r a t i n g on the a c t o r s i n an i n t i m a t e s e t t i n g . The f i n a l s c a l e drawing, wi t h c o n s t r u c t i o n d e t a i l s , i s i n c l u d e d i n Appendix XI. ELEVATION Plate V CHAPTER THREE CONSTRUCTION AND PLANNING OF SCENERY AND LIGHTING Simplicity of design provided generous benefits i n con-struction time and costs. The comparatively inexpensive method of 1" x 3" frame construction covered by factory cotton made t o t a l construction of the "set" possible i n r e l a t i v e l y few hours. The r e s u l t i n g l i g h t structure was also a bonus l a t e r during performances, because The Apothecary was the l a s t item on the programme of opera scenes, and this "set" was put up quickly during the intermission with the assistance of only three people. The acquiring of a writing desk and two chairs eliminated some rather time-consuming building projects and saved consid-erably on production costs. The main workbench on stage l e f t had to be s o l i d l y b u i l t to support the weight of two actors. To assure s u f f i c i e n t s t r u c t u r a l strength, 3/4" plywood braced by 2" x 4" beams was used. However, the t o t a l weight of the workbench was l i m i t e d by i t s r e l a t i v e l y small s i z e , and two people were able to. move i t without d i f f i c u l t y . At no time did the f i r e p l a c e have any excessive s t r a i n placed on i t , so o v e r a l l s o l i d a r i t y was provided by a 3/4" plywood top, and the weight was kept to a minimum using 1/8" veneer for the sides with 1" x 3" bracing on the four sides of 21 22 the base. The chimney was permanently b o l t e d to the stage l e f t w a l l f o r the sake o f speed i n the scene change. Since the c o t ton-covered " f l a t s " were q u i t e unsteady, a heavy chim-ney would have caused the e n t i r e s t r u c t u r e to sway, even w i t h b r a c i n g . The weight of the chimney was kept to o n l y a few pounds by u s i n g 1/4" plywood on the back, 1" x 3" b r a c i n g around the chimney opening, and t h i n cardboard to cover the main area. Both the f i r e p l a c e and chimney u n i t s were l i g h t -weight, i n e x p e n s i v e , and v i s u a l l y e f f e c t i v e . The door and window openings i n the w a l l s were gi v e n the appearance o f t h i c k n e s s by a d d i t i o n o f a l e n g t h o f 1" x 6" board to the edges of the f l a t w a l l s t h a t were v i s i b l e to the audience, an inexpensive e x t r a , d i s p e l l i n g the two-dimensional e f f e c t t h a t many s e t t i n g s have. The unavoidable two-dimensional e f f e c t i s due to the sim-p l i f i c a t i o n o f d e s i g n . I t i s u l t i m a t e l y d e s i r a b l e to b u i l d dimension i n t o a " s e t " by generous use o f m a t e r i a l . However, an a c c e p t a b l e , inexpensive a l t e r n a t i v e i s p o s s i b l e through e l a b o r a t e p a i n t i n g and d e c o r a t i n g to c r e a t e the v i s u a l impres-s i o n o f p h y s i c a l dimension. T h i s path was chosen f o r t h i s p r o d u c t i o n o f The Apothecary w i t h p o s i t i v e r e s u l t s . A v o l u n t e e r group o f s i n g e r s a p p l i e d the grey base-coat to the "raked" stage, which formed the f l o o r f o r the s e t t i n g , and b r i g h t y e l l o w base-coat t o the w a l l s . B r i g h t y e l l o w was chosen because o f the u n d e r l y i n g l i g h t and comic nature o f the opera. Realism and mood was developed by " t e x t u r i n g " the s e t t i n g . 23 The walls were made to appear as stucco plaster by an over-a l l s t i p p l e application of several d i f f e r e n t shades of brown paint. The r e a l i s t i c e f f e c t of smoke-soot was painted i n the area of the f i r e p l a c e using a sponge l i g h t l y dipped i n black paint, and applying the black paint by "wiping" away from the f i r e p l a c e i n the d i r e c t i o n and area that smoke would normally t r a v e l . The Doctorine of Two C o n t r a r i e s 6 design of the alchemists was painted on the double e x i t door so that opening the doors separated the "male" from the "female". And f i n a l l y , door frames were painted around the doors. These eff e c t s can be seen i n the coloured photographs of the se t t i n g , Appendix III . The f l a t surfaces of the workbench were also given dimen-sion. A brown base-coat gave an appearance of natural wood colour. Using contrasting l i g h t and dark colours, sunken panels were created on the f l a t surfaces i n a three-dimensional e f f e c t . A technique of dry-brushing with assorted l i g h t colours was used to "texture" the i n d i v i d u a l panels to give them a wood-grain appearance. A stained-glass window on the' stage r i g h t wall also added mood to the setting. I t was simply constructed by cutting c i r c l e s of l i g h t i n g "gels", and attaching them to a sheet of wood veneer i n which corresponding c i r c l e s had been cut out i n a pattern. The areas of wood between the c i r c l e s were painted to simulate the lead that would have been used to seal the 6 Charles-Albert Reichen, A History of Chemistry (New York: Hawthorn Books Inc., 1963), pp. 32-33. 24 indi v i d u a l glass panels i n a r e a l window. Some other building and painting projects were involved i n the preparation of stage properties. These included a r t i -cles such as the l e g a l - s i z e p o r t f o l i o s used by the "notaries" 7 i n the quartet scene . The p o r t f o l i o s were made by binding two pieces of 1/8" wood veneer with factory cotton and paint-ing them. But mainly, the properties are a l i s t of c o l l e c t e d a r t i f a c t s . While i t i s possible to buy most of the required a r t i c l e s , pressure on a lim i t e d budget can be spared by acquir-ing a r t i c l e s from any conceivable source; or, i f lucky, having them given as g i f t s by some person or organization. For exam-ple : metal eye-glass frames such as the three pairs required i n t h i s work would have cost approximately s i x t y d o l l a r s . How-ever, an eye-glass firm was approached, and they donated the required frames. They were i n fact used and discarded frames, yet they looked authentic enough and served our purpose. Stage properties greatly contribute to the realism of a production when they are c a r e f u l l y chosen and handled. A case i n point were the a r t i c l e s used i n connection with the non-operational f i r e p l a c e . F i r e and heat were indicated i n several ways: bellows were used to fan up the "blaze"; dry-ice and water were used i n the brass beaker to indicate steam r i s i n g from the chemicals within being "heated"; and f i n a l l y , tongs were used to remove the "hot" beaker from the "flames". The actor was c a r e f u l l y coached to make his responses to the " f i r e " 7 Haydn, op. c i t . , pp. 62-76. 25 r e a l i s t i c . See Appendix IV f o r a l i s t d f the p r o p e r t i e s used i n t h i s p r o d u c t i o n . The budget f o r t h i s p r o d u c t i o n was extremely l i m i t e d . Labour c o s t s were e l i m i n a t e d by having the s i n g e r s h e l p out o c c a s i o n a l l y w i t h l a r g e p r o j e c t s . Otherwise, i t was simply a matter of keeping the amount of m a t e r i a l used to a minimum, t h a t f a c t o r having a l r e a d y been i n c o r p o r a t e d i n t o the b a s i c d e s i g n . Most of t h e p r o p e r t i e s were a c q u i r e d g r a t i s , but a few a r t i c l e s had to be purchased. Costs were f u r t h e r reduced by u s i n g as much m a t e r i a l a l r e a d y on hand as p o s s i b l e . T h i s r e f e r s to the "raked" st a g e ; s e v e r a l o f f s t a g e " f l a t s " t h a t were used i n e a r l i e r p r o d u c t i o n s and simply r e p a i n t e d to s u i t The Apothecary; and the costumes, which were chosen out of an e x i s t i n g stock. A l i s t of r e q u i r e d m a t e r i a l s and a r t i c l e s w i t h i n c u r r e d c o s t s i s i n c l u d e d i n Appendix V. L i g h t i n g the show was b a s i c a l l y a s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d matter of i l l u m i n a t i o n . A b a s i c l i g h t d i r e c t i o n was e s t a b l i s h e d from an imaginary window on the imaginary w a l l , downstage c e n t e r . The stage was "washed" w i t h warm shades of y e l l o w s and pinks i n keeping w i t h the b a s i c warm tones of the s e t t i n g . A f u r t h e r "washing" of the s e t t i n g w i t h the three primary c o l o u r s added a d e s i r a b l e t h r e e - d i m e n s i o n a l e f f e c t — the a c t o r s seemed to stand out from the stage s e t t i n g . Yet use of the three p r i -maries wi t h a r e s u l t a n t combining to c r e a t e white l i g h t on the s e t t i n g and a c t o r ' s faces d i d not upset the o v e r - a l l scheme of 26 the colours employed. Warm " f i l l " l i g h t was provided by PAR lamps at 75% of f u l l voltage — creating a desirable yellow-orange l i g h t without the necessity of using "gels". g Richard Pilbrow's "Key and F i l l " system of l i g h t i n g was used as a basis for t h i s production. P r a c t i c a l l i m i t a -tions necessitated the elimination of the backlighting ad-vocated by Piibrow, but loss of th i s e f f e c t did not seriously detract from the effectiveness of the l i g h t i n g ; the actors did stand out from the setting somewhat because of the use of primary colours i n the basic wash. Direct or diagonal l i g h t -ing positions were used as required to illuminate the doorways and the open entrance to the offstage "chemical storage room". Backlighting of the entrances was provided by lamps mounted on the offstage walls. Illumination of the downstage areas of the setting came from the F.O.H. and F.O.H. side pocket positions. Lamps on the f i r s t r a i l l i g h t e d the upstage areas of the setting, plus special areas of l i g h t i n g , such as up-stage of the fi r e p l a c e which could not be e f f e c t i v e l y l i t from any of the F.O.H. positions. This simple and d i r e c t approach to l i g h t i n g was chosen for The Apothecary to prevent d i s t r a c t i o n from the p r i n c i p a l aim of concentration upon the actors. Appendix VI i s an instrument schedule of the l i g h t i n g instruments and "gels" (colours) used i n th i s production. 8 Richard Piibrow, Stage Lighting (London: Studio V i s t a , 1970), pp. 30-31. 27 Appendix VII i s the l i g h t i n g cue sheet used i n the running of the show. A l i g h t i n g p l o t (diagram) can be found i n Appen-d i x XII. S p e c i a l e f f e c t s p l a y e d an i n t e r e s t i n g r o l e , adding mood and, i n the case o f the e x p l o s i o n i n the f i r e p l a c e , m o t i v a t i o n f o r a c t i o n . Again, d r y - i c e was used i n the brass beaker to i n d i c a t e "steam" r i s i n g from a "heated" l i q u i d . The e f f e c t i s simply produced by pouring b o i l i n g water over commercially a v a i l a b l e d r y - i c e p e l l e t s . The major problem to be overcome was storage of the f a s t - e v a p o r a t i n g d r y - i c e . A styrofoam box used f o r s h i p p i n g r a d i o components worked e f f i c i e n t l y to preserve the s m a l l amount o f i c e r e q u i r e d i n t h i s p r o d u c t i o n d u r i n g the few hours between a c q u i r i n g i t from the commercial o u t l e t and the evening's performance. Another e f f e c t o c c u r r e d while Mengone mixed chemicals to make medicines f o r h i s c l i e n t s . In t h i s case, he mixed two c l e a r l i q u i d s together which, s u r p r i s i n g l y , r e s u l t e d i n a b r i l -l i a n t s c a r l e t l i q u i d . The U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia Chemistry Department developed t h i s e f f e c t f o r the p r o d u c t i o n . A l i g h t i n g e f f e c t was produced i n connection w i t h the s t a i n e d - g l a s s window d i s c u s s e d under p r o p e r t i e s . An o f f s t a g e l i g h t shone through the l i g h t i n g " g e l s " used i n c o n s t r u c t i o n of the window, and c r e a t e d c o l o u r p a t t e r n s on the faces and costumes o f the a c t o r s p a s s i n g through the range of t h i s l i g h t . The c o l o u r s were a p l e a s a n t touch, adding mood and v a r i e t y to a l i g h t i n g scheme t h a t was otherwise f a i r l y uniform. 28 The e x p l o s i o n i n the f i r e p l a c e was the most s p e c t a c u l a r of the e f f e c t s , w i t h a sudden f l a s h of flame, and b i l l o w i n g clouds of smoke f i l l i n g the semi-darkened stage. The event was c o m i c a l l y emphasized by V o l p i n o and chorus. They r e a c t e d i n mock s u r p r i s e to the smoke, immediately bowing i n homage to the pretended presence of " A l l a h " . By the time the smoke c l e a r e d and the l i g h t s came up again, the drama had come to a close--Mengone aided i n h i s e f f o r t s t o g a i n the hand of G r i l l e t t a by the e x t r a c o n f u s i o n caused by the e x p l o s i o n . C o n s t r u c t i o n of the e x p l o s i o n e f f e c t was begun by r e c e s -s i n g a w e l l , 12" x 12" x 6" deep i n t o the top of the f i r e p l a c e . Into t h i s r e c e s s was p l a c e d a f l a s h - p o t : a metal cup 1"-1V i n diameter, open on two ends, and attached to a 9" x 9" p i e c e of 3/4" plywood. Through the open ends of the cup are strung t h i n e l e c t r i c a l wires which a t t a c h to e l e c t r i c a l termin-a l s o u t s i d e the cup. The cup i s then f i l l e d w i t h a s m a l l amount of medium-grain gunpowder, so t h a t the gunpowder a l s o covers the t h i n e l e c t r i c a l w i r e s . At the d e s i r e d moment of i g n i t i o n , an e l e c t r i c a l c u r r e n t i s passed through the w i r e s , h e a t i n g them s u f f i c i e n t l y t o i g n i t e the gunpowder. In t h i s i n s t a n c e , power was s u p p l i e d from an o r d i n a r y 110-volt u t i l i t y o u t l e t . The c u r r e n t was broken by a switch, and, a t the a p p r o p r i a t e moment, i t was turned to i t s "on" p o s i t i o n . See Appendix VII f o r a s c a l e d diagram. ( The w e l l i n the f i r e p l a c e was d i s g u i s e d by a g r a t i n g made of h" wooden d o w e l l i n g p a i n t e d to simulate soot-blackened metal. The area of s p e c i a l e f f e c t s i s d e f i n i t e l y the fun area of 29 p r o d u c t i o n . They are fun because they a c t u a l l y do something i n the p r o d u c t i o n , r e q u i r e i n g e n u i t y and s k i l l to produce, and r e q u i r e a p r e c i s e sense o f t i m i n g to make them work each time d u r i n g the running o f the show. W a l l s , f o r i n s t a n c e , o n l y form an i n t e g r a l p a r t of the t o t a l p i c t u r e , and, once they are completed, l o s e t h e i r c h a l l e n g e . In the e x e r c i s e of good t a s t e , r e s t r a i n t i s necessary to a v o i d the obvious temptation, of i n c l u d i n g too many s p e c i a l e f f e c t s . A few, s t r a t e g i c a l l y p l a c e d e f f e c t s was the c r i t e r i a of choice f o r The Apothecary. Too many s u c c e s s f u l e f f e c t s can d e t r a c t from the p r i n c i p a l aim of c o n c e n t r a t i o n upon the a c t o r s . CHAPTER FOUR MUSICAL REALIZATION M u s i c a l p r e p a r a t i o n of Joseph Haydn's The Apothecary d i v i d e d i n t o two major areas: p r e p a r a t i o n f o r the conducting of the work; and p r e p a r i n g the s i n g e r s i n the l e a r n i n g and i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f t h e i r music. P e r s o n a l p r e p a r a t i o n f o r conducting The Apothecary r e l i e d h e a v i l y upon p r i n c i p l e s of conducting as o u t l i n e d i n the t e x t by Max Rudolph, Grammar of Conducting. Max Rudolph's c l e a r l y d e t a i l e d beat p a t t e r n s a s s i s t e d g r e a t l y i n d e v e l o p i n g a c l e a r , e a sy-to-read p a t t e r n t h a t i s e s s e n t i a l i n opera. F u r t h e r d i s -c u s s i o n s of s p e c i f i c problems such as h o l d s , t r a n s i t i o n s , and tempi changes were a l s o u s e f u l i n development o f a secure and a u t h o r i t a t i v e l e a d e r s h i p . A g r e a t d e a l of p r e p a r a t i o n and study was r e q u i r e d to r e a l i z e the tempi and t h e i r r e l a t i o n s h i p s i n t h i s work. The 9 q u a r t e t , f o r i n s t a n c e , has s i x b a s i c tempo changes; the G r i l l e t t a , Mengone, Sempronio t r i o 1 0 has e l e v e n changes. Often there was a r e t a r d i n d i c a t e d j u s t b e f o r e the change o f tempo. A m e t r i c balance had to be found to a l l o w a l l these tempi to c o - e x i s t without a p e d a n t i c r e n d i t i o n of the music. The p r a c t i c a l working out o f the music d u r i n g the r e h e a r s a l s 9 Haydn, op. c i t . , pp. 65-76. 10 I b i d . , pp. 30-41. 30 31 exposed any inconsistencies, and these were solved during the ongoing course of the rehearsals. I t was quickly learned that both singers and accompaniment responded best when tempi changes were anticipated by a change i n the size of the beat pattern; and c l e a r l y and r i g i d l y defining the pattern during the f i r s t few measures of the new tempo. Further decisiveness was attained by maintaining a high degree of eye contact with the singers and accompaniment, v i s u a l l y a n t i c i p a t i n g problems and lapses of memory as they occurred. Often only a cue or nod was required to reassure singers and accompaniment that a l l was i n order, and that t h e i r e f f o r t s were secure.. Examination of the score of the three-act version of The  Apothecary^ reveals that the o r i g i n a l r e c i t a t i v e was written in the I t a l i a n secco s t y l e . However, Hirschfeld's 1895 one-act version adopts the st y l e of accompagnato, or accompanied r e c i t a t i v e . A basic four/four beat had to be maintained throughout these r e c i t a t i v e s to preserve the accompagnato structure. Most of the musical inserts i n the accompaniment were composed and included by Hirschfeld. That he was influenced by the nineteenth century p r i n c i p l e of the L e i t -motiv i s c l e a r l y i l l u s t r a t e d in two measures of r e c i t a t i v e from the Hir s c h f e l d score (example 2): 11 Joseph Haydn, Lo Speziale (Salzburg: Haydn-Mozart Presse, 1970). 32 Example 2. J. Haydn, Der Apotheker, p. 77, measures 6-8 Leitmotiv i n s e r t This i s a musical quotation from Volpino's a r i a where he persuades Sempronio to become r i c h by accepting a p o s i t i o n with the Pasha in Turkey. The inclu s i o n of thi s theme i n example 2 anticipates Mengone's l i n e lamenting his b e l i e f that Volpino now seems victorious in the bat t l e for the hand of G r i l l e t t a because of the advantage gained i n l i n i n g up the job for Sempronio. This type of structuring i s t y p i c a l of the Wagnerian influence sweeping the world of music in 1895, but i s not the style of Haydn's music i n 176 8, when The Apothecary was written, as comparison with the three-act version r e c i t a -tives w i l l a ttest. However, many sections were obviously derived from the o r i g i n a l secco s t y l e . By allowing these secco-influenced sections some l i b e r t i e s and f l e x i b i l i t y of phrasing, and then by returning to a s t r i c t tempo for the accompagnato i n t e r j e c t i o n s , quite a natural delivery of the r e c i t a t i v e was achieved. 12 Haydn, Der Apotheker, pp. 42-47. 33 P a r t o f the m u s i c a l p r e p a r a t i o n was the o b s e r v a t i o n and i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of dynamic markings and a c c e n t s . T h e i r obser-v a t i o n and e x e c u t i o n are an i n t r i n s i c p a r t of the s t y l e of Haydn's music. Without s u f f i c i e n t c o n t r a s t , the m u s i c a l p er-formance was r a t h e r f l a t i n t e x t u r e , and l a c k e d the elegance and dynamism u s u a l l y a s s o c i a t e d w i t h Haydn's music. Again, Max Rudolph's t e x t was a u s e f u l r e f e r e n c e i n the e x e c u t i o n of dynamics i n conducting. During the course of r e h e a r s a l s , i t became obvious t h a t some of the notes p r i n t e d i n the score seemed i n c o r r e c t , d i d not f i t Haydn's s t y l e , and were, upon i n v e s t i g a t i o n , m i s p r i n t s . C a r e f u l a n a l y s i s and amendment of the chord s t r u c t u r e of the p a r t i c u l a r chords i n v o l v e d e l i m i n a t e d the Webernesque sounds from the accompaniment, and l e d to a more harmonious r e n d e r i n g of the s c o r e . In order to b r i n g the m u s i c a l performance to proper f r u i t i o n , s e v e r a l o b j e c t i v e s had to be s e t w h i l e r e h e a r s i n g the s i n g e r s . The f i r s t o f these was the s i n g i n g of c o r r e c t notes and note v a l u e s . T h i s p a r t of the work was e a s i e s t to a c h i e v e . However, obdurate p e r s i s t e n c e was r e q u i r e d to pro-gress beyond t h i s stage to achieve the a d d i t i o n a l m u s i c a l v a l u e s d e s i r e d . Haydn's music i s f i l l e d w i t h c o n t r a s t s : short, rhythmic phrases f o l l o w l o n g , f l o w i n g phrases; long c a n t a b i l e phrases are separated by s h o r t , s t a c c a t o - l i k e i n t e r j e c t i o n s ; f o r t e phrases are c o n t r a s t e d by piano phrases, f r e q u e n t l y a l t e r n a t i n g every o t h e r measure. Sometimes the v o c a l l i n e i s melodious w i t h an accompaniment o f c o n t r a s t i n g A l b e r t i bass. 34 Less seldom, the v o c a l l i n e c o n s i s t s o f broken phrases and i s s u s t a i n e d by an accompaniment o f repeated e i g h t h - n o t e chords changing harmony as the v o c a l l i n e i s supported. These d e t a i l s were r e a l i z e d o n l y by meticulous r e h e a r s a l s and f i r m c o n t r o l over the performers w h i l e conducting the performances. C l e a r d i c t i o n and i n t e l l i g i b i l i t y o f words were o t h e r prime o b j e c t i v e s . I t was found t h a t a c c e p t a b l e d i c t i o n i n the r e h e a r s a l room d i d not s u f f i c e when the s i n g e r s reached the l a r g e r space o f the Old Auditorium. Consonants e s p e c i a l -l y had to be c l e a r l y a r t i c u l a t e d , without d i s t o r t i o n of the m u s i c a l l i n e , to be i n t e l l i g i b l e from the stage. Yet, t h i s o b j e c t i v e had to be met so t h a t the s i n g e r s d i d not s t r a i n t h e i r v o i c e s : a d e l i c a t e balance t h a t was, however, p o s s i b l e to a c h i e v e . D i c t i o n , and even a u d i b i l i t y , can be obscured by l a c k o f a proper volume balance between s i n g e r s i n duets and ensembles. A proper balance must a l s o be reached between the s i n g e r ( s ) and the accompanying medium t o a v o i d r e p e t i t i o n of the prob-lem from another source. In c o n t r a p u n t a l ensemble passages i t was necessary to subdue some v o i c e s to a l l o w one o r more v o i c e s to stand out from the t e x t u r e when these v o i c e s c a r r i e d the more important melodic m a t e r i a l . With a change of m u s i c a l emphasis, o t h e r v o i c e s were f e a t u r e d , r e q u i r i n g another adjustment to the balance. S i n c e balance i s so v a r i a b l e a f a c t o r , i t had to be taken i n t o account a t a l l times d u r i n g r e h e a r s a l s and perform-ances. Diction and o v e r - a l l q u a l i t y of sound i s greatly affected by the precision that i s reached whenever an ensemble with singers and accompaniment i s i n progress. The greater number of persons added to the ensemble, the more d i f f i c u l t i t becomes to achieve t h i s p r e c i s i o n . To keep matters i n hand during the preparation of The Apothecary, i t was necessary to rehearse the larger scenes with a number of performers on quite a regular basis. The scene involving the chorus was intensely prepared, with a number of repetitions required 13 before any s o l i d a r i t y was achieved. One "patter" section was e s p e c i a l l y elusive in the search for p r e c i s i o n , and required more rehearsal time than other sections. I t was observed that the more fa m i l i a r each i n d i v i d u a l singer became with the other vocal l i n e s and accompaniment of each p a r t i c u -l a r section, the more quickly he mastered his own music. Knowing the complete score thoroughly allowed them to a n t i c i -pate t h e i r own musical ent r i e s , thus leading to p o s i t i v e , assured, and precise entries. A further aim throughout t h i s production was perfecting the timing between the action onstage and the music i n the accompaniment. In the t o t a l concept of this staging for The Apothecary, i t was desirable that the characters appear as having genuine problems and emotions. Much of the stage action was inspired by the music provided by Haydn i n the accompaniment. The danger was always inherent that the charac ters would act l i k e so many puppets whose movements were 13 Haydn, op. c i t . , p. 90, staves 3 and 4. 36 d i c t a t e d by Haydn's m u s i c — e x a c t l y o p p o s i t e to the r e a l and n a t u r a l c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n s s t r i v e n f o r . Such a t r a p was avoided by adopting the p r i n c i p l e of c o - o r d i n a t i n g the t i m i n g of a c t i o n and music so t h a t the music seemed to be drawn from the accompaniment by the a c t i o n onstage. In p r a c t i c e , the onstage a c t i o n was i n i t i a t e d v ery s l i g h t l y ahead of the music. The accompaniment then seemed to u n d e r l i n e the a c t i o n s of the s i n g e r s . A s p i r a t i o n s towards t h i s i d e a l r e s u l t were f a c i l i -t a t e d by having the combined r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s of conducting and s t a g i n g . I f a c e r t a i n necessary a c t i o n onstage was thwarted because of l a c k of time p r o v i d e d i n the music, i t was p o s s i b l e to a l l o w the music to " g i v e " a l i t t l e , and a l l o w the needed s p l i t - s e c o n d f o r the a c t i o n to be completed. Being i n the dual r o l e of d i r e c t o r and conductor allowed a d i r e c t awareness of the source of problems from both areas; and a d i r e c t and immediate s o l u t i o n to these problems. CHAPTER FIVE FINAL APPRAISAL The one-act v e r s i o n o f The Apothecary proved to be an a p p r o p r i a t e choice f o r p r o d u c t i o n . A l l found the s i n g i n g o f Haydn's w e l l - w r i t t e n music a c o n s i d e r a b l e c h a l l e n g e ; y e t no s i n g e r was over-taxed v o c a l l y . S u f f i c i e n t c h a l l e n g e was a l s o found i n the area o f a c t i n g , as emphasis i n t h i s p r o d u c t i o n was p l a c e d on c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n s o f i n d i v i d u a l r o l e s . No l a r g e s c e n i c " e f f e c t s " d i v e r t e d the a t t e n t i o n o f the audience from themselves, so the s i n g e r s were r e q u i r e d to be c o n s i s t e n t and c o n v i n c i n g i n the p o r t r a y a l of t h e i r r o l e s a t a l l times. The p r o d u c t i o n had p r a c t i c a l m e r i t s as w e l l . The one-act, one-scene format d i d not overburden the s m a l l s t a f f a v a i l a b l e f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n of the stage s e t t i n g and the running o f the performances. T h i s s i m p l i c i t y was r e f l e c t e d f u r t h e r i n con-s t r u c t i o n c o s t s . C o n s i d e r i n g the r e l a t i v e l e n g t h o f The Apoth-ecary, i t s importance i n the programme, and t h a t i t was a complete opera as opposed to an e x c e r p t — the t o t a l c o s t can only be c o n s i d e r e d as reasonable. The economy s t r i v e n f o r both i n s i n g e r resources and pr o d u c t i o n c o s t s d i d not seem to d e t r a c t from the a t t r a c t i v e -ness of the p r o d u c t i o n . Audience r e a c t i o n seemed to be an i n d i c a t i o n o f i t s success. The few s p e c i a l e f f e c t s i n c l u d e d i n t h i s p r o d u c t i o n were 37 38 q u i t e s u c c e s s f u l , adding to the mood, r e a l i s m , and comic elements of the s t o r y . The p h y s i c a l presence of the s p e c i a l e f f e c t s added d i v e r s i o n and v a r i e t y t o a p r o d u c t i o n t h a t was otherwise continuous i n i t s s c e n i c p r e s e n t a t i o n . The m u l t i p l i c i t y of d u t i e s was b e n e f i c i a l i n t h a t a g r e a t e r o v e r - a l l u n i t y i n the work was achieved because of i n d i v i d u a l c o n t r o l of a l l aspects of p r o d u c t i o n . I t was pos-s i b l e t o r e - c r e a t e a work from c a s t i n g to f i n a l c u r t a i n t h a t f u l f i l l e d p e r s o n a l ideas and concepts of opera p r o d u c t i o n . I t was a l s o p o s s i b l e to see how a d e c i s i o n made i n one area can have g r e a t e f f e c t on another aspect of p r o d u c t i o n — a knowledge t h a t w i l l be u s e f u l l a t e r when the assigned d u t i e s may be l i m i t e d to o n l y one area of p r o d u c t i o n , as i s u s u a l i n the f i e l d of p r o f e s s i o n a l opera. Another a s s e t gained from t h i s t o t a l experience i s acquaintance w i t h the needs, problems, and the running of an opera workshop s i t u a t i o n . Future employment p o s s i b i l i t i e s c e r t a i n l y i n c l u d e the d i r e c t i n g of an opera programme i n a t e a c h i n g i n s t i t u t i o n , and the experience of producing t h i s opera i s c e r t a i n l y b a s i c p r e p a r a t i o n f o r such a p o s t . L a s t l y , p r o d u c t i o n of The Apothecary was a g r e a t p e r s o n a l c h a l l e n g e t h a t i n v o l v e d choosing a s u i t a b l e work, and develop-i n g a t o t a l p r o d u c t i o n concept of t h a t work. T o t a l concept i n t h i s case i n c l u d e d : the t r a n s l a t i o n ; c a s t s e l e c t i o n ; stage d e s i g n ; s e t c o n s t r u c t i o n ; l i g h t i n g ; t e a c h i n g and r e h e a r s a l of music; and conducting of the performances. In a d d i t i o n was the r e s p o n s i b i l i t y of o r g a n i z i n g and r e a l i z i n g the e n t i r e 39 p r o j e c t w i t h a minimum o f a s s i s t a n c e and funds. Where know-ledge was l a c k i n g , i t was researched. D i f f i c u l t i e s t h a t arose i n any area of the p r o d u c t i o n were d e a l t w i t h on the spot. Cast members who were e x p e r i e n c i n g d i f f i c u l t i e s w i t h t h e i r r o l e s , d r a m a t i c a l l y , m u s i c a l l y , or v o c a l l y , were g i v e n e x t r a h e l p and encouragement. However, the e x t e n s i v e l i s t of d u t i e s made the p r o j e c t worthwhile: i t was p o s s i b l e to view a l l aspects of opera p r o d u c t i o n s i m u l t a n e o u s l y ; and to a p p r e c i a t e the i n t e r - r e l a t i n g problems i n h e r e n t i n t h i s o r any o t h e r opera p r o d u c t i o n . BIBLIOGRAPHY Bartha, Denes, and Laszlo Somfai. Haydn als Operkapellmeister. Mainz, B. Schott's Sonne, 1960. Boucher, Francois. 20,000 Years of Fashion. New York, Harry N. Abrams Inc. Bruhn, Wolfgang, and Max T i l k e . A P i c t o r i a l History of Costume. London, A. Zwemmer Ltd., 1955. Burian, K. V. The Story of World Opera. London, Peter N e v i l l e Limited, 1955. Encyclopaedia Britannica, pub. Wm. Benton, 15th E d i t i o n . Chicago, Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc., 19 74. Geiringer, Kar l . Haydn: A Creative L i f e i n Music. New York, W. W. Norton, 1946. de Givry, G r i l l o t . Witchcraft, Magic, and Alchemy, trans. J. Courtney Locke. New York, Dover Publications Inc., 1971. Grout, Donald Jay. A Short History of Opera, one-volume ed i t i o n . New York, Columbia University Press, 1963. Hainaux, Rene, and Yves Bonnat. Stage Design Throughout the  World Since 1935. London, George G. Harrap and Co. Ltd., • 1957. Haydn, Joseph. Der Apotheker (Lo Speziale), edited and trans-lated by Robert Hirschfeld. Vienna, Universal E d i t i o n , 1895. Haydn, Joseph. Lo Speziale, ed. H.C. Robbins-Landon, Three-Act E d i t i o n . Salzburg, Haydn-Mozart Presse, 19 70. Ihde, Aaron J . The Development of Modern Chemistry. New York, Harper and Row, 1964. Lehner, Ernst. Symbols, Signs, and Signets. New York, Dover Publications Inc., 1950. 40 41 Parker, W. Oren, and Harvey K. Smith. Scene Design and Stage  Lighting. Toronto, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston Inc., • 1963. Partington, J. R. A Short History of Chemistry. London, MacMillan and Co., 1960. Pilbrow, Richard. Stage Lighting. London, Studio V i s t a , 1970. Reichen, Charles-Albert. A History of Chemistry. New York, Hawthorn Books Inc., 1963. Rudolph, Max. Grammar of Conducting. New York, G. Schirmer and Co., 1950. Trease, George Edward. Pharmacy i n History. London, B a i l l i e r e , T i n d a l l , and Cox, 1964. World Furniture, ed. Helena Hayward. Toronto, Hamlyn, 1965. Zentner, Wilhelm. Reclams Opernfuhrer. Stuttgart, P h i l l i p Reclam jun., 1973. 42 APPENDIX I Scene Breakdown (For Rehearsal Purposes) Pp. 1-19 Mengone Sempronio V o l p i n o V o l p i n o G r i l l e t t a Mengone G r i l l e t t a Sempronio Sempronio V o l p i n o Pp. 54-76 G r i l l e t t a Sempronio V o l p i n o Mengone G r i l l e t t a Mengone Pp. 82-95 Mengone, Sempronio, V o l p i n o 15 Pp. 3-19 E n t e r p. 6, e x i t p. E n t e r p. 9, - 19 Pp. 19-26 V o l p i n o , G r i l l e t t a Pp. 19-26 e n t e r p. 20, e x i t p. 22 Pp. 27-41 Mengone, G r i l l e t t a , Sempronio Pp. 27-41 Pp. 27-41 E n t e r p. 28, -41 Pp. 41-53 Sempronio, V o l p i n o Pp. 41-53 Pp. 41-48 e x i t G r i l l e t t a , Sempronio, V o l p i n o and Mengone Pp. 54-76 E n t e r p. 59-76 E n t e r p. 62-76 E n t e r p. 63-76 Pp. 77-81 G r i l l e t t a , Mengone G r i l l e t t a Mengone Sempronio V o l p i n o Chorus Pp. 77-81 Pp. 77-81 ( F i n a l e ) G r i l l e t t a , Mengone, V o l p i n o , Sempronio, and Chorus Pp. 82-95 Pp. 82-95 Pp. 82-95 Pp. 83-95 Pp. 83-95 43 APPENDIX II REHEARSAL SCHEDULE Scene breakdown key: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Date Oct 7 11 16 18 20 28 30 Nov. 1 2 pp. PP-PP. 1-19 19-26 27-41 pp. 41-53 pp. 54-76 pp. 77-81 pp. 82-95 M, S, V V, G M, Gf S S, V G, S, V, M M, G S o l o i s t s , and Chorus Rehearsal 8:30-10:30 7:00- 8:30 Musical Musical 8:30-10:00 8 : 30-10:00 2:30- 5:00 Musical Special coaching (M) Musical (M,V,S) At 3:30 (G) 21 8 : 23 8 : 25 7: 26 2 : 30-10:00 30-10:00 00-10:00 00- 5:00 Musical Musical Musical Musical (All) 7:00- 8:30 Stage 1 & 2 7:00- 8:30 Stage 3 & 4 7:00- 8:30 2:00- 5:00 Work 1,2,3,4 Stage 5, plus 1-4 as needed Date Rehearsal Nov. 4 7:00- 8:30 Work 5 6 8:30-10:00 Musical 7 (with chorus) 8 7:00- 8:30 Stage 6 (M & G) 9 2:00- 5:00 Work 1-6 10 7:00-10:00 Stage 7 (with chorus) 13 7:00- 8:30 Work 7 (with chorus) 15 8 :30-10 :00 Work 1-4 17 7:00-10:00 Work 5-7 At 7 : 00 (chorus) 18 7:00- 8:30 Work Arias 20 8:30-10:00 Work 7 (with chorus) 22 7:00- 8:30 Work 3 & 5 24 2:00- 5:00 Run-through 25 7:00- 8:00 Work 7 26 Dress Rehearsal: call 6:30 27 Dress Rehearsal: call 6:30 29 Performance 8:00 : call 6:30 30 Performance 8 :00: call 6:30 APPENDIX I I I COLOURED PHOTOGRAPHS OF SETTING S e t t i n g f o r Der Apotheker, J . Haydn, F r o n t a l view 44 S e t t i n g f o r Der Apotheker, J . Haydn, Stage l e f t d e t a i l S e t t i n g f o r Der Apotheker, J . Haydn, Stage r i g h t d e t a i l 47 APPENDIX IV PROPERTIES LIST I Preset on Stage Workbench Stage l e f t Balance scales Mortar and pestle Ceramic bowl 2 chemical bottles (sprayed black) Clear glass chemical b o t t l e 2 test tubes with clear l i q u i d s ( s c a r l e t effect) 1 q u i l l pen 1 ink well Large, gold handbook of formulas 1 p i l l b o t t l e Folded paper for notes (10 sheets) Test tube holder Fireplace Stage l e f t Hand bellows Large metal tongs Desk Stage r i g h t Map Q u i l l pen Ink well 3 account books Loose wr i t i n g paper (10 sheets) 1 old newspaper Center L e f t (upstage) Wall S k u l l Center Backstage Globe II Stage Right Properties Table 1 old newspaper 1 set eyeglasses 2 folded paper notes 1 - 1 2 " dagger 1 money bag, 6 coins inside 1 small, woven basket (for G r i l l e t t a ) Cigar Matches 48 Stage Right Properties Table, continued Notaries 2 t r i - c o r n hats 2 black academic capes 2 black, l e g a l - s i z e p o r t f o l i o s Papers for p o r t f o l i o s (10 sheets each) 2 sets eyeglasses Finale Note for Sempronio (from Pasha p. 82) Beard (Volpino) Money chest Gold-painted washers (money) i n chest 2 large wicker baskets 1 - 12" x 24" Persian rug III Stage L e f t Properties Table Brass bowl Dry-ice Hot (boiling) water 2 trays 4 chemical bott l e s (2 on each tray) Feather duster Finale Large glass beaker • 2 sets books 2 bottle s 2 additional sets books 49 APPENDIX V LIST OF INCURRED EXPENSES A r t i c l e s : Large f l a t s 124'-1" x 3" c l e a r spruce @25C f t . 21' - 1 " x 6" c l e a r spruce @58<r f t . Small f l a t s (2) 50' -1" x 3" c l e a r spruce @25£ f t . Small window 17' -1" x 3" c l e a r spruce @25C f t . Double doors, stage r i g h t 30' -1" x 3" c l e a r spruce @25<: f t . S i n g l e door, upstage r i g h t 30' - 1 " x 3" c l e a r spruce @25<r f t . Wall braces (2, 12 f t . length) 24" - 1 " x 3" c l e a r spruce @25C f t . Work t a b l e 36' - 2" x 4" c l e a r f i r @58<r f t . 1 sheet, 4'x 8' f i r 3/4" plywood 1 p i e c e , 30" x 60" f i r 3/4" plywood F i r e p l a c e 1 p i e c e , 2' x 3' f i r 3/4" plywood 30' - 1" x 3" c l e a r spruce"@25C f t . 1 sheet, 4" x 8' mahogany 1/8" veneer 2 yards x 18" b r i c k m o t i f Mac-tac Chimney 10' - 1" x 3" c l e a r spruce @25£ f t . 1 p i e c e , 3' x 4' mahogany 1/4" plywood 1 sheet, 4" x 8' P a c i f i c board F a c t o r y Cotton c.a. 10 yds. @ $2.95 yd. 50 P a i n t : F l o o r (2 g a l . ) , Walls (2 g a l . ) , T e x t u r i n g (1 gal.) 3 g a l . white @ $8.00 24.00 2 g a l . c o l o u r @ $12.00 24.00 P r o p e r t i e s : S k u l l 5.25 Globe p a r t s 2.58 Washers (coins) 7.25 Gunpowder 4.8 3 C i g a r s .53 Beards 4.20 Paper 2.58 TOTAL $261.73 51 APPENDIX VI LIGHTING INSTRUMENT SCHEDULE Use area B area H wash .. area I are?. C wash_ area J area K wash area D area E area. A. area G Colour 1 s t Pipe' T (door) iL(wash) L (desk) R ( sku l l . _S .(door) 0_ (wash.) Q_(door) P.(wash) F. ( f i r e ) M (desk) U (door) window V (door) blend wash ...3_ .52. _9. 52 54 52 3 17 Ci r cu i t .5.1. 2 ..._2. .5?. .4 _53_ 5 55 7 8 Ganged with Dimmer 8 7 3 .L .6. 2 6 3 3 -..6_ ... 3 53. . 1 _ .__39. 3. ' 20 ..... 3_ ... . 51 . .5.1.. no.gel . _..5.L. no gel 10 15 (P.C.) Patt . 12|3 (Fresne'l) Pat t . 223 (Fresnejl) Pat t . 264 (P.C.) J.L 17 .20. _22. _23. J.5. .1.6 22... 24 .38 39 22 23/24/39 7 7 10 11 J24/39/17 _ ? 2 _ 16 39/17/23 1.7/23/24 40 35 gels 1 - 4" 1 - 8" 4 - 4" 2 - 8" 1 - 6" 1 - 8" 1 - 8" 12 4 11 Dimmer 1 Intensi ty 33 _8_ 6 8~ 6k 6k 12 .22/16 JO.. .11 .LL _1_2_ ...5. 12 8h 3k 6k 6k #1 #2. #3 #3 #6 #9 #17 Radial 11 lh 10 Ik 6 " . ^ 0 6" #39 M 4" # 8" 8" #5> 4" #93 8" #54 52 APPENDIX VII LIGHTING CUE SHEET Cue 1 Accompanist & conductor's l i g h t s on 2 House out 3 Page 3, bar 3 - B r i n g i n p r e s e t (both r a d i a l s f u l l ) as c u r t a i n r i s e s 4 Page 91, 4th s t a v e , 1st measure, 2nd beat -I g n i t e f l a s h p o t 5 Page 91, 4th s t a v e , 3rd measure - both R a d i a l s 7 6 Page 93, top 1 s t t h r e e measures - both R a d i a l s to 10 7 Page 95, l a s t t h r e e measures - l i g h t s out as c u r t a i n goes down 8 F.O.H. up f o r 1 s t c u r t a i n c a l l - TABLEAU 9 F.O.H. down as c u r t a i n c l o s e s 10 Stage work l i g h t s on 11 F.O.H. up f o r s o l o bows on apron 12 F.O.H. down as s i n g e r s leave apron 13 Repeat 10 and 11 as necessary 14 House up to FULL 53 APPENDIX V I I I FLASH POT SCALE: - 3/3 ~- / 3/4 f PLYWOOD T///A' WIRE-, QUNPO\MDER - ELECTR/CAL V TERMINAL TO //O - VOLT (JT/L/TY OU TL £ T THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC Old Auditorium Friday, November 29, 1974 Saturday, November 30, 1974 8:00 p.m. UBC OPERA WORKSHOP 'An evening of Opera' II French Tickner, Director The Merry Wives of Windsor Act II, Scene 7 to end of act 0. Nicolai (1810-1849) Sir John Falstaff, Mrs. Page Derek Del Puppo Linda Irving Dorothy-Jean Lloyd* Cosi fantutte Act I, Finale W.A. Mozart (1756-1791) F i o r d i l i g i Elizabeth French* Elfrieda Langemann Dorabella Linda Irving* Dorothy-Jean Lloyd Guglielmo Douglas Riley Gerald Smuin* Fernando Barry Rector Despina Betty Cosar* Joanne Dorenfeldfi Don Alfonso Douglas Graeb* Derek Del Puppo INTERMISSION The Apothecary Complete in one act F.J. Haydn (1732-1809) Sempronio Doug 1 as Graeb * Derek Del Puppo Mengone Ben Heppner G r i l l e t t a Bette Cosar Joanne Dorenfeld*P> Volpino Linda Irving* Dorothy-Jean Lloyd Servants and Chorus from the Opera Workshop ensemble Designed, staged and conducted by Steven Henriksont Translation by Steven Henrikson OPERA WORKSHOP STAFF Graduate Assistants Douglas Riley Steven Henrikson Technical Director Douglas Riley Coach-Accompanists Grant Hurst Thomas Quigley Stage Manager Sam McMaster Costume Assistant Elfrieda Langemann Properties Assistant Jennifer Jestley * Indicates performance Saturday, November 30. t In par t i a l fulfillment of the Degree of Master of Music in Opera. P. In partial fulfillment of the Degree of Doctor of Musical Arts in Performance. The Opera Workshop gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the Department of Theatre 55 ( L O S P E Z I A L E ) 6ro\'io^\) OPERA BUFFA J O S E P H H A Y D N ( 1 7 6 8 ) / V E ^ e ^ ^ d h MIT GENEHMIGUNG SR. DURCHLAUCHT DES FORSTEN PAUL ESTERHAZY VON GALANTHA AUS DEM ORIGINAL OBERSETZT UND FREI BEARBEITET Dr. ROBERT HIRSCHFELD UNIVERSAL EDITION 56 Personen S e m p r o n i o , Apotheker Bariton Mengone, in Diensten bei clem Apotheker Tenor G r i l l e t t a , Sempronios Miindel . Sopran V o l p i n o , ein junker, reidier Geek Mez.zosopran Lehrjungen, Hausgesinde, Nadibarn. Die Scene stellt einen v o l l k o m m e n c i n g e r i c h t e t e n A po t h e k e r 1 a d e n vor. Ira Hintergrunde eine Glastiire, die nadi aufien fiihrt, nidit direkt auf die Strafie, sondern in einen grolien Hof oder Gang. Neben der Mitteltiire ein breites Fenster, welches in diesen Hof oder Gang sehen la'Ut. L i n k s die lange Stellage mit den Biidisen und Flasdien, davor der lange Ladentisdi nadi Apothekenart. L i n k s eine Tiire mit der Aufsdirift: „Laboratorium". Ein Sdirank mit der Aufsdirift: „Gift". L i n k s v o r n ein Tisch mit Sesseln. Minter dem Tisdie redits und zugleidi vor dem Ladentisch ein holier Drehsessel mit einem kleinen Pult davor, wie Sdireiber es in Comptoirs beniitzten. Der r e c h t e k l e i n e r e Teil der Biihne soil mehr wohnlich eingerichtet sein. Exotisdie Trophiien. Tiere ausgestdpft oder als Skelette an der Wand. G r o R e L a n d k a r t e n alte Bilder. Lin Tisdidien mit einem grofien Globus und MeHinstrumenten. R e c h t s eine Tiire. die in den YVohnraum fiihrt. R e c h t s v o r n ein Tisch mit Sempronios Lehn-sessel. Zeitungen. Karten. Biidier. Alles ungeordnet. Den Biilinen und Vereinen gegeniiber uls Manuskript gcclruckt. Das Auffiihrungsrcdit fiir siimtlidic Biihnen ties In- und Auslandes ist aussdiliufilidi von der Universal Edition A. G., Wien, I., Karlsplatz 6 zu crvverben. Nadidruck verboten. Auffulinings-, Arrangements-, Vcrfilinungs-, Senile-, Vervielfaltigungs-und L'bersetzungsredite fiir alle Lander vorbehalten. IJ. E. 6 b l 7 . Al . le Ta . ge, Al . le Ta . ge klopfen, reiben ca f« . rm.fr-,,—r—i r-^i - r — i — — I M I 'l P , Lie Ih.rerZier , Zones regard. 3* dicn' ich hier und meinHerzklppft fur und fur. Klopfen hier und Klopfen dort, , Z_sceK here flnaftefltsm/ kearrtor wm^^ore . Qe^fn^^eafi^ Is ^he^rr^ Unir«r»j l E d i t i o n N r . 6 6 1 7 58 h'Leaks*- o*~(\t <D/i"+ i r e , ©Sac da _ hinkannstdus ^ Ta . ge klopfen,klopfen rei.ben, Lie . be, Lie . be,.  . i i5<g M T r>f n i ^ ° " -trei.benli Ih r,rec Zier dien ich hier ,1 sye /f /4nc/basfs my mftpm beautyheafr, Zier die?n ich hier! Ih . , rer Zier y die'n ich hier, jal , *&rd T. seek teCL+LpXJ re-ward x sett hsrt^MA 7_^ r- es klopfej fiirund fur , r ^ ^ X xekivr nS\\t& morel _lopfen,klo.pfen klo.pfen hier und dort, > heart: , / klopfen klopfen klo.pfen klo.pfen klo-pfen klo.pfen klo . pfen hier klo_ pfen '. Bedty,heat>"pt kert\^jbeff}^ foeaf^^ becfo+Q ;JT~^ _ J ^ X / d / ^ 59 QdassderarmeKranke, hat erdenSai't iniLei Jae,wollt' ge . ne .sen! , / • -0-1 -O- t9-f m Mein Henvder A . po-the-ker, ein mm.der.lijches We.sen; sorgt sieh y\\j ma„te^ iheapofiecary) ex. man of rtf-u -ta-rionj fins, de" 60 - V t~r— zi.nen, AYn&f derblia.de Zu.fall muss den Kranken fee,"' _) Al . le tf • * Jlj J ' 1 f p 1 J J J ' 1 i — — j — j 5 « « i « » / , ^ # . v K ° , m m t ' , n e i n e F r o s s e Zeitung vertieftrochtsaus dem D e m p r o n r o . i ^ e n r a u n l ^ u ^teggone der sich achtloswjiterbesehaftigt;) | fffTn' , « tP-z , (lesend=) Hor, rtdieneu.e sta KunJel / S i o 0 ,r hear He latent ne\^i; g g . g , a -*;Die.,/ I?/-thJfn I n v d i - a J i e r imfer.nen 7 he <vo(ih American j«di3.«s -iUctvjz call (auf eine .Meng.Uhnein I^edikament zeigchd.) /<> ^ f m p ^ e ^ ' t ! Men^fifanpender.); Semp^,]'enj'n A.ber Herr die.ses , C h i . na.U ^ Pas C h i . n a l Ja dasXhi,- pa! ) Lass das, But- Sir, f t a ^Kiw-i^e, T t \ e < ] m - / y^iMsrfihforlAefiSCjT^ Chi "na! Hor1 lie,, ber was. mein Vet . ter der A p t , ge . trie . ben be j ffe*r tafher> *jUr rt?a-sm rtz doctor ha* done. < Erkam in's Liab/in, Jn's Lieben, hat sein reLches Mun_del sich ver. schrie.ben, trotz iun.gen FVei,ern, horst du, un . ge - zah let hat doch das Kind dem 62 5V^J" (gehelmnl.ssvoll); . «• b> i i / ' - • • — — — • XOJ:—I Vormund sich vema-let. He!! Passtnicht die Go.schich.te aufGriLlettaundauf miehj' •> DassEuch Gril.let.ta er.wah let, daswusst'auch ich. / Noch.ni you have cho&ev\ &/>,'( I &fra^-^rfWe-ry ckaf. .yhou^ku nicht ver.ma. let, , 1 weVe ^o^,married 1 dochbald wird sie mein! / Wahr.lich ein netrtesBrautdienl, IWannsoll dielloch zeit s'ein o » M H I i l t*w*e K /jky*«r brides^ be cW*<^ |^jeuwiH ^  hv? " n ^ I e ^ ^ e T 5 Semp . jsucht abzulenken, hatjdie Zeitung wieder enifaltet und liost laut.als warejilchts v o U e f a S e ^ * dreiSchif.fe xoll be la den mit WeLbern ei . nes tur _ ki.schen Ha.rems Three £h'ps ful-ly (o*Atc{ udk je^e/i a^dujameMfro^a. "Turkish 63 bringt sie Mn. ( de von Be.deu.tung Gril . let.ta ent.flohn in, gy-ter Be.glei.tung. g r o w e r * , ^'l bnnp tht news i | ( ~ u^s seevi os^Ae flerf M c ^ ^ ! o % . C loot u f J V ^4 < ^ i-> 1 ' ' 1 &emp.(hjlickt auf, wlrft die Zeitungweg; verzweifelt:) Heir1 ifhrepht?ln Be-glei.tung? -?'» Entilo. hen! WobleibtmeinWil.le?. , „ / " D'id \jttts«y/k)#k Cwfflyef?S « SUeH fame m t + U e * ^ c f c ' e t •' (|ich beruhigend^ Mengone zuf lustorad^-^*^ J —71——0-9-00 n g c —1 ^ s ^ . TErVlegrweitor srhr^ibferrascht.) / 2 N F ^ f i ^ 1 ' Gril - l e t ^ a istyomVormundwolge . hfi-tett, 0 Dalies,Mengon,dassdie Pest bei,, den Jtus.sen wfi.thetlj Griiss euch wer.the. Herrnl/ ^Pestl Man , / ? u ^ * t P / ^ & K r * ^ ^ /TN freer-/y Zfrs I Pfat&jr'ke ihn nicht beachtef; in die \ Zoitung vertieft-.) yb Sempr.(immergleich:)y 0j ^ Seifipr. Y c ^ t S d ^ " * mnss dieGren-ze spefreri I' Be_st'er£em_pro_nin ,0 die Pest 1 / Hort dochl.Wassteht zuDiensten? >, * a tempo L M^dear pitfe ffeve, Bur het'fVJhrfao Wa^ f-^ .'r f 10 , V l > l p . ( h a s t | g . ) ^ ^ ^ 64 —> •  \ . i . _v ii _ l • l Sempr. (sohrvfTrcgt.) 4 PuLver o - der ein Trankchen, ganz nach Be _ lie .ben. Et.was ist euchdorti ver . Poyj-der> or ex. po cir your dis - c r e - K o * . . So^Tw^ k fJl^ 'K I Meng.(geht auf Vojpm'zu.) (mit ironischiT Spitzp,gpgenVol. pin, sRincn Wi;bcnbuh^er.)/ schrie.benl, Kommt \ol i i n -— 9' * i • (.V j * Volp .(sichbestandigumblickend ungeduldig.) A 2 M » T rie.benl Al.sodennl (Der audi scheint Grillet.ta zu liebenl)/ MengonmeinjBesterjl, )/lS he -/PO (xnM$*)rit. C ~~~ friend \ das Z W i e ? „ 1st denn wirkJich Ei . le? (0 ver.dammtl. Ich ver.steh nicht ei . rye T k^/oul}^e\ loef+er. ( x lost" . ^  */> 7<*Q" ^ £ g ^ - o -— "-^= ¥—• | y i | l J | t ± r g ± d Zei lel,X Dio.scr Dok.tor fUhrt mi.se. rab . le Schrift I. Weiss nicht, verdach.ti . ees (Aaf m »/ bearWfi"* , .yo^d^cior ,t [ X Hthk Mat i f yon fate pa hen. Ich Sam pur, um Gnl . l e t . ta zn , se . hen.) Wisst ihr hke , X ewe, hjr^o^j io sec • dear anf-ftr-fat) l\s~-Y£^ ne eln Billet und eine Borse.) j M e n g ^ nicht,werGfil. let ta das Briefchen ste.cken , konn.te? 9 Da.rum die Me . di . ka A h ^ . W r X ra* \eajcW!, letter Ac O^ij- TrF-la < M L , se 1 { e - ) I ^ ^ 66 12 Meng. A p p «h * -ff-j) i i u P ) tip- fl I j Still, nurnicht so schreicn I Gut gutl [ dochbit.te sagt fiir m, Volp. (In Verlegenheit wegen der fingirteri Recepte.) renbraucht tfir die Arz - nei,- en? -> Dem E i . nen, wis . set, fehlt es hier da. • ' :—' • —• ^ w.en (auf den Kopf yV^ f f ^ c f a *zcigend.) Meng.<{Wichtlg thuend.' Volp. 1 o ^ e r 1 fcht eine Gaberde.) j ^ ^t>° Meng. (erleichtert.) j i W ' 1 : J '• A • 1 k j 1 (Ruft den Gehilfen zn, welche aus den Labo . ratorium eilen.) ^ p»- ~ — •/ | ^- -a- \ j — / ; raiorium ene Ihr verstehtmichlv ( Verstandcn,verstanden! Nunraschan'sWerklSeidznllandenl' / v />_ //_ . I \IO(. T u» AD r—<•(•/) IAM I 1-4v/ *,i ,A JJ. I I W, / . o f L..£il ' A r i e d. M e n g O n e . (Sehr g^schSftig, relbt Pulver, macht allerlei Handgrlffe. Dio Gesellen lelsten - • 1 '*• . 'V ihm dabel bestandlg hilfreiche Hand.Wahrend der Arle kommt Sempronio im Allegro aSSai./Strassenkleide aus dor ThUre rechts und geht.grUssend ab durch die Mittelthur.) 67 la 'tVttuft - * • — / ameiiomama - f H ^ Is P a a a « 1 r r r r r r r r l I | r 1-4— • p a—p—I ' r r r r I IIP Meng. t j I J J J n£j=p; neh-raenwir van die.sein Thee.Ver _ darbergarden Magen sich Rhabar.ber hilftsicher../ l a iiJk pre-^opz+hk special brcv. Someont ha^A&sh^sskilk.•tT CuffH^ *JiH\ y e / / W L^rit - fF 1 • i J f i I ' I - I • . . : i r—IS 1-™ = = *• . r i r / / i r e - frdrevh/'fJ^ 3E 1 J»x • _i -lich Rha . bar.ber hilft sicher-lich. . / A O 9 O IE (zu Einzelnen.) ~6> 2-Hur - tig! ^A.yesher.bei! . Al.lesher.beit / JUleshei er.bei! . p 3E 14 68 stacc. Von diese'm Quantum suf.fi .cit,von je.neronimm die Handvollmit,dannstossen,reiben , / , j ^ = ^ ^ = ^ - r ? i / . r r r 7 f r TCTT^-T-^FM^ J \ drucktderKopf inn noch, so schwer,und . hilft ihmauchkein, ^ t y k , , tormehr Ein { X $ o d r o r - - f , - x f e no cure and th^rocmrt&rmtdecnk & S"<e. O.rx Schlufk! EinSchluck! der Kran . ke hat ge - nng! . Wenn Rha-69 16 70 ilftsicher. lich Rha. bar.ber hilft.si.chor.hc' Ma-gensich Rha.bar.ber h ft er ilft,si- q . K.// i Von diesem Quantum suffLcit,von jenem nimm die Handvollmit. .  H I P j p y , I _ i,. i , _>tt ^ Dann stossen,reiben, ruh.ren,fur je-desRechnung fuhren. • r > . 1—B>——g-» ,Vbn diesem Quantum We^iv. preserjpf/»ns f p fl p p p p -ih-it^ b J> P"p p (i i r p p suf-fi.cit, von je.nem nimm die Handvollmit,dannstpssen,reiben, ruh.ren,fiir jedes.Rechnung m U - f m 1 • - £ EL Lp _> a C/. -TTr9 ' ^  a fuh.renJ Und driicktder Kopf ihn npch /so schwer.und hilft ihm auch kein . 4^ MOL Cl{fC)^A\ * • !i l l 71 17 Wenn,, hart ,Be. drangniss ihn , .beschleicht.wena hart,. Be . driingniss p 33 ritnr37 - o ihn beschleicht, Rha - bar.herhats bald er - reicht, er . reichtl/ fa , i reichtl Von diesem Quantum suf.fi.cit, yon jenem nimm die •lj *>t.?t^ fifx-^-••'.-y/j. >:. v.\-f.-, ••-'-e-jn :«jr<nc-r\ 72 18 4r^y^\ >C I /><« Handvollmit,dannstossen,reiben, ruh-ren,fur je.des Rechnung, fiih.ren, fiir ie. des Rechnung 3 4 • 1 « • i fiih-ren. Und driickt der Kopf .ihn noch soschwer,und [hu-rr'x^ , £\y\4 \jh-^ 0/ doctor -findi CurC-\a,i\g -0 e> f .hilft / ihin auch kein / Thus .</ .pro cfa'ims -/-haf Dok . tbrmehr Ein Schluck! Ein Schluckl, Ein Schluckl der Kranke hat ge-,// J& sun>. Or* /^Kfti-A^ . D n e drl<yC-rz^ilcxX\ act Cured 1 m 0a 0m i i » ' ff-i L T L T 1 f — f r - f * — nug. A Wenn hart, Re . drangniss ihn , r , beschleicht.Rha-f , T i f f -i 7 F — c t " P •53 i f 'l / /bar.berhats bald er - reichtl/ Rha . bar.ber hats bald er . reichtl Ihin wird so hfla/fA. cc-Srvrvfa^ J fu// heoHh is r e . - f o r d * j no imtf& 73 leicht. Rha . , bar.ber hats bald , er . reicht, ihm wird so leichtl ,UIV/lilv. / 1 Vila. — . u a i — UUl u a i D U U i u v* - • » VIVUV| »UIII I»UU i . pa In ! full W#.i<> fe-9fo(H C£~5«>'a , w ffi n? ^yrg, zw,7> / R h a . bar,, ber hats bald ,er - reicht, ihm wird so leicht, ihm wird so hp$. Mi '>.<> fe.-s~ofc-H A - ^ i n ^ w l - H M Moft ba\*^_^a\\--k no more p~ ' ' (jtfengone mit den Gehilfen ab ins Laboratorium.) schnelle ie.tzo in .die Hexen . kuche, brau-et Saf.te brau.et Elii-che. ) Doch nun zu Gril-bus^mixirvi Irenes bce*& aMpa^m^.H^l ewse hi. hei~ -fen f/oni- J3*t nouj io~~~~ 74 20 j | ! (goht Ictse zur Thiiro rechts, slehprorslchtig- umschauenrt.) | * / JZ Y Y " r!i_ A* tT\nA Kn ci fvonl / TW ^ o o P ^ r au/Volpin zu und klopftihn i i v 7^ T^"( Klopft an/JTB-XThure hifiten auf die Schulter.) 1 i \ >M • und will sle offnen.) ( ^ Grilletta. I 1 1 A V. . X ; 4-, m r-m 1\ kl_ it durch die Mltt*lthiire > n ° * l # < " hn Volp JlieDrache fort das wiUfch nutzen. , _ G r i l . let. ta I Seht Ke.cken! / Wel.che — - >v .c*^ — ~ i-QfllleH-ei Inas ckoien wof - /» / W / GrilfT(schnippisch.) ^ • fah_ren, ] dfjpmlisst ihr das ^Ge . f eim pis .b^ euL it/ Stc&rkl Then your dz-par--fure Zjouidvmke a. hap-M ^ ' " j j N ? ^ hen jour de- ft y x Y- 1 •—'—'— r—f r r p p> > r • r wtlleucherleuchten, ichyilleuch lenken, dieses H|ndchpp musstibjnichtdemToLpel schenken. icr as yg«rfeg^uQrW u4lod-u6QioHlka\>etharb/ockheAi uell Q.-h»e.tmd someone L g / j£^ ^ ofe^V door I , o wiebe^orrtl.Gemyilljchmichnach .richten / A.ber aucb. ihr Vol m [eilt rechts Ins Gemach: A rK<? fioof aus der Thiire , bevor UA_' V . _ _ U ^ • __. -r o o m , 4 4*$ 0 ^ Wo Lie . . bes got . -de Sudar- ro - vancc, r i - . .y/ ^  er lackien, stiirmt u\n-bow\aidi £jl\/e$ (Sieht nach der Rlchtung des Laboratori-ums und legt dte Hand an den Degen.) (einhaltend.) ( \ r7s • Should Mogane ^ 0 (Wleder losgehend, zleht den Degen.) • 9 ^  Ich stfir . me, ich . stiirime ( . vex . we. gen dem tfilmVcf I shall wet J<th d&--fiance.; -for a ' i ^ i r 24 78 (Thut,als ob or den (iegner in den Sand strcckto.) i i i i r r r r r r r seinl / Gril-let-ta du Ver . r a . tho.rin.d'iis Rlut-bud >vird,I)ich rcu'n!/ Gril.lct.ta duVer. . rii _ the-rin.das Blutbad wird Dich. reifn, J das Blut . bad wird. Dich yon sW/ — i — r f _ " " _ K — J — , | ••|„..^._| . — z?— - » t H —H-UBL^— — nil*' [7 9 w ff-Lf g f l L f fLie bes. got . _ ter lach.ten. stiirmt Hass auf, fo-$Q¥£J2^ un-bomdeA) 6\\/(Li flit fo r* 0 \G : 0-0-m r-= 0 r-C^ ~r) Hass und ver. hate. Oanci ci/S '-0-.9 0-P-i 25 ach . ten I Den Ri va Ion brjn.ge, X sfai|sect>w ri-val .ichvpr meine Klin.ee. Drauf,draufmit Hieb und, Stich.rait Hieb und Sticli! , / trifft,Men.go - ne mjchl, Ich s t u r me, stur.me ver.we.gen dem T ° d / / -ent.ge.gen, dem J meet m de-reduce', for death X /ear nor, -for . .Esmuss^_ LEAF 81 OMITTED IN PAGE NUMBERING. 8 2 Gu-tes mchtgeJ'un.den! Ei sieh!dasHeerchenfort,das ist nicht.schlechtinimwardeinWink von I i i 1 o.ben!/Ich fandinden Re . cepten jnjchnicht zu recht der Kran.ke war'un.feb.Lbar ab. ge ^ / ^ g y ' - i - <^'" «&cttU*pccscrfiW) muckfaconfajfavJiGjZh**.boui {fared another 7?. (schaut nt&3[isi!h r{ (>of rill.durch die Thiir w rechts in den LaclHn^ Meng. fc Meng.(angstlich.) s c h o b e n Cr!$is Men.go . c i . uol Gril.let.tal Hast mich gerne? ^Frei.lichl-Alber Sem. ~ "— Js. ^"Mh>m. &y for**Surely/ / W " y o u rit. i jQl J 3 ' i -*t— 83 28 Grill , rt Meng. pron) \ Der ist nochfer.ne. Saginivlbist mirauchgut? Ja,doehichfuroh.te sej.aul cicrllut! , i k-n i k — 1 v i 'I ; 1 gass-* rei i 5 ^ 7 _____ s ^ 5 _ * G r i n J , v — | — < . • — i | Meng.Chahert sich ilir, Muth fassend.) j j *-rT-= J - h r - l _ . _ = 7 ^ i F - v— i G r i l l . V*—»—1 ^ V P j? ^ P r p p p !____ ^ p—1 naliert sjich ihm ganziich.) l 3 ^ Meng. i 5 5 ? HE=5 (sichangstlich oLn umscnauHiid.) ^ [  (spitzfcden . MundA h , \\\m nicht, bis ichsnicht se7he/. So warteI Lei.se, lei.se, Na.herlDirwinkteinLohn.Bindie bdle^JonT be <s> S!"^ • So waif w o t j W ^ e t y U ' ^ Neater1, Tfs,*o& Iwporfwk J aw _ (Sie fassen sich an beiden Hande; Meng. wahrend Sempronio gerade zur I ; Mitteltliiire eintritt.) Deinel/ dieMei.nel, i Daist er school i Ei was thut ihr?' ZuinTeuJell, Achder r^rs! yourHuntfte*! ^Here comgW^J VW uork'^*''The CAW'A ! /Ik ih f f i L. -y S C . ' i - r r t w ±=± Meng;(bei Seite.)Gril£° i , ,i  I  (die friihere Stel. ( Semp. lung beidernach ! ahmend.) i Ann . stfl , ihin ist ganz u . b e l l , poo^—-Qnt[ tie's a of CL. -feJer / =?— C m Hab ihin den Puis ge .fuh.let fti'i puke is racing yr>ad/y. Sol Sol den 84 29 Puis!/ Mirfehltwas! , Euchfehlt einvoUerWasserkiibel derdenKopf euchwiederkUhJet | Weiss tul<fJ.r™ reel A a T_ OscucziM-Squirt tinsle>r^j^ldw^w v A U s c o l c t X nicht wo. hin ihr zie . let. Wisst es ' Bei.del / Ihr ahnt nicht, p . Sem. donr km^'Joa.fao^e- ~ai>»<}; ^hali T. s A o u j / o ^ i '••you do • not +eej__ pro-nio, .wie i'urchier.lichich lei.de. . Jal Ihr Ahnt nicht.Sein Lei den sitzt ganzdrin.nenl, -ho^areacttUli£+i«c pa\n , TU'&ati-Hcri&* QT • reefers whWewell bemf,. SetzteuchAr.beitsoUbe.gin.nen. HabtnocbPulverzureLben, und , Dir,sch6_ ne GriU___ta_ urn mus O is.,sig oicnt zu r cXe/5 ~r~o -rUl cht zu blei.ben, sollt aus den gro. ssen Bii . chern Rech.nun.gen s-z-r here. <xr jour &o -ble. , qui'ier ana 85 . | ^  i ( I aw welche er zuigt.) I l A - * ' I A fop Hup p P i T T i » r T p f p r ^ ^ r ^ ^ - ^ ( halt uf e schrei. ben. Auch ich will flei.ssig sein; derKriegist nicht b e . en.det, nein nein! will sf-lll - X also hue *7,y b)ock,)iheM(~ not pj- e^ded, n o 1 _J~ 4 * 4, (legt die Zeitung auf ^ L VA f den Tisch fiihrt dac/1 ^ r&r , rauf rait den Finger j P f t j • hiii und her.) ' mr: r1-S i t • • . hm und her.) / *? jfr -m -my „ ., i ^ p-p> ftp pi \ W V r pip p ip r » sehn wie er sich wendet .J ' Fbl.ge demMarschderHee.re. Dasskei.ner s t p . r e l / >v.«sf return ^ p < ^ & ^ /< s ; W / 0 / y ^amre , i i I' T e r z e t t . (Gri l let ta . Mengone. Sempronio.) / >J?, 7s. r\ ICM CAnJaute m o d ^ r l t o p Cr Mil V s (hi Mengone seizt sich an den Tisch, ganz vorn links; er schiittet im Folgenden kleine Kb'rn,efyfn eine & £ > ' ^Schal^Jnd zerreib* sW. Grilletta holtgrosse Geschaftsbikher und hiipft auf den Drehsessel,zuni SchreibetNfoereit. Sempronio holt den grossen Globus und setzt sich ganz weit von den Beidenanden iz eit von den Beiden — H r 86 aoderen Tisch rechts uud stu. diert,Globus und Zeitung ver. T w r „ „ „ » M « r, , ^ „, „ L I \ ^Idchend.cifrigden Krieg.) Mengone (leise zu Grilletta; schmachtend.) 31 So viel Tausend fei.ner .Kor.ne _lein in die SchaJe/ jet.zo / PP. » m .= at=_ HP 1 ein. zu.streu'n, . so viel Seuf r zer nach der^ Lieh.sten mein, berg ich tief, in meL] Grilletta (ebenso zu Mengone.) L-_ Br.tist!^ . So viel Zah.len hier in stil.lerPein ich schreibcn muss z ,lan. genReih'n, - so v i e ^ r e u . den welckest, du al.lein el/)Ere  _  k_kest,  l.l i  in » mir/,izurhpi cb_s^ en ^ Sempronio (von der Zeitung auffahrend.) /Lust. HaidemGee. ner winkt einilofihunesscheinlErdrinfftin / din. KY> xtim^ ein / .IIMQC g & gsscheinlErdragti  » Fe.stungj . Jaldas , » ^ » s % y ft? 32 87 (Auf dem Globus wird •ft a _, den Ort suchend.) A J S L . ,ein lu.stig Vi ..yatsdirei'nl Nur da r hier kanndie.se Fe. stung sein! history! ja ich hab' e ____ ;s gleich f- i*J0« lei wusst, ich hab's ge ,/ G r i l l ( M e n& o n e n a t s l c n m i t d e r Schale hlnter den Lade1 entisch, Grilletta ge Mein .Sinn, .ist dumpf und/ triib. mein Sinn istdumDfun geniiber gesetzt.)  . i  ; i   dump  d ho fie &r o 0 Mein Sinn, ist dumpf und. trub, mein ist dumpf und nohofie. 0f~ tru iib. Ach das ,Schreibenl, ) M Ml .Trouble} rA0iwr<Y<\-Ach dasSchreibenl j -Trouble!. ^ oMMt-iVyv Al. les On Iv -a—i- _ p ip P P p triib. Ach das Rei.benl / A A A Ach das Rei.benl A l . les 88 lie Ar-beit har.te. Es ist , ein schweres Stuck! / Es ist ein scbweres I „ , .^. Pol-l-Zlr,* _ -Tt'A »v»/»Ai!ii -fur ivo itvLA// . TlA MA/3 /< -far Too mir / d i sch er  t ! /  i t i  sdiweres /s/ VO (ZU Mengone) (zu Grilletta) £ t T f . f f h U s gleich.bin ich' .jzu - riickl / Gleich, gleich bin ich i.zu iringt vom Hessel mid liiuft in pro-nioSiat den Platzge. riiu-met, und doch ihr saumet, Mengon ihr triiumetl j Gril 1=1" 1—"p" "p J a - a - J <: « • — # - 5 - * — a — o (geht jetzt erst auf Grilletta zu) War ei . tel un.ser let - ta, mei-ne/ Lie .he, wie bist du dpch so , schon. War ei - tel un.ser dearer ifea!Mfe., our /o\)e is. beyond measure, &ur >Ja>r\ is ^ S i ^ e n -i i i . ^ i ' ' N IB a • H Wah.nen miisst, ich , in stiLlem Seh.nen, in Sehn . sucht yer . gehn. / _ - r—=J L 11' 1 1 1 I - I / — V j ' i . I i u 3 C 3 ^ Wah.nen miisst ich in stiLlem Seh.nen, in Sehn . .sucht yer . gehn./ -90 35 ' K.'icli rair die IJnud die trautc. r) : > A RI ;H-fUr VQM be-true Sxhnpller! , If- *y i r 0 wekbe su-ssy._ Lau.tc! JSY'U L  Schneller! or UlltfrA uS> oaf! Schnell dieHandl Erkbnnf uns sehnl SchneUer 11 S /t_W_ <^ 00<^  Oy0(2^  9 1 36 i H i £=§= Schlach . tea, zu den Sie.genl j Ich mar - schie . re mit dem Feind durc^ •0-O / 0 ' . 7 I/* y f f f _ h f h£^0-fi-o-a -3 §gut sich zum Sturtium7 Mene.( Ieis__u_ Itad.te oh-ne . Zahl mit ihm yer . eint / ii.ber Bergund Thai I iSolches leiden o.deiv _| # g STHAQ ^ <Jfq__U. 9-| _ M ^ £ | g"/Gr ivpy ,-vr.iMJ -to,'fey fc^_c/- gtiHnim") e g Im^-fii frrHrffUn) 3_3 EtEEfe •EC G r i l l Lie . be . all . zu . mal J ja die Lie.be ja die Lie.be . lin.dert a l . le ja die Lie.be , i j a die Lie.De ,lin_lert ai.ie ^ f = p - f f f ^ f ^ f f f f ^ _ ] ^ a , ie.be -d l l92 Quail) ja die .Lie-boj/ja die Lie.bei lindeit al.le QuaJI / Quail ( Ja die Lie.be, | i°t&i-n - tort e-tefnoJ -— 0 0 0 0 0 ja, die . Lie.be lindert al . le Quail / Such CL IoiQ. r>\uk?<,WiilP ev'fV pat,'A . HP PP -0- a_o mm. •0- -0-35 (Sempronio blickt wiederholt hiniibe?und^rk^^dU^h^ts^inverstandniss.) X- IOOAJZ_ "t^o 4-^--^ Sempr. (sich verstellend) _ a> • 0- <s»-*ff—fl—r~0 -at WW u .die.ser Zeichen Ful . lel wp steckt denn meine Bril.le? ver. -l—i—I 1 i I *' i' r—^ I—HI I a • 1 I 1/ I.,-' -—t 1 -5 = f= r K 1 1 r ' P, 1 1 1 1 1 • 1 ^ wirret ist mein,Blick! / >^ Ihr schrei,. bet/ ihr rei/,. bet.eleich.cleich bin , ich zu ». 4 sstEuch ,Won.ne-sii ..sse Lie - bes.grii - . sse ha.ben b o . s e n Stieit.entfachtl,, / w„„ „ Q C C A T i p hp« erii . sse ha.ben bo - sen Streit entfachtl Won.ne.si i - sse Lie . bes.grii - se La-ben bo . sen Streit entfachtl g « , r f t 7 |f_.g Ich verschliesse ' i c h , verschU?- ,se \ j h « f i $ $ t $ f l Holjde sel'.ge Hoffnungstriiume i seid zer-stq.ben!Wer hatfsgedacht 1 . j Stilles Bapgen, S^ ck (a^pG^ma boiling., -fu^l^/SHckan t^Jk ' 2 1 ' , u p h ' a V g ™-g^)ir, ^ -?•',""£#•, HoLde sel'.ge Hoffnungstraume seid zer.sto .benI Wer hatt'sgedaohtl Stilles Bangen, - - * tt -Pl^Sl ., I M, , i : f c ! 1 ' **• B— P 0 » ^ K I ^ P- W JB 1 0 2 ? — - \ i I — i l g l i l l ^ ^ I I l I es an den Tag ge-brachtl •0——rT-1. les an den Seid ge. fan.gen! Al _ les an i  .fan.ge] <W desired, § @ 5 HaL nun weiss, iclv; rfuafe-cau^:_ a,c\^jfhotk£ I E E E £ Tec 96 41 I^iborato. nraum.) •tempo rit.\ 11, j r r r \ p r i ^ r f i f - f i P P T F P I garnt die KJeUne hier vor . mei. nen Au.een/' Ja! ja! , die Mit-gift mochte ihm, . Trvf h e r r f f i t t e - f g p z r p j MJ-rj eyg^ ' Jg^yei J . Ke receive Agr nek taugen.dcr.schnapptmimochdas, reiche Miindelweg, | ich heirathe sie vom Fleck. Schonen . c7<;JrV , vJwfj (tare fake ^rllltita t\*>*i fro** r*e .J-llvjed herUifa*rc(elay • UJh^Qoo^ 42 97 Sempr. (vertieft sich wieder in dio Zeitung ) j ', s . 9J r> i nr: „.!„.. J.. f'^ ol^ l UuVif ilir ir I ^ s K W i e d e r d i r G e c k l H a b V i l i r ir.gendVnSchaden?? Sonrtwr-lgsst meinen L a W ^ o r n ^ o f ^ 4-;^ I Hate, yon ±™&ipe.cM problem . Or plea* le^^Ade^ k Volp Sempr. (Bei £eite.) i Was tat B . . . r V p r . l « - r v , / W » - - j « - ! « " ? / / ^ j Vplp. (Bei |5eite.) J | ( ]v : |>p p fo> J ' p- n- f l P "P P '"P P " ^ M E y ? " ^ wirdsbaldl -Um Gril .let .tas Hand von ihm zu . krie.gen will ich den Nar.ren ! < i > N „ . -«r -Jr p P P * l/*?m flin P«i C/>ri o 0110 Tii r* Iron 1 «i n rt mm rcl-AD^nn G».l * r » » i ^ Es kamein Pa_scha aus TiirJienJand, vom grossen SuJ.tan n feiht vrt>»\Tu-rkey >s in ouf'/W, om-ba'^Aor of • I . L « l « < 0 « 1 A ' » C hier. t J 7 r ~ l T T T T ~ T " her ge.sandt. Im Reich d,er Os .ma .nen , die, ZeLtung lassts ah „ nen, ist . 44 trTurk *rtw*4 sftfai, A clr-xj^fdo'He a l;* -l>k w #A I -> in tU—br-r-pr'' m _ <* « • » . 1 uns . ron B e . z i r . k e n zum Feld.a . po . the . ker den rech . ten Mann. Ihr A' (macht rait gekreuzten Armen die charakterischen Bewegungen der Tiirken nach.) £ TK 1 — _ .» _ O _ _ 1 N—»»_,—|K— L , ' wisst, Ihr vvisst,dassder T i n - / . ke zah,. len kann. / Sem-pro.nio viel werther ihr, seid ein Ge _ lehr.terl, Ein Ge p J> p p p p - P p i P p » « f r i p p p «e - T f-ehr,.ter. ein Ge.lehr.ter. ein Ge . lehr.terl / _ rZehn. tau .sendDu.ka . tei lehr,.ter, ein Ge_lehr7ter, ein Ge . lehr.terl / Zehn. tau.send Du . ka . t e n , SckofarAsjouve <X scholar , you're a, schg/zr . -They'll ^'v_ yoM i ^ - r A o ^ W f t —0-BEE5E E__E_E 3EEE _ -•_ = — r - _ — t f • ft 5-gibt euch der. 1 _r -y r r ke Jah -zx-ptn •• r -m-wPS £t~ i ^ r j r r - ressoldl, Sagt -p p>—^—ki—f1 ob ihr nach Constanti . ' O U S T ^ > - p'c he. M * * m m p • •#-C I f F 4 ^ - -- B — 39 _ 29 p 7._J<| * A * _P 9 100 C1'?2.-P,e!,w'0,11}1 Seid, IfoLa.po-thekcr.und schwimmtin Gold! . r) a & J S ^ 5 7 T - * s ^ I ^ ^ ^ ^ P ^ O H ' I I / „ go/a: tcmpo^ S ^ ^ - 1 jgr*—O "— — ~ gliickli,-ch'er Sjtarnt M i , , kann euch em . pfeh.len dem ho, r hen Herrnl, Ihr )..! r>.. i"_ ._ i r . ' • r^.. FJftfnJni™} > iPie - .v,5-r/Pa stil.len, die rfla.stor die. PU . le.ii, die g j t = £ n a 1 K — — — g JZjjg^rg-e1^-^ tri -o r=m-0--O'f :-'B—.—L——-—-—^-101 46 =el,.l.inir.Til, die Miireer bcscbvr«it,<lie Ti i . pfe, l )e-_el , Al-lcs von\Yert,W!niiniit Die Turken parodierendT) ^ OL^a'k^spe&f. X ^ ^ J ^ ^ ^ U ' X aJt+he —-—^ f w • »—r7 17 p r f r „ r Weibchen mir las.sen, ja Gril . l e t . t a , ja Grillet . ta, ja G r i l . l e t . t a l Wie lasst mir zum Lohn! ( tt v % m —v ff _J_ W " ri Sem. pronl Sempronl Sem-pronl 0 .lasst si< • <a_a—a—p p p ' I — 0*0 mirl/ Ach.gebtsie mir! Gri _ let.ta bleibt mir. Sa| M r " ob ihrnachConstanti. no . pel wollt, zu den Tin-i iir - - ken wollt? Seid Hof.a.po . the Aer.schwimmtin 103 „V - r- .."^  :r~1 r~i T i_ r.-:„..u»„ „:,.i,f ,n« Rpi «« vnll Hcfichwerden. Will ein —i- 1 ~ •— I 7711 (Yersuchtdieparodistischen BewggulQe^olpinos nach zujmauhen.) ISchnell. anl. IhTmuBBt dem Tiir .ken mich em . tfeh Jen Auf P»L- ne Dunk- ^ar_ feed', V<w Z 0 ^ ' c e e ^ reco^&^( 1 ^L^3~= keit konnt ihr stets zah.len. Rasch ver _ liert kei rie Zeitj l - ~f- ~ I I ' X Rasch v e r . liert kei rfe Zeit: sagt dem 104 ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i ) 49 lan.ge.nl/ Will vor der R»;.i_se# rair sie noch fan.eenl / aim - o . | Quf marriage UM / r ^ e P f e t /-/wi — ^ gfcy , m 4—0 <2> Piipp.chen sind nicht zu er . grunden, sind nicht zu er - grun-deni, Wel.che c\v\~ tics j s / V ^ / y c a ^ ' f ^ f i f g K i , ! sw-p/y eav\r-frfkon J Children 3E 5= mm IF Ndth mit den zier.lichen. Kituienl Spriihen EiinkejiundFlammen und/ ziin.den!/ Alt un y p. Su n l  . d •at - - B P H 3 =2 Jung wird Yon ih.nen ent . brannt, yon ih.ncn ent . brannt! J  ir  y  i . e  e t . ra t,  i . c  e t . ra t! 2> * 3 .pfen und zu_prfen das H e r z e , mit uns spielenund <,ec -the*'. dgkbWs) 4 pujl>^ o r i w ^ a d zie len auf fa* je - den Fant. Ach, das bringt mich urn mei.nen Ver - stand!/ 0 um To • P P ~ f — f r ~ f — * r — ^ — spin.nen ge _wi = f = r d n.nen sie 0 AA 1 fy • p jlp ? f ~ P je . den Eant, und die ' r\) -fop ) a*cl Con -1 V P y P P )P 1 Wiir.de gibt nichts mehr im.. •f!*-*€ L\A'T!I -fAey oil | | j J | ! ' 3 = 01: # J 4 . 0 — = — 1 t. i - $ r : & 7 fflf 7 Hrj • —j 1 -1— 107 1 i I l l 56 ! 112 57 Men - gong dem ich mein Ilerz uill schen.ken, hat X WOuld ny>/ heart fredi aNt , lau rf ach so schwanken S^nn setzt vor die That Be.den. ken! / erhe ha<, ^ r - f o , , ^ +ht courage -to Take -Tib* ' Das tuns nicht Ge.winn I y —~~gl ThiiteMen-go-nc dochwasermusslErfindet das _ rr/emone Trite Q$ besth& can I B^can never t i l t i—<*——  ;7 ff? E W / , . . < r . ; , . V , f <V T?„* ,.„l.i..-.„i rx i'_ , i d Wort nicht, den fe.sten EnLschJuss! 0 Ver.drussl, 0 Ver druss' , Summon thg ujords -to-be-?}'* J-—- Ok(JM&\ -fate ! O cru£/ fate' 113 114 S e ^ fro^o will y j r ( ± y^a>> o/*j<k_ ) s t lie er Al . te len. ket mein Ge. Schick. 0 Lie _ he; •A / (Bei den l e i H a n \VortP" i ^ - S ^ j H - i t r r r ^ p i n g p t r f t t p n , er horte,in der Sempr. r>)Q. . Th'ur stehend, die Schlusstakte wohlgefallig an.) I j f P T p I? P <  P I P P P 'P p imp (Nahertretend.) . ^ ^ ^ Nach.ti. gall h,abt ihr ge _ sun . gen, doch trau^rig hats g e . k l u n . g e n . Ihr j.'Ke a, nlgUk\~-gjfilfl- /»» gladness j b*r J^kec>.r QY\ - $aa- nes^ - Do p r r ~ p p lrp -f-ji r/p p | J denkt wohl manch.nial an die E _ he? *> Denk' oft da . rani / Zur £\joj the-,-, -fh'"\k up-on a mr-rr,C4^-, ^ yes ih /<, s o j ^ 4 G r i l l . Sempr. p i J 1 ')'• P = * /PI i _ i rr 115 G O Grille ^ '.7 Semp. j t Eh' gc.hort ein Mannl f Ll ja! ein Mann/ Ihr muss* tiur (fen, be s^n wah len. Leiditzu feh.len! ( Wenn Ihr, nun, recht vol lot, seid ihr lieu _te, schon Brautf Heu.te schonBraut?0 Ja BrautIGrilTlet7tin.chen mein klei.ncs,klei ncsBieaxhenl, Adw i M£ fried n"^fj^^^^y fart in a- ^ cm M • * e,), ff/g aj^L^ (mit droheuder Miene in^ Laboratorium weifeend.) Hiihnchen! Nimmst in al . len Fill len S , Sempr. , G r U 1 t Sempr. Anit unendliehem Pathos) „ Gril l , (seblad) 1 ' fli- >' < ^ " i P l ? * c h ) ^ m±.\ •• m Wisst inV^nManniurmich? ., Ei-nenUas bin ich! , Wir Ihr'Bin A . po^he ker a l j e r . go. ne.) PP Eucli nehrn ich! (Das , ist schnell ge _ gan _ gen!). ^ $ i n No G r i l l , (erschreckt.); Sempr. tar kommt licrl married wowJ ft B ^yas soil denn W.Ury© Vow n-i<?<a S • / I =1= der?o Ich hab' ihn mir/ bc-.stellt. dass er,wenn'seuchge.f;illt, ge.wis se Punk.te brin. ge zu Pa.pier, | Wars recht von ;-.^Cov\_S|^n bafiv curr\omfi} iof X" he_- frax/eftte not*— r^f >$ COfAW^. JJr vJo<> your G r i l l . (bei t 5 _ — e) r r T Br —] , mir, ,nach dem No,, tar zu sen .den? ,!a!, ia! / (Sag Ei ne hier, wie soli das , , $k^±^jm±Jj>'JAKMr^ • ? _Tyeiil/es'. (oU Codg^k^tii^^ki^-j^i^^ 62 (Volpino, als Notar verkleidet, tritt ein, geht links ganz vor , wahrend die Beiden sich auf de Biihne rechts befinden.) 117 Volp; (bei Seite)<£. en.den?) \ Prachtig! / Ker No . tar, den Men-gonbo.stell_te ist nochnicht bei Sple'Aa>y[ \ Tl\<L yi^afyHc^wh or-dere^Uj, nry& —: A d l^ i Sempr. (Grilletta vorstellend) ihjnen, J i Wcunitkann ich die.nen? Bin der No.tar! |Vor.trefflich!DiesGriLlet_ta / . , r\ted V (/)re / w ready S\r* J^aty oucse/vfce: fl^ri y> W/.WI Pkai-e wk* h u b ^ ' Ich hab euch meinbe_sterHerrNo. tar, ru.fen las.sen,unseLnen E . he_ver_trag ab-zuJassen. / T ^ — — 1 . J Vblp.jvbn Seite, sehr vernehmlich) . i ' t )^  , t (laut) k i zupftihn.) Grill.(nahert sich Vol inc (Bei Seite) ; pino.da sie ihn erkenntund *P*P zupft ihn.) . r r . ' » (Hab a l . so recht ver.nonumeni) Bin des-halb ge.kom.men. (Ei[E|[Vol.pi.no!) StiLle I!) IU •/£ all In O rde r, (siihr deutlich beTSefteZ/p^  le hi \ i 118 63* ^ N ? , l \ < v / - ^ Sempr. (Volpino H«tzt sich an den Tisch rechts.) s J 0 / 1 i 1 (laut zu Semprohio) ' v - • * • .. . . i still!) Be.feh.let, ich volLfiih.re! , Hier ist Pa.pier und Tin te! Ich d i M U r e , , / preach) fiJ-yourpleatoKLflere.'!!, f&fcr a*<l Ink. ' Z slwtl cUJ*^* (Wahrend der Vorbereitungen / V IP? M*VH ? n ' e 5S5f a l , , s . a i 9 Meng. (Bei Seite, aber JS A/\Notarverkleidet,ergehtgleich- "»""8 . . t]'jph * " V X falls links vor und sieht rechts hinuber. 9 e n r d u m i c n > ^ u i - - ^ U - ^ — g «a at— (Naher hinblickend.) < ^ W " \ Sempr. rit. VerdammtlDa sitzt schon derRechtelScheintnurauAnichtderEAtelWaswill pk**lfUef<:'zih oni a( reach/1 Uei &i itihz. a 4 Jfr>>'yjUo ar&> Meng. (wie fruher^Volpino) Sempr. (verzweiflungsvoll, mit ^ M e n g o n e > s e h r b e s t i m m t ) erhobenen H&nden.) der? Bin der N o . tarl •/ Kom.men Zwei. e garl , Berr, ihr seid zu spiitl j yjetf XV« at" / ^ / yrvfeg I / / D ^ ^ £ f C e W i here. S /> > y ^ a f e ^ ^ /age • G r i l l , (hat den Mengone erkannt.), T^ UT eng. (NunauchMengon!WeissGott;wiesgeht!)MichricfMen-gpn,doch will ich kei nen Zwang. B e . . (bei Seite, aber sehr vernehmlich.) Z\Jik<M tfrvte,j'iilC-.tfo*& Crt/Mptf '»C> «J <•'•" 64 zahltuiirmjrdcnGangls^stzurn Bersten) Mich rief Mongon als er. ste^WrrCoIJi! genurnicht nu  de  Gang! s ist z u m t ! _ f i r A V / X\r*e.. T^^^^i^l MA y o * i i i i i i i i dop pelt Ho.no . ra.re, Gut, so schreiht zuzwei'n unagleich zwei E . xem pla re! i (Die beiden Notare setzen sich rasch, Mengone an don Tisch links, Volpiuo an den Tisch rechts, so dass sie leicht ill's Publikum sprechen kOnueu. Gri l le t ta nimmt eine Haudarbeit vor und setzt sich in die Niihe Meugones. Sempronio geht diktireud zwischen beiden Notaxen atif.und ab.) , , | ! I ' • ) \ 0 j i Ge.lost ist .die Fra gel , Al so,schreibt, was ich sa / Q u a r t e t t . Un JIOCO Adagio G r i l l . 05 S 5/ovJ )L Un poco^SdagioTA — — .ftliafi._S.glo. ^ t vor wi i r .d i . gen Zeu.gen... „Frei .wil . lig gibt sichGril. *4= zu e i . gen.. . zu ei_ gen . . . let . ta zu ei .gen. . . 1 ehr.sam als E ' . he.frau 1 60 121 i 67 124 69 Volp. (erhebtsich glcichfalls.) Meng. Herr Col . lc j A - yet gahats ge - t rof . fenl O h r n e \{-k -<-h'^  diS' p o * " ^ ' x <**el Q f *~ die sesgchtes nicht, oh ne die . scsgehtcs nicht. . die . ses jelgehtes nicht., „ o h r n e die . sesgchtes nicht.Semp.(zu Grilletta.) Sempr. (ihr Diktat fort. liifurtfiwir"**™*" 1 G r i l l . (Ironisch.) i i p p i i i i ^ i i | p p i l | M ^Ich, trau dem Trc i . ben nicht, vyir un . tec -schrei.ben nicht,bis w i r ' s g e - sehnl Bis wir's ge - sehn! __ 1  | j pri"-c;-p/e, ye y)anr zee.} if vie, a ~ pree.i V o l p - r f l . P P d y t Na das wird schon. / Na das wird scho'n.i "Thgrga-y*, our -tec * schrei.ben nicht,bis wir's ge . sehnl Bis wir 'sge - sehnl, pr\n - c! - pie, ue. tJ&tjr 4 o s g e t ^ / f ue a - cj ree • 128 73 Volp. (bei Seite.) „chr.sam als GleichkommtdioSte-leli • Meng. (bei Seite.) Jetztwlrdihm hel.lel . „zu ei.gen" in marriage, (stellt sich sehr erstaunt; laut.) E . he-frau" ,yol . pi_no.ll" Wie das?,, H-ovj So f s „demviel ge - eb S e n " (sehr erstaunt, laut:) „Mcn - ghj-nojl" t i l l JA mo I to Presto. (Volpino unrf^Mengone nehraen abwechseJiiaCvon Sempronio und Grilletta^die Bogen, schanen Xinein, dann nehmen wledcr Sempronio und Grilletta die Bogen zur^Hand.) Ihr konnt nicht le . sen, so,, zeigt doch wies stehtl / \j-)H cue n\i - Ac, It. - e 1 , ^ee If- a - ^ airi , Ihr konnt nicht le,. sen, so , zeigt doch wics stehtl i 'lo:*, ore rr.'.j - j a k •?!•>., Ids S C £ ><- o - f a -sent! / „ , 'a.vf Presto. P 129 .So 1st ge . we . sen Ihr wollt uns V o n f>Q'\)*ke. ui> ^ \~h all //,,_ Ihr konnt nicht . l e , . sen, so,, zelgt doch wies stehtl , lop ore. m i t - Tnk-e*,, Iqt i _e£ it « - J)f'A ' konnt sen, so ze . -eigt doch wies stehtl fon are, t*!* - lat - , tet's iedretf*;* . Sempr. (auf seinen Bogen klopfend.) So ist, ge . we . sen Ihr wollt uns 'rt fio-s/okc __<4 w i f A *.!i_/7,,'i Nun scheints ge . bo . ten sich zu ent . de .cken: , T Hmr gx -pose. y'o»f U0> / / _ n 3 r - f>leQt't^ / Spassoh. ne Glei . chenl Das ist Vol - p i . nol He E — • J-130 75 Spass p h . ne Glel - chen Spass oh . nc 7^ >i T « E l H c r r V o I . pl .nol Hochldie Ver . lob . ten. y w J 6 — \')er~I wmr wiA her; werd Ich nicht wei . chen / I ' l l r,,r fce i k a A r - <2*t. — -J-- g 1»-Bii -bi . schen a r i a <9 — Spass oh .ne Glcichenl / ,ochldie Ver . lob - tenl / er- J- wuif u/\A her t ,Lie.be muss sie _ gen Hochldie Ver - lob - tenl/ Lie.be muss sie - gen Streichen werd ich nicht w'ei.chen 4 « .War ,so ver . schwle.gen trotz der Ge . fahrl / Aove /n con - rea/• nic-nf~, uul-ll -to - cfa <./• Vi.vat! Das Paar! Jovi /Viii sue - zeea' ; Ob sio sich , How I" ckatl V i ... __. ' L_*> 1 0 A . H A . <A . ; E3E Mich zu be . trii . gen! Wie blind ich warl 3 •p-a ~ SEE •P-131 76 •War so ver. schwiegenl, War ,so ver. schwiegen I / Jal ' Lte.be mus _ . krie.gen, 1st noch nicht klar. , V i . v a t l / VLvatl i , Lic.be muss" sie . gen, krie.gen, ist noch nicht klar. / Vi.^vatl/ Vi.vatl I ,Lie.be,miiss sie . gen, uss sie,. gen,vit. '.'Or J , .v e.mu _'•«Y ' [/it'i-ry. AoVe wii| (ICPC \)'\C ' T-f* , Mich zu be . tru V gen I ' Mich zu be . tru gen I Mich zu be . tru .gen 1, Ja / Vow K«^e de'celml " ^ - r - \ \ / 0 n fmi'i? ^ e - ceiJfcfr^e , ye$,i ,das 1st mir klar I. O V « W i l l 4l'C - CCftff i Ja! j Jal / ,Lie_be,muss sie,. gen, das ist, mir klarj. 55 3^  V i . v a t l das Paarl , Vi.vatl/ Vi.vatl ,0b sie,sich krie.gen ist noch nicht klar... ,./ >ff will iuc - C«?d . |/V-f >y > V' f ' Y j / H^g yl^-l-o^ vy ^ [ W y M . g ^ t -Vi . vatl das Paarl ( .Vi.vatl, VLvatl / ,0b sie, sich krie.gen ist noch nicht klar^_i < 1 i » / i r-<» 1 T-fi— --a -y — :p 3 E Rasch zum No . tar 1 Jal / Jal / Mich zu be . trii °. gen! Wie blind ich warl ft * 1» .. *> a—a • . r-.jt /Lie. be muss sie gen,das 1st mir klar I, (Sempronfo wuthend ab durchMie Mi j & r - o v e W»A\ UJZ v 'pat^ i h</<> •Jill -cecd ^  * A . ittelthiire, m m ,0b sie sich krie.gen ,ist noch nicht klar 1, ebenso Volpino, den Sempronio hinausstosst. LviQ. \\CJC. yicfgff; lo'ji Kill Si/e- ctcct I Orllietta wurde von Sempronio In denWohn-, m ,0b sie sich krie,. gen ist noch nicht klarl / raum rechts durch die Thiire geschoben. /-ov? wilt \IA>/« v^t-v**^, /«je will suc-ceaet. Mengone entwischte dem Wuthcnden und P Rasch zum No. tar I Rasch zum No . tarl bleibt auf der Scene.) K ..T wtlI tiave \/t*-S£a*ce. T w.'il suc-ieccf J Wf • - e s S i erase. — P — P -ol Jf —P—P-* 3 . 132 (Wirft ill f. Notarkleidunjr, Perriir.ke etc. ab (Mengone utnl schleudcrt'sie ins, Lahoratorium.) 77 Wahr.lichl Lie . oe muss sie . gen! > Doch mit Prol.len und Li i .genl < E W 1 i 0 wel.choPla.gen! /Ich muss ZweLe ach! aus demFel.de schla.gen! Vol.pi.no i'iihrt gleich \ ( 3E * t Q j o o r den letzten Streich , |>wy clever scUe-t*>t> . ? ^ ^ ^ ^ Vol.pin das schlaue Herrchen mit sei.nem ESEEjE — i •• i j • I c i -I_J___VI___*I ..'.n. i r . _ A r i . i ..-n /! i i i i i Tiirkenmarchen, das ihm Seinpro.ni glauht,schlag ich aufs Haupt Jetzt gilt os, fes.tenMnth zu , htrk'tikgrt'-y. S&KJVOVUQ goes a - Una , cjcfiw^ osh'is pt$Y)t)t A T \ ' M reoA-j, Jrk^c T° "hike — i JY_ :—£ : kr 1— \ 1 : 1 -e»-£|E 3 ^ (lliertrat Grilletta von rechts ein, sie ahmt ihm spottisch nach.) * 1 Grilletta . ' ' ' r i l letta . ! •' I . . i 1 Meng i ^ i.iiL J» ill T^ I i * i - i !• T-i fas . senl „Muth zu fas . sen!", n .la I jal Meng. hi . no, das ist nicht dein Fachl.Die Cocifacje! , * r a Courage 1.4^ ye±[ " " ^ grre >;a^  -)'/..; hff&- TTM£ A-EE V = ^ 1 133 7 8 i f^f=f f Lie - be, die Lie . be mach . to mich schwach, doch kriift'. ge That soil .heu.te noch enLscheLdenl Sempronio und Vol. pin, ich nehiu' es auf mit BeLden! rfoaHqg ihecoctfse: of ad I ' M / , ^re noiu y-6e ueafar tacKo* tru . b e u n . s e -for- wenr.T/ioc«»A lig Herzleidder , ,Hoff.mmgniilden .Schein. E , . wig /C\ wig Dein! ja,. dein E.wig Dein! So soils be _ Grilletta. '^yA . Won.nigBeben.! i Ncu - - ^es •1 J ' i 1—. . I 0 Mengone. schlos . sen seinl j A d d - £ \ / - c r - m o r e Was ich fuh . le solltapf . re That fbrt_an Dir be . vjajc-G^o-il cour - a«e <a«ia! i / a / - /bur'd ecdi 'M\ ev -pvil™) zeugen.Nah dem Zie . le ver.geb'ich Zau . dernund muthlos Schweigen. 0 Gluck der l r r-r=-»« r J , / L, ,\ I .1—, J J G — L ! J _ . 135 8 0 6 r i U - o v Liobel.Nim.mer nir Lionel i . er mm . io?c,in re' ^ ^Meng.fgr^ ii . bo un. se . , lig Herz - leid der _ Niin fear mer tru . bo u n . s e . lig Herz . leid d e r ^ Hoff.nungmil.der Schein_ E . wig Dein 1 / E . ™$t»f$J Hoff.nungmiLder Schein_ E . wig Dein! W 1 S ®*\nr I ¥, f i 'icy i . — . / / r m ^ — = — . 1 ' r°n #-soils be.schlos.sen sein, ja so We'"lTbd. — /"-j z*-er- yore. y_J<, be - - -• I —L\ , 1^  r- 1 1 1 I S n „ , , soils be.schlos.sen sein. j j a so dein, so soils be.schlos.sen sein, / soils be . schlos sen €v-er — jyAw<dein, so .soils beLschlos.sen sein, / soils be . schlos . - sen ^dtg^'Mh*pjy <?v>-<?r- nitre, UeMi-K^  hop — f>y *r~tL" 137 S e m n r n n i n ^ f t i l t o r r o ^ r t > , ' i , l n n UHef in Hamlen, in den Ladi-n , wirft r - $tolz.j,prufi:ude Ulicke auf>einc Hiklisen und Flasrhdi. ) r r — li A v « n V n l n i r . Anm T V . . . . c* . • . n i : „ x Ein BriefVein Brief von Vol. pin dem Teu.fels . jnn.gen! j Sein Plan ist ge . lun-gen! Er schickt die Tur.ken mir. Der Pa.scha mit Ge . fol.ge ist gleich hier. / -rear \*Thp " chid U\i cow^ocz CX>W.\M beta.. Priift den La den.kauft ihn , zu hoh.en Prei.sen! i Als Hof. a . po . the. ker f ^ n a l l m 0rf}e<^ ^ reoA'sf ra ir* - pre±S ju'^  . ^ frkicy - H ^ W duc-afe> Schlin.ge! Ich soil euch Gril.let.ta, so schreibt er da, _ ne.hen, Vol.pin zum Man ne it III 138 m ^ A \ SMenRfhiir.'ii G e - ( l n hoehster K m - g u n g , H.J C\ /- ^ /)^vOh ^ ; i i riiusehund Scmi)r.rl'->1t''t f -in.-n A i i / u g , \Joo/ O f , « ^ Q r i l l v i l ( . | l z l l m F , M I S t ( . r ) 1 strllt Ding,, zur. 'd.t .) • -rn- -0- -m; X geben.Sowi Is dor Pascha Doch da wird niehts,d rails Sic kommenl /Sic sind im Hans pr.\o • 5-,-.rT U » a - a 0 ,4. 0 ; gtw\ rp t o o l . / i V ^ y r . c?^ ;,^ !| 7ht>(rck>(erJ-1 I;; J(.>|. Turlu^heOlar^filuiad Scene. ?f| ! i . ^ c w - { ^ y (Gemessen nicht SChnoILj (Volpino als vornehmbr Turke verkleidet, mit tiirkischem Gcfolge(Bas-| t | jp,~t~r~ 0 38T Z__j j " se)tri t t gravitatisch unier sfeltsamen fieberden ein. Die Tiirken bringen g _ il i l 4 grosse Kbrbe mit ;^ ieb^if ten arifangs in geschlossener Rctne stehen; mit gekreuzten Armen.) NI \ pern —0-fl 7 4-5 a> - — « t Volpino. (rait charaktrristischer Verbeugung.) Sempronio.(im EiferVolpino's Verbeugung nachatimend.) Sa . lem a lei _ kuml Volp. _Con_.stan.ti . nu . po.lal Ht ~g • ••OBSBKHatKa— £ 3 E — ^ ^ _ ^ Jr<y'r r i,«w». \ loo*1- VnlnO,0'^ 1 d i e Arme hoch ausstre-9- S .mTie Lbor.(ihnan- • , .V \ , , ^koP V o l P-ckend durch don ganzen Laden. ? aempr. y^- rtonnorn(gbempr. (wie zustimmend.) S n i -Nach Art orientalischer Vorsanger.) no.po.la! nu.po.lal nu.po.la! 84 Semp.(m^ " K e b e n e r U{ y j (zeigt einen grossen uouij j . Verbeugung.) \ V 0 1 P ' Ilr.utel mit Gold.) Chor ( jeder einen grossen Reutel hochhaltcnd.) A I i i • . w — " ^ —r 1 ^ 1_ ,A1 . les dein!, , . Du . -ff|| p~ i '— 1 — S E E ka ten! So viel Du.ka.ten dein! / Semp. p $ R G r i l l . vernehm}lch } Meng.(ebenso) bemp. (Die Hande wiesegnendempor. if s J j s A , • \ »oIp.haltend,nach Art eines ihou ' auca,U * e . orientalischen Vorsangers)Chor. (einfallend ) PP, (parodlstisch) A Semp.(entschieden) Chor. , , Volp 140 Chor mm Gril let _ ta I Gril lot . ta muss fur VoLpLno sein!( rtMi^f^giye 4a \/ol - p i n > 8 5 a - J * v j V G r i l l . (spottisch auf Sempronio eindringend) (bei Seite zu einander) j» — H - F — f Lasst euch doch ra . then, nehmt die Du . ka . ten , ich ~fb'iL ' s n c ? ^ " I'IAA - n- j y-fa/ee all ihe'ir r^on~-&'-f> Semp. Chor (immer noch ganz ruhig) Nein, nein, nein, nein! ^ «A4> IS', i l B , H « , •'V-*- :  Gril let ta muss ' fiir )$ -fo our SI W27 3t I 4 fit 5 = 5 = 5 0' ti' = j g <j* bin no Lasst euch doch ra . then, 8 = 1 E N P N N — 7 " — f r ^ f r — i—0 1 B» 0 s V 7 m Nein, nein, nein,nein! Geht nur al . lein! j P \\ 0-> S3 —07 I y 0 Vol Pi - no sein I ( Gril dear . . let 141 86 G r i l l . Meng . nehmt die Du . ka . ten Ich . ~Jhke oil -their won-ey. ve bin Nein, nein, nein, nein! Nein, nein, nein,nein I Geht nur al AJo, Dein! die panze Scene beherscht und bleibt, die Hande zum Befehl ausgestreckt, wiihrend des Folgenden unbewcgiich ^1 (J Volp. (zu den Turken) - f a •• i - . _ ^ i - 1—^  i ^ . — f l h r r - k . ^ V^r^ ^ ( ^ M o d e r a t o ma deciscK/ Sofort stifllt sich der 1 P a c k l ein ,packt e i n . p a c k t e i n , packt ein.packt e i n ' , L ; i l l ^ s t , ! » ls Wache Pad t*e 4U Mneiihcrw zee <,4W/^ heft '.n" d i u MittekhSre. 1 _ v -I d ni D l f t a " d e r n Turken attacca fallen _in stuifen »«we^ungcn_ iiber den'ganzen Laden her. Anfangs Ju scheinbaren Absicht, g r f f a •-r:.\ / = £ 3 X T einzupackens werfen aberdann, was sie nur erreichen konneiu Flasehen, Biichsen, Pulver,Gerathe, Tcipfe, Tiegel in die Kijrbe, dass e^kHrfj^^Juiuu|t^^ 7 ^^ '^ ^^ Ijj'jJ^  J"^ -Tiir.keri! Ach . tung auf das Glasl ; 35t Tiir.ken schont das ed le t r g " •V^Alle ausser sVmtJronio den Ver.^ > 0nd; !seir^tetrcTr""we zweiflung erfasst.) - . +J>-es efr-s etreTr'M ngone und Grilletta am Tische rechts.Gril. lctta driickt Mengone die Feder % r X s ^ r d e i n f L.fer rfpS'l in die Hand. Er schreibt stehend —,—2/a A l l e . Nass! 2 * einige Zeilen,und nun ganz im „ Hei das wird ein theu.rer Spass I, Vordergrund zudemverzweifelnden S o c * A.* w".|| af/ fee porr Sempronio und unbeachtet von\ol-i d •/Meng. (halt Sempronio das beschriebene Papier vor) Un S i T 1 3' ter . schrei . bet! | a—& Un . ter. schrei 1 S bet I / 88 143 90 145 o\a r-i^hr -—~ v rrPf-r- ti^A j~ Chor Mit Festigkeit.(Dei dVm Rufe hebt Jeder cine Flasche alii beiden Hiinden hoclluild HI h«tt bleibt steif stehen.) /T\ ( (Hier wird mit einem Sehlage \ • Alles klirrend in die Korbe geworfen) \ / . j " T i m r / 1—— K kc k ^ k k Semp. Tiir . ken . hun . de, schont Chor Packt nur, packt den g a n . This, f r e - f&yise ejtiei suck den L a . den, un . er _ mess _ lich ist der zen L a . d e n , , H e r r Vol pi . no zahlt den en - j o-j - w^r ; and uUr -ft*.*, is This cv>i MengAinLSie zer . truni. mern aucn' den L a . den? 1m Volp. Packt nur, packt den gan Tkli pre - feme ^,uci W f i nrer ' gro . sser zen L a . den, ich. be . zah . le wird der al _ len T^A 14 Con -7* rm • {ou are uretk. ht>f>) looui Y0M inu',f~<(op rA\'s all <a/" Scha . den. Tiir . ken . hun . de schont den L a . den I Hei da fliesst das ed . le Scha _den Kein Er . bar . men, kei ne Gnadenl Hei da fliesst das ed . le •jut,- )0n I 2-t -fAe P/# mnam K#r sfyj'.U^ LOC muvr- ko»e. here a If a r Scha_ den, Al . les hangt an ei . nem F,a . denl Hei da ,fliesst,das ed . le •fui - lev, I And T $u>ear X u-ill ueiu r a . ueni nei aa inesst aas ea,. le , wot"stop u*- /ess j. lef ~ra's ^  M«. e r r t 146 91 Volp . (iii geschlossenem Ilaufen) i f f P i r rp P rcr-jf__a Se mn (stellt sich vor den „Gif t "kasten o ^ ^ f ^ / r . . . • 1 • + 11 <•• vTT^ o e m P - ihn schiitzend.) • Sc5wort.Gnl.Iot.ta soli fur, Vol . Chor " p w d l h ^ -p i . no sein! i ~ ~~ . & ive , Semp Jit > l»p P E pi.no se,inl Will dennKeinerhiermichret.ten? / W will no one. nrreM\ev\ iote « f HadieTurkenspannenKet . A. Very Caw>V will i><?|A/pr;,f for 92 (Die Tiirken sehreitftiwifrohend nuf Sempronio zu.immor gravitiitisch steif wie ini Miircheiibildu.) A lah! A l . l a h - il A l . lab! A l . l a h g S S a a a Al „ lah . il __A1 o ° O g ? molto crescendo rit. (klirrender Schlagl) Sempr.Czu Mengone flehend.ganz ge brochen) r if - F P E E ^ lahl Wollt die Tiir , . ken , Ihr ver.trei, . ben?. C s V ^ " y c v i a / i r e ikcit b^ drh $C*T - Ter < • * 4 r C h o r ^ t o W ^ ^ f ^ (jgehr breit) ^ 'T P p Fy t 1 s5 (Volpino und die Turken bleiben in jeweiliger S t e l . lungin einer starren Gruppe j j ^ e i n lebendes Bild) \ a tempo VOID TT , . T (Grosse Pause Sempronio « ^ ^ L ^ r - ^ f U i ^ ^ u n t e r s c h r e i b t zitternd) Meng T ^ Sempr.* * -A-- T T i " * • I * * i I %T« " - „ ;^*VEtV " \ (Mengone und Grilletta gehen auf V o l . G r i U . U n - t e r - s c h r e i b e n l N l m m S l e m n ! ( ) pinozu.derunbeweglich starr dasteht, j .ritenmolto f^\. p-Ta Sehr breit. ^ temP° J U D d r e i s S ( i D i h m d ( - ' D falschen Bart ab) p a c h ba» • 0—^—r ' f ; * 1 ff > » J J J J p P f» A I? — i J J J — ^ = = g [" g—Stria—| © / © 2 @3 Meng. attacca , {AlIegroKMann 148 Chor 93 or (Tonore)mi(l Frauen(Soi)raiie).IIausgosinde und NuchbnrK':han,\velelie schon voin Kenster if a us eiuzeln die Scene beobachtet luiMen.d rung-en herein. G r i l . l e t . t a , Men ue, dem Al tej ftK??^ ^ win GriL,Jet.,ta,.Men z go^e, dem . A ^ - t e f l zum H ^ . ^ ^ m ^ - j m I zum Gril . , _ W AMen..,_.go = .ne, dem ^ - t e j ^ H g j . ^ dem^  taj. ( Gril -_let_ta, Men_^go.ne, dem Al ten zum Hoh.ue, dem Al - ten zurn^ 149 94 iU If Lo Vo\piy)o r^~— ——. j ' X^j^AUe o h " e V o l p i l K ^ d c u Volpino holineml) r _ r r | La-deu ? e r . t rum.mert , Vol . pi . j u > \ be . kum mert,be . zahlt ai - k«.s haarl<*/^~. Z v, r - trw'n-mcft , V o l . p i . n o ( be . kum.mert , .be . zahlt. a l . l e s b a a r t V e r . sdMf ;2r " t T ^ - ^ U V o 1 - P j - n o < - .Hum. inert, be . zahlt al . l e s baarl , La.den zer . t rum.mert , V o l Pi - npV be . k u m . m e r t , be _ zahlt a l . les baarl, ^ - — C ^ ^ i a l a m e ) a y > ^ _ _ } ^ n\nzr~ pA</-fcr all I . lo . ren ™n. ,7^ -./}°'- i ? n I / T ' \ f 7 ll- r e n' v e r 7^  *?i i ren'/ , E i n P d r e r - « r k 0 - ren.o yAllefa-^' 'p^-r^ [ZMe far ^ A l l e ^ ' " ^ / A-A-oHer s k i AllecAcxan, / U w i . ., i 1 - I 1 — 1 i • _ -I. I — rle'S Ver . lo . . renl , / Alle. # *'it-H p V V e r . lo . . renl Al le f R - / o ^ E r . ko . renlO 4 ^ i o A ^ / / ^ ^ V e r lo renl Ein a n d . r e r . er ko . ren.o Gjliick . Ii . c h e s , / Paar! / W - ygy be. '. _ „ O. Freu . del , Gluck . Ii . ches. , Paarl 0. Freu . del , ,0 150 !».> Frt'.u . del Wie sehneLle oiu gl i ick . Ii . ehes I 'aarlVi vatj V i vat! Die AllefW hcfCh ^ U o f - ^ j Ike.j ore', ^UV : '1 io ' ! jy., U i e s c h n e l . l e ein gj i ick . l i . ches Taar! V i . vat! V i v a i l , Die A F r e u . d e l / , \ \ ie schnel.le ein gl i ick . Ii . ches Paarl U'f - 91 • r-Wy K^ '/5!/ ^  U ^ Y ' / +<^ 7 are .' J J) J) J h ^ V i e schhelire ein g l i i C k . ' l i . ches7 Paarl -y r , r B e i . d e l , zur H61 le zur H o i . le u n . schick. i i ches Paarl (zu Volpino v ^ det spottend.) T ^ g g r ^ ; K H L l e r t r i n k t l e e r l ^ n S { ? h a ^ ' Den Schaden, den Schaden, den Schadenzahlterl . Kei loa'Jr Jr. 'H^ZYYJ^i DM Schaden aahlt erl , Den Schaden, den Schaden, den Schadenzahlterl / TT ^ ^ tri^k! HT1 .Pjf Schaden zahlt erl Dep Schaden, den Schaden, den Schadenzahlterl , C P r o i u c o t a ^ J " Pen Schaden zahlt erl. Den Schaden, den Schaden, den Schadenzahlterl ^ ^ ^ ^ . Vorhang, Ende. Waldhcim Eberle. Wlen VII. 151 KEY TO SYMBOLS USED IN STAGING 0 Centre Stage DS Downstage DSL Downstage l e f t DSR Downstage r i g h t US Upstage C C h a r a c t e r c r o s s to t h i s p o s i t i o n C h a r a c t e r make c r o s s i n t h i s d i r e c t i o n X Make c r o s s a t t h i s time . & and c wi t h 0 Globe oo used i n F i n a l e to i n d i c a t e 2 baskets S Sempronio M Mengone G G r i l l e t t a V V o l p i n o / / THE A POTHEC ARY-.-S EHAYDN OPERA WORKS 1IOP 01D AUDI 1 OPIUM MMLMBER 79 JQIffl S1AGE DESIGN :- SI LVLN HENRIKSON WASTERS THESIS ~ MUSIC 6 4 9 SCME:-%'/t? APPENDIX XI J WALL CONSTRUCT/ON DETAIL 

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