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Role of tatiana in Eugene Onegin by Tchaikovsky Sellinger, Dionne Rachelle 2006

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ROLE OF TATIANA IN EUGENE ON EG IN BY TCHAIKOVSKY by Dionne Rachelle Sellinger B.Mus., University of British Columbia, 2004 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Opera) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA April 2006 © Dionne Rachelle Sellinger, 2006 ABSTRACT The thesis for the Master of Music degree in Opera consists of the performance of a major role in one full opera production in the first or second year. My major role in one full opera production was performed in Eugene Onegin on March 6, 2005. HIS 9 (MMoteb Opus K) MesslCimJublo Opus "7 > •aryi Nixon, prgarf "1 • i Richard VVfiaf|sf c#n<|i€lof Soloists: Sarah Vardy 1 Andrew Greenwood Pacific Singers Tjpm Sunday, March 13th, 2005 StAndrew's-WesloChnrth Bomnl ni Ntta VBKHI tr TicktttSIJ-SISillktof, Present this handbill upon purchase of your ticket to receive a second ticket free! The local Arts Recital Scries Hi. h-.nl Valium* \t*»k Utrnlor Frena Tradition 6ireat Songs and Arias fry French Composer, »w Greenwood, baritoi Matthew Ma, Thursda-f Martb 10, 8:00pm t>t. Andrew's -Wesley £burch $13-$15 at the door Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin The Chan Shun Concert Hall March 3, 4, 5, and 6, 2005 E U G E N E ONEGIN By Pyotr lllyich Tchaikovsky Opera in 3 acts Libretto by Tchaikovsky and Shilovsky From a prose poem by Pushkin With The UBC Opera Ensemble And The UBC Symphony Orchestra Premiere—Moscow, Mahy Theatre, students of the Moscow Conservatory, 1879 Professional Premiere—Moscow, Bolshoy Theatre, 1881 Conductor Norbert Baxa Director Nancy Hermiston Music Director Richard Epp Set Design Bryan Pollock Lighting Design Jeremy Baxter There will be one twenty—minute intermission Chan Shun Concert Hall March 3,4, 5, 6, 2005 This production is made possible by generous assistance through the Chan Endowment Fund and the David Spencer Endowment Encouragement Fund of the University of British Columbia UBC TheChan ACT ONE Scene 1 Madame Larina's garden In the garden, Madame Larina and her devoted servant Filipievna are talking together while Larina's daughters Tatiana and Olga can be heard practicing a duet. Peasants come in from the fields bringing freshly cut hay and celebrating the completion of the harvest. The outgoing Olga is taking part in the celebrations while the pale and shy Tatiana remains wrapped up in her beloved novels. Lenski, Olga's suitor, and his worldly friend, Eugene Onegin, arrive. The four young people awkwardly mingle until Lenski and Olga pair off as do Tatiana and Onegin. Lenski pours out his love for Olga. While strolling through the garden, Onegin asks Tatiana if she is growing tired of her boring existence. Visibly upset, Tatiana has difficulty answering. As evening falls, the couples go in for dinner. Scene 2 Tatiana's bedroom Tatiana and her nurse, Filipievna, have been talking. Tatiana is unable to fall asleep and asks Filipievna to tell her a story. Filipievna tells Tatiana about her life, love, and marriage but notices that Tatiana's mind is wandering and asks if she is ill. Tatiana replies that she is se-cretly in love and asks to be left alone. When she is finally alone, Tatiana begins writing a letter to Onegin pouring out her feelings. She closes by pleading for his understanding and when the morning ar-rives, she gives the letter to Filipievna for delivery to Onegin. Scene 3 A different part of the garden A group of women has gathered in Madame Larina's garden singing about flirting with boys. Tatiana hurries in, followed by Onegin. Onegin tells Tatiana that love and marriage are not for him and, while he is flattered by her attentions, he loves her like a brother and no more. Tatiana is crushed and humiliated. INTERMISSION ACT TWO Scene 1 Madame Larina's house, months later During a ball for Tatiana's birthday, Monsieur Triquet, the dancing master, sings a song in her honor. Onegin dances with Tatiana, which gives rise to some ill-natured gossip from the neighbors. Onegin, bored with the whole evening, chooses to flirt with Olga and arouse Lenski's jealousy. They quarrel and Lenski challenges Onegin to a duel. Scene 2 The following morning At dawn, Lenski and his second, Zaretsky, await Onegin. Lenski re-flects on the folly of his life and imagines Olga visiting his grave. Onegin arrives with his second. They sing of regret for their earlier rashness but, in the end, pride prevails. Neither Lenski nor Onegin will make the first move towards reconciliation. The pistols are loaded and the opponents measured up. Lenski is killed at the first shot. A C T T H R E E Scene 1 A hall of a palace in St. Petersburg, several years later A magnificent ball is in progress. Onegin is there after spending sev-eral years in seclusion to atone for the death of his friend, Lenski. Prince Gremin, the host of the party, arrives with his beautiful wife. The Prince talks with his cousin, Onegin, who questions him as to the identity of his wife. Gremin tells Onegin of the love and beauty that Tatiana has brought into his life since they were married two years earlier. Gremin introduces Onegin to Tatiana. Tatiana excuses herself after a few words to Onegin, who is utterly captivated by her. Scene 2 Later that same evening Onegin has written an impassioned letter to Tatiana. Though many years have passed, she still loves him. She receives him , and recalls their former meeting and shows some indignation at his return. Is his interest in her now due to her marriage to a rich, prominent, and no-ble husband? Perhaps he only seeks notoriety. She remembers the happiness that could have been theirs but is now out of reach. Onegin declares his love again and Tatiana prays for courage. She admits that she loves him as much as before, but tells him the past can not be recaptured. She is married now and she will be forever devoted to her husband. Appealing to Onegin's sense of honour, she asks him to leave her at once. All his pleas are in vain—she resists his temptation and turns away in a final farewell. A distraught and despairing Onegin falls to his knees to contemplate his bitter fate. CAST MARCH 3/5 MARCH 4/6 Tatiana Whitney Sloan *Krzysztof Biernacki Dionne Sellinger Onegin *Andrew Greenwood Lenski Stephen Bell *John Arsenault Olga Alison Temple Rose Ellen Nichols Filipievna Joyce Ho Milo Lowry Larina Megan Morrison Erin Fisher Captain Kevin Louden David English Zaretsky Scott Brooks Michael Mori Triquet John Marino(3)/Brian Lee(5) Adrian Glaubert Gremin Andrew Stewart Andrew Stewart Guillot Andrew Jameson Andrew Jameson Tenor Solo Kevin Lee Tomas Bijok David English (Gremin Understudy) UBC OPERA ENSEMBLE CHORUS Linda Baird, Jess ica Bowes, Tomas Bijok, Scott Brooks, DJ Calhoun, Brent Calis, Esther Choi, Leah Field, Erin Fisher, Adrian Glaubert, Brooke Harris, Joyce Ho, Chloe Hurst, Teiya Kasahara, Michelle Keobke, Amy LaFroy, Brian Lee, Kevin Lee, Elaine Lee, Margo Levae, Kevin Louden, Milo Lowry, John Marino, Katie May, Gina McLellan, Melanie McTaggart, Mimi Roth - Miller, Michael Mori, Matthew C. Mori, Diana Oros-Wilder, Alina Raskin, Lucy Smith, Kathleen Susak, lain Taylor UBC OPERA ENSEMBLE DANCERS Tomas Bijok, Scott Brooks, DJ Calhoun, David English, Adrian Glaubert, Nancy Hasiuk, Chloe Hurst, Laurren lacobellis, Michelle Keobke, Kevin Lee, Elaine Lee, Kevin Louden, Gina McLellan, Melanie McTaggart, Michael Mori, Matthew C. Mori, Rose-Ellen Nichols, Diana Oros-Wilder, Kathleen Susak, Alison Temple *courtesy of the Canadian Actor's Equity Association Aleksandr Pushkin Pyotr lllyich Tchaikovsky UBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Violin I Concertmaster: Regina Ho Assistant:James Wei Natalie Jeon Drie Ignas Theresa Choi Bora Lee Katya Sokolavskaya Heather Wright Si-Fan Yiu Jason Ho Violin II *Erin James Alana Chang Grace Tsang Ji Younge Park Aida Boiesan Sarah Chang Laura Weingarten Sherry Chuang Chandra Susillo Violas *Peter Ing Lana Elias Vanessa Hellinga Jay Yiu Eric Edington Hryb Josh Belevedere Tally Lemire Cellos *Jianan Zhao Alexandra Sia Brian Chan Tina Hsu Mi Kung Kim Sabrina Tsou Caroline Szram Double Bass *Adam Jones Finn Vaughan Sandy Chen Dana Neilsen Flutes *Susan Lee Elaine Sum Gloria Huh (piccolo) Oboes *Marea Chernoff Elizabeth Brown Clarinets *lan Munro Michelle Goddard Bassoons *Michael Siu Rachel Fels-Elliot Horns *Mindy Liang Jessica Piper Julie Wilhelm Trumpets *Malcolm Aiken Nicole Tickner Trombones *Sean Wright Cary McCaffery Michael Schafer Timpani Christy Fast Harp Andrew Chan Assistant Conductor John van Deursen Librarian Micajah Sturgess *denotes principal Krista McAdams Eugene Onegin Libretto by Tchaikovsky and Shilovsky From a prose poem by Aleksandr Pushkin "Life is not like a novel" is one of the catch phrases of Eugene Onegin, an op-era completed in 1878 by composer Pyotr llych Tchaikovsky and adapted col-laboratively with Konstantin Shilovsky from the novel in verse by the same name written by Russia's revered poet Alexander Pushkin. Contrary to the catch phrase, the Onegin libretto reflects significant details about the lives of its prominent authors. Set in the Russian countryside and St. Petersburg during the 1820s, the libretto tells the story of a young and bored aristocrat, Eugene Onegin, who is introduced by his poet friend, Lenski, to the Larin family. As Act I opens, Onegin has moved into his recently deceased uncle's country estate and become neighbors of Madame Larina and her two young daughters Olga and Tatiana, who are polar opposites. Lenski courts the younger daughter Olga, a jubilant girl with few serious thoughts. Tatiana is the brooding, novel-reading brunette who succumbs to the "magic poison of desire" and against her own good judgment writes Onegin a letter to tell him how much she loves him. Onegin, who presents himself as a jaded elitist, condescendingly says that her candour is sweet, but that routine would destroy any love he could muster which, in fact, would only be brotherly. While Tchaikovsky was writing Eugene Onegin, he received a pas-sionate love letter from an unnoticed young woman who was begging to meet him. His letter, polite but a cool rebuff, further inflamed her and she threat-ened suicide if he wouldn't meet her. Tchaikovsky who was 37 years old had been considering marriage for some time, hoping to achieve the comforts of a regular home life and to overcome gossip. Although Tchaikovsky had ex-plained the Platonic arrangement he desired, Antonina Milyukova did not want a brotherly kind of love. The practical marriage to Antonina lasted only a few days. The legal marriage ended when she died in a mental institution in 1917. Act II depicts a bored Onegin entertaining himself by baiting his hot-blooded friend Lenski as Onegin steals Olga as his dance partner. Olga, a carefree spirit, punishes Lenski's jealously by insisting that Onegin's flirting is nothing and by allowing Onegin to escort her for the evening's grand cotillion promenade. The act ends with Onegin killing Lenski in a gentleman's duel that Onegin demeans by both showing up late and making his coachman his sec-ond. At 27, Pushkin died two days after being wounded in a duel that involved the honour of his beautiful wife Natalia. D'Anthes, the adopted son of the Dutch ambassador, ignored Pushkin's challenge to settle the matter by duel and later married Natalia's sister as a way to peacefully end the matter. However, D'Anthes continued to pursue Natalia saying his attention was now a family matter. To add insult to injury, had Pushkin survived the duel, he would have been put to death because that was the penalty in Russia for participating in a duel. Pushkin's demise verges on the fantastic and, like Tchaikovsky's mar-riage, contains sexual elements that were not discussed in public in the 19th century. In Act III of Onegin, Tchaikovsky has Onegin fall in love with Tatiana who has married his cousin Prince Gremin. Although Tatiana still loves the man who spurned her, she chooses to honor the commitment to her adoring older husband, knowing Onegin may be attracted to her only because she represents an enticing conquest. Because Tatiana is the character who changes and matures, many past critics of this opera argue with good logic that this opera is her story and not Onegin's. Stage Director: Assistant: Conductor: Assistant Conductor: Repetiteurs: Rehearsal Pianists: Choreographer: Russian Coach: Nancy Hermiston Darrell Croft Norbert Baxa John van Deursen Richard Epp David Booth royd Aleks Szram Donna Falconer Shauna Martin Catherine Lee Tatiana Mouravieva Technical Staff Production Manager: Elia Kirby Technical Director: Keith Smith Assistant Tech. Directors: John Conlon Andrew Jameson Set Design: Set Construction: Painters: Bryan Pollock Harry Vanderschee Larry Walske Lorraine West Skai Fowler Lighting Design: Jeremy Baxter Lighting Assistant: Kevin Louden Lighting Assistant/Operator: Jane Loong Properties Supervisors: Lynn Burton Janet Bickford Properties Builders: Jennifer Meng Valerie Moffat Wendy Subity Wardrobe Supervisor: Parvin Mirhady Wardrobe Assistant: Gina McLellan Makeup Supervisor: Nel Volrich Makeup Assistant: Carmen Garcia Hairdressing and Wigs: Elke Englicht Surtitles: John Arsenault Megan Morrison Stage Manager: Melissa Tsang Asst. Stage Managers: Melissa Eyes Melania Radelicki Stage Crew: Pascale Gendreau Olivia Mowatt For the Chan Centre of the Performing Arts Acting Managing Director Sid Katz Director of Facilities and Operation Cameron McGill Assistant Technical Director Owen Schellenberger Director of Programming & Administration Joyce Hinton Programming Coordinator Wendy Atkinson Events Manager Lindsay Jameson Director of Marketing & Customer Service Marie Edwards Head Lighting Technician Andrew Riter Head Audio Technician Jay O'Keefe Systems Administrator Ted Clark Front of House Coordinators Carl Armstrong Andrew Elliot Concessions Coordinator Nathan Lee Ticket Office Manager Donna Caedo Financial Officer Flora Lew Financial Clerk Laura Lee Samuels Reception Clerk Kim Claybo Production Clerk Sherri Fetterly Tour Guide Rachel Lowry SPECIAL THANKS The David Spencer Endowment Encouragement Fund The Chan Family Martha Lou Henley Charitable Foundation The Vancouver Opera The Vancouver Opera Guild The UBC School of Music and staff Theatre UBC and staff Staff of the Chan Centre of the Performing Arts Malabar's Art's Club Theatre Vancouver Playhouse Bruce Kennedy at Studio 58 Dunbar Lumber Cat's Meow Restaurant Brad Dowd Colin Cooper Thank you to all the patrons, donors and volunteers who made our first Masked Ball a success! And Special Thanks To The DAL RICHARDS ORCHESTRA And Steve Lemire and UBC CATERING For their spectacular music And Fantastic food! The UBC President's Office, The Chan Family, The Vice President's Office for External and Legal Af-fairs, UBC Ceremonies, The Dean of Arts Office, The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, Vancou-ver Opera, Ben Heppner, Judith Forst, Burgoo's Restaurant, La Notte Italian Restaurant, Sears, Country Furniture, Judi May, the Lowry Family, the Ho Family, the McTaggart Family, Harbour Cruises, Village VQA Wines Dunbar, David Lemon, Rhonda Nichols, lain Taylor, Don McLellan, Angela Lee, Van Dusen Botanical Garden, Back to Back Massage, Paul Crowder, Ward Hunting Thank you! Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin d W X M 1 'M "• , i >- Am K EUGENE ONEGIN By Pyotr lllyich Tchaikovsky Opera in 3 acts Libretto by Tchaikovsky and Shilovsky From a prose poem by Pushkin With The UBC Opera Ensemble And The UBC Symphony Orchestra Premiere—Moscow, Maliy Theatre, students of the Moscow Conservatory, 1879 Professional Premiere—Moscow, Bolshoy Theatre, 1881 Conductor Norbert Baxa Director Nancy Hermiston Music Director Richard Epp Set Design Bryan Pollock Lighting Design Jeremy Baxter There will be one twenty—minute intermission Chan Shun Concert Hall March 3,4, 5, 6, 2005 This production is made possible by generous assistance through the Chan Endowment Fund and the David Spencer Endowment Encouragement Fund of the University of British Columbia U B C TheChan ACT ONE Scene 1 Madame Larina's garden In the garden, Madame Larina and her devoted servant Filipievna are talking together while Larina's daughters Tatiana and Olga can be heard practicing a duet. Peasants come in from the fields bringing freshly cut hay and celebrating the completion of the harvest. The outgoing Olga is taking part in the celebrations while the pale and shy Tatiana remains wrapped up in her beloved novels. Lenski, Olga's suitor, and his worldly friend, Eugene Onegin, arrive. The four young people awkwardly mingle until Lenski and Olga pair off as do Tatiana and Onegin. Lenski pours out his love for Olga. While strolling through the garden, Onegin asks Tatiana if she is growing tired of her boring existence. Visibly upset, Tatiana has difficulty answering. As evening falls, the couples go in for dinner. Scene 2 Tatiana's bedroom Tatiana and her nurse, Filipievna, have been talking. Tatiana is unable to fall asleep and asks Filipievna to tell her a story. Filipievna tells Tatiana about her life, love, and marriage but notices that Tatiana's mind is wandering and asks if she is ill. Tatiana replies that she is se-cretly in love and asks to be left alone. When she is finally alone, Tatiana begins writing a letter to Onegin pouring out her feelings. She closes by pleading for his understanding and when the morning ar-rives, she gives the letter to Filipievna for delivery to Onegin. Scene 3 A different part of the garden A group of women has gathered in Madame Larina's garden singing about flirting with boys. Tatiana hurries in, followed by Onegin. Onegin tells Tatiana that love and marriage are not for him and, while he is flattered by her attentions, he loves her like a brother and no more. Tatiana is crushed and humiliated. INTERMISSION ACT TWO Scene 1 Madame Larina's house, months later During a ball for Tatiana's birthday, Monsieur Triquet, the dancing master, sings a song in her honor. Onegin dances with Tatiana, which gives rise to some ill-natured gossip from the neighbors. Onegin, bored with the whole evening, chooses to flirt with Olga and arouse Lenski's jealousy. They quarrel and Lenski challenges Onegin to a duel. Scene 2 The following morning At dawn, Lenski and his second, Zaretsky, await Onegin. Lenski re-flects on the folly of his life and imagines Olga visiting his grave. Onegin arrives with his second. They sing of regret for their earlier rashness but, in the end, pride prevails. Neither Lenski nor Onegin will make the first move towards reconciliation. The pistols are loaded and the opponents measured up. Lenski is killed at the first shot. A C T T H R E E Scene 1 A hall of a palace in St. Petersburg, several years later A magnificent ball is in progress. Onegin is there after spending sev-eral years in seclusion to atone for the death of his friend, Lenski. Prince Gremin, the host of the party, arrives with his beautiful wife. The Prince talks with his cousin, Onegin, who questions him as to the identity of his wife. Gremin tells Onegin of the love and beauty that Tatiana has brought into his life since they were married two years earlier. Gremin introduces Onegin to Tatiana. Tatiana excuses herself after a few words to Onegin, who is utterly captivated by her. Scene 2 Later that same evening Onegin has written an impassioned letter to Tatiana. Though many years have passed, she still loves him. She receives him , and recalls their former meeting and shows some indignation at his return. Is his interest in her now due to her marriage to a rich, prominent, and no-ble husband? Perhaps he only seeks notoriety. She remembers the happiness that could have been theirs but is now out of reach. Onegin declares his love again and Tatiana prays for courage. She admits that she loves him as much as before, but tells him the past can not be recaptured. She is married now and she will be forever devoted to her husband. Appealing to Onegin's sense of honour, she asks him to leave her at once. All his pleas are in vain—she resists his temptation and turns away in a final farewell. A distraught and despairing Onegin falls to his knees to contemplate his bitter fate. CAST MARCH 3/5 MARCH 4/6 Tatiana Whitney Sloan *Krzysztof Biernacki Dionne Sellinger Onegin *Andrew Greenwood Lenski Stephen Bell *John Arsenault Olga Alison Temple Rose Ellen Nichols Filipievna Joyce Ho Milo Lowry Larina Megan Morrison Erin Fisher Captain Kevin Louden David English Zaretsky Scott Brooks Michael Mori Triquet John Marino(3)/Brian Lee(5) Adrian Glaubert Gremin Andrew Stewart Andrew Stewart Guillot Andrew Jameson Andrew Jameson Tenor Solo Kevin Lee Tomas Bijok David English (Gremin Understudy) UBC OPERA ENSEMBLE CHORUS Linda Baird, Jessica Bowes, Tomas Bijok, Scott Brooks, DJ Calhoun, Brent Calis, Esther Choi, Leah Field, Erin Fisher, Adrian Glaubert, Brooke Harris, Joyce Ho, Chloe Hurst, Teiya Kasahara, Michelle Keobke, Amy LaFroy, Brian Lee, Kevin Lee, Elaine Lee, Margo Levae, Kevin Louden, Milo Lowry, John Marino, Katie May, Gina McLellan, Melanie McTaggart, Mimi Roth - Miller, Michael Mori, Matthew C. Mori, Diana Oros-Wilder, Alina Raskin, Lucy Smith, Kathleen Susak, lain Taylor UBC OPERA ENSEMBLE DANCERS Tomas Bijok, Scott Brooks, DJ Calhoun, David English, Adrian Glaubert, Nancy Hasiuk, Chloe Hurst, Laurren lacobellis, Michelle Keobke, Kevin Lee, Elaine Lee, Kevin Louden, Gina McLellan, Melanie McTaggart, Michael Mori, Matthew C. Mori, Rose-Ellen Nichols, Diana Oros-Wilder, Kathleen Susak, Alison Temple *courtesy of the Canadian Actor's Equity Association Aleksandr Pushkin Pyotr lllyich Tchaikovsky ACT TWO Scene 1 Madame Larina's house, months later During a ball for Tatiana's birthday, Monsieur Triquet, the dancing master, sings a song in her honor. Onegin dances with Tatiana, which gives rise to some ill-natured gossip from the neighbors. Onegin, bored with the whole evening, chooses to flirt with Olga and arouse Lenski's jealousy. They quarrel and Lenski challenges Onegin to a duel. Scene 2 The following morning At dawn, Lenski and his second, Zaretsky, await Onegin. Lenski re-flects on the folly of his life and imagines Olga visiting his grave. Onegin arrives with his second. They sing of regret for their earlier rashness but, in the end, pride prevails. Neither Lenski nor Onegin will make the first move towards reconciliation. The pistols are loaded and the opponents measured up. Lenski is killed at the first shot. ACT THREE Scene 1 A hall of a palace in St. Petersburg, several years later A magnificent ball is in progress. Onegin is there after spending sev-eral years in seclusion to atone for the death of his friend, Lenski. Prince Gremin, the host of the party, arrives with his beautiful wife. The Prince talks with his cousin, Onegin, who questions him as to the identity of his wife. Gremin tells Onegin of the love and beauty that Tatiana has brought into his life since they were married two years earlier. Gremin introduces Onegin to Tatiana. Tatiana excuses herself after a few words to Onegin, who is utterly captivated by her. Scene 2 Later that same evening Onegin has written an impassioned letter to Tatiana. Though many years have passed, she still loves him. She receives him , and recalls their former meeting and shows some indignation at his return. Is his interest in her now due to her marriage to a rich, prominent, and no-ble husband? Perhaps he only seeks notoriety. She remembers the happiness that could have been theirs but is now out of reach. Onegin declares his love again and Tatiana prays for courage. She admits that she loves him as much as before, but tells him the past can not be recaptured. She is married now and she will be forever devoted to her husband. Appealing to Onegin's sense of honour, she asks him to leave her at once. All his pleas are in vain—she resists his temptation and turns away in a final farewell. A distraught and despairing Onegin falls to his knees to contemplate his bitter fate. Eugene Onegin Libretto by Tchaikovsky and Shilovsky From a prose poem by Aleksandr Pushkin "Life is not like a novel" is one of the catch phrases of Eugene Onegin, an op-era completed in 1878 by composer Pyotr llych Tchaikovsky and adapted col-laboratively with Konstantin Shilovsky from the novel in verse by the same name written by Russia's revered poet Alexander Pushkin. Contrary to the catch phrase, the Onegin libretto reflects significant details about the lives of its prominent authors. Set in the Russian countryside and St. Petersburg during the 1820s, the libretto tells the story of a young and bored aristocrat, Eugene Onegin, who is introduced by his poet friend, Lenski, to the Larin family. As Act I opens, Onegin has moved into his recently deceased uncle's country estate and become neighbors of Madame Larina and her two young daughters Olga and Tatiana, who are polar opposites. Lenski courts the younger daughter Olga, a jubilant girl with few serious thoughts. Tatiana is the brooding, novel-reading brunette who succumbs to the "magic poison of desire" and against her own good judgment writes Onegin a letter to tell him how much she loves him. Onegin, who presents himself as a jaded elitist, condescendingly says that her candour is sweet, but that routine would destroy any love he could muster which, in fact, would only be brotherly. While Tchaikovsky was writing Eugene Onegin, he received a pas-sionate love letter from an unnoticed young woman who was begging to meet him. His letter, polite but a cool rebuff, further inflamed her and she threat-ened suicide if he wouldn't meet her. Tchaikovsky who was 37 years old had been considering marriage for some time, hoping to achieve the comforts of a regular home life and to overcome gossip. Although Tchaikovsky had ex-plained the Platonic arrangement he desired, Antonina Milyukova did not want a brotherly kind of love. The practical marriage to Antonina lasted only a few days. The legal marriage ended when she died in a mental institution in 1917. Act II depicts a bored Onegin entertaining himself by baiting his hot-blooded friend Lenski as Onegin steals Olga as his dance partner. Olga, a carefree spirit, punishes Lenski's jealously by insisting that Onegin's flirting is nothing and by allowing Onegin to escort her for the evening's grand cotillion promenade. The act ends with Onegin killing Lenski in a gentleman's duel that Onegin demeans by both showing up late and making his coachman his sec-ond. At 27, Pushkin died two days after being wounded in a duel that involved the honour of his beautiful wife Natalia. D'Anthes, the adopted son of the Dutch ambassador, ignored Pushkin's challenge to settle the matter by duel and later married Natalia's sister as a way to peacefully end the matter. However, D'Anthes continued to pursue Natalia saying his attention was now a family matter. To add insult to injury, had Pushkin survived the duel, he would have been put to death because that was the penalty in Russia for participating in a duel. Pushkin's demise verges on the fantastic and, like Tchaikovsky's mar-riage, contains sexual elements that were not discussed in public in the 19 th century. In Act III of Onegin, Tchaikovsky has Onegin fall in love with Tatiana who has married his cousin Prince Gremin. Although Tatiana still loves the man who spurned her, she chooses to honor the commitment to her adoring older husband, knowing Onegin may be attracted to her only because she represents an enticing conquest. Because Tatiana is the character who changes and matures, many past critics of this opera argue with good logic that this opera is her story and not Onegin's. Stage Director: Assistant: Conductor: Assistant Conductor: Repetiteurs: Rehearsal Pianists: Choreographer: Russian Coach: Nancy Hermiston Darrell Croft Norbert Baxa John van Deursen Richard Epp David Boothroyd Aleks Szram Donna Falconer Shauna Martin Catherine Lee Tatiana Mouravieva Technical Staff Production Manager: Elia Kirby Technical Director: Keith Smith Assistant Tech. Directors: John Conlon Andrew Jameson Set Design: Set Construction: Painters: Bryan Pollock Harry Vanderschee Larry Walske Lorraine West Skai Fowler Lighting Design: Jeremy Baxter Lighting Assistant: Kevin Louden Lighting Assistant/Operator: Jane Loong Properties Supervisors: Lynn Burton Janet Bickford Properties Builders: Jennifer Meng Valerie Moffat Wendy Subity Wardrobe Supervisor: Parvin Mirhady Wardrobe Assistant: Gina McLellan Makeup Supervisor: Nel Volrich Makeup Assistant: Carmen Garcia Hairdressing and Wigs: Elke Englicht Surtitles: John Arsenault Megan Morrison Stage Manager: Melissa Tsang Asst. Stage Managers: . Melissa Eyes Melania Radelicki Stage Crew: Pascale Gendreau Olivia Mowatt For the Chan Centre of the Performing Arts Acting Managing Director Director of Facilities and Operation Assistant Technical Director Director of Programming & Administration Programming Coordinator Events Manager Director of Marketing & Customer Service Head Lighting Technician Head Audio Technician Systems Administrator Front of House Coordinators Concessions Coordinator Ticket Office Manager Financial Officer Financial Clerk Reception Clerk Production Clerk Tour Guide Sid Katz Cameron McGill Owen Schellenberger Joyce Hinton Wendy Atkinson Lindsay Jameson Marie Edwards Andrew Riter Jay O'Keefe Ted Clark Carl Armstrong Andrew Elliot Nathan Lee Donna Caedo Flora Lew Laura Lee Samuels Kim Claybo Sherri Fetterly Rachel Lowry SPECIAL THANKS The David Spencer Endowment Encouragement Fund The Chan Family Martha Lou Henley Charitable Foundation The Vancouver Opera The Vancouver Opera Guild The UBC School of Music and staff Theatre UBC and staff Staff of the Chan Centre of the Performing Arts Malabar's Art's Club Theatre Vancouver Playhouse Bruce Kennedy at Studio 58 Dunbar Lumber Cat's Meow Restaurant Brad Dowd Colin Cooper Thank you to all the patrons, donors and volunteers who made our first Masked Ball a success! And Special Thanks To The DAL RICHARDS ORCHESTRA And Steve Lemire and UBC CATERING For their spectacular music And Fantastic food! The UBC President's Office, The Chan Family, The Vice President's Office for External and Legal Af-fairs, UBC Ceremonies, The Dean of Arts Office, The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, Vancou-ver Opera, Ben Heppner, Judith Forst, Burgoo's Restaurant, La Notte Italian Restaurant, Sears, Country Furniture, Judi May, the Lowry Family, the Ho Family, the McTaggart Family, Harbour Cruises, Village VQA Wines Dunbar, David Lemon, Rhonda Nichols, lain Taylor, Don McLellan, Angela Lee, Van Dusen Botanical Garden, Back to Back Massage, Paul Crowder, Ward Hunting Thank you! Tchaikovsky's ene nesin Presented by the UBC Opera Ensemble, Theatre UBC, &r The Chan Centre The Chan Centre March 3,4,5,2005 8:00 pm March 6,2005 3:00 pm Nancy Hermiston, director Norbert Baxa, conductor UBC Symphony Orchestra Tchaikovsky's Eusene cd by the UBC Opera Ensemble BC, & The Chan Centre If 

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