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Graduate Recital Mitchell, Christopher John 2005

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GRADUATE RECITALS by CHRISTOPHER JOHN MITCHELL B.Mus., University of British Columbia, 2003  A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC in  THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Orchestral Instrument)  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA April 2005  © Christopher John Mitchell, 2005  ABSTRACT  The thesis for the Master of Music degree in Orchestral Instruments consists two full-length recitals, or the equivalent, with emphasis on solo works, but also including representative chamber works. The two full-length recitals were performed on November 25, 2003 and April 17, 2005.  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA * SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Sunday, April 17, 2005 8:00 p.m.  MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* CHRIS MITCHELL, TRUMPET with Sarah Bowker, piano Trumpet Concerto in E flat major Allegro Largo Vivace John van Deursen, Conductor Alana Chang, Violin Elyse Jacobson, Violin Grace Tsang, Violin Erin James, Violin James Wei, Violin Bora Lee,Violin Peter Ing, Viola Eric Edington-Hryb, Viola Genevieve MacKay, Viola Sabrina Tsou, Cello Nicholas Epperson, Cello Richard St-Onge, Cello Adam Jones, Bass Annabelle Paetsch, Harpsichord  Johann Baptist Neruda (1708-1780)  Proclamation  Ernest Bloch (1880-1959)  Sonata No. 1 in F Allegro Grave Allegro  p  Annabelle Paetsch, Organ  -  INTERMISSION  -  i e t r o  Baldassare (1683-1768)  Sonata (Vox Gabrieli)  Stjepan Sulek (1914-1986)  Three Bagatelles Prelude Improvisation Caprice  Fisher Tull (1934-1994)  Bonheur d'occasion (Elegie pour Gabrielle Roy)  Nicholas Francis (b. 1977)  Vincent Vohradsky, Trumpet Let the Bright Seraphim from Samson  George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)  Simone Osborne, Soprano Annabelle Paetsch, Organ  In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Trumpet.  PROGRAMME NOTES Tohann Baptist Neruda (1708-1780) Neruda was a Czech composer, active in Germany. He trained as a violinist and cellist, and was for several years a member of the theatre orchestra in Prague. In 1741 he entered the service of Count Rutowski in Dresden, and by 1750 he was a violinist in the court orchestra. He remained in Dresden until his death. Neruda is known to have composed at least 97 works, although many are now lost. His music shows clear signs of Italian influence, although in his use of dynamics he was evidently also influenced by the Mannheim School. The textures are mostly homophonic, often with figured bass. Trumpet Concerto in E flat major The Concerto in Eb Major, discovered in the Music Department of the National Museum in Prague in 1974, was originally intended for the corno-da-caccia (hunting horn), a valveless member of the horn family. This instrument possessed a slender bore size and was coiled. It differed from the traditional 18 century horn in that it possessed a shallow cupshaped mouthpiece quite similar to that of a trumpet. The cono-da-caccia was believed to have been used as early as the late 17 century, and was often used by composers such as J. S. Bach and Handel. For it to be played properly, trumpeters were often required to play the instrument, resulting in a tone that might have sounded more similar to that of a modern trumpet than a horn. th  th  Ernest Bloch (1880-1959) The creator of music of great spiritual expression, Ernest Bloch was born in 1880 in Geneva, Switzerland. After studying composition and violin in Europe, Ernest Bloch went to the United States in 1916. In that year the successful premiere of his String Quartet no.l led to performances of his orchestral works in Boston, New York and Philadelphia. Following additional successes in Philadelphia, he signed a contract with G. Schirmer, who published these compositions with what was to become a trademark logo - the six-pointed Star of David with the initials E.B. in the centre; this firmly established for Bloch a Jewish identity in the public mind. Bloch served as founding director of the Cleveland Institute of Music (1920-25), where he conducted the student orchestra, taught composition, established masterclasses and courses for the general public, and proposed such radical reforms as the abandonment of examinations and textbooks in favour of direct musical experience. During the 1930s Bloch lived mainly in Switzerland, but because of growing anti-Semitism, and also because he wished to retain his American citizenship, Bloch returned to the USA and assumed a professorship at the University of California at Berkeley. In his later years, during which he lived reclusively at Agate Beach, Oregon, he continued to compose in a wide variety of genres. He died of cancer in 1959.  Proclamation (1955) ^ Bloch's compositions were often influenced by philosophical, poetic, or religious themes, resulting in highly dramatic scores. Bloch's pupil Roger Sessions praised him for his special ability to express "the grandeur of human suffering." The 1955 Proclamation, written in Bloch's last years, is no exception. One can only speculate, but Bloch must have been experiencing a certain feeling of alienation and isolation at that time. Pain and suffering are suggested by the proclamation's emphatic dissonant intervals in both the trumpet and piano. These elements are juxtaposed by strong fanfare declarations by the trumpet.  Pietro Baldassare ((1683-1768) Early historians name Rome as Baldassare's birthplace, but some contemporary documents describe him as being from Brescia, where Baldassare was quite a common name. Apart from music written to celebrate the name day of the Empress Amalia Wilhelmina, little of Baldassari's music has survived. From that which has survived, his musical language can be said to bear traces of the canonic writing practiced by members of the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna. Baldassare is known to have been a choirmaster in Brescia between 1721 and 1725. He also is believed to have composed oratorios but none have been found. Sonata No. 1 in F This sonata is one of two sonatas written by Baldassare for cornett and strings. The cornett was a wooden, lip-vibrated wind instrument with finger-holes and a cup-shaped mouthpiece. It was mainly used from the end of the 15th century to the end of the 17 centruy. The English spelling was usually 'cornet', but the common variant 'cornett' has been widely adopted, to prevent confusion in print with the modern valved cornet. The sound of a performance on the wooden cornett would have differed greatly from that of a modern performance on piccolo trumpet, a metal, valved instrument. th  Stjepan Sulek (1914-1986) Croatian composer, conductor and violinist Stjepan Sulek completed his violin studies at the Zagreb Academy of Music, where he periodically also attended composition class. He was appointed professor of violin there in 1945 and professor of composition in 1947. Until his retirement in 1975, his composition class produced most of the important contemporary Croatian composers, from Kelemen, Horvat and Detoni to Davorin Kempf. From 1958 to 1962 Sulek was the conductor of the Zagreb Radio Chamber Orchestra, which grew under his direction into an ensemble of international standing. As an outstanding symphonist, Sulek was the leading personality of 20th-century Croatian music. His Romantic mode of expression, the Baroque-like structure of his compositional material, and his Classical organization of form are the basis on which he developed his all-embracing musical language. Sulek turned increasingly to mottos and symbolic motifs in the works of his last decade. His form gradually developed towards a rhapsodic freedom, contrasting with the Classical balance of his earlier compositions. As a result of his composing 'music  about music/ his late works are radically retrospective, with elements suggesting a closeness to musical postmodernism. Sonata (Vox Gabrieli) (1973) This sonata was written for trombone and piano. It was commissioned by the International Trombone Association and is written in a late romantic style. With the exception of one pedal Bb, the piece also works very well on B flat trumpet, played one octave higher than written. The title refers to the angel Gabriel's voice, which can be heard in the introductory theme. The different episodes in the piece can be interpreted as a battle between good and evil, cluminating in a final battle where only one prevails. Several motifs quote other composers, such as Brahms, and one piano passage is strongly reminiscent of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition.  Fisher Tull (1934-1994) Fisher Tull was born in Waco Texas, and he received his training at North Texas State University. After graduating in 1957 he went to Sam Houston State University as instructor of trumpet, theory, and jazz ensembles. He returned to NTSU in 1962 to study his doctorate in composition. After completing his Ph.D. Fisher Tull returned to Sam Houston State University as chairman of the department of music, and since then was twice named in "Outstanding Educators of America." His recent works include Concerto No. 2 for Trumpet, Orchestra, or Band, written for "Doc" Severinsen. Three Bagatelles (1975) Three Bagatelles for Trumpet and Piano was written to honour John J. Haynie for his 25 years of outstanding service as professor of trumpet at North Texas State University. It was premiered there in May of 1975. According to the composer, "the three movements are designed to display three contrasting styles of trumpet performance: dramatic boldness, lyric expression and agile virtuosity." This work covers a broad range of technique, style, and range.  Nick Francis (b. 1977) Born in Toronto, Ontario, Nicholas Francis holds a Bachelor of Music degree in trombone performance from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Music degree in the same concentration from the University of British Columbia. Further to his studies in trombone he studied orchestral conducting with Raffi Armenian at U of T, and at UBC completed special projects in composition with Eugene Wilson and Ramona Luengen as well as serving a season as the Assistant Conductor of the Symphonic Wind Ensemble. His compositions have been performed throughout Canada and in the United States, and are published by Cherry Classics in Vancouver. He is currently active as a trombonist, composer, conductor, and clinician in the Greater Toronto Area, where he serves as the Assistant Conductor and brass section coach of the Toronto Youth Wind Orchestra and as the Artistic Director of the Toronto Brass Ensemble.  Bonheur d'occasion (Elegie pour Gabrielle Roy) (2005) \ This piece is a commissioned work written for this recital. The composer wrote the following about the music: "This is spatial music, first and foremost. It explores the acoustic possibilities of two like instruments (in this case trumpets) placed on opposite ends of the recital hall—indeed in two separate rooms—and accompanied by a piano which in this case primarily fills the role or a pitched percussion instrument, adding texture to, and enriching the harmonies of, the calling and answering of the two trumpets. The title and subtitle were suggested by the novel of the same name (Bonheur d'occasion) by the Franco-Canadian novelist Gabrielle Roy. It is a story of the urban downtrodden and of opportunism (but not opportunity, for the most part) in the very poor St-Henri district of Montreal at the beginning of the Second World War. Roy's richness of language and description as well as her singular ability to tell a spellbinding story make this rather dark take nearly impossible to describe in words, but also give it a decidedly musical quality. Like the characters of the novel, the music reaches out toward a series of opportunities that cave in on themselves, leaving the two trumpets the eulogize aimlessly while the piano reiterates the same question over and over again, before eventually fading with the trumpets into darkness."  George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) Though consistently acknowledged as one of the greatest composers of his age, Handel's reputation from his death to the early 20th century rested largely on the knowledge of a small number of orchestral works and oratorios, Messiah in particular. In fact, he contributed to every musical genre current in his time, both vocal and instrumental. The composition of operas, mainly on Italian librettos, dominated the earlier part of his career, and are the finest (though not the most typical) of their kind. In his later years his commitment to large-scale vocal works, usually with a strong dramatic element, found a more individual outlet in English oratorio, a genre that he invented and established Let the Bright Seraphim from Samson (1743) Samson is an oratorio for solo voices, choir, and orchestra with text by Hamilton based upon poems by Milton. Premiered in 1743, it tells the biblical story of Samson, who possesses great strength but loses it when Delilah cuts off his long hair. The text of "Let the Bright Seraphim, a Da Capo aria for Soprano, is as follows: Let the bright Seraphim in burning row, their loud uplifted angel trumpets blow: Let the Cherubic host, in tuneful choirs, touch their harps with golden wires.  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Sunday, April 17, 2005 8:00 p.m.  MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* CHRIS MITCHELL, TRUMPET with Sarah Bowker, piano Trumpet Concerto in E flat major Allegro Largo Vivace John van Deursen, Conductor Alana Chang, Violin Elyse Jacobson, Violin Grace Tsang, Violin Erin James, Violin James Wei, Violin Bora Lee,Violin Peter Ing, Viola Eric Edington-Hryb, Viola Genevieve MacKay, Viola Sabrina Tsou, Cello Nicholas Epperson, Cello Richard St-Onge, Cello Adam Jones, Bass Annabelle Paetsch, Harpsichord  Proclamation  Johann Baptist Neruda (1708-1780)  Ernest Bloch (1880-1959)  Sonata No. 1 in F Allegro Grave Allegro  Pietro Baldassare (1683-1768) Annabelle Paetsch, Organ  -  INTERMISSION  -  Sonata (Vox Gabrieli)  Stjepan Sulek (1914-1986)  Three Bagatelles Prelude Improvisation Caprice  Fisher Tull (1934-1994)  Bonheur d'occasion (Elegie pour Gabrielle Roy)  Nicholas Francis (b. 1977)  Vincent Vohradsky, Trumpet Let the Bright Seraphim from Samson  George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)  Simone Osborne, Soprano Annabelle Paetsch, Organ  In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Trumpet.  PROGRAMME NOTES  Tohann Baptist Neruda (1708-1780) Neruda was a Czech composer, active in Germany. He trained as a violinist and cellist, and was for several years a member of the theatre orchestra in Prague. In 1741 he entered the service of Count Rutowski in Dresden, and by 1750 he was a violinist in the court orchestra. He remained in Dresden until his death. Neruda is known to have composed at least 97 works, although many are now lost. His music shows clear signs of Italian influence, although in his use of dynamics he was evidently also influenced by the Mannheim School. The textures are mostly homophonic, often with figured bass. Trumpet Concerto in E flat major The Concerto in Eb Major, discovered in the Music Department of the National Museum in Prague in 1974, was originally intended for the corno-da-caccia (hunting horn), a valveless member of the horn family. This instrument possessed a slender bore size and was coiled. It differed from the traditional 18 century horn in that it possessed a shallow cupshaped mouthpiece quite similar to that of a trumpet. The cono-da-caccia was believed to have been used as early as the late 17 century, and was often used by composers such as J. S. Bach and Handel. For it to be played properly, trumpeters were often required to play the instrument, resulting in a tone that might have sounded more similar to that of a modern trumpet than a horn. th  th  Ernest Bloch (1880-1959) The creator of music of great spiritual expression, Ernest Bloch was born in 1880 in Geneva, Switzerland. After studying composition and violin in Europe, Ernest Bloch went to the United States in 1916. In that year the successful premiere of his String Quartet no.l led to performances of his orchestral works in Boston, New York and Philadelphia. Following additional successes in Philadelphia, he signed a contract with G. Schirmer, who published these compositions with what was to become a trademark logo - the six-pointed Star of David with the initials E.B. in the centre; this firmly established for Bloch a Jewish identity in the public mind. Bloch served as founding director of the Cleveland Institute of Music (1920-25), where he conducted the student orchestra, taught composition, established masterclasses and courses for the general public, and proposed such radical reforms as the abandonment of examinations and textbooks in favour of direct musical experience. During the 1930s Bloch lived mainly in Switzerland, but because of growing anti-Semitism, and also because he wished to retain his American citizenship, Bloch returned to the USA and assumed a professorship at the University of California at Berkeley. In his later years, during which he lived reclusively at Agate Beach, Oregon, he continued to compose in a wide variety of genres. He died of cancer in 1959.  Proclamation (1955) Bloch's compositions were often influenced by philosophical, poetic, or religious themes, resulting in highly dramatic scores. Bloch's pupil Roger Sessions praised him for his special ability to express "the grandeur of human suffering." The 1955 Proclamation, written in Bloch's last years, is no exception. One can only speculate, but Bloch must have been experiencing a certain feeling of alienation and isolation at that time. Pain and suffering are suggested by the proclamation's emphatic dissonant intervals in both the trumpet and piano. These elements are juxtaposed by strong fanfare declarations by the trumpet.  Pietro Baldassare ((1683-1768) Early historians name Rome as Baldassare's birthplace, but some contemporary documents describe him as being from Brescia, where Baldassare was quite a common name. Apart from music written to celebrate the name day of the Empress Amalia Wilhelmina, little of Baldassari's music has survived. From that which has survived, his musical language can be said to bear traces of the canonic writing practiced by members of the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna. Baldassare is known to have been a choirmaster in Brescia between 1721 and 1725. He also is believed to have composed oratorios but none have been found. Sonata No. 1 in F This sonata is one of two sonatas written by Baldassare for cornett and strings. The cornett was a wooden, lip-vibrated wind instrument with finger-holes and a cup-shaped mouthpiece. It was mainly used from the end of the 15th century to the end of the 17 centruy. The English spelling was usually 'cornet', but the common variant 'cornett' has been widely adopted, to prevent confusion in print with the modern valved cornet. The sound of a performance on the wooden cornett would have differed greatly from that of a modern performance on piccolo trumpet, a metal, valved instrument. th  Stjepan Sulek (1914-1986) Croatian composer, conductor and violinist Stjepan Sulek completed his violin studies at the Zagreb Academy of Music, where he periodically also attended composition class. He was appointed professor of violin there in 1945 and professor of composition in 1947. Until his retirement in 1975, his composition class produced most of the important contemporary Croatian composers, from Kelemen, Horvat and Detoni to Davorin Kempf. From 1958 to 1962 Sulek was the conductor of the Zagreb Radio Chamber Orchestra, which grew under his direction into an ensemble of international standing. As an outstanding symphonist, Sulek was the leading personality of 20th-century Croatian music. His Romantic mode of expression, the Baroque-like structure of his compositional material, and his Classical organization of form are the basis on which he developed his all-embracing musical language. Sulek turned increasingly to mottos and symbolic motifs in the works of his last decade. His form gradually developed towards a rhapsodic freedom, contrasting with the Classical balance of his earlier compositions. As a result of his composing 'music  about music/ his late works are radically retrospective, with elements suggesting a closeness to musical postmodernism. Sonata (Vox Gabrieli) (1973) This sonata was written for trombone and piano. It was commissioned by the International Trombone Association and is written in a late romantic style. With the exception of one pedal Bb, the piece also works very well on B flat trumpet, played one octave higher than written. The title refers to the angel Gabriel's voice, which can be heard in the introductory theme. The different episodes in the piece can be interpreted as a battle between good and evil, cluminating in a final battle where only One prevails. Several motifs quote other composers, such as Brahms, and one piano passage is strongly reminiscent of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition.  Fisher Tull (1934-1994) Fisher Tull was born in Waco Texas, and he received his training at North Texas State University. After graduating in 1957 he went to Sam Houston State University as instructor of trumpet, theory, and jazz ensembles. He returned to NTSU in 1962 to study his doctorate in composition. After completing his Ph.D. Fisher Tull returned to Sam Houston State University as chairman of the department of music, and since then was twice named in "Outstanding Educators of America." His recent works include Concerto No. 2 for Trumpet, Orchestra, or Band, written for "Doc" Severinsen. Three Bagatelles (1975) Three Bagatelles for Trumpet and Piano was written to honour John J. Haynie for his 25 years of outstanding service as professor of trumpet at North Texas State University. It was premiered there in May of 1975. According to the composer, "the three movements are designed to display three contrasting styles of trumpet performance:.dramatic boldness, lyric expression and agile virtuosity." This work covers a broad range of technique, style, and range.  Nick Francis (b. 1977) Born in Toronto, Ontario, Nicholas Francis holds a Bachelor of Music degree in trombone performance from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Music degree in the same concentration from the University of British Columbia. Further to his studies in trombone he studied orchestral conducting with Raffi Armenian at U of T, and at UBC completed special projects in composition with Eugene Wilson and Ramona Luengen as well as serving a season as the Assistant Conductor of the Symphonic Wind Ensemble. His compositions have been performed throughout Canada and in the United States, and are published by Cherry Classics in Vancouver. He is currently active as a trombonist, composer, conductor, and clinician in the Greater Toronto Area, where he serves as the Assistant Conductor and brass section coach of the Toronto Youth Wind Orchestra and as the Artistic Director of the Toronto Brass Ensemble.  Bonheur d'occasion (Elegie pour Gabrielle Roy) (2005) This piece is a commissioned work written for this recital. The composer wrote the following about the music: "This is spatial music, first and foremost. It explores the acoustic possibilities of two like instruments (in this case trumpets) placed on opposite ends of the recital hall—indeed in two separate rooms—and accompanied by a piano which in this case primarily fills the role or a pitched percussion instrument, adding texture to, and enriching the harmonies of, the calling and answering of the two trumpets. The title and subtitle were suggested by the novel of the same name (Bonheur d'occasion) by the Franco-Canadian novelist Gabrielle Roy. It is a story of the urban downtrodden and of opportunism (but not opportunity, for the most part) in the very poor St-Henri district of Montreal at the beginning of the Second World War. Roy's richness of language and description as well as her singular ability to tell a spellbinding story make this rather dark take nearly impossible to describe in words, but also give it a decidedly musical quality. Like the characters of the novel, the music reaches out toward a series of opportunities that cave in on themselves, leaving the two trumpets the eulogize aimlessly while the piano reiterates the same question over and over again, before eventually fading with the trumpets into darkness."  George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) Though consistently acknowledged as one of the greatest composers of his age, Handel's reputation from his death to the early 20th century rested largely on the knowledge of a small number of orchestral works and oratorios, Messiah in particular. In fact, he contributed to every musical genre current in his time, both vocal and instrumental. The composition of operas, mainly on Italian librettos, dominated the earlier part of his career, and are the finest (though not the most typical) of their kind. In his later years his commitment to large-scale vocal works, usually with a strong dramatic element, found a more individual outlet in English oratorio, a genre that he invented and established Let the Bright Seraphim from Samson (1743) Samson is an oratorio for solo voices, choir, and orchestra with text by Hamilton based upon poems by Milton. Premiered in 1743, it tells the biblical story of Samson, who possesses great strength but loses it when Delilah cuts off his long hair. The text of "Let the Bright Seraphim, a Da Capo aria for Soprano, is as follows: Let the bright Seraphim in burning row, their loud uplifted angel trumpets blow: Let the Cherubic host, in tuneful choirs, touch their harps with golden wires.  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC  iK • (  Recital Hall Tuesday, November 25,2003 8:00 p.m.  MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL' CHRIS MITCHELL, TRUMPET with Sarah Bowker, Piano Intrada  Otto Kerting (b. 1935)  Sonata I. Allegro moderato n. Adagio tenero m. Allegro  Halsey Stevens (1908-1989)  Sonata "Saint Mark" I. Grave n. Allegro m. Andante IV. Vivace  Tomaso Albinoni (1671-1750)  THE CASCADES BRASS  Chris Mitchell, trumpet Nathan Sobieralski, trumpet Joanna Schulz, horn Nicholas Francis, trombone Daniel Pain, tuba -  INTERMISSION  -  Concerto for Two Trumpets I. Allegro II. Lento DI. Allegro  Francesco Martfredini (1680-1748)  Nathan Sobieralski, trumpet Siete Canciones Populares Espaftolas I. ElPanoMoruno II. Seguidilla Murciana m. Asturiana IV. Iota V. Nana VI. Cancidn VTI. Polo  *  Manuel de Falla (1876-1946)  In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Trumpet.  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC  •.' J ;  HS>-'i V ' '•  Recital Hall Tuesday, November 25,2003 8:00 p.m.  MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* CHRIS MITCHELL, TRUMPET with Sarah Bowker, Piano Intrada  Otto Ketting (b. 1935)  Sonata I. Allegro moderato n. Adagio tenero m. Allegro  Halsey Stevens (1908-1989)  Sonata "Saint Mark" I. Grave n. Allegro ffl. Andante TV. Vivace  Tomaso Albinoni (1671-1750) i THE CASCADES BRASS  Chris Mitchell, trumpet Nathan Sobieralski, trumpet Joanna Schulz, horn Nicholas Francis, trombone Daniel Pain, tuba -  INTERMISSION  -  Concerto for Two Trumpets I. Allegro II. Lento m. Allegro  Francesco MarUTedini (1680-1748)  Nathan Sobieralski, trumpet Siete Canciones Populares Espaftolas I. ElPanoMoruno n. Seguidilla Murciana m. Asturiana TV. Jota V. Nana VI. Canci6n VH. Polo  Manuel de Falla (1876-1946)  In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Trumpet.  

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