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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Curriculum design for the high school credit program in Korean language at Sup sogŭi Hosu (Lake in the… Choi, Junghwa 2002

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Curriculum Design for the High School Credit Program in Korean Language at Sup sogiii Hosu (Lake in the Woods), the Korean Language Village at Concordia Language Villages by Junghwa Choi B.A. Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, 1993 M.A. Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, 1999 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR T H E DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS in THE F A C U L T Y OF G R A D U A T E STUDIES (Department of Asian Studies) We accept this thesis as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA May 2002 © Junghwa Choi, 2002 In p r e s e n t i n g t h i s t h e s i s i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f the r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r an advanced degree at the U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia, I agree t h a t the L i b r a r y s h a l l make i t f r e e l y a v a i l a b l e f o r r e f e r e n c e and study. I f u r t h e r agree t h a t p e r m i s s i o n f o r e x t e n s i v e c o p y i n g of t h i s t h e s i s f o r s c h o l a r l y purposes may be g r a n t e d by the head of my department or by h i s or her r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . I t i s u n d e r s t o o d t h a t c o p y i n g or p u b l i c a t i o n of t h i s t h e s i s f o r f i n a n c i a l g a i n s h a l l not be a l l o w e d w i t h o u t my w r i t t e n p e r m i s s i o n . Department of The U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia Vancouver, Canada Date T U K U L IP I 0 ^ Abstract This thesis concerns curriculum design for the high school credit program in Korean Language at Sup sogiii Hosu (Lake in the Woods), the Korean Language Village (KLV) at Concordia Language Villages (CLV). It reviews the main features and principles of the draft curriculum for the Korean Language Village 4-week high school credit program, evaluates the design based on the classroom results of the inaugural credit session, discusses the feasibility of a total immersion approach in Korean learning for speakers of English, and suggests further directions for Korean immersion curriculum development using WebCT tools. The entire draft curriculum, covering two years of high school curriculum, is presented as an appendix. Along with a general review of immersion, this study also contains a general review of CLV's educational philosophy and its actual program features, and suggests the critical role that K L V can play in facilitating Korean education in the U. S., where the need for more effective Korean language education is rapidly increased. The thesis also discusses the importance of Korean language education for the Korean adoptees who make up a significant portion of the K L V population, and calls for the reform of existing Korean education programs targeted mainly at 2 n d generation Koreans in the U. S. ii Table of Contents Abstract ii Table of Contents iii List of Figures iv Introduction 1 Chapter 1: What Is Immersion ? 3 Chapter 2: Teaching Korean at the K-12 Level in North America 12 Chapter 3: CLV's Educational Philosophy 21 Chapter 4: 2001 K L V Credit Program 32 Chapter 5: Credit Curriculum Design 41 Chapter 6: Future Design 53 Bibliography 57 Appendix I Credit Calendar & Text 61 Appendix II CURRICULUM Summary in English 86 Appendix III 7-Week CURRICULUM in Korean 121 Appendix IV Credit Villager Mid-Session Progress Report 211 Appendix V Credit Villager Final Evaluation & Test 212 in List of Figures Figure 1: Concordia Language Villages Basic Daily Schedule 27 Figure 2: Credit Text Units 42 Figure 3: Credit Schedule 44 Figure 4: Credit Schedule in Detail 44 Figure 5: Credit Curriculum Curriculum Sample 52 iv Introduction This thesis is based on my knowledge, training and experience in teaching the Korean language; first as an instructor for five years teaching Korean to foreigners at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, then as a sessional lecturer and teaching assistant for first-and second-year Korean at UBC the past two years, and for the last three summers, as a curriculum designer at Sup sogui Hosu (Lake in the Woods), the Korean Language Village (KLV) at Concordia Language Villages (CLV) in Minnesota. This past summer (2001) we inaugurated our first 4-week intensive high school credit program with eleven students. The attached draft curriculum, developed by myself with the help of funding from the Korea Research Foundation, was used on a trial basis for the new program. While we made adjustments to the credit curriculum during the session based on villagers' feedback, overall the first year of K L V 's credit program was successful and opened up rich possibilities for significant progress in the coming years. The thesis reviews the main features and principles of the draft curriculum for the Korean Language Village 4-week high school credit program, evaluates the design based on classroom results, and suggests further directions for Korean immersion curriculum development. Chapters 1 and 2 give a brief literature review of the past and current academic definitions of immersion education and the current state of curriculum development and Korean teaching at the K-12 level in North America. Chapter 3 outlines CLV's educational philosophy and its understanding and application of immersion concepts. Chapters 4 and 5 review the main features of the K L V seven-week credit curriculum and the results of KLV's 1 2001 credit program, including students' backgrounds and evaluations. In the conclusions, I suggest future directions for curriculum development through maximizing villagers' learning outcomes after camp using the WebCT tool. Most immediately, the findings of this thesis will be useful for both K L V credit teachers and villagers. Some conclusions will be applicable to all languages and villages. But it is also hoped that Korean instructors in general, and those teaching young adults any language in an immersion framework, will benefit from the ideas and suggestions presented. 2 Chapter 1 What is Immersion? Before describing Concordia Language Villages' educational philosophy, I will examine in this chapter past and current academic definitions of immersion education. The Origins of Immersion Teaching in North America Language immersion is an approach to foreign language instruction in which the usual curriculum activities are conducted primarily in the foreign or 'target' language. The new language is the medium as well as the object of instruction. Immersion programs vary in the amount of time devoted to instruction in the second language and in the time of entry (early, middle or late immersion). Children in immersion programs in the United States and Canada are generally English speakers who are learning to speak a foreign language. The idea of immersing second language learners in an environment in which they must use the language is obviously not a new one. Determining the real history of immersion - how the transition from foreign students in a native grammar class to a curriculum in secondary language immersion for native students occurred - is beyond the scope or needs of this thesis. It is enough to state that, broadly speaking, the popularity of immersion, like any teaching method, has been cyclical. The first modern North American public school immersion program began in 1965 with a kindergarten in St. Lambert, Quebec. It was prompted by a group of English-speaking 3 parents who were concerned that the traditional French programs were not sufficient to meet their children's needs for greater comprehension of and fluency in French, at a time when bilingualism in French and English had become a necessity. These parents read accounts of different forms of bilingual education that might serve as alternatives to what was being offered to their children, and consulted with scholars in bilingualism at McGill University. As a result, they proposed to their school board a radical departure from any existing French program in Canada: a program in which, from the first day of school in kindergarten, their unilingual English-speaking children would be instructed entirely in French. Thus the children first learned to read in French, and only later, in grade 2, were first literacy skills introduced in English; by grade 6 about half the curriculum was taught in English and half in French (Johnson & Swain 1997) After news about the French immersion program initiated in Quebec spread (through the media and through academic journals), French immersion spread widely and rapidly to other parts of Canada during the late 1970's and early 1980's. By 1982 the number of students in primary school immersion in Canada had reached 100,000 (Stern 1984). This was due to the success of the original St. Lambert program and the subsequent research and evaluation results, which were widely disseminated. There was also a strong perception, particularly among influential English speaking groups in Canada, of the potential economic, political, and social value of a high level of proficiency in French (Johnson & Swain 1997). The first public school immersion program in the United States was started in 1971 in Culver City, California, with the help of professors at the University of California at Los 4 Angeles. Genesee (1987) stated that for the most part, immersion programs in Canada were developed in response to official policies of bilingualism and to the practical realities of bilingualism in the country. Immersion programs in the United States, however, can be classified according to one or more of three different purposes: 1) as linguistic, cultural, and general educational enrichment; 2) as 'magnet schools' to bring about a balanced ratio of ethnolinguistic groups; 3) as a means of achieving some degree of two-way bilingualism in communities with large populations of non-English speaking residents1 Parents and school administrators in North America have frequently expressed fears that students in immersion programs will not achieve well in the basics and will fall behind their peers in monolingual English classes. The two main concerns are: 1. What effect will participation in immersion have on the students' native language development? 2. Will the students' academic achievement suffer as result of being taught academic subjects through a second language (Genesee 1987)? 1 After the passing of the Bilingual Educational Act by Congress in 1968, bilingual education in the US in the 1970s can be classified as 'Transitional bilingual education'. That is, until immigrant students master standard English, teach them in their heritage language. The problem was that as minority students mastered English they often lost their first language. In other words, Transitional bilingual education's goal is not to develop bilingual children but instead to raise fluent English speakers (Park 1997, Lee 2000). 5 Because of parental and administrative concerns with total immersion, variations in format were also implemented. Worries about the first-language development of children led to early partial immersion programs, mid-immersion programs, and late immersion programs. 1. Early partial immersion: half the school day is taught in English and half in the second language from grade 1 on. 2. Mid- immersion: grade 4 or 5 3. Late- immersion: grade 6 or 7 6 Goals and Results of Immersion The following goals are most commonly found in immersion programs. 1. Functional proficiency in the second language; children are able to communicate in the second language on topics appropriate to their age level. 2. Mastery of subject-content material of the school district curriculum. 3. Cross-cultural understanding. 4. Achievement in English language study comparable to or surpassing the achievement of students in English-only programs. Research results (Swain 1984) show that students in early immersion programs perform as well as, or often out-perform, their English-educated peers on tests of achievement in English. Immersion students are initially behind in their English skills but catch up within a year after the English components are introduced into the curriculum. Immersion students perform as well as or better than their monolingual English-speaking peers on tests of subject-content mastery in mathematics, science, and social studies. Abundant research reports on immersion programs in Canada have thoroughly described and documented the positive effects of the immersion approach since the original St. Lambert study (Lambert and Tucker 1972). 7 As would be expected, the language skills of students in partial and total immersion programs are found to differ: the more contact hours students have with the second language, the better their second language proficiency (Campbell, Gray, Rhodes and Snow 1985). Helena (1994) reports that immersion students acquire remarkable proficiency in the second language compared with students in other second language programs. But it must be noted that this proficiency is not native-like in every aspect. Immersion students are able to communicate on any topic appropriate to their level of intellectual development, but they do make grammatical errors, and they have to use circumlocutions and other strategies to express themselves when they are lacking the appropriate vocabulary. One reason that immersion students do not have native-like speech in every respect is that they do not usually have the opportunity to interact with native speaking peers. Often the only native speaker model that the immersion students have available to them is their one classroom teacher. The other models that they hear constantly are their non-native speaking classmates. Immersion students who have moved into a native speaking environment, however, have been able to adjust their speech successfully. There are some arguments about immersion students' accuracy as compared to fluency. Immersion students can communicate coherent meaning, but lack the grammatical accuracy of native speakers. Lapkin and Swain (1984) admit that immersion students' productive second-language skills (writing and speaking) do not reach native-like levels. They claim that immersion students are very capable of conveying meaning, but the way they express themselves is very different from their native peers. 8 Error Correction The concern over the correction of error in second language instruction has always been a key issue in immersion programs. In Quebec immersion programs, Quebecquois dialect2 eventually began to emerge. This led to the realization that in most cases there was no target language model outside the classroom. Immersion students need learning materials modified to address this fact. Lyster (1987) wrote about his experience teaching French immersion: It has been assumed since the beginning of French Immersion that its students were in a second-language acquisition situation. They were therefore exposed to the whole language at once even though they were actually in a learning environment, the classroom. Most of their subsequent exposure to the language was through materials designed for native speakers rather than for second-language learners. I proposed that the immersion students' fossilized inter-language results from this teaching methodology, which is aimed at first-language users. I believe that my students have not learned French in the same way they acquired their mother tongue, and that most materials developed for 2 This is relevant primarily to "heritage" learners who come from a home/family background characterized by a non-standard or dialect variety of the target language, and has not yet emerged as a curriculum design issue at KLV. However, once significant numbers of 2 -generation Korean Americans start to attend KLV, this could become a challenge. Jo (2001) points out that the Korean-American students' 'standard' Korean is their parents' or relatives' form of the language. This can be called "Personal 'Standard' Korean" Thus, some linguistic variations which students bring to the class conflict with the 'standard' Korean their teacher uses. 9 native speakers of French are probably inappropriate for the immersion classroom, (p.705) Today immersion it still considered a successful second language teaching approach. However there is a need for a change in methodology and for specially designed materials for the second-language learner that emphasize accuracy as well as fluency in communication. I N C R E A S E D I N T E N S I T Y The Concordia Language Villages have a staff-to-villager ratio of 1: 4.5 and the staff at the K L V is comprised of approximately 80% native speakers and 20% 'expert' speakers of Korean as a second language. This allows students to be exposed to the target language at a higher concentration level than in a traditional school environment, enabling them to develop fluency and accuracy. There is a growing body of research comparing regular 'slow boat to China' language teaching (3 hours per week spread out over the school year) vs. intensive, do-nothing-but-foreign language for several weeks, then revert to a normal school schedule for the rest of the school year without the foreign language component. As seen in the report of the Intensive Core French Project (2002), the addition of an intensive exposure to French instruction for five months in grade 6 is an effective way to improve the oral and written communicative skills of the students with many positive effects on the emotional and social development of the participants. Results from the classroom observations have also given much data which advance the current theoretical positions on second language acquisition, such as the 10 relationship between fluency and accuracy, the relationship between teaching strategies and the development of both oral and written abilities of the students, and teaching practices that are most effective for the development of the ability to communicate in French in a school situation. This research shows that short bursts of intensive teaching is more effective in terms of learning outcomes than the usual spoon-feeding, one mouthful at a time, standard practice. It is my belief that this is also applicable to Korean language learning in the non-school environment of the Korean Language Village (and, indeed, to all Concordia Language Villages). From my observations and research, I conclude that the C L V immersion environment is a most advantageous one to language learning in terms of intensive teaching, but future research will need to try to document how the K L V education outcomes compare to those obtained in traditional school environments. 11 Chapter 2 Teaching Korean at the K-12 Level in North America Most immersion research and theory has focused on French (Canada) or Spanish/English (USA). Almost no Korean immersion curriculum research has been done to date. In this chapter I will review the current condition of Korean education in North America through relevant previous research that has been done, which comparing traditional and non-traditional approaches to teaching Korean in North America in order to better understand KLV's educational features vs. other Korean programs. Community Schools Korean is primarily learned (aside from at home through conversation with parents and siblings) at Community Schools (so called Saturday schools or Hangiil schools). Sohn (2000) reports that 90% of Korean community schools are annexed to churches. Churches play an important role in preserving Korean language and culture for Korean Americans. In the US in 1997 there were approximately 850 Korean community schools. There are large differences between community schools, both qualitatively and quantitatively; for example, student numbers vary from 10 to 500. However they have important common characteristics: 1. Curriculum: 3 hours of classes (45 minutes /class) on Saturday mornings for 12 weeks (one semester). The first 2 classes are normally Korean 12 language and the third is a Korean cultural activities class (art, music, history traditional dance, movies, etc.) 2. Students range in age from kindergarten to grade 12. 70-80% are kindergarten and elementary school age, 2nd-generation Korean Americans. 3. The majority of teachers are students themselves who have come from Korea to study at universities or graduate schools in the US, and Korean American church members, or people who have had teaching experience in Korea. 4. Pay rates are relatively low, around 15$/hour. 5. There is not a wide variety of texts . 6. Most students are forced to attend by parents. Lee (2000) reports that Korean community schools in the US face many problems, even as there are some exceptional successes. The lagging curriculum and teaching methodology have kept students from developing the four skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) of Korean. The most typical reasons are lack of proper teacher training, out-of-date textbooks and materials, reliance on memorization teaching method, unsuitable student Park (1997) reports that in California, which has the largest population of Korean immigrants in the U.S., there are four main textbooks used to teach Korean: It's fun to learn Korean (published by the South California Korean School), Korean I, II, III (Published by the Korean Government), Korean I, II (Learning Korean) by Kyung-Nam Park, and Hangul (The Korean Language). Arguably the best of the four, Hangul (The Korean Language) was published with the budget support of the US Defense Department in 1994-1995. The team who worked on this textbook consisted of Ok-Soon Kim from San Francisco Unified Educational District, Jung-Bin Lim and professor Kyung-Nyun Kim from UC Berkley, and Teacher A-Mi Cho from Lowell High School. This 316-page book includes conversation, reading, writing and understanding of Korean culture. In addition, its teacher guide has a Korean language teaching method and language exercises for students, which can be utilized as homework. This textbook has been distributed to high schools with Korean programs in North America as well as universities with Korean teacher development programs such as UCLA and USC. 13 language proficiency evaluation and placement, insufficient financial status, poor learning environment and facilities, and low student motivation & attendance rate. In most cases, the teaching materials used were originally developed for use in Korea, when ideally they should be materials developed for the target group (King 1998). Most teachers in Korean community schools do not have a Korean teaching education, and many are volunteers. There is a shortage of materials and teaching tools, facilities are generally poor, and there is not a single school with its own building in the North California area (Park 1997). Public Schools The Foundation of SAT II Korean reported the following distribution of the 33 American high schools offering Korean language classes in 1998: California 18 (Southern California 14, Northern California 4), New York 6, Washington 4, Illinois 1, Maryland 1, Virginia 1, Michigan 1, Connecticut 1, and Hawaii 1. Today (January 2002) in the US there are 39 high schools with a Korean language class. Class sizes range from 7-80. The Foundation of SAT II Korean plans to help establish 50 new classes every year by collecting donations, and there are 29 schools now preparing to launch Korean classes. The Foundation has identified 100 schools where it is feasible to establish Korean language classes. Moreover, they plan to help fund and set up Korean language teaching credential programs at 10 colleges in order to produce qualified Korean language teachers. 14 It does appear that there is sufficient demand for more Korean language high school credit programs. Although the number of students decreased from 2,900 in the year before to 2,250, Korean language was the third biggest in the number of students taking the SAT II in 1998 after Spanish and Chinese (Lee 1998). It had 1,000 students more than Japanese. However this appears to be the result of the educational enthusiasm of Korean parents. In 1998 there were over 700 curriculum schools that had a Japanese language program, whereas there were only 33 high schools that offered Korean. The reason for such a higher number of Japanese curriculum classes is that 80% of Japanese students are ethnically non-Japanese while 99% of Korean language students are second generation or adoptee Koreans. Immersion Schools As mentioned in chapter 1, traditional US bilingual education does not aim to make children bilingual. Most Korean classes in regular elementary, middle, and high schools are for helping Korean immigrant students because they can't follow regular classes (Sohn 2000). Schools offer Korean classes for immigrant students as a stopgap measure until they learn English, after which they stop taking Korean. This is typical of transitional bilingual education. Sohn (2000) sees two-way immersion teaching as a new trend away from transitional bilingual education. Students participating in such programs are American students whose mother tongue is English as well as 1.5 or 2 n d generation immigrants who already use English freely. Taking classes in both the second language and English allows these students to be truly bilingual. 15 Educational research on teaching Korean that has touched briefly on immersion has been done by Park (1997) and Sohn (2001). Sohn describes the successful 'Korean-English Two-Way Immersion' program in the Los Angeles Unified School District. In this program English and Korean instruction is separated, Korean grammar is not taught explicitly, and a content-based curriculum is followed. Sohn (2001) points out that test results comparing fourth grade two-way immersion Korean American students versus English program Korean-American students show that the immersion program students outperform their peer students in English and Mathematics. Park (1997) describes the most well known Korean-English bilingual education programs in California - Sunny Hills School (K-12), Fullerton California, Cahuenga School (K-2), Denker Avenue School (K-2), Wilton Place School (K-2), all in Los Angeles. At Sunny Hills they teach in Korean 35% of the time and 33% of the teachers are fluently bilingual. English and Korean are used as the media for teaching their curriculum. For example, in grade 9, Korean is used to teach world history, mathematics, and Korean4 while English is used for other classes. The school population is 47% Asian, 43% White, 8% Latin, and 1% African American. The stated goals of the Sunny Hills program are: 1) improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing in both English and Korean, producing bilingual students 2) elevating learning achievement 3) raising students' and teachers' multi-cultural awareness, and providing an opportunity for 4 Sunny Hills high school Korean program curriculum Student number: 150, Levels: 1-5 (starting in middle school, grade 8) Class hours: one hour/ day, 5 hours/week Text: Korea University Korean Text and supplementary materials. (Sohn 2000) 16 cultural exchange 4) raising students' self-esteem Cahuenga, Denker Avenue, and Wilton Place schools are for Kindergarten to grade 2. Most the students are Korean or Hispanic. They average 2 classes and 27 students in a class. All the teachers are fluent bilinguals. The goals of the programs are to develop second language ability to communicate at an advanced and academic level; to maintain their first language at the same level as English program students' proficiency or even out-perform them; to have positive attitude and deeper social/ psychological understanding about their heritage group; and to raise ability to study using the computer in both languages. The demand for Korean language education is steadily growing and recently inaugurated public school Korean language programs are aiming for a higher standard of Korean language achievement and cultural education. Whether through community or public schools, the Korean language education community needs to continue to develop more effective ways to teach Korean to American students. Improved texts, materials and curriculum need to be created, and classes and materials must better meet the needs of the student group and its interests. Teacher training will be central to this effort. Previous Research Suggestions Kim and Lee (1999) point out that in Korean language education, especially in the US, the role of a textbook is highly important because it reflects the teaching methodology and is 17 the primary guide for the teacher. The objective when developing a textbook should be to achieve the teaching purposes while maximizing learner interest. They suggest that: 1. Chapter themes should relate to real life to establish learner interest 2. Vocabulary necessary to the theme should be minimized and reflected in tune with considerations of frequency of use. 3. Grammar points should also be selected in accord with frequency of use. 4. Devices should be provided by which grammar and vocabulary can be mastered naturally. 5. Teaching should be done through the effective use of exercises, which are different from homework. 6. Additional content, such as pictures and other materials, should be selected for the interest of the learner. Sohn (2000) also suggests the development of multi-media texts and web-based courses. Web-based teaching is a nascent field with much potential. Cha (2000) concludes that using web sites for texts and other reading materials has significant merits in motivating students visiting Korea after their return to their native countries and improves the ability to read and learn real-time authentic material about and in Korean as well as learning more about Korean culture. He suggests that, from a curriculum standpoint, web material should strive to integrate listening, reading, writing, and speaking. 18 In her research on the issues of developing web-based Korean instruction, Jee (2001) analyzed representative Korean sites like Monash, KOSNET, Koreantutor, and Sogang. She proposes six issues to consider when developing Korean web sites. These are: 1. How to select the appropriate computer environment 2. Designing a linear or multi-linear domain 3. How to teach reading, listening, writing, and speaking on the web 4. The proper utilization of multimedia 5. Choosing a regular course, irregular program, or free service 6. The relation between on-line (virtual) education and off-line education. There is also a need for using more authentic materials. In her article, 'Korean Language Teaching Using Film,' Lee (1999) states that the value of teaching Korean using film is in the authenticity of teaching materials, which is important in the communicative teaching and culture education methods preeminent today. Kim (2001) also asserts that one of most effective ways of teaching Korean is through popular media such as movie and songs. These give practical aspects and background of the target language to the learners, improve listening skills and motivate learners. She suggests how to choose movies and songs according to learners' levels and integrate them into lesson plans. After reviewing the features of CLV's educational philosophy and approach in the next chapter, we will be in a better position to compare the efficacy and potential of 19 traditional Korean community schools and public schools vs. non-traditional, immersion approaches to teaching the Korean language. Fundamentally, I will argue that the immersion method using C L V guidelines, with a curriculum and materials that meet student needs and incorporate new technology, is the path with the highest potential for future success in Korean language education. 20 Chapter 3 Concordia Language Villages' Educational Philosophy In this chapter, I explain C L V (and KLV)'s educational philosophies through a review of daily life in a C L V village. The primary distinction I want to draw is in the difference between the learning environment in an immersion classroom and in a non-traditional immersion language village. The students ('villagers') who attend the language villages typically attend for two weeks at a time in the summer and the programming goes on for all the waking hours students are in attendance. The range of activities that students participate in spans a much broader range than what is typical for a classroom setting (Dahl 1997). Concordia Language Villages was established in 1961 at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota (four years prior to the start of the Lambert School's immersion program in 1965!). Based on the experience of Dr. Gerry Haukebo, a Concordia college professor. As a visiting scholar in Germany in 1960, he found that while he had difficulty learning German, his daughter learned German without trouble in a normal German school setting. This triggered the idea to launch a 'language camp' in which children would be exposed to a foreign language within a daily life setting. In 1961, Camp Waldsee started as the first language camp. The initial 'language camp' concept has since been refined to that of 'language village', and reflects CLV's commitment to holistic, experience-based, community-centered, immersion programming. The basic idea on which the Language Villages are founded is that the process of living is a school, and that villagers learn about the culture and language of specific countries simply by taking part in them. They learn when 21 they eat and when they buy something from the village store. In short, they learn throughout the day no matter what they are doing. The Concordia Language Villages have now operated for 41 years as an internationally recognized and respected world language and culture education program. Currently, CLV operates programs in twelve different languages (Spanish, Russian, German, French, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Japanese, Chinese, Korean and English) and hosts nearly 6,000 young people ages 7-18 at its sites every summer. CLV is a non-profit organization dedicated to the mission of 'preparing young people for responsible citizenship in our global community'. In a nutshell, CLV does this by offering innovative foreign language and culture educational programming based on immersion principles. The Korean and English villages, both inaugurated in the summer of 1999, were the first new villages to be established since the founding of Mori no Ike, the Japanese Language Village, in 1989. The KLV welcomes young people of all backgrounds; it does not originate in the Korean immigrant community, and is not a program targeted specifically at the children of Korean immigrants. Actually, initial demand for the KLV came from parents and young people in the Minnesota Korean adoptee community, and marketing of the program in the period leading up to its first summer was limited to the adoptee community. (King 1999) CLV & KLV Philosophy CLV's language learning principles are based on the 'Key Concepts of Immersion" found in Curtain and Pesola (1994). Some of the highlights of these principles are as follows: 22 1) C L V creates a language-rich environment where the target language is used continuously by the staff; 2) Situations where villagers need to use the target language to complete tasks are built into the daily routines of the village; 3) Language learning begins with village-centered interactions and vocabulary, and is then continuously expanded; 4) Supportive modeling of correct language use is more effective than error correction; 5) Culture is integrated into daily routines; 6) Use of English by staff is kept to a minimum and English is used only when necessary to meet the safety and emotional needs of the villagers At the heart of the educational philosophy of Concordia Language Villages' cultural and language immersion programming are three crucial methods: villager-centered programming, content-based/task-based instruction, and the use of experiential techniques. Villager-centered programming encourages villagers to take ownership of their learning and also encourages staff to respond to villagers' learning needs. In the core of high school credit programming, this is exemplified in the self-placement process, villager input in progress reports, and in portfolio assessments. Content-based and task-based instruction gives villagers the opportunity to explore a subject area (e.g., current affairs, poetry, or environmental science) or participate in an 23 activity (e.g., bead making, martial arts, cooking) using the language as their tool. This requires a higher level of intellectual engagement as they achieve knowledge and skill outcomes as well as linguistic outcomes. Experiential learning combines direct experience with reflection and analysis in a challenging, meaningful, and active approach where a villager can connect mind, body, heart and spirit. The daily routine at the village of exchanging money into foreign currency at the bank, making purchases at the candy store, eating culturally authentic meals, as well as participating in simulations, are examples of the experiential approach implemented at the villages (Concordia Language Villages Credit Teacher Handbook 1998). Isolated explicit error correction is usually ineffective in changing language behavior (Brown 1994). How to correct students' errors without pressure is the key to success in enhancing their accuracy with fluency. On this point, CLV's immersion environment produces many chances for students to learn native-like language as they are surrounded by native staff. One of the most frequently asked questions about C L V is "How much language can villagers learn in one or two weeks at camp?" One of CLV's biggest missions is make children life-long learners of languages. After 30 years, former villager and now K L V Dean Dr. Ross King says: 24 I still remember many of the songs I learned as a villager in the 1970s, and can still deliver a toast in Russian, an important Russian cultural and linguistic tool I learned at the Russian Language Village. And I am convinced that my attendance at C L V at that crucial age between 11 and 14 when children are still 'ripe' and sponge-like for language learning helped hone my listening and production skills as a foreign language learner. Needless to say, C L V is also to blame for my fascination with foreign languages and cultures. My experience as a C L V villager turned me into a lifelong learner of languages (King, 1999). First Day at the Village Villagers discover, learn and live a foreign language and culture from the moment they enter villages with their passport issued by the Concordia Language Villages office. Their passport is stamped, and they go through the traditional customs inspection. Villagers choose their name5 (in the village language) to use during their stay, and have to wear a nametag all the time. This leads a new identity that makes it easier for them to try new things that they have never done before, such as eating Korean food everyday and speaking Korean all the time. Villagers exchange their American dollars for the currency of each country they choose for shopping in the village store and take their suitcase to their cabin, named after a major city or province in each country. Their luggage is checked for contraband - English language tapes, CDs, books, food or other American items, which they will get back when 5 Since most adopted Koreans already have a Korean name, they just use that. 25 they leave the village. Villagers meet other villagers as they unpack and their counselors help them settle into their cabin and show them around their new land. Village counselors are native speakers or Americans who have studied the language abroad and at home. They tell villagers what it's like to live in their chosen country and share their various experiences. A Typical Day at the Village Each day is full of activities, starting with morning exercises followed by breakfast. Drama and music play an important role at C L V . Each day has its own productions to be enjoyed and music to be learned. Time is set aside daily for learning a variety of songs, from the latest pop-groups to traditional folk songs. There are differences among villages but below is a sample daily schedule. 26 ure 1: Concordia Language Villages Basic Daily Schedule Concordia Language Village Basic Daily Schedule Wake up Cleaning Morning Exercises Breakfast Large Learning group Small Language Group Fruit Break Cultural Activities Lunch Small Language Learning Group Free Time Cultural Activities Dinner Evening Program Cabin Time Good Night! Mealtime Food plays an important role at C L V ; breakfast is mostly continental, but lunch and dinner are authentic native meals prepared by a professional kitchen staff with lots of experience satisfying villagers and staffs appetites. For example, at the Chinese Language Village Sen Lin Hu, breakfast perhaps will be xifan (a type of rice cereal), you tiao (a deep-fried doughnut) and cha (tea). Of course, these villagers will eat with chopsticks too. At the Korean Language Village lunch and supper consist of Korean food, served and eaten with authentic Korean tableware. Villagers are responsible for meal presentations before eating; using simple skits, villagers tell everybody about today's menu in the target language. Every moment in the village can be a learning opportunity. Large and Small Group Language Sessions While informal language instruction begins as soon as villagers awaken, formal large-and small-group language sessions introduce villagers to new words and phrases. There is one "Large Group" meeting in the morning, where a basic dialogue or frame is presented to the whole assembly, along with lots of song activity. Large group language sessions usually begin with staff playing guitar to teach songs, and skits modeling the day's expressions. Later in the day, villagers meet in two or three small-group sessions with their "family". Villagers are assigned to a family group on the first day of camp, and this is actually a group of villagers with similar background /level in the target language. 28 Organizing small group language sessions by level of proficiency allows villagers to learn and improve their vocabulary and grammar while playing games and learning about culture. Cultural Activities Cultural activities are a medium for teaching languages. Villagers can choose from numerous activities. For example, in the Japanese village, villagers can learn origami (paper folding), odori (folk dancing), karate and kendo (martial arts) and there also are lots of sports such as swimming, canoeing, soccer and volleyball. In the Korean village, villagers can learn taekwondo, samul nori or Korean percussion, t 'al ch 'um or mask dance, ssirum or Korean judo, traditional games, paper folding, etc. Free Time During free time, villagers take the opportunity to visit the village bank and candy store where they will find authentic imported goods, and C L V souvenir items and snacks which they can buy with actual currency from the target culture. Free, time provides numerous opportunities for language learning and is also a time when villagers can 'hang out' with staff members and practice language in an informal setting. Evening Program This is a time when the whole village comes together to experience a festival, cultural presentation, simulation game or other activity. A whole range of evening programs explores cross-cultural and global themes. In cabin council, after finishing all activities, villagers get 29 together at the cabin with their counselors to share their stories and review what they have learned. Officially they can speak English during a cabin council for better understanding of villagers' difficulties and problems adjusting to the new environment and also to relieve their tension of learning new language and mingle with each other. However, depending on the cabin counselors, the amount of English time will be reduced if desirable. K L V Demographics The K L V welcomes young people of all backgrounds. While not a cultural camp6 for Korean adoptees, most of the villagers to date have been Korean adoptees. In 1999, 65 of the villagers were Korean adoptees; another 12 villagers were Caucasian, 3 villagers were from mixed race marriages, 3 villagers were second-generation Korean immigrants, and 1 villager was African-American. Of the 12 Caucasian villagers, two or three were siblings of Korean adoptees, and the rest were T'aekwondo practitioners. The demographics have remained roughly the same in 2000 and 2001, with adoptee Koreans the majority of villagers. For these villagers, learning Korean is felt to be a key in helping discover their identity. Most Sup sogui Hosu adoptee Koreans have participated in Korean culture camps before coming to K L V , such as Kamp Kimchee or Camp Tiger. These 6 For more details about Korean culture camps for adopted Koreans, visit the K A A N website: http://www.kaannet.com K A A N is the Korean American Adoptee Adoptive Family Network. Adoptees, adoptive Parents and Korean Americans are involved in this organization, which links individuals and organizations across the United States and Canada. Kamp Kimchee is a Korean culture camp for Korean adoptees and their families. Classes are offered for 4-year olds through 12th grade. The purpose of Kamp Kimchee is to develop positive self-esteem, as well as: 30 cultural camps typically last less than a week, and do not teach Korean intensively, (or much at all)-usually only some basic vocabulary. As most of the adoptee Koreans plan to visit Korea when they grow older in order to find their biological parents, they want learn to speak and understand Korean. Since autumn 2001, C L V has made aggressive moves to market K L V in the broader Korean American community, but it remains to be seen how effective the marketing measures will be in attracting significant numbers of 2 n d generation Korean Americans. • Positive relationship between students, and students and teachers • To build positive feelings about each family's international heritage. • To establish an appreciation of Korean culture. • To establish an environment that encourages family involvement. Classes offered include: Korean social studies/culture, Hangul (Korean vocabulary), Korean music, dance, Tae Kwon Do, artistic expression and self-esteem. 31 Chapter 4 2001 K L V Credit Program In this chapter, I examine the backgrounds of the K L V high school credit students from the inaugural year 2001 and their evaluations of the credit program, in their own voices, and show how this feedback led to adjustments in the curriculum. There are three different C L V program lengths; the one-week and two-week programs and the four-week high school credit program. The one-month high school credit program is based on a thematic curriculum, experiential-immersion techniques, and performance-based assessment and is accredited through the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Classes are small, allowing for individualization according to need and learning style. Course work and grades are typically based on the following: instruction and practice in language - listening, speaking, reading, and writing; activities (sports, arts, environmental, etc.); and cultural programs. This program offers the equivalent of at least 180 hours of high school instruction and is designed for learners at all levels, beginning to advanced. Upon successful completion of the program, students receive the equivalent of one year of high school language study. One-week Exploratory Session (Ages 7-11 and 11-15) The exploratory session offers a taste of the Concordia Language Villages' atmosphere for those villages who are being introduced to language learning and a new culture for the first time. The exploratory session gives these villagers initial exposure to the language of their choice. Specific activities are designed for the needs and interests of two age groups ranging from 7-11 and 11-15. Two-week Immersion Session (Ages 8-18) The two-week enrichment session is the most popular program among first-time and returning villagers. This session is designed to give the beginning, intermediate or advanced language learner an in-depth immersion experience. The two-week program is more than an introduction to the language. The length of this program allows villagers time to adapt to the new environment and take advantage of the extra activities to build from their language base. 32 2001 K L V Credit Student's background In 2001 we had eleven credit students, eight of whom were returning villagers (one boy transferred after first attending the two-week program). There were four girls and seven boys. All of the students were adopted Koreans except one Caucasian boy and all were returning villagers except for two boys. Returning villagers were familiar with the Korean language and alphabet through their experience in the prior year in the 2-week program. Some of the villagers had been exposed to Korean before K L V through weekend classes when younger. Mijin's comments were typical: I did go to a Korean Saturday school when I was around 8 but dropped out because the school was designed for Korean kids with Korean parents who could help them. Camp has been the only other thing. (Mijin 2001) As adoptees most of the villagers said their dream is to eventually find their biological parents in Korea. So communicating freely with their Korean family is also one of the main reasons and motivations for studying Korean. Based on the first-day interviews, we decided to start one single credit class for all eleven students. Two weeks later, the students who had no prior background in the study of the Korean alphabet seemed confused and overwhelmed by peer pressure from the students who already knew the Korean alphabet. So we split the class into two, which removed the 33 needless stress of comparing themselves to the other kids and accelerated the students' learning speed. Joonghyun wrote: At first I didn't know how to read or write so it was very hard to understand what was being taught. Because of this I missed some of what was taught in the first few days. (KLV villager self-evaluation 2001 summer, Joonghyun KP84) And Mijin wrote: At the moment I am taking Spanish in school and doing very well. The reason for this is because the alphabet is so similar (just different pronunciations) and because there are words I can relate them to. I can't do that with Korean. (Mijin) Given the need for ad hoc amendments and adjustments as we tried the curriculum for the first time, we followed the draft curriculum about 80% of the time, with the other 20% going to introduction of other, unanticipated materials or else to coverage of materials originally slated for teaching at a later stage. These adjustments will be incorporated into next year's curriculum, and were due to the diversity in the credit students' individual language backgrounds and proficiency levels. Contextual factors also accounted for some of the amendments: the atmosphere of the camp setting obviously impacts students and their learning behavior. Overall, the ad hoc changes introduced into the curriculum were successfully implemented in the program. 34 As a result, nearly all of the 11 students were able to read and write Korean with a basic level of proficiency at the end of the four weeks. Fully two-thirds of the students had little or no trouble conducting basic conversations with native Korean-speaking counselors by the end of the session. The credit students had numerous practice conversations with native counselors as they question-and-answered back and forth. They appeared to enjoy the credit program and were highly satisfied with their experience, given their expressed wishes to come back in summer 2002. I plan on attending the Korean village for as long as possible. After that I don't know what I will do. I would love to go to Korea and continue learning there but I don't know if that is possible, (credit villager, Mijin) 100% Immersion? In the C L V educational philosophy 100% immersion is strongly emphasized. The Credit Facilitator Manual states that the use of English by staff is kept to a minimum and English is used only when necessary to meet the safety and emotional needs of the villagers. During the pre-session orientation for staff this is translated as "you don't speak any English unless you see tears or blood." Only a safety issue or a villager with an emotional problem (e.g., homesickness) sanctions the use of English. Korean challenged this philosophy - we seriously question whether '100% immersion' is an effective and efficient methodology for teaching Korean to high school 35 students whose native language is English. The students complained that they had difficulty learning certain difficult grammar points when we taught only in Korean. One of the villagers said: I think that the idea of a 100 % immersion environment sounds really good, but in order for the kids to understand some of the topics like particles, since we don't really deal with them in the same way in English, it is important to have the English explanations. But for everyday conversations, I think that the immersion concept worked out well. (Songhee) I need the English explanations. 100% Korean leaves me lost and confused while everyone else nods their understanding. (Mijin) I liked the occasional explanation in English, some of the things I just didn't understand without it, especially how to use the verbs ...(Joonghyun) One of the leading scholars in Japanese language teaching, Noda (1990) has questioned the effectiveness of immersion education level at the elementary level for "truly foreign" languages like Japanese, Korean and Chinese, and has also pointed out the potential benefits of providing certain kinds of information and instruction in English. 36 We accepted their opinion and started using English briefly to clarify what they had misunderstood, and added a lecture series (Korean grammar in English) by Dr. King, Dean of K L V . Songhee commented, They were good for the technicalities of learning Korean, and he was a good teacher. It was nice to have his perspective on it, since he was not a native speaker. Korean9 for English speakers is a 'truly foreign language', which has little in common with English and little for English speakers to rely on under 'immersion' conditions. Thus, using some English for learners of Korean at strategically chosen junctures appears to be a good and useful supplement or complement to 'immersion' for achieving better educational outcomes. Still, we acknowledge the overall utility of maintaining a Korean-dominant language environment. From a teaching standpoint, staking out a more hard-core 'immersion' high ground allows one the flexibility of slight retreats from that position. Future of the Credit Program and K L V Overall, the first year of the K L V credit program was successful and leaves many possibilities for significant progress in the coming years. We are relatively confident that our 9 Korean is an uncommonly taught language with its own alphabet, and villagers can be overwhelmed. Kang (2001) states that at the DLI (Defense Language Institute), the twenty-four foreign languages currently taught are divided into four different categories based on the belief that the farther the distance between the target language and students' mother tongue, the harder the target language is for students to learn. Korean belongs to the Category IV languages with Japanese and Chinese, which are considered to be the most difficult languages for American learners. The length of the course varies depending on the Category. For example, a Category I language will last a minimum 26 weeks, but Category IV language courses last a minimum 63 weeks, for students to reach a 2+ in speaking and listening at the DLI 1-5 proficiency scale. 37 student numbers will double next year. We are also convinced that the credit program is extremely beneficial for K L V in terms of adding depth and stability to our overall programming, and in terms of securing our status as a village in the future. The majority of Korean American children do not have a chance to learn Korean in an effective way. When they come to the village, they learn Korean in an exciting and fun way while they interact with other Korean American children. According to students' feedback, the program is playing a positive role in restoring their identification with their heritage. Before attending the village, most kids thought that learning Korean was difficult and did so because their parents forced them; however, with the experience of the camp education, they realized that learning Korean can be fun. How to integrate credit curriculum with 2-week curriculum Larsen (1997) encourages the credit curriculum facilitator to maintain a close relationship with the 2-week program coordinator. There is considerable space for interaction to keep the village from becoming two entirely distinct programs. She suggests the following ideas that villages have successfully used to keep the two programs integrated: - Advanced credit villagers "student teach" a two-week learning group for a two- or three-day unit; a credit class or a two-week group leads a village-wide activity, or villagers from each program lead an activity; 38 Counselors and credit teachers team-teach a lesson, or swap groups for a period or a day; the two-week facilitator or the credit facilitator offers to substitute for a lesson so that the teacher/counselor can observe a day in the other program; two- week staff work as "tutors" during study hall; A "floater" counselor offers a special lesson (an art project, nature lesson, history simulation, etc.) to both the credit and two-week program; Integrate the two-week curriculum into the entire day (at the bank, during meal presentation, etc.), so that it involves the entire village. In addition to Larsen's ideas, I suggest the following for integration at KLV: - Credit students do a group project with 2-weekers, or help them to make their own project. Credit villagers make a movie about the 2-week program including interviewing 2-weekers about their experience of KLV. Credit villagers 'guest speak' in 2-week small language session and help the 2-week small group leader. - Assign credit villagers and 2-week villagers mentor relationships as a language partners. At KLV, credit villagers usually join in the evening program twice a week with the 2-weekers. This is good chance to mingle together, share their learning experience and motivate each other. Credit villagers develop confidence when they communicate in Korean with 2-weekers and also 2-weekers can be motivated seeing credit villagers as their role 39 models. Keeping a close relation between the credit and 2-week programs, increases the chances that 2-weekers will return the next summer as credit villagers From a 2-week curriculum design standpoint, the 2-week program designers can modify their own curriculums based on the credit curriculum. Since the credit curriculum intensively covers Korean grammar, structures and vocabularies, the 2-week designer can simply choose some structures from the credit curriculum according to their 2-weekers levels and motivations. When 2-weekers have mastered their lessons successfully and come back the next year as a credit villager, the first week can be an intensive review for remembering what they learned during the 2-week program the prior year. In our credit program most former 2-weekers learned rapidly, quickly recovering their memory, especially for Hangul. When they already know the Korean script, it is better to split classes by literacy vs. non-literacy ("Einstein" group in K L V version). However, it depends on students' language levels and will differ from year by year. We need to develop the credit program to teach novice to intermediate/advanced students, whether they are heritage learners or not. 40 Chapter 5 Credit Curriculum Design In this chapter, I explain the main features of the K L V credit curriculum and suggest ideas on how to integrate the credit curriculum with the two-week program. T E X T Using basic grammar and vocabulary for beginners I designed the text around the village's core daily activities. Examples include eating at the dining hall, banking, and shopping at the village candy store. This reinforces the teaching by encouraging the villagers to use what they learned immediately after class. The immersion setting pushes villagers to learn Korean in a natural environment during class hours and after classes. The credit text is precisely designed for using expressions in real situations. As K L V does not yet have enough materials and history, without the actual text and lesson plans it is very hard for novice teachers to prepare each day's activities during the program. So I believe the text is very helpful for controlling the program to follow the curriculum. Each unit has three sections and covers one week's teaching. In the four weeks of the program, beginning villagers can ideally learn through unit four. Below are the text themes for each unit. (See appendix: F U L L TEXT) After teaching Hangul, each of credit students gets a copy of text by lessons. 41 Figure 2: Credit Text Units UNIT Section Communicative Functions Unit 1 What's your name? 1 .What's your name? 2. What place is this? 3. What is this? Self-introduction/Greetings Asking Where (locations) Asking What Unit 2 Where are you going now? 1. Where are you going right now? 2. What do you want to buy? 3. How much is this? Ask where someone is going Buying things in a store Unit 3 Who are you writing a letter to? 1 .What are you doing now? 2. Are you good at taekwondo? 3. Why are you learning Korean? Talk about what I am doing now Talk about the ability to do something Unit 4 What do you want to do when you go to Korea? 1. What do you want to do when you go to Korea? 2. What are you going to buy? 3. Can you access the Internet from home? Talking about future plans Talking about reasons Unit 5 Where do you feel the pain? 1 .What time is it now? 2.Where do you feel the pain? 3.It's nice weather; would you like to go canoeing? Talking about feelings Making suggestions Unit 6 What kind of weather do you like? 1 .It's nice weather today, isn't it? 2.What's the weather like in summer in Korea? 3.It's raining outside. Talking about weather Talking about Korea 42 1 .What are you doing now? Talking about experiences Unit 7 What are you doing 2.Have you ever played Talking about food now? Janggul 3.What is the menu for lunch today? Xii 1 2\ 01 m 01 £ | Oil fi? Unit One: What' your name?1 o}<S ul Ail fi. M OlMfB 1 SrOil fi. Hello. My name is Jung-Hwa. 01 S 0 | °- |0 | | f i? What's your name? X] ^  g S 0 | Oil fi. I'm Myung-Hoon. CH P 0\\ M & CH fi? Where are you from? @ 2} fe1" £ Oil AH S CH fi. From Pyungannamdo. S M 01 Oil fi? How old are you? Xi ^  § Q# MOI Oil fi. I'm fifteen years old. V U 91 CH fi? Do you have an older sister? O r U f i , StCHfi.No,Idon't. CREDIT SCHEDULE This text follows the format of 'Korean 1' published by the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies Korean program. 43 Figure 3: Credit Schedule 7:30 Wake-up Duty 8:15 Morning Gathering & Taekwondo Aerobics 8:30 Breakfast 9:30 Cabin Cleaning 9:50 Credit Small Class 1 11:00 Fruit Break & Bank 11:30 Credit Small Class 2 12:30 (Kitchen Duty) 12:45 Lunch 13:30 Siesta 14:00 Credit Small Class 3 14:50 Break 15:00 Activity Period 1 15:50 Free Time (Store, Bank, Coffee Shop) /Task-Solving 16:50 S.TngaSong.0 18:00 Evening Gathering 18:15 Supper 20:00 Evening Program /Credit Self-Study/Special Lecture 21:45 Homeward Bound + Cabin Council 22:30 Lights Out! From the above schedule, the below shows how credit students start to learn Korean in detail. We will review the characteristics of the program in each section. Figure 4: Credit Schedule in Detail Small Class 1 12 • Learning new patterns and vocabulary based on the text. • Intensive drill conversations: teacher and student, student and student • Role-play and simple activities • Using games and activities to practice new patterns and vocabulary in a more fun and relaxed atmosphere Small Class 3 • Reading and listening using materials based on the text patterns and vocabulary • Extending vocabulary according to the students' interests 44 Task Solving • During free time, villagers have to solve the task by asking questions using each day's new expressions; villagers can enhance their conversational skills with native staff. Sing a Song J3 • Learning Korean popular songs • Making new songs based on the lessons; homework; and one-on-one questions and answers with teachers • Using the Karaoke machine to practice songs and rehearse for concerts (talent show, Closing Day performance) Group Study & Internet Cafe • Homework and one-on-one questions and answers with teachers • Discussion about today's daily task • Discussion about group project; Sup sogui Hosu weekly newspaper, make a movie or documentary film about the village; village web page • Using internet searches about Korea and today's lesson, sending email or voice mail in Korean Special Lectures • Learning Korean lectures by Dr. King for deeper understanding of Korean language from a non-native speaker perspective, (twice a week) S M A L L CLASS This time is devoted to learning Korean in-depth by utilizing words and patterns from the text. Through role-play and discussion, students are able to practice the expressions they have already learned. In addition, through games and activities, they are allowed to acquaint themselves with those expressions in a fun manner. Whereas Small Class 1 and 2 are composed of speaking and listening to learn new patterns and vocabulary, Small Class 3 is designed to intensify reading and writing through reading materials using each day's lessons and asking questions to help understand content. TASK-SOLVING 45 Each day during free time, credit villagers have to find staff and interview them in Korean in order to get information. Our daily task-solving activity helps students to talk with native staff more freely and certain kinds of students have to lead conversations based on what they learn each day. Lyster (1987) states that communicative activities form an essential part of immersion methodology, and combined with a structural focus, should result in a more balanced program aiming for both fluency and accuracy. This is a sample. Task-Day 8 Q i : m±\m momo.? Q 2 : ¥ £ S ^ g #OrrJHfi? Q 3 : S § § SCHrJHfi? What kinds offood do you like? What kinds of music do you like? What kinds of sports do you like? moms.. E H 3 E m u ^5HI0|MB SOroHS. Tahiti likes Korean food and classical music and she likes taekwondo and skating. 2. HrXllfig 1. ± S m % CH 21CK Find a staff member (at least 3) 2. r ^ S O O l ' ¥ £ + N ' 3 1 ^ 5 U SlOr^Cr. Ask questions based on today's lesson's "what kinds of NOUN" pattern and gather information. SING A SONG J3 46 Singing is a very effective way to memorize phrases in a context, not just words on a list, and songs are just words with music, so at this level anyone can write them. During the 'sing a song' time, villagers change the lyrics of songs they already know, and come up with another verse or create new songs. They make a simple song based on each day's key structures and new vocabulary and also learn Korean popular songs requested by students' interest and Internet searches during the group study time. This is the song from the 2001 credit boys; S.yI (Mosquito) by Kangho Mosquito! Mosquito! Where are you from, Mosquito! I hate you , I hate you!! SPECIAL LECTURES As we reviewed the credit program evaluations, it became clear that learning Korean grammar through Dr. King's periodic "Learning Korean in English" sessions was very helpful for students to comprehend Korean as a whole. We will continue to use this method twice weekly. During the class, we will try to minimize using English only for the simple pattern explanation. Instead, through this special lecture, students will have a chance to learn more about grammar. Dr. King's previous learning experiences provide grammar insights that native teachers often do not realize. 47 GROUP STUDY & Internet Cafe Students do self-study or do homework and one-on-one questions and answers with teachers for an hour and a half or two hours each evening. They discuss today's daily task and during this time, they work on group projects as well Sup sogui Hosu on the weekly newspaper, make a movie or documentary film about the village, village web page. There are two computers so that students can search on the Internet for Korea-related topics. And also villagers learn how to type in Korean, and to send e-mail messages in simple Korean as well as voice messages. High connectivity and 'wiredness' is a ubiquitous feature of contemporary Korea's cityscape. Today in Korea over 50% of households (8 million) have high-speed Internet access. At KLV, internet/computer skills (we have 2 PCs, expanding to 3 in 2002) are a key component of our curriculum (See section on WebCT). ASSESSMENT Assessment can be understood in two senses: how we assign grades to students based on their learning and performance, and assessing how much our students learn in comparison to students school classroom environments. 48 Assessment of students' progress consists of two reports: a mid-session report and final evaluation report. After the first two weeks, a mid-session progress report is sent to the students' parents. The report is based on an unofficial interview which focuses on the material that was covered. The oral interview is held in light of the fact that students are not yet comfortable writing and reading in Korean. Mid-session reports include students' evaluation of their own progress and teachers' comments, along with grades A to F. Normally, grades A to B are given to students in order to encourage students. Mid-Session reports are more of a comment on students' attitude and participation rather than their actual academic performance. The final test includes about 30 questions covering what they learned in their 20 days of lessons (see appendix: curriculum framework), and they undergo a written test and intense interview with the same questions. Class participation, 'daily task' written results (tasks include interviewing staff members and noting their answers. For example, a student will ask teachers about their favorite food, hobbies, etc.). Because it is, after all, camp, we try not to hold too many exams. Instead, every day before finishing class, teachers ask two or three questions based on each day's lesson and observe the students' performance (listening comprehension, fluency, accuracy). Also during the class and after class, teachers continue monitoring students' attitude regarding how hard he/she is trying to use Korean on a daily basis, and that is also considered in the evaluation of their improvement, even though it is not easy to measure objectively. Based on these factors we assign grades and evaluate their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the language (See the appendix: Mid-Session Progress Report/Final Evaluation Report/Credit Test). 49 The questions of how, and how much, K L V credit program students learn in comparison to Korean Language learners enrolled in school programs is a fascinating one, but one which is beyond the scope of this thesis and which would require an ambitious and multi-year project to assess. One possible clue could be derived from students' performance on the Korean SAT II Achivement test, but here, too, we would need to wait some years for enough significant data to accumulate. CREDIT TEACHERS Most of our teachers teaching credit classes are very highly qualified even though they may not be uncertified. It is virtually impossible to certify teachers in the United States in Korean except for the new Single Subject Korean Teacher credential program of Hope International University (California). It is also impossible to find certify teachers of Korean that K L V credit program like all C L V credit program is fully accredited through the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. One of our credit teachers is a University of Georgia Ph.D student in TESOL who has been teaching Korean in undergraduate programs for more than six years. Another is a currently employed Korean instructor in the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies Korean language program, with an M.A degree in Teaching Korean as a Foreign Language from Yonsei University in Seoul. I myself have extensive experience in teaching the Korean language: first as an instructor for five years teaching Korean to foreigners at Hankuk 50 University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, then as a sessional lecturer and teaching assistant for first-and second-year Korean at the University of British Columbia during the 1999-2000, and 2001-2002 academic sessions. 51 CURRICULUM Figure 5: Credit Curriculum Curriculum Sample Day 2 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Be able to introduce one's family and home Review: role-play. Present self-introduction in front of the group as learned on Day 1 Today's Lesson: kinship term /family introduction Do you have an older sister (brother...)? Pattern practice Material: Kinship picture with family First, learn kinship terms. Then, practice patterns "Do you have an older sister?" Divide the class in two and have the class ask a student multiple questions. "Do you have or "what's your name?" (...SI012? ..01 fiOl ¥-10112?) Small Class 2 Goal: after memorizing numbers, be able to tell their age. Review: number game using games or songs to memorize numbers easily Today's Lesson: How old are you? I'm years old. (S #01 Oil 2? XI M OlOllfi) Ask each other's age, then, talk about family members' ages Activity: Number game 10-20 Small Class 3 Activity: drawing a family tree and introducing one's family Present to the class about family members' names and ages using the family tree they drew Task -solving Day 2 Task : Ask staff their family names and age Ql: y§^(VLl,211,eiL|,01S^y..) 21012? Do you have a brother (sister)? Q2: y-M y^ 01¥ -10112? What's your younger brother's name? Q3: y-M£S£ £ MOimQ.? How old is he? Sing a Song Camp Song Songs for helping memorize numbers and kinship terms Make a simple song based on today's lesson ( T U 21012? Do you have an older sister?) This week's pop song : Magic Castle song by the Classic Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 1-3 lessons and Korean script ' Hangar. Study Group Or Evening Program Discussion about today's task and group portfolio (making Sup sogui Hosu Weekly newspaper using Digital camera/ make a movie) Help villagers to study today's lesson. Internet Cafe: Internet search for a newspaper idea 52 Chapter 6 Future Design Concordia Language Village attendance has relied on the "returning villager factor"; it is not uncommon for villagers to attend for 5 to 10 summers. But new instructional technologies allow us to provide new opportunities for maintenance of contact with both the village and the target language. At C L V , language learners are in the 7-18 age group, the computer generation. Teaching Korean using the Web gives them more confidence as they already possess the requisite computer skills and know how to and enjoy surfing the web. Although the language itself is new, the technology environment makes them feel comfortable and motivated. WebCT is a Web-based set of course tools designed to deliver online learning. It was developed by the University of British Columbia11 and is presently being used by universities and colleges all over the world. Some of the WebCT tools used to support online learning include homepages, bulletin board, e-mail, chat, glossary, calendar and quiz. WebCT allows one to create and manage an entirely online course, or can be used as an extension of the traditional environment. Based on my teaching experience in UBC Korean 300 courses, and after taking a graduate seminar that used WebCT, I taught my Korean students to use the bulletin board feature of WebCT and wimba. Surprisingly, students' writing skills dramatically improved. After this success, I decided to try to teach WebCT to K L V villagers " At the University of British Columbia, each of the Korean 102, 104, 200, and 300 course websites contains course content as well as an asynchronous text forum called Bulletin Board and an asynchronous voice forum called Wimba. The Bulletin Board is a discussion forum that enables participation in course discussions at any time and any place. Wimba was the first company to create voice message boards. It uses a free-to-install Java Applet, which runs in Internet Explorer, Netscape and AOL browsers. A user can hear messages and record his/her own voice atany time (Cho and Carey, 2001). 53 for use after camp. After camp, I sent a voice mail in Korean to all credit students, something they appreciated since they hadn't had a chance to hear Korean after camp. I also sent an email in Korean and some students were able to reply in Korean too. During the camp, it is necessary to teach them how to type Korean and some other skills to use WebCT tools without any problems after they return home. Carey (1999) points out that immersion students may begin to speak "immersionese" for the same reasons that ESL students in China, Japan, or Singapore speak Chinglish, Japlish or Singlish" - namely, a lack of native speakers to converse with and the inevitable code switching and interference from their mother tongue. And he suggests how to overcome these problems with WebCT. He continued to refine the use of the tool, based on his Asian ESL student's feedback, creating the opportunity to discuss, negotiate and critique course content in a non-threatening low anxiety learning environment. Moreover, as Cho and Carey (2001) show a class with C M C (computer mediated communication) fulfills the needs and demands for effective learning regardless of the heritage vs. non-heritage background of the learners because it can satisfy individual differences through interactive communication as well as incidental feedback. It can also help students learn authentic Korean culture. We may reduce the significant gap in the prior knowledge of Korean between heritage and non-heritage learners by implementing C M C as a supplement and an extension to the classroom within the existing system. We can deal with our heritage issues and immersion limitations with C M C . We need preparation time to incorporate the tool into our program, but sooner or later I believe it will be possible with support from staff and villagers. 54 C L V cannot deny the influence of new technologies on the traditional summer language village. We need to adapt our curriculum to the twenty-four hour, anytime, anywhere web milieu as it offers the unparalleled opportunity to continue language contact and immersion, even if only immersion in a web page. In this sense, future curriculum using the web after camp will help students to retain their language learning. Carey (1999) states that WebCT works because "it is a virtual ESL immersion process free of the classroom's limited opportunity for output." The most consistent response is that the bulletin board reading of the messages (comprehensible input) and the subsequent contemplating and reflecting on the input (throughput) and the composition of the response (comprehensible output) is particularly conductive to ESL learning. He argues that WebCT finally permits us to approximate the idealized conditions of second language acquisition much closer that a regular immersion classroom. A Credit Abroad Program: 'Sup sogui Hosu in Seoul' The French, German, Japanese, and Spanish villages now have credit abroad programs. As a brand new village, K L V is not quite ready yet to launch a Korean credit 12 Credit abroad program in Spain: celebrate Madrid. The four-week Spanish credit experience is a language immersion program that combines experiential learning with the formal study of language and culture. The program in Spain starts in the capital city of Madrid. During the stay in the capital city, students tour Madrid's two main art museums, watch an evening flamenco show and attend an optional bullfight. Participants are evaluated and placed in appropriate language levels. The main study portion of the trip takes place in the city of Santiago de Compostela in the region of Galicia. The discovery of the supposed tomb of St. James the Apostle, in the 9th century, has made this city an important cultural attraction of Spain. While in Santiago de Compostela, students are housed in a college residence hall. Days are filled with language, conversation and Spanish culture classes, city explorations, cultural activities and various excursions. A highlight of the program is a weeklong stay with a Spanish family. The family stay takes 55 abroad program. In the future when we have enough students and money, it will make sense to develop curriculum for a credit abroad program. "Sup sogui Hosu in Seoul" will be KLV's next big challenge -credit abroad villagers bargaining in Namdaemun Market, eating authentic Korean food everywhere, conversing with many Koreans, making traditional alcohol Baesaeju at the alcohol museum. Understanding the language and culture in situ is the ultimate in immersion teaching. K L V is an excellent opportunity to teach and learn Korean language. For over forty years Concordia Language Villages have achieved enormous success, and our new Korean village will also grow under the C L V umbrella. Hopefully the credit draft curriculum will hopefully serve as a stepping stone to a better curriculum and will boost villagers' interest and staff investment in developing the program. With more experience and know-how we will teach Korean in an even more effective immersion approach. Hopefully one day K L V will be a major program like the German, French, and Spanish Language Villages. place in Burgos, in the community of Castilla and Leon. During this week, participants are able to practice their previous study of the Spanish language and culture. 56 Bibliography Berthold, M . (1990). The Language Immersion Concept. Babel: Journal of the Australian Modern Language Teachers' Association, 25(2), 30-35. Brown, H. H. (1994). Principles of language learning and teaching. Eaglewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Campbell, R. N., Gray, T. C , Rhodes, N. C , & Snow, M . A. (1985). Foreign language learning in the elementary schools: A comparison of three language programs. The Modern Language Journal, 69, 44-54. Carey, S. (1999). The Use of WebCT for a Highly Interactive Virtual Graduate Seminar. Computer Assisted Language Learning. 12(10), 85-98. (1999). Opening our Minds to Highly Interactive ESL Acquisition on the Internet. In Proceedings from the Eighth International Symposium on English Teaching, (pp. 15-25) Crane Publishing, Taipei. Cha, D. (2000). A study of Korean reading education using the Internet/ Internet ul hwaryonshan Han 'gugo ilkki kvovuk yon 'su (2J Ej HA o g/ EL^OI siJIUmQl^?). Kyung-hee University, Seoul. M A Thesis. Chapelle, C. A. (1999). Technology and Language Teaching for the 21 s t Century. English Teachers' Association (ROC, Taipei). November, 25-36. Cho, G., Cho, K., & Tse, L. (1997). Why Ethnic Minorities Want to Develop Their Heritage Language: The Case of Korean-Americans. Language Culture and Curriculum. 10(2). 106-112. Cho, S. and Carey, S. (2001). Increasing Korean oral fluency using an electronic bulletin board and Wimba based voiced chat. The Korean Language in America, 6, 115-128. American Association of Teachers of Korean. Chowan, T. (1997). Key Concepts of Successful Immersion. ACIE Newsletter, 1(1) University of Minnesota: Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition. Cook, V. (1996). Second language learning and language teaching. London, Great Britain: Hodder Headline Group. Cummins, J. & Swain, M . (1986). Bilingualism in Education: Aspects of theory, research and practice. Longman Group U K Limited. Curtain, H.A. & Pesola, C A . (1994). Language and Children: Making the Match. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. 57 Dahl, T. (1997). Situated Learning in Immersion Environments. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language. Genesee, E. (1994). Integrating language and content: Lessons from immersion. Educational Practice Reports. No 11. National Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics. Genesee, F. (1985). Second language learning through immersion: A review of U.S. programs. Review of Educational Research. 55(4). 541-561. (1987). Learning Through Two Languages: Studies of Immersion and Bilingual Education. Newbury House Publishers, Cambridge. Graser, Elizabeth. (1998). Integrating Language and Content Instruction in the Immersion Classroom. The Bridge: From Research to Practice. ACIE Newsletter 1(2). Harley, B., & Swain, M . (1984). The interlanguage of immersion students and its implications for second language teaching. In A. Davies, C. Criper, & A Howatt (Eds.), Interlanguage, 291-311. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Jee, H. (2001). Issues in developing web-based Korean instruction/ Web kiban Han 'gugo kyoyuk ui maengjdm (WJIPI §}^0j JR^ Han 'gugo kyoyuk /Journal of Korean Language Education, 12(1), 253-274. The International Association for Korean Language Education. Jo, H. (2001). 'Heritage' Language Learning and Ethnic Identity: Korean Americans' Struggle with Language Authorities. Language Culture and Curriculum, 14(1), 26-41. Johnson, R. K. & Swain, M . (Eds.). (1987). Immersion education: International perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Kang, S. (2001). Korean Language Education for Native Speakers of English. The Proceedings of the l l 1 International Symposium of International Korean Language Education Association. Seoul. Kim, J. & Lee, K. (1999). The study of Korean textbook development for foreigners/ Oegugin ul wihan Han'gugo kyojae kaebal e kwanhanyon'gu (2I^21S Et^Cr] MIXHJH Han'sugo kvovuki'Journal of Korean Language Education, 10(1), 61-81. Kim, K. (2001). A study of Korean language education for the mid-level learners through movies and songs/ Chunssup haksiipia rul wihan Han'gugo kyoyuk yon'gu -ydnshwa wa norae rul chungsim uro. Kyunghee University, Seoul. M A thesis. 58 King, R. (1998). Korean as a heritage language (KHL) VS. Korean as a foreign language (KFL) in North America and the former USSR: Ambiguous priorities and insufficient resources. Acta Koreana. 1. 27-40. (1999). Sup sogui Hosu: Concordia Language Villages' New Korean Language Village. UBC ms. (1999). Korean Language Village Summer 1999 Final Report. Krashen, S. (1981). Second Language Acquisition and Second Language Learning. Pergamon Institute of English (Oxford). Lambert, W. E. , & Tucker, G.R. (1972). Bilingual Education of Children: The St. Lambert Experiment. Rowley, Mass.: Newbury House. Lapkin, S. & Swain, M . (1984). Research Update. Language and Society, 12(winter), 48-54. Larsen, E. (1997). Credit facilitator's Handbook: A manual for the leaders of the credit program of Concordia Language Villages. Lee, K. (1998). Mikuk esoiti Han'gugo kyoyuk silt'ae wapaljonjok kaeson 'an /Korea education in the US and suggestions for its improvement Dl^0ilA-j°l Ei^Oi MEH21 7//ff 20 Iiunsonohak/Bilingual Research. 15. 351-384. Seoul: The Korean Society of Bilingualism. Lee, M . (2000). An introduction to bilingualism /Ijungono sayong kaeron (0l£&O1MgJH&). In: Lee, D. (Eds.), Studies on Korean In Community Schools, (pp. 25-51). Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Centre. University of Hawai' i at Manoa. Lee, J. (1999). How to teach Korean through movies./Yonghwa ritl t'onghan Han'gugo suop pangan yon 'gu (2$ si- S SEl -=£ £ / o/' 2.^  2/ -r2) Han gugo kyoyuk /Journal of Korean Language Education, 10(1), 221-240. The International Association for Korean Language Education. Netten, J., Germain, C. & Seguin, S. P. (2002). L'APPRENTISSAGE INTENSIF DU FRANCAIS: RAPPORT FINAL. Partrimoine Canadien, Programme de perfectionnement linguistique. Noda, M . (1990). Teaching Japanese at Elementary Schools: Is immersion a way to go? Japanese: Language, Culture. Report of a seminar for Western State Chiefs of Department of Education Western Department of Higher Education Schools and University Representatives, (pp. 27-36). Denver, Colorado. Lyster, R. (1987). Speaking immersion. The Canadian Modern Language Review/ La Revue 59 Canadienne des langues vivantes. 43(4). 701-717. Park, Y. (1997). Ijung tajung kyoyuk-ron /Bilingual/multilingual language education fOI&/Cr&&OlMl^E). Hanshin Publishing Co. Sohn, H. (2000). Mikuk esoiii Han'gugo Kyoyuk/ Korean Education in the US (OI^OilA-jBI m^OiJR^). In: Lee, D. (Eds.), Studies on Korean In Community Schools, (pp. 3-24). Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Centre. University of Hawai' i at Manoa. Sohn, S. (2001). Chaemidongp 'o ise rul taesang uro han Han'gugo kyoyuk /Korean language education for 2nd'generation Korean Americans/ (XHOI^M 2 MIS CH&Qsl §} Et^CH J5^T). Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium of International Korean Language Education Association, (pp. 65-74). Seoul, Korea. Thrond, M . (1998). Credit Teacher's Handbook. Moorhead, Minnesota: Concordia Language Villages. 60 Appendix I: Credit Calendar & Text 1. 2002 CREDIT C A L E N D A R During the 4-week credit session, we have 20 days; my curriculum is designed for 35 day, and thus covers approximately 2 years of credit session when one allows for review and catch-up in the second level. MON 7/29 Opening Orientation TUE 7/30 CLASS 1 WED 7/31 CLASS 2 Lecture 1 THU 8/1 CLASS 3 FRI 8/2 CLASS 4 SAT 8/3 CLASS 5 Lecture 2 SUN 8/4 Activity Movie MON 8/5 CLASS 6 TUE 8/6 CLASS 7 WED 8/7 CLASS 8 Lecture 3 THU 8/8 CLASS 9 FRI 8/9 I-DAY SAT 8/10 CLASS 10 Lecture 4 SUN 8/11 FREE WEEKEND MON 8/12 CLASS 11 TUE 8/13 CLASS 12 WED 8/14 CLASS 13 Lecture 5 THU 8/15 CLASS 14 FRI 8/16 CLASS 15 SAT 8/17 CLASS 16 Lecture 6 SUN 8/18 Activity Movie MON 8/19 CLASS 17 TUE 8/20 CLASS 18 WED 8/21 CLASS 19 Lecture 7 THU 8/22 CLASS 20 FRI 8/23 Final Test Portfolio SAT 8/24 CLOSING 61 2. CREDIT T E X T 7 UNITS HI 1 all- 01B 01 ¥1 Oil fi? Unit One: What' your name? fi 1 eiSolAIIS. HI 01 §51011 fi. Hello. My name is Jung-Hwa. 01101 ¥1 Oil fi? What's your name? Xife S SOI Oil 2. I'm Myung-Hoon. 01 Cl Oil AH SI 01 fi? Where are you from? S 21 y E Oil Al S 01 fi. From Pyungannamdo. g #01 Oil fi? How old are you? XHfe § CI4d #01 Oil fi. I'm fifteen years old. U 2101 fi? Do you have an older sister? Omfi, 2101 fi. No, I don't. fi 2 01JI 01 P Oil fi? What place is this? OPIfe i l S 01 Oil fi. This is the auditorium. X-Plfe OlPOIIfi? What place that is over there? >Plfe ^ 5 l § 01 Oil fi. That's the store. H§! £ 01P Oil 21CH fi? Where is Kangwondo? ^ 9 3 Oil 2101 fi. Next to the dining hall. II £1 # g 01P Oil 21CH fi ? Where is the bathroom? IIS# 1= S ¥1 Oil 2101 fi. The bathroom is above the dining hall. fi 3 3 3 ¥-1 Oil fi? What is this? 012i S X | Oil fi. That's Kimchee. SI 2101 fi? Does it taste good? L.11,01-^  5Lh2101fi. Yes, it's very tasty. HcUfi? Really? S X | § ^ All S . Could you please pass the kimchee? O P I SiCHfi.Hereyougo. ^MmUQ. Thanks. OlUOl l f i .No ta t a l l . Oi[[Hfi?How is it? 0 1 0 R , L i ¥ 0H?-lfi. Wow, too spicy! HI 2 III 113 (HP Oil 3>|-fi? Where are you going now? fm 1 XIS 01P Oil } I fi? Where are you going right now? gSOII Jifi.Tothe bank. Oil °-l Sl-EH }|fi? What are you going to the bank for? §tfi£| 31 fi. To take out some Korean money. 2H E S 5^ 01'fi? Why are you taking out money? el^31XI• All! 01 fi. I want to buy Korean snacks, tl ^ HI XI • 11016H fi ? Do you like Korean snacks? Ul, SOIoHfi. Yes, Ida 6 2 CH AH fiAllfi. Welcome! SiytiiAllfi? OlfiOl ¥-1 Oil fi? Greetings. What's your name? &iy6|A||fi. Xlfe Dl 5! 01 CHI S. Hi. I'm Mijin. 0131 21 Oi fi? Do you have your passport? UI.OPI aiCHfi. Yes, here you go. Sj Di ?-l fi? How much do you need? 221 S! ^Allfi. I'd like 5000 won, please. 3 AIIH -felOlfi? What do you want to buy? 21XI §• g El 11 AIH M Oi fi. I want to buy some crisps and a cola. ?^Sl^al|Xi»S0|-5Hfi? What kinds of Korean crisps do you like? U S H M S SOieHfi. I like Koraebap. PJL|61 3 r All fi. Goodbye Pi^ol FiAllfi. Goodbye. fii 3 01 AH 2 Al fi. Welcome! ergSrAlia.Hello. 012 ¥-1 Oil 2? What is this? AH ¥ SJ- 01 Oil 2. Those are shrimp crackers. 3 D|0||2? How much are they? ai 2^S!0|0||2. 1000 won. XI2 ¥-1 Oil 2? What are those over there? 3 2 ^ §11 Oil 2. That's called shikhye. <N §11 % 010|| 2? How much is the shikhye? ZI2 S S 01 Oil 2. That's 1000 won, too. US, AH ^  S" 5 f H <^ | S|| ^ Al 2. In that case, please give me a packet of shrimp crackers and a shikhe. Dl- a DI-OIIQ? How much is it altogether? 01SS! 01 Oil 2. 2000 won. OP I 2iCH2. Here you go. IrAHrLICK Thank you. Xii 3 HI- ¥ 51 HI @ IIU Mi fi? Who are you writing a letter to? m 1 XIS °-| oH fi? What are you doing now? @ XI • Mi fi. I'm writing a letter. ¥ i t Ell @ XIB Mi fi? Who are you writing to? y-It ^ St Ell " & XI • Mi fi. I'm writing a letter to my little brother. y - S ^ 01 & 01 H H CH £ ? Do you miss your little brother a lot? Lil, StOI M 2 £!0ifi . Yes, I miss him a lot. 3£H AH S Oil W CH fi? So do you want to go home? O l U f i , s l ^ h LH¥ XH 01 £i Oi fi. No, Sup sogui Hosu is too much fun. °V\ HIH XHDISiCHfi? What's the most fun? X i b St^i= h g ¥ 5 | H EH3IE2I HI Si IH012!CHS. Forme, studying Korean and taekwondo are the most fun. u\ 2 EH 3! E • It oH fi? Are you good at taekwondo? Ul, £ S oH fi. Yes, I can do a little. 2i HI xH M EH 3! E • bH S Oi fi? When did you first learn taekwondo? ^ t3 2 Oil Xi g bH xi CH fi. I first learned a year ago. ¥ ^ SI Ell AH bH S Oi fi? Who did you learn from? S t ^ 2! ? §1 Ell AH bHxiOi fi. I learned from a Korean friend. S l ^ a ^ ^ l StOI SiOifi? Do you have lots of Korean friends? 0ILI2, St § SiOifi.NoJustone. 3 51 ^ SI Ell Ai St ^  i t £ bH xi CH fi? Did you also learn Korean from her? U I , £ S HHxtOifi. Yes, a little. m\ 3 2H St ^  i t 8 bH ?i fi? Why are you learning Korean? HI St ^  £l ^  i f St ^  i t £ 010 PI 5l It Oi fi. I want to speak Korean with my Korean friends. 66 HcUfi? Really? St^Oll J\ SI 012? Have you ever been to Korea? O h § 1 g j £ o| ^ S O I f i . I haven't been even once yet. LH t3 Oil a 3H Oil fi. I'm going to go next year. SAT 1= Oil fi? Are you going to go by yourself? 0 | L | 2 , S ^ f i S U l HOI i P 1 Oil fi. No, I'm going to go with my friends. 5.^011 H O m S i S >l CHI fi? How long will you stay in Korea? £1 fi- § E Si S >l Oil fi. I'll be there about a month. CH Cl Oil HI gi 1 hi! Oi fi? Where do you want to go most? Al 8 6H2 HI ^ E Oil 3HQ &CH fi. I want to go to Seoul and Cheju Island. 1 4 jlf Et^ CHI JIPJ m & CHfi? What do you want to do when you go to Korea? 6 1 t t ^ CHI J\<£ I 5t J2 Oi S ? What do you want to do when you go to Korea? i t Mil fi, Si Xi £! ? I I S t U H ^ CH fi. I'm not really sure. First I want to meet my friends. S! =?• S £ CH P CHI M 01 fi? Where do your friends live? A H g o l H ¥c>CHI M O I f i . They live in Seoul and Pusan. &t P PJ S 5111 it CH fi ? What do you want to do when you meet them? S l ^ f i o i ^ l 0 I 0 P I E 6112 W I S E a01 6H2 £tCHS. I want to talk and travel a lot with my friends. H i d Gil, X I 3 CH P CHI }!fi? Where are you going right now? C J S S Ah BH ^  S IS CHI J t f i . I'm going to the store to buy a present. I tOI I t £H fi ? Want to come along? SOIfi. Sure! m\ 2 a At7\ (HI fi? What are you going to buy? El Al 2 o\H B 8 6t 1\ CHI fi. I'm going to buy a t-shirt and a mask. CIS 51£r 2t A l f i ? You're not buying anything else? £ 0 1 SJOiAH 5 A t f i . I'm out of money, so I can't. ¥ T 1 fit Ell I I » CHI fi? Who are you going to give the present to? g - ° ^ey j | | E E I H , E | A | * f e H P ! gJS 7\ CHIfi.ril give the mask to my parents, and the t-shirt I'm going to wear. o Xi S! ^  £18 §r et At fi? You're not buying a present for your boyfriend? 01-5] y X! £! ^  SI CH fi. I don't have a boyfriend yet. SitOICHIfi? Is that so? ii 3 S CHI AH el EH yi ft 4 2i Oi fi? Can you access the Internet from home? Lil, ft 4= SiCHfi. Yes, lean. 3 § S CHI SOPIBi 01 OHi lS Pi ^ tftEHfi? In that case, when we get home shall we stay in contact by email? 68 mO\S.. CHS^il £H2? Sure. What's your address? 0131 SiOlf i . Here you go. t l ^ H £ @ XI 4= Si01 fi? Can you write letters in Korean? HU xi XI gi § H 5H fi. I've learned how, but I'm not very good. SI gj AH S Ail fi. ft 4= SiOH fi. Try it once. You can do it. 3 0 CHI LH a Oil Cl- Al S 4= SI Oi fi? Say, can you come back next year? LH ^ Oil Xi ^ 19 #01 £1 Al S 4- SiCH fi. Next year I'll be 19, so I can't come back. § H fiSSlLllfi! Too bad! HI 5 JII- 0\L\D\ OI-UlS? Where do you feel the pain? fi 1 XI ^  S Al Oil S? What time is it now? 7 Al 30 SOI OIIS. It's 7 o'clock and 30 minutes. 3£H S? !• ELI Si 01 US. Is it? Let's get up quickly. SM ^BPI- l^AIS-fflOIOIIS. We are on meal duty today. OM m LH ATH 91 31S? Ah! Can I sleep a little more? OH BP I- § OI-JIIS. I have a slight headache. 3 £HS? Really? 6igOHI DPI SOII 2J-S#0|| SI AH 3>hOt 5HS. Then, you need to go to the nurse office before going to the dining hall. "# B| ^ gj CH S. Get dressed quickly. HSiOIS.Isee. §• 21 °}J I Cl Bl ^ Al S. Please wait a moment, fi 2 01 CP! OIEIS? Where do you feel the pain? DHciPhOI-HII^EOI-EhS.I have a headache and sore throat. PJ HI" EH 01. K 01S? When did it start? , .<• • ' 0| HI XI ^  ^  EH 3 £H S. Since yesterday evening. Qi= § 2| Si 01S? Did you eat well? UI.Yes. 2PI OIIS. You have a cold. otfj CH 22 S; 4| 2 2H 5hS 1\ Oil S. You will be all right after you take medicine and a rest. ^Al-E g>0|-0f EH S? Do I need to get a shot too? 01-LIS, ^ Al-fe SI S^ OIE 31S. No, you don't need a shot. fi 3 Sfe ^MIE SgOl 3|-±r El BH HBUS? It's a nice weather. Would you like to canoe? SI£H S, 2PI Oil 3 B| AH 4-1 OH Oh 31S. No, I can't. I need to get rest due to my cold. S| St CHS? Did you take medicine? L| |, 5 ^ 3011 BJStOIS. Yes. I took one just before. 70 D. § X I O T I ft Ji CHI 2 ? Then, what are you going to do now? n y 3H &l CHI AH 41 B| 2 6"H2.1 am going to take a rest at the cabin. 2 H ^ 9! ± HI El CHI I t 4= 21 CH 2 ? Can you go to a dance party tonight? 0 | 0 | I t 4= 2 1 8 >ICHI2. Probably, I can. 3 g § 4 1 3 01 I P I Si 2 . Oil £ 5 12 21- 2 ! Well. Take it easy. 1 will see you later. Wear pretty clothes. 71 All 6 21 CH S bhM| M SOIoH 2 ? What kind of weather do you like? fi 1 fife HM| 3>| LH. ¥ 5 X I SJOIS? It is such nice weather today, isn't it? Ml, § H S U I f i . Yes. It is really nice. CH SI HMI • mom fi? What kind of weather do you like? Xlfer dl fib b h S S 01611 fi. I like a rainy day.. H£Hfi? Really? Xlfe g t g H M I B SOloHf i . I like fine weather. H M I E SgLHI ° £ | 2 4= Oil 4=9 51 El 312 . Well. It's a nice day. Let's go to swim at the lake, g ° AH 2| o | OH e . That's a good idea. 312. Let's go now. fi 2 S l ^ g S i CHsOII y- MP! 01 ID fi? What's the weather like in summer in Korea? CHMOII 01-^ . S H 7 S ¥ E | S S H I X I b HIE SIOI 212 . It's very hot in the summer. It rains a lot in July and August. 3 £U 2 ? Really? 3 g 3j g OH t l ^ Oil 3>II2 ^ C H f i . Then, I want to go to Korean in winter. ^ S O I I b b E a0| fill 014^ ^ ? 1 f i . It's really cold in winter with lots of snow. Xlfe ±3\ Elfe 3 1 014^ S0I6HAH £ 0 1 StOI £ S S01-fi. I like skiing, so I like it when it snows a lot. H £d Ql SI DhU fi? But, how cold is it? M S SI S 61 10 E § E 0 I I 2 . Usually, it's 10 below zero. 3 g J\\ 4^?1 fi? It is that cold? 3 S PJAII SR0I I 31b 3101 S 0 | 2 ? Well. When is good to go to Korea? 0|0|gO |L|;>l80ISe IH Oil S.Probably spring or fall, fi 3 X I S ^011 d P I 2 | 2 . It's raining outside. dl &01 212? Is it raining a lot? U S 511 S 0 | fiXIfe & 0 | f i . Not too much. d P I 2 & 1 4 - g f t 4 = S t 8 2i H 0 | 2 . With rain, we might not be able to swim. 72 5! ft 3H Oil 2 . We won't be able to. H e i Q I 2 f e LH*? § XI a 0 | 2 . But, it's hot today. H B H 2 . CH Xii a CI LH CHS 51 S 0 1 2 . Yes. It's hotter than yesterday. 01 g 511 CH m M Ul J\ 21 Al 1 SCH 2 . It's good that it rains when it's so hot. £ ! 0 i 2 . You're right. HI 7 JH- XI = a 612 21 CH 2? What are you doing now? - 1 XIS a or 2 21 CH 2? What are you doing now? 3 y 0I¥ 5 E £1 oH2. Nothing. 2H2?¥£iJ2iCH2? Why? Is there anything wrong? 01U, 3 y m HI S 5H AH 2. No, I am just a little tired. 3 § 3H &l CHI 3> I AH g 41 511 CH ttH 2? Then, why don't you go to your cabin to get some rest? 3131012. OP I 3 y 2iS£H 2. It's OK. I just want to be here. 3£i HI XI i i 0^1 Qiy Al ZiOl L| M "ME.\ HI0I6H 2. But, it's cultural activity class time, so I should go now. 3SH2? 3 § ' 1*01 712. Really? Then, let's go together. 2 S^xHS2|OI2i012? Have you ever played Janggu? 0m el S E xH S 0^1 SiCH 2.1 haven't played it yet. 0121 91 CHI 2? What is this? 01,321 ISmS-ldli olfeCHI r^apl 0|^ 3H2. Ah, that is Kkoenggwari and its sound is very loud. 3>l Et £1 XH S 3 £t CH 2.1 want to play that one. 6H SAHI2. 0r^ Al 012t 8 D\ CHI 2. Please try. It should be a lot of fun. ±i\J\ § it 3LHI2. It is really loud. XH 21 XH g Sfe 2! CHI 91 CHI 2? I haven't seen that one before. What is it? 321 S0IE-I-2 SlfeCHI ±E]J\ 01^ 51X12. That is Jing and its sound is very nice. XI51E el & XH e All 2. Please try that one as well. XH fe S! ill £1 ± El S CI § ± aP I CH # 0| 2.1 like Jing sound better than Kkoenggwari's. a 3 2 § £J CHI r f fe 91 CHI 2? What is the menu for lunch today? Al 8! 51 a SI 01 CHI 2. It is refreshing Nangmyun. 321 el S1E S|CH ^ 301 StfeGI 91 CHI 2? I haven't eaten that one before either. What is it? aiBHo|2 dl^ StCHI M gy3 AIXI&l S121CH2. It is similar to Ramyun. It's a little spicy and sour yet delicious. 3 CHI AH E sPH Et S 4= 21 CH 2? Can you make it at home easily? 74 S E 0 I X I 2 . Or^ 2I&5H2. Of course. It's very simple. ^ 3 E l E f e 3>r^Xi II BH 2 ? Then, would you please teach me how to make Nangmyun? S W £ 2 ? For free? Li |? Excuse me? Or01, feg-010112. Well. It wasajoke. 3. INDEX UNIT 1 1-1 o\m - g / b oi a AH -oil AH s o . CM .Ai-i i a * ! v u si a O r L | 2 si a . 1-2 CH a AH 31 3 P I -Oil Al Ch 1 CD CM 1-3 ¥i 0 1 3 a xi a i s i u ui CD ^Aiie irAi&urj om one oi [rue? OIOI^ greetings my name special particles (contrast) to be I Pyungan province from came how many years old fifteen older sister to be/have/locate/exist no not have here whrere auditorium over there there department store Kangwon Province to dining hall beside restroom top it what this kimchee delicious Yes It that so? please please pass me Thank you not at all How is it? wow 23 Cr too much spicy UNIT 2 2-1 X I 3 now J[Q to go bank o l P to do -(2)£1 ^ 1 2 go to do (something) t!^ Korea money S!P to find/withraw 2H why 2 rX| snack ArP to buy - 2 £ C H 2 want to do (something) object marker S O I o l P like 2-2 CH A) 2 All 2 Welcome! 013! passport SOI how much 4 I 2 ( ^ P ) to give 2 2 ! S! 5000 won ^ A | | 2 Please give me - (01)^ and M P Coke -re what kind of 2 2 H & animal cracker <=> object marker 2 r S SI peacefully 7! All 2 Please go JU All 2 Please stay 2-3 AH¥S shrimp snack 2! 2 ^ § ! 1,500 won ±!8|| shikhe (sweet rice drink) 2! S! 1000 won then - 6 I H and P all 012! S! 2000 won UNIT 3 3-1 BX\ a letter to write who -SIEHI to CD C D O younger brother SOI a lot e n &Q to miss • SHAH Is that so? XI home -01 subject case marker Sup sogui Hosu Fun o i subject case marker AHISI best/most S l ^ S t Korean language O - 7" study EH3IE Taekwondo 3-2 well 2 3 little PJAtl when xH§ first time to learn SI *s one year before -SI HI AH from friend - S ( S I S ) ' person (1 person) - E also 3-3 to learn in OIOPI story 3 £ H 2 ? Really? oi/oi a a. try 013 not yet SI & IE even once PJ not ma next year - ( 2 ) = 310112 be going to... SAT alone HOI together SI DILI how long SI H one month S E about AH g Seoul XII^E Chejudo UNIT 4 4-1 -(2)2! if/when well E JX I first - E = the suffix which makes SrUCr to meet #012 to live Pusan oi a travel by the way present -(2)s EH2? Shall we? S C I good 4-2 El AH * T-shirt Eh mask cie another thing money -01/01 Al because it is... 51 can not ^ C l to give parents Jll honorific marker to EEICI honoriic verb to give -2 connective ending 'and gjci to wear boyfriend 7H av o s is that so? 4-3 eiEiys Internet ft 4 21 ci Be able to do S0P1C1 get back 01 CHI &! e-mail PJ^o lC l to keep in touch ^± address OlSIHI how £|C1 to become r^Cl to write -XI Er connective ending 'but S ! E! once CIAI again 2C| to come ^ d o l C l sorry/sad UNIT 5 5-1 -A| gai iOIUCf ¥ £ l 3 Ah CH -(°)PJ Pi £1 0-CHcl O r H O O l SOil PJAH -OI/CHOI SrL> 55 H Q S2J-0J 3|Q£|Ch -01/01 ^LV 5-2 -¥EH AHM HI-I P I Ot —I ai st a ^ A | st a -01/01 Oh SHL> 5-3 ^ M | - ( ° )<-0 | 5>r¥ Eld - ( ° ) £ H 2 ? g £ i a 41 a - ( f i )£ in m a Ei! Uh El -(°)= 4- SiCh o'clock minute quickly to get up today we meal duty more must not do head be sick before doing nurse office first have to do clothes to know wait a moment to wait do as a favor for ... throat from dinner rice /meal cold medicine take a rest be ok injection/shot to take Have to weather condition/introduction canoe to ride Shall we..? to take just to rest be going to / intend to do dance party can OrDr mayby OliPr after OH™L> be pretty the suffix which makes descriptive verb an adjective UNIT 6 6-1 -XI a CI -Ul 2 CHS! Ul gtCr 1 4 6-2 a s CHM 0 1 ^ SCI JrXI 7 | g tSC! g a m Sr So"! - E niPi i CD -(0|)C| 6-3 -a CI OISJII - ( 2 ) = [Ll St CI Negation Mild exclamation what kind of rain noun which.... day fine/clear lake thinking usually summer very be hot until winter snow be cold ski how much about a subzero temperature degree so spring either ..or fall outside seems like than like this when... be right UNIT 7 7-1 Or¥ III 5 ma -fe 711 CHDIfi? 8 0 1 OrS 7-2 013 - S 3 01 2iCr OH amai .(oi) £rHoia ±£1 3 d XI CI § 51XI CI 7-3 XH Al CD CD CHItt AlSolCr El a bl^SICI AlCr 2 31 eisci s^oia 213 61 C| tH fed sw Ml? be ing any what kind of a matter tired How about... ? cultural activities Korean drum not yet have ever been.. Ah! a small gong they call it a (Noun) sound big/loud to hit/strike a gong cool lunch menu be refreshing Nangmyun ramyun be similar sour easily to make of course be simple methods free Excuse me? Appendix II: Curriculum Summary in English Day 1 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 ORIENTATION : Self-Placement (allows villagers to share the responsibility for choosing a level that best fits their individual needs) Have an orientation meeting for the credit villagerers to inform them of credit class schedule, teachers, portfolio, evaluation policy ,etc. Small Class 2 Goal: Unit 1-1, introducing self (name, cabin) Today's Lesson: What's your name? I'm..../ My name is....(01 g01 ¥-10112? AH fe/AHl 01 Hg. . . . )Where are you from? From ( O l d 0)1 AH & C H 2 ? ( S £ 1 ^ E ) 0)1 AH S 0 1 2 . ) Activity 1: Make a circle and toss a beanie bear to each other practicing today's lesson until students know their peers' names and cabins Activity2: 'My name is Michael Jackson' Students write down famous people's names, put them into a box, pick up and introduce themselves as if they are those celebrities. Small Class 3 Goal: be able to count up to 20 Today's Lesson: one to twenty (61 LI, fi, ^ . . . . ^ I t ) : Activity: Using a number game through music to memorize numbers easier Task-Solving Asking staff their name and age, and cabin name. Ql : 01 It 01 ¥-10112? What's your name? Q2: 01 Cl CHI AH S 0i 2 ? Where are you from? Students do not know how to read and write in Korean yet; therefore, allow students to get staff to write down their names on the paper with cabin names. Cabin (Staffs name, ) a d y £ ( c J D I , ) S P i y E ( S S , ) Sing a Song. Camp songs : theme song of Sup sogui hosu and some other camp songs Make a simple song using today's lesson 'self-introduction' through the music ex) 2001 credit boy Kangho's 'Mosquito'song. Mosquito! Mosquito! Where are you from? Mosquito. (Oil) £ 3 1 E£H: E 3 | ! CH Cl Oil AH S C H 2 ? £ 3 1 . . . ) This week's pop song: Magic Castle ^ J[2. ^ VA Study Group Or Evening Program Discussion about today's task Help villagers to study today's lesson. Internet Cafe : search Korean music internet site and find this week's pop song 'Magic Castle', try to listen to some Korean pop songs and make a list of songs they want to learn for the next 4 weeks. 86 Day 2 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Be able to introduce one's family and home Review: role-play. Present self- introduction in front of the group as learned on Day 1 Today's Lesson: kinship terms /family introductions Do you have an older sister (brother...)? Pattern practice Material: Kinship picture with family. First, learn kinship terms. Then, practice patterns "Do you have an older sister?" Divide the class in to two and have the class ask a student multiple questions. "Doyouhave *>" or "what's yourname?" (...21 CHS? ..0IS0I 9-ICHIS?) Small Class 2 Goal: after memorizing numbers, be able to tell their age. Review: number game using games or songs to memorize numbers easily Today's Lesson: How old are you? I'm years old. (S #01 CHI S? XI fe *t 01 CHI S) Ask each other's age, then, talk about family members' ages. Activity: Number game 10-20 Small Class 3 Activity : draw a family tree and introducing one's family Present to the class their family members' name and age using the family tree they drew Task -solving Day 2 Task : Ask staff their family names and age Ql: y-|fcl(feU,S«li|,PJL|,Oie^..) 2101S? Doyouhave a brother(sister)? Q2: y-Hcii OIHS °-|CHIS? What's your younger brother's name? Q3: y S ^ S 1 £0m\ 9.7 How old is he? Sing a Song Camp Song Songs for helping memorize numbers and kinship terms Make a simple song based on today's lesson (fe L| 21 CH S? Do you have an older sister?) This week's pop song : Magic Castle song by the Classic Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 1-3 lessons and crash course in Korean script 'Hangul'. Study Group Or Evening Program Discussion about today's task and group portfolio (making Sup sogui Hosu Weekly newspaper using Digital camera/ make a movie ) Help villagers to study today's lesson. Internet Cafe: Internet search for a newspaper idea 87 Day 3 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 1 -2— asking places Review: Asking family name and age in pairs. Today's Lesson: What place is this? This is (place name) (0131 CH El CHI fi? 0131 b Oil fi) What place it that over there? That is (place name) (Xi 3 1 01 E| Oil fi? XV 1 .... Oil fi) Where is (place name)? ( £ CH C| Oil fi?) Learn different names of places Activity: Using Sup sogui hosu site map, asking place names to each other Small Class 2 Goal: be able to tell directions Review: number game /asking each other one's age Today's Lesson: Directions (above, below, beside, front, back, right, left) ?IOII,ORH,SOII,301l,¥l01l,S!^,fie^ Activity: Cover eyes and try to find things (One student covers eyes and another student behind tells the direction to find things) Small Class 3 Goal: be able to read basic vowels and consonants Today's Lesson: 8 vowels ( h t i 1 J- n. T TT ) 7 consonants ( T - c E o t J A ) Activity: Have students write letters and make letter cards. Task- Solving Day 3 Task : Asking staff "What place is this?" "What place is that over there?" ("0131= 01POHS?""H3|b 01POIIS?) Sing a Song Practice all camp songs Learning new songs to help memorize directions e.g.)' °l Oil °| Oil' Make new simple song based on today's lesson This week's pop song: Magic Castle V* Group Study Or Evening Program Discussion about today's task and group portfolio (making Sup sogui Hosu Weekly newspaper using Digital camera/ make a movie ) Help villagers to study today's lesson. Internet Cafe : Internet search about Korea 88 Day 4 Day 4 Credit Curriculum Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 1-2 —Using direction terms, giving directions to places Review: telling places by action to memorize places name. Today's Lesson: "Where is (Place)?" " Place 1 is (direction) Place2 " ex) Where is the bathroom? (5| S# g CH C| Oil £1 CH fi?) The bathroom is above the auditorium. (SrS^ti iJil °ICHI SiCHfi.) Activity: Using sup sogui Hosu ask about places in pairs. Small Class 2 Goal: be able to describe direction of countries. Review: Asking place names using simple map Today's Lesson: country name/ asking where is that country)? Ex) Where is Korea? (&^t= CH P CHI SiCHfi?) Near Japan (US exH CHI 2iCHfi.) Activity: Using a world map, ask each other about country locations. Draw the map of their house location and ask each other the location in pairs Small Class3 Goal: Continue to learn Korean -script vowels and consonants Review: Finding right vowel and consonant cards on the table from Day 3 Today's Lesson: 7 vowels(— 1 H HI -L-l -rl -1) and 7 consonants ( ° ^ ^ 1 1 * ) Activity: Have students write letters and make letter cards Use flash cards to practice script Task-Solving Day 4 Task Asking staff Ql:§l§#SCHC|CHI£iCHfi? Where is the bathroom? Q2: £ 1 ^ 8 CH CI CHI 2iCH fi? Where is Korea? Sing a Song Review camp songs Make a song using "Where is the bathroom?" pattern. Master this week's Pop song: Magic Castle Group Study Or Evening Program Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson 89 Day 5 Day 5 Credit Curriculum Small Class 1 Goal: be able to ask "What is this/that?" (012J ¥1 Oil fi? Xi 2j ¥1 CHI fi?) Review: Use kinship terms practicing "Where is your (brother)?" Pattern. Ceim&g: OH Cl CHI SiOHfi?) Today's Lesson: Learn things around the students (book, pencil, bag, passport, etc.) Activity: Put different things in a box, take out one at a time and ask what it is. Use Korean magazine to learn practical nouns and places Small Class 2 Goal: be able to communicate in Korean during meal time Review: asking country names using direction Today's Lesson: Please pass me . Thank you/Not at all ( . . . H ^AHIfi, K A H I L I EK Si PI CHI fi) Taste delicious/spicy/hot Activity: Simulation at a dining hall /asking about things in the dining hall/tasting food Taste salt, sugar, vinegar, pepper, etc to learn different expression of the taste. Practice the names of dinnerware; spoon, chopsticks, bowl, etc. Small Class 3 Goal: learn vowels and consonants Review: Finding Cards /Reading Flash Cards Today's Lesson: 5 consonants ('n,a:,ua , ^ , 3 W ) 6 vowels ( H HI x|- TH xH T-11 ) Activity: Have students write letters and make letter cards. Task-Solving Day 5 Task : asking a staff member "What is this?" about what staff has or things around staff Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 4-5 lessons. Sing a Song Karaoke Time!!: Sing Magic Castle together Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson ( Korean food...etc) Discussion about today's task and group portfolio 90 Day 6 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 2-1: be able to use "Where are you going?" pattern. (CH P CHI 7r2?) Review: asking questions from Unit 1 naturally Today's Lesson: Where are you going right now? (XI i i CH P CHI 7r2?) To ( CHI 7r2) What are you doing (in a place)? (....CHI AH 1 6H2?) Basic verbs (to eat/to study/to swim/to sleep, etc.) (SH p/g «5 i p/4 g si P/XI P ) Activities: using places cards, ask each other what people usually do in a certain place learn different basic verbs Role-play in pairs When two people gesture a story, the rest of the class predicts what they are talking about Small Class 2 Goal: be able to express "I'd like to do something" Review: country names and directions Today's Lesson: I'd like to do something pattern ('....jI x i C H 2 ' ) What would you like to do now? (XI i i a 5111 & CH 2?) Where would you like to go? (CH P CHI 7IH & Oi 2?) Activity: Using new pattern, ask each other. Small Class 3 Goal: be able to read vowels and consonants Review: Finding Cards /Reading Flash Cards Today's Lesson: 7 final consonants (~> >- <= s o t=i <=>) as a third component of a syllable Activity: Have students write letters and make letter cards Task-Solving Day 5 Task ask staff member Ql: X IH J CH CP CHI 712? Where are you going right now? Q2: Place CHI AH °-| 6H 2? What are you doing (in a place)? Q3: XI3 1 6|H ^ CH 2? What would you like to do now? Sing a Song Make a simple new song based on today's lesson This week's Pop song : Good Good "SOISOl!" lA or student's request song Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio (making Sup sogui Hosu Weekly newspaper using Digital camera/ make a movie ) 91 Day 7 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit2-1/2-2 Review: Using pictures, ask questions about yesterday's key pattern (01 El Oil 3h2? Place CHI AH 918112?) Today's Lesson: Where are you going right now? (XI3 CH E| CHI 312?) Be going to the PLACE to do something. ( EH 312). pattern Activity: Have each student gesture in front of the class to guess where they are going and what they are going to do Small Class2 Goal: be able to count money. Review: number game to review numbers Today' Lesson : Sino-Korean numbers 1-10000 (ii, 01, Pi ) , won (S) Acitivity: using real Korean money, count money in pairs. Small Class3 Goal: be able to read and write Korean alphabet. Review: Finding Cards /Reading Flash Cards Today's Lesson: build up more vocabulary for practicing Korean alphabet Hangul Learn words for Animals, Foods, Occupations...etc Activity: Using variety of cards, find the right card. Task-Solving Day 7 Task Ask staff Ql: Place CHI ¥1 5| EH 312? Why are you going to (PLACE)? Q2: ¥1 31 £| 3 ^ CH 2? What do you want to be? Sing a Song Review camp songs Make a song based on today's lesson. This week's Pop song: Good Good "S0|#0H" 2/4 /or students' request songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Review 92 Day 8 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 2- 2— be able to communicate at a bank, /expressing likes and dislikes. Review: What do you do in a PLACE? / Where is the P L A C E ? (Place CHJAH a 8H2? ...Pr CH Cl Oil SiCHfi? ) Today's Lesson: Welcome. How much do you need? ( 2 014-1 fi?) Do you like Noun? (Noun S0 r 6HQ?) Activity: Bank scene role-play Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use 'What kinds of N O U N do you like?" pattern Review: Where is a doctor? Connecting occupation and place Today's Lesson: What kinds of music/food/sports do you like? ( ¥ £ /SH-21 3 S @ 9A1 S r S ) M 2 | ( & ^ g 2 J / 3 E | l ^ / e £ / X I I £ . . . . ) g ± i , f i £ l ( g ^ g ± ! / £ l £ ! f i £ l . . ) ¥ £ S i ( S r ^ / U H ^ / g ^ . . . ) ¥ £ S X | . . ( D H ^ S X I / ^ : S * SXI . . . ) Activiy: Free discussion about favorite things with today's lesson about what kinds N O U N ( ¥ £ ) Small Class 3 Goal: be able to read sentences based on Unit one structures. Review: Using flash cards, practice yesterday's new vocabulary in a pair Today's Lesson: using material based on Unit one structures Sample : My family Ail 0 | « S ( 9 S | ) 0 | | f i . ¥ E | aoilfe E l * (AriOOl 2ICH2. (OI-tHXI), CHCHU, ( 2 W ) , 9JU m\n xioiifi. I l g f O l E & 0 r c | 21012. ( 2 9 0 1 ) 0 | » 8 L r d |0 | | f i 2 W r = Ail £ 0 1 2 PJUfe ^ ¥ #010112. 2 £12 X | £ ( S U S ) #010112. ¥ E I 2 9 0 1 U d | £ & £010112. Activity: fill in the blanks in a reading material. , Write real students' family story. Task-Solving Day 8 Task Ask staff Q l : S ^ 8 SCHoHfi/^CHSHfi? What kinds of food do you like/dislike? Q2: S l t S SOIoHf i /^CHsHfi? What kinds of sports do you like/dislike? Sing a Song Review camp songs Make a song based on today's lesson. This week's Pop song: SOI SOU 3/4 /or students' request songs Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 6-8 lessons. Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio 93 Day 9 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 2- 3 Vi --? be able to shop in a store Review: What would like to buy in a department store? (^  5 l § CHI AH I ! A12 CH fi?) Today's Lesson: How much is this? 017\ M • hCHI fi. Please give me Nl and N 2 (Nl (0|)ifN2 4AHIfi) Activity: store scene role play Small Class2 Goal: be able to tell time Review: number game (SiL l g m 01 & £ X I JUS) Today"s Lesson: What time is it now ? It's 3 o'clock. S A| CHI fi? XI3 3 A| CHI fi. 3:30 Activity: using material above, showing motion and time. Small group discussion What do you do at 3:30 ? I play soccer. (AHI Al &JCHI 91 8H2? m=?m 5Hfi) Small Class3 Goal: be able to Review: ask questions about yesterday's reading material Today's lesson: Sample: My cabin °E.|S ¥ £ . i s £ apyECHifi. aaiys scnife g S ^ E ?H&JOI sioifi. ¥ £ i s sjoiife S 4 0 I S^CHfi. 5 4 SCHI H H ^ S E 2ICHQ. SSJSCHI 21 CHS. ^ I S l g 91011= D l s ^ o l - I ! &S.H0\ SiCHfi. SijIlSCHIfe £1^21 X P I & 0 | SiOHfi. Task-Solving Day 9 Task Ask staff Q1: 0 PH 01 CHI fi? How much is this? Q2: i i S Al CHI fi ? What time is it now? Q3: Time CHI 91 6H fi? What do you do at a certain time? Sing a Song Review camp songs Make a song based on today's lesson. This week's Pop song: S 0 | SOU or students' request songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio 94 Day 10 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 2-3— be able to buy anything in a store/ in a certain country Review: store scene role play Today's Lesson: new vocaburary about THINGS (clothes, car, TV...) to buy. What do you want to buy in a certain country? (SR)CHIAH a Ain 41CH2? Activity: making a conversation "shopping in Korea" Small Class2 Goal: be able to tell time expressions Review: number game/time Today"s Lesson: Time Adverbials; day, month, year, birthday, today, yesterday, tomorrow (SJ..H, c4SJ,2fe, CHHI,LHS0 Activity: Small Class3 Goal: be able to comprehend a story based on Unit 2 structures. Review: asking about yesterday's reading story. Today's Lesson: my daily life. L\2\ o l¥ life MS OIS 7AI0II SCH L|2. 3ELIH A|?-|» 6U2. OrSCHI § ^ § i ^CH2.9AI CHI SIJHOII 712. SfiQCHI AH S¥M 6H2.3 A|g SCHI 212. SCHIAH A^HIM Sin T V S SI2. AHMCHI PJUoill &0| AH ^8 ^CH2. Activity: Ask about each other's daily life, write about one's daily life Task-Solving Day 10 Task Ask staff Ql: OR CHI AH a MH £!CH2? What would you like to buy in US? Q2: ^ ii 01 gH AHI CHI 2? When is your birthday? Q3: £ it CHI ¥ £ & EM @*U 4! CH 2? What kinds of present would you like to get onyour birthday? Sing a Song Karaoke Time! (S0IS0H/DiS°l & ...) Concert! Make a song with this week's expressions and compete in teams. Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 9-10 lessons. Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio 95 Day 11 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 3- 1 14 Review:: Which country would you like to go? Why? Today's Lesson: ¥ thEll 0 XIM Mi fi? Who areyou writing a letter to? °0\ Aim XHD|5iCHfi? What's the most fun? Activity: small discussion "?-l J [ Aim AH Si OH fi/S!SiOH fi?" " V J r Aim S 3 ^ O i f i ? " V ^ r Aim S O r f i ? " what's the most delicious/fun? , Who do you miss most? /Who do you like most? Small Class2 Goal: be able to understand verb conjugation Review: What do you do in a certain place? Place CHI AH ¥1 6H fi? Verb expression Today's Lesson: Verb Conjugation P r U V J r f i pattern) Activity: make a big verb conjugation board and display it in the classroom Small Class3 Activity: A H ^ ° | SJHrCHI QJ6HAH § 2 XPI S U H t±H 2.DI Goal: be able to write a letter in Korean Review: time expressions (day, month, year) Review the Time adverbs Today's Lesson: expressions for letter writing Activity: writing a letter to one's family fiirOOl 2.WI fi§ CHB^I XILHfi? U 0 ^ E XUHf i . Ohm 0 r S 7 Al ^CHI g jCHUf i . LHSI § r ^ g * ] 8 SOI eiCHfi. 0 r ^ 5Lh2iCHfi. S x l E Dim ^ C H f i . E H 3 E E HH?Hfi. S R U E 0 ^ AHOISiCHfi. 2002 8 SI-13 i l afiSi =^S |S4 -0 | |AH D|£! Task-Solving Day 11 Task : interviewing staff Q1: ¥31- Aim S 3 £!CHfi? Whodoyou miss most? Q2: = ^ ° l S 4=011 AH ^ \J\ Aim XHOISiCHfi? What's the most fun at Sup sogui Hosu? Q3: 01J1 CHI AH ?H 1 \ AHI i l 5Lh Si CH fi ? What's the most delicious food here? Sing a Song Review camp songs Make a song based on today's lesson. This week Pop song: S Or 5 OH or students' request songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: internet search about today's lesson /send an e-mail in Korean to each other. (teach how to type Korean Fonts on the computer) Discussion about today's task and group portfolio 96 Day 12 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 3- 1 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's Lesson: interesting/be good at it... AH • 1 Si 07 §J Q l h oiQ/% or 0 1- 6HS? Pi AHI HHxiCHS? fe^SlEHIAH xHM UHSOHS? Activity: Talent Show (what I do well !!) Ask "What do you do well? (S H §H 2?)" and present one's talent in front of the class Talk about what they do well or poorly in a pair Small Class2 Goal: be able to use past tense Review: ask questions using basic verbs Today's lesson: using past tense Activity: small group discussion based on past event Ex) OH AHI 91 SKOIS? What did you do yesterday? 3 ^ CUM CHI 91 ti! CHS? What did you do last year? Small Class3 Goal: be able to use daily life expressions freely Review: Reading yesterday's letter in front of class Today's lesson: compare daily life at Sup sogui Hosu and at home Activity: discussion about "What do you do at (certain time)?" < Lr£| 6 I ¥ > Life MS SOU AH 8 Al CHI gjCHUS. HSCHI 0171 CHI AH 7 Al 30SCHI gJCHUfi. MS 3 CHI AH OISS Pi 3CHfi. H g j e i l OPIOHAHfe 8 Al &1CHI OilJS ^CHS. § CHI AH fe i ^ i ^ l l Pi eiCHS. 3 Ei! CHI OPIOHAHfe OHi! l ^ l ^ l e^ CHS. Task-Solving Day 12 Task : interviewing staff using "what kinds of (N) do you do well(bad)" " ¥ £ + N mm m (H)oHe?".-. Q1: ¥ £ fe t§ S § 611S? What sport do you do well? Q2: ? c fetlll l h 56HS? What sport do you do not well? Sing a Song Review camp songs Make a song using based on today's lesson. This week's Pop song: SOI SOU or students' request songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio 97 Day 13 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 3- 2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: Dative particles (- SI Ell AH), (time) ago + past tense Activity: changing tense from present to past Small Class 2 Goal: be able to count things using counters (-9/PH • • •) Review: Change the verb to past tense in front of the class Today's lesson : various counters (-S/Arit/DtEL|/J|1...) Ex) ¥ Aria Two persons ( a count of two persons), 12901 Ul OrEL| four cats (a count of 4 cats) Activity: counting things using counters Small Class3 Goal: be able to use past tense freely Reviw: ask questions about their daily life based on yesterday's material Today's lesson : story based on past tense Activity: small discussion about yesterday's events and write about it by tomorrow. <01A1I 0|0p|> oiAHife SrSiJoi&toie. tfMPt ot4= s s t o l e . CH*H= S I ^ S & E I I &J\m « c n e . a ^ s o i a o i 5 2 & s t o t e . o u t s o t s o i i MI dm 512 ^ s t o t e . s^joiife d i s s s e t s t o t e . d i s s s otAH MS s t s t o i e . ot4= s t s t s t o i e . e s t d i s s s S}2 0^1 e . e^CHI ^ItSOIIAH El A1*M &0\Q. S-?ShEHI 4=2 ^ o i e . Task-Solving Day 13 Task ; ask staff about funny past experiences using past tense "PJ Ail AH E St/St/St 01 e ? " § When did you first do something? ex) PJ Al  AH i l 31 ± SH S CH e ? When did you first kiss? Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 11-13 lessons. Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Sending an email in Korean / try leaving a voice mail in Korean 98 Day 14 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 3-3 Vi — be able to use ' Have you ever...' pattern Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: 'Have you ever been to (Place)' I haven't been even once yet. ' CHI D\ SCH2?' 0 i 3 g h H E - g Activity: discussion about their travel story. "Have you ever been to India?" When/What did you do/ Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use'Have you ever been..'pattern freely Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson : 'Have you ever ..? pattern -Or/CH SCH 2 ? Activity: group discussion l.OI^EPrCHI J\ SCH 2 ? Have you ever been to Africa? 2. i i £ CH M HH ?-l SCH 2 ? Have you ever learned Japanese? Small Class 3 Goal: be able to talk about past experiences Review: ask quesions based on yesterday's materieal Today's lesson: I have been to (Place) CHI 31 SCH 2 Activity: < L|°| P J E O I O P I > Life 5 t 3 2CHI %m PJECHI J\ S C H 2 . °JEECHIfe S I ^ P l t r S 21CH2. S ^ 1 O I B S Sol EE CHI 2 . Sl^fe 113 s |A|£!0|CHI2. PJECHIfe A1U0I 014 BOI 21212. Life I B I S U l 0|Z3E r 3 E I I 1 XHSCHI J\ S C H 2 . OIHEICHIfe EIXIDIftOI 21CH2. Q-AI PJECHI J\ fiH £ 0 1 2 . Task-Solving Day 14 Task ask staff using "Have you ever...?" pattern ^ a CHI 31 '-01/01 SCH2? ' feS2^ I f e Q1:PJECHI3ISCH2? Have you ever been to India? Q 2 : ( I P i ) ^ C H S 0 | 2 ? Have you ever had (FOOD NAME) ? Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio • 99 Day 15 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 3- 3- be able to use future tense '_(2)s 3H CHI2' Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: be going to /how long/ about a month ( (2) = 3H CHI 2. g 01 14 SJ-QJ- XH CZ \ J= CD-I j Activity: make a plan for going to Korea Small Class 2 Goal: be able to combine the sentences with the connective ending '-2':two events are in a temporal relationship. The first event proceeds the second. Review: combining two nouns using 'N or2 1 (01) H N' Today's lesson: Sentence 1 + 2 £12 Sentence2 =+~2 Ex) M S 01SCHI §j SH2? Ar3IM 6H2. 11 £12 O r S S ^ 0 H 2 = A1?H» 512 O r S S ^ C H 2 . What are you doing in the morning? I take a shower and (then) eat breakfast. Small Class 3 Goal: be able to use ' be going to ' pattern freely (-(2)s 3H Oil 2) Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: 'be going to' pattern'-(2 ) £ 2 » Oil 2' Activity: asking students' future plans < I 4 ° | sR0Hii> 14*= 2oo2aoii tRoii at 3ioii2. S I^OI I s s i a e M E I ir 310112.141= 01*1 m S E El^ OII Pi 31 SCH2. 2 EH AH LH ¥ 31 M2 £!012. tl^ CHIAH i r ^ S R M B0| Piitf 3H0II2. 2EI2 OHIJ ^ 8 310112. Task-Solving Day 15 Task; ask staff about their future plans Ql: LHtf! OH ¥-1 ft 31 CHI 2? What are you going to do next year? Sing a Song Karaoke Time!! Sing all the songs learned Concert! Contest of the songs made this week Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about traveling in Korea Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 100 Day 16 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 4- 1 Y2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: if... -(2)Pi Activity: using 'if pattern discuss about one's dream If you meet (SOMEBODY), what do you want to ask? (CH @ M^S PJLIPJ §! S01S2 41012?) Small Class 2 Goal: be able to link two sentences using ' 12' Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: be able to combine sentences with'-2' Activity: long story telling using pictures. Who can produce the longest sentence? Small Class 3 Goal: be able to master 'if/when..'pattern '-(2)PJ' Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson : based on 'if/when 'pattern '-(2)0' Activity: discussion about their real 'if/when' story and write a story. <§R0II > Hfe Xiii £01 Si 012. SrXIEr £01 &0| ° 1 2 0 0 H 8 5111 M0\Q_. g^ CHI J\ 5 2 4! 012. °R0 | | JiEM S R S ^ S S PiU2 41012. S ? i i SrLrEl 2!? Sol 2 l=h0| P I 0111512 41012. A|g, HI4EE0II J\ S 2 4! 012. AHgOil m0\£ Al SOU AH SIMS AI2 41012. Task-Solving Day 16 Task; ask staff about their big dream Q: If you were a millionare, what would you want to do? 100 Pi i= cU J1 2! 2 0 S or 2 4J012? Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued . Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 14-16 lessons. Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 101 Day 17 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 3-1 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lessombe able to make suggestions using ' (fi) s £H fi' pattern Activity: make an appointment using '-(—)s EHfi' pattern Small Class2 Goal: be able to use connective eding freely ('-2') Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: utilization of '-U' Activity: Story telling using - H Small Class 3 Goal: be able to master 'if/when' pattern -(fi)S Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: 'if/when' pattern in -(fi)9 Activity: <aSCH<M0| 2ifiS> H= EJgjm^g 2 J ° S E*SCH£!§ EIIJ 1880 af iS J\H £CHfi. 1888 t^fi^ soPrPj say- AH* § sua O I O P I B sua MO\S_. ^ E I tro r mxiE e m e u MOis.. mo\ti\x\m Pius aoi ±\Mm sm O I O P I S BOI tr >IOIIS. Task-Solving Day 17 Task: What do you want to do if you go to (PLACE)? (Place Oil J\°l §! 6TH ^CHfi?) Make them answer with more than two sentences using -H Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued. Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 102 Day 18 Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 4- 2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: CrS 2 , negative marker P i /H " S S Acitivity: using table below, find out what others can/can't do H W U a n AhUl ^ m?\ 2 1 ^ 0 1 * E I ^ E Fruit list S b | g rJIgJgJ E r¥ t t ^ l 01B E| ^  E Food list D^ AI A L o 5 c g D [ g E ? , M A i ^ j r * sportslist s ^ C H l i ^ O ) ^ffllPJO) MiJOl H E I ^ O ) °jO) 5.1 ^E= language list Small Class 2 Goal: be able to combine the sentences with connective ending '-0I7CH AH' ;The first sentence is a reason or cause for the second. Reveiw: combining sentences with connective ending'-al' Today's lesson: -01/0H AH Activity: finishing incomplete sentences Ex) CHE.P1 01 EiA) . . . . ( I had a headache, so ) Small Class3 Goal: be able to use 'honorific forms of speech'fE CUSS 8 §J CI. Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson : honorific forms /nouns < ¥ E I OILHAH > A | | 0 | » S OICHIfi. All 01LHII S & g 010112. H f e #010)12. All 01HHAI SAHIfe 010112. AHI I I 010)12. AHI OlbHXI m 11010112. AHfe H g ^ A y 0 | o | | Q _ XHI OltHXPUHfe SIAlOll d L | A H 2 . Task-Solving Day 18 Task ask staff about honorific form Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 103 Day 19 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit4- 3 Y2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: _ ( 2 ) = 4= StOI 2/StO| 2 be possible, capable/not be able to.. Activity: fiding out from partner what he/she can do /can't do.. ( & o m o i a e 4= s i m g*i= xi OIOPISHAH s t o m p i ) Ql: t i r £ ! f t 4= SICH2? Can you drive? Q2: § 3 S P i S 4= SJCH 2 ? ifc/Ws of dishes can you make? Small Class 2 Goal: be able to combine sentences with the connective ending ' -XI Pi ' 'but' Review: connetive endings ' and ' -Or/CH AH' Today's lesson: -XI Pi Activity: 'Continued story' using connective endings to stimulate conversations through the use of an imaginative serial story Small Class 3 Goal: to master pattern 'be able to/not be unable to' -8/4= SI CH 2 /S t CH 2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: 'be able to' pattern in - ( 2 ) s 4 1 SiCH 2 <Sl^ii ft 4= SICH2!> ^ a o i i f = s t a s i s m&M s t ^ s ^ o - m s t ^ s t ^ O I O P I m 4= ststcH2. mxipi x i s e e t ^ i m bin°-iAH m^^si O I O P I m 4=21 CH2. LH^CHI S R O I I Jte t t ^ S R S r H I t l ^ i ^ O I O P I m 4- SI01 AH 0r4^ 3IIIH2. <m^> Task-Solving Day 19; Task ask staff using 'be able to /not be able to ' pattern ft 4 1 St CH 2 /21 CH 2 Ql: g^it ft 4= 910] Can you speak Chinese? Q2: U x l l l P i S 4= St 012? Can you make kimchee? Sing a Song This week's pop song ,continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Special Lecture Learning Korean in English with Dr. King. About Day 17-19 lessons. Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 104 Day 20 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 4-3 Review: yesterday's lesson Today's Lesson: be able to express a sense of admiration or mild surprise -LHI 2 ! some useful adjectival verbs Activity: compliment time - find something to admire/praise in each other Small Class 2. Goal: be able to combine sentences using connective endings freely. Review: aks about yesterday's reading material Today's lesson: be able to combine sentences using ' - 2 / - X I PJ7-0r AH' <LHaO)| ISH01I f l 21 AH £j£jSl!2!> LH^OII XHfe 19 #01 EICHAH = 24011 S 4 Si OH AH LH¥ ^ S l X I E r ERCHIfer & 4 21012. SRCHI 310 S I ^ S S Eftf 4 212 t R I ^ E UH8 4 2101 AH 014 S 0 1 2 . X I S R £ ! ^ 3 1 SOI 21X10 gROil 313 S R * ! 1 ? * SOI Ar3 4 218 3H0II2. Small Class 3 Goal: REVIEW Today's lesson: review all lessons Acitivify: discussion using key patterns (Unit 1-4) Task-Solving Day 20 Task; ask staff in an intensive interview about general issues. Sing a Song Karaoke Time! Concert! Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 105 Day 21 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 5-1 V2 Review: yesterday's lesson Today's Lesson: - ( 2 ) 2 °f£| Q /-Oh/OH E E| Q disapproval/permission Activity: Make rules in a credit class at Sup sogui Hosu = ^ 2 1 S^OIIAH S U H » I I | S | E £ | | £ ? Ul 0[L |2 Can I smoke at Sup sogui Hosu? YES NO 3H&J0IIAH SCH£ m SHE 312? HI 0 | L | 2 Ca« / speak English in a cabin? YES NO Small Class 2 Goal: to master pattern 'have to do something' '-Or/CH 01 6H 2 ' Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -01-/010t §H 2/£H 2 Activity: Imagine a new country with funny laws and rules. Small Class 3 Goal: be able to talk about rules/manners Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -Oh/CH E £| C r/-(2)PJ Pi £| Q Sh^OIIAHfe ¥ S y gJOIIAHfe SbHM ffl¥PJ Pi ElXIPi DROHAHfe SHHB EIS IE S H S 0 I 2 . SROHAHfe OIOPI ¥ S i d ° l O I S S ¥ = PJ Pi £1X1 Pi O R Oil AH ¥S fe l£1 O I B S £ 3 E £H2. <e§f> Task-Solving Day 21 Task: ask staff member about Korea (culture/rules/manners, etc.) Ex) SR0IIAHf= 0\E &0IIAH SbHM EI¥PJ Pi 912? Can't you smoke in front of the elderly in Korea? Sing a Song This week's pop song Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe : Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 106 Day 22 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 5-1 Reveiw: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: Ol S Oil before doing ... Activity: talk about one's daily activity chronologically, then try to say that the other way using 'Ol 2Oil' Ex) AI?J,» oi2 o m a 5jcHs-oiss e p i soil A I? - I« mo.. I take a shower and then have breakfast - Before having breakfast I take a shower. Small Class 2 Goal: Unit 5-1 be able to request something politely using '-Oi/CH 4 All 2' Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -01/CH 4 All 2. Activity: make a situation using the expression '-OH/OH 4 All 2 ' Small Class 3 Goal: be able to make a complete story using -Ol S CHI/-1— W-Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: Ol SOU,-1- ^CHI before/after doing... <§LRa ; ?B PiUOl SCHI> n= S R S ^ I m s 21CH2. n DJLPI aoiife § f ^ s ? 3 m S E si 21012. P i y ? 0 I I S R M ^ g eiOi SCH2. 3 8 ^ 1 PiLPI SOIIfe & 5? Oil GUSH AH 34J0I Si Si XI gj- P S ? 1 erfch ^Ollfe SR01I CH6H AH 34101 8 0 1 2 . <e§f> Task-Solving Day 22 Task: ask staff member using today's lesson 'Ol 51 Oil' /-<- W-Q\l Ql: DRCHI 231 2011 CHP0IIAI1 S)i012? What were you doing and where before you came to the US? Q2: a ^ J I lit! ?CHI Ol CI on AH a & >|0|I2? W/?a? are you going to do and where after the camp? Sing a Song This week's pop song ,continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 107 Day 23 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 5-2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: review how to talk about being sick, taking medicine and resting Activity: role-play as a doctor and a patient Small Class 2 Goal: be able to express one's symptoms Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: objects in nurse office/ illness names Activity: simulations in nurse office Small Class 3 Goal: be able to express one's symptoms in writing Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: Expression to describe illness ¥£iaoiife JV\ m ohE-i &icue. ¥£i ^ P I ei asoii 014 oiacna. SEE urn ^ArEE SJCHe. f^EE 2)22X101 J \ \ ^ OiHhAH SSjCHI 21CHe. n a m 4AIEE §>21CHe. xife u ? omoi oiscne. ¥c i JHS= m^m mm a uatcne. Task-Solving Day 23 Task ask staff member about past experience of being sick Ql:SS!0l|gJS!6HSCHe? Have you ever been hospitalized? Q2: 4so"H SCH e? 3 01 OPI m m 4A|| e. Haveyou ever had an operation? Tell me about it. Q3:9JAil AilS &h0| 01&CH2? 2H/CH g JII/CHCP1 01SCH2? When were you sick the most? Why/How/Where were you sick? Sing a Song This week's pop song,continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 108 Day 24 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 5- 3 lA be able to suggest something and make an appointment Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: connective ending -¥QI(l)conditions / - ( 2 ) s SHS? Shall we..? Activity: create a situation to make an appointment/plan in pairs Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use ' - ( ° ) £ | IL 5TCr ' be planning to/be about to Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: - ( 2 ) 3 2 o[Q OIDh 0\TtD\ ... Activity: Talk about intentional sentences using ' - (—)^ ^ 6TQ- ' Small Class 3 Goal: be able to use connetive ending Ql '(1) condition Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: review connective endings so far —H/-AI2J7-CH AH / - f = Ql AHzr CHSS HHfe J}^ OrHrAH gSIOII 3*01 2iXIEr A R E £ OH Si S i l 6"H AH 2 £ t 5 H 2 . All S l ^ f i g SUHE ffl¥I> I E OrAIAIPJ AH Is StJHE 21 ffl^H ^ E Pi OrAIQ. SCHIfe: O ^ M SOrfi t feQI A R E Q I U ^ B S O l s H f i . •HBi OrSCHI Q | L | ^ » X\U 2*011 oHfi. Task-Solving Day 24 Task : ask staff using ' - ( ° ) 3 | H oTCl' asking one's future plans. Q1: 10 t3 ¥ Oil 01 Cl Oil AH M or EH H oH 2 ? What are you going to do 10 years from now? Sing a Song This week's pop song continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study • 109 Day 25 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Dvst(2)+ Noun Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: Dvst(2)i-+ Noun, coulor, useful adjective Activity: using Dvst(S)1- Noun pattern ask questions in pairs D H S mmm soroue? mm S O I S H Q ? Do you like spicy food? What kind of color do you like? Small Class 2 Goal: be able to master unit 5 pattern Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: unit 5 pattern review Activity: story making game Small Class 3 Goal: REVIEW Today's lesson: review all lessons/Simple test Acitivify: discussion using key patterns (Unit 5) Task-Solving Day 25 Task ask staff member using today's lesson Ql: D H S s ^ g WOmS.7 Do you like spicy food? Q2: ¥ £ mm S0r5He? What kind of color do you like? m^mm WOmQ. I like red. Sing a Song Karaoke Time! Concert! Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 110 Day 26 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 6- 1 V2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -X| S*0|2? /-01/CHfi(=Let's...: ( 2 ) « Al CI) Activity: using '-XI 8s 012?' keep making questions in pairs. Small Class 2 Goal: practice the expression using Adjectives+fe N Review: ask questions related to various adjectives Today's lesson: review the method how to embellish the noun using practical verb Activity: LH J\ SOlSlfe 3 8 LP r ^0 | 5 | f eSS What I like What I don't like OI2febh 01^81= Alii-Day it rains People who do drugs TVMfe 3 ¥AHS §11 Watching TV Scary movie 2E i6 i fes son 21= a Cooking Staying home sxifea DHse^ 1 sjfe3 Sleeping Eating spicy food Small Class 3 Goal: master pattern what kind of.... 01 @ Review: CHE/?£ which/what Today's lesson: ask questions using Ol ±/¥z= which/what Activity: discuss topics utilizing 01 E / ? £ / 0 | @ Task-Solving Day 26 Task: ask staff member what staff like or dislike Q: 012 ^M|/M&|/A1^/S21« S01S1I2? What kinds of weather/food/people/movie, etc do you like? Sing a Song This week's pop song .continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Special Lecture Learning Korean in Engligh with Dr.King. Abut Day 24-26 Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 111 Day 27 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 6- 'A Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: learn 2 different expression: from-to (-¥ Ei-D\XI) and season (3il 3 5 S ) Activity: group discussion about hometown's seasons, Q & A session Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use expressions related to seasons freely Review: tell a story using CH E / ¥ £ / O i E! Today's lesson: enhance expressions about seasons Activity: discussion and team project Q. Hf oi PJ ¥-13 \ o 1^ L| D\l What does it come to your mind when it comes to spring? M — S Spring - Flower CHS - HrEI- Ol 1? Summer - Sea, Baseball D\S - Fall - Falling Leaves DiS - ±3\ g>h*t Winter-Ski, Vacation Small Class 3 Goal: master the pattern of seasons and weather Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: enhance vocabulary for seasons and weather Activity: weather forecast game O i l ! 0 | 0 P I > MOI sen O P I xpioiiAi gaoi ma. xit I I SOISHAH S O I mt= mm 01^ SOISHfi. CHIIOilfe UhO-OIIAH ft ¥ 2iCH AH #012. SEAHSE ft 4- 2 i H A | | E ^ 3 | E S 4= 2ICH2. 31801 EIPH 8 X I E SXIE & 0 I S . 3isoi i¥ on AH mm gife a s soiona. ^goi EIPH goisife ±3\m s ^ SlOiAH S012. 01 a ^SOIIb ^ t ? 2 E i dH^BUl oH2. <e§f> Task-Solving Day 27 Task: ask staff member about Korea's four seasons and compare to villagers's Describe the weather at home town Sing a Song This week's pop song ,continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 112 Day 28 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 6- 2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: like this/like that..., either A or... 01 BJJI/Xi g J i l O S J i l -(01)14 £| * g Activity: discussion using today's lesson Small Class 2 Goal: learn various countries' weather and climate through making different tour guide books Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: expression used to introduce different countries Activity: act as a tour guide for each country <3HI4P> bTMl: 10ll¥EH 4 SI 31XI H P ! 8 0 1 2 2 5 S ¥ E H 81131X1 014 S S o H Q g-[£ bhM| 0112. M / O I S P I S / ^ S Oil 81 4 SJfe 2 ^ A l . c n —i . A S : 3101§lfe 3 : -A. y • Small Class 3 Goal: be able to master Unit 6-2 patterns Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: utilization of pattern § Sc/ 8 014/ -fe 5! < 142) i J S O I S > Xlfe OHIo l fe 3 8 014 SOI SHAH ii til Oil SI ^ S J S E f e ^ OISi 6U2. ^ a O l i l O l l f e gJgOII 2ifeQI 014 0191 AH 0 ISJo l2 XmOII ¥ 0 A19 l» 51101 S 0 H 2 . S 3 exHOII 2 i fe SSCHIAH j H b Q | 0 l ^ 3 | fe0| 5 ° f 0 H 2 . ASIElfe 2 8 S0151S 51SCHI Si S Oil 3|fe 2 E S 0 1 2 . < s § f > Task-Solving Day 28 Task: ask staff member about hometown/travel experience and the most impressive places using today's lesson Sing a Song This week's pop song , continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 113 Day 29 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 6 3 Vi Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -St It Q it seems.. Activity: guessing game Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use comparison pattern Review: talk about different characteristics of each country Today's lesson : comparison patternNl N2 0\P\ LH Or/CHS Activity: debate game c ^ X P r LH g O r f i ? OlXPt LH SOt fi? Do you like man better? Or woman? 011101 LH S0tfi?^jg0| LH S O r f i ? Do you prefer summer? Or winter? StiPt LH AHOIStCHfi? LH XWQ1910] 3.? Do you find school more fun? Or camp? Small Class 3 Goal: be able to master unit 6-3 pattern Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -31 SRCHI si is 14001 OH at oi mists syjfeai a i s P J ^ O I stots. otDt fig 0t¥" dt£ 5! I t O t f i . 3 S^StH OR sy U J C oj. •j-yisLHI PiUPJ 0t^ xHQiats a nots. SROIIAH si^g- st i § t sen 1421 tRStoi stoi s a aotfi. Task-Solving Day 29 Task: ask staff member questions using comparison pattern Q. i=tXPt LH gotfi? 01 Apt LH gOtfi? Do you like man better? Do you like woman better? Sing a Song This week's popsong , continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Special Lecutere Learning Korean in English with Dr.King. Abut Day 27-29 Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 114 Day 30 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 6- 3 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson : when - ( 2 ) = M, Sh £| Q (go well), §>Cr (be right) Activity: - S HH S 5rU 41012? What would you like to do when( it rains)? Small Class 2 Goal: be able to master unit 6 pattern Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: unit 6 pattern review Activity: story making game Small Class 3 Goal: REVIEW Today's lesson: review all lessons/ simple test Acitivity: discussion using key patterns (Unit 6) Task-Solving Day 30 Task ask staff member - ( 2 ) = Hrlfe H S i l l 41012?. Ql: U P ! S HH S S H I 41012? When it rains, what would you like to do? Sing a Song Karaoke Time! Concert!! Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 115 Day 31 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit7- 1 Vi Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: - U 21 Cr be doing (the progressive form) Or? -anything/anytime/anybody... Activity: Role play Small Class 2 Goal: be able to answer the reason of the activities freely Review: review already learned pattern -01701 AH to link sentences Today's lesson: ? £ SI 21CH2? What's wrong?.../ Or/Oi AH S.because.... Activity: time to question and answer reasons Small Class 3 Goal: master pattern - H 21 CI 01?-Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: - H 21 CI Or? -< L | ° | 4SI"> AHfe 4SiCHI M S SCHIAH ( O i ? 3 E ) Pi mil ( 0 r ? E ) P ! L | A | 8 H ( O I ^ O O I E ) SSrSlXI 812 S CHI AH S P ! X l f i . M S O ISO| | fe (0 |? 3 E ) S J X I 8 2 311^ AlfeCHI 2^011 UH3I H5PH SICHUAH. S A P i DIAII2 C|A| X I 2 . HSCHI = 240I IAHfe ^STOII S S 3 8 5H2. a s s a i l ! IrlDI21fe 3 8 Br Mil 210H2. Task-Solving Day 31 Task : ask staff member questions using "2D 8 /11 oH 2 ? " to get answers utilizing " 01/CH AH 2 " and write them down Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 116 Day 32 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 7- 1 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -Or/CH AH -is D\\ CH HU fi? How about going to do something ? Activity: using today's lesson role play Ex)fiS fi^ou uoi 4=§5rb^i OH cue? How about going to swim together this afternoon? Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use pattern ' -L| D\' Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: connective ending ' -L| J)\' since Activity: to complete sentences ending with - L | J)\ to make it perfect Ex) LHPr 2 U 5 K . . . Since it is raining Small Class 3 Goal: be able to use pattern _0\/0i AH (2) Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson : -Or/CH AH (2) <e.R01l D\M> AH is LH^OII gROII DtM S R i m UH¥£1H oUsQI § R 0 | | D\M S R ^ S HH¥S CH AUDI S i8 Di ^ O r f i . § R 0 | | }RAH StOI eiUH A S £ SOI ft ^ O i l f i . = C U § AISOII PhAH CHI^ t r ^ E A rU S!?S £ ! g E AHQ ^ O i f i . <m^> Task-Solving Day 32 Task ask staff using today's lesson '-e? D\\ CH W fi?' to suggest and make an appointment/plan Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 117 Day 33 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 7- 2 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -01/01/01 S 3 0 1 SIC1, have ever had... N (0 | ) c i m 5 r E r They call it a NOUN Activity: make up a funny story as a real experience Ex) jwnj\m s jo i s 301 si 012? Have you ever had dog meat? Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use pattern Ql Review: connective ending -e?QI (1) condition: b lMP l S E Q I 31¥ EJ-EH 5/«ce wee weather, shall we go to canoe? Today's lesson: connective ending ¥Ql (2) introduction: 0 I 2 § 0 1 2 0 ol feQI. . . This is Jing and Activity: make a story of "looking at pictures" using-5.pl § r¥QI Small Class 3 Goal: be able to master today's lesson Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson : -Oh/OH £ 3 01 Sia,N(0|)f21I? S f r j 01 P J S E 9 3 | ^ | r 2 H ) S lbQI 2 1 PJEiyiOIIAI 01? 2PISie? ° J S O | 0 | | 2 . £!W O l i g D r A I D r ^ a ^ 6H2. 11 y S2J 01? 9 I01S SHI2JQI A 1 # E 01? ¥ A H S S J I 0 I I 2 . A J ¥ 21S1B 013 SI S E S 3 E SiXIPJ 2 1 1 SROUHe? 9 31 Pi SIM 2 ^ e ? A l ^ O I & C H 2 . <e§f> Task-Solving Day 33 Task ask staff member ' 01/01/01 g 3 01 SI 012? ' Qi: son AH eisoi g 301 si012? Have you ever made kimchee at home? Sing a Song This week's popsong, continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 118 Day 34 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 7- 3 Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: master the pattern _fe Gl 91 CHI fi? This is a... what is it? -3HI suffix '-D\l' makes descriptive verbs adverbs. (£13H/CH g 3fl/5.h 91311...) Activity: link questions continuously Small Class 2 Goal: be able to use pattern ' Verb+fe S ' how to (verb) Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: -fe S Activity: sharing recipies EX) A E| 3|| E| E l E f e B StOI fi? Do you know how to make spaghetti? Small Class 3 Goal: be able to mater today's lesson Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson:-3||-fe.QI . ' < S i ^ A l i r > HI3 r 2 i fe 3 CHI AH fe S l ^ A I ^ O I g £ SiCHAH S I S A I ^ S Bibl 4 3 | SiCHfi. i ! S A 1 ^ 0 I U e ^ A l ^ g £3 | | ° i b h 4 3 1 gifeGI S R A H l g OIUCHIfi. SaCHI 014 CHg3|| A I ^ S SiidfeGI 3 A l ^ S 1 1 4 8 ^CHI L>E S f i ^ Task-Solving Day 34 Task : Ask staff members to find out' fe S ' Ql: 21*1 E l E f e B 8 3|^5H gEHf i? Would you teach me how to make kimchee? Sing a Song This week's pop song, continued Based on today's lesson, make a simple song Review camp songs Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 119 Day 35 Curriculum Framework Small Class 1 Goal: Unit 7 review and more Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: free, joke, lie. gW, feg-, 7\ 5! St... Activity: guessing game whether it is true or not. Small Class 2 Goal: be able to master unit 6 pattern Review: ask questions using yesterday's lesson Today's lesson: unit 7 pattern review Activity: story making game Small Class 3 Goal: REVIEW Today's lesson: review all lessons Acitivity: discussion using key patterns (Unit 7) Task-Solving Day 35 Task: ask staff a funny Korean joke or a current popular lie. Sing a Song Karaoke Time! Concert! Group Study Or Evening Program Internet Cafe: Internet search about today's lesson Discussion about today's task and group portfolio Self-study 120 Appendix III 7-Week CURRICULUM in Korean Day 1 2 S ° | MS/4A1I: X13|AJHol3| S i S i2£! 1 2 a i 2 ! ! a i 0 | £ AI2J-B r S ^ AIS l^rglBOII CHS1 O H ^ I / ^ a ^ S / ^ a & a / S S S B i a O I I CHSh A3H/I2A1I U9I43I / £ g | y A3H S|3| s s 2 M S : X13|£31lo|3| (Xii 1 Hi 1 S SCH3131 ) HHS S S : e iaSrAl l f i . OIMOI 910)12? Xife/Xil O I B S 0)12. SOI CHP0II2? 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S S I LHI32SH 8C1, (SMOILJ-3 M ^ H ° i i ^ i i ? i i 4 aia.) # S W S f i ? 1. 31 API Sf£S0OI ^ 9 1 ! 1 2 1 31EPISAH 2 AH/OH El AH/g 01011 £18 II gOH8Cl . 2. fifAH aixioii5|| Q| gOHSU £ S 2 £18 a X I Al a X I OIOPI §H S 3 S l^ l f iOl AH2 ! 8 6 P 1 • SSPII §H 8E1. 3. CIS Oil 32A18 3MI0U 218LHI 8 8 LHXI QUI 3 y g>2is HH/88 LHXI-8H2 Mti\±m g i g ttH ' S W E i b s e g £cnn git ic i . 4. a ^ s 0 O I S W S £18 g a o l 218 XI, i l £ ±AH ° i g o j f f O H S C K OIIS SOH 21EH^ & m AHUIA8 S i g M 0 I U 3 S32 012 3 8 9HB1I2 i l t l C l . #010|,fe&0|CHIfi. 1. 32A18 61^ 011311 9S0II g=P|| feSS 51U 0 2 E 1 . feS2| ° | D | » 312x12 AH2. g & S 4 2 £P1I S1EK 2. 831 319 fe&8 ! 618 Al LHI325H 8E1. 3. 018EH "a90|0| | f i"/3HS^O|0| | f i21 118 B S E 312SC1. 9 8 32 ! 2 e i o ^ B : 9 8 32! 1 Oil AH UHS S S S *!61311 9SE1. MeAllgJ: OH AHI A1£0|| 531 £1 0I0PI U H S B S : gPIXIS mM: i P I 28 209 1. S S S CIS S S S * I U ¥ - l ^ 2 g ^ S SJOrAH S S S £ AH Oil g>3l ¥ £ 5 1 3 1 8H SCK 2. • £! S S S 2X131 SCK 3. H i S 9 8 XIS3ICH9 XI UH28H SCK • 4 . • X | S » OlgsHAH 4 2 S S S S C K 5. 4XHIB 4 2 73011 AH UHS T T S S 0 | 0 P I » PJSCH 231 ft 4 E si a. 3 8 m i 3 73^1X1 HHS S S S I ^ J ° S 5HAH 3m or9AH S M s 7 31011 AH HH8 S S S U ¥ H 4 2 4 A l l * 01 AH 3 S 3 S 9 S C H 2 3 I S C K oixisi- AIsCHI CHS mti\m S C K 210 Appendix IV: Credit Villager Mid-Session Progress Report Credit Villager M i d - Session Progress Report Concordia Language Villages - Sup Sogiii Hosu, 2001 -Session K P 84 Name Sup Sogiii Hosu Name Credit Teacher G O A L S Villager: One of my goals for this session is to... Villager: So far... Teacher: And my impression is . . . . L A N G U A G E L E A R N I N G Villager: I have made progress in these areas... Teacher: I would like to add.. Villager: Something I want to work on is... Teacher: One way I can help is... E S T I M A T E D K O R E A N L A N G U A G E G R A D E A B C D F This in-progress grade and these comments are intended to give parents a general indication of villager progress. This brief from is not ,however, a complete inventory of language learning accomplishments or skills demonstrated by the villager so far. . Signed Date (Credit Teacher) (Villager) 211 Appendix V: Credit Villager Final Evaluation & Test Concordia Language Villages High School Credit Program Final Evaluation Korean Language Village Sup Sogui Hosu KP 84 2001 Summer Name: Andrew Carter Level: Beginning Sup Sogui Hosu Name: £1 S Teacher: Choi Jung Hwa / Chang Sun Mee Language Skills Listening He has shown his excellent listening skill during this one-month per iod. He has been very guick to pick up w h a t teachers said. He seems to understand all the contents taught during the class. Speaking He always tried to prac t ice w h a t he learned during the class with other credit peers a n d native counselors. He speaks with g o o d pronunciat ion. Actual ly, w e cou ld p r o c e e d conversat ion with him for a while on a certain top ic . He is great. Reading His reading skill is outstanding, considering his beginning level. He understands sentences a n d short passages m a d e of the contents taught during the class. Writing We g a v e lots of interview homework for giving students chances to prac t ice w h a t they learned during the class. He beautifully m a d e lists of information he got from his interviewees. He has been great . Addi t ional Comments We are sure that he will ach ieve a huge progress if he keeps learning Korean with this p a c e a n d intensity. We are h a p p y to have him here. Participation Always Usually Sometimes Rarely Never Final Grade : A+ / 98 % 8/25/01 Villager Signature Date 8/25/01 Credit Teacher Date 212 Credit Final Test KP84 1. % M 01 Oil fi? How old are you? 2. CH P Oil AH & CH fi? Where are you from? 3. 1\ 11 CH P Oil fi? Where is that? 4. CHin pg-IAHJ-OI Ollf i? What is your nationality? 5. 3 Oil S M = 01 21 CH fi? How many people do you have in your family? 6. S CHI ¥ J F 21 CH fi? Who lives in your house? 7. S ExH CHI 21 CH fi? What do you have near your house? 8. fite^l^OICHLIHfi? How do you feel today? 9. ¥£g^MSO|eHfi? What kinds of food do you like? 10. ^5 | -§01 l °-| §1-2.1 J\S11 What are you going to the department store for? 11. CH ±=L 14 £1-011 ^ | H ^ CH fi? Which country would you like to go? 12. fif 3 Oil AH % A| CHI C H § # ^CH fi? What time do you usually have breakfast at home? 13. 0\J I Oil AH % A| CHI A > S ? What time do you usually go to bed at camp? 14. i i 01 21 Ail CH| fi? tfTzen is your birthday? 15. ^ s Oil fi§ °-| §H fi? fFfort do you do usually on the weekends? 16. 21 All XH m 4= 9 M bH x i CH fi? 07ze« Jz^ow first learn how to swim? 17. ¥ T 1 & EH AH XH M XI2IH. S tJH x i CH fi? 07io w rTze first person who taught you how to ride a bike? 213 18. £ 8 i ! 0 | | 2 ! ? § [ 9 1 AH 3 g * H ^ C H f i ? mat would you like to get from your friends on your birthday? 7P. B £ | ^ D r r ^ CHI ¥ 2 y §191 3 2J CH fi? On Christmas, what would you like to give to your parents? 20. CHXil SKCHfi? What did you do yesterday? 21. ? § i HI SI § B H f i ? What sports are you best at? 22. HD\^m 21 Ail CH P Oil AH &CH fi? When/Where did you buy the bag? 23. Z l J|-£J"M sQFCHI & C H f i ? //ow much was the bag? 24. Hi-^ CHI S C H f i ? Have you ever been to Korea? 25. JH H J I ff CH S CH fi? #ave J/OH ever eaten dog meat? 26. 31 :^:5rl SCH fi? Have you ever been kissed? 27. % A H s £ S i SHCHfi? PF/zen ^ j y o w / f a f cfrz've a car? 25. A| g 01 CH Si CH fi? How was the test? 29. s ^ 2J ^ 4^ J r S St CH fi? Do you like being at Sup sogiii Hosu? 214 Concordia Language Villages High School Credit Program Final Evaluation Korean Language Village Sup Sogiii Hosu K P 84 2001 S U M M E R Class lists with final grades & course levels N A M E Sup Sogui Hosu Name Level Final Grade / % Andrew Carter EM Beginning A+/ 98% Chris Horns Beginning B / 75% James Okey Beginning B / 75% Jin-Oak Ottoson Mckeen Beginning A / 86% Kendra Hanson Beginning A+ / 95% Jim Ross mm Beginning B / 75% Megan Quinn 015! Beginning B+ / 83% Ned Gawron Beginning A / 90% Sean Bussell Beginning A+ /99% Shana Lee Beginning A+ /93% Tyler Schloss SS Beginning B / 75% 215 

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