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Spark spectra of zinc Gutmann, Francis 1958

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SPARK SPECTRA OF ZINC by FRANCIS GUTMANN B. A . , University of British Columbia, 1956 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS.FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE in the Department of PHYSICS We accept this thes is as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA April, 1958 Abstract* The spectra of zinc have been photographed i n the region between 2400A* and 7000/f . Electrodeless discharge and Schuler tube were used as sources, and exposures were taken on a Hilger E-498 medium quartz spectrograph, a Hilger E - l Littrow prism spectrograph and a 21 foot concave d i f f r a c t i o n grating. There were 1200 l i n e s measured i n t h i s regie® of which 110 were already c l a s s i f i e d . In presenting t h i s thesis i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t of the requirements for an advanced degree at the University of B r i t i s h Columbia, I agree that the Library s h a l l make i t f r e e l y available for reference and study. I further agree that permission f o r extensive copying of t h i s thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the Head of my Department or by his representative. I t i s under stood that copying or publication of t h i s thesis f o r f i n a n c i a l gain s h a l l not be allowed without my written permission. Department of Physics  The University of B r i t i s h Columbia, Vancouver 8, Canada. Date April .16. 1958 . AG'KMOWLEDGEMEMT I am very grateful to Dr;A.M.Crooker for h i s devoted supervision. His i n s p i r i n g discussions and interest! were stimulating throughout th i s work. I am also indebted to Mr.J.Lees and Mr.A.Fraser for the i r h e l p f u l technical assistance. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Abstract i i i Acknowledgements i v Introduction 1 Exp er i m en t a l 3 Analysis and Results 7 L i s t of Measured Zinc Lines.. 10 Bibliography $® I l l u s t r a t i o n s following p.6 (a) C a l i b r a t i o n Curve for Hand Spectroscope (b) Electrodeless Discharge (c) Electrodeless Discharge ( C i r c u i t Discharge),, Temperature Control (d) Schuler Tube (e) Schuler Tube ( C i r c u i t Diagram) 1 INTRODUCTION During the time between the two world wars, there was a tremendous amount of work done in the f i e l d of o p t i c a l spectre. . The analysis of emission spectre yielded i n a short time a large amount of information which was soon interpreted by people l i k e Bohr, Catalan, Russell, Saunders, Hund, Paul!, Bowen, and M i l l l k a n . t However, the.interest in t h i s f i e l d declined soon because there did not seem to be much more In formation one could obtain from any further a n a l y s i s . At that stage the atomic theory was able to predict i n a semi-quantitative way the structure of most spectra. However, although numerous theories have been put forward regarding prediction of atomic energy l e v e l s , none of them was adequately tested because of the many gaps In our knowledge of atomic spectra. Meggers (11) points out that out of k2J& t h e o r e t i c a l l y possible spectra, 3$00 were unknown in 19^6, and also that i o n i z a t i o n potentials of only 65 neutral atoms and 60 ions were known. The table of "Atomic Energy Levels" compiled by Mrs Moore-Sitterly show that there are s t i l l many gaps i n the study of i s o e l e c t r o n i c sequences and f r e  quent unexplained, i r r e g u l a r i t i e s i n position of energy l e v e l s and energy l e v e l i n t e r v a l s . A large amount of work must s t i l l he done in the analysis of spectra of transuranic elements and rare earth elements and also i n the second and t h i r d spark spectra of the f i r s t long period. Beside a l l the mentioned d e f i c i e n c i e s , 2 wave length v a l u e s must f r e q u e n t l y "be changed when remeasured on modern improved ins t ruments . . The o b j e c t of t h i s work was to o b t a i n the b e s t p o s  s i b l e l i s t o f z i n c spark l i n e s . The a r c spectrum o f z i n c , wh ich was a n a l y s e d m a i n l y by H e t z l e r , Boreman, and Burns i n 1935* i s c o m p l e t e . Von S a i l s , P a s c h e n , Lang , and Shenstone observed Zn 11 but the a n a l y s i s i s s t i l l not complete s i n c e a number o f terms a r i s i n g from 3 d ^ s n x a r e m i s s i n g . The most complete l i s t up to now o f h i g h e x c i t a t i o n z i n c l i n e s was compi led by L . and E . B l o c h i n 1936 . Mazumder used p a r t l y t h i s l i s t t o o b t a i n the twenty f o u r terms he p u b l i s h e d . L a p o r t e and Lang observed the spectrum i n the vacuum u l t r a v i o l e t and o b t a i n e d 9 t § r m s . S i n c e Zn 111 i s expec ted t o have r o u g h l y the same number o f terms as Cu 11 and N i 1, i t i s q u i t e c l e a r t h a t o n l y about o n e - t h i r d o f the terms have been observed and t h a t a l a r g e amount o f work s t i l l has to be done to complete the a n a l y s i s . 3 EXPERIMENTAL In t h i s analysis, the electrodeless discharge was adopted as the source, the main reasons being that the spectrum produced i s nearly free of impurities, that the l i n e s produced are sharp, and that the excitatiom and i n t e n s i t y are high. A quartz tube containing a few grams of zinc metal was placed inside a furnace, which consisted of four e l e c t r i c heaters placed around the discharge tube as shown i n the diagram. Wrap ped around the tube was a copper c o i l , consisting of eight turns, that was connected through a spark gap to a mica condenser so as to form a closed loop. The c o i l had an inductance of about 2 . 6 ^ / / and the condenser had a capacitance of . 0 0 3 8 ^ , thus making the c i r c u i t resonant at 10 cycles per second. The high frequency o s c i l l a t i o n s were produced by placing the condensers across a 50 KV X-ray transformer. After evacuating the tube,*,the temperature VOLS raised to about 500*C to produce a . 7 6 mm Hg zinc vapour pres sure. In order to avoid conduction across the spark gap and thus Increase the excitation, an e l e c t r i c fan was used to blow a i r across the spark gap. The a i r v e n t i l a t i o n also prevented the condenser from becoming too hot. After running the discharge for a r e l a t i v e l y short time, zinc would d i f f u s e out of the f u r  nace into the cool part of the discharge tube. This caused the quartz windows on either end of the tube to become coated with a f i l m of zinc which reduced the i n t e n s i t y of the source and cut down the amount of available zinc vapour. This was overcome by placing a gas flame at the end of the tube so as to keep i t hotter than the remaining part. During every exposure, the changes i n excitation (i.e.changes i n i n t e n s i t y of known high e K C i t a t i o n l i n e s ) were watched through one end of the tube using a Canadian Arsenal no.109 hand spectroscope. For the purpose of Identifying some of the strong low exc i t a t i o n l i n e s , the hand spectroscope was calibrated, using a mercury vapour lamp and a copper arc. As an attempt to obtain an alt e r n a t i v e low exc i t a t i o n source, a Schuler tube was used. It consisted of a hollow water-cooled cathode tube into which was placed a small zinc rod. The Schuler tube was connected through two l i q u i d a i r traps to a mercury c i r c u l a t i n g pump to form a closed system. After evacu ating the apparatus, a small amount of argon was l e t i n . The Schuler tube was now connected across a condenser. The spark gap between the anode and the high p o t e n t i a l terminal of the con denser served also to control the p o t e n t i a l difference between the anode and the cathode. The c i r c u l a t i n g speed of the argon gas was controlled by a needle valve. It was found that the excitation was controlled mainly by varying the spark gap which was easier to change than i n the case of electrodeless discharge. Instruments used for exposures were a Hilger E - l Llttrow prism spectrograph, a Hilger E~^9& medium quartz spectro graph, and a 21 foot concave d i f f r a c t i o n grating with a Paschen- Runge mounting. Exposures were taken on the medium quartz spectrograph 5 using the Schuler tube as a source. The exposures l a s t i n g about f i v e minutes were taken on I l f o r d HP3 and I l f o r d Q- plates. The wavelength scale i n the instrument was used for i d e n t i f i c a t i o n of l i n e s instead of the usual i r o n standards. The current be tween the anode and the cathode remained roughly constant at about 35 m.a. during a l l exposures while the c i r c u l a t i o n speed and the potential difference between the anode and the cathode was varied. The same procedure was repeated using the Hilger E - l spectrograph. The electrodeless discharge was used f i r s t with the Hilger E-l. spectrograph. Two series of exposures were taken with Kodak F - l l and I l f o r d HP-3 plates i n the v i s i b l e and near- u l t r a v i o l e t region, and I l f o r d Q-plates i n the f a r - u l t r a v i o l e t . After t r a n s f e r r i n g the electrodeless discharge to the 21 foot grating, six three-hour exposures were taken. In f i v e out of the six exposures, the Instrument was f u l l y loaded with plates. The d i s t r i b u t i o n of the d i f f e r e n t types of plates along the plate holder i s shown i n the following table: s i l t Run Number nl#8 pl#6 Pl#5 Pl#5 PL #2 Pl#l 5710X HP3 HP 3 HP 3 HP 3 HP 3 HP3 HP 3 HP 3 5720X HP 3 HP 3 HP3 HP 3 HP 3 HP3 HP 3 HP 3 5730X HP 3 HP3 HP3 HP 3 HP 3 HP 3 HP 3 HP3 5740X 0. Q 0. C 5750X HP 3 HP 3 Infrared f. L.R. Q HP3 HP3 5760X HP 3 HP 3 L.R.T L.R. HP 3 HP 3 Q L.R. denotes I l f o r d Long-Range plate. In order to prevent l i n e broadening and s h i f t i n g , the temperature of the immediate surroundings of the grating was kept constant to within l/ 2 5°C by heating the room to about 2°C above i t s normal temperature. A mercury column acting as a c i r c u l t switch controlled the heaters. The temperature changes were being watched outside the grating room by a bridge c i r c u i t connected as shown on the diagram. It was possible with t h i s temperature-measuring device to note changes of about 1/1000 0C, since an increase of about 375°f2 i n R w a a equivalent to a T C drop i n temperature. / A l l plates were measured on a Hilger comparator; how ever, the weak l i n e s had to be measured with an eyepiece. A l  though the distances measured on the Hilger comparator could be read to .001 mm., the readings were usually reproducible to about .OO1! mm. depending upon the width of the l i n e . I S P E C T R O S C O P E PUMP Q U A / ? T Z Q U A R T Z T U B E ^AAAAAAAAAAAAA/ H E A T E R H E A T E R vVVWWVWVVAAAA C O P P E R C O I L / / Q U A R T Z WINDOW E L E C T R O D E L E S S D I S C H A R G E T E M P E R A T U R E C O N T R O L E L E C T R O D E L E S S D I S C H A R G E C I R C U I T D I A G R A M NEEDLE VALVE 12.5 KV(RMS) 20O0 iX 0.25fjf j r . ANODE CATBODE S C H O L E R T U B E C I R C U I T D I A G R A M 7 Analysis and Results In the analysis of the plates obtained using the Schuler tube as source, mercury and argon l i n e s had appreci able i n t e n s i t y . Hence i t was decided not to analyse those plates i n any great d e t a i l . The wavelength l i s t compiled contains therefore only l i n e s emitted by the electrodeless discharge. The prism plates were reduced using the Hartmann dispersion formula and iron standards. The weak l i n e s were determined by l i n e a r extrapolation from a known neighbouring zinc l i n e , using the experimental dispersion curves which are roughly approximated by the following formulas: 1) ^ i n A /mm for 3100A -6500A i>= /SH (Prism r o t a t i o n at 17.00.) 2 ) * **// i n A / m m f o r 24-°°A -3100A D= 'bo (prism r o t a t i o n at 13.30.) 3) T> ^//j l n A / m m f o r region below 2400A j>* (Prism r o t a t i o n at 9.20.) The prism wavelengths were l a t e r used to determine the order on the grating spectrograms. By using the well-known strong Zn 1 and Zn 11 l i n e s and the theoretically-predicted dispersion, the i r o n standards were i d e n t i f i e d . Since b » grating 16..934A* i n. angle of incidence = 25° R = radius of curvature of the grating = 642.214 cm. i t follows from the theory that the dispersion ( i n A /mm) i s given by D» 2.63687 - ^ 1 - ^ - sin: 2 i) The D values were calculated and tabulated for increments of 100 A° and l i e between 2.61 and 1.96. The dispersion deter mined experimentally was found to agree very well with the tabu la t e d values. The order of the l i n e s was determined mainly with the help of the prism plates. Rowland ghosts helped often to con firm the order of the stronger l i n e s . Values for ghost spac ing corresponding to any p a r t i c u l a r order and any n'X were ob tained from the thesis of R.E. Bedford. The actual Rowland ghost separations are given by~ ds _* yyi A where p= number of grating l i n e s / X> p period =750 m«=:Rowland ghost order. An appreciable number of l i n e s were also i d e n t i f i e d because they reappeared i n higher orders,' and because t h e i r i n  tensity on the plate varied depending upon the s e n s i t i v i t y of the plate i n that p a r t i c u l a r wavelength region. The accuracy of the wavelength varies from ,005A° around 2400A* to about ,04A° i n the i n f r a red region. The most complete l i s t of high e s c i t a t i o n l i n e s up to now was com p i l e d by L. and E. Bloch i n 1934. Considering the fa c t that the dispersion they quote i s at l e a s t t t e n times lower than the one used i n t h i s analysis, the agreement i s quite good especi a l l y i n the 5000A0 region. A l l the wavelength given by L. and E.Bloch are high by about .02A° — ,15A° compared to the ones obtained here. On most exposures Zn II and Zn III l i n e s dominate the spectrum. In the region between 2400A* and 6600A9 there are about 1200 l i n e s recorded here, out of which, 110 are c l a s s i f i e d . 10 L i s t of Measured Zinc Lines P : in t e n s i t y on E - 1 (prism G : in t e n s i t y on 21 foot grating B : i n t e n s i t y observed by L. and E.Bloch Note: Inte n s i t i e s are on a v i s u a l scale from - 1000. Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vacj p G A0 cm*' Class 100 1 0 5 100 0 6635.71 6632.58 6625.50 6601.53 6595-60 15065.85 15074.07 15089.04 15143.83 15157.44 10 500 50 Id 30 50 500 6569.50 6545.24 6499 . 69 6498.14 6496.85 15217.66 15274.07 15281.08 15284.77 15287.83 5 500 20 40 5 1 1000 6483.34 6483.10 6399 . 20 6396.98 6362.32 15419.89 15420.47 15622.64 15628.07 15713.20 11 11 1 50 500 500 5 5 10 500 5 6300 .,15 6268.94 6265.94 6214.61 6186.09 15768.26 15947.26 15954.90 16086.67 16160.84 11 50 100 500 50 500 20 30 500 50 100 6149.29 6111.53 6102.49 6071.62 6053.15 16257.55 16358..00 16381.96 16465.52 16515.76 11 11 500 5 1 5 5 500 10 6046.42 6045 ..49 6044. 69 6021.18 5982.27 16534.15 16536.69 16538.88 16603.45 16711.43 11 L i s t (continued) 11 Intensity p G- 50 5 5 50 5 100 15 500 100 50 15 10 5 1 5 5 500 50 ' 5 10 1 500 200 10 160 50 2 500 200 10 15 10 15 15 lOd 10 20 100 1° 500 500 500 500 15 0 1 1 20 50 30 15 15 10 10 500 AO 20 20 Wavelength ( a i r ) A0 5937.22 5934.88 5928.79 5908.49 5894..33 5883.18 5865.73 5852.42 5820.63 5820.09 5814.92 5812.86 5801.22 5757.-87 5755.46 5741.66 5699.10 5 686..00 5678.27 5678.09 5658.38 5623.58 5620.01 5610.31 5586.04 5578 ..81 5563.79 5563-38 5550 .,48 5528.61 5525.21 5522.09 5520.12 5519 ..80 5516.84 5513.23 5512.12 5510.62 5510.32 5509.49 Wave Number (vac) cm"1 Cla8;S 16838.24 16845.82 16862.19 169 20 ..12 16960.77 11 16992.91 17043.46 17082.22 17175.52 17177.12 17192.39 17198.84 17232.99 17362.73 17370.00 17411.75 17541.77 17582.19 17606.12 17606.71 17668.01 17777.34 17788.64 17819 ;39 17896.81 17920.01 17968.38 17969.73 18011.47 18082.72 18093.85 18104.06 18110.53 18111.58 18121.30 18133.16 18136.81 18141.74 18142.73 18145.47 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wav^ e Number (vac. B P G A° cm"' 10 15 5498.65 18181.24 15 5493.17 18199.38 10 100 549 2..51 18201.57 10 15 5472.47 18268.22 500 100 5468 ..19 18282.52 5 30 5439.66 18378.41 10 10 5427. 4 18420.1 50 50 5423.81 18432.18 100 100 5416.34 18457.53 50 10 5403 .34 18501.94 50 10 5400.02 18513.45 1 5390.76 18545.12 2 30 5389.32 18550 .07 2 30 5388.77 18551.97 1 10 5387.07 18557.82 3 500 1000 5386.27 18560.58 1 20 5384.-92 18565.23 0 10 5380.96 18578..89 2 100 50 5375.66 18597.21 30 5373.62 18604.27 15 5362.27 18643.65 20 5359.05 18654.85 lOd 5357.66 18659.69 20 5357.47 18660.38 1 5337.95 18728.59 5 500 50 5336.88 18732.29 0 1 5312.36 18819.23 10 2 5310.84 18824.19 2 50 5 5290.56 18896.34 0 5288.26 18904.56 1 50 5 5271.05 189 66.29 4 500 80 5 249 . 68 19 043 ..49 3 100 30 5233 .50 19102.37 0 5 0 5217..83 19159.74 0 20 1 5206.57 19201.17 1 100 30 5192.33 19253.83 2 100 0 5181.97 19292.32 5d 5159.04 19378.07 3 500 50 5157.61 19383.44 10 1 5145.6 19428.6 Intensity- L i st (continued) Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) 13 P G 1 2 500 40 5 0 20 3 500 50 10 2 500 100 10 5 10 10 5 1 4 500 80 10 5 1 7 500 500 8 500 1000 1 10 30 5 500 80 2 50 10 6 100 50 2 50 10 4 100 30 8 500 i e o 10 500 50 50 10 500 500 5d 5 2 10 100 100 1 2 10 20 5 5d ; 2? lOd 1 1 10 100 20 3 10 5 A" cm c l a s s 5122..11 5119.81 5095.22 5085.05 5075.-33 19517.78 19526.55 19620.78 19660.o3 19697.68 5069.44 5050 ..13 5035.45 4994.08 49 88 ..9 6 19720.56 19795.96 19853.68 20018.14 20038 ..18 I 4986.5 4970..78 4960.42 49 40 ..70 4924.01 20048.5 20111.98 20153.98 20234.42 20303.00 II 4911.-63 4910..45 4879.92 4879.14 4874.23 2 0354.18 20359 . 0 7 20486. 44 20489. 71 20510. 35 II 4866.84 4850..26 4836.05 4818..91 4810.53 20541.49 20611.71 20672.27 20745.80 20781.94 I 4806.06 4722.20 4713.79 4691.18 4680.12 20801.27 21170.67 21208.43 21310.65 21361.01 I I 4679.68 4679.11 4657.90 4654.24 4650.29 21363.02 21365.62 21462.91 21479.79 21498.04 4649.17 4641.82 4640.0 4629.80 4609^.-19 21503.22 21537.26 21545.8 21593.18 21689 .73 I L i s t (continued) 14 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B: P a A* cm" 3 10 10 4605.58 21766.73 15 4595.12 21756.14 50 4589.88 21780.98 10 40 4567-20 21889-00 50 5 4540.90 22615-91 50 5 4523-53 22100.45 5 100 40 4510.19 22165.72 5 4505.79 22187-56 3 100 5 4502.55 22203.43 2 500 20 4487-66 22277-10 4 20 20 4482.69 22301-80 10 4465.6 22387-3 1 25 lOd 4451 .00 22460.58 5 4445.01 22490.84 20 5 4442.14 22505-39 10 4436.7 22533.0 2 30 50 4431.43 22559.77 3 40 80 4424.91 22593-01 1 10 4424.01 22597.60 1 20 4420.92 22613.40 0 15 4419.68 22619.74 4 40 100 4419.37 22621.33 3 80 4417.51 22630.85 3 60 500 4415.10 22643.21 3 200 4413.86 22649.57 2 40 4412 .03 22658.96 2 50 4407-41 22682.71 4 80 500 4406.04 22689-77 4 100 4405.56 22692.24 2 50 4404.21 22699.19 2 10 5 4402 .72 22706.87 3 4402.25 22709.30 2 20 50 4399.63 22722.82 0 5 4398.10 22730-73 1 30 4394.20 22750.90 3 20 100 4392.18 22761.36 1 20 4391.60 22764.37 0 30 4385-75 22794.73 3 40 80 4385.52 22795.93 3 30 500 4381.15 22818.67 L i s t (continued) 15 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B P G A° cm"' 1 30 4380.80 22820.49 20 4370.76 22872.91 4 30 100 4370.44 22874.59 5 50 100 4361.30 22922.52 40 4359.66 22931.14 5 100 4359.40 22932.51 4 30 200 4351.70 22973.09 4 100 4351-12 22976.15 2 Ida 4349.43 22985.08 1000 4347.-98 22992.75 1 10 5 4354.10 23007.98 50 80 4341.3 23028.03 2 20 1 4334.97 23061.75 5 4329.30 23091.95 4 50 5 4328 .33 23097.13 4 5 4327.©6 23104.91 0 4322.36 23129.03 15 5 4320.66 23138.22 1 4316.65 23159.62 3 30 1 4316.52 23160.34 1 20 4314.10 23173.31 0 4312.90 23179.76 10 4305.3 23220.7 1 20 4302.6 23235.1 2 6 10 4298.34 23258.27 10 1 4297.17 23264.61 1 6 5 4292.89 23287.80 4 0 4289-68 23305.23 15d 40 4282.91 23342.67 0 4280.96 23352 .70 0 4280.83 23353.41 lOd 80 4277.55 23371.31 4 8 4272.44 23399.26 1 4268.42 23421.30 Od 4267.07 23428.71 30 100 4266.53 23431.68 2 20d 4261.1 23461.8 3 lOd 4258.8 23485.1 20d 5 4254.36 23498.71 0 4254.17, 23499-75 Intensity- L i s t (continued) 16 Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) Class B" P G A0 cm"1 5 4249.6 23525-6 2d 0 4243.5 23558.9 10 5 4239.38 23581.74 2d 1 4239.14 23583.07 1 4238.71 23585.46 10 50 4228.18 23644.20 30 8 4222.45 23676.29 15 4222.24 23677-46 4 5 4222.04 23678.59 1 6 20 4218.31 23699.52 1 6 20 4214.27 23722.25 lOd 10 4210.31 23746.55 2 5 4209.62 23748.45 2 lOd 10 4205.66 23770.81 3 15d 15 4200 ..89 23797.80 2 4195-64 23827.57 3 20d 5 4195.41 23828.88 30d 5 4189.81 23860.72 5 4189.69 23861.41 20 10 4184.41 23891.64 1 10 4183.95 23894.15 2d 20d lOd 4178.36 239 26.12 3d 20d 4171.6 23964.7 30d 4167.6 23987.9 0 4164.73 24004.42 lOd 15 4156.13 24054.09 10 4153.47 24069.48 4 30 15 4148.61 24097-69 2 10 4145.4 24116.6 20 4137-8 24160.64 30 41337-7 24184.6 50 4131.77 24195-91 6 40 40 4119.39 24268.62 3 10 10 4113.13 24305.55 2 20d 10 4103-90 24360.21 2 10 10 4094.64 24415.30 0 5 4082.8 24485.7 6 40 40 4078.14 24514.09 30 4072.34 24549.00 5 50 4071.99 24551.11 II I I II II L i s t (continued) 17 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B P G- A° cm"1 5 10 4066.90 24581.84 0 1 4065.01 24593.26 8 4063.2 24604.0 10 4060.16 24619.9 10 4059.4 24627.2 10 4056.0 24647.7 20 4052.88 24666.87 10 20 4049.94 24685.26 2 100 4043.15 24726.23 20 20 4040 ..46 24742.81 2 20 4039.89 24746.18 10 4039.17 24750.59 10 10 4036.07 24769.60 0 10 4035.64 24772.24 20 2 4019.27 24873.13 10 4017.30 24885.33 500 4013.85 24906.72 2 4011.20 24923.17 1 10 4009.4 24934.4 0 1 4007.25 24948.74 0 20 4005.9 24956.2 0 10 4001.0 249 86.7 0 20 1 3998.03 25005.27 0 1 3995.01 25024.18 4 50 3989.96 25055.84 6 50 100 3988.96 25062.12 10 3974.80 25151.41 1 10 15 3974.51 25153.25 5 50 100 3971.44 25172.69 5 lOd 3968.38 25192.10 0 2 39 63.45 25223.43 n 5 39 62.84 25227.71 5 3960.41 25242.79 5 3958.05 25257 ..84 1 3944.27 25346.08 2 40 30 3943.05 25353.92 0 2 2 3940.44 25370.72 1 10 3939 . 48 25376.90 2 40 30 3938.44 25383.60 3 50 80 3935.01 25405.73 L i s t (continued) 18 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B P G A° cm"' Clas 6 20 3928.64 25446.92 10 5 3924.63 ' 25472.92 20d 3920.1 25502.0 1 20 15 3914.87 25536.43 3 80 100 3912.05 25554.84 2 20 20 3909.09 25574.19 1 10 10 3904..51 25604.18 5 10 3892.01 25686.41 5 3888.7 25708.0 1 20 15 3886..13 25725.-28 1 15 3885.32 25730.64 1 10 15 3882.15 25751-65 2 20 30 3878.75 25774.22 15 3869.74 25834.23 15 3868.-56 25842.11 1 15 30 3865.58 25862.03 3 40 20 3864.97 25866.11 20 3863.40 25876.63 0 3862.29 25884.o6 0 3862.06 25886.41 10 3860.56 25895-66 1 30 20 3859.74 25901.16 1 15 3850.03 25966.49 20 3849.4 25970.7 4 30 30 3842.21 26019-33 8 80 500 3840.29 26032.34 II 10 3837.24 26053-03 • 5 3833-49 26078.52 15 3831.69 26090.77 4 30 200 3830.42 26099.42 2d 3827.04 26122.47 1 3826.83 26123.90 3 50 100 3825.27 26134.56 1 100 3824.44 26140.23 2 20 30 3822.95 26150.42 0 15 3814.60 26207.66 4 50 500 3812.65 26221.06 2 10 30 3810.57 26235.37 5 3809.47 26242.95 20 3809.02 26246.33 19 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B ' P G A" cm"' 0 20 3807.98 26253.22 8 50 200 3806.31 26264.73 30 3804.87 26274.68 50 20 3803.27 26285.73 30 10 3801.79 26295.96 30 100 3801.06 26301.01 10 3795.36 26340.51 0 20 3789.21 26383.26 1 30 20 3785.01 26412.54 1 20 3778.35 26459.09 1 10 30 3776.95 26468.90 0 30 10 3776.56 26471.63 1 30 3775.65 26478.31 3 20 50 3770.81 26512.00 0 20 3766.56 26541.91 20 3765.28 26550.94 2 50 3757.93 26602.86 4 30 1000 3756..65 26611.93 3 500 3755.04 26623.34 4 30 100 3748.63 26668.86 20 20 3745.06 26694.28 30 1©0 3739.91 26731.04 10 3737.90 26745.41 0 10 15 3732.64 26783.10 2 20 50 3730.34 26799.61 50 3729.33 26806.81 10 15 3727.31 26821.40 15 3724.43 26842.14 5 80 1000 3720.34 26871 ..65 1 20 100 3717.52 26892.03 4 40 1000 3713.68 26919 .84 1 20 100 3705.80 26977.08 30 3704.10 26989 - 46 4 80 1000 3703.48 2699 3.98 20 3702.81 26998.86 3 30 200 3695.17 27054.68 5 50 500 3693.38 27067.80 10 3692.07 27077.40 4 30 100 3687.93 27108.79 50 1000 3683.39 27140.47 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) B P Gr A° 1 3682.54 2 30 300 3677.29 9 80 1000 3668.18 2 40 100 3661..70 1 25 80 3657-43 1 10 15 3653-60 4 80 500 3647.65 1 3639 . 84 50 3637.88 3 60 100 3635.53 7 60 1000 3631.96 1 10 100 3629.95 1 3627.04 9 50 1000 3624.18 5 30 500 3620.36 3 40 100 3615.-20 100 3614.31 1 5 3612.91 2 15 80 3612.07 2 5 100 3 6 0 I . . I 8 2 50 500 3598.88 2 10 10 3595.23 2 10 20 3587 ..43 8 100 3588.44 0 10 10 3581.66 6 50 1000 3580.70 100 3576.69 1 15 5 3575.89 8d 20 3572.70 8 3569.5 8 50 500 3562.46 0 10 10 3556.80 5 3556.12 0 8 15 3555-32 3 20 1000 3553.19 6 5 3547.92 0 8 3544.9 4 25 100 3539.09 5 50 200 3536.86 3 50 3531.16 Wav^ e Number (vac.) cm"' Class 27147.47 27186.23 27253.75 27301.97 27333.84 27362.50 27407.13 27465.94 27480.74 27498.50 27525.52 27540.77 27562.86 27584.61 27613.72 27653.13 27659.94 27670.66 27677.09 27760.79 27778.53 27806.73 27851.66 27859.34 27912.08 27919.56 27950.08 27957.12 27982.08 28007.6 28062.50 28107.16 28112.54 28118.86 28135.72 28177.50 28201.2 28247.81 28265.62 28311.24 l i s t (continued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) B P G A0 6 50 1000 3530.80 4 40 3529.39 1 3528.91 4 15d 3525.26 10 3520.01 1 10 20 3519.69 1 8 3519.05 0 5 3515-99 lOd 10 3515.63 30 3514.. 38 30 3514.19 0 20 3512.76 lOd 3511.68 8 100 3511.16 0 2 0 3510.20 0 5 20 3508 ..84 10 8 3507.35 6d 50 3503.61 1 4 30 3499.-23 0 10 15 3498.91 5 3494.86 1 3494.12 15 3493.13 20 3492.97 5 30 500 3492.41 2 50d 3490.74 1 6 20 3484.29 6 40 3480.52 0 30 3478.95 10 3478.49 30 3476.76 20 3476.33 30 3475.18 0 20 3471.03 8 5 3465.90 2 25 30 3462.26 10 3461.42 0 10 3460.17 0 15 3459 .-12 0 2 25 3458.15 Wave Number (vac.) cm"' Class 28314.13 28325.44 28329.29 28358.62 28400.92 28403.50 28408.67 28433.39 28436.30 28446.42 28447.95 28459.53 28468.29 28472.50 28480.29 II 28491.33 II 28503.43 28534.02 28569 . 57 28572.16 28605.29 28611.35 28619.46 28620.77 28625.36 28639.05 28692.07 28723.15 28736.11 28739.91 28754.21 28757.76 28767.28 28801.67 28844.30 28874.63 28881.64 28892.07 28900.84 28908.95 L i s t (continued) 22 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B P G- A" cm"' Cla 20 3456.47 28923.00 20 20 3455*77 28928.85 2 20 3454.35 28940.75 10 3454.12 28942.67 15d 3447.27 29000.18 0 10 3446.54 29 0 0 6.32 © 8 15d. 3446.21 29009.10 15 3445.01 29019.21 6 20 3444.74 29021.58 5 3444.63 29022.41 0 0 3441.72 29046.94 0 8d 5 3439.96 29061.81 3 8d 20 3434.39 29108.94 1 lOd 3433.01 29120.64 0 6 10 3428.81 29156.31 2 12 30 3426.09 29179 . 45 8d 1 3423-42 29 202.21 1 dd 1 3417.69 29251.15 5 3414.0 29282.8 5 10 3410.99 29308.62 0 5 3405.7 29354.2 30 3404.31 29366 .30 20 100 3403.85 29370.10 8 1 3394.42 29451.69 0 3393.00 29464.02 4 20 ' 3389.81 29491.74 2 1 3382.86 29552.33 10 15 3382.09 29559.06 5 3380.56 29572.44 15 10 3374.01 29629.84 1 1 3373.74 29632.21 II 1 1 3363.54 29722.08 1 5 10 3361.36 29741.35 50 3358.54 29766.32 5d 3355.24 29795.59 lOd 3351.14 29732.04 15d 3350.95 29733.74 3 50 3345.94 29778.41 I 6 100 3345.57 29782.07 I 8 500 300 3345.01 29886.71 I LI at. * (continued) 23 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) Br P G A° cm"' Class 5 3344.76 29888.95 5 5 3339.57 29935.39 2 15 3336.83 29959.98 3 30 100 3334.85 29977.76 5 3329.9 30022.2 1 1 3326.50 30053.01 4 1 3320.07 30111.21 2 20d 40 3317.15 30137.72 1 3316.95 30139.54 1 3316..45 30144.08 1 3316.18 30146.53 3 6 3314.25 30164.09 5 1000 3311.25 30191.42 0 3308.63 30215.32 5: 75 1000 3306..04 30288.99 II 0 3304.14 30256.38 5 50 3302.94 30267.37 I, II 5 200 3302.54 30271.04 I 150 500 3301.86 30277.27 3d 3300.11 30293.51 4 50 1000 3299.40 30299.85 II 0 10 3298.05 30312.25 5 0 3294.85 30341.69 5 0 3289.7 30389.2 1 15 10d 3288.60 30399.35 5 3285.6 30427.1 40 3282.33 30457.42 I 4 10 3279.-72 30481.67 3 20 20 3276.57 30510.98 II 4 3274.9 30526.5 4d 1 3273.22 30542.I8 0 3272.89 30545.26 0 Od 3272.54 30548.53 10 5 3269.95 30572.73 3 20 20d 3266.26 30607.26 15d 3265.33 30615.98 1 15 3263.5 30633.2 10 3262.08 30646.48 6 1 3261.19 30654.94 0 5d 3259.23 30673.28 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) B P G A" 8 3259.12 10 10 3258.77 3 30 15 3255.58 1 20d 1 3252.98 6 15 3249.84 0 3249.61 10 3249.45 3 5 30 3247.90 3 30 20 3245.07 10 3243.73 3 15 15 3240.24 10 5 3238.28 0 3237.25 4 20 20 3233.98 1 20 10 3231.61 3 5 3227.-32 2 3 3223.41 2 3222.8 2 3218.4 3 3212.8 1 30d Id 3209.90 0 3209.55 e 30d 3205.7 lOd lOd 3200.79 10 3197.12 7 300 20 3196.32 15d 10 3192.14 15d 1 3188.97 1 30d 10 3185.92 5 3185.76 0 3185 .-51 lOd 3 3182.21 5d 0 3180.62 30 20 3178.59 1 15 5 3177.58 3 50 10 3175.84 8 100 15 3172.23 1 100 15 3171.45 10 3168.7 30 10 3165.50 Wav/e Number (vac. ) cm"1 C l a s s 30674.69 30677.61 30707.67 II 30732.21 30761.90 30764.08 30765.59 30780.28 30807.12 30819.84 30853.04 30871.71 30881.53 30912.76 II 30935.43 30976.55 31ol4.12 31020.0 31662.4 31116.5 31144.65 31148.05 31185.5 31233.29 31269.14 II 31276.97 II 31317.92 31349.06 31379.06 31380.63 31383.10 31415.64 31431.35 31451.42 31461.42 31478.65 31516.46 II 31522.23 II? 31550.0 31581.48 25 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac. ) B P G- A0 cm*' Class 10 3165 .-35 31583.97 30 3158 ..9 31648.5 30d 5 3153.44 31702.25 lOd 5 3149.18 31745.13 5d 3147 ..8 31759.0 lOd 3141.7 31820.6 0 30d 3138.7 31851.1 20d Qd 3134.68 31891.97 20d 3.29.6 31943.2 0 lOd 5 3128.15 31958.54 20d 3125.7 319 83..5 30 10 3121.58 32025.80 lOd 3118.6 32056.4 II 1 20d 3111.3 32131.6 5d 3168.1 32164.7 1 lOd 3105.2 32194.7 II 1 40 2 3097.13 32278.62 20 20 3093.43 32317.22 2 8 3091.7 32335.31 III 30 15 3086.14 32393.56 6d 3079.7 32461.3 15 5 3078.14 32477.75 5 100 50 3075.91 32501.29 5 200 50 3072.7 32541.91 10 3064.74 32619.74 4 0 3063.39 32634.12 2 15d lOd 3060.50 32664.93 III 15 3059.1 32679 .3 20 15 3054.76 32726.31 III? 10 3054.58 32728.24 0 8 ' 3049 ..8 32779.5 4 3048 ..4 32794.6 30 1 3046.5 32819.88 30 1 3043.89 32843.17 10 3042.8 32854.4 4 100 100 3035.73 32931.45 I 8d 3031.8 32974.1 8d 15 3028.89 33005.81 6d 3027.0 33026.4 1 50 70 3025.31 33044.87 III L i s t (conitinued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) B P G- A" 2 15 3024.45 1 40 3023-96 10 15 3023.53 4 60 50 3018.34 lOd 3009.7 30 50 3002.64 2 lOOd 2997.8 0 50 5 2992.16 15 5 2990.68 8d 20 2988.80 20 5 2987.64 20 2986.4 30 1 2983.78 lOd 2979.1 5 2977.2 0 lOd 2964.3 20d 2962.8 2 lOd 15 2960.25 3 40 10 2956.69 5 295 6.54 10 15 , 2953.87 15 1 2953.18 0 20 10 2952.79 0 20 5 2750.43 5 2945.6 5 2944.8 10 10 2942.92 3 30 20 2942.26 5 2939.8 3 40 30 2935.34 6 2934.2 4 5 2932.87 30 5 2930.15 15d 2d 2926.01 40 10 2916.55 2 40 10 2916.11 30 Od 2912.95 4 100 15 2902.30 30 2899 .4 lOd 15 2892.81 Wave Number (vac.) cm"1 Class 33054.27 III 33059.59 33064.33 33121.17 I 33215.9 33294.35 33348.1 33410.96 33427.49 33448.51 33461.50 33475 .4 33504.79 33557.4 33578.8 33725.0 337 42.0 33771.09 33811.74 33813-47 33844.03 33851-94 33856.41 33883.49 II 339 38.5 33948.3 33969.95 33977.57 III 34006.0 34057.67 34070.3 34086.35 34116.82 34166.26 34177.07 34282.25 III 34319-43 34345.36 34379.8 34458.24 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wav/elength ( a i r ) B P G A0 10 2892.02 lOd 2891.6 50d 10 2887.67 10 5 2885.49 40 15 2884.50 10 2884.23 5 2883.92 3 50 10 2882.16 20 I 9d 2881.19 3 30 15 2879.83 lOd 2879.31 10 2878.7 10 1 2877.25 10 2876.10 4 100 15 2875.68 15 2875.53 1 25 5 2872.18 5 2871.87 10 2871.2 20 2868.6 10 2867.2 0 30d 10 2866.16 10 2865.67 1 20 5 2864.35 0 10 2862.6 10 2861.8 0 10 2860.1 25 1 2859.60 50d 10 2857.59 15 10 2855.32 20 15 2853.84 40 15 2853.04 20 5 2852.09 4 100 30 2849.22 20 2848.96 25 Id 2845.08 Id 2844.86 8 2842.9 0 lOd 5 2841.57 3 50 15 2838.66 Wave Number- (vac.) cm"1 Claiss 34467.80 34473 .4 34619.87 34646.02 34657.91 34551 .16 34664.88 34686.05 34697.73 34714.11 34720.38 34727 .7 34745.24 34759.13 34764. 21 34766 .02 34806.57 34810.32 34818.4 34850.0 34867 .0 34879.67 34885.64 34901.71 34923.7 349 3 2 . 2 3495 3 .0 III 34959 .68 34984.27 35012.08 35030 .33 35040.06 35051 .73 35087.04 35090.24 35138.09 35140.80 35164.4 35181.49 35217.56 L i s t (continued) 28 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B P G- A* cm"1 Cla 4 20 lOOd 2837-61 35230.59 III 4 20 500d 2836.70 35241.89 2 30 lOd 2832.50 35294.14 8 2829.7 35328.4 III 10 5 2826.57 35368.18 4 2 2824..63 35392.47 0 20 15 2821 ..09 35435-63 10 15d 2816.,07 35500.05 15 1 2815.35 35509.13 30 lOd 2809 ..44 35583-82 20 2 2804.72 35643.70 II 4 200 50 2861.94 35679.07 I 15 2801.05 35690.40 II 6 200 50 2800.86 • 35692.82 II 20 2800.74 35694.35 I 10 2798,6 35721.6 10 5 2796.66 35746.42 0 lOd 2793.3 35789.4 10 10 2788.82 35846.91 5 2788..67 35848.84 1 20 10 2786.14 35881.38 III 5 1 2784.41 35903.68 10 2783.53 35915.03 2 30 30 2782.81 35924.32 II 4 10 2782.16 35932.72 1 2781.69 35938.79 5 2781.55 35940.60 30 2781.26 35944.34 I 2 15 2779.0 35973.3 5 5 2775.24 36022.30 20 2770.98 36077-88 I 3 100 30 2770.86 36079.25 I 1 lOd 2768.49 36110.13 II 15d 15 2767-66 36120.96 1 5 . 15 2766.72 36133.23 II 0 30 10 2763-96 38169 . 31 15 1 2762.18 36192.62 1 10 15 2761.29 36204.28 0 20 10 2758.85 36236.30 II 2 1 2757-60 36252.72 L i s t (continued) 29 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wav?e Number (vac.) cm"' Class 36267.72 I 36284.96 363ol . 0 3 36328.87 36335.60 1 36392.6 36399.2 36400.6 36416.5 36473.06 36506.09 36507.96 36315.16 36520.2 36534.9 36544.3 36565.78 36580.4 36592.4 36621.9 36651.97 36657.88 36690.8 36722.8 36736.68 36743.57 III 36757.9 36772.22 36782.9 36795.8 36805.3 36814.74 36850.97 36855.72 I 36867.00 36895.03 III 36906.43 36909 . 06 36031.42 369 34.15 B P G A' 2 40 50 2756.46 1 40 20 2755.15 30 30 2753.93 6 1 2751 .-82 0 10 10 2751.31 10 2747.0 1 10 2746.5 5 2746.4 4d 2745.2 1 lOd 10 2740.94 5 2738.46 30 10 2738.32 2d 1 2737 .78 5 2737 .4 1 2736.3 10 2735.6 2 30d lOd 2733.99 5 2732.9 1 2732 .0 10 2729 .8 15 10 2727.56 3 15 20 2727 .12 10 2724.6 10 2 7 2 2 . 3 20 2721.27 5 50 50 2720.76 0 10 2719 .7 10 15 2718.64 2 2717.9 5 2716.9 2 2716 .2 0 5d 0 2715.50 100 20 2712 .83 0 15 2712.48 5 10 2711.65 3 30 15 2709.59 40 5 2708 .76 3 10 2708..64 20 10 2706.92 1 10 2706 .72 L i s t (continued) 30 Class Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number B P G- A" cm"1 10 2705.68 36948 .35 2 20 20 2705 .52 35950 .53 15 15 2704.42 36965 .56 2d 2703 .5 36978.1 10 2702.6 36990.5 5 2701.6 37004.1 2 20 10 2701.16 37010.17 10 0 2700.19 37023.46 4 50 10 2699-42 37034.02 5 5 2698.70 37043.90 5 2697-4 370 61.8 10 2696.08 37079.90 3 50 20 2695-96 37081.68 20 20 2694 .53 37I01.23 4 30 50d 2693-89 37110.04 10 2692.75 37125.75 3 40 20 2692.59 37127.36 5 2692.1. 37134.7 2 2691.2 37147.1 2 2690.6 37155-4 0 10 0 2689-83 37166.05 0 15 10 2688.31 37187-06 1 10 2687-8 37194.1 5 2686.0 37219-0 2 2685-5 37226 .7 e 10 lOd 2684.95 37233.60 5 2684.18 37244.28 50 30 2683.99 37246.92 20 50 2683.33 37256.08 20 50 2682.81 37263.30 15 2681.2 37285.7 2 20 10 2680.59 37294 .16 1 15 2679 ..4 37310.7 1 15 Id 2678.46 37323-81 15 2675.9 37359 .5 1 15 20 2675-30 37367 .90 10 2674.72 37376.00 2 20 2674.19 37383.40 5 2673-9 37387-5 3 20 15 2673.12 37398.37 III III III Intensity p a 5 5 10 50 30 10 50 200 10 10 40 20 15 5 30 20 30 10 15 5d 15 5 10 20 10 15 40 100 15 50 10 15 30 30 1 5d 1 1 10 0 30 20 10 10 15 lOd 35 10 1 5 10 50 30 100 15 20 50 50 30 5 8 10 15 10 L i s t (c ont inued) Wa velength (ai r) A° 2672 .45 2671.7 2670 .56 2 6 6 9 . 4 2668.25 2667.89 2666 .67 2666 .22 2665 .75 2664.91 2663 .54 2662 .78 2661 .85 2661 .66 2661.49 2660 .68 2659 .68 2658 .65 2658.46 2 65 8 .£8 2658.15 2657.65 2657.40 2657 .26 2657.08 2655 .16 2655 .10 2654.41 2653 .16 2652 .94 2652.25 2651.-54 2651.08 2650.60 2650.45 2650 .05 2649.83 2649.49 2647.79 2647 .44 Wave Number (vac.) cm"' Class 37407.74 37418.2 37434.22 I 37450.5 37465.62 37471.68 37488.82 37494.30 37501.72 37513.58 37532.69 37543.58 37556.70 37559.38 37561.78 37573.21 37587.34 III 37601.90 37604.59 37607.13 37608.97 II 37616.04 37619.59 37621.57 37624.12 37651.32 37652.17 37 661.96 37679.70 37 682.83 37692.63 37702.72 37709.26 3771 6.09 37718.23 37723.92 37727.05 37731.89 37756.12 L i s t (continued) 32 Intensity wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number BP P G- A° cm"' 0 10 1 2646.68 37771.95 0 15 40 2645.59 37787.51 1 15 50 2644.58 37801.94 1 Id 2643.34 37819.68 2 10 5 2641.91 37840.14 30 2641.70 37843.15 15 5 2641.42 37847.16 3 50 500 2640.34 37862.64 2 10 2638.48 37889.33 1 5 20 2637.92 37897.37 10 30 2637.39 37904.99 .5 2636.93 37911.60 lOd 2636.34 37920.08 1 30 50 2636.22 37921.81 0 2 2633.5 37961.0 0 5 20 2632.93 37969.20 10 50 2632.36 37977.41 0 1 2630.88 37998.78 lOd 15 2630.73 38000.96 0 15 20 2630.05 38010.77 15d 2629.66 38016.40 20 2629.38 38020.45 20 40 2629.09 38024.66 0 10 15d 2628.36 38035.21 20 2627.40 38049.10 2 30 20 2627.19 38052.14 lOd 15 2626.29 38065.18 10 2625.94 38070.26 5 2625.82 38072.00 15 2624.7 38088.2 Id 1 2623.04 38112.35 5 2622.80 38115.83 15 30 2622.17 38124.99 15 15 2621.97 38127.86 3d 10 2621.82 38130.08 15 40 2621.65 38132.55 10 lOd 2621.20 38139.10 15 2619.6 38162.4 15 20 2619.10 38169 . 67 20 2618.96 38171.62 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wavel ength ( a i r ) Wave Number ( B P G- A° cm"' 5d 15 50 2618.66 38176.08 10 2617.9 38187.2 15 10 2617.40 38194.46 3 v 30 30 2615.84 38217.25 15 2615.72 38219.00 15 20 2614.47 38237.27 10 20 2613.41 38252.77 20 2613.22 38255.56 2d 10 2612 .93 38259.80 20 30 2612.80 38261.70 5 15 2612.21 38270.34 15 15 2611.68 38278.01 1 2611 .33 38283.24 2 30 50 2610.62 38293.65 10 2608.64 38322.71 Id 300 20 2608.54 38324.18 1 20 10 2607.10 38345.35 15 5 2606.21 38358.44 0 15d 30 2605.67 38366.39 10 2605.37 38370.81 1 5 2604.15 38388.78 30 20 2603.99 38391.14 20 2603.79 38394.09 10 5 2603.19 38402.94 5 2602.28 38416.37 3 50 100 2600.94 38436.16 20 2600.66 38439.11 10 10 2600.47 38443.11 10 10 2599.88 38451.83 10 5 2599.22 38461.59 50 30 2597.-06 38493.58 0 10 10 2595.91 38510 .63 1 lOd 15 2593.91 38540.32 5 50 500 ' 2592.93 38554.89 lOd 10 2592.25 38565.00 20 50 2591.16 38581.23 1 30 80 2590.39 38592.69 2 20 80 2589.91 38599.84 1 15 15 2588.40 38622.36 10 lOd 2587.78 38631.61 34 L i s t (continued) Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac. B P- G A° cm*"' Claa 1 10 30 2586.84 38646.65 . 50 80 2586.08 38657.01 10 2585.57 38664.63 0 lOd 20 2585.22 38669.86 3 15 2582.49 38710.74 I 0 300 30 2582.43 38711.64 30 2582.14 38715.99 10 10 2580.43 38714.64 10 5 2579.87 38750.05 20 lOd 2578.-78 38766.43 10 5d 2577.61 38784.02 5 10 2577.20 38790.19 7 500 500 2575.79 38811.43 200 2575.36 38817.91 1 2572.0 38867.9 30 20 2571.28 38879.49 1 30 30 2570.66 38888.87 II 2 50 20 2569 .-87 38900.83 I 50 30 2567 ..98 38929.45 2 50 10 2567.79 38932.33 II 20 2566.70 38948.87 30 30 2564.46 38982.89 II 10 2562.61 39011.20 I 20 2558.46 3907 4 .30 6 1000 1000 2557.94 39082.24 II 30 2556.23 39108.34 5 2554.96 39127.82 2 50 20 2554.28 39138.24 10 2553.4 39151.7 3 50 20 2552.54 391 64.92 lOd 30 2551.39 39182.57 1 1 2549.SI 39205 . 31 1 50 10 2547.47 39242.86 1 lOd 2546.09 39 2 64.13 1 20 20 2545.52 39272.92 5 '2545.0 39 280.9 10 5 2544.21 39293.14 2 50 10 2542.39 39321.27 I 5 2542.26 39323.28 50 30d 2541.68 39332.25 L i s t (count inued) Intensity Wavelength ( P G A° 10 20 2540.40 50 50 2539-25 10 10 2537 .93 3 2536.01 100 100 2535.73 1 100 40 2534.58 10 20d 2533.77 3d 100 50 2533.16 2 100 50 2531.96 15 20d 2530.18 10 2529.82 20 20 2528.49 50 15 2527.83 5 2527.57 5 100 40 2526.85 20 10 2526.25 10 2526.02 10 2525.4 2 2525.0 5 lOOd 100 2522.06 25 2521.99 30 15 2520.57 2 10 2520.41 lOd 10 2519.14 5d 2518.2 40 2515 .93 4 100 2515.77 2 100 50 2515 .03 8 2514.70 10 lOd 2513.28 30 lOOd 2512.06 40 2509.78 7 1000 80 2509 .03 1 15 2508.19 50 50 2508.09 10 5 2506.69 1 2506.1 15 1 2504.93 5 2504.5 20 2504.22 Wave Number (vac.) cm"1 Class 39352.07 39 369 . 89 39390.36 39420.18 39424.54 39442.42 39455.05 39464.53 39483.23 39511.00 I? 39516.63 395 37 . 41- 39547.74 39551.80 39563.07 39572.46 39576.07 39585.8 39592,1 39638.20 39 639 13 39661.63 39664.15 39684.15 39699 .0 39734.77 39737.30 I 39748.99 39754.21 3977 6.67 39795.99 39832.13 39844.08 39857.38 39858.97 39881.23 39890.6 39909.25 39916.1 39920.57 L i s t (continued) 36 Intensity Wavelength ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B P G A* „ -1 cm 15 30 2504.11 39922.32 20 50 2503.28 39935.55 6 1000 1000 2501.98 39956.30 15 2501.66 39961.41 10 2501.54 39963.33 10 10 2498.33 40014.68 1 50 50 2497.82 40022.85 0 50 50 2497.13 40035.51 2 50 100 2496.18 40049 .14 15 20 2495.39 40061.82 1 2494.2 40080.9 20 1 2493.46 40092.82 3 500 2492.05 40115.51 20dd 2491.57 40122.91 4 1000 1000 2491.20 40129.19 5 2489.8 40151.8 5 3 2488.88 40166.60 5 0 2488.05 40167.08 10 2487.3 40192.1 5 1Q0 200 2486.87 40199.05 3 100 100 2486.16 40210.53 5 5 2485.03 40228.82 4 100 100 2484.53 40236.91 30 2484.36 40239.67 15 15 2484.06 40244.53 Id 2483.2 40258.5 15 10 2480.72 40298.71 5 1000 100 2479.80 40313.66 25 10 2478.70 40331.55 10 2478.55 40333.98 Id 2477.3 40354.3 5 2476.5 40367.4 10 5 2476.08 40374.22 20 . 50 2473.82 40411.10 2 50 100 2473.28 40419.93 2 50 100 2472.63 40430.55 1? 15 15 2472.46 40433.33 10 5 2470.25 40469.50 3 2469.98 40473.92 20 5 2469.50 L i s t (conitimued) Intensity Wavelength P G A* 50 500 2468.87 5 2467.70 5 . 2467.5 100 1000 2467.05 2 Od 2465.04 80 2463.65 lOd 2463.52 1000 100 2463.30 30 40 2462.56 50 50 2462.01 10 2460.92 50 50 2460.42 15 10 2458.00 50 20 2456.01 2 1 2455.51 5 Id 2454.92 2 2454.4 5 0 2454.03 8 5 2454.39 10 5 2452.97 10 5 2452.02 2 2451.90 50 10 2451.22 500 500 2450.27 15 20d 2449.72 15 2449.44 40 30 2448.17 10 2447.76 10 20 2447.53 5 5d 2447*04 1 5 ;..2446.16 10 2445.5 50 100 2444.93 1 Od 2443.52 10 5 2442.64 5 2442.54 100 100 2441.96 50 lOd 2440.19 15 2439.5 15 20 2438.72 Wave Wumiber (vac.) ca"' Class 40492.12 40511.31 40514.6 40521.99 40555.02 40577 .90 40580 .05 I 40583.67 40595.86 40604.93 40632.95 40631.17 40671.17 40704.12 40712.41 40722.19 40730.8 40736.96 40747.59 40754*56 40770.35 40772.35 40783.66 40800.47 40808.63 I 40813.29 40834.47 40841.30 40845.14 40853.32 40868.04 40879.0 40888.57 40910.49 40926.90 40928.48 40938.30 40967.99 40979.6 40992.68 L i s t (continued) 38 Intensity Wavelength- ( a i r ) Wave Number (vac.) B P G Av cm 5 50 50 2438.17 41001.93 4 50 80 2437.48 41013.54 10 20 2436.92 41022.96 2 15 10 2435.80 41041.82 2 10 40 2435.45 41047.72 20 2434.51 41063.56 4 100 100 2434.27 41067.61 5 1 2433.20 41085.67 0 10 5 2432.74 41093.44 0 30 lOd 2431.09 41121.33 5 lOdd 2429.46 41148.91 20 20 2429.07 41155.52 0 2428.90 41158.40 10 2427.50 41182.14 10 2427.13 41188.41 10 500 500 2426.94 41191.64 10 2426.79 41194.18 15d lOd 2426.31 41202.33 10 1 2425.47 41216.60 10 8 2422.79 41228.16 10 2424.3 41236.5 20 100 2423.97 41242.11 10 10 2423.54 41249.42 6 50 500 2423.33 41253.00 20 6 2422.92 41259.98 3 2422.74 41263.04 15 5 2421.94 41276.67 1 50 100 2420.73 41297.30 10 2419.9 41411.5 1° 300 1000 2418.73 41331.54 2 2417.7 41349.0 2 2416.9 41362.7 2 3 2416.30 41373.61 1 2416.00 41378.14 6 2415.87 41380.37 100 10 2415.66 41383.87 2 2415.49 41386.88 2 5 2415.07 41394.08 15 10 2413.22 41425.81 5 5 2411.79 41450.37 Intensity p G 4 20 15 10 15 5 100 100 5 1 50 15 10 30 20 0 2 1 5 2 Id 10 20 50 50 2dd? 15 10 50 50 1 8 15d 50 25 15 3 2 lOd 50 80 20 30 20 30 20 30 10 10 5 10 2 30 2 2 2 L i s t (continued) Wavelength ( a i r ) A° 2411.09 2411.01 2410.86 2409.10 2408.45 2408.11 2405.21 2405.01 2404.61 2403.86 2403.40 2402.87 2402.45 2401.49 2400.3 2399 . 22 2398.82 2398.35 2397.1 2396.55 2395 . 67 2395.5 2393.8 2393.03 2391.59 2390.04 2390.87 2387.22 2387.0 2386.7 2386.1 2383.6 2383.27 2382.7 Wave Number (vac.) cm"' Class 41462.40 41463.78 41466.36 41496.65 I 41507.85 41513.71 I 41563.75 41567.21 41574.12 41587.09 41595.05 41604.23 I? 41611.50 41628.14 41648.8 41669.25 I 41674.46 41683.62 41704.4 I 41713.93 41729.26 41732.2 41761.8 41775.29 41800.44 41827.54 41813.02 41876.95 41880.8 41886.1 41896.6 41940.5 41945.35 41956.4 40 BIBLIOGRAPHY' 1. H.Beutler,, K.Gugenheimer, Z e i t . f. Phys., 87, 176, 1933 2. L. HLoch, E. Bloch,, J . Phys. e t Radium,, (7) 5_, 289, 1934 3. W. G r o t r i a n , , O.Laporte* E.A.. M i l n e * K.Wurm,, "Grundlagen der A s t r o p h y s i k " , J . S p r i n g e r , B e r l i n , 1930 4. G.R.. Har r i s o n , , "M.I.T. Wavelength T a b l e s " , John W i l e y and Sons, Mew York,, 1939 5. G. H e r z b e r g , "Atomic S p e c t r a and Atomic S t r u c t u r e " , Dover P u b l i c a t i o n s , Mew York* 1944 6. C.W. H e t z l e r , R.W. Foreman, K.Burns, Phys. Rev.4j|, 656„ 1935 7. P.M. K a l i a, I nd. J . Phys.,, 10„ 463,, 1936 8. H: Ka y s e r , " T a b e l l e d e r H a u p t l i n i e n d e r L i n i e n s p e k t r e n a l l e r Elemente", J . S p r i n g e r , B e r l i n , 1939 9. 0., L a p o r t e , R.J. Lang„ Phys. Rev. 3.0, 378, 1927 10. K.C. Mazumder,, I n d . J . Phys.. 10, 171. 1936 11. W.F. Meggers, J . Opt. S o c Am. 36, 1946 12. C.E. Moore,, "Atomic Energy L e v e l s " , V.1, (1949) and V.2, (1952), N a t i o n a l Bureau o f S t a n d a r d s . 13. C.R. Misenwanger,, J.R. Holmes,. G.L. W e i s s l e r , J . Opt. Soc. Am.. 3_6„ 5 8 l f 1946 14. F. Paschem,, R. R i t s c h l , , Ann. d e r Phys. (5), 18, 890, 1933 15. G.V. S a i l s , Ann., der Phys. (4), 16, 145, 1925 16. R.A. Sawyer, " E x p e r i m e n t a l S p e c t r o s c o p y " , P r e n t i c e - H a l l , New York„ 1946 17. (a) H . S c h u l e r , Z e i t . f - Phys. 35_, 323, 1926 (b) H..Schuler„ Z e i t . f . Phys. 59, 149, 1929 18. H. S c h u l e r , H. Gollnow,, Z e i t . f . Phys. (5) 93, 621, 1935 19. Y. Takahashi,, Ann. der Phys. (5) 3, 27, 1929 20.. H.E. w h i t e , " I n t r o d u c t i o n t o Atomic S p e c t r a " , M c G r a w - H i l l , Mew York,, 1934 

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