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Postmodern refections[sic] for marine safety education on "tin boating" in the Canadian wilderness Rosenthal, Alex 1996

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POSTMODERN REFECTIONS FOR MARINE SAFETY EDUCATION ON "TIN BOATING" IN THE CANADIAN WILDERNESS By ALEX ROSENTHAL A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULLFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS i n THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES Department of Educational Studies We accepUh^s thesis as conforming le required standard The University of British Columbia July, 1996 ©Alex Rosenthal, 1996 In presenting this thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an advanced degree at the University of British Columbia, I agree that the Library shall make it freely available for reference and study. I further agree that permission for extensive copying of this thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the head of my department or by his or her representatives. It is understood that copying or publication of this thesis for financial gain shall not be allowed without my written permission. Department of f U Car fO*J*r*- ^Tc<^^^S The University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada Date /9 /Ut>'£-~l4**e \ l9^£> DE-6 (2/88) ABSTRACT Marine safety education initiatives are most often constructed along rational functionalist lines that tend to assume that accidents and deaths that accompany them are caused by lack of appropriate technical knowledge, equipment failure or the irrational behaviour of participants. One sector identified by this research, which seems to have a disproportionally high rate of involvement in these incidents, is that of small open skiffs < 5.5m - usually made from aluminum. Most of these incidents take place on the inland waterways of the Canadian Shield. I look at the activity from the perspective of two separate but parallel discourses on the topic: the official discourse as portrayed by the Canadian Coast Guard, Search and Rescue, the Power and Sail Squadrons, the Canadian Red Cross and various police forces and the popular discourse as seen in lifestyle commercials, advertising catalogues, outdoors sporting goods shows and sports television. I suggest throughout that gender, race and economic marginality are powerful influences that must be factored into our educative efforts if we, the Canadian boating public, are to reduce the number of fatalities. The construction of the subjectivites of the participants will be considered in the context of several competing conceptions concerning the nature of Nature in the postmodern era. A form of narrative analysis known as deconstruction is used to interrogate the theoretical foundations of the textual artefacts. I use postcolonial theory to develop a distinctively Canadian narrative concerning the underpinnings of a reconceptualized marine safety education. In the final section, some considerations for extending this work into other areas of wilderness recreation were explored. ii T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S Abstract . . . . . . . . . ii Table of Contents . . . . . . . . iii List of Tables . . . . . . . . vii List of Figures . . . . . . . . viii Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . ix Chapter One: S O M E BACK(GROUND) T O A S T O R Y A B O U T SAFE 'TIN-B O A T I N G ' Jack and Tom's Stories . . . . . . 6 Purpose . . . . . . . . 14 Organizational Structure . . . . . . 16 Chapter Two: L O C A T I N G TIN B O A T I N G Preliminary Thoughts on Landscape . . . . . 18 Postmodernly Fishing For a Living . . . . . 21 Reflections on the Canadian Wilderness . . . . 24 Challenging Conventional Constructions o f Safe-Boating' . . 25 The Challenge of Postmodernity . . . . . 29 Interrogating the Theory Beneath Marine Safety Education . . 33 iii The Political Economy of the Consumption of Recreational Services Locating Tin Boating Education in a Postmodern Context . 35 37 Chapter Three: M E T H O D O L O G Y Considerations on Conventional Methodologies . . . 40 Postmodern Challenges to Conventional Research Methodologies . 42 The Purpose of a Postmodern Critique of the Story of Safe Boating. 44 Data Sources . . . . . . . . 46 Conceptual Framework . . . . . . 49 Deconstructionism . . . . . . . 49 -The Text as Constitutive of Author and Subject . . 50 Power/Knowledge . . . . . . . 53 Scientific Truth and Linguistic Foundations . . . . 57 -Freudian Discourse . . . . . . 58 - Lacanian Discourse . . . . . . 59 - Lacanian "Other" and the Teaching of Safe Boating Practice 60 Narratives and Sub-narratives . . . . . 61 -A Canadian Sub-narrative on'Safe Boating' . . 63 -Other Players in the Canadian 'Safe Boating ' Narrative . 64 iv Chapter 4: THE OFFICIAL DISCOURSE Deconstructing the Safe Boating Guide . . . 66 -Of Strands and Resonances . . . . . 73 Power/Knowledge Relationships . . . . 75 -On Docile Subjects . . . . . . 77 -Limit Experiences . . . . . . 82 -The Safe Boating Narrative on Beaver Dam Jumping . 84 -Being Marginal to a Narrative . . . . 86 Chapter 5: THE POPULAR DISCOURSE The Popular Curriculum According to Lund ™ and Others . . 88 Elements of the Discourse . . . . . . 92 Elements of the American Colonizing Discourse . . . 96 Some Ideas on Those'Written Out'by the Colonizing Discourse . 100 Who's Missing? . 102 Sales Brochures and Consumer Education . . . . 105 Chapter 6: ESCAPING THE FIXITY OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROJECT Other Ways of Knowing - Questioning Experience? . . . 110 Future Research . . . . . . . 117 v References 121 Appendices 133 vi L I S T O F T A B L E S 1). Sources of Data for a Study of Tin Boating in Canada vii LIST O F FIGURES 1) . Dichotomies in Perceptions of the Wilderness 2) . Perspectives for Understanding Consumption 3) . Cover of TJae^afe_E^ating_Guide viii A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S I wish to acknowledge Roger Boshier for allowing me the space and time to pursue a postmodern analysis in a field where traditions and entrenched bureaucracy make such work unlikely. Jean Barman's reading and timely commentary were much appreciated. I would also like to thank two lifelong friends Clifford Falk and Gordon Trick for their unwavering support and constructive criticism. Finally, I would like to thank my wife Cathy for her keen historical insights and support and my children for their patience. ix 1 C H A P T E R O N E S O M E B A C K G R O U N D T O A S T O R Y A B O U T S A F E "TIN-BOATING" Annually, since 1985, approximately 600 Canadians drown while engaging in a variety of waterborne work and recreational activities. Of these, 43% occur in conjunction with boating related activities. Of these boating related mishaps, 40% are associated with arguably the most popular water craft of this era - tin boats. 'Tin-boats' is a pejorative term coined by Bill Robinson, to describe open aluminum skiffs that form the vast majority of the NittiQnaLTJtowimigJ^ class (powerboats < 5.5m). Using the above figures, it is possible to extrapolate an approximate national total of 73 drownings per year related to one specific type of boat. Most of these drownings take place on inland lakes and rivers where the most significant marine related information could best be described as being based on "local knowledge." While obvious inferences as to the safety of this type of craft are overdue, this paper will address some cultural issues that underpin the popularity of this group of power boaters within the overall community of boaters. I will consider economic, mythological, gender and social implications for the design and delivery of public education initiatives targeted at tin boaters. Because drowning is considered the most significant outcome of these mishaps 2 (and to a lesser extent the fact that drowning data is what is collected) the primary focus of this thesis will be on the type of teaching/learning/learning materials/learning medium that might be most appropriate and effective in drowning prevention. In the analysis, I will explore other impacts that affect survivors, families and the communities in which these people lived. Most mishaps are related to the recreational use of these boats - a quintessential^ "modern" activity. While initially troubled by the trendiness of a postmodern analysis of what is typically described as a singular activity, "boating," I quickly came to the conclusion that the very diversity of the boating community was at the root of the inability of conventional efforts to design effective educational opportunities. In modern late capitalist cultures, "consuming' a recreational commodity can be seen to include the consumption of the educational opportunities that are seen to accompany it. Notwithstanding the fact that the popularization of recreational boating is largely a post-war phenomenon, I believe that the impetus to experience the wilderness first hand lies deeply rooted in the Canadian psyche. Hence, I investigate ways in which tin boaters construct meaning within this activity and to a lesser extent envision themselves. I believe that a discontinuous lineage links the exploration efforts of the Northwest Trading Company metis voyageurs, to prowess at aluminum fabrication skills gleaned from World War II aircraft construction, coalescing in an assumption that the Canadian wilderness is a legacy readily accessible to a public anxious to "escape the gaze" of modernity. In my preliminary investigations, I have found that almost everyone with whom I spoke had some experience with these craft. My concern about safety and 3 education for safety arises not only from the statistical evidence, but also from the number of people who had a personal story about an incident, which was or could have been serious. Because of these conversations, I began to think that something at the very core of our understanding of the nature of tin boating was amiss. Most of the literature on marine safety and educational material from organizations such as the Coast Guard, the Canadian Power and Sail Squadron and the Canadian Red Cross is constructed along functionalist lines. Each of these organizations has its genesis in quasi-naval or merchant marine environments noted for their highly rational organization and thinking. I posit that boating is not a completely rational activity at all - particularly in the moments or hours leading up to the mishaps described herein. As an activity rife with irrational impulses and predicated on varying degrees of experiential knowledge, these user groups, often unwittingly, place themselves at the mercy of an unforgiving wilderness. The wilderness that forms the backdrop for much of the activity is in a profound sense beyond the reach of these organizations - both geographically and conceptually. The aesthetic experience involved ranges from a search for a solitary peace to the raucous camaraderie of a hunting camp. In my view, our emotional responses to various aspects of tin boating trigger many of the situations which end so tragically. What if another sport, such as climbing or skiing in the Canadian Rockies, claimed over 70 lives annually? Surely, the combined forces of the businesses, consumer groups, legal and educative bureaucracies would snap to attention and solve the "problem." Why the ominous silence on matters related to boating? In whose interest 4 could it possibly be to allow the carnage to continue? A typical structuralist analysis would point to the profitability potential for boat manufacturers, the tourism industries and governments anxious to foster job opportunities within these sectors. The inadequacy of such an analysis is immediately obvious when juxtaposed against the finality and horror of deaths on the water. Nobody, it seems, intends that people die. In a fatalistic sense, it's just an unintended outcome - an accident or series of accidents - 73 annually to be more precise. However, I would like to emphasize that this study was not a witchhunt. Unfortunately as we saw in the 1994-95 Krever Inquiry (into the contamination of the Canadian blood supply), attaching blame may be one of the only effective methods of encouraging change in an institutionally entrenched bureaucracy. Change in the way we conduct this business - business, in the sense that it describes the consumption of recreational opportunities/services. We, Canadian tin boaters, must attempt to reshape and rebuild our conceptual practises reflecting the fact many victims of these isolated tragedies did not construct their understanding on the time-honoured principles of good seamanship or the spiritual cohesiveness of aboriginal canoeing practice. If, as the coroners' reports suggest, they simply did not know, we beg the question - Why? The material seems to be available. Are they not using it? Is it useable? Are they intentionally not following safe practice? Suicidal? Apparently not, none of the 15% of drownings deemed to be suicide involved tin boats. This is not the vehicle of choice for those about to give up their life by drowning. It has, however, captured a special place in the popular imagination as demonstrated by its proliferation. In the same sense that Volkswagens in Hitler's prewar Germany or the Model A in Henry Ford's Americas were Everyman's car, this is "Everyman's" boat. Cheap, fast, requiring little, or more likely no maintenance (ultimately disposable), they have come to represent freedom, carefreeness and unfettered masculinity unbecoming of many situations in which their owners place them. Reviewing the gender of the victims, I conclude that this cultural phenomenon is predominately a male related activity (Tessler, 1992). By this I do not mean to underestimate the tragic impact for the surviving family members or to trivialize the deaths of those victims who were travelling with these men. Before continuing with any further analysis, I would like todraw the attention of the reader to those boats which I intend to include in my inquiry. Fortunately, most of the manufacturers of these craft have chosen to reserve a page or two near the end of their respective brochures to display the "low-end" models. In this regard, I draw your attention to Appendix B, 19J^6JjmdLAJIraditi^^^ p. 42, Appendix C, !9_5^ S_ea N_yjnpJiJvlQSlJEo4)AilarJ^^ p.12-13, Appendix F, Sea Nymph '96: When Fishing Comes First, p. 14-15 and Appendix J, Princecraft: The Perfect Escape, p. 26-28. Named as cartoppers, compacts, utility V's or generically as aluminium skiffs or boats, the group of boats I will consider are easily the most ubiquitous craft of our time. I am an interested party to this narrative. As a father to three children and a "boater" for 35 years, I too have constructed my understanding of the activity from a combination of technical reading, familial transmission of good practice and personally experiencing many waterborne activities. I would like to learn to reconstruct my own understanding of boating safety and play a part in that of my children and loved ones. 6 Like many of my co-participants, my faith in positivism has been eroded in the face of simplistic remedies for an enduring problem. Furthermore, I am beginning to understand that the "product" of scientific inquiry is in some senses antithetical to what I hope to accomplish through narrative analysis. I too am snared in the web of consumer images, that are so easy to mistake for useful knowledge. Decoding this web will make that same work easier in other realms. Jack's and Tom's Stories I will begin the narrative with two stories, first an obituary from The Sioux Lookout Herald of August 20, 1925, followed by a personal experience from the same geographic region. Rosenthal, Jack, drowned on the waters of Woman Lake when his canoe carrying steel rails was swamped during a sudden squall. Jack is survived by his wife Marie Louise (nee Fortney), two young sons, Alexander and John, daughter Suzanne and recently adopted daughter Bernice. He immigrated to Canada in 1915 from Latvia and was in the employ of the Wrigley Gum Co. as a prospector at the time of his death. The body has not been found. I never met Jack Rosenthal, as my father was a boy of eight years when he lost his father. In the intervening years, Marie Louise, his young widow, took in laundry to 7 feed her family and the children would forego high-school completion in favour of immediate job prospects with Ontario Hydro. As a child, we never talked much about our missing grandfather, although I remember many instances when I would dream about what the man might have been like. There remains an old family photograph of a handsome man in suspenders and work clothes, carrying two railway ties in huge hands, which hung down past his knees. When I look at the clipping now, I am seized by the many ironies within. Drowned on Woman Lake. Who drowned? Who was the ultimate victim? What was the Wrigley Gum Co. doing in the mining exploration syndicate game? How could an experienced Bushman allow himself to think it reasonable to cross a treacherous lake in an early fall blizzard, in an overloaded motorized canoe? Why didn't he heed the warnings of the Indians, who refused to go with him? Why didn't he learn to swim after having been shipwrecked on the North Sea years earlier? Of course the answers to many of these questions are bound up in gaining an understanding of who the man was, how he saw himself and thousands of other constructions of history, economics and myth making, that preceded the fateful event. I relate this story for two reasons. Researchers working in postmodern ethnographic analysis continually struggle with the insider/outsider conundrum of how to get at the truth of a situation supposedly somehow keeping track of and accounting for personal subjectivity - (namely in my case, a technical, rationalist working on an academic thesis) subverting the outcome. For the moment, I must suspend the name calling of "self' and accept that my biography is constituted by relationships to people (and ways of knowing), which may be at cross purposes to what I am trying to 8 accomplish. Secondly, since it might be tempting to paint Jack Rosenthal at the nexus of modern and premodern knowledge (outside the temporal framework of this thesis), it is the concrete reality of the impacts of his death, that must inform the narrative. Of course there is more than one nexus, death by drowning always generates a series of unanticipated reverberations - each unique to the situation and those involved. To construct my own understanding, my own place within this narrative, I hope to use narrative as Kvale suggests, "not merely (as) a transmitter of information. In the very act of telling a story the position of the storyteller and the listener, and their place in the social order is constituted; the story creates and maintains social bonds. The narratives of a community contribute to uphold the values and social order of that community" (1994: 125). Although this first incident took place before my birth, my telling it recreates a period in Canadian cultural history, when immigrant labourers often paid with their lives in their quest for financial security. This story links me and my readers with the pioneer's reality of a harsh and unforgiving landscape, which has become so essential to our collective Canadian identity. This study is further complicated by the fact that the groups to be studied have only one essential feature in common at this time. They are all dead. Their individual "narratives" are told in the coroner's reports that followed their deaths. The authenticity is already mediated by the necessarily dispassionate language and form of a coroner's report. Our society's propensity to externalize death makes this so. I do not reach any "objective truths" in the traditional sense. I use a narrative analysis because I believe that the richness embedded in narrative to be much more powerful than statistical analysis in 9 uncovering pertinent aspects of what happened, how people felt and most importantly how similar occurrences could be avoided for others in the future. Imagine for example the value of the statistical information that might be garnered from my grandfather's story. Male, 42 years. Not wearing personal floatation device, non-swimmer. Type of boat - canoe, motorized (probably overloaded). Death ruled by coroner to be accidental, occupational hazard. Alcohol was not involved. True in every detail from a coroner's perspective. Illuminating - not particularly, except the similarities it shares with the deaths and injuries resulting from a myriad of other industrial or "modernist" deaths compiled by Tessler (1993) and others. If we consider for a moment the fundamental assumption of modernity, namely the taming of a hostile environment, deaths by drowning represent some type of failure within that assumption. Other assumptions such as the creation of more leisure time and the creation of surplus wealth to enjoy that time will also weigh heavily within the narrative. The essence of this and thousands of other drownings lies hidden in the cultural practices of the time and the complex web of relationships of the individuals involved. From my experience of the locations where the majority of 'tin-boat' drownings occur, the presence and effect of this "official" narrative is fundamentally - absent. The other players in this narrative, the RCMP and other police forces, the coroners and, even, the Red Cross lifeguards in more populated areas, face the impossible task of suveilling 10 an immense wilderness, usually only after the fact. Even if we could accept the narrative as the true story of "safe boating", the difficulty of delivering the story is probably impossible within this framework. To illustrate this point, I recount a second story from my own experience of the late 1970's near Ear Falls, Ontario. Ear Falls at the time was a small community of about 2000 people, 250 miles northeast of Winnipeg. Employment in the area was split between open pit mining, logging and tourist outfitters in a way which I would describe as a quintessentially Canadian shield wilderness economy. Residents tended to be young, males with strong individualistic tendencies and a passion for the outdoors. Highly transient, the population was different from that of urban centres in many ways. As workers, most were semiskilled with respect to what we could describe as trades or more traditional credentialling practice. Most were high school dropouts, lured to the modern frontier by relatively high paying jobs and an alienation from urban values. Their skills were infinitesimally more likely to be with a two-cycle engine on a chain saw or outboard than in creating 'scientific' knowledge for the consumption of others. Possessions were much more likely to be a half-ton truck, a skidoo and a tin boat than a house or a wardrobe. Among its inhabitants was Tommy Williams, a twenty some year old metis man who had built a beautiful log outfitters camp on Wine Lake. Tom had lost one leg above the knee at the age of seventeen, when a load of pipe fell off a semi he was unloading for Banister Pipelines. (He spent the seven thousand dollar settlement from the Workers Compensation Board on a new Mustang, which he totalled, before having insured it.) It was Tom who introduced me to the art of 'beaver dam jumping' in a tin boat. I 11 remember.... Wine Lake, the site of Tom's camp, is about twenty miles by water from Ear Falls along a series of creeks, sloughs and small ponds, interrupted a half dozen times by beaver dams. The weekly journey into town, to drop off last week's tourists, purchase groceries and supplies and pick up next week's customers requires about three hours on the water. Crossing each portage in the more conventional fashion involves unloading the boats (usually two or three), packing the supplies up or down a trail alongside the lake or stream, dragging the boat over and reloading on the other side. Tom's contribution to the alternative narrative I would like to construct involved the purchase of two 40-horsepower Mercury outboards, one for each of his fourteen foot 'Lund Guide' boats. With the additional power, Tom learned, and eventually taught me to 'jump' the beaver dams. Coming from the top, the technique is simple. Drop the tourists and show them the trail, idle back out into the stream, align the boat perpendicular to the dam, unlock the reverse latch and, when within about twenty feet of the dam, accelerate quickly, lifting the bow out of the water five or six feet. The boat strikes the dam midway along the keelson and the forward momentum carries the boat over the slippery muck and down the two or three feet on the lower side. The outboard kicks up, revs for a split second and regains its thrust in the undisturbed water of the lower side. No problem. I never really mastered the upstream manoeuvre as well as Tom. In that version, the driver of the boat has to jump out at just the right instant and drag the boat just before it teeters back into the water behind. Like skateboarding, the driver leaves the boat for an 12 instant, while retaining the momentum. It's poetry, when done by the master. I relate this story, in this context, for several reasons, the first of which is to describe how far it is geographically and spiritually from the narrative of 'safe boating', as developed thus far. Tin-boating for Tom and many of the people of that area really was an emancipatory experience. The feelings of freedom and power after a successful 'jump' were exhilarating. There was, and I believe still is, another alternate narrative, which more authentically describes the 'truth' about tin-boating in the Canadian wilderness. I don't know if Tom had ever seen anything like a S^eJio^tmgjGuide (see Appendix A), but I think he would have laughed at its advice (I remember them being available at the hardware store or garage where we bought our fishing licences). Tom knew tin-boats from twenty years of hands-on-experience, not from the wisdom of researchers at McGill or the University of Berlin, as the 'narrative' of this thesis knows. My second consideration stems from the observation that we tend to use the products of popular culture in ways that were never intended. These uses are in some way about the endless curiosity that forms the human condition. Our fathers had known the route to Wine Lake by canoe, we the products of a contorted and uneven modernity, learned it by tin-boat. In a stimulating departure from the traditional statistical analysis, the Canadian Red Cross has published a study titled Real Drowning Stories (Trussler, 1992) which considers extracts from coroners reports grouped according to type of drowning, mitigating factors and conclusions about new approaches to water safety education. This paper will draw on the data in the coroner's reports and on the ground work laid by this 13 report. Within this section of the analysis, I suggest the primary consideration be that these reports are couched in the language and meaning systems of coroners. Medical doctors are adept in the languages of science and, as such, tend to detach the evidence - a body, from the cultural context in which that body existed as a living human being. My reservation with this report begins with the similarities in reporting practice with those drownings associated with automobile crashes. I contend that while the automobile, particularly in North American culture, is the ultimate symbol of modernity, the essence of boating is sufficiently different as to warrant a separate analysis. There are no "roads" on the water. The signs, minimalist as they are, achieve their meaning from another discourse. Mitigating factors in marine incidents described in these reports such as squalls (invariably foreshadowed by the ability to "read" changing cloud and wind patterns) suggest that different skills underpin safe practice in the two realms. If capsizing is, as Trussler suggests, the predisaster trigger incident in 90% of all tin boat drowning, the scope of this analysis shifts to a range of factors irrelevant to the automotive culture. What thinking and eye/hand coordination skills are involved in preventing this occurrence? Why couldn't they climb back onto or into the boat if it were still floating? What other less visible practices precede tin boaters assumptions about our ways of knowing if we are competent and acting in our own best interests? How might Joseph Conrad's description of the inevitability of confronting one's destiny in a watery grave figure in our collective subconscious? Is there not some primal connection made, when a living being disappears beneath the surface of a lake or river, often never to be seen again? 14 Tin boats typically ply the waters of smaller lakes and rivers of the Canadian hinterland. Names of locations where these incidents occur include Tochacha Lake, Deka Lake, Inklin River and Batnuni Lake. Hardly household names for the majority of British Columbians. The remoteness and unfamiliarity of the locations suggests a foreignness unfamiliar in most recreational activities. The allure of these locations and their association with this class of boats does not augur well for future water safety statistics. An increasing population with increased mobility - new logging roads, more "sport -recreational" 4X4's and the desire for more authentic wilderness experiences -will undoubtably spawn an increase in incidents. The promotion in newspapers and on television of "extreme sports" such as Eco-Challenge will almost certainly be factored into statistics in the near future. The modernist perspective metaphorically assumes this exteriority. The truth about these incidents is ultimately generalizable and immutable for modernists. It is the remoteness of these locations, within a deconstructive metaphor that looks for the interiority, the specificity, the particularity and the familiarity of the specific context of the incident. In this way, I hope to convince readers that individual "stories" form a valid framework for analysis. Purpose While the preceding paragraphs describe reasons for my interest in pursuing a postmodern analysis of the modern activity of tin boating, I think we must carefully distinguish them from the purpose of the thesis. In this regard, the purposes of this thesis 15 are as follows: 1) . To elaborate on, and extend awareness of, the role of language in the design of marine safety educational initiatives aimed at drowning and injury prevention. 2) . To juxtaspose "official" with "popular" safe boating curricula with the intention of exposing contradictory and incommensurable understandings. 3) . To locate tin boating within a Canadian discourse on wilderness recreation in the midst of a burgeoning of marine activities and sports. In the first instance, the purpose is obvious - to come to an understanding of how educative initiatives could become more effective in preventing drownings and other injuries associated with this activity. Implicit in the assumption is a de facto admission that the current practice of delivering pamphlets and the occasional video clip isn't working. When compared to the high production value programming provided by commercial interests, this product looks pale and anemic. This part of the analysis will focus on why the "textual" bias of this form of communication is ineffective. I posit that the connection between talking and writing about activities such as tin boating is a limiting and sometimes deceptive method for communicating the experience. A second thrust will be to develop a critical re-contextualization of the activity within popular culture. This part of the analysis stems from the recognition that 16 recreational activities are part of the larger material culture and influenced by the same sorts of advertising and "lifestyle" promotions, as are other forms of consumption. Not unlike some supposedly more "extreme" recreational activities such as bungee jumping, rock climbing or moto-cross racing, tin boating under some conditions is obviously hazardous. The purpose in this instance is to shed light on the ways that popular conceptions of the activity construct the subjectivity of the participants. What influences for example inform the ethos of what it means to be a skateboarder? Much information on the nature of tin boating comes from American television, magazines and promotional literature. In Chapters 4 and 5,1 expand on two parallel discourses. The first, I will name the "official discourse," that construction of the activity as understood by marine safety officialdom that includes SAR, RCMP and the Red Cross. The latter I will call the "popular discourse" constituted by the participants from sales brochures, catalogues, television, familial interaction and first hand experience. The latter part of the analysis necessarily exists in contradistinction to much of the official discourse, albeit more in keeping with the Canadian geographic and cultural context. Finally, I engage the current debate within environmental circles on the nature of Nature in late modern times. As a definitive phenomenon, accessing the Canadian hinterland via tin boat places this activity on the edge of changing perceptions of wilderness. Although we may more closely align postmodernity with seemingly benign activities such as birding, canoeing or back country hiking, many issues pursued in this thesis will have carry over effects for these burgeoning areas. The predation of our remaining wilderness by resource extraction interests and increasing population densities 17 will force us to reconceptualize our current perceptions of what wilderness is, and how we, as postmodern consumers, fit into a modified landscape. Organizational Structure Chapter 2 locates the practice of tin boating culturally, temporally and geographically. I will attempt to delineate current theoretical constructions and provide a brief lineage of current theoretical practices. I argue in favour of a postmodern analysis and explain my insistence on a Canadian version of the discourse. In Chapter 3, the methodology used to explore the central idea, of parallel "official" and "popular" discourses, will be developed. Chapter 4 will begin with a deconstruction of the Safe RoatingJauids (see Appendix A) followed by analyses of the implicit power/knowledge relationships the role of the "official" discourse as a sub-narrative of the modern project of education. In Chapter 5 a more postmodern analysis of the textual and visual artefacts of the "popular" discourse will be conducted. The closing chapter will propose some enticing side channels for exploration and churn the increasingly silted waters beneath our educative skiff. I wiil now shift to a more expansive description of where I believe one node of this collective narrative unfolds. 18 CHAPTER TWO LOCATING TIN BOATING .... "the" Canadian difference has tended to be defined in terms of quasi-logical contrarieties vis-a-vis the United States. Leaving aside its essentialism, such a procedure is suspect because the map on which it is based tends to presuppose rather than critically reflect upon the binary givens of the dominant ideological field. Especially tenacious has been the romantically tinged dichotomy that counter poses America as a symbol for city, industry, and automobile to Canada as a figure for escape and the untamed land. (Wernick 1993: 297) The Beaver Bites Back While romanticism is surely an element in our emotional attachment to the Canadian hinterland, much remains in our wilderness that has been "developed" in the American equivalent. The only way to prevent our landscape becoming homogenized and equated with our neighbours to the south is through the telling and retelling of our distinct story. As Wernick says, "Lived culture derives its everyday material from the cultural industries, just as the cultural industries appropriate from the lived culture whatever is marketable" (1993: 301). In this chapter, I will investigate the range of debate about how the seemingly banal activity of climbing into an Eaton's Viking car 19 topper occurs in the foreground of intense theoretical debates about the concept of a Canadian wilderness. Wilderness, thus imagined, is a product of the juxtaposition of the "cultured" and the "natural" - that which is not cultured. As in Corbin's The Lure of the Sea: The discovery of the seaside 1750-1849, discovery of the Canadian shield wilderness during the 1960's and 70's involved extending the cultural aesthetic along with the geographic boundaries of Canadian experience. Preliminary Thoughts on Landscape In a collection of essays titled ReiiY^ntingjfclature.?, Soule and Lease et. al challenge the rhetoric of "postmodern deconstructionists" which "justifies further degradation of wildlands for the sake of economic development" (Soule and Lease 1995: xv). While primarily concerned with postmodernity's seeming ambivalence or outright rejection of a knowable "reality" of nature, the author's attempt to salvage a scientificity for environmentalism is apparent. For our purposes, the book is valuable in articulating the dichotomies, which emerge when potential consumers equate the natural landscape (to the extent that such a place exists) with simulacra, such as theme parks or a virtual ski-hill in a Japanese shopping mall. A video clip in Appendix D illustrates the habitat enhancement project of a section of Hamilton's (also ongoing in most other Canadian cities) waterfront, places the efforts of Canadians in concert with those of other industrial nations in the symbolic and concrete [sic] reconstruction of nature. While pertinent in the 20 CANADIAN AMERICAN NATURE CULTURE NORTH SOUTH WILDERNESS URBAN DANGEROUS SAFE Fig.l, Dichotomies in Preceptions of the Wilderness context of the popular discourse which I intend to develop in Chapter 5,1 submit this data more as a foreshadowing of future events - as a probable consequence of conflating the hyperreal with the real. I am aware that I valorize a very particular construction of Nature - that of a lightly touched Canadian Shield wilderness (see Fig.l). My aesthetic experience of this wilderness is a product of "historically specific discursive, social, and cultural conditions " (Hayles 1995:47). As previously stated, my positionality is largely that of a technical rationalist, who knows nature from the science of a Western liberal education as well as many years experience in the geographic setting. Like other postmodern constructions, my "ownership" of this sometimes transgressive narrative is written against the dominant discourse, variously patriarchal, racist, sexist and allied with the hegemonic interests of global capital. Writing this thesis is, in part, an exercise in getting 21 out from under the baggage of this dominant regime of truth. Perhaps my humanism encourages me to concur with Lease's comment that If one does have access, however, and is able to control the communication over a phenomenon, then one controls how it is to be understood. A contest over what is allowed to represent reality - and that is what intelligent access is all about - is a struggle over that reality itself. This is the heart of our age's modernism, the process by which we establish what "counts" as reality (1995: 4). As a thesis writer in the liberal academy, postmodernity allows me one such moment of access. The question then becomes, how do we know if our "reality" is real? I attempt to build in Hayles three constraints in my claim to truth; first, my positionality, as I understand it, is stated, secondly, my representation is consistent with my experience and finally, it is possible to negate based on claims inconsistent with the experience. This position Hayles describes as, "constrained constructivism . . . Constraints delineate ranges of possibility within which representations are viable. Neither cut free from reality, nor existing independent of human perception, the world as constrained constructivism knows it is the result of complex and active engagements between the unmediated flux and human beings" (Hayles 1995: 53). There are currently many competing constructions concerning the nature of Nature. From organizations such as Share BC or the Forest Alliance to Greenpeace, the Sierra Club or Haida Gwaii, significantly different representations are being articulated. I bring these considerations to the fore now because I see alarming indications in the "text" of video clips that I believe form another element in the unofficial curriculum for popular education in the practice of tin boating. Remembering that most of these constructions are in large part alike (in their sharing of the bourgeois capitalist aesthetic values) remains important. As Gary Nabham observes However varied the views of the natural world held by the myriad ethnic groups which have inhabited this continent, many of them are now converging on a new view - not so much one of experienced participants dynamically involved with their local environment as one in which they too may feel as though they are outside the frame looking in (1995: 99). The frame which we look through is, of course, television. The mediation of nature through electronic media is but another link in the totalizing discourse of modernity. Perhaps more correctly identified as the show business of nature, even the stunning landscapes highlighted by camera angles and special effects seem "real" after only a few hours of these shows. If these shows are a significant influence in the way Canadians now know nature, then this commercial curriculum becomes a valid site for our investigation of tin boat safety. Postmodernly Fishing for a Living 23 The television guide for a typical Sunday midwinter afternoon in Vancouver lists ten half hour fishing and outdoor recreation shows. Largely extended commercials for the boats, motors, batteries, fishing gear, trucks, clothing and destination resorts, they form part of the network of the construction of nature as written by the authors of transnational capital. From the perspective I have tried to articulate, we can see it as a colonizing discourse from the American imperial centre. It displays an unabashed greed, intertwined with an explicit patriarchal, sexist, racist subtext. It delivers a vivid and powerful imagery, which is currently overwriting a more Canadian version, in its modern quest for an all consuming monoculture. Interspersed throughout are de-contextualized shots of men catching and releasing literally hundreds of fish, from an incredible selection of small boats, on a similarly vast collection of equipment. Ironically, the only fish kept after they unwittingly make their screen debuts are those destined for the weigh-in table at the Bassmaster's MegaBucks Tournament of Champions. The forty thousand dollar first prize goes to one, of one hundred and nine, "professional" tournament fishers and their "amateur" companions. While it probably isn't necessary to say that I find the whole production loathsome to the point of being one of the most revolting afternoons of my adult life, I, and probably millions of others, were educated to a particular construction of nature. How, after such a weekly display, can the Canadian Coast Guard not know why people seem to ignore the wisdom of the &afeJk>^mgJjnide (Appendix A)? Is this show of consumption far enough removed from the Canadian experience of a fishing derby to warrant a separate analysis? Are the "professional tournament fishers" described above any less abusive of "nature" than 24 Canadian outfitters charged with hunting from aeroplanes or aboriginal Canadians abusing fishing regulations near Campbell River or on the Fraser River in 1995? To what end do we continue with our modernist presumption of there being such a thing as a native view of nature. As Nabham suggests Whether they prejudice one toward the notion of Native (North) American as extirpators of species or assumes that most have been negligible or respectful harvesters, there is a shared assumption that all Native (North) American have viewed and used the flora and fauna in the same way. This assumption is both erroneous and counterproductive in that it undermines any respect for the realities of cultural diversity (1995: 91). Even if we are propagandized to the view of overall native stewardship and harmony in relation to nature, can the reality of satellite television and Nintendo replacing more traditional pastimes for native children foretell any different understanding than that which multinational capital inculcates our own urban children. Even without being able to claim any moral high ground vis a vis environmental sensitivity (another Late modernist construct) is there any merit in attempting to separate out a distinctive Canadian discourse? Is Tommy William's adaptation of the tin boat as a beaver dam jumping tool (presented previously as innocent play) any less reprehensible than animal rights enthusiasts would have us believe "catch and release" fishing is? If governments are unwilling or unable to manage/control the proliferation of images of nature on Sunday afternoon television, what role, if any, can we expect it to take regarding marine safety education? Is bemoaning the loss of innocence, typically associated with my 25 group of apologists, likely to have any effect on halting or changing the course of the statistical carnage this set of practices exacts? Armed with a different understanding of the power of popular culture, might we not recontextualize the phenomenon, and relocate our own version more in keeping with our post colonial present. In the closing chapter of this thesis, I intend to argue in the affirmative. The saturation of our culture with Other centrisms, first Euro and latterly American, is a battle long waged by Canadians. To have survived 130 years of modernizing homogenizing, it is clearly time for "the Beaver Bites Back," as the title of Flaherty and Manning's (1993) book suggests. Reflections on a Canadian Wilderness Discourse Articulating some significant differences necessarily forms part of my discursive construction. Most Canadian fishing derbies, within my experience, are community-sponsored events. While prize money has increased over the past few years, they seldom attract large multinational sponsorships. Any residual earnings from such events usually end up in the accounts of Chambers of Commerce, local Fish and Game, Lions, Rotary or Kinsmen Clubs. While simultaneously available for deconstruction, these largely volunteer organizations retain at least some semblance of traditional small town "local" control. Presumably with less at stake, the manic "race" or competition aspect so carefully valorized in the video clips is absent. Obviously, this comment doesn't deal with other problematic aspects such as the abuse of alcohol or inexperience, which seem to be embedded in the other statistical research cited (Tessler 1993; Barss 1994). The 26 conquest of this more "modernly" constructed conception of nature, and the participation in activities related to it, remains less confident - in the Canadian wilderness, the commodification is less complete. Ironically, diminished discretionary incomes and an increasingly steep differential between the Canadian and American dollar will mean that Canadians remain consumers of the low-end product - the tin boat < 5.5 metres. Will local groups take on the responsibility for their own "education," (perhaps using the new communication technologies to coordinate and construct linkages with other local groups) as rock climbers or kayakers already do? Aligning the interests of local businesses (sales of marine equipment and services) with those of the consuming popular culture (as popular culture always does in any case) may be the only way of avoiding the imperial discourse. In such a scenario, the role of modern institutions such as the Red Cross or the Coast Guard seems less central, more at the margins. By refusing to engage in privileging their respective patriarchies, we are already witnessing their devolution through privatization and downsizing. Challenging Conventional Constructions of "Safe Boating" In Chapter 1,1 alluded to the necessity of moving away from a rational functionalist analysis of tin boating to get at a more "local" understanding of the nature of the cultural milieu surrounding the activity. I will attempt to use a musical metaphor to explain how a counter hegemonic story can emerge alongside, while still maintaining contrast with the dominant narrative. In the Glenn Gould's Quiet in the Land 27 composition, he creates a polyphony by superimposing, contrapuntally, one distinct melody/voice against another. As his biographer Otto Friedrich explains one passage ...And as the minister speaks those words, another voice is saying, I think there is a conflict on the idea of Utopianism versus scattering into the world . . . And as the earnest voices continue their explorations of these earthly matters, the music in the background keeps veering between a solo cello playing a reflective Bach saraband and Janis Joplin singing, "Oh, Lord, won't you buy me a Mercedes-Benz" (1990: 197)? In the same way, I understand this thesis to be in some sense an antithesis to the conventional wisdom regarding boating safety. At times, I sense that the dominant rationalist "melody" will drown [sic] out this second addition. At other times, the truth it offers will rise to the surface and carry the tune. I believe that the several popular versions of the narrative of tin boating exist alongside the "official" story. I anticipate some dissonance as mutually exclusive parts of the narratives clash. The purpose of contrapuntal harmony in music is to interweave these component elements to produce a more dynamic challenging hybrid successor - neither one nor the other. As for boating safety, I hope to encourage some of that hybrid vigour to the current repertoire of marine safety education. I plan to expand the frame of reference, by making transparent the ideologically liberal belief system in which it is embedded. As Bhabba states, "Despite the more radical political alternatives of the right and the left, the popular, common-sense view of the place of the individual in relation to the social is still substantially thought and lived in ethical terms moulded by liberal beliefs" (1994: 24). These liberal beliefs form the basis of most current marine safety education practice. 28 L I B E R A L M A R X I S T P O S T M O D E R N Commodities are seen as We develop a fetishism for Commodities are the tools an extension of individual commodities as a result of with which we "think" our taste. desires which are created way into the social order. by capitalist elites. Consumption is Within popular culture, our "innocenf'and constructed Marxist "false consumption patterns can be within bourgeouis consciousness" coerces us transgressive or resistant aesthetic. into emulating our depending on the way we use oppressors. Consumption the language and is a political act. power/knowledge constructs which define them. Fig. 2 Perspectives for Understanding Consumption What then, is there about tin boating, that makes it part of popular culture and more importantly, what parts of the "popular" can be influenced in favour of safer practice? We can trace the phenomenon in historical terms to the consumer explosion of the sixties and seventies. In terms of the landscape, I suspect that the sterility of suburban living was also a contibuting factor. Traditional liberal economic analysis of that period usually records the absolute increases in earnings for most lower and middle class Canadians (in stark contrast to the previous thirty years). Parallelling the American and West European experience, inflation and high interest rates followed double digit 29 economic growth, during much of the period in Canada. Much of this growth was predicated on increases in consumer spending fuelled by increases in consumer credit. Some of the more important commodities purchased were cars, houses, televisions and notably for purposes of this thesis, tin boats. Also more important for purposes of this analysis was the reason for purchasing them and the way in which they ultimately held value for many of their owners. Typical liberal supply/demand economic analysis of this sequence of events makes distinctions between "needs" (food, shelter, clothing) and luxury goods to explain the dramatic upsurge. We now historically inscribe the duration of the growth period in our understandings of the effects of the so called "baby boom." Beyond such revelations and the demand/supply reversal of the eighties, liberal economic theory and its neo-conservative cousin have little more to add to the most tumultuous period in Western economic history. More revealing in the context of a cultural phenomenon is a Marxist analysis of the use, exchange and symbolic value of the commodities at the centre of the revolution. In the Marxist lexicon, all goods have a value attached to them because of the raw materials, energy and labour consumed in their manufacture. In its most elemental form, the Marxist critique of capitalism concludes that the accumulation of profit, the vivifying metaphor of capitalism, is nothing more than the expropriation of the surplus value by the owners of capital. More important is his insight that this fundamental alienation from one's production (accomplished through the switch to wage labour in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) results in a "fetishism of commodities." Intrinsic to the capitalist mode of production is the attachment people form with their commodities, 30 especially the tension implicit in the desire to exchange them for different commodities, which may "appear" to the holder in a different context to be of greater value. The role of advertising is thus understood to be one of "educating" consumers about the relative merits of other commodities. Capitalism's genius is seen to be its ability to continuously "creatively destroy" (devalue through shifting consumer desire), while simultaneously producing new objects to be desired. As for macro-economic theory, Marxists charge that late-capitalism lurches through a series of crises, where manufactured scarcities precedes price increases, and are followed by over production, stagnation in a cyclical pattern. In the sense that both capitalist and Marxist theory seek "universal emancipation through mobilization of the powers of technology, science and reason" (Harvey 1990: 45), both are firmly anchored in the structuralist ontology of the Enlightenment. By the late 1960's, primarily emanating from the French neo-Marxist intelligentsia, a form of critique, variously called poststructuralist or more generally postmodernism, began to emerge. The Challenge of Postmodernity In the course of re-learning about the truth of 'safe boating', prerequisite to the writing of a masters thesis, I have often found myself on both sides of conversations that centred around Canadian mythology, the uniqueness of the Canadian wilderness and the condition of postmodernity. On the one hand, postmodernity treats nationhood and nationalism as part of the totalizing discourse of Eurocentric patriarchy. Nations in this narrative are derivative of male rationality of two main discourses of modernity - the liberal humanism of the Enlightenment and, later, German Idealism via Hegel and Marx. Citizens of the respective countries are bound by the histories or 'told' in the forthcoming Derridean analysis, members of this or that power/knowledge formation from a Foucauldian perspective, deceived by an elusive sense for an 'othered' national self in the Lacanian. As I will attempt to show the through the work of Lyotard, they can be marginalized or written out of the narrative of 'safe boating'. My perception of the role of myth and myth making is that it operates at both the conscious and subconscious levels. Notwithstanding the contingency of 'text', as described in the Derridean chapter, myths are transferred in stories, poetry, song, advertising, film and at the personal level in the actions of mentors. A postmodern critique offers supplementarity in proposing a second or third understanding from a particular perspective (Bhabba 1994: 54). Like a supplemental question in the House of Commons, many questions which arise in postmodern analysis are triggered by peripheral or marginal players in response to their own lived experience. Paradoxically, postmodernism privileges the local and the specific. Canada has a wealth of local history, largely 'written out' during the colonial period, but currently enjoying a resurgence in the wake of aboriginal revitalization, some critical feminist writings and postcolonial anti-American critique. The neo-conservative revolution of the eighties and exigencies of transnational capital have at the same time solidified their grasp on the Canadian psyche, and created new fissures for oppositional readings. 32 I suggest that at some time during the fifties and early sixties, a mythical rediscovery of the Canadian wilderness occurred. This rediscovery was not the genteel lake country of Georgian Bay, nor the cottage country of the Muskoka Lakes. With waterborne activities at its core, this reawakening opted for tin boats, rather than glistening mahogany Chris Crafts seen in On Golden Pond. That was a pursuit of the moneyed class, relaxing in the comfort of cabins a few hours drive from the hustle and bustle of postwar Toronto. Again, Wernick's observation, this time in relation to Northrope Frye's The Bush Garden (1971) and Gaile McGregor's The Wacousta Syndrome (1985), "the American myth of wilderness is anthropocentric and paradisaical -Nature as cooked - whereas the Canadian myth is defensive and agonic - Nature as raw.", is instructive (1993: 297). Important distinctions were simultaneously being made discursively, between an "imperial" (read American) and "hinterland" (read Canadian Shield) construction of what it meant to engage the wilderness. The tin boat culture about which I speak opted, and was written, within the Canadian version. This was a taste of the popular, probably the product of the first significant increases in personal wealth in the lives of its participants. This generation of people had spent their formative years on the farms and in the small towns of rural western Canada. The war years brought the fixation with production for the war effort and were followed quickly with marriages and the raising of families. By the 1960's, the first of those children were in their teens - cars, suburban living and the explosion in consumer culture was under way. Predicated in part on a sense of alienation from the rural environment in 33 which they had been raised and abetted by the possibilities allowed by the new found mobility provided by cars, our Father Knows Best families needed somewhere to go. Popular culture identified an opportunity made possible by technology from the aircraft manufacturing industry (noteably Grumman Aircraft Co., see Appendix H), increased disposable income from wage jobs and a memory of the rural, and ran with it. Perhaps the idea and reality of having "leisure" time should also be factored in. As a resource, time to engage in activities (erstwhile considered within the purvey of the wealthy) represents a shift from the more agrarian prewar sensibility. The preoccupation with fishing while boating further reveals the acceptance of "non-productive" time, especially when juxtaposed with the increasing awareness of efficiencies and productivity prevalent in most other realms during the period. John Fiske says Popular culture is made by subordinated people in their own interests out of resources that also, contradictorily, serve the economic interests of the dominant. Popular culture is made from within and below, not imposed from without as mass culture theorists would have it (Fiske 1989: 2). Canadian tin boat culture in this regard is a hybrid constructed on the margin of a modernist American discourse of dominance, mitigated by a distinctively Canadian recognition of the immensity and potential cruelty of the wilderness. Nature within this essentially modernist ontology is constructed binarily, opposite to culture; only that which has not been heavily overwritten by culture, qualifies as natural. 34 Interrogating the Theory Beneath Marine Safety Education Increasingly, theory is seen as an esoteric, elitist remnant of modern Western academia - no longer necessary or even particularly desirable. From a structuralist perspective, theoretical research is the framework from which cultural activities are suspended, not unlike the metal frame and cords of a hammock. Principal theories were dualistically opposed, economically either Marxist or capitalist, culturally between dominant and oppressed, along gender lines, between races and geographically, North versus South or Western against Orientalist. While liberal cultural theorists have claimed decisive "victories" within each of these camps in recent years, Canadian culture remains suspended, if precariously, on a torn fabric, resistant threads holding here, patches intact there. In Canada, hegemonic theory emanating from the framework of transnational capital assumes victory and challenges us to "Just do it!" Bask in the luxury of our leisure - our Tightness. Against this backdrop, the "posts" of positivism, feminism, structuralism and modernism (Hebdige 1988: 181) rant for a new frame that might allow those who slipped through the netting of their respective hammock to regain some semblance of dignity. From the dispossessed, the questions about why there aren't enough hammocks, when we supposedly possess the technology, labour and materials to produce infinite numbers of them, why those for women are disproportionally small and uncomfortable, why only some people's children have to weave them or why a 35 competitive edge demands that they be made in this country or some low rent dictatorship, remain. In Canada, aboriginal groups, working both within and without the constitutional structure, challenge mainstream Canadians assumed right to plant our hammock on disputed territory. Rolling out of the tattered male, structuralist, capitalist, Western embrace, the need for a new kind of theoretical framework is obvious. So it is with public education in Canada, the most privileged of democracies, near the end of the second millennium. Postmodern theory, then, asks whether the possibility of a hammock is available, whose claim to validity assures one or even if the existing linguistic method of describing the design is adequate to the task. I have chosen the hammock metaphor rather deliberately, because I think Canadians are, as a society, being awoken from our comfortable slumber by a number of warning bells. Ironically, at the precise time that our level of material comfort should be sufficient to buffet us from the vagaries of dissenting opinion, the entire structure of Western education is being challenged from all sides. Throughout the past several decades we have allowed ourselves to be lulled by a false sense of security, into thinking that when the fabric and even the cords of the hammock rotted, it could simply be replaced. The framework was solid. In our educational endeavours, the framework of humanist science was made of steel, galvanized by layers of research, properly applied to protect it against lifetimes of corrosive assault by an avaricious marketplace or occupiers of a distant landscape. Canadians came to understand that there was no need for a theoretical substructure other than the comfortable one we had come to ignore (or more correctly believed only existed in the ethereal realm of academia). All valid research fit 3 6 comfortably within the bipolar network of assumptions long since argued into submission. With marine safety education, admittedly way down the hierarchy of pressing needs (in Maslow's sense), an uncomfortable node in the educational network is coming unspun. It appears that the framework was theoretical, after all, as are all representational systems. The reality is that any activity in which people engage, and more significantly for the educational services that they consume in support of that activity have a theoretical basis. If theory is thus performative, our current theory is sadly lacking, not much advanced since Jack's story, except in the ability to describe posthumously in ever increasing detail and with ever increasing detachment. Counting and categorizing the deaths does not equal theorizing about their cause or prevention. The importance of theory becomes one of "imagining" how tin boaters and those responsible for marine safety education might understand this activity differently, so that they can imagine different ways of "doing" it. No longer does a single theory about marine safety education exist, in and of itself, any more than any individual file created by existing system describes the range of other occurrences. Within the postmodern moment, the design of educational initiatives must first take into account the construction of the subjectivities of the participants. This approach is significantly different from a functionalist one that starts out from a collection of transcendent truths or rules. 37 The Political Economy of the Consumption of Recreational Services Within the broader community of recreational boaters, tin, boaters presently occupy lower ranks in terms of status, wealth and the ability to manipulate a power/knowledge formation with respect to support services or education. As a popular phenomenon, tin boating began in the early 1960's in Canada. With the first few American tourists pushing Northward in search of bigger Walleye or Muskie the outfitter camps of Northwestern Ontario flourished. The impressive log construction of some of these lodges remains as testimony to the wealth of this "recreational" vanguard. As a teenager I remember seeing tin boats at Lockport, Manitoba in the tail waters of the hydro dam across the Red River. Within a few years, the lake country to the east and north seemed to open up - the Everyman with his Everyman's boat described in Chapter One, emerged almost imperceptibly amid the increasing wealth of the time. I hope to locate this genesis as accurately as possible, not so much because of its similarities with today's tin boaters, but more to demonstrate how our first "take" was naive and ultimately constructed within the postwar liberal metaphor of voluntary consumption. Who was buying these boats and why was it important to explore the Canadian wilderness at this time? At what point does it become important to reconsider the consumption of recreational opportunities in terms of the transnational capitalism and its attendant machinery for the creation of a need (when previously no need existed)? To what extent is the acceptance of recreational boating in the Canadian wilderness as a valid pursuit the product of an orchestrated effort to reconstruct the subjectivity of the 38 participants. How did those first bulky orange, Kapok filled, Department of Transport approved, life jackets reassure parents of the safety of tin boating? How did the Red Cross come to take charge of the water safety education of the first generation where most people could swim? In the preceding paragraphs I have attempted to locate the practise of tin boating for a very specific segment of the population - the casual, recreational camper, fisher or hunter. This is in no way intended to exclude constructions of various other user groups such as aboriginal peoples or those who use these boats in conjunction with jobs in the wilderness. These constructions will necessarily be different in some respects, alike in others. Locating Tin Boating "Education" in a Postmodern Context A search of the course offerings of several institutions normally associated with the provision of recreational education reveals little that could be described as specific to tin boating. At first surprising, in view of the number of people who have and use these boats, it becomes less so if we consider the modern theoretical assumption that "boating" is an inclusive activity defined more by the general rules, than specific. Considered as part of a larger totalizing discourse (see Chapter 4), the offerings typically divide themselves into categories such as seamanship, further subdivided into navigation, celestial navigation, instrument navigation, and in a plea to the popular, "rules of the road." Maintenance, seen objectively, gets divided into subcategories such as diesel, inboard/ outboard and outboard or by material construction - wood or fibreglass. 39 Similarly, types of boats, sailing, power, canoe, kayak and location - coastal or offshore -each seem to merit a specific type of instruction. Significantly, not one course description even mentions the aluminum outboard powered craft, that singularly accounts for more boat sales than all the other types combined. These observations result in two conclusions. The first assumption, from a modernist perspective, is that those tin boaters who do engage in any "formal" training adapt the materials as best they can from the formal offerings and would expect to supplement their knowledge with other reading or experiential knowledge. Within modernity, a basic assumption was that all education, in one way or another, contributed to the overall "good." There was no such thing as "bad" education. Conversely, in a postmodern examination of popular culture, a second and more likely scenario would be that very little in the way of training or "information" comes by way of formal instruction. I suspect that we transmit the bulk of the "education" these people rely upon in sales brochures, sport fishing and hunting magazines, television shows and, through watching, as fathers and friends engaged in the activity. In the sense that advertising is the curriculum of consumer education, our largely uncritical acceptance of its messages provides advertisers with a powerful opening for constructing the subjectivity of participants. We could, from a liberal educative perspective, describe much of it as misinformation. It might be described as dis-education from the perspective of those engaged in the propagation of the official modern story of tin boating safety. For example, in the '95 Sea Nymph (part of the O M C 40 Boat Group, Appendix C) promotional literature, a twenty odd page full colour brochure fails to show even one example of anyone actually wearing a life jacket. Within the modernist "official" story of safe boating, the wearing of life jackets in small open boats is considered common knowledge. They show the life jackets, most noticeably in the smaller, (read cheaper) models, neatly folded against the gunwales or on the seats. What other message can this send to a prospective buyer than that life jackets are an available but unnecessary "extra." Homage is paid to the icon, then rejected, only those parts which are marketable remain. The numerous pictures show an all-white male cast (a Loni Andersen lookalike woman is presented as if she is available as optional extra), fishing in either a lily pad filled pond or racing off to some tournament destination. When examined from the perspective of curricula for popular consumer education, the organizing theme is power, literally with respect to the O M C engines and symbolically, since more sophisticated equipment requires more money power and playing in the high stakes tournament fishing game involves assembling teams of technological warriors akin to the pit crews at the Molson Indy. Chapter 3 will deal more extensively with postmodern conceptions of power as part of a power/knowledge formation as described by Michel Foucault. As the brochure says, "Sea Nymph owners across the nation (United States) enjoy running boats that are the envy of everyone else on the ramp." The implicit message is that by engaging in the fetishization of this commodity, one will gain status among peers, since safety and survival are a secondary distant concern within this idyll. Postmodernly, commodities are, as Fiske states, "not just objects of economic exchange; they are goods to think with, goods to speak with" (1989: 31). Thinking "tin boat," thus 41 includes a range of practices, modes of learning, constraints and/or transgressions which emanate from the available discourses. With regard to the purposes outlined in Chapter 1,1 will now shift to a comparison of conventional methodologies, which are juxtaposed with postmodern strategies thereafter. Recall that those purposes were to understand the role of language in constructing subjectivity of participants, the juxtaposition of the official and popular discourses and increasing awareness of the potential hazards of a naive theoretical construction for wilderness recreation, in view of increasing access and popularity. As this thesis is concerned primarily with those artefacts usually encountered by recreational users, the "public" documents will continue to be the focus of the analysis. 42 CHAPTER THREE METHODOLOGY Considerations on Traditional Methodologies Analytical educational research within a modernist ontology attempts to wrest truth from available documents, practices, legal codes and policy statements through inductive logic. In Research in Education: A Conceptual Introduction, students of research methodology are informed that, "The validity of an analytical study lies in the procedures inherent in the methodology, which includes the search for and criticism of sources, and the interpretation of facts for causal explanations" (McMillan & Schumacher 1989: 433). This form of analysis is instrumental, since ideas stemming from this type of analysis are true or valid to the extent that they guide action. It is rational in its demands that those engaged in such research are involved in an intellectual activity, which strives to strip away error resulting from faulty or unreliable sense perception or emotion. Within modernism, when analytical research focuses on linguistic problems, it strives for a single "best" or intended meaning. The truth which emerges from the rigour of such inquiries claims its validity from a rational, instrumental logic -a transcendent immutable truth. Ethnographic research is a qualitative methodology, characterized by some combination of observation, interviewing and document analysis (McMillan and 43 Schumacher 1989: 36), which usually allows for research procedures to develop while research is underway, in response to changes in either the researcher's perception of or changes in the problem. A prolonged exposure to the specific environment, allows the researcher to acclimatize to the environment so that he/she may be more sensitive to the nature of the subject/problem and material at hand. Throughout the study, the researcher is careful to minimize his/her impact on the subject/environment, so as not to skew the results or upset the conditions which prevailed prior to the intervention. The results of this method of enquiry are usually in the form of extensive notes, interviews and/or artifacts which are analysed for meaning. Qualitative ethnographic research is considered particularly effective due to the richness inherent in language and the "groundedness" of the enquiry. It begins with the "facts" as they present themselves in the specific environment to be studied. Critical qualitative ethnographic research, as broadly defined by Usher and Edwards, "is a broad and diverse field of theory and practice drawing on aspects of the modernist perspective of the later Frankfurt School, feminism, Freirean pedagogy, postcolonial discourse as well as postmodernism to construct a radical approach to education" (1994: 214). It concerns itself with emancipatory projects, largely constructed in opposition to the hegemonic state-sponsored efforts. Aronowitz and Giroux, two educational researchers often associated with the Freirean pedagogy distinguish their practice from that of Bloom, in saying But whereas Bloom wants to reconstruct the category of truth through an unproblematic, 44 quasi-essentialist, and elitist reading of history, we believe that recovering a notion of truth grounded in a critical reading of history that validates and reclaims democratic life is fundamental to the project of educational reform (1991: 37). Some noteworthy observations on the language in which this quotation and the theoretical framework are predicated, include the observation that modernist Liberal education is seen as elitist, and in the final analysis undemocratic (inasmuch as it is prescribed by an elite male professoriate). While deemed to be radical, its appeal in countries currently rising through the smog of colonial modernity (typically tagged paternalistically as developing or Third World) is immense. Within feminist discourse, the dichotomy often juxtaposes this patriarchy with the emancipatory goals of feminists seeking freedom or redress from male oppression. Excepting those recent analyses which shift the focus of "meaning making" to the contingency of language and language use, relations of power/knowledge in the control and maintenance of popular culture, and those interested in the construction of subjective positions, critical, qualitative ethnography tends to accept the binary oppositions of modernity. For purposes of this thesis, with its intended development and analysis of the parallel "official" and "popular" discourses of tin boating, the textual and visual sources of data, it becomes essential to understand these binary oppositions. With regard to the purposes of this thesis, the attention to those shifts listed above and a sense of the ironic distinguish this work from critical ethnography. 45 The Postmodern Challenge to Conventional Research Methodologies While the immediate urge at this point is to define postmodernism, I intend to proceed instead with an explanation of why it stems from a modern conception of the nature of knowledge/research and furthermore, why doing so may be counter to the postmodern moment. The principal challenge which postmodern critique presents is one of de-stabilizing the notion of stable transcendent truth. The "moment" often referred to in conjunction with postmodern pronouncements is a glimpse, contingent on the temporal and spatial location of the event. Any resultant signification from this type of inquiry has in its genesis the seeds of its own destruction (deconstruction). In recognizing that no knowledge is innocent, that is, that there is no will to power embedded in its generation, postmodern analysis recognizes that any assignation of truth is immediately available for further deconstruction by an(other). The fundamental difference, then, is that truth as understood within postmodernity accepts its limitations -accepts the fact that it does not stand alone, must be contextualized and is valid only within this framework. As Bhabba says The ethnographic demands that the field of knowledge - the total social fact - must be appropriated from the outside like a thing, but like a thing, which comprises within itself the subjective understanding of the indigenous. The transposition of this process into the language of the outside's grasp - this entry into the area of the symbolic of representation/signification - then makes the social fact 'three dimensional.' For 46 ethnography demands that the subject has to split itself into object and subject in the process of identifying its field of knowledge. The ethnographic object is constituted 'by dint of the subject's capacity for indefinite self-objectification (without ever quite aboloshing itself as subject) for projecting outside itself ever-diminishing fragments of itself (1994: 150). Postmodern analysis, by contrast, promises no objective truth. It refuses generalizablity, which to the modern project of education is currency. Being able to locate an activity within a period, group, locale or system of thought with certainty is a definitive characteristic of the modern method of the legitimization of knowledge. Paradoxically, this leads to charges of relativism from within the modern academy. This relativism, I contend, is precisely postmodernity's strength. Unconstrained by the performativity of having to be attachable to any modern meta-belief system, postmodern research can revel in the joy of an unfettered exploration of the momentary subjectivities of its co-subjects. The resulting analysis, while typically contrary to official stories, has the potential to get nearer the aesthetic of the participants. When "caught" valorizing the whimsical or trivial, postmodernity concurs wholeheartedly, the subject in such a playful pose is displaying only one of many de-centred "selfs," informed by one of many discourses. We can see the ludic in this sense as resistive - it challenges the seriousness of "serious" claims to objective truth. As a methodology, the techniques of postmodern inquiry - deconstruction of the artifacts and practices of modernity, analysis of knowledge from within its power/knowledge framing 47 and symbiotic growth in the construction of "self' of author and subject are useful in getting out from under the layers of rationalizations of the modern project of education. The Purpose of a Postmodern Critique of the Story of Safe Boating As described in Chapter 2, most research aimed at improving water safety is constructed along rational functionalist lines by and for a technically literate and appreciative audience. This is entirely in keeping with the notion that practitioners of tin boating fit the stereotype of maleness - technically able, virile, intuitive and rational. This type of research should appeal to, and conventional wisdom has it, that there should be little incongruence with the learning styles or capabilities of its intended users. What if it isn't the main source of information? What if the majority opinion on safe tin boating is constructed elsewhere - in the infomercials produced by the major breweries or within the thinly veiled erotica of manufacturers brochures? How can the Coast Guard comment on the overt connection between boats and breasts in the popular literature? The purpose of using postmodern critique on the official story is that, as a cultural producer (thesis writer), I am less bound by the constraints of subject material and institutional needs. This thesis will necessarily be more personal, reflecting my experience, outside the hegemony of the official story, less reverent and ultimately, I hope, closer to construction methods used by my co-participants. In a sense, writing this thesis is an after-the-fact experience that attempts to 48 legitimize my experience over a period of thirty years. I, for one, got away with many hazardous practices which led to the deaths of others. Unlike research conducted within modernist ontology, the objective is not to remove any trace of the "author." I propose to use experiential knowledge to make the narrative more believable - to enhance its validity. I, and presumably many others, remember seeing publications such as the Safe BlJatingJjJiide (Appendix A) during those years, but never having considered it particularly relevant to my lived experience. Casual conversations with friends and other boaters seem to point to a common experience in this regard. One purpose in this sense is to understand where the various pieces of information which make up my understanding come from, how are these pieces are in turn constructed - to recontextualize the experience with the official discourse off to the side rather than at centre stage. Since I am convinced that this popular activity is primarily informed by sources other than the pamphlets and manuals of the dominant discourse, I think a postmodern approach which accepts advertising and film as "text" will de-stabilize the significatory processes of conventional marine safety research. Ultimately, I will post a critical distinction between the badge-covered coveralls of an American tournament bass fisher in his 70 miles per hour bass boat (as seen on any Saturday afternoon television fishing show) and the Canadian experience on a remote lake which I have experienced. Doing so requires me to redefine the practice of tin boating in a method sensitive to the context of the Canadian wilderness. In spite of this, I remain conscious of the need to avoid situating myself as the "Great Emancipator," saying what things mean (Lather 1994:19). The contextualization of the practice in postmodern critical ethnography is the definitive 49 requirement of this type of research. Data Sources I analyse how the "texts" of two parallel discourses, which although sometimes contradictory, inform the practice of tin boating. These "texts" included print materials, advertising and video clips and the various groups which produce and promote them Table 1, below, delineates the range of each category. With respect to the first purpose of this thesis - elaborating on the role of language in constructing the subjectivities of participants, I move now to an explanation of one of the principle techniques of postmodern inquiry - deconstruction 50 Table 1 Sources of Data for a Study of Tin Boating in Canada O F F I C I A L DISCOURSE P O P U L A R DISCOURSE Research: -Canadian Red Cross Developers -Departments of Transport/Fisheries -World Health Organization -Advertising/Product -Film Production Staff -Popular Culture Theorists Education: -Canadian Red Cross Television -Canadian Coast Guard Brochures -Power and Sail Squadrons Magazines -St. John's Ambulance Transmission -Outdoor Recreation -Catalogues and Sales -Fishing and Hunting -Experiential/F amilial Enforcement: -Royal Canadian Mounted Police -Local Police Forces/Fish and Game -Market Forces -Community Standards 51 -Canadian Coast Guard -Perceptions of Self -Harbour Authorities Conceptual Framework Deconstuctionism From the vantage of postmodern critical theory, the writings of Descartes, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx are increasingly seen as patriarchal, Eurocentric and, above all, founded on the logic of rationality. Within the late modern period, and for the purposes of this paper, after World War II, the "leading edge" in leftist social and cultural research was commanded by critical theorists. All writing for critical theorists, within the modernist paradigm, is based upon (sometimes transparent) theoretical and ideological assumptions, which are in turn believed to be expressed through language or text. Essentially, the positionality of the author is assumed to be determinable by the words he or she uses. I intend to attempt a deconstruction of these "texts" to reveal the ideological and theoretical constructions implicit in their writing. Deconstruction, as an analytical technique, hinges on the work of Jacques Derrida. The underlying premise, central to this analysis, is a critique of the logocentric bias of communication, particularly in 52 educative endeavours. The logos, from Greek, meaning word -centred, but more importantly incorporating rationality from Enlightenment metaphysical discourse. According to Falk: Enlightenment logic, of course, holds that rationalism is the inevitable result and a final expression of the inexorable, progressive movement of history, and that modern Western values are universal values. Their immutable superiority, by definition, cannot be denied by rational persons. Rationality, to complete the tautology, is assumed to be the highest intellectual position possible. Those who were not white and (North) European and who had not internalized this western logic, that is those who had not been colonized by logocentrism, were relegated to inferior status. Many of the victims of this imposed "master status" of inferiority that automatically marginalized their corporeality as well as their intellectuality are only now struggling out from under this totalizing and racist discourse of modernity (1994: 12). Deconstructionist critical theorists remove the centred position of the author, arguing that the "text" itself reveals the power relation of the author(s) to the subject. These biases present themselves as intentional meanings, ultimately linked into "regimes of truth," they create opportunities for oppositional or transgressive readings from alternative perspectives or understandings. A "regime of truth" as defined by Foucault is a set of discursive practices which links specific knowledge to a series of power relationships. I think it may be worthwhile to point out that these transgressive readings and their subsequent "rewriting" of the text are more than "reading between the lines" 53 common in other types of criticism. No "text" for deconstructionists can ever be definitive, transcendent or immutable - because of the nature of language, meaning is always contingent and open to challenge. The Text As Constitutive of Author and Subject Typically, when speaking of language in Western metaphysical terms, researchers refer of words (signifiers) coupled with their metaphoric meanings and rhetorical devices, which operate outside or external to the ideas (truths) it presents. Language in deconstructive reading as Gergen suggests is, "as a thing in itself... it is specious for all the other disciplines to claim that their languages carry truth. Languages principally carry themselves" (Gergen 1991: 107). In deconstruction, language is seen as constitutive of the writer. The positionality of the author is problematised because his /her choice of language is an artefact of the authors social, historic and economic history. More correctly, this should be described as the voice within the "text," which writes the author. Thus the "text" which the author(s) produce must be examined to determine what that particular "history" could or could not have said, at that particular time and in those specific circumstances. There is never a transcendental signified, a definitive and permanent meaning created as a result of a "text." Simultaneously, a "subtext" emerges from the gaps between what they (the "text') want to say and what was said. As Payne explains of deconstructive readings, "The name given simultaneously to the stress created in texts (what they want to say and what they do say) and to the detection of such 54 gaps. A deconstructive reading attends to the deconstructive processes always occurring in texts and already there waiting to be read (1994:121). The primary text favours or valorizes particular "voices" while silencing or marginalizing others, according to the logic and power/knowledge relationships implicit in the invisible "subtext." These subtexts operate invisibly, beneath the surface in the form of modes of professional understanding or expert opinion and are referred to in the Foucauldian literature as "regimes of truth." The deception inherent in accepting such a "regime of truth" namely, the collection of discursive truths and practices embodied in a publication such as the Safe Boating Guide (Appendix A), begins with the acceptance of meaning as the author may have intended it. As explained by Gergen: the presumption that words reflect the workings of the mind as it converts the surrounding chaos into order. This traditional view demands reverence for the knower's words, for if such words are based on sound reason and observation, they can elucidate the essence of what is the case . . . Derrida opposes the view of words as the individual's reflections of essences. Instead, he proposes, language is a system unto itself. Words derive their capacity to create a seeming world of essences from the properties of the system. This system of language (or of sense making) preexists the individual; it is "always already" there, available for social usage. Thus anything about the world of self should, in principle, be placed in quotations. If it is sensible, it has already been said. The most on can do is rearrange the sayables (1991: 107). 55 The sayables for marine safety education have for the most part come from the pens of one group, predominantly male, functionalists in positions of authority within modern Western bureaucracies. We can see these well-intentioned productions as a subset of the discursive practices of modern, instrumental rationalism. The casting of SAR technicians, RCMP constables, M O T policy writers and coroners as benevolent patriarchs supervising the fun is implicit. They step in only when one of the participants flagrantly breaks a rule or regulation or when a piece of equipment fails, completing the set. Essentially, Derridian critical analysis claims that this casting masks the importance of the "text" with a "seduction of the obvious." (Usher & Edwards 1994: 120) How does the privileging of this technical discourse (by publishing and popularizing and legally entrenching its requirements) marginalize others? In other words, how does a standard interpretation of this text mean anything? If meaning making takes place at the interstices of colliding interpretations of the text (at very least those of the author and reader) we can no longer expect one transcendent truth to emerge. As Fish explains, "Each derives its sense of validity from a particular community of interpretation a group of individuals who by virtue of persuasion and consent come to share certain assumptions about the proper reading of a text" (Fish 1991: 104). What of the readings of those who don't read in the proper (intended) sense, are physically or mentally unable to adopt the regimen or whose political, social or economic histories preclude compliance with the intended meaning of the author? In this sense, one might begin to see how a seemingly sensible, reasonable document forms an 56 integral part of a normalizing disciplinary discursive practice. Power/Knowledge Relationships Within the modern educative project of safe boating practice, the following two assumptions about how and why people learn are embedded. By constructing this effort within the confines of Western liberal rationalism, one assumes that a rational person, involved in the activity of boating, will learn for his or her own "good" and that of other participants. Following this assumption, on a macro level, is the assumption that within modern democracies, the state, has the power to coerce certain behaviours. These two premises are at the heart of the liberal understanding of power. In the case of the individual, we see agency as the way an individual can change him/herself to better adapt to a given situation. The state, on the other hand, has an array of tools at its disposal, that can be used to ensure the greatest good for the greatest number (Bentham). In other words, the state can legitimately intervene if the activities of one group are unduly impinging on the "freedom" of others. The traditional liberal understanding of power is, that of external force held either by an individual or the state, which can be applied when desired to cause change. The mechanist metaphor of the "levers of power" exemplifies this understanding. The remedies available, according to Bentham, for those whose behaviour is incompatible with the needs of the majority included, "physical - overindulgence becomes stale or nauseating (self control of excess); political - imprisonment may await i 57 any pleasure seeker who transgresses on the rights of others; moral or popular - public opinion may censor, condemn, or ostracize the evildoer; and religious - God may punish the seeker of excessive or antisocial pleasures" (Sahakian 1968: 216). As for understanding the means of social control in late modern democracies, one can thus trace the genealogy of power back, at least as far, as the British Utilitarianism of Bentham and Mill. Implicit in this construction, and evident in the work of Montesqui and early Enlightenment thinkers, is the concept of inalienable individual rights. These inalienable individual rights were central to the French and American revolutions. As the secularism of the state grew throughout the modern era, the role of God as a force in social control declined in most sectors. Parallelling the widespread adoption of the positivistic metaphysic of the modern industrial state, massive displacements of agricultural workers and later industrial workers occurred. To alleviate the social disorder that resulted, all Western democracies and the totalitarian Eastern block undertook massive publicly and privately funded "projects of education." These educational "projects" covered an unprecedented breadth of human endeavour -from the liberal canon at prestigious European universities to the mechanics institutes in Britain and the public school movement everywhere (see intro for elaboration on locating the practice of safe boating within the totality of educational discourse). By the early twentieth century, "schooling" became a panacea for many of society's problems. The "postmodern" era from the late sixties until the present (notwithstanding countless notable exceptions) continues, in most sectors with this project, oblivious or unwilling to accept the challenges to its hegemony over the 58 "project." Without further elaboration at this point, I think it reasonable to state that a discourse specific to the practice of safe boating has evolved. Within that discourse, certain voices are privileged while others have been silenced. It is at the interstices of individual interests and those of the state and business sanctioned discourse, that postmodern analysis finds the "gap" which problematizes this relationship. Michel Foucault's contribution to the debate lies in his development of ideas around what he calls the "discursive" practices of the emergent modernity. As Ball elaborates: Discourses are . . . about what can be said, and thought, but also about who can speak, when, where, and with what authority. Discourses embody meaning and social relationships, they constitute both the subjectivity and power relations . . . Thus, discourses construct certain possibilities for thought. They order and combine words in particular ways and exclude or displace other combinations (1990: 17). Hopefully, the threads of the discourse developed in the previous section on deconstruction allow the connection with the problematization of the decentring of the author and with the contingency of the meaning of words as "text." Modernity "sees" itself as a seamless totality of interrelated discourses founded on the principles of Enlightenment rationality. Incremental gains by individuals or groups add to the increasingly scientific understanding of our selves and the material world which surrounds us. Educative efforts in a myriad of fields of specialization reach 59 a consensus on the best available remedy for any given situation. Education speeds and systematizes this process by adopting canon(s) of relevant literature, authored by "experts" in the field and delivered under the auspices of a variety of institutions and organisations. In the post World War II period, Western democracies have spawned an exponential explosion in the need for and delivery of "education." The extent of this recent phenomenon has led to the description of our time as the transition from industrial age to the information age, or from the modern to the postmodern. It is within this transition that this narrative wrests the construction and delivery of boating safety education as a subset of public education as perceived in the exclusivity of Enlightenment rationality. Scientific Truth and Linguistic Foundations In a most annoying manner, M. Lacan says "the constitution of reality" instead of simply "reality" (Edouard Pichon quoted.in Deans (1992:11). The subject, upon which the discourse on safe boating fixes its gaze, is thus problematised in two ways. From the Derridian deconstruction developed previously, we see that the decentred subject is a product of the tension between the language of the 60 "text" and the variable and contingent meanings implicit in language. From a Foucauldian perspective, we see that a repressive discourse, constructed within the normalizing, homogenizing metaphysics of modernity has the potential to constitute the "truth" about safe boating and, in doing so, silences other discourses. This in turn invites oppositional responses, so extreme, that they often result in subjects engaging in activities that appear irrational, often clearly not in their own best interests or those of society overall. These behaviours, in modern Western psychological terms, are variously described as neurotic, compulsive, and occasionally pathologic. Risk taking behaviours, for the purposes of this study, in both the National Drowning Report and Real Drowning Stories, can be associated with the subgroup of male(s) age 25-74, who fish from small tin boats (Barss, P. 1994, Tessler 1993). Psychologically, risk taking behaviour is seen as a complex desire to 'prove' oneself (to know the truth about oneself in a personal sense), often to peers, in competitive or dangerous settings. Mastery of a difficult manoeuvre or dangerous activity is seen as an essential part of the adolescent stage development theory (Maslow, Rogers, Kohlberg). Presumably, with maturation, men [sic] can resist these urges and substitute more reasoned (reasonable outlets) for this urge (informed by social rules and rules of law) (Gergenl991: 168). Freudian Discourse In order for psychoanalysis and humanist psychology to be understood as other 61 than quaint psychic practices (like palm reading or astrology), they appeal to the scienticity of biology. Within the framework of humanistic psychology, a centred, rational, conscious subject is acted upon by various social forces. Language within this discourse is seen, innocently, as the vehicle that transmits thoughts and feelings. It is problematised by the fact it can transmit untruths. Psychology 'hopes' for transcendency, something which language cannot deliver with certainty due to its contingent and variable meaning (Edwards and Usher 1994: 56). The rational, self-knowing subject behaves according to desires formulated in the unconscious (which is repressed) and mollified to a knowable reality. This Freudian unconscious is continually repressed (deceived), succumbing to the causal history of a knowable conscious reality. Unconscious drives, predominately sexual, inform the unconscious, are partly biological but also social (mediated through language). In this way, Freudian "unconscious" understands drives as more than biological, but complicated and hidden by the social and linguistic constructions of the conscious self. The knowing of self requires interpretation, as in dream analysis. Lacanian Discourse Jacques Lacan, a French critic of psychoanalysis often associated with postmodern analysis, concurs with Freud that subjectivity is not constituted by consciousness. Desire remains a force or pressure 62 but is not reduced, even ambiguously, to the purely biological... The energy implied in the Freudian discourse of quasi-biological drives becomes in Lacan a dynamic of want conditioned by lack and mediated by language and intersubjectivity . . . In Lacan, the subject is split between an ego (or 'moi'), i.e. the subject as posited by science and psychology, the 'self as conventionally understood, and a speaking subject (an I or 'je') Edwards and Usher (1994: 62) Desire, from a Lacanian perspective, is the need for recognition by other(s) - rather than internal and solitary, it is intersubjectively constructed. Significantly, desire moves out of the realm of satisfying the individual's biological needs and into that of the unconscious, where meaning is made through language signification. To describe Lacan's subject in Freudian terms, the ego existing in the imaginary order combines with the linguistically constructed T to create the self as an "other." As in the Derridean deconstruction, and again due the instability of language "speaking" its subject, the ego becomes unstable. "I" is defined referentially according to any number of social relationships such as brother of, employee of or owner of. The tentative fixing of identity is possible because of a negative aspect of language, categorizing subjects by what they are not. This distancing of the subjectivity from "I" works at the same time for the subject and others (present). Lacanian "Other" and Teaching of Safe Boating Practice The Lacanian model of psychoanalysis, while available as a forensic tool in trying to understand what happened, is probably too contorted to be useable in everyday practice, but it does point to a series of problems in the delivery of safe boating education. As outlined above, psychology and its theoretical cousin, psychoanalysis, construct the subject as rational and self-knowing. As such, it is assumed that if information which will increase the chances of survival is presented, the subject will master the requisite knowledge. Humanist pedagogy, and andragogy (notwithstanding protestations to the contrary), refuse to look, ....beneath the level of conscious meaning explored by Sartre and the phenomenologist, another level, unconscious and unthought, anonymous and impersonal, that regulated meaning in advance. The human being is therefore not absolutely free (or absolutely responsible). . . but always restrained, pinioned, snared in a web of language beyond its control (Miller 1993: 150). As Lacan says, "If I call the person to whom I am speaking by whatever name I choose to give him [sic] I intimate the subjective function that he will take on in order to reply to me . . . (Lacan 1977:86-7)." In other words, the naming of subject as ignorant or less than knowledgeable on a particular topic creates within the subject that identity. Far from encouraging the agency so admired within humanism, this is an alienating experience. The "ideal" ego, as positioned in the Lacanian "other," needs a positive recognition from the other (teacher) rather than the expert loaded with irrefutable and unquestionable "truths." Ironically, the most important learning teachers of small boat safety can take from Lacan's psychoanalytical theorizing is that one must continually 64 examine one's practice for the repressive metaphysic (often unconsciously perpetuated) when 'innocently' teaching from within a totalizing discourse. Narratives and Sub-narratives The narrative of 'safe boating,' as constructed by manuals such as the Safe Baating_Guide (Appendix A) and its numerous associated publications, can be seen as a sub-narrative of a general narrative of education, within the project of modernity. Well intentioned for the most part, it is premised on the notion of developing a 'scientific' body of knowledge, which if properly interpreted, will contribute to the safety and well being of those engaged in the activity. Implicit in a more complete scientific knowledge of one's abilities and limitations, presumably, one would become freer to enjoy the benefits of the wilderness experience. The State can thus be seen to be contributing to the maximization of the potential for enjoyment and legitimate, in its provision of educational initiatives. Within a Hegelian context, knowledge is seen in speculative terms, as leading to a totality of specific disciplines. These knowledges are ultimately synthesized into a coherent and transcendent Ideal that in turn defines the State and Society (Lyotard quoted in Usher & Edwards 1994: 162). In this scenario, most discernible in the Marxist tradition, Knowledge generated in the politically and intellectually free academy is accorded the highest status. Historically, the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have privileged 'scientifically' validated knowledge emanating from the discourses of the 65 universities. While the narrative of 'safe boating' seems a long way from the esoteric critique of European leftist intellectuals, there are undeniable linkages between the production and dissemination of knowledge of'safe boating' in Canadian governmental and university institutions and what Lyotard calls "grand or meta - narratives." As the introduction to the National Drowning Report states, "The development and maintenance of programs depend on having valid, reliable, and current information. The study of water-related deaths provides information that enables The Canadian Red Cross Society to address current issues and design prevention programs aimed at reducing drowning and water-related deaths" (1994). Lyotard suggests that we should be suspicious of the metanarratives of modernity, based on their respective failure to deliver either the emancipation promised by liberal humanism or the totality of knowledge of historical materialism. He further claims that in late modern societies, "Scientific knowledge is to inform people of the reality within which their prescriptions are to be executed" (Usher & Edwards 1994: 162). In the next chapter, I hope to extend Lyotard's analysis of grand narrative to the sub-narrative of 'safe boating', to demonstrate how this particular understanding is privileged and in turn privileges the authors and their associates at the expense, in several ways, of the intended recipients. A Canadian Sub-narrative on 'Safe Boating' 66 The Canadian experience with organizations such as the Canadian Red Cross Society is at the same time unique and similar to experience in other parts of the world. If we accept as true the comment of authors Bill Belanger and Bob McCulloch, that the first recorded appearance of the symbol of the Red Cross was in 1885 during the battle of Batoche, we gain a glimpse of the Canadian-ness of its efforts. In this story, a Major George Steling Ryerson used a Red Cross on a wagon being used to carry wounded soldiers from the battlefield. (Belanger, B. & McCulloch 1990). While this version of the story is congruent with the common humanitarian perception of the neutrality of the Red Cross, a revisionist Canadian historian would have to ask if there was any evidence of that same wagon having carried any metis soldiers. The point in this analysis is not whether or not the Red Cross, symbolically, represented to Major Sterling neutrality, but rather how this act combined with thousands of others since then has shaped the credibility and legitimacy of the institution. On balance, we are probably correct in believing that the track record of the Red Cross has been for the most part exemplary. The point to consider, from within the Lyotardian perspective, is how these interlocking historical and scientific narratives restrict and confine what we can think about such organisations. Until the 1994-1997 Krever inquiry, Canadians generally (and to a large extent still) would have thought the idea of the Red Cross being anything short of beneficent preposterous, if not heretical. (The Krever inquiry into the Canadian blood supply was triggered by the dissemination of blood containing HIV, the AIDs virus.) The fact remains, that all these organizations are made up of individuals with interests, which they vigorously protect. The higher one goes in the institutional hierarchies, the 67 greater the privilege accorded to the functionaries. In 1996 revelations about the payment for testimony, to former heads of the Canadian Red Cross Society of $150,000, provide a concrete example of how deeply this privilege runs (Kenny 1996: A3). Concurrently, the higher one goes within the structure, the closer the credentialling is aligned to that of the institutions (which produce the legitimate scientific knowledge) respecting 'safe boating' practice. For example, the National Drowning Report is authored by Dr. Peter Barss, a consulting physician and injury epidemiologist. He carried out the research at the Institute of Medical Research, Montreal General Hospital; McGill University under the Program for Careers in Health for Indians and Inuits, Health and Welfare Canada. Ironically a long way from its humble beginnings on a wagon at Batoche, we must ask ourselves if it is not time to revisit the relevance of this scientific doctrine - particularly in view of the persistent and growing problem of people drowning in the Duck Lakes of Western Canada. No offence to the work of these talented and dedicated professionals is implied. My claim is that some of the millions of dollars spent on this narrative should be redirected at other 'ways of knowing' about this tragic phenomenon - ways that are closer to 'home', more local. Other Players in the Canadian 'Safe Boating' Narrative It could be easily and effectively argued that the conclusions of the Krever inquiry are irrelevant to the context of 'safe boating' as outlined in this paper. To do so, I think is to miss the point that Lyotard captures in his critique of meta-narratives. In the 68 case of the Krever inquiry, we can see how individuals made decisions, which placed the preservation of the institution and its members ahead of those it meant to serve. As alluded to above, we were limited in our ability even to conceptualize this possibility, by an abiding belief in the progress and 'rightness' of the efforts of these dedicated professionals. Such faith, I believe, is a good demonstration of the power of these invisible narratives to coerce us into believing that all is well. In the case of the Krever inquiry, one could argue that the actions of many professionals combined to cause the horrific result. With 'the safe boating practice' narrative, I believe that the opposite is true. In effect, it is what the institutions normally associated with aiding 'safe boating' are not doing that constitutes the failure. In the following chapter, I apply two techniques of postmodern enquiry, deconstruction of the textual artefacts and an examination of the power/knowledge relationships to the official discourse in an effort to make this coercive attribute more clear. At the same time, 1 demonstrate how a regime of truth allows only certain things to be said. 69 CHAPTER FOUR THE OFFICIAL DISCOURSE Deconstructing the SirfeJ3_aaling_Guid£ At the time of writing, marine safety education for this sector is conducted at the governmental level under the auspices of the Small Craft Safety Program of the Ministry of Transport. At the time of writing (I will argue that this move is part and parcel of the theoretical construction), Search and Rescue (SAR) and some functions of delivering marine safety education have been transferred to Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). Administrative and policy writing responsibilities remain within MOT. The Canadian Red Cross, the leading non governmental organization (NGO), provides educative materials for users of boats less than 5.5 metres. The theoretical underpinnings of this effort can be found embedded in World Health Organization (WHO) epidemiological statistical data groupings E830 and E832 . The definitive popular document of this program from the public perspective is the S^feJBaatmgJjJiMe (Appendix A). The practise of safe boating is, besides being read about in slim government publications, informed by a wealth of other more concrete teaching/learning practices. I do not want to foster the impression that it is merely a rhetorical exercise, in either the playful sense or in the sense of coercing trivialities from bureaucratic jargon. 70 The "Guide" conjures up an image of some of the most proficient users of the boats in question. It suggests to me a silent, plaid shirted man standing on the dock of some remote fishing lodge in Northern Saskatchewan. Silent perhaps, because he knows that the narrative contained in the Safe Boating Guide (Appendix A) is as foreign as the guests he must entertain. The guide is a glove box sized pamphlet in nautical white with horizontal blue stripes, two idyllic colour pictures, a pair of small Canadian flags aside the bold blue lettering. The rear cover has the logo of the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) and a toll-free phone number for more information on boating safety. My first reading would be that one can expect to enjoy such scenes, provided one stays within (actually beneath) the blue "rules" of the Canadian Coast Guard. The forty odd pages between the covers will be used in support my hypothesis, within the reconstructed narrative I plan to develop. COVER OF SAFE BOATING GUIDE 71 One technique of deconstruction is to locate and expose the binary oppositions of the "text" to expose its "violent hierarchies." Binary oppositions are metaphysically embedded in textual artefacts in such seemingly benign forms as rich/poor, male/female, sophisticated/primitive or adult/ child. The critical point in Derridian deconstructions is that the "text" is weighted in favour of one of these poles. By deprivileging the neutral or centred position of the authors, deconstructive readings expose the political and coercive features of a particular discourse. Predictably, the Safe^oating_Quide (Appendix A) contains many of these binary oppositions. Polarities such as safe/dangerous, responsible/ irresponsible, coastal/inland, rich/poor, male/female, sober/drunk, technically superior/ technically impoverished, careful/reckless and law abiding/criminal. In each of these cases, the positionality of the author is aligned with the former. Not surprisingly, in a deconstructive reading, many incidents involving tin boats would be more appropriately described as aligning the victim with the latter. The discursive power inherent in these oppositions manifests itself more clearly if we return to the idea of language being self-referential, for example, we can only talk about good in relation to bad. Oppositional or transgressive readings of the text subvert the power of these "texts" to require or manipulate appropriate behaviour in effect position 'readers' in different ways which effect their lives by rendering them a s powerful or powerless subjects (Gergen 1991: 145). In turning to the guide, we can examine the safe/dangerous opposition from any 72 number of perspectives. "Safe" within the intended meaning might refer, for example, to being cognizant of the weather. The "text" constructs the safe boater, variously, as capable of rational and therefore compliant behaviour (willing to read and understand Callis.innJS.ules or SmallJl&sselJS£gulatinns . . . 2), potentially careless or even reckless (Don't buzz bathing beaches or cruise at high speed in or near an anchorage . . . 38), docile (willing to obey speed, right of way rules . . . 41, 27), juvenile (Don't show off. . . 38), and irresponsible (remember that a life jacket or PFD is no substitute for adult supervision . . . 11). These oppositional poles of the "subtextual" provide some fruitful openings for inquiry. An examination of how the "text" constructs the anonymous writers at M O T reveals them to be Rational (by conflating the writing of this text with other legislatively authoritative texts such as Constructions Standards for Small Vessels or Charts and Publication Regulations . . .9, 26), paternalistic (small craft operators need to have a good level of boating knowledge and skill and Although pleasure boating is a recreational activity, certain rules must be observed. . . 2, 41), valorizing of technical superiority The Canadian Coast Guard does not monitor Channel 9 CB or, Do not try to follow an ACV and do not be alarmed if you see one heading for shore or shallow water at high speed... 75, 33) and expert (more information regarding boat safety courses, small vessel regulations and general boating safety 73 can be obtained by calling the Coast Guard's boating safety hotline 1-800-267-6687... 2). (Small craft warnings are included in marine weather forecasts and near-shore forecasts if winds are expected to exceed twenty knots . . . 31) aligned to create the "text" of what it means to adopt and comply with the rational, legal and regulatory aspect of safe boating practice. A deconstructive reading, for example, might require one to refer to the size and type of boat, to con(text)ualize the event. Meaning in this sense is "within the text." For example, twenty knots of wind would be considered excellent for even a small sailboat, while being described as reckless for a tin boat operator. The apparently empirical knowledge of wind velocity can only be valuable when it is referred through language to create socially constructed (mediated and contingent) meaning. Derrida describes a process, wherein meaning is always constructed in differance to language. As Usher and Edwards explain, these endless substitutions of meaning, the play of differance -Derrida's term for the differing (the 'play of difference') and deferrals (the 'postponement') of meaning come to the fore (Edwards and Usher 1994: 145). If for example we add to the above situation an incident where a drowning occurs in conjunction with shifting winds, meaning would necessarily be deferred (postponed), and again contingent. While admittedly having constructed this scenario to demonstrate the contingent and mediated meaning that comes from "text" - through the violent hierarchies of binary opposition - the situation described could describe any of a number 74 of incidents from Tessler's study (1993). Let us then look at the specificity of the "texf'of an incident from RfialTJrowiung as Derrida's work suggests. In doing so, we will necessarily create another "text" which will necessarily be open to further deconstruction. Tessler's reconstruction of coroners' narrative (already twice mediated by language use) for one such incident is as follows. M 25, was fishing with two friends in a 12-ft aluminum boat with an 18-HP motor on Hankin Lake - the motor stopped and wouldn't start so he put it in gear at full throttle -when it finally did start, the sudden thrust threw everyone overboard: he was heavily dressed, could not swim and had no PFD (.13 blood alcohol ) Jul. 88 (1993: 33). Using the classificatory hierarchies (binary oppositions) previously excavated from the S.afeJBiiating_Guide_(Appendix A), we might conclude that the drowning was a result of a technically malfunctioning motor, on an overpowered boat, complicated by a reckless non-swimmer who was legally drunk. This death from the point of view of the Naticm^alJ^awjiingJBLer^ was not "accidental" and probably "preventable." Let me now "re-story" the event from the perspective of the opposite poles of these "violent hierarchies" outlined above. M 25, obviously knowledgeable about outboards, realized that by improving the air/gas ratio (opening the throttle butterfly valve fully) he could restart the engine. To do this, he would have to disengage the full throttle start lock usually installed on this type of outboard. (Not an unreasonable conclusion, 75 provided the engine isn't in gear). Eighteen horsepower may not have been an unreasonable size of engine considering that the weight of boat, occupants, motor, fuel and gear would have been near one thousand pounds. The issue of not wearing a PFD may have been related to his perception of how his friends might see him, having forgotten it or a belief that he didn't need one. Howsoever we understand this detail, it is complicated and impossible to locate precisely, from the available information. The role played by alcohol consumption is similarly complicated. Societally (emotionally, physiologically and legally), tolerance for consumption in most quarters has diminished significantly in the past twenty odd years. Perhaps our victim was part of that world, where a blood alcohol content of. 13 is still considered moderate. In any case, the construction of the incident around the former set of oppositions presents a diametrically opposite view of this tragedy from the latter. In masking "truth" about the incident in either of these "stories," we considerably alter the epithet his friends and family might feel obligated to write. In constructing our educative endeavours around one, we silence the other. The former favours the "official" text while the latter favours the "local knowledge" specific to the victim. Invariably, conversations about incidents such as the one described above come down to statements such as, "He should have used some common sense." The term "common sense" and others such as 'practical," "sensible"or "reasonable," to name only a few, are best described, within this type of analysis, as an uncritical acceptance of the "regimes of truth" already implicit in the discursive practice (implicit in the "regime of 76 truth" of the official "text"). As these words have no "meaning" outside the context of the specific event being considered or independent of the set of discursive practices described, they serve only further to bias the conclusion. No elucidation can result from their use. Oppositional readings might be more useful to those groups who are "othered" by discursive practices of the hegemonic order. In case of marine safety education, I would include that group of tin boaters, enforcement personnel, policy writers (cultural producers of the history of quotidian practice of safe boating), who understand compliance as a rational construction. Again, the referential characteristic of language, to a wide array of other discursive practices, entrenches the dominant position. In addition to experiential knowledge this group has on its side the legitimising authority of the official "text" in the form of statistical studies done by the Red Cross using WHO categories and methodologies, radio and television advertisements, coroner's reports, displays at boat and sports shows, uniformed SAR technicians conducting voluntary dockside inspections and the like. This constructed perception is a multi-layered, complex web of interrelationships aligned with the "text." The "subtext" provides the rationale for complying with the legal and regulatory aspects of safe boating practice for that group of tin boaters, enforcement personnel, policy writers (cultural producers of the history of quotidian practice of safe boating) who understand compliance as a rational construction. They are thus consumers of their own regime of truth. Of Strands and Resonances 77 Seen from the perspective of Derridian deconstruction, the eminently practical world of delivering marine safety education is problematised. Oppositional readings point to the strangeness of a constantly moving "meaning." Where does agency fit and how can we use this theorisation to improve educative efforts? Derrida claims that these oppositional readings provide a resonance, a new way of seeing an old problem. I suggest that even the most hardened practitioner of the Red Cross school of statistical thought could feel the resonance of the other voice from my narrative. The characterising feature of this form of analysis is that by listening for these resonances of truth, we allow our selves to see strands of another truth (meaning), constructed out of other ways of seeing. As Edwards and Usher elaborate: We see in a way which relates to our concerns and, at the same time, in ways which help us reformulate those concerns through both seeing difference in and recognising different ways of thinking and speaking. We are provided with a new set of vivifying metaphors from which perhaps even momentarily we can escape from the power-knowledge discourses of epistemologically grounded and scientifically validated 'truth', from the logocentrism, as Derrida would put it, of our ways of thinking and speaking (1994: 124). The discourse on safe boating practice is, I believe, one of these totalizing discourses of modernity. In a subsequent chapter, I hope to develop a concurrent strand from a Canadian aboriginal description of the "dreaming" of maps. As alluded to earlier, the ubiquitous "tin boat" has achieved the status of 78 Everyman's boat because of its price, durability and functionality. In the popular press, these factors add up to its constructed perception (proper reading) as the craft of choice for immediate access to the Canadian wilderness. Interwoven in this perception are ideas of freedom, the frontier and of going places "others" cannot. Laws and regulations recede as quickly as distance from the shoreline. What is the nature of these laws and regulations that make it so important to be able to escape their effect and why might this group be more likely to ignore them than, say, the Commodore of a Royal Vancouver Yacht Club? On the surface, the sayables in these laws and regulations are as Derrida predicted - sensible, already said. My contention is that this carefully constructed, politically corrected narrative hides the positionality of the author and deceives the subject by moving the "meaning" of safe boating from a complex set of cultural relations into the supposedly benign world of the technical. Within the rationality of this instrumental construction, it follows that any subject could engage the educational project and learn what is required to become a "safe boater." Continuing within the late modern critical ontology, would require only that we "fine tune" our interventionist educative activities by targeting ever more specific groups with increasingly specific programs. While I readily admit that this paper has targeted a very specific group, I intend to challenge the fundamental framing of the activity rather than rely on the implicit assumptions of deficit within the individual or the fatalism of failed technology. This, I believe, is an exemplar of the Foucauldian "microphysics of power." By framing the activity within "local knowledge," informed by experience, I hope to move the positionality of my "text" toward the subjectivity of the victims of these incidents. 79 Power/Knowledge Relationships Through the privileging of a particular discourse, in our case, that of the Safe Roating_Guide (Appendix A) and its attendant power/knowledge relationships, other "voices" are silenced. In fact, Foucault goes further in saying, "By doing this, discourses 'systematically' form the object of which they speak . . . [they] are not objects; they constitute them" (1974: 49). In this sense, the discourse on safe boating as developed by MOT, the Coast Guard, the Canadian Red Cross, the RCMP, the marine manufacturers, the advertising industry and most of the participants in the activity constitute what it means to be a safe boater. The problem, at least within the confines of the construction of the idea of safe tin boating in general, is to understand why some members of the community refuse or are unable to engage in this activity as prescribed by the discourse. Foucault would describe this discourse as disciplinary, to normalise activity within the realm of safe boating. Normal (rational) subjects, as constructed by this discourse it seems, would be coerced by any of Bentham's remedies. As the NaticuiaLDjrcjwjQmg Report told us, in 1992 seventy-three people somehow escaped the gaze of this discourse and ultimately paid with their lives. Society paid in many ways as the report suggests; lost income from men [sic] in their prime productive years, squandered education dollars, costs associated with attempted rescues and investigations to determine the cause. Individuals paid with loss of loved ones, incapacitating grief and in some cases with debilitating injuries directly associated with injuries incurred in the 80 incident. Only for a firm believer (or one thoroughly propagandized by the tenants) of modernity's science, can this be a description of delivering the greatest good for the greatest number as understood by Bentham. We must hear other "voices" if we hope to reconceptualize our understanding of safe boating in a way that prevents another seventy-three from disappearing beneath the deceptively smooth waters of our "modern" lakes and rivers in future years. Rumblings within the recreational marine community at the time of writing seem to be suggesting that the "discursive elite" are increasingly leaning toward Bentham's second remedy for social control. Licencing of small boat operators, and its attendant fines and prison terms for the recalcitrant, cannot be seen as other than a repressive manoeuvre, falling on the heels of a flawed and failed discourse (Canadian Coastguard 1996; 1996a). Other initiatives, such as the abandonment of West coast lighthouses to unproven technology and a shuffling of the lower orders (SAR moves from M O T to DFO), speak loudly of the malaise within this modern discourse. Foucault speaks of the time when "normalizing discourses" are in crisis as the time when resistant and alternate voices can be heard. Perhaps that time is near. On Docile Subjects Elucidating further, and perhaps as parallel to my distaste for more regulation (which incidentally runs contrary to the emancipatory goals of humanism), Foucault provides a detailed description of the workings of his "power/knowledge" formation in 81 The Archaeology of Knowledge and Discipline and Punish: The Birth of Prison. (Foucault 1974, 1979). In a study of the reformulation of "madness" in the Victorian period and latterly, with the conceptualization of prisons, Foucault points to the self-discipline late modernists impose on themselves as a condition of operating within a particular discourse. As he traces the genealogy of these through their respective histories, he finds not the incremental linearity of modernism, but ruptures and discontinuity. Apparently "progress" in the language of modern humanism evolved in fits and starts in response to the development of new "technologies of self." He contends that with the rise in prison populations in the early modern era, other more efficient ways of managing the unruly had to be found. Specific groups - psychiatry in the case of madness and the combined forces of medical and legal professions in prisons - undertook the project of studying the "meaning of madness" and in doing so, constituted what it means to be "mad" in a modernist sense. Thus, knowledge about the "madness" discourse becomes the defining factor in having "power" over that discourse. Knowledge thus problematised is never innocent and vice versa, no power exists without an accompanying knowledge base. By inextricably linking this power/knowledge formation, Foucault explains how being one who speaks through a particular discourse (the discourse itself being transparent) by necessity privileges that discourse, while simultaneously silencing others. Let us turn to the activity of safe boating practice in search of evidence of such a "discourse." First, to what authorities do the writers of the Safe Boating Guide (Appendix A) turn in search of legitimation ('expert' confirmatory testimony)? Page 82 nine suggests that all vessels up to six metres must meet or exceed the minimum Construction Standards issued by Transport Canada, while page 13 suggests that information on the disposal of outdated flares should be sought from the nearest law enforcement agency, Canadian Coast Guard office or fire department. Similarly, Collision Regulations the government of Canada publisher (18), essential charts available from the Hydrographic Chart Distribution Office (26), information on the buoyage system from Canada Communication Group government of Canada (27), Notices to Mariners from the Canadian Coast Guard (30), weather information from Weatheradio Canada (31), information on the Great Lakes locks system from the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority and Search and Rescue from the Canadian Marine Rescue Auxiliary - collectively, one stop shopping on the discourse of safe boating. I am not arguing that the knowledge that anyone or group of these organizations dispenses is invalid, rather, that the interrelatedness that the collective group holds on the "discourse" is constitutive of that selfsame discourse. It effectively grants itself the power to silence all the others, through its self-referential knowledge. As Lyotard comments, "One final remark about technoscience. It fulfills the project of modernity: man makes himself master and possessor of nature. But at the same time, contemporary technoscience profoundly destabilizes that project. For the term "nature" must also include everything constituting the human subject: its nervous system, genetic code, cortical processor, visual and auditory receptors, communication systems (particularly linguistic), its organizations of group life, and so on. Its science and technoscience also end up being part of nature" (Lyotard 1992:20). The central problem becomes that only those aspects 83 that can be measured or controlled are sanctioned for legitimate study. The techno-scientific authority, which all of these organisations share, further entrenches its authority, through links with organizations such as the Canadian Red Cross and the World Health Organization, which in turn legitimises its activity with more scientifically constructed research. Finally, having come full circle, we are left with a "discourse" that failed seventy-three tin boaters in 1992. Ironically, docile subjects to an invisible knowledge/power formation become its victims. In this sense and others, the knowledge, implicit in "the discourse on safe boating" is not innocent, rather, its power to coerce is -deadly. Equally and not less pervasive, the gaze of this discourse is not fixed on the subjects alone. As stated earlier, these systems of surveillance are most accurately described as a complex of webs, attached at various and changing points to the knowledge bases and alliances of power concomitant with their respective coercive powers. Those responsible for the administration and delivery of educative endeavours are simultaneously enveloped in another normalizing, complementary, discourses, as managers. For example, what does it mean to be a good "manager" of the delivery of "safe boating practice education" (Usher & Edwards 1994: 112) The public health definition of surveillance [sic], as described in the MatiojialJjro^yjiing_R^Qrt, is ... the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health data essential to the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice, closely integrated with the timely dissemination of these data to those who need to know. The final link in the surveillance chain is the application of these data to prevention and 84 control, italics mine) Centres for Disease Control, 1986 quoted in the National Drowning Report, (1994: 6) Clearly, the Canadian Red Cross understands its data as cumulative knowledge gained from surveillance that must be interpreted and disseminated in a timely fashion to those who need to know. From a technico-empiricist perspective, these components fit - hand in glove. From a Foucauldian perspective, the data (constructed as neutral facts) gleaned from surveillance (of self and 'other') are interpreted (within a specific discourse) and disseminated (used to normalize behaviours) to those who need to know (practitioners of the discourse of safe boating). From the perspective of the techno-empirical rationalist discourse all the elements of a program for safe boating are in place. The persistent problem of people drowning themselves by ignoring the best efforts to public health authorities (here the water safety organizations) can be dealt with by honing the 'edge' of programs directed at the offending subgroups (in our case, tin boaters) perhaps by turning up the heat of regulatory enforcement (licencing). In view of the above analysis, concluding that even from a Foucauldian perspective seems reasonable, all the ingredients for compliance with safe boating practice are in place. We.can begin to see how important it might be to be "othered" by this set of discursive practices. First, the observation that managers or spokespersons of the discourse are, as Foucault suggests, blind to or unwilling to step outside the discourse because of the disciplinary ramifications for their personal well 85 being. These disciplinary forces take many forms; reasonably well paying jobs in an uncertain market, a comprehensive and rational body of knowledge with a 'history' of its own, a feeling of being a contributory member of a humanitarian organization and constructions of 'self," that 'need' the reinforcement of a coherent rationale. In the myriad of combinations that these disciplinary forces could generate, it would be easy to see how the repressive forces might proceed from the "mental" to the "physical." For an individual, in the employ of any of these agencies to maintain an oppositional or transgressive stance, would be a very "visceral" experience - thus the connection to Foucault's "docile bodies." Further, questioning the Neitzchean roots of Foucault's thought one must interrogate self as the contingent and changing product of a shifting deployment of cultural and corporeal forces (Miller, 1993: 69). It is, however, not only the compliant, those normalized or propagandized by the discursive practices of safe boating, rather the subjects of the narrative - the dead, we must interrogate. Given the impossibility of this task, let me now return to the Foucaldian "text" for clues to why? It is the abnormal which arouses theoretical interest in the normal. Norms are recognized as such only through infractions. Functions are revealed only through their breakdown Life rises to the consciousness and science of itself through maladaption, failure and pain (Canguilhem 1993: 60). Is unsafe boating, the negative reality, as found at the margins, perhaps a more fruitful 86 opening for discovering the "microphysics of power" as Foucault suggests? Can unsafe boating properly be described as a "limit-experience," one that pushes the limits of our subconscious to know one's 'true' or 'authentic' self? To contextualize a perplexing aspect of the tin boat story found in the ReaUto^ming, I will explore the dichotomous Dionysian/Apollonian metaphor that pervades Western literature. Limit Experiences Foucault describes, in connection with his experiences in student riots in 1968 in Tunis and Paris and later in reference to sado-masochistic homosexual experiences in San Francisco, the tension Nietzsche attributed to the fact that "every human being embodies a compound of nature and culture, chaos and order, instinct and reason- two heterogenous dimensions of being symbolized, . . . by Dionysus and Apollo" (Miller 1994: 69). The wild animal instinct and the propensity to be very drunk seemed to be not far below the surface in many of the incidents described in the boating safety literature. Miller continues, "To tap the primal essence of our own animal nature was, for Nietzsche, to grasp anew the mysterious capacity of "transcendence," and to exercise what he called the "will to power." As important and liberating as this capacity was it touched only the Dionysian element of the human compound" (1994: 70). The knowledgeable discourse of safe boating "knows" the body of the victims of so-called "safe boating," it records gender, age, where they were at the time of the incident, if they had any predisposing pathologies and how much alcohol they had consumed. A quick 87 survey of the data reveals that many of these people were not drunk; they were very drunk. By separating out the blood alcohol statistic, this modern discourse de-contextualizes the event. The Dionysian side of humanness refutes and tries, often to the extent of its own destruction, to flee the pressures of the Apollonian logic and reason. Back to Nietzsche for the observation that, "The secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is - to live dangerously . . . the riddle which man must solve, he can only solve in being, in being what he is and not something else" (Miller 1994: 71). How often metaphors of the Canadian wilderness, in literature, advertising and the songs of the frontier encapsulate this message. Notably, the recently sanitized beer and cigarette commercials that valorize this masculine animalism usually construct the consumption of their products as man [sic] against nature. The women, powerless within a complementary discourse, are irresistibly attracted to these weekend warriors. None of the dark side of self-destruction ever appears, beer drinking now occurs after the heroes return, triumphant in their conquest of nature. Corbin relates an interesting parallel in his description of an 1835 event when, "Tourists, and even simple bathers who enjoyed watching a storm unleash its fury, could hope to take in the efforts of the crew of a sinking ship" (1995: 245). Partly vicarious, partially voyeuristic, the animalist struggle against nature has a long history in western maritime mythology. Thus constructed, the oppositional reaction to the discource becomes in fact an essential product or outcome of it. Any attempts to regulate and control are met with opposition from the margins (here metaphorically significantly, I think the geographic 88 margins) by those most marginalized by the discourse. The more tight the surveillance, the more vigourous the resistance. Ruptures and discontinuities break out everywhere, more remote locations, more bizarre circumstances and larger groups of people as with Kelowna's Peach Festival, Nanaimo's bathtub races or Vancouver's Symphony of Fire. So-called risk taking behaviour, moved from the realm of behaviourist aberration to the realm of the product of a repressive discourse, illustrates the extent to which this discourse is constitutive of the problem. The 'Safe Boating' Narrative on Beaver Dam Jumping Before going into an analysis of what the narrative of 'safe boating' might say about beaver dam jumping, let me say that I am aware that I am valorizing a particular set of behaviours (albeit opposite), in the same way that the 'narrative' does. This is a tentative and temporary position I will take to demonstrate, what I believe may be happening more often than we think. What is striking about activities such as beaver dam jumping is its distance from the conventional narrative on safe boating. We cannot talk about beaver dam jumping in the context of 'safe boating' except by describing it as aberrant and negative. If the Ontario Provincial Police or Ministry of the Environment enforcement officials ever had to investigate a fatality associated with this activity, it would be described as a death by misadventure. Statistically, Doctor Barss' research would be forced to add it to the list of "irrational behaviours" around which an educative or enforcement initiative should be constructed (if it were more widespread). My point 89 is, that from Tom's perspective, beaver dam jumping is neither irrational, nor particularly dangerous. He knows 'better', or at least 'different'. The instructive potential of the narrative of'safe boating' is simply - irrelevant. The experiential facts generated by these two ways of knowing are incommensurable. Licencing Tom or fining him if they caught him, would have been the source of great amusement the following Friday at the Northland Hotel. It would only add to the sense of ridiculousness, which many of these people already hold for the legitimizing authorities. Perhaps we must come to grips with the ideas that beaver dam jumping is one of the things people do with tin boats. What can valorizing Coast Guard technicians in a hovercraft or proselytizing the intricacies the Canadian buoyage system possibly do to convince Tom (who I swear had never see a hovercraft or marker buoy) that these people are consuming his tax dollars in his best interest? Again, in searching for universal truths about 'safe boating,' the narrative has painted too wide a swathe through the community of boaters. What we need I suggest, is specific knowledge constructed by individuals, who have credibility with the Toms, of the Canadian wilderness. By valorizing Tom's considerable skills in a tin boat, I have created another incongruity as alluded to above. While Tom may be atypical of the stereotype of an occasional sport fisher on a weekend outing, he is typical of the group of people who drown in 'activities of daily living and occupation' as described in Barss' research (1994: 46). Even here, if he showed up as a statistic, he would be atypical because he was, to the best of my knowledge, always sober when jumping beaver dams. Is Lyotard asking us to develop strategies for each and every segment of the boating community, for 90 all levels of ability and experience? I think not, more appropriately, his work may point to a problem with education in general. If the postmodern moment has anything to say about 'safe boating' it will be that Tom and the many users of tin boats, both like him and unlike him, have grown sceptical of these modern discourses. Sceptical too, as Spivak notes in the sense that, "Critical evaluation is dismissed as "pedantic" by the real consumers of popular culture" (1996: 246). As we collectively, and more likely innocently, withdraw our support for these elites (a strategy Vaclav Havel suggested was used in the 'Velvet Revolution' in Czechoslovakia in 1988), their authority to prescribe the conditions of our understandings of activities like tin boating also disappear. This I believe is closer to what is happening, than any irrational or revolutionary tendencies. In a sense, the perplexing support of neo-conservative administrations by people, who grew up in the sixties and seventies when governments solved problems with programs, is a reflection of their growing awareness of the irrelevance of many of these now mature bureaucracies. This is different from the structuralist, 'us' against 'them' of sixties radicalism. Being Marginal to a Narrative The group of boaters I have alluded to thus far suddenly appear to be not nearly as homogenous as the euphemistic 'tin-boater' name I have applied suggests. Many of the dead in Tessler and Barss' studies may have shared some common terrain [sic] water, with my hypothetical construction. They may have been as unlike Tom or Jack 91 Rosenthal as I have suggested or they may be similar in some respects. That their boat of choice [choice to the extent that their wealth or 'pre-(text)' allowed] was a tin-boat is hardly definitive. Tom used one, I suspect, because the 'Lund Outfitter' was a part of yet another narrative he was more familiar with. To a certain extent, the 'tin-boat' is a poor cousin to the 'greater than 5.5m' class of boats valorized in the S^eJkialingJ^lanual, less seaworthy, less prestigious and for our purposes, more often associated with drowning than any other. Its status is that of the subaltern (though not strictly so in the Spivakian sense). In the hands of a weekend sport fisher, we might more properly construct it as a dangerous commodity prone to taking its occupants so far from the familiar con-(text) of their familiar highway and urban surroundings that it ultimately consumed their lives. As for the purveyors of the narrative, the Coast Guard, the Red Cross and the police forces, its conspicuous absence from the sub-(text) is not nearly so mysterious. Within the postmodern moment, all these narratives are true to a greater or lesser extent, but more importantly from very specific and particular perspectives. Being marginal to any one of these narratives is an undesirable position; it's just that some are more undesirable than others. In combination with the deconstruction of the popular discourse which follows, I believe we may have inadvertantly (at least on the surface) created a dangerously deceptive sense of security, oblivious in large part to the physical environment in which participants find themselves. 92 Chapter Five THE POPULAR DISCOURSE The Popular Curriculum According to Lund and Others Note: Some photos of Lund boats in this catalogue show factory and/or dealer installed options. Photographs are taken under controlled conditions. While every effort is made to depict safe boating, the photographs are not intended to serve as examples of correct boat procedures. While boats photographed are equipped with USCG (United States Coast Guard)-approved life jackets and other required safety gear, these are not necessarily visible in all photographs. Because Lund is dedicated to constant product improvements, the specifications, options, colour selections and model availabilities of our boat are subject to change without notification. LUND, A TRADITION OF QUALITY 1996 (Appendix B) On first reading, the above disclaimer seems to be just the product of a legal department of a major industrial manufacturer, written as a preemptory strike against what Canadians generally see as an overly litigious American population. Closer 93 scrutiny reveals some fruitful openings for the examination of tin boat safety in this analysis. As with the Safe Boating Guide (Appendix A), I intend to begin with a deconstruction of the "text" of the graphic imagery. Ironically, the text appears in white against a light green yellow background, underwater! The artist's back cover depiction of this underwater world is actually contiguous with the front cover (See Appendix B). When opened, the image shows a thin layer of froth atop two significantly different coloured waters. The shallow left side (rear cover) is light in colour, home to a school of small bait fish, while the right (front cover) shows a dark rather deeper and impenetrable blue green with a large menacing looking fish warily eyeing a corkscrew-like lure. On the surface of the water, in a Lund Pro-V boat (featured on page 28), sits a red shirted fisherman (gender distinction intended), anxiously awaiting his first early morning strike. Notwithstanding the three motors on this magnificent machine, it paints the quintessential modern image of a civilized man taking on the hostile and predatory wilderness. Ironically, due to the exaggerated foregrounding of the fish, it appears larger than the boat, more menacing especially when coupled with mythical Western-Celtic fear of sea monsters; it creates an anxious tension for the excitement that will ensue, if only the fish would strike (Corbin 1995: 7). When I first connected this surreal sectional "boat over sea-creature" image, I thought it merely an interesting twentieth century updating of the sixteenth century La Cosmographie universelle de tout le monde (Paris 1575) shown as plate one in Corbin's Lure of the Sea (1994: 213). Serendipitously, I purchased a 1990 limited edition print by Jo Ann George (see Appendix E) with a similar juxtaposition of characters with the notable exception; one of the two figures in the West 94 coast style canoe was a woman. In this depiction, the water surface occurs approximately almost three quarters of the way up the picture and the fish appears three to four times larger than the canoe (which would typically be 18 - 20 feet in length). Their canoe and fishing gear by contrast with the Lund photolithograph are drab earth tones. In view of these first three occurrences, I was shocked when the 1996 OMC® Aluminium Boat Group's (Lund's principal competitor) Sea Nymph '96: When Fishing Comes First™ (see Appendix F) catalogue arrived several months later, with eight more variations on the same theme. Clearly, large sea creatures under boats are an important mythological signifier of the danger implicit in the unknown depths. In the following sections, I will develop some of these significatory links in an attempt to show how the authors (primarily advertising designers for multinational concerns) manipulate the "text" by aligning their productions with the "popular." As outlined in Chapter 3, popular culture and the textual and visual artefacts produced in support of its activities can be seen as an unofficial and often contra curriculum for would-be practitioners. The consumption of recreational activities follows a carefully choreographed script provided in part, but not exclusively, by those best positioned to benefit from the sale of commodities that support that activity. We can best understand popular education in this sense (not to be confused with the Freirean variety) as "education" for consumption. The goal posts are always moving as the disclaimer suggests and the buyer (student) must always be wary. In this context, understanding the regime of truth within which we construct a particular activity is useful in understanding the motivation. Deconstructing the visual images proffered by those who control the 95 manufacture of the desire to participate is a powerful investigative tool. I will first turn my attention to the Lund presentation. The most striking (and somewhat contradictory to my experience) feature of this is that the man pictured in the boat is alone. Has he no friends or children? Is he alone because his purchase has alienated him from companionship - alien, like his aluminum boat, to this organic culture? He looks mannequin-like, in stark contrast to the hyperealism reserved for the detail on the fish scales or the tree branches in the background - unable or unwilling to partake in the seeming natural splendour around him. The boat, with its straight horizontal red, black and white stripes, seems to be rising from the mists of an unknowable depth. Fighter jet windshields and comfortable seats hint at the possibility of bringing the technological superiority of the American military-industrial complex and comforts of a middle class home to this surround. The large mutant fish with its spiny dorsal and curving tail is infinitely better suited to the environment but, irresistibly drawn to the artificial and fatal lure, while a school of bait fish swims unperturbed only a few feet away. As part of the re-storying of the tin boat narrative, this picture is illustrative of the weaving of signals and symbols, which form the discourse of recreational consumer culture, crafts its curriculum. As the Lund (Appendix B) brochure says, "And every year we push the standards of quality and performance a little bit higher. This is what has made Lund™ the industry leader since we crafted our first boat over 47 years ago (1996: 45). Yet exactly what in the discourse has been pushed a little bit harder? What are Lund™ and other boat builders really 96 selling? How does interrogating the discourse bring us any closer to an understanding of the way consumers of this construction continue to endanger themselves and loved ones? Elements of the Discourse As the cover picture implies, and the pictures and text within affirm, this publication constructs some interesting binaries. The boats and their occupants are associated (named) with speed, power, strength, endurance and style. Nature on the other hand is emasculated - all the pictures in the forty-six page document show calm water, no rapids, reefs or squalls. After a passing reference to safety regarding the Baron line, on page three, not one direct reference occurs until page thirty-three in a reference to the Alaskan (Lund 1996, Appendix B). The Harbour Security™ Plan referred to by the OMC® Aluminum Boat Group refers, paradoxically, to protection for owners against losses associated with the commodity, rather than the occupants (Lowe 1996: 32, Appendix I). Even to the choice of name, "harbour" [ME herberwe < OE here army+ beorg refuge], the inference is one of safety, ironically, not for the tin boater. Clearly, safety as portrayed in the official discourse developed in Chapters 4 does not sell boats -speed and power do! Speed and power are the central characters in the modern narrative. From its earliest concrete manifestations during the industrial revolution, machines claimed value 97 because they could do more work, on larger pieces, more quickly. Trains were faster than horses, carried more passengers and cargo, generated more profit ergo, they were a good thing. Similarly, steam replaced sail because it was more dependable and increased the "velocity" at which goods moved through the market mechanisms. Writers, speaking about the essence of postmodernity, often comment on the shift from spatial to temporal metaphoricity (Harvey, Gergen, Baudrillard). The postmodern era witnesses the shift from a geographic referencing (exploration literature) to a time based paradigm (Trick in conversation). The sub-narrative, concerning tin boating, follows this shift meticulously. Early models delivered the experience with five to ten horsepower, while current manufacturer specifications indicate that adequate "performance" is achieved with ten times the power (Lund™, Sea Nymph®, Prince craft). In this sense, the blurring of images often associated with postmodernity becomes the real. Going faster places the occupant in the familiar environs of a car or aeroplane. The wilderness scenery is not important for any idyllic absorption, but for the process of passing through it quickly. The hypereality of a Baudrillardian simulacra is brought home in sharpened images of a fleeting shoreline in the promotional literature (Roughneck 1996: 6, Lund 1996: 23, Appendices B,G). The consequences for marine safety are obvious - the statistical evidence frequently notes that speed or overpowering were a factor in an incident. In contradistinction to the above observation, most of the photos seem to be selling tranquility, perhaps best epitomized in the Lowe®, sepia tone cover photo (Lowe 1996:1, Appendix I). Given the age of the clientele (see photo), I suggest this scenario is an attempt to harken back to a time when the narrative of tin boating was nascent and, by 98 inference, more innocent. Significantly, the small inset photos juxtapose a voluptuous woman and child (symbol of fertility) and a grandfather and child (symbol of benign self-sacrifice). In the first case, the woman appears to be relaxing in the sun-shadow of the canopy while the child gleefully looks forward. This image on closer reflection would hardly be one most mothers would use, to describe time spent aboard boats with young children. The second image also seems wrong in the sense that most of the other images show men focused on the seriousness of the event - concentrating on piloting a high speed craft or fishing in earnest. The message is clearly that only a "grandfather type" would have time to sit midships, away from the motor, past his prime as a pilot predator. The destabilizing power of these subliminal messages is apparent in the contradictions presented on closer examination of the "text" of the images. In the larger picture that combines the official discourse described in Chapter 4, the hegemony of larger, faster craft is also apparent. From the bouyage system (traffic lanes, radio beacons and radar reflectors) to the communication systems (VHF radios, global positioning systems and electronic charts) the hegemony of power and speed is endemic to the marine safety narrative. Like aircraft, segregated at a modern airport based on speed and size, tin boaters are marginal in the overarching narrative. In the same way that a Cessna might be "othered" to a municipal airport (shorter runways, no fire fighting equipment or no instrument landing capability), tin boats typically operate outside the modernly constructed "safe zones." If we look at a modern control tower, its gaze is comprised of multi level (altitudinally and directionally coordinated positioning) knowledge of the relative position of the craft within its embrace. By contrast, the tin 99 boat, particularly within the popular narrative currently being examined, seems cut loose from the locating mechanisms of modernity. Losses (life and property) within this sector of the narrative exist as such, prior to any incident. Even in the most functionalist terms, our knowledge is a void. Perhaps the romantic characterization of the abyss of the sea (Corbin) has more presence in our construction than we modernly admit. Once we engage the wilderness described in Chapter 2, we step outside these discourses in a very profound way. In much of consumer culture, female sexuality through association is used to convey the desirability of the product. Female flesh is conspicuously absent in this production. Only one woman appears in a bathing suit and she, in an over the shoulder shot, at the helm of a fast runabout, in the company of two tense looking men (Lund 1996:13, Appendix B). Other pictures of women show them sensibly dressed for summer in the northern wilderness. Jackets and hats presumably guard against the cool weather and bugs. Also noticeably absent in their attire are life jackets (excepting two small pictures on pages 40 and 42) - they are invariably represented as mothers, either holding small children or watching them in another part of the boat. It seems that Lund™ knows its clientele consists of the young families, particularly the fathers and grandfathers of the American Midwest. Earnest, no nonsense, clean living sort of folks with no time or appreciation for the seductive intrigue of the voluptuous models in other boat promotional literature. I suggest that because these boats are bought with increasingly scarce discretionary income, Lund™ has made a conscious decision to de-sexualize its advertising in an effort not to alienate the women in these men's lives. We can see this as 100 an American family values influenced discourse, leaning heavily on the neo-conservative and evangelical Christian movements of our neighbours to the south. The problem created by this de-contextualized imagery is that it simply does not square with the statistical evidence gathered by Dr. Barss and others. As Wernick suggests, an(other) story can be constructed alongside and in opposition to this American discourse. Do the authors really expect us to believe that the drink holders are for Coke as the pictures suggest? If so, how does this mesh with the fact that more than 40% of drowning victims were legally impaired? Why is it so essential to "write-out" the alcohol factor in these sales brochures? My personal experience in the bars, lodges and restaurants of the towns of these wilderness destinations reminds me of a drunken lasciviousness completely absent in this literature. I remember an inside joke among young native women in a town in Northwestern Ontario, that made reference to the season of Winnebago babies corresponding to the May 15 opening of fishing season. I suggest that in the same way that this debauchery is written out of the advertising part of the unofficial curriculum, so also have concerns about safety. In deference to the puritan Christian values of the American heartland, a sober, sanitized, de-sexualized metaphor emerges. Ironically, the second largest manufacturing facility in the Lund™ corporation names Steinbach, a Mennonite town in Manitoba as its home. Elements of the American Colonizing Discourse 101 This series of metaphors makes up what I will refer to as a colonizing discourse. The split between the southern, American version and the more northerly, Canadian one can be seen in the sales brochures, in the topography of the landscape, species of fish, severity of the climate, species of trees, shape of the boat and style of fishing. The manufacture of these boats, not surprisingly takes place on the divide of the two great drainage basins of the North American continent - Hudson Bay to the north and the Mississippi River Basin to the south. Sharing water as an organizing theme for our purposes, the two regions are as different as night and day. Most of the northern half the region over which the discourse has power is frozen for several months of the year. In the southern chain of lakes and rivers, successive glaciations have scoured the landscape, leaving swampy lowlands drained by lazy creeks in stark contrast to the sharp rocky shorelines and rapids of the Canadian shield to the north. The waters of the southern system are typically muddy with reed or lily pond shorelines, while the north is rocky, punctuated by sand or pebble beaches. In the promotional literature only Lund™ (Appendix B), and they marginally, seem to have captured this difference. The important difference for boating safety relates to air and water temperature, underwater topography and current. As Barss' research points out, the majority of deaths by drowning occur in the months of May-June and September-October, when water temperature significantly lowers time one can spend in the water, before the debilitating effects of hypothermia set in (1992). A careful examination of the literature shows a split in design within this size of boats, which I believe exemplifies other important differences. For example, the 102 Roughneck catalogue titled 1996 Boats As Tough As You Are (see Appendix G), in an oblique reference to oil rig workers promotes a unique and distinctly American style known as Jon boats. Khaki camouflage paint, with its military connotations, immediately introduces a foreignness to the discourse in this subset of boats. Characteristically, these boats are extremely flat bottomed with as little as 6" of freeboard when fully loaded. Often squared bowed, the fourteen-foot nine inch long, 1548VTN model (page 3) is rated for forty horsepower. While suited to the bayou country of the south central United States, this boat would be a dangerous commodity in the rugged Canadian wilderness. The entire genre of "bass boats," reflects a preoccupation with speed and power that is characteristically American. Capable of speeds greater than 70 miles per hour, speed is seen as necessary to ensure that the "professional" tournament fisher reaches favoured fishing holes ahead of his competition. This idea of a fishing hole being crowded exists in contradistinction to the solitary vastness of the Canadian wilderness and is probably significant in the observation in Red Cross literature, that drowning deaths are seldom witnessed (Tessler 1993). In Chapter 6,1 analyse tournament fishing as an industry. Finally, distinctions in the life forms that inhabit this hypothetical divide provide clues to the differences, which this modernist story attempts to blur. The warmer waters of the south are home to various species of crappie, bass and catfish grouped under the "panfish" designation (Lowe® Aluminum Boats and Pontoons 1996: 8, Appendix I). Northern species, highly prized within this construction for their strength and size, include Lake Trout (Lund: A Tradition of Quality 1996: 13, 15, Appendix B), pickerel (Lund: A Tradition of Quality 1996: 17, 19, 21) and Jacks (Lund: A Tradition of Quality 103 1996: 29, 31). Parallelling the European hegemonic notion, developed during the seventeenth century, northern cultures are seen as being more vigorous, genetically predisposed to technological and economic superiority (Adas). Not surprisingly, the refugee descendants of this European story now continue to tell of the imagined vigour and robustness of their colonial appendage to the north. Even the naming of the fish is subject to Americanisms- "lunkers, tyee, Muskie, walleye and Northern Pike overwrite the domestic pickerel, jacks (slough sharks) and rainbow nomenclature. Similarily, Grumman®, Rogue™, Renegade™, And Outlaw™ harken back to a highly romanticized and overwritten American wild west (Grumman: Great Value Advantage, Appendix H ) . This naming illustrates an interesting postmodern dilemma. When it is advantageous for a particular discourse to appropriate characteristics of another, it does so. As Fiske quotes Douglas and Isherwood in Reading the Popular: Enjoyment of physical consumption is only part of the service yielded by goods; the other part is the enjoyment of sharing names... Physical consumption involves proving, testing or demonstrating that the experience in question is feasible. But the anthropological argument insists that by far the greater part of utility is yielded not at proving but in sharing names that have been learned and graded. This is culture (Fiske 1989:30). Even to the naming of fish, the violent hierarchies described by Derrida (see Chapter 3 & 4), privilege one in favour of another. For purposes of selling boats, it is more convincing to 104 associate one's product with the more vigorous and powerful in deference, even to the more local surround, where the boats are manufactured. Significantly, only Lund™, with a major manufacturing presence in Canada, picks up on this distinction. Another important element of the discourse as told by Lund™ relates to the subservience of nature to machines. As Michael Adas relates, the influence of Europeans such as August Comte was seminal in this discourse of dominance. For Comte, advances in scientific thought were essential to the evolution of humanity and the greater social harmony that would ensue when people concentrated on controlling nature rather than dominating each other (1989: 213). In the late modern period, the domination is complete (more so in the United States than in Canada). Any road map of the American heartland shows paved roads surrounding almost every lake and parallelling nearly all the rivers in contrast to the rugged logging and seismic roads of what remains of the Canadian wilderness. The proliferation of "fly-in" destination resorts exhibiting at the Vancouver Boat Show is testimony to the popular appeal of remoteness, within this discourse. More likely to be strapped to the pontoons of a Beaver or Otter aircraft, tin boats are seen as integral to the hinterland up north. While the coniferous forests of the Canadian Shield fall to the feller bunchers and chainsaws of Germany and Sweden, the idea that nature in its wildest form can be conquered by machines and technology reigns supreme. References to Bass Power Tools (Lowe Aluminum Boats and Pontoons 1996: 7, Appendix I), or Roughneck Jon Bass boats "built for battle" (Roughneck 1996, Boats As Tough As You Are: 5, Appendix G) or Grumman (of World War II aircraft fame, Appendix H) prowling the backwaters . . . 105 (Grumman,Great Value Advantage: 13, Appendix H) seem to stand out in an age of increasing environmental sensitivity in most other quarters. The factory installation of "live wells," aerated and lighted, speaks volumes to the idea of keeping live fish within the boat until a larger specimen can be caught. Lund's reference to being at the "Top of the Food Chain" (Lund, A Tradition of Quality 1996: 20, Appendix B), nowadays seen as being an unenviable position due to concentrations of toxins, is celebrated within this metaphor of domination. As a discourse of modernity, Foucault urges us to look to see who has been left out of the narrative, when looking for clues about whose story we are reading. With this idea in mind, I now turn to the stories of those silenced in this, the dominant version. Some Ideas on Those 'Written Out' by the American Discourse The metaphor of dominance clearly extends beyond technological and economic superiority. Conspicuously absent from the tin boat promotional literature are the native Indians of the Canadian shield. Equally strange is the absence of black people in all but one picture (ironically beside a Prince craft Yukon) in these brochures (Princecraft, The Perfect Escape 1996: 26). Within popular American mythology, from Tom Sawyer to the catfish pie of the American blues, the connection of fishing and the black subculture is strong. Why, then, would sellers of the lowest priced point of access to the water ignore (or more accurately remove) any reference to a group, which must be a significant part of its clientele. Similarly, in Canada, among Indian or metis peoples, the aluminum boat 106 displays its ubiquity. Why would it be desirable for Prince craft to seek a celebrity endorsement from Felipe Alou, a Hispanic manager of the Montreal Expos, when thousands of seemingly more appropriate hunting and fishing guides from across the territory must surely be available (Prince craft, The Perfect Escape 1996: 17). Alou, I suggest is seen as successful within the extended and parallel discourse of sports as business. Like Pavel Bure's 1995 endorsement of Maxum boats in Vancouver, athletic prowess and success are commodities, as surely as the recent sale of Wayne Gretsky by the L A Kings demonstrates. Commodification is intrinsic to the bourgeois understanding everything. Associating the acquisition of boats and consumption of this set of recreational activities, with success in other venues, is an example of the predatory elite using popular culture's modus operandi - appropriate whatever you need and recontextualize it. Finally, teenagers excepting those in the company of a father or grandfather figure are conspicuously absent. Could it be because they do not buy boats or should we consider teenagers in the context of the nuclear family? Again the idea, that if it can't be commercially conquered, it does not merit mention. The true predation of consumer capitalism lies in the realm of identification. In a recent Vancouver Sun article, Shari Graydon elaborates on the work of Dallas Smythe in this regard. Smythe takes the issue of commodification to its logical conclusion; the real job of television programming is to deliver the customers to the various business interests (Vancouver Sun, March 18, 1996). In a seeming reversal of our usual understanding, Smythe declares that in this sense, the commodity (for the multinational producer) is the potential customer. Apropos to our discussion of the 107 proliferation of "outdoorsman" shows, Graydon cites the Sports Network (named as the provider of seven of the ten shows) as claiming, "We deliver the male." With respect to the gender bias in these shows, little more need be said about the deliberate and conscious environment within which this programming is cast. Who's Missing? In an ironic sense, looking through these brochures is like a reverse looking for Waldo in preschool children's picture books. Instead of finding Waldo, a postmodern analysis asks whose story has been erased - whose valorized and why? Clearly, the brochures are aimed at a stereotypical middle America (and Canada) which overwrites the current reality. Women (who make up 53 per cent of the population), visible ethnic minorities, indigenous peoples and teenagers are absent or presented in subaltern roles. The manufacturers of these boats have deliberately chosen to ignore that portion of the population least likely to purchase the larger more profitable boats. Assuming this to be true for the moment, what evidence do we have in support of such a conclusion. Typically, the brochures dedicate 75 percent of the pages to boats in the 14 - 17 foot ranges, 15 -20 percent to 14 feet or less, and the balance to options, tables and warranty information. Remembering that the purpose of these brochures, from the perspective of the manufacturers, is to maximize profit on any boat sales, the apparent strategy is obvious. "Educate" your consumer to the merits of ever more elaborate and larger boats and allow cost constraints to force those with less purchasing power to settle for 108 whatever level of sophistication they can afford. The extent to which these consumers are part of the "redundant" class of postcolonial capital formations is unclear. Are they, in fact ironically, as redundant in both their ability to earn the capital required to purchase the higher ticket item and their desire to purchase same? Are they perhaps not fully colonized, or colonizable, to the notion of tournament fishing? Looking at these brochures from the perspective of one marginalized by the discourse, by less discretionary income or a lack of technical sophistication, the message is more insidious. Conversations with sales personnel at each display at the Vancouver Boat Show revealed, as expected, that men write the cheques for almost all the boats in this class. Interestingly, three of the four made a point of saying that wives had a role in the final decision. In the same way that the brochures make an obligatory concession to the consumptive decision making unit of the nuclear family, the impression left by sales personnel was that women picked colours, seating arrangements and accessories. We could extend this assignation of subaltern roles to the other groups mentioned above. By locating the purchase and use of these boats firmly within white, male, middle class consumer culture and reinforcing a hierarchy familiar in the automotive culture, the brochures align boat manufactures with many other mutually reinforcing patriarchal, sexist, racist regimes of truth. This conclusion is confirmed if we look at the disproportionately high representation of the marginalized groups described above in Tessler's statistics. In this sense, boat brochures join the endless list of "texts" which re-inscribe the colonial metaphors of exclusivity. Page after page after page repeats the message, that 109 white male privilege will dominant (write) this wilderness landscape. Why, we must ask ourselves, is it so important to repeat the myth so often and with such apparent, blatant disregard for the plurality of our social context? Perhaps the observation of Bhabba on the process of identification will be helpful, "the question of identification is never the affirmation of pre-given identity, never a self-fulfilling prophecy - it is always the production of an image of identity and the transformation of the subject in assuming that image. The demand of identification - that is, to be for an Other - entails the representation of the subject in the differentiating order of otherness" (1994: 45). The desire of the marginalized to take the place of the dominant illustrates the power of the seeming ambivalence to inscribe the marginalized on the cultural record. The apparent symbolic difference (as implied in the endless combinations and permutations of possibilities), that is, the deliberate construction of tin boaters as possessing the power to construct themselves within the "text" of tin boating subculture at first sets up the otherness of the dominant participants. The "we" of this popular text is virile, wealthy, owning of leisure time, dominant in relations with women and children and constitutive of this construction of nature. The problem that immediately attaches itself grows from the "unknowability " of this discourse, for those who must construct their knowledge from the shadow of the discourse of the dominant. Since the dominant group may be enslaved to an invisible discourse of consumptive superiority, the marginal are ironically, doubly submerged by their being written as economically and technically inferior as well as being invisible in the dominant narrative. 110 Sales Brochures and Consumer Education It seems prudent at this point to examine whether the connection between the promotional literature described above and education for consumption is as direct, as I have implied. The link, between the tendency of tin boaters not to wear life jackets a shown in drowning statistics and full colour pictures in sales brochures, is not necessarily causal. Given the opportunity to defend their publications, it seems likely that manufacturers might point out that on the smaller, less stable craft and on younger participants, they do advise and show boaters with life jackets. On the surface, this inference is correct, however, the overwhelming majority of pictures show none. We could say the same for standing in boats (which raises the centre of gravity) and the role this practice has in capsizing (Tessler 1994: 16). In a stunning display of either arrogance or ignorance, the president of Lund boats, Larry Lovold, can be seen standing in the bow of a Pro-V L E without a lifejacket (Lund: A Tradition of Quality 1996: 1)! How then is the popular curriculum simultaneously linked and juxtaposed with the official curriculum of the Coast Guard? As a teacher for many years in technical education at the high school level, I am continually taken by the need of some students to remember seemingly obscure details concerning horsepower, gear ratios or elapsed time in quarter mile trials. At the same time, simple formulae or conversion constants remain a mystery to all but the most propagandized to the official curriculum. In view of the comments made in Chapters 2 I l l and 3 regarding popular education, I do not find this contradiction surprising. Among the peer group, horsepower, gear ratios or speed are code, for signalling to peers, that one has "knowledge" about cars. This "knowledge" about cars is then linked to other meaning schemes (regimes of truth) about speed, power, virility and status. It is superficial knowledge, arranged in simplistic tables in a familiar format. It does not equal "mechanic" knowledge in the sense that it could be useful in repairing a car, nor is it "engineer" knowledge in the sense that it would be of much use in designing a car. Within the dominant regimes of truth, those charged with the writing of automotive culture, it is low status knowledge. It is useful within the peer group for demonstrating a growing sophistication or coming of age - membership in the group competent in the world of adult symbols. One could say the same about the type of information in the sales brochures; most often thought of "consumer" knowledge. Typically, it concerns itself with length, beam, approximate weight, horsepower ratings, transom height (for determining which length of motor shaft to buy), fuel tank capacity, number and size of live wells and bait wells and the number of seats (Lund: A Tradition of Excellence 1996: 28, Appendix B). In the same way that teenaged boys create the appearance and convince themselves of their knowledge, consumers of the popular tin boat curriculum use the brochures to prove and assure themselves of their competence in this heavily symbolic discourse. Missing in the technical information are elements such as degrees of deadrise (an indication of rough water handling capability), reserve buoyancy, degrees of prop pitch recommended for a particular application, beam at waterline (transverse stability) and 112 full load freeboard, which might encourage a user to gain a more sophisticated understanding of potential hazards. This is hardly an innocent discourse. As Fiske points out, popular culture appropriates those parts of a discourse which enhances its own interest, while contradictorily serving the needs of the hegemonic order (Fiske 1989:2). Popular culture takes whatever liberties it wants when sorting or ranking the importance of specific elements. In this scenario, if the wearing of life jackets or standing in a boat is incongruent with the desired perceptions of virility and status, it will be "written out" of the working mythology. Many incidents described in Tessler's work seem to point at such a process. The foregoing analysis points to some contradictory elements in the two central discourses of tin boat safety. While functionalist research, particularly that done under the normalizing gaze of large universities, would turn at this point to solutions or remedies, I intend to push forward with an analysis of why it is probably not prudent to do so. In the closing chapter, I hope first to counter the notion that a transcendent new educational narrative which might attempt to describe practice for all tin boat users is neither possible or desirable. Following that, I plan to reiterate the problematization of self developed in the Lacanian analysis to show how conceptions of individual experience are necessarily contingent and context bound. Finally, and with some trepidation, I will explore some impacts for wilderness management policy that might ensue (given my current understanding of the historicality of education for a safer tin boating). 113 C H A P T E R SIX ESCAPING the FIXITY of the E D U C A T I O N A L P R O J E C T If we contest the 'grand narratives', then what alternative temporalities do we create to articulate the differential (Jameson), contrapuntal (Said), interruptive (Spivak) historicities of race, gender, class, nation within a growing transnational culture? Do we need to rethink the terms in which we conceive of community, citizenship, rationality and the ethics of social affiliation (Bhabba 1994: 174)? A critical discourse does not yield a new political object, or aim, or knowledge, which is simply a mimetic reflection of an a priori political principle or theoretical commitment. As author of this hundred odd page thesis, I am aware of the requirement to bring some form of closure to the production. As I reread these pages, I can see where the paper has written me. A certain nostalgia hangs over parts, early on in the narrative (not necessarily the first pages), as the complexity of the problem began to present itself. Like notes written in the margins of a book, it is interesting to recall where one was positionally, temporally or politically at the time of first reading/writing. On the down side, knowing this production so intimately makes me keenly aware of the specificity of the work. Within the liberal academy, a funnel or hourglass is often used as a metaphor for the shape of an academic thesis. Large volumes of information are poured in, digested 114 and limited by the metallic form, narrowed and channelled by the inverted cone and eventually streamlined in a predictable counter clockwise vortex, to a more uniform and directed knowable truth. Presumably, if the mouth of the funnel is large enough and the digestion period sufficiently intense and rational, a narrative of substantial rigour will emerge, stimulating further research. In this postmodern production, I have attempted to use the image of a tin boat as a symbol for late modernity. Its contingency can be found in the essentially disposable commodity that it is. Like a funnel, its metallic shape is a part of the vision that emerges. With the tin boat, the obvious inversion is intertwined with our desire to keep the water out. Only the tightness of the bailing plug and the height of the gunwales determine the dryness of its modern occupants. Purveyors of the official narrative tell this part of the narrative against an increasingly saturated polyphony of contra stories. The landscape, which I have painted as hostile, harsh and uncaring, exists within a very particular construction of nature. Within the popular narrative, this nature is benign, tamed by the technology. The "problem" thus posited was that some of our occupants continue to lose their lives, due in part to the conflicting and overwhelming "education" consumed by the practitioners. Adult education as understood by organizations such as the Coast Guard, the Canadian Red Cross and other institutionally aligned organizations, with its assumed valorization of agency, seemed a likely candidate to sort and order the information into a comprehensible whole. In this thesis, I have attempted to problematise this conception of education based on the positionality of the authors, the power/knowledge relationships within which this understanding is constructed, and the constructions of "self' attendant 115 with consumer capitalism. Finally, I attempted to pour in the multiphrenic liquor of images and symbols of television/advertising to assess the possible impacts of these "popular" media. Now, nearing the end, the aqueous "landscape" asserts its contingent form, shaped simultaneously by the levelling blades of bulldozers and the fading of a receding romanticism. Can we expect the "texts" of modernity to resist the turbulence that is at once conquered by more power, speed and "development" on one hand and the fast forward urges of hyper-real imaging on the other? Would there be any point, assuming that it was even remotely possible, to freeze this picture by inscribing a new curriculum with gender, race or age sensitivity? Can we escape the fixity of our educational project? As Bhabba's quote at the start of this chapter suggests, we must escape the desire to create "a new political object, or aim, or knowledge" as the product of such an(other) new discourse. At the end, if we can lay bare the structures of the construction of the extant method/systems of thought, to allow for new imaginings of the landscape of our thought, we will have progressed. In the same way that a recycler of aluminum might not know where, or in what form, the crushed hull of one of these late modern artefacts will re-emerge, the current discourse must be allowed to "melt down" making way for different "local" knowledges of the increasingly postmodern landscape. Other Ways of Knowing - Questioning Experience? I have argued earlier for the inclusion of some voices, such as those of Tommy Williams or the guides from remote fishing camps, silenced by the official discourse, in 116 any new narratives that might emerge. In doing so, I have valorized some central tenets of adult education - experience. As Usher suggests Where Knowles foregrounds the use of experience, Jarvis stresses the transformation needed for use. Yet, in both cases, learning is grounded in experience and it is the individualistic subject who 'has' the experience and who thus 'owns' through a meaning-giving which authenticates (Usher & Edwards 1992: 202). His postmodern critique of experience in adult education, which suggests that experience can be meaningful or meaningless creates a special dilemma for this thesis. I remain convinced of the importance of tapping the hands-on experince of the Tom Williams of the tin boat world. However, I echo this problematization in discussing meaningless technical specifications or irrelevant buoyage systems. To whom, does one direct a Ministry of Transport approved VHF radio " M A Y D A Y , " in much of the country, if there is no one to hear it? The essential knowable self, which adult education in its andragogical version celebrates, "owns" its own experience (Usher 1992: 202). But what then of the Lacanian proposition of self as Other? If our "experience" of the external world is one, which is mediated and shaped within a range of meanings, which exist in the particular social milieu (invisibly and continuously renegotiated, temporally and spatially, by the participant's historicalities), then how can the adult educator ever hope 117 to get a fix on "needs." How do we attempt to theorize any sense of agency on behalf of tin boaters, while simultaneously resisting the implicit suggestion, that the narratives of the marine manufacturers, for example, are pervasive and irresistible? In critical pedagogy, such as Freirean conscientization, the emphasis is more on "coming to know" the oppressive structures that constrain and frustrate emancipatory efforts. In this instance, the subject must overcome a false consciousness, ultimately with the goal of setting up different structures of thought and action. Again, a knowable self conflicts with a concrete external reality. Change in this case, as in the Gramscian version, becomes the theoretical/cultural work of "organic intellectuals." Again, the humanist propensity to define a "knowable" reality, albeit social - the ramifications are clear. Constructed within the determinist setting, the victims remain just that - victims. I have little doubt that most of the people, who ultimately form the statistics in Tessler's research, did not understand themselves as victims of a discursive regime. In view of this observation, what mix of formal or informal strategies can a postmodern perspective contribute to the narrative? Can the irony implicit in American satellite images, of what is increasingly becoming our landscape, be harnessed in the service a hybrid Canadian marine safety education? I have argued throughout this thesis that answers to these dilemmas are more likely to be found in education designed to draw attention to the nature of gendered constructions of "self' and critical awareness of media, than in the instrumentalism of the current practitioners. The recent increases in incidents involving fifteen to twenty-four year olds and among aboriginal peoples hint at the increasing alienation from the 118 wilderness now being experienced by our "citified" children (SARSCENE 1996: 8). Perhaps we must find ways to use the new tools at our disposal to reach an audience increasingly unlikely to pick up and read the Safe_Bimting_Guide (Appendix A). In the same way that the AIDS epidemic galvanized the gay community into rewriting its own narrative on sexuality, the current epidemic of deaths in tin-boats, if properly exploited, could be used to force the experts on boating safety to rethink their understandings. As the Krever commission draws to a close in late 1996, we can perhaps take advantage of the instability that will undoubtably follow, to encourage a fresh look at other areas within the Canadian Red Cross organization. Perhaps a new collection of narratives of survivors, rather than autopsies, could form the basis for future research initiatives. If such a collection focused on the narratives of those currently silenced, we would have the basis for a new beginning. Ultimately, as I have argued, a major problem with our official constructions of safe boating is the logocentric bias of our communication medium. Much boating is about other sensual perceptions such as smell, hearing and observation. The ominous calm before a thunderstorm and its attendant squall is a good example of a "pre-reading" which must be learned or re-learned if we are to take proactive defensive strategies. Perhaps we must look toward our public school system with its new Career and Personal Planning and outdoor education curricula, not with an eye to reducing costs, but to provide the early experiences around boats in a safe environment. With the drop in price of CD-ROM technology, we could design and widely distribute games very cost effectively. One such "game" is currently being promoted in 119 the schools by the Forest Alliance of British Columbia. Doubtless, a very specific truth will make winning in this game harmonious with the official discourse of its parent organization. Perhaps if we introduced a sense of the ironic into a marine safety awareness game (possibly win one bureaucrat or researcher for your team for every successful marine education strategy), the game might even be fun. Using a geograpically accurate interface as a playing field, players could pick the degree of risk or difficulty, align themselves with a particular type of thinking , pick the medium of transmission, choose a type of craft (based on considerations other than money) and gain an entirely different perspective in the process. This isn't necessarily fanciful thinking -lots of other organization are already doing. It does, however, require a different mindset and a sincere desire to do what might be best for the client! When does the reader imagine was the last time anyone at C C G proposed spending an afternoon brainstorming how a program targeted at 15 - 24 boys might be designed so that it actually engaged this rapidly growing statistical sector? The last conference I attended spent half its time drooling over new high tech emergency locaters and the remainder trying to figure out how to charge errant trekkers for the cost of their rescue. The Internet, quickly becoming as accessible as the telephone in the sixties, already makes dozens of web sites specific to marine culture available. The informal and collegial nature of this medium already takes even the most arcane or esoteric question before thousands of knowledgeable people. Each of these media has the advantage of taking the information directly to the people and thus avoiding the patronizing and authoritarian stereotypes currently associated with the official curriculum. They are 120 problematic in other senses. As tools of the technically literate they extend the possibility of domination for those most likely to be able to afford to produce the high production value programming associated with them. What is more important is that they move us farther down the road of confusing the simulacra as the real thing. As I have argued continually, "information" is never innocent. Gleaning any of the positive benefits from their implementation, will be accomplished only by ensuring that they retain the richness of the narrative of those written out of both the official and popular discourses. The important distinction that a postmodern analysis posts is that this is already how many of us live. As a society, we can and must make decisions differently. Two examples from the automotive culture come to mind. In Canada we have daytime running lights as a direct result of a small piece of legislation - the United States does not. Car manufacturers around the world recognized the requirement and adapted their cars because they wanted access to the market - period. The other example, air bags was delayed for almost fifteen years that coincided with a "business friendly" series of administrations. We now take air bags for granted - cars got cheaper (especially in Canada) and in the end we can hardly think about why it took so long. With respect to tin boating, many "technological" features needed to make these boats safer are already well known (emergency inflatable bladders, roll over trapezes, bottom handles, automatic bailers and even locater beacons). We simply have to care enough to require them and quit putting the interests of some imagined loss of profit first. Business can and will adapt; there will always be a market for an entry level boat; the question is whether or not we want a safer one. The repercussions for education in 121 this regard are more in developing a critical awareness amoung consumers. Again, I see no evidence within current "curriculum," either official or popular, of much in the way of education for critical consumption. Perhaps Ralph Nader had the right idea when, as advocate for the car buying public, he tested some previously sacrosanct product disclaimers. If the notion of a nation state, in the era of consolidation of the interests of transnational capital, is to represent anything beyond facilitator to capital, it will be in the way that state legislates this sort of issue - distinctively. Throughout the latter half of this thesis, I have argued in favour of a postmodern analysis leaning toward a more critical understanding of the resistive and evasive tactics characteristic of popular culture. I argued earlier that the official discourse is quintessentially modernist and as such is embedded in language systems with discursive conceptions of power and the idea of a rational, knowable subject with inalienable rights. As we have seen, the liberal construction anchors its educative initiatives in a patriarchal pedagogy (andragogy) informed by a techno-rational metaphysic. Where then, are the other narratives? What sort of environment do we need to coax or cajole or force them to the surface? How do we create a "safe zone" for writers and researchers of subaltern stories? Where are the faculties of recreational studies or do the revenues from product research contracts in our newly "corporatised" universities already silence this sector? How do we avoid regressing to the time of Jack's tale, when coincidental death was one of the costs of doing business? Perhaps if some of our currently vested bureaucracy were to begin to see themselves as advocates for their clientele, rather than as part of the entrenched discourse, we could see some different results. 122 The most recent initiative of universal licencing and mandatory "training' might better be understood as yet another significatory naming process. In the latest twist, the naming practice of the discursive elite will require that the subjects pay for the privilege of being coded. Armed with more surveillance, presumably the "gaze" will encourage more self-discipline. I have argued that the need to resist, as an intrinsic characteristic of the popular, will have the opposite effect. Ironically again, perhaps a full-blown consumer revolt could have some positive impact for this otherwise intransigent group of policy writers. I remain unconvinced of the ascendant teleology valorized by my humanist education, particularly one guided by this rationalist penchant. Again the practice invariably turns out to be opposite the rhetoric. At the time of writing, an acquaintance who has actively trapped (on a legally registered trap line) the circumference of Big Trout Lake in Northwestern Ontario for twenty years, as been forcibly removed from the area. Ministry of Natural Resources officials explained that he and his family's presence on the lake was denying the customers of an American owned lodge the "authentic" wilderness experience for which they had paid! As for wilderness resource management policy, it seems that the most hopeful route will be to bring the decision making process, including education and enforcement, closer to home. A promising example might be found in the aboriginal justice reform movement. In this example, routine matters of justice (policing, enforcement and punishment) are handled within the community unless the local council or band requests federal assistance. I envision a system where geographic regions (perhaps a watershed) or community groups, with a direct interest or knowledge of a particular area become 123 stewards for that area. It makes little sense to have a bureaucrat in Ottawa deciding on the need for a lighthouse keeper at Cape Scott, a boat launch at LaRonge or a rescue boat on Lake of the Woods, if there are qualified locals to make those decisions. Any budgeting or administrative communication needed could easily take place over any of the new electronic media. The principle advantage, I believe, would be that people would "buy in," in a sense, initiatives would become part of the "popular" again - a local discourse. Future Research As the trend to postmodern consumption of wilderness as a service proliferates, whale watching instead of whaling, fishing shows instead of fishing or buying hiking equipment becomes conflated with hiking, tin boaters can occupy a peculiar vanguard position. By comparison to other boating sectors, tin boating is, as minimalist jazz is, to popular music - sparing, occasionally discordant or dissonant and operating on the fringe. Ironically, due to its cheapness, portability and ubiquity (the very reasons for this thesis in the fist place), tin boaters may be the group that leads us through the next wave of low impact eco-tourism. As marketing pressure writes the desirability of increasingly remote voyages of personal discovery, the urban tourists will find the tin boat to be always, already there signifier - the modern equivalent of the premodern canoe. As many towns devastated by the rationalizations of multinational capital have learned (from Newfoundland fishing villages to the murals of Chemainus), there is a new trade 124 in the artifacts of modernity emerging. As demonstrated in Mountain Co-op's fetishization of travelling "light," the local knowledge needed to survive in these remote areas can only come from those seasoned locals who, for reasons articulated earlier, opted years ago not to live in the cities. As discussed at many recent SAR conferences, projected government funding for support and search and rescue is inadequate to the task. Perhaps some research into the feasibility of enlisting the services of these people, possibly on retainer as local agents of a wilderness insurance umbrella group, would be timely. In British Columbia, this might provide an innovative use for the embarrassing riches of the Forest Renewal Fund. Are these not some of the Jobs, Jobs, Jobs for the dislocated loggers? Other jurisdictions such as the Scandinavian countries and the more northerly remains of the Soviet Republic must surely be dealing with similar problems with this type of craft. Are their initiatives significantly different or more /less effective? Have their aboriginal peoples been able to articulate subjectivities that leave them less vulnerable than Canadian aboriginals? Did two generations of socialism/communism generate a less masculinist discourse? Ultimately, I believe our understanding of wilderness will come down to a debate between public and private. Historically, albeit with many exceptions, those who held tenure and presumably gleaned the greatest good from a resource had some degree of responsibility to provide for the occupants of that land. I believe that an important research initiative must be undertaken to ensure that those interests, which create the access to these erstwhile remote sites, shoulder their share of the responsibility to safeguard its postmodern occupants. Essentially, this would 125 mean that part of the profit generated from first round resource extraction "rights," on public lands would be dedicated to the safeguarding and education of the Othered occupants. Conceptually this proposal would be controversial given the positions of groups like Fraser Institute or the Conference Board of Canada (in their respective roles as advocates for transnational capital). Theoretically, I have argued that tin boaters are part of a subaltern group made redundant by these very interests. Their redundancy as workers doubly disadvantages them (replaced by larger more efficient machines) and as consumers (because of their limited purchasing power). Any attempts to reverse this precarious position must take into account the lived experience of this manufactured marginality. As we are currently learning from the land claims in British Columbia, the solutions to these problems are not simple. We must find ways to counter the reactionary rhetoric of people like Reform MP John Cummins whose differancing of the idea of equality would derail more progressive efforts to redistribute access and ownership of these resources more equitably. Finally and perhaps most important, we must continue to interrogate the subject positions constructed within the popular discourse. If the commodity, tin boat - in this case 'is' in fact an object to think with as Fiske says, what else might tin boat-eze say? What other, more resistive strategies might we investigate? How many trappers can Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources evict before a guerilla strategy emerges? How do we ensure that the simulacra created by TSN's Saturday afternoon's fishing shows projects a distinctly Canadian image for our children to consume? Are the counter culture demonstrations of the sixties and seventies an adequate model for the future? If 126 we wish to maintain those parts of the official discourse that have merit, how do we simultaneously shed the baggage and privilege associated with the current regime of truth and valourize the differance this study has attempted to reveal? 127 References Adas, M . (1989). Machines as the Measure of Men, Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Aronowitz, S. & Giroux, H. (1991). Postmodern Education -Politics Culture & Social Criticism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Atkins, G. Douglas. (1992). Estranging the Familiar - Toward a Revitalized Critical Writing. 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Canadian Coast Guard 134 Appendix B. 1996 Lund: ATradition of Quality. Genmar Boats Canada 182 Appendix C. '95 Sea Nymph: Most Popular Boat at the Ramp. O M C Aluminum Boat Group 230 Appendix D. Sea Nymph '96: When Fishing Comes First. O M C Aluminum Boat Group 258 Appendix E . Roughneck 1996 Boats: As Tough As You Are. O M C Aluminum Boat Group 286 Appendix F. Grumman Great Value Advantage. 1996 Grumman Fishing Boats and Pontoons. OMC Aluminum Boat Group 294 Appendix G. Lowe® Aluminum Boats and Pontoons. O M C Aluminum Boat Group 318 >3¥ •TP 511E • j^u • Canadian Garde cotiere Coast Guard canadienne S A F E B O A T I N G GUIDE Canada I 3 T C o n t e n t s Think prevention Everyone w h o operates a boat is responsible for: Knowledge and skill needed for safe small craft operation Vessels up to 5.5.m in length (minimum required equipment) Vessels more than 5.5 m and up to 8 m in length (minimum required equipment) Vessels more than 8 m and up to 12 m in length -(minimum required equipment) Vessels more than 12 m and up to 20 m in length (minimum required equipment) Vessels more than 20 m in length Special craft Licensing, registration and markings Capacity and construction standards plates Safety practices Flotation devices Approved lifesaving cushions General upkeep Notice to parents Throwable devices Fighting fire the right way Types of fire extinguishers Calling for help - the distress signals Propane can be hazardous Safe ventilating and refuelling Operating your vessel safely Radar reflector Operating regulations Navigation lights for small vessels (collision regulations) Nautical charts Low-head dams Overhead power lines The Canadian buoyage system-Lateral buoys Cardinal buoys 8 9 10 10 11 11 11 11 12 12 13 16 16 18 19 20 22 26 26 26 27 28 Special purpose buoys 29 Standard Day Beacons . 2 9 Communications and weather information 30 Marine radio 30 Licence and restricted certificate 30 Weather information 31 Weather warnings 31 Marine security 32 What you can do now 32 Diving 33 Air cushion vehicles (ACVs) 33 Entering and exiting locks 34 Hypothermia. 35 Boating and alcohol 36 Shore protection zone 36 Common sense things to do and not to do 37 Search and rescue 39 Canadian Marine Rescue Auxiliary / 39 Falling overboard 40 Safe speeds 41 Information sources 42 Where to call for Search and Rescue 42 Environment Canada Marine Weather Forecast Services 42 Where to obtain nautical charts, sailing directions, tide and current tables, and "A guide for the radiotelephone operator" 42 Where to obtain other marine publications and regulations (published by the Government of Canada) 43 Where to take safe boating course 43 Where to obtain application forms for licensing vessels 43 Where to obtain a free copy of the "St. Lawrence Seaway Pleasure Craft Guide" 43 Where to obtain a free copy of the "Heritage Canals Navigation Data" 43 Cette publication est aussi disponsible en francais TP 511F \ 3 1 Knowledge and skill needed for safe small craft operation^^^-In the interest of safety/v^hen operating a boat, both recre-ational and commercial small craft operators need to have a ggc|d.level of boating knowledge and skill. It is also impor-tant to realize that this level of boating ability must be consis-tent with the type of boating activity being undertaken. The primary areas of knowledge and skill involved are listed below: 1. Laws and Regulations Before heading out, boaters need to know the applicable laws, regulations and local rules. These include: Collision Regulations, Small Vessel Regulations, local rules concern-ing safe speeds, vessel separation/right of way, and key laws that apply to the operation of all vessels, regardless of size. In addition, there are Criminal Code laws concerning impaired or dangerous driving of a vehicle/vessel, waterski-ing and other activities. -2. Navigation To navigate safely, a boater needs to know and understand many things. For example: Canadian buoyage system, the use of marine charts, compasses, navigation lights and sig-nals, plotting courses, positioning methods, navigational references such as tide tables, notices to mariners, sailing directions and the use of electronic navigational equipment. 3. Safety and Seamanship Safety is a key element to a good boating experience. In order to have a safe and enjoyable time out on the water. boaters need to know both the required and desirable safe-ty equipment for their type of boat and area of operation. Sound boat operation, handling and seamanship requires good boating knowledge and skill. This includes knowing and recognizing weather and sea conditions and their importance for boating safely. All boats require regular maintenance and inspection to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the boat. This includes both motor and equip-ment upkeep. Safe fuelling procedures should also be well understood. 4. Communications and Information To obtain current information on weather/sea conditions, boaters need to know how to access sources both before heading out and while out on the water. Accessing infor-mation and communication networks requires knowledge and skill for proper use of marine radio telephone. Communicating messages or requesting assistance may also be required in emergency situations. A thorough knowledge of emergency and distress communication methods and procedures is essential. The above information is intended as a guide to persons w h o may be involved or are considering becoming involved in operating a small craft. This Guide contains more informa-tion on these and other points. In the back of this Guide, a list of various boating agencies and training organizations can be found. For more information on Safe Boating contact the Canadian Coast Guard 1-800-267-6687. 2 Vessels up to 5.5 m in length (Minimum required equipment) One approved lifejacket, PFD or life-saving cushion for each person on board. Two oars wi th rowlocks or t w o paddles. One hand-held bailer or one manual pump. One Class B-I fire extinguisher - if ves-sel has inboard motor or fixed fuel tank or heating or cooking appliance that burns liquid or gaseous fuel. Lights must comply with "Coll ision Regulations" if permanently fitted. Some type of sound signalling device. Vessels more than 5.5 m and up to 8 m in length (Minimum required equipment) I 3^ One approved lifejacket or P F D for each person on board. Two oars with rowlocks or two paddles, or one anchor with 15 m (minimum) chain, cable or rope. One bailer or one manual pump. One Class B-I fire extinguisher - if vessel is power driven or has cooking or heating appliance that burns liquid or gaseous fuel. Lights must comply with "Collision Regulations" if permanently fitted. Some type of sound signalling device. An approved lifesaving cushion or a buoyant heaving line (recommended length minimum 1 5 m) or life buoy 508, 610 or 762 mm in diameter. Six approved distress flares: - three A, B or C types, and - three A, B, C or D types Note: These flares are not required if the vessel is. engaged in or preparing for racing competition and has no sleeping accommodation, or operating exclusively in a river, canal or lake in which the boat can never be more than one nautical mile from shore, or propelled solely by oars or paddles. Vessels more than 8 m and up to 12 m in length (Minimum required equipment) One approved lifejacket or PFD for each person on board. One anchor with 15 m (minimum) chain, cable or rope. One bailer and one manual bilge pump. One Class B-H fire extinguisher - if vessel is power driven, or has a cooking or heating appliance that burns liquid or gaseous fuel. Lights must comply with "Collision Regulations." Sound device must comply with "Collision Regulations." One approved life buoy 610 or 762 mm in diameter. Not less than 15 m of buoyant line. Twelve approved distress flares. - six A, B or C types, and - six A, B, C or D types. Vessels more than 12 m and up to 20 m in length (Minimum required equipment) One approved lifejacket or PFD for each person on board. One anchor with 15 m (minimum) chain, cable or rope. Efficient bilge pumping system. Two Class B-H fire extinguishers, one of which is next to the sleeping cabin entrance and the other next to the machinery space entrance. Additional Class B-I fire extinguisher if vessel is power driven or has a cooking or heating appliance that burns liquid or gaseous fuel. Manual or power fire pump - water must reach any part of vessel or one class B-Tf fire extinguisher Two buckets to extinguish fire. One fire axe. Lights must comply with "Collision Regulations." Sound devices must comply with "Collision Regulations." One approved life buoy 762 mm in diameter or two approved life buoys 610 mm in diameter. 15 m (minimum) of buoyant line. Twelve approved distress flares: - six A, B or C types, and - six A, B, C or D types. Vessels more than 20 m in length (Minimum required equipment) One approved lifejacket or PFD for each person on board. One anchor wi th 15 m (minimum) chain, cable or rope. Efficient bilge pumping system. Two Class B-H fire extinguishers -one in machinery space, one near entrance. One Class A-H fire extinguisher in each sleeping cabin (maximum of three extinguishers required). Power fire pump — water must reach any part of vessel. Four fire buckets. Two fire axes. Lights must comply with "Coll ision Regulations." Sound devices must comply with "Coll ision Regulations." Two approved life buoys 762 mm in diameter; one must have self-igniting light. 27.5 m (minimum) of buoyant line. Twelve approved distress flares: - six A , B or C types, and - six A , B, C or D types. One V H F radio telephone installation. Special craft Licensing, registration and markings In place of the equipment normally required on pleasure craft, sailboarders require only an approved lifejacket or personal flotation device (PFD) for each person on board. Sailboarders must bear in mind that a wetsuit is not an approved PFD. Obtain as much information as possi-ble on the area where you intend to pursue your sport. Rapids, currents and commercial shipping channels are all potentially dangerous. All pleasure craft, under 20 registered tons powered by an engine 7.5 kw (10 HP) or more must be licensed, regard-less of where they operate in Canada. Pleasure craft exceeding 20 register tons must be registered. Applications are available from Customs Canada. Licence number is issued free of charge. Changes of ownership of vessel must be recorded at the Customs House at the port where the vessel is licensed. Markings must be in block characters and in contrasting colour: licensed, 7.5 cm; registered, 10.3 cm. I* Transport Transports Canada Canada R E C O M M E N D E D M A X I M U M S _ M A X I M U M S R E C O M M A N D E E S K I R N O R M A L O P E R A T I O N P O U R O P E ' R A H O N N O R M A L E Capacity and Construction Standards Plates Overloading is dangerous. The number of persons that can be carried safely depends on the type of boat, distribu-tion of occupants and the equipment carried. Each operator must know the (imitations of the vessel. Every vessel 5 m or under that can be powered by an engine of 7.5 kW (1 OHp) or more must carry a capacity plate (1). It identifies that the boat complies with construction standards. It also indicates recommended maximum gross load capacity, total engine power and num-ber of adults that can be safely trans-ported in the vessel. Note: Since 1993 w e issue capacity plates for boats up to 6 m . The capacity plate produced prior to 1993 (2) is still valid. It indicates the maximum load which includes the weight of the people, engine, fuel and equipment. Virtually all motorized pleasure craft manufactured in Canada are required to display a metal plate or a decal (3) stating that the vessel meets or exceeds the minimum Construction Standards issued by Transport Canada. Garde cotiere | * | Coast Guard CAPACITE MAXIMUM CAPACITY PAR BEAU 7 EMPS - IN FAIR WEATHER C H A R G E * ka A D U L T E S 3 A D U L T S P U I S S A N C E kW lbs H P P O W E R L O A D * 1 BUILDER-CONSTHUCTEUR •PERS01NES MOTEUrf ESSENCE GREEVENT PERSONS Mi'TOR CAS GEAR MODEl-MODELE kW e s t c o n f o r m e a u x N o r m e s d e c o n - p r o d u c t c o m p l i e s w i t h t h e C o n s t r u c -s t r u c t i o n d o s p c t i t s b a l e a u x , l i o n S t a n d a r d s ( o r S m a l l V e s s e l s . (Note: The maximum load is calculated for fair weather operating conditions.) Safety practices Flotation devices The law requires all pleasure craft to be equipped wi th one approved lifejacket or approved personal flotation device (PFD) for each person on board. You should choose this piece of equipment carefully, bear-ing in mind the type of activity it is intended for. Choose one that fits you wel l . Make sure that it is approved by the Canadian Department of Transport. Flotation devices approved by the U.S. Coast Guard are not recognized on Canadian vessels as part of the required safety equipment. Standard lifejacket Small vessel lifejacket Personal flotation devices PFDs Styling: Keyhole Keyhole or vest type Vest, coat, coverall type keyhole also available Reversible? Yes Yes No Outside colour Inside colour Orange, red or yellow Orange, red or yellow Orange, red or yellow Orange, red or yellow Orange, red or yellow Sizing "adults" "children" Universal over 41 kg (90 Ib) Universal under 41 kg (90 Ib) Universal Chest size and/or weight Weight only. 3 categories Type of boating activity Abandon ship emergency use Abandon ship emergency use in sheltered waters General boating. For constant wear where risk exists. Turns unconscious per-son face up in water? Yes Yes, for most people No Provides flotation only. Advantages High buoyancy, turning ability in rough weather. Simple to put on. Reduced buoyancy and turning ability. Simple to put on. Comfortable. Wide range of styles/sizes available for recreational boating. Disadvantages Bulky and uncomfortable Bulky and uncomfortable. No turning ability. 10 Approved lifesaving cushions Place the strap over your head and make sure that the cushion is tied tightly to your body. For use on pleasure craft not longer than 5.5 m or as a throwable device on pleasure craft not longer than 8 m. General upkeep Take good care of your lifejacket or PFD. It should not be used to kneel on or as a bumper for your boat. Check its buoyancy regularly by wad ing out until the water is waist deep; bend your knees and see h o w wel l you float. You should a l low your flotation device to dry in the open air, not close to a direct heat source. It should be kept in a dry, well-ventilated, easily accessible place. Clean wi th a mild soap or running water. Strong detergents or gasoline should not be used. Do not dry clean. Notice to parents Children should be encouraged to wear their lifejacket or PFD at all times. They should learn h o w to put them on and try them out in the water. Some lifejackets and PFDs are designed specially for children; select the one that best suits your child's size and weight. Because of the w a y their body weight is distributed, children do not float wel l in a face up position and tend to panic easily. Throwable devices Remember that a lifejacket or PFD is no substitute for adult supervision. Horseshoe-type lifebuoys are not approved by the Canadian Depart-ment of Transport. Fighting fire the right way Types of fire extinguishers: Fire extinguishers must be of a type approved by: • Board of Steamship Inspection (Transport Canada) • Underwriters Laboratories of Canada • British Board of Trade for Marine Use • United States Coast Guard for Marine Use Regulations governing fire extinguishers refer to designators such as AJ, An, BI, BII, which may not appear on the label. The fo l lowing equivalency table shows wh ich extinguis-hers) you require for your vessel. E q u i v a l e n t f i r e e x t i n g u i s h e r s Foam Carbon Dry Dioxide Gas Chemical Dry Chemical Multi-purpose Class L kg kg kg A l 4.5 — — 0.90 A l l 9 — — 2.25 Bl 4.5 2.25 0.90 0.90 BII 9 4.5 2.25 2.25 Note: The Small Vessel Regulations do not cover the automatic extinguishing systems that may be installed in pleasure craft. If you have this type of system on your boat, you must still carry the required number of portable extinguishers. Dry chemical extinguishers tend to "cake , " so shake them periodically. Store them where there is least con-stant engine vibration. CO2 fire extinguishers should be weighed annually and recharged if they contain less than 9 0 % of rated capacity. The letters A , B or C which appear on the label, represent the class of fire the extinguisher is designed for: e - combustiDle solid (wood, paper, etc.) combustible liquid (gas, oil , etc.) electrical It is important to be familiar with their operation and to place them where they are readily available for use. 12 Calling for help — The distress signals 1*8 There are four types of approved pyrotechnics (A, B, C, D). It is important to note that they are va l id on ly four years f rom date of manufacture as marked on the flares. General observat ions: 1) Pyrotechnics are used to make distress signals. 2) Read the instructions on the devices regularly. 3) A l l o w a sufficient time period between the firing of each pyrotechnic signal. Your chances of being seen wi l l be much greater. 4) If you see a distress signal, you are responsible for determining whether you can assist the persons in distress without running an undue risk. If you can, remember that it is your duty to do so. Where possible, you must also contact the nearest Rescue Coor-dination Centre and inform them of the type and location of the pyrotechnic signal. Storage: 1) Pyrotechnics should be stored in a cool , dry location and in a watertight container. 2) They should be readily accessible in case of an emergency. Disposal : To dispose of outdated flares 1) Seek advice from the nearest law enforcement agency, Canadian Coast Guard office or fire department. 2) Ask the retailer to take back expired flares w h e n a new purchase is made. 3) Retain the flares, if they are in good condition, as supplements to approved flares. Type A : Parachute Easily observed from surface or air, this flare may have a two - or three-second delay after pulling fire pin, and burns for at least 40 seconds. Type B: Mul t i - s tar Readily observed from surface or air; burns four to five seconds. B Note: Some type B flares project only one star at a time. When using this type, you will need twice the number of cartridges in order to comply with the regulations. The stars should be fired in groups of two with a delay between them of not more than 15 seconds. c Type C: H a n d held Limited surface visibility, best observed during an air search. A V O I D L O O K I N G DIRECTLY A T F L A R E W H I L E B U R N I N G ; H O L D W E L L CLEAR O F THE B O A T . D Type D: Buoyant or h a n d held USE SMOKE FLARE AS A DAY DISTRESS SIGNAL ONLY; BURNS FOR THREE MINUTES. To attract attention: spread on cabin or deck top, or fly from mast. 14 / SB International code flag "N" over " C . " A n y type of ball shape over or under any square flag or cloth. ARM SIGNAL: Raise and lower out-stretched arms repeatedly. D O NOT USE NEAR DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE HELICOPTERS. (Different meaning). Use sound signals or flashlight to signal SOS repeatedly. Marine Radio 156.8 M H z — C h . 16; 2182 kHz; CB: Ch. 9 (see note) In case of grave and imminent danger, on one of these channels repeat " M A Y D A Y " three times, then give name of vessel and position, and nature of distress and assistance requested. W h e n no grave and imminent danger exists but assistance of some nature is required, use the urgency signal. O n one of these channels repeat " P A N P A N " three times, then give name of vessel and position, and nature of urgency and assistance requested. Complete instructions are contained in the Industry Canada publication Radiotelephone Operator Handbook N o t e : The Canadian Coast Guard does not monitor Channel 9 CB. Propane can be hazardous i s - t Propane and butane can pose higher risks than gasoline. Heavier than air, they f low rapidly into lower parts of the boat. They are extremely difficult to remove. W h e n using any portable cooking or heating appliances ensure that they are fully secured to guard against fire due to any unexpected movement of your vessel. Make sure there is adequate ventila-tion w h e n using a gas-burning appliance wi th a pilot light. D O N O T P L A C E F L A M M A B L E SUB-S T A N C E S N E A R N A K E D F L A M E S . It is recommended that equipment installation should meet government standards — liquefied petroleum gas regulations. For more information contact Canadian Gas Association, Don Mills, Ontario, M3B 2R3. Safe ventilating and refuelling For proper ventilation you need a duct for exhaust, and a duct for supply. Exhaust ducts lead from bilges, under the engine or fuel tanks, to the surface. Supply ducts lead from surface to a level below carburetor intake. Keep them as far apart as possible to a l low good air circulation. Two ducts are the minimum. Addit ional ventilation may be needed, depending on the size of your boat. 16 ALL ENCLOSED SPACES SHOULD BE WELL VENTILATED IF THEY CONTAIN FUEL. Ducts may be fitted with wind-activated, self-trimming or rotary exhauster heads, in addition to mandatory power-operated exhaust fans. Run the exhaust for at least five minutes before starting the engine. Gasoline fumes are heavier than air and are highly explosive. Take these precautions: 1. Moor the boat securely. 2. Shut off engines; make sure all passengers are ashore. 3. Don't smoke and extinguish all open flames; close all w i n d o w s and hatches. 4. Take portable tanks ashore. 5. Don't use electrical switches. 6. Ground nozzle against filler pipe; don't overfill. 7. Wipe up any spillage; turn on blower for at least five minutes. 8. Check for vapour odours. Flame arrestors are required. Clean them often wi th soap and water. Drip pans must be fitted under the carburetor for inboard gasoline engines. 17 /53 Operating your vessel safely The Collision Regulations require every vessel to maintain a constant lookout. You must also use every available means, such as radar and radio, to determine whether there is a risk of collision. Under normal circumstances, power-driven vessels must keep clear of sailboats, rowboats and canoes. Copies of Collision Regulations, Office Consolidation may be obtained, for minimal fee, from authorized booksellers or from the Canada Communicat ion Group-Publishing. The address is on the last page of this guide If you operate a boat, an air cushion vehicle, waterskis, surfboard or any towed object in a dangerous manner, you are guilty of a criminal offence and liable to imprisonment or a fine. Under the Criminal Code of Canada, this offence includes 1) operating a vessel w h e n impaired, 2) tow ing a person on skis after dark, 3) towing a person on skis without another person keeping watch, and 4) failing to stop at the scene of an accident. WARNING: In a narrow channel, a power-driven vessel less than 20 m long or a sail-ing vessel must not ham-per the safe passage of a vessel that can navigate only inside such a channel. 18 Radar reflector For craft under 20 m in length and all non-metal craft Locate reflectors above all superstruc-tures, at least 4 m above the water (if possible). Properly positioned, its reflection wi l l increase the range and probability of detection (contact) on radar screens. Note: A radar reflector need not be carried where it is not essential for the safety of the vessel or is impracticable to fit. 19 Operat ing regulations Port Starboard Stern Port: If a power-driven vessel approaches within this sector, main-tain your course and speed with caution. Starboard: If any vessel approaches within this sector, keep out of its way . {Note: This rule may not always apply if one or both vessels are sailboats.) Stern: If any vessel approaches this sector, maintain your course and speed with caution. B A blows one blast and alters course to starboard. B blows one blast and alters course to starboard. B A keeps clear of B B keeps clear of D C keeps clear of A and B D keeps clear of A and C B A keeps clear of and must avoid cross-ing ahead of B. A power-driven vessel keeps clear of a sailing vessel. 20 A n y vessel overtaking another must keep clear. Sailing vessel a) W h e n each sailing vessel has the w ind on a different side, the vessel which has the w ind on the port side shall keep out of the w a y of the other. A keeps clear of B b) W h e n both sailing vessels have the w ind on the same side, the vessel which is to w i n d w a r d shall keep out of the w a y of the vessel which is to leeward. B keeps clear of A c) If a sailing vessel with the w i n d on the port side sees a sailing vessel to w indward and cannot determine wi th certainty whether the other sailing vessel has the w ind on the port or the starboard side, she shall keep out of the w a y of the other. Mote: The windward side shall be deemed to be the side opposite to that on which the mainsail is carried or, in the case of a square-rigged vessel, the side opposite to that on which the largest fore-and-aft sail is carried. b) wind a) wind B \ B 21 Navigation lights for small vessels (collision regulations) Navigation lights must be displayed from sunset to sunrise and in restricted visibility. Motor boats less than 20 m long, w h e n Motor boats less than 12 m long, under way : w h e n under way , have a third option: Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 22 Sailing vessels w h e n under way : (See Note and the Canadian modifica-tion on page 25). Note: These t w o lights shall not be exhibited in conjunction wi th the combined red, green and white lantern (Option 3). Sailing vessels less than 20 m long, have a third option - a combined red, green and white lantern (side-lights and sternlight): 23 >51 Sailing vessels less than 7 m long, A vessel under oars, w h e n under w h e n under way , have a fourth way , exhibits: option: Option 4 Option I Option 2 2 4 NOTE: Sailing vessels proceeding under sail Vessels less than 50 m long, w h e n and also being propelled by machinery anchored exhibit: exhibit a cone shape (apex d o w n -ward), by day. At night, exhibit the lights required by a power-ariven vessel of similar length. Canadian modification In Canadian roadsteads, harbours, rivers, lakes and inland waters, a sailing vessel less than 12 m long under sail and also propelled by machinery is not required to exhibit the cone shape, but may do so. A vessel less than 7 m in length, w h e n at anchor, not in or near a narrow channel, fairway or anchorage, or where other vessels normally navigate, shall not be required to exhibit the lights or shape prescribed. Nautical charts The Charts and Publications Regula-tions require every type of vessel used in navigation and not propelled by oars to carry, maintain and use appropriate charts, tide tables, lists of lights and other nautical publications. Pleasure craft under 100 gross tons need not carry them if the operator has a full knowledge of the area. Nautical charts may be obtained from the organizations listed at the end of this guide. Local knowledge, updated charts and publications are essential for a safer and more enjoyable outing. then forced under water. Victims are then pushed a w a y from the dam under water. After surfacing, the vic-tim is d rawn back in toward the base of the dam, starting the cycle over again. Low-head dams Illustrated is the hydraulic backwash current action characteristic of low-head dams. Boaters and anglers often get too close to the downstream side of the dam, become drawn or sucked into the backwash current that takes them to the base of the dam, and are fLi Overhead power lines Overhead power lines across water-ways and near launching ramps are hazardous. Make sure there is ade-quate clearance for the vessel's mast or antenna before sailing or launching your vessel under overhead power lines. Note: An electrical shock can occur without actually making contact with the wires. If the mast or antenna is too close to the wire and the voltage is high enough, electricity can use the air as a conductor and create an elec-tric arc. The Canadian buoyage system Details of the buoyage system are available in Canada through your local bookseller i Canada Communication Group (Catalogue No. T31-29-1992E). L a t e r a l b u o y s Port (green can) Keep this buoy on your port (left) side when proceeding in the upstream direction. Bifurcation (red & green bands). You may pass this buoy on either side when proceeding in the upstream direction, but the main or preferred channel is indicated by the colour of the topmost band. For example: keep this buoy on your starboard (right) side. Port (green spa yf Keep this hwoy on your port (left) sidywhen proceeding S in tfje'upstream direction. Starboard (red spar) Keep this buoy on your starboard (right) side when proceeding in the upstream direction. (Fairway-white & red stripes/white light) You may pass this buoy on either side, but when it is marking the middle of a channel, it should be kept on your port (left) side. Cardinal buoys North East South West P I L L A R S P A R P I L L A R S P A R P I L L A R S P A R P I L L A R S P A R i 2 B L A C K C O N E S P O I N T S U P W A R D 2 B L A C K C O N E S B A S E T O B A S E 2 B L A C K C O N E S P O I N T S D O W N W A R D 2 B L A C K C O N E S P O I N T T O P O I N T W H I T E W H I T E Cardinal Buoys C a r d i n a l b u o y s i n d i c a t e t h e l o c a t i o n o f t h e s a f e s t a n d d e e p e s t w a t e r b y r e f e r e n c e t o t h e c a r d i n a l p o i n t s o f t h e c o m p a s s . T h e r e a r e f o u r c a r d i n a l b u o y s : N o r t h , E a s t , S o u t h a n d W e s t . f e . g . a n o r t h c a r d i n a l b u o y is l o c a t e d s o t h a t s a f e w a t e r ex i s t s t o t h e n o r t h o f it.J Important A . N o t a l l b u o y s a r e f i t t e d w i t h l i g h t s a n d t o p m a r k s . B. It is e s s e n t i a l t h a t t h i s b u o y a g e s y s t e m b e u s e d in c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h t h e nautical c h a r t s . K e e p t o t h e n a m e d s i d e o f a l l c a r d i n a l b u o y s (i .e. k e e p t o t h e n o r t h o f n o r t h c a r d i n a l b u o y s , k e e p t o t h e e a s t o f e a s t c a r d i n a l b u o y s , etc. ) a n d t h e b u o y w i l l b e b e t w e e n y o u a n d t h e d a n g e r . C o n s u l t y o u r c h a r t f o r d e t a i l s o f t h e d a n g e r . Memory aids (a) T h e p o i n t s o f t h e t o p m a r k c o n e s p o i n t t o w a r d t h e b l a c k p a r t s o f t h e b u o y (b) T h e c o n e s o n t h e n o r t h c a r d i n a l p o i n t n o r t h a n d t h o s e o n t h e s o u t h c a r d i n a l p o i n t s o u t h . (c) T h e n u m b e r o f s h o r t l i g h t f l a s h e s i n e a c h g r o u p o n t h e e a s t , s o u t h a n d w e s t c a r d i -n a l s is t h e s a m e a s t h e h o u r a t t h e c o r r e s p o n d i n g p o i n t o n a c l o c k f a c e (e .g . t h e 3 f l a s h e s f o r t h e e a s t c a r d i n a l c o r r e s p o n d s t o 3 o ' c l o c k ) Clock Face E A S T S O U T H W E S T 2 8 buoys Anchorage Used to mark the perimeter of designated anchorage areas; consult your chart for water depths. Cautionary Used to mark dangers such as firing ranges, underwater pipelines, race courses, seaplane bases and areas where no through channel exists; consult your chart for details of dangers being marked. Mooring Used for mooring or securing vessels; be aware that a vessel may be secured to such a buoy. Hazard Buoy A hazard buoy marks random hazards such as rocks and shoals. <3> • Keep out Used to mark areas in which boats are prohibited. Control Used to indicate speed limits, wash restrictions, etc.; obey the restriction illustrated within the orange circle. Information Used to display informa-tion such as locality, name, marina, campsite, etc.; be guided by infor-mation illustrated within the orange square. STANDARD DAYBEACONS B L A C K OR G R E E N (Preferred chBnne! to right) J U N C T I O N (Preferred c h a n n e l t o left) S T A R B O A R D H A N D 2 9 Communications a n d weather information Marine radio w ^ The Canadian Coast Guard provides 24-hour service on channel 16 (156.8 MHz), and on 2182 kHz. They are to be used as distress and calling frequencies only. The C C G recommends that radio operators contact the Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) Stations directly on the local area V H F working frequencies rather than making the initial call on ch. 16. Complete information on the radiotelephone services pro-vided by the Canadian Coast Guard is contained in Radio Aids to Marine Navigation, Canada Communicat ion Group-Publishing. (See addresses in back of booklet.) Procedures for two-way radiotelephone use, can be obtained from Canada Communication Group-Publishing. Canadian Notices to Mariners, published biweekly, contain important information and amendments to marine charts and publications. These notices may be obtained free on request from: Canadian Coast Guard Canada Building Vessel Traffic Services 6th Floor 344 Slater St. O t tawa , Ontario K1A 0N7 Licence and Restricted Certificate All vessels equipped with a VHF radio must have a licence issued by Industry Canada. The licence or a copy of it must be placed in full view near the radio installation. VHF radio oper-ators are required to have a restricted radiotelephone opera-tor's certificate. Please contact your local Industry Canada office for further information. 30 Weather information Weather forecasts may be obtained from various sources. • Channels 21B and 83B on the Atlantic Coast and Great Lakes • Channels 21B and 39 (WX1) on the Pacific Coast • Weatheradio Canada (Environ-ment Canada) includes: V H F broadcasts in Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, and Halifax • Regular A M and F M radio weather forecasts • The Marine Weather Services Bulletin may be obtained by writ ing to the nearest Environment Canada Office. (See addresses in back of booklet.) Weather warnings Small craft warnings are included in marine forecasts and near-shore fore-casts if winds are expected to exceed 20 knots. Gale warnings are included if winds are expected to exceed 34 knots but remain less than 48 knots. Storm warnings are included if winds are expected to exceed 47 knots Note: A receiver for continuous marine weather forecasts is available on the market and distributed through marine supply outlets. Marine security Institute a Marine Watch in your area. This program provides your boat and its contents wi th the same protection that Neighbourhood Watch does for your home. The emphasis is on pre-vention and by marking all items, recording serial numbers and prac-tising some simple common sense pre-cautions, theft and vandalism can be reduced. What you can do now % Secure your outboard motor to the boat with a case-hardened steel chain padlock and hardened steel chain. 9 A lso , use a locking bar designed to conceal the motor mounting screws which secure the motor to the transom. 0 If you store your boat at a moor-ing, secure it wi th a lock and chain made with case-hardened steel in addition to your mooring line. 9 A v o i d leaving loose gear on board w h e n the vessel is left unat-tended. Loose gear should be secured in locked compartments. 9 Photograph your vessel and gear to aid in fast and easy identifica-tion by police. 32 Diving Air cushion vehicles (ACVs) % A n A C V is most controllable and creates minimum wash w h e n moving at high speed. Do not be alarmed at high speed operation. £ W h e n operating, an A C V has no draught. Do not try to fo l low an A C V and do not be alarmed if you see one heading for shore or shal low water at high speed. 9 A C V s may be identified by an all -round flashing amber light. Mariners and others should exercise particular vigilance and care w h e n navigating in waters where diving signals are exhibited. The Code Flag " A " of the Interna-tional Code of Signals indicating "I have a diver d o w n : keep wel l clear at s low speed." is required by the Coll i -sion Regulations to be s h o w n on vessels engaged in diving operations. Such vessels are restricted in their abil-ity to manoeuvre. The red and white flag carried on a buoy is used to mark areas where skin diving is in progress. Again, stay well clear at slow speed 33 Enter ing a n d exit ing locks Vessels waiting to enter a lock must not obstruct the path of exiting vessels. A green light indicates the lock is ready for operation and vessels may proceed into the lock. A red light indicates the lock is not ready for operation and vessels may not proceed past the limit of approach. A flashing red light indicates the lock is being prepared for operation, and vessels may not proceed past the limit of approach. Upon entering the lock chamber, ves-sels must be tied to the mooring cables on the walls of the lock. Tie lines loosely to permit movement; if tied too tightly, lines may become taut and cause the vessel to capsize. A n y boater wi th problems entering or exiting the lock should request assistance from the lock operator. Note: The St. Lawrence Seaway Authority published a Pleasure Craft Guide for users of its locks. To obtain a copy, write to the Authority at the address given on page 43. Users of the Parks Canada locks may obtain the publication The Heritage Canals: Navigation Data at the address given on the same page. 34 Hypothermia l7o Hypothermia is a drop in body temperature below the normal level. It places the body in a state of shock, which in turn depresses normal body functions. • Main Heat Loss Areas NOTE: More information on cold water survival may be obtained by calling 1-800-267-6687 and ordering the COLD WATER SURVIVAL pamphlet H o w long can a person survive in cold water? According to data from experiments conducted at sea wi th average size men and women w h o remained immobile in the water, wearing light clothing and a regular lifejacket, a person can be expected to survive for between 2'fe and 3 hours in 10°C (50°F) water. This can vary, depend-ing on what other factors are involved. Some positions that can help you to survive longer: • Single person wearing a flotation device: fetal position. • Two or more persons: huddle. • Try to climb onto any nearby floating object. 35 Boating and alcohol Whether you are on the road or on the water, the same rules apply regarding the consumption of alcohol. W h e n you are on the water, a number of factors such as fatigue, sun, vibration and dizziness can affect your reaction time. If alcohol is combined wi th these, you wil l jeopardize your o w n life and the lives of others. People w h o are under the influence of alcohol become falsely confident of their ability to steer and manoeuvre the craft, as numerous tragic experiences have proven. The Canadian Coast Guard strongly recommends that pleasure craft owners read the Transport Canada publication Smashed. A l though its subject is drinking and driving, boat owners wi l l benefit greatly from it. To obtain a copy, write to: Public Affairs Transport Canada Place de Ville Tower C, 2 8 , h Floor Ot tawa, Ontario K l A 0N5 Shore Protection Zone In August 1991, the Boating Restriction Regulations were amended to incorporate a new safety measure that all provinces may adopt. The amendment introduced a shore protection zone: a 30-metre band where power boats are limited to a speed of 10 km/h. The provision is universal in provinces electing to join the program and does not require any signage. Manitoba, Ontario and Saskatchewan have already taken advantage of this preventive measure which serves to separate swimmers from boaters. Several other provinces are planning to jo in . Water skiers taking off on a trajectory perpendicular to shore are exempted from the new regulation. 36 Common sense things to do and not to do D O • Wear a lifejacket or PFD approved by Transport Canada. • Head for the nearest safe anchorage or landing w h e n a storm threatens. Avo id the tempta-tion to buck it. • Slow d o w n w h e n passing rowboats and canoes, especially in narrow waters. • Slow d o w n in bad weather and w h e n making sharp turns. • Give your float plan to a responsi-ble person. • Assist any boat in distress. Watch for distress signals. If in doubt about a signal you have seen, investigate. • Slow d o w n w h e n passing an area where divers may be working. • Keep the bilges clean and free of oil , gasoline and rags. Vent any enclosed areas into the open air. • Before starting an outboard motor, make sure it is set in neutral and in the straight-ahead position. A motor started in gear can cause a small boat to turn suddenly and capsize. • Keep some spare clothing in a watertight plastic bag, plus a flashlight, whistle, knife, adequate first aid kit and emergency rations. • Have on board the safety equip-ment required. • Carry an anchor and a sufficient length of cable, rope or chain (at least five times the average anchorage depth). Be sure that the inboard end of the line is fastened securely. • (For children) A lways wear a PFD near water. • Check the battery and its ventilation. I 7 J DON'T • Stand up or change seats in a small boat, particularly w h e n it is fully loaded. If it is necessary to move, crouch low, keep your weight on the centre line and hold onto both gunwales. • Stand up w h e n starting an out-board motor. • Mix liquor and boating. • Sound your horn or use the spotlight unnecessarily. • Wait until the last minute to signify your intention of obeying the collision regulations. 38 • Be a show-off. • Buzz bathing beaches. Swimmers are hard to see in the water. • Carry outdated charts and publica-tions in your boat. • Overload your boat. • Anchor close to other boats. • Cruise at high speed in or near an anchorage. Search and Rescue Search and rescue operations in Canada are jointly coordinated by the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Coast Guard (Transport Canada). The Depart-ments of Fisheries and Oceans, Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Energy, Mines and Resources, the RCMP, Ontario Provincial Police, and Surete du Quebec also assist in some circumstances. The Department of National Defence, assisted by the Coast Guard, maintains 24-hour Rescue Coordination Centres at Halifax, Trenton, and Victoria. The Coast Guard also operates Marine Rescue Sub-Centres at St. John's and Quebec. The volunteer Canadian Marine Rescue Auxiliary is coordinated by the Coast Guard throughout Canadian coastal waters, the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River. More information on Search and Rescue, Courtesy Examinations and the Canadian Marine Rescue Auxiliary may be obtained from: Canadian Coast Guard Rescue a n d Environmental Response RO. Box 1300 St. John's, Newfound land A l C 6H8 Tel.: (709) 7 7 2 - 4 0 7 4 Canadian Coast Guard Rescue and Environmental Response RO. Box 1013 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4K2 Tel.: (902) 4 2 6 - 7 5 2 5 Canadian Coast Guard Rescue and Environmental Response 201 North Front Street Suite 703 Sarnia, Ontario N 7 T 8 B 1 Tel.: (519) 383-1982 Canadian Coast Guard Rescue and Environmental Response 25 Huron Street Victoria, British Columbia V 8 V 4V9 Tel.: (604) 4 8 0 - 2 6 0 0 Canadian Marine Rescue Auxiliary (CMRAj This volunteer organization of inter-ested individuals is actively supported by the Coast Guard. It provides sup-port in SAR operations. The CMRA is also involved in SAR prevention and marine safety education Strictly a volunteer organization the members receive compensation only for operating expenses (fuel) when on authorized Search and Rescue duties. Members fly this pennant. |*!§• Canadian Coast Guard Rescue and Environmental Response 1 04 Dalhousie Street Quebec, Quebec G1K 4B8 Tel.: (418) 648-5331 Note: The Canadian Coast Guard has produced safe boating films for public viewing. These films are available at National Film Board offices or from the Canadian Coast Guard at the above addresses. 39 Falling overboard When someone falls overboard, immediately: • sound alarm — stop engines — throw a buoyant object to assist the person and to mark the spot • detail one person to keep sight of the person in the water • carefully manoeuvre to effect recovery • be careful in retrieval; many would-be rescuers have been pulled into the water by the person in distress In reduced visibility or if it is not possi-ble to keep the person in sight, use the Williamson Turn: • Immediately put the rudder hard over to the side from which the person fell. Maintain engine speed until approximately 60° from origi-nal heading, then ease the rudder and put hard over to the opposite direction to bring the vessel around to the reciprocal of the original course. Stop engines and the vessel should drift down to the person's position dead ahead. Note: The effectiveness of this manoeuvre will vary with each vessel and with weather/sea conditions. Practice it — it may save a life. 40 Safe speeds Rule 6 of the Canadian Coast Guard's Collision Regulations state: Every vessel shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so that she can take proper and effective action to avoid collision and be stopped within a distance appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions. In determining a safe speed the following factors shall be among those taken into account: a) By all vessels: i) the state of visibility, ii) the traffic density including concentrations of fishing vessels or any other vessels, iii) the manoeuvrability of the vessel with special reference to stopping distance and turning ability in the prevailing conditions, iv) at night the presence of background light such as from shore lights or from backscatter of her o w n lights, v) the state of wind, sea and current, and the proximity of navigational hazards, vi) the draught in relation to the available depth of water. ' The Canadian Coast Guard has published the Safe Boating Guide in effort to help familiarize the operators of pleasure craft with boating regulations, all of which are designed to ensure safety afloat. Although pleasure boating is a recreational activity, certain rules must be observed. The Canadian Coast Guard strongly recommends that vessel operators recognize the limitations of their abilities and strive to improve their knowledge and skill in attempt to operate their vessel in a safe and competent manner. 1 Canadian Coast Guard. Office Consolidation, Collision Regulations: International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 with Canadian Modifications. Rule 6 Safe Speed - International, pg.8. January 1991. Information sources Where to call for Search and Rescue EAST: Halifax Phone: (902) 427-8200 or 1-800-565-1582 St. John's Phone: (709) 772-5151 Other areas Phone: 1-800-563-2444 CENTRAL Trenton Phone: (613) 392-2811 (613) 965-3870/3875 or 1-800-267-7270 Quebec Phone: (418) 648-3599 or 1-800-463-4393 WEST Vancouver Phone: (604) 666-4301/4302 Victoria Phone: (604) 380-2333 Other areas Phone: 1-800-567-51 I 1 Edmonton Phone: (403) 973-4402 1-800-661-5631 42 Environment Canada Marine Weather Forecast Services Environment Canada Officer in charge Maritimes Weather Centre 1496 Bedford Highway Bedford, Nova Scotia B4A 1 E5 Chief of Operations Quebec Weather Centre Atmospheric Services Branch 100 Alexis N ihon Blvd., Third Floor St. Laurent, Quebec H 4 M 2N8 Regional Centre Toronto Weather and Environmental Services Branch Environment Canada-Ontario Region 4905 Dufferin Street Downsview, Ontario M 3 H 5T4 Chief of Operation Environmental Services Branch Environment Canada Twin Atria Building, Room 200 4999-98th Avenue Edmonton, Alberta T6B 2X3 Pacific Weather Services Environment Canada 200-1200-73rd Avenue West Vancouver, British Columbia V6P 6P9 Where to obtain nautical charts, sailing directions, tide and current tables, A guide for the radiotelephone operator and the Radio Aids to Marine Navigation Hydrographic Chart Distribution Office Department of Fisheries and Oceans 1675 Russell Road P.O. Box 8080 Ottawa, Ontario K 1 G 3 H 6 Institute of Ocean Sciences 9860 West Saanich Road P.O. Box 6000 Sidney, British Columbia V8L 4B2 \ Where to obtain other marine publica-tions and regulations (published by the Government of Canada). Canada Communication Group-Publishing Ottawa, Ontario K1A0S9 To learn more about navigation or boating safety courses, please contact these organizations: Canadian Yachting Association 1600 James Naismith Dr. Gloucester, Ontario K l B 5N4 Tel: (613) 748-5687 Canadian Yachting Association 333 River Road Ottawa, Ontario K l L 8H9 Tel: (613) 748-5687 Canadian Red Cross Society 1800 Alta Vista Drive Ottawa, Ontario K1J 4J5 Tel: (613) 739-3000 Canadian Power and Sail Squadrons 26 Golden Gate Court Scarborough, Ontario M1P 3A5 Tel.: (416) 293-2438 or 1-800-268-3579 Royal Life Saving Society Canada 287 McArthur Avenue Ottawa, Ontario K1C 6P3 Tel.: (613) 748-5759 Canadian Recreational Canoeing Association P.O. Box 500 Hyde Park, Ontario N 0 M 1Z0 Tel.: (519) 473-2109 Where to obtain application forms for licensing vessels: Addresses and telephone numbers of Revenue Canada, Customs and Excise in your area may be found in your local telephone directory. Where to obtain a free copy of the St. Lawrence Seaway Pleasure Craft Guide: The Information Office St. Lawrence Seaway Authority 360 Albert Street Ottawa, Ontario KIR 1X7 Where to obtain a free copy of the Heritage Canals Navigation Data: Parks Canada Government Inquiries Centre 351 St. Joseph Boulevard Hull, Quebec Kl A 0H3 H 9 Revised November 1994. ©Minister of Supply and Services Canada 1993 Cat. No. T31-31/1993 Erev. ISBN 0-662-21247-6 43 179 For more information on boat-ing safety, call this toll-free number: 1-800-267-6687. / & 3 YOU'LL FIND THE FINEST IN THE FINEST BOATS. The Lund Tradition of Quality and market Leadership continues today as we build the finest aluminum fishing boats in our industry. New product development The Lund plant in New York Mills, Minnesota. Lunds are also built in Steinbach, Manitoba Canada. and customer service are top priorities throughout our company, and they continue to be key elements related to our success. Lund Boats are built in modern facilities located in New York Mills, Minnesota; and Steinbach, Manitoba. We are very proud of the over 500 employees that build our products and over 350 Lund Dealer/Partners that sell and service our products throughout the United States and Canada. Today, we lead our industry with over 50 models ranging from 12' to 24' in size. Boats of the latest design, featuring appointments that meet the expectations of the most discriminating customer. Today, names such as Pro-V, Tyee and Baron have become household words. Last summer on Larry Lovoid, President the Professional Tournament Circuit, Lund Pro-V Signatures won both the PWT and NAWA championships (the two most prestigious wall-eye tournaments in the world). This year, you will see more Lund Pro-Vs and Tyees on the tour-nament trail than any other brand. On behalf of all our employees and dealers, 1 invite you to review our '96 product line shown in this catalog to see exacdy what we mean by a tradition of quali-ty. I then ask that you visit one of our dealers to assist you in choosing the new Lund that best meets your needs. "In my business I fish "Welcome aboard and good fishing!" JJg gjj J[ has always given me the versatility and dependability to do my job right." Al Lindner Television Host of In-Fisherman With Al Lindner and Larry Lovoid, and a new 1890 Pro-V LE, the fish don't stand a chance. See page 17 for all the details on this all-new Lund boat. F I S H S E R I E S Fish. Cruise. Ski. These are the boats that do it all Page NEW! 2150 Baron Magnum Gran Sport 3-4 2100 Baron Traditional 3-4 NEW! 1950 Tyee Magnum Signature 5-6 1950 Tyee Magnum Gran Sport ...5-6 1850 Tyee Signature 7-8 1850 Tyee Gran Sport ....7-8 Page 1850 Tyee Traditional 7-8 1750 Tyee Gran Sport 9-10 1750 Tyee Traditional 9-10 1650 Tyee Traditional 9-10 Baron & Tyee Specifications 11-12 NEW! 1800 Gran Sport LE 13-14 The definitive approach to bigwater game fishing. 2450 Genmar Sport Cabin 15-16 T O U R N A M E N T S E R I E S Tournament legends start here. NEW! 1890 Pro-V LE 17-18 1890 Pro-V DLX Signature 19-20 1890 Pro-V Signature 23-24 1890 Pro-V DLX SE 19-20 1890 Pro-V DLX Traditional 19-20 1890 Pro-V SE & Traditional Gary Roach Editions 23-24 1775 Pro-V DLX Signature 21-22 1775 Pro-V Signature 23-24 1775 Pro-V DLX SE 21-22 1775 Pro-V SE 23-24 1775 Pro-V DLX Traditional 21-22 1775 Pro-V Traditional 23-24 1660 Pro-V DLX SE 25 1660 Pro-V SE 25 1660 Pro-V DLX Traditional 25 1660 Pro-V Traditional 25 1800 Pro-V Bass SE 26 Pro-V Specifications 27-28 S P O R T S M A N S E R I E S For the beginning angler or the seasoned fisherman. NEW! 1650 Angler 29-30 NEW! 1650 Angler DLX 29-30 Pike 16 31-32 Pike 16 DLX 31-32 1700 Pro Guide 31-32 1700 Pro Guide DLX 31-32 S E R I E S Lund quality shines in these hardworking, hard-fishing boats. WC-14 Deluxe 42 WC-14 42 WC-12 42 20 Alaskan 33-34 SV-18 Alaskan 33-34 SV-18 33-34 SV-16 33-34 SV-14 33-34 16 Laker 33-34 14 Laker 33-34 A D V E N T U R E S E R I E S FULL-LINE SPECIFICATIONS Specification Chart 43-44 All Lund and all within easy reach. 1800 Fisherman 35-36 1750 Fisherman 35-36 NEW! 1750 Fisherman SE 35-36 1650 Fisherman 35-36 NEW! 1650 Fisherman SE 35-36 1700 Pro Angler DLX 37-38 1700 Pro Angler 37-38 1600 Pro Angler DLX 37-38 1600 Pro Angler 37-38 EXCLUSIVE FEATURES The Famous Lund Deep-V Hull 45 ProLong Live Well System 45 16 Rebel DLX 39-40 16 Rebel 39-40 14 Rebel 39-40 1790 Bass 41 A-16 42 A-14 42 A-12 42 ACCESSORIES AND OPTIONS Clothing, Canvas, Options, Rigging 46 BARON N E W 2 1 5 0 B A R O N M A G N U M G R A N S P O R T pr N E W 2 1 5 0 B A R O N M A G N U M G R A N S P O R T I /O 2 1 0 0 B A R O N T R A D I T I O N A L 2 1 0 0 B A R O N T R A D I T I O N A L I /O THE SIZE, THE RANGE, THE ATTITUDE. America's most challenging and abundant fisheries are in safe reach of the Lund fisher-man. Barons are the big water answer. Great lakes. Huge reservoirs. Sounds. Coastal bays. The new 2150 Magnum Gran Sport and 2100 Traditional models put them in reach. When Mother Nature shows her force, you'll be glad there's a double-riveted, twin-plated deep-V Lund hull under your feet The roomy 2150 is the newest example of how Lund has perfected a big-water balance between toughness, safety and performance. ( THE NEW 2150 BARON MAGNUM GRAN SPORT. • 80-gallon fuel tank for a one fill-up per weekend • 25" transom. • Dual Prolong live wells. • Huge 96" beam for stability, performance and roomines: • Tilt wheel and no-feedback steering. • New radius deck styling. • Convertible top storage (outboard only) • Stand up canvas. • Optional head. • Padded bow bolsters. • 6 seat bases. • See pages 11-12 for full specifications. 2150 Baron magnum Gran Sport I/O. Volvo or Mercruiser I/O options let you power your boat the way you like. In the l/Os, there are two ProLong live wells in the bow. The upholstered motor cover is flanked by two jump seats. 2100 Baron Traditi Famous for a safe, smooth, perfectly-balanced ride, the traditional 2100 Baron is an old hand on the big water. Reinforced decks for downriggers. Day-long range with 60-gallon fuel tanks. 2100 outboards feature bow and aft aerated live wells. Traditional Baron Console. Lund's Traditional model consoles introduce you to the highest standard of style and performance. No-feedback steering. Reinforced surfaces to mount your electronics. 2100 Baron Traditional I/O. 2100 Barons boast huge 89" beams, enormous 60-gallon fuel tanks and finished storage all around. A host of options lets you equip a Baron to fit your needs. MAGNUMS LEAVE EVERYTHING ELSE IN THEIR WAKE. At almost 20 feet, Tyee Magnums are dominant powerhouses-putting speed, range and all-out performance under your command. Designed for big water, big crews and big fish. Magnums do it all with a gutsy, sport/utility attitude you can feel as soon as you settle behind the wrap-around console. Gran Sport consoles take performance and style to another level. Gran Sport consoles clearly define a standard other manufacturers have yet to reach. Wrap around sport styling. Padded dash and tilt wheel. Full controls and instrumentation including a 12-volt power receptacle. Prolong -the industry's most advanced live well. Magnum outboards have bow and aft ProLong lighted live well systems. I/Os have dual ProLongUve wells in the bow. Bottom-fed aeration. Console-controlled drain, fill, recirculate. True 22-gallon capacity. Bait well. Flush-out. Heavy-duty filtration. Designed to prevent airlock. 22*uoe 1 16° EVIHRUDEi OUTBOARDS Signature superiority is graphically clear. This year you can finish your Tyee Magnum with the style, colors and equipment of a Lund Signature. Color-match this elite model with an Evinrude or Johnson outboard motor. If a flash of Dark Cranberry and Sand Beige flys across the water, you can be sure it says Lund Signature on the side. THE 1850 TYEE GRAN SPORT & SIGNATURE. • 45-gallon fuel tank in the outboards. • Dual ProLong live wells. • Refined hull is deeper & wider for a dry, smooth, high-performance ride. • Color-matched outboard options. • New radius deck styling. • Convertible top storage (outboard only). • Padded bow bolsters. • Larger cockpit space. • See pages 11-12 for full specifications. Signature models entitle you to a personalized name plate, jacket and cap. SIGNATURE IS ONE OF A KIND. One look at the 1850 Tyee Signature tells you why these boats have come to define the pinnacle of styling. The striking colors are rich and confident. Color-matched engine options can complete the look. This year the hand-fitted upholstery is padded throughout the entire boat. And e the color-matched top-set rests in a convertible pocket when it's not in use. For the fisherman or the family who c appreciate the finer things. 1850 Tyee Gran Sport I/O. A Gran Sport gives you an upgraded console, AM/FM stereo cassette, dual Prolong live wells, a curved windshield and a complete canvas top-set to cover it all. See pages 11-12 for Gran Sport details. 1850 Tyee Traditional. When Lund set out to build a boat that fished as well as it skied, the Tyee was the result. Walk-through windshields. ProDeck bow conversions. Plenty of gear storage. Precise handling under full-throttle. Ask your dealer lor the outboard power of your choice up to 150 HP. Top storage. Take the top down and tuck it away. Lund's new top storage is available on 1850,1950 and 2150 Baron and Tyee Gran Sport, Magnum Gran Sport and Signature outboard models. The frame slides back and your top-set drops right into the pocket keeping it secured and out of the way when it's not in use. Signature consoles. Until Lund brought you a wrap-around dash that could handle the elements in style, you could only find appointments like this in today's finest automobiles. Burled wood accents. Ergonomic control and instrumentation placement. Padded wheel. Soft-touch console. There's nothing else like it. 1650 Traditional Tyee Console. From glass boats to wood boats, there have never been console designs this exciting or functional. The stylish 1650 Tyee dash is a cross between a sports car and a 4 x 4. 10 TYEE TRADITIONAL Traditional Baron and Tyee models set a standard that can only be topped by another Lund. For a complete list of features, see the facing page. • Bow ProDeck conversions. • Aerated live wells. • No-feedback steering. • Bow trolling motor plug-in. • Walk-through windshield. 1750 Tyee 1850 Tyee Traditional console. GRAN SPORT 2150 and 1950 Magnum, 1850 and 1750 Tyee Gran Sport models give you all the great Traditional features plus: • Curved, automotive-style windshield. • Two ProLong lighted live well systems and a bait well system in outboard models. • Complete canvas top-set. • A M / F M stereo cassette. • Color-matched outboard options. • Gran Sport console. • Radius deck styling on the 2150s, 1950s and 1850s. Gran Sport console. SIGNATURE The 1950 and 1850 Tyee Signature models are striking, superbly styled and equipped boats for the discriminating owner. • Four ProRide Signature seats. • Two ProLong lighted live wells systems (outboard model). • Complete color-matched canvas top. • 50-watt A M / F M stereo cassette with remote. • Exclusive Signature soft-touch console with burled wood accents. • Radius deck styling. • 20-oz. Sand Beige carpet. 1950 Tyee Magnum 2100 Baron Signature console. EvirmuDEi OUTBOARDS 'ilahnsan aUTBOAROS 2150 Baron 11 BARON • TYEE 1750 Tyee I/O 1850 Tyee I/O 1950 Tyee Magnum I/O 2100 Baron I/O 2150 Baron I/O Traditional Barons and Tyees available in Flame Red, Midnight Blue and Graphite with Quicksilver accents. Freeboard Carpet Vinyl Gran Sport models are available in Burnt Red, Navy Blue and Jewel Green — all with Sand Beige accents. Graphite Gran Sports are accented with Quicksilver. Freeboard Carpet Vinyl The Tyee Signature model is immediately recognizable by its Dark Cranberry color and warm Sand Beige accents. BARON AND TYEE LIVE WELLS MODEL BOW AREA AFT AREA 2150 BARON MAG G . S . 2 ProLong Live Well Systems 2150 BARON MAG. G. S. I/O 2 ProLong Live Well Systems 2100 BARON Aerated live well Aerated live well 2100 BARON I/O 2 Aerated live wells 1950 TYEE M A G N U M G.S. ProLong Live Well System ProLong Live Well System 1950 TYEE M A G N U M G.S I/O 2 ProLong Live Well Systems 1950 TYEE SIGNATURE ProLong Live Well System ProLong Live Well System 1950 TYEE SIGNATURE I/O 2 ProLong Live Well Systems 1850TYEE Aerated live well Aerated live well 1850 TYEE I/O 2 Aerated live wells - E E ' i F A f : S f ' R T ProLong Live Well System ProLong Live Well System 1850TYEEG.S . I/O ? pr•• ,Linn:; Uvi: I'IV 1 S 1850 TYEE SIGNATURE ProLong Live Well System ProLong Live Well System 1850 TYEE SIGNATURE I/O 2 ProLong Live Well Systems 1750TYEE Aerated live well Aerated live well 1750 TYEE I/O Aerated live well 1750 TYEE GRAN SPORT ProLong Live Well System ProLong Live Well System 1750 TYEE G.S. I/O ProLong Live Well System 1650 TYEE Aerated live well 9? I I I ! I I I 2150 BARON MAGNUM GRAN SPORT Length 21 '5" Beam 96" Approx. Wt. (Ib.) 0.B 2090 Approx. Wt. (Ib.) I/O 3098 NVMA Max. HPO.B Transom Height O.B Fuel Tank (gal.) Aerated Live Well System(s) ProRide Folding Seats 2100 BARON ..203" ....89" ..1720 ..2710 225(0.B.) 200(O.B 25" 20.5" 80 60 2 2 4 .4 Pedestals (Power, Air, Solid) 1P.3A 1P.3A Seat Bases 4 (6 O.B.) 4 1750 TYEE ..17'3".. ..83.5". ..1195.. ..2015.. ...140... 1650 TYEE ,.16'3" ....80" ...975 ...115 ..20.5" ....20 1 ....2 ....2S 5 1950 1850 TYEE MAGNUM TYEE GRAN SPORT Length 19'8" 18'3".. Beam 90" 88".... Approx. Wt. (Ib.) O.B 1650 1412.. Approx. Wt. (Ib.) I/O 2840 2396.. NMMA Max. HPO.B 200 150... Transom Height O.B 20.5" 20.5" 20.5" Fuel Tank (gal.) O.B 60(55 I/O) 32(27 I/O)* 32(27 I/O).. Aerated Live Well System(s) 2 1 1 ProRide Folding Seats 4 3 3 Pedestals (Power. Air, Solid) 1 P.3A 1R2S 1 P,2S Seat Bases 4 4 4(2 I/O).... *1850 Tyee GS, & Sig. O.B. Fuel Tank 45 gal. 1850 Tyee GS, & Sig, I/O Fuel Tank 36 gal. I/O ENGINE OPTIONS: See page 44. TRADITIONAL COLORS • Flame Red with Red carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom • Midnight Blue with Blue carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom • Graphite with Midnight Star carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom GRAN SPORT MODEL COLORS • Burnt Red with Blue Burgandy carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom • Navy Blue with Jasmine Blue carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom • Jewel Green with Hunter Green carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom • Graphite with Midnight Star carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom SIGNATURE MODEL COLORS • Dark Cranberry with 20-oz. Sand Beige carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom, Signature graphics TRADITIONAL STANDARD EQUIPMENT • Molded console w/ glove box • Two aerated live well systems (one in the 1650 and 1750 I/O) • No-feedback steering (2150, 2100,1950. 1850, 1750) • Walk-through windshield • Aft bait well system (O.B.s: 2150, 2100,1950, 1850,1750) • Bow ProDeck conversion • Reinforced deck surfaces for downriggers • Bow trolling motor plug-in • Deck mounting pad • Rod lockers • Console storage • Lockable storage (2150, 2100.1950,1850, 1750) •Aftstorage (1650, 2100) • Built-in tackle compartment (2100, 2; 1950, 1850,1750,1) • Battery holders (2) • Navigational and interior lighting • Plug-in wire harness • Automotive-style fuse panel • Step pads • Chrome cleats (4) • Bow and stern eyes • Stainless steel bow rails • Bilge pump (Baron & Magnums, 2; Tyees,1) • Self-draining splash pan (outboards) • I/O Mercruiser or Volvo engine options (2150, 2100, 1950. 1850,1750). see pg. 44 • Aft jump seats (l/Os, 2) • Lighted instrumentation (l/Os) • Insulated motor cover (l/Os) • Mercruiser or Volvo controls (l/Os) GRAN SPORT MODEL UPGRADE EQUIPMENT 2150 BARON & MAGNUM G.S. O.B. & I/O • 1950 TYEE MAGNUM G.S. O.B. & I/O 1850 TYEE G.S. - 1850 TYEE G.S. I/O • 1750 TYEE G.S. • 1750 TYEE G.S. I/O • 2 ProLong lighted live well systems (1750 I/O has one) • Bait well system (outboard only) • Curved auto-style walk-through windshield • AM/FM stereo cassette • Radius deck styling (2150,1950,1850) • Horn • Fire extinguisher • Complete top-set SIGNATURE MODEL UPGRADE EQUIPMENT 1950 TYEE MAGNUM SIGNATURE O.B. & I/O -1 • Color-matched soft-touch Signature dash, glove box and wheel • 4 Signature ProRide seats, 3 air ride pedestals, 1 power pedestal • Curved auto-style walk-through windshield • 12/24-volt trolling motor plug-in, bow only OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT (Not all options available • Sport option group 1 • Tilt steering • Bow cushions • 12/24-volt trolling motor plug-in • ProSelectronics groups available: featuring Lowrance, Hummingbird and Minn Kota components • Factory O/B pre-rigging • Onboard battery charging system (Signature model only) Custom molded console w/ color-matched dash, glove box & wheel Tilt steering Air ride pedestals 12-volt power receptacle Top storage (2150,1950,1850) Padded bow bolsters (2150.1950,1850) 850 TYEE SIGNATURE O.B. & I/O • 50-watt AM/FM stereo w/ remote and power antenna • Complete color-keyed top-set • Bow cushions • Automatic bilge pump for all models; see your dealer.) • Convertible sunbather seat 1 Sun top • Complete top-set • Side and stern curtain set • Mooring cover • Boarding ladder or platform • Horn • Fire extinguisher • Vinyl floor • Arm rests (Signature and Gran Sport) • Solid or air ride pedestal seat • Stand up top-set (Traditional and Gran Sport only) 12 THE PERFECT CONVERTIBLE. 1800 Gran Sport LE raises the fish an ski standard of the Tyees to an even higher level. If you enjoy holding a ski rope as much as a fishing rod, the new Gran Sport LE delivers. All the Gran Sport LE features and a few more extras make LE a one-of-a-kind sport boat. E V i m U D E i ouTBoartos For the fishing. Over your hot spot, the Gran Sport LE equips you with fishing essentials. A bow ProDeck conversion. Aerated live well. Bow plug-in. And a smart layout that keeps fishermen out of each others way. GRAN SPORT LE Lennth 18T Beam 88" Approx. Wt. (lb.) 1490 NMMA maxH.P. 150 Transom Height 20.5" Fuel Tank (gal.) 32 Aerated Live Well System 1 Bucket Seats 4 Pedestals 4 Seat Bases 4 4 _ . Aft innovations. In the back of the LE you'll find some smart innovations. Like a conversion for an aft casting platform. A built-in cooler. A Tuck-away pocket for the canvas top-set. 1800 Gran Sport LE 1800 GRAN SPORT LE MODEL COLORS • Burnt Red with Sand carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom • Navy Blue with Sand carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom • Jewel Green with Sand carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom For list of colors see page 12. For the fun of it. The new console says it all. For flexibility, fishermen and sport enthusiasts alike r f i -l l in the same seat. From the comfortable bucket seat, the dashboard takes a ! dynamic approach to control and instrumentation. Tilt wheel. No-feedback steering. Lighted instruments. 12-voit power receptacle. STANDARD EQUIPMENT • Aerated live well system • No-feedback steering • Curved auto-style walk-through windshield • Custom molded con-sole w/ color-matched dash, glove box & wheel • Tilt steering • Bow ProDeck conver-sion • Aft casting platform conversion • 50-watt AM/FM stereo cassette • Complete top-set • Top storage • Built-in cooler • Radius deck styling • Bow cushions • Padded bow bolsters OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT • Factory 0/B pre-rigging • Mooring cover • Bow trolling motor plug-in > Deck mounting pad > Battery holder > Navigational and interior lighting • Plug-in wire harness > Automotive-style fuse panel • Step pads • Chrome cleats (4) • Bow and stern eyes • Stainless steel bow rails • Bilge pump • Self-draining splash pan • 12-volt power receptacle > Horn > Fire extinguisher • Ski tow bar • Boarding ladder or platform 1 4 2450 GENMAR Length 24' Beam 102" Approx. Wt. (lb.) I/O 4150 NMMA Capacity (lb.) 3400 Fuel Tank (gal.) 96 Aerated Live Well System 1 Folding Seats/Aft Jump Seats ..2/2 ENGINE OPTIONS (See page 44) VOLVO: 4.3 GL SX; 4.3 GS SX; 5.0 Fl SX; 5.0 Fl DUOPROP; 5.8 FL SX; 5.7 GI DUOPROP; 5.8 Fl SX MERCRUISER:4.3L; 4.3 LX; 5.7 L; 5.7 L EFI REWARD YOURSELF. Chase the big ones deep. Genmar 2450 is big, stable and built to handle big water. It's loaded with top-end game Pishing features and uncompromising comforts. Perfect for a weekend fishing adventure or relaxing evenings of dock-side entertaining. Customize it to your taste and budget with a full line of premium options. Every detail of the Genmar 2450 reflects our dedication to building the finest fishing boats in the world. Straight from the lake into the frying pan. Nothing tastes better than fresh fish right out of the lake. With Genmar s optional full-service galley, you can prepare an entire meal without coming ashore. Comes complete with stove and ice box. Add an optional portable head, and you're ready for days ol uninterrupted fishing. Freeboard Carpet 2450 Genmar Vinyl 2450 GENMAR MODEL COLORS • Burnt Red with Blue Burgundy carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom • Navy with Jasmine carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom • Graphite with Midnight Star carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom STANDARD EQUIPMENT • ProRide seats • Full lighted instrumen-• Helm seat platform tation • V-berth w/ cushions • Interior and navigation-• Sink w/ faucet and al lighting water supply • Fire extinguisher w/ • Convertible table/bunk holder • Beverage holders • Plug-in wire harness • Clothing locker • Automotive-style fuse • Rope locker panel • Lockable bulkhead • 2 bilge pumps (1 auto-storage matic) • Lazarettes • Helm seat platform • Foot locker • Welded stainless steel • Cabin rod racks bow rails • Rod lockers • 8" chrome cleats (4) • Bow hatch • Rope chocks (2) • Built-in tackle trays • Step pads (2) • Stainless steel cap- • Bow and stern eyes tain's wheel • Vinyl floor • Power steering • Mercruiser or Volvo • Tilt steering wheel controls • Seat slider • Accessory fuse panel • Foot rest • Battery holder OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT • Sport package (see • Shore power wiring dealer) • Power plug-in • Sundeck conversion • Galley w/ back-to-back • Sun top seating • Camper top • Refrigerator • Drop curtain • Portable head w/ •Cabin curtains pump-out • Remote spot light • Wash down system • Dual trumpet horn • Single or dual wipers • Boarding ladder • Trim tabs • Teak or poly boarding • Compass platform • 50-watt AM/FM stereo • Teak swim platform w/ 4 speakers and • Bow pulpit remote 1K Fish from the driver's seat. When it's time to fish, everything is at hand. Like the aft OnDeck bait center. No other fishing boat makes better use of your equipment ai TOP OF THE FOOD CHAIN. In the 1890 Pro-V DLX, you're the top predator on the water. A tough, twin-plated, double-riveted hide. Rated up to 190 HP, it moves you into striking distance fast. Silent trolling puts you over fish before they know you're there. And, after you've made the catch, an aerated live well keeps it fresh. Put it all together and there's no stopping you. 1890 Pro-V DLX SE. The SE model makes perfect sense for the demanding fisherman. Premium color options. ProLong live well upgrade. Tilt steering. AM/FM cassette stereo. All the great features of the Traditional models plus lots more. 1890 Pro-V DLX Traditional The Pro-V name is synonymous with tournament wins, rugged durability, precision craftsman-ship, exciting performance and most of all, uncompromised fishing. The huge 1890 Pro-V is packed with all the features that have made Pro-V the most recognized fishing boat on the water. EVinRUDE OUTBOARDS Signature Console. It's one of a kind. It takes a one-of-a-kind console to control a boat as special as a Lund Signature. Padded dash. Burled-wood accents. Wrap-around styling. Tilt wheel. / m 1775 PRO-V DLX SIGNATURE JMl 1775 PRO-V DLX SE 1775 PRO-V DLX TRADITIONAL 1775 PRO-V DLX SE AND SIGNATURE • 32-gallon fuel tank. • No-feedback steering, ap-around sport consoles. rt console options. al ProLong live well systems. e pages 27-28 for full s uahnsan OUTBOAROS Live well and prosper. Put the very best at your feet. The huge ProLong live well system rates a water capacity of 22 gallons. Console-controlled drain, fill and recirculation. Bottom-fed aeration. Exclusive removable bait well and heavy-duty debris screens. Prolong live wells are standard in the SE and Signature models. See page 45 for the complete story. in - V 1890 PRO-V SE GARY ROACH EDITION 1890 PRO-V TRADITIONAL GARY ROACH EDITION 1890 PRO-V SIGNATURE 1775 PRO-V SIGNATURE 1775 PRO-V SE 1775 PRO-V TRADITIONAL ITS YOUR OPTION. There are as many ways to catch fish as there are fish. For all the different sys-tems, presentation methods, and personal secrets, there's a Pro-V that fits like a glove. Rig a Pro-V Traditional any way you want or turn to the upgrades of SE and Signature Models. There isn't a fishing boat made that provides a -smarter layout of features and equipment. * "For live-bait presentations, the boat is one of the most important pieces of fejjt equipment I have. That's why I appreicate the control of my Pro-V nature. erry Good 994 PWT Cham 95 Mille Lacs PWT ampion "During my career I've ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ t o a « i n » « _ _ fished in every kind of wafer, and whether I'm trolling, casting or back-trolling, Lund perfor-mance has afwjnjfe. covered every aspect of my fishing. 1890 Pro-V SE Gary Roach Edition. Gary Roach Gary Roach is a legendary filler fisherman. He's perfected successful back-trolling. And Walleye I,iS D o a t 0f choice has always been Lund, Same for the tour's hottest stick. Perry Good; of Fame fisherman the Roach Edition is his choice, too. It's input from fishermen like this that make a Pro-V '=3saKi3 better boat for fishermen like you. To experience the thrill of a 90-HP tiller, see y o u - J 1775 Pro-V. There's no mistaking a Pro-V SE — or its owner. Get right to business and you'll find the best fishing features in the industry. All put together on a huge, 85-inch beam. Dual ProLong live wells. ProRide pedestal seats. Built-in tackle trays. 12/24-volt bow plug-in. Electronic Command Center. When it comes to finesse fishing, a tiller-controled Lund Pro-V is the only way to go. In fact, Lund's Electronic Command Center puts all of the boat's controls and electronics right in front of you. Foot-controlled trim switch. Live well controls. Lights. Your personal electronics. With a tiller in one hand, everything else is still in reach. 2 4 100% PRO-V ATTITUDE. 2*>7 SIZED TO FIT YOUR STYLE. The 1660 delivers the same off-road attitude as the bigger Pro-Vs. And it's loaded with the features you want. Tiller and Console models to choose from. 1660 Pro-V Traditional. A fishing machine that's unmistakably Pro-V. Loaded with the options thinking fisherman demand. Aerated live well system, bow casting platform, bow trim switch and ProRide seats. Choose from tiller or console control Take a now. The bow in a Pro-v is second-to-none. The storage at your feet is finished on the inside as well as on the outside. With the option of a ProSelectronics group, you'll be surrounded by the best equipment on the water. A BASS BOAT WITHOUT THE G1ASS JAW. A professional bass boat through and through. Built for tough, fast performance. The manuevrablidiy to handle backwater obstacles without flinching. Eight-foot rod lockers and tons of storage. Roomy flippin' decks. PRO-V BASS SE fast, high-performance bass machine. Dual live wells. No-feedback steering. SE color options. TRADITIONAL The Lund Pro-V was the first boat designed by professionals for serious fishermen. Today, they are the boat of choice for fishermen everywhere. Available in Flame Red or Midnight Blue with Quicksilver accents. These are the best-equipped fishing boats ever built. • Dual aerated recirculating live wells (single live well in 1660 models). • Exclusive Electronics Command Center on tiller-controlled Pro-Vs. • Bow casting platform and trolling motor plug-in. • Rod lockers and ample gear storage. n@Lf\ SE 1660, 1775 and 1890 Pro-V SE models have all the legendary features found in the Traditional models plus: • ProLong live well system. • AirRide pedestals. • A M / F M stereo cassette. • 12/24-volt trolling motor plug-in upgrade. • Tilt steering in the DLX SE models. SIGNATURE There has never been a fishing boat that compares to the new Lund Pro-V Signature. In a striking Dark Cranberry accented by Sand Beige, the 1775 and 1890 Signatures deliver unmatched elegance and style. • ProLong lighted live well upgrade. • Exclusive Signature colors and graphics. • Four ProRide Signature seats. • Signature color-matched soft-touch dash, glove box and tilt steering wheel. • 50-watt A M / F M stereo with weatherband and remote control. • Optional ProSelectronics group. • 20-oz. Sand Beige carpeting. 27 PRO-V r 1890 Pro-V LE. The industry's state-of-the-art fishing boat. Freeboard Carpet Vinyl Traditional Pro-V's available in Flame Red, Midnight Blue and Graphite Grey with Quicksilver accents. Freeboard Carpet Vinyl SE models are available in Burnt Red, Navy Blue and Jewel Green — all with Sand Beige accents. Black comes with Quicksilver accents. Freeboard Carpet Vinyl The Signature model is immediately recognizable by its Dark Cranberry color and warm Sand Beige accents. 1890 1890 1890 PRO-V LE PRO-V PRO-V DLX Length 1811" 18'11" 18'11" Beam 92" 92" 92" Approx. Wt. (Ib.) 1480 1225 1250 NMMA Max. HP 190 90 190 Transom Height 25" 21.5" 21.5" Fuel Tank (gal.) 38 38 38 Live Well System(s) 2 2 2 Bait Well System(s) 2 1 1 ProRide Seats 3 3 3 Pedestals (Power, Air.Solid) 1P, 3A 3 1P, 2S Seat Bases 4 4 4 1660 PRO-V Length 163"... Beam 79".... Approx. Wt. (Ib.) 830 .... NMMA Max. HP 60 Transom Height 20".... Fuel Tank (gal.) 20 Live Well System(s) 1 Bait Well System(s) — ProRide Seats 2 Pedestals (Power, Air, Solid) 2 Seat Bases 3 1660 PRO-V DLX 16'3" 79" 860 100 20" 20 1 1775 PRO-V ....17'6".... ....85.5".... ....1085.... 75 ...21.5 ... 32 2 1 3 3S 5 PRO-V DLX 17'6" 85.5" 1085 150 21.5" 32 2 „..1l 3 2S, 1P .4 1800 PRO-V BASS SE 18'0" ..1295 ...175 ..21.5" ....35 2 ...2... ..2S. ...5.. ..2/1 bench 2A 2 TRADITIONAL COLORS • Flame Red with Red carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom • Midnight Blue with Blue carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom SE MODEL COLORS • Navy Blue with Jasmine carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom, SE Graphics • Burnt Red with Blue Burgandy carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom. SE Graphics • Black with Midnight Star carpeting and Quicksilver deck/bottom, SE Graphics • Jewel Green with Hunter Green carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom, SE Graphics SIGNATURE MODEL COLORS • Dark Cranberry with 20-oz. Sand Beige carpeting and Sand Beige deck/bottom, Signature Graphics TRADITIONAL STANDARD EQUIPMENT • Electronics Command Center, lockable (tiller model only) • Foot trim switch (1890 and 1775 tiller models only) • Molded console w/ glove box (DLX model only) • No-feedback steering (1890 LE, 1890,1775 DLX models only) • Bow panel with trim switch • Electronics locker (1890 DLX model only) • Aerated live well system w/ recirculators • ProRide seats • Bow casting platform • 12V bow and aft trolling motor plug-ins • Bow panel with trim switch • Lockable rod lockers (1890, 8') • Lockable storage SE MODEL UPGRADE EQUIPMENT • Dual ProLong Live Well Systems (1660, 1) • Air ride pedestals • AM/FM stereo with cassette • Tilt steering • 12/24V bow and aft trolling motor plug-ins • OnDeck bait system (1890 tiller only) SIGNATURE MODEL UPGRADE EQUIPMENT • Two 22-gallon ProLong live well systems (1890) • Color-matched soft-touch dash (DLX model only) • ProRide seats with air ride pedestals (4) • 12/24V bow, aft trolling motor plug-ins • 50-watt AM/FM stereo w/ remote and power antenna •Automatic bilge pump LE MODEL UPGRADE EQUIPMENT • Bow and aft OnDeck bait stations • Dual ProLong live well systems • Air ride pedestals • Tilt steering • 12/24V bow and aft trolling motor plug-ins • Aft casting platform • Bow storage • Utility drawers (1890,1775) • Deck mounting pad • Battery storage compartment (1890 LE. 1890, 1775) • Battery holders (3) • Plug-in wire harness • Automotive-style fuse panel • Navigational and interior lighting 1 Step pads (2) • Chrome cleats (4) • Bow and stern eyes • Bilge pump • Self-draining splash pan • Flat floor w/ marine carpet • Horn • Fire extinguisher • Built-in tackle compartments (1890 & 1775 only) • Battery condition indicator • Windshield (DLX model only) • Signature DLX ProRide seats (1 power ped,, 3 air ride) > Tilt steering (DLX model only) •Windshield (DLX model only) • OnDeck bait System (1890 tiller only) • Built-in tackle compartments • Battery condition indicator > Set-back console • 25" Transom* Electronic command center • Horn • Fire extinguisher OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT (Not all options available for all models; see your dealer.) > Sport option group • ProSelectronics groups available featuring Lowrance, Hummingbird and Minn Kota and Motor Guide • On-board battery charging system • Factory O/B pre-rigging •12/24-volt electrical upgrade • Mooring cover •Arm rests (SE & Signature) • Rear casting platform (DLX model and standard on LE) •Tilt steering (DLX model only) • Port console (DLX model only) • Port console windshield (DLX model only) THE ALL NEW ANGLERS. • Ruilt-in 18-gallon fuel tank. • Row ProDeck. • Aft aerated live well. • Aft casting platform (DLX only). A NEW BOAT FOR THE NEW OUTBOARDS. The all-new 1650 Anglers have been tuned to be the perfect companion for today's exciting, economical 50-HP 4-stroke engines. And whether you opt for a little more power or a little less, a new Angler is the best equipped, highest performing fishing boat in its class. 1650 Angler STEPPING OUT ON ITS OWN. The new Angler stands in a class by itself. The dash makes the Angler DLX an exciting performer. A tiller-controlled model gives the finesse fisherman total control. And like all Lunds, you can see that fit and finish is one of the areas where Lund craftsmen - excel. Hand-cut, hand-laid carpet fits perfectly all around. Upholstered surfaces are smooth, tight and wrinkle-free. Attention to detail and quality you only get from a Lund. 1650 Angler DLX. If a tiller is what you're after, Angler can handle as much as 50 HP. The DLX models can take you all the way to 75 HP. However you put your Angler together, you get a lot of boat with money to spare. And it's waiting for you at your Lund dealer. Angler DLX console. Curved around the driver. Full instrumentation. Another example of Lund leading the wai with the most exciting and functional consoles to ever steer a fishing boat. ~ - ' • , I From the electronics center to tackle and rod storage, the interior layout is second-to-none. Everything is positioned right where we need it. Fishability, reliability and accessibility make Lund number one." Scott and Marty Glorvigen Professional Tournament Fishermen and Fishing Guides Angler electronic storage. The advantages of Lund's electronic storage areas have hooked every fisherman that's usei them. This year the tiller-driven Anglers have them, too. They put you face-fo-face with instrumentation, electronics and control. P R O G U I D E \y PIKE 16 m PIKE 16 DLX TAKE IT FOUR-WHEEUN Lightweight, tough-as-nails Pikes trailer fast and tow easily. Take it for a ride; then tuck it into your garage. This lean, mean, feature-packed fishing boat puts a Lund experience in the reach of any serious angler. 1700 PRO GUIDE 1700 PRO GUIDE DLX PIKE 16 & 1700 PRO GUIDES. • Bow casting platforms • Built-in tanks in the Pro Guides, • Aerated live well. • Battery storage. I 1650 ANGLER Length 16'3' Beam Approx. Wt. (lb.)Tiller....770 Approx. Wt. (Ib.) DLX....802 NMMA Max. HP, Tiller ....50 NMMA Max. HP, DLX 75 Fuel Tank (gal.) 1 Aerated Live Well 1 Fold-Down Seats 2 Seat Bases, Tiller 3 1700 Pro Guide DLX. Punch it down and split the surface of the lake. The 1700 Pro Guide DLX easily handles up to 90 HP, getting you over fish fast. Custom console control and windshield. Live well/bait well. Bow ProDeck. Rod and battery holders 00 Pro Guide is the perfect all around fishing machine, with loads of room, from the aft baitwell to the bow casting platform with tournament sized livewell and huge storage compartments. This Pro Guide is ready for your favorite fishing hole. 1650 Angler DLX FREEBOARD 16 Pike DLX 1700 Pro Guide DLX CARPET VINYL STANDARD COLORS • Flame Red with Red carpeting and Quicksilver deck • Midnight Blue with Jasmine carpeting and Quicksilver deck • Graphite with Midnight Star carpeting and Quicksilver deck STANDARD EQUIPMENT • Custom console (DLX) •Windshield (DLX) • Auto-timer on live well (Anglers) • Bait well (Pro Guides) • Solid seat pedestals • Bow ProDeck • 12V bow trolling motor plug-in (Anglers) • Deck mounting pad • Lockable rod locker (Anglers, Pikes) • Rod holders (Pro Guides) • Storage compartments OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT • Sport option group (Anglers) • Standard seat w/ solid or air ride pedestal • Battery holders (Anglers, 2; Pike, 1; Pro Guide, 1) > Plug-in wire harness (Anglers) • Navigational lighting • Interior lighting (Angler) • Flat floor w/ marine carpet • Self-draining splash pan • Chrome cleats, 4 > Bilge pump > Bow and stern eyes • Mooring cover > Factory 0/B pre-rigging • Aft casting platform (Pro Guide DLX) 3 2 Pike 16 DLX. When you're fishing unfamiliar water, you need a boat with the heart of a Pike. The Pike 16 DLX can be equipped up to 60 HP to cover lots of water in a hurry. Alt casting platform increases your fishing coverage. The console control allows you to instantaneously respond to avoid hazards. ALASKAN*SV-LAKER ZJ6 SV-16 SV-14 20 ALASKAN Length 20' 1" Beam 85" Approx. Wt. (Ib.) 760 NMMA Max. HP 75 Seats (Fold-Down/Solid Ped.) 1 Fuel Tank (gal.) 20 SV-18 ALASKAN 18' 76" 602 60 1 16 Laker SV-18 ...18'.. ...75".. ..436. ...60.. SV-16 ..16' 2". ....71"... ...321.. ....40... SV-14 ..14' 2". ....69"... ...283.. ....35... 14 Laker 16 LAKER 16'.... 72".... 451 .... 40 14 LAKER ...14' 2" 69" 395 35 STANDARD COLORS: Venetian Red with Grey vinyl fleck interior STANDARD EQUIPMENT ALASKANS: •7"V-bottom (18 Alas.) • Flat floor w/vinyl (18 Alas.) • Lockable storage, rod lockers • Bow deck (20 Alas.) • 20" transom • Battery holder • Bow eye • Stern handles • Self-draining splash pan • Bilge pump (20 Alas.) • Chrome cleats (20 Alas., 6; 18 Alas., 4) • Seat Bases, 1 • Bow storage (20 Alas.) • Built in 20 gal. fuel tank (20 Alas.) OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT ALASKANS: • Console w/ mechanical steering •Aerated live well (SV-18) • Navigational lighting •Large bow deck (SV-18) • Arm rests • Camouflage paint • Mooring cover •Built in fuel tank (18 Alas.) • Dual consoles w/walk thru windshield • Vinyl floor (20 Alas.) SVs: • 7' V-bottom •Bow deck (SV-18) • 20" transom • Gas tank storage •Battery holder (SV-18) • Cast aluminum oar locks •Walk-through seat (SV-18) • Bow eye • Stern handles • Self-draining splash pan SVs: • 15" transom • Bow deck • Mooring cover • Console w/ mechanical steering • Navigational lighting • Camouflage paint LAKERS: • Rod holders • Flat floor w/ vinyl • Aerated live well • Storage compartment • Gas tank storage • Navigational lighting • Bow eye • Stern handles • Self-draining splash pan • Aluminum keelsons (4) • Aluminum-encased transom LAKERS: • Swivel seats • Arm rests • Seat cushions • Mooring cover • Camouflage paint EVIHRUDE OUTBOARDS FISHERMAN Length Beam Approx. Wt. (Ib.)O.B Approx. Wt. (lb.) I/O NMMA Max. HP O.B Fuel Tank (gal.) 32(1/0, 27) Fold Down Seats 3(1/0,2)... Solid Pedestals 3(1/0.2),.. Seat Bases 5(1/0,3)... 1800 FISHERMAN 18' 3" 87-1360 1915 130 1750 FISHERMAN 17'7" 85" 1155 1650 FISHERMAN 16' 3" 85" 995 ..120. ...27.. ....3... ....3... ...A... ..90 ..23 ..5 ...3 ...4 1800 Fisherman 1800 Fisherman I/O 1750 Fisherman 1650 Fisherman FREEBOARD CARPET VINYL STANDARD COLORS • Flame Red with Quicksilver deck, Scarlet carpeting (Fisherman, Grey vinyl floor) • Midnight Blue with Quicksilver deck, Jasmine carpeting (Fisherman, Grey vinyl floor) • Graphite with Quicksilver deck, Midnight Star carpeting (Fisherman, Grey vinyl floor) "SE" colors (see dealer) 1800 FISHERMAN I/O ENGINE OPTIONS (See page 44) VOLVO: 3.0 GS SX; 4.3 GL SX; 4.3 GS SX MERCRUISER:3.0LX; 4.3 L; 4.3 LX STANDARD EQUIPMENT •Aerated live wells (1800. 2; 1750,1; 1650,1) • Live well timer • Full-lighted instrumentation (1800 I/O) • Mercruiser/Volvo controls (1800 I/O) • Custom molded dash w/glove box • Windshield w/ walk-through •Aft jump seats (I/O, 2) • Bow casting platform (1800) • Rod locker (1800) • Lockable storage (1800) • Console storage • Bow trolling motor plug-in • Navigational lighting • Flat floor w/ marine carpet (1750,1650) •Rod holders (1750,1650) • Flat floor w/vinyl (1800) > Automotive-style fuse panel (1800) • Deck mounting pad > Step pads (2) • Bilge pump • Stainless steel bow rails • Chrome cleats (4) • Bow and stern eyes • Large, self-draining splash pan (O.B.) •Battery holder (2,1800; 1,1750; 1,1650) • Reinforced deck surface for down riggers (1800) > Insulated motor cover (1800 I/O) OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT (Not all options available for all models; see your dealer.) •Bow Pro deck (1750 & 1650) • Sport option group • Factory O/B pre-rigging • Sun top • Complete top • Convertible sunbather seat •Bow cushions (1750 & 1650) • Rod locker door (1750,1650) "SE" SPECIAL OPTION UPGRADE 1650 & 1750 FISHERMAN •See your dealer for details • Side and stern curtain set • Mooring cover • Solid pedestal seat • Solid or air ride pedestal seat • Boarding ladder and platform • Complete stand-up canvas •Vinyl floor (1750 & 1650) 36 I - S ^ ^ — — ^ — I l l l ^ — — 1750 Fisherman. The 1750 Fisherman sports a hefty 85-inch beam for a stable ride and is designed to handle up to 120 HP. Open it up and the tough, deep-V hull will cover a lof of water - fast. The "SE" version comes with two live wells, one in the bow and one in the aft. Multiple storage and lockable rod lockers. Fully equipped and ready for action on any lake, big or small. PRO ANGLER 1600 Pro Angler. Get right down to business with an aerated live well, gear storage, rod lockers, and bow platform with a trolling motor plug-in. We've put together a professionally-styled fishing boat at a great value. 1700 1700 1600 PRO PRO ANGLER PRO PRO ANGLER ANGLER DLX ANGLER DLX Length 16' 10" ...16' 10" 16'3 16'3" Beam ....84".. 84" 76" 76" Approx. Wt. (ib.) ...776 825 712 752 NMMA Max. HP ....60... 90 50 75 Fold-Down Seat 2.... 2 ? 2 Solid Pedestals 2.... 2 7 2 Seat Bases 3.... 4 3 4 1700 Pro Angler 1700 Pro Angler DLX 1600 Pro Angler 1600 Pro Angler DLX FREEBOARD CARPET VINYL STANDARD COLORS • Flame Red with Quicksilver deck, Scarlet carpeting • Midnight Blue with Quicksilver deck, Jasmine carpeting • Graphite with Quicksilver deck, Midnight Star carpeting STANDARD EQUIPMENT • Built-in fuel tank • Aerated live well with timer • Custom console (DLX) • Bow trolling motor plug-in • Electronics compartment (1700 Pro Angler & DLX) • Storage compartments • Bow casting platform Windshield (DLX) Rod locker Navigational lighting Deck mounting pad Flat floor with marine carpet Bilge pump Chrome cleats (4) Bow and stern eyes Self-draining splash pan Battery holders (2) OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT • Sport option group • Mooring cover (see dealer) • Factory 0/B pre-rigging • Solid or air ride pedestal seat (Angler & DLX) 3 8 7M 1mA 16 REBEL DLX 16 REBEL 14 REBEL REBEL ATTITUDE. CONS The Rebel is the right way to get fishing. A perfect balance of price, features and perfor mance. Lightweight and rugged with a flat floor, storage and high gunnels for safe, dry running. Built to get the most out of smaller motors. Getting into Lund fishability has never been 14 Reb... This compact workhorse is perfect for tight maneuvering — especially in backwater channels. Use the bow platforms for rigging, jigging and casting. Rod holders. It's all here. 16 16 14 REBEL DLX REBEL REBEL Length 16' 16' .14' 2" Beam 73' 73" 69" Approx Wt (lb) 520 455 . 441 NMMA Max HP 45 45 35 Fold-Down Seats, Solid Pedestals 2 2 2 Seat Bases 4 „ . . ...„..3 2 16 Rebel DLX 16 Rebel 14 Rebel FREEBOARD CARPET VINYL STANDARD COLORS • Flame Red with Quicksilver deck, Scarlet carpeting • Midnight Blue with Quicksilver deck, Jasmine carpeting • Graphite with Quicksilver deck, Midnight Star carpeting STANDARD EQUIPMENT • Aerated live well • Bow eye • Bow platform • Stem handles • Casting platform • Self-draining • Deck mounting pad splash pan • Bow storage • Rod holders • Navigational lighting • Flat floor with marine carpet • Bilge pump OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT • Factory 0/B pre-rigging (16 DLX) •Windshield (16 DLX) • Mooring cover • Arm rests • Console w/steering (14) 40 1790 BASS SE 1790 BASS The hog pen. The 1790 Bass features the industry's best aerate welt— a Lund Prolan FREEBOARD CARPET 1790 BASS Length 17' 2" Beam 83" Approx. Wt. (lb.)....905 NMMA Max. HP 90 Fold-Down Seat 4 Solid Pedestals 2 Seat Bases 2 41 y ' |n n 1790 Bass STANDARD EQUIPMENT • Built-in 20-gallon • Deck mounting pad fuel tank • Flat floor with marine • ProLong live well carpet • Custom console • Bilge pump STANDARD • Bow trolling motor • Chrome cleats (4) COLORS plug-in • Bow and stern eyes • Flame Red with • Storage compartments • Self-draining splash pan Quicksilver deck, • Bow casting platform • Battery holders (2) Scarlet carpeting •Windshield • Midnight Blue with • Rod locker Quicksilver deck, • Navigational lighting Jasmine carpeting • Graphite with Quicksilver deck, Midnight Star OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT carpeting • Deluxe Sport group • Air ride pedestal seat (see dealer) • Mooring cover • SE Package • Arm rests • Factory O/B pre-rigging BASICALLY, AS TOUGH AS THEY COME. A day of trouble-free fishing starts widi the WC-14 and C-12. These basic Lunds are strong. Durable. Corner and ow caps and oar locks are solid cast aluminum. Gunnel rails are single-piece extrusions. Tt's attention to detail like this that puts every Lund in a class by itself. I WC • A WC-14 WC-14 WC-12 DELUXE Length 1310 1310 1110" Beam 63" 63" 60" Approx. Wt. (Ib.) 240 202 154 NMMA Max. HP 20 20 15 jjS co CO cb o o l g ZZL S, O Z E m s ZD y =3 CO . - 1— CD "O x 5r o US" o S 3 GO .—. m S 3 11 Ii =C CD =E CD 11 o ^ co ~6 o rn < § m —I cn GO C~> ZD ZE 3> O m CD CO CZ : EPOWE MAXIMI SON:; MAXIML "ERLINE MGTH) NSOM -INCHI DSHIP -INCH! I o 3C ^ I m co m I >] i ? S KNESS RD/BOT PLATE KNESS m CT m CO CD 3> CO m CO : g C O WELL/ WELL CO CO O cu <ABLE TORAG O o ZJ3 CD 9** ^ - s T~ o CO 3 > C Z m CD m m CO | 2 4 5 0 GENMAR 1 5 . 4 1 5 0 3 4 0 0 1 2 2 4 ' 0 " 5 3 . 2 5 7 . 2 9 8 1 0 2 . 0 6 % o r j . 1 0 0 1 D/adj 1 D/power /+ / / 9 5 g . • • • | 2 1 5 0 BARON M A G N U M 3 . 2 0 9 0 2 0 0 0 2 2 5 1 0 2 1 '5" 2 5 5 4 . 5 5 7 . 5 9 6 9 6 . 0 8 0 / A o o . 1 0 0 3 D/air 1 D/power / s / T w i n / • 8 0 gl • • • 1 2 1 5 0 BARON M A G N U M 1 . 0 . 3 . 3 0 9 8 2 8 0 0 1 0 2 1 ' 5 " 5 4 . 5 5 7 . 5 9 6 9 6 . 0 8 0 / A o o . 1 0 0 3 D/air 1 D/power • 4 / T w i n + / • 8 0 gl • • • 1 2 1 0 0 B A R O N 3 . 1 7 2 0 1 8 9 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 ' 3 " 2 0 . 5 4 7 4 9 . 5 8 6 8 9 m m . 1 0 0 3 D/solirJ 1 D/power / 4 / T w i n • • 6 0 gl • • • | 2 1 0 0 BARON 1 . 0 . 3 . 2 7 1 0 2 3 0 0 1 0 2 0 ' 3 " 4 7 4 9 . 5 8 6 8 9 - 0 8 0 / 1,00 . 1 0 0 3 D/solid 1 D/power / ' *^Twin+ / • 6 0 gl • • • | 1 9 5 0 TYEE M A G N U M 5 . 1 6 5 0 1 9 0 0 2 0 0 9 1 9 ' 8 " 2 0 . 5 4 6 . 4 4 7 . 1 8 8 9 0 0 8 0 / 1QQ . 1 0 0 3 D/air 1 D/power • 4 / T w i n / • 6 0 gl • • • | 1 9 5 0 TYEE M A G N U M LO. 5 . 2 8 4 0 2 0 1 0 9 1 9 ' 8 " 4 6 . 4 4 7 . 1 8 8 9 0 O S O y i o o . 1 0 0 3 D/air 1 D/powe / 4 / T w i n + / • 5 5 gl • • • | 1 8 5 0 TYEE 7 . 1 4 1 2 1 8 8 0 1 5 0 7 1 8 ' 3 " 2 0 . 5 4 2 4 4 8 2 8 8 - 0 8 0 / . ! o o . 1 0 0 2 D/solid 1 D/power / 4 •/'Twin. / • 3 2 gl • • | 1 8 5 0 TYEE 1 . 0 . 7 . 2 3 9 6 1 4 5 5 8 1 8 ' 3 " 4 2 4 4 8 2 8 8 . 0 8 0 / ! o o . 1 0 0 2 D/solid • j/;ii:wm / 4 / T w i n + / • 2 7 gl • • • | 1 8 5 0 TYEE G . S . & S I G . 7 . 1 5 2 5 1 8 8 0 1 5 0 7 WS 2 0 . 5 4 4 . 5 4 5 . 5 8 9 8 9 . 0 8 0 / ! o o . 1 0 0 2 D/air ! D/power / 4 / T w i n • • 4 5 gl • • • 1 1 8 5 0 TYEE G.S. & S I G . LO. 7 . 2 4 4 0 1 4 5 5 8 1 8 ' 5 " 4 4 . 5 4 5 . 5 8 9 8 9 . O 8 O / 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 2 D/air 1 D/power / 4 / T w i n + / • 3 6 gl • • • 1 1 8 0 0 GRAN SPORT LE 1 3 . 1 4 9 0 1 9 0 0 1 5 0 7 1 8 V 2 0 . 5 4 2 4 5 . 5 8 8 8 8 . O 8 O / 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 4 B/solid / 4 / T w i n / • 3 2 gl | 1 7 5 0 T Y E E 9 . 1 1 9 5 1 3 7 5 1 4 0 6 1 7 3 " 2 0 . 5 3 8 4 0 7 9 8 3 . 5 . O 8 O / . 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 2 D/solid 1 D/power • 4 / T w i n / • 3 2 gl • • • 1 7 5 0 TYEE 1 . 0 . 9 . 2 0 1 5 1 2 2 0 7 1 7 3 " 3 8 4 0 7 9 8 3 . 5 , 0 8 0 / / o o . 1 0 0 1 D/solid 1 D power / 2 / T w i n + / / ; • • • 1 6 5 0 TYEE 9 . 9 7 5 1 4 2 0 1 1 5 6 1 6 ' 3 " 2 0 . 5 3 7 . 5 3 9 . 2 7 6 8 0 - 0 8 0 / . 0 8 0 . 0 6 3 2 D/solid / 5 / T w i n / • 2 0 gl • • • 1 8 9 0 PRO-V 2 3 1 2 2 5 1 7 2 5 9 0 7 1 8 ' 1 1 " 2 1 . 5 3 7 4 0 8 9 9 2 - 0 8 0 / 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 3 D/solid / 4 / • 3 8 gl • • • 1 7 7 5 PRO-V 2 3 . 1 0 8 5 1 5 1 0 7 5 7 1 7 ' 6 " 2 1 . 5 3 6 3 9 . 5 8 1 . 5 3 5 . 5 . 0 8 0 / 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 3 D/solid / 5 / • 3 2 gl • • • 1 6 6 0 PRO-V 2 5 . 8 3 0 1 2 7 5 6 0 6 1 6 ' 3 " 2 0 3 4 3 5 . 5 7 5 7 9 0 6 3 / . 0 8 0 . 0 6 3 2 D/solid / 3 / • 2 0 gl • • • 1 8 9 0 PRO-V LE 1 7 . 1 4 8 0 1 8 0 0 1 9 0 7 1 8 1 1 " 2 5 3 7 4 0 8 9 9 2 . 0 8 0 / 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 3 D/air 1 D/power / 4 / / • 3 8 gl • • 1 8 9 0 PRO-V DELUXE 1 9 . 1 2 5 0 1 7 2 0 1 9 0 7 1 8 1 1 " 2 1 . 5 3 7 4 0 8 9 9 2 . O 8 O / 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 2 D/solirl 1 D/pnwer • 4 / S i d e / • 3 8 gl • • • 1 7 7 5 PRO-V DELUXE 2 1 . 1 0 8 5 1 5 1 0 1 5 0 6 1 7 ' 6 " 2 1 . 5 3 6 3 9 . 5 8 1 . 5 8 5 . 5 . O 8 O / 1 0 0 . 1 0 0 2 D/solid 1 D power / 4 / S i d e / • 3 2 gl • • • 1 1 6 6 0 PRO-V DELUXE 2 5 . 8 6 0 1 2 7 5 1 0 0 5 i f f 2 0 3 4 3 5 . 5 7 5 7 9 0 6 3 / . 0 8 0 . 0 6 3 2 D/solid / 5 / S i d e / • 2 0 gl • • • 1 1 8 0 0 PRO-V B A S S S E 2 6 . 1 2 9 5 1 3 5 0 1 7 5 5 1 8 ' 0 " 2 1 . 5 3 2 . 7 3 1 . 7 8 8 8 8 , 0 8 0 / / o o . 1 0 0 2 U .i 1 bench / 2 / S i d e / • 3 5 gl • • 1 1 6 5 0 ANGLER DELUXE 2 9 . 8 0 2 1 2 0 0 7 5 5 l e y 2 0 3 0 . 5 3 3 . 5 7 5 . 5 8 0 . 0 6 3 / 0 7 7 . 0 6 3 2 solid / 5 / S i d e / • l 8 g l • 1 1 6 5 0 ANGLER 2 9 . 7 7 0 1 2 0 0 5 0 5 1 6 ' 3 " 2 0 3 0 . 5 3 3 . 5 7 5 . 5 3 D . 0 6 3 / 0 7 7 , 0 0 3 2 solid / 3 / • l 8 g l • • 1 1 7 0 0 PRO GUIDE DELUXE 3 1 . 7 0 4 1 4 3 5 6 0 9 0 5 1 7 ' 3 " 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 1 . 5 7 2 . 5 7 5 . 0 6 3 / 0 7 7 3 solid / 4 / S i d e / • l 8 g l • 1 7 0 0 PRO GUIDE 3 1 . 6 7 6 1 4 3 5 3 0 6 0 5 1 7 ' 3 " 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 1 . 5 7 2 . 5 7 5 0 6 3 ,177 1 solid / 4 / • l 8 g l • PIKE 1 6 DELUXE 3 1 . 6 2 3 1 3 1 3 4 5 6 0 5 1 6 T 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 1 . 5 7 1 . 5 7 6 , 0 6 3 / 0 7 7 2 solid • 4 / S i d e / • • PIKE 1 6 3 1 . 5 9 5 1 3 1 3 3 0 4 0 5 1 6 T 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 1 . 5 7 1 . 5 7 6 , 0 6 3 / 0 7 7 2 solid / 4 / • • 1 6 LAKER 3 4 . 4 5 1 1 2 5 0 4 0 6 1 6 ' 0 " 2 0 2 9 . 2 3 3 . 7 6 7 7 2 0 5 8 / 0 6 3 / HD / • 1 4 LAKER 3 4 . 3 9 5 1 1 3 0 3 5 5 I C " 2 0 2 9 . 7 3 3 . 7 6 7 6 9 0 5 8 / 0 6 3 3 cross • . / • 2 0 A L A S K A N DLX 3 3 . 7 6 0 2 2 8 7 1 2 0 7 2 o r 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 2 . 2 7 5 . 5 8 5 . 0 8 0 / 1 0 0 1 solid / 1 / S i d e • 2 0 gl • 2 0 A L A S K A N 3 3 . 7 6 0 2 2 8 7 4 0 7 5 7 2 0 ' 1 " 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 2 . 2 7 5 . 5 8 5 . O 8 O / 1 0 0 1 solid / 1 • 2 0 gl • S V - 1 8 A L A S K A N 3 3 . 6 0 2 1 5 1 0 3 0 6 0 7 i l l " 2 0 2 8 . 5 3 3 . 2 7 1 7 6 . 0 6 3 / i o o 1 solid / 1 •Twin • • 1 3 gl • • • 1 c w -10 15" T R A N S O M I OV-IO 20" T R A N S O M 3 3 . 42" 436 1420 1625 3 0 6 0 7 1 8 ' 0 " 15 20 2 8 . 5 3 4 7 1 7 5 . 0 6 3 / i o o 3 cross 1 split / HD • Side 1 c\l 1C IS" I R A N S O M • 0V-lb 20" T R A N S O M 3 3 . 313 321 1105 1285 3 0 4 0 5 6 1 6 ' 2 " 15 20 2 6 . 5 3 1 . 5 6 5 7 1 . 0 5 8 / 0 7 7 A cross • 1 ' • Side ew 1/1 15" T R A N S O M 5V-I4 20" T R A N S O M 3 3 . 275 283 915 1050 1 8 3 5 •l I f f 15 20 2 6 . 5 3 1 . 5 6 5 6 9 0 5 8 / 0 6 3 4 cross / HD • Side | W C - 1 4 DELUXE 4 2 . 2 3 0 7 2 0 1 5 2 0 4 I 5 ' 1 0 ' 1 5 2 4 . 5 3 1 . 5 6 0 6 3 0 5 1 / . 0 5 8 2 cross / • I W r 1/1 15" T R A N S O M 1 VVL.-I1 20" T R A N S O M 4 2 . 223 230 895 960 1 5 2 5 4 4 1 4 ' 0 " IS 20 2 4 . 5 3 1 . 5 6 0 6 3 0 5 1 / . 0 5 8 3 cross / HD W C - 1 2 4 2 . 1 5 8 6 0 0 1 1 1 5 3 1 1 ' 1 0 " 1 5 2 0 . 5 2 5 5 7 . 5 6 0 • 0 5 1 A 0 5 8 3 cross / HD 1 8 0 0 FISHERMAN 3 5 . 1 3 6 0 1 8 0 0 1 3 0 8 1 8 ' 3 " 2 0 . 5 4 2 4 5 8 2 8 7 • 0 8 0 / 0 8 0 . 1 0 0 3 solid / 5 / T w i n / • 3 2 gl • • | 1 8 0 0 FISHERMAN 1 . 0 . 3 5 . 1 9 1 5 1 6 2 5 8 1 8 ' 3 " 4 2 4 5 8 2 8 7 • 0 8 0 / 0 8 0 . 1 0 0 2 solid / 3 / T w i n / • 2 7 gl • • | 1 7 5 0 FISHERMAN 3 5 . 1 1 5 5 1 8 0 0 8 8 1 2 0 5 wr 2 0 3 5 3 7 8 4 8 5 • 0 8 0 / . 0 8 0 . 1 0 0 3 solid / 5 / T w i n / • 2 3 gl • • • ] 1 6 5 0 FISHERMAN 3 5 . 9 9 5 1 4 2 0 7 6 9 0 5 1 6 ' 3 " 2 0 3 5 3 5 8 0 8 2 • 0 8 0 / 0 8 0 . 1 0 0 3 solid • 5 / T w i n / • 2 3 gl • • 1 1 7 9 0 B A S S • 4 1 . 9 0 5 1 2 9 5 9 0 5 1 7 ' 2 " 2 0 2 6 2 7 . 5 8 3 8 3 • 0 6 3 / . 0 8 0 . 0 6 3 4 (2 solid) / 2 / S i d e / • 2 0 gl • • | 1 7 0 0 PRO ANGLER DLX 3 7 . 8 2 5 1 2 2 0 9 0 5 1 6 ' 1 0 " 2 0 3 1 3 2 8 4 8 4 0 6 3 / . 0 8 0 . 0 6 3 2 solid / 4 / S i d e / • 2 0 gl • • 1 7 0 0 PRO ANGLER 3 7 . 7 7 6 1 2 5 5 5 0 6 0 6 1 6 ' 1 0 " 2 0 3 1 3 2 8 4 8 4 • 0 6 3 / , 0 8 0 . 0 6 3 2 solid / 3 / • 2 0 gl • | 1 6 0 0 PRO ANGLER DLX 3 7 . 7 5 2 1 0 8 5 4 0 7 5 5 1 6 ' 3 " 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 1 5 7 1 . 5 7 6 . 0 6 3 / 0 7 7 . 0 6 3 2 solid / 4 / S i d e / • l 5 g l • • 1 1 6 0 0 PRO ANGLER 3 7 . 7 1 2 1 0 8 5 2 5 5 0 5 1 6 3 " 2 0 2 9 . 5 3 1 . 5 7 1 . 5 7 6 • 0 6 3 / . 0 7 7 . 0 6 3 2 solid / 3 / • l 5 g l • • 1 1 6 REBEL DELUXE * 3 9 . 5 2 0 1 3 0 0 4 5 4 5 6 1 6 ' 0 " 2 0 2 8 3 4 6 7 7 3 • 0 6 3 / , 0 6 3 2 solid • 4 / S i d e / • | 1 6 REBEL 3 9 4 5 5 1 3 0 0 3 5 4 5 6 1 6 ' 0 " 2 0 2 8 3 4 6 7 7 3 • 0 6 3 / . O 6 3 2 solid / 3 / • | 1 4 REBEL 3 9 . 4 4 1 1 0 1 0 2 4 3 5 5 14 '2" . 2 0 3 0 3 4 6 7 6 9 0 6 3 / , 0 6 3 2 solid / 3 / • 1 A - 1 6 4 2 . 2 8 5 9 6 0 2 1 3 0 5 1 6 ' 0 " 1 5 2 6 3 1 5 8 6 9 0 5 8 / 0 6 3 4 cross 1 A - 1 4 4 2 . 1 7 0 7 8 0 1 5 1 5 4 1 4 ' 1 " 1 5 2 0 . 5 2 2 . 7 5 5 1 . 5 6 0 0 5 1 / 0 5 8 3 cross | A - 1 2 4 2 . 1 3 0 6 4 2 1 1 1 0 3 1 2 ' 1 " 1 5 2 0 . 5 2 3 5 1 . 5 5 8 0 5 1 / , 0 5 8 3 Gross CO CD m ~a c r s: ~o CD m ZT3 -< ZC o o m 3D INTERIOR LIGHTS BOW/STERN LIGHTS BOARDING LADDER VINYL FLOORS CARPETED FLAT FLOOR CASTING PLATFORM DECK MOUNTING PAD BOW DECK STEP PADS DECK RAILS CHROME CLEATS ALUMINUM KEELSONS ALUMINUM ENCASED TRANSOM SPLASH WELL CAST ALUMINUM OAR LOCKS BOW, STERN EYES STERN HANDLES LEVEL FLOTATION MOORING COVER CANVAS / 2 / / / • / / • / « / • • 3 ,4 / 2 / / 2 / • / / / / / / 4 / / / • / 1 / 2 / / 3 / • / / / / / / 4 / • 7 1 / 2 • / 4 • • • / / / 7 / • 4 • / / / • • 1,2 / 2 / /A / • • / / / / / / 4 • • • 1,2 / 2 / / 2 / • • / / / / / / 4 / / / / • • 1,2 / 2 / / 2 / • • / / / / / / 4 / • • 1.2 / • / 2 7 • • / / / / / / 4 / / / / • • i 2 / / / 2 / • • / / / / • • 4 / • • 1,2 / / / 2 / • • / 7 / / / / 4 / / / / • • 1,2 / / / 2 / • • / / / / / / 4 / • • 1,2 / / / 3 / • / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / 1 / / / 2 / • • / / / / / / 4 / / / / • • 1,2 / / / 2 7 • • / / / / / / 4 / • • 1 , 2 / / / 1 / • / / / / • / 4 / / / / • • 1,2 / / / 3 / / 7 / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 3 / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 2 / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 3 / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / 2 7 / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 2 • / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 2 / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 1 / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 1 / / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 1 / / / / / / 7 4 / / / / • / / / / / / / /A / / / / • / / / / / / / / 4 • / / / • • / / / / / / 4 • 4 / / / / • / • / / / 7 4 /A / / / / • / / / / / / / • / / / 7 4 / • / / • / / / / / / 6 / 6 / / / / • • / / / / / 6 / 6 / / / / • / / • • / • • 7 4 / 4 • / / / • / • • / / 4 / / / / / • • • • / 4 / / / / / • • • • / 4 / / / / / • / • 2 / • / / • / • / 2 / / / • • / • / 2 / / / / • / • / • / / / / / 4 / / / / • • 1,2 / / • • / / / / /-] / • • 1,2 / / / • • / / / / / / 4 / / / / • • 1,2 / / / • • / / / / / / 4 / / / / • • 1,2 / / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 1 / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / 1 / / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / / / / 4 / / / / • • / / / / / 4 / / / / • / / / / / 4 / / / / • • / 2 • • / 2 / / / / • • / 2 / / / / • Standard Feature Optional Equipment Deluxe Seats Solid Pedestal Seats Air Ride Pedestal Seats Power Pedestal Seats • Cross Standard, High-Density Perma-Ply Seats Standard, High-Density Perma-Ply Seats Standard Twin Consoles/ Standard Walk-thru Windshield Additional Standard Features -Voltmeter, Trim Gauge, Temp Gauge, Oil Pressure Gauge, Speedometer, Tach, Bilge Blower Optional Side Console Standard Side Console • D Solid Air Power HD / H O • Twin • Side / S i d e • 1 Complete Top - Includes Top, Sides, Bows, Stern Cover, Walkway Curtain, Boot, and Tonneau • 2 Top Only - Includes Top, Bows, Walkway Curtain, Boot, and Tonneau • 3 Complete Top - Includes Top, Side Curtain, Camper Top, Stern Cover, Bows, and Boot (Top, Side Curtain not included with optional hardtop) • 4 Top Only - Includes Top, Bows, and Boot Boat weights are with standard equipment only. STERNDRIVE ENGINES PROPSHAFT HORSEPOWER 2450 GENMAR i 2150 & 2100 BARON ! 1950 TYEE MAGNUM I 1850 TYEE 1750TYEE 1800 FISHERMAN VOLVO PENTA 3.0 GS SX 135 • • • 4.3 GS SX 185 • • • • • 5.0 FL SX 190 • • • 5.7 Gi EFI SX 250 • • • MERCRUISER 3.0 LX WPS 135 • • • 4.3 LX WPS 180 • • • • • 5.7 L WPS 210 • • • 5.7 LX EFI 250 • • • 44 THE INSIDE STORY. There's a reason a used Lund has more life in it than most other boats do when they're new. It's all in the way a Lund is put together. Nothing gives you the strength, durability and weight advantages of aluminum. And no one puts together aluminum better than the craftsmen at Lund. From the precise fit and finish on the outside, to the wave-handling toughness in the guts of the hull, a Lund boat is a cut above the competition. Deep in the hull you'll find longitudinal, aluminum stringers running from the transom to past amidship. Our twin-plating and exclusive I-beam system tie them to the transverse stringers in the bow, creating a unified, unyielding structure. Marine-grade aluminum is precisely fitted and double-riveted along every seam creating a hull unparalleled in the industry. Our poured flotation foam fills every corner and crevice. It quiets the ride, strengthens the hull improves safety and surpasses government standards. Then we finish our boats with the best polyurethane paint available. It doesn't crack, chip or yellow. And every year we push the standards of quality and performance a little bit higher. This is what has made Lund the industry leader since we crafted our first boat over 47 years ago. The deep-V hull of the new 1890 Pro-V LE in action. THE MOST ADVANCED LIVE WELL SYSTEM EVER MADE. Timed aeration, lights, draining, filling and recirculation — all fingertip controlled. These huge live wells have long been recognized as state-of-the-art. Feature for feature, ProLong live wells outperform the imitators. AIR INTAKE VALVE | Pulls oxygen into filling and recirculating water Diagram not to scale. The exclusive bait well system with unique lift-out liner keeps bait lively and fresh like no other. ProLong live wells feature console control of filling, draining, recirculation and timed aeration. LEJ REMOVABLE BAIT WELL Lund's ProLong oxygenating system aerates at the bottom of the live well. Fish do not gather at a surface spray because oxygen is distributed throughout the water. Fish are less vulnerable to injury. THREADED -O-DEBRIS SCREEN ' i s rrmrm CATCH \ . FJBBgg BASIN REMOVABLE DRAIN PLUG 22-GALLON • WATER CAPACITY THROUGH FREEBOARD AERATION Debris screen protects § TUBE your pump and valve from clogging or damage. = VALVE Valve has three positions: Fill, Recirculate and Drain. Individual pumps for bow and aft live wells have been placed where they ride low in the boat to prevent air-lock. PUMP FLUSH-OUT DRAIN Easy, complete cleaning of debris that accumulates in catch basin without running it through the pump (Pro-V models only). THROUGH-HULL DRAIN PIPE PUMP DRAIN • • PUMP INTAKE Bow and aft live wells are positioned for optimum weight balance when running and for optimum convenience to anglers anywhere in the boat while fishing. 45 ACCESSORIES AND OPTIONS EXCLUSIVELY FROM LUND. 2 Z f When you own one of the best boats on the water, Rain or shine, you'll stay comfortable in rugged you need the premium Lund clothing to match. Lund sportswear. Sweatshirts, t-shirts, jackets, windbreakers, caps all top quality just like our boats. Protect your investment in Lund quality with a can- For comfortable boating under any condition, the A stand-up canvas top keeps you at the wheel — vas mooring cover. Perfect for dockside or storage, complete canvas top-set keeps you warm and dry. and you and your passengers out of the elements. If you spend a lot of time fishing with a partner, look into the option of a port-side console. An aft casting platform makes more room for fishing and storage. A long day of fishing is a comfortable day in a Lund seat. Ask your dealer about options like arm rests. No one pre-rigs better than Lund. Let the experts connect the power to your new Lund boat. Nothing says class like an optional color-matched motor. Ask you Lund dealer for full details. Lund's Selectronics group puts the world's finest electronics on the world's best fishing boats. 45 ONLY THE HIGHEST STANDARDS. Every Lund boat is built to meet or exceed the highest standards set by NMMA, the Coast Guard and the American Boat and Yacht Council. But first, every Lund must pass the toughest test of all — our own standards for quality and craftsmanship. LDND QUALITY - OUR WARRANTY GUARANTEES IT, OUR RESALE VALUE PROVES IT. Every Lund hull is warranted for 10 full years from the date of purchase by the original owner. When you buy a Lund boat, you become part of the Lund famd^— and part of our tradition of excellence. When it comesjjpe to sell yourJLund boat, your investment in Lund qualjW^Hl be rewarded. THE LUND EXPERIENCE BEGINS WITH THE FINEST DEALERS AROUND. Because we build the best boats on the water, we can afford to be selective with who sells them. When you see the Lund sign hanging in the window, you know the dealer inside meets Lund's strict standards for customer satisfaction. Stop by any of our dealers, and you'll see why they've earned the right to carry the Lund line. THANKS TO THE PROFESSIONALS WHO MAKE LDND BOATS HAPPEN. Without the dedicated efforts of the Lund craftsmen who build our boats, and the professional fishermen who help design them, the Lund tradition of excellence would not be possible. Thank you. Z 3 t S ea Nymph® boat, motor and trailer packages stand out from the rest with better looks, construction and features. And with such a complete selection, every boating or fishing family will find exactly what they want. From versatile utility boats to high performance deckboats, plus fishing boats for practically every type of water or gamefish, you get an outstanding boat package for a great price. Consider the rugged construction features like heavy-duty extruded aluminum support ribs and extra strength reinforced keels. Or the superior materials designed to withstand the elements—from the decks and fasteners to the carpet and seat vinyl. Plus high impact, high tech molded dashes and livewells. Conveniences include drink holders, generous storage, 12-volt receptacles, mooring cleats and much more. Plus these boats look great with bright white paint finishes, bold graphics, contoured consoles and color-coordinated seats and carpet. Add a standard Evimude8 or Johnson® outboard for the world's most dependable marine power and a custom-built, tubular frame trailer—and you've got an unbeatable boat package. Join the thousands of Sea Nymph owners across the nation who enjoy rurming boats that are the envy of everyone else on the water. They also enjoy every moment aboard their Sea Nymph boats because they're made to please—from the quality to the price. Get the ultimate in performance and reliability. Sea Nymph is proud to equip every boat package with Evimude or Johnson motors, giving you unsurpassed marine performance and reliability. Proven reputations, efficient operation, impressive acceleration, high thrust, amazing dependability, exclusive features, superior corrosion resistance and advanced technology are all benefits of Evimude and Johnson outboards. And with over 5,000 servicing dealers across North America, trained OMC marine service experts are always close by. El Rounded Livewells With Self-Sealing Insulated Lids Featuring a unique ridge and channel design, our livewells are topped with foam-insulated self-sealing lids, which control water temperature • and reduce splash. And we make them black, the color choice of tournament pros, to give you one more competitive edge! H Tuf-Dek™ Aluminum Floor Liners A on SS165, FM170, BT175, SC175, GLS175, GLS195 and TC195, the Tuf-Dek extends the life of your rig by resisting change to climatic conditions. Aluminum decks are both light-weight and strong. II Marine Tech™ Wood Deck With Limited Lifetime Warranty Sea Nymph wood decks are accompanied by a limited lifetime warranty to the original owner. 0 Reverse Chine Hull Design And Double-Riveted Hull Seams A reverse chine hull offers quicker planing and improved performance. Double-riveting (available on some models) adds even more strength to high-impact areas. El Durable Polyurethane Hull Finish Sea Nymph uses a strong-bonding polyurethane paint finish that resists chipping, fading and scratches. Not only does the finish look great, but it cleans easily, too. Our white paint finish also softens the glare from the sun for those aboard. B Patent-Pending Bow Insert This unique design allows a bow insert to be used for platform fishing and casting, then removed for additional seating, convenience and comfort. Available on .SS165, GLS175, GLS195. Q Maximum Fuel Capacities Sea Nymph sets the standard with large capacity fuel tanks, both removable and built-in for longer operation between fill ups. II One-Piece Formed And Heat-Treated Ribs All Sea Nymph jon bass feature one-piece rib construction for superior strength over the more common method of multiple rib pieces welded together. Ribs are formed and heat-treated, helping to reduce stress on the ribs. El Extra-Wide Gunnels Our heavy-duty gunnels add greater durability to the hull by providing strength at extra-usage areas. IB Rounded, Full Length Extruded Center Keel In hull Bottom/Formed-ln Keels At Hull Sides And Bottom Round keels, versus more commonly used V-shaped keels, add structural integrity to our hulls. They displace loads more evenly, which improves tracking and hull performance. ED OMC SysteMatched™ Parts & Accessaries are integrated into every package we build. Cables, controls, wiring and gauges are built to our specifica-tions for top performance and response. i l l Waterproof Lowrance1 Fish Finders fea-ture a bright blue Supertwist display, large viewing area, fish alarm, automatic operation and 350' depth chart. A standard feature of our Deluxe Fishing and Pro packages. B AM/FM Stereo Cassette Packages feature crisp, clear sound, weather resistant speakers and 33 Oil Injection System gives you optimum performance from your Evinrude or Johnson outboard and assures an accurate gas/oil mixture. IB S.L.O.W. (Speed Limiting Overheat Warning) system automatically reduces engine RPM when necessary to prevent damage. EE Evinrude And Johnson Electric Trolling Motors deliver 12 to 24 volts of silent power. Three-speed models standard on some packages, 6-speed models optional on others. HH Fish Line Traps on 25 HP motors prevent stray line from damaging the gearcase seal. Weedless water intakes prevent clogging. S3 Loop-Charging for improved performance and greater fuel efficiency on all 40-60 HP Evinrude and Johnson outboards. SI Custom-Built Shoreland'rtt Trailers feature baked-on powder paint, injection molded fenders, plug-in wiring, tube-steel all-welded frame and a 5-year limited manufacturer's warranty. fl Portside Consoles are equipped with big, locking glove boxes and a low-profile top for mount-ing and storing electronics and accessories. 33 Fishing Seats With Pull-Out Lure/Drink Trays All Sea Nymph pedestal fishing seats include pull-out lure/drink trays and seat-back storage nets to keep your gear neatly stored, your drink safely in place, and your lures handy. Z22 W hen you're out to meet the challenges of big-water fishing or an afternoon of skiing, Sea Nymph is ready, no matter what fun you've planned. Our 17' and 19' Sportfishers give you plenty of that movin' around room that's so important when hunting salmon, lake trout, or any other big-water prey that strikes your fancy. For walleye enthusiasts, our new TC195 is loaded with fishing features like a Lowrance fish/depth finder and a stern fishing platform. The Sportfishers and Twin Console Walleye feature aerated livewells and plenty of room to store your gear. Our brand new SS165 Fish-N-Ski, is adept at pulling a skier or trolling over your favorite hot spot. All four of these deep-V wonders are built extra tough with double-riveted hull seams and feature walk-through windshields. So if you're out for a day of skiing or fishing, searching the big-water depths for salmon or lake trout, or drift fishing for walleye, Sea Nymph offers four high-quality choices, just for you! Back-to-back fold-down lounge seat is available as an exchange with the standard passenger's seat. Available on GLS195 and GLS175 only. DeepVS Versatile Sportfisher, Walleye and Fish-N-Ski TC195 Walleye Twin Console Shorn with optional listing package. inr SS165 Fish-N-Ski base package includes electric start 48 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp, 60 hp outboards with trim/tilt available. Center Line Beam Bow Height Transom h Person Cap.A Approx. \ Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap Protect yourself from rain or shine with the Designed for fishermen, the contoured dash Lockable rod storage is a must for every serious Aerated livewell and storage compartment are Sportfish Top(shown). Or exchange it for a features easy-to-read instruments, fish/depth fisherman. Sea Nymph gives you more storage standard equipment on the GLS195 and GLS175 i Runabout Top with boot. finder and AM/FM stereo cassette radio. (Radio than most others. (A vailable on GLS models.) Sportfisher. optional on TC195.) X 3 f S ea Nymph top-of-the-line Fishing Machines are designed to increase your probability of catching more fish. No, these popular fishing boats won't help you pick the right lure or set the hook, but they'll give you all the fishability features you need. Al l you have to worry about is your own fishing tech-nique. And you probably have that perfected anyway! An all new addition to the Fishing Machine lineup for 1995 is the 170 Fishing Machine, a 17-footer loaded with fishing features like a Lowrance fish/depth finder and bow/stern aerated rounded livewells. Like all the Fishing Machines, the 170 gives you marine grade carpet, navigation light control, concealed throttle controls and tinted windshield. New for '95 on the 161 is a bow aerated rounded livewell with divider, timer and self-sealing lid. New on all FM series boats are drivers and passenger seats with storage nets and pedestal fishing seats with storage nets and pull-out lme/orink trays. Al l three models offer the dependability of Evimude or Johnson outboard power, to male sure you get to your favorite hot spot quickly. You can further customize your Fishing Machine with a number of 'accessory package' and 'fishing package' options, larger motors and special trailers. In fact, these are such great fishing boats, we guarantee you'll have more fun! epV's Deluxe Fishing Machine FM170 Fishing Machine FM170 Fishing Machine base package includes electric start 40 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard with trim/tilt, painted bunk trailer. Optional 60 hp, 90 hp, 115 hp outboard with trim/tilt available. Beam 80" Bow Height 28" Transom Height 21" Person Cap./Wt. 5/650 Approx. Weight 960 Hull Gauge .090 Horsepower Cap 120 Shown with optional fishing package. FM160 Fishing Machine FM160 Fishing Machine base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp, 60 hp outboard with ; trim/tilt available. Center Line Beam 69' Bow Height 30.5" Transom Height 21" Person Cap./Wt. 6/775 Approx. Weight 650 Hull Gauge .072 Horsepower Cap H S t o n i t # optional fishing package. FM161 Fishing Machine ® m a (1 v-=1 " 1 -Shown with optional fishing package. FM161 Fishing Machine base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp, ... 60 hp outboard with t~~ trim/tilt available. Center Line 16'5" Beam BowHeigl Transom Height Person Cap./Wt. 6/925 Approx. Weight 650 Hull Gauge .072 Horsepower Cap 70 6 AS4 Aerated livewell system with timer features a Custom Accessory package (shown) includes easy Lockable rod locker makes a convenient storage sell-sealing insulated lid. to read instruments. It's optional on FM160 and area for rods, gear and other fishing tackle. FM161, standard on FM170 with optional radio Standard on all Fishing Machine models. package. FM164 Fishing Machine Shorn with optional lishing package FM164 Fishing Mach ine base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp tiller steered outboard with trim/tilt available. Center Line 16'5" Beam • H Bow Height 33.5" Transom Height Person Cap./Wt. 6/925 Approx Weight 610 Hull Gauge .072 Horsepower Cap 50 ieep V s Extra-Value Sidewinder, Fishing Madiine and Backtroller FM146 Fishing Machine ing Machine I package includes electric start 15 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional " "hp tiller outboard available. Center Line Beam Bow Height Transom Height Person Cap./Wt. 4/600 Approx Weight 435 Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap 28" 064 35 SC175 Sidewinder base package includes electric start 40 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard with trim/tilt, painted bunk trailer. Optional 60 hp, 90 hp, 115 hp outboards with trim/tilt available. Center Lii Beam Bow Heir Transom Height Person CapTWt. Approx. Weight 998 Hull Gauge .090 Horsepower Cap 120 38" • i 6/825 SC170 Sidewinder base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp, 60 hp, 90 hp outboards with trim/tilt available. Center Li Beam Bow Transom Height 21* Person Cap./Wt. 5700 Approx. Hull Gauge Horsepo\ 90 BT175 Backtrol ler base package includes electric start 40 hp tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard with trim/tilt, painted bunk trailer. Optional 60 hp tiller outboard with trim/tilt available. Center Line Beam Bow Height Transom Height Person Cap./Wt. 6825 38" 21" Approx V Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap 958 .090 161 BT165 Backtrol ler base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp tiller steered outboard with or without trim/tilt available. Center Line Beam 68" Bow Height 28" Transom Height 21" Person CapTWt. 5/700 Approx Weight 500 Hull Gauge .064 Horsepower Cap 40 Z39 comes i oat offers. Still others like the forward visability of a console-controlled fishing boal ver to your angling challenges. Our 17' Sidewinders are perfect big-water fishing tools '95 you'll find even more fishing features on the Sidewinders. The 175 Sidewinder even . Lowrance X-25A fish/depth finder standard. When backtrolling is vom prefered technique, Sea Nymph has a pair of boats specifi-cally designed for your type of fishing. The roomy 175 Backtroller offers an overall length of 17'4" and a beam of 85". The 165 Backtroller is generous in size o, with 16' overall length and 68" beam. Both backtrollers are equipped with a pedestal fishing seat, rod storage compartment and aerated livewell. T h ; Machines both have a driver's seat plus a pedestal fishing seat, two bases and an aerated livewell. In addition to a powerful Johnson or E rd, these excellent packages come with a painted bunk trailer, ready to go. Just fill 'em up, grab your tackle and head for the fishing action. Lockable rod storage is ample (shown SC170). Store your rods, tackle and other important items safely in this roomy compart-ment. Not available on FM146. Side tackle trays and storage are just a few of the Command Center features including instruments and AM/FM stereo option. Mailable on BT175 only. Bow casting deck features a removable fold-down pedestal fishing seat, aerated livewell and more storage. Available on 3T175andSC175. V FM146 FISHING MACHINE Shorn with optional listing package. £ 3 ? More trophy-size freshwater fish have been caught from aluminum utility V boats than any other type of boat. And nobody offers a utility V lineup with as many built-in features and as much quality as Sea Nymph. These fishing boats might share a 'traditional' looking shape with others, but when you compare their specifications and their prices, you'll find Sea Nymph clearly is the value leader. Three additions to our utility V lineup for '95 will make this group of tough fishing tools even more popular. The 1880T Wide Body, a beamy 18-footer, and 16 and 14-foot models - the 1667 Camp and 1467 Camp - are built to meet the fishing challenges that await around the next point. These three, like all Sea Nymph utility Vs, are designed and built for big-water trolling and casting. They're made of heavy gauge marine aluminum that's seam-sealed and double-riveted, with heavy-duty keels, aluminum-clad transoms and sturdy cast bow plates. You get two hefty transom handles and oarlocks, too. And all of these boats have strong bench seats filled with foam for flotation and quiet operation. Special packages team these boats up with a quality Johnson or Evinrude outboard plus a quality painted bunk trailer. Utility V s Ready to go where the fish are waiting X9 1880T King Wide Body base package includes 25 hp electric tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp tiller and 40 and 60 hp tiller outboards with trim/tilt availabli Transom Heigh' Person Cap./1 Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower Cat 1880T 1667 Camp Boat base package iocludes 9.9 hp electric tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, paioted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available Center L Beam Bow Height Transom Height Person Cap./Wt. Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower C 1667 1666WT 1666WT Musk ie base package iocludes 15 hp electric tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available. Transom Height 21" Person Cap./Wt. 5/610 Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower Ca| 1666T /1666 1666T/1666* Musk ie base package includes 9.9 hp electric tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available.'«3s/e boat only. Bow Height Transom Height Person Cap./! Approx. Weigh' Hull Gauge Horsepower Caj Center L Beam Bow Heig Transom I 1467 Camp Boat base package includes 9.9 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available. Person CapTWt. Approx. Weight 290 Hull Gauge .072 1465WT/1465W Musk ie base package includes 9.9 hp electric tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted buok trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available. CenterL Beam Bowl-Transom r Person Cap./Wt. Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower C 1465WT /1465 W I 1465T/1465* Musk ie base package includes 9.9 hp electric tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, paioted buok trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered OUtbOard available. -Available boat only. Beam Bow Height Transom Height Person Cap./Wt. Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap 1465T /1465 Here are four ways to get into productive lake fishing, and with three of them you don't even need to have a trailer, The 1462 is the value leader among 14 footers, and in its package with standard Evinrude or Johnson 9.9 hp, motor and painted bunk trailer, you are looking at an affordable way to get into fishing action with a complete rig that's ready to give you years of satisfaction. The three Kar-Lite models, at 10,12 and 14 feet, are designed for cartop portability and long lasting value. All of these compacts have painted interiors, spray rails, reinforced bow eyes and heavy-duty keels. Seats are alu-minum filled with foam flotation. These boats are up to resort standards in terms of their rugged construction and quality aluminum. And you'll certainly find them up to your standards for fishing versatility, light weight and lasting value. Utility V's America's favorite quality compacts 1462 Big Water 1457 Kar-Lite im t 1 =0= ti f rl h X 4 \ A 4 \ 4 [ 1256 Kar-Lite rl f V } / 4 V A \ 1055 Kar-Lite 1462 Big Water standard pack- Center Line age includes 9.9 hp electric tiller Beam steered Evinrude or Johnson out board, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp electric tiller steered outboard available. Bow Height Transom Height Person CapTWt. Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap 1457 Kar-Lite is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, reinforced bow eye, and heavy-duty center keel. Fishing seat with sliding/swivel bracket is optional. Trailer sold separately. Center Line Beam Bow Height Transom Height Person Cap.AVt. Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap ar-Lite is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, reinforced bow eye and heavy-duty center keel. Fishing seat with sliding/swivel bracket optional. Trailer sold separately. Bow Height Transom Height Person CapJWt Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap 1055 Kar-Lite is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, reinforced bow eye and heavy-duty center keel. Fishing seat with sliding/swivel bracket optional. Trailer sold separately. Center Line Beam Bow Height Transom Height Person CapTWt. Approx. Weight Hull Gauge Horsepower Cap 12 13 Z V 3 S ome anglers call 'em modified Vs. others call 'em jon bass boats. No matter how you describe them, you'll find three Sea Nymph Tournament Pro models that challenge the costly fiberglass bass boats when it comes to the bottom line - features that help catch more fish with comfort and convenience. All three offer several features brand new for 1995. Stem aerated livewells with self-sealing lids, driver's and passenger's seats with storage nets and under-seat storage. All this, along with two pedestal fishing seats with storage nets and pull-out lure/drink trays will make your days on the water all that more enjoyable. The TX165 features a timer with its livewell. The loaded TX175 offers bow and stern livewells, both equipped with timers. You'll also find an aluminum console with molded dash, a Lowrance X-25A fish/depth finder and an OMC electric trolling motor standard on the TX 175. Optional Deluxe fishing packages on the TX155 and TX165 include a Lowrance X-22A fish/depth finder and OMC electric trolling motor. Another option for the TX155 and TX165 is the Custom accessory package which adds an AM/FM cassette stereo system and full instrumentation. When it comes to bass fishing, these spirited Tournament Pros let you run with the big dogs without investing a King's ransom. Modified Vs Tournament Pros that help catch more bass TX175 Tournament Pro base package includes electric start 40 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard with trim/tilt, painted bunk trailer and Deluxe Fishing Package. Optional 60 hp outboard with trim/tilt, 50 hp and 90 hp jet outboard also available. Center Line 17' Beam 73" Side Depth 21' Transom Height 21' Person CapJWt 4/495 Approx. Weight 715 Hull Gauge .072 Horsepower Cap 70 1X165 Tournament Pro base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp outboard with trim/tilt available. Center Line Beam 72" Side Depth 21" Transom Height 21" Person C a p M 4/600 Approx. Weight 650 Hull Gauge .072 Horsepower Cap 50 TX155 Tournament Pro ba: includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Center Line 15' Beam 61" Side Depth 20" Transom Height 21' Person GapJWt. 4/540 Approx Weight 340 Hull Gauge .064 Horsepower Cap 35 Shown with optional fishing package. 14 T he Sea N y m p h crappie series has three models designed specifically for crappie and panfish angling. After all, plenty of anglers wi l l tell you there's nothing more fun than catching fish after fish on light tackle. A n d that's exactly why we built these boats. The 150 Crappie Catcher gives you a bow casting deck with pedestal seat featuring a pull-out drink holder/lure tray. The 162 Crappie offers the forward visibility you only get from a stick-steered boat. A n d this year the 162 features a locking swivel operator's seat with storage net and a box pedestal fishing seat with storage net and under-seat storage, The 161 Crappie Pro features a pair of box pedestal fishing seats and an a luminum console with molded dash and a driver's seat with storage net and under-seat storage. A l l three of these fishing machines have high-gloss polyurethane hu l l finishes, T u f - D e k ™ a luminum floors covered with marine carpeting, plus aerated livewells, storage compartments and 12V trolling motor harnesses. Choose a package with a powerful Johnson or Evinrude outboard and quality painted bunk trailer and enjoy the fishing action. Modified Vs Your best value in full-feature crappie boats SBW with optional listing package. TX161 Crappie Pro base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp outboard with trim/tilt available. TX162 Crappie Stick Steer Shorn wilh optional tishing package. TX162 Crappie Stick Steer base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp and 40 hp outboard with trim/tilt available. Center Line 15'10" Beam 72" Side Depth 21" Transom Height 21" Person CapTWL 4/600 Approx Weight 520 Hull Gauge .072 Horsepower Cap 50 Center Line 1510" Beam 72" Side Depth 21" Transom Height 21" Person CapTWt 4/600 Approx. Weight 520 Hull Gauge .072 Horsepower Cap 40 TX150 Crappie Catcher Shown wilh optional listing package. TX150 Crappie Catcher base package includes electric start 15 hp Evinrude or Johnson tiller steered outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available. Center Urn 15' Beam 61' Side Depth 21" Transom Height 16' Person CapTWt. 4/540 Approx Weight 310 Hull Gauge .064 Horsepower Cap 25 16 Stick steer control puts the driver up front- The TX161 and TX162 side aerated livewell tea- Lowrance X-22A fish/depth finder with LCD where the action is! Other forward features tures marine grade carpeted exterior and roomy, display, depthto350", selective fish ID., auto include pedestal seat and 12V trolling motor quick-to-fill interior operation and multiple zoom is optional, harness (1X162 only). z<(1 Y ou can't beat a flat-bottom Jon boat for fishing stability. And you can't beat them for all-out fishing boat value, either. Sea Nymph takes Jon boat fishing seriously and has a large selection of models from which to choose. All the way from 10 to 18 feet, we have the jon boat for you. The newest members of the Sea Nymph jon boat lineup, the 1852MTNN Tunnel Jon and 1648TNN Tunnel Jon, combine an innovative tunnel hull design with the advanced technology of Johnson or Evimude jet outboard power to produce a boat that can run in as little as six inches of water. There are both square bow and V-bow models and some with 6-degree V-bottoms. Every jon is built to last with rugged marine-grade aluminum, formed-in spray rails and heavy-duty formed corner caps. And all have sturdy aluminum seats with foam flotation, plus transom handles and oarlocks. Some offer livewells. All are fully painted in olive drab green. These are practical boats for practical anglers who want solid value with a minimum of bells and whistles. Special packages combine Sea Nymph's most popular models with traditional, prop-driven Johnson or Evinrude outboards, plus painted bunk trailers. They represent the best value available in this type of fishing rig, and are built to give lasting satisfaction. Jon Boats Lunker, Sport and Angler Jon models for every fishing need 1752VCT base package includes electric start 25 hp Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp outboard with trim/tilt available. 1IS52MT base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25; or 40 hp outboard with trim/tilt. Side console package for remote steer available. 1852T base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. 1652MT base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp and 40 hp outboard with trim/tilt and side console package for remote steer available. 1652T base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. CI 1648V base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. 1852MTNN base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional side console package with prop-driven 25 hp or 50 jet outboard for remote steer available. 1648TNN base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Johnson or Evinrude outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional packages include a tiller steered 40 hp jet outboard and a side console package with prop-driven 25 hp or 50 hp jet outboard for remote steer. 1848 base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. 1648MPT base package includes electric start 25 hp remote steer Evinrude or Johnson outboard, portside aerated livewell, painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 hp outboard with trim/tilt with remote steer available. 1648MW base package includes electric start 10 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available 1648MT base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. 1448M base package includes electric start 10 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard and 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. 1448 base package includes electric start 10 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard and 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. 1648 base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp outboard with side console package for remote steer available. 1648M base package includes electric start 25 hp tiller steered Johnson or Evinrude outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional side console package with 25 hp outboard for remote steer available. 1448MW base package includes electric start 10 hp tiller steered Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 hp tiller steered outboard available. 1640M is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles, livewell, and flat bottom V-bow. Trailer sold separately. 1440M is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles livewell, and flat bottom V-bow. Trailer sold separately. 1436M is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles livewell, and flat bottom V-Bow, Trailer sold separately. 18 Customize your Sea Nymph with these Complete remote steering option is also available Lockable rod and gear storage is available on special options Side console package (remote for center seat installation. Ask your dealer lor some models, steer) with complete steering cables and control more details, box with cables is available on some models. 1436 is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles and flat bottom square bow. Trailer sold separately. 1436L is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles and flat bottom square bow. Trailer sold separately. 1236 is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles and flat bottom square bow. Trailer sold separately. 1431 is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles and flat bottom square bow. Trailer sold separately. 1231 is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles and flat bottom square bow. Trailer sold separately. 1031 is available boat only. Features include oarlocks, two transom handles and flat bottom square bow. Trailer sold separately. Length Beam Bottom Width Side Depth Transom Height Max.Per.Cap/ Max. Per. Wt. Cap Lbs. Max. Wt. Cap. Lbs. Approx.Hull Wt Lbs. Hull Gauge Max. HP Capacity Remote/Tiller 1752VCT 17' 74" 52" 21" 21" 11 6/750 1130 330 .072 70/50 1852MT 18' 75" 52" 21" 21" 10 7/900 1290 345 .072 60/45 1852T 18' 75" 52" 21" 21" 11 7/900 1290 345 .072 60/45 1652MT 1510" 75" 52" 21" 21" 9 6/750 1130 310 .072 50/35 1652T 1510" 75" 52" 21" 21" 9 6/750 1130 310 .072 50/35 1648V 1510" 70" 48" 22" 16" 10 5/605 920 260 .072 40 1852MTN 18' 75" 52" 21" 21" 10 7/900 1290 385 .072 60/45 1648TNN 1510" 70" 48" 19" 16" 9 5/605 920 285 .072 35 1848 18' 70" 48" 19" 16" 10 6/755 1070 300 .072 40 1648MPT 1510" 70" 48" 19" 21" 9 5/605 920 370 .072 50 1B48MW 15'10" 70" 48" 21" 16" 9 5/605 920 285 .072 35 1648MT 1510" 70" 48" 21" 21" mn 5/605 920 285 .072 35 1648 15'10" 70" 48" 19" 16" 9 5/605 920 285 .072 35 1648M 1510" 70" 48" 21" 16" 9 5/605 920 285 .072 35 1448MW 14' 70" 48" 21" 16" HI 4/545 765 240 .072 25 1448M 14' 70" 48" 21" 16" H i 4/545 765 240 .072 25 1448 14' 70" 48" 19" 16" M I 4/545 765 240 .072 25 1640M 1510" 60" 40" 19" 16" HI 5/680 900 225 .064 25 1440M 14' 59" 40" 19" 16" HI 4/500 720 195 .064 20 1436M 14' 56" 36" 17" 16" 8 3/395 615 170 .064 20 1436 14' 57" 36" 17" 16" H i 3/395 615 170 .064 20 1436L 14' 57" 36" 17" 16" — 3/350 530 130 .050 15 1236 12' 56" 36" 17" 16" 6 3/340 500 155 .064 10 1431 1310" 46" 31" 13" 15" 5 2/305 390 100 .043 6 1231 1110" 46" 31" 13" 15" HI 2/295 335 80 .043 3 1031 911" 46" 31" 13" 15" 2 2/180 275 70 .043 3 S ea Nymph didn't invent the pontoon. We just raised the standards so nobody can match 'em. These Family Sport models feature full-length 23-inch diameter pontoon logs with extruded keels for maximum stability and are made from heavy-duty 5052 marine aluminum with sealed bulkheads. Decks feature pressure-treated wood with a limited lifetime warranty and marine carpeting. Rails are anodized aluminum; mooring and bow eyes are stainless steel. Deck furniture features Roto-Cast seat bases and backs, offering increased durability and rot-resistance over conventional wooden construction. They have a vacuum-formed console and helm seat, L-shaped stern lounge, pedestal mount table and two bow sleeper lounges. Standard equipment includes a 24-gallon fuel system with dashboard gauge, privacy enclosure, navigation lights, tinted windshield and much more. The SP240 Family Sport also includes a propane grill. The dependable power of a 25 hp electric start Johnson or Evinrude outboard is included as standard equipment on both Family Sports. ontoons Family Sport models offer quality and versatility Comfortable helm stations include removable 34-quart cooler, tinted windshield, binnacle control. Accessory options including AM/FM radio and lull instrumentation shown. S P 2 0 0 Family Sport base package includes ictric start 25 hp ' rude or Johnson itboard. Optional 48 hp outboard and 40 and 60 hp outboards with trim/tilt available. 20 Aft seating includes an L-shaped lounge Stem entry deck with ladder makes getting Pop-up privacy enclosure works great as The SP240 offers an optional Fun Deck that with padded armrests and drink holders aboard from the water a snap. Enclosed engine a changing room. Large enough for a makes a great place for sunning or solitude, and enclosed stern with sundeck pad. area looks neat and cuts engine noise. port-a-pottie, too. T he Sea Nymph Fishing Machine combines the versatility of a family pontoon with the special features for fishing to make it the perfect boat for anglers who want to enjoy the excitement of fishing and the relaxation of a pontoon cruise from the same boat. They have an aerated livewell and plenty of storage. Both have 12V trolling motor harnesses. And both models feature lounge seating with padded armrests and drink holders. The furniture aboard the FM200 is built with Roto-Cast seat bases and backs for increased durability and rot-resistance. The FM200 has four pedestal fishing chairs equipped with handy pull-out lure/drink trays, while the FM180 has two. The FM180 also offers a pedestal mount table, too. Just as the Family Sport models, these Fishing Machines are built on pontoons that extend the entire length of the deck, have a fall-length keel, plus sealed bulkheads. Decks are made of pressure-treated wood and come with a limited lifetime warranty. Rails are anodized aluminum and hardware, mooring eyes and bow eyes are stainless steel, Each has a built-in fuel system for easy fill-ups. The payoff for you from these boats' design and quality is greater stability and capacity, better performance and lasting value. Pontoons Fishing Machine combines fishability with comfort FM200 Fishing Machine Shorn with optional Helm station puts it all at your fingertips. Shown here with optional Custom Accessory and Deluxe Fishing packages. Two-way seat with storage and pedestal mount table with drink holders are part of the standard furniture package of the FM 180 Fishing Machine. Aerated livewell with battery storage and drink holders is conveniently located between two bow pedestal fishing seats. (Shown with optional trolling motor.) W hile we may not have invented the pontoon boat, we definitely invented the aluminum deck boat. For the speed and maneuverability of a runabout and the comfort and roominess of a pontoon boat, no one else comes close to these fast, comfortable boats. They're great for fishing, but you can enjoy family cruising with them too. In fact, there's a ski tow pylon available, as well as a deluxe fishing package, so these are true "fish ski" designs. They come with Johnson or Evinrude standard outboard power, painted bunk trailer and color-coordinated bimini top with boot. The Stinger is set up for angling with four pedestal fishing seats featuring convenient pull-out drink/lure trays. The fishing seats are on the boat's aft and forward fishing decks. Two aerated livewells and rod storage also are standard on the Stinger. For the cruising aficionado, the Stinger Sport features lounge seating. Both have complete helm with tinted windshield, concealed throttle control and full engine instrumentation, plus horn and navigational lights with storage clips. Also standard: a quality AM/FM stereo cassette system with four speakers and telescoping antenna. The Stinger and Stinger Sport look sharp and run fast. And they're priced right to make them exceptional family boating and fishing values. Deck Boats The Stinger and Stinger Sport mean exciting performance M o n o H u l l DESIGN Bottom Width 74" Person Cap./Wt. 7/920 Approx. Weight 1500 Hull Gauge .090 Horsepower Cap 120 STS190 Stinger Sport base package includes electric start 60 hp nrude or Johnson board with trim/tilt, ited bunk trailer with ge brakes. Optional and 115 hp outboards i trim/tilt available. 24 Helm station Includes removable 34-quart cooler, Both models feature a bow aerated livewell with There's plenty of storage aboard both models. The tinted windshield, full instrumentation, AM/FM timer. The ST 190 Stinger includes an additional recessed cockpit area reveals compartments stereo cassette and concealed throttle control. stern livewell lor serious fishermen. (Shown with for rods, tackle, skis, life vests and more. optional trolling motor.) ST 190 STINGER Shown with optional fish package. Features & Options I 1 | § 1 1 I I I I I E fl | I I I I 1 1 1 1 I I 1 Construction Features NMMA certified White high gloss polyurethane finish • • Marine carpet Built-in fuel system in gallons 27 27 29 29 22 22 29 29 13 24 24 14 20 27 27 Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • • • t • • • Double riveted hull seams • • 5052 Marine grade aluminum alloy Bilge pump • • Stainless steel hardware Transom curtain • • Mooring Cleats Bow rails • • t • • Stern fishing platform • • • Navigation lights Al! aluminum motor mount • • • • Bolted deck construction • • • • Marine Tech wood floor with Limited Lifetime Warranty • • • • • • • Pressure-treated wood deck with Limited Lifetime Warranty • • • • Wheelchair-size gates • • • • Molded corner caps • • • • Stainless steel mooring eyes • • • • Safety railing • • Stainless steel bow and ski eyes t • • • Full length extruded pontoon keels • • • • Heavy-duty extruded aluminum cross channels • • • • Heavy-duty extruded aluminum "M" brackets • • • • Three heavy-duty extruded aluminum 1/4" stem cross channels • Anodized rails and trim Under-deck spray detlectors • • • • Wave Tamer A A A A Privacy enclosure • • Stern entry deck with ladder • • • • Propane grill • Stern fuel and battery trays • • 4-Step stowaway or non-stowaway ladder A A Reinforced bow eye • Wide extruded gunnels Fishing Features Livewells 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 Grab rails • • Stem tackle shelf • Bow and stern casting decks with storage • • • • Bow and stern casting decks • Bow casting deck with storage • • • • • • t • • • Bow casting deck insert i • • Bow trolling motor deck • Bow battery storage • • • • Stick steering module • Lowrance X25A 1ish finder t t • • • t • Deluxe Fishing Package* • • A • A • • • A A A A A A A A Custom Accessory Package" • • A A A A A A Pro Package-1 A A A A A A Trolling motor harness 12V 12V 12V 12V 12V 12V 12V 12V 12V 12V Bow trolling motor panel 12/24V 12/24V 12/24V 12V 12/24V 12V 12V 12V 12/24V 12/24V 12/24V 12/24V Aft dry bait box • • Aft aerated bait well • • Lockable rod locker Rod holders • • • • • • • • Standard • Optional A "Deluxe Fishing Package includes Lowrance X22A fish finder and OMC electric trolling motor. "Custom Accessory Package includes speedometer, tachometer, voltmeter, AM/FM stereo cassette radio with two speakers and telescoping antenna. "Pro Package includes Deluxe Fishing and Custom Accessory Packages. ^Command Center includes electronic storage, horn, switch panel, speedometer, voltmeter, tachometer, fuel gauge, remote trim switch, AM/FM stereo cassette radio with two speakers and telescoping antenna, Lowrance X22A fish/depth finder. zs-4. 96131 GLS195 GLS175 SC175 SC170 SS165 FM170 FMI 60 FM161 FM164 FM146 BT175 BT165 TX175 TX165 TX155 TX161 TX162 TX150 SP240 SP200 FM200 FM180 ST190 STS190 Furniture Roto Cast seat bases and caps • • • • Drink holders • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Driver's seat Passenger's seat • • • • • • • • Pedestal fishing seat 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 4 2 2 Pedestal seat base(s) 5 4 4 3 5 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 Pedestal seat assembly • • • A A A A A A A A A A Locking swivel operator's seat with storage • • Box pedestal fishing seat with storage 2 1 Helm seat • • Combination drink holders with tackle trays • • • Back-to-back fold-down lounge seat • • • Bow rider cushions • • Two bow pedestal fishing seats • L-shaped stern seating • Twin consoles with tinted windshield • Padded armrest with drink holder • Glove box • • • Ski tow pylon A A Two-way seat with storage • Bow lounges • Pedestal mount table with drink holders Stern lounge with padded armrests and drink holders • Stern L-shaped lounge with padded armrest and drink holder • • • Stern lounge • • Enclosed stern with sundeck pad • • Bow sleeper lounges with padded armrest and drink holder • • Color Selection White with blue accents Aqua/blue with plum accents Trailers Galvanized bunk • • • A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A White painted bunk • • White painted roller • • A A A A A A A A Brake kit • • • A A • • Tops/Covers Color coordinated bimini top with boot Canvas Bimini top A A Canvas Sportfish top • A Canvas Runabout top • • • Sportfish top with boot • • • 10'Aluminum hardtop A Fun Deck with ladder A Mooring cover • A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A Camper canvas (lor 10' hard top only) A Helm Contoured dash • • • • Vacuum-formed console with cooler storage Removable 34-quart cooler Horn • • • Concealed throttle control • • • • • • Binnacle control • • • • Emergency stop switch • • • • Vanity mirror 12 volt receptacle Switch panel Tinted windshield • • • • • • Instrument Package: Speedometer, voltmeter, tachometer • • t • A t • • • • AM/FM Stereo cassette radio, 2 speakers, telescoping antenna A • • A • A A A A AM/FM Stereo cassette radio, 4 speakers, telescoping antenna • • Fuel gauge • • • • • Aluminum twin consoles with contoured dash • • • • Walk-thru windshield with door • • • • Locking glove compartment • • • • Command Center1" • Courtesy light • • • • 1*7 PRICE ESTIMATE Date Good Thru. Model # Serial # Base Price $ Options Dealer Prep $ Freight $ Total $ Down $ APR Mos._ Approx. Monthly Payments $ After you've chosen the Sea Nymph package that best suits your needs, ask your dealer about arranging monthly payments. He'll show you how, with approved credit, you can take delivery on your new boat now and pay later. l\l§jmpH O M C A L U M I N U M BOAT G R O U P Sea Nymph Boats 2900 Industrial Drive, Lebanon, MO 65536 In Canada Contact Outboard Marine Corporation Of Canada Ltd., 1994 Fisher Drive, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada K9J 7B6 For Canadian Dealer Information Call 705-876-2699 ad Carefully Dimensions, capacities, ratings and additional specifications plus complete warranty and service information are available Irom your Sea Nymph dealer. Product illustrations and data within this catalog are based upon information available at the time of publication. Sea Nymph reserves the right to make changes without notice or obligation. Ask your local Sea Nymph dealer for the most current product specifications prior to purchase. Some ot the eguipment shown separately or on products illustrated in this catalog may be optional at extra cost. Sea Nymph is a member in good standing of the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA). All Sea Nymph boats meet or exceed the standards established by this organization under the NMMA certification program. NMMA establishes standards lor flotation, fuel systems, ventilation, electrical and safety. Ask about our 2/10 year limited warranty. ® Registered trademarks Outboard Marine Corporation. '"Trademarks Outboard Marine Corporation. © 1994 Outboard Marine Corporation. tRegistered trademark Lowrance Electronics, Inc. ttRegistered trademark Midwest Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Printed in U.S.A. Zs9 >Ve Take Your Fishing As Se If your idea of a good time is rising well before the sun, drinking coffee from a thermos and making your first cast just as dawn breaks, then you're our kind of person. You see, at Sea Nymph? fishing comes first. We crave those mornings just like you do. And, we build our boats with the attitude that, if it doesn't help you catch more fish, it just doesn't belong. It's this attitude that's made our popular deep-V Fishing Machine1" line the standard for today's aluminum fishing boats. Likewise, our Great lakes Series has been tried and proven by recreational and professional fishermen alike. Add to that a complete lineup of jon bass, panfish, bacfetrollers, pontoons and deckboats, and you're looking at one of the widest selections of aluminum fishing boats afloat today. All with the most important fishing features, the best layouts, quality construction and top ualue. Sea Nymph: The Choice Of Those WhoPutFishingFirst J In the world of fishing, few have travelled and fished as extensively as Dan Gapen. From boyhood with his father through adult life, Dan has fished over 5,000 lakes, rivers and streams for dozens of species of fish, and taught thousands how to better enjoy the sport as a longtime sport show i always put fishing first, and sees Sea Nymph as a Here are some thoughts from a man who has V " V - y * 1 ^ company that does the same 7 grew up fishing walleye, salmon, catfish and everything in between. And usually from very basic, sound boats with low to medium horsepower engines. That's what impressed me about Sea Nymph. They offer a very complete line of good, basic models and build them with the fisherman in mind-with all the most important features. They have good, functional layouts, too. and they're built by "real people" who know fishing. Sea Nymph is. without question, the best aluminum fishing boat for the money I've seen on today's market. From the factory and its people to the product they put out, it's like they say. Fishing Comes First. I think you'll like them too." Your Most Important Piece MM DOUBLE-RIVETED HULL SEAMS • • • Hull seams on our Deep V models are double riveted adding strength and durability to potential high-stress points on the hull, •V-TECH HULL Our exclusive V-Tech™ hull designs have wide, reverse chines for a dry ride and exceptional stability underway or while fishing. •J MOLDED HELM CONSOLES * ™ Durable, molded helm consoles accommodate optional instrument packages, AM/FM stereos and added fishing electronics. Bl TUF-DECK*" Exclusive Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floors and casting decks combine high structural strength and light weight, and are especially resistant to ever-changing climatic conditions. TUf ALL ALUM1NU Del?) JM FLOORING I S LIVEWELLS M Roomy tournament-class livewells are rounded and aerated with timers to keep your catch lively. Dividers keep bait and/or catch separated. Carpeted tempered aluminum hatch lids are insulated and seal securely. B FORMED-IN KEELS AND EXTRUDED CENTER KEEL Our rounded, extruded center keel is stronger than typical v-shaped keels and adds structural integrity to the hull. Formed-in keels on sides and bottom of our jon boats distribute loads more evenly for improved tracking and planing. ROD STORAGE Locking rod storage on many models accommodates even larger rods, keeping them secure underway and when trailering. | 1 | EXTRUDED RIBS One-piece extruded rib construction offers superior strength over the more common method of multiple rib pieces welded together. Extruded aluminum adds strength and reduces weakening due to stress. F Fishing Equipment Outboard Power That's Second To None Only OMC Offers System Check The Ultimate Early Warning System For Your Engine LOWRANCE Mg LOWRANCE FISH FINDER " Many models feature a premium Lowrance* X-22A fish/depth fioder offering depth capability to 350', selective fish I.D. system aod multiple zoom ranges. D PEDESTAL SEATS Our Everlast™ furniture backs and bases are coostructed of low density polyethylene. This adds structural strength, is light weight and will NEVER rot or become water damaged. Seat back cushions are also removable for easy storage away from the elements. E S L A S T C O M P O N E N T S •PULL OUT DRINK/LORE TRAYS -Handy pull-out drink and lure trays on our pedestal seats keep your favorite tackle (and beverage) close at hand and easy to get to. D ELECTRIC TROLLING MOTOR Maoy Sea Nymph models come with standard Evinrude or Johnson electric trolling motors. Where this is an option, your Sea Nymph is pre-wired with a harness to accept 12 or 12/24 Volt motors depending on the model. TRAILER A quality Shorland'rn trailer com-plete with a 5-year warranty is included with all Sea Nymph fishing models. £ » EVItM S Y S T E M Outboard Early Warning System* I' When you buy a L Sea Nymph, you get * full-featured Evinrude and Johnson power with OMC's exclusive System Check engine monitoring system. System Check is the ultimate in operator early warning systems. Just like in your car, a special gauge alerts the operator with both a horn blast and appropriate warning light for four key engine performance areas: no oil, overheat, restricted fuel flow and low oil. This effectively forewarns you to problems, helping keep damage to a minimum and helping your servicing dealer diagnose the problem. Only Evinrude and Johnson outboards offer System Check, and a host of other premium features. This gives you full featured outboard power nobody else can match. Sea Nymph offers System Check standard on all remote-steer models. 'Standard on all remote-steer models 9.9hp and over plus 40. 50. and 60hp tiller models. 5 TRANSOM HEIGHT SYSTEM *—1 I i — i S 16'5" 14'8" 72" 72" 33.5" 33.5" 21" 21" 15 14 925 835 6 6 650 615 1350 1150 .072 .072 70 40 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 Opt Opt HI Std Std Opt Opt Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt _ Opt _ Out _ Outboard Early Warning System • ('/eft; The FM 161 features a molded helm console-shown with full instru-mentation and an AM/FM stereo cassette (both optional). • (right) Ample locking rod storage is one thing you'll find plenty of on every Fishing Machine, with room for most larger rods too. FM 161 Fishing Machine'"' Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ aod white painted bunk trailer. Optional 50 or 70 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ available. Shown with optional Pro Package • FM 141 Fishing Machine Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ aod white painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package 1 APPROX. HULL WT. LBS. MAX. WEIGHT CAPACITY HULL GAUGE iHmaafliM-..,... Pedestal Fishinq Seats Aerated Livewell w/Divider/Timer Raised Castinq Deck(s) Additional Pedestal Seat Lockable Rod Storaqe Tuf-Dek Aluminum Floor Liner Alum. Console w/Molded Dash 12V Electric Trolling Motor 12/24V Electric Trolling Motor 12 Volt Receptacle Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder AM/FM Stereo Cassette Radio Mooring Cover Painted Roller Trailer Spare Tire & Bracket ' Speedometer f Tachometer 1610' 16' 168' 80" 69" 84" 28" 30.5" 33" 21" 21" 21" 17 15 18 650 775 700 5 6 J8BIJM| 5 LSI Hi EH i l l H HI H B l .090 .072 .090 .090 120 70 120 90 H Opt Std Std II HI Std _ _ HI HI E l B HI B in HI B9 H -m HI Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt _ EH Opt Ell _ EH EH Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt d i E l Opt Opt E l E l Std Opt H E l Std Opt m E l Std Opt m E l Us SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System • (left) Locking rod storage is designed to keep your gear safely stowed while underway or trailering. • (right) Aerated livewells have dividers, a timer and a self-sealing carpeted hatch lid to keep fish lively and secure. FM170 Fishing Machine Standard Package includes 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ white painted bunk trailer and 12/24VOMC electric trolling motor. Optional 70,90 or 115 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. FM 160 Fishing Machine Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ and a white painted bunk trailer. Optional 50 or 70 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Pro Package SC175 Sidewinder™ Standard Package includes 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ Optional 70,90 or 115 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. SC 170 Sidewinder Standard Package includes 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 70 or 90 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Pro Package SPECIFICATIONS LENGTH TRANSOM HEIGHT RIBS MAX. PERSON WT. LBS. MAX. PERSONS CAPACITY APPROX. HULL WT. LBS. MAX. WEIGHT CAPACITY HULL GAUGE Pedestal Seat Bases Pedestal Fishing Seats mm Additional Pedestal Seat Lockable Rod Storage Twin Console w/Molded Dash 12V Electric Trolling Motor 12 Volt Receptacle Tuf-Dek Aluminum FloorLliner Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder AM/FM Stereo Cassette Radio a • -Brake Kit Painted Bunk Trailer Galvanized Bunk Trailer i Painted Roller Trailer Transom Saver ! Tilt/Trim Gauge i TC195 GLS195 GLS175 SS 165 191" 191" 17'4" 1511" 86" 86" 84" 77" 43" 43" 38" 30.5" 21" 21" 21" 21" 17 17 17 14 975 1425 900 675 7 8 7 5 1185 1150 970 795 1500 2000 1600 1100 .100 .100 .090 .072 150 150 120 70 5 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 n E l E l m HI HI H HI 23 HI HI EH E l Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Opt Opt Std Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Std Std Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Outboard Early Warning System • (left) Raised, carpeted bow decks provide convenient under-deck storage for gear and tackle. • (right) Deluxe molded helms feature instrumentation, AM/FM stereo cassette and room for electronics. TC 195 Twin Console Walleye Standard Package includes 70 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ Optiooal 90,115 or 150 HP electric-start outboard available. Gl5l95SpoitfisherTM Standard Package includes 70 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johosoo outboard w/trim/tilt aod OMC System Check™ Optional 90,115 or 150 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Runabout Top GLS175 Spottfisher Standard Package includes 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ Optional 70,90 or 115 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. SSl65Fish-n-Ski Standard Package includes 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 70 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Runabout Top 11 Z7o 3 ^ 85" • B l • i n • 1 825 E l v 6 5 6 4 958 500 610 435 1350 1050 1305 920 1851 1 34 .072 .064 j 1 I 50 35 1 • H 2 2 Opt E l Std St d -Std • - -R E M Std -H I Opt Opt _ _ Opt Opt PI W, 15 M l Opt Opt 1 PI Opt Opt 1 EH -_ Std -KM _ _ SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System* • (left) Rounded, aerated livewells are easy to access and keep your day's catch lively. • (right) Optional OMC electric trolling motors (available on BT165, FM 164 and FM 146) feature a three-speed foot control and a two-blade weedless prop. BT 175 Backtrofler ™ Standard Package includes 40 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 60 HP electric-start tiller outboard w/trim/tilt available. BTl65Backffoller Staodard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnsoo tiller outboard aod white painted bunk trailer. Optiooal 40 HP electric-start tiller outboard and 40 HP electric-start tiller outboard w/trim/tilt available. FM 164 Fishing Machine Staodard Package iocludes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 HP electric-start tiller outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package • 1 L i FM 146 Fishing Machine Standard Package includes 15 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard available. 'Standard on all remote-steer installations starting at 9.9hp and 40, 50 and 60hp tiller models. 13 SV 1880T King'" Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller SV 1666/1666T Mliskie Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 HP electric-start and 40 or 60 HP electric-start Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard tiller outboard w/trim/tilt and O M C System Check™ Steering console kit also available. and steering console kit available. SV 1667 Camp Boat Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or SV 1467 Camp Boat Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional steering console kit available. tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard and steering console kit available. SV 1666WT Mliskie 'M Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard available. 14 SV 1465W/1465WT Mliskie Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard available. S V 1 4 6 5 / 1 4 6 5 T M l i s k i e Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or S V 1 2 5 6 K a r - L i t e Available as boat only. Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard and steering console kit available. S V 1 4 6 2 B i g W a t e r Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson S V 1 0 5 5 K a r - L i t e Available as boat only, tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard and steering console kit available. S V 1 4 5 7 K a r - L i t e ' " Standard Package includes 8 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 15 HP rope-start tiller outboard available. 15 2.7Y SYSTEA/I Outboard Early Warning System • (left) Ra ised cast ing decks feature under -deck storage (all) and a livewell ( T X 1 7 5 only) . Pedesta l f i sh ing seats with E v e r l a s t ™ backs and bases are comfor t contoured for long days on the water, a n d convenient drink/lure t rays keep the necess i t ies of life nearby. • (right) M o l d e d he lm c o n s o l e s feature inst rumentat ion , and opt ional A M / F M stereo cassette. A L o w r a n c e X - 2 2 A fish/depth f inder is standard on the TX 1 7 5 , optional on T X 1 6 5 and 1 5 5 . 15' 61" 42" • 20" E l 21' 13 8 4 4 495 54 0 715 Wfi m TX175 Tournament Pro™ Standard Package includes 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ OMC 12V electric trolling motor and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 70 HP outboard w/trim/tilt available. m m _ Std Std Std m m n EI Opt _ -1 r l TX165 Tournament Pro Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 50 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt H m El m Std Opt Opt TX155 Tournament Pro Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package 17 Mooring Cover Painted Bunk Trailer Galvanized Bunk Trailer Spare Tire & Bracket Transom Saver 2 7* )72 H • i 1 • • 1 Std S I Wm Hal mm Opt •Opt Opt H n Std Opt _ g I kin s I H Bail Opt Opt SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System* • (left) U n d e r - d e c k storage prov ides a place for impor tant gear and supp l ies . • (right) The handy l ivewell on the TX 1 5 0 has r o u n d e d c o r n e r s and an aerator to help keep y o u r catch f resh and lively. Handy rod ho lders help keep y o u r tackle secure . TX 162 Crappie Stick Steer Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 40 HP electric-start outboard a n d 40 HP electric-Start w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package TX 161 Crappie Pro Standard Package i n c l u d e s 30 HP e lect r ic -s tar t Evinrude or Johnson ou tboard with OMC System Check™ and whi te painted bunk trailer. Optional 50 HP electric-Start Outboard W/trim/tilt ava i lab le . Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package TX 150 Crappie Catcher™ Standard Package includes 15 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package "Standard on all remote-steer installations starting at 9.9hp and 40, 50 and 60hp tiller models. 1 9 S1852MTNN Tunnel Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 30 HP electric-start or 35 jet power outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1652T Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 30 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. i ! S1648M Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 25 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1852MT Lunker'"Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 30 HP electric-start or 50 HP electric-start w/trim/lilt and OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. SI648TNN Tunnel Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 28 jet power rope-start tiller jet outboard w/OMC System Check™ Also available, remote-steer 25 HP electric-start or 35 jet power outboard w/OMC System Check™ Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1648 Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 25 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1852T Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 30 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1&48MW Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. nil S1640M Angler Jon Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1848 Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 25 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green Optional Smoke Gray available. Slfj48MPT Lunker Jon Pro Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 50 HP electric-start w/trim/tilt available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1448MW Ixtnker Jon Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1752VCT Lunker'" V Jon Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 50 HP electric-start w/trim/tilt available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1648VV Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 25 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1448M Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and while painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard or remote-steer 25 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. 20 S1652MT Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional remote-steer 30 HP electric-start or 50 HP electric-start w/trimAilt and OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. 'fni'ffirirn S1648MT Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer Optional remote-steer 30 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1448 Lunker Jon Standard Package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard or remote-steer 25 HP electric-start with OMC System Check™ available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. Z78 • (left) Opt ional s i d e - m o u n t e d steer ing c o n s o l e s c o m e comple te with all cab les and engine contro l box . • (center) A n opt ional remote -s teer center c o n s o l e is a lso avai lable for center seat instal lat ion. • (right) Opt ional gear s torage lockers are perfect for keeping rods , g u n s or gear safely s t o w e d . bl440M Anger Jon Standard Package includes 8 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 15 HP rope-start tiller outboard. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1436M Sport Jon Standard Package includes 8 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer Optional 15 HP rope-start tiller outboard available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. L I  S1436L Sport Jon Standard Package includes 8 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 15 HP rope-start tiller outboard available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1436 Sport Jon Standard Package includes 8 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 15 HP rope-start tiller outboard available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S143I Sport Jon Standard Package includes 6 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Color: Olive Drab Green, S1236 Sport Jon Standard Package includes 8 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard and white painted bunk trailer. Optional 10 HP rope-start tiller outboard available. Color: Olive Drab Green. Optional Smoke Gray available. S1231 Spott Jon Available as boat only. Color: Olive Drab Green. S1031 Sport Jon Available as boat only. Color: Olive Drab Green. Beam Bottom width Side depth 00 Max. person capacity Max. person weight lbs. Approx. hull weight Max. weight cap. lbs. Hull gauge 1 I s 1 SPECIFICATIONS 1852MTNN IM! EM EM 10 6 865 Em • K i l l EM 65/45 1852MT 75" 52" 21" 21" 10 6 865 360 1290 .072 65/45 1852T 75" 52" 21" 21" 10 6 865 360 1290 .072 65/45 1848 18' 70" 48" 19" 16" 10 6 755 300 1070 .072 40 1752VCT 17' 74" 52" 21" 21" 11 6 750 330 1130 .072 70/50 1652MT 1510" 75" 52" 21" EM 9 6 750 330 1130 .072 50/35 1652T 1510" 75" 52" 21" 9 6 750 330 1130 .072 50/35 STNN 1510" 70" 48" 19" 9 5 605 285 920 .072 35 164! 5MW mm EM _4 B": E9 El 9 5 605 285 920 .072 35 164! 3MPT H a i t i mm _4 8" 19" 21" 9 5 605 370 920 .072 50 164! IV SISwM mm _4 8" 22" 16" 10 5 605 260 920 .072 40 164! !MT Irani mm 4 3" 21" 21" 9 5 605 285 920 .072 35 1648M 1510" 70" 48" 21" 16" 9 5 605 285 920 .072 35 1648 1510" 70" 48" 19" 16" 9 5 605 285 920 .072 35 1640M 1510" 60" 40" 19" 16" 9 5 680 1—— 225 900 .064 25 14' 70" 48" 21" 16" 7 4 545 240 765 .072 25 1448M SWMJHI KM a 21" 7 4 545 240 765 .072 25 1448 CM EM IM m 7 4 545 240 765 .072 25 1440M 59" 4 19" 8 4 500 195 720 .064 20 1436M 5fi" 36" 17" 8 3 395 175 615 .064 20 1436L 57" 36" 17" 8 3 350 130 530 .050 15 1436 14' 57" 36" 17" m 8 3 395 175 615 .064 20 1431 1310" 46" 31" 13" 5 2 305 100 390 .043 6 1236 12' 56" 36" 17" 6 3 340 155 500 .064 10 1231 1110" 46" 31" 13" 3 2 295 80 335 .043 3 1031 911" 46" 31" 13" 2 2 180 70 275 .043 3 Std - Standard, Opt - Optional Many Sea Nymph Jon Boats available with optional aluminum floor liner kits. See your dealer for details. Z 9 o SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System • (left) Foredeck inc ludes pedestal f i sh ing seats with E v e r l a s t ™ backs and bases and pu l l -out drink/lure trays. Opt ional O M C electr ic t ro l l ing m o t o r ( shown) is avai lable on both the F M 1 8 0 a n d F M 2 0 0 . • (right) C o m f o r t a b l e stern lounge and pedestal d in ing table of the F M 1 8 0 is a perfect place for lunch between casts . 20' 18' 18'9" 152" 8' 8' 23" 21" 10 8 1900 1200 1550 1200 2300 1650 14 20 75 50 4 2 4 2 1 1 Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt J 1 1 _s id 1 td 1 s 1 Opt Opt Opt Opt m FM200 Fishing Machine Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ Optional 50 or 70 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package FM180 Fishing Machine Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ Optional 50 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package 2 3 SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System • (top left) H e l m c o n s o l e features s torage for a removab le 3 4 - q u a r t cooler . • (top right) Conven ient p o p - u p pr ivacy enc losure prov ides a place to change after an af ternoon s w i m . • (bottom left) Comfor tab le aft s u n d e c k is a great place to relax and take in the s u n . • (bottom right) L - s h a p e d stern lounge with s torage beneath w r a p s a r o u n d a p e d e s t a l - m o u n t table. A great place for a s n a c k or m e a l . 24' 20' 237 18'9" 23" 23" 13 10 2200 1900 2170 1550 24 24 115 75 4 _ 9 H 13 12 900 1620 2600 2170 150 115 Opt -Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Std _ 9 J td td S Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt SI S I Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt XL Performance Package: A specially-designed center log with integrated aluminum motor pod and our special Wave-Tamer™ under-deck spray shield, pump up the performance of these pontoons. Enjoy increased speed, a smoother ride in choppy water and improved planing and handling. The XL package also increases the boat's horsepower rating for added skiing/towing capacity. SP240(XL) Family Spoit Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnsoo outboard with OMC System Check™ Optional 50,70,90, 115 or 150 HP* electric-start outboards w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional XL Performance Package *150 HP available w/XL Performance Package only SP200 Family Sport Standard Package includes 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ Optional 50,70 90* or 115* HP electric-start outboards w/trim/tilt available. "90 and 115 HP available w/XL Performance Package only 25 Z8<f SYSTEM 21" 19' 19' 36" 96" 96" 74" 74" 20 18 18 8 7 7 iflil wM mm 375 1500 1500 330 1470 1470 30 130 130 m Hal 1 1 1 1 1 2 7 8 6 4 4 4 - - 4 Pt Opt -td Std Std I Pt Opt Opt td Std Std | Jit Opt Opt td Std Std td Std Std pt Opt Opt td Std Std I Pt Opt Opt td Std Std I • 19 I l l • Ell td 11 Std td Std Std td Std Std td Std Std Outboard Early Warning System • (left) Comfor tab le stern lounge a n d pedesta l d in ing table of the S T 1 9 0 make a great place for relaxing with a snack . • (right) P e d e s t a l - m o u n t f i sh ing seats feature E v e r l a s t ™ backs and bases p lus conven ient pu l l -out drink/lure t rays . ST190 Stinger™ Standard Package includes 70 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim/tilt and OMC System Check™ and white painted bunk trailer. Optiooal 90 or 115 HP electric-start outboard w/trim/tilt available. Shown with optional Deluxe Fishing Package 27 A R B O R ECURITY ~ L A N /iicr Warranty Program The Harbor Security'Plan: The Security You Deserve The Harbor Security Plan gives owners of Sea Nymp boats the added assurance they deserve against costly, unexpected boat repairs. The Harbor Security Plan is designed and backed by the OMC Aluminum Boat Group specifically for owners of our products. We understand your purchase is an expression of trust in us, so we stand behind every boat we build. It's our way of letting you know we'll be there when you need us. With experience, service and an unmatched commitment to customer satisfaction. Ask your authorized Sea Nymph* dealer for details. Thank you for your interest in Sea Nymph- boats, and Welcome Aboard! Your Sea Nymph Dealer Puts Your Fishing First Our past customers have told us a major factor in their decision to purchase a Sea Nymph was their local dealer. That's why we've always been picky about the kind of dealer we choose to represent us. Service tops the list. If a dealer doesn't have a strong service commitment and the facilities to satisfy customer needs, he/she doesn't deal Sea Nymph. Period. We've got over 220 servicing dealers across North America, in the largest cities, and the smallest towns. Knowledgeable, trained and committed to continuing the Sea Nymph tradition of putting more value and satisfied fishing customers on the water. O M C ALUMINUM B O A T G R O U P IVymph mien Fishing Comes First' S e a N y m p h Boats , 2 9 0 0 Industrial Drive, L e b a n o n , M O 6 5 5 3 6 In Canada Contact Outboard Mar ine Corporat ion Of C a n a d a Ltd . , 1994 Fisher Drive, P e t e r b o r o u g h , Ontar io, Canada K 9 J 7 B 6 For Canadian Dealer Informat ion Cal l 7 0 5 - 8 7 6 - 2 6 9 9 Please Read Carefully Dimensions, capacities, ratings and additional specitications plus complete warranty and service information are available Irom your Sea Nymph dealer Product illustrations and data within this catalog ate based upon information available at the time ol publication. Sea Nymph reserves the right to make changes without notice or obligation. Ask your local Sea Nymph dealer for the most current product specifications prior to purchase. Some of the equipment shown separately or on products illustrated in this catalog may be optional at extra cost. Sea Nymph is a member in good standing of the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA). All Sea Nymph boats meet or exceed the standards established by this organization under the NMMA certification program. NMMA establishes standards for flotation, fuel systems, ventilation, electrical and safety. ® Registered trademarks Outboard Marine Corporation. "Trademarks Outboard Marine Corporation. © 1995 Outboard Marine Corporation. fRegistered trademark Lowrance Electronics, Inc. ttRegistered trademark Midwest Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Printed in U.S.A. 12/95 Built to take it. With 12 models ranging in length from 14 to 19 feet, Roughneck Jons are renowned for strength and durability that comes from heavy-gauge, all-welded construction. Some jons come with livewells, remote-steer packages and other features. Whether you enjoy hunting waterfowl or angling for lunkers, Roughneck has a jon boat designed to fit your needs and your budget, too. 7J&7 SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System* Heavy Duty%k)ns FEATURES/OPTIONS Painted Bunk Trailer Galvinized Bunk Trailer Spare Tire & Bracket Raised Bow Deck Rounded Formed-ln Keels Formed-ln Spray Rails Transom Handles (2) Transom Drain Plug Transom Saver Tuf-Deck™ Aluminum Floor Liner Aluminum Floor Liner Heavy Duty Knee Brace Extruded Gunwales Gravity-Fed Livewell Aerated Livewell Bow Storage Side Steering Console Center Steering Console Std-Standard. Opt-Optional ritions starting at 9.9hp. 1436 1960MHT0 1960MHT 1 •360/1760M1 1 1752VT 1648WT- v 1648VPT 1548VTN 1542¥/¥T 1 34£/ I 34£ 1 Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt - - - -Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std -Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std Std - - Std Std Std Std - Std Std Std Std - _ - Std - - - - - Std Std Opt Opt Opt - - - - - - - - -Std Std - - - - - - - - - -- -/Opt - Opt - - - - - - -- - Std - Std Std Std Std Std Std Std — - Std - Std Std Std Std Std Std -- Std - - Opt - - - - - Std -Std Std _ Std Opt Opt Std Std Std Std Opt - Std Opt Opt Opt -Std - Opt - - Opt - - - - -OPTIONAL S I D E - M O U N T E D S T E E R I N G C O N S O L E S C O M E C O M P L E T E WITH A L L C A B L E S A N D ENGINE C O N T R O L B O X . S Y S T E M SPECIFICATIONS 1960MHTD 1960MHT - 960/1760MT 1752VT Length 19' 19' 19717' 16'11" Beam 83" 83" 83" 74" Side depth 21.5" 21.5" 21.5" 21" Transom height 21" 21" 21" 21" Max. person capacity 7 7 9/8 6 Max. person weight capacity 925 975 1185/1035 750 Maximum weight capacity 1550 1400 1500/1350 1130 Approximate hull weight 920 610 500/460 370 Hull gauge .125 .100 .100 .100 Horsepower capacity 90 80 80(r)50(t)/ 65(r)40(t) 70(r) 50(t) SPECIFICATIONS 1648WT 1648VPT 1648VT 1548VTN Length 15'10" 15'10" 15' 10" 14'9" Beam 70" 74" 74" 70" Side depth 21" 21" 21" 19" Transom height 21" 21" 21" 20" Max. person capacity 5 5 5 4 Max. person weight capacity 605 605 605 480 Approximate hull weight 320 390 350 380 Hull gauge .080 .100 .100 .090 Horsepower capacity 35 50 50(r) 40(t) 40 SPECIFICATIONS 1542V/VT 1542/1542T 1448 1436 Length 14'11" 14'11" 14' 14' Beam 63" 63" 70" 57" Side depth 20" 20" 19" 17" Transom height 16"/21" 16"/21" 16" 16" Max. person capacity 4 5 3 3 Max. person weight capacity 540 635 435 395 Approximate hull weight 250 250 305 190 Hull gauge .090 .090 .090 .080 Horsepower capacity 30 25 30 20 Outboard Early Warning System Outboard Power As Tough As You Are. Only OMC Offers System Check" The Ultimate Early Warning System For Your Engine. When you buy a Roughneck, you can depend on durable, full-featured Evinrude' and Johnson" power. And now. on select power options enjoy the security of OMC's exclusive System Check engine monitoring system. System Check is the ultimate in operator early warning systems. Just like in your car, a special gauge alerts the operator with both a horn blast and appropriate warning light for four key engine performance areas: no oil, overheat, restricted fuel flow and low oil. This effectively forewarns you to problems, helping keep damage to a minimum and also helps your servicing dealer diagnose the problem. Only Evinrude and Johnson outboards offer System Check, and a host of other premium features. That's full-featured outboard power nobody else can match. Roughneck offers System Check standard on all remote-steer models from 9.9 horsepower up. Tougher By Design. (r) - remote (t) - tiller O P T I O N A L G E A R S T O R A G E L O C K E R S A R E P E R F E C T FOR K E E P I N G R O D S , G U N S O R G E A R S A F E L Y S T O W E D . Plenty of boat builders talk about "tough"- it's an easy word to throw around. Delivering on that promise is another thing. For Roughneck, delivering a uniquely rugged product has been status quo from the beginning. That's because everything from the material we use to the skilled craftsmen who build our boats is specifically selected to produce a superior product from the start. We use only specific grades of top quality .090 and. 100 heavy gauge aluminum. This, combined with precise welding methods, ensures maximum strength at hull seams-not weakened or brittle joints common where poor welding or a lesser grade stock was used. All top-notch-right down to each and every craftsmen on our production line. Could we build a cheaper boat? Sure. But when your grandkids are still enjoying the boat you buy today, you'll be glad we didn't. WW* .TART EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (SIDE riVEN OR 28 JET POWER ROPE-START JET OUTBOARD riONAL) iVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD WITH OMC SYSTEM RIM/TILT AND OMC SYSTEM CHECK™ OPTIONAL) m [START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (SIDE CONSOLE IMC SYSTEM CHECK™ OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB 15' Guide Jon n o u g h n e s c f c STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 15 HP ROPE-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (25 HP TILLER ELECTRIC OR SIDE CONSOLE REMOTE STEER 25 HP (1542V)/ 30 HP (1542VT) WITH OMC SYSTEM CHECK™ OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) 15' Guide Jon STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 15 HP ROPE-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (25 HP TILLER ELECTRIC-START OUTBOARD OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) 14'Guide Jon STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 15 HP ROPE-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (25 HP TILLER ELECTRIC 40 HP ROPE-START JET OUTBOARD OMC SYSTEM CHECK™ OPTIONAL) ALSO AVAILABLE SIDE CONSOLE REMOTE STEER 25 HP ELECTRIC OUTBOARD WITH OMC SYSTEM CHECK™. COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) 14'Jon VINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD W/OMC SYSTEM CHECK™ ONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 8 HP ROPE-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (15 HP TILLER OUTBOARD OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) Hulk Deluxe STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 30 HP ELECTRIC-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD W/OMC SYSTEM CHECK™ (50 OR 70 HP W/TRIM/TILT OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) Hulk :.j«-|-psr, ratmmf 0 m J & ••••-MmmmmP STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 30 HP ELECTRIC-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD W/OMC SYSTEM CHECK™. ALUMINUM CENTER CONSOLE W/FRONT STORAGE SEAT. (50 HP OR 70 HP ELECTRIC-START W/TRIM/TILT OPTIONAL). COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPT.) 17'and 19'Husky Jon STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 25 HP TILLER ELECTRIC-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (SIDE CONSOLE PACKAGE WITH 30 HP ELECTRIC OR 50 HP - PLUS 70 HP ON 1960 MT - W/TRIM/TILT AND OMC SYSTEM CHECK™ OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) 17' Pro Series STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 25 HP TILLER ELECTRIC-START EVINRUDE OR JOHNSON OUTBOARD. (SIDE CONSOLE PACKAGE WITH REMOTE STEER 30 HP ELECTRIC OUTBOARD, 50 HP OR 70 HP W/TRIM/TILT AND OMC SYSTEM CHECK ™ OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) 16' Pro Series Walk Thru i R o u y l - i i - i e j c l t STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 25 HP TILLER ELECTRIC CONSOLE PACKAGE WITH REMOTE STEER 30 HP PROP-D OPTIONAL) COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY 0 16' Pro Series STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 30 HP ELECTRIC-START CHECK™. (SIDE CONSOLE WITH REMOTE STEER 50 HP W COLOR: OLIVE DRAB GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) 16' Pro Series STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 25 HP TILLER ELECTRI WITH REMOTE STEER 30 HP OR 50 HP W/TRIM/TILT ANC GREEN (SMOKE GRAY OPTIONAL) 15' Pro Series STANDARD PACKAGE INCLUDES: 30 HP ELECTRIC-STAR (35 JET POWER OUTBOARD W/OMC SYSTEM CHECK™ 0 Take on the tough stuff. Whether you're fishing rocky shorelines or stick-up timbers, a Roughneck Jon Bass is built to take It. From its heavy-gauge aluminum hull to its full complement of standard fishing features, these Roughnecks are built for battle. Features like rounded aerated livewells and molded pedestal fishing seats. The 150 and 160 models have optional fishing packages featuring Lowrance X-22A fish/depth finder and an OMC electric trolling motor; the 170 offers a Lowrance X-22A fish/depth finder, OMC trolling motor and an additional aerated livewell standard. Consider its Evinrude or Johnson outboard plus equality, painted bunk-style trailer and you've got a tough boat value that's even tougher to beat. SPECIFICATIONS 160 Length 15'11" Beam 72" Side depth 21" Transom height 21" Max. person capacity 4 Max. person weight capacity 600 Maximum weight capacity 985 Approximate hull weight 675 Hull gauge .100 Horsepower capacity 70 FEATURES/OPTIONS 160 FEATURED/OPTIONS (cont'd] 160 Pedestal Seats 2 12/24W Trailing Motor Pedestal Seat Bases 2 Harness w/Plug S«d Aerated Livewell(s) 1 12 Volt Receptacle Std i Raised Casting Deck(s) 2 Painted Bunk Trailer Std Std Tuf-Dek™ Alum. Floor Liner Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt I Lockable Rod Storage Std Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Molded Console Std Transom Saver Opt Opt 12V Electric Trolling Motor Opt Speedometer Std Opt 1224V Electric Trolling Motor - Tachometer Std Opt Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Opt Voltmeter Std opt j 12V Trolling Motor Fuel Gauge -Harness w/Plug Std Tilt/Trim Gauge -•StandjtlOpt-0 17' Bass Outboard Early Warning System S T A N D A R D P A C K A G E I N C L U D E S : 50 H P E L E C T R I C - S T A R T E V I N R U D E OR J O H N S O N O U T B O A R D W/TRIM/TILT A N D O M C S Y S T E M C H E C K " (70 H P W/TRIM/TILT O P T I O N A L ) C O L O R : P E W T E R 16' Bass S T A N D A R D P A C K A G E I N C L U D E S : 30 H P E L E C T R I C - S T A R T E V I N R U D E OR J O H N S O N O U T B O A R D A N D O M C S Y S T E M C H E C K " (50 H P OR 70 H P W/TRIM/TILT O P T I O N A L ) C O L O R : P E W T E R 15' Bass S T A N D A R D P A C K A G E I N C L U D E S : 30 H P E L E C T R I C - S T A R T E V I N R U D E OR J O H N S O N A N D O M C S Y S T E M C H E C K " (50 H P W/TRIM/TILT O P T I O N A L ) C O L O R : P E W T E R ( S H O W N WITH O P T I O N A L F I S H I N G P A C K A G E ) R O O M Y A E R A T E D L I V E W E L L S H A V E R O U N D E D C O R N E R S A N D S U R E - S E A L I N G A L U M I N U M LIDS. Shallow-minded boats. If you measure your favorite fishing stream in inches rather than feet, then a Roughneck Tunnel Jet boat may be just the ticket. Roughneck's special tunnel hull design, combined with jet outboard power, allows running in as little as three inches* of water - taking you places conventional propeller-driven craft simply can't. SINCE T H E J E T ' S L O W E R UNIT IS S A F E L Y A B O V E T H E H U L L B O T T O M , U N D E R W A T E R O B S T A C L E S A R E N ' T A S LIKELY T O C A U S E D A M A G E A S WITH P R O P E L L E R - D R I V E N O U T B O A R D S . T i m e ! J e t s SPECIFICATIONS 1968JCN 1768JCN 1655JN Length 17' 17' 15'10" Beam 82" 82" 82" 75" Side depth 27.5™ 27.5" 27.5" 22.5" Transom height 24.75" 24.75" 24.75" 20" Max. person capacity 8 7 7 6 Max. person weight capacity 1035 925 925 750 Maximum weight capacity 1450 1350 1350 1130 Approximate hull weight 1025 880 950 435 Hull gauge .100 .100 .100 .090 Horsepower capacity 140 120 120 80 'When operated by an experienced jet op> j FEATURES/OPTIONS Painted Bunk Trailer Galvinized Bunk Trailer Spare Tire & Bracket Raised Bow Deck Raised Stern Deck Bilge Pumps (2) Transom Spray Deflector Transom Saver Tuf-Deck™ Aluminum Floor Liner (Vinyl covered) Aluminum Floor Liner 14 Gallon Saddle Fuel Tanks (2) Wide Extruded Gunwales Bow Storage Std • Standard, Opt - Optional 1968JCN 1768JCN 1768JWN 1655JN Std Std Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Std Std - -Std Std Std -Std Std Std -Std Std Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt : Std Std Opt Opt Opt Opt -Std Std Std Std - - Std -R U G G E D , H E A V Y - G A U G E A L U M I N U M H U L L S , S T R U C T U R A L S U P P O R T A N D E X P E R T W E L D I N G A R E R O U G H N E C K T R A D E M A R K S . NOTICE TO OPERATORS: Roughneck outboard tunnel jet boats am specifically intended for use in shallow streams and rivers where underwater obstructions would pose a hazard to a conventional propeller-—driven outboard. Handling of these outboard jet powered crafts differs from that of conventional boats and allows sharper turning through careful coordination of throttle and steering controls. For these reasons, we recommend considerable practice on smooth, open water before attempting to manuever near obstructions. Consult your Roughneck dealer with questions concerning particular applications. "Batteries shown available through dealer only. 19' Tunnel Jet Center Console S T A N D A R D P A C K A G E I N C L U D E S - : 80 J E T P O W E R E L E C T R I C - S T A R T E V I N R U D E OR J O H N S O N J E T O U T B O A R D W / O M C S Y S T E M C H E C K ™ ( 1 0 5 J E T P O W E R O P T I O N A L ) C O L O R : G R A Y ( S H O W N WITH O P T I O N A L S A D D L E F U E L T A N K S ) 17' Tunnel Jet Center Console S T A N D A R D P A C K A G E I N C L U D E S * : 80 J E T P O W E R E L E C T R I C - S T A R T E V I N R U D E OR J O H N S O N J E T O U T B O A R D W / O M C S Y S T E M C H E C K ™ ( 1 0 5 J E T P O W E R O P T I O N A L ) C O L O R : G R A Y 17' Tunnel Jet Walk-Thru ***** S T A N D A R D P A C K A G E I N C L U D E S * : 80 J E T P O W E R E L E C T R I C - S T A R T E V I N R U D E OR J O H N S O N J E T O U T B O A R D W / O M C S Y S T E M C H E C K ™ ( 1 0 5 J E T P O W E R O P T I O N A L ) C O L O R : G R A Y 16' Tunnel Jet Side Console \J65m\JN\ S T A N D A R D P A C K A G E I N C L U D E S * : 3 5 J E T P O W E R E V I N R U D E OR J O H N S O N J E T O U T B O A R D W / O M C S Y S T E M C H E C K ™ (80 J E T P O W E R O P T I O N A L ) C O L O R : G R A Y H A R B O R S E C U R I T Y P L A N Owner Warranty Program The Harbor Security"Plan: The Security You Deserve The Harbor Security Plan gives owners of Roughneck boats the added assurance they deserve against costly, unexpected boat repairs. The Harbor Security Plan is designed and backed by the OMC Aluminum Boat Group specifically for owners of our products. We understand your purchase is an expression of trust in us, so we stand behind every boat we build. It's our way of letting you know we'll be there when you need us. With experience, service and an unmatched commitment to customer satisfaction. Ask your authorized Roughneck dealer for details. Thank you for your interest in Roughneck boats, and Welcome Aboard! Roughneck Boats AsToughAsYouAreM R o u g h n e c k A l u m i n u m Boats 2 9 0 0 Industrial Drive, L e b a n o n , M O 6 5 5 3 6 1 - 8 0 0 - O M C - 4 F U N In Canada Contact Outboard Mar ine Corporat ion Of Canada Ltd . , 1994 Fisher Drive, P e t e r b o r o u g h , Ontar io, Canada K 9 J 7 B 6 For Canadian dealer in format ion call 1 - 7 0 5 - 8 7 6 - 2 6 9 9 Please Read Carefully: Dimensions, capacities, ratings and additional specifications plus complete warranty and service information are available from your Roughneck dealer. Product data within this brochure is based upon information available at the time of publication. Roughneck reserves the right to make changes without notice or obligation. Ask your local Roughneck dealer for the most current product specifications prior to purchase. Some of the equipment shown separately or on products illustrated in this catalog may be optional at extra cost. Roughneck is a member in good standing of the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA). All Roughneck boats meet or exceed the standards established by this organization under the NMMA certification program. NMMA certification establishes standards for flotation, fuel systems, ventilation, electrical and safety. ©tf.995 Outboard Marine Corporation. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. 11/95 OMC ALUMINUM B O A T G R O U P The Grurrurian Great Value Advantage: A Lot More For A Lot Less. Many models feature a premium Lowrance' X-22A fish/depth finder offering depth capability to 350', selective fish I.D. system and multiple zoom ranges. Hull seams on our Deep-V models are double riveted adding strength and durability to potential high-stress points on the hull. A quality Shorland'r f t trailer complete with a 5-year warranty is included with all Grumman fishing models. One-piece extruded rib construction offers superior strength over the more common method of multiple rib pieces welded together. Extruded aluminum adds strength and reduces weakening due to stress. TUf-Dek A L L A L U M I N U M F L O O R I N G Exclusive Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floors combine high structural strength and light weight, and are especially resistant to ever-changing climatic conditions. JL9* Locking rod storage on many models accommo-dates even larger rods, keeping them secure underway and when trailering. Many Grumman models come with standard Evinrude® or Johnson® electric trolling motors. Where this is an option, your Grumman is pre-wired with a harness to accept 12 or 12/24 Volt motors depending on the model. Our Everlast™ furniture backs and bases are constructed of low density polyethylene. This adds structural strength, is light weight and will NEVER rot or become water damaged. EZ^LAST C O M P O N E N T S Get Greater Value From Your Outboard Motor Aerated livewells keep your catch lively. On some models, dividers keep bait and/or catch separated. Our rounded, extruded center keel is stronger than typical v-shaped keels and adds structural integrity to the hull. Formed-in keels on sides and bottom of our jon boats distribute loads more evenly for improved tracking and planing. v mm Only OMC Offers System Check™ The Ultimate Early Warning System For Your Engine When you buy a Grumman, you get full-featured Evinrude9 and Johnson9 power with OMC's exclusive System Check engine monitoring system. System Check is the ultimate in operator early warning systems. Just like in your car, a special gauge alerts the operator with both a horn blast and appropriate warning light for four key engine performance areas: no oil, overheat, restricted fuel flow and low oil. This effectively forewarns you to problems, helping keep damage to a minimum and helping your servicing dealer diagnose the problem. Only Evinrude and Johnson outboards offer System Check, and a host of other premium features. This gives you full-featured outboard power nobody else can match. Grumman offers System Check standard on all remote-steer models 9.9 hp and over, plus 40, 50 and 60 hp tiller models. Z 9 9 Whether you like to spend your time on the water pulling w\ lunker fish from a favorite fishing hole or pulling water skiers around the lake, Grumman has a Lake V that's sure to fit your needs, and your budget.ftw^^^^and ^^ ^^ 5^  Super Pro and Pro Backtroller fishing machines to 16 and 19 foot Fish-n-Skis with twin consoles, Grumman has a total 1 boats in their deep-V line up, all loaded with a host of G e t t h e m o s t o u t o f o u r d a y . . standard features guaranteed to help you get the most enjoyment w from your day on the water. And to help you get to where you want to go quickly and easily, Evinrude and Johnson outboards provide marine power you can depend on. And at day's end, you can load your rig onto a painted bunk trailer. So no matter if you like to fish, ski, or both, a Lake-Vmakes perfect sense day in and day out. EVERY SUPER PRO & MASTER FISH PACKAGE INCLUDES THESE STANDARD FEATURES: SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System' Aerated livewell 12V trolling motor harness Navigation lights with storage clips Bow storage Evinrude/Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ Extruded keels Molded pedestal fishing seats with Everlast™ backs/bases Aluminum side console ge pump • Marine carpet Emergency ignition stop switch Marine grade aluminum alloy certified U N D E R S E A T S T O R A G E L O C K A B L E R O D S T O R A G E Features shown available on select models. I N - F L O O R S T O R A G E C O M P L E I N S T R U M E N T P A C K A G E 2 Ox> . . . a n d y o u r d o l l a r . 5 ^ pi** FEATURES/OPTIONS Raised Casting Deck 17SP 1 16SP 1 16B 2 1666SP 1 1465SP SPECIFICATIONS Length 17SP 17'6" 15'11" 16B 15'8" 1666SP 1 6 1 " 1465SP 1 4 T Pedestal Seats/Bases* 2/5 1/3 2/2 1/2 1/2 Beam 85" 77" 77" 68" 68" Additional Pedestal Seat Opt Opt - Opt Opt Bottom width 69" 60" 60" 47" 47" Lockable Rod Storage Std Std Std - - Bow depth 38" 30.5" 28" 28" 28" 12V Electric Trolling Motor Sid Std Std Opt Op! Transom height 21" 21" 21" 21" 21" Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Std Std Opt Opt 12 Volt Receptacle Std Std Std Ribs 17 18 18 12 10 Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Opi Opt Person capacity 5 6 5 5 4 Painted Bonk Trailer Std Std Std Std Std Persons weight capacity 700 770 675 610 590 Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Maximum weight capacity 1250 1200 1100 925 905 Painted Roller Trailer Op; Opt Opt - Approximate hull weight 955 680 715 530 465 Spare Tire & Bracket Opi - Opt Opt Opi Hull gauge .090 .072 .072 .064 .064 Brake Kit Opt Opt - - - Horsepower capacity 120 70 70 40 30 ' In addition to standard locking helm seat, t Standard on all remote-steer installations from 9.9 hp. Deep -V versatilil EVERY FISH-N-SKI PACKAGE INCLUDES THESE STANDARD FEATURES: SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System' White, painted bunk trailer AM/FM Stereo 12V receptacle Trolling motor harness Full instrumentation Evinrude/Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ Walk-thru windshield Twin console with molded dash Glove box • Bow storage Aerated livewell • Bilge pump Molded pedestal seats with Everlast™ backs/bases certified C O M P L E T E I N S T R U M E N T P A C K A G E P A S S E N G E R ' S S E A T G L O V E B O X A E R A T E D L I V E W E L L Features shown available on select models. F E A T U R E S / O P l l O N S 19TC 17TC 16TC Pedestal Seats/Bases" 2/5 2/5 2/4 Additional Pedestal Seat Opt Opt Opt Lockable Rod/Ski Storaqe Std Std -12V Electric Trolling Motor - - Opt Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Std Opt Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt i Bow Deck Cushions Opt Opt Opt i Canvas/Canopies/Curtains Opt Opt Opt I Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt I Painted Roller Trailer Opt Opt Opt I Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Opt Brake Kit Opt - -Trim/tilt gauge Sid Std -SPECIFICATIONS 19TC 17TC 16TC Lenqth 191 ' 17'6" 1511" Beam 86" 85" 77" Bow depth 43" 38" 30.5' Transom height 21" 21" 21" Ribs 17 17 18 Person capacity 8 5 5 Persons weight capacity 1425 700 675 Maximum weight capacity 2000 1250 1100 Approximate hull weight 1120 1045 795 Hull gauge .100 .090 .072 Horsepower capacity 150 70 In addition to standard locking helm seat, t Standard on all remote-steer installations from 9.9 hp. FEATURES/OPTIONS Pedestal Seats/Bases Aerated Livewell(s) Additional Pedestal Seat iti l r Lockable Rod 12V Electric T Lowrance Fist 4 t i f . u n _ « _ _ rolling Motor h/Depth Finder 12 Volt Receptacle Mooring Cover Galvanized Bunk Trailer Painted Roller Trailer Spare Tire & Bracket Transom Saver Fuel Opt Opt Opt Std Std Opi Std Opt Opt Opt Std Op Opt Opt Opt Opt Opi 3*3 s P E C i n c A n o N S 16P 1666P 1465P Lenqth 15'11" 161" 141" Beam 77" 68" 68" Bottom width 60" 47" 47" Bow depth 30.5" 28" 28" Transom height 21" 21" 21" Ribs 18 12 10 Person capacity 6 5 4 Persons weight capacity 770 610 590 Maximum weight capacity I'50 900 905 Approximate hull weight 600 500 440 Hull gauge , J 7 2 .064 .064 Horsepower capacity 50 40 30 16P L a k e V s . 16's a n d 14 EVERY PRO BACKTROLLER AND SUPER PRO DELUXE PACKAGE INCLUDES THESE STANDARD FEATURES: • White, painted bunk trailer • Bow storage • Bilge pump • Aerated livewell • Extruded keels • 12V Trolling motor harness • Navigation lights with storage clips • Evinrude/Johnson outboard • Molded pedestal seats with Everlast™ backs/bases • Marine carpet i certified • IN-FLOOR S T O R A G E *»• ROD S T O R A G E So4 No matter what type of light tackle angler you are - catch and release or catch and cook - you're sure to appreciate Grumman's Jon Bass, Panfish and Mod-Vseries. These are quality, aluminum fishing boats, designed specifically for your kind of fishing. Anglers can choose from five boats that come in 15, Wand 17 foot lengths, with modified-V hulls, and depend-able Evinrude and Johnson power. The 15 foot Rogue Bass and Y o u r k i n d o f b o a t . . . | the 17 foot Outla w Bass both feature console steering and the 16 foot Renegade comes in three models - console, stick-steer, and tiller rig. If your idea of fishing is prowling the backwaters in search of a trophy bass or a stringer full of panfish, you owe it to yourself to check out these serious fishing machines from Grumman. After all, they were designed and built with anglers like you in mind. Jo Jon Bass, Panfish a n d M o d V s » • A E R A T E D L I V E W E L L • T R O L L I N G M O T O R & F I S H F I N D E R Features shown available on select models. R O D H O L D E R S LOOK FOR THESE STANDARD FEATURES ON EVERY ROGUE, RENEGADE AND OUTLAW PACKAGES: • Lowrance X-22A fish/depth finder • Tuf-Dek aluminum floor liner • 12V Trolling motor harness • 12V,3-speed electric trolling motor • White, painted bunk trailer • Wide extruded gunnels • Full length extruded center keel • Evinrude/Johnson outboard with OMC System Check™ • Aluminum console with molded dash • Navigation lights with storage clips • Aerated livewell • N M M A certified Outboard Early Warning System 3e 9 I B * " " ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ FEATURES/OPTIONS Seats 1749B 4 2 1649T 2 1649SC 4 1542B 4 SPECIFICATIONS Length 1749B 17 1649SS 1510" 1649T 1510" 1649SC 1510" 1542B 1411" Raised Casting Deck(s) 2 - - — 2 Beam 68" 68" 68" 68" 63" Lockable Rod Storage Std - - _ - Bottom width 49" 49" 49" 49" 42" Molded Console S:d - - - Std Side depth 21" 21" 21" 21" 20" 12V Electric Trolling Motor Std Std Std Std Opt Transom height 20" 20" 20" 20" 20" Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Std Std Std Opt Ribs 12 11 11 11 9 Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opi Opt Opt r Opt Opt Person capacity 5 5 5 5 7^ 4 Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Persons weight capacity 690 700 700 685 540 Speedometer Std _ Opt Maximum weight capacity 1240 1080 1080 1060 855 Tachometer Std - _ Opt - Approximate hull weight 675 515 son 535 520 Voltmeter Std - - Opt - Hull gauge 072 .072 .072 .072 .064 Fuel Gauge Std - - Horsepower capacity 70 40 60 40 J o ? H a r d - w o r k i n g U t i l i t y V s & J o n B o a t s If it's portability and lasting quality you're looking for, look to a Grumman Utility V or Jon Boat. The Utilities range from a 10' cartop model to 16' tiller models with optional console steering kits. The Jons feature modified-V and flat-bottom hull designs and range in size from 10 to 18 feet. And like all Grummans, their quality and durability make^f them a real boating value, both today and for years to come. 1666WT 1666WT Split Seat Fisherman base package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer, port livewell. 25 HP electric tiller outboard, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 1465W/1465WT14' Split Seat Fisherman base package includes 15 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer, port livewell. 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 1666/1666T16' Fisherman base package includes 15 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. 25 HP electric tiller outboard, galvanized trailer optional. 1465 /1465T14' Fisherman base package includes 15 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 145714' Cartopper base package includes 8 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. 15 HP rope-start tiller outboard, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 125612' Cartopper available as non-package only. 105510' Cartopper available as non-package only. ^SPECIFICATIONS Maximum weight capacity Approximate hull weight 320 320 235 235 195 195 128 100 Hull .064 .064 .064 .064 .064 .064 .064 .051 .051 .051 Horsepower capacity 40 30 30 30 25 25 15 10 3fo A D J U S T A B L E C O N S O L E S E A T M O U N T C E N T E R C O N S O L E • U T I L I T Y S T O R A G E B O X Options shown available on most models. 1848MT 1648M 1848MT18' Ultra Jon MVB base package includes 25 HP tiller electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Side console - remote steer, 30 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 1648M16' Ultra Jon MVB base package includes 25 HP electric-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Side console - remote steer, 25 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check, aluminum floor liner, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 1648MRT 1542M 1448M 1436M 1436 1648MRT16' Ultra Ranger Jon MVB base package includes 25 HP electric-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Side console - remote steer, 30 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check, aluminum floor liner, galvanized bunk trailer I 1542M15' Trophy Jon MVB base package includes 15 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard, galvanized bunk trailer optional, 1448N114' Ultra Jon MVB base package includes 15 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. Side console - remote steer, 25 HP electric-start outboard with OMC System Check, 25 HP electric-start tiller outboard, aluminum floor liner, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 1436M14' Scout Jon MVB base package includes 8 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, painted bunk trailer. 15 HP rope-start tiller outboard, galvanized bunk trailer optional. 1436 14 Scout Jon base package includes 8 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, 1236 1231 1031 123612' Scout Jon base package includes 8 HP rope-start tiller Evinrude or Johnson outboard, linted bunk trailer. 10 HP rope-start tiller outboard, iffer o " 123112' Scout Jon available as non-package only, 103110' Scout Jon available as non-package only. .15 HP rope-start t galvanized bunk trailer optional. SPECIFICATIONS 1848MT 1 6 4 8 M R T 1648M 1542M 1448M I436M 1436 1 2 3 6 1231 1 0 3 1 Length 18' 1510" 1510" 1411" 14 14' 14' 12' 1110" 911" Beam 70" 70" 70" 65" 70" 56" 57" 56" 46" 46" Bottom width 48" 48" 48" 42" 48" 36" 36" 36" 31" 31" Side depth 21" 21" 21" 20" 21" 17" 17" 17" 13" 13" Transom height 21" 21" 16" 15" 16" 16" 16" 16* 15" 15" Ribs 10 9 9 7 7 8 3 6 3 2 Seats 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Person capacity 6 5 5 5 4 3 3 3 2 2 Persons weight capacity 755 605 605 635 545 395 395 340 295 180 Maximum weight capacity 1070 920 920 855 765 615 615 500 335 275 Approximate hull weight 300 285 285 210 240 170 170 155 80 70 Hull gauge .072 .072 .072 .064 .072 .064 .064 .064 .043 .043 Horsepower capacity 40 35 35 25 25 20 20 10 3 3 t Standard on all remote-steer installations from 9.9 hp. 311 Grumman Pontoons and Deckboats: The Best limes it The Best Value Convenient privacy enclosures set up There's plenty of under-seat storage on Special pressure-treated wood floors easily and make great on-board your Grumman pontoon or deckboat to combine high structural strength and a changing rooms. keep gear and supplies. limited lifetime warranty for added value. I TUf-Dek A L L A L U M I N U M F L O O R I N G ;  Exclusive Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floors found on Grumman deckboats combine high structural strength and light weight, and are especially resistant to ever-changing climatic conditions. T ' Many Grumman pontoon and deckboat models are available with optional Evinrude or Johnson electric trolling motors. Your Grumman is pre-wired with a harness to accept 12 or 12/24 Volt motors depending on the model Our Everlast™ furniture backs and bases are constructed of low density polyethylene. This adds structural strength, is light weight and will NEVER rot or become water damaged. C O M P O N E N T S MonoHull design Deckboats feature Grumman's patented Monohull design which provides the agility and speed of a runabout with the room and amenities of a pontoon boat. A quality Shorland'r trailer complete with a 5-year warranty is included with Grumman deckboat models. Aerated livewells available on most models keep your catch lively. On some models, dividers keep bait and/or catch separated. S Y S T E M Many models feature a premium Lowrance X-22A fish/depth finder offering depth capability to 350', selective fish I.D. system and multiple zoom ranges. All Grumman pontoons and deckboats include dependable Evinrude or Johnson outboard power with OMC's exclusive System Check™ early warning system-added protection for your investment. Special entry ladders (standard on deckboats) provide easier boarding for swimmers or skiers. 19 Fun Ship; Sportfish" & Fisn-n-Fun" Wkf LOOK FOR THESE w STANDARD FEATURES ON PONTOON PACKAGES: • AM/FM Stereo cassette radio • Molded pedestal seats with Everlast™ backs/bases • Evinrude/Johnson outboard S Y S T E M with OMC System Check K?wP • Quiet-Ride rails and fencing™ ^MJOU • Full instrumentation C H E C K " • Bimini top W i t h bOOt Outboard Early •12V receptacle Warning System • 12V Trolling motor wiring harness 34-quart cooler • Extruded aluminum "M" brackets i • Pressure-treated wood deck with I I mount table with drink holders • Under-deck spray deflectors • NMMA certified P R I V A C Y E N C L O S U R E A E R A T E D L I V E W E L L • D I N E T T E T A B L E - U N D E R S E A T S T O R A G E Features s h o w n available on select mode ls . 3 ^ F E A T U R E S / O P T I O N S 18FN1 Livewell Pedestal Seats 12V Electric Trolling Motor Opt Opt 12V Trolling Motor Harness Std Std Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Opt Opt Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Opt Propane Grill Std Bow Sleeper Seat Conversion Opt Wave-Tamer™ Spray Shield S P E C I F I C A T I O N S 1 8 F N F 2 0 S P 2 4 F S Pontoon length 18' 20' 20' 24" Deck length 15 2' 18*9" 18'9" i Beam B 8' 8' Pontoon diameter 21" 23" 23" 23" Fuel capacity 20 gal. 20 gal. 13 gal. 20 gal. Person capacity 8 10 10 13 Persons weight capacity 1200 1900 1900 2200 Maximum weight capacity 1650 2300 2300 2600 Approximate hull weight 1200 1550 1600 2170 Horsepower capacity 50 75 76 115 1 ^PM* J 3f* FEATURES/OPTIONS SD19 SD22 Raised Casting Deck 1 1 Aerated Livewell 1 1 Pedestal Seat Bases 2 2 Pedestal Seats 2 2 (Opt) 12/24V Electric Trolling Motor Opt Opt Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Opt Opt Moorinq Cover Opt Opt Ski Tow Eye Opt Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Transom Saver Opt Opt Full instrumentation Std Std SPECIHCATIONS S D 1 9 Length 19' 221" Beam 96" 96" Bottom width 74" 74" Ribs 18 19 Person capacity 7 8 Persons weight capacity 920 1080 Maximum weight capacity 1470 1630 Approximate hull weight 1500 2300 Hull gauge .090 .090 Horsepower capacity 130 130 9B« 2 2 Outboard Early Warning System 12V receptacle White, painted bunk trailer Quiet-Ride™ rails and fencing Bimini top with boot Evinrude/Johnson outboard with OMC System Check Aerated livewell • Lockable rod/ski storage pedestal seats with Evertast™ backs/bases Pressure-treated wood deck witl limited lifetime warranty Removable 34-quart cooler Bow and stem lounges with padded armrests Sunpad and storage area • Navigation light with storage clip • NMMA certified I N - F L O O R S T O R A G E • P R I V A C Y E N C L O S U R E • U N D E R S E A T S T O R A G E R E A R S U N P A D m available on select models. 3(7 P R I C E E S T I M A T E Date Good Thru Model # Serial # Base Price $ Options Dealer Prep $ Freight $ Total $ Down $ APR Mos. Approx. Monthly Payments $ After you've chosen the Grumman package that best suits your needs, ask your dealer about arranging monthly payments. He or she will show you how, with approved credit, you can take delivery of your new boat now and pay later. \Zr?JSver h ° a Q , Delta B C V4G1S5 987-8522 946-sSfe-Fi P L A N Owner W;irTant\rni[jiLm T h e H a r b o r S e c u r i t y ™ Plan: T h e Security Y o u Deserve The Harbor Security Plan gives owners of Grumman boats the added assurance they deserve against costly, unexpected boat repairs. The Harbor Security Plan is designed and backed by the OMC Aluminum Boat Group specifically for owners of our products. We understand your purchase is an expression of trust in us, so we stand behind every boat we build. It's our way of letting you know we'll be there when you need us. With experience, service and an unmatched commitment to customer satisfaction. Ask your authorized Grumman dealer for details. Thank you for your interest in Grumman boats, and Welcome Aboard! OMC G R U M M A N BOATS BOAT GROUP Great Value. Trusted Reputation. G r u m m a n Boats 2 9 0 0 Industrial Drive. L e b a n o n , M i s s o u r i 6 5 5 3 6 In Canada , contact Outboard Mar ine Corporat ion of Canada Ltd . . 1994 Fisher Drive. Pe te rborough . Ontar io, Canada K 9 J 7 B 6 For Canadian dealer in format ion , call 1 - 7 0 5 - 8 7 6 - 2 6 9 9 . Please Read Carefully Dimensions, capacities, ratings and additional specifications plus complete warranty and service information are available from your Grumman dealer. Product illustrations and data within this catalog are based upon information available at the time of publication. Grumman reserves the right to make changes without notice or obligation. Ask your local Grumman dealer for the most current product specifications prior to purchase. Some of the equipment shown separately or on products illustrated in this catalog may be optional at extra cost. Grumman is a member in good standing of the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA). All Grumman boats meet or exceed the standards established by this organization under the NMMA certification program. NMMA established standards for flotation, fuel systems, ventilation, electrical and safety. ® Registered trademarks Outboard Marine Corporation, Trademarks Outboard Marine Corporation. © 1995 Outboard Marine Corporation. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. Grumman' is a registered trademark ol the Grumman Corporation, t Registered trademark Lowrance Electronics, Inc. t t Registered trademark Midwest Industries, Inc. N I N E T E E N N I N E T Y - S I X LJOWEAUJMINUM BOATS A N D PONTOONS 4<e W E X P E C T M O R E F R O M Y O U R B O A T W H E N Y O U ' R E L O O K I N G F O R M O R E , L O O K T o L O W E For over 23 years, Lowe has been committed to giving its customers that "little something extra." In that time, Lowe has put over 250,000 boats on the water, and built an enviable reputation in the process. A reputation for giving families across the country a better boating experience and the memories that go along with spending time on the water. How? By paying attention to the details. Details in design. Details in construction. Details in features and quality component parts. We build boats for people who have come to expect more from the products they purchase-both now, and at trade-in time. Lasting value. It's what we've built since day one, and why we invite you to always expect more from your Lowe boat. 3 l o Lowe. For The Weekend A n g l e r or the Best of B .A.S.S. 7 TM W H Y A L U M I N U M ? 1 Peak performance with less horsepower 1 Lightweight, easy to trailer 1 Nothing compares for durability and resistance to the elements 1 Gives the buyer maximum value for the dollar Lar ry Nixon B.A.S.S. Ail-Time Money Winner, ime B.A.S.S. Megabucks Champion, Bass Masters Classic Champion, Time B.A.S.S. Angler of the Year His Weekend Boat: A Lowe 1800 Bass Striker™ "As a professional bass angler, I spend a lot of my working days chasing around in an exotic fiberglass bass rig. But let me tell you a little secret: when I go out fishin'just for the fun of it, with my kids or buddies back home, I hitch up a Lowe to my truck. That's right. For good old leisure time fishin', you can't beat the easy handling, light weight and surprising performance Lowe packs into all of its boats. Whether I'm pre-fishing a tournament site, or just 'hawg huntin'back home, my Lowe really does the job." B.A.S.S. is a registered trademark oi the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society. J 2 / E X P E C T M O R E F R O M Y O U R L O W E One-piece extruded rib construction offers superior strength over the more common method of multiple rib pieces welded together. Extruded aluminum adds strength and reduces weakening due to stress. Many Lowe models come with standard Evinrude' or Johnson 8 electric trolling motors. Where this is an option, your Lowe is pre-wired with a harness to accept 12 or 12/24 Volt motors depending on the model. Locking rod storage on many models accommodates even larger rods, keeping them secure underway and when trailering. Our Everlast™ furniture backs and bases are constructed of low density polyethylene. This adds structural strength, is light weight and will NEVER rot or become water damaged like wood can. Seat back cushions are also removable for easy storage away from the elements. C O M P O N E N T S A quality Shoreland'r t t trailer complete with a 5-year warranty is included with all Lowe fishing models. Our rounded, extruded center keel is stronger than typical v-shaped keels and adds structural integrity to the hull. Formed-in keels on sides and bottom of our jon boats distribute loads more evenly and improve tracking and planing. Hull seams on our Deep V models are double riveted adding strength and durability to potential high-stress points on the hull. Many models feature a premium Lowrancet X-22A fish/depth finder offering depth capability to 350', selective fish I.D. system and multiple zoom ranges. Exclusive Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floors and casting decks combine high structural strength and light weight, and are especially resistant to ever-changing climatic conditions. Tuf-ALL ALUMINU Our exclusive V-Tech™ hull designs have wide, reverse chines for a dry ride and exceptional stability underway or while fishing. Roomy tournament-style livewells are rounded and aerated with timers to keep your catch lively. Dividers keep bait and/or catch separated. Carpeted tempered aluminum hatch lids seal securely. xpect More From Your Outboard Power ONLY O M C OFFERS SYSTEM CHECK"-T H E ULTIMATE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR YOUR ENGINE When you buy a Lowe, you get ll-featured Evinrude and Johnson" power with OMC 's exclusive System Check engine monitoring system. System Check is the ultimate in operator early warning systems. Just like in your car, a special gauge alerts the operator with both a horn blast and appropriate warning light for four key engine performance i oil, overheat, restricted fuel flow and This effectively forewarns you to problems, keep damage to a minimum and helping vicing dealer diagnose the problem. )nly Evinrude and Johnson outboards offer System Check, and a host of other premium features. This gives you full featured outboard ver nobody else can match. Lowe offers i Check standard on all remote-steer models. on all remote-steer installations over 25hp. 3 * 3 170Jon Bass Striker SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System 160 J O N BASS STRIKER™ Standard Package Includes: • 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (50 HP w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Bow and stern casting decks • Composite molded console w/windshield • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Rounded aerated livewell Shown with optional Lunker Package 165 FISH-N-PRO™ Standard Package Includes: • 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (50 HP w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Bow casting deck w/storage • Aluminum console w/molded dash and windshield • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Port & starboard aerated livewells Shown with optional Fishing Package P O W E R T O O L S ! Electric Trolling Motor Raised Casting Deck w/2 Storage Compartments Pedestal Seats J (2) w/Everlast™ 4 backs/bases ---J Rounded, Aerated Livewells (2) w/dividers Locking Rod Storage Lowrance X-22A Fish/Depth Finder . . Molded Driver & Passenger Seats w/Everlast™ backs/bases and under seat storage Raised Casting Deck w/3 Storage Compartments (2 insulated) 170 J O N BASS STRIKER Standard Package Includes: • 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim & tilt & O M C System Check™ (70 HP w/trim & tilt or 50 HP jet outboard optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Composite molded console w/windshield • Tuf -Dek™ aluminum floor liner Molded acrylic helm console on the 170 Jon Bass Striker includes full instruments and Lowrance fish/depth finder (both optional on 165/160). ed casting decks provide under-deck storage, livewells and elevated pedestal seating. All hatch lids are tempered aluminum and carpeted for sure sealing. Features/Options 170 165 160 Pedestal Seats 2 2 2 Pedestal Seat Bases 2 2 2 Aerated Livewell(s) 2 2 1 Raised Casting Deck(s) 2 1 2 Lockable Rod Storage Std - Std Molded Console Std - Std 12V Electric Trolling Motor Std Opt Opt 12/24V Electric Trolling Motor Opt - -Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Opt Opt 12 Volt Receptacle Std Std Std AM/FM Stereo Cassette Opt - -Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Painted Bunk Trailer Std Std Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Opt Transom Saver Opt Opt Opt Speedometer Std Opt Opt Tachometer Std Opt Opt Voltmeter Std Opt Opt Fuel Gauge Std - Std Tilt/Trim Gauge Std - -Std - Standard, Opt-Optional Locking rod storage on our 162 and 161 keeps several rods safe and easily accessible. :er aerated livewell with divider and ioned top doubles as an extra seat on our 162 and 161 models. Features/Options 162 161 140 Fishing Seats 2 2 2 Aerated Livewell(s) 1 1 2 Lockable Rod Storage Std Std -12V Electric TroHing Motor Opt Opt -Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Opt Opt -12 Volt Receptacle Std Std -Mooring Cover Opt Opt -Painted Bunk Trailer Std Std Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt -P A N F I S H P E R F O R M E R S Std - Standard, Opt-Optional Trolling Motor Plug & System Check™ Engine Gauge Molded Locking Driver's Seat w/Everlast™ back/base and under seat storage Storage Compartment Locking Rod Storage Rounded, Aerated Livewell w/divider and seat cushion Molded Fishing Seat w/Everlast™ back/base and under seat storage 162 PANFISH STICK S T E E R Standard Package Includes: • 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (40 HP electric-start or 40 HP w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner s c 161 PANFISH Standard Package Includes: • 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard w/OMC System Check™ (40 HP electric start or 40 HP w/trim & tilt and OMC System Check™ optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Molded locking driver's seat w/removable cushions and under seat storage • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Center aerated livewell w/divider & seat cushion 'fi? Panfish Stick Steer SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System* 140 PANFISH Standard Package Includes: • 8 HP rope-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard (15 HP rope-start optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Elevated bow deck • Molded fishing seats w/removable cushions • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • 2 gravity-fed fish boxes with fish slots 'Standard on all remote-steer installations starting at 9.9hp. 9 jam Bo* de# 17 :son capacity 5 jrson wt. lbs. 625 f c. hul wt. lbs. 1230 wt. capacity lbs. 1200 57' 30 2A" A • u 6S" 32 2A" (6 JO 070 9 tap! "l600 Bass Sinker S Y S T E M •a Outboard Early Warning System 1600 BASS STRIKER Standard Package Includes: • 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (50 or 70 HP w/trim & tilt optional) • V - T e c h ™ hull design • White, painted bunk trailer • Bow and stern casting decks w/storage • Composite molded console w/windshield • Tuf -Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Rounded aerated livewell w/divider & timer B B 1 7 0 0 BASS STRIKER Standard Package Includes: • 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim & tiit & O M C System Check™ ( 7 0 , 9 0 or 115 HP w/trim & tilt and electric-start optional) • V - T e c h ™ hull design • White, painted bunk trailer • O M C 12/24V, 6-speed electric trolling motor • Lowrance X - 2 5 B fish/depth finder • Bow and stern casting decks w/storage • Composite molded console w/windshield • Tuf -Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Bow & stern rounded aerated livewells W E E K E N D P R O " T H E S M O O T H - R I D I N G , G R E A T - P E R F O R M I N G V - T E C H H U L L R E A L L Y I M P R E S S E D M E - L A R R Y NIXON Electric Trolling Motor Pedestal Seats (2) w/Everlast™ backs/bases Rounded, Aerated Livewells (2) w/dividers Raised Casting Deck w/2 Storage Compartments Locking Rod Storage Raised Casting Deck w/2 Insulated Storage Compartments Lowrance X-25B Fish/Depth Finder . . Molded Driver & Passenger Seats w/Everlast™ backs/bases and under seat storage 1 8 0 0 BASS STRIKER Standard Package Includes: 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim & tilt & OMC System Check™ (70,90 or 115 HP w/trim Stilt and electric-start optional) • V-Tech™ hull design • White, painted bunk trailer Composite molded console w/windshield • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner nament-class livewells have black rounded corners, dividers and ner. Your catch stays lively and safe. Features/Options 1800 1700 1600 Pedestal Seats 2 2 2 Pedestal Seat Bases 2 2 2 Aerated Livewell(s) 2 2 1 Raised Casting Deck(s) 2 2 2 Lockable Rod Storage Std Std Std Molded Console Std Std Std 12/24V Electric Trolling Motor Std Std -12V Electric Trolling Motor - - Opt Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Std Opt 12 Volt Receptacle Std Std Std AM/FM Stereo Cassette Opt Opt -Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Painted Bunk Trailer Std Std Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt Painted Roller Trailer Opt Opt Opt Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Opt Brake Kit Opt Opt -Transom Saver Opt Opt Opt Speedometer Std Std Opt Tachometer Std Std Opt Voltmeter Std Std Opt Fuel Gauge Std Std Std Tilt/Trim Gauge Std Std -Std - Standard, Opt-Optional F U N C T I O N A L F I S H I s Exclusive Everlast™ seat backs and bases and marine aluminum hatch lids are typical of the durability built into every Lowe Fish-N-Pro. Features/Options 1920 1720 1620 1605 1405 Raised Casting Deck 1 1 1 1 1 Pedestal Seats 3 3 3 1 1 Pedestal Seat Bases 5 5 5 3 3 Aerated Livewell(s) 2 2 1 1 1 Additional Pedestal Seat Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Lockable Rod Storage Std Std Std - -12V Trolling Motor Harness - - Std Std Std 12V Electric Trolling Motor - - Std Opt Opt 12/24V Trolling Motor Harness Std Std - - -Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Std Std Opt Opt 12 Volt Receptacle Std Std Std Std -AM/FM Stereo Cassette Opt Opt Opt - -Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Painted Bunk Trailer Std Std Std Std Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Painted Roller Trailer Opt Opt Opt - -Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Opt Opt Opt Brake Kit Opt Opt - - -Transom Saver Opt Opt Opt - -Speedometer Std Std Std Opt Opt Voltmeter Std Std Std Opt Opt Tachometer Std Std Std Opt Opt Fuel gauge Std Std Std - -Trim/tilt gauge Std Std - - -Std - Standard, Opt - Optional B B 4 C if • T Casting Deck w/Storage Pedestal Seat Base Aerated livewells (2) w/divider & timer Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Console w/molded dash and windshield Pedestal Seats (2) w/Everlast™ backs/bases Lockable Rod Storage Molded Locking Driver's Seat w/Everlast™ back/base 1920 FISH-N-PRO Standard Package Includes: • 70 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (90,115 or 150 HP w/trim Stilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Aluminum console w/molded dash and windshield • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • Downrigger access plates & supports 1720 FISH-N-PRO Standard Package Includes: • 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard w/trim & tilt & OMC System Check™ (70,90 or 115 HP w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • 3 Molded pedestal seats (1 locking) • Lowrance X-25B fish/depth finder • Aluminum console w/molded dash and windshield • Bow casting deck w/livewell & storage • 12/24V trolling motor harness • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • Bow & stern rounded aerated livewells • Downrigger access plates & supports 1605Fish-n-Pro 1 6 2 0 F I S H - N - P R O Standard Package Includes: • 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (50 or 70 HP electric-start outboard w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • OMC 12V electric trolling motor • 3 Molded pedestal seats (1 locking) • Lowrance X-22A fish/depth finder • Aluminum console w/molded dash and windshield • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • Bow casting deck w/livewell & storage S Y S T E M m 1 6 Q 5 F 1 S H - N - P R O Standard Package Includes: • 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (50 HP electric-start outboard w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Molded pedestal seat • Molded driver's seat w/under-seat storage • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • 12V trolling motor harness • Port side aerated livewell • Bow casting deck with storage Outboard Early Warning System 1 4 0 5 F 1 S H - N - P R O Standard Package Includes: • 30 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/OMC System Check™ (40 HP electric-start outboard w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Molded pedestal seat • Molded driver's seat w/under-seat storage • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • 12V trolling motor harness • Port side aerated livewell • Bow casting deck with storage 331 B A C K T R O L L I N G S P E CI F\C AT \9\0 \7\0 Lencjth 19T 17'2" Beam 86" 84" Bottom width 68" 68" Bow depth 43.5" 39" Transom height 21" 21' Rtix 17 f Max. person apac'ty 7 Max. person wt. lbs. 900 Approx. hull wt. lbs. 1150 Max. wt. capacity lbs. U5Q Max HP capacity 85 Hull gauge .100 Casting Deck w/Storage Port Side Storage Pedestal Seat Base Aerated livewell w/divider & timer Pedestal Seats (2) w/Everlast backs/bases Features/Options 1910 1710 1610 1410 Raised Casting Deck 1 1 1 1 Pedestal Seats 3 3 2 2 Pedestal Seat Bases 4 4 3 3 Aerated Livewell(s) 2 2 1 1 Additional Pedestal Seat - Opt Opt Opt Lockable Rod Storage Std Std - -12V Trolling Motor Harness - - Std Std 12V Electric Trolling Motor - - Opt Opt 12/24V Trolling Motor Harness Std Std - -Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Std Opt Opt 12 Volt Receptacle Std Std Std -AM/FM Stereo Cassette Opt Opt - -Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Opt Painted Bunk Trailer Std Std Std Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt Opt Painted Roller Trailer Opt Opt - -Spare Ti re & Bracket Opt Opt Opt Opt Brake Kit Opt Opt - -Transom Saver Opt Opt - -Speedometer Std Std - -Voltmeter Std Std - -Tachometer Std Std - -Fuel gauge Std Std - -Remote Trim Switch Std Std - -Std-Standard, Opt-Optional Lockable Rod Storage Stern Aerated Rounded Livewell Molded Locking Driver's Seat w/Everlast back/base Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Commmand Center w/ electronics storage and full instrumentation Aft Storage Compartment 1910 BACKTROLLER™ Standard Package Includes: • 40 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard w/trim & tilt & OMC System Check™ (60 HP tiller w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • Downrigger access plates & supports 14 •Standard on all remote-steer installations starting at 9.9hp. 1710 BACKTROLLER Standard Package Includes: • 40 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard w/trim & tilt & OMC System Check™ (60 HP tiller w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • 3 Molded pedestal seats (1 locking) • Lowrance X-25B fish/depth finder • Command center w/electronics storage and gauges • Bow casting deck w/livewell & storage • 12/24V trolling motor harness • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • Bow & stern rounded aerated livewells • Downrigger access plates & supports 1610 BACKTROLLER Standard Package Includes: • 25 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard (40 HP electric-start outboard w/trim & tilt and OMC System Check™ optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • 2 Molded pedestal seats (1 locking) • Tuf-Dek aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • 12V trolling motor harness • Port side aerated livewell • Bow casting deck with storage Shown with optional Fishing Package Roomy, rounded livewells come complete with dividers, timer, and sure-sealing carpeted aluminum lids. Raised bow decks provide room for ample storage, livewell and pedestal seatiog. There's plenty of room to install an optiooal OMC trolling motor, too. SYSTEM Outboard Early Warning System* 1410 BACKTROLLER Standard Package Includes: • 25HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson tiller outboard • White, painted bunk trailer 2 Molded pedestal seats (1 locking) • Tuf-Dek aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • 12V trolling motor harness • Port side aerated livewell • Bow casting deck with storage FEATURE CLOSE-UP F I S H - N - S K I Convertible bi-level casting decks turn comfortable bow lounges (cushions optional) into functional fishing platforms complete with pedestal seating, livewell and storage. Plenty of power to pull skiers or just troll for lunker gamefish. Full-featured Evinrude or Johnson Power with OMC's exclusive System Check early warning system means added value and years of enjoyment. Features/Options 1930 1730 1630 Raised Casting Deck 1 1 1 Pedestal Seats 2 2 3 Pedestal Seat Bases 5 5 5 Aerated Livewell(s) 2 2 1 Additional Pedestal Seat Opt Opt Opt Lockable Rod/Ski Storage Std Std -12V Trolling Motor Harness - - Std 12V Electric Trolling Motor - - Opt 12/24V Trolling Motor Harness Std Std -Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Std Std Opt 12 Volt Receptacle Std Std Std AM/FM Stereo Cassette Std Std Std Mooring Cover Opt Opt Opt Bow Deck Cushions Opt Opt Opt Stern Bench Seat Cushions Opt Opt -Canvas/Canopies/Curtains Opt Opt Opt Painted Bunk Trailer Std Std Std Galvanized Bunk Trailer Opt Opt Opt Painted Roller Trailer Opt Opt Opt Spare Tire & Bracket Opt Opt Opt Brake Kit Opt Opt -Transom Saver Opt Opt Opt Speedometer Std Std Std Voltmeter Std Std -Tachometer Std Std Std Fuel gauge Std Std Std Trim/tilt gauge - Std -Bi-level Casting Deck w/Storage Pedestal Seat Base Aerated Livewells (2) w/Divider & Timer Aluminum Twin . Consoles w/Molded Dash Lowrance Fish/Depth Finder Molded Locking Driver's Seat and Fishing Seat w/Everlast™ backs/bases Lockable Rod/Ski Storage (2) 1 9 3 0 FISH-N-SKI Standard Package Includes: • 70 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim & tilt and OMC System Check™ (90,115 or 150 HP optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Double-riveted hull seams • Downrigger access plates & supports SYSTEM 16 Std - Standard, Opt - Optional Outboard Early Warning System 1630 Fisti-n-Ski 1730 FISH-N-SKI Standard Package Includes: • 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim & tilt and OMC System Check™ (70 HP w/trim & tilt, 90 or 115 HP optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • 2 Molded pedestal seats (1 locking) • Lowrance X-25B fish/depth finder • AM/FM stereo cassette w/four speakers • Aluminum twin consoles w/molded dash and walk-thru windshield • Bi-level bow casting deck w/livewell & storage • 12/24V trolling motor harness • Tuf-Dek™ aluminum floor liner • Lockable rod & ski storage • Double-riveted hull seams • Bow & stern rounded aerated livewells • Downrigger access plates & supports E E 1630 FISH-N-SKI Standard Package Includes: • 50 HP electric-start Evinrude or Johnson outboard w/trim & tilt and OMC System Check™ (70 HP w/trim & tilt optional) • White, painted bunk trailer • 3 Molded pedestal seats (1 locking) • AM/FM stereo cassette w/four s