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Geology and petrography of the Wellington Seam, Nanaimo Coalfield, Vancouver Island Bickford, Corilane Gwyneth Cathyl 1993

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GEOLOGY AND PETROGRAPHY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAM, NANAIMOCOALFIELD, VANCOUVER ISLANDByCORILANE GWYNETH CATHYL BICKFORDB.Sc., The University of British Columbia, 1978A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OFTHE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OFMASTER OF SCIENCEinTHE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES(Department of Geological Science)We accept this thesis as conformingto the required standardTHE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIAMarch 1993©Corilane Gwyneth Cathyl Bickford, 1993In presenting this thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an advanceddegree at the University of British Columbia, I agree that the Library shall make itfreely available for reference and study. I further agree that permission for extensivecopying of this thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the head of mydepartment or by his or her representatives. It is understood that copying orpublication of this thesis for financial gain shall not be allowed without my writtenpermission.(Signature) Department of .-.52_(:::. 1ic►cs:::t The University of British ColumbiaVancouver, CanadaDate 1SS'5 MaccJ, 2 DE-6 (2/88)i iABS'i RACTThe Wellington Seam in the Nanaimo Coalfield of Vancouver Island hascontributed significantly to British Columbia's coal production since its discovery in1871. Difficult geological conditions and conflicts between surface land use and miningactivities have hampered the efficient development of coal mines in the WellingtonSeam. This study contributes to the assessment of the coal resources of the NanaimoCoalfield by describing the geology, quality, petrographic composition and depositionalorigin of the Wellington Seam.Surface geological mapping of the western half of the Nanaimo Coalfield wasdone at scales of 1:6000 to 1:20,000. Detailed mapping of the Wellington Seam wasdone in the underground workings of Wolf Mountain Colliery. 229 stratigraphicsections were measured, and three columnar samples of coal and associated mudstonepartings within the Wellington Seam were collected in the mine Five coal and threemudstone lithotypes were recognized in the columnar samples. The petrographiccomposition of the coals and mudstones was determined by point-counting at highmagnification under incident light in immersion oil. Moisture and ash content, and freeswelling index were determined for the coals and mudstones.Seven formations and nine members, comprising the basal half of the UpperCretaceous Nanaimo Group, crop out and are present in boreholes and mine shaftswithin the study area. Formations and members are distinguished on the basis oflithostratigraphy. Coal is present within five lithostratigraphic units: the Northfield andMillstream Members of the Extension Formation, the Cranberry and NewcastleMembers of the Pender Formation, and the Reserve Member of the ProtectionFormation.i i iThe Wellington Seam is a composite of up to three closely-associated coal bedsnear the base of the Northfield Member. Coal of the Wellington Seam is typicallybright banded, blocky and very hard. The dry ash content of the coal is seldom lessthan 5 percent, and is usually over 9 percent. Its sulphur content is usually between 0.5and 1 percent, and rarely exceeds 1.5 percent. The low sulphur content of theWellington coal suggests that its precursor peat was generally not in contact withsulphur-rich marine or brackish water.Sandstones of the East Wellington Formation, underlying the Wellington Seam,were deposited on the shoreface of a northwest-prograding strandplain, fed by sand-dominated distributaries. Most of the Wellington coals sampled at Wolf Mountainoriginated as wet forest swamp peats, and less commonly as fen peats or marsh peats.Mudstone and siltstone partings within the Wellington Seam were deposited asoverbank flood deposits, crevasse splays and levee deposits associated with streamchannels. Siltstones, mudstones and coals of the Northfield Member, overlying theWellington Seam, probably originated as overbank flood, crevasse splay and swampdeposits. Isolated sandstones and conglomerates within the Northfield Member mayhave been deposited by anastomosing streams. Conglomerates and sandstones of theMillstream Member, overlying and locally truncating the Northfield Member,represent deposits of gravel bed rivers, probably part of a coastal braid plain delta.Mining of the Wellington Seam has been hampered by the irregular topographyof the seam floor, splits within the seam, and minor faulting and clastic dikes within theseam roof. Most of the topographic irregularities of the seam floor are of sedimentaryrather than tectonic origin. Detailed mapping at Wolf Mountain shows that theposition and extent of seam splits and perhaps some of the irregularities of the seamfloor are controlled by syndepositional faults. Recognition of the controls of seam splitsivand floor structures affords the possibility of geological forecasting in advance ofmining.Petrographic composition of the Wellington Seam can be partially correlatedwith coal lithotypes. Lustrous coals and dull and bright coals have very high vitrinitecontents and low inertinite contents. Bright banded and bright coals have lowervitrinite contents and higher inertinite contents, but still consist predominantly ofvitrinite. All of the Wellington coals sampled at Wolf Mountain have very low liptinitecontents.Free swelling indices of the Wellington coals at Wolf Mountain are generallyless than 3, indicating that the coals are not strongly agglomerating. Very few of thecoal samples from Wolf Mountain have free swelling index values greater than 4.There is no clear relationship between ash content and free swelling index of the coals.CONTENTSABSTRACT^ iiTABLE OF CONTENTS^ vLIST OF TABLES xLIST OF FIGURES^ xiiiACKNOWLEDGEMENT xxiChapter I. INTRODUCTION^ 11.1 INTRODUCTION 11.2 OBJECTIVES^ 21.3 TERMINOLOGY 21.4 LOCATION AND ACCESS^ 51.5 MINING HISTORY^ 51.6 EXPLORATION HISTORY^ 81.7 GEOLOGICAL SETTING 91.8 PREVIOUS GEOLOGICAL WORK^ 101.9 EXTENT OF AVAILABLE DATA 151.9.1 Boreholes^ 151.9.2 Mine plans 161.9.3 Analytical data^ 171.10 STUDY METHODS 171.10.1 Surface mapping^ 171.10.2 Underground mapping 181.10.3 Underground section measurement^ 181.10.4 Underground sampling^ 191.10.5 Analytical Procedures 19Chapter IL REGIONAL GEOLOGY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAM 222.1 STRATIGRAPHIC FRAMEWORK^ 222.1.1 Basement^ 222.1.2 Comox Formation 252.1.2.1 Benson Member^ 262.1.2.2 Dunsmuir Member 272.1.3 Haslam Formation^ 282.1.4 East Wellington Formation 292.1.5 Extension Formation^ 302.1.5.1 Northfield Member 302.1.5.2 Millstream Member^ 362.1.6 Pender Formation^ 382.1.6.1 Cranberry Member^ 382.1.6.2 Newcastle Member 392.1.7 Protection Formation^ 402.1.7.1 Cassidy Member 402.1.7.2 Reserve Member^ 412.1.7.3 McMillan Member 412.1.8 Cedar District Formation^ 422.2 REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAM^422.3 REGIONAL SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAM 442.3.1 Coal^ 442.3.2 Clastic Partings^ 452.3.3 Roof strata of the Wellington Seam^ 462.3.4 Floor strata of the Wellington Seam 52vivii2.4 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY^ 542.4.1 Structures north of the Chase River Fault^552.4.2 Chase River Fault^ 562.4.3 Structures south of the Chase River Fault^57Chapter III. STRUCTURAL AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC PA I I ERNS OFTHE WELLINGTON COAL BED AT WOLF MOUNTAIN COLLIERY 593.1 INTRODUCTION^ 593.2 COAL BED DETAILS 593.2.1 Coal characteristics^ 703.2.2 Characteristics of partings 703.3 STRUCTURAL FEATURES AT WOLF MOUNTAIN COLLIERY 713.3.1 Faults^ 763.3.2 Floor rolls 833.3.3 Swilleys^ 843.4 EFFECTS OF STRUCTURAL FEATURES ON SEAM THICKNESS 853.4.1 Thickness variations associated with faults^853.4.2 Thickness variations associated with floor rolls 873.4.3 Thickness variations associated with swilleys^873.5 ROOF CHARACTERISTICS^ 923.5.1 Coal and sandstone dikes 923.6 SEDIMENTOLOGIC INTERPRETATIONS^ 953.6.1 Floor rolls^ 953.6.2 Swilleys 963.6.3 Partings^ 97viii3.7 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TECTONIC AND DEPOSITIONALFEATURES^ 983.8 IMPLICATIONS FOR RESOURCE ASSESSMENT^100Chapter IV. PETROGRAPHY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAM AT WOLFMOUNTAIN COLLIERY^ 1024.1 OBJECTIVE^ 1024.2 TERMINOLOGY 1024.3 RESULTS^ 1034.3.1 Field observations^ 1034.3.2 Section description and correlation^ 1034.3.3 Maceral point counts^ 1114.3.4 Ash content^ 1324.3.5 Free Swelling Index 1324.3.6 Petrographic indices^ 1334.4 RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LITHOTYPE, VITRINITECONTENT, ASH CONTENT AND FREE SWELLINGINDEX OF WELLINGTON COALS^ 1554.5 INTERPRETATION^ 1624.5.1 Petrography of the Wellington Seam^ 1624.5.2 Petrographic indices^ 1714.5.3 Depositional histories 1714.5.3.1 Locality WM100^ 1724.5.3.2 Locality WM220 1734.5.3.3 Locality WM222^ 174ixChapter V. CONCLUSIONS^ 177Chapter VI. BIBLIOGRAPHY^ 185APPENDIX I - Borehole data summaries and stratigraphic interpretations 228APPENDIX II - Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of the coalsof the Extension Formation^ 247APPENDIX III - Measured sections of the Wellington Seam and associatedstrata at Wolf Mountain Colliery^270APPENDIX IV - Glossary of words used by Vancouver Island coal minersto describe geological features^ 396LIST OF TABLESTable I^Lithostratigraphic nomenclature of the lower half of theNanaimo Group in the Nanaimo Coalfield. All units inupper case are of formation rank; all units in lowercase are of member rank^ 196Table II^Stratigraphic divisions of the Wellington Seam^198Table III^Lithotype classification scheme^ 199Table IV^Maceral classification scheme^ 201Table V^Classification of peatlands by vegetation type andhydrologic characteristics^ 202Table VI^Maceral point counts, whole rock basis^204Table VII^Maceral composition of samples, volume percent, wholerock basis^ 207Table VIII^Maceral composition of samples, volume percent,mineral-matter-free basis^ 210Table IX^Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent,whole rock basis^ 213xxiTable X^Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent,mineral-matter-free basis^ 217Table XITable XIIStructured vitrinite, degraded vitrinite and inertinitecomposition of samples, volume percent, mineral-matter and liptinite-free basisStructured vitrinite, degraded vitrinite and inertinitecomposition of lithotypes, volume percent, mineral-matter and liptinite-free basis220222Table XIII^Analytical results, maceral group content andpetrographic indices of samples^223Table XIV^Analytical results and petrographic indicesof lithotypes^ 227Table XV^Borehole data summary^ 229Table XVI^Stratigraphic interpretation of borehole records^238Table XVII^Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam^ 248Table XVIII^Moisture, ash and free swelling index analyses of theWellington Seam^ 260xi iTable XIX^Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theNo.2 Seam^ 264Table XX^Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theNorthfield No.3 Seam^ 266Table XXI^Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theNorthfield No.4 Seam^ 267Table XXII^Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWolf Mountain No.3 Seam^ 268Table XXIII^Proximate and calorific value analysis of theWolf Mountain No.4 Seam^ 269LIST OF FIGURESFigure 1-1 Location of study area^ 4Figure 1-2Figure 1-3Regional map of the Wellington coal bed in the NanaimoCoalfield, showing major mines, outcrop trace of the coal,and principal geologic featuresStratigraphic column of the lower half of the NanaimoGroup712Figure 2-1 Geological sketch map of the Wellington Seam, NanaimoCoalfield^ 24Figure 2-2Figure 2-3Stratigraphic section A-B of the Wellington Seam andassociated strata in the Northfield area. Section locationis shown on Figure 1-2Stratigraphic section C-D of the Wellington Seam andassociated strata in the Harewood area. Section locationis shown on Figure 1-23234Figure 2-4 Composite sedimentological profile of the EastWellington Formation at Extension Colliery^48Figure 2-5^Detailed stratigraphic section of the roof of theWellington Seam at Wolf Mountain^ 50x ivFigure 3-1 Stratigraphic section of the Wellington Seam and its boundingstrata at Wolf Mountain Colliery, based on borehole, outcropand mine data 61Figure 3-2 Legend for coal bed cross sections (Figures 3-3 through 3-5)^63Figure 3-3 Section A-A' across line of split on the upper parting at WolfMountain Colliery, at a vertical exaggeration of 6.67:1. Datumis base of roof, corrected for gentle northward dip ifcoal measures. Section location shown in Figure 3-7. SeeFigure 3-2 for legend 65Figure 3-4 Detail of section A-A', at no vertical exaggeration. Noteinfilling by upper parting of extensional sags in the under-lying coal and rock bands. See Figure 3-2 for legend^67Figure 3-5 Section B-B' across major extensional fault at Wolf MountainColliery, showing associated channeling and changes in coaland rock thicknesses, at vertical exaggeration of 13.33:1.Datum is base of roof, corrected for gentle northward dip ofcoal measures. Section location shown on Figure 3-7. SeeFigure 3-2 for legend 69Figure 3-6 Map of thickness and coarsest lithology of the upper parting atWolf Mountain Colliery. Note parallelism of trends with thesoutherly major fault^ 73Figure 3-7 Map of structural features in roof of the Wellington Seam atWolf Mountain Colliery^ 75Figure 3-8 Structure contour map of floor of Wellington Seam, showingfloor rolls and swilleys. Contour interval is 0.5 metres, datumis sea level 78Figure 3-9 Map of total thickness of the Wellington Seam (includingrock bands) at Wolf Mountain Colliery, with positions offloor rolls and swilleys superimposed 80Figure 3-10 Map of total rock band thickness within the WellingtonSeam at Wolf Mountain Colliery^ 82Figure 3-11 Details of erosive contact between Upper Wellington coaland silty, erosive-based sandstone of upper parting. Notewarping of coal bed and minor fault at base of parting, inresponse to differential loading across the margin of thechannel scour. Section exposed in east rib of Crosscut X-5,at junction with Main Entry, Wolf Mountain Colliery,between geological stations 7 and 212, on February 4, 1987^89Figure 3-12 Overthrust of Wellington Rider coal above a floor roll. Faultfollows base of upper parting, then ramps up through the Riderinto the roof, at 34 degrees to bedding. Section exposed in eastrib of D Heading, 1A's panel, Wolf Mountain Colliery,between geological stations 37 and 126, on May 6, 1985^91Figure 3-13 Plan and section of coal dike associated with major fault, nearjunction of Supply Road and Room No.0, 1A's Panel, WolfMountain Colliery. Cross-section A-B is at same scale as plan 94Figure 4-1 Locality map showing location of study area within theNanaimo Coalfield^ 105Figure 4-la Typical stratigraphic section of the Wellington Seamillustrating its subdivision into named coal beds and partings 107Figure 4-2 Correlation diagram of seam sections showing relation ofsample sites to line of split^ 109Figure 4-3 Lithotype and maceral profiles of the Wellington Seam^113Figure 4-4 Ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellingtoncoals, mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportion ofvitrinite (V), inertinite (I) and liptinite (L)^115Figure 4-5 Detailed ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellingtoncoals, mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportion ofvitrinite (V), inertinite and (I) and liptinite (L)^117Figure 4-6 Ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellingtoncoals, mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportion ofstructured vitrinite (SV), degraded vitrinite (DV) andinertinite (I)^ 120Figure 4-7 Ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellingtonmudstones, mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportionof structured vitrinite (SV), degraded vitrinite (DV) andinertinite (I) 122Figure 4-8 Maceral composition of lithotypes, whole rock basis: brightcoal (B), bright banded coal (Bb), dull and bright coal(D + B), dull coal (D), lustrous coal (DL), carbonaceousmudstone (Mcb), coaly mudstone (Mco) and granularmudstone (Mgr) 124Figure 4-9 Maceral composition of lithotypes, mineral-matter-freebasis: bright coal (B), bright banded coal (Bb), dull andbright coal (D+B), dull coal (D), lustrous coal (DL),carbonaceous mudstone (Mcb), coaly mudstone (Mco)and granular mudstone (Mgr) 127Figure 4-10 Crossplot of ash content (weight percent, whole rock basis) andvitrinite content (volume percent, whole rock basis) formudstone lithotypes of the Wellington Seam^129xv i i iFigure 4-11 Crossplot of mineral matter content (volume percent, wholerock basis) and vitrinite content (volume percent, whole rockbasis) for mudstone lithotypes of the Wellington Seam 131Figure 4-12 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot for coal lithotypes of the Wellington Seam^136Figure 4-13 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot for the Wellington Rider, Upper Wellingtonand Lower Wellington coal beds^ 138Figure 4-14 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot for samples from three different columnarsections (sites WM100, WM220 and WM222) of theWellington Seam^ 140Figure 4-15 Crossplot of vitrinite content and inertinite content (mineral-matter-free basis, volume percent) for coal lithotypes of theWellington Seam^ 142Figure 4-16 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot for bright banded coals and bright coals ofthe Wellington Seam^ 144Figure 4-17 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot for dull and bright coals and dull coals ofthe Wellington Seam^ 146x ixFigure 4-18 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot for lustrous coals of the Wellington Seam^148Figure 4-19 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot showing changes in composition ofWellington coals at locality WM100^ 150Figure 4-20 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot showing changes in composition ofWellington coals at locality WM220^ 152Figure 4-21 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index(TPI) cross-plot showing changes in composition ofWellington coals at locality WM222^ 154Figure 4-22 Crossplot of vitrinite content (mineral-matter-free, volumepercent) and ash content (dry basis, weight percent) of coallithotypes of the Wellington Seam 157Figure 4-23 Crossplot of free swelling index and ash content (dry basis,weight percent) of Wellington coals^ 159Figure 4-24 Crossplot of free swelling index and ash content (dry basis,weight percent) of Wellington bright coals and brightbanded coals^ 161XXFigure 4-25 Crossplot of free swelling index and ash content (dry basis,weight percent) of Wellington dull and bright coals,dull coals and lustrous coals^ 164Figure 4-26 Crossplot of free swelling index and vitrinite content (wholerock basis, volume percent) of Wellington coals^166Figure 4-27 Crossplot of free swelling index and vitrinite content (wholerock basis, volume percent) of bright coals and bright bandedcoals of the Wellington Seam^ 168Figure 4-28 Crossplot of free swelling index and vitrinite content (wholerock basis, volume percent) dull and bright coals, dull coalsand lustrous coals of the Wellington Seam 170Map 1^Geological Map of the Nanaimo Coalfield (West Half)^in pocketMap 2^Plan of Wolf Mountain Colliery^ in pocketxxiACKNOWLEDGEMENTCflwynir y llyfr hwn gyda chariad a diolchgawrch i'w destun yr gwythien Welyngdwn.Field and laboratory investigations were supported in part by an NSERC grantand a B.C. Geoscience Research Grant to Dr. R.M. Bustin. Substantial financialsupport was provided by the Geological Survey Branch of the British ColumbiaMinistry of Energy, Mid-Island Coal Company, Smoky River Coal Limited,Toyomenka Canada Ltd. and Westwater Mining Ltd. Material support was provided byBP Canada Inc., the Coal Mining Research Company, the Groundwater Division of theWater Resources Branch of the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, and theBritish Columbia Archives and Records Service. Library research was aided by BrianYoung and Terry Eastwood at BCARS, Liz Johnston at ERCB, Fariyal Pirani at UBCand Mary Akehurst at GSC. Fieldwork, both surface and underground, was aided byCraig Roberts, Geordie Hall, John Burns, Georgia Hoffman, Esther Lobb and KateSlater.Thanks are due to my supervising committee: Professors Bustin, Barnes andSavigny of the Department of Geological Sciences at UBC, and graduate advisors:Professors Fletcher and Ross.Bendith iddyn nhw, tri glowyr marw: Stan Lawrence, rheolwr yn Nglofa TsableRiver, a Trevor Jahn a Ferris Dewan, glowyrs yn Glofeydd Wolf Mountain a Westray.Bendith yn fawr.Diolch iddyn nhw: y preswyr o Media House, Coal House, Greywoods House, aLamey's Mill. Diolch yn fawr.Pa wlad wedi'r siarad syddmor lan a Chwaeraeth lonydd?Dyrna'r llyfr roeddwn i'n ethych amdano. Dyna ddigon; newch fel y mynnoch chi.1I. INTRODUCTION1.1 INTRODUCTIONThe Wellington Seam has contributed a substantial part (about 30 megatonnes)of the production of the Vancouver Island coalfields since its discovery in 1871. Duringthe years of peak production and sales (1890 to 1920) the Wellington coal was reputedto be an excellent coal for household and industrial heating. Mining of the Wellingtoncoal continued, with some interruptions, until 1987. Throughout the history of miningin the Wellington Seam, difficult geological conditions, including seam splits, washoutsand faults, have hampered the mechanization of underground coal mines, and havepresented hazards to workers and equipment.Despite a long and chequered contribution to Canada's coal mining industry, aregional study of the geology and coal quality of the Wellington Seam has not beenmade since Charles Clapp finished his Geological Survey Memoir on the NanaimoCoalfield in 1914. Since Clapp's time, a large volume of surface and subsurfacegeological data have been collected concerning the Wellington Seam, allowing therecognition of additional mineable reserves of Wellington coal.Over the past fifty years, residential and commercial development of Nanaimoand its suburbs has led to conflicts between surface land use and coal mining activities.This study is intended to provide a basis for knowledgeable consideration of thegeology, quality and remaining potential for mining development of the WellingtonSeam.21.2 OBJECTIVESThe purpose of this study is to determine, by means of stratigraphic andsedimentological mapping, geological controls upon the original extent, quality andmining conditions of the Wellington Seam within the Extension Formation, in theNanaimo Coalfield of southwestern British Columbia (Figure 1-1). The majorobjectives of this study are to:1. establish a regional correlation for the coals of the Extension Formation, includingthe Wellington Seam;2. relate the lateral continuity, thickness, quality and mineability of the WellingtonSeam to depositional environment; and3. establish the petrographic composition and depositional origin of coal and mudstonelithotypes present within the Wellington Seam.1.3 TERMINOLOGYCoal miners and mining engineers, including those of the Vancouver Islandcoalfields, have a rich and varied vocabulary of specialized terms for geologicalfeatures of coal seams and technological features of coal mining. Most if not all of thespecialized vocabulary used on Vancouver Island was originally derived from thedialect spoken by Scottish and Welsh coal miners and geologists. Definitions of termsused in old mining and geologic records of the Wellington Seam are presented inAppendix IV of this thesis.Figure 1-1 Location of study area3British Columbia MainlandVancouver4964Figure 1-151.4 LOCATION AND ACCESSThe Nanaimo Coalfield (Figure 1-2) is situated on the eastern coast ofVancouver Island, in southwestern British Columbia. The coalfield is part of a once-larger sedimentary basin (Georgia Basin), which has been dissected by erosion. Thecentre of the Nanaimo coalfield underlies the city of Nanaimo. Coal measures extendfor about 28 kilometres along the coastal lowlands of the island, from Lantzville in thenorthwest to Cassidy in the southeast (James, 1969). The Wellington Seam crops outalong the western edge of the coalfield, and extends eastward towards the coastline,beneath Nanaimo.Urban and suburban development has spread outwards from Nanaimo over thepast fifty years, and now covers much of the northern half of the coalfield. Theremainder of the area is occupied by small rural holdings and tree farms. As a result ofdevelopment, the Nanaimo Coalfield is served by a good network of paved andgravelled roads.1.5 MINING HISTORYThe Wellington Seam was discovered by Robert Dunsmuir in 1871, two yearsafter his discovery of an overlying, thinner coal bed (Dunsmuir, 1871). Dunsmuir'sdiscovery outcrop was situated about 2 kilometres northwest of Diver Lake, a shortdistance north and west of the coal property owned by his previous employer, theVancouver Coal Mining and Land Company (Bowen, 1982). Dunsmuir had previouslyfound an outcrop of the Little Wellington coal at Harewood, 4 kilometres southwest ofNanaimo, but had judged it unsuitableFigure 1-2 Regional map of the Wellington coal bed in the Nanaimo Coalfield,showing major mines, outcrop trace of the coal, and principalgeologic features6<DCP amaiktio Harbour1ACify of AlaoalmoAkrohpedrcoIli;zyEast. iyelli,NiowlAlakefial4 Collieries- ; V We ...•;i;t •1-larewood Collier^E4X+ertsi.V.outcrop of Welb:shm Seam1= 1 0ivikerlavids L.--GA .24y----.Meizad area^ ,4- .\; .Eastward p iviclioat - of coalC4:1;.*Cb k is I o nitara t a - flied   Walkout &anima)^ldolf Nicuvrtairi CollieryNa of split /0\ 4jObrviabmeot 0.4 sp/ifss"cle.)^(^)‘......, ----t0^i KmI^3figure  I-2I —If"518for development and sold it to an English syndicate (Brown, 1870; Clapp, 1914).Prospecting and further mine development at Wellington progressed steadily, sothat in the year 1894, 383,006 tonnes of coal were mined from six interconnected mineswhich together constituted the Wellington Colliery. In 1895, Dunsmuir commenceddevelopment of a second large colliery at Extension, southwest of Nanaimo, where coalhad been discovered by a local settler. Development of Extension Colliery wasaccelerated following the abandonment of the less profitable Wellington Colliery in1900; in 1906, 370,542 tonnes of coal were produced from the three mines atExtension. Extension Colliery was closed in 1931, due to a combination of low coalprices and the high cost of production from several widely-scattered faces within anextensive complex of workings (Bowen, 1982).Several smaller mines worked the Wellington Seam, in both the vicinity of thetwo larger collieries, and throughout a larger area extending from Lantzville in thenorth to Haslam Creek in the south. Among these operations were Wakesiah Colliery(1918-1930), East Wellington Colliery (1883-1893), Northfield Colliery (1889-1895 and1936-1941), White Rapids Colliery (1944-1950) and Timberlands Colliery (1918-1926and 1941-1944).1.6 EXPLORATION HISTORYExploration for additional reserves of the Wellington coal commenced soonafter development of Wellington Colliery, and generally kept pace with therequirement to replace worked-out areas. Most of the exploration was in areasadjacent to existing mines. This first phase of exploration ended in 1949, when9Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited ceased drilling in the Nanaimo Coalfield, infavour of exploration in the Tsable River Coalfield further to the north.Interest in the Wellington coal was renewed by the oil price increases of the late1970's. Following a large coal licence application by Netherlands Pacific Mining Co.Inc. in 1978, Gulf Canada and Esso Resources conducted aggressive programmes ofland acquisition and rotary drilling, in an effort to find surface-mineable coal reservesnear tidewater (Peach, 1981; Perry, 1981a, 1981b). Results of these programmes weremostly negative, with the exception of the 1981 drilling by Gulf, which disclosed thepresence of an outlier of thick Wellington coal on Wolf Mountain, south of MountBenson (Perry, 1981a). Despite trenching, adit driveage and drilling done by theWestern Fuel Company between 1917 and 1935, the existence of mineable coal onWolf Mountain had been previously unsuspected. Further drilling by NetherlandsPacific Mining and partners demonstrated the existence of underground-mineablereserves at Wolf Mountain (Perry, 1982, 1983). In 1984 a small underground mine,Wolf Mountain Colliery, commenced extraction of the Wellington Seam at WolfMountain (Roberts, 1985). The mine was closed in 1987 due to poor marketconditions, leaving most of the coal reserves untouched.Locations of known entries to mines and prospects in the Wellington Seam areshown on Map 1 (in pocket).1.7 GEOLOGICAL SETTINGThe Nanaimo Coalfield occupies the northwestern corner of the Nanaimo sub-basin of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary Georgia Basin (Muller and Atchison, 1971;Bickford10and Kenyon, 1988; Monger, 1990). The coal measures at Nanaimo are part of theNanaimo Group (Table I; Figure 1-3) which is of Turonian to Maastrichtian age(Muller and Jeletzky, 1970; Haggart, 1991). Basement beneath the Nanaimo Groupwithin the study area consists of Triassic volcanic rocks of the Wrangellia Terrane(Jones and others, 1977), which are locally intruded by Jurassic plutons.The Wellington Seam occurs at the base of the Extension Formation (Clapp,1912a), about 180 to 210 metres above the base of the Nanaimo Group. Owing to reliefon the basement paleosurface, the interval between the base of the Wellington coaland the top of the basement varies. Isolated hills and ridges of basement rocks locallyproject up above the stratigraphic position of the Wellington coal, resulting in localareas in which the coal was not deposited (Buckham, 1947a).In the northern end of the coalfield, near Wellington and Lantzville, the coalmeasures are gently deformed into broad open folds which are broken by steep normalcross-faults. Deformation has been more intense to the south; near Extension the coalmeasures have been stacked into a succession of folded overthrust sheets (Clapp, 1914;Buckham, 1947a; Muller and Atchison, 1971).1.8 PREVIOUS GEOLOGICAL WORKClapp (1914) and Muller and Atchison (1971) have aptly summarized thegeological literature which was available to them. Most of the early work on theNanaimo Coalfield was published by the Geological Survey of Canada. Historicaldetails of the Survey's work on Vancouver Island have been outlined by Zaslow (1975),as part of a history of the Geological Survey of Canada. The following discussion drawsFigure 1-3 Stratigraphic column of the lower half of the Nanaimo Group11••■•••m., ••■•gma•••••,-,•■•••••■•,^— •^•• 44; cs--Lirtswia;r Mb.0-1(x)rrt^10 15ok1 Mb.0-1aome're •I •^•■•••C•I •^I,Cedar &Ind- Fm.330- Ehcc, rnMcMillan  Mb.9OrnReserve Mb_40-6en,Cassidy 103.Newcastle30-60,„Cram berriy Mb.130-horn1M.1 lsfi-r w. M L90-230mNOrish! in0-4:etnidMb_ECtSi" Wei ingiCr7I-ksla 144 rvV1 .1o0-(So rn•trFitAlesV V 1'13heavily upon these sources, with the addition of materials which became available after1971.The first detailed study of the Nanaimo Coalfield, including the WellingtonSeam, was done by James Richardson of the Geological Survey of Canada(Richardson, 1872; 1878). Whiteaves (1879, 1903) described many of the fossilscollected by Richardson. Henry Poole revisited the area for the Geological Survey in1905, collecting additional data but publishing only a brief report (Poole, 1906).Charles Clapp conducted detailed geological mapping of the Nanaimo map-area forthe Geological Survey in 1911. Two reports were published: a brief preliminary report(Clapp, 1912a) and a lengthy memoir (Clapp, 1914). Additional fieldwork, particularlyin underground workings at Lantzville, was done by John McKenzie in 1921.In 1939, Alexander Fraser Buckham commenced a resurvey of the NanaimoCoalfield for the Geological Survey in an effort to resolve the structural complexities ofthe coal measures. Buckham continued working at Nanaimo for the Survey until 1948.He produced three unpublished reports on the coal resources near Lantzville(Buckham, 1943a, 1943b and 1943c) and two papers covering the entire NanaimoCoalfield: a short discussion focussing on structural geology (Buckham, 1947a), and anannotated preliminary map (Buckham, 1947b). Buckham then left the Survey tobecome Chief Geologist for Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. Buckham continuedhis studies of the Nanaimo Coalfield, producing a review (Buckham, 1966) of thehistory of coal mining at Nanaimo; nevertheless, much of his work remainedunpublished. Before his death in 1976, Buckham donated his extensive collection ofgeological and historical notes and records to the British Columbia Archives andRecords Service, where they are now available for study.14Some of Buckham's data were made available to Jan Muller of the GeologicalSurvey of Canada, who remapped the Nanaimo Coalfield in the late 1960's. Mullerrevised the stratigraphy of the Nanaimo Group (Muller and Jeletzky, 1970), andpublished a study of the geology and remaining reserves of the Vancouver Islandcoalfields (Muller and Atchison, 1971). Muller and Jeletzky's work was subsequentlyexpanded upon by Peter Ward, who restored to formational rank (Ward, 1976 and1978) some of the stratigraphic units which had been previously suppressed by Mullerand Jeletzky.While the Geological Survey of Canada concentrated upon working out thebasic geology of the Nanaimo Coalfield, the British Columbia Ministry of Minesconcentrated on the application of geological information to engineering and safetyproblems in the Nanaimo mines. Some geological data were reported as part of thedescriptions of coal mines in the annual reports of the British Columbia Minister ofMines, for the years 1874 through 1968. Following the closure of the last small collieryin 1968, Tony James, who was then the District Inspector of Mines, examined thepotential for additional discoveries of mineable coal at Nanaimo In his report (James,1969), he was unable to provide a figure for remaining coal reserves, but did providedetails of the potential for additional coal exploration in the Wellington Seam.Geological studies of the Wellington Seam were commenced by officers and contractstaff of the British Columbia Geological Survey Branch in 1987. Preliminary findingshave been published as several short papers (Bickford and Kenyon, 1988; Bickford,1989; Kenyon and Bickford, 1989; Cathyl-Bickford, 1992).The mining companies which worked the Wellington Seam commissioned alarge number of technical reports. Geological studies, concentrating upon thedocumentation of mineable coal reserves, were done by Sutton (1904), Gwillim (1908),15McCallum (1909), Turnbull (1910), King (1918 and 1929), Laird (1932), Buckham(1950), Curcio (1979), Peach (1981), Perry (1981a, 1981b, 1982, 1983), and Roberts(1985). Engineering studies, containing geological data, were done by Brewer (1902aand 1902b), Lewis (1910), Morison and Forster Brown (1910), Faulds (1918),Campbell-Johnston (1920), Graham (1926), Spruston (1926a and 1926b), Hunt andScott (1931), Evans (1928 and 1932), Loftus (1936), Strong and others (1939) andStrachan (1941). Most of these reports are held by the British Columbia Archives andRecords Service and the Glenbow-Alberta Institute Archives.1.9 EXTENT OF AVAILABLE DATA1.9.1 BoreholesAt least 215 boreholes have been drilled to or below the stratigraphic level ofthe Wellington Seam in the Nanaimo Coalfield. Records for 158 of the holes havebeen preserved in the coal assessment report files of the British Columbia Ministry ofEnergy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, or in the extensive collections of the BritishColumbia Archives and Records Service. Additional borehole records are held in theNanaimo City Engineer's office, the Glenbow-Alberta Institute Archives and theNanaimo Museum.Several versions exist for some of the logs; wherever possible, corroboration hasbeen sought from other sources such as engineering and geological reports, drillingcost records, drillers' time sheets, and similar contemporary documents.Locations for most of the boreholes, as shown on Map 1, have been confirmedeither by using old maps (Faulds, 1904; Forster Brown and others, 1910; Loftus, 1936,16Buckham, 1943c) as guides to relocating the drill sites in the field, or by plotting ofHepburn's (1939) site survey notes onto accurate base maps. Casing has been left insome boreholes, and they could conceivably be reentered with downhole geophysicaltools.Drilling details and stratigraphic interpretations of the boreholes are presentedin Appendix I.1.9.2 Mine PlansDetailed plans are available for most of the Wellington bed workings. Officialabandonment plans of the larger collieries are held in the office of the DistrictInspector of Mines and Resident Engineer at Nanaimo, while large-scale (1:1200)composite plans, which were compiled in 1939 by J.T. Hepburn, are held in the officeof the Inspection and Engineering Branch in Victoria. Intermediate-scale (1:6000)composite plans were compiled by Island Geotechnical Services in 1979 (Pelly, 1979).Copies of these plans are available through the Nanaimo City Engineer's office. Manyadditional plans, including geologists' and engineers' progress plans, are held in thearchival map collection of the Nanaimo Centennial Museum, and in the Map Divisionof the British Columbia Archives and Records Service.Information contained in these plans, besides the position and extent ofWellington coal workings, includes notes on the thickness and working section of thecoal bed, elevations of the roof or floor of the coal, location and displacement of faults,and summaries of boreholes through the coal bed.17Plans of the later mines generally contain the most useful information.Particularly detailed plans are available for Northfield Colliery, Timberlands Colliery,Beban Mine and Wolf Mountain Colliery.1.9.3 Analytical dataNumerous samples of the Wellington Seam and associated coal beds have beencollected for analysis by mine operators, in order to determine the marketability of thecoal. Proximate analyses, consisting of determination of the moisture, volatile matter,fixed carbon and ash content of coals, were routinely done by mine operators, generallyto establish whether the coal was sufficiently clean to be marketable. Total sulphurcontent and calorific value of the coal, although not strictly part of a proximateanalysis, were often also reported, because they affected the marketability of theWellington coal for specific end-uses such as steam generation or cement manufacture.Records of proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of the Wellington Seam arepresented in Appendix II.1.10 STUDY METHODS1.10.1 Surface MappingReconnaissance-scale geological mapping was done at scales varying from1:6,000 to 1:20,000, using base maps and aerial photographs obtained from the Surveysand Mapping Branch of the British Columbia Ministry of Environment. Wherepossible, old mine entries and borehole sites were relocated, with the aid of surveynotes (Hepburn, 1939) which were found in the British Columbia Archives and18Records Service. Results of surface geological mapping are discussed in Chapter 2 ofthis study and presented on Map 1.1.10.2 Underground MappingWorkings of Wolf Mountain Colliery were mapped in detail as part of this studyprior to the closure of the mine in February of 1987. Because up-to-date plans wereunavailable, the extent of the mine workings was surveyed by means of a Bruntoncompass and measuring tape, using existing control points in the mine roof whereverpossible. The mine plan was constructed from the survey data, following standardconventions (National Coal Board, 1984). Geological features were mapped at a scaleof 1:1,000, using photocopies of the mine plan. Geological features of the WellingtonSeam at Wolf Mountain are discussed and illustrated in Chapter III of this study.1.10.3 Underground section measurementA total of 229 sections were measured of the Wellington Seam in the workingsof Wolf Mountain Colliery. Sections were measured at nearly every junction within themine, on approximately 20 metre centres. Additional sections were measured in areasof complex geology. Section locations are shown on Map 2, and the sections arepresented in Appendix III of this report.Coal lithotypes are macroscopically recognizable bands of coal seams (Stachand others, 1982). In this study, a modified version (Table III) of the Australian 'dull-bright' lithotype classification system (Diessel, 1967; Hoffman, Jordan and Wallis,1982) was used to describe the coal. British National Coal Board standards (Elliott andothers, 1984) were followed for the description of dirt bands, along with the roof and19floor strata. The thickness of the coal bed and its constituent layers was measured usinga tape graduated in 20ths of a foot (15 millimetres). The minimum band thicknessmeasured was 1/20th of a foot (15 millimetres).1.10.4 Underground SamplingColumnar samples of the Wellington Seam were collected at geological stationsWM100, WM220 and WM222 within the workings of Wolf Mountain Colliery (Map 2).The sample sites were chosen to investigate compositional changes within the coal bed,both vertically at each site and horizontally between sites.Debris and loose coal were cleared away from the coal face at each site, and thesection of the coal bed was then recorded for later reference. A column of coal wasoutlined with a sledgehammer and drill bit, by carving two parallel grooves across thethickness of the coal, about 10 centimetres apart and 15 centimetres deep. Blocks ofcoal and associated rock bands were then extracted with a wood chisel, andsuccessively placed in a wooden box for transport to the laboratory.1.10.5 Analytical ProceduresIn the laboratory, the samples of coal and mudstone from the Wellington Seamwere subdivided vertically into several plies. Each ply was then split into halves alongits length. One half of each ply was crushed to pass a 1.18 millimetre sieve, andsubsampled by coning and quartering to provide replicate samples for analysis. Theother half of each ply was retained for later examination and resampling, if required.2 0Three sets of replicate samples were obtained, to determine their petrographiccomposition, ash and moisture content, and caking power.The first set of samples was prepared for determination of their petrographiccomposition by mixing with Transoptic (registered trademark) plastic powder andforming into pellets using a Buehler (registered trademark) Speed Press. The pelletswere polished following the procedure specified by Bustin and others (1985).The pellets were examined at high magnification (625x) under incident light inoil immersion, using a Leitz MPV II (registered trademark) petrographic microscopeand a Swift (registered trademark) automatic point-counting stage. Eleven macerals,following the standard classification scheme for bituminous coals (Bustin and others,1985; Table IV) plus mineral matter were counted by point-counting. A minimum of300 points were counted for each sample.Following the splitting out of a subsample for maceral samples, the sampleswere recrushed to pass a 250 micron sieve, by means of stage crushing to minimizefines. A second set of samples, for determination of moisture and ash content, was splitout of the recrushed material. Moisture and ash content of the samples weredetermined by standard methods D3173-73 and D3174-73 of the American Society forTesting and Materials (1980).To test for moisture according to standard method D3173-73, a sample ofpowdered coal is placed in a covered container, weighed, and heated at a temperatureof 104°C to 110°C for one hour. The sample and container are then allowed to coolwithin a desiccator. When cooled to room temperature, the sample and crucible areweighed. The weight loss from the sample indicates its moisture content.21To test for ash according to standard method D3174-73, a sample of powderedcoal is placed in a container, weighed, and heated in a furnace to a temperature of700°C to 750°C. Ignition of the sample is continued until it attains a constant weight.The material remaining in the container after complete ignition is the ash of the coalsample. The ash content of a coal as obtained by this high-temperature method is oftenless than the original mineral matter content of the coal, because when certainminerals are heated rapidly they evolve volatile substances such as water and carbondioxide. For example, clays and gypsum yield water when heated rapidly, carbonatesyield carbon dioxide, and pyrite yields sulphur dioxide.The third set of samples was used for investigation of the caking power of thecoal, by determining its free swelling index (FSI) following standard method D720-67of the American Society for Testing and Materials (1980). The FSI test involvesheating 1 gram of powdered coal in a covered crucible to a temperature ofapproximately 800°C over a period of 2.5 minutes. The crucible is then removed fromthe source of heat and its contents compared to a set of standard profiles. FSI valuesare reported on a dimensionless scale from 0 to 9.The FSI of a coal is a simple measure of its potential value for manufacture ofcoke (Ward, 1984). The ideal FSI value of a coking coal is 4 to 6, which indicates thatthe coal will expand sufficiently during coking to produce a porous coke, but will notexpand so greatly as to produce an overly-porous, thin-walled coke with low crushingstrength.22II. REGIONAL GEOLOGY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAM2.1 STRATIGRAPHIC FRAMEWORKThe coal measures of the western part of the Nanaimo Coalfield are of LateCretaceous age; they constitute the basal part of the Nanaimo Group (Dawson, 1890;Clapp, 1912a, 1914) . Stratigraphic nomenclature of the Nanaimo Group (Table I) hasundergone considerable revision since Clapp's early work was published (Usher, 1952;Muller and Jeletzky, 1970; Ward, 1978; Bickford and Kenyon, 1988; England, 1989 and1990; England and Hiscott, 1991).Lithostratigraphy of the basal seven formations (Figure 1-3) of the NanaimoGroup is described in this chapter. From the base upwards, they are the Comox,Haslam, East Wellington, Extension, Pender, Protection and Cedar DistrictFormations. The Wellington Seam (Figure 2-1), which has the lithostratigraphic rankof bed and is the principal object of the present study, occurs near the base of theExtension Formation. The other six formations are of significance to this study in thatthey define the broader stratigraphic context of the Wellington Seam.2.1.1 BasementBasement beneath the Nanaimo Group in the study area consists of hard, darkgreen Triassic volcanic rocks of the Karmutsen Formation. In the southwestern part ofthe study area, along Nanaimo River and Haslam Creek, Jurassic granodiorite of theNanaimo River Batholith (Muller and Carson, 1969; R.L. Armstrong, personalcommunication, 1989) intrudes the Karmutsen Formation.Figure 2-1 Geological sketch map of the Wellington Seam, Nanaimo Coalfield232 5The basement paleosurface formed isolated hills with up to 220 metres of localrelief during the deposition of the Comox, Haslam, East Wellington and ExtensionFormations (Buckham, 1947a). Buckham interpreted a prominent salient ofKarmutsen volcanic rock between Wakesiah and East Wellington Collieries as anexposed headland during deposition of the Wellington Seam. An alternativeexplanation of this feature offered here, based on geological mapping of the exposedrocks and interpretation of boreholes and mine plans, is that the 'headland' is actuallyan overthrust block of basement, in tectonic rather than depositional contact with thecoal measures. At least one inlier of basement rock has, however, been encountered bymine workings on the Wellington Seam, in the Lewis Heading District of WakesiahColliery, northeast of the Wakesiah shafts. Boreholes north and east of WakesiahColliery also suggest that a buried basement ridge extends north towards NorthfieldColliery.2.1.2 Comox FormationClapp (1912b) introduced the name 'Comox Formation' for coal-bearingsandstones of the Comox Coalfield. Muller and Jeletzky (1967) extended the ComoxFormation to a unit of conglomerate and sandstone immediately overlying pre-Cretaceous basement in the Nanaimo Coalfield. Muller and Jeletzky suggested that thebasal conglomerate at Nanaimo be mapped as the Benson Member of the ComoxFormation.Bickford and Kenyon (1988) further refined the subdivision of the ComoxFormation into three members: the basal Benson Member, and two new units, thecoal-bearing Cumberland Member and the sandy Dunsmuir Member. Only the Benson26and Dunsmuir Members are present in the western half of the Nanaimo Coalfield; allthree members are present at depth in the vicinity of Harmac and Yellow Point in theeastern half of the Nanaimo Coalfield.England (1989, 1990) rejected Muller and Jeletzky's (1967) extension of thename Comox to the basal conglomerate and sandstone of the Nanaimo Coalfield. Ongrounds of nomenclatural priority (North American Commission on StratigraphicNomenclature, 1983), England recommended the restoration of Clapp's (1912) BensonFormation. England also proposed the subdivision of the Benson Formation into twomembers: the basal conglomeratic Tzuhalem Member (which had been previouslymapped by Muller and Jeletzky as the Benson Member of the Comox Formation) andthe overlying sandy Saanich Member (which had been previously mapped by Bickfordand Kenyon as the Dunsmuir Member of the Comox Formation). England's proposedrevisions to the Comox Formation (in the sense used by Muller and Jeletzky) have notbeen adopted in this thesis because the usage of the term 'Comox Formation' hasbecome well established in literature concerning Georgia Basin (Ward, 1978; Wardand Stanley, 1982; Pacht, 1984), and because the Comox Formation and its memberscan be readily mapped along the entire western erosional edge of Georgia Basin(Cathyl-Bickford and Hoffman, 1991).2.1.2.1 Benson MemberClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'Benson Formation' for the basalconglomerates of the Nanaimo Coalfield. Muller and Jeletzky (1967) subordinated theBenson to member status within their redefined Comox Formation. The BensonMember unconformably overlies pre-Cretaceous basement and is best developed alongthe flanks of basement paleohighs. The Benson intertongues basinwards with the27Dunsmuir Member and the Haslam Formation. The Benson thins rapidly away frombasement highs; its thickness ranges from nil to about 120 metres, and averages about30 metres (Clapp, 1914).Most of the Benson Member is conglomerate, consisting mainly of subangularto well-rounded pebbles, cobbles and boulders of volcanic rock, in an abundant matrixof coarse-grained, dark green, brown-weathering, volcanic sand, cemented by chloriteand calcite (Clapp, 1914). Most Benson conglomerates are very thick-bedded andframework-supported, although matrix-supported conglomerates and pebblysandstones occur locally.Lenses of thin to medium-bedded red shale are locally abundant near the baseof the Benson Member, for example on the shoreline north of Horsewell Bluff, and inboreholes near Wakesiah Colliery. Thin to medium-bedded calcarenite and coquinaoccur in the basal 15 metres of Benson Member along the north shore of DepartureBay (Clapp, 1914; Mathews, 1947). These shell-bearing beds contain mostly brokenand abraded valves of pelecypods and gastropods, with some fragments of bryozoansand echinoids.2.1.2.2 Dunsmuir MemberBickford and Kenyon (1988) introduced the name 'Dunsmuir Member' for theupper sandstones of the Comox Formation exposed near the Dunsmuir coal mines inthe Comox Coalfield. The Dunsmuir Member is exposed in the western part of theNanaimo Coalfield (Cathyl-Bickford and Hoffman, 1991). The Dunsmuir Memberoverlies and intertongues with the Benson Member. The thickness of the Dunsmuir2 8Member varies from nil to approximately 100 metres. Where the Benson is absent, theDunsmuir locally directly overlies the basement.The Dunsmuir Member consists of thick- to very thick-bedded, medium tocoarse-grained, yellow-weathering, light grey, quartz-feldspar-volcanic sandstone. TheDunsmuir sandstones are well-indurated and tightly cemented by calcite.2.1.3 Haslam FormationClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'Haslam Formation' for a shale unit whichis well exposed in the canyon of Haslam Creek. The Haslam Formation is alsoexposed in stream channels and road cuts west of Wellington and Extension. Outcropsof the Haslam Formation are otherwise uncommon owing to lack of resistance toerosion. The Haslam Formation is 100 to 150 metres thick in the Nanaimo Coalfield.In the southern part of the coalfield, thrust faults and associated folds have increasedthe apparent thickness of the Haslam to as much as 500 metres.Ward (1978) proposed the subdivision of the Haslam Formation into twomembers: the basal Haslam Creek Member, consisting of massive shales, and theoverlying Cowichan Member, consisting of turbiditic shales, siltstones and sandstones.Inasmuch as the Cowichan Member has not been recognized in the Nanaimo Coalfield(Ward and Stanley, 1982), subdivision of the Haslam Formation has not beenattempted in the present study.The Haslam Formation in the Nanaimo Coalfield consists of thin- to medium-bedded dark grey to black mudstone and siltstone, with occasional thin to mediuminterbeds of fine-grained cherty sandstone. The upper 15 to 40 metres of the Haslam2 9locally contains more frequent sandstone beds. The uppermost Haslam Formation isgradational by interbedding with the overlying East Wellington sandstone.2.1.4 East Wellington FormationClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'East Wellington Formation' for a ridge-forming sandstone which is well exposed at East Wellington. Muller and Jeletzky(1967) subordinated the East Wellington to member rank within their newly-proposedExtension-Protection Formation. In the present study the East Wellington is onceagain recognized as a formation within the Nanaimo Group, following Clapp's (1912a,1914) earlier usage. Recognition of the East Wellington as a formation in the presentstudy is based on its distinctive lithology (sandstone) and mappability (at 1:50,000scale).Outcrops of the East Wellington Formation are common in the Wellington andExtension areas, where the sandstone forms rimrock around southeast-plungingsynclines. Elsewhere, the formation is often concealed beneath Pleistocene sedimentsand talus derived from the Extension Formation. The East Wellington Formation is 8to 21 metres thick along its outcrop edge, and thins gradually downdip to the south andeast. At the extreme northern end of the study area, the formation is thicker; boreholesnear Lantzville have intersected up to 47 metres of East Wellington sandstone (Mullerand Jeletzky, 1970).The East Wellington Formation typically consists of fining-upward, fine tomedium-grained, well-sorted, light grey quartz-feldspathic sandstone. The sandstonelocally grades into fine pebble-conglomerate and grit (hence the old miners' term'Millstone Grit' for this formation). The East Wellington coarsens and becomes30cleaner towards its top, and is often coaly and rooty at its top contact with theExtension Formation.2.1.5 Extension FormationClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'Extension Formation' for a cliff-formingconglomerate unit which was well exposed near the village of Extension. Clapprecognized that the basal part of the formation consisted of finer-grained rocks (1914,page 58) but did not consider them to be mappable as an independent unit. Muller andJeletzky (1970) reduced the Extension to member rank, as the lower coarse-grainedmember of their Extension-Protection Formation. On the strength of borehole datawhich had become available since Clapp's work was done, Bickford and Kenyon (1988)subdivided the Extension into two members: the lower, shaly Northfield Member andthe upper, conglomeratic Millstream Member. Figures 2-2 and 2-3 depict the grosslithology and distribution of coal beds within the Extension Formation near Northfieldand Harewood.2.1.5.1 Northfield MemberBickford and Kenyon (1988) introduced the name 'Northfield Member' for thedominantly fine-grained basal portion of the Extension Formation. The NorthfieldMember is best developed in the vicinity of Northfield Colliery, from which its name istaken. Outcrops of the member are scarce, owing to its lack of resistance to erosion.Most outcrops are adjacent to mine entries into the Wellington Seam, where deepopen-cuts have been excavated into bedrock. The thickness of the Northfield Membervaries according to the extent of scouring at its contact with the overlying Millstream31Figure 2-2 Stratigraphic section A-B of the Wellington Seam and associated stratain the Northfield area. Section location is shown on Figure 1-233 3Figure 2-3 Stratigraphic section C-D of the Wellington Seam and associated stratain the Harewood area. Section location is shown on Figure 1-2343 5conglomerates. In the north near Wellington, the Northfield Member is about 45metres thick, while in the south at Wolf Mountain and Extension, it is 9 to 12 metresthick. The thickness of the Northfield Member decreases abruptly on the north side ofHarewood Colliery, due to an apparent southward step down of the base of theMillstream Member (Figure 2-3). This step might also be interpreted as a southwardintertonguing of the upper Northfield into the basal Millstream.The Northfield Member consists of thin- to medium-bedded brown and greymudstone, sandy siltstone and coal. Lenses of coarse-grained clastic sedimentary rocksoccasionally occur within the Northfield Member: near Departure Bay, anortheastward-thickening tongue of conglomerate, up to 25 metres thick, occurs in themiddle of the member (Bickford, 1989), while at Wolf Mountain a fairly persistent bedof fine-grained, silty sandstone lies about 8 metres above the base of the member.The Northfield Member contains several coal beds, some of which attainmineable thicknesses. The thickest and most extensive of these coals is the WellingtonSeam, which usually lies at the immediate base of the Northfield Member, although athin to medium bed of shale may occasionally intervene (Clapp, 1914; Buckham,1947a) between the coal and the underlying East Wellington sandstones. The usualthickness of the Wellington Seam is 1.5 to 2.1 metres, although limited areas of verythick coal, in the 4 to 5 metre range, have been encountered in Extension, Wellingtonand Wolf Mountain Collieries.Several thinner and less persistent coals occur higher in the Northfield Member.The No.2 Seam (locally known as the Little Wellington Seam) lies 5 to 10 metresabove the top of the Wellington Seam. The No.2 Seam is thickest (60 to 85 centimetresthick) at the northwest end of Wellington Colliery, about a kilometre southwest of3 6Long Lake. At Harewood (Figure 2-3), the No.2 Seam (known here as the HarewoodSeam) is the stratigraphically-highest coal in the Northfield Member.In Wellington and Northfield Collieries, two additional coal beds overlie theNo.2 bed (Figure 2-2): the Northfield No.3 bed (40 to 65 centimetres thick) about 18metres above the base of the Wellington Seam, and the Northfield No.4 bed (35 to 70centimetres thick) about 8 metres further up (Buckham, 1947a).2.1.5.2 Millstream MemberBickford and Kenyon (1988) introduced the name 'Millstream Member' for acliff-forming conglomerate unit, well exposed along the northeastern bank of MillstoneRiver (known locally as The Millstream), 5 to 9 kilometres northwest of downtownNanaimo. Outcrops of the Millstream Member are plentiful, owing to its resistance toerosion. The Millstream Member is 90 to 120 metres thick at Northfield, and graduallythickens southeastward to 160 metres at Extension, 190 metres in the Nanaimo Rivercanyon, and 230 metres in the New Vancouver Coal Mining and Land CompanySouthfield W-20 borehole.The Millstream Member consists of very thick-bedded pebble-conglomerate,with interbeds of coarse-grained, gritty sandstone and greenish-grey siltstone, darkmudstone and dirty coal. The proportion of conglomerate in the Millstream Memberincreases southwards, from 60-75% at Northfield (Figure 2-2) to 80-85% at Harewood(Figure 2-3). Pebbles in the conglomerate are subrounded, consisting mainly of whitequartz and dark grey chert with minor red chert, in a matrix of chlorite-rich quartz-feldspar sand.37Most of the Millstream conglomerates are framework-supported. Sandstonelenses are of similar composition to the matrix of the conglomerates, and containfloating pebbles and granules of quartz and chert similar to those found in theconglomerates. The conglomerates and sandstones are well-indurated and tightlycemented by quartz and calcite.Siltstones of the Millstream Member are thin- to medium-bedded and locallycontain rootlets. Mudstones of the Millstream Member are thin-bedded, locally silty orcarbonaceous, and are often rooted.Coal beds within the Millstream Member are usually thinner than those of theNorthfield Member. Between Northfield and Departure Bay, one to threediscontinuous coal beds (15 to 30 centimetres thick) occur within a shale unit which lies15 to 25 metres above the base of the Millstream Member. At Extension, adiscontinuous bed of up to 3 metres of interlaminated shale and coal (the Jacks coalbed of Clapp, 1914) lies 50 to 80 metres above the base of the member.At Wolf Mountain, three coal beds (the No.3, No.4 and No.5 beds) lie 33, 60and 80 metres respectively above the base of the member. The Wolf Mountain No.3coal bed locally attains a thickness of 1.5 metres, inclusive of several thin to mediumbeds of carbonaceous to coaly mudstone; this coal bed may be correlative with theJacks coal bed of the Extension area. The Wolf Mountain No.4 and No.5 coal bedseach consist of less than 40 centimetres of coal without rock bands.382.1.6 Pender FormationWard (1978) introduced the name 'Pender Formation' for a distinctivesandstone/mudstone unit on North Pender Island, southeast of the Nanaimo Coalfield.This unit was previously mapped as the Ganges Formation by Clapp and Cooke (1917)who recognized it as the lateral equivalent of the Newcastle and Cranberry Formations(Clapp, 1912) at Nanaimo. Ward (1978) considered the Newcastle and Cranberry to bemembers of the Pender Formation; such usage is accepted in the present study.2.1.6.1 Cranberry MemberClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'Cranberry Formation' for the fine-grainedunit immediately overlying the Extension Formation. Following Ward's (1978)stratigraphic revisions, the Cranberry is now considered to be the basal member of thePender Formation. The thickness of the Cranberry Member is poorly known, owing toincomplete exposure and a paucity of complete borehole intersections Limited drillingnear Nanaimo and South Wellington suggests that the Cranberry Member is 130 to 160metres thick.The Cranberry Member consists of distinctively dark greenish-grey siltymudstone, sandy siltstone and coarse-grained gritty sandstone, with occasional thin tomedium beds of coal. The top part of the member is fairly well exposed, but the basalpart is usually recessive, and may consist chiefly of dark grey and green shale, asreported in driller's logs of diamond-drill holes through the basal Cranberry. One fairlylaterally continuous coal bed, the Cranberry bed, occurs 10 to 15 metres below the topof the Cranberry Member (Cathyl-Bickford and others, 1992). The Cranberry coal bed39is 20 to 60 centimetres thick, and contains a few very thin bands of siltstone and coalymudstone.2.1.6.2 Newcastle MemberClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'Newcastle Formation' for the coal-bearingunit immediately underlying the Protection Formation, and overlying the CranberryFormation. As in the case of the Cranberry Formation, the Newcastle was downgradedto member rank within the Pender Formation by Ward (1978). The thickness of theNewcastle Member ranges from 30 to 60 metres.The upper 30 to 40 metres of the Newcastle Member consists of shale, siltstoneand coal. 15 to 25 metres below the top of the Newcastle Member is the laterally-discontinuous but locally very thick (2.1 metres) Douglas Rider Seam The DouglasRider Seam consists of thinly-interbedded coal, black coaly mudstone and siltstone.The base of the fine-grained interval, 30 to 40 metres below the top of the NewcastleMember, is marked by thick (60 centimetres to 4.5 metres) coal of the Douglas Seam.The basal half of the Newcastle Member consists mainly of thick- to very thick-bedded,shell-bearing conglomerate and gritty sandstone, with coal of the Newcastle Seam (0.8to 1.2 metres thick) at its base. The base of the Newcastle Seam marks the contact ofthe Newcastle Member with the underlying Cranberry Member. The Douglas Seamand the Newcastle Seam coalesce southeast of Nanaimo Harbour, forming the DouglasMain Seam, which is 0.3 to 21 metres thick (Cathyl-Bickford and others, 1992). Theextreme variability of the thickness of the Douglas Main Seam is largely due to localfolding of its floor (Graham, 1924).402.1.7 Protection FormationClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'Protection Formation' for the distinctivelight-coloured, clean sandstones overlying the Newcastle Formation and underlying theCedar District Formation. The Protection Formation is particularly well exposed onProtection Island in Nanaimo Harbour. Muller and Jeletzky (1970) reduced theProtection to member rank, as the upper coarse-grained member of their Extension-Protection Formation. Ward (1978) restored the Protection to formation rank, inrecognition of its utility as a distinctive and readily mappable marker unit throughoutthe southern part of Georgia Basin. Bickford and Kenyon (1988) subdivided theProtection Formation into three members on the basis of gross lithology; from topdown, the McMillan, Reserve and Cassidy Members.2.1.7.1 Cassidy MemberBickford and Kenyon (1988) introduced the name 'Cassidy Member' for thebasal sandstone unit of the Protection Formation in the Nanaimo Coalfield. The mostcomplete exposures of the Cassidy Member are in the lower canyon of Nanaimo River,below the Esquimault and Nanaimo Railway bridge at Cassidy. The Cassidy Memberalso crops out further to the north. It forms a series of low ridges east of Beck Creek,and covers most of the surface of Newcastle Island, where it was formerly quarried forbuilding stone (Parks, 1917; White, 1988). The Cassidy Member is 80 to 105 metresthick.Ridge-forming fine to medium-grained, light grey to white, clean, thick- to verythick-bedded sandstone constitutes most of the Cassidy Member. The sandstoneconsists of subequal amounts of quartz and feldspar, with minor hornblende. Medium41to thick lenticular beds of fine-grained, quartzose pebble-conglomerate and cross-bedded grit occasionally occur near the base of the member.2.1.7.2 Reserve MemberBickford and Kenyon (1988) introduced the name 'Reserve Member' for adistinctively fine-grained coal-bearing unit in the middle of the Protection Formationin the Nanaimo Coalfield. The subsurface type section of the Reserve Member is in theMain Shaft of Reserve Colliery, located on the Nanaimo River delta, about 1.5kilometres south of Nanaimo Harbour. A nearly complete section of the ReserveMember is exposed in high roadcuts at the junction of Cedar and McMillan roads, nearthe east abutment of the Cedar Road bridge crossing of Nanaimo River. The ReserveMember is 40 to 60 metres thick near Cedar village, and thins southward toward SouthWellington and Cassidy.The Reserve Member consists of thin- to medium-bedded, green to brownish-grey sandy siltstone and fine to medium-grained, medium- to thick-bedded, greenish-grey sandstone, containing abundant lenses and medium (0.10 to 0.30 m) interbeds ofshaly coal.2.1.7.3 McMillan MemberBickford and Kenyon (1988) introduced the name 'McMillan Member' for theupper sandstone unit of the Protection Formation in the Nanaimo Coalfield. TheMcMillan Member is well exposed in roadcuts along McMillan Road, 7 kilometressoutheast of downtown Nanaimo. The McMillan Member is also exposed on theeastern shoreline of Protection Island in Nanaimo Harbour, and forms a series of low42hills between South Wellington and Nanaimo River. The McMillan Member is 60 to 90metres thick.The McMillan Member consists mainly of ridge-forming, coarse-grained, thick-bedded, light grey to white sandstone with occasional thin recessive interbeds of darkgrey to greenish-grey sandy siltstone.2.1.8 Cedar District FormationClapp (1912a) introduced the name 'Cedar District Formation' for a recessiveunit, chiefly consisting of shale, which crops out in the low rolling country east of thelower Nanaimo River in Cedar District. The Cedar District Formation is 330 to 600metres thick.Dark grey to black shale and siltstone forms the bulk of the Cedar DistrictFormation Thin (5 to 10 cm) sandstone bands, together with sandstone dykes, arelocally abundant in the middle of the formation. Near the base of the Cedar DistrictFormation is a ridge-forming interval of thick-bedded, light grey sandstone similar tothe sandstone of the upper Protection Formation. This sandstone is well exposed in aseries of low hills south and west of Nanaimo Airport, in the extreme southwesterncorner of the study area.2.2 REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAMThe Wellington Seam is a composite of up to three closely-associated coal beds:the Wellington Rider, Upper Wellington and Lower Wellington, which have been4 3locally mined together as a unit. Detailed stratigraphy of the Wellington Seam and itscomponent coal beds and clastic sedimentary rock partings is presented in Table II. Inconsidering the detailed stratigraphy of the Wellington Seam, it should be born in mindthat not all its constituent coal beds or partings may be present in any given localitywithin the coalfield.In the vicinity of Wellington Colliery, East Wellington Colliery and the northernend of Extension Colliery, the three coal beds coalesce and the Wellington Seamconsists of a single very thick coal bed, 2.1 to 4.3 metres thick. Numerous unprofitablemining ventures have demonstrated that workable areas of Wellington Seam arebounded by split areas in which the Wellington Seam has split into two or three of itsconstituent coal beds, separated by thick clastic sedimentary rocks of the upper andlower partings.In some areas, one or two of the individual coal beds within the WellingtonSeam has been mined singularly, the remainder of the seam being either absent or leftunworked. For example, the very thick (1.8 m) coal worked at Timberlands Collieryappears to be the Wellington Main coal; its immediate siltstone roof is the upperparting. Isolated remnants of the Wellington Rider coal bed are present atTimberlands; most of the Wellington Rider coal has been removed by erosion prior todeposition of the overlying Millstream conglomerates. No.4 Mine of Extension Collierymay also have worked the Wellington Main coal, although here there is no sign of arider coal above the bed which was worked. In White Rapids Colliery, the LowerWellington coal was worked by itself, although it was of marginally mineable thickness(0.8 to 1.2 metres), and the proximity of the overlying coals resulted in very poor roofconditions.442.3 REGIONAL SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAM2.3.1 CoalCoal of the Wellington Seam is typically bright banded, medium-bedded, blockyand very hard. It is finely-banded and consists chiefly of clarain (Hacquebard andothers, 1967) according to the lithotype classification of Stopes (1935). Despite theclean appearance of the coal, its dry ash content is rarely less than 5 percent, and isusually over 9 percent, due in part to the presence of thin films of calcite along cleatsurfaces. The sulphur content (dry basis) of the Wellington Seam is usually between 0.5and 1 percent, and rarely exceeds 1.5 percent (Table XVII).Wellington coal is duller and has a higher ash content near basement highs, andlocally grades into a black, carbonaceous or coaly mudstone. In some areas, forexample at East Wellington and Wakesiah Collieries, the thickest and cleanest coaloccurs a short distance from basement highs, which may have sheltered the coal-forming swamps from the influx of sediments (Buckham, 1947a). Perhaps here thecoal-forming environment, being situated adjacent to emergent bedrock knobs, wastopographically higher than the valley bottoms where sedimentation occurred.The low sulphur content of coal from the Wellington Seam suggests that itsprecursor peat originated in fresh-water mires removed from the active shoreline, andwas not subsequently in contact with sulphate-rich marine or brackish water (Cohen,1974, 1984; Kalkreuth and Leckie, 1989).452.3.2 Clastic PartingsThe Wellington Seam is split by partings of clastic sediment over much of itsextent (Clapp, 1913). Partings less than 20 centimetres thick typically consist of darkbrown to black, carbonaceous to coaly mudstone which is usually intensely sheared anddifficult to distinguish from sheared shaly coal. Rootlets are often present, particularlyat the top of dirt bands. Poorly preserved, thin-shelled pelecypods are occasionallypresent within dirt bands. The rooted mudstones probably are overbank deposits,formed by floods of turbid water from streams. The shell-bearing mudstones probablywere formed in shallow lakes which occupied the surface of the coal-forming swamps.A very thin (1 to 2 cm) persistent band of black arenaceous mudstone, termed'pelletstone' by local miners (J. Perry, personal communication, 1989) occurs in themiddle of the Wellington Rider coal. Where fresh, it has a uniform black colour and isdifficult to distinguish from coal without close examination. Where weathered, it standsout as a light brown to brownish-grey band within the coal. It usually contains abundantwisps of bright coal, and is occasionally rippled. In thin section, this band consists ofsubangular grains of quartz, with rims of light brown carbonate (siderite or ferroandolomite?) set in a matrix of dark brown to black carbonaceous mud. The origin of thisband is uncertain: it may be an altered tuff, an eolian deposit, or a fire splay.Partings 20 to 50 centimetres thick tend to be slightly coarser-grained thanthinner dirt bands, ranging from silty mudstone to siltstone. Their colours are lighter,ranging from light brown to brownish-grey; they are usually rooted and massive, withno obvious vertical grain size gradations. Normally-graded partings are less abundantthan massive partings; the graded partings tend to be greater than 40 centimetres thick,and typically consist of siltstone grading up to silty mudstone which in turns grades up4 6to rooty carbonaceous mudstone. These fining-upward beds probably represent distalcrevasse-splay deposits, while more uniform beds may represent levee deposits.Partings 50 to 120 centimetres thick tend to consist either of massive, rootedmudstone and siltstone, or of silty sandstone. The sandstones often are crossbedded orrippled, and may contain thin crosslaminae of mudstone or muddy siltstone. Thesandstones tend to be less silty at their bases, and locally scour down into theunderlying coal. Such erosive-based sandstones commonly contain angular, twistedblocks of coal near their bases. Sandstones which contain mudstone laminae may bepoint bar deposits, while the erosive-based sandstones are probably proximal crevassesplays.2.3.3 Roof strata of the Wellington SeamThe lithology of the strata immediately above the Wellington Seam variesnotably (Clapp, 1914). In the northwestern quarter of the Nanaimo Coalfield, theimmediate roof of the Wellington Seam consists of fine-grained strata of the NorthfieldMember.At Wellington, Northfield, Wolf Mountain and immediately to the north ofHarewood Colliery (Figures 2-2, 2-3 and 2-5) the roof of the Wellington Seam consistsof 5 to 11.5 metres of thin- to medium-bedded, brownish-grey or greenish-grey sandysiltstone and very fine- to fine-grained silty sandstone, overlain by up to 60 centimetresof light grey, rooted mudstone, which in turn is abruptly overlain by coal of the No.2Seam.4 7Figure 2-4 Composite sedimentological profile of the East Wellington Formation atExtension Colliery- oMures106(0re/1 (Cif)1 5tract 5511s.:;LA.cts-4-ca.tu^, , INtektAim, low-a/121 1ecr s - 5i173,4-;48•3-2rccacx-Viovick c_.-mn+c,(;) 5a4ci than cz.e?..3^c-ra45 5- Biz() ci k.&ct.btAytdosni-woos! ^0 cca s ic,A0.1^wts ea AdFe bbl e- ci:Datgrtactiovt a I c.n.acicl./tc16+0•11Z,occas i c) ,A ck IWIZ bzo{5 5■ItSA-IDA2F-160RE 2-4••• ••• rf^•• .^.II^I ,^I.^•^-•Mu 5;^F NI C vc G r p¢},KA(N SI Z.EIn EL-LI NGseAme,)cs3tLL=^5+cACGtfSvo.na Cf2c.uS , Ctx:ty4-/ASFigure 2-5 Detailed stratigraphic sections of the roof of the Wellington Seam atWolf Mountain4950EC1101.1 MeA.S.A1ZEI^.F:OL061C-AL STA-710\1 225,NAct.0.11;--J.- V-1II0.^• •cj^• .II^I%It^It^„S ;141 muctsione -Floor ofNo. 2 cc.cs 1 bedsilfsiome, aNrigi carbcwiacety-Asvo‘tarstenne. .A IN.Anc)a*rt ..rict44+aci,ris •Fi4e.ra 4..04 .5 avutsitivie.3r006.-1-;ovtchl tsetseoctoui.56te c14 sii-isiov■e.Zo % si1+54orte. - 1.5mm "9:4,1,4-A/A;ck-F1-4645-uopart1 couptets-grada-Kopual base60% sii+sie►esiltArzyte a v►LsamiJsiont9:%ft sil+sioise at /vaseSiltsiotut , massive,.COM-4.46Js+Dite•CAL Cooly 15+06eCoAL.Caleivorbottscms Ihk4SietleCcoAL..CAcb PA•4asioneCaA LiAL&J sconeDG\g22111aUI020Me^ i.escowFne9r44te)• cir^6, N'tgweAss) es —3-^F 1GLAR_E. a-551At East Wellington and Wakesiah, the roof of the Wellington Seam consists of 5to 9 metres of massive dark grey siltstone or soft silty mudstone with coaly streaks,overlain by coal of the No.2 Seam.At Wellington, East Wellington, Northfield, Wakesiah (Figures 2-1 and 2-2) andthe northern end of Harewood Colliery (Figures 2-1 and 2-3), the No.2 Seam is in turnoverlain by dark grey and brown mudstone and siltstone with occasional thin coal beds(including the No.3 and 4 Seams) and lenses of sandstone and conglomerate. To thesouth and east of Harewood Colliery (Figure 2-3), at Wolf Mountain, and at thesoutheastern end of Extension Colliery, the fine-grained beds above the No.2 Seam aretruncated by massive or trough cross-bedded conglomerates of the MillstreamMember.The dominantly fine-grained strata of the Northfield Member, whichimmediately overlies the Wellington Seam, probably originated in a delta plainenvironment. Fining-upward sandy siltstones and silty mudstones represent overbankflood or crevasse splay deposits, while carbonaceous mudstones and coals representswamp deposits. Isolated lenses of sandstone and conglomerate in the NorthfieldMember were probably deposited as fluvial bars or channel fills. Although the densityof borehole and shaft sections through the Northfield Member is insufficient toconclusively prove that the sandstone and conglomerate bodies have the ribbonmorphology typical of anastomosing stream deposits (Miall, 1992), the general scarcityof coarse clastic sediments in the Northfield Member suggests that widespreadmeander belts are absent in the Northfield Member. It is therefore more likely that theNorthfield streams were anastomosing rather than meandering.52The conglomerates and associated sandstones of the Millstream Member, whichoverlies and locally truncates the fine-grained strata of the Northfield Member,represent deposits of gravel bed rivers (Miall, 1992), probably part of a coastal braid-plain delta. Laterally persistent, occasionally coal-bearing, fine-grained units within theMillstream Member probably represent floodplain and backswamp deposits whichformed in areas between active river channels.2.3.4 Floor strata of the Wellington SeamThe floor of the Wellington Seam, as mentioned previously, is usually the EastWellington sandstone. A single coarsening-upward succession is typical of the EastWellington Formation in the western part of the Nanaimo Coalfield. Observations ofnumerous exposures of the East Wellington sandstone in road cuts near ExtensionColliery, supported by information from boreholes, allow the compilation of asedimentological profile of the East Wellington Formation (Figure 2-4).The basal 3 to 6 metres of the East Wellington Formation typically consists ofvery fine-grained, light grey, brown-weathering, medium- to very thick-bedded,concretionary sandstone with occasional thin interbeds of dark grey rubbly-weatheringsandy siltstone similar to siltstone of the underlying Haslam Formation.Gradationally overlying the concretionary sandstone is a unit, 1 to 5 metresthick, of fine-grained, light grey, light brown-weathering, clean, medium to thick-bedded sandstone. This sandstone unit locally contains medium to thick trough cross-beds with abundant coalified wood fragments and imprints of logs. Lenses of coarse-grained pebbly sandstone, gritstone and pebble-conglomerate (Clapp, 1914) alsolocally occur within this unit.53Gradationally overlying the medium to thick-bedded sandstone is a unit, 4 to 10metres thick, of medium-grained, light grey, clean, low-angle cross-stratified, thick- tovery thick-bedded sandstone. Trace fossils resembling Macaronichnus segregatis (Clifton and Thompson, 1978) are locally abundant near the middle of this unit.The massive sandstone unit in turn grades up to 5 to 10 centimetres of dark greyto black, rooted, fine- to medium-grained carbonaceous sandstone, which generallyforms the immediate floor of the Wellington Seam.The contact of the East Wellington sandstone with the overlying coal is almostalways abrupt, and is usually marked by small-scale undulations ranging in amplitudefrom 15 to 120 centimetres, known to coal miners as 'floor rolls' and 'swilleys'. Theircharacteristics and possible origins are discussed at length in Chapter III of this study.In the northwestern corner of the Wellington area, near Little Ash Mine andGillfillian Colliery (Entries 3 and 7a respectively on Map 1), the uppermost EastWellington sandstone grades upwards and southeastwards into dirty, sandy coal, up to30 centimetres thick, which in turn grades up to clean coal of the Wellington Seam.Elsewhere in the Wellington area, a thin to medium bed of light to medium grey, softmudstone lies between the top of the East Wellington sandstone and the base of theWellington Seam. This mudstone (known to local miners as 'fireclay') lacks bedding orlamination, but is locally rooted.The vertical sedimentological profile of the East Wellington Formation (Figure2-4) resembles the Type A vertical sequence of sediments deposited along a wave-dominated, prograding coastline (Kalkreuth and Leckie, 1989). They interpreted their54Type A section (coarsening-upward sandstone) as being representative of shorelinessupplied by sand-dominated distributaries, and their Type B section (sandstoneoverlain by sharp-based conglomerate) as being representative of shorelines suppliedby gravel-dominated distributaries.The East Wellington Formation was therefore probably deposited on theshoreface of a prograding wave-dominated strandplain, fed by sand-dominateddistributaries. The local southeastward intertonguing of the uppermost EastWellington sandstone with the basal Wellington coal, together with the generalsoutheastward thinning of the East Wellington Formation, suggest that the EastWellington shoreface sands prograded to the northwest.2.4 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGYThe structural geology of the Nanaimo Coalfield (Map 1) was first outlined byClapp (1914), who considered folds to be the dominant structural elements within theNanaimo Group. Buckham (1947a) and Muller (in Muller and Jeletzky, 1970) bothconsidered faulting to be more significant than folding in the Nanaimo Group.Buckham suggested that steep faults in the basement might pass upwards intoasymmetric fold pairs within the upper Nanaimo Group. Muller considered tilted faultblocks to be the dominant structural elements within the coal measures, and suggestedthat there were few well-defined folds, and perhaps no flat-dipping thrusts. Muller'sstructural model may be more or less correct in the northern part of the NanaimoCoalfield, but in the southern part of the coalfield (from Extension south to HaslamCreek) evidence from this study, including surface structural mapping, mine plans anddeep boreholes, suggests that thrust faults and folds are locally common within the55Nanaimo Group. Intensity of deformation increases from northwest to southeast acrossthe Nanaimo Coalfield.2.4.1 Structures north of the Chase River FaultAt the extreme northern end of the coalfield, in the Lantzville outlier, the coalmeasures are gently warped into broad, open, northeast-plunging folds, with limb dipsof 5 to 8 degrees. A few steep faults, with vertical displacements up to 18 metres, havebeen encountered in the workings of Lantzville Mine.To the south, at Wellington and Northfield, folds plunge to the southeast andeast and have slightly steeper limb dips, up to 12 degrees. Two major faults (theHarbour and Jingle Pot Faults) parallel the general northwestward strike of the coalmeasures. Each fault is bounded by a narrow zone of drag folding. Neither fault isexposed at surface, but their position and vertical displacement have been proven bymining.The Harbour Fault forms the northeastern boundary of the No.1 Slopeworkings of Wellington Colliery, and cuts through the centre of Northfield Colliery. Interms of the Norris (1958) classification of faults, the Harbour Fault is an extensionfault in the Wellington-Northfield area, where it has a steep northeastward dip andvertical displacement of 15 to 20 metres down to the northeast. To the southeast, alongthe southwestern shore of Nanaimo Harbour, the Harbour Fault is associated with abelt of easterly-verging asymmetric folds which was encountered in the workings ofNanaimo Colliery (Buckham, 1947a). The Harbour Fault eventually ceases to berecognizable as a discrete fault near the mouth of Chase River.56The Jingle Pot Fault forms the southeastern boundary of Wellington and WestWellington Collieries, and cuts across the southwestern sides of East Wellington andWakesiah Collieries. The Jingle Pot Fault is a thrust fault; it dips at 30 to 50 degreessouthwestward, and has a vertical displacement of 30 to 100 metres. Considerablefolding is developed adjacent to the Jingle Pot Fault where it crosses East WellingtonColliery (Buckham, 1947a). At this locality, the roof of the Wellington Seam is foldedinto several recumbant, north-northeast-verging asymmetric anticlinal folds (termed"rolls" by Clapp, 1913), while the floor is essentially undeformed. As a result of thestructural disharmony of its roof and floor, the Wellington Seam pinches and swellsacross the rolls. The top part of the coal bed, and the basal roof, are sheared andslickensided, while the floor is essentially undeformed. Sheared, dirty coal (termed"rash" by Clapp) occurs in thin, pinched portions of the Wellington Seam, while clean,blocky coal occurs in the thick, swelled areas.Northeast-trending extension faults cross the western workings of WellingtonColliery. One of these faults, which passes just north of the confluence of Tunnel Creekand Millstone River, cuts both the Jingle Pot and Harbour Faults, and has an apparentsinistral offset of 200 to 400 metres.2.4.2 Chase River FaultIn the central part of the study area, stratigraphic contacts, as well as severalnorthwest-trending faults, are offset across the northeast-trending Chase River Fault.Although this cross fault is largely concealed by unconsolidated surficial deposits, it hasbeen intersected by the Douglas Seam workings of Nanaimo Colliery under downtownNanaimo and Nanaimo Harbour. Boreholes southeast of Wakesiah Colliery suggest 50to 100 metres of southward downthrow of the Wellington Seam across the Chase River57Fault. The pattern of faults and geological contacts on either side of the Chase RiverFault suggests that displacement along the Chase River Fault also has a substantialdextral strike-slip component, on the order to 1 to 2 kilometres.2.4.3 Structures south of the Chase River FaultOn the south side of the Chase River Fault, the major structural element is theExtension Anticline, which extends approximately 9 kilometres southeastward fromHarewood Colliery to the south side of the Nanaimo River. Contraction faults withopposing dips flank the anticline: on the northeast limb, contraction faults cut down tothe northeast, while on the southwest limb, contraction faults cut down to thesouthwest.The crest of the Extension Anticline is poorly exposed. Isolated outcrops ofMillstream conglomerate north and southeast of Extension village show very steepnortheastward dips, suggesting the core of the anticline may be structurally complex.The northeastern limb of the Extension Anticline dips to the northeast at 10 to15 degrees. Just northeast of the anticlinal crest, the northeast-dipping Lakes Fault cutsdown to the northeast through the coal measures, and forms the northeastern boundaryof No.4 Mine, Extension Colliery. The surface trace of the Lakes Fault is marked by aprominent southwestward-facing cuesta scarp, the base of which is followed by StarkCreek. The Lakes Fault cannot be traced north of Extension Prospect Mine, nor southof Nanaimo River. At the north end of its trace, the Lakes Fault appears to beunderlain by a footwall lateral ramp in the Millstream Formation. Along NanaimoRiver, the Lakes Fault may pass into a zone of bedding-plane detachment and folding.58On the southwest side of the Extension Anticline, extensive workings ofExtension Colliery have clearly defined the structure of the coal measures. Threesouthwest-verging asymmetric, southeast-plunging synclines are present in this area.The synclines have broad northeast limbs which dip 10 to 15 degrees southwest, andnarrow, steep southwest limbs which dip 35 to 65 degrees northeast. The synclines arebounded by four southwest-dipping, northeasterly-directed contraction faults: theTimberlands, White Rapids, Extension Main and Village Faults. Subparallel to eachfault is a belt, up to 50 metres wide, of bedding-plane shear and crumpling in the weakrocks of the Northfield Member.The Extension fold-thrust belt continues southeastward beyond Nanaimo Riverto Haslam Creek. The fold-thrust belt cannot be traced far south of Haslam Creek, andappears to be terminated by the Cassidy Fault. The Cassidy Fault is best exposed in theworkings of Granby Colliery, where it consists of a 150 to 250 metre wide shear zonewith a cumulative southeastward downthrow of 200 to 240 metres to the southeast.59III. STRUCTURAL AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC PA'I TERNS OF THEWELLINGTON COAL BED AT WOLF MOUNTAIN COLLIERY3.1 INTRODUCTIONSyndepositional faulting in coal-bearing strata has long been recognized,particularly in British and American Carboniferous rocks (Raistrick and Marshall,1939; Broadhurst and others, 1968; Broadhurst and Simpson, 1983; Weisenfluh andFerm, 1984), but these studies have largely relied upon drill logs and mine plans asdata sources. There is a general lack of detailed information about the sedimentaryresponse to contemporaneous faulting in coal measures. This chapter describes andinterprets the interaction between faulting and sedimentation in the Wellington Seam,based upon detailed study of the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain Colliery (Maps 1and 2), where excellent exposures have been created during room-and-pillar mining ofthe coal.3.2 COAL BED DETAILSThe total thickness of the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain ranges from 1.5to over 5 metres, of which 65 to 95% by thickness is coal and the remainder is partings.Three laterally continuous coal beds (the Wellington Rider bed, the Upper Wellingtonbed and the Lower Wellington bed) and two major partings (the upper and lowerpartings) constitute the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain (Table 1-2; Figure 3-1).Figures 3-3, 3-4 and 3-5 exemplify the local variability of the Wellington Seam'sconstituent coal beds and partings.6 0Figure 3-1^Stratigraphic section of the Wellington Seam and its bounding strata atWolf Mountain Colliery, based on borehole, outcrop and minedataGeneral Section of Coal Measuresshalesiltstoneshale andNo.4 COALconglomerate0 000000 0 000 0 0. 0000000000 000 000000 00 000600000 0 0000.0 000000000 000p00, ogp90 0 0 0 dew 00 0 00,000 0000 0 00000 o e,000000 0 0 0 No.2 COALshale siltstone andsandstoneWELLINGTON COAL ^East WellingtonSandstoneliaslam Shale^ siltstone11^M^Srd Or C9MillstreamConglomerateNorthfieldCoal Measures30zam100oc?0 0PPPc:1-70. 0 0 000 0 000000 0 0 0 00 00 00000 0000 0 00 0 0 0 00000000 0 00 0000 000000 00064.1.0000000C"),--, shale andNo.3 COALconglomeratesandstone.=.0.9=. 0 0, 010A-03e=> 00 0 0 0,g)conglomeratesandstone00.0g P000^ Bodoc==>0000000000000 0conglomerateNo.5 COALconglomerateDetailed Roof Sectionsilty mudstonesandy siltstone,minor carbonaceousmudstoneline silty sandstoneinterlaminatedsandstone andsiltstoneinterlaminatedsiltstone andsandstone3Wellington Rider COAL^ _ upper partingUpper Wellington COALlower partingLower Wellington COALM SC 5Jrri10Figure 3-16/Figure 3-2 Legend for coal bed cross sections (Figures 3-3 through 3-5)62COAL-74,595555S5S5(-_.PA A- - -c- --C-cSheared COALGranular coaly mudstoneCoaly mudstoneCarbonaceous mudstoneMudstone,0 )Silty mudstoneSiltstoneSandstoneCoalified stumpRooty bedRipples......■•■•■•0ta^O•^/a^0,.0^I.^.•^.0••^••^0.^..Figure 3-26364Figure 3-3 Section A-A' across line of split on the upper parting at Wolf MountainColliery, at a vertical exaggeration of 6.67:1. Datum is base ofroof, corrected for gentle northward dip of coal measures. Sectionlocation shown in Figure 3-7. See Figure 3-2 for legend6 6Figure 3-4 Detail of section A-A', at no vertical exaggeration. Note infilling byupper parting of extensional sags in the underlying coal and rockbands. See Figure 3-2 for legend47-E a.inSu0^ S t,^S I0to...... ••• ••■•••••••,..../fedr, /97.. .... •■ . . . ........ .. • • ••• ••• . . ....• ■••• ... .. . .. . .. .. .^ -■.............tii.........., zz.i.".1 ..,, ,...... ._.....,.^.^....,,,,..., ..... ..... ........................ ...... ...^ .v.„,,,,,,,,,,,,-^ --...... 3..• 2. 1-xe-,:-.4..*21,:i •••••.-................................. V./01•1001••■■•MIIMMIM1111.11. 111111111111111M11111fin gum.^ -........"....-"*"..11.111.111111.111158"'"""MINIIIIIIM""''1................-•• •./7••... .;? ••..^tr/7 /!vim fsag68Figure 3-5 Section B-B' across major extensional fault at Wolf Mountain Colliery,showing associated channeling and changes in coal and rockthicknesses, at vertical exaggeration of 13.33:1. Datum is base ofroof, corrected for gentle northward dip of coal measures. Sectionlocation shown on Figure 3-7. See Figure 3-2 for legend0c-i ainSII^0U1-,AP. /7 /9^,,,,,,,,,,,A..., . •/' <11,--, •;;- ------ .,-----,,--- ..,f.,, ,-- ,-,...-7.77---,71,-.^ J^..,•• -/.0"1 1703.2.1 Coal characteristicsThe three coal beds within the Wellington Seam can be readily differentiatedon the basis of their characteristic lithotypes. All three coal beds maintain theirdistinctive characteristics throughout the mined area at Wolf Mountain.Coal of the Wellington Rider bed is bright banded to bright, hard and blocky,with a very thin (1 to 2 cm) but persistent marker band of black, arenaceous coalymudstone. Coal of the Upper Wellington bed is dull to dull and bright, thin-beddedand shaly in appearance, with lenses of black coaly mudstone. One or more bands ofhard, dull grey coal with a distinctive submetallic lustre are often present within thisunit. Coal of the Lower Wellington bed is bright banded and massive, with isolatedlenses of dirty coal and coaly and carbonaceous mudstone.3.2.2 Characteristics of partingsThe two major rock partings within the Wellington Seam are distinguishedmainly by their stratigraphic positions within the seam. At Wolf Mountain the upperparting, between the Wellington Rider and Upper Wellington coal beds, is 5centimetres to over 5 metres thick, whereas the lower parting, between the UpperWellington and Lower Wellington coal beds, is 10 to 40 centimetres thick.Both partings locally split the Wellington Seam. The lower parting causes a splitto the southwest of the mine, as indicated by boreholes beyond the mine workings. Thelower parting has had little effect on mine operations thus far, owing to its smallerthickness within the mined area. The upper parting causes a split to the southeast, and71thickens in the southeastern workings. Owing to its impact on mining operations andexcellent exposure at Wolf Mountain Colliery, the upper parting has been studied indetail.Both partings are generally structureless where they are thinner than 0.1 metres.Where the partings attain a greater thickness, they consistently display normal fining-upward grading, and become coarser-grained overall.Throughout most of the mine, both partings consist of fine-grained, more or lesscarbonaceous clastic sedimentary rock, ranging from soft black coaly mudstonethrough brown carbonaceous mudstone to hard light brown siltstone.Within the existing mine workings, the upper parting thickens and coarsenssoutheastward (Figure 3-6), passing laterally from 1 to 2 centimetres of soft black coalymudstone, to 30 centimetres of moderately hard brown silty mudstone, to over 5metres of hard sandstone and sandy siltstone. Figure 3-3 shows the rapid onset ofsplitting on the upper parting, and the extent to which the parting locally scours downinto the underlying coals.3.3 STRUCTURAL FEATURES AT WOLF MOUNTAIN COLLIERYWolf Mountain Colliery is situated on the eastern end of a broad, doubly-plunging syncline. Limb dips in the mined area range from 10 to 16 degrees, and thesynclinal axis plunges westward at 3 to 5 degrees. Two major faults cross the mine area,and have sufficient downthrow (on the order of a few metres) to constitute barriers tomine development. The roof of the Wellington Seam is displaced by many smallerextensional and compressional faults (Figure 3-7), but is otherwise structurally simple,7 2Figure 3-6 Map of thickness and coarsest lithology of the upper parting at WolfMountain Colliery. Note parallelism of trends with the southerlymajor fault11-11de^1' ^_i^ I^1- 1i^— —1^1 L,1^It^ 1c71111/n •---1^- ^---„...........^ .1-1i1 _ 1- 1I 1,o.t5,,,^st 10 15-‘_—Coarsest lithology present:coaly mudstonec=f9 carbonaceous mudstonesilty mudstone4'7> siltstonesandy siltstonesilty sandstone<c:D sandstoneMajor fault. •.^•5mFigure 3-6100Figure 3-7 Map of structural features in roof of the Wellington Seam at WolfMountain Colliery74NtII I Ct.'II^II^IIL.011  j- -1I^I1 "^-II^1^,,I^t '44.)^I-Iet,^1^1^I _3r— F.^( ^I 9 f1 I^I I,1I^I I^L _ _^-L__ 1 -1^- L i_ _ iL-- _,- -)I qA„NrMajor fault (cuts roof and floor)Minor extensional fault in roofter.Minor compressional fault in roof■■••■•••• _.-Sandstone  dike in roofCoal dike in roofA^A'Line of coalbed sectionI- ,__7_*.z.a..1_1_Jots ^1 r — ---.. I )I_ I .... --- -- __ --•li 10001ir .0.^XeetI --- &so,I 1I^N. IIIf ------ 14.1L.MFigure 3-77 6with only gentle local warps superimposed upon the broad synclinal structure. Besidesthe broad syncline, more complex structures occur on the floor of the coal bed, asshown by detailed floor elevation surveys (Figure 3-8). Two types of local floorirregularities have been recognized: 'floor rolls', which are local topographic highs, and'swilleys', which are local depressions.3.3.1 FaultsTwo major faults have been encountered within the workings of Wolf MountainColliery. These faults are shown as heavy dark lines of Figures 3-6 through 3-10. Bothmajor faults have extensional displacements of 0.6 to 5 metres down to the north orwest. Across the more southerly of the two major faults, substantial changes occur inthe thickness of individual coal and dirt bands, along with a consistent local rise in thefloor on the immediate northwestern side of the fault (Figures 3-5, 3-6 and 3-9). Acrossthe other, more westerly major fault, the only effect appears to be local shearing andflow of the Wellington coal from the western (downthrown) side to the eastern(upthrown) side of the fault (Figure 3-7).Minor extension faults are abundant, occurring as two sets, both of which cutthe roof and the Wellington Rider coal, and appear to flatten within the upper parting.The dominant set strikes to the northwest, displays consistent downthrow to thenortheast, and shows good lateral continuity. This set of faults occurs at intervals ofapproximately 80 metres. A subordinate set of faults strikes to the northeast, hasdownthrow to both the northwest or southeast, and shows little lateral continuity. Thesubordinate faults tend to occur in closely spaced swarms.77Figure 3-8 Structure contour map of floor of Wellington Seam, showing floor rollsand swilleys. Contour interval is 0.5 metres, datum is sea levelt_^""------,....5195'Ass-tl-o WOntFigure 3-8..0*."-- Floor rollc=2Swilley....ir.°. Major faultCV79Figure 3-9 Map of total thickness of the Wellington Seam (including rock bands) atWolf Mountain Colliery, with positions of floor rolls and swilleyssuperimposed1J r .L -JLine of spliton upper partingFloor rollSwilleyMajor faulttOoFigure 3-981Figure 3-10 Map of total rock band thickness within the Wellington Seam at WolfMountain Colliery0 .1 s4 5I-451•0-3.00_r—1^0.^11...___,- 1 ,,s„^1 --1,cl^r^`,'Ts 1'2, ',i^I^i^ — -1I ■^..- II N siLine of spliton upper parting.....•— Floor rollSwilleyMajor fault15^0-6°1- I1coOI^f Figure 3-1083Minor compressional faults, ranging from steep thrusts to near-bedding-planeshears, are the next most abundant structures. They strike to the northwest, parallelingthe dominant set of minor extensional faults.A few minor rotational faults are also present in the immediate roof of theWellington Seam. Their sense of displacement changes along strike fromcompressional to extensional, passing through an intermediate zone of no apparentoffset.3.3.2 Floor rollsA floor roll is a local topographic and structural high at the base of a coal bed,over which the coal may either flex upward or thin. The term 'floor roll' is in broad usein Canadian coal mines, although its original origin is obscure; it is geometric ratherthan geologic in nature, and does not imply any particular mode of origin for thefeature.Floor rolls beneath the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain Colliery are 20 to30 metres wide, and 30 to 90 centimetres high. They usually form gentle swells in thefloor, over which the coal thins. Onset of floor rolls is occasionally marked by steepupward slopes in the floor. Dips of these steep faces, upon which a polished coal-floorcontact is occasionally present, range from 25 to 35 degrees, and their heights rangefrom 60 to 90 centimetres.Floor rolls consist of medium-grained, carbonaceous, root-penetrated sandstonewhich is indistinguishable from the usual floor of the Wellington Seam. The coal8 4abruptly overlies the top of the floor rolls. Along the flanks of the floor rolls, bandingin the coal is asymptotic to the floor, and there is no sign of intertonguing of coal withthe rock of the rolls.Floor rolls are present throughout Wolf Mountain Colliery; in the northernworkings they occur as a fairly persistent northwest-striking swarms, spaced at 40 to 60metre intervals, with steep faces on their southwestern sides. Elsewhere in the mine,the distribution of floor rolls is more irregular.Floor rolls are also present in the Douglas Seam within the Pender Formationof the Nanaimo Coalfield. Clapp (1914) considered these features to be minor folds ofthe Douglas Seam and its shale floor. He considered the rolls to have formed as aresult of lateral sliding of the Douglas Seam over its floor, which was relatively weak incomparison with its sandy shale roof. Clapp noted that the coal above the rolls wasdirty and soft, whereas the floor of the Douglas Sea, was nearly always sheared andslickensided at the rolls. Such pervasive shearing within and above floor rolls is notpresent in the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain.3.3.3 SwilleysA swilley is a local depression in the floor of a coal bed, which may be filledeither with coal or with interbedded coal and fine-grained clastic sedimentary rock.When coal forms the filling of swilleys, it is often bright and high in ash, or may consistof cannel. Banding in the filling of a swilley abuts against the sides of the swilley(Elliott and others, 1984).85The term 'swilley' is geometric rather than geologic in nature, and does notimply any particular mode of origin for the feature.Swilleys beneath the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain are 20 to 40 metreswide, and 0.4 to 2.1 metres in amplitude (Figure 3-8). Their margins are usually gentleslopes of 5 to 10 degrees, although local 'steps' up to a metre high display dips as steepas 60 degrees. The swilleys are sinuous in plan, and at one locality a near right-anglebend in a swilley is accompanied by a rapid 1.5 metre step downward of the swilley'sfloor. One of the swilleys at Wolf Mountain has two short branches joining it from thenorth.The swilleys are filled with bright banded coal, occasionally accompanied bythin bands of coaly mudstone. Banding in the coal and mudstone abuts against thesides of the swilleys, and usually bends upwards in an aysmptotic manner immediatelyadjacent to the sides of the swilleys. The coal in the swilleys is indistinguishable fromthat forming the basal part of the Wellington Seam outside the swilleys. The floor andsides of the swilleys consist of rooted sandstone similar to the sandstone beneath theWellington Seam outside the swilleys.3.4 EFFECTS OF STRUCTURAL FEATURES ON SEAM THICKNESS3.4.1 Thickness variations associated with faultsThe Wellington Seam is consistently thinner on the downthrown sides of thetwo major faults. In the case of the more westerly fault, attenuation of the coal bed islargely due to shearing and squeezing of coal in a narrow belt immediately adjacent to86the fault. Coal appears to have flowed cataclastically from the downthrown to theupthrown side of the fault, and has at one point formed a coal dike in the roof.Thickness and lithologic trends in the upper parting are generally parallel to themore southerly of the two major faults (Figure 3-6). The other major fault appears tohave no effect on either thickness or lithology of the parting.On the northwestern side of the southerly fault, the upper parting consists of 5to 30 centimetres of soft black coaly mudstone, locally grading at its base to darkbrown carbonaceous or brown silty mudstone. Thickness variations appear to berandom in this area.On the southwestern side of the southerly fault, however, the upper partingbecomes thicker and coarser-grained. As the parting thickens from 20 to 60centimetres, it passes from dark brown carbonaceous mudstone through brown siltymudstone to hard siltstone. Isopachs of the upper parting generally parallel the fault,although there is much local variation in both thickness and lithology of the parting(Figures 3-4 and 3-6).The 60 centimetre isopach of the upper parting (Figure 3-6) marks the limit ofmineability and the onset of rapid thickening of the upper parting, and is thereforemapped as the line of split for practical purposes. The parting thickens rapidly to thesoutheast, doubling in thickness within a distance of 10 to 15 metres. At thesoutheastern corner of the mine workings, the upper parting is more than 5 metresthick, consisting of a fining-upward sequence of clean rippled sandstone, siltysandstone and sandy siltstone. The basal sandstone of the parting scours down into the87underlying Upper Wellington coal bed, and eventually truncates the coal altogether(Figs. 3-3 and 3-11).3.4.2 Thickness variations associated with floor rollsThe Wellington Seam thins over floor rolls. The magnitude of thinning rangesfrom 0.3 to 0.9 metres, and is consistently less than the height of the floor rolls, whichranges from 0.4 to 1.2 metres. This difference is probably due to differentialcompaction of peat over the relatively incompactible sand of the floor roll (Cairncross,1989). The roof of the coal bed arches gently over floor rolls. Over steep faces of floorrolls, the roof is often broken by minor faults which are subparallel to the steep faces,and have downthrows of 0.15 to 0.45 metres away from the rolls (Figure 3-12).The total thickness of rock bands within the Wellington Seam decreases overthe floor rolls and increases between them (Figure 3-10), with the greatest effects seenin the thickness of the basal partings within the Lower Wellington coal. The overallproportion of coal to rock is slightly lower over the floor rolls, owing to the attenuationof the relatively clean Lower Wellington coal.3.4.3 Thickness variations associated with swilleysThe Wellington Seam thickens, in places quite dramatically, in swilleys (Figure3-8). The magnitude of thickening ranges from 0.3 to nearly 2 metres, and is generallyslightly less than the depth of the swilleys. The difference in magnitude of thickening ismade up by broad, gentle sags of the roof, which conform to the course of the swilleys.88Figure 3-11 Details of erosive contact between Upper Wellington coal and silty,erosive-based sandstone of upper parting. Note warping of coalbed and minor fault at base of parting, in response to differentialloading across the margin of the channel scour. Section exposedin east rib of Crosscut X-5, at junction with Main Entry, WolfMountain Colliery, between geological stations 7 and 212, onFebruary 4, 19879 0Figure 3-12 Overthrust of Wellington Rider coal above a floor roll. Fault followsbase of upper parting, then ramps up through the Rider into theroof, at 34 degrees to bedding. Section exposed in east rib of DHeading, lA's panel, Wolf Mountain Colliery, between geologicalstations 37 and 126, on May 6, 1985zt-E anadrwmaNrigew/zosi..v.e../.4.499",uwyzerw.i://^Arzew.w.46%.m.ehrepoArem....,'SW z;/^,ff.".'^"Iff^/•^,77#^v'24 '; .7177:1777 ^4."97/1;97. /ffg7^/'two....ok-17 7:■7".. 70V/YZ.I.7•■•■•■•■•■■1!n1Iauolspuusauolsipsauolslailad IIIaucnspnw XtuoDIuoDCINHOTI92The total thickness of rock bands (Figure 3-10) increases slightly over swilleys,due to the presence of lenses of coaly mudstone in the basal part of the LowerWellington coal within the swilleys. These mudstone beds pinch out against themargins of the swilleys. The thicknesses of the major rock bands, higher in the coalbed, do not change over swilleys. The overall proportion of coal to rock is, however,slightly higher over swilleys, due to the marked thickening of the Lower Wellingtoncoal.3.5 ROOF CHARACTERISTICSThe immediate roof of the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain is a 5 to 6metres thick unit, which coarsens upward from massive, plant-bearing siltstone throughinterlaminated siltstone and sandstone to fine-grained silty sandstone (Figure 3-1). Thebasal contact of the roof with the underlying coal is usually abrupt. In the southwesterncorner of the mine, where the two major faults converge, the roof-coal contact isirregular and rough, and the basal 2 to 3 metres of the roof is locally slickensided orbrecciated.3.5.1 Coal and sandstone dikesCoal and sandstone dikes are infrequent but significant features of the roof ofthe Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain. Both types of dikes are narrow, elongate,steep-dipping bodies of material quite different from the usual roof rocks, and occur inclose association with faults.Coal dikes are bodies of intensely sheared and slickensided coal, which occur inthe immediate footwall of major faults, and are parallel to them (Figure 3-13). Coal9 3Figure 3-13 Plan and section of coal dike associated with major fault, near junctionof Supply Road and Room No.0, lA's Panel, Wolf MountainColliery. Cross-section A-B is at same scale as plan0^-E9 5dikes range in width from 0.3 to 2.5 metres, and tend to pinch and swell along strike.Exposure of the upward extent of coal dikes is limited to those localities where theyhave either collapsed into the mine workings, or have been deliberately excavatedduring mining. In some areas coal dikes extend at least 4 metres up into the roof. Theyare bounded by narrow (3 to 5 metres) belts of strongly jointed roof.Sandstone dikes are bodies of fine-grained, slightly silty, well-induratedsandstone, which project down through the immediate roof and "V" downward into thetop of the Wellington Rider coal. Sandstone dikes seldom penetrate more than 10centimetres into the coal. They parallel, and occasionally pass laterally into, thedominant set of minor extensional faults. The sandstone dike material resembles thesandstone which occurs in the roof, 3.5 to 6 metres above the Wellington Seam.3.6 SEDIMENTOLOGIC INTERPRETATIONS3.6.1 Floor rollsA variety of origins have been suggested for floor rolls in coal mines. Clapp(1914) considered the floor rolls in the Douglas Seam of the Nanaimo Coalfield to beminor folds, related to lateral movement of the Douglas Seam over its relativelyincompetent floor. Ward (1984) suggested that floor rolls could also be formed byintrusion of underlying strata into a coal seam following hydration-induced swelling.A tectonic origin for the floor rolls at Wolf Mountain is unlikely, due to therelatively strength of the sandstone floor as compared with the siltstone roof of theWellington Seam. If minor folds had formed due to lateral sliding of the WellingtonSeam, it is more probable that the folds would occur at the contact of the coal and its9 6relatively incompetent roof. The floor rolls are unlikely to have formed by hydration-induced intrusion, since the floor of the Wellington Seam does not contain moisture-sensitive materials.Several authors have proposed that floor rolls are sedimentary structures.Diessel and Moelle (1970) and Cairncross and others (1988) have suggested that floorrolls represent the fillings of river channels which either flowed beneath peat deposits(with floating peat roofs) or were incised within and confined by the peat, which laterfilled the channels following their abandonment. In both theories, the floor rolls havebeen reported to at least locally have interfingering contacts with the coal;interfingering contacts between floor rolls and coal have not been observed in the caseof the Wellington Seam. Macfarlane (1985) has suggested that floor rolls representscroll bars, part of fluvial point bar complexes which have been buried by peat. Bunnelland others (1984) have interpreted floor rolls as relict beach ridges.While no shell fossils have been recovered from the sandstones beneath theWellington Seam, the presence of Macaronichnus segregatus  trace fossilsapproximately 6 metres below the base of the coal together with the coarsening-upward grain-size profile of the sandstone suggests that it was deposited in a shallowmarine, shoreface environment. The floor rolls do not display sufficient continuity tobe beach ridges, but they may represent sand bars which were formed at a beachsurface and then subsequently uplifted and buried by peat.3.6.2 SwilleysElliott (1965) interpreted features which were similar to, but broader than theWolf Mountain swilleys, as abandoned river channels. Elliott and others (1984)9 7extended this interpretation to include lake basins. They observed that the floor of theswilleys usually lacked evidence of rooting, and suggested that the coal within swilleysmight be of allochthonous origin.The presence of rootlets in the sandstone floor and sides of the swilleys at WolfMountain shows that plants grew within the swilleys. The lithotypic similarity of thecoal within the swilleys and the basal part of the Wellington Seam outside the swilleyssuggests that conditions of peat accumulation and preservation were similar within andwithout the swilleys, and that it is not necessary to invoke an allochthonous origin forthe coal in the swilleys. The branching of one of the swilleys at Wolf Mountain suggeststhat it originated as some sort of channel rather than as a fold in the floor. The swilleysat Wolf Mountain are therefore tentatively identified as the abandoned channels ofsmall streams which subsequently were occupied by peat-forming mires.3.6.3 PartingsThin bands of coaly and carbonaceous mudstone represent the very fine-graineddeposits of overbank floods. Thicker, coarser sandy siltstones and silty mudstonesrepresent crevasse splay and possibly levee deposits. The erosive-based, locally-rippledsandstones of the upper parting in the southeastern corner of the mine may representbars and channel fills of a stream. Local deepenings of the basal scoured contact of thesandstones strike to the northeast. Steep cross-beds within the overlying silty sandstonedip to the north and northeast, suggesting northeastward sediment transport along thechannel.9 83.7 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TECTONIC AND DEPOSITIONAL FEATURESThe orientation of swilleys may be at least partially fault-related, as suggestedby the right-angle bend made by the swilley in the southwestern corner of the mine(Figure 3-7), where the two major faults converge, and the close proximity of thisswilley to the more southerly fault.Thickness changes of the lower parting and individual coal plies within theWellington Seam adjacent to the southerly fault (Figure 3-5, centre) record scouringand filling of a channel during peat accumulation, and suggest that the fault continuedto influence channel position.The parallelism of thickness and lithology trends in the upper parting to thesouthern major fault (Figure 3-6) is difficult to explain, particularly as the partingthickens on what is now the upthrown side of the fault. Southward tilting of theupthrown block is suggested by the initially nonerosive wedge-like thickening of theupper parting (Figure 3-3), accompanied by neither appreciable squeezing out of theunderlying Wellington Main peat, nor thinning of the overlying Wellington Rider peat.Close examination of the zone of rapid thickening (Figure 3-4) of the upperparting shows that its basal contact, although still non-erosive, is very irregular indetail. Clastic sediments of the upper parting appear to have filled extensional cracksand sags in the underlying peat and mud, consistent with southeastward downslopesliding of the lower beds. Elliott and others (1984) described similar extensionalfeatures in Carboniferous coals of Great Britain, which they believed to be formed bylateral mass movement of unconsolidated sediments and peat into stream channels.Perhaps the extensional cracks and sags in the coal beneath the upper parting at Wolf99Mountain were formed by lateral mass movement of the peat towards the northernmargin of the washout which cuts out the lower part of the Wellington Seam near themine portals.Growth faulting, which has been invoked as the cause of coal bed splits in othercoalfields (Weisenfluh and Ferm, 1984) is a possible cause for local syndepositionaltilting of the Wellington peats and associated clastic sediments. The most likelyposition of such a possible growth fault responsible for the tilting is postulated to besomewhere south of the mined area at Wolf Mountain.The close association of coal and sandstone dikes with minor extensional faultsin the roof of the Wellington Seam suggests that the Wellington Seam and its roof weredisrupted after burial but before the peat and overlying sediments were consolidated.Shirley (1955) recognized similar disruption features in the roof of a Carboniferouscoal bed in Britain, and suggested they were formed by earthquake-induced groundshaking. Although the clastic dikes at Wolf Mountain could have originated asinjection features following earthquake-induced liquefaction of sandstone beds, it isalso possible that the dikes and associated minor extensional faults were formed bycompaction of the sediments overlying the Wellington Seam. It is not possible toclearly establish the origin of the dikes and minor faults, in the absence of further dataconcerning the vertical and lateral variability of the sedimentary rocks immediatelyabove the coal seam.1003.8 IMPLICATIONS FOR RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCoal resource assessment is usually done by means of drilling in advance ofmining, thus providing detailed information about the coal bed and its bounding strata,at isolated points within a given coal deposit. Some of the geological features of theWellington Seam, such as splits, washouts and maybe the largest swilleys, can beoutlined by closely-spaced drilling. It is obviously impractical, however, to attempt tolocate every minor geological structure by means of drilling, because such significantfeatures as floor rolls and sandstone dikes have a very small areal extent. Nevertheless,minor geological structures might upon occasion be intersected by drillholes andrecognized in core, as suggested by Cairncross and others (1988) in the case of floorrolls.Provided that the orientation and spacing of either the controlling structures,such as faults or folds, or their products, such as coal bed splits or channels, can berecognized, predictions may be made as to the location of other such structures andtheir resultant products. Geologic forecasts would be made easier and more accurateby having either good surface exposures, or well-documented mine workings near thearea in question.Mathew and Ferm (1982) have suggested that the precision of coal reserveestimates is not greatly affected by increasing the spacing between points ofobservation within the area being investigated. Nevertheless, increased spacing ofgeologic observations reduces the likelihood that small geological structures, which areresponsible for many of the day-to-day operational difficulties in a coal mine (Elliott,1973), will be observed during exploration. Until a workable means of wide-radiusborehole geophysical sounding has been discovered, there will be a need for careful101and detailed geological study of coal outcrops, and timely examination of advancingmine workings in order to predict geologic hazards before they stop coal production.102IV. PETROGRAPHY OF THE WELLINGTON SEAMAT WOLF MOUNTAIN COLLIERY4.1 OBJECTIVEThe objective of this chapter is to assess whether lithotypes within theWellington Seam can be successfully related to depositional environments. Asecondary objective is to assess the relationships between coal lithotypes, ash contentand caking ability of the coal (expressed as free swelling index), in order to determinewhether moderately-caking coals could be reliably recognized in working faces of themine, and thus perhaps be selectively mined.4.2 TERMINOLOGYThick peat deposits may form in depositional environments where two basicconditions are satisfied (Lamberson and others, 1991). Firstly, an approximate balancemust be maintained between the rate of accumulation of plant debris and the rate ofsubsidence of the ground surface. Secondly, predominantly wet conditions must bemaintained.The terminology of peat-forming depositional environments is in a state ofconsiderable confusion. Various authors use words such as 'mire', 'bog' and 'swamp' ina seemingly interchangeable fashion (Williamson, 1967; Gary and others, 1973; Jeglumand others, 1974; Gore, 1983; Moore, 1987; Cameron and others, 1989). Table Vpresents the classification of peatlands and definition of peatland terms used in thisstudy. The generic term used in this study for a peat-forming depositional environmentis 'mire'; specific peatland types include 'swamp', 'marsh' and 'fen'.1034.3 RESULTS4.3.1 Field observationsThe Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain (Figure 4-1) may be subdivided intofive informal lithostratigraphic units (Table II; Figure 4-1A): the Wellington Rider coalbed, the upper parting (a continuous rock band), the Upper Wellington coal bed, thelower parting (another continuous rock band) and the Lower Wellington coal bed.Bright banded coals dominate in all the sections studied. Bright, dull and bright,and lustrous coals are present in most sections, but dull coals are not abundant.Discrete and laterally continuous bands of clastic sedimentary rock are commonthroughout the mine workings (Figure 4-2). Most rock bands consist of coaly orcarbonaceous mudstone. A thin band of granular mudstone is ubiquitous near the topof most sections. Silty mudstone, siltstone and fine-grained sandstone occur within theWellington Seam in the extreme southeastern corner of the study area, but were notencountered in the three pillars which were sampled.Lateral continuity of individual coals is moderate to high, while rock bands tendto pinch out, particularly within the Upper Wellington coal bed.4.3.2 Section description and correlationThe Wellington Rider coal bed, upper parting, Upper Wellington coal bed,lower parting and Lower Wellington coal bed are continuous across the study area(Figure 4-2).Figure 4-1 Locality map showing location of study area within the NanaimoCoalfield104I--1I 4.1.7.7.7.7. 11......7,11rWane:►vio ilarboar-/IIty of NanaimoAbrilifisza"k"-Collieryy louraim/ INakesiali,ColIceriesWeirs-gni Coilie ,arewcod^ ColiczyOutrrip of Welkloo 5eam,4Welad areaEastward pi.icinovi-of coa/- %kCovtslow ierocle-fil led^ ..,..,'lAkiikotAl- clianvta I Wolf Mowrfai,n CollieryLine of Split^.^, .4t.(oroaMent ovi srlrf side)^//^ I^\-.../ c.)rTi;vtberlardsCollieryI Kir% 3Figure 4-1Figure 4-la Typical stratigraphic section of the Wellington Seam illustrating itssubdivision into named coal beds and partings106U ?FEZWE U.] NCql-01,1COALLovkJEKLNG LLi 1..) G-rp1,1c oA L5 L_T -ro1.3 E Rc=r==,FCOAR.Ar\RJ LJkR MUD STON)GOAC_QAL7 NAUt-051 c..._.)NE-CCA LCAF So NA CF__cDt.1 s NA LA Ds -ro FC-4\ L -r \-1 M E C3,4sCc,AL. MODSTGr■_)ECAR.G.tN)ACeck.AS NAkkSTON Eeros 0A0.1 bash.E L.t.)1■1 alors1R)DsRCoAuPPER_NPARm NGLcw.ERPAR-n r.)6.^%.l CZTY, SE-/ EARED CCA.A1,31.s1 (4\1= F Lc=c)KFitfiRE- 4-IAMETRE5O/07108Figure 4-2 Correlation diagram of seam sections showing relation of sample sites toline of split11/PV..S4A1P/..Et.220--Virl4PLED100581/2 99 125SE22220 t2o4LA.,P47UAtrx gooF82^209^33^32^207^/73L.0WEICWELLJA.WDniCCALBright coo lII Br** banded coalcoal1E Ian banded coalcoalLustrous cordE C-Shear-ea coalCozily rtzadstime.arbeetacaouS InucksiDeutMads-topieinaishipte54.11Siorxe6andsiorteMetresAlo kerizoK1221.secticin Icoa-Hayls strn...41cm Mar EFIGuk'E 4-2l09re---It110The uppermost coal bed, the Wellington Rider, is continuous and maintains anearly uniform thickness across the study area. The Rider contains three correlatableand lithologically distinct plies of coal and rock: an uppermost bright coal, a medialgranular mudstone, and a basal bright banded coal.The upper parting is easily correlated between sections. The upper partingconsists mainly of coaly mudstone; as it thickens to the southeast it progressivelycoarsens to carbonaceous mudstone, silty mudstone, siltstone and sandstone.The Upper Wellington coal bed as a whole is easily correlated betweensections, but its constituent lithotypes are not continuous across the study area. TheUpper Wellington bed consists of interbedded coal and rock. Lustrous coal is the mostabundant lithotype in the Upper Wellington bed, together with dull and bright coal andcoaly mudstone. Dull and bright coals are often dirty, containing numerous thinlaminae of coaly mudstone. Within the Upper Wellington coal bed there is a generalupwards increase in the percentage of the duller coal lithotypes. The percentage ofmudstone, both as discrete bands and as laminae within coals, gradually decreasesupwards within the Upper Wellington coal bed. Lustrous coals are correlatable acrossdistances of 60 to 100 metres, and some of the mudstone bands extend at least 180metres.The lower parting is continuous across the study area, but locally pinches to lessthan 0.1 foot (30 millimetres) thick, rendering its recognition more difficult in somesections. The lower parting consists of carbonaceous and coaly mudstone near thethree sample points. In the southwestern corner of the study area the parting coarsensto silty mudstone.111The Lower Wellington coal bed consists mainly of bright banded coal, withlenses of dull and bright, dirty coal, coaly mudstone and carbonaceous mudstone. Dulland bright coals are locally concentrated near the top of the Lower Wellington coalbed, resulting in an overall dulling-upward seam profile. The bright banded coals arecontinuous and easily correlated, while the dull and bright coals and the mudstones arediscontinuous.4.3.3 Maceral point countsResults of maceral point count analyses of samples of coal and mudstone fromthe Wellington Seam are presented in Tables VI, VII and VIII, and illustrated byFigure 4-3.Tables IX and X summarize maceral composition of the five coal and threemudstone lithotypes which were recognized in the three columnar samples of theWellington Seam. Means and standard deviations are presented for each lithotype.The coals consist mainly of vitrinite, low to moderate amounts of inertinite andmineral matter, and low amounts of liptinite (Figure 4-4). The low liptinite content ofthe coals causes the coals to cluster near the vitrinite-inertinite axis of the diagramFigure 4-5 shows in detail the area near the vitrinite vertex of the ternary plot. Maceralcompositions of the Wellington coals overlap considerably, but there is a generalcompositional clustering of coals of similar lithotype.Lamberson and others (1991) introduced an alternative style of ternary plot toillustrate the maceral composition of coals which contain minimal liptinite.Figure 4-3 Lithotype and maceral profiles of the Wellington Seam112;)NW SEWM 220 WM 100 WM 222liptiniteinertinitemineralmattertelocollinitedesmocolliniteteliniteMACERALSIA1BI Ca3A3B3C451A787C89I0II7.25 ft. (2.21 m)WELLINGTONRIDER COALuppERPARTINGUPPERWELLINGTONCOALLOWERPARTINGLOWERWELLINGTONCOAL0^100volume percentgi dirty coallustrous coalr^coaly7Zri mudstonecarbonaceous^ mudstone■ bright coalbright bandedcoaldulland bright^I coalin dull coal100volume percentLITHOTYPESgranularmudstone114Figure 4-4 Ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellington coals, mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportion of vitrinite (V), inertinite(I) and liptinite (L)Coal Lithotypes:*: Bright*: Bright Banded±: Dull and Bright*: Lustrous,„: DullFigure 4-425 7550116Figure 4-5 Detailed ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellington coals,mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportion of vitrinite (V),inertinite and (I) and liptinite (L)Coal Lithotypes:*: Bright* : Bright Banded+: Dull and Bright* : Lustrous,6, : DullFigure 4-50O I10^15^20^25^30^-■NI118The constituents which are plotted are structured vitrinite (SV), degradedvitrinite (DV) and inertinite.For the purposes of this study, SV is considered to consist of telinite andtelocollinite; DV is considered to consist of desmocollinite Tables XI and XII presentSV, DV and inertinite contents of the coals examined in this study. Figure 4-6 is a plotof SV against DV and inertinite (volume percent, mineral-matter-free basis) for coallithotypes of the Wellington Seam. Dull and bright coals and bright banded coals showfair clustering in adjacent fields on this plot. Figure 4-7 is a similar plot for mudstonelithotypes of the Wellington Seam. The three mudstone lithotypes show fair clusteringon this plot.On a whole rock basis (Table IX; Figure 4-8), lustrous coals have the highestmean vitrinite content (87%) of the five coal lithotypes recognized in this study,followed by bright coals (85%), bright banded coals (83%), dull and bright coals (83%)and dull coals (one sample only, 80%). Bright banded coals have the highest meaninertinite content (15%), followed by bright coals (11%), dull coals (one sample only,7%), dull and bright coals (7%) and lustrous coals (3%). Bright coals have the highestmean liptinite content (2%), followed by bright banded coals (1%) and lustrous coals(1%). Dull and bright coals and dull coals contain only traces of liptinite. Dull andbright coals and dull coals contain the highest mean mineral matter content, at 12%each, followed by lustrous coals (8%), bright coals (2%) and bright banded coals (2%).On a whole rock basis (Table IX; Figure 4-8), granular mudstones have thehighest mean vitrinite content (70%) of the three mudstone lithotypes which weresampled, followed by coaly mudstone (60%) and carbonaceous mudstone (28%). Coalymudstones have the highest mean inertinite content (4%) followed by granular119Figure 4-6 Ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellington coals, mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportion of structured vitrinite (SV),degraded vitrinite (DV) and inertinite (I)SVLithotypes:*: Bright Coal*: Bright Banded Coal±: Dull and Bright Coal,i : Lustrous CoalA : Dull Coal^<rDDVFigure 4-7 Ternary maceral composition diagram of the Wellington mudstones,mineral-matter-free basis, showing proportion of structuredvitrinite (SV), degraded vitrinite (DV) and inertinite (I)121Lithotypes:0 : Carbonaceous Mudstone,: Coaly Mudstone0 : Granular MudstoneFigure 4-7DV25 1007550123Figure 4-8 Maceral composition of lithotypes, whole rock basis: bright coal (B),bright banded coal (Bb), dull and bright coal (D + B), dull coal(D), lustrous coal (DL), carbonaceous mudstone (Mcb), coalymudstone (Mco) and granular mudstone (Mgr)1009080605040 ^30 — 20 ^10 ^structuredvitrinitedesinocollinitesemilusinitefusiniteother incrtstotalliptinitemineralmatter13^Bb^DB•1111 1136•• •5Might70  Sae OOOOOalIOW OOOOO1811^I O^11:^IMISSIOSSOISMOSSUSD^DL Mcb Mco^Mgr11 111 1111NMI :111.1IBMS :::MEV1111111111111di IA!IS ISIS111111011aim11111 OOOO1.11111HIM illISMIISI SillI N I1111111ULMOOOOOO OOOOFigure 4-8:Maceral composition of lithotypes, whole rock basisB = Bright coal^Bb = Bright banded coal^DB = Dull and bright coalD Dull coal DL = Lustrous coal^Mcb = Carbonaceous mudstoneMco = Coaly mudstone^Mgr = Granular mudstone125mudstones (3%) and carbonaceous mudstones (2%). All three rock lithotypes haveidentical mean liptinite contents (1%). Carbonaceous mudstones have the highestmean mineral matter content (68%), followed by coaly mudstones (34%) and granularmudstones (4%).On a mineral-matter-free basis (Table X; Figure 4-9), lustrous coals have thehighest mean vitrinite content (95%) of the five coal lithotypes recognized in this study,followed by dull and bright coals (94%), dull coals (one sample only, 91%), bright coals(86%) and bright coals (84%). Bright banded coals have the highest mean inertinitecontent (15%), followed by bright coals (11%), dull coals (one sample only, 8%), dulland bright coals (5%) and lustrous coals (4%). Bright coals have the highest meanliptinite content (2%), followed by bright banded coals (1%), lustrous coals (1%), dulland bright coals (trace) and dull coals (one sample only, trace).On a mineral-matter-free basis (Table X; Figure 4-9), among the mudstones,coaly mudstones have the highest mean vitrinite content (92%), followed bycarbonaceous mudstones (81%) and granular mudstones (80%). Granular mudstoneshave the highest mean inertinite content (19%), followed by carbonaceous mudstones(18%) and coaly mudstones (8%). All three rock lithotypes have identical meanliptinite contents (1%).The three mudstone lithotypes (carbonaceous, granular and coaly) showconsiderable overlap on a crossplot (Figure 4-10) of vitrinite content (volume percent,whole rock basis) versus ash content (weight percent, whole rock basis). The lithotypescan, however, be fairly well distinguished on a crossplot (Figure 4-11) of vitrinitecontent (volume percent, whole rock basis) against mineral matter content (volumepercent, whole rock basis). Coaly mudstones have a clearly higher vitrinite content126Figure 4-9 Maceral composition of lithotypes, mineral-matter-free basis: bright coal(B), bright banded coal (Bb), dull and bright coal (D + B), dullcoal (D), lustrous coal (DL), carbonaceous mudstone (Mcb),coaly mudstone (Mco) and granular mudstone (Mgr)11111111111"1 11 1 structuredvitrnntetotalliptinitedesmocollinitesemilusinitelusiniteother inertsFigure 4-9:Maceral composition of lith otypes, mineral-matter-free basisB = Bright coalD = Dull coalBb =DL =McoBright banded coalLustrous coal= Coaly mudstoneDB = Dull and briLdu coalMcb = Carbonaceous mudstoneMgr = Granular mudstone100B Bb90 ;;^SO ......80.. IMMO 1111111111■1111111111111mom11111 111111111■Iiiiiiii II .cor;" main1111m1 1111115170 11111111mum 11111111111111111■11111111 MUMIMM■!■111110160 NIMBI OIDOSSOE M1111111 "MIgillelm1111111115011111111E'10`4330-62010DB1:::51 IMMOaimellOaI■■■IMM■smutNumnemHMOHMSIIOIIsmo■MUMsuns■111111111■I■HessmomD^DL^Mcb^Mco^N'lgrSOM.MOMOMRN128Figure 4-10 Crossplot of ash content (weight percent, whole rock basis) and vitrinitecontent (volume percent, whole rock basis) for mudstonelithotypes of the Wellington Seam0aAOAA70T0 Mudstone Lithotypes:0 : GranularA : Coalyp: Carbonaceous60-oAAA_^50 --^0p4^__ 0_cn^_ AA40 -A30-11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111200^10^20^30^40^50^60^70^80Vitrinite Figure 4-10130Figure 4-11 Crossplot of mineral matter content (volume percent, whole rock basis)and vitrinite content (volume percent, whole rock basis) formudstone lithotypes of the Wellington Seam^90-z^ Mudstone Lithotypes:0^ 0: Granular80 _ 0^A: Coaly0: Carbonaceousci) 70=--4—)^= 0_-4—)ct 60A50Ct 40 =1^ A®0;.-1^= ACi..)^=_- A30=,•F.1 ^_ A^ 20-7:0 0=10=70==0^10^20^30^40^50^60^70^80Vitrinite Figure 4-11132(mean 92%, standard deviation 6%) than granular mudstones (mean 80%, standarddeviation 4%). The mineral-matter-free vitrinite content of carbonaceous mudstone(mean 81%, standard deviation 16%) overlaps the vitrinite content of the other twomudstone lithotypes.4.3.4 Ash contentTable XIII presents results of ash content determinations of samples of coal andmudstone from the Wellington Seam. Table XIV summarizes ash content of the fivecoal and three mudstone lithotypes which were recognized in the three columnarsamples of the Wellington Seam Means and standard deviations are presented foreach lithotype.On a dry basis, dull and bright coals have the highest mean ash content (22.8%)of the five coal lithotypes recognized in this study, followed by dull coals (one sampleonly, 18.5%), lustrous coals (16.8%), bright coals (11.2%) and bright banded coals(10.2%).On a dry basis, carbonaceous mudstones have the highest mean ash content(56.9%) of the three mudstone lithotypes which were sampled, followed by coalymudstone (45.2%) and granular mudstone (44.3%).4.3.5 Free Swelling IndexTable XIII presents results of FSI determinations of samples of coal from theWellington Seam. Table XIV summarizes FSI values of the five coal lithotypes which133were recognized in the three columnar samples of the Wellington Seam. Means andstandard deviations are presented for each lithotype.On an as-received basis, bright banded coals have the highest mean FSI (3.6),followed by bright coals (33), lustrous coals (3.3), dull and bright coals (3.0) and dullcoals (one sample only, 2.0).4.3.6 Petrographic indicesTable XIII presents two calculated petrographic indices: the gelification index(GI) and the tissue preservation index (TPI). Diessel (1982; 1986) introduced theseindices as components of a crossplot which could be used to assess the depositionalenvironment of a coal, given maceral composition of the coal.The TPI as defined by Diessel (1986, page 19) is:telinite + telocollinite + semifusinite + fusinitedesmocollinite + macrinite + inertodetriniteThe TPI of a coal is the ratio of material with remnant cellular structure tomaterial lacking cellular structure. Coal with a high TPI contains abundant wellpreserved plant tissue. High TPI values may therefore indicate increased contributionof arboreal vegetal material to a peat, or they may be due to concentrations ofsemifusinite and fusinite, which were formed by burning of plant tissues (Lambersonand others, 1992).134The GI as originally defined by Diessel (1986, page 19) is:vitrinite + macrinitesemifusinite + fusinite + inertodetriniteThe GI of a coal is the ratio of gelified material to non-gelified material. Coalwith a high GI contains abundant gelified material, which may be due to the presenceof a high water table with limited oxygen supply; a decrease in the GI indicatesincreased oxidation of plant tissues (Lamberson and others, 1992).Crossplots of GI of whole seam sections against TPI were introduced by Diessel(1986) to distinguish coals which originated in different depositional environments.Diessel recognized eight different depositional environments: limno-telmatic, telmatic,marsh, fen, limnic, wet forest swamp, dry forest swamp and terrestrial.Figures 4-12, 4-13 and 4-14 are crossplots, constructed according to Diessel'smodel, of GI and TPI for the Wellington coals sampled in this study. One lustrous coalfrom the Upper Wellington coal bed at locality WM222, near the southeastern cornerof the area, has an extremely high TPI (8.1) and therefore plots outside the limits ofthe diagram.Figure 4-12 is a crossplot of GI and TPI of the various coal lithologies sampledin this study. Bright banded coals and banded coals tend to plot together, with lower GIvalues than those of dull and bright coals, dull coals and lustrous coals.Figure 4-13 is a crossplot of GI and TPI for the same data set, keyed tostratigraphic position within the Wellington Seam. Coals from the Wellington Rider,135Figure 4-12 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotfor coal lithotypes of the Wellington SeamLIMNO-TELMATICMARSHFENTELMATIC* ++*A **J.k., WET*FORESTDRYFORESTSWAMPTERRESTRIALCoal Lithotypes:*: Bright* : Bright Banded: Dull and Bright* . Lustrous• DullFigure 4-12O 1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^1^10 1 2 3 4 5Tissue Preservation Index137Figure 4-13 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotfor the Wellington Rider, Upper Wellington and LowerWellington coal bedsLIMNO-TELMATICMARSHFEN0*^**WEI*FOREST**DRYFORESTSWAMPTERRESTRIALStratigraphic Position:*. Wellington Rider„: Upper Wellington*: Lower WellingtonFigure 4-13TELMATIC* *0^1^2^3^4^5Tissue Preservation Index139Figure 4-14 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotfor samples from three different columnar sections (sites WM100,WM220 and WM222) of the Wellington SeamLIMNO-TELMATIC TELMATICYENxx„ wETX_H_ * x FOREST* *0^1Tissue2^3^4^5Preservation In ex+Sample Locations:+. Section 100DRY x : Section 220FORESTSWAMP *. Section 222Figure 4-14TERRESTRIALIIIIIIII1111111111111111(1111111111111111111111Ill* +C-_141Figure 4-15 Crossplot of vitrinite content and inertinite content (mineral-matter-freebasis, volume percent) for coal lithotypes of the Wellington Seam100LustrousyrDull andcoals andBright coals9590=CL)••--185•r-4••i■)80 -=75Coal Lithotypes:*: Bright*: Bright Banded± : Dull and Bright* : Dull Lustrous• : DullBright coals andBright Banded coals70 ^ IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII0 5^10^15^20^25Inerti ite Figure 4-15143Figure 4-16 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotfor bright banded coals and bright coals of the Wellington Seam*** *** ^FOREST* SWAMPDRYFORESTSWAMP*Coal Lithotyp es:* : Bright*: Bright BandedFigure 4-16FENug^*MARSHcpLIMNO-TELMATIC^TELMATICTERRESTRIALIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIiii0^1^2^3^4^5Tissue Preservation Index145Figure 4-17 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotfor dull and bright coals and dull coals of the Wellington SeamLIMNO-TELMATIC TELMATIC^M ^ +(1) +:7i^MARSH+0 .A^+_FEN^WET- FORESTSWAMP0•P■I+)-Q. r-i "--4 7-•I-1^:•il^-Fi^-(1)^- DRYFORESTC...^-SWAMPCoal Lithotypes:+: Dull and Bright6,: DullFigure 4-17TERRESTRIAL1-4• IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiiiOnv^1^2^3^4^5Tissue Preservation Index147Figure 4-18 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotfor lustrous coals of the Wellington SeamLIMNO-TELMATIC TELMATIC MARSH**0FEN WETFORESTSWAMPCoal Lithotypes:„. LustrousDRYFORESTSWAMPFigure 4-18TERRESTRIAL.,•-4•^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1Onu 1^2^3^4^5Tissue Preservation Index149Figure 4-19 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotshowing changes in composition of Wellington coals at localityWM100LIMNO-TELMATIC TELMATICFENUDRYFORESTSWAMPTERRESTRIALR = Rider coalU = Upper coalL = Lower coalLocality WM 1001MARSHFigure 4-19°0IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIiIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I1^2^3^4^5Tissue Preservation Indext0l151Figure 4-20 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotshowing changes in composition of Wellington coals at localityWM220LIMNO-TELMATIC TELMATICMARSHDRYFORESTSWAMPR = Rider coalU = Upper coalL = Lower coalLocality WM 220Figure 4-20TERRESTRIAL•^IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIIi i IIIIIIIIii° 0 1^2^3^4^5Tissue Preservation Index153Figure 4-21 Gelification index (GI) versus tissue preservation index (TPI) cross-plotshowing changes in composition of Wellington coals at localityWM222LIMNO-TELMATIC TELMATIC0IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIIi i1^2^3^4^5Tissue Preservation IndexOne coal plots off scale to rightR = Rider coalU = Upper coalL = Lower coalLocality WM 222Figure 4-21DRYFORESTSWAMPTERRESTRIAL11O00-r1 -155Upper Wellington and Lower Wellington subdivisions of the Wellington Seam overlapon this plot. At the scale of entire coal beds there is no obvious stratigraphic control onGI and TPI values.Figure 4-14 is a crossplot of GI and TPI for the same data set, keyed to samplelocation within the study area. There is considerable overlap of the GI and TPI valuesfor coals from all three locations. Coals from locality WM220, near the northwesterncorner of the underground study area, tend to have slightly lower TPI values than coalsfrom locality WM100, in the middle of the mine4.4 RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LITHOTYPE, VITRINITE CONTENT, ASHCONTENT AND FREE SWELLING INDEX OF WELLINGTON COALSFigure 4-22 is a crossplot of vitrinite content (by volume, mineral-matter-freebasis) against ash content (by weight, dry basis) of the Wellington coals. Twocompositional clusters are present on this plot. Bright banded coals and bright coalsform the first cluster, characterized by mineral-matter-free vitrinite contents of 75 to 90percent by volume and dry ash contents of 5 to 15 percent by weight. Dull and brightcoals and lustrous coals form the second cluster, characterized by mineral-matter-freevitrinite contents of 87 to 98 percent by volume and dry ash contents of 10 to 34percent by weight.Figure 4-23 is a crossplot of free swelling index (FSI) against ash content (byweight, dry basis) of the Wellington coals. There is a general tendency for coals withlower ash contents to have higher free swelling indices. In an attempt to clarify therelationship between FSI and ash content, the coals were grouped by lithotype. FSIvalues of coals in the first group (Figure 4-24), consisting of bright and bright banded156Figure 4-22 Crossplot of vitrinite content (mineral-matter-free, volume percent) andash content (dry basis, weight percent) of coal lithotypes of theWellington Seam35.0 -ir"\I^Cluster 2: mainly/ -T- Dull and Bright coalsand Lustrous coals\^30.0 -^Coal Lithotypes:: Bright*. Bright Banded/ + : Dull and Bright^/25.0 - *: Lustrouso: D ull ±*4cn 20.0 -Bright coals^ \ ACluster 1:and Bright Banded coals^Ni_^± 1^_^ *15.0 - ---7/^"-• .....,„_N * \N*^›\^ r10.0 -^N...*^/\* * **^......../..-75.0^I^I^I^IIIIIII--+- r-i—riIIIIIIIIIIIiii70 80^90^100^Vitrinite Figure 4-22Figure 4-23 Crossplot of free swelling index and ash content (dry basis, weightpercent) of Wellington coals1585.0 :^=^*(i) 4.5 - Coal Lithotypes:rzi^:^* X^ *: Bright4.0 -_- * *: Bright Banded** ±: Dull and Bright*^+^* *: Lustrous:),-0 3.5 -^* A : Dull= *+^•,-4^- *7.- 3.0 -cl)^1^*^ +2.5 -C/D^- **^+CI) 2.0 -^ A^C.)^:.T._i 1.51.0 1^I^I^1^1^I^I0^10 20 30 40Ash Figure 4-23Figure 4-24 Crossplot of free swelling index and ash content (dry basis, weightpercent) of Wellington bright coals and bright banded coals1605.0 —=cu 4.5 7_" t 14.0 —a-•-.4^-**.(^** ******Coal Lithotypes:*: Bright*: Bright Banded**1.0^ 1^I^ I^ 10 10 20 30Ash Figure 4-24162coals, are strongly depressed by increased ash content. FSI values of coals in thesecond group (Figure 4-25) show no clear relationship to ash content.Figure 4-26, 4-27 and 4-28 are crossplots of FSI against vitrinite content (byvolume, whole rock basis) of the Wellington coals. Considerable scatter is evident onthese plots. Separation of the coals into two groups as above does not resolve thescatter; it therefore appears that changes in vitrinite content have no major effect onthe FSI of the Wellington coals.4.5 INTERPRETATION4.5.1 Petrography of the Wellington SeamA crossplot of the mineral-matter-free vitrinite and inertinite contents of theWellington coals (Figure 4-15) indicates that they are fairly evenly distributed betweentwo end-members. Bright coals and bright banded coals have higher GI values thandull and bright coals and lustrous coals, indicating that bright coals and bright bandedcoals contain a higher proportion of structured plant tissues. Perhaps the structuredplant tissues formed a coarser-grained peat, in which case the bright appearance of thefirst group of coal lithotypes may be due to more efficient reflection of light fromcoarse-grained organic matter. Conversely, the second group of coal lithotypes mayappear less bright on a macroscopic scale due to diffuse reflection of light from finer-grained organic matter.Figure 4-25 Crossplot of free swelling index and ash content (dry basis, weightpercent) of Wellington dull and bright coals, dull coals andlustrous coals163+^*^Coal Lithotypes:+: Dull and Bright*: LustrousA: Dullz 3.0 -•p•-i -2.5 -C/D^-a.)^CI) 2.0 - A1.50^10^20^30^40Figure 4-25As165Figure 4-26 Crossplot of free swelling index and vitrinite content (whole rock basis,volume percent) of Wellington coals* Coal Lithotypes:*: Bright*: Bright Banded+: Dull and Bright* : Lustrous+^p: Dull****^+^*A5.0 -Mcu 4.54.03.57-1 3.0-I.)2.5 1CirD (1) 2.0 =CI)4_, 1.5 7_1.070^80^90^100Vitrinite Figure 4-26167Figure 4-27 Crossplot of free swelling index and vitrinite content (whole rock basis,volume percent) of bright coals and bright banded coals of theWellington Seam*(:1) 2.0C.)••1T..4 1.51.0*5.0=cu 4.54.0 =Coal Lithotypes:*: Bright*: Bright Banded70^80^90^100Vitrinite Figure 4-27169Figure 4-28 Crossplot of free swelling index and vitrinite content (whole rock basis,volume percent) dull and bright coals, dull coals and lustrouscoals of the Wellington SeamCL)4.0* +3.53.0 -2.5 --2.0 A1.570^80^90Vitrinite100Figure 4-28**Coal Lithotypes:: Dull and Bright*: LustrousA : Dull1714.5.2 Petrographic indicesThe high TPI and GI of many of the Wellington coals indicates that their peatprecursors contained relatively high amounts of structured plant tissues. The peatswere probably deposited under wet conditions, consistent with origin in wet forestswamps, fens or marshes (Table V; Figures 4-12, 4-13 and 4-14).Bright banded coals and bright coals from the Wellington Seam have moderateto high TPI and GI value, suggesting that they originated mainly in wet forestedswamps and less commonly in fens or marshes (Figure 4-16).Dull and bright coals and dull coals from the Wellington Seam have high TPIand high GI values, again suggesting that they originated in wet forested swamps(Figure 4-17). Very high GI values (over 20) suggest that the coal-forming peat waseither rapidly buried or perhaps accumulated under very wet conditions.The anomalously-high TPI of the lustrous coal (sample WM222/3) from theUpper Wellington coal bed at locality WM222 is due to its high combined telinite andtelocollinite content (87% by volume On a mineral-matter-free basis). This coal mayhave originated as individual logs. The other samples of lustrous coal show markedlylower TPI values, suggesting that they originated in wet forest swamps or marshes(Figure 4-18).4.5.3 Depositional historiesAn indication of the depositional history of a coal seam may be obtained bycross-plotting GI and TPI for successive coal plies within the seam at a given locality.172Figures 4-19, 4-20, and 4-21 are composite cross-plots for coal samples of theWellington Seam at localities WM100, WM220 and WM222 respectively within theworkings of the Wolf Mountain mine.4.5.3.1 Locality WM100At locality WM100 (Figure 4-19) in the middle of the mine workings (Map 2),the TPI/GI crossplot indicates that nearly all the coals originated as wet forest swamppeats. Coals of the basal part of the Lower Wellington Seam contain a high proportionof material derived from structured plant tissues; their precursor peats may haveconsisted mainly of logs. The overall proportion of structured plant tissue (as indicatedby declining TPI values) decreased and the level of oxidation (as indicated bydecreasing GI) increased as the peat accumulated. By the time that the last of theLower Wellington peats accumulated, the peat was only slightly dominated bystructured material, perhaps indicating establishment of a mixed community of treesand sedge-like plants, under slightly drier conditions. The Lower Wellington peat wascapped by mud of the lower parting. The erosional basal surface of the parting atWM100 (Figure 4-2) suggests that the top of the peat was scoured by streams.The basal coal of the Upper Wellington bed at locality WM100 has a markedlyhigher GI, suggesting the return of wetter conditions; the overlying coal has a lower GI,suggesting that conditions subsequently became drier. The TPI of both coals is similarto that of the uppermost coal of the Lower Wellington bed, suggesting that the relativeabundance of woody and non-woody plants remained stable while the UpperWellington peat was deposited. The brief increase in GI for the Upper Wellington mayreflect the presence of standing water in channels at the top of the underlying LowerWellington peats, only partially infilled by muds of the lower parting (Figure 4-2).173Following deposition of the upper parting mud, increased GI and TPI of thebasal coal of the Wellington Rider bed suggest that wetter conditions again prevailed,and that trees became more dominant as a source of organic debris. The upper coal ofthe Wellington Rider has higher TPI, indicting perhaps a greater component of woodymaterial, but slightly lower GI, indicative of slightly drier conditions.4.5.3.2 Locality WM220At locality WM220 in the northwestern corner of Wolf Mountain Colliery (Map2), the TPI/GI crossplot (Figure 4-21) indicates that the coals originated as wet forestswamp, fen and marsh peats. Coals of the basal part of the Lower Wellington Seamcontain a moderately high proportion of material derived from structured plant tissues,as indicated by their TPI greater than 2; their precursor peats may therefore have beenwoody. The TPI and GI values of the basal coal indicate that it originated as wet forestswamp peat. The proportion of structured plant tissue gradually decreased as theremainder of the Lower Wellington peat was deposited, indicating a gradual decline inthe contribution of woody material to the peat. The GI of the Lower Wellington peatslowly declined at first, indicating slightly greater levels of oxidation and probablyslightly drier conditions. The GI of the uppermost coal of the Lower Wellington bed ismarkedly higher (23.8) than that of the underlying coal (7.5), indicating considerablylower levels of oxidation of the precursor peat, probably associated with considerablywetter conditions but still within a wet forest swamp environment.Following deposition of the muds of the lower parting, the basal UpperWellington peat was deposited. The TPI and GI of this unit are similar to those of themiddle coal of the Lower Wellington bed, suggesting a return to somewhat drier174conditions within a wet forest swamp environment. The overlying two coals aremarkedly duller (Figure 4-2) and have successively higher GI values, suggesting thatlevels of oxidation declined and conditions again became wetter, probably in a marshenvironment. The uppermost two coals of the Upper Wellington bed are also dull, butdisplay a gradual increase in TPI. Slight upward increase of the GI of the coals suggestsan initially lower level of oxidation followed by a slightly higher level of oxidation,perhaps related to initially drier then slightly wetter conditions. The precursor peats ofthese coals were probably deposited in an environment which was transitional from amarsh to a wet forest swamp.Following deposition of the upper parting mud, the Wellington Rider peatswere deposited. The coals of the Wellington Rider bed are brighter than the uppercoals of the underlying Upper Wellington Bed. The basal bright banded coal of theWellington Rider has a moderately low TPI and GI, indicating a decline in thecontribution of structured plant tissue and increased oxidation of the precursor peat;this peat was perhaps deposited in a fen environment. The TPI and GI of the overlyingbright coal are moderate, indicating a higher content of structured plant tissue andslightly lower levels of oxidation in the precursor peat, which was probably deposited ina wet forest swamp environment.4.5.3.3 Locality WM222At locality WM222 near the southeastern corner of the mine workings (Map 2),the TPI/GI (Figure 4-15) crossplot indicates that the coals originated under widelyvarying conditions. The bright banded coals of the basal part of the Lower WellingtonSeam contain a moderate to moderately high proportion of material derived fromstructured plant tissues, as indicated by their TPI values greater than 1.5; their175precursor peats may therefore have contained significant quantities of woody material.The TPI and GI values of the basal coal indicate that it originated as wet forest swamppeat. The proportion of structured plant tissue in the overlying peat was lower, asindicated by lower TPI values. Oxidation of the peat was slightly less effective, perhapsindicative of slightly wetter conditions. The peat probably accumulated in a transitionalenvironment between a wet forest swamp and a fen. The upper coal of the LowerWellington bed has a slightly higher TPI and lower GI, indicative of greater input ofstructured plant material to the peat under somewhat drier conditions. A wet forestswamp origin is suggested for this coal.Following deposition of muds of the lower parting, the Upper Wellington peatwas deposited. The Upper Wellington bed consists of a single ply of lustrous coal, withvery high TPI (8.1) and GI (47.7) values. This coal probably originated as a deposit oflogs, branches and twigs.The upper parting at WM222 is represented by a bed of carbonaceousmudstone; immediately to the southeast of this locality the parting thickens andcoarsens rapidly. It is therefore probable that WM222 was on the distal edge of acrevasse splay deposit.Following deposition of the upper parting mud, the Wellington Rider peatswere deposited. The coals of the Wellington Rider bed are, as elsewhere at WolfMountain, brighter than the underlying coals. The basal bright banded coal of theWellington Rider has a moderately high TPI and a high GI, suggesting that it wasdeposited in a very wet forest swamp environment. The overlying bright coal has a verylow TPI and moderately high GI, indicating that its precursor peat consisted mainly ofdegraded, moderately oxidized plant tissue. This coal's GI and TPI values, together176with its high content of ash (23%) and desmocollinite (61%, mineral-matter-free)suggest that it originated in a marsh which was subject to inundation by mud-richwater. The uppermost coal of the Wellington Rider is also bright, but has a relativelylow ash content (9%), moderately high TPI and moderate GI, indicating a markedlygreater input of structured plant tissues and slightly higher levels of oxidation,consistent with an origin in a wet forested swamp.177V. CONCLUSIONSThe Wellington Seam, which has the lithostratigraphic rank of bed and is 1.5 to5 metres thick, lies near the base of the Northfield Member of the ExtensionFormation, of Late Cretaceous age. The Extension Formation is one of sevenformations, comprising the basal half of the Upper Cretaceous Nanaimo Group, whichcrop out and are present in boreholes and mine shafts within the western half of theNanaimo Coalfield.Difficult geological conditions, including seam splits, washouts and faults, havehampered development of underground coal mines at Nanaimo. Nevertheless, theWellington Seam was extensively mined, yielding about 30 megatonnes of coal from 96mine entries within the western half of the Nanaimo Coalfield Mining of theWellington Seam began in 1871, and continued, with some interruptions, until 1987.Although all of the mines are now closed, they continue to present hazards to urbandevelopment of the city of Nanaimo, through subsidence, collapse and mine fires.Basement beneath the Nanaimo Group in the study area consists mainly ofTriassic volcanic rocks of the Karmutsen Formation, locally intruded by Jurassicgranodiorite of the Nanaimo River Batholith. The basement paleosurface formedisolated hills during deposition of the basal Nanaimo Group within the study area. Atleast one of the basement hills remained emergent while the precursory peats of theWellington Seam were being formed, resulting in local absence of the WellingtonSeam.Formations of the basal half of the Nanaimo Group are defined on the basis oflithostratigraphy. From the base upwards, they are the Comox Formation, the Haslam178Formation, the East Wellington Formation, the Extension Formation, the PenderFormation, the Protection Formation, and the Cedar District Formation.The Comox Formation consists of two members within the study area: the basalconglomeratic Benson Member, nil to 120 metres thick, and the overlying sandyDunsmuir Member, nil to 100 metres thick. The coal-bearing Cumberland Member ofthe formation, recognized in the Comox Coalfield, is absent within the study area. TheBenson Member unconformably overlies pre-Cretaceous basement and is bestdeveloped along the flanks of basement paleohighs. The Benson Member intertonguesbasinwards with the Dunsmuir Member and the Haslam Formation. Where the BensonMember is absent, the Dunsmuir Member directly overlies the basement.The Haslam Formation consists of 100 to 150 metres of mudstone and siltstonewith minor sandstone. The upper 15 to 40 metres of the Haslam Formation locallycontain more abundant sandstone beds. In the southern part of the Nanaimo Coalfield,thrust faults and associated folds have increased the apparent thickness of the HaslamFormation to as much as 500 metres.The East Wellington Formation consists of a single coarsening-upward unit of 5to 47 metres of sandstone with minor pebble-conglomerate and grit. The EastWellington is thickest along its outcrop edge, and thins gradually downdip to the southand east. The contact of the East Wellington sandstone with the overlying coal of theWellington Seam is almost always abrupt, marked by small-scale undulations rangingin amplitude from 15 to 120 centimetres. In the northwestern corner of the NanaimoCoalfield, the uppermost East Wellington sandstone grades upwards andsoutheastwards into dirty, sandy coal, which in turn grades into clean coal of theWellington Seam. The East Wellington Formation was probably deposited on the179shoreface of northwest-prograding wave-dominated strandplain, fed by sand-dominated distributaries.The Extension Formation consists of two members within the study area: thebasal, dominantly fine-grained Northfield Member, nil to 45 metres thick, and theoverlying conglomeratic Millstream Member, 90 to 230 metres thick. The MillstreamMember thickens to the south and east at the expense of the Northfield Member,which is locally altogether absent due to erosion prior to deposition of the Millstreamconglomerates. Coal beds are present within both members of the ExtensionFormation, but coal of mineable thickness is confined to the Northfield Member. Thethickest and most laterally continuous coal is the Wellington Seam.The Wellington Seam is a composite of up to three closely-associated coal beds:the Wellington Rider, Upper Wellington and Lower Wellington, which have beenmined together as a unit in localities where the intervening clastic rock partings arethin Mudstones are the most common clastic rocks found in close association with theWellington Seam. A very thin (1 to 2 cm) but laterally persistent band of blackarenaceous or 'granular' mudstone occurs in the middle of the Wellington Rider coal.This band may represent an altered tuff, an eolian deposit or a fire splay. Fining-upward siltstones, silty mudstones and carbonaceous mudstones associated with theWellington Seam probably represent crevasse-splay or levee deposits. Cross-bedded,rippled, locally erosive-based sandstones, which occasionally form very thick partingswithin the Wellington Seam, may represent point bar or proximal crevasse splaydeposits.The Wellington Seam consists mainly of bright banded coal and coalymudstone. Individual coals within the Wellington Seam are more continuous than the180associated rock bands. The Wellington coals contain abundant vitrinite, modestamounts of inertinite and mineral matter, and minimal amounts of liptinite.Five coal lithotypes were recognized in the Wellington Seam: bright, brightbanded, dull and bright, dull, and lustrous. The distinction between bright coals andbright banded coals, which was made during fieldwork in Wolf Mountain Colliery,cannot be upheld on the basis of their petrographic composition. Likewise, thedistinction between dull and bright coals and lustrous coals is not supported bydifferences in petrographic composition.Lustrous coals and dull and bright coals have very high vitrinite contents andlow inertinite contents. Bright banded coals and bright coals have lower vitrinitecontents and higher inertinite contents, but they still consist predominantly of vitrinite.Dull coal, which was only sampled once, appears to be intermediate in compositionbetween these two groups.Bright banded coals and bright coals of the Wellington Seam probablyoriginated mainly as wet forest swamp peats, and less commonly as fen peats or marshpeats. Dull and bright coals and dull coals of the Wellington Seam probably alsooriginated mainly as wet forest swamp peats. However, these peats were either morerapidly buried or accumulated under wetter, more oxic conditions than the peats thatformed bright coals and bright banded coals. Lustrous coals probably originated mainlyas wet forest swamp peats. Some samples of lustrous coals, which contain very highamounts of macerals with preserved cellular structure, probably originated asindividual logs.181Bright banded coals and bright coals have ash contents of 5 to 15 percent (byweight, dry basis). FSI values of these coals are strongly depressed by increased ashcontent; when ash exceeds 10% (by weight, dry basis), FSI values drop below 3. Dulland bright coals, lustrous coals and dull coals have ash contents of 10 to 34 percent (byweight, dry basis). There is no clear relationship between ash content and FSI for thesecoals. The maximum FSI observed in the coal samples examined in this study was 4.7.Very few of the coal samples from Wolf Mountain Colliery had FSI values over 4, andit appears doubtful that the Wellington Seam at Wolf Mountain could be readily soldas a soft coking coal.Two types of small-scale topographic and structural irregularities, floor rolls andswilleys, occur at the floor of the Wellington Seam. Floor rolls are gentle swells in thefloor, over which the coal thins. Where examined in detail at Wolf Mountain, they are20 to 30 metres wide, and 30 to 90 centimetres high. The floor rolls beneath theWellington Seam may represent sand bars which were formed at a beach surface andthen subsequently uplifted and buried by peat.Swilleys are local depressions in the floor of the Wellington Seam, over whichthe coal thickens. In the workings of Wolf Mountain Colliery, where they wereexamined in detail, they are 20 to 40 metres wide, and 0.4 to 2.1 metres deep. They aresinuous in plan, and one swilley has two short branches joining it from the north.Swilleys beneath the Wellington Seam may represent abandoned channels of smallstreams, which were subsequently occupied by peat-forming mires.The orientation and position of swilleys, splits and erosional channels in theWellington Seam may be partially fault-related. Some of the extensional faults in theWellington Seam may have been formed by lateral mass movement of unconsolidated182sediments and peat. Lateral mass movement was probably initiated by erosion orundercutting of the peat alongside stream channels, perhaps enhanced by growth fault-induced syndepositional tilting of the peats.Clastic dikes of coal and sandstone are locally abundant within the roof of theWellington Seam, and often parallel minor extensional faults. The clastic dikes mayhave originated as injection features following earthquake-induced liquefaction ofsediments overlying the Wellington Seam, or they may have formed, along with theminor faults, in the course of compaction of the sediments.The general scarcity of coarse clastic deposits within the Northfield Membersuggests that widespread meander belts are absent within the Northfield Member ofthe study area. The isolated sandstone and conglomerate bodies of the NorthfieldMember may therefore have been deposited by anastomosing streams In contrast, themore widespread conglomerates and sandstones of the Millstream Member representdeposits of gravel bed rivers, probably part of a coastal braidplain delta. Fine-graineddeposits within the Millstream Member probably represent floodplain and backswampdeposits which formed in areas between active river channels.The Pender Formation consists of two members within the study area: the basalCranberry Member, 130 to 160 metres thick, and the overlying Newcastle Member, 30to 60 metres thick. Both members consist mainly of mudstone and siltstone. TheCranberry Member contains interbeds of coarse-grained gritty sandstone, withoccasional thin to medium interbeds of coal, including the Cranberry bed, 0.2 to 0.6metres thick, which occurs 10 to 15 metres below the top of the member. TheNewcastle Member contains several thick coal beds: the basal Newcastle Seam, 0.8 to1.2 metres thick, the Douglas Seam, 0.6 to 4.5 metres thick, and the uppermost Douglas183Rider Seam, 0.8 to 1.2 metres thick. The Newcastle and Douglas Seams coalescesoutheast of Nanaimo Harbour, forming the Douglas Main Seam, which is locally up to21 metres thick.The Protection Formation consists of three members within the study area: thebasal sandy Cassidy Member, 80 to 105 metres thick, the medial, fine-grained, coal-bearing Reserve Member, 40 to 60 metres thick, and the overlying sandy McMillanMember, 60 to 90 metres thick. Coals of the Reserve Member are generally less than30 centimetres thick.The Cedar District Formation consists of 330 to 600 metres of shale andsiltstone. Thin sandstone bands and sandstone dykes are locally abundant in the middleof the formation. A ridge-forming sandstone unit, similar to the sandstone of theMcMillan Member, lies near the base of the Cedar District Formation.Framework compositions of sandstones and conglomerates of the lower half ofthe Nanaimo Group within the study area vary with stratigraphic position. The basalconglomerate of the Benson Member consists almost exclusively of volcanic rock clasts,while the Dunsmuir sandstones consist of subequal amounts of quartz, feldspar andvolcanic rock fragments. Sandstones of the East Wellington Formation consist mainlyof quartz and feldspar with minor volcanic rock fragments, while the sandstones andconglomerates of the Extension Formation consist mainly of quartz and dark grey chertwith minor red chert. Sandstones of the Cassidy Member consist of subequal amountsof quartz and feldspar with minor hornblende. The overall upward decrease in volcaniccontent and increase in plutonic content probably reflects the gradual uplift andunroofing of plutonic rocks within the Coast Range.184Overall intensity of deformation increases from northwest to southeast acrossthe Nanaimo Coalfield, and northwest-striking thrust faults and folds are increasinglyabundant towards the southern boundary of the coalfield. Extensional faults arecommon throughout the coalfield. The central part of the Nanaimo Coalfield isdislocated by a major northeast-striking cross fault, the Chase River Fault. Downthrowacross the Chase River Fault is 50 to 100 metres to the southeast; offsets of northwest-striking faults and geological contacts across the Chase River Fault suggest itsdisplacement also has a substantial dextral strike-slip component, on the order of 1 to 2kilometres.185VI. 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Douglascoal in middle; Newcastle coal atbase. 30 to 60 metres thick.CRANBERRY Green mudstone and siltstone; minorsandstone and conglomerate. 130 to160 metres thick.EXTENSION MILLSTREAM Conglomerate and gritty sandstone;minor siltstone and shale. Occas-ional thin coal beds. 90 to 230metres thick.NORTHFIELD Brown and grey mudstone and sandysiltstone. Several thin coal bedsin upper half; Wellington coal at196197TABLE I (continued):Table of formations:Formation:^Member: Lithology and thickness:1^base. 0 to 45 metres thick.EAST WELLINGTON^Light grey sandstone; minor con-glomerate, shale and siltstone.5 to 47 metres thick.HASLAM^ Dark grey to black shale and silt-stone, with thin bands of sand-stone near top. 100 to 150 metresthick.COMOX DUNSMUIR Light grey sandstone; minor silt-stone at top. 0 to 100 metresthick.BENSON^Conglomerate; minor sandstone, redshale and coquina. 0 to 120 metresthick.198TABLE II:Stratigraphic divisions of the Wellington Seam:Component units:^ Composite units:Wellington Rider coalUpper Parting dirt bandUpper Wellington coal (may I Where Lowerinclude several thin dirt I Parting isWhere boththe Upperand LowerPartings areless than60 cm thick,bands)Lower Parting dirt bandLower Wellington coal (maylocally contain a dirtband)less than 60 cm I thisthick, thisassemblageconstitutes the^theWellington Main^Wellingtoncoal bed.^I coal bed.assemblageconstitutes199TABLE III:Lithotype classification scheme:Lithotype^ Descriptionbright coal black, subvitreous to vitreouslustre, with greater than 80% brightlaminae; conchoidal or unevenfracturebright banded coal^black, predominantly bright coal,with 60% to 80% bright laminaedull and bright coal^black, interlaminated dull and brightcoal, with 40% to 60% bright laminaedull banded coal^black, predominantly dull coal, with(not present within^20 % to 40% bright laminaesamples examined)dull coal^ black, matte lustre, uneven fracture,with less than 20% bright laminaelustrous coal^dark grey, submetallic lustre, unevenfracture, massivecarbonaceous mudstone^dark brownish-grey to black, earthylustre, with up to 20% laminae ofbright coal; hard200TABLE III (continued):Lithotype classification scheme:Lithotype^Descriptioncoaly mudstone^earthy lustre, may be fissile,with up to 40% laminae of brightcoal; soft to moderately hard.granular mudstone^earthy to subvitreous lustre, hacklyfracture, with up to 20% laminae ofbright coal; hardModified from Diessel (1967) Hoffman and others (1982) andLamberson and others (1991)TABLE IV:Maceral classification scheme Maceral Group^Maceral 201AbbreviationVitrinite Telocollinite^TCDesmocollinite^DesTelinite^TelInertinite Semifusinite^SFFusinite FMacrinite^MacInertodetrinite^IDSclerotinite^SclLiptinite^ Resinite^ResSporinite SpoCutinite^CutMineral matter^ MM202Table V:Classification of peatlands by vegetation type and hydrologiccharacteristics:Mire:^any non-saline peat-forming system (Moore, 1989).Swamp:^a treed peatland where standing or gentlyflowing water occurs at surface at particularseasons of the year or for longer periods of time (Jeglumand others, 1974; Cameron and others, 1989).Wet forest swamp: a densely-treed swamp which isflooded for a substantial partof the year.Dry forest swamp: a densely-treed swamp which isflooded during a brief part ofthe year; has a consistently lower water table thana wet forest swamp (Lamberson and others, 1991).Marsh:^a saturated or shallow-water peatland inhabitedpredominantly by herbaceous vegetation such assedges, rushes or grasses; may contain scattered orclumped trees. Surface water levels may fluctuateseasonally, but water remains within the rooting zone ofplant during at least part of the growing season (Jeglumand others, 1974; Cameron and others, 1989).203Table V (continued):Classification of peatlands by vegetation type and hydrologiccharacteristics:Fen:^a saturated peatland inhabited primarily byherbaceous vegetation such as sedges; maybe covered by shrubs and sparse trees; fen waters usuallyhave lower oxygen saturation than marsh waters (Jeglumand others, 1974; Moore, 1989).TABLE VI:Maceral point counts, whole rock basis:SampleVitrinites:TC^Des^TelInertinites:SF^F^Mac ID SclLiptinites:Res^Spo^CutMineralmatter TotalWM100/1A 139 76 42 9 19 0 5 1 0 4 1 4 300WM100/1B 121 68 10 20 25 0 5 tr 4 1 1 45 300WM100/1C 102 90 76 11 7 0 7 1 1 1 1 3 300WM100/2 71 107 4 5 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 106 300WM100/3 101 110 33 33 7 1 10 tr 1 2 1 1 300WM100/4 24 3 1 4 15 1 0 0 0 0 0 252 300WM100/5 132 94 7 8 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 53 300WM100/6A 124 7 3 4 tr 1 0 tr 0 1 0 160 300WM100/6B 63 6 23 9 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 194 300WM100/7A 128 112 14 21 22 0 8 1 2 1 0 1 310WM100/7B 118 73 44 36 15 1 9 1 0 2 1 0 300WM100/7C 181 56 6 18 12 0 12 2 0 9 1 3 300WM100/8 165 79 11 8 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 34 300WM100/9 172 53 38 15 12 1 5 2 0 0 1 2 301204TABLE VI (continued):Maceral point counts, whole rock basis:SampleVitrinites:TC^Des^TelInertinites:SF^F^Mac ID SclLiptinites:Res^Spo^CutMineralmatter TotalWM220/lA 125 99 27 21 19 0 5 1 0 1 1 1 300WM220/1B 103 83 30 17 18 1 4 1 2 0 0 41 300WM220/1C 68 141 16 38 22 4 9 1 0 tr 1 0 300WM220/2 88 73 19 3 0 1 0 0 tr 0 1 115 300WM220/3A 129 84 11 10 2 0 3 0 2 4 0 55 300WM220/3B 119 98 24 13 6 0 2 tr 0 1 0 37 300WM220/3C 110 133 34 6 3 0 2 1 2 0 0 9 300WM220/4 141 25 30 7 3 0 tr 0 1 0 0 93 300WM220/5 152 78 22 10 8 0 4 1 1 0 0 27 303WM220/6 95 29 26 12 8 2 4 tr 0 tr tr 124 300WM220/7A 131 93 8 29 13 1 4 1 0 1 0 19 300WM220/7B 102 40 63 3 6 1 tr 0 tr 0 0 85 300WM220/7C 97 102 63 5 6 0 tr tr tr 1 2 24 300WM220/8 111 37 9 9 10 0 2 tr 3 tr 0 119 300WM220/9 128 91 17 33 11 1 7 tr 2 2 0 8 300WM220/10 72 154 8 2 4 0 2 tr tr 2 0 56 300205TABLE VI (continued):Maceral point counts, whole rock basis:SampleVitrinites:^Inertinites:^Liptinites:^MineralTC^Des^Tel SF^F^Mac^ID^Scl^Res^Spo^Cut^matter TotalWM220/11 118 80^45^17 15 1^7^tr 3 3 0^12 301WM222/1A 150 93^13^13 16 1^5^tr 0 1 2^6 300WM222/1B 45 176^31^9 7 2^5^1 4 5 2^13 300WM222/1C 93 98^31^35 20 4^4^0 1 1 1^22 310WM222/1D 71 94^118^4 4 0^1^tr 1 2 0^5 300WM222/2 127 27^13^4 0 1^1^tr 1 1 1^128 304WM222/3 67 31^188^3 2 0^1^tr 0 0 0^8 300WM222/4 47 0^4^8 0 2^0^tr 0 0 0^239 300WM222/5A 113 89^42^20 12 1^15^1 0 tr 1^6 300WM222/5B 136 102^22^11 15 5^6^1 0 1 0^1 300WM222/6 84 88^11^28 10 3^4^0 0 2 0^72 302WM222/7 111 74^64^24 13 1^5^1 1 1 2^5 302Notes: TC = Telocollinite F = Fusinite Res = ResiniteDes = Desmocollinite Mac = Macrinite Spo = SporiniteTel = Telinite ID = Inertodetrinite Cut = CutiniteSF = Semifusinite Scl = Sclerotinite tr = trace206TABLE VII:Maceral composition of samples, volume percent, whole rock basis:Vitrinites: Inertinites: Liptinites: MineralSample: TC Des Tel SF F Mac ID Scl^Res^Spo^Cut matter:WM100/1A 46 25 14 3 6 0 2 tr 0 1 tr 1WM100/1B 40 23 3 7 8 0 2 tr 1 tr tr 15WM100/1C 34 30 25 4 2 0 2 tr tr tr tr 1WM100/2 24 36 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 35WM100/3 34 37 11 11 2 tr 3 tr tr 1 tr trWM100/4 8 1 tr 1 5 tr 0 0 0 0 0 84WM100/5 44 31 2 3 1 0 tr 0 0 tr 0 18WM100/6A 41 2 1 1 tr tr 0 tr 0 tr 0 53WM100/6B 21 2 8 3 1 0 tr 0 tr 0 0 65WM100/7A 41 36 5 7 7 0 3 tr 1 tr 0 trWM100/7B 39 24 15 12 5 tr 3 tr 0 1 tr 0WM100/7C 60 19 2 6 4 0 4 1 0 3 tr 1WM100/8 55 26 4 3 0 0 0 0 tr tr tr 11WM100/9 57 18 13 5 4 tr 2 1 0 0 tr 1207TABLE VII (continued):Maceral composition of samples, volume percent, whole rock basis:Vitrinites: Inertinites: Liptinites: MineralSample: TC Des Tel SF F Mac ID Scl Res Spo Cut matter:WM220/1A 42 33 9 7 6 0 2 tr 0 tr tr trWM220/1B 34 28 10 6 6 tr 1 tr 1 0 0 14WM220/1C 23 47 5 13 7 1 3 tr 0 tr tr 0WM220/2 29 24 6 1 0 tr 0 0 tr 0 tr 38WM220/3A 43 28 4 3 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 18WM220/3B 40 33 8 4 2 0 1 tr 0 0 0 12WM220/3C 37 44 11 2 1 0 1 tr 1 0 0 3WM220/4 47 8 10 2 1 0 tr 0 tr 0 0 31WM220/5 50 26 7 3 3 0 1 tr tr 0 0 9WM220/6 32 10 9 4 3 1 1 tr 0 tr tr 41WM220/7A 44 31 3 10 4 tr 1 tr 0 tr 0 6WM220/7B 34 13 21 1 2 tr tr 0 tr 0 0 28WM220/7C 32 34 21 2 2 0 tr tr tr tr 1 8WM220/8 37 12 3 3 3 0 1 tr 1 tr 0 40WM220/9 43 30 6 11 4 tr 2 tr 1 1 0 3WM220/10 24 51 3 1 1 0 1 tr tr 1 0 19208TABLE VII (continued):Maceral composition of samples, volume percent, whole rock basis:Vitrinites:^Inertinites:^Liptinites:^MineralSample: TC Des^Tel SF F Mac^ID^Scl^Res Spo Cut^matter:WM220/11 39 27^15^6 5 tr^2^tr^1 1 0^4WM222/1A 50 31^4^4 5 tr^2^tr^0 tr 1^2WM222/1B 15 59^10^3 2 1^2^tr^1 2 1^4WM222/1C 30 32^10^11 6 1^1^0^tr tr tr^7WM222/1D 24 31^39^1 1 0^tr^tr^tr 1 0^2WM222/2 42 9^4^1 0 tr^tr^tr^tr tr tr^42WM222/3 22 10^63^1 1 0^tr^tr^0 0 0^3WM222/4 16 0^1^2 0 1^0^tr^0 0 0^80WM222/5A 38 30^14^7 4 tr^5^tr^0 tr tr^2WM222/5B 45 34^7^4 5 2^2^tr^0 tr 0^trWM222/6 28 29^4^9 3 1^1^0^0 1 0^24WM222/7 37 25^21^8 4 tr^2^tr^tr tr 1^2Notes: TC = Telocollinite F = Fusinite Res = ResiniteDes = Desmocollinite Mac = Macrinite Spo = SporiniteTel = Telinite ID = Inertodetrinite Cut = CutiniteSF = Semifusinite Scl = Sclerotinite tr = trace209TABLE VIII:Maceral composition of samples, volume percent, mineral-matter-free basis:Vitrinites: Inertinites: Liptinites:Sample: TC Des Tel SF F Mac ID Scl Res Spo CutWM100/1A 47 26 14 3 6 0 3 tr 0 1 trWM100/1B 47 27 4 8 10 0 2 tr 2 tr trWM100/1C 34 30 26 4 3 0 3 tr tr tr trWM100/2 37 55 2 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0WM100/3 34 37 11 11 2 tr 3 tr tr 1 trWM100/4 50 6 2 8 31 2 0 0 0 0 0WM100/5 53 38 3 3 2 0 tr 0 0 tr 0WM100/6A 89 5 2 3 tr 1 0 tr 0 1 0WM100/6B 59 6 22 8 3 0 1 0 1 0 0WM100/7A 41 36 5 7 7 0 3 tr 1 tr 0WM100/7B 39 24 15 12 5 tr 3 tr 0 1 trWM100/7C 61 19 2 6 4 0 4 1 0 3 trWM100/8 62 30 4 3 0 0 0 0 tr tr trWM100/9 58 18 13 5 4 tr 2 1 0 0 tr210TABLE VIII (continued):Maceral composition of samples, volume percent, mineral-matter-free basis:Vitrinites: Inertinites: Liptinites:Sample: TC Des Tel SF F Mac ID Scl Res Spo CutWM220/1A 42 33 9 7 6 0 2 tr 0 tr trWM220/1B 40 32 12 7 7 tr 2 tr 1 0 0WM220/1C 23 47 5 13 7 1 3 tr 0 tr trWM220/2 48 40 10 2 0 tr 0 0 tr 0 trWM220/3A 53 34 5 4 1 0 1 0 1 2 0WM220/3B 45 37 9 5 2 0 1 tr 0 tr 0WM220/3C 38 46 12 2 1 0 1 tr 1 0 0WM220/4 68 12 14 3 1 0 tr 0 tr 0 0WM220/5 55 28 8 4 3 0 1 tr tr 0 0WM220/6 54 16 15 7 5 1 2 tr 0 tr trWM220/7A 47 33 3 10 5 tr 1 tr 0 tr 0WM220/7B 47 19 29 2 3 tr tr 0 tr 0 0WM220/7C 35 37 23 2 2 0 tr tr tr tr 1WM220/8 61 20 5 5 6 0 1 tr 2 tr 0WM220/9 44 31 6 11 4 tr 2 tr 1 1 0WM220/10 30 63 3 1 2 0 1 tr tr 1 0211TABLE VIII (continued):Maceral composition of samples, volume percent, mineral-matter-free basis:Vitrinites:^Inertinites:^Liptinites:Sample: TC Des^Tel SF F Mac^ID^Scl^Res^Spo^CutWM220/11 41 28^16^6 5 tr^2^tr^1 1 0WM222/1A 51 32^4^4 5 tr^2^tr^0 tr 1WM222/1B 15 61^11^3 2 1^2^tr^1 2 1WM222/1C 32 34^11^12 7 1^1^0^tr tr trWM222/1D 24 32^40^1 1 0^tr^tr^tr 1 0WM222/2 72 15^7^2 0 tr^tr^tr^tr tr trWM222/3 23 11^64^1 1 0^tr^tr^0 0 0WM222/4 77 0^7^13 0 3^0^tr^0 0 0WM222/5A 38 30^14^7 4 tr^5^tr^0 tr trWM222/5B 45 34^7^4 5 2^2^tr^0 tr 0WM222/6 37 38^5^12 4 1^2^0^0 1 0WM222/7 37 25^22^8 4 tr^2^tr^tr tr 1Notes: TC = Telocollinite F = Fusinite Res = ResiniteDes = Desmocollinite Mac = Macrinite Spo = SporiniteTel = Telinite ID = Inertodetrinite Cut = CutiniteSF = Semifusinite Scl = Sclerotinite tr = trace212213TABLE IX:Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent, whole rock basis:Bright(4)Brightbanded(14)Dull andbright(4)Dull(1)Lust-rous(3)Carbon-aceousmudstone(4)Coalymudstone(9)Granularmudstone(3)Telocollinite AVG 38 40 45 40 34 22 33 35SDEV 16 10 10 11 15 8 5Desmocollinite AVG 37 30 30 33 27 3 21 28SDEV 15 8 4 17 4 16 5Telinite AVG 9 13 9 8 26 3 6 8SDEV 4 10 9 32 4 6 4Total vitrinite AVG 85 83 83 80 87 28 60 70SDEV 1 5 4 11 20 10 4Semifusinite AVG 4 8 3 4 2 2 3 8SDEV 2 4 1 1 1 3 3214TABLE IX (continued):Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent, whole rock basis:Bright(4)Brightbanded(14)Dull and^Dullbright^(1)(4)Lust-rous(3)Carbon-aceousmudstone(4)Coalymudstone(9)Granularmudstone(3)Fusinite AVG 5 4 2 2 1 2 2 7SDEV 2 2 1 0 2 1 1Macrinite AVG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0SDEV 1 1 0 0 1 1 1Inertodetrinite AVG 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 1SDEV 0 1 1 1 0 1 1Sclerotinite AVG 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0SDEV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0Total inertinite AVG 11 15 5 7 3 2 4 3SDEV 3 5 2 2 1 1 1215TABLE IX (continued):Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent, whole rock basis:Bright(4)Brightbanded(14)Dull andbright(4)Dull(1)Lust-rous(3)Carbon-aceousmudstone(4)Coalymudstone(9)Granularmudstone(3)Resinite AVG 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1SDEV 1 0 0 1 0 0 1Sporinite AVG 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0SDEV 1 1 0 1 0 0 0Cutinite AVG 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0SDEV 1 0 1 0 0 0 0Total liptinite AVG 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 1SDEV 2 1 0 1 1 0 1Mineral matter AVG 2 2 12 12 8 68 34 12SDEV 2 2 5 9 19 10 4TABLE IX (continued):Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent, whole rock basis:Notes:^AVG = AverageSDEV = Standard Deviation(*) = Number of samples analysed216217TABLE X:Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent, mineral-matter-free basis: Bright Bright Dull and Dull^Lust- Carbon- Coaly^Granular(4)^banded bright^(1) rous^aceous^mudstone mudstone(14)^(4) (3)^mudstone (9)^(3)(4)Telocollinite AVG 39 40 51 45 38 65 52 40SDEV 16 11 12 15 12 18 8Desmocollinite AVG 38 30 33 37 30 7 30 31SDEV 16 8 5 18 6 20 4Telinite AVG 10 13 10 9 27 10 9 9SDEV 4 10 9 32 9 9 4Total vitrinite AVG 86 84 94 91 95 81 92 80SDEV 2 5 2 3 16 6 4Semifusinite AVG 4 8 3 5 2 8 4 9SDEV 2 4 1 2 5 3 3218TABLE X (continued):Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent, mineral-matter-free basis:Bright(4)Brightbanded(14)Dull andbright(4)Dull(1)Lust-rous(3)Carbon-aceousmudstone(4)Coalymudstone(9)Granularmudstone(3)Fusinite AVG 5 4 2 2 1 9 3 8SDEV 2 2 1 0 15 2 2Macrinite AVG 0 0 0 0 o i 1 0SDEV 1 1 0 o 1 1 1Inertodetrinite AVG 2 3 0 1 1 0 1 2SDEV 0 1 1 1 0 1 1Sclerotinite AVG 0 0 0 0 o o 0 0SDEV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0Total inertinite AVG 11 15 5 8 4 18 8 19SDEV 3 5 2 2 17 6 3219TABLE X (continued):Maceral composition of lithotypes, volume percent, mineral-matter-free basis:Bright Bright Dull and Dull^Lust- Carbon- Coaly^Granular(4)^banded bright^(1) rous^aceous^mudstone mudstone(14)^(4) (3)^mudstone (9)^(3)(4)Resinite^AVG^0^0 0 0 1 0 0 1SDEV^1^0 0 1 1 1 1Sporinite^AVG^1^1 0 0 1 0 0 0SDEV^1^1 0 0 1 0 0 0Cutinite^AVG^1^0 0 0 0 0 0 0SDEV^1^0 1 0 0 0 0Total liptinite^AVG^2^1 0 0 1 1 1 1SDEV^2^1 1 2 1 1 1Notes:^AVG = AverageSDEV = Standard Deviation(*) = Number of samples analysedTABLE XI:Structured vitrinite, degraded vitrinite and inertinitecomposition of samples, volume percent, mineral-matter andliptinite-free basis:Sample: Structured Degraded Totalvitrinite vitrinite inertiniteWM100/lA 62 26 12WM100/1B 53 27 20WM100/1C 61 31 9WM100/2 39 55 6WM100/3 45 37 17WM100/4 52 6 42WM100/5 57 38 5WM100/6A 91 5 4WM100/6B 82 6 12WM100/7A 46 37 17WM100/7B 55 25 21WM100/7C 65 20 15WM100/8 67 30 3WM100/9 70 18 12WM220/1A 51 33 15WM220/1B 52 33 16WM220/1C 28 47 25WM220/2 58 40 2WM220/3A 59 35 6WM220/3B 55 37 8WM220/3C 50 46 4WM220/4 83 12 5WM220/5 63 28 8220TABLE XI (continued):Structured vitrinite, degraded vitrinite and inertinitecomposition of samples, volume percent, mineral-matter andliptinite-free basis:Sample: Structured Degraded Totalvitrinite vitrinite inertiniteWM220/6 69 16 15WM220/7A 50 33 17WM220/7B 77 19 5WM220/7C 59 37 4WM220/8 67 21 12WM220/9 50 32 18WM220/10 33 64 3WM220/11 58 28 14WM222/1A 56 32 12WM222/1B 28 64 9WM222/1C 44 34 22WM222/1D 65 32 3WM222/2 81 16 3WM222/3 87 11 2WM222/4 84 0 16WM222/5A 53 30 17WM222/5B 53 34 13WM222/6 42 39 20WM222/7 60 25 15221222TABLE XII:Structured vitrinite, degraded vitrinite and inertinite composition of lithotypes, volumepercent, mineral-matter and liptinite-free basis: Bright Bright Dull and Dull^Lust- Carbon- Coaly^Granular(4)^banded bright^(1) rous^aceous^mudstone mudstone(14)^(4) (3)^mudstone (9)^(3)(4)Structured^AVG^49^54^62^55^65^75^62^50vitrinite^SDEV 15^11^4 19^15^21^5Degraded^AVG^39^31^26^37^31^7^30^31vitrinite^SDEV 17^7^18 18^7^20^4Inertinite^AVG^12^15^5^8^4^18^8^19SDEV^2^5^2 2^17^6^3Notes:^AVG = AverageSDEV = Standard Deviation(*) = Number of samples analysedTABLE XIII:Analytical results, maceral group content and petrographic indices of samplesSample: Thick.^Ash(ft.)^(wt.%)FSI^Lith-ologyWhole rock basis:%V^%I^%L %MM %VMMF basis:%I^%L^GIIndices:TPIWM100/1A 0.80 6.24 4.0 Co B 86 11 2 1 87 12 2 7.8 2.6WM100/1B 0.10 36.82 M gr 66 17 2 15 78 20 2 4.0 2.4WM100/1C 0.60 11.29 4.0 Co Bb 89 9 1 1 90 9 1 10.7 2.0WM100/2 0.20 45.06 M co 61 4 0 35 94 6 0 20.6 0.8WM100/3 0.85 10.88 3.0 Co Bb 81 17 1 <1 82 17 1 4.9 1.4WM100/4 0.05 50.02 M cb 9 7 0 84 58 42 0 1.5 11.0WM100/5 1.00 33.49 2.8 Co D+B, dy 78 4 <1 18 94 5 <1 17.9 1.6WM100/6A 0.35 52.63 M co 45 2 <1 53 96 4 1 33.8 16.4WM100/6B 0.15 62.06 M cb 31 4 <1 65 87 12 1 7.1 14.0WM100/7A 1.30 8.40 4.2 Co Bb 82 17 1 <1 82 17 1 5.0 1.5WM100/7B 0.75 6.58 4.0 Co Bb 78 21 1 0 78 21 1 3.9 2.6WM100/7C 1.00 5.42 4.3 Co Bb 81 15 3 1 82 15 3 5.8 3.2WM100/8 0.25 17.73 3.2 Co D+B, dy 85 3 1 11 96 3 1 31.9 2.3WM100/9 1.50 7.73 3.5 Co Bb 87 12 <1 1 88 12 <1 8.3 4.0totals: 8.90 79 12 1 7 86 13 1223TABLE XIIIAnalytical(continued):results, maceral group content and petrographic indices of samplesSample: Thick.^Ash(ft.)^(wt.%)FSI^Lith-ologyWhole rock basis:%V^%I^%L %MM %VMMF basis:%I^%L^GIIndices:TPIWM220/lA 0.95 6.89 3.8 Co B 84 15 1 <1 84 15 1 5.6 1.8WM220/1B 0.05 42.87 M gr 72 14 1 14 83 16 1 5.6 1.9WM220/1C 0.50 11.58 3.2 Co Bb 75 25 <1 0 75 25 <1 3.3 0.9WM220/2 0.45 54.02 M co 60 1 <1 38 97 2 1 60.3 1.5WM220/3A 0.20 22.98 3.7 Co DL 75 5 2 18 91 6 2 14.9 1.7WM220/3B 0.20 18.51 2.0 Co D, dy 80 7 <1 12 92 8 <1 11.5 1.6WM220/3C 0.35 16.63 3.3 Co DL 92 4 1 3 95 4 1 25.2 1.1WM220/4 0.15 39.72 0 M co 65 3 <1 31 95 5 1 19.6 7.2WM220/5 0.35 16.83 3.7 Co D+B, dy 83 8 <1 9 91 8 <1 11.5 2.3WM220/6 0.20 35.21 1.2 M co 50 9 <1 41 85 15 <1 6.3 4.0WM220/7A 0.70 13.30 2.2 Co Bb 77 16 <1 6 83 17 <1 5.1 1.8WM220/7B 0.15 37.76 0.5 M co 68 3 <1 28 95 5 <1 22.9 4.2WM220/7C 0.30 22.93 2.2 Co D+B 87 4 1 8 95 4 1 23.8 1.7WM220/8 0.30 56.00 M co 52 7 1 40 87 12 2 7.5 3.6WM220/9 0.30 14.64 4.7 Co Bb 79 17 1 3 81 18 1 4.6 1.9WM220/10 0.45 42.43 M co 78 3 1 19 96 3 1 29.3 0.6224TABLE XIIIAnalytical(continued):results, maceral group content and petrographic indices of samplesSample: Thick.^Ash(ft.)^(wt.%)FSI^Lith-ologyWhole rock basis:%V^%I^%L %MM %VMMF basis:%I^%L^GIIndices:TPIWM220/11 1.65 9.19 3.7 Co Bb 81^13 2^4 84 14 2 6.3 2.2totals: 7.25 77^11 1^11 87 12 1WM222/1A 1.10 8.56 3.8 Co B 85^12 1^2 87 12 1 7.6 1.9WM222/1B 0.15 22.97 1.7 Co B 84^8 4^4 88 8 4 12.1 0.5WM222/1C 0.15 53.19 M gr 72^20 1^7 77 22 1 3.8 1.7WM222/1D 0.60 13.26 2.3 Co Bb 94^3 1^1 96 3 1 31.4 2.1WM222/2 0.45 48.56 M cb 55^2 1^42 95 3 2 33.6 5.0WM222/3 0.70 10.89 2.8 Co DL 95^1 <1^3 98 2 <1 47.7 8.1WM222/4 0.25 66.81 M cb 17^3 <1^80 84 16 <1 6.6 29.5WM222/5A 1.00 11.03 4.0 Co Bb 81^16 <1^2 83 17 <1 5.2 1.8WM222/5B 1.05 11.13 3.0 Co Bb 87^13 <1^0 87 13 <1 8.3 1.6WM222/6 0.20 43.58 M co 61^15 1^24 80 20 1 4.4 1.4WM222/7 1.50 8.40 4.3 Co Bb 83^15 1^2 84 15 1 6.0 2.7totals: 7.15 81^11 1^8 88 12 1225TABLE XIII (continued):Analytical results, maceral group content and petrographic indices of samples226Notes: Thick. = Thickness of sample interval,Ash = Ash content, dry basis, aver. ofFSI = Free Swelling Index, as-receivedstandard methodCo B = Bright coalCo Bb = Bright banded coalCo D+B = Dull and bright coalCo D = Dull coalCo DL = Lustrous coalM cb = Carbonaceous mudstoneM co = Coaly mudstoneM gr = Granular mudstone%V = volume percent of vitrinite%I = volume percent of inertinite%L = volume percent of liptinite%MM = volume percent of mineral matterMMF = mineral-matter-freeGI = Gelification IndexTPI = Tissue Preservation Indexin feet3 determinations, ASTM standard methodbasis, aver. of 3 determinations, ASTM227TABLE XIV:Analytical results and petrographic indices of lithotypes:Bright(4)Brightbanded(14)Dull andbright(4)Dull(1)Lust-rous(3)Carbon-aceousmudstone(4)Coalymudstone(9)Granularmudstone(3)Ash, dry basis,weight percentAVGSDEV11.177.9310.202.6822.757.6518.51 16.836.0556.868.9845.167.4644.298.28Free Swelling AVG 3.3 3.6 3.0 2.0 3.3Index, as -receivedSDEV 1.1 0.8 0.6 0.5Gelification AVG 8.3 7.8 21.3 11.5 29.3 12.2 22.7 4.5Index SDEV 2.7 7.1 8.7 16.8 14.5 17.4 1.0Tissue AVG 1.7 2.1 2.0 1.6 3.6 14.9 4.4 2.0Preservation SDEV 0.9 0.8 0.4 3.9 10.4 5.0 0.4IndexNotes:^AVG = AverageSDEV = Standard Deviation(*) = Number of samples analysedAPPENDIX I - Borehole data summaries and stratigraphicinterpretations228TABLE XV:Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:Cl 1910 202 2.62 45.31 coreCla 1902 ? ? ? noneC2 1910 125 0.91 99.11 coreC2a 1902 ? ? ? noneC3 1910 108 9.64 233.04 coreC3a 1902 76 0? >182.88 summary onlyC4 1910 164 0 38.81 coreC5 1911 195 0 134.29 coreC6 1912 101 0 447.93 coreC7 1911 203 0 278.08 coreC8 1911 146 0.51 32.97 coreC9 1912 165 2.59 479.17 coreC10 1911 65 8.53 99.67 coreC11 1911 44 11.30 150.90 coreC12 1911 37 5.21 259.33 coreC13 1912 52.4 15.24 205.18 coreC13a 1908 54.25 7.82 149.28 coreC14 1917 39.93 6.10 327.96 coreC15 1912 74.68 0.61 220.37 coreC15a 1908 58.82 0 124.97 coreC17 1912 184 1.24 149.63 coreC21 1913 168 0.61 131.67 coreC22 1916 224 0.69 211.94 coreC23 1916 150 2.13 214.48 coreC24 1916 118 20.63 195.30 core229TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:C25 1917 125 0.76 168.05 coreC26 1917 122 3.20 125.40 coreC27 1917 286.51 1.55 231.34 coreC28 1917 285.60 1.58 128.32 coreC29 1917 274.84 2.44 19.81 coreC30 1917 111 29.03 142.34 coreC46 1922 78 56.79 341.99 coreC47 1922 74 27.89 331.01 coreC50 1923 218.97 4.57 55.12 coreC51 1923 224.17 1.52 107.90 coreC52 1923 267.90 1.98 113.54 coreC54 1924 213 1.07 93.57 coreC55 1924 207 1.22 227.39 coreC56 1924 222 0 123.44 coreC57 1924 212 0 25.60 coreC58 1927 236 0.61 90.98 coreC59 1927 240 2.67 87.38 coreC60 1928 119 1.22 226.16 coreC61 1928 120 4.27 119.48 coreC61a 1933 114.38 7.01 87.55 coreC63 1934 113 17.68 245.67 coreC64 1934 64.64 77.72 coreC65 1935 118.45 24.38 141.73 coreC66 1935 107.65 3.05 78.33 coreC67 1939 83.94 43.89 152.10 core230TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:C68 1940 73.82 19.81 36.27 coreC69 1940 72.91 13.64 22.25 coreC70 1940 72.39 19.81 30.48 coreC71 1940 71.63 22.86 31.70 coreC72 1940 71.69 4.88 22.56 coreC73 1940 71.17 12.19 17.68 coreC74 1940 70.99 36.58 43.59 coreC75 1940 71.48 >13.72 13.72 summary onlyC77 1943 128 0 59.74 coreC78 1943 140 3.66 89.84 coreC79 1943 162 1.22 59.74 coreC85 1950 70 2.59 93.27 coreC86 1950 63 0 72.34 coreC87 1950 88 13.72 94.18 coreC88 1950 74.00 20.88 53.64 coreC89 1950 73.98 15.24 20.98 coreC90 1950 72.99 16.71 21.31 coreC91 1950 72.64 19.96 26.82 coreC92 1950 74.73 3.96 7.16 coreC93 1950 74.90 26.82 34.44 coreC94 1950 79.23 19.81 32.31 coreC95 1950 140 0? 16.76 summary onlyC96 1950 162 0? 30.18 summary onlyCH1 1931 ? ? <60.96 summary onlyCH2 1931 ? 17.07 >17.07 summary only231TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:CH3 1931 129.54 44.20 45.42 summary onlyCH4 1931 76? >53.34 53.34 summary onlyCM1 1885 80 noneCM2 1885? 87.6 >115.82 summary onlyD1 1879 1 0 61.94 coreDB1 1893 99 25.45 192.63 coreDH1 1879 99.82 36.27 53.87 coreDL1 1879 113 0.61 174.88 cuttingsEH3 1980 70 24.8 236.0 GR/DENS/FBL/DIPEH8 1980 130 26.0 241.0 GR/DENS/FBLEH10 1980 95 54.4 142.5 GR/DENS/FBLEH12 1980 70 21.6 185.0 GR/DENS/FBLEM1 1900? 233 ? ? core (partial)EM2 1900? 222 ? ? core (partial)GB1 1981 461 5.7 45.5 GR/N/DENS/FBLGB2 1981 290 2.5? 207.6 GR/N/FBLGB3 1981 230 2.2 107 GR/N/DENSGB4a 1981 230 14.5 242.5 GR/N/DENS/FBLGB5 1981 699.51 0 411.5 GR/N/DENS/FBLGB6 1981 670 No logs runGB12 1981 100 5.5 83.5 GR/N/DENS/FBLGB13 1981 225 0 273.4 GR/N/DENS/FBLGB14 1981 322 4.7 286.5 GR/N/DENS/FBLHG1 1910? 1.5 15.54 360.88 coreJB1 1887 117 41.58 69.35 cuttings232TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:K1 1916 72 36.12 50.29 summary onlyLl 1912 0 23.16 220.07 coreL2 1912 0 42.67 134.42 coreL3 1912 0 81.38 178.19 coreL4 1912 -5? 80.77 106.38 coreNFlu 1937 -1.35 14.50 coreNF2u 1937 7.01 12.47 coreNF3u 1937 12.56 9.14 coreNF4u 1937 21.29 6.91 coreNF5u 1938 10.67 coreNF6u 1938 38.50 8.01 coreNF7u 1938 27.31 10.97 coreNF8u 1938 36.79 5.18 summary onlyNF9u 1938 -16.08 17.16 coreNF1Ou 1938 15.75 coreNF11u 1939 5.14 22.51 coreNF12u 1939 6.40 coreNF13u 1939 5.53 coreNF14u 1940 19.34 coreNF15u 1940 12.67 coreNF16u 1940 16.58 coreNF17u 1940 13.81 coreNF18u 1940 24.03 coreNF19u 1940 13.71 coreNF2Ou 1940 -8.93 21.45 core233TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:NF21u 1940 -16.03 19.81 coreNF22u 1941 43.09 coreP17A 1911 35 6.10 321.11 corePB1 1911 32 11.58 285.60 corePC1 1911 39 ? >195.38 summary onlyPR1 1894 119 34.19 72.72 coreSW1 1879 70 ? 55.85 coreSW2 1879 81 1.98 70.63 coreSW3 1879 63.67 27.28 111.65 coreVN1 1912? 101 8.53 90.53 coreVN3 1912? 64.31 14.02 132.89 coreVN4 1912? 57.61 2.13 135.64 coreVN5 1912? 56 1.52 148.13 coreW9 1881 65 34.75 238.86 coreW12 ^ no recordW13 ^ no recordW14 1884 38.1 7.32 238.84 coreW15u 1888 -182.88 ? 385.11 coreW17 1888 108 52.25 206.55 coreW18 1888 101.80 2.90 128.63 coreW19 1888 111.13 10.67 127.25 coreW20 1890 19.35 0 591.06 coreW23 1891 72.76 25.76 209.09 coreW24 1891 1.22 4.57 285.18 coreW25 1891 80.16 56.69 185.93 core234TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:W26 1891 125.3 11.43 148.74 coreW27 1891 1.22 13.41 286.93 coreW28 1891 162.85 1.83 107.44 coreW29 1891 102 9.14 114.60 coreW30 1892 102.81 39.62 202.39 coreW31 1892 92.96 47.24 344.12 coreW32 1893 117.96 57.91 214.88 coreW33 1894 105.64 57.76 195.99 coreW34 1894 91.44 0.91 139.60 coreW35 1894 99.97 0.91 139.90 coreW36 1895 64.01 1.83 110.34 coreW37 1896 59.03 1.83 144.48 coreW38 1896 139.9 0.91 231.34 coreW39 1896 60.05 0.61 183.49 coreW40 1896 54.86 0.36 170.69 coreW41 1896 103.02 0.61 220.68 coreW42 1897 115 0.91 345.95 coreW43 1897 -1.73 34.14 448.36 coreW65 1901 137 3.20 105.77 coreW66 1901 167 0.74 44.93 coreW67 1901 165 0.61 44.81 coreW68 1901 148.13 1.22 76.20 coreW69 1901 120.09 1.73 103.83 coreW70 1901 145 1.22 92.66 coreW76u 1904 -112.71 ? 400.27 core235TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD: Logs available:W83 1910 31.55 6.10 493.95 coreW88 1910 2.83 27.43 299.31 coreW92 1911 6.80 6.40 308.76 coreW102 1917 73.37 20.73 105.46 coreW104 1918 59.26 4.57? 100.89 coreW105 1918 63.66 3.96 89.00 coreW106 1918 67.40 22.56 99.06 coreW107 1918 61.67 9.75 107.90 coreW109 1918 70.63 24.99 104.24 coreW110 1918 61.99 8.84 109.73 coreW111 1918 63.76 0 128.40 coreW112 1918 59.70 3.66 99.06 coreW113 1918 60.24 2.36 105.61 coreW114 1918 48.64 47.24 199.82 coreW123 1922 91.78 29.95 153.01 coreW124 1922 44.57 65.23 204.67 coreW125 1922 44.57 40.16 201.78 coreW126 1923 85.28 14.33 123.44 coreW129 1923 59 1.22 169.16 coreW131 1923 32.95 6.40 261.82 coreW135 1935 621 1.22 46.94 coreW136 1935 650 1.83 81.08 coreWE1 1910? 82 21.95 242.01 coreWE2 1910? 75 29.87 190.20 coreWF1 1878 66 37.19? 59.03 core (partial)236237TABLE XV (continued):Borehole data summary:Hole: Year: Elev.: Drift: TD:^Logs available:WIN1 1943 8.66 15.24 272.80^coreWM1 1982 662.90 1.07 60.96^cuttingsWM2 1982 643.37 2.13 77.72^cuttingsWM2a 1982 643.21 2.13 72.54^core (partial)WM3 1982 702.86 1.37 48.77^cuttingsWM4 1982 707.69 0.61 45.72^cuttingsWM5 1982 637.46 2.41 45.72^cuttingsWM6 1982 635.90 3.00 27.43^cuttingsWM6a 1982 635.52 7.31 22.86^core (partial)WM7 1982 735.79 1.22 27.43^cuttingsWM7a 1982 734.29 1.22 28.34^core (partial)WM8 1982 663.24 0.91 65.53^cuttingsWM9 1982 688.25 3.35 79.24^cuttingsWM10 1982 632.5 2.54 19.20^cuttingsWM11 1982 634.5 5.26 12.32^cuttingsNotes: all elevations and depths are in metresYear:^year of completion (including redrills)Elev:^collar elevation above sea levelDrift: depth to bedrockTD:^total depthcore:^driller's core descriptionGR:^natural gamma ray logN: neutron logDENS:^sidewall density logFBL:^focussed beam resistivity logSuffix 'u' on borehole number indicates borehole drilledfrom an underground location within mine workings.238TABLE XVI:Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top^Top^Top^Top^Top^Top^Top TotalExM:^ExN:^EW:^H: CxD:^CxB:^Bsmt: Depth:Cl^starts 31.55 44.27 DNR^ 45.31Cia starts ^ no record ^C2^starts 82.30 98.50 DNR 99.11C2a starts no record ^C3^ starts 51.69Extension Main Fault @ 115.42DNR (lower plate was in Cranberry Mb. to TD)C3a starts ?^182.88? ---- no record ----C4^starts 24.31 38.00 DNRC5^starts 42.92 131.24 DNRC6^starts 76.86 90.50 102.41Extension Main Fault @ 115.42contin DNRC7^starts ----NP^ 112.32White Rapids Fault @ 265.27contin DNRC8^starts 17.27 28.86 DNRC9^starts NP^129.62White Rapids Fault @ 131.14233.04>182.8838.81134.29447.93278.0832.97contin ----NP 203.38Extension Main Fault @ 248.79contin^NP^395.71 419.28 DNRC10 starts 86.56 91.13 DNRC11^66.19 DNRC12 starts 96.16 106.78 120.85 DNR479.1799.67150.90259.33239TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top Top Top Top Top Top Top TotalExM: ExN: EW: H: CxD: CxB: Bsmt: Depth:C13^starts 104.85 136.12 147.80 196.60 DNR 205.18C13a starts 101.40 132.82 144.70 DNR 149.28C14^starts NP NP 198.22 DNR 327.96C15^starts 78.94 114.66 130.15 NP NP 220.07 220.37Cl5a starts 92.30 DNR 124.97C17^51.18 DNR 149.63C21^starts 101.35 102.26 116.43Village Fault @ 130.15contin DNR 131.67C22^starts 40.29 48.90 79.40 DNR 211.94C23^starts 137.36 138.71 140.84 DNR 214.48C24^starts 81.53 86.13 106.25 DNR 195.30C25^starts 108.87 120.19 125.53 DNR 168.05C26^starts DNR 125.40C27 starts 13.49 DNR 231.34C28 starts 5.69 DNR 128.32C29 starts 3.35 DNR 19.81C30 starts DNR 142.34C46^77.42 234.39 245.97 259.08 DNR 341.99C47^52.73 242.31 257.56 270.36 DNR 331.01C50^starts 30.05 39.57 DNR 55.12C51 starts 4.95 DNR 107.90C52^starts 45.85 59.69 80.21 DNR 113.54C54^starts 69.49 80.87 86.66 DNR 93.57C55^starts 77.42 90.22 96.32 DNR 227.39240TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top^Top^Top^Top^Top^Top^Top TotalExM:^ExN:^EW:^H: CxD:^CxB:^Bsmt: Depth:C56 starts 105.92White Rapids Fault @ 114.60^contin DNR^ 123.44C57 starts DNR 25.60C58 starts ----NP^ 79.32 DNR^ 90.98C59 starts ----NP^ 80.37 DNR 87.38C60 starts ----NP^ 156.97 DNRExtension Main Fault @ base of hole?^ 226.16C61 starts DNR^ 119.48C6la starts 53.34 DNR^ 87.55C63 starts^NP^84.43 88.39White Rapids Fault @ 112.17contin ----NP 164.29Extension Main Fault @ 188.37contin DNR^ 245.67C64 --no record-- 60.96 71.32 DNR^ 77.72C65 starts 97.54 140.21 DNR^ 141.73C66 starts 50.98 77.50 DNR 78.33C67 starts 136.86 DNR^ 152.10C68^ starts 25.60 DNR^ 36.27C69^starts DNR^ 22.25C70 starts DNR^ 30.48C71^starts DNR^ 31.70C72 starts 19.81 DNR^ 22.56C73^ starts DNR^ 17.68241TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top^Top^Top^Top^Top^Top^Top TotalExM:^ExN:^EW:^H: CxD:^CxB:^Bsmt: Depth:C74^starts 42.14 DNR^ 43.59C75 ^did not reach bedrock ^ 13.72C77 starts 39.62 56.44 DNR^ 59.74C78 starts 73.15 87.40 DNR 89.84C79 starts 41.40 56.44 DNR^ 59.74C85 starts 55.88 72.92 86.26 DNR^ 93.27C86 starts 36.88? 50.52? 57.76? DNR 72.34C87 starts 82.91 87.63 DNR^ 94.18C88^starts 32.87 DNR 53.64C89^starts 19.15 DNR^ 20.98C90^starts 19.58 DNR 21.31C91^starts 24.36 DNR^ 26.82C92^starts^5.33 DNR 7.16C93^starts 32.13 DNR^ 34.44C94 starts DNR^ 32.31C95^ starts?^ 16.76C96 starts? 30.18CH1^ starts? DNR <60.96CH2 starts >17.07CH3^ starts 45.42CH4 ----did not reach bedrock ^ 53.34CM1 --- no record ---CM2 starts^?^>115.82?^ >115.82D1^starts 30.05 37.62 DNR 61.94DB1 starts 112.32 132.03 144.35^NP 171.40 DNR^192.63242TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top^Top Top^Top Top Top Top TotalExM:^ExN: EW:^H: CxD: CxB: Bsmt: Depth:DH1 starts^49.33 DNR 53.87DL1^starts^41.83 72.54^101.93 DNR 174.88EH3^starts 205.6 206.4^220.8 DNR 236EH8^starts 109.0 120.6^129.0White Rapids Fault @ 143.1contin 191.5 199.6^226.6 DNR 241.0EH10 starts 122.8 127.8^136.4 DNR 142.5EH12^29.2^DNR 185.0EM1^starts 122.53 129.03?^? ?EM2^starts 158.19 160.71?^? ?GB1 starts NP 29.5? 33.7? 45.5GB2 starts^16.0? DNR 195.1GB4a 124.0^DNR 242.5GB5^starts 106.1 123.9^146.5 DNR 411.5GB6 starts? ?GB12 starts DNR 83.5GB13 starts^43.0 50.2^69.8 DNR 273.4GB14 startsFault @ 26.45 starts^38.35 251.9 274.3? 276.2 286.5HG1^178.92 250.24 311.81 327.66 DNR 360.88JB1^starts 69.35? DNR 69.35K1 starts? DNR? 50.29Ll^starts^33.70 37.80^68.50 DNR 220.07L2^starts^68.81 80.29^96.93 DNR 134.42L3 starts 97.46^123.75 DNR 178.16243TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top^Top Top^Top Top Top Top TotalExM:^ExN: EW:^H: CxD: CxB: Bsmt: Depth:L4 starts DNR 106.38P17A 155.14 303.89 311.51 319.74 DNR 321.11PB1 78.03^236.83 249.02 257.56 DNR 285.60PC1 189.18 195.38? >195.38PR1 starts^51.58 DNR 72.72SW1 - no record -- 54.76^DNR 55.85SW2 starts^51.95 DNR 70.63SW3 starts^76.22 111.16^DNR 111.65VN1 starts NP 65.53 84.12 90.53VN3 starts^67.36 98.45 105.16 NP NP 115.82 132.89VN4 starts^35.36 109.42^120.40 DNR 135.64VN5 starts^89.31 127.41 140.21 DNR 148.13W9 43.28 173.71 184.23 190.02 NP 225.27 230.96 238.86W12 ^ no record ^W13 ^ no record ^W14 204.47^DNR 238.84W15u 154.08 270.36 284.53^292.30 370.94? DNR? 385.11W17 starts 138.13 173.10 185.29 DNR 206.55W18 starts^85.80 121.18^DNR 128.63W19 starts^88.24 124.92? DNR 127.25W20 261.24^NP NP^492.38 DNR 591.06W23 starts 122.53 146.91 159.41 DNR 209.09W24 51.51 173.74 184.71 203.61 NP 263.35 270.36 285.18W25 starts 156.97 172.52^DNR 185.93W26 starts^59.59 76.91^97.18 DNR 148.74244TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: TopExM:TopExN:TopEW:TopH:TopCxD:TopCxB:TopBsmt:TotalDepth:W27 121.01 171.60 218.85 241.40 NP NP 284.07 286.93W28 starts 41.50 52.25 63.25 DNR 107.44W29 starts 50.44 102.79 110.49 DNR 114.60W30 starts 141.56 163.78 177.55 DNR 202.39W31 starts 138.07 163.07 175.87 256.64 277.98 DNR 344.12W32 starts 157.05 181.97 196.90 DNR 214.88W33 starts 158.50 187.66 DNR 195.99W34 starts 83.82 116.94 130.15 DNR 139.60W35 starts 78.03 114.30 126.80 DNR 139.90W36 starts 9.45 53.95 55.78 NP 73.76 93.88 110.34W37 starts 84.73 111.86 118.57 NP NP 142.04 144.48W38 starts 28.35 48.16 54.25 NP NP 221.28 231.34W39 starts 102.87 146.00 155.75 DNR 183.49W40 starts 105.54 147.24 159.72 DNR 170.69W41 starts 134.26 142.39 149.35 DNR 220.68W42 starts 115.21 131.06 142.95 331.62 NP 345.44 345.95W43 445.31 DNR 448.36W65 starts 57.15 84.73 100.28 DNR 105.77W66 starts 42.95 DNR 44.93W67 starts 37.03 DNR 44.81W68 starts 62.03 75.59 DNR 76.20W69 starts 91.90 DNR 103.63W70 starts 83.11 DNR 92.66W76u 74.37 180.59 234.54 247.65 DNR 400.27W83 168.55 260.30 304.50 314.55 DNR 493.95245TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top^Top^Top Top Top Top Top TotalExM:^ExN:^EW: H: CxD: CxB: Bsmt: Depth:W88 144.78 205.74?258.47 269.44 DNR 299.31W92 161.54 214.88 261.21 274.62 DNR 308.76W102 starts? 39.62?103.23 DNR 105.46W104 starts? 90.22 96.93? 97.54? 98.15? DNR 100.89W105 starts^16.84^85.95 NP NP 86.26 87.17 89.00W106 starts? 97.33 DNR 99.06W107 starts^19.51^NP NP NP 91.44?106.38 107.90W109 starts?^NP NP NP NP 102.72 104.24W110 starts^81.08?^NP NP NP NP 108.97 109.73W111 starts^86.82 104.32 117.12 DNR 128.40W112 starts^35.36?^NP NP NP 84.73 97.54 99.06W113 starts^41.15^NP NP NP 99.67 102.41 105.61W114 81.31 176.43^DNR 199.82W123 starts 121.92 145.08 DNR 153.01W124 starts 179.91 190.35 DNR 204.67W125 71.78 178.69 197.08 DNR 201.78W126 starts^87.78 117.20 DNR 123.44W129 starts^37.19^60.55? 63.50? NP 146.97 DNR 169.16W131 98.98 212.93 231.67 236.22 DNR 261.82W135 starts^38.96^DNR 46.94W136 starts^77.42^DNR 81.08WE' starts^71.93 119.18 138.07 NP NP 180.14 242.01WE2 starts 108.20 132.13 147.52 NP NP 182.27 190.20WF1 starts^56.54? DNR 59.03WIN1 179.02 254.81 272.05? DNR 272.80246TABLE XVI (continued):Stratiqraphic interpretation of borehole records:Hole: Top^Top^Top^Top Top Top Top TotalExM:^ExN:^EW:^H: CxD: CxB: Bsmt: Depth:WM1^starts^28.00^40.32^DNR 60.96WM2^starts^57.00^70.80^DNR 77.72WM2a starts^? 72.54WM3^starts^27.70^42.16^DNR 48.77WM4^starts^23.6^38.6^DNR 45.72WM5^starts^27.08^40.10^DNR 45.72WM6^starts^7.12^20.58^DNR 27.43WM6a starts^? 22.86WM7^starts^5.72^23.13^DNR 27.43WM7a starts^? 28.34WM8^starts^47.60^59.16^DNR 65.53WM9^starts^59.76^73.44^DNR 79.24WM10 starts^DNR 19.20WM11^starts^12.32? DNR 12.32Note: all depths are in metresAbbreviations:ExM:^Millstream Member of Extension FormationExN:^Northfield Member of Extension FormationH: Haslam FormationCxD:^Dunsmuir Member of Comox FormationCxB:^Benson Member of Comox FormationBsmt:^Basement (usually Karmutsen Formation)DNR:^hole did not reach this unitcontin: hole continues in this unit below faultNP:^this unit is absent247APPENDIX II - Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analysesof the coals of the Extension Formation248TABLE XVII:Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location: Basis: M: VM: FC: Ash: S: BTU:Borehole C54Top Ply AR 1.50 38.90 50.30 9.30D ---- 39.49 51.07 9.44 13435Bottom Ply AR 1.15 39.45 50.80 8.60D ---- 39.91 51.39 8.70 13267Borehole C55Bottom Ply AR 1.50 39.25 49.05 10.20D ---- 39.25 49.80 10.35 13723Borehole C61AAR 2.40 42.60 47.05 7.95 0.92 13140D ---- 43.65 48.21 8.15 0.94 13463Borehole C66AR 2.40 42.30 42.00 13.30 0.70 12381D ---- 43.34 43.03 13.63 0.72 12685Borehole C77AR 1.22 38.24 51.03 9.51 0.32 13213D ---- 38.71 51.66 9.63 0.32 13376Borehole C78AR 1.17 37.70 48.47 12.57 0.41 12560D ---- 38.15 49.04 12.72 0.41 12709Borehole C79AR 1.23 38.42 51.26 9.09 0.33 13286D ---- 38.90 51.90 9.20 0.33 13451249TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M: VM: FC: Ash: S: BTU:Borehole C89AR 1.16 43.66 48.14 7.04 0.69 13169D ---- 44.17 48.70 7.12 0.70 13324Borehole C90Top ply AR 1.14 43.06 44.94 10.86 0.69 12598D ---- 43.56 45.46 10.99 0.70 12743Middle ply AR 1.15 42.85 45.61 10.39 0.70 12722D ---- 43.35 46.14 10.51 0.71 12870Bottom ply AR 1.18 40.49 46.93 11.40 0.70 12425D ---- 40.97 47.49 11.54 0.71 12573Nanoose-Wellington Colliery:Lump coal,Sept. 1922 AR 4.00 43.60 41.64 10.76D ---- 45.42 43.37 11.21 12260No.1 nut coalSept. 1922 AR 3.50 41.30 35.70 19.50D ---- 42.80 36.99 20.21 10922No.2 nut coal (32 x 6.3 mm),Sept.^1922 AR 3.70 37.25 31.99 27.06D ---- 38.68 33.22 28.10 9663250TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location: Basis: M: VM: FC: Ash: S: BTU:Lantzville Colliery,Run of mine,No.1 Mine:June 1933 AR 1.3 35.76 47.14 15.80 0.70 11656D --- 36.23 47.76 16.01 0.71 11810Run of mine,June 1941 AR 4.19AD 2.7 31.3 52.3 13.7 0.67 11310D --- 32.17 53.75 14.08 0.69 11624Northfield Colliery:Face sample,April 1939 AR 2.3 31.80 52.60 13.30 1.50 12090D --- 32.55 53.84 13.61 1.54 12375Run of mine,1938 D --- 35.0 38.2 26.8 1.0Run of mine,June 1941 AR 1.47AD 0.8 34.30 51.90 13.00 0.74 12120D --- 34.58 52.32 13.10 0.75 12218Lump coal,June 1941 AR 1.63AD 1.3 35.70 57.90 5.10 0.77 13650D --- 36.17 58.66 5.17 0.78 13830251TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M: VM: FC: Ash: S: BTU:East Wellington Colliery:Run of mine AR 1.65 43.25 45.52 9.24 1.24[1911] D ---- 43.98 46.28 9.40 1.26Lump coal,Feb. 1926 AR 3.00AD 2.00 34.80 54.70 8.50 0.50 12865D ---- 35.51 55.82 8.67 0.51 13128Washed nut coal,Feb.^1926 AR 2.50AD 2.00 35.10 52.70 10.20 0.50 12710D ---- 35.82 53.78 10.41 0.51 12969Washed pea coal,Feb.^1926 AR 2.40AD 1.90 34.50 52.90 10.70 0.50 12555D ---- 35.17 53.92 10.91 0.51 12798Washery fines,Feb.^1926 AR 3.50AD 2.00 34.90 54.40 8.70 0.40 12710D ---- 35.61 55.51 8.88 0.41 12969Wakesiah Colliery:Run of mine,April 1925 AR 2.3 41.2 48.4 8.1 0.4 13130D --- 42.2 49.5 8.3 0.5 13450252TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Wakesiah Colliery (continued):Domestic lump coal,Feb. 1926^AR^1.80AD^0.80 33.60 53.60 12.00 1.22 11625D ---- 33.87 54.03 12.10 1.23 11719Lump coal,1928^AR^2.08 38.67 47.27 10.38 1.60D ---- 39.50 48.26 10.60 1.64Wolf Mountain Colliery:Face sample in Main Entry, March 1984 (Data from CraigRoberts, Wolf Mountain Coal Limited Partnership, personalcommunication, 1987)AR^3.61 39.70 50.04 6.65 0.48 13264D ---- 41.19 51.91 6.90 0.50 13761Face sample in Return Airway, March 1984 (Data from CraigRoberts, Wolf Mountain Coal Limited Partnership, personalcommunication, 1987)rider coal AR 5.46 38.63 43.27 12.64 0.79 12068D ---- 40.86 45.77 13.37 0.84 12765upper coal AR 6.05 36.98 44.21 12.76 0.47 11939D ---- 39.36 47.06 13.58 0.50 12708lower ptg. AR 7.31 12.44 3.12 77.13 0.76 1600D ---- 13.42 3.37 83.21 0.82 1726253TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Wolf Mountain Colliery (continued):lower coal^AR^5.50 34.68 40.35 19.47 0.46 10888D^---- 36.70 42.70 20.60 0.49 11522Face sample at geological station 100, February 1987 (Datafrom Dr. F.Goodarzi, Geological Survey of Canada, personalcommunication, 1992)Ply 1A AR 1.4 38.0 53.8 6.8 0.65D --- 38.5 54.6 6.9 0.66Ply 1B AR 0.8 21.5 27.7 50.0 1.01D --- 21.7 27.9 50.4 1.02Ply 1C AR 1.4 36.9 50.4 11.3 0.48D --- 37.4 51.1 11.5 0.49Ply 2 AR 1.8 25.2 28.7 44.3 0.30D --- 25.7 29.2 45.1 0.31Ply 3 AR 1.2 36.3 51.9 10.7 0.42D --- 36.7 52.5 10.8 0.43Ply 4 AR 0.7 38.8 10.6 49.9 0.09D --- 39.1 10.7 50.2 0.09Ply 5 AR 1.5 29.7 33.7 35.1 0.36D --- 30.2 34.2 35.6 0.37Ply 6A AR 2.0 22.4 23.9 51.6 0.30D --- 22.9 24.4 52.7 0.31Ply 6B AR 1.6 23.7 14.2 60.5 0.27D --- 24.1 14.4 61.5 0.27254TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M: VM:^FC: Ash: S: BTU:Wolf Mountain Colliery (continued):Ply 7A AR 1.2 37.7 54.2 6.8 0.54D --- 38.2 54.9 6.9 0.55Ply 7B AR 1.2 38.2 54.2 6.3 0.51D --- 38.7 54.9 6.4 0.52Ply 7C AR 1.2 38.5 55.0 5.2 0.48D --- 39.0 55.7 5.3 0.49Ply 8 AR 1.3 34.3 44.7 19.6 0.46D --- 34.8 45.3 19.9 0.47Ply 9 AR 1.1 38.8 52.9 7.2 0.59D --- 39.2 53.5 7.3 0.60Extension Prospect Mine,Face sample,October 1940 AR 2.30 41.32 49.69 6.69 13605D ---- 42.29 50.86 6.85 13925Beban Colliery:Face sample,April 1939 AR 1.4 29.80 53.10 15.70 0.60 12245D --- 30.22 53.85 15.92 0.61 12419Run of mine,June 1941 AR 1.41AD 0.6 31.90 52.30 15.20 0.51 12040D --- 32.09 52.62 15.29 0.51 12113255TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Beban Colliery (continued):Lump coal,June 1941^AR^1.28AD 1.1 32.2 58.4 8.3 0.64 13410D --- 32.56 59.05 8.39 0.65 13559Chambers' No.5 Mine:Run of mine,Sept. 1955 AR 1.26 39.63 50.82 8.29 13094D ---- 40.14 51.47 8.40 13261No.1 Mine, Extension CollieryTop coal,1902 AR 1.44 31.40 46.18 20.65 0.33 11401D ---- 31.86 46.85 20.95 0.33 11568Bottom coal,1902 AR 1.52 35.27 57.04 5.85 0.32 13416D ---- 35.81 57.92 5.94 0.32 13623No.1, No.2 and No.3 Mines, Extension Colliery:Run of mine,1911 AR 1.16 40.47 50.04 7.80^0.53D ---- 40.94 50.63 7.89 0.54Lump coal,May 1925 AR 1.9 39.6 52.8 5.7 0.5 13420D --- 40.3 53.9 5.8 0.5 13910256TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M: VM:^FC: Ash: S: BTU:No.1, No.2 and No.3 Mines, Extension Colliery (continued):Lump coal,Feb.^1926^AR^2.90AD 1.40 35.30 56.70 6.60 0.40 13640D ---- 35.80 57.51 6.69 0.41 13834Washed nut coal,Feb. 1926^AR 4.90AD 1.40 33.80 54.90 9.90 0.40 12710D ---- 34.28 55.68 10.04 0.41 12890Washed pea coal,Feb. 1926^AR 8.70AD 1.20 33.00 52.30 13.50 0.46 12555D ---- 33.40 52.94 13.66 0.47 12707Washery fines,Feb. 1926^AR 2.80AD 1.30 34.60 57.10 7.00 0.46 13485D ---- 35.06 57.85 7.09 0.47 13663Washed nut coal,1928^AR 1.28 33.36 52.29 12.53 0.54D ---- 33.80 52.95 12.70 0.55Washery fines,1928^AR 1.72 33.12 46.20 18.38 0.58D ---- 33.70 47.01 18.70 0.59257TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Vancouver Slope, Extension Colliery:Top coal,Sept.^1926 AR^1.80 41.00 49.80 7.40 0.96 13278D^---- 41.75 50.71 7.54 0.98 13521Bottom coal,Sept.^1926 AR^1.80 39.50 48.20 10.50 0.68 12709D^---- 40.22 49.08 10.69 0.69 12942White Rapids Colliery:Face sample,October 1944Main Return Airway,AR^1.27 39.22 49.77 9.74 0.83 13094D^---- 39.72 50.41 9.87 0.84 13262Face sample,May 19494's Right Longwall,AR^3.27 34.93 51.09 10.71 0.43 12543D^---- 36.11 52.82 11.07 0.44 13032No.7 Mine, Extension Colliery:Face sample,May 1924 AR^1.60 42.30 45.00 11.10 13406D^---- 42.99 45.73 11.28 13624Face sample,March 1925 AR^1.30 39.00 35.10 24.60D^---- 39.51 35.56 24.92258TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:No.7 Mine, Extension Colliery (continued):Top coal, raw^May 1925^AR^4.85AD^1.50D^----Top coal,^float 1.50 s.g.32.4032.89(62%36.40 29.7036.95 30.15yield):May 1925 AR^1.50 38.50 46.70 13.30 1.54 13068D^---- 39.09 47.41 13.50 1.56 13267Timberlands Colliery:Face sample,top coal,New SlopeAR^1.50 36.75 53.75 8.00 0.82 13597March 1928 D^---- 37.31 54.57 8.12 0.83 13804bottom coal, AR^1.30 37.00 50.00 11.70 0.86 13130March 1928 D^---- 37.49 50.66 11.85 0.87 13303Face sample,coal only,Counter Heading,AR^1.40 37.20 51.20 10.20 1.24 13229July 1928 D^---- 37.73 51.93 10.34 1.26 13417Face sample,coal only,First Left LevelAR^1.40 35.20 45.50 17.80 1.51 12063July 1928 D^---- 35.70 46.15 18.05 1.53 12234Face sample,coal only,Main Raise at HeadingAR^1.40 34.60 45.20 18.80 1.12 11934July 1928 D^---- 35.09 45.84 19.07 1.14 12103259TABLE XVII (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theWellington Seam: Location: Basis: M:^VM:^FC: Ash: S: BTU:Timberlands Colliery (continued):Face sample, No.1 Right Levelcoal only, AR^1.40 35.80 47.60 15.20 1.18 12533July 1928Grab sample,March 1941D^---- 36.31 48.28top coal,AR^1.98 38.24 53.5215.426.261.20 1271113616Grab sample,March 1941D^---- 39.01 54.60bottom coal,AR^2.06 37.76 53.686.396.461389113721D^---- 38.55 54.81 6.60 14010Face sample,bottom of New l's Longwall,June 1944 AR^1.34 28.10 40.46 30.10 0.46 9778Face sample,June 1944D^---- 28.48 41.01skip road, 5's Longwall,AR^1.23 34.60 53.2730.5110.900.470.46991112812Face sample,June 1944D^---- 35.03 53.93bottom of 13's Longwall,AR^1.30 33.40 48.9011.0416.400.470.431297311902D^---- 33.84 49.54 16.62 0.44 12058Notes: AR: As-received basisD: Dry basisVM: Volatile matterS: SulphurBTU: Calorific value inpounds.g.: Specific gravityM: MoistureFC: Fixed carbonBritish Thermal Units perData source: except as noted, from A.F. Buckham collection(Add.Mss. 436) in British Columbia Archives and RecordsService260TABLE XVIII:Moisture, ash and free swelling index analyses of theWellington Seam: Location: Basis: M: Ash: FSI:Wolf Mountain Colliery:Face sample at geological station 100, February, 1987Ply 1A AR 1.80 6.13 4.0D 6.24Ply 1B AR 1.21 36.37D 36.82Ply 1C AR 1.80 11.09 4.0D 11.29Ply 2 AR 1.89 44.21D 45.06Ply 3 AR 1.52 10.72 3.0D 10.88Ply 4 AR 0.85 49.59D 50.02Ply 5 AR 1.80 32.89 2.8D 33.49Ply 6A AR 2.15 51.50D 52.63Ply 6B AR 1.97 60.84D 62.06Ply 7A AR 1.36 8.29 4.2D 8.40Ply 7B AR 1.15 6.50 4.0D 6.58261TABLE XVIII (continued):Moisture, ash and free swelling index analyses of theWellington Seam: Location: Basis: M: Ash: FSI:Wolf Mountain Colliery (continued):Ply 7C AR 1.37 5.34 4.3D 5.42Ply 8 AR 1.30 17.50 3.2D 17.73Ply 9 AR 1.34 7.63 3.5D 7.73Face sample at geological station 220, February, 1987Ply 1A AR 1.62 6.78 3.8D 6.89Ply 1B AR 1.14 42.38D 42.87Ply 1C AR 1.26 11.44 3.2D 11.58Ply 2 AR 1.94 52.97D 54.02Ply 3A AR 1.49 22.64 3.7D 22.98Ply 3B AR 1.34 18.26 2.0D 18.51Ply 3C AR 1.36 16.40 3.3D 16.63Ply 4 AR 1.85 38.99 0.0D 39.72262TABLE XVIII (continued):Moisture, ash and free swelling index analyses of theWellington Seam:Location: Basis: M: Ash: FSI:Wolf Mountain Colliery (continued):Ply 5 AR 1.23 16.62 3.7D 16.83Ply 6 AR 1.32 34.75 1.2D 35.21Ply 7A AR 1.00 13.16 2.2D 13.30Ply 7B AR 1.23 37.29 0.5D 37.76Ply 7C AR 1.31 22.63 2.2D 22.93Ply 8 AR 1.61 55.09D 56.00Ply 9 AR 1.10 14.48 4.7D 14.64Ply 10 AR 1.17 41.94D 42.43Ply 11 AR 0.97 9.10 3.7D 9.19Face sample at geological station 222, February, 1987Ply 1A^AR^1.47^8.44D 8.56^3.8Ply 1B^AR^1.11^22.71D 22.97^1.7263TABLE XVIII (continued):Moisture, ash and free swelling index analyses of theWellington Seam: Location: Basis: M: Ash: FSI:Wolf Mountain Colliery (continued):Ply 1C AR 0.81 52.76D 53.19Ply 1D AR 1.52 13.06 2.3D 13.26Ply 2 AR 1.77 47.71D 48.56Ply 3 AR 2.10 10.66 2.8D 10.89Ply 4 AR 2.12 65.40D 66.81Ply 5A AR 1.72 10.84 4.0D 11.03Ply 5B AR 1.64 10.95 3.0D 11.13Ply 6 AR 1.81 42.79D 43.58Ply 7 AR 1.63 8.27 4.3D 8.40Notes:^AR: As-received basis^M: MoistureD: Dry basis^FSI: Free swelling indexData source: this study264TABLE XIX:Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of the No.2Seam:Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Borehole C12AR 1.14 40.45 38.44 19.97 0.57D ---- 40.92 38.88 20.20 0.58Borehole C61AAR 2.90 43.05 45.25 8.80 1.10 13066D ---- 44.34 46.60 9.06 1.13 13456Borehole C66AR 2.30 39.90 41.00 16.80 0.76 11850D ---- 40.84 41.97 17.20 0.78 12129Borehole W135AR 2.30 41.40 41.80 14.50 12350D ---- 42.37 42.78 14.84 12641Harewood Colliery,Run of mine,1902 AR 1.58 33.84 52.17 11.85 0.56 12238D ---- 34.38 53.01 12.04 0.57 12434Wolf Mountain, Bottom Prospect,Top coal,July 1917 AR 2.16 39.4 55.0 3.4 1.16D ---- 40.3 56.2 3.5 1.19265TABLE XIX (continued):Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of the No.2Seam:Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Notes:^AR: As-received basisD: Dry basisM: MoistureVM: Volatile matterFC: Fixed carbonS: SulphurBTU: Calorific value in British Thermal Units perpoundData source: from A.F. Buckham collection (Add.Mss. 436) inBritish Columbia Archives and Records Service266TABLE XX:Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses of theNorthfield No.3 Seam:Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Borehole C61AAR^3.00 42.60 44.55 9.85 0.66 12971D^---- 43.92 45.93 10.15 0.68 13372Borehole C66AR^2.70 43.70 42.90 10.70 0.75 12681D^---- 44.91 44.09 11.00 0.77 13033Notes: AR: As-received basisD: Dry basisM: MoistureVM: Volatile matterFC: Fixed carbonS: SulphurBTU: Calorific value in British Thermal Units perpoundData source: from A.F. Buckham collection (Add.Mss. 436) inBritish Columbia Archives and Records Service267TABLE XXI: Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analyses ofthe Northfield No.4 Seam:Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Borehole C61AAR^3.10 39.40 39.70 17.80 0.70 11400D ---- 40.66 40.97 18.37 0.72 11765Borehole C65AR^2.60 44.75 41.85 10.80 0.70 12859D ---- 45.94 42.97 11.09 0.72 13202Borehole C66AR^2.50 41.70 43.80 12.00 0.94 12538D ---- 42.77 44.92 12.31 0.96 12859Notes: AR: As-received basisD: Dry basisM: MoistureVM: Volatile matterFC: Fixed carbonS: SulphurBTU: Calorific value in British Thermal Units perpoundData source: from A.F. Buckham collection (Add.Mss. 436) inBritish Columbia Archives and Records Service268TABLE XXII: Proximate, sulphur and calorific value analysesof the Wolf Mountain No.3 Seam:Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash: S:^BTU:Wolf Mountain, Top Prospect,Bottom coal,July 1917^AR^1.75 38.95 53.50 5.80 1.02D ---- 39.64 54.46 5.90 1.04Wolf Mountain, backhoe trench,As sampled,1979^AR^1.15 21.65 18.35 58.85D ---- 21.90 18.56 59.53Float at 1.55 s.g. (22.1% yield),1979^AR^2.47 33.36 48.20 15.97 0.60 11699D ---- 34.20 49.42 16.37 0.62 11995Notes: AR: As-received basisD: Dry basisM: MoistureVM: Volatile matterFC: Fixed carbonS: SulphurBTU: Calorific value in British Thermal Units perpounds.g.: Specific gravityData sources: Top Prospect sample analysis from A.F. Buckhamcollection (Add.Mss. 436) in British Columbia Archives andRecords Service; backhoe trench sample analyses from Curcio(1979)269TABLE XXIII: Proximate and calorific value analysis of theWolf Mountain No.4 Seam:Location:^Basis: M:^VM:^FC:^Ash:^BTU:Borehole W136AR^2.90 34.40 34.00 28.70^9930D^---- 35.43 35.02 29.56^10227Notes: AR: As-received basisD: Dry basisM: MoistureVM: Volatile matterFC: Fixed carbonBTU: Calorific value in British Thermal Units perpoundData source: from A.F. Buckham collection (Add.Mss. 436) inBritish Columbia Archives and Records Service270APPENDIX III - Measured sections of the WellingtonSeam and associated strata at Wolf Mountain CollierySECTION 1LOCATION: ON NORTH RIB OF ROOM NO.7, BETWEEN C AND DHEADINGSCOORDINATES: 12 R, 7.5MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985^REVISED: NOVEMBER 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - SHALY, BROWN, HARD BUT SOMEWHAT WEATHERED.AT THE FACE OF THIS ROOM, THE ROOF HAS BEEN CUT OUTBY LIGHT CREAMY GREY, STONY TILL, WHICH CUTS DOWNINTO THE COAL. AT ITS LOWEST POINT, APPROXIMATELY 4FEET OF COAL REMAIN.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED1.0 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 2LOCATION: ON LEFT RIB AT FACE OF CROSSCUT X-4COORDINATES: 2.7L, 9MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, A CONSISTENT MARKER1.0 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED AT TOP1.2 FT. SILTSTONE - GREY, SANDY, A FEW CARBONACEOUS LAMINAE0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT3.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONESECTION 3LOCATION: ON RIGHT RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, AT INBYE END OF ARCHESCOORDINATES: 0, 1.9MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 3.2 FEET (ROOF IS UPPER PARTING)ROOF: SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, MEDIUM GREY, SILTY, FAIRPOROSITY; GRADES UP TO SANDSTONE-SILTSTONE LAMINITE271(60:40) - RIPPLED. THIS UNIT IS AT LEAST 9 FEETTHICK, AND IS A PARTING WITHIN THE WELLINGTON COALBED, HERE TAKEN AS THE MINE ROOF1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - DIRTY, SHEARED1.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COARSE-GRAINED, DARK GREY, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 4LOCATION: AT INBYE CORNER OF JUNCTION OF MAIN ENTRY ANDCROSSCUT X-1COORDINATES: 0, 2.6MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 4.85 FEET (ROOF IS UPPER PARTING)ROOF: SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, SILTY, MEDIUM GREY,HARD, WITH TINY PLANT FRAGMENTS AND RIPPLES.EROSIONAL BASE.0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK GREY, SILTY, HARD, WITHCARBONACEOUS LAMINAE. POLISHED AT TOP.0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT3.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, MINOR SHEARINGFLOOR: SANDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 5LOCATION: ON LEFT RIB OF CROSSCUT X-1, 20 FT. INBYESECTION 4COORDINATES: 0.5R, 2.6MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.4 FT. (ROOF IS UPPER PARTING)ROOF: SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, SILTY, MEDIUM GREY,HARD WITH TINY PLANT FRAGMENTS AND A FEW RIPPLES.EROSIONAL BASE.NIL - 0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WITH CALCITE ON CLEATS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK GREY, CARBONACEOUS, WITHABUNDANT BRIGHT COAL BANDS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, SILTY, WITH MINORPLANT FRAGMENTS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK,COALY, SHEARED, SOFT2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.9 FT. COAL - SHEARED; DIRTY?1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.272273SECTION 6LOCATION: ON LEFT RIB OF CROSSCUT X-1, 40 FT. INBYESECTION 4COORDINATES: 0.7R, 2.7MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.4 FT. (ROOF IS UPPER PARTING)ROOF: SANDSTONE - AS AT SECTION 5, WITH ABUNDANT IMPRINTS OFLEAVES, BARK AND LOGS. EROSIONAL BASE.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, WITH ABUNDANT CALCITE ON CLEATS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS WITH ABUNDANTTHICK BRIGHT COAL BANDS^AT THIS HORIZON, 0.1 FT. HIGH CRUMPLED OVERTHRUSTS UPTOWARDS EAST, STRIKING NEAR-PARALLEL TO RIB.0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, SILTY, WITH A FEW THINCOAL BANDS.0.4 FT. COAL - STONY0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED3.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED,0.2 FT. COAL - SHEARED1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY CONTORTEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.SECTION 7LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF MAIN ENTRY AND STUB OFCROSSCUT X-2, ON OUTSIDE CORNER OF JUNCTIONCOORDINATES: 0, 3.3MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 6 FEET (ROOF IS UPPER PARTING)ROOF: SILTSTONE - MEDIUM TO DARK GREY, WITH ABUNDANT PLANTDEBRIS; BASAL 2.65 FEET CONTAINS 50% VERY FINE TOFINE-GRAINED SANDSTONE AS RIPPLES AND LAMINAE.0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, BLOCKY, WITH STUMPS PROJECTING UPINTO ROOF; LENTICULAR BED, VARYING FROM NIL TO 0.2FT. THICK0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, WITH ABUNDANT THINAND THICK BRIGHT COAL BANDS0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK GREY, VERY SILTY0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED; RAPIDLY PINCHINGAND SWELLING FROM 0.1 TO 0.5 FEET; CUTS DOWN 2 FT.INTO UNDERLYING COAL BED2.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED AND SLABBYTHROUGHOUT0.2 FT. COAL - SHEARED1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, AS ABOVE. DOES NOT PART FROMUNDERLYING SANDSTONEFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY.SECTION 8LOCATION: ON RIGHT RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, 170 FEET INBYESECTION 7. HERE TOP LEAF OF WELLINGTON COAL BEDFIRST APPEARS IN ROOF.COORDINATES: 0, 6MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 12.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE?2.0 FT. COAL - SLABBY, WITH SOME POLISHED SURFACES4.5 FT. SILTSTONE - MEDIUM GREY, WITH ABUNDANT RIPPLES ANDLAMINAE OF LIGHT GREY, FINE-GRAINED SANDSTONE, ANDABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.4 FT. COAL - SHEARED, SOFT; DIRTY?3.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, AS ABOVEFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARDSECTION 9LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF MAIN ENTRY AND CROSSCUT X-3, ON NECORNERCOORDINATES: 0, 7MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH PLANT DEBRIS.1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, A DISTINCT BENCH.0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. COAL - SHEARED, POLISHED, SOFT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.7 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, SANDY, HARD0.2 FT. COAL - SHEARED5.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 10LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF CROSSCUT X-3 AND RETURN AIRWAY, ONNE CORNERCOORDINATES: 1R, 7MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985^REVISED NOVEMBER 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.85 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS.2740.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED, GRADATIONAL BASE0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED,GRADATIONAL BASE0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, SILTY, HARD ANDHEAVY, BLOCKY, MAY BE SOMEWHAT FERRUGINOUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, FISSILE, CRUMPLED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AT BASE4.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, SLIGHTLY SHEAREDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 11LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF CROSSCUT X-3 AND 3RD RIGHT COUNTERCOORDINATES: 3R, 7MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985^REVISED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.75 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, WITH LENSES OFDULL AND BRIGHT COAL0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, WITH OCCASIONAL COALLENSES1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.9 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED4.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 12LOCATION: AT NE CORNER OF JUNCTION OF X-2 AND RETURN AIRWAYCOORDINATES: 2.2R, 4.3MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985^REVISED: FEBRUARY 18, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD, WITH ABUNDANT PLANTFRAGMENTS.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, WITH 50%INTERBEDS OF BRIGHT COAL2750.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,SHEARED0.4 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,SHEARED2.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED,CORNFLAKES1.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, BLACK, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 13LOCATION: AT SE CORNER OF JUNCTION OF X-1 AND RETURN AIRWAYCOORDINATES: 1.9R, 3MEASURED: JUNE 16, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 12.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS.1.1 FT.^COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD, RESISTANT BED1.1 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED1.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, BLOCKY, WITH ANGULARFRACTURE PATTERN; GRADATIONAL BASE1.7 FT. SILTSTONE - GREY, HARD, FINES UPWARD; BLOCKY, WITHANGULAR FRACTURE PATTERN1.0 FT. COAL - DULL, STONY, HARD1.3 FT. COAL AND SHALE - SHEARED AND CONTORTED COAL, WITHNUMEROUS THIN BANDS OF BLACK AND BROWN, CARBON-ACEOUS MUDSTONE.4.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, BLACK, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 14LOCATION: AT SE CORNER OF JUNCTION OF X-4 AND MAIN ENTRYCOORDINATES: 0, 9MEASURED: JUNE 17, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH PLANT DEBRIS, STUMPSAND SANDSTONE DYKES.1.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, FLAKY, WITHABUNDANT THIN BRIGHT COAL BANDS; SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD0.15 FT. COAL - SHEARED; GRADATIONAL BASE276INTENSELYINTENSELY0.75 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, CONTORTED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED3.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. COAL - SHEARED2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.SECTION 15LOCATION: ON E SIDE OF JUNCTION OF X-4 AND 1ST LEFT COUNTERENTRYCOORDINATES: 1L, 9MEASURED: JUNE 17, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS,OCCASIONAL STUMPS AND SANDSTONE DYKES1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, WITH CALCITE ONCLEATS; A DISTINCT BENCH1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED ANDPOLISHED0.45 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, SOFT1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED BUT HARD0.8 FT. COAL AND SHALE - INTERBANDED SHEARED COAL AND BLACKCARBONACEOUS SHALE2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.6 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED AND POLISHED; SOFT ANDFLAKY2.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD;IRREGULAR SURFACESECTION 16LOCATION: ON E SIDE OF JUNCTION OF X-4 AND 2ND LEFT COUNTERENTRYCOORDINATES: 2L, 9MEASURED: JUNE 17, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH GREY, WITH PLANT DEBRIS AS BEFORE1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, LUSTROUS; A DISTINCT BENCH.PYRITE ON CLEATS AT TOP2772780.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AND PULVERISED0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK AND CARBONACEOUS AT TOP, GRADINGDOWN TO BROWN AND SILTY AT BASE0.35 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, BROKEN AND BLOCKY, SOFT;OCCASIONAL EGG-SIZED INCLUSIONS OF POWDERY BRIGHTCOAL (LARGE PLANT STEMS?); ABRUPT BASE0.9 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, CONTORTED, HARD1.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED AND POLISHED, SOFT1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARD, POLISHEDSURFACE.SECTION 17LOCATION: ON S SIDE OF 2ND LEFT COUNTER, 25 FEET EAST OF X-5COORDINATES: 2L, 10.4MEASURED: JUNE 17, 1985^REVISED: FEBRUARY 19, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.5 FEETNOTE: THE 1.6 FT. SHEARED COAL AND DIRTABOVE THE FAULT IS AN ANOMALOUS THICKENINGOF THE BASAL RIDER.ROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, MEDIUM-BEDDED, SLABBY BUTSTRONG, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.7 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED^MINOR THRUST FAULT, ESTABLISHED^0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.65 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED, HARD1.3 FT. SHALE AND COAL - THIN INTERBEDS OF BLACK COALYMUDSTONE AND BRIGHT BANDED COAL2.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT AND FLAKY1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARD; IRREGULARSURFACESECTION 18LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF MAIN ENTRY AND CROSSCUT X-5, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 0, 11MEASURED: JUNE 17, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWNISH-GREY, WITH ABUNDANT PLANTDEBRIS1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, NOT AS HARD AS COAL ABOVE1.0 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, PARTICULARLYAT TOP0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, TOUGH2.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED, HARD0.75 FT. COAL AND SHALE - COAL AS ABOVE, WITH NUMEROUSLENSES AND BANDS OF BLACK, COALY MUDSTONE0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 19LOCATION: ON W SIDE OF CROSSCUT X-5, BETWEEN 1ST AND 2NDLEFT COUNTERSCOORDINATES: 1.4L, 11MEASURED: JUNE 25, 1985^REVISED: FEBRUARY 19, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, HARD WITH ABUNDANT PLANTDEBRIS1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED^THRUST FAULT, ESTABLISHED^0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED ATTOP, SILTY AT BASE, WITH COALIFIED LOGS0.35 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. COAL AND SHALE - THINLY INTERBANDED BRIGHT COAL ANDBROWN CARBONACEOUS SHALE0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH SCATTEREDBRIGHT COAL BANDS0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, TOUGH2794.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 20LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF X-5 AND 1ST RIGHT COUNTER, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 1R, 11MEASURED: JUNE 25, 1985^REVISED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH ABUNDANTTHIN BRIGHT COAL BANDS0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY3.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, VERY HARD.SECTION 21LOCATION: 50 FEET INBYE OF X-4, ON NORTH RIB OF 2ND LEFTCOUNTERCOORDINATES: 2L, 10MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.45 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, HARD, WITH ABUNDANT PLANTTRASH.1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, WITH CALCITE ANDPYRITE ON CLEATS0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, NOT AS HARD0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH ABUNDANTLENSES OF BRIGHT COAL0.5 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, SOFT, WITH LISTRIC SURFACES1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AND FLAKY4.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.280SECTION 22LOCATION: 50 FEET INBYE OF X-4, ON NORTH RIB OF 1ST LEFTCOUNTERCOORDINATES: 1L, 10MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.2 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS ABOVE1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, WITH CALCITE ONCLEATS1.0 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN AND BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, WITHABUNDANT LENSES OF BRIGHT COAL, SOME OF WHICH ARERECOGNISABLE AS FLATTENED, COALIFIED LOGS.0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY1.0 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. COAL - SHEARED AND FLAKY2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 23LOCATION: 50 FEET INBYE OF X-4, ON NORTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRYCOORDINATES: 0, 10MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - HARD, BROWNISH-GREY, AS BEFORE.1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, NOT AS HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, CARBONACEOUS, HARD0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD1.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS AND COALY4.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD AND CLEANFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, BLACK, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 24LOCATION: 50 FEET INBYE OF X-4, ON NORTH RIB OF 1ST RIGHTCOUNTER ENTRYCOORDINATES: 1R, 10MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.2810.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, NOT AS HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, SILTY, HARD0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD1.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHARED AT BASE2.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD AND CLEANFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, BLACK, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 25LOCATION: 10 FEET OUTBYE X-4, ON SOUTH RIB OF 1ST RIGHTCOUNTER ENTRYCOORDINATES: 1R, 8.7MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985^REVISED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.95 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, HARD, WITH ABUNDANTPLANT TRASH AT BASE.1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD1.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, SOFT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED, PINCHES ANDSWELLS AT BASE; THICKNESS VARIES FROM NILTO 0.6 FT.0.65 FT. COAL - SHEARED AND POLISHED, FORMING GLOSSY PLATES.PINCHES AND SWELLS FROM 0.35 TO 0.95 FT.; THICKWHERE THE OVERLYING SILTY MUDSTONE IS THIN, ANDVICE VERSA.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, CRUMPLED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED ATBASE0.25 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.SECTION 26LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOM NO.00, ON NECORNERCOORDINATES: 4R, 9MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.4 FEET282ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WET2.4 FT. COAL- BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED5.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 27LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOM NO.1, ON NECORNERCOORDINATES: 6R, 9MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, WET, SOFT1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - SHEARED1.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 28LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A-1 HEADING AND ROOM NO.1, ON NECORNERCOORDINATES: 6R, 11MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985^REVISED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN TO BLACK, CARBONACEOUS,INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.15 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.55 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2832.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COARSE-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,ROLLY.SECTION 29LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF E HEADING AND ROOM NO.1, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 6R, 6MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, AS BEFORE.1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT0.9 FT. COAL - SHEARED2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SOFT, WITH ABUNDANTTHIN BRIGHT COAL BANDS5.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, CLEANFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.SECTION 30LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF SUPPLY ROAD AND 3RD RIGHT COUNTERON SW CORNERCOORDINATES: 3.1 R, 6MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985^REVISED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.0 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.6 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS,BRIGHT COAL BANDSWITH ABUNDANT THIN0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.15 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2841.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD, ROLLYSECTION 31LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF RETURN AIRWAY, AT JUNCTION WITHSUPPLY ROADCOORDINATES: 1.2 R, 5.2MEASURED: JULY 5, 1985^REVISED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED, ABUNDANT COAL LENSES0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 32LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND 3RD RIGHT COUNTER, ONNE CORNERCOORDINATES: 3R, 10MEASURED: JULY 19, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.15 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - DIRTY, SHEARED AND POLISHED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.285SECTION 33LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF Al HEADING AND ROOM NO.00, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 4R, 11MEASURED: JULY 19, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: > 7.85 FEET ( LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - SHEARED AND POLISHED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 34LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A3 HEADING AND ROOM NO.00 ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 4R, 12.8MEASURED: JULY 19, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.1 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH GLOSSY SLIPS AT 45DEGREES.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WET1.3 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED AND POLISHED, FORMINGSIGMOIDAL PLATES AT 130 / 65 SW0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.05 FT. COAL AND SHALE - INTERLAMINATED BRIGHT COAL ANDBROWN, CARBONACEOUS SHALE ('COAL AND BANDS'LITHOTYPE)0.7 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, SLIGHTLY CRACKED0.75 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED AND SOFTFLOOR: COAL - HARD.286SECTION 35LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF Al HEADING AND ROOM NO.6, ON NWSIDECOORDINATES: 11R, 11MEASURED: AUGUST 1, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS.0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, WITH CALCITE ANDPYRITE ON CLEAT1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WITH CALCITE AND PYRITE ONCLEAT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY SHEARED, SOFT0.1 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SHEARED, FORMINGCORNFLAKES1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD.SECTION 36LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF Al HEADING AND ROOM NO.4, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 9R, 11MEASURED: AUGUST 1, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - COALY, SHEARED3.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, HARD.287SECTION 37LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF D HEADING AND ROOM NO.2, ON NWCORNERCOORDINATES: 7R, 7MEASURED: AUGUST 1, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: > 9,65 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.6 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.5 FT.^MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.0 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, CONTORTED, FOLD AXES AT0.5 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED4.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED115FLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 38LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A2 HEADING AND ROOM NO.4 ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 6R, 12MEASURED: AUGUST 1, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 7. 8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED1.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY3.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, LOCALLY SHEAREDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARDSECTION 39LOCATION: IN SOUTH RIB OF RETURN AIRWAY, 10 M OUTBYE FACE ASOF AUGUST 1COORDINATES: 1R, 13.5MEASURED: AUGUST 1, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 11.9 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.2880.91.0FT.FT.COAL - BRIGHT, HARDCOAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.0 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.2 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED5.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED. BASAL 3.75 FEET LEFT INFLOOR, PROVEN BY DRILLING INTO FLOOR.FLOOR: SANDSTONESECTION 40LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF RETURN AIRWAY AND CROSSCUT X-6, ONSW CORNERCOORDINATES: 1R, 14MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.95 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.8 FT. COAL - SHEARED AND CONTORTED0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY4.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY HARD.SECTION 41LOCATION: ON S RIB OF RETURN AIRWAY, AT FACE ON AUGUST 9,1985COORDINATES: 1R, 15MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, HARD.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY2890.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.5 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN TO BLACK, COALY1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN TO BLACK, COALY1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD, ROLLY.SECTION 42LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A3 HEADING AND 3RD RIGHT COUNTER,ON SOUTH SIDECOORDINATES: 3R, 13MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - SHEARED, POLISHED, CONTORTED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED3.65 FT. COAL? - COVERED BY DEBRIS AND WATERFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, UNDER WATER AND MUDSECTION 43LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF Al HEADING AND 3RD RIGHT COUNTER,ON NE CORNERCOORDINATES: 3R, 11MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, AS BEFORE.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2902910.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT1.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, INTENSELY SHEARED3.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, INTENSELYSO AT BASE2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COARSE-GRAINED, DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,ROOTY.SECTION 44LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF Al HEADING AND ROOM NO.0, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 5R, 11MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: > 7.65 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.0 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED3.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 45LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF D HEADING AND ROOM NO.4 ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 9R, 7MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.75 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, INTENSELY SHEARED1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COARSE-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 46LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF F HEADING AND ROOM NO.4, ON NORTHSIDECOORDINATES: 9R, 5MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT TRASH; WET0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED4.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 47LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF D HEADING AND ROOM NO.6, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 11R, 7MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - DARK BROWN AT BASE, WITH ABUNDANT FINELY-BROKEN PLANT TRASH.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN TO BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT2.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.292SECTION 48LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOM NO.6, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 11R, 9MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.85 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, AS BEFORE.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.05 FT. COAL - DULL, SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COARSE-GRAINED, LIGHT BROWN, SLIGHTLYCARBONACEOUS.SECTION 49LOCATION: AT FACE OF B HEADING, ON EAST RIBCOORDINATES: 12,8R, 9MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.05 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.85 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.95 FT. MUDSTONE - COALY, SHEARED1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.293SECTION 50LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOM NO.4, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 9R, 9MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, AS BEFORE.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, OVERTHRUST TO 0550.8 FT. COAL - SHEARED AND POLISHED, FLAKY0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.0 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED AT TOP0.8 FT. COAL - SHEARED, CORNFLAKES1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 51LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF Al HEADING AND ROOM NO.2, ON NECORNERCOORDINATES: 7R, 11MEASURED: AUGUST 9, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.65 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.294SECTION 52LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF 3RD RIGHT COUNTER ENTRY, 100 FEETOUTBYE (EAST) OF JUNCTION WITH CROSSCUT X-8COORDINATES: 3R, 14.5MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: >9.2 FT (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, HARD.0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, "SANDY"; SPHAEROSIDERITIC?0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, MODERATELY TO INTENSELYSHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.55 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED AND SLICKED BUT LOOKSCLEAN0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED4.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, BLOCK, HARD, SLIGHTLY SHEAREDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 53LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF RETURN AIRWAY AND X-8, ON SW SIDECOORDINATES: 1R, 16MEASURED: NOVEMBER 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.05 FEETSAMPLES: COMPOSITE CHIP SAMPLE OF COAL: WM 53/1COMPOSITE CHIP SAMPLE OF PARTINGS: WM 53/2BASAL 6 INCHES OF ROOF: WM 53/3ROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH ABUNDANT COALIFIEDPLANT TRASH AT BASE. TOP COAL ADHERES FIRMLY TO BASEOF ROOF.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL (OOLITIC?)STRUCTURE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED, MAY BE A LENSE0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED AT TOP0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN TO BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, WITHABUNDANT THIN BRIGHT COAL BANDS0.35 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED, GRADATIONAL2952960.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.1 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, CARBONACEOUS, TOUGH,WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS3.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, BLOCKYFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COARSE-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,ROLLY SURFACESECTION 54LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF D HEADING AND ROOM NO. 0, ON SWSIDECOORDINATES: 5R, 7MEASURED: NOVEMBER 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: >9.7 FEET (LEFT COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE, SHEARED AT TOP0.75 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.9 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SHEARED AND CONTORTED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE5.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY CRUMPLED AT TOPFLOOR: NOT REACHED.SECTION 55LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND ROOM NO.7, ON N SIDECOORDINATES: 12R, 10MEASURED: NOVEMBER 5, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH ABUNDANT TINY PLANTTRASH.1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD, LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - HARD, DARK BROWN, COALY, SANDY: WISPSOF BRIGHT COAL MAKE 50% OF THIS INTERVAL0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AT BASE2.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COARSE-GRAINED, CARBONACEOUS, BROWN.SECTION 56LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 2ND RIGHT COUNTER AND X-8, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 2R, 16MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.25 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, FISSILE0.7 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.4 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, FISSILE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, FISSILE1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WITH CALCITE FILMS ON CLEAT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED1.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 57LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF RIGHT COUNTER AND CROSSCUT X-9, ONSE CORNERCOORDINATES: 1R, 18MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE. INBYE THIS POINT, THE ROOFCHANGES TO BLOCKY SILTSTONE, WITH MANY THIN STRINGERSOF COAL. IT APPEARS TO BE A COLLAPSE BRECCIA.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT, INTENSELY SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.15 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED: MAY BE A LENSE0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED2972980.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, WITH OCCASIONAL VERY THINLAMINAE OF BRIGHT COAL1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 58LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF RETURN AIRWAY, 30 FEET INBYEFAULT, AT POINT WHERE ROADWAY BEGINS TO RISE INTOROOFCOORDINATES: 1R, 12MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: >7.1 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR TO MAKEGRADE)ROOF: SILTSTONE - GREY, BLOCKY, LAMINATED, STRONG, WITHSCATTERED PLANT DEBRIS; OCCASIONAL SMALL COALIFIEDSTUMPS PROJECTING UP FROM BASAL CONTACT WITH THE COALBED. BASE MARKED BY SLICKENSIDES TRENDING ENE.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARDMUDSTONE - COALY, SPHEROIDAL, FORMS ISOLATEDRIPPLES.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT,VARIES FROM 0.25 TO 0.45 FT.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED, GRADATIONAL0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED AT TOPFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 59LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF MAIN ENTRY AND CROSSCUT X-9, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: OR, 18MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.55 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, BRECCIATED IN PLACES.CONSIDERABLE COAL LAMINAE IN BASAL 0.5 FT.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.8 FT.0.65 FT.0.2 FT.0.7 FT.0.65 FT.COAL - DULL BANDEDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALYCOAL - SHEAREDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY,COAL - DULL AND BRIGHTSHEARED AT BASE2990.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD, OCCASIONAL VERY THINCOAL LAMINAE1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLYSHEARED1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 60LOCATION: ON EAST SIDE OF FACE OF X-9, 66 FEET INBYE MAINENTRYCOORDINATES: 1L, 18MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, BLOCKY BUT COHERENT, WITHCONSIDERABLE COALY DEBRIS IN BASAL 0.5 FT.0.8 FT.0.1 FT.0.7 FT.0.1 FT.0.05 FT.0.5 FT.0.25 FT.0.65 FT.0.8 FT.COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURECOAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARDMUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, INTENSELY SHEAREDCOAL - LUSTROUS, MAY BE A LENSEMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALYCOAL - DULL BANDED, CONTORTEDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AT BASECOAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, STRUCK BY DRILL BUT NOT SEENSECTION 61LOCATION: ON SOUTH SIDE OF FACE OF LEFT COUNTER, 111 FEETINBYE X-8COORDINATES: 1L, 17.7MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985.ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.1 FEET. NOTE: ROOF MOSTLY CONCEALED BY TOPCOAL.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE BUT SOMEWHAT SANDY.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AND POLISHED0.35 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, CONTORTED0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD, ABUNDANT VERY THINCOAL LAMINAE1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED. PARTS FREELY AT BASE1.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 62LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF LEFT COUNTER AND CROSSCUT X-8, ONSW CORNERCOORDINATES: 1L, 16MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.45 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WITH TRACE BORNITE AT TOP0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD, FINER THAN BEFORE,DENSE (MAY BE FERRUGINOUS), WITH SCATTERED THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS. VARIES FROM 0.75 TO 0.85 FT.1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.300SECTION 63LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, 60 FEET INBYE X-9COORDINATES: OR, 18.9MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.75 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWNISH-GREY, BLOCKY AT BASE, MAYBE EROSIONAL.0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS?, SHEARED0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SLIGHTLY CARBONACEOUS0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, DENSE, HARD1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, GRADATIONAL0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, ABRUPT1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD,ROOTY.SECTION 64LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, 35 FEET INBYE JUNCTIONWITH X-9COORDINATES: OR, 18.5MEASURED: DECEMBER 20, 1985ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - GREY, SANDY, WITH THIN COALY WISPS.EROSIONAL BASE.0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - DULL, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - DULL, SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.25 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.301SECTION 65LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF RETURN AIRWAY AND FIRST ROAD TONORTH INBYE FAULT. ON SOUTH RIB OF AIRWAY.COORDINATES: 1R, 13MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >7.35 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR TO MAKEGRADE)ROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT TRASHAT BASE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE, WITHNUMEROUS LENSES OF BRIGHT COAL0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 66LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 2ND RIGHT COUNTER AND CROSSCUT X-6,ON SE CORNER, AT EASTERN (OUTBYE) END OF CUT DOWNINTO BOTTOM COAL.COORDINATES: 2R, 14MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 15.0 FEET (7.15 FEET FROM ROOF TO ORIGINALCOAL FLOOR OF ENTRY, AND ADDITIONAL 7.85FEET DOWN TO BOTTOM OF CUT).ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, STANDING NICELY ACROSS THEJUNCTION. SMOOTH BASE, DIPPING CA. 5 DEGREES TO WEST.1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED3023030.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, CONSIDERABLE COAL LAMINAE0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED, LOW DENSITY0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, CONSIDERABLE BRIGHTCOAL BANDS---- ORIGINAL FLOOR OF ENTRY ----0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED ANDCRUMPLED.5.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY CRUMPLED. DIPGRADUALLY INCREASES DOWNSECTION, FROM 10 TO 30DEGREES TO SOUTHWEST.0.4 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD, DIP CA. 60 TOWEST.SECTION 67LOCATION: ON EAST RIB OF X-1, AT JUNCTION WITH 3RD RIGHTCOUNTERCOORDINATES: 3.4R, 3.9MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.15 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH COALIFIED STUMPSPROJECTING UP FROM BASE OF UNDERLYING COAL BED.1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - SHEARED, PASSING LATERALLY INTO COAL ASABOVE0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, WITH SCATTERED THIN BRIGHT COALBANDS0.25 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, ABUNDANT THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS0.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.15 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, ABUNDANT THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED,SOFT3.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS.SECTION 68LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF X-2 AND 3RD RIGHT COUNTER, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 3.2R, 5MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.7 FEETROOF - SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, WITH SCATTERED BRIGHT COAL BANDS0.3 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY0.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED4.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,HARD.SECTION 69LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 2ND RIGHT COUNTER AND X-9, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 2R, 18MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - DARK GREY, BRECCIATED AND CRUMPLED, MANYSLICKED SURFACES. SOFT AND CLAYEY, MAY BE WEATHERED.CAVES READILY.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.65 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, ARGILLACEOUS, HARD, ABUNDANTPLANT DEBRIS3041.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, BROWN, COALY, ROLLY SURFACE.SECTION 70LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF 3RD RIGHT COUNTER BETWEEN X-8 ANDFACECOORDINATES: 3R, 17MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD, WITH SMALL NW-TRENDING NORMALFAULTS.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, CONTORTED AND SLICKED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD, ROLLY SURFACE.SECTION 71LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D HDG. AND NO. 00, ONSW CORNERCOORDINATES: 4R, 16MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >7.65 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR TO AIDROOF-BOLTING)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, SMOOTH BASE, STANDING NICELY.0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED3050.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, CONTORTED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED3.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 72LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 3RD RIGHT COUNTER AND X-8, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 3R, 16MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,ROLLY TOP, HARD.SECTION 73LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 2ND RIGHT AND A-2 HEADING, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 2R, 12MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >9.2 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CRUMPLED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY3060.55 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, ABUNDANT THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, TOUGH2.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 74LOCATION: ON EAST RIB OF A-1 HEADING, ON LINE OF 2ND RIGHT(NOT DRIVEN)COORDINATES: 2R, 11MEASURED: JANUARY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.6 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SPHEROIDAL TEXTURE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED ANDCONTORTED0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, CONTORTED0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, BLOCKY.SECTION 75LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF C HEADING AND ROOM NO.4, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 9R, 8MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.25 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD, SANDY0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT, INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN TO BLACK, CARBONACEOUS0.2 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED4.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED307FLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, ROLLYSECTION 76LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF C HEADING AND ROOM NO.5, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 10R, 8MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.9 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED4.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 77LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOM NO.5, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 10R, 9MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.75 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT, INTENSELY SHEARED,PUSHING OUT1.0 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED AT TOP0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, FISSILE0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED, SOFT1.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, SMOOTH SURFACE308SECTION 78LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND ROOM NO.5, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 10R, 10MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.35 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.75 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, GRADATIONAL0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 79LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A-1 HEADING AND ROOM NO.5, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 10R, 11MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.25 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.85 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE309SECTION 80LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND ROOM NO.6, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 11R, 10MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.6 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT LUSTROUS, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, PODDY1.0 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT3.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 81LOCATION: ON NE CORNER OF JUNCTION OF X-4 AND 2ND RIGHTCOUNTERCOORDINATES: 2R, 9MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.9 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, CAVED TO WEST OF JUNCTION.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY0.05 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE310SECTION 82LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF G AND ROOM NO.0, ON SECORNERCOORDINATES: 5R, 13MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE0.9 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED4.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, BROWN, ROLLYSECTION 83LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF C AND ROOM NO.00, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 4R, 17MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 13.0 FEET (FLOOR EXPOSED 15 FEET TO WEST INROOM NO. 00)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.75 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED, SLICKED, BRIGHT, LIGHT,"RASHY"0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SILTY1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED5.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED311FLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 84LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D AND ROOM NO.0, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 5R, 16MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.15 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, BUT HARDER TO DRILL ANDSOMEWHAT SANDY1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.15 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.6 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, GRADATIONAL0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY4.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVESECTION 85LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D AND ROOM NO.1, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 6R, 16MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >7.4 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - SANDY, AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, VERY HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT0.65 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SLIGHTLYSILTY3.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE312SECTION 86LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E AND ROOM NO.0, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 5R, 15MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - SANDY, AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED1.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 87LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E AND ROOM NO.00, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 4R, 15MEASURED: JANUARY 17,1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.8 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - SANDY, AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE-BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE313SECTION 88LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F AND ROOM NO.00, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 4R, 14MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.6 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT0.65 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS3.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVESECTION 89LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF MAIN ENTRY AND X-8, ON SW CORNERCOORDINATES: OR, 16MEASURED: JANUARY 17, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.05 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AND CRUMPLED0.1 FT. COAL - DULL, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, MAY BE A LENSE0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - COALY, AS ABOVE1.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, VERY SILTY, HARD1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, AS BEFORE314315SECTION 90LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF 1ST RIGHT COUNTER, BETWEEN X-8 ANDX-9COORDINATES: 1R, 17MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.15 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, HARD WITH BRIGHT COAL BANDSAT BASE.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, SHEARED INTOP 0.4 FT.0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.5 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.75 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.2 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - COALY, HARDSECTION 91LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF C AND ROOM NO. 0, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 5R, 17MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.75 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD, SHEAR PLANE AT BASE0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.2 FT. COAL BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, A LENSE0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AT BASE0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD, SHEARED AT BASE0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED2.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, A FEW LOW-ANGLE SLIPS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED2.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, MINOR SHEARINGFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 92LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D AND ROOM NO. 2, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 7R, 16MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SLIGHTLY SILTY, SHEARED2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 93LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D AND ROOM NO. 3, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 8R, 16MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.15 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CRUMPLED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED5.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, NUMEROUS SLICKENSIDESFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE316SECTION 94LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D AND ROOM NO. 4, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 9R, 16MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 95LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D AND ROOM NO. 5, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 10R, 16MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, A LENSE0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, WITH THIN BRIGHTCOAL BANDS0.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED317FLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 96LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F AND ROOM NO. 2, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 7R, 14MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >7.75 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.85 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.15 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS3.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVESECTION 97LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF G AND ROOM NO. 2, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 7R, 13MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.1 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.05 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED318FLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVESECTION 98LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E AND ROOM NO. 4, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 9R, 15MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.1 FT. COAL - SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED5.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 99LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F AND ROOM NO. 3, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 8R, 14MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, WITH 50% THINBANDS OF BRIGHT COAL0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WITHLENSES OF SLICKENSIDED BRIGHT COAL0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, ABUNDANT THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS, SLICKENSIDED0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED3.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED319FLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 100 (CHECK SECTION FOR BOREHOLE WM-2AC)LOCATION: IN 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF G AND ROOM NO. 1, ON SWCORNERCOORDINATES: 6R, 13; 3 METRES SOUTH OF BOREHOLEMEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986^REVISED: FEBRUARY 18, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.9 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, CONTORTED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD1.0 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED, WITH BANDS OF DARKBROWN, CARBONACEOUS MUDSTONE0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, GRADATIONAL0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SILTYAT BASE. EROSIONAL BASE3.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, WITH ANGULAR FRACTURES0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, DIRTY, SHEARED1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 101LOCATION: AT FACE OF 3RD RIGHT COUNTER, INBYE CROSSCUT X-5COORDINATES: 3R, 9.3MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, WITH LENSES OFBRIGHT COAL, ALL SHEARED1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, ROLLING UP TO EAST.320321SECTION 102LOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF A-1 HEADING, ON CENTRELINE OF ROOMNO.3COORDINATES: 8R, 11MEASURED: FEBRUARY 21, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.05 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, WITH THIN BRIGHT COALBANDS0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS4.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 103LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF G HEADING AND ROOMNO.^3COORDINATES: 8R, 13, SW CORNERMEASURED: MARCH 14, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.8 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.8 FT.^COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, STRONG CLEAT AT 135,CALCITE ALONG CLEAT: PLATY.0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.7 FT.^COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT.^MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.7 FT.^MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, FISSILE0.1 FT.^MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, STICKY, TOUGH2.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH POLISHED TOP SURFACE.SECTION 104LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E HEADING AND ROOMNO. 5COORDINATES: 10 R, 15, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MARCH 14, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.45 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, WITH BRIGHT COALLENSES0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, ROLLY BASE (MAY BESCOURED)3.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 105LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY AT CROSSCUT X-6COORDINATES: 0 R, 14MEASURED: MARCH 14, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.4 FEET. CORRECTED FOR DIP OF 20 NORTH.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.15 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS1.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AND CONTORTED,MINOR KINK FOLD AXES AT 320, SENSE OF OVERTURNINGTO THE SW.0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SILTY,TOUGH3.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED322FLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 106LOCATION: AT FACE OF CROSSCUT X-8 (D HEADING OR ROAD 16), ONEAST RIBCOORDINATES: 1.5 L, 16MEASURED: MARCH 14, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.0 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE BUT A LITTLE SOFTER AND WEAKER.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED AT BASE0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SILTY0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.95 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD3.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 107LOCATION: ON SOUTH WALL OF FAN PORTAL, AT EDGE OF MINE YARDCOORDINATES: 1.5 R, 0.6 (AT OUTCROP)MEASURED: MARCH 14, 1986ROOF NOT EXPOSED. SECTION OF LOWER WELLINGTON COAL AND UPPERPARTING.15.0 FT. TILL - STONY; EROSIONAL BASE.3.1 FT. SILTSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, SANDY, BLOCKY,SOFT, WEATHERED. TOP IS ERODED. UPPER PARTING.0.75 FT. COAL - WEATHERED, SOFT.FLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, DARK BROWN TO BLACK,CARBONACEOUS. [EAST WELLINGTON FORMATION]323SECTION 108LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADING AND ROOMNO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 17, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MARCH 14, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: > 7.5 FEET. GRADING THROUGH FAULT AND LEAVINGCOAL FLOORROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, STICKY, SOFT1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 109LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADING AND ROOMNO.5COORDINATES: 10 R, 17, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.65 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD, SLICKED AT TOP.0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED AT BASE0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.35 FT. COAL - DULL, SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY3.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD324SECTION 110LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF D HEADING AND ROOMNO.6COORDINATES: 11 R, 16, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.55 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, BUT BROKEN BY SMALL EXTENSIONALAND THRUST FAULTS; WEAK AND BRECCIATED IN PART: MAYBE COMPACTIONAL FAULT ZONE. BROWNISH-GREY AND SANDY.1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, TOUGH3.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD.SECTION 111LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E HEADING AND ROOMNO.7COORDINATES: 12 R, 15, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH OCCASIONAL PLANT STEMS.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.35 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, TOUGH4.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD,WITH ROLLY TOP SURFACE.325SECTION 112LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E HEADING AND ROOMNO.6COORDINATES: 11 R, 15, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED0.85 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.0 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 113LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F HEADING AND ROOMNO.7COORDINATES: 12 R, 14, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.5 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE326SECTION 114LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F HEADING AND ROOMNO.6COORDINATES: 11 R, 14, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.15 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.5 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED; SCOUREDBASE4.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 115LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF G HEADING AND ROOMNO.5COORDINATES: 10 R, 13, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.65 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, VERY HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS3.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE327SECTION 116LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF G HEADING AND ROOMNO.4COORDINATES: 9R, 13, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.25 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY0.5 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, CALCITE ONCLEATS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, WHITE STREAKS (SHELLFOSSILS?), SCOURED BASE.3.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 117LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF G HEADING AND ROOMNO.6COORDINATES: 11 R, 13, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT.^MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, VERY HARD0.5 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED AT TOP0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.5 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.95 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE328SECTION 118LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOMNO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 18, ON NW CORNER (TO AVOID WATER)MEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.75 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, OCCASIONAL BANDS OF GREYDURAIN0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED,SCOURED BASE; THICKNESS RANGES FROM 0.15TO 0.35 FT.1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED; FROM 1.7 TO 1.9 FT. THICKFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 119LOCATION: ON MAIN ENTRY INBYE FAULT, AT JUNCTION WITHCROSSCUT X-7COORDINATES: 0, 15, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 4, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.6 FEET; CORRECTED FOR DIP 10 NROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY; PINCHES OUT TO EAST0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - SHEARED AND SLICKED0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED AND SLICKED2.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE329SECTION 120LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOMNO.4COORDINATES: 9 R, 18, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARDSECTION 121LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT NORTH FACE OF B HEADINGCOORDINATES: 9.4 R, 18, ON CENTRELINEMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED,SCOURED BASE2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD. AT W SIDE OF FACE THE FLOOR DROPSAWAY TO NW.330SECTION 122LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND ROOMNO.4COORDINATES: 8 R, 19, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 7.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE. DIP 6 SSW.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED,PINCHING AND SWELLING FROM 0.45 TO 0.65 FEET0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.6 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, OCCASIONAL VERY THIN DIRT BANDS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE ? - HARD, MAKING WATER, CONCEALED BY WATERAND DEBRIS.SECTION 123LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOMNO.2COORDINATES: 7 R, 18, SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 7.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, BUT SOFTER0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED AT TOP0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SILTY AT BASE2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE ? - HARD, MAKING WATER, CONCEALED BY WATERAND DEBRIS.331SECTION 124LOCATION: IN RETURN AIRWAY, 81 FEET OUTBYE SE CORNER OFJUNCTION WITH CROSSCUT X-1. OUTBYE OF HERE THEUPPER PARTING IS CARRIED AS ROOF. HERE THESILTSTONE MAIN ROOF IS EXPOSED WHERE THETIMBERING FAILED, ALLOWING THE PARTING TO FALL.COORDINATES: 1.8 R, 1.8, ON S RIB OF AIRWAYMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 14.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - HARD, STANDING WELL, SMOOTH BASE; MAKINGWATER.1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, BLOCKY, INACCESSIBLE FORDESCRIPTION.1.95 FT. SILTSTONE - DARK GREY, WEATHERED, SOFT, SOMELISTRIC SURFACES; APPEARS TO BE SHEARED AT TOP.4.0 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, SANDY, HARDER THANABOVE, BLOCKY, WITH SCATTERED ROOTLETS AT BASE.SLIP SURFACE AT BASE.0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, BLOCKY, HARD0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, THIN BRIGHTCOAL BANDS0.25 FT. COAL - DULL, SHEARED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, ROLLY SURFACE.SECTION 125LOCATION: ON E RIB OF CROSSCUT X/3, HALFWAY BETWEEN SECTIONS10 AND 11.COORDINATES: 2.5 R, 7MEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, HARD, ABUNDANT PLANTDEBRIS, WITH OCCASIONAL SANDSTONE DYKES.1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. COAL AND SHALE - INTERLAMINATED BRIGHT COAL ANDBLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD MUDSTONE0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.7 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, ROOTY, HARD1.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY2.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED IN TOP HALF0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3322.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 126LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, ON D HEADING AT CREST OF FLOOR ROLLCOORDINATES: 8 R, 7, ON E RIB AT CENTRELINEMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.95 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, HARD; TOP COAL ADHERES TOROOF.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, COALY, WITH SIDERITE LENSES0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY; GRADING IN BASAL 0.05 FT.TO BROWN, SILTY, CARBONACEOUS; INTENSELY SHEARED3.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE; OUTBYE THIS SECTION THE FLOORROLLS DOWN AT 30 SSW, DROPPING AT LEAST 3 FEET. ROOFSTAYS FLAT OVER THIS ROLL.SECTION 127LOCATION: IN PANEL 'A'S, AT JUNCTION OF E HEADING AND ROOMNO. 4COORDINATES: 9R, 6, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE333STATION 127 ALOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, AT JUNCTION OF E HEADING AND ROOMNO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 6, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.55 FEETSECTION 128LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, AT JUNCTION OF F HEADING AND ROOMNO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 5, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.55 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 129LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, AT JUNCTION OF F HEADING AND ROOMNO. 5COORDINATES: 10 R, 6, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.35 FEET; FLOOR DROPS AWAY AND SEAM THICKENSTO NORTH.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.4 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, BROKEN0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY; LENSES OF LUSTROUSCOAL0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED3343.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESTATION 129 ALOCATION: IN PANEL 'A'S, AT NORTH FACE OF E HEADINGCOORDINATES: 10.3 R, 6, ON CENTRELINE AT FACEMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.85 FEETSTATION 129 BLOCATION: IN PANEL IA'S, AT JUNCTION OF D HEADING AND ROOMNO.5COORDINATES: 10 R, 7, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.95 FEETSTATION 129 CLOCATION: IN PANEL IA'S, AT NORTH FACE OF D HEADINGCOORDINATES: 11.9 R, 7, AT CENTRELINE OF FACEMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.65 FEETSTATION 129 DLOCATION: IN PANEL IA'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADING AND ROOMNO. 6COORDINATES: 11 R, 8, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.05 FEETSTATION 129 ELOCATION: IN PANEL 'A'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADING AND ROOMNO. 7COORDINATES: 12 R, 8, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.5 FEET335STATION 129 FLOCATION: IN PANEL 1A/S, AT NORTH FACE OF C HEADINGCOORDINATES: 12.8 R, 8, ON CENTRELINE AT FACEMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.65 FEET; ROOF IS WEATHERED AND WET, WITHCLAY SEAMS ALONG JOINTS. AT NE CORNER OFFACE, NORMAL FAULT IN ROOF, DIP 45 NE, THROWDOWN 1/2 FT. TO NE.STATION 129 GLOCATION: IN PANEL 1A/S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOMNO. 7COORDINATES: 12 R, 9, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.75 FEETSECTION 130LOCATION: AT SOUTH SIDE OF MAIN ENTRY PORTAL, AT OUTCROP.COORDINATES: 0.2 L, 0.5MEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >15.4 FEET; ROOF NOT REACHED5.0 FT. TILL - STONY, HARD, WITH BRIGHT COAL FRAGMENTS ATBASE.^TOP OF UPPER PARTING ?^5.9 FT. SILTSTONE - AS BELOW; TOP FORMS LEDGE; GRADATIONALBASE.3.7 FT. SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, SILTY, DARK GREY,RIPPLED; ABRUPT BASE.4.3 FT. SILTSTONE - DARK GREY, SANDY, WEATHERED AND SOFT;EROSIONAL BASE.^BASE OF UPPER PARTING^0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WEATHERED1.2 FT. COAL ? - MEASURES CONCEALED BY DEBRIS AND TILLFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, CARBONACEOUS, ROOTY, HARDSECTION 131LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A/S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND ROOMNO. 0COORDINATES: 5 R, 10, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.15 FEET; FLOOR WAS EXPOSED BY BRUSHING.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD3360.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, PINCHING SOUTHWESTWARD,FROM 0.3 FT. TO 0.1 FT.0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WITH SMALL STUMPS AT BASE0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, BROKEN0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SILTY, SCOUREDBASE, THICKNESS 0.15 TO 0.25 FEET3.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 132LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT NORTH FACE OF D HEADINGCOORDINATES: 11.5 R, 16, ON E SIDE OF FACEMEASURED: APRIL 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.75 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE; ROLLING DOWN FROM MIDDLE TOLEFT SIDE OF FACE, ROLL ATTITUDE 025 / 30 W,THROW 3 FEET, A FEW SMALL NORMAL FAULT STEPS DOWN TOWEST BUT BASICALLY A MONOCLINAL ROLL. ROOF WHEREINVOLVED IN ROLL IS BRECCIATED AND WEAK, WITH LISTRICSURFACES. BOLTS AND BARS ARE TAKING WEIGHT JUSTOUTBYE HERE; THE PLACE WILL PROBABLY CAVE.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT, INTENSELY SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.65 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE; DROPS AWAY UNDER ROLL TOWEST.337SECTION 133LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, ON S RIB OF ROOM NO. 2, 42 FEETINBYE B HEADING, WHERE COAL BED HAS PINCHED OVERA FLOOR ROLL UP TO E.COORDINATES: 7 R, 17.4MEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 5.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED AT TOP0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SILTY AT BASE1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, FALLING AWAY TO WEST; 3 FT.TO WEST THE ROOF-TO-FLOOR INTERVAL IS 6.5 FEET.SECTION 134LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT HOLING OF A HEADING INTO ROOMNO. 2COORDINATES: 7 R, 19, ON CENTRELINE OF A HEADINGMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD; BASAL 0.05FT. IS BROWN, SPHAEROSIDERITIC BAND0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED,OCCASIONAL SILTY FLASERS0.85 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, WITH SLIPS AT 45 WSW0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH STUMPS AT BASE0.15 FT. MUDSTONE -BLACK, COALY, ROOTY0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WITH SLIPS AT 45 WNW0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED2.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, WET338SECTION 135LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-1 HEADING AND ROOMNO.^3COORDINATES: 8 R, 20, SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.95 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.55 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY2.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, WETSECTION 136LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND ROOMNO.5COORDINATES: 10 R, 19, SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 7.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED0.15 FT MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - WET339SECTION 137LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOMNO. 5COORDINATES: 10 R, 18, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED4.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 138LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADING AND ROOMNO. 4COORDINATES: 9 R, 17, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.25 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE340SECTION 139LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADING AND ROOMNO. 4COORDINATES: 9 R, 19, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.05 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, HARD; AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY; SILTY AT BASE; SHEARED4.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE; WET.SECTION 140LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADING AND ROOMNO. 6COORDINATES: 11 R, 18, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.85 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, WET343.SECTION 141LOCATION: ON CROSSCUT X-1, AT SW CORNER OF LARGE ROOMCOORDINATES: 1.4 R, 3.2MEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 14.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, STANDING NICELY, A FEW DRIPPERS2.1 FT. COAL - BLOCKY, INACCESSIBLE FOR DESCRIPTION0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, RUBBLY ANDCARBONACEOUS AT TOP, WEAK THROUGHOUT; GRADATIONAL4.0 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, SANDY, HEAVY, BLOCKY,WITH SLIP SURFACE AT BASE. FURTHER INBYE TO THESOUTHEAST, THE BASE OF THIS UNIT IS ROLLY, BUT ASFAR AS THE BRATTICE THERE IS NO REAL DOWNCUTTING.CF. SECTIONS 4 THROUGH 6.0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.95 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, WITH SCATTERED THIN BRIGHTCOAL BANDS. FURTHER INBYE TO SOUTHEAST, THIS UNITCONTAINS A DISCONTINUOUS 0.1 FT. BAND OF DIRTY,TRASHY COAL.0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED4.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, ROOTY, ROLLY, AS BEFORESECTION 142LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF RETURN AIRWAY AND CROSSCUT X-1(SUMP ROAD)COORDINATES: 2.3 R, 3.7, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.55 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH CONSIDERABLE COALIFIEDPLANT TRASH1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. COAL - DULL, GREASY LUSTRE, LOW DENSITY, MAY BECANNELOID0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED ANDSLICKED, WITH LENSES OF LUSTROUS, SLICKEDCOAL0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED;GRADATIONAL0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED, SCATTERED BRIGHT COALBANDS; GRADATIONAL0.5 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, SHEARED3423430.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED, WITH ABUNDANTCOALY PLANT TRASH. ABRUPT0.60.35FT.FT.MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, WITH LARGE BLOCKS (RIP-UPCLASTS?) OF LUSTROUS, COAL. ABRUPTCOAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN,BRIGHT COAL BANDS CARBONACEOUS, SCATTERED THIN1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESTATION 142 ALOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADINGAND ROOM NO.0COORDINATES: 5 R, 9, ON SE CORNERMEASURED : MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.5 FEETSTATION 142 BLOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADINGAND ROOM NO.1COORDINATES: 6 R, 8, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.8 FEETSTATION 142 CLOCATION: IN PANEL 1A/S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADINGAND ROOM NO.2COORDINATES: 7 R, 8, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.8 FEETSTATION 142 DLOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADINGAND ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 8, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.0 FEETSTATION 142 ELOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT FACE OF C HEADING ABOVEFLOOR ROLLCOORDINATES: 8.7 R, 8, ON CENTRELINE OF HEADINGMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.85 FEETSTATION 142 FLOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADINGAND ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 9, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.3 FEETSTATION 142 GLOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADINGAND ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 10, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.65 FEETSTATION 142 HLOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADINGAND ROOM NO.2COORDINATES: 7 R, 10, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.8 FEETSTATION 142 ILOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADINGAND ROOM NO.1COORDINATES: 6 R, 10, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: MAY 2, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.15 FEET344SECTION 143LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, ON SW CORNER OF FACE OF ROOM NO.4,66 FEET INBYE A HEADINGCOORDINATES: 9 R, 20MEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.55 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE. TOP COAL ADHERES AT BASE3450.9 FT.0.2 FT.0.5 FT.0.25 FT.0.3 FT.0.1 FT.0.8 FT.COAL - BRIGHT, HARDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARDCOAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEAREDCOAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTEDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEAREDCOAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.65 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, MINOR BANDS OF BLACK, COALYMUDSTONE0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SILTY, SHEARED1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, AS BEFORE.SECTION 144LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, ON B HEADING BETWEEN ROOMSNO. 2 AND 3COORDINATES: 7.5 R, 18, ON W RIBMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.65 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT.0.2 FT.0.6 FT.0.4 FT.0.3 FT.0.1 FT.1.75 FT.COAL - BRIGHT, HARDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARDCOAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEAREDCOAL - LUSTROUSMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEAREDCOAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, SMOOTH SURFACE - SHEARED AT TOP?SECTION 145LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 3COORDINATES: 8 R, 15, SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 8.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SIGMOIDAL SHEARS DIPPINGTO SSE0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT (A LENSE?)0.3 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, STICKY3.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARDSECTION 146LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, IN ROOM NO.3 AT BARRIERCOORDINATES: 8 R, 12.3, ON N RIBMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD; PARTS READILY AT BASE0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEAREDAND LISTRIC0.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.4 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, TOUGH2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE, LIGHT BROWN346SECTION 147LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT FACE OF E HEADINGCOORDINATES: 12.5 R, 15, ON CENTRELINE OF HEADINGMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.65 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, OCCASIONAL LENSES OF DIRT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESTATION 147 ALOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF E HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 2COORDINATES: 7 R, 15, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >9.2 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)STATION 147 BLOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 4COORDINATES: 9 R, 14, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.5 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)STATION 147 CLOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 5COORDINATES: 10 R, 14, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.5 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)347SECTION 148LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 3COORDINATES: 8 R, 10, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 22, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.65 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.45 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH OCCASIONALBRIGHT COAL LENSES UP TO 0.1 FT. THICK AND 1 FT.WIDE, WITH LONG AXES TO SE; PROBABLY FLATTENEDLOGS4.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 149LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, IN ROOM NO. 2 AT BARRIERCOORDINATES: 7 R, 12.6, ON N RIBMEASURED: MAY 23, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.15 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE348SECTION 150LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF F HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 1COORDINATES: 6 R, 14, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: MAY 23, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8 .5 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE . - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD. THIS COAL OVERSTEPSSMALL NORMAL FAULTS WHICH OFFSET BEDS BELOW0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, STICKY0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED BUT TOUGH4.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVESECTION 151LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF 1ST RIGHT COUNTER ENTRY,33 FEET INBYE CENTRE OF CROSSCUT X-9COORDINATES: 1 R, 18.5MEASURED: JUNE 26, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, SANDY, SLICKENSIDED,TENDS TO SCALE.0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLYSHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED3490.15 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD, CARBONACEOUS0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, HARD.SECTION 152LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, IN ROOM NO.1, 35 FT.INBYE E HEADINGCOORDINATES: 6R, 5.5, ON N RIBMEASURED: JUNE 26, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - HARD, BROWNISH-GREY.1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WET0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED5.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY DEBRIS.SECTION 153LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, AT JUNCTION OF A HEADINGAND ROOM NO.4COORDINATES: 9R, 10, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - HARD, BROWNISH-GREY, AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD. YELLOW SULPHATESAT TOP.0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLYSHEARED2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, BROWN, ROOTY, HARD.350SECTION 154LOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADINGAND ROOM NO.7COORDINATES: 12R, 9, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - HARD, BROWNISH-GREY, AS BEFORE.1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD.0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE0.55 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, IRREGULAR BASE2.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, BROWN, ROOTY, HARD.SECTION 155LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A/S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADINGAND ROOM NO.7COORDINATES: 12R, 8, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - HARD, BROWNISH-GREY, AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD. WHITE ANDYELLOW SULPHATES ALONG CLEAT IN TOP HALF.SLIGHTLY WEATHERED.0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.0 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SILTY RIPPLES?1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE351SECTION 156LOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF CROSSCUT X-1, 26 FEET SOUTHOF SECTION 141.COORDINATES: 1.1R, 3MEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.3 FEET (CARRYING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).ROOF: SILTSTONE - DARK GREY, SANDY, PLATY, WITH ABUNDANTPLANT DEBRIS INCLUDING COALIFIED STUMPS IN GROWTHPOSITION.0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, LENTICULAR, PART OF A ROOT MASS.0.15 FT. COAL - DULL, STONY, PLATY, PART OF A ROOT MASS.0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK GREY, CARBONACEOUS, ROOTY0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWNISH-GREY, CARBONACEOUS0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD1.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN TO BLACK, CARBONACEOUS,CONTORTED, SOME ROOTS, LOOKS LIKE PALEOSOL.1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, BROWN, ROOTY.SECTION 157LOCATION: IN SUMP ROAD (CROSSCUT X-1), 40 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142COORDINATES: 2.8R, 4.0, ON W RIBMEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH PLANT DEBRIS.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD, PINCHES OUT 3 FT. TONORTH0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, PINCHES OUT 5 FT. TO NORTH1.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED, PINCHES OUT 4 FT.TO NORTH0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, CONCRETIONS, ROOTY,GRADATIONAL1.0 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD, EROSIONAL BASE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, THICKER TO NORTH0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, BROWN, ROOTY352SECTION 158LOCATION: IN SUMP ROAD (CROSSCUT X-1), 26 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142COORDINATES: 2.6R, 3.9, ON W RIBMEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH PLANT DEBRIS.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD.0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, PINCHES OUT 2 FT. TO S1.0 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, THICKENS TO N0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY TO CARBONACEOUS, WITHLENSES OF LUSTROUS COAL0.35 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, VERY ARGILLACEOUS, WITH LENSESOF LUSTROUS COAL1.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM-GRAINED, BROWN, ROOTYSECTION 159LOCATION: IN SUMP ROAD (CROSSCUT X-1), 56 FEET NORTH OFSECTION 142COORDINATES: 3.1R, 4.1, ON W RIBMEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, WITH PLANT DEBRIS.0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD.0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, SILTY, WITH PLANT DEBRIS0.95 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD; OCCASIONAL CARBONACEOUSSTREAKS1.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED IN MIDDLE0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE353STATION 159 ALOCATION: IN SUMP ROADSECTION 142COORDINATES: 3.2R, 4.2,MEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18,ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.2 FEETPINCHED(CROSSCUT X-1), 67 FEET NORTH OFON W RIB1986(HERE THE WELLINGTON RIDER ISOUT).SECTION 160LOCATION: IN SUPPLY ROAD TO PANEL lA'S, OUTBYE MAIN FAULTCOORDINATES: 4.5R, 5.8, ON E RIBMEASURED: SEPTEMBER 18, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - HARD, BROWNISH-GREY, AS BEFORE.0.95 FT.0.1 FT.0.65 FT.0.6 FT.0.5 FT.1.8 FT.0.3 FT.COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARDCOAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDMUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUSMUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTYCOAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CONTORTEDCOAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARD0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, SOFT3.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY WATER.SECTION 161LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-2 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.5COORDINATES: 10 R, 21, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.65 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, IRREGULAR BASE0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY3541.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, AS BEFORE.SECTION 162LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-2 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 21, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.45 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, PLATY, WITH SHALE LAMINAE0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, WITH MANY BRIGHTCOAL LENSES2.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.75 FT. COAL - BRIGIIf BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 163LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, ON N RIB OF ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 20.6MEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 8.65 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, MINOR DIRT LAMINAE0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY4.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY WATER AND DEBRIS355SECTION 164LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-1 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.2COORDINATES: 7 R, 20, ON NE CORNER, TO AVOID WATERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED0.45 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT (MIGHT BE A LENSE):0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLICKENSIDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, TOUGH, SLICKENSIDED2.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY WATER AND DEBRISSECTION 165LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, IN A HEADING 31 FEET SOUTH FROMROOM NO.2COORDINATES: 6.5 R, 19, AT SW CORNER OF FACEMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH POLISHED BASE1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WITHOCCASIONAL BRIGHT COAL BANDS AT BASE0.75 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE, HARD0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY 2 FEET OF WATERAND DEBRIS356SECTION 166LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, 10 FEET OUTBYE SOUTH FACEOF B HEADINGCOORDINATES: 6 R, 18, ON W RIBMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.9 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH MINOR SHALE LAMINAE0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, GRADATIONAL0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY3.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, UNDER WATERSECTION 167LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 6COORDINATES: 11 R, 17, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, WITH BRIGHT COAL LENSES0.55 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED4.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY DEBRIS357SECTION 168LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT NORTH FACE OF B HEADINGCOORDINATES: 12.2 R, 18, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, WITH ABUNDANT BRIGHTCOAL LENSES0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY4.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY DEBRISSECTION 169LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF B HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 6COORDINATES: 12.2 R, 18, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD1.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WITHSCATTERED BRIGHT COAL LENSES0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, WITH BRIGHT COAL LENSES0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS3.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY DEBRIS358SECTION 170LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-1 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.5COORDINATES: 10 R, 20, ON NW CORNER OF JUNCTIONMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS4.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 171LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-2 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.4COORDINATES: 9 R, 21, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED AND LISTRICATED0.35 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS4.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY DEBRIS359SECTION 172LOCATION: IN PANEL 1AIS, AT JUNCTION OF D HEADINGAND ROOM NO.1COORDINATES: 6 R, 7, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 10. 0 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT1.15 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT4.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARDSECTION 173LOCATION: IN MAINS, ON 3RD RIGHT COUNTER ENTRY INBYE DOUBLEBENDCOORDINATES: 3 R, 7.8, ON S RIBMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED,GRADATIONAL BASE0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, WITH ABUNDANT BRIGHT COALLENSES2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3601.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUSSECTION 174LOCATION: IN OLD SUPPLY ROAD TO PANEL 1-A'S, AT BENDCOORDINATES: 2.7 R, 5.8, ON E RIBMEASURED: OCTOBER 31, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.4 FT. SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, ROOTY0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.95 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESECTION 175LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-3 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.5COORDINATES: 10 R, 22, ON NE CORNERMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 8.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, LIGHT BROWN, WEAK.0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.1 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, OCCASIONAL CARBONACEOUSMUDSTONE BAND0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED3.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, UNDER DEBRIS.361SECTION 176LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT NW FACE OF A-1 HEADINGCOORDINATES: 11 R, 20, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH NUMEROUS BRIGHT COALLENSES IN BASAL 0.2 FT. CUT BY THRUST FAULT AT110/15-30 S, THROW 1 FT., SLICKENSIDES SHOW THRUSTINGTO 020. AT FACE, ATTITUDE OF ROOF IS 100/5 N.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED. THRUSTFROM ROOF FLATTENS OUT AT THIS HORIZON.0.95 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED0.7 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH SCATTERED THIN DIRTBANDS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS3.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, MINOR SQUEEZINGFLOOR: SILTSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SANDY, SOFT,INTENSELY SHEARED, MAY BE FAULTED. AT LEAST 0.5 FT.THICK.SECTION 177LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-3 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 22, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.7 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.6 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.65 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT,BANDS WITH NUMEROUS THIN DIRT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SILTY AT BASE,OCCASIONAL ROOTS3.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD, ROLLING DOWN TO SOUTH.362STATION 177ALOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, ON SOUTH RIB OF ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 22.5MEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.7 FEETSECTION 178LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT WEST FACE OF ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 8 R, 23, ON SE CORNER, ABOVE FLOOR ROLL DOWN TONORTHEASTMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, DIPPING 5 E, THUS COMPACTEDDOWN IN TROUGH0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD, WET, BUBBLING WATERAND MINOR GAS.0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH OCCASIONAL THIN DIRTBANDS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SILTYAT BASE. MAKES WATER AND GAS AS ABOVE.3.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE.SECTION 179LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, IN A-3 HEADING BETWEENROOM NO.3 AND NO.4COORDINATES: 8.5 R, 22, IN NARROW NECK OF HEADINGMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.1 FEET. HERE ATOP THE FLOOR ROLL.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH NUMEROUS BRIGHT COAL BANDSIN BASAL 0.2 FT., THUS ALMOST A GRADATIONAL CONTACT.0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT.SHEAR SURFACES DIP S 20 W0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH MANY THIN DIRT BANDS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY363SILTY, SOFT2.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORESECTION 180LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-3 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.4COORDINATES: 9 R, 22, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.2 FEET. THICKENS TO EAST IN ROOM NO.4,TO ABOUT 7 FEET?ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.65 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH THIN DIRT BANDS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED, STICKY, SOFT3.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORESECTION 181LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT FACE OF ROOM NO. 6, ON SW CORNERCOORDINATES: 9 R, 22.3, AT 18 FEET WEST OF BM (9 R, 22) INROOFMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY,0.5 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDHARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT, INTENSELY SHEARED0.4 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, WITH THINDIRT BANDS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,SHEARED AND SOFT, SILTYSTICKY, INTENSELY3.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE364SECTION 182LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT NORTH FACE OF A-3 HEADINGCOORDINATES: 9.7 R, 22MEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 5.1 FEET. 3 FEET TO SOUTH, FLOOR ROLLS DOWN2.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE. DIP 6 S0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, PLATY0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WITHOCCASIONAL LUSTROUS COAL LENSES TO 0.2 FT.THICK0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED. DIRTYCOAL UNIT IS MISSING AT THIS POINT0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, STICKY, SOFT1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE.SECTION 183LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, 8 FT. SOUTH OF SECTION 182COORDINATES: 9.6 R, 22, ON EAST RIBMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.4 FEET. SLICKENSIDES IN ROOF SHOW THRUSTINGTO 010ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.7 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH THIN DIRT BANDS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFT,STICKY4.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE365SECTION 184LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, ON LINE WITH WEST RIBOF X-1COORDINATES: 0, 2.4, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.35 FT (CARRYING UPPER PARTING IN ROOF)ROOF: SANDSTONE - AS BELOW1.5 FT. SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, LIGHT GREY, CLEANER THANBEDS BELOW. LARGE PALM FRONDS AT TOP. GRADATIONAL.3.3 FT. SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, LIGHT GREY, SILTY,RIPPLED AT BASE; CUT-AND-FILL STRUCTURES ABOVE.BLOCKY. ABRUPT.1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, BLOCKY, WEATHERED.0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT, WEATHERED.1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, FRESHER THAN ABOVE.FLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.SECTION 185LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, 26 FEET OUTBYESECTION 184COORDINATES: 0, 2, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: > 10.85 FEET (CARRYING UPPER PARTING IN ROOF)ROOF: SANDSTONE - AS BELOW.4.0 FT. SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, RIPPLE-DRIFT CROSS-LAMINATED, GRADATIONAL.3.2 FT. SANDSTONE - SILTY, EROSIONAL.1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY WEATHERED0.95 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED,SIGMOIDAL SHEAR SURFACES AT 020/55 W1.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 186LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, OPPOSITE SW CORNEROF X-2COORDINATES: 0, 3.6, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: > 9.7 FEET (CARRYING UPPER PARTING IN ROOF).HERE THE INTERVAL FROM UPPER PARTING TOFLOOR IS 3.9 FEET. 6 FEET TO WEST IT IS 5.1FEET (THE BASE OF THE PARTING IS EROSIONAL,AND RISES AT LEAST 1.2 FEET). BASE OF UPPERPARTING DEFINES A CHANNEL STRIKING 055.366ROOF: SANDSTONE - AS BELOW1.5 FT. SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, MEDIUM-BEDDED, LIGHTTO MEDIUM GREY, SILTY, MICACEOUS, ABUNDANT FINELYBROKEN PLANT DEBRIS AND PALM FRONDS TO 18 INCHESLONG. ABRUPT.4.3 FT. SILTSTONE/SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED (30:70GRADING DOWN TO 70:30 AT BASE) - PLANARINTERLAMINAE AND CROSS-BEDS (XBEDS 070/20 NW),LOOKS LIKE A POINT BAR UNIT. POSSIBLE PALEOFLOW TONE. EROSIONAL.^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, FISSILE, THICKER TO WEST.1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLY SILTY1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 187LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, 30 FEET INBYESECTION 186COORDINATES: 0, 4.1, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.1 FEET (CARRYING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).HERE THE INTERVAL FROM UPPER PARTING TOFLOOR IS 8.1 FEET. 10 FEET OUTBYE TO EAST,THE BASE OF THE PARTING DROPS 2 FEET ANDTHUS CUTS OUT THE TOP TWO PLIES OF THE COALBED.ROOF: SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, LIGHT GREY, WITH SILTYLAMINAE. EROSIONAL.0.95 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT1.05 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, ABUNDANTBRIGHT COAL BANDS.0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY3.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.367SECTION 188LOCATION: IN MAINS, AT SOUTH FACE OF CROSSCUT X-5, ON SECORNER.COORDINATES: 2.4 L, 11, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.6 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE (MAIN ROOF OF WELLINGTON COALBED)1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, FISSILE0.45 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, SOFT, SCATTERED PLANT DEBRIS0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.35 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS2.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. COAL - SHEARED, DIRTY?1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 189LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B/S, AT FACE OF B HEADING, ON SW CORNERCOORDINATES: 5.3 R, 18, ON W RIBMEASURED: IN DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.85 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH THIN DIRT BANDS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED3.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.368SECTION 190LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT FACE OF ROOM NO.1, ON NW CORNERCOORDINATES: 6 R, 18.8, ON N RIBMEASURED: DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.25 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT0.4 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.65 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, OCCASIONAL THIN DIRT BANDS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SLIGHTLYSILTY, SHEARED1.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, UNDER DEBRIS AND WATERSECTION 191LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, IN A-2 HEADING, 76 FT. INBYECENTRELINE OF ROOM NO.3COORDINATES: 6.8 R, 21, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: IN DECEMBER 5, 1986ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.0 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SCATTERED THIN DIRT BANDS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED3.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, UNDER 3 FEET OF WATER AND DEBRIS.369SECTION 192LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, ON EAST FACE OF ROOM NO.1 (FORMING)COORDINATES: 6 R, 17.8, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: JANUARY 8, 1987ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 6.5 FEET. SECTION TAKEN ATOP A FLOORROLL WHICH STEPS 2 FEET DOWN TONORTHWEST.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, UNDISTURBED.0.6 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, COALY, SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT,CARBONACEOUS MUDSTONE;NUMEROUS BANDS OFSHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN,SHEARED CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - MEDIUM TO COARSE-GRAINED, BROWN,CARBONACEOUS, HARD.SECTION 193LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT SE FACE OF B HEADINGCOORDINATES: 4.3 R, 18MEASURED: JANUARY 8, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.5 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR).ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD^RIDER IS CUT BY SINISTRAL SHEAR AT 045 / 70 NW0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.75 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED AT TOP0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH THIN CARBONACEOUSMUDSTONE BANDS0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SHEARED1.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.370SECTION 194LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT SE FACE OF A HEADING INBYEROOM NO.1COORDINATES: 5.5 R, 19MEASURED: JANUARY 8, 1987ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 8.4 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD^PARTS READILY AT BASE^0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, CONTORTED0.95 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH NUMEROUS THIN BANDS OFCARBONACEOUS MUDSTONE0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SOFT, INTENSELYSHEARED4.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, CONCEALED BY WATER.SECTION 195LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT SW FACE OF ROOM NO.1COORDINATES: 6 R, 20, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: JANUARY 8, 1987ROOF TO HARD FLOOR: 8.1 FEET AT FACE. SINCE JUNCTION,AVERAGES 8.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY, SHEARED, 0.05TO 0.25 FT. THICK.0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY SHEARED AT TOP0.7 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED, WITH ABUNDANTBANDS OF BLACK, COALY MUDSTONE0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, SOFTAND STICKY4.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE? - HARD, UNDER WATER.371SECTION 196LOCATION: IN PANEL 1B'S, AT NORTH FACE OF B HEADING.COORDINATES: 12.5 R, 18MEASURED: JANUARY 8, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.4 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR).ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, ATTITUDE: 135 / 4 SW.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT.PINCHES AND SWELLS RAPIDLY, PROBABLE CUT-AND-FILL0.8 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, PLATY0.8 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD3.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: COAL - AS ABOVE.SECTION 197LOCATION: IN SUMP ROAD, 15 FEET S OF FACECOORDINATES: 4.4 R, 4.5, ON E RIBMEASURED: JANUARY 8, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.35 FEET.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, WITH PLANT DEBRIS AND RUSTYSULPHATES.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED, SOFT, WET0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, FISSILE0.4 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, HARD, VERY THIN-BEDDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, ABUNDANT PLANTDEBRIS AND THIN BRIGHT COAL BANDS1.1 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, PLATY0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, ABUNDANT THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS, WET5.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, LIGHT BROWN, AS BEFORE372SECTION 198LOCATION: AT NORTH FACE OF X-2, INBYE THIRD RIGHTCOUNTER ENTRYCOORDINATES: 3.8 R, 5.2, ON NW CORNER OF FACEMEASURED: JANUARY 8, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.95 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,THICK BRIGHT COAL BANDSWITH ABUNDANT0.3 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.7 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, CONTORTED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS3.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORESECTION 199LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 2ND RIGHT COUNTER ENTRY AND SUMPROADCOORDINATES: 3.4 R, 4.3, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.05 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, SANDY, WITH ABUNDANT FINELYBROKEN PLANT DEBRIS.1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SLIGHTLY CARBONACEOUS, ROOTY ATTOP, LISTRICATED0.3 FT. SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWN0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SILTY AT BASE2.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, LIGHT BROWN.373SECTION 200LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 2ND RIGHT COUNTER ENTRYAND SUMP ROADCOORDINATES: 3.7 R, 4.4, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, SOFT AND CARBONACEOUS ATTOP, ROOTY; GRADATIONAL0.55 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, WITH OCCASIONAL THIN BRIGHT COALBANDS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.85 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.1 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, BECOMING SILTY AT BASE2.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 201LOCATION: ON W RIB OF SUMP ROAD ON N (UPTHROWN) SIDE OF 0.75METRE FAULTCOORDINATES: 3.3 R, 4.2MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED (?), INTENSELY SHEARED, LOOKSAS IF A WEDGE THRUST BETWEEN BEDS ABOVE AND BELOW.PINCHES OUT 6 FEET NORTH OF FAULT0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, WITH SCATTERED BRIGHT COALBANDS AND OCCASIONAL ROOTLETS0.75 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, WITH COAL SPARS AT BASE.EROSIONAL0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.15 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT3740.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 202LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF RETURN AIRWAY AND CROSSCUT X-1COORDINATES: 2.0 R, 3.6, ON SW CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.75 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE, DIP 15 NNW, WEDGING UP OVERSPLIT TO S1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, PLATY0.1 FT. COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED, LENTICULAR, NIL TO 0.2FT. THICK0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, WITH OCCASIONAL ROOTLETS0.45 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, WITH OCCASIONAL CARBONISED PLANTFRAGMENTS0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, LISTRICATED,PLATY0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SHEARED0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, WITHLENSES OF LUSTROUS COAL3.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE.375SECTION 203LOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF CROSSCUT X-2, BETWEEN 1ST AND 2NDRIGHT COUNTER ENTRIESCOORDINATES: 2.6 R, 4.9MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 6.5 FEET. SECTION IS 8 FEET SOUTH OF AXIS OFCHANNEL IN ROOF. RIDER COAL IS CUT OUTENTIRELY FOR A WIDTH OF 10 FEET, AND ROOF DIRECTLY OVERLIESTHE UPPER PARTING. CHANNEL IS CA. 30 FEET WIDE AND 2 FEETDEEP. ROOF HERE HAS CAVED FOR 4 FEET, EXPOSING LOW- ANGLESHEARS AND SLICKS, CA. COMPACTIONAL IN ORIGIN. BOLTS PULLEDOUT. NOTE: RIDER SEEMS TO BE MORE SQUEEZED OUT RATHER THANERODED.ROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, SANDY, WITH OCCASIONAL COALFRAGMENTS.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD, SLIGHTLYBROKEN0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CANNELOID0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, ROOTY AT TOP0.7 FT. SILTSTONE- BROWN, OCCASIONAL THIN BRIGHT COAL BANDS0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH ABUNDANTTHIN BRIGHT COAL BANDS2.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, LIGHT BROWN, AS BEFORESECTION 204LOCATION: IN SUPPLY ROAD TO PANEL 1-A'S, 23 FEET INBYE 1STRIGHT COUNTER ENTRYCOORDINATES: 2.1 R, 5.8, ON W RIB, ON S (DOWN) SIDE OF 0.53METRE FAULTMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.0 FEET. RIDER IS SQUEEZED OUT HERE; PRESENTON NORTH SIDEROOF: SILTSTONE- LIGHT BROWN, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, OCCASIONALBRIGHT COAL BANDS1.0 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD0.75 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, FISSILE, SOFT3.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE376SECTION 204ALOCATION: IN SUPPLY ROAD TO PANEL 1-A'S, 2 FEET INBYE (N) OFSECTION 204.COORDINATES: 2.1 R, 5.8, ON W RIB, ON N (UP) SIDE OF 0.53METRE FAULTMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOT TO FLOOR: 9.75 FEET. HERE MEASURED RIDER, CONFORMABLYOVERLYING UPPER PARTING. TO SOUTH OF FAULT,THE RIDER SLOWLY THICKENS FROM NIL.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD(REMAINDER OF SECTION NOT MEASURED)SECTION 205LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF SUPPLY ROAD AND 1ST RIGHTCOUNTER ENTRYCOORDINATES: 1.8 R, 5.6, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, WITH DULL COALLENSES0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH PLANTDEBRIS; FISSILE0.6 FT. SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWN1.0 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED2.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE377SECTION 206LOCATION: IN PANEL 1A'S, AT JUNCTION OF C HEADINGAND ROOM NO. 00COORDINATES: 4 R, 8, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 11.05 FEET (LEAVING COAL IN FLOOR)ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN,SHEARED. CRUMPLEDCARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.25 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, SLIGHTLY SHEARED0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,SHEARED AND CRUMPLED INTENSELY6.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: COAL - HARD, AS ABOVE.SECTION 207LOCATION: ON CROSSCUT X-4, 10 FEET NORTH OF MAIN FAULTCOORDINATES: 3 R, 9, ON EAST RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.1 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED AT TOP.GRADES DOWN TO BROWN, CARBONACEOUS MUDSTONE ATBASE. THICKNESS VARIES FROM NIL TO 0.6 FT.0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, WITHOCCASIONAL COAL LENSES2.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED1.5 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE378SECTION 208LOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 16 FEET NORTH OFSECTION 142.COORDINATES: 2.5 R, 3.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1) 1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2) 0.3 FT.^MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING3) 0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD4) 0.2 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED (?), LUSTROUS, SHEARED5) 0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS6) 0.4 FT.^MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, YELLOW-WHITE-WEATHERING, MAY BE JAROSITIC BLOOM7) 0.1 FT.^MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY8) 0.55 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS9) 0.4 FT.^MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD10) 0.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS11) 0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY12) 1.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED13) 0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED14) 1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 208ALOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 17 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142.COORDINATES: 2.5 R, 3.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1) 1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2) 0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING3) 0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD4) ---MISSING---5) 0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS6) 0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY6A) 1.3 FT. SILTSTONE- BROWN7) 0.1 FT.^MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY8) ---MISSING---9) ---MISSING---10) --MISSING---11) --MISSING---12) 0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED37938012A) 0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, WITH CALCITEVEINLETS12B) 1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED13) 0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY INTENSELY SHEARED14) 1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 208BLOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 18 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142.COORDINATES: 2.5 R, 3.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1) 1.3 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2) 0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING3) 0.6 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD4) 0.2 FT.^COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED5) 0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS6) 0.7 FT.^MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY6A) 0.45 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN7) ---MISSING---8) ---MISSING---9) ---MISSING---10) --MISSING---11) --MISSING---12) 2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED13) 0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED14) 1.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 208CLOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 19 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142.COORDINATES: 2.6 R, 3.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.15 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1) 1.4 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2) 0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING3) 0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD4) 0.4 FT.^COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED5) 0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS6) 0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY6A) --MISSING---7) ---MISSING---8) ---MISSING---9) ---MISSING---10) --MISSING---11)---MISSING---12) 3.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED13) 0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED14) 1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 208DLOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 21 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142.COORDINATES: 2.6 R, 3.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.25 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1) 1.2 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2) 0.3 FT.^MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING3) 0.5 FT.^COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD4) 0.3 FT.^COAL - INTENSELY SHEARED5) ---MISSING---6) ---MISSING---6A) -- MISSING---7) ---MISSING---8) ---MISSING---9?) 0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY10?) 0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED11) 0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY12) 2.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED13) 0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED14) 1.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 208ELOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 12 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142.COORDINATES: 2.5 R, 3.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.3811) 1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2) 0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING2A) 0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED2B) 0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING3) 0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD4) 0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED (?), LUSTROUS, SHEARED5) 0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS6) 0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, YELLOW-WHITE-3826A) 0.25 FT.7) 0.15 FT.8) 0.65 FT.9) 0.2 FT.10) 0.25 FT.11) 0.2 FT.12) 0.35 FT.12A) 0.1 FT.12B) 0.7 FT.13) 0.2 FT.14) 1.6 FT.WEATHERINGSILTSTONE - BROWNMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALYCOAL - LUSTROUSMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARDCOAL - DULL AND BRIGHTMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALYCOAL - BRIGHT BANDEDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALYCOAL - BRIGHT BANDEDMUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEAREDCOAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 208FLOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 10 FEET NORTHOF SECTION 142.COORDINATES: 2.4 R, 3.7MEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.2 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1) 1.25 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD2) 0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING2A) 0.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED2B) 0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, LIGHT-WEATHERING3) 0.45 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD4) ---MISSING---5) 0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS6) 0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, YELLOW-WHITE-WEATHERING6A) 0.25 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN7) ---MISSING---8) 0.4 FT.^COAL - LUSTROUS8A) 0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS8B) 0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS3839) 0.3 FT.^MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY10) 0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT11) 0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY12) 1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED13) 0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED14) 1.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 209LOCATION: IN PANEL lA'S, AT JUNCTION OF A-2 HEADINGAND ROOM NO.0COORDINATES: 5 R, 12, ON SE CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.55 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, SANDY, AS BEFORE.0.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED ANDSOFT, LOCALLY PINCHES TO 0.05 FT.0.4 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.25 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY2.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED1.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSECTION 210LOCATION: MAIN ENTRY, 82 FEET INBYE CROSSCUT X-2COORDINATES: 0, 4.9; ON NORTH RIB, WHERE POST FELL DOWNAGAINST CABLEMEASURED: FEBRUARY 4, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.15 FEET (CARRYING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).HERE THE INTERVAL FROM UPPER PARTING TOFLOOR IS 8.15 FEET.ROOF: SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWNISH-GREY, SANDY, BLOCKY, WEAK,WITH ABUNDANT LOGS AND STUMPS AND LEAVES. AT BASE ARELENSES, UP TO 0.2 FT. THICK, OF MUDSTONE - BLACK,COALY, FISSILE.^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, WITH CLOSELY-SPACED COLUMNAR CLEATS.FRIABLE.0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK GREY, SLIGHTLY CARBONACEOUS0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT0.5 FT. COAL - SHEARED, FRIABLE0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT1.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WEATHERED, POWDERY0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT1.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARD.SECTION 211LOCATION: ON SOUTH RIB OF MAIN ENTRY, 40 FEET INBYE PORTALCOORDINATES: 0, 0.9, TAKEN WHERE RIB PROJECTS THROUGHLAGGINGMEASURED: FEBRUARY 5, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 12 FEET (CARRYING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).HERE THE INTERVAL FROM UPPER PARTING TOFLOOR IS 2.45 FEET. THE TOP PART OF THEROADWAY IS A STONE DRIVEAGE THROUGH THEUPPER PARTING.ROOF: SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, SILTY, BLOCKY.EROSIONAL.^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WEATHERED0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT1.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WEATHEREDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD.SECTION 212LOCATION: IN MAINS, AT NORTH FACE OF CROSSCUT X-2, OFF MAINENTRY.COORDINATES: 0.5 R, 3.4 ON NE CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 5, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 7.7 FEET (TAKING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).INTERVAL FROM UPPER PARTING TO FLOOR =7.7 FEET.ROOF: SILTSTONE - LIGHT GREY, SANDY, THIN-BEDDED, WITHCOALIFIED LEAVES AND STEMS. EROSIONAL.^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, WITH CLOSELY-SPACED CLEATS. CALCITEAND PYRITE FILMS ALONG CLEATS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, HARD, FORMS PROMINENTLIGHT BAND IN RIB0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT3842.85 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED, SOFT2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSTATION 212ALOCATION: IN MAINS, AT JUNCTION OF CROSSCUT X-2AND MAIN ENTRY.COORDINATES: 0, 3.6, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 5, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 7.7 FEET (TAKING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).INTERVAL FROM UPPER PARTING TO FLOOR =7.7 FEET.SECTION 213LOCATION: ON CROSSCUT X-1, 13 FEET SOUTH OF 156COORDINATES: 0.8 R, 2.7, ON W RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 16, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: >8.0 FEET (LEAVING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF)ROOF: SANDSTONE - VERY FINE-GRAINED, DARK GREY, SILTY, WITHABUNDANT PLANT TRASH. THIN-BEDDED, PARTING READILYALONG BEDDING PLANES; SCALING UP 0.5 TO 1 FOOTBETWEEN ROOF SUPPORTS. BASAL 0.2 FEET IS MUDSTONE -BLACK, COALY, PLATY.^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^0.9 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, BLOCKY, WITH CALCITE ONCLEAT0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, ABUNDANT THICK BRIGHT COALBANDS, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, A FEW THIN MUDSTONE LAMINAE0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SOFT; GRADATIONAL0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD3.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, LIGHT BROWN.385SECTION 214LOCATION: ON CROSSCUT X-1, 13 FEET NORTH OF 156COORDINATES: 1.3 R, 2.9, ON S RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 16, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: >7.8 FEET (LEAVING UPPER PARTING IN ROOF)ROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN, SANDY, BLOCKY, WITH ABUNDANT FINEPLANT DEBRIS; BASAL 0.15 FT. IS MUDSTONE - BLACK,COALY, PLATY^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^0.8 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, WITH CALCITE ON CLEATS0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, FISSILE0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, PLATY0.4 FT. COAL - DULL BANDED, WITH LENSES OF BLACK COALYMUDSTONE0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED1.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 215LOCATION: AT SW CORNER OF LARGE ROOM ON X-1, 25 FEETSOUTH OF 202COORDINATES: 1.5 R, 3.6MEASURED: FEBRUARY 16, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 12.3 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - MASSIVE, LIGHT BROWN, PLANT DEBRIS ATBASE.1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.35 FT. COAL - SHEARED^ TOP OF UPPER PARTING ^0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.85 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, GRADATIONAL2.25 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, BLOCKY0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^0.95 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, BLOCKY0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SLIGHTLY SILTY0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.35 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED2.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED3860.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 216LOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 23 FEET NORTH OF 142COORDINATES: 2.6 R, 3.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 16, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.95 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY; THIS BED PINCHES OUT AT208D0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, HARD0.9 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, CARBONACEOUS, HARDER THAN ABOVE2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.55 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORE.SECTION 217LOCATION: ON WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 33 FEET NORTH OF 142COORDINATES: 2.7 R, 3.9MEASURED: FEBRUARY 16, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.15 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD; VARIES FROM NIL TO0.1 FT. THICK0.9 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED, SOFT1.3 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, CARBONACEOUS0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED3871.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, LIGHT BROWN, AS BEFORESECTION 218LOCATION: IN WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 46 FEET NORTH OF 142COORDINATES: 3.1 R, 4.0MEASURED: FEBRUARY 16, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.1 FEETROOF : SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.8 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS1.0 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, ARGILLACEOUS0.45 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY1.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED1.0 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS,SHEARED INTENSELY1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORESECTION 219LOCATION: IN WEST RIB OF SUMP ROAD, 6 FEET SOUTH OF 159ACOORDINATES: 3.2 R, 4.2MEASURED: FEBRUARY 16, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.35 FEET. AT POINT 1 FOOT SOUTH OF HERE, THESANDY MUDSTONE OF THE RIDER HAS PINCHEDOUT FROM THE SOUTH.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.55 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD1.0 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS0.5 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, ARGILLACEOUS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.1 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SILTY BASE1.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED0.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED2.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED388FLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 220LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF E HEADING AND ROOM NO.7 IN PANEL1B SCOORDINATES: 12 R, 15 ON NE CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 17, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.25 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.05 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SLIGHTLY CONTORTED0.2 FT. COAL - DULL, DIRTY, SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH OCCASIONAL THIN DIRTBANDS0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED (CORNFLAKES)0.7 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, BLOCKY AT TOP0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.3 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORESECTION 221LOCATION: ON NORTH RIB OF RETURN AIRWAY, 39 FT. EASTOF JUNCTION WITH X-1COORDINATES: 2.1 R, 2.8MEASURED: FEBRUARY 17, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.8 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.0.65 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD1.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY1.25 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, BLOCKY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.6 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT3890.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED3.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.SECTION 222LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF RETURN AIRWAY AND CROSSCUT X-2COORDINATES: 2 R, 4.5, ON NW CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 18, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 7.15 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, SHEARED0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, RUSTY-WEATHERING0.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED, FORMING CORNFLAKES0.7 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED2.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED1.5 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - HARD, AS BEFORESECTION 223LOCATION: AT SW CORNER OF OFFSET IN RETURN AIRWAY WEST OFCROSSCUT X-1COORDINATES: 2.2 R, 4.1MEASURED: FEBRUARY 18, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.5 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. COAL - DULL, GREASY LUSTRE, LOW DENSITY, CANNELOID?0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, RUSTY-WEATHERINGRIPPLE-LAMINATED; SHOWS PALEOFLOW OF 0400.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, PLATY0.2 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED0.65 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SPLINTERY0.2 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, BLOCKY0.5 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.2 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, PLATY0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CRUMPLED, SLICKED, WEAK1.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED3900.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.75 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARD.SECTION 224LOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, 48 FEET WEST OF CROSSCUT X-5COORDINATES: 0, 12, ON S RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 18, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.75 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, SANDY, MEDIUM-BEDDED, A FEWLEAVES0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.65 FT. COAL -BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.45 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED, WITHOCCASIONAL LENSES OF BRIGHT COAL0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, SLIGHTLY CARBONACEOUS0.75 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.6 FT. COAL - DULL AND BRIGHT, WITH THIN BANDS OFCARBONACEOUS MUDSTONE0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED4.6 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUS AT TOP, HARDSECTION 225LOCATION: MAIN ENTRY, THROUGH ROCK DRIVEAGE ACROSS MAINFAULTCOORDINATES: 0, 13.5, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 19, 19871.0 FT. SILTSTONE - DARK GREY, SANDY, WITH DECIDUOUS LEAFFOSSILS.0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH THINBRIGHT COAL BANDS.1.8 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, SANDY, SLIGHTLYCARBONACEOUS, BLOCKY, WEAK, ABUNDANT PLANTDEBRIS. SPECIMEN 225/5.6.5 FT. SANDSTONE - FINE-GRAINED, LIGHT GREY, SILTY,BLOCKY, THIN TO MEDIUM-BEDDED, GRADATIONAL.SPECIMEN 225/4.4.3 FT. SANDSTONE - AS ABOVE BUT VERY FINE-GRAINED,WITH DISCRETE FINING-UPWARD LAMINAE 0.05 TO0.1 FT. THICK, CONSISTING OF BASAL CLEANSANDSTONE AND OVERLYING DARKER SILTSTONE.ESSENTIALLY A LAMINITE HORIZON RESEMBLING391BEDS ABOVE LOWER CHAMBERLAIN SEAM ATSUKUNKA COLLIERY. SILTSTONE FORMS 20 % OF UNIT.THIN-BEDDED, PLATY TO BLOCKY, GRADATIONAL.SPECIMEN 225/3.5.6 FT. SILTSTONE - MEDIUM GREY, SANDY, LAMINATED ASABOVE BUT MUCH LESS SAND (20% AT TOP,10 % AT BASE). ABRUPT. SPECIMEN 225/2.1.4 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWNISH-GREY, MASSIVE, BLOCKY.SPECIMEN 225/1.^ TOP OF WELLINGTON RIDER COAL BED ^0.95 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD.0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD.****** COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD.^ TOP OF UPPER PARTING ^0.75 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED.^ TOP OF WELLINGTON MAIN COAL BED ^0.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED.0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED.4.0 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SLIGHTLY SHEARED.REMAINDER OF SECTION CONCEALED BY DEBRIS. SEE 105 FOR DETAILS.SECTION 226LOCATION: AT JUNCTION OF 2ND LEFT COUNTER ENTRY AND CROSSCUTX-5COORDINATES: 2L, 9, ON NE CORNERMEASURED: FEBRUARY 19, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 10.35 FEETROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, VERY HARD0.95 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED0.45 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, SLIGHTLY SHEARED, BLOCKY0.75 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS0.3 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY2.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.5 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELY SHEARED3.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, HARD.392SECTION 227LOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, 100 FEET WEST OF CROSSCUT X-2COORDINATES: 0, 5.1, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 20, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: >7.9 FEET (TAKING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF)ROOF: SILTSTONE - GREY, SANDY, WITH ABUNDANT PLANT DEBRIS.0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, WITH COALYLAMINAE.^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^0.9 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED. CALCITE FILMS ON CLEATS. THISBED PINCHES OUT JUST WEST OF 187; IT ISCONSISTENTLY PRESENT ELSEWHERE ALONG THIS ROAD1.5 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD, WITHLENSES OF BRIGHT COAL (COALIFIED LOGS) UP TO 0.35FT. THICK AND 2.8 FT. WIDE.3.05 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED2.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARDSTATION 227ALOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, 58 FEET WEST OF CROSSCUT X-2COORDINATES: 0, 4.5, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 20, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 7.9 FEET (TAKING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).STATION 227BLOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, 33 FEET WEST OF CROSSCUT X-2COORDINATES: 0, 4.2, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 20, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: > 8.45 FEET (TAKING UPPER PARTING AS ROOF).SECTION 228LOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, 167 FEET WEST OF CROSSUT X-2COORDINATES: 0, 6.1, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 20, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 13.25 FEET. HERE THE RIDER APPEARS IN THEROOF.ROOF: SILTSTONE - BROWN.^ TOP OF WELLINGTON RIDER COAL BED ^1.7 FT. COAL - INACCESSIBLE FOR DESCRIPTION0.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, SHEARED^ TOP OF UPPER PARTING ^3930.4 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, INTENSELYSHEARED1.7 FT. MUDSTONE - BROWN, SILTY, GRADATIONAL2.8 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, HARD, ABRUPT0.15 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^0.6 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS1.55 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, HARD, WITHLENSES OF BRIGHT COAL (COALIFIED LOGS)2.1 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.2 FT. COAL - DIRTY, SHEARED2.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - LIGHT BROWN, HARDSECTION 228ALOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, ON CENTRELINE OF CROSSCUT X-3COORDINATES: 0, 7, ON SOUTH RIBMEASURED: FEBRUARY 20, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 9.95 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE1.9 FT. WELLINGTON RIDER COAL BED^ TOP OF UPPER PARTING^1.15 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.6 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN, BLOCKY0.2 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, INTENSELY SHEARED^ BASE OF UPPER PARTING ^6.1 FT. WELLINGTON MAIN COAL BEDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORESTATION 228BLOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, 67 FEET EAST OF CROSSCUT X-4COORDINATES: 0, 7.8, ON SOUTH RIB; 25 FEET EAST OF CREST OFFLOOR ROLL.MEASURED: FEBRUARY 20, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR:^11.35 FT.WELLINGTON RIDER: 1.65 FT.UPPER PARTING:^1.15 FT.WELLINGTON MAIN: 8.55 FT.394SECTION 229LOCATION: IN MAIN ENTRY, 33 FEET EAST OF CROSSCUT X-4COORDINATES: 0, 8.4, ON SOUTH RIB, ON HIGH SIDE OF FLOORROLL.MEASURED: FEBRUARY 20, 1987ROOF TO FLOOR: 8.9 FT.ROOF: SILTSTONE - AS BEFORE.1.3 FT. COAL - BRIGHT, VERY HARD0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SANDY, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD1.2 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED0.3 FT. SILTSTONE - BROWN0.1 FT. MUDSTONE - BLACK, COALY, SHEARED0.35 FT. COAL - LUSTROUS, SHEARED0.25 FT. MUDSTONE - DARK BROWN, CARBONACEOUS, SHEARED2.35 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARD0.4 FT. COAL - DIRTY, SHEARED2.15 FT. COAL - BRIGHT BANDED, HARDFLOOR: SANDSTONE - AS BEFORE.395396APPENDIX IV - Glossary of words used by Vancouver Islandcoal miners to describe geologicalfeatures397A bench is a portion of a coal seam which may be minedseparately from underlying or overlying portions of the seam.'Bench' is a miners' term and does not necessarily refer to adistinctive or consistently recognizable stratigraphicsubdivision of a coal seam.Bone is dull, hard coal which is heavier than ordinarycoal and contains an ash content usually greater than 30percent on dry basis.Clod is dark brown or black, slightly shearedcarbonaceous or coaly mudstone directly overlying a coal bed.A dirt band is a thin bed of mudstone or siltstone whichlies between two coal beds. Dirt bands are generally less than6 inches (15 centimetres) thick and are not usually laterallycontinuous. In most cases within the Wellington Seam, dirtbands were mined with the coal rather than left in the roof orfloor of the mine workings.Fireclay is light to medium grey or brownish-grey softmudstone or stiff silty clay, locally occurring directlybeneath a coal bed. As the term 'fireclay' was used byVancouver Island miners, it did not necessarily require thatthe rock in question have particular refractory properties,but instead referred to the distinct colour, fine grain sizeand soft texture of the rock.Mining dirt is black, intensely sheared carbonaceous orcoaly mudstone, commonly softer than the associated rocks andtherefore easily excavated by miners. Mining dirt consists ofsmall fragments of mudstone, generally finer than coarse-grained sand. 'Mining dirt' is usually abbreviated as 'M' or'Dt' on Wellington Seam mine plans.A parting is one or more beds of clastic sedimentary rockwhich lie between two coal beds. Partings are distinguishedfrom dirt bands by being laterally continuous and readilycorrelatable between points of measurement. Partings wereusually not recognized as distinct stratigraphic entities bycoal miners unless the partings were either consistentlythicker than 6 inches (15 centimetres) or consisted ofunusually hard material such as sandstone or sandy siltstone.Rash is a dark brown to black sheared and slickensidedmixture of coal and coaly mudstone and carbonaceous mudstone,commonly softer than the associated rocks and therefore easilyexcavated by miners. Rash consists of readily visibleparticles of coal and mudstone, generally coarser than coarse-grained sand. 'Rash' is usually abbreviated as 'Rh' onWellington Seam mine plans.A rider is a laterally continuous coal bed which overliesa coal seam, but is not usually sufficiently thick or closely-associated with the underlying coal to be considered mineable398with it. Riders may split and rejoin from the underlying coalseam, or they maintain a distinct stratigraphic separationfrom the coal seam. Riders are principally of significance inthat they may exacerbate roof control problems during coalmining.

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