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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Geology of Britannia Ridge, east section, southwest British Columbia McColl, Kathryn Margaret 1987

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G E O L O G Y O F B R I T A N N I A R I D G E , E A S T S E C T I O N , S O U T H W E S T B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A B y K A T H R Y N M A R G A R E T M c C O L L B . S c , T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f W a t e r l o o , 1 9 8 1 T H E S I S S U B M I T T E D I N P A R T I A L F U L F I L L M E N T OF T H E R E Q U I R E M E N T S F O R T H E D E G R E E OF M A S T E R OF S C I E N C E i n T H E F A C U L T Y OF G R A D U A T E S T U D I E S ( D e p a r t m e n t o f G e o l o g i c a l S c i e n c e s ) We a c c e p t t h i s t h e s i s a s c o n f o r m i n g t o t h e r e q u i r e d s t a n d a r d T H E U N I V E R S I T Y OF B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A O c t o b e r 1 9 8 7 ( t ) K a t h r y n M a r g a r e t M c C o l l , 1 9 8 7 In presenting this thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an advanced degree at the University of British Columbia, I agree that the Library shall make it freely available for reference and study. I further agree that permission for extensive copying of this thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the head of my department or by his or her representatives. It is understood that copying or publication of this thesis for financial gain shall not be allowed without my written permission. Department of <££P l PC K A t - 5C|g / \JdJg-^ The University of British Columbia 1956 Main Mall Vancouver, Canada V6T 1Y3 DE-6(3/81) P a g e i i I I . ABSTRACT A s t r a t i g r a p h i c f r a m e w o r k f o r a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c r o c k s a s s i g n e d t o t h e L a t e J u r a s s i c - E a r l y C r e t a c e o u s G a m b i e r G r o u p ( H e a h e t a l . i 1 9 8 6 ) i s p r o p o s e d t h a t c o r r e l a t e s u n i t s f r o m t h e a b a n d o n e d B r i t a n n i a M i n e w i t h s t r a t a a l o n g t h e e a s t e r n s e c t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e a n d t h e F u r r y C r e e k v a l l e y . G e o l o g i c a l m a p p i n g d e f i n e s t h r e e p a c k a g e s , i n t e r p r e t e d a s v o l c a n i c s e q u e n c e s , t h a t r e p r e s e n t a c o n t i n u o u s s u c c e s s i o n o f m a i n l y m a f i c t o f e l s i c v o l c a n i c s . F r o m n o r t h t o s o u t h , p a c k a g e s 1 , 2 a n d 3 d i p m o d e r a t e l y a n d f a c e c o n s i s t e n t l y s o u t h w e s t . P a c k a g e 1 i s c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y a m a f i c f l o w s e q u e n c e i n t r u d e d b y r h y o l i t e d o m e s . P a c k a g e 2 i s d o m i n a t e d -b y a f e l s i c dome c o m p l e x a n d a s e d i m e n t a r y b a s i n , b o t h b l a n k e t e d b y a t h i c k p y r o c l a s t i c f l o w u n i t . P a c k a g e 3 i s c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y f e l s i c l a v a s a n d a s h f l o w t u f f s g r a d a t i o n a l u p w a r d s t o a t h i c k a r g i l l i t e u n i t . D e v e l o p e d o r e b o d i e s o c c u r a t t w o m a j o r h o r i z o n s t h a t a r e c l o s e t o t h e l o w e r a n d u p p e r c o n t a c t s o f p a c k a g e 2 . S u l p h i d e s a s s o c i a t e d w i t h c h e r t h o r i z o n s o c c u r w i t h i n a l t e r e d s h e a r e d e q u i v a l e n t s o f c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f a n d f e l s i c b r e c c i a r e l a t e d t o f e l s i c dome c o m p l e x e s . W h o l e r o c k a n a l y s e s d e f i n e a n a l t e r e d c a l c - a l k a l i n e v o l c a n i c s u i t e . A l t e r a t i o n , a t t r i b u t e d t o h y d r o t h e r m a l s o l u t i o n s a c c o m p a n y i n g m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e s , i s m o s t i n t e n s e i n p a c k a g e s 1 - a n d 2 w h e r e r o c k s a r e M g O - r i c h , C a O - p o o r a n d e n r i c h e d o r d e p l e t e d i n Page i i i a l k a l i s compared to normal sub a l k a l i n e rocks. Rocks i n package 3 and from l a t e r c r o s s c u t t i n g dykes are r e l a t i v e l y unaltered. Rb-S values t e n t a t i v e l y define a J u r a s s i c to E a r l y Cretaceous age of 167 +_ 37 Ma f o r the a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c s u i t e . K-Ar dates of 90.5 3.2 Ma and 81.4 +_ 3 Ma are i n t e r p r e t e d as reset by Coast P l u t o n i c Intrusions surrounding the v o l c a n i c pendant and a l a t e r deformational or undocumented i n t r u s i v e event. Massive sulphides a s s o c i a t e d with f e l s i c v o l c a n i c rocks on B r i t a n n i a Ridge are s i m i l a r to volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits described i n the Canadian Archean greenstone b e l t s and the Miocene Kuroko deposits of Japan. jvjc j , P a g e i v I I I . T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S P a g e I . C O P Y AND R E F E R E N C E P E R M I S S I O N i I I . A B S T R A C T i i I I I . T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S i v I V . L I S T OF T A B L E S x V . L I S T O F F I G U R E S x i 1 . I N T R O D U C T I O N 1 1.1 O B J E C T I V E AND A P P R O A C H 1 1 . 2 L O C A T I O N , S I G N I F I C A N C E AND H I S T O R Y OF A R E A 2 1 . 2 . 1 L o c a t i o n 2 1 . 2 . 2 S i g n i f i c a n c e o f t h e A r e a 4 1 . 2 . 3 G e o l o g i c a l H i s t o r y 5 1 . 3 A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S 8 2 . R E G I O N A L G E O L O G Y 9 2 . 1 I N T R O D U C T I O N 9 2 . 2 G E O L O G Y 11 2 . 2 . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n 11 2 . 2 . 2 S t r a t i f i e d R o c k s 13 2 . 2 . 3 G a m b i e r G r o u p 15 P a g e v P a g e 2 . 2 . 4 B r i t a n n i a P e n d a n t 19 1 . I n t r o d u c t i o n 19 2 . L i t h o l o g y 19 3 . S t r u c t u r e , 20 4 . A g e 22 5 . E c o n o m i c M i n e r a l i z a t i o n 22 6 . H i s t o r y o f M a p p i n g 23 7 . C o r r e l a t i o n w i t h t h e G a m b l e r G r o u p 25 3 . L O C A L G E O L O G Y 27 3 . 1 I N T R O D U C T I O N 27 3 . 2 P A C K A G E 1 , " F O O T W A L L " S E Q U E N C E 32 3 . 2 . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n 32 3 . 2 . 2 U n i t D e s c r i p t i o n s 32 1 . A r g i l l i t e , U n i t 1 32 2 . A n d e s i t e - B a s a l t , U n i t 2 33 3 . R h y o l i t e , U n i t 3 35 4 . W h i t e B l o c k B r e c c i a , U n i t 4 37 5 . F e l s i c C r y s t a l A s h T u f f , U n i t 5 38 6 . M a f i c L a p i l l i B l o c k T u f f , U n i t 6 40 7 . A l t e r e d B a s a l t , U n i t 7 43 3 . 2 . 3 S u m m a r y 45 3 . 3 P A C K A G E 2 , " M I N E " S E Q U E N C E 47 3 . 3 . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n 47 P a g e v i P a g e 3 . 3 . 2 U n i t D e s c r i p t i o n s 48 1 . . A r g i l l i t e , A s h T u f f , U n i t 8 48 2 . D a c i t e , U n i t 9 49 3 . C r y s t a l L i t h i c T u f f , U n i t 10 53 4 . A s h T u f f , A r g i l l i t e , C h e r t , U n i t 11 56 5 . Q u a r t z - S e r i c i t e S c h i s t a n d S u l p h i d e s , U n i t 12 57 3 . 3 . 3 S u m m a r y 59: 3 . 3 . 4 C o n t a c t b e t w e e n P a c k a g e s 1 a n d 2 60 3 . 4 P A C K A G E 3 , " H A N G I N G W A L L " S E Q U E N C E 64 3 . 4 . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n 64 3 . 4 . 2 U n i t D e s c r i p t i o n s 65 1 . C r y s t a l L i t h i c T u f f , U n i t 13 65 2 . R h y o d a c i t e , U n i t 14 66 3 . A s h T u f f , A r g i l l i t e , U n i t 15 68 4 . A r g i l l i t e , U n i t 16 69 5 . A n d e s i t e B r e c c i a T u f f , U n i t 17 70 3 . 4 . 3 S u m m a r y 70 3 . 4 . 4 C o n t a c t b e t w e e n P a c k a g e s 2 a n d 3 71 3 . 5 I N T R U S I V E R O C K S 75 3 . 5 . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n 75 3 . 5 . 2 D y k e s a n d I n t r u s i o n s 77 1 . D a c i t e , U n i t 18 77 2 . A n d e s i t e a n d D i o r i t e , U n i t 19 78 Page v i Page 3.5.3 Intr u s i o n s of the Coast P l u t o n i c Complex 79 1. Granodiorite, Quartz D i o r i t e , Unit 20 79 4. WHOLE ROCK GEOCHEMISTRY 81 4.1 INTRODUCTION 81 4.2 GROSS CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS 84 4.2.1 Rock Types 84 4.2.2 Packages 85 4.3 ALTERATION 90 4.3.1 Unaltered versus A l t e r e d 91 4.3.2 A l k a l i 93 4.3.3 A l t e r a t i o n Involving CaO, MgO and S i 0 2 98 4.3.4 Hydrothermal A l t e r a t i o n Related to Massive Sulphides 101 4.4 MAGMATIC CHARACTERISTICS 102 4.4.1 Intr o d u c t i o n 102 4.4.2 A l k a l i n i t y 103 4.4.3 Fe - Enrichment Trend 104 4.5 VOLCANIC ENVIRONMENT 107 5. GEOCHRONOMETRY 110 5.1 INTRODUCTION 110 5.2 K/Ar DATING 1-14 5.3 Rb/Sr DATING 115 Page v i i i Page 6. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS 121 6.1 INTRODUCTION 121 6.2 LOCAL GEOLOGY, SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION 122 6.2.1 Introduction 122 6.2.2 Packages 123 1. Package 1 123 2. Package 2 124 3. Package 3 126 6.2.3 Structure 127 1. B r i t a n n i a Shear Zone 128 2. Monocline 130 3. F a u l t s 132 6.3 VOLCANIC HISTORY .133 6.3.1 Intr o d u c t i o n 133 6.3.2 Vol c a n i c A c t i v i t y 136 6.3.3 Sulphides 139 6.4 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 140 6.4.1 Strat i g r a p h y and Structure 140 6.4.2 Volcanic Environment 141 6.4.3 Age and C o r r e l a t i o n 143 6.4.4 Tectonic Environment 144 7. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 147 Page ix Page APPENDICES 163 A. ROCK CHIP SAMPLES 163 B. WHOLE ROCK AND TRACE ELEMENT CHEMICAL ANALYSES 200 B.1 Whole Rock Analyses 200 B. 2 Trace Element Analyses 201 C. ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES AND GEOCHEMICAL PREPARATION 203 C.1 Trace Element Determinations 203 C.2 K-Ar A n a l y t i c a l Techniques 206 C.3 Rb-Sr A n a l y t i c a l Techniques 206 Page x LIST OF TABLES Page 1.1 H i s t o r y of g e o l o g i c a l mapping within NTS 092G. 6 2.1 Formations i n the region of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 12 3.1 Major features d e f i n i n g packages i n the B r i t a n n i a 28 Ridge area. 4.1 Major elements i n s e l e c t e d rock samples from the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 82 4.2 Average major element values fo r b a s a l t , d a c i t e and rhyodacite from the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 88 5.1 K-Ar data for v o l c a n i c rocks from B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 111 5.2 Rb-Sr analyses of v o l c a n i c rocks from B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 112 5.3 C a l c u l a t e d Rb-Sr isochron dates for the B r i t a n n i a Ridge v o l c a n i c s u i t e . 113 A.1 Index f o r l i s t i n g s of rock chip samples (Tables A.4 and A.5) from the B r i t a n n i a Ridge area. 166 A.2 Codes for rock types i n Tables A.4 and A.5. 167 A.3 Codes for colours of rocks i n Tables A.4 and A.5. 168 A.4 L i s t i n g of 1982 rock chip samples. 169 A. 5 L i s t i n g of 1983 rock chip samples. 194 B. 1 Table of estimated thresholds by rock type for trace elements i n samples from the B r i t a n n i a Ridge area. 202 Page x i LIST OF FIGURES Page 1.1 Location and Regional Geology. 3 2.1 Comparative S t r a t i g r a p h i c Sections, 16 proposed by various workers, for the Gambier Group within the Britannia Pendant. 3.1 S i m p l i f i e d Geology of the Britannia Ridge Area. 28 3.2 Geologic Map with Cross-sections of the east section of Bri t a n n i a Ridge (1 : 1 0,000). ^fweKul"] 4.1 Plot of % FeOT/MgO versus % Si02 data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. 86 4.2 Plot of % MgO versus % CaO data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. 92 4.3 Plot of % Na 20 + % K 20 versus % S i 0 2 data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. 94 4.4 Plot of % K 20 versus % S i 0 2 data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. 96 4.5 Plot of % Na 20 versus % S i 0 2 data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. 97 4.6 Plot of % CaO versus % S i 0 2 data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. 99 4.7 Plot of % MgO versus % S i 0 2 data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. 100 4.8 Plot of % FeO T versus % S i 0 2 data from the east section of Britannia Ridge. t 105 Page x i i Page 4.9 Plot of % A I 2 O 3 versus % Si02 data from the east se c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 106 4.10 Pl o t of % TiG^ versus % FeOrp data from the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 108 5.1 Rubidium-strontium isotope p l o t f o r samples from the B r i t a n n i a Ridge area. 117 6.1 C o r r e l a t i o n of units and i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the v o l c a n i c h i s t o r y of the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. 135 A.1 F i e l d Base Map of the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, i n c l u d i n g outcrop and sample lo c a t i o n s ( 1 : 5,000 ). k<P&&&@£*i' A.2 Terminology and nomenclature used to describe p y r o c l a s t i c rocks. 165 Page 1 1 . INTRODUCTION 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND APPROACH The B r i t a n n i a Mine, which clo s e d i n 1974 a f t e r 69 years of production, has been the focus of d e t a i l e d g e o l o g i c a l mapping i n c o a s t a l southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia during the l a s t century. C o n f l i c t i n g i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s of s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s and the formation of the B r i t a n n i a orebodies remain c o n t r o v e r s i a l . The main o b j e c t i v e of t h i s study i s to propose a p r a c t i c a l d e s c r i p t i v e framework f o r the v o l c a n i c s t r a t i g r a p h y , e s p e c i a l l y m i n e r a l i z e d u n i t s , at B r i t a n n i a to f a c i l i t a t e c o r r e l a t i o n between B r i t a n n i a Mine area and the Vancouver Watershed region to the east. Mapping i n the v i c i n i t y of B r i t a n n i a Ridge ( F i g s . 1.1 and 3.2), 30 km north of Vancouver, defines three packages w i t h i n Mesozoic c a l c - a l k a l i n e v o l c a n i c rocks assigned to the Gambier Group (Roddick et a_l. , 1 979). From north to south packages 1, 2 and 3 dip moderately and face c o n s i s t e n t l y southwest. Re l a t i o n s h i p s among them are complex. Package 1 c o n s i s t s of a th i c k sequence of ba s a l t flows with interbedded submarine ashflows and l o c a l i z e d r h y o l i t e domes. Package 2, host to the B r i t a n n i a orebodies, i s dominated by a v a r i a b l y a l t e r e d i n t r u s i v e -ex t r u s i v e d a c i t e dome complex with associated b r e c c i a , p y r o c l a s t i c and sedimentary rocks. Package 3, the l e a s t a l t e r e d , c o n s i s t s of rhyodacite flows, welded ash flows, and sedimentary rocks. Page 2 Sulphides associated with q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e ( c h l o r i t e ) s c h i s t and r e l a t e d to f e l s i c volcanism occur at the contacts between the packages. This work, based on g e o l o g i c a l mapping over three f i e l d seasons, was l i m i t e d by d i f f i c u l t i e s imposed by scarce outcrop exposure and extreme topography superimposed on a complex pa l e o v o l c a n i c terrane. G e o l o g i c a l i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s are supported by petrography, whole rock chemistry and preliminary Rb-Sr and K-Ar d a t i n g . D e t a i l e d s t r u c t u r a l and chemical s t u d i e s , beyond the scope of t h i s study, are recommended to f u r t h e r define the s t r a t i g r a p h y , a l t e r a t i o n and p o t e n t i a l of B r i t a n n i a - t y p e massive sulphides i n the Furry Creek v a l l e y . 1.2 LOCATION, SIGNIFICANCE AND HISTORY OF THE AREA 1.2.1 Location This study covers a map area 6.5 km by 3.3 km centered along B r i t a n n i a Ridge, approximately 10 km east of B r i t a n n i a Beach ( F i g . 1.1). The area i s bounded by B r i t a n n i a Creek to the north, the B r i t a n n i a open p i t s to the west, and Furry Creek to the south; i t extends east to the Vancouver Watershed boundary. The map area straddles claims west of and i n c l u d i n g the o l d mine p i t s , owned by by Copper Beach Estates Ltd. and the claims east of the above P a g e 3 Kllomatraa COVER UNITS Alluvial. Glacial PLUTONIC ROCKS |+<\'lj Granodiorite, Quartz Dlorita I^ ^J Dlorita. Migmatite Complex STRATIFIED ROCKS j J Qambiar Group H H Bowan Island Group V/'.'. //'//X Twin Island Qroup Recent and Tertiary Cretaceoua Jurassic-Cretaceoua Triasaic Pennsylvanian-Permian FIGURE 1.1 L o c a t i o n and R e g i o n a l Geology (from Roddick e t a l . , 1975) around the B r i t a n n i a Ridge a r e a , s o u t h w e s t e r n B r i t i s h Columbia. Wavy l i n e d e f i n e s "shear zones"; d o t s l o c a t e m i n e r a l o c c u r r e n c e s ; t r i a n g l e s mark l o c a l i t i e s r e f e r r e d to i n t e x t . F o r mations are d e s c r i b e d i n T a b l e 2.1. Page 4 ground to the Vancouver Watershed that were held by Anaconda E x p l o r a t i o n Canada Limited, but are now owned by Fleck Resources Ltd., Vancouver. B r i t a n n i a Ridge i s a c c e s s i b l e from Highway #99 by four-wheel d r i v e v e h i c l e along a p r i v a t e logging road up the Furry Creek v a l l e y , or from the north by locked gravel road through the abandoned Mount Shear townsite. Topography i s extreme; a l t i t u d e s range from 700 m at Furry Creek to 1,600 m on B r i t a n n i a Ridge. The steep slopes, covered with dense c o a s t a l vegetation, are often impassable c l i f f s . Outcrop i s scarce, exposed mostly by logging roads, on stream beds or along r i d g e s . However, the south-facing slope of the Furry Creek v a l l e y has been c l e a r cut and provides e x c e l l e n t exposures. The mapping season i s short. Snow covers the e n t i r e area from October to June, and may remain year-round on ridge tops and north-facing slopes. Rainy weather i s most t y p i c a l . Heavy downpours i n f a l l o f ten wash out logging roads, r e q u i r i n g seasonal maintenance.of access routes. 1.2.2 S i g n i f i c a n c e of the Area Most mineral occurrences i n southwestern.British Columbia are i n pendants of Mesozoic v o l c a n i c rock within the Coast P l u t o n i c Complex. The l a r g e s t and most s i g n i f i c a n t of these, the B r i t a n n i a Page. 5 pendant, hosts the B r i t a n n i a Mine that was i n almost continuous production f o r the 69 years from 1905 to 1974. In the t h i r t i e s , B r i t a n n i a Mine was the l a r g e s t copper producer i n the B r i t i s h Commonwealth. During i t s operation about 50 m i l l i o n tonnes (55 m i l l i o n tons) of ore grading 1.1% Cu, 0.65% Zn, 7 ppm Ag (0.2 oz Ag/ton) and 0.7 ppm Au (0.02 oz Au/ton) were produced (Payne et a l . , 1980). The ore, contained w i t h i n seventeen d i s t i n c t mining lenses i n a b e l t over 4 km long and more than 2 km deep, was developed by an extensive system of p i t s and underground workings. The main haulage l e v e l at 1,700 m (4,100 f t ) extends from a p o r t a l near B r i t a n n i a Beach to the Fairwest workings at C y r t i n a Creek i n the Furry Creek v a l l e y ( F i g . 3.2)--a d i s t a n c e of approximately 12 km. Most workings now are clo s e d and flooded. With the acceptance of volcanogenic massive sulphide theory, v o l c a n i c pendants i n southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia are of renewed i n t e r e s t to mineral e x p l o r a t i o n companies. Most areas with abundant v o l c a n i c rocks are staked; a c t i v i t y i s concentrated around o l d prospects and showings. 1.2.3 G e o l o g i c a l H i s t o r y Very l i t t l e has been published r e c e n t l y on v o l c a n i c rocks of southwestern c o a s t a l B r i t i s h Columbia, de s p i t e proximity to Vancouver. Table 1.1 i s a b r i e f chronology of g e o l o g i c a l mapping i n the rugged t e r r a i n around Howe Sound. Reports from the e a r l y H i s t o r y of T h i s t a b l e g e o l o g i c a l mapping r e l e v a n t t o the geology a t B r i t a n n i a (Vancouver Map Sheet 092G). does not i n c l u d e u n p u b l i s h e d company r e p o r t s and t h e s e s . AUTHOR REFERENCE AREA REPORTED NOTES Goat Mountain F o r m a t i o n , Gambier Group Heah et a l . (1986> Payne et a 1. (1980) Sutherland-Browm < 1970 ) Rodd ick I 196$) bos t ock I 1963 J Sky P i l o t Mountain i n the B r i t a n n i a - In d i a n R i v e r pendant B r i t a n n i a Mine B r i t a n n i a Mine Vancouver Nort h, C o q u I t l a m and P i t t Lake map areas Squamish map are a R e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a d e p o s i t s as v o l c a n o g e n i c i n o r i g i n , and co m p a r i s o n w i t h Kuroko d e p o s i t s B r i t a n n i a Mine C l o s e s •* ************** ******** Suggested p o s s i b i l i t y t h a t the d e p o s i t s might be v o l c a n o g e n i c i n o r i g i n S p e c i a l emphasis on the e v o l u t i o n of p l u t o n i c r o c k s . Descr i p t ions of v o l c a n o s e d i r n e n t a r y pendants R e g i o n a l g e o l o g i c a l map GSC 42-1963 Mathews (1958, 1972) Armst rong (1953) 1 r v i n e (1946, 1948) Phemi s t e r (1945) t'hbutt ( 19 3 5, 1(* 4 21 James ( 1929 » Schof i e I d (1918, 1926) Burwash I 1918 ) Catnse 11 ( 1918 > McConnel1 ( 1914 > Daley ( 1912 ) LeRoy (1906, 1906) Bauerman ( 1885 ) Mount G a r i b a l d i and the Vancouver a r e a Vancouver North map area Br l t a n n i a Mine Southern c o a s t a l B r i t i s h Co 1 umb i a , I K M r Vdiicou ver B r i t a n n i a Mine B r i t a n n i a - Indian K i v e r pendant Br i t a n n i a - 1 [id i an K i v t f pendant Vancouver and v i c i n i t y Squamish and L i l l o o e t a r e a s Texada I s l a n d , B r i t a n n i a -Ind i a n R i v e r pendant North American C o r d i l l e r a a l o n g the 49th p a r a l l e l Souttiern c o a s t a l B r i t i s h Columbia Ex a m i n a t i o n of the G a r i b a l d i v o l c a n i c s and s u r r o u n d i n g geology Proposed the term Gambier Croup; c o r r e l a t e d the B r i t a n n i a f o r m a t i o n with the Upper Gambier Group and the Goat Mountain. f o r m a t i o n w i t h the Lower Gambier Group S t r u c t u r e o f o r e b o d i e s d e s c r i b e d D e s c r i p t i o n o f the Coast Range b a t h o l i t h O u t l i n e d the r e l a t i o n s h i p o f s t r u c t u r e t o the d e p o s i t i o n o f ore D e s c r i b e d the B r i t a n n i a group and the B r i t a n n i a A n t i c l i n e ; proposed the o l d e r B r i t a n n i a f o r m a t i o n i s t h r u s t i n t o i t s p o s i t i o n o v e r l y i n g ttie Coat Mountain f o r m a t i o n D i v i d e d the B r i t a n n i a group i n t o the B r i t a n n i a f o r m a t i o n and the u n d e r l y i n g , o l d e r Goat Mountain f o r m a t i o n R e connaissance g e o l o g y D e s c r i b e s the Roy, B e l l e , and D a i s y p r o s p e c t s i n the B r i t a n n i a p e n d a n t R econnaisance g e o l o g y w i t h s h o r t d e s c r i p t i o n s o f the B r i t a n n i a o r e d e p o s i t s R econnaisance g e o l o g y Proposed the name B r i t a n n i a group and b r i e f l y d e s c r i b e d the B r i t a n n i a o r e d e p o s i t s ***• * • « • * * • • • • * * * * * • * • • • • * • * B r i t a n n n i a Mine Opens • • * * * * * » * • * Vancouver and B r i t a n n i a a r e a s Reconnaisance g e o l o g y Page 7 decades of the century centered around B r i t a n n i a Mine. Geo l o g i c a l notes published by Bauerman (1885) preceded the opening of the B r i t a n n i a Cu-Zn Mine i n 1905. S c h o f i e l d (1918) d i v i d e d s t r a t i f i e d rocks of the B r i t a n n i a pendant, r e f e r r e d to as B r i t a n n i a group, i n t o the B r i t a n n i a and Goat Mountain formations. The s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p of. these formations was disputed by James (1929) and remains c o n t r o v e r s i a l . Numerous unpublished company reports describe d e t a i l e d geology of the mine. The Cu-Zn deposit was b e l i e v e d to be a replacement deposit r e l a t e d to i n t r u s i o n s i n t o the s t r a t i f i e d B r i t a n n i a group. Very l i t t l e company mapping extended beyond the immediate v i c i n i t y of the mine, and l i t t l e or no r e g i o n a l work was done. Armstrong (1953), i n r e g i o n a l work during the f i f t i e s by the G e o l o g i c a l Survey of Canada, incorporated the B r i t a n n i a group i n t o his Gambier Group--a c a t c h a l l term s t i l l i n use f o r a l l Late J u r a s s i c and E a r l y Cretaceous c a l c - a l k a l i n e v o l c a n i c s i n southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia (Heah et a l . , 1986). In the s i x t i e s , g e o l o g i c a l reports concentrated on g r a n i t e s of the Coast P l u t o n i c Complex (Roddick, 1965). By the e a r l y seventies i n t e r e s t i n the area dwindled. B r i t a n n i a Mine closed i n 1974.before theories on volcanogenic massive sulphides, were widely accepted i n Canada. The most recent p u b l i c a t i o n on the area (Payne et_ a_l. , 1 980), based on work at the time the mine closed, convincingly presents a Page 8 rei n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the Britannia mine as a Kuroko-type vplcanogenic deposit. A volcanogenic i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of o r i g i n i s now generally accepted for many massive sulphide deposits within Gambier Group rocks (e.g. M i l l e r ; 1973; Clendenan, 1978). 1.3 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This project was conceived by and car r i e d out under the supervision of C.I. Godwin, The University of B r i t i s h Columbia, and L. Ri c c i o , previously with Anaconda Exploration Canada Limited. Anaconda provided funding for f i e l d support, a n a l y t i c a l chemistry, and research during 1982 and 1983. Fieldwork for the project was completed in 1984 with the cooperation of H.L. Gibson and Corporation Falconbridge Copper Ltd. NSERC provided personal support during 1983, and provided funding by grants to C.I. Godwin. Copper Beach Estates allowed access to the Britannia mine area. I thank Tr i s h Webb for her competent assistance, companionship and excellent cooking that made f i e l d work a pleasure. My understanding of the rocks benefited from discussions in the f i e l d with H. Gibson. I am gr a t e f u l to A. de Rosen-Spence for a s s i s t i n g me in the use of her v a r i a t i o n diagrams. Special thanks are due to my mother, without whose support the completion of this project would not have been possible. Page 9 2. REGIONAL GEOLOGY 2.1 INTRODUCTION The southwestern coast of B r i t i s h Columbia i s underlain by the Coast Pl u t o n i c Complex. This complex i s a broad b e l t of g r a n i t o i d and v a r i a b l y metamorphosed rocks, which extends f o r about 1,800 km along the coast from Vancouver, through southeastern Alaska, and into the Yukon T e r r i t o r y . Within t h i s complex, v a r i a b l y metamorphosed v o l c a n i c and sedimentary rocks occur as' "pendants"--separate bodies of s t r a t i f i e d rock, surrounded by plut o n i c rocks. The l a r g e s t of these "pendants" i n southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia, the B r i t a n n i a - Indian River pendant, c o n s i s t s of c a l c - a l k a l i n e v o l c a n i c rocks assigned to the Late J u r a s s i c -Early Cretaceous Gambier Group (Heah et. a l . , 1 986 ). The Coast P l u t o n i c Complex, described by Monger and Pri c e (1979), i s a s e r i e s of ncrthwest-trending allochthonous terranes accreted to North America i n the Mesozoic and cut by Cretaceous plutons. Southwestern mainland B r i t i s h Columbia, and Vancouver Island are underlain by Wrangellia. Woodsworth and Tipper (1980) suggested that volcanism migrated eastward from Vancouver Island to the southern Coast Mountains during the J u r a s s i c and Cretaceous. The a c c r e t i o n of Wrangellia to southern B r i t i s h Page 10 Columbia has been set between Early J u r a s s i c and mid-Cretaceous (Woodsworth and Tipper, 1980). Det a i l e d timing of events that formed the Coast P l u t o n i c Complex are poorly known. The ages of .most s t r a t i f i e d rocks are unknown because f o s s i l s are scarce and s t r a t i g r a p h i c c o r r e l a t i o n between i s o l a t e d pendants is-extremely d i f f i c u l t . Radiometric K-Ar dates on p l u t o n i c rocks are v a r i a b l y i n t e r p r e t e d as time of emplacement or time of major deformation. Southwestern c o a s t a l B r i t i s h Columbia i s a region with a h i s t o r y of, and a p o t e n t i a l f o r , economic mineral development. The region has been prospected since the l a t e eighteen hundred's, and consequently many old showings can be i d e n t i f i e d only by abandoned a d i t s or workings. Most pendant s t r a t a and adjacent p l u t o n i c rocks have been staked. Mineral occurrences, a number of which have been producing mines, are concentrated within the pendant rocks. These occurrences are described (MINFILE, B.C. M i n i s t r y of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources) as: vein, shear, skarn and volcanogenic deposits associated with Cu, Zn, Pb, Ag and Au. Cu-Mo porphyry deposits are described within some plu t o n i c rocks. Three p r i n c i p l e concentrations of mineral occurrences i n the Vancouver - Hope area that were o u t l i n e d by a metallogenic study (Ditson, 1978) were: the Britannia-Indian River pendant (Bri t a n n i a Mines), the Callaghan pendant (Northair Mines), Page 11 and the Sechelt Peninsula pendants. B r i t a n n i a Mine, i n the Br i t a n n i a - Indian River pendant has been the l a r g e s t producer i n the region. 2.2 GEOLOGY 2.2.1 Introduction Three major geologic u n i t s that underlie the southwestern Coast Range of B r i t i s h Columbia are: s t r a t i f i e d rocks, p l u t o n i c rocks, and cover u n i t s (Table 2.1, F i g . 1.1). Elongate pendants of older s t r a t i f i e d v o l c a n i c and sedimentary rocks make up about 15 % of the area. P l u t o n i c rocks make up about 30 % of the area. The remainder c o n s i s t s of Pleistocene cover units that include the G a r i b a l d i Group v o l c a n i c s and a l l u v i a l deposits; these represent contemporaneous,extrusion and g l a c i a t i o n , r e s p e c t i v e l y . Half of the p l u t o n i c rocks i n the reg i o n a l area are quartz d i o r i t e ; however, d i o r i t e and gr a n o d i o r i t e are common, and a small percentage are gabbro and migmatite'. The pl u t o n i c rocks are heterogeneous i n appearance, texture and mineral proportions. Most are not f o l i a t e d . L o c a l , discontinuous and f a i n t f o l i a t i o n i s marked by p a r a l l e l alignment of mafic minerals that have a north to northwesterly trend and steep d i p s . F o l i a t i o n i s most common near shear zones and pendant contacts (Roddick, 1965). TABLE 2.1 Formations i n the r c q i o n o f B r i t a n n i a Ridge ( F i g . 1.1), southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. PERIOD OR EPOCH FORMATION OR MEMBER LITHOLOGY AGE {Ma I ( t h i c k n e s s i n meters) P l e i s t o c e n e Cover u n i t s (60 - 1,000) A l l u v i a l or g l a c i a l sand and g r a v e l . Gar i b a i d i Group ( 6 0 0 ) 2 B a s a l t , a n d e s i t e , d a c i t e f l o w s and minor p y r o c l a s t l c s . Lamprophyre, a p l i t e and b a s i c dykes. Unconformable C o n t a c t L a t e C r e t a c e o u s Squami sh P l u t o n G r a n o d i o r i t e , q u a r t z d i o r i t e . 102 • 1 5 7 F u r r y Creek P l u t o n Quartz d i o r i t e . 100' Mounta i n Lake p l u t o n G r a n o d i o r i t e , q u a r t z d i o r i t e . 100 1 I n t r u s i ve C o n t a c t Hornblende v e i n and d i o r i t e . 95 . 1 3.3 6, 101 ^ 4 6 Ear ly Cretaceous Gambier Group (1 ,800 ) Upper Gambier Group (»600) A n d e s i t e , s l a t e y t u f f s . M i d d l e Gambier Group (580) S l a t e , a r g i l l i t e , a r k o s e , q u a r t z i t e . A l b i a n Lower Gambier Group (600) A n d e s i t e f l o w s , p y r o c l a s t l c s , b a s a l v o l c a n i c d e b r i s . Anqu1 ai Unconf or mi t y I n t r u s i v e C o n t a c t 0 io r 11 e 1 1 7 4^ Thornborough I n t r u s i o n s I n t r u s i o n s c r o s s c u t the Bowen I s l a n d Croup on Gambier I s l a n d . 153 • S 4 -_?_-7_.7--?--?-- -?--? RELATIONSHIP UNKNOWN ?--?--?--?--?--?- - - ? . . Late J u r a s s i c I?; \ B r i t a n n i a group ( 6 , 0 0 0 ) 1 0 B r i t a n n i a f o r m a t i o n (2,000) (packages 2 and 3) Goat Mountain f o r m a t i o n (4,000) (package 11 A r g i l l i t e , i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e f e l s i c dome complexes and p y r o c l a s t i c s . A n d e s i t e - b a s a 1 t , b a s a l t f l o w s , agglomerate, r h y o l i t e , f i n e t u f f . 167 81 . 90. 4 , 5 3 7 8 . 3» ± 3 2 9 Tr i ass i c Bowen I s l a n d Group ( 1 . 5 0 0 ) 2 A l t e r e d a n d e s i t e , t u f f , minor c h e r t , greywacke and metamorphosed e q u i v a l e n t s . RELATIONSHIP UNKNOWN ? - - ? - - ? - - ? - ? - - ? - ?- -?- - ? - - ? - -P e n n s y l v a n i a n - Permian Twin I s l a n d s Group ( t h i c k n e s s unknown) Itornbl ende-andes i ne, granu 1 i t e , g n e i s s s c h i s t , a m p h i b o l i t e h o r n f c l s , q u a r t z i t e , meta-arkose, I i m e - s i l i c a t e r o c k s . 1. Based on U-Pb a n a l y s e s of z i r c o n s , Armstrong in He ah ( 1 982). 2. D i v i s i o n s and t h i c k n e s s e s a r e from Roddick (1965). 3. Based on ammonite found i n a r g i l l i t e s at Porteau Cove, J e l e t s k y in Mathews (1972). 4. Dased on K-Ar a n a l y s e s by McK i M o p ( 1973 ). 5. Based on K-Ar a n a l y s e s by Caron in Woodsworth (1979). 6. Based on K-Ar a n a l y s e s o f hornblende i n d i o r i t e by Heah (1962). 7. Based on a two p o i n t i s o c h r o n from Rb-Sr a n a l y s e s by Heah (1982). 8. Based on Rb-Sr d a t a , t h i s paper ( T a b l e 5.3). 9. Based on K-Ar d a t e , t h i s paper ( T a b l e 5.1). 10. T h i c k n e s s e s a r e a f t e r S c h o f i e l d in McCullough (1968). Page 13 S t r a t i f i e d u n i t s are Mesozoic v o l c a n i c and sedimentary rocks preserved as remnants within the Coast Plutonic Complex. These volcano-sedimentary pendants trend northwesterly and have sharp to gradational i n t r u s i v e contacts, or r e c r y s t a l l i z e d and hornfelsed contacts (Roddick, 1965). S t r a t i f i e d rocks are commonly deformed, metamorphosed and a l t e r e d by Cretaceous i n t r u s i o n s . 2.2.2 S t r a t i f i e d Rocks Volcanic and sedimentary rocks i n the region ( F i g . 1.1) are di v i d e d into three Groups of d i f f e r e n t metamorphic grade (Table 2.1; Roddick et a_l. , 1 979). The Twin Islands Group, believed to be the o l d e s t , i s succeeded by the Bowen Island and Gambier Groups. B r i t a n n i a group rocks of the B r i t a n n i a - Indian River pendant have been assigned to Gambier Group by previous authors (Roddick, 1965; Roddick et a l . , 1979; Heah et a l . , 1986), although t h i s c o r r e l a t i o n i s considered here to be t e n t a t i v e . The i s o l a t e d nature of these rocks i n s t u c t u r a l l y separate pendants, and the lack of d i s t i n c t i v e l i t h o l o g i e s and f o s s i l s , make r e l a t i o n s h i p s and c o r r e l a t i o n among these separate bodies d i f f i c u l t to e s t a b l i s h . Page 14 Twin Islands Group embraces those rocks having undergone intense metamorphism of high to upper amphibolite f a c i e s . L i t h o l o g i e s present are g r a n u l i t e , amphibolite, micaceous q u a r t z i t e , p h y l l i t e , s c h i s t , gneiss, minor conglomerate, meta-andesite, rhyodacite and h o r n f e l s . These rocks are confined to r e l a t i v e l y small bodies, often l e s s than 5 km across, concentrated i n the southern part of Figure 1.1 along the southern fro n t of the mountains. Age, specul a t i v e since no f o s s i l s have been found, has been assigned Pennsylvanian to Permian by Roddick and O k u l i t c h (1 973). Bowen Island Group rocks are a n d e s i t i c flows with minor interbedded sedimentary rocks that may be t h i n l y banded cherts or t u f f s . Generally, they have been metamorphosed to greenschist grade. The group was named f o r a t h i c k assemblage on Bowen Island (Armstrong, 1953). Bowen Island Group, where i t i s highly metamorphosed, i s s i m i l a r to Twin Islands Group, but i t d i f f e r s by containing more v o l c a n i c rocks and less q u a r t z i t e than the l a t t e r (Roddick, 1965). Roddick and Oku l i t c h (1973) assigned a Lower to Middle T r i a s s i c age to the group, but f o s s i l evidence i s absent. Gambier Group, named by Armstrong (1953), i s a complex assemblage of andesite-and rhyodacite flows, p y r o c l a s t i c rocks, a r g i l l i t e , minor conglomerate, limestone and s c h i s t that underlies the northern part of Gambier Island. Gambier Group rocks have. Page 15 been metamorphosed to greenschist f a c i e s . Structure on a d e t a i l e d scale i s complex; but generally the rocks have a northwesterly f o l i a t i o n and bedding dips moderately to steeply southwest. Most pendants from Gambier Island north to Mount G a r i b a l d i are- mapped as Gambier Group. Roddick (1965) assigned an Upper J u r a s s i c to Lower Cretaceous age to Gambier Group rocks (see s e c t i o n 2.2.3). Because t h i s i s the main u n i t i n the B r i t a n n i a pendant ( F i g . 1.1) i t i s described further below. 2.2.3 Gambier Group Gambier Group was d i v i d e d by Roddick (1965) i n t o three members: Lower, Middle and Upper ( F i g . 2.1), on the basis of a more complete s t r a t i g r a p h i c . type s e c t i o n on Brunswick Mountain (exposures on the east side of Howe Sound are poor, and at no place are a l l three members well exposed). Upper Gambier Group c o n s i s t s of more than. 600 m of andesite and s l a t e y t u f f . Middle Gambier Group i s represented by 580 m of sedimentary rock c o n s i s t i n g of s l a t e , a r g i l l i t e , arkose and q u a r t z i t e . A basal conglomerate, containing g r a n i t i c and v o l c a n i c d e b r i s , together with a n d e s i t i c flows and p y r o c l a s t i c rocks, forms the Lower Gambier Group. Age of the Gambier Group i s f a i r l y well known compared with other s t r a t i g r a p h i c u n i ts of the southern Coast Plutonic Complex. Roddick (1965) concluded that the Gambier Group possessed s i m i l a r L O C A T I O N T Y P E SECTION GAMBIER ISLAND MOUNT BRUNSWICK 6'nistrong 1 ,250 m R o d d i c k I96S 1,750 m LEGEND Congtomerote, o r k o s e , greywocke 1 —1 A r g i l l i t e E53 Tuf f ( l a p i l l i , c r y s t a l ) Block tuff, breccia Felsic lovo, flow, si l l I* •_! Mofic lava, flow, si l l Basalt flow, agglomerate BRITANNIA -INDIAN RIVER PENDANT ( Br i tannia Port ) Page 16 FIGURE 2.1 Comparative s t r a t i g r a p h i c s ec t ions , proposed by var ious workers, for the Gambier Group i n the B r i t a n n i a pendant ( F i g . 1.1) , southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Page 17 o v e r a l l l i t h o l o g i c c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s and r e l a t i o n s h i p s to 'plutonic rocks as Upper J u r a s s i c and Lower Cretaceous rocks elsewhere i n the Coast Mountain B e l t . An Albian ammonite found i n a r g i l l i t e s close to Highway #99 at Porteau Cove (Jeletzky in Mathews, 1972) defines a Lower Cretaceous age for Middle Gambier Group. On Gambier Island, Gambier Group s t r a t a unconformably o v e r l i e the Thornborough Intrusions, f o r which McKillop (1973) obtained an J u r a s s i c K-Ar date of 153 Ma. Along Howe Sound the basal conglomerate of the Gambier Group l i e s unconformably on d i o r i t e s that y i e l d a K-Ar date from hornblende of 117 + 4 Ma (Caron i n Woodsworth, 1979), suggesting Lower Gambier Group i s not older than t h i s . Roddick e_t a l . (1979) i n d i c a t e a Lower Cretaceous age for the Gambier Group. However, recent discovery of Lower J u r a s s i c ammonites i n sediments from a pendant on the Sechelt Peninsula (G. Crowe, 1984, pers. comm.) in d i c a t e s an older age f o r some of the s t r a t a mapped as Gambier Group. The name Gambier Group has been extended to include a l l Late J u r a s s i c and Ea r l y Cretaceous s t r a t a i n the region that are l i t h o l o g i c a l l y s i m i l a r to the vo l c a n i c s and sediments on Gambier Island (Heah et. a l . , 1 986). L i t t l e recent work has been published on Gambier Group st r a t i g r a p h y ; therefore, i t i s d i f f i c u l t to define s t r a t i g r a p h i c a l l y or to c o r r e l a t e with s p e c i f i c areas. C o r r e l a t i o n i s hampered further by the i s o l a t e d nature of fragmented remnants surrounded by pl u t o n i c rocks, the paucity of age data, and the lack of t i m e - s t r a t i g r a p h i c units within Page 18 pendants. Rugged t e r r a i n and poor access to co a s t a l southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia complicates matters f u r t h e r . Most pendants between Vancouver and Mount G a r i b a l d i are shown as Gambier Group on The Fraser Map Sheet (NTS 092; Roddick et a l . , 1979). These pendants, form a northwesterly trending band from as far west as Bute I n l e t to as f a r east as Indian Arm. Pendants within t h i s band ( F i g . 1.1) are located at Lynn Creek, Brunswick Mountain, Newman Creek, northern Gambier Island, B r i t a n n i a -Indian River and along the northwestern coast of Howe Sound. Pendants l i t h o l o g i c a l l y s i m i l a r to the Gambier Group north of Mount G a r i b a l d i are mapped as the Lower Cretaceous Cheakamus or F i r e Lake Formations. L i t h o l o g i c a l l y s i m i l a r pendants east of Indian Arm, are mapped as the Middle J u r a s s i c Harrison Lake Formation. Gambier Group rocks represent a Late J u r a s s i c to Early Cretaceous marine environment char a c t e r i z e d by mafic, intermediate and f e l s i c volcanism that accompanied u p l i f t and emplacement of plutons (Woodsworth and Tipper, 1980). The band of aligned v o l c a n i c pendants of Gambier Group i s suggestive of convergent plate margin t e c t o n i c s of modern arc regions. The mafic to f e l s i c v o l c a n i c c y c l e with voluminous p y r o c l a s t i c rocks accumulating i n a submarine environment i s also notably s i m i l a r to Archean greenstone b e l t s . Submarine v o l c a n i c s of the Gambier Group represent a favourable environment f o r the accumulation of massive Page 19 sulphides. Numerous showings and prospects, i n c l u d i n g the large past-producer B r i t a n n i a , are hosted within rocks assigned to Gambier Group ( F i g . 1.1). 2.2.4 B r i t a n n i a - Indian River Pendant 1.Introduction The B r i t a n n i a - Indian River pendant, covering an area of 150 km , i s the l a r g e s t and economically most s i g n i f i c a n t remnant of rocks mapped as Gambier Group. I t i s bounded on the west by Howe Sound and extends east f o r 24 km, with an average width of 3.5 km. Sedimentary and v o l c a n i c rocks are surrounded to the north by the Squamish pluton, and to the south and east by b a t h o l i t h i c rocks that include the Furry and Mountain Lake plutons. The pendant i s separated into two parts, B r i t a n n i a and Indian River, by a g r a n o d i o r i t e "bridge". The western end at B r i t a n n i a , an area of 9 90 km , trends east-west from t i d e water at B r i t a n n i a Beach, to the B r i t a n n i a open p i t s , from where i t continues northwesterly. The eastern end, Indian River, i s 60 km and trends northwesterly. C o r r e l a t i o n of B r i t a n n i a pendant stratigraphy with Gambier Group i s uncertain and weak, and i n the absence of f o s s i l s i s based on l i t h o l o g i c a l s i m i l a r i t i e s . 2. L i t h o l o g y Stratigraphy i n both the B r i t a n n i a and Indian River parts of the pendant was considered c o r r e l a t i v e by James (1929), even Page 20 though they are separated by a g r a n o d i o r i t e "bridge". The two parts each contain an eastern b e l t of andesite and a western b e l t of f e l s i c p y r o c l a s t i c s . L i t h o l o g i e s present are: pillowed b a s a l t s , andesite, d a c i t e to r h y o l i t e flows and p y r o c l a s t i c s , v o l c a n i c b r e c c i a s , a r g i l l i t e , minor greywacke, arkose, and highly a l t e r e d q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t . These rocks form a complex p i l e of mafic flows and agglomerates o v e r l a i n and intruded by f e l s i c v o l c a n i c s dominated by p o r p h y r i t i c cores with f l a n k i n g b r e c c i a s , p y r o c l a s t i c debris and o v e r l y i n g t u f f s and sediments. 3. Structure The most prominent structures i n the pendant are s u b p a r a l l e l zones of northwesterly trending, strongly schistose and a l t e r e d rock. The steeply d i p p i n g . " B r i t a n n i a Shear Zone", proximal to a l l the B r i t a n n i a orebodies (Payne e_t a l . , 1980), trends northwesterly across the western h a l f of the pendant, and cuts the r e g i o n a l trend of bedding and u n i t s at a small angle ( F i g . 1.1). I t i s i n t e r p r e t e d here as a s t r a t i g r a p h i c l a y e r , hydrothermally a l t e r e d during the emplacement of massive sulphides and subsequently p r e f e r e n t i a l l y deformed. The Indian River Shear zone, p a r a l l e l to the B r i t a n n i a Shear Zone, cuts across the Indian River h a l f of the pendant. To the northwest, across Howe Sound i n a small pendant, a s i m i l a r zone of sheared rocks occurs i n what may be an extension of the B r i t a n n i a pendant shear zones ( F i g . 1.1). Southeast of the B r i t a n n i a pendant, a migmatite body i s aligned along the same northwestern trend. Page 21 Int e r n a l s t r u c t u r e of the pendant i s complex. I t i s not well understood because of a lack of p e r s i s t e n t marker u n i t s and heavy-f o r e s t cover. O r i g i n a l s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s are a l s o obscured by numerous major and minor f a u l t s , and large i n t r u s i v e bodies. As a r e s u l t , the normal s t r a t i g r a p h i c succession of the • units across the pendant i s poorly known. A major a n t i c l i n a l s t r u c t u r e , plunging northwest at 35 degrees, was described by James (1929) i n the B r i t a n n i a h a l f of the pendant within d a c i t i c v o l c a n i c s . Payne et a_l. (1 980) suggested that the B r i t a n n i a Shear Zone coincided with the a x i a l plane of t h i s a n t i c l i n e east of the Jane Basin ( F i g . 3.1 ) and along the Furry Creek v a l l e y . The general trend of bedding across the western h a l f of the pendant i s northwesterly and dips are 45 degrees southwest. In the mine area dips steepen to 70 degrees. The major st r u c t u r e i n the Indian River h a l f of the pendant was i n t e r p r e t e d by James (1929) to be a northerly plunging a n t i c l i n e . Bedding at the northwestern end of Indian River Ridge ( F i g . 3.1) s t r i k e s northwest and dips 45 degrees southwest.. Farther southwest along the ridge, bedding i s h o r i z o n t a l . At the southeastern end of the ridge beds steepen to a l m o s t • v e r t i c a l . Roddick (1965), unable to refute or confirm James' i n t e r p r e t a t i o n , noted only that the rocks trended northwesterly, p a r a l l e l to Indian River, with steep dips to the southwest. Page 22 4. Age No f o s s i l s have been found i n the pendant; hence the only age c o n s t r a i n t s are based on the age of p l u t o n i c rocks that intrude the v o l c a n i c s . The Squamish and Furry plutons are mid-Cretaceous, about 100 Ma (Armstrong i n Heah, 1982), based on U-Pb analyses of z i r c o n s . Heah (1 982) a l s o obtained dates of 101 +_ 4 Ma and 95.1 +_ 3.3 Ma by K-Ar methods on hornblende from d i o r i t e . Contact metamorphic aureoles i n the pendant c l e a r l y i n d i c a t e that the plutons are younger than the pendant rocks (Payne et a_l. , 1 980). Thus, pendant rocks" are older than mid-Cretaceous but commonly y i e l d reset ages. 5. Economic M i n e r a l i z a t i o n B r i t a n n i a Mine, i n operation f o r almost 70 years from 1905 to 1974, was the focus of numerous reports and considerable e x p l o r a t i o n i n the Brit a n n i a - I n d i a n River pendant. Ten major orebodies were developed. A l l are i n the northwest-trending. B r i t a n n i a Shear Zone. Within t h i s zone of a l t e r e d rock, massive sulphides are associated s p a t i a l l y with massive p o r p h y r i t i c d a c i t e s that might represent v o l c a n i c domes. Br i t a n n i a deposits were di v i d e d i n t o categories comparable to Kuroko-type m i n e r a l i z a t i o n (Payne et_ a_l. , 1 980) i n c l u d i n g sulphate, sulphide-sulphate "zinc ores", sulphide " s i l i c e o u s copper ores", and stockwork "c h a l c o p y r i t e veins". Eighty percent of the 50 m i l l i o n tonnes (55 m i l l i o n tons) of ore produced was Page 23 from " s t r i n g e r ore", the other 20 % was from "massive sulphides". A s e r i e s of mineral occurrences, p r i m a r i l y of Cu but with minor Pb, Zn, Ag and Mo, have been located along the "Indian River Shear Zone" ( F i g . 1.1). There has been no production from these occurrences despite considerable e x p l o r a t i o n . On the southern flank of Mount Baldwin ( F i g . 3.1) Cu, Pb, Zn and Ag occur as sulphides i n a r g i l l a c e o u s rocks associated with r h y o l i t e t u f f s and p o r p h y r i t i c amygdaloidal flows r e l a t e d to a proposed "vent zone" (property held by I n t e r n a t i o n a l Maggie Mines Ltd., Vancouver; Clendenan, 1978). North of Mount Baldwin at the McVicar pro p e r t i e s ( F i g . 1.1) layered Pb-Zn sulphides and high-grade veins and lenses occur over a s t r i k e length of several hundred meters. On Ray Creek at the MacKinnon property ( F i g . 3.1) chert and r h y o l i t e b r e c c i a hosts concentrations of p y r i t e , c h a l c o p y r i t e and s p h a l e r i t e i n lodes that are v e i n - l i k e but conformable to stratigraphy.. Three kilometers south on the Ray property ( F i g . 1.1; Ditson, 1978) p y r i t e and c h a l c o p y r i t e occur i n a s i l i c e o u s zone i n rhyodacite t u f f within an intermediate to f e l s i c , moderately deformed v o l c a n i c sequence. At the Roy prospect ( F i g . 3.1) a schistose porphyry associated with flow banded r h y o l i t e , b reccias and jasper, hosts massive c h a l c o p y r i t e , p y r i t e and minor s p h a l e r i t e ( R i c c i o and R e b a g l i a t t i , unpublished report, 1980). 6. History of Mapping B r i t a n n i a Mine was the focus of mapping a c t i v i t y and Page 24 expl o r a t i o n i n the Britan n i a - I n d i a n River pendant i n the e a r l y part of the century (Table 1.1). Numerous unpublished company reports from 1919 through 1971 describe the geology of the mine, but few deal with r e g i o n a l c o r r e l a t i o n s of st r a t i g r a p h y . The name B r i t a n n i a group was o r i g i n a l l y proposed by LeRoy (1908) f o r a r g i l l i t e , s l a t e , a n d e s i t i c t u f f s , breccias and flows outcropping along Howe Sound south of B r i t a n n i a Creek. Mapping within the pendant, S c h o f i e l d (1926) d i v i d e d the B r i t a n n i a group into the Goat Mountain formation on Goat Ridge i n the north, and the o v e r l y i n g B r i t a n n i a formation i n the south. James (1929) subdivided the Goat Mountain formation into Lower, Middle and Upper members. He al s o suggested the reverse r e l a t i o n s h i p f o r th two formations, b e l i e v i n g the B r i t a n n i a formation to have been thrust i n t o i t s o v e r l y i n g p o s i t i o n along a steeply i n c l i n e d f a u l t This proposed f a u l t , s t r i k i n g northwesterly and dipping to the southwest, occurred at the contact between v o l c a n i c rocks of the Goat Mountain formation and a r g i l l i t e s of the B r i t a n n i a formation According to James (1929), the Lower Goat Mountain formation i s absent i n the B r i t a n n i a Mine area. Later i n v e s t i g a t o r s a l t e r n a t e l y adopted e i t h e r i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the r e l a t i v e p o s i t i o n s of the two formations ( F i g . 2.1). Roddick (1965) and Payne et a l . (1980) agreed with James 1 . i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the older B r i t a n n i a formation thrust into i t s present p o s i t i o n o v e r l y i n g the younger Goat Mountain formation. Page 25 This paper, fo l l o w i n g S c h o f i e l d (1926), i n t e r p r e t s the a r g i l l i t e s of the B r i t a n n i a formation to be younger and to o v e r l i e moderately dipping b a s a l t s of the Goat Mountain formation. This work concludes that s t r a t a on the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge dip and face c o n s i s t e n t l y southwest, and form a continuous succession from mainly mafic flows of the Goat Mountain formation to o v e r l y i n g a r g i l l i t e s arid f e l s i c v o l c a n i c s of the B r i t a n n i a formation ( F i g . 2.1). Studies from adjacent areas by McCullough (1968) and Heah (1 982) support t h i s a t t i t u d e f o r s t r a t a of the B r i t a n n i a pendant. B r i t a n n i a formation s t r a t i g r a p h y on the west end of B r i t a n n i a Ridge was i n t e r p r e t e d by McCullough (1968) as a monoclinal panel dipping and f a c i n g c o n s i s t e n t l y southwest. Goat Mountain formation s t r a t a at Sky P i l o t Mountain form a gently dipping homocline f a c i n g southwest (Heah, 1982). 7. C o r r e l a t i o n with Gambier Group Stratigraphy i n the B r i t a n n i a - Indian River pendant has been c o r r e l a t e d , on the basis of l i t h o l o g y , with the Gambier Group (Heah et a l . , 1986; Roddick, 1965). Roddick (1965) suggested that Middle Gambier Group exposed at Brunswick Mountain was p o s s i b l y equivalent to the t h i c k sequence of shales of the B r i t a n n i a formation. Following James (1929), the Lower Goat Mountain formation was c o r r e l a t e d to the Upper member of the Gambier Group on the basis of i t s presumed younger age and l i t h o l o g i c a l s i m i l a r i t i e s (Roddick, 1 965; Payne et al.. , 1 980 ). Here, fo l l o w i n g Page 26 Sc h o f i e l d (1926) and McCullough (1968), the Goat Mountain formation i s presumed to underlie the B r i t a n n i a formation; i t therefore cannot be c o r r e l a t e d with the Upper member of the Gambier Group. Problems e x i s t i n c o r r e l a t i n g v o l c a n i c p i l e s of s i g n i f i c a n t l y d i f f e r e n t thicknesses s t r i c t l y on the basis of l i t h o l o g y ( F i g . 2.1). The same l i t h o l o g i e s are repeated several times throughout the s t r a t i g r a p h i c s e c t i o n of the Gambier Group. Andesites occur i n both the Upper and Lower members of Gambier Group. Several units of a r g i l l i t e , approximately 500 m t h i c k , are present within B r i t a n n i a group rocks. The thi c k sequence of a r g i l l i t e s of Middle Gambier Group therefore cannot be c o r r e l a t e d c o n f i d e n t l y to any one of these a r g i l l i t e u n i t s . S i m i l a r i l y , mafic flows of the Goat Mountain formation cannot be assigned to a s p e c i f i c member of Gambier Group. B r i t a n n i a group rocks form a thickness of over 6,000 m compared to the type s e c t i o n of 1,750 m. Resolution of s t r a t i g r a p h i c 'position within the pendant i s necessary before more d e t a i l e d c o r r e l a t i o n . o f the B r i t a n n i a group with members of the Gambier Group i s p o s s i b l e . In the absence of f o s s i l s from the Br i t a n n i a pendant, c o r r e l a t i o n on the basis of age r e s t s l o o s e l y on the upper l i m i t imposed by dates of plu t o n i c rocks. Page 27 3. LOCAL GEOLOGY 3.1 INTRODUCTION The east se c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge ( F i g . 3.1) i s underlain by vo l c a n i c and sedimentary rocks of the B r i t a n n i a pendant i n d i c a t e d to be Gambier Group by Roddick et al.(1979). The pendant rocks are surrounded by i n t r u s i o n s of the Coast Pl u t o n i c Complex. Rocks of the area have been r e g i o n a l l y metamorphosed to lower greenschist f a c i e s . Contact aureoles from 300 to 1,200 m t h i c k (McCullough, 1968) surround the plutons and ov e r p r i n t r e g i o n a l metamorphism within the pendant. The study area [F i g s . 3.1, 3.2 ( i n pocket)] comprises 22 km^, 80 % of which i s s t r a t i f i e d rocks that c o n s i s t predominantly of vo l c a n i c flows and p y r o c l a s t i c s . S t r a t i f i e d rocks form a monoclinal panel dipping moderately to the southwest, i n t e r p r e t e d here as a continuous v o l c a n i c - sedimentary sequence p r o g r e s s i v e l y younging to the southwest. Within the map area rocks change character from p r i m a r i l y mafic flows and f e l s i c s u b a e r i a l t u f f s at the base of the sequence, through i n t r u s i v e and extrusive f e l s i c domes and f e l s i c p y r o c l a s t i c t u f f s , to dominantly sedimentary rocks at the top of the p i l e . The writer mapped the study area of Figure 3.2 at a scale of FIGURE 3.1 S i m p l i f i e d geology of the B r i t a n n i a Ridge area, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Area mapped i n ^ d e t a i l ( F i g . 3.2 ( i n poc k e t ] ) i s o u t l i n e d by box. P l u t o n i c mid-Cretaceous g r a n o d l o r i t e and d i o r i t e ^ are patterned with The B r i t a n n i a pendant has no p a t t e r n o u t s i d e the area d e t a i l e d ; w i t h i n the ^ box, packages 1 to 3 (see Table 3.1) are d e f i n e d by c r o s s e d , h o r i z o n t a l and i n c l i n e d h a t c h i n g , r e s p e c t i v e l y . "Shear zones" are d e f i n e d by f a u l t symbols. O ld mine workings i n the B r i t a n n i a - to Indian River pendant are i d e n t i f i e d by s t a r s . CO Page 29 1:5,000, with selected areas at 1:2,000 and 1:1,000, using d e t a i l e d topographic maps (with 5 m contour i n t e r v a l s ) and an alti m e t e r to e s t a b l i s h c o n t r o l . Emphasis was on the s t r a t i f i e d rocks of the B r i t a n n i a pendant. The f i e l d base map, Figure A.1 (in pocket) includes d e t a i l e d geology, and outcrop and sample l o c a t i o n s . Unit d e s c r i p t i o n s are based p r i m a r i l y on outcrop and hand specimen observations supported by petrography. A l t e r a t i o n v a r i e s to extreme i n the metavolcanic s u i t e ; consequently, conclusive determination of primary rock types always has not been made. F i e l d names have been retained f o r the u n i t s . Terminology (from F i s h e r and Schminke, 1984 and Schimd, 1981) used f o r c l a s s i f i c a t i o n of p y r o c l a s t i c rocks i s i n Appendix A ( F i g . A.2). . S t r a t i f i e d rocks within the map area of Figure 3.2 'were di v i d e d into three packages i n i t i a l l y defined by l i t h o l o g y and p o s i t i o n r e l a t i v e to the B r i t a n n i a orebodies i n the Jane Basin ( F i g . 3.1). The packages, numbered 1, 2 and 3 from north to south i n Figure 3.1, are r e f e r r e d to as: the " f o o t w a l l " , "mine" and "hangingwall" sequences r e s p e c t i v e l y . Major features of these three packages are o u t l i n e d i n Table 3.1. Package 1 co n s i s t s p r i m a r i l y of mafic flows. Package 2 i s dominated by a f e l s i c dome complex and ba s i n a l f a c i e s blanketed by p y r o c l a s t i c f e l s i c c r y s t a l t u f f . Package 3 con s i s t s of f e l s i c ash flows o v e r l a i n by a thic k sequence of black a r g i l l i t e . S t r a t a i n each of the packages c o n s i s t e n t l y dip and face southwesterly. D i v i s i o n of the rocks on Br i t a n n i a Ridge into these three main packages provided a us e f u l P a g e 30 TABLE 3.1 Major features d e f i n i n g packages ( F i g . 3.1) in the east Dritan B r i t i s h Columbia. Ridqe study area ( F i q . 3.2), southwestern PACKAGE Name "FOOTWALL" SEQUENCE "MINE" SEQUENCE "HANG INGWALL" SEQUENCE FORMATION (Schof i d d , 1926) (Roddick, DISTRIBUTION STRUCTURE Dips Tops THICKNESS LOWER CONTACT MINERALIZATION ALTERATION METAMORPHISM Regional Contact FOLIATION AGE Foss i I s Rb - Sr Goat Mountain North s lope of Br i tann ia R i dge, east s e c t i o n Andes i te-basa11, Basalt flows, breccias and pyroclast i c s Rhyoli te lava domes F e l s i c t u f f s 30 Hpqrpps southwest. Dips north on top of r h y o l i t e domes l'p h,is«d on qrad i nq, sconriti'i, .md pi l l o w morphn1oqy 1,400 m Undefined: be Iip vod to form t h<? top of the basalt sequence on Goat. R i duo Copper rl i ss^mi nat i i n rher ty f Iow • to brecc \ a s 'Native t:opp<*r in v Seawater: Na-rich Uydrnthfrm-i I : Mn-Ca prior B r i t a n n i a Middle Gambier Group South slope of Brit a n n i a Ridqe, east section Argi1 l i t e Daci te dome complex; i ntrus i ve and e x t r u s i ve Q u a r t r - s e r i c i t e sch i s t B r i t a n n i a Middle Gambier Group Southwest of Bri t a n n i a p i t s , and south of - Furry Creek Rhyodac i t e flows, ash flows F e l s i c t u f f A r g i 1 1 i t e Dac i t e , Andes i te i n t r u s i v e s , dykes - Beds d i p moderate I y and (ace southwest 20 degrees southwest 40 deqrees southwest. Steepens In 70 ,|,.,ltp«.s southwest in " r . h i v i r ?one" tip hased on qradinq, lo.nlinq, dome morpholoqy .intI sul ph ide morpho 1 oqy 1 , 200 m Con formab1e: a rq i 1 1 i t e o v e r l i e s pillow basalt and ash f1ows Intrusive: d.trite 'fome complex cuts pi 1 ;.IW*HJ haS.I It. f 1 ows n r i ta nn i a "r ehod i 17 d i s t i nc t mini n-i 1 of r I nqer , mass i ve bedded f-optu- r -1 i n<; o flydrother m,i 1 : Mq-nch 'Jij-i r t z - se r i t; i ( - - c h l o r i t e Up based on qradinq flOO m Conformab le: quart z• schist separates c r y s t a l l i t h i c tuff above and below contac t Faulted m places in the open p i t s Gold in quartz veins Copper disseminated in crysta I l i t h i c tuf f R e la t i ve1y una I tered none undef ined qreenschisr fa<:i«s - - b iot i te aureo le 300 to 1,200 m from i n t r u s i v e contact --cons i stent, nor thwest-1 rend t nq, with steep southwestwa rd d i p La te J u r a s s i c 1ft) . S4 La te Cretaceous 00.5 * 1.0 Ma Cretacf 4 . 1 M.i Page 31 framework f o r mapping and i n t e r p r e t i n g l o c a l s t r a t i g r a p h y . The packages a r e i n t e r p r e t e d h e r e as a c o n t i n u o u s m a i n l y m a f i c t o f e l s i c v o l c a n i c sequence. F u r t h e r s t r u c t u r a l and s t r a t i g r a p h i c d e f i n i t i o n o f t h e model i s i n d i c a t e d by complex c o n t a c t r e l a t i o n s h i p s and numerous f a u l t s o f unknown movement and e x t e n t . S e l e c t e d samples were a n a l y s e d f o r . m a j o r and t r a c e e l e m e n t s . A l l whole r o c k and t r a c e e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s a r e i n A p p e n d i x A. T r a c e e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s , not used i n . t h i s s t u d y , a r e i n c l u d e d o n l y as s u p p l e m e n t a l t o t h e f i e l d base map ( F i g . A.1 ) f o r f u t u r e s t u d i e s . M a j o r e lement a n a l y s e s from t h e l e a s t a l t e r e d f l o w r o c k s were used t o c l a s s i f y r o c k s from t h e B r i t a n n i a R i d g e a r e a as a c a l c - a l k a l i n e s u i t e w i t h a medium K and an i n t e r m e d i a t e Fe c o n t e n t t h a t f o l l o w s a t y p i c a l Cascade Fe-poor t r e n d i n Fe-enric.hment ( C h a p t e r 4 ) . D a t i n g by the K-Ar and Rb-Sr methods i s i n C h a p t e r 5. K-Ar d a t a p r o v i d e two d a t e s i n t e r p r e t e d as r e s e t by C o a s t P l u t o n i c • I n t r u s i o n s and a l a t e r i n t r u s i v e o r d e f o r m a t i o n a l e v e n t . P r e l i m i n a r y Rb-Sr d a t a i n d i c a t e r o c k s i n the B r i t a n n i a R i d g e a r e a may be L a t e J u r a s s i c , o l d e r t h a n the E a r l y C r e t a c e o u s . a g e p r e s e n t l y a s s i g n e d t o t h e s e assumed Gambier Group r o c k s ( R o d d i c k e_t a l . , 1979; Woodsworth, 1979; Woodsworth and R o d d i c k , 1975). Page 32 3.2 PACKAGE 1, "FOOTWALL" SEQUENCE 3.2.1 Introduction Package 1, the " f o o t w a l l " sequence, occupies the northern part of Figure 3.2 ( i n pocket), southwest of the Mountain Lake pluton, where i t forms the c r e s t and north slope of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. Package 1 i s chara c t e r i z e d by a t h i c k succession of v a r i a b l y a l t e r e d mafic flows, with l o c a l f e l s i c domes and interbedded submarine ash flows. The package, d i v i d e d into seven u n i t s , i s 1,400 m t h i c k . Flows, flow breccias and agglomerates (unit 2), and a l t e r e d p i l l o w lavas (unit 7) exceed 1,000 m combined thickness and make up more than 70 % of the package. Discontinuous wedges of a n d e s i t i c p y r o c l a s t i c b r e c c i a and t u f f -br e c c i a (unit 6) up to 350 m t h i c k , and r h y o l i t e domes with r e l a t e d breccias and f e l s i c t u f f s (units 3, 4 and 5) up to 400 m t h i c k , occur within the mafic sequence and make up the remaining 30 % of t h i s package. 3.2.2 Unit Descriptions A r g i l l i t e , u n i t 1, i s exposed on the steep north - fa c i n g slope south of Condor Lake ( F i g . 3.2) at the eastern end of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. A thickness of 125 m of purple-black, t h i n l y bedded, Page 33 f i s s i l e a r g i l l i t e with minor interbeds of grey to buff ash and c r y s t a l t u f f i s present. Beds dip 15 to 22 degrees southwest. The base of unit 1 i s not exposed. Unit 1 i s the oldest i n the map area because bedding a t t i t u d e s i n d i c a t e i t underlies the southwesterly dipping basalts (unit 2) that outcrop on the prominent north - trending ridge west of Condor Lake ( F i g . 3.2). F e l s i c breccia and t u f f (units 4 and 5) that dip north outcrop d i r e c t l y above unit 1, but are separated by a f a u l t on the steep north - facing slope. Granodiorite and d i o r i t e of' the Mountain Lake pluton (unit 20) intrude unit 1 and account for the present hornfelsed appearance of unit 1. The unit represents quiet submarine deposition p r i o r to the extrusion of unit 2. Andesite-basalt, unit 2, forms a succession 400 to 600 m thick of shallow-dipping mafic to intermediate flows, i n t e r f l o w breccia and agglomerate. Unit 2 occupies most of the northwest corner of Figure 3.2, and i s also present i n outcrops along the south -dipping slope east of Cyrtina Creek. It i s best exposed on the prominent north - south ridge running perpendicular to and north of Britannia Ridge ( F i g . 3.2). Feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c basalt flows and breccias on the ridge i n t e r f i n g e r to the northwest with the agglomerate member overlying basalt flows and h y a l o c l a s t i t e on Glory Hole road. Dark-grey weathering fine-grained black a n d e s i t i c to b a s a l t i c flows .at the base of unit 2 are o v e r l a i n by a 7 m thick Page 34 h y a l o c l a s t i t e with fragments i n a minor white c l a y matrix. Massive flows up to 10 m t h i c k are separated by 2 to 5 m of often rusty, chert f i l l e d flow-top b r e c c i a . White chert f i l l s f r a c t u r e s and columnar j o i n t s , and surrounds angular blocks. Flows dip approximately 45 degrees southwest. P l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts, 1 to 3 mm across, and present up to 15 %, are subhedral and s a u s s e r i t i z e d . They g e n e r a l l y are randomly or i e n t e d . Trace (<1 %) o l i v i n e and augite are present l o c a l l y . i n the very f i n e grained groundmass. Quartz amygdules (3 % ) , 1 to 5 cm across, are elongated perpendicular to flow contacts. C a l c i t e amygdules are rare. A dark green weathering mafic p y r o c l a s t i c b r e c c i a (agglomerate) and t u f f - b r e c c i a member, 150 to 350 m t h i c k , i n t e r f i n g e r s with the massive flows near the base of unit 2 outcropping along the Glory Hole Road ( F i g . 3.2). The monolithic breccias form t h i c k unsorted beds that dip 45 degrees to the southwest. Tuff - br e c c i a contains subrounded mafic bombs, mafic l a p i l l i , and occasional r h y o l i t e and pumice l a p i l l i . The matrix i s mafic t u f f with trace disseminations of c h a l c o p y r i t e and pyrite." Dark green weathering massive feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c andesite, east of Cyrtina Creek, i s o v e r l a i n by mafic t u f f - b r e c c i a c o n s i s t i n g of angular to i r r e g u l a r mafic amygdaloidal feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c blocks i n a s i l i c e o u s matrix. F e l s i c fragments are Page 35 r a r e l y present. The mafic t u f f - breccia i s gradational to monolithic mafic l a p i l l i - t u f f and intermediate t u f f . Samples from unit 2 plot- as r e l a t i v e l y unaltered c a l c i c to c a l c - a l k a l i n e i s l a n d arc b a s a l t i c andesite (Chapter 4). Analyses from two samples of unit 2 are a l k a l i - p o o r compared to average Cascade values f o r b a s a l t i c andesite (Irvine and Barager, 1971). K-Ar mid-Cretaceous dates of 90.5 +_ 3.2 Ma (Chapter 5) are impossibly young and most probably represent r e s e t t i n g by i n t r u s i o n of the Mountain Lake pluton. Unit 2 represents mafic flows, flow breccias and interbedded agglomerate with minor mafic t u f f - b r e c c i a . Smooth upper surfaces on flows, columnar j o i n t i n g and the prismatic shape of the flow, members may be i n d i c a t i v e of confined subaerial accumulation along the north - south ridge perpendicular to Britannia Ridge (Fig. 3.2). West of t h i s ridge, i n t e r f i n g e r i n g agglomerates and breccias represent a slope or flow front of some r e l i e f , and a subaqueous environment of deposition. Rhyolite, unit _3, co n s i s t s of creamy feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c • i n t r u s i v e and extrusive phases that form small domes and plugs along the crest of Britannia Ridge ( F i g . 3.2). The massive and brecciated r h y o l i t e unit, 100 to 400 m thick, i s separated into two main bodies: the extrusive. "Ridge lava dome" outcropping along the ridge, and the l a r g e l y i n t r u s i v e "Cyrtina dome" outcropping Page 36 northeast of Cyrti n a Creek ( F i g . 3.2). Smaller bodies of v a r i a b l y exposed r h y o l i t e occur scattered along a northwesterly trend around and between these two main bodies. Fine-grained r h y o l i t e weathers white to buff and i s grey-green on f r e s h surface. In t h i n s e c t i o n the r h y o l i t e i s glomeroporphyritic. Up to 20 % p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts, 0.1 by 0.05 mm, are scattered through a fi n e - g r a i n e d groundmass of anhedral quartz and fe l d s p a r . The c r y s t a l s are zoned, with cores s l i g h t l y s a u s s e r i t i z e d . "Cyrtina dome" c o n s i s t s of massive r h y o l i t e with amygdules, coarse s p h e r u l i t e s , wispy mafic fragments and angular blocks concentrated at the contact of the dome with o v e r l y i n g sedimentary u n i t s . I t represents a shallow endogenous plug. F e l s i c t u f f of uni t 5, and l o c a l remnants of un i t 4, o v e r l i e and cover much of the dome. The "Ridge lava dome" c o n s i s t s of r h y o l i t e with e x c e l l e n t coarse to f i n e flow - banding. This r h y o l i t e l i e s d i r e c t l y on basalts of un i t 2 along B r i t a n n i a Ridge. I t i s o v e r l a i n by a gossanous, p y r i t i c , framework supported flow b r e c c i a . The rusty flow b r e c c i a i s o v e r l a i n by unit 4, a steeply dipping t u f f b r e c c i a with large blocks of flow banded feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c r h y o l i t e . Rhyolite of unit 3 i s chemically d i s t i n c t from other f e l s i c Page 37 volcanic rocks i n the map area. Samples of Cyrtina dome pl o t as a l t e r e d c a l c - a l k a l i n e r h y o l i t e with r e l a t i v e l y low CaO, and high MgO and Na 20 values compared to the other feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c r h y o l i t e s and dacites i n the map area (Chapter 4). No analyses of the Ridge lava dome are a v a i l a b l e . Compared to average values from r h y o l i t e s of the Cascades, unit 3 has a high MgO and CaO, and a low K 20 content. Unit 3 f e l s i c volcanism i n Figure 3.2, i s l o c a l i z e d along B r i t a n n i a Ridge. The subspherical r h y o l i t e bodies surrounded by breccias represent submarine extrusion, along a l i n e a r northwesterly trend, of f e l s i c lavas on to basalt flows. High Na 20 values may be due to soda metasomatism. Continued i n t r u s i o n of the feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c r h y o l i t e into i t s own carapace r e s u l t s in penecontemporaneous deformation and complicated s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s east of Cyrtina Creek ( F i g . 3.2). Unit 3 represents areas of p o s i t i v e r e l i e f on top of submarine basalts that create b a r r i e r s to deposition of subsequent mafic flows in the eastern half of Figure 3.2. White block b r e c c i a , unit _4, i s d i s t i n c t i v e , 50 m thick, and dips 50 degrees north i n steep contact with the r h y o l i t e dome (unit 3) on Bri t a n n i a Ridge; i t also o v e r l i e s Cyrtina dome northeast of Cyrtina Creek ( F i g . 3.2). White blocks in a green c h l o r i t i c ashy matrix form t h i c k l y bedded and graded t u f f -breccia and lapi11istone. The.matrix of f e l d s p a r - r i c h a n d e s i t i c Page 38 t u f f supports angular white f e l s i c and chert blocks and minor pumice, feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c andesite, and chert l a p i l l i . Traces of disseminated galena, c h a l c o p y r i t e , s p h a l e r i t e and p y r i t e occur in the matrix. Unit 4 i s gradational to the o v e r l y i n g unit 5, f e l s i c c r y s t a l ash t u f f . Unit 4, a t h i c k , steeply dipping, non-welded, matrix supported p y r o c l a s t i c unit represents a f a l l o u t deposit produced by the subaqueous explosive d i s i n t e g r a t i o n of a feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c r h y o l i t e dome (unit 3), spine or lava flow as i t entered water (c f . Fisher and Schminke, 1984). F e l s i c c r y s t a l ash t u f f , unit 5_, i s associated with minor' interbedded a r g i l l i t e , chert, l a p i l l i t u f f and l a p i l l i s t o n e . This unit, from 50 to 300 m t h i c k , mantles f e l s i c domes (unit 3) along B r i t a n n i a Ridge ( F i g . 3.2). It occurs as scattered erosional remnants along the south-facing slope of" B r i t a n n i a Ridge west of Cyrtina Creek, and more extensively east of Cyrtina Creek where, i t outcrops in creek beds, road cuts and c l i f f s j u s t below t r e e l i n e (F i g . 3.2). It i s i n contact i n the northern part of Figure 3.2 with the Mountain Lake granodiorite where i t i s hornfelsed up to several hundred meters from the contact. Resistant coarse t u f f outcrops of unit 5 weather buff to pale green. On fresh surface the t u f f i s pale green, pink or black. Hornfelsed members are purple-black on fresh surfaces Page 3 9 due to metamorphic b i o t i t e . Thick, massive beds contain f i n e ovoid to c i r c u l a r a c cretionary l a p i l l i . Minor interbeds within the pale coloured ash t u f f u n i t are: dark green weathering mafic t u f f containing p y r i t e and epidote, laminated pink-grey chert with minor bedded c h a l c o p y r i t e and p y r i t e , chert b r e c c i a with sulphides surrounding angular fragments, f o l i a t e d black a r g i l l i t e , and matrix supported t h i n l y bedded l a p i l l i s t o n e . Unit 5 i s massive to t h i n l y bedded and i s generally u n f o l i a t e d . West of Cyrti n a Creek, the un i t dips 25 to 40 degrees north ( F i g . 3.2: s e c t i o n C-C 1). East of Cy r t i n a Creek, mantling Cyrt i n a dome (unit 3), beds dip 40 to 60 degrees north, and 22 to 45 degrees south on the north and south flanks of the dome, r e s p e c t i v e l y . The sedimentary layers of unit 5 are v i s i b l y warped upward, broken and bent when viewed from the logging road c r o s s i n g C y r t i n a Creek at approximately the 1,100 m e l e v a t i o n ( F i g . 3.2). Unit 5 represents a submarine f a l l o u t deposit, based on normal grading and s o r t i n g and rock a s s o c i a t i o n of t u f f with interbedded chert and a r g i l l i t e (Fisher and Schminke, 1984). Unit 5 mantles the r h y o l i t e domes and br e c c i a s . Beds i n the unit that dip both north and south are probably the r e s u l t of penecontemporaneous deformation through upwarping and i n t r u s i o n of magma, as opposed to l a t e r s t r u c t u r a l deformation. Deformed and brec c i a t e d sedimentary layers of un i t 5 at Cy r t i n a Creek represent a diatreme approximately 100 m wide, which has warped and broken Page 40 the sedimentary units, and brought angular mafic fe l d s p a r p o r p h y r i t i c blocks up from the underlying u n i t 2. This diatreme represents e i t h e r continued i n t r u s i o n of Cy r t i n a dome (unit 3), or a l a t e r eruption r e l a t e d to the d a c i t i c dome complex (unit 9). Bedded sulphides i n chert and sulphide breccias are evidence of mineralized hydrothermal s o l u t i o n s r e l a t e d to explosive v o l c a n i c a c t i v i t y during the dep o s i t i o n of unit 5. Greater than 50 % ash si z e d material i n un i t 5 and the preservation of th i c k massive beds of accretionary l a p i l l i i s evidence of shallow to p o s s i b l y s u b a e r i a l d e p o s i t i o n (Fisher and Schmincke, 1984). Mafic l a p i l l i block tuf f, u n i t 6_, i s represented by discontinuous p y r o c l a s t i c and/or e p i c l a s t i c lenses present at d i f f e r e n t s t r a t i g r a p h i c l e v e l s within the mafic flows of u n i t s 2 and 7. Three lenses up to 800 m long, and from 50 to 350 m t h i c k , occur within flows near the top of un i t 2 northwest of the Ridge lava dome ( F i g . 3.2). One lense, exposed at an e l e v a t i o n of 850 m on the Glory Hole Road ( F i g . 3.2), o v e r l i e s the agglomerate member of unit 2; the other two lenses l i e beneath bleached mafic flows of u n i t 7. East of Cyrti n a Creek, outcropping on the south-dipping slope, u n i t 6 o v e r l i e s mafic t u f f - brec c i a of un i t 2. • Unit 6 i s o v e r l a i n by sedimentary (unit 8) and p y r o c l a s t i c (unit 10) units of package 2. Beds within u n i t 6 are of v a r i a b l e thickness. The separate • lenses of t h i s unit a l l e x h i b i t a s i m i l a r arrangement, which Page 41 generally includes a gradation from a l i t h i c t u f f - b r e c c i a to a c r y s t a l t u f f o v e r l a i n by a f i n e aphyric t u f f and chert. The beds are graded. Several outcrops d i s p l a y "double-grading", where each i n d i v i d u a l bed i s graded, and the e n t i r e sequence f i n e s upwards. These double-graded sequences have c r y s t a l - r i c h bases and pumice-rich tops. Unit 6 consistently, dips about 30 degrees southwest; tops are a l l to the southwest based on grading and scouring of f i n e r u n i t s . Within the western members of un i t 6, well sorted and framework supported coarse h e t e r o l i t h i c t u f f - b r e c c i a forms the lower blocky member. Coarser dense fragments are most common at the base and pumice i s more common at the top. C l a s t s include: mafic and occasional hematite - stained blocks, and subrounded v e s i c u l a r mafic, angular r h y o l i t i c and subrounded cherty l a p i l l i . In c ontrast, upper t u f f - b r e c c i a members comprise unsorted and ungraded, matrix supported pumice and angular r h y o l i t i c l a p i l l i and blocks. The matrix i s feldspar phyric. Blocky members are o v e r l a i n by many coarse to f i n e graded t u f f beds i n a sequence that becomes f i n e r upwards over 50 m. East of Cy r t i n a Creek, unit 6 c o n s i s t s of a n d e s i t i c t u f f and l a p i l l i - t u f f beds truncated by a h e t e r o l i t h i c t u f f - b r e c c i a gradational to l a p i l l i s t o n e and to a n d e s i t i c c r y s t a l t u f f . Within the lower t u f f l o c a l l y thin-bedded, laminated, contorted and p y r i t i c , f e l s i c t u f f and chert beds slump i n t o and around Page 42 occasional blocks. The th i c k h e t e r o l i t h i c b r e c c i a truncates and scours beds of the f i n e r , underlying andesitic' t u f f . The t u f f -bre c c i a i s non-bedded and framework supported. I t contains: very c l o s e l y packed d i s t i n c t i v e i r r e g u l a r subrounded fel d s p a r p o r p h y r i t i c amygdaloidal a n d e s i t i c blocks, l e s s than 10 % f e l s i c blocks (up to 10 cm acro s s ) , 20 % f e l s i c l a p i l l i 1 to 3 cm wide, black c h l o r i t i c wisps, and 10 % mafic l a p i l l i . This t u f f -bre c c i a i s l o c a l l y o v e r l a i n by e i t h e r a d i s t i n c t i v e white block t u f f - br e c c i a with a mafic fe l d s p a r p o r p h y r i t i c matrix, or an • a n d e s i t i c t u f f - b r e c c i a that scours down in t o the h e t e r o l i t h i c b r e c c i a . L a p i l l i s t o n e , poorly to well sorted, i s made up dominantly of feld s p a r p o r p h y r i t i c mafic l a p i l l i , 10 % angular to subangular f e l s i c l a p i l l i and occasional f e l s i c blocks (up to 6 cm acr o s s ) . Massive f i n e - g r a i n e d a n d e s i t i c t u f f to c r y s t a l t u f f with epidote and magnetite patches and c l o t s contains occasional f e l s i c l a p i l l i . Unit 6 i s unconformably o v e r l a i n by f e l s i c c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f , u n i t 10, east of Cyrti n a Creek. Topographical i r r e g u l a r i t i e s on t h i s "dip-slope" make determinations of the r e l a t i o n s h i p s w i t h i n , and the r e l a t i v e p o s i t i o n s of, u n i t s d i f f i c u l t . The western members of unit 6 represent subaqueous p y r o c l a s t i c flows, based on l i t h i c , c r y s t a l and pumice fragments and the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c lower blocky members o v e r l a i n by double-graded sequences. Double-grading s i g n i f i e s contemporaneous subaqueous volcanism with d e p o s i t i o n from t u r b i d i t y flows and not Page 43 ju s t sloughing o f f oversteepened p y r o c l a s t i c slopes of a volcano ( c f . Fiske and Matsuda (1964) i n Fisher and Schmincke, 1984). The great v a r i e t y of l i t h i c fragments mixed with pumice and c r y s t a l s i s suggestive of the shattering of a rubbly volcano. The p y r o c l a s t i c flows were erupted and deposited e i t h e r as submarine fans between b a s a l t i c flows, or as aprons o f f the flanks of b a s a l t i c ridges or f e l s i c domes. The eastern member of unit 6 i s l a r g e l y e p i c l a s t i c . The framework supported, well sorted c l a s t i c member of waterlain reworked v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s cuts down into and scours underlying p y r o c l a s t i c u n i t s . L i t h o l o g i c a l s i m i l a r i t i e s of coarser members and fragments within units 5 and 6 suggest unit 6 may represent submarine deposition and/pr reworking of members of unit 5 that were deposited i n a shallow to subaerial environment. Altered basalt, unit 1_, i s the uppermost unit of package 1 , and forms the top 150 to 350 m of the thi c k mafic flow sequence. It i s best exposed on Glory Hole Road at about 875 m el e v a t i o n ; i t also outcrops along B r i t a n n i a Ridge d i r e c t l y north of the V i c t o r i a open p i t , and on the south-facing slope of Britannia Ridge west of Cyrtina Creek ( F i g . 3.2). It i s massive to pillowed, and characterized by a pale green c h l o r i t i c weathered surface, abundant c h l o r i t i c amygdules, and a "bleached" grey-green fresh surface. This "bleached" unit i s not present east of Cyrtina Creek. At the top of unit 7.the pillow lavas are in c r e a s i n g l y Page 44 v e s i c u l a r and contain more interbedded h y a l o c l a s t i t e l a y e r s . Fine-grained grey chert i n f i l l s between the p i l l o w s . Subspherical p i l l o w s , 1 to 2 m long, lack well developed selvages and rims, but contain up to 20 % amygdules throughout. Pi l l o w morphology vaguely i n d i c a t e s tops are to the southwest. The p i l l o w s i n "bleached" outcrops are surrounded by white, massive chert. Amygdules composed of c h l o r i t e , c a l c i t e , and/or quartz, are round, sometimes i r r e g u l a r , and o c c a s i o n a l l y elongated. They range i n s i z e from 1 mm to 4 mm. On average, c h l o r i t e amygdules are 1 mm across, but the l a r g e r c a l c i t e amygdules average about 2 mm and can be as big as 8 mm i n diameter. C a l c i t e amygdules have c h l o r i t i c rims and quartz centers. A l t e r e d b a s a l t may contain up to 15 % p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts from 1 to 3 mm i n length. Phenocrysts are almost completely s a u s s e r i t i z e d . Unit 7 p l o t s as a c a l c - a l k a l i n e arc b a s a l t , which i s a l k a l i n e compared to u n i t 2 ( F i g . 4.3) and most c a l k - a l k a l i n e rocks. S p i l i t i z a t i o n i n v o l v i n g the a d d i t i o n of Na 20 during seawater a l t e r a t i o n i s responsible f o r the a l k a l i n e composition of unit 7. S p i l i t i z e d flows of u n i t 7 represent depo s i t i o n i n a subaqueous environment than flows of unit 2 based on the shallower increase Page 45 i n amygdules, h y a l o c l a s t i t e s and p i l l o w s (Fisher and Schmincke, 1984). These upper pillowed flows u n d e r l i e , i n t e r f i n g e r , and o v e r l i e f e l s i c t u f f and t u f f - b r e c c i a on B r i t a n n i a Ridge. Ash flow units with pumice and f e l s i c blocks are interbedded within the u n i t . Unit 7 represents extrusion of b a s a l t contemporaneous with and succeeding f e l s i c v o l c a n i c a c t i v i t y . The character and d i s t r i b u t i o n of these l a t e r flows were a f f e c t e d by the area of p o s i t i v e r e l i e f created by the r h y o l i t e domes. 3.2.3 Summary, Package 1 Seven u n i t s i n package 1 form a panel 1,400 m t h i c k dipping 45 degrees and f a c i n g southwest. Over 1,000 m of mafic flows, flow breccias and agglomerate are gradational to s p i l i t i z e d , pillowed basalt flows. Local r h y o l i t e domes with r e l a t e d auto-breccia, t u f f - b r e c c i a , and t u f f up to 400 m t h i c k i n t e r f i n g e r with the mafic flows at the top of the package. E x c e l l e n t grading i n the tuffaceous u n i t s c o n s i s t e n t l y i n d i c a t e s tops are to the southwest. This facing i s consistent with p i l l o w morphology. Accretionary l a p i l l i may represent a f a c i e s change to a shallower and p o s s i b l y s u b a e r i a l environment where an area of p o s i t i v e r e l i e f developed in the eastern h a l f of package 1 above the r h y o l i t e domes. Package 1 i s the lowermost s t r a t i g r a p h i c package i n the study area of Figure 3.2. The lower contact i s undefined but package 1 i s i n t e r p r e t e d to form the top part of the t h i c k , moderately Page 46 dipping b a s a l t i c p i l e on Goat Ridge described by Heah (1982). It i s intruded and o v e r l a i n by a d a c i t i c dome complex and sedimentary and p y r o c l a s t i c rocks of package 2. The a l t e r e d b a s a l t s , c l a s s i f i e d as isl a n d - a r c b a s a l t s , are s l i g h t l y a l k a l i n e due to enrichment i n Na20. They are CaO-poor compared to most c a l c - a l k a l i n e s u i t e s (Chapter 4). Basalt samples from package 1 are chemically i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e from basalt samples from Sky P i l o t and Co- P i l o t Mountains d i r e c t l y north of the map area ( F i g . 3.1). Rhyolite samples from Cyrtina dome are Na- and Mg-rich compared to f e l s i c rocks in the other packages. Variably low and high K 20 values occur in the mafic rocks from package 1. Sulphide m i n e r a l i z a t i o n occurs at several horizons within package 1. Disseminated sulphides occur within massive white chert i n flow top breccias, fractures and surrounding pi l l o w s , p a r t i c u l a r l y at the top of the package within the bleached unit 7. Gossans are common along the margins of the massive r h y o l i t e domes and within cherty interbeds and breccias that interbedded within f e l s i c t u f f s that o v e r l i e the domes. Age i s undefined for package 1. K-Ar dates of 90.5_f 3.0 Ma from the freshest basalts (Chapter 5) have been reset by the Mesozoic Coast Plutonic i n t r u s i o n s . Rb-Sr dates (Chapter 5) for the basalts are undefined. No f o s s i l s were found in the s t r a t a . Page 4 7 Interpreted to underlie and be intruded by dacite s of package 2, package 1 i s considered to be the oldest package i n the map area. 3.3 PACKAGE 2, "MINE" SEQUENCE 3.3.1 Introduction Package 2, chara c t e r i z e d by a b a s i n a l f a c i e s , a dome complex and a t h i c k p y r o c l a s t i c blanket, host to the B r i t a n n i a orebodies, covers most of the c e n t r a l part of Figure 3.2. I t extends from the B r i t a n n i a open p i t s (Jane Basin), i n the center of the western map area, - across the southern slope of B r i t a n n i a Ridge and along Furry Creek v a l l e y to the eastern edge of the map. The package i s hal f p y r o c l a s t i c rocks, 30 % massive i n t r u s i o n s and flows, and 20 % sedimentary rocks. The f i v e u n i t s of package 2 vary i n t o t a l thickness from 500 to 1,200 m. Feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c d a c i t e (unit 9) forms a dome complex of massive, brecc i a t e d and tuffaceous f a c i e s 300 to 500 m t h i c k . The dome complex i s surrounded by a t h i c k apron (200 to 500 m) of unsorted c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f (unit 10). Massive sulphide deposits are hosted within rocks strongly a l t e r e d to q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t (unit 12). Black' a r g i l l i t e (unit 8) outcrops west of the large d a c i t e complex. Page 48 3.3.2 Unit Descriptions A r g i l l i t e and ash t u f f , u n it 8_, occupies the north slope of B r i t a n n i a Ridge i n the Jane Basin at the western edge of Figure 3.2. This u n i t , 500 m t h i c k , i s a r g i l l i t e at the base, but grades upward to dominately f e l s i c t u f f at the top. Interbeds of t u f f , f e l s i c t u f f - b r e c c i a , greywacke and p y r i t i c chert occur within the a r g i l l i t e . Monotonous, fin e - g r a i n e d black a r g i l l i t e weathers r e c e s s i v e l y around more r e s i s t a n t paler and , coarser fragmental u n i t s . A r g i l l i t e i s massive to t h i n l y bedded and well f o l i a t e d . Interbeds, 1 to 4 m t h i c k with f l a t tops and rounded load-casted bottoms, are poorly sorted with 50 % angular feldspar phyric f e l s i c c l a s t s supported by a black f i n e - g r a i n e d matrix. Fragments range from c r y s t a l s to 10 cm blocks. One v o l c a n i c l a s t i c interbed contains massive l i t h i c and v e s i c u l a r pumiceous blocks i n a poorly sorted, u n s t r a t i f i e d c r y s t a l - r i c h matrix. Very f i n e - g r a i n e d , pale, grey-green t u f f beds and pale green chert beds are common at the top of u n i t 8, which d i r e c t l y underlies the B r i t a n n i a open p i t s . A r g i l l i t e beds dip 45 degrees southwest and cleavage dips 50 to 75 degrees southwest; bedding - cleavage r e l a t i o n s h i p s i n d i c a t e a gently northwest-plunging a n t i c l i n a l axis to the north of Figure 3.2. Small "s" drag f o l d s i n f i n e - g r a i n e d , grey t u f f beds support Page 49 t h i s s t r u c t u r a l i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . These fin e - g r a i n e d t u f f beds are contorted and deformed, which may l o c a l l y represent s o f t sediment deformation but more generally r e f l e c t s s t r u c t u r a l deformation. Flame s t r u c t u r e s , grading and loading a l l c o n s i s t e n t l y i n d i c a t e tops are to the southwest. Numerous quartz veins, p a r a l l e l to th f o l i a t i o n , cut the a r g i l l i t e . Unit 8 represents a sedimentary basin on the flank of a d a c i t i c complex. I t changes character from monotonous black a r g i l l i t e with f e l s i c t u r b i d i t e s , upward to ash flow t u f f s and chert. This change i n character r e f l e c t s d e p o s i t i o n i n a basin during i n c r e a s i n g d a c i t i c volcanism. Subaerial or submarine eruption into the basin i s represented by the i n t e r m i t t e n t t u r b i d i t y flows, and beds of pumice, c r y s t a l s and ash that rained into the basin. Dacite, unit 9, c o n s i s t s of a t h i c k (150 to 350 m) i n t r u s i v e e x t r u s i v e dome complex with massive, brecc i a t e d and tuffaceous f a c i e s , located i n the west c e n t r a l part of Figure 3.2 Unit 9 i s d i v i d e d i n t o two main members: (1) the " P i t dome", poorly exposed on. the east wall of the p i t s , c o n s i s t i n g of an a l t e r e d , l a r g e l y i n t r u s i v e body underlying u n i t 8 ( F i g . 3.2: se c t i o n A-A'), and (2) the " V i c t o r i a dome complex" which c o n s i s t s of prominent c l i f f s of massive da c i t e over 40 m high on the south slope of Br i t a n n i a Ridge above the V i c t o r i a open p i t ( F i g . 3.2: sec t i o n Page 50 B-B 1), and t u f f - br e c c i a along B r i t a n n i a Ridge. The diameter of the P i t dome i s approximately 0 . 5 km; the V i c t o r i a dome diameter i s 1 . 5 km. A zoning of s i m i l a r f a c i e s around a c e n t r a l massive core i s exh i b i t e d by the two members of un i t 9 . L o c a l i z e d massive feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c cores are rimmed by autobreccia with a s i l i c e o u s , igneous textured matrix, gradational outward to t u f f b r e c c i a , l a p i l l i t u f f and ash t u f f . Breccia around the P i t dome i s 20 m th i c k and i s o v e r l a i n by a chert horizon. V i c t o r i a dome i s surrounded by a h e t e r o l i t h i c p y r o c l a s t i c b r e c c i a g r a d a t i o n a l over a 2 0 0 m thickness to t u f f - b r e c c i a and to t u f f . Massive d a c i t e weathers buff-white to speckled buff-green, i s grey-green to grey-blue, and contains 5 to 15 % p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts i n a f i n e to medium grained quartz-feldspar groundmass. The phenocrysts are v a r i a b l y a l t e r e d to s e r i e i t e and clay minerals. At the edge of V i c t o r i a dome phenocrysts l o c a l l y are a l i g n e d . V e s i c l e s and amygdules of quartz, c h l o r i t e and z e o l i t e are present. Rarely v e s i c l e s contain traces of native copper. The"margins of the domes l o c a l l y are aphyric, v e s i c u l a r and flow-banded. Samples from P i t dome lack amygdules and z e o l i t e s , but are marked by completely s a u s s e r i t i z e d phenocrysts i n an a l t e r e d matrix. A carapace, 20 to 80 m t h i c k , of angular feldspar phyric P a g e 51 b l o c k s i n a s i l i c e o u s m a t r i x s u r r o u n d s t h e m a s s i v e c o r e s . P l a g i o c l a s e p h e n o c r y s t s i n t h i s a u t o b r e c c i a a r e b r o k e n . T h e m a t r i x i s i r r e g u l a r l y f i n e t o m e d i u m g r a i n e d a n d q u a r t z - r i c h ; i t c a n c o n t a i n c h l o r i t e a n d b e s l i g h t l y f o l i a t e d . M i n o r d i s s e m i n a t e d p y r i t e i s p r e s e n t i n t h e m a t r i x . T h i s a u t o b r e c c i a l o c a l l y i n c l u d e s a n g u l a r f r a g m e n t s o f a r g i l l i t e a n d i s g r a d a t i o n a l t o a t h i c k l y b e d d e d , f r a m e w o r k - s u p p o r t e d t u f f b r e c c i a . T u f f - b r e c c i a , i n a d d i t i o n t o d a c i t i c f e l d s p a r p h y r i c b l o c k s , i n c l u d e s a n g u l a r t o s u b r o u n d e d s u l p h i d e f r a g m e n t s , a n g u l a r a n d s u b r o u n d e d m a f i c l a p i l l i , a n d a n g u l a r b l o c k s o f f l o w - b a n d e d r h y o l i t e . T h i n l y b e d d e d l a p i l l i - t u f f , a n d t u f f w i t h r a n d o m l y . o r i e n t e d s a u s s u r i t i z e d p l a g i o c l a s e p h e n o c r y s t s (1 t o 4 mm) o v e r l i e t h e t u f f - b r e c c i a . S a m p l e s f r o m u n i t 9 p l o t i n t h e c o m p o s i t i o n r a n g e o f a l t e r e d c a l c - a l k a l i n e a n d e s i t e t o r h y o d a c i t e ( C h a p t e r 4 : F i g . 4 . 1 ) . C o m p a r e d t o t y p i c a l C a s c a d e d a c i t e s ( I r v i n e a n d B a r a g e r , 1 9 7 1 ) , u n i t 9 h a s h i g h T i G ^ a n d M g O . T h e P i t dome i s m o r e a l t e r e d a n d m o r e m a f i c t h a n t h e V i c t o r i a dome m e m b e r . P i t dome h a s a n a n d e s i t i c t o d a c i t i c c o m p o s i t i o n w i t h r e l a t i v e l y l o w CaO a n d a l k a l i v a l u e s . v a l u e s r a n g e f r o m v e r y h i g h t o v e r y l o w ( F i g . 4 . 5 ) . V i c t o r i a dome h a s a d a c i t i c c o m p o s i t i o n w i t h m e d i u m t o h i g h v a l u e s . A K - A r d a t e f r o m u n i t 9 ( C h a p t e r 5 ) ' o f 7 9 . 5 _+ 2 . 9 Ma i n d i c a t e s . Page 52 a reset mid-Cretaceous date which could be r e l a t e d to Coast Plu t o n i c i n t r u s i o n s (c_a. 100 Ma) or more l i k e l y , to a l a t e r undocumented i n t r u s i v e or deformational event. Unit 9 i s in t e r p r e t e d as the eastern p o r t i o n of a large east to southeasterly trending d a c i t i c lava - dome i n t r u s i o n that extends along B r i t a n n i a Ridge both east and west of the B r i t a n n i a open p i t s ( F i g . 3.1). The da c i t e s on the west s e c t i o n of Br i t a n n i a Ridge, west of the open p i t s and Figure 3.2, were described by McCullough (1968) to be dominantly i n t r u s i v e . Unit 9, within Figure 3.2, contains the v a r i a t i o n s i n textures and structures expected i n an i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e dome complex. Oval bodies associated with/ and rimmed by brecc i a zones and fragments of d a c i t e , are t y p i c a l of phreatomagmatic eruptions caused by magma contacting consolidated but s t i l l wet sediments (Fisher and Schmincke,,1984). The coarser grained P i t dome--lacking flow-banding, v e s i c l e s and a th i c k tuffaceous b r e c c i a - - i s i n t e r p r e t e d as a lower l e v e l i n t r u s i o n . The coarser grained matrix with unbroken phenocrysts i s found i n the slow cooling center of a dome. V i c t o r i a dome f a c i e s containing abundant fragmented p l a g i o c l a s e i n a f i n e to medium-grained matrix with d e v i t r i f i e d glass and fragments of a r g i l l i t e r e f l e c t explosive extrusion. Chemical, t e x t u r a l and s p a t i a l d i s t i n c t i o n between the two members i n d i c a t e that unit 9 might be separable i n t o two u n i t s . Page 53 C r y s t a l l i t h i c tuff,- 'unit j_0, i s a t h i c k , pale, p y r o c l a s t i c rock c h a r a c t e r i z e d by d i s t i n c t i v e green c h l o r i t i c mottles. I t forms a s t r i k i n g l y consistent band 200 to 500 m t h i c k across the e n t i r e length and center of Figure 3.2. The pale, mottled, green and white outcrops are best exposed i n the open p i t s , where they are the most abundant rock type and host to many orebodies. Previous mine and company reports (Hodgson and Burton, 1966) r e f e r r e d to t h i s d i s t i n c t i v e u nit as "GFBx", a green fragmental b r e c c i a , and "GMS", green mottled s c h i s t . V a r i a t i o n s i n colour, proportions of fragments and t h e i r s i z e , composition, and s o r t i n g occur within t h i s d i s t i n c t i v e l y mottled u n i t . Generally, unit 10 dips 40 degrees southwest. In the open p i t s the dip l o c a l l y steepens to 60 degrees. Outcrops weather buff to rusty pale green and white. Fresh surfaces range from a whitish pink to green-blue or grey-green background mottled by darker green c h l o r i t i c fragments. Large outcrops form 5 m high topographic steps with varying colour and grain s i z e . Green c h l o r i t i c mottles commonly weather r e c e s s i v e l y with respect to the more r e s i s t a n t s i l i c e o u s matrix. Unit 10, most often unbedded and unsorted, i s characterized by randomly oriented c l a s t s and c r y s t a l s . Green fragments may be elongated or f l a t t e n e d i n one d i r e c t i o n , which might define a primary f o l i a t i o n normal to h o r i z o n t a l d e p o s i t i o n a l flow. A l t e r e d members or those with more c h l o r i t i c mottles tend to be s l i g h t l y Page 54 schistose with micaceous minerals marking a preferred o r i e n t a t i o n . Near the top, the un i t i s commonly strongly s e r i c i t i z e d or sheared where sulphide m i n e r a l i z a t i o n i s present. Some outcrops can be separated into a coarse lower member that i s g r adational to a f i n e r upper member. The lower t u f f - b r e c c i a i t h i c k l y bedded, framework supported, and poorly sorted; i t contains angular to subangular f e l s i c l i t h i c fragments and minor green fragments. The br e c c i a grades to a l a p i l l i - t u f f with,wispy c h l o r i t i c fragments, grading to an upper c r y s t a l l a p i l l i - t u f f , which i s charac t e r i z e d by wispy feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c c h l o r i t i c fragments i n a feldspar phyric matrix containing l e s s than 10 % l i t h i c fragments. D i s t i n c t i v e , wispy c h l o r i t i c fragments form up to 1 0 % of the rock. They may be angular to subrounded tabular or disc-shaped with d e l i c a t e t a i l s . The fragments range i n s i z e from 0.5 to 10 cm and tend to be equant i n coarser t u f f - b r e c c i a s . The green fragments, t y p i c a l l y hourglass shaped with frayed ends, are composed of aligned muscovite, c h l o r i t e and v a r i a b l e amounts of quartz. They o c c a s i o n a l l y are molded around s i l i c e o u s fragments or c r y s t a l s . The fine-grained mottled and often glassy matrix generally contains 15 %, and may contain up to 30 %, randomly oriented white feldspar c r y s t a l s . In t h i n s e c t i o n , the groundmass i s v a r i a b l y Page 5 5 textured, aphanitic to coarse grained, and streaked due to v a r i a t i o n s i n quartz to mica r a t i o s . D e l i c a t e curved l i n e s and ovals are defined by c h l o r i t e . Broken or bent p l a g i o c l a s e (An-jo_35> c r y s t a l s form c l u s t e r s i n the groundmass. Randomly orie n t e d , unbroken fe l d s p a r c r y s t a l s are replaced by quartz i n subrounded quartz aggregates. The rounded aggregates are separated from each other by micaceous material and are l o c a l l y p o r p h y r i t i c . Subordinate to the c r y s t a l s and green fragments are l i t h i c fragments present from 0 to 10 %. They are dominately white to pale grey, subrounded, and s p h e r i c a l . Rarely these l i t h i c fragments are angular black chert, large v e s i c u l a r blocks, blocks of bedded t u f f , or sulphide fragments. The a l t e r a t i o n of un i t 10, host to many orebodies, may provide a chemical index of a l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d to accompanying sulphide m i n e r a l i z a t i o n . Compared to other f e l s i c v o l c a n i c rocks in- the map i t i s s i g n i f i c a n t l y enriched i n 1^0 and MgO, and depleted i n NaO and CaO (Chapter 4: F i g s . 4.7, 4.5, 4.6, and 4.10). F e l s i c c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f i s a non-welded to p a r t i a l l y welded subaqueous p y r o c l a s t i c flow, r e s u l t i n g from a powerful phreatic eruption r e l a t e d to the d a c i t i c dome complex. The t u f f d i s p l a y s the t y p i c a l lack of s o r t i n g and bedding, and f l a t t e n e d pumice Page 56 fragments i n a c r y s t a l - r i c h glassy matrix of an ignimbrite sheet. The green fragments appear to be fiamme. Undeformed s i l i c e o u s fragments might have been s o l i d at the time of dep o s i t i o n . P e r l i t i c cracks are i n d i c a t i v e of hydration of vol c a n i c glass (Freidman and Smith, 1 958 _in Fisher and Schmincke, 1984). D i f f e r e n t c o o l i n g units may be represented by v a r i a t i o n s ' i n colour, r e s i s t a n c e to weathereing and degrees of compaction. Varying proportions of fragments and c r y s t a l s i n d i c a t e a s e r i e s of separate ash flows with varying compositions. Ash t u f f , a r g i l l i t e and chert, unit 1 1 , i s a t h i n discontinuous sedimentary unit interbedded in,"and o v e r l y i n g , u n i t 10. A r g i l l i t e and chert interbeds i n the mine p i t s ( F i g . 3.2) range i n thickness up to 60 m. P y r i t i c , pale green chert beds thicken to as much as 15 m as concomitant by black a r g i l l i t e t h i n s along s t r i k e . A f i n e t u f f member, up to 200 m thi c k at the top of package 2, o v e r l i e s V i c t o r i a dome and i s exposed at the base of the slope south of Furry Creek ( F i g . 3.2; sec t i o n B-B 1). Black a r g i l l i t e s containing abundant p y r i t e i n the Jane Basin ( F i g . 3.2) are u s u a l l y close to where massive and bedded sulphides were removed from the open p i t s . Unit 11 i s t h i n l y bedded, dips 45 degrees southwest at the western edge of Figure 3.2, and steepens to 78 degrees o v e r l y i n g the d a c i t i c dome. Beds within p y r i t i c a r g i l l i t e are transposed into lenses p a r a l l e l to a nearly v e r t i c a l pervasive f o l i a t i o n . Page 57 Unit 11 represents a,pause i n explosive a c t i v i t y , and a s e t t l i n g of f i n e ash and sediments, between and a f t e r d e p o s i t i o n of unit 10 ash flows. I t represents a basin or period of quiescence within or during which massive sulphides may have accumulated. Q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e ( c h l o r i t e ) s c h i s t , unit 12, p r i m a r i l y a hydrothermally a l t e r e d f e l s i c c r y s t a l l a p i l l i t u f f and sedimentary rock, i s host to a l l developed B r i t a n n i a orebodies. The s c h i s t , best exposed i n the B r i t a n n i a open p i t s , outcrops on Empress Creek and along the Furry Creek v a l l e y at the base of the north - f a c i n g slope on the south side of Furry Creek ( F i g . 3.2). Unit 12 ranges i n thickness from 60 to 300 m, i s rusty weathering, and v a r i e s on f r e s h surface from pale and dark green to a yellowish-grey where i t i s a l t e r e d . The u n i t c o n s i s t s of a v a r i e t y of v a r i a b l y a l t e r e d sediments and tuffaceous rocks equivalent to u n i t s 10 and 11. The major rock type i s an a l t e r e d c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f . A l t e r a t i o n i n the uppermost 100 m of the unit obscures the o r i g i n a l rock type. Quartz veins and gashes are common. L o c a l l y a l t e r a t i o n cuts across l i t h o l o g i c boundaries. Ten major orebodies of various s i z e s were described within a panel of highly a l t e r e d and f i s s i l e rock, up to 450 m t h i c k , that dips approximately 45 degrees southwest (Payne et a_l. , 1 980). Old mine terminology r e f e r r e d to the panel of f i s s i l e rocks as the Page 58 "Britannia Shear Zone". This panel i s generally coincident with units 10, 11 and 12 i n package 2 ( F i g . 3.2: section A-A'). Orebodies extend from an e l e v a t i o n of 1,000 m i n the Jane Basin to the lowest working l e v e l (5,700 foot mining l e v e l ) at 400 m below sea l e v e l . Glory holes from the deposits are aligned along a rusty saddle that cuts from Jane Basin, across B r i t a n n i a Ridge at Empress Creek, to V i c t o r i a p i t i n the Furry Creek v a l l e y ( F i g . 3.2). The orebodies were,crude lenses of semi-massive to massive lay e r s , and .stringer deposits and p y r i t i c sediments, which were compared by Payne et a_l. (1980) to Kuroko - type m i n e r a l i z a t i o n . The general morphology of orebodies described as s t r i n g e r , massive, and bedded by Payne et a_l.(1 980) may be consistent with a' facing to the southwest ( F i g . 3.2: section A-A 1). Sulphide mineralogy in the B r i t a n n i a orebodies was f a i r l y constant, c o n s i s t i n g of p y r i t e , c h a l c o p y r i t e , s p h a l e r i t e , e r r a t i c galena, tennantite, t e t r a h e d r i t e and p y r r h o t i t e . P y r r h b t i t e was confined to high grade copper m i n e r a l i z a t i o n . Gold occurred i n scattered narrow veins and " l a t e " high grade quartz v e i n l e t s . Quartz and quartz-pyrite veins increase in number toward orebodies. Non-metallic minerals include: muscovite, c h l o r i t e , anhydrite and b a r i t e (Payne e_t a_l. , 1 9 8 0 ) . Unit 12 represents a l i n e a r , semi-conformable zone of hydrothermal a l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d to volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits. Sulphides are believed to be mainly exhalites deposited Page 59 by hydrothermal s o l u t i o n s r e l a t e d to f e l s i c volcanism at several s p e c i f i c horizons i n a complex volcanosedimentary p i l e . Mapping revealed several horizons of mineralized chert--at l e a s t f i v e w ithin package 2. Orebodies represent a s e r i e s of stacked lenses from productive hydrothermal centers l o c a l i z e d along a l i n e a r zone marked now by the a l t e r e d rock of unit 12. Deformation p r e f e r e n t i a l l y a f f e c t e d hydrothermally a l t e r e d rock producing highly schistose rocks between competent v o l c a n i c blocks. 3.3.3 Summary, Package 2 'Five u n i t s i n package 2 form a panel of rock 170 to 850 m thick c o n s i s t i n g of a c e n t r a l d a c i t e dome complex and a western b a s i n a l f a c i e s ; both are covered by a blanket of f e l s i c c r y s t a l t u f f , t u f f , and minor a r g i l l i t e and chert that v a r i e s i n thickness from 150 to 700 m. Generally, package 2 faces and dips 45 degrees southwest. Within the l e s s competent a r g i l l a c e o u s and p y r o c l a s t i c u n i t s , p a r t i c u l a r l y on the flanks of massive domes, dips may steepen to 70 degrees southwest. Loading and grading i n f e l s i c t u r b i d i t e beds i n a r g i l l i t e , p y r o c l a s t i c s and breccias i n d i c a t e tops are to the southwest. Vergence i n minor f o l d s also i s consistent with t h i s f a c i n g . A l l of package 2 appears to be r i g h t side up and fac i n g southwest. B r i t a n n i a orebodies, contained within seventeen d i s t i n c t mining lenses, are hosted by a v a r i e t y of tuffaceous or Page 60 sedimentary rocks v a r i a b l y a l t e r e d to q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e ( c h l o r i t e ) s c h i s t . .Sulphides occur as c h a l c o p y r i t e - p y r i t e massive and s t r i n g e r "ore", and as bedded z i n c - b a r i t e "ore" (Payne et a l . , 1980). Crude r e c o n s t r u c t i o n , from o l d mine sections and Payne et a l . (1980), of zoned sulphide orebody morphology ( s t r i n g e r , to massive and bedded) supports the proposed southwest f a c i n g f o r the v o l c a n i c s u i t e ( F i g . 3.2; s e c t i o n A-A 1). Package 2 i s composed of the most a l t e r e d rocks i n the map area. A l t e r e d feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c v o l c a n i c rocks range i n composition from andesite to rhyodacite (Chapter 4). The rocks are enriched i n MgO and K2O and depleted i n CaO compared to normal subalkaline rocks. Rb-Sr values from samples i n Package 2 define an isochron with a J u r a s s i c to E a r l y Cretaceous age of 163 +_ 54 Ma (Chapter 5: Table 5.3). K-Ar data (Chapter 5) from four samples provide an average date of 81.4 + 3 Ma that represents e i t h e r r e s e t t i n g by an i n t r u s i o n r e l a t e d to the Coast Range, or a l a t e r , deformational event responsible f o r the B r i t a n n i a Shear Zone. 3.3.4 Contact between Packages 1 and 2 The contact between package 1 and package 2 s t r i k e s northwest across the upper t h i r d of Figure 3.2, and dips less than 45 degrees southwest.- On the surface i t i s marked by massive to Page 61 t h i n l y bedded chert and chert breccia including sulphide disseminations and fragments. This contact marks the upper l i m i t of mafic flows i n the B r i t a n n i a Ridge stratigraphy. At depth, p r o j e c t i o n of the contact i n t e r s e c t s the bottom of the #8 orebody (located east of Figure 3.2) and the West V i c t o r i a orebodies ( F i g . 3.2: section A-A'), and may coincide with the Furry and Robinson prospects beneath overburden i n the Furry Creek v a l l e y . Basalt i s shown as the footwall to deposits on the old mine sections. It therefore might be s i g n i f i c a n t that sulphides are present on the surface i n several outcrops along t h i s contact. The contact between packages 1 and'2 changes from apparently conformable i n the northwest, to a nonconformable i n t r u s i v e contact in the c e n t r a l map area/ to an erosional angular unconformity east of the Cyrtina Creek f a u l t . The change in character from submarine deposition i n the northwest to possibly subaerial erosion i n the southeast r e f l e c t s changes i n f a c i e s r e l a t e d to the f e l s i c dome complexes. From west to east ( F i g . 3.2) the contacts separates units 8 and 7, 8 and 6, 9 and 7,- 10 and 7, 10 and 6, and 10 and 2. A complex volcanic environment and the t r a n s i t i o n from a submarine to a subaerial environment across the length of the map provides one explanation for the missing units and the onlapping r e l a t i o n s h i p of package 2 with package 1. The deposition of units 7 and 8 east of the Cyrtina Creek f a u l t was prevented by r h y o l i t e domes of p o s i t i v e r e l i e f which created a b a r r i e r to the submarine flows. Page 62 A conformable contact r e l a t i o n s h i p between the two packages e x i s t s i n the northwestern corner of Figure 3.2 (section A-A 1). Here, the contact separates a l t e r e d pillowed b a s a l t flows (unit 7) and submarine ash flows (unit 6) of package 1 from black a r g i l l i t e (unit 8) of package 2. At 880 m e l e v a t i o n on the Glory Hole road, a s i l i c i f i e d b a s a l t flow with p i l l o w s surrounded by rusty chert and sulphide fragments i s o v e r l a i n by black a r g i l l i t e , with a steep f o l i a t i o n , along an i r r e g u l a r surface dipping 30 degrees southwest. Five hundred meters southeast along the contact, a r g i l l i t e o v e r l i e s the doubly graded mafic t u f f - b r e c c i a (unit 6) that faces and dips 20 degrees to the southwest. T u r b i d i t e beds within a r g i l l i t e (unit 8) are composed of f e l s i c fragments s i m i l a r to those i n u n i t 6. The t u r b i d i t e interbeds dip 45 degrees southwest and are c h a r a c t e r i z e d by e x c e l l e n t grading, rounded load cast bottoms, and f l a t tops p a r a l l e l to the package contact. On the basis of p a r a l l e l bedding, consistent f a c i n g to the southwest, and the s i m i l a r and gradational character of the p y r o c l a s t i c units i n both packages, the contact, here, i s considered conformable within a submarine d e p o s i t i o n a l sequence. West of the Cyrtina s e c t i o n ( F i g . 3.2: s e c t i o n B-B 1), the contact between packages 1 and 2 i s i n t e r p r e t e d as i n t r u s i v e . Dacite b r e c c i a (unit 9) outcrops south of a l t e r e d and bleached mafic flows (unit 7) along the southern slope of B r i t a n n i a Ridge and at 1,300 m e l e v a t i o n on the ridge. Dacite b r e c c i a fragments include angular blocks of feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c andesite (units 2 P a g e 63 a n d / o r 7 ) , d a c i t e , p u m i c e , b e d d e d c h e r t y t u f f s ( u n i t 5 ) a n g u l a r q u a r t z a n d s u l p h i d e l a p i l l i , a n d f e l d s p a r c r y s t a l s ; t h e s i l i c e o u s f i n e - g r a i n e d m a t r i x c o n t a i n s d i s s e m i n a t e d s u l p h i d e s . A n g u l a r b l o c k s o f a n d e s i t e a n d f r a g m e n t s f r o m t h e u n i t s o f p a c k a g e 1 s u p p o r t t h e i n t r u s i v e n a t u r e o f t h e c o n t a c t a n d t h e o v e r l y i n g p o s i t i o n o f p a c k a g e 2 a n d t h e s o u t h w e s t f a c i n g f o r t h e t w o p a c k a g e s . P a c k a g e 1 i s s e p a r a t e d f r o m p a c k a g e 2 b y a n a n g u l a r u n c o n f o r m i t y e a s t o f t h e C y r t i n a C r e e k f a u l t . R h y o l i t e , b r e c c i a , a n d f e l s i c t u f f s ( u n i t s 3 , 4 a n d 5 ) , a n d m a f i c f l o w s a n d e p i c l a s t i c b r e c c i a s ( u n i t s 2 a n d 6 ) o f p a c k a g e 1 u n d e r l i e c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f ( u n i t 1 0 ) o f p a c k a g e 2 . B e l o w t h e c o n t a c t , b e d s i n u n i t 5 , o v e r l y i n g C y r t i n a d o m e , s t r i k e a l m o s t n o r t h - s o u t h a n d d i p 25 d e g r e e s w e s t w i t h e x c e l l e n t g r a d i n g i n d i c a t i n g t o p s a r e t o t h e s o u t h w e s t . E p i c l a s t i c b r e c c i a s o f u n i t 6 t h a t c u t a n d s c o u r u n i t 5 s t r i k e e a s t - w e s t a n d d i p s o u t h . U n i t 10 i n t e r p r e t e d a s a s u b a q u e o u s p y r o c l a s t i c f l o w , b l a n k e t s t h e u n d e r l y i n g u n i t s o f p a c k a g e 1 a n d s t r i k e s n o r t h w e s t - s o u t h e a s t w i t h d i p s a b o u t 35 d e g r e e s s o u t h t o s o u t h w e s t . T h e c o n t a c t a t t h i s p o i n t i s i n t e r p r e t e d a s a n e r o s i o n a l s u r f a c e . S u l p h i d e m i n e r a l i z a t i o n a c c o m p a n y i n g q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t i s p r e s e n t a t s e v e r a l p l a c e s a l o n g t h e c o n t a c t ( F i g . 3 . 2 : s e c t i o n s C - C ' a n d D - D 1 ) . Page 64 3.4 PACKAGE 3, "HANGINGWALL" SEQUENCE 3.4.1 Introduction Package 3 i s cha r a c t e r i z e d by f e l s i c massive and ash flows o v e r l a i n by t h i c k sedimentary u n i t s and mafic i n t r u s i o n s . Package 3 i s the l e a s t a l t e r e d and most poorly defined of a l l three sequences. I t covers the bottom t h i r d of Figure 3.2, outcropping on the "hangingwall s l i d e " i n the Jane Basin ( F i g . A.1), and on the steeply-dipping north-facing slope of Downing Ridge along the Furry Creek v a l l e y , east to the Vancouver Watershed boundary. The lower contact i s placed somewhat a r b i t r a r i l y above the q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t (unit 12), separating " a l t e r e d " units of package 2 from " f r e s h " units of package 3. The upper contact i s undefined, and l i e s beyond the map to the south. Six u n i t s , forming a combined thickness of over 800 m, make up the hangingwall sequence. Units dip shallowly 20 to 45 degrees southwest, and face c o n s i s t e n t l y southwest. Mapping was concentrated within the lower 200 m of the package, focusing on the f e l s i c flow units exposed i n the open p i t s and at the Watershed boundary. Upper u n i t s are poorly defined. Access generally i s d i f f i c u l t , e s p e c i a l l y at poor exposures on the nearly v e r t i c a l north face of Downing Ridge ( F i g . 3.2). Page 6 5 . 3.4.2 U n i t D e s c r i p t i o n s C r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f , u n i t 13, i s a m o t t l e d green and white t u f f a c e o u s u n i t l a r g e l y i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e from u n i t 10 i n package 2. I t i s separated from u n i t 10 by a l t e r e d q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t and f i n e t o t h i c k l y bedded t u f f s and a r g i l l i t e s . U n i t 13 v a r i e s i n t h i c k n e s s up t o 150 m and outcrops above a f a u l t on the hanging w a l l i n the F a i r v i e w open p i t ( F i g . 3.2: s e c t i o n A-A'), on the s o u t h e a s t e r n edge of the #5 and Empress g l o r y h o l e s , a t the base of the n o r t h f a c e of Downing, Ridge, and below and above r h y o l i t e ash flows south of F u r r y Creek a t the e a s t e r n edge of F i g u r e 3.2 ( s e c t i o n D-D'). C r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f i s g r a d a t i o n a l t o u n i t 14 and i s b e l i e v e d to be a b l o c k y , unwelded f a c i e s of t h a t u n i t . Outcrops of u n i t 13, weather white and are p a l e green on f r e s h s u r f a c e . They are' c h a r a c t e r i z e d by d i s t i n c t i v e dark green fiamme. The u n i t i s . l a r g e l y unbedded and u n s o r t e d . R a r e l y i t i s g r a d a t i o n a l from t u f f - b r e c c i a a t the base to a f i n e r l a p i l l i - tu near the top; Minor i n t e r b e d s of t u f f and a r g i l l i t e o c c u r . Samples from u n i t 13 are r e l a t i v e l y f r e s h and u n a l t e r e d a lthough s i m i l a r to u n i t 10 i n o u tcrop appearance. In c o n t r a s t to u n i t 10, a n a l y s e s from u n i t 13 p l o t w i t h i n the normal s u b a l k a l i n e domain f o r K 2 0 , N a 2 0 , CaO and MgO ( C h a p ter. 4 : F i g s . 4 . 4 , 4 . 5 , 4 . 6 and 4 . 7 ) . Page 66 Feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c rhyodacite, unit 14, forms shallow -dipping r e s i s t a n t creamy white outcrops at the eastern and -western edges of Figure 3.2, on the hangingwall i n the open p i t s , and i n , an area south of Furry Creek at the Watershed boundary. Unit 14 i s characterized by massive centers intimately i n t e r c a l a t e d and surrounded by p o r p h y r i t i c and pumiceous breccias. I t ranges i n thickness from 100 to 500 m. L o c a l l y a d i s t i n c t i v e , green and white layered member forms the top of unit 14. Minor black a r g i l l i t e , and interbedded t u f f and chert occur within t h i s u n i t . Massive f e l s i c flows, up to 75 m th i c k , outcrop at the eastern edge of Figure 3.2. The flows dip 20 degrees and face southwest. These flows are flow-banded (10 mm), v e s i c u l a r and s p h e r u l i t i c . The bases of the flows are characterized by flow-breccia and v e s i c l e s are concentrated at the tops of flows. C h l o r i t e l o c a l l y o u t l i n e s minor f o l i a t i o n and s p h e r u l i t e s . Fine-grained pale green fragments, 2 to 10 cm across, make up 5 % of the u n i t . D i s t i n c t i v e green and white layers on average 5 cm thick, at the top of the uni t , have a l t e r a t i o n textures (rods and c i r c l e s ) that might represent d e v i t r i f i c a t i o n of a welded unit or flow. Thin sections reveal 10 to 15 % plagioclase phenocrysts and amygdules with c h l o r i t e centers surrounded by quartz are s l i g h t l y elongated. The plag i o c l a s e c r y s t a l s are s a u s s e r i t i z e d , and are replaced by fine-grained c h l o r i t e , s e r i c i t e and epidote. Quartz f i l l s f ractures and forms amygdules. The phenocrysts and Page 67 amygdules form a preferred o r i e n t a t i o n , probably p a r a l l e l to d e p o s i t i o n a l flow. P y r o c l a s t i c breccias containing pumice blocks, on average 6 cm and up to 16 cm long, surround the massive f e l s i c flows. Pale green and white fi n e - g r a i n e d l a p i l l i , c h l o r i t i c fiamme and sulphide l a p i l l i occur within a fel d s p a r p o r p h y r i t i c t u f f matrix. Unit 14 forms a more homogeneous feldspar porphyry 200 m t h i c k i n the open p i t s , at the western edge of Figure 3.2. The top of the u n i t has d i s t i n c t i v e green and white l a y e r s ; i t i s separated from the massive porphyry by 100 m of f i n e l y bedded t u f f and a r g i l l i t e . The layers are p a r a l l e l to bedding i n the sedimentary u n i t , which dips 23 degrees southwest. Tops are to the southwest based on e x c e l l e n t examples of grading and loading i n the f i n e r grained t u f f s and a r g i l l i t e s . Samples from unit 14 p l o t as unaltered c a l c - a l k a l i n e d a c i t e to r h y o l i t e i n compoaition (Chapter 4). S l i g h t Na 20 and MgO enrichment compared to normal subalkaline r h y o l i t e , i s demonstrated by samples 609 and 185 (Figs. 4.5, and 4.7). Unit 14 i s t h i c k e r , l e s s extensive and more massive than unit 13, but i s s i m i l a r i n composition; i t i s gradational to i t i n the more fragmental members at the margins and base. Unit 14 contains more c h l o r i t e from d e v i t r i f i c a t i o n and a l t e r a t i o n along f r a c t u r e s . Page 68 U n i t 14 r e p r e s e n t s a sequence o f m a s s i v e t o p o s s i b l y w e l ded subaqueous f e l s i c a sh f l o w s . The f l o w s a r e r e c r y s t a l l i z e d and g l a s s has a l t e r e d t o c h l o r i t e and q u a r t z . The m a r g i n s , g r a d a t i o n a l t o f r a g m e n t a l members, a r e t h e r e s u l t o f e x p l o s i o n s where t h e p y r o c l a s t i c f l o w s have h i t w a t e r ( F i s h e r and Schmincke, 1 9 8 4 ) . N a - e n r i c h m e n t may be due t o soda - metasomatism ( D i c k i n s o n , 1 9 6 2 ) . U n i t 13 r e p r e s e n t s t h e unwelded base and ma r g i n s o f m a s s i v e f l o w s . I n t e r b e d d e d a r g i l l i t e and t u f f w i t h i n u n i t 14 i n d i c a t e t h e welded p y r o c l a s t i c f l o w d e p o s i t i s subaqueous. Ash t u f f and a r g i l l i t e , u n i t 1 5 , w e a t h e r s r u s t y g r e y t o b l a c k , and i s i n t e r b e d d e d w i t h i n , o r o v e r l i e s , u n i t s 13 and 1 4 . U n i t 15 c o n t a i n s m inor i n t e r b e d s o f c h e r t , s i l i c e o u s t u f f , c r y s t a l t u f f , g r e ywacke, and c o a r s e r beds w i t h a c c r e t i o n a r y l a p i l l i and c h e r t f r a g m e n t s . The f i n e l y bedded t o l a m i n a t e d u n i t r a n g e s i n t h i c k n e s s from 25 t o 100 m. Beds d i p 20 t o 47 d e g r e e s s o u t h w e s t , w i t h g r a d i n g i n d i c a t i n g t o p s t o t h e s o u t h w e s t . B l a c k , f i n e l y bedded a r g i l l i t e i s f o l i a t e d , s i l i c e o u s and c o n t a i n s o c c a s i o n a l t u f f a c e q u s i n t e r b e d s . L a p i l l i - t u f f c o n t a i n s c l o s e l y - packed c h e r t y and w h i t e l a p i l l i . Green c h l o r i t i c t u f f c o n t a i n s f i n e - g r a i n e d f e l s i c beds o r o c c a s i o n a l b l o c k s o f subrounded t o s u b a n g u l a r r h y o l i t e . U n i t 15 r e p r e s e n t s a p a u s e a n d t h e f i n a l s e t t l i n g o f f e l s i c Page 69 t u f f a f t e r f e l s i c volcanism. I t r e f l e c t s shallow submarine deposi t i o n between r h y o l i t e flows at the edges of Figure 3.2. A r g i l l i t e , u n i t 16, i s a monotonous sequence over 400 m t h i c k that covers the bottom of Figure 3.2. I t outcrops i n several l o c a t i o n s over the map area: (1) on B r i t a n n i a Ridge west of Jane Basin, (2) i n the Furry Creek r i v e r bed, and (3) along much of Downing Ridge. The a r g i l l i t e weathers rus t y grey to black, i s f i n e - g r a i n e d and purple-black. I t contains minor interbeds of a r g i l l a c e o u s s i l t s t o n e , and pale grey t u f f beds 1 to 5 m t h i c k with fragments up to l a p i l l i s i z e that include occasional pumice. Disseminated p y r i t e i s r a r e l y present. The u n i t i s f i n e l y bedded and dips generally 33 degrees southwest. A strong, pervasive, northwest-striking f o l i a t i o n i s present. This nearly v e r t i c a l f o l i a t i o n dips northeast and forms the s l i p plane f o r the hangingwall s l i d e ( F i g . A.1) and the disasterous Jane S l i d e of the e a r l y ninteen hundred's. Large blocks of i n t r u s i v e d a c i t e s i t p r e c a r i o u s l y on t h i s steep north-dipping plane above the open p i t s ( F i g . 3.2: section A-A'). Unit 16 represents quiet submarine deposition across the e n t i r e length of the map, marking a hiatus i n v o l c a n i c a c t i v i t y and the disappearance of an area of p o s i t i v e r e l i e f i n the eastern Page 70 map area. Andesite t u f f - breccia, unit 17, consists of dark green weathering outcrops at the western end of Figure 3.2, west of Furry Creek. This unit of unknown thickness, i s massive and contains 5 % feldspar phenocrysts i n a tuffaceous matrix. Minor d a c i t i c l a p i l l i - t u f f interbeds are present. C h l o r i t e and epidote a l t e r a t i o n commonly occurs. The unit was not c l o s e l y examined, but i s believed to represent a period of mafic volcanism following the f e l s i c a c t i v i t y which dominated, most of the map area. 3.4.3 Summary, Package 3 The uppermost s t r a t i g r a p h i c package in Figure 3.2, consists of at least 800 m of shallowly dipping f e l s i c flows, welded ash t u f f s , breccias and sedimentary rocks, overlain and intruded by andesite. - The flows, l o c a l i z e d at the edges of the map, are gradational to c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f , and overlain by thick sedimentary units of f e l s i c t u f f and black a r g i l l i t e . Units in package 3 consistently dip shallowly southwest. Gradations in unit 13, and excellent grading and loading in unit 15, indicate tops are to the southwest. Basal breccias and vesicular tops in the r h y o l i t e flows of unit 14 support t h i s facing. Disseminated sulphides occur within unit 13, unit 15, and in the fragmental al t e r e d margins f e l s i c t u f f s of unit 14. of Page 71 Quartz veins c u t t i n g u n i t s at the base of package 3 contain v i s i b l e disseminated sulphides and y i e l d high Au values. On the west se c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, the Daisy showing occurs within rocks considered part of package 3 within t h i s s t r a t i g r a p h i c c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . Although package 3 lacks the extensive a l t e r e d and tuffaceous rocks that host the B r i t a n n i a orebodies i n package 2, s i m i l a r l i t h o l o g i e s and a l t e r a t i o n may i ndicate'favourable p o t e n t i a l f o r s i m i l a r massive sulphide deposits.. Units i n package 3 are r e l a t i v e l y unaltered--unlike most units of packages 1 and 2. Values from samples i n package 3 f a l l within the unaltered normal subalkaline domain f o r c a l c - a l k a l i n e d a c i t e to r h y o l i t e (Chapter 4). Na 20 values from the f e l s i c flows are higher than values f o r normal subalkaline rocks. Package 3, i n t e r p r e t e d to o v e r l i e the upper u n i t s of package 2, i s the youngest sequence i n the map area. The one Rb-Sr data point (Chapter 5: Table 5.2) f o r package 3 does not define an age. 3.4.4 Contact between Packages 2 and 3 The contact between package 2 and package 3 s t r i k e s northwest to southeast and dips 45 degrees southwest, p a r a l l e l to bedding. I t i s located above a discontinuous horizon of q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t (unit 12), marking the upper l i m i t of major a l t e r a t i o n that accompanies sulphide m i n e r a l i z a t i o n of the B r i t a n n i a orebodies. Page 72 The contact separates " a l t e r e d " rocks of package 2 from the r e l a t i v e l y " f r e s h " , but l i t h o l o g i c a l l y s i m i l a r u n i t s of package 3. The contact i s poorly defined across the map area and may coincide with, or be o f f s e t by, f a u l t s of unknown movement. At the surface, the contact between packages 2 and 3 i n t e r s e c t s the top of the developed Fairview Zinc and Empress orebodies, the Fairwest workings and the Watershed showing ( F i g . 3.2). The contact between " a l t e r e d " and " f r e s h " rocks of the two packages i s d i s t i n c t l y v i s i b l e on the walls of open p i t s i n the Jane Basin, and cuts across B r i t a n n i a Ridge j u s t south of the rusty saddle of exposed p i t s down Empress Creek ( F i g . 3.2). On the B r i t a n n i a s e c t i o n (Figure 3.2: s e c t i o n A-A') massive white feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c r h y o l i t e (unit 14) i s separated from the Fairview Zinc bedded massive sulphides and black a r g i l l i t e by a f a u l t zone marked by mylonitized c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f , q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t , and basa l t dykes that were intruded p a r a l l e l to the f o l i a t i o n . A prominent f a u l t i n the Jane Basin ( F i g . 3.2), which i s generally coincident with the contact between packages 2 and 3, l o c a l l y cuts u n i t s 13 and 14. Massive white outcrops of feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c , s p h e r u l i t i c r h y o l i t e (unit 14) of package 3 outcrop i n sharp contact above sheared rusty rocks of package 2 on: (1) the northwestern wall of the Jane open p i t , (2) the southwestern wall of the Fairview Zinc p i t , and (3) the southern wall of the Page 7 3 Fairview p i t above the Gordon Gallup hole. Below the p r o j e c t i o n of t h i s f a u l t , u n it 14 conformably o v e r l i e s interbedded a r g i l l i t e and chert, which host massive and disseminated sulphides dipping 45 degrees southwest on the southwestern wall of the B l u f f glory hole. The contact southeast the Jane Basin i s projected across the southern wall of the East Fairview open p i t and down the south-facing slope of B r i t a n n i a Ridge southwest of the #5 and Empress g l o r y holes. I t separates q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t and rusty c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f with green mottles (unit 10) from the o v e r l y i n g , l i t h o l o g i c a l l y s i m i l a r , but white weathering u n i t 13. Complex s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s i n the map area are well exposed i n the open p i t s . Complications r e s u l t from: (1 severe a l t e r a t i o n of u n i t s to q u a f t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t , sometimes across unit contacts, (2) transformation of bedding i n fin e - g r a i n e d rocks by steeply dipping pervasive f o l i a t i o n , (3) numerous f a u l t s of unknown movement that may coincide with or o f f s e t the contact between packages 2 and 3, and (4) i n t r u s i o n of l a t e r d a c i t e and andesite dykes into the a l t e r e d deformed f a u l t zone. Along the Furry Creek v a l l e y , on the poorly exposed north-fac of Downing Ridge ( F i g . 3.2), the contact between the packages i s placed somewhat a r b i t r a r i l y above outcrops of q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e Page 74 s c h i s t . The contact runs p a r a l l e l to, and south of, Furry Creek along the v a l l e y . The s t r a t i g r a p h y on the poorly exposed, i n a c c e s s i b l e steep slope i s l a r g e l y unknown and has been o f f s e t by numerous north to northeast-trending f a u l t s . The contact outcrops: (1) at the western end of the Downing Ridge, (2) 1.1 km east along the Ridge, and (3) above the Fairwest workings south of the confluence of C y r t i n a Creek and Furry Creek. East of Fairwest ( F i g . 3.2) the contact i s d i s p l a c e d by f a u l t s i n t o the Furry Creek v a l l e y and outcrops again on the road at the Vancouver Watershed boundary at the eastern margin of the map. At the Watershed boundary, the contact between packages 2 and 3 separates f e l s i c c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f (unit 10) that i s shallow-dipping to the southwest, from a l i t h o l o g i c a l l y s i m i l a r but more massive, and perhaps welded unit that has a s i m i l a r o r i e n t a t i o n and facing (unit 14). The contact i s marked by s e r i c i t i z e d , sheared outcrops with sulphides occurring i n quartz veins and as minor disseminations. The contact between packages 2 and 3 i s an a l t e r e d horizon within a conformable sequence of f e l s i c p y r o c l a s t i c rocks younging to the southwest. L i t h o l o g i c a l s i m i l a r i t i e s between the packages, the gradational nature of units from l a r g e l y p y r o c l a s t i c i n package 2 to sedimentary i n package 3, and the consistent s t i k e , dip and facing of units across t h i s contact, support t h i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . Units 10 and 13 are v i r t u a l l y Page 7 5 i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e — separated only by discontinuous horizons of q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t . " A l t e r e d " and " f r e s h " rocks may not be a v a l i d major d i v i s i o n because, several a l t e r e d horizons e x i s t within the B r i t a n n i a Ridge st r a t i g r a p h y . Poor exposure and s t u c t u r a T complexities make i t d i f f i c u l t to c o n f i d e n t l y p r o j e c t t h i s d i v i s i o n at the same s t r a t i g r a p h i c l e v e l across the e n t i r e map. The contact does mark an upper l i m i t of major a l t e r a t i o n associated the B r i t a n n i a orebodies. Smaller l o c a l i z e d exposures of s i m i l a r a l t e r a t i o n with accompanying sulphide m i n e r a l i z a t i o n of unknown economic p o t e n t i a l do occur s t r a t i g r a p h i c a l l y higher i n package 3 within s i m i l a r but les s extensive p y r o c l a s t i c u n i t s . 3.5 INTRUSIVE ROCKS 3.5.1 Introduction Numerous r e l a t i v e l y fresh dykes and i n t r u s i o n s cut a l t e r e d s t r a t i f i e d rocks of the three packages i n Figure 3.2. The l a r g e s t dykes and i n t r u s i v e bodies of d a c i t i c (unit 18) and a n d e s i t i c (unit 19) composition have been included on Figure 3.2. Numerous dykes, less s i g n i f i c a n t i n s i z e , but common across the map area, are included on Figure A.1. Large unaltered d a c i t i c dykes and s i l l s (unit 18) are most evident i n the Jane Basin open p i t s ( F i g . Page 76 3.2). R e l a t i v e l y f r e s h a n d e s i t i c dykes and s i l l s (unit 19) are commonly traceable f o r more than 100 m. I n t r u s i v e bodies, 200 to 800 m i n length, of d i o r i t i c , a n d e s i t i c (unit 19) and d a c i t i c (unit 18) compositions that outcrop i n the southwestern corner of Figure 3.2 within package 3 were not examined c l o s e l y . More d e t a i l e d mapping i s required to resolve complicated intrusive-and ext r u s i v e r e l a t i o n s h i p s that e x i s t . The genetic r e l a t i o n s h i p of these i n t r u s i o n s with the v o l c a n i c s u i t e and the plutons i s unknown. Coarse-grained plutons of the Coast Mountain P l u t o n i c Complex completely surround the s t r a t i f i e d rocks of the three packages. The Mountain Lake pluton occupies most of the northeastern corner of Figure 3.2. Furry pluton intrudes B r i t a n n i a pendant rocks to the south and i s present along the southeastern edge of the map. I n t r u s i v e contacts i n the southern part of Figure 3.2 have l a r g e l y been taken from maps i n o l d company reports ( B r i t a n n i a Research Labs, Progress Reports, 1 96'4 to 1.971; Jennings and Payne, 1 974). Lamprophyre dykes up to 1 m wide are probably r e l a t e d to Pleistocene G a r i b a l d i v o l c a n i c s . The dykes have an i r r e g u l a r northwesterly trend and intrude l a t e f a u l t s . Dykes l o c a l l y incorporate coarse-grained p l u t o n i c fragments. These small dykes have not been included on Figure 3.2. Page 77 3.5.2 Dykes and Intrusions Rhyolite dykes, quartz and feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c , 25 to 50 m wide cut the r h y o l i t e lava dome and f e l s i c units at the top of package•1. The pink to buff dykes weather pale pink to white. Euhedral quartz phenocrysts (< 10 %) with d e v i t i f i e d centers and broken, s l i g h t l y a l t e r e d feldspar phenocrysts (up to 25 %) occur i n a m i c r o g r a n u l i t i c groundmass with r e l i c t s p h e r u l i t i c s t r u c t u r e s . Samples from t h e s e - r h y o l i t e dykes p l o t as normal unaltered subalkaline rocks with both Fe-poor and Fe-enrichrnent trends (Chapter 4). Feldspar p o r p h y r i t i c d a c i t e , unit 1 8, occurs in large bodies across much of the southwestern map area, at the top of package 3. In the open p i t s unit 18 forms c r o s s c u t t i n g dykes intruded into a p r e - e x i s t i n g f a u l t zone. These c r o s s c u t t i n g dykes might represent synvolcanic, r a d i a l dyke swarms. Along Downing Ridge the dacite i s associated with a n d e s i t i c i n t r u s i v e s (unit 19) and may represent dome complexes s i m i l a r to unit 9; here, more d e t a i l e d mapping i s required to d i s t i n g u i s h extrusive phases from fragmental margins of i n t r u s i v e bodies. Green and white weathering dacite i s massive, f i n e to medium grained and contains up to 30 % feldspar phenocrysts. The unit i s d i s t i n c t l y unaltered compared to dacites of unit 9. The r e l a t i v e l y fresh character of the mine dykes indicates i n t r u s i o n took place. Page 78 a f t e r a l t e r a t i o n associated with m i n e r a l i z a t i o n and deformation. Unit 18 samples from the "mine dykes" i n the Jane Basin ( F i g . 3.2) plot within the unaltered domain for c a l c - a l k a l i n e r h y o l i t e and o u t l i n e an o r i g i n a l c a l c i c magmatic trend with a medium K 20 content (Chapter 4). Compared to t y p i c a l Cascade r h y o l i t e s the dykes are CaO-rich and K 20-poor. Compared to t y p i c a l dacites they are r i c h i n SiC>2 and low i n A l 2 0 and K 20 (Chapter 4). Andesite and D i o r i t e , unit 19, forms c r o s s c u t t i n g dykes within packages 1 and 2, and large coarser grained i n t r u s i v e bodies c u t t i n g package 3 on Downing Ridge ( F i g . 3.2). Green, massive, f i n e - to medium-grained andesite dykes weather dark greenish brown. Dykes have sharp contacts and are exposed with widths from 10 to 50 m and lengths from 200 to 500 m. They occur along the length of Figure 3.2, most commonly associated with mineralized massive f e l s i c volcanics and minor r h y o l i t e dykes. Plagioclase phenocrysts form 20 % of the rock, are randomly oriented, and are commonly s a u s s e r i t i z e d . C h l o r i t e and epidote are present up to 5 % each. R e l a t i v e l y unaltered andesite i n t r u s i v e s define a c a l c i c magmatic trend, and plot within Miyashiro 1s'(1974) t h o l e i i t i c domain (Chapter 4). Chemically they are s i m i l a r to normal subalkaline rock compositions with low K 20 content. Samples o u t l i n e an Fe-rich trend of iron enrichment. Page 79 D i o r i t e bodies, f i n e - to medium-grained on Downing Ridge form large c l i f f s that are speckled green and white i n colour, and weather buff to pale green. Large broken p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts (up to 20 %) and b i o t i t e (up to 15 %) occur i n a groundmass with quartz, c h l o r i t e and epidote. These d i o r i t i c bodies contain v a r i a b l e amounts of quartz and p l o t within the unaltered domain for c a l c - a l k a l i n e andesite to d a c i t e (Chapter 4). Chemically they have a normal subalkaline composition with medium K 20 content. They follow an Fe-poor Cascade trend of i r o n enrichment. Unit 19 c o n s i s t s of r e l a t i v e l y unaltered dykes, compared to the a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c s they cut. The coarser grained member of Unit 19 i n package 3 i s a plug, p o s s i b l y r e l a t e d to the Furry g r a n o d i o r i t e pluton. This unit represents a l a t e r mafic F e - r i c h i n t r u s i v e event, which s i g n a l l e d a change i n the character of the B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e . 3.5.3 I n t r u s i v e Rocks of the Coast Plutonic Complex Granodiorite, quartz d i o r i t e , u n it 20, forms large p l u t o n i c bodies that enclose v o l c a n i c and sedimentary rocks of the map area to the north and south ( F i g . 3.2). The Coast Range p l u t o n i c complex c o n s i s t s of commonly f o l i a t e d bodies ranging from d i o r i t e to g r a n o d i o r i t e , and massive bodies ranging from quartz d i o r i t e to quartz monzonite (Payne et a_l. , 1 980). The Mountain Lake pluton, r e l a t e d to the Squamish i n t r u s i o n s , covers the northeast corner of Page 80 Figure 3.2, outcropping above t r e e l i n e as massive pale-coloured ridge tops. Furry pluton, a f o l i a t e d body occupies Downing Ridge, south of the map area. Contact metamorphic aureoles, containing b i o t i t e are up to several hundred meters wide; they are superimposed on the v o l c a n i c and sedimentary rocks of the B r i t a n n i a pendant (McCullough, 1968). Mountain Lake pluton weathers grey-green to pale grey, i s massive, coarse to medium-grained, and contains b i o t i t e , hornblende and p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts. A minor f o l i a t i o n p a r a l l e l s the o u t l i n e of the pendant. Finer grained d i o r i t e forms a margin, up to 50 m t h i c k , along the contact with package 1. The g r a n o d i o r i t e i s cut by numerous coarse grained g r a n i t i c dykes. Page 81 4. WHOLE ROCK GEOCHEMISTRY 4.1 INTRODUCTION Whole rock analyses from the fr e s h e s t , most massive u n i t s i n Figure 3.2 were used to c l a s s i f y major rock types and the magmatic su i t e on the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. Hand specimans and t h i n sections were used to s e l e c t the freshest samples from a su i t e of 410 rock chip samples taken from the map area ( F i g . A.1). Analyses from 38 samples, r e c a l c u l a t e d v o l a t i l e - f r e e , are tabulated i n Table 4.1 and are used i n p l o t s i n t h i s chapter. Not a l l units i n the map area are represented i n t h i s chemical c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . Chemical analyses of the e n t i r e s u i t e of rock chip samples were by Chemex Labs Ltd., North Vancouver. Locations, d e s c r i p t i o n s and a n a l y t i c a l values of a l l samples are l i s t e d i n Appendix A (Tables A.4 and A.5). D e t a i l s of preparation and a n a l y t i c a l methods used by Chemex Labs Ltd. are i n Appendix C. Chemical, petrogenetic and t e c t o n i c c l a s s i f i c a t i o n of rock types and the v o l c a n i c s u i t e i s l i m i t e d by regional and contact metamorphism and hydrothermal a l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d to deposition of the B r i t a n n i a orebodies. The primary mineralogy of the o r i g i n a l rock types i n most cases has been destroyed. A l l the v o l c a n i c rocks of the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge l i e within 3 km of Page TABLE 4.1. M a i o r e l e m e n t s i n s e l e c t e d r o c k c h i p s a m p l e s f r o m t h e S r i t a n n i a R i d a e a r e a ( F i q . 3 . 2 ) , s o u t h w e s t e r n B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a . S a m p l e s a r e l o c a t e d on F i g u r e 3.2 a n d m A p p e n d i x A i F i a u r e A . I , a n d T a b l e s A.4 a n d A.51 . D a t a a r e p l o t t e d i n F i g u r e s 4.1 t o 4.10. V a l u e s a r e r e c a l c u l a t e d v o l a t i l e - f r e e f r o m A p p e n d i x A ( T a b l e s A.4 a n d A.51 w i t h F e O T • 0.8999 F e j O - j . PACKAGE UN IT ROCK T Y P E SAMPLE NUMBER ' ELEMENT I w e i g h t * d r y ) F I E L D LAB S i 0 2 A t 2 ° 3 F e 0 T T i 0 2 ! i <*° C a 0 N a Z ° K 2 ° p 2 ° 5 "FOOTWALL" SEQUENCE Andes i t e - MC8 3 626 6380 UA 56 1 2 1 5 98 7 55 .84 7 1 7 1 0 01 2 00 1 2 .19 b a s a l t MC82 009 6230 a 53 69 1 7 53 9 06 .94 7 40 9 42 1 68 07 .20 B a s a l t M C 8 3 630 6 3 8 1 50 54 1 8 24 9 41 .98 9 58 6 41 ' 3 27 1 16 .20 MC82 • 015 62 36 a 50 85 1 7 98 10 09 1 .02 8 86 6 1 7 1 91 2 92 . '9 MC82 • 015 2236 • 50 1 6 1 7 69 1 0 22 1 . 0 1 9 91 6 16 1 67 2 99 . 1 3 MC83 632 6183 52 04 1 7 63 9 45 . 9 7 7 95 6 06 2 12 1 72 . 1 5 HC83 • 631 6384 49 94 1 9 1 4 1 0 00 1 . 1 3 8 15 5 54 4 69 75 .25 MC82 -019 62 34 a 53 04 18 25 9 46 1.11 6 68 6 46 4 41 17 .23 MC82 019 2234 n 52 1 8 1 7 85 9 47 1 .08 ' 7 41 6 31 4 59 17 .24 M C 8 3 633 6 3 88 51 40 1 7 59 8 99 . 98 7 24 9 01 4 28 27 . 1 9 M C 8 3 -615 6387 48 81 1 9 53 -i 96 1 .01 9 58 6 40 3 2 0 1 23 .26 MC83 631 6382 52 0! 1 7 19 8 43 .98 7 7 ] 7 82 5 52 10 . 19 • MC83 60S 6169 52 95 1 7 26 7 99 . 9 3 7 69 6 89 4 56 1 46 .26 R h y o l i t e MC82 040 6088 7 1 49 1 4 57 2 36 . 48 2 54 2 47 1 40 2 60 .07 ( C y r t i n a MC9 2 -040 2008 71 54 1 4 50 2 1) . 4 7 2 46 2 43 1 25 2 66 .08 dome) MC82 007 6144 70 60 1 5 36 1 45 . 68 2 56 1 25 ' 5 77 1 49 . 1 3 "MINE" SEQUENCE D a c i t e MC82 238 6257 66 85 1 7 11 5 10 .70 2 21 1 1 7 4 19 05 . 1 7 ( P i t dome! MC82 238 2257 * 65 65 1 6 96 5 28 .69 2 4 4 1 09 5 65 04 . 1 8 MC81 645 6199 65 55 16 61 6 1 2 .71 1 91 2 1 7 3 1 4 1 56 . 20 MC8 3 645 6259 • 64 4B 1 7 26 5 99 .74 1 1 5 1 71 4 1 0 41 . 1 9 MC8 3 -614 6 385 UA 60 56 1 6 19 7 58 1 .09 1 48 6 60 6 6 3 35 .29 MC82 -211 6250 63 91 1 8 24 6 29 . 7 5 1 1 6 2 56 4 1 2 84 . 1 4 MC82 -211 2 2 50 * 6) 04 18 26 6 21 .71 1 19 2 51 4 80 85 . 1 7 MC83 619 6191 * 62 17 1 8 17 6 87 .80 4 1 6 2 1 8 3 8 8 1 51 . 1 9 ( V i c t o r i a MC8 3 620 6179 UA 70 06 1 4 59 1 77 .63 1 58 1 1 4 3 68 2 19 . 16 dome I MC8 3 601 6365 66 48 1 4 51 4 40 . 58 2 4 1 1 4 25 2 81 . 1 7 MC8! 601 6166 • 1 6 51 1 5 1 7 4 70 . 58 2 6 6 1 0 3 4 45 2 70 . 1 6 NC81 6 1 8 6177 66 14 1 6 52 4 11 .67 1 65 2 77 5 05 2 29 . '. 7 MC81 601 6 368 71 78 1 1 90 ) 60 .51 2 51 1 62 2 62 1 12 . 1 1 HC8 3 617 6176 70 55 1 4 79 1 08 . 5 9 1 67 1 54 4 » 8 2 65 . 1 6 MC81 6 1 9 6178 67 91 1 5 52 4 02 . 6 1 2 0B 2 13 4 28 1 06 . 1 7 MC83 201 6 1 5 4 . 68 20 1 5 61 4 25 . 66 1 87 2 58 4 51 2 1 6 . 1 1 C r y s t a l MC81 641 6191 62 18 1 6 17 7 47 . 88 5 16 78 1 21 5 11 .22 l i t h i c t u f f M C 8 3 641 6394 * 62 14 1 6 0] 7 60 . 86 5 4 1 84 1 16 5 12 .23 "HANGINGWALL" SEQUENCE 1 3 C r y s t a l MC8 3 647 6400 66 8 3 15.74 4 5 4 . 68 2 49 3.05 4 74 1 74 . 18 l i t h i c t u f f MC8 3 647 6401 * • 66 5 ) '5.85 4 48 . 72 2 45 2 . 97 5 30 '• 50 . 20 1 4 R h y o d a c i t e MC83 609 6370 UA 72 27 14.36 2 58 . 32 98 2.05 4 87 2 48 .09 MC8 3 609 637 1 • 72 37 1 4.14 2 4 4 . 30 90 2. 25 5 08 2 45 .08 MC8 3 610 6372 UA 6 6 67 1 5 . 72 4 49 . 65 2 28 3.71 3 91 2 39 . 1 9 MC8 3 61 3 6 3 74 67 57 1 5 . 49 4 47 .67 l 94 2 . 35 4 47 2 85 . 1 3 MC8 3 61 3 6375 • 67 92 15.31 4 33 . 67 l 85 2 . 50 4 69 2 34 . 1 8 MC8 2 1 85 61 38 UA 73 43 14.13 ! 34 .51 9 3 1 .32 5 45 31 .07 MC8 2 185 21 36 § 73 04 1 4 . 36 3 31 .50 d9 1 . 79 5 69 31 . 10 MC8 2 -186 61 39 65 54 i t 7.06 5 35 . 76 2 1 1 3. 29 J 68 2 07 . 1 J DYKES AND INTRUSIONS 18 D a c i t e MCS3-638 6390 UA 73 68 1 4 06 2 43 .32 . 70 2 7 1 4.12 ! 89 . 10 MC83-654 6404 UA 7 4 34 1 3 28 2 30 . 33 . 50 2 87 4 . 06 2 22 . i 1 1 9 O l o r i t e MC82-315 6335 UA 6 7 37 1 5 5 9 4 T 3 . 78 1.84 ) 49 4 . 30 1 l 8 . 2 l • MC82-317 6 3 36 UA 6 ) 30 1 6 41 6 10 . 96 1.94 5 78 4.14 1 0 6 . 31 A n d e s i t e MC82-192 6 1 4 5 UA 54 J 1 15 09 i 5 28 i .02 * .05 7 75 1.77 0 1 .28 MC82-17 3 6122 UA 5 7 08 t 7 62 9 31 1 . 30 ! . 56 4 1 3 . 78 10 . 34 MC82->00 6020 66 04 1 4 '-S 7 1 5 1.14 3 . 9 1 2 1 5 3 . -M 50 . JO MC82-189 6142 t>0 44 1 7 o7 9 40 i . i a 2 . 73 J 00 4 . ! 5 1 i 3 . .24 _ R h y o 1 i t e MC82-258 6277 UA 7 7 01 1 2 95 1 5 7 . 1 9 .21 i 1 4 4 . 76 2 1 4 .02 . MCB2 - 154 6339 UA 79 hQ 1 2 36 1 29 . 1 7 . 5 3 85 2. 54 2 55 .02 • • • • • • • • m i i i i s i m s i i i a a m * = a a a a 3 3 a s a a a a a a a a a a a a a = a a a a 3 a i a a * a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a = s S3* D u p l i c a t e a n a l y s i s o f t h e same s a m p l e i s i n d i c a t e d by , o f trie a aide p u l p by '1, -ind r e o e a t s a m p l e f rom t h e same o u t c r o p by •>, " U n a l t e r e d " s a m p l e s , i n d i c a t e d by "UA", a r e d e f i n e d , b a s e d o n a p p a r e n t immoOi l i t y o f MqO a n d CaO, i n Page 83 known massive sulphide deposits; a distance commonly within the zone of influence of a l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d to hydrothermal systems depositing massive sulphides (Ohmoto and Skinner, 1983). M o b i l i t y of S i 0 2 , K 20, Na 20, MgO, CaO and FeO (Payne et a l . , 1980) i n v a l i d a t e s most c l a s s i f i c a t i o n schemes for igneous rocks. Within the l i m i t a t i o n s posed by the a l t e r e d s u i t e , whole rock geochemical data have been used to i d e n t i f y r e l a t i v e l y "unaltered" samples. These have been used to assess the general chemical c h a r a c t e r i s i t c s of the rock u n i t s , to c h a r a c t e r i z e the magmatic s u i t e f o r comparison with s i m i l a r v o l c a n i c s u i t e s , and to propose a t e c t o n i c environment f o r the formation of the B r i t a n n i a v o l c a n i c s u i t e . "Unaltered", or the l e a s t a l t e r e d samples, from the 38 freshest samples were i d e n t i f i e d by a procedure developed by de Rosen-Spence (1976) i n a study of the Archean Noranda v o l c a n i c sequence. Unaltered versus a l t e r a t e d samples are defined on a chemical v a r i a t i o n diagram of % MgO versus % CaO where the unaltered domain f o r subalkaline rocks i s defined from unaltered Cenozoic s u i t e s (de Rosen-Spence, 1976). The B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e i s a c a l c - a l k a l i n e s u i t e which has an o r i g i n a l medium K content and i s r e l a t i v e l y sodic. I t follows an Fe-poor Cascade trend of i r o n enrichment. The s u i t e and, more p a r t i c u l a r l y , package 1 rocks and l a t e r dykes have c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of an i s l a n d arc t h o l e i i t i c s e r i e s . A l t e r a t i o n , believed to Page 84 r e f l e c t hydrothermal m i n e r a l i z a t i o n , i s most intense i n package 2, the mine sequence. The s u i t e i s g e nerally enriched i n MgO and depleted i n CaO compared to normal subalkaline rocks. The c a l c - a l k a l i n e v o l c a n i c rocks formed i n an i s l a n d arc t e c t o n i c s e t t i n g . An extensional t e c t o n i c environment i s i n d i c a t e d by the bimodal s u i t e . -4.2 GROSS CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS 4.2.1 Rock Types T h i r t y - e i g h t of the most massive, l e a s t a l t e r e d samples were sele c t e d to chemically c l a s s i f y rock types and the v o l c a n i c s u i t e on the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. P y r o c l a s t i c u n i t s that cover more than a t h i r d of the area of Figure 3.2 were not used. The c l a s s i f i c a t i o n was based on 54 whole rock analyses (16 of which are repeat samples of outcrops or repeat analyses of pulps) covering the composition range from basalt to r h y o l i t e (Table 4.1 ). The sample set includes: 16 analyses from units 2, 3 and 7 i n package 1--the pre-ore footwall sequence, 18 analyses from units 9 and 10 i n package 2--the mine sequence, and 10 analyses from units 13 and 14 i n package 3--the post-ore, hangingwall sequence. Also included are 10 analyses from r e l a t i v e l y fresh dykes, which are p o s s i b l y cogenetic with the a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c suite they intrude and crosscut. Page 85 D e f i n i t i o n of rock types here i s based on % S i 0 2 , despite the suspected m o b i l i t y of s i l i c a r e l a t e d to d e p o s i t i o n of massive sulphides. For s i m p l i c i t y , f i e l d names f o r the rock u n i t s have been ret a i n e d . Analyses, r e c a l c u l a t e d v o l a t i l e - f r e e from samples l i s t e d in Table 4.1, are p l o t t e d on Figure 4.1, a p l o t of % FeG\p/MgO versus % S i 0 2 . Boundaries f o r rock types are from G i l l (1981). The analyses generally define a c a l c - a l k a l i n e s u i t e (Miyashiro, 1974) ranging i n composition from b a s a l t to r h y o l i t e , cut by t h o l e i i t i c a n d e s i t i c and r h y o l i t i c dykes. Samples from u n i t 2 plot as andesite-basalt, and samples from u n i t 7 p l o t as b a s a l t . Samples from C y r t i n a dome (unit 3) p l o t i n the r h y o l i t e f i e l d . Samples from unit 9 (squares) s c a t t e r across the andesite, d a c i t e and r h y o l i t e domains, generally forming two c l u s t e r s representing the P i t dome and the more f e l s i c V i c t o r i a dome. Units 13 and 14 ( t r i a n g l e s ) p l o t as dac i t e to r h y o l i t e i n composition. Dykes ("D's") that cut the a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c rocks are a n d e s i t i c and r h y o l i t i c i n composition, but coarser-grained i n t r u s i v e bodies p l o t as d a c i t e . 4.2.2 Packages A general l i t h o l o g i c grouping by packages i s demonstrated on Figure 4.1. Package 1 ( c i r c l e s ) i s ch a r a c t e r i z e d by ba s a l t and r h y o l i t e , package 2 (squares) by d a c i t e , and package 3 ( t r i a n g l e s ) by rhyodacite. The r e l a t i o n s h i p between the b a s a l t i c and f e l s i c o en 2 3 o * 2-• o Package I ("unaltered", altered) • • Package 2 ("unaltered", altered) * a Package 3 ("unaltered", altered) • 0 Dykes Sky Pilot Tholei i t ic ,192 632 ^019 6 3 3 0 6 3 0 H V ° 9 6 3 5 Q </A|5° o608 » 6 2 6 ••°630 • Andesite Basalt C a l c a l k a l i n e . 185 M 638 186 ~23B - " ^8 613 -,i>620 \ a 639 647>5n60l \ V, ctor ia dome S 641 645 Pit dome Daci te a ,603 040 Cyr t ino dome IC./007 Rhyolite IS" 53 63 70 % SiO„ FIGURE 4. 1 P l o t of % FeO„/MgO versus % S i 0 2 data (Table 4.1) from the east s e c t i o n • southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. FeOm/MgO = 1.56 x SiO, d e f i n e s boundary of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, f o r t h o l e i i t i c v e r s u s c a l c - a l k a 1 i n e domains (Mi y a s h i r o , 1974). Boundaries f o r rock types are based on % S i O , ( G i l l , 1981). D u p l i c a t e analyses are j o i n e d by l i n e s . A l t e r e d versus " u n a l t e r e d " are d e f i n e d i n F i g u r e 4.2. 13 (D CO Page 87 lavas i s unclear, but a mafic to f e l s i c c y cle would be consistent with the d i f f e r e n t i a t i o n of a v o l c a n i c p i l e . Average major element values c a l c u l a t e d from whole rock analyses i n Table 4.1 for the main rock types of the three packages are i n Table 4.2. Representation from each of the three packages v a r i e s s i g n i f i c a n t l y . The proportion of magmatic rocks to p y r o c l a s t i c and sedimentary rocks drops from 65 % i n package 1 , to 30 % i n package 2 to only 5 % i n package 3. 1. Package 1 Al t e r e d b a s a l t and r h y o l i t e flows of package 1 represent a bimodal arc t h o l e i i t i c s e r i e s . Mafic flows cover 10 % of the map area and make up 80 % of the magmatic rocks of package 1. Analyses, from u n i t 7 p l o t as basalt and straddle Miyashiro's (1974) boundary between t h o l e i i t i c and c a l c - a l k a l i n e . These analyses p l o t in. a close c l u s t e r with mafic samples from Sky P i l o t Mountain (Heah, 1-982) i n d i c a t e d by dots on Figure 4.1. SiG^ analyses from u n i t 2 are higher than those from unit 7. The large standard d e v i a t i o n i n % SiC>2 (Table 4.2) r e f l e c t s t h i s range i n composition. Sampling i n t h i s study i s not adequate to determine i f t h i s i s a r e f l e c t i o n of primary composition or i f i t r e f l e c t s more l o c a l s i l i c a m o b i l i t y . Compared to average Cascade high-alumina basalts (Irvine and Barager, 1971) basalts of package 1 are a l k a l i - r i c h , have lower AI2O3 and CaO values, and are enriched i n MgO. On Figure 4.1, package 1 rocks show no increase i n FeOT/MgO with increasing Si02, which i s a c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of an TABLE 4.2. Average major element values, from Table 4.1, f o r basalt s , dacites and rhyodacites from the east s e c t i o n of Britannia Ridge ( F i g . 3.2), southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. PACKAGE 1 2 3 ROCK TYPE BASALT DACITE RHYOLITE UNIT 2, 7 9 13, 14 n T 1 3 16 1 0 ELEMENT . mean S.D 2 mean S.D. mean S.D. s i 0 2 A1 20 3 F e 2 0 3 T i 0 2 MgO 50.60 . 5.58 68.61 9.79 67.47 3.02 16.51 1 .08 1 3.69 4.08 14.97 0. 59 9. 74 2. 52 4.74 2.11 4.26 1 .03 0.91 0.09 0.56 0.25 0 . 56 0.17 6.81 2.07 2.43 1 . 42 1 .81 0. 64 CaO 6.48 1 .66 2.10 1 .51 2.65 0. 55 Na 20 K 2 ° P2°5 3.35 1 .28 2.86 1 .64 4.65 0.44 1 .05 1 .08 2.59 1 .26 2.24 0. 48 0.20 0.05 0.15 0.07 0.16 0.05 Loss on 3 .72 1 . 49 2.29 0.72 1 . 72 0. 34 Ignition 1. "n" is the number of analyses from each rock type included in the average. Duplicate analyses were averaged before c a l c u l a t i o n s . 2. "S.D." i s the standard deviation. Page 89 i s l a n d arc t h o l e i i t i c rock s e r i e s (Miyashiro, 1974). Submarine volcanism, p i l l o w lavas, cherts, t u r b i d i t e s and s p i l i t e s i n package 1 are al s o c h a r c t e r i s t i c of an arc t h o l e i i t i c s e r i e s (Jakes and G i l l , 1970). values range from very low to very high. The mean value of 3.72 % f o r "Loss on I g n i t i o n " from basalts of package 1 i n d i c a t e s strong a l t e r a t i o n . R h yolite flows of package 1 cover about 3 % of the map area and make up the other 20 % of the magmatic rocks i n package 1. Analyses from C y r t i n a dome (unit 3) p l o t as c a l c - a l k a l i n e r h y o l i t e on Figure 4.1, chemically d i s t i n c t from f e l s i c u n i t s i n packages 2 and 3. Package 1 r h y o l i t e s are MgO-rich and Na20-rich compared to the P i t and V i c t o r i a domes .(package 2), and ash flows of un i t s 9 (package 2), 13 and 14 (package 3). 2. Package 2 The da c i t e dome complex (unit 9) covers 10 % of the map area and makes up about 30 % of the rocks i n package 2. Analyses from un i t 9, p l o t t e d as squares on Figure 4.1, range from andesite to r h y o l i t e i n cpmpositon within the c a l c - a l k a l i n e domain defined by Miyashiro (1974). Samples p l o t generally i n two c l u s t e r s r e f l e c t i n g the s p a t i a l l y and chemically d i s t i n c t P i t dome and V i c t o r i a dome members of unit 9. Compared to average Cascade da c i t e s (Irvine and Barager, 1971), u n i t 9 i s a l k a l i - p o o r , has low AI2O3 and Na 20 values, and high MgO values. An average L.O.I of 2.29 % (Table 4.2) r e f l e c t s s i g n i f i c a n t a l t e r a t i o n i n these Page 90 samples. 3. Package 3 Units 13 and 14 together cover 5 % of the map area and represent 20 % of the rocks of package 3. Samples, p l o t t e d as t r i a n g l e s on Figure 4.1, are c a l c - a l k a l i n e d a c i t e to r h y o l i t e i n composition. On the basis of mean major element values (Table 4.2), between those of d a c i t e and r h y o l i t e the u n i t s are r e f e r r e d to as rhyodacite. Compared to average values from the Cascades (Irvine and Barager, 1971) rocks from package 3 are a l k a l i - p o o r and MgO-rich. L.O.I values l e s s than 2 % from analyses i n package 3 (Table 4.2) i n d i c a t e that the rocks are r e l a t i v e l y unaltered—package 3 i s the l e a s t a l t e r e d of the three packages i n the map area ( F i g . 3.2). 4.3 ALTERATION A l l of the v o l c a n i c rocks i n the B r i t a n n i a Ridge area are a l t e r e d . Mineral assemblages include c l a y minerals, quartz, s e r i c i t e , c h l o r i t e , c a l c i t e and epidote. These r e f l e c t r e g i o n a l greenschist metamorphism and hydrothermal a l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d to the d e p o s i t i o n of volcanogenic massive sulphides. The two processes of a l t e r a t i o n are superimposed and often i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e . Primary mineralogy of the rocks and the o r i g i n a l major element chemistry have been destroyed. Page 91 C h l o r i t i z a t i o n and s e r i c i t i z a t i o n i s v i s i b l e i n hand specimans from most u n i t s . In t h i n s e c t i o n , f e l d s p a r s i n a l l u n i t s are commonly s a u s s e r i t i z e d . Average L.O.I values f o r the most massive units i n the three packages are high: 3.72 % f o r package 1, 2.29 % for package 2, and 1.79 % f o r package 3 (Table 4.2). 4.3.1 "Unaltered" versus A l t e r e d Samples Within the metavolcanic suite'; "unaltered" or l e a s t a l t e r e d samples were i d e n t i f i e d on Figure 4.2 with respect to % MgO and % C a O - - c r i t e r i a i d e n t i f i e d by de Rosen-Spence (1976) as the most d i s c r i m i n a t i n g f o r i d e n t i f y i n g a l t e r a t i o n i n v o l c a n i c rocks. Fourteen samples p l o t within the "unaltered domain" defined f o r normal subalkaline rocks by de Rosen-Spence (1976). These samples are i n d i c a t e d by s o l i d symbols on Figures 4.1 through 4.10, and by the s u f f i x "UA" on Table 4.1. The unaltered subset i n c l u d e s : one sample from package 1, two samples from package 2, three samples from package 3, and eight samples from dykes and i n t r u s i o n s that cut the a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c s . Samples that p l o t within the "unaltered domain" on Figure 4.2 are considered to best represent the o r i g i n a l chemistry of the s u i t e (in the absence of analyses for elements s p e c i f i c a l l y noted for immobility). Most samples from the B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e p l o t outside the "unaltered domain" on Figure 4.2. Thus the s u i t e i s r e l a t i v e l y enriched in. MgO and depleted i n CaO compared to normal unaltered FIGURE 4.2 P l o t of % MgO versus % CaO data (Table 4.1) from the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Data are i n d i c a t e d from package 1 by c i r c l e s , from package 2 by squares, from package 3 by t r i a n g l e s , and from c r o s s c u t t i n g dykes by "D's". Samples that p l o t w i t h i n the " u n a l t e r e d domain" f o r normal s u b a l k a l i n e rocks (de Rosen-Spence, 1976) are i n d i c a t e d by s o l i d j ~ symbols. D u p l i c a t e a n a l yses were averaged before p l o t t i n g . ^ (D Page 93 subalkaline rocks. .Most analyses from the footwall and mine sequences, packages 1 and 2 ( p l o t t e d on Figure 4.2 as c i r c l e s and squares r e s p e c t i v e l y ) , are a l t e r e d , which supports t h e i r i n t e r p r e t e d "pre-ore" s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p to the B r i t a n n i a orebodies. Analyses from package 3, the hangingwall sequence ( t r i a n g l e s ) and l a t e r dykes ("D's") generally are unaltered, supporting t h e i r "post-ore" age. I d e n t i f i c a t i o n of "unaltered" samples by these c r i t e r i a provides a u s e f u l and quick method of assessing the a l t e r a t i o n within a v o l c a n i c s u i t e , and i d e n t i f i e s a more r e l i a b l e subset for c l a s s i f i c a t i o n of the s u i t e . This i n i t i a l p l o t c l e a r l y separates the fresh l a t e r dykes from the a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c rocks providing a t o o l f o r grouping u n i t s where outcrop exposure does not allow for c l e a r i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s . Using further chemical c r i t e r i a (Na20, K 20, and S i 0 2 ) on the f o l l o w i n g p l o t s (Figs. 4.3 to 4.8) four of the s i x "unaltered" samples selected from the three' packages are demonstrated to be a l t e r e d compared to normal subalkaline rocks. Excluding these samples means that c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n of the the magmatic s u i t e at B r i t a n n i a i s based on l a t e r c r o s s c u t t i n g dykes whose d e t a i l e d r e l a t i o n s h i p to the v o l c a n i c s u i t e i s unknown. 4.3.2 A l k a l i A l t e r a t i o n The p l o t of samples on Figure 4.3, t o t a l a l k a l i e s versus s i l i c a , shows them to be generally within subalkaline domains % Alk — i \ i i . i J i 1— 45 50 55 60 65 70 75%Si0 2 FIGURE 4.3 P l o t of % Na 20 • * KjO versus % SiO, data (Table 4.1) from the e a s t s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. A l k a l i n e versus s u b a l k a l i n e boundary i s from I r v i n e and Barayer (1971). Other boundaries are from de Rosen-Spence (1976) a f t e r Kuno (1966). An o r i g i n a l c a l c i c magmatic trend i s o u t l i n e d by the " u n a l t e r e d " subset ( s o l i d symbols) d e f i n e d i n F i g u r e 4.2. D u p l i c a t e a n a l y s e s were averaged before p l o t t i n g . Refer to F i g u r e 4.1 f o r symbols. Page 9 5 (Irvine and Barager, 1971; de Rosen-Spence, 1976) with the exception of package 1 b a s a l t s , which are a l k a l i n e . The unaltered subset ( s o l i d symbols) defines an o r i g i n a l c a l c i c magmatic trend (de Rosen-Spence and S i n c l a i r , 1986) within the subalkaline domain. Al t e r e d samples are generally more a l k a l i n e than t h i s , which, along with wide ranges i n a l k a l i values, suggests that rocks within Figure 3.2 have been a f f e c t e d by a l k a l i metasomatism. A large range i n K 20 values i s demonstrated on Figure 4.4, a p l o t of % K 20 versus % S i 0 2 . Basalts of un i t 7 and samples from the P i t dome member of un i t 9 d i s p l a y a wide range of K 20 values suggesting m o b i l i t y of K during a l t e r a t i o n . Very low K values i n basal t samples i n d i c a t e that they are not t r u l y a l k a l i n e rocks, but p l o t within the a l k a l i n e domain as a r e s u l t of enrichment of Na 20. High K 20 values r e f l e c t the strong s e r i c i t i z a t i o n , ubiquitous within rocks of package 2. The highest K 20 value (5.29 %) i s from a c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f of un i t 10--a unit v a r i a b l y a l t e r e d to q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t that hosts many B r i t a n n i a orebodies. Samples from u n i t s 7 and 3 of package 1 and from u n i t 1 4 of package 3 p l o t i n the "Na added" domain compared to normal subalkaline rocks on Figure 4.5, % Na 20 versus % S i 0 2 . Na enrichment i n the basalt i s due to s p i l i t i z a t i o n through r e a c t i o n with sea water. Al t e r e d p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts and abundant v e s i c l e s f i l l e d with c a l c i t e , c h l o r i t e and quartz support t h i s K 2 0 5 . Very High K High K Victor ia dome Medium K i g ' " 0 ' FIGURE 4.4 P l o t of % K 20 versus % S iO, data (Table 4.1) from the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. D u p l i c a t e analyses were averaged b e f o r e p l o t t i n g . KjO d i v i s i o n s are from G i l l (1981) m o d i f i e d to i n c l u d e b a s a l t s , r h y o l i t e s and a l k a l i n e p o t a s s i c s u i t e s (Spence, 1985). O r i g i n a l medium K 20 content i s o u t l i n e d by " u n a l t e r e d " samples ( s o l i d symbols) d e f i n e d i n Figure 4.2. Refer to F i g u r e 4.1 f o r symbols. CD ID % N o 2 0 10 FIGURE 4.5 P l o t of « Na 20 versus % S i 0 2 data (Table 4.1) from the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. D u p l i c a t e analyses were averaged before p l o t t i n g . Normal s u b a l k a l i n e domain i s from de Rosen-Spence ( 1 976). Refer to F i g u r e 4.1 f o r symbols. jjj* (D Page 98 i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . A s i m i l a r sea water r e a c t i o n may be in d i c a t e d by the high Na value from the Cy r t i n a dome (unit 3) and from the r h y o l i t e flows (unit 14). Two samples i n the "Na added" domain p l o t as low K on Figure 4.4., and two samples i n the "Na l o s t " domain p l o t as high to very high K ( F i g . 4.4). These r e l a t i o n s h i p s suggest Na-K exchange during s e r i c i t z a t i o n . 4.3.3 A l t e r a t i o n Involving CaO, MgO and Si02 Most samples from the B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e p l o t within the normal subalkaline domain on Figure 4.6, a p l o t of % CaO versus % Si02- Exceptions are un i t 7 b a s a l t s , the P i t dome member of un i t 9, and c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f (unit 10), both of which are r e l a t i v e l y low i n CaO. The l a t t e r u nderlie known massive sulphide deposits ( F i g . 3.2: se c t i o n A-A'). Almost a l l samples l i s t e d i n Table 4.1 pl o t within the "Mg added", domain on Figure 4.7, a p l o t of % MgO versus % Si02-Enrichment of MgO and/or Si02 would r e s u l t i n the displayed r i g h t s h i f t from a normal subalkaline domain i n the basal t data. Enrichment i n Si02 and or MgO i n samples from the f e l s i c domes would produce data that p l o t i n the "Mg added" domain. Analyses from unaltered dykes and l a t e r i n t r u s i o n s ("D's") pl o t within the subalkaline domain. FIGURE 4.6 P l o t of % CaO versus % SiO, data (Table 4.1) from the eas t s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. D u p l i c a t e analyses were averaged b e f o r e p l o t t i n g . Normal s u b a l k a l i n e domain i s from de Rosen-Spence (1976). Refer to F i g u r e 4.1 f o r symbols. 4.7 P l o t of % MgO versus % SiO, data (Table 4.1) from the eas t s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. D u p l i c a t e analyses were averaged b e f o r e p l o t t i n g . Normal s u b a l k a l i n e domain i s from de Rosen-Spence (1976). Refer t o F i g u r e 4.1 f o r symbols. Page 101 4.3.4 Hydrothermal A l t e r a t i o n Related to Massive Sulphides t A l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d to the d e p o s i t i o n of massive sulphides i s s i g n i f i c a n t i n the rocks of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. A l l of the samples are a l t e r e d according to Izawa's (1980) a l t e r a t i o n index "A.I" [A.I. = 100(MgO + K 20) /(MgO + CaO + Na 20 + K 20)] f o r Kuroko-type deposits. A l t e r e d rocks were demonstrated, above, to be enriched i n S i 0 2 , MgO, depleted i n CaO, and v a r i a b l y enriched or depleted i n K 20 and Na 20 r e l a t i v e to normal subalkaline rocks and to the unaltered subset. With the exception of s p i l i t i z a t i o n w ithin package 1 rocks, t h i s a l t e r a t i o n i s s i m i l a r to hydrothermal a l t e r a t i o n haloes aroung volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits described by Ohmoto et a l . (1983). C r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f , the host rock of many B r i t a n n i a orebodies, d i s p l a y s t h i s t y p i c a l hydrothermal a l t e r a t i o n with high K 20, low Na 20, low CaO and high MgO values. Samples from the P i t dome underlying the ore deposits are also enriched i n MgO and K 20 and depleted i n CaO and Na 20. This a l t e r a t i o n pattern concurs with that described by Payne et a l . (1980) who noted that rocks from the B r i t a n n i a Mine area (package 2) were a f f e c t e d by Mg metasomatism, enriched i n K 20, S i 0 2 and H 20, and depleted i n CaO and t o t a l Fe. A l t e r a t i o n within the three packages in. Figure 3.2 generally agrees with the proposed s t r a t i g r a p h i c f acing of the sequence. A l t e r a t i o n haloes are common i n footwall rocks below Kuroko and Canadian volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits, where Page 102 mineral assemblages c o n s i s t of: z e o l i t e , montmorillonite, s e r i c i t e and c h l o r i t e proceeding toward the ore zone (Ohmoto and Skinner,' 1983). Zoned dep l e t i o n of Na->0 and Ca 20 and increase of K 20 and MgO i s a record of i n t e r a c t i o n between seawater and hot v o l c a n i c rocks during several cycles of hydrothermal a c t i v i t y (Ohmoto et a l . , 1983 ). Most samples of package 3 and the l a t e r dykes and i n t r u s i o n s are unaltered, and therefore represent hangingwall and post-ore rocks. Samples from the mine sequence d i s p l a y t y p i c a l a l t e r a t i o n patterns expected i n footwall rocks below massive sulphide deposits. Units of package 1 d i s p l a y MgO and Na 20 enrichment and may be enriched i n CaO and depleted or enriched i n K 20. 4.4. MAGMATIC CHARACTERISTICS 4.4.1 Introduction Chemical c l a s s i f i c a t i o n of the B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e , based p r i m a r i l y on the 14 unaltered samples defined above,, and more s p e c i f i c a l l y on the , c r o s s c u t t i n g dykes and i n t r u s i o n s , i s not d e f i n i t i v e . The dykes define an arc t h o l e i i t i c s u i t e that follows an Fe-poor trend of i r o n enrichement. A bimodal character i s i n d i c a t e d on Figure 4.1 for both package 1 (basalt, r h y o l i t e ) and the e n t i r e s u i t e by the "andesite gap", between 53 % and 63 % S i 0 2 anhydrous ( G i l l , 1981). However, the missing andesite f r a c t i o n Page 103 might be represented by voluminous p y r o c l a s t i c rocks not included in t h i s c l a s s i f i c a t i o n , or by deeper l e v e l i n t r u s i o n s (e_.g_. P i t dome) poorly exposed and therefore not re p r e s e n t a t i v e l y sampled. Detailed r e l a t i o n s h i p s between the b a s a l t i c and f e l s i c lavas remain unclear. Package 1 may represent a chemically d i s t i n c t magma serie s and environment, or represent the earl y melt from which the c a l c - a l k a l i n e s u i t e d i f f e r e n t i a t e d . 4.4.2. A l k a l i n i t y A normal subalkaline magma serie s i s defined by the unaltered subset ( s o l i d symbols) on Figure 4.3, a pl o t of t o t a l a l k a l i s versus s i l i c a . Analyses from unaltered samples plot within the subalkaline domain defined by Irvine and Barager (1971). C.I.P.W. norm c a l c u l a t i o n s i n Appendix A (Tables A.4 and A.5) of rock chip samples support a subalkaline c l a s s i f i c a t i o n , although L.O.I values greater than 2 % for most samples and a l t e r a t i o n observed in t h i n section i n d i c a t e severe a l t e r a t i o n . Analyses for Na20, CaO and MgO from the unaltered subset f a l l within the normal subalkaline domains indicated on Figures 4.5 to 4.7. An o r i g i n a l medium K 20 content ( G i l l , 1981) for the suite i s defined on Figure 4.4. C r i t e r i a to c l a s s i f y the subalkaline s u i t e as a c a l c - a l k a l i n e or arc t h o l e i i t i c rock s e r i e s i s inconclusive. The unaltered subset defines a c a l c i c (arc t h o l e i i t i c ) magmatic trend on Figure Page 104 4.3. This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i s supported by a Peacock Index of 64 (Peacock, 1931: weight % S i 0 2 where CaO = Na 20 + K 20) c a l c u l a t e d for the B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e (de Rosen-Spence and S i n c l a i r , 1987). Compared to arc t h o l e i i t i c or c a l c i c s u i t e s i d e n t i f i e d i n B r i t i s h Columbia (Mt Eurydice, Doctor's Point, Southfork, Spences Bridge) de Rosen-Spence and S i n c l a i r (1987) found rocks from the eastern s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge to be considerably more sodic, less p o t a s s i c and less c a l c i c . The B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e f a l l s between domains f o r i s l a n d arc t h o l e i i t i c s e r i e s and c a l c - a l k a l i n e s e r i e s on a p l o t of % K 20 versus % S i 0 2 (not shown; Jakes and G i l l , 1970). On a p l o t of % MgO versus % FeO T (not shown; Jakes and G i l l , 1970) the data generally follow a c a l c - a l k a l i n e Cascade trend. Compared to t y p i c a l analyses from the Cascades (Irvine and Barager, 1971) the B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e has higher T i 0 2 , MgO, FeO T and lower Al-jO-^ and CaO, which would support an arc t h o l e i i t i c or c a l c i c c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . 4.4.3. Fe - Enrichment Trend The east B r i t a n n i a Ridge v o l c a n i c s u i t e follows a trend of i r o n - d e p l e t i o n t y p i c a l of the Cascades ( F i g . 4.8). The s u i t e i s c l a s s i f i e d as c a l c - a l k a l i n e on the basis of the Fe-poor trend and the abundance of large p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts (Jakes and G i l l , 1970). A kink representing r a p i d i r o n enrichment, expected i n a t h o l e i i t i c s u i t e , i s present only i n samples of l a t e r andesite dykes. On Figure 4.8 samples from the packages define a trend of > 192 .% A l 2 0 3 22 -20 -18 173 16 14 ,626 .634 x 610 315 620. I* 185 • 638 609 .654 ,258 12 154 _ j i 1 I i — ^ . I 1 45 50 55 60 65 70 75%Si0 2 FIGURE 4.9 P l o t of % A l 2 0 j versus % S i O j data (Table 4.1) from the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Only " u n a l t e r e d " d a t a , d e f i n e d i n F i g u r e 4.2, are p l o t t e d . C i r c l e d p o i n t s were i n d i c a t e d to be a l t e r e d on F i g u r e s 4.5, 4.6 and 4.7. The Cascade trend from de Rosen-Spence (1976) r e p r e s e n t s a t y p i c a l c a l c - a l k a l i n e Fe-poor t r e n d of i r o n enrichment. Refer to F i g u r e 4.1 f o r symbols. Page 107 intermediate i r o n enrichment. A t y p i c a l c a l c - a l k a l i n e or Fe-poor trend i s defined on Figure 4 . 9 . Almost a l l v o l c a n i c rocks from the three packages and f e l s i c dykes p l o t i n the c a l c - a l k a l i n e f i e l d on Figure 4.1 defined by Miyashiro (1974) with respect to % S i 0 2 and FeOrp/MgO. On a p l o t of % FeOT/MgO versus % FeO T (not shown) the s u i t e show a t y p i c a l c a l c - a l k a l i n e trend. The s u i t e i s u n l i k e t h o l e i i t i c s u i t e s that are not commonly p o r p h y r i t i c , and contain o l i v i n e and pyroxene phenocrysts ( G i l l , 1 9 8 1 ) . The abundance of p l a g i o c l a s e phenocrysts i n the B r i t a n n i a Ridge rocks and the absence of o l i v i n e and pyroxene phenocrysts supports a c a l c - a l k a l i n e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . Later mafic dykes (unit 19) that cut the v o l c a n i c s u i t e are t h o l e i i t i c by the same c r i t e r i a (Figure 4.1 ) . 4 . 5 . VOLCANIC ENVIRONMENT Whole rock geochemistry of t h i s study i s not d i a g n o s t i c of a s p e c i f i c t e c t o n i c environment; however, northwest-trending v o l c a n i c b e l t s or "pendants" i n the Coast Range Complex are suggestive of an i s l a n d arc s e t t i n g . Abundant p y r o c l a s t i c t u f f s and extrusive v o l c a n i c rocks within the B r i t a n n i a pendant also support t h i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . R e l a t i v e l y immobile elements T i 0 2 and FeO T c l a s s i f y basalts from B r i t a n n i a Ridge as i s l a n d arc ( F i g . 4.10). Major element chemistry of these b a s a l t s i s s i m i l a r to c i r c u m - p a c i f i c i s l a n d arc b a s a l t s l i s t e d by Ewart (1976). Page 109 The B r i t a n n i a Ridge s u i t e may represnt an i s l a n d arc v o l c a n i c suite s i m i l a r to the Northeast Japan arc (Miyashiro, 1974), that includes both a t h o l e i i t i c rock, s e r i e s (package 1 ) and a c a l c - a l k a l i n e rock s e r i e s (packages 2 and 3). Sampling and data in t h i s study are not s u f f i c i e n t to determine t h i s . The bimodal character, e s p e c i a l l y of package 1, may be i n d i c a t i v e of an extensional environment or s p l i t t i n g within the i s l a n d arc. S i m i l a r i t i e s e x i s t between the B r i t a n n i a area and i t s ore deposits, and the Japan Basin that hosts the Kuroko deposits where Ohmoto (1983) in t e r p r e t e d a bimodal basalt - d a c i t e , r h y o l i t e suit e to have formed in an extensional back-arc spreading region associated with tensional t e c t o n i c s . Uyeda and co-workers suggested subduction associated with steeply dipping plates i n i t i a t e d the Green Tuff volcanism and t e c t o n i c s i n the back-arc spreading region (Ohmoto, 1983). No meaningful statement can be made from these data alone about the degree of d i f f e r e n t i a t i o n i n the s u i t e . Resolution of the c l o s e l y linked problems of petrogenesis, and the character of the tectonic environment requires a more s p e c i f i c study of samples whose ages or s t r a t i g r a p h i c l o c a t i o n i s better constrained. P a g e 110 5 . GEOCHRONOMETRY 5 .1 I N T R O D U C T I O N A g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n s w e r e a t t e m p t e d b y t h e K - A r a n d R b - S r m e t h o d s o n 14 s a m p l e s f r o m t h e a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c s u i t e a t B r i t a n n i a . Y o u n g K - A r d a t e s a r e i n t e r p r e t e d t o h a v e b e e n r e s e t b y C o a s t P l u t o n i c i n t r u s i o n s a n d p o s s i b l y r e l a t e d o r l a t e r d e f o r m a t i o n a l e v e n t s . H o w e v e r , R b - S r d a t e s a r e p r o v i s i o n a l l y J u r a s s i c o r E a r l y C r e t a c e o u s . T h i s J u r a s s i c - E a r l y C r e t a c e o u s a g e f o r B r i t a n n i a p e n d a n t s t r a t a i s s o m e w h a t o l d e r t h a n w a s e x p e c t e d f o r t h e B r i t a n n i a g r o u p , w h i c h i s c u r r e n t l y c o r r e l a t e d ( R o d d i c k e t a l . , 1 9 7 9 ) w i t h t h e E a r l y C r e t a c e o u s G a m b i e r G r o u p . T h i s s u g g e s t s t h a t new i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s o f s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s w i t h i n s o u t h w e s t e r n c o a s t a l B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a may b e w a r r a n t e d . A l l a n a l y s e s w e r e d o n e a t t h e G e o c h r o n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y a t T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a . A r g o n a n a l y s e s w e r e b y J . H a r a k a l . P o t a s s i u m a n a l y s e s , r u b i d i u m a n d s t r o n t i u m c o n c e n t r a t i o n s , a n d s t r o n t i u m i s o t o p i c d e t e r m i n a t i o n s w e r e b y K . S c o t t u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n o f R . L . A r m s t r o n g . A n a l y t i c a l p r o c e d u r e s a r e d e s c r i b e d i n A p p e n d i x C . A n a l y t i c a l r e s u l t s , t h e c o n s t a n t s u s e d , a n d t h e a p p a r e n t a g e s w i t h t i m e d e s i g n a t i o n s a r e g i v e n i n T a b l e s 5 . 1 , 5 . 2 a n d 5 . 3 . TABLE 5.1 Potassium-argon data for volcanic rocks from Britannia Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Sample s i t e s are located on Figures 3.2 and A . I . SAMPLE LOCATION ROCK TYPE 4 0 A r * 4 0 A r * Fiel d Northing Easting [Package-Unit] %K 1 — - — z APPARENT Lab lat(°N) long(°W) (Comment) ( + ) ^ t o t a l 1 0 ^ STP/g AGE (Ma) J TIME MC83-633 -6384 5495850 490460 Basalt (1-7] 49°36'25" 123°07'20" (altered;?, low K 20 6, low CaO7) 0.255 0.652 (0.001) 0.920 90.5 + 3.2 Late Cretaceous MC83-619 5494640 491180 Dacite (2-9) -6378 49o36'01" 123°06'52" ( s l i g h t l y altered5) 2.27 (0.03) 0.879 7.166 79.5 +2.9 Late Cretaceous MC83-640 5495170 490090 Crystal l i t h i c t u f f 12-10] 1.72 0.723 -6392 49°36'08" 123°07'16" (quartz-rich) (0.02) MC83-657 5494980 489740 Quartz-sericite schist [2-11] 3.26 0.961 49°36'08" 123°07'48" (contact of packages (0.03) 2 and 3) 5.557 10.768 81.3 • 2.9 Late Cretaceous 83.1 + 3.0 Late Cretaceous MC83-625 5494630 490480 Crystal l i t h i c tuff [3-13] 1.12 49°36'02" 123°07'24" ( s e r i c i t i z e d ) (0.03) 0.691 3.634 81.6 + 3.0 Late Cretaceous 1. Argon analyses are by J . Ilarakal and potassium analyses are by K. Scott; a l l analyses were done at the Goochronology Laboratory, The University of B r i t i s h Columbia. 2. Ar* indicates radiogenic argon. 3. Constants used are from Steiqer and Jager (1977): e = 0.581 x 1 0 _ l u yr~'; b= 4.962 x 10"' uyr K/K = 1.167 x 10 . Errors are one standard deviation. 4. Time designation i s from Armstrong (1978) and Harland et a l . (1982). 5. Alteration i s defined on Figure 4.2. 6. r^ O danains are defined on Figure 4.4. 7. CaO domains are defined on Figure 4.6. PJ (D TABLE 5 . 2 . Rubidium-strontium analyses of vo l c a n i c rock from B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Data, located on Figures 3 . 2 and A.I, are p l o t t e d on Figure 5 . 1 . Dates are c a l c u l a t e d i n Table 5 . 3 . Sample Number1 Sample d e s c r i p t i o n Northing Easting Sr Rb B / R b / B b S r B / S r / b b S r F i e l d Lab Rock type (comment) [Package-Unit 1 (Latitude) (Longitude) ppm ppm (+2%) ( + 0 . 0 0 0 1 ) MC83 -608 6369 B a s a l t ( a l t e r e d 5 , l o w CaO7) [ 1 - 7 ] MC83 -609 6 3 7 0 * R h y o d a c i t e [ 3 - 1 4 ] MC83 -610 6372 R h y d a c i t e ( a l t e r e d 5 ) 1 3 - 1 4 ] MC83 - 6 1 9 3 6378 D a c i t e ( V i c t o r i a dome, h i g h K 2 0 6 ) ( 2 - 9 ] yea 3 -620 6 3 7 9 * D a c i t e ( V i c t o r i a dome) [ 2 - 9 ] MT83 -626 6 3 8 0 * A n d e s i t e - b a s a l t ( l o w K ^ 6 ) [ 1 - 2 ] MC83 631 6382 B a s a l t ( l o w K ^ . C a O ; h i g h N a 2 0 ) [ 1 - 7 ] MC83 6 3 3 3 6384 B a s a l t ( l o w K-fi6, C a O 7 ) [ 1 - 7 ] MC83 634 6385 D a c i t e ( P i t dome, h i g h K 2 0 6 , T i 0 2 ) [ 2 - 9 ] MT83 644 6397 C h e r t / E x h a l i t e [ 2 -111 MC83- b c;4 6 4 0 4 * D a c i t e Dyke ( M i n e d y k e ) I - 1 8 ] HVAH C j A 4 D a n t e 1 1 - ? ] HFAH- 6 A 4 B a s a l t d - ? l HKAH- 17* Q u a r t z b a s a l t [ 1 - ? ] HEAH- 2 6 A 4 D a c i t e [ 1 - ? ] 5494940 491300 415 13 1 0 091 0 7044 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 0 7 " ) 5495076 489800 311 30 2 0 282 0 7040 4 9 ° 36" 1 3 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 7 * 5 4 " ) 5494990 489740 406 32 4 0 229 0 7038 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 1 2 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 7 ' 5 6 " ) 5494640 491180 233 40 9 0 506 0 7051 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 0 1 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 6 ' 5 2 " ) 5494570 491380 316 31 0 0 283 0 7043 4 9 ° 3 5 ' 5 8 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 6 ' 4 2 " ) 5496230 491540 458 4 5 0 029 0 7036 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 3 2 " ) < 1 2 3 ° 0 6 ' 2 5 " ) 5495840 490580 458 2 1 0 013 0 7040 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 2 5 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 7 * 1 5 " ) 5495850 490460 543 10 1 0 054 0 7044 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 2 5 " ) ( 1 2 3 o 0 7 l 2 0 " ) 5495500 490430 399 9 9 0 071 0 7041 4 9 o 3 6 ' 2 0 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 7 ' 2 7 " ) 5495060 490230 12 14 1 3 504 0 7117 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 1 0 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 7 ' 3 6 " ) 5495170 489870 236 33 5 0 409 0 7047 4 9 ° 3 6 ' 1 3 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 7 , 5 0 " ) 4 9 ° 3 7 ' 4 8 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 5 ' 2 7 " ) 269 21 3 0 229 0 7036 4 9 ° 3 7 ' 4 4 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 5 ' 1 5 " ) 512 6 6 0 037 0 7033 4 9 ° 3 9 ' 0 2 " ) ( 1 2 3 ° 0 5 ' 5 2 " ) 477 4 5 0 027 0 7036 4 9 ° 3 8 , 1 1 " ) < 1 2 3 ° 0 4 ' 0 5 " ) 442 2 4 0 016 0 7035 1. S a m p l e s n a r k e d by * a r e u n a l t e r e d a s d e f i n e d on F i g u r e 4 . 2 . 2 . A n a l y s e s , of w h o l e r o c k s a m p l e s , were done a t t h e G e o c h r o n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y , The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , by K. S c o t t under t h e d i r e c t i o n o f R . L . A r m s t r o n g . 3. Who le r o c k K - A r a n a l y s i s i s r e p o r t e d i n T a b l e 5 . 1 . 4 . A n a l y s e s a r e f rom Heah ( 1 9 8 2 ) . 5 . A l t e r a t i o n i s d e f i n e d o n F i g u r e 4 . 2 . 6 . K 2 0 d o m a i n s a r e d e f i n e d o n F i g u r e 4 . 4 . 7 . CaO d o m a i n s a r e d e f i n e d o n F i g u r e 4 . 6 . Table 5.3 C a l c u l a t e d Rb-Sr isochron dates f o r the B r i t a n n i a Ridge v o l c a n i c s u i t e , southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Analyses are l i s t e d i n Table 5.2. Data and s e l e c t e d i s o c h r o n s (*) are p l o t t e d i n F i g u r e 5.1. Isochron Subset Number Sample Numbers L i n e Parameters Age^ Time of i n t e r c e p t ( S r i ) (Ma) P o i n t s 1 * A l l samples 15 ( see Table 5.2) 0. .7037 + .03 1 59 + 31 Late J u r a s s i c 2* B r i t a n n i a Ridge 11 (exclud ing Mounta i n , Sky see P i l o t Table 5.2) 0. .7038 + 1 1 46 + 25 Late J u r a s s i c 3 "Una l t e r e d " 6 626, 654 619, 620, 609, 610, 0 . 7033 + 2 231 41 T r i a s s i c 4 "Best?" 3 626, 620, 609 0. . 7035 • 2 1 54 + 7 2 meaningless 5* A l t e r e d B a s a l t - C h e r t 2 644 , 633 0 . 7043 + 2 1 49 + 1 1 Late J u r a s s i c 6 Package 1 4 626, 631 , 608 , 633 0. .7041 + 1 undef ined meaningless 7 Package 2 3 634 , 620, 619 0. , 7038 + 3 1 63 + 54 Late J u r a s s i c 8 Package 3 3 609, 610 , 654 0. , 7026 + 3 357 + 60 meaningless 9* Packages 2 and 3 6 634 , 654 620, 619,- 609, 610, 0. . 7036 + 2 1 67 37 Middle J u r a s s i c 1. Isochron dates were c a l c u l a t e d using l e a s t squares f i t t i n g methods of York (1967). The programme was w r i t t e n f o r HP-85 microcomputer by R. L. Armstrong. E r r o r i n 8 ' S r / "Sr i s 0.0001; Rb/Sr r a t i o i s assigned 2 % e r r o r when Rb and Sr c o n c e n t r a t i o n s are over 50 ppm, otherwise a p r o p o r t i o n a l e r r o r of r a t i o d i v i d e d by lowest ppm. Decay constant ( S t e i g e r and Jager, 1977): = 1.42 x 10 yr . E r r o r s are 1 standard d e v i a t i o n . . H3 uq Page 114 5.2 K-AR DATING K-Ar age determinations i n Table 5.1 were made on f i v e samples of volcanic rock from the B r i t a n n i a pendant. Representative samples from each of the three packages were s e l e c t e d . Descriptions and lo c a t i o n s of the samples are i n Table A. 5, and whole rock chemistry for samples 619 and 633 i s i n Table 4.1. Sample 633, from unit 7 i n package 1, i s an a l t e r e d p i l l o w basalt with c a l c i t e amygdules. I t has medium to low K 20 ( F i g . 4.4) and low CaO compared to normal subalkaline basalts ( F i g . 4.6). Three samples from package 2 were selected. Sample 619 (unit 9) i s a non-porphyritic d a c i t e with quartz phenocrysts and s l i g h t l y elongated v e s i c l e s . This a l t e r e d sample has a r e l a t i v e l y high K 20 value compared to other samples from unit 9, and a higher MgO value than normal subalkaline dacites (Fig; 4.7). Sample 640 i s of the d i s t i n c t i v e green mottled s c h i s t (unit 10), that hosts the Britannia orebodies. Sample 657 i s q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t (unit 11 ) taken from a band of very a l t e r e d "paper" p h y l l i t e , which i s possibly f a u l t r e l a t e d , and d i r e c t l y o v e r l i e s the Fairview Zinc bedded sulphides i n the open p i t s ( F i g . 3.2; section A-A') close to the contact between packages 2 and 3. Sample 657 i s a c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f from unit 13 in package 3. Unit 13 i s s i m i l a r to, but generally less a l t e r e d than unit 10 in package 2. K-Ar data (Table 5.1) group into two Late Cretaceous apparent ages for the a l t e r e d volcanic rocks: (1) an older date o f 90.5 + Page 115 3.2 Ma for basalt of unit 7 i n package 1, and (2) a younger average date of 81.4 +_ 3 Ma for the four samples from packages 2 and 3. The apparent age for the basalt of unit 7 i s approximately equivalent to dates of 90 Ma, 94 Ma, and 95.1 _+ 3.3 Ma (Heah, 1982) for the Squamish and Furry plutons and t h e i r i n t r u s i v e contacts. Because the pendant rocks and sulphide m i n e r a l i z a t i o n are n e c e s s a r i l y older than the Late Cretaceous i n t r u s i o n and deformation, the date of package 1 i s i n t e r p r e t e d as reset by i n t r u s i o n of the Mountain Lake pluton g r a n o d i o r i t e (unit 20) which intrudes unit 7. The younger age obtained for units i n package 2 may be r e l a t e d to the f i n e r grained nature of the samples or may represent r e s e t t i n g by an undocumented i n t r u s i v e event and/or by a re l a t e d major deformational event. 5.3 RB-SR DATING Samples for rubidium-strontium analysis (Table 5.2) from a l l three packages defined in Section 3.1, consisted of: (1) package 1: four basalt samples (one from unit 2 and three from unit 7), (2) package 2: four samples (three dacites of unit 9, and one chert from unit 11), (3) package 3: two rhyodacite samples from unit 14, and (4) one dacite dyke sample from unit 18. The samples are located on Figures 3.2 and A.1; d e t a i l e d sample d e s c r i p t i o n s and major element chemistry are in Table A.5. Page 116 Analyses f o r the 11 samples are i n Table 5.2. Rb-Sr values from 4 rocks from Sky P i l o t Mountain (Heah, 1982), d i r e c t l y north of the study area, have been included i n the Table and Figures. Sky P i l o t Mountain samples are c o r r e l a t e d t e n t a t i v e l y with package 1. "Unaltered" samples, defined i n Figure 4.2, are i n d i c a t e d by * and are p l o t t e d as s o l i d symbols on Figure 5.1. Rubidium and strontium r a t i o s are p l o t t e d on Figure 5.1 using c i r c l e s , squares, t r i a n g l e s and D's to represent, r e s p e c t i v e l y , samples from packages 1, 2 and 3, and dykes. Calculated apparent ages with varying e r r o r s f o r nine t r i a l isochrons, some of which have been drawn through the data points on Figure 5.1, are i n Table 5.3. Nine t r i a l isochrons through selected subsets of i s o t o p i c data, based on a l t e r a t i o n and s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s , y i e l d dates with varying degrees of confidence. The best " f i t s " - - i s o c h r o n s 1, 2, and 9--have been p l o t t e d on Figure 5.1. Large e r r o r s , due to low Rb values (<50 ppm) and a l t e r a t i o n are associated with most isochrons. Time designations are inconclusive for the isochrons because of the large e r r o r s , which allow ranges of age from T r i a s s i c through J u r a s s i c to E a r l y Cretaceous. Isochrons 4, 6 and 8 are very poorly defined or meaningless. Isochron 9, considered to approximate most c l o s e l y the age of ft 7 ft ft the B r i t a n n i a Ridge v o l c a n i c s , has an i n i t i a l 0 / S r / 0 D S r value of 0.7036 _+ 2 and a c a l c u l a t e d age of 167 _+ 37 Ma. This isochron, FIGURE 5.1 Ruba ciium-st ront i urn i s o t o p e p l o t f o r samples from the B r i t a n n i a Ridge a r e a , southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. Data are i n T a b l e 5.2. Isochrons are numbered as i n T a b l e 5.3. Sample 644 was used o n l y i n the c a l c u l a t i o n of i s o c h r o n 5. Data from Sky P i l o t Mountain (Heah, 1982) are i n d i c a t e d by x. Symbols are those of F i g u r e 4.1. Page 118 based on the g e o l o g i c a l l y most r e l i a b l e subset, i s composed of samples from packages 2 and 3, but excludes samples from package 1 that have been demonstrated to be a l t e r e d (Chapter 4, F i g . 4.2). The i n i t i a l strontium r a t i o and a J u r a s s i c age defined by isochron 9 are generally supported by isochrons 1 and 2 based r e s p e c t i v e l y on the e n t i r e data set (Table 5.2), and data e x c l u s i v e l y from the Britannia Ridge s u i t e . High Sr r a t i o s f o r the a l t e r e d basalt samples are consistent with observed chemical exchange during hydrothermal a l t e r a t i o n of basalt by seawater (Mottl and Holland, 1978). This i s i n d i c a t e d on Figure 5.1 (inset) by basalt data from package 1, where an almost v e r t i c a l l i n e (isochron 6) r e f l e c t s progressive a l t e r a t i o n from the "unaltered" sample 626 from unit 2, to the more a l t e r e d samples 608 and 633 from unit 7. Depletion of Ca and Sr, and higher Sr r a t i o values i n basalts r e s u l t from mixing with Q "7 i s o t o p i c a l l y heavy S r - r i c h seawater. It might be s i g n i f i c a n t that the highest Sr r a t i o values in Table 5.2 are from package 2 where intense seawater i n t e r a c t i o n r e l a t e d to the deposition of the massive sulphide deposits could be expected. Sample 644 provides r a t i o s s i g n i f i c a n t l y higher than the other samples and plots well beyond the c l u s t e r of other data points on Figure 5.1. This sample, from unit 11, i s a chert which i s possibly an e x h a l i t e based on i t s close s t r a t i g r a p h i c a s s o c i a t i o n with known ore deposits. The addition of seawater strontium to t h i s Page 119 chert cannot be assessed, but i t would have the e f f e c t of 8 7 increasing the °'Sr content. This makes the minimum age olde r than i t would be without seawater strontium a d d i t i o n . I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g to note sample 644 i s i n t e r s e c t e d by isochron 9. Isochron 5, projected between samples 644 and 633 ( F i g . 5.1), both ft 7 apparently enriched i n °'Sr, has a c a l c u l a t e d age of 149 +_ 11 Ma, consistent (error excepted) with the Late J u r a s s i c isochrons 9, 1 and 2. I n i t i a l Sr r a t i o s i n Table 5.3 range from 0.7033 + 2 to 0.7043 _+ 2 (excluding i n t e r c e p t s from undefined isochrons 4, 6 and 8) and average 0.7037, which corresponds to i n i t i a l Sr r a t i o s of magmas with upper mantle sources (Faure, 1977). This small range of i n i t i a l Sr r a t i o s i n d i c a t e s that a value of 0.7037 i s appropriate for use i n age c a l c u l a t i o n s and suggests that the three packages, and hence the Goat Ridge and B r i t a n n i a formations, evolved from a common o r i g i n and might be co-magmatic. Whole rock strontium i s o t o p i c compositions provide estimated ages, i n Table 5.3, of Middle to Late J u r a s s i c f o r the a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c s u i t e on B r i t a n n i a Ridge. The data set does not allow for age determinations of i n d i v i d u a l packages or d i s c r i m i n a t i o n among them on the basis of age. C a l c u l a t i o n of isochrons requires the assumption that the system has remained closed to Rb and Sr a f t e r c r y s t a l l i s a t i o n (Faure, 1977). Therefore the noted e f f e c t s of seawater or hydrothermal a l t e r a t i o n require that the proposed P a g e 1 2 0 J u r a s s i c d a t e s b e c o n s i d e r e d t e n t a t i v e . T h i s c a u t i o n i s r e i n f o r c e d b y : ( 1 ) t h e e r r o r s , w h i c h a l l o w a C r e t a c e o u s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n , a n d ( 2 ) t h e e x p e c t e d E a r l y C r e t a c e o u s a g e i n t h e B r i t a n n i a p e n d a n t b a s e d o n a c o r r e l a t i o n w i t h t h e G a m b i e r G r o u p ( R o d d i c k , 1 9 6 5 ) . Page 121 6. I N T E R P R E T A T I O N AND C O N C L U S I O N S 6.1 I N T R O D U C T I O N An i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the v o l c a n i c and d e p o s i t i o n a l environment for the accumulation of the B r i t a n n i a massive sulphide deposits can be made from u n i t s described within the three packages defined on the eastern s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge. The packages, and units within them that represent several v o l c a n i c f a c i e s , form a continuous succession of mainly mafic to f e l s i c eruption episodes with mineralized horizons r e l a t e d to f e l s i c v o l c a n i c a c t i v i t y . S i m i l a r v o l c a n i c sequences are described as host to volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits i n Archean greenstone b e l t s and the Miocene i s l a n d arcs. Introduction of a simple volcanic framework for c o r r e l a t i o n of the units i n the Jane Basin with those i n the Furry Creek v a l l e y : (1) provides a basis f o r more d e t a i l e d s t r a t i g r a p h i c and s t r u c t u r a l i n v e s t i g a t i o n s , ( 2 ) allows f o r the r e c o n s t r u c t i o n of the paleovolcanic environment and the l o c a t i o n of massive sulphide deposits within i t , (3) emphasizes the e x p l o r a t i o n p o t e n t i a l f o r volcanogenic massive sulphides east of the B r i t a n n i a Mine, and ( 4 ) i d e n t i f i e s favourable stratigraphy that might be recognizable elsewhere i n the B r i t a n n i a - Indian River pendant. P a g e 122 6 . 2 L O C A L G E O L O G Y , SUMMARY AND D I S C U S S I O N 6 . 2 . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n D i v i s i o n o f r o c k s o n B r i t a n n i a R i d g e i n t o t h r e e m o d e r a t e l y d i p p i n g p a c k a g e s p r o v i d e s a s t r o n g f r a m e w o r k f o r d e s c r i b i n g l o c a l s t r a t i g r a p h y . T h e t h r e e p a c k a g e s p r o v i d e a g e n e r a l l i t h o l o g i c g r o u p i n g t h a t r e f l e c t s t h e c h a n g e i n c h a r a c t e r o f a v o l c a n i c p i l e f r o m p r i m a r i l y m a g m a t i c , t o p y r o c l a s t i c , a n d f i n a l l y t o d o m i n a n t l y s e d i m e n t a r y . P a c k a g e d i v i s i o n s p r o v i d e u s e f u l " p r e - " a n d " p o s t " o r e d e s i g n a t i o n s . M o s t k n o w n o r e d e p o s i t s o c c u r w i t h i n p a c k a g e 2 , t h e m i n e s e q u e n c e . T h e c o n t a c t s b e t w e e n t h e p a c k a g e s r e p r e s e n t s t r a t i g r a p h i c h o r i z o n s t h a t a r e c l o s e t o s u l p h i d e m i n e r a l i z a t i o n a t t h e p r e s e n t s u r f a c e , a n d t o s e v e r a l o f t h e d e v e l o p e d o r e b o d i e s a t d e p t h . M i n e r a l i z e d c h e r t h o r i z o n s o f u n k n o w n p o t e n t i a l o c c u r w i t h i n p a c k a g e s 1 a n d 3 . A l t e r a t i o n o f r o c k s , d o m i n a n t i n p a c k a g e 2 , s u p p o r t s f o o t w a l l , m i n e , a n d h a n g i n g w a l l d e s i g n a t i o n s f o r p a c k a g e s 1, 2 a n d 3 , r e s p e c t i v e l y . D e t e r m i n a t i o n o f s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s w i t h i n a c o m p l e x p a l e o v o l c a n i c p i l e r e p r e s e n t i n g r e p e a t e d e r u p t i o n s , d e f o r m a t i o n a n d f a u l t i n g i s d i f f i c u l t . P o o r e x p o s u r e i n m o u n t a i n o u s t e r r a i n a n d s u s p e c t e d m o v e m e n t a l o n g m a j o r f a u l t s , o f f s e t t i n g l a r g e b l o c k s o f s t r a t a p o s e m o r e p r o b l e m s . C o r r e l a t i o n o f u n i t s a c r o s s t h e map f r o m t h e J a n e B a s i n t o t h e F u r r y C r e e k v a l l e y i s c o m p l i c a t e d by t h e w e s t t o e a s t f a c i e s c h a n g e f r o m p r i m a r i l y s u b a q u e o u s b a s i n a l P a g e 123 d e p o s i t i o n , t o a s h a l l o w a n d p o s s i b l y s u b a e r i a l e n v i r o n m e n t a b o v e f e l s i c d o m e s . T h e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f t h e t h r e e p a c k a g e s a s a n a p p r o x i m a t e m o n o c l i n e w i t h g e n e r a l l y c o n f o r m a b l e f o o t w a l l , m i n e a n d h a n g i n g w a l l s e q u e n c e s m i g h t b e t o o s i m p l e . T h e u n i t s , n u m b e r e d 1 t o 1 7 , g e n e r a l l y f o l l o w a y o u n g i n g s e q u e n c e , a l t h o u g h many o v e r l a p p i n g a n d u n c o n f o r m a b l e r e l a t i o n s h i p s e x i s t . R e p e t i t i o n o f s i m i l a r l i t h o l o g i c a l u n i t s a n d a p p a r e n t o v e r l a p o f u n i t s b e t w e e n p a c k a g e s m a k e d i v i s i o n s d i f f i c u l t t o e x t e n d a c r o s s t h e l e n g t h o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 . D e f o r m a t i o n a n d u n k n o w n d i s p l a c e m e n t a l o n g f a u l t s i n d i c a t e f u r t h e r c o m p l i c a t i o n s . M o r e d e t a i l e d s t r a t i g r a p h y i s n e e d e d f o r r e f i n e d s t r a t i g r a p h i c i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s , a n d f o r d i v i s i o n o f t h e map a r e a i n t o t i m e - s t r a t i g r a p h i c u n i t s , v o l c a n i c f a c i e s o r e r u p t i o n u n i t s . 6 . 2 . 2 P a c k a g e s P a c k a g e j _ ( u n i t s 1 t o 7 ) , f o r m s t h e b r o a d m a f i c b a s e f o r f e l s i c v o l c a n i s m . F e l s i c v o l c a n i s m , a t t h e t o p of p a c k a g e 1, and r e l a t e d e x h a l a t i v e a c t i v i t y p r o d u c e d s m a l l f e l s i c d o m e s and a s s o c i a t e d b r e c c i a a n d t u f f , w h i c h h o s t s u l p h i d e a c c u m u l a t i o n s of u n k n o w n e c o n o m i c p o t e n t i a l . W i t h i n p a c k a g e 1 , 1 ,000 m o f s p i l i t i z e d m a f i c f l o w s , f l o w - b r e c c i a and a g g l o m e r a t e ( u n i t s 2 and 7 ) , f o r m a p l a t f o r m o r r i d g e , i n t r u d e d by l o c a l r h y o l i t e p l u g s and domes ( u n i t s 3 and 4 ) , and o v e r l a i n by f e l s i c t u f f ( u n i t 5 ) . Page 124 Submarine p y r o c l a s t i c flows (unit 6), r e l a t e d to the f e l s i c volcanism, form fans up to 350 m thi c k between flows. The rocks of package 1 are suggestive of shallowing to emergent volcanism. A change from massive flows and p i l l o w lavas to i n c r e a s i n g amounts of v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s , thin-bedded t u f f , pumice and ac c r e t i o n a r y l a p i l l i upwards i n the package i s cons i s t e n t with the b u i l d i n g of an emergent v o l c a n i c cone on a mafic platform (Kokelaar, 1986). The reworked nature of beds i n unit 6 and pumice implies shoaling to subaerial explosive eruptions (Stix et aJL. , 1 986). Accretionary l a p i l l i within massive beds of f e l s i c t u f f (unit 5) may be i n d i c a t a t i v e of a subaerial environment above the f e l s i c domes. Massive and disseminated sulphides occur w i t h i n chert near the top of package 1. This chert surrounds p i l l o w s and flow-breccia i n u n i t s 2 and 7, i s within r h y o l i t e flow b r e c c i a at the margins of domes of unit 3, and i s interbedded with f e l s i c t u f f s o v e r l y i n g the domes. Units 5 and 6 are t e n t a t i v e l y c o r r e l a t e d on the basis of s i m i l a r fragment types. These u n i t s , gradational i n t o each other, represent p y r o c l a s t i c f a l l o u t and flow deposits. The l a t t e r form submarine fans between b a s a l t flows o f f the f l a n k s of the r h y o l i t e domes. The contact between package 1 and 2 i s marked by the i n t r u s i o n of a major d a c i t i c dome complex with r e l a t e d p y r o c l a s t i c t u f f and sulphide m i n e r a l i z a t i o n . Package 2 (units 8 to 12), l o c a l l y intrudes and o v e r l i e s package 1. It comprises an extensive dome complex (unit 9) 350 m thick that covers approximately 2 km i n the mapped area. Black P a g e 125 a r g i l l i t e a n d p y r o c l a s t i c r o c k s c o n f o r m a b l y o v e r l i e m a f i c f l o w s a n d b r e c c i a s o f p a c k a g e 1 . T h e i n t r u s i v e c o n t a c t i s m a r k e d b y a b l e a c h e d , a l t e r e d b r e c c i a t h a t i n c l u d e s f r a g m e n t s o f f e l d s p a r p o r p h y r i t i c b a s a l t ( u n i t 7 ) w i t h i n f e l s i c t u f f . A s e d i m e n t a r y b a s i n , d e v e l o p e d o n t h e w e s t e r n f l a n k o f t h e dome c o m p l e x , i s r e p r e s e n t e d b y 500 m o f b l a c k a r g i l l i t e ( u n i t 8 ) w i t h i n t e r b e d d e d f e l s i c b r e c c i a a n d t u f f i n t e r p r e t e d a s p y r o c l a s t i c f l o w s a n d t u r b i d i t e s p r o b a b l y r e l a t e d t o t h e d a c i t e dome c o m p l e x . T h e b a s i n a n d dome a r e b l a n k e t e d b y u n i t 1 0 , a n o n - w e l d e d s u b a q u e o u s f l o w 500 m t h i c k w i t h c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f a n i g n i m b r i t e s h e e t . T h e s h a p e a n d r e l a t i o n s h i p o f u n i t s 10 a n d 9 a r e s u g g e s t i v e o f a f l a t i g n i m b r i t e s h e e t l i n k e d t o t h e f o r m a t i o n o f a c r a t e r . U n i t 11 r e p r e s e n t s f a l l o u t d e p o s i t s d e p o s i t e d w i t h i n d e p r e s s i o n s i n t h e c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f b l a n k e t , o r d u r i n g q u i e t p e r i o d s b e t w e e n p u l s e s i n e r u p t i o n o f t h e f e l s i c p y r o c l a s t i c f l o w . B a s i n d e v e l o p m e n t d u r i n g t h e i n t r u s i o n - e x t r u s i o n o f t h e d a c i t e dome c o m p l e x ( u n i t 9 ) , i s i n d i c a t e d by t h e i n c r e a s i n g a p p e a r a n c e o f f e l s i c c l a s t s a n d t u f f a c e o u s i n t e r b e d s t o w a r d s t h e t o p o f u n i t 8 . A t l e a s t f i v e l a y e r s o f m i n e r a l i z e d c h e r t o c c u r i n t h e 300 m s t r a t i g r a p h i c t h i c k n e s s o f p a c k a g e 2 . T h e s e a r e s t r a t i g r a p h i c a l l y r e l a t e d t o t e n o r e b o d i e s o n t h e m a r g i n s o f t h e dome c o m p l e x . S t r i n g e r , m a s s i v e a n d b e d d e d s u l p h i d e a c c u m u l a t i o n s o c c u r w i t h i n b a s i n s m a r g i n a l t o f l o w b r e c c i a s a n d o v e r l y i n g p y r o c l a s t i c f a c i e s o f t h e dome c o m p l e x . H y d r o t h e r m a l a l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d t o t h e Page 126 deposition of the orebodies i s represented by q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e ( c h l o r i t e ) s c h i s t (unit 12). The contact between packages 2 and 3, d i v i d e s hydrothermally a l t e r e d f e l s i c u n i t s from fresh u n i t s . I t also marks the upper l i m i t of known economically s i g n i f i c a n t accumulations of massive sulphides. Package _3 (units 13 to 17), includes up to 350 m of massive and p y r o c l a s t i c f e l s i c flows gradational to 100 m of f i n e ash t u f f and at l e a s t 250 m of black a r g i l l i t e that caps the e n t i r e v o l c a n i c sequence across the length of Figure 3.2. Unit 13 represents the margins of massive or welded p y r o c l a s t i c flows (unit 14) fragmented by contact with water. A r g i l l i t e interbedded i n unit 14 i s evidence f o r subaqueous d e p o s i t i o n of the flows. Ash t u f f , u n i t 15, represents r e l a t e d f a l l o u t deposits or waning vol c a n i c a c t i v i t y above and around the l o c a l i z e d f e l s i c flows. A r g i l l i t e , u n i t 16, represents quiet submarine d e p o s i t i o n across the map area a f t e r f e l s i c v o l c a n i c a c t i v i t y has subsided. Waning volcanism i s also r e f l e c t e d i n the gradual change i n character of the package rocks from tuffaceous to sedimentary. Numerous unconformities i n the s t r a t i g r a p h y r e f l e c t the complexities of a v o l c a n i c environment. Extrusion of b a s a l t s (units 2 and 7), contemporaneous with the emplacement of l o c a l i z e d r h y o l i t e domes (unit 3), r e s u l t e d in overlapping r e l a t i o n s h i p s P a g e 127 among u n i t s i n p a c k a g e 1 . U p w a r d d i a p i r i c m o v e m e n t o f f e l s i c d o m e s d e f o r m i n g a n d p i e r c i n g t h e i r own c a r a p a c e s , d i a t r e m e b r e c c i a s p i e r c i n g s e d i m e n t s , a n d r e p e a t e d e r u p t i o n s o r i n t r u s i o n s p o s s i b l y f r o m t h e same v o l c a n i c v e n t r e s u l t i n c o m p l i c a t e d s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e l a t i o n s h i p s a r o u n d t h e d o m e s . L a t e r a l v a r i a t i o n a t t h e t o p o f p a c k a g e 1 i s d u e t o a f a c i e s c h a n g e f r o m w e s t t o e a s t a s s o c i a t e d w i t h a s h a l l o w i n g s u b m a r i n e e n v i r o n m e n t . S t r o n g a l t e r a t i o n w i t h i n p a c k a g e s 1 a n d 2 i s u s u a l l y a s s o c i a t e d w i t h s t r a t a b o u n d m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e d e p o s i t s . T h e m o s t a l t e r e d r o c k s o c c u r w i t h i n t h e m i n e s e q u e n c e , p a c k a g e 2 , w h e r e e n r i c h m e n t i n MgO a n d d e p l e t i o n i n CaO i s i n t e r p r e t e d t o h a v e b e e n r e l a t e d t o h y d r o t h e r m a l s o l u t i o n s t h a t f o r m e d t h e m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e s . A l t e r a t i o n w i t h i n m a s s i v e u n i t s o f p a c k a g e 1 i s p r i m a r i l y s e a w a t e r a l t e r a t i o n o f h o t l a v a s . O n l y r o c k s i n t h e h a n g i n g w a l l p a c k a g e 3 a n d l a t e r c r o s s c u t t i n g d y k e s a r e r e l a t i v e l y u n a l t e r e d . 6 . 2 . 3 S t r u c t u r e D e f o r m e d s t r a t a w i t h i n t h e map a r e a o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 f o r m a s o u t h w e s t - d i p p i n g m o n o c l i n e o n t h e s o u t h e r n l i m b o f a l a r g e , g e n t l y w e s t - p l u n g i n g f o l d , w h o s e a n t i c l i n a l a x i s l i e s n o r t h o f t h e m a p p e d a r e a . T h i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s u p p o r t s a y o u n g e r B r i t a n n i a f o r m a t i o n c o n f o r m a b l y o v e r l y i n g t h e G o a t M o u n t a i n f o r m a t i o n - - a n i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s i m i l a r t o t h o s e o f e a r l i e r m i n e r e p o r t s P a g e 128 ( S c h o f i e l d , 1 9 2 6 ; M c C u l l o u g h , 1 9 6 8 ) , b u t a t o d d s w i t h a m o r e r e c e n t d e t a i l e d s t u d y o f t h e d e f o r m e d B r i t a n n i a s u l p h i d e d e p o s i t s ( P a y n e e t a l . , 1 9 8 0 ) . P e r v a s i v e a x i a l p l a n a r f o l i a t i o n i s d e v e l o p e d a c r o s s t h e e n t i r e a r e a o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 , b u t i s m o s t e x t e n s i v e w i t h i n t h e h y d r o t h e r m a l l y a l t e r e d r o c k s w i t h i n t h e B r i t a n n i a o p e n p i t s . P a c k a g e b o u n d a r i e s a n d u n i t c o n t a c t s c a n b e t r a c e d a l o n g s t r i k e a n d t h e r e f o r e d o n o t a p p e a r t o h a v e b e e n a f f e c t e d b y d e f o r m a t i o n o n t h e s c a l e o f t h e m a p . M u c h o f t h e d e f o r m a t i o n i s c o n s i d e r e d t o be p e n e c o n t e m p o r a n e o u s w i t h t h e e m p l a c e m e n t o f t h e f e l s i c d o m e s . T h e " B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e " , t h e m o s t p r o m i n e n t s t r u c t u r e i n t h e B r i t a n n i a p e n d a n t , i s i n t e r p r e t e d h e r e a s a l a r g e , l i n e a r s e m i - c o n f o r m a b l e z o n e o f h y d r o t h e r m a l l y a l t e r e d r o c k s . r e l a t e d t o v o l c a n o g e n i c m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e d e p o s i t s t h a t b e c a m e p r e f e r e n t i a l l y d e f o r m e d b e t w e e n t h e c o n f i n i n g i n f l u e n c e o f m o r e c o m p e t e n t p a c k a g e s . T h e B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e i s t h e l a r g e s t a n d b e s t k n o w n e x a m p l e o f t h e t y p e o f a l t e r a t i o n a n d d e f o r m a t i o n a s s o c i a t e d w i t h m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e s w i t h i n t h e p e n d a n t , b u t s m a l l e r z o n e s o f s i m i l a r a l t e r a t i o n a n d s h e a r i n g o c c u r a t s e v e r a l h o r i z o n s t h r o u g h o u t t h e e n t i r e s t r a t i g r a p h i c s e q u e n c e . W i t h i n F i g u r e 3 . 2 t h e s h e a r z o n e i s a c r u d e l y s t r a t a b o u n d , 50 t o 300 m w i d e z o n e o f s c h i s t o s e r o c k s w i t h s t e e p l y s o u t h w e s t e r l y d i p p i n g f o l i a t i o n a n d b e d d i n g . T h i s s c h i s t o s i t y r o u g h l y p a r a l l e l s t h e t r e n d o f r h y o l i t e a n d d a c i t e domes o f p a c k a g e s 1 a n d 2 , w h i c h m i g h t h a v e b e e n l o c a l i z e d a l o n g l i n e a r f i s s u r e s . S h e a r i n g w i t h i n t h i s z o n e i s u n e v e n l y d e v e l o p e d ; P a g e 1 2 9 m a s s i v e , w e a k l y s h e a r e d a n d h i g h l y s h e a r e d u n i t s a l t e r n a t e o r o c c u r n e x t t o o n e a n o t h e r . T h e d e g r e e o f s h e a r i n g i s r e l a t e d b o t h t o t h e o r i g i n a l r o c k t y p e , a n d t o t h e d e g r e e o f a l t e r a t i o n p r i o r t o d e f o r m a t i o n . I n t e n s e s h e a r i n g i s c o i n c i d e n t w i t h q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e ( c h l o r i t e ) s c h i s t , a n d c o m m o n l y o b s c u r e s t h e o r i g i n a l r o c k t y p e . L o c a l l y , z o n e s o f s c h i s t a r e d i s c o r d a n t a n d t r a n s e c t l i t h o l o g i c b o u n d a r i e s . F o r e x a m p l e , a t t h e V a n c o u v e r w a t e r s h e d ( F i g . A . 1 ) a s c h i s t o s e z o n e c h a n g e s c o m p o s i t i o n f r o m s e r i c i t e - c h l o r i t e s c h i s t t o q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t a s i t c r o s s e s t h e c o n t a c t f r o m a n d e s i t i c b r e c c i a ( u n i t 2 ) t o f e l s i c t u f f ( u n i t 1 0 ) . T h e B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e was r e c o g n i z e d t o h a v e a n i m p o r t a n t a s s o c i a t i o n w i t h B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s e a r l y i n t h e d e v e l o p m e n t o f B r i t a n n i a M i n e ( S c h o f i e l d , 1 9 2 6 ; J a m e s , 1 9 2 9 ) a n d h a s b e e n t h e f o c u s o f n u m e r o u s r e p o r t s a n d s t u d i e s ( M c C u l l o u g h , 1 9 6 8 ; H o d g s o n , 1 9 6 9 ; P a y n e e t a l . , 1 9 8 0 ) . P a y n e e t a l . ( 1 9 8 0 ) d e s c r i b e t h e b r o a d , s t e e p l y s o u t h - d i p p i n g z o n e o f c o m p l e x d e f o r m a t i o n a s t h e a x i s a l o n g w h i c h v o l c a n i s m , h y d r o t h e r m a l a c t i v i t y , s h e a r d e f o r m a t i o n , f a u l t i n g , m e t a m o r p h i s m a n d t h e B r i t a n n i a a n t i c l i n e w e r e c e n t e r e d . H o d g s o n ( 1 9 6 9 ) d e s c r i b e d i t a s a z o n e o f f i s s i l e r o c k , a p p r o x i m a t e l y 450 m w i d e , t h a t c a n b e t r a c e d f o r 13 km f r o m Howe S o u n d , e a s t t o w h e r e i t i s t e r m i n a t e d b y C o a s t R a n g e i n t r u s i o n s . T h e s t r i k e o f t h e s t e e p l y s o u t h - d i p p i n g s h e a r z o n e c h a n g e s f r o m e a s t - w e s t a t t h e J a n e B a s i n , t o e a s t - s o u t h e a s t ( M c C u l l o u g h , 1 9 6 8 ) i n t h e e a s t e r n p a r t o f t h e p e n d a n t . A l l t h e B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s P a g e 130 o c c u r w i t h i n a 1 .5 km l o n g s e g m e n t o f t h e s h e a r z o n e , w h i c h v a r i e s i n t h i c k n e s s a s f o l l o w s ( F i g . A . 1 ) : 50 m t o t h e w e s t o f t h e J a n e B a s i n , 300 t o 1 , 2 0 0 m a t t h e E m p r e s s a n d B l u f f d e p o s i t s , 600 m a t V i c t o r i a , a n d 900 m a t F a i r w e s t . M c C u l l o u g h ( 1 9 6 8 ) f o u n d t h e l i m i t s o f t h e s h e a r z o n e t o b e r e l a t e d t o r o c k t y p e . W i t h i n t h e s h e a r z o n e b e d d i n g n e a r l y p a r a l l e l s s c h i s t o s i t y . B e c a u s e s c h i s t o s i t y i s n o t g e n e r a l l y p a r a l l e l t o m a j o r l i t h o l o g i c c o n t a c t s , M c C u l l o u g h ( 1 9 6 8 ) s u g g e s t e d t r a n s p o s i t i o n o f t h e b e d d i n g h a d o c c u r r e d w i t h i n t h e s h e a r z o n e . R o c k s w i t h i n m u c h o f w h a t w a s m a p p e d a s t h e s h e a r z o n e i n p r e v i o u s r e p o r t s ( P a y n e e t a _ l . , 1 980 ; M c C u l l o u g h , 1 9 6 8 ) a r e i n f a c t r e l a t i v e l y u n d e f o r m e d a n d a r e s e p a r a t e d , h e r e , i n t o s e p a r a t e r o c k t y p e s a n d v o l c a n i c f a c i e s ( u n i t s 1 0 , 1 1 , a n d 1 2 ) . A m o n o c l i n e b e s t d e s c r i b e s t h e s t r u c t u r e o f t h e p a c k a g e s i n F i g u r e 3 . 2 . P e r v a s i v e n o r t h w e s t - t r e n d i n g f o l i a t i o n a n d a s t e e p e n i n g o f d i p s i n p a c k a g e 2 s u g g e s t s t h a t t h e s t r a t i g r a p h i c s e q u e n c e f o r m s a m o n c l i n e o n t h e s o u t h w e s t - d i p p i n g l i m b o f a l a r g e f o l d . T h e i n t e r s e c t i o n o f c l e a v a g e s t e e p e r t h a n b e d d i n g i n d i c a t e s t h a t t h e a n t i c l i n a l a x i s o f t h i s f o l d l i e s t o t h e n o r t h o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 ( o n o r n o r t h o f G o a t R i d g e ) , a n d t h e s y n c l i n a l a x i s l i e s s o u t h o f t h e map a r e a ( s o u t h o f D o w n i n g R i d g e ) . C l e a v a g e - b e d d i n g l i n e a t i o n s i n d i c a t e t h a t d s p l u n g e a b o u t 30 d e g r e e s w e s t . M i n o r f o l d s o c c u r i n l e s s c o m p e t e n t , f i n e - g r a i n e d a r g i l l i t e a n d t u f f u n i t s o f p a c k a g e 2 . M a j o r l i t h o l o g i c b o u n d a r i e s a n d p a c k a g e b o u n d a r i e s a r e n o t m a r k e d l y f o l d e d . P a g e 131 I n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f t h e o v e r a l l s t r u c t u r e i n t h e map a r e a ( F i g . 3 . 2 ) a s a m o n o c l i n e i s s i m i l a r t o p r o p o s a l s b y S c h o f i e l d ( 1 9 2 6 ) , H o d g s o n ( 1 9 6 7 ) a n d M c C u l l o u g h ( 1 9 6 8 ) , a n d a t o d d s w i t h i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s o f J a m e s (1 9 2 9 ) a n d P a y n e e t aJL. (1 9 8 0 ) . T h i s a u t h o r f o u n d t h e f o l l o w i n g e v i d e n c e s u p p o r t i n g t h e m o n o c l i n e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n : ( 1 ) t o p s c o n s i s t e n t l y f a c e t h e s o u t h w e s t e v e r y w h e r e i n t h e map a r e a , ( t h e o p p o s i t e f a c i n g i s r e q u i r e d n o r t h e a s t o f t h e o p e n p i t s f o r t h e p r o p o s e d a n t i c l i n a l a x i s p l a c e d a l o n g t h e B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e t h r o u g h t h e J a n e B a s i n ) , w i t h t h e e x c e p t i o n o f n o r t h - d i p p i n g t u f f a c e o u s u n i t s m a n t l i n g r h y o l i t i c d o m e s i n p a c k a g e 1 , ( 2 ) a x i a l p l a n a r f o l i a t i o n c u t s b e d d i n g w i t h a n a c u t e a n g l e t o t h e n o r t h i n o u t c r o p s o f p a c k a g e s 1 a n d 2 o n t h e G l o r y H o l e R o a d n o r t h e a s t o f t h e o p e n p i t s ( t h e o p p o s i t e i s r e q u i r e d f o r c l o s u r e o f t h e B r i t a n n i a a n t i c l i n e i n t h e o p e n p i t s ) , ( 3 ) l a r g e s c a l e r e p e t i t i o n o f u n i t s e x p e c t e d i n a f o l d e d s e q u e n c e i s n o t o b s e r v e d w i t h i n t h e map a r e a , ( 4 ) t h e s y n c l i n e i n a r g i l l i t e s o n t h e n o r t h - s o u t h t r e n d i n g r i d g e e a s t o f t h e o p e n p i t s , a n d t h e c l o s u r e o f a n a n t i c l i n e i n a r g i l l i t e s a b o v e t h e J a n e p i t s u p p o r t i n g t h e p r e s e n c e o f t h e B r i t a n n i a A n t i c l i n e ( P a y n e e_t a l . , 1 9 8 0 ) w a s n o t o b s e r v e d i n o u t c r o p , a n d ( 5 ) t h e c o r r e l a t i o n o f c o a r s e d a c i t i c b r e c c i a s t o f o r m a f o l d e d f e l s i c h o r i z o n i s t e n u o u s , a n d f i e l d e x a m i n a t i o n , h e r e , o f t h i s u n i t s u p p o r t e d s e p a r a t i o n i n t o s i m i l a r b u t s e p a r a t e h o r i z o n s o f f e l s i c v o l c a n i c s . P a g e 132 N u m e r o u s maj o r a n d m i n o r f a u l t s c u t a n d o f f s e t t h e d e f o r m e d s t r a t a i n t h e B r i t a n n i a R i d g e a r e a . T h e e x i s t a n c e , l o c a t i o n a n d m o v e m e n t o f m a j o r f a u l t s r e m a i n c o n t r o v e r s i a l ; v a r i o u s , o f t e n c o n f l i c t i n g , i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s h a v e b e e n made r e g a r d i n g t h e m . A d e t a i l e d e x a m i n a t i o n o f f a u l t s i n t h e map a r e a r e q u i r e s s t r a t i g r a p h i c c o n t r o l s a n d i s b e y o n d t h e s c o p e o f t h i s e x a m i n a t i o n . D e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e t w o m a j o r f a u l t s m a r k e d o n F i g u r e 3 . 2 f o l l o w s . T h e B r i t a n n i a R i d g e f a u l t s t r i k e s e a s t - w e s t t o s o u t h e a s t a c r o s s t h e n o r t h e r n s l o p e o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e ( F i g . 3 . 2 ) , a n d d i p s m o d e r a t e l y t o t h e s o u t h w e s t . T h e f a u l t c u t s u n i t 8 i n p a c k a g e 2 a t t h e w e s t e r n e d g e o f t h e m a p , s e p a r a t e s u n i t s 3 a n d 4 f r o m u n i t 1 a t t h e e a s t e r n e d g e o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e , a n d i s t r u n c a t e d t o t h e e a s t b y t h e M o u n t a i n L a k e p l u t o n ( u n i t 2 0 ) . T h e f a u l t i s i n t e r p r e t e d a s a s y n v o l c a n i c n o r m a l f a u l t t h a t l o c a l i z e d t h e l a r g e d a c i t i c dome c o m p l e x ( u n i t 9 ) a l o n g t h e e n t i r e l e n g t h o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e . D a c i t e o c c u p i e s t h e B r i t a n n i a R i d g e f a u l t a l o n g B r i t a n n i a R i d g e w e s t o f t h e J a n e B a s i n ( M c C u l l o u g h , 1 9 6 8 ) . S u b s i d e n c e o f t h e s o u t h s i d e o f t h e f a u l t f o r m e d a d e p r e s s i o n i n w h i c h t h e o r e b o d i e s now l i e ( G i b s o n , 1 9 8 4 , u n p u b l i s h e d r e p o r t ) . T h i s same f a u l t i s i n t e r p r e t e d b y p r e v i o u s a u t h o r s ( J a m e s , 1 9 2 9 ; I r v i n e , 1 9 4 8 ) a s a s t r o n g t h r u s t f a u l t f o r m i n g a f o o t w a l l a t t h e n o r t h e r n b o r d e r o f t h e B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e . I r v i n e ( 1 9 4 8 ) i n d i c a t e d t h a t a l l o r e b o d i e s , e x c e p t t h e J a n e , w e r e n e a r o r o n t h e h a n g i n g w a l l o f t h i s f a u l t . P a g e 133 T h e n o r t h e a s t - t r e n d i n g C y r t i n a C r e e k f a u l t ( F i g . 3 . 2 ) h a s r i g h t l a t e r a l d i s p l a c e m e n t , s i m i l a r t o o t h e r f a u l t s w i t h a s i m i l a r o r i e n t a t i o n o n F i g u r e 3 . 2 . S p a t i a l d i s t r i b u t i o n o f t h e f a u l t t o r h y o l i t i c d o m e s s u g g e s t t h a t t h e f a u l t may be s y n v o l c a n i c a n d h a s b e e n r e m o b i l i z e d s e v e r a l t i m e s d u r i n g t h e h i s t o r y o f t h e v o l c a n i c p i l e . L a t e r e a c t i v a t i o n i s a l s o i n d i c a t e d b e c a u s e t h e C y r t i n a C r e e k f a u l t c u t s t h e g r a n o d i o r i t e i n t r u s i o n ( u n i t 2 0 ) . S e v e r a l s m a l l , l a t e r f a u l t s w i t h a s i m i l a r o r i e n t a t i o n o c c u r s o u t h o f F u r r y C r e e k , a n d l o c a l l y h a v e b e e n i n t r u d e d b y a n d e s i t i c d y k e s . A r i g h t l a t e r a l d i s p l a c e m e n t s i m i l a r t h e C y r t i n a C r e e k f a u l t h a s o f f s e t a r g i l l i t e ( u n i t 1 6 ) w i t h a s t e e p n o r t h e r l y d i p p i n g f o l i a t i o n s o u t h o f t h e o p e n p i t s ( F i g . 3 . 2 : s e c t i o n A - A ' ) f r o m o u t c r o p s o f t h e same l i t h o l o g y a n d f o l i a t i o n o b s e r v e d a b o v e t h e J a n e p i t j u s t b e y o n d t h e w e s t e r n e d g e o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 . 6 . 3 V O L C A N I C H I S T O R Y 6 . 3 . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n G e o l o g i c a l m a p p i n g a l o n g the e a s t s e c t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e i n t h e B r i t a n n i a - I n d i a n R i v e r pendant a l l o w s f o r a t e n t a t i v e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f t h e p a l e o v o l c a n i c e n v i r o n m e n t . S e v e n t e e n v o l c a n o - s e d i m e n t a r y u n i t s w i t h i n the t h r e e packages d e s c r i b e a v o l c a n i c p i l e t h a t changes c h a r a c t e r from p r e d o m i n a t e l y m a f i c f l o w s i n package 1, t o a f e l s i c i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e dome c o m p l e x P a g e 1 3 4 w i t h a t h i c k p y r o c l a s t i c b l a n k e t i n p a c k a g e 2 , t o a p y r o c l a s t i c g r a d a t i o n a l t o s e d i m e n t a r y c h a r a c t e r i n p a c k a g e 3 . V o l c a n i c f a c i e s i n d i c a t e t h e a r e a o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 r e p r e s e n t s s u b a q u e o u s t o p o s s i b l y s u b a e r i a l d e p o s i t i o n o n t h e f l a n k s o f a l a r g e f e l s i c s t r a t o v o l c a n o c o n s t r u c t e d o n t h e p l a t f o r m f o r m e d b y e x t e n s i v e m a f i c s u b a q u e o u s f l o w s . F i g u r e 3 . 2 r e p r e s e n t s a t l e a s t o n e m a j o r v o l c a n i c c e n t r e , d e f i n e d b y F i s h e r a n d S c h m i n c k e ( 1 9 8 4 ) a s a n a r e a t h a t i n c l u d e s o n e s o u r c e o r many c l o s e l y s p a c e d s o u r c e s o f v o l c a n i c r o c k . T h e c i r c u l a r t o e l o n g a t e d d o m e s w i t h i n F i g u r e 3 . 2 may r e p r e s e n t s e p a r a t e v o l c a n i c v e n t s . P r o b l e m s i n s t r a t i g r a p h i c a n a l y s i s o f r o c k u n i t s a n d t i m e - s t r a t i g r a p h i c c o r r e l a t i o n o f p a c k a g e s a n d u n i t s a l o n g t h e e a s t e r n s e c t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e a r e d u e l a r g e l y t o t h e v e r t i c a l a n d l a t e r a l c h a n g e i n t h e r o c k r e c o r d . T h i s i s i n d i c a t e d b y t h e s t r a t i g r a p h i c c o l u m n s i n F i g u r e 6 . 1 , a n d c a n b e a t t r i b u t e d t o a n o r m a l n e a r - s o u r c e v o l c a n i c e n v i r o n m e n t . C o m p l e x i t i e s i n a n e a r - s o u r c e v o l c a n i c e n v i r o n m e n t i n c l u d e (c_f . F i s h e r a n d S c h m i n k e , 1 9 8 4 ) : ( 1 ) a b u n d a n t u n c o n f o r m i t i e s , ( 2 ) r a p i d f a c i e s c h a n g e s , ( 3 ) s y n c h r o n o u s r a p i d e r o s i o n , ( 4 ) i n t e r f i n g e r i n g o f v o l c a n i c s a n d n o n v o l c a n i c s , a n d ( 5 ) t h e o c c u r r e n c e o f o l d e r u n i t s s u c c e e d i n g y o u n g e r u n i t s i n v e r t i c a l s e q u e n c e . F i g u r e 6 . 1 i s a r e c o n s t r u c t i o n b a s e d o n a g r o u p i n g o f u n i t s , w i t h i n t h e a r e a o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 , i n t o m a g m a t i c o r e r u p t i v e e p i s o d e s w i t h i n t e r v e n i n g i n t e r v a l s o f s e d i m e n t a r y d e p o s i t i o n . M a s s i v e s u l p h i d e d e p o s i t s w i t h i n t h e s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e c o r d a c c u m u l a t e d d u r i n g p a u s e s i n Page 135 Northwest Southeast BRITANNIA A V ICTORIA B C Y R T I N A C W A T E R S H E D D 1 FIGURE 6.1 C o r r e l a t i o n of u n i t s and i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of v o l c a n i c h i s t o r y of the east s e c t i o n of B r i t a n n i a Ridge, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. S t r a t i g r a p h i c columns are from c r o s s - s e c t i o n s i n F i g u r e 3.2. P a g e 136 v o l c a n i c a c t i v i t y . 6 . 3 . 2 V o l c a n i c A c t i v i t y R o c k s i n t h e map a r e a o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 a r e d i v i s i b l e i n t o f i v e g e n e r a l m a g m a t i c o r e r u p t i v e e p i s o d e s b a s e d o n i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s o f t h e s t r a t i g r a p h i c r e c o r d i n F i g u r e 6 . 1 . T h e v o l c a n i c h i s t o r y o f t h e e a s t e r n s e c t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e i s i n f e r r e d b y t h e s e q u e n c e o f e p i s o d e s d r a w n i n F i g u r e 6 . 1 . T h e s c a l e a n d t i m i n g o f t h e e p i s o d e s a n d e r u p t i v e c y c l e s i s u n k n o w n . F i g u r e 6 . 1 t e n t a t i v e l y d e f i n e s f o u r m a i n e p i s o d e s s e p a r a t e d b y p a u s e s r e p r e s e n t e d b y s e d i m e n t a r y u n i t s 5 , 8 , 11 a n d 1 6 . T h e e p i s o d e s a r e d e f i n e d i n t e r m s o f c o m p o s i t i o n a n d o f i n t e r v e n i n g i n a c t i v e p e r i o d s i n d i c a t e d b y t h i c k s e q u e n c e s o f f i n e - g r a i n e d s e d i m e n t a r y b e d s . E a c h e p i s o d e c o n t a i n s s e v e r a l e r u p t i v e e v e n t s o r e r u p t i o n u n i t s . T h i c k a r g i l l a c e o u s s e q u e n c e s o f u n i t s 1 a n d 16 u n d e r l i e a n d c a p t h e v o l c a n i c s e q u e n c e d e s c r i b e d i n t h e map a r e a . T h e o l d e s t m a g m a t i c e p i s o d e i s o f m a f i c c o m p o s i t i o n f r o m a n u n k n o w n s o u r c e . T h e o t h e r t h r e e e p i s o d e s , o f v a r y i n g s c a l e s , a r e o f c a l c - a l k a l i n e f e l s i c i n t r u s i o n s , f l o w s a n d p y r o c l a s t i c s . T h e s e f e l s i c e r u p t i o n s a r e a l l l o c a l i z e d a l o n g a n o r t h w e s t e r n t r e n d p a r a l l e l t o t h e B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e . E p i s o d e o n e , t h e l o w e r m o s t e r u p t i v e e v e n t , i s r e p r e s e n t e d by o v e r 1 , 0 0 0 m o f s u b m a r i n e m a f i c f l o w s ( u n i t s 2 a n d 7 ) , a n d i s P a g e 1 3 7 b o u n d e d b y a r g i l l i t e s o f u n i t 1 a n d u n i t 8 . P i l l o w s , h y a l o c l a s t i t e s , a n d i n t e r f i n g e r i n g s u b m a r i n e a s h f l o w t u f f i n d i c a t e t h e e n v i r o n m e n t o f d e p o s i t i o n w a s s u b m a r i n e ; h o w e v e r , s m o o t h f l o w s u r f a c e s a n d c o l u m n a r j o i n t s o b s e r v e d o n s e c t i o n B - B * ( F i g . 3 . 2 ) m i g h t i n d i c a t e a l o c a l a r e a o f c o n f i n e d s u b a e r i a l a c c u m u l a t i o n . T h e e p i s o d e r e p r e s e n t s q u i e t e x t r u s i o n o f f l o w s t h a t f o r m e d l o w b r o a d s h i e l d s a n d p l a t e a u s c h a r a c t e r i s t i c o f a H a w a i i a n o r S t r o m b o l i a n e r u p t i o n . I n t e r f i n g e r i n g a g g l o m e r a t e a n d b r e c c i a r e p r e s e n t s a s l o p e o r f l o w f r o n t a d j a c e n t t o t h e e x t e n s i v e f l o w s . E x t r u s i o n o f m a f i c f l o w s c o n t i n u e d d u r i n g a n d a f t e r t h e s u b s e q u e n t e r u p t i o n o f r h y o l i t e ( u n i t 3 ) . T h i s i s i n d i c a t e d b y i n t e r b e d d e d s u b m a r i n e a s h f l o w s ( u n i t 6 ) w i t h f e l s i c f r a g m e n t s a n d p u m i c e , a n d p i l l o w e d f l o w s ( u n i t 7 ) t h a t o v e r l i e o r a b u t f e l s i c l a v a d o m e s ( u n i t 3 ) . S t r u c t u r a l e v i d e n c e a n d l i t h o l o g i c a l s i m i l a r i t e s s u g g e s t t h i s m a g m a t i c e p i s o d e r e p r e s e n t s t h e t o p o f a t h i c k s e q u e n c e o f s o u t h w e s t - d i p p i n g b a s a l t f l o w s d e s c r i b e d o n G o a t R i d g e b y H e a h ( 1 9 8 2 ) . E p i s o d e t w o , a l s o w i t h i n p a c k a g e 1 s t r a t i g r a p h y , i s r e p r e s e n t e d b y a n i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e r h y o l i t e ( u n i t 3 ) dome c o m p l e x up t o 400 m t h i c k t h a t i s l o c a l i z e d a l o n g B r i t a n n i a R i d g e . T h e r h y o l i t e dome c o m p l e x s i t s d i r e c t l y o n b a s a l t f l o w s a n d c o m p r i s e s : ( 1 ) m a s s i v e d o m e s r i m m e d b y a u t o b r e c c i a ( u n i t 3) o v e r l a i n b y ( 2 ) a b l o c k y b r e c c i a ( u n i t 4 ) t h a t r e p r e s e n t s t h e P a g e 138 s u b m a r i n e e x p l o s i v e d i s i n t e g r a t i o n o f t h e r h y o l i t e d o m e , a n d ( 3 ) p y r o c l a s t i c d e p o s i t s ( u n i t s 5 a n d 6 ) , w h i c h b l a n k e t a n d f o r m s u b m a r i n e f a n s up t o 350 m t h i c k o n t h e f l a n k s o f t h e d o m e s a n d o f f t h e u n d e r l y i n g b a s a l t r i d g e . U n i t 4 i s g r a d a t i o n a l t o f e l s i c c r y s t a l a s h t u f f ( u n i t 5) c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y a c c r e t i o n a r y l a p i l l i a n d i n t e r b e d d e d l a p i l l i s t o n e a n d a r g i l l i t e . W e l l b e d d e d , p o o r l y s o r t e d u n i t s w i t h a n g u l a r v i t r i c a n d l i t h i c f r a g m e n t s a n d a c c r e t i o n a r y l a p i l l i a r e i n d i c a t i v e o f a h y d r o c l a s t i c o r V u l c a n i a n e r u p t i o n ( F i s h e r a n d S c h m i n c k e , 1 9 8 4 ) . F i n i n g u p w a r d s a n d g r a d a t i o n o f t u f f a c e o u s b e d s t o a r g i l l i t e i n u n i t 5 m a r k s t h e u p p e r b o u n d a r y o f t h e s e c o n d e r u p t i v e e p i s o d e . E p i s o d e t h r e e , o f d a c i t i c c o m p o s i t i o n , c o m p r i s e s t h e 900 m t h i c k i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e dome c o m p l e x ( u n i t 9) i n t h e c e n t r a l map a r e a , a n d t h e p y r o c l a s t i c u n i t ( u n i t 1 0 ) t h a t c o v e r s t h e e n t i r e map a r e a . U n i t 9 a p p a r e n t l y i n t r u d e s u n i t 8 a r g i l l i t e s a n d t h e u n d e r l y i n g m a f i c f l o w s o f u n i t 7 . O v a l b o d i e s a s s o c i a t e d w i t h , a n d r i m m e d by b r e c c i a z o n e s a n d f r a g m e n t s o f d a c i t e , g l a s s a n d a r g i l l i t e a r e t y p i c a l o f p h r e a t o m a g m a t i c e r u p t i o n s c a u s e d by magma c o n t a c t i n g c o n s o l i d a t e d b u t s t i l l w e t s e d i m e n t s ( F i s h e r a n d S c h m i n k e , 1 9 8 4 ) . P o w e r f u l a n d p r o b a b l y r e l a t e d e r u p t i o n s p r o d u c e d a 500 m t h i c k b l a n k e t o f c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f ( i n c l u d i n g p a r t l y w e l d e d a s h f l o w s , w a t e r l a i n t u f f , m i n o r d e b r i s f l o w s a n d a r g i l l i t e ) . T e r r i g e n o u s a n d c h e m i c a l s e d i m e n t a t i o n f o l l o w i n g e r u p t i o n s o f p y r o c l a s t i c a s h f l o w s i s r e p r e s e n t e d by u n i t 11. H o t s p r i n g a c t i v i t y d e p o s i t e d m o s t o f t h e B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s a t P a g e 139 s e v e r a l h o r i z o n s d u r i n g t h i s p y r o c l a s t i c v o l c a n i s m . E p i s o d e f o u r c o m p r i s e s t h e 300 m t h i c k m a s s i v e o r w e l d e d a n d p a r t i a l l y w e l d e d r h y o l i t e a s h f l o w s o f p a c k a g e 3 t h a t o v e r l i e h y d r o t h e r m a l l y a l t e r e d r o c k s o f p a c k a g e 2 . W a n i n g v o l c a n i c a c t i v i t y i s r e p r e s e n t e d b y a g r a d u a l i n c r e a s e i n t e r r i g e n o u s m a t e r i a l i n t h e f i n e - g r a i n e d b e d s o f u n i t 1 5 . U n i t 16 f o r m s a t h i c k a r g i l l i t e c o v e r a c r o s s t h e l e n g t h o f t h e map a r e a t h a t m a r k s t h e e n d o f f e l s i c v o l c a n i s m i n F i g u r e 3 . 2 . A n a d d i t i o n a l e p i s o d e o f i n t e r m e d i a t e v o l c a n i s m a t t h e t o p o f t h e p i l e i s r e p r e s e n t e d b y t h e p o o r l y d o c u m e n t e d a n d e s i t e f l o w s a n d b r e c c i a ( u n i t 1 7 ) t h a t a r e i n t e r b e d d e d i n u n i t 16 a r g i l l i t e i n t h e s o u t h w e s t e r n c o r n e r o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 . 6 . 3 . 3 S u l p h i d e s S u l p h i d e m i n e r a l i z a t i o n , a s s o c i a t e d w i t h many c h e r t h o r i z o n s t h r o u g h o u t t h e s t r a t i g r a p h i c c o l u m n s ( F i g . 6 .1 ) , o c c u r s a s d i s s e m i n a t i o n s , v e i n s , b r e c c i a s , b e d s a n d m a s s i v e d e p o s i t s i n s h o w i n g s a n d d e v e l o p e d o r e b o d i e s . T h e s e s u l p h i d e h o r i z o n s a r e e x h a l i t e s d e p o s i t e d by h y d r o t h e r m a l s o l u t i o n s r e l a t e d t o s p e c i f i c f e l s i c v o l c a n i c e v e n t s . S u l p h i d e s , i n d i c a t e d i n F i g u r e 6 . 1 , a r e r e l a t e d s p a t i a l l y t o f e l s i c domes w h e r e t h e y a c c u m u l a t e d o n t h e i r f l a n k s , w i t h i n b r e c c i a s , t u f f s o r b e d d e d s e d i m e n t s m a n t l i n g t h e d o m e s . T h e m o s t s i g n i f i c a n t a c c u m u l a t i o n s o c c u r a t t h e u p p e r a n d P a g e 140 l o w e r c o n t a c t s o f p a c k a g e 2 . T h e s e a r e r e l a t e d t o t h e m a j o r i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e dome c o m p l e x ( u n i t 9 ) , a n d p y r o c l a s t i c b l a n k e t ( u n i t 1 0 ) , o f t h e t h i r d e r u p t i v e e p i s o d e . D e v e l o p e d o r e b o d i e s a n d s h o w i n g s o f t h e B r i t a n n i a M i n e , r e p r e s e n t a s e r i e s o f s t a c k e d l e n s e s f r o m p r o d u c t i v e h y d r o t h e r m a l c e n t e r s l o c a l i z e d a l o n g a l i n e a r , m a r k e d now b y a l t e r e d r o c k ( u n i t 1 2 ) . M i n o r a c c u m u l a t i o n s o c c u r i n p a c k a g e 1 s u r r o u n d i n g a n d o v e r l y i n g s m a l l r h y o l i t e d o m e s ( u n i t 3 ) , w i t h i n t h e u p p e r b a s a l t f l o w s ( u n i t s 2 a n d 7 ) , a n d a s s o c i a t e d w i t h r h y o l i t e a s h f l o w s ( u n i t s 13 a n d 1 4 ) i n p a c k a g e 3 . H y d r o t h e r m a l a l t e r a t i o n , s i m i l a r t o e x t e n s i v e a l t e r a t i o n r e p r e s e n t e d b y u n i t 1 2 , i s l o c a l l y p r e s e n t a t t h e s e s h o w i n g s . 6 . 4 C O N C L U S I O N S AND R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S 6 . 4 . 1 S t r a t i g r a p h y a n d S t r u c t u r e R o c k s w i t h i n t h e map a r e a o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 w e r e d i v i d e d i n t o t h r e e m a i n p a c k a g e s b a s e d o n l i t h o l o g y a n d p o s i t i o n r e l a t i v e t o t h e B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s . P a r a l l e l b e d d i n g , c o n s i s t e n t f a c i n g t o t h e s o u t h w e s t , a n d a g r a d a t i o n a l c h a r a c t e r b e t w e e n u n i t s a c r o s s p a c k a g e b o u n d a r i e s a r e c o n s i s t e n t w i t h t h e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f t h r e e g e n e r a l l y c o n f o r m a b l e p a c k a g e s f o r m i n g a m o n o c l i n a l p a n e l y o u n g i n g t o t h e s o u t h w e s t . T h e c h a n g e s i n v o l c a n i c r o c k t e x t u r e s a n d g r o s s c h e m i s t r y among t h e p a c k a g e s m i g h t r e f l e c t t h e d i f f e r e n t i a t i o n o f a s o u r c e a r e a r e l a t e d t o a s i n g l e v o l c a n i c p i l e , o r m i g h t P a g e 141 r e p r e s e n t t w o d i s t i n c t i n t e r f i n g e r i n g v o l c a n i c s e q u e n c e s . A l t e r e d a n d d e f o r m e d r o c k s u n d e r l y i n g t h e e a s t s e c t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e f o r m a c o n t i n u o u s s u c c e s s i o n o f m a f i c t o f e l s i c v o l c a n i c s p r o g r e s s i v e l y y o u n g i n g t o t h e s o u t h w e s t . E x t e n s i v e m a f i c f l o w s a n d s m a l l l o c a l r h y o l i t e d o m e s a r e i n t r u d e d a n d o v e r l a i n b y a l a r g e i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e d a c i t e dome c o m p l e x a s s o c i a t e d w i t h a w e s t e r n b a s i n a l f a c i e s . T h i s dome c o m p l e x a n d b a s i n f a c i e s a r e b l a n k e t e d b y 500 m o f c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f t h a t r e p r e s e n t s a s u b a q u e o u s p y r o c l a s t i c f l o w ; t h i s u n i t h o s t s t h e B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s . T h i c k c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f i s g r a d a t i o n a l u p w a r d s t o s i m i l a r , l e s s e x t e n s i v e , p a r t i a l l y w e l d e d r h y o l i t e f l o w s a n d t u f f s o v e r l a i n b y o v e r 4 0 0 m o f b l a c k a r g i l l i t e . H y d r o t h e r m a l a l t e r a t i o n r e l a t e d t o t h e d e p o s i t i o n o f m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e s h a s r e s u l t e d i n h o s t r o c k s e n r i c h e d i n M g O , d e p l e t e d i n C a O , a n d m e t a m o r p h o s e d t o q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t . T h e v o l c a n i c s e q u e n c e i s d e f o r m e d i n t o a m o n o c l i n e t h a t g e n e r a l l y d i p s m o d e r a t e l y t o t h e s o u t h w e s t , b u t i s g e n e r a l l y s t e e p l y d i p p i n g a d j a c e n t t o t h e B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s . A s t e e p l y d i p p i n g a x i a l p l a n a r f o l i a t i o n i s u n e v e n l y d e v e l o p e d a c r o s s t h e map a r e a . U n a l t e r e d d a c i t e a n d a n d e s i t e d y k e s i n t r u d e f a u l t z o n e s a n d c u t t h e d e f o r m e d v o l c a n i c s e q u e n c e . 6 . 4 . 2 V o l c a n i c E n v i r o n m e n t T h e t r a n s i t i o n f r o m a d o m i n a n t l y m a f i c t o f e l s i c s e q u e n c e P a g e 142 r e p r e s e n t s t h e d e v e l o p m e n t o f f e l s i c d o m e s , w i t h r e l a t e d p y r o c l a s t i c r o c k s a n d h y d r o t h e r m a l a c t i v i t y , o n t o p o f a m a f i c p l a t f o r m . T h e i n i t i a l e r u p t i o n o f r h y o l i t e d o m e s w a s c o n t e m p o r a n e o u s w i t h t h e f i n a l e x t r u s i o n o f b a s a l t f l o w s . A m a j o r e r u p t i o n , l o c a l i z e d b y t h e B r i t a n n i a R i d g e f a u l t , r e s u l t e d i n t h e d e v e l o p m e n t o f a n i n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e d a c i t e dome c o m p l e x , a n d a d j a c e n t b a s i n , o n t h e b a s a l t p l a t e a u . T h i s e r u p t i o n w a s f o l l o w e d b y o n e m a j o r , a n d s e v e r a l m i n o r p h r e a t i c e x p l o s i o n s t h a t d e p o s i t e d c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f , s e p a r a t e d b y p e r i o d s o f q u i e t d e p o s i t i o n r e p r e s e n t e d b y i n t e r b e d d e d f i n e t u f f a n d a r g i l l i t e . T h e d e p o s i t i o n a l e n v i r o n m e n t i s d o m i n a n t l y s u b m a r i n e . T h e r e i s a s h a l l o w i n g u p w a r d s e q u e n c e i n t h e s o u t h w e s t e r n p a r t o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 . , a n d p o s s i b l y a t r a n s i t i o n t o s u b a e r i a l v o l c a n i s m i n t h e e a s t e r n p a r t o f t h e f i g u r e . A n i n c r e a s e i n v e s i c l e s , a c c r e t i o n a r y l a p i l l i , p u m i c e , p y r o c l a s t i c m a t e r i a l , b r e c c i a a n d s t r a t i g r a p h i c c o m p l e x i t y , r e f l e c t a s h a l l o w i n g t o a p o s s i b l y s u b a e r i a l e n v i r o n m e n t — e s p e c i a l l y i n t h e e a s t e r n p a r t o f t h e m a p . T h i s m i g h t i n d i c a t e t h a t a c e n t r a l v e n t z o n e l i e s w i t h i n , o r i s c l o s e t o t h e e a s t e r n p a r t o f t h e map a r e a ( J a m e s ( 1 9 2 9 ) d e s c r i b e d a v o l c a n i c v e n t a t B e n L o m o n d ( F i g . 3 . 1 ) , j u s t e a s t o f F i g u r e 3 . 2 ) . M a s s i v e s u l p h i d e s w e r e d e p o s i t e d by h y d r o t h e r m a l s o l u t i o n s a t s e v e r a l h o r i z o n s d u r i n g p a u s e s b e t w e e n e r u p t i o n s ; t h e y a c c u m u l a t e d o n t h e f l a n k s o f d o m e s o r i n b a s i n s a d j a c e n t t o t h e m . M a s s i v e , s t r i n g e r a n d b e d d e d s u l p h i d e s o f t h e d e v e l o p e d B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s P a g e 1 4 3 a r e i n a l t e r e d a n d s h e a r e d e q u i v a l e n t s o f t h e c r y s t a l l i t h i c t u f f b l a n k e t , a n d i n f e l s i c b r e c c i a s o v e r l y i n g a n d a d j a c e n t t o t h e m a j o r d a c i t e dome c o m p l e x . F u t u r e m a p p i n g s h o u l d c o n c e n t r a t e o n t h e d e l i n e a t i o n o f v o l c a n i c f a c i e s o f t h e dome c o m p l e x w i t h a f o c u s o n e x t e n s i o n s o f t h e m a i n B r i t a n n i a o r e h o r i z o n s . T h e p o t e n t i a l o f s i m i l a r l y m i n e r a l i z e d c h e r t h o r i z o n s o v e r l y i n g s m a l l e r f e l s i c d o m e s s h o u l d b e e x p l o r e d . 6 . 4 . 3 A g e a n d C o r r e l a t i o n R b - S r v a l u e s t e n t a t i v e l y d e f i n e a L a t e J u r a s s i c a g e o f 1 67 +_ 37 Ma f o r t h e a l t e r e d v o l c a n i c s u i t e o n B r i t a n n i a R i d g e . K - A r d a t e s o f 9 0 . 5 _+ 3 . 2 Ma a n d 8 1 . 4 +_ 3 Ma a r e i n t e r p r e t e d t o h a v e b e e n r e s e t b y i n t r u s i o n o f t h e C o a s t P l u t o n s a n d / o r d e f o r m a t i o n . S t r a t a o f p a c k a g e 1 , o n t h e e a s t e r n p a r t o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e , f o r m t h e t o p o f t h e m a f i c G o a t M o u n t a i n f o r m a t i o n ( 3 , 5 0 0 m t h i c k ) . T h e f e l s i c v o l c a n i c s a n d s e d i m e n t s o f p a c k a g e s 2 a n d 3 ( 2 , 5 0 0 m t h i c k ) f o r m t h e y o u n g e r , o v e r l y i n g B r i t a n n i a f o r m a t i o n . T h e r e l a t i o n s h i p o f t h i s s t r a t a w i t h t h e r e s t o f t h e B r i t a n n i a - I n d i a n R i v e r p e n d a n t i s u n k n o w n . F o s s i l s r e c e n t l y d i s c o v e r e d w i t h i n s t r a t a o f t h e I n d i a n R i v e r p a r t o f t h e p e n d a n t , y e t t o b e i d e n t i f i e d ( D . R e d d y , p e r s . c o m m . , 1 9 8 7 ) m i g h t h e l p t o r e s o l v e some p r o b l e m s o f a g e a n d c o r r e l a t i o n . P a g e 144 C o r r e l a t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a g r o u p s t r a t i g r a p h y w i t h t h e l o o s e l y d e f i n e d G a m b i e r G r o u p i s d i f f i c u l t . T h e p o s s i b l e L a t e J u r a s s i c a g e f o r t h e B r i t a n n i a R i d g e s t r a t i g r a p h y i s o l d e r t h a n m i d - C r e t a c e o u s d a t e s p u b l i s h e d f o r G a m b i e r G r o u p s t r a t a . O v e r . 6 , 0 0 0 m o f c a l c - a l k a l i n e v o l c a n i c s a n d s e d i m e n t s w i t h i n t h e B r i t a n n i a p e n d a n t , w h i c h i n c l u d e s e v e r a l u n i t s o f a r g i l l i t e o v e r 500 m t h i c k , c a n n o t b e c o n f i d e n t l y c o r r e l a t e d t o t h e 1 , 7 5 0 m t y p e - s e c t i o n o f G a m b i e r G r o u p o n B r u n s w i c k M o u n t a i n ( F i g . 1 . 1 ) . L i t h o l o g i c a l s i m i l a r i t i e s e x i s t b e t w e e n t h e B r i t a n n i a g r o u p s t r a t i g r a p h y a n d s t r a t i g r a p h y a l o n g t h e w e s t s i d e o f H a r r i s o n L a k e d e s c r i b e d b y A r t h u r ( 1 9 8 6 ) . I n t r o d u c t i o n o f a m o r e r i g o r o u s g r o u p i n g f o r M e s o z o i c s t r a t a i n s o u t h w e s t e r n c o a s t a l B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a p e r h a p s i s i n d i c a t e d . 6 . 4 . 4 T e c t o n i c E n v i r o n m e n t T h e t e c t o n i c e n v i r o n m e n t o f d e p o s i t i o n f o r t h e B r i t a n n i a g r o u p r o c k s i s a n i s l a n d a r c , p o s s i b l y t r a n s i t i o n a l f r o m a n e x t e n s i o n a l e n v i r o n m e n t t o t h e v o l c a n i c a r c . P a c k a g e 1, t h e G o a t M o u n t a i n f o r m a t i o n , may r e p r e s e n t a v o l c a n i c b e l t a n d t e c t o n i c e n v i r o n m e n t s e p a r a t e f r o m p a c k a g e s 2 a n d 3 , t h e B r i t a n n i a f o r m a t i o n . S i m i l a r , r e l a t e d v o l c a n i c b e l t s a r e d e s c r i b e d i n t h e J a p a n a r c ( M i y a s h i r o , 1 9 7 4 ) a n d w i t h i n t h e Y e l l o w k n i f e S u p e r g r o u p ( E a s t o n , 1 9 8 6 ) . M a f i c f l o w s w i t h m i n o r f e l s i c l a v a dome c o m p l e x e s a n d s u b a e r i a l p y r o c l a s t i c s o f p a c k a g e 1 P a g e 145 a r e c h a c t e r i s t i c a l l y a r c t h o l e i i t i c . A s h i e l d v o l c a n o may h a v e e r u p t e d f r o m a f i s s u r e s y s t e m a l o n g a r i f t - b a s i n m a r g i n o r w i t h i n a back . - a r c b a s i n . I n t r u s i v e - e x t r u s i v e d o m e s a n d s u b a e r i a l t o s u b a q u e o u s a s h f l o w s h e e t s o f p a c k a g e s 2 a n d 3 a r e m o r e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c a l l y c a l c - a l k a l i n e . T h e s e t y p e s o f v o l c a n i c s may be i n d i c a t i v e o f i s l a n d a r c s w i t h w e l l d e v e l o p e d c a l d e r a s a n d a b u n d a n t p y r o c l a s t i c m a t e r i a l i n t h e p i l e . H o w e v e r , s h e e t s o f w e l d e d a n d n o n - w e l d e d a s h f l o w t u f f s may a l s o b e e m p l a c e d w i t h i n t h e b a c k - a r c e n v i r o n m e n t ( W r i g h t a n d C a s , 1 9 8 6 ) . R o c k s i n t h e e a s t e r n s e c t i o n o f B r i t a n n i a R i d g e a n d t h e B r i t a n n i a - I n d i a n R i v e r p e n d a n t s h a r e t h e f o l l o w i n g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s w i t h m o d e r n i s l a n d a r c r e g i o n s ( c f . F i s h e r a n d S c h m i n c k e , 1 9 8 4 ) : ( 1 ) m a f i c t o f e l s i c v o l c a n i c c y c l e s , ( 2 ) w i d e s p r e a d c a l c - a l k a l i n e v o l c a n i s m , i n c l u d i n g v o l u m i n o u s , e x p l o s i v e f e l s i c r o c k s , ( 3 ) p r e d o m i n a t e l y s u b a q u e o u s a c c u m u l a t i o n o f v o l c a n i c a n d a s s o c i a t e d s e d i m e n t a r y r o c k s , a n d ( 4 ) p a r a l l e l a r c - l i k e a r r a n g e m e n t o f l i n e a r v o l c a n i c b e l t s . A v o l c a n i c p r o v i n c e w i t h s e v e r a l i d e n t i f i e d c e n t r a l v e n t z o n e s , w h o s e e m p l a c e m e n t may be c o n t r o l l e d by t h e p r o m i n e n t l i n e a r c a l l e d t h e " B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e " , c a n b e i d e n t i f i e d w i t h i n t h e p e n d a n t . T h e s t r o n g n o r t h w e s t e r l y t r e n d o f G a m b i e r G r o u p p e n d a n t s i n t h e C o a s t P l u t o n i c C o m p l e x r e f l e c t s t h i s a r c - l i k e , p a r a l l e l a r r a n g e m e n t o f s e v e r a l v o l c a n i c b e l t s . P a g e 146 N o t a b l e s i m i l a r i t i e s e x i s t b e t w e e n t h e n u m e r o u s l e n s e s o f m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e s i d e n t i f i e d i n f e l s i c v o l c a n i c r o c k s o f t h e B r i t a n n i a - I n d i a n R i v e r p e n d a n t , a n d t h e v o l c a n o g e n i c m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e d e p o s i t s o f t h e C a n a d i a n A r c h e a n g r e e n s t o n e b e l t s a n d t h e J a p a n e s e M i o c e n e K u r o k o d e p o s i t s . S p e c i f i c a l l y , K u r o k o s u l p h i d e d e p o s i t s a c c u m u l a t e d i n m a r g i n a l d e p r e s s i o n s o f c a l d e r a s f o l l o w i n g t h e e r u p t i o n o f l a r g e v o l u m e s o f f e l s i c t u f f s ( O h m o t o a n d S k i n n e r , 1 9 8 3 ) . T h i c k d a c i t i c f r a g m e n t a l s e q u e n c e s , b o u n d e d o n t h e t o p a n d b o t t o m b y b a s a l t i c p i l l o w l a v a s a n d m a f i c f l o w s , a r e a l s o s i m i l a r t o d e s c r i p t i o n s o f r o c k s i n g r e e n s t o n e b e l t s . T h e n a t u r e o f t h e s e s i m i l a r d e p o s i t - t y p e s e m p h a s i z e s t h e p o t e n t i a l f o r a v e r y l a r g e m i n e r a l p r o v i n c e w i t h i n J u r a s s i c - C r e t a c e o u s r o c k s m a p p e d a s G a m b i e r G r o u p i n s o u t h w e s t e r n c o a s t a l B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a . P a g e 147 7 . S E L E C T E D B I B L I O G R A P H Y A r m s t r o n g , J . E . , 1 9 5 3 : P r e l i m i n a r y M a p , V a n c o u v e r N o r t h , B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , P a p e r 5 3 - 2 8 , 7 p . A r m s t r o n g , R . L . , 1 9 7 8 : P r e - C e n o z o i c P h a n e r o z o i c t i m e - s c a l e c o m p u t e r f i l e o f c r i t i c a l d a t e s a n d c o n s e q u e n c e s o f new a n d i n - p r o g r e s s d e c a y c o n s t a n t r e v i s i o n s ; i n C o h e e , G . V . , G l a e s s n e r , M . F . , a n d H e d b e r g , H . D . e d s . , C o n t r i b u t i o n s t o t h e g e o l o g i c t i m e s c a l e ; A m . A s s o c . P e t r o l e u m G e o l o g i s t , S t u d i e s i n G e o l o g y 6 , p . 7 3 - 9 2 . A r t h u r , A . J . , 1 9 8 6 : S t r a t i g r a p h y a l o n g t h e w e s t s i d e o f H a r r i s o n L a k e , s o u t h w e s t e r n B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ; in C u r r e n t R e s e a r c h , P a r t B , G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , P a p e r 8 6 - 1 B , p . 7 1 5 - 7 2 0 . B a r k e r , F . a n d P e t e r m a n , Z . E . , 1 9 7 4 : B i m o d a l t h o l e i i t i c - d a c i t i c m a g m a t i s m a n d t h e e a r l y P r e C a m b r i a n C r u s t ; P r e C a m b r i a n R e s e a r c h , v . 1 , p . 1 - 1 2 . B a u e r m a n , H . , 1 8 8 5 : R e p o r t o f p r o g r e s s o f t h e G e o l o g i c a l a n d N a t u r a l H i s t o r y S u r v e y o f C a n a d a f o r 1 8 8 2 - 1 8 8 4 , p . 5 B - 4 4 B . B o s t o c k , H . S . , 1 9 6 3 : S q u a m i s h M a p - a r e a ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , Map 4 2 - 1 9 6 3 . P a g e 1 4 8 B u r w a s h , E . 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T h e s i s , U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , 65 p . M a r t i n , R . F . , a n d P i w i n s k i i , A . J . , 1 9 7 2 : M a g m a t i s m a n d T e c t o n i c S e t t i n g s ; J o u r n a l o f G e o p h y s i c a l R e s e a r c h , v . 7 7 , p . 4 9 6 6 - 4 9 7 5 . P a g e 1 5 5 M a t h e w s , W . H . , 1 9 5 8 : G e o l o g y o f t h e M o u n t G a r i b a l d i m a p - a r e a , S o u t h w e s t e r n B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a . P a r t I : I g n e o u s a n d m e t a m o r p h i c r o c k s ; G e o l o g i c a l S o c i e t y o f A m e r i c a , B u l l e t i n 6 9 , p . 1 6 1 - 1 7 8 . M a t h e w s , W . H . , 1 9 7 2 : G e o l o g y o f t h e V a n c o u v e r a r e a o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ; I n t . G e o l . C o n g . G u i d e b o o k A 0 5 - C 0 5 , C a n a d a , 2 4 t h S e s s i o n , 4 7 p . M c C o n n e l l , R . G . , 1 9 1 4 : T e x a d a I s l a n d , B . 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M i y a s h i r o , A . , 1 9 7 4 : V o l c a n i c R o c k S e r i e s i n I s l a n d A r c s a n d A c t i v e C o n t i n i n e n t a l M a r g i n s ; A m e r i c a n J o u r n a l o f S c i e n c e , v . 2 7 4 , p . 3 2 1 - 3 5 5 . P a g e 156 M o n g e r , J . W . H . , 1 9 7 8 : E v o l u t i o n o f t h e C o r d i l l e r a , GEOS F a l l , E n e r g y M i n e s a n d R e s o u r c e s P u b l i c a t i o n . M o n g e r , J . W . H . , 1 9 7 5 : C o r r e l a t i o n o f E u g e o s y n c l i n a l T e c t o n o s t r a t i g r a p h i c B e l t s i n t h e N o r t h A m e r i c a n C o r d i l l e r a ; G e o s c i e n c e o f C a n a d a , v . 2 , p . 4 - 1 0 . M o n g e r , J . W . H . , 1 9 7 2 : O c e a n i c C r u s t i n t h e C a n a d i a n C o r d i l l e r a . i n I r v i n g , E . ( e d . ) " T h e A n c i e n t O c e a n i c L i t h o s p h e r e " , D e p t . o f E n e r g y , M i n e s a n d R e s o u r c e s , E a r t h P h y s i c s B r a n c h P u b l i c a t i o n , v . 4 2 , p . 5 9 - 6 4 . M o n g e r , J . W . H . a n d P r i c e , R . A . , 1 9 7 9 : G e o d y n a m i c e v o l u t i o n o f t h e C a n a d i a n C o r d i l l e r a - p r o g r e s s a n d p r o b l e m s ; C a n a d i a n J o u r n a l o f E a r t h S c i e n c e s , v . 1 6 , p . 7 7 0 - 7 9 1 . M o n g e r , J . W . H . , S o u t h e r , J . G . , G a b r i e l s e , H . , 1 9 7 2 : E v o l u t i o n o f t h e C a n a d i a n C o r d i l l e r a : A P l a t e T e c t o n i c M o d e l ; A m e r i c a n J o u r n a l o f S c i e n c e , v . 2 7 2 , p . 5 7 7 - 6 0 2 . M u l l e r , J . E . , 1 9 7 7 : E v o l u t i o n o f t h e P a c i f i c M a r g i n , V a n c o u v e r I s l a n d a n d a d j a c e n t r e g i o n s ; C a n a d i a n J o u r n a l o f E a r t h S c i e n c e s , v . 1 4 , p . 2 0 6 2 - 2 0 8 5 . P a g e 1 5 7 O h m o t o , H . , 1 9 8 3 : G e o l o g i c S e t t i n g o f t h e K u r o k o D e p o s i t s , J a p a n , P a r t 1 . G e o l o g o c H i s t o r y o f t h e G r e e n T u f f R e g i o n , i n O h m o t o , H . a n d S k i n n e r , B . J . , e d s . , T h e K u r o k o a n d R e l a t e d V o l c a n o g e n i c M a s s i v e S u l p h i d e D e p o s i t s . E c o n o m i c G e o l o g y M o n o g r a p h 5 , p . 9 - 2 4 . O h m o t o , H . , a n d S k i n n e r , B . J . , 1 9 8 3 : T h e K u r o k o a n d R e l a t e d V o l c a n o g e n i c M a s s i v e D e p o s i t s : I n t r o d u c t i o n a n d S u m m a r y o f New F i n d i n g s . E c o n o m i c G e o l o g y M o n o g r a p h 5 , p . 1 - 8 . P a y n e , J . G . , B r a t t , J . A . a n d S t o n e , B . G . , 1 9 7 4 : D e f o r m e d M e s o z o i c V o l c a n o g e n i c C u - Z n S u l p h i d e D e p o s i t s i n t h e B r i t a n n i a D i s t r i c t , B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ; U n p u b l i s h e d c o m p a n y r e p o r t , A n a c o n d a E x p l o r a t i o n C a n a d a L t d . P a y n e , J . G . , B r a t t , J . A . a n d S t o n e , B . G . , 1 9 8 0 : D e f o r m e d M e s o z o i c V o l c a n o g e n i c C u - Z n S u l p h i d e D e p o s i t s i n t h e B r i t a n n i a D i s t r i c t , B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ; E c o n o m i c G e o l o g y , v . 7 5 , p . 7 0 0 - 7 2 1 . P e a c o c k , M . A . , 1 9 3 1 : C l a s s i f i c a t i o n o f I g n e o u s R o c k S e r i e s ; J o u r n a l o f G e o l o g y , v . 3 9 , p . 5 4 - 6 7 . P e a r c e , J . A . a n d C a n n , J . , 1 9 7 3 : T e c t o n i c s e t t i n g o f b a s i c v o l c a n i c r o c k s u s i n g t r a c e e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s ; E a r t h a n d P l a n e t a r y S c i e n c e L e t t e r s , v . 1 9 , p . 2 9 0 - 3 0 0 . P a g e 158 P h e m i s t e r , T . C . , 1 9 4 5 : T h e C o a s t R a n g e b a t h o l i t h n e a r V a n c o u v e r , B . C . ; Q u a r t . J . G e o l . S o c . L o n d o n , v . 1 0 1 , p t s . 1 a n d 2 . R o d d i c k , J . A . , 1 9 6 5 : V a n c o u v e r N o r t h , C o q u i t l a m a n d P i t t L a k e Map a r e a s , B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , w i t h s p e c i a l e m p h a s i s o n t h e e v o l u t i o n o f t h e p l u t o n i c r o c k s ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , M e m o i r 3 5 5 , 2 7 6 p . R o d d i c k , J . A . , M a t h e w s , W . H . a n d W o o d s w o r t h , G . J . , 1 9 6 5 : S o u t h e r n e n d o f t h e C o a s t P l u t o n i c C o m p l e x ; G . A . C . F i e l d t r i p g u i d e b o o k , T r i p 9 . R o d d i c k , J . A . a n d O k u l i t c h , A . V . , 1 9 7 3 : F r a s e r R i v e r ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a O p e n F i l e Map # 1 6 5 , J u l y . R o d d i c k , J . A . , M u l l e r , J . E . , a n d O k u l i t c h , A . V . , 1 9 7 9 : F r a s e r R i v e r ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , Map 1 3 8 6 A . R o d d i c k , J . A . a n d W o o d s w o r t h , G . J . 1 9 7 5 : C o a s t M o u n t a i n s P r o j e c t : P e m b e r t o n ( 9 2 J W e s t h a l f ) map a r e a , B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , _in R e p o r t o f A c t i v i t i e s , P a r t A ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , P a p e r 7 5 - 1 A , p . 3 7 - 4 0 . R o d d i c k , J . A . , a n d W o o d s w o r t h , G . J . , 1 9 7 9 : G e o l o g y o f V a n c o u v e r w e s t h a l f a n d m a i n l a n d p a r t o f A l b e r n i ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , O p e n F i l e 6 1 1 . P a g e 1 5 9 S e l f , S . a n d S p a r k s , R . S . J . , 1 9 7 8 : C h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f W i d e s p r e a d P y r o c l a s t i c D e p o s i t s F o r m e d b y t h e I n t e r a c t i o n o f S i l i c i Magma a n d W a t e r ; B u l l e t i n V o l c n o l o g i q u e , v . 41 ( 3 ) , p . 1 9 6 - 2 1 1 . S c h m i d , R . , 1 9 8 1 : D e s c r i p t i v e n o m e n c l a t u r e a n d c l a s s i f i c a t i o n o f p y r o c l a s t i c d e p o s i t s a n d f r a g m e n t s : R e c o m m e n d a t i o n s o f t h e I U G S S u b c o m m i s s i o n o n t h e S y s t e m a t i c s o f I g n e o u s R o c k s ; G e o l o g y , v . 9 , p . 4 1 - 4 3 . S c h o f i e l d , S . J . , 1 9 1 8 : B r i t a n n i a m a p - a r e a ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , S u m m a r y R e p o r t , p a r t B , p . 5 6 - 5 9 . S c h o f i e l d , S . J . , 1 9 2 6 : T h e B r i t a n n i a M i n e s , B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ; E c o n o m i c G e o l o g y , v . 2 1 , p . 2 7 1 - 2 8 4 . S n y d e r , W . S . , D i c k i n s o n , W . R . a n d S i l b e r m a n , M . L . , 1 9 7 6 : T e c t o n i c I m p l i c a t i o n s o f s p a c e - t i m e p a t t e r n s o f C e n o z o i c m a g m a t i s m i n t h e w e s t e r n U n i t e d S t a t e s ; E a r t h a n d P l a n e t a r y L e t t e r s , v . 3 2 , p . 9 1 - 1 0 6 . S o u t h e r , J . G . , 1 9 7 * : V o l c a n i s m a n d t e c t o n i c e n v i r o n m e n t s i n t h e C a n a d i a n C o r d i l l e r a - a s e c o n d l o o k i n V o l c a n i c R e g i m e s i n C a n a d a ; GAC S p e c i a l V o l u m e . S t e i g e r , R . H . , a n d J a g e r , E . , 1 9 7 7 : S u b c o m m i s s i o n o n g e o c h r o n o l g y : C o n v e n t i o n o n t h e u s e o f d e c a y c o n s t a n t s i n g e o -P a g e 160 a n d c o s m o c h r o n o l o g y : E a r t h P l a n e t . S c i . L e t t e r s , v . 3 6 , p . 3 5 9 - 3 6 2 . S t e r n , C . R . , 1 9 8 0 : G e o c h e m i s t r y o f C h i l e a n o p h i o l i t e s : E v i d e n c e f o r t h e c o m p o s i t i o n a l e v o l u t i o n o f b a c k - a r c b a s i n b a s a l t s ; J o u r n a l o f G e o p h y s i c a l R e s e a r c h , v . 8 5 , p . 9 5 5 - 9 6 6 . S t i x , J . , G o o d w i n , M . P . , a n d E v e n s o n , N . M . , 1 9 8 6 : A r c h e a n - A g e P y r o c l a s i t c F l o w s a n d a s s o c i a t e d R o c k s , L a k e o f t h e W o o d s , O n t a r i o , C a n a d a : I n t e r n a t i o n a l V o l c a n o l o g i c a l C o n g r e s s , F e b r u a r y , 1 9 8 6 , A b s t r a c t s , p . 7 7 . S t o n e , B . G . a n d P a y n e J , G . , 1 9 8 2 : D e f o r m e d M e s o z o i c V o l c a n o g e n i c C u - Z n S u l f i d e D e p o s i t s i n t h e B r i t a n n i a D i s t r i c t - A r e p l y . E c o n o m i c G e o l o g y , v . 7 7 , p . 7 1 2 - 7 1 4 S u t h e r l a n d - B r o w n , A . , 1 970 : B r i t a n n i a m i n e , i n . G e o l o g y , E x p l o r a t i o n a n d M i n i n g 1 9 7 0 ; B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a D e p a r t m e n t o f M i n e s a n d P e t r o l e u m R e s e a r c h , p . 2 3 3 - 2 4 6 . S u t h e r l a n d - B r o w n , A . , C a t h r o , R . J . , P a n t e l e y e v , R . J . , a n d N e y , C . S . , 1 9 7 1 : M e t a l l o g e n y o f t h e C a n a d i a n C o r d i l l e r a ; C a n a d i a n I n s t i t u t e o f M i n i n g a n d M e t a l l u r g y T r a n s . , v . 7 4 , p . 1 2 1 - 1 4 5 . T h o r s t a d , L . E . a n d G a b r i e l s e , H . , 1 9 8 6 : T h e U p p e r T r i a s s i c K u t c h o F o r m a t i o n C a s s i a r M o u n t a i n s , N o r t h - C e n t r a l B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a . G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , P a p e r 8 6 - 1 6 , 5 3 p . P a g e 161 W a t e r m a n , G . C , 1 9 8 2 : D e f o r m e d M e s o z o i c V o l c a n o g e n i c C u - Z n S u l f i d e D e p o s i t s i n t h e B r i t a n n i a D i s t r i c t - A D i s c u s s i o n , E c o n o m i c G e o l o g y , v . 7 7 . p . 7 1 0 - 7 1 2 . W h e e l e r , J . O . a n d G a b r i e l s e , H . , 1 9 7 2 : T h e C o r d i l l e r a n S t r u c t u r e P r o v i n c e in P r i c e , R . A . a n d D o u g l a s , J . W . ( e d s . ) , " V a r i a t i o n s i n T e c t o n i c S t y l e s i n C a n a d a " , G e o l o g i c a l A s s o c i a t i o n o f C a n a d a , S p e c i a l P a p e r 1 1 , p . 1 - 8 1 . W i n c h e s t e r , J . A . a n d F l o y d , P . A . , 1 9 7 7 : G e o c h e m i c a l d i s c r i m i n a t i o n o f d i f f e r e n t magma s e r i e s a n d t h e i r d i f f e r e n t i a t i o n p r o d u c t s u s i n g i m m o b i l e e l e m e n t s ; G e o c h e m i c a l G e o l o g y , v . 2 0 , p . 3 2 5 - 3 4 3 . W i n c h e s t e r , J . A . a n d F l o y d , P . A . , 1 9 7 8 : I d e n t i f i c a t i o n a n d d i s c r i m i n a t i o n o f a l t e r e d a n d m e t a m o r p h o s e d v o l c a n i c r o c k s u s i n g i m m o b i l e e l e m e n t s ; G e o c h e m i c a l G e o l o g y , v . 2 1 , p . 2 9 1 - 3 0 6 . W o o d s w o r t h , G . J . , 1 9 7 9 : M e t a m o r p h i s m , d e f o r m a t i o n a n d p l u t o n i s m i n t h e M o u n t R a l e i g h P e n d a n t , C o a s t M o u n t a i n s , B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , B u l l e t i n 2 9 5 , 5 8 p . W o o d s w o r t h , G . J . a n d T i p p e r , H . W . , 1 9 8 0 : S t r a t i g r a p h i c f r a m e w o r k o f t h e C o a s t P l u t o n i c C o m p l e x , W e s t e r n B . C . , i_n V o l c a n o g e n i c d e p o s i t s a n d t h e i r r e g i o n a l s e t t i n g i n t h e C a n a d i a n C o r d i l l e r a ; G . A . C . m e e t i n g , p r o g r a m m e a n d a b s t r a c t s , p . 3 2 - 3 4 . P a g e 162 W o o d s w o r t h , G . J . a n d R o d d i c k , J . A . , 1 9 7 7 : G e o l o g y o f P e m b e r t o n m a p - a r e a , B r i t i a h C o l u m b i a , (NTS 9 2 J ) ; G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y o f C a n a d a , O p e n F i l e Map 4 8 2 . W o o d s w o r t h , G . J . a n d R o d d i c k , J . A . , 1 9 7 7 a : M i n e r a l i z a t i o n i n t h e C o a s t P l u t o n i c C o m p l e x o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , s o u t h o f l a t i t u d e 5 5 N ; G e o l o g i c a l S o c i e t y o f M a l a y s i a , B u l l e t i n 9 , p . 1 - 1 6 . Y o r k , D . , 1 9 6 7 : T h e b e s t i s o c h r o n . E a r t h a n d P l a n e t a r y S c i e n c e L e t t e r s , 2 , p . 4 7 9 -P a g e 1 6 3 A P P E N D I C E S A . ROCK C H I P S A M P L E S F o u r h u n d r e d a n d t e n r o c k c h i p s a m p l e s w e r e t a k e n f o r c h e m i c a l a n a l y s e s f r o m o u t c r o p f a c e s a n d d r i l l c o r e o v e r t h e a r e a o f F i g u r e A . 1 . I n i t i a l o b j e c t i v e s o f a l i t h o g e o c h e m i c a l s t u d y i n t h e map a r e a ( F i g . 3 . 2 ) w e r e t o : ( 1 ) a i d d e f i n i t i o n a n d g r o u p i n g o f t h e r o c k t y p e s w i t h i n t h e p o o r l y k n o w n s t r a t i g r a p h y , a n d ( 2 ) a i d e x p l o r a t i o n f o r m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e s s i m i l a r t o B r i t a n n i a o r e b o d i e s . S a m p l i n g i n 1 9 8 2 w a s c o n c e n t r a t e d a l o n g f o u r s e c t i o n s c r o s s c u t t i n g t h e B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e i n t h e F u r r y C r e e k v a l l e y , a n d a l o n g o n e s e c t i o n t h r o u g h t h e B r i t a n n i a o p e n p i t s . S a m p l i n g i n 1 9 8 3 c o n c e n t r a t e d o n t h e m o s t m a s s i v e u n i t s w i t h i n t h e B r i t a n n i a o p e n p i t s i n t h e J a n e B a s i n . S e l e c t e d r o c k c h i p s a m p l e s w e r e a n a l y s e d f o r w h o l e r o c k m a j o r e l e m e n t s a n d f o r 12 t r a c e e l e m e n t s c o m m o n l y c o m p o n e n t s o f v o l c a n o g e n i c m a s s i v e s u l p h i d e d e p o s i t s . T r a c e e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s n o t u s e d i n t h i s s t u d y a r e i n c l u d e d h e r e a s p a r t o f a c o m p l e t e d a t a s e t s u p p l e m e n t a l t o F i g u r e A . 1 . T r a c e e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s e m p h a s i z i n g o r e - r e l a t e d m e t a l s w e r e made t o i d e n t i f y a n d c o r r e l a t e m i n e r a l i z e d h o r i z o n s f r o m t h e B r i t a n n i a o p e n p i t s a c r o s s t h e F u r r y C r e e k v a l l e y . T h r e e h u n d r e d a n d f o r t y - f i v e s a m p l e s w e r e a n a l y s e d f o r C u , M o , P b , Z n , A g , N i , C o , F e , A s , A u , Hg a n d B a . T h r e s h o l d s f o r t h e s e e l e m e n t s , w e r e e s t i m a t e d f o r e a c h r o c k t y p e f r o m c u m u l a t i v e f r e q u e n c y p l o t s , a r e P a g e 164 i n A p p e n d i x C ( T a b l e C . 1 ) . A n a t t e m p t t o i d e n t i f y p a t h f i n d e r e l e m e n t s u s e f u l f o r a s s e s s m e n t o f t h e p o t e n t i a l f o r " B r i t a n n i a - t y p e " s u l p h i d e s i n t h e F u r r y C r e e k v a l l e y w a s c o n s i d e r e d p r e m a t u r e a n d a b a n d o n e d d u e t o l a c k o f s t r a t i g r a p h i c c o n t r o l . R o c k c h i p s a m p l e l o c a t i o n s , d e s c r i p t i o n s a n d c h e m i c a l s a m p l e d e s c r i p t i o n i n c l u d e s f o u r c a r d s : 1 ) i d e n t i f i c a t i o n a n d l o c a t i o n , 2 ) d e s c r i p t i o n s o f t h e s a m p l e s 3 ) t r a c e e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s a n d 4) m a j o r e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s . T e r m i n o l o g y a n d n o m e n c l a t u r e u s e d i n d e s c r i b i n g t h e p y r o c l a s t i c u n i t s a r e i n F i g u r e A . 2 . A c o m p l e t e l i s t i n g o f t h e s a m p l e s f o l l o w s i n T a b l e s A . 4 a n d A . 5 . T a b l e A . 1 i s a n i n d e x f o r t h e c o m p u t e r f i l e s . PUMICE. GLASS Nomenclature and stratification thickness (Ingram. 1954) Name Thickness Very thickly bedded > 1 m Thickly bedded W 100 cm Medium bedded 10 V) cm Thinly hedded 3-10 cm Very thinly hedded 1 1 cm Thickly laminated 0 3 1 cm Thinly laminated <03 cm GRANULOMETt-.C CLASSIFICATION Of PYUOCI ASTS AND OF UNIM0DAL. WELL-SORTED PYROCLASTIC DWSITS Clast size Pyroclast Pyroclastic deposit' Mainly unconsolidated: tephra Mainly consol pyroclastic Bomb, block Agglomerate, bed of blocks or bomb, block tephra Agglomerate, pyroclasttc 64 am Lapi 11 L I S Layer, bed of lapi l l i or U p i l l l tephra Lapilli tuff Z <m Coarse ash grain Coarse ash Coarse (ash) 1/16 ™ Fine asn grain (dust grain) Fine ash (dust) Fine (ash) (dust tuff) P a g e 166 TABLE A . 1 . Index for l i s t i n g s of rock chip sampLes (Tables A.4 and A.S> from the Bri t a n n i a Ridge area, southwestern B r i t i s h Columbia. COLUMN ITEM DEFINITION 1. Card Number 1 - I d e n t i f i c a t i o n and Location card number f i e l d number a n a l y t i c a l number sample type R-rock, D - d r i l l core, P-puip northing easting d r i l l hole number area-Level-hole number d r i l l hole footage (from) ' " " (to) ele v a t i o n (meters) analyses done TE-trace eLement, ME-major element RE- rare earth, TS- t h i n s e c t i o n cut RS- Rb-Sr dating KA- K-Ar dating repeat sample numbers dumber 2 - Rock Descriptions card number f i e l d number a n a l y t i c a l number rock type (CODES IN TABLE A.2) map unit (private co. report, K.M.McCol1,1983) Irvine and Barager C l a s s i f i c a t i o n rock name, AFM, Al vs. Pl a g i o c l a s e colour - fresh (CODES IN TABLE A.3) colour - weathered (CODES IN TABLE A.3) texture 0 -massive, 1 - p o r p h y r i t i c , 2-amygdaloidal, 3-pyroclastic, 4-agglomeratic, 5-breccia 6 - sedimentary grain size - matrix 1-aphanitic, 2-fine grained 3-medium grained, 4-coarse grained cLasts or phenocrysts abundance Q-none, 1- <3%, 2- 3-20%, 3- >2Q% size 0- <1/16, 1- <• 2mm , 2 - 2 -62mm, 3- > 62mm 0-fine ash, 1-coarse ash, 2 - L a p i l l i , 3-block f o l i a t i o n Q-none, 1-bedding, 2-igneous lamination 3-"GMS", 4 - s c h i s t o s i t y , 5-alligned fragments s c h i s t o s i t y i n t e n s i t y 0-none, 1 - f a i n t , 2-moderate 3-heavy, 4-extensive, 5-extremely f i s s i l e 67 competence 0-good, i - f a i r , 2-pooc, 3-very poor 69-73 a l t e r a t i o n 69 degree 0-none, ' - s l i g h t , 2 - moderate, 3-extreme 71-73 composition 0-fresh, 1 - s i l i c a , 2-epidote, 3 - c h l o r i t e , 4 - s e n c i t e , 5-anhydrite, 6 - b i o t i t e , 7-CaC03, 8-hornblende 75 veins 0-none, 1-quartz, 2-quartz, p y r I t e , 3-anhydnte 4-epidote, 5 - e h l o n t e , 6-ankerite 77-80 sulphides 77 d i s t r i b u t i o n 0-none, i-massive, 2-aggregate, 3-disseminated, 4-layers, 5-vein, 6-vein and disseminated 79-80 primary sulphide 1-pyrite, 2-chalcopyrite, 3-arseno-py r i t e , 4-sphalerite, 5-galena 3. Card Numoer 3 - Trace Element Analyses 3 -1 0 1 2 - 1 5 1 7 1 9 - 2 5 27 - 3 2 34 - 4 0 42 - 4 8 49 - 5 4 56 - 5 9 61 -71 73 - a o Card 3 -10 1 2 - 1 5 1 7 - 2 0 22 -26 23 - 3 5 37 - 42 44 - 4 5 47 - 48 50 52 -61 52 54 - 5 6 56 -61 63 65 1 c a r d number 3- 1 0 f i e l d number 12- 1 5 a n a l y t i c a l n 25- 29 Cu ppm 30- 34 MO ppm 35- 39 Pb ppm 40- 44 Zn ppm 45- 49 Ay ppm 50- 54 Ml PPm 55- 59 Co ppm 60- 64 Fe % 65- 69 AS PPm 70- 74 Au ppb ( A 75- 79 He, ppb 80- 84 Ba ppm 4. C a r d Number 4 - Ma)or E l e m e n t A n a L y s e s 1 c a r d numoer 3-10 f i e l d number 12-15 a n a l y t i c a l number 25-29 5 i 0 2 % 30-34 A1203 » 35-39 Fe2G 3 * 40-44 T102 » 45-49 MgO » 50-54 CaO t 55-59 Na20 » 60-64 K20 % 65-69 P205 * 70-74 L.O.I. » .».=.»* = = . . = = = = = = = = = = . = = 3 « = T A B L E A . 2 . C o d e s f o r r o c k t y p e s i n T a b l e s A . 4 a n d A . 5 . P l u t o n i c ( P ) PGDR G r a n o d i o r i t e PQZD Q u a r t z D i o r i t e I n t r u s i v e D C I V I n t r u s i v e D a c i t e D K F E F e l s i c d y k e DKME M a f i c d y k e S c h i s t ( S ) S Q Z S Q u a r t z - s e r i c i t e s c h i s t S C C L C h l o r i t e s c h i s t S P S C " G M S " S P S S S u l p h i d e s c h i s t S e d i m e n t a r y (M) MARG A r g i l l i t e MCHT C h e r t M T F F T u f f a c e o u s D a c i t e ( D ) D C I T D a c i t e D C F L D a c i t e f l o w D B T F D C L P D C T F D F T F D B L T D C L T A n d e s i t e ( A ) A G L M A g g l o m e r a t e b l o c k t u f f l a p i l l i t u f f c o a r s e a s h t u f f f i n e a s h t u f f b l o c k l a p i l l i t u f f a s h l a p i l l i t u f f A B L T A n d e s i t e B l o c k L a p i l l i T u f f A B T F A N L T A C T F A F T F B l o c k T u f f L a p i l l i T u f f c o a r s e a s h t u f f f i n e a s h t u f f R h y o l i t e ( R ) R Y L T R h y o l i t e R Y B X R h y o l i t e b r e c c i a B a s a l t ( B ) B S L T B a s a l t B P L V B a s a l t p i l l o w l a v a M a s s i v e S u l p h i d e M V S P V e i n V E I N T A B L E A . 3 . C o d e s f o r c o l o u r o f r o c k s a m p l e s l i s t e d i n T a b l e s A . 4 a n d A . 5 . C o l o u r c o d e s a r e b a s e d o n t h e M u n s e l l c o l o u r c h a r t ; 1 i s t h e d a r k e s t a n d 10 i s t h e l i g h t e s t . C o l o u r L i s t i n g M u n s e l l C h a r t C o l o u r L i s t i n g M u n s e l l C h a r t FRESH COLOURS! B r o w n BR 3 5 YR 7 / 2 G r e e n GR3 5 G 8 /1 B R 2 5 YR 6 / 2 GR2 5 G 7 /1 BR1 5 YR 5 / 2 GR1 1 0 GY 5 / 2 Y e l l o w YW2 1 0 Y 7 / 4 G r e e n - G r e y GG5 5 GY 1 0 / 2 YW1 5 Y 6 / 6 GG4 5 GY 9 / 2 O l i v e OL1 1 0 Y 5 / 3 GG3 5 GY 8 / 2 S i l v e r S L 3 1 0 Y 9 / 1 GG2 5 GY 6 / 2 S L 2 1 0 Y 7 / 2 GG1 5 GY 5 / 2 S L 1 1 0 Y 6 / 2 D a r k G r e e n DG4 1 0 GY 3 /1 B l a c k BK1 5 Y 2 / 1 DG3 1 0 GY 3 / 2 G r e y G Y 6 N 5 /1 DG2 5 GY 2 / 1 G Y 5 N 6 /1 DG1 1 0 GY 3 /1 GY4 B l u e B L 4 5 B 7 /1 G Y 3 N 4 / 1 B L 3 5 B 5 /1 G Y 2 B L 2 5 B 6 / 1 GY1 5 Y 5 /1 BL1 5 B 6 / 2 W E A T H E R E D C O L O U R S : 0 - w h i t e , 1 - l i g h t g r e e n , 2 - b u f f , 3 - r u s t y , 4 - g r e e n , 5 - d a r k g r e e n 6 - g r e y , 7 - s i l v e r g r e y , 8 - y e l l o w P a g e 169 T A B L E A .4. L i s t i n g o f 1982 r o c k c h i p s a m p l e s ( i n c l u d i n g l o c a t i o n d e s c r i p t i o n s a n d c h e m i c a l a n a l y s e s ) . F o r m a t f o r t h e s e l i s t i n g s a r e i n T a b l e A . 1 . D e t a i l e d c o d e s f o r s p e c i f i c f i e l d s a r e i n T a b l e s A . 2 a n d A . 3 . L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13 47:26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCId=KMMC Page 1 1 MC82 - 134 6001 R 5493595 493748 1156 TE 2 2 MC82 - 134 6001 MCHT 5C GY2VWI 3 7 2 0 1 1 1 3 15 0 2 1 3 3 MC82 - 134 6001 6 1 19 78 20 2 2 2 .88 9 10 40 1400 4 4 MC82 - 134 6O0I 5 1 HC8 2 - 133 6002 R 5493657 493650 1131 TE ME TS 6 2 MC8 2 133 6002 MCHT 5C GY4BR1 3 7 2 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 3 1 7 3 MC82 - 133 6002 20 1 22 1 16 10 62 10 3 52 7 10 50 660 a 4 MC82 - 133 6O02 69 33 13 52 4 83 63 3 : 20 37 46 3 2 1 08 3 15 9 1 MC8 2 - 132 6003 R 5493657 493642 1130 TE ME TS 10 2 MC8 2 - 132 6003 MCHI 5C GV 6 1 47 2 3 23 14 0 2 0 2 14 1 3 1 1 1 3 MC8 2 - 132 6O03 a 1 6 35 10 3 3 1 32 4 10 50 620 12 4 MC8 2 - 1 32 6003 13 1 ML 6 2 -13 1 6O04 R 5493670 493621 1116 TE 14 2 MC8 2 -13 1 6004 ACTF 20 0G1 13 4 2 3 2 1 0 2 1 1 1 5 3 1 15 3 MC82 - 131 6004 15 1 1 64 10 1 6 4 23 7 10 140 160 16 4 MC8 2 - 131 6004 17 1 MC8 2 - 130 6005 R 5493680 49360O 1110 TE 18 2 ML 8 2 - 130 6005 MCHT 5C GY 3 3 4 2 2 12 1 0 0 1 2 1 5 3 1 19 3 MC8 2 - 130 6005 18 1 1 1 102 10 15 6 4 24 5 10 40 740 20 4 MC82 130 6005 2 1 1 MC82 129 6006 R 5493687 493586 1107 TE 22 2 MC82 - 129 6O06 MCHT 5C GY 3 1 4 2 3 12 1 0 0 0 2 1 5 3 1 23 3 MC82 - 129 6006 16 1 1 83 10 1 4 3 65 4 10 30 5 10 24 4 MCB2 - 1 29 6O06 25 1 MC82 -128 60O7 R 5493696 493568 1103 TE 26 2 MC8 2 - 128 6007 MCHT 5C GY 3 12 4 2 3 32 9276 0 1 1 1 134 O 0 27 3 MC 8 2 128 6007 76 1 1 101 10 15 10 4 45 4 IO 2 30 50O 28 4 MC8 2 - 128 6007 29 1 MC82 127 6008 R 5493708 493560 I09S TE 30 2 MC8 2 127 6008 MCHT 5C BK 1 16 7 2 0 1 2 1 I 1 6 3 1 3 1 3 MC8 2 127 60OS 92 9 1 150 IO 7 17 6 00 5 10 90 900 32 4 MC82 - 127 6 0 0 * 33 I ML 8 2 126 6009 R 5493725 493515 1080 TE 34 2 MC82 126 6009 MCHT 5C GY20G2 13 7 2 O 1 1 0 2 13 O 4 1 35 3 MC82 - 126 6009 57 5 6 106 10 8 14 1 92 3 IO 60 680 36 4 MC82 - 126 6009 37 1 MC82 - 125 6010 R 5493735 493475 1067 TE 38 2 ML 8 2 - 125 6010 MCHT 5C GY 2 13 7 2 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 3 1 39 3 MC82 - 125 6010 20 2 1 109 20 2 7 3 98 4 10 40 1250 40 4 MC82 - 125 6010 4 t 1 MC82 -008 601 1 R 5493745 493435 1050 TE 42 2 MC82 -008 601 1 DCLT 30C 0G2 3 4 1 3 23 5 0 0 0 3 1 O 3 1 43 3 MC82 -OOB 601 1 103 1 1 1 1 1 10 4 1 1 4 62 2 10 40 260 44 4 MC82 -O08 601 1 45 1 MC82 - 137 6012 R 5493722 493381 1045 TE 46 2 MC82 - 137 6012 MIFF 5T 0G2 3 17 2 0 1 0 0 1 3 3 5 1 47 3 MC82 - 137 6012 40 2 1 98 10 1 14 4 7 1 2 10 30 260 48 4 MC82 - 137 6012 49 1 MC82 138 6013 R 5493705 493360 1030 TE 50 2 MC82 - 138 6013 MCHT 5C GY5 23 14 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 3 6 3 1 51 3 MC82 - 138 6013 4800 10 1 140 4 . 80 22 33 6 63 12 20 30 390 52 4 MC82 - 138 6013 53 1 MC82 -139 6014 R 5493690 493343 1023 TE TS 54 2 MC82 - 139 6014 MCHT 5C GY2 63 17 1 0 1 0 0 1 16 2 6 1 55 3 MC82 139 6014 27 3 3 1 19 20 1 6 1 74 3 10 40 840 56 4 MCB2 - 139 6014 57 I MC82 - 105 6015 R 5493509 493070 0960 TE 58 2 MC82 - 105 6015 DCLP 3C 0G1GR2 12 4 3 3 23 1256 3 1 0 2 437 0 0 ID o L i s t i n g of GOOD at 13 47:26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCId=KMMC Page 59 3 MC82 - 105 6015 67 1 34 96 10 1 5 1 96 2 10 50 440 60 4 MC82 - 105 6015 6 1 t MCB2 - 104 6016 R 5493505 493055 0960 TE 62 2 MC8 2 - 104 6016 ACTF 20 GR 1 1 74 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 14 0 0 63 3 Mi 82 - 104 6016 36 2 1 68 10 47 8 3 20 22 10 60 5 30 64 4 MC82 104 6016 65 1 MC82 - 103 6017 R 5493495 493033 0953 TE 66 2 MC82 103 6017 S02S B DG1GG1 23 4 2 2 2 1 3 3 0 2 134 0 0 67 3 MCB2 - 103 6017 8 3 7 65 . 10 1 1 1 97 4 10 30 640 6B 4 MCB2 - 103 6017 69 1 MC82 - 102 6018 R 5493475 493014 0945 TE 70 2 MCB2 - 102 6018 S02S 8 GRIG<5 10 4 3 2 2 1 3 3 2 2 134 0 0 7 1 3 MC8 2 - 102 6018 10 1 1 59 10 9 1 1 92 7 10 30 660 72 4 MC82 - 102 6018 73 1 MC82 - 101 6019 R 5493454 492999 0937 TE 7J 2 MCB2 - 101 6019 ABLT 2BC DG1GR1 3 4 2 3 32 1246 0 2 0 2 34 0 3 2 1 75 3 MC82 - 101 6019 46 7 10 100 . 10 9 9 3 27 3 10 20 1 140 76 4 MCB2 - 101 6019 77 1 MC82 - 100 6020 R 5493435 492989 0933 TE ME TS 78 2 MC8 2 - 100 6020 AGLM 2A AN CA CA DG2 3 26 3 2 24 58 0 0 0 1 32 0 3 1 79 3 MC82 - 100 6020 14 1 6 185 10 1 1 1 4 88 3 10 40 630 80 4 MC8 2 - 100 6020 62 79 14 24 7 55 1 08 3 72 2 04 3 65 48 29 2 64 8 1 1 MC8 2 -099 602 1 R 5493425 492985 0930 TE ME TS 82 2 MC8 2 -099 602 1 ACIF 20 AN GR 1 2 4 3 3 2 17 O 0 0 i 0 O 0 3 1 83 3 MC82 -099 602 1 6 2 1 105 . 20 1 4 3 88 3 10 30 270 84 4 MC82 -099 602 1 85 1 MCB2 -098 6022 R 54934 18 492966 0927 TE 86 2 MC8 2 -098 6022 DCTF 3D GG1BL3 6 4 2 2 2 8 0 0 0 1 3 0 3 1 87 3 MC 8 2 -098 6022 9 1 16 1 18 . 20 3 10 4 64 6 lO 40 7B0 88 4 MC82 098 602 2 89 1 MC8 2 097 6023 R 5493402 492958 0920 TE 90 2 MC8 2 09 7 602 3 ACL T 2C0 GR1GV 1 13 4 2 3 23 7 196 0 2 1 1 43 1 3 1 9 1 3 MC8 2 097 602 3 46 1 1 270 . 10 1 18 6 59 4 i o 30 1640 92 •1 MC82 -097 6023 93 1 MC8 2 -096 6024 R 5493395 492948 09 15 TE 94 2 MC82 096 6024 AC L T 2CD GY 1 3 4 2 3 23 126 0 1 0 1 3 1 3 1 95 3 MC82 -U96 6024 6 2 1 143 10 1 10 4 26 5 10 50 320 96 4 MCB 2 -096 602 4 97 1 MC82 -095 6025 R 5493388 492943 0913 TE ME TS 98 2 MCB2 -095 6025 ACTF 20 AN CA CA GY 1 3 4 2 3 2 126 0 1 0 1 34 1 3 1 99 3 MCB2 -095 6025 16 2 6 155 . 10 1 1 1 5 00 4 10 40 300 100 4 ML 82 -095 6025 57 33 15 12 B 93 1 2 1 6 . 09 1 04 3 1 1 92 26 4 90 101 1 MC82 -094 6026 R 549333B 492945 0905 TE ME 102 2 MC82 -094 6026 GWAV 7 AN CA CA DG2GG5 3 4 2 3 32 1 3 3 1 2 34 0 3 1 103 3 MC82 -094 6026 6 2 22 130 10 9 9 4 20 9 10 20 2 70 104 4 MCB 2 - 094 6026 66 OI 12 39 6 90 .67 5 5 1 60 1 83 1 10 12 4 03 105 1 MC82 -093 6027 R 5493377 492933 0908 TE ME 106 2 MC82 -093 6027 AFTF 2E BA CA GR 1 1 43 3 3 32 15 1 1 1 2 237 6 0 107 3 MC82 -093 602 7 4 1 1 45 10 IS 8 2 90 2 10 10 20O 108 4 MC82 -093 6027 48 05 17 51 10 50 90 5 8 1 13 49 2 06 65 24 1 4 1 109 1 MC82 092 6028 R 5493363 492920 0897 TE 1 10 2 MC82 -092 602B ACTF 2D GR 1 3 4 2 3 2 716 0 1 0 1 235 6 1 1 1 3 MC82 -092 6028 90 2 14 131 10 19 7 3 63 10 10 10 980 1 12 4 MCB2 -092 6028 1 13 1 MC82 09 1 6029 R 5493348 492912 0890 TE 1 14 2 MCB 2 09 1 6029 ABLT 2BC DG1GY5 3 4 4 3 34 9526 0 0 0 1 23 0 6 1 1 15 3 MC8 2 -09 1 6029 25 2 5 1 16 10 6 6 4 30 7 10 30 7 50 1 16 4 MCB 2 -09 1 6029 PJ LQ L i s t * n g of GOOD a t 1 3 4 7 : 2 6 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCId=KMMC Page 3 1 17 1 MC82 -0B9 6030 R 5493340 492880 0885 TE 1 18 2 MC8 2 -089 6030 ACTF 2D DG 1 3 4 2 3 12 12 0 1 1 1 32 4 3 1 1 19 3 MC82 -089 6030 185 2 6 185 to 24 19 5 85 3 to 30 20O0 120 4 MC82 -089 6030 12 1 1 MCB 2 -088 6031 R 5493340 492880 0885 TE 122 2 MC82 -088 603 1 OCT F 3D GV 1 3 4 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 3 1 123 3 MC82 -088 603 1 69 2 22 189 20 1 3 3 50 6 to 30 4200 124 4 MC82 -088 6031 125 1 MC82 090 6032 R 5493335 492910 0883 TE 126 2 MC82 -O90 6032 ACTF 2D GGIGV1 13 4 2 3 2 7 126 0 0 0 1 23 4 3 1 127 3 MC82 090 6032 153 3 5 198 10 10 1 1 6 00 6 10 40 2600 128 4 MC8 2 090 6032 129 1 MC82 -087 6033 R 5493329 492897 0880 TE 1 30 2 MCB 2 0B7 603 3 ACTF 2D DG4 13 4 2 2 2 1 3 2 0 1 14 1 3 1 1 3 1 3 MCB 2 08 7 6033 8 1 5 126 io 1 8 4 OO 5 IO 20 1 160 132 4 MC8 2 087 6033 133 1 MCB 2 -086 6034 R 5493320 492892 0873 TE 134 2 MC82 086 6034 ANLP 2C DG1GV5 34 4 2 3 32 12 5 2 1 2 43 0 3 1 135 3 MC82 OB6 6034 3 1 2 65 10 1 2 1 65 5 10 30 1700 136 4 MCB 2 086 6034 137 1 MC82 085 6035 R 5493312 492882 0870 TE 138 2 MC82 085 6035 GWAV 7 0G4SL3 3 4 2 3 32 12 5 2 1 2 34 0 3 t 139 3 MC82 -085 6035 4 2 1 74 10 1 5 1 75 3 10 SO 820 140 4 MC82 -0B5 6035 14 1 1 MC82 -08 4 6036 R 5493309 492881 0870 TE 142 2 MCB 2 084 6036 OCLT 3CD GR 1 13 4 2 3 32 1 5 3 2 2 16 0 3 I 143 3 MC8 2 08 4 6036 3 2 1 1 16 10 1 4 2 04 4 10 30 800 144 4 MCB 2 -OB4 6036 145 1 MC82 083 6037 R 5493307 492879 0868 TE 146 2 M( 8 2 -083 6037 DCLP 3C DG4 13 4 2 3 32 6149 3 3 1 2 134 0 3 1 147 3 MCB 2 083 6037 2 1 1 104 10 1 2 1 79 3 10 20 690 148 4 MC8 2 08 3 6037 149 1 MCB 2 -082 6038 R 5493305 492875 0867 TE 150 2 MC8 2 -08 2 6038 DCTF 3D GR3 36 4 2 2 2 1 0 2 1 1 14 1 3 1 15 1 3 MCB 2 -082 6038 3 2 425 178 80 1 3 2 32 4 10 40 1 160 152 4 MC82 082 6038 153 1 MC82 08 1 6039 R 5493303 492866 0860 TE 154 2 MCB 2 -OB 1 6039 ACTF 2D DG 1 1 4 2 3 12 684 0 2 0 2 237 0 3 1 155 3 MC8 2 08 1 6039 55 1 3 175 10 49 26 5 95 4 IO 30 920 156 4 MCB2 -08 1 6039 157 1 MC8 2 080 6040 R 5493295 492865 0860 TE 158 2 MC82 -080 6040 ANLP 2C 0G1 1 4 2 3 12 12 3 3 2 2 43 0 3 1 159 3 MCB 2 080 6040 14 5 2 132 30 5 8 3 26 4 10 20 3800 160 4 MCB 2 -080 6O40 16 1 1 MC82 079 604 1 R 5493295 492865 0855 TE ME 162 2 MC82 -079 604 1 ACTF 2D AN CA CA DG 1 1 4 2 3 12 6819 0 2 0 1 32 0 3 1 163 3 MCB 2 -079 604 1 94 3 1 195 20 29 17 6 to 3 to 40 820 164 4 MC82 -079 604 1 55 75 16 79 7 55 1 13 6 49 1 81 3 62 96 28 3 96 165 1 MC 82 -07 8 604 2 R 5493294 492865 0855 TE 166 2 MCB 2 -078 6042 DCTF 3D DG2GG3 3 1 4 2 3 12 12 3 3 2 2 34 0 3 1 167 3 MC82 -078 604 2 5 2 1 76 10 1 3 2 1 1 3 10 20 260 168 4 MCB 2 078 604 2 169 1 MC82 -077 604 3 R 5493287 492850 0850 TE 170 2 MCB 2 -077 604 3 ACTF 2D 0G1 13 4 2 3 32 986 0 3 2 2 23 0 3 1 17 1 3 MC82 -077 6043 3 1 16 lOO 570 to 33 12 6 10 15 10 160 1060 172 4 MC82 -077 604 3 173 1 MC8 2 076 6044 R 5493280 492846 0846 TE 174 2 MC 8 2 -076 6044 DCLP 3C 0G1SL2 3 4 2 3 32 1 0 3 2 2 13 0 3 1 (D ro L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13.47:26 o n NOV 7. 19B4 f o r CCId=KMMC Page 4 175 3 MC82 076 604 4 4 4 4 S3 10 9 2 1 77 4 IO 30 4B0 176 4 MC82 -076 6044 177 1 MC82 075 6045 R 5493268 492845 0840 TE 178 2 MC82 -075 6045 ACTF 20 DG1 1 4 2 3 12 6179 0 1 0 1 3 0 3 1 179 3 MC82 -075 604 5 172 1 1 260 10 33 19 6 63 6 IO 30 260 180 18 1 4 1 MC82 MC82 -075 -07 4 6045 6046 R 5493265 492B44 0840 TE 182 2 MC82 -074 6046 S02S 8 DG2GG3 3 4 2 2 2 1 5 4 2 2 14 O 3 1 183 3 MC82 -074 6046 6 0 0 0 00 0 2 1 83 5 IO 20 440 184 4 MC8 2 -074 6046 185 1 MC82 -073 604 7 R 5493265 492B33 0837 TE 186 2 MCB2 073 604 7 DC TF 3D GR 1 3 4 2 3 12 1 7 O 2 0 1 4 O 3 1 18? 3 ML'8 2 073 604 7 4 1 1 67 10 1 3 I 76 5 10 30 440 188 4 MC8 2 -073 604 7 189 1 MC8 2 -072 604 8 R 5493250 492818 0829 TE 190 2 MC8 2 -072 6048 SOZS 8 GR2 3 4 2 0 1 0 3 2 1 1 0 3 1 19 1 3 MC82 -072 604B 5 13 8 7 1 20 3 2 2 90 5 IO 30 240 192 4 MC82 -072 6048 193 1 MCB2 060 6049 R 54932 15 492819 08 10 TE 194 2 MC82 060 6049 DCTF 3D GR2 3 4 2 3 2 259 0 3 2 2 43 0 3 1 195 3 MC82 060 6049 10 3 4 75 10 2 8 4 50 1 1 10 30 480 196 4 MCB2 060 6049 197 1 MCB2 07 1 6050 R 5493220 492800 0810 TE 198 2 MC8 2 07 1 605O AFTF 2E GV 1 12 4 2 0 1 14 0 1 0 1 13 0 199 3 ML 8 2 -07 1 6050 3 1 2 1 84 10 30 9 5 40 5 10 40 480 20O 4 ML 8 2 -07 1 6050 20 1 1 ML 8 2 07O 605 1 R 54932 15 492800 0809 TE 202 2 MC8 2 070 605 1 AF1F 2F GV 1BR3 3 4 2 0 1 14 5 1 0 1 16 0 3 1 203 3 ML82 -070 605 1 32 2 1 3 157 10 25 14 5 05 15 IO 20 540 204 4 MC82 070 605 1 205 1 ML82 -059 6052 R 5493207 492815 0806 IE ME IS 206 2 MC8 2 059 6052 SQ2S 8 RV CA T H BL2 3 4 1 3 32 624 5 2 0 2 43 0 3 1 207 3 MC82 -059 6052 8 1 3 64 10 1 3 1 95 IO IO 30 2BO 208 4 MLB 2 059 b052 7 4 99 1 1 32 3 82 42 1 84 4 1 3 12 1 47 03 2 65 209 1 MC82 058 6053 R 5493200 492815 0806 TE 2 10 2 ML 8 2 05B 6053 SUZS 8 SL3DG4 3 4 1 2 2 129 3 4 2 2 34 0 3 1 2 1 1 3 ML 8 2 058 6053 4 8 1 8 1 10 1 3 2 OS 4 10 20 580 2 12 4 MCB2 058 6053 2 13 1 MC82 057 6054 R 5493195 492815 0805 TE 2 14 2 MC82 057 6054 AFTF 20E DG4 3 4 2 1 2 257 0 2 0 2 347 0 3 1 2 15 3 MC8 2 057 6054 84 18 72 265 30 27 12 4 83 7 1 10 40 760 2 16 4 MC8 2 -057 6054 2 17 t Ml 82 069 6055 R 5493198 492798 0804 TE 2 IB 2 MC82 -069 6055 MIFF 51 DG3 3 47 2 0 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 19 3 MC 82 069 6055 25 7 18 168 30 35 15 6 50 22 10 30 1 180 220 4 MC82 -069 6055 22 1 1 MC82 -06B 6056 R 5493195 492798 0802 TE 222 2 MC82 068 6056 ACIF 20 GR 1 3 4 2 2 2 1925 0 1 0 3 324 1 3 1 223 3 MC82 -068 6056 39 6 44 1 17 20 33 14 4 82 16 10 20 1 140 224 4 ML 8 2 -068 6056 225 1 MC82 -056 6057 R 5493180 492814 0803 TE 226 2 MC62 066 6057 AFTF 2DE GGI 3 4 2 1 2 5 5 2 0 3 237 0 3 1 227 3 MC82 056 6057 73 2 32 154 10 25 2 1 5 00 15 10 20 720 228 4 ML 8 2 056 6057 229 1 MC8 2 067 6058 R 5493185 492790 0797 TE 2 30 2 MC82 067 6058 ANLP 2C GR 1 1 4 2 3 34 6285 0 1 0 2 234 0 3 1 23 1 3 MC8 2 067 6058 1 7 4 14 67 10 20 14 4 90 1 4 10 20 560 232 4 MC82 067 6058 L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13 47:26 on NOV 7, 1984 f o r CCId'KMMC Page 5 233 1 MC82 054 6059 R 5493175 4928 10 0802 TE 2 34 2 MC82 -054 6059 MIFP 5T BL4 3 47 2 1 1 2 5 2 0 3 14 0 3 1 235 3 MC82 -054 6059 126 65 49 97 60 26 18 4 00 16 10 40 900 236 4 MC82 -054 6059 237 1 MC82 -066 6060 R 5493178 492780 0794 TE 238 2 MCB2 066 6060 AFTF 2DE DG4 2 4 2 3 32 6529 0 2 1 2 34 0 3 1 239 3 MC82 -066 6060 3 1 2 10 79 1 00 22 19 4 88 12 10 30 720 240 4 MC82 -066 6060 24 1 1 MC82 -05S 606 1 R 5493172 492806 0797 TE ME 242 2 MC82 -055 606 1 ACTF 2D BA TH DG2DG1 4 4 1 3 234 895 0 2 0 3 23 0 3 1 243 3 MC82 -055 606 1 89 3 1550 1700 40 23 24 4 74 IS 10 50 60 244 4 MC8 2 -055 6061 48 64 16 95 1 1 i 07 96 3 79 13 17 92 02 35 3 37 245 1 ML 8 2 -065 606 2 R 5493138 492755 0782 TE 246 2 ML 8 2 -065 6062 AFTF 2DE GR 1 3 1 4 2 1 2 54 1 3 2 2 34 0 247 3 MC82 -065 6062 44 2 8 94 10 27 18 4 88 14 10 30 340 248 4 MC8 2 -065 6062 249 1 MC8 2 -064 6063 R 5493124 492743 0779 TE 250 2 MC8 2 -064 6063 DCTF 3D GG 1 1 4 2 2 2 5 0 2 1 2 4 0 3 1 25 1 3 MC8 2 -064 6063 27 1 23 137 10 24 17 5 33 6 IO 30 380 252 4 MC82 -064 606 3 253 1 MC82 -053 6064 R 5493 120 492755 0782 TE 254 2 MC82 -OS3 6064 S02S 8 GR 1 12 13 1 2 23 9 5 4 2 4 2 0 3 1 255 3 MC82 -05 3 6064 79 1 5 101 . 10 52 17 4 40 16 IO 20 740 256 4 MC82 -053 6064 257 1 MC8 2 -063 6065 R 5493124 492740 0777 TE 258 2 MC82 -06 3 6065 AFTF 2E DG1 1 4 2 3 2 269 0 3 2 2 34 0 3 1 259 3 ML 82 -06 3 6065 27 2 9 101 10 28 18 5 .62 14 10 30 280 260 4 ML82 063 6065 26 1 1 MC82 052 6066 R 5493 100 492712 0771 IE 262 2 MC82 05 2 6066 sozs a GR 1 3 4 2 3 2 19 5 3 2 2 34 1 3 t 263 3 ML82 052 6066 14 4 22 48 30 2 5 2 20 5 10 30 860 264 4 M L 8 2 052 6066 265 1 MC8 2 - 106 6067 R 54929BO 49260O 0774 TE 266 2 MC8 2 - 106 606 7 SOZS 8 BL4GG4 32 4 2 1 23 1 0 5 3 3 4 0 0 267 3 ML 8 2 106 6067 5 5 5 65 10 1 2 2 17 6 10 40 440 268 4 MC82 - 106 6067 269 1 MCB2 - 107 6068 R 5492880 492525 0862 TE 270 2 MC82 - 107 6068 SOZS 8 BL4GG4 32 4 1 1 3 1 0 4 2 3 14 1 0 27 1 3 MC8 2 - 107 6068 3 1 2 2 72 20 1 1 2 24 29 10 160 1400 272 4 MC82 - 107 6068 273 1 MCB2 - 108 6069 R 5492874 492517 0865 TE ME 274 2 MC82 - 108 6069 ACTF 2D BA CA DG3 1 4 2 3 1 4 0 1 1 1 27 6 3 1 275 3 MC82 - 108 6069 73 1 1 144 10 4 18 7 25 5 10 20 360 276 4 MC82 - 108 6069 53 42 16 09 10. 79 1  29 4 52 6 10 2 83 22 25 3 97 277 1 MC82 - 109 6070 R 5492874 492495 0875 TE 278 2 MC82 - 109 6070 SOZS 8 GG46L4 23 17 1 0 0 4 2 3 14 1 3 1 279 3 MC82 - 109 6070 4 1 1 66 10 1 2 1 10 3 10 40 640 280 4 MCB2 109 6070 28 1 1 MC82 - 1 10 607 1 R 5492848 492493 0897 TE 282 2 MC82 - 1 10 607 1 SQZS 8 BL4GG4 23 17 1 0 0 5 2 3 14 1 3 1 283 3 MC82 - 1 10 607 1 6 2 3 70 20 1 1 1 78 4 10 30 760 284 4 MCB2 - 1 10 607 1 285 1 MC82 -111 607 2 R 5492819 492470 0920 TE 286 2 MCB2 -111 6072 MCHT 8C GG3 23 47 1 1 2 1 0 3 2 2 16 1 5 1 287 3 MC82 -111 607 2 4 2 3 43 10 1 2 1 39 10 10 30 860 288 4 MC8 2 -111 6072 289 1 MLB 2 - 1 12 607 3 R 5492790 492473 0940 TE 290 2 MC82 -112 607 3 MCHT 8C GY6BRJ 3 7 1 0 5 5 2 2 14 1 3 1 13 s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13.47:26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CC i d = KMMC Page 6 29 1 3 MC82 -112 607 3 2 1 1 1 23 20 1 2 87 10 10 30 1280 292 4 MC82 -112 607 3 293 1 MC82 -113 6074 R 5492789 492438 0957 TE 294 2 MC82 -113 607 4 DKMA 6M DG2 14 14 1 0 1 O 2 0 2 13 0 0 295 3 MC82 -113 607 4 37 1 1 190 10 7 17 4 88 4 10 20 160 296 4 MC82 -113 6074 297 1 MC82 114 6075 R 5492769 492453 0960 TE 298 2 MC8 2 -114 6075 SCCL ac 0G1 35 4 2 2 3 157 5 2 1 2 342 4 5 1 299 3 Mf 8 2 -114 6075 10 2 4 123 10 4 24 6 40 6 IO 30 240 3O0 4 MC8 2 -114 6075 3U 1 I Ml 8 2 115 6076 R 5492760 492462 0965 TE 3C2 2 Ml. 8 2 115 60? 6 ACTF 2D DG 1 23 4 t 2 2 17 3 2 1 2 34 0 0 30 3 3 Ml. 8 2 1 15 6076 4 1 1 49 10 1 6 2 40 4 10 30 20O0 304 1 M C 8 2 115 6076 305 1 Ml 8 2 1 16 6077 R 5492745 492460 0975 TE 306 2 Mf 8 2 1 16 6077 DCLP 3C 0G1GR2 12 4 3 3 32 125 3 5 1 2 34 1 0 30 7 3 MC8 2 1 16 6077 1 1 1 2 S3 10 5 4 2 53 20 10 30 160O 3o8 4 MC82 -116 6077 3*19 1 Ml 8 2 -117 6078 R 5492734 492450 0990 TE 3 10 2 Ml 8 2 117 6078 MIFF 5T GR 1 23 7 t 0 1 2 1 1 10 1 0 3 1 1 3 Ml 8 2 117 6078 20 1 1 54 10 27 12 4 40 1 1 10 40 1200 3 12 4 Mi.82 -117 6078 3 1 3 1 MC 8 2 -118 6079 R 5492010 493635 0765 TE 3 I 4 2 MC 8 2 M ! 6079 SCCL 8C GR 1 3 4 2 2 3 1 4 5 1 3 13 2 6 12 3 15 3 MC" 8 2 i i a 60 ?9 OOOO I 3 255 IO SO 1 4 14 00 165 120 400 60 3 I k 4 Ml'8 2 1 1 8 6079 3 1 7 1 MCB 2 1 19 6 0 8 0 R 5492011 493645 0768 TE 3 18 2 MC 8 2 1 1 9 6O80 SOZS 8 GR 1 3 4 2 0 3 1 4 3 2 3 34 2 6 12 3 19 3 Ml 82 1 1 9 6080 OOOO 3 3 86 5 70 5 8 13 00 32 20 200 140 3 2 0 4 MC 8 2 1 19 60B0 3 2 1 1 Ml 8 2 - 1 20 608 1 R 5492010 493650 0764 TE )22 2 Mi 8 2 1 20 608 1 SCCL 8C GR 1 23 4 2 O 4 4 2 3 34 2 3 1 J? 1 .1 M- 8 2 I 20 608 1 8 GOO 5 3 142 1 10 6 12 4 16 12 20 70 340 i . ' 4 4 Mi. a 2 120 t o d 1 3 2') 1 Mi 8 2 1 2 1 60B2 H S492005 493666 0767 TE 3 2 fa 2 MCB 2 12 1 6085 SPSC BG BL 4 38 4 2 O 4 3 2 3 34 0 3 1 32 ' 3 MCB 2 12 1 6082 345 3 6 fad 20 6 5 2 37 6 10 40 360 328 4 MCB 2 12 1 608 2 329 1 MC82 - 122 608 3 R 5492 198 493663 0767 TE 3 30 2 MC82 122 608 3 SCCL 8C GR 1 3 4 2 0 12 17 4 3 2 3 34 2 6 1 33 1 3 MCB 2 - 122 608 3 3650 2 2 300 80 12 10 4 18 15 20 40 420 332 4 MC82 122 60B3 333 1 MC82 - 123 6084 R 5492998 492652 0767 TE 334 2 MCB 2 -123 6084 VEIN SL3 4 0 1 3 3 3 16 2 4 1 335 3 MCB 2 - 123 608 4 143 2 4 2 1 20 2 1 1 3 62 14 10 40 100 336 4 MC82 - 123 6084 337 1 MC82 124 6085 R 5492998 492645 0767 TE 338 2 MC82 - 124 6085 MTFF 5T GG4 3 7 2 0 1 1 3 3 3 3 86 0 4 1 339 3 MC82 - 124 6085 18 1 3 1 33 .40 2 5 4 5 1 1 1 IO 30 40 340 4 MC82 - 124 6085 34 1 1 MC82 -04 3 6086 R 5493225 493630 1173 TE 342 2 MCB 2 -043 6086 DBLT 3BC 343 3 MC82 -043 6086 72 1 3 72 10 8 7 4 50 9 10 20 1040 344 4 MCB 2 04 3 6086 345 1 MC82 -039 6087 R 5492805 493725 1024 TE 346 2 MCB 2 -039 608 7 MCHT 5C DG2GG4 4 4 1 3 34 6342 0 1 0 1 23 0 O 347 3 MC82 039 608 7 70 1 1 68 10 13 2 4 80 5 10 20 860 348 4 MCB 2 039 608 7 P a g e 176 o n o ci c i m O CN o o GO CO in n <— ci fN O 10 (0 Cl co O O O o O O m CO CN O CN CN o o o n CO <0 o CN CN CN CN ci 10 n in D CO m in T n CN T CN n n CN — — — _ CN «- CN _ CN „ CN CN cn cn L P O 0) in in i/> O T 10 i - o O O O O O O »- O in *" o CN O - 10 — U l O CN CN _ o O UJ _ CN UJ o CN Ul O o I T X r- Z 10 Z r-O o o o o o o o o CN UJ U l CN Ul UJ •» U l CN Ul t— r - >- cn — r- r- CO co o o CN o T O O O — O o O o o o o o n Ol c i CN n m O CN CN o O m o m CN in O m in in CN Cl CN O CO 10 cn ID ci n r> r- CN in T CN O 0) Ol en CN CN CN ci CN Cl n Cl ~ CN o O C O n CN CN CO CN in T T Cl i n 10 CN r» O ID o o r> r- o o o o c i 10 CN o o 01 CN n O n O « O in fN m o <0 T in CD T <0 *" fN — CN CN t*i CN CN *" o» T *T - T CN p. 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T »— T U , *T T T u T u. *T u. in u. in _i m - i in _J in >- in _i in - in m m cc in in in u CO CO u u ca <j ca CJ u a o a a or Q a a 0T O a a or < or a or < or < or a a < a a cc < cn cn cn en n T -T n in uitfi in u> i 0 lo t0 r- r» r» r * c o c o e o e o c n c n c n c n o o o o _ — CN CN CN CN cn cn m cn *r n v m in in uj 10 » o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 10 10 10 10 10 10 IO 10 10 10 10 10 <0 10 10 10 10 U3 10 (0 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 (0 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 (0 10 10 (0 10 10 10 U9 10 (0 10 10 10 10 o o — — — CN CN CN CN rn en rn cn f- !~~ CN CN CN CN CO CO CO CO rn cn cn rn m cn 0> 01 T T T T in in in in O o O o 10 10 10 10 m in in m in m in in m in in in in in in in in m T T T T 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 T T *T T 10 10 10 10 •7 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 i 0 in in in in 10 10 10 10 cn cn cn m t ( ( , ( o O O o o O o o "~ 7 " o O o o o O o o O O O O CN CN CN CN CN Ci CN CN CN CN CN CN ;N CN CN CN CN rN CN CN CN CN CN CN rN CN CN CN Ci CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CN CO CO CO CO CO cu CO CO CO CO CO CO CD CO CD CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 3} CO CO CO CO CO CD CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO SO CO GO CO CO U U u u o O CJ U u (J U -J U o ( J U ( j u u u U U J <J <J u ( J u u O u u u o u 1J u u u u \ J u ( J X X X X X £ X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X rn T - CN rn - CN n T - CN n T - CN n T - CN m - CN n T CN cn *T CN r*i T - rN cn CN rn T CN cn 1 - CN n *y - CN cn T CN cn co cn O — < o o o - - • T *T T T T ' <ncnO — C N n n ' i n ^ r ^ a j o i O - c N c n n ' ^ u i f ^ c o c n o ^ c N M - * ^ r ^ r N r N C N r ^ < N o j f N ( N C N n n r i n r n o n n n n > t i n g of GOOD a t 13 :47:26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r C C I d * KMMC Page 9 465 1 MC82- 167 61 17 a 5492878 494155 1135 TE 466 2 MC82- 167 6 117 RVBC 4 GG5DG2 10 6 2 3 4 12 0 0 0 2 3 2 3 1 467 3 MC82- 167 61 17 5 2 1 55 10 1 5 2 40 4 10 10 520 468 4 MC82- 167 6117 469 1 MC82- 169 6 1 18 R 5492865 494131 1127 TE 470 2 MC82- 169 61 18 AGLM 28 0G2 10 56 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 2 23 0 0 4 7 1 3 MC82 -169 6 118 1 1 1 t t o t 10 1 13 4 89 5 IO 10 120 472 4 MC82- 169 6 1 18 473 1 MC82- 168 6 1 19 R 5492855 494153 1117 TE 474 2 MCB2- 168 6 t 19 DCTF 30 GR3 10 46 2 3 234 1259 0 0 0 3 123 4 3 1 476 3 MC82- 168 6 1 19 38 1 2 58 20 2 6 4 61 7 IO 20 260 476 4 MC82 - 168 6 1 19 477 1 MCB 2 - 034 6 120 R 5492830 494 1 10 1095 TE 478 2 MC82 -034 6 120 ABTF 2B DG2 34 4 2 3 34 6428 0 0 O 2 23 0 3 1 479 3 MCB2 - 034 6120 38 2 2 106 10 1 1 1 5 19 6 IO 30 lOOO 480 4 MC 6 2 -034 6 120 48 1 1 MC82- 172 6 12 1 R S492795 494 1 17 1075 TE 482 2 MCB2- 172 6 12 1 ANFL 2A DG2 12 14 2 3 2 817 0 0 0 1 234 4 0 483 3 MC82- 172 6 12 1 49 2 t 65 10 1 9 4 7 1 6 10 40 460 484 4 MC82- 172 6 12 1 485 1 MCB2 -173 6 122 R 5492780 494098 1065 TE ME 486 2 MC82- 173 6 122 ANFL 2A BA CA DG2 1 12 2 1 t 8 0 0 0 1 23 4 0 487 3 MC82- 173 6122 76 1 1 ioo 20 t 15 5 85 5 to 40 60 488 4 MC 82 - 173 6 122 54 l 79 16.91 10. 46 1  25 3 42 6 15 3 63 IO 33 2 51 489 1 MC82- 174 6 123 R 5492765 494086 1052 TE 490 9 MC82 - 174 6123 ANBX 2B 0GIBL3 13 6 2 3 43 4256 0 2 O 2 326 0 3 1 49 1 3 MCB2- 174 6 123 63 1 1 55 10 1 3 4 60 0 10 0 0 492 4 MC82 - 174 6 123 493 1 MC82 175 6124 R 5492730 494065 1025 TE 494 2 MC8 2 175 6 1 24 ABTF 2B DG2BL3 36 6 2 3 34 6425 0 1 0 2 23 1 3 1 495 3 MC82 - 175 6 124 27 2 1 50 20 2 9 4 25 0 IO O 0 496 4 MCB 2 175 6 124 497 1 MC82- 176 6 125 R 5492703 494059 IOIO TE 498 2 MC82- 176 6 125 ABLT 2BC DG1BL3 1 4 2 3 234 684 1 1 2 0 2 243 2 0 0 499 3 MC 8 2 - 176 6 125 8 1 1 70 . 20 2 1 1 5 30 o 10 0 O 500 4 MCB2 - 176 6 125 501 1 MC8 2 177 6 1 26 R 549268B 494060 tOOO TE 502 2 MC82- 177 6 126 DCLP 3C DG2GR3 3 4 2 3 3 654 1 0 t 1 2 43 0 3 t 503 3 MC82 -177 6 126 5 1 1 87 20 1 2 3 10 0 10 0 0 504 4 MC82 -177 6 126 505 1 MC82 -178 6 127 R 5492673 494064 0995 TE 506 2 MC8 2 - 178 6 127 DCLP 3C DG4 13 4 2 3 23 14 0 2 1 2 43 0 3 1 507 3 MC82 -178 6127 8 1 1 103 10 1 4 4 15 0 10 O O 508 4 MC 8 2 -1 78 6 127 509 1 MC82- 157 6 128 R 5493022 493903 1187 TE TS 5IO 2 MC82- 157 6128 DCLT 3CD BL3 2 4 2 3 23 15 5 1 0 2 13 0 3 1 5 1 1 3 MC82- 157 6128 9 1 4 134 . 10 1 7 4 10 0 10 0 0 5t 2 4 MC82- 157 6128 513 1 MC82 -158 6 129 R 549302O 493885 t183 TE 514 2 MC82- 158 6 129 DCLT 3CD GR 1 13 4 3 3 2 17 0 1 0 1 34 0 3 1 5 15 3 MC82 -158 6 129 6 8 2 72 10 2 2 2 60 5 10 20 2BO 5 16 4 MCB 2 158 6 129 517 1 MC82- 159 6 130 R 5493037 493895 1195 TE 518 2 MC82- 159 6 130 DCFT 30 OG2BL3 12 4 2 2 12 24 0 0 0 t 34 O 3 1 5 19 3 MCB2- 159 6 130 14 t 1 too . to 7 8 4 70 4 20 20 180 520 4 MC8 2 -159 6 130 52 1 1 MC82- 160 6 131 R 5493035 493920 1200 TE 522 2 MC82- 160 6 13 1 ANLP 2C DG2 3 1 4 2 3 32 1246 O t 0 2 43 0 3 1 L i s t i n g of GOOD a t 13:47:26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCId-KMMC Page IO 523 3 MCB2- 160 6131 IS 3 1 145 . 10 to 1 1 5 OO 5 10 20 320 524 4 MCB2- 160 6131 525 1 MC82- 179 6 132 R 5492425 494020 0907 TE 526 2 MCB2- 179 6132 SPSC 8G GR1GR2 3 4 2 1 2 1 4 4 2 3 4 1 3 1 527 3 MC8 2- 179 6132 8 5 20 120 10 4 7 3 90 63 20 10 340 528 4 MC82- 179 6 132 S29 1 MC82 -ISO 6 133 R 549240O 494105 0907 TE 530 2 MC82- 180 6 133 SOZS 8 GR3GR2 23 14 2 1 2 4 4 2 3 4 0 3 1 . 531 3 MC82- 180 6133 30 2 1 62 20 1 1 2 00 9 10 30 1460 532 4 MC82 -1B0 6133 533 1 MC82- 18 1 6 134 R 5492355 494 tOO 0905 TE 534 2 MC82- 181 6134 SOZS 8 GRIBL3 23 2 0 4 3 2 3 4 1 3 1 635 3 MC82 -18 1 6 134 6 2 1 56 10 1 1 2 10 4 10 20 840 536 4 MC82 - 18 1 6 134 537 1 ML 8 2 -182 6 135 R 5492355 494088 0910 TE 538 2 MCB2 - 182 6135 SOZS 8 GR 1 3 14 2 0 4 2 1 2 4 1 0 539 3 MC82- 182 6 135 15 1 1 43 10 1 1 2 75 5 IO 20 1060 540 4 MC82 - 182 6 t35 54 1 1 MC82 - 183 6 136 R 5492355 494018 0920 TE 542 2 MC 8 2- 183 6 136 SOZS 8 GR1DG4 02 14 2 1 2 1 4 3 1 3 4 0 543 3 MC82 -183 6 136 4 1 1 46 10 3 12 4 15 4 10 10 720 544 4 MC82- 183 6 136 545 1 MC8 2 184 6137 R 5492319 493005 0927 TE TS 546 2 MC82- 184 6137 ACTF 20 DG3DG4 4 24 3 2 2 1 4 3 1 2 4 0 0 547 3 MC82- IB4 6 137 4 1 6 70 10 1 5 3 75 4 10 20 680 548 4 MC82 -184 6137 549 1 MCB2 - 1B5 6 138 R 5492315 493968 0928 TE ME TS 2 138 550 2 MC82 - 185 6138 DCFL 3A DA CA CA BL3 4 12 1 1 2 8 0 1 0 1 24 0 3 1 55 1 3 Ml 8 2 -185 6138 2 1 1 IB 10 t 2 2 65 3 10 20 200 552 4 MCB2 - 185 6 138 72 5 1 13 95 3 67 50 92 1 79 5 38 3 1 07 1 OO 553 1 Mi 8 2 -1B6 6 1 39 R 5492303 493947 0930 TE ME TS 554 2 MC 8 2 -186 6 139 OCFL 3A AN CA CA BL3 01 34 1 2 2 129 5 3 t 2 34 0 0 555 3 MC 8 2 -186 6 139 14 1 2 42 10 2 9 3 85 9 10 20 1460 556 4 Ml 82 - 186 6 t 3 9 63 66 16 57 5 77 -74 2 05 3 19 3 58 2 01 13 2 19 557 1 MC82- 187 6 140 R 5492301 493945 0930 TE 558 2 MCB2 - 187 6 140 VEIN GG 1 38 1 1 0 0 1 I 2 14 2 6 1 559 3 MC82 -187 6 140 3 1 19 2 1 90 3 1 2 45 3 3200 10 80 560 4 MC82 -187 6 140 561 1 MC82 -188 614 1 R 5492284 493915 0935 TE 562 2 MC82- 188 614 1 ANLP 2C BL3DG2 10 4 3 3 3 614 5 2 0 2 24 0 0 56 3 3 MC82 -188 614 1 5 1 2 32 20 7 3 2 85 5 40 20 860 564 4 MCB2 -188 6 14 t 565 1 MC82- 1B9 6142 R 5492272 4938B3 0937 TE ME 566 2 MC82- 189 6142 AGLM 2AB AN TH CA DG2 31 5 2 2 4 5 0 1 0 3 32 2 0 567 3 MC82- 1B9 6142 127 t 1 59 30 2 14 6 55 6 10 20 380 568 4 MC82- 189 6 142 57 82 16 9 1 10 OO 1 1 3 2 66 2 87 3.97 t oa 23 2 8 t 569 1 MC82- 190 6143 R 5492260 493862 0943 TE ME TS PH 2143 570 2 MCB2- 190 6 143 GWAV 7 0G2GG4 31 4 3 3 34 15 5 1 0 1 3 0 0 57 1 3 MC82- 190 6143 7 1 t 22 . 10 4 8 2 50 4 IO 20 1060 572 4 MC82 -190 6 143 69 16 15 12 4 06 .56 1 36 3 75 2 76 t 79 1 1 1 74 573 1 MC82- 19 1 6 144 R 5492256 493850 0943 TE 574 2 MC8 2- 19 1 6 144 MTFF 5T BKIBL3 3 1 2 0 1 1 2 t 1 1 0 0 575 3 MC82 -191 6144 9 1 1 52 10 16 10 4 70 6 10 20 840 576 4 MC82- 19 1 6 144 577 1 MCB2 - 192 6145 R 5492250 49380O 0940 TE ME TS 578 2 MCB2- 192 6 145 BSLT IA BA TH 0G2 3 12 2 2 4 4 0 2 0 3 132 4 2 t 579 3 MC8 2 192 6 145 18 3 1 55 . 10 8 23 9 85 4 10 20 120 580 4 MCB2 -192 6 145 52 33 14 43 16 23 97 3 87 7 4 1 1 69 03 27 2 66 cQ CD L i s t i n g o f G000 at 13 47 26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCid'KMMC Page 58 1 1 MC82 - 193 6 146 R 5492244 493753 0947 TE Mf. TS 582 2 MC82 - 193 6 146 MARG 5A BK 1 3 1 2 0 1 3 2 1 18 0 0 583 3 MC8 2 - 193 6146 16 1  1 58 . 10 65 15 4 90 584 4 MC82 193 6 146 6 1 95 17 36 7 26 84 2 40 1 95 2 50 585 1 MCB 2 - 194 6147 R 5492077 493880 1018 586 2 MC82 - 194 6 147 DCLP 3C BL3 36 14 2 2 43 12 3 3 1 2 14 O 3 1 587 3 MC82 - 194 6 147 20 1  1 42 20 22 14 3 50 588 4 MC82 - 194 6 147 589 1 MC82 - 195 6 148 R 5492 105 493875 1000 TE ME PH 590 2 MC8 2 195 6 148 ABLT 2BC BA TH 0G3 35 4 3 2 23 14 1 1 0 3 12 0 3 1 5 9 1 3 MCB 2 - 195 6 148 23 1  1 35 20 12 13 4 95 592 4 MC H 2 i9S 6148 64 . 03 1 4 16 7 93 7 1 2 23 6 32 1 83 593 1 M C 6 2 196 6 149 R 54921 14 493883 0995 IE CJ4 2 t.V 112 196 C 1 19 DCLP 3C B L 3 3 1 4 3 3 23 18 5 1 0 1 24 0 0 595 3 MCB 2 1 9 6 6 149 6 1 1 19 20 3 5 2 45 516 4 MC 8 2 196 6 149 5 9 7 1 MCB 2 - 197 6 150 R 5492126 493884 0986 IE 598 ? Ml 8 2 197 6 150 GWAV 7 GR2GG5 13 4 4 3 3 14 5 1 O 1 34 0 0 519 3 MC B 2 197 6 150 4 1 l 1 3 t IO 3 6 2 95 6u0 1 MC82 - 197 6 150 bu 1 1 M C 8 2 t98 6 15 1 R 5492140 493890 0983 IE 6u2 2 MC8 2 198 6 15 1 MIFF 51 BL 1 13 4 2 3 12 81 1 2 1 1 124 1 0 6c>3 3 MCB 2 199 6 15 1 1 1 1 i 1 45 10 3 6 4 80 604 4 McB2 198 6 15 1 6l>5 1 M C 8 2 199 f> 152 R 5492 1 9 6 493875 0960 TE b')6 2 M L 8 2 - 199 6 152 MIFF 5T BL2 6 4 2 2 12 1 0 3 2 2 4 0 3 1 6(.7 3 M L 8 2 199 6 152 25 1 1 60 IO 12 10 3 50 6 i i8 4 M C 8 2 1 99 C 152 h- .9 1 Ml 8 2 2; i i ) 0 15 3 K 549.17 1 0 492448 0944 TE ME TS C l . i 2 M i 8 2 2l-| ' lb I O i l 1 K 0 DA CA CA GR 1 02 4 2 2 23 1279 0 2 0 1 1 2 3 1 t i 1 t 1 Mi H 2 2<r j C 15 J 6 0 2 1 1 82 40 2 12 2 90 t 1 2 4 M . 8 2 6 lb J 65 B I 15 67 4 3 7 73 2 7 3 64 2 56 6 i 1 1 M H 2 2 " i 6 154 R 54918/8 4924 15 1020 TE ME 6 i 4 M H : 2 D I I, 1 5 4 ANt t 2 A DA 1 A CA DG WW2 4 3 2 3 2 2 78 0 0 0 1 82 0 3 1 1. i 5 3 M i 8 2 212 1 b 1 54 18 1 6 69 10 2 13 3 05 b lb 4 Mi H2 2 0 1 6 154 6 6 40 15 20 4 60 65 1 B2 2 5 1 4 4 1 6 1 7 1 Mi 8 2 2iM 6 1 5 5 R 5493795 4 92 220 0935 IE ME b 18 2 Ml 8 2 - 21)4 b 155 AGLM 2BC AN CA CA GR 1 4 6 2 3 4 6 0 2 1 2 13 0 6 19 3 M L 8 2 - 204 6 155 19 1 1 96 20 25 29 5 80 620 4 MCB 2 204 6 155 55 72 16 35 8 72 1 1 09 4 75 3 02 3 99 62 1 1 MCB 2 205 6 156 R 5493843 491990 0915 TE ME TS 6352 622 2 M C 8 2 -205 6 156 MTFF 5T AN GG2 3 4 1 t 3 1 4 3 1 2 4 0 623 3 MCB 2 -205 6 156 58 1 1 174 152 40 16 16 4 85 624 4 MC8 2 -205 6 156 60 i 39 14 85 7 15 98 6 00 58 2 91 625 1 MC82 206 6157 R 5493857 491994 0927 TE 626 2 MC82 -206 6 157 ANLP 2C GGSDG1 23 4 2 3 23 6529 3 3 2 2 34 0 3 1 627 3 MC 82 206 6 157 16 1 1 10 1 13 .20 8 14 2 95 628 4 MC82 -206 6 157 629 1 MC82 -207 6 158 R 5493123 492035 0866 TE 6 30 2 MC82 -207 6 158 ANFL 2A 0G1 1 2 2 3 2 8 0 0 0 1 23 0 63 1 3 MC82 -207 6 158 84 1 3 128 20 19 26 5 35 632 4 MC82 -207 6 158 633 1 MC82 -208 6 159 R 5493114 492033 0857 TE 634 2 MC82 -208 6 159 SCCL 8C GR 1 1 4 2 2 12 178 4 3 1 2 3 0 3 1 635 3 MC82 -208 6 159 54 1 1 95 SO 30 35 5 80 6 36 4 MC8 2 - 208 6 159 637 1 MCB 2 -209 6 160 R 5493 1 11 492033 0857 TE 638 2 MC82 -209 6 160 S02S 8 GR3 2 4 2 2 2 179 4 5 2 3 34 0 3 1 10 30 640 12 3 11 10 20 1140 IO 20 160 22 2 05 40 340 30 200 10 30 100 IO 30 480 10 3<l 1800 14 2 14 10 20 700 13 1 53 10 20 820 30 3 96 10 40 1700 2 1 3 75 40 460 10 20 180 10 20 PJ LQ <T> CD O L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13 47:26 on NOV/ 7. I9S4 f o r CCId'KMMC Page 12 639 3 MC82 -209 6 160 5 4 2 27 10 1 6 1 50 4 10 20 500 640 4 MC82 -209 6 160 64 t 1 MC82 -2 10 6161 R 5493110 492030 0855 TE ME 642 2 MC82 -2 10 6161 DCLP 3C RY CA CA GR3 3 4 2 3 23 179 4 5 2 3 43 0 3 1 643 3 MC8 2 -2 10 6 16 t 2 1 1 28 20 1 5 1 70 4 10 20 360 644 3 MCB 2 -2 10 6161 2 1 1 28 20 t 5 1 70 4 10 20 360 645 4 MC8 2 - 2 10 6161 73 90 13 40 2 63 .44 1 50 58 4 39 1 16 03 1 92 646 1 MC82 -2 1 t 6 162 R 5493 108 492030 0853 TE ME TS 647 2 MC82 2 11 6 162 SOZS 8 GR 1 3 4 2 648 3 MC82 -2 1 1 6 162 3 3 t 21 . 10 1 13 3 15 3 10 20 900 649 4 MC82 -2 1 t 6 162 7 1 44 13 . 65 5 .• 09 44 2 58 15 60 3 06 02 3 36 650 1 MCB 2 -2 12 6 163 R 5493065 492034 0879 TE 65 1 2 MC82 -2 12 6 163 SCCL BC GR I 17 24 t 2 1 7 4 5 2 2 4 1 0 652 3 MC8 2 212 6163 2 1 t 39 40 2 12 3 IS 2 10 20 660 653 4 MC82 -2 12 6 163 654 1 MCB 2 -2 13 6 164 R 5493055 492035 0885 TE 655 2 MCB 2 2 13 6164 SOZS 8 GR 1 17 4 2 2 2 7 4 5 2 2 43 656 3 MCB 2 -213 6 164 2 1 1 35 50 1 10 2 05 3 10 20 940 657 4 MCB 2 -2 13 6 164 658 1 MC82 -214 6165 R 5493018 49I0O7 0925 TE 659 2 MC82 -2 14 6 165 SOZS 8 GR 1 17 4 2 2 32 2 16 4 5 2 2 4 660 3 MC82 -2 14 6 165 13 1 7 64 to 1 9 2 55 2 10 20 400 661 4 MCB2 -2 14 6165 662 1 MC82 -2 15 6 166 R 5493005 491005 0947 TE 66 3 2 MCB 2 2 15 6 166 SOZS 8 GR 1 24 4 2 2 2 1 4 5 2 2 34 0 3 1 664 3 MC8 2 2 15 6 166 t 1 4 47 20 1 7 1 60 5 10 20 760 665 4 MC82 -2 15 6 166 666 1 MC82 2 16 6 167 R 5492978 49 1972 0975 TE 66 7 2 MC8 2 -2 16 6 167 GWAV 7 GRIDG 1 23 4 2 3 23 127 5 4 2 2 43 0 3 1 668 3 MCB 2 -2 16 6 167 12 1 4 85 10 2 7 2 45 24 10 20 1200 669 4 MC82 2 16 6167 670 1 MCB 2 -2 17 6 168 R 5492943 491943 1007 TE 67 1 2 MC8 2 2 17 6 168 SOZS 8 GR 1 3 2 0 4 4 0 3 34 2 3 1 672 3 MCB 2 217 616B 56 1 2 1 14 90 7 15 4 IO 67 10 20 560 673 4 MCB 2 -2 17 6 168 674 1 MC82 -2 18 6 169 R 5492910 491938 1030 TE 675 2 MC82 -2 18 6 169 ACTF 2D 0G1 3 4 2 2 12 1 0 3 1 2 34 1 0 676 3 MC82 -2 18 6 169 29 1 1 73 . 20 19 25 6 20 3 10 20 180 677 4 MC8 2 2 18 6 169 678 1 MC82 2 19 6 170 R 5492895 491943 1040 TE ME TS 679 2 MC82 - 2 19 6 170 ACL T 2CD BA TH DG 1 3 4 2 t 12 17 0 2 0 2 1 2 3 2 680 3 MC82 -2 19 6 170 590 to 1 t 18 80 20 46 12 OO . 12 to 20 too 68 1 4 MC8 2 -2 19 6 170 43 55 16 14 20 19 1 0 2 4 06 6 39 1 29 26 33 6 34 682 1 MC82 -400 6171 0 5493400 492128 5- 18-02 0176 0 0178 0 0760 TE 683 2 MC82 -40O 6 17 1 AFTF 2E DG2 t 4 2 2 2 79 4 4 3 2 73 0 3 t 684 3 MCB2 -400 6171 61 t 2 90 .20 6 26 3 .70 2 10 60 640 685 4 MC82 -4O0 6 17 1 686 t MC82 -401 6172 D 5493400 492128 5- 18-02 0381 0 0383 0 0760 TE 687 2 MC82 -401 6172 AFTF 2E DG1 1 4 2 2 12 45 4 5 2 2 38 0 3 1 688 3 MC82 -401 6 172 55 1 47 250 1 30 43 19 4 10 53 20 80 860 689 4 MC82 -401 6172 690 I MC82 -402 6173 D 5493400 492128 5- 18-02 0514 0 0516 0 0760 TE 691 2 MCB 2 -402 6 173 AFTF 2E DG3BL3 4 4 2 3 23 1247 4 3 2 2 38 6 3 1 692 3 MC82 -402 6 173 2 1 1 20 135 30 36 16 4 40 10 10 60 1200 693 4 MCB 2 -402 6173 694 1 MCB 2 403 6 174 0 5493400 492128 5- 18-02 0660 0 0662 0 0760 TE 695 2 MCB 2 403 6174 DF T F 3E BL3 4 2 2 2 7 0 3 t 1 4 1 3 1 696 3 MC82 -403 6 174 6 3 3 1 16 IO 12 8 2 50 3 10 40 1760 L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13.47:26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CC i d » K M M C Page 697 4 MC82 -403 6174 698 1 MC82 -404 6175 D 549340O 492128 5-18-02 0876 5 878 . 5 0760 TE 699 2 MC82 -404 6 175 ACTF 2D 0G2 4 2 3 2 68 0 2 1 2 23 O 3 1 70O 3 MC82 -404 6 175 177 1 5 225 10 2 1 22 5 40 1 1 10 30 1540 701 4 MC82 -404 6175 702 1 MC82 -405 6176 0 5493400 492128 5-18-02 0925 .0 0927 O 0760 TE 703 2 MC82 -405 6 176 ACTF 20 DG1 4 3 3 2 6179 0 2 1 1 23 t 3 1 704 3 MC82 -405 6176 168 1 4 1750 20 30 22 5 90 10 10 2 10 2200 705 4 MC82 -405 6 176 706 1 MC82 -406 6 177 D 5493400 492128 5-18-02 1066 0 1068 0 0760 TE 707 2 MC82 -406 6 177 OCLT 3C0 G<6 4 3 3 32 1964 5 2 1 2 4 0 708 3 MC8 2 -406 6 177 16 2 1 75 . 10 8 2 1 55 3 10 30 360 709 4 MC82 -406 6 177 7 10 1 MCB2 -407 6178 D 5493400 492 128 5-18-02 1163 0 1 165 0 0760 TE 7 1 1 2 MLB 2 -407 6178 08L T 3BC GV3BL3 4 1 3 123 1246 O 3 1 2 4 0 3 1 712 3 MCB2 -407 6178 4 1 1 4 52 10 8 5 1 .50 4 10 70 420 7 13 4 MCB2 -407 6 1 78 7 14 1 MCB2 -408 6 1 79 D 5493400 492128 5-18 02 1348 0 1350 .0 0760 TE 7 15 2 MC82 -408 6179 DCLT 3C0 0G2GR1 4 1 2 23 6 19 0 3 2 2 24 0 3 1 7 16 3 MC82 -408 6 1 79 19 3 6 134 to 8 3 2 OO 3 10 30 740 7 17 4 ML 8 2 -408 6 179 7 18 1 MC82 -409 6 180 D 549340O 492 128 5-18 02 1513 0 1515 0 0760 TE 7 19 2 MC82 -409 6 180 DCTF 30 DG2BL2 4 2 2 23 69 4 4 2 3 34 0 3 1 720 3 MC82 -409 6 180 12 7 2 153 10 1 1 5 2 . 50 7 IO 30 440 72 1 4 ML 8 2 -409 6 180 722 1 MC8 2 -4 10 6 18 1 0 5493400 492128 5 -18-02 1595 0 1597 .0 0760 TE 723 2 MC8 2 4 10 6 18 1 DCFL 3A 0G4BL1 2 1 0 7 0 O O 4 2 2 5 1 724 3 HC8 2 -4 10 6 18 1 8 5 4 22 10 6 3 1 30 14 20 30 80 725 4 MC82 -4 10 6 18 1 726 1 MC82 -220 6 182 R 549240O 493826 0885 TE 727 2 MC82 -220 6 182 ANLP 2C DG4 36 4 1 1 2 6 0 2 0 2 134 2 3 728 3 MC8 2 220 6 182 2 1 1 15 10 1 2 1 20 5 IO 30 380 729 4 MCB2 220 6 182 7 30 1 ML 8 2 -22 1 6 183 R 5492377 493831 0893 IE 731 2 ML 8 2 22 1 6 183 ABIF 2B DG1SL3 36 64 1 2 34 12 5 3 1 2 43 0 732 3 MCB2 -22 1 6 183 35 1 1 1 32 . 20 1 2 1 90 4 10 20 1200 733 4 MC82 22 1 6183 67 58 15 68 3 . 3 1 57 1.64 1 77 2 78 2 98 10 2 58 734 1 MC82 -222 6184 R 5492347 493857 0908 TE 735 2 MCB2 -222 6 184 SU2S 8 BL 2 3 4 2 3 32 8127 0 4 2 1 42 O 3 1 7 36 3 MC82 -222 6 184 24 1 2 31 30 1 4 2 60 3 20 20 940 737 4 MC8 2 -222 6 184 738 1 MC82 -223 6 185 R 5492340 493862 0910 TE 739 2 MC82 -223 6 165 MIFF 5T GV1BL2 46 47 1 1 1 0 2 0 2 1 O 7 40 3 MC82 -223 6185 58 2 1 62 . 20 45 19 4 45 7 10 10 1760 74 1 4 MC82 -223 6185 742 1 ML 8 2 -224 6 186 R 5492321 493863 0912 TE 743 2 MC8 2 -224 6 186 MARG 5A BK1 3 7 1 0 1 4 2 2 1 1 744 3 MC82 -224 6 186 67 2 1 53 . 30 38 18 4 35 7 IO 20 880 745 4 MC82 -224 6 186 746 1 MC82 -225 6 187 R 5492305 493867 0920 TE 747 2 MC82 -225 6 187 DCLP 3C DG3 02 4 2 3 23 128 0 4 2 2 432 2 3 1 748 3 MC8 2 -225 6187 3 1 2 22 10 1 2 1 95 4 20 30 1260 749 4 MC82 -225 6 187 750 1 MC82 -226 6 188 R 5492305 493850 0920 TE 75 1 2 MC82 226 6 188 ANFL 2A DG1 1 2 2 3 2 78 0 0 0 1 823 0 3 1 752 3 MC82 -226 6 188 44 3 1 68 40 28 26 5 . 25 5 10 20 540 753 4 MC8 2 -2 26 6 188 754 1 MCB2 -227 6 189 R 5492295 493850 0927 TE 01 LQ 00 L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t (3:47:26 on NOV 7, (984 f o r CCId'KMMC Page 14 755 2 MC82 -227 6189 GWAV 7 BL2 IS 4 3 3 32 6128 5 1 0 1 824 0 3 1 756 3 MC82 -227 6 189 3 1 1 28 10 1 4 2 .40 5 10 10 620 757 4 MC82 -227 6 189 758 1 MC82 -228 6 190 R 5492275 493845 0937 TE 759 2 MC82 -228 6190 GWAV 7 BL2SL3 20 4 2 3 3 2 5 1 0 2 13 0 760 3 MC82 -228 6190 2 1 1 27 (0 6 9 2 20 6 20 10 1 too 76 ( 4 MC82 -228 6 190 762 1 MC8 2 -411 6 19 1 0 5493446 492060 5- 18-ISA 463 0 0464 5 0760 TE 763 2 MC82 4 t t 6 19 1 AFTF 2E OGt 34 2 2 12 9 4 4 2 2 37 2 5 1 764 3 MCB2 4 11 6 19 1 174 1 27 178 10 49 22 4 60 7 10 30 540 765 4 MC8 2 -4 11 6 19 1 766 1 MCB 2 -4 12 6 192 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-ISA 501 5 0503 0 0760 TE 767 2 MC82 4 12 6 192 AFTF 2E 0G1 4 2 2 2 4 16 0 3 2 2 38 0 768 3 MC82 -4 12 6 192 30 4 103 107 30 38 (7 3 60 77 10 1 10 1640 769 4 MC8 2 -4 12 6 192 770 1 MC82 4 13 6193 0 5493446 492060 5- 18-13A 549 0 0550 .5 0760 TE 77 1 2 MCB 2 -4 13 6 193 ACTF 2D OGt 4 2 3 2 9746 4 3 2 2 38 0 3 1 772 3 MCB 2 -4 13 6 193 46 1 4 155 to 33 (5 4 50 6 IO 30 480 773 4 MCB 2 -4 13 6 193 774 1 MC82 -4 14 6 194 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-ISA 668 O 0670 0 0760 TE 775 2 MC82 -4 14 6 194 ACLT 2CD GY6 4 3 3 23 6197 4 3 1 2 4 0 3 1 776 3 MC82 -4 14 6 194 30 4 24 68 10 18 9 2 45 9 10 90 560 777 4 MC82 -4 14 6 194 778 1 MCB 2 -4 15 6 195 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-13A 7 36 0 073B 0 0760 TE 779 2 MC82 -4 15 6 195 FEDK 6F GR 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 ( 3 1 7 80 3 MCB 2 -4 15 6 195 9 2 5 78 IO 9 6 2 50 5 10 30 2 lOO 78 1 4 MC82 -4 15 6 195 782 1 MC8 2 -4 16 6 196 D 5493446 492060 5- 18 - 13A 820 0 0822 0 0760 IE 783 2 MC8 2 4 16 6 196 OF T F 3E BL3 4 2 2 2 6279 0 2 1 1 43 ( 3 1 784 3 MCB 2 4 16 6 196 6 2 1 109 10 12 8 2 60 3 10 30 1000 785 4 MCB 2 -4 16 6 196 786 1 MCB 2 4 17 6 (97 D 5493116 492O60 5- 18-13A 906 0 090B O 0760 IE 787 2 MCB 2 -4 17 6 (97 DCTF 3D BLS 4 2 2 12 79 0 2 1 1 43 2 5 1 788 3 MC 8 2 -4 17 6 197 7 2 3 1 12 10 13 5 2 55 3 IO 20 IOOO 789 4 MC82 -4 17 6 ( 9 7 7 90 1 MC8 2 4 18 6 198 D 5493446 492060 5- IB-13A1052 0 105 4 5 0760 TE 79( 2 MC82 - 4 IB 6 198 DCTF 3D GY6 4 2 3 32 9256 4 3 1 2 43 0 3 1 792 3 MC82 -4 IB 6 198 12 1 4 42 10 6 1 t 55 3 to 20 560 793 4 MC82 4 18 6 198 794 1 MC82 -4 19 6 199 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-ISA 1154 0 1184 0 0760 TE 795 2 MC8 2 - 4 19 6 199 AFTF 2E DG2 4 1 3 21 97 0 3 1 1 3 1 2 3 12 796 3 MCB 2 -4 19 6 199 6 lOO 1 1 162 80 2 1 1 3 7 45 6 20 40 440 797 4 MCB 2 -4 19 6 199 798 1 MCB 2 -420 6 200 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-ISA 13 17 5 1319 5 0760 TE 799 2 MCB 2 -420 6200 SPSC 8G BL2BR2 4 1 3 3 59 4 3 2 3 543 0 3 1 800 3 MC82 4 20 6200 194 1 t 63 10 7 2 t 85 5 10 20 440 801 4 MC82 -420 6200 802 1 MC82 -42 1 6201 0 5493446 492060 5- 1 8 1 3 0201 5 0203 8 0760 TE 803 2 MC82 42 1 6 201 ANLP 2C DG2 4 2 3 12 479 4 4 2 2 73 0 804 3 MC82 42 1 E201 77 2 1 80 . to 53 24 5 15 3 to 20 380 805 4 ML82 -42 1 6201 806 1 MC82 -422 6202 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-13 0348 0 0350. 0 0760 TE 807 2 MC82 -422 6202 ACTF 20 0G2 3 2 2 13 129 O 3 1 2 (73 7 3 1 808 3 MC8 2 422 6202 16 1 2 88 . 10 49 23 5 05 3 10 40 280 809 4 MCB 2 422 6202 8 10 1 MC82 423 6203 0 5493446 492060 5- IB-13 0446 0 0448 0 0760 TE 8 1 t 2 MCB 2 -423 6203 SOZS 8 BLS 4 2 3 2 619 4 4 1 2 4 7 3 1 8 12 3 MC8 2 423 6203 68 1 20 158 10 14 10 4 40 1 4 to 40 320 L i s t i n g of GOOD a t 13.47:26 On NOV 7. 1984 f o r CC i d = KMMC Page 15 8 13 4 MC8 2 - 423 6203 814 1 MC8 2 -424 6204 D 5493446 492060 5- 18- 13 046 1 5 0463 5 0760 TE 8 15 2 MC82 -424 6204 SOZS a BL2 4 2 2 12 649 5 3 2 2 43 3 1 8 16 3 MC82 -424 6204 52 3 27 123 10 35 17 4 20 32 20 20 780 8 17 4 MC82 -424 6204 8 18 1 MC82 -425 6205 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-13 0558 .0 0560 0 0760 TE 8 19 2 MC8 2 -425 6205 AFTF 2£ GV6 4 2 2 12 4 4 5 3 3 48 3 3 1 820 3 MC8 2 -425 6205 2 1 4 2 1 123 10 3 1 13 4 50 12 10 30 300 82 1 4 MC82 425 6205 822 1 M C 8 2 -426 6206 D 5493446 492060 5- 18- 13 0645 5 0647 5 0760 TE 823 2 M L 8 2 426 6 206 AFTF 2E Gv 1 4 2 1 74 4 4 3 2 4 2 3 1 824 J M L 8 2 426 6206 22 2 10 43 IO 15 a 2 30 5 20 40 400 825 4 MC8 2 -426 6 206 826 1 MC82 -427 6207 D 5493446 492060 5- 18 - 1 3 0790 .0 0792 0 0760 TE 827 2 M L 8 2 427 6207 OF TF 30 FJL3 4 2 2 2 6197 4 3 2 1 4 0 3 1 828 3 M L B 2 427 6207 9 1 1 125 10 14 7 2 40 4 I O 20 1660 829 4 M f 82 -427 6207 8 30 1 M L 8 2 428 6208 0 5493446 492060 5- 18-13 0847 .5 0850 0 0760 TE 83 1 2 M L 8 2 428 6 208 OF TF 3D BL3 4 2 3 12 619 1 3 1 2 34 2 3 1 832 3 MC 8 2 428 6208 6 1 1 165 10 13 7 3 05 7 10 20 460 833 4 M L 8 2 428 6208 834 1 M L 8 2 -429 6209 0 5493446 492060 5- t a -13 0885 0 093O 0 0760 TE 835 2 ML82 -429 6209 SCCL 8C 0G2 4 2 1 2 4 O 3 1 3 13 2 3 1 836 3 MC8 2 -429 6209 5400 1 5 205 1 70 20 13 3 60 9 10 50 560 837 4 M L 8 2 429 6209 838 1 MC8 2 -4 30 62 10 • 5493446 4 9 2060 5- 1 8 1 3 103 1 0 1033 0 0760 TE 839 2 M L B 2 43L> 62 10 ACIF 20 DG1GG2 4 2 3 2 8 0 1 0 1 23 0 3 1 840 3 M L B 2 430 62 10 300 1 1 3 238 10 30 23 6 OO 5 10 20 440 84 1 4 M L 8 2 4 30 62 10 842 1 M f 8 2 43 1 62 11 D 5493416 492060 5 - 18 13 1 149 O 115 1 0 0760 TE 843 2 M ' 8 2 43 1 62 1 1 SPSC BG BL2DG2 4 2 2 3 549 5 3 1 3 43 0 3 1 8 14 3 ML 8 2 43 1 62 1 I 22 3 1 75 10 8 2 1 80 7 to 20 340 845 4 MC8 2 43 1 62 11 846 1 MC8 2 -432 62 12 0 54934 10 492027 5- 18 12 0293 0 0295 0 0755 TE 847 2 MC8 2 432 62 12 DC T F 30 GI6 4 2 3 2 7 4 5 3 3 43 6 3 1 848 3 MC8 2 -432 62 12 34 1 12 1 13 10 27 18 2 15 5 20 60 320 849 4 MC8 2 432 62 12 850 1 ML B 2 -433 62 13 D 54934 10 492027 5- IB- 12 0333 0 0373 0 0755 TE B5 1 2 MC82 433 62 13 SPSC BG DG2BL2 4 2 3 32 6297 5 3 1 3 143 2 6 1 852 3 ML'82 -433 62 13 2900 2 5 74 1 OO 8 6 2 00 4 20 SO 420 853 4 MC82 433 62 13 854 1 ML 8 2 434 62 14 D 5493410 492027 5- 18-12 0438 O 0440 0 0755 TE 855 2 MC82 434 62 14 SPSC BG DG2BL2 4 2 3 32 SI97 5 3 2 3 43 O 3 I 856 3 MC82 434 62 14 89 1 1 72 10 9 3 2 90 16 10 20 460 857 4 MC8 2 434 62 14 858 1 MC82 435 62 15 D 5493410 492027 5- 18- 12 0485 0 0487 0 0755 TE 859 2 MC82 -435 62 15 SUZS 8 GY6 4 2 3 32 759 4 5 1 3 43 0 860 3 MC82--435 62 15 25 1 1 93 . 10 7 2 1 85 3 10 20 240 86 1 4 MC82 435 62 15 862 1 MC82 436 62 16 D 5493410 49202/ 5- 18-12 0568 0 0570. 0 0755 TE 863 2 MC8 2 436 62 16 AFTF 2E DG2 4 2 3 12 74 4 3 2 3 3 6 3 1 864 3 MC82 436 62 16 95 1 65 442 . 10 42 23 6 15 6 20 20 2450 865 4 MC82 436 62 16 866 1 MC 8 2 • 437 62 17 0 5493410 492027 5- 18-12 0625 0 0627 0 0755 IE 867 2 MC82 437 6217 AFTF 2E 0G3 24 2 2 12 598 0 1 0 2 23 6 3 1 868 3 MC8 2 437 62 17 122 1 57 228 10 4 1 22 5 15 7 20 20 1 120 869 4 MCB2 437 62 17 870 1 MC8 2 438 62 IB D 5493446 492060 5- 18-138 I 628 0 0630 0 0760 TE L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13:47:26 on NOV 7, 1984 f o r CCId-KMMC Paga 16 87 1 2 MC82 -438 62 18 ACTF 2D DG4BL3 4 2 2 12 174 4 3 2 2 53 1 3 1 872 3 MC82 -438 6218 47 2 35 285 30 43 23 4 80 12 10 70 360 873 4 MC82 -438 6218 874 1 MC82 -439 6219 D 5493446 492060 5- 18-13B 805 . 5 0807 .0 0760 TE 875 2 ML 82 -439 6219 ACTF 30 BL 3 4 2 3 2 6297 4 3 1 2 143 1 3 1 876 3 MC82 -439 62 19 13 2 8 120 10 18 9 2 85 4 10 20 1500 877 4 MCB2 -439 62 19 878 1 MC82 -440 6 2 20 0 5493446 492O60 5- 18-138 933 5 0955 0 0760 TE 879 2 MC8 2 -440 6220 DCTF 3D BL3DG4 4 2 3 2 54 4 3 1 2 348 1 3 1 8 8 0 3 MC82 -440 6220 10 2 2 153 10 18 7 2 B5 IS 10 30 400 88 1 4 MC8 2 -440 6220 882 1 MC8 2 44 1 6221 D 5493446 4 92060 5- 18-13B1068 0 1070 0 0760 TE 883 2 M L 8 2 -44 1 622 1 DCLP 3CD GR 1 4 2 3 32 6549 4 2 O 2 345 0 3 1 B84 3 MC8 2 44 1 622 1 1 10 2 9 80 30 13 5 2 20 5 10 50 460 8 8 5 4 MC8 2 •14 1 622 1 886 1 MC82 -442 6222 0 5493446 492060 5- 18-13B1123 0 1 125 0 0760 TE 887 2 MC B 2 -442 6222 DCLP 3CD BL 3 4 2 3 12 6479 4 3 1 2 43 1 3 1 888 3 MC82 -442 6222 26 3 3 138 . 10 10 B 2 . 50 23 IO 30 220 889 4 MCB2 -442 6222 890 1 MCB2 -443 6223 D 5493446 492060 5 - 18-I3B1178 0 1 180 0 0760 T E 89 I 2 MC8 2 -443 6223 DCTF 3D BL2DG2 4 2 3 32 657 4 4 3 3 843 0 892 3 M L B 2 -443 6223 250 3 2 57 10 8 3 1 70 4 10 30 460 893 4 Mf 8 2 443 6223 894 1 M f B2 -444 6224 D 5493446 4 92060 5 18-138 1224 0 1226 O 0760 TE B95 2 M C B ? 444 6224 DCFL 3A GR1VW2 2 2 2 2 81 0 1 0 2 27 0 896 3 M L 8.' 444 6224 1 18 1 12 160 10 25 27 5 65 25 10 20 660 897 4 M L 8 2 - 444 6224 89B 1 MC 8 2 445 6225 D 5493446 492060 5 - 18- I3B1323 0 1325 0 0760 TE 899 2 ML 8 2 - 445 6225 SCCL 8C DG2 74 2 1 4 4 2 I 2 3 6 3 1 9o0 3 MC82 -445 6225 29 1 1 358 10 56 20 a 95 5 10 30 300 90 1 4 MC82 -445 6225 902 1 Mf 8 2 446 6226 0 5493446 492060 5 - 18-13B1405 0 1407 . 0 0760 TE PH 903 2 M ( 8 2 -446 6226 SCCL BC 0G2 4 2 1 94 1 4 3 1 3 13 2 3 1 904 3 MC 82 -446 6226 30O0 1 10 298 1 40 35 16 6 65 10 10 40 60 905 4 MCB2 -446 6226 906 1 MC8 2 -447 6227 D 5493446 492O60 5- IB-13B1525 0 1527 0 0760 TE PH 907 2 MC82 -447 6227 SPSC 8G DG2BL2 4 2 2 23 9 5 3 1 3 134 2 3 1 90S 3 MC82 -447 6227 7 1 2 1 58 10 8 5 1 90 3 10 20 480 909 4 MC B 2 -447 6227 9 10 1 MC82 -0 1 1 6228 R 5496250 4916 10 0809 TE -91 1 2 MC8 2 -01 1 6228 AFTF 2E 9 12 3 MC82 01 1 6228 26 2 1 60 .20 1 20 4 70 3 20 20 800 913 4 MC82 -01 1 6228 914 1 MC82 010 6229 R 5496245 491595 0805 TE 9 15 2 MC82 010 6229 ABTF 2B DG2GG4 4 64 2 3 3 4 0 0 0 2 34 0 916 3 MC82 010 6229 5 1 3 1 4 1 50 4 1 16 4 55 4 10 10 340 9 17 4 MC82 010 6229 9 18 1 MCB2 -009 6230 R 5496235 491525 0798 TE ME 6380 9 19 2 MC82 -009 6230 BK1 3 4 1 2 23 17 0 0 0 I 2 0 920 3 MC82 009 6230 45 2 16 35 20 33 1 1 1 90 6 10 10 200 92 1 4 MC8 2 -009 62 30 52 28 17 OB 9 ( 1 1 .92 7 21 9 18 1 63 17 20 98 922 I MC82 012 623 1 R 5495995 491200 0834 TE 923 2 MC82 012 623 1 ACLT 2C0 0G2 1 4 2 3 23 6845 0 0 0 2 123 0 2 1 924 3 MC82 -012 623 1 1 18 2 7 52 40 59 39 3 .90 6 10 30 160 925 4 MC82 012 623 1 926 1 M( 8 2 -013 6232 R 5495915 490975 0853 TE 927 2 ML 8 2 0 13 6232 ACLI 2CD DG2 12 34 3 0 123 6952 5 1 0 2 34 0 928 3 ML B 2 013 6232 4 1 2 2 64 30 48 26 5 10 3 1 0 IO 200 PJ LQ 0> 00 UT L i s t i n g of GOOD a t 13:47:26 on NOV 7. 1964 f o r CClO=KMMC Page 17 929 4 MC82 -013 6232 930 1 MC82 -014 6233 R 5495885 490895 0865 TE 931 2 MC82 -014 6233 MCHI 5C GY3 3 7 1 123 19 2 0 3 13 0 3 1 932 3 MC82 014 6233 43 1 1 lOO 30 46 23 S 35 3 10 20 460 933 4 MC82 -014 6233 934 1 MC82 -019 6234 R 5495840 490445 0892 TE ME TS 63842234 93S 2 MC8 2 -019 6234 BSPL 1A BK 1 3 3 1 1 2 3 9 O 1 O 1 37 O 936 3 MC82 019 6234 24 1 1 75 10 50 24 5 10 9 20 20 380 937 4 MC82 -019 6234 50 12 17 25 9 93 1 OS 6 31 6 10 4 16 35 22 3 25 936 1 MC82 018 6235 R 5495840 490485 0887 TE 939 2 MC82 018 6235 ACL I 2CD DG2 3 74 2 2 32 6594 1 1 2 1 3 0 940 3 MC82 -018 6235 20 1 9 145 . 10 23 1 1 3 70 1 1 10 to 640 94 1 4 MCB2 -018 6235 942 1 MC82 -015 6236 R 5495830 490620 0880 TE ME TS 63812236 943 2 MC82 -015 6236 BSLT 1 GGIDG2 1 4 1 3 12 129 0 1 0 1 432 7 0 944 3 MC82 -015 6236 48 2 1 75 20 87 34 6 55 3 10 10 lOOO 945 4 MC82 015 6236 47 48 16 79 10 47 95 8 27 5 76 1 78 2 73 18 4 42 946 1 MC82 -017 6237 R 5495830 490480 0B88 TE 6383 947 2 MC8 2 -017 6237 ACTF 2D GR 1 I 4 2 2 2 9 0 1 0 2 724 7 0 948 3 MC82 -017 6237 50 2 1 80 20 58 32 6 55 2 10 10 800 949 4 MCB 2 017 6237 950 1 MC8 2 -0 16 6238 R 5495820 490560 0883 TE 6382 95 1 2 MC82 -016 6238 ACTF 20 GR 1 t 4 2 2 2 9 0 1 0 2 724 7 0 952 3 MC82 016 6238 47 3 1 58 30 4B 20 3 25 3 10 20 60 953 4 MC82 -016 623B 954 1 MCB 2 -O20 6239 R 5495830 4904 30 0895 TE 955 2 MCB 2 -O20 6239 MARG 5A BK 1 23 7 2 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 956 3 MC 8 2 0 2 0 6239 44 3 6 1 15 60 40 14 4 15 7 10 20 360 957 4 MC B 2 - 0 2 0 6239 958 1 MC 8 2 02 1 6240 R 5495780 490220 0910 TE 959 2 MCB 2 02 1 6240 MARG 5A DG2 1 7 2 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 960 3 MC8 2 02 1 6240 32 1 7 87 90 19 6 3 90 24 10 30 840 96 1 4 MC82 02 1 6240 962 1 MC8 2 • 022 624 1 R 5495775 490180 0913 TE ME TS 6349 96 3 2 MCB 2 022 624 1 DCLP 3C DA CA CA GR1BL1 3 4 1 3 32 452 1 3 t 1 3 643 1 3 1 964 3 MCB 2 -022 624 1 14 2 1 85 20 13 2 3 20 4 10 30 760 965 4 MCB 2 022 624 1 6 1 92 19 98 4 59 1 22 1 48 97 3 16 2 99 23 3 07 966 1 MCB 2 023 6242 R 5495695 490045 0930 TE 967 2 MC82 -023 6242 DCLP 3C GR2 3 4 2 3 32 6174 5 2 0 2 43 0 3 1 968 3 MCB2 023 6242 49 2 1 85 SO 38 25 6 40 9 IO 30 7 BO 969 4 MC82 -023 6242 970 1 MCB 2 -024 6243 R 5495565 489940 0952 TE 97 1 2 MCB 2 024 6243 MIFF 5T G Y 6 2 7 2 0 O 2 1 3 14 1 3 1 972 3 MC82 024 6243 26 3 30 109 1 60 4 3 1 80 29 10 140 940 973 4 MCB 2 -024 6243 974 1 MC82 -025 6244 R 5495555 489915 0953 TE 975 2 MCB 2 -025 6244 DCLP 3C 0G1SL3 3 4 2 3 432 6124 5 3 2 2 14 0 3 1 976 3 MCB 2 -025 6244 24 6 22 170 BO 3 3 2 30 22 10 220 1 160 977 4 MC8 2 -025 6244 978 1 MC82 -026 6245 R 5495555 489900 0955 TE 979 2 MC8 2 -026 6245 MIFF 5T GY 3 6 7 2 1 1 2 5 2 1 2 4 0 3 1 980 3 MC8 2 026 6245 107 2 t 128 90 4 23 7 70 25 10 40 500 98 1 4 MC82 -026 6245 982 1 MC82 -027 6246 R 5495550 489880 0955 TE 98 3 2 MCB 2 -027 6246 MTFT 5T 0G4 84 7 1 1 2 19 5 2 1 2 3 2 5 1 984 3 MC8 2 027 6246 85 2 1 85 1 OO 5 2 1 6 25 25 10 30 300 985 4 Mc8 2 -027 6246 986 1 Mi 8 2 028 624 7 R 54955 10 489840 0960 TE ME &) cQ fD 00 L i s t i n g of GOOD a t 13 47 26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CC Id -KMMC Page 18 98 7 2 MC82 -028 6247 MARG 5A BK 1 32 7 1 0 1 3 1 0 1 988 3 MC82 -02B 6247 39 2 1 65 30 70 2 1 4 BO 5 1 IO 20 660 989 4 MC82 -028 6247 65 72 15 . 74 6 13 72 1 93 1 07 2 10 2 77 10 3 33 990 1 MC82 - 2 2 9 6248 R 5495505 490O50 1043 TE 991 2 MC82 -229 6248 MARG 5A BK 1 3 7 2 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 14 0 3 1 992 3 MC82 -229 6248 47 2 1 35 30 43 1 1 3 35 12 10 20 1740 993 4 MC82 -229 6248 994 1 HCB2 -230 6249 R 5495490 490040 1043 TE 995 2 MCB2 -2 30 6249 DCTF 3D 996 3 HC82 -230 6249 75 2 1 73 .30 12 15 5 10 3 10 20 1060 997 4 MCB 2 -230 6249 998 1 MC82 -233 6250 R 5495443 490097 1105 TE ME TS 639122SO 999 2 MC82 -233 6250 OFBC 3A GY 1 2 46 2 2 12 28 0 0 1 1 124 1 0 1000 3 MC82 -233 6250 5 1 1 103 10 8 10 4 10 2 10 20 320 1001 4 MC82 -233 6250 60 92 17 39 6 67 7 1 3 01 2 44 3 . 93 BO 13 2 55 1002 1 MC82 -231 625 1 R 54954 18 49OO08 1055 TE ME TS 63472251 1003 2 MC82 231 62S 1 DCTF 3D GY 3 23 4 1 3 32 124 5 3 2 2 14 1 3 3 1004 3 MC82 -231 625 1 4 2 2 37 10 1 1 1 80 2 10 30 820 1005 4 MC82 -231 6251 67 15 16 39 3 18 48 3 67 2 07 2 80 1 1 7 09 3 05 1006 1 MC82 -241 6252 R 5495398 490210 1185 TE IO07 2 MC82 -24 1 6252 MARG 5A BK 1 1 7 2 1 O 0 1 2 1 3 1 O IO0B 3 MC82 -24 1 6253 4 1 1 44 10 58 18 4 20 5 10 20 480 1O09 4 MC8 2 -24 1 6252 1010 1 MC82 -240 6353 R 5495387 4901B3 1171 TE 101 1 2 MC82 -240 6253 DCLP 3C GG40G2 3 4 1 3 32 6972 0 2 1 2 34 0 3 1 1012 3 MC82 -240 6353 15 15 5 23 10 4 3 1 60 10 10 20 760 1013 4 MC82 - 240 6253 1014 1 MC82 -242 6254 R 5495375 490217 1187 TE 1015 2 MC82 -242 6254 5 1016 3 MC82 -242 6254 1 1 1 1 25 10 10 3 1 80 5 10 20 520 1017 4 MC82 -242 6254 1018 1 MC82 239 6255 R 5495360 490185 1169 TE 1019 2 MC82 239 6255 MCHT 5C 0G2 3 67 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 1 6 3 1 1O20 3 MCB 2 -239 6255 5 8 1 24 10 24 5 1 95 9 20 20 160 102 1 4 MC8 2 -239 6255 1022 1 MC82 -232 6256 R 5495345 490050 1075 TE 1023 2 MC82 232 6256 DCLP 3C 1024 3 MCB 2 232 6256 6 4 5 60 20 5 1 2 OO 3 10 30 1 lOO 1025 4 MCB 2 232 6256 1026 1 MC82 -238 6257 R 5495335 490205 1173 TE ME TS 2257 1027 2 MCB 2 238 6257 DCFL 3A GY 1 3 4 2 2 2 528 5 2 1 1 12 0 3 1 1028 3 MC82 -238 6257 9 1 1 48 . 10 6 9 3 40 2 10 20 260 1029 4 MC82 -238 6257 64 17 16 45 5 66 68 2.15 3 04 4 21 05 16 1 93 1030 1 MC82 - 2 4 3 6358 R 5495315 490235 1182 TE 103 1 2 MC82 - 2 4 3 6258 OCLT 3CD GR 1 6 4 2 3 32 8619 0 1 0 2 234 0 1032 3 MC82 -243 6258 4 1 1 40 IO 2 6 2 90 3 10 30 340 1033 4 MC82 - 2 4 3 6358 1034 1 MC82 - 2 4 4 6359 R 5495288 490260 1185 TE ME TS 63992259 1035 2 MCB 2 - 2 4 4 6359 DF TF 3DE AN CA CA GY 1 6 2 1 2 2 78 1 t 0 3 2 0 1036 3 MC82 -244 6259 4 1 1 53 . IO 3 9 3 90 4 10 IO 920 1037 4 MC82 -244 6259 62 07 16 62 6 41 7 1 3 03 3 57 3 95 .40 18 2 33 1038 1 MCB 2 -245 6360 R 54952 18 490310 1187 TE 1039 2 MC82 - 245 6360 ANLP 2C GR 1 1 4 2 3 3 2546 0 3 0 2 34 0 1040 3 MC82 -345 6260 52 2 1 58 10 17 22 3 90 1 10 10 460 104 1 4 MCB 2 -245 6260 1042 1 MC82 -247 626 1 R 5495 150 490440 1345 TE 1043 2 MC82 -247 626 1 ACTF 2D GR2 3 4 2 3 33 9456 5 1 t 3 234 O 3 1 1044 3 MC82 247 626 1 18 1 1 38 . 3 0 13 3 3 80 3 10 10 440 ( D LQ fD co L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13 47 26 on NOV 1984 f o r C C l d « K M M C Page 1045 4 MC82 -247 626 1 1046 1 MC82 -234 6262 R 5495158 490203 1124 TE ME 1047 2 MC82 -234 6262 ACTF 20 DG1 3 4 2 3 2 57 0 1 2 3 34 0 2 3 1048 3 HC82 -234 6262 27 1 3 315 .60 30 16 7 25 4 10 20 1500 1049 4 MC82 -234 6262 1050 1 MC82 237 6263 R 5495154 490227 1136 TE 105 1 2 MC82 -237 6263 ACTF 2D DG2 3 4 2 3 32 6129 0 2 0 1 34 0 3 1 1052 3 MC82 -237 6263 46 2 5 275 60 23 16 6 65 9 10 30 2 100 1053 4 MC82 -237 6263 1054 1 MC82 -248 6264 R 5495145 490459 1253 TE 1055 2 MC82 -248 6264 MTFF 5T BL 2 3 74 1 1 1 4 3 2 2 4 0 3 1 1056 3 MC82 - 248 6264 71 5 2 62 40 13 16 3 00 5 10 50 720 1 0 5 7 4 MC82 248 6264 1058 1 M C 8 2 235 6265 R 5495135 490180 1084 TE ME TS 1059 2 M C 8 2 235 6265 SOZS 8 BL 2 23 13 2 1 12 5 5 3 1 3 4 16 O 3 1 0 6 0 3 MC8 2 -235 6265 88 3 5 50 60 1 1 1 75 7 10 20 4 20 106 1 4 MC82 235 6265 72 1 69 14 10 2 .1 39 .46 2 7 1 09 1 4 1 3 80 04 3 27 1 0 6 2 1 M C 8 2 2 36 6266 R 5495125 490175 1084 TE ME TS 635 1 1063 2 M L 8 2 -236 6266 SCCL 8C BL 3 34 14 1 3 32 5 5 3 1 3 34 0 0 1064 3 MLB 2 - 236 6266 745 2 1 640 .60 38 SO 4 30 16 10 30 980 1065 4 M L 8 2 -236 6266 42 ! 86 20 73 7 12 69 5 86 7 37 1 38 4 39 15 9 37 1066 1 MC8 2 249 6267 R 5495080 490540 1268 TE 106 7 2 M L 8 2 - 249 6267 MARG 5A BK 1 3 7 1 0 0 O 0 3 1 1 1 0 3 1 1068 3 MC82 -249 6267 42 2 1 128 40 54 14 2 80 7 10 40 BOO 1069 4 M L ' 8 2 249 6267 1070 1 MC82 -250 6268 R 5495026 490562 1279 TE 1 0 7 1 2 M L B 2 - 2 50 626B AFTF 2E GR 1 3 4 1 0 12 4 0 1 0 2 234 4 3 1 1072 3 MC8 2 - 250 6268 43 2 1 63 20 4 24 6 70 1 1 10 40 100 1073 4 MC82 250 626B 1074 1 M L 8 2 246 6269 R 5495007 490435 1245 TE 1075 2 MC8 2 -246 6269 ACTF 2D GR 1 3 4 3 3 2 19 0 1 0 2 234 2 3 1 1076 3 Ml 8 2 246 6269 38 2 1 130 10 5 4 3 25 24 10 30 1560 1 0 7 7 4 M< 8 2 246 6269 1078 1 M . 8 2 2 5 1 6270 ft 549t>0G6 490569 1275 TE 1079 2 M L 8 2 2 5 1 6270 AFTF 2E DG4 3 4 1 2 2 289 4 3 1 2 34 0 3 1 1080 3 Ml 82 25 1 6270 50 3 1 103 50 4 28 7 90 32 10 60 120 10B 1 1 M ( 8 2 25 1 6270 1082 1 M L H 2 253 627 1 R 5494996 490515 1282 TE 108 3 2 M L B 2 253 627 1 SCCL 8C G< 1 3 3 1 2 2 9 5 4 2 3 34 0 3 1 1084 3 M C 8 2 - 253 627 1 58 3 30 228 1 50 22 14 4 60 46 IO 200 1 too 1085 4 M L 8 2 253 627 1 1086 1 MC8 2 252 6272 R 5494990 490556 1279 TE 1087 2 MCB2 -252 6272 SOZS 8 BL2SL3 3 4 1 2 2 12 3 3 2 2 34 0 3 1 1088 3 M L 8 2 - 252 6272 46 4 1 43 50 8 14 2 85 15 20 70 760 1089 4 MC82 -252 6272 1090 1 MC82 - 254 6273 R 5494877 490505 1267 TE 109 1 2 MC 8 2 - 254 6273 SOZS 8 SL3GG2 3 4 1 2 12 129 3 3 2 2 43 0 3 1 1092 3 M L 8 2 -254 6273 46 5 36 58 20 1 1 1 30 23 10 40 40O 1093 4 MC B 2 -254 6273 1094 1 MC82 - 255 6274 R 5494 109 493244 1230 TE 1095 2 MC82 - 255 6274 DF TF 3E GY6 23 4 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 14 0 0 1096 3 MC82 -255 6274 1 3 8 23 10 1 1 1 50 14 10 30 1 100 1097 4 MC82 -255 6274 1098 1 MC82 -256 6275 R 5494 140 493235 1250 TE PH 1099 2 MC82 - 256 6275 DBLT 3BC i too 3 MC82 - 256 6275 1 3 24 13 . 10 1 1 1 . 60 36 40 SO t020 1 101 4 MC8 2 -256 6275 1 102 1 Mf 8 2 -257 6276 R 5494 145 493270 1245 TE PJ cQ ft) oo 00 L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13:47:26 on NOV 7, 1984 f o r CCid-KMMC Page 20 103 2 MC82 -257 6276 DCTF 30 GV 1 3 4 2 3 2 2456 5 1 0 2 243 0 3 1 104 3 MC82 -257 6276 1 2 10 43 . 10 1 1 1 75 1 1 10 20 780 105 4 MC82 -257 6276 toe 1 HC82 -258 6277 R 5494 157 493272 1257 TE ME TS PH 107 2 MC82 -258 6277 RYLT 4A RV CA CA SL 1 23 2 1 3 2 17 0 1 0 2 64 0 3 1 108 3 MC62 -258 6277 9 1 15 40 IO 1 1 1 05 5 20 30 1060 109 4 MC82 - 258 6277 76 89 12 93 1 75 19 2 1 1 1 4 4 75 2 14 02 69 1 10 1 MC82 -259 6278 R 5494164 493279 1260 TE I t 1 2 MC82 -259 6278 MCHT 5C BR t 1 7 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 12 3 MC82 -259 6278 24 2 22 104 . 10 44 8 4 OO 35 10 10 940 1 1 3 4 MC82 -259 6278 1 14 1 MC82 260 6279 R 3494 17 1 493320 1250 TE 1 15 2 MC82 260 6279 MCHT 5C BK 1 3 7 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 16 3 MC82 -260 6279 28 3 4 95 10 5 1 13 3 55 12 10 10 920 I 17 t 18 4 1 MC8 2 HC82 - 260 -26 1 6279 6280 R 5494219 493322 1280 TE 1 19 2 MC82 26 1 62BO MCHT 5C BK 1 3 7 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 120 3 MC8 2 -26 1 6280 40 3 3 123 30 42 1 3 3 70 10 10 20 960 12 1 4 MC8 2 -26 1 6280 122 t Mr 8 2 -262 628 1 R 5495339 489597 1025 TE PH 123 2 MC82 - 262 628 1 MIFF SI BK 1 83 7 1 0 0 0 5 3 2 3 431 0 3 t 124 3 MC8 2 - 262 628 1 30 13 78 510O 3 30 7 1 1 45 63 BO I3O0 1BOO 125 4 M C 8 2 -262 628 1 126 1 MC82 - 263 6282 R 5495287 489545 1060 TE PH 127 2 MC 8 2 -263 6282 MSSV 3D BL3 3 4 1 2 12 1 4 3 1 3 14 2 2 1 128 3 MC8 2 -263 6282 385 13 83 170 2 70 3 9 4 . 40 48 2400 220 660 129 4 M r e 2 263 6282 1 30 1 M i 8 2 - 264 6283 R 5495250 489760 0962 TE PH 1 3 1 2 M C 8 2 264 6283 132 3 M r 8 2 264 6283 30O0 2 1 325 10000 3 50 2 t 3 60 38 150 530 2O0 133 4 M ' 8 2 264 62B3 1 J J 1 M l 8 2 265 6284 R 5495293 490O72 0988 TE 135 2 M. 8 2 265 62B4 SuZS B GR 1 3 43 1 2 2 19 5 4 2 2 43 O 3 I 1 J6 3 Ml 8 2 265 62B4 865 6 165 3850 2 70 15 17 4 40 155 120 290 1 160 137 4 M( 8 2 265 6284 1 38 1 ML 8 2 266 6285 R 5495275 49OO90 0988 TE 139 2 Mr 8 2 - 266 62B5 SOZS 8 GR 1 3 4 1 2 2 19 4 4 2 2 34 1 3 1 1 40 3 ML 8 2 266 62B5 3050 9 57 280 3 50 5 7 3 25 175 200 170 860 1 4 1 4 MCS2 266 6285 142 1 MC8 2 -267 6286 R 5495 152 489944 1088 TE ME TS 143 2 MC82 -267 6286 AFTF 20 BK 1 3 47 1 2 12 4 5 3 1 0 0 4 1 144 3 MC 82 267 6286 147 4 37 240 3.80 28 19 3 65 170 SO 90 1460 145 4 MCB2 -267 6286 57 69 15 38 7 48 99 4.73 1 38 64 3 12 23 6 79 146 1 ML 8 2 -268 6287 R 5495124 490O04 1108 TE PH 147 2 MC82 -268 6287 SCCL BC GR 1 3 4 1 1 2 19 4 4 2 2 43 0 3 1 148 3 MC82 - 268 6287 86 9 87 255 2 . 40 1 1 14 5 20 63 50 50 900 149 4 MC8 2 -268 6287 150 1 MC82 -269 6288 R 5495075 49003 1 1108 TE PH 15 1 2 MCB2 -269 6288 SOZS 8 BL 3 3 1 4 0 1 0 5 3 3 43 0 3 1 152 3 MC82 -269 6288 585 4 38 2 10 3 30 18 9 2 OO 4 1 50 30 1800 153 4 MC82 -269 6288 154 1 MC8 2 -270 6289 R 5495067 490122 1084 TE PH 155 2 MC82 -270 6289 SPSC 8G BL2 3 4 1 2 23 1249 3 3 2 2 43 1 3 1 156 3 MC82 -270 6289 5100 7 3 82 2 60 1 1 2 05 4 10 40 1560 157 4 MC82 -270 6289 158 1 MC82 -27 1 6290 R 5495045 490327 120O TE 159 2 MCB2 -271 6290 ACIF 20 DG3 3 4 2 3 23 249 0 2 O 2 129 0 3 1 160 3 MC8 2 -27 1 6290 128 2 SO 300 50 21 22 7 35 12 20 30 700 pj LQ 00 LD L i s t i n g of GOOD a t 13:47:26 on NOV 7, 1984 for CCId=KMMC Page 21 16 1 4 MC82 -271 6290 162 1 MC82 -272 S291 R 5495065 490280 1205 TE 163 2 MCB 2 -272 6291 164 3 MC82 -272 629 1 285 16 158 340 1 70 2 1 4 05 63 120 30 1OOO0 16S 4 MC82 -272 6291 166 1 MCS2 -273 6292 R 549505O 490240 1084 TE 6397 167 2 MC82 -273 6292 RVLT 4 BL2 3 7 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 1 0 3 1 168 3 MC82 -273 6292 44 10 445 152 1 OO 3 1 1 90 27 60 40 620 169 4 MC82 -273 6292 170 1 MC82 -274 6293 R 5494982 490220 t145 TE ME TS 1 7 1 2 MC82 -274 6293 SPSC 8G BL2 3 4 1 2 23 29 3 3 2 2 134 2 5 25 172 3 Ml 8 2 -274 6293 17 4 7 53 30 2 1 1 55 9 20 20 540 173 4 MC8 2 -274 6293 83 04 8 10 2 72 25 1 49 08 45 2 IB 02 2 11 174 1 MC82 -275 6294 R 5494830 490270 1208 TE ME TS P H 175 2 MCB 2 -275 6294 SPSC 8G DG1GG3 3 4 1 2 32 9 3 4 2 3 346 2 5 32 176 3 MC82 -275 6294 2 150 3 22 80 1 50 1 1 2 . 10 10 20 20 500 177 4 MC82 275 6294 83 OO 6 85 3 78 .23 1 82 1 1 87 1 53 02 2 38 178 1 MC82 -276 6295 R 5494758 490316 1190 TE 1 179 2 MCB 2 -276 6295 SPSC 8G DG1GG4 38 4 1 2 23 9 3 4 2 3 34 2 3 24 1 180 3 MC8 2 -276 6295 2250 2 10 1 13 80 1 1 1 BO 12 30 30 280 I 18 1 4 MC82 -276 6295 1 182 1 MC8 2 277 6296 R 5494 145 491335 0925 TE 1 183 2 MC82 -277 6296 DCLT 3C0 DG2 4 4 2 3 23 6274 0 1 0 1 3 1 0 1 184 3 MC82 -277 6296 2 1 3 4 70 10 3 4 2 90 2 IO 30 680 1 185 4 MC8 2 -277 6296 1 186 1 MCB 2 -278 6297 R 5494 188 491370 0947 TE 1 187 2 MC82 -278 6297 DCTF 3D DG4 3 4 2 2 2 279 0 0 0 1 34 0 3 1 1 188 3 MCB 2 278 6297 23 2 1 56 10 3 7 2 70 3 IO 40 700 1 189 4 MCB 2 -278 6297 1 190 1 MCB 2 279 6298 R 5494 190 49 1433 0977 TE 119 1 2 MCB 2 -279 6298 DCTF 3D DG4 3 4 2 2 2 279 0 0 0 1 34 O 3 1 1 192 3 MCB 2 -279 6298 18 2 1 65 10 1 3 3 18 3 10 30 780 1193 4 MC8 2 -279 6298 1 194 1 MC82 -280 6299 R 5494215 491509 1023 TE 1 195 2 MC82 -280 6299 DCTF 3D DG4 3 4 2 2 2 279 0 0 0 1 34 0 3 1 1 196 3 MC82 -280 6299 24 1 1 60 10 1 5 2 65 3 10 20 780 1 197 4 MC82 - 280 6299 1 198 1 MCB 2 -28 1 6300 R 5494234 491524 1053 TE 1 199 2 MCB 2 281 6300 ACTF 20 DG4 1 4 2 3 32 129 5 2 1 2 32 0 3 1 1200 3 MC8 2 -281 63O0 31 2 1 80 10 1 10 4 48 7 10 20 840 1201 4 MCB 2 -281 6300 1202 1 MC82 - 282 6301 R 5494086 491530 0942 TE 1203 2 MC82 282 6301 ANLP 2C GG4DG2 3 4 2 3 32 6279 0 3 2 2 34 0 0 1204 3 MC82 -282 6301 2 1 2 1 88 30 1 1 5 3 67 10 10 20 680 1205 4 MC82 -282 6301 1206 1 MC82 -283 6302 R 5493995 4915 13 0855 TE 1207 2 MC82 -283 6302 DCLP 3C GR2 1 4 2 3 23 6259 0 1 0 2 4 0 1208 3 MC82 -283 6302 16 1 1 55 . 10 2 2 1 98 2 10 20 1300 1209 4 MC82 -283 6302 12 10 1 MC82 -284 6303 R 5493975 4914 30 0827 TE ME TS 12 11 2 MCB 2 -284 6303 ACTF 2D GR 1 4 4 1 3 23 147 0 1 0 1 123 1 3 1 12 12 3 MC82 -284 6303 13 2 1 57 10 2 4 2 02 2 10 30 940 12 13 4 MC82 -284 6 303 69 53 14 80 3 43 52 1 73 1 . 47 3.78 2 73 07 1 77 12 14 1 MC82 310 6 304 R 5494565 490792 1020 TE 1215 2 MC82 -3 10 6304 SQ2S 8 SL3 23 4 1 1 0 1 4 5 3 3 4 0 3 1 12 16 3 MC82 3 10 6 304 77 8 1 12 1 15 * 90 1 1 2 .95 46 20 690 980 12 17 4 MC82 -310 6304 12 18 1 MC82 - 309 6305 R 5494524 490790 0998 TE ME TS pj cQ CD o L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13:47:26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCId-KMMC Page 22 12 19 2 MC82 -309 6305 SOZS 8 BLS 6 43 1 1 1 0 4 4 2 3 43 0 3 1 1220 3 MC82 -309 6305 49 2 20 48 1 .20 6 7 1 88 145 20 280 1000 122 1 4 MC82 -309 6305 67 . 25 15 32 6 14 1 .11 88 . 13 90 4 15 04 5 36 1222 1 MC82 -308 6306 R 5494420 490750 1003 TE 1223 2 MC82 -308 6306 SPSC 8G BL 1 38 4 1 3 2 3 3 4 3 3 43 0 3 1 122-1 3 MC82 -308 6306 15 2 5 58 10 1 1 1 78 6 10 80 220 1225 4 MC82 -308 6306 1226 1 MC82 -307 6307 R 5494480 490805 0983 TE 1227 2 MC82 -307 6307 MTFF 5T BL2 3 47 1 1 1 5 5 3 2 4 3 0 3 1 1228 3 MC82 -307 6 307 120 2 1 500 225 5 30 26 5 3 25 t75 120 750 460 1229 4 MCB2 -307 6307 12 30 1 MC82 -306 6308 R 5484454 490817 0973 TE 123 1 2 HC82 -306 6308 MTFF 5T BL2 36 47 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 4 1 0 3 1 1232 3 MC82 - 306 6308 245 13 156 2SOO 7 60 25 1 1 4 37 85 170 660 2650 1233 4 MCB 2 -306 6308 1234 1 MCB 2 -305 6309 R 5494385 490865 0932 TE 1235 2 MCB 2 -305 6309 SOZS 8 GR2 13 4 1 3 2 249 5 4 3 3 43 5 3 1 1236 3 MC82 -305 6309 45 4 23 155 50 15 12 4 OB 1 1 IO 160 540 1237 4 MC82 -305 6309 1238 1 MCB 2 -304 6310 R 5494354 490898 0920 TE 1239 2 MC82 -304 6310 SOZS 8 GV3 3 4 1 2 12 59 5 4 2 4 1 0 3 1 1240 3 MC82 -304 63 10 82 3 a 170 50 17 2 7 1 1 10 20 50 660 124 1 4 MC8 2 -304 63 10 1242 1 MC82 -303 63 t 1 H 5494287 490882 0878 TE 1243 2 MC8 2 -303 631 1 DCTF 3D DG4 3 4 2 2 2 479 0 0 0 1 34 1 3 1 1244 3 MC82 -303 631 1 103 1 15 270 20 18 14 5 60 7 10 30 t 1O0 1245 4 MCB 2 -303 63 1 1 1246 1 MC82 -302 63 12 R 5494275 490880 0870 TE 1247 2 MC82 -302 63 12 SOZS 8 SL3 2 4 1 1 0 0 4 4 3 3 4 0 0 1248 3 MC82 -302 63 12 79 2 7 32 10 1 1 1 40 1 1 10 40 860 1249 4 MC82 -302 6312 1250 1 MC82 -301 63 13 R 5494243 4908B5 0855 TE 1251 2 MCB 2 -301 63 13 SOZS 8 GG4 3 4 1 1 2 O 4 4 3 3 4 O O 1252 3 MCB 2 -301 63 13 1 15 2 54 62 10 1 1 3 10 6 10 20 380 1253 4 MC82 -301 63 13 1254 1 MC82 -300 63 14 R 5494201 49088 1 0842 TE 1255 2 MC82 -300 6314 SPSC 8G GR3DG3 3 4 1 2 12 29 3 3 2 2 43 0 3 1 1256 3 MC8 2 -300 63 14 2 15 2 10 47 20 1 1 2 22 9 10 30 260 1257 4 MC82 -300 63 14 1258 1 MC82 -299 63 15 R 5494 158 490849 0818 TE 1259 2 MC82 -299 63 15 SOZS 8 BL4 23 4 1 2 2 12 3 4 3 3 43 0 0 1260 3 MC82 -299 63 15 80 3 96 1 12 to 1 1 1 .58 9 10 70 640 126 1 4 MC82 -299 63 15 1262 1 MC82 -298 63 16 R 5494 142 490843 08 14 TE 1 ME TS 1263 2 MC82 298 6316 SOZS 8 GR3 3 4 1 2 12 97 4 3 2 3 34 0 3 1 1264 3 MC82 -298 63 16 39 2 4 94 . 10 2 2 1 . 76 3 10 20 4 20 1265 4 MC82 -298 6316 75 12 II 91 2 . 76 .39 3. 78 05 62 2 59 02 3 14 1266 1 MC82 -286 6317 R 5493692 491033 0783 TE 1267 2 MC82 -286 63 17 DCTF 3D GY6 6 4 1 1 2 t 5 1 0 1 3 1 3 1 1268 3 MC82 -286 6317 10 1 33 66 to 1 4 1 74 12 10 30 1460 1269 4 MC82 -2B6 63 17 1270 1 MCB 2 -287 63 18 R 5493695 491012 0780 TE 127 1 2 MC82 -287 6318 MTFF 5T GY6 23 47 2 2 12 5 5 3 2 2 4 O 0 1272 3 MC82 -287 63 18 3 1 2 18 1 2 10 20 3 5 3 50 3 10 50 880 1273 4 MC82 -287 63 18 1274 1 MC82 -288 63 19 R 5493673 491029 0797 TE 1275 2 MC82 -288 63 19 3 1276 3 MC82 - 288 63 19 17 8 77 68 10 1 2 1 . 40 5 10 SO 1700 L i s t i n g o f GOOD a t 13 4 7 : 2 6 o n NOV 7 , 1984 f o r C C i d - K M M C P a g e 23 1277 4 MC82 288 63 19 1278 1 MC82 - 2 8 9 6 3 2 0 R 5493649 491017 0825 TE 1279 2 MC82 - 2 8 9 6 3 2 0 sozs a GRIGG5 12 46 1 t 12 5 0 4 1 2 14 0 1280 3 MC82 - 2 8 9 6 3 2 0 IS 2 1 70 10 1 5 2 OO 2 20 20 1340 128 1 4 MC82 - 2 8 9 6 3 2 0 1282 1 MC8 2 - 2 9 0 632 1 R 5 4 9 3 6 1 0 491005 0863 TE 1283 2 MC82 290 632 1 SPSC BG SL3DGI 2 4 1 3 32 174 3 3 2 2 143 0 3 1 1284 3 MC82 - 2 9 0 632 1 4 1 t 75 10 t 2 t 70 2 10 30 1 100 1285 4 MC82 - 2 90 632 1 1286 1 MC82 -291 6322 R 5493594 4910O3 0894 TE 1287 2 MCB 2 -291 6322 MARG 5A BK 1 3 7 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 1 0 3 1 1288 3 MC82 -291 6322 17 6 1 80 10 1 12 6 50 7 10 20 1360 1289 4 MC82 -291 6322 1290 I MC82 - 2 9 2 6323 R 5 4 9 3 5 7 5 49099O 0 9 2 0 TE 1291 2 MC82 -292 6323 MCHT 5C DG 1 3 4 1 3 32 1928 0 3 1 2 432 0 3 1 1292 3 MC82 - 292 6323 38 3 1 54 . 20 1 1 7 3 75 6 20 20 920 1293 4 MC82 - 2 9 2 6323 1294 1 MCB 2 - 293 6324 R 5493559 490986 0 9 4 5 TE 1295 2 MC82 - 2 9 3 6324 SPSC 8C Gv 1 3 43 t 1 2 3 5 5 2 2 43 0 1296 3 MC82 - 2 9 3 6324 3 1 1 1 140 20 12 24 7 70 7 20 30 700 1297 4 MC82 293 6324 1298 1 MC62 -294 6325 R 5493526 490972 0 9 8 0 TE 1299 2 MCB 2 - 294 6325 ACL T 2CD 0G4 1 4 2 2 23 6249 0 1 0 2 34 0 3 1 1300 3 MC82 - 294 6325 26 1 1 1 15 to 6 22 5 43 2 IO 30 460 1301 4 MCB 2 - 294 6325 1302 1 MC82 - 295 6326 R 5493495 490974 1006 TE 1303 2 MC82 - 2 9 5 6326 M T f f 5T DG4 1 4 I 2 2 175 4 4 2 2 34 0 0 1304 3 MC8 2 - 2 9 5 6326 15 1 1 80 10 19 13 4 10 14 10 20 720 1 305 4 MCB2 - 2 9 5 6326 1306 1 MCB 2 - 2 9 6 6327 R 5 4 9 3 4 5 0 490992 1054 TE 1307 2 MCB2 - 2 9 6 6327 MARG 5A BK 1 1 47 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 14 0 0 1308 3 MC82 - 2 9 6 6327 16 2 1 67 10 3 1 1 1 3 OO 19 to 30 8 4 0 1309 4 MCB 2 - 2 9 6 6327 13 10 1 MCB2 - 2 9 7 6328 R 5493294 491045 1095 TE 13 11 2 MC82 -297 6328 DCLP 3C DG4 2 4 1 1 3 7 1 0 1 0 1 14 0 3 1 13 12 3 MC82 -297 6328 10 1 1 50 . 10 2 4 2 25 3 10 20 1360 13 13 4 MC8 2 - 297 6328 13 14 1 MC82 - 3 1 9 6329 R 5492425 4 9 4 0 2 0 0907 TE 6 132 13 15 2 MC82 -3 19 6329 1316 3 MC82 - 3 19 6329 46 1 56 123 50 10 6 2 60 23 10 30 340 1317 4 MCB 2 - 3 19 6329 13 18 1 MC82 - 3 2 0 6 3 3 0 R 5 4 9 2 4 0 0 494105 09O7 TE 6 133 13 19 2 MC82 - 320 6 3 30 1320 3 MC82 - 320 6 3 3 0 24 2 5 69 . 10 3 2 2 35 6 10 20 1800 132 1 4 MC82 - 3 2 0 6 3 3 0 1322 1 MCB 2 -322 6331 R 5 4 9 3 1 0 0 492712 0771 TE 6066 1323 2 MC82 - 3 2 2 6331 1324 3 MCB 2 - 322 633 1 27 t 23 105 . 2 0 10 7 2 15 4 20 20 780 1325 4 MC82 - 3 2 2 633 1 1326 1 MCB 2 - 328 6332 R 5492105 493875 1000 TE PH 6148 1327 2 MC82 - 3 2 8 6332 1328 3 MCB 2 -328 6332 140 2 9 500 . IO 13 13 7 30 9 10 30 80 1329 4 MC8 2 -328 6332 1330 1 MCB 2 326 6333 R 5492365 494163 0 9 2 5 TE 1331 2 MC8 2 - 3 2 6 6333 1332 3 MCB 2 326 6333 lOOO 9 145 3800 2 OO 6 19 6 55 65 120 2 10 120 1333 4 MC82 -326 6333 1334 1 MC82 - 3 2 5 6334 R 5493145 494305 1340 TE PH L i s t i n g of GOOD a t 13 47 26 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCtd'KMMC Page 24 1335 2 MC82 -325 6334 1336 3 MC82 -325 6334 70 4 2 1 87 30 35 13 2 95 32 10 30 1020 1337 4 MC82 -325 6334 1338 1 MC82 315 6335 R TE ME IS 1339 2 MC82 315 6335 BSL T 14 AN CA CA BK 1 36 3 1 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 8 0 0 1340 3 MC82 -315 6335 3 1 1 1 45 20 0 0 0 00 0 10 0 0 134 1 4 MC82 -315 6335 66 33 15 . 35 5 . 18 77 1 8 1 3 .43 4 73 1 16 2 1 1 28 1342 I MC82 3 17 6336 R 5492370 490616 07 10 TE ME TS 134 3 2 MC82 -317 6336 DC IV 9 AN CA CA 1344 3 MC a 2 -3 17 6336 28 2 3 42 20 0 0 0 OO O 10 0 0 1345 4 MC82 -317 6336 62 27 16 15 6 68 94 1 9 1 5 69 4 07 1 04 3 1 1 IO 1 346 1 MC82 -32 1 6337 R TE ME TS 1347 2 MC8 2 -32 1 6337 AN CA 1348 3 MC8 2 -32 1 6337 49 1 1 39 . 20 0 0 0 OO 0 to 0 0 1 349 4 M ' 8 2 -32 1 6337 65 3 1 15 25 5 80 73 1 59 4 58 3 52 1 02 19 1 04 1 3SO 1 Mi. 8 2 - 32 3 6338 R 5492720 494353 1025 IE ME TS 135 1 2 MC8 2 - 323 6338 ACLT 2CD BA TH CA GR 1 34 4 1 3 32 597 0 1 0 2 32 0 3 1 1352 3 MC 8 2 323 6338 19 3 1 20 10 0 0 0 00 0 10 0 0 1353 4 MC 8 2 323 6338 53 34 16 37 8 8 1 i 1 16 8 14 2 94 2 22 60 30 5 18 1 354 1 MC 82 - 154 6339 R 5492755 493715 0990 ME TS 1 355 2 MC82 - 154 6339 RVLT 4 RV CA IH GR1SL2 40 12 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 3 4 0 0 1356 3 MC8 2 - 154 6339 36 1 8 36 . 20 0 0 0 OO 0 IO 0 0 1 357 4 MC8 2 - 154 6339 78 62 12 19 1 4 1 17 52 84 2 5 1 2 52 02 1 40 1 358 1 MC8 2 - 156 6340 R 5492990 493863 1160 ME 1359 2 MC 8 2 - 156 6340 MT F P 5T AN CA CA DG2DG4 12 4 2 3 12 8346 1 0 0 2 23 4 0 1 3CO 3 ML B 2 - 156 6340 12 1 3 39 30 0 O 0 OO O IO O 0 1 36 1 4 MC82 - 156 6340 59 15 16 04 8 25 i 1 34 4 17 2 . 92 4 . 52 30 30 2 9 1 1362 1 MC82 -032 634 1 R 5492830 494005 1077 IE ME 1 363 2 MC82 -032 634 1 ANLP 2C AN CA CA OG IBL3 3 4 1 3 23 6425 0 2 0 2 23 0 3 1 1 364 3 M L 8 2 032 634 1 27 1 4 20 20 0 0 0 OO 0 10 0 0 1365 4 Mi 8 2 032 634 1 60 06 15 24 8 33 1 I 09 3 37 3 96 3 23 56 29 2 89 1 306 1 ML 8 2 029 6342 R 5492820 493675 1016 TE ME TS 136 7 2 ML 8 2 029 6342 ABL T 2BC AN CA CA DG2 3 4 1 3 32 6425 O 2 0 2 23 0 3 1 1 168 3 Mi 8 2 -029 6342 46 1 32 24 60 0 O O 00 0 10 0 O 1 369 4 ML 8 2 029 6342 6o 65 15 79 7 80 1 2 1 3 47 2 26 4 80 58 32 2 26 1 37u 1 ML b 2 06 2 6343 R 5493J75 492950 0909 TE ME 137 1 2 M L 8 2 062 6343 ANLP 2C AN CA CA BL3 13 4 2 2 423 6412 3 2 0 1 3 0 3 1 1372 3 ML 8 2 06 2 6343 13 3 2 38 30 0 0 O.OO 0 10 0 0 1373 4 ML 8 2 06 2 6343 6 1 76 15 32 7 48 i 1.07 2 95 3.66 3 90 88 32 2 51 1374 1 MC8 2 007 6344 R 5493440 493380 1060 TE ME TS 1375 2 ML 8 2 007 6344 DCFL 3A RV CA CA SL 1 2 12 1 3 1 7 0 0 0 1 24 0 3 1 1376 3 ML 8 2 -007 6344 49 1 3 93 30 0 0 0 00 0 10 0 0 1377 4 MCB2 -007 6344 69 40 15 54 1 58 .67 2 51 1 23 5 65 1 46 13 1 49 1378 \ MC82 001 6345 R 5494056 491142 08 17 ME 1379 2 MC8 2 -001 6345 DBLI 3BC AN CA GG50G1 3 4 1 3 432 6259 3 2 0 2 314 0 1380 3 ML 8 2 001 6345 "* 24 3 5 375 . 20 0 0 0 OO 0 10 O 0 138 1 4 MC8 2 -001 6345 62 20 18 53 3 11 .56 , 3 97 3 30 2 61 1 69 12 3 01 PJ oo P a g e 194 T A B L E A . 5 L i s t i n g o f 1983 r o c k c h i p s a m p l e s ( i n c l u d i n g l o c a t i o n d e s c r i p t i o n s a n d c h e m i c a l a n a l y s e s ) . F o r m a t f o r t h e s e l i s t i n g s a r e i n T a b l e A . 1 . D e t a i l e d c o d e s f o r s p e c i f i c f i e l d s a r e i n T a b l e s A . 2 a n d A . 3 . L l s t I n g 101 at 13 57:17 on NOV 7, 1984 f o r CCId-KMMC Pane 1 1 MC83 -626 6380 R 5496230 49 1540 0798 ME 6230 2 2 MC83 -626 6380 BSLT IA 3 3 MC83 -626 6380 4 4 MC83 626 6380 55 08 15 69 8 21 82 7 04 9 85 1 96 12 19 1 27 5 1 MC83 -630 638 t R 5495850 490650 0882 ME 6236 6 2 MC8 3 -630 638 t BSLT IA 7 3 MC8 3 -630 6381 8 4 MCB 3 -630 63B 1 47 45 17 12 9 82 92 8 99 6 03 3 . 07 1 28 19 5 18 9 1 MCB3 -63 1 6382 R 5495840 490580 0945 ME 6238 10 1 1 2 3 MCB 3 MC83 63 1 63 1 6382 6382 BSLT 1A 12 4 MCB 3 -63 1 6382 48 80 16 12 8 78 92 7 25 7 34 5 18 09 18 4 7 1 13 1 MCB 3 -632 63B3 R 5495830 490530 0975 ME 6237 14 2 M( B3 632 6383 BSLT IA 15 3 MC8 3 -632 6383 16 4 Ml B3 632 63B3 48 16 16 32 9 72 90 7 27 5 61 t 96 3 44 14 5 14 17 1 MCB 3 -633 6384 R 5495850 490460 1025 ME 6234 18 2 MCB 3 -633 6384 BSLT IA 19 3 MCB 3 633 6384 20 4 MC83 -633 6384 47 46 18 19 10 56 1 09 8 02 5 32 4 50 0 72 . 24 3 79 2 1 1 MC 8 3 635 6387 R 5495510 4909OO 1070 ME 22 2 MCB 3 -635 6387 BSLT IA 23 3 MC8 3 635 6387 24 4 MCB 3 635 6387 45 . 06 18 03 10 22 93 8 85 5 91 2 96 1 14 24 5 06 25 1 MC 8 3 -636 638B R 5495530 490940 1070 ME 26 2 MCB 3 636 6388 BSLT IA 27 3 MCB 3 636 63B8 28 4 MC83 6 36 6388 49 04 16 79 9 53 93 6 9 1 8 60 4 12 26 18 2 77 29 1 MCB 2 192 6 145 R 5492250 493800 O940 TE ME TS 30 2 MCB 2 192 6 145 BSLT 1A BA IH 0G2 3 12 2 2 4 4 0 2 0 3 132 4 2 1 3 1 3 MC8 2 - 192 6145 18 3 1 55 10 a 23 9 85 4 10 20 32 4 MCB 2 192 6 145 52 33 14 43 16 23 97 3 87 7 4 1 1 69 03 27 2 66 33 1 MCB 2 019 6234 R 5495840 490445 0892 TE ME TS 63842234 34 2 MCB 2 -019 6234 BSPL IA BK 1 3 31 1 2 3 9 0 1 0 1 37 0 35 3 MCB 2 -OI9 6234 24 1 1 75 10 50 24 5 10 9 20 20 36 4 MCB 2 -019 6234 50 12 17 25 9 93 1 05 6 31 6 10 4 16 35 22 3 25 37 1 MCB 2 015 6236 R 5495830 490620 0880 TE ME TS 63812236 38 2 MC82 0 15 6236 BSLT 1 GG10G2 1 4 1 3 12 129 0 1 0 1 432 7 0 39 3 MCB 2 015 6236 48 2 1 75 20 87 34 6 55 3 10 10 40 4 MC8 2 015 6236 47 48 16 79 10 47 . 95 a 27 5 76 1 78 2 73 18 4 42 4 1 1 MC82 -3 15 6335 R TE ME TS 42 2 MC82 3 15 6335 BSLT IA AN CA CA BK1 36 3 1 2 2 1 O 1 O 1 8 O O 43 3 MCB2 3 15 6335 31 1 1 45 20 0 0 0 00 0 10 0 44 4 MCB 2 -3 15 6335 66 33 15 35 5 18 77 t 8 1 3 43 4 73 1 16 2 1 1 28 45 1 MC82 258 6277 R 5494 157 493272 1257 TE ME TS PH 46 2 MCB 2 -258 6277 RYL T 4A RY CA CA SL 1 23 2 1 3 2 17 0 1 O 3 1 64 0 3 1 47 3 MCB 2 -258 6277 9 1 15 40 . 10 1 1 1 OS 5 20 30 48 4 MC8 2 -258 6277 76 89 12 93 t 75 19 21 1 14 4 75 2 14 02 69 4 9 1 Ml 8 2 273 6 292 R 5495050 490240 1084 TE 6397 50 2 MC82 -273 6292 RYLT 4 BL2 3 7 1 0 0 0 i C i 2 i 0 3 t 0 3 1 5 1 3 MCB2 -273 6292 44 IO 445 152 1 OO 3 1 1 90 27 60 40 52 4 MCB 2 -273 6292 53 1 MC82 - 154 6339 R 5492755 493715 0990 ME TS 54 2 MC82 - 154 6339 RYLT 4 RY CA TH GR1SL2 40 12 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 3 1 4 0 0 55 3 MC82 - 154 6339 36 1 8 36 20 0 0 0 OO 0 10 0 56 4 MC82 - 154 6339 7B 62 12 19 1 4 1 17 52 84 2 5 1 2 52 02 1 40 57 1 MC83 637 6389 R 5495260 489870 0980 ME 58 2 MCB 3 -637 6389 R l L T 4A PJ L Q ( D Cn L i s t * n g F TOT a t 13:57:17 on NOV 7. 1984 for CCld-KMMC Page 59 3 MC83 -637 6389 60 4 MC83 -637 6389 90 10 3 64 2 34 12 2 08 33 02 46 02 1 54 6 1 1 MC83 -644 6397 R 5495060 490230 1208 ME 6292 62 2 MCB3 -644 6397 RVLT 44 63 3 MC83 -644 6397 64 4 MC83 -644 6397 93 17 2 74 1 55 15 75 2 1 02 58 02 1 03 65 1 MC82 -040 6088 R 5493380 493475 1023 TE ME TS 2088 66 2 MC82 -040 6088 DCFL 3A DA CA CA DG1 1 12 1 3 2 87 0 0 0 1 32 0 0 67 3 MC82 -040 6088 2 1 1 152 150 20 4 1 1 64 6 10 30 6B 4 MC82 -040 6088 70 37 14 34 2 58 47 2 42 2 43 3 34 2 56 07 1 6 1 69 1 MC8 2 - 151 6 103 R 5493143 494158 1313 IE ME TS 6348 70 2 MC82 -15 1 6 103 DCFL 3A AN CA GG3 12 4 2 2 12 7 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 7 1 3 MC82 -15 1 6 103 64 1 12 1 16 10 37 19 3 63 55 10 40 72 4 MC82 151 6 103 55 01 17 02 7 26 1 08 4 96 5 17 3 64 1 35 26 3 56 73 1 MC82 - 185 6 138 R S4923 15 493968 0928 IE ME IS 2 138 74 2 MC82 - 185 6 138 DCFL 3A OA CA CA BL3 4 12 1 1 2 8 0 1 0 1 24 O 3 1 75 3 MC82 - 185 6 138 2 1 1 18 10 1 2 2 65 3 10 20 76 4 MC82 185 6 13S 72 5 1 13 95 3 67 . 50 92 1 79 5 38 31 07 1 OO 77 1 MC82 - 186 6 139 R 5492303 493947 09 30 IE ME TS 78 2 MC82 - 186 6 139 DCFL 3A AN CA CA BL3 01 34 1 2 2 129 5 3 1 2 34 0 0 79 3 MC82 - 186 6 139 14 1 2 42 10 2 9 3 85 9 10 20 SO 4 MC82 - 186 6 139 6 3 66 16 57 5 77 .74 2 05 3 19 3 58 2 O l 1 3 2 19 8 1 1 MC82 -4 10 6 18 1 0 5493400 492128 5-18-02 1595 0 1597 0 0760 IE 82 2 MC82 -4 10 6 18 1 DCFL 3A DG4BL1 2 1 0 7 0 0 0 4 2 2 5 1 83 3 MC82 -4 10 6 18 1 8 5 4 22 10 6 3 1 30 14 20 30 84 4 MC82 -4 10 6 18 1 85 1 MC82 - 444 6224 D 5493446 492060 5-18- 13B 1224 0 1226 0 0760 TE 86 2 MCB2 -444 6224 DCFL 3A GR1VW2 2 2 2 2 8 1 0 1 0 2 27 0 87 3 MC B 2 444 6224 1 18 1 12 160 10 25 27 5 65 25 10 20 83 4 MC82 -444 6224 89 1 MC8 2 -233 6 2 50 R 5495442 490097 1105 TE ME TS 63912250 90 2 MC8 2 -233 6250 DFBC 3A GV 1 2 46 2 2 12 28 0 0 1 1 124 1 0 9 1 3 MCB2 -233 6 2 50 5 1 1 103 10 B 10 4 10 2 10 20 92 4 MCB2 -233 6250 60 92 17 39 6 67 7 1 3 01 2 44 3 93 80 13 2 55 93 1 MC82 -238 6257 R 5495335 490205 1173 TE ME TS 2257 94 2 MC8 2 -238 6257 DCFL 3A GV 1 3 4 2 2 2 528 5 2 1 1 12 O 3 1 95 3 MC82 -238 6257 9 1 1 48 10 6 9 3 40 2 10 20 96 4 MOB 2 -238 6257 64 17 16 45 5 66 68 2 15 3 04 4 2 1 05 16 1 93 97 1 MO 8 2 -317 6336 R 5492370 4906 16 0710 TE ME TS 98 2 ML 8 2 317 6336 DC IV 9 AN CA CA 99 3 MCB2 -317 6336 28 2 3 42 20 0 0 0 00 0 10 0 100 4 MC8 2 -3 17 6336 62 27 16 15 6 68 .94 1 9 1 5 69 4 07 1 04 3 1 1 10 101 1 MC82 007 6344 R 5493440 4933BO 1060 IE ME TS 102 2 MC82 -007 6344 DCFL 3A RV CA CA SL 1 2 12 1 3 1 7 0 0 0 1 24 0 3 1 103 3 MC82 -007 6344 49 1 3 93 . 30 0 0 o . o o 0 IO 0 104 4 MCB2 007 6344 69 . 40 15 54 1 58 67 2 51 1 23 5 65 1 46 13 1 49 105 1 MC83 -601 6365 R 5494150 491340 092 1 ME 6366 106 2 MC83 -601 6365 DCFL 3A 107 3 MC83 -601 6365 108 4 MC83 -601 6365 65 01 14 19 4 79 57 2 61 4 02 4 16 2 75 17 2 27 109 1 MCB3 -601 6366 R 5494 ISO 49 1340 092 1 ME 6365 1 10 2 MC83 -601 6366 DCFL 3A 1 1 1 3 MC83 -601 6366 1 12 4 MC83 601 6366 65 74 14 99 5 17 58 2 63 2 99 4 40 2 67 16 1 72 1 13 1 MC83 -603 6368 R 5494630 401710 1340 ME 1 1 4 2 MC83 -603 6368 DCFL 3A 1 15 3 MC83 -603 6368 1 16 4 MC8 3 603 6368 69 99 13 55 3 . 90 52 2 47 1 58 2 56 3 23 1 1 2 14 PJ cQ (5 LD L 1 s t i n g F I O I a t 13:57:17 on NOV 1984 f o r CCId=KMMC Page 1 17 1 MC8 3 -609 6370 R 5495070 4898O0 1 140 ME 637 1 1 18 2 MC83 -609 6370 DCFL 3A 1 19 3 MC8 3 -609 6370 120 4 MC8 3 -609 6370 7 1 76 14 26 2 85 32 98 2 03 4 84 2 . 46 09 1 27 12 1 1 MCB 3 -609 637 1 R 5495070 489BOO 1 140 ME 6370 122 2 MC83 -609 637 1 DCFL 3A 123 3 MC83 -609 637 1 124 4 MC83 -609 637 1 7 1 69 14 OO 2 68 .30 89 2 22 5 03 2 42 08 1 38 125 1 MCB3 -6 10 6372 R 5494990 489740 1205 ME 126 2 MC83 -6 10 6372 DCFL 3A 127 3 MC 8 3 6 10 6372 128 4 MC8 3 6 10 6372 65 33 15 40 4 89 64 2 23 3 63 3 83 2 34 18 2 29 129 1 ML 8 3 -6 13 6374 R 5494270 489640 1280 ME 6375 130 2 MCB 3 6 13 6374 DCFL 3A 13 1 3 MCB 3 613 6374 132 4 MCB 3 6 13 6374 66 62 15 27 4 90 66 1 9 1 2 32 4 4 1 2 8 1 18 1 79 133 1 MCB3 -6 1 3 6375 R 5494270 489640 1280 ME 6374 1 34 2 MCB 3 -6 1 3 6375 DCFL 3A 135 3 MC83 613 6375 136 4 MCB3 613 6375 67 04 15 12 4 75 66 1 83 2 47 4 63 2 5 1 18 1 76 137 1 MC83 -617 6376 R 5494670 491070 I200 ME 138 2 MC83 617 6376 DCFL 3A 139 3 MC83 6 17 6376 140 4 MC83 -617 6376 69 42 14 54 3 37 58 1 . 64 1 51 4 79 2 60 16 1 69 14 1 1 MC83 -6 19 6378 R 5494640 491180 1200 ME 142 2 MC83 6 19 6378 DCFL 3A 143 3 MCB 3 6 19 6378 144 4 MC83 -6 19 6378 66 15 15 1 1 4 35 60 2 02 2 . 27 4 17 2 98 1 7 2 58 145 1 MC83 -620 6379 R 5494570 491380 1225 ME 146 2 MCB 3 -620 6379 DCFL 3A 147 3 MCB 3 -620 6379 148 4 MCB 3 620 6379 68 69 14 30 4 l 1 62 1 55 3 OS 3 6 2 34 16 1 85 149 1 MC83 634 6385 R 5495500 490430 1250 ME 150 2 MC8 3 634 6385 DCFL 3A 15 1 3 MCB3 6 34 6385 152 4 MC83 -634 6385 57 90 15 67 B 06 1 04 3 33 6 3 1 63 3 20 28 3 01 153 1 MCB3 -638 6390 R 5495250 489840 1010 ME 154 2 MCB 3 638 6 390 OCFL 3A 155 3 MCB 3 -638 6390 156 4 MC83 638 6390 7 1 5 1 13 64 2 62 . 3 1 68 2 63 4 OO 1 83 IO 1 72 157 1 MC83 639 639 1 R 5495430 490150 1088 ME 6250 158 2 MC83 639 639 1 DCFL 3A 159 3 MC8 3 639 6391 160 4 MCB 3 -639 639 1 59 81 17 62 7 3 1 77 3 99 2 09 3 72 1 46 18 3 . 04 161 1 MC8 3 -64 1 6393 R 5495150 490030 1 100 ME 6394 162 2 MC8 3 -64 1 6393 DCFL 3A 163 3 MCB 3 64 1 6393 164 4 MCB 3 64 1 6393 59 08 15 50 7 87 83 5 08 74 1 15 5 05 2 1 3 57 165 1 MC83 64 1 6394 R 5495 150 49OO30 1 10O ME 6393 166 2 MCB3 64 1 6394 DCFL 3A 167 3 MC83 -64 1 6394 168 4 MCB 3 64 1 6394 58 95 15 16 7 99 .81 5 1 1 79 1 29 5 03 22 3 46 169 1 MC83 -643 6396 R 5495020 490040 1 150 ME 170 2 MC8 3 643 6396 DCFL 3A 17 1 3 MCB 3 643 6396 172 4 MC8 3 643 6396 70. 99 14 87 3 00 34 87 1 23 2 96 3 14 1 1 1 90 173 1 MC83 -645 6399 R 5495320 490240 1 165 ME 6259 174 2 MCB3 -645 6399 DCFL 3A •a pj (D L O L i s t I n g FTOT a t 13:57:17 on NOV 7. 1984 f o r CCld-KMMC Page 175 3 MC83 -645 6399 176 4 MC8 3 -645 6399 63 34 16 07 6 58 .69 3 77 2 10 3 04 1 5 1 . 19 2 79 177 1 MC83 -647 6400 R 5495230 489660 1000 ME 6401 178 2 MC8 3 -647 6400 DCFL 3A 179 3 MCB3 -647 6400 180 4 MC83 -647 6400 65 12 15 34 4 .92 67 2 . 43 2 97 4 62 1 69 18 1 63 18 1 1 MC83 647 6401 R 5495230 489660 lOOO ME 6400 182 2 MC83 -647 6401 DCFL 3A 183 3 MC83 -647 6401 184 4 MC83 -647 6401 64 76 15 43 4 85 70 2 . 39 2 89 5 16 1 46 . 20 1 91 185 1 MC83 -649 6402 R 5495140 490260 1 150 ME 186 2 MC83 -649 6402 DCFL 3A 187 3 MC8 3 -649 6402 188 4 MC8 3 649 6402 7 1 36 15 OO 2 9 1 35 84 1 02 3 08 3 02 1 1 2 07 189 1 MC83 -654 6404 R 5495170 489870 1050 ME 190 2 MC83 -654 6404 DCFL 3A 19 1 3 MCB3 -654 6404 192 4 MC83 -654 6404 72 . 06 12 87 2 48 32 49 2 78 3 94 2 15 1 1 1 84 193 1 MCB3 040 2088 P 5493380 493475 1023 ME TS 6088 194 2 MC B 3 040 2088 DCFL 3A DA CA CA DG1 1 12 1 3 2 87 0 0 0 1 32 0 0 195 3 MCB3 040 2088 196 4 MC83 040 2088 70 12 14 50 2 54 46 2 . 4 1 2 38 3 18 2 60 08 1 60 197 1 MC8 3 - 185 2 138 P 5492315 493968 0928 ME TS 6 138 198 2 MC83 - 185 2 138 DCFL 3A DA CA CA BL 3 4 12 1 1 2 8 O 1 0 1 24 0 3 1 199 3 MCB3 - IBS 2 138 200 4 MC83 - 185 2 138 72 12 14 18 3 64 50 88 1 76 5 62 3 1 10 99 201 1 MCB3 -233 2250 P 5495442 490067 1 105 ME TS 62506391 202 2 MCB3 -233 2250 DFBC 3A GY 1 2 46 2 2 12 28 0 0 1 1 124 1 0 203 3 MC83 -233 2250 204 4 ML 8 3 -233 2250 6 I 03 17 68 6 7 1 70 3 29 2 45 4 65 82 17 2 52 205 1 MC83 238 2257 P 5495335 490205 1 173 ME TS 6257 206 2 ML83 238 2257 DCFL 3A GV 1 3 4 2 2 2 528 5 2 1 1 12 0 3 1 207 3 MC8 3 -238 2257 208 4 MC83 -238 2257 63 99 16 54 5 7 1 68 2 38 3 02 5 51 04 18 1 92 209 1 MC83 -60B 6369 R 5494940 49 1300 1340 ME 2 10 2 MC83 -608 6369 ANFL 2A 2 1 1 3 MC83 -608 6369 2 12 4 MC83 -608 6369 50 04 16 32 8 39 88 7 27 6 51 4 31 1 38 25 5 31 2 13 1 MC83 6 18 6377 R 5494660 491150 1200 ME 2 14 2 MC83 6 18 6377 ANFL 2A 2 15 3 MC83 -6 18 6377 2 16 4 MC83 -6 18 6377 65 11 16 2 1 4 73 66 1 8 1 2 72 4 . 96 2 25 17 1 98 2 17 1 MC82 - 100 6020 R 5493435 492989 0933 TE ME TS 2 18 2 MC62 -100 6020 AGLM 2A AN CA CA DG2 3 26 3 2 24 58 0 0 0 1 32 0 3 1 2 19 3 MC8 2 - too 6020 14 1 6 185 10 1 1 1 4 88 3 10 40 220 4 MC82 - too 6020 62 79 14 24 7 55 1 08 3 1.72 2 .04 3 1 65 48 29 2 64 22 1 1 MC82 -005 6090 R 5492680 493875 0983 TE 222 2 MC82 -005 6090 ABLT 2BC GR2DG2 1 24 4 2 3 3 6529 0 2 0 1 342 0 223 3 MC82 -005 6090 32 2 20 120 10 1 8 4 29 5 10 30 224 4 MC82 -005 6090 225 1 MC82 -0O6 609 1 R 5492680 493720 0990 TE 226 2 MC82 006 609 1 ABLT 2BC DG 1 3 4 2 3 234 6247 O 1 0 1 34 0 3 1 227 3 MC82 -006 609 1 64 1 12 67 20 1 5 5 03 4 10 20 228 4 MC82 -006 609 1 229 1 MC82 - 169 61 18 R 5492B65 49413 1 1 127 TE 2 30 2 MC82 169 6 118 AGLM 2B 0G2 10 56 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 2 23 0 0 23 1 3 MC82 169 6 118 1 1 1 1 101 10 1 13 4 89 5 10 10 232 4 MC82 - 169 6 118 P LQ (D L£> 00 L i s t ing i TOT a t 13.57:17 o n NOV 7, 1984 f o r CCtd=KMMC Page 233 1 MC82- 172 6121 R 5492795 494 117 1075 TE 234 2 MC82- 172 6 121 ANFL 2A DG2 12 14 2 3 2 817 0 0 0 1 234 4 0 235 3 MCB2- 172 6121 49 2 1 65 . 10 1 9 4 7 1 6 10 40 460 236 4 MC82- 172 6121 237 1 MC82- 173 6122 R 5492780 494098 1065 TE ME 238 2 MC82- 173 6 122 ANFL 2A BA CA 0G2 1 12 2 1 1 8 0 0 0 1 23 4 0 239 3 MC82- 173 6122 76 1 1 100 20 1 15 5 85 5 10 40 60 240 4 MC82 -173 6 122 54 79 16 91 10 46 1 25 3 42 6 . 15 3 63 . 10 33 2 51 24 1 t MC82 174 6123 R 5492765 494086 1052 TE 242 2 MCB 2 -174 6 123 AN8X 2B 0G1BL3 13 6 2 3 43 4256 0 2 0 2 326 0 3 1 243 3 MC82 -174 6123 63 1 1 55 10 1 3 4 60 0 10 0 0 244 4 MCB 2 174 6 123 245 I MC82- 189 6 142 R 5492272 493883 0937 TE ME 246 2 MC 8 2 -189 6 142 AGLM 2AB AN TH CA DG2 31 5 2 2 4 5 0 1 0 3 32 2 0 247 3 MCB 2 -189 6 142 127 1 1 59 30 2 14 6 55 6 10 20 380 248 4 MC82 - 189 6 142 57 82 16 91 10 00 1 13 2 66 2 87 3 97 1 08 23 2 81 249 1 MC82- 201 6 154 R 5493878 4924 15 1020 TE ME 250 2 MCB2- 201 6 154 ANFL 2A OA CA CA DG1VW2 43 2 3 2 2 78 0 0 0 1 82 0 3 1 25 1 3 MC82 -201 6 154 18 1 6 69 . 10 2 13 3 05 5 10 20 7O0 252 4 MCB 2 201 6 154 66 40 15 20 4 60 65 1 82 2 51 4 4 1 2 IO 13 1 53 253 1 MC82 -207 6 158 R 5493 123 492035 0866 TE 254 2 MCB2- 207 6 158 ANFL 2A DG 1 1 2 2 3 2 8 0 0 0 1 23 0 255 3 MC82 207 6 158 84 1 3 128 20 19 26 5 35 5 10 20 180 256 4 MC82- 207 6158 257 1 MC82- 226 6 1B8 R 5492305 493850 0920 TE 258 2 MC82 -226 6 188 ANFL 2A DG 1 1 2 2 3 2 78 0 O 0 1 823 0 3 1 259 3 MCB 2 226 6 188 44 3 1 68 40 28 26 5 25 5 10 20 540 260 4 MCB 2 -226 6 IBB pj LQ fD LD P a g e 200 B . WHOLE ROCK AND T R A C E E L E M E N T C H E M I C A L A N A L Y S E S B . 1 W h o l e R o c k A n a l y s e s One h u n d r e d a n d t h i r t y - t h r e e f i s t - s i z e d s a m p l e s f r o m t h e f r e s h e s t m o s t m a s s i v e u n i t s w e r e t a k e n f o r w h o l e r o c k a n a l y s e s . E m p h a s i s w a s o n t h e d a c i t e s i n t h e v i c i n i t y o f t h e B r i t a n n i a o p e n p i t s . X - r a y f l u o r e s c e n s e s p e c t r o m e t r y f o r m a j o r e l e m e n t a n a l y s e s w a s d o n e b y C h e m e x L a b s L t d . , 212 B r o o k s b a n k A v e . , N . V a n c o u v e r , B . C . , V 7 J 2 C 1 . C o n c e n t r a t i o n s w e r e d e t e r m i n e d f r o m g l a s s d i s c s d i l u t e d w i t h C h e m p l e x G r a d e I I I f l u x . Na a n d t r a c e e l e m e n t s w e r e d e t e r m i n e d f r o m u n d i l u t e d p r e s s e d p o w d e r p e l l e t s . C h e m i c a l a n a l y s e s a r e r e p o r t e d i n T a b l e s A . 4 a n d A . 5 o n c a r d 4 . M a j o r e l e m e n t d a t a f r o m 38 s e l e c t e d s a m p l e s , r e c a l c u l a t e d t o 100 % d r y , a r e c o n t a i n e d i n T a b l e 4 . 1 . A v e r a g e v a l u e s o f m a j o r e l e m e n t s f o r t h e m a i n r o c k t y p e s i n t h e t h r e e p a c k a g e s ; b a s a l t , d a c i t e a n d r h y o d a c i t e a r e c o n t a i n e d i n T a b l e 4 . 2 . T h i n s e c t i o n s w e r e c u t b y C o o t s P e t r o g r a p h i c f o r e a c h o f t h e s a m p l e s a n a l y s e d f o r m a j o r e l e m e n t s . P a g e 201 B . 2 T r a c e E l e m e n t A n a l y s e s S a m p l e s o f u p t o 2 k i l o g r a m s o f c h i p s w e r e t a k e n r a n d o m l y f r o m t h e f a c e s o f o u t c r o p s e v e r y 25 m e t e r s ( i f o u t c r o p was p r e s e n t ) a l o n g f o u r n o r t h e a s t - s o u t h w e s t s e c t i o n s ( p r i v . c o . r e p o r t , K . M . M c C o l l , 1 9 8 3 ) c r o s s c u t t i n g t h e B r i t a n n i a S h e a r Z o n e . T h r e e h u n d r e d a n d t h i r t y - f o u r r o c k c h i p s a m p l e s , i n c l u d i n g 48 s a m p l e s f r o m 1 9 7 3 A n a c o n d a d r i l l c o r e w e r e a n a l y s e d f o r C u , Z n , P b , M o , A u , A g , N i , A s , H g , B a , C o , a n d F e . T h e a n a l y s e s a r e c o n t a i n e d i n T a b l e A . 4 . A n a l y s e s f o r t r a c e e l e m e n t s w e r e made f r o m p r e s s e d p o w d e r p e l l e t s b y C h e m e x L a b s L t d . , 212 B r o o k s b a n k A v e . , N o r t h V a n c o u v e r , B . C . , V 7 J 2 C 1 . G e o c h e m i c a l p r e p a r a t i o n a n d a n a l y t i c a l p r o c e d u r e s a r e i n c l u d e d i n A p p e n d i x C . P r e l i m i n a r y s t a t i s t i c a l m a n i p u l a t i o n o f t h e t r a c e e l e m e n t d a t a p r o d u c e d e s t i m a t e d t h r e s h o l d s f o r t r a c e e l e m e n t s b y r o c k t y p e c o n t a i n e d i n T a b l e C . 1 . P e r c e n t a g e c u m u l a t i v e f r e q u e n c y p l o t s a n d p e r c e n t a g e h i s t o g r a m s a i d e d d i v i s i o n o f a n a l y t i c a l v a l u e s f o r e l e m e n t s i n t o a n o m a l o u s a n d b a c k g r o u n d p o p u l a t i o n s by r o c k t y p e . A n o m a l o u s t h r e s h o l d s w e r e e s t i m a t e d f r o m t h e mean o f t h e a n o m a l o u s p o p u l a t i o n . M e a n s o f t h e b a c k g r o u n d p o p u l a t i o n a r e a l s o i n c l u d e d i n T a b l e C . 1 . F r o m t h e s e t h r e s h o l d s 29 l o c a t i o n s a n o m a l o u s i n a t l e a s t t h r e e e l e m e n t s w e r e d e t e r m i n e d ( p r i v . c o . r e p o r t , K . M . M c C o l l , 1 9 8 3 ) . T A B L E B . 1 T a b l e o f e s t i m a t e d t h r e s h o l d s f o r e l e m e n t s b y r o c k t y p e f o r t r a c e e l e m e n t s i n s a m p l e s f r o m t h e B r i t a n n i a R i d g e a r e a . D a t a a r e f r o m T a b l e s A . 4 a n d A . 5 . ROCK T Y P E R H Y O L I T E D A C I T E A N D E S I T E B A S A L T S C H I S T S E D I M E N T A R Y n 1 = 5 80 1 0 7 4 57 70 E L E M E N T X T H R 2 X THR X THR X THR X THR X THR C u ppm 20 30 12 1 0 0 47 1 1 7 28 40 1 5 2 0 0 0 28 1 59 Mo ppm 3 7 1 6 1 7 2 3 2 9 2 1 2 P b ppm 94 75 2 7 2 45 1 1 2 41 2 71 Z n ppm 62 1 00 76 1 70 80 3 0 8 62 60 58 2 2 0 81 1 80 A g ppm . 3 . 8 - . 3 . 1 . 7 .1 . 2 . 2 .1 1 N i ppm 2 2 1 4 3 40 32 70 4 34 6 56 C o ppm 3 3 4 1 7 1 3 30 26 30 7 20 1 1 25 F e % 1 1 2 4 3 7 7 8 2 6 2 5 A s ppm 9 1 5 4 20 5 53 5 6 6 47 8 90 A u p p b 22 50 - 1 5 - 20 12 1 5 - 20 - 20 Hg p p b 24 1 5 26 55 23 81 16 1 6 - 70 31 70 B a ppm 448 2 1 0 575 1 8 0 0 4 9 8 2 0 0 0 3 5 5 5 0 0 5 9 7 , 1 2 0 0 3 2 9 1 2 0 0 1. T h e n u m b e r o f s a m p l e s i n c l u d e d i n e s t i m a t e i s " n " . 2 . T h e mean o f t h e b a c k g r o u n d p o p u l a t i o n i s " X " , t h e e s t i m a t e d a n o m a l o u s t h r e s h o l d i s " T H R " . P a g e 2 0 3 C . G E O C H E M I C A L P R E P A R A T I O N AND A N A L Y T I C A L P R O C E D U R E S C . 1 T r a c e E l e m e n t D e t e r m i n a t i o n T h e f o l l o w i n g a r e p r o c e d u r e s p u b l i s h e d b y C h e m e x L a b s L t d . e f f e c t i v e A p r i l 1 9 8 2 . 1 . G e o c h e m i c a l s a m p l e s ( s o i l s , s i l t s ) a r e d r i e d a t 80 C f o r a p e r i o d o f 12 t o 24 h o u r s . T h e d r i e d s a m p l e i s s i e v e d t o - 8 0 m e s h f r a c t i o n t h r o u g h a n y l o n a n d s t a i n l e s s s t e e l s i e v e . R o c k g e o c h e m i c a l m a t e r i a l s a r e c r u s h e d , d r i e d a n d p u l v e r i z e d t o - 1 0 0 m e s h . 2 . A 1 . 0 0 g r a m p o r t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s w e i g h e d i n t o a c a l i b r a t e d t e s t t u b e . T h e s a m p l e i s d i g e s t e d u s i n g h o t 70 % H C I O ^ a n d c o n c e n t r a t e d HNO3. D i g e s t i o n t i m e = 2 h o u r s . 3 . S a m p l e v o l u m e i s a d j u s t e d t o 25 m i s . u s i n g d e m i n e r a l i z e d w a t e r . S a m p l e s o l u t i o n s a r e h o m o g e n i z e d a n d a l l o w e d t o s e t t l e b e f o r e b e i n g a n a l y z e d b y a t o m i c a b s o r p t i o n p r o c e d u r e s . 4 . D e t e c t i o n l i m i t s u s i n g T e c h t r o n A . A . 5 a t o m i c a b s o r p t i o n u n i t a r e : C o p p e r 1 ppm M o l y b d e n u m 1 ppm Z i n c 1 ppm * S i l v e r 0 . 2 ppm * L e a d 1 ppm * N i c k e l 1 ppm * C h r o m i u m 5 ppm * C o b a l t 1 ppm M a n g a n e s e 5 ppm I r o n 2 ppm C a d m i u m 0 . 1 ppm * A g , P b , C o , a n d N i a r e c o r r e c t e d f o r b a c k g r o u n d a b s o r p t i o n . 5 . E l e m e n t s p r e s e n t i n c o n c e n t r a t i o n b e l o w t h e d e t e c t i o n l i m i t s a r e r e p o r t e d a s o n e h a l f t h e d e t e c t i o n l i m i t , i . e . A g -0 . 1 p p m . P a g e 204 P P M A r s e n i c : A 1.0 g r a m s a m p l e i s d i g e s t e d w i t h a m i x t u r e o f p e r c h l o r i c a n d n i t r i c a c i d t o s t r o n g f u m e s o f p e r c h l o r i c a c i d . T h e d i g e s t e d s o l u t i o n i s d i l u t e d t o v o l u m e a n d m i x e d . A n a l i q u o t o f t h e d i g e s t i s a c i d i f i e d , r e d u c e d w i t h K l a n d m i x e d . A p o r t i o n o f t h e r e d u c e d s o l u t i o n i s c o n v e r t e d t o a r s i n e w i t h N a B H 4 a n d t h e a r s e n i c c o n t e n t d e t e r m i n e d u s i n g f l a m e l e s s a t o m i c a b s o r p t i o n . D e t e c t i o n l i m i t : 1 ppm P P B M e r c u r y : T h e s a m p l e i s d i g e s t e d w i t h n i t r i c a c i d p l u s a s m a l l a m o u n t o f h y d r o c h l o r i c a c i d . F o l l o w i n g d i g e s t i o n t h e r e s u l t i n g c l e a r s o l u t i o n i s t r a n s f e r r e d t o a r e a c t i o n f l a s k c o n n e c t e d t o a c l o s e d s y s t e m a b s o r p t i o n c e l l . S t a n n o u s s u l f a t e i s r a p i d l y a d d e d t o r e d u c e m e r c u r y t o i t s e l e m e n t a l s t a t e . T h e m e r c u r y i s t h e n f l u s h e d o u t o f t h e r e a c t i o n v e s s e l i n t o t h e a b s o r p t i o n c e l l w h e r e i t i s m e a s u r e d b y c o l d v a p o u r a t o m i c a b s o r p t i o n m e t h o d s w i t h a V a r i a n S p e c t r o p h o t o m e t e r . T h e a b s o r b a n c e o f s a m p l e s i s c o m p a r e d w i t h t h e a b s o r b a n c e o f f r e s h l y - p r e p a r e d m e r c u r y s t a n d a r d s o l u t i o n s c a r r i e d t h r o u g h t h e same p r o c e d u r e . D e t e c t i o n l i m i t : 5 p p b P a g e 2 0 5 B a r i u m : A 0 . 2 0 gm s a m p l e i s d i g e s t e d w i t h a m i x t u r e o f H F - H C I O ^ -NHO^ a c i d s t o d r y n e s s . T h e b a k e d r e s i d u e i s l e a c h e d w i t h 25 m l o f 10 % H C 1 w i t h N a C l a d d e d t o r e d u c e i o n i z a t i o n e f f e c t s i n t h e A . A f l a m e . A n a l y s i s i s b y A A S u s i n g N2O - ^2^2 9 a s m : t X t u r e . G o l d N . A . A . M e t h o d : A 10 gm s a m p l e i s f u s e d i n l i t h a r g e , c a r b o n a t e a n d s i l i c i o u s f l u x . T h e r e s u l t i n g l e a d b u t t o n c o n t a i n i n g a n y g o l d i n t h e s a m p l e i s c u p e l l e d i n a m u f f l e f u r n a c e t o p r o d u c e a p r e c i o u s m e t a l s b e a d . S a m p l e b e a d s , p l u s s t a n d a r d a n d b l a n k b e a d s a r e i r r a d i a t e d i n a t h e r m a l n e u t r o n f l u x . T h e gamma e m i s s i o n s o f t h e i r r a d i a t e d b e a d s a r e c o u n t e d u t i l i z i n g a Ge ( L i ) d e t e c t o r a n d q u a n t i f i e d f o r g o l d . T h e d e t e c t i o n l i m i t f o r a 10 gm s a m p l e i s 1ug / k g ( p p b ) . P a g e 2 0 6 C . 2 K - A r A n a l y t i c a l T e c h n i q u e s T h e f o l l o w i n g t e c h n i q u e s w e r e p r o v i d e d b y t h e G e o c h r o n o l g y L a b o r a t o r y , T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a f o r a n a l y s e s p e r f o r m e d i n A p r i l , 1 9 8 5 . K i s d e t e r m i n e d i n d u p l i c a t e b y a t o m i c a b s o r p t i o n u s i n g a T e c h t r o n A A 4 s p e c t r o p h o t o m e t e r . A r i s d e t e r m i n e d b y i s o t o p e d i l u t i o n u s i n g a n AE1 M S - 1 0 M a s s s p e c t r o m e t e r a n d h i g h p u r i t y J O A r s p i k e . E r r o r s r e p o r t e d a r e f o r o n e s t a n d a r d d e v i a t i o n . C . 3 R b - S r A n a l y t i c a l T e c h n i q u e s T h e f o l l o w i n g t e c h n i q u e s w e r e p r o v i d e d b y t h e G e o c h r o n o l g y L a b o r a t o r y , T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a f o r a n a l y s e s p e r f o r m e d i n A u g u s t , 1 9 8 4 . R b a n d S r ppm c o n c e n t r a t i o n s a r e d e t e r m i n e d b y r e p l i c a t e a n a l y s i s o f p r e s s e d p o w d e r p e l l e t s u s i n g X - r a y f l u o r e s c e n c e . U . S . G e o l o g i c a l S u r v e y r o c k s t a n d a r d s a r e u s e d f o r c a l i b r a t i o n . M a s s a b s o r p t i o n c o e f f i c i e n t s w e r e o b t a i n e d f r o m Mo K a l p h a C o m p t o n s c a t t e r i n g m e a s u r e m e n t s . R b - S r r a t i o s a n d c o n c e n t r a t i o n s h a v e a p r e c i s i o n o f o n e s t a n d a r d d e v i a t i o n (2 % a n d 5 % r e p e c t i v e l y ) . P a g e 207 I s o t o p e d e t e r m i n a t i o n s a r e p e r f o r m e d o n a 60 d e g r e e S e c t o r , 30 cm r a d i u s s o l i d s o u r c e m a s s s p e c t r o m e t e r a u t o m a t e d b y a H P 8 5 d e s k t o p m i n i c o m p u t e r . E x p e r i m e n t a l d a t a a r e n o r m a l i z e d t o a n D S r / S r v a l u e o f 0 . 1 1 9 4 a n d r e c a l c u l a t e d r e l a t i v e t o t h e NBS S r C 0 3 ( S R M 9 8 7 ) v a l u e o f 0 . 71 020+_2 a n d t h e E i m e r a n d A m e n d SrCO-^ s t a n d a r d v a l u e o f 0 . 7 0 8 0 0 + 2 . ft 7 ft ft T h e p r e c i s i o n o f a s i n g l e S r / o a S r r a t i o i s o n e s t a n d a r d d e v i a t i o n ( . 0 1 5 % ) . — 1 1 -R b - S r d a t e s a r e b a s e d o n a d e c a y c o n s t a n t o f 1 . 4 2 x 1 0 y r 

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