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Resource leveling and linear scheduling Dubey, Ashish 1993

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to the required standardRESOURCE LEVELING AND LINEAR SCHEDULINGbyASHISH DUBEYA THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OFTHE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OFMASTER OF APPLIED SCIENCEinTHE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIESDEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERINGWe accept this thesis as conformingTHE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA30 APRIL 1993ASHISH DUBEY, 1993In presenting this thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an advanced degree atthe University of British Columbia, I agree that the Library shall make it freely available forreference and study. I further agree that permission for extensive copying of this thesis forscholarly purposes may be granted by the Head of my Department or by his or herrepresentatives. It is understood that copying or publication of this thesis for financial gainshall not be allowed without my written permission.Department of Civil EngineeringThe University of British Columbia2324 Main MallVancouver, CanadaV6T 1Z4Date: 30 April 1993ABSTRACTResource leveling in the context of linear scheduling has been explored in this thesis.Multilocation projects such as high rise construction, bridges and so forth have specialcharacteristics which should be taken into account in resource leveling procedures - e.g., flowline characteristics should be maintained or a specified location execution sequence must befollowed.The Minimum Moment Algorithm for resource leveling by Harris has been used as a startingpoint to develop a modified algorithm to treat linear scheduling. Further modifications havebeen made to accommodate activities with variable resource usage profiles. The newalgorithm has been named the "Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm".The research version of the REPCON Construction management information System hasbeen used for the testing of the algorithm. The multilocation activity modeling structures ofREPCON have been used to define linear activity types. One constraint on the levelingalgorithm is that these activity types must maintain their attributes when subjected toleveling, e.g., a continuous activity must maintain free float equal to zero between itsintermediate locations and the ordered activity must follow the specified location sequence.The algorithm has been programmed and tested on several examples. Resource histogramsiiTABLE OF CONTENTSAbstract ^  iiList of Tables  viiList of Figures ^  viiiAcknowledgements  xii1 Introduction ^ 11.1 Objectives 11.2 Methodology ^ 22 Linear Scheduling^ 42.1 Introduction 42.2 The Linear Scheduling Method ^ 42.3 Linear Scheduling and Resource Leveling ^ 92.4 Resource Modeling in REPCON 153 Review of Resource Leveling Literature ^ 193.1 Introduction ^ 193.2 Burgess and Killebrew ^ 19iv3.3^Burman ^  213.4^Levy, Thompson and Weist ^  223.5^Harris ^  253.6^Easa  313.7^Antill and Woodhead^  343.8^Davis ^  393.9 Summary  404^Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm ^  414.1^Introduction     414.2^The Minimum Moment Algorithm: An Introduction ^ 414.3^The Concept of Improvement Factor ^  444.3.1 Improvement Factor for Activities withConstant Resource Usage ^  454.3.2 Improvement Factor for Activities withVariable Resource Usage^  504.4^The Concept of Back Float  644.5^Sequence Step Numbers ^  674.6^Weighting Scheme for Resources  684.7 A Brief Review of the Harris Minimum Moment Algorithm ^ 694.8^Refinements and Modifications to the BasicMinimum Moment Algorithm for Linear Schedulingand Variable Resource Usage ^  73v4.9^The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm for Resource Leveling ^ 754.9.1 Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm for Problemsinvolving Activities with Constant Resource Usage ^ 774.9.2 Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm for Problemsinvolving Activities with Variable Resource Usage ^ 835^Examples ^  886^Conclusion and Recommendations ^  141Bibliography^  144Appendix A ^  A-1Appendix B  B-1Appendix C ^  C-1Appendix D D-1Appendix E ^  E-1Appendix F  F-1Appendix G ^  G-1Appendix H H-1Appendix I ^  I-1Appendix J  J-1Appendix K ^  K-1viLIST OF TABLES2.1 Project Schedule from REPCON reporting system(for the example in Figure 2.4) ^ 132.2 Classification of Resources; Battersby (7) ^ 152.3 A tabular resource usage report from REPCON ^ 173.1 Resource levels before and after leveling (Burman)^ 243.2 Resource levels before and after leveling (Packing Method) ^ 293.3 Resource levels before and after leveling (Easa) ^ 343.4 Resource levels before and after leveling (Antill & Woodhead) ^. 36List of Figures2.1 Linear Planning Chart ^ 62.2 Linear planning chart for an activitywith one crew^ 82.3 Linear Planning chart for the same activitybut with three crews ^ 82.4 Major activity types in REPCON ^ 112.5 Linear Planning Chart from REPCON reporting system(for the example in Figure 2.4 ^ 142.6 General resource usage profile for an activity ^ 163.1 Network and Schedule for Burman's example; Burman (10) ^ 223.2 Resource histograms before and after leveling; Burman (10) 233.3 Network and Schedule for Harris Packing Method; Harris (23) ^ 283.4 Resource histograms before and after leveling; Harris (23) 303.5 Network and schedule for Easa's example; Easa (18) ^ 313.6 Resource histograms before and after leveling (Uniformhistogram criteria); Easa (18) ^ 333.7 Resource histograms before and after leveling (Min. dailyresource variation criteria); Easa (18) ^ 33viii3.8 Network and schedule for Antill & Woodhead's example;Antill & Woodhead (3) ^ 353.9 Resource levels before and after leveling- Manpower; A & W (3) ^ 373.10 Resource levels before and after leveling- Equipment A; A & W(3) ^ 373.11 Resource levels before and after leveling- Equipment B; A & W(3) ^ 384.1 Shifting activity with constant resource rate (S __ T) ^ 464.2 Shifting activity with variable resource usage profi6le (S < T) ^ 524.3 Shifting activity with variable resource usage profile ^ 595.1 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.1 ^ 905.2 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.2 925.3 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.3 ^ 945.4 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.4 965.5 Network for resource leveling with two resources - example 5.5 ^ 995.6 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Res. 1; example 5.5 ^ 1005.7 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Res 2; example 5.5 ^ 1015.8 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Res 1 +Res 2; example 5.5 ^ 1025.9 Network for resource leveling; (Clough and Sears example) ^ 1045.10 Resource histograms before and after leveling; example 5.10(Modified Minimum Moment algorithm) ^ 1055.11 Resource leveling before and after leveling; example 5.10(Cloughs and Sears approach) ^ 1065.12 Network for resource leveling; example 5.7 ^ 109ix5.13 Manual resource leveling computations for example 5.7 ^ 1105.14 Resource histograms before and after leveling; example 5.7 1115.15 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.7 ^ 1125.16 Linear planning chart for late start schedule; example 5.7 1135.17 Linear planning chart for leveled schedule; example 5.7 ^ 1145.18 Manual resource leveling computations for example 5.8 1175.19 Resource histograms before and after leveling; example 5.8 ^ 1185.20 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.8 1195.21 Linear planning chart for leveled schedule; example 5.8 ^ 1205.22 Linear planning chart for late start schedule 5.8 1215.23 Network for resource leveling with two resources; example 5.9 ^ 1235.24 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Resource 1; example 5.9 ^ 1245.25 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Resource 2; example 5.9 ^ 1255.26 Resource histograms: leveled and early start; example 5.10 ^ 1285.27 Resource histograms: leveled and late start; example 5.10 1295.28 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.10 ^ 1305.29 Linear planning chart for late start schedule; example 5.10 1315.30 Linear planning chart for resource leveled schedule; example 5.10 ^ 1325.31 Linear planning chart for resource leveled schedule; example 5.10(after four iterations) ^ 1335.32 Resource histograms: leveled and early start; example 5.11 ^ 1365.33 Resource histograms: leveled and late start; example 5.11 137x5.34 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.11 ^ 1385.35 Linear planning chart for late start schedule; example 5.11  1395.36 Linear planning chart for leveled schedule; example 5.11 ^  140)dACKNOWLEDGEMENTSI express my sincere gratitude to Dr. A. D. Russell, for his guidance during the course of thisstudy. I greatly appreciate his efforts and time in reviewing this thesis and the valuablesuggestions to improve the content. My thanks are extended to Dr. W. F. Caselton and Dr.T. M. Froese for reviewing this thesis.xiiChapter 1INTRODUCTION1.1 OBJECTIVESThe primary objective of this thesis is to explore resource leveling in the context of linearscheduling. Multilocation activities (as found in repetitive construction) require specialconsideration in resource leveling operations. For example, if it is desired to havemultilocation activities exhibit flow line characteristic or to follow a given location sequence,then in the leveled schedule these attributes should be reflected in the respective activities.Therefore, the objective is to produce a leveling procedure that is applicable to linearscheduling. The second objective of this thesis is that the leveling procedure must have thecapability to handle activities with both constant and variable resource usage over theirdurations. The leveling procedure should also be able to deal with multiple resources.As a first step, an overview of linear scheduling and resource leveling is presented in chapter2. As the next step, various leveling procedures currently available in the literature havebeen investigated and their review is presented in chapter 3. The Minimum MomentAlgorithm for resource leveling by Harris (22) has been reviewed in chapter 4 and has beentaken as the starting point for further development to accomplish the objectives of thisthesis. Thus in this thesis the concept of Minimum Moment Algorithm has been developedfurther to enhance its ability to deal with a wider variety of problems including LinearScheduling. The modified and extended Minimum Moment Algorithm for resource levelingChapter I. Introduction^ 2has been named the "Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm".1.2 METHODOLOGYThe basic Minimum Moment Algorithm assumes that activities have a constant resourceusage rate over their durations. The algorithm has been extended to treat activities withvariable resource usage profiles. This objective has been achieved by formulating anexpression for the computation of "Improvement Factors" for activities with variable resourceusage profiles. This expression has been derived in chapter 4.The research version of the REPCON Construction Management Information System, whichincludes an implementation of linear scheduling, has been used as a test bed for thealgorithm developed in this thesis.Linear Scheduling in REPCON is accomplished through its activity modeling structureswhich are specially designed for this purpose. Shadow, Ordered and Continuous activitytypes form the foundation and body of these modeling structures. Each of these activitytypes has its own attributes. It is important while shifting a multilocation activity for thepurpose of resource leveling, that it maintain its attributes, e.g., flow line behaviour mustbe maintained, the free float must remain zero for the intermediate locations of a continuousactivity, and the individual locations of an ordered activity must follow the specified locationexecution sequence. Thus, each of these activity types should be treated differently whenshifting them. This issue has been addressed in the algorithm proposed.Chapter I. Introduction^ 3The algorithm has been programmed in the C programming language. It has been appliedto a number of examples for validation purposes and to explore the behaviour of linearschedules that are subject to resource leveling. For the former, several examples correspondto ones found in the literature, although no linear scheduling examples were found. For thelatter, manual resource leveling computations have been worked out for two linearscheduling examples to verify the accuracy of the computer code. Other larger scale linearplanning example are also included to explore the behavior of resource leveling as appliedto linear scheduling.+Chapter 2LINEAR SCHEDULING2.1 INTRODUCTIONThe primary purpose of this thesis is to explore resource leveling as it applies to linearscheduling. The linear planning chart is a very powerful way of presenting schedules forprojects which are repetitive or cyclic in nature. Its importance increases when it is used toanalyze the movement of crews and resources from one location to another. Therefore, itis a very direct way of assessing how efficiently resources are being utilized in a project.Description of traditional scheduling methods like bar chart and network analysis haveappeared many times in the literature [Antill (3), Fondahl (20), Kelley (27), Moder (32)],but the linear scheduling method still is not well understood. The purpose of this chapteris to provide a brief explanation of the linear scheduling method in order to develop a clearunderstanding of it and then relate it to REPCON (see section 2.3) for the purpose ofresource modeling and leveling.2.2 THE LINEAR SCHEDULING METHODLinear scheduling method is best suited for those type of projects which involve therepetition of activities such as in road construction, tunnelling operations, high-rise buildingconstruction or pipeline works. But what makes CPM scheduling undesirable for repetitiveprojects? In his paper, Carr (13) identifies two criteria to be met by a project in order thatCPM scheduling may be applied successfully:Chapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 51) The number of activities is commensurate with the complexity of the project; and2) The activities have clear dependencies which define the progress required throughto project completion.For many projects with repetitive activities, the first criterion does not apply. The quantumof activities involved is often very large and the resulting network turns out to be verycomplex in contrast to the simple unit network.The second condition may not be fulfilled for repetitive construction because in many casesit is hard to justify the dependencies between the activities of one unit and another. Intheory, any unit may succeed the ongoing one if the non-construction restraints are relaxed.However, many of the relationships between units flow from logistical considerations whichcan have a significant influence on overall productivity. Thus the order in which work mayflow from one unit to another is highly variable and depends on management decisionsrather than any logical relationship amongst activities between units. Thus, these reasonsmake CPM scheduling and monitoring awkward for treating repetitive operations.In the linear scheduling method, the schedule is presented in the form of a linear planningchart. The linear planning chart consists of two axes, one for time and the other for location(or distance or unit number, etc.). The activities are plotted against these two axes. Anactivity may have a constant slope over all locations meaning that the production rateremains constant, i.e., each location takes the same amount of time for execution. If the5421Chapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 6slope changes, then work is not progressing at the same rate at different locations. If the lineis not continuous, then work interruptions occur between locations, and the crews are notgetting continuous work for that activity. An example linear planning chart is shown inFigure 2.1. It shows a construction project involving 8 activities in each location with a totalof 5 locations requiring 86 days for project completion. The activities "clear and grade site"and "lay blocks" are examples of activities with a constant rate of production. For activity"deliver blocks", the production rate changes from location to location. For activities "layoutfootings" and "dig footings", work interruptions occur between locations signifying that crewsare not getting continuous work.10^20^30^40^50^60^70^80^90Time (days)Figure 2.1 Linear planning chartProperly planning repetitive work will significantly improve on work productivity and thuson cost. With the objectives of maintaining a constant and continuous rate of work for anyChapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 7repetitive activity, resources (equipment, labor, etc.) can be mobilized efficiently with littleor no idle time. Also, hiring and firing situations which are typical of unplanned and non-repetitive works are minimized. In addition, significant increases in productivity may begained by learning curve effects while work progresses from location to location.In their paper, Arditi and Albulak (5) define the "natural rhythm" as the optimum rate ofoutput for any activity that a crew of optimum size can produce. Examples of this could beexpressed as number of locations completed per day per crew or number of units made perday per crew. If the actual production rate of crews being used is not an exact multiple ofthe natural rhythm then there will be periods of inactivity for the respective crews from timeto time over the project duration. Therefore, the need arises of employing and deploying thenumber of crews in such a way that their rate of production (a multiple of natural rhythm)matches the required rate of production. For example, for a repetitive activity, consideringits logical relationship with other activities, if the required rate of production is 9 locationsper day and the natural rhythm of the crew is 3 locations per day then the number of crewsneeded will be 3. The above can be illustrated through the example shown in Figure 2.2.Suppose the natural rhythm for an activity is 3 locations per day and the number of crewsemployed is 1, then the actual rate of production will be 3 locations per day as shown inFigure 2.2. If the number of crews is increased to 3 then the actual rate of production wouldincrease to 9 locations per day as shown in Figure 2.3.crew 1 Icrew 1crew 1Crewcrew 1crewcrewcrew 1crew 1Chapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 8987c0 51J 4—I321061^2^3Time, t in daysFigure 2.2 Linear planning chart for an activity with one crewActual rate of production is 3 locations/day40^1^2^3^4Time, t in daysFigure 2.3 Linear planning chart for the same activity but with three crewsActual rate of production is 9 locations/dayChapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 9The other major advantages derived from the linear scheduling method are as follows. Thesimple way in which the linear planning chart conveys detailed information aids sitepersonnel to execute the work in an efficient manner without being loaded down by excessnumerical data as often happens in traditional CPM network scheduling. Project monitoringusing the linear planning chart while work is in progress can be very convenient andintelligible. It is quite easy for the project manager and other site personnel to analyze,understand and appreciate the linear planning chart and then to implement the workaccordingly or to suggest any changes if need be. Using the linear planning chart, it is easyto know the resource spreadout over the project duration. If resource buildup occurs atcertain periods over the project duration then the corresponding activities may be shiftedin their float period in order to get a leveled resource profile for the project. Thus theobjectives of smooth flow of work and smooth consumption of resources can be achievedby making necessary changes in the linear planning chart.2.3 LINEAR SCHEDULING AND RESOURCE LEVELINGTo date, the only known mathematically based and computerized implementation of linearscheduling has been developed by Russell (39) and Russell and Wong (40). No referenceshave been found in the literature dealing with the topic of resource leveling in the contextof linear scheduling. Hence, the goal of this thesis is to address this topic. The researchversion of the REPCON Construction Management Information System has been used asan environment for testing a leveling algorithm. This approach has allowed me to takeadvantage of the activity modeling structures and reporting capabilities of REPCON. Here,Chapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 10I describe briefly the modelling structures and give a simple example which is used later inthe resource leveling work. The major activity types which may be defined in REPCON are:1) Ordered activity,2) Continuous activity,3) Shadow activity, and4) Hammock activity.Management may preassign a certain location sequence that an activity must follow as workprogresses, although interruptions are permitted. Such an activity can be treated using theordered activity type. This activity type is also used for modeling cyclic work patterns - e.g.,for two activities A and B, B at location i is a successor to A at location i, and B at locationi is a predecessor to A at location i+1. A continuous activity type is used to ensure acontinuous flow of work from location to location without involving any interruption in time,unless specified. For the multi-location activity for which the location sequence isunimportant the shadow activity type is used. The hammock activity type is used to spanseveral activities - its production rate is determined from its predecessor and successorrelationships.We illustrate the use of these activity types through a simple example shown in Figure 2.4.The example consists of 6 activities. Activity number 1 is the start milestone. The secondactivity A is a shadow activity which occurs at 4 locations. It can be represented by activitiesA1 , A2, A3, and A4 at locations 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, to correspond to a traditional5 10450 [ 5A2 I 310A5 1064 10early start date early finish dateCritical path17 21Continuous activitylocation B4 12 activity number4 10Start00 00105 10duration^number of resourcesSample activity27 133C4115 6 1 10-1110-17 [ 21 21 25 33 33D1 11 ^ D2 14 Rash 164 10 4 10 0 0[ , A2 , A3 , A4] — Shadow activity[ B1 , B2 , B 3, B 4] -- Ordered activity[ c, , C2 , C3, C4 — Ordered activity[ D t , 02 ] — Continuous activityFigure 2.4 Major activity types in REPCONI.Chapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 12CPM representation. The third activity, activity B, is an ordered activity occurring at 4locations - B1, B2, B3, and B4 at locations 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The fourth activity,activity C, is also an ordered activity occurring at 4 locations - C 1 , C2, C3, and C4 at locations1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The fifth activity, activity D, is a continuous activity which occursat locations - D 1 and D2 at locations 1 and 2, respectively. The sixth activity is a finishmilestone. Table 2.1 shows the project schedule and Figure 2.5 shows the Linear PlanningChart for early start schedule as presented by the REPCON reporting system. Activitynumbers have been assigned to each location of an activity in Figure 2.4 - e.g., A3corresponds to activity 4.Resource leveling is accomplished by shifting activities in their float periods. Usually, shadowactivities have a fair amount of float associated with them making them a good candidatefor shifting. For a continuous activity, all its locations move as an unit. Therefore, theintermediate locations of a continuous activity are not independent and are devoid of freefloats. Thus the shifting and leveling of a continuous activity as a whole is possible only whenits last location has positive float. Individual locations of an ordered activity will always havesome float time associated with them if they are not critical. Thus the ordered activities arealso candidates for shifting and leveling operations.It should be noted that projects amenable to flow line modeling loose potential for resourceleveling because flow lines tend to limit the amount of float. For a continuous activity, thenext location must follow the ongoing one immediately upon its completion.Table 2.1 Project schedule from REPCON reporting system (for the example in Figure 2.4)UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABMajor Activi ty Types in Repcon — Chapter 2ACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONLOCATIONLOC^DESCRIPTIONEARLY^LATE^SCHEDULED^ACTUAL^SCHED^ACT.^TOTAL^EXTRASTART^FINISH^START^FINISH^START^FINISH^START^FINISH^DUB^DUB^FLOAT^FLOAT* G00100 Activity A 1 Location 1 011WI93 05MAR93 010111193 05MAR93 5 N/A N/AG00100 Activity A 2 Location 2 01MAR93 05MAR93 07MAR93 11MAR93 5 N/A N/AG00100 Activity AG00100 Activity A3 Location 34 Location 401MAR93 05MAR93 13MAR93 17MAR9301MAR93 05MAR93 19MAR93 23MAR935511N/AN/A11N/AN/A* G00200 Activity B 1 Location 1 06MAR93 09MAR93 06MAR93 09MAR93 4 N/A N/AG00200 Activity B 2 Location 2 10MAR93 13t 1193 12MAR93 15MAR93 4 N/A N/A600200 Activity B 3 Location 3 14MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 21MAR93 4 N/A N/AG00200 Activity B 4 Location 4 111MAI193 21MAR93 24MAR93 27MAR93 4 N/A N/A* G00300 Activity C 1 Location 1 10MAR93 15MAR93 10MAR93 15MAR93 6 N/A N/A* G00300 Activity C 2 Location 2 16MAR93 21MAR93 16MAR93 21MAR93 6 N/A N/AN G00300 Activity C 3 Location 3 22MAR93 27MAR93 22MAR93 27MA893 6 N/A N/A* G00300 Activity C 4 Location 4 28MAR93 02APR93 20MAR93 02APR93 6 N/A N/AG00400 Activity D 1 Location 1 1EIMAII93 21M11893 26MAR93 29MAR93 4 0 0G80400 Activity D 2 Location 2 2711AR93 25MAA93 30MAR93 02APR93 4 0 0* G00500 Project Start 1 Location 1 01MAR93 N/A NI N/ N/A N/ N/AN G00600 Project Finish 4 Location 4 OZAPR93^O2APR93 [02APR93] N/A N/ 1 N/A^I I N/ALIST OF DATESFile Used: D:\REP200\PROJ19\TWO^ + ^ Report Date: 24APR93Revision No:^0 I * critical activity^P activity has procurement sequence^ Report Tine: 11:52:20ZT percent time^II estimated actual Finish, float and duration I Progress Date: -None-Select: All activities^ 4 Schedule Window: Fran 01MAR93Sort: by Activity Code To 02APR93Page 1UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABFile Used 0 \REP200\PROJ19\TWOSelect . All ActivitiesSort'^Start DateDate Selection' Act/Sch/EarlySchedule WindowTime: 01MAR93 To 02APR93Locations:^1 To^4KEY^w Critical Activity^p Activity has procurement sequenceMajor Activity Types in Repcon — Chapter 2LINEAR PLANNING CHART ACTIVITY INDEX^ Report Date:^24APR93Report Time:^11:49:17Progress Date:Revision Number: 0c Completed^Activity Types: 0 Ordered, C Continuous, S Shadow, H Hammock, SM Start Milestone, FM Finish Milestoneu ,011.REPCON—Page 2 U 2N1Colc)„coACode Type DescriptionG00500 SM Project StartM^ 2O000100 S Activity ACode Type DescriptionG00200^0 Activity BG00300^0 Activity CCode Type Description0 G00400 C Activity D® GOOBOO FM Project FinishComment:LOCN DESCRIPTION4 Location 43 Location 32 Location 21 Location 1Ei1993MARCH15^22 29A--— ' _.------17_-----"- . . .............„......„„..../." ,_,-----"-F........---------3 (5------------7-4^58 15^22MARCH199329AFigure 2.5 Linear Planning Chart from REPCON reporting system (for the example in Figure 2.4)I.Chapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 15Therefore, for the intermediate locations of a continuous activity, float is reduced to zero,leaving no scope for them to get shifted independently. The individual locations of orderedactivity may have floats associated with them. However, the mutual interdependency ofindividual locations of the ordered activity and the condition imposed on them that theyfollow a given location execution sequence tends to limit the associated floats. Thus, the flowlines by themselves tend to spread the resources over time, but simultaneously they reducethe further shifting and reshifting opportunities of activities by limiting their float times.2.4 RESOURCE MODELING IN REPCONTable 2.2 adopted from Battersby (7) gives one classification of the major types of resourceswhich a project planner is likely to consider. Four major classes of resources have beenTable 2.2 Classification of Resources; Battersby (7)Money as a common measure Difficult toevaluateMen Machines Material MiscellaneousUnskilled^Semi-^SkilledskilledDirect^ServiceReturnableand non-returnableCapitalSpaceArtificial, e.g.,safety, timerestrictions,locationCasual^Permanent^Trades,depart-mentsor otherdistinctionsOwned or hiredMobile or restricted to one locationOn day work, overtime, bonus workor shift workChapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 16identified and are subsequently divided into subclasses. Major class of resources are:1) Men,2) Machines,3) Materials, and4) Miscellaneous.This classification is given only to enhance the understanding on the issue of resource typesand is not unique.30 ->. 25 -RS0 20 _a)m 15 —10 -54^6^8^10^12^14^16^18^20^22^24^26^28II II I 1 I 1^A l^A 2^ A 3^A4Location and DurationFigure 2.6 General resource usage profile for an activityTo support the work described in this thesis, a reasonably rich resource modeling capabilitywas incorporated into the experimental version of REPCON. A resource can belong to aTable 2.3 A tabular resource usage report from REPCONcoREPCONT“co1c)coit(XIUBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABTEST PROJECT FOR THESIS - EXTENDEDRESOURCE USAGE REPORTFile Used: D:\REP200\PROJ10\ASHONEReport Period: 01MAR93 - 1EIJUN93Selected Resources. All Project Activities.TEST 1Report Date: 13APR93Report Time: 28:11:18Progress Date:Revision Number: 8••CLASS/SUBCLASS/RESOURCE^DAILY/CUMULATIVE RESOURCE USAGE•^Resource: LABOURERS^•01MAR93 02MAR93 03MAR93 84MAR93 85MAR93 0003 07MAR93 08MAR93 09MAR93 10MAR93 11MAR93 121111193 13MAR93 1003 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 19MAR93 28MAR93 21MAR93Usage: Rate Unit: MEN/DAY ES - Daily 14.00^14.88^14.00^38.00^38.08^38.60^36.88^66.60^66.00^66.88^66.00^66.00^81.88^81.00^81.80^76.00^76.08^76.00^76.00^76.80^76.00Logistics: Cumulative 14.00^28.88^42.00^80.08^118.80^156.80^192.08^258.08^324.08^398.88^456.08^522.08^603.08^684.80^765.08^841.00^917.00^993.00 1069.00 1145.88 1221.00Used to level: No Weight:^1.88 LS - Daily 14.08^14.80^14.00^24.08^24.00^24.00^38.00^44.08^44.88^54.00^54.00^54.00^51.00^57.80^57.08^69.88^69.08^69.00^51.00^57.00^57.80Cumulative 14.00^28.08^42.00^66.00^90.88^114.00^152.08^196.00^240.88^294.68^348.08^402.88^453.08^518.80^567.08^636.08^705.00^774.80^825.80^882.00^939.00AL - Daily 14.00^14.00^14.08^38.00^38.80^38.00^36.80^66.80^66.80^66.00^66.08^66.80^69.80^69.00^69.00^78.00^78.00^78.00^76.00^76.80^76.00Cumulative 14.80^28.80^42.00^WOO^118.08^156.80^192.00^258.08^324.60^390.00^456.80^522.08^591.08^668.00^729.08^887.08^885.00^963.80 1039.88 1115.08 1191.88221111193 23MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 311111193 81APR93 82APR93 03093 84APR93 05APR93 86APR93 07093 08APA93 09APR93 10APA93 11APR93ES - Daily 76.80^76.00^76.88^76.88^76.80^76.08^73.00^73.00^73.00^71.00^71.00^66.00^66.80^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.80^66.00^63.80^63.80^63.80Cumulative 1297.00 1373.00 1449.00 1525.00 1601.80 1677.00 1758.80 1823.00 1896.00 1967.00 2038.00 2104.00 2170.00 2236.00 2302.08 2368.00 2434.00 2500.80 2563.00 2626.08 2689.00LS - Daily 66.88^66.80^66.00^48.08^57.80^57.80^66.80^66.80^66.00^46.00^55.00^55.00^66.00^66.88^66.08^46.80^50.08^50.80^58.00^58.00^58.08Cumulative 1085.80 1071.00 1137.00 1185.00 1242.88 1299.80 1365.00 1431.08 1497.00 1543.00 1598.08 1653.00 1719.80 1785.08 1851.80 1897.00 1947.00 1997.00 2055.00 2113.00 2171.80AL - Daily 76.00^76.08^76.88^66.00^66.08^66.00^73.80^73.00^73.00^63.00^63.00^68.80^68.08^68.80^68.00^68.08^68.80^58.00^55.08^55.00^55.00Cumulative 1267.00 1343.88 1419.00 1485.80 1551.00 1617.80 1698.80 1763.00 1836.80 1899.80 1962.88 2830.80 2098.80 2166.88 2234.08 2302.00 2378.08 2428.08 2483.80 2538.88 2593.0012APR93 13APR93 14093 15APR93 16AP1193 17APR93 18APR93 19APA93 20APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 ZDAPF193 29APR93 38APR93 01MAY93 02MAY93ES - Daily 58.08^58.00^58.00^60.00^60.80^68.00^60.00^60.80^68.00^57.00^57.00^57.00^57.00^57.00^57.00^52.00^52.00^52.00^42.00^42.80^42.00Cumulative 2747.08 2805.00 2863.00 2923.00 2983.00 3043.00 3183.80 3163.00 3223.06 3280.08 3337.00 3394.88 3451.88 3588.00 3565.00 3617.80 3669.00 3721.80 3763.00 3885.00 3847.00LS - Daily 38.00^45.08^45.00^53.08^53.08^53.00^38.00^45.00^45.00^53.00^53.00^53.00^38.00^45.80^45.08^50.00^58.08^58.00^33.00^43.88^43.80Cumulative 2209.00 2254.00 2299.80 2352.80 2405.80 2458.80 2496.00 2541.00 2586.88 2639.00 2692.88 2745.00 2783.00 2828.08 2873.00 2923.08 2973.00 3023.88 3056.00 3099.00 3142.08AL - Daily 58.00^43.00^43.00^58.08^50.00^50.00^58.00^43.88^43.00^43.88^50.80^58.00^58.00^50.88^43.80^38.80^38.80^42.00^42.00^42.08^42.00Cumulative 2651.00 2694.80 2737.00 2787.00 2837.80 2887.80 2937.08 2980.08 3023.80 3066.00 3116.00 3166.80 3216.80 3266.00 3309.08 3347.00 3305.08 3427.08 3469.08 3511.00 3553.0083MAY93 84MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 07MAY93 08MAY93 09MAY93 10MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY93ES - Daily 35.88^35.8035.80^35.08^35.00^35.08^35.00^35.80^35.80^30.00^25.88^25.88^25.08^25.80^25.80^25.00^25.00^25.00^25.88^5.00^5.80Cumulative 3882.80 3917.00 3952.08 3987.00 4022.00 4057.00 4892.00 4127.00 4162.08 4192.00 4217.00 4242.00 4267.80 4292.00 4317.08 4342.80 4367.00 4392.88 4417.00 4422.80 4427.08LS - Daily 50.80^50.08^50.00^33.00^38.00^38.00^45.08^45.08^53.80^28.00^33.00^37.00^45.00^45.00^45.00^17.00^45.80^45.00^45.00^37.08^37.88Cumulative 3192.86 3242.00 3292.00 3325.80 3363.80 3401.00 3446.00 3491.80 3544.08 3572.80 3605.08 3642.80 3687.08 3732.08 3777.80 3794.00 3839.00 3884.80 3929.80 3966.00 4803.88AL - Daily 38.00^38.00^38.80^42.00^42.08^42.00^42.00^38.00^38.80^33.80^37.08^37.88^37.00^37.00^25.00^25.00^25.00^25.00^25.00^20.88^20.00Cumulative 3591.00 3629.00 3667.00 3709.88 3751.00 3793.80 3835.80 3873.80 3911.00 3944.80 3981.80 4818.00 4055.80 4092.00 4117.80 4142.00 4167.00 4192.00 4217.00 4237.00 4257.8824MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 81JUN93 82JUM93 83J1193 04JUN93 05JUN93 86JUM93 87JUM93 88,111N93 09JUN93 10JUN93ES - Daily 5.80^5.00^5.08^5.00^5.88^5.00^5.00^5.00^5.80^5.80^5.00^5.00^5.80^5.00^5.80^5.00^5.08^5.00Cumulative 4432.08 4437.00 4442.08 4447.80 4452.00 4457.00 4462.88 4467.08 4472.08 4477.00 4482.08 4487.00 4492.00 4497.08 4502.88 4507.80 4512.80 4517.80LS - Daily 17.00^37.08^30.80^40.80^40.08^40.80^20.08^48.08^40.88^40.08^40.00^40.80^15.80^15.88^15.00^15.00^15.00^15.00Cumulative 4020.80 4057.08 4087.08 4127.00 4167.00 4287.08 4227.00 4267.80 4387.00 4347.88 4387.80 4427.00 4442.80 4457.08 4472.00 4487.00 4502.08 4517.00AL - Daily 20.00^10.00^10.80^18.00^10.00^10.08^20.00^20.80^15.00^15.80^15.00^15.80^15.80^15.80^15.00^15.00^15.80^15.00Cumulative 4277.00 4287.00 4297.88 4307.08 4317.08 4327.00 4347.00 4367.08 4382.80 4397.00 4412.08 4427.80 4442.00 4457.00 4472.88 4487.00 4502.00 4517.80•  Chapter 2. Linear Scheduling^ 18subclass and a class (e.g., a rough terrain 40 ton crane can belong to the subclass "crane"which in turn belong to the class, "equipment"). Variable resource usage profiles can beattached to an activity - different rates from location to location, and a variable rate at alocation. See Figure 2.6 for a hypothetical resource usage profile for a continuous activity.Resource can be aggregated (providing they have the same usage units - e.g., men/day) andleveling can be performed for individual or aggregated resource profiles.A tabular resource usage report (see Table 2.3) was incorporated as well as the ability toexport an ASCII file. File output was used to generate the resource usage profiles at theproject level shown elsewhere in the thesis.f elChapter 3REVIEW OF RESOURCE LEVELING LITERATURE3.1 INTRODUCTIONIn this chapter, I present a brief review of the literature on resource leveling for networkbased scheduling. Emphasis is placed on methods which are applicable to practical-sizedprojects. Presentation and extension of the Minimum Moment Algorithm by Harris (22) isfound in Chapter 4.3.2 BURGESS AND KILLEBREWThe method by Burgess and Killebrew (9) for resource leveling is introduced first. Thismethod is particularly noteworthy for this thesis because the criterion to measureeffectiveness of resource utilization, which is "the sum of the squares of resourcerequirements" for each period over the project duration, has also been adopted by Harris(22) for the Minimum Moment Algorithm - see Chapter 4. With the minimization ofvariance of the daily resource demands over the project duration, the peaks and valleys areleveled and the sum of the squares of daily resource demand decreases. The objective of thisleveling procedure is to shift the activities in their float periods in such a way that the sumof the squares of the daily resource demands over the project duration is minimized. Themethod applies to constant resource usage over the activity duration.To begin with, an early start schedule is prepared for the network and slack or float valuesChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 20are computed for each activity. Activities are listed in the order of precedence by arrangingthe arrow heads or node numbers in ascending order. If two or more activities have thearrow head numbers tied then the activities are listed in such a way that the arrow tailnumbers also follow the above rule. This ensures a unique ranking because all activities arerequired to have a unique i-j designation. The shifting procedure commences with the lastactivity and with the calculation of the respective total sum of squares of resourcerequirements for each day of the activity's possible shift. The activity being considered isshifted to the time location which gives the least sum of squares. If the sums so obtained arethe same for two or more locations then the activity is positioned in the location which givesthe maximum shift. The early start date and early finish date of the shifted activity areupdated as well as the float values of those activities which are affected due to the shift. Theprocedure is repeated until the first activity is reached. During this cycle if there has beenany improvement then the above procedure is repeated once again. In this way the abovecycle is iterated until no further improvement in the total sum of squares of resourcerequirements is achieved. The schedule thus obtained represents a leveled resource profile.The disadvantage of this approach is that a resource buildup occurs at the end of theproject. The procedure does not position activities in a way so as to obtain an optimumsolution, although this may happen by chance. To get the optimum solution, alternateschedules have to be obtained using a different order of activities for shifting. The numberof these alternate schedules will be large even for small projects rendering the approach animpractical one. Alternatives to the sequence of the leveling steps have been suggested byChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 21the authors in order to approach optimum results. One suggestion is to start the procedurewith the first activity instead of the last one and proceeding to the last activity, utilizing theavailable free floats. In the second and the subsequent cycles, activities may be moved bothto the right or left in order to attain the best solution. Another suggestion is to use total floatas the range of the activity shift.The example discussed by the authors is for activities in a cyclical sequence. It has thereforenot been included.3.3 BURMANBurman (10), in his book presents a method for resource leveling which also minimizes thetotal sum of squares of resource requirements. While the Burgess-Killebrew approach usesfree float as the limit of the activity shift, Burman's approach uses total float as themaximum activity shift criterion. It should be noted that Burgess and Killebrew suggestedin their paper that this change could be tried out. The leveling operation is performed aftermaking the resource allocation based on the resource availability. Therefore, the initialresource profile at the start of the leveling operation may not necessarily be the early startprofile.The example network shown in Figure 3.1 has been discussed in his book. The networkschedule and the resource details are shown in the figure itself. The initial and leveledresource profile are given in Table 3.1 and in Figure 3.2. It should be noted in this exampleduration1 early finish time2 1 5 1 7E 6 3 1 0 1 8f^fearly start timelate start time late finish time61^1 1 7C 9resourcesSample activity111 4 1127 1 4 111 111 3114 151 0 115Finish 13F 10 0.- 0 12151 01 151110,...,0 1 1^1 1 1 1 3 i 4 101 5 11514 KJ^8 11614 1 7 7 1 5 110 101 2115 2 1 4 110ii..1 218110HH 70 1 2 1 2D 32 1 5 1 7E a2 1 4 1 60 1 2 1 2A 2 El 57 1 o 1115 1 3 1 70 1 6 1 2 \ 1101,■ 3 1 0 1 8 8 1 2 112 1210 150 1 01 0Start 10 1 0 1 0Critical path^activity numberChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 22that the initial resource profile is not the early start resource profile but is the one obtainedafter making resource allocation.Figure 3.1.1 Network and Schedule for Burman's example, Burman (10).3.4 LEVY, THOMPSON AND WEISTLevy, Thompson and Weist (45) proposed a resource smoothing program which wasoriginally programmed for leveling manpower in naval shipyards. However, the method hasgeneral applicability including the construction industry. The method is a multi-project3 4 5 6 1110 12 13 14^159R8• 70u 654▪ 3t107^8."Meet cloy:^ before leveling critical resources1^2after levelingFigure 3.2 Resource histograms before and after leveling; Burman (10)t•JChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 24Table 3.1 Resource levels before and after leveling (Burman)Project Day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Daily Resource AggregatesBefore Leveling9 9 8 4 4 9 9 9Daily Resource AggregatesAfter Leveling6 9 7 8 4 9 9 9Project Day 9 10 11 12 13 14 15Daily Resource AggregatesBefore Leveling6 6 6 4 2 2 2Daily Resource AggregatesAfter Leveling6 6 4 6 2 2 2leveling procedure. For each project, activities are deemed to start at their early start datesand their float values are established. A resource profile is then generated for each project.The next step is to set the "trigger levels" one resource unit below the peak requirementsin each project and then reschedule the jobs so that peak requirements in all projects dropbelow the trigger level. After shifting, if the trigger levels are not exceeded for all projects,and time intervals, then the trigger level is dropped further and the process is repeated untilthe shift of some activity causes the resource level to exceed the trigger level. The activitieson this peak day are examined, and ones without floats are dropped from consideration forChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 25shifting. From the remaining, one is picked at random and rescheduled to a point beyondthe peak day. The schedule is then updated for the following activities.If, during the process, it becomes impossible to reduce the peak below the trigger levels inone or more projects, then the former set of trigger levels is recalled and the trigger levelsare examined independently for each project starting with the project utilising the mostexpensive resource. The trigger levels for this project are reduced one unit at a time untilfurther reduction is impossible. Then the next most expensive resource is examined and theprocedure repeated. This is done for all projects until no further reduction of the triggerlevel is possible, thus leading to a final schedule.The above procedure is repeated a number of times, using a random choice step in thealgorithm. This way a set of schedules with different leveled profiles will be obtained fromwhich the best solution can be chosen. Thus, optimal results cannot always be produced andthe effectiveness of the method is problem dependent, varying with the amount of activityfloats and the number of non-critical activities in the network. They do not discuss anyexample in their book.3.5 HARRISThe Packing Method for resource leveling by Harris (23) approaches the problem by firstconsidering a base histogram comprised of critical activities and then arranging the non-critical activities over the base histogram in such a way so as to get a project minimumChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 26resource histogram, defined as the resource histogram with minimum moment. However, thisminimum moment of the histogram is not the absolute minimum because the proceduredoes not necessarily place the activities so as to get an optimized resource profile. Theprocedure is based on a few heuristic rules which are used to make a priority list of activitieswhich are candidates for assignment. This priority list is called a "processing queue" and theactivities are selected for assignment, one by one, based on their order in the processingqueue. The heuristic rules adopted for constructing a processing queue are,1) select first the activity with the greatest resource rate 'r',2) if tied, select the activity with the smallest total float,3) if still tied, select the activity with the greatest sequence step number,4) if still tied, select an activity at random.The packing algorithm assumes constant resource usage across the activity duration. Thedecrease in the moment of the histogram is directly proportional to the resource rate 'r' ofthe activity. Assuming other factors remain the same, when two or more activities withdifferent resource rates compete for a particular position, then the activity with the greatestresource rate gives the greatest reduction in the histogram moment. The total float of anactivity also represents the total float of the activity chain to which it belongs. Thus, if theinitial activity in a chain is assigned first, then it would decrease the total float of the chainby the amount of float it consumes. This would decrease the possible assignment positionsof the later activities in the chain. To prevent this from happening, the activity at a latersequence step is selected first for assignment, if the resource rate and the total float of theactivities under consideration are tied. Thus, when the later activity in the chain is positionedChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 27first then the activities preceding it would retain certain amounts of float which will dependupon the float consumed by the activity being positioned.Thus, the assignment procedure starts with the activity with the greatest resource rate 'r'. Forthe candidate activity, all of its possible assignments are identified, including the maximumshift to the activity's late finish date. For each assignment, the histogram ordinates to whichthe activity's resource rate are added are summed up. The number of elements of thehistogram to be summed is equal to the number of unassigned days in the duration of theactivity (equal to the number of days after the early finish date to be occupied by theactivity). The sum of the histogram ordinates for each of the preceding activity's futureassignment are calculated. The minimum of these sums is the penalty contributed by thepreceding activity for making the particular assignment of the activity under consideration.In a similar way the penalty contributed by preceding activities is calculated for each possibleassignment of the activity under consideration. Similarly, the penalty contributed by thesucceeding activities is calculated for each possible assignment of the activity underconsideration.For each possible assignment of an activity the sum of the histogram ordinates and penaltiescontributed by all preceding and succeeding activities are summed up. The minimum ofthese sums points to the assignment to be made for the activity. If two or more of thesesums are equal then the activity is assigned so that it retains the maximum amount of float.With the activity's assignment accomplished the histogram ordinates are updated. The aboveprocedure is repeated for all activities in the processing queue.185 1_ i 0 1 2222 17 1 89117early start date early finish datei 12^1 65 ...— activItYnumber4^1 4duration^number ofresourcesSample activityt t010 ^Start 1 0 1 0  —7 111 -O. 15 116^► Finish 12—1110.- 1 r 2104110 115r 3122O1 434 f 14110718O114^b.1IChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 286188 1 8 Critical pathFigure 3.3 Network and Schedule for Harris's Packing Method, Harris (23)The order of activities in the processing queue will affect the end results and also theefficiency of the leveling operation. As mentioned previously, the total float for any activityis equal to the total float of the chain of activities to which it belongs. Thus if a precedingactivity in the chain gets shifted then it affects the total floats of succeeding activities.Therefore, if in the priority list, the first few activities are those which occupy earlierpositions in the various chains or network and if they are assigned first, this assignment willreduce the total float of activities in the respective chains. This reduced total float ofsucceeding activities also reduces shifting opportunities, affecting the potential forChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 29improvement of the histogram moment. From the above it can be concluded that reasonableresults can be expected only when, in the processing queue, the activities from the later partof chains are placed at a lower position when compared to the earlier activities in the chains.Therefore, the efficiency of this method for resource leveling is largely problem dependent.The example network shown in the Figure 3.3 was presented by Harris (23). The networkschedule and the resource details are shown in the figure itself. The initial and resourceleveled profiles are given in Table 3.2 and in Figure 3.4.Table 3.2 Resource levels before and after leveling (Packing Method)Project Day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Daily Resource AggregatesBefore Leveling7 9 11 11 16 16 12 6Daily Resource AggregatesAfter Leveling7 9 7 7 10 10 10 6Project Day 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16Daily Resource AggregatesBefore Leveling6 6 3 1 1 1 1 2Daily Resource AggregatesAfter Leveling6 6 5 7 7 7 3 21^2^3^4^5^6^7^8^9^10^11^12^13^14^15^16. . . . .day;after leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 3.4 Resource histograms before and after leveling; Harris (23)3 1 4^ir. E 61 1 23^1 i 2 1 1 2132D 41 1 42 1 5B 5 3 1 6.410.,____5_ j_._.Finish 7o I 03140 1 0Start 1 0 1 0012A 2 211001 1Chapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 313.6 EASAEasa (18) formulated an integer linear optimization model for resource leveling whichguarantees the optimal leveling for the assumptions made. They include the requirement thatactivities not be split. The procedure is for a single resource, but multiple resources can beleveled in a single operation if they can be expressed in a common unit (e.g., men/day).early start time^early finish timeCritical path activity number^t ^t^duration^resourcesSample activityFigure 3.5 Network and schedule for Easa's example, Easa (18)Chapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 32The objective function used in this method is to minimize the absolute deviations betweenthe resource requirements and the desired resource usage rates at the overall project level.These rates may be represented either by uniform or non-uniform resource usage levels. Forthe objective of uniform leveling, the condition of absolute deviation minimization from auniform resource level may render the project resource histogram being close to level butwith frequent variations from uniformity. To minimize these variations, another measuresuggested is to minimize the absolute deviations between the project resource rates ofconsecutive time units.CPM scheduling results and the activity resource usage rates are required as input. Theresource usage rates are assumed to be constant over the activity duration. Using this data,an interface program automatically creates a file consisting of the objective function and theconstraints of the model. The resulting file constitutes the input to an integer linearoptimization program, UNDO, which solves the model. The main feature to be noted aboutthe model is that optimal leveling is guaranteed.The model is good only for small or medium-sized projects. The number of variables andconstraints is a function of project duration, number of non-critical activities and their floattimes. For large projects the number of variables and constraints will exceed the capacity ofthe UNDO routine.The example network shown in Figure 3.5 was discussed in their paper. The network141210R.on. 86cr s 4p^2Chapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 331^2^3^4^5Project:day111 after leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 3.6 Resource histograms before and after leveling (Uniform histogram criteria); Easa (18)141210e un 8c -t 6s .c^4201^2^3^4^5'Projectday:after leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 3.7 Resource histograms before and after leveling (Min. daily resource variation criteria); Easa (18)Chapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 34schedule and the resource details are shown in the figure itself. The initial and leveledresource profiles are given in Table 3.3 and in Figure 3.6 and Figure 3.7Table 3.3 Resource levels before and after leveling (Easa)Project Day 1 2 3 4 5Daily Resource AggregatesBefore Leveling14 10 8 8 6Daily Resource AggregatesAfter Leveling (UniformHistogram Criteria)10 10 8 10 8Daily Resource AggregatesAfter Leveling (Minimum DailyResource Variation Criteria)10 10 10 8 83.7 ANTILL AND WOODHEADThe leveling procedure proposed by Antill and Woodhead (3) relies on heuristic rules. Theearly start schedule is used as the starting point. All critical activities are started at theirearliest so that the project finish is not delayed. Total float for an activity represents itsrange of shift. The total float of the activity is also equal to the total float of the chain ofactivities to which it belongs. The chain of activities with the smaller total float gets priorityfor shifting. With this priority criterion the activities are then shifted in their float periodsChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 35based on some other heuristic rules.durationearly start time^early finish time Critical path^activity number0 1 8 1 8 8 19117 171 8 125resource(manpower)1resource(equip.Sampleresource 3(equip. B)2A)activity2 5 9101^1 1 0 151 01 1 8^0 1 0►0^0 0 ^ 01414 4 114[ 18 25 0 25Start 1 3 6 Finish 11►0 10 lo ^ 5 1010 ^ 4 1 1^1^o 0 1 0 1 0473 1 0 1 00 1 5 1 5 5 I 7 112 121 3 1154 8 108 1010 e^o^1 7 1 0 oFigure 3.8 Network and Schedule for Antill & Woodhead's example,Antill and Woodhead (3)For the chains of activities involving many activities and utilizing various labor requirements,skills and equipment, the resources can be leveled in a series fashion. The best waysuggested is to start with the labor craft or major equipment item having the greatestvariations in the levels. Disregarding other resources, this resource is leveled first and thenthe process moves to the next resource and so on until a satisfactory overall resource profileTable 3.4 Resource levels before and after leveling (Anti11 & Woodhead)Project Day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25Daily ResourceAggregatesBefore Leveling(Manpower)23 23 23 2.3 25 23 23 23 28 28 25 25 26 26 26 19 19 12 8 8 8 8 8 8 8Daily ResourceAggregatesAfter Leveling(Manpower)18 18 18 18 18 21 21 15 20 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 22 21 21 21 21 21 19 15 15Daily ResourceAggregatesBefore Leveling(Equipment A)1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0.0 0 0 0 0Daily ResourceAggregatesAfter Leveling(Equipment A)1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0Daily ResourceAggregatesBefore Leveling(Equipment B)0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0Daily ResourceAggregatesAfter Leveling(Equipment B)0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 02 -Res_ni^1eChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 3730R 25u^ 20s n°.... i 115r^1050 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25HPibjett.-diYi:after leveling^^ before leveling^/ critical resourcesFigure 3.9 Resource levels before and after leveling - Manpower; Antill - Woodhead (3)1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25Project day:after leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 3.10 Resource units before and after leveling - Equipment A; Antill - WoodheadChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 381 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25roject dayafter leveling^El before leveling / critical resourcesFigure 3.11 Resource units before and after leveling - Equipment B; Antill - Woodhead (3)is obtained. Networks involving complex chains, the same craft or equipment may have tobe reviewed many times to obtain an acceptable schedule by virtue of the shifting andreshifting of the activities involved. The best approach recommended is to first shift activitieswith small total float followed by the activities with large float. Thus for this method, theleveling effectiveness depends upon the amount of activity floats, number of critical activitiesin the network and the assigned resource priorities.The leveling operation was carried out for the network shown in the Figure 3.8. The projectChapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 39involved three kinds of resources - Manpower, equipment A and equipment B. First prioritywas given to leveling the resource requirements of the equipment. The network schedule andthe resource details are shown in the figure itself. The initial and leveled resource profilesare given in Table 3.4. and in Figure 3.9, 3.10 and 3.11. These profiles are for a singleschedule. Note that the leveled profiles for equipment A and equipment B, in addition tothe required resource usage also include 1 day of overhaul period.3.8 DAVISOther work on the resource leveling problem has been reviewed by Davis (16). Citing thework of Dewitte (17), he comments that the model minimizes manpower fluctuations byshifting the project activities in their slack periods. Here, the measure of effectiveness is theminimization of absolute magnitude of fluctuations from a calculated project mean level ofresource usage. The resource profile is partitioned into specially derived intervals and theneach interval is leveled in sequence updating the early start times and slacks of the affectedactivities. He further comments that although the method is simple in concept, it is lengthyand intricate when compared to the Burgess-Killebrew algorithm. Referring to the work ofWilson (46), he comments that it is a modification of Levy's method. The modificationWilson suggests is that, instead of a random choice step, a dynamic programming schemebe introduced at each iteration to determine feasible combinations of activities forrescheduling. It is suggested that the method is simple to use for small problems. However,it would quickly lead to computational complexities for large projects.Chapter 3. Review of Resource Leveling Literature^ 403.9 SUMMARYFrom the above review it can be observed that most of the leveling procedures are basedon arbitrary rules which do not necessarily lead to an optimized solution. For mostprocedures, the final solution is largely problem dependent. Optimizing techniques whenused on large projects quickly lead to computational complexities because the large numberof variables and constraints involved exceed the handling capacity of existing optimizationroutines. Heuristic leveling procedures seem to be the only choice for actual projects.Although heuristic procedures do not guarantee an optimized solution, they arecomputationally efficient and can produce satisfactory resource leveled schedules.41Chapter 4THE MODIFIED MINIMUM MOMENT ALGORITHM4.1 INTRODUCTIONHarris's (22) Minimum Moment Algorithm has been adopted as the starting point for thedevelopment of a resource leveling algorithm for linear scheduling. It has been selected for thefollowing reasons. First, being an unlimited resource leveling procedure, it does not extend theproject length. Second, the procedure is not based on random decisions rules and therefore itsapplication guarantees an improvement in the resource profile, eliminating any chance ofworsening the resource profile. Third, it is possible to treat multiple resource cases. Fourth, thepotential exists to extend the algorithm to treat a variable resource usage profile for anyactivity. Fifth, the procedure can be extended for linear scheduling. Sixth, activities may beleveled so as to enclose the leveled profile within a preferred resource histogram.In this chapter, I first present a brief introduction to the original algorithm. It is then extendedto cope with nonuniform resource usage profiles at the activity level and is further extended tothe linear scheduling case as implemented in the REPCON system.4.2 THE MINIMUM MOMENT ALGORITHM: An IntroductionThe Minimum Moment Algorithm is an unlimited resource leveling procedure introduced byHarris (22). The project length is not altered by the use of this algorithm. When the resourcesconsumed by the activities in a project are in the form of a histogram over the project duration,Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 42then the Minimum Moment Algorithm for resource leveling seeks to minimize the moment ofthis histogram.Assumptions that accompany this algorithm are as follows. First, an early start scheduleconstitutes the starting point. The maximum amount by which an activity can be shifted is equalto the free float of the activity. Activities are continuous throughout their duration i.e., activitysplitting is not considered. The resource usage rate should be constant over the entire durationof an activity. In this thesis, this assumption has been removed. The final assumption is that thelogic or precedence relationships among activities remain unaltered during the whole levelingprocess - an assumption common to virtually all leveling procedures.The concept of Minimum Moment Algorithm is based on the theorem that, for a given set ofelements in histogram form arranged over a fixed intervals, the minimum moment of theelements exists when the histogram is a rectangle over the interval set.In the original method, the critical path method is used for network analysis. The shiftingprocess is divided into two parts, a forward pass followed by a backward pass. Starting with theearly start schedule, the activities are first shifted to a later time slot in the forward pass andthe backward pass then shifts the activities to an earlier time slot when there is an improvementin the resource histogram. Activities are shifted backwards during the backpass operation tohelp avoid a resource buildup in the later portion of the project.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 43On any day in the network, for all activities scheduled on that particular day, the respectiveresources are summed up to get an aggregate resource usage. This sum is called the "dailyresource aggregate". Repeating this for all days of the network, an aggregate resource profileis obtained for the entire network duration. The sum of the squares of the resource aggregatefor each day in the project schedule is used as a measure of the effectiveness of the levelingprocedure. This sum of the 'daily resource aggregates' decreases as the peaks and valleys aresmoothened over the project duration. The concept of "improvement factor" has beenintroduced by Harris to decide which activity to shift in order to minimize the histogram area.The term 'improvement' refers to the decrease in histogram moment resulting from the shiftof an activity.Two factors control the order in which the activities are to be shifted. They are,i) Sequence Step Number, andii) Resource Improvement Factor.An activity's sequence step number is the earliest logical position that it can occupy whilepreserving its logical relationships with other activities. The shifting procedure starts with theactivities on the last sequence step, with the resource improvement factor being the basis forselecting the activity to shift. An improvement factor is computed for all activities on thesequence step for each possible shift day. The activity with the largest non-negativeimprovement factor is shifted by the respective amount of shift. Once all activities on thecurrent sequence step have been examined and no further improvements in the histogramChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 44moment are possible, the activities on the next earlier sequence step are examined. The processcontinues until the first sequence step is reached and all activities have been examined. At thispoint, the shifting process is reversed, starting from the first sequence step and progressing tothe last. The final histogram moment so obtained due to these daily resource aggregates is theminimum and is representative of the leveled resource demands.If done manually, this approach is unworkable for large networks and several resources. Onceprogrammed, however, it poses few restraints. Interestingly, no computational experience withthe original algorithm has been published. When dealing with more than one resource, theymay be leveled one by one in series or may be aggregated before a single application of theleveling procedure. The final solution is generally different depending on the order in whichresources are leveled and leveling using an aggregated profile provides yet another finalhistogram for each resource. The latter approach assumes identical resource usage units or thetransformation of all resources into monetary units. If any particular resource is to be givenpriority then a preassigned weighting of the resource may be used to favour its shifting. SeeHarris (22) for a description of a rather elaborate weighting scheme.4.3 THE CONCEPT OF IMPROVEMENT FACTORThe improvement factor quantifies the reduction of the histogram moment when an activity isshifted. It is used to determine the activity to be chosen for shifting from a given set of activitieson a sequence step so as to reduce the histogram moment by the maximum amount. The basicChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 45Minimum Moment Algorithm assumes that all activities in the network have a constant resourceusage over their activity duration - thus Harris's improvement factor is specific to this case. Foractual project situations, not all activities have a constant resource usage rate (e.g. cranage mayonly be required for the start-up of an activity). One of the major objectives of this thesis is toextend the minimum moment algorithm and the concept of improvement factor to the generalresource usage profile case at the activity level. Presented below is the mathematicalformulation for both cases. First, the improvement factor expression for those activities whichhave a constant resource usage over their duration is derived, followed by the improvementfactor expression for those activities which have variable resource usage over their duration.43.1 Improvement Factor for Activities with Constant Resource Usage ProfileConsider an activity, a, with duration, T. Let the shift of the activity be S, and the resourceusage rate of the activity be represented by r. S can have a maximum value up to the free floatof the activity. The resource usage aggregate on any project day j, j = 1, 2,^, finish date, isrepresented by, xi. Let m be a factor, defined as the minimum of either the days that theactivity is to be shifted, S, or the activity duration, T. Thus, m = min(S, 7). See Figure 4.1 foran illustration of the foregoing variables. The reader should note the following convention. Thetime counter starts at time 0. Thus, the early start time, EST, for the first activity is set equalto zero. For a duration T, this means that the activity's start and finish times are 0 and T,respectively, or the activity spans day 1 through to day T. In what follows an activity ispositioned by its early start time, and the day counter j starts at EST + I.EST =a 3 EFTA 11resource profileduration r- T 8shift8 = 31 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19Chapter 4. Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 46constant resource rate 'r'for activity "a"dailyresourceaggregates'x ^projectday 'j'Time ---.-0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19project resource histogram with cross-hatched area representing theportions of the histogram affected due to the shift of activity "a"Figure 4.1 Shifting activity with constant resource rateChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 47Let X (EFTa+1) • x (EFT„+2) • , x (En...,„,) be the set of daily resource aggregates,from which m daily resource rates, r, are to be deducted. In Figure 4.1, this is represented bythe cross-hatched area on the left side marked as T.[X1 ]j — ESTa+M-^E xiJ-ES; + 1[4.1]The corresponding set of daily resource aggregates after the shift, S, will be,j —ESTa+M[XXI] —^ E^(xj -r)j—ESTa+1[4.2]Let x (EFTa+S-m+1) • X (EPTa+S-m+2) • ^ • X (Erra+s) represent the set of daily resourceaggregates, to which m daily resource rates, r, are to be added. In Figure 4.1, this is representedby the cross-hatched area on the right side marked as 'II'.j — EFTa + S[X2 ] —^ E^xi^ [4.3]j—EFTa + S— M+ 1The corresponding set of daily resource aggregates after the shift, S, will be,j — EFTa + S[XX2] —^ E^(xi +r)j — EFTa + S—M+1[4.4]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 48By looking at the resource histogram in Figure 4.1, it can be seen that the shift of activity a willonly affect the cross-hatched portions of the resource histogram. The remaining area will notcontribute to any change in the histogram moment, and can therefore be neglected.Thus, the moment of the resource histogram to be considered before shifting the activity is thesum of the squares of /X,] and X21 (areas I and II in Figure 4.1). Thus,j—ESTa+M^j—EFT,+SE X •2j—ESTa +1^j—EFTa+S—M+1[4.5]Similarly, the moment of the histogram after shifting the activity is the sum of the squares ofp0C/J and 1rx21. Thus,j—ESTa+M^j—EFT,+SM2^E^(x—r) 2 +^ (xi+r) 2j • ESTa+1 j—EFTa+S—M+1[4.6]Improvement in the histogram moment will result from the shift, 5, only when M2 5- MrTherefore,j—ESTa +1^j—EFT,+SE^(xj — r) 2 +^ (xj+r) 2j—ESTa +M j—EFTa+S—M+1Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 49j —ESTa +M4j —EST,+1j — EFTa+ S+ E 2X •Jj — EFTa + S-111+1[4.7]From the above expression we get,j • - ESTa+ME 4J-ESTa + 1j —EFTa+S— 2r^E^xi.1- EFTa + S—M+1+ mr2  +j+ESTa +m2X •Jj —EFTa + S—M+1j — EFTa + S+ 2r^E^x•JEFTa+S—m+1+ m r 2 5j — ESTa+ME 4J-ESTa+1j —EFTa+S+ E 2X •Jj —EFTa + S—M+1[4.8]Rearranging terms, we get,j —ESTa+M^j — EFTa+S—2r E x.J + 2ri - EST a +1^j — EFT a + S—M+1Ex.J + 2mr 2^5^0[4.9]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 50Factoring out r and dividing through by -2, we obtain,jESTa +M^j EFT,,+Sr(,^E x; -^E^xj — mr )j — ESTa+1^j — EFT a + S-112+10[4.10]In the above expression, the left side portion is called the improvement factor. Therefore, foractivity, a, with shift, S, the improvement factor, IF, is,j — ESTa +M^j —EFTa +S(IF (a, S) — r ,^E x., -^E^xi - mr )j—ESTa+1^j —EFT a + S—M+1[4.11]Thus if an improvement in the resource histogram is to be obtained, then the improvementfactor must have a positive value. Equation [4.11] represents the condition originally derivedby Harris (22) for determining how much an activity should be shifted.4.3.2 Improvement Factor for Activities with Variable Resource Usage ProfileConsider an activity a with duration T. Let the shift of the activity be S, and the resource ratesfor the activity be represented by, rk, where the subscript k refers to the activity day, whosevalue ranges from 1 to T, respectively. The resource aggregates on any project day j, j = 1,2,^, project duration, is represented by, xj. The variable, S, can have a maximum value up tothe free float of the activity. Define factor m as the minimum of either the days that the activityChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 51is to be shifted, S, or the activity duration, T, i.e., m = min(S,T). With respect to the amountof shift there are two conditions to be considered here for the calculation of improvementfactors : 1) When the shift, S, is less than the activity duration, T, and 2) When the shift, S, isequal to or greater than the activity duration, T. Improvement factor relationships for the twoconditions have been derived below. Refer to Figure 4.2 and Figure 4.3 to aid in understandingthe derivation that follows. Note that a test of the derivation is that the expression for IF shouldbe the same as previously derived when rk = r for all k.Condition 1:^The shift S, of the activity is less than the duration, T, of the activity.For this case, the value of m will always be equal to the shift, S, of the activity -i.e., m = S.Let X (ESTa+1) 1 X (ESTa+2) ' ^  f X (ESTeS) be the set of daily resource aggregates,from which k = S resource rates, ri, r2 ...., rs, are to be deducted, respectively. In Figure 4.2 thisis represented by the cross-hatched area on the left side which is marked as 'I'.[ X1 ]j—ESTa+S-^ E^x.Jj—ESTa +1[4.12]The corresponding set of daily resource aggregates after the shift will be,j—ESTa +S, k—S[ XXI. ] —^ E^(xi - rk )^[4.13]j—ESTa+1, k-1ESTa= 3shiftS =3x x x X x x x x^x^x x x1 2 3 x4 x5 x 6 x7 x8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 181 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18dailyresourceaggregates'xprojectday 'j'1919Chapter 4. Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 52variable resource rate, cofor activity Pa'sduration r T r 8r3 ^r^r 4 5 6resource profileCrresourcerates'rk'2EFra = 1 1time^►0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19project resource histogram with cross-hatched area representingportions of the histogram affected due to the shift of activity 'a'Figure 4.2 Shifting activity with variable resource usage profile (S < T)Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 53Also, X (EFT.+1) , X (EFTa+2) ' , X (Era+s) is the set of daily resource aggregates,to which k = S daily resource rates, TT-s+1 , TT-s+2 „ ri. are to be added, respectively. InFigure 4.2, this is represented by the cross-hatched area on the right side which is marked asj -EFT,+S[ x2 ] —^E^xi_1—EFT, +1[4.14]The corresponding set of daily resource aggregates after the shift S will bej -.EFTa+ S , k-TE^( xi + r k )^[4.15]j -EFT,+1 , k-T-S+1Also, x(EFTa-,s+3.) , x(EFra+s+2) , "CEP; is the set of daily resource aggregates,from which k = T - S resource rates, rsig , r5+2 , ^ ri. are to be subtracted, respectively, andk = T - S resource rates r1 , r2 ,...., rr_s are to be added, respectively. In Figure 4.2, this isrepresented by the cross-hatched area in the middle which is marked as 'BT.[ x3 1j -EFT,— E^xiJ—ESTa +S+1[4.16]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 54The corresponding set of daily resource aggregates after the shift will be,[ XX3 ]j—EFTS, k—T—S-^E^(x; - rk+s+ rk)j—ESTa+S+1, k-1[4.17]By looking at the resource histogram in Figure 4.2, it can be seen that only the sections labelledI, II, and III will be affected by the shift S. The moment of the remaining part of the histogramis not affected and therefore can be neglected.Thus, the moment of the resource histogram before shifting the activity will be the sum of thesquares of /Xj, /X2/ and /X3/, neglecting non-cross-hatched regions of Figure 4.2. Thus,j—ESTa+S^j—EFTa+SMi —^E 2 +X •_7^E 2Alij—ESTa+1^j—EFTa+1j—EFTa+ 2Xij—ESTa +S+1[4.18]Similarly, the moment of the histogram after the activity shift will be the sum of the squares of/XXII /XX2/ and JXX3J. Thus,j—ESTa+S, k— SM2 .. E^(xi - r k ) 2j—ESTa+1, k-1j—EFTa+S, k—T4. E^(x; + rk ) 2 +j—EFTa+1, k— T— S+1Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 55k-T-S..1ESTa +S+1, k-1^r k+ s+ Id 2^[4.19]The improvement in histogram moment will result only when M2 5 M1. Therefore,j-ESTa+S, k-S^ j-EFTa+S, k- T(x,--rk) 2 +^ (X + k) 2j-ESTa+1, k-1 j-EFTa+1, k- T-S+1j-EFTa , k-T-SIc+s+ k) 2j-ESTa+S+1, k-1j-, ESTa+S^j-EFTa+S+^E^xi2j•.ESTa +1^j-EFTa+1[4.20]From the above expression we get,j-ESTa+SEJ-ESTa+1k-S2+^rkj-ESTa +S, k-S^j-EFTa+S2^xirk^E^x;2J-EsTa +i, k-1^j-EFTa+1k-T^j-EFTa+S, k- T^j-EFTa+ 2^r^xirk^ 2k- T-S+1^j-•EFTa+1, k- T-S+1^j-ESTa+S+1Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 56k-T-S^ j-EFT,, k-T-S+ Xi ( rk - rk+S ) 2+ 2^E^xk-1 (rrk+s)j-ESTa+S+1, k-1j-ESTa+SE 2Xji ESTa +1j-EFTa+S+ E Xi_I-EFTa +1j -EFT,+ E 2X •.7j - ESTa+S+1[4.21]Rearranging the terms and simplifying,k-S^j-ESTa+S, k-S^k-T^j-EFTa+S, k-TX1 ,. 2 - 2'L k Ej-ESTa+1, k-1 irk +x E^2-1+ 2^ xirkk-T-S+1Ej-EFTa+1, k-T-S+1k-T-S+^(rx- rk+s) 2iC-• 1j-EFTa , k-T-S+ 2^E^xi (rk- rk+s)j-ESTa+S+1, k-1s^0[4.22]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 57Dividing by -1,^1C-.S^j-ESTa+S, k-S^k-T^j-EFTa+S, k-T-rk + 2 2xjrk - E rk - 2^ xark^-1^j-ESTa+1, k-1^k- T- S+1^j-EFTa+1, k- T- S+1k•.T-S^ j-EFTa, k-T-Srk+S ) 2 - 2xj ( -rk - rk+s)^2^0- 1 j-ESTa+S+1,k-1[4.23]We call the left side of the above expression the improvement factor.Therefore, for any activity, a, with a shift S, and the shift being smaller than the duration, T,of the activity, the improvement factor, IF, will be,IF(a, S)^k-S^j-ESTa+S, k-Srk 2 -Kirk^1^j-ESTa+1, k-1k-T21ck-T-S+1j-EFTa+S, k- T- 2^ Xjrkj-EFTa+1, k- T- S+1k-T-S^ j -EFTa, k-T-Srk+s) 2 - 2^ xj (rk - rk+s)j-ESTa+S+1, k-1[4.24]Because of division by -1 in the derivation, the improvement factor must always have a positiveChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 58value in order to reduce the moment of the histogram. Also, if the improvement factor of anactivity with constant resource rate is calculated using this procedure, it will be twice the valueobtained using the expression for IF derived for the constant resource profile at the activitylevel. Letting rk = r, for k = 1, 2,  T, the improvement factor as obtained from equation[4.24] reduces to:j • • ESTa + S^j -EFTa +SIF (a, S) - 2r (^ E^x; -^E xj - Sr ) [4.25]j • .. ESTa +1^j -EFT,+1Inputting m = S in equation [4.11] we find that it is half of equation [4.25] which proves thestatement made in the previous paragraph.Condition 2: The shift S, of the activity is equal to or greater than the duration T of theactivity.For this case, the value of m equals the duration, T, of the activity. That is, m = TLet x (EsTa+i) x (ESTa+2) ^ 1 X (ESTa+T) be the set of daily resource aggregates,,^1from which k = m = T resource rates, r1 , r2 ,.... , rr , are to be deducted, respectively. In Figure4.3, this is represented by the cross-hatched area on the left side which is marked as 'I'.j • • EFTa[ X1 ] ••^E^x;J.- ESTa +1[4.26]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 59variable resource rate, cofor activity neeresourcerates'r k'ESTa =1r7EFTa = 9r2 S la b reresource profilerTama:shiftS := 10.dailyresourceaggregates'x : ^1projectday 'j' —Is3 19time --Il 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19project resource histogram with cross-hatched area representingportions of the histogram affected due to the shift of activity ma°2x2 x34x45x56x67x78x89x90 11 12 13 14x14 ^x 15 1815 16 17x17 )i818Figure 4.3 Shifting activity with variable resource usage profile (S z T)Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 60The corresponding set of daily resource aggregates after the shift will be,j—EFT,, k—T(xi - rk )j-EST.+1, k-1[4.27]^Also x (Es2, a.s+i) • x (EsTa+s+2) • ^ X (EST.+S+T— EFTa+S) is the set of daily resourceaggregates, to which k = m = T daily resource rates, rp r2,....., r7, are to be added, respectively.In Figure 4.3, this set is represented by the cross-hatched area on the right side which is markedas 'II'.j—EFT,+SX2^ xi^ [4.28]j—ESTa+S+1The corresponding set of daily resource aggregates after the shift will be,^xx2^j—EFTa+S, k—T ( xi r k )^[4.29]j—EST,+S+1, k-1The portion of the histogram that will be affected by the shift of the activity is cross-hatchedin Figure 4.3. The remaining area will not contribute to any change of the histogram momentand therefore can be neglected.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 61Thus, the moment of the resource histogram before shifting the activity will be the sum of thesquares of [Xi] and /X2J, respectively. Therefore,j —EFT,^j — EFT a+ SMi. _ E 2 +X..7^E 2Xij —EST a+1^j —EST.+ S+1[4.30]Similarly, the moment of the histogram after the activity shift will be the sum of the squares ofpg(il and pfxj, respectively. Therefore,^j — EFT a , k— T^j — EFT a+ S , k— TM2 "•^E^(x_I-Ek) 2 +^E^(xi 4- rid 2^[4.31]^j — EST a+1 , k-1 j —EST a+ S+1 , 1&1Improvement in the histogram moment will result only when M2 s M1. Therefore,^j —EFT a , k—T^ j—EFTa+S, k— TE (xi -rid 2 +^E^(x_i 4- rk) 2^j —EST a+1 , k-1 j —EST a+ S+1 , k-1sj —EFT aEJ-ESTa + 1j — EFT a + SX -2^ 2+^E^xJ•J j -EST a + S+1[4.32]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 62From the above expression we get,j EFTa^k•• TE^.4 4- E .rl — 2j—ESTa + 1^k:•1^j —EFTa , k—T^j —EFTa+Sxir k +^E Xj^j . n ESTa +1 , k•fll^j --ESTa+S+1.k.•T2+ T r k-1j —EFTa + S , k•• T+ 2^E^Ajrkj —ESTa + S+1 , k.-1sj — EFTaE2X -.3j.•ESTa +1j —EFTa +S+^E 2X •Jj —ESTa +S+1[4.33]Rearranging the terms, we get,k—T22^rk -1j —EFTa , .1( T2^E^xirk +j ESTa +1 , k- 1j • • EFTa + S , k—T2^E^Altrk^s^0j-ESTa +S+1, k-1[4.34]Dividing by -1,k—T2- 2 T rk +-1j — EFTa , k—T2^E^xirk —j—ESTa+1, k-1j - EFTa+S, k- T2^E^x.irk 2 0j —ESTa +S+1 , k-1[4.35]In the above expression the left side portion is called the improvement factor.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 63Therefore, for any activity, a, with shift S, and S T, the improvement factor, IF, is:^k—T^j —EFT., k—T^IF (a, S) — — 2 T rl. + 2^E^xirk-1^j=EST.+1, .101j-EFTa+S, k-T- 2^E^xirk^[4.36]j—EST.+S+1, k-1Because of division by -1 in the derivation, the improvement factor must always have a positivevalue in order to reduce the moment of the histogram. Also, if the improvement factor of anactivity with constant resource rate is calculated using this procedure, it will be twice the valueobtained using the expression for IF derived for the constant resource profile at the activitylevel (equation [4.11]). Letting rk = r, for k = 1, 2, , T, the improvement factor as obtainedfrom equation [4.36] reduces to:IF (a,S) - 2rj —EFT.^j—EFT.+SE xi - E xij-ESTa+1^j-ESTa+S+1- Tr )[4.37]Inputting m = T in equation [4.11] and making some transformations we find that it is half ofequation [4.36] which proves the statement made in the previous paragraph.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 644.4 THE CONCEPT OF BACK FLOATThe concept of back float as introduced by Harris (22) is necessary to understand because,during the backward pass of the algorithm, the maximum limit of the shift for any activity isdefined and limited by the back float.Assuming an early start schedule the non-critical activities can be scheduled within a range oftimes which will depend on the finish dates of its predecessors and the start dates of itssuccessors.An activity can start once all its predecessors are finished, i.e. the latest of the early finish datesof its predecessor activity controls its early start date, for the case of non-overlappingrelationships. In the same way the earliest of the early start dates of its successors will controlits early finish date. If the activity starts at its earliest, then, the period between its actual finishdate and the earliest of the early start dates of its successors is called the Free Float of theactivity. If shifted, the activity may consume a part or the full amount of its free float. Similarly,when the activity is scheduled at its late finish date, the free float reduces to zero. The periodbetween the latest early start date and the latest of the early finish dates of its predecessors iscalled the Back Float.Therefore, back float for any activity is the difference between its start date and the latest ofthe early finish dates of its predecessors. Thus, for any activity, a, with n predecessors, the backChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 65float, BF„, is defined as,BF, — EST, — maxvn EFTn [4.38]where, the latter half of the right hand side of the above equation corresponds to thepredecessor activity which has the latest early finish date.The concept of Back Float has been extended for treating the precedence relationships of typesFS, SS, FF and SF. These relationships have been discussed individually and are presentedbelow.FS precedence relationship: For an activity, a, having FS precedence relationship with its npredecessors, the back float, BF., is defined as,Max [EFT„ + FS„]BFa — ESTa — Vn [4.39]where, FS represents the activity's lag value and the latter half of the right hand side ofequation [4.39] corresponds to the predecessor activity which produces the maximum sum(EFT. + FS.).SS precedence relationship: For an activity, a, having SS precedence relationship with its npredecessors, the back float, BF., is defined as,Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 66Max [ESTn + SSn ]BFa - ESTa - V n [4.40]where, SS represents the activity's lag value and the latter half of the right hand side ofequation [4.40] corresponds to the predecessor activity which produces the maximum sum(EST„ + SS.).FF precedence relationship: For an activity, a, having FF precedence relationship with its npredecessors, the back float, BF., is defined as,BFa - EFTa - MvanX [EFTa + FFn ]^ [4.41]where, FF represents the activity's lag value and the latter half of the right hand side ofequation [4.41] corresponds to the predecessor activity which produces the maximum sum(EFT„ + FF.).SF precedence relationship: For an activity, a, having SF precedence relationship with its npredecessors, the back float, BF,„ is defined as,BFa - EFTa - %X [EST„+ SFn ]^ [4.42]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 67where SF represents the activity's lag value and the latter half of the right hand side of equation[4.42] corresponds to the predecessor activity which produces the maximum sum (EST„ + SF„).4.5 SEQUENCE STEP NUMBERS'A sequence step may be defined as the earliest logical position in the network that an activity canoccupy while maintaining its proper dependencies" Harris(22).The purpose of this section is to introduce "sequence step numbers" in reference to multiplelocation activity types as found in the REPCON environment for linear scheduling.Ordered Activity: Locations of an ordered activity all have a different sequence step number.Given an ordered set of locations 12 , 12, .... , /k„ l„ for activity a with n locations, then thesequence step number for location /k+i is at least one greater than that for location /k , i.e.,SSNik., 2^SSNlk + 1^[4.43]Continuous Activity: All locations of a continuous activity have the same sequence step number.Given a continuous set of locations 11 , /2 , .... , lk „ 4, for activity a with n locations, then,SSN/i - SSN12 - SSAT/ k - SSNI .^ [4.44]Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 68Shadow Activity:^The sequence step number for each location of a shadow activity is equalto one greater than its governing predecessor sequence step number.4.6 WEIGHTING SCHEME FOR RESOURCESWhen using the modified minimum moment algorithm for the multiple resource case, oneapproach is to assign weights to the different resources using some priority weighting schemeand then to sum up the weighted resources to get an aggregate resource usage profile for theproject. Only a simple resource weighting scheme has been included to date. It involves the userassigning a weight to the resource varying from 0 to oc. The default is 1. Each resource ismultiplied by its weight factor when aggregating resources to generate the histogram andcomputing improvement factors.Weighting schemes along the lines suggested by Harris (22) should be explored in the future.However, there may be considerable computational time involved because of the following stepsin the weighting scheme. First, for each resource, the differences in the daily resourceaggregates on a day-by-day basis for the project duration have to be computed to obtain therelative weight of each resource. Second, each resource profile must be factored by theirrespective weights to get an aggregated resource profile at the start of the leveling operation.Third, at the completion of the leveling operation, histograms for each resource contributingto the aggregated resource profile have to be recomputed using the resource level assigned toget the profiles for individual resources. As the number of resources increases, the timeChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 69required to derive the weightings are considerable. For the Harris procedure, these weightingsare computed only once. A case could be made for their recomputation at different intervalsin the leveling process to take account of shifts in the resource profile shape.4.7 A BRIEF REVIEW OF THE HARRIS MINIMUM MOMENT ALGORITHMAs a first step toward developing a more generalized minimum moment algorithm, we firstreview the basic algorithm set out by Harris (22). The algorithm is applicable to the case ofconstant resource usage at the activity level (i.e., rk = r for k =1, 2, ^, 7). To commence theleveling procedure, network computations are made and early start and finish times for everyactivity are established along with sequence step numbers. Free Float is determined for everyactivity and the critical path is identified. The resource to be leveled is selected and the usageamount required for each activity is assigned. The daily resource aggregates are obtained byassuming that all activities start at their EST. The maximum possible amount by which anyactivity can be shifted is equal to its Free Float. The leveling procedure begins with a forwardpass with activities on the last sequence step. Improvement factors for all possible shifts of allactivities on this sequence step are calculated. The activity with the largest improvement factoris chosen and the shift is made. If there is a tie in improvement factors between two or moreactivities, then the selection of the activity is made based on a set of heuristic rules. If theactivity has the same maximum improvement factor for more than one shift position, then theactivity is shifted by the maximum amount. Free Floats, EST and EFT are updated if shiftinghas taken place. This procedure is repeated until all activities on this sequence step areChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 70processed and no further shift is possible. The procedure then moves to the next earliersequence step. The above approach is repeated for all activities on this sequence step. Theprocess continues until the first sequence step is reached.The backward pass then starts. The Back Floats for all activities are determined. The back passprocess starts with the activities on the first sequence step. The same procedure is adopted asin the forward pass, except that Back Float is used instead of Free Float and the activities movebackwards now. The process continues until the last sequence step is reached. The originalalgorithm as stated by Harris is presented below:SetupA. Prepare an arrow or precedence network of the project and determine the sequence stepnumber for each activity.B. Prepare a link matrix and compute the ESD and EFD for each activity. Compute thelags for each link. Determine the total float for each activity and identify the criticalpath.C. Select a resource to be leveled.D. Determine the amount of the selected resource which is required per day for eachnetwork activity. Call this required resource rate, "r."E.^Prepare a bar chart showing the early start time for each activity and its duration. Plotcritical activities first, followed by noncritical activities.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 71F.^For each day of the project, total the resource rates at the foot of the bar chart to obtainthe daily resource sums.ProcedureThe procedure begins with the activities on the last sequence step.1.^Examine activities on the sequence step.(a) Every activity on the sequence step having zero free float is passed over.(b) Every activity on the sequence step having a zero resource rate is shifted tothe limit of the activity free float to allow preceding activities to be shifted.(c)^For each activity on the sequence step having a positive resource rate,determine the extent of its free float and compute improvement factors for allpossible days that the activity can be shifted until the free float limit is reached.2.^Select the activity having the largest improvement factor determined in algorithm step1(c).(a) If the largest improvement factor is negative, no shifting takes place. Go to thenext sequence step and examine the activities as in algorithm step 1.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the largest improvement factor for severalactivities:(i) Select the activity with the greatest "r" value.(ii) If still tied, select the activity which creates the greatest free float forChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 72preceding activities.00^If still tied, select the activity with the latest start date.(iv)^If still tied, select the first activity in the queue.3.^Shift the selected activity subject to the following:(a) If the largest improvement factor is zero or positive, shift the selected activity bysubtracting the activity resource rate being vacated and adding this same rate toeach of the daily resource sums at the position being occupied.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the improvement factor at several of thepossible activity positions, shift the activity the greatest number of time units.4.^If shifting has occurred in algorithm step 3, update the lags, ESD and EFD, in the linkmatrix.5. Reexamine the activities on the sequence step and repeat algorithm steps 1 through4 until all shifting is complete on this step.6. Examine the next earlier sequence step and repeat algorithm steps 1 through 5.Continue in this manner until all activities have been considered and all possibleshifting has taken place on every sequence step.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 737. Repeat algorithm steps 1 through 6 until no further shifting takes place. This is the endof the forward cycle.8. Beginning with the first sequence step, using back float instead of free float, andprogressing to the next latest sequence step instead of to the next earliest sequence step,repeat algorithm steps 1 through 7 until all activities have been considered and shifted,where possible, to an earlier time position. This is the end of the backward cycle andcompletes the leveling.4.8 REFINEMENTS AND MODIFICATIONS TO THE BASIC MINIMUM MOMENTALGORITHM FOR LINEAR SCHEDULING AND VARIABLE RESOURCEUSAGEThe following refinements and modifications have been made in the Harris Minimum MomentAlgorithm.1)^The scope of the basic algorithm has been extended to include activities which consumeresources at a variable rate over their duration. With reference to linear scheduling asimplemented within the REPCON environment, activity types of shadow, ordered andcontinuous, with multiple locations and variable resource usage profile can be dealt with. Forcontinuous activities, all locations must move - i.e., a continuous activity behaves as a singlelarge activity spanning over several locations.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 742) New rules have been added to take care of activities with multiple locations. If theactivities with multiple locations are tied for shifting then they are shifted with respect to theirlocation execution sequence. For a shadow activity the last location of it is selected first duringthe forward pass shift and the first location in the activity location sequence is selected firstduring the backward pass shift. This has been done to ensure that the work progresses in arational way in terms of location sequence execution. However, inclusion of this rule does notalways guarantee the above solution because the selection of an activity for shifting and its shiftamount is primarily controlled by the improvement factor produced by the respective shift.Continuous activity acts as a single large activity spanning over several locations. Thereforewhen required to shift, all of its locations are moved as an unit. For an ordered activityindividual locations can be shifted independently while maintaining their precedencerelationships with other locations.3) Modifications have been made in some heuristic rules which are used to break the tiebetween activities which have the same improvement factor value. The purpose of thesemodifications is to increase the computational efficiency of the modified algorithm. The rulein the basic minimum moment algorithm which states "shift the activity which creates thegreatest free float for preceding activities" has been changed to "shift the activity with greatestfree float". With the original rule increased free float has to be calculated for every predecessorof the tied activities. This requires considerable computational effort and time. Therefore, thisrule change has been made to save on computation time.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 754)^Step number 7 of the basic minimum moment algorithm has been deleted. Due to thisfact, for any network there is only one Forward Pass and one Backward Pass. This has beendone in order to save on computation time.Because of this modification it may happen that a few activities may not be shifted to the fullestextent possible during the forward pass and similarly they may not be shifted backward by thefullest extent possible during the backward pass. This change may produce different resultswhen compared to the results produced by the original minimum moment algorithm.4.9 THE MOD& IED MINIMUM MOMENT ALGORITHM FOR RESOURCELEVELINGThe Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm for resource leveling is presented below along withthe reasoning for the heuristic rules where they apply. The algorithm has been presentedseparately for both problems classes, i.e., for activities involving constant resource usage andfor those involving variable resource usage. Multiple resource conditions have been assumedwhich means that the resources are aggregated and leveled in a single run. This aggregationmay be based on the natural resource weighting or the respective resource weight factors maybe assigned by the user.There are certain prerequisites to be completed before applying the minimum momentalgorithm, given the network plan.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 76i) The sequence step numbers of all the locations of activities must be determined.ii) EST and EFT for each activity are determined and the lags for each network link arethen computed. The critical path of the network is identified.iii) A "Resource leveled dates record" is created which contains the Leveled Start and FinishTimes of all activities including their Leveled Lags (from which Leveled Free and BackFloats are derived). Initialize the Leveled Start and Finish Times for all activities withtheir EST and EFT times. Similarly initialize the Leveled Lags with the Lags at the startof the leveling procedure. Also initialize the Leveled Free Floats with the Free Floatsof the corresponding activities. Back Floats for all activities are initialized to 0.iv) Resources to be leveled are identified.v) Resources and their usage profiles must be assigned to the activities.vi) Using the assigned weight factors for different resources of the same class (default is 1.0for all resources), the resources for individual activities on all activity days are summedup, respectively, to obtain an aggregated resource usage profile.If the activity has a constant resource usage rate, then it is referred to as the requiredresource usage rate, r.For an activity with a variable resource usage profile, the resource rates are identifiedby rk , where the subscript k refers to the day of the activity and its value ranges from1 to T, where T is the duration of the activity. The total resource consumption for theactivity is determined by summing up the different resource usages on all activity days.This is referred to as activity resource consumption and is denoted by XRESO. This isChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 77done for all activities.vii) Daily resource aggregates for each day of the project are obtained by summing up theresources consumed by the scheduled activities on the respective days.4.9.1 Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm for Problems involving Activities withConstant Resource UsageThe shifting procedure is divided into forward pass and backward pass steps. As mentionedearlier, in the forward pass, the activities are shifted forward in the range of their free floatsand during the backward pass they are shifted backwards in the range of their back floats, inorder to minimize the resource histogram area and achieve a leveled resource profile.Forward PassThe shifting procedure commences with the activities on the last sequence step.1.^Examine activities on the current sequence step.(a) Every activity with zero free float as well as milestone and hammock activities areskipped. (Not addressed in this work is the potential for the lengthening ofhammock activities due to leveling. This could be important if resources areassigned to the hammock activity).(b) Every activity having a zero resource usage rate is shifted to the limit of its freefloat. This allows the preceding activities to be shifted by the greatest amountChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 78(within the free float constraint).(c)^For each activity on the step having a non-zero resource usage rate, determineits free float and improvement factors for all possible days that the activity canbe shifted until the free float limit is reached.2.^Select the activity with the largest improvement factor as determined in the previousstep.(a) No shifting takes place if the largest improvement factor is negative. Move to thenext sequence step and examine the activities as in step 1.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the largest improvement factor for severalactivities:(i) Move to (ii) if no shadow activity is involved. For the case of a shadowactivity, keep the location with the highest location index number forfurther comparisons while discarding its other locations.(This rule tries to ensure that location execution sequence for a shadowactivity follows the pattern of the project's sequence of locations.)(ii) Select the activity with the greatest "r" value.(Thus, preference is given to eliminate the excess peaks of the resourcehistogram. Along with the achievement of minimum histogrammoment we also achieve the objective of minimum hiring of resources onChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 79the project days vacated by the activity.)(iii) If still tied, select the activity with the greatest Free Float.(The idea here is to generate increased free float for predecessor activities,assuming that the activity has noncritical activities as its predecessors.)(iv) If still tied, select the activity with the latest resource leveled start date.(An arbitrary rule to select an activity.)(v)^If still tied, select the activity with the smallest activity code.(This is an arbitrary rule to break a tie - each activity has a unique code.)3.^Shift the selected activity subject to the following:(a) If the largest improvement factor is zero or positive, shift the selected activity bysubtracting the activity resource usage rate from each of the daily resourceaggregates at the position being vacated and adding the same rate to each of thedaily resource aggregates at the position being occupied.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the improvement factor at several of thepossible activity positions, shift the activity the greatest number of time units. Thiswould allow the preceding activities to be shifted by a greater amount. Updatethe daily resource aggregates field as described in 3(a).4.^If shifting has occurred in step 3, update the "Resource leveled dates record" (i.e.,Leveled Start and Finish Times, Leveled Free Float and Free Float for all theChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 80predecessors of the shifted activity).5. Re-examine the activities on the sequence step and repeat steps 1 through 5 until allshifting is complete on this step.6. Examine the next earlier sequence step and repeat steps 1 through 5. Continue in thismanner until all activities have been considered and all possible shifting has taken placeon every sequence step.Backward PassThe shifting procedure commences with the activities on the first sequence step.7.^Examine activities on the current sequence step.(a) Every activity with a zero back float as well as milestone and hammockactivities are passed over.(b) Every activity having a zero resource usage rate is shifted to the limit of theactivity back float. This allows succeeding activities to be shifted by the greatestamount (within the back float constraint).(c)^For each activity on the step having a non-zero resource usage rate, determinethe extent of its back float and compute improvement factors for all possible daysthat the activity can be shifted until the back float limit is reached.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 818.^The activity with the largest improvement factor as determined in the previous step isselected.(a) If the largest improvement factor is negative, no shifting takes place. Move to thenext sequence step and examine the activities as in step 7.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the largest improvement factor for severalactivities:(i) Move to (ii) if no shadow activity is involved. For the case of a shadowactivity, keep the location with the lowest location index number for furthercomparisons while discarding its other locations.(This rule tries to ensure that the location execution sequence for a shadowactivity follows the sequence order of the project's locations.)(ii) Select the activity with the greatest "r" value.(Thus, preference is given to eliminate the excess peaks of the resourcehistogram. Also, along with the achievement of minimum histogrammoment we also achieve the objective of minimum hiring of resources onthe project days vacated by the activity.)(iii) If still tied, select the activity with the greatest Back Float.(The idea here is to generate increased back float for successor activities,assuming that the activity has noncritical activities as its successors.)(iv) If still tied, select the activity with the latest resource leveled start date.(An arbitrary rule to select an activity.)Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 82(v)^If still tied, select the activity with the smallest activity code.(This is an arbitrary rule to break a tie - each activity has a unique code.)9.^Shift the selected activity subject to the following:(a) If the largest improvement factor is zero or positive, shift the selected activity bysubtracting the activity resource usage rate from each of the daily resource sumsat the position being vacated and add this same rate to each of the dailyresource sums at the position being occupied.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the improvement factor at several of thepossible activity positions, shift the activity the greatest number of time units.Update the daily resource aggregates field as described in 3(a).10.^If shifting has occurred in step 3, update the "Resource leveled dates record" (i.e.,Leveled Start and Finish Times, Leveled Back Floats and Back Float for all thesuccessors of the shifted activity).11.^Re-examine the activities on the sequence step and repeat steps 7 through 10 until allshifting is complete on this step.12.^Examine the next later sequence step and repeat steps 7 through 11. Continue in thismanner until all activities have been considered and all possible shifting has taken placeChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 83on every sequence step. This is the end of the backward cycle and completes the levelingoperation.4.9.2 Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm for Problems involving Activities withVariable Resource UsageAgain the shifting procedure is divided into a forward pass and a backward pass operation. Inthe forward pass, the activities are shifted forward in the range of their free floats and duringthe backward pass the activities are be shifted backwards in the range of their back floats, inorder to minimize the resource histogram area and achieve a leveled resource profile.Forward PassThe shifting procedure begins with the activities on the last sequence step.1. Examine activities on the current sequence step.(a) Every activity with zero free float as well as milestone and hammock activities areskipped.(b) Every activity having a zero resource usage rate is shifted to the limit of its free float.This allows the preceding activities to be shifted by the greatest amount (within thefree float constraint).(c) For each activity on the step having a non-zero resource usage rate, determine theextent of its free float and compute improvement factors for all possible days that theactivity can be shifted until the free float limit is reached.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 842.^Select the activity with the largest improvement factor as determined in the previous step.(a) No shifting takes place if the largest improvement factor is negative. Move to the nextsequence step and examine the activities as in step 1.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the largest improvement factor for several activities:(i) Move to (ii) if no shadow activity is involved. For the case of a shadowactivity, keep the location with the highest location index number for furthercomparisons while discarding its other locations.(ii) Select the activity which utilizes the greatest number of resources over itsduration i.e., the greatest activity resource consumption ERESO.(Thus for two activities with the same duration but with different total resourceconsumption, the activity with the greater resource consumption would give agreater reduction in resource levels on the days being vacated. An alternatechoice to this rule has been suggested in chapter 6.)(iii) If still tied, select the activity with the greatest Free Float.(iv) If still tied, select the activity with the latest resource leveled start date.(v) If still tied, select the activity with the smallest activity code.3.^Shift the selected activity subject to the following:(a) If the largest improvement factor is zero or positive, shift the selected activity andsubtract the activity resource rates, rk ( k = 1,2, from each of the dailyresource aggregates at the position being vacated, respectively, and adding the sameChapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 85rates to each of the daily resource aggregates at the position being occupied,respectively.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the improvement factor at several of the possibleactivity positions, shift the activity the greatest number of time units. Update the dailyresource aggregates field as described in 3(a).4. If shifting has occurred in step 3, update the "Resource leveled dates record" (i.e.,Leveled Start and Finish Times, Leveled Free Float of the shifted activity and LeveledFree Float of all the predecessors of the shifted activity).5. Re-examine the activities on the sequence step and repeat steps 1 through 4 until allshifting is complete on this step.6. Examine the next earlier sequence step and repeat steps 1 through 5. Continue in thismanner until all activities have been considered and all possible shifting has taken placeon every sequence step.Backward PassThe shifting procedure commences with the activities on the first sequence step.7.^Examine the activities on the current sequence step.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 86(a) Every activity with zero back float as well as milestone and hammock activities arepassed over.(b) Every activity having a zero resource usage rate is shifted to the limit of the activityback float. This allows the succeeding activities to be shifted by the greatest amount(within the back float constraint).(c) For each activity on the sequence step having a non-zero resource usage rate,determine the extent of its back float and compute improvement factors for allpossible days that the activity can be shifted until the back float limit is reached.8. Select the activity with the largest improvement factor as determined in the previous step.(a) If the largest improvement factor is negative, no shifting takes place. Move to the nextsequence step and examine the activities as in step 7.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the largest improvement factor for several activities:(i) Move to (ii) if no shadow activity is involved. For the case of a shadowactivity, keep the location with the lowest location index number for furthercomparisons while discarding its other locations.(ii) Select the activity which utilizes the greatest number of resources over itsactivity duration i.e., the greatest activity resource consumption /RES°.(iii) If still tied, select the activity with the greatest Back Float.(iv) If still tied, select the activity with the latest resource leveled start date.(v) If still tied, select the activity with the smallest activity code.Chapter 4. The Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm^ 879.^Shift the selected activity subject to the following:(a) If the largest improvement factor is zero or positive, shift the selected activity andsubtract the activity resource rates, rk (k = 1,2, ^ 1), from each of the dailyresource aggregates at the position being vacated, respectively, and adding the samerates to each of the daily resource aggregates at the position being occupied,respectively.(b) If there is a tie in the value of the improvement factor at several of the possibleactivity positions, shift the activity the greatest number of time units. Update the dailyresource aggregates field as described in 3(a).10. If shifting has occurred in step 3, update the "Resource leveled dates record" (i.e.,Leveled Start and Finish Times, Leveled Back Float of the shifted activity and theLeveled Back Float of all the successors of the shifted activity).11. Re-examine the activities on the sequence step and repeat steps 7 through 10 until allshifting is complete on this step.12. Examine the next later sequence step and repeat steps 7 through 11. Continue in thismanner until all activities have been considered and all possible shifting has taken placeon every sequence step. This is the end of the backward cycle and completes the levelingoperation.ssChapter SEXAMPI PS5.1^IntroductionIn this chapter examples have been worked out using the Modified Minimum MomentAlgorithm. The first four examples presented were taken from the literature on resourceleveling and were discussed in chapter 3. These examples were used to validate theimplementation of the modified minimum moment algorithm and to compare its results withother approaches. A small number of examples are presented for linear projects. The linearscheduling examples have been designed to provide insight on how the leveling procedurebehaves when confronted by flow lines. A measure of goodness for the leveling procedure,called the resource improvement coefficient (RIC) by Harris (22) has been computed bothfor the early start time and resource leveled histogram for each problem. RIC is the ratioof the moment of actual histogram to the hypothetical minimum moment histogram(perfectly uniform resource usage) and is given by the formula:n E yi2RIC - ^(E )92[5.1]where, yi , represents the resource demand on day i of the project and the summation is overthe n intervals covered by the histogram. In this chapter the value of n will always beassumed to be equal to the project length (This is the definition used in the modifiedminimum moment algorithm).Chapter 5. Examples^ 89Example 5.1: Burman Example (10)The network diagram for this example was given in Figure 3.1. Figure 5.1 shows the earlystart and leveled resource histograms. The resource leveled histogram obtained usingBurman's approach (3.3) has also been superimposed on Figure 5.1. Appendix A gives theearly start and leveled schedule for the project and the daily resource aggregates before andafter leveling. Resource improvement coefficient values for the various resource profiles areas follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.2009RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.1756RIC - Burman's method = 1.1836Two observations are made. First, given the small size of the problem, the opportunity forsignificant shifting of activities is small. Second, the minimum moment approach providesbetter results than Burman's approach.1 2 3 4 5 6 10^11^12^13^14^154./X „e, /// /A4Z^, 4///,/A;, /4/4^ .^t /1, z111 after leveling^^ before leveling^F , Burman's solution 0 critical resourcesFigure 5.1 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.1, Burman (10)Chapter 5. Examples^ 91Example 5.2: Harris Example (Packing Method (23))The network diagram for this example was given in Figure 3.2. Figure 5.2 shows the earlystart and leveled resource histograms. It should be noted that the result obtained usingHarris's Packing Method (3.5) is exactly the same as obtained through the use of ModifiedMinimum Moment Algorithm. Appendix B gives the early start and leveled schedule for theproject and the daily resource aggregates before and after leveling. Resource improvementcoefficient values for various resource profiles are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.5527RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.1056RIC - Harris's Packing method = 1.105616 —R 14 —es 12 —010 —r89 10 11 12^13^14^15^166•n4t. s .^201^2^3^4^5^6^7^8iProject!in after leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 5.2 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.2, Harris (22)Chapter 5. Examples^ 93Example 53: Easa Example (18)The network diagram for this example has been given in Figure 3.3. Figure 5.3 shows theearly start and leveled resource histograms. It should be noted that the result obtained usingEasa's method (3.6) is exactly the same as obtained through the use of Modified MinimumMoment Algorithm. Appendix C gives the early start and leveled schedule for the projectand the daily resource aggregates before and after leveling. Resource improvementcoefficient values for resource profiles are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.0491RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.0113RIC - Easa's method = 1.01131 2 3:Pi-Ojëefiday.:^ before leveling5after leveling critical resources41 41 20 1 0r 86n 4tFigure 5.3 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.3, Easa (18)Chapter 5. Examples^ 95Example 5.4: Antill and Woodhead Example (3)The network diagram for this example was given in Figure 3.4. Three types of resources areinvolved - Manpower, Equipment A and Equipment B. The three resources have beensummed up for each activity to get the aggregate resource profile. The leveling operationis then performed on the combined resources. Figure 5.4 shows the early start and leveledresource histograms. The resource leveled histogram obtained using Antill and Woodhead'sapproach (3.7) has also been superimposed on Figure 5.4. Appendix D gives the early startand leveled schedule for the project and the daily resource aggregates before and afterleveling. Resource improvement coefficient values for the various resource profiles are asfollows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.1736RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.0193RIC - Antill and Woodhead's method = 1.0131From Figure 5.4 it can be observed that the peak values using the Antill & Woodhead'smethod is less, accounting for the slightly better RIC value. Although not done, a seconditeration (another forward and backward pass) using the modified minimum momentalgorithm may be worth considering.1^2^3^4^5^6^7^8^9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25ti After leveling^^ before leveling^Antill & Woodhead's 4 critical resourcessolutionFigure 5.4 Resource histograms before and after leveling - example 5.4, Antill & Woodhead (3)Chapter 5. Examples^ 97Example 5.5: Original Harris Minimum Moment Algorithm Example (22)This example has been adopted from Harris (22). The network diagram, early start scheduleand the resource details are shown in Figure 5.5. The leveling operation has been performedon two resources - Resource 1 and Resource 2. Three cases have been considered. Case 1:Resource leveling for Resource 1 only, Case 2: Resource leveling for Resource 2 only andCase 3: Resource leveling for combined resources i.e., Resource 1 + Resource 2.Figure 5.6 shows the early start and leveled resource histograms for case 1 - i.e., resourceleveling for Resource 1 only. The resource improvement coefficient values are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.4914RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.1506The solution was identical to Harris's solution.Figure 5.7 shows the early start and leveled resource histograms for case 2 - i.e., resourceleveling for Resource 2 only. The resource improvement coefficient values are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.9169RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.1667Harris does not give the resource profile for leveling resource 2 only but gives the resourceimprovement coefficient value for this case. RIC value obtained from Modified MinimumMoment Algorithm is found to be the same as from Harris's minimum moment algorithm.Figure 5.8 shows the early start and leveled resource histograms for case 3 - i.e., resourceChapter 5. Examples^ 98leveling for combined resources, Resource 1 + Resource 2. Resource improvementcoefficient values are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.6809RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.1622Resource improvement coefficient values when compared to that obtained by Harris arefound to be the same.Appendix E gives the early start and leveled schedule for the project and the daily resourceaggregates before and after leveling for all three cases.early start time^()arty finish time5 I iiactivity number I. F 73 1 6 1_ 2resource ?1 I resource 2duration2 1 41 1 2 1 4critical pathSample activity O 1 2A 20 1 2 1 221 8E 6 21815-••■--011. 8 1 10K 104 I 2150 1 0 ^ O 1 5^ 5 1 11^ -O.^ r 18 1 20ST 1 ^Ow" B 3 ^IMP" F 7 ^rill... L 11 ^III► P 1401010^ 2 1 5 1 3 3 1 8 1 2 21 710^ 0 2 0O 1 3 ^ 3 1 9^ 9 1 12^C  4 G 8 M 12 ^2 1 3 1 0 2 1 3 1 8 3 1 7^IH 9^0 1 41- 5 4 1- 2 13Figure 5.5 Network for resource leveling with two resources; example 5.5, Harris (22)S1 12^13^14^15^16^17^18^19^202^3^4^5^6^7^8^9^10^11critical resources,I I ;I:11 ,;10,00!!!! ,![, 111" 111.,,tojeot:1140 ,;:a11,1„,.,m1„„„„:„,„„„„,.VI after leveling^^ before levelingR 12eso 10urceFigure 5.6 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Resource 1; example 5.5, Harris (22)g18 —R 16 —es 14 —0u 12 —rc 10 —e1^2^3^4^5^6^7^8^9^10^118 —12^13^14^15^16^17^18^19^20. rojecII after leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 5.7 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Resource 2; example 5.5, Harris (22)35 —30 —eo 25 —ur 20 —ce15 —un 10 —t1••••• •••••••^v'' 1^2^3^4^5^6^7^8^9^10^11^12^13^14^15^16^17^18^19^20loor TOW PIIPoi0j:after leveling^^ before leveling^A critical resourcesFigure 5.8 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Resource 1 + Resource 2; example 5.5, Harris (22)Chapter 5. Examples^ 103Example 5.6: Clough and Sears Example (15)This example has been adopted from Clough and Sears (15). The network diagram for thisexample has been given in Figure 5.9. Three types of resources are involved - Carpenters,Labourers and Equipment operators. All three resources have been summed up to get anaggregated resource profile for the project. The leveling operation is then performed on thecombined resources. Figure 5.10 shows the early start and leveled resource histograms usingthe modified minimum moment algorithm. Figure 5.11 shows the early start and leveledresource histograms obtained by Clough and Sears.Appendix F consists of reports generated by REPCON for this project. They treat: activityproduction data, predecessor and successor relationships, resource assignment details, activitydates and float, early start and leveled resource usage profiles, and usage profiles for criticalactivities.Resource improvement coefficient values for various resource profiles are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.6842RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.3949RIC - Clough and Sears solution = 1.7145Thus we notice that the Clough and Sears solution has worsened the initial RIC. Thishappened because in that leveled schedule, resource buildup occurred during the central andlatter half of the project. During the first 12 days, activities with resources were notscheduled. Thus the increase in the levels of the histogram during the latter half of theproject resulted in the increase of histogram moment as measured by RIC.Chapter 5. Examples104BOO^ SUM 29 OM MOM8a 10S1.1e• 6• 4nt 2 -S12 -1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69Project^ •.y•IN after leveling^El before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 5.10 Resource histograms before and after leveling; example 5.10 (Modified Minimum Moment Approach)tS2 -12 -R6• 10s.08U:.• rc• 6ei iy^';,01 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 694 1 1 oafter leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesI^-1 1^If11111Figure 5.11 Resource histograms before and after leveling; example 5.6, (Clough and Sears solution)Chapter 5. Examples^ 107Example 5.7: Linear Scheduling, Example 1The network diagram for this example is given in Figure 5.12. This is a linear project with4 locations involving 3 ordered activities arranged in ascending order of production rate andone resource. The leveling operation for this example was also carried out manually andFigure 5.13 gives the manual computations along with the activity shifting details. Figure 5.14shows the early start and leveled resource histograms. Linear planning charts for early start,late start and leveled schedules are shown in Figures 5.15, 5.16 and 5.17, respectively.Appendix G gives the early start and leveled schedule for the project and the daily resourceaggregates before and after leveling.Resource improvement coefficient values for the earlystart time and leveled resource profiles are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.1458RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.0937By arranging the fastest activity first, slowest last in the example, significant float for earlieractivities has been created, maximizing opportunities for the shifting of activities at higherlocations.The peaks on days 7 and 8 have been removed in the leveling process and a fairly leveledresource profile has been obtained. As we see in the Linear Planning Chart in Figure 5.17,the flow lines for activity A and activity B have been broken at locations 3 and 4respectively. Activity C being the critical activity maintains its flow line characteristics. Thuswe see that when flow line activities are subjected to leveling operations, they could looseChapter 5. Examples^ 108their continuous flow line behaviour.early start date^early finish date6 8A4 7location ---11. activity number2 5565410714I A3210 14 18t^tduration resource rateSample activity3 5 8-IP- B1 B2B2 B3 B4 10412 12 18 18 24 24 306 C2 9 C3 11 rraillim. C4 12PP6 6Critical pathFigure 5.12 Network for resource leveling; example 5.78sir3Z6-5Chapter 5. Examples^ 110SSN DAY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 301 .51239-511-5: 1245'ow././'Ar •458 2•52•4•-•5• ,^•5.5.0„^...^;^ ....^ ...^.^ .....^.^ .^ .^ .^.. : .^ . . ....!^1 1^; .. .. 1Or Ad13, 5110•5^ICI^5 5 10 10 10 10 15 15 10 10 10!10;1011011011011011015 :5 1515 ; 515151515151 5 51^10 -1.- 6 .5^1-5^1+51+5 i+5^1^111^5^5 10 ; 10 : 10110;15;15 ;10 ;10110110110110151515151515 ;10110110110151515151515;7-0-12 11.51.51111^1111^:^1+5J+51^1^111111111^1 2^5 5 10 10 10110110110110110110110110;10151515 5110!10;10110110110151515151 5151..^...^.^.^.^.^.^.^.^.8 -1.-4 1^1^1^1^1-5 1-5^1•5 1+51+51+5 :+51^1^1^1^1^.. 1^1^.. 113^5 5 10 10110110 1 101101101101 5 5 5 5110110110110110;1011011011011015 ; 5 15 15 1 554 -6. 8 :.51•51111111+51+51111111111111111114^5 5 10;10 : 51 5110110110110 1 51 5 ! 10 1010110110110 10110110110110110 1 5 15 15 15^5155--2 !^1.51-51^:^1+5451^111:11^1 ::^....15^5 5 110110 ^5! 5 5! 5;10 ;10 !10!10  10 10 . 10 .... 10  10 110;10;1011011011015 5 5 15^5152 -1.- 4 1-51Z;^1+5+5;;!;^11^;^111111^111111^1 6^5 5. 5! 5 5 5110: 10;10110110 1 10110:10110110 :10 10110110:10110;10 ! 1015 15 5 15 1 515,^. .^.. ^„^ ...2 -.1- 4 1^+5+51^1.5:.51 1^!^11 11^1^111.!^:11!^1^!!!:^1^"^11^ :1 7 ! 5^5 10'10 ^5^51 5 ^5:10110 :10110:10; 10;10110; 10110110:10:10110110 :1015 :5 15 :5 :5 154^8 ! l+51+51111111.51•5!^11111111^I^11!^11118 ! 5 i 5 10 j10 1 10110: 51 5110110110110! 5 15 :10110110'10110 10110110 11011015 :5 15 15 15 155 -.8- 2 1+5 '+5 !^1•51 9 :5 5 10 10 :10:101101101101101 5 515 5 10 10110 10 10 10 10;10110:10! 5 ; 5151515 ! 57.4- 8^ 1+51+5^ Z11015 5 10 10!10 10!1011010 10'10 1015 5 10 10110 10I 5 5 ' 10 10110 10 5 5 55 58 .4- 2 +5+5^Z -5111 : 5 5 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10110 10 10:10 5 5 5 5110 10110 1015 5 5 5 :5^510 ^4 +51+5 +5 +5^1-5 Z112 5 5 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10I 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 '5 5Figure 5.13 Manual resource leveling computations for example 5.733445CL0u.16 -1^2^3^4^5^6^7^8^9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30pj , NI after leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 5.14 Resource histograms before and after leveling; example 5.7Chapter 5. Examples^ 1120# If^IF^1 , 11f.0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32duration (days)Figure 5.15 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.7Chapter 5. Examples^ 1130 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32duration (days)Figure 5.16 Linear planning chart for late start schedule; example 5.7Chapter 5. Examples^ 1143a0To 20^ [If^I^11[1i^i^f^I^I^I^i^f0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32duration (days)Figure 5.17 Linear planning chart for leveled schedule; example 5.78Chapter 5. Examples^ 115Example 5.8: Linear Scheduling Example 2.The network diagram for this example was given in Figure 2.4. This is a linear project with4 locations involving 1 shadow activity - A (locations 1 to 4), 2 ordered activities - B and C(locations 1 to 4) and 1 continuous activity - D (locations 1 and 2). The leveling operationfor this example was also carried out manually and Figure 5.18 gives the manualcomputations along with the activity shifting details. Figure 5.19 shows the early start andleveled resource histograms. Linear planning charts for early start, late start and leveledschedule are shown in Figures 5.20, 5.21 and 5.22, respectively. Appendix H gives the earlystart and leveled schedule for the project and the daily resource aggregates before and afterleveling. Resource improvement coefficient values are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.2561RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.0134In this example we see that the shadow activities were associated with large amounts of float.In the early start schedule these activities were scheduled simultaneously causing the peakdemand of resources during the first 5 days of the project. In the leveling operation shiftingof these activities along with the shift of other activities produced a fairly good leveledresource profile. From the Linear planning chart in Figure 5.22 it can be observed that thecontinuous flow line behaviour of ordered activity B (early start schedule) is broken atlocation 3. The shifting behaviour of Shadow activity A requires explanation. We see thatthe shadow activity A at location 4 has been scheduled before work at location 3. Thishappened despite the insertion of rule 2 (b) (i) in the modified algorithm. To understandChapter 5. Examples^ 116this behaviour, refer to Figure 5.18 which shows the manual leveling computations. Duringthe Forward pass location A2(activity 3), A3(activity 4) and A4(activity 5) were tied for a shiftof 6 days. The algorithm selected activity 5 (loc.4) for shifting it being the last location of theshadow activity A. In the next trial on this sequence step, activity 5 (loc.4) could not beshifted further (although it had the greatest free float of 12 days) but activity 4 (loc.3) wasshifted beyond activity 5 (loc.4). This happened because activity 5 (loc.4) at its new positioncould not produce an equal or greater improvement factor than activities 4 (loc.3) and 3(loc.2) and therefore activity 4 (loc.3) was shifted. Again, in the backward pass, activity 4(loc.3) was not shifted back (owing to the improvement factor produced) but activity 5(loc.4) was shifted backward by 1 day. Thus, activity 5 (loc 4) was scheduled earlier thanactivity 4 (loc 3). Expressing it in another way, the initial movement of activity 5 (loc.4) by6 days hindered its further movement. It can be seen that being greedy and taking thelargest shift may not always be the best strategy.One way to prevent this situation would be to ensure that before shifting a location of ashadow activity, it does not get scheduled beyond its earlier locations (earlier in the senseof execution order). If such a situation arises, then a more logical construction result couldbe obtained by comparing and switching shadow activity locations while maintaining otherprecedence relationships. This approach will not generally be workable when the shadowactivity has different resource usage rates at different locations.Chapter 5. Examples^ 117DAYi 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33SSN2-10234567 6 108-10.1 0-1 013-1015 - 103-10^; 1410 1 5-107 1,101^,1^ !.10^1!12-101 1,1 4-1 0r 222456610 40 40 i40 40 ;4011011,14 -41-8i11 40404040 401012-■4112 140 40 40 140 40 : 10^to  ! 0 20 ^20 120 20 20 20 20 30 SO SO SO 40 20 20 40 110 10 Ito 1,3 Ito tc:1 io !to:^!^!^:^!^,^r^r^!^! 10 40 r10 -10 10 .10 710 -10 +1010+10+10+10 1+10+10+10:^r^!10110110 12020 20 ! 20 120 20120120 20! 20 r 20 !2010 10 !10 i10 4040 i20 20 20120 2020i^!^:^I^;^I^1^40 40 710 -10 ;+10+10+10+10^1^1^1^.10 10 i 10 .4020 20 20202012012010 110 10 110 20 20 20 20 2020 120 20 20 20202094^ 10 10^1-10 1+10+11:410+10!13 140; 404040' 40110 10110i 1020 2020120110 i10 I10 110 2020120202020 20 201201 202017-'- 2^1^i-10 r40^+10+10^!^!^;^"r14 140! 40: 404040; 10 10! 11:: 100 110 2S! 20: 201 2010 !10 12020 20 . 1 20 20 20 20^.; 20! 20;! 2016 40 -10 -10 -10 -10^+1W440410+10410!^;;!^ ::;:;.;;;:;;;:.,15 30 30 30 30 30 10 2020 2020 20 20 1:2020 12010 110 :2020 2020 20120 20 2020 20 204-0-12--10 -10 -10 -10 -10 1.+1074-10 1+10 1+101+10;16 20 20 20 20 20 10 20 2020120 20 20: 3030 3020 20 i20 20 1 1 20202020 2020 2020 203^1 -10^+1020 20 20 20 203^1 + 1 0^-108 20 20 20 20 20 10 20 20 20 20 20 20 30 30 30 20 205-■-1 +10^A019 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 10 20 30 30 30 20 207-1-2^ +10+10^-10 -101 10 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 30 20 20 30 20 20 20 2017 10 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 30 30 30 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 2020 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20Figure 5.18 Manual resource leveling computations for example 5.840R 35 -S 30 -OU 2r• 20 —e15Uni 10tS 51^2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33Project aid after leveling^^ before leveling^/' critical resourcesFigure 5.19 Resource histograms before and after leveling; example 5.8Chapter 5. Examples^ 11940281 1^I^1^1^10 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36duration (days)activity A activity B activity C activity D-----*----Figure 5.20 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.80^3^6^9 12 15 18 21duration (days)Chapter 5. Examples^ 120activity A activity B activity C activity DFigure 5.21 Linear planning chart for leveled schedule; example 5.8Chapter 5. Examples^ 1214•3 —Cc.)I I I I—F4-1 ^0 3^6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27duration (days)130 33 36activity A activity B activity C activity D♦Figure 5.22 Linear planning chart for late start schedule; example 5.8Chapter 5. Examples^ 122Example 5 9- Linear Scheduling Example 3This is the same project discussed in Example 5.8 but with different resources usages. Twocases have been considered. Case 1: Resource leveling for Resource 1 only and Case 2:Resource leveling for Resource 2 only.The network diagram, including early start schedule and resource details, is given in Figure5.23. Appendix I gives the early start and leveled schedule for the project and the dailyresource aggregates before and after leveling for the two cases.Figure 5.24 shows the early start and leveled resource histograms for case 1 - i.e., levelingResource 1 only. Resource improvement coefficient values are as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.5340RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.0798Figure 5.25 shows the early start and leveled resource histograms for case 2 - i.e., levelingResource 2 only. Resource improvement coefficient values are as follows:RIC before leveling = 1.1680RIC after leveling = 1.0523early strut datelocationresourcesearly finish dateactivity number2resources17 21B4^1281 41 61^I0 5 9 9 13 13 17 17 21 durationAl 2 B2 7 B3 9 B4^12 Sample activity11.1(1 51 4 8 -1 6 8141 6 81- 41 6 81 41 6► 11•••0 9 15 15 21 21 27 27 33—a. A2 3 C1 8 C2 10 C3 13 C4 151C1 5 1 4 61 618 61 618 61618 6161833 330^0 0 1^5 17 1 21 21 125Stan^1 A3 1 4 D. 11 ^ D 14 Ruh 16olol o 1(1514 41 4110 41411( 0101 0Continuous activityFigure 5.23 Network for resource leveling with two resources; example 5.9-11- 0^5 ^ A4 51(1 51 4 Critical path40R 35S 30U 25e• 2012 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33Project dayMEM1^2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11• 15ni 10tS 5°V1it after leveling^Li before leveling^0 critical resourcesFigure 5.24 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Resource 1; example 5.925R6 20S0Ur 15Ce10nt1^2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33!Rat /allafter leveling^^ before leveling^critical resourcesFigure 5.25 Resource histograms before and after leveling - Resource 2; example 5.9Chapter 5. Examples^ 126Example 5.10 Large Project - 1 (Linear Scheduling)A larger linear project was subjected to resource leveling. It consisted of 15 locations and8 activities. Excluding the two milestones and one shadow activity, all the other activitieswere ordered activities. The logic and schedule along with the activity resource usage profilescan be found in Appendix J. Figure 5.26 shows the leveled resource histogram superimposedover the early start resource histogram. Similarly, Figure 5.27 shows the leveled resourcehistogram superimposed over late start resource histogram. Figure 5.28, 5.29 and 5.30 showthe linear planning charts for the early start, late start and leveled schedules, respectively.It can be observed from the linear planning chart for the leveled schedule that the locationsof the shadow activity do not follow the sequence order of the project's locations. Note thatthe various locations of the shadow activity do not share the same sequence step number.Resource improvement coefficient values were found to be as follows:RIC - Early Start Schedule = 1.4753RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.2967The facility to iterate several times (a forward pass and backward pass constitute a singleiteration) was added to the computer code. 4 iterations were conducted and a furtherimprovement in the resource histogram was obtained. Figure 4.31 shows the linear planningchart for the leveled schedule after 4 iterations. With 4 iterations, the improvement factorwas:Chapter 5. Examples^ 127was:RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.2707Left to explore is whether iterations should be conducted on the forward pass and thenmove to the backward pass including iterations.90 —1^6^11^16^21^26^31^36^41^46^51^56m 61^66^71^76^81^86^91^96 101 106 111 116 121om=MEMafter leveling^^ before levelingFigure 5.26 Resource histogram: leveled and early start; example 5.1080 —1^6^11^16^21^26^31^36^41^46^51^56^61^66^71^76^81^86^91^98 101 106 111 116 121^llllE^1010after leveling^^ late start profileFigure 5.27 Resource histograms: leveled and late start; example 5.10UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABFile Used . 0 \REP200\PROJ23\ASHONESelect . All ActivitiesSort:^Activity CodeDate Selection . Act/Sch/EarlySchedule WindowTime OINAR93 To 29JUN93Locations:^I To^15REPCONTMTEST PROJECT FOR THESIS — EXTENDED TEST 1Page 2W 2Early DatesQReport Date:^27APR93LINEAR PLANNING CHART ACTIVITY INDEX^ Report Time:^15:24:41Progress Date:Revision Number: 0 VICritical^Activity p^Activity has procurement sequence^c^CompletedCode Type Description Code^Type DescriptionG00700 SM PROJECT START G00300^0^ACTIVITYG00100 0 ACTIVITY A * OG00400^0^ACTIVITY 0G00200 0 ACTIVITY B 0600500^D^ACTIVITY EFEY^** ®* 0Activity Types: 0 Ordered, C Continuous. S Shadow, H Hammock, SM Start Milestone, FM Finish Milestone "P.Code Type Description0 G00600 0 ACTIVITY FO G00800 S ACTIVITY GLOCN8MARCH15.22 29..5.APRIL12^19199326.3 10MAY17.24.7JUNE14.21.281514,7 .13. . .^. .1211. . . 7 . . .109. . .87. . •6//—5.43. . . . . .21 1• • . . • . •2 3 4118515MARCH22 29 5t12^0APRILM 3 10 17MAY24 7 14JUNE21 281993Figure 5.28 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.10LoaOUBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCONIMFile Used 0 \REP200\PROJ23\ASHONESelect' All ActivitiesSort^Activity CodeDate Selection: Act/Sch/LateSchedule Windowlime. ^To 29JUN93Locations'^I To^15TEST PROJECT FOR THESIS - EXTENDED TEST 1Late OatesLINEAR PLANNING CHART ACTIVITY INDEX Report Date:^27APR93Report Time:^15:22:35Progress Date:Revision Number: 0Page 2 01 2* Critical Activity^p Activity has procurement sequence^c Completed^Activity Types: 0 Ordered, C Continuous, S Shadow. H Hammock, SN Start Milestone, FM Finish MilestoneCode Type DescriptionO G00700 SW PROJECT START0 0600100^0 ACTIVITY A0 G00200 0 ACTIVITY ICode Type DescriptionO G00300 0 ACTIVITY CG00400^0 ACTIVITY 0@ G00500 0 ACTIVITY ECode Type Description0 G00600 0 ACTIVITY F® G00800 S ACTIVITY GLOCN MARCH8^15 22 29 5APRIL12^19199326 3MAY.10^17^24JUNE7^14 21 2815 .^.^. ........ ...7,•14 /0-./13 . ^ .^. /712 —I/ `/11 Z. . . . . .10 Z/7 /9 . ^ . .Z/..7 ./76 /7 /75 / . //32 /1 &5K . . . .^.^. .8^15 22 29 5 12^19 26 3 10^17^24 7^14 N 28MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE1993Figure 5.29 Linear planning chart for late start schedule; example 5.10UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REFICON"File Used D. \REP200\PROJ23\ASHONESelect . All ActivitiesSort .^Activity CodeDate Selection' Act/Sch/Res LevSchedule WindowTime: 0IMAR93 To 29JUN93Locations:^1 To^15KEY^x Critical Activity^p Activity has procurement sequenceTEST PROJECT FOR THESIS — EXTENDED TEST 1Resource Leveled DatesLINEAR PLANNING CHART ACTIVITY INDEXPage 2 Of 2Report Date:^27APR93Report Time:^15:28:09Progress Date:Revision Number: 0c Completed^Activity Types: 0 Ordered. C Continuous, S Shadow, H Hammock, SW Start Milestone, FM Finish MilestoneCode Type DescriptionG00700 SM PROJECT START® G00100 0 ACTIVITY Aw0 G00200 0 ACTIVITY BCode Type DescriptionG00300^0 ACTIVITY Cx 0600400 0 ACTIVITY 00 G00500 0 ACTIVITY ECode Type Description0 G00600 0 ACTIVITY Fx 0 G00800 S ACTIVITY GLOCN MARCH8^15 22 29 5APRIL12^19199326 3 10MAY17 24 7JUNE14^21 2815 . < i Z — Z '_14 7-. 7/13• . ___/:,12../10. . • . _ /.8 /6Z4, /• . . • .2/ i2^3 . . . .^. . . (P...<.8^15 22 29 5 12^19 26 3 10 17 24 7 14^21 28MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE1993Figure 5.30 Linear planning chart for resource leveled schedule; example 5.10UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABFile Used 0 \REP200\PHOJ23\AS110NESelect . All ActivitiesSort^Activity CodeDate Selection Act/Sch/Res LevSchedule WindowTime 0INAR93 Io 29JUN93Locations'^110^15TEST PROJECT FOR THESIS — EXTENDED TEST 1Resource Leveled DatesLINEAR PLANNING CHART ACTIVITY INDEX Report Date:^28APR93Report Time:^16: 33: 15Progress Date:Revision Number: 0AT Y^v Critical Activity^p Activity has procurement sequence^c Completed^Activity Types: 0 Ordered, C Continuous, S Shadow, H Hassock, SN Start Milestone. FN Finish MilestoneCode Type Description600700 SW PROJECT STARTm O600100 0 ACTIVITY Am 0 G00200 0 ACTIVITY BCode Type DescriptionA O 600300 0 ACTIVITY Co O600100 0 ACTIVITY 00 600500 0 ACTIVITY ECode Type Description0 G00600 0 ACTIVITY Fw8O600800 S ACTIVITY GLOCN8MARCH15 22 29 51993APRIL12^19^26 3.10MAY17 24.7JUNE14^21 28151 413 . . — ___,/r12 X //7_^7 _Z11109 Z.^. .a . _ .7.•7.65/— i. .^. • .2 712 3 I 5• . . 0 .^. • (t(e 15 22 29 5 12^19^26 3 M 17 N 7 IA^a MMARCH APRIL MAY JUNE1993Figure 5.31 Linear planning chart for resource leveled schedule; example 5.10(after four Iterations)Chapter 5. Examples^ 134Example 5.11 Large Project - 2 (Linear Scheduling)The logic and schedule for this example project can be found in appendix K along withactivity resource details. Figure 5.32 shows the resource leveled histogram superimposed overthe early start histogram. Similarly, Figure 5.33 shows the resource leveled resourcehistogram superimposed over late start resource histogram. Figures 5.34, 5.35 and 5.36 showthe linear planning charts for the early start, late start and leveled schedules, respectively.Resource improvement coefficient values were found to be as follows:RIC - EST Schedule = 1.3794RIC - Modified Minimum Moment Algorithm = 1.2510The presence of flow lines restricted the movement of the activities by limiting the amountof floats. The effects of flow lines were more prominent during the initial phase of theproject where the activities were either critical or near-critical. For this project, mostnoncritical activities with considerable floats were scheduled during the latter part of theproject. Therefore, significant changes and smoothing in the resource profile can be seen inthis part of the schedule.This is the largest project for which the leveling operation was carried out and is much largerthan any example found in the literature. The results demonstrate that the ModifiedMinimum Algorithm is workable for large sized projects.Chapter 5. Examples^ 135This example was solved on an IBM 286 machine using a file server and the computationtime was found to be approximately 3 minutes. With the availability of 386, 486 and noweven 586 machines, the computation time can be significantly reduced.1^11^21^31^41^51^61^71^81^91^101^111^121^131^141^151^161^171^181^191^201Project dayafter leveling^^ before levelingFigure 5.32 Resource histograms: leveled and early start; example 5.111^11^21^31^41^51^61^71^81^91^101^111^121^131^141^151^161^171^181^191^201Project dayI after leveling^^ late start profileFigure 5.33 Resource histograms: leveled and late start; example 5.11UGC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCONTNFile Used D \REP200\PADJ11\SANPLESelect . All ActivitiesSort .^Start DateDate Selection: Act/Sch/EarlySchedule WindowTime: 01JUN88 To 31NAR89Locations . GPRJ To PNTHSAMPLE HIGHRISE PROJECT — REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2.0Early Start Time DatesReport Date:^27APR93Report Time:^14:48'49Progress Date:Revision Number: 0Page 1 Of 2LOCN JUNE^I6^13^20^27^4 JULY^I11^18^25^2.AUGUST8^15^22^291988^SEP^I6^12^19^26^3.OCTOBER11^17^24 NOV7^14^21^28 DEC5^12^19^28 JANUARY9^16^23^301989FEB6^13^20^27 MARCH6^13^20^28PNTH .^. _^. .. .^.^. 15,1ROOF ,,,riAWil,,ger:#1111111110.141WAIAMIIIIIIIMIIEINIEWAMIIIMIIIIIIIIIMPOIMINNEFAIIIPAINIIIMMIKEWM.1/1111111/11/11211OVAIRIMIWANWMAIIIII111111/111111111011111111/AWASIVAIIIKMAIM111111INCIIIIIIIITANIAMMIANEMENVAMMEVEMIIIIIMPRAFAVAIRIMIWAMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII109MEINa76543 Ail grArANWMPAMINWATIWAIIIIVAMMIMI2 ■ 11111111M11111111MVAIVAMMINFAMINIIIIMINIEllMAIN ■NEMainalIM MM.,,itkiprigrig11116111"1311EMB21.1■11.1111111-Wrd11111111111111111112111111111MBI82 1111WAMAD21111111.11=111111.111110FON ■ I EMII lif4a 1 I I II • II IC ID r(D( ) MIMISW WWII I EglaKM   I^I brIMMIIIIIMINVAPPIOS Gina it11 . . .^.^. .^. 111111MMI '^. ^....APPRGPRJ ir 161320274111825 2^8^15^22^29 6^12^19^26 3^11^17^24 7^14^2!^28 5^12^19^28 9^16^23^30 6^13^20^27 6^13^20^28JUNE^JULY^AUGUST SEP^'OCTOBER NOV DEC JANUARY FEB MARCH1988 1989Figure 5.34 Linear planning chart for early start schedule; example 5.11UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCON"File Used D \REP200\PROJTOSANPLESelect . All ActivitiesSort'^Start DateDate Selection . Act/Sch/LateSchedule WindowTime 01JUN88 To 31NAR89Locations . GPRJ To PNTHSAMPLE HIGHRISE PROJECT — REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2.0Late Start Time DatesReport Date:^27APR93Report Time:^14:53:45Progress Date:Revision Number: 0Page I Of 2LOCN JUNE^16^0^RP 4JULY^IUN^25^2AUGUST8^15^22^291988^SEP^I6^12^6^26^3OCTOBERHPNNOV7^M^'a^28DEC5^QoaJANUARY9^than1989FEB6^navMARCH6^nanPNTH 767_ . . AROOF /4I VIII.11 — -- ----I-1—EMI1 0 IIIIMIMIWAWEElIIIIIMEIMWAND'WA rallAWPAPIMMIllAUNIARMAIIKII Pia IIMVP'^All9B7 4iV,ElltiiiMMIVAIIIIIMPAMPAVAIFFINFAWAVIEMPWATIERMIllIIIMPAVAMIEWAIMEMAWAIWAII/1111AIME.s mid/1111.111111111VAII/543■ImmoBRIMPWFAIMIMOWNettAmill11111111111M1111111111111111•11111=61111MENIENIAININA;q4EMU..-11W111111111111111/AMal111111MOIMYANNIAIWAIMIRMEn.yrAitimmalawm.AMPANYAIONIEMPIEMEI2MAINB 1B2EON■ IA111103111111118111CIMIPJLIKAIIVIMIIIIIIIIN AVAMININ€111111XUD (111LNINCIIIMIIIIIIINLIImormismimiMialaMEMENEWswDSAPPR ■NM.GPRJ # 0  ^, 16132027 4111825 2^8^l5 22 3111724 7142128 512628 9 wsomvsnanJUNE^JULY^AUGUST SEP^!OCTOBER NOV DEC JANUARY FEB MARCH1988 1989Figure 5.35 Linear planning chart for late start schedule; example 5.11UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCONINFile Used A: \SAMPLESelect . All ActivitiesSort'^Start DateDate Selection: Act/Sch/Res LevSchedule WindowTime 01JUN88 To 31MAR89Locations . GPRJ To PNTHSAMPLE HIGHRISE PROJECT — REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2.0Resource Leveling Time DatesReport Date:^29APR93Report Time:^15:57:54Progress Date.Revision Number: 0Page I Of 2LOCN JUNE^I6^13^20^27^4JULY^Ill^18^25^2AUGUST8^15^22^291988SEP6^12^19126^3OCTOBERII^17^24NOVEMBER7^14^21^28DECEMBER5^12^19^28JANUARY9^16^23^301989FEBRUARY6^13^20^27MARCH6^13^20^28PNTH. . .^. .1, . .--.-^I^1A19:e)ROOF 441AllinwillMIMIcioritaimmoVAIWIAVAIIPIAWANS4/1111111111111111111111111111to."11111111111/APAIIIIRMINEMMILMS■111111111111EVEIV(M111111111MENIIIIIINIESIMIENUIDMIIILIIMIIIIFAFACSWAOIAWSIIMIIIMPYAIIIH1111111/11MNIFAIREMIIIIIIIIIMIW111111WAWMAINFAIIIIWANO2111111/41111111111111OrdrAllarrainialliralirAINO•11111WAVAIIIIIIIIIIIMINWAVAIII111111111111111FAMINIVATONWAIIIIggrAMINIMIEWAININWAIMINFAIPPP'^-..■•••"111111111111111111111,01111111APAPIEMIIIIREWANIAMINIIffirifilliffrAirAMINFAMMEMIEMOMWAIMMII_ ---•to9BMil76543,d44111111si4"Álit#11APPrAli1I=KIM.^.^.2MAIN ODB1 '41446.WONENTV:TOB 2FDN;laIII IIII0 NOSW 11®^la0 S . .^_APPRGPRJ . . . . 1.6020274JUNEII^18^25JULY2^8^15^22296AUGUST12^19SEP198826 3^111724OCTOBER NOVEMBER71421285121928DECEMBER9^16^23^30JANUARY6^13^20^27FEBRUARY19896^13^20^28MARCHFigure 5.36 Linear planning chart for resource leveled schedule; example 5.117Chapter 6^ 141CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONSThe objective of this thesis, which was to explore resource leveling as it applies to linearscheduling and variable resource usage at the activity level, has been accomplished. TheMinimum Moment Algorithm by Harris (22) has been modified to include additional rulesfor the purpose of resource leveling of linear schedules. The modified algorithm wasdeveloped based on REPCON's special modeling structures which facilitate linearscheduling. It was then programmed and implemented into REPCON. Further modificationshave been made in the basic algorithm to make it more computationally time efficient.The Modified Moment Algorithm has been tested on a series of examples and the resultshave been presented in the previous chapter. The results obtained through the use of thisprocedure in most cases are found to be better than the results obtained from other levelingprocedures.For the multiple resource case, the algorithm currently combines the resources assuming anatural weighting and levels them in a single operation. With the assumption of naturalweighting, the resource which contributes the most to the "difference of the daily resourceaggregates" is favored in the leveling operation. In future, this work should be extended toderive weights to allow, for example, resources to contribute equally to the leveling process.The computation of weighting factors for respective resources can be based upon the criteriaChapter 6. Conclusion and Recommendations^ 142of "difference of daily resource aggregates" over the project duration, as described in Harris(22). Another approach would be to allow the user to assign weights directly. This facilityhas been incorporated in REPCON.In future, alternate priority rules should be explored for step 2(b) of the algorithm, where,in order to select an activity for shifting, a choice must be made among identicalimprovement factors. Instead of the rule which states that one should select the activity withthe greatest free float, an alternate might be "to select the activity with the greatest amountof shift". For the variable resource usage case, the rule "select the activity with the greatesttotal resource consumption" may be replaced with the rule "select the activity with thegreatest average resource rate ( = total resource consumption/duration)". These rules shouldbe tried out over a variety of examples and a comparative analysis should be made toascertain the performance of these heuristic rules.The effect of multiple iterations of the forward and backward pass on the leveling resultsshould be further explored. The testing should be done on large-sized projects involvingactivities with significant amounts of float. In the present implementation, this facility hasbeen included by giving the user the option to decide on the number of iterations to beperformed. One iteration signifies a forward pass followed by a backward pass. Anotherapproach which should be explored is to first conduct the forward pass iterations followedby the backward pass iterations.Chapter 6. Conclusion and Recommendations^ 143Further investigations should be carried out to test the effectiveness of the algorithm usingtotal float as the maximum limit of the shift for any activity rather than using the criteria offree float. The algorithm may further be extended to include the condition of activitysplitting.Another interesting approach would be to fuse the Minimum Moment Algorithm with thePacking Method for Resource Leveling. While making the decision to shift an activity on anysequence step, the penalties contributed by the preceding activities in the forward pass andthe succeeding activities in the backward pass may also be ascertained apart from calculatingthe moments of the resource histogram. The resultant effect of the moment of the histogramand the penalties contributed by the preceding or succeeding activities due to the shift willdetermine the activity's positioning. This procedure likely would turn out to becomputationally time intensive compared to the Minimum Moment Algorithm by itself.Lastly, the modified minimum moment algorithm could be extended to the resourceallocation case, where the minimum project duration extension is sought in order to havethe peak of the resource histogram be less than or equal to some user imposed limitBIBLIOGRAPHY(1) Adrian, J., "Quantitative Methods in Construction Management," American elsvierPublishing Company, Inc., New York, 1973.(2) Ahuja, H.N., "Project Management, Techniques in Planning and ControllingConstruction Projects," John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1984.(3) Antill, J.M. ,and Woodhead, R.D., "Critical Path Methods in Construction Practice,"John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1982.(4) Archibald, R.D., and Villoria, R.L., "Network-Based Management Systems(PERT/CPM)" John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1965.(5) Arditi, D., and Albulak, Z., "Line-Of-Balance Scheduling in Pavement Construction,"Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, ASCE, Vol. 112, No. 3,September, 1986.(6) Badiru, A.B., "Project Management in Manufacturing and High TechnologyOperations," John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1988.(7) Battersby, A., "Network Analysis for Planning and Scheduling," Macmillan andCompany Limited, London, 1967.(8) Boctor, F.F., "Some Efficient Multi-Heuristic Procedures for Resource-ConstrainedProject Scheduling," European Journal of Operational Research, November 6, 1990.(9) Burgess, A.R., and Killebrew, J.B., "Variation in Activity Level on a Cyclic ArrowDiagram," Journal of Industrial Engineering, March-April, 1962.(10) Burman, P.J.,"Precedence Networks for Project Planning and Control, "McGraw-HillBook Company (UK) Limited, London, 1972.(11) Busch, D.H., "The New Critical Path Method, The State-of-Art in Project Modelingand Time Reserve Management," Probus Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois, 1991.(12) Carmichael, D.G., "Construction Engineering Networks: Techniques Planning andManagement," Ellis Harwood Limited, Chichester, 1989.0+Bibliography^ 145(13) Carr, R.I., and Meyer, W.L., "Planning Construction of Repetitive Building Units,"Journal of the Construction Division, ASCE, Vol.100, No.0O3, September., 1974.(14) Charzanowski, E.N.,and Johnston, D.W.," Application of Linear Scheduling," Journalof Construction Engineering and Management, ASCE, Vol.112, 1986.(15) Clough, R.H., and Sears, G.A., "Linear Scheduling Method for HighwayConstruction," Second Ed., John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1979.(16) Davis, E.W., "Project Scheduling Under Resource Constraints: Historical Review andCategorization of Procedures," AIIE Transactions, December 1973.(17) Dewitte, L., "Manpower Leveling of PERT Networks," Data Processing forScience/Engineering, March-April, 1964.(18) Easa, S.M., "Resource Leveling in Construction by Optimization," Journal ofConstruction Engineering and Management, ASCE, Vol.115, No.2, June, 1989.(19) Elmaghraby, S.E., "Activity Networks," John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1977.(20) Fondahl, J.W., "A Noncomputer Approach to the Critical Path Method for theConstruction Industry," Dept. of Civil Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford,Calif., 2nd Edition, 1962.(21) Galbreath, R.V., "Computer Program for Leveling Resource Usage," Journal ofConstruction Division, ASCE, Vol.91, No.1, 1965.(22) Harris, R.B., "Precedence and Arrow Networking Techniques for Construction,"John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1978.(23) Harris, R.B., "Packing Method for Resource Leveling (PACK)," Journal ofConstruction Engineering and Management, ASCE, Vol.116, No.2, June 1990.(24) Hendrickson C., and Au, T., "Project Management for Construction," Printece Hall,Inc. Englewoods Cliffs, New Jersey 07632, 1989.(25) Johnston, D.W., "Linear Scheduling Method for Highway Construction," Journal ofConstruction Division, ASCE, Vol.107, No.0O2, June 1976.(26) Kasevich, L.S., "Harward Project Manager/Total Project Manager: Contolling YourResources," Tab Books Inc., Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214, 1986.Bibliography^ 146(27) Kelley, J., "Critical Path Planning and Scheduling: Mathematical Basis," OperationResearch, Vol.9, No.3, May-June 1961.(28) Kochan, S.G., "Programming in ANSI C," Hayden Books, Indianapolis, Indiana,1988.(29) Lewis, J.P., "Project Planning, Scheduling & Control," Probus Publishing Company,Chicago, Illinois, 1991.(30) Lockyer, K., "Critical Path Analysis and Other Project Network Techniques," PitmanPublishing Limited, London, 1984.(31) Martino, R.L., "Resource Management," MDI Publications, ManagementDevelopment Institute, Inc., Wayne, Pennsylvania, 1968.(32) Moder, J.J., Phillips, C.R., and Davis, E.D., "Project Management with CPM, PERTand Precedence Diagramming," Van Mostrand Reinhold, New York, 1983.(33) O'Brien, J.J., "Scheduling Handbook," McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1969.(34) O'Brien, J.J., "VPM Scheduling for High Rise Buildings," Journal of the ConstructionEngineering Division, ASCE, Vol.101, No.004, December 1975.(35) O'Brien, J.J., Kreitzberg, F.C.,and Mikes, W.F.,"Network Scheduling Variations forRepetitive Work," Journal of the Construction Engineering and Management, ASCE,Vol.111, No.2, June 1985.(36) Oldrich, S., and Cacha, J., "Time Space Scheduling Method," Journal of theConstruction Division, ASCE, Vol.108, No.0O3, September 1982.(37) Peters, G., "Construction Project Management Using Small Computers," TheArchitectural Press: London, 1984.(38) Purdum, J., "QuickC Programming," SAMS, Carmel, IN 46032, 1990.(39) Russell, Alan, D., "REPCON: An Innovative Construction Management System",Managing Projects, by V. Ireland and T. Uher (eds.), International Symposium onBuilding Economics and Construction Management, Sydney Australia, Vol.6, 1990.(40) Russell, A. D., and Wong, W.C.M., "A new Generation Of Planning Structures,"ASCE Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, June 1993.Bibliography^ 147(41) Sarraj, Z.M., "Formal Development of Line-Of-Balance Technique," Journal ofConstruction Engineering and Management, ASCE, Vol.116, No.4, 1990.(42) Seibert, J.E. , and Evans, G.W., "Time-Constrained Resource Leveling," Journal ofConstruction Engineering and Management, September, 1991.(43) Stevens, J.D., "Techniques for Construction Network Scheduling," McGraw-HillPublishing Company, New York, 1990.(44) Thesen, A., "Computer Methods in Operation Research," Academic Press, Inc., NewYork, 1978.(45) Wiest, J.D., and Levy, F.K., "A Management Guide to PERT/CPM withGERT/PDM/DCPM and other Networks," Prentice-Hall, Inc.,Englewood Cliffs, NewJersey, 1977.(46) Wilson, R.C., "Assembly Line Balancing and Resource Leveling," University ofMichigan Summer Conference, Production and Inventory Control, 1964.Appendix - A148149Activity Duration Resources ESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 0 0 0 0 0 0 02 2 3 0 2 0 2 43  2 6 0 2 0 0 24 1 4 0 1 0 0 15 4 0 2 6 0 4 86 5 0 2 7 0 2 77 8 4 2 10 0 2 108 3 5 1 4 6 4 79 1 4 6 7 4 11 1210 4 2 7 11 0 7 1111 5 2 10 15 0 10 1512 3 0 11 14 1 12 1513 0 0 15 15 0 15 15Early Start and Leveled Schedule - example 5.1Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Resource aggregatesbefore leveling13 14 9 9 4 4 8 6Resource aggregates afterleveling10 6 7 7 9 9 9 6Project day 9 10 11 12 13 14 15Resource aggregatesbefore leveling6 6 4 2 2 2 2Resource aggregates afterleveling6 6 4 6 2 2 2Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling - example 5.1Appendix - B150Activity Duration Resources ESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 0 0 0 0 0 0 02 2 2 0 2 0 0 23 4 1 0 4 0 0 44  1 4 0 1 0 0 15 4 4 2 6 1 10 146 3 2 4 7 0 7 107 6 4 4 10 0 4 108 6 6 1 7 0 1 79 1 0 7 8 7 14 1510 4 2 7 11 4 11 1511 5 1 10 15 0 10 1512 1 2 15 16 0 15 16Early and Leveled Schedule - example 5.2Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Resource aggregatesbefore leveling7 9 11 11 16 16 12 6Resource aggregates afterleveling7 9 7 7 10 10 10 6Project day 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16Resource aggregatesbefore leveling6 6 3 1 1 1 1 2Resource aggregates afterleveling6 6 5 7 7 7 3 2Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling - example 5.2151Appendix - C152Activity Duration Resources ESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 0 0 0 0 0 0 02 '2 10 0 2 0 0 23 1 2 0 1 2 2 34 1 4 2 3 0 3 45 3 6 2 5 0 2 56 1 2 3 4 1 4 57 0 0 5 5 0 5 5Early Start and Leveled Schedule - example 5.3153Project day 1 2 3 4 5Resource aggregatesbefore leveling14 10 8 8 6Resource aggregates afterleveling10 10 8 10 8Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling - example 5.3Appendix - D154155Activity Duration Resources ESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 0 0 0 0 0 0 02 8 11 0 8 0 0 83 4 5 0 4 0 0 44  5 8 0 5 0 3 85 9 16 8 17 1 8 176 14 5 4 18 7 11 257 6 3 4 10 2 5 118 7 7 5 12 0 15 229 8 8 17 25 0 17 2510 3 7 12 15 0 22 2511 0 0 25 25 10 25 25Early and Leveled Schedule - example 5.4Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9Resource aggregatesbefore leveling24 24 24 24 27 26 26 26 31Resource aggregates afterleveling16 16 16 24 19 22 22 22 19Project day 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18Resource aggregatesbefore leveling31 28 28 28 28 28 21 21 13Resource aggregates afterleveling19 19 21 21 21 21 28 28 20Project day 19 20 21 22 23 24 25Resource aggregatesbefore leveling8 8 8 8 8 8 8Resource aggregates afterleveling20 20 20 20 20 20 20Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling - example 5.4Appendix - E156Activity Duration Resource 1 ESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 0 0 0 2 0 0 02 2 0 0 2 0 0 23 .^5 2 0 5 0 0 54 3 2 0 3 0 0 35 2 1 2 4 4 3 56 6 2 2 8 0 2 87 6 3 5 11 0 5 118 6 1 3 9 0 5 119 4 0 3 7 2 3 710 2 4 8 10 8 14 1611 7 2 11 18 0 11 1812 3 2 9 12 6 11 1413 2 4 9 11 7 16 1814 2 0 18 20 0 18 20Early and Leveled Schedule: Resource 1 - example 5.5Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Resource aggregatesbefore leveling4 4 7 6 5 6 6 6 8 13Resource aggregates afterleveling4 4 6 5 5 6 6 6 4 4Project day 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20Resource aggregatesbefore leveling9 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0Resource aggregates afterleveling4 4 4 4 6 6 6 6 0 0Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling: Resource 1 - example 5.5157Activity Duration Resource 2 ESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 0 0 0 2 0 0 02 2 2 0 2 0 0 23 '^5 3 0 5 0 0 54 3 0 0 3 0 0 35 2 4 2 4 4 11 136 6 5 2 8 0 2 87 6 2 5 11 0 5 118 6 0 3 9 0 3 99 4 5 3 7 2 7 1110 2 5 8 10 8 13 1511 7 0 11 18 0 11 1812 3 8 9 12 6 15 1813 2 3 9 11 7 11 1314 2 0 18 20 0 18 20Early and Leveled Schedule: Resource 2 - example 5.5Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Resource aggregatesbefore leveling5 5 12 17 13 12 12 7 7 18Resource aggregates afterleveling5 5 8 8 8 7 7 12 7 7Project day 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20Resource aggregatesbefore leveling13 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0Resource aggregates afterleveling7 7 7 5 5 8 8 8 0 0Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling: Resource 2 - example 5.5158Activity Duration Resource 1+Resource 2ESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 0 0 0 2 0 0 02 2 2 0 2 0 0 23 '^5 5 0 5 0 0 54 3 2 0 3 0 0 35 2 5  2 4 4 2 46 6 7 2 8 0 5 117 6 5 5 11 0 5 118 6 1 3 9 0 4 109 4 5 3 7 2 3 710 2 9 8 10 8 13 1511 7 2 11 18 0 11 1812 3 10 9 12 6 15 1813 2 7 9 11 7 11 1314 2 0 18 20 0 18 20Early and Leveled Schedule: Resource 1 + Resource 2 - example 5.5Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Resource aggregatesbefore leveling9 9 19 23 18 18 18 13 15 31Resource aggregates afterleveling9 9 12 15 11 18 18 13 13 13Project day 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20Resource aggregatesbefore leveling22 12 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0Resource aggregates afterleveling12 9 9 11 11 12 12 12 0 0Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling: Resource 1 + Resource 2 - example 5.5159Appendix - F160* Critical Activity+ Governing predecessor of an activityor successor governed by activityFile Used: C:\REP280\PROJ06\CLOUGHSelect: All ActivitiesSort:^Activity CodeReport Date:^19APR93Report Time:^14:26:38Revision Number: 0Progress Date:UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^REPCONTMExample Project from Clough and Searspred/suec/duration^ Page 1 Of 3ACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONPREDECESSORSACT. CODE^DESCRIPTION TYPE PLOC DEL LAG^OFF/LOCSUCCESSORSI ACT. CODE^DESCRIPTION TYPE SLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOCLOC_RANGEI PROD. DATAWORK SKIP DUBI*G88100 Project Start +C00608 Shop drawings girders T FS N 1- 1 1 0 0+G80500 Deliver piles T FS+G80400 Move in T FS+G88380 Shop dwgs footing steel T FS*+C00280 Shop drawings abut&steel deck T FS*G00208 Shop drawings abut&steel deck *+MMM Project Start T FS^0 0^N *+601200 Deliver abutment & steel deck T FS N 1- 1 1 0 10G00388 Shop dwgs footing steel *40M80 Project Start T FS^0 0^N +C00700 Deliver footing steel T FS N 1- 1 1 0 5G88400 Move in *400100 Project Start T FS^0 0^N +G88900 Excavate abutment 4 1 T FS N 1- 1 1 0 3G00800 Make abutment forms T FS680500 Deliver piles *400100 Project Start T FS^8 0^11 +G81808 Drive piles abutment Al 1 FS N 1- 1 1 8 15M0688 Shop drawings girders *+G80100 Project Start T FS^0 0^N +G02700 Deliver girders FS N 1- 1 1 0 10MNM Deliver footing steel +G00388 Shop dwgs footing steel T FS^8 ON G81300 Forms & steel footing 41 1 FS N 1- 1 1 0 7G80808 Make abutment forms G00400 Move in T FS^0 0^N * G81700 Forms & steel abutment Al T FS N 1- 1 1 0 3600980 Excavate abutment 4 1 +G08480 Move in T FS^8 ON G01100 Excavate abutment 4Z FS N 1- 1 1 0 3G01000 Drive piles abutment 41 FSG01808 Drive piles abutment 41 G08980 Excavate abutment 0 1 T FS^8 0^N +G81400 Drive piles abutment 42 FS N 1- 1 1 0 3+G00508 Deliver piles T FS^0 0^N +G01308 Forms & steel footing 01 FSG81100 Excavate abutment AZ G80988 Excavate abutment 4 1 T FS8 ON G01480 Drive piles abutment 02 T FS N 1- 1 1 0 Z*G01200 Deliver abutment & steel deck *+G00200 Shop drawings abut&steel deck T FS^0 0^N *+681700 Forms & steel abutment 01 T FS N 1- 1 1 0 15G01308 Forms & steel footing 01 G00780 Deliver footing steel T FS0 ON G01500 Pour footing 41 T FS N 1- 1 1 0 2+G01000 Drive piles abutment 01 T FS^0 ONG01408 Drive piles abutment 42 +C01880 Drive piles abutment 01 T FS^0 0^N G81800 Forms & steel footing 42 T F'S^8^0^N 1- 1 1 8 3G81100 Excavate abutment AZ T ISO ONG81500 Pour footing 41 G81388 Forms & steel footing 01 T FS^0 8^N +G81600 Strip footing 41 T FS^0^0^N 1- 1 1 0 1G81680 Strip footing 01 +G01580 Pour footing Al T FS^0 0^N +G81000 Forms & steel footing 42 T FS^8^8^N 1- 1 1 0 1* G01788 Forms & steel abutment 41 T FS^0^0^N*G81708 Forms & steel abutment 41 **COMO Deliver abutment & steel deck T FS^0 0^N *+601900 Pour abutment 01 T FS^8^0^N 1- 1 1 0 43ACTIVITY PREDECESSORS I^SUCCESSORS LOC_RANGE I^PROD. DATAPage^Z OfCODE^DESCRIPTION ACT. CODE DESCRIPTION TYPE PLOC DEL LAG^OFF/LOC ACT. CODE DESCRIPTION TYPE SLOC DEL LAG^OFF/LOC WORK SKIPDURIG88608 Make abutment Forms T^FS^8 0 NG01688 Strip footing 41 T^FS^8 0 NG81888 Forms & steel footing *2 +G81680 Strip footing 41 T^FS^8 B N * G02800 Pour footing 42 T^FS^0 0^N 1-^1 1 8 2G81408 Drive piles abutment 112 T^FSO ON*G81900 Pour abutment 41 *401708 Forms & steel abutment 111 T^FS^0 0 N 30G82180 Strip & cure abutment *1 T^FS^8 0^N 1-^1 8 2*G82000 Pour footing 42 GO1800 Forms & steel footing 112 FS^0 0 N *+G02208 Strip footing 112 T^FSO ON 1-^1 0 1*G82180 Strip & cure abutment 41 *401900 Pour abutment 111 T^FS^0 0 N +G83100 Rub concrete abutment *1 T^FS^8 0^N 1-^1 8 30G02488 Forms & steel abutment 42 T^FS^0 0^N* G82308 Backfill abutment 41 T^FS^O' 0^N*G82200 Strip footing 42 *402008 Pour footing 112 T^FS^0 0 N *+GO2408 Forms & steel abutment *2 T^FSO ON 1-^1 1 B 1*G02300 Backfill abutment 41 * G02100 Strip & cure abutment 41 T^FS^8 B N x+GO2900 Set girders T^FS^0 0^N 1-^1 1 8 3+G82088 Backfill abutment *2 T^FSO 0N*G82488 Forms & steel abutment 112 *+G82100 Strip & cure abutment 41 T^FS^8 B N *+GO2580 Pour abutment 42 T^FSO ON 1-^1 1 8 4*+G82280 Strip footing 112 FS^B 0 N*G82500 Pour abutment 112 IK82400 Forms & steel abutment 4Z T^FS^8 0 N PG82680 Strip & cure abutment 42 T^FS0 ON 1-^1 1 8 Z*G82600 Strip & cure abutment 112 **WHO Pour abutment 42 T^FS^B 8 N * G83300 Rub concrete abutment 42 T^FS^0 0^N 1-^1 1 0 3**G82988 Set girders T^FS^0 0^N+G82800 Backfill abutment 42 T^FS^0 0^NG02700 Deliver girders 400688 Shop drawings girders T^FS^0 0 N * G02988 Set girders T^FS^0 0^N 1-^1 1 B 25G82880 Backfill abutment 4Z *402380 Backfill abutment 41 T^FS^0 0 N * G03200 Pour & cure deck T^FS^0 0^N 1-^1 1 8 3*+GO2688 Strip & cure abutment 42 T^FS^8 0 N*G82900 Set girders *+GO2380 Backfill abutment Al T^FS^0 8 N *483000 Deck Forms & steel T^FS^B ON 1-^1 1 B 2*+GO2600 Strip & cure abutment 112 T^FS^0 0 NG82700 Deliver girders T^FSO ON*G83008 Deck forms & steel *482900 Set girders I^FS^0 0 N *+G83208 Pour & cure deck T^FS^8 8^N 1-^1 1 El 4G03108 Rub concrete abutment Ill *482108 Strip & cure abutment 41 T^FS^0 0 N G03780 Guardrail T^FSO ON 1-^1 1 B 3* G03608 Painting T^FS^0 0^N*G83200 Pour & cure deck G02800 Backfill abutment 42 T^FS^8 0 N G83588 Saw joints T^FS^0 0^N 1-^1 1 B 3*483088 Deck forms & steel T^FSO ON PG83400 Strip deck T^FS^8 8^N*G83388 Rub concrete abutment 42 * G02680 Strip & cure abutment *2 T^FS^0 8^N GO3700 Guardrail T^FSO 8^N 1-^1 1 8 3PG83680 Painting T^FS^0 8^N*G83400 Strip deck 0G83200 Pour & cure deck T^FSO ON G83780 Guardrail T^FSO ON 1-^1 1 B 30603688 Painting T^FS^0 0^NG83500 Saw joints * G03200 Pour & cure deck T^FS^B 0 N * G03888 Cleanup T^FSO ON 1-^1 1 D 1*G83688 Painting G83180 Rub concrete abutment *1 T^FS^0 0 N *+G83800 Cleanup T^FS^8 8^N 1-^1 i B 5*+GO3480 Strip deck T^FS^0 8 N*+G03308 Rub concrete abutment 42 T^FS 8 N3ACTIVITY 1^PREDECESSORS I^SUCCESSORSTYPE FLOC DEL LAG^OFF/LOCII ACT. CODE LOC_RANGE1 PROD. DATA 1Page^3 OFCODE^DESCRIPTION I ACT. CODE DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION TYPE SLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC PORK SKIP DURIG83700 Guardrail G03100 Rub concrete abutment Al T^FS^0^0^N * G83000 Cleanup T^FS^0 8^N 1-^1 1 0^3* G83300 Rub concrete abutment A2 T^FS^0^8^NIf G03400 Strip deck T^FS^0^0^N*G83000 Cleanup *+G03600 Painting T^FS^0^0^N *+G03900 Final^inspection T^FSOON1- 1 103G83780 Guardrail T^FS^8^0^NG03500 Saw joints T^FS^0^8^N*G83900 Final^inspection *403080 Cleanup T^FS^8^0^N *484880 Contingency T^FS^8 0^N 1-^1 1 0^1*G04080 Contingency *403988 Final^inspection T^FS^8^0^N 1-^1 1 8^6FOR A TOTAL OF 48 ACTIVITIESUBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^REPCONMPile Used: C:\REP2B0\PROJOG\CLOUGRSelect: All ActivitiesSort:^Activity CodeExample Project from Clough and Searsduration & resources* Critical ActivityGoverning predecessor of an activityor successor governed by activityPage 1 Of 3Report Date:^19APR93Report Time:^14:26:09Revision Number: 0Progress Date:ACTIVITY^CODE^DESCRIPTION*G08100^Project StartCO8200^Shop drawings abut&steel deckG00300^Shop dugs footing steelLOC_RANGE11-^11-^11-^1PROD. DATA'WORK SKIP DURIRES11^0^01^8^101^0^5'RESOURCES ASSIGNEDABBREV DESCRIPTIONACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGEILOCJANGE^USAGE/UNITS AUG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE^LEVELG00400 Move in 1- 1 1 0 3 2 carp^carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.001 lab^labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 4.00 1 3 4.003 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 3 1.0BG00500 Deliver piles 1- 1 1 0 15688688 Shop drawings girders 1- 1 1 8 10G80700 Deliver Footing steel 1- 1 1 0 7G00808 Make abutment forms 1- 1 1 0 3 1 lab^labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.002 carp^carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.00688988 Excavate abutment 0 1 1- 1 1 8 3 1 lab^labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 6.00 1 3 6.003 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 3 1.00G01000 Drive piles abutment 111 1- 1 1 0 3 1 lab^labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 4.00 1 3 4.082 carp^carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 3 1.003 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.80 1 3 1.00G81100 Excavate abutment 42 1- 1 1 0 Z 1 lab^labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 4.00 1 2 4.00*G81200 Deliver abutment & steel deck 1- 1 1 0 15G01308 forms & steel footing Dl 1- 1 1 0 2 2 carp^carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 3.00 1 Z 3.00G81400 Drive piles abutment 4Z 1- 1 1 0 3 1 lab^labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 4.00 1 3 4.00carp^carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 3 1.003 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 3 1.00Page 2 Of 3ACTIVITYCODE DESCRIPTIONLOC_RANGE PROD. DATAWORK SKIP DURIRES4RESOURCES ASSIGNEDABBREV DESCRIPTIONACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGELOC_RANGE^USAGE/UNITS AUG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE^LEVELG01500 Pour footing 111 1- 1 1 B 1 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 4.00 1 4.002 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1.003 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.08 1 1.80G01600 Strip footing 111 1- 1 1 B 1 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 2.BB*G01700 Forms & steel abutment Al 1- 1 1 8 4 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.BB 1 4 2.082 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.08 1 4 2.80G01000 Forms & steel Footing 112 1- 1 1 B 2 2 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 2 2.BB*G01900 Pour abutment 111 1- 1 1 B 2 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 6.00 1 2 6.002 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 2 1.883 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 2 1.88*G02000 Pour footing 112 1- 1 1 B 1 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 4.00 1 4.002 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1.BB3 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1.00*G02100 Strip & cure abutment 111 1- 1 1 B 3 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1 3.80*G02200 Strip footing 112 1- 1 1 B 1 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 2.00*G02300 Backfill abutment 111 1- 1 1 0 3 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 3.BB 1 3 3.BB*G02400 Forms & steel abutment 112 1- 1 1 0 4 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 4 2.002 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 4 2.00*G02500 Pour abutment 112 1- 1 1 B 2 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 6.00 1 2 6.802 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.80 1 2 1.883 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.88 1 2 1.BB*G02600 Strip & cure abutment 112 1- 1 1 B 3 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.88 1 1 3.00G02700 Deliver girders 1- 1 1 B 25G02000 Backfill abutment 112 1- 1 1 B 3 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 3.88 1 3 3.00*G02900 Set girders 1- 1 1 0 2 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 3.00 1 2 3.883 equip^equipment operators 1 1 Rate: men/day 1.88 1 2 1.88*G03000 Deck forms & steel 1- 1 1 8 4 1 lab labourers 1 1 Rate: men/day 3.00 1 4 3.882 carp carpenters 1 1 Rate: men/day 3.00 1 4 3.08Page 3 OF 3ACTIVITY LOC_RANGEI PROD. DATA^'RESOURCES ASSIGNED ACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGECODE DESCRIPTION WORK SKIP DURIRES4 ABBREV DESCRIPTION LOC_RANGE^USAGE/UNITS AVG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE^LEVELG83100 Rub concrete abutment 41 1-^1 1 0 3 1 lab labourers 1^1 Rate: men/day 1.08 1 3 1.08*G83200 Pour & cure deck 1-^1 1 0 3 1 lab labourers 1^1 Rate: men/day 6.00 1 3 6.00*G83300 Rub concrete abutment 42 1-^1 1 0 3 1 lab labourers 1^1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 3 1.08*G83400 Strip deck 1-^1 1 0 3 1 lab labourers 1^1 Rate: men/day 3.08 1 3 3.00G83500 Saw joints 1-^1 1 0 1 1 lab labourers 1^1 Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1.08*G83608 Painting 1-^1 1 0 5G03780 Guardrail 1-^1 1 0 3 1 lab labourers 1^1 Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.08*G03800 Cleanup 1-^1 1 0 3 1 lab labourers 1^1 Rate: men/day 4.08 1 3 4.00*G03900 Final^inspection 1-^1 1 0 1*G04000 Contingency 1-^1 1 0 6FOR A TOTAL OF 40 ACTIVITIESUBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABFile Used: C:\REP208\PROJ86\CLOUGHSelect: All ActivitiesSort:^Activity CodeExample Project from Clough and Searsdates* Critical Activity4. Governing predecessor of an activityor successor governed by activityREPCONTMPage 1 Of 2Report Date:^19APR93Report Time:^14:34:33Revision Number: 0Progress Date:ACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONLOC 1^EARLYI START^FINISHI RES. LEVELEDI START^FINISHLATESTART^FINISHFREE FLOATNORMAL EXTRATOTAL FLOAT 'LEVELED FLOAT'NORMAL EXTRAINORMAL EXTRAT I*G00100 Project Start * 81MAR93^N/A 01MAR93^N/A N/A^N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A*G00280 Shop drawings abut&steel deck *^1 01MAR93 12MAR93 01MAR93 12MAR93 01MAR93 12MAR93 0 N/A 0 N/A 0 N/AG00300 Shop dwgs footing steel 1 01MAR93 05MAR93 81MAR93 05MAR93 12MAR93 18MAR93 0 N/A 9 N/A 9 N/AG00400 Move in 1 0IMAR93 03MAR93 01MAR93 03MAR93 17MAR93 19MAR93 0 N/A 12 N/A 12 N/AG80508 Deliver piles 1 01MAR93 19MAR93 01MAR93 19MAR93 04MAR93 24MAR93 8 N/A 3 N/A 3 N/AG80600 Shop drawings girders 1 01MAR93 12MAR93 01MAR93 12MAR93 11MAR93 24MAR93 0 N/A 8 N/A 0 N/AG80700 Deliver footing steel 1 88MAR93 16MAR93 88MAR93 16MAR93 19MAR93 29MAR93 6 N/A 9 N/A 9 N/AG00880 Make abutment forms 1 04MAR93 08MAR93 09MAR93 11MAR93 31MAR93 02APR93 19 N/A 19 N/A 16 N/A000900 Excavate abutment 4 1 1 84MAR93 08MAR93 04MAR93 08MAR93 22MAR93 24MAR93 0 N/A 12 N/A 12 N/AG01000 Drive piles abutment Al 1 22MAR93 24MAR93 22MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 29MAR93 8 N/A 3 N/A 3 N/AG01100 Excavate abutment 42 1 09MAR93 10MAR93 12MAR93 15MAR93 85APR93 86APR93 10 N/A 19 N/A 16 N/A*G01200 Deliver abutment & steel deck *^1 15MAR93 82APR93 15MAR93 OZAPR93 15MAR93 02APR93 0 N/A 0 N/A 0 N/AG81300 Forms & steel footing *1 1 Z5MAR93 26MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 8 N/A 3 N/A 3 N/AG01400 Drive piles abutment 42 1 25MAR93 29MAR93 25MAR93 29MAR93 07APR93 09APR93 1 N/A 9 N/A 9 N/A681508 Pour footing *1 29MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 30MAR93 01APR93 81APR93 8 N/A 3 N/A Z N/AG81608 Strip footing 41 1 30MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 31MAR93 82APR93 82APR93 0 N/A 3 N/A 2 N/A*G81700 Forms & steel abutment 11 *^1 85APR93 00APR93 85APR93 08APR93 85APR93 88APR93 0 N/A 0 N/A 0 N/AG01080 Forms & steel footing 42 1 31MAR93 01APR93 01APR93 0ZAPR93 12APR93 13APR93 0 N/A 8 N/A 7 N/A*G01900 Pour abutment Al *^1 09APR93 12APR93 09APR93 12APR93 09APR93 12APR93 8 N/A 0 N/A 0 N/A*G82008 Pour footing 42 02APR93 02APR93 14APR93 14APR93 14APR93 14APR93 0 N/A 8 N/A 0 N/A*GOZ180 Strip & cure abutment Al *^I 13APR93 15APR93 13APR93 15APR93 13APR93 15APR93 0 N/A 0 N/A 0 N/A*G82208 Strip Footing 42 *^1 85APR93 85APR93 15APR93 15APR93 15APR93 15APR93 8 N/A 8 N/A 0 N/APage 2 OF 2ACTIVITY LOCI^EARLY I RES. LEVELED LATE FREE FLOAT^FLOAT^FLOAT ICODE^DESCRIPTION START^FINISH START^FINISH 1 START^FINISH'TOTAL^'LEVELED1 NORMAL EXTRA NORMAL EXTRA NORMAL EXTRAC82300^Backfill abutment Al *^1 16APR93 20APR93 26APR93 28APR93 2EAPR93 28APR93 6^N/A 6^N/A 0^N/A*G02400^Forms & steel abutment 112 N^1 16APR93 21APR93 16APR93 21APR93 16APR93 21APR93 8^N/A 0^N/A 0^N/A*G02500^Pour abutment 112 *^1 ZZAPR93 23APR93 22APR93 23APR93 22APR93 23APR93 0^N/A 0^N/A 8^N/A*G02680^Strip & cure abutment 42 *^1 26APR93 28APR93 26APR93 28APR93 26APR93 28APR93 0^N/A 8^N/A 0^N/AG02708^Deliver girders 1 15MAR93 16APR93 15MAR93 16APR93 25MAR93 20APR93 8^N/A 8^N/A 8^N/AG02800^Backfill abutment 112 1 29APR93 03MAY93 29APR93 03MAY93 04MAY93 06MAY93 3^N/A 3^N/A 3^N/A*G02980^Set girders *^1 29APR93 30APR93 29APR93 30APR93 29APR93 30APR93 0^N/A 0^N/A 0^N/A*G03880^Deck forms & steel *^1 03MAY93 06MAY93 03MAY93 06MAY93 03MAY93 06MAY93 0^N/A 8^N/A 0^N/AG03100^Rub concrete abutment 111 1 16APR93 20APR93 16APR93 28APR93 12MAY93 14MAY93 18^N/A 18^N/A 18^N/A*G03200^Pour & cure deck *^1 07MAY93 11MAY93 07MAY93 11MAY93 07MAY93 11MAY93 0^N/A 0^N/A 8^N/A*G03300^Rub concrete abutment 112 *^1 29APR93 03MAY93 12MAY93 14MAY93 12MAY93 14MAY93 9^N/A 9^N/A 8^N/A*G83400^Strip deck *^1 12MAY93 14MAY93 12MAY93 14MAY93 12MAY93 14MAY93 0^N/A 0^N/A 0^N/AG03500^Saw joints 1 12MAY93 12MAY93 17MAY93 17MAY93 21MAY93 21MAY93 7^N/A 7^N/A 4^N/A*G03600^Painting *^1 17MAY93 21MAY93 17MAY93 21MAY93 17MAY93 21MAY93 0^N/A 0^N/A 0^N/AG03700^Guardrail 1 17MAY93 19MAY93 18MAY93 28MAY93 19MAY93 21MAY93 2^N/A 2^N/A 1^N/A*G03800^Cleanup *^1 24MAY93 26MAY93 24MAY93 26MAY93 24MAY93 26MAY93 0^N/A 0^N/A 0^N/A*G03900^Final inspection *^1 27MAY93 27MAY93 27MAY93 27MAY93 27MAY93 Z7MAY93 8^N/A 0^N/A 0^N/A*G04000^Contingency *^1 28MAY93 04JUN93 Z8MAY93 04JUN93 28MAY93 04JUN93 0^N/A 0^N/A El^N/AFOR A TOTAL OF 48 ACTIVITIESClass:Usage: Rate Unit: men/day ES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeflL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeUBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCON TMExample Project from Clough and SearsRESOURCE USAGE REPORTFile Used: C:\REP288\PROJ06\CLOUGHReport Period: 81MAR93 - 04JUN93Selected Resources. All Project Activities. Deport Date: 19APR93Report Time: 14:30:54Progress Date:Revision Number: 0CLASS/SUBCLASS/RESOURCE DAILY/CUMULATIVE RESOURCE USAGE01MAR93 02MAR93 83MAR93 04MAR93 05MAR93 06MAR93 07MAR93 08MAR93 09MAR93 10MAR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAI193 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 19MAR93 20MAR93 21MAR93^7.80^7.00^7.00^11.00^11.08^11.00^4.00^4.00^0.80^8.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.007.00^14.80^21.00^32.80^43.00^43.80^43.00^54.80^58.00^62.00^62.80^62.80^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.80^62.80 62.80 62.00 62.00 62.007.00^7.00^7.007.00^14.00^21.08^21.00^21.807.00^7.00^7.00^7.08^7.88^7.08^4.08^4.00^4.08^4.00^4.00^0.00^8.80^8.00^0.007.00^14.00^21.08^28.00^35.00^35.88^35.88^42.00^46.00^58.00^54.00^58.80^58.80^58.00^62.08^62.00^62.08^62.08^62.80^62.80^62.0022MAR93 23MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 01API193 02APR93 03APR93 04API193 05APR93 86APR93 07APR93 08APR93 89APR93 10APR93 11APR936.80^6.00^6.00^9.00^9.00 12.00^2.00^2.08^2.80^6.00 6.00^4.08^4.00^4.80^8.8068.00^74.00^80.08 89.00^98.00^98.80 98.00 110.00 112.00 114.00 116.08 122.80 122.00 122.88 128.00 132.80 136.80 140.00 148.00 148.08 148.007.00^7.00^7.00^6.08^6.08 6.08^3.80^7.88^18.00^6.00^8.00^8.00^10.08^10.80^14.0028.00^35.00^42.00^48.00^54.00^54.80^54.80^60.08^63.00^70.00^80.00^86.00^86.00^86.00^94.00 182.00 112.00 122.00 136.00 136.00 136.086.00^6.00^6.00^9.00^9.00 6.00^6.00^2.00^2.00^2.08 ----^4.00^4.00^4.00^4.00^8.0068.80^74.00 80.00^89.88^98.88^98.00 98.00 104.88 110.00 112.80 114.00 116.08 116.08 116.80 120.00 124.80 128.08 132.00 140.00 140.80 140.8012APR93 13APR93 14APR93 15APR93 16APR93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 20APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 28APR93 29APR93 30APR93 01MAY93 02MAY938.00^3.00^0.00^0.00^8.00 8.00^8.00^4.00^8.08^8.88^3.00^0.00^8.80^8.00^8.00156.08 159.00 159.00 159.88 167.80 167.00 167.00 175.80 183.80 187.00 195.08 203.00 203.80 283.00 206.08 206.00 206.00 214.08 222.00 222.80 222.0010.08^5.00^6.00^2.00^4.00^4.00^4.00^4.00^8.00^8.00 6.00^3.00^3.00^4.00^4.00146.00 151.00 157.80 159.00 163.00 163.80 163.00 167.00 171.00 175.00 183.08 191.80 191.00 191.00 197.80 208.00 203.00 207.00 211.00 211.00 211.008.80^3.00^6.00^2.08^5.00 5.00^5.00^4.80^8.00^8.08^6.00^3.80^3.00^7.00^7.00148.00 151.00 157.08 159.00 164.00 164.80 164.80 169.00 174.00 178.00 186.00 194.00 194.00 194.00 200.00 203.00 206.00 213.00 228.00 220.00 220.0003MAY93 04MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 07MAY93 08MAY93 09MAY93 18MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY9318.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.08^6.80^6.00^4.00^3.00^3.00^2.08^2.88^2.80^0.00^0.00232.00 238.00 244.00 250.00 256.00 256.00 256.08 262.00 268.00 272.00 275.00 278.00 278.00 278.80 280.00 282.00 284.00 284.00 284.08 284.00 284.086.00^9.00^9.08^9.00^6.00 6.80^6.00^5.00^5.00^5.00 0.00^0.00^2.00^2.00^3.80^----^--217.00 226.00 235.00 244.00 250.00 250.00 258.00 256.80 262.00 267.80 272.08 277.08 277.00 277.00 277.08 277.00 279.00 281.00 284.00 284.00 284.009.00^6.00^6.00^6.08^6.00^6.00^6.00^4.00^4.00^4.00^1.00^2.88^2.00^2.88^0.00229.00 235.00 241.80 247.00 253.00 253.08 253.00 259.00 265.00 269.00 273.88 277.00 277.00 277.08 278.00 280.00 282.08 284.00 284.00 284.80 284.0824MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01JUN93 02JUN93 03JUN93 84JUN934.00^4.00^4.00^0.00^0.08^8.00^0.00^0.00^0.80^8.00288.00 292.80 296.00 296.08 296.00 296.00 296.08 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.08 296.804.80^4.00^4.00^0.00^0.00 0.00^0.08^0.00^0.00^0.00288.00 292.80 296.08 296.08 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.08 296.004.08^4.00^4.00^0.80^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00288.00 292.08 296.08 296.00 296.00 296.80 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.00 296.00Resource: labourersUsage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - DailyLogistics: CumulativeUsed to level: No Weight: 1.00 LS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - Daily01MAR93 02MAR93 03MAR93 04MAR93 85MAR93 86MAR93 07MAR93 08MAR93 89MAR93 10MAR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 19MA1193 20MAR93 21MAR934.00^4.80^4.08^8.00^8.00^8.00^4.80^4.00^0.08^8.00^0.00^0.00^0.08^0.00^0.004.00^8.00^12.00^20.00^28.00^28.88^28.00^36.00^40.08^44.00^44.00^44.08^44.00^44.80^44.00^44.00^44.00^44.00^44.00^44.00^44.004.00^8.00^12.00^12.00^12.084.00^4.80^4.80^6.00^6.00^6.00^2.00^2.00^2.80^4.00^4.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.004.00^8.08^12.00^18.00^24.00^24.08^24.80^30.08^32.00^34.80^36.08^40.08^40.00^40.00^44.00^44.08^44.00^44.00^44.00^44.80^44.0022MAR93 23MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 38MAR93 31MAR93 01APR93 02APR93 03APR93 84APR93 05APR93 06API193 07APR93 88APR93 09AP1193 10APR93 11APA934.00^4.00^4.00^4.00^4.00 8.00^2.00^0.00^0.00^4.00 4.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^6.0048.00^52.00^56.00^60.00^64.00 64.00^64.80^72.80^74.00^74.80^74.08^78.80^78.88^78.00^82.00^84.00^86.00^88.08^94.88^94.00^94.006.80^6.00^6.00^4.00^4.80^4.00^0.08^2.00^6.80^4.00 6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^MOO18.00^24.00^30.08 34.88^38.08^38.00^38.00^42.00^42.00^44.00^50.80^54.00^54.00^54.80 60.00^66.00^72.00^78.00^88.00^88.00 88.804.08^4.00^4.00^4.00^4.00 4.00^4.00^2.00^0.00^0.00 2.00^2.88^2.08^2.80^6.0048.00^52.00^56.00^60.00^64.00^64.00^64.00^68.00^72.00^74.80^74.88^74.80^74.00^74.00^76.88^78.00^80.00^82.00^88.88^88.00^88.0012APR93 13APR93 14APR93 15APR93 16APA93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 28APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 28APA93 29APR93 30API193 01MAY93 02MAY936.00^3.80^8.88^0.80^6.08 6.00^6.00^2.80^6.00^6.00^----^3.00^0.00^8.00^7.80^7.08100.00 103.00 103.00 103.00 109.00 109.00 189.00 115.00 121.00 123.80 129.80 135.80 135.00 135.00 138.80 138.00 138.00 145.00 152.08 152.88 152.80^6.00^3.88^4.00^2.00^2.80^2.80^2.08^2.08^6.88^6.00^6.00^3.00^3.00^3.80^3.0094.88^97.00 101.00 103.00 105.88 105.00 105.00 107.08 109.00 111.00 117.00 123.80 123.80 123.08 129.00 132.00 135.00 130.00 141.00 141.00 141.006.00^3.80^4.00^2.88^3.08 3.00^3.00^2.00^6.00^6.80 6.00^3.00^3.00^6.00^6.0894.00^97.88 181.80 103.08 106.00 106.80 106.88 189.88 112.88 114.08 120.88 126.00 126.00 126.00 132.80 135.00 138.00 144.88 150.00 158.80 158.00B3MAY93 84MAY93 05MAY93 86MAY93 B7MAY93 08MAY93 89MAY93 1BMAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY937.00^3.00^3.00^3.00^6.00^6.BB^6.00^4.00^3.00^3.08^2.00^2.00^2.80^0.00^8.80159.88 162.00 165.08 168.00 174.08 174.80 174.88 180.08 106.08 190.08 193.88 196.00 196.80 196.00 198.88 280.80 202.00 202.00 202.00 202.00 202.003.00^6.00^6.00^6.08^6.08 6.BB^6.00^5.00^5.00^5.08 0.00^0.00^2.00^2.00^3.00144.88 158.08 156.08 162.00 168.00 168.80 168.80 174.88 180.88 185.88 190.80 195.00 195.00 195.00 195.00 195.80 197.00 199.88 282.88 202.00 282.086.00^3.00^3.00^3.0B^6.08^6.88^6.00^4.00^4.00^4.88^1.88^2.88^2.00^2.08^8.00156.80 159.80 162.08 165.88 171.80 171.00 171.80 177.00 183.00 187.80 191.80 195.08 195.00 195.00 196.00 190.00 280.08 202.00 202.00 282.80 282.0024MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01JUN93 02JUN93 83JUN93 04JUN934.00^4.00^4.00^8.80^0.08^B.BB^0.08^0.00^B.BB^8.80206.80 210.80 214.00 214.08 214.00 214.08 214.00 214.00 214.00 214.00 214.80 214.084.80^4.80^4.88^0.00^0.08 8.00^0.80^8.00^BOB. ^8.00206.00 210.00 214.00 214.00 214.08 214.00 214.00 214.08 214.00 214.00 214.00 214.804.80^4.88^4.00^BOB. ^B.BB^0.00^8.00^B.BB^8.00^0.00206.00 218.00 214.88 214.00 214.00 214.80 214.88 214.80 214.80 214.00 214.08 214.00CumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulative •81MAR93 82MAR93 03MAR93 B4MAR93 05MA1193 86MAR93 07MAR93 08MAR93 09MAR93 10MAR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 19MAR93 ZOMAR93 21MAR932.00^2.00^2.88^2.00^2.00^2.08^8.00^0.00^BOB. ^8.00^----^8.08^0.00^0.00^8.80^OM2.80^4.80^6.00^8.00^10.88^10.00^10.00^12.08^12.00^12.00^12.00^12.88^12.00^12.00^12.00^12.80^12.80^12.00^12.80^12.00^12.002.0B^4.88^6.80^6.00^6.002.88^2.08^2.88^0.88^0.00--------BOB. ^2.00^2.00^2.00^B.08^0.80^8.88^0.88^0.00^0.882.00^4.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.08^6.88^8.88^10.88^12.08^12.00^12.00^12.00^12.08^12.00^12.00^12.08^12.00^12.00^12.8022MAR93 23MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 38MAR93 31MAR93 01APR93 82APR93 03AP1193 04APR93 05APR93 06API193 07APR93 B8APR93 09APR93 10API193 11APR931.08^1.00^1.08^4.00^4.00 2.00^8.80^2.00^2.80^1.08 2.08^2.88^2.00^2.00^1.0013.00^14.80^15.00^19.80^23.88^23.00^23.00^25.08^25.08 27.88 29.88^38.80^38.08^30.00^32.00^34.00^36.08^38.88^39.00^39.00^39.880.00^8.00^0.08^1.88^1.00 1.00^3.80^5.00^3.80^2.08 2.00^2.88^3.88^3.00^2.006.00^6.80^6.00^7.00^8.80^8.08^8.88^9.88^12.88^17.88^20.08^22.00^22.00^22.00^24.88^26.00^29.00^32.80^34.08^34.00^34.801.88^1.00^1.88^4.08^4.80 1.00^1.00^0.80^2.00^2.88 2.08^2.00^2.88^2.00^1.0013.00^14.00^15.00^19.00^23.00^23.00^23.88^24.00^25.88^25.00^27.08^29.88^29.00^29.08^31.88^33.88^35.00^37.08^38.08^38.00^38.8012APA93 13APR93 14APR93 15APR93 16APR93 17APR93 18API193 19APA93 28APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 28APR93 29APR93 30APR93 81MAY93 02MAY931.00^0.00^0.00^0.08^2.00 2.00^2.00^2.00^1.80^1.08 8.00^8.00^BOB. ^8.00^0.0048.80^40.00^40.00^48.80^42.80^42.88^42.88 44.88^46.88^48.00^49.08^50.00^50.00^50.08^50.00^58.88 50.00^58.80 50.80 58.00^58.003.08^2.08^1.88^0.08^2.08 2.00^2.08^2.00^1.08^1.88 0.08^0.00^8.88^8.88^8.0837.00^39.80^40.00^40.00^42.00^42.08^42.80^44.00^46.00^48.00^49.00^58.08^50.00^50.88^50.80^50.00^50.08^50.00^50.00^50.08^58.081.88^8.88^1.00^0.80^2.88 2.88^2.88^2.88^1.88^1.80 0.80^8.08^0.08^8.00^0.B039.00^39.00^40.08^40.88^42.00^42.00^42.00^44.00^46.00^48.80^49.80^50.00^50.80^58.00^50.00^58.00^50.00^58.00^50.00^50.00^50.8883MAY93 04MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 B7MAY93 08MAY93 89MAY93 1BMAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY933.00^3.00^3.08^3.80^0.88 8.08^8.80^0.08^0.08^0.88 0.08^0.00^0.08^B.88^0.8853.08^56.80 59.00^62.00^62.00^62.80^62.80^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.80^62.08^62.88^62.08^62.80^62.00^62.88^62.00^62.80 62.08^62.883.00^3.00^3.88^3.88^0.08 8.88^B.B8^0.88^B.B8^B.00^---- 0.08^0.00^0.08^0.80^0.0053.80^56.88 59.00^62.00^62.00^62.08^62.80 62.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.08^62.00^62.08^62.00^62.08^62.88^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.003.00^3.00^3.88^3.80^0.88 8.88^0.88^0.88^0.08^0.08^---- 0.80^0.80^0.00^0.88^0.8853.88^56.88 59.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.00^62.88^62.88^62.08 62.00^62.88^62.00^62.00^62.88^62.0824MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01JUN93 02JUN93 03JUN93 04JUN938.80^0.00^0.00^0.00^BOB. 0.00^BOB. ^0.8B^8.0B^0.0862.00^62.88 62.00^62.80^62.08^62.88 62.08 62.80^62.08^62.08^62.00^62.808.88^BOB. ^0.00^0.08^0.08 0.00^8.00^8.00^8.80^8.0062.80^62.08 62.80^62.00^62.80^62.88^62.08 62.00^62.88^62.80^62.00^62.008.00^0.00^0.00^0.08^0.00 0.08^8.80^0.80^8.00^0.0862.80^62.00 62.00^62.00 62.00^62.08^62.88^62.08^62.88^62.00^62.08^62.00Resource: carpentersUsage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - DailyLogistics: CumulativeUsed to level: No Weight: 1.00 LS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeResource: equipment operatorsUsage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - DailyLogistics: CumulativeUsed to level: No Weight: 1.80 LS - DailyCumulativeAL - DailyCumulativeES - Daily01MAR93 02MAR93 03MAR93 84MAR93 85MAR93 86MAR93 07MAR93 08MAR93 09MAR93 18MAR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 19MAR93 20MAR93 21MAR931.80^1.88^1.00^1.00^1.80^1.00^0.88^0.80^0.08^0.80^0.88^8.80^8.80^0.08^0.001.00^2.08^3.80^4.80^5.88^5.80^5.00^6.00^6.88^6.88^6.08^6.88^6.08^6.00^6.08^6.08^6.88^6.00^6.88^6.88^6.001.00^1.00^1.001.00^2.88^3.80^3.88^3.001.00^1.88^1.88^1.00^1.80^1.00^0.88^0.88^8.00^0.08^0.88^0.00^0.80^0.00^8.00^---1.08^2.00^3.00^4.88^5.08^5.80^5.00^6.88^6.00^6.00^6.08^6.00^6.00^6.88^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.013^6.88^6.00^6.0022MAR93 23MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 01APR93 02APR93 03APR93 04APR93 05APR93 06APR93 07APR93 08APR93 09APR93 18APR93 11APR931.00^1.00^1.00^1.88^1.08 2.00^8.00^0.00^8.88^1.80 0.00^0.08^0.00^0.88^1.00CumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeRL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeRL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeRL - DailyCumulativeES - DailyCumulativeLS - DailyCumulativeRL - DailyCumulative7.00^8.08^9.80^10.00^11.80^11.00^11.00^13.00^13.00^13.00^13.08^14.00^14.00^14.00^14.00^14.00^14.08^14.00^15.00^15.00^15.801.00^1.00^1.00^1.00^1.08 1.08^0.00^0.08^1.08^8.00 8.80^0.00^1.00^1.00^2.004.00^5.00^6.00^7.00^0.00^8.00^8.08^9.00^9.08^9.00^18.08^10.00^10.80^18.80^10.00^10.00^11.00^12.00^14.00^14.00^14.881.08^1.08^1.88^1.00^1.00 1.00^1.80^8.00^0.00^0.80 0.00^0.00^8.88^8.88^1.887.00^8.08^9.80^18.80^11.88^11.00^11.00^12.80^13.00^13.00^13.00^13.08^13.80^13.88^13.00^13.08^13.00^13.00^14.00^14.00^14.8012APR93 13APR93 14APR93 15APR93 16APR93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 20APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 28APR93 29APR93 30APR93 01MAY93 EMAY931.80^0.00^8.00^0.00^0.00 0.08^B.00^0.00^1.00^1.00 0.00^0.00^OM^1.00^1.0016.80^16.00^16.08^16.00^16.00^16.00^16.08^16.00^16.08^16.00^17.08^18.88^18.08^18.00^18.00^18.80^18.00^19.00^20.00^20.80^20.801.00^0.00^1.00^0.00^8.80 0.00^0.00^0.00^1.00^1.00 0.00^0.08^0.00^1.00^1.8015.00^15.00^16.00^16.00^16.00^16.80^16.00^16.80^16.00^16.00^17.00^18.00^18.00^18.00^18.00^18.00^10.80^19.00^20.00^20.00^28.001.80^0.08^1.00^0.80^0.00 0.08^0.00^0.80^1.80^1.00 0.00^0.00^0.08^1.00^1.0015.00^15.00^16.80^16.00^16.00^16.08^16.08^16.00^16.08^16.00^17.08^18.00^18.00^18.00^18.00^18.00^18.00^19.00^20.80^28.80^28.0003MAY93 04MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 87MAY93 08MAY93 09MAY93 10MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY930.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.80 8.00^0.88^8.00^0.00^0.00 0.00^0.00^8.80^0.80^0.0828.00^28.00 20.00^28.00^20.08 20.00^20.00^20.00^20.00^28.00^20.00^20.00^20.08^20.08 20.00^20.00^20.00^28.00^20.08^20.80 20.000.88^0.08^8.00^0.80^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00 0.00^0.00^0.08^0.00^0.00ZHAO^20.00^20.80^20.00^28.00^20.00^20.08^20.08 20.00^20.80^20.80^28.00^20.00^20.00^20.00^20.80^20.00^20.00^20.00 20.00^20.800.00^0.00^0.00^0.08^8.00 0.00^0.88^0.00^0.08^0.00^- 0.08^0.00^0.00^0.08^0.0028.00^20.00^28.00^20.00^20.88 20.00^28.00^20.00^20.00 20.00^20.00^20.00^20.08^20.00^20.08^20.00^20.00^20.00^20.00^20.00^20.0024MAY93 25MAY93 26MAV93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01JUN93 02JUN93 03JUN93 04JUN930.08^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.08^0.00^8.00^8.08^0.0020.00^20.00^20.00 20.00^28.00 20.00^20.00^28.00^20.00^28.00^20.00^20.000.00^0.00^0.00^0.08^0.80 8.00^8.88^0.08^0.08^0.0020.00 28.00 20.00 20.80 20.00 28.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 MOO 20.00 20.008.88^8.88^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.08^0.00^0.00^8.00^0.0020.00^20.08^20.88^20.00^20.00 20.00^20.00^20.80^Z0.00^28.00^20.00^20.00 REPCONTMUBC CONSTRUCTCONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABExample Project from Clough a n d S e a r sRESOURCE USAGE REPORTFile Used: C:\REPCON2\PROJ03\CLOUGHReport Period: 01MAR93 - 04JUN93Selected Resources. All Critical Activities.•CLASS/SUBCLASS/RESOURCE^ DAILY/CUMULATIVE RESOURCE USAGEReport Date: 01APR93Report Tine: 16:13:55Progress Date:Revision Number: 001MAR93 02MAR93 03MAR93 04MAR93 05MAR93 86MAR93 07MAR93 08MAR93 89MAR93 10MAR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 19MAR93 20MAR93 21MAR9322MAR93 23MAR93 24MAR93 2511A1193 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 01APR93 02APR93 03APR93 04APR93 05APR93 06APR93 07APR93 08APR93 09APR93 10APR93 11APR93^4.00^8.00^12.00 16.00 24.00 24.00^24.004.00^4.00^4.08^4.00^8.004.00^0.08 12.00^16.00 24.00 24.00 24.004.08^4.00^4.00^4.00^8.004.00^8.08 12.00^16.00 24.00 24.00 24.0012APR93 13APR93 14APR93 15APR93 16APR93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 20APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 28APR93 29APR93 30APR93 01MAY93 82MAY938.08^3.00^0.88^0.88^4.08^----^4.00^4.00^4.80^8.00^8.00^--^----^3.00^0.08^0.00^4.00^4.08^----32.08 35.00 35.00 35.00 39.00 39.00 39.00 43.00 47.00 51.08 59.00 67.00 67.^67.00 70.00 70.00 78.00 74.08 78.00 70.08 70.008.80^3.08^0.80^8.80^4.00^----^4.00^4.00^4.00^8.00^8.00 3.80^0.00^0.08^4.00^4.80^----32.08 35.00^35.00^35.00^39.00 39.80 39.00 43.00^47.^51.08 59.00 67.80 67.00 67.00 70.08 70.08^70.00 74.00 78.00^78.00^78.008.00^3.08^0.00^0.00^4.00^----^4.80^4.00^4.00^8.00^8.00^3.00^0.00^0.00^4.00^4.0832.00^35.00^35.00^35.00^39.08 39.00 39.00^43.08 47.00 51.00 59.00 67.00^67.00 67.00 70.00 70.00 78.00^74.00^78.80 78.00^78.0803MAY93 04MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 07MAY93 88MAY93 09MAY93 10MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY936.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.80^6.00^3.00^3.00^3.80^----^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.0884.80 90.00 96.88 102.00 108.88 188.00 108.80 114.00 120.08 123.00 126.80 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.806.08^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.08^----^6.88^6.00^3.00^3.00^3.00 0.00^8.08^0.88^0.00^0.0084.80 98.00 96.00 102.00 108.80 108.08 188.00 114.00 120. s 123.00 126.00 129.08 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.00 129.80 129.006.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00 6.00^6.00^3.00^3.00^3.00^----^8.08^0.00^0.08^0.00^0.0084.88 90.00 96.80 102.00 108.00 188.00 108.00 114.80 120.00 123.00 126.00 129.00 129.08 129.00 129.80 129.80 129.08 129.00 129.00 129.08 129.0024MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01JUN93 02JUN93 03JUN93 04JUN934.00^4.08^4.00^0.00^0.80^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00133.00 137.00 141.00 141.00 141.00 141.00 141.08 141.00 141.80 141.00 141.00 141.004.00^4.00^4.00^0.00^0.88 0.08^8.80^8.08^0.00^0.00133.00 137.80 141.00 141.00 141.08 141.08 141.00 141.00 141.80 141.80 141.00 141.004.00^4.00^4.80^0.00^0.80^0.00^8.00^0.00^0.00^0.80133.00 137.00 141.00 141.00 141.00 141.08 141.00 141.00 141.08 141.88 141.00 141.00Class: labourUsage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.RL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cunul.LS - Daily- Cunul.RL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cunul.LS - Daily- Cunul.RL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.RL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Curl.RL - Daily- Curl.Resource: labourersUsage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - DailyLogistics: - Cumul.Used to level: No Weight: 1.00^LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Curl.RL - Daily- Curl.ES - Daily8IMAR93 02MAR93 03MAR93 04MAI193 05MAR93 06MAR93 07MAR93 08MAR93 09MA1193 10MAR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 10MAR93 19MAR93 20MAR93 21MAR9322MAR93 23MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 20MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 01APR93 02 2APR93 03APR93 04APR93 05APR93 86APR93 07APR93 08APR93 89APR93 10APR93 11APR932.00^4.00^6.00^8.00^14.00^14.00^14.002.00^2.08^2.00^2.00^6.002.80^4.08^6.80^8.00^14.00^14.88 14.00- -^ 2.00^2.00^2.80^2.08^6.082.00^4.00^6.00^8.00^14.80^14.00^14.0012APR93 13APR93 14APR93 15APR93 16APR93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 20APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 28APR93 29APR93 30APR93 81MAY93 02MAY936.88^3.00^0.00^0.80^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^6.80^6.00^3.08^8.00^0.00^3.80^3.00 - Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.28.00 23.08^23.00^23.00^25.08 25.00 25.00^27.80^29.00 31.00^37.00 43.00^43.80^43.00 46.08^46.00 46.00 49.08 52.08 52.00^52.806.00^3.00^0.00^0.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^6.08^6.08 3.88^8.00^BOB. ^3.80^3.00^----^23.08^23.00 23.08^25.88 25.00 25.00^27.80 29.00 31.80 37.08 43.00^43.08^43.00 46.08 46.00 46.00 49.00 52.00 52.00^52.086.00^3.08^0.00^0.80^2.00^----^2.00^Zi.^2.08^6.00^6.88^----^----^3.08^0.00^0.00^3.00^3.80^----23.00 23.00 23.00 25.00 25.00 25.88 27.08 29.00 31.00 37.00 43.80 43.00 43.00 46.80 46.80 46.00 49.00 52.00 52.80 ^52.0003MAY93 04MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 87MAY93 08MAY93 09MAY93 10MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY933.00^3.00^3.80^3.08^6.00^6.00^6.80^3.80^3.00^3.00^0.00^0.80^0.00^0. 8855.08 58.08 61.00 64.80^70.00^70.80 70.00^76.00 82.00 85.00^88.00^91.00^91.00^91.00 91.80 91.00 91.00 91.08 91.00^91.80^91.803.00^3.00^3.00^3.08^6.08 6.80^6.00^3.88^3.08^3.00 0.08^8.08^0.88^0.0055.80 58.08 61.00 64.80^70.00^70.08^70.00^76.80 82.00 85.00^88.00^91.00^91.08^91.08^91.08 91.00 91.00 91.80 91.00 91.00^91.803.80^3.00^3.80^3.00^6.08 6.00^6.::^3.80^3.00^3.00 8.00^0.88^0.08^0.0055.00 58.00^61.00 64.00^78.00 70.08^70.00 76.00 82.00 85.00 88.80 91.80 91.00 91.80^91.80 91.80 91.80 91.00 91.80 91.00^91.0824MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 38MAY93 31MAY93 01JUN93 02JUN93 83JUN93 04JUN934.00^4.88^4.00^0.00^0.00^----^----^8.00^0.00^8.08^0.80^0.8895.08 99.80 103.00 103.80 103.80 183.00 183.00 103.08 103.80 103.00 103.08 103.004.00^4.08^4.08^0.08^0.00 0.00^8.00^0.08^0.08^8.8895.80^99.00 183.00 103.00 103.08 183.88 103.08 183.88 103.00 103.08 103.88 103.804.00^4.00^4.80^0.00^0.00^0.08^8.00^8.08^0.80^8.8895.80^99.88 183.00 103.80 103.80 183.80 183.00 103.00 103.00 103.00 103.80 103.08Resource: carpentersUsage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - DailyLogistics: - Cumul.Used to level: No Ueight: 1.00^LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.01MAR93 02MAR93 03MAR93 04MAR93 05MAR93 86MAR93 8714893 8818893 09MA193 1011A893 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 1818893 19MAR93 20MAR93 21MAR9322MAR93 23MAR93 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 30MR93 31t1A1193 01APR93 02APR93 03APR93 04APR93 05APR93 06APR93 07APA93 08APR93 09API193 18AP1193 11APR932.00^4.00^6.80^8.ss^9.00^9.00^9.00Z.^2.88^2.80^2.00^1.00^----^----2.00^4.08^6.08^8.80^9.00^9.08^9.00----^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.08^1.00^----2.08^4.00^6.00^8.00^9.08^9.88^9.0012APR93 13APR93 101193 15APR93 16APA93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 20APR93 21APR93 ZZAPR93 23APR93 24APA93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 Z8APR93 29APA93 38APR93 B1MAY93 02MAY931.00^0.00^0.80^0.00^2.88^2.80^2.08^2.80^1.88^1.80^0.00^0.00^8.00^0.00^0.0018.08^10.88^10.80 18.88^12.00^12.00 12.80^14.80 16.00^18.80^19.00 20.80 20.00 20.80 28.^20.^20.00 20.00^28. s s^20.80^20.1.00^8.00^8.00^8.80^2.00 ----^2.08^2.88^2.80^1.00^1.00^----^0.88^0.00^8.80^0.80^0.00^----10.00 10.00 10.00 12.08 12.00 12.00 14.80 16.88 18.00 19.08 28.00 28.80 20.08 20.00 28.80 20.00 20.08 20.08 20.08 20.001.08^0.00^O. s s^B. s s^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.88^1.00^1.00 0.08^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.8010.08^10.88^18.00 10.80^12.00^12.08 12.80^14.00 16.00^18.08^19.00^28.88 28.80 20.00 20.80 20.00 20.80^20.00 20.00^20.08^20.0003MAY93 84MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 07MAY93 88M8Y93 09M8Y93 18MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15M1Y93 16M0Y93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 28MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY933.88^3.00^3.08^3.80^8.00^----^8.00^8.00^0.00^0.80^8.88^0.88^8.00^8.00^0.0B^0.0023.80 26.00 29.00 32.00 32.00 32.80 32.08 32.08 32.00 MOO 32.00 32.00 32.80 32.00 32.00 32.08 32.00 32.00 32.00 32.00 32.003.00^3.80^3.80^3.88^8.00^----^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.88^8.00^----^0.80^0.00^8.00^0.00^0.0823.00 26.00 29.00 32.00 32.00 32.80 32.00 32.88 32.80 32.00 32.00 32.80 32.00 32.00 32.80 32.80 32.00 32.00 32.80 32.00 32.003.08^3.80^3.::^3.00^8.08 0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^----^0.88^8.00^8.80^0.00^0.8023.00 26.00 29.80 32.00 32.08 32.00 32.08 32.00 32.00 32.00 MOO 32.08 32.08 32.88 32.00 32.80 32.00 32.88 32.00 32.00 32.0024MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01JUN93 02JUN93 03JUN93 04JUN930.00^0.88^0.80^0.88^8.00^0.80^8.00^8.00^0.00^8.8032.00 32.00 32.88 32.08 32.00 32.08 32.00 32.00 32.00 32.00 32.08 32.008.00^8.80^8.00^0.00^0.00 0.08^0.00^8.00^O.ss^0.0032.08 32.00 32.00 32.00 32.00 MOO 32.08 32.80 32.00 32.:;^32.00 32.800.00^8.08^0.80^0.00^0.08^0.00^8.^0.08^0.00^0.0032.00 32.80 32.08 32.00 32.00 32.08 32.80 32.00 32.00 32.00 32.08 32.00Resource: equipment operatorsUsage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - DailyLogistics: - Cumul.Used to level: No^Ueight: 1.80^LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily01MAR93 0218893 03MAR93 04MAR93 05MAR93 06MAR93 87MAR93 08MAR93 89MAR93 101AR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 1318893 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 1918893 20MAR93 21M0R9322MAR93 23MAR93 24MA193 25MAR93 26MAR93 2711AR93 22MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 01APR93 82APR93 03APR93 04APR93 05APR93 06AP1193 87APR93 88APA93 09AP1193 10AP1193 11AP11931.00^----1.00^1.88^1.081.001.00^1.00^1.081.00^1.00^1.0812APR93 13APR93 14APR93 15APR93 16APR93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 20APR93 21APR93 22APR93 23093 24APR93 25APR93 26A11193 27APR93 28APR93 29APR93 38APR93 01MAY93 02MAY93^1.80^0.00^8.80^0.80^0.08^0.08^0.00^0.00^1.08^1.00^0.00^0.00^0.80^1.08^1.002.00^2.80^2.00^2.08^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.80^2.00^3.00^4.08^4.08^4.00^4.80^4.88^4.00^5.00^6.00^6.00^6.1.08^0.00^0.00^0.00^0.00 0.00^0.00^0.00^1.80^1.80 ----^8.80^0.80^0.08^1.00^1.802.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.80^2.00^2.08^2.80^2.00^3.80^4.00^4.08^4.00^4.00^4.80^4.00^5.00^6.00^6.08^6.081.00^0.08^8.80^8.00^0.;; 0.00^0.08^0.08^1.00^1.80 0.00^0.00^0.08^1.00^1.082.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^2.00^3.00^4.80^4.00^4.00^4.00^4.00^4.00^5.00^6.00^6.80^6.0003MAY93 84MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 07MAY93 0811AY93 09MAY93 10MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 10MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY938.00^0.08^0.00^8.88^0.00 0.80^0.00^0.88^0.88^0.00^---^0.08^0.08^0.08^0.08^0.80^----6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.88^6.00^6.08^6.80^6.88^6.00^6.80^6.00^6.80^6.80^6.88^6.80^6.08^6.80^6.000.00^0.00^0.00^8.00^0.08 0.00^0.80^0.80^0.00^0.00^---- 0.80^8.00^0.00^0.00^0.00^----6.08^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.80^6.00^6.08^6.80^6.80^6.00^6.80^6.00^6.88^6.00^6.00^6.08^6.80^6.08^6.880.00^0.00^8.00^0.00^0.00 ----^0.00^0.00^0.08^0.00^0.00^---- 0.00^0.08^8.00^0.88^0.08^----6.80^6.08^6.00^6.00^6.80^6.00^6.80^6.80^6.00^6.00^6.80^6.08^6.88^6.00^6.08^6.80^6.00^6.00^6.80^6.08^6.0024MAY93 2%11 93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01.11M3 82JUM93 03JUH93 84JUM930.80^0.08^0.88^0.80^0.00^----^0.00^0.08^8.80^0.80^8.006.80^6.08^6.00^6.80^6.08^6.000.00^0.80^0.08^0.80^0.806.;1^6.rs^6.ss^6.00^6.00^6.800.08^0.00^8.00^0.88^0.00 --6.88^6.08^6.00^6.00^6.00^6.6.00^6.08^6.00^6.88^6.00^6.00----^8.80^8.08^8.80^0.88^0.006.00^6.88^6.00^6.80^6.80^6.00----^0.80^8.00^8.00^8.88^0.006.08^6.00^6.00^6.80^6.;■^6.08- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.RL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.RL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.AL - Daily- Cumul.ES - Daily- Cumul.LS - Daily- Cumul.RL - Daily- Cumul.Appendix - G175176Activity number &location ID*DurationdaysESD EFD FF Leveled ScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 - A1 2 0 2 0 0 22 - A2 2 2 4 0 2 43 - B 1 4 2 6 0 4 64 - A3 2 4 6 0 10 125 - B2 4 6 10 0 2 66 - C1 6 6 12 0 6 107 - A4 2 6 8 6 12 168 - B3 4 10 14 0 16 209 - C2 6 12 18 0 6 1210 - B4 4 14 18 6 12 1811 - C3 6 18 24 0 18 2412 - C4 6 24 30 0 24 30' Subscript 1,2,3 and 4 refer to the location number for the activityEarly Start and Leveled Schedule - example 5.7Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Resource aggregatesbefore leveling5 5 10 10 10 10 15 15 10 10Resource aggregates afterleveling5 5 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10Project day 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20Resource aggregatesbefore leveling10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 5 5Resource aggregates afterleveling10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10Project day 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30Resource aggregatesbefore leveling5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5Resource aggregates afterleveling5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling - examp e 5.7Appendix - H177178Activitynumber &location IDType DurationdaysResources ESD EFD FF LeveledScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 Start Milestone - 0 0 0 0 0 02- Al Shadow 5 10 0 5 0 0 53- A2 Shadow 5 10 0 5 4 0 54- A3 Shadow 5 10 0 5 8 12 175- A4 Shadow 5 10 0 5 12 5 106- B 1 Ordered 4 10 5 9 0 5 97- B2 Ordered 4 10 9 13 0 9 138- C1 Ordered 6 10 9 15 0 9 159 - B3 Ordered 4 10 13 17 0 17 2110 - C2 Ordered 6 10 15 21 0 15 2111 - D 1 Continuous 4 10 17 21 0 25 2912 - B4 Continuous 4 10 17 21 6  21 2513 - C3 Ordered 6 10 21 27 0 21 2714 - D4 Ordered 4 10 21 25 8 29 3315 - C4 Ordered 6 10 27 33 0 27 3316 Finish Milestone - 0 33 33 0 33 33Subscript 1, 2, 3 and 4 refer to the location number for the activityEarly Start and Leveled Schedule - example 5.8179Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11Resource aggregatesbefore leveling40 40 40 40 40 10 10 10 10 20 20Resource aggregates afterleveling20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 30 20Project day 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21•22Resource aggregatesbefore leveling20 20 20 20 20 20 30 30 30 30 20Resource aggregates afterleveling20 30 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20Project day 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33Resource aggregatesbefore leveling20 20 20 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10Resource aggregates afterleveling20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling - example 5.8Appendix - I180181Activitynumber &location IDType DurationdaysResource 1 ESD EFD FF LeveledScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 Start Milestone - 0 0 0 0 0 02- Al Shadow 5 10 0 5 0 0 53- A2 Shadow 5 10 0 5 4 1 64- A3 Shadow 5 10 0 5 8 12 175- A4 Shadow 5 10 0 5 12 6 116- B 1 Ordered 4 8 5 9 0 5 97- B2 Ordered 4 8 9 13 0 9 138- C 1 Ordered 6 6 9 15 0 9 159 - B3 Ordered 4 8 13 17 0 17 2110 - C2 Ordered 6 6 15 21 0 15 2111 - D 1 Continuous 4 4 17 21 0 25 2912 - B4 Continuous 4 8 17 21 6 21 2513 - C3 Ordered 6 6 21 27 0 21 2714 - D4 Ordered 4 4 21 25 8 29 3315 - C4 Ordered 6 6 27 33 0 27 3316 Finish Milestone - 0 33 33 0 33 33• Subscript 1, 2, 3 and 4 refer to the location number for the activityEarly Start and Leveled Schedule: Resource 1 - example 5.9182Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11Resource aggregatesbefore leveling10 20 20 20 20 18 18 18 18 16 16Resource aggregates afterleveling10 20 20 20 20 18.18 18 18 24 24Project day 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22Resource aggregatesbefore leveling14 24 24 24 16 16 14 14 14 14 14Resource aggregates afterleveling14 24 16 16 16 16 14 14 14 14 14Project day 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33Resource aggregatesbefore leveling14 14 14 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10Resource aggregates afterleveling14 14 14 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling: Resource 1 - example 5.9183Activitynumber &location IDType DurationdaysResource 2 ESD EFD FF LeveledScheduleStartDateFinishDate1 Start Milestone - 0 0 0 0 0 02- Al Shadow 5 4 0 5 0 0 53- A2 Shadow 5 4 0 5 4 0 54- A3 Shadow 5 4 0 5 8 5 105- A4 Shadow 5 4 0 5 12 5 96- B 1 Ordered 4 6 5 9 0 10 147- B2 Ordered 4 6 9 13 0 14 188- C1 Ordered 6 8 9 15 0 15 219 - B3 Ordered 4 6 13 17 0 17 2110 - C2 Ordered 6 8 15 21 0 15 2111 - D 1 Continuous 4 10 17 21 0 22 2612 - B4 Continuous 4 6 17 21 6 18 2213 - C3 Ordered 6 8 21 27 0 21 2714 - D4 Ordered 4 10 21 25 8 26 3015 - C4 Ordered 6 8 27 33 0 27 3316 Finish Milestone - 0 33 33 0 33 33• Subscript 1, 2, 3 and 4 refer to the location number for the activityEarly Start and Leveled Schedule: Resource 2 - example 5.9184Project day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11Resource aggregatesbefore leveling16 16 16 16 16 6 6 6 6 14 14Resource aggregates afterleveling12 12 12 12 12 10 10 10 10 12 14Project day 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22Resource aggregatesbefore leveling14 14 14 14 14 14 24 24 24 24 18Resource aggregates afterleveling14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14Project day 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33Resource aggregatesbefore leveling18 18 18 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8Resource aggregates afterleveling18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 8 8 8Daily Resource Aggregates before and after leveling: Resource 2 - example 5.9Appendix - J185UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCONTMTEST PROJECT FOR THESIS - EXTENDED TEST 1Pred/Succ/Production^ Page 1 Of 1File Used: D:\REPZ80\PROJ23\ASHONESelect: All ActivitiesSort:^Activity Code* Critical ActivityGoverning predecessor of an activityor successor governed by activityReport Date:^27AP1193Report Time:^15:29:51Revision limber: 0Progress Date:ACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONDECESSORSACTT. CODE^DESCRIPTION•^TYPE PLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC•SUCCESSORSACT. CODE^DESCRIPTION TYPE SLOC DEL LAG^OFF/LOCLOC_RANGEI PROD. DATAWORK SKIP DURI*G80100 ACTIVITY A PG80708 PROJECT START NT I FS^8 1 *400200 ACTIVITY B T FS8 ON 1- 15 1 0 3488500 ACTIVITY E NT 1 FS^0 15*GOOZOO ACTIVITY B *400100 ACTIVITY A T FS^0 0 N *480308 ACTIVITY C T FS^B ON 1- 15 1 0 4+G80600 ACTIVITY F NT 15 FS^0 15*G00300 ACTIVITY C *•G00208 ACTIVITY B T FS^0 0 N PG00400 ACTIVITY D T FSA 8N 1- 15 1 0 5*G00400 ACTIVITY D *400308 ACTIVITY C T IS^8 0 N 14+G00800 ACTIVITY G T ISO ON 1- 15 1 B 7G00600 ACTIVITY F NT 15 FS^0 15G80500 ACTIVITY E 1K00100 ACTIVITY A NT 15 FS^0 1 **G80000 ACTIVITY G T FF^0 0^N 1- 5 1 0 3G80600 ACTIVITY F **G80200 ACTIVITY B NT 15 FS^0 15 * G00400 ACTIVITY D NT 15 FS^0 15 15- 15 1 0 10*G00708 PROJECT START *+G00100 ACTIVITY A NT I FS^0 1 1- 1 1 0 0*G081300 ACTIVITY G 0080400 ACTIVITY D T FS^0 0 N 1- 15 1 0 4480580 ACTIVITY E T FF^0 0FOR A TOTAL OF B ACTIVITIESUBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCONTMTEST PROJECT FOR THESIS - EXTENDED TEST IPage 1 Of 1File Used: 0:\REPZ00\PROJ23\ASHONEResource & Production Report Date:^27APR93Report Time:^15:31:28Revision Number: 0Progress Date:Select: All ActivitiesSort:^Activity Codem Critical ActivityGoverning predecessor of an activityor successor governed by activityACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONLOC_RANGEI PROD. DATA'RESOURCES ASSIGNEDWORK SKIP DURIRES11 ABBREV DESCRIPTIONACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGELOC_RANGE^USAGE/UNITS AVG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE^LEVELmG00100 ACTIVITY A 1- 15 1 0 3 1 LAB LABOURERS 1 Z^Rate: MEN/DAY 14.80 1 3 14.003 5 Rate: MEN/DAY 12.00 1 3 12.006 10 Rate: MEN/DAY 10.80 1 3 10.0811 15 Rate: MEN/DAY 8.80 1 3 8.00mG00200 ACTIVITY B 1- 15 1 0 4 1 LAB LABOURERS 1 3 Rate: MEN/DAY 24.80 1 4 24.004 6 Rate: MEN/DAY 21.88 1 4 21.087 9 Rate: MEN/DAY 18.08 1 4 18.0010 12 Rate: MEN/DAY 15.88 1 4 15.0013 15 Rate: MEN/DAY 12.80 1 4 12.00mG00380 ACTIVITY C 1- 15 1 0 5 LAB LABOURERS 1 5 Rate: MEN/DAY 30.80 1 5 30.006 10 Rate: MEN/DAY 25.00 1 5 25.0011 15 Rate: MEN/DAY 20.00 1 5 20.00mG88400 ACTIVITY D 1- 15 1 0 7 LAB LABOURERS 1 5 Rate: MEN/DAY 15.00 1 7 15.006 18 Rate: MEN/DAY 10.08 1 7 18.0011 15 Rate: MEN/DAY 5.88 1 7 5.00G00500 ACTIVITY E 1- 5 1 0 3 1 LAB LABOURERS 1 5 Rate: MEN/DAY 18.80 1 3 10.00G80600 ACTIVITY F 15- 15 1 0 10 1 LAB LABOURERS 15 Rate: MEN/DAY 5.00 1 10 5.000000700 PROJECT START 1- 1 1 0 0mG00800 ACTIVITY G 1- 15 1 0 4 1 LAB LABOURERS 1 15 Rate: MEN/DAY 3.00 1 4 3.00FOR A TOTAL OF 8 ACTIVITIESUBC CONSTRUCT ION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCON TMTEST PROJECT FOR THES I S - EXTENDED TEST 1RESOURCE USAGE REPORTFile Used: D:\REP200\PROJ23\ASHONEReport Period: 01MAR93 - 29JUN93Selected Resources. All Project Activities.Report Date: 27APR93Report Time: 15:47:51Progress Date:Revision Number: 0CLASS/SUBCLASS/RESOURCEResource: LABOURERS•^ DAILY/CUMULATIVE RESOURCE USAGE01MAR93 02MAR93 03MA1193 04MAR93 05MAR93 06MAR93 07MAR93 88MAR93 09MAR93 18MAR93 11MAR93 12MAR93 13MAR93 14MAR93 15MAR93 16MAR93 17MAR93 18MAR93 19MAR93 20MAR93 21MAR93Usage: Rate Unit: MEN/DAY ES - Daily 14.00^14.00^14.00^38.00^38.00^38.00^36.08^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.88^81.00^81.00^81.00^76.00^76.00^76.00^76.00^76.08^76.00Logistics: Cumulative 14.08^28.00^42.//^88.00^118.80^156.80^192.00^258.08^324.00^390.00^456.08^522.00^683.00^684.00^765.00^841.00^917.00^993.00 1069.00 1145.00 1221.00Used to level: No Weight:^1.00 LS - Daily 14.00^14.00^14.00^24.00^24.00^24.00^24.08^44.80^44.00^44.00^54.00^54.00^39.80^39.00^57.00^57.08^57.88^69.00^69.00^39.88^39.00Cumulative 14.08^28.00^42.80^66.00^98.00^114.00^138.00^182.00^226.80^278.00^324.80^378.00^417.00^456.00^513.00^570.00^627.00^696.00^765.08^884.00^843.80AL - Daily 14.80^14.08^14.00^38.00^38.08^38.00^36.08^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.00^69.00^69.00^69.00^78.00^78.08^78.00^76.00^76.00^76.00Cumulative 14.80^28.80^42.08^80.00^118.00^156.00^192.80^258.80^324.00^390.80^456.08^522.00^591.08^660.00^729.00^807.00^885.00^963.80 1039.80 1115.00 1191.0022MAR93 231141193 24MAR93 25MAR93 26MAR93 27MAR93 28MAR93 29MAR93 30MAR93 31MAR93 01APR93 02APR93 83APR93 84AP1193 05APR93 86APR93 07APR93 08APR93 09APR93 10APR93 11APR93ES - Daily 76.80^76.00^76.00^76.00^76.00^76.00^73.00^73.08^73.00^71.00^71.80^66.88^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.00^66.00^63.00^63.80^63.00Cumulative 1297.00 1373.80 1449.00 1525.00 1681.00 1677.00 1750.08 1823.00 1896.08 1967.08 2038.88 2104.08 2170.08 2236.00 2382.00 2368.08 2434.88 2500.08 2563.00 2626.00 2689.00LS - Daily 57.80^57.00^57.00^66.00^66.80^36.00^36.00^57.00^57.00^57.08^66.08^66.80^36.00^36.00^55.00^55.00^55.00^66.80^66.00^36.00^36.80Cumulative 980.00^957.80 1014.00 1880.00 1146.08 1182.00 1218.08 1275.88 1332.00 1389.00 1455.80 1521.00 1557.00 1593.00 1648.00 1703.80 1758.00 1824.00 1890.00 1926.00 1962.00AL - Daily 76.80^76.08^76.80^66.00^66.00^66.00^73.00^73.80^73.00^63.00^63.80^68.00^68.88^68.00^68.80^68.00^68.08^58.00^63.00^63.80^63.88Cumulative 1267.00 1343.80 1419.00 1485.80 1551.08 1617.80 1690.08 1763.00 1836.00 1899.00 1962.80 2030.88 2098.08 2166.00 2234.00 2302.80 2370.00 2428.00 2491.00 2554.00 2617.0012APR93 13APR93 14093 15093 16APR93 17APR93 18APR93 19APR93 28093 21APR93 22APR93 23APR93 24APR93 25APR93 26APR93 27APR93 28APR93 29APR93 30APR93 01MAY93 02MAY93ES - Daily 63.00^63.80^66.00^68.08^68.08^66.08^63.08^63.08^66.00^60.80^68.00^63.80^63.00^63.80^66.88^58.00^55.00^55.08^42.00^45.80^45.00Cumulative 2752.00 2815.00 2881.80 2949.00 3017.00 3883.08 3146.00 3209.00 3275.00 3335.00 3395.00 3458.00 3521.80 3584.00 3650.00 3708.80 3763.08 3818.00 3860.00 3905.00 3950.80LS - Daily 50.00^58.00^50.80^58.00^58.00^28.00^28.80^45.08^45.00^45.80^53.00^53.00^28.00^28.00^45.00^45.00^45.00^53.00^53.80^28.08^28.08Cumulative 2012.80 2062.00 2112.00 2170.00 2228.80 2256.00 2284.00 2329.00 2374.00 2419.00 2472.00 2525.00 2553.00 2581.00 2626.08 2671.08 2716.00 2769.00 2822.00 2850.00 2878.00AL - Daily 63.08^63.08^63.00^55.00^55.00^50.08^50.80^50.00^58.00^43.08^43.08^43.80^35.80^35.00^35.00^42.00^42.80^42.80^42.00^38.08^38.08Cumulative 2680.00 2743.88 2806.08 2861.88 2916.00 2966.00 3016.00 3866.00 3116.08 3159.00 3282.00 3245.08 3280.00 3315.00 3350.00 3392.00 3434.00 3476.00 3518.00 3556.00 3594.0003MAY93 84MAY93 05MAY93 06MAY93 07MAY93 08MAY93 09MAY93 10MAY93 11MAY93 12MAY93 13MAY93 14MAY93 15MAY93 16MAY93 17MAY93 18MAY93 19MAY93 20MAY93 21MAY93 22MAY93 23MAY93ES - Daily ROO^38.80^35.00^35.08^35.00^38.08^38.00^38.80^38.00^35.00^30.80^38.00^33.80^33.08^33.00^33.00^30.00^30.00^30.00^8.08^8.08Cumulative 3988.08 4026.00 4061.80 4096.88 4131.00 4169.00 4207.00 4245.00 4283.00 4318.00 4348.00 4378.00 4411.00 4444.00 4477.08 4510.00 4540.00 4570.08 4600.80 4608.00 4616.00LS - Daily 45.00^45.00^45.00^50.00^50.00^25.08^25.00^43.00^43.80^43.00^58.00^50.00^25.00^25.08^38.00^38.00^38.00^45.00^45.00^20.00^20.00Cumulative 2923.00 2968.80 3013.88 3863.80 3113.08 3138.08 3163.80 3206.00 3249.00 3292.08 3342.00 3392.00 3417.00 3442.80 3480.00 3518.00 3556.00 3601.00 3646.00 3666.08 3686.08AL - Daily 38.00^30.00^38.80^38.00^30.00^30.00^30.00^30.00^30.80^22.00^22.00^22.00^22.00^18.00^18.00^18.08^10.00^20.00^20.00^18.00^10.00Cumulative 3632.08 3662.00 3692.00 3722.00 3752.00 3782.00 3812.00 3842.00 3872.08 3894.80 3916.00 3938.08 3960.80 3978.08 3996.80 4014.00 4024.00 4044.80 4064.00 4082.00 4180.0024MAY93 25MAY93 26MAY93 27MAY93 28MAY93 29MAY93 30MAY93 31MAY93 01,111193 02JUN93 03JUN93 04JUN93 05JUN93 06JUN93 87JUN93 08,1111193 89JUN93 10JUN93 11JUN93 12JUN93 13JUN93ES - Daily 8.08^8.00^5.80^5.80^5.00^8.00^8.80^8.00^8.00^5.00^5.00^5.00^8.00^8.00^8.80^8.00^5.00^5.00^5.80^8.00^8.00Cumulative 4624.00 4632.00 4637.88 4642.00 4647.00 4655.00 4663.80 4671.00 4679.00 4684.08 4689.00 4694.00 4782.08 4718.00 4718.00 4726.00 4731.00 4736.00 4741.00 4749.00 4757.00LS - Daily 33.00^33.08^33.80^37.88^37.00^25.80^25.00^33.00^37.00^45.00^45.00^45.00^17.00^17.80^37.80^37.08^38.00^30.00^30.80^10.80^10.00Cumulative 3719.00 3752.00 3785.08 3822.80 3859.00 3884.80 3989.00 3942.08 3979.00 4024.00 4069.00 4114.00 4131.08 4140.00 4185.80 4222.00 4252.08 4282.08 4312.00 4322.80 4332.00AL - Daily 18.00^18.08^27.00^27.00^27.08^17.80^16.00^19.80^19.00^19.08^13.00^38.00^30.80^30.80^30.08^30.80^15.08^15.08^15.00^25.00^25.08Cumulative 4118.80 4136.80 4163.80 4190.00 4217.00 4234.80 4258.08 4269.08 4288.80 4307.08 4320.00 4358.80 4388.00 4418.00 4440.00 4470.00 4485.00 4500.00 4515.00 4540.80 4565.0014JUN93 15JUN93 1611193 17JUN93 18JUN93 19JUN93 20JUN93 21JUN93 21111M93 23JUN93 24JUN93 25JUN93 26JUN93 27JUN93 28JUN93 29JUN93ES - Daily 8.08^8.00^5.08^5.00^5.00^8.80^8.00^8.00^8.00^5.06^5.00^5.80^3.00^3.08^3.00^3.08Cumulative 4765.00 4773.80 4778.00 4783.00 4788.88 4796.08 4804.88 4812.80 4828.00 4025.00 4838.08 4835.00 4838.00 4841.08 4844.00 4847.80LS - Daily 30.00^40.00^48.88^48.00^48.08^15.00^15.00^15.00^15.80^15.00^15.08^15.80^55.08^55.80^55.08^55.00Cumulative 4362.00 4402.00 4442.08 4482.08 4522.80 4537.08 4552.00 4567.08 4582.08 4597.08 4612.00 4627.00 4682.00 4737.08 4792.00 4847.80AL - Daily 25.00^25.00^28.00^14.88^14.00^28.00^20.88^14.00^14.00^18.00^15.80^15.00^15.08^15.00^15.08^15.08Cumulative 4590.00 4615.80 4643.08 4657.88 4671.00 4691.08 4711.88 4725.00 4739.00 4757.00 4772.08 4787.08 4802.00 4817.00 4832.00 4847.00UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LABSAMPLE HIGHR I SE PROJECT - REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2 . 0RESOURCE USAGE REPORTREPCON TMFile Used: D:\REP208\PROJ11\SAMPLEReport Period: 81JUM88 - 31MAI189Selected Resources. All Project Activities.Report Date: 28APR93Report Time: 17:31:12Progress Date:Revision Number: 8^CLASS/SUBCLASS/RESOURCE^ DAILY/CUMULATIVE RESOURCE USAGEResource: labour^ 01JUN88 OZJUNI30 03JUN88 04JUN88 05JUN88 0611180 87JUN88 08JUN88 09JUN88 18JUN88 MUNN 12JUN88 13JUN80 14111180 15JUN88 16JUN88 17JUM08 18JUM80 19J01108 20J01188 21.14108Usage: Rate^Unit: men/day^ES - Daily^----^ 4.00^4.06^4.08^4.08^4.88^5.00^5.00^4.00^4.08^4.88Logistics: Cumulative 4.00^8.00^12.00^12.80^12.00^16.08 20.00^25.80^30.08 34.88 34.00 34.08 38.80^42.08Used to level: Yes Weight: 1.60^LS - Daily 4.80^4.88^4.08 4.00^4.08^2.00^2.00^2.00 5.00^5.00Cumulative^ 4.00^8.08^12.00^12.08^12.00^16.08 20.86 '22.00^24.00 26.00 26.00 26.08 31.80^36.00AL - Daily 4.08^4.08^4.08^---- 4.00^4.00^5.00^5.00^4.00^4.08^4.00Cumulative 4.00^8.08^12.00^12.80^12.00^16.00 20.80 25.08^30.08 34.80 34.00 34.08 38.80^42.002ZJUN38 23JUN88 24JUN813 25JUN88 26JUN88 27JUN88 28JUN88 29JUN88 30JUN88 01JUL88 02JUL88 03JUL80 04JUL88 05JUL80 86JUL88 07JUL88 08JUL88 09JUL88 10JUL83 11JUL88 12JUL88ES - Daily^3.00^3.88^3.00^6.80^6.08^6.00^6.80 ----^6.08^6.00^6.08^6.08^6.80^6.80^6.08Cumulative^45.00 48.80^51.08 51.60^51.00 57.00 63.80^69.08^75.00^75.08^75.08^75.00^81.00 87.00^93.60^99.00 105.00 105.00 185.88 111.00 117.88LS - Daily^3.00^3.08^3.00^----^3.00^3.00^6.08^6.00 6.00^6.08^6.88^8.80^8.00 0.00^6.80Cumulative^39.80^42.80 45.08 45.80^45.08 48.00^51.00 57.08 63.80^63.68 63.80^63.00^69.88 75.08 81.00 89.00^97.00^97.08 97.08 105.00 111.00AL - Daily^3.08^3.08^3.00 6.00^6.68^6.88^6.00 6.08^6.88^6.80^6.80^6.88^----^6.08^6.60Cumulative^45.00 48.08 51.08 51.68^51.08 57.00 63.88 69.80^75.00^75.00 75.00^75.00^81.60 87.08^93.08 99.00 105.00 185.86 105.08 111.08 117.0013JUL88 14JUL88 15JUL88 16JUL88 17JUL88 18JUL88 19JUL88 20JUL88 21JUL88 22JUL88 23JUL88 24JUL88 25JUL88 26JUL88 27JUL88 28JUL88 29JUL88 30JUL88 31JUL88 01AUM8 02AUG88ES - Daily^6.06^5.00^13.08^13.00^0.08^18.00^10.00^16.08^----^16.00^16.80^8.00^8.00^0.66^ 8.08Cumulative^123.80 128.08 141.80 141.00 141.00 154.88 162.00 172.00 182.00 198.00 190.80 198.00 214.80 230.00 238.00 246.00 254.80 254.00 254.80 254.00 262.60LS - Daily^6.00^5.88^13.80 13.00^11.80^13.08^10.80^16.08 16.00^16.68^8.88^8.80^8.00 8.00Cumulative^117.00 122.00 135.00 135.00 135.00 148.88 159.00 172.00 182.00 198.08 198.80 198.80 214.08 230.08 238.80 246.00 254.00 254.80 254.00 254.00 262.00AL - Daily^6.00^5.00^13.08^13.00^8.00^18.00^10.80^16.80^16.00^16.80^8.80^8.80^8.80^ 8.00Cumulative^123.80 128.00 141.80 141.80 141.80 154.08 162.88 172.80 182.88 198.00 198.88 198.80 214.80 230.00 238.88 246.00 254.00 254.00 254.86 254.08 262.8003AUG88 84AUG88 05AUG88 06AUG88 07AUG88 08AUG88 09AUG88 10AUG88 11AUG88 12AUG88 13AUG88 14AUG88 15AUG88 16AUG88 17AUG88 18AUG88 19AUG88 28AUG80 21AUG88 22AUG88 23AUG88ES - Daily^8.88^8.00^8.00^3.00^3.88^3.00^8.00^8.00^5.00^7.00^7.00^7.08^7.80^11.00^11.80Cumulative^270.00 278.00 286.00 286.08 286.00 289.00 292.88 295.80 383.00 311.08 311.ss 311.08 316.08 323.00 330.08 337.00 344.00 344.00 344.88 355.80 366.80LS - Daily^8.80^8.88^8.00 3.80^3.80^3.06^8.00^8.00^----^5.00^7.08^7.08^7.00^7.00 11.80^11.80Cumulative^278.00 278.88 286.00 286.08 286.00 289.00 292.80 295.88 383.00 311.80 311.80 311.68 316.80 323.80 338.80 337.80 344.00 344.88 344.00 355.00 366.08AL - Daily^8.00^8.08^8.80^3.00^3.08^3.00^8.08^8.80 5.00^7.80^7.00^7.88^7.00^---- 11.88^11.00Cumulative^270.00 278.861 286.00 286.00 286.00 289.08 292.08 295.80 303.80 311.80 311.88 311.88 316.08 323.00 330.08 337.08 344.80 344.00 344.80 355.80 366.8024AUG80 NUMB 26AUG88 27AUG88 28AUG88 29AUG88 30AUG88 31AUG88 01SEP88 82SEP88 03000 04SEP88 05SEP88 06SEP88 07088 08088 09SEP88 10SEP88 11088 12SEP88 13SEP88ES - Daily^11.00^11.00^8.08^8.08^8.00^8.08^8.00^8.00^ 8.^8.00^16.88^24.80^----^16.00^15.00Cumulative^377.88 388.08 396.80 396.08 396.80 484.00 412.00 420.80 428.60 436.00 436.68 436.80 436.00 444.00 452.00 468.80 492.88 492.00 492.00 508.00 523.80LS - Daily^11.00^11.88^8.00 8.00^8.00^8.80^8.00^8.06 8.00^8.88^16.00^23.60 16.80^16.08Cumulative^377.80 388.00 3%.88 396.00 396.88 484.08 412.60 420.00 428.88 436.88 436.88 436.80 436.00 444.00 452.08 468.00 491.00 491.00 491.00 587.08 523.00AL - Daily^11.00^11.80^8.00^8.00^8.80^8.00^8.80^8.08^ 8.00^8.08^16.00^23.88^16.00^16.80Cumulative^377.80 388.00 396.00 396.00 396.80 404.00 412.68 420.00 428.80 436.00 436.08 436.80 436.00 444.08 452.00 468.00 491.88 491.08 491.00 507.00 523.0014000 15SEP88 16088 17SEP88 18SEP88 19SEP88 20000 21080 22SEP88 23SEP88 24SEP88 25SEP88 26088 27SEP88 28088 29088 30SEP88 010CT88 02OCT88 030CT88 040CT88ES - Daily^7.88^5.00^11.08^11.00^10.00^15.80^14.08^9.80^9.00^12.00^5.68^8.08^15.00^11.00^14.00Cumulative^530.00 535.80 546.00 546.00 546.80 557.si 567.00 582.86 596.00 605.00 605.80 605.00 614.80 626.00 631.08 639.08 654.00 654.00 654.88 665.00 679.88LS - Daily^7.80^5.80 11.80 11.00^10.00^14.08^15.08^7.08^----^7.00^18.00^3.88^6.88^13.80 7.08 10.00Cumulative^538.80 535.08 546.80 546.88 546.80 557.00 567.00 581.^596.00 603.80 603.00 603.00 610.80 620.rs 623.00 629.80 642.08 642.08 642.00 649.00 659.80AL - Daily^7.00^5.88^11.88^11.00^11.00^14.08^14.88^9.08^----^9.00^12.00^5.08^8.86^15.80^11.00^14.00Cumulative^530.08 535.08 546.08 546.80 546.00 557.00 568.00 582.80 596.00 685.00 605.00 605.08 614.80 626.88 631.00 639.00 654.08 654.88 654.00 665.00 679.08050CT88 060CT88 070CT88 080CT88 090CT88 100CT80 110CT88 120CT88 130CT88 140CT88 150CT88 160CT88 170CT88 100CT88 190CT80 200CT88 210CT08 220CT88 230CT88 240CT88 250CT88ES - Daily^9J1^12.rs^19.08^----^---- 13.08^16.88^9.08^12.80^17.00^13.08^16.88^9.68^12.08^19.80^13.80Cumulative^688.80 780.00 719.80 719.80 719.00 719.80 732.00 748.09 757.id 769.08 769.08 769.80 786.00 799.x4 815.88 824.00 836.00 836.00 836.80 855.00 868.80LS - Daily^3.08^6.08^13.08 7.08^18.88^3.^6.08 13.00^7.1;^10.08^3.00^6.00 13.08^7.08Cumulative^662.08 668.08 681.00 681.08 681.00 681.00 688.88 690.00 781.08 787.00 707.08 787.80 720.08 727.80 737.00 740.80 746.80 746.88 746.80 759.08 766.00AL - Daily^9.00^12.08^19.88^ 13.08^16.00^9.00^12.80^17.00^13.54^16.08^9.00^12.00^19.00^13.08Cumulative^680.88 708.08 719.^719.00 719.80 719.00 732.88 748.80 757.00 769.88 769.00 769.08 786.88 799.00 815.00 824.80 836.00 036.80 836.08 855.00 068.00260CT88 270CT88 280CT88 290CT88 3000'08 310CT88 01M00J88 02110V138 03MOV08 04NOV88 0910908 06MO 1J88 07110V88 08NOV00 09MOV80 10H0V88 11H0V08 12110U88 13H0V08 141.10V88 15110V011ES - Daily^16.86^9.00^12.88 19.00^13.88^16.00^9.08^12.00^19.80^13.80^16.80^9.00^ 12.00^19.88Cumulative^884.00 893.80 985.00 905.00 905.08 924.68 937.88 953.00 962.00 974.00 974.00 974.80 993.68 1886.00 1022.80 1031.00 1031.00 1031.00 1031.08 1043.00 1062.00LS - Daily^18.00^5.00^0.08^15.80^9.00^12.00^5.08^8.08^15.80^9.08^14.00^7.08^ 10.00^17.00Cumulative^776.88 781.00 709.08 789.00 789.80 884.00 013.00 825.88 830.08 838.08 038.80 838.00 853.00 862.00 076.88 003.08 803.80 803.00 883.08 893.88 910.00AL - Daily^16.00^9.08^12.08 19.00^13.88^16.88^9.00^12.00 19.80^13.08 16.88^9.80 12.00^19.00Cumulative^^004.80 893.00 905.00 985.00 905.08 924.08 937.80 953.00 962.00 974.00 974.00 974.08 993.08 1006.88 1022.08 1031.00 1031.80 1031.00 1031.08 1043.00 1062.0016NOUB8 17NOV88 MOVIE 19NOU88 20NOV88 21NOV08 22NOUBB 23HOU80 24N01108 25NOW8 26NOV88 27NOU88 MOM 29NOU88 38NOV80 81DEC88 02DEC80 03DEC88 04DECB0 05DEC88 06DEC88ES - Daily^11.00^14.00^19.80^---- 22.80 29.88 29.80 32.00 31.00^---- 16.08 22.80 19.80^17.00^15.80^10.00^18.00Cumulative 1873.00 1007.00 1186.80 1106.08 1186.80 1120.80 1157.00 1106.00 1210.08 1249.00 1249.00 1249.00 1265.08 1207.00 1306.00 1323.00 1338.80 1338.00 1338.00 1356.00 1374.00LS - Daily^11.00^14.00^19.88^---- 20.00 28.00 16.80^16.00^16.00 4.88^4.88^2.00^0.08^17.00 20.00^19.00Cumulative^921.08 935.80 954.00 954.00 954.00 974.00 1002.00 1810.08 1034.08 1050.08 1058.00 1850.00 1054.88 1050.88 1060.88 1060.88 1885.80 1005.00 1005.00 1105.00 1124.80AL - Daily^11.08^14.00^19.80 22.00^29.00^26.00 27.00 28.80^13.00^10.88^22.08^17.80^15.00^18.08^10.80Cumulative^1873.00 1807.88 1106.00 1106.80 1106.80 1120.80 1157.00 1183.80 1210.80 1238.80 1238.00 1238.00 1251.00 1269.80 1291.00 1300.88 1323.00 1323.00 1323.80 1341.08 1359.8087DECI313 WEBB 09008 10DEC88 11DEC88 12DEC88 13DECOB 14DEC88 15DEC88 16DEC88 17DEC88 MEMO 19DEC88 28DEC89 21DEC88 22DEC88 23DEC80 24DEC88 25DEC80 26DEC88 27DEC88ES - Daily^21.08 13.80 15.00^--^ 27.00 27.80 27.80 30.00 35.00^35.00 35.00 33.00 33.00 27.80^ --Cumulative 1395.00 1488.00 1423.00 1423.00 1423.00 1458.00 1477.00 1504.80 1534.80 1569.08 1569.88 1569.08 1684.08 1639.80 1672.08 1785.88 1732.00 1732.00 1732.00 1732.00 1732.00LS - Daily 16.00 21.00 21.00 22.88 25.08 25.00 27.80 20.00 34.00 32.08 32.00 35.00 32.00 --Cumulative 1140.00 1161.00 1182.00 11132.00 1182.80 1204.00 1229.00 1254.88 1281.00 1389.80 1309.00 1309.08 1343.00 1375.80 1407.80 1442.80 1474.00 1474.88 1474.00 1474.00 1474.00AL - Daily 21.80 13.80 18.08 22.00 22.00 20.80 23.80 23.00 23.88 23.00 23.00 23.08 17.00Cumulative^1380.08 1393.00 1403.00 1403.00 1403.00 1425.08 1447.00 1467.00 1490.00 1513.00 1513.08 1513.00 1536.08 1559.00 1582.88 1605.08 1622.00 1622.80 1622.00 1622.08 1622.8820DEC88 29DEC88 30DEC88 31DEC88 01JANO9 02JAN139 03JANO9 04JAN09 05JANO9 06JANO9 07JAN89 08JAN89 09JAN89 10JAN89 MAO 12JAN89 13JAN89 14JAN89 15JANO9 16JAN89 1714109ES - Daily 27.88 21.08 21.80 19.88 9.00 9.08 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.88 9.80 14.08 14.00 14.80Cumulative 1759.80 1788.08 1001.80 1081.08 1801.08 1801.88 1820.08 1029.88 1830.08 1847.80 1847.00 1047.00 1856.00 1865.00 1074.00 1803.88 1897.00 1897.80 1097.00 1911.80 1925.00LS - Daily 24.00 15.80 15.08 15.80 15.00 15.80 20.08 28.80 28.88 28.00 20.00 22.00 22.00 22.00Cumulative 1498.80 1513.00 1520.00 1520.00 1520.00 1528.80 1543.80 1558.80 1573.00 1593.00 1593.00 1593.80 1613.00 1633.00 1653.00 1673.08 1695.08 1695.00 1695.08 1717.00 1739.00AL - Daily 20.00 19.08 19.00 17.80 19.80 19.00 19.80 19.08 19.80 19.00 19.08 19.80 19.08 19.00Cumulative^1642.00 1661.00 1608.08 1680.00 1600.00 1600.08 1697.08 1716.80 1735.80 1754.88 1754.00 1754.00 1773.00 1792.08 1811.00 1038.00 1849.80 1849.00 1049.00 1060.80 1887.0018JANO9 19JAN89 28JAN89 21JAM89 22JAN89 23JANB9 24JANB9 25JAN89 26JAN89 27JA1189 MAO 29JAN89 38JAN89 31JAN89 011E889 82FEB09 031E009 041009 05E889 06009 87FEBB9ES - Daily^14.00^17.80 17.80^20.00 28.88 26.88 26.00 26.80^---- 26.00 26.80 26.00 26.00 26.08^26.08 26.00Cumulative 1939.80 1956.80 1973.08 1973.88 1973.00 1993.00 2013.08 2839.00 2865.80 2091.08 2891.00 2891.08 2117.00 2143.00 2169.00 2195.00 2221.00 2221.00 2221.00 2247.00 2273.00LS - Daily 22.80 25.00 20.00 22.88 22.00 23.00 28.00 31.00 31.00 27.00 27.00 30.80 30.00 27.00 27.80Cumulative 1761.08 1786.00 1806.80 1886.SS 1086.00 1820.00 1050.08 1073.08 1901.08 1932.00 1932.80 1932.08 1963.80 1990.00 2017.80 2047.88 2077.00 2877.00 2077.80 2184.08 2131.00AL - Daily 19.08 19.08 19.08 18.00 18.88 19.88 19.08 19.08 19.80 19.80 22.00 22.00 22.80 19.00 19.80Cumulative 1906.88 1925.00 1944.00 1944.00 1944.80 1962.08 1900.80 1999.80 2018.80 2037.00 2037.00 2837.80 2056.08 2075.00 2097.00 2119.80 2141.08 2141.08 2141.00 2160.00 2179.80001089 09PE009 101E1309 11PE889 12FEB89 13FEB89 141E889 151E889 161E009 171E009 1131009 19FEB89 HEBB 211009 22FEB89 231E089 241E809 25FEB89 26FEB89 271E809 28FEB89ES - Daily 24.80 24.08 21.88 21.00 21.00 21.00 21.00 21.88 21.88 22.80 19.00 19.00 19.88 19.00 19.80Cumulative 2297.00 2321.00 2342.80 2342.00 2342.00 2363.88 2304.80 2485.00 2426.00 2447.08 2447.00 2447.00 2468.00 2498.08 2589.80 2528.08 2547.00 2547.00 2547.00 2566.00 2505.80LS - Daily 27.88 27.00 27.00 27.00 24.08 24.00 23.80 23.00 28.88 28.00 21.00 21.08 21.80 21.80 21.00Cumulative 2150.08 2185.00 2212.08 2212.80 2212.00 2239.08 2263.80 2207.08 2310.08 2333.08 2333.80 2333.08 2353.08 2373.00 2394.08 2415.08 2436.08 2436.80 2436.80 2457.00 2478.00AL - Daily^19.00^19.80^19.00^----^19.88 19.80 19.00 23.00 20.08^20.00^20.00 21.08^21.88 21.00^21.00^21.08Cumulative 2198.80 2217.00 2236.00 2236.08 2236.80 2255.88 2274.88 2293.08 2316.00 2336.00 2336.80 2336.00 2356.00 2376.08 2397.00 2410.08 2439.08 2439.00 2439.00 2468.00 2481.0001MAR89 02MAR09 03HAR89 84MA809 05MAA09 06MAR89 07MAR89 MAW 09MAR89 10MA809 11M1109 12MAR89 13MAA09 14MAA139 15MAR89 16MAA09 17MAA89 10MAI109 19MAB89 2011A809 21MAI189ES - Daily^19.00^19.80^19.^----^ 14.00^14.00^14.80^14.88^11.00^11.00^11.00^9.00^6.08^6.88^6.00^6.08Cumulative 2684.08 2623.00 2642.00 2642.00 2642.00 2656.00 2670.00 2604.08 2698.08 2789.00 2709.00 2709.00 2720.80 2731.00 2748.00 2746.00 2752.00 2752.00 2752.00 2750.00 2764.00LS - Daily 21.08 19.08 19.88 19.00 19.08 19.00 19.80 16.80 16.00 16.00 14.00 11.80 13.08 13.00 13.00Cumulative 2499.00 2518.00 2537.80 2537.80 2537.08 2556.88 2575.08 2594.00 2613.00 2629.00 2629.00 2629.00 2645.00 2661.00 2675.00 2606.80 2699.00 2699.80 2699.80 2712.00 2725.00AL - Daily 111.08 19.80 19.80 19.08 19.88 19.00 19.00 16.08 16.88 16.80 14.00 13.08 13.00 13.00 13.00Cumulative 2499.80 2518.00 2537.08 2537.00 2537.00 2556.00 2575.00 2594.08 2613.08 2629.80 2629.08 2629.00 2645.00 2661.80 2675.08 2688.08 2701.88 2701.00 2781.00 2714.80 2727.0022MAA09 23MAI109 24MAR89 25MAA09 26M0109 27MAA89 20MAA89 29MABB9 30MAA89 31MAI109ES - Daily 6.80 6.80 6.88 3.00 3.80 2.00Cumulative 2770.80 2776.80 2776.88 2776.00 2776.08 2776.00 2782.00 2785.08 2788.08 2790.00LS - Daily 13.88 13.08 11.00 8.00 10.00 10.80Cumulative 2730.08 2751.88 2751.08 2751.00 2751.80 2751.00 2762.80 2770.80 2700.88 2790.00AL - Daily 13.00 11.00 11.00 18.00 10.00 8.00Cumulative 2748.08 2751.08 2751.80 2751.00 2751.08 2751.80 2762.88 2772.00 2782.80 2790.80Appendix - K191UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^REPCONTMFile Used D:\REP200\PROJ11\SAMPLESelect: All ActivitiesSort*^Start DateDate Selection: Act/Sch/EarlySchedule WindowTime: 01JUN8B To 31MAR89Locations* GPRJ To PNTHSAMPLE HIGHRISE PROJECT — REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2.0Early Start Time DatesLINEAR PLANNING CHART ACTIVITY INDEXPage 2 Of 2Report Date:^27APR93Report Time: 14:5L36Progress Date:Revision Number: 0KEY^m Critical Activity^0 Activity has procurement sequence^c Completed^Activity Types: 0 Ordered, C Continuous, S Shadow, H Hammock, SM Start Milestone, FM Finish MilestoneCode Type DescriptionG01500 SM PROJECT START0 G00200 0 OBTAIN DEMOLITION PERMIT0 G00400 0 OBTAIN EXCAVATION PERMIT0 G00300 0 DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTUREw 50 G01600 FM DEMOLITION COMPLETE020200^0 CLEAR SITE0 G00500 D MOBILIZE SITEO 160400 0 INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER0 020100 C EXCAVATIONe 030100 C MESH, TIEBACKS 6 SHOTCRETE@ 040200 0 REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS@ G00600 0 FORM 6 POUR FOUNDATIONS@ G00700 0 ERECT CRANE@ G01900 FM CRANE INSTALLED@ G02700 H CRANE USAGE@ 040400 0 REINFORCE 82 WALLS & COLSw l7 G01000 0 FORM 6 POUR B2 WALLS & COLS0 G00900 0 BACKFILL FTGS 6 GRADE SOGCI 040300 0 REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADE0 001100 0 FORM 6 POUR B2 SLAB ON GRADECode Type Description160500^0 INSTALL ELECTRICAL ROOMmp@ 100100 C INSTALL PRECAST PANELSwp@ 110100 0 INSTALL WINDOWS 6 DOORS8 160200 C ELECTRICAL ROUGH-IN@ 120100 C INSTALL STEEL STUDDING@ 040700 0 REINFORCE PLANTERS 6 WALLS@ 001400 0 FORM 6 POUR PLANTERS/WALLS0 090100 0 INSTALL ROOFING@ G02100 FM ROOF COMPLETED@ 120200 C INSTALL DRYWALL0 120300 S TAPE 6 FILL DRYWALL@ 090200 0 INSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANEep @ 160300 C ELECTRICAL FINISHING0 050100 0 LANDSCAPINGG00800 0 DISMANTLE CRANE@ G02000 FM CRANE DISMANTLED0 150300 C FINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM@ G011300 FM SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETIONCode Type Description^G01200^0 FORM & POUR B1 FLOOR SLAB040500^0 REINFORCE 81 FLOOR SLAB0 040600 0 REINFORCE 81 WALLS 6 COLS@ 001300 0 FORM 6 POUR Bt WALLS 6 COLSup @ G00100 0 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS0 G02400 H SUPERSTRUCTURE SLABSmp@ 040100 0 REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABSm @ 150500 0 MECH SLEEVING - SS FLOOR SLABSxp @ 160100 0 ELECT SLVG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABSm 30 G02500^0 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE0 G02200 0 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS 6 COLS@ G02600 H SUPERSTRUCTURE WALLS 6 COLS@ 040800 0 REINFORCE SS WALLS & COLS@ 150400 0 MECH SLEEVING - SS WALLS & COL0 160600 0 ELECT SLVG/CONDUIT - WALLS&COL@ G02300 0 STRIP WALLS 6 COLS@ G01700 FM STRUCTURE FINISHED@ G02800 H SUPERSTRUCTURE0 150200 0 ROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEM@ 150100 0 ROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEMComment'UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^REPCONTMFile Used D\REP200\PROJ11\SAMPLESelect: All ActivitiesSort'^Start DateDate Selection: Act/Sch/LateSchedule WindowTime: 01JUN88 To 31MAR89Locations: GPRJ To PNTHSAMPLE HIGHRISE PROJECT — REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2.0Late Start Time DatesLINEAR PLANNING CHART ACTIVITY INDEXReport Date:^27APR93Report Time:^14'56:30Progress Date'Revision Number' 0Page 2 Of 2KEY^m Critical Activity^p Activity has procurement sequence^c Completed^Activity Types: 0 Ordered, C Continuous, S Shadow, H Hammock, SM Start Milestone, FM Finish MilestoneCode Type DescriptionG01500 SM PROJECT STARTG00200^0 OBTAIN DEMOLITION PERMIT0 G00300 0 DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTURE0 G01600 FM DEMOLITION COMPLETE5O ^0 OBTAIN EXCAVATION PERMITG00500^0 MOBILIZE SITE0 020200 0 CLEAR SITE® 020100 C EXCAVATION0 030100 C MESH, TIEBACKS S SHOTCRETEe 160400 0 INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER@ 040200 D REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS@ G00600 0 FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS@ G00700 0 ERECT CRANE0 G01900 FM CRANE INSTALLEDe G02700 H CRANE USAGE0 040400 0 REINFORCE B2 WALLS & COLS@ G01000 0 FORM & POUR B2 WALLS & COLS0 G00900 0 BACKFILL FIGS S GRADE SOG@ 040300 0 REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADEG01100^0 FORM & POUR B2 SLAB ON GRADECode Type Descriptionw 21 G01200^0 FORM & POUR B1 FLOOR SLABw 22 040500^0 REINFORCE B1 FLOOR SLAB0 040600 0 REINFORCE BI WALLS 6 COLS@ G01300 0 FORM & POUR B1 WALLS & COLSvp 0 G00100 0 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS0 G02400 H SUPERSTRUCTURE SLABSxp® 040100 0 REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS)9® 160100 0 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABSm @ 150500 0 MECH SLEEVING - SS FLOOR SLABS0 G02500 0 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE0 G02200 0 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS@ G02600 H SUPERSTRUCTURE WALLS & COLS0 040800 0 REINFORCE SS WALLS & COLS0 150400 0 MECH SLEEVING - SS WALLS S COL@ 160600 0 ELECT SLVG/CONDUIT - WALLS&COLa CI G02300 0 STRIP WALLS & COLS0 G01700 FM STRUCTURE FINISHED@ G02800 H SUPERSTRUCTUREp @ 160500 0 INSTALL ELECTRICAL ROOM@ 150200 0 ROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEMe Code Type Description0 ROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEMC INSTALL PRECAST PANELS0 100100@ 160200 C ELECTRICAL ROUGH-IN0 INSTALL WINDOWS S DOORSP@ 110100@ 120100 C INSTALL STEEL STUDDING0 INSTALL ROOFING0 090100@ G02100 FM ROOF COMPLETED@ 120200 C INSTALL DRYWALLS TAPE & FILL DRYWALL0 120300CI 160300 C ELECTRICAL FINISHING0 REINFORCE PLANTERS & WALLS0 040700@ 601400 0 FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS@ 090200 0 INSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANE@ 150300 C FINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM@ 050100 0 LANDSCAPING@ G00800 0 DISMANTLE CRANE@ G02000 FM CRANE DISMANTLED0 G01800 FM SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETIONComment'UBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCONMSAMPLE HIGHRISE PROJECT - REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2.0pred/suec/product ion^ Page 1 Of 5File used: O:\REP200\PROJ11\SAMPLESelect:^All ActivitiesSort:^Activity CodeACTIVITY PREDECESSORS* Critical Activity+ Governing predecessoror successor governedof an activityby activitySUCCESSORSReport Date:Report Time:Revision Number:Progress Date:0LOC_RANGEI28APR9316:51:20PROD. DATACODE^DESCRIPTION ACT. CODE^DESCRIPTION^TYPE FLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC I ACT. CODE^DESCRIPTION^TYPE SLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC WORK SKIP DURI*020100^EXCAVATION 028200^CLEAR SITE^NT^SW FS^B^131 +830100^MESH, TIEBACKS & SHOTCRETE^FE 0^N 131-^81 1^0^7G00480^OBTAIN EXCAVATION PERMIT^NT^APPR FS^0^B1 130100^MESH, TIEBACKS & SHOTCRETE SS 0^ti B2-^B2 1^0^800500^MOBILIZE SITE NT^SW FS^0^111 * G80600^FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS^NT^FDN FF FDN FDN- FDN 1^0^3*480680^FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS^NT^FDN SS FDN* 040280^REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS NT^FDN FF FDN*+040200^REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS^NT^FUN SS FDN020280^CLEAR SITE *+G08300^DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTURE^NT^SW FS^8^SW +160400^INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER^NT^SW FS SW SW-^SW 1^0^2* 020100^EXCAVATION^NT^B1 FS SW030100^MESH, TIEBACKS^SHOTCRETE *+020100^EXCAVATION^T^SS^3^0^N * G00600^FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS^NT^FDN FF B2 111-^B1 1^0^7*+020100^EXCAVATION T^FF^3^0^N * 040200^REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS NT^FDN FF BZ BZ-^82 1^0^8*040100^REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS *480100^STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^T^SS^1^0^N *+G82500^PLACE SLAB CONCRETE^ES 0^II MAIN-MAIN 1^0^3*400100^STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^T^FF^0^0^N +150200^ROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEM^FS 3^N 2- 2 1^B^2150100^ROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEM FS 3^N 3- 10 1^0^1*+100100^INSTALL PRECAST PANELS FS 5^N ROOF-ROOF 1^0^2G81700^STRUCTURE FINISHED^NT^PNTH ROOFG01400^FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS^NT^SW FS ROOF090180^INSTALL ROOFING NT^ROOF FS ROOF*040200^REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS *+020100^EXCAVATION^NT^FDN SS^1^FDN *400708^ERECT CRANE^NT^SW SS FDN FDN 1^0^8* 028100^EXCAVATION NT^FDN FF^3^FDN 840400^REINFORCE 82 WALLS & COLS^NT^B2 FF FDN030100^MESH, TIEBACKS & SHOTCRETE^NT^BZ FF^3^FDN x+040400^REINFORCE B2 WALLS & COLS^NT^BZ SS FDN*040300^REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADE *480900^BACKFILL FIGS & GRADE SOG^NT^FDN FS^0^BZ o G01200^FORM & POUR 01 FLOOR SLAB^NT^131 FSoG81100^FORM & POUR BZ SLAB ON GRADE^NT^B2 FF02B2B2 1^0^2*401100^FORM & POUR BZ SLAB ON GRADE^NT^B2 SS B2*040400^REINFORCE BZ WALLS & COLS *+040280^REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS^NT^FDN SS^5^B2 *+G80900^BACKFILL FIGS & GRADE SOG^NT^FDN FS 82 BZ 1^0^10040200^REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS NT^FDN FF^5 B2*+G80600^FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS^NT^FDN SS^5^112* G00600^FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS NT^FDN FF^5 BZ*480780^ERECT CRANE^NT^SW FS^0^B2*040500^REINFORCE 131 FLOOR SLAB *+G01200^FORM & POUR 01 FLOOR SLAB^NT^81 SS^4^B1 *+G81300^FORM & POUR 131 WALLS & COLS^NT^B1 FS^0^131 B1 1^8^4*481200^FORM & POUR B1 FLOOR SLAB^NT^B1 IF^0 B1 N.040600^REINFORCE B1 WALLS & COLS^NT^B1 FS^0 B1*040600^REINFORCE 01 WALLS & COLS *+040500^REINFORCE B1 FLOOR SLAB^NT^B1 IS^8^131 *+G88100^STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^NT^MAIN FF^2^131 1^0^18*41312^FORM & POUR B1 FLOOR SLAB^NT^B1 FS^0^111 * G00108^STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^NT^MAIN SS^5 B1048700^REINFORCE PLANTERS & WALLS .G81400^FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS^NT^SW SS^0^SW 13881380^DISMANTLE CRANE^NT^SW FS^0^SW SW 1^0^15+G81480^FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS^NT^SW FF^0^SW 090200^INSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANE^NT^SW FS^0^SWACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONPREDECESSORSACT. CODE DESCRIPTIONPage 2 Of 5SUCCES^ PROD.TYPE PLOC BEL LAG OFF/LOC I ACT. CODESORSLOC_RANGEIDESCRIPTION^TYPE SLOC REL LAG OFF/LOC^WORK SKIDPATADURI*040800^REINFORCE SS WALLS & COLS058100^LANDSCAPING098180^INSTALL ROOFING090288^INSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANE*100100^INSTALL PRECAST PANELS*118100^INSTALL WINDOWS & DOORS128100^INSTALL STEEL STUDDING*120288^INSTALL DRYWALL*120308^TAPE & FILL DRYWALL150188^ROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEM150208^ROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEM158300^FINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM*150488^MECH SLEEVING - SS WALLS & COL*+G80100*+840180*+160108REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS^NT ROOF FSSTRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^NT ROOF FSELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS NT ROOF FSSTRIP WALLS & COLS^NT PNTH FSINSTALL PRECAST PANELS^NT MAIN FSINSTALL ROOFING^NT ROOF FSREINFORCE PLANTERS & WALLS^NT^SW FSFORM 1 POUR PLANTERS/WALLS^NT^SW FSINSTALL WINDOWS & DOORS^NT MAIN FSSTRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^T^FSREINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS T^FSELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS T^FS*402300 F'S 8^O NSTRIP WALLS & COLS+G82100* 120280090200ROOF COMPLETEDINSTALL DRYWALLINSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANESW+850108^LANDSCAPING^NT^SW FS 0FS 0FS 0F'S 0FS 0FS ElFS 0FS 03330333NNNNNHNISO^ONFS 0^8 NFS 0^B NTMTNTNTT^F CI ^2 N^FS 0^1 NSW FS 0^MAINFS 0^8 N2 FS B^10SW FS B^MAINH O^ONFS 0^8 N0 N5T^FS 0NT^SW FS B2220101^01^01^81^01^01^0SWROOFROOFROOFROOFSWSWSWSWSW5 N^+1281005 N *+1101085 N^0902001 N^120100*+120208+8902002 N^+1602000 N * 1202000 N0 NT^FS 0^ ELECTRICAL ROUGH-INT^FS 0 INSTALL DRYWALL150300+150100120100GE1800*+1112300^STRIP WALLS & COLS*+G02200^FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS^T0G02200^FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS^TSS B^B NFF B^0 NFORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS^TFORM & PLACE SS WALLS 1 COLS^TTAPE & FILL DRYWALLROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEM^TROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEM^TSS 0^B NFF 0^8 NFS 0^0^tiFS 0^0 NFS 0^8 NMAINT^BOONT^FS 0T^FS 0T^FS 0^0 N P120380^TAPE & FILL DRYWALLT^FS 0^8 N^+GO0000^DISMANTLE CRANENT ROOF SS 5 2NT^1I3 FS 0T^FS 0^0 N *+160300^ELECTRICAL FINISHING+150300^FINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM^T150380^FINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM^T120188^INSTALL STEEL STUDDINGFINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM^TROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEM^TINSTALL STEEL STUDDINGSUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION^NT GPRJ FS 0*+108100158100158200* 110100128100160280898100*+118100*+120200INSTALL PRECAST PANELSROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEMROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEMINSTALL WINDOWS & DOORSINSTALL STEEL STUDDINGELECTRICAL ROUGH-ININSTALL ROOFINGINSTALL WINDOWS & DOORSINSTALL DRYWALL+090200^INSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANE^NT^SW FS*4100100^INSTALL PRECAST PANELS^T^FSN G81800^SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION NT GPRJ FS 0Kr ROOF FS 8NT^2 SS 5Kr^SW FS 8SWROOFROOFROOF* G00100* 040100* 160100+150200*488100*+04810001 +160100*+120380150180158208**G82280N+G112200STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^TREINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABSELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS TROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEM^TSTRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^TREINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABSELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS TFS 0^B NFS 0^0 NFSO^ONFSO^ONINSTALL STEEL STUDDINGINSTALL WINDOWS & DOORSINSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANEINSTALL STEEL STUDDINGINSTALL DRYWALLINSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANEM 040100* G00100* 160100*+G02308* 108100090100040700601408*418100MAIN23- 10PNTHSWROOFSW2- 10MAIN2- 10MAIN2- 10MAIN2- 10MAINZ- 10MAINBZ- B1MAIN2- 18PNTH82- B1MAIN2- 10PNTHBZ- B12- 10PNTHMAINMAIN2- 101^8^101^0 31^0 51^0 31^0 61^0^41^0 61^0^41^0 71^0 B1^0^II1^0 71^0 51^0 41^0 31^B1^0 61^8 41^0 21^0 21^8 21^0 21^0 Z1^0 21^0^15ACTIVITYCODE DESCRIPTION I ACT.. CODE DESCRIPTION TYPE PLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC I ACT. CCES S. CODEORS DESCRIPTION TYPE SLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOCLOC_RANGEI PROD.WORK SKIDPATAOURPage^3 OfIPATH 1^8 1*150500 MECH SLEEVING - SS FLOOR SLABS 10G80100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T^SS^1 8^N *+02500 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE T FS^8 0^N MAIN-MAIN 1^0 2*+00180 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS I^FF^-1 8^N 2-^18 1^0 1ROOF-ROOF 1^0 1*160100 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS *+00100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T^SS^1 0^N *+0Z500 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE T FS 0^N MAIN 1^8 3*400100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T^FF^8 0^N +150200 ROUGH-IN VEHTILATION SYSTEM T FS 3N Z 102150100 ROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEM T FS 3^N 3-^10 1^0 1*+100100 INSTALL PRECAST PANELS T FS 5^N ROOF 1^0 201780 STRUCTURE FINISHED NT PNTH FS ROOF090100 INSTALL ROOFING NT ROOF FS ROOF160280 ELECTRICAL ROUGH-IN +128100 INSTALL STEEL STUDDING T^FS^0 8^N * 120280 INSTALL DRYWALL T FS 0^N B2-^81 1^0 62-^18 1^8 6PATH I^0 3MAIN 1^0 5*160300 ELECTRICAL FINISHING *+120380 TAPE & FILL DRYWALL T^FSO ON *+01800 SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION NT^GPRJ FS^B MAIN BZ -^81 1^8 3160500 INSTALL ELECTRICAL ROOM NT^BZ FS^0 2 2-^10 1^8 4PNTH 1^8 3MAIN 1^B 3160480 INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER +020200 CLEAR SITE NT^SW FS^0 SW * G00600 FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS NT FDN ES^3 SW SW 1^8 3*480500 MOBILIZE SITE NT^SW SS^2 SW*+00508 MOBILIZE SITE NT^SW FF^0 SW160508 INSTALL ELECTRICAL ROOM * 08100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS NT^3 FS^0 82 * 168388 ELECTRICAL FINISHING NT 2 FS^8 82 BZ 1^8 38*160688 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT - WALLS&COL *+GOZZOO FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS T^SS^0 0^H *+02300 STRIP WALLS & COLS T FS^0 8^N MAIN 1^0 2*.G02200 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS T^FF^0 8^N 2-^18 1^0 1PATH 1^0 1*G00100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS 002300 STRIP WALLS & COLS T^SS^0 -1^N +02800 SUPERSTRUCTURE T SS^0 N MAIN 1^0 4*402300 STRIP WALLS A COLS T^FF^2 -1^H *402500 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE T FS^0 N 2 1^0 3* 01300 FORM & POUR B1 WALLS & COLS NT^81 SS^5 MAIN +02400 SUPERSTRUCTURE SLABS T SS^8 N 3-^10 1^0 2*401380 FORM & POUR 81 WALLS & COLS NT^B1 Fr^2 MAIN *+150500 MECH SLEEVING - SS FLOOR SLABS T FF^-1 N ROOF 1^8 4* 840600 REINFORCE 81 WALLS & COLS NT^BI SS^5 MAIN *+150508 MECH SLIDING - SS FLOOR SLABS T SS^1 N0040600 REINFORCE In WALLS & COLS NT^81 FF^2 MAIN *+160100 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS T FF^0 N*+160100 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS T SS^1 N+150208 ROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEM T FS^0 N150100 ROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEM T FS N*+100100 INSTALL PRECAST PANELS T FS^0 N*4048100 REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS T FF^8 N*+040100 REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS T SS^1 N01700 STRUCTURE FINISHED NT PNTH FS^8 ROOFG01400 FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS NT SW FS^8 ROOF090100 INSTALL ROOFING NT ROOF FS^5 ROOF160500 INSTALL ELECTRICAL ROOM NT 82 FS^0 3*082 OBTAIN DEMOLITION PERMIT 0031500 PROJECT START NT^GPRJ FS^0 APPR *+0300 DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTURE NT SW FS^0 APPR APPR 1^0 5*00300 DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTURE *+G0020fl OBTAIN DEMOLITION PERMIT NT^APPR FS^8 SW *401608 DEMOLITION COMPLETE NT SW FS^8 SW SW 1^0 5*+00500 MOBILIZE SITE NT SW FS^0 SW+020200 CLEAR SITE NT SW FS^0 SW08488 OBTAIN EXCAVATION PERMIT **G01500 PROJECT START NT^GPRJ PS^8 APPR * 020100 EXCAVATION NT B1 FS^8 APPR APPR 1^8 5ACTIVITY PREDECESSORS SUCCESSORS LOC_RANGEI PROD. DATAPage^4 Of^5CODE DESCRIPTION ACT. CODE DESCRIPTION^TYPE PLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC ACT. CODE^DESCRIPTION TYPE SLOG REL LAG^OFF/LOC WORK SKIP DUBI*G80500 MOBILIZE SITE 0030300 DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTURE^NT^SW ES^0^SW +160400^INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER NT^SW FF^0^SW SW 1^0^5+160400^INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER NT^SW SS^2^SW*+020100^EXCAVATION NT^Al FS^8^SW*G00608 FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS )0020180 EXCAVATION^NT^ITN SS^1^FEIN * G01000^FORM & POUR 82 WALLS & COLS NT^BZ FF^5^FUN FDN 1^0^8* 020100 EXCAVATION NT^FDN FF^1^FDN *401800^FORM & POUR 82 WALLS & COLS NT^82 SS^5^FDN030100 MESH, TIEBACKS & SHOTCRETE^NT^B2 FF^4^FDN N+G00700^ERECT CRANE NT^SW SS^3^FDN160400 INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER^NT^SW FS^3^FDN * 848488^REINFORCE B2 WALLS & COLS NT^BZ FT^5^FDN*+040400^REINFORCE BZ WALLS & COLS NT^132 SS^5^FDN*G00780 ERECT CRANE *+080600 FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS^NT^FDN SS^3^SW +G82700^CRANE USAGE NT^SW SS^0^SW SW 1^0^2*140200 REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS NT^FDN SS^3^SW *+G01900^CRANE INSTALLED NT^SW FS^0 SW*401008^FORM & POUR BZ WALLS & COLS NT^BZ FS^0^SW*+040400^REINFORCE B2 WALLS & COLS NT^BZ FS^0^SWG80800 DISMANTLE CRANE 0128200 INSTALL DRYWALL^NT^5 FS^0^SW +082000^CRANE DISMANTLED NT^SW FS^0^SW SW 1^0^2G01480 FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS^NT^SW FS^8^SW * G01800^SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION NT^GPRJ FS^0 SW040700 REINFORCE PLANTERS & WALLS^NT^SW FS^0 SWG02700 CRANE USAGE^NT^SW FF^0^S W*G00900 BACKFILL FIGS & GRADE SOG *#040400 REINFORCE B2 WALLS & COLS^NT^132 FS^0^FDN *+040300^REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADE NT^B2 FS^0^FDN FUN 1^0^3*+G01008 FORM & POUR 82 WALLS & COLS^NT^82 FS^0^FDN*G81000 FORM & POUR BZ WALLS & COLS *+G013600 FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS^NT^FDN SS^5^B2 *+080900^BACKFILL FIGS 1 GRADE SOG NT^FDN FS^0^BZ BZ 1^0^10* 083608 FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS NT^FDN FF^5 BZ*0;00700 ERECT CRANE^NT^SW FS^0^BZ*G01188 FORM & POUR BZ SLAB ON GRADE *+840300 REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADE^NT^B2 SS^0^B2 *+081280^FORM & POUR B1 FLOOR SLAB NT^131 FS^0^02 112 1^0^3*+040300 REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADE^NT^82 Fr^1^82*G01280 FORM & POUR 131 FLOOR SLAB *401100 FORM & POUR BZ SLAB ON GRADE^NT^B2 FS^0^01 *+G01380^FORM & POUR 111 WALLS & COLS NT^Ill FS^0^81 81 1^0^8* 040300 REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADE^NT^BZ FS^0^81 PO40600^REINFORCE B1 WALLS & COLS NT^81 FS^0 Al*+048508^REINFORCE 01 FLOOR SLAB NT^01 FF^0^01*+040500^REINFORCE B1 FLOOR SLAB NT^111 SS^4 B1*G81300 FORM & POUR 81 WALLS & COLS *401200 FORM & POUR 81 FLOOR SLAB^NT^B1 FS^0^81 *+008108^STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS NT^MAIN FF^2^Al 81 1^0^10*440500 REINFORCE 01 FLOOR SLAB^Hr^B1 FS^0 B1 * G00100^STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS NT^MAIN SS^5 111G81408 FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS N G88100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^NT^ROOF FS^0^SW G88808^DISMANTLE CRANE NT^SW FS^0^SW SW 1^0^15* 840180 REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS^NT^HOOF FS^8^SW 090200^INSTALL WATERPROOF METIBRANE NT^SW FS^0^SW*+G82300 STRIP WALLS & COLS^NT^PNTH FS^0 SW +040700^REINFORCE PLANTERS & WALLS NT^SW FF^0 SW+040708^REINFORCE PLANTERS & WALLS NT^SW SS^0^SW*G01500 PROJECT START +G80400^OBTAIN EXCAVATION PERMIT NT^APPR FS^0^GPRJ GPRJ 1^0^8*+008208^OBTAIN DEMOLITION PERMIT NT^APPR FS^0^GPRJ*G01680 DEMOLITION COMPLETE *+000300 DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTURE^NT^SW FS^0^SW SW 1^0^0G81700 STRUCTURE FINISHED * G80108 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS^NT^ROOF FS^0^PNTH PNTH 1^0^0* 040180 REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS^NT^ROOF FS^0^PNTH* 168100 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS Kr^ROOF FS^8^PNTH*402300 STRIP WALLS & COLS^NT^PNTH FS^0^PNTH*G01800 SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION *460380 ELECTRICAL FINISHING^NT^MAIN FS^8^GPRJ GPRJ 1^0^8G80800 DISMANTLE CRANE NT^SW FS^0^GPRJ058100 LANDSCAPING^NT^SW FS^0^GPRJVD5ACTIVITY PREDECESSORS SUCCESSORS LOC_RANGEI PROD. DATAPage^5 OfCODE^DESCRIPTION ACT. CODE DESCRIPTION TYPE PLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC ACT. CODE^DESCRIPTION TYPE SLOC REL LAG^OFF/LOC WORK SKIP DUDI150308 FINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM NT^MAIN FS^8^GPRJ*G81900 CRANE INSTALLED m+680700 ERECT CRANE NT SW FS^8^SW SW 1 8 8G82088 CRANE DISMANTLED •G00800 DISMANTLE CRANE NT SW FS^0^SW SW 1 8 0G82100 ROOF COMPLETED +098100 INSTALL ROOFING NT^ROOF FS^0^ROOF ROOF 1 8 8*G82280 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS 0G02500 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE T^FS^0^8^N x+682300 STRIP WALLS & COLS T FS MAIN-MAIN 1 8 30602500 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE NT^ROOF FS^0^PNTH +G02600 SUPERSTRUCTURE WALLS & COLS T SS N 2- 2 1 0 2*+840800 REINFORCE SS WALLS & COLS T FF 3- 10 1 0 1x+040880 REINFORCE SS WALLS & COLS T SS N PNTH-PNTH 1 8 40150400 MECH SLEEVING - SS WALLS & COL T FFm+150400 MECH SLEEVING - SS WALLS & COL T SSx+160608 ELECT SLVG/CONRUIT - WALLS&COL T FF0160600 ELECT SLVG/CONDUIT - WALLS&COL T SS*G82308 STRIP WALLS & COLS G02000 SUPERSTRUCTURE FF N x+680100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T FF -1^N MAIN-^18 1 0 10112200 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS T FS N x+600100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T SS -1^N PNTH 1 0 10160608 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT - WALLS&COL T FS N +G01700 STRUCTURE FINISHED NT PNTH FS Prfli0150400 MECH SLEEVING - SS WALLS & COL T FS N +G81400 FORM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLS NT SW FS PNTH•040800 REINFORCE SS WALLS & COLS T FS N +090100 INSTALL ROOFING NT ROOF FS PNTH682688 SUPERSTRUCTURE WALLS & COLS T PPG82480 SUPERSTRUCTURE SLABS m+G08180 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T SS N 0G02500 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE T FF 0^N MAIN-ROOF 1 0 N/A*G82500 PLACE SLAB CONCRETE m+608100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T FS N *402200 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS T^FS 0^N MAIN-ROOF 1 8 10160100 ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS T FS N x+682200 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS NT^PNTH FS ROOF0158500 MECH SLEEVING - SS FLOOR SLABS T FS0040100 REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS FSG82400 SUPERSTRUCTURE SLABS FFG02600 SUPERSTRUCTURE WALLS & COLS 0682280 FORM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLS T SS N 0682300 STRIP WALLS & COLS T FP^8 0^N MAIM-^10 1 0 N/APNTH-PNTH 1 0 N/A602780 CRANE USAGE m+G80700 ERECT CRANE NT SW SS^8^SW +G80880 DISMANTLE CRANE HT SW FF^8 SW SW 1 0 N/AG82000 SUPERSTRUCTURE 0600100 STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS T SS^8^0^N x+682300 STRIP WALLS & COLS T FF^0 0^N 2-^10 1 0 N/AFOR A TOTAL OF 58 ACTIVITIESUBC CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LAB^ REPCON TMSAMPLE HIGHRISE PROJECT - REVISED SCHEDULE VER 2.0Page 10f 4File Used: D:\REPZEIO\PROJIl\SAMPLESelect: All Activities^Sort:^Activity CodeACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONLOC_RANGEI PROD. DATA'RESOURCES ASSIGNEDWORK SKIP DURIRES1 ABBREV DESCRIPTIONproduct ion/resources4* Critical Activity•Governing predecessor of an activityor successor governed by activity•^ACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGELOC_RANGE USAGE/UNITSReport Date:^28APR93Report Time:^17:07:12Revision Number: 0Progress Date:AUG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE LEVEL Ilabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourBl- 111 1 0 7^1B2- R2 1 0 13FDN- FUN 1 0 3SW-^SW 1 0 Z^181- 81 1 0 7^1B2- 82 1 0 8MAIN-MAIN 1 0 3^12- 2 1 8 23- 18 1 0 1ROOF-ROOF 1 0 2FDN 1 0 8^1BZ 1 0 2^1B2 1 0 10^101 1 0 4^1B1 1 0 10^1SW 1 0 15^1MAIN I 0 Z^12 1 0 23- 10 1 8 1PNTH 1 0 2SW 1 0 20^1ROOF 1 0 10^181 B1^Rate: men/day 3.08 1 7 3.80BZ B2^Rate: men/day 3.80 1 B 3.08FDN^FUN^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.00SW SW^Rate: men/day 3.08 1 2 3.00B1 131^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 7 3.0002 82^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 8 3.00MAIN MAIN^Rate: men/day 5.80 1 3 5.002 2^Rate: men/day 5.00 1 2 5.803 10^Rate: men/day 4.80 1 4.08ROOF Rate: men/day 3.00 1 2 3.80FDN Rate: men/day 3.08 1 8 3.00B2 Rate: men/day 3.80 1 2 3.8882 Rate: men/day 3.00 1 10 3.0001 Rate: men/day 4.00 1 4 4.8081 Rate: men/day 3.00 1 10 3.00SW Rate: men/day 2.00 1 15 2.00MAIN Rate: men/day 3.00 1 2 3.002 Rate: men/day 3.80 1 2 3.083 10^Rate: men/day 3.08 1 3.80PNTH Rate: men/day 3.08 1 Z 3.88SW Rate: men/day 5.08 1 20 5.80ROOF Rate: men/day 5.08 1 18 5.08x020100^EXCAVATION020208^CLEAR SITE030180^MESH, TIEBACKS & SHOTCRETE*040100^REINFORCE SS FLOOR SLABS*040200^REINFORCE FOUNDATIONS*040308^REINFORCE SLAB ON GRADE*040400^REINFORCE BZ WALLS & COLS*840500^REINFORCE B1 FLOOR SLAB*048600^REINFORCE 81 WALLS & COLS040700^REINFORCE PLANTERS & WALLS*040800^REINFORCE SS WALLS & COLS050108^LANDSCAPING098100^INSTALL ROOFINGACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONLOC_RANGEI PROD. DATA (RESOURCES ASSIGNEDWORK SKIP DURIRESI ARROW DESCRIPTION890200 INSTALL WATERPROOF MEMBRANE SW 1 0 10 1*100180 INSTALL PRECAST PANELS 2-^10 1 0 3 1MAIN 1 0 5*110180 INSTALL WINDOWS & DOORS 2-^18 1 0 3 1MAIN 1 0 6120100 INSTALL STEEL STUDDING 2-^10 1 0 4 1MAIN 1 0 6*120208 INSTALL DRYWALL 2-^10 1 0 4 1MAIN 1 0 7*120300 TAPE & FILL DRYWALL 2-^18 1 0 B 1MAIN 1 0 II158100 ROUGH-IN SPRINKLER SYSTEM BZ-^B1 1 0 7 1MAIM 1 0 52-^10 1 0 4PNTH 1 0 3150280 ROUGH-IN VENTILATION SYSTEM B2-^B1 1 0 8 1MAIN 1 8 62-^10 1 0 4PNTH 1 0 2150300 FINISH VENT/SPRINKLER SYSTEM B2-^111 1 0 2 12-^10 1 0 2PNTH 1 0 2MAIN 1 0 ZN150400 MECH SLEEVING - SS WALLS & COL MAIN 1 0 2 12-^18 1 0 1MTH 1 8 1*150500 MECH SLEEVING - SS FLOOR SLABS MAIN-MAIN 1 02-^18 1 0 1ROOF-ROOF 1 0 1labour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGELOC_RANGE^USAGE/UNITS AVG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE^LEVELPage^2 Of^4SW^Rate: men/day 4.00 1 10 4.002^10^Rate: men/day 6.00 1 3 6.80MAIM^Rate: men/day 6.00 1 5 6.002^10^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 3 3.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 6 3.002^10^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 4 3.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 6 3.002^10^Rate: men/day 5.80 1 4 5.08MAIN^Rate: men/day 5.00 1 7 5.00Z^10^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 8 3.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 8 3.00BZ^81^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 7 2.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 2.80 1 5 2.002^10^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 4 2.80PNTH^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.08BZ^01^Rate: men/day 2.88 1 8 2.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 6 2.002^10^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 4 2.00PNTH^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 2 2.00BZ^81^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 2 1.082^10^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 2 1.00PNTH^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 2 1.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 1.80 1 2 1.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 2 1.002^10^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1.00PNTH^Rate: men/day 1.80 1 1.00MAIN MAIN^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 2 1. ■^2^10^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1.00OACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONLOC_RANGE PROD. DATA RESOURCES ASSIGNEDWORK SKIP DURIRES1 ABBREV DESCRIPTION18SWB2MAIN2-PNTH*160100^ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT IN SS SLABS160200^ELECTRICAL ROUGH-IN*160300^ELECTRICAL FINISHING160400^INSTALL TEMPORARY POWER160500^INSTALL ELECTRICAL ROOM*160600^ELECT SLUG/CONDUIT - WALLS&COL*G00180^STRIP/FORM SS FLOOR SLABS1^0 31^0 21^0^11^0 21^0 61^0^61^0 31^0 51^0 31^0 41^8 31^0 31^0 31^8 301^0 21^8 11^0 11^0 41^0 31^0 Z1^0 41^labour labour1^labour labour1^labour labour1^labour labour1^labour labour1^labour labour1^labour labour*G00200^OBTAIN DEMOLITION PERMIT*G00300^DEMOLISH EXISTING STRUCTUREG00488^OBTAIN EXCAVATION PERMIT*G00500^MOBILIZE SITE*G00600^FORM & POUR FOUNDATIONS*G00700^ERECT CRAKEGMBH^DISMANTLE CRANE^APPR^1^0 5SW^1^0 5 1^labour labourAPPR^1^0 5SW^1^8 5^1^labour labourFDN^1^0 0 1^labour labourSW^1^8 2 1^labour labourSW^1^0 2 1^labour labourMAIN23- 10ROOFB2- 812- 18PNTHMAIN02- 812- 10PNTHMAINMAIN23- 10ROOFACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGELOC_1101GE^USAGE/UNITS AUG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE^LEVELPage^3 Of^4ROOF ROOF^Rate: men/day 1.00 1 1.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 2.08 1 3 2.002^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 2 2.803^10^Rate: men/day 2.80 1 2.08ROOF^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 2 2.08B2^81^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 6 3.002^18^Rate: men/day 3.08 1 6 3.88PNTH^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 3 3.08MAIN^Rate: men/day 3.08 1 5 3.00B2^111^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.002^10^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 4 2.00PNTH^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.88MAIN^Rate: men/day 2.80 1 3 2.80SW^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 3 2.00B2^Rate: men/day LOA 1 38 2.00MAIN^Rate: men/day 2.08 1 2 2.882^10^Rate: men/day 2.80 1 2.00PNTH^Rate: men/day 2.08 1 2.80MAIN^Rate: men/day 8.00 1 4 8.082^Rate: men/day 7.80 1 3 7.803^10^Rate: men/day 6.08 1 2 6.80ROOF^Rate: men/day 6.00 1 4 6.00SW^Rate: men/day 4.00 1 5 4.08SW^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 5 2.00FDN^Rate: men/day 5.08 1 8 5.08SW^Rate: men/day 2.00 1 2 2.08SW^Rate: men/day 2.80 1 2 2.00t•-.)Olabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourlabour labourPage 4 Of 4ACTIVITYCODE^DESCRIPTIONLOC_RANGE1 PROD. DATA 'RESOURCES ASSIGNEDIlOORN SKIP DURIRES11 ABM DESCRIPTIONACTIVITY RESOURCE USAGELOC_RANGE USAGE/UNITS AVG. USAGE AMOUNT DAY_RANGE LEVELFDN 1 0 3^1B2 1 0 10^1B2 1 0 3^1B1 1 0 8^181 1 0 10^1SW 1 8 15^1GPRJ 1 0 0SW 1 0 0PNTH 1 0 0GPRJ 1 0 0SW 1 0 0SW 1 0 8ROOF 1 0 0MAIN-MAIN 1 0 3^12- 2 1 0 23- 10 1 A 1PNTH-PNTH 1 0 4MAIM-^10 1 0 1^1PNTH 1 0 1MAIN-ROOF 1 0 N/AMAIN-ROOF 1 8 1^1MAIN-^10 1 0 N/APNTH-PNTH 1 0 N/ASW 1 0 N/A2-^10 1 0 N/AFDN^Rate:B2^Rate:BZ^Rate:B1^Rate:B1^Rate:SW^Rate:men/daymen/daymen/daymen/daymen/daymen/day3.005.005.007.005.003.881111113103810153.805.005.007.085.003.00MAIN MAIN^Rate: men/day 5.00 1 3 5.002^2^Rate: men/day 4.08 1 2 4.803^10^Rate: men/day 4.00 1 4.00PNTH PNTH^Rate: men/day 5.00 1 4 5.00MAIN^10^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 3.00PNTH^Rate: men/day 3.00 1 3.00MAIN ROOF^Rate: men/day 7.00 1 7.00NG00900^BACKFILL FIGS & GRADE SOG*G01000^FORM & POUR 82 WALLS & COLS*G81100^FORM & POUR 82 SLAB ON GRADE*G81200^FORM & POUR Al FLOOR SLAB*G81308^FORM & POUR Al WALLS & COLSG81400^FOAM & POUR PLANTERS/WALLSC01508^PROJECT START*G01680^DLrOLITION COMPLETEG01780^STRUCTURE FINISHED*G01800^SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION*G01900^CRANE INSTALLEDG82000^CRANE DISMANTLEDG02100^ROOF COMPLETED*G02208^FOAM & PLACE SS WALLS & COLSC112300^STRIP WALLS & COLSG02400^SUPERSTRUCTURE SLABS*G02500^PLACE SLAB CONCRETEG02600^SUPERSTRUCTURE WALLS & COLSG02700^CRANE USAGEG02800^SUPERSTRUCTUREFOR A TOTAL OF 58 ACTIVITIES

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