UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Hydrology of the Britannia Mine Zabil, David 1998

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubc_1998-0676.pdf [ 4.54MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0050232.json
JSON-LD: 1.0050232+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0050232.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0050232+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0050232+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0050232+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0050232 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0050232.txt
Citation
1.0050232.ris

Full Text

HYDROLOGY OF THE BRITANNIA MINE by David Zabil B.A.Sc, The University of British Columbia, 1996 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF APPLIED SCIENCE in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES Department of Civil Engineering We accept this thesis as conforming to the required standard ^ The University of British Columbia October 1998 © David Zabil, 1998 In presenting this thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an advanced degree at the University of British Columbia, I agree that the Library shall make it freely available for reference and study. I further agree that permission for extensive copying of this thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the head of my department or by his or her representatives. It is understood that copying or publication of this thesis for financial gain shall not be allowed without my written permission. Department of C\v\\- fa.<OG> M r-F.R w(a The University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada Date ? */lo/llf-DE-6 (2/88) Abstract The Britannia Mine is located on the east shore of Howe Sound approximately 50 kilometers north of Vancouver, British Columbia. During its 73 years of operation (1902-1974), the Britannia Mine evolved into a vast network of shafts and tunnels with numerous stopes and open pits at the surface. Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) has been issuing from the portals and waste rock dumps since the early stages of development. The ARD problem has not been properly dealt with due to questions of ownership and liability. Now, however, the initiative has been taken by Environment Canada and the BC Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks (BC MOELP) to reduce the contaminant loading into Howe Sound and into Britannia Creek by treating the ARD. To aid in the design of a wastewater treatment plant, the hydrologic properties of the Britannia Mine area were investigated and a design flow rate was calculated. Monitoring of flows at two major outflow points of the mine and two affected creeks has been carried out on a regular basis since 1995 with various random measurements taken before 1995. Water samples at the same locations were taken on a weekly basis by the BC MOELP since 1995 and analyzed for pH, dissolved and total metals, sulphate concentration, acidity, and conductivity. Other water samples had been taken and analyzed by various individuals before 1995 and the results have been recorded. Meteorological data have been collected at six precipitation gauges near the Britannia Mine from as early as 1932. ii To determine a design flow rate for the proposed treatment plant the following steps were performed. The precipitation data were analyzed to determine the precipitation event magnitude for a given return period. The flow data were analyzed to determine the flow rate associated with a given return period. A 10 year return was selected as a basis for design. A relationship between precipitation and mine outflow was established and a suitable year's worth of flows was used as the design flow through the treatment plant. To reduce the peak flows, the possibility of storing water inside the mine workings was examined and an available storage volume was estimated. The required storage for a given constant treatment plant flow rate was calculated and compared with the available storage. A design flow rate with a 10 year return was calculated based on the available data. In addition to this, an attempt was made to model the Britannia Mine outflow given precipitation and temperature for flow forecasting purposes. Forty-two years of record were available to generate return period graphs for mine outflows and precipitation events. The data indicated that a strong relationship exists between the annual precipitation volumes and the annual mine outflow volumes. An average year was chosen as the design flow and the required storage was calculated. The storage volume could not be determined accurately due to insufficient data however, estimates suggest that approximately one million cubic meters are available. A storage of one million cubic meters would allow the treatment plant design flow rate to be reduced to 40% of the average annual maximum flow. This would result in a considerable reduction in the costs of building and operating the treatment plant. iii Further testing is needed to determine the storage available inside the mine with greater accuracy as well as the ability of the mine to hold this amount of water before a wastewater treatment plant is designed. The routing mechanism of the mine workings should be examined in more detail so that a better precipitation - flow model can be developed for flow forecasting. iv Table of Contents Abstract ii List of Tables viList of Figures viiAcknowledgments ix 1. INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Contaminated Site1.1.1 Britannia Mine 2 1.1.2 Previous Control Measures 3 1.2 Objectives and Scope 4 1.3 Summary 5 2. BACKGROUND 7 2.1 Acid Rock Drainage 7 2.2 Neutralization / Precipitation Water Treatment for Rehabilitation 8 2.2.1 Neutralization of pH 8 2.2.2 Reduced Metals Concentration 9 2.2.3 Neutralization / Precipitation Treatment Options 10 2.3 The Need to Rehabilitate the Britannia Mine Site 10 2.3.1 Outflow Properties 11 2.3.2 Britannia Creek 2 2.3.3 Mine Portals3. METHODS, MATERIALS, and DATA PROCESSING 17 3.1 Electronic Data 13.1.1 Meteorological Data 17 3.1.2 Hydrologic Data 9 3.1.3 Pressure Data 22 3.2 Mine Workings3.3 Topography 23 v 3.4 Data Processing 23 4. OBSERVATIONS and RESULTS 25 4.1 Meteorological Data4.1.1 Regional Weather 25 4.1.2 Local Meteorological Record 27 4.2 Treatment Plant Design Flow Rate 8 4.2.1 Return Period Analysis 29 4.2.2 Precipitation - Flow Relationship 31 4.2.2.1 General Patterns 34.2.2.2 Effective Catchment Area 35 4.2.3 Mine Volume and Storage 36 4.2.3.1 Volume Based on Drawings 37 4.2.3.2 Volume Based on Pressure Records 37 4.2.4 Design Flow 41 4.2.5 Summary 3 4.3 Flow Modeling 44 5. CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS 46 References 49 Figures 51 Appendix A 76 vi List of Tables Table 1.1. Elevations of the Britannia Mine Portals and Levels 3 Table 2.1. Metals Concentrations in Drainage and Post Treatment 12 Table 2.2. Water Quality of Drainage in the Furry Creek Watershed 13 Table 2.3. Water Quality of Drainage in the Britannia Creek Watershed 14 Table 2.4. Water Quality of Drainage from the 2200 and 4100 Level Portals 15 Table 4.1. Flows and Precipitation for Various Return Periods 31 Table A-1. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1930-1956) (1/2) 77 Table A-2. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1930-1956) (2/2) 8 Table A-3. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1995-1998) (1/2) 79 Table A-4. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1995-1998) (2/2) 80 Table A-5. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1977-1993) (1/3) 1 Table A-6. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1977-1993) (2/3) 82 Table A-7. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1977-1993) (3/3) 3 Table A-8. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1995-1998) (1/2) 84 Table A-9. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1995-1998) (2/2) 5 Table A-10. Jane Creek Flow (1995-1998) (1/3) 86 Table A-11. Jane Creek Flow (1995-1998) (2/3) 7 Table A-12. Jane Creek Flow (1995-1998) (3/3) 88 Table A-13. Pressure Data (1/2) 89 Table A-14. Pressure Data (2/2) 90 vii List of Figures Figure 1.1. Location Map of the Britannia Mine 52 Figure 1.2. Mine Site Schematic 53 Figure 1.3. East-West Cross-section of the Britannia Mine 54 Figure 2.1. 4100 Level Concrete Plug Schematic 55 Figure 2.2. 4100 Level Portal Flow Path to Howe Sound 56 Figure 4.1. Regional Temperature Relationships 57 Figure 4.2. Regional Cumulative Precipitation Comparison 58 Figure 4.3. Regional Precipitation Relationships 59 Figure 4.4. Local vs. Regional Temperature Comparison 60 Figure 4.5. Local vs. Regional Cumulative Precipitation Comparison 61 Figure 4.6. Annual Average and Maximum 2200 & 4100 Level Portal Flows vs. Return Period 62 Figure 4.7. Total Annual Precipitation and 24hr Maximum Precipitation at the Furry Creek Station vs. Return Period 63 Figure 4.8. Flows and Precipitation vs. Time (November, 1997) 64 Figure 4.9. Flows and Precipitation vs. Time (1995 - 1997) 65 Figure 4.10. 4100 Level Portal Flow and Average Squamish A CS Precipitation vs. Time (1977 - 1993) 66 Figure 4.11. 2200 Level Portal Flow and Average Furry Creek Station Precipitation vs. Time (1931 - 1956) 7 Figure 4.12. Annual Total Squamish A CS Precipitation, Annual Total 4100 Level Portal Flow Volume, and Effective Catchment Area vs. Time 68 Figure 4.13. Annual Total Furry Creek Station Precipitation, Annual Total 2200 Level Portal Flow Volume, and Effective Catchment Area vs. Time 69 Figure 4.14. Pressure and Storage vs. Time 7Figure 4.15. Storage vs. Pressure (1983 and 1984 Pressure Peaks and Shaft & Tunnel Volume) 1 Figure 4.16. 2200 and 4100 Level Portal Flow -10 Year Return Design Year 72 Figure 4.17. Required Storage vs. Treatment Plant Flow Rate 73 Figure 4.18. Comparison of Jane Creek Flow Routed Through 20 Reservoirs and 4100 Level Portal Flow 74 Figure 4.19. Output of the UBC Watershed Model - 4100 Level Portal Flow (actual and modeled with groundwater component shown) 75 viii Acknowledgments Thanks to my supervisor, Dr. Gregory A. Lawrence, for suggesting this interesting topic and helping me improve the structure and content of this thesis. I acknowledge, with thanks, mine drainage flow data provided by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks, and Copper Beach Estates Ltd. I would like to thank Robert G. McCandless, P. Geo. of Environment Canada and Barry Azevedo, P. Eng. and David Robertson of the BC Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks for their continued assistance and support. I wish to acknowledge the assistance of Dave Robinson and Gary Myers of Atmospheric Environment Services in making data available. Thanks to Professor J. W. Atwater for reviewing this thesis. ix 1. INTRODUCTION Unlike today, in 1902 when the Britannia Mine began operations, mining regulations concerning pollution control were minimal. Today, pollution prevention and control are addressed before mining commences. However, no such consideration was given to the Britannia Mine and the result is continuing acid rock drainage (ARD) flowing from the disturbed ground into the receiving waters. Now, remediation measures must be taken to eliminate the threat the contaminated water poses to the receiving waters and repair the damage it has already done. 1.1 Contaminated Site This project was initiated by Robert McCandless of Environment Canada, Pollution Abatement Branch. Several previous studies have been performed on the water quality in the receiving waters of the Britannia Mine outflow and have prompted remediation measures at this site. These include the reports by: • Drake and Robertson, 1973 • Goyette and Ferguson, 1985 • Moore and van Aggelen, 1986 • Steffen, Robertson, and Kirsten Inc. (SRK), 1991 • Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995 1 1.1.1 The Britannia Mine The Britannia Mine is located at Britannia Beach approximately 50 km north of Vancouver, British Columbia, see Figure 1.1. The mined ore bodies are located in a ridge between Furry Creek and Britannia Creek. Figure 1.2 shows the various portals and creeks and the pit complex. Mining took place at various elevations of the ridge from 1300 meters (4300 feet) above sea level to 450 meters (1400 feet) below sea level. A network of shafts and tunnels comprised the 80 km of mine workings that were excavated during the operation of the mine. Figure 1.3 shows an East - West section through the Britannia Mine. During the Britannia Mine's operational life, 47 million tonnes of ore were processed (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). Operations began in 1902 under the Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Ltd. In 1963, ownership was sold to the Anaconda Mining Company which ran the mine until 1974. The main product of the Britannia Mine was copper (500,000 tonnes), but zinc (125,000 tonnes), lead (15,000 tonnes), gold, and silver were also recovered (McCandless, 1997). Drainage exits the mine from several portals on either side of the ridge, however, two contribute the majority of the contaminated effluent. These are the 2200 Level portal which drains into Jane Creek, a tributary of Britannia Creek and the 4100 Level portal which drains into Howe Sound. The levels of the Britannia Mine are numbered in feet below the top of the ridge which is 4300 feet above sea level. Therefore the 2200 Level portal is 2200 feet below the top of the ridge, 640 meters above sea level. The major levels and their respective elevations are listed in Table 1.1. 2 Table 1.1 Elevations of the Britannia Mine Portals and Levels Elevation above sea level Portal in meters in feet 4150 Level 45 150 4100 Level 60 200 3250 Level 320 1050 3100 Level 370 1200 2700 Level 490 1600 2200 Level 640 2100 Daisy 1100 3600 Beta 780 2550 1200 Level 940 3100 1050 Level 990 3250 Barbara 1160 3800 (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995) 1.1.2 Previous Control Measures Acid rock drainage has been a problem at Britannia Beach since the early stages of operation. The existing discharge requirements based on a Pollution Abatement Order (1981) produced by the Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks state that the 4100 Level portal drainage is to be treated in the precipitation plant when the copper concentration exceeds 15 mg/l (Price, Schwab, and ,Hutt, 1995). The Pollution Abatement Order also required that a submerged outfall be built to carry the 4100 Level portal drainage into Howe Sound bypassing Britannia Creek. Restoration efforts to date included two precipitation plants, a sedimentation pond, and a deep outfall into Howe Sound. The precipitation plants, a series of troughs conveying the drainage past scrap iron, aided in the removal of copper from the 4100 and 2200 3 Level portal drainage by way of replacement reaction. Tin cans comprised the majority of the scrap iron and removal of the precipitated copper was done by diverting the precipitation plant outflow to the sedimentation pond and shaking the cans so that the copper flocks would get washed downstream (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). The copper removal was greatest when the dissolved copper concentration was greater than 20 mg/l (Goyette and Ferguson, 1985). Price, Schwab, and Hutt conclude that even when the dissolved copper concentration exceeds 20 mg/l, only 30% removal is achieved. The overall copper removal was 19% (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). Currently, the precipitation plant at the 2200 Level is not in operation and the 2200 Level portal discharge is flowing directly into Britannia Creek via Jane Creek. The copper concentration in the 2200 Level portal drainage is approximately 70 mg/l (Zabil, 1998). The copper concentration in the 4100 Level portal drainage fluctuated between 11 and 16 mg/l during the period from January to May, 1998 (Zabil, 1998). Even though the copper concentration fluctuates above 15 mg/l, the precipitation plant is not being maintained at present. Portions of the troughs contain no tin cans and the tin cans are not being replaced or shaken. 1.2 Objectives and Scope This thesis is concerned with the hydrological and hydraulic properties of the Britannia Mine and surrounding area. The results are specific to this area and will be used for the purpose of designing a wastewater treatment plant which will treat the ARD from the 2200 and 4100 Level portals (Simons, 1998). The main objective of the study was 4 to determine the treatment plant design flow rate. In order to achieve this, the following steps were performed: • The precipitation data were analyzed to determine the precipitation event magnitude for a given return period • The flow data were analyzed to determine the flow rate associated with a given return period • A relationship between precipitation and mine outflow was established • The amount of available storage inside the mine was estimated • The required storage for a given treatment plant flow rate was calculated In addition to this, an attempt was made to model the Britannia mine outflow given precipitation and temperature for flow forecasting purposes. The results of the analysis suggest that the storage volume inside the mine is on the order of one million cubic meters. This is approximately equal to the storage volume required given a 10 year return period as the design flow. The wastewater treatment plant will be able to operate at a constant flow rate of 0.179 CMS (the 10 year return annual average flow) with the higher flow peaks being stored in the mine for release during low flow periods. 1.3 Summary This thesis consists of five sections. Section 1 defines the scope of this thesis and provides information on the study site. Background information on acid rock drainage, neutralization / precipitation water treatment, and the qualifications of the Britannia 5 Mine to be a rehabilitation candidate are contained in Section 2. Section 3 contains the data used in this thesis and details the processing of it. The results and their consequences are presented in Section 4. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations are made in Section 5. Flow records from various locations at the Britannia Mine and records of pressure behind the 4100 Level plug are contained within Appendix A. 6 2. BACKGROUND The Britannia Mine ARD problem was introduced in the previous section and the objectives of this thesis were defined. This section gives background information which is required in the coming sections. This section consists of a brief definition of ARD and its prevention, background information on neutralization / precipitation water treatment, and a discussion of the suitability of the Britannia Mine site for rehabilitation. 2.1 Acid Rock Drainage The most important environmental concern associated with the mining industry is acid rock drainage (McCandless, 1995). Acid rock drainage is the term used for the water that carries oxidation products from ores or waste rock with a high sulphur content. The associated reactions are extremely complex and involve the following ingredients: oxygen, water, sulfide minerals, and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. Methods of eliminating acid rock drainage fall into three categories: Primary Control: control of the reactions which generate acid Secondary Control: control of the transport of contaminated water Tertiary Control: collection and treatment of contaminated water If possible, primary control should be applied as it is the most desirable option. In certain situations, as with old abandoned mines, tertiary control needs to be implemented along with primary and secondary control. Primary control involves removing a necessary ingredient for acid generation. Removing the exposed sulphide 7 mineral, covering the waste rock to remove oxygen and/or water access, and using bactericides to eliminate the sulphide-oxidizing bacteria. Secondary control involves preventing water entry into the waste rock by diversion, interception, application of covers over the waste rock, and locating waste in a manner that will minimize infiltration. Tertiary control involves collecting and treating already contaminated water using a lime precipitation treatment plant and tailings pond disposal of precipitates or a passive treatment system such as wetlands. (Filion, Sirois, and Ferguson, 1992) 2.2 Neutralization / Precipitation Water Treatment for Rehabilitation Neutralization / precipitation water treatment is a form of tertiary ARD control and requires a treatment plant employing chemical and mechanical processes to partially remove target contaminants. The processes involved in neutralization / precipitation water treatment are designed to: • neutralize the pH of the acidic water entering the plant. • reduce the concentrations of metals in the water. 2.2.1 Neutralization of pH The pH of the mine drainage is acidic. Based on 1998 data, the 2200 Level portal drainage pH fluctuates between 3.01 and 3.13 and the 4100 Level portal drainage pH fluctuates between 3.43 and 4.18 (Zabil, 1998). The first step in the neutralization / precipitation water treatment is to neutralize the pH of the water entering the plant. This can be done with the addition of an alkaline compound such as lime, soda ash, or pulp 8 mill residue (Simons, 1998). The amount of the alkaline compound added is a function of the pH of the inflow and the flow rate. The pH of the mine drainage varies slightly and will affect the alkaline reagent dosage but is independent of flow rate. The flow rate through the treatment plant will determine the quantity of alkaline reagent needed. It will also determine the physical treatment plant size as larger flow rates will increase the size of the mixing tank, the reactor tank, and the clarifier. 2.2.2 Reduced Metals Concentration A neutralization / precipitation water treatment plant utilizes chemical precipitation, flocculation, and settling to remove the metals from solution. In a neutralization / precipitation reaction, the pH of the mine drainage is raised to a level at which the target metals are less soluble and therefore precipitate out. A flocculant may be desirable as it will increase the precipitated particle size and increase the settling rate. This allows for a smaller clarifier or a higher flow rate through the clarifier. The products of the neutralization / precipitation treatment are an effluent with characteristics that make it suitable for release into receiving waters and a sludge consisting of water, the alkaline reagent, and the precipitated metals (Simons, 1998). The sludge must be disposed of by placing it in a sludge pond or otherwise processing it to recover the metals if profitable (SRK, 1991). 9 2.2.3 Neutralization / Precipitation Treatment Options There are several options in chemical reagents for the neutralization / precipitation reaction. These include hydrated lime, caustic soda, magnesium hydroxide, soda ash, limestone, dolomite, magnesite, and alkaline pulp mill residue. All of these reagents may be used to raise pH in order to promote metal precipitation, however, the drainage water properties, site conditions, and reagent availability will determine which reagent is most suitable. (Simons, 1998) A high or low density sludge process may also be used. The high density sludge process requires partial recirculation of sludge through the plant. With this process a denser, more stable sludge and a higher quality effluent are produced. (SRK, 1991) 2.3 The Need to Rehabilitate the Britannia Mine Site Several studies have been performed on the properties of the Britannia Mine outflow, as well as, on the properties of the mine itself (Goyette & Ferguson,1985, SRK, 1991, Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995, Simons, 1998). The acid rock drainage problem has been described as being the worst point source of pollution in the province (McCandless, 1995). Water quality data records have been kept on a regular basis by the BC Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks (BC MOELP) since 1995 and also periodic measurements were taken during mine operation. The discharge poses a threat to juvenile salmon in Howe Sound by destroying habitat along the coastline. A multi year study of the fate of metals entering Howe Sound is under way as part of a 10 Ph.D. thesis in the Department of Oceanography at UBC (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). Rehabilitation action has been delayed due to ownership and liability disagreements between the province, the Anaconda Mining Company, and Copper Beach Estates. It has been decided, by Environment Canada and BC MOELP, to go ahead with the pre-feasibility design and cost estimate of a treatment plant and continue to resolve liability issues (McCandless, 1998). The Britannia Beach properties are situated between Squamish and the fast-growing community of Furry Creek. The land at Britannia Beach, if cleaned up, may have similar potential in terms of development as the Furry Creek community. Because of the acid rock drainage clean-up responsibility associated with land ownership, land developers are reluctant to invest. A wastewater treatment plant would eliminate the acid rock drainage problem and potentially create the opportunity for growth at Britannia Beach. 2.3.1 Outflow Properties The Britannia Mine drainage exceeds water quality standards for discharge into the environment, as set by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Ministry of Environment. The target metals for removal by the neutralization / precipitation treatment process are listed in Table 2.1. 11 Table 2.1. Metals Concentrations in Drainage and Post Treatment Metal in Mine Drainage Annual Average Concentration in Mine Drainage* Target Concentration in Treatment Plant Effluent Copper (Cu2+) 28 mg/l 0.2 mg/l Iron (Fe2+) 15 mg/l 0.5 mg/l Zinc (Zn2+) 25 mg/l 0.3 mg/l Aluminum (Al3+) 31 mg/l 0.5 mg/l Manganese (Mn2+) 4.8 mg/l 1.0 mg/l Cadmium (Cd2+) 0.12 mg/l 0.05 mg/l * Flow weighted average of 4100 and 2200 Level portal concentrations (Simons, 1998) 2.3.2 Britannia Creek A large part of the contamination in Britannia Creek is due to the 2200 Level portal drainage which discharges into Britannia Creek via Jane Creek. The iron in the water leaves rocks in Britannia Creek stained. The water then flows into Howe Sound contaminating the brackish water along the coastline which is favored by juvenile salmon as rearing habitat (McCandless, 1995). The 4100 Level portal drainage did enter Britannia Creek in the past, but in 1978 a submerged outfall into Howe sound was built and Britannia Creek was bypassed (SRK, 1991). 2.3.3 Mine Portals There are several portals into the mine on both the Britannia and Furry Creek sides of the ridge. On the Furry Creek side, there are four portals; the Barbara, Empress Camp 1050 Level, 1200 Level, and Beta portals. Water samples were taken at several locations in the Furry Creek watershed between October 1992 and January 1993. The 12 water quality properties of each portal's drainage are listed in Table 2.2. No flow out of the Barbara portal was observed, nor was any expected since the portal declines into the mine. The channel carrying the Beta portal drainage is stained a blue-green color resulting from the precipitation of malachite due to the higher pH and the low concentrations of aluminum and iron (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). All three portals drain into Portal Creek which exhibited similar water properties as the portals. Empress Creek also contained elevated copper and zinc concentrations and a pH of 4. Both the Portal and Empress Creeks drain into Furry Creek. Samples from Furry Creek show acceptable copper and zinc levels. With a flow rate three orders of magnitude larger than the Empress and Portal Creeks combined, Furry Creek water quality is ensured by dilution (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). Table 2.2. Water Quality of Drainage in the Furry Creek Watershed Site Flow Rate (l/s) pH Cu (mg/l) Zn (mg/l) Cd W) Fe (mg/l) S04 (mg/l) 1050 Level portal 0.8 3.4 33 9.6 100 5.2 280 1200 Level portal 0.2 0.22 0.045 5.0 0.23 12 Beta portal 1.0 5.4 2.8 3.2 47 0.18 160 Portal Creek 0.5 3.9 1.7 1.2 14 2.3 97 Empress Creek 4.0 4.1 0.40 0.31 2.0 0.17 50 Furry Creek 3000 7.0 0.018 0.020 5.0 0.049 5.0 (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995) On the Britannia Creek side, there are several portals including the Daisy, the 2200 Level, the 2700 Level, the 3100 Level, the 3250 Level, and the 4100 Level portals. The Daisy portal, the two 2700 Level portals, and the 3100 and 3250 Level portals all drain into Mineral Creek. The flow from each is less than 1 l/s (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). Water samples were taken at several locations in the Britannia Creek 13 watershed in November 1992. The water quality properties of each portal's drainage are listed in Table 2.3. Table 2.3. Water Quality of Drainage in the Britannia Creek Watershed Site Flow Rate (l/s) pH Cu (mg/l) Zn (mg/l) Cd (HQ/0 Fe (mg/l) S04 (mg/l) Daisy portal 0.5 5.8 0.002 0.20 1.0 0.020 14 2700 Level portal A 0.5 4.3 0.26 1.24 7.0 8.9 260 2700 Level portal B <1.0 0.046 0.15 1.0 0.010 9.0 3100 Level portal <1.0 3250 Level portal <1.0 Jane Creek* 45 5.8 28 13 78 16 545 Mineral Creek* 130 7.9 0.012 0.032 6.0 0.060 31 Britannia Creek* 1500 4.3 2.7 2.6 17 1.2 180 * at mouth of creek (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995) The two portals that contribute the majority of contaminated flow are the 2200 and 4100 Level portals. The 2200 Level portal is located at the former Mt. Sheer townsite and its outflow drains into Jane Creek. Jane Creek flows into Britannia Creek which flows out into Howe Sound, see Figure 1.2. The 2200 Level portal drainage is highly acidic with a pH of 3. The 2200 Level portal drainage properties are listed in Table 2.4. The average flow rate out of the 2200 Level portal based on the 1996 record is 30 l/s (Zabil, 1998).. An attempt was made to divert the 2200 Level portal flow down through the mine to the 4100 Level by building a dam inside the 2200 Level tunnel. The success of this attempt was only temporary until the dam started overtopping and flow out of the 2200 Level portal resumed. A rectangular weir was built at the entrance to the portal and water surface elevation is measured on the upstream side. Waste rock 14 piles at the 2200 Level also contribute ARD into Britannia Creek (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). Table 2.4. Water Quality of Drainage from the 2200 and 4100 Level Portals Parameter 2200 Level portal 4100 Level portal Average Flow Rate (l/s) 30 115 pH* 3.01 -3.13 3.43-4.18 Copper (mg/l)* 45 - 78 11-16 Zinc (mg/l)* 27-39 16-30 Cadmium (p:g/l)* 160-250 60 - 100 Iron (mg/l)* 22-44 3.5 - 8.6 Sulphate (mg/l)* 980 - 1270 1320 - 1580 * based on 1998 data (Zabil, 1998) The 4100 Level portal is located at the foot of the ridge at Britannia Beach. A concrete plug 400 meters inside the 4100 Level tunnel holds back the flow. Three pipes (4", 6", and 10") convey water through the plug, see Figure 2.1. The water flows out of the pipes and into a ditch which runs along one side of the tunnel towards the entrance. Four hundred and seventy meters from the concrete plug, the ARD in the ditch falls down a shaft to the 4150 Level. The path that the 4100 Level portal drainage takes from there is illustrated in Figure 2.2. The water emerges out of the mine and flows towards the Parshall flumes located several meters from the 4150 Level portal. The ARD enters a splitter box where it is split into two directions. Part of the flow enters a Parshall flume where its flow rate is measured and drains towards the powerhouse building. From there it flows underground towards the submerged outfall in Howe Sound. The remainder of the ARD flows into two side by side Parshall flumes where its flow rate is measured. Currently, one of the flumes is blocked off forcing all the flow into the other. From the flume the ARD flows down a wooden trough, falls into a 15 culvert, and emerges in the precipitation plant. The ARD flows down the concrete troughs of the precipitation plant, into a manhole where it merges with the powerhouse flow component, and is carried to the submerged outfall. The 4100 Level portal drainage is highly acidic with a pH of 3.5. The drainage characteristics are listed in Table 2.4. The average flow rate out of the 4100 Level portal based on the 1996 record is 115 l/s (Zabil, 1998). 16 3. METHODS, MATERIALS, and DATA PROCESSING The previous section gave background information on ARD generation and prevention and described the use of a neutralization / precipitation reaction for water treatment. It also described the Britannia Mine site and the need for its rehabilitation. This section focuses on the data and the tools used for collection and processing of the data. In Section 3.1 the meteorological, hydrologic, and pressure data that were used in this study are presented. The information regarding the mine workings is discussed in Section 3.2. The required topographical maps are listed in Section 3.3 And the data processing is described in Section 3.4. 3.1 Electronic Data The electronic data consist of meteorological data from climate stations near the Britannia Mine area, flow data from the two major outflow points of the mine, flow data from a small creek near one on the portals, and records of pressures behind the 4100 Level plug. The data were supplied by BC MOELP and Environment Canada. 3.1.1 Meteorological Data Meteorological data consisted of total daily precipitation and minimum, average, and maximum daily temperature. Meteorological data for the period of flow record (1930 to present) were collected at six stations near the Britannia Mine. Each station has an individual period of record with numerous gaps in the data. The six stations are: 17 • Squamish A CS (4947N 12310W) • Squamish STP Central (4942N 1231OW) • Furry Creek station (4935N 12313W) • Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS (4924N 12312W) • Gambier Harbour station (4927N 12326W) • 2200 Level station (4937N 12308W) The Squamish A CS (Automatic Climate Station) is located at the Squamish airport at an elevation of 59 meters above sea level. The available data at this station are from May 1982 to September 1996. The Squamish STP Central station is located at an elevation of 39 meters above sea level. The available data at this station are from September 1996 to March 1998. The Furry Creek station is located at an elevation of 9 meters above sea level. The available data for this station are from January 1932 to October 1974 and from January 1994 to April 1998. The Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS is located on Hwy. #1 near the Cypress Bowl exit at an elevation of 850 meters. The available data for this station are from December 1984 to December 1995. The Gambier Harbour station is located on Gambier Island at an elevation of 53 meters above sea level. Only precipitation data are available for this station from August 1962 to May 1997. The 2200 Level station is located near the 2200 Level portal at an elevation of 640 meters above sea level. The available data for this station are from October 1997 to January 1998. 18 3.1.2 Hydrologic Data Hydrologic data consisted of flows measured at four locations at the Britannia Mine. Each of these locations has an individual period of record with numerous gaps in the data. The four locations are: • 2200 Level portal • 4100 Level portal (flow to powerhouse) • 4100 Level portal (flow to precipitation plant) • Jane Creek Flow emerging from the 2200 Level portal is measured at a rectangular weir located at the entrance to the 2200 Level tunnel. A staff gauge is installed to measure the water surface elevation upstream of the weir. The crest of the weir is at an elevation that coincides with a staff gauge reading of 0.186 meters. The weir is 0.911 meters wide and has a weir coefficient of 0.637. Flow over it is governed by the equation: Q = ( 1.714 - 0.376 * ( S - 0.186 )) * ( S - 0.186 ) 15 (3.1) where Q is the flow rate in cubic meters per second, and S is the staff gauge level in meters (Triton, 1997). Equation 3.1 was derived from the equation for discharge over a rectangular weir: Q = 2/3 * Cw * ( L - 0.2 h ) * ( 2 g ) 05 * h 15 (3.2) where Q is the flow rate over the weir in cubic meters per second, Cw is the weir coefficient, L is the width of the weir in meters, h is the depth of water over the crest of the weir in meters, and g is the gravitational constant, 9.81 m/s2 (Triton, 1997). The 2200 Level portal discharge was measured at three different flow rates and compared 19 to the flow rate calculated using Equation 3.1. The values agreed to within 9%. There is insufficient data to determine whether this error is associated with the flow measurement or with the inaccuracy of Equation 3.1. The depth of water upstream of the weir is measured automatically by a nitrogen gas bubbler water level sensor. A data logger stores the water level values every fifteen minutes and stored data are periodically downloaded to free up memory. The 2200 Level portal flow records are available from January 1930 to December 1956 on a semi monthly basis. From January 1996 to March 1997 and from October 1997 to January 1998 records are available on an hourly basis. Flow from the 4100 Level portal is measured at two Parshall flumes located at the 4150 level. Both Parshall flumes are 12 inches wide and flow through them is governed by the equation: Q = 4.0*W*Ha1 522 *w°26 (3.3) where Q is the flow rate in cubic feet per second, W is the flume width in feet, and Ha is the depth of flow measured in feet at a point two-thirds of the length of the sidewall of the converging section back from the crest (Triton, 1997). The flow through each flume was measured at three different flow rates and compared to the flow rate calculated using Equation 3.3. The values agreed to within 12%. Since the 4100 Level portal contributes approximately 90% of the treatment plant flow, the equation should be refined as more flow measurements are made. Currently, there is insufficient data to determine whether this error is associated with the flow measurement or with the inaccuracy of Equation 3.3. 20 The depth of water in the Parshall flumes is measured automatically by a nitrogen gas bubbler water level sensor. A data logger stores the water level values from each Parshall flume every fifteen minutes and stored data are periodically downloaded to free up memory. The 4100 Level portal flow records are available from October 1977 to December 1993 on a weekly basis. From September 1995 to March 1997 and from October 1997 to January 1998 records are available on an hourly basis. Flow in Jane Creek is measured at a rectangular weir located near the 2200 Level portal. A staff gauge is installed to measure the water surface elevation upstream of the weir. The crest of the weir is at an elevation that coincides with a staff gauge reading of 0.212 meters. The weir is 0.916 meters wide and has a weir coefficient of 0.637. Flow over it is governed by the equation: Q = ( 1.723 - 0.376 * ( S - 0.212 ) ) * ( S - 0.212 ) 15 (3.4) where Q is the flow rate in cubic meters per second, and S is the staff gauge level in meters (Triton, 1997). Jane Creek flow was measured at two flow rates and compared to the flow rate calculated using Equation 3.4. The values agreed to within 15%. There is insufficient data to determine whether this error is associated with the flow measurement or with the inaccuracy of Equation 3.4. The water level upstream of the weir is measured by a Stevens chart recorder. The Stevens chart recorder uses a float which is mechanically attached to a pen plotter. As the float moves up and down, the pen moves across the paper. The pen scribes a continuous line as the paper moves by. The roll of paper is periodically replaced and 21 the data are digitized into computer files. Jane Creek flow records are available from January 1996 to January 1997 and from May 1997 to June 1998 on an hourly basis. 3.1.3 Pressure Data The water level behind the 4100 Level plug has fluctuated a great deal since the plug was installed. From 1980 to 1986, the pressure behind the plug was recorded on a weekly basis. Each of the three pipes conveying water through the plug had a pressure gauge installed on it between the plug and the valve, see Figure 2.1. During the six year period (1980 to 1986), the valves were regulated. For extended periods of time, only one of the three valves would be open and the pressure was recorded on at least one of the closed valves. The measurements were recorded in 5 psi increments in a ledger provided by Robert McCandless of Environment Canada. The data were entered into Microsoft Excel for analysis. 3.2 Mine Workings The mine workings of the Britannia Mine consist of tunnels, shafts, stopes, and pits. An incomplete set of drawings of the mine workings, made available by Robert McCandless of Environment Canada, includes an elevation view showing the numerous levels and shafts and plan views showing each level. The elevation view indicates the positions of the stopes, however, the plan views do not. These 1:2400 scale drawings were used to estimate the volume of storage available between the 22 4100 Level portal and the next portal above it, the 3250 Level portal. The major shafts, tunnels, and ore bodies are shown in Figure 1.3. 3.3 Topography Various topographical maps were used to estimate catchment areas. A 1:20000 scale map obtained from the University of British Columbia Map Library (No. 92G.065 Digital) was used to estimate the catchment area of Jane Creek and the open pit complex. A 1:4800 scale map, made available by Robert G. McCandless of Environment Canada, was used to revise both estimates. In addition, a visual inspection of the terrain around the open pits was performed from a helicopter and also on foot. 3.4 Data Processing The electronic data were imported into Microsoft Excel 7.0 for processing. The temperature, precipitation, and flow records were manipulated to produce graphs showing correlation between sets of data. Meteorological data from the six climate stations were analyzed for similar weather patterns. The precipitation and flow records were used to generate return period plots and establish a precipitation-flow relationship. A volume inside the mine between the 4100 and 3250 Levels was estimated. A design flow based on the 10 year return flow rate and available storage was calculated. The 10 year return period was agreed on by HA Simons and Environment Canada. 23 In order to achieve a numerical relationship between precipitation, temperature, and mine outflow for possible flow forecasting, the UBC Watershed model was applied. The UBC Watershed model was developed to describe the behavior of streams in mountainous areas (Quick, 1995). The model has the ability to model groundwater flow and flow through a series of reservoirs. The model was used to estimate the relative quantities of fast runoff and slow groundwater flow. It was also used because of its ability to model snow accumulation and melt using only precipitation and maximum and minimum temperature as input. It was never the intention of the developers for the UBC Watershed model to be used for flow though mine workings. Attempting to apply it to flow through a mine was done to test whether or not it could be applied with reasonable success. Successful modeling would allow the flow out of the mine to be predicted given precipitation and temperature data. The storage reservoir could be better managed, draining it down when high flow rates are predicted and storing more water during dryer periods. 24 4. OBSERVATIONS and RESULTS The previous section described the sources of data and processing methods applied to acquire meaningful results. This section covers the results and associated observations. The results of the meteorological data analysis are presented in Section 4.1. In order to determine a design flow rate for the wastewater treatment plant the following results were obtained. The results of the return period analysis which were used to determine the 10 year return flow rate are presented in Section 4.2.1. The precipitation - flow relationship that is required to determine what a design year of flow should look like is discussed in Section 4.2.2. The available storage volume inside the mine is estimated in Section 4.2.3 and the design flow is calculated in Section 4.2.4. Flow modeling for forecasting purposes is discussed in Section 4.3. 4.1 Meteorological Data The meteorological data that were collected at the six stations near the Britannia Mine were compared to determine whether or not each station experienced similar weather patterns. 4.1.1 Regional Weather The stations with overlapping records were compared by temperature and precipitation. Figure 4.1 shows the temperature relationships between the Squamish A CS, Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS, and Furry Creek stations for the period of 25 record. All three locations experienced similar temperature fluctuations and therefore the temperature at any station may be expressed as a function of the temperature at another. The following relationships were observed: TFC = 0.90 xTSq +2.3 (4.1) TCy•= 0.88 x TSq - 2.8 (4.2where TFc is the temperature at the Furry Creek station (in Celsius), TSq is the temperature at the Squamish A CS (in Celsius), and TCy is the temperature at the Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS (in Celsius). The Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS recorded lower temperatures than the Squamish A CS or the Furry Creek station. This is due in part to the fact that the Cypress Bowl gauge is at an elevation of 850 meters above sea level while the Squamish and Furry Creek gauges are at 59 meters and 9 meters above sea level, respectively. A cumulative precipitation comparison of the Squamish A CS, Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS, Furry Creek, and Gambier Harbour stations for the period January 1994 to February, 1997 was performed. Each location exhibits a similar precipitation pattern as can be seen in Figure 4.2. The Furry Creek and Gambier Harbour stations consistently recorded lower precipitation values than the Cypress Bowl or Squamish A CS stations. The Cypress Bowl station consistently recorded the highest precipitation values. This is due, in part, to the precipitation gradient resulting in higher precipitation values at higher elevations. Regional variation may also be a factor in the precipitation difference between stations. The precipitation at one station can be expressed as a function of the others. The precipitation at the Cypress Bowl station is on average 11% greater than that at the Squamish A CS and the precipitation at the Squamish A CS is, on average, 22% greater than that at the Gambier Harbour station. The Gambier 26 Harbour station precipitation is, on average, 3% greater than that at the Furry Creek station. Figure 4.3 shows these relationships. Each station recorded similar weather patterns suggesting that the data from any one of the four stations is representative of the precipitation and temperature occurring in the Britannia Mine catchment. 4.1.2 Local Meteorological Record In October 1997, a precipitation and temperature gauge was installed near the 2200 Level portal to obtain a local weather record. Data recorded at this station were compared to the regional weather patterns. Figure 4.4 shows the temperature comparison between the Squamish STP Central, Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS, and the 2200 Level stations for the period of October to November, 1997. The 2200 Level temperature did not fluctuate as much as the temperature at the Cypress Bowl and Squamish stations. All three locations experienced similar temperature fluctuations with a period of 24 hours. Larger temperature fluctuations generally occurred on days without precipitation. This is reasonable since higher fluctuations occur on cloudless days. The cumulative precipitation at the Squamish STP Central, Cypress Bowl - West Vancouver CS, and the 2200 Level stations was compared for the period of October to November, 1997. The 2200 Level station precipitation values were significantly lower than all the other stations in the area. The record at this station however is believed to 27 be incorrect as it is unlikely that the precipitation at the base of the ridge (Furry Creek station) would be higher than that at the 2200 Level. It was suggested that the precipitation may have been recorded in inches instead of millimeters. A factor of 25.4 would increase the 2200 Level precipitation to a value consistent with the other precipitation gauges. The datalogger's programming has since been erased and it cannot be confirmed or denied that the precipitation was recorded in inches. The precipitation gauge was calibrated in April, 1998, however, the datalogger's memory was already full at that time and the data were lost. On the assumption that the 2200 Level station precipitation was recorded in inches, the precipitation values were multiplied by a factor of 25.4 to convert them to millimeters. Figure 4.5 shows the cumulative precipitation comparison. The Squamish and Cypress stations recorded precipitation totals of 449 mm and 296 mm, respectively, while the 2200 Level gauge recorded a total precipitation of 340 mm (13.4 x 25.4). All three gauges did experience similar precipitation events. For this short period (one month), the Squamish STP Central precipitation is greater than the Cypress Bowl precipitation even though the Cypress Bowl station is 811 meters higher than the Squamish station. Short-term regional weather patterns may account for this discrepancy. 4.2 Treatment Plant Design Flow Rate In order to design the treatment plant, a flow rate must be determined. The wastewater treatment plant is going to treat both the 4100 and 2200 Level portal drainage, therefore both flows must be considered. 28 The 4100 Level portal contributes 90% of the total flow. A complete year of flow records on a daily basis is available within the period from September 20, 1995 to September 20, 1996. However it is not know whether this year of data is typical or atypical. To determine this, the other 4100 Level portal flow data must be examined. The available data are readings taken on a weekly basis between 1977 and 1993. A complete year of daily flows beginning in September does not exist for the 2200 Level portal. The reason for dividing the years in September is discussed in Section 4.2.1. The daily flow data begins on January 1st, 1996 and continues through to March 4th, 1997. Flow readings were taken on a semi-monthly basis between 1931 and 1956. Both the 4100 and the 2200 Level portal sets of flow data were analyzed to determine average and maximum flows. The flow and precipitation data were compared and an effective catchment area was calculated. The available storage volume in the mine was estimated in order to determine the reduction in flow rate through the treatment plant offered by peak flow attenuation by storage. 4.2.1 Return Period Analysis A return period analysis was performed to determine the average and maximum flow rates of discharge out of the 4100 and 2200 Level portals for 10, 20, 50, and 100 year events. 29 All available Furry Creek station precipitation data and all 2200 and 4100 Level portal outflow data were compiled to develop return period plots. A Normal distribution was used for analysis of total or average values and a Gumbel distribution was used for maximum values. Both precipitation and flow data are divided into years starting at the beginning of September and ending at the end of August. This division is preferred over a calendar year division since summer flows are actually driven by melting snow which accumulated during the late fall and winter of the previous year. Figure 4.6 shows the annual average and maximum outflow from the 4100 and 2200 Level portals plotted against return period. Only Furry Creek gauge precipitation data were analyzed because it has the longest record and its location is nearest to the Britannia Mine catchment. The Furry Creek data can be multiplied by a factor to give estimates of Squamish or Cypress precipitation values. This was discussed in Section 4.1.1. Total annual precipitation and 24-hour maximum precipitation are plotted against return period in Figure 4.7. The values of the flows and precipitation for a number of return periods are listed in Table 4.1. The average and maximum 2200 Level portal flows presented in Table 4.1 are relatively low when compared to recent data. The peak 2200 Level portal flow recorded in 1996 is 0.090 CMS which is greater than the 100 year return annual maximum flow. 1996 was an above average year for precipitation, however, it was only approximately a 1 in 10 wet year. During the period of record for the 2200 Level portal flows (1931 to 1956), the mine was still being developed and the flow rates were therefore changing. A closer look at the flows and precipitation reveals this in the following section. 30 Table 4.1. Flows and Precipitation for Various Return Periods Return Period Mean 10 years 20 years 50 years 100 years Annual average 4100 0.136 0.160 0.166 0.174 0.179 flow CMS CMS CMS CMS CMS Annual maximum 0.326 0.413 0.451 0.499 0.536 4100 flow CMS CMS CMS CMS CMS Annual average 2200 0.0131 0.0190 0.0207 0.0226 0.0239 flow CMS CMS CMS CMS CMS Annual maximum 0.0273 0.0371 0.0413 0.0467 0.0508 2200 flow CMS CMS CMS CMS CMS Total annual Furry Cr. 2100 2480 2580 2700 2780 precipitation mm mm mm mm mm Annual 24 hour maximum Furry Cr. 74 97 107 120 129 precipitation mm mm mm mm mm 4.2.2 Precipitation - Flow Relationship In order to determine what a typical year of flows may look like, past flow records were plotted, along with precipitation records, for inspection. General trends were identified and a relationship between precipitation and flow was established in the form of an effective catchment area. 4.2.2.1 General Patterns The inspection of flow and precipitation pattern was done by first focussing in on a short time scale during which data were collected frequently. Then a longer time scale with less frequent data was examined. And lastly, a longest time scale with very coarse 31 data was examined. Jane Creek flow is included as a reference flow of a typical creek within the Britannia Mine catchment. For a short period of time, precipitation and flows were recorded on an hourly basis. The period of October 24th, 1997 to November 28th, 1997 is plotted in Figure 4.8. As can be seen in the figure, Jane Creek responds very well to precipitation events. A spike in Jane Creek flow follows each precipitation event recorded at the 2200 Level station. At the end of the summer when there is no snow, Jane Creek does not dry up during periods of no precipitation. This suggests that Jane Creek is fed by groundwater flow. Catchment area of Jane Creek was determined from a topographical map to be approximately 0.50 km2. Multiplying this value by the average annual precipitation at the Furry Creek station (1960 mm) yields a total annual precipitation volume of 0.98 x 106 m3. The total annual volume from measured flows in Jane Creek was 1.79 x 106 m3, a value almost twice that of the calculated precipitation volume. This discrepancy can be attributed to both a precipitation gradient between the Furry Creek precipitation gauge and the Jane Creek basin and the fact that Jane Creek is fed by groundwater flow. The groundwater flow in Jane Creek is believed to be seepage from the mine workings as it contains elevated metals concentrations (Price, Schwab, and Hutt, 1995). The 2200 Level portal flow is not as responsive to precipitation events as Jane Creek flow. The spikes in 2200 Level portal flow do correspond to precipitation events. However, the spikes are much smoother with smaller precipitation events being attenuated and therefore not causing a rise in flow. The flow out of the 2200 Level portal appears to be routed through some form of reservoir. The mine workings and 32 rectangular weir combine to cause this attenuation. The catchment of the 2200 Level portal drainage cannot be clearly defined on a map. The flow out of the 2200 Level portal is affected by water entering the shafts that surface in the pits at the top of the mine. Like Jane Creek, the 2200 Level portal does not dry up and is also most likely fed by groundwater. Its base flow, however, is approximately one third that of Jane Creek. The 4100 Level portal flow shows very little response to precipitation events. Individual precipitation events combine to increase the flow much more gradually. Detention in the upper levels of the mine and behind the plug smoothes out the inflow peaks making a precipitation-flow relationship visually imperceptible. At the beginning of the October to November 1997 period, the valve on the 10 inch pipe at the plug was only half open. The flow spiked as the valve was fully open on October 10th, see Figure 4.8. The flow quickly returned to just above its previous value. Since January 1st, 1996, flow in Jane Creek and the discharge from the 2200 Level portal have been recorded on an daily basis. The daily 4100 Level portal discharge records have been kept since September 20th, 1995. The period of September 20th, 1995 to March 3rd, 1997 is plotted in Figure 4.9. As can be seen in this figure, the relationships between precipitation and flow based on the hourly data discussed above hold for the most part, however, snowmelt and snow accumulation alters the flow response. All three flows exhibit a recession flow during the summer period (June to September), characteristic of snowmelt dominated flow with precipitation peaks appearing as short-lived spikes on the flow curve. 33 The response of the 4100 Level portal flow is more apparent than in Figure 4.8. High intensity and long duration precipitation events combine to cause large spikes in the flow as can be seen at the end of 1995 and 1996, as well as in May, 1996. Other high intensity precipitation events cause spikes in the flow as can be seen around January 20th, February 20th, and March 14th of 1996 and February 2nd, 1997. The large flow peak in mid June 1996 is a result of the combination of snowmelt and rainfall events. Smaller precipitation peaks alone do not cause spikes in the 4100 Level portal flow. Complicated routing and storage mechanisms along with snow accumulation are likely to be responsible for these observations. In order to determine whether the more recent data (daily) is representative of the typical flows, the weekly flow data from 1977 to 1993 were plotted and examined. The 4100 Level concrete plug was installed in 1978 and since then the valves on the three pipes that carry the flow through the plug were regulated until February 1st, 1991 at which time all three were fully opened and remained so for the remainder of this period. For this reason, during the 1977 to 1991 period, the same precipitation events would result in differing outflows from the 4100 Level portal today than the flows recorded in that year. Nevertheless, Figure 4.10 shows the 4100 Level portal flows from 1977 to 1993 overlaid over a one year period with the average flows plotted as a darker curve. Also plotted in Figure 4.10 is the average precipitation at the Squamish A CS. The Squamish station precipitation was chosen because it was more complete than the other precipitation records available for this period (Cypress Bowl and Gambier Harbour). The 4100 outflow follows the same pattern for the entire sixteen year period. The flow peaks twice during the year, once in the fall and once in the late spring or early summer. The spring peaks are the highest as they are a combination of 34 snowmelt and rain. The fall peaks vary from year to year as a function of temperature and precipitation. Low temperatures cause snow accumulation and therefore a lower peak flow in the fall. In order to determine whether the trends observed in the more recent 2200 Level portal flow data (daily) are typical, the semi-monthly flow measurements taken between 1931 and 1956 were examined. As the Britannia Mine was still being developed during these and following years, the 2200 Level portal outflows may not be representative of the mine behavior today. It is still worthwhile to examine these flow records for general trends. For this period, only the Furry Creek station records were available. Similar patterns as were observed in the 4100 outflows can be seen in Figure 4.11. The peak flows occur in the late spring or early summer, during periods of low precipitation. The second annual peak, most often lower than the spring peak, occurs in the fall. A semi monthly sampling period is too coarse because the 2200 Level portal flows change very rapidly. It is likely that peak flows are missed and the data are not representative of actual flows, average or maximum. However, no complete daily sampled year's worth of flow is available for the 2200 Level portal. The return period analysis of the 2200 Level portal flows may be an underestimate. The limited recent flow data support this hypothesis. 4.2.2.2 Effective Catchment Area Because the route the water takes through the mine workings is unknown, it is difficult to measure the catchment area for either the 2200 or 4100 Level portal flows from a topographical map. Instead, total annual flow volumes and total annual precipitation 35 values were compared. An effective catchment area (in square meters) was calculated by dividing the total annual outflow volume (in cubic meters) by the total annual precipitation (in meters). Figure 4.12 shows that the effective catchment area of the 4100 Level portal flow remains very much constant at approximately 2,000,000 square meters (200 ha) over the 12 year period. A similar plot was developed for the 2200 Level portal outflow and the Furry Creek station precipitation data, see Figure 4.13. The effective catchment area for the 2200 Level portal outflow appears to be high in the 1930s and then settles down to approximately 170,000 square meters (+/- 20,000 square meters) An explanation of the drop in effective catchment area may be that between 1938 and 1940, some of the 2200 Level portal outflow was intercepted by a new shaft which diverted the flow to the lower workings (McCandless, 1998). The effective catchment areas calculated will become useful when estimating inflows into the mine and for flow modeling. Both of these analyses will be presented in following sections. 4.2.3 Mine Volume and Storage Storage is an important factor in determining the treatment plant size. Storage allows peak flows to be attenuated thereby reducing the flow through the plant. Storage would also allow the plant to shut down for maintenance or in case of emergency without having to spill untreated water (Simons, 1998). The mine workings may possibly serve the purpose of a storage reservoir. Water can be allowed to build up behind the 4100 Level plug up to the 3250 Level, 260 meters above. The volume between these two 36 level is estimated by various methods. Direct measurement of the volume is not possible. 4.2.3.1 Volume Based on Drawings The storage volume of the Britannia Mine between the 4100 Level and the 3250 Level is estimated at 200,000 cubic meters. This value was calculated by measuring the length of tunnels and shafts and multiplying it by a cross-sectional area of 10.5 square meters (the area of the 4100 tunnel at the plug). Plan views were not available for four small levels which appeared on the cross-sectional view of the mine and were therefore not taken into account. Also, any stopes in the mine where ore was removed were not accounted for. This additional volume may be offset by any material that may have slumped in from higher levels. The value of 200,000 cubic meters is believed to be a lower bound for the available storage volume. Based on experience with mines of Britannia's type, Brennan Lang of Ground Control Consulting Engineers believes that the shafts and tunnels would only account for 15% of the total volume, the stopes accounting for the remainder (Simons, 1998). This would suggest that approximately 1.3 million cubic meters of storage are available. 4.2.3.2 Volume Based on Pressure Records To obtain an upper bound for the mine volume, the pressure records were examined. During the six years that pressure was recorded, the pressure rose once to 305 psi in July 1982. This value corresponds to a height of 215 meters above the 4100 Level. 37 Then the pressure steadily declined to a value of 12 psi (8.5 meters above the 4100 Level). During this period, 1.42 million cubic meters of water flowed out of the 4100 Level portal. This peak pressure event occurred in mid-July during snowmelt and therefore no snow accumulation was occurring. Any precipitation that occurred during this period would enter the mine workings almost immediately. Multiplying the precipitation that occurred during the drawdown by the effective catchment area for the 4100 Level portal flow (200 ha) results in 0.49 million cubic meters of water entering the mine workings. This value takes into account the groundwater component of flow. This inflow volume value does not take into account snowmelt and is therefore a lower bound for inflow. The difference between the outflow and inflow volumes (930,000 cubic meters) is therefore an estimate of the storage volume available between the 4070 Level (8.5 meters above the 4100 Level) and 3400 Level (215 meters above the 4100 Level). This volume accounts for 206.5 of the 260 vertical meters of height available for storage. Assuming a linear height versus storage relationship, the 930,000 cubic meters of storage calculated accounts for approximately 80% (100% x 206.5 m -260 m) of the entire volume between the 4100 and 3250 Levels. This suggests that an estimate for the entire volume is 1.16 million cubic meters. In reality, the storage volume may not be directly proportional to elevation. It appears that the ore body around the No. 2 shaft contributes increasingly larger volumes with increasing elevation, see Figure 1.3. If this is the case, the 930,000 cubic meters calculated may account for less than 80% of the total volume and therefore, the total volume estimate would be greater than 1.16 million cubic meters . In any case, the estimate is consistent with Brennan Lang's estimate of 1.3 million cubic meters. 38 The two bounds for volume are 0.20 and 1.3 million cubic meters. The range of possible volume values is great and the bounds must be refined if possible. To refine the upper bound, a better estimate of inflows needs to be calculated. To do this, snowmelt is taken into account. There are five years of pressure record for which precipitation and temperature was also recorded. The peak recorded pressure event (305 psi), a second peak of 280 psi, and three lower peaks are available for analysis. The highest of the three lower peaks is 130 psi. All peaks occurred in either June or July when snow was melting. Precipitation and outflow volumes were calculated from September of the previous year up to the start of the pressure peak. The precipitation volume was calculated using the effective catchment area method. The difference in precipitation and outflow volumes gave the volume of water stored as snowpack. Snowmelt was simulated by a simple model relating melt to temperature. Melt = constant x Temperature (4.3) The constant was varied from year to year in order to achieve complete melt of the snowpack volume by the end of the melting period. During the melting period, a tally of melt volume, precipitation volume and outflow volume was kept. The difference between inflows (snowmelt and precipitation) and outflow was recorded as the storage. Cumulative storage values were recorded and compared to the pressure rise, peak, and fall. The melting period was adjusted so that the cumulative storage curve followed the pressure curve. Figure 4.14 shows the three highest pressure peaks and the best fit storage values. The pressure and storage peaks lined up very well in the first year and fairly well in the second year. The third year pressure and storage peaks did not coincide as well. The best fit that could be achieved is that shown in Figure 4.14. In 39 these three years during which the pressure rose to 305 psi, the storage reached 790,000 cubic meters. Figure 4.15 shows the storage versus pressure plot for these three pressure peaks. Plotted on the figure is the estimated shaft and tunnel volume curve which should be the lower bound for storage and therefore all the storage data resulting from the pressure record analysis should plot higher. In fact, a majority of the storage data does exceed this lower bound, see Figure 4.15. A linear fit was applied to the pressure data that exceeded 150 psi. Extrapolating this line up to the 3250 Level (384 psi) gave an estimate of the total storage of 1.03 million cubic meters. Once again referring to Figure 1.3, it appears that the ore body around the No. 2 shaft starts contributing to the volume at approximately the 3800 Level (130 psi). It contributes increasingly larger volumes with increasing elevation, therefore a linear extrapolation may be a lower estimate for the storage using this analysis. It may be possible that 1.3 million cubic meters of storage is available in the mine, see Figure 4.15. The estimate is consistent with the previous estimates (1.16 and 1.3 million cubic meters). It is difficult to make any further refinements on the mine volume without additional data, ln order to obtain a better estimate of the mine volume, inflows into the mine need to be determined with greater certainty. For now, the limits of 200,000 and 1,300,000 cubic meters suffice, but before a treatment plant is built, further testing and data acquisition are necessary if the treatment plant flow is to be minimized. 40 4.2.4 Design Flow To determine a design flow for the treatment plant, the following need to be determined: • Which drainage is going to be treated • What return period is going to be used • What is a typical year of flows for the drainage • How much storage is available These issues have been addressed in the preceding sections. To summarize, only the 2200 and 4100 Level portal drainage will be treated; a 10 year return period is going to be used for design; a typical year will be selected based on annual average and maximum flows for the period of record; and the storage will be left as a variable with 1.3 million cubic meters as a maximum. The 1995-96 year for which daily 4100 Level portal flow data exist is not a good candidate for a design year's worth of flows. The flow peak in the fall is unusually high. It is nearly twice as high as the spring peak. The annual maximum flow rate to annual average flow rate ratio is high (3.33) compared to the average ratio of all 17 years of record (2.39). For these reasons, the 1995-96 year is unsuitable for use as a typical year for treatment plant design. Instead, the September 1984 to August 1985 year's worth of 4100 Level portal outflow data was used in developing the flow design year. This year's worth of flows had the same annual maximum flow to annual average flow ratio as the entire 17 years of record that the return periods are based on. Since the response of the 4100 Level portal flows to precipitation is dampened and the flow rate 41 changes gradually, weekly readings are not likely to result in missed peaks. Therefore the frequency of the record should not disqualify it from use in this analysis. The 1984-85 4100 Level portal outflows were scaled up so that the annual average flow matched the calculated 10 year value of 0.160 cubic meters per second. Scaling the annual average up resulted in an annual maximum flow of 0.410 CMS which is only slightly lower than the 10 year annual maximum flow (0.413 CMS). Figure 4.16 shows the 4100 Level portal contribution to design flow. No complete year of daily data exist for the 2200 Level portal flow. The 1953-54 year was selected because both scaling factors, to bring the annual maximum and average flow up to the 10 year return values, were the same for that year. The result was a 10 year average flow of 0.019 CMS and a 10 year maximum flow of 0.037 CMS. The 2200 Level portal contribution to design flow is plotted in Figure 4.16. Figure 4.16 also shows the combined flow for a 10 year return period design year. The 10 year return average combined flow is 0.179 CMS and the 10 year return maximum combined flow is 0.447 CMS. The maximum required storage, using the 10 year return flow design year and a treatment plant flow of 0.179 CMS (the annual average flow rate), will be 1.02 million cubic meters. This value matches the best estimate of storage volume (1.03 million cubic meters). The required storage for a particular treatment plant flow was calculated based on the 10 year return design year shown in Figure 4.16. Figure 4.17 shows the required storage versus treatment plant flow curve. The required storage for various flow rates was calculated by integrating over time the difference between the 10 year return flow (as shown in Figure 4.16 - combined flow) and the proposed constant flow 42 through the treatment plant. The highest storage reached is the required storage for that particular treatment plant flow rate. If the available volume was only 200,000 cubic meters (the lower bound for mine volume), the treatment plant flow would have to be approximately 0.36 CMS. The best estimate of storage volume (1.03 million cubic meters) yields a treatment plant flow of 0.18 CMS. The error associated with flow measurement will affect the design flow. The difference between the measured 4100 Level portal flow and the flow given by Equation 3.3 is as much as 12%. An error of this magnitude in the 10 year return average flow (0.160 CMS) would either increase the flow to a 100 year return (0.179 CMS) and decrease it to a 2.5 year return (0.141 CMS). The flow through the Parshall flumes should be determined to a greater accuracy before the treatment plant is sized. Because of the smaller contribution to total plant flow, the need to refine the 2200 Level portal flow measurement accuracy is a lower priority. 4.2.5 Summary The physical treatment plant size depends on several factors. The two that are most uncertain are the design flow year and the available storage. The design flow year may be one that requires less storage as the flow peaks may be of shorter duration. It is difficult to predict what the 10 year return year of flows will be like. To deal with this uncertainty, a higher return period could be selected. However, the 10 year return was selected with this in mind. The plant may be operated above capacity during higher flows with a possible decrease in performance (Simons, 1998). 43 Given a design flow year, the available storage will significantly affect the flow rate through the treatment plant and therefore its size. From the analysis in the preceding sections, the flow rate may need to be as high as 0.36 CMS, a value twice that of the average flow rate. Or the flow rate may be 0.179 CMS (the 10 year annual average flow) or lower if more storage is available. The best estimate for storage volume is 1.03 million cubic meters. With this available storage, the treatment plant design flow is 0.18 CMS. It is clear that storage will affect the capital cost of the wastewater treatment plant and therefore needs to be estimated with greater certainty. 4.3 Flow Modeling An attempt to model the outflow out of the 4100 Level portal was made to determine the possibility of modeling the Britannia Mine outflows. If successful, the model would allow forecasting of flows given meteorological data and storage reservoir management. Two models were used with limited success. Attempts using simple snow budget and linear reservoir models failed to accurately describe the 4100 and 2200 Level outflows. One such attempt uses Jane Creek flows as being representative of the inflows entering the mine with the effects of snow accumulation, snowmelt, and groundwater flow already incorporated. This flow was routed through various combinations of channels and reservoirs with little success. Figure 4.18 shows on attempt involving modeling the mine as twenty reservoirs in series. Using one reservoir did not sufficiently change the shape of the inflow curve so 44 additional reservoirs were added. The mine workings generate a very complex routing mechanism that could not be reproduced using channel and reservoir routing procedures. The UBC Watershed model was applied with some success. Figure 4.19 shows an output of the model comparing the observed and calculated flow from the 4100 Level portal. Figure 4.19 also shows the estimated groundwater flow component. The groundwater component of the 4100 Level portal outflow accounts for more than 50% of the annual total flow volume. The model offers optimization for precipitation distribution variables, water budget allocation variables, and routing constants. After optimization of all the variables, the UBC Watershed model was unable to model the mine outflow with much accuracy. The model calculates a modeling efficiency value (based on standard deviation). The best efficiency value was 0.66, 1.0 being perfect agreement between modeled and actual flow. A value of 0.8 suggests good agreement between with the actual and modeled flow (Quick, 1995). Neither model is sufficient for use in forecasting. Knowing what the inflows into the mine are with more certainty as well as having an accurate storage versus elevation relationship would allow for better mine outflow modeling. 45 5. CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS Monitoring of flows at two major outflow points of the mine and two affected creeks has been carried out on a regular basis since 1995. Meteorological data has been collected at six precipitation gauges nearest the Britannia Mine from as early as 1932. The analysis of the data revealed the following. The mine acts to attenuate the outflows from the 2200 and 4100 Level portals. Inflows due to snowmelt and precipitation enter the mine at various rates: as fast speed runoff into shafts, as medium speed fracture flow, and as slow speed infiltration. Regional groundwater table elevations also contribute to both inflow (during high groundwater table periods) and outflow (during low groundwater table periods). The flow that enters the mine workings undergoes a complex form of routing as a result of the network of shafts and tunnels, small dams, a concrete plug, and valves. A more complex model is needed to describe the routing characteristics of the mine workings. Despite the precipitation record from the 2200 Level station, the stations in the region of Britannia Beach recorded similar weather patterns. Using precipitation records from near-by stations for analysis is justified. It is recommended that the next 2200 Level station check include another set of precipitation gauge calibrations. The tests should be conducted in a way which will determine the effect of rainfall intensity. This can be done by pouring a constant volume of water into the precipitation gauge at various rates. The data recorded by the datalogger should be downloaded immediately following the calibration for analysis. 46 The possibility of storing water inside the mine and of attenuating the peak flows in order to decrease the treatment plant design flow rate was examined. The maximum required storage, using the 10 year return flow design year and a treatment plant flow of 0.179 CMS (the average flow rate), will be 1.02 million cubic meters. This value is approximately equal to the best estimate of storage volume (1.03 million cubic meters). Given that approximately one million cubic meters of storage are available in the mine, the treatment plant design flow rate would be 0.18 CMS. In order to determine accurate mine storage characteristics for a more cost-effective treatment plant design, a better estimate of volume needs to be made. In order to do this, the inflows into the mine need to be determined. The groundwater table fluctuations need to be recorded. Snowmelt has to be calculated by performing surveys of snow depth. Precipitation needs to be measured near the top of the mine at the pits. Infiltration in non-pit areas needs to be quantified and travel time through the mine workings has to be determined. Once inflow can be calculated with certainty, the storage may be calculated simply by allowing the mine to fill up to the 3250 Level and subtracting total outflow from total inflow. Before the inflows are determined by collecting the necessary data, an acceptable estimate of volume may be made by allowing the mine to fill rapidly. The test should be performed during a high but relatively steady inflow period such as that during the snowmelt recession. The valves should be adjusted so that the pressure is not rising or falling and therefore inflow is equal to outflow. Then the valves are shut, and the pressure rise is recorded over time. Once the mine fills up to the 3250 Level, the valves can be opened to drain the mine. This test may take several days depending on the inflow rate. The pressure is once again equalized to obtain another inflow value 47 which may be lower than the inflow at the beginning of the test due to the flow recession. The inflow rate can be interpolated from these two values. Inflow integrated over time will yield the storage of the mine. This test would also confirm the mine's ability to hold such a volume of water. To reduce the error associated with flow measurement, especially that of the 4100 Level portal flow, the stage - discharge relationship must be refined. To achieve this, more flow measurements at various flow rates must be made. With additional stage -flow data, the portion of the total error that can be attributed to flow measurement can be determined and a more precise estimate of flow rate can be made from stage values. 48 References Drake, J. and J. Robertson. 1973. Preliminary Report on the Disposal of Mine Effluents from the Britannia Mine Ltd. Britannia Beach, B.C. Based on a Research Project in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of the Mineral Engineering 480 Course. Dept. of Mineral Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. Filion, M.P., L. Sirois and K. Ferguson. 1992. Acid Mine Drainage Research in Canada. Proceedings of the First International Conference on Environmental Issues and Waste Management in Energy and Mineral Production. Battelle Press, Columbus, Ohio. 1992. pp 208-235 Goyette, D. and K. Ferguson. 1985. Environmental Assessment of the Britannia Mine -Howe Sound. Dept. of the Environment, EPS, Pacific Region H.A. Simons Ltd. 1998. Treatment of Acid Drainage at the Anaconda - Britannia Mine; Britannia Beach, BC. Report No. P.B257B, Prepared for Environment Canada and the BC Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks. North Vancouver, B.C. 24 pp + Appendices Moore, B. and G. van Aggelen. 1986. (Anaconda Britannia Mines) Copper Beach Estates Ltd. AE-2194 Environmental Impact Assessment 1985/86 Update Survey. Internal Report. Ministry of Environment Price, W.A., T. Schwab and N. Hutt. 1995. A Reconnaissance Study of Acid Mine Drainage at the Britannia Mine. Prepared for the BC Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria, B.C. March 1995. 89 pp + Appendices Quick, M.C. 1995. UBC Watershed Model Manual. Version 4.0. Mountain Hydrology Group, Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of British Columbia, B.C. February 1995. 55 pp + Appendices. McCandless, R.G. 1995. The Britannia Mine: Historic Landmark or Environmental Liability. The BC Professional Engineer. Vol. 46 #3. April 1995. pp 4-7 McCandless, R.G. 1997. The Britannia Mines Problem: Rocks, Architecture, and Footprint. Fourth International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage, Vancouver, B.C. 7 pp McCandless, R.G. 1998. Pers. comm. Steffen, Robertson and Kirsten Inc. 1991. Evaluation of ARD from Britannia Mine and the Options for Long Term Remediation of the Impact on Howe Sound. Prepared for the BC Acid Mine Drainage Task Force. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria, B.C. 144 pp + Appendices 49 Triton Environmental Consultants Ltd. 1997. Britannia Creek Watershed Hydrometric Surveys. Draft Report. Prepared for Environment Canada, North Vancouver, B.C. 13 pp + Appendices Zabil, D. 1998. Britannia Hydrological and Chemistry Data. Compilation of data. Prepared for Environment Canada, North Vancouver, B.C. September 1998 50 Figures 51 Figure 1.1. Location Map of the Britannia Mine 52 53 54 55 56 57 Figure 4.2. Regional Cumulative Precipitation Comparison 8000.0 T— — 01/01/94 07/02/94 12/31/94 07/01/95 12/30/95 06/29/96 12/28/96 Date Squamish A CS Cypress ——Furry Creek • Gambier 58 Figure 4.3. Regional Precipitation Relationships 6500 Squamish A CS Cumulative Precipitation (mm) A Cypress • Furry Creek • Gambier Linear (Furry Creek) ——Linear (Cypress) Linear (Gambier) 59 c o w *z (0 Q. E o O 0) (0 1_ V Q. E Q) c p '5) DC </) > o o ii o c\i p c» o co o o co o o c\i o d q co o CD o q c\j o d co CNJ o o C\i T~ (snjs|33) ajniBjadmai 60 Figure 4.5. Local vs. Regional Cumulative Precipitation Comparison 500 -| 10/25/97 11/01/97 11/08/97 11/15/97 11/22/97 11/29/97 Date Squamish STP Central — —Cypress Bowl —2200 Level 61 Figure 4.6. Annual Average and Maximum 2200 & 4100 Level Portal Flows vs. Return Period 1.000 0.001 -I 1 1 M I I I j 1 1 1 I I I I I |  | | I | II IJ 1 0 100 1000 Return Period (years) -•-Annual Maximum 4100 Flow -a-Annual Average 4100 Flow Annual Maximum 2200 Flow -©-Annual Average 2200 Flow 62 Figure 4.7. Total Annual Precipitation and 24hr Maximum Precipitation at the Furry Creek Station vs. Return Period 10000 10 10 100 Return Period (years) 1000 •24hr Maximum Precipitation Total Annual Precipitation 63 (siuo) aiey MOIJ o o co 0) n E > o z (1) E CO > c o CO a o 1_ a. 08 v> o oo to 3 U) ii o CD O LO C\l b £ o c CD T3 Q. E 0 O CL C 0 -4—' CL "5 O O e was o > o e was pen > o CO > To - x: o LO CM O O o > o co OJ > o > o CD <-> CO Q > o 19 co o O o c\j g o O CD C ca g o o o o o C\J C\J c o £ 'Q-Q o o C\J (M (LULU) UOjlBljdpaJd 64 (siuo) siey MO|J LO LO LO LO LO ^^cocr>c\jc\ii-;T-;p oooooooooo I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 o o o o o o o o o d d d d d d d d d 05 co CD LO CO CM (IUIU) uoiieiidpajd 65 (IUW) uojteijdjoajd o o o OOOOOOOOOOO-i-OLnoLnomomoLno LO^^cqcqc\jcviT-;T-oo (swo) ajey MOIJ 66 67 (UIUI) uojieudjoejcj ro 1-o 0. "55 > _l o o « E ro > g 22 < < - 4-" c c O <D E S <•> £ §> 81 < 5i sz * CO "D E g ro -3 CD cr E (/) J c c < oi i-3 CO LI o o o CO o o in CM o o o c\j o o LO o o o o o LO CD OT OT OT OT CNJ OT OT O OT OT CO co OT OT a> 00 OT CM co OT 4- § ^ OT OT OT O O O o" O O CO" o o o o" o o o o o 0" o o CD" o o o o" o o OT o o o o" o o o o o o" o o o o o o" o CD CM o o o o" o o ( ui) eajv S (Pui) auiniOA 68 (uiui) uojieijdjoaJd 0) > 0) -I o o CM CM 75 o l-75 ra cu 3 C < E < c CD E o u (0 .ti «J CL O O CD o > Q. cti C o ffe "•3 LU 05 TJ (/) £ (0 .¥ a> cu a> i_ E O 3 >» O i_ >_ > 1 Fu low (0 LU Tol tal o £ C < CO 3 g> (2ui) eajv $ (Eui) aiuri|OA 69 70 Figure 4.15. Storage vs. Pressure (1982,1983, and 1984 Pressure Peaks and Shaft & Tunnel Volume) 1,300,000 T 1,200,000 -1,100,000 -Pressure (psi) • 1982 Peak A 1983 Peak • 1984 Peak —X— Shaft & Tunnel Volume Fit to >150 psi data 71 72 Figure 4.17. Required Storage vs. Treatment Plant Flow Rate 1,100,000 1,000,000 900,000 800,000 700,000 E 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 Flow Rate (cms) 73 (soio) a;ey MOIJ 74 XJ c ro 75 3 *~> U re 3 o LL 75 ^ t c o tt Q. o II JO 0) tf) ev c _i d) o c o o a 5- E 1 o 75 o TJ Mo ate TJ <D idw JZ u> 3 o re ith O m TJ Z> 0) 0) O sz TJ *-> O o E 3 Q. • 3 o *t <D 1_ 3 O) ii h « O 3 K « (U 75 Appendix A Flow and Pressure Data 76 Table A-1. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1930-1956) (1/2) Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/14/30 0.021 01/30/30 0.020 02/14/30 0.018 02/28/30 0.025 03/15/30 0.023 03/31/30 0.024 04/15/30 0.037 04/30/30 0.044 05/15/30 0.045 05/31/30 0.045 06/15/30 0.048 06/30/30 0.032 07/15/30 0.024 07/31/30 0.026 08/15/30 0.017 08/31/30 0.014 09/14/30 0.013 09/29/30 0.012 10/14/30 0.012 10/30/30 0.015 11/14/30 0.020 11/29/30 0.018 12/14/30 0.019 12/30/30 0.018 01/14/31 0.017 01/30/31 0.028 02/14/31 0.030 02/28/31 0.021 03/15/31 0.028 03/31/31 0.030 04/15/31 0.033 04/30/31 0.036 05/15/31 0.039 05/31/31 0.037 06/15/31 0.034 06/30/31 0.023 07/15/31 0.034 07/31/31 0.016 08/15/31 0.011 08/31/31 0.011 09/15/31 0.011 09/30/31 0.018 10/15/31 0.018 10/31/31 0.018 11/15/31 0.030 11/30/31 0.021 12/15/31 0.016 12/31/31 0.017 01/15/32 0.017 01/31/32 0.016 02/15/32 0.015 02/29/32 0.018 03/15/32 0.028 03/31/32 0.026 04/15/32 0.028 04/30/32 0.027 05/15/32 0.036 05/31/32 0.034 06/15/32 0.037 06/30/32 0.034 07/15/32 0.025 07/31/32 0.023 08/15/32 0.020 08/31/32 0.018 09/14/32 0.015 09/29/32 0.015 10/14/32 0.012 10/30/32 0.017 11/14/32 0.019 11/29/32 0.032 12/14/32 0.025 12/30/32 0.011 Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/14/33 0.010 01/30/33 0.011 02/14/33 0.010 02/28/33 0.009 03/15/33 0.009 03/31/33 0.009 04/15/33 0.008 04/30/33 0.012 05/15/33 0.021 05/31/33 0.026 06/15/33 0.031 06/30/33 0.035 07/15/33 0.032 07/31/33 0.029 08/15/33 0.018 08/31/33 0.011 09/14/33 0.010 09/29/33 0.015 10/14/33 0.016 10/30/33 0.015 11/14/33 0.020 11/29/33 0.014 12/14/33 0.013 12/30/33 0.011 01/14/34 0.014 01/30/34 0.011 02/14/34 0.015 02/28/34 0.014 03/15/34 0.011 03/31/34 0.012 04/15/34 0.022 04/30/34 0.029 05/15/34 0.025 05/31/34 0.019 06/15/34 0.015 06/30/34 0.012 07/15/34 0.010 07/31/34 0.013 08/15/34 0.012 08/31/34 0.011 09/14/34 0.009 09/29/34 0.009 10/14/34 0.009 10/30/34 0.014 11/14/34 0.027 11/29/34 0.033 12/14/34 0.017 12/30/34 0.018 01/14/35 0.015 01/30/35 0.022 02/14/35 0.031 02/28/35 0.018 03/15/35 0.014 03/31/35 0.016 04/15/35 0.014 04/30/35 0.015 05/15/35 0.023 05/31/35 0.030 06/15/35 0.037 06/30/35 0.035 07/15/35 0.034 07/31/35 0.025 08/15/35 0.019 08/31/35 0.017 09/15/35 0.015 09/30/35 0.017 10/15/35 0.014 10/31/35 0.023 11/15/35 0.018 11/30/35 0.013 12/15/35 0.017 12/31/35 0.021 Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/15/36 0.020 01/31/36 0.013 02/15/36 0.011 02/29/36 0.010 03/15/36 0.012 03/31/36 0.011 04/15/36 0.011 04/30/36 0.036 05/15/36 0.042 05/31/36 0.042 06/15/36 0.037 06/30/36 0.030 07/15/36 0.023 07/31/36 0.023 08/15/36 0.018 08/31/36 0.015 09/14/36 0.012 09/29/36 0.015 10/14/36 0.014 10/30/36 0.015 11/14/36 0.011 11/29/36 0.011 12/14/36 0.010 12/30/36 0.014 01/14/37 0.013 01/30/37 0.010 02/14/37 0.009 02/28/37 0.009 03/15/37 0.010 03/31/37 0.010 04/15/37 0.009 04/30/37 0.009 05/15/37 0.021 05/31/37 0.026 06/15/37 0.034 06/30/37 0.027 07/15/37 0.014 07/31/37 0.026 08/15/37 0.011 08/31/37 0.009 09/14/37 0.008 09/29/37 0.008 10/14/37 0.010 10/30/37 0.018 11/14/37 0.018 11/29/37 0.019 12/14/37 0.017 12/30/37 0.018 01/14/38 0.014 01/30/38 0.012 02/14/38 0.012 02/28/38 0.010 03/15/38 0.009 03/31/38 0.010 04/15/38 0.015 04/30/38 0.033 05/15/38 0.029 05/31/38 0.039 06/15/38 0.037 06/30/38 0.035 07/15/38 0.010 07/31/38 0.007 08/15/38 0.006 08/31/38 0.005 09/14/38 0.004 09/29/38 0.005 10/14/38 0.012 10/30/38 0.009 11/14/38 0.016 11/29/38 0.012 12/14/38 0.020 12/30/38 0.008 77 Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/14/39 0.008 01/30/39 0.006 02/14/39 0.006 02/28/39 0.004 03/15/39 0.004 03/31/39 0.007.. 04/15/39 0.008 04/30/39 0.015 05/15/39 0.022 05/31/39 0.024 06/15/39 0.023 06/30/39 0.012 07/15/39 0.010 07/31/39 0.008 08/15/39 0.006 08/31/39 0.005 09/15/39 0.004 09/30/39 0.004 10/15/39 0.004 10/31/39 0.007 11/15/39 0.012 11/30/39 0.016 12/15/39 0.023 12/31/39 0.011 01/15/40 0.013 01/31/40 0.009 02/15/40 0.010 02/29/40 0.006 03/15/40 0.006 03/31/40 0.008 04/15/40 0.010 04/30/40 0.011 05/15/40 0.014 05/31/40 0.011 06/15/40 0.007 06/30/40 0.006 07/15/40 0.005 07/31/40 0.004 08/15/40 0.004 08/31/40 0.004 09/14/40 0.004 09/29/40 0.005 10/14/40 0.006 10/30/40 0.020 11/14/40 0.011 11/29/40 0.007 12/14/40 0.009 12/30/40 0.012 01/14/41 0.008 01/30/41 0.008 02/14/41 0.012 02/28/41 0.008 03/15/41 0.009 03/31/41 0.010 04/15/41 0.015 04/30/41 0.014 05/15/41 0.013 05/31/41 0.017 06/15/41 0.010 06/30/41 0.007 07/15/41 0.007 07/31/41 0.006 08/15/41 0.006 08/31/41 0.008 09/14/41 0.016 09/29/41 0.017 10/14/41 0.011 10/30/41 0.011 11/14/41 0.020 11/29/41 0.009 12/14/41 0.006 12/30/41 0.006 Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/14/42 0.006 01/30/42 0.006 02/14/42 0.006 02/28/42 0.006 03/15/42 0.006 03/31/42 0.004 04/15/42 0.010 04/30/42 0.012 05/15/42 0.014 05/31/42 0.025 06/15/42 0.016 06/30/42 0.015 07/15/42 0.010 07/31/42 0.010 08/15/42 0.007 08/31/42 0.006 09/14/42 0.004 09/29/42 0.003 10/14/42 0.005 10/30/42 0.006 11/14/42 0.006 11/29/42 0.008 12/14/42 0.006 12/30/42 0.008 01/14/43 0.006 01/30/43 0.005 02/14/43 0.004 02/28/43 0.004 03/15/43 0.004 03/31/43 0.004 04/15/43 0.009 04/30/43 0.016 05/15/43 0.011 05/31/43 0.017 06/15/43 0.018 06/30/43 0.016 07/15/43 0.010 07/31/43 0.008 08/15/43 0.006 08/31/43 0.005 09/15/43 0.004 09/30/43 0.003 10/15/43 0.003 10/31/43 0.010 11/15/43 0.007 11/30/43 0.006 12/15/43 0.008 12/31/43 0.005 01/15/44 0.004 01/31/44 0.008 02/15/44 0.005 02/29/44 0.004 03/15/44 0.005 03/31/44 0.004 04/15/44 0.007 04/30/44 0.007 05/15/44 0.014 05/31/44 0.015 06/15/44 0.016 06/30/44 0.009 07/15/44 0.006 07/31/44 0.005 08/15/44 0.004 08/31/44 0.004 09/14/44 0.003 09/29/44 0.004 10/14/44 0.008 10/30/44 0.010 11/14/44 0.020 11/29/44 0.014 12/14/44 0.013 12/30/44 0.009 Table A-2. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1930-1956) (2/2) Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/14/45 0.010 01/30/45 0.009 02/14/45 0.010 02/28/45 0.007 03/15/45 0.005 03/31/45 0.005 04/15/45 0.006 04/30/45 0.006 05/15/45 0.018 05/31/45 0.021 06/15/45 0.017 06/30/45 0.015 07/15/45 0.010 07/31/45 0.009 08/15/45 0.006 08/31/45 0.005 09/14/45 0.006 09/29/45 0.004 10/14/45 0.004 10/30/45 0.005 11/14/45 0.007 11/29/45 0.006 12/14/45 0.007 12/30/45 0.005 01/14/46 0.006 01/30/46 0.006 02/14/46 0.005 02/28/46 0.004 03/15/46 0.004 03/31/46 0.009 04/15/46 0.006 04/30/46 0.009 05/15/46 0.018 05/31/46 0.019 06/15/46 0.019 06/30/46 0.019 07/15/46 07/31/46 08/15/46 08/31/46 09/14/46 09/29/46 10/14/46 10/30/46 0.006 11/14/46 0.012 11/29/46 0.009 12/14/46 0.007 12/30/46 0.007 01/14/47 0.007 01/30/47 0.007 02/14/47 0.009 02/28/47 0.014 03/15/47 0.008 03/31/47 0.013 04/15/47 0.013 04/30/47 0.016 05/15/47 0.017 05/31/47 0.017 06/15/47 0.017 06/30/47 0.016 07/15/47 0.013 07/31/47 0.012 08/15/47 0.008 08/31/47 0.006 09/15/47 0.006 09/30/47 0.006 10/15/47 0.007 10/31/47 0.008 11/15/47 0.011 11/30/47 0.007 12/15/47 0.006 12/31/47 0.006 Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/15/48 0.007 01/31/48 0.006 02/15/48 0.005 02/29/48 0.004 03/15/48 0.004 03/31/48 0.003 04/15/48 0.003 04/30/48 0.020 05/15/48 0.016 05/31/48 0.031 06/15/48 0.027 06/30/48 0.023 07/15/48 0.013 07/31/48 0.012 08/15/48 0.009 08/31/48 0.015 09/14/48 0.011 09/29/48 0.009 10/14/48 0.011 10/30/48 0.012 11/14/48 0.009 11/29/48 0.007 12/14/48 0.006 12/30/48 0.006 01/14/49 0.006 01/30/49 0.006 02/14/49 0.005 02/28/49 0.005 03/15/49 0.006 03/31/49 0.005 04/15/49 0.006 04/30/49 0.013 05/15/49 0.021 05/31/49 0.027 06/15/49 0.024 06/30/49 0.018 07/15/49 0.013 07/31/49 0.010 08/15/49 0.008 08/31/49 0.009 09/14/49 0.007 09/29/49 0.007 10/14/49 0.007 10/30/49 0.007 11/14/49 0.007 11/29/49 0.018 12/14/49 0.015 12/30/49 0.008 01/14/50 0.006 01/30/50 0.011 02/14/50 0.014 02/28/50 0.008 03/15/50 0.007 03/31/50 0.006 04/15/50 0.006 04/30/50 0.012 05/15/50 0.009 05/31/50 0.016 06/15/50 0.026 06/30/50 0.028 07/15/50 0.024 07/31/50 0.014 08/15/50 0.009 08/31/50 0.008 09/14/50 0.007 09/29/50 0.006 10/14/50 0.014 10/30/50 0.011 11/14/50 0.013 11/29/50 0.011 12/14/50 0.013 12/30/50 0.016 Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/14/51 0.009 01/30/51 0.007 02/14/51 0.007 02/28/51 0.008 03/15/51 0.006 03/31/51 0.006 04/15/51 0.007 04/30/51 0.011 05/15/51 0.016 05/31/51 0.020 06/15/51 0.018 06/30/51 0.014 07/15/51 0.009 07/31/51 0.008 08/15/51 0.005 08/31/51 0.004 09/15/51 0.003 09/30/51 0.003 10/15/51 0.005 10/31/51 0.008 11/15/51 0.006 11/30/51 0.007 12/15/51 0.007 12/31/51 0.006 01/15/52 0.005 01/31/52 0.005 02/15/52 0.006 02/29/52 0.005 03/15/52 0.004 03/31/52 0.004 04/15/52 0.006 04/30/52 0.011 05/15/52 0.017 05/31/52 0.024 06/15/52 0.022 06/30/52 0.020 07/15/52 0.021 07/31/52 0.014 08/15/52 0.009 08/31/52 0.007 09/14/52 0.006 09/29/52 0.005 10/14/52 0.006 10/30/52 0.006 11/14/52 0.009 11/29/52 0.007 12/14/52 0.006 12/30/52 0.006 01/14/53 0.009 01/30/53 0.012 02/14/53 0.015 02/28/53 0.014 03/15/53 0.011 03/31/53 0.012 04/15/53 0.010 04/30/53 0.019 05/15/53 0.022 05/31/53 0.025 06/15/53 0.023 06/30/53 0.023 07/15/53 0.023 07/31/53 0.017 08/15/53 0.012 08/31/53 0.010 09/14/53 0.009 09/29/53 0.007 10/14/53 0.014 10/30/53 0.016 11/14/53 0.012 11/29/53 0.009 12/14/53 0.009 12/30/53 0.006 78 Date 2200 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/14/54 0.009 01/30/54 0.006 02/14/54 0.007 02/28/54 0.007 03/15/54 0.010 03/31/54 0.008 • 04/15/54 0.007 04/30/54 0.009 05/15/54 0.016 05/31/54 0.025 06/15/54 0.025 06/30/54 0.025 07/15/54 0.025 07/31/54 0.021 08/15/54 0.018 08/31/54 0.013 09/14/54 0.012 09/29/54 0.011 10/14/54 0.011 10/30/54 0.013 11/14/54 0.017 11/29/54 0.025 12/14/54 0.019 12/30/54 0.013 01/14/55 0.012 01/30/55 0.010 02/14/55 0.008 02/28/55 0.007 03/15/55 0.006 03/31/55 0.006 04/15/55 0.006 04/30/55 0.006 05/15/55 0.008 05/31/55 0.024 06/15/55 0.025 06/30/55 0.026 07/15/55 0.023 07/31/55 0.019 08/15/55 0.017 08/31/55 0.011 09/15/55 0.009 09/30/55 0.009 10/15/55 0.012 ; 10/31/55 0.016 11/15/55 0.024 11/30/55 0.016 12/15/55 0.011 12/31/55 0.008 01/15/56 0.006 01/31/56 0.006 02/15/56 0.006 02/29/56 0.006 03/15/56 0.006 03/31/56 0.005 04/15/56 0.005 04/30/56 0.009 05/15/56 0.017 05/31/56 0.028 06/15/56 0.027 06/30/56 0.022 07/15/56 0.025 07/31/56 0.021 08/15/56 0.018 08/31/56 0.011 09/14/56 0.007 09/29/56 0.007 10/14/56 0.009 10/30/56 0.013 11/14/56 0.015 11/29/56 0.011 12/14/56 0.009 12/30/56 0.008 Table A-3. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1995-1998) (1/2) Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 08/17/95 0.008 08/29/95 0.004 09/06/95 0.003 09/12/95 0.002 09/19/95 0.001 09/26/95 0.000 10/04/95 0.000 10/11/95 0.034 10/17/95 0.065 10/24/95 0.021 10/31/95 0.021 11/07/95 0.016 11/15/95 0.085 11/28/95 0.076 12/12/95 0.103 12/19/95 0.060 01/01/96 0.034 01/02/96 0.035 01/03/96 0.036 01/04/96 0.040 01/05/96 0.043 01/06/96 0.046 01/07/96 0.043 01/08/96 0.052 01/09/96 0.051 01/10/96 0.049 01/11/96 0.047 01/12/96 0.046 01/13/96 0.045 01/14/96 0.044 01/15/96 0.044 01/16/96 0.043 01/17/96 0.040 01/18/96 0.038 01/19/96 0.036 01/20/96 0.035 01/21/96 0.035 01/22/96 0.034 01/23/96 0.033 01/24/96 0.031 01/25/96 0.029 01/26/96 0.028 01/27/96 0.028 01/28/96 0.029 01/29/96 0.029 01/30/96 0.028 01/31/96 0.028 02/01/96 0.028 02/02/96 0.027 02/03/96 0.027 02/04/96 0.027 02/05/96 0.028 02/06/96 0.028 02/07/96 0.028 02/08/96 0.028 02/09/96 0.027 02/10/96 0.025 02/11/96 0.026 02/12/96 0.027 02/13/96 0.025 02/14/96 0.025 02/15/96 0.025 02/16/96 0.027 02/17/96 0.028 02/18/96 0.042 02/19/96 0.088 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 02/20/96 0.069 02/21/96 0.056 02/22/96 0.047 02/23/96 0.043 02/24/96 0.039 02/25/96 0.037 02/26/96 0.035 02/27/96 0.034 02/28/96 0.032 02/29/96 0.031 03/01/96 0.030 03/02/96 0.029 03/03/96 0.030 03/04/96 0.029 03/05/96 0.028 03/06/96 0.029 03/07/96 0.029 03/08/96 0.029 03/09/96 0.030 03/10/96 0.030 03/11/96 0.035 03/12/96 0.054 03/13/96 0.047 03/14/96 0.042 03/15/96 0.041 03/16/96 0.039 03/17/96 0.038 03/18/96 0.037 03/19/96 0.036 03/20/96 0.035 03/21/96 0.034 03/22/96 0.032 03/23/96 0.031 03/24/96 0.030 03/25/96 0.030 03/26/96 0.030 03/27/96 0.026 03/28/96 0.026 03/29/96 0.026 03/30/96 0.026 03/31/96 0.027 04/01/96 0.027 04/02/96 0.027 04/03/96 0.027 04/04/96 0.027 04/05/96 0.027 04/06/96 0.027 04/07/96 0.027 04/08/96 0.026 04/09/96 0.026 04/10/96 0.026 04/11/96 0.028 04/12/96 0.031 04/13/96 0.039 04/14/96 0.052 04/15/96 0.067 04/16/96 0.084 04/17/96 0.090 04/18/96 0.076 04/19/96 0.070 04/20/96 0.065 04/21/96 0.070 04/22/96 0.054 04/23/96 0.051 04/24/96 0.050 04/25/96 0.049 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 04/26/96 0.048 04/27/96 0.046 04/28/96 0.046 04/29/96 0.044 04/30/96 0.043 05/01/96 0.041 05/02/96 0.039 05/03/96 0.037 05/04/96 0.036 05/05/96 0.034 05/06/96 0.032 05/07/96 0.031 05/08/96 0.030 05/09/96 0.030 05/10/96 0.031 05/11/96 0.033 05/12/96 0.035 05/13/96 0.038 05/14/96 0.042 05/15/96 0.050 05/16/96 0.060 05/17/96 0.069 05/18/96 0.075 05/19/96 0.084 05/20/96 0.075 05/21/96 0.068 05/22/96 0.065 05/23/96 0.065 05/24/96 0.069 05/25/96 0.075 05/26/96 0.079 05/27/96 0.079 05/28/96 0.073 05/29/96 0.069 05/30/96 0.064 05/31/96 0.061 06/01/96 0.060 06/02/96 0.063 06/03/96 0.073 06/04/96 0.078 06/05/96 0.073 06/06/96 0.069 06/07/96 0.068 06/08/96 0.067 06/09/96 0.061 06/10/96 0.056 06/11/96 0.054 06/12/96 0.051 06/13/96 0.050 06/14/96 0.051 06/15/96 0.050 06/16/96 0.048 06/17/96 0.046 06/18/96 0.044 06/19/96 0.042 06/20/96 0.041 06/21/96 0.041 06/22/96 0.038 06/23/96 0.034 06/24/96 0.032 06/25/96 0.030 06/26/96 0.029 06/27/96 0.029 06/28/96 0.028 06/29/96 0.028 06/30/96 0.027 79 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 07/01/96 0.026 07/02/96 0.026 07/03/96 0.026 07/04/96 0.026 07/05/96 0.027 07/06/96 0.027 07/07/96 0.026 07/08/96 0.026 07/09/96 0.026 07/10/96 0.026 07/11/96 0.026 07/12/96 0.025 07/13/96 0.024 07/14/96 0.024 07/15/96 0.023 07/16/96 0.022 07/17/96 0.020 07/18/96 0.022 07/19/96 0.024 07/20/96 0.025 07/21/96 0.024 07/22/96 0.022 07/23/96 0.018 07/24/96 0.018 07/25/96 0.016 07/26/96 0.016 07/27/96 0.015 07/28/96 0.015 07/29/96 0.015 07/30/96 0.015 07/31/96 0.016 08/01/96 0.015 08/02/96 0.016 08/03/96 0.014 08/04/96 0.014 08/05/96 0.014 08/06/96 0.013 08/07/96 0.014 08/08/96 0.012 08/09/96 0.012 08/10/96 0.012 08/11/96 0.013 08/12/96 0.012 08/13/96 0.012 08/14/96 0.011 08/15/96 0.007 08/16/96 0.006 08/17/96 0.006 08/18/96 0.005 08/19/96 0.005 08/20/96 0.006 08/21/96 0.006 08/22/96 0.005 08/23/96 0.005 08/24/96 0.005 08/25/96 0.005 08/26/96 0.005 08/27/96 0.006 08/28/96 0.006 08/29/96 0.005 08/30/96 0.006 08/31/96 0.006 09/01/96 0.006 09/02/96 0.006 09/03/96 0.006 09/04/96 0.006 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 09/05/96 0.005 09/06/96 0.006 09/07/96 0.007 09/08/96 0.008 09/09/96 0.008 09/10/96 0.009 09/11/96 0.009 09/12/96 0.008 09/13/96 0.007 09/14/96 0.007 09/15/96 0.007 09/16/96 0.007 09/17/96 0.007 09/18/96 0.007 09/19/96 0.006 09/20/96 0.006 09/21/96 0.006 09/22/96 0.006 09/23/96 0.006 09/24/96 0.006 09/25/96 0.006 09/26/96 0.006 09/27/96 0.006 09/28/96 0.006 09/29/96 0.006 09/30/96 0.006 10/01/96 0.006 10/02/96 0.007 10/03/96 0.010 10/04/96 0.014 10/05/96 0.019 10/06/96 0.018 10/07/96 0.016 10/08/96 0.015 10/09/96 0.017 10/10/96 0.021 10/11/96 0.025 10/12/96 0.029 10/13/96 0.034 10/14/96 0.038 10/15/96 0.036 10/16/96 0.031 10/17/96 0.025 10/18/96 0.024 10/19/96 0.020 10/20/96 0.019 10/21/96 0.018 10/22/96 0.018 10/23/96 0.021 10/24/96 0.025 10/25/96 0.023 10/26/96 0.022 10/27/96 0.025 10/28/96 0.054 10/29/96 0.046 10/30/96 0.035 10/31/96 0.026 11/01/96 0.023 11/02/96 0.022 11/03/96 0.021 11/04/96 0.020 11/05/96 0.019 11/06/96 0.019 11/07/96 0.020 11/08/96 0.025 11/09/96 0.038 Table A-4. 2200 Level Portal Flow (1995-1998) (2/2) Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 11/10/96 0.036 11/11/96 0.035 11/12/96 0.038 11/13/96 0.040 11/14/96 0.038 11/15/96 0.035 11/16/96 0.033 11/17/96 0.031 11/18/96 0.030 11/19/96 0.028 11/20/96 0.026 11/21/96 0.025 11/22/96 0.024 11/23/96 0.023 11/24/96 0.022 11/25/96 0.022 11/26/96 0.021 11/27/96 0.024 11/28/96 0.033 11/29/96 0.032 11/30/96 0.030 12/01/96 0.029 12/02/96 0.028 12/03/96 0.026 12/04/96 0.025 12/05/96 0.024 12/06/96 0.023 12/07/96 0.022 12/08/96 0.021 12/09/96 0.021 12/10/96 0.022 12/11/96 0.021 12/12/96 0.021 12/13/96 0.020 12/14/96 0.020 12/15/96 0.019 12/16/96 0.019 12/17/96 0.018 12/18/96 0.018 12/19/96 0.017 12/20/96 0.017 12/21/96 0.017 12/22/96 0.016 12/23/96 0.016 12/24/96 0.015 12/25/96 0.015 12/26/96 0.015 12/27/96 0.015 12/28/96 0.015 12/29/96 0.014 12/30/96 0.014 12/31/96 0.020 01/15/97 0.012 01/16/97 0.012 01/17/97 0.015 01/18/97 0.016 01/19/97 0.029 01/20/97 0.048 01/21/97 0.037 01/22/97 0.030 01/23/97 0.025 01/24/97 0.022 01/25/97 0.020 01/26/97 0.019 01/27/97 0.019 01/28/97 0.019 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 01/29/97 0.019 01/30/97 0.033 01/31/97 0.032 02/01/97 0.027 02/02/97 0.024 02/03/97 0.022 02/04/97 0.020 02/05/97 0.020 02/06/97 0.019 02/07/97 0.018 02/08/97 0.017 02/09/97 0.017 02/10/97 0.016 02/11/97 0.015 02/12/97 0.015 02/13/97 0.014 02/14/97 0.015 02/15/97 0.016 02/16/97 0.018 02/17/97 0.018 02/18/97 0.016 02/19/97 0.016 02/20/97 0.015 02/21/97 0.014 02/22/97 0.014 02/23/97 0.014 02/24/97 0.014 02/25/97 0.013 02/26/97 0.013 02/27/97 0.012 02/28/97 0.012 03/01/97 0.013 03/02/97 0.013 03/03/97 0.013 03/04/97 0.012 03/05/97 0.013 03/06/97 0.013 03/07/97 0.014 03/08/97 0.014 03/09/97 0.014 03/10/97 0.015 03/11/97 0.015 03/12/97 0.015 03/13/97 0.016 03/14/97 0.016 03/15/97 0.016 03/16/97 0.017 03/17/97 0.017 03/18/97 0.022 03/19/97 0.059 03/20/97 0.070 03/21/97 0.047 03/22/97 0.036 03/23/97 0.030 03/24/97 0.027 03/25/97 0.026 03/26/97 0.025 03/27/97 0.024 03/28/97 0.023 03/29/97 0.022 03/30/97 0.022 03/31/97 0.020 04/01/97 0.020 04/02/97 0.020 04/03/97 0.018 04/04/97 0.017 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 04/05/97 0.017 04/06/97 0.017 04/07/97 0.017 04/08/97 0.018 04/09/97 0.018 04/10/97 0.018 04/11/97 0.019 04/12/97 0.022 04/13/97 0.025 04/14/97 0.021 04/15/97 0.024 04/16/97 0.092 04/17/97 0.087 04/18/97 0.058 04/19/97 0.047 04/20/97 0.057 04/21/97 0.058 04/22/97 0.054 04/23/97 0.054 04/24/97 0.056 04/25/97 0.057 04/26/97 0.070 04/27/97 0.103 04/28/97 0.081 • 04/29/97 0.069 04/30/97 0.064 05/01/97 0.057 05/02/97 0.054 05/03/97 0.055 05/04/97 0.058 05/05/97 0.072 05/06/97 0.090 05/07/97 0.077 05/08/97 0.075 05/09/97 0.078 05/10/97 0.089 05/11/97 0.099 05/12/97 0.125 05/13/97 0.145 05/14/97 0.167 05/15/97 0.180 05/16/97 0.175 05/17/97 0.160 05/18/97 0.137 05/19/97 0.123 05/20/97 0.112 05/21/97 0.103 05/22/97 0.096 07/09/97 0.069 09/10/97 0.004 10/23/97 0.027 10/24/97 0.027 10/28/97 0.023 10/29/97 0.030 10/30/97 0.062 10/31/97 0.063 11/01/97 0.052 11/02/97 0.046 11/03/97 0.052 11/04/97 0.067 11/05/97 0.056 11/06/97 0.064 11/07/97 0.071 11/08/97 0.059 11/09/97 0.050 11/10/97 0.044 80 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 11/11/97 0.039 11/12/97 0.035 11/13/97 0.033 11/14/97 0.030 11/15/97 0.028 11/16/97 0.026 11/17/97 0.025 11/18/97 0.023 11/19/97 0.023 11/20/97 0.021 11/21/97 0.020 11/22/97 0.020 11/23/97 0.023 11/24/97 0.038 11/25/97 0.032 11/26/97 0.028 11/27/97 0.026 11/28/97 0.035 11/29/97 0.045 11/30/97 0.050 12/01/97 0.041 12/02/97 0.037 12/03/97 0.033 12/04/97 0.030 12/05/97 0.028 12/06/97 0.026 12/07/97 0.024 12/08/97 0.023 12/09/97 0.021 12/10/97 0.021 12/11/97 0.020 12/12/97 0.019 12/13/97 0.018 12/14/97 0.018 12/15/97 0.017 12/16/97 0.017 12/17/97 0.017 12/18/97 0.016 12/19/97 0.015 12/20/97 0.016 12/21/97 0.015 12/22/97 0.015 12/23/97 0.015 12/24/97 0.014 12/25/97 0.014 12/26/97 0.014 12/27/97 0.014 12/28/97 0.014 12/29/97 0.016 12/30/97 0.016 12/31/97 0.016 01/01/98 0.018 01/02/98 0.021 01/03/98 0.021 01/04/98 0.020 01/05/98 0.019 01/06/98 0.018 01/07/98 0.017 01/08/98 0.015 01/09/98 0.016 01/10/98 0.015 01/11/98 0.014 01/12/98 0.014 01/13/98 0.015 01/14/98 0.016 01/15/98 0.017 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 01/16/98 0.016 01/17/98 0.016 01/18/98 0.017 01/19/98 0.018 01/20/98 0.017 01/21/98 0.015 01/22/98 0.015 01/23/98 0.017 02/11/98 0.022 04/22/98 0.015 05/12/98 0.077 Table A-5. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1977-1993) (1/3) Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 10/01/77 0.064 10/08/77 0.064 10/15/77 0.064 10/22/77 0.095 11/01/77 0.182 11/08/77 0.152 11/15/77 0.152 11/22/77 0.121 12/01/77 0.114 12/07/77 0.114 12/13/77 0.144 12/19/77 0.129 12/25/77 0.114 01/01/78 0.091 01/08/78 0.091 01/15/78 0.091 01/22/78 0.091 02/01/78 0.083 02/08/78 0.098 02/15/78 0.083 02/22/78 0.083 03/01/78 0.083 03/07/78 0.083 03/13/78 0.083 03/19/78 0.083 03/25/78 0.121 04/01/78 0.144 04/08/78 0.129 04/15/78 0.136 04/22/78 0.121 05/01/78 0.178 05/08/78 0.167 05/15/78 0.193 05/22/78 0.220 06/01/78 0.227 06/07/78 0.234 06/13/78 0.197 06/19/78 0.265 06/25/78 0.265 07/01/78 0.250 07/08/78 0.114 07/15/78 0.117 07/22/78 0.106 08/01/78 0.106 08/08/78 0.102 08/15/78 0.098 08/22/78 0.098 09/01/78 0.098 09/08/78 0.258 09/15/78 0.235 09/22/78 0.212 10/01/78 0.174 10/08/78 0.144 10/15/78 0.106 10/22/78 0.098 11/01/78 0.098 11/08/78 0.121 11/15/78 0.129 11/22/78 0.106 12/01/78 0.102 12/07/78 0.087 12/13/78 0.069 12/19/78 0.065 12/25/78 0.065 01/01/79 0.053 01/08/79 0.053 Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/15/79 0.049 01/22/79 0.045 02/01/79 0.049 02/08/79 0.045 02/15/79 0.042 02/22/79 0.046 03/01/79 0.049 03/07/79 0.053 03/13/79 0.057 03/19/79 0.057 03/25/79 0.064 04/01/79 0.061 04/08/79 0.061 .04/15/79 0.061 04/22/79 0.064 05/01/79 0.083 05/08/79 0.144 05/15/79 0.152 05/22/79 0.189 06/01/79 0.227 06/07/79 0.235 06/13/79 0.197 06/19/79 0.197 06/25/79 0.197 07/01/79 0.197 07/08/79 0.193 07/15/79 0.174 07/22/79 0.159 08/01/79 0.144 08/07/79 0.129 08/13/79 0.106 08/19/79 0.083 08/25/79 0.076 09/01/79 0.076 09/08/79 0.098 09/15/79 0.106 09/22/79 0.106 10/01/79 0.106 10/08/79 0.091 10/15/79 0.091 10/22/79 0.083 11/01/79 11/08/79 11/15/79 11/22/79 12/01/79 12/08/79 12/15/79 12/22/79 01/01/80 01/08/80 01/15/80 0.114 01/22/80 0.068 02/01/80 0.076 02/07/80 0.076 02/13/80 0.076 02/19/80 0.076 02/25/80 0.106 03/01/80 0.144 03/08/80 0.144 03/15/80 0.114 03/22/80 0.068 04/01/80 0.083 04/08/80 0.045 04/15/80 0.064 04/22/80 0.083 Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 05/02/80 0.167 05/09/80 0.197 05/16/80 0.204 05/23/80 0.212 05/30/80 0.212 06/06/80 0.129 06/13/80 0.152 06/20/80 0.167 06/27/80 0.189 07/04/80 0.189 07/11/80 0.189 07/18/80 0.189 07/25/80 0.174 08/01/80 0.159 08/08/80 0.152 08/15/80 0.125 08/22/80 0.114 08/29/80 0.098 09/05/80 0.095 09/12/80 0.091 09/19/80 0.076 09/26/80 0.068 10/03/80 0.076 10/10/80 0.076 10/17/80 0.076 10/24/80 0.068 10/31/80 0.068 11/07/80 0.083 11/14/80 0.129 11/21/80 0.144 11/28/80 0.152 12/05/80 0.159 12/12/80 0.159 12/19/80 0.152 12/26/80 0.167 01/02/81 0.216 01/09/81 0.231 01/16/81 0.227 01/23/81 0.220 01/30/81 0.212 02/06/81 0.205 02/13/81 0.182 02/20/81 0.174 02/27/81 0.167 03/06/81 0.163 03/13/81 0.152 03/20/81 0.129 03/27/81 0.129 04/03/81 0.181 04/10/81 0.121 04/17/81 0.098 04/24/81 0.083 05/01/81 0.114 05/08/81 0.129 05/15/81 0.182 05/22/81 0.197 05/29/81 0.235 06/05/81 0.280 06/12/81 0.265 06/19/81 0.250 06/26/81 0.235 07/03/81 0.220 07/10/81 0.208 07/17/81 0.182 07/24/81 0.159 07/31/81 0.114 81 Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 08/07/81 0.106 08/14/81 0.083 08/21/81 0.083 08/28/81 0.076 09/04/81 0.068 09/11/81 0.064 09/18/81 0.042 09/25/81 0.045 10/02/81 0.061 10/09/81 0.144 10/16/81 0.212 10/23/81 0.152 10/30/81 0.174 11/06/81 0.295 11/13/81 0.288 11/20/81 0.280 11/27/81 0.265 12/04/81 0.227 12/11/81 0.197 12/18/81 0.167 12/25/81 0.152 01/01/82 0.152 01/08/82 0.136 01/15/82 0.114 01/22/82 0.091 01/29/82 0.091 02/05/82 0.076 02/12/82 0.076 02/19/82 0.076 02/26/82 0.076 03/05/82 0.076 03/12/82 0.076 03/19/82 0.068 03/26/82 0.064 04/02/82 0.072 04/09/82 0.068 04/16/82 0.053 04/23/82 0.049 04/30/82 0.061 05/07/82 0.068 05/14/82 0.068 05/21/82 0.114 05/28/82 0.189 06/04/82 0.258 06/11/82 0.295 06/18/82 0.341 06/25/82 0.235 07/02/82 0.197 07/09/82 0.208 07/16/82 0.265 07/23/82 0.261 07/30/82 0.246 08/06/82 0.227 08/13/82 0.220 08/20/82 0.205 08/27/82 0.189 09/03/82 0.148 09/10/82 0.131 09/17/82 0.106 09/24/82 0.098 10/01/82 0.091 10/08/82 0.083 10/15/82 0.076 10/22/82 0.091 10/29/82 0.182 11/05/82 0.220 Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 11/12/82 0.220 11/19/82 0.159 11/26/82 0.159 12/03/82 0.152 12/10/82 0.136 12/17/82 0.123 12/24/82 0.116 •12/31/82 0.114 01/07/83 0.098 01/14/83 0.091 01/21/83 0.113 01/28/83 0.123 02/04/83 0.133 02/11/83 0.227 02/18/83 0.167 02/25/83 0.186 03/04/83 0.197 03/11/83 0.199 03/18/83 0.212 03/25/83 0.197 04/01/83 0.197 04/08/83 0.144 04/15/83 0.125 04/22/83 0.121 04/29/83 0.136 05/06/83 0.159 05/13/83 0.205 05/20/83 0.197 05/27/83 0.273 06/03/83 0.250 06/10/83 0.265 06/17/83 0.197 06/24/83 0.288 07/01/83 0.288 07/08/83 0.303 07/15/83 0.307 07/22/83 0.295 07/29/83 0.303 08/05/83 0.280 08/12/83 0.265 08/19/83 0.197 08/26/83 0.227 09/02/83 0.182 09/09/83 0.182 09/16/83 0.167 09/23/83 0.129 09/30/83 0.152 10/07/83 0.125 10/14/83 0.091 10/21/83 0.083 10/28/83 0.068 11/04/83 0.091 11/11/83 0.121 11/18/83 0.250 11/25/83 0.303 12/02/83 0.258 12/09/83 0.197 12/16/83 0.136 12/23/83 0.136 12/30/83 0.106 01/06/84 0.106 01/13/84 0.131 01/20/84 0.131 01/27/84 0.136 02/03/84 0.129 02/10/84 0.106 Table A-6. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1977-1993) (2/3) Date mm/dd/yy 4100 Flow (cms) Date mm/dd/yy 4100 Flow (cms) Date mm/dd/yy 4100 Flow (cms) Date mm/dd/yy 4100 Flow (cms) Date mm/dd/yy 4100 Flow (cms) 02/17/84 0.144 05/24/85 0.205 08/29/86 0.106 12/04/87 0.106 03/10/89 0.076 02/24/84 0.121 05/31/85 0.212 09/05/86 0.076 12/11/87 0.098 03/17/89 0.068 03/02/84 0.121 06/07/85 0.311 09/12/86 0.083 12/18/87 0.068 03/24/89 0.091 03/09/84 0.106 06/14/85 0.303 09/19/86 0.091 12/25/87 0.061 03/31/89 0.076 03/16/84 0.121 06/21/85 0.303 09/26/86 0.083 01/01/88 0.068 04/07/89 0.205 03/23/84 0.136 06/28/85 0.303 10/03/86 0.076 01/08/88 0.068 04/14/89 03/30/84 0.129 07/05/85 0.182 10/10/86 0.076 01/15/88 0.061 04/21/89 0.152 04/06/84 0.121 07/12/85 0.212 10/17/86 0.061 01/22/88 0.061 04/28/89 0.152 04/13/84 0.121 07/19/85 0.212 10/24/86 0.061 01/29/88 0.061 05/05/89 0.250 04/20/84 0.121 07/26/85 0.136 10/31/86 0.061 02/05/88 0.061 05/12/89 0.220 04/27/84 0.121 08/02/85 0.117 11/07/86 0.061 02/12/88 0.061 05/19/89 0.235 05/04/84 0.114 08/09/85 0.106 11/14/86 0.061 02/19/88 0.068 05/26/89 0.265 05/11/84 0.114 08/16/85 0.091 11/21/86 0.068 02/26/88 0.068 06/02/89 0.301 05/18/84 0.114 08/23/85 0.091 11/28/86 0.076 03/04/88 0.068 06/09/89 0.265 05/25/84 0.136 08/30/85 0.076 12/05/86 0.083 03/11/88 0.068 06/16/89 0.254 06/01/84 0.182 09/06/85 0.068 12/12/86 0.076 03/18/88 0.068 06/23/89 0.235 06/08/84 0.242 09/13/85 0.045 12/19/86 0.076 03/25/88 0.068 06/30/89 0.208 06/15/84 0.227 09/20/85 0.061 12/26/86 0.098 04/01/88 0.068 07/07/89 0.159 06/22/84 0.273 09/27/85 0.061 01/02/87 0.091 04/08/88 0.098 07/14/89 0.114 06/29/84 0.303 10/04/85 0.045 01/09/87 0.159 04/15/88 0.144 07/21/89 0.098 07/06/84 0.364 10/11/85 0.045 01/16/87 0.144 04/22/88 0.144 07/28/89 0.083 07/13/84 0.349 10/18/85 0.053 01/23/87 0.136 04/29/88 0.163 08/04/89 0.091 07/20/84 0.326 10/25/85 0.106 01/30/87 0.121 05/06/88 0.303 08/11/89 0.091 07/27/84 0.280 11/01/85 0.144 02/06/87 0.136 05/13/88 0.326 08/18/89 0.091 08/03/84 0.235 11/08/85 0.144 02/13/87 0.140 05/20/88 0.371 08/25/89 0.068 08/10/84 0.188 11/15/85 0.136 02/20/87 0.133 05/27/88 0.303 09/01/89 0.068 08/17/84 0.174 11/22/85 02/27/87 0.129 06/03/88 0.311 09/08/89 0.038 08/24/84 0.106 11/29/85 0.114 03/06/87 0.235 06/10/88 0.250 09/15/89 0.061 08/31/84 0.106 12/06/85 0.098 03/13/87 0.212 06/17/88 0.303 09/22/89 0.061 09/07/84 0.091 12/13/85 0.083 03/20/87 06/24/88 0.265 09/29/89 0.053 09/14/84 0.091 12/20/85 03/27/87 0.144 07/01/88 0.227 10/06/89 0.053 09/21/84 0.076 12/27/85 0.068 04/03/87 0.144 07/08/88 0.220 10/13/89 0.076 09/28/84 0.080 01/03/86 0.068 04/10/87 0.152 07/15/88 0.189 10/20/89 0.106 10/05/84 0.076 01/10/86 0.068 04/17/87 0.144 07/22/88 0.167 10/27/89 0.121 10/12/84 0.152 01/17/86 0.068 04/24/87 0.114 07/29/88 0.114 11/03/89 0.121 10/19/84 0.227 01/24/86 0.076 05/01/87 0.227 08/05/88 0.114 11/10/89 0.182 10/26/84 0.212 01/31/86 0.114 05/08/87 0.458 08/12/88 0.106 11/17/89 0.144 11/02/84 0.189 02/07/86 0.114 05/15/87 0.364 08/19/88 0.083 11/24/89 0.152 11/09/84 0.152 02/14/86 0.114 05/22/87 0.311 08/26/88 0.091 12/01/89 0.189 11/16/84 0.152 02/21/86 0.076 05/29/87 0.314 09/02/88 0.076 12/08/89 0.159 11/23/84 0.167 02/28/86 0.114 06/05/87 0.273 09/09/88 0.076 12/15/89 0.114 11/30/84 0.114 03/07/86 0.152 06/12/87 0.159 09/16/88 0.038 12/22/89 0.106 12/07/84 0.129 03/14/86 0.189 06/19/87 0.292 09/23/88 0.063 12/29/89 0.114 12/14/84 0.114 03/21/86 0.182 06/26/87 0.261 09/30/88 0.068 01/05/90 0.098 12/21/84 0.091 03/28/86 0.167 07/03/87 0.237 10/07/88 0.068 01/12/90 0.091 12/28/84 0.076 04/04/86 0.189 07/10/87 0.197 10/14/88 0.076 01/19/90 0.091 01/04/85 0.076 04/11/86 0.182 07/17/87 0.152 10/21/88 0.106 01/26/90 0.091 01/11/85 0.061 04/18/86 0.152 07/24/87 0.106 10/28/88 0.182 02/02/90 0.114 01/18/85 0.061 04/25/86 0.152 07/31/87 0.114 11/04/88 0.174 02/09/90 0.083 01/25/85 0.061 05/02/86 0.152 08/07/87 0.102 11/11/88 0.152 02/16/90 0.083 02/01/85 0.061 05/09/86 0.152 08/14/87 0.106 11/18/88 0.121 02/23/90 0.076 02/08/85 0.068 05/16/86 0.129 08/21/87 0.091 11/25/88 0.114 03/02/90 0.091 02/15/85 0.061 05/23/86 0.091 08/28/87 0.083 12/02/88 0.114 03/09/90 0.076 02/22/85 0.057 05/30/86 0.250 09/04/87 0.076 12/09/88 0.114 03/16/90 0.076 03/01/85 0.061 06/06/86 0.333 09/11/87 0.076 12/16/88 0.114 03/23/90 0.091 03/08/85 0.053 06/13/86 0.371 09/18/87 0.072 12/23/88 0.106 03/30/90 0.083 03/15/85 0.053 06/20/86 0.223 09/25/87 0.068 12/30/88 0.106 04/06/90 0.114 03/22/85 0.061 06/27/86 0.311 10/02/87 0.068 01/06/89 0.106 04/13/90 0.167 03/29/85 0.053 07/04/86 0.277 10/09/87 0.038 01/13/89 0.083 04/20/90 0.174 04/05/85 0.053 07/11/86 0.254 10/16/87 0.038 01/20/89 0.076 04/27/90 0.174 04/12/85 0.053 07/18/86 0.212 10/23/87 0.038 01/27/89 0.068 05/04/90 0.227 04/19/85 0.083 07/25/86 0.159 10/30/87 0.076 02/03/89 0.068 05/11/90 0.212 04/26/85 0.091 08/01/86 0.144 11/06/87 0.045 02/10/89 0.068 05/18/90 0.250 05/03/85 0.098 08/08/86 0.144 11/13/87 0.045 02/17/89 0.068 05/25/90 0.227 05/10/85 0.121 08/15/86 0.136 11/20/87 0.053 02/24/89 0.076 06/01/90 0.242 05/17/85 0.091 08/22/86 0.136 11/27/87 0.061 03/03/89 0.076 06/08/90 0.273 82 Table A-7. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1977-1993) (3/3) Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 06/15/90 0.250 06/22/90 0.114 06/29/90 0.197 07/06/90 0.144 07/13/90 0.117 07/20/90 0.106 07/27/90 0.091 08/03/90 0.091 08/10/90 0.091 08/17/90 0.038 08/24/90 0.068 08/31/90 0.061 09/07/90 0.061 09/14/90 0.061 09/21/90 0.053 09/28/90 0.068 10/05/90 0.061 10/12/90 0.068 10/19/90 0.068 10/26/90 0.129 11/02/90 0.227 11/09/90 0.265 11/16/90 0.250 11/23/90 0.227 11/30/90 0.167 12/07/90 0.189 12/14/90 0.114 12/21/90 0.091 12/28/90 0.076 01/04/91 0.076 01/11/91 0.076 01/18/91 0.121 01/25/91 0.166 02/01/91 0.182 02/08/91 0.205 02/15/91 0.220 02/22/91 0.140 03/01/91 0.114 03/08/91 0.098 03/15/91 0.089 03/22/91 0.076 03/29/91 0.083 04/05/91 0.083 04/12/91 0.098 04/19/91 0.121 04/26/91 0.129 05/03/91 0.159 05/10/91 0.197 05/17/91 0.212 05/24/91 0.258 05/31/91 0.235 06/07/91 0.250 06/14/91 0.258 06/21/91 0.227 06/28/91 0.205 07/05/91 0.197 07/12/91 0.159 07/19/91 0.136 07/26/91 0.136 08/02/91 0.121 08/09/91 0.114 08/16/91 08/23/91 08/30/91 09/06/91 0.144 09/13/91 0.114 Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 09/20/91 09/27/91 0.083 10/04/91 0.083 10/11/91 0.083 10/18/91 0.057 10/25/91 0.076 11/01/91 0.068 11/08/91 0.076 11/15/91 0.076 11/22/91 0.076 11/29/91 0.068 12/06/91 0.076 12/13/91 0.076 12/20/91 0.076 12/27/91 0.083 01/03/92 0.083 01/10/92 0.106 01/17/92 0.136 01/24/92 0.174 01/31/92 0.159 02/07/92 0.174 02/14/92 0.136 02/21/92 0.159 02/28/92 0.144 03/06/92 0.152 03/13/92 0.144 03/20/92 0.152 03/27/92 0.140 04/03/92 0.174 04/10/92 0.167 04/17/92 0.311 04/24/92 0.280 05/01/92 0.341 05/08/92 0.189 05/15/92 0.182 05/22/92 0.197 05/29/92 0.167 06/05/92 0.152 06/12/92 0.144 06/19/92 0.121 06/26/92 0.114 07/03/92 0.114 07/10/92 0.106 07/17/92 0.098 07/24/92 0.083 07/31/92 0.068 08/07/92 0.068 08/14/92 0.061 08/21/92 0.061 08/28/92 0.057 09/04/92 0.053 09/11/92 0.053 09/18/92 0.053 09/25/92 0.053 10/02/92 0.045 10/09/92 0.053 10/16/92 0.121 10/23/92 0.129 10/30/92 0.152 11/06/92 0.136 11/13/92 0.148 11/20/92 0.114 11/27/92 0.091 12/04/92 0.106 12/11/92 0.114 12/18/92 0.098 Date 4100 Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 12/25/92 0.068 01/01/93 0.063 01/08/93 0.061 01/15/93 0.057 01/22/93 0.076 01/29/93 0.064 02/05/93 0.064 02/12/93 0.064 02/19/93 0.064 02/26/93 0.064 03/05/93 0.064 03/12/93 0.076 03/19/93 0.076 03/26/93 0.061 04/02/93 0.076 04/09/93 0.087 04/16/93 0.080 04/23/93 0.068 04/30/93 0.080 05/07/93 0.303 05/14/93 0.371 05/21/93 0.349 05/28/93 0.303 06/04/93 0.288 06/11/93 0.227 06/18/93 0.133 06/25/93 0.152 07/02/93 0.121 07/09/93 0.129 07/16/93 0.114 07/23/93 0.106 07/30/93 0.091 08/06/93 0.087 08/13/93 0.083 08/20/93 0.076 08/27/93 0.083 09/03/93 0.076 09/10/93 0.061 09/17/93 0.057 09/24/93 0.053 10/01/93 0.053 10/08/93 0.053 10/15/93 0.053 10/22/93 0.061 10/29/93 0.068 11/05/93 0.061 11/12/93 0.053 11/19/93 0.061 11/26/93 0.076 12/03/93 0.076 12/10/93 0.061 12/17/93 0.061 83 Table A-8. 4100 Level Portal Flow (1995-1998) (1/2) Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 08/09/95 0.081 08/17/95 0.081 08/29/95 0.073 09/06/95 0.073 09/12/95 0.081 09/19/95 0.058 09/20/95 0.061 09/21/95 0.053 09/22/95 0.052 09/23/95 0.050 09/26/95 0.050 09/27/95 0.052 09/29/95 0.052 10/03/95 0.059 10/04/95 0.052 10/05/95 0.050 10/06/95 0.050 10/07/95 0.055 10/09/95 0.052 10/11/95 0.052 10/12/95 0.052 10/14/95 0.059 10/17/95 0.061 10/18/95 0.084 10/20/95 0.086 10/21/95 0.089 10/23/95 0.094 10/24/95 0.105 10/25/95 0.105 10/26/95 0.110 10/27/95 0.112 10/31/95 0.110 11/01/95 0.112 11/02/95 0.110 11/03/95 0.109 11/04/95 0.110 11/05/95 0.116 11/06/95 0.116 11/07/95 0.116 11/08/95 0.112 11/09/95 0.119 11/10/95 0.101 11/11/95 0.101 11/13/95 0.110 11/14/95 0.122 11/15/95 0.125 11/16/95 0.110 11/17/95 0.125 11/18/95 0.145 11/19/95 0.164 11/20/95 0.195 11/21/95 0.238 11/22/95 0.244 11/23/95 0.282 11/24/95 0.319 11/25/95 0.317 11/26/95 0.340 11/27/95 0.344 11/28/95 0.355 11/29/95 0.396 11/30/95 0.438 12/01/95 0.405 12/02/95 0.370 12/03/95 0.383 12/04/95 0.376 12/05/95 0.367 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 12/06/95 0.367 12/07/95 0.317 12/08/95 0.317 12/09/95 0.297 12/10/95 0.297 12/11/95 0.310 12/12/95 0.448 12/13/95 0.336 12/14/95 0.313 12/15/95 0.297 12/16/95 0.309 12/17/95 0.325 12/18/95 0.343 12/19/95 0.358 12/20/95 0.340 12/21/95 0.317 12/22/95 0.349 12/23/95 0.300 12/30/95 0.203 12/31/95 0.183 01/02/96 0.146 01/03/96 0.144 01/04/96 0.140 01/05/96 0.135 01/06/96 0.132 01/07/96 0.132 01/08/96 0.130 01/09/96 0.133 01/10/96 0.133 01/11/96 0.132 01/12/96 0.134 01/13/96 0.134 01/14/96 0.135 01/15/96 0.137 01/16/96 0.141 01/17/96 0.140 01/18/96 0.141 01/19/96 0.144 01/20/96 0.143 01/21/96 0.142 01/22/96 0.140 01/23/96 0.138 01/24/96 0.136 01/25/96 0.132 01/26/96 0.129 01/27/96 0.127 01/28/96 0.124 01/29/96 0.122 01/30/96 0.117 01/31/96 0.113 02/01/96 0.110 02/02/96 0.107 02/03/96 0.104 02/04/96 0.102 02/05/96 0.101 02/06/96 0.102 02/07/96 0.103 02/08/96 0.105 02/09/96 0.109 02/10/96 0.110 02/11/96 0.110 02/12/96 0.108 02/13/96 0.103 02/14/96 0.102 02/15/96 0.101 02/16/96 0.100 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 02/17/96 0.101 02/18/96 0.102 02/19/96 0.103 02/20/96 0.105 02/21/96 0.108 02/22/96 0.111 02/23/96 0.113 02/24/96 0.110 02/25/96 0.106 02/26/96 0.101 02/27/96 0.097 02/28/96 0.094 02/29/96 0.089 03/01/96 0.088 03/02/96 0.082 03/03/96 0.083 03/04/96 0.085 03/05/96 0.086 03/06/96 0.087 03/07/96 0.089 03/08/96 0.090 03/09/96 0.093 03/10/96 0.098 03/11/96 0.112 03/12/96 0.118 03/13/96 0.130 03/14/96 0.130 03/15/96 0.126 03/16/96 0.122 03/17/96 0.119 03/18/96 0.117 03/19/96 0.116 03/20/96 0.115 03/21/96 0.114 03/22/96 0.112 03/23/96 0.111 03/24/96 0.109 03/25/96 0.108 03/26/96 0.107 03/27/96 0.107 03/28/96 0.106 03/29/96 0.102 03/30/96 0.100 03/31/96 0.096 04/01/96 0.096 04/02/96 0.093 04/03/96 0.092 04/04/96 0.086 04/05/96 0.084 04/06/96 0.085 04/07/96 0.086 04/08/96 0.086 04/09/96 0.086 04/10/96 0.090 04/11/96 0.092 04/12/96 0.098 04/13/96 0.105 04/14/96 0.111 04/15/96 0.119 04/16/96 0.124 04/17/96 0.131 04/18/96 0.136 04/19/96 0.143 04/20/96 0.150 04/21/96 0.155 04/22/96 0.160 84 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 04/23/96 0.164 04/24/96 0.170 04/25/96 0.168 04/26/96 0.171 04/27/96 0.172 04/28/96 0.172 04/29/96 0.173 04/30/96 0.173 05/01/96 0.177 05/02/96 0.178 05/03/96 0.173 05/04/96 0.189 05/05/96 0.198 05/06/96 0.170 05/07/96 0.168 05/08/96 0.156 05/09/96 0.149 05/10/96 0.144 05/11/96 0.141 05/12/96 0.138 05/13/96 0.141 05/14/96 0.157 05/15/96 0.162 05/16/96 0.160 05/17/96 0.159 05/18/96 0.159 05/19/96 0.163 05/20/96 0.170 05/21/96 0.163 05/22/96 0.162 05/23/96 0.159 05/24/96 0.159 05/25/96 0.160 05/26/96 0.161 05/27/96 0.164 05/28/96 0.167 05/29/96 0.172 05/30/96 0.175 05/31/96 0.180 06/01/96 0.183 06/02/96 0.187 06/03/96 0.193 06/04/96 0.197 06/05/96 0.199 06/06/96 0.200 06/07/96 0.203 06/08/96 0.207 06/09/96 0.214 06/10/96 0.220 06/11/96 0.221 06/12/96 0.222 06/13/96 0.221 06/14/96 0.222 06/15/96 0.219 06/16/96 0.215 06/17/96 0.209 06/18/96 0.205 06/19/96 0.200 06/20/96 0.196 06/21/96 0.192 06/22/96 0.187 06/23/96 0.181 06/24/96 0.177 06/25/96 0.169 06/26/96 0.164 06/27/96 0.159 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 06/28/96 0.155 06/29/96 0.154 06/30/96 0.153 07/01/96 0.152 07/02/96 0.151 07/03/96 0.148 07/04/96 0.146 07/05/96 0.143 07/06/96 0.141 07/07/96 0.138 07/08/96 0.136 07/09/96 0.132 07/10/96 0.130 07/11/96 0.129 07/12/96 0.127 07/13/96 0.125 07/14/96 0.124 07/15/96 0.122 07/16/96 0.120 07/17/96 0.118 07/18/96 0.116 07/19/96 0.115 07/20/96 0.112 07/21/96 0.110 07/22/96 0.108 07/23/96 0.106 07/24/96 0.105 07/25/96 0.103 07/26/96 0.101 07/27/96 0.100 07/28/96 0.100 07/29/96 0.098 07/30/96 0.090 07/31/96 0.088 08/01/96 0.087 08/02/96 0.087 08/03/96 0.085 08/04/96 0.085 08/05/96 0.085 08/06/96 0.084 08/07/96 0.082 08/08/96 0.083 08/09/96 0.083 08/10/96 0.081 08/11/96 0.078 08/12/96 0.078 08/13/96 0.077 08/14/96 0.076 08/15/96 0.075 08/16/96 0.074 08/17/96 0.073 08/18/96 0.072 08/19/96 0.072 08/20/96 0.071 08/21/96 0.071 08/22/96 0.071 08/23/96 0.070 08/24/96 0.070 08/25/96 0.068 08/26/96 0.066 08/27/96 0.062 08/28/96 0.058 08/29/96 0.057 08/30/96 0.057 08/31/96 0.057 09/01/96 0.058 Table A-9. 4100 Level Portal Flows (1995-1998) (2/2) Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 09/02/96 0.058 09/03/96 0.060 09/04/96 0.060 09/05/96 0.059 09/06/96 0.059 09/07/96 0.059 09/08/96 0.059 09/09/96 0.059 09/10/96 0.059 09/11/96 0.059 09/12/96 0.058 09/13/96 0.058 09/14/96 0.058 09/15/96 0.057 09/16/96 0.057 09/17/96 0.057 09/18/96 0.057 09/19/96 0.057 09/20/96 0.056 09/21/96 0.056 09/22/96 0.055 09/23/96 0.056 09/24/96 0.056 09/25/96 0.056 09/26/96 0.056 09/27/96 0.056 09/28/96 0.055 09/29/96 0.055 09/30/96 0.055 10/01/96 0.055 10/02/96 0.055 10/03/96 0.055 10/04/96 0.055 10/05/96 0.056 10/06/96 0.056 10/07/96 0.057 10/08/96 0.057 10/09/96 0.058 10/10/96 0.060 10/11/96 0.061 10/12/96 0.063 10/13/96 0.066 10/14/96 0.070 10/15/96 0.074 10/16/96 0.077 10/17/96 0.079 10/18/96 0.083 10/19/96 0.087 10/20/96 0.086 10/21/96 0.086 10/22/96 0.089 10/23/96 0.091 10/24/96 0.093 10/25/96 0.096 10/26/96 0.095 10/27/96 0.094 10/28/96 0.095 10/29/96 0.101 10/30/96 0.098 10/31/96 0.099 11/01/96 0.100 11/02/96 0.101 11/03/96 0.103 11/04/96 0.103 11/05/96 0.103 11/06/96 0.103 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 11/07/96 0.106 11/08/96 0.106 11/09/96 0.112 11/10/96 0.111 11/11/96 0.110 11/12/96 0.113 11/13/96 0.116 11/14/96 0.121 11/15/96 0.128 11/16/96 0.136 11/17/96 0.143 11/18/96 0.151 11/19/96 0.156 11/20/96 0.164 11/21/96 0.165 11/22/96 0.168 11/23/96 0.166 11/24/96 0.165 11/25/96 0.164 11/26/96 0.161 11/27/96 0.158 11/28/96 0.159 11/29/96 0.155 11/30/96 0.151 12/01/96 0.149 12/02/96 0.144 12/03/96 0.143 12/04/96 0.137 12/05/96 0.137 12/06/96 0.133 12/07/96 0.133 12/08/96 0.132 12/09/96 0.130 12/10/96 0.127 12/11/96 0.123 12/12/96 0.121 12/13/96 0.119 12/14/96 0.117 12/15/96 0.112 12/16/96 0.111 12/17/96 0.107 12/18/96 0.104 12/19/96 0.102 12/20/96 0.100 12/21/96 0.101 12/22/96 0.098 12/23/96 0.095 12/24/96 0.091 12/25/96 0.090 12/26/96 0.088 12/27/96 0.087 12/28/96 0.085 12/29/96 0.084 12/30/96 0.082 12/31/96 0.081 01/01/97 0.094 01/16/97 0.095 01/17/97 0.094 01/18/97 0.097 01/19/97 0.099 01/20/97 0.108 01/21/97 0.102 01/22/97 0.105 01/23/97 0.109 01/24/97 0.1.13 01/25/97 0.116 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/26/97 0.117 01/27/97 0.117 01/28/97 0.118 01/29/97 0.120 01/30/97 0.121 01/31/97 0.129 02/01/97 0.123 02/02/97 0.125 02/03/97 0.127 02/04/97 0.127 02/05/97 0.127 02/06/97 0.100 02/07/97 0.082 02/08/97 0.081 02/09/97 0.081 02/10/97 0.080 02/11/97 0.079 02/12/97 0.079 02/13/97 0.078 02/14/97 0.076 02/15/97 0.075 02/16/97 0.076 02/17/97 0.076 02/18/97 0.075 02/19/97 0.074 02/20/97 0.076 02/21/97 0.075 02/22/97 0.073 02/23/97 0.070 02/24/97 0.069 02/25/97 0.069 02/26/97 0.067 03/01/97 0.064 03/02/97 0.075 03/03/97 0.176 03/04/97 0.075 07/09/97 0.239 09/10/97 0.065 10/15/97 0.199 10/23/97 0.172 10/25/97 0.160 10/26/97 0.159 10/27/97 0.159 10/28/97 0.156 10/29/97 0.155 10/30/97 0.161 10/31/97 0.148 11/01/97 0.147 11/02/97 0.147 11/03/97 0.155 11/04/97 0.154 11/05/97 0.155 11/06/97 0.161 11/07/97 0.164 11/08/97 0.168 11/09/97 0.172 11/10/97 0.188 11/11/97 0.190 11/12/97 0.191 11/13/97 0.192 11/14/97 0.188 11/15/97 0.186 11/16/97 0.183 11/17/97 0.178 11/18/97 0.172 11/19/97 0.166 85 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 11/20/97 0.161 11/21/97 0.155 11/22/97 0.150 11/23/97 0.147 11/24/97 0.143 11/25/97 0.139 11/26/97 0.138 11/27/97 0.140 11/28/97 0.141 11/29/97 0.140 11/30/97 0.139 12/01/97 0.139 12/02/97 0.135 12/03/97 0.135 12/04/97 0.136 12/05/97 0.135 12/06/97 0.134 12/07/97 0.134 12/08/97 0.130 12/09/97 0.128 12/10/97 0.125 12/11/97 0.124 12/12/97 0.122 12/13/97 0.119 12/14/97 0.117 12/15/97 0.114 12/16/97 0.116 12/17/97 0.113 12/18/97 0.108 12/19/97 0.108 12/20/97 0.107 12/21/97 0.103 12/22/97 0.100 12/23/97 0.098 12/24/97 0.095 12/25/97 0.093 12/26/97 0.092 12/27/97 0.090 12/28/97 0.091 12/29/97 0.096 12/30/97 0.091 12/31/97 0.089 01/01/98 0.090 01/02/98 0.089 01/03/98 0.090 01/04/98 0.090 01/05/98 0.091 02/11/98 0.111 04/22/98 0.079 05/12/98 0.278 Table A-10. Jane Creek Flow (1995-1998) (1/3) Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 11/15/95 0.143 11/28/95 0.133 12/12/95 0.175 12/19/95 0.113 01/01/96 0.066 01/02/96 0.065 01/03/96 0.106 01/04/96 0.106 01/05/96 0.083 01/06/96 0.074 01/07/96 0.116 01/08/96 0.108 01/09/96 0.167 01/10/96 0.164 01/11/96 0.131 01/12/96 0.123 01/13/96 0.106 01/14/96 0.113 01/15/96 0.178 01/16/96 0.230 01/17/96 0.142 01/18/96 0.107 01/19/96 0.092 01/20/96 0.081 01/21/96 0.073 01/22/96 0.066 01/23/96 0.061 01/24/96 0.056 01/25/96 0.054 01/26/96 0.053 01/27/96 0.053 01/28/96 0.054 01/29/96 0.053 01/30/96 0.052 01/31/96 0.053 02/01/96 0.054 02/02/96 0.053 02/03/96 0.054 02/04/96 0.045 02/05/96 0.054 02/06/96 0.078 02/07/96 0.075 02/08/96 0.085 02/09/96 0.083 02/10/96 0.063 02/11/96 0.055 02/12/96 0.052 02/13/96 0.052 02/14/96 0.052 02/15/96 0.052 02/16/96 0.053 02/17/96 0.058 02/18/96 0.112 02/19/96 0.120 02/20/96 0.128 02/21/96 0.125 02/22/96 0.095 02/23/96 0.083 02/24/96 0.072 02/25/96 0.064 02/26/96 0.060 02/27/96 0.058 02/28/96 0.058 02/29/96 0.056 03/01/96 0.048 03/02/96 0.045 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 03/03/96 0.042 03/04/96 0.042 03/05/96 0.039 03/06/96 0.039 03/07/96 0.038 03/08/96 0.044 03/09/96 0.077 03/10/96 0.108 03/11/96 0.122 03/12/96 0.097 03/13/96 0.081 03/14/96 0.075 03/15/96 0.071 03/16/96 0.066 03/17/96 0.062 03/18/96 0.058 03/19/96 0.061 03/20/96 0.061 03/21/96 0.058 03/22/96 0.054 03/23/96 0.051 03/24/96 0.048 03/25/96 0.045 03/26/96 0.044 03/27/96 0.042 03/28/96 0.039 03/29/96 0.038 03/30/96 0.037 03/31/96 0.038 04/01/96 0.045 04/02/96 0.041 04/03/96 0.039 04/04/96 0.038 04/05/96 0.054 04/06/96 0.095 04/07/96 0.093 04/08/96 0.083 04/09/96 0.087 04/10/96 0.085 04/11/96 0.091 04/12/96 0.099 04/13/96 0.086 04/14/96 0.081 04/15/96 0.107 04/16/96 0.149 04/17/96 0.160 04/18/96 0.141 04/19/96 0.118 04/20/96 0.099 04/21/96 0.088 04/22/96 0.093 04/23/96 0.176 04/24/96 0.146 04/25/96 0.136 04/26/96 0.128 04/27/96 0.105 04/28/96 0.097 04/29/96 0.090 04/30/96 0.082 05/01/96 0.077 05/02/96 0.074 05/03/96 0.073 05/04/96 0.067 05/05/96 0.063 05/06/96 0.063 05/07/96 0.067 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 05/08/96 0.064 05/09/96 0.061 05/10/96 0.057 05/11/96 0.053 05/12/96 0.058 05/13/96 0.085 05/14/96 0.075 05/15/96 0.071 05/16/96 0.069 05/17/96 0.084 05/18/96 0.136 05/19/96 0.122 05/20/96 0.105 05/21/96 0.097 05/22/96 0.093 05/23/96 0.087 05/24/96 0.081 05/25/96 0.078 05/26/96 0.074 05/27/96 0.073 05/28/96 0.071 05/29/96 0.064 05/30/96 0.060 05/31/96 0.058 06/01/96 0.054 06/02/96 0.053 06/03/96 0.051 06/04/96 0.051 06/05/96 0.050 06/06/96 0.048 06/07/96 0.048 06/08/96 0.048 06/09/96 0.046 06/10/96 0.046 06/11/96 0.046 06/12/96 0.044 06/13/96 0.042 06/14/96 0.042 06/15/96 0.040 06/16/96 0.038 06/17/96 0.038 06/18/96 0.038 06/19/96 0.036 06/20/96 0.036 06/21/96 0.035 06/22/96 0.033 06/23/96 0.032 06/24/96 0.032 06/25/96 0.032 06/26/96 0.031 06/27/96 0.031 06/28/96 0.030 06/29/96 0.028 06/30/96 0.027 07/01/96 0.026 07/02/96 0.025 07/03/96 0.025 07/04/96 0.026 07/05/96 0.026 07/06/96 0.025 07/07/96 0.025 07/08/96 0.024 07/09/96 0.024 07/10/96 0.024 07/11/96 0.024 07/12/96 0.023 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 07/13/96 0.023 07/14/96 0.022 07/15/96 0.022 07/16/96 0.021 07/17/96 0.026 07/18/96 0.026 07/19/96 0.031 07/20/96 0.025 07/21/96 0.024 07/22/96 0.024 07/23/96 0.022 07/24/96 0.021 07/25/96 0.021 07/26/96 0.020 07/27/96 0.019 07/28/96 0.018 07/29/96 0.019 07/30/96 0.019 07/31/96 0.019 08/01/96 0.019 08/02/96 0.019 08/03/96 0.020 08/04/96 0.021 08/05/96 0.020 08/06/96 0.019 08/07/96 0.020 08/08/96 0.019 08/09/96 0.019 08/10/96 0.018 08/11/96 0.018 08/12/96 0.018 08/13/96 0.017 08/14/96 0.016 08/15/96 0.018 08/16/96 0.019 08/17/96 0.018 08/18/96 0.018 08/19/96 0.017 08/20/96 0.018 08/21/96 0.016 08/22/96 0.015 08/23/96 0.018 08/24/96 0.017 08/25/96 0.017 08/26/96 0.017 08/27/96 0.016 08/28/96 0.016 08/29/96 0.015 08/30/96 0.020 08/31/96 0.018 09/01/96 0.017 09/02/96 0.016 09/03/96 0.020 09/04/96 0.019 09/05/96 0.019 09/06/96 0.018 09/07/96 0.026 09/08/96 0.024 09/09/96 0.020 09/10/96 0.018 09/11/96 0.018 09/12/96 0.018 09/13/96 0.020 09/14/96 0.046 09/15/96 0.043 09/16/96 0.034 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 09/17/96 0.029 09/18/96 0.027 09/19/96 0.026 09/20/96 0.026 09/21/96 0.025 09/22/96 0.025 09/23/96 0.023 09/24/96 0.023 09/25/96 0.021 09/26/96 0.022 09/27/96 0.021 09/28/96 0.021 09/29/96 0.021 09/30/96 0.021 10/01/96 0.020 10/02/96 0.020 10/03/96 0.031 10/04/96 0.100 10/05/96 0.051 10/06/96 0.040 10/07/96 0.036 10/08/96 0.034 10/09/96 0.032 10/10/96 0.045 10/11/96 0.046 10/12/96 0.048 10/13/96 0.068 10/14/96 0.108 10/15/96 0.088 10/16/96 0.067 10/17/96 0.065 10/18/96 0.074 10/19/96 0.061 10/20/96 0.055 10/21/96 0.068 10/22/96 0.069 10/23/96 0.074 10/24/96 0.088 10/25/96 0.073 10/26/96 0.061 10/27/96 0.057 10/28/96 0.134 10/29/96 0.099 10/30/96 0.078 10/31/96 0.070 11/01/96 0.063 11/02/96 0.060 11/03/96 0.060 11/04/96 0.055 11/05/96 0.050 11/06/96 0.052 11/07/96 0.048 11/08/96 0.118 11/09/96 0.117 11/10/96 0.092 11/11/96 0.084 11/12/96 0.105 11/13/96 0.133 11/14/96 0.105 11/15/96 0.093 11/16/96 0.086 11/17/96 0.077 11/18/96 0.069 11/19/96 0.067 11/20/96 0.064 11/21/96 0.058 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 11/22/96 0.056 11/23/96 0.056 11/24/96 0.051 11/25/96 0.048 11/26/96 0.048 11/27/96 0.077 11/28/96 0.108 11/29/96 0.065 11/30/96 0.071 12/01/96 0.069 12/02/96 0.060 12/03/96 0.051 12/04/96 0.050 12/05/96 0.046 12/06/96 0.045 12/07/96 0.042 12/08/96 0.041 12/09/96 0.040 12/10/96 0.048 12/11/96 0.042 12/12/96 0.038 12/13/96 0.036 12/14/96 0.035 12/15/96 0.035 12/16/96 0.034 12/17/96 0.033 12/18/96 0.033 12/19/96 0.032 12/20/96 0.031 12/21/96 0.031 12/22/96 0.031 12/23/96 0.030 12/24/96 0.029 12/25/96 0.029 12/26/96 0.029 12/27/96 0.029 12/28/96 0.028 12/29/96 0.028 12/30/96 0.028 12/31/96 0.053 01/01/97 0.157 01/02/97 0.114 01/03/97 0.073 01/04/97 0.052 01/05/97 0.044 01/06/97 0.040 01/07/97 0.039 01/08/97 0.037 01/09/97 0.037 01/10/97 0.037 01/11/97 0.035 01/12/97 0.031 01/13/97 0.029 01/14/97 0.028 01/15/97 0.026 01/16/97 0.027 01/17/97 0.068 01/18/97 0.070 01/19/97 0.173 01/20/97 0.148 01/21/97 0.085 01/22/97 0.068 01/23/97 0.058 01/24/97 0.051 01/25/97 0.049 01/26/97 0.048 Table A-11. Jane Creek Flow (1995-1998) (2/3) Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 01/27/97 0.044 01/28/97 0.039 01/29/97 0.066 01/30/97 0.172 01/31/97 0.088 02/01/97 0.068 02/02/97 0.059 02/03/97 0.051 02/04/97 0.046 02/05/97 0.041 02/06/97 0.038 02/07/97 0.035 02/08/97 0.032 02/09/97 0.030 02/10/97 0.028 02/11/97 0.027 02/12/97 0.026 02/13/97 0.024 02/14/97 0.029 02/15/97 0.046 02/16/97 0.045 02/17/97 0.060 02/18/97 0.048 02/19/97 0.044 02/20/97 0.037 02/21/97 0.033 02/22/97 0.030 02/23/97 0.029 02/24/97 0.029 02/25/97 0.029 02/26/97 0.027 02/27/97 0.025 02/28/97 0.024 03/01/97 0.024 03/02/97 0.025 03/03/97 0.023 03/04/97 0.021 03/05/97 0.021 03/06/97 0.022 03/07/97 0.025 03/08/97 0.022 03/09/97 0.023 03/10/97 0.023 03/11/97 0.022 03/12/97 0.021 03/13/97 0.020 03/14/97 0.018 03/15/97 0.020 03/16/97 0.017 03/17/97 0.052 03/18/97 0.212 03/19/97 0.297 03/20/97 0.145 03/21/97 0.084 03/22/97 0.069 03/23/97 0.061 03/24/97 0.053 03/25/97 0.055 03/26/97 0.060 03/27/97 0.052 03/28/97 0.046 03/29/97 0.045 03/30/97 0.042 03/31/97 0.041 04/01/97 0.038 04/02/97 0.035 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 04/03/97 0.033 04/04/97 0.030 04/05/97 . 0.030 04/06/97 0.029 04/07/97 0.028 04/08/97 0.027 04/09/97 0.028 04/10/97 0.028 04/11/97 0.029 04/12/97 0.029 04/13/97 .0.033 04/14/97 0.034 04/15/97 0.082 04/16/97 0.246 04/17/97 0.130 04/18/97 0.088 04/19/97 0.088 04/20/97 0.146 04/21/97 0.105 04/22/97 0.092 04/23/97 0.111 04/24/97 0.102 04/25/97 0.106 04/26/97 0.158 04/27/97 0.161 04/28/97 0.127 04/29/97 0.117 04/30/97 0.105 05/01/97 0.096 05/02/97 0.088 05/03/97 0.114 05/04/97 0.127 05/05/97 0.193 05/06/97 0.182 05/07/97 0.144 05/08/97 0.128 05/09/97 0.129 05/10/97 0.129 05/11/97 0.137 05/12/97 0.148 05/13/97 0.150 05/14/97 0.152 05/15/97 0.153 05/16/97 0.142 05/17/97 0.127 05/18/97 0.111 05/19/97 0.104 05/20/97 0.094 05/21/97 0.090 05/22/97 0.100 05/23/97 0.103 05/24/97 0.097 05/25/97 0.094 05/26/97 0.093 05/27/97 0.089 05/28/97 0.096 05/29/97 0.110 05/30/97 0.111 05/31/97 0.142 06/01/97 0.122 06/02/97 0.115 06/03/97 0.116 06/04/97 0.118 06/05/97 0.106 06/06/97 0.100 06/07/97 0.094 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 06/08/97 0.086 06/09/97 0.080 06/10/97 0.076 06/11/97 0.072 06/12/97 0.068 06/13/97 0.065 06/14/97 0.062 06/15/97 0.062 06/16/97 0.066 06/17/97 0.100 06/18/97 0.083 06/19/97 0.078 06/20/97 0.075 06/21/97 0.081 06/22/97 0.088 06/23/97 0.095 06/24/97 0.089 06/25/97 0.089 06/26/97 0.087 06/27/97 0.084 06/28/97 0.078 06/29/97 0.074 06/30/97 0.070 07/01/97 0.067 07/02/97 0.063 07/03/97 0.060 07/04/97 0.057 07/05/97 0.058 07/06/97 0.055 07/07/97 0.054 07/08/97 0.139 07/09/97 0.105 07/10/97 0.084 07/11/97 0.077 07/12/97 0.071 07/13/97 0.067 07/14/97 0.063 07/15/97 0.061 07/16/97 0.057 07/17/97 0.055 07/18/97 0.052 07/19/97 0.050 07/20/97 0.047 07/21/97 0.048 07/22/97 0.046 07/23/97 0.043 07/24/97 0.043 07/25/97 0.042 07/26/97 0.041 07/27/97 0.039 07/28/97 0.038 07/29/97 0.037 07/30/97 0.036 07/31/97 0.036 08/01/97 0.035 08/02/97 0.034 08/03/97 0.033 08/04/97 0.032 08/05/97 0.032 08/06/97 0.032 08/07/97 0.031 08/08/97 0.030 08/09/97 0.028 08/10/97 0.028 08/11/97 0.027 08/12/97 0.027 Date mm/dd/yy Flow (cms) 08/13/97 0.027 08/14/97 0.026 08/15/97 0.025 08/16/97 0.025 08/17/97 0.024 08/18/97 0.024 08/19/97 0.023 08/20/97 0.025 08/21/97 0.027 08/22/97 0.025 08/23/97 0.026 08/24/97 0.026 08/25/97 0.027 08/26/97 0.050 08/27/97 0.048 08/28/97 0.037 08/29/97 0.032 08/30/97 0.030 08/31/97 0.029 09/01/97 0.028 09/02/97 0.027 09/03/97 0.026 09/04/97 0.027 09/05/97 0.026 09/06/97 0.025 09/07/97 0.025 09/08/97 0.024 09/09/97 0.024 09/10/97 0.024 09/11/97 0.025 09/12/97 0.026 09/13/97 0.025 09/14/97 0.058 09/15/97 0.075 09/16/97 0.053 09/17/97 0.108 09/18/97 0.066 09/19/97 0.052 09/20/97 0.049 09/21/97 0.047 09/22/97 0.046 09/23/97 0.045 09/24/97 0.044 09/25/97 0.046 09/26/97 0.080 09/27/97 0.091 09/28/97 0.107 09/29/97 0.080 09/30/97 0.122 10/01/97 0.195 10/02/97 0.222 10/03/97 0.158 10/04/97 0.154 10/05/97 0.153 10/06/97 0.129 10/07/97 0.113 10/08/97 0.128 10/09/97 0.157 10/10/97 0.210 10/11/97 0.140 10/12/97 0.117 10/13/97 0.106 10/14/97 0.096 10/15/97 0.097 10/16/97 0.092 10/17/97 0.085 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 10/18/97 0.077 10/19/97 0.072 10/20/97 0.067 10/21/97 0.062 10/22/97 0.059 10/23/97 0.056 10/24/97 0.054 10/25/97 0.052 10/26/97 0.076 10/27/97 0.063 10/28/97 0.065 10/29/97 0.117 10/30/97 0.191 10/31/97 0.125 11/01/97 0.104 11/02/97 0.096 11/03/97 0.141 11/04/97 0.114 11/05/97 0.113 11/06/97 0.154 11/07/97 0.126 11/08/97 0.105 11/09/97 0.095 11/10/97 0.085 11/11/97 0.077 11/12/97 0.071 11/13/97 0.066 11/14/97 0.061 11/15/97 0.057 11/16/97 0.054 11/17/97 0.053 11/18/97 0.052 11/19/97 0.048 11/20/97 0.051 11/21/97 0.048 11/22/97 0.047 11/23/97 0.088 11/24/97 0.087 11/25/97 0.067 11/26/97 0.061 11/27/97 0.081 11/28/97 0.146 11/29/97 0.193 11/30/97 0.164 12/01/97 0.113 12/02/97 0.095 12/03/97 0.082 12/04/97 0.072 12/05/97 0.066 12/06/97 0.063 12/07/97 0.059 12/08/97 0.056 12/09/97 0.050 12/10/97 0.049 12/11/97 0.047 12/12/97 0.046 12/13/97 0.044 12/14/97 0.047 12/15/97 0.046 12/16/97 0.092 12/17/97 0.090 12/18/97 0.064 12/19/97 0.055 12/20/97 0.052 12/21/97 0.047 12/22/97 0.044 Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) 12/23/97 0.043 12/24/97 0.041 12/25/97 0.039 12/26/97 0.039 12/27/97 0.038 12/28/97 0.046 12/29/97 0.118 12/30/97 0.114 12/31/97 0.092 01/01/98 0.077 01/02/98 0.061 01/03/98 0.052 01/04/98 0.044 01/05/98 0.039 01/06/98 0.036 01/07/98 0.031 01/08/98 0.031 01/09/98 0.029 01/10/98 0.030 01/11/98 0.029 01/12/98 0.030 01/13/98 0.030 01/14/98 0.054 01/15/98 0.053 01/16/98 0.036 01/17/98 0.046 01/18/98 0.061 01/19/98 0.094 01/20/98 0.061 01/21/98 0.046 01/22/98 0.039 01/23/98 0.135 01/24/98 0.176 01/25/98 0.132 01/26/98 0.140 01/27/98 0.095 01/28/98 0.081 01/29/98 0.100 01/30/98 0.100 01/31/98 0.078 02/01/98 0.068 02/02/98 0.079 02/03/98 0.067 02/04/98 0.065 02/05/98 0.097 02/06/98 0.080 02/07/98 0.077 02/08/98 0.082 02/09/98 0.089 02/10/98 0.072 02/11/98 0.066 02/12/98 0.115 02/13/98 0.136 02/14/98 0.088 02/15/98 0.069 02/16/98 0.059 02/17/98 0.053 02/18/98 0.079 02/19/98 0.131 02/20/98 0.124 02/21/98 0.113 02/22/98 0.078 02/23/98 0.061 02/24/98 0.052 02/25/98 0.047 02/26/98 0.042 Table A-12. Jane Creek Flow (1995-1998) (3/3) Date Flow Date Flow mm/dd/yy (cms) mm/dd/yy (cms) 02/27/98 0.037 05/04/98 0.083 02/28/98 0.036 05/05/98 0.082 03/01/98 0.038 05/06/98 0.081 03/02/98 0.034 05/07/98 0.077 03/03/98 0.031 05/08/98 0.075 03/04/98 0.029 05/09/98 0.071 03/05/98 0.026 05/10/98 0.067 03/06/98 0.025 05/11/98 0.063 03/07/98 0.023 05/12/98 0.060 03/08/98 0.023 05/13/98 0.057 03/09/98 0.024 05/14/98 0.059 03/10/98 0.025 05/15/98 0.062 03/11/98 0.033 05/16/98 0.053 03/12/98 0.052 05/17/98 0.048 03/13/98 0.074 05/18/98 0.046 03/14/98 0.078 05/19/98 0.043 03/15/98 0.072 05/20/98 0.042 03/16/98 0.067 05/21/98 0.040 03/17/98 0.058 05/22/98 0.039 03/18/98 0.050 05/23/98 0.040 03/19/98 0.048 05/24/98 0.042 03/20/98 0.046 05/25/98 0.052 03/21/98 0.051 05/26/98 0.046 03/22/98 0.087 05/27/98 0.063 03/23/98 0.079 05/28/98 0.051 03/24/98 0.079 05/29/98 0.046 03/25/98 0.069 05/30/98 0.041 03/26/98 0.062 05/31/98 0.040 03/27/98 0.057 06/01/98 0.038 03/28/98 0.051 06/02/98 0.036 03/29/98 0.046 06/03/98 0.034 03/30/98 0.043 06/04/98 0.033 03/31/98 0.041 06/05/98 0.033 04/01/98 0.039 06/06/98 0.031 04/02/98 0.037 06/07/98 0.029 04/03/98 0.034 06/08/98 0.028 04/04/98 0.032 06/09/98 0.027 04/05/98 0.035 06/10/98 0.028 04/06/98 0.035 06/11/98 0.027 04/07/98 0.035 06/12/98 0.026 04/08/98 0.033 06/13/98 0.025 04/09/98 0.030 06/14/98 0.024 04/10/98 0.029 06/15/98 0.024 04/11/98 0.031 06/16/98 0.024 04/12/98 0.030 06/17/98 0.023 04/13/98 0.029 06/18/98 0.023 04/14/98 0.029 04/15/98 0.026 04/16/98 0.025 04/17/98 0.024 04/18/98 0.029 04/19/98 0.029 04/20/98 0.028 04/21/98 0.031 04/22/98 0.038 04/23/98 0.052 04/24/98 0.057 04/25/98 0.047 04/26/98 0.045 04/27/98 0.046 04/28/98 0.052 04/29/98 0.059 04/30/98 0.070 05/01/98 0.080 05/02/98 0.087 05/03/98 0.086 Table A-13. Pressure Data (1/2) Date pipes open (x) pressure (psi) 4" 6" 10" 4" 6" 10" 05/09/80 X 40 05/16/80 X 60 40 05/23/80 X 40 60 50 05/30/80 50 55 45 06/06/80 X 70 75 70 06/13/80 X 100 90 90 06/20/80 X 130 125 125 06/27/80 X 140 130 130 07/04/80 X 135 140 07/11/80 X 140 135 135 07/18/80 X 140 140 140 07/25/80 X 125 125 125 08/01/80 X 120 100 100 08/08/80 X 85 85 85 08/15/80 X 65 65 65 08/22/80 X 62 62 08/29/80 X 45 45 09/05/80 X 42 42 09/12/80 X 30 30 09/19/80 X 20 20 25 09/26/80 X 23 18 18 10/03/80 X 20 25 25 10/10/80 X 18 20 20 10/17/80 X 18 20 20 10/24/80 X 20 20 20 10/31/80 X 20 20 20 11/07/80 X 23 23 23 11/14/80 X 50 50 50 11/21/80 X 60 60 60 11/28/80 X 80 80 80 12/05/80 X 90 90 90 12/12/80 X 80 80 80 12/19/80 X 90 90 90 12/26/80 X 100 100 100 01/02/81 X 170 170 170 01/09/81 X 190 190 190 01/16/81 X 180 180 180 01/23/81 X 155 155 155 01/30/81 X 155 155 155 02/06/81 X 118 118 118 02/13/81 X 107 107 107 02/20/81 X 100 100 100 02/27/81 X 90 90 90 03/06/81 X 90 90 90 03/13/81 X 75 75 75 03/20/81 X 60 60 60 03/27/81 X 1 60 60 60 04/03/81 X 10 10 10 04/10/81 X 90 10 04/17/81 X 0 04/24/81 X 0 05/01/81 X 10 05/08/81 X 15 05/15/81 X 30 05/22/81 X 40 05/29/81 X 55 50 06/05/81 X 55 55 55 06/12/81 X 06/19/81 X 65 65 06/26/81 X 54 54 07/03/81 X 50 50 07/10/81 X 45 45 07/17/81 X 25 25 . 07/24/81 X 15 15 07/31/81 X 10 10 08/07/81 X 10 10 Date pipes open (x) pressure (psi) 4" 6" 10" 4" 6" 10" 08/14/81 X 0 08/21/81 X 0 08/28/81 X 0 09/04/81 X 0 09/11/81 X 0 09/18/81 X 0 09/25/81 X 0 10/02/81 X 0 10/09/81 X 0 10/16/81 X 20 10/23/81 X 20 20 10/30/81 X 10 10 11/06/81 X 80 80 80 11/13/81 X 80 80 11/20/81 X 80 80 11/27/81 X 65 65 12/04/81 X 65 12/11/81 X 60 12/18/81 X 55 12/25/81 X 30 01/01/82 X 17 01/08/82 X 10 10 01/15/82 X 5 5 01/22/82 X 0 0 01/29/82 X 0 0 02/05/82 X 0 0 02/12/82 X 0 0 02/19/82 X 0 0 02/26/82 X 0 0 03/05/82 X 0 0 03/12/82 X 0 0 03/19/82 X 0 0 0 03/26/82 X 0 0 04/02/82 X 0 0 04/09/82 X 0 0 04/16/82 X 0 0 04/23/82 X 0 0 04/30/82 X 0 0 05/07/82 X 0 0 05/14/82 X 0 0 05/21/82 X 0 0 05/28/82 X 26 26 06/04/82 X 70 80 06/11/82 X 84 82 06/18/82 X 125 125 06/25/82 X 200 200 07/02/82 X 265 265 07/09/82 07/16/82 X 305 305 07/23/82 X 290 290 07/30/82 X 270 270 08/06/82 X 240 240 08/13/82 X 230 230 08/20/82 X 165 165 08/27/82 X 165 165 09/03/82 X 100 100 09/10/82 X 65 65 65 09/17/82 X 45 45 45 09/24/82 X 25 25 10/01/82 X 20 20 10/08/82 X 20 20 10/15/82 X 15 15 10/22/82 X 12 10/29/82 X 30 30 11/05/82 X 50 11/12/82 X 50 Date pipes open (x) pressure (psi) 4" 6" 10" 4" 6" lo 11/19/82 X 35 11/26/82 X 25 12/03/82 X 35 ss 12/10/82 X 30 30 12/17/82 X 30 30 12/24/82 X 30 30 12/31/82 X 0 0 01/07/83 X 0 0 01/14/83 X 0 0 01/21/83 X 25 25 01/28/83 X 02/04/83 X 12 02/11/83 X 25 25 02/18/83 X 25 25 02/25/83 X 25 25 03/04/83 X 30 30 03/11/83 X 27 27 03/18/83 X 35 35 35 03/25/83 X 25 25 04/01/83 X 30 30 04/08/83 X 20 20 04/15/83 X 25 0 25 04/22/83 X 15 15 04/29/83 X 20 20 05/06/83 X 30 30 05/13/83 X 40 40 05/20/83 X 40 40 05/27/83 X 65 65 06/03/83 x 140 150 06/10/83 X 225 225 06/17/83 X 260 260 06/24/83 X 270 270 07/01/83 X 280 280 07/08/83 X 270 07/15/83 X 275 07/22/83 X 280 07/29/83 X 275 08/05/83 X 260 08/12/83 X 230 08/19/83 X 08/26/83 09/02/83 X 09/09/83 09/16/83 X 09/23/83 X 09/30/83 40 10/07/83 X 10/14/83 X 0 0 10/21/83 X 0 0 10/28/83 X 0 0 11/04/83 X 0 0 11/11/83 X 10 10 11/18/83 X 30 30 11/25/83 X 40 40 12/02/83 X 30 12/09/83 X 25 25 12/16/83 X 10 10 12/23/83 X 10 12/30/83 X 0 0 01/06/84 X 0 5 01/13/84 X 10 8 01/20/84 X 10 8 01/27/84 X 12 12 02/03/84 X 10 10 02/10/84 X 10 8 02/17/84|x |x | | | 8 89 Table A-14. Pressure Data (2/2) pipes open (x) pressure (psi) Date .4" 6" 10" 4" 6" 10" 02/24/84 X X 5 03/02/84 X X 5 03/09/84 X X 0 03/16/84 X X 0 03/23/84 X X 5 03/30/84 X X 5 04/06/84 X X 5 04/13/84 X X 10 04/20/84 X X 10 04/27/84 X X 10 05/04/84 X X 5 05/11/84 X X 05/18/84 X X 0 05/25/84 X X 10 06/01/84 X X 10 06/08/84 X X 15 06/15/84 X X 15 06/22/84 X 35 06/29/84 X 45 07/06/84 X 100 07/13/84 X 130 130 07/20/84 X 80 75 07/27/84 X 60 60 08/03/84 X 45 45 08/10/84 X 35 35 08/17/84 X 20 20 08/24/84 X 10 8 08/31/84 X 10 8 09/07/84 X 0 0 09/14/84 X 0 0 09/21/84 X 0 0 09/28/84 X 0 0 10/05/84 X 0 0 10/12/84 X 15 15 10/19/84 X 35 35 10/26/84 X 35 35 11/02/84 X 28 28 11/09/84 X 15 15 11/16/84 X 11/23/84 X 15 15 11/30/84 X 5 5 12/07/84 X 5 5 12/14/84 X 0 0 12/21/84 X 12/28/84 X 01/04/85 X 01/11/85 X 01/18/85 X 01/25/85 X 0 0 02/01/85 X 0 0 02/08/85 X 02/15/85 X 0 0 02/22/85 X 0 0 03/01/85 X 0 0 03/08/85 X 0 0 03/15/85 X 0 0 03/22/85 X 0 0 03/29/85 X 0 0 04/05/85 X 0 0 04/12/85 X 0 0 04/19/85 X 0 0 04/26/85 X 0 0 05/03/85 X 10 10 05/10/85 X 15 15 05/17/85 05/24/85 pipes open (x) pressure (psi) Date 4" 6" 10" 4" 6" 10" 05/31/85 x 10 06/07/85 X 80 06/14/85 X 80 06/21/85 X 80 06/28/85 X 80 07/05/85 X 60 60 07/12/85 X 35 35 07/19/85 X 20 20 07/26/85 X 5 20 20 08/02/85 X 08/09/85 X 08/16/85 X 0 0 08/23/85 X 08/30/85 X 0 0 09/06/85 X 0 0 09/13/85 X 0 0 09/20/85 X 09/27/85 X 0 0 10/04/85 X 0 0 10/11/85 X 0 0 10/18/85 X 0 0 10/25/85 X 10 10 11/01/85 X 10 20 11/08/85 X 20 10 11/15/85 X 10 20 11/22/85 X 0 0 11/29/85 X 0 0 12/06/85 X 12/13/85 X 0 0 12/20/85 12/27/85 X 0 0 01/03/86 X 0 0 01/10/86 X 0 0 01/17/86 X 0 0 01/24/86 X 0 0 01/31/86 X 10 10 02/07/86 X 10 10 02/14/86 X 10 10 02/21/86 X 0 0 02/28/86 X 10 10 03/07/86 X 20 20 03/14/86 X 30 30 03/21/86 X 20 20 03/28/86 X 20 20 04/04/86 X 20 20 04/11/86 X 20 20 04/18/86 X 20 20 04/25/86 X 20 20 05/02/86 X 20 20 05/09/86 X 20 20 05/16/86 X 15 15 05/23/86 X 20 20 05/30/86 X 55 60 06/06/86 X 100 105 06/13/86 X 100 105 06/20/86 X 100 100 06/27/86 X 100 100 07/04/86 X 07/11/86 X 07/18/86 X 07/25/86 X 10 10 08/01/86 X 10 10 08/08/86 X 10 10 08/15/86 X 10 10 90 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
China 14 12
United States 8 3
Canada 5 0
Japan 4 0
Russia 1 0
City Views Downloads
Beijing 11 0
Ashburn 5 0
Unknown 3 2
Shenzhen 3 12
Lincolnton 2 0
Iwakura 2 0
Tokyo 2 0
Langley 1 0
Saint Petersburg 1 0
Vancouver 1 0
Seattle 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}
Download Stats

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.831.1-0050232/manifest

Comment

Related Items