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Ordinary beauty Padgett, Eileen Victoria 2017

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     ORDINARY BEAUTY by EILEEN VICTORIA PADGETT B.Mus., Queen’s University, 2009 M.Mus., The University of British Columbia, 2011  A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT  OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF    DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL STUDIES  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (VANCOUVER)  October 2017  © EILEEN VICTORIA PADGETT, 2017    Abstract  Ordinary Beauty is a piece for piano and strings (Violin I, Violin II, Viola, Cello, Bass). The string parts may be performed by a string orchestra, or with a single player on each part. The work is approximately 23 minutes in length, and comprises of 5 movements, each named after and inspired by scenes of commonplace beauty found in the natural surroundings of Vancouver.  The movements are as follows: Leaf in the Wind, Petals in the Rain, Sunlit Grove, Hawk in Flight, and Ocean Spray. Ordinary Beauty overlays Romantic structures on minimalist patterns. The minimalist figures heighten the rhythmic interest, while the Romantic melodic and harmonic principles provide the piece with structure and direction. The piece pays homage to the natural world, but also explores the boundaries between nature and technology; minimalism has ties to industrialization and machinery, while Romanticism is associated with pastoral imagery. The intentional juxtaposition and hybridization of these styles questions the boundaries and limits of both the respective styles and their real-world associations.    ii  Lay Abstract  Ordinary Beauty is a piece of music for piano and strings. It is approximately 23 minutes long, and consists of 5 movements. Each movement is inspired by and named after scenes in the natural environment of Vancouver. The movements are titled: Leaf in the Wind, Petals in the Rain, Sunlit Grove, Hawk in Flight, and Ocean Spray.     iii  Preface  This dissertation is original, unpublished, independent work by the author, Eileen Padgett.     iv  Table of Contents Abstract .....................................................................................................................................ii Lay Summary...........................................................................................................................iii Preface......................................................................................................................................iv Table of Contents ......................................................................................................................v List of Tables ..........................................................................................................................vii List of Figures........................................................................................................................viii Acknowledgements..................................................................................................................ix 1. Introduction ...........................................................................................................................1 2. Stylistic Influences ................................................................................................................3  2.1 Minimalism ...........................................................................................................3   2.2 Romanticism .........................................................................................................4 3. Genre .....................................................................................................................................6 4. Orchestration Overview ........................................................................................................8 5. Overview of Harmonic Processes .........................................................................................9 6. Rhythmic Overview.............................................................................................................10 7. Formal Principles.................................................................................................................11 8. First Movement: Leaf in the Wind.......................................................................................12  8.1. Introduction ..........................................................................................................12  8.2. Motivic Content....................................................................................................12  8.3. Structural Features................................................................................................13   8.4. Analysis mm. 1-10................................................................................................15  9. Second Movement: Petals in the Rain ................................................................................17 v   9.1. Introduction .......................................................................................................17   9.2. Motivic Content .................................................................................................17  9.3. Structural Features .............................................................................................17  9.4. Analysis mm. 1-10 .............................................................................................20 10. Third Movement: Sunlit Grove .........................................................................................21  10.1. Introduction .....................................................................................................21  10.2. Motivic Content ...............................................................................................21  10.3. Structural Features ...........................................................................................22  10.4. Analysis mm. 1-12 ...........................................................................................25 11. Fourth Movement: Hawk in Flight ...................................................................................26  11.1. Introduction ......................................................................................................26  11.2. Motivic Content ...............................................................................................26  11.3. Structural Features ...........................................................................................27  11.4. Analysis mm. 28-41..........................................................................................30 12. Fifth Movement: Ocean Spray..........................................................................................31   12.1. Introduction......................................................................................................31  12.2. Motivic Content ...............................................................................................31  12.3. Structural Features ...........................................................................................31  12.4. Analysis mm. 1-10 ...........................................................................................32 13. Conclusion ........................................................................................................................35 Bibliography ...........................................................................................................................36 Appendix A: Ordinary Beauty – Score ...................................................................................36   vi   List of Tables 1. Ordinary Beauty Movement 1: Leaf in the Wind – Structural Features..............................14  2. Ordinary Beauty Movement 2: Petals in the Rain – Structural Features ...........................18 3. Ordinary Beauty Movement 3: Sunlit Grove – Structural Features.................................... 23 4. Ordinary Beauty Movement 4: Hawk in Flight– Structural Features.................................29 5. Ordinary Beauty Movement 5: Ocean Spray– Structural Features ....................................33   vii  List of Figures 1. Movement 1: Primary Motives (m. 1: Piano) .....................................................................12 2. Movement 1: Leaf in the Wind, mm. 1-10 ..........................................................................16 3. Movement 2: Primary Motives (mm. 7 and 10: piano) ......................................................17 4. Movement 2: Petals in the Rain, mm. 1-10 ........................................................................19 5. Movement 3: Primary Motives (mm. 1-6: piano) ..............................................................21 6. Movement 3: Sunlit Grove, mm. 1-12 ................................................................................24 7. Movement 4: Motive X, and Motive Y origins (mm. 1-2: piano) ......................................26 8. Movement 4: Motive Y (mm. 19-23: Violin I) ...................................................................26 9. Movement 4: Hawk in Flight, mm. 28-41 ..........................................................................29 10. Movement 5: X and Y motives (m. 1: Violin I and Cello) ...............................................31 11. Movement 5: Ocean Spray, mm. 1-10 ..............................................................................34    viii  Acknowledgements I would like to acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals without whose support this thesis would not have been possible:  Florian Gassner Maria Angelita Padgett Arnold Padgett Emily Padgett  Dr. Stephen Chatman Drs. Dorothy Chang, and Keith Hamel    ix  1. Introduction  Ordinary Beauty is an ensemble piece in six parts for piano and strings.1 Written with flexibility in mind, it can be performed with either a single string player on a part, or by a string orchestra. The piece is approximately twenty-three minutes in length, and is organized into five semi-independent movements, each of which may be used for a stand-alone performance. The work maintains unity and coherence through its pattern-based approach, recurring structural features, emphasis on open sonorities, use of registral space, pan-diatonic soundscape, recurring gestures, and an overriding arch narrative that both creates and resolves tension on a larger scale.  The title Ordinary Beauty refers to the casual, understated, and at times overlooked beauty of the natural world. Each movement is a focused still life musical portrait of a commonplace scene observed in the landscape of British Columbia. The first movement, Leaf in the Wind, depicts a leaf lost in a mountainous wind; the second movement, Petals in the Rain, is a close up view of rose petals bearing the weight of a Vancouver rain shower; the third movement, Sunlit Grove, illustrates the still and quiet airlessness of a sheltered mountain grove; the fourth movement, Hawk in Flight, portrays the bird of prey as it soars and dives from great heights; the fifth and final movement, Ocean Spray, captures the laughing and jousting surface waves above the deeper currents, and their transformation into sea foam washing upon the shore.  The title Ordinary Beauty alludes to the dual nature of the work. “Ordinary” can indicate that something is common or mundane, but its meaning of regularity and structure also correlates to the tightly woven musical machinery. “Beauty” refers to the many intuitive choices that enhance the texture and further the perceived beauty of the piece. These intuitive compositional decisions act upon the economic structure and strict motivic development; consequently, the                                                  1. The string parts are as follows: Violin I, Violin II, Viola, Cello, and Bass. 1  established patterns frequently react to novel elements in the musical texture, and are forced to readjust themselves in new contexts.   2  2.  Stylistic Influences 2.1  Minimalism  Minimalism is arguably one of the more influential musical movements of the twentieth-century. Defined and stylized by the music of American composers La Monte Young (1935-), Terry Riley (1935-), Philip Glass (1937-), Steve Reich (1936-), and John Adams (1947-),2 it carries widespread cultural relevance and has been incorporated into both popular and classical music vernaculars. Because of the pitch repetition inherent in this style, and the tendency of minimalist composers to emphasize diatonic collections and stable sonorities, the musical tension exists mainly in the rhythmic profile, and the minute changes to the established patterns.  The music of composers such as John Adams (1947-), Marjan Mozetich (1948-), and Michael Torke (1961-) demonstrate how in contemporary and post-minimalism there is comparatively more freedom in how the composer manipulates the musical mechanism. The slow-burning, and highly-structured process music has given way to a more organic approach. Ordinary Beauty capitalizes on this potential for flexibility by accelerating the rate of change, and incorporating the rhythmic cells into larger tonal structures.  The music of Canadian minimalist composer Marjan Mozetich is the most significant musical influence in Ordinary Beauty. His music combines minimalist processes, controlled motivic development, and the lyricism and tonal stability of Romanticism. The two pieces from his oeuvre that are most relevant to this work are Affairs of the Heart (1997) and Three Pieces for Piano Solo (1984). A concerto for violin and string orchestra, Affairs of the Heart relies on sustained string textures. Both the use of sustained strings and the focus on a solo instrument                                                  2. Bernard, “The Minimalist Aesthetic,” Perspectives of New Music 31 no. 1 (Winter 1993), 86. 3  against a broad textural palette are elements found throughout Ordinary Beauty. Both the Three Pieces for Piano Solo and Ordinary Beauty use a controlled pattern-based approach that explore different registers and timbres of the piano in a linear fashion; however, in the latter, there is a higher frequency of pattern-disruption, the texture is liable to change at a faster rate, and both the piano part and the overall texture utilize an idiosyncratic wide registral spacing. In general, Ordinary Beauty differs in style and construction from the music of Mozetich in its increased harmonic rhythm, starker textural contrasts, and the use of widely spaced orchestration.    The other important musical influence in Ordinary Beauty is the music of Arvo Pärt (1935-). Pärt is one of the Holy Minimalists, a title applied to a diverse group of minimalist composers from the latter part of the twentieth-century who found inspiration in traditional liturgical music. The wide registral spacing and the textural simplicity found in pieces such as Für Alina (1976) and Spiegel im Spiegel (1978) have a direct impact on the orchestration in Ordinary Beauty. This use of unfilled extreme registers is occasionally found within the piano part, and the various instrumental groupings.  2.2  Romanticism   Ordinary Beauty is inspired by the music of the late Romantic period. Its tonal stability, traditional melodic structures, and use of nature imagery all have ties to the music of the late 19th and early 20th century. The composers from this era whose music has most influenced this piece are the English pastoralists Sir William Edward Elgar (1857-1934), and Vaughan Williams (1872-1958).    Ordinary Beauty utilizes extra-musical imagery and incorporates the lyricism, diatonicism, and phrase structures that are the hallmarks of Romanticism; however, the lyricism is heavily controlled by both developmental processes and a minimalist aesthetic, the diatonicism 4  is modal rather than tonal and moves according to slow linear motion or tertiary relationships instead of traditional harmonic progressions, and the phrase structures frequently dissolve into minimalist patterns, supporting the rise of new melodic material.   Ordinary Beauty superimposes Romantic structures on minimalist patterns. The intermingling of these two styles occurs throughout contemporary music;3 in the case of Ordinary Beauty, the minimalist figures heighten the rhythmic interest, while the guiding melodic and harmonic principles provide the piece with shape and dynamic flexibility. Furthermore, the juxtaposition of minimalist machinations with the lyrical and harmonically driven treatment of the rhythmic cells infuses the work with a sense of organicism; the unusual growth and evolution of the rhythmic devices allude to a natural aesthetic, while simultaneously, the repetitions and patterns themselves reflect a sense of the mechanical.                                                     3. See the music of John Adams (1947-), Mozetich (1948-), Torke (1961-), and Kernis (1960-), etc.  5  3.  Genre  Ordinary Beauty is an ensemble piece featuring piano, and strings: Violin I, Violin II, Viola, Cello, and String Bass.4 This instrumentation and the balance of musical textures make the piano quintet and the piano concerto the closest musical genres, although the piece does not satisfactorily adhere to the norms of either category. During the Romantic Period, the piano quintet ripened as a musical genre when it was popularized by composers such as Schubert (1797-1828), Schumann (1810-1856), and Brahms (1833-1897).5 Most twentieth century piano quintets may be categorized as a Neo-Romantic homage to, a Postmodern commentary on, or a continuation of the perceived musical evolution of the genre. Regardless of the motivation, any composer writing a piece that intentionally invokes the genre of “string quintet” invites comparison with the masterpieces that defined the genre. Unlike the traditional string quintet, Ordinary Beauty employs an additional string bass, and is written so that it may be performed either by individual string players on each part, or by a string orchestra. Unlike the piano quintet, the string parts in Ordinary Beauty are less individuated than in most chamber music – they often work together to form a group texture, and to sustain the sound beneath the piano.  The piano concerto received significant attention from renown twentieth-century composers. It was an ideal vehicle to push the limits of virtuosity and musical expression. Ordinary Beauty often features the piano as a solo instrument, while the strings tend to collaborate as an instrumental group. Although the piece includes a variety of instrumental                                                  4. To ensure utmost flexibility, the work is orchestrated so that it may be played with one or more performer per string part.  5ie. Schubert’s “Trout Quintet” Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667 (1819), Schumann’s Piano Quintet in E-Flat major, Op. 44 (1842), and Brahm’s Piano Quintet in F Minor, Op. 34 (1865).   6  pairings, each movement is pillared in sections where either the piano is in the foreground with the strings in the background, or the strings form the foreground material and the piano adds colour or commentary. In this way, the work alludes to the Baroque ritornello form, but is much more fluid in its transitions, ordering, and pacing, and includes the uninhibited participation of the solo instrument while the ensemble carries the salient material. Ordinary Beauty also departs from the concerto form in its exclusive use of strings in the accompanying group (absence of woodwinds, brass, or percussion), and the accessibility of the piano part. Virtuosity is one of the defining features of the contemporary concerto, and the while the role of the piano in Ordinary Beauty is prominent, the technique it requires is delicate and precise, rather than athletic.   7  4.  Orchestration Overview  The orchestration of Ordinary Beauty allows for the string parts to be played by one or several performers. Because of this flexibility and the minimalist aesthetic of the piece, there is no string divisi indicated at any point in the score. The lack of any divisi, in combination with the occasional wide unfilled registral spacing, creates a soundscape that is simple and restrained. The approach to instrumental technique is likewise very frugal. The piano part does not contain any extended techniques, and the strings only intermittently employ pizzicato and bowed tremolo.  Ordinary Beauty utilizes a variety of string textures. The string parts perform contrapuntally, as a group, or in grouped parts. When the texture is divided between the upper and lower strings, they are treated independently (ie. bowed tremolo in the lower strings in mm. 102-106 in the second movement). The use of wide registral spaces is another defining feature of the string part writing. The string bass regularly doubles the cellos down the octave to create a sensation of greater depth, and the first violin periodically highlights a pitch from the texture and sustains it as a bell tone, high above the other strings (ie. mm. 59-76 in the first movement).   There is a strong sense of foreground and background in the orchestration of Ordinary Beauty. The sensitive use of register, the careful balancing of the rhythmic activity between the piano and the strings, the wide registral spacings, the use of the upper strings to delicately highlight pitches from the texture, and the application of crossfading techniques contribute to a visual impression of bringing objects in and out of focus.    8  5. Overview of Harmonic Processes  The harmonic profile of Ordinary Beauty focuses on the natural minor collection. Each movement and section connects to a tonal anchor; movement away from this pitch is often a result of tertiary or linear motion. Additionally, sonorities that do not emphasize the tonic serve a dominant or sub-dominant function, thus increasing tension back towards the tonic. Horizontal structures are typically the product of melodic or pattern interaction; the rest of the texture is filled primarily through tertiary constructions, but at times include quartal and quintal harmonies. Concurrent linear patterns are generally separated by the interval of a third or sixth – allowing for a fuller texture, and a more traditional tertiary sound.    9  6.  Rhythmic Overview  The rhythmic profile in Ordinary Beauty consists of perpetual motion in the lowest common subdivisions with rhythmic accents and melodic contours marking the repeating cells. The only exceptions are in the third movement, where the rhythmic pattern is defined by one or more half-notes followed by whole notes, and in the fifth movement, where the pattern consists of two eighths followed by a rest. Throughout the movements, the interplay between rhythmic patterns of different lengths create interesting and constantly evolving textures. The rhythmic textures are constantly being formed and degraded, allowing for an organic ebb and flow.   10  7.  Formal Principles  Ordinary Beauty is composed of five movements, each approximately four or five minutes long. Each movement has its own tonal area, rhythmic texture, and featured gestures. They are connected through a shared tonal language, their unified structural approach, their treatment of minimalist-inspired material, and an underlying narrative of tension and resolution. The first movement establishes the musical language and style, and maintains energy and momentum through its perpetual motion and rhythmic complexity. The second movement maintains momentum but with a greater focus on texture rather than individual lines. The third movement offers a rhythmic and harmonic reprieve; it is the movement with the slowest tempo and simplest texture. The fourth movement is the movement with the most rhythmic and harmonic tension, which finds resolution in the fifth and final movement.   11  8.  First Movement: Leaf in the Wind  8.1  Introduction  The first movement, Leaf in the Wind, depicts an autumn leaf tossed around at the whims of a cold mountain wind. It is an energetic start to the piece and introduces the sound world and musical processes of Ordinary Beauty. It is based in the E natural minor collection, with contrasting sections in B minor and C# minor. The near perpetual motion of its running eighth-note patterns, and its frequently changing meters give the movement a sense of rushing motion and lift, imitating the wind as it gusts or suddenly changes direction. 8.2  Motivic Content Leaf in the Wind utilizes two primary motives, labelled motives X and Y (see Fig. 1). Motive X, first found in the right hand of the piano in m. 1, is a three-note gesture formed by a descending perfect fifth followed by an ascending major second. Motive Y is a four-note gesture comprising of an ascending fifth followed by a descending major second and then minor third. Because the two motives are of different lengths, when juxtaposed they are out of phase with one another, creating a variety of rhythmic accents, with the X material accenting every dotted quarter note, and the Y material emphasizing every half note. At the beginning of every 12/8 measure they align, reinforcing the meter. These gestures generate all of the melodic and pattern-based material in this movement. Fig. 1. Movement 1: Primary Motives (m. 1: Piano)  12  8.3  Structural Features  The structure of this movement is similar to sonata form, but instead of an unstable development section, the “development” is of a series of stable contrasting sections. Table 1 provides a detailed overview of these sections (stable sections indicated by uppercase letters, transitional material denoted by lower case), as well as tonal areas, common meters, motivic development, textural features, and dynamic range.  The exposition of the movement (mm. 1-58) begins with a statement (A) in which the piano part hosts the main motivic material (foreground) and the strings provide harmonic support. After a brief transitional section, the opening material returns, this time with the piano counterpoint doubled in the strings. The tension builds until m. 34 where the materials spills over into a brief piano solo. In the B section (mm. 34-58), the meter changes to 4/4, and at m. 41, the X-based material in the right hand of the piano stabilizes, and the overlapping strings parts highlight key pitches, fading in and out of the texture (crossfading).  The contrasting sections analogous to the development of a sonata are found in mm. 59-136. The first section, labelled C (mm. 59-85) modulates to B minor. The X-based pattern in the right hand of the piano fades into the background, while the sustained strings surge into the foreground. In the following section, designated D (mm. 86-118), the X-based pattern disappears from the texture, and instead the motive forms the basis for melodic and accompanying material. This section features the strings in melody and accompaniment, and call and response textures – until m. 100, the piano part is limited to the occasional bell tone. In mm. 100-108, the rhythmic strings create a near martial atmosphere, building to a false recapitulation in mm. 119-125, in which there is a brief modulation back to E minor and the opening material. The “development” closes with a penultimate modulation to  13  Table 1. Ordinary Beauty Movement 1: Leaf in the Wind – Structural Features  Movement 1: Leaf in the Wind Key: E minor Time Signature: 12/8 Tempo: q.= 100  Total Number of Measures: 163 Performance Time: 4՛25՛՛ Section mm. Key Meter Motivic Development Texture DynamicsExposition A  1-9 Em 12/8, 2/4, 6/8, 7/8 X – Piano RH Y – Piano LH Piano (foreground) and sustained stringsp/pp<mp 10-18 Piano (foreground) and rhythmic stringsmf/mp a 19-25 Variants of X and Y – Violins Violins (foreground), piano and lower strings in unison  mf/mp,p A՛ 26-33 X – Violins X variant – Piano RH Y՛ – Viola and CelloActive strings (foreground), rhythmically active piano f/mf b 34-40 4/4 X – Piano RH Piano solo fpB  41-48 X – Piano RH Y – Piano LH Piano minimalist pattern (foreground) string swells in background p/pp49-56 p/pp<57-58 Bm  mf<Development C 59-76 Bm 6/4 X՛ – Piano RH Sustained linear strings (foreground), X motive forms 6-note minimalist pattern in piano p↔f/pp  c 77-85 6/4, 6/8 Strings become gradually more activeppp↔mf/ ppD 86-99 12/8, 6/8, 9/8 X – Vln II, Vla, Vc X variants – Vln I Linear, melodic strings with piano bell tones mf/p D՛  100-109 9/8, 6/8, 2/4 X – Piano RH, Vln I Y – Vla and Vc (mm. 106, 109) Lower strings in rhythmic downbows, X motive based “call & response” between piano and upper strings mp 110-116 9/8, 6/8 mf/mp< d 114-118 6/8, 9/8 X – Strings  Piano fades from texture, strings build tension mf< A  119-125 12/8, 2/4 X – Violins Y՛ – Viola and CelloStrings active (piano absent) f E 126-132 C#m 11/8, 2/4, 5/8 X – Piano RH Piano solo (RH only) mf Recap 133-136 Em 11/8, 2/4 Piano (foreground) and sustained stringsmf/>mp B՛՛ 137-150 4/4 Y՛ inverted – Piano RH Piano RH (foreground), sustained strings, tremolo strings (mm. 41-50) mf/mp< D 151-156 12/8 X inverted – Piano and Strings Piano LH (foreground) and active, linear strings f157-163 ff/f>pp 14  C# minor (m. 126-132). The final return to E minor in m. 133 marks beginning of the recapitulation. The movement ends with a return to the B material (mm. 137-150), concluding with another statement of the D material (mm. 151-163). There is no need for the opening material (A) to make a reappearance as it was recently reinforced in the false recapitulation (mm. 119-125) and because the D material, like all parts of this movement, is so closely connected motivically to the beginning that the listener perceives it as the final transformation of the opening gestures. 8.4  Analysis of mm. 1-10  The developmental processes and general character of Leaf in the Wind are evident in a closer look at the opening measures. The minimalist patterns take root in the piano; the left-hand performs groups of four eighth notes (motive Y) pitted against groups of three in the right hand (motive X). At the end of the first measure, both patterns complete their cycles and start to degrade; the intervallic structure of the right hand condenses and the meter simultaneously decreases from 12/8 to 9/8 to 7/8. The left-hand pattern continues to evolve gradually, altering no more than one pitch per measure. At m. 4 the right-hand pattern re-establishes itself, but this time the devolution accelerates and the following measure immediately shifts from 12/8 to 2/4. The third statement of the right-hand pattern (mm. 6-9) ends with an expanding wedge, leading towards a restatement of the opening. During the first nine measures, the strings quietly support the texture with wide-spaced open fifths. At m. 10, the opening material returns, with the strings more active in the texture, highlighting the X and Y motives in the piano part. The opening of the first movement, while supporting minimalist textures, also fulfils the basic requirements of a sentence structure; although nine measures long rather than the typical eight, the basic idea is repeated in a slightly altered and truncated form and the continuation ends with what can be 15  considered a cadence. The combination of sentence structure and minimalist patterns lends the movement and work an organic sense of growth and direction. Fig. 2. Movement 1: Leaf in the Wind, mm. 1-10     16  9.  Second Movement: Petals in the Rain  9.1  Introduction  The second movement, Petals in the Rain, is a musical illustration of raindrops falling on the petals of roses. It contrasts with the opening movement through key, meter, and the subdivisions that form the underlying rhythmic pulse. It is situated in the C# minor collection, and modulates back and forth to E major, the key in which the movement concludes (see Table 2). The imagery that accompanies this movement explores the world of flowers and the dramatic nature of raindrops when viewed from such close quarters; accordingly, the musical focus in this movement is on the minute changes to the piano pattern rather than larger musical gestures. 9.2  Motivic Content  The motivic content of this movement is relatively straightforward. The main motive, designated X, is an ascending minor second (see Fig. 3). Through additive processes, the X motive becomes the Y motive (ascending major second followed by minor second) and then the Z motive (ascending fourth, major second, and minor second). As shown in Fig. 3, throughout this movement the right hand of the piano shadows the left hand motivic material, but with adjustments to the motivic contours. Fig. 3. Movement 3: Primary Motives (mm. 7 and 10: piano)   9.3  Structural Features  The structure of this movement is a developing variation (see Table 2). Each section     17  establishes the interlocking pattern in the piano part while the string swells highlight key pitches, and then the texture gradually disintegrates before beginning anew. The first two statements (mm. 1-61) are both in C# minor and quite similar in content; however, in the second statement (A՛), the strings come into the foreground. The following statement (B) is in E major (mm. 62-69). The piano is once again in the foreground, accompanied by string swells and by a playful pizzicato at m. 61 in the lower strings. The A material returns in m. 70-91 followed by a sudden break from the musical machinery in mm. 92-101 (C). This textural change provides a moment of psychological release, featuring an unaccompanied descending line in the upper Table 2. Ordinary Beauty Movement 2: Petals in the Rain – Structural Features Movement 2: Petals in the Rain Key: C# minor Time Signature: 2/3 Tempo: h= 50 Total Number of Measures: 109 Performance Time: 4՛11՛՛ Section mm. Key Meter Motivic Development Texture DynamicsA  1-13 C#m 2/2 x, y, z – LH Piano  Piano pattern (foreground), sustained strings (background) p/pp14-39 3/2, 2/2 pp<mf40-45  mf<fA՛ 46-61 2/2, 3/2, 12/8 x, y – LH Piano  Piano pattern (background), sustained strings (foreground) pp<p B 62-69 E+ 12/8 y – LH Piano y՛ – Violin 1 & 2 Piano pattern (background), Vln 1 and Vln 2 have free material based on Y (foreground), pizzicato lower strings pp<p A՛՛ 70-91 C#m 2/2 x, y, z – LH Piano  Piano pattern (foreground), sustained strings (background) p<mp C 92-101 E+  - Piano absent, upper strings have descending line and are joined by lower strings in mm. 98-101 mp A 102-109 y – LH Piano  Piano pattern (foreground), upper strings sustained and lower strings utilize bowed tremolo (background) mf<f  18  Fig. 4. Movement 2: Petals in the Rain, mm. 1-10     19  strings. The piano pattern returns for a brief statement in mm. 102-109 (A), but this time in the key of E major; there is a sense of triumph in the conclusion of this movement, emphasized by the tremolos in the lower strings before the final chord. 9.4 Analysis of mm. 1-10 The beginning of this movement introduces its approach to texture and structure. The interlocking pattern – repeating cells in the left hand that are phased-shifted and re-contoured in the right hand (see Fig. 4) – increases its intervallic structure and undergoes additive processes before losing momentum at m. 8 and disintegrating at m. 11. The waxing and waning of the surface rhythmic activity throughout the movement mimics the changes in intensity of rain as it alternates between drizzling and pouring.  The emphasis on the subdominant and mediant at the beginning of the piece and all subsequent statements of the A material obscures the tonality. The slow growth and progress towards the tonic reinforces the sensation of observing minutiae; it is necessary to slow down and in order to perceive small details, such as the impact of raindrops on the delicate pedals.    20  10.  Third Movement: Sunlit Grove 10.1 Introduction  The third movement, Sunlit Grove, portrays a quiet and still forest grove in the mountains, lit with a warm morning light. In the narrative scope of the piece, it is the eye of the storm. In terms of surface rhythmic activity, it is the slowest movement. It provides a psychological reprieve from the other movements with its almost complete adherence to a single tonal area, its simple texture, and its wide registral expanse.6  10.2  Motivic Content  Unlike the first two movements, the motivic content of Sunlit Grove does not form a perpetually moving rhythmic pattern (see Fig. 5). The X motive is an ascending major second, and the closely related Y motive consists of two concurrent ascending major seconds followed by a descending fourth; in each gesture, the last pitch is held for twice the duration of the preceding pitches. In contrast to all the other movements of the piece, the motives frequently appear in an alternating pattern within the same part. Throughout the rest of the piece, the motivic content either transforms itself over time within one part, or different motives are developed in multiple parts simultaneously.  Fig. 5. Movement 3: Primary Motives (mm. 1-6: piano)                                                   6The style exhibited in this movement may be compared to the music of Arvo Pärt (1935-), specifically Für Alina (1976) and Spiegel im Spiegel (1978). 21  10.3 Structural Features  As with the second movement, the third movement is in a developing variations form. The opening section (mm. 1-24) is comprised of three statements formed by the alternation of the X and Y motives (see Table 3). Throughout this section (A), the piano is in the foreground. With each subsequent statement of the X-Y pattern, the strings become more active, beginning with sustained pitches (mm. 1-8), then providing a homorhythmic counterpoint to the piano part (m. 9-16), and eventually elaborating the counterpoint by functioning in two separate rhythmic groups (mm. 17-24).  In approaching the B section (mm. 25-34), the piano drops out of the texture and the strings perform a variation of the X-Y pattern where the Y statements are truncated (A՛).  The B section (mm. 35-40) consists of a homorhythmic chordal texture loosely based on truncated X and Y motives. This section is the only part of the movement that moves away from A minor, briefly modulating to C major.  Section C (mm. 41-50) returns to the key of A minor, but the piano is absent from the texture. There is a feeling of airlessness and suspension in this section because of the long sustained rhythmically augmented X variants in the strings.  The piano returns along with the A՛ material in mm. 51-66. The truncated X and Y statements are first found in the rolled piano chords – accompanied by interlocking X-based counterpoint in the upper strings – and then in the strings in counterpoint with the piano. In the final statement (mm. 67-76), the piano and the strings are doubled, with the exception of Violin I; the first violin holds a C from the previous section as a high bell tone above the string section.    22  Table 3. Ordinary Beauty Movement 3: Sunlit Grove – Structural Features  Movement 3: Sunlit Grove Key: A minor Time Signature: 3/2  Tempo: h= 54 Total Number of Measures: 76 Performance Time: 4՛47՛՛ Section mm. Key Meter Motivic Development Texture DynamicsA 1-8 Am 3/2, 4/2  Alternating X-Y Pattern  (X, Y, X՛, Y՛, X՛, X variant) Piano solo, sustained strings in mm. 6-8 mp/pp↔ppp 9-16 X-Y Pattern – Piano  X augmented – Strings  Piano (foreground) in counterpoint with homorhythmic string texturemf/p 17-24 X-Y Pattern – Piano X and Y variants – Strings Piano (foreground) in counterpoint with strings, upper strings and lower strings functioning in two separate rhythmic groups f/mp A՛ 25-34 X-Y pattern, truncated Y statements – Upper Strings  Upper strings (foreground), lower strings sustained, piano absent mf B 35-40 C+ Truncated X and Y variants – Piano and Strings Piano chordal texture (foreground), strings sustained then support piano gestures f C 41-50 Am 4/2, 5/2, 3/2 Rhythmically augmented X variants – Strings Sustained homorhythmic strings, piano absent until m. 49ff>p<mp A՛ 51-56 3/2 X – Piano and Viola X՛ – Violin I Y՛ variant – Violin II Rolled piano chords (foreground), upper strings in interlocking pattern, lower strings sustained mf/mf>mp/p 57-66 X-Y pattern, truncated Y – Strings (-Violin I) X and X՛ – Piano   All strings except Vln 1 in homorhythmic texture piano rolled chords in counterpoint with strings, Vln 1 plays bell tone mf/pp A՛՛ 67-76 3/2, 4/2 X-Y pattern, truncated Y –  Strings (-Violin I) and Piano Piano and added strings in foreground in homorhythmic texture, Vln 1 plays bell tone (C) p>pp/ppp    23  Fig. 6. Movement 3: Sunlit Grove, mm. 1-12  24  10.4 Analysis of mm. 1-12  The processes and aesthetic that govern the third movement are evident in the opening measures. The movement begins with unaccompanied piano performing a phrase composed of alternating X and Y motives (see Fig. 6). The outer voices of the piano part move in parallel motion, and are set a 10th apart, while the inner voice completes the triadic harmony. This simplicity of material and harmonic approach is at the heart of this movement, which radiates peace and stillness. The strings enter the texture at m. 6 in the low part of their ranges – the wide registral spacing between the strings and piano is characteristic of this movement. The addition of the string counter phrase in m. 9 follows the general trend of this movement in that there is a slow addition and evolution of the texture in each subsequent statement of the opening phrase.   25  11.  Fourth Movement: Hawk in Flight 11.1 Introduction   The fourth movement, A Hawk in Flight, portrays the hawk as it soars and dives through the air. It marks a return to the renewed energy and rhythmic activity of the first two movements. This movement is the most dissonant of the work, because of the incidental semi-tones that arise between the left and right hand repetitions. In terms of tempo, it is also the fastest movement, increasing tension towards the finale of the piece. 11.2 Motivic Content  There are two primary motives in the fourth movement (see Fig. 7 and Fig. 8). The X motive, an ascending perfect fifth followed by a perfect fourth, provides the musical engine for the movement. The incidental falling semitone that occurs between the first two statements of the X motive (Fig. 7) is the origin of the Y motive – the building block for the majority of the movement’s melodic material. The Y motive is first featured in the violins (see Fig. 8); its stepwise motion contrasts with the disjunct X motivic material, allowing for easier aural differentiation amid the texture. Fig. 7. Movement 4: Motive X, and Motive Y origins (mm. 1-2: piano)    Fig. 8. Movement 4: Motive Y (mm. 19-23: Violin I)  26  11.3 Structural Features   The fourth movement – like the first movement – is analogous to a sonata without a development (see Table 4). The exposition, in C minor, begins with an introduction (mm. 1-11) in which we become acquainted with the X-based pattern in the piano, supported by sustained lower strings. In mm. 12-39, the violins are in the foreground with melodic material based on Y (A). The piano breaks into the foreground in mm. 40-61 (A՛), and then joins the strings in a reiteration of the opening A material (mm. 62-73). In mm. 74-89, the texture transitions towards the B material, where the strings are in the foreground with X material, and the piano part develops a new pattern based on Y material in the right hand, and truncated X statements in the left (mm. 90-118). The exposition ends with a transitional section and modulates to A minor.  The “development” section (mm. 119-186) gradually expands the upper range, creating the sensation of ascension. It features Y-based melodic material first in the first violin (mm. 119-150) and then in the right hand of the piano (mm. 151-186) above sustained strings and an X-based pattern in the piano left hand. The ascension reaches its peak on the downbeat of m. 175, when the right hand of the piano hits its highest pitch, C8. This moment also marks the modulation back to C minor in anticipation of the recapitulation (mm. 175-186).  The recapitulation reworks the opening material so that the piano is in the background, and ascending lines derived from the Y motive are featured in the upper strings (mm. 187-242). There is a break from the drone of the sustained lower strings in mm. 243-249; the Violin I part performs a solo, unaccompanied ascending major 2nd before all parts return to the texture, and the movement finishes in the tonic major (mm. 250-256).    27  Table 4. Ordinary Beauty Movement 4: Hawk in Flight– Structural Features  Movement 4: Hawk in Flight Key: C minor Time Signature: 6/8  Tempo: q.= 112-120 Total Number of Measures: 256 Performance Time: 4՛40՛՛ Section mm. Key Meter Motivic Development Texture DynamicsExposition a 1-11 Cm 6/8 X – Piano Piano minimalist pattern (foreground), sustained strings (background) pp<mf>p A 12-27 X – Piano Y – Violins  Violins (foreground), piano pattern and sustained lower strings (background) p<mf28-39 p<mf< A՛ 40-61 Piano pattern forms melodic contours (foreground), sustained strings (background) f, mf<f>mp  A 62-73 X – Piano LH Y – Piano RH, Violins Piano right hand and violins (foreground), piano left hand and sustained strings (background) mp<mf a 74-89 X – Piano  Y – ViolinsViolins (foreground), piano and sustained strings (background) >pp↔mf B 90-103 X variant – all strings (-Violin 1) X՛ – Piano LH Y – Piano RHAll strings except Vln 1 form large melodic contour (foreground), piano pattern and Vln 1 tremolo (background) f>pp↔ppp 104-111 X՛ – Piano LH Y – Piano RH Piano pattern ascends (foreground), strings sustained (background) ppp<b 112-118 Am mf<f Development C 119-150 X – Piano  Violin 1 (foreground), piano pattern and sustained strings (background) <ff>mf/mp/p 151-174 X – Piano LH Piano RH (foreground), piano LH and sustained strings (background) mf/p/ppc 175-186 Cm X՛՛ – Piano LH Y – Piano RH mf/p Recap A՛՛ 187-242 X – Piano Y inverted (ascending 2nds) – Upper StringsUpper Strings (foreground), Piano and sustained lower strings (background) mf/mp<ff 243-249 Y inverted (ascending 2nd) – Violin Violin solo >mp 250-256 C+ X - Piano Piano pattern and sustained strings (foreground) pp    28  Fig. 9. Movement 4: Hawk in Flight, mm. 28-41      29  11.4 Anaylsis mm. 28-41  The conclusion of the first statement of the A material in the exposition (mm. 28-41) demonstrates the defining features of the movement (see Fig. 9). The continuous x-based eighth note arpeggios in the piano maintain the energy and direction, the lower strings sustain pitches derived from the piano, while the upper strings provide the y-derived melodic focus. Both the arpeggiated and linear material give an impression of direction and purpose; on the downbeat of m. 40, the piano part evolves and the arpeggios sweep into the foreground while the violins, having reached the goal of their melodic lines, sustain their pitches (tonic and mediant, respectively). This combination of musical materials, and the gradually shifting of focus between the different layers, characterize this movement.   30  12.  Fifth Movement: Ocean Spray 12.1 Introduction   The fifth movement and final movement, Ocean Spray, is in a celebratory 5/4 meter. A musical depiction of the dancing waves above deeper currents, it provides a sense of closure to the narrative of the piece through its harmonic and melodic stability. While beginning in A minor, at times it evokes the Lydian mode. It modulates to C# minor, E minor, and back to A minor before ending in a firm and exultant C major (see Table 5). 12.2 Motivic Content  The primary motive of this movement is motive X, an ascending major second followed by an eighth rest (see Fig. 10). The secondary Y motive is not as prominent in the motivic development of the moment, but serves to heighten the rhythmic interest and drive of the A section material (see Table 5).  Fig. 10. Movement 5: X and Y motives (m. 1: Violin I and Cello)  12.3 Structural Features  The final movement, like the first and fourth movements, is comparable to a sonata form with stable contrasting sections serving the psychological and harmonic purpose of a development section. Unlike any of the other movements, the fifth movement begins with a complete musical statement where the piano is absent from the texture (mm. 1-10). In the repetition of the opening material (mm. 11-20) the X material appears in the right hand of the piano, accompanied by pizzicato Y-variants in the strings. In mm. 21-38, the X motive equips a symmetrical piano pattern that provides rhythmic and harmonic support to sustained string 31  gestures. The piano pattern rises to the foreground in mm. 39-52, and drives the motion towards to the contrasting middle section.  The pseudo-development section modulates to C# minor. In this new texture, the x-based rhythmic pattern migrates to the violin II and viola parts, the lower strings sustain pitches, the violin I performs bell tones, and the piano remains in the foreground with large chordal gestures loosely based on X (mm. 53-86). The piano holds its place as the musical focus while the pattern returns in mm. 87-110, and furthers the motion into the next “development” section. Anticipating the recapitulation, the end of the “development” reworks material from the exposition and modulates to the key E minor (mm. 119-132).  In mm. 133-142, the A section material makes a full return in the home key of A minor, with motivic material in the strings and forceful rhythmic chords in the piano part. However, there is a surprise interpolation of new material in mm. 143-158 (D). The violin II and viola parts continue with an x-based pattern, while the piano, violin I, cello and bass take turns in hosting the x-based melodic material. The movement, and piece as a whole ends with the piano and strings in a homorhythmic texture in C major, in a slightly slower tempo (mm. 166-196). 12.4 Anaylsis mm. 1-10  The opening measures of Ocean Spray offer a glimpse into the construction and character of the movement (see Fig. 11). The first four measures are tonally ambiguous, perhaps suggestive of the Lydian mode. A minor is not affirmed until m. 5, but its arrival dispels any uncertainty as to the tonal anchor. The 5/4 meter is dancelike, and the switch to 3/4 in m. 8 creates even more motion towards the upcoming arrival of the piano in m. 11. This introduction establishes the main features of the movement – its tonal language, its irregular meter, the playfulness of the gestures, and the intensity and dynamism of the musical lines. 32  Table 5. Ordinary Beauty Movement 5: Ocean Spray– Structural Features Movement 5: Ocean Spray Key: Am Time Signature: 5/4  Tempo: q= 152 Total Number of Measures: 197 Performance Time: 5՛05՛՛ Section mm. Key Meter Motivic Development Texture DynamicsExposition A 1-10 Am 5/4, 3/4 X – Upper strings Y – Lower strings Upper strings (foreground), rhythmic lower strings (background), piano absent mf<f 11-20 X – Piano RH Y variant - StringsPiano RH (foreground), pizzicato strings mf/ mp>pB 21-28 6/8 X – Piano  Homorhythmic sustained strings (foreground), piano pattern mf29-38 mf/mf<f>pb 39-50 X variants – Piano  Piano pattern (foreground), sustained strings mf/pp<p< 51-52 C#m Development C 53-86 X inverted – Vln II and Vla Piano chords (foreground), Vln 1 bell tones, Vln II and Vla rhythmic pattern, lower strings sustained f/mf 87-113 X inverted – Piano RH Piano and upper strings (foreground), lower rhythmic strings c 114-118 Em 3/4, 5/4 X variants – Piano RH Piano RH (foreground), sustained strings and Piano LH  >mp<f/mf A՛ 119-122 5/4, 6/4 mp/n< 123-126 5/4 X variants – Vln II and Vla Violin II and Viola (foreground), Piano chords, sustained remaining strings mp/p/pp a՛ 127-132 5/4, 2/4 Vln II and Vla dialogue (foreground), Piano chords, sustained lower strings  mf/p/pp< Recapitulation A 133-142 Am 5/4, 3/4 X – Upper Strings Y – Lower Strings Upper strings (foreground), rhythmic lower strings and piano (background) f D 143-150 5/4 X – Vln II and Vla  X variant – Vln I and PianoPizz. Vln 1 and piano (foreground), Vln II and Vla pattern, pizz. Lower stringsmf/p 151-158 X – Vln II and Vla  X variant – lower strings Lower strings (foreground), Vln II and Vla pattern, Vln I bell tone, piano absent f/mf/p<mp d 159-165 5/4, 2/4 X – Piano, Vln II and Vla Piano (foreground), Vln I bell tone, Vln II and Vla pattern, lower strings sustained f/mp E 166-176 5/4, 4/4 X inverted (descending line) upper stringsPiano and upper strings homorhythmic (foreground), lower strings sustained mf>pp A՛՛ 177-196 C+ 4/4 X augmented – Piano and upper stringspp<ff 33   Fig. 11. Movement 5: Ocean Spray mm. 1-10    34  13.  Conclusion  Ordinary Beauty is a work that explores boundaries of style, structure, and aesthetic through its hybridization of minimalist-inspired processes and principles of Romanticism. Furthermore, this stylistic juxtaposition offers the opportunity to question the aesthetics that underlie these musical categorizations. Romanticism is associated with the pastoral, while minimalism has ties to industrialization and production; the conscious coupling of these styles and their associations is a comment on the fragility of distinctions between nature and technology.  Ordinary Beauty is also a celebration of the beauty and wonder of the natural world. Each movement focuses scenes that are familiar in the local environment, observing these commonplace occurrences with gravity and intention. There are many ways to be an artist, and one of them lies in this simple act of bearing witness to the world around us.         35  Bibliography  Bernard, Jonathan W. “The Minimalist Aesthetic in the Plastic Arts and in Music.” Perspectives  of New Music 31 no. 1 (Winter 1993): 86-132.  _________________. “Minimalism, Postminimalism, and the Resurgence of Tonality in Recent  American Music.” American Music 21 no. 1 (Spring 2003): 122-133.  Burkholder, J. Peter, Donald J. Grout and Claude V. Palisca. A History of Western Music. 7th ed.  New York: W. W. Norton, 2006.  De Leeuw, Ton. Music of the Twentieth Century; A Study of Its Elements and Structure.  Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2005.  Fink, Robert. Repeating Ourselves; American Minimal Music as Cultural Practice. Berkeley:  California University Press, 2005.  Ford, Andrew. Illegal Harmonies; Music in the 20th Century. Marrickville: Hale & Iremonger Pty  Ltd., 1997.   Griffiths, Paul. Modern Music and After. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., 2010.    Potter, Keith. Four Musical Minimalists; La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, Philip  Glass.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.  Radice, Mark A. Concert Music of the Twentieth Century. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey:  Pearson Education Inc., 2003.  Ross, Alex. The Rest is Noise; Listening to the Twentieth Century.  New York: Picador, 2007.  Schwarz, Robert K. Minimalists. London: Phaidon Press, 1996.  Strickland, Edward. Minimalism: Origins. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993.  Watkins, Glenn. Soundings; Music in the Twentieth Century. New York: Schirmer Books, 1988.  Whittall, Arnold. Exploring Twentieth-Century Music; Tradition and Innovation. Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 2003.   36  Appendix A  Ordinary Beauty – Score 37&&&&B??#######81281281281281281281242424242424242812812812812812812812424242424242428128128128128128128129LROLQ,9LROLQ,,9LROD&HOOR'RXEOH%DVV3LDQRœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‡.w‚.w‚.w‚‡:LWK0RWLRQD9pnnn&RQ3HGDOHœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‡.w.w.w‡‰‰‰eÉ e œ œ œœ œ œ œ‡ÇÇLJœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ» . .ǂ.w.w‚.w.w‚nnœ œ œœ œ œ œÇÇÇÇlj&&&&B??#######8128128128128128128124242424242424286868686868686878787878787878128128128128128128129OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR6 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.w.w.w‰œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ?ÇÇÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œÇ œ‚ œ œœƒœ‚œ .œÇ œ jœ‚Ç œ œ œ‚Ç œ jœ‚Ppppppœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.œ .œ .œ .œ.œ .œ .œ .œÇ-ƒÇ-‚Ç-‚Ç-ƒÇ-‚Ç-‚Ç-ƒÇ-‚Ç-‚FPPPPP‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWWI. 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Petals in the Rain54&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #23232323232323222222222222229OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR11 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwww‰œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwrit. wUwUÇ ÇUwUwUwUwU• œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.w.w.wnnnn&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #222222222222229OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR15 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwn‰‰‰‰œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwpœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwnnnnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ .Çwwwwp‰œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwww‰pppII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW55&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR20 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ .Çwwwwpœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwpœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œÇ Çwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwww&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR24 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œw Ç3wwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwPPPœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW56&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR28 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?wwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwww œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‡‡w Ç3wwPPFnnpœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‡‡www&?&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR32 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‡‡Ç Çwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‡» Ç‚Ç Çwwpœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‡w.Ç œwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œw‚Ç ÇwwwFFFpII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW57&?&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR36œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwÇ ÇwwFPœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwÇ Çwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwÇ Çwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwÇ ÇÇ Çww&?&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #23232323232323222222222222229OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR40œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwÇ Çwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwÇ Çwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ3wÇ Çwwwrit. wwwwww‡a tempoffF‡‡www‡‡‡‡ &.w.w‡‡‡II. 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Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW59&&&&&&?# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR51 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.w.w‡‰‰œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.w.w‡œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ.Ç œJœ .œ.Ç œ Jœ .œ.w.w‡pp&&&&&&?# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QRœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç .Ç.w.w.w‡‰‰‰œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç .œ .œ.w.w.w‡II. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW60&&&&&&?# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR56 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.w.w‡œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.w.w‡&&&&&&?# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR58 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç .œ .œ.w.w.w‡œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç .Ç.w.w.w‡II. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW61&&&&&&?# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR60 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç .œ .œ.w.w.w ?‡œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.Ç .œ Œ . B» . .Ç.Ç .ÇSL]] pSL]]p&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QRœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.Ç .Ç.Ç .Ç.Ç .lj‰SL]]pœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç œ œƒ œ œ œ œ.Ç œ œƒ œ œ œ œ.œ .œ .Ç.œ .œ .Ç.œ .œ .ÇppII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW62&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR64 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.w.w.Ç .Ç.Ç .Ç.Ç .Çœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.œ .œ‚ œ œ œ œ œ œ.œ .œ‚ œ œ œ œ œ œ.œ .œ .Ç.œ .œ .Ç.œ .œ .Ç&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR66 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç .œ .œ‚.Ç .œ .œ‚.Ç .Ç.Ç .Ç.Ç .Çœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.œ .Ç .œ.œ .Ç .œ.œ .Ç .œ.œ .Ç .œ.œ .Ç .œII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW63&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #222222222222229OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR68 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç .œ‚ .œ.ǃ .Ç.Ç .Ç.Ç .Ç.Ç .Çœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.œ .Ç .œ.œ .Ç .œ.œ .Ç Œ ..w.wwwww‡‡‡‡‡www‚‡‡nDUFR&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR72 ‡‡www» ǂ‡nDUFR» Œ ‰ • Rœ‡.ÇŒ.Ç Œww» ǂpnDUFRpœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwnnpœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwppœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwpII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW64&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR77 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwnnnPPœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwppœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwPœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwww&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QRœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwww œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW65&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR86 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwww&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR90 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwwÇ »œ œ œ œœ œ œ Ç3wwÇ »‡‡wwww‡‡‡‡‡ww‡‡‡‡‡w‚w‡‡‡PP‡‡ww‡‡‡‡‡ww‡‡‡‡‡ww‡‡‡‡‡ww» ǂ‡‡nII. Petals in the Rain‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW66&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR99 ‡‡www» ǂ‡n‡‡wwww» ǂn‡‡wwwww• œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwƒwƒwŽwŽwŽFFFFF‰œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwŽwŽwŽœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwŽwŽwŽ&&&&B??# # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # ## # # #9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR105 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwwwŽwŽwŽœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3œ œ œ œ œ œwwwŽwŽwŽrit.fwwwwwwwfffff wwwwwww     *Pause at least 10 seconds before continuing to 3rd movement‡U‡U‡U‡U‡U‡U‡UII. 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Sunlit Grove‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW73??&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb86868686868686444444444444449LROLQ,9LROLQ,,9LROD&HOOR'RXEOH%DVV3LDQRœ> œ œ .œŒ . œ œ œ‡‡‡‡.ǂ‰n:LWK0RWLRQD8	œ> œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ‡‡‡‡.Çœ> œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ‡‡‡‡.Çœ> œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ‡‡‡‡.Çœœ>œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ‡.ǂ.ǂ..Çǂ.ÇnPnnpœ> œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ‡.Ç.Ç..ÇÇ.Ç??&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb44444444444444868686868686869OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR7œ> œ.Ç.œ jœ> œœ œ> œ‡wwwwwŒ . œ œ œœ> œœ .œ‡.Ç..Çǃ..Çǃ.ǃFFFFF.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ‡‡..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Çn.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ‡‡..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ‡‡..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.ǂ.ǂ..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Çpppppp.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Nj(LOHHQ93DGJHWWIV. Hawk in Flight74??&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR14 .œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œœ Jœƒ œ. œ œœ jœƒ œ. œ œ..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.ÇFF.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œŒ ǂŒ ǂ..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Çpp.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œJœ> œ. Jœ œ.Jœ> œ. Jœ œ...ÇÇ..ÇÇ.ÇFF??&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR21 .œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œJœ œ. 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Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW77&?&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR“56 .œ Œ .? &œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ..ÇÇ..ÇÇ.LJœ œ œ œ œœ.Çœ œ œ œ œ œœƒ œ œ œ œ œ..ÇÇ.LJœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.ǃ.ǃ‡œ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.LJœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.LJœ œ œ œ œœJœ ‰ ‰ Œ .jœ ‰ ‰ Œ ..Ç.Ç.ÇPPppp...ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.ǂ.ǂ.Ç.Ç.ÇP...ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç&?&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR(“)64 ...ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœœœ Jœœœ œœœ.œœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ Jœ œ. œ œœ jœ œ. œ œ.Ç.Ç.ÇFFŒ ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœŒ Jœ‚ .œŒ Jœ‚ .œ.Ç.Ç.ÇPP...ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç...ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç...ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇJœœ> œœ. Jœœ œœ.œ œ œ œ œœJœ> œ. Jœ œ.Jœ> œ. Jœ œ..Ç.Ç.ÇFFFJœœ œœ. Jœœ œœ.œ œ œ œ œœJœ œ. Jœ œ.jœ œ. jœ œ..Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW78&?&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR(“)72Jœœ œœ. Jœœ œœ.œ œ œ œ œœJœ œ. Jœ œ.jœ œ. jœ œ..ǃ.ǃ.ǃjœœ œœ. œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œœ œJœ œ. œ œ œjœ œ. œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç..œœ œ œœ?œ œ œ .œ &Jœ œ œ œ œjœ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç .œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ .œ ?Jœ œ œ œ œjœ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œ?œ œ œ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.lj‰‰.œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œœ œ œ?œ œ œ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.lj‰FFF?&&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR79 .œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œ?œ œ œ .œ &œ> œ œ .œœ> œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.ÇFF‰‰‰.œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œœ œ œ?œ œ œ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇFFF.œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œ?œ œ œ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ .œ ?.œ ‰ œ‚ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW79&?&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR86 .œ œ œ œ?œ œ œ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œœ œ œ? &œ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç·fffff ‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ Œ .‡‰‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.œ Œ ..œ Œ ..œ ‰ œ‚ œœƒ œ œ Jœ œ.ǃ‰‰pp‰‰&&&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR93œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œŒ . .œŽ‰ œ‚ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Çpˆœœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.ǎ.Ç.Ç.LJ‰‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.ǎ.Ç.Ç&‡‡‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.œŽ Œ ..œ Œ .Œ . ‰ œ‚ œœƒ œ œ Jœ œ&.ǃppˆ‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œŒ . .œŽ‰ œ‚ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Çpœœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.ǎ.Ç.Ç.LJ‰‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.ǎ.Ç.LJ ?‡‰‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.œŽ Œ ..œ Œ .Œ . ‰ œ‚ œœƒ œ œ jœ œ&.ǃˆppIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW80&&&&&&?bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR101œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œŒ . .œŽ‰ œ‚ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Çpœœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.ǎ.Ç.Ç.LJ‰‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ.ǎ.Ç.LJ‡‰œœ œœ œœ œœ œœjœ œ œ Jœ.œŽ Œ ..LJ‡‡ˆ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœjœ œ œ Jœ‡.LJ‡‡œœ œœ œœ œœ œœjœ œ œ Jœ.ǂ.LJ B‡‡œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ œ Jœ.Ç.Ç.ǂ‡ ?‡ˆœœ œœ œœ œœ œœjœ œ œ Jœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-‚.Ç-‚pp&&&&B??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR109 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœjœ œ œ Jœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-.Ç-œœ œœ œœ œœ œœjœ œ œ Jœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-.Ç-œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ œ Jœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-.Ç-œœN œœN œœ œœ œœJœœN .œ.Ç.ÇN.Ç.ÇN -ƒ.ÇN -ƒFFFFFFœœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ.œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-.ÇN -œœ œœ œœ œœ œœJœ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-.Ç-œœœ œœÇÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çffffff~~~~IV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW81&?&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR116....ÇÇÇÇœ œœ œ œ œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç....ÇÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç....œœœœ œœœœ Jœœ œ œ jœ œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç....œœœœœ œ œœ œ œ.œ&.Ç.Ç.ǃ.ǃ.ǃƒƒƒƒƒƒ.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç~~~&?&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇpppPFp.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ&.ǃ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ&.Ç.Ç.ǂ.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW82&&&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR130 .œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ &.Ç.ǂ.Ç.ǂ.ǂ.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œœœ œ œ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ jœ œ œ œjœ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç&?&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR137 œ jœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ jœ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œeœ œ œœd œœ .œ &œƒ œ œ œ œ .œœƒ œ œ œ œ .œ.ǃ.ǃ.ǃPPPFF.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œœ œ œ?œ œœ .œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW83??&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR143 .œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ &œ> œ œ œ œ .œœ> œ œ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œœ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç .œœ œ œ&œ œ œ.œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç&&&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR“150 œ jœ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç &.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇF‰‰‰‰pVLQJLQJTXDVLVRORXQWLOP.Çœ œ œ œ œœ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œœ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW84&?&&&??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR(“)157 .Çœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ .œœ œ œ œœ œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œœ œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ Jœ œœ œ œ œœ œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç&&&&&??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR(“)164 .œ œ Jœœ œ œ œ œ œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œœ œ &.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œœ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç..ÇÇœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç..œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW85&?&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR(“)171 .Çœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œœ ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç..ÇÇœ œ œ œœ œ&.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç..œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œA œ œ œ.ǃ.ÇAƒ.ÇAƒ.ÇAƒ.ÇAƒppppœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç&&&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR(“)178œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.ǃ.Ç.ÇFFœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.ǂ.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW86&&&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR185œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-œ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç-.Ç-FPP.Çœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç.ǂ.Ç.Ç.ÇPŒ . œ œ œ?œ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç œ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç??&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR193.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.ǂ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.ǃ.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.ǂ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œœœ œ œ.œœ œ œ .œ.ǃ.ǃ.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW87??&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR201 .œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.ǃ.Ç.Ç.Çf œ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.ǂ.Ç.ǂ.Ç.ÇFFFFF.œ œ œ œ&œ œ œ.œ.Ç.ǃ.Ç.Ç.Ç&?&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR208 œ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.ǂ.Ç.ǂ.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ.œ.Ç.ǃ.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.ǂ.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW88&?&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR215 œ œ œ .œ.œ œn œ œ&.œ .œ.ǃ.Çn.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œn œ œ.œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œn œ œ.œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œn œ œ.œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œœ œ œ.Ç.Ç.ǃ.ǃ.ǃfffƒƒƒœ œ œ .œ.œœ œ œ?.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çœ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç&?&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR222 œ œ œ .œ.œ œ œ œ.Ç.Ç.ǂ.Ç.Ç.œœ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ÇF.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Çjœƒ œ. jœ œ..Ç.lj‰f.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Çjœ œ. jœ œ..Ç.ÇIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW89&?&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR229.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Çjœ œ. jœ œ..Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Çjœ œ. œ œ œ.œ œ‚ œ œ.Çff.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çn.ǃ.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.ǃƒ&?&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR236.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.LJ.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.LJ‡.œ œ œ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.Ç.LJ‡œ Jœ œœ œœ œ œ .œ.Ç.LJ‡‡IV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW90&?&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR243 .œ Œ .‡.LJ‡‡‡‡‡.LJ‡‡‡‡‡.LJ‡‡‡‡‡.LJ‡‡‡‡‡.LJ‡‡‡P‡‡.LJ‡‡‡‡ ?‡.LJ‡‡‡Œ . œn œ œœ œ œn .œ.Ç.Çnƒ.ǃ.ǃ.ǃ‰‰‰‰‰.œ œ œn œœ œ œn .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç??&&&??bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR252 .œ œ œ œnœ œ œn .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œn œ œœ œ œn .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œn œœ œ œn .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.œ œ œ œnœ œ œn .œ.Ç.Ç.Ç.Ç.Çrit. ..ÇÇnU..ÇÇU.ÇU.ÇU.ÇU.ÇU.ljIV. Hawk in Flight‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW91&?&&B??454545454545459LROLQ,9LROLQ,,9LROD&HOOR'RXEOH%DVV3LDQR‡‡œƒ œ ‰ jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œƒ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œƒ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.ǃ œ œ< œ<‡:LWK(QHUJ\DFFFF‡‡œ œ ‰ jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.Ç œ œ< œ<‡‡‡œ œ ‰ jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.Ç œ œ œÇƒ œ œ œF‡‡œ œ ‰ jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.Ç œ œ œÇ œ œ œ&?&&B??43434343434343454545454545459OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR5 ‡‡œ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.Ç œ œ œÇÇ œœ œœ œœÇ œ œ œ‡‡œ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.Çd œ œ œ. œ œ.ÇÇdœœ œœ œœÇd œ œ œ‡‡œ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.ÇÇdœœ œœ œœÇÇdœœ œœ œœÇd œ œ œ‡‡œ œ ‰ Jœ œœœ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ÇÇ œœÇÇ œœÇ œ‡‡œe œ œ œ œ œœe œ œœœe œœ œœœœ œ œ œ œƒ œœ œ œfffff‡‡œ Œ Œœe œ œ œ œƒœœœeƒœœ œœœeƒ œ œ œ œ œœdƒ œ œ‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWWV. 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Ocean Spray‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW101&?&&B??43434343434343454545454545459OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR137...ÇÇÇ> ÇÇÇ...ÇÇÇ>ÇÇÇœ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.Çd œ œ œÇÇdœœ œœ œœÇd œ œ< œ<...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇœ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ jœ jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.Çd œ œ œ. œ œ.ÇÇdœœ œœ œœÇd œ œ< œ<...ÇÇÇ> ÇÇÇ...ÇÇÇ>ÇÇÇœ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.œ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ œ œ. œ œ.ÇÇdœœ œœ œœÇÇdœœ œœ œœÇd œ œ< œ<...ÇÇÇ...ÇÇÇœ œ ‰ Jœ œœœ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ÇÇ- œœÇÇ- œœÇ- œ...ÇÇÇ...ÇÇÇœ œ œ œ œ œœe œe œeœœe œœe œœeœœd œ œe œ œe œœd œd œd...ÇÇÇ...ÇÇÇœ Œ Œœ œ œ œ œ œœœe œœd œœdœe œ œe œ œe œœd œd œd&?&&B??454545454545459OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR“ ...ÇÇÇ> ÇÇÇ...ÇÇÇ>ÇÇÇœ> Œ Œ œ œjœ> œjœ œ œ œ œ œjœ> œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœœ¬‰ » Çjœ¬‰ » ÇSL]]SL]]SL]]FFppf‡‡œ œ œ Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç Ç‡‡Œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç Ç‡‡ &œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç œ œ.Ç œ œ..ÇÇ œœ œœ.Ç œ œœ Œ Œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç ÇFV. Ocean Spray‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW102&&&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR148œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç Çœœ ÇÇ Œœœœ Ç Œ œŒ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç Çœœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç œ œ.Ç œ œ..ÇÇ ÇÇ.Ç Ç.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Çƒ.Ç ÇƒfFFDUFRDUFRff‡‡» . Œ œ‚jœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œDUFRp&&&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR153 ‡‡.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç œ œ.Ç œ œ‡‡.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ‡‡.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç Ç‡‡.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ‡‡.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç ÇPV. Ocean Spray‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW103&&&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR“158 ‡‡ ?.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç ÇJœœœ Jœ œ œœ œ œ œ..ÇÇ ÇÇ&.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç ÇfffJœœ œ Jœ œ œœ œ œ œ...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç ÇJœœœ Jœ œ œœ œ œ œ...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç ÇJœœ œ Jœ œ œœ œ œ œ...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ ?.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç Ç&?&&B??4242424242424245454545454545444444444444449OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR(“)163Jœœœ œ Jœ œ œœ œ œ œ...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç ÇJœœ œ Jœ œ œœ œ œ œ...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ.Ç Çjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ œ.Ç Ç.Ç Çœœ œ œœ œÇÇÇÇœ œ œ œœ œ œ œÇÇpoco rit. ...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ..ÇÇ ÇÇ.ǃ Ç.ǃ Ç.ǃ Ç.ǃÇ.ǃÇ Slightly SlowerDFFFFFF...ÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ..ÇÇÇÇÇ&.Ç Ç‚.Ç Ç‚.Ç Ç.Ç Ç.Ç ÇÇÇÇ ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ ÇÇ ÇwwwÇÇÇ ÇÇÇÇÇÇ ÇÇÇ?Ç ÇÇ ÇwwwV. Ocean Spray‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW104&?&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR170 wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww‡U‡U‡U‡U‡U‡U‡U‰‰‰‰‰w‡wƒwƒwƒ‡‡‰&?&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR178 w‡www‡‡w‡www‡‡w‡www‡‡w‡www‡‡w‡www‡‡pppwwwwwwwƒ‡ppwwwwwww‡wwwwwww‡V. Ocean Spray‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW105&?&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR186 wwwwwwwwwpwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwŽwŽwŽffffff&?&&B??9OQ,9OQ,,9OD9F'%3QR¥192 wwwwwwwwŽwŽwŽwwwwwwwwŽwŽwŽwwwwwwwwŽwŽwŽœœÆ Œ »œœœÆŒ »œœÆ Œ »œœ¬ Œ »œœ¬Œ »œœÆ Œ »œ¬ Œ »ƒƒƒƒƒƒ‡ ?‡‡‡‡‡‡wwUwwUwUwUwUwwUwUV. Ocean Spray‹(LOHHQ93DGJHWW106

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