Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Soil amendments from urban residuals and their effect on crop productivity and nutrient cycling Bazza, Zineb 2017

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_november_2017_bazza_zineb.pdf [ 43.28MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0356612.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0356612-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0356612-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0356612-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0356612-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0356612-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0356612-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0356612-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0356612.ris

Full Text

  SOIL  AMENDMENTS  FROM  URBAN  RESIDUALS  AND  THEIR  EFFECT  ON  CROP  PRODUCTIVITY  AND  NUTRIENT  CYCLING      by  Zineb  Bazza  B.Sc.  (Applied  Biology),  University  of  British  Columbia,  2015      A  THESIS  SUBMITTED  IN  PARTIAL  FULFILLMENT  OF  THE  REQUIREMENTS  FOR  THE  DEGREE  OF  MASTER  OF  SCIENCE  in  The  Faculty  of  Graduate  and  Postdoctoral  Studies  (Soil  Science)    THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)  October  2017  ©  Zineb  Bazza      ii    Abstract  Urban  residuals  have  been  used  in  agriculture  to  decrease  disposal  costs,  recycle  nutrients,  and  prevent  or  counteract  the  degradation  of  soils  linked  to  the  intensification  of  agriculture.  Technological  advancements  continue  to  produce  novel  residuals  that  can  be  used  as  soil  amendments,  with  the  potential  to  reduce  or  eliminate  waste.  This  thesis  entails  two  studies  that  examine  the  potential  to  utilize  new  urban  residuals  for  food  production.  The  objectives  of  the  first  study  were  to  look  at  the  potential  benefits  and  impacts,  on  crop  productivity  and  nutrient  cycling,  of  using  monopotassium  phosphate  (MKP)  fertilizers,  made  using  the  co-­products  of  biodiesel  production.  The  treatments  in  this  study  include  MKP-­M,  a  purified  form  of  MKP,  MKP-­C,  a  crude  MKP  from  biodiesel  production  with  glycerin  and  MKP-­C2,  similar  to  MKP-­C  but  with  double  the  glycerin.  There  were  no  differences  in  yields  in  the  field  trial.  The  greenhouse  trial  showed  higher  pepper  yields  using  MKP-­C  and  foliar  MKP-­M,  and  higher  number  of  fruits  with  foliar  MKP-­M  and  a  retail  MKP.  Soil  analyses  suggest  that  glycerin  in  certain  amounts  can  inhibit  nitrification  and  improve  nitrogen  (N)  uptake.  In  the  second  study,  a  compost  like  material  (HTI  Compost)  made  in  24  hours  was  tested  to  better  understand  the  effects  unstable  and  immature  compost  could  have  on  yield,  nutrient  cycling  and  greenhouse  gas  (GHG)  emissions.  The  treatments  were  the  HTI  compost,  UBC  farm  compost  (typical  municipal  compost),  a  mix  of  the  two  composts,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal,  and  no  amendment.  The  results  show  the  HTI  treatments  had  similar  yields  to  the  UBC  farm  compost  for  beets,  but  lower  yields  in  spinach  due  to  reduced  or  delayed  germination.  The  HTI  treatments  delayed  soil  N  availability  and  resulted  in  higher  GHG  emissions.  Emissions  of  carbon  dioxide  and  methane  from  the  HTI  treatments  were  high  in  the  beginning  of  the  season  when  the  compost  was  decomposing,  while  nitrous  oxide  emissions  were  highest  later  on  as  decomposition  rates  declined.  These  results  show  promising  benefits  for  using  urban  residuals  as  soil  amendments,  but  the  management  of  these  amendments  is  crucial  to  avoid  any  negative  impacts  on  crop  productivity  or  the  environment.               iii    Lay  summary  This  thesis  describes  two  studies  that  were  conducted  in  order  to  investigate  the  potential  benefits  and  impacts  of  using  two  novel  urban  residuals  as  agricultural  amendments  on  crop  productivity  and  nutrient  cycling.  In  the  first  study,  residuals  made  from  biodiesel  co-­products  were  applied  as  either  a  soil  amendment  or  directly  to  crop  leaves  in  a  field  and  greenhouse  environment.  Crops  yields  and  soil  nitrogen  availability  were  assessed.  In  the  second  study  a  compost  made  in  as  little  as  24  hours  in  a  high-­throughput  in-­vessel  composter  was  applied  as  a  soil  amendment  at  the  University  of  British  Columbia  farm.  The  results  show  that  while  these  new  products  can  be  beneficial  to  the  agriculture  industry,  further  research  is  needed  to  identify  specific  management  practices  to  maximize  crop  production  benefits  while  minimizing  impacts  to  the  environment.               iv    Preface  The  work  presented  in  this  thesis  in  Chapter  2  is  the  result  of  a  collaboration  between  the  Sustainable  Agricultural  Landscapes  Lab  at  the  University  of  British  Columbia  and  Earth  Renu  Energy  Corp.  and  in  Chapter  3  with  Recycling  Alternative.  The  general  experimental  design  for  both  projects  was  developed  by  Dr.  Sean  Smukler  and  myself,  with  feedback  from  Earth  Renu  Energy  Corp.  and  Recycling  Alternative.  The  fertilizers  used  in  Chapter  2  were  provided  by  Earth  Renu  Energy  Corp.  and  the  composts  used  in  Chapter  3  were  provided  by  Recycling  Alternative  and  the  UBC  farm.    I  was  responsible  for  the  field  design,  all  the  data  collection,  most  of  the  laboratory  analysis,  and  the  data  interpretation.  Soil  elemental  analysis  was  done  by  the  Ministry  of  Environment  in  Chapter  2,  and  by  members  of  the  SAL  lab  in  Chapter  3.  I  was  also  responsible  for  growing  and  maintaining  the  crops  used  in  Chapter  2,  while  the  UBC  farm  was  responsible  for  crop  production  in  Chapter  3.    The  SAL  lab  and  Dr.  Gabriel  Maltais-­Landry  were  responsible  for  the  installation  of  the  Picarro  greenhouse  gas  (GHG)  analyzer  used  in  Chapter  3.  I  was  responsible  for  utilizing  the  analyzer  to  collect  all  GHG  data.                           v    Table  of  contents  Abstract  ...................................................................................................................  ii  Lay  summary  ..........................................................................................................  iii  Preface  ...................................................................................................................  iv  Table  of  contents  .....................................................................................................  v  List  of  tables  .........................................................................................................  viii  List  of  figures  ...........................................................................................................  x  List  of  abbreviations  .............................................................................................  xiv  Acknowledgements  ..............................................................................................  xvi  1.  General  introduction  ...........................................................................................  1  1.1  Fertilizers  from  biodiesel  production  .............................................................  2  1.2  Compost  from  high-­throughput  in  vessel  composters  ..................................  4  2.  Monopotassium  fertilizers  with  glycerin  co-­products  and  their  impacts  on  crop  productivity  and  soil  nutrient  cycling  .....................................................................  10  2.1  Introduction  .....................................................................................................  10  2.2  Materials  and  methods  ...................................................................................  14  2.2.1  Germination  test  ......................................................................................  14  2.2.2  Field  trial  ..................................................................................................  14  2.2.2.1  Crop  productivity  ...............................................................................  15  2.2.2.2  Soil  nutrient  cycling  ...........................................................................  16  2.2.3  Greenhouse  trial  ......................................................................................  16  2.2.3.1  Crop  productivity  ...............................................................................  17  2.2.4  Statistical  analysis  ...................................................................................  18  2.3  Results  ...........................................................................................................  18  2.3.1  Germination  test  ......................................................................................  18  2.3.2  Field  trial  ..................................................................................................  19        vi    2.3.2.1  Crop  productivity  ...............................................................................  19  2.3.2.3  Soil  properties  ...................................................................................  20  2.3.2.5  Plant  available  nitrogen  .....................................................................  21  2.3.3  Greenhouse  trial  ......................................................................................  24  2.4  Discussion  ......................................................................................................  26  2.4.1  Germination  test  ......................................................................................  26  2.4.2  Field  trial  ..................................................................................................  26  2.4.3  Greenhouse  trial  ......................................................................................  28  3.  The  effects  of  high-­throughput  in-­vessel  compost  on  soil  properties  and  crop  productivity  ...........................................................................................................  30  3.1  Introduction  .....................................................................................................  30  3.2  Materials  and  methods  ...................................................................................  33  3.2.1  Germination  trial  ......................................................................................  33  3.2.2  Field  trial  ..................................................................................................  33  3.2.2.1  Crop  productivity  ...............................................................................  33  3.2.2.2  Soil  analysis  ......................................................................................  34  3.2.2.3  Greenhouse  gases  measurements  ...................................................  35  3.2.2.4  Soil  incubations  .................................................................................  36  3.2.3  Statistical  analysis  ...................................................................................  37  3.3  Results  ...........................................................................................................  37  3.3.1  Germination  test  ......................................................................................  37  3.3.2  Crop  productivity  ......................................................................................  38  3.3.3  Soil  analyses  ............................................................................................  41  3.3.4  Plant  available  nitrogen  ...........................................................................  41  3.3.5  Greenhouse  gases  emissions  .................................................................  44  3.3.5.1  Seasonal  emissions  ..........................................................................  44  3.3.5.2  Cumulative  greenhouse  gases  ..........................................................  47  3.3.6  Soil  incubations  ........................................................................................  49  3.4  Discussion  ......................................................................................................  50        vii    3.4.1  Germination  test  ......................................................................................  50  3.4.2  Crop  productivity  ......................................................................................  50  3.4.3  Soil  nitrogen  content  ................................................................................  51  3.4.4  Greenhouse  gases  emissions  .................................................................  52  3.4.5  Soil  incubations  ........................................................................................  53  4.  General  conclusion  ...........................................................................................  55  4.1  Research  findings  .......................................................................................  55  4.1.1  Fertilizers  from  biodiesel  co-­products  ..................................................  55  4.1.2  High-­throughput  in-­vessel  compost  ......................................................  56  4.2  Strengths  and  contributions  to  the  field  of  study  .........................................  57  4.3  Limitations  and  directions  for  future  research  .............................................  58  4.4  Implications  and  recommendations  ............................................................  60  References  ...........................................................................................................  61  Appendix  ..............................................................................................................  67          viii    List  of  tables  Table  2.1.  Average  (±  standard  error)  potato  yield  by  size  class  in  kg  ha-­1,  fruit  number  and  potato  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  <  0.05)....………………….20  Table  2.2.  Average  (±  standard  error)  squash  yield  by  size  class  in  kg  ha-­1,  average  fruit  number  and  squash  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).    No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  <  0.05).........…...20  Table  2.3.  Average  (±  standard  error)  potato  yield  by  size  (g  pot-­1),  average  fruit  number  and  potato  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment  in  the  greenhouse:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M),  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK)  and  commercial  MKP  fertilizer  (retail-­MKP).  Significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)  are  indicated  by  different  letters.………….....................….24  Table  2.4.  Average  (±  standard  error)  pepper  yield  by  size  (g  pot-­1),  average  fruit  number  and  potato  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment  in  the  greenhouse:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK),  commercial  MKP  (Retail-­MKP)  and  commercial  MKP  and  MKP-­M  sprayed  foliarly  (retail-­MKP-­foliar;;  MKP-­M-­foliar).  Significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)  are  indicated  by  different  letters..……………….....….……25  Table  3.1.  Average  (±  standard  error)  endline  soil  properties  for  nitrogen  (%N),  carbon  (%C)  and  C:N  ratio  per  treatment:  Control  consists  of  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high        ix    throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  <  0.05)...…42  Table  3.2.  F  and  P  value  for  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  and  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  soil  content  by  treatment,  by  date  and  by  the  interaction  of  treatment  and  date….….45    Table  3.3.  F  and  P  value  for  CO2,  N2O  and  CH4  fluxes  by  treatment,  by  date  and  by  the  interaction  of  treatment  and  date.………………..............……….………….48  Table  A.1.  Potato  field  endline  soil  average  (±  standard  error)  concentrations  of  potassium  (K),  phosphorus  (P),  carbon  (C)  and  nitrogen  (N)  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  <  0.05)…….86  Table  A.2.  Squash  field  endline  average  (±  standard  error)  soil  concentrations  of  potassium  (K),  phosphorus  (P),  carbon  (C)  and  nitrogen  (N)  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  <  0.05)........86  Table  A.3.  Quality  indicators  for  HTI  compost  compared  to  quality  indicators  for  an  optimum  compost…..........................................................................................87  Table  A.4.  Wet  compost  application  rates  in  Mg  ha-­1  for  the  different  treatments..............................................................................................................87                 x    List  of  figures  Figure  2.1.    Average  germination  rate  on  day  15  of  the  germination  trial  for  three  types  of  monopotassium  phosphate  (MKP)  fertilizer:  methanol-­washed  (MKP-­M);;  Isopropanol-­washed  MKP  (MKP  –  P);;  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP  –  C);;  and  no  fertilizer  (Control).  Error  bars  represent  standard  error.  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  <  0.05).…………………………………………………………............19  Figure  2.2.  a.  Soil  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  and  b.  soil  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  throughout  the  season  in  the  potato  field  for  the  different  fertilizer  treatments:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  Error  bars  represent  the  standard  error.  No  significant  differences  among  treatments  were  found  (P  <  0.05).  ……………………………………………................................……………..…22  Figure  2.3.a.  Soil  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  and  b.  soil  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  throughout  the  season  in  the  squash  field  for  the  different  fertilizer  treatments:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  Error  bars  represent  the  standard  error.  Letters  indicate  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).…………………………………………………………………..............………...23  Figure  3.1.  a.  Average  germination  rate  (%)  and  b.  average  biomass  (g)  on  day  15  of  the  germination  trial  for  six  application  rates  of  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost:  0x  –  no  HTI  compost,  0.5x  –  half  the  field  application  rate,  1x  -­  field  application  rate,  2x  –  double  the  field  application  rate,  10x  –  ten  times  the  field  application  rate,  and  20x  –  twenty  times  the  field  application  rate.  Error  bars  represent  standard  error.  Different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)……………………………………..........................................……………….…40        xi    Figure  3.2.  a.  Average  spinach  and  b.  beet  yield  (kg  ha-­1)  by  treatment:  Control  represents  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.    Error  bars  represent  standard  error.  Different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)……..41  Figure  3.3.  a.  Soil  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  content  and  b.  soil  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  content  in  mg  kg-­1.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.    Error  bars  represent  standard  error  and  different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).……………………………………………………………………………………..44  Figure  3.4.  a.  Average  N2O  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1  b.  average  CO2  flux  in  g  m2  day-­1  and  c.  average  CH4  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.    Different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).……………………………...............  ………………………….…………………47  Figure  3.5.  a.  Cumulative  N2O  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1,  b.  cumulative  CO2  flux  in  g  m2  day-­1  over  and  c.  cumulative  CH4  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1  over  the  entire  season.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm        xii    compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.  Error  bars  represent  standard  error  and  different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)..  49  Figure  3.6.  Average  CO2  flush  in  mg  CO2-­C  kg-­1  soil  among  the  different  treatments  at  the  end  of  the  growing  season.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.  Error  bars  represent  standard  error  and  different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)………………..............……..…50  Figure  A.1.  Germination  trial  for  study  1.……………............…………....……......69  Figure  A.2.  Fertilizing  potato  crop  using  MKP  fertilizers  with  added  glycerin  in  study  1…………….....................................................................................…….....70  Figure  A.3.  Photograph  of  the  field  trial  with  squash  crops  and  potato  crops  in  study  1………………….....................................................................................….71  Figure  A.4.  Photograph  of  the  field  trial  with  squash  crops  and  potato  crops  in  study  1………………….....................................................................................….72  Figure  A.5.  Quality  assessment  of  potato  crop  from  the  field  trial  in  study  1……………………………….............................................................................….73  Figure  A.6.  Fertilizer  treatments  for  the  greenhouse  trial  in  study  1,  including  soil  and  foliar  application  fertilizers.……………………………………………………………………………...…74  Figure  A.7.  Greenhouse  set-­up  with  potato  and  pepper  crop  in  the  UBC  horticulture  greenhouse  for  study  1.…………………….............………………...…75  Figure  A.8.  Quality  assessment  of  pepper  crop  from  the  greenhouse  trial  in  study  1………………………............................................................................................76        xiii    Figure  A.9.  Germination  trial  at  day  15  for  study  2………........…………………...77  Figure  A.10.  Biomass  measuring  on  day  15  of  germination  trial  for  study  2........78  Figure  A.11.  Field  tilling  after  treatment  application  for  study  2  …...……………..79  Figure  A.12.  Field  after  greenhouse  gas  chambers  installation  for  study  2.…….80  Figure  A.13.  Spinach  and  beet  crops  for  study  2  ………………...………………..81  Figure  A.14.  Spinach  harvest  for  study  2  …………………………………………...82  Figure  A.15.  Spinach  harvest  for  study  2..  ………………………………………….83  Figure  A.16.  Yield  measurements  for  beet  crop  in  study  2..………………………84  Figure  A.17.  Example  of  an  endline  soil  measurement  using  a  soil  probe  for  study  2……………………............................................................................................…85               xiv    List  of  abbreviations  ANOVA  BaCl2  BCPs  Analysis  of  Variance  Barium  Chloride  Biodiesel  Co-­Products  C   Carbon  CO2   Carbon  Dioxide  CH4  DAP    FFA    Methane  Days  After  Planting    Free  Fatty  Acids  HCl   Hydrochloric  Acid  HTI   High-­throughput  in-­vessel  KCl   Potassium  Chloride  MKP   Monopotassium  Phosphate  MKP-­C                         Crude  monopotassium  Phosphate  MKP-­C2                     Crude  Monopotassium  Phosphate  with  double  the  glycerin  MKP-­I   Isopropanol  washed  Monopotassium  Phosphate  MKP-­M                         Methanol  washed  Monopotassium  Phosphate  NaOH   Sodium  Hydroxide        xv    NPK   Nitrogen  Phosphorus  Potassium  fertilizer  N       Nitrogen  NH4+-­N          NO2-­                            Ammonium  Nitrogen  Nitrite    NO3-­-­N     Nitrate  Nitrogen  N2O   Nitrous  oxide  P  PAN  Phosphorus  Plant  Available  Nitrogen  UBC   University  of  British  Columbia                         xvi    Acknowledgements  I  would  like  to  thank  my  supervisor  Dr.  Sean  Smukler  for  giving  me  the  opportunity  to  be  a  member  of  his  research  lab,  and  for  his  constant  support  throughout  the  duration  of  my  time  as  his  graduate  student.  Dr.  Sean  Smukler  has  always  been  available  to  discuss  the  projects  or  provide  any  help  that  was  needed.  I  would  also  like  to  acknowledge  my  committee  members:  Dr.  Les  Lavkulich  and  Dr.  Will  Valley.  Dr.  Les  Lavkulich  for  always  supporting  me,  both  in  my  research  and  emotionally,  and  Dr.  Will  Valley  for  suggesting  one  of  the  two  projects.    I  would  also  like  to  thank  Earth  Renu  Energy  Corp.  and  NSERC  for  funding  these  projects.  Without  them,  I  would  not  have  been  able  to  complete  this  work.  Steve  Harpur,  Dr.  Alexandre  Vigneault  and  Marc  Zinman  from  Earth  Renu,  and  Recycling  Alternative,  for  providing  me  with  a  project  idea  and  the  fertilizer  and  compost  needed  to  conduct  these  experiments.  I  would  also  like  to  acknowledge  Tim  Carter  from  the  UBC  Farm,  Seane  Trehearne  from  the  UBC  Totem  Fields  Research  Station  and  Melina  Biron  from  UBC  Horticulture  Greenhouse  for  providing  me  with  the  space  and  expertise  needed  to  conduct  these  experiments.    A  particular  thank  you  to  my  lab  mates  at  the  Sustainable  Agricultural  Landscape  (SAL)  Laboratory.  It  has  been  a  pleasure  sharing  an  office  and  a  laboratory  setting  with  them.  I  would  particularly  like  to  thank  Dr.  Gabriel  Maltais-­Landry  for  helping  me  with  my  lab  work  and  guiding  me  in  my  research,  always  with  patience.  And  thank  you  to  Katarina  Neufeld,  the  SAL  lab  manager,  for  always  being  available.  I  would  also  like  to  acknowledge  all  the  SAL  lab  volunteers  and  undergraduate  students  that  helped  with  the  projects.    And  finally,  I  would  like  to  thank  my  family  and  friends  for  their  love  and  support,  and  for  always  believing  in  me.  I  could  not  have  done  this  without  each  and  every  one  of  them.          1    1.  General  introduction  In  recent  years,  environmental  and  economic  factors,  which  include  the  impacts  of  constructing  and  maintaining  landfills,  the  emissions  and  cost  of  transporting  waste  products,  and  the  emissions  and  high  costs  associated  with  synthetic  fertilizer,  have  created  an  opportunity  to  transform  urban  waste  products  into  residuals  that  can  be  used  to  benefit  agricultural  production  (Hargreaves  et  al.,  2008).  Residuals  that  originate  from  urban  settings  are  primarily  from  the  food  industry  or  landscaping,  which  are  characterized  by  organic  residues  and  raw  materials  (Jayathilakan  et  al.,  2012).  Given  that  organic  materials  can  be  decomposed  effectively  they  have  the  potential  to  be  used  in  agricultural  settings  to  decrease  their  disposal  costs,  recycle  the  nutrients  that  are  contained  in  them,  and  to  prevent  or  counteract  the  degradation  of  soils  linked  to  the  intensification  of  agriculture  (Giusquiani  et  al.,  1988).    The  main  urban  residual  that  is  extensively  used  in  agricultural  settings  is  composted  municipal  solid  waste  (MSW),  which  consists  mainly  of  kitchen  waste  and  yard  trimmings  (Hargreaves  et  al.,  2008).  MSW  is  used  as  a  soil  conditioner  and  as  a  fertilizer,  to  increase  soil  organic  matter  and  to  meet  crop  nitrogen  requirements  (Hargreaves  et  al.,  2008).  Much  research  has  been  done  to  look  at  its  effects  on  the  chemical  properties  of  soils,  on  soil  aggregate  stability,  and  soil  microbial  activity  (Giusquiani  et  al.,  1988;;  Annabi  et  al.,  2007;;  Ros  et  al.,  2003).  And,  while  there  are  benefits  to  using  MSW  compost  as  a  soil  amendment,  there  are  also  potential  negative  impacts  such  as  salt  or  metal  contamination  of  the  soil  (Hargreaves  et  al.,  2008).    Other  soil  amendments,  often  categorized  as  industrial  bio-­waste,  include  products  from  fish  waste,  seaweed,  or  the  meat  and  poultry  industry  (Lopez-­Mosquera  et  al.,  2011;;  Jayathilakan  et  al.,  2012).  Many  of  these  bio-­wastes  are  either  used  directly  after  composting  or  refined  to  produce  a  type  fertilizer  that  can  be  used  in  organic  agriculture.  Co-­composting  of  fish  offal  with  drift-­seaweed  and        2    pine  bark,  for  example,  has  been  shown  to  be  an  effective  means  of  transforming  what  many  consider  a  waste  product  into  a  valuable  nutrient  resource  for  agriculture  (Lopez-­Mosquera  et  al.,  2011).    While  there  is  much  research  on  the  utilization  of  urban  residuals  as  agricultural  soil  amendments  there  are  still  management  challenges  that  need  to  be  addressed  to  ensure  their  optimal  use.  Furthermore,  technological  advances  continue  to  introduce  new  or  improved  residuals.  These  products  have  the  potential  to  close  the  loop  between  food  or  fuel  production  and  waste,  with  potential  to  reduce  or  even  eliminate  waste  and  increase  the  sustainability  in  food  production.  Before  novel  residuals  are  used  for  agriculture  (or  any  recycling  application)  they  need  to  be  carefully  assessed  to  determine  their  impact  on  crop  productivity  and  the  environment.    1.1  Fertilizers  from  biodiesel  production  Biodiesel  production  has  become  an  important  industry  worldwide,  and  while  this  industry  has  changed  how  we  view  our  automotive  fuel,  it  has  also  forced  us  to  consider  uses  for  its  potentially  valuable  co-­products  or  residuals.  There  are  a  number  of  residuals  that  are  produced  during  biodiesel  processing  that  instead  of  being  seen  as  waste  requiring  expensive  disposal,  are  now  being  investigated  for  potential  utilization  value.  Biodiesel  co-­products  (BCP),  mainly  glycerin,  free  fatty  acids,  and  monopotassium  phosphate  (MKP)  recovered  from  production  can  be  used  as  renewable  resources.  Recovered  MKP  combined  with  glycerin  or  on  its  own  may  be  an  effective  fertilizer  for  crop  production  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010;;  Soerens  and  Parker,  2012).      The  highly  soluble  properties  of  MKP  make  it  ideal  for  providing  nutrients  to  plants  as  a  foliar  spray,  hydroponics  or  through  fertigation  (Boman,  2001;;  Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).    Given  that  it  is  not  formulated  with  a  nitrogen  (N)  source  using  MKP  enables  agricultural  producers  to  customize  nutrient  application  rates.  Nitrogen,  P  and  K  needs  of  the  crop  can  therefore  be  targeted  effectively  to  optimize  marketable  yield,  which  is  particularly  beneficial  in  crops  like  potatoes,  a        3    prominent  crop  in  British  Columbia.    Other  studies  have  demonstrated  the  use  of  MKP  as  a  foliar  fungicidal  spray.  The  spray  has  been  effective  for  reducing  foliar  pathogens  including  powdery  mildew,  rust,  northern  leaf  blight  and  bacterial  spot  in  different  crops  such  as  cucumber,  tomato,  bell  pepper,  broad-­leaf  bean,  maize,  rose,  grapevine,  apple,  nectarine  and  mango  (M.  Reuveni,  Oppenheim,  &  Reuveni,  1998;;  R.  Reuveni,  Dor,  &  Reuveni,  1998).  This  is  due  to  the  toxic  effect  that  phosphates  have  on  fungi,  while  providing  access  to  nutrients  that  help  to  increase  the  plant’s  natural  defense  mechanisms  (Reuveni  and  Reuveni,  1998).    A  number  of  studies  have  shown  positive  yield  outcomes  when  using  MKP  compared  to  more  typical  fertilizers,  but  not  all.  There  have  been  observed  decreases  in  corn  yields  following  MKP  foliar  applications  (Liu  et  al.,  2013).    Other  studies  have  illustrated  the  benefits  of  using  glycerin  and  free  fatty  acids  as  soil  amendment  (Liu  et  al.,  2013;;  Qian  et  al.,  2011  and  Subbarao  et  al.,  2008).  Adding  these  co-­products,  which  have  a  high  concentration  of  readily  available  C,  to  soil,  has  been  shown  to  immobilize  soil  N  as  microbial  population  utilize  the  C  additions  and  quickly  consume  any  N  in  the  system.  The  increased  microbial  activity  after  the  addition  of  the  amendments  can  thus  decrease  the  overall  amount  of  N  lost  to  leaching  or  de-­nitrification  (Redmile-­Gordon  et  al.,  2013).  Reducing  leaching  losses  could  help  protect  groundwater  resources  from  nitrate  (NO3-­)  contamination  which  has  been  shown  to  impact  human  and  ecosystem  health.  Reducing  de-­nitrification  could  also  decrease  nitrous  oxide  emissions,  a  greenhouse  gas  with  ~300  times  the  radiative  forcing  of  carbon  dioxide  (IPCC  2013).    A  reduction  in  N  losses  is  also  beneficial  for  the  producer  as  it  results  in  a  more  efficient  use  of  a  costly  input.  A  lot  of  research  has  been  conducted  on  MKP  fertilizers  as  well  as  on  glycerin,  however  little  is  known  on  the  effects  of  MKP  specifically  recovered  from  biodiesel  production  mixed  with  glycerin,  the  major  biodiesel  co-­product  on  plant  growth.  MKP  fertilizers  can  be  recovered  from  biodiesel  residuals  by  adding  phosphoric  acid  to  the  residuals  to  create  crude  MKP  fertilizer  with  glycerin  (Johnson  and  Taconi,  2007).  If  this  crude  MKP  is  further  purified  with  methanol,  a  pure  form  of  MKP  is  created,  similar  to  retail  MKP        4    fertilizers.  This  novel  way  of  creating  MKP  fertilizers  needs  to  be  investigated  to  better  understand  if  and  how  they  can  be  used  for  crop  production.        1.2  Compost  from  high-­throughput  in  vessel  composters  Major  recent  advances  in  in-­vessel  composting  have  integrated  technology  and  microbial  processes  to  improve  processing  times  to  unprecedented  speeds,  drastically  increasing  the  potential  to  divert  large  quantities  of  organic  materials  from  landfill  and  reduce  transport  costs.  Typically,  industrial  composting  facilities  operate  on  a  scale  of  one  to  three  months  to  produce  compost  and  then  let  the  compost  stabilize  for  another  3-­6  months  before  making  it  available  as  a  valuable  soil  amendment  (Litterick  et  al.,  2003).  A  new  alternative,  high-­throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  composters,  could  effectively  recycle  organic  materials  while  reducing  transport  and  storage  impacts,  as  they  can  convert  food  waste  into  a  compost  like  product  in  as  little  as  24  hours.  These  vessels  also  contain  the  composting  material  during  the  sanitation  phase,  which  prevents  the  odor  and  dust  typically  released  during  the  composting  process  (Areikin  et  al.,  2012).    Composting  is  the  biological  decomposition  of  organic  materials  controlled  by  the  type  of  inputs,  time,  temperature  and  moisture.  Managing  these  factors  effectively  ensures  the  decomposition  of  organic  materials  and  reduction  of  pathogens.  Specifications  for  managing  these  factors  are  dependent  on  the  type  of  composting  method  used,  which  include  vermicomposting,  windrow  composting  and  aerated  static  pile  composting.  All  composting  systems  use  microorganisms  such  as  bacteria  and  fungi,  decompose  materials  into  smaller  particles.  Bacteria  and  fungi  utilize  the  carbon  (C)  and  N  contained  in  the  organic  inputs  as  an  energy  source  releasing  mainly  carbon  dioxide  into  the  atmosphere.  The  most  effective  composting  can  be  achieved  when  the  C:N  ratio  of  input  materials  are  between  20:1  and  30:1.  A  typical  composting  process  includes  three  phases:  a  mesophilic  phase,  a  thermophilic  phase  and  second  mesophilic  phase.  In  the  first  phase,  mesophilic  bacteria  break  down  organic  matter  and  increase  the  temperature  of  the  compost,  leading  to  the  thermophilic  phase,  in  which  decomposition  continues  with  thermophilic  bacteria.  As  the  high  source  of  labile  C        5    in  the  residual  material  decreases,  the  microbial  activity  and  temperature  decrease,  resulting  in  the  second  and  final  mesophilic  phase.  This  phase  is  also  associated  with  maturation  and  stability  of  the  final  compost  product.  This  process  leads  to  compost,  a  stable  by-­product  with  a  C:N  ratio  between  14:1  and  20:1  that  can  be  used  as  a  soil  amendment.  A  stable  and  mature  compost  has  undergone  thorough  decomposition  during  the  composting  process  and  does  not  lead  to  N  immobilization  which  typically  occurs  in  soils  amended  with  materials  with  C:N  ratios  >25:1  (Hadas  et  al.,  2004).    Rapid  HTI  composting  differs  from  the  typical  composting  process  described  above  by  containing  the  waste  material  within  a  chamber  and  adding  proprietary  microorganisms.  This  chamber  has  internal  rotating  arms  for  the  mixing  of  the  waste  materials,  and  moisture  and  temperature  are  carefully  controlled.  The  temperature  of  the  chamber  is  raised  to  75  C  for  one  hour  to  eliminate  pathogens  (Oklin  International,  2015).  Within  24  hours  the  volume  of  input  materials  can  be  reduced  by  80%  to  90%.  These  HTI  composters  are  drastically  changing  the  typical  environmental  factors  and  microbial  populations  that  are  used  in  composting,  which  likely  affects  the  stability  and  maturity  of  the  compost.    It  is  possible  that  this  technology  results  in  a  very  different  type  of  compost  and  its  impact  on  crop  productivity  and  nutrient  cycling  are  largely  unknown.  It  is  likely  that  the  materials  are  still  highly  microbially  active  and  will  continue  to  decompose  after  being  applied  to  soil,  as  compost  takes  a  few  weeks  (depending  on  the  source  of  organic  materials)  to  fully  decompose  under  the  right  conditions  (Epstein,  1996).    In  order  to  ameliorate  these  short-­term  negative  impacts  of  using  an  unstable  and  immature  compost,  I  have  decided  to  look  at  the  effects  of  mixing  HTI  compost  with  other  soil  amendments,  such  as  mature  compost  or  bloodmeal,  which  would  provide  the  necessary  nutrients  at  the  beginning  of  the  season  while  the  HTI  compost  is  undergoing  decomposition.  However,  the  impact  of  using  HTI  compost  alone,  or  mixed  with  other  soil  amendments,  are  still  unknown.    To  address  the  research  gaps  associated  with  the  utilization  of  BCP  and  HTI  compost  I  conducted  two  separate  studies  that  each  consisted  of  a  number  of        6    experiments.  The  first  study,  described  in  Chapter  2,  investigated  the  effects  of  using  the  fertilizer  made  from  BCP  on  crop  productivity  and  soil  nutrient  cycling.  The  second  study,  described  in  Chapter  3,  investigated  the  effects  of  using  HTI  compost  on  crop  productivity,  soil  nutrient  cycling  and  greenhouse  gas  emissions.    My  specific  objectives  for  Chapter  2  were  to  determine:  1.  If  MKP  made  from  BCP  mixed  with  different  levels  of  glycerin  would  have  the  equivalent  impact  on  vegetable  yield  as  a  typical  retail  fertilizers  and  2.  how  these  different  fertilizer  mixes  would  affect  the  soil  nitrogen  cycle  particularly  the  availability  of  ammonium  (NH4+)  and  NO3-­.  To  meet  these  objectives,  I  carried  three  different  experiments,  a  germination  test,  a  field  trial  and  a  greenhouse  trial.  In  these  experiments,  three  different  grades  of  recovered  MKP  containing  different  levels  of  impurities  were  tested:  a  highly  purified  MKP  fertilizer  in  powder  form  washed  with  Methanol  (MKP-­M)  which  would  be  very  similar  to  a  commercially  available  (retail)  MKP;;  an  unwashed  or  crude  version  containing  a  glycerin  co-­product  which  comes  in  a  semi-­liquid  form  (MKP  –  C);;  and  a  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  with  twice  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP  –  C2).  The  control  in  these  experiments  is  a  commonly  used  commercially  available  fertilizer  containing  N,  P  and  K  (retail-­NPK).  Because  MKP  does  not  contain  a  N  source,  N  in  the  form  of  urea  was  added  to  the  fertilizer  applications.  And  finally,  for  the  greenhouse  trial,  we  also  used  a  retail  MKP  with  an  added  source  of  urea  as  an  additional  treatment,  and  applied  MKP-­M  and  retail  MKP  both  to  the  leaves  (as  a  foliar  spray)  and  directly  to  the  soil,  to  determine  the  difference  between  these  two  application  options  on  crop  performance.    My  hypotheses  for  the  biodiesel  study  in  chapter  2  were:  H1:  The  germination  rate  of  lettuce  amended  with  BCPs  will  not  differ  from  retail  fertilizer  as  BCPs  do  not  contain  concentrations  of  compounds  known  to  be  toxic  to  seedlings.  H2:  Yields  of  potatoes  and  squash  grown  in  field  trial  will  be  higher  in  the  MKP-­C2  treatment,  as  the  N  inhibitors  in  the  glycerin  will  prevent  nitrogen  losses  through        7    leaching  and  will  make  it  available  later  in  the  season  in  the  form  of  nitrate  for  plant  uptake,  other  BCP  treatments  will  not  differ  from  the  retail  fertilizers.  H3:  There  will  be  no  differences  in  crop  quality,  determined  by  the  percent  of  internal  and  external  defects  in  the  marketable  harvest,  among  the  different  fertilizer  types.    H4:  Soil  ammonium  and  nitrate  content  will  be  higher  in  the  MKP-­C2  treatment,  as  the  nitrogen  inhibitors  in  the  glycerin  will  prevent  nitrogen  losses  to  the  environment.  H5:  Yields  of  potatoes  in  the  greenhouse  trial  will  be  higher  in  the  MKP-­C2  treatment  as  the  N  inhibitors  in  the  glycerin  will  prevent  nitrogen  losses  through  leaching,  making  it  available  for  plant  uptake.  And  the  yields  of  peppers  grown  in  the  greenhouse  trial  will  be  higher  in  the  MKP-­M  foliar  and  retail-­MKP-­foliar  as  nutrients  will  be  more  readily  available  to  the  crop  through  the  leaves.    H6:  There  will  be  no  differences  in  crop  quality  among  the  different  treatments.    My  specific  objectives  for  the  HTI  study  in  Chapter  3  were  to  investigate  the  impacts  of  using  HTI  compost  made  from  food  waste  as  an  agricultural  soil  amendment  on:  1.  Vegetable  seed  germination  2.  Organic  vegetable  productivity,  nitrogen  availability  and  GHG  emission  3.  Soil  health.  To  meet  these  objectives,  I  set  up  two  experiments,  a  germination  test  and  a  field  trial.    In  the  germination  test  I  compared  different  rates  of  the  HTI  compost  on  germination  rate  and  biomass  in  order  to  determine  if  there  are  any  negative  impacts  on  seed  germination  associated  with  the  use  of  HTI  compost.      To  assess  the  effects  of  HTI  compost  crop  productivity,  nitrogen  availability  and  GHG  emission  I  established  an  experimental  field  trial  at  the  University  of  British  Columbia’s  (UBC)  Farm.  The  treatments  were:  1.  HTI  compost  only,  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  3.  HTI  compost  and  compost  that  is  typically  used  by  the  UBC  farm;;  4.  the  typical  UBC  farm  compost  alone;;  and  5.  a  control  with  no  soil        8    amendment.  In  each  plot,  I  planted  spinach  and  beets.    Baseline  soil  samples  were  taken  to  determine  the  initial  soil  properties  (bulk  density,  texture,  N,  P,  K,  NH4+-­N  and  NO3-­-­N  levels).    During  the  growing  season,  I  monitored  the  availability  of  NH4+-­N  and  NO3-­-­N  in  soil  samples  taken  every  two  weeks.  I  also  tracked  decomposition  and  greenhouse  gas  (GHG)  emissions  using  a  Picarro  Cavity  Ring  Down  Spectrometer  weekly.  At  the  end  of  the  growing  season,  end  line  soil  properties  were  assessed,  and  the  yields  of  spinach  and  beet  measured.  This  research  project  will  help  determine  the  potential  benefits  of  a  technology  that  decreases  the  time  it  takes  to  produce  compost,  with  important  implications  for  the  storage  and  transport  requirements  for  compost  and  food  waste.  My  hypotheses  for  the  HTI  study  in  Chapter  3  were:  H7:  The  application  of  HTI  will  not  result  in  significant  differences  in  germination  rates  or  biomass  compared  to  standard  potting  mix.  H8:  Spinach  and  beet  yields  and  quality  will  be  highest  in  HTI  and  bloodmeal  as  the  bloodmeal  provides  an  immediate  source  of  available  nitrogen,  and  the  HTI  compost  releases  nutrients  as  it  matures  ensuring  nutrients  are  available  throughout  the  entire  growing  season.    H9:  Ammonium  and  nitrate  availability  will  be  initially  lowest  in  the  treatments  that  have  HTI  compost  in  them  (HTI  compost,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  and  HTI  compost  +  UBC  farm  compost)  and  higher  later  in  the  season  as  N  from  microbial  activity  will  be  released  through  mineralization.    H10:  N2O  emission  will  be  lower  in  HTI  compost  treatments  than  UBC  farm  compost  because  the  majority  of  N  will  utilized  by  microbial  populations  during  decomposition  but  increased  microbial  activity  will  result  in  higher  CO2  and  CH4  emissions.  Cumulative  GHG  emissions  will  be  highest  in  the  HTI  compost  treatments  than  the  UBC  farm  compost  and  the  control  for  the  same  reasons  mentioned  above.          9    H11:  Total  microbial  activity  will  be  higher  with  HTI  compost  because  the  nutrients  are  not  stable  and  are  readily  available  to  the  microbial  communities,  increasing  their  populations.    The  outcomes  of  this  research  are  important  for  understanding  how  fertilizers  with  biodiesel  co-­products  used  in  an  agricultural  setting  can  affect  crop  productivity  and  soil  nutrient  cycling,  and  how  a  high-­throughput  in-­vessel  compost  like  product  made  in  24  hours  can  also  affect  crop  productivity  and  nutrient  cycling,  as  well  as  greenhouse  gas  emissions.                     10    2.  Monopotassium  fertilizers  with  glycerin  co-­products  and  their  impacts  on  crop  productivity  and  soil  nutrient  cycling  2.1  Introduction  Biodiesel  production  has  become  an  important  industry  worldwide  as  an  alternative  and  potentially  more  sustainable  fuel  source.    In  the  process  of  making  biodiesel  several  co-­products  or  residuals  are  produced.    Finding  ways  to  efficiently  utilize  these  co-­products  could  increase  the  sustainability  of  the  fuel  source,  and  if  made  marketable,  could  potentially  positively  change  the  economics  of  production.  During  the  production  of  biodiesel  from  recycled  oils,  a  number  of  co-­products  can  be  generated.  Large-­scale  biodiesel  facilities  usually  use  potassium  hydroxide  as  the  catalyst  for  biodiesel  production  (Boyd  et  al.,  2004).  A  major  co-­product  of  the  process  is  potassium  phosphates  (or  sodium  phosphate),  used  in  the  conversion  of  oils  and  alcohol  into  biodiesel  and  crude  glycerin,  which  can  be  used  for  the  production  of  fertilizers  (Boyd  et  al.,  2004).  The  raw  glycerin  by-­product  from  biodiesel  production  contains  methyl  esters,  glycerol,  methanol  and  soaps.  The  amount  and  ratio  of  the  other  co-­products  will  depend  on  how  the  biodiesel  waste  is  processed  and  how  much  free  fatty  acids  (FFA)  are  present  in  the  source  oil  (Boyd  et  al.,  2004).  There  have  been  a  number  of  uses  explored  for  recycling  biodiesel  co-­products  (BCP)  including  use  in  agricultural  production.  A  few  studies  have  investigated  the  impacts  of  biodiesel  co-­products,  BCPs,  in  agricultural  production,  particularly  focused  on  soil  processes  (Liu  et  al.,  2013;;  Qian  et  al.,  2011  and  Subbarao  et  al.,  2008).  Subbarao  et  al.,  (2008)  found,  in  a  study  that  compared  traditional  agricultural  practices  with  applications  of  small        11    amounts  of  BCP  (glycerin)  as  a  soil  amendment,  that  losses  of  nitrogen  (N)  from  the  soil  profile  were  greatly  reduced.  Applying  BCPs  provides  a  readily  available  carbon  (C)  source  for  soil  microbes,  enabling  their  utilization  of  available  N  and  a  rapid  increase  in  their  community  size.  Microbial  utilization  of  N  results  in  N  immobilization,  thus  preventing  it  from  leaching  to  groundwater  (Subbarao  et  al.,  2008).  These  findings  indicate  that  adding  BCPs  as  a  soil  amendment  could  be  an  effective  method  to  reduce  N  losses  from  agricultural  soils  and  prevent  nitrate  (NO3-­)  pollution  of  groundwater.    Glycerin  has  been  shown  to  have  benefits  for  plant  growth.  A  study  in  Western  Australia  investigated  the  effects  of  directly  applying  crude  glycerol  on  a  wheat  field  at  seeding  time  (Franco  et  al.,  2000).  Results  showed  that  glycerol  applications  could  help  correct  water  repellency  of  the  non-­wetting  sandy  soils  by  covering  the  non-­wetting  coatings  on  soils  particles  (hydrophobic  particulate  organic  matter)  at  a  decreased  cost  compared  to  alternative  methodologies  (Franco  et  al.,  2000).  Another  study  looked  at  the  effect  of  applying  glycerol  on  wheat  crops  in  Saskatchewan  at  different  rates  and  assessed  subsequent  wheat  growth  and  soil  characteristics  (Qian  et  al.,  2011).  The  results  showed  that  wheat  biomass  and  nitrogen  uptake  increased  at  low  and  medium  rates  of  glycerol  (100  and  1,000  kg  glycerol  ha-­1  respectively)  applications.  However,  adding  glycerol  at  the  highest  rate  of  10,000  kg  glycerol  ha-­1  resulted  in  decreased  yield.  This  loss  in  yield  was  explained  as  a  consequence  of  N  immobilization  indicating  both  the  potential  benefits  and  negative  consequences  of  BCPs  utilization.    Another  BCP,  free  fatty  acids  (FFAs),  and  their  methyl  esters  are  also  thought  to  act  as  inhibitors  of  nitrification  (Subbarao  et  al.,  2008).  Studies  that  tested  the  biological  nitrification  inhibiting  capabilities  of  a  number  of  FFAs  including  linoleic  acid  (LA),  linolenic  acid  (LN)  and  methyl  linoleneate  (LA-­ME)  showed  an  inhibitory  effect  on  nitrifying  micro-­organisms  (Subbarao  et  al.,  2008).  Inhibiting  nitrification  can  delay  the  microbial  oxidation  of  NH4+  to  NO3-­,  a  more  soluble  and  leachable  form  of  N,  which  could  reduce  denitrification  and  losses  of  N  to  the  atmosphere  as        12    nitrous  oxide  (N2O)  a  greenhouse  gas  with  the  climate  forcing  potential  300  times  that  of  carbon  dioxide  (Subbarao  et  al.,  2008).    Recovering  monopotassium  phosphate  (MKP)  during  the  biodiesel  production  process  could  also  be  effectively  used  in  an  agricultural  setting,  as  potassium  (K)  and  phosphate  (P)  based  fertilizers  are  commonly  used  in  fertigation,  hydroponics  or  as  foliar  fertilizers  when  a  fast  response  is  required.  Potassium  and  P  are  specifically  used  by  plants  for  the  formation  and  transportation  of  sugars,  starches  and  acids,  as  well  as  for  increasing  fruit  quality  and  product  shelf  life.  Phosphorus  promotes  root  growth  and  early  maturity.  The  purity  of  the  fertilizer  makes  it  easy  for  both  elements  to  be  taken  up  by  the  plants  to  satisfy  demands  for  these  macronutrients  (Chapagain  and  Wiesman,  2004).  MPK  is  water  soluble,  which  makes  it  ideal  for  fertigation  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).  The  lack  of  N  in  the  initial  fertilizer  mix  enables  users  to  develop  a  custom  application  rate  to  avoid  excess  or  unnecessary  N  applications.  If  N  is  needed,  an  additional  source  such  as  another  fertilizer,  manure  or  compost  can  be  added.    There  are  a  number  of  other  reported  benefits  associated  with  MKP  in  addition  to  its  agronomical  advantages.  MKP  does  not  contain  any  chloride,  sodium  or  heavy  metals,  making  it  relatively  safe  for  use  with  all  kind  of  plants  (Haifa  Group,  2014).  A  low  salt  index,  and  lack  of  ammonia  makes  it  ideal  for  hydroponic  cultures  (Haifa  Group,  2014).  MKP  has  been  investigated  for  its  fungicidal  properties,  and  has  been  shown  to  be  effective  in  controlling  powdery  mildew  in  many  crops  including  grape,  apple,  nectarine,  and  cucurbits  such  as  melon  and  cucumber  (Reuveni  et  al.,  1998).  Many  of  the  MKP  fertilizers  available  in  the  market  are  sold  in  a  salt  form  that  is  water  soluble,  and  it  can  further  be  mixed  with  pesticides  for  a  simultaneous  application  of  both  (Haifa  Group,  2014).    There  is  evidence  that  MKP  could  be  particularly  appropriate  for  potato  production  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).  A  study  conducted  in  Idaho,  USA,  between  2004  and  2006  investigated  the  efficacy  of  MPK  as  an  in-­season  fertigation  option  for  potatoes  and  found  that  P-­fertilizer  can  result  in  increased  tuber  yields  and  quality  when        13    potato  petioles  show  deficiencies  in  P  concentrations  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).  Potatoes  have  surface  feeding  roots  once  the  canopy  closes,  which  help  facilitate  the  uptake  of  fertigated  P  when  it  is  applied  in  a  water-­soluble  form  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).    Almost  all  commonly  used  P  fertilizers  contain  ammonia  (e.g.  Monoammonium  phosphate  and  diammonium  phosphate),  which  can  be  problematic  if  the  nitrogen  status  of  the  potato  plant  is  already  high  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).  When  the  N  levels  are  already  high  in  the  plant,  adding  additional  N  can  be  detrimental  to  crop  yields  due  to  their  sensitivity  to  excessive  N,  which  can  result  in  vegetative  growth  at  the  expense  of  tuber  growth  (the  cash  crop),  and  delay  skin  development  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).    MKP  can  be  applied  with  a  custom  application  rate  of  N,  therefore  meeting  the  plant’s  P  and  K  demands  without  over  supplying  N.  There  is  some  evidence  that  MKP,  used  as  a  starter  fertilizer  or  a  foliar  spray,  can  impact  crop  yields.    MKP-­based  starter  fertilizers  are  thought  to  enhance  snap  bean  yield  (Hochmuth,  2006).  Hochmuth  (2006)  determined  that  yield  was  enhanced  by  the  MKP-­based  starter  fertilizer  application,  and  demonstrated  that  the  direct  application  of  MKP  on  the  seed  was  safe  and  did  not  lead  to  any  damage.  Grapefruit  trees  that  received  foliar  applications  of  MKP  (post  bloom)  have  been  shown  to  produce  fruit  that  were  significantly  larger  than  a  control  treatment  (Boman  and  Hebb,  1998).  In  another  study  however,  Sawyer  and  Barker,  (2000)  found  a  slight  decrease  in  corn  grain  yield  after  foliar  application  of  MKP  compared  to  a  control.  No  visible  leaf  damage  was  observed  from  these  applications  and  the  study  provided  no  explanation  for  the  decreased  yield  (Sawyer  and  Barker,  2000).  So,  while  there  have  been  a  number  of  studies  to  document  the  advantages  of  using  MKP  as  a  fertilizer  there  is  at  least  one  case  that  has  documented  potential  negative  impacts  of  foliar  applications  to  corn.  While  there  is  substantial  evidence  that  using  BCPs,  particularly  glycerin  and  MKP  for  agricultural  production,  there  are  also  indications  that  there  may  be  some  potential  negative  impacts.  It  is  unclear  how  management  options  impact  the        14    optimization  of  BCPs.  It  is  also  unclear  if  BCPs  can  be  used  to  improve  beneficial  outcomes.  Using  MKP  fertilizers  that  include  sizable  concentrations  of  FFAs  in  the  form  of  glycerin  from  biodiesel  production  could  increase  the  efficiency  of  N  fertilizer  applications  and  decrease  N  losses  to  the  environment  while  supplying  crops  with  the  nutrients  they  require.    My  objectives  for  this  study  were  to  investigate  the  impacts  of  using  a  biodiesel  co-­product,  glycerin  and  recovered  MKP,  for  crop  production.  More  specifically,  I  wanted  to  determine  if  MKP  with  different  levels  of  glycerin  would  have  the  equivalent  impact  on  crop  seed  germination  and  yield  as  a  typical  retail  fertilizer.  I  also  wanted  to  determine  the  impact  of  glycerin  on  the  nitrogen  cycle  specifically  the  availability  of  NH4+  and  NO3-­.    2.2  Materials  and  methods  2.2.1  Germination  test  The  first  experiment  I  carried  out  was  a  germination  test  in  the  Horticulture  Greenhouse  at  UBC,  to  ensure  that  the  MKP  fertilizers  made  from  biodiesel  production,  purified  or  with  glycerin,  do  not  inhibit  crop  germination.  Four  lettuce  seeds  (Lactuca  satvia)  were  planted  per  pot,  to  test  the  MKP  fertilizers:  highly  purified  MKP  in  powder  form  that  was  washed  from  impurities  using  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  a  purified  MKP  also  in  powder  form  washed  with  isopropanol  (MKP-­I);;  a  crude  MKP  fertilizer  with  a  glycerin  co-­product  (MKP-­C);;  and  a  retail  NPK  as  a  control.  I  had  four  replicates  per  treatment,  and  the  pots  were  randomly  ordered  to  account  for  external  factors  in  the  greenhouse.  The  pots  were  watered  daily  by  the  greenhouse  staff.  A  germination  assessment,  or  the  number  of  germinated  seeds  per  treatment,  was  done  on  day  5,  day  10  and  day  15.    2.2.2  Field  trial  Shortly  following  the  germination  trial,  in  June  2015,  a  field  trial  was  conducted  at  the  Totem  Fields  Research  Station  at  UBC,  a  research  field  within  the  UBC        15    campus.  The  climate  is  a  moderate  oceanic  climate  with  mild  and  wet  winters  and  dry  summers.  The  soil  type  at  the  research  station  is  a  sandy  loam  from  the  Bose  soil  series.  The  field  trial  was  established  to  test  the  response  of  potato  (Solanum  tuberosum  L)  and  squash  (Cucurbita  pepo)  crops  to  additions  of  the  three  different  grades  of  MKP  fertilizers  (MKP-­M,  MKP-­C,  MKP-­C2),  with  an  added  nitrogen  source,  urea.  MKP-­C2  is  similar  to  MKP-­C  (described  above),  but  contains  twice  the  amount  of  glycerin.  The  amounts  of  fertilizers  that  were  administered  to  the  plants  were  calculated  using  recommended  N,  P  and  K  amounts  for  potatoes  and  squash  respectively.  For  both  crops,  I  followed  typical  production  practices  for  planting,  spacing,  weed  control,  irrigation  rate  and  frequency,  and  other  management  practices  for  optimal  plant  growth.  The  fertilizer  applications  were  split  into  two,  the  first  shortly  after  the  germination  of  the  crops,  and  the  second  before  the  flowering  of  the  crops.  For  the  potato  crops,  the  fertilizer  was  mixed  in  water  and  applied  to  the  soil  surface.  For  the  squash  plants,  the  fertilizer  was  sprayed  directly  on  the  leaves  in  order  to  maximize  fertilizer  uptake.    The  fertilizer  application  rates  were  determined  using  the  N  and  K  requirements  of  the  crops,  as  K  is  the  limiting  nutrient  in  MKP  fertilizers.  Application  rates  for  the  squash  were  90  kg  N  ha-­1,  74  kg  P  ha-­1  and  141  kg  K  ha-­1,  and  for  potatoes,  the  rates  were  225  kg  N  ha-­1,  59  kg  P  ha-­1  and  133  kg  K  ha-­1.  Treatments  were  applied  in  a  completely  randomized  block  design  to  account  for  the  differences  in  soil  properties  across  the  field,  with  four  replicates  each.  Within  each  plot,  four  squash  plants,  and  three  potato  plants  were  planted.  2.2.2.1  Crop  productivity  For  both  squash  and  potato  plants,  the  yield  was  measured  at  the  end  of  the  growing  season,  ~90  days  after  planting.  The  yield  was  obtained  for  the  marketable  crop,  as  well  as  the  above  ground  biomass  (AGB),  which  is  the  non-­marketable  plant  material  (i.e.  stems  and  leaves).  Squash  fruits  were  collected  by  hand,  and  potatoes  were  dug  from  the  ground  with  a  pitch  fork.  The  AGB  was  cut  as  close  to  the  ground  as  possible.  The  marketable  crop  yield  was  divided  into  size  classes:  small,  medium  and  large  for  the  squash  crop  and  different  diameter        16    size  classes  from  potatoes:  over  7.5  cm,  under  7.5  cm,  under  6  cm,  under  4  cm  and  under  2.5  cm.  Marketable  yield  was  then  analyzed  for  external  and  internal  defects  (all  potato  tubers  were  analyzed,  and  four  squash  fruits  from  different  size  classes  were  randomly  selected  for  quality  assessment).  The  quality  of  the  crop  is  reported  in  percentage  of  the  sample  showing  defects.  Marketable  yield  and  AGB  were  weighed  fresh  and  the  AGB  was  oven  dried  at  60  C  for  48  hours  and  re-­weighed.    2.2.2.2  Soil  nutrient  cycling  Soil  samples  from  the  0-­15  cm  and  15-­30  cm  depths  were  taken  using  an  Oakfield  soil  probe  (1.9  cm  in.  dia.)  at  the  beginning  of  the  experiment  to  determine  a  baseline  for  nutrients  and  soil  physical  properties.  Soil  samples  were  collected  every  two  weeks  after  the  first  fertilizer  application,  from  the  0-­15  cm  depth.  From  each  plot,  3  cores  were  taken  and  composited.  Soil  samples  were  immediately  taken  back  to  the  laboratory  and  extracted  for  both  available  NH4+  and  NO3-­.  A  5-­g  field-­moist  subsample  was  extracted  with  25  mL  of  2  M  potassium  chloride  (KCl)  and  shaken  for  30  min  before  centrifuging  (5000  rpm  for  5  minutes)  and  filtering  (Fisherbrand  Q2  filters).  The  extracted  samples  were  frozen  until  they  were  analyzed  to  determine  the  NH4+  (Weatherburn  1967)  and  NO3-­  (Doane  and  Horwarth  2003)  concentrations  by  colorimetry.  Soil  samples  were  also  sent  to  the  Ministry  of  Environment  laboratory  to  determine  extractable  P  and  K  using  the  Mehlich  III  method,  and  total  C  and  N  using  an  elemental  analyzer.    2.2.3  Greenhouse  trial  The  greenhouse  trial  was  designed  to  replicate  the  potato  production  from  the  field  experiment  in  a  controlled  environment  but  also  to  assess  the  use  of  the  different  grades  of  MKP  fertilizers  for  use  in  typical  greenhouse  production  of  bell  peppers  (Capsicum  annuum).  For  the  greenhouse  trial,  the  potatoes  received  five  different  treatments,  the  three  MKP  fertilizers  used  in  the  field  trial  (MKP-­M,  MKP-­  C,  MKP-­C2),  a  retail  MKP  fertilizer  from  the  brand  Haifa  (retail-­MKP)  and  a  typical  retail  NPK  fertilizer.  The  peppers  received  the  same  treatments  as  the  potatoes,        17    with  two  added  treatments:  MKP-­M  and  the  retail  MKP  applied  as  foliar  fertilizer  sprays.  Pots  for  each  crop  were  placed  in  a  completely  randomized  design  with  five  replicates.  The  crops  were  fertilized  weekly  for  8  weeks.  The  fertilizers  were  mixed  with  water  and  either  applied  directly  to  the  soil  for  the  potatoes  at  a  rate  of  225  kg  N  ha-­1,  135  kg  P  ha-­1  and  160  kg  K  ha-­1,  or  applied  to  the  leaves  using  a  spray  bottle  for  the  peppers  at  a  rate  of  200  kg  N  ha-­1,  60  kg  P  ha-­1  and  350  kg  K  ha-­1.  2.2.3.1  Crop  productivity  Marketable  crop  yield  was  measured  for  each  treatment,  as  well  as  the  above  ground  biomass  148  days  after  planting.  The  marketable  portion  of  the  crop  was  classed  in  size  classes  for  potatoes  as  described  above  in  the  field  trial;;  and  for  peppers:  small,  medium  and  large.  Four  peppers  and  potatoes  of  each  size  classes  per  treatment  were  selected  to  assess  external  and  internal  damage  of  the  crop.  For  the  peppers,  the  fourth  pepper  was  selected  from  the  most  dominant  size  class  in  the  harvest  in  order  to  select  a  representative  sample  for  crop  quality  determination.               18    2.2.4  Statistical  analysis  Analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  was  used  to  detect  crop  productivity  differences  among  fertilizer  treatments  using  block  as  a  fixed  effect.  If  any  differences  were  found,  Tukey’s  range  test  was  then  used  to  determine  where  the  differences  occur  among  treatments.  Quality  assessment,  or  internal  and  external  damage  count,  was  assessed  using  the  Chisquare  test.  And  finally,  for  the  PAN  results,  I  used  a  repeated  measures  ANOVA  using  block  as  a  random  effect.    In  cases  where  there  were  interactions  between  the  treatments  and  the  sampling  dates  (time)  an  ANOVA  was  run  for  each  date  and  if  significant,  a  Tukey’s  range  was  used.  Data  was  tested  for  normality  using  the  Shapiro-­Wilk  test,  and  when  the  assumptions  for  the  test  were  not  met,  the  data  was  log-­transformed.  Function  plots  and  qqnorm  were  used  to  test  mixed  models  for  normality.  All  statistical  analyses  were  done  using  R  (R  Core  Team  2016).      2.3  Results  2.3.1  Germination  test  The  lettuce  seed  germination  trial  showed  a  high  rate  of  germination  for  all  fertilizer  treatments  (Figure  2.1).  By  day  5  all  treatments  had  an  average  germination  of  >75%,  by  day  10  >85%  and  by  day  15  >  87%  (data  not  shown).    There  were  no  significant  differences  among  the  four  fertilizer  treatments  (P  <  0.05).        19      Figure  2.1.    Average  germination  rate  on  day  15  of  the  germination  trial  for  three  types  of  monopotassium  phosphate  (MKP)  fertilizer:  methanol-­washed  (MKP-­M);;  Isopropanol-­washed  MKP  (MKP  –  P);;  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP  –  C);;  and  no  fertilizer  (Control).  Error  bars  represent  standard  error.  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  >  0.05).    2.3.2  Field  trial    2.3.2.1  Crop  productivity    In  the  field  trial,  the  average  yield  of  potatoes  was  highly  variable  both  in  terms  of  the  total  yield  and  distribution  across  the  size  classes  (Table  2.1).  There  were  however,  no  significant  differences  in  ABG  or  marketable  yields  among  the  treatments  (P  >  0.05).  The  number  of  potatoes  was  consistent  across  the  treatments  and  again  there  were  no  significant  differences  (P  >  0.05).  Observations  of  the  quality  of  the  potatoes  was  also  consistent  across  the  treatments  and  low  for  both  internal  and  external  defects  (<13%  of  the  sample)  and  there  no  significant  difference  found  (P  >  0.05).   020406080100120MKP	  -­‐‑ M MKP	  -­‐‑ P MKP	  -­‐‑ C ControlAverage	  germination	  rate	  (%)Fertilizer	  treatment      20    Table  2.1.  Average  (±  standard  error)  potato  yield  by  size  class  in  kg  ha-­1,  fruit  number  and  potato  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  >  0.05).             Average  yield  (kg  ha-­1)  by  size  class  (cm)   Average  fruit  #  Quality  (%  with  defects)  Treatment   7.5  +   7.5   6   4   2.5   Total  yield    External   Internal  MKP-­C   2699   5111   3804   244   69   11,925  ±  1,785   12  ±  1.1   0.0   1.3  MKP-­C2   1729   4987   2137   207   38   9,097±  941   10  ±  1.4   1.3   1.9  MKP-­M   723   5009   4598   186   9   10,523  ±  2,708   10  ±  2.1   0.3   0.3  retail-­NPK   3822   7009   3003   135   55   14,024  ±  2,453   9  ±  2.4   3.1   7.0    The  results  for  the  squash  harvest  were  similar  to  potatoes  (Table  2.2).  There  were  no  significant  differences  across  the  treatments  for  yields  or  quality  (P  >  0.05).    Table  2.2.  Average  (±  standard  error)  squash  yield  by  size  class  in  kg  ha-­1,  average  fruit  number  and  squash  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).    No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  >  0.05).             Average  yield  (kg  ha-­1)  by  size  class       Quality  (%  with  defects)  Treatment   Small   Medium   Large   Total  yield   Average  fruit  #   External   Internal  MKP-­C   2466   3075   13374   18,914  ±  8148   6.0  ±  2.3   0.0   0.0  MKP-­C2   5748   9551   16964   32,304  ±  12338   9.5  ±  0.5   0.0   0.0  MKP-­M   6477   5510   15847   27,834  ±  8570   9.3  ±  3.0     0.0   0.6  retail-­NPK   4454   3849   10460   18,763  ±  6481     6.5  ±  2.7   0.0   0.6    2.3.2.3  Soil  properties    Soil  concentrations  of  K,  P,  total  N  and  total  C  for  both  the  potato  and  squash  trial  were  not  significantly  different  for  any  treatments  at  either  depth  (P  >  0.05)  (Appendix  Tables,  A.X.1  and  A.X.2).          21    2.3.2.5  Plant  available  nitrogen  Plant  available  nitrogen  (PAN)  in  the  form  NH4+-­N  and  NO3-­-­N  varied  substantially  in  the  potato  field  over  the  growing  season  (Figure  2.2).  Soil  NH4+-­N  content  started  at  0  mg  NH4+-­N  kg-­1  soil  and  increased  until  hitting  a  peak  at  65  days  after  planting  (DAP)  before  decreasing  to  its  initial  values  after  crop  harvest  for  all  treatments  (Figure  6.1a).  NO3-­-­N  however  decreased  until  30  DAP,  then  increased  after  the  fertilizing  events  also  reaching  its  peak  at  65  DAP  and  decreasing  slightly  after  harvest  (Figure  6.1b).  Although  time  was  significant  (P  <  0.05),  no  significant  differences  were  found  for  either  NH4+-­N  and  NO3-­-­N  by  treatment  (P  >  0.05).    Similar  to  the  PAN  results  for  potatoes,  NH4+-­N  content  in  the  squash  field  was  close  to  zero  at  the  beginning  of  the  season,  increased  until  65  DAP  and  decreasing  after  harvest.  NO3-­-­N  decreased  from  8  mg  kg-­1  to  almost  zero  and  increased  after  the  fertilizing  events.  It  continued  to  increase  after  harvest  (Figure  2.2).  At  32,  48,  and  65  DAP,  the  MKP-­C  treatment  had  significantly  higher  soil  NH4+-­N  content  than  all  the  other  treatments  (MKP-­C2,  MKP-­M  and  NPK)  (P  <  0.05).  There  were  however  no  significant  differences  for  NO3-­-­N  content  among  the  fertilizer  treatments  (P  >  0.05)  (Figure  2.2b).               22        Figure  2.2.  a.  Soil  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  and  b.  soil  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  throughout  the  season  in  the  potato  field  for  the  different  fertilizer  treatments:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  Error  bars  represent  the  standard  error.  No  significant  differences  among  treatments  were  found  (P  <  0.05).     0510152025300 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90Soil	  NH4+-­‐‑N	  content	  (mg	  kg-­‐‑1)Fertilizingevent	  #1Fertilizing	  event	  #	  2Harvest	  02468101214160 20 40 60 80 100Soil	  NO3-­‐‑-­‐‑N	  content	  (mg	  kg-­‐‑1)Days	  after	  plantingMKP-­‐‑CMKP-­‐‑C2MKP-­‐‑MNPK      23        Figure  2.3.  a.  Soil  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  and  b.  soil  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  content  (mg  kg-­1)  throughout  the  season  in  the  squash  field  for  the  different  fertilizer  treatments:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  Error  bars  represent  the  standard  error.  Letters  indicate  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).      -­‐‑505101520250 20 40 60 80 100Soil	  NH4+-­‐‑N	  Content	  (mg	  kg-­‐‑1) Fertilizing	  event	  #1Fertilizing	  event	  #2Harvestaa ab b b0246810121416180 20 40 60 80 100Soil	  NO3-­‐‑-­‐‑N	  content	  (mg	  kg-­‐‑1)Days	  after	  plantingMKP-­‐‑CMKP-­‐‑C2MKP-­‐‑MNPK      24    2.3.3  Greenhouse  trial    In  the  greenhouse  trial,  potato  yields  were  significantly  different  among  fertilizer  treatments  (p<0.0001)  (Table  2.3).  Potatoes  yields  varied  by  over  60%  from  207  grams  per  pot  for  retail-­MKP  to  75  g  per  pot  for  MKP-­M.  Yields  for  retail  NPK  were  147%  higher  than  MKP  -­M  but  were  not  significantly  different  from  MKP-­C  or  MKP-­C2.  There  were  also  significant  differences  in  the  number  of  potato  tubers  among  the  different  treatments  (P  <  0.05).  Retail-­MKP  had  four  times  more  fruits  than  the  lowest  treatment,  MKP-­M.    There  were  no  significant  differences  found  for  internal  and  external  damage  among  the  treatments  (P  >  0.05).    Table  2.3.  Average  (±  standard  error)  potato  yield  by  size  (g  pot-­1),  average  fruit  number  and  potato  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment  in  the  greenhouse:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M),  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK)  and  commercial  MKP  fertilizer  (retail-­MKP).  Five  pots  were  measured  per  treatment.  Significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)  are  indicated  by  different  letters.    In  the  greenhouse  trial,  the  yield  of  peppers  varied  by  85%  between  MKP-­C2,  the  lowest  yielding  treatment,  and  the  MKP-­M-­foliar  treatment  (Table  2.4).  MKP-­M-­foliar  and  MKP-­C  had  significantly  higher  yield  (P  <  0.05)  than  MKP-­C2  and  retail-­NPK  but  did  not  differ  from  the  other  treatments.    The  number  of  fruits  per  pot  for  peppers  varied  from  1  pepper  only  on  average  for  Retail-­NPK  to  6  peppers  per  pot  for  MPK-­M-­foliar.  MKP-­M-­foliar,  retail-­MKP-­foliar,  and  retail-­MKP  had  the  highest  Treatment  Average  yield  (g  pot-­1)  Average  tubers  (#  plot-­1)  Quality  (%  with  defects)                 External   Internal  MKP-­C   198.9  ±  21.7  ab   6.2  ±  1.4  ab     0.0   0.0  MKP-­C2   106.7  ±  5.4  abc   3.6  ±  1.6  ab     1.3   0.0  MKP-­M     83.6    ±  10.7  c   2.4  ±  0.7  b   0.0   0.0  Retail-­MKP   207.6  ±  16.2  a   8.6  ±  0.9  a     0.0   1.3  Retail-­NPK   142.7  ±  17.2  b   4.6  ±  0.5  ab   1.3   0.0        25    number  of  fruits  and  were  significantly  (P  <  0.05)  greater  than  retail-­NPK.  There  were  no  significant  differences  among  the  other  fertilizer  treatments  (P  >  0.05).  MKP-­M-­foliar  was  the  only  fertilizer  treatment  with  no  internal  or  external  damage;;  all  other  treatments  had  both  some  type  of  internal  and  external  damage.  While  some  fertilizer  treatments  had  external  and/  or  internal  damage,  and  others  did  not,  no  significant  differences  were  found  among  the  treatments  (P  >  0.05).    Table  2.4.  Average  (±  standard  error)  pepper  yield  by  size  (g  pot-­1),  average  fruit  number  and  potato  quality  in  percent  by  fertilizer  treatment  in  the  greenhouse:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK),  commercial  MKP  (Retail-­MKP)  and  commercial  MKP  and  MKP-­M  sprayed  foliarly  (retail-­MKP-­foliar;;  MKP-­M-­foliar).  Five  pots  were  measured  per  treatment.  Significant  differences  (P  <  0.05)  are  indicated  by  different  letters.         Treatment   Average  yield  (g)   Average  fruit  (#)  Quality  (%  with  defects)                 External   Internal  MKP-­C       163.1  ±  13.9  a       5.2  ±  0.8  ab   0.0   1.3  MKP-­C2   31.9    ±  18.7  b       2.0  ±  1.1  ab   2.5   1.3  MKP-­M-­foliar       199.2  ±  27.0  a                             6.4  ±  1.0  a   0.0   0.0  MKP-­M       105.7  ±  9.8  ab       4.2  ±  0.7  ab   0.0   2.5  Retail  MKP-­foliar     126.6  ±  10.7  ab   5.4  ±  1.2  a   2.5   2.5  Retail-­MKP     131.3  ±  11.2  ab   5.2  ±  0.9  a   0.0   1.3  Retail-­NPK     78.3  ±  12.9  b   1.2  ±  0.7  b   2.5   2.5        26    2.4  Discussion  2.4.1  Germination  test  The  results  from  the  germination  test  indicated  that  there  are  no  concerns  with  the  MKP  fertilizers  or  the  glycerin  for  germination.  All  the  treatments  had  a  germination  rate  of  above  90%  and  there  were  no  significant  differences  among  the  germination  rates  for  the  different  treatments.  These  results  were  consistent  with  Soerens  and  Parker  (2012)  who  also  looked  at  the  effects  of  glycerin  on  germination  and  found  no  impacts.    2.4.2  Field  trial  Overall,  there  were  no  significant  differences  among  the  fertilizer  treatments  applied  to  the  crops  in  the  field  trial.    Crop  yields,  number  of  tubers  or  fruits  and  the  crop  quality  were  similar  regardless  of  fertilizer  type.  While  the  variability  was  high  for  some  of  the  results  these  were  likely  due  to  differences  in  soil  properties  that  were  not  measured  across  the  field.  However,  I  did  see  a  trend  in  performance  showing  that  the  mean  yield  and  number  of  tubers/fruits  was  the  highest  for  the  retail  NPK  fertilizer  and  the  MKP–M  fertilizer  and  the  lowest  consistently  being  MKP–C2.  This  trend  was  also  consistent  with  the  visual  observations  of  the  field  trial,  with  the  retail  NPK  and  MKP  –M  having  the  largest  and  healthiest  looking  plants,  and  the  MKP–C2  and  MKP-­C  having  the  smallest  plants,  with  smaller  or  fewer  fruits  and  some  damage  to  the  plants.  While  on  one  hand  these  results  are  promising,  suggesting  that  BCP  fertilizers  are  as  effective  as  retail  NPK  we  had  expected  that  they  would  outperform  the  retail  NPK.    When  Hopkins  et  al.  (2010),  carried  out  a  similar  experiment,  comparing  yield  and  quality  of  potatoes  using  a  retail  potassium  nitrate  (KNO3)  fertilizer  and  MKP  fertilizer,  they  found  significantly  higher  yield  for  the  potato  crops  fertilized  with  MKP  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).  They  suggested  this  was  due  to  the  low  P  concentration  in  the  soil  and  MKP  providing  potato  crops  with  P  mid-­season,  boosting  tuber  production.  The  quality  was  also  higher  for  the  same  reasons  (Hopkins  et  al.,  2010).  The  baseline  concentrations  of  P  in  the  potato  field  in  my  study  were  above        27    200  mg  kg-­1  of  soil  for  all  treatments,  indicating  that  the  potatoes  were  not  likely  deficient  in  P  (Penn  State  Extension,  2002).  There  would  therefore  be  no  benefit  to  adding  additional  P  which  could  partly  explain  the  lack  of  significant  differences  in  yield  among  the  different  treatments.    For  the  PAN  results,  given  that  two  of  the  fertilizer  treatments  (MKP-­C  and  MKP-­C2)  contain  glycerin,  a  nitrification  inhibitor,  I  expected  to  see  higher  NH4+-­N  levels  over  the  season  in  these  treatments  and  lower  NO3-­-­N  contents.  Glycerin  is  thought  to  be  a  promising  soil  amendment  to  reduce  N  loss  and  promote  its  use  efficiency  (Liu  et  al.,  2013).  Nitrification  inhibitors,  such  as  glycerin,  work  by  temporarily  stopping  nitrifying  bacteria  from  turning  NH4+  to  nitrite  (NO2-­)  (from  several  weeks  to  several  months)  (Liu  et  al.,  2013).  They  deactivate  the  ammonia  monooxygenase  enzyme  responsible  for  the  oxidation  of  NH4+  to  NO2-­.  Nitrogen  in  the  soil  is  therefore  kept  in  the  form  of  NH4+-­N  for  longer,  which  increases  nitrogen  uptake  opportunities  for  plants  (Kim  et  al.,  2012).  Liu  et  al.,  (2013)  also  found  differences  in  treatments  when  they  conducted  a  study  where  glycerin,  a  reported  nitrification  inhibitor,  was  added  to  the  soil.  The  results  from  their  experiment  show  that  the  application  of  glycerin  significantly  increased  the  NH4+-­N  content  of  the  soil  which  could  contribute  to  increasing  the  N  uptake  of  the  plant  and  ultimately,  crop  yields  (Liu  et  al.,  2013).  Although  I  observed  increased  N  availability  in  the  squash  trial  I  did  not  see  this  result  in  differences  in  yields.  Surprisingly,  this  pattern  of  increased  NH4+-­N  was  only  observed  for  the  MKP-­C  treatment  in  the  squash  trial,  and  not  the  treatment  MKP-­C2  which  had  double  the  concentration  of  glycerin  or  in  the  potato  trial.  In  a  review  of  N  inhibitors  Liu  et  al  2013,  found  that  that  very  low  application  rates  often  had  similar  or  better  inhibition  effects.  While  no  explanation  was  given  as  to  why  very  low  rates  performed  as  well  and  in  some  cases,  better,  this  is  consistent  with  my  findings.    The  sampling  protocol  I  used  might  help  explain  why  PAN  differed  for  the  squash  and  not  the  potatoes.  For  the  potato  crop,  the  fertilizer  was  applied  at  the  base  of  each  plant,  while  soil  samples  were  taken  at  a  minimum  distance  of  30  centimeters  of  the  plant  to  avoid  causing  any  damage  to  the  roots  given  the        28    sampling  intensity.  It  is  possible  that  soil  samples  were  taken  outside  of  the  area  most  influenced  by  the  BCPs.    For  the  squash  crop  however,  the  zone  of  influence  was  likely  much  wider  given  that  when  the  fertilizer  was  sprayed  on  the  leaves  and  dripped  to  the  ground  at  the  edge  of  the  canopy.    2.4.3  Greenhouse  trial  The  results  from  the  greenhouse  trial  showed  clear  differences  among  the  fertilizer  treatments  in  terms  of  crop  yield  and  fruit  number  for  both  potatoes  and  peppers.  For  potatoes,  there  were  interesting  differences  in  yields.    While  the  retail-­MKP  fertilizer  resulted  in  higher  yields  than  retail-­NPK,  the  MKP-­M  surprisingly  did  not.  There  were  however  clear  yield  benefits  from  the  addition  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C).  Again,  this  could  be  due  to  the  nitrifying  effect  of  the  glycerin  in  the  MKP-­C,  which  is  what  I  had  expected  to  see.  The  results  for  the  MKP-­C2  were  consistent  with  those  of  the  field  trial  in  that  it  did  not  perform  better  than  the  lower  dose  of  glycerin.  For  the  peppers,  a  similar  trend  was  observed  where  the  yields  of  the  MKP–C  treatment  were  significantly  higher  than  the  NPK  fertilizer  but  the  MKP-­C2  was  not.  For  the  number  of  fruits,  significant  differences  can  be  seen  in  both  potatoes  and  peppers.  Interestingly  the  foliar  applications  of  MKP  resulted  in  higher  yields  and  a  greater  number  of  peppers.  In  this  case,  we  could  assume  that  applying  the  MKP–M  and  Retail-­MKP  to  the  leaves  increased  the  uptake  of  P  and  K  by  the  plants,  which  was  shown  to  increase  the  number  of  peppers  produced  (Boman  and  Hebb,  1998).  The  uptake  of  K  by  the  plants  post-­bloom  induces  fruit  production.  Similar  results  were  reported  in  an  experiment  using  grapefruit  that  showed  there  was  a  higher  proportion  and  bigger  fruits  when  MKP  was  applied  to  the  leaves  post-­bloom  as  opposed  to  a  soil  application  or  a  retail  NPK  fertilizer,  which  was  also  applied  to  the  soil  (Boman  and  Hebb,  1998).    The  yields  of  the  MKP-­C2  treatment  were  low  because  of  the  mortality  of  three  out  of  the  five  plants.  Mortality  was  observed  only  in  the  MKP-­C2  treatment  suggesting  the  additional  glycerin  contributed  to  the  losses.  Soerens,  2012,  when  looking  at  adding  glycerin  as  a  soil  amendment  determined  that  adding  more  than  1%  glycerin  of  the  total  volume  of  the  growing  medium  was  detrimental  to  plant        29    growth,  which  is  likely  due  to  the  hygroscopic  properties  of  glycerin.  The  glycerin  could  have  absorbed  the  water  and  made  it  unavailable  to  the  plants  (Soerens,  2012).  In  my  study,  I  added  over  20%  of  the  total  volume  of  MKP-­C2  which  corroborates  with  this  threshold  and  explains  the  sudden  wilting  of  three  pepper  plants  in  the  MKP-­C2  treatment.  2.5  Conclusion    In  the  germination  trial,  no  differences  were  seen  among  the  BCP  fertilizer  treatments  and  the  control,  indicating  MKP  fertilizers  or  added  glycerin  do  not  inhibit  germination.  The  results  of  the  field  trial  indicate  that  BCP  fertilizers  perform  no  differently  than  retail  fertilizers  in  terms  of  crop  yields,  numbers  and  quality.  The  BCP  fertilizers  did  however  impact  the  availability  of  soil  NH4+-­N.    In  the  squash  trial,  MKP  treatments  with  added  glycerin  consistently  had  higher  concentrations  of  NH4+-­N.  This  is  probably  due  to  the  immobilization  of  N  by  an  increase  in  microbial  communities  facilitated  by  the  addition  of  C  in  the  glycerin.  After  the  glycerin  is  consumed,  N  is  once  again  available  for  plant  uptake.  For  the  greenhouse  trial,  both  potatoes  and  peppers  showed  differences  in  yield  and  number  of  tubers.  In  the  controlled  environment  of  the  greenhouse  I  observed  clear  differences  in  the  performance  of  the  BCP  fertilizers.    The  MKP-­C  fertilizer  performed  as  well  as  retail  MKP  fertilizer  and  better  than  retail  NPK.    Doubling  the  glycerin  (i.e.  MKP-­C2)  however,  has  a  negative  impact  on  pepper  productivity,  resulting  in  a  high  rate  of  mortality.  The  treatments  that  were  most  beneficial  for  greenhouse  growth  are  MKP  fertilizers  with  urea  applied  directly  to  the  leaves,  likely  due  to  the  direct  uptake  of  the  nutrients  by  the  plants.  And  finally,  there  were  no  differences  in  crop  quality  among  the  different  treatments.  The  results  of  this  series  of  experiments  indicate  BCP  fertilizers  could  be  sold  as  a  substitute  for  current  retail  fertilizers  and  may  even  have  some  additional  benefits  if  used  appropriately.                 30    3.  The  effects  of  high-­throughput  in-­vessel  compost  on  soil  properties  and  crop  productivity  3.1  Introduction  Food  waste  disposal  has  become  an  important  problem  worldwide.  For  example,  in  the  United  States  of  America,  over  97%  of  food  waste  is  buried  in  landfills  (Levis  et  al.,  2010).    Efforts  to  divert  food  waste  from  landfills  have  led  to  the  development  of  alternative  technologies  that  promise  to  be  more  sustainable  (Kim  et  al.,  2008).  Composting,  which  is  defined  as  the  biological  decomposition  and  stabilization  of  organic  waste  under  specific  temperature,  is  the  most  popular  option  for  food  waste  disposal  given  its  low  environmental  impact  (Kim  et  al.,  2008).  It  is  also  attractive  as  it  generates  a  product  from  food  wastes  that  can  be  used  to  grow  food,  closing  the  loop  between  food  production  and  food  waste.  Over  the  last  few  decades,  in-­vessel  composting  has  known  major  advancements  and  has  grown  in  popularity  and  is  now  used  in  many  large  scale  municipal  composting  operations  (Areikin  et  al.,  2012).  The  in-­vessel  composting  process  occurs  within  a  chamber  where  environmental  factors  are  controlled,  and  contains  a  biofilter  to  prevent  odor  and  dust  from  escaping  the  chamber.  The  advantages  associated  with  in-­vessel  composting  are:  less  space  required  for  the  composting  process,  higher  processing  efficiency,  and  control  of  the  odor  and  dust  typically  associated  with  composting  (Areikin  et  al.,  2012;;  Kim  et  al.,  2008).    While  in-­vessel  composting  has  many  advantages,  a  number  of  studies  have  evaluated  how  the  impacts  of  using  in-­vessel  compost  differs  from  more  typical  compost  (e.g.  static  pile,  turned  windrow).  Iyengar  and  Bhave  (2006),  report  that  in-­vessel  composting  creates  a  product  of  higher  quality  than  typical  composting;;  characterized  by  higher  concentrations  of  humus  that  is  known  to  help  enhance        31    soil  physical  properties  and  provide  basic  plant  nutrients.  Kim  et  al.,  (2008),  also  report  that  the  in-­vessel  compost  is  well  suited  for  agricultural  use,  based  on  compost  maturity,  electrical  conductivity,  and  heavy  metals  concentrations.  Large  scale,  in-­vessel  compost  has  been  used  for  agricultural  production  for  many  years  and  has  clearly  demonstrated  that  it  can  produce  a  nutrient  rich,  pathogen  free  source  of  organic  inputs  to  maintain  soil  functioning  effectively  (Langarica-­Fuentes  et  al.,  2014).  Within  the  last  few  years,  there  have  been  substantial  advances  in  this  type  of  technology  that  has  reduced  the  size  of  the  machinery  and  the  speed  in  which  a  batch  is  processed,  thus  enabling  high  throughput  of  organic  materials.  While  large  scale  in-­vessel  composting  has  been  studied  extensively,  there  is  little  to  no  information  on  the  effects  of  using  high-­throughput  compost  made  in  vessels  that  are  using  new  technologies  that  allow  the  production  of  a  compost-­like  product  in  as  little  as  24  hours.    High  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost  differs  from  other  compost  operations  primarily  in  terms  of  the  time  food  waste  is  processed.  The  makers  of  HTI  machines  are  promising  a  usable  by-­product  from  food  waste  within  24  hours,  and  the  reduction  of  the  input  materials  by  80%  to  90%.  This  processing  rate  is  far  faster  than  other  composting  types,  for  example  in-­vessel  composting,  only  reduces  the  materials  by  as  much  as  65%  to  70%  over  30  days  (Iyengar  and  Bhave,  2006).  These  changes  are  likely  to  affect  the  stability  and  maturity  of  the  compost,  two  important  factors  that  affect  crop  productivity  and  nutrient  cycling.    It  is  likely  that  the  materials  made  in  HTI  composters  in  only  24  hours  are  still  highly  microbially  active  and  will  continue  to  decompose  after  being  applied  to  soil  (Benito  et  al.,  2003).  When  unstable  or  immature  compost  is  applied  as  a  soil  amendment,  it  can  lead  to  anaerobic  conditions  for  micro-­organisms  due  to  the  decomposition  of  organic  materials,  which  can  lead  to  nitrogen  immobilization  and  high  greenhouse  gas  emissions  (Benito  et  al.,  2003)  N  immobilization  increases  with  the  increase  in  microbial  communities  (which  increases  with  the  addition  of  undecomposed  organic  matter)  due  to  the  assimilation  of  the  inorganic  N  contained  in  the  soil  (Aoyama  and  Nozawa,  1993).    Under  anaerobic  conditions,        32    we  are  likely  to  see  an  increase  in  CH4,  a  greenhouse  gas  34  times  more  powerful  than  CO2.  Anaerobic  conditions  also  lead  to  microbial  communities  inefficiently  utilizing  N,  which  can  result  in  increased  N2O  emissions,  a  greenhouse  gas  298  times  more  powerful  than  CO2.  For  these  reasons,  I  want  to  determine  if  by  mixing  this  immature  material  with  either  a  readily  available  N  source  (e.g.  fertilizer  or  bloodmeal)  or  an  already  mature  compost,  the  immobilization  impacts  could  be  minimized.    Another  issue  associated  with  unstable  and  immature  composts  is  phytotoxicity  due  to  organic  acids  produced  in  the  early  stages  of  composting  (He  et  al,  1995).  The  overarching  objective  of  this  study  is  to  better  understand  the  potential  for  utilizing  HTI  compost,  an  unstable  and  immature  compost,  in  the  production  or  organic  vegetables.  More  specifically,  I  wanted  to  assess:  1.  The  impact  of  various  rates  of  HTI  compost  on  seed  germination  2.  How  HTI  alone  or  mixed  with  mature  compost  or  bloodmeal,  an  organically  certified  N  rich  fertilizer,  affects  crop  productivity,  soil  N  availability  and  GHG  emissions.               33    3.2  Materials  and  methods  3.2.1  Germination  trial      The  first  experiment  carried  out  was  a  germination  trial  in  the  Horticulture  Greenhouse  at  UBC,  to  ensure  that  the  HTI  compost  does  not  inhibit  seed  germination.  Four  lettuce  seeds  (Lactuca  satvia)  were  planted  per  pot,  to  test  the  HTI  at  different  application  rates:  The  application  rate  set  for  meeting  crop  N  demands  for  the  field  trials,  29  Mg  ha-­1  (1x),  half  the  field  application  rate  (0.5x),  twice  the  application  rate  (2x),  ten  times  the  field  application  rate  (10x),  twenty  times  the  application  rate  (20x),  and  no  amendment  as  the  control  (0x).  There  were  four  replicates  per  treatment,  and  the  pots  were  randomly  ordered  to  account  for  any  variation  within  the  greenhouse  environment.  The  pots  were  watered  daily  by  the  greenhouse  staff  as  they  would  typically  for  plant  germination.  A  germination  assessment,  or  the  number  of  germinated  seeds  per  treatment,  was  done  on  day  15,  and  the  biomass  of  the  seedlings  was  measured.  3.2.2  Field  trial  3.2.2.1  Crop  productivity    Shortly  following  the  germination  trial,  in  July  2016,  a  field  trial  was  conducted  at  the  UBC  Farm.  The  UBC  Farm,  run  by  the  Center  for  Sustainable  Food  Systems,  is  24-­ha  research  and  production  farm  located  on  the  UBC  campus  in  Vancouver,  British  Columbia.  The  climate  is  a  moderate  oceanic  climate  with  mild  and  wet  winters  and  dry  summers.  The  soil  type  at  the  farm  is  a  sandy  loam  from  the  Bose  soil  series.  The  field  trial  was  established  to  test  the  response  of  beets  (Beta  vulgaris)  and  spinach  (Spinacia  oleracea)  crops  to  different  compost  treatments:  HTI  compost,  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  HTI  compost  and  UBC  Farm  compost,  UBC  Farm  compost  and  no  compost.  The  amounts  of  compost  and  bloodmeal  that  were        34    applied  to  the  plots  were  calculated  using  an  average  of  the  recommended  rates  of  N  at  150  kg  ha-­1  (Appendix  Table  A.X.4).  For  both  crops,  management  followed  UBC  Farm’s  typical  production  practices  for  planting,  spacing,  weed  control,  irrigation  rate  and  frequency,  and  other  management  practices  for  optimal  plant  growth.  Compost  treatments  were  applied  a  week  before  planting  to  plots  that  were  three  beds  (70  cm  of  bed  and  30  cm  of  path)  wide  and  5  m  long.  Treatments  were  applied  in  a  completely  randomized  block  design  to  account  for  the  differences  in  soil  properties  across  the  field,  with  four  replicates  each  (20  plots  total).    For  both  the  spinach  and  beet  crops,  yield  was  measured  when  it  was  considered  marketable.  For  the  spinach,  only  the  marketable  aboveground  biomass  (AGB)  was  harvested.  For  the  beets,  the  yield  was  obtainable  for  the  marketable  root  of  the  crop.  Yields  were  taken  within  a  randomly  selected  2-­m  length  of  the  bed,  buffering  greenhouse  gas  collars  and  edges  of  the  plots.    3.2.2.2  Soil  analysis  Soil  samples  at  0-­15  cm  depths  were  taken  using  an  Oakfield  soil  probe  (1.9  cm  in.  dia.)  at  the  beginning  of  the  experiment,  to  determine  a  baseline  for  nutrients  and  soil  physical  properties.  To  determine  extractable  P  and  K,  a  Fourier  Transform  Infrared  (FTIR)  spectrometer  was  used.  Total  C  and  N  were  measured  by  combustion  on  a  Vario  EL  Cube  Elemental  Analyzer  (Elementar,  Langenselbold,  Germany).  From  each  plot,  four  cores  were  taken  and  composited.  Soil  samples  were  then  collected  every  two  weeks  after  the  first  treatments  application,  again  at  the  0-­15  cm  depth.  Soil  samples  were  taken  back  to  the  laboratory  and  extracted  for  the  plant  available  nitrogen  (PAN)  content  in  the  form  of  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  and  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N).  A  5-­g  field-­moist  subsample  was  extracted  with  25  mL  with  2  M  potassium  chloride  (KCl),  shaken  for  30  min  before  centrifuging  (5000  rpm  for  5  minutes)  and  filtering  (Fisherbrand  Q2  filters).  The  extracted  samples  were  frozen  until  they  were  analyzed  to  determine  the        35    NH4+-­N  (Weatherburn  1967)  and  NO3-­-­N  (Doane  and  Horwarth  2003)  concentrations  by  colorimetry.    3.2.2.3  Greenhouse  gases  measurements  Soil  GHG  measurement  were  taken  every  ten  days  throughout  the  growing  season  using  a  Picarro  G208  cavity  ring  down  spectrometer  (Picarro  Inc.,  Santa  Clara,  CA,  USA).  Simultaneous  measurements  of  N2O,  CO2  and  CH4  were  made  using  a  non-­steady  state  chamber  system  (Christiansen  et  al.,  2015).  An  opaque  chamber  lid  with  a  fan  was  used  to  cap  15-­cm  long  PVC  collars  with  a  20-­cm  inner  diameter  pounded  into  the  soil  at  the  beginning  of  the  season  leaving  5-­10  cm  above  the  surface.    Gas  accumulation  in  the  headspace  was  measured  during  a  5-­min  enclosure.  Air  was  re-­circulated  at  a  rate  of  2  L  min-­1  using  a  vacuum  pump  during  measurements.  After  each  sample,  the  system  was  flushed  with  outside  air  (10  L  min-­1  for  2  min)  to  reduce  gas  concentrations  to  background  levels.  Greenhouse  gas  fluxes  were  computed  with  MATLAB  v.  R2014a  (MathWorks  Inc.  2014),  using  the  following  formula:  F  =  (ρ  *  S  *  V)  /  (A)     where  F  is  the  flux  (µmol  m-­2  s-­1),  ρ  is  the  molar  density  (mole  m-­3)  of  dry  air  (i.e.,  corrected  for  the  average  mixing  ratio  of  water  measured  during  measurements),  S  is  the  slope  of  GHG  accumulation  within  the  headspace  (µmol  mol-­1  s-­1),  V  is  the  headspace  volume  (m-­3),  and  A  is  the  headspace  area  (m-­2).  The  slope  of  gas  accumulation  was  measured  by  linear  regression,  and  slopes  were  utilized  without  further  modification  if  the  coefficient  of  determination  (R2)  was  greater  than  0.75.  Slopes  with  R2  <  0.75  were  visually  examined  and  converted  to  zero  (if  no  quantifiable  gas  accumulation  in  the  headspace)  or  removed  (when  measurement  issues  were  observed).  Cumulative  GHG  fluxes  were  computed  using  linear  interpolation  between  measurements  (Gana  et  al.,  2016),  using  the  following  formula:  F(t)  =  F(t1)  +  (t  -­  t1)  *  (F(t2)  -­  F(t1))/(t2  -­  t1)        36    where  F(t1)  and  F(t2)  are  fluxes  at  time  t1  and  t2,  and  t1  <  t  <  t2.  3.2.2.4  Soil  incubations  Soil  samples  were  collected  at  a  depth  of  0-­15  cm  from  each  plot  at  the  end  of  the  growing  season  to  determine  if  there  were  any  differences  in  microbial  communities  among  the  different  soil  amendments  using  methods  modified  from  (Franzluebbers,  1999).  From  each  plot  3  cores  were  taken  and  composited.  The  soil  samples  were  air  dried,  ground  using  a  rolling  pin  and  passed  through  a  2-­mm  sieve.  80  grams  of  soil  was  then  re-­wetted,  and  incubated  in  1  L  mason  jars  with  10  mL  of  distilled  water  and  10  mL  of  sodium  hydroxide  (NaOH)  for  a  3-­day  period,  as  described  by  Franzluebbers  (2016).  Two  vials  containing  only  NaOH  and  distilled  water  were  incubated  to  determine  the  ambient  concentration  of  CO2.  The  NaOH  was  then  collected  and  mixed  with  3.5  mL  of  1.5  M  barium  chloride  (BaCl2)  and  two  drops  of  phenolphthalein  color  indicator,  and  titrations  were  performed  using  hydrochloric  acid  (HCl).  The  amount  of  HCl  used  in  the  titrations  was  then  converted  to  the  evolved  amount  of  CO2  from  the  soil  sample  using  the  following  equation  (Franzluebbers,  1999).      Flush  of  CO2  (mg  CO2  −  C  ∙  kg−1  soil)  =  (𝑉[𝑏𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑘]  −  𝑉[sample])  ∙  𝐶𝐻𝐶𝑙  ∙  𝑘/𝑚    where:      V[blank]  =  total  volume  of  HCl  used  in  titration  of  blank  (mL)    V[sample]  =  total  volume  of  HCl  used  in  titration  of  sample  (mL)    CHCl  =  concentration  (normality)  of  acid  (mol/L)    k  =  6000,  a  conversion  factor  involving  molar  mass  of  carbon,  mol  ratio  between  HCl  and  CO2  and  unit  conversion  from  L  to  mL  and  g  to  kg    m  =  soil  mass  (g)        37    3.2.3  Statistical  analysis  Germination,  yield,  soil  properties  and  soil  incubation  results  were  compared  for  significant  differences  among  treatments  using  analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA).  If  any  differences  were  found,  Tukey’s  range  test  was  used  to  determine  where  differences  occur  among  treatments.  For  soil  PAN  and  GHG  measurements,  a  linear  mixed  effect  model  was  used,  using  treatment,  time  and  treatment  x  time  interaction  as  fixed  effects  with  block  as  a  random  effect.  If  an  interaction  between  treatment  and  time  was  found,  an  ANOVA  was  used  to  look  at  the  differences  among  the  treatments  for  each  sampling  date.  Data  was  tested  for  normality  using  the  Shapiro-­Wilk  test,  and  when  the  assumptions  for  the  test  were  not  met,  the  data  was  log-­transformed.  Function  plots  and  qqnorm  were  used  to  test  mixed  models  for  normality.  Statistics  were  done  R  Studio  Version  0.99.491  (R  Core  Team  2016).  3.3  Results  3.3.1  Germination  test  Differences  in  germination  and  biomass  were  found  during  this  trial,  with  high  concentrations  of  HTI  compost  resulting  in  lower  germination  rates  and  lower  biomass.  The  lettuce  seed  germination  trial  showed  no  significant  differences  in  germination  rate  among  the  0x,  0.5x,  and  2x  application  rates  with  all  three  treatments  having  a  germination  rate  of  above  80%.  The  0x  treatment  had  a  significantly  higher  germination  rate  than  1x,  10x,  and  20x,  which  were  not  significantly  different.  The  20x,  which  has  a  significantly  lower  germination  rate  than  all  the  other  treatments,  with  a  germination  rate  of  around  10%  (Figure  3.1.a).    The  lettuce  seedling  biomass  resulted  in  a  somewhat  different  pattern.  Again,  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  average  biomass  among  treatments  with  low  application  rates  of  HTI,  0x,  0.5x,  1x,  and  2x,  with  values  ranging  from  0.87  g  for  0x  to  0.55g  for  0.5x.  The  biomass  of  10x  was  four  times  lower  than  the  highest        38    biomass  and  20x  was  even  lower,  100  times  lower  than  the  highest  biomass,  at  only  0.15  g  and  0.008  g  respectively  (Figure  3.1.b).      3.3.2  Crop  productivity    Crop  productivity  results  showed  that  UBC  farm  compost  had  a  higher  yield  than  HTI  compost  and  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  for  spinach,  but  no  significant  differences  in  yield  were  found  for  the  beets.  UBC  Farm  Compost  spinach  yields  were  twice  as  high  as  either  the  HTI  compost  or  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  (Figure  3.2.a).  There  were  however,  no  significant  different  among  the  other  treatments.  The  biomass  of  marketable  beet  yields  ranged  from  an  average  of  17,000  kg  ha-­1  in  the  HTI  +  UBC  farm  treatment  to  20,000  kg  ha-­1  in  the  HTI  compost  and  UBC  farm  compost  treatments  (Figure  3.2.b)  but  there  were  no  significant  differences  (P  >  0.05).             39        Figure  3.1.  a.  Average  germination  rate  (%)  and  b.  average  biomass  (g)  on  day  15  of  the  germination  trial  for  six  application  rates  of  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost:  0x  –  no  HTI  compost,  0.5x  –  half  the  field  application  rate,  1x  -­  field  application  rate,  2x  –  double  the  field  application  rate,  10x  –  ten  times  the  field  application  rate,  and  20x  –  twenty  times  the  field  application  rate.  Error  bars  represent  standard  error.  Different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).     0204060801001200	  x 0.5	  x	   1	  x 2	  x 10	  x 20	  xAverage	  Germination	  Rate	  (%)a ab b	   ab bc00.20.40.60.811.20	  x 0.5	  x	   1	  x 2	  x 10	  x 20	  xAverage	  Biomass	  (g)Treatmentaa a abc      40        Figure  3.2.  a.  Average  spinach  and  b.  beet  yield  (kg  ha-­1)  by  treatment:  Control  represents  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.    Error  bars  represent  standard  error.  Different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).     020004000600080001000012000Control HTI	   +	  UBC	  farm	   compost HTI	   compost HTI	   compost	   +	  bloodmeal UBC	   farm	  compostSpinach	  yield	  (kg	  ha-­‐‑1) ab ab b ba050001000015000200002500030000Control HTI	  +	  UBC	  farm	  compost HTI	  compost HTI	  compost	  +	  bloodmeal UBC	  farm	  compostBeets	  yield	  (kg	  ha-­‐‑1)Treatment      41    3.3.3  Soil  analyses  Endline   samples   showed   no   significant   differences   among   the   treatments   in  average  soil  %N,  %C  or  C:N  ratios  (P  <  0.05)  (Table  3.1).  These  results  show  that  the   different   amendments   to   the   soil   did   not   alter   any   of   its   basic   physical  properties  or  nutrient  contents.    Table 3.1. Average (± standard error) endline soil properties for nitrogen (%N), carbon (%C) and C:N ratio per treatment: Control consists of no soil amendment, HTI + UBC farm compost is a mixture of the current UBC farm management practice with the high throughput in-vessel (HTI) compost, HTI compost is the high throughput in-vessel compost alone, HTI compost + bloodmeal is a mixture of HTI compost and bloodmeal, and UBC Farm compost is the farm’s current management practice only. No significant differences were found (P > 0.05). Treatment   %  C   %  N   C:N  ratio    Control    6.40  ±  0.46    0.39  ±  0.03    16.5  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost   7.50  ±  0.62   0.48  ±  0.04   15.7  HTI  compost   7.20  ±  1.31   0.50  ±  0.10   14.8  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal   6.51  ±  1.10   0.42  ±  0.06   15.6  UBC  farm  compost   7.33  ±  1.60   0.48  ±  0.07   15.3    3.3.4  Plant  available  nitrogen  Plant  available  nitrogen  in  terms  of  both  soil  NH4+-­N  and  NO3-­-­N  was  highly  variable  over  the  season.  Although  there  were  significant  effects  for  date  and  treatment  for  both  NH4+-­N  and  NO3-­-­N,  their  response  varied  by  sampling  date  as  the  interaction  was  significant  (Table  3.2).  Through  most  of  the  season  there  were  significant  differences  among  treatments  but  the  response  pattern  varied  by  sampling  event.  Soil  NH4+-­N  concentrations  were  in  general  almost  twice  those  found  for  NO3-­-­N.  Soil  NH4+-­N  content  increased  after  compost  application  and  peaked  by  sampling  event  4  on  August  17th,  before  decreasing  to  its  initial  values  (Figure  3.3a).  At  the  first  sampling  event  after  treatment  application  (Sampling  event  2,  on  July  21st),  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  soil  NH4+-­N  content  among  the  treatments.        42    At  sampling  event  3  on  August  3rd,  HTI  compost  had  a  significantly  higher  soil  NH4+-­N  content  than  the  other  treatments.  At  sampling  event  4  on  August  17th,  HTI  compost,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  and  UBC  farm  compost  had  between  4  to  5  times  the  soil  NH4+-­N  content  of  the  other  two  treatments.  By  sampling  event  5  and  6,  only  the  HTI  compost  treatment  was  significantly  higher  in  soil  NH4+-­N  content  than  the  other  treatments,  with  around  three  times  more  soil  NH4+-­N  content  than  the  other  treatments.    The  overall  trend  for  soil  NO3-­-­N  content  over  the  growing  season  showed  that  soil  NO3-­-­N  increased  for  UBC  farm  compost  and  the  control  shortly  after  compost  application,  while  it  increased  for  HTI  compost  later  on  in  the  season  (one  week  later).  Soil  NO3-­-­N  content  for  HTI  compost  +  UBC  farm  and  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  did  not  increase  as  much  as  the  other  treatments.  After  sampling  event  4  on  August  17th,  soil  NO3-­-­N  content  decreased  for  all  treatments  except  for  HTI  compost,  which  was  significantly  higher  than  all  the  other  treatments  (Figure  3.4b).  At  the  second  sampling  event  on  July  21st,  after  treatment  application,  there  are  no  significant  differences  among  the  treatments.  At  sampling  event  3  on  August  3rd,  the  UBC  farm  compost  had  a  significantly  higher  soil  NO3-­-­N  content  than  the  other  treatments.  For  sampling  events  4,  5  and  6,  the  only  significant  difference  was  for  HTI  compost,  which  consistently  had  a  significantly  higher  soil  NO3-­-­N  content  than  the  other  treatments  until  the  end  of  the  growing  season.               43      Figure  3.3.  a.  Soil  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  content  and  b.  soil  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  content  in  mg  kg-­1.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.    Error  bars  represent  standard  error  and  different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).     -­‐‑70-­‐‑50-­‐‑30-­‐‑1010305070901101302 3 4 5 6Soil	  NH4+-­‐‑N	  Content	  (mg	  kg-­‐‑1)a ]b ]a] b ]b aba-­‐‑10-­‐‑50510152025303540452 3 4 5 6Soil	  NO3-­‐‑-­‐‑N	  Content	  (mg	  kg-­‐‑1)Sampling	  eventsControlHTI	  CompostHTI	  Compost	  +	  BloodmealUBC	  Farm	  Compost	  HTI	  +	  UBC	  Farm	  Compostabbaa ab]b ]b      44    Table  3.2.  F  and  P  value  for  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  and  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  soil  content  by  treatment,  by  date  and  by  the  interaction  of  treatment  and  date.       NO3-­-­N   NH4+-­N       F   P   F   P  Treatment   4.01   0.02   3.69   0.03  Date   0.30   0.00   4.65   0.05  Treatment*Date   7.03   0.02   9.73   0.02      3.3.5  Greenhouse  gases  emissions  3.3.5.1  Seasonal  emissions    Fluxes  of  all  three  GHGs  varied  over  the  course  of  the  season  and  there  was  a  significant  interaction  between  treatment  and  date  (Table  3.3).  Fluxes  of  N2O  increased  for  HTI  compost,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  and  HTI  compost  +  UBC  farm  compost  in  the  middle  of  the  season  for  a  couple  of  weeks  before  decreasing  to  initial  values.  Alternatively,  the  UBC  farm  compost  and  control  treatments  had  low  and  stable  emissions  (Figure  3.4a).  The  fluxes  of  CO2  and  CH4  were  highest  at  the  beginning  of  the  season  for  treatments  containing  HTI  compost,  peaking  at  the  second  and  third  sampling  date  respectively  before  decreasing  and  leveling  out  (Figure  3.4b  and  c).  UBC  farm  compost  and  the  control  treatments  had  stable  CO2  and  CH4  fluxes  over  the  season.    For  the  first  five  sampling  events,  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  N2O  fluxes  among  the  different  treatments  (Figure  3.4a).  On  August  12th,  all  the  treatments  containing  HTI  compost;;  HTI  compost,  UBC  farm  +  HTI  compost  and  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  had  a  significantly  higher  N2O  flux  than  the  other  two  treatments.  On  August  19th,  HTI  compost  had  a  significantly  higher  N2O  flux  than  all  the  other  treatments  with  a  N2O  flux  of  over  10  mg  m2  day-­1,  which  is  twice  as  much  as  the  next  highest  treatment;;  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost,  and  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  also  had  higher  N2O  fluxes  than  the  other  two  treatments.  On  August  26th,  HTI  compost  had  a  higher  N2O  flux  than  all  the  other  treatments.  For  the  rest  of  the  sampling  events,  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  fluxes  among  the        45    treatments,  but  on  September  23rd,  HTI  compost  once  again  was  significantly  higher  than  all  the  other  treatments.  At  the  first  sampling  event,  on  July  8th,  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  CO2  flux  among  the  treatments  (Figure  3.4b).  On  July  15th,  the  CO2  flux  of  the  HTI  compost  treatment  was  16  times  higher  than  the  lowest  treatments  (UBC  farm  and  control)  and  over  3  times  more  CO2  flux  than  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  and  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost.  On  July  22nd  and  29th,  the  HTI  compost  treatment  had  a  significantly  higher  CO2  flux,  but  there  were  no  differences  among  the  other  treatments.  For  the  rest  of  season,  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  CO2  flux  among  the  treatments.    On  July  8th,  there  are  no  significant  differences  in  CH4  fluxes  among  the  treatments  (Figure  3.4c).  On  July  15th  and  22nd,  the  CH4  flux  was  significantly  higher  for  the  HTI  compost  treatment  than  the  other  treatments,  and  the  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost  and  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  were  significantly  higher  than  the  control  and  the  UBC  farm  compost  treatments.  HTI  compost  had  a  daily  flux  5  times  higher  than  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  and  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost,  while  the  UBC  farm  compost  and  the  control  had  negative  CH4  fluxes.  On  July  29th,  HTI  compost  was  significantly  higher  than  the  control  and  the  UBC  farm  compost,  with  no  differences  among  the  other  treatments.  And  finally,  for  the  rest  of  the  growing  season,  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  CH4  flux  among  the  treatments.        46      Figure  3.4.  a.  Average  N2O  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1  b.  average  CO2  flux  in  g  m2  day-­1  and  c.  average  CH4  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.    Different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).      -­‐‑505101520Average	  N2O	  flux	  (mg	  m2d)abc]abab ab0100200300400500Average	  CO2flux	  (g	  m2d)abcab-­‐‑0.250.250.751.251.752.252.75Average	  CH4flux	  (mg	  m2d) UBC	  Farm	  Compost	  ControlHTI	  +	  UBC	  Farm	  Compost	  HTI	  Compost	  +	  BloodmealHTI	  Compost	  abcabca]bSampling	  date      47    Table  3.3.  F  and  P  value  for  CO2,  N2O  and  CH4  fluxes  by  treatment,  by  date  and  by  the  interaction  of  treatment  and  date.    3.3.5.2  Cumulative  greenhouse  gases  The  results  for  cumulative  GHGs  were  highest  for  HTI  compost  for  all  three  gases,  N2O,  CO2,  and  CH4  (Figure  3.5).  Cumulative  N2O  flux  for  HTI  compost  was  significantly  higher  than  all  the  other  treatments,  with  over  twice  the  flux  of  the  second  highest  treatment,  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost  (P  <  0.05);;  the  other  treatments  did  not  differ  significantly  (Figure  3.5a).  The  same  pattern  was  observed  for  the  cumulative  CO2  flux  where  the  HTI  compost  treatment  had  again  over  double  the  flux  than  the  rest  of  the  treatments  (Figure  3.5b).  HTI  compost  treatments  also  had  a  significantly  higher  CH4  fluxes  than  the  control  and  the  UBC  farm  compost  treatments.  All  three  treatments  containing  HTI  compost  have  positive  cumulative  CH4  fluxes  over  the  growing  season,  while  the  control  and  the  UBC  farm  treatments  resulted  in  CH4  consumption  (Figure  3.5c).           CO2               N2O                         CH4       F   P   F   P   F   P  Treatment   19.64   <  0.01   1.30   0.27   0.08   0.99  Date   138.85   <  0.01   0.18   0.68   0.94   0.33  Treatment*Date   5.02   <  0.01   3.66   0.01   3.75   <  0.05        48      Figure  3.5.  a.  Cumulative  N2O  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1,  b.  cumulative  CO2  flux  in  g  m2  day-­1  over  and  c.  cumulative  CH4  flux  in  mg  m2  day-­1  over  the  entire  season.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.  Error  bars  represent  standard  error  and  different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).         0100200300400500600Control HTI	   +	  UBC	  farm	   compost HTI	   compost HTI	   compost	   +	  bloodmeal UBC	   farm	  compostTotal	  N2O	  flux	  (mg	  m2d-­‐‑1 )bbab b01000200030004000500060007000Control HTI	   +	  UBC	  farm	   compost HTI	   compost HTI	   compost	   +	  bloodmeal UBC	   farm	  compostTotal	  CO2flux	  (g	  m2d-­‐‑1 )bbabb-­‐‑15-­‐‑10-­‐‑505101520253035Control HTI	  +	  UBC	  farm	  compost HTI	  compost HTI	  compost	  +	  bloodmeal UBC	  farm	  compostTotal	  CH4flux	  (mg	  m2d-­‐‑1 )b baaaTreatment      49    3.3.6  Soil  incubations  The  results  of  the  soil  incubations,  or  the  CO2  flush  after  rewetting  soil  samples  that  were  obtained  at  the  end  of  the  growing  season,  were  generally  higher  for  the  treatments  containing  compost  than  the  control.  The  CO2  flush  of  HTI  compost  treatment  was  34%  higher  than  the  control  (P  <  0.05).  There  were  no  significant  differences  among  the  other  treatments.      Figure  3.6.  Average  CO2  flush  in  mg  CO2-­C  kg-­1  soil  among  the  different  treatments  at  the  end  of  the  growing  season.  Control  is  no  soil  amendment,  HTI  +  UBC  Farm  compost  is  a  mixture  of  the  current  UBC  Farm  management  practice  with  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost,  HTI  compost  is  the  high  throughput  in-­vessel  compost  alone,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  is  a  mixture  of  HTI  compost  and  bloodmeal,  and  UBC  Farm  compost  is  the  farm’s  current  management  practice  only.  Error  bars  represent  standard  error  and  different  letters  represent  significant  differences  (P  <  0.05).        050100150200250300350400Control HTI	  +	  UBC	  farm	  compost HTI	  compost HTI	  compost	  +	  bloodmeal UBC	  farm	  compostAverage	  CO2flush	  (mg	  CO2-­‐‑C	  kg-­‐‑1	   soil)Treatmentab ab ab ab      50    3.4  Discussion  3.4.1  Germination  test  In  this  study,  the  use  of  HTI  compost  clearly  had  an  effect  on  germination  both  in  the  greenhouse  and  in  the  field.  While  germination  rates  were  not  affected  greatly  by  the  addition  of  HTI  compost  to  the  growing  medium  until  twenty  times  the  field  application  rate  was  added,  the  biomass  of  the  seedlings  was  affected  by  the  addition  of  the  compost  at  only  1x,  which  is  the  application  rate  at  29  Mg  ha-­1.  There  are  several  reasons  why  HTI  compost  could  have  impacted  germination  and  early  establishment.  Germination  can  be  affected  by  salinity,  which  can  inhibit  seed  growth  by  decreasing  water  uptake.  Salt-­sensitive  plants  can  be  affected  at  conductivities  below  4  mS.cm-­1  (Marchiol  et  al.,  1999).  The  conductivity  of  the  HTI  compost  was  4.8  mS.cm-­1  and  sodium  was  25.7%,  while  optimum  ranges  are  below  4  mS.cm-­1  and  <1%  respectively  (Appendix  Table  A.X.3).  The  high  salt  content  could  explain  the  differences  in  biomass  among  the  different  treatments,  as  lettuce  is  particularly  sensitive  to  salinity  during  the  early  seedling  stages  (Shannon  &  Grieve,  1998).    The  HTI  compost  used  was  immature  and  unstable  as  indicated  by  the  GHG  emissions,  and  may  have  had  higher  organic  acids,  although  this  was  not  measured.  Immature  compost  is  thought  to  have  an  effect  on  seed  germination  due  to  potential  of  phytotoxicty  from  organic  acids  released  during  the  composting  process  (Ozores-­Hampton  et  al.,  1999;;  He  et  al,  1995).        3.4.2  Crop  productivity  My  results  showed  the  spinach  yields  of  the  UBC  farm  compost,  the  current  management  practice  used  by  the  UBC  farm,  was  over  twice  as  much  as  the  HTI  compost  and  the  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal,  but  did  not  differ  from  the  control  and  the  HTI  +  UBC  farm  compost.  Alternatively,  there  were  no  differences  among  the  treatments  for  beets.  The  difference  in  spinach  yield  is  most  probably  due  to  the        51    delayed  or  even  lack  of  germination  that  was  observed  in  the  spinach  seedlings  in  the  treatments  with  HTI  compost.  Chanyasak  et  al.,  (1983)  in  a  study  examining  the  effects  of  compost  maturity  on  Komatsuna  growth  (a  Japanese  mustard  spinach),  concluded  that  the  immature  compost  had  an  inhibitory  effect  on  the  growth  of  the  of  the  crop  during  early  stages  of  development  due  to  the  presence  of  low  fatty  acids  (propionic  acid  and  n-­butyric  acid).  Delayed  germination  was  also  observed  for  beets,  but  the  longer  growing  period  to  maturity  enabled  the  crop  to  eventually  catch  up  resulting  in  no  differences  in  yield.    3.4.3  Soil  nitrogen  content  For   soil   NH4+-­N   content,   across   most   of   the   sampling   dates   throughout   the  season,  HTI  compost  was  higher   than   the  other   treatments,  except  on  sampling  event  4  on  August  17th  where  HTI  compost,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  and  UBC  farm   compost   were   significantly   higher   than   the   other   two   treatments.   This   is  probably  due  to  higher  N  mineralization.  The  nature  of  the  compost,  immature  and  unstable,  means  a  probable  increase  in  soil  microbial  communities  and  a  lack  of  readily  available  nitrogen,  which   led   to   the   immobilization  of  NH4+-­N   (Brady  and  Weil,  2010).  For  soil  NO3-­-­N  content,  HTI  compost  had  a  significantly  higher  NO3-­-­N  content  than  all  the  other  treatments  throughout  the  growing  season,  except  at  the   third   sampling   event   on   August   3rd   where   UBC   farm   compost   had   a  significantly  higher  NO3-­-­N  content   than  all   the  other   treatments.  We  can  clearly  see  that  UBC  farm  NO3-­-­N  content  peaks  earlier   in  the  season  and  HTI  compost  treatments  peak   later   in   the  season.  Again,   this   is  probably  due   to   the  nature  of  the  HTI  compost.  UBC  farm  compost  is  already  mature  and  stable  and  releases  N  earlier  in  the  season  while  N  in  HTI  composts  is  immobilized  by  microbial  activity  before  being  mineralized  when  microbial  activity  decreases  throughout  the  season  (Brady  and  Weil,  2010).               52      3.4.4  Greenhouse  gases  emissions  All  GHG  emissions  were  highest  for  the  treatments  that  had  HTI  compost:  HTI  compost,  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal  and  HTI  compost  +  UBC  farm  compost.  CO2  and  CH4  emissions  for  the  treatments  with  HTI  compost  were  highest  at  the  beginning  of  the  season,  right  after  compost  application,  and  N2O  emissions  were  highest  mid-­season,  which  coincides  with  the  PAN  data.  Given  that  composting  is  the  microbial  transformation  of  organic  materials,  emissions  of  CO2  and  CH4  are  clear  indicators  of  continued  microbial  consumption  of  C  (Epstein,  1996).  The  emissions  observed  for  the  HTI  compost  follows  the  same  pattern  as  those  observed  in  the  generation  of  compost  in  typical  industrial  facilities.  First,  biogenic  CO2  is  emitted  from  the  decomposition  of  the  composted  waste,  followed  by  N2O  emissions  when  the  readily  available  carbon  has  been  consumed  (Boldrin  et  al.,  2009).  In  the  literature,  observations  of  CH4  emissions  from  composting  vary.  Some  studies  have  found  that  there  are  no  CH4  emissions  during  composting  (Jackel  et  al.,  2005),  while  others  found  that  CH4  is  emitted  even  in  well-­aerated  processes  (Clemens  and  Cuhls,  2003).  Interestingly,  the  stable  UBC  compost  and  control  resulted  in  the  consumption  of  CH4  while  the  HTI  containing  compost  resulted  in  fluxes.  Overall  the  GHG  results  confirm  the  immaturity  and  instability  of  the  HTI  compost.  Although  the  GHGs  where  higher  in  HTI  containing  treatments  this  does  not  necessarily  mean  that  the  use  of  these  materials  has  a  greater  climate  forcing  impact,  or  carbon  footprint,  than  other  typical  composts  (e.g.  the  UBC  farm  compost).  When  the  carbon  footprint  of  a  compost  is  evaluated  over  its  life  cycle  there  are  impacts  that  can  be  assessed  generally  as  direct  or  indirect  emissions.  Direct  emissions  are  those  from  the  composting  process  at  the  composting  site,  and  are  linked  to  the  degradation  or  decomposition  of  the  composted  material.  Indirect  emissions,  are  those  produced  by  a  compost  after  it  has  left  the  composting  facility,  including  transport  and  post  application  soil  emissions  (Boldrin  et  al.,  2009).  This  study  quantified  emissions  from  the  soil,  and  without  a  full  life        53    cycle  assessment,  no  conclusions  can  be  made  regarding  the  relative  global  warming  potential  of  HTI  compost.    3.4.5  Soil  incubations  The  results  from  the  soil  incubations  indicate  that  the  CO2  flush,  and  therefore  microbial  activity  after  rewetting,  was  higher  for  the  HTI  compost  than  the  control  at  the  end  of  the  production  season,  with  no  differences  among  the  other  treatments.  It  was  expected,  that  all  of  the  treatments  receiving  additional  organic  inputs  from  the  compost  would  have  resulted  in  increasing  microbial  activity  (Saison  et  al.,  2006).    It  was  surprising  then,  that  the  HTI  compost  had  the  highest  CO2  flush  and  the  other  treatment  did  not  differ  from  the  control.    This  may  be  indicative  of  the  overall  high  concentration  of  organic  matter  in  the  soils  at  the  UBC  farm  (~11%).  Soil  microorganisms  have  been  commonly  used  as  indicators  of  soil  health,  with  an  increase  in  soil  microbial  activity  equating  to  increased  soil  health  as  they  are  important  to  the  processes  and  functions  of  a  healthy  soil  (Doran  and  Zeiss,  2000).  This  CO2  flush  method  has  been  proposed  as  a  cost-­effective  proxy  for  assessing  microbial  populations  and  thus  soil  health,  but  has  its  limitations.  While  we  know  that  HTI  has  resulted  in  a  larger  population  of  microorganism  we  do  not  have  data  on  the  type  or  diversity,  which  may  be  important  if  not  more  critical  factors  in  differentiating  the  impacts  of  these  treatments  on  soil  health  (Franzluebbers,  1999).      3.5  Conclusion    Results  of  this  study  indicate  that  HTI  compost  has  the  potential  to  be  a  useful  soil  amendment  but  needs  to  be  used  carefully.  Seed  germination  was  negatively  affected  when  high  amounts  of  HTI  compost  was  used  suggesting  that  there  are  likely  compounds  in  the  materials  that  are  toxic  at  high  concentrations.  Yield  was  also  affected  by  HTI  compost  for  spinach,  a  crop  with  a  short  growing  season.  This  was  most  likely  caused  by  the  delayed  germination  and  patchy  establishment  resulting  in  low  biomass  at  harvest  which  was  only  35  days  after  planting.  Yields        54    for  beets  however,  where  unaffected  by  HTI  compost  at  harvest  at  around  70  days  after  planting.  The  results  for  PAN  for  HTI  compost  and  other  treatments  with  HTI  compost  were  as  excepted,  with  immobilization  of  N  in  the  form  of  NH4+-­N  after  compost  application,  but  higher  N  availability  later  in  the  season.  The  same  was  observed  with  greenhouse  gases  results,  with  high  emissions  for  CO2  and  CH4  at  the  beginning  of  the  season  due  to  the  ongoing  decomposition  of  this  immature  compost.  N2O  was  however  the  highest  mid-­season  for  the  HTI  compost  treatments,  which  coincides  with  the  release  of  NO3-­-­N  after  decomposition  is  complete  and  microbial  activity  from  decomposition  declines.  And  finally,  the  incubations  showed  that  at  the  end  of  the  season,  HTI  compost  has  the  highest  microbial  activity  potential.               55    4.  General  conclusion  4.1  Research  findings  In  this  thesis,  I  have  evaluated  some  of  the  impacts  of  recycling  two  types  of  urban  residuals  for  use  in  agricultural  production.    In  Chapter  2,  I  examined  the  effects  of  combinations  of  biodiesel  co-­products  (BCPs),  specifically  monopotassium  phosphate  fertilizers  (MKP)  mixed  with  different  rates  of  glycerin,  a  nitrification  inhibitor,  on  lettuce  seed  germination,  potato  and  squash  productivity  and  on  nitrogen  cycling  in  the  field.  And  on  potato  and  pepper  productivity  in  a  greenhouse  setting.  In  Chapter  3,  I  examined  the  effects  of  high  throughput  in-­vessel  (HTI)  compost  at  different  rates  on  seed  germination,  and  HTI  compost  alone  and  in  various  combinations  with  a  typical  municipal  compost  and  bloodmeal  on  crop  productivity,  soil  nitrogen  (N)  cycling,  greenhouse  gas  emissions  (GHG)  and  microbial  activity.    4.1.1  Fertilizers  from  biodiesel  co-­products    As  expected  (H1)  there  were  no  differences  in  germination  rate  among  the  different  BCP  fertilizer  treatments  and  the  control.  In  the  field,  there  were  no  significant  differences  in  yield,  tuber/fruit  number  or  quality  of  the  crops  for  both  potatoes  and  squash  among  the  different  fertilizer  treatments  indicating  BCP  based  fertilizers  perform  equally  as  well  as  typical  retail  fertilizers  but  additional  glycerin  did  not  increase  yields  as  hypothesized  (H2  and  H3).  There  were  also  no  significant  differences  in  soil  ammonium  (NH4+-­N)  and  nitrate  (NO3-­-­N)  content  among  the  fertilizer  treatments  for  the  potato  crop.  However,  significant  differences  in  NH4+-­N  were  found  for  the  squash  crop.  At  the  sampling  events  following  fertilizing,  the  MKP-­C  (crude  MKP  mixed  with  glycerin)  treatment  had  a  significantly  higher  soil  NH4+-­N  content  than  the  other  treatments  confirming  my  hypothesis  (H4)  that  glycerin  would  act  as  a  N  inhibitor  but  surprisingly  the  higher  rate  of  glycerin  MKP-­C2  did  not  show  the  same  pattern.  For  soil  NO3-­-­N  content,  while  a  pattern  was  observed,  no  significant  differences  were  found.          56    In  a  controlled  environment,  the  greenhouse,  significant  differences  in  yield  were  observed  for  both  potato  and  pepper  crops.  For  the  potato  crop,  the  highest  yields  were  obtained  using  retail-­MKP,  which  had  a  significantly  higher  yield  than  a  retail-­NPK  fertilizer,  but  did  not  differ  from  MKP-­C  or  MKP-­C2.    These  results  show  that  the  MKP-­M  fertilizer,  which  should  have  been  similar  to  a  retail-­MKP,  did  not  perform  as  well.  The  addition  of  glycerin  had  a  positive  on  impact  yield  with  the  MKP-­C  treatment.  The  greenhouse  peppers  also  had  significant  differences  in  yield,  as  hypothesized  (H5),  MKP-­M  foliar  performed  better  than  retail-­NPK.  Interestingly,  MKP-­C  had  much  higher  yields  than  MKP-­C2  which  resulted  60%  mortality  of  the  sample.  These  results  indicate  that  there  is  limit  as  to  how  much  glycerin  can  be  added  within  a  certain  volume  before  there  are  negative  consequences  for  crop  productivity.    And  finally,  as  expected  (H6),  there  were  no  differences  in  crop  quality  among  the  different  treatments.    4.1.2  High-­throughput  in-­vessel  compost    Surprisingly,  germination  was  affected  by  the  HTI  compost  at  application  rates  higher  than  10  times  the  application  rate  of  29  Mg  ha-­1  used  for  the  field  experiment  set  to  meet  crop  N  demands  (H7).  This  suggests  that  there  is  a  rate  of  the  HTI  compost  at  which  germination  is  negatively  affected,  potentially  due  to  high  salt  content  or  increased  organic  acids.  Again,  as  opposed  to  my  hypothesis  (H8),  the  yield  of  spinach  was  highest  for  the  UBC  farm  compost,  which  was  significantly  higher  than  HTI  compost  and  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal.  Lower  yields  in  the  treatments  with  HTI  compost  were  likely  due  to  delayed  or  reduced  germination  of  the  spinach.  While  this  delay  was  observed  in  the  beet  crop,  the  effect  was  not  significant  by  the  end  of  the  longer  growing  season.    As  expected  (H9),  plant  available  nitrogen  (PAN)  was  impacted  by  treatments  with  HTI  compost.  Ammonium  was  significantly  higher  than  all  other  treatments  early  and  late  in  the  production  season.  While  NO3-­-­N  in  the  HTI  compost  was  much  lower  than  all  the  other  treatments  early  in  the  season  and  then  higher  towards  the  end  of  the  season.  These  results  indicate  that  while  N  was  immobilized  by        57    microbial  activity  when  the  HTI  compost  was  first  applied  to  the  field,  it  was  mineralized  later  on  in  the  season.  Using  HTI  compost  could  be  therefore  be  problematic  if  N  availability  is  not  timed  with  N  uptake.  Interestingly,  adding  bloodmeal  to  HTI  did  not  increase  early  season  PAN,  and  adding  mature  compost  actually  reduced  PAN.      As  I  hypothesized  (H10),  the  HTI  compost  had  the  highest  cumulative  GHG  emissions  due  to  its  unstable  and  immature  nature,  which  results  in  an  increase  in  microbial  activity  after  its  application.  However,  I  hypothesized  that  N2O  emissions  would  be  lower  in  the  treatments  with  HTI  compost  thinking  the  majority  of  the  N  would  be  utilized  by  microbial  populations  during  decomposition.  In  fact  I  found  the  opposite  result,  N2O  emissions  were  the  highest  for  HTI  compost.  Initially,  during  the    beginning  of  the  growing  season,  N2O  emissions  were  similar  to  the  other  treatments,  but  in  the  middle  of  the  growing  season  I  observed  a  large  increase  in  emissions  corresponding  with  the  release  of  NO3-­-­N.  As  hypothesized,  CO2  and  CH4  emissions  were  highest  for  HTI  compost  and  the  other  treatments  containing  HTI  compost  after  application.  And  finally,  at  the  end  of  the  season,  I  did  find  as  expected  (H11),  that  the  CO2  flush  was  significantly  higher  than  the  other  treatments  for  the  HTI  compost  treatment,  indicting  higher  potential  microbial  activity  by  the  end  of  the  growing  season.    4.2  Strengths  and  contributions  to  the  field  of  study  The  two  studies  I  present  in  this  thesis  contribute  to  the  body  of  literature  that  looks  at  the  effects  of  novel  soil  amendments  made  from  urban  residuals  on  crop  productivity,  soil  N  cycling,  GHG  and  microbial  activity.  While  there  is  an  extensive  body  of  literature  that  has  examined  some  of  the  impacts  of  using  urban  residuals  as  soil  amendments,  I  have  added  to  this  work  in  a  number  ways  by  investigating  the  impacts  of  two  new,  unstudied,  sets  of  materials  made  from  urban  residuals:1.  novel  mixtures  of  BCPs  including  recovered  MKP  and  glycerin;;  and  2.  Mixtures  of  HTI  compost.            58    My  research  provides  a  glimpse  at  the  overall  efficacy  of  two  novel  products  and  how  they  can  affect  crop  productivity  depending  on  the  rate  of  application  or  mixtures.  The  results  of  these  two  studies  will  help  provide  guidance  to  develop  management  practices  for  these  novel  products  that  can  help  maximize  their  benefits  for  agricultural  production  while  minimizing  their  negative  impacts  on  the  environment.  My  findings  provide  some  insight  on  the  environmental  impacts  in  terms  of  potential  losses  of  N  in  chapter  2  and  3,  and  GHG  emissions  in  chapter  3.  My  results  show  the  timing  of  PAN,  which  is  extremely  important  for  understanding  the  potential  impacts  on  crop  N  uptake  and  unused  N  that  can  be  lost  to  contaminate  water  resources.  My  study  was  the  first,  in  my  knowledge,  to  investigate  GHG  emissions  from  HTI  compost  applied  on-­farm.    4.3  Limitations  and  directions  for  future  research  In  chapter  2,  one  of  the  limitations  of  my  analysis  was  my  method  for  assessing  the  impacts  of  BCP  fertilizers  on  PAN.  It  is  probable  that  my  method  of  soil  sampling  did  not  actually  capture  the  impacts  of  the  fertilizer  applications,  particularly  for  the  potato  field.  For  the  potato  crop,  the  fertilizer  was  applied  directly  to  the  soil  at  the  base  of  each  plant  whereas  my  soil  samples  for  PAN  were  taken  at  least  30  centimeters  away  from  the  stems  to  avoid  causing  any  damage  to  the  roots.  It  is  therefore  probable  that  I  did  not  capture  the  bulk  of  the  impact.    Alternatively,  for  the  squash,  fertilizer  was  applied  foliarly,  which  resulted  in  a  substantial  portion  of  the  application  dripping  from  the  edge  of  the  leaf  canopy  onto  the  soil.  My  soil  sampling  method  was  well  within  this  drip  line.  This  could  explain  the  differences  in  PAN  results,  with  no  differences  seen  for  the  potato,  but  some  seen  for  the  squash.    In  hindsight,  it  would  have  been  better  apply  the  fertilizer  to  a  wider  area  to  ensure  sampling  captured  any  glycerin  effect  on  PAN.    It  would  have  also  been  beneficial  to  investigate  changes  in  microbial  communities  in  study  1  in  order  to  better  understand  the  effects  that  glycerin  has  on  microbial  activity,  which  could  corroborate  and  help  explain  the  PAN  results.  It  would  have  also  helped  to  look  at  the  effects  of  different  rates  of  glycerin  on  nutrient  cycling  and  microbial  activity  through  laboratory  incubations,  where  the        59    environment  is  controlled.  It  would  have  also  been  interesting  to  track  loses  of  N  either  as  leaching  or  emissions.  Future  research  should  incorporate  these  loss  pathways  to  provide  more  insights  on  how  glycerin  affects  soil  nutrient  cycling  and  microbial  activity.    Limitations  for  chapter  3  include  the  fact  that  soil  microbial  community  through  laboratory  incubations  was  only  done  at  the  end  of  the  growing  season  due  to  the  limited  soil  sampled  that  was  available  for  incubations.  Over  80  grams  of  soil  are  needed  for  one  incubation,  which  was  not  accounted  for  as  I  sampled  throughout  the  season.  I  therefore  only  had  enough  soil  to  do  incubations  at  the  end  of  the  growing  season.    Further  research  on  microbial  activity,  either  through  incubation  or  through  other  methods  (e.g.  phospholipid  fatty  acid  analysis),  would  help  explain  the  results  obtained  for  soil  N  cycling  and  GHG  emissions.  It  would  also  be  important  to  look  at  the  effects  of  using  HTI  compost  on  weed  control,  as  the  effect  of  HTI  compost  on  germination  could  be  used  to  give  crops  a  growth  advantage  by  delaying  or  suppressing  weed  germination.    It  would  be  critical  to  track  how  organic  acids  and  salinity  could  be  impacting  the  soil  over  the  long-­term.                 60    4.4  Implications  and  recommendations  The  research  conducted  in  the  studies  in  chapter  2  and  3  provide  some  basis  for  recommendations  for  agricultural  application  rates  and  management  practices  for  BCP  fertilizers  and  HTI  compost.  For  growers,  it  is  important  to  note  that  using  MKP  fertilizers  with  no  added  glycerin  is  beneficial  to  crop  yield,  especially  when  applied  as  a  foliar  fertilizer,  most  probably  due  to  the  direct  uptake  of  the  nutrients  by  the  plants,  which  could  also  minimize  leaching  potential  if  applied  judiciously.  Foliar  application  of  MKP  also  seems  to  be  a  good  option  for  greenhouse  production.  HTI  compost  clearly  impacted  PAN  and  it  is  important  that  users  of  the  material  recognize  that  there  is  likely  a  longer  duration  of  PAN  supply  from  HTI  than  from  typical  mature  compost.  This  research  also  highlights  the  potential  negative  impacts  that  glycerin  and  immature  compost  can  have  on  crop  growth.  While  glycerin  has  the  potential  of  being  beneficial  to  plant  growth,  it  is  important  to  note  that  large  quantities  of  glycerin  were  shown  to  kill  plants  in  the  greenhouse.  From  the  results  in  study  2,  I  would  recommend  that  HTI  compost  should  be  used  at  either  very  low  application  rates  or  on  crops  that  are  salt  tolerant  or  have  longer  production  times  to  maturity,  to  avoid  any  negative  impacts  on  germination.    Overall,  this  study  helps  us  better  understand  how  these  novel  products  that  would  otherwise  be  considered  waste  products  can  be  successfully  applied  to  an  agricultural  setting  and  be  used  by  farmers  and  growers  without  any  negative  impacts  on  crop  productivity  and  the  environment.                 61    References  Annabi,  M.,  S.  Houot,  C.  Francou,  M.  Poitrenaud,  and  Y.  L.  Bissonnais.  (2007).  Soil  Aggregate  Stability  Improvement  with  Urban  Composts  of  Different  Maturities.  Soil  Sci.  Soc.  Am.  J.  71:413-­423.  Aoyama,  M  &  Nozawa,  T  (1993)  Microbial  biomass  nitrogen  and  mineralization-­immobilization  processes  of  nitrogen  in  soils  incubated  with  various  organic  materials,  Soil  Science  and  Plant  Nutrition,  39:1,  23-­32.  Areikin  E,  Horne  J  &  Scholes  P  et  al.  (2012)  A  Survey  of  the  UK  Organics  Recycling  Industry  in  2010.  Waste  and  Resources  Action  Programme  (WRAP),  Banbury.  Benito,  M.,  Masaguer,  A.,  Moliner,  A.,  Arrigo,  N.,  &  Palma,  R.  M.  (2003).  Chemical  and  microbiological  parameters  for  the  characterisation  of  the  stability  and  maturity  of  pruning  waste  compost.  Biology  and  Fertility  of  Soils,  37(3),  184-­189.  Boldrin,  A.,  Andersen,  J.  K.,  Møller,  J.,  Christensen,  T.  H.,  &  Favoino,  E.  (2009).  Composting  and  compost  utilization:  accounting  of  greenhouse  gases  and  global  warming  contributions.  Waste  Management  &  Research,  27(8),  800-­812.  Boman,  B.  J.,  &  Hebb,  J.  W.  (1998).  Post  bloom  and  summer  foliar  K  effects  on  grapefruit  size.  Florida  State  Horticultural  Society,  (111),  128–135.  Boyd,  M.,  Murray-­hill,  A.,  &  Schaddelee,  K.  (2004).  Biodiesel  in  British  Columbia  Feasibility  Study  Report.  Eco-­Literacy  Canada.    Brady,  N.C.,  Weil,  R.R.,  2010.  The  Nature  and  Properties  of  Soils,  15th  ed.  Pearson  Education,  Inc.,  Upper  Saddle  River,  NJ.  Brus,  D.J.,  Kempen,  B.,  Heuvelink,  G.B.M        62    Chanyasak,  V.,  Katayama.,  A,  Hirai,  M.F.,  Mori,  S  &  Kubota,  H  (1983)  Effects  of  compost  maturity  on  growth  of  komatsuna  (brassica  rapa  var.  pervidis)  in  neubauer's  pot,  Soil  Science  and  Plant  Nutrition,  29:3,  239-­250.  Chapagain,  B.  P.,  &  Wiesman,  Z.  (2004).  Effect  of  Nutri-­Vant-­PeaK  foliar  spray  on  plant  development,  yield,  and  fruit  quality  in  greenhouse  tomatoes.  Scientia  Horticulturae,  102(2),  177-­188.  Christiansen,  J.  R.,  Outhwaite,  J.,  &  Smukler,  S.  M.  (2015).  Comparison  of  CO  2,  CH  4  and  N  2  O  soil-­atmosphere  exchange  measured  in  static  chambers  with  cavity  ring-­down  spectroscopy  and  gas  chromatography.  Agricultural  and  Forest  Meteorology,  211,  48-­57.  Clemens,  J.,  &  Cuhls,  C.  (2003).  Greenhouse  gas  emissions  from  mechanical  and  biological  waste  treatment  of  municipal  waste.  Environmental  technology,  24(6),  745-­754.  Doane,  T.  A.,  &  Horwáth,  W.  R.  (2003).  Spectrophotometric  determination  of  nitrate  with  a  single  reagent.  Analytical  Letters,  36(12),  2713-­2722.  Doran,  J.  W.,  &  Zeiss,  M.  R.  (2000).  Soil  health  and  sustainability:  managing  the  biotic  component  of  soil  quality.  Applied  soil  ecology,  15(1),  3-­11.  Epstein  E.  The  science  of  composting.  Boca  Raton.  FL:  CRC  Press;;  1996.  Franco,  C.  M.  M.,  Clarke,  P.  J.,  Tate,  M.  E.,  &  Oades,  J.  M.  (2000).  Hydrophobic  properties  and  chemical  characterisation  of  natural  water  repellent  materials  in  Australian  sands.  Journal  of  Hydrology,  231,  47-­58.  Franzluebbers,  A.  J.  (1999).  Potential  C  and  N  mineralization  and  microbial  biomass  from  intact  and  increasingly  disturbed  soils  of  varying  texture.  Soil  Biology  and  Biochemistry,  31(8),  1083-­1090.  Franzluebbers,  A.  J.  (2016).  Should  Soil  Testing  Services  Measure  Soil  Biological  Activity?.  Agricultural  &  Environmental  Letters,  1(1).        63    Gana,  C.,  Nouvellon,  Y.,  Marron,  N.,  Stape,  J.  L.,  &  Epron,  D.  (2016).  Sampling  and  interpolation  strategies  derived  from  the  analysis  of  continuous  soil  CO2  flux.  Journal  of  Plant  Nutrition  and  Soil  Science.  Giusquiani,  P.L.,  Marucchini,  C.  &  Businelli,  M.  Plant  Soil  (1988)  109:  73.    Hadas,  A.,  Kautsky,  L.,  Goek,  M.,  &  Kara,  E.  E.  (2004).  Rates  of  decomposition  of  plant  residues  and  available  nitrogen  in  soil,  related  to  residue  composition  through  simulation  of  carbon  and  nitrogen  turnover.  Soil  Biology  and  Biochemistry,  36(2),  255-­266.  Haifa  Group.  (2014).  Haifa  MKP  –  Mono  Potassium  Phosphate  0  –  52  –  34.  Fact  Sheet.  Hargreaves,  J.  C.,  Adl,  M.  S.,  &  Warman,  P.  R.  (2008).  A  review  of  the  use  of  composted  municipal  solid  waste  in  agriculture.  Agriculture,  Ecosystems  &  Environment,  123(1),  1-­14.    Hochmuth,  G.  J.  (2006).  Evaluation  of  Monopotassium  Phosphate  Solution  Effects  on  Vegetable  Production  in  Florida  96-­06.  Institute  of  Food  and  Agricultural  Sciences,  University  of  Florida.    Hopkins,  B.  G.,  Ellsworth,  J.  W.,  Shiffler,  A.  K.,  Cook,  A.  G.,  &  Bowen,  T.  R.  (2010).  Monopotassium  Phosphate  as  an  in-­Season  Fertigation  Option  for  Potato.  Journal  of  Plant  Nutrition,  33(10),  1422–1434.    He,  X.  T.,  Logan,  T.  J.,  &  Traina,  S.  J.  (1995).  Physical  and  chemical  characteristics  of  selected  US  municipal  solid  waste  composts.  Journal  of  Environmental  Quality,  24(3),  543-­552.  Iyengar,  Srinath  R.,  and  Prashant  P.  Bhave.  "In-­vessel  composting  of  household  wastes."  Waste  Management  26.10  (2006):  1070-­1080.  Jäckel,  U.,  Thummes,  K.,  &  Kämpfer,  P.  (2005).  Thermophilic  methane  production  and  oxidation  in  compost.  FEMS  Microbiology  Ecology,  52(2),  175-­184.        64    Jayathilakan,  K.,  Sultana,  K.,  Radhakrishna,  K.,  &  Bawa,  A.  S.  (2012).  Utilization  of  byproducts  and  waste  materials  from  meat,  poultry  and  fish  processing  industries:  a  review.  Journal  of  food  science  and  technology,  49(3),  278-­293.  Johnson,  D.  T.  and  Taconi,  K.  A.  (2007),  The  glycerin  glut:  Options  for  the  value-­added  conversion  of  crude  glycerol  resulting  from  biodiesel  production.  Environ.  Prog.,  26:  338–348.    Ko,  H.  J.,  Kim,  K.  Y.,  Kim,  H.  T.,  Kim,  C.  N.,  &  Umeda,  M.  (2008).  Evaluation  of  maturity  parameters  and  heavy  metal  contents  in  composts  made  from  animal  manure.  Waste  management,  28(5),  813-­820.  Langarica-­Fuentes,  A.,  Zafar,  U.,  Heyworth,  A.,  Brown,  T.,  Fox,  G.  and  Robson,  G.  D.  (2014),  Fungal  succession  in  an  in-­vessel  composting  system  characterized  using  454  pyrosequencing.  FEMS  Microbiol  Ecol,  88:  296–308.    Levis,  J.  W.,  Barlaz,  M.  A.,  Themelis,  N.  J.,  &  Ulloa,  P.  (2010).  Assessment  of  the  state  of  food  waste  treatment  in  the  United  States  and  Canada.  Waste  Management,  30(8),  1486-­1494.  Litterick,  A.,  Harrier,  L.,  Wallace,  P.,  Watson,  C.  A.,  &  Wood,  M.  (2003).  Effects  of  composting  manures  and  organic  wastes  on  soil  processes  and  pest  and  disease  interactions.  Report,  Scottish  Agricultural  College  (Defra  Project  OF0313).  Liu,  C.,  Wang,  K.,  &  Zheng,  X.  (2013).  Effects  of  nitrification  inhibitors  (DCD  and  DMPP)  on  nitrous  oxide  emission,  crop  yield  and  nitrogen  uptake  in  a  wheat-­maize  cropping  system.  Biogeosciences,  10(4),  2427–2437.    López-­Mosquera,  M.  E.,  Fernández-­Lema,  E.,  Villares,  R.,  Corral,  R.,  Alonso,  B.,  &  Blanco,  C.  (2011).  Composting  fish  waste  and  seaweed  to  produce  a  fertilizer  for  use  in  organic  agriculture.  Procedia  Environmental  Sciences,  9,  113-­117.        65    Marchiol,  L.,  Mondini,  C.,  Leita,  L.,  &  Zerbi,  G.  (1999).  Effects  of  Municipal  Waste  Leachate  on  Seed  Germination  in  Soil-­‐Compost  Mixtures.  Restoration  Ecology,  7(2),  155-­161.  MATLAB  and  Statistics  Toolbox  Release  2014,  The  MathWorks,  Inc.,  Natick,  Massachusetts,  United  States.  Oklin  International  Ltd.  (2015).  Technology.  54-­66  Canton  Road,  Tsim  Sha  Tsui,  Kowloon,  Hong  Kong.  Ozores-­Hampton,  M.,  T.  A.  Obreza,  P.  J.  Stoffella,  and  G.  Fitzpatrick.  2002.  Immature  compost  suppresses  weed  growth  under  greenhouse  conditions.  Comp.  Sci.  Util  10:105–113.  Ozores-­Hampton,  M.,  P.  J.  Stoffella,  T.  A.  Bewick,  D.  J.  Cantliffe,  and  T.  A.  Obreza.  1999.  Effect  of  age  of  composted  MSW  and  biosolids  on  weed  seed  germination.  Comp.  Sci.  Util  7:51–57.  Qian,  P.,  Schoenau,  J.  J.,  King,  T.,  &  Fatteicher,  C.  (2011).  Effect  of  Soil  Amendment  with  Alfalfa  Powders  and  Distillers  Grains  on  Nutrition  and  Growth  of  Canola.  Journal  of  Plant  Nutrition,  34(10),  1403–1417.    RStudio  Team  (2016).  RStudio:  Integrated  Development  for  R.  RStudio,  Inc.,  Boston,  MA  URL  http://www.rstudio.com/.  Redmile-­Gordon,  M.  A.,  Armenise,  E.,  Hirsch,  P.  R.,  &  Brookes,  P.  C.  (2014).  Biodiesel  co-­product  (BCP)  decreases  soil  nitrogen  (N)  losses  to  groundwater.  Water,  Air,  &  Soil  Pollution,  225(2),  1831.    Reuveni,  M.,  Oppenheim,  D.,  &  Reuveni,  R.  (1998).  Integrated  control  of  powdery  mildew  on  apple  trees  by  foliar  sprays  of  mono-­potassium  phosphate  fertilizer  and  sterol  inhibiting  fungicides.pdf,  17(7),  563–568.        66    Reuveni,  R.,  Dor,  G.,  &  Reuveni,  M.  (1998).  Local  and  systemic  control  of  powdery  mildew  (Leveillula  taurica)  on  pepper  plants  by  foliar  spray  of  mono-­potassium  phosphate.  Crop  Protection,  17(9),  703–709.  Reuveni,  M.,  &  Reuveni,  R.  (1998).  Foliar  applications  of  mono-­potassium            phosphate  fertilizer  inhibit  powdery  mildew  development  in  nectarine  trees.  Canadian  journal  of  plant  pathology,  20(3),  253-­258.  Ros,  M.,  Hernandez,  M.T.,  &  Garcia,  C.  (2203).    Soil  microbial  activity  after  restoration  of  a  semiarid  soil  by  organic  amendments,  Soil  Biology  and  Biochemistry,  35  (3),  P463-­469.  Saison,  C.,  Degrange,  V.,  Oliver,  R.,  Millard,  P.,  Commeaux,  C.,  Montange,  D.,  &  Le  Roux,  X.  (2006).  Alteration  and  resilience  of  the  soil  microbial  community  following  compost  amendment:  effects  of  compost  level  and  compost-­‐borne  microbial  community.  Environmental  Microbiology,  8(2),  247-­257.  Shannon,  M.  C.,  &  Grieve,  C.  M.  (1998).  Tolerance  of  vegetable  crops  to  salinity.  Scientia  horticulturae,  78(1),  5-­38.  Soerens,  S.  T.  (2012).  Biodiesel  Waste  Profucts  as  Soil  Amendments  –  Field  Study  and  Runoff  Impacts.  MBTC  DOT  3034.    Subbarao,  G.  V.,  Nakahara,  K.,  Ishikawa,  T.,  Yoshihashi,  T.,  Ito,  O.,  Ono,  H.,  …  Berry,  W.  L.  (2008).  Free  fatty  acids  from  the  pasture  grass  Brachiaria  humidicola  and  one  of  their  methyl  esters  as  inhibitors  of  nitrification.  Plant  and  Soil,  313(1-­2),  89–99.    Sawyer,  J.E.  &  Barker,  D.  (2000).  Foliar  fertilization  of  corn  with  mono-­potassium  phosphate  and  urea.  Final  research  report  Iowa  State  University  Weatherburn,  M.  W.  (1967).  Estimation  of  ammonia  nitrogen  by  colorimetric  method.  Anal.  Chem,  39,  971-­974.             67    Appendix      Figure  A.1.  Germination  trial  for  study  1.            68      Figure  A.2.  Fertilizing  potato  crop  using  MKP  fertilizers  with  added  glycerin  in  study  1.              69        Figure  A.3.  Photograph  of  the  field  trial  with  squash  crops  and  potato  crops  in  study  1.            70        Figure  A.4.  Photograph  of  the  field  trial  with  squash  crops  and  potato  crops  in  study  1.              71      Figure  A.5.  Quality  assessment  of  potato  crop  from  the  field  trial  in  study  1.              72      Figure  A.6.  Fertilizer  treatments  for  the  greenhouse  trial  in  study  1,  including  soil  and  foliar  application  fertilizers.              73      Figure  A.7.  Greenhouse  set-­up  with  potato  and  pepper  crop  in  the  UBC  horticulture  greenhouse  for  study  1.            74      Figure  A.8.  Quality  assessment  of  pepper  crop  from  the  greenhouse  trial  in  study  1.            75      Figure  A.9.  Germination  trial  at  day  15  for  study  2.          76      Figure  A.10.  Biomass  measuring  on  day  15  of  the  germination  trial  for  study  2.            77      Figure  A.11.  Field  tilling  after  treatment  application  for  study  2.            78      Figure  A.12.  Field  after  greenhouse  gas  chambers  installation  for  study  2.          79      Figure  A.13.  Spinach  and  beet  crops  for  study  2.          80      Figure  A.14.  Spinach  harvest  for  study  2.          81      Figure  A.15.  Spinach  harvest  for  study  2.            82      Figure  A.16.  Yield  measurements  for  beet  crop  in  study  2.          83      Figure  A.17.  Example  of  an  endline  soil  measurement  using  a  soil  probe  for  study  2.               84    Table  A.1.  Potato  field  endline  soil  average  (±  standard  error)  concentrations  of  potassium  (K),  phosphorus  (P),  carbon  (C)  and  nitrogen  (N)  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  >  0.05).  Treatment   Depth                   K                    P    Total  N   Total  C            (mg  kg-­1)        (mg  kg-­1)          (%)         (%)  Control   0-­15   246.0  ±  109.1    394.4  ±  105.4    0.2  ±  0.0   4.2  ±  0.1       15-­30   224.0  ±  98.1    335.1  ±  61.1    0.2  ±  0.0   3.9  ±  0.1  MKP-­C   0-­15   184.8  ±  125.2    292.7  ±  103.9    0.2  ±  0.0   4.1  ±  0.1       15-­30   223.5  ±  131.6    337.1  ±  89.9    0.2  ±  0.0   4.0  ±  0.4  MKP-­C2   0-­15   241.8  ±  104.4    309.5  ±  71.6    0.2  ±  0.0   4.1  ±  0.2       15-­30   220.3  ±  129.4    336.6  ±  56.1    0.2  ±  0.0   3.9  ±  0.2  MKP-­M   0-­15   220.5  ±  212.5    316.4  ±  152.3    0.2  ±  0.0   4.0  ±  0.2       15-­30   252.0  ±  72.5    360.6  ±  66.7    0.2  ±  0.0   3.9  ±  0.1    Table  A.2.  Squash  field  endline  average  (±  standard  error)  soil  concentrations  of  potassium  (K),  phosphorus  (P),  carbon  (C)  and  nitrogen  (N)  by  fertilizer  treatment:  crude  MKP  with  glycerin  (MKP-­C);;  crude  MKP  with  double  the  amount  of  glycerin  (MKP-­C2);;  high  grade  MKP  washed  with  methanol  (MKP-­M);;  and  a  commercial  NPK  fertilizer  (retail-­NPK).  No  significant  differences  were  found  (P  <  0.05).  Treatment   Depth   K    P    Total  N   Total  C        (mg  kg-­1)    (mg  kg-­1)    (%)   (%)  Control   0-­15   234.5  ±  185.5    232.1  ±  142.9    0.2  ±  0.0   3.8  ±  0.2       15-­30   227.3  ±  124.8    273.0  ±  83.90    0.2  ±  0.0   3.7  ±  0.1                          MKP-­C   0-­15   207.5  ±  102.1    225.5  ±  103.4    0.2  ±  0.0   3.8  ±  0.2       15-­30   347.0  ±  161.1    334.7  ±  82.80    0.2  ±  0.0   3.7  ±  0.2                          MKP-­C2   0-­15   196.5  ±  114.1    208.0  ±  81.70    0.2  ±  0.0   3.8  ±  0.2       15-­30   244.8  ±  116.3    287.6  ±  104.2    0.2  ±  0.0   3.9  ±  0.2                          MKP-­M   0-­15   258.0  ±  128.6    258.2  ±  87.40    0.2  ±  0.0   3.7  ±  0.1       15-­30   417.0  ±  132.2    378.4  ±  80.00    0.2  ±  0.0   3.9  ±  0.1              85       Table  A.3.  Quality  indicators  for  HTI  compost  compared  to  quality  indicators  for  an  optimum  compost.    Quality  indicators    Optimum    HTI  compost    Total  inert  materials   0%   0%  Heavy  metals   Not  exceeding  accepted  limits  C:N  ratio   6.5-­7   4.9  Moisture  content  (%)   50-­60   44.1  Soluble  salts  (mS/cm)   <  2   5.1  Sodium  (%)   <  1   13.5  Mg/K   7:1   0.33:1  Ca/Mg   5:1   1.5:5  Total  N(%)   0.7-­2.5   1.95  Nitrate  N  (ppm)   100-­199   202    Table  A.4.  Wet  compost  application  rates  in  Mg  ha-­1  for  the  different  treatments.    Treatment  Compost  Rate  (Mg  ha-­1  wet  weight)  HTI  compost   29  HTI  compost  +  bloodmeal   15  HTI  compost  +  UBC  Farm  compost   30  UBC  Farm  compost   31  Control   0    

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0356612/manifest

Comment

Related Items