UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Societal unease with modern agricultural production : the case of animal welfare Robbins, Jesse Andrew 2017

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2017_september_robbins_jesse.pdf [ 1.2MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0347624.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0347624-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0347624-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0347624-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0347624-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0347624-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0347624-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0347624-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0347624.ris

Full Text

	   	  SOCIETAL	  UNEASE	  WITH	  MODERN	  AGRICULTURAL	  PRODUCTION:	  	  THE	  CASE	  OF	  ANIMAL	  WELFARE	  by	  JESSE	  ANDREW	  ROBBINS	  	  B.Sc.,	  The	  Evergreen	  State	  College,	  2009	  	   THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIRMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  	  DOCTOR	  OF	  PHILOSOPHY	  in	  THE	  FACULTY	  OF	  GRADUATE	  AND	  POSTDOCTORAL	  STUDIES	  (Applied	  Animal	  Biology)	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  	  May	  2017	  	  ©	  Jesse	  Andrew	  Robbins,	  2017	  	   ii Abstract	  Agricultural	  intensification	  has	  created	  a	  great	  deal	  of	  public	  skepticism.	  One	  major	  area	  of	  concern	  has	  been	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals.	  This	  thesis	  explores	  a	  diversity	  of	  issues	  centering	  on	  perceptions	  of	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals.	  Chapter	  1	  begins	  by	  reviewing	  the	  literature	  on	  theories	  of	  welfare	  in	  both	  humans	  and	  animals.	  After	  highlighting	  several	  challenges	  for	  contemporary	  theorizing	  about	  animal	  welfare,	  I	  conclude	  that	  philosophical	  progress	  on	  these	  problems	  can	  be	  enhanced	  via	  experimental	  research.	  Chapter	  2	  describes	  what	  such	  an	  approach	  might	  look	  like	  by	  testing	  the	  prominent	  view	  that	  animal	  welfare	  consists	  entirely	  of	  how	  an	  animal	  feels.	  	  Chapter	  3	  then	  examines	  the	  empirical	  support	  for	  the	  popular	  view	  that	  there	  is	  a	  negative	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  	  Using	  a	  broad	  conception	  of	  welfare,	  I	  conclude	  that	  farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare	  exhibit	  no	  consistent	  relationship.	  	  Chapter	  4	  explores	  how	  perceived	  openness	  and	  trust	  affects	  perceptions	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  I	  found	  evidence	  that	  attempts	  to	  restrict	  the	  ability	  to	  monitor	  a	  farm’s	  inner-­‐workings	  (operational	  transparency)	  diminished	  trust,	  led	  to	  more	  negative	  perceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  and	  greater	  support	  for	  legislative	  and	  regulatory	  restrictions	  governing	  animal	  care.	  	  Chapter	  5	  is	  a	  case	  study	  describing	  the	  attitudes	  of	  different	  stakeholders	  regarding	  the	  common	  practice	  of	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves.	  After	  describing	  the	  level	  of	  support	  among	  different	  stakeholders	  in	  my	  sample,	  I	  explore	  the	  barriers	  to	  adopting	  pain	  mitigation	  strategies	  by	  focusing	  primarily	  on	  the	  reasons	  given	  by	  participants	  opposed	  to	  providing	  pain	  relief.	  	  	  	   	   iii Lay	  summary	  This	  dissertation	  explores	  how	  the	  public	  perceives	  animal	  welfare.	  	  I	  begin	  by	  comparing	  public	  perceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  with	  those	  of	  experts.	  	  Taking	  the	  broadest	  possible	  definition	  of	  animal	  welfare,	  I	  next	  evaluate	  whether	  existing	  evidence	  supports	  the	  popular	  view	  that	  animal	  welfare	  is	  poorer	  on	  larger	  farms.	  	  Next,	  I	  describe	  an	  experiment	  testing	  the	  effect(s)	  of	  limiting	  information	  access	  on	  public	  concerns	  about	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  Lastly,	  I	  describe	  a	  case	  study,	  examining	  the	  views	  of	  different	  stakeholders	  towards	  the	  common	  (and	  painful)	  practice	  of	  dehorning	  dairy	  cattle.	  Overall,	  this	  dissertation	  uses	  a	  variety	  of	  social	  science	  methods	  to	  deepen	  our	  knowledge	  about	  societal	  concerns	  about	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals.	  	  	  	  	  	    iv Preface	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  1	  is	  in	  preparation	  for	  publication:	  Robbins,	  J.	  A.,	  B.	  Franks	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  Some	  thoughts	  on	  the	  nature	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  J.	  A.	  Robbins	  developed	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  research.	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  B.	  Franks	  provided	  input	  on	  material	  and	  editing	  drafts.	  	  This	  project	  did	  not	  require	  ethics	  board	  approval.	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  2	  is	  in	  preparation	  for	  publication:	  Robbins,	  J.	  A.,	  B.	  Franks	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  	  More	  than	  a	  feeling:	  an	  empirical	  challenge	  to	  hedonistic	  accounts	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  	  J.	  A.	  Robbins	  and	  B.	  Franks	  developed	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  research.	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  contributed	  as	  a	  typical	  primary	  supervisor,	  providing	  input	  on	  material	  and	  editing	  drafts.	  	  This	  project	  received	  UBC	  research	  ethics	  board	  approval	  (certificate	  number:	  H15-­‐03053).	  	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  3	  has	  been	  published:	  Robbins,	  J.	  A.,	  D.	  Fraser,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  2016.	  Farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  doi:10.2527/jas.2016-­‐0805.	  	  J.	  A.	  Robbins	  researched	  and	  developed	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  research.	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  D.	  Fraser,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  acted	  in	  the	  typical	  role	  of	  supervisors,	  providing	  input	  and	  editing	  drafts.	  This	  project	  did	  not	  require	  ethics	  board	  approval.	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  4	  has	  been	  published:	  Robbins,	  J.	  A.,	  B.	  Franks,	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  2016.	  Awareness	  of	  ag-­‐gag	  laws	  erodes	  trust	  in	  farmers	  and	  increases	  support	  for	  animal	  welfare	  regulations.	  	  Food	  Policy.	  61:121-­‐125.	  	  J.	  A.	  Robbins	  and	  B.	  Franks	  researched	  and	  developed	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  research.	  	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	   v and	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  acted	  as	  supervisors,	  providing	  input	  on	  analysis	  and	  draft	  editing.	  This	  project	  received	  UBC	  research	  ethics	  board	  approval	  (certificate	  number:	  H13-­‐01466).	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  5	  has	  been	  published:	  Robbins,	  J.	  A.,	  D.	  M.	  Weary,	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  2015.	  Views	  on	  treating	  pain	  due	  to	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  24:399-­‐406.	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  developed	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  research.	  	  J.	  A.	  Robbins,	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  analysed	  the	  data	  and	  developed	  the	  paper.	  	  This	  paper	  received	  UBC	  research	  ethics	  board	  approval	  (H12-­‐02429).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   vi Table	  of	  contents	  Abstract	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Lay	  summary	  ........................................................................................................................................	  iii	  Preface	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  iv	  Table	  of	  contents	  .................................................................................................................................	  vi	  List	  of	  tables	  ........................................................................................................................................	  viii	  List	  of	  figures	  ........................................................................................................................................	  ix	  Acknowledgements	  ..............................................................................................................................	  x	  Chapter	  1:	   Introduction	  ..................................................................................................................	  1	  1.1	   A	  primer	  on	  the	  nature	  of	  non-­‐human	  (and	  human)	  welfare	  ...............................................	  2	  1.2	   The	  relationship	  between	  welfare	  and	  ethics	  ............................................................................	  2	  1.3	   The	  ‘thickness’	  of	  welfare	  ..................................................................................................................	  3	  1.4	   Welfare	  as	  prudential	  value	  ..............................................................................................................	  4	  1.5	   ‘One	  welfare’	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  5	  1.6	   A	  theory	  of	  animal	  welfare	  ................................................................................................................	  6	  1.7	   Theories	  of	  human	  welfare	  ...............................................................................................................	  6	  1.8	   Hedonism	  ................................................................................................................................................	  7	  1.9	   Desire	  satisfaction	  .............................................................................................................................	  10	  1.10	   Objective	  list	  theories	  ....................................................................................................................	  14	  1.11	   Empirical	  research	  on	  how	  people	  conceive	  of	  animal	  welfare	  ......................................	  16	  1.12	   Methodological	  limitations	  ..........................................................................................................	  20	  1.13	   Thesis	  aims	  ........................................................................................................................................	  25	  Chapter	  2:	  An	  empirical	  challenge	  to	  hedonistic	  accounts	  of	  welfare	  .............................	  27	  2.1	   Introduction	  ........................................................................................................................................	  27	  2.2	   Methods	  ................................................................................................................................................	  31	  2.3	   Results	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  33	  2.4	   Discussion	  ............................................................................................................................................	  36	  2.5	   Conclusion	  ............................................................................................................................................	  39	  Chapter	  3:	  Farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare	  ..................................................................................	  41	  3.1	   Introduction	  ........................................................................................................................................	  41	  3.2	   Methods	  ................................................................................................................................................	  46	  3.3	   Results	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  47	  3.4	   Discussion	  ............................................................................................................................................	  62	  3.5	   Conclusion	  ............................................................................................................................................	  65	  Chapter	  4:	  Effect	  of	  openness	  on	  trust	  and	  perceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  ....................	  66	  4.1	   Introduction	  ........................................................................................................................................	  66	  4.2	   Methods	  ................................................................................................................................................	  68	  4.3	   Results	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  70	  4.4	   Discussion	  and	  conclusion	  .............................................................................................................	  76	  Chapter	  5:	  The	  case	  of	  dehorning	  young	  dairy	  calves	  –	  a	  painful	  procedure.	  ...............	  79	  5.1	   Introduction	  ........................................................................................................................................	  79	  5.2	   Methods	  ................................................................................................................................................	  81	   vii 5.3	   Quantitative	  results	  ..........................................................................................................................	  84	  5.4	   Qualitative	  results	  .............................................................................................................................	  87	  5.5	   Discussion	  ............................................................................................................................................	  90	  5.6	   Conclusion	  ............................................................................................................................................	  94	  Chapter	  6:	  Overview,	  limitations,	  and	  next	  Steps	  ...................................................................	  95	  References	  .........................................................................................................................................	  101	   	   	   viii List	  of	  tables	  Table	  1.1	  	  Comparison	  of	  Parfit	  and	  Fraser’s	  typologies.	  .......................................................................	  7	  Table	  1.2	  	  Studies	  reporting	  how	  different	  groups	  conceive	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  .......................	  19	  Table	  2.1	  Select	  quotations	  of	  welfare	  hedonism.	  ...................................................................................	  28	  Table	  2.2	  Effect	  of	  treatment	  by	  concept	  including	  interaction	  term.	  ............................................	  34	  Table	  3.1	  	  Empirical	  research	  on	  dairy	  cattle	  welfare	  and	  farm	  size	  ..............................................	  48	  Table	  4.1	  	  Demographic	  characteristics	  of	  sample	  and	  test	  of	  condition	  independence.	  ......	  71	  Table	  4.2	  	  Effect	  of	  treatment	  by	  demographic	  category.	  ....................................................................	  73	  Table	  5.1	  	  The	  number	  (and	  %)	  of	  participants	  who	  supported,	  opposed	  or	  were	  “Neutral”	  regarding	  the	  provision	  of	  pain	  relief	  .................................................................................................	  84	  Table	  5.2	  The	  most	  popular	  reason	  cited	  within	  each	  of	  the	  8	  groups	  ..........................................	  88	  	  	                            ix List	  of	  figures	  Figure	  3-­‐1	  	  Comparison	  of	  mean	  and	  midpoint	  herd	  size	  changes	  for	  U.S.	  dairy	  farms.	  ........	  44	  Figure	  4-­‐1	  Trust	  in	  farmers	  significantly	  decreases	  after	  learning	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  laws.	  ..........	  73	  Figure	  4-­‐2	  	  Regardless	  of	  (a)	  political	  affiliation,	  (b)	  living	  environment	  and	  (c)	  dietary	  preference	  -­‐	  trust	  in	  farmers	  significantly	  decreased	  after	  learning	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  laws	  (p	  <	  .001).	  ........................................................................................................................................................	  75	   	   x Acknowledgements	  My	  deepest	  thanks	  go	  to	  Marina	  (Nina)	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  Daniel	  Weary	  and	  David	  Fraser	  for	  allowing	  me	  the	  opportunity	  to	  join	  your	  program.	  I	  am	  especially	  indebted	  to	  Nina	  for	  taking	  a	  chance	  on	  me	  and	  granting	  me	  the	  freedom	  to	  pursue	  my	  unique	  interests	  and	  express	  contrary	  opinions.	  	  Many	  thanks	  to	  all	  my	  past	  and	  present	  animal	  welfare	  program	  colleagues.	  I	  have	  benefited	  immensely	  from	  our	  interactions.	  Special	  thanks	  goes	  to	  Becca	  Franks	  for	  our	  ongoing	  discussions	  about	  research	  methods,	  statistics,	  welfare,	  ethics	  and	  consciousness.	  I	  would	  also	  like	  to	  thank	  all	  the	  people	  at	  UBC	  who	  rarely	  get	  the	  attention	  they	  deserve;	  those	  of	  you	  who	  make	  sure	  the	  grass	  is	  cut,	  the	  lights	  are	  on,	  the	  bathrooms	  are	  clean,	  the	  garbage	  is	  picked	  up,	  the	  campus	  is	  safe,	  the	  coffee	  is	  hot	  and	  the	  checks	  are	  in	  the	  mail.	  	  Special	  thanks	  to	  Michael	  Paros	  for	  demonstrating	  that	  argumentation	  for	  its	  own	  sake	  is	  the	  only	  true	  path	  to	  knowledge	  and	  that	  persistent	  disagreement	  is	  compatible	  persistent	  friendship.	  Many	  thanks	  to	  Bernard	  Rollin	  for	  first	  sparking	  my	  interest	  in	  the	  ethics	  of	  animal	  use	  and	  the	  limits	  of	  science.	  Most	  importantly,	  thank	  you	  for	  showing	  me	  that	  being	  respected	  is	  more	  important	  than	  being	  liked.	  For	  Audrey	  and	  Caleb,	  my	  two	  greatest	  accomplishments	  during	  graduate	  school.	  Finally	  and	  most	  importantly,	  I	  would	  like	  to	  thank	  my	  wife,	  Michelle,	  for	  her	  indefatigable	  support	  over	  the	  last	  15	  years.	  You	  have	  constantly	  reminded	  me	  that	  while	  the	  unexamined	  life	  is	  not	  worth	  living,	  the	  over-­‐examined	  life	  isn’t	  anything	  to	  write	  home	  about	  either.	  	  My	  achievements	  are	  yours. 1 Chapter	  1:	   Introduction	  At	  various	  periods	  throughout	  history	  ethical	  questions	  regarding	  our	  duties	  to	  animals	  has	  been	  a	  topic	  of	  interest	  to	  philosophers.	  However,	  for	  most	  of	  this	  history	  any	  duties	  they	  were	  owed	  were	  thought	  to	  accrue	  indirectly.	  Philosophers	  like	  Kant,	  Descartes	  and	  Aquinas	  believed	  that	  the	  wrongness	  of	  harming	  animals	  derived	  its	  moral	  force	  from	  the	  fact	  that	  individuals	  engaged	  in	  such	  actions	  would	  eventually	  graduate	  to	  harming	  the	  only	  true	  bearers	  of	  moral	  consideration	  -­‐	  humans	  (Linzey	  and	  Clarke,	  1990).	  McCauley	  (1849)	  captured	  the	  essence	  of	  this	  position	  in	  his	  famous	  line,	  “The	  Puritan	  hated	  bear	  bating,	  not	  because	  it	  gave	  pain	  to	  the	  bear,	  but	  because	  it	  gave	  pleasure	  to	  the	  spectators”.	  	  The	  indirect	  duty	  view	  has	  always	  been	  a	  tenuous	  position	  because	  it	  hinges	  on	  a	  straightforward	  empirical	  question	  about	  human	  psychology;	  if	  harming	  animals	  does	  not	  have	  the	  suspected	  ‘moral	  spillover’	  effects,	  then	  the	  manner	  in	  which	  we	  treat	  animals	  is	  of	  no	  moral	  concern	  (Nozick,	  1974).	  Given	  the	  counter-­‐intuitiveness	  of	  this	  conclusion	  it	  is	  not	  surprising	  that	  indirect	  duty	  views	  have	  fallen	  out	  of	  fashion	  (see	  also	  Carruthers,	  1992).	  Today	  the	  modern	  conversation	  takes	  it	  for	  granted	  that	  animals	  have	  a	  good	  of	  their	  own	  that	  should	  be	  included	  in	  any	  ethical	  accounting	  (Raz,	  1992).	  This	  conventional	  social	  consensus	  ethic	  accepts	  that	  animal	  use	  (including	  killing)	  is	  justifiable	  provided	  the	  animals	  involved	  are	  afforded	  good	  lives	  before	  they	  are	  killed.	  	  The	  study	  of	  animal	  welfare	  centres	  around	  determining	  what	  constitutes	  a	  good	  life.	  Non-­‐anthropocentric	  facts	  about	  the	  biology	  and	  behaviour	  of	  animals	  obviously	  play	  a	  crucial	  role	  in	  this	  process	  and	  remain	  central	  to	  what	  many	  think	  of	  as	  ‘animal	  welfare	  science’.	  However,	  it	  is	  increasingly	  recognized	  that	  the	  barriers	  to	  improving	  the	  lives	  of	   2 animals	  involve	  social,	  cultural,	  political	  and	  economic	  considerations	  cannot	  be	  completely	  captured	  by	  the	  ‘hard	  sciences’	  (Lund	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Davies	  et	  al.,	  2016).	  Thus	  the	  study	  of	  animal	  welfare	  must	  transcend	  narrow	  disciplinary	  boundaries	  to	  include	  not	  only	  the	  animal	  sciences,	  physiology,	  veterinary	  medicine,	  ethology,	  but	  also	  philosophy,	  psychology,	  sociology,	  economics	  and	  law.	  	  In	  recognition	  of	  this	  fact,	  let	  us	  begin	  by	  examining	  various	  facets	  of	  the	  central	  phenomena	  under	  investigation	  –	  welfare.	  	  1.1	   A	  primer	  on	  the	  nature	  of	  non-­‐human	  (and	  human)	  welfare	   Much	  of	  the	  modern	  conversation	  surrounding	  our	  ethical	  obligations	  tends	  to	  assume	  that	  animals	  are	  objects	  of	  direct	  moral	  concern	  and	  rights	  are	  often	  invoked	  to	  protect	  their	  welfare	  (Raz,	  1992).	  	  Moreover,	  it	  is	  increasingly	  the	  case	  that	  limiting	  unnecessary	  animal	  suffering	  (for	  the	  animal’s	  own	  sake)	  is	  a	  necessary,	  but	  not	  a	  sufficient,	  condition	  for	  fulfilling	  our	  duties	  to	  many	  animals.	  Talk	  about	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals	  is	  shifting	  from	  simply	  preventing	  harm	  (or	  having	  bad	  welfare),	  to	  ensuring	  animals	  live	  truly	  good	  lives	  with	  good	  welfare	  (Tannenbaum,	  2002).	  Much	  less	  clear	  is	  what	  exactly	  it	  means	  for	  an	  animal	  to	  have	  good	  welfare.	  	  1.2	   The	  relationship	  between	  welfare	  and	  ethics	  Attention	  to	  the	  welfare	  of	  sentient	  beings	  is	  indispensible	  when	  discussing	  the	  proper	  ethical	  course	  of	  action.	  Ethical	  theories	  can	  differ	  on	  the	  question	  of	  whether	  there	  are	  additional	  values	  beyond	  welfare	  (Keller,	  2009).	  For	  instance,	  some	  environmental	  ethicists	  argue	  that	  the	  destruction	  of	  the	  environment	  is	  intrinsically	  wrong,	  regardless	  of	  whether	  or	  not	  it	  harms	  anyone	  or	  anything.	  Similarly,	  opponents	  of	  abortion	  might	  argue	  that	  foetuses	  have	  intrinsic	  or	  sacred	  value.	  In	  contrast,	  Welfarism	  is	  the	  view	  that	  welfare	   3 is	  the	  only	  value	  relevant	  to	  ethical	  deliberation	  (Sumner,	  1996).	  This	  view	  is	  most	  at	  home	  within	  a	  utilitarian	  framework,	  which	  evaluates	  the	  rightness	  or	  wrongness	  of	  actions	  according	  to	  their	  likely	  effects	  on	  the	  welfare	  of	  all	  affected	  parties.	  It	  should	  be	  noted	  that	  Welfarism	  is	  also	  possible	  within	  a	  non-­‐consequentialist	  framework	  as	  well.	  For	  instance,	  deontological	  approaches	  to	  ethics	  might	  hold	  that	  moral	  rules	  or	  rights	  are	  designed	  for	  the	  express	  purpose	  of	  protecting	  or	  improving	  welfare	  (Keller,	  2009).	  Regardless	  of	  whether	  or	  not	  you	  think	  welfare	  is	  the	  only	  ethical	  value,	  or	  one	  among	  many,	  it	  is	  difficult	  to	  find	  an	  ethical	  theory	  where	  welfare	  is	  not	  a	  major	  consideration.	  	  1.3	   The	  ‘thickness’	  of	  welfare	  In	  the	  human	  context,	  welfare	  is	  generally	  considered	  as	  a	  ‘thick’	  concept	  (Kirchin,	  2013).1	  Thick	  concepts	  differ	  from	  ‘thin’	  concepts,	  in	  that	  thin	  concepts	  are	  either	  entirely	  descriptive	  or	  entirely	  evaluative,	  while	  thick	  concepts	  contain	  both	  descriptive	  and	  evaluative	  components.2	  Descriptive	  concepts,	  not	  unlike	  beliefs,	  serve	  to	  pick	  out	  certain	  features	  of	  the	  world	  while	  evaluative	  concepts	  are	  much	  more	  similar	  to	  desires	  in	  that	  they	  involve	  some	  sort	  of	  pro-­‐attitude.	  Recognizing	  welfare’s	  status	  as	  a	  thick	  concept	  suggests	  that	  theories	  of	  welfare	  must	  be	  evaluated	  according	  to	  at	  least	  two	  different	  criteria	  -­‐	  their	  descriptive	  and	  normative	  adequacy	  (Sumner,	  1996).	  Meeting	  the	  former	  requirement	  means	  that	  the	  theory	  must	  reflect	  ordinary	  usage	  of	  the	  concept.3	  A	  theory	  of	  welfare	  entirely	  divorced	  from	  people’s	  everyday	  experience	  is	  an	  inadequate	  theory.	                                              1 Instead	  of	  ‘thick’,	  Fraser	  (1999)	  refers	  to	  animal	  welfare	  as	  an	  evaluative	  concept.	  2	  Whether	  the	  descriptive	  and	  evaluative	  elements	  of	  thick	  concepts	  can	  be	  meaningful	  disentangled	  remains	  a	  topic	  of	  much	  philosophical	  debate	  (Blomberg,	  2007;	  Kirchin,	  2013).	  3	  Some	  interpretations	  amend	  the	  descriptive	  adequacy	  requirement	  to	  require	  that	  theories	  also	  make	  empirically	  testable	  predictions	  (Griffin,	  1986).	   4 Fulfilling	  the	  requirement	  of	  normative	  adequacy	  entails	  providing	  good	  reasons	  or	  justifications	  as	  to	  why	  the	  theory	  being	  offered	  is	  good	  and/or	  action	  guiding.	  It	  is	  not	  enough	  to	  show	  that	  the	  theory	  accords	  to	  its	  everyday	  meaning,	  it	  must	  also	  include	  some	  explanation	  as	  to	  why	  the	  components	  of	  welfare	  on	  offer	  are	  something	  worth	  aiming	  at	  or	  promoting	  (Tiberius,	  2012).	  	  The	  dual	  character	  nature	  of	  the	  welfare	  concept	  has	  important	  implications	  for	  animal	  welfare	  scientists.	  Since	  the	  phenomenon	  under	  investigation	  contains	  both	  descriptive	  and	  normative	  aspects,	  a	  strictly	  scientific	  approach	  to	  animal	  welfare	  is	  impossible	  (Tannenbaum,	  1991;	  Fraser,	  1995;	  2003;	  Rollin,	  1993;	  2006).	  This	  means	  that	  despite	  their	  objective	  appearances,	  frequently	  encountered	  claims	  made	  by	  scientists	  along	  the	  lines	  of	  	  “X	  positively/negatively	  impacts	  Y’s	  welfare”	  cannot	  be	  purely	  empirical	  claims	  because	  the	  concept	  they	  are	  invoking	  is	  not	  purely	  descriptive	  (Schmidt,	  2011).	  Alexandrova	  (2015)	  summarizes	  this	  point	  nicely	  stating,	  “a	  science	  organized	  around	  the	  study	  of	  a	  thick	  concept	  necessarily	  inherits	  the	  concept’s	  thickness.”	  1.4	   Welfare	  as	  prudential	  value	  Within	  the	  study	  of	  axiology	  or	  value	  theory,	  well-­‐being,	  flourishing,	  happiness,	  or	  what	  I	  will	  be	  referring	  to	  as	  welfare,	  is	  typically	  identified	  as	  a	  form	  of	  prudential	  value	  (Taylor,	  2013).	  Prudential	  value	  differs	  from	  other	  types	  of	  value,	  such	  as	  moral	  and	  aesthetic,	  in	  that	  it	  is	  agent	  relative	  or	  personal.	  In	  order	  for	  something	  to	  count	  as	  influencing	  welfare,	  it	  must	  be	  good/bad	  for	  someone	  or	  something	  (from	  a	  particular	  point	  of	  view),	  not	  simply	  good/bad	  in	  some	  absolute	  sense	  (from	  the	  point	  of	  view	  of	  the	  universe;	  Kraut,	  2011).	  Still,	  we	  often	  talk	  about	  things	  like	  water	  and	  sunlight	  being	  good	  for	  trees,	  certain	  events	  being	  good	  for	  a	  species	  or	  even	  oil	  as	  being	  good	  for	  a	  car,	  yet	  it	   5 somehow	  seems	  odd	  to	  speak	  about	  the	  welfare	  of	  such	  things	  because	  it	  is	  difficult	  to	  conceive	  of	  what	  it	  could	  mean	  for	  them	  to	  have	  a	  particular	  point	  of	  view	  or	  interests.	  Rosati	  (2009)	  has	  argued	  that	  this	  suggests	  we	  may	  actually	  be	  dealing	  with	  “multiple	  good	  for	  relations”	  with	  welfare	  representing	  one	  specific	  variety	  that	  attaches	  to	  conscious	  subjects	  with	  a	  capacity	  to	  experience	  events	  as	  positively	  or	  negatively	  valenced.	  If	  correct,	  things	  may	  be	  said	  to	  be	  good/bad	  for	  a	  tree/forest,	  but	  nothing	  can	  be	  good/bad	  for	  the	  welfare	  of	  a	  tree/forest,	  because	  trees/forests	  have	  no	  conscious	  interests	  and	  thus	  no	  welfare	  (Varner,	  2002).	  1.5	   ‘One	  welfare’	  Since	  welfare	  applies	  to	  all	  sentient	  creatures,	  some	  scholars	  have	  suggested	  that	  it	  is	  important	  for	  theories	  of	  human	  and	  animal	  welfare	  to	  share	  a	  similar	  basic	  structure	  (Sumner,	  1996,	  Kraut,	  2009).	  In	  one	  of	  the	  most	  influential	  texts	  on	  welfare,	  Welfare,	  Happiness	  and	  Ethics,	  Sumner	  (1996)	  writes:	  “We	  make	  welfare	  assessments	  .	  .	  .	  concerning	  a	  wide	  variety	  of	  subjects.	  Besides	  the	  paradigm	  case	  of	  adult	  human	  persons,	  our	  welfare	  vocabulary	  applies	  just	  as	  readily	  to	  children	  and	  infants,	  and	  to	  many	  non-­‐human	  beings.	  It	  is	  perfectly	  natural	  for	  me	  to	  say	  that	  my	  cat	  is	  doing	  well,	  that	  having	  an	  ear	  infection	  is	  bad	  for	  her,	  that	  she	  has	  benefited	  from	  a	  change	  of	  diet,	  and	  so	  on.	  In	  making	  these	  judgments	  it	  certainly	  seems	  to	  me	  that	  I	  am	  applying	  exactly	  the	  same	  concept	  of	  welfare	  to	  my	  cat	  that	  I	  habitually	  apply	  to	  my	  friends.	  A	  theory	  of	  welfare	  will	  therefore	  .	  .	  .	  be	  incomplete	  if	  it	  covers	  only	  them	  and	  ignores	  her.”	  	   (Sumner,	  1996)	  Appleby	  and	  Sandoe	  (2002)	  have	  endorsed	  a	  similar	  position,	  arguing	  that	  the	  best	  way	  to	  develop	  and	  test	  theories	  of	  animal	  welfare	  is	  by	  comparing	  and	  contrasting	  them	  with	  prominent	  theories	  of	  human	  well-­‐being,	  abstracting	  away	  until	  we	  arrive	  at	  general	  principles	  applicable	  to	  all	  sentient	  beings.	  In	  doing	  so,	  this	  unified	  approach	  to	   6 understanding	  welfare	  allows	  us	  to,	  “gain	  insights	  from	  the	  debate	  about	  human	  well-­‐being	  to	  inform	  our	  assessment	  of	  various	  theories	  of	  animal	  well-­‐being	  and	  allow	  examples	  and	  arguments	  concerning	  animals	  to	  inform	  our	  views	  about	  human	  well-­‐being”	  (Rice,	  2015).	  	  	  1.6	   A	  theory	  of	  animal	  welfare	  Theories	  of	  animal	  welfare	  have	  received	  much	  less	  attention	  that	  those	  developed	  for	  humans.	  	  Perhaps	  the	  most	  widely	  cited	  account	  of	  animal	  welfare	  comes	  from	  Fraser	  and	  colleagues	  (1997)	  who	  proposed	  a	  three-­‐factor	  conception	  based	  on	  the	  major	  ethical	  concerns	  regarding	  animals.	  On	  this	  view,	  an	  animal	  is	  said	  to	  be	  faring	  well	  when	  it:	  “(1)	  leads	  a	  natural	  life	  through	  the	  development	  and	  use	  of	  its	  natural	  adaptations	  and	  capabilities,	  (2)	  feels	  well	  by	  being	  free	  from	  prolonged	  and	  intense	  fear,	  pain,	  and	  other	  negative	  states,	  and	  by	  experiencing	  normal	  pleasures,	  and	  (3)	  when	  it	  functions	  well,	  in	  the	  sense	  of	  satisfactory	  health,	  growth	  and	  normal	  functioning	  of	  physiological	  and	  behavioral	  systems”.	  Different	  theorists	  have	  identified	  each	  of	  these	  three	  domains	  individually	  as	  having	  final	  welfare	  value.	  	  1.7	   Theories	  of	  human	  welfare	  The	  most	  widely	  cited	  typology	  of	  theories	  of	  human	  welfare	  comes	  from	  Derek	  Parfit’s	  Reasons	  and	  Persons	  (1984)	  where	  he	  identifies	  three	  broad	  theories	  of	  welfare:	  Hedonism,	  Desire	  Satisfaction	  and	  Objective	  List.	  These	  three	  types	  of	  welfare	  theories	  all	  differ	  with	  respect	  to	  what	  they	  consider	  as	  having	  final	  or	  ultimate	  value,	  or	  what	  is	  non-­‐instrumentally	  best	  for	  an	  agent	  (Brulde,	  2007).	  	  A	  comparison	  of	  prominent	  theories	  of	  human	  and	  animal	  welfare	  can	  be	  seen	  in	  Table	  1.	  	  	  	   7 	  	  Table	  1.1	  Comparison	  of	  Parfit	  and	  Fraser’s	  typologies	  and	  how	  they	  relate	  with	  each	  other.	  	  	  Adapted	  from	  Appleby	  and	  Sandoe	  (2002).	   Human	  welfare	  (Parfit,	  1984)	   Animal	  welfare	  (Fraser	  et	  al.,	  1997)	  Hedonism	   Affective	  states	  	  	  	  	  -­‐Preferences	  Desire	  Satisfaction	  Objective	  List	  Theories	  	  	  	  -­‐Perfectionism	   Health	  and	  Biological	  Functioning	  Natural	  living	  (e.g.	  telos,	  capabilities	  approach)	  	  1.8	   Hedonism	  	   Hedonistic	  accounts	  of	  welfare	  can	  be	  traced	  as	  far	  back	  as	  the	  Carvaka	  (600	  BCE),	  through	  Socrates,	  Protagoras	  and	  Epicurus,	  although	  they	  are	  most	  commonly	  associated	  with	  the	  work	  of	  Jeremy	  Bentham	  and	  later	  his	  pupil	  John	  Stuart	  Mill	  (Weijers,	  2011).	  Hedonism	  posits	  that,	  “what	  is	  good	  for	  any	  individual	  is	  the	  enjoyable	  experience	  in	  her	  life,	  what	  is	  bad	  is	  the	  suffering	  in	  that	  life,	  and	  the	  life	  best	  for	  an	  individual	  is	  that	  with	  the	  greatest	  balance	  of	  enjoyment	  over	  suffering”	  (Crisp,	  2006).	  Welfare	  on	  this	  account	  is	  sensory-­‐based,	  comprising	  a	  vast	  array	  of	  mental	  states	  that	  all	  share	  in	  common	  a	  distinctive	  qualitative	  sensation	  that	  varies	  along	  dimensions	  of	  intensity	  and	  duration	  (Bentham,	  1789).	  	  Proponents	  of	  hedonism	  in	  animal	  welfare	  science	  have	  included	  Dawkins	  (1990),	  Simonsen	  (1996)	  and	  Duncan	  (2004),	  who	  has	  characterized	  his	  position	  as	  follows,	  "...animal	  welfare	  is	  all	  to	  do	  with	  the	  secondary,	  subjective	  feelings,	  with	  the	  absence	  of	   8 negative	  feelings,	  particularly	  the	  strong	  negative	  feelings	  we	  call	  suffering	  and	  with	  the	  presence	  of	  positive	  feelings	  that	  we	  call	  pleasure".	  Hedonism,	  as	  an	  account	  of	  welfare	  in	  humans,	  fell	  out	  of	  favour	  in	  the	  20th	  century	  after	  a	  series	  of	  damaging	  philosophical	  critiques	  (Crisp,	  2006).	  Most	  notable	  among	  these	  was	  a	  challenge	  put	  forth	  by	  Robert	  Nozick	  in	  his	  book	  Anarchy,	  State	  and	  Utopia	  (1974)	  where	  he	  proposed	  the	  following	  thought	  experiment:	  “Suppose	  there	  was	  an	  experience	  machine	  that	  would	  give	  you	  any	  experience	  you	  desired.	  Superduper	  neuropsychologists	  could	  stimulate	  your	  brain	  so	  that	  you	  would	  think	  and	  feel	  you	  were	  writing	  a	  great	  novel,	  or	  making	  a	  friend,	  or	  reading	  an	  interesting	  book.	  All	  the	  time	  you	  would	  be	  floating	  in	  a	  tank,	  with	  electrodes	  attached	  to	  your	  brain.	  Should	  you	  plug	  into	  this	  machine	  for	  life,	  preprogramming	  your	  life’s	  experiences?	  If	  you	  are	  worried	  about	  missing	  out	  on	  desirable	  experiences,	  we	  can	  suppose	  that	  business	  enterprises	  have	  researched	  thoroughly	  the	  lives	  of	  many	  others.	  You	  can	  pick	  and	  choose	  from	  their	  large	  library	  or	  smorgasbord	  of	  such	  experiences,	  selecting	  your	  life’s	  experiences	  for,	  say,	  the	  next	  two	  years.	  After	  two	  years	  have	  passed,	  you	  would	  have	  ten	  minutes	  or	  ten	  hours	  out	  of	  the	  tank,	  to	  select	  the	  experiences	  of	  your	  next	  two	  years.	  Of	  course,	  while	  in	  the	  tank	  you	  won’t	  know	  that	  you’re	  there;	  you’ll	  think	  it’s	  actually	  happening.	  Others	  can	  also	  plug	  in	  to	  have	  the	  experiences	  they	  want,	  so	  there	  is	  no	  need	  to	  stay	  unplugged	  to	  serve	  them.	  Would	  you	  plug	  in?”	  	  (Nozick,	  1974).	  	  If	  what	  ultimately	  makes	  life	  go	  better	  or	  worse	  is	  simply	  a	  matter	  of	  how	  one	  feels	  as	  the	  hedonist	  claims,	  then	  we	  should	  all	  be	  willing	  to	  plug	  in.	  Since	  we	  are	  unwilling	  (or	  at	  least	  hesitant),	  other	  factors	  besides	  mental	  states	  must	  be	  important	  for	  a	  good	  life.	  Nozick’s	  argument	  is	  straightforward	  and	  persuasive;	  there	  are	  many	  cases	  where	  humans	  and	  animals	  appear	  motivated	  to	  engage	  in	  activities	  for	  their	  own	  sake,	  not	  because	  they	  are	  particularly	  pleasurable.	  	  Another	  challenge	  levied	  against	  hedonism	  has	  been	  to	  question	  the	  assumption	  that	  there	  exists	  a	  sensation	  common	  to	  all	  pleasurable	  experiences.	  After	  all,	  many	  seemingly	  pleasurable	  experiences	  such	  as	  reading,	  conversing	  with	  old	  friends,	  sex,	  contact	  with	  nature,	  etc.	  all	  seem	  to	  be	  very	  different	  from	  each	  other.	  To	  address	  this	   9 challenge,	  Kagan	  (1992)	  suggests	  an	  analogy	  between	  pleasure	  and	  acoustic	  volume.	  Pleasure,	  like	  volume,	  is	  best	  thought	  of	  as	  a	  dimension	  along	  which	  experiences	  can	  vary	  rather	  than	  be	  a	  single	  discrete	  component	  common	  to	  all	  pleasurable	  experiences.	  In	  the	  same	  way	  that	  very	  different	  sounds	  can	  be	  categorized	  and	  ranked	  according	  to	  their	  volume,	  so	  it	  is	  with	  pleasurable	  experiences.	  Other	  scholars	  have	  endorsed	  a	  similar	  view,	  arguing	  that	  ostensibly	  dissimilar	  pleasant	  experiences	  share	  in	  common	  “feeling	  tone”	  (Crisp,	  2006)	  or	  “positive	  buzz”	  (Hurka,	  2010).	  	  	  Another	  response	  to	  this	  challenge	  has	  been	  to	  restrict	  what	  counts	  as	  a	  pleasant	  experience	  to	  those	  that	  are	  also	  desired.	  This	  view,	  known	  as	  preference	  or	  attitudinal	  hedonism,	  denies	  that	  sensory	  pleasures	  have	  final	  value,	  reserving	  this	  status	  only	  for	  pleasant	  sensory	  pleasures	  that	  are	  also	  positively	  evaluated	  by	  the	  individual	  experiencing	  them	  (Feldman,	  2004).	  To	  experience	  attitudinal	  pleasure	  is	  to	  have	  a	  pro-­‐attitude	  toward	  the	  object	  of	  the	  experience	  akin	  to	  enjoyment.	  The	  applicability	  of	  this	  theory	  to	  animals	  is	  unclear	  as	  it	  depends	  on	  whether	  or	  not	  animals	  possess	  the	  capacity	  to	  form	  the	  requisite	  attitudinal	  states.	  Feldman	  (2002)	  certainly	  believes	  that	  they	  do,	  writing	  “…all	  sorts	  of	  lowly	  creatures	  have	  propositional	  attitudes	  all	  day	  long.”	  However,	  many	  other	  philosophers	  maintain	  that	  natural	  language	  is	  necessary	  for	  the	  possession	  of	  intentional	  states	  like	  attitudes	  (Davidson,	  1982;	  Dennett,	  1995	  and	  Stich,	  1979,	  but	  see	  Bermudez,	  2003).	  These	  sceptics	  would	  likely	  agree	  that	  it	  is	  appropriate	  to	  claim	  that	  my	  dog	  ‘is	  pleased’	  when	  I	  arrive	  at	  home,	  but	  they	  would	  doubt	  that	  it	  is	  possible	  to	  say	  that	  my	  dog	  ‘is	  pleased	  that	  I	  am	  home’	  because	  this	  implies	  a	  much	  more	  complex	  conceptual	  framework	  that	  includes	  additional	  concepts	  such	  as	  truth	  and	  falsity	  (Hurka,	  2010).	  The	  emphasis	  on	  attitudinal	  endorsement	  makes	  this	  approach	  difficult	  to	  distinguish	  from	   10 another	  theory	  of	  welfare	  that	  has	  become	  what	  is	  perhaps	  the	  most	  popular	  theory	  of	  human	  welfare.	  1.9	   Desire	  satisfaction	  	   As	  the	  name	  suggests,	  desire	  or	  preference	  satisfactionism	  (hereafter,	  preferentialism)	  posits	  that	  a	  life	  goes	  well	  to	  the	  extent	  that	  subjects	  get	  what	  they	  want	  and	  avoid	  what	  they	  do	  not	  want.	  Importantly,	  any	  feelings	  that	  happen	  to	  accompany	  the	  satisfaction/frustration	  of	  these	  preferences	  are	  irrelevant.	  Instead	  of	  welfare	  being	  fully	  determined	  by	  discrete,	  valenced	  mental	  states,	  preferentialism	  describes	  a	  relation	  between	  the	  object	  of	  desire	  and	  the	  subject’s	  perception	  of	  their	  current	  state	  of	  affairs.	  Preferences	  are	  satisfied	  when	  the	  subject’s	  perception	  of	  the	  way	  the	  world	  is	  matches	  the	  object	  of	  the	  desire	  (i.e.	  the	  way	  they’d	  like	  the	  world	  to	  be)	  (Kagan,	  1992).4	  In	  formal	  terms	  Sandoe	  (1996)	  describes	  the	  preferentialist	  approach	  to	  animals	  as	  follows:	  "A	  subject’s	  welfare	  at	  a	  given	  point	  in	  time,	  t1,	  is	  relative	  to	  the	  degree	  of	  agreement	  between	  what	  he/it	  at	  t1	  prefers…and	  how	  he/it	  at	  t1	  sees	  his/its	  situation	  –	  the	  better	  the	  agreement	  the	  better	  the	  welfare.”	  	  Although	  preferentialism	  as	  a	  theory	  of	  welfare	  can	  be	  traced	  back	  to	  Hobbes,	  it	  did	  not	  gain	  prominence	  in	  the	  20th	  century	  with	  the	  rise	  of	  welfare	  economics	  and	  decision	  theory.	  Frustrated	  by	  the	  difficulty	  involved	  in	  measuring	  and	  comparing	  utility,	  economists	  proposed	  that	  measuring	  people’s	  revealed	  preferences	  offers	  a	  better,	  more	  objective	  approach	  to	  the	  study	  of	  welfare	  (Kahneman	  and	  Sugden,	  2005).	  Inspired	  by	                                              4Brulde	  (2007)	  makes	  an	  interesting	  case	  that	  because	  it	  is	  possible	  for	  unsatisfied	  preferences	  to	  exist	  without	  any	  aversion	  to	  their	  absence,	  welfare	  will	  usually	  only	  be	  negatively	  impacted	  when	  aversions	  (preferences	  that	  something	  not	  occur)	  are	  satisfied.     11 these	  changes	  in	  economics,	  animal	  welfare	  scientists	  also	  began	  employing	  their	  own	  preference	  tests	  as	  means	  of	  assessing	  animal	  welfare.	  The	  basic	  premise	  is	  that	  by	  calculating	  demand	  curves	  -­‐	  the	  percentage	  change	  in	  consumption	  as	  a	  function	  of	  price	  (i.e.	  how	  much	  effort	  the	  animal	  is	  willing	  to	  exert	  to	  obtain	  different	  resources)	  -­‐	  we	  can	  objectively	  assess	  and	  compare	  the	  relative	  contributions	  of	  different	  factors	  to	  welfare.	  If	  consumption	  decreases	  following	  an	  increase	  in	  price,	  the	  resource	  is	  believed	  to	  bring	  about	  less	  positive	  welfare	  value	  than	  if	  consumption	  were	  to	  remain	  stable	  or	  price	  insensitive	  (Dawkins,	  1983).	  The	  more	  (and	  stronger)	  preferences	  the	  animal	  satisfies	  the	  better	  its	  welfare	  is	  believed	  to	  be.	  	  Today	  preference	  (and	  motivation)	  testing	  has	  become	  one	  of	  the	  most	  popular	  and	  widely	  utilized	  methods	  in	  animal	  welfare	  science	  (Kirkden	  and	  Pajor,	  2006;	  Fraser	  and	  Nicol,	  2011).	  Contrary	  to	  human	  theories	  of	  welfare,	  preference	  testing	  is	  generally	  thought	  of	  as	  a	  methodology	  within	  animal	  welfare	  science,	  rather	  than	  a	  theory	  in	  its	  own	  right	  (see	  Table	  1).	  However,	  Dawkins	  (2012)	  has	  outlined	  a	  theory	  of	  welfare	  that	  could	  rightfully	  be	  considered	  a	  preference	  satisfaction	  account.	  	  Preferentialism	  as	  a	  formal	  theory	  of	  welfare	  has	  had	  a	  significant	  impact	  in	  animal	  ethics.	  Peter	  Singer	  (2011)	  famously	  rejected	  hedonism	  arguing	  that	  many	  animals	  (e.g.	  primates,	  dogs,	  cats,	  dolphins,	  elephants,	  pigs)	  qualify	  as	  persons	  because	  they	  appear	  to	  have	  a	  sense	  of	  themselves	  existing	  over	  time.	  He	  then	  went	  on	  to	  argue	  that	  beings	  capable	  of	  projecting	  themselves	  into	  the	  future	  must	  also	  be	  able	  to	  form	  desires	  about	  their	  future.	  If	  animals	  can	  form	  desires	  about	  their	  future,	  then	  it	  is	  possible	  for	  them	  to	  form	  desires	  about	  things	  that	  extend	  beyond	  their	  immediate	  pleasure	  and	  pain.	  All	  things	  being	  equal,	  Singer	  reasoned,	  a	  life	  where	  these	  desires	  are	  fulfilled	  is	  better	  than	  one	  in	   12 which	  they	  are	  not,	  independent	  of	  any	  pleasant	  feelings	  they	  experience.	  Tom	  Regan	  has	  also	  endorsed	  a	  preferentialist	  approach	  to	  welfare	  albeit	  from	  a	  deontological	  standpoint,	  claiming	  that	  animals	  enjoy	  welfare	  when	  they	  “pursue	  and	  obtain	  what	  they	  prefer”	  (Regan,	  2004).	  If	  Singer	  and	  Regan	  are	  correct	  that	  welfare	  consists	  of	  the	  satisfaction	  of	  preferences,	  the	  question	  then	  becomes	  a	  matter	  of	  identifying	  which	  animals	  are	  capable	  of	  possessing	  desires	  that	  extend	  beyond	  pleasure	  and	  pain.	  This	  question	  is	  beyond	  the	  scope	  of	  this	  thesis,	  but	  one	  detailed	  analysis	  by	  Varner	  (2002)	  concluded	  that	  desires	  are	  likely	  held	  by	  a	  wide	  array	  of	  animal	  species.5	  	  Preferentialism	  is	  appealing	  because	  it	  offers	  a	  plausible	  response	  to	  some	  of	  the	  major	  objections	  to	  hedonism.	  Namely,	  it	  provides	  an	  answer	  to	  Nozick’s	  experience	  machine	  objection.	  A	  life	  of	  pleasant	  dream-­‐like	  states	  is	  unlikely	  to	  improve	  welfare	  because	  such	  a	  life	  would	  likely	  leave	  many	  desires	  unfulfilled.	  Preferentialism	  recognizes	  that	  things	  besides	  the	  pleasant	  experiences	  are	  valued.	  We	  want	  to	  actually	  achieve	  certain	  things,	  not	  just	  the	  pleasant	  experiences	  that	  might	  or	  might	  not	  result	  from	  them.	  Preferentialism	  is	  also	  appealing	  because	  it	  is	  less	  judgmental	  that	  either	  hedonism	  of	  objective	  list	  theories.	  The	  content	  of	  the	  desire	  does	  not	  matter	  for	  welfare,	  what	  matters	  is	  its	  strength	  and	  whether	  or	  not	  it	  is	  fulfilled.	  	  In	  many	  cases	  there	  may	  be	  a	  close	  correspondence	  between	  the	  satisfaction	  of	  desires	  and	  the	  experience	  of	  positive	  mental	  states	  -­‐	  an	  animal	  that	  gets	  what	  it	  wants	  will	  often	  feel	  good	  as	  a	  result	  (Duncan	  and	  Fraser,	  1997).	  However,	  this	  need	  not	  be	  true	  in	  all	  circumstances.	  Consider	  any	  animal	  with	  a	  strong	  desire	  to	  fight.	  It	  seems	  odd	  to	  think	  that	                                              5 Varner	  (2002)	  concludes	  that	  some	  animals	  (e.g.	  some	  fish)	  may	  be	  capable	  of	  experiencing	  pain	  without	  desiring	  that	  it	  end.	  This	  phenomenon	  also	  occurs	  in	  humans	  with	  prefrontal	  lobe	  damage	  who	  report	  feeling	  pain,	  but	  have	  no	  desire	  for	  it	  to	  stop.	   13 by	  allowing	  this	  animal	  to	  fulfil	  its	  preference	  we	  have	  somehow	  improved	  its	  welfare.	  Moreover,	  many	  desires	  in	  both	  humans	  and	  animals	  are	  relatively	  unstable	  –	  varying	  depending	  on	  the	  context	  in	  which	  they	  are	  presented.	  Lichtenstein	  and	  Slovic	  (1971)	  famously	  showed	  that	  when	  people	  were	  presented	  with	  two	  options	  simultaneously	  they	  indicated	  a	  reliable	  preference	  for	  one	  of	  the	  two	  options.	  However,	  when	  the	  very	  same	  two	  options	  were	  evaluated	  individually	  their	  preferences	  reversed.	  Collectively,	  these	  challenges	  have	  been	  referred	  to	  as	  the	  problem	  of	  defective	  desires	  (Heathwood,	  2005).	  These	  challenges	  to	  preferentialism	  have	  led	  to	  the	  addition	  of	  numerous	  idealizing	  conditions.	  Most	  often	  these	  include	  the	  requirement	  that	  desires	  must	  be	  informed	  and	  presently	  held	  in	  order	  to	  affect	  welfare	  (Griffin,	  1986).	  For	  a	  desire	  to	  count	  as	  being	  informed	  it	  must	  persist	  in	  being	  held	  after	  considering	  the	  likely	  results	  of	  its	  fulfilment.	  Varner	  (2002)	  argues	  that	  this	  condition	  cannot	  apply	  to	  animals	  because,	  unlike	  humans,	  animals	  will	  never	  possess	  the	  ability	  to	  consider	  such	  information.	  The	  requirement	  that	  desires	  be	  presently	  held	  is	  more	  applicable	  in	  the	  case	  of	  animals:	  “If	  a	  dog	  is	  frightened	  of	  you	  and	  would	  prefer	  you	  to	  leave,	  it	  does	  not	  contribute	  to	  her	  welfare	  if	  you	  leave	  secretly	  (behind	  a	  screen,	  say,	  so	  that	  she	  thinks	  you	  are	  still	  present)	  or	  if	  you	  leave	  when	  her	  fear	  has	  ended	  (perhaps	  because	  you	  feed	  her)”	  (Appleby	  and	  Sandoe,	  2002).	  Preferentialism	  has	  many	  advantages	  over	  hedonism	  as	  a	  theory	  of	  welfare,	  yet	  there	  is	  something	  fundamentally	  odd	  about	  the	  idea	  of	  equating	  the	  satisfaction	  of	  desires	  with	  a	  good	  life.	  According	  to	  Aristotle,	  things	  cannot	  be	  made	  good	  by	  the	  fact	  that	  they	  are	  desired;	  they	  are	  desired	  because	  they	  are	  good	  independent	  of	  our	  desires	  for	  them	  (Crisp,	  2008).	  This	  observation	  leads	  us	  to	  our	  final	  category	  of	  welfare	  –	  Objective	  List	  theories.	   14 1.10	   Objective	  list	  theories	  	   On	  an	  objective	  list	  account	  of	  welfare,	  factors	  such	  as	  autonomy,	  knowledge,	  friendship,	  love,	  contact	  with	  reality	  and	  meaningful	  work	  may	  all	  be	  independently	  necessary	  for	  a	  good	  life,	  regardless	  of	  whether	  or	  not	  they	  make	  an	  object	  feel	  good	  or	  satisfy	  their	  desires.	  One	  popular	  version	  of	  objective	  list	  theory	  is	  the	  Aristotelian	  notion	  of	  perfectionism,	  which	  argues	  that	  welfare	  consists	  in	  the	  exercise	  and	  development	  of	  one’s	  natural	  or	  essential	  capacities	  (Hurka,	  1993;	  Dorsey,	  2010).	  Perfectionist	  accounts	  of	  animal	  welfare	  are	  often	  expressed	  as	  concerns	  about	  ‘naturalness’.	  Within	  the	  field	  of	  animal	  welfare	  science,	  perfectionist	  accounts	  are	  most	  often	  associated	  with	  the	  work	  of	  Bernard	  Rollin,	  as	  exemplified	  in	  the	  following	  quote	  (Rollin,	  1995):	  	  “…animals	  too	  have	  natures,	  genetically	  based,	  physically	  and	  psychologically	  expressed	  which	  determine	  how	  they	  live	  in	  their	  environments.	  Following	  Aristotle,	  I	  call	  this	  the	  telos	  of	  an	  animal,	  the	  pigness	  of	  the	  pig,	  the	  dogness	  of	  the	  dog	  –	  ‘fish	  gotta	  swim,	  birds	  gotta	  fly’.	  (…)	  Social	  animals	  need	  to	  be	  with	  others	  of	  their	  kind;	  animals	  built	  to	  run	  need	  to	  run;	  these	  interests	  are	  species	  specific.	  Others	  are	  ubiquitous	  in	  all	  species	  with	  brains	  and	  nervous	  systems	  –	  the	  interest	  in	  avoiding	  pain,	  in	  food	  and	  water,	  and	  so	  forth.”	  6	  	  	  Other,	  more	  detailed	  perfectionist	  accounts	  of	  animal	  welfare	  can	  also	  be	  found.	  Extending	  her	  work	  involving	  humans,	  Martha	  Nussbaum’s	  (2004)	  capabilities	  approach	  proposed	  a	  basic	  list	  of	  features	  that,	  when	  realized,	  improve	  an	  animal’s	  welfare.	  These	  capabilities	  are:	  (i)	  life,	  (ii)	  bodily	  health,	  (iii)	  bodily	  integrity,	  (iv)	  senses,	  imagination,	  and	  thought,	  (v)	  emotions,	  (vi)	  practical	  reason,	  (vii)	  affiliation,	  (vii)	  relation	  to	  other	  species,	  (ix)	  play,	  and	  (x)	  control	  over	  one’s	  environment.	  Although	  certain	  kinds	  of	  pleasure	  and	  pain	  are	  addressed	  by	  (iv)	  and	  (v),	  it	  is	  fully	  possible	  for	  many	  capabilities	  to	  contribute	  to	                                              6 Rollin	  is	  often	  categorized	  as	  an	  Aristotelian	  about	  welfare.	  However,	  other	  work	  makes	  it	  clear	  that	  he	  views	  essential	  species-­‐typical	  capacities	  as	  instrumentally	  valuable	  (see	  Verhoog,	  1992).	   15 an	  animal’s	  welfare	  regardless	  of	  whether	  they	  are	  experienced	  as	  pleasant	  or	  desired.	  Nussbaum	  acknowledges	  the	  dangers	  involved	  in	  presenting	  a	  theory	  that	  alludes	  to	  the	  characteristic	  flourishing	  of	  species.	  Specifically,	  she	  is	  concerned	  that	  it	  leads	  humans	  to	  “worship”	  and	  “romanticize”	  nature.	  To	  avoid	  this	  risk	  she	  makes	  it	  plain	  that	  not	  all	  forms	  of	  characteristic	  functioning	  improve	  welfare	  and	  discerning	  which	  do	  necessarily	  involves	  normative	  judgments	  (Nussbaum,	  2006).	  	  Rosalind	  Hursthouse’s	  (1999,	  pg.	  204)	  account	  of	  animal	  welfare	  probably	  represents	  the	  purest	  version	  of	  perfectionist	  theory.	  Her	  view	  is	  that	  a	  well-­‐off	  animal	  is	  one	  that	  is,	  “well-­‐fitted	  or	  endowed	  with	  respect	  to	  four	  aspects,	  their:	  (i)	  parts,	  (ii)	  operations/reactions,	  (iii)	  actions,	  and	  (iv)	  desires	  and	  emotions;	  whether	  it	  is	  thus	  well-­‐fitted	  or	  endowed	  is	  determined	  whether	  these	  four	  aspects	  well	  serve:	  (1)	  its	  individual	  survival,	  (2)	  the	  continuance	  of	  the	  species,	  and	  (3)	  its	  characteristic	  freedom	  from	  pain	  and	  characteristic	  enjoyment,	  and	  (4)	  the	  good	  functioning	  of	  its	  social	  group	  –	  in	  ways	  characteristic	  of	  that	  species.”	  	  Nussbaum	  and	  Hursthouse	  agree	  that	  what	  is	  good	  for	  an	  animal	  is	  pursuing	  their	  ends	  in	  ways	  that	  are	  characteristic	  of	  their	  species.	  They	  also	  agree	  that	  this	  will,	  in	  many	  cases,	  not	  be	  consistent	  with	  the	  maximization	  of	  pleasant	  psychological	  experience	  and	  the	  satisfaction	  of	  desires.	  However,	  Hursthouse	  differs	  from	  Nussbaum	  in	  believing	  that	  her	  approach	  does	  not	  depend	  on	  human	  values,	  but	  instead	  relies	  entirely	  on	  biological	  facts	  of	  the	  type	  studied	  by	  zoologists	  and	  ethologists.	  Upon	  closer	  examination	  it	  is	  apparent	  that	  value	  judgments	  enter	  into	  both	  approaches	  in	  the	  initial	  process	  of	  determining	  what	  counts	  as	  a	  species-­‐typical	  trait.	  The	  capabilities	  approach	  differs	  because	  it	  allows	  normative	  evaluations	  to	  enter	  a	  second	  time;	  namely,	  when	  considering	   16 which	  parts	  of	  the	  animal’s	  nature	  influence	  its	  welfare	  and	  which	  do	  not.	  For	  Hursthouse,	  this	  second	  step	  is	  unnecessary	  because	  once	  we	  have	  decided	  what	  is	  characteristic	  of	  the	  species	  we	  can	  deduce	  the	  welfare	  of	  any	  individual	  according	  to	  how	  well	  it	  reflects	  these	  characteristics	  (Rice,	  2015).	  	  Perfectionist	  approaches	  to	  welfare	  have	  been	  widely	  criticized	  for	  being	  too	  paternalistic	  and	  removed	  from	  the	  individual	  whose	  welfare	  we	  are	  supposed	  to	  be	  discussing.	  They	  suggest	  that	  things	  can	  affect	  welfare	  regardless	  of	  whether	  or	  not	  they	  are	  in	  some	  sense	  endorsed	  by	  the	  agent	  in	  question	  and	  thus	  strain	  the	  agent-­‐relativity	  requirement	  of	  welfare.	  A	  chimpanzee	  that	  does	  not	  enjoy	  being	  with	  its	  group,	  grooming	  others	  or	  playing	  is	  a	  ‘defective’	  chimpanzee	  and	  thus	  not	  well	  off.	  An	  attempt	  has	  been	  made	  to	  modify	  perfectionist	  approaches	  to	  animal	  welfare	  so	  that	  they	  are	  more	  sensitive	  to	  individual,	  within-­‐species	  variation.	  The	  self-­‐fulfilment	  alternative	  outlined	  by	  Visak	  and	  Balcombe	  (2013)	  still	  considers	  species-­‐typical	  characteristics,	  but	  allows	  for	  individual	  idiosyncrasies,	  atypical	  of	  the	  species,	  to	  influence	  welfare.	  This	  approach	  has	  precedence	  in	  the	  case	  of	  humans	  (Haybron,	  2008),	  but	  it	  is	  too	  early	  to	  tell	  whether	  this	  offers	  a	  workable	  alternative	  for	  animals.	  Thus	  far	  I	  have	  referred	  to	  philosophical	  research.	  In	  the	  next	  section	  I	  will	  critically	  evaluate	  the	  growing	  body	  of	  social	  science	  research	  that	  has	  empirically	  examined	  how	  different	  people	  understand	  animal	  welfare.	  1.11	   Empirical	  research	  on	  how	  people	  conceive	  of	  animal	  welfare	  An	  increasing	  volume	  of	  social	  science	  research	  is	  now	  being	  conducted	  within	  animal	  welfare	  science	  (examples	  given	  in	  Table	  1.2).	  A	  major	  focus	  of	  this	  work	  is	  discerning	  how	  different	  groups	  of	  people	  think	  about	  welfare.	  This	  research	  may	  offer	   17 insights	  into	  whether	  or	  not	  the	  intuitions	  of	  specialists	  are	  representative	  of	  ordinary	  people.	  Without	  this,	  it	  is	  not	  possible	  to	  discern	  whether	  both	  groups	  are	  referring	  to	  the	  same	  concept	  or	  not.	  Because	  social	  science	  research	  in	  animal	  welfare	  is	  relatively	  new	  (e.g.	  see	  review	  by	  Weary	  et	  al.,	  2016)	  most	  studies	  have	  been	  qualitative	  case	  studies.	  	  One	  such	  study	  involved	  swine	  farmers	  from	  six	  European	  countries	  and	  found	  that	  welfare	  was	  defined	  differently	  depending	  on	  whether	  farmers	  were	  participating	  in	  basic	  (non-­‐animal	  welfare	  specific)	  or	  specific	  animal	  welfare	  assurance	  schemes	  (Skarstad	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Interestingly,	  farmers	  in	  the	  latter	  category	  placed	  greater	  emphasis	  on	  an	  animal’s	  ability	  to	  express	  natural	  behaviour	  and	  less	  on	  the	  biological	  health	  and	  functioning	  of	  their	  animals.	  This	  same	  study	  also	  reported	  that	  Norwegian	  consumers	  held	  a	  more	  nuanced	  definition	  of	  animal	  welfare	  emphasizing	  freedom,	  naturalness	  and	  care	  while	  farmers	  focused	  almost	  exclusively	  on	  animals	  having	  good	  health	  and	  functioning.	  Spooner	  et	  al	  (2014)	  also	  reported	  that	  swine	  producers	  largely	  equated	  welfare	  with	  good	  biological	  health	  and	  functioning.	  	  Other	  studies	  have	  used	  quantitative	  methodologies	  to	  examine	  statistical	  relations	  between	  different	  groups.	  One	  study	  presented	  non-­‐farmer	  and	  farmer	  participants	  with	  a	  list	  of	  72	  welfare	  related	  factors	  and	  asked	  them	  to	  rate	  their	  importance	  for	  obtaining	  an	  acceptable	  level	  of	  animal	  welfare	  (Vanhonacker	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  These	  factors	  were	  organized	  into	  seven	  categories	  (Housing	  and	  Climate,	  Transport	  and	  Slaughter,	  Feed	  and	  Water,	  Human-­‐Animal	  Relationship,	  Animal	  Suffering	  and	  Stress,	  Animal	  Health	  and	  Ability	  to	  Engage	  in	  Natural	  Behaviour).	  The	  main	  finding	  was	  that	  farmers	  and	  non-­‐farmers	  largely	  agreed	  on	  which	  factors	  “have	  to	  do	  with	  animal	  welfare”	  although	  the	  ability	  to	  engage	   18 natural	  behaviour	  was	  consistently	  ranked	  more	  highly	  by	  non-­‐farmers	  (Vanhonacker	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  	  	  Another	  study,	  comparing	  consumer	  and	  farmer	  conceptions	  of	  welfare,	  found	  that	  farmers	  thought	  of	  welfare	  largely	  in	  terms	  of	  health	  and	  functioning.	  Consumers	  also	  mentioned	  these	  factors,	  but	  went	  beyond	  them	  to	  include	  things	  like	  the	  freedom	  to	  move	  and	  fulfil	  “natural	  desires”	  (Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  Similarly,	  a	  Dutch	  study	  found	  that	  expert	  and	  non-­‐farmer	  beliefs	  about	  swine	  welfare	  were	  largely	  in	  agreement	  except	  that	  non-­‐farmers	  held	  a	  more	  complex	  view	  of	  animal	  welfare	  than	  the	  welfare	  experts	  (Lassen	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  	  Tuyttens	  et	  al.	  (2010)	  asked	  several	  different	  groups:	  vegetarians,	  farmers	  and	  non-­‐farmers	  to	  rate	  the	  importance	  of	  12	  different	  welfare-­‐related	  criteria.	  Once	  again,	  general	  agreement	  was	  high	  between	  groups	  with	  the	  exception	  of	  vegetarians	  who	  gave	  consistently	  higher	  scores	  than	  both	  farmers	  and	  citizens	  on	  every	  criterion.	  Farmers	  and	  vegetarians	  differed	  most	  on	  the	  perceived	  importance	  of	  “appropriate	  behavior”.	  Table	  1.2	  	  A	  sample	  of	  studies	  reporting	  how	  different	  groups	  conceive	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  Study	   Country	   Population	   Sample	  Size	   Design	  Vanhonacker	  et	  al.,	  2008	   Belgium	   Farmers	  and	  Non-­‐farmers	   663	   Quantitative/correlational	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002	   The	  Netherlands	   Farmers	  and	  Non-­‐farmers	   30	   Qualitative	  Lassen	  et	  al.,	  2006	   Denmark	   Non-­‐farmers	   36-­‐42	   Qualitative	  Tuyttens	  et	  al.,	  2010	   Belgium	   Farmers,	  Non-­‐farmers	  farmers	  and	  Vegetarians	   735	   Quantitative/correlational	  Spooner	  et	  al.,	  2014a	   Canada	   Farmers	  and	  Non-­‐farmers	   24	   Qualitative	  Skarstad	  et	  al.,	  2007	   Norway	   Farmers	  and	  Non-­‐farmers	   216-­‐237	   Qualitative	  Vanhonacker	  et	  al.,	  2010	   Belgium	   Non-­‐farmers	   29	   Qualitative	  Vanhonacker	  et	  al.,	  2012	   Belgium	   Non-­‐farmers	   459	   Quantitative/correlational	  Bock	  and	  Van	  Huik,	  2007	   The	  Netherlands,	  France,	  Norway,	  Sweden,	  Britain	  and	  Italy.	  Farmers	  	   60	   Qualitative	  Prickett	  et	  al.,	  2010	  	   United	  States	   Non-­‐farmers	   1,019	   Quantitative/correlational	  Spooner	  et	  al.,	  2014b	   Canada	   Pig	  farmers	   20	   Qualitative	  Spooner	  et	  al.,	  2012	   Canada	   Cattle	  farmers	   23	   Qualitative	  Frewer	  et	  al.,	  2005	   Denmark	   Non-­‐farmers	   1,000	   Quantitative	  1.12	   Methodological	  limitations	  	   Objectively	  evaluating	  this	  research	  is	  difficult	  because	  of	  inconsistent	  and	  inadequate	  descriptions	  of	  methods,	  particularly	  with	  respect	  to	  data	  analyses.	  For	  example,	  Bock	  and	  Van	  Huik	  (2007)	  fail	  to	  provide	  any	  information	  about	  their	  materials	  other	  than	  stating,	  “researchers	  agreed	  upon	  a	  basic	  questionnaire	  with	  a	  common	  core	  of	  semi-­‐structured	  questions.”	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  (2002)	  also	  give	  no	  detailed	  information	  about	  how	  their	  data	  were	  analysed	  before	  moving	  into	  a	  discussion	  of	  their	  results.	  Moreover,	  the	  inclusion	  of	  methods	  designed	  to	  enhance	  reliability	  are	  used	  infrequently.	  	  Only	  Spooner	  et	  al.	  (2014a)	  described	  the	  steps	  used	  to	  validate	  their	  analysis.	  Triangulating	  qualitative	  data	  via	  repeated	  analysis	  by	  more	  than	  a	  single	  researcher	  and	  ‘feeding	  back’	  responses	  to	  participants	  would	  all	  improve	  future	  research	  in	  this	  area	  (Mays	  and	  Pope,	  2000).	  More	  generally,	  relatively	  few	  studies	  have	  directly	  focused	  on	  the	  concept	  of	  welfare.	  Those	  that	  clearly	  outline	  their	  research	  aims	  are	  often	  focused	  on	  assessing	  people’s	  attitudes	  towards	  animal	  welfare	  in	  general.	  For	  example,	  participants	  are	  asked	  to	  rate	  the	  current	  state	  of	  animal	  welfare	  and	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  they	  approve/disapprove	  of	  what	  they	  perceive	  of	  as	  the	  status	  quo	  (Vanhonancker	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Another	  study	  asked	  subjects	  what	  they	  thought	  about,	  “…the	  accusations	  of	  animal	  welfare	  activists”	  and	  then	  asserted	  that	  the	  responses	  “…contained	  information	  about	  the	  way	  they	  define	  animal	  welfare…”	  (Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  These	  approaches	  may	  contain	  useful	  information	  about	  how	  people	  think	  about	  welfare,	  but	  they	  are	  also	  likely	  to	  contain	  information	  unrelated	  to	  what	  they	  view	  as	  good	  for	  animals.	  Without	  better	    21 methodological	  descriptions	  it	  is	  not	  possible	  to	  tell	  how	  investigators	  distinguished	  signal	  from	  noise.	  A	  further	  limitation	  of	  the	  studies	  reviewed	  here	  is	  that	  all	  of	  them	  focused	  on	  animal	  welfare	  in	  the	  context	  of	  food	  consumption.	  For	  instance,	  both	  Skarstad	  et	  al.	  (2007)	  and	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al.	  (2002)	  initiated	  interviews	  by	  asking	  people	  to	  talk	  about	  their	  consumption	  of	  animal	  products	  prior	  to	  asking	  them	  to	  define	  animal	  welfare.	  Hall	  and	  Sandilands	  (2007)	  examining	  views	  about	  poultry	  welfare,	  asked	  subjects	  to	  define	  welfare,	  but	  before	  responding	  they	  were	  encouraged	  to,	  “remember,	  we’re	  talking	  about	  chickens	  bred	  for	  meat	  production”	  (Hall	  and	  Sandilands	  2007).	  This	  framing	  is	  likely	  to	  have	  biased	  participant	  responses.	  Studies	  have	  shown	  that	  reflecting	  on	  meat-­‐eating	  leads	  to	  lower	  ratings	  of	  animal	  mental	  abilities	  and	  concern	  for	  their	  welfare	  (Loughnan	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Bastian	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Again,	  such	  data	  is	  also	  likely	  to	  be	  ‘noisy’	  since	  food	  animal	  welfare	  if	  often	  used	  as,	  “an	  indicator	  of	  other,	  usually	  more	  important,	  product	  attributes	  such	  as	  food	  safety,	  quality	  and	  healthiness”	  (Harper	  and	  Henson,	  2001).	  	  	  The	  majority	  of	  these	  studies	  were	  limited	  to	  a	  few	  (mainly	  European)	  countries	  (see	  examples	  given	  in	  Table	  2).	  Moreover,	  approximately	  half	  of	  the	  studies	  appeared	  to	  utilize	  the	  same	  data	  set	  (Vanhonacker	  et	  al.,	  2008,	  2010,	  2012	  and	  Tuyttens	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Many	  studies	  rely	  on	  very	  small	  sample	  sizes	  and	  report	  very	  little	  by	  way	  of	  demographic	  information.	  For	  example,	  Lassen	  et	  al.	  (2006)	  provide	  no	  information	  about	  their	  sample	  beyond	  stating	  that	  they	  were	  “not	  farmers”	  and	  that	  they	  “differed	  in	  age,	  gender,	  education	  and	  place	  of	  residence	  (urban/rural)”.	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al	  (2002)	  only	  provided	  the	  following	  information	  about	  their	  sample:	  “The	  selected	  respondents	  were	  as	  different	  from	  each	  other	  as	  possible,	  and	  at	  the	  same	  time	  represented	  others	  as	  much	  as	  possible.”	  Overreliance	  on	  small	  samples	  with	  little	  attention	  to	  their	  characteristics	  compromises	  the	    22 validity	  of	  much	  psychological	  research	  (Henrich	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Studies	  using	  larger	  samples,	  in	  different	  locations	  (and	  cultures)	  may	  yield	  very	  different	  conclusions.	  Thus,	  caution	  is	  warranted	  when	  generalizing	  the	  results	  of	  these	  studies	  to	  different	  contexts	  (von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  Hötzel,	  2015).	  There	  also	  seems	  to	  be	  an	  over-­‐reliance	  on	  the	  use	  of	  direct-­‐projective	  methods	  of	  assessment.	  Direct	  methods	  depend	  on	  the	  subject’s	  motivation	  and	  ability	  to	  access	  and	  linguistically	  express	  their	  thoughts.	  Overreliance	  on	  such	  methods	  is	  problematic	  because,	  although	  linguistic	  expression	  and	  thought	  are	  closely	  related,	  much	  of	  our	  thinking	  occurs	  at	  a	  level	  below	  conscious	  perception	  and	  is	  never	  externalized	  (Greenwald	  and	  Banaji,	  1995).	  Similarly,	  many	  of	  our	  moral	  judgments	  occur	  spontaneously	  and	  intuitively	  without	  being	  consciously	  experienced	  (Haidt,	  2001).	  In	  cases	  where	  these	  judgments	  are	  externalized,	  they	  are	  often	  very	  labile	  and	  susceptible	  to	  subtle	  changes	  in	  elicitation	  methods	  (Fischhoff	  et	  al.,	  1980).	  In	  response,	  social	  scientists	  have	  developed	  a	  number	  of	  indirect	  (implicit)	  psychological	  methods	  that	  “do	  not	  destroy	  the	  natural	  form	  of	  the	  attitude	  in	  the	  process	  of	  describing	  it.”	  (Campbell	  1950).	  Research	  has	  shown	  that	  direct	  and	  indirect	  measures	  of	  the	  same	  psychological	  construct	  can	  yield	  drastically	  different	  responses	  within	  the	  same	  individual	  -­‐	  often	  without	  their	  awareness	  (Nosek	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  	  Indirect	  methods	  are	  preferred	  because	  they	  can	  minimize	  the	  influence	  of	  a	  variety	  of	  external	  response-­‐influencing	  pressures	  that	  can	  reduce	  data	  quality.	  Most	  commonly,	  these	  include	  demand	  characteristics,	  social	  desirability	  bias	  and	  the	  problem	  of	  non-­‐attitudes	  (Azjen,	  2001).	  Several	  studies	  have	  found	  social	  desirability	  bias	  to	  be	  much	  more	  common	  in	  face-­‐to-­‐face	  interview-­‐based	  studies	  (Richman	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Leggett	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Kreuter	  et	  al.,	  2008),	  which	  constitute	  the	  bulk	  of	  studies	  reviewed	  here.	  The	  problem	  of	  non-­‐attitudes	  refers	  to	  the	  well-­‐documented	  fact	  the	  many	  people	  simply	  do	  not	  have	    23 coherent	  attitudes	  about	  many	  objects,	  despite	  reporting	  that	  they	  do.	  Phillip	  Converse	  (1970)	  first	  introduced	  the	  notion	  of	  non-­‐attitudes	  as	  an	  explanation	  of	  the	  low	  stability	  (i.e.	  low	  test/re-­‐test	  reliabilities)	  of	  some	  pubic	  opinion	  research.	  Numerous	  studies	  have	  found	  people	  often	  report	  having	  “considered	  views”	  about	  matters	  that	  they	  have	  never	  actually	  considered	  (Bishop	  et	  al.,	  1980;	  Sturgis	  and	  Smith,	  2010).	  One	  prominent	  anthrozoological	  researcher	  has	  suggested	  that	  many	  (if	  not	  most)	  attitudes	  about	  animals	  probably	  qualify	  as	  non-­‐attitudes	  (Herzog,	  2010).	  A	  recent	  study	  examining	  views	  about	  animal	  welfare	  among	  6,000	  Chinese	  consumers	  found	  that	  more	  that	  two	  thirds	  have	  never	  even	  heard	  of	  the	  term	  ‘animal	  welfare’	  (You	  et	  al.,	  2014)	  and	  Spooner	  et	  al.	  (2012;	  2014b)	  reported	  that	  farmers	  they	  studied	  never	  use	  the	  term	  “welfare”.	  This	  provides	  some	  preliminary	  evidence	  that	  asking	  people	  what	  they	  think	  about	  “animal	  welfare”	  may	  not	  be	  an	  intelligible	  question.	  Complementing	  and	  building	  on	  existing	  studies	  via	  methodological	  refinements	  such	  as	  indirect	  measures	  and	  experimental	  designs	  that	  manipulate	  specific	  variables	  of	  interest,	  could	  help	  us	  develop	  a	  better	  understanding	  of	  how	  ordinary	  people	  understand	  animal	  welfare.	  	  	  The	  lack	  of	  hypothesis-­‐driven	  research	  examining	  the	  ordinary	  concept	  of	  welfare	  might	  be	  a	  function	  of	  the	  concept	  itself.	  As	  currently	  formulated,	  the	  broadness	  of	  this	  complex	  concept	  of	  welfare	  makes	  it	  difficult	  to	  imagine	  data	  that	  would	  not	  support	  this	  concept.	  For	  instance,	  applying	  the	  welfare	  construct	  outlined	  by	  Fraser	  et	  al.	  (1997)	  makes	  it	  difficult	  to	  exclude	  most	  scientific	  findings	  involving	  animals	  without	  invoking	  additional	  ad	  hoc	  criteria.	  	  This	  is	  problematic	  because	  empirical	  evidence	  cannot	  support	  a	  theory,	  if	  the	  theory	  is	  formulated	  in	  a	  manner	  that	  is	  consistent	  with	  any	  observations	  whatsoever	  (Popper,	  2005).	  	  Further	  conceptual	  work	  is	  needed	  to	  clarify	  the	  constituents	  of	  welfare	  in	  a	  manner	  that	  would	  allow	  for	  falsifiable	  hypotheses	  to	  be	  tested.	  	  Such	  work	    24 is	  especially	  needed	  to	  clarify	  pervasive	  claims	  about	  naturalness	  and	  how	  they	  relate	  to	  other	  terms	  commonly	  encountered	  such	  as	  autonomy,	  comfort	  and	  integrity	  (Lassen	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  Additional	  research	  is	  also	  needed	  to	  discern	  whether	  there	  might	  be	  additional	  factors	  that	  influence	  welfare	  beyond	  those	  currently	  identified.	  For	  example,	  some	  have	  argued	  that	  factors	  such	  as	  death	  (Yeates	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  2011),	  longevity	  (Bruijnis	  et	  al.,	  2013)	  and	  integrity	  (Bovenkerk,	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Rocklinsberg	  et	  al.,	  2014)	  can	  all	  influence	  our	  judgments	  about	  an	  animal’s	  welfare	  despite	  not	  being	  straightforwardly	  captured	  by	  the	  three	  concerns	  outlined	  by	  Fraser	  et	  al.	  (1997).	  In	  the	  case	  of	  death,	  consider	  philosopher	  Jerrold	  Tannenbaum’s	  (2002)	  thought	  experiment:	  	  “A	  researcher	  uses	  radioactive	  tracer	  chemicals	  to	  study	  the	  anatomical	  structure	  of	  the	  brains	  of	  rhesus	  monkeys.	  After	  the	  chemicals	  are	  injected	  intravenously,	  the	  animals	  are	  killed	  painlessly.	  The	  brain	  tissue	  is	  then	  removed	  for	  study.	  At	  no	  time	  do	  the	  monkeys	  experience	  any	  pain,	  distress,	  or	  discomfort	  other	  than	  the	  minimal	  amount	  associated	  with	  the	  injections.	  Does	  this	  experiment	  have	  a	  negative	  impact	  on	  the	  monkey’s	  welfare?”	  	  Tannenbaum	  claims	  that	  when	  he	  first	  began	  presenting	  this	  scenario	  to	  diverse	  audiences	  more	  than	  three	  decades	  ago,	  virtually	  no	  one	  considered	  it	  an	  animal	  welfare	  issue.	  However,	  he	  now	  claims	  that	  the	  question	  evokes	  “immediate	  and	  substantial	  laughter”	  because	  it	  was	  “patently	  obvious	  to	  everyone”	  that	  the	  monkey’s	  welfare	  is	  negatively	  affected	  by	  when	  his	  or	  her	  life	  is	  terminated.	  Whether	  Tannenbaum’s	  intuition	  is	  widely-­‐shared	  or	  not	  remains	  to	  be	  seen.	  	  If	  correct,	  this	  would	  have	  significant	  practical	  implications.	  If	  death	  negatively	  impacts	  an	  animal’s	  welfare	  then	  this	  would	  mean	  that	  the	  routine	  killing	  of	  animals	  at	  the	  end	  of	  experiments,	  even	  if	  done	  painlessly,	  constitutes	  a	  welfare	  issue	  (DeGrazia,	  2016).	    25 Despite	  these	  limitations,	  the	  research	  reviewed	  here	  generally	  appears	  to	  support	  the	  hypothesis	  that	  people	  hold	  a	  complex	  notion	  of	  animal	  welfare	  involving	  concern	  for:	  1)	  the	  animal’s	  biological	  functioning,	  2)	  how	  the	  animal	  feels	  and	  3)	  the	  animal’s	  ability	  to	  live	  a	  natural	  life.	  Many	  studies	  have	  found	  that	  responses	  to	  various	  animal	  welfare-­‐related	  questions	  yield	  responses	  that	  can	  be	  categorized	  according	  to	  at	  least	  one	  of	  these	  three	  domains	  described	  by	  Fraser	  at	  al.	  (1997).	  There	  are	  however	  some	  possible	  exceptions.	  	  For	  instance,	  people	  often	  mention	  factors	  such	  as	  freedom,	  integrity	  and	  care	  as	  being	  constitutive	  of	  welfare.	  	  Given	  that	  the	  concerns	  about	  the	  quality	  of	  life	  of	  animals	  under	  our	  care	  are	  increasingly	  being	  brought	  to	  the	  forefront,	  particularly	  by	  the	  lay	  (folk)	  public,	  efforts	  must	  continue	  to	  focus	  on	  understanding	  the	  perceptions,	  values	  and	  attitudes	  of	  all	  citizens	  on	  the	  issue	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  	  This	  is	  particularly	  true	  for	  farm	  animals,	  which	  make	  up	  the	  greatest	  proportion	  of	  animals	  under	  human	  care.	  Failure	  to	  understand	  how	  people	  think	  about	  these	  issues	  will	  likely	  lead	  to	  mismatched	  response	  strategies	  that	  may	  further	  undermine	  trust.	  1.13	   Thesis	  aims	   This	  thesis	  thus	  aims	  to	  elucidate	  the	  perceptions,	  concerns,	  and	  values	  of	  North	  American	  industry	  and	  lay	  stakeholders	  on	  matters	  pertaining	  to	  animal	  welfare,	  with	  a	  large	  but	  not	  exclusive	  emphasis	  on	  the	  food	  animal	  industries.	  	  Building	  on	  the	  review	  of	  conceptual	  work	  on	  the	  concept	  of	  welfare,	  Chapter	  2	  describes	  the	  first	  attempt	  to	  experimentally	  investigate	  the	  folk	  concept	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  It	  addresses	  the	  fundamental	  philosophical	  question	  of	  whether	  or	  not	  welfare	  is	  ultimately	  a	  matter	  of	  an	  animal’s	  subjective	  experience.	  This	  chapter	  proceeds	  from	  the	  premise	  that	  better	  and	  worse	    26 conceptualizations	  of	  welfare	  can	  be	  adjudicated	  (at	  least	  in	  part)	  by	  how	  well	  they	  track	  ordinary	  intuitions.	  I	  hypothesized	  that	  unlike	  popular	  technical	  theories,	  features	  of	  the	  animal’s	  life	  beyond	  their	  mental	  states	  would	  influence	  folk	  judgments	  of	  welfare.	  	  Since	  one	  prominent	  aspect	  of	  farm	  animal’s	  lives	  consist	  of	  the	  farm	  where	  it	  its	  raised,	  Chapter	  3,	  explores	  the	  empirical	  support	  for	  the	  widespread	  perception	  that	  animal	  welfare	  (broadly	  defined)	  is	  inversely	  related	  with	  farm	  size.	  	  I	  suggest	  that	  the	  discordance	  between	  beliefs	  about	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals	  on	  large	  farms	  and	  common	  scientific	  indicators	  of	  welfare	  may	  be	  the	  result	  of	  the	  folk	  holding	  a	  more	  expansive,	  life-­‐focused	  conception	  what	  it	  means	  to	  flourish.	  Chapter	  4	  explores	  how	  the	  social	  perception	  of	  openness	  and	  trust	  might	  mediate	  these	  perceptions	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  Given	  the	  unlikelihood	  that	  people	  possess	  clear	  attitudes	  about	  highly	  technical	  industry	  practices,	  focusing	  on	  trust	  may	  provide	  a	  more	  valid	  indicator	  of	  public	  support.	  Using	  a	  real	  world	  example,	  I	  hypothesized	  that	  attempts	  to	  limit	  access	  to	  information	  coming	  from	  farms	  would	  increase	  negative	  perceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  and	  decrease	  trust	  in	  farmers.	  Finally,	  Chapter	  5	  functions	  as	  a	  case	  study	  focused	  on	  a	  specific	  management	  issue,	  dehorning	  of	  young	  dairy	  calves.	  This	  chapter	  seeks	  to	  gain	  further	  insights	  into	  the	  factors	  that	  ordinary	  people	  perceive	  as	  relevant	  to	  welfare	  using	  a	  novel	  methodological	  approach	  that	  better	  mimics	  social	  decision-­‐making.	  	  Taken	  together	  these	  chapters	  serve	  to	  demonstrate	  how	  various	  methods	  borrowed	  from	  the	  social	  sciences	  can	  deepen	  our	  knowledge	  of	  how	  animal	  welfare	  in	  construed	  and	  evaluated	  by	  the	  public. 	   	    27 Chapter	  2:	  An	  empirical	  challenge	  to	  hedonistic	  accounts	  of	  welfare	  2.1	   Introduction	   A	  variety	  of	  evidence	  suggests	  that	  concern	  about	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals	  is	  increasing	  (Pinker,	  2011).	  	  In	  response	  to	  these	  concerns	  the	  field	  of	  animal	  welfare	  science	  emerged	  to	  provide	  empirical	  answers	  to	  questions	  about	  how	  different	  factors	  affect	  an	  animal’s	  welfare.	  Scientists	  working	  in	  this	  field	  typically	  draw	  inferences	  about	  welfare	  based	  on	  changes	  in	  behavior	  and	  physiological	  functioning.	  Although	  still	  a	  relatively	  new	  field,	  the	  number	  of	  scientific	  papers	  addressing	  animal	  welfare	  has	  increased	  10-­‐15%	  annually	  over	  the	  last	  20	  years	  (Walker	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  This	  research	  has	  been	  incorporated	  into	  veterinary	  and	  animal	  science	  curricula	  around	  the	  world	  (Broom,	  2011)	  and	  is	  increasingly	  used	  to	  inform	  legislative	  and	  regulatory	  policies,	  as	  well	  as	  private	  accreditation	  schemes	  (Croney	  and	  Millman,	  2007).	  	  However,	  despite	  its	  growing	  influence,	  there	  is	  still	  no	  universally	  accepted	  definition	  of	  welfare	  (Hewson,	  2003).	  Among	  animal	  welfare	  scientists	  there	  appears	  to	  be	  strong	  support	  for	  one	  particular	  theory	  known	  as	  welfare	  hedonism	  (Table	  2.1).	  Welfare	  hedonism	  is	  the	  view	  that	  subjective	  experience	  is	  the	  only	  non-­‐instrumentally	  valuable	  constituent	  of	  welfare	  (Petersen	  and	  Ryberg,	  2014).	  On	  this	  view,	  an	  animal’s	  welfare	  is	  diminished	  if,	  and	  only	  if,	  the	  animal	  experiences	  negatively-­‐valenced	  feelings	  (referred	  to	  generally	  as	  pain,	  but	  also	  including	  various	  other	  negative	  emotions	  such	  e.g.	  fear,	  depression,	  boredom)	  and	  enhanced	  if,	  and	  only	  if,	  the	  animal	  experiences	  positively	  valenced	  feelings	  (referred	  to	  generally	  as	  pleasure)	  (Duncan,	  2004;	  Sandoe	  and	  Simonsen,	  1992).	  	  By	  extension,	  concepts	  such	  as	  ‘quality	  of	  life’	  are	  said	  to	  refer	  to	  the	  net	  balance	  of	    28 positive	  over	  negative	  psychological	  states	  over	  an	  extended	  period	  of	  time	  (Mench,	  1998;	  McMillan,	  2000;	  Yeates,	  2011;	  2016;	  UFAW,	  2016).	  	  	  Table	  2.1	  Select	  quotations	  representing	  welfare	  hedonism.	  “To	  be	  concerned	  about	  animal	  welfare	  is	  to	  be	  concerned	  with	  the	  subjective	  feelings	  of	  animals.”	  	   Dawkins,	  1988	  	  “…animal	  welfare	  is	  dependent	  solely	  on	  the	  mental,	  psychological	  and	  cognitive	  needs	  of	  the	  animals	  concerned…as	  long	  as	  the	  mental	  state	  is	  protected	  (i.e.,	  as	  long	  as	  the	  animal	  “feels”	  all	  right)	  then	  its	  welfare	  will	  be	  all	  right…animal	  welfare	  is	  dependent	  solely	  on	  the	  cognitive	  needs	  of	  the	  animals	  concerned”	  	  Duncan	  and	  Petherick,	  1991	  “…something	  can	  only	  affect	  the	  welfare	  of	  an	  animal	  if	  it	  affects	  the	  conscious	  experiences	  of	  the	  individual.”	  	  Sandoe	  and	  Simonsen,	  1992	  “…the	  animals	  perception	  of	  its	  condition	  must	  serve	  as	  the	  basis	  for	  well-­‐being…”	  	   Gonyou,	  1993	  “Animal	  welfare	  consists	  of	  the	  animal’s	  positive	  and	  negative	  experiences.”	  	   Simenson,	  1996	  “…welfare	  will	  depend	  on	  the	  relative	  preponderance	  of	  positive	  over	  negative	  experiences	  during	  the	  animal’s	  lifetime.”	  	  Mench,	  1998	  “Quality	  of	  life	  refers	  to	  a	  state	  of	  mind;	  it	  is	  conscious,	  subjective,	  mental	  experience.”	  	   McMillan,	  2000	  “Welfare	  is	  a	  characteristic	  of	  animals,	  i.e.	  it	  is	  a	  descriptive	  property	  of	  animals…The	  welfare	  state	  of	  an	  animal	  is	  determined	  by	  all	  the	  emotional	  states	  and	  only	  the	  emotional	  states	  insofar	  as	  they	  are	  experienced	  subjectively	  by	  that	  animal….Per	  definition,	  a	  drugged	  animal	  that	  is	  kept	  in	  a	  permanently	  euphoric	  state	  has	  high	  welfare	  status	  even	  though	  it	  may	  be	  questioned	  whether	  this	  is	  morally	  acceptable.”	  	  Bracke,	  2001	    29 “Welfare	  is	  fulfilled	  when	  the	  animals	  do	  not	  feel	  any	  long	  lasting	  negative	  emotions	  and	  when	  they	  can	  experience	  positive	  emotions.”	  	  	  Desire,	  et	  al.,	  2002	  "...animal	  welfare	  is	  all	  to	  do	  with	  the	  secondary,	  subjective	  feelings,	  with	  the	  absence	  of	  negative	  feelings,	  particularly	  the	  strong	  negative	  feelings	  we	  call	  suffering	  and	  with	  the	  presence	  of	  positive	  feelings	  that	  we	  call	  pleasure.”	  	  	  	  Duncan,	  2004	  	  	  	  “An	  individual’s	  overall	  welfare	  depends	  on	  the	  combination	  of	  all	  its	  current	  experiences…Like	  overall	  welfare,	  Quality	  of	  Life	  is	  a	  matter	  of	  the	  animal’s	  mental	  experiences.	  	  It	  is	  effectively	  a	  balance	  of	  all	  experiences	  within	  a	  specific	  period.”	  	  Yeates,	  2011	  “Animal	  welfare	  is	  a	  state	  within	  the	  animal…how	  the	  animal	  feels	  now.”	  	   Hemsworth	  et	  al.,	  2015	  “Animal	  welfare	  is	  a	  state	  that	  is	  subjectively	  experienced	  by	  an	  animal;	  it	  is	  a	  state	  within	  the	  animal.”	  	  Mellor,	  2016	  	  “The	  welfare	  of	  any	  sentient	  animal	  is	  determined	  by	  its	  individual	  perception	  of	  its	  own	  physical	  and	  emotional	  state.”	  	  Webster,	  2016	  	  “Welfare	  is	  net	  happiness	  (enjoyment	  minus	  suffering).”	   Ng,	  2016	  	  “…an	  animal’s	  welfare	  state	  reflects	  what	  the	  animal	  itself	  experiences	  subjectively,	  i.e.,	  its	  affective	  experiences	  or	  affects.”	   Littlewood	  and	  Mellor,	  2016	  	   Importantly,	  the	  hedonist	  position	  construes	  welfare	  as	  a	  descriptive	  concept	  (Haybron,	  2008).	  Determining	  whether	  or	  not	  an	  animal	  is	  happy	  is	  seen	  as	  solely	  a	  matter	  of	  accurately	  representing	  or	  describing	  the	  animal’s	  mental	  states.	  If	  the	  animal	  is	  perceived	  as	  meeting	  the	  requisite	  psychological	  criteria	  (i.e.	  low	  negative	  affect	  and	  high	  positive	  affect)	  then	  the	  concept	  is	  said	  to	  apply	  and	  the	  animal	  is	  happy.	  External,	    30 normative	  considerations	  of	  the	  sort	  commonly	  associated	  with	  objective	  list	  theories	  (e.g.	  physical	  health,	  naturalness,	  bodily	  integrity)	  are	  not	  directly	  relevant.	  We	  believe	  that	  there	  is	  good	  reason	  to	  question	  this	  account	  of	  welfare.	  An	  alternative	  possibility	  suggests	  welfare	  cannot	  simply	  be	  a	  matter	  of	  experiencing	  certain	  mental	  states,	  because	  the	  concept	  itself	  is	  not	  purely	  descriptive	  (Fraser,	  1995).	  This	  alternative	  view	  sees	  welfare	  as	  a	  ‘thick	  concept’	  containing	  both	  descriptive	  and	  normative	  content	  (Tiberius,	  2013).	  When	  we	  ascribe	  happiness	  we	  are	  not	  simply	  representing	  or	  describing	  their	  mental	  state	  -­‐	  we	  are	  evaluating	  their	  life	  circumstances	  more	  generally;	  we	  are	  deciding	  whether	  it	  is	  a	  life	  we	  would	  endorse,	  encourage	  or	  recommend	  (Kagan,	  1994).	  	  One	  way	  to	  adjudicate	  between	  these	  competing	  analyses	  is	  to	  determine	  which	  of	  them	  best	  reflects	  ordinary,	  common	  sense	  usage	  (Sumner,	  1996,	  Taylor,	  2013).	  By	  investigating	  patterns	  in	  how	  ordinary	  people	  apply	  or	  do	  not	  apply	  their	  concepts	  in	  particular	  situations	  we	  can	  gain	  insights	  into	  their	  fundamental	  structure	  and	  function	  (Knobe	  and	  Nichols,	  2013).	  In	  the	  case	  of	  animal	  happiness,	  this	  criterion	  resonates	  with	  calls	  for	  closer	  correspondence	  between	  theories	  of	  animal	  welfare	  and	  public	  values	  (Dawkins,	  2008;	  Fraser,	  2008).	  In	  what	  follows	  we	  describe	  the	  first	  attempt	  to	  systematically	  study	  the	  folk	  concept	  of	  animal	  happiness.	  Contrary	  to	  popular	  hedonistic	  conceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  put	  forth	  by	  many	  scientists,	  we	  hypothesized	  that	  judgments	  of	  animal	  happiness	  would	  be	  influenced	  by	  factors	  other	  than	  the	  animal’s	  subjective	  experience.	  Specifically,	  we	  predicted	  that	  normative	  judgments	  about	  the	  life	  the	  animal	  was	  living	  would	  influence	  folk	  attributions	  of	  happiness.	  	  	  	    31 2.2	   Methods	   This	  study	  received	  ethics	  approval	  from	  the	  Behavioural	  Research	  Ethics	  Board	  (H15-­‐03053)	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  	  Participants	  (n=502)	  were	  recruited	  using	  Amazon	  Mechanical	  Turk	  and	  randomly	  assigned	  to	  read	  one	  of	  four	  vignettes	  (See	  Table	  2.2)	  describing	  the	  life	  of	  a	  hypothetical	  chimpanzee.	  	  Following	  the	  general	  principles	  outlined	  in	  the	  Contrastive	  Vignette	  Technique,	  (Burstin	  et	  al.,	  1980),	  scenarios	  were	  designed	  to	  systematically	  manipulate	  the	  descriptive	  mental	  states	  (positive	  affect	  vs.	  negative	  affect)	  the	  chimpanzee	  was	  described	  as	  experiencing,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  normative	  value	  of	  her	  life	  (good	  life	  vs.	  bad	  life)	  thereby,	  creating	  a	  fully-­‐crossed	  2	  (affect)	  x	  2	  (life	  value)	  experimental	  design.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	    32 Table 2.2 Vignettes for each experimental condition  Feels good/good life. Sally is a female chimpanzee living in the jungle.  She lives in a troop with six other chimpanzees and often interacts with them.  She spends most of her days roaming the jungle and foraging for food. She is in good physical health and has many healthy offspring who also live with her. Along with her food, Sally eats Aspilia leaves every day. These leaves serve as a natural stimulant that promotes mental health.  A team of neuropsychologists and primate experts, using state-of-the-art technology, has recently determined that Sally spends almost all of her time feeling excellent.  Feels bad/good life. Sally is a female chimpanzee living in the jungle.  She lives in a troop with six other chimpanzees and often interacts with them.  She spends most of her days roaming the jungle and foraging for food. She is in good physical health and has many healthy offspring who also live with her. Along with her food, Sally eats Aspilia leaves every day. These leaves serve as a natural stimulant that promotes mental health.  Nonetheless, a team of neuropsychologists and primate experts, using state-of-the-art technology, have recently determined that Sally spends almost all of her time feeling terrible.  Feels good/bad life. Sally is a female chimpanzee living in a primate research facility. She lives alone apart from any other chimpanzees and seldom interacts with her caretakers. She spends most of her days in her indoor enclosure, waiting for food to be delivered. She is in poor physical health and has never had any offspring. Along with her food, Sally is given a dose of psychoactive drugs every day. These drugs serve as an artificial stimulant that promotes mental health.  A team of neuropsychologists and primate experts, using state-of-the-art technology, has recently determined that Sally spends almost all of her time feeling excellent.    Feels bad/bad life. Sally is a female chimpanzee living in a primate research facility. She lives alone apart from any other chimpanzees and seldom interacts with her caretakers. She spends most of her days in her indoor enclosure, waiting for food to be delivered. She is in poor physical health and has never had any offspring. Along with her food, Sally is given a dose of psychoactive drugs every day. These drugs serve as an artificial stimulant that promotes mental health.  Nonetheless, a team of neuropsychologists and primate experts, using state-of-the-art technology, have recently determined that Sally spends almost all of her time feeling terrible. 	  Our	  primary	  dependent	  variable	  consisted	  of	  a	  single	  item	  asking	  participants	  to	  indicate	  how	  much	  they	  agreed/disagreed	  with	  the	  following	  statement,	  “Sally	  is	  happy”	  using	  a	  seven-­‐point	  response	  scale	  (1	  =	  Strongly	  disagree	  through	  7	  =	  Strongly	  agree).	  	  Participants	  subsequently	  responded	  to	  several	  other	  items	  about	  other	  commonly	    33 encountered	  prudential	  adjectives	  presented	  in	  random	  order	  (e.g.	  ‘well-­‐being’,	  ‘welfare’,	  ‘quality	  of	  life’).	  After	  indicating	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  they	  thought	  the	  chimpanzee	  was	  happy,	  participants	  responded	  to	  a	  ‘true-­‐false’	  manipulation	  check	  	  (“Sally	  spends	  almost	  all	  of	  her	  time	  feeling	  terrible”)	  followed	  by	  basic	  demographic	  questions.	  To	  preempt	  concerns	  that	  participants	  might	  not	  use	  the	  concept	  of	  ‘happiness’	  when	  referring	  to	  non-­‐humans,	  we	  also	  included	  an	  item	  asking:	  “Do	  you	  think	  it	  makes	  sense	  to	  talk	  about	  a	  chimpanzee	  as	  being	  happy?”	  Response	  options	  consisted	  of	  a	  seven-­‐point	  response	  scale	  anchored	  at	  1	  with	  “Definitely	  not”,	  at	  4	  with	  “Not	  sure”,	  and	  at	  7	  with	  “Definitely	  yes”.	  	  Lastly,	  participants	  were	  thanked	  and	  compensated	  ($0.50).	  Prior	  to	  data	  collection	  it	  was	  decided	  that	  subjects	  would	  be	  excluded	  from	  analysis	  for	  any	  one	  of	  the	  following	  reasons:	  a)	  missing	  responses,	  b)	  indicating	  that	  English	  was	  not	  their	  native	  language,	  c)	  having	  an	  IP	  address	  originating	  outside	  the	  US,	  or	  d)	  failing	  the	  manipulation	  check.	  In	  total,	  responses	  from	  29	  participants	  were	  excluded	  from	  our	  analyses.	  Multiple	  regression	  analyses	  using	  R	  language	  (R	  Core	  Team,	  2015)	  were	  conducted	  for	  each	  concept	  (e.g.	  happy,	  welfare,	  well-­‐being,	  quality	  of	  life,	  etc.)	  using	  subjective	  experience	  (high	  positive	  affect/low	  negative	  affect	  and	  low	  positive	  affect/	  high	  negative	  affect),	  life	  value	  (good	  versus	  bad	  life)	  and	  the	  interaction	  between	  them	  as	  predictors.	  2.3	   Results	   Our	  final	  sample	  consisted	  of	  473	  participants	  (51%	  female,	  Age:	  mean=	  38,	  SD	  =	  12).	  Participants	  appeared	  comfortable	  referring	  to	  chimpanzees	  as	  being	  happy	  (mean	  =	  6.12,	  SD	  =	  1.34).	  	  Main	  effects	  on	  judgments	  of	  happiness	  were	  observed	  for	  both	  subjective	    34 experience	  and	  life	  value.	  Subjects	  in	  the	  feels	  good	  condition	  viewed	  Sally	  as	  happier	  (mean	  =	  5.25,	  SE	  =	  0.12)	  than	  those	  in	  the	  feels	  bad	  condition	  (mean	  =	  1.81,	  SE	  =	  0.07;	  t(471)	  =	  24.31,	  p	  ≤	  .0001).	  Subjects	  in	  the	  good	  life	  condition	  believed	  Sally	  was	  happier	  (mean	  =	  4.35,	  SE	  =0	  .15)	  than	  those	  in	  the	  bad	  life	  condition	  (mean	  =	  2.69,	  SE	  =0.13;	  t(471)	  =	  8.42,	  p	  ≤	  .0001).	  	  	   The	  interaction	  between	  experience	  and	  life	  value	  was	  significant	  for	  all	  concepts	  tested	  (Table	  2.3).	  The	  effect	  of	  subjective	  experience	  on	  judgments	  of	  happiness	  depended	  on	  the	  life	  the	  animal	  was	  described	  as	  living,	  and	  vice	  versa.	  When	  Sally	  was	  described	  as	  feeling	  bad,	  the	  evaluation	  of	  the	  life	  she	  was	  living	  had	  less	  of	  an	  effect	  on	  happiness	  judgments	  then	  when	  she	  was	  described	  as	  feeling	  good.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	    35 Table	  2.3	  Effect	  of	  treatment	  by	  concept	  including	  interaction	  term	  Concept	   β	   SE	   t-­‐value	   P	  HAPPY	   	   	   	   	  Intercept	   1.46	   0.12	   	   	  Feels	  good	  (vs	  Feels	  bad)	   2.54	   0.17	   15.30	   <.0001	  Good	  life	  (vs	  Bad	  life)	   0.72	   0.16	   4.39	   <.0001	  Feels	  good	  x	  Good	  life	   1.64	   0.23	   7.04	   <.0001	  UNHAPPY	   	   	   	   	  Intercept	   6.35	   0.12	   	   	  Feels	  good	  (vs	  Feels	  bad)	   -­‐2.23	   0.18	   -­‐12.56	   <.0001	  Good	  life	  (vs	  Bad	  life)	   -­‐0.68	   0.18	   -­‐3.84	   <.0001	  Feels	  good	  x	  Good	  life	   -­‐1.72	   0.25	   -­‐6.90	   <.0001	  WELFARE	   	   	   	   	  Intercept	   2.11	   0.13	   	   	  Feels	  good	  (vs	  Feels	  bad)	   0.92	   0.18	   5.00	   <.0001	  Good	  life	  (vs	  Bad	  life)	   1.83	   0.18	   10.06	   <.0001	  Feels	  good	  x	  Good	  life	   1.57	   0.26	   6.08	   <.0001	  WELL-­‐BEING	   	   	   	   	  Intercept	   1.83	   0.12	   	   	  Feels	  good	  (vs	  Feels	  bad)	   1.56	   0.18	   8.88	   <.0001	  Good	  life	  (vs	  Bad	  life)	   1.75	   0.17	   10.07	   <.0001	  Feels	  good	  x	  Good	  life	   1.43	   0.25	   5.81	   <.0001	  QUALITY	  OF	  LIFE	   	   	   	   	  Intercept	   1.88	   0.12	   	   	  Feels	  good	  (vs	  Feels	  bad)	   0.99	   0.18	   5.54	   <.0001	  Good	  life	  (vs	  Bad	  life)	   2.13	   0.18	   11.98	   <.0001	  Feels	  good	  x	  Good	  life	   1.44	   0.25	   5.74	   <.0001	  GOOD	  LIFE	   	   	   	   	  Intercept	   1.88	   0.12	   	   	  Feels	  good	  (vs	  Feels	  bad)	   1.11	   0.17	   6.68	   <.0001	  Good	  life	  (vs	  Bad	  life)	   2.24	   0.16	   13.61	   <.0001	  Feels	  good	  x	  Good	  life	   1.20	   0.23	   5.15	   <.0001	  	  	  	   	    36 2.4	   Discussion	   Our	  results	  replicate	  and	  extend	  previous	  research	  showing	  that	  the	  concept	  of	  human	  happiness	  is	  not	  restricted	  to	  describing	  mental	  states.	  One	  cross-­‐cultural	  study	  of	  historical	  trends	  of	  language	  use	  found	  that	  happiness	  has	  most	  commonly	  been	  equated	  with	  favorable	  external	  conditions	  and	  not	  internal	  feelings	  (Oishi	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  An	  extensive	  series	  of	  experimental	  studies	  by	  Phillips	  et	  al.	  (2011;	  2014)	  showed	  that	  judgments	  of	  human	  happiness	  were	  heavily	  influenced	  by	  normative	  evaluations	  about	  the	  life	  the	  person	  was	  described	  as	  living.	  	  Our	  results	  therefore	  support	  the	  conjecture	  that	  the	  concept	  of	  happiness	  functions	  similarly	  when	  applied	  to	  some	  non-­‐human	  animals	  (Sumner,	  1996;	  Foot,	  2003;	  Kraut,	  2009).	  	  This	  suggests	  that	  further	  conceptual	  insights	  into	  animal	  welfare	  might	  be	  found	  by	  attending	  more	  closely	  to	  the	  much	  more	  developed	  philosophical	  and	  scientific	  literatures	  on	  human	  welfare	  (Degrazia,	  1996;	  Nordenfelt,	  2011).	  	  Although	  we	  showed	  that	  the	  concept	  of	  happiness	  can	  function	  similarly	  in	  the	  case	  of	  some	  non-­‐humans,	  it	  seems	  likely	  that	  this	  effect	  may	  vary	  from	  species	  to	  species	  depending	  on	  their	  moral	  status.	  	  While	  it	  is	  generally	  the	  case	  that	  moral	  concern	  for	  animals	  is	  growing,	  the	  strength	  of	  these	  concerns	  varies	  widely	  by	  species	  (George	  et	  al.,	  2016).	  Some	  studies	  have	  shown	  such	  concerns	  increase	  proportionally	  with	  perceived	  biological	  and	  behavior	  similarity	  with	  humans	  (Batt,	  2009).	  	  Other	  work	  paints	  a	  more	  complex	  picture	  whereby	  factors	  such	  as	  emotional	  attachment	  to	  individual	  animals	  as	  well	  as	  historical	  and	  cultural	  influences	  mediate	  this	  relationship	  (Amiot	  and	  Bastian,	  2017).	  Including	  covariates	  that	  take	  into	  account	  variations	  in	  moral	  attitudes	  would	  provide	  a	  more	  nuanced	  picture	  of	  the	  role	  they	  play	  in	  shaping	  and	  influence	  judgments	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  	    37 Interestingly,	  the	  interaction	  effect	  we	  observed	  indicated	  that	  the	  influence	  of	  these	  evaluative	  considerations	  was	  less	  pronounced	  when	  the	  chimpanzee	  was	  described	  as	  feeling	  bad	  as	  opposed	  to	  when	  she	  was	  described	  as	  feeling	  good.	  This	  was	  also	  the	  case	  with	  respect	  to	  judgments	  of	  unhappiness,	  which	  were	  less	  influenced	  by	  evaluative	  considerations.	  This	  is	  consistent	  with	  previous	  findings	  by	  Phillips	  (2014;	  experiment	  4)	  who	  reported	  that	  unlike	  happiness,	  when	  deciding	  whether	  or	  not	  someone	  was	  unhappy,	  people	  did	  in	  fact	  seem	  to	  be	  representing	  the	  target’s	  mental	  states.	  This	  asymmetry	  between	  the	  seemingly	  polar	  opposite	  concepts	  of	  happiness	  and	  unhappiness	  may	  have	  important	  implications	  for	  animal	  welfare	  science.	  As	  the	  field	  shifts	  its	  focus	  from	  the	  prevention	  of	  negative	  welfare	  to	  the	  promotion	  of	  positive	  welfare	  (Tannenbaum,	  2002;	  Yeates	  and	  Main,	  2008)	  the	  role	  of	  evaluative	  judgments	  may	  become	  relatively	  more	  prominent.	  	  Our	  methodological	  approach	  offers	  several	  advantages	  over	  previous	  research	  examining	  how	  different	  groups	  conceptualize	  animal	  welfare.	  Unlike	  these	  earlier	  studies,	  which	  have	  been	  largely	  exploratory	  in	  nature	  (Te	  Velde	  and	  Van	  Woerkum,	  2002;	  Lassen	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Skarstad	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Spooner	  et	  al.,	  2014a),	  our	  experimental	  design	  allowed	  us	  to	  systematically	  manipulate	  key	  variables	  and	  test	  a	  specific	  hypothesis.	  Moreover,	  instead	  of	  simply	  asking	  people	  to	  define	  animal	  happiness,	  we	  inferred	  their	  concept	  of	  happiness	  based	  on	  concept	  usage.	  This	  indirect	  approach	  to	  studying	  concepts	  respects	  the	  fact	  that	  people	  can	  possess	  a	  concept	  while	  being	  mistaken,	  and/or	  unable	  to	  express	  information	  about	  its	  properties	  (Laurence	  and	  Margolis,	  1999).	  	  	  Unfortunately,	  we	  cannot	  comment	  on	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  animal	  welfare	  scientists	  adhere	  to	  welfare	  hedonism.	  	  Our	  assumption	  of	  its	  popularity	  was	  based	  on	  the	  written	  statements	  of	  animal	  welfare	  scientists	  (Bracke,	  2001;	  Duncan,	  2004;	  Mellor,	  2016)	  and	    38 our	  own	  personal	  experiences	  working	  in	  the	  field.	  The	  only	  research	  involving	  animal	  welfare	  experts	  that	  we	  are	  aware	  of	  reported	  finding	  that	  animal	  welfare	  experts	  equated	  welfare	  with	  subjective	  feelings	  while	  lay	  participants	  held	  a	  more	  complex	  view	  (Lassen,	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  We	  encourage	  future	  research	  that	  more	  closely	  examines	  the	  views	  of	  welfare	  scientists	  and	  how	  they	  compare	  with	  ordinary	  people.	  	  	  The	  current	  research	  is	  consistent	  with	  the	  classification	  of	  happiness	  and	  its	  cognates	  as	  ‘thick	  concepts’.	  Thick	  concepts	  have	  the	  dual	  function	  of	  simultaneously	  describing	  and	  evaluating	  (Tiberius,	  2013).	  When	  people	  are	  deciding	  whether	  or	  not	  an	  animal	  is	  happy	  they	  are	  not	  to	  simply	  trying	  to	  determine	  whether	  some	  factual	  state	  of	  affairs	  obtains	  or	  not	  (i.e.	  was	  the	  animal	  experiencing	  positive	  affect?),	  they	  are	  making	  an	  evaluation	  about	  the	  life	  the	  animal	  is	  living.	  	  The	  idea	  that	  life	  evaluation	  is	  an	  important	  aspect	  of	  welfare	  has	  been	  noted	  elsewhere	  but	  never	  before	  considered	  with	  respect	  to	  animals	  (Kagan,	  1994;	  Mulnix	  and	  Mulnix,	  2015).	  	  Our	  life	  evaluation	  manipulation	  emphasized	  two	  previously	  suggested	  non-­‐subjective	  aspects	  of	  welfare	  -­‐	  physical	  health	  and	  natural	  living.	  The	  bad	  life	  condition	  consisted	  of	  having	  poor	  physical	  health	  and	  living	  in	  an	  animal	  research	  facility	  whereas	  the	  good	  life	  condition	  consisted	  of	  having	  excellent	  physical	  health	  and	  living	  in	  the	  wild.	  Objective	  list	  theories	  of	  welfare	  often	  include	  but	  are	  not	  limited	  to,	  these	  specific	  features.	  Some	  theorists	  include	  other	  non-­‐subjective	  factors	  besides	  these	  as	  constituents	  of	  animal	  flourishing	  (Nussbaum,	  2006).	  Our	  goal	  here	  was	  not	  to	  arbitrate	  among	  specific	  list	  items,	  but	  rather	  to	  test	  the	  specific	  claim	  that	  subjective	  experience	  is	  the	  only	  item	  on	  that	  list.	  Viewing	  animal	  welfare	  as	  a	  thick	  concept	  may	  help	  explain	  some	  of	  the	  skepticism	  expressed	  towards	  animal	  welfare	  research,	  especially	  by	  those	  with	  more	  deontological	  inclinations	  (Haynes,	  2012).	  If	  one	  is	  of	  the	  opinion	  that	  some	  forms	  of	  animal	  use	  are	    39 morally	  illegitimate,	  perhaps	  because	  animals	  are	  being	  used	  as	  mere	  means,	  then	  the	  very	  notion	  that	  animals	  can	  be	  happy	  in	  such	  conditions	  may	  seem	  incoherent.	  This	  might	  also	  explain	  the	  controversy	  surrounding	  the	  relationship	  between	  death	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  Animal	  welfare	  scientists	  have	  often	  dismissed	  the	  notion	  that	  death	  is	  welfare	  relevant	  (Webster,	  1994).	  However,	  if	  the	  concept	  of	  welfare	  contains	  an	  evaluative	  dimension	  focused	  not	  simply	  on	  the	  animal	  itself	  but	  the	  broader	  circumstances	  and	  conditions	  in	  which	  the	  animal	  exists,	  then	  judgments	  about	  the	  moral	  acceptability	  of	  killing	  animals	  may	  in	  fact	  influence	  the	  animal’s	  welfare	  (Tannenbaum,	  2002).	  The	  thick	  conception	  of	  welfare	  makes	  the	  prediction	  that	  moral	  views	  about	  the	  legitimacy	  of	  different	  forms	  of	  animal	  use	  influence	  the	  determination	  of	  whether	  an	  animal	  is	  flourishing	  or	  not.	  This	  thick	  concept	  status	  is	  not	  compatible	  with	  the	  pure	  science	  model	  of	  animal	  welfare,	  which	  posits	  that	  welfare	  can	  be	  scientifically	  studied	  without	  invoking	  any	  value	  judgments	  (Broom,	  1991).	  In	  principle,	  such	  a	  position	  might	  be	  tenable	  if	  the	  concept	  under	  investigation	  were	  purely	  descriptive,	  but	  as	  we	  have	  seen	  this	  does	  not	  appear	  to	  be	  the	  case.	  Our	  results	  support	  Tannenbaum’s	  (1991)	  contention	  that,	  “it	  is	  impossible	  to	  use	  the	  term	  welfare	  as	  it	  is	  ordinarily	  employed	  by	  people	  without	  committing	  oneself	  to	  certain	  ethical	  judgments.”	  What	  exactly	  this	  all	  means	  for	  the	  field	  of	  animal	  welfare	  science	  is	  not	  immediately	  clear.	  Discussions	  along	  these	  lines	  are	  beginning	  to	  occur	  in	  the	  context	  of	  the	  science	  of	  human	  happiness	  and	  may	  provide	  a	  useful	  model	  moving	  forward	  (Alexandrova,	  2015).	  2.5	   Conclusion	   Previously	  it	  has	  been	  suggested	  that	  the	  study	  of	  animal	  welfare	  and	  ethics	  will	  benefit	  from	  experimental	  philosophy	  research	  (Persson	  and	  Shaw,	  2015).	  Here	  we	  have	    40 described	  the	  first	  attempt	  to	  systematically	  examine	  the	  folk	  concept	  of	  animal	  happiness.	  We	  found	  folk	  judgments	  of	  animal	  happiness	  were	  not	  consistent	  with	  the	  predictions	  of	  welfare	  hedonism	  which	  asserts	  that	  happiness	  is	  a	  solely	  a	  matter	  of	  possessing	  the	  right	  psychological	  states.	  It	  appears	  that	  it	  is	  possible	  to	  distinguish	  between	  how	  one’s	  life	  goes	  from	  the	  inside	  based	  on	  how	  they	  feel,	  and	  how	  their	  life	  is	  evaluated	  as	  going	  from	  the	  outside.	  	       	    41 Chapter	  3:	  Farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare	  3.1	   Introduction	  Historically,	  livestock	  production	  has	  been	  predominantly	  small	  scale	  and	  extensive,	  and	  it	  still	  remains	  this	  way	  throughout	  much	  of	  the	  world.	  However,	  in	  the	  last	  century	  many	  countries	  have	  intensified	  their	  livestock	  production.	  Agricultural	  intensification	  is	  characterized	  by	  many	  changes	  (Thompson,	  2008):	  increased	  automation	  and	  specialization,	  changes	  in	  the	  nature	  and	  quantity	  of	  inputs	  (e.g.,	  non-­‐renewable	  vs.	  renewable,	  off	  farm	  vs.	  on	  farm,	  and	  high	  input	  vs.	  low	  input),	  confinement	  of	  livestock	  in	  more	  controlled	  and	  restrictive	  environments,	  consolidation	  of	  ownership,	  substitution	  of	  capital	  for	  labor,	  vertical	  integration	  and	  supply	  contracts,	  increased	  reliance	  on	  nonfamily	  labor,	  and—the	  focus	  of	  this	  paper—increased	  farm	  size.	  Many	  members	  of	  the	  public	  believe	  that	  animals	  raised	  on	  larger	  farms	  have	  poorer	  welfare	  than	  those	  reared	  on	  smaller	  farms	  (Lassen	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Krystallis	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Tonsor	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  A	  representative	  sample	  of	  U.S.	  citizens	  found	  that	  most	  (57%)	  agreed	  or	  strongly	  agreed	  with	  the	  statement,	  “farm	  animals	  raised	  on	  small	  farms	  have	  a	  better	  life	  than	  those	  raised	  on	  large	  farms”	  (Lusk	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Farmers,	  however,	  seem	  to	  view	  farm	  size	  as	  much	  less	  related	  to	  animal	  welfare	  (Vanhonacker	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Judging	  the	  accuracy	  of	  these	  perceptions	  is	  difficult	  because	  size	  is	  a	  complex	  variable.	  The	  categorization	  of	  farms	  as	  “small”	  or	  “large”	  depends	  greatly	  on	  context.	  What	  is	  considered	  a	  large	  dairy	  farm	  in	  Norway,	  where	  mean	  herd	  size	  is	  26	  cows	  (Statistics	  Norway,	  2015),	  is	  likely	  different	  than	  in	  New	  Mexico,	  where	  mean	  herd	  size	  exceeds	  2,000	  cows	  (USDA-­‐NASS,	  2015).	  Size	  categorizations	  also	  depend	  on	  the	  species	  of	  livestock.	    42 Although	  a	  dairy	  farm	  with	  5,000	  cows	  is	  likely	  to	  be	  considered	  large	  by	  almost	  any	  standard,	  a	  poultry	  farm	  with	  the	  same	  number	  of	  birds	  would	  be	  too	  small	  to	  be	  commercially	  viable	  in	  many	  countries.	  The	  aim	  of	  this	  paper	  is	  to	  review	  and	  critically	  assess	  the	  literature	  relevant	  to	  the	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  the	  welfare	  of	  farm	  animals.	  Given	  that	  we	  are	  most	  familiar	  with	  the	  work	  on	  dairy	  cattle,	  we	  have	  focused	  on	  those	  animals,	  but	  where	  applicable,	  we	  also	  cite	  literature	  on	  other	  farmed	  animals.	  To	  provide	  context,	  we	  begin	  with	  a	  brief	  review	  of	  recent	  changes	  in	  farm	  size.	  Increases	  in	  average	  farm	  size	  have	  occurred	  as	  a	  result	  of	  many	  operators	  exiting	  the	  industry,	  with	  those	  that	  remain	  increasing	  in	  size.	  For	  example,	  between	  1970	  and	  2006	  the	  number	  of	  both	  U.S.	  and	  Canadian	  dairy	  farms	  decreased	  by	  approximately	  88%	  (Singbo	  and	  Larue,	  2014).	  Despite	  the	  precipitous	  decline	  in	  the	  number	  of	  livestock	  farms,	  global	  demand	  for	  animal	  products	  continues	  to	  increase,	  especially	  in	  developing	  and	  emerging	  economies	  (Thornton,	  2010).	  To	  meet	  this	  growing	  demand,	  remaining	  farms	  have	  increased	  the	  size	  of	  their	  operations	  considerably.	  This	  increase	  is	  apparent	  for	  virtually	  all	  commonly	  farmed	  species	  but	  is	  most	  pronounced	  in	  species	  and	  stages	  of	  production	  that	  rely	  heavily	  on	  concentrate	  feeding	  (Fraser,	  2008).	  In	  Canada,	  the	  average	  number	  of	  pigs	  per	  farm	  increased	  32%	  between	  2006	  and	  2011	  (Statistics	  Canada,	  2015).	  In	  China,	  the	  number	  of	  swine	  farms	  with	  more	  than	  1,000	  head	  increased	  by	  55%	  between	  2007	  and	  2009	  (USDA-­‐FAS,	  2011),	  and	  the	  number	  of	  dairy	  farms	  with	  500	  to	  999	  cows	  has	  increased	  by	  72%	  from	  2008	  to	  2009	  (Sharma	  and	  Zhang,	  2014).	  Between	  1974	  and	  2013,	  mean	  dairy	  herd	  size	  in	  New	  Zealand	    43 increased	  by	  258%	  from	  112	  to	  402	  cows	  (Dairy	  New	  Zealand,	  2014).	  Similarly,	  the	  average	  size	  of	  Australian	  dairy	  herds	  increased	  by	  230%,	  from	  86	  in	  1979	  to	  284	  in	  2014	  (Dairy	  Australia,	  2015).	  Between	  1995	  and	  2008	  the	  average	  size	  of	  dairy	  and	  poultry	  farms	  in	  the	  Netherlands	  doubled,	  and	  the	  average	  size	  of	  pig	  farms	  tripled	  (De	  Bakker	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  These	  figures	  likely	  understate	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  farm	  size	  has	  increased	  since	  they	  come	  from	  skewed	  distributions	  containing	  many	  very	  small	  farms,	  whereas	  production	  is	  disproportionally	  concentrated	  on	  larger	  farms.	  For	  instance,	  MacDonald	  et	  al.	  (2016)	  compared	  mean	  changes	  in	  U.S.	  dairy	  farm	  size	  between	  1987	  and	  2012	  with	  weighted	  median	  herd	  size,	  the	  point	  at	  which	  half	  of	  all	  cows,	  as	  opposed	  to	  farms,	  are	  in	  larger	  herds	  and	  half	  are	  in	  smaller	  herds.	  They	  found	  that	  the	  mean	  herd	  size	  grew	  from	  50	  to	  144	  cows	  (+188%)	  during	  this	  period,	  but	  the	  weighted	  median	  herd	  size	  increased	  from	  80	  to	  900	  (+1,025%;	  Fig.	  1).	    44  Figure	  3.1	  Comparison	  of	  mean	  and	  midpoint	  herd	  size	  changes	  for	  U.S.	  dairy	  farms	  (1987-­‐2012).	  Redrawn	  from	  MacDonald	  et	  al.	  (2016).	  	  Multiple	  factors	  contribute	  to	  these	  increases	  in	  farm	  size.	  Those	  most	  often	  cited	  include	  economies	  of	  scale,	  learning	  curve	  effects,	  technological	  advancements,	  increased	  labor	  mobility,	  and	  an	  increasing	  urban-­‐rural	  income	  gap,	  as	  well	  as	  increasingly	  competitive	  markets.	  Economies	  of	  scale	  refer	  to	  the	  ability	  to	  spread	  fixed	  costs	  over	  a	  larger	  number	  of	  animals,	  thereby	  reducing	  production	  costs	  per	  unit	  of	  output.	  Economies	  of	  scale	  also	  permit	  farmers	  to	  reduce	  variable	  costs	  by	  taking	  advantage	  of	  volume	  discounts	  via	  bulk	  purchasing	  (Duffy,	  2009).	  Learning	  curve	  effects	  describe	  the	  tendency	  for	  productivity	  per	  unit	  time	  to	  increase	  with	  experience	  (Gehani,	  1998).	  Such	  effects	  are	  accentuated	  by	  a	  50	   61	   78	   99	   133	   144	  80	  101	   140	  275	  570	  900	  0	  100	  200	  300	  400	  500	  600	  700	  800	  900	  1000	  1987	   1992	   1997	   2002	   2007	   2012	  Mean	  herd	  size	  Midpoint	  herd	  size	    45 growing	  scientific	  understanding	  of	  the	  processes	  underlying	  livestock	  production.	  Technological	  innovations	  like	  climate-­‐controlled	  housing,	  veterinary	  pharmaceuticals,	  and	  individual	  animal	  monitoring	  systems	  make	  it	  more	  feasible	  to	  raise	  large	  numbers	  of	  animals	  with	  less	  labor	  (Fernandez-­‐Cornejo	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Russell	  and	  Bewley,	  2013).	  Moving	  beyond	  the	  farm,	  a	  variety	  of	  studies	  have	  found	  that	  the	  availability	  of	  higher-­‐paying	  urban	  employment	  opportunities	  encourage	  people	  to	  leave	  the	  sector	  (Todaro,	  1969;	  Fields,	  1975;	  Mazumdar,	  1976;	  Seeborg	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Zhang	  and	  Song,	  2003).	  Last,	  increasingly	  competitive	  agricultural	  markets	  have	  reduced	  profit	  margins,	  which	  in	  turn	  have	  strengthened	  incentives	  to	  reduce	  per-­‐unit	  production	  costs	  and	  have	  required	  operators	  to	  increase	  herd	  or	  flock	  size	  to	  maintain	  incomes	  (Reardon	  and	  Barrett,	  2000;	  Fraser,	  2008).	  Many	  critics	  contend	  that	  increased	  farm	  size	  has	  been	  injurious	  to	  the	  environment,	  food	  safety,	  food	  quality,	  human	  health,	  rural	  communities,	  and	  animal	  welfare	  (Harrison,	  1964;	  Berry,	  1977;	  Schlosser,	  2001;	  Pollan,	  2006;	  Foer,	  2010,	  Kirby,	  2010).	  This	  has	  led	  to	  popular	  support	  for	  legislative	  and	  regulatory	  restrictions	  on	  farming	  practices	  such	  as	  confinement	  livestock	  housing	  (Centner,	  2010)	  and	  increased	  demand	  for	  agricultural	  products	  produced	  using	  alternative	  methods	  such	  as	  organic	  (Sahota,	  2009).	  Survey	  data	  suggest	  that	  U.S.	  consumers	  believe	  larger	  farms	  are	  “less	  likely	  to	  share	  their	  values”	  and	  are	  “more	  likely	  to	  place	  profit	  ahead	  of	  public	  interest”	  (Center	  for	  Food	  Integrity,	  2013).	  Strong	  opposition	  to	  larger	  farms	  has	  been	  found	  not	  only	  in	  the	  United	  States	  (Darby	  et	  al.,	  2008)	  but	  also	  in	  Belgium,	  Denmark,	  Germany,	  Greece,	  and	  Poland	  (Verbeke	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Sørensen	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Some	  countries,	  such	  as	  the	  Netherlands,	  have	    46 even	  considered	  legislation	  that	  would	  place	  caps	  on	  the	  size	  of	  farms	  (Government	  of	  the	  Netherlands,	  2013).	   3.2	   Methods	  We	  reviewed	  published,	  peer-­‐reviewed	  studies	  that	  reported	  differences	  in	  farm	  size	  and	  some	  aspect	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  To	  minimize	  subjective	  distinctions	  regarding	  absolute	  size,	  we	  simply	  compared	  “larger”	  and	  “smaller”	  farms	  within	  each	  study	  on	  the	  basis	  of	  herd	  or	  flock	  size.	  Studies	  that	  relied	  on	  non-­‐animal-­‐based	  measures	  of	  farm	  size	  (e.g.,	  land	  base,	  income,	  employees,	  etc.)	  were	  not	  included.	  Studies	  were	  excluded	  if	  they	  involved	  very	  small	  group	  sizes	  (2	  to	  12	  animals)	  created	  for	  experimental	  purposes	  and	  not	  reflective	  of	  commercial	  farms	  in	  that	  region.	  We	  also	  did	  not	  include	  studies	  that	  considered	  species	  other	  than	  cattle,	  chickens,	  turkeys,	  sheep,	  goats,	  and	  pigs.	  During	  our	  literature	  search	  we	  used	  specific	  key	  words,	  and	  combinations	  of	  keywords,	  including	  “farm	  size,”	  “herd	  size,”	  “flock	  size,”	  “group	  size,”	  “risk	  factor(s),”	  “large	  farm(s),”	  “small	  farm(s),”	  “large	  herd(s),”	  “small	  herd(s),”	  “large	  flock(s),”	  “small	  flock(s),”	  “management	  practices,”	  “animal	  welfare,”	  “animal	  well-­‐being,”	  and	  “animal	  health.”	  To	  increase	  our	  coverage,	  we	  systematically	  repeated	  this	  search	  using	  Web	  of	  Science	  and	  Google	  Scholar	  search	  engines,	  as	  well	  as	  directly	  searching	  journals	  that	  specialize	  in	  applied	  animal	  science	  research,	  including	  Acta	  Veterinaria	  Scandinavica,	  Animal	  Science,	  Animal	  Welfare,	  Anthrozoos,	  Applied	  Animal	  Behaviour	  Science,	  Applied	  Animal	  Welfare	  Science,	  Dairy	  Science,	  Livestock	  Science,	  Preventative	  Veterinary	  Medicine,	  Preventative	  Veterinary	  Medicine,	  and	  Veterinary	  Record.	  We	  then	  searched	  forward	  and	  backward	  in	  time	  by	  examining	  the	  papers	  cited	  in	  the	  studies	  we	  identified	  and	  any	  paper	  that	  cited	    47 these	  papers.	  Governmental	  reports	  containing	  information	  of	  management	  practices,	  such	  as	  the	  USDA	  National	  Animal	  Health	  Monitoring	  System	  (NAHMS),	  were	  also	  reviewed.	  In	  line	  with	  a	  widely	  cited	  interpretation	  of	  animal	  welfare	  (Fraser	  et	  al.,	  1997),	  we	  construed	  indicators	  of	  welfare	  broadly	  as	  any	  measure	  related	  to	  the	  animal’s	  biological	  functioning	  (health	  and	  mortality),	  affective	  state	  (including	  painful	  procedures	  and	  positive	  interactions	  with	  people),	  and	  the	  ability	  of	  the	  animal	  to	  live	  a	  reasonably	  natural	  life.	  Evidence	  regarding	  the	  amount	  or	  quality	  of	  care	  provided	  by	  farm	  workers	  to	  the	  animals	  was	  also	  reviewed.	  The	  effects	  of	  this	  “care”	  on	  the	  animal’s	  welfare	  may	  be	  uncertain,	  but	  considerations	  of	  the	  care	  provided	  to	  animals	  can	  be	  an	  important	  component	  in	  citizen	  appraisals	  of	  livestock	  welfare	  (Ventura	  et	  al.,	  2015).	  Below	  we	  describe	  the	  results	  of	  our	  review,	  describing	  how	  different	  animal	  welfare	  factors	  are	  associated	  with	  farm	  size.	  We	  then	  discuss	  the	  various	  relationships,	  including	  how	  farm	  size	  may	  be	  associated	  with	  different	  measures	  of	  welfare.	  3.3	   Results	   Health	   Various	  studies	  have	  recorded	  between-­‐herd	  disease	  prevalence	  (the	  percentage	  of	  farms	  where	  at	  least	  1	  animal	  is	  diagnosed	  with	  the	  condition	  in	  a	  given	  herd)	  and	  within-­‐herd	  prevalence	  (the	  proportion	  of	  animals	  diagnosed	  with	  the	  condition	  in	  question).	  Between-­‐herd	  prevalence	  typically	  increases	  with	  herd	  size	  for	  obvious	  reasons:	  the	  more	  animals	  you	  assess,	  the	  greater	  the	  probability	  is	  that	  at	  least	  1	  of	  them	  will	  test	  positive.	  For	  example,	  dairy	  farms	  with	  more	  than	  100	  milking	  cows	  were	  more	  likely	  to	  have	  calves	  that	  tested	  positive	  for	  cryptosporidium	  (Garber	  et	  al.,	  1994).	  Indeed,	  a	  large,	  stratified	    48 random	  sample	  representing	  21	  states	  and	  approximately	  86%	  of	  U.S.	  dairy	  cattle	  showed	  that	  between-­‐herd	  disease	  prevalence	  for	  several	  common	  diseases	  affecting	  dairy	  cattle	  tended	  to	  increase	  with	  herd	  size,	  even	  though	  the	  proportion	  of	  affected	  cows	  within	  a	  herd	  decreased	  (Hill	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  From	  the	  perspective	  of	  animal	  welfare,	  within-­‐herd	  prevalence	  is	  the	  more	  relevant	  measure	  and	  is	  the	  focus	  of	  the	  studies	  reviewed	  below.	  Many	  studies	  have	  examined	  the	  relationship	  between	  health	  outcomes	  and	  herd	  size,	  with	  some	  studies	  showing	  a	  positive	  relationship	  between	  herd	  size	  and	  health	  outcomes,	  others	  finding	  a	  negative	  relationship,	  and	  yet	  others	  reporting	  no	  relationship	  (Table	  3.1).	  These	  measures	  are	  discussed	  by	  order	  of	  the	  number	  of	  studies	  available.	  Table	  3.1	  	  Empirical	  research	  on	  dairy	  cattle	  examining	  a)	  health	  and	  b)	  mortality	  indicators	  in	  relation	  to	  herd	  size.	  Indicators	  are	  listed	  in	  order	  of	  the	  number	  of	  studies	  available,	  and	  then	  listed	  alphabetically	  within	  each	  measure.	  The	  methods	  used	  to	  collect	  data	  on	  the	  indicator	  (e.g.	  self-­‐reports	  by	  the	  farmer,	  scored	  by	  the	  researcher,	  etc.),	  association	  with	  herd	  size	  (positive,	  not	  significant,	  and	  negative),	  number	  of	  farms	  used	  to	  derive	  the	  relationship	  (separately	  by	  region	  and	  year	  if	  appropriate),	  the	  country	  where	  the	  study	  was	  performed	  and	  the	  citation	  are	  provided.	  Missing	  values	  indicate	  the	  variable	  was	  not	  reported.	  Indicator	   Detection	  Method	  Assoc.	  w/	  herd	  size	  #	  of	  farms	   Country	   Reference	  	   	   	   	   	   	  A)	  Health	  	  	   	   	   	   	  Lameness	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   165	  	   Denmark	   Alban,	  1995	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   205	  	   Britain	   Barker	  et	  al.,	  2010	  	   Scored	   Pos.	   194	  	   Netherlands	   de	  Vries	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   	   Ireland	   Arkins,	  1981	  	   Scored	   Neg.	   40	  &	  39	  	   U.S.	   Chapinal	  et	  al.,	  2013	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   50	  	   U.S.	   Espejo	  &	  Endres,	  2007	  	   Scored	   Neg.	   34	  	   China	   Chapinal	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Self	  report,	  Scored	   Neg.	   222	  	   U.K.	   Leach	  et	  al.,	  2010a	  	   Self	  report	   N.S.	   45	  	   U.S.	   Groehn	  et	  al.,	  1992	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   486,	  341	  &	  248	   Britain	   Whitaker	  et	  al.,	  2004	  	   Self	  report	   Neg.	   91	   Britain	   Whitaker	  et	  al.,	  2004	    49 Indicator	   Detection	  Method	  Assoc.	  w/	  herd	  size	  #	  of	  farms	   Country	   Reference	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   73	  	   Australia	   Harris	  et	  al.,	  1988	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   80	  	   France	   Faye	  &	  Lescourret,	  1989	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   19	  	   Norway	   Amory	  et	  al.,	  2006	  	   Scored	  by	  hoof	  trimmer	   N.S.	   703	   Finland	   Kujala	  et	  al.,	  2009	  	   Scored	   Neg.	   141	  	   Canada	   Solano	  et	  al.,	  2015	  	   Scored	   Pos.	   103	  	   Austria	  	   Dippel	  et	  al.,	  2009	  	   Vet.	  report	   Neg.	   1822	   Britain	   Rowlands	  et	  al.,	  1983	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   59	  	   N.Z.	   Fabian	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Scored	   Pos.	   34	  	   Turkey	   Yaylak	  et	  al.,	  2010	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   152	  	   Switzerland	   Busato	  et	  al.,	  2000	  	   Scored	   Pos.	   40	   Greece	   Katsoulos	  &	  Christodoulopoulos,	  2009	  	   Scored	  by	  hoof	  trimmer	   N.S.	   57	   Norway	   Sogstad	  et	  al.,	  2005	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Hock	  lesions	  	   	   	   	   	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   80	  	   U.K.	   Rutherford	  et	  al.,	  2008	  	   Scored	   Pos.	   63	  	   U.K.	   Potterton	  et	  al.,	  2011	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   38	  &	  38	   U.S.	   Barrientos	  et	  al.,	  2013	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   152	  	   Switzerland	   Busato	  et	  al.,	  2000	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   34	  	   China	   Chapinal	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   232	   Norway	   Kielland	  et	  al.,	  2009	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Claw	  lesions	  	   	   	   	   	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   112	  	   Norway	   Sogstad	  et	  al.,	  2005	  	   Scored	  by	  researcher	   N.S.	   117	   Netherlands	   Frankena	  et	  al.,	  1992	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Digital	  dermatitis	  	   	   	   	   	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   	   U.S.	   Wells	  et	  al.,	  1999	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   383	  	   Norway	   Holzhauer	  et	  al.,	  2006	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   37	   Netherlands	   Somers	  et	  al.,	  2005a	  	   Scored	   N.S.	   46	   Netherlands	   Somers	  et	  al.,	  2005b	  	   Scored	  by	  researcher	   N.S.	   22	   Chile	   Rodriguez-­‐Lainz	  et	  al.	  1999	  	   Scored	  by	  researcher	   Pos.	   123	   Netherlands	   Frankena	  et	  al.,	  1993	  Mastitis	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Records	   Pos.	   7551	  &	  2128	   U.K.	   Archer	  et	  al.,	  2013	  	   Records	   Pos.	   274	  	   Norway	   Barkema	  et	  al.,	  1998	  	   Records	   Neg.	   	   Norway	   Waage	  et	  al.,	  1998b	  	   Records	   Neg.	   11719	  	   U.S.	   Oleggini	  et	  al.,	  2001	  	   Records	   Neg.	   23431	  	   Norway	   Sviland	  &	  Waage,	  2002	  	   Records	   Neg.	   3450	  	   U.S.	   Allore	  et	  al.,	  1997	  	   Records	   N.S.	   340	   England	   Whitaker	  et	  al.,	  2000	  	   Records	   N.S.	   91	   Britain	   Whitaker	  et	  al.,	  2004	  	   Records,	  Self	   Neg.	   273	  	   Britain	   Wilesmith	  et	  al.,	  1986	    50 Indicator	   Detection	  Method	  Assoc.	  w/	  herd	  size	  #	  of	  farms	   Country	   Reference	  report	  	   Researcher	  tested	   N.S.	   92	  	   Australia	   Hoare	  &	  Roberts,	  1972	  	   Records	   N.S.	   144	  	   England	   Kossaibati	  et	  al.,	  1998	  	   Samples	   Neg.	   501	  	   Britain	   Wilson	  &	  Richards,	  1980	  	   Producer/Vet.	  diagnosed	   Pos.	   50	  	   U.S.	   Bartlett	  et	  al.,	  1992	  	   Records	   Neg.	   812	   Norway	   Simensen	  et	  al.,	  2010	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Salmonella	  spp.	  	   	   	   	   	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   105	  	   U.S.	   Huston	  et	  al.,	  2002	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   110	  	   U.S.	   Fossler	  et	  al.,	  2005	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   126	  	   Netherlands	   Vaessen	  et	  al.,	  1998	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   91	  	   U.S.	   Kabagambe	  et	  al.,	  2000	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   46	  	   U.S.	   Warnick	  et	  al.,	  2001	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   831	  	   U.S.	   Cummings	  et	  al.,	  2009	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   91	  	   U.S.	   Wells	  et	  al.,	  2001	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   449	  	   U.K.	   Davison	  et	  al.,	  2006	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   12	  	   U.S.	   Warnick,	  et	  al.,	  2003	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   97	   U.S.	   Blau	  et	  al.,	  2005	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   97	  	   U.S.	   Evans	  &	  Davies,1996	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Ketosis	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Self	  report	   Neg.	   1268	   Sweden	   Bendixen	  et	  al.,	  1987	  	   Blood	  samples	   Neg.	   25	   Jordan	   Al-­‐Rawashdeh,	  1999	  	   Vet.	  records	   Neg.	   17793	   Norway	   Solbu,	  1983	  	   Milk	  samples	   Pos.	   	   Finland	   Lindstrom	  et	  al.,	  1984	  	   Vet.	  records	   Neg.	   306	   Norway	   Rieman	  et	  al.,	  1985	  	   Vet.	  diagnosis	   Pos.	   283	   Finland	   Saloniemi	  &	  Roine,	  1981	  	   Records	   Neg.	   812	   Norway	   Simensen	  et	  al.,	  2010	  Diarrhea,	  calves	  	   	   	   	   	  	   Vet.	  records	   Pos.	   100	   Austria	   Klein-­‐Jöbstl	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   92	   U.S.	   Frank	  &	  Kaneene,	  1993	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   906	   U.S.	   Wells	  et	  al.,	  1996a	  Crypto.	  spp.	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Fecal	  sample	   Pos.	   1103	   U.S.	   Garber	  et	  al.,	  1994	  	   Fecal	  sample	   N.S.	   44	   U.S.	   Szonyi	  et	  al.,	  2012	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Metritis	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   97	   U.S.	   Kaneene	  &	  Miller,	  1994	  	   Records	   N.S.	   2144	   Denmark	   Bruun	  et	  al.,	  2002	  	   Vet.	  diagnosis	   Pos.	   283	   Finland	   Roine	  &	  Saloniemi,	  1978	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Dystocia	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Records	   N.S.	   2627	   Ireland	   Mee	  et	  al.,	  2011	  	   Vet.	  diagnosis	   N.S.	   283	   Finland	   Roine	  &	  Saloniemi,	  1978	  Displaced	  abomasum	  	   	   	   	   	  	   Records	   Pos.	   60	   Sweden	   Stengarde	  et	  al.,	  2012	    51 Indicator	   Detection	  Method	  Assoc.	  w/	  herd	  size	  #	  of	  farms	   Country	   Reference	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Milk	  fever	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Vet.	  Records	   Pos.	   17793	   Norway	   Solbu,	  1983	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Respiratory	  disease	  	   	   	   	   	  	   Vet.	  diagnosis	   Pos.	   431	   Norway	   Norstrom	  et	  al.,	  2000	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   906	   U.S.	   Wells	  et	  al.,	  1996a	  Prolapses	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Vet.	  diagnosis	   N.S.	   283	   Finland	   Roine	  &	  Saloniemi,	  1978	  B)	  Mortality	  	  	   	   	   	   	  Calves	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   247	   U.S.	   Hartman	  et	  al.,	  1974	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   104	   Canada	   Waltner-­‐Toews	  et	  al.,	  1986	  	   Records,	  Self	  report	   Pos.	   379	   U.S.	   Spreicher	  &	  Hepp,	  1973	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   477	   U.S.	   Oxender,	  1973	  	   Records	   Pos.	   14474	   Norway	   Gullikesen	  et	  al.,	  2009	  	   Records	   Pos.	   4103	   U.S.	   Silva	  del	  Rio	  et	  al.,	  2007	  	   Records	   Pos.	   93727	   France	   Raboisson	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Records	   Pos.	   407	   U.S.	   James	  et	  al.,	  1984	  	   Self	  report	   Neg.	   140	   U.S.	   Jenny	  et	  al.,	  1981	  	   Records	   N.S.	   	   Ireland	   Mee	  et	  al.,	  2008	  	   Records	   N.S.	   4337	   Denmark	   Nielsen	  et	  al.,	  2010	  	   Self	  report	   N.S.	   416	   U.S.	   Walker	  et	  al.,	  2012	  	   Self	  report	   N.S.	   906	   U.S.	   Wells	  et	  al.,	  1996b	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   16	   U.S.	   Martin	  et	  al.,	  1975	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   48	   U.S.	   Lance	  et	  al.,	  1992	  	   Self	  report	   Pos.	   122	   Sweden	   Svensson	  et	  al.,	  2006	  	   Self	  report	   N.S.	   28	   Italy	   Zucali	  et	  al.,	  2013	  	   Records	   N.S.	   95	   Italy	   Lora	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Records	   Neg.	   2555	   Ireland	   Jago	  &	  Berry,	  2011	  	   Records	   Neg.	   99221	  &	  94676	   France	   Raboisson	  et	  al.,	  2013	  	   Self	  report	   N.S.	   1539	   US	   Losinger	  and	  Heinrichs,	  1997	  	   	   	   	   	   	  Cows	   	   	   	   	   	  	   Self	  report	   N.S.	   1306	   N.	  Ireland	   Menzies	  et	  al.,	  1995	  	   Records	   N.S.	   2534	   Canada	   Batra	  et	  al.,	  1971	  	   Records	   Pos.	   	   Denmark	   Norgaard	  et	  al.,	  1999	  	   Records	   Pos.	   11259	   U.S.	   Smith	  et	  al.,	  2000	  	   Records	   Pos.	   186	   U.S.	   Weigel	  et	  al.,	  2003	  	   Records	   Pos.	   78178	   U.S.	   Hadley	  et	  al.,	  2006	  	   Records	   Pos.	   2574	   U.S.	   Dechow	  &	  Goodling,	  2008	  	   Records	   Pos.	   953	   U.S.	   McConnel	  et	  al.,	  2008	  	   Records	   Pos.	   2815	   Denmark	   Thomsen	  &	  Sorensen,	  2009	  	   Records	   Pos.	   2054	   U.S.	   Pinedo	  et	  al.,	  2010	  	   Records	   Pos.	   99200	   France	   Raboisson	  et	  al.,	  2011	  	   Records	   Pos.	   6898	   Sweden	   Alvasen	  et	  al.,	  2012	  	   Records	   Neg.	   45032	   U.S.	   Miller	  et	  al.,	  2008	  	   Records	   Pos.	   7188	   U.S.	   Shahid	  et	  al.,	  2015	    52 Indicator	   Detection	  Method	  Assoc.	  w/	  herd	  size	  #	  of	  farms	   Country	   Reference	  	   Records	   Pos.	   145	   Sweden	   Alvasen	  et	  al.,	  2014	  	   Records	   Pos.	   6839	   Denmark	   Thomsen	  et	  al.,	  2006	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  Lameness	  This	  is	  a	  chronically	  painful	  condition,	  with	  prevalence	  exceeding	  20%	  in	  many	  herds	  (von	  Keyserlingk	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Of	  23	  studies	  that	  addressed	  the	  relationship	  between	  herd	  size	  and	  lameness	  in	  dairy	  cattle,	  9	  found	  a	  higher	  prevalence	  in	  larger	  herds,	  8	  reported	  no	  difference,	  and	  the	  remaining	  6	  studies	  found	  that	  lameness	  prevalence	  was	  lower	  on	  larger	  farms.	  At	  least	  some	  of	  these	  differences	  may	  be	  explained	  by	  the	  differences	  in	  herd	  sizes	  considered	  in	  the	  different	  studies.	  For	  example,	  studies	  where	  herd	  size	  was	  relatively	  small	  (ranging	  from	  a	  low	  of	  10	  cows	  per	  farm	  to	  a	  high	  of	  about	  200	  cows)	  have	  tended	  to	  report	  increased	  lameness	  in	  larger	  herds	  (e.g.,	  Rowlands	  et	  al.,	  1983;	  Alban,	  1995;	  de	  Vries	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  In	  contrast,	  studies	  focused	  on	  larger	  herds	  (ranging	  from	  a	  low	  of	  about	  150	  cows	  to	  a	  high	  of	  more	  than	  8,000	  cows	  per	  farm)	  have	  reported	  the	  opposite	  relationship	  (e.g.,	  Chapinal	  et	  al.,	  2013,	  2014).	  These	  results	  suggest	  that	  the	  risk	  of	  lameness	  may	  have	  some	  curvilinear	  relationship	  with	  herd	  size,	  with	  lameness	  initially	  increasing	  and	  then	  declining	  with	  increasingly	  large	  herds.	  In	  addition	  to	  these	  studies	  that	  have	  directly	  assessed	  lameness	  by	  evaluating	  the	  gait	  of	  cows,	  other	  studies	  have	  examined	  hock	  injuries	  that	  can	  contribute	  to	  lameness.	  Of	  5	  studies	  that	  measured	  hock	  lesion	  prevalence	  and	  farm	  size,	  2	  reported	  a	  positive	  relationship	  with	  farm	  size	  (i.e.,	  more	  lesions	  on	  larger	  farms),	  and	  3	  others	  reported	  no	    53 relationship.	  In	  summary,	  the	  available	  evidence	  suggests	  that	  there	  is	  no	  consistent	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  lameness	  on	  dairy	  farms.	  Udder	  Health	  Mastitis	  (acute	  inflammation	  of	  the	  udder)	  is	  common	  in	  milking	  cows	  and	  is	  associated	  with	  infections	  due	  to	  a	  range	  of	  pathogens	  (see	  review	  by	  Barkema	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  In	  some	  studies	  mastitis	  cases	  are	  identified	  using	  clinical	  assessments	  of	  the	  cows,	  but	  in	  other	  cases	  infections	  are	  inferred	  on	  the	  basis	  of	  high	  somatic	  cell	  counts.	  Of	  14	  studies,	  3	  found	  higher	  rates	  of	  disease	  on	  larger	  farms.	  Seven	  studies	  found	  evidence	  of	  better	  udder	  health	  on	  larger	  farms,	  and	  the	  remaining	  4	  studies	  reported	  no	  relationship	  with	  farm	  size.	  For	  example,	  Kossaibati	  et	  al.	  (1998)	  followed	  144	  dairy	  herds	  over	  3	  yr	  and	  found	  no	  association	  between	  herd	  size	  and	  incidence	  of	  mastitis.	  We	  conclude	  that	  there	  is	  no	  consistent	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  udder	  health	  on	  dairy	  farms.	  Salmonella	  Salmonella	  infections	  on	  dairy	  farms	  are	  a	  risk	  for	  consumers	  and	  farm	  workers,	  but	  the	  welfare	  consequences	  for	  the	  animal	  are	  less	  clear.	  All	  11	  of	  the	  studies	  that	  examined	  the	  prevalence	  of	  Salmonella	  infection	  and	  herd	  size	  reported	  higher	  prevalence	  in	  larger	  herds.	  Thus,	  the	  preponderance	  of	  studies	  finds	  increased	  risk	  in	  larger	  herds.	  In	  swine,	  evidence	  of	  an	  association	  between	  herd	  size	  and	  Salmonella	  is	  more	  mixed	  (Gardner	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  Other	  ailments	  Of	  7	  studies	  that	  examined	  within-­‐herd	  prevalence	  of	  ketosis	  and	  herd	  size,	  5	  found	  lower	  rates	  of	  this	  disease	  in	  larger	  herds,	  whereas	  2	  found	  the	  opposite	  relationship.	  In	    54 contrast,	  of	  3	  studies	  that	  examined	  diarrhea	  (a	  nonspecific	  sign	  of	  gastrointestinal	  disease),	  all	  found	  higher	  rates	  in	  larger	  herds.	  For	  the	  other	  ailments	  (i.e.,	  metritis,	  dystocia,	  displaced	  abomasum,	  milk	  fever,	  and	  respiratory	  disease)	  we	  identified	  too	  few	  published	  studies	  to	  determine	  whether	  there	  is	  any	  consistent	  relationship	  with	  farm	  size.	  	  	  Mortality	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  specific	  conditions	  described	  above,	  poor	  health	  and	  welfare	  may	  also	  be	  reflected	  in	  higher	  rates	  of	  mortality.	  Of	  16	  studies	  that	  compared	  cow	  mortality	  rates	  across	  farms	  of	  different	  sizes,	  13	  reported	  higher	  mortality	  on	  larger	  farms,	  1	  reported	  lower	  mortality,	  and	  2	  reported	  no	  difference.	  Another	  21	  studies	  assessed	  differences	  in	  mortality	  of	  dairy	  calves	  across	  a	  range	  of	  farm	  sizes;	  11	  of	  these	  reported	  higher	  calf	  mortality	  on	  larger	  farms,	  7	  reported	  lower	  mortality	  on	  larger	  farms,	  and	  the	  remaining	  7	  studies	  reported	  no	  difference.	  This	  evidence	  suggests	  that	  cows	  are	  at	  a	  higher	  risk	  of	  dying	  on	  larger	  farms	  but	  that	  there	  is	  no	  consistent	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  mortality	  for	  calves.	  These	  mixed	  results	  are	  also	  consistent	  with	  the	  few	  studies	  that	  have	  examined	  mortality	  on	  swine	  farms	  of	  differing	  sizes	  (Gardner	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  The	  relationship	  between	  mortality,	  culling,	  and	  welfare	  is	  not	  easily	  interpretable.	  For	  example,	  in	  2003	  U.S.	  federal	  legislation	  was	  passed	  prohibiting	  the	  slaughter	  of	  nonambulatory	  cattle.	  This	  change	  likely	  resulted	  in	  many	  cows	  that	  would	  have	  previously	  been	  shipped	  for	  slaughter	  being	  euthanized	  on	  farm,	  thereby	  increasing	  on-­‐farm	  mortality	  (Miller	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  High	  culling	  rates	  may	  reflect	  the	  aggressive	  removal	  and	  replacement	  of	  lower-­‐producing	  cows	  (Fetrow	  et	  al.,	  2006);	  this	  may	  be	  welfare	  neutral	  or	  be	  associated	    55 with	  welfare	  to	  the	  extent	  that	  low	  production	  is	  a	  result	  of	  disease	  or	  other	  problems	  with	  the	  animals’	  biological	  functioning.	  Other	  reasons	  for	  culling	  may	  be	  welfare	  neutral,	  for	  example,	  high	  beef	  prices	  (Maher	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  The	  decision	  when	  to	  euthanize	  (versus	  cull)	  may	  be	  important.	  One	  study	  reporting	  data	  collected	  in	  2004	  showed	  that	  the	  likelihood	  of	  having	  cull	  dairy	  cows	  condemned	  before	  slaughter	  increased	  with	  herd	  size,	  suggesting	  that	  the	  larger	  farms	  did	  a	  poorer	  job	  of	  assessing	  the	  suitability	  of	  cattle	  for	  transport	  (Hoe	  and	  Ruegg,	  2006).	  However,	  more	  recent	  data	  indicate	  that	  a	  higher	  percentage	  of	  nonambulatory	  cows	  died	  (and	  were	  not	  euthanized)	  on	  farms	  with	  30	  to	  99	  cows	  (23.6%)	  than	  on	  operations	  that	  had	  more	  than	  500	  cows	  (14.8%;	  USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2016).	  Future	  studies	  should	  distinguish	  between	  animals	  that	  are	  found	  dead	  on	  the	  farm	  (likely	  related	  to	  poor	  welfare	  conditions)	  vs.	  those	  that	  were	  euthanized	  to	  prevent	  animal	  suffering	  as	  well	  as	  the	  reason	  why	  animals	  were	  culled.	  Many	  of	  the	  studies	  we	  reviewed	  provided	  too	  little	  detail	  on	  mortality	  measures	  to	  distinguish	  these	  events.	  Of	  large	  farms	  (>500	  cows)	  that	  reported	  having	  to	  euthanize	  a	  nonambulatory	  cow,	  approximately	  72%	  did	  so	  within	  2	  d	  compared	  to	  only	  59%	  in	  the	  case	  of	  small	  farms.	  Moreover,	  6.4%	  of	  the	  small	  farms	  reported	  having	  waited	  more	  than	  6	  d	  before	  euthanizing	  nonambulatory	  cows;	  this	  is	  approximately	  3	  times	  longer	  than	  the	  value	  reported	  for	  large	  farms.	  The	  majority	  of	  large	  operations	  (57%)	  have	  standard	  operating	  procedures	  in	  place	  for	  caring	  for	  nonambulatory	  cows,	  which	  was	  not	  the	  case	  for	  smaller	  operations	  (16%	  to	  24%;	  USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2016).	  Overall,	  2.6%	  of	  cows	  became	  nonambulatory	  during	  2013,	  with	  large	  operations	  (>500	  cows)	  reporting	  the	  lowest	  percentage	  (2.1%)	  compared	  to	  all	  other	  farm	  sizes,	  e.g.,	  4.7%	  on	  very	  small	  farms	  (<30	  cows;	  USDA-­‐NAHMS	  2016).	    56 We	  encourage	  future	  work	  to	  develop	  and	  record	  measures	  that	  better	  capture	  how	  much	  suffering	  cows	  experience	  in	  the	  final	  days	  of	  their	  lives	  and	  how	  this	  varies	  in	  relation	  to	  early	  culling	  decisions,	  on-­‐farm	  euthanasia	  protocols,	  and	  other	  factors.	  	  Painful	  Procedures	  Many	  farmed	  animals	  experience	  painful	  surgical	  procedures	  like	  castration	  and	  dehorning,	  but	  farms	  vary	  in	  whether,	  when,	  and	  how	  the	  procedures	  are	  performed	  and	  thus	  how	  much	  pain	  the	  animals	  are	  likely	  to	  experience.	  There	  are	  few	  published	  data	  on	  the	  relationship	  between	  painful	  procedures	  and	  the	  size	  of	  dairy	  farms.	  However,	  the	  USDA-­‐NAHMS	  (2009)	  survey	  of	  practices	  on	  U.S.	  farms	  did	  address	  dehorning	  practices	  and	  found	  that	  larger	  farms	  performed	  this	  procedure	  at	  younger	  ages,	  arguably	  providing	  some	  welfare	  benefit	  for	  the	  calves.	  Pain	  due	  to	  dehorning	  can	  be	  more	  meaningfully	  addressed	  by	  using	  pain	  control	  methods	  such	  as	  local	  anesthetics	  and	  postoperative	  analgesics	  (see	  review	  by	  Stock	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  Unfortunately,	  the	  provision	  of	  these	  treatments	  is	  still	  rare	  on	  U.S.	  farms,	  and	  there	  is	  no	  clear	  relationship	  between	  herd	  size	  and	  the	  provision	  of	  pain	  control	  (USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2009).	  Positive	  Interactions	  with	  Humans	  It	  is	  almost	  inevitable	  that	  human	  interactions	  with	  the	  animals	  decrease	  as	  herd	  size	  increases,	  and	  several	  studies	  have	  reported	  this	  relationship.	  The	  majority	  of	  studies	  to	  date	  have	  focused	  on	  positive	  interactions.	  For	  example,	  Waiblinger	  and	  Menke	  (1999)	  reported	  that	  Austrian	  dairy	  farmers	  were	  less	  likely	  to	  take	  the	  time	  to	  brush	  their	  cows	  as	  herd	  size	  increased.	  Similarly,	  a	  study	  of	  French	  veal	  farms	  found	  that	  the	  frequency	  of	  positive	  interactions	  was	  lower	  on	  larger	  farms	  (Lensink	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  Although	  few	  studies	    57 to	  date	  have	  addressed	  the	  topic	  in	  dairy	  cattle,	  the	  frequency	  of	  negative	  interactions	  may	  also	  decrease	  on	  larger	  farms.	  One	  study	  of	  pig	  farms	  showed	  that	  the	  percentage	  of	  stockpersons	  displaying	  predominately	  negative	  behaviors	  toward	  pigs	  was	  57%	  on	  smaller	  farms	  vs.	  43%	  on	  larger	  farms	  (Hemsworth	  and	  Coleman,	  2010).	  Measures	  of	  avoidance	  of	  humans	  have	  been	  used	  as	  an	  indicator	  of	  fear	  in	  farm	  animals.	  The	  smaller	  the	  avoidance	  distance	  (the	  closer	  you	  can	  get	  to	  an	  animal	  without	  it	  fleeing)	  is,	  the	  less	  fearful	  the	  animal	  is	  believed	  to	  be.	  Mattiello	  et	  al.	  (2009)	  measured	  avoidance	  distances	  on	  dairy	  farms	  and	  found	  that	  cows	  on	  smaller	  farms	  could	  be	  approached	  more	  readily.	  Similarly,	  veal	  calves	  on	  smaller	  farms	  were	  more	  willing	  to	  approach	  a	  passive	  experimenter	  (Leruste	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  However,	  a	  large	  study	  looking	  at	  both	  dairy	  cattle	  and	  dairy	  goats	  found	  that	  goats	  were	  less	  likely	  to	  avoid	  people	  on	  smaller	  farms,	  but	  that	  was	  not	  the	  case	  with	  dairy	  cattle	  (Mattiello	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  The	  authors	  attributed	  this	  species	  difference	  to	  the	  limited	  variation	  in	  management	  among	  dairy	  cattle	  farms	  in	  their	  study.	  ‘Naturalness’	  People	  often	  refer	  to	  the	  animal’s	  ability	  to	  live	  a	  reasonably	  natural	  life	  as	  a	  necessary	  condition	  for	  good	  welfare,	  and	  many	  equate	  having	  access	  to	  pasture	  as	  essential	  for	  a	  good	  life	  in	  dairy	  cattle	  (Cardoso	  et	  al.,	  2016).	  Recent	  survey	  data	  indicate	  that	  the	  use	  of	  pasture	  decreases	  with	  increases	  in	  farm	  size;	  farms	  having	  fewer	  than	  100	  cows	  are	  far	  more	  likely	  (>70%)	  to	  incorporate	  pasture,	  particularly	  during	  the	  summer	  months,	  compared	  to	  medium	  (100	  to	  499	  cows;	  32%)	  or	  large	  farms	  (>500	  cows;	  5%;	  USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2016).	  However,	  pasture	  use	  is	  often	  associated	  with	  tie	  stall	  and	  stanchion	  housing,	  where	  cows	  are	  restrained	  for	  the	  majority	  of	  each	  day	  and	  may	  be	  turned	  out	  to	    58 pasture	  for	  exercise.	  Tie	  stalls	  are	  still	  common	  on	  farms	  with	  fewer	  than	  100	  cows,	  whereas	  larger	  farms	  more	  typically	  use	  free	  stall	  and	  open	  lot	  housing	  where	  cows	  are	  not	  restrained	  (USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2016).	  Evidence	  from	  other	  farmed	  species	  suggests	  that	  smaller	  farms	  are	  at	  an	  advantage	  in	  terms	  of	  an	  animal’s	  ability	  to	  live	  a	  reasonably	  natural	  life.	  Small	  poultry	  operations	  (when	  defined	  as	  between	  1,000	  and	  9,999	  birds)	  are	  more	  than	  10	  times	  as	  likely	  to	  provide	  birds	  with	  outdoor	  access	  compared	  to	  larger	  flocks	  (USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2008).	  Even	  within	  alternative	  housing	  systems	  for	  poultry,	  flock	  size	  is	  inversely	  associated	  with	  outdoor	  access	  (Green	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Bestman	  and	  Wagenaar,	  2003).	  Smaller	  U.S.	  swine	  operations	  tend	  to	  wean	  later,	  which	  more	  closely	  approximates	  the	  natural	  weaning	  process	  (USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2015).	  Smaller	  swine	  operations	  are	  also	  more	  likely	  to	  provide	  rooting	  substrate	  for	  pigs	  (Czekaj	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  an	  enrichment	  believed	  to	  improve	  welfare	  by	  decreasing	  abnormal	  behavior	  and	  increasing	  play	  (Bolhuis	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Tuyttens,	  2005).	  In	  summary,	  smaller	  farms	  appear	  more	  likely	  to	  provide	  outdoor	  access	  and	  some	  other	  management	  practices	  that	  allow	  animals	  to	  express	  more	  natural	  behavior.	  Other	  Assessments	  of	  Welfare	  Given	  the	  multidimensional	  nature	  of	  animal	  welfare,	  assessments	  that	  take	  into	  account	  multiple	  indicators	  may	  be	  more	  helpful	  than	  those	  that	  consider	  just	  a	  single	  dimension.	  To	  our	  knowledge	  there	  are	  no	  comprehensive	  studies	  on	  dairy	  cattle	  examining	  multidimensional	  assessments	  of	  welfare	  in	  relation	  to	  farm	  size.	  A	  few	  studies	  have	  taken	  this	  type	  of	  comprehensive	  approach	  on	  other	  animals.	  For	  example,	  1	  Irish	  study	  (Mazurek	  et	  al.,	  2010)	  evaluated	  welfare	  in	  194	  beef	  herds	  using	  33	  environmental	  and	  resource-­‐based	  indicators	  covering	  5	  categories	  (locomotion,	  social	  interactions,	    59 flooring,	  environment,	  and	  stockpersonship)	  and	  found	  that	  overall	  welfare	  scores	  decreased	  as	  farm	  size	  increased.	  Another	  study	  of	  20	  commercial	  sheep	  farms	  in	  Great	  Britain,	  using	  qualitative	  welfare	  assessment,	  found	  no	  relationship	  between	  flock	  size	  and	  overall	  animal	  welfare	  scores	  (Stott	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  A	  third	  study	  of	  pig	  farms	  in	  Croatia	  reported	  that	  larger	  farms	  did	  a	  better	  job	  of	  meeting	  the	  5	  freedoms	  (Wellbrock	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Violations	  of	  animal	  care	  regulations	  may	  provide	  another	  method	  of	  evaluating	  welfare.	  Countries	  vary	  in	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  farm	  practices	  are	  codified	  in	  law,	  but	  in	  some	  countries	  where	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  is	  more	  highly	  regulated,	  studies	  have	  looked	  at	  how	  noncompliance	  varies	  with	  farm	  size.	  A	  study	  of	  73	  Danish	  dairy	  farms	  found	  no	  effect	  of	  herd	  size	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  welfare	  violations	  (Otten	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Similarly,	  a	  study	  of	  Danish	  pig	  farmers	  found	  no	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  welfare	  violations	  (Czekaj	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  A	  Swedish	  study	  reported	  that	  violations	  were	  more	  common	  and	  severe	  on	  smaller,	  more	  diverse	  farms	  (Hess	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  The	  authors	  attributed	  this	  finding	  to	  differences	  in	  the	  degree	  of	  specialization	  and	  higher	  opportunity	  costs	  associated	  with	  smaller	  farms.	  A	  Danish	  study	  analyzing	  government	  records	  also	  reported	  no	  association	  between	  animal	  care	  violations	  and	  farm	  size	  (large	  farms	  were	  defined	  as	  having	  more	  than	  150	  cows	  or	  more	  than	  2,000	  pigs)	  and	  concluded	  that	  most	  violations	  resulted	  from	  a	  combination	  of	  socioeconomic	  and	  psychiatric	  risk	  factors	  (Andrade	  and	  Anneberg,	  2014).	  Several	  studies	  have	  shown	  that	  farmers	  on	  smaller	  farms	  are	  more	  stressed	  (Simkin	  et	  al.,	  1998)	  and	  at	  increased	  risk	  for	  suicide	  (Gregoire,	  2002),	  which	  in	  turn	  may	  also	  put	  animals	  at	  greater	  risk.	    60 More	  studies	  are	  needed	  to	  assess	  multidimensional	  estimates	  of	  welfare,	  but	  work	  to	  date	  shows	  no	  consistent	  relationship	  with	  farm	  size.	  Also,	  the	  number	  of	  legal	  violations	  is	  not	  consistently	  related	  to	  farm	  size,	  although	  some	  evidence	  suggests	  that	  smaller	  farms	  may	  be	  at	  greater	  risk.	  Farm	  Size	  and	  Farmer	  Attitudes	  Relative	  to	  Animal	  Welfare	  Farmer	  attitudes	  about	  animal	  welfare	  are	  correlated	  with	  animal	  welfare	  outcomes	  on	  farms	  (Kielland	  et	  al.,	  2010),	  and	  farmer	  beliefs	  and	  attitudes	  about	  animal	  welfare	  are	  known	  to	  vary	  with	  production	  system	  (e.g.,	  organic	  vs.	  conventional;	  Dockès	  and	  Kling-­‐Eveillard,	  2006;	  Sørensen	  and	  Fraser,	  2010;	  Bracke	  et.	  al.,	  2013).	  Opponents	  of	  larger	  farms	  assert	  that	  as	  farms	  increase	  in	  size,	  profitability-­‐oriented	  values	  come	  to	  replace	  nonuse	  values	  such	  as	  animal	  welfare	  (Hess	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  We	  are	  unaware	  of	  research	  examining	  a	  broad	  range	  of	  dairy	  farmer	  attitudes	  about	  animal	  welfare	  in	  relation	  to	  farm	  size,	  although	  a	  few	  studies	  have	  examined	  specific	  issues.	  For	  example,	  2	  studies	  (Hoe	  and	  Ruegg,	  2006;	  Wikman	  et	  al.,	  2013)	  examined	  farmer	  perceptions	  about	  the	  ability	  of	  cattle	  to	  feel	  pain	  and	  found	  no	  effect	  of	  farm	  size.	  Another	  study	  of	  Kentucky	  dairy	  producers	  found	  no	  association	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  the	  likelihood	  of	  a	  farmer	  defining	  “success”	  in	  terms	  of	  animal	  well-­‐being.	  However,	  larger	  farms	  were	  more	  likely	  to	  define	  success	  in	  terms	  of	  milk	  production	  per	  cow,	  suggesting	  greater	  emphasis	  on	  economic	  aspects	  of	  dairy	  production	  as	  farm	  size	  increased	  (Russell	  and	  Bewley,	  2013).	  On	  the	  other	  hand,	  a	  study	  of	  Turkish	  sheep	  farmers	  (Kilic	  and	  Bozkurt,	  2013)	  found	  that	  what	  they	  called	  “perceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare”	  were	  lower	  on	  larger	  farms	  and	  that	  these	  lower	  perceptions	  correlated	  with	  providing	  less	  space	  per	  animal	  and	  poorer	  air	  quality.	  It	  is	  worth	  noting	  that	  a	  number	  of	  studies	  have	  found	  that	  larger	  farms	  are	  more	  likely	  to	    61 participate	  in	  environmental	  conservation	  programs	  and	  implement	  practices	  designed	  to	  minimize	  environmental	  impacts	  (Knowler	  and	  Bradshaw,	  2007).	  	  Farm	  Size	  and	  Professionalization	  Animals	  raised	  within	  the	  same	  production	  system	  can	  have	  different	  levels	  of	  welfare	  depending	  on	  how	  the	  system	  is	  managed,	  and	  management	  structures	  and	  practices	  vary	  with	  farm	  size	  (Fraser,	  2005).	  Mirroring	  the	  general	  process	  of	  industrialization,	  as	  farm	  size	  increases,	  the	  relative	  importance	  of	  family	  labor	  decreases,	  and	  managerial	  positions	  focused	  on	  coordinating	  and	  supervising	  workers	  become	  more	  common	  (Hadley	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  Larger	  farms	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  require	  and	  benefit	  from	  standard	  operating	  procedures	  and	  employee	  training	  intended	  to	  improve	  consistency	  and	  minimize	  human	  error.	  Division	  of	  labor	  (i.e.,	  specialization)	  also	  tends	  to	  increase	  with	  farm	  size.	  Whereas	  workers	  on	  smaller	  farms	  may	  be	  responsible	  for	  a	  variety	  of	  tasks	  ranging	  from	  fieldwork	  to	  accounting,	  employee	  supervision,	  equipment	  repair,	  and	  animal	  care,	  tasks	  on	  larger	  farms	  are	  often	  much	  more	  specialized	  (Hyde	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Larger	  farms	  also	  appear	  to	  be	  more	  receptive	  to	  science-­‐based	  recommendations.	  For	  instance,	  larger	  dairy	  farms	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  implement	  recommended	  best	  management	  practices	  for	  colostrum	  feeding	  and	  adhere	  to	  biosecurity	  recommendations	  (Hoe	  and	  Ruegg,	  2006;	  USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2009;	  Ellis-­‐Iversen	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Russell	  and	  Bewley	  (2013)	  found	  that	  smaller	  farms	  (1	  to	  49	  cows)	  were	  less	  likely	  than	  larger	  farms	  (>200	  cows)	  to	  use	  the	  advice	  of	  nutritionists,	  veterinarians,	  and	  consultants	  in	  making	  management	  decisions.	  A	  German	  study	  of	  429	  dairy	  farms	  found	  that	  routine	  veterinary	  visits	  were	  more	  common	  in	  larger	  herds	  (Heuwieser	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  The	  percentage	  of	  U.S.	    62 dairy	  farms	  that	  consulted	  a	  veterinarian	  increases	  with	  herd	  size,	  as	  does	  the	  frequency	  of	  these	  visits	  (USDA-­‐NAHMS	  2016).	  A	  study	  of	  nearly	  900	  Australian	  dairy	  farms	  found	  that	  larger	  herds	  had	  a	  higher	  proportion	  of	  workers	  with	  formal	  qualifications	  and	  industry	  training	  (Beggs	  et	  al.,	  2015).	  There	  is	  also	  evidence	  suggesting	  that	  smaller	  producers	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  take	  off-­‐farm	  employment,	  thus	  reducing	  the	  amount	  of	  time	  spent	  on	  the	  farm	  (Fernandez-­‐Cornejo	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Farm	  worker	  satisfaction	  is	  thought	  to	  be	  important	  in	  ensuring	  a	  high	  degree	  of	  animal	  welfare	  (Rushen	  and	  de	  Passillé,	  2010).	  One	  correlate	  of	  job	  satisfaction	  is	  compensation	  (Judge	  et	  al.,	  2010),	  and	  several	  studies	  of	  U.S.	  dairy	  farms	  have	  found	  that	  employee	  compensation	  is	  positively	  correlated	  with	  farm	  size	  (Mugera	  and	  Bitsch,	  2005).	  Similar	  results	  were	  found	  in	  the	  U.S.	  swine	  industry,	  where	  larger	  operations	  pay	  workers	  more	  and	  provide	  more	  and	  better	  benefits	  than	  smaller	  operators,	  even	  after	  controlling	  for	  worker	  skill	  (Hurley	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  These	  findings	  are	  consistent	  with	  the	  wider	  business	  literature	  that	  finds	  a	  positive	  relationship	  between	  establishment	  size	  and	  employee	  compensation	  (Brown	  and	  Medoff,	  1989).	  In	  summary,	  these	  results	  indicate	  that	  farm	  workers	  tend	  to	  be	  better	  paid,	  better	  trained,	  more	  specialized,	  and	  more	  satisfied	  on	  larger	  farms.	  These	  differences	  may	  contribute	  to	  better	  quality	  of	  care	  provided	  to	  animals	  on	  larger	  farms.	  3.4	   Discussion	  Our	  review	  does	  not	  support	  the	  contention	  that	  there	  is	  a	  consistent	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  welfare	  on	  dairy	  farms	  or,	  indeed,	  other	  types	  of	  livestock	  farm.	  Moreover,	  the	  differences	  that	  exist	  are	  unlikely	  to	  be	  caused	  directly	  by	  size	  but	  by	  other	    63 factors	  associated	  with	  size	  such	  as	  economic	  viability,	  staffing	  level,	  awareness	  of	  and	  exposure	  to	  emerging	  issues,	  professional	  management,	  and	  access	  to	  resources	  (e.g.,	  time,	  capital,	  expert	  consultants,	  scientific	  information,	  etc.).	  Smaller	  farms	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  raise	  animals	  outdoors	  in	  extensive	  conditions,	  which	  some	  people	  view	  as	  integral	  to	  high	  welfare.	  However,	  many	  smaller	  farms	  use	  the	  same	  controversial	  practices	  as	  their	  larger	  counterparts	  (e.g.,	  gestation	  stalls,	  painful	  surgery	  without	  analgesia)	  and	  in	  some	  cases	  do	  so	  to	  an	  even	  greater	  degree;	  for	  example,	  tie	  stalls,	  which	  greatly	  restrict	  movement,	  are	  more	  common	  on	  smaller	  dairy	  farms.	  New	  research	  is	  required	  to	  tease	  apart	  the	  different	  aspects	  of	  intensification	  to	  determine	  their	  relative	  importance	  to	  the	  quality	  of	  life	  of	  animals.	  Larger	  farms	  tend	  to	  have	  fewer	  workers	  per	  animal	  (Bewley	  et	  al.,	  2001),	  so	  they	  are	  at	  a	  disadvantage	  in	  terms	  of	  providing	  individualized	  care.	  This	  is	  a	  problem	  if,	  as	  Anthony	  (2003)	  argued,	  farmers	  should	  be	  able	  to	  “form	  bonds	  with	  all	  their	  animals.”	  However,	  there	  is	  little	  evidence	  to	  suggest	  that	  the	  ratio	  of	  caretakers	  to	  animals	  is	  a	  useful	  indicator	  of	  this	  bond	  or	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  Simply	  considering	  the	  frequency	  of	  possible	  interactions	  fails	  to	  recognize	  that	  such	  interactions	  can	  be	  positive,	  negative,	  or	  neutral	  (Hemsworth	  and	  Barnett,	  1992;	  Hemsworth	  et	  al.,	  1993;	  Zulkifli,	  2013).	  Animal	  care	  is	  likely	  to	  be	  affected	  by	  other	  factors,	  including	  the	  nature	  of	  the	  group	  being	  managed	  (e.g.,	  newborn	  or	  adult,	  healthy	  or	  ill,	  wild	  or	  tame,	  aggressive	  or	  docile),	  the	  skill	  and	  disposition	  of	  the	  stockperson,	  and	  the	  degree	  to	  which	  technology	  is	  used	  to	  enhance,	  extend,	  or	  replace	  traditional	  husbandry	  activities.	  Intuitively,	  positive	  interactions	  should	  contribute	  to	  improved	  welfare	  on	  these	  farms,	  but	  the	  literature	  also	  suggests	  that	  many	  farm	    64 animals	  are	  naturally	  fearful	  of	  humans,	  thus	  making	  contact	  aversive	  (at	  least	  initially)	  despite	  the	  positive	  intentions	  of	  the	  caregiver	  (Rushen	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Boivin	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Other	  variables	  related	  to	  farm	  size,	  including	  production	  style	  (e.g.,	  extensive	  vs.	  intensive),	  profitability,	  degree	  of	  specialization,	  technology,	  and	  stocking	  density,	  may	  better	  explain	  variation	  in	  animal	  welfare.	  For	  example,	  Barker	  et	  al.	  (2010)	  reported	  that	  the	  strong	  association	  between	  herd	  size	  and	  lameness	  on	  dairy	  farms	  ceased	  to	  be	  significant	  when	  other	  factors	  such	  as	  breed,	  production	  type,	  and	  milk	  yield	  were	  added	  to	  their	  model.	  Along	  similar	  lines,	  Leontides	  et	  al.	  (1994)	  also	  found	  that	  the	  relationship	  between	  pig	  farm	  size	  and	  pseudorabies	  ceased	  to	  be	  significant	  when	  factors	  such	  as	  stocking	  density	  were	  taken	  into	  account.	  Perhaps	  most	  notably,	  Alban	  (1995)	  found	  that	  cows	  belonging	  to	  farmers	  who	  were	  uncertain	  about	  continuing	  as	  dairy	  producers	  had	  a	  1.6-­‐fold	  increase	  in	  the	  odds	  of	  lameness.	  USDA	  census	  data	  show	  that	  larger	  dairy	  farms	  tend	  to	  be	  more	  economically	  viable	  (returns	  exceed	  operating	  expenses	  on	  average)	  and	  are	  thus	  more	  likely	  to	  report	  that	  they	  would	  still	  be	  in	  business	  in	  the	  next	  5	  yr	  (MacDonald	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Longer	  planning	  horizons	  and	  greater	  access	  to	  resources	  may	  make	  farms	  more	  willing	  and	  able	  to	  adapt	  to	  changing	  social	  values	  and	  scientific	  evidence	  (Waddock	  and	  Graves,	  1997).	  We	  argue	  that	  any	  reported	  association	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare	  should	  be	  accompanied	  by	  some	  plausible	  explanation	  of	  the	  mechanism	  by	  which	  the	  relationship	  occurs	  and	  a	  discussion	  of	  the	  intervening	  variables.	  If	  farm	  size	  is	  used	  as	  a	  surrogate	  for	  a	  broader	  range	  of	  concerns	  about	  intensification,	  then	  adopting	  more	  holistic	  measures	  of	  intensification,	  rather	  than	  size,	  is	  likely	  to	  be	  more	  appropriate.	  For	    65 instance,	  a	  recent	  European	  Food	  Safety	  Authority	  report	  (EFSA	  Panel	  on	  Animal	  Health	  and	  Animal	  Welfare,	  2015)	  incorporates	  aspects	  such	  as	  source	  of	  workforce,	  level	  of	  input	  use,	  use	  of	  breeds,	  and	  production	  style,	  in	  addition	  to	  farm	  size.	  This	  more	  sophisticated	  analysis	  is	  likely	  to	  better	  reflect	  social	  concerns	  and	  thus	  be	  more	  useful	  to	  farmers	  and	  others	  in	  developing	  industry	  policy	  by	  more	  accurately	  identifying	  the	  causal	  factors	  that	  result	  in	  better	  and	  worse	  welfare	  outcomes.	  3.5	   Conclusion	  Farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare	  exhibit	  no	  consistent	  relationship.	  Although	  larger	  farms	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  adopt	  some	  practices	  (such	  as	  worker	  training	  and	  standard	  operating	  procedures)	  that	  benefit	  animal	  welfare,	  they	  are	  less	  likely	  to	  use	  other	  practices	  (such	  as	  pasture	  access)	  that	  may	  also	  be	  beneficial.	  The	  oversimplified	  view	  that	  animal	  welfare	  is	  better	  on	  smaller	  farms	  may	  create	  complacency	  among	  small	  farmers	  (allowing	  welfare	  problems	  to	  persist)	  and	  fails	  to	  focus	  efforts	  on	  specific	  welfare	  challenges	  that	  need	  to	  be	  resolved	  on	  farms	  of	  all	  sizes.	  	   	    66 Chapter	  4:	  Effect	  of	  openness	  on	  trust	  and	  perceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  4.1	   Introduction	  In	  January	  2008,	  an	  undercover	  investigation	  at	  the	  Hallmark-­‐Westland	  Meat	  Packing	  Company	  in	  Chino,	  California,	  captured	  video	  footage	  of	  workers	  dragging,	  kicking	  and	  electrically-­‐shocking	  dairy	  cattle	  unable	  to	  walk.	  	  At	  one	  point,	  a	  worker	  attempts	  to	  force	  a	  prostrate	  cow	  to	  stand	  by	  repeatedly	  ramming	  her	  with	  the	  blades	  of	  a	  forklift.	  These	  graphic	  scenes	  sparked	  a	  great	  deal	  of	  controversy7,	  leading	  to	  the	  largest	  meat	  recall	  in	  U.S.	  history	  (more	  than	  64	  million	  kg	  of	  beef);	  a	  multi-­‐million	  dollar	  civil	  lawsuit,	  multiple	  felony	  animal	  cruelty	  convictions	  (Flaccus,	  2009);	  and	  a	  federal	  ban	  on	  the	  slaughter	  of	  non-­‐ambulatory	  cattle	  (USDA,	  2009).	  Since	  1998,	  there	  have	  been	  approximately	  117	  such	  undercover	  investigations	  of	  livestock	  farms	  conducted	  in	  North	  America	  (Animal	  Visuals,	  2015).	  In	  response	  to	  what	  they	  believe	  to	  be	  extreme	  and	  unfair	  representations	  of	  their	  industries,	  many	  livestock	  groups	  have	  supported	  legislation	  designed	  to	  restrict	  these	  undercover	  investigations.	  Commonly	  referred	  to	  as	  ‘ag-­‐gag’	  laws,	  this	  legislation	  contains	  provisions	  that	  prohibit	  intentionally	  deceiving	  employers	  and	  taking	  or	  possessing	  photographs,	  video,	  or	  audio	  recordings	  without	  farmer	  consent	  (Landfried,	  2013;	  Broad,	  2014;	  Shea,	  2014).	  	  Such	  legislation	  has	  been	  introduced	  in	  at	  least	  16	  U.S.	  states	  –	  having	  been	  passed	  into	  law	  in	  eight	  (Marceau,	  2015).	  The	  results	  of	  several	  polls	  show	  that	  when	  informed,	  a	  significant	  majority	  of	  the	  public	  are	  opposed	  to	  ‘ag-­‐gag’	  laws	  (Jacobs,	  2011;	  ASPCA,	  2012).	  	  Opposition	  is	  also	  found	  within	  the	  agricultural	  community.	  One	  poll	  conducted	  by	  a	  prominent	  cattle	  industry	                                              7 As of March 25 2015, this video has received approximately 1.3 million views on YouTube.     67 publication	  asked	  its	  readership,	  “Are	  ‘ag	  gag’	  laws	  a	  good	  idea	  for	  the	  livestock	  industry	  to	  pursue?”	  and	  found	  that	  of	  the	  more	  than	  500	  responses,	  more	  than	  60%	  of	  respondents	  said	  “No”	  (Radke,	  2012).	  	  Opponents	  of	  these	  laws	  often	  argue	  that	  such	  laws	  create	  the	  impression	  that	  animal	  agriculture	  has	  something	  to	  hide	  which	  leads	  to	  distrust	  (Broad,	  2014).	  Rousseau	  et	  al.	  (1998)	  put	  forth	  a	  widely	  accepted	  definition	  of	  trust	  as,	  “a	  psychological	  state	  comprising	  the	  intention	  to	  accept	  vulnerability	  based	  on	  positive	  expectations	  of	  the	  intentions	  or	  behaviors	  of	  another.”	  	  The	  decision	  of	  whether	  or	  not	  to	  trust	  depends	  not	  only	  on	  the	  dispositions	  of	  the	  trustor,	  but	  crucially	  on	  the	  perceived	  trustworthiness	  of	  the	  trustee	  (Mayer	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  A	  number	  of	  factors	  have	  been	  proposed	  to	  influence	  judgments	  of	  trustworthiness	  including	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  individuals	  or	  organizations	  are	  perceived	  to	  be	  transparent	  about	  their	  practices	  (Peters	  et	  al.,	  1997;	  Fisman	  and	  Khanna,	  1999;	  Maeda	  and	  Miyahara,	  2003;	  Rawlins,	  2008).	  In	  turn,	  transparency	  has	  been	  found	  to	  be	  positively	  associated	  with	  purchasing	  intentions,	  loyalty	  and	  willingness	  to	  share	  positive	  information	  about	  a	  particular	  company	  with	  others	  (Chaudhuri	  and	  Holbrook,	  2001;	  Kang	  and	  Hustvedt,	  2014).	  Evidence	  also	  suggests	  that	  transparency	  may	  be	  especially	  important	  following	  a	  crisis,	  which	  is	  precisely	  the	  time	  when	  the	  temptation	  to	  limit	  transparency	  is	  greatest	  (Jahansoozi,	  2006;	  Auger,	  2014).	  	  Thus,	  the	  trust	  literature	  points	  to	  an	  interesting	  paradox:	  policies	  intended	  to	  prevent	  reputational	  damage	  by	  restricting	  information	  flow	  may,	  in	  fact,	  further	  undermine	  trustworthiness.	  	  	   Despite	  its	  importance,	  trust	  has	  received	  relatively	  little	  scientific	  attention	  within	  the	  context	  of	  agriculture.	  Using	  a	  current,	  real-­‐world	  policy	  initiative,	  we	  conducted	  an	  experiment	  to	  determine	  whether	  the	  perceived	  intention	  to	  limit	  transparency	  impacts	    68 trust.	  We	  predicted	  that	  learning	  about	  ‘ag-­‐gag’	  laws	  would	  result	  in:	  1)	  lower	  levels	  of	  trust	  in	  farmers;	  2)	  more	  negative	  perceptions	  about	  the	  welfare	  of	  farm	  animals	  and;	  3)	  greater	  support	  for	  more	  laws	  protecting	  animal	  welfare.	  	  	  4.2	   Methods	   This	  study	  received	  ethics	  approval	  from	  the	  Behavioural	  Research	  Ethics	  Board	  (H13-­‐01466)	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  	  After	  conducting	  a	  power	  analysis	  on	  a	  similar	  pilot	  study,	  we	  determined	  that	  we	  would	  need	  approximately	  750	  participants	  to	  achieve	  90%	  power	  and	  recruited	  758	  participants	  via	  Amazon’s	  Mechanical	  Turk	  (AMT).	  AMT	  participants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  be	  more	  diverse	  than	  standard	  samples	  (e.g.	  internet,	  college	  student,	  community)	  whilst	  also	  providing	  data	  of	  equally	  reliable	  quality	  (Buhrmester	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Goodman	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Paolacci	  and	  Chandler,	  2014).	  Participants	  were	  invited	  to	  participate	  in	  “a	  short	  survey	  about	  human	  psychology	  and	  public	  policy”.	  Participation	  was	  limited	  to	  U.S.	  residents	  18	  years	  of	  age	  or	  older.	  After	  consenting,	  participants	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  to	  either	  the	  Control	  or	  Law	  (treatment)	  condition.	  Subjects	  in	  the	  Law	  group	  were	  told	  that,	  “Several	  U.S.	  states	  are	  considering	  a	  new	  law	  regarding	  the	  flow	  of	  information	  from	  livestock	  farms.”	  and	  that	  we	  were	  looking	  for	  their	  honest	  opinion	  of	  this	  law.	  Participants	  were	  then	  presented	  with	  three	  features	  common	  to	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation:	  	  1.	  Restricts	  or	  bans	  video/audio	  recording	  and	  photographing	  of	  farms,	  or	  the	  possession	  of	  any	  such	  materials,	  without	  permission	  from	  the	  owner.	  	  2.	  Makes	  it	  illegal	  to	  obtain	  employment	  at	  any	  farm	  under	  false	  pretenses	  (i.e.	  using	  a	  fake	  name	  or	  not	  disclosing	  your	  plan	  to	  film/record).	    69 3.	  Requires	  any	  documented	  evidence	  of	  farm	  animal	  abuse	  be	  turned	  over	  to	  authorities	  within	  a	  specific	  amount	  of	  time	  (e.g.	  within	  48-­‐120	  hours).	  	  	  Next,	  participants	  were	  provided	  with	  a	  counterbalanced	  list	  of	  three	  common	  arguments	  provided	  by	  supporters	  and	  opponents	  of	  these	  laws.	  To	  limit	  potential	  negativity	  bias	  (Rozin	  and	  Royzman,	  2001),	  the	  labels	  ‘supporters’	  and	  ‘opponents’	  were	  avoided.	  Instead	  the	  phrases,	  “those	  in	  favor	  of	  this	  law”	  and	  “those	  not	  in	  favor	  of	  this	  law”	  were	  used.	  Participants	  were	  then	  asked	  to	  indicate	  their	  level	  of	  support	  for	  the	  law	  on	  a	  7-­‐point	  likert	  scale	  (1	  =	  strongly	  oppose,	  7	  =	  strongly	  support)	  followed	  by	  a	  question	  asking	  whether	  or	  not	  they	  were	  aware	  of	  this	  legislation	  before	  taking	  our	  survey.	  As	  a	  buffer	  between	  stimuli	  and	  dependent	  measures,	  participants	  completed	  two	  unrelated	  psychological	  inventories	  that	  will	  not	  be	  discussed	  here	  further	  (complete	  materials	  can	  be	  found	  in	  the	  supplementary	  online	  materials).	  Our	  primary	  dependent	  variable	  was	  self-­‐reported	  trust	  measured	  using	  a	  10-­‐item	  scale	  developed	  and	  validated	  by	  Frewer	  et	  al.	  (1996)	  to	  assess	  trust	  regarding	  food-­‐related	  hazards.	  In	  addition	  to	  being	  respondent	  generated,	  this	  scale	  was	  selected	  because	  it	  is	  sensitive	  to	  different	  sources	  (e.g.	  farmers)	  and	  topics	  (e.g.	  animal	  welfare)	  of	  trust.	  These	  items	  asked	  participants	  to	  indicate	  their	  level	  of	  agreement	  with	  a	  variety	  of	  statements	  about	  farmers	  as	  sources	  of	  information	  on	  the	  subject	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  on	  a	  7-­‐point	  Likert	  scale	  (1	  =	  strongly	  disagree,	  7	  =	  strongly	  agree)	  (e.g.	  “Information	  about	  farm	  animal	  well-­‐being	  from	  farmers	  is	  trustworthy.”).	  Using	  the	  same	  Likert	  scale,	  participants	  then	  answered	  several	  questions	  designed	  to	  gauge	  their	  perceptions	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  (e.g.	  “In	  general,	  farm	  animals	  have	  good	  lives.”).	  To	  obscure	  our	  intent,	  these	  items	  were	  intermixed	  with	  items	  reflecting	  a	  variety	  of	  controversial	  agricultural	    70 issues	  not	  involving	  animal	  care	  and	  welfare	  (e.g.	  “Agricultural	  chemicals	  and	  pesticides	  are	  causing	  human	  health	  problems.”).	  These	  items	  also	  allowed	  us	  to	  test	  the	  specificity	  of	  any	  effects	  of	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation	  on	  perceptions	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  being	  versus	  agriculture	  in	  general.	  Finally,	  participants	  completed	  basic	  demographic	  questions	  including:	  age,	  gender,	  political	  affiliation,	  rural-­‐urban	  living,	  dietary	  preference,	  etc.	  	  Participants	  in	  the	  Control	  condition	  did	  not	  read	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation;	  instead	  they	  were	  provided	  generic	  information	  modified	  from	  the	  Wikipedia	  entry	  for	  “hay”.	  This	  material	  was	  selected	  as	  it	  was	  loosely	  related	  to	  the	  study	  focus	  (agricultural	  issues)	  and	  was	  edited	  to	  approximate	  word	  count	  and	  cognitive	  load	  requirements	  of	  the	  treatment	  condition	  (e.g.	  “Hay	  is	  grass,	  legumes	  or	  other	  herbaceous	  plants	  that	  have	  been	  cut,	  dried,	  and	  stored	  for	  use	  as	  animal	  fodder,	  particularly	  for	  grazing	  livestock	  such	  as	  cattle,	  horses,	  goats,	  and	  sheep.”).	  Subjects	  in	  the	  Control	  condition	  then	  completed	  the	  identical	  buffer,	  the	  modified	  farmer	  trust	  inventory,	  general	  perceptions	  items	  and	  demographics,	  all	  in	  the	  same	  order	  as	  the	  Law	  condition.	  	  Upon	  completion,	  all	  participants	  were	  debriefed,	  thanked	  and	  paid	  $0.50.	  	  4.3	   Results	  	   Participants	  were	  excluded	  from	  analysis	  (n	  =	  42)	  for	  invariant	  responding	  or	  failure	  to	  pass	  an	  attention	  check	  (Oppenheimer	  et	  al.,	  2009)	  leaving	  a	  final	  sample	  of	  716	  participants.	  	  Subjects	  included	  in	  this	  study	  consisted	  of	  a	  nationally	  diverse	  sample	  of	  716	  U.S.	  adults.	  The	  sample	  was	  49%	  female	  with	  the	  majority	  (78%)	  of	  respondents	  between	  18	  and	  44	  years	  of	  age.	  Complete	  demographic	  information	  can	  be	  seen	  in	  Figure	  4.1.	  Demographics	  were	  consistent	  with	  large	  body	  of	  literature	  showing	  that	  M-­‐turk	    71 participants	  are	  significantly	  more	  representative	  than	  standard	  convenience	  samples.	  Of	  participants	  who	  received	  information	  about	  the	  law	  (n	  =	  324),	  few	  (9%)	  reported	  being	  aware	  of	  such	  legislation	  before	  participating	  in	  the	  current	  study.	  A	  majority	  of	  those	  who	  received	  information	  about	  the	  law	  were	  opposed	  to	  it	  (64%	  opposed	  vs.	  24%	  support).	   Table	  4.1	  	  Demographic	  characteristics	  of	  sample	  and	  test	  of	  condition	  independence.	  Demographics	  (%)	   Total	  n	  =	  716	  	  Control	  n	  =	  392	  Treatment	  n	  =	  324	  P	  value	  Age	  	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  18-­‐24	   123(17.2)	   65(16.6)	   58(17.9)	   .884	  	  	  	  	  25-­‐34	   316(44.1)	   175(44.6)	   141(43.5)	   	  	  	  	  	  35-­‐44	   121(16.9)	   66(16.8)	   55(17.0)	   	  	  	  	  	  45-­‐54	   73(10.2)	   43(10.1)	   30(9.3)	   	  	  	  	  	  55-­‐64	   68(9.5)	   38(9.7)	   30(9.3)	   	  	  	  	  	  65	  or	  Above	   13(1.8)	   4(1.0)	   9(2.8)	   	  	   	   	   	   	  Female	  	   348(48.6)	   195(49.7)	   153(47.2)	   .509	  	   	   	   	   	  Education	  	   	   	   	   .970	  	  	  	  	  Some	  high	  school	   8(1.1)	   4	  (1.0)	   4(1.2)	   	  	  	  	  	  High	  school	  graduate	  	   65(9.1)	   37(9.4)	   28(8.6)	   	  	  	  	  	  Trade	  or	  vocational	  degree	   16(2.2)	   13(3.3)	   3(0.9)	   	  	  	  	  	  Some	  college	   196(27.4)	   93(23.7)	   103(31.8)	   	  	  	  	  	  Associate	  degree	   86(12.0)	   59(15.1)	   27(8.3)	   	  	  	  	  	  Bachelors	  degree	   256(35.8)	   138(35.2)	   118(36.4)	   	  	  	  	  	  Graduate	  or	  profess.	  degree	   87(12.2)	   47(11.0)	   40(12.3)	   	  	   	   	   	   	  Living	  Environment	   	   	   	   .523	  	  	  	  	  Urban	   209(29.2)	   108(27.6)	   101(31.2)	   	  	  	  	  	  Suburban	   364(50.8)	   201(51.3)	   163(50.3)	   	  	  	  	  	  Rural	   136(19.0)	   79(20.2)	   57(17.6)	   	  	  	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	  Total	  Household	  Income	   	   	   	   .386	  	  	  	  	  Less	  than	  60,000	   475(66.3)	   267(68.1)	   208(64.2)	   	    72 Demographics	  (%)	   Total	  n	  =	  716	  	   Control	  n	  =	  392	   Treatment	  n	  =	  324	   P	  value	  	  	  	  	  $60,001	  –	  $199,999	   197(27.5)	   99(25.3)	   98(30.2)	   	  	  	  	  	  >	  $200,000	   11(1.5)	   9(2.3)	   2(0.6)	   	  	   	   	   	   	  Political	  Party	  Affiliation	   	   	   	   .222	  	  	  	  	  Democrat	   293(40.9)	   151(38.5)	   142(43.8)	   	  	  	  	  	  Republican	   118(16.5)	   69(17.6)	   49(15.1)	   	  	  	  	  	  Independent	   280(39.1)	   157(40.1)	   123(38.0)	   	  	   	   	   	   	  Religious	   277(38.7)	   150(38.3)	   127(39.2)	   .736	  	   	   	   	   	  Pet	  Owner	   457(64)	   246(62.8)	   211(65.1)	   .519	  	   	   	   	   	  Vegetarian/Vegan	   56(8)	   27(6.9)	   29(9.0)	   .320	  	   	   	   	   	    Negatively-­‐worded	  items	  measuring	  trust	  were	  reversed	  scored	  and	  then	  combined	  to	  form	  an	  index	  of	  trust	  ranging	  from	  1	  (complete	  distrust)	  to	  7	  (complete	  trust).	  The	  10-­‐item	  trust	  inventory	  showed	  high	  internal	  reliability	  (α	  =	  0.91,	  CI95	  [95%	  Confidence	  Interval]	  0.89,	  0.93).	  The	  mean	  trust	  score	  in	  the	  control	  condition	  was	  4.47	  (SD	  =	  1.02);	  participants	  in	  the	  Law	  condition	  had	  lower	  trust,	  with	  a	  mean	  trust	  rating	  of	  3.59	  (SD	  =	  0.98).	  	  Thus,	  learning	  of	  the	  restriction	  to	  information	  flow	  proposed	  by	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation	  lead	  to	  0.88	  (CI95	  0.73,	  1.03)	  point	  drop	  in	  trust	  (t(714)	  =	  11.72,	  p	  <	  0.0001);	  Fig.	  4.1).	  This	  effect	  remained	  significant	  after	  controlling	  for	  all	  demographic	  characteristics	  (0.83;	  CI95	  0.68,	  0.98;	  t(662)	  =	  10.88,	  p	  <	  .0001	  (Table	  4.2).	  	      73  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4-­‐1	  Trust	  in	  farmers	  significantly	  decreases	  after	  learning	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  laws	  (p	  <	  .0001).	  Filled	  points	  (·)	  represent	  participants	  in	  the	  Control	  condition;	  open	  circles	  (o)	  represent	  participants	  in	  the	  Law	  condition;	  error	  bars	  correspond	  to	  99%	  confidence	  intervals	  of	  the	  mean.	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  Table	  4.2	  	  Effect	  of	  treatment	  by	  demographic	  category.	  Variable	   β	   SE	   t-­‐value	   P	  Intercept	   5.03	   0.22	   	   	  Law	  	   -­‐0.83	   0.08	   -­‐10.88	   <.001	  Female	   -­‐0.05	   0.08	   -­‐0.61	   .541	  Age	  	   0.00	   0.03	   0.07	   .948	  Education	   -­‐0.02	   0.03	   -­‐0.75	   .453	  Income	   0.07	   0.08	   0.94	   .347	  Democrat	  (vs.	  Republican)	   -­‐0.30	   0.11	   -­‐2.73	   .006	  Independent	  (vs.	  Republican)	   -­‐0.33	   0.11	   -­‐2.97	   .003	  Urban	  (vs.	  rural)	   -­‐0.36	   0.11	   -­‐3.21	   .001	  Suburban	  (vs.	  rural)	   -­‐0.22	   0.10	   -­‐2.12	   .034	  Pet	  owner	   -­‐0.16	   0.08	   -­‐1.92	   .056	  Religious	   0.14	   0.08	   1.73	   .084	  Vegetarian	  	   -­‐0.52	   0.14	   -­‐3.61	   <.001	    74 Further	  analysis	  showed	  that	  the	  effect	  of	  reading	  about	  the	  law	  was	  similar	  across	  important	  demographic	  groups.	  For	  participants	  on	  the	  Control	  condition,	  Republicans	  held	  the	  highest	  levels	  of	  trust	  in	  farmers	  (mean	  =	  4.82,	  SD	  =	  0.98)	  compared	  to	  Democrats	  (mean	  =	  4.42,	  SD	  =	  1.02)	  and	  Independents	  (mean	  =	  4.35,	  SD	  =	  1.02).	  The	  drop	  in	  trust	  after	  reading	  about	  the	  law	  did	  not	  vary	  by	  political	  affiliation	  (p	  >	  0.9)	  and	  the	  magnitude	  of	  decline	  was	  such	  that	  Republicans	  who	  had	  read	  about	  the	  law	  reported	  less	  trust	  in	  farmers	  than	  Democrats	  who	  had	  not	  read	  the	  law	  (Fig.	  2a.).	  	  Similarly,	  people	  living	  in	  rural	  areas	  were	  more	  trusting	  in	  farmers	  than	  those	  living	  in	  the	  suburbs	  or	  urban	  environments.	  Again,	  the	  drop	  in	  trust	  after	  reading	  the	  law	  did	  not	  vary	  by	  living	  environment	  (urban-­‐rural)	  (p	  >	  0.6)	  and	  was	  so	  large	  that	  people	  living	  in	  rural	  environments	  who	  had	  read	  about	  the	  law	  reported	  less	  trust	  in	  farmers	  than	  people	  living	  in	  urban	  environments	  who	  had	  not	  read	  about	  the	  law	  (Fig.	  2b.)	  	  Finally,	  omnivores	  reported	  more	  trust	  in	  farmers	  than	  did	  vegetarians	  (see	  Table	  1).	  Again,	  the	  drop	  in	  trust	  after	  reading	  about	  the	  law	  did	  not	  vary	  with	  diet	  (p	  =	  0.139).	  Omnivores	  who	  had	  read	  about	  the	  law	  reported	  less	  trust	  in	  farmers	  than	  vegetarians	  who	  had	  not	  read	  about	  the	  law	  (Fig.	  2c.).	  	    75  Figure	  4-­‐2	  	  Regardless	  of	  (a)	  political	  affiliation,	  (b)	  living	  environment	  and	  (c)	  dietary	  preference	  -­‐	  trust	  in	  farmers	  significantly	  decreased	  after	  learning	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  laws	  (p	  <	  .001).	  	  Points	  (·)	  represent	  participants	  in	  the	  Control	  condition;	  open	  circles	  (o)	  represent	  participants	  in	  the	  Law	  condition;	  error	  bars	  correspond	  to	  99%	  confidence	  intervals	  of	  the	  mean.	  	  	  	  	  Learning	  of	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation	  also	  reduced	  perceptions	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  by	  0.73	  points	  (CI95	  0.50,	  0.95;	  t(714)	  =	  6.42,	  p	  <	  .0001)	  and	  reduced	  how	  comfortable	  participants	  reported	  feeling	  about	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  by	  0.31	  points	  (CI95	  0.08,	  0.54;	  t(714)	  =	  2.62,	  p	  =	  	  .009).	  	  Learning	  of	  the	  law	  increased	  support	  for	  stricter	  laws	  protecting	  (a) (b) (c)   76 farm	  animals	  by	  0.23	  points	  (CI95	  .01,	  0.44;	  t(714)	  =	  2.07,	  p	  =	  .038)	  and,	  interestingly,	  decreased	  the	  perception	  that	  farmers	  do	  a	  good	  job	  of	  protecting	  the	  environment	  by	  0.50	  points	  (CI95	  0.29,	  0.72;	  t(714)	  =	  4.49,	  p	  <	  .0001).	  Reading	  about	  the	  law	  did	  not	  affect	  perceptions	  of	  food	  safety	  or	  worker’s	  rights	  (p’s	  >	  0.15).	   4.4	   Discussion	  and	  conclusion	   Results	  of	  this	  study	  showed	  that	  learning	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation,	  which	  restricts	  the	  flow	  of	  information	  coming	  out	  of	  farms,	  reduced	  trust	  in	  farmers.	  This	  finding	  is	  consistent	  with	  previous	  predictions	  that	  have,	  until	  now,	  remained	  empirically	  untested	  (Adam,	  2011:	  Negowetti,	  2014).	  The	  reduction	  in	  trust	  we	  observed	  was	  as	  pronounced	  among	  the	  most	  initially	  trusting	  demographic	  categories	  (rural,	  conservative,	  omnivores)	  as	  it	  was	  among	  the	  least	  trusting	  (urban,	  liberal,	  vegetarians).	  Importantly,	  the	  overall	  decrease	  in	  trust	  represented	  a	  shift	  from	  slightly	  trusting,	  to	  slightly	  distrusting	  farmers.	  	  Consistent	  with	  previous	  research	  showing	  that	  low	  levels	  of	  trust	  are	  associated	  with	  increased	  support	  for	  sanctions	  (Balliet	  and	  Van	  Lange,	  2013),	  exposure	  to	  information	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation	  also	  increased	  support	  for	  more	  regulations	  aimed	  at	  protecting	  farm	  animals.	  Animal	  welfare	  regulations	  increase	  industry-­‐operating	  costs	  (Brouwer,	  2012)	  that	  are	  then	  passed	  down	  to	  consumers.	  Following	  California’s	  implementation	  of	  voter	  approved	  animal	  welfare	  regulations	  governing	  space	  requirements	  for	  laying	  hens,	  consumer	  egg	  prices	  increased	  by	  33-­‐70%	  (Malone	  and	  Lusk,	  2016).	  	  This	  range	  is	  commensurate	  with	  estimated	  per	  unit	  cost	  increases	  borne	  by	  producers	  (Sumner	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  	  Regulations	  also	  affect	  non-­‐consuming	  taxpayers	  in	  the	    77 form	  of	  increased	  taxes	  for	  administrative	  and	  enforcement	  activities	  associated	  with	  new	  regulations	  (Antle,	  1999).	  	  Lending	  support	  to	  the	  view	  that	  ag-­‐gag	  laws	  foster	  the	  impression	  farmers	  have	  something	  to	  hide	  (Broad,	  2014),	  we	  found	  perceptions	  of	  the	  current	  status	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  were	  more	  negative	  among	  participants	  exposed	  to	  information	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  laws	  compared	  with	  subjects	  in	  the	  control	  group.	  Notably,	  this	  effect	  was	  limited	  to	  perceptions	  relating	  to	  the	  care	  and	  welfare	  of	  animals;	  it	  did	  not	  affect	  perceptions	  of	  worker	  rights	  or	  food	  safety.	  Learning	  about	  the	  law	  did	  affect	  perceptions	  of	  farmers’	  care	  of	  the	  environment,	  however.	  	  After	  reading	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  laws,	  fewer	  participants	  agreed	  with	  the	  statement,	  “Farmers	  do	  a	  good	  job	  of	  protecting	  the	  environment	  (water,	  air,	  soil,	  wildlife	  etc.)”.	  Taken	  together	  these	  results	  suggest	  that	  blocking	  access	  to	  information	  about	  one	  domain	  of	  activity	  (e.g.	  treatment	  of	  animals),	  may	  cause	  people	  to	  form	  negative	  impressions	  of	  activities	  in	  closely	  related	  domains	  (e.g.	  treatment	  of	  the	  environment,	  etc.),	  but	  not	  in	  more	  distantly	  related	  domains	  (e.g.	  food	  safety).	  	  	  Previous	  research	  has	  found	  animal	  protection	  groups	  are	  considered	  to	  be	  more	  credible	  sources	  of	  information	  sources	  than	  livestock	  industry	  groups	  (McKendree	  et	  al.,	  2014)	  and	  that	  this	  positive	  perception	  tends	  to	  increase	  following	  animal	  abuse	  scandals	  (Scudder	  and	  Bishop-­‐Mills,	  2009;	  Tiplady	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  This	  reaction	  is	  consistent	  with	  the	  general	  societal	  tendency	  to	  view	  whistleblowers	  favorably	  (Callahan	  and	  Dworkin,	  2000),	  despite	  their	  destabilizing	  social	  impacts	  (Hersh,	  2002).	  Thus,	  it	  is	  possible	  that	  in	  addition	  to	  harming	  their	  own	  reputations,	  individuals	  or	  organizations	  attempting	  to	  block	  access	  to	  information	  may	  also	  be	  bolstering	  the	  credibility	  of	  their	  antagonists.	  	  While	  we	  were	  unable	  to	  test	  this	  hypothesis	  in	  the	  current	  research,	  these	  findings	  suggest	  intriguing	  follow	  up	  studies	  investigating	  the	  ramifications	  of	  reducing	  transparency.	  	  	    78 The	  communication	  and	  conflict	  resolution	  literatures	  point	  towards	  more	  productive	  reactions	  to	  crises.	  Responses	  previously	  identified	  as	  resulting	  in	  more	  positive	  evaluations	  of	  transgressors	  have	  included	  acceptance	  of	  responsibility	  (Nadler	  and	  Liviatan	  2006),	  apology	  (Ohbuchi	  et	  al.,	  1989),	  expressions	  of	  empathy	  and	  remorse	  for	  victims	  (Schwartz	  et	  al.	  1978;	  Pace	  et	  al.,	  2010)	  and	  corrective	  action	  (Dutta	  and	  Pullig	  2011).	  Our	  results	  provide	  initial	  support	  that	  increasing	  operational	  transparency	  also	  merits	  consideration	  for	  inclusion	  with	  these	  other	  accommodative	  responses.	  These	  findings	  indicate	  that	  restricting	  access	  to	  information	  can	  have	  negative	  reputational	  consequences	  for	  the	  interested	  parties.	  	  Indeed,	  it	  is	  possible	  that	  the	  intention	  to	  reduce	  transparency	  erodes	  trust	  more	  than	  awareness	  of	  the	  negative	  events	  they	  seek	  to	  inhibit.	  The	  relevance	  of	  this	  dynamic	  becomes	  especially	  important	  when	  one	  considers	  that	  the	  majority	  of	  legislation	  introduced	  in	  the	  U.S.	  never	  becomes	  law,	  yet	  can	  still	  receive	  significant	  public	  attention.	  	  	  	   	    79 Chapter	  5:	  The	  case	  of	  dehorning	  young	  dairy	  calves	  –	  a	  painful	  procedure.	  5.1	   Introduction	   Disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  are	  common	  management	  practices	  on	  dairy	  farms	  performed	  to	  reduce	  the	  likelihood	  of	  injury	  to	  cattle	  and	  farm	  workers	  (AVMA,	  2012).	  The	  term	  ‘disbudding’	  refers	  to	  the	  destruction	  or	  excision	  of	  horn	  producing	  cells	  before	  skull	  attachment;	  ‘dehorning’	  entails	  the	  excision	  of	  the	  horn	  after	  this	  tissue	  has	  attached	  to	  the	  skull.	  The	  time	  of	  attachment	  varies	  by	  breed	  and	  individual	  animal,	  but	  is	  thought	  to	  occur	  around	  8	  weeks	  of	  age	  when	  the	  horn	  bud	  is	  approximately	  5-­‐10	  mm	  long	  (Stafford	  and	  Mellor,	  2005).	  Disbudding	  is	  usually	  achieved	  by	  burning	  the	  innervated	  tissue	  immediately	  surrounding	  the	  bud	  either	  using	  a	  hot	  iron	  (~600	  °C)	  or	  caustic	  paste,	  while	  dehorning	  is	  typically	  done	  surgically	  using	  a	  mechanical	  gouger,	  wire	  or	  saw.	  Since	  disbudding	  is	  performed	  at	  an	  earlier	  age	  and	  entails	  less	  tissue	  damage,	  it	  is	  generally	  considered	  less	  invasive	  and	  therefore	  preferable	  to	  dehorning	  (AVMA,	  2012).	  Several	  U.S.	  studies	  have	  found	  a	  substantial	  proportion	  of	  calves	  are	  dehorned	  rather	  than	  disbudded	  (Fulwider	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  USDA-­‐NAHMS,	  2009).	  Regardless	  of	  timing	  or	  method,	  there	  is	  considerable	  behavioral,	  physiological	  and	  cognitive	  research	  indicating	  that	  all	  forms	  of	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  are	  painful	  (Stafford	  and	  Mellor,	  2011).	  To	  address	  the	  pain	  caused	  by	  these	  procedures,	  a	  variety	  of	  pain	  management	  strategies	  have	  been	  investigated.	  The	  administration	  of	  local	  anesthesia	  (e.g.	  lidocaine)	  in	  combination	  with	  non-­‐steroidal	  anti-­‐inflammatory	  drugs	  (e.g.	  meloxicam)	  has	  been	  shown	  to	  provide	  effective	  pain	  control	  throughout	  the	  intra-­‐	  and	    80 post-­‐operative	  periods	  (McMeekan	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Milligan	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Stewart	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Heinrich	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Stilwell	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Huber	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  Distress	  associated	  with	  the	  handling	  and	  restraint	  required	  for	  administration	  of	  anesthetics	  and	  analgesics	  can	  be	  mitigated	  with	  the	  use	  of	  a	  sedative	  (e.g.	  xylazine)	  administered	  before	  the	  procedure	  (Faulkner	  and	  Weary,	  2000).	  	  These	  findings	  have	  informed	  a	  number	  of	  policies.	  The	  Council	  of	  Europe,	  that	  represents	  47	  member	  countries	  including	  all	  of	  the	  European	  Union	  member	  states,	  recommends	  the	  use	  of	  pain	  relief	  when	  disbudding	  calves	  more	  than	  4	  weeks	  of	  age	  (ALCASDE,	  2009).	  In	  Sweden,	  Denmark	  and	  the	  Netherlands	  pain	  relief	  is	  legally	  required	  when	  disbudding/dehorning	  regardless	  of	  age	  (ALCASDE,	  2009).	  There	  are	  no	  such	  legal	  requirements	  in	  the	  U.S.	  or	  Canada.	  However,	  the	  recently	  revised	  U.S.	  National	  Milk	  Producers	  Federation	  Farmers	  Assuring	  Responsible	  Management	  animal	  welfare	  program	  (NMPF-­‐FARM)	  recommends	  calves	  be	  disbudded	  before	  8	  weeks	  of	  age	  using	  pain	  mitigation	  (NMPF,	  2013).	  The	  Canadian	  Code	  of	  Practice	  for	  Care	  and	  Handling	  of	  Dairy	  Cattle	  states,	  “Pain	  control	  must	  be	  used	  when	  dehorning	  or	  disbudding”	  (NFACC,	  2009).	  	  Regulations	  regarding	  pain	  control	  for	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  are	  also	  in	  place	  in	  New	  Zealand	  (NAWAC,	  2005)	  and	  Australia	  (PIMC,	  2004).	  	  	  Despite	  evidence	  these	  procedures	  are	  painful,	  use	  of	  pain	  mitigation	  remains	  low	  in	  many	  parts	  of	  the	  world.	  For	  example,	  multiple	  U.S.	  surveys	  indicate	  that	  less	  than	  18%	  of	  dairy	  farms	  reported	  using	  pain	  relief	  when	  disbudding	  or	  dehorning	  (Hoe	  and	  Ruegg,	  2006;	  Fulwider	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  USDA,	  2009).	  In	  a	  survey	  of	  more	  than	  600	  Italian	  dairy	  farmers	  less	  than	  20%	  reported	  using	  some	  form	  of	  pain	  relief	  (Gottardo	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  and	  a	  survey	  of	  over	  400	  French	  dairy	  farms	  found	  that	  only	  8	  farms	  used	  local	  anesthesia	  for	  these	  procedures	  (Le	  Cozler	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  	  In	  Canada,	  the	  reported	  use	  of	  local	  anesthesia	    81 was	  22%	  in	  Ontario	  (Misch	  et	  al.,	  2007)	  and	  45%	  in	  Quebec	  (Vasseur	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Smaller	  farms	  appear	  somewhat	  more	  likely	  to	  provide	  pain	  relief	  (Gottardo	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  perhaps	  because	  veterinarians	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  perform	  these	  procedures	  on	  smaller	  farms	  (USDA,	  2009).	  That	  said,	  involvement	  of	  a	  veterinarian	  is	  no	  guarantee	  pain	  relief	  will	  be	  provided;	  37%	  of	  veterinarians	  in	  the	  United	  States	  (Fajt	  et	  al.,	  2011)	  and	  between	  8-­‐15%	  of	  veterinarians	  in	  Canada	  (Hewson	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Misch	  et	  al.	  (2007)	  reported	  not	  using	  analgesia	  when	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves	  (<	  6	  months	  of	  age).	  	  Analyzing	  the	  views	  of	  stakeholders	  may	  aid	  in	  identifying	  barriers	  to	  adoption	  of	  pain	  mitigation	  when	  disbudding/dehorning	  dairy	  calves.	  The	  goals	  of	  this	  study	  were	  to:	  1)	  assess	  the	  normative	  beliefs	  of	  various	  stakeholders	  with	  respect	  to	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  and,	  2)	  identify	  and	  reconcile	  discrepancies	  between	  these	  beliefs	  and	  available	  evidence.   5.2	   Methods	   This	  study	  received	  ethics	  approval	  from	  the	  Behavioural	  Research	  Ethics	  Board	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia’s	  (UBC)	  “Your	  Views”	  web	  site	  (www.yourviews.ubc.ca)	  was	  created	  to	  engage	  people	  on	  ethical	  issues	  regarding	  science	  and	  technology.	  The	  “Cow	  Views”	  section	  focused	  on	  animal	  welfare	  topics	  related	  to	  dairy	  production.	  We	  used	  the	  N-­‐Reasons	  platform	  designed	  to	  improve	  public	  participation	  in	  ethically	  significant	  social	  decisions	  (Danielson,	  2010),	  including	  contentious	  issues	  facing	  the	  dairy	  industry	  (see	  Weary	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Ventura	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Schuppli	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  The	  N-­‐Reasons	  platform	  allowed	  for	  the	  collection	  of	  responses	  to	  close-­‐ended	  questions	  (Yes,	  No	  and	  Neutral)	  and	  open-­‐ended	  comments	  (the	  participant’s	  reasons	  for	    82 their	  choice).	  Participants	  were	  able	  to	  see	  votes	  and	  reasons	  put	  forward	  by	  previous	  participants,	  creating	  a	  virtual	  'town-­‐hall'	  environment.	  Self-­‐administered,	  internet	  surveys	  such	  as	  this	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  minimize	  social	  desirability	  bias	  relative	  to	  more	  traditional,	  direct	  methods	  (Tourangeau	  and	  Yan	  2007;	  Chang	  and	  Krosnick	  2009;	  Heerwegh	  2009).	  	  Data	  were	  collected	   from	  November	  30,	  2010	  until	   July	  12,	  2012.	  The	  survey	  was	  made	   available	   on	   the	   worldwide	   web,	   so	   anyone	   with	   access	   to	   the	   Internet	   could	  participate.	   Internet	   surveys	   result	   in	   diverse	   samples	   comparable	   to	   more	   traditional	  survey	  methods	   (Gosling	   et	   al.,	   2004).	  We	   preferentially	   targeted	   individuals	  working	   in	  the	   United	   States	   and	   Canadian	   dairy	   industry	   via	   advertisement	   at	   producer	   meetings,	  contacts	   at	   the	  United	   States	  Department	  of	  Agriculture,	   livestock	   feed	   companies,	   and	   a	  livestock	   pharmaceutical	   company.	   Additionally,	   we	   targeted	   animal	   advocates	   via	   a	  posting	   in	   the	  newsletter	  of	   the	  British	  Columbia	  Society	   for	   the	  Prevention	  of	  Cruelty	   to	  Animals.	   Broader	   public	   input	   was	   gathered	   from	   participants	   recruited	   via	   Amazon’s	  Mechanical	  Turk	  crowd	  sourcing	  service	  (www.mturk.com).	  This	  combined	  sample	  should	  not	   be	   considered	   representative	   of	   any	   particular	   population.	   Rather	   our	   intent	  was	   to	  describe	  the	  range	  of	  themes	  that	  participants	  provide	  to	  support	  their	  views	  on	  this	  issue.	  	  	   Participants	  taking	  the	  survey	  were	  provided	  with	  the	  following	  information	  on	  the	  practice	  of	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  dairy	  cattle:	  	   “The	  developing	  horns	  of	  dairy	  calves	  are	  typically	  removed	  to	  reduce	  the	  risk	  of	  injuries	  to	  farm	  workers	  or	  other	  cattle	  that	  can	  be	  caused	  by	  horned	  cattle.	  Horns	  of	  calves	  three	  months	  of	  age	  or	  older	  are	  normally	  removed	  surgically	  (“dehorning”)	  by	  scooping,	  shearing	  or	  sawing.	  Horn	  buds	  of	  younger	  calves	  are	  typically	  removed	  (“disbudding”)	  using	  a	  caustic	  paste	  or	  a	  hot	  iron.	  	    83 There	  is	  considerable	  scientific	  evidence	  that	  all	  of	  these	  procedures	  cause	  pain.	  The	  immediate	  pain	  can	  be	  reduced	  using	  a	  local	  anesthetic	  to	  provide	  a	  nerve	  block	  –	  this	  procedure	  has	  been	  used	  safely	  for	  decades	  and	  costs	  just	  pennies	  a	  shot.	  Pain	  can	  persist	  24	  hours	  or	  more;	  this	  longer	  lasting	  pain	  can	  be	  reduced	  using	  non-­‐steroidal	  anti-­‐inflammatory	  drugs	  (like	  the	  ibuprofen	  you	  take	  for	  a	  headache).	  Providing	  calves	  a	  sedative	  before	  the	  procedure	  can	  reduce	  handling	  stress	  and	  make	  the	  procedure	  easier	  to	  carry	  out.	  	  In	  many	  countries	  some	  pain	  relief	  is	  required.	  For	  example,	  Canada’s	  new	  Code	  of	  Practice	  for	  the	  Care	  and	  Handling	  of	  Dairy	  Cattle	  requires	  that	  pain	  control	  be	  used.	  Approximately	  18%	  of	  dairy	  farms	  in	  the	  United	  States	  report	  using	  pain	  relieving	  drugs	  for	  disbudding	  or	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves.”	  	  Participants	  were	  then	  asked:	  “Should	  we	  provide	  pain	  relief	  for	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves?"	  	  	   As	  people	  joined	  the	  discussion	  they	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  into	  one	  of	  eight	  groups	  (virtual	  ‘town	  halls’)	  with	  a	  mean	  size	  of	  44	  participants.	  Within	  each	  group,	  subsequent	  participants	  could	  see	  all	  previous	  participant’s	  responses	  (yes/no/neutral	  vote,	  reasons	  and	  number	  of	  votes	  earned	  for	  each	  reason),	  but	  not	  responses	  from	  other	  groups.	  This	  way,	  each	  group	  provided	  an	  independent	  assessment	  and	  ensured	  that	  an	  especially	  articulate	  or	  persuasive	  reason	  could	  only	  influence	  votes	  within	  a	  single	  group.	  	   Participants	  were	  asked	  to	  provide	  basic	  demographic	  information	  including	  gender	  (male	  or	  female),	  age	  (19-­‐29,	  29-­‐39,	  39-­‐49,	  49-­‐59,	  60+),	  educational	  attainment	  (secondary,	  college/university,	  masters/doctorate,	  other)	  or	  country	  of	  origin	  (U.S.,	  Canada,	  other).	  Participants	  were	  also	  asked,	  “Which	  best	  describes	  your	  involvement	  with	  dairy	  production?”	  Choices	  included:	  no	  involvement,	  dairy	  producer/worker,	  student,	  veterinarian,	  dairy	  industry	  professional	  (e.g.	  nutritionist),	  or	  animal	  advocate.	  Differences	  among	  groups,	  and	  the	  effect	  of	  each	  demographic	  variable,	  on	  quantitative	  responses	  were	  tested	  separately	  using	  a	  Chi-­‐square	  test,	  with	  significance	  declared	  at	  P	  <	  0.05	  (2-­‐tailed).	    84 	   Similar	  to	  previous	  studies	  using	  the	  N-­‐Reasons	  platform	  (Weary	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Ventura	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  participants	  were	  not	  required	  to	  write	  their	  own	  reason	  for	  their	  vote.	  	  They	  could	  select	  reasons	  submitted	  by	  other	  participants	  within	  their	  group.	  	  There	  was	  no	  limit	  as	  to	  how	  many	  unique	  reasons	  participants	  could	  select;	  however	  each	  selection	  was	  discounted	  by	  the	  total	  number	  of	  selections	  made	  by	  that	  individual;	  in	  this	  way,	  each	  participant	  could	  contribute	  just	  one	  ‘vote’	  in	  total.	  	  Reasons	  were	  coded	  following	  the	  methods	  described	  by	  Knight	  and	  Barnett	  (2008).	  Two	  evaluators	  (J.	  A.	  Robbins	  and	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli),	  blind	  to	  demographic	  information,	  independently	  examined	  each	  reason	  line-­‐by	  line,	  breaking	  them	  down	  into	  smaller	  ‘chunks’.	  They	  then	  met	  to	  compare	  results	  and	  reconcile	  any	  discrepancies.	  	  Finally,	  these	  ‘chunks’	  were	  compared	  and	  organized	  into	  common	  themes.	  	  	  5.3	   Quantitative	  results	   A	  total	  of	  354	  individuals	  participated	  in	  this	  study	  (Table	  5.1).	  Of	  these,	  65%	  were	  female,	  53%	  were	  >30	  years	  old,	  91%	  were	  from	  either	  the	  U.S.	  or	  Canada,	  and	  22%	  had	  graduate	  degrees.	  Participants	  self-­‐identified	  their	  involvement	  in	  the	  dairy	  industry	  as:	  dairy	  producer/worker	  (10%);	  veterinarian/industry	  professional	  (7%);	  student	  (16%);	  animal	  advocate	  (9%);	  or	  no	  involvement	  (57%).	  	   Table	  5.1 The	  number	  (and	  %)	  of	  participants	  (n	  =354)	  who	  supported	  (“Yes”),	  opposed	  (“No”)	  or	  were	  “Neutral”	  regarding	  the	  provision	  of	  pain	  relief	  for	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves.	  1,2 	   Yes	   No	   Neutral	  All	  participants	  (n	  =	  354)	   320(90.4%)	   16(4.5%)	   18(5.1%)	  Gender	  (n	  =339)	   	   	   	    85 	   Yes	   No	   Neutral	  Female	   207(93.2%)	   5(2.3%)	   10(4.5%)	  Male	   99(84.6%)	   11(9.4%)	   7(6.0%)	  Age	  (n	  =339)	   	   	   	  19-­‐29	   143(89.9%)	   9(5.7%)	   7(4.4%)	  30-­‐39	   71(89.9%)	   1(1.3%)	   7(8.9%)	  40-­‐49	   51(92.7%)	   3(5.4%)	   1(1.8%)	  50-­‐59	   25(89.3%)	   2(7.1%)	   1(3.6%)	  60	  +	   16(88.9%)	   1(5.6%)	   1(5.6%)	  Country	  of	  Origin	  (n	  =	  339)	   	   	   	  Canada	   110(89.4%)	   8(6.5%)	   5(4.1%)	  U.S.A	   168(90.8%)	   6(3.2%)	   11(5.6%)	  Other	   28(90.3%)	   2(6.5%)	   1(3.2%)	  Dairy	  background	  (n	  =336)	   	   	   	  Producer/Worker	   29(82.9%)	   6(17.1%)	   0(0.0%)	  Veterinarian/Industry	  Professional	   22(91.7%)	   1(4.2%)	   1(4.2%)	  Student	   48(87.3%)	   4(7.3%)	   3(5.5%)	  No	  Involvement	   176(91.7%)	   4(2.1%)	   12(6.3%)	  Animal	  Advocate	   28(93.3%)	   1(3.3%)	   1(3.3%)	  Education	  (n=339)	   	   	   	  Secondary	   34(91.9%)	   2(5.4%)	   1(2.7%)	  College	   197(91.6%)	   7(3.3%)	   11(5.1%)	  Masters/Doctorate	   64(85.3%)	   6(8.0%)	   5(6.7%)	    86 	   Yes	   No	   Neutral	  Other	   11(91.7%)	   1(8.3%)	   0(0.0%)	  Group	  (n	  =	  354)	   	   	   	  1	  (n=51)	   46(90.2%)	   3(5.9%)	   2(3.9%)	  2	  (n=43)	   38(88.4%)	   3(7.0%)	   2(4.7%)	  3	  (n=47)	   38(80.9%)	   6(12.8%)	   3(6.4%)	  4	  (n=32)	   30(93.8%)	   0(0.0%)	   2(6.3%)	  5	  (n=69)	   66(95.7%)	   2(2.9%)	   1(1.5%)	  6	  (n=73)	   65(89.0%)	   0(0.0%)	   8(11.0%)	  7	  (n=18)	   17(94.4%)	   1(5.6%)	   0(0.0%)	  8	  (n=21)	   20(95.2%)	   1(4.8%)	   0(0.0%)	  Responses3	  (n	  =	  354)	   	   	   	  Single	   245(89.4%)	   15(5.5%)	   14(5.1%)	  Multiple	   75(93.8%)	   1(1.3%)	   4(5.0%)	  1	  Categories	  where	  n	  =	  <	  354	  reflect	  participants	  not	  providing	  demographic	  information.	  2	  Percentages	  have	  been	  rounded	  up	  so	  may	  not	  equal	  100%.	  3	  Participants	  selecting	  one,	  or	  more	  than	  one,	  unique	  reason	  to	  justify	  their	  vote.	  	  	  	   The	  majority	  (90%)	  of	  individuals	  believed	  that	  pain	  relief	  should	  be	  provided	  when	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves,	  with	  5%	  voting	  “No”	  and	  5%	  voting	  “Neutral”.	  The	  level	  of	  support	  tended	  to	  vary	  among	  groups,	  from	  a	  low	  of	  81%	  to	  a	  high	  of	  96%	  (χ2	  =	  23.0,	  d.f.	  =	  14,	  P	  =	  0.06).	  Support	  also	  varied	  in	  relation	  to	  involvement	  in	  the	  dairy	  industry,	  from	  a	  low	  of	  83%	  for	  dairy	  producers	  and	  farm	  workers	  to	  a	  high	  of	  93%	  for	  animal	  advocates	  (χ2	  =	  17.9,	  d.f.	  =	  8,	  P	  =	  0.02).	  Females	  were	  more	  supportive	  of	  providing	    87 pain	  relief	  than	  males	  (93%	  vs.	  85%;	  χ2	  =	  9.3,	  d.f.	  =	  2,	  P	  =	  0.01).	  There	  was	  no	  effect	  of	  education,	  country	  of	  origin	  or	  participant	  age	  on	  support	  for	  pain	  relief.	  	  	  5.4	   Qualitative	  results	   Participants	  provided	  101	  unique	  reasons	  in	  support	  of	  their	  positions.	  These	  written	  reasons	  averaged	  (±	  SD)	  23	  ±	  18	  words	  and	  130	  ±	  106	  characters	  in	  length.	  	  The	  dominant	  themes,	  and	  the	  %	  of	  unique	  reasons	  corresponding	  to	  these	  themes,	  were	  as	  follows:	  pain	  and	  suffering	  (67%),	  concerns	  about	  drug	  use	  (20%),	  ease	  and	  practicality	  (12%),	  alternatives	  (12%)	  and	  cost	  (11%).	  Participants	  from	  every	  demographic	  selected	  reasons	  that	  cited	  each	  of	  these	  themes.	  For	  example,	  reasons	  containing	  the	  theme	  pain	  and	  suffering	  were	  selected	  by	  the	  majority	  of	  participants	  in	  each	  of	  category	  of	  dairy	  industry	  involvement	  (i.e.	  by	  farmers,	  industry	  professionals,	  students,	  animal	  advocates,	  and	  those	  claiming	  no	  involvement	  with	  dairy).	  Participants	  in	  favor	  of	  pain	  control	  suggested	  that	  dehorning	  was	  painful	  and	  that	  pain	  mitigation	  was	  effective	  and	  practical	  to	  implement.	  They	  also	  believed	  pain	  relief	  was	  beneficial	  to	  the	  physical	  health	  and	  productivity	  of	  calves	  in	  terms	  of	  reduced	  stress	  and	  recovery	  times	  and	  that	  the	  use	  of	  pain	  relief	  makes	  the	  task	  of	  dehorning	  easier	  for	  the	  workers	  to	  perform.	  Reasons	  given	  in	  support	  were	  often	  phrased	  as	  moral	  claims;	  e.g.	  “this	  is	  just	  the	  right	  thing	  to	  do”,	  “it’s	  the	  most	  humane	  thing	  to	  do”	  and	  “we	  have	  a	  moral	  obligation…”	  (see	  Table	  5.2),	  and	  used	  terminology	  like	  “cruel”	  and	  “inhumane”	  to	  describe	  dehorning	  without	  pain	  relief.	  	  	  	   	    88 Table	  5.2	  The	  most	  popular	  reason	  cited	  within	  each	  of	  the	  8	  groups	  expressed	  as	  a	  total	  number	  of	  times	  the	  reason	  was	  voted	  for,	  divided	  by	  the	  total	  number	  of	  participants	  within	  the	  group,	  in	  response	  to	  the	  question	  “Should	  we	  provide	  pain	  relief	  when	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves?” Group	   n	   Percent	   Reason	  1	   51	   61	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “there	  is	  pain	  involved	  and	  the	  means	  are	  readily	  available	  to	  address	  the	  pain.	  We	  have	  the	  responsibility	  to	  treat	  production	  animals	  as	  co-­‐existent	  beings.	  It	  is	  valuable	  to	  the	  farmer/persons	  individual	  soul	  to	  have	  compassion	  for	  living	  beings	  animal	  and	  human.”	  2	   43	   58	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “we	  should	  try	  to	  alleviate	  pain	  in	  animals	  whenever	  possible.”	  3	   47	   51	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “if	  we	  have	  a	  way	  to	  reduce	  pain	  without	  many	  side-­‐effects	  then	  we	  should	  use	  it!”	  4	   32	   50	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “providing	  pain	  control	  should	  be	  standard	  practice	  on	  farms.	  Withholding	  pain	  control	  for	  such	  a	  painful	  procedure	  is	  unacceptable	  and	  inhumane.”	  5	   69	   55	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “it's	  the	  most	  humane	  thing	  to	  do.”	  6	   73	   79	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “the	  procedure	  produces	  pain.”	  7	   18	   61	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “it	  is	  only	  fair.	  Nothing	  should	  needlessly	  suffer.”	  8	   21	   62	   Yes	  because	  ...	  “while	  animals	  are	  useful	  for	  food	  production,	  they	  should	  not	  suffer	  in	  the	  process.”	  	  	   Opponents	  of	  pain	  relief	  also	  referenced	  pain,	  but	  expressed	  doubts	  about	  the	  intensity	  and	  duration	  of	  the	  pain,	  arguing,	  “the	  pain	  is	  only	  temporary”,	  “the	  pain	  is	  short	  term”	  and	  “I	  don’t	  believe	  the	  pain	  is	  excessive	  or	  long-­‐lasting”.	  Opponents	  also	  suggested	  that	  the	  young	  age	  of	  calves	  was	  a	  reason	  for	  not	  providing	  pain	  relief	  stating,	  “young	  calves	  are	  less	  sensitive	  to	  pain…”	  and	  “I	  hope	  to	  get	  it	  done	  as	  quickly	  as	  possible”.	  They	    89 also	  expressed	  doubts	  about	  the	  efficacy	  of	  pain	  control	  modalities,	  commenting	  “pain	  relief	  suggested	  is	  topical	  and	  has	  minimal	  impact	  on	  the	  calf”.	  Opponents	  also	  identified	  the	  additional	  cost	  as	  a	  reason	  why	  pain	  relief	  should	  not	  be	  provided.	  	  Concerns	  about	  drug	  use	  were	  mentioned	  across	  all	  possible	  vote	  categories	  (“Yes”,	  “No”	  and	  “Neutral”).	  	  One	  participant	  stated,	  “non-­‐steroidal	  anti-­‐inflammatory	  drugs	  can	  have	  negative	  side-­‐effects	  for	  the	  animals,	  including	  cardiovascular,	  gastrointestinal,	  liver,	  and	  kidney	  effects.	  The	  effect	  on	  humans	  who	  consume	  this	  meat	  should	  also	  be	  taken	  into	  account.”	  Another	  said,	  “I	  would	  wonder	  what,	  if	  any,	  long	  term	  effects	  there	  are	  on	  the	  animal	  and	  the	  milk	  they	  produce.	  To	  give	  medicine	  that	  only	  causes	  greater	  problems	  later	  for	  a	  short	  term	  pain	  would	  be	  unwise.”	  Similarly,	  another	  participant	  questioned,	  “will	  giving	  medication	  impact	  organic	  status?”	  and	  another	  asserted	  that	  recommendations	  “might	  have	  to	  be	  more	  flexible	  for	  organic	  farmers…”	  Reference	  to	  possible	  alternatives	  also	  emerged	  across	  vote	  categories	  with	  one	  participant	  suggesting,	  “the	  debate	  could	  be	  shifted	  to	  dehorning	  or	  not	  dehorning.	  Polled	  genetics	  can	  be	  used	  to	  reduce	  the	  number	  of	  animals	  requiring	  dehorning.	  Horns	  could	  be	  left	  on,	  cut	  farther	  from	  the	  skull	  where	  they	  don't	  cause	  pain.	  They	  continue	  to	  grow,	  but	  aren't	  pointy.”	  Others	  questioned	  the	  assumption	  that	  horns	  are	  inherently	  dangerous	  and	  therefore	  must	  be	  removed.	  As	  one	  participant	  stated,	  “Yes,	  certainly	  we	  should	  not	  want	  to	  cause	  pain.	  However,	  the	  original	  problem	  is	  a	  mistaken	  premise.	  We	  should	  not	  be	  dehorning	  or	  disbudding	  dairy	  calves	  in	  the	  first	  place.	  We	  should	  not	  be	  putting	  the	  animals	  in	  such	  close	  contact	  with	  each	  other	  that	  they	  will	  damage	  each	  other	  with	  their	  horns.	  Animals	  with	  enough	  room	  to	  move	  around	  would	  not	  require	  such	  cruel	  interventions.”	     90 5.5	   Discussion	   Previous	  research	  has	  characterized	  attitudes	  towards	  painful	  procedures	  including	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  of	  those	  closely	  allied	  with	  the	  dairy	  industry	  including:	  dairy	  producers	  (Hoe	  and	  Ruegg,	  2006;	  Gottardo	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Wikman	  et	  al.,	  2013)	  veterinarians	  (Huxley	  and	  Whay,	  2006;	  Laven	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Fajt	  et	  al.,	  2011)	  and	  university	  animal	  science	  faculty	  (Heleski	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  This	  study	  is	  the	  first	  to	  include	  non-­‐industry	  stakeholders	  in	  an	  interactive	  manner	  while	  also	  allowing	  for	  open-­‐ended	  responses.	  	  Rarely	  do	  industry	  and	  non-­‐industry	  perspectives	  directly	  interact	  to	  discuss	  animal	  welfare	  issues	  despite	  the	  fact	  that	  long-­‐term	  sustainability	  depends	  heavily	  on	  this	  type	  of	  engagement	  (Boogaard	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Miele	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  	  The	  reasons	  provided	  by	  opponents	  of	  pain	  relief	  (4.5%)	  were	  especially	  interesting.	  These	  appeared	  to	  reflect	  a	  variety	  of	  misconceptions	  that	  may	  contribute	  to	  calves	  being	  left	  untreated.	  Opponents	  of	  pain	  relief	  tended	  to	  downplay	  the	  intensity	  and	  duration	  of	  the	  pain	  and	  use	  this	  as	  justification	  for	  not	  providing	  pain	  relief.	  Previous	  work	  has	  shown	  a	  positive	  association	  between	  perceived	  painfulness	  and	  likelihood	  of	  analgesic	  use	  (Hewson	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  There	  is	  ample	  behavioral	  and	  physiological	  evidence	  that	  both	  dehorning	  and	  disbudding	  cause	  pain	  and	  distress	  regardless	  of	  timing	  or	  method	  used	  (Stafford	  and	  Mellor,	  2005;	  Stafford	  and	  Mellor,	  2011).	  Plasma	  cortisol	  concentrations	  remain	  elevated	  for	  approximately	  7-­‐	  9	  h	  (Sutherland	  et	  al.,	  2002)	  and	  differences	  in	  behavior	  such	  as	  grazing	  have	  been	  detected	  48	  h	  after	  dehorning	  (Stafford	  and	  Mellor,	  2005).	  More	  recent	  work	  by	  Neave	  et	  al.	  (2013)	  has	  shown	  calves	  dehorned	  without	  pain	  relief	  exhibit	  a	  pessimistic	  cognitive	  bias	  indicative	  of	  anxiety	  or	  depression.	  Unlike	  opponents	  of	  pain	  relief	  who	  mentioned	  specific	  features	  of	  pain	  such	  as	  duration	  and	  intensity,	  proponents	  never	  mentioned	  these	  specific	  features.	  For	  proponents	  of	  pain	    91 relief,	  the	  mere	  presence	  of	  pain	  and	  the	  ability	  to	  control	  it	  seemed	  sufficient	  to	  make	  an	  ethical	  judgment.	  	  The	  structures	  and	  mechanisms	  necessary	  to	  perceive	  pain	  are	  present	  shortly	  after	  birth	  in	  farmed	  species	  (Mellor	  and	  Diesch,	  2006),	  yet	  opponents	  of	  pain	  relief	  suggested	  young	  animals	  experience	  pain	  less	  acutely.	  This	  view	  may	  arise	  from	  the	  common	  recommendation	  to	  perform	  painful	  procedure	  at	  the	  earliest	  age	  practicable	  (AVMA,	  2012).	  While	  younger	  animals	  may	  be	  easier	  to	  handle	  and	  recover	  more	  quickly	  there	  is,	  however,	  no	  evidence	  to	  indicate	  that	  they	  experience	  less	  pain	  (Anil	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  Histological	  examinations	  of	  innervation	  surrounding	  the	  horn	  region	  have	  found	  few	  differences	  between	  newborn	  and	  4	  month	  old	  calves	  (Taschke	  and	  Folsch,	  1997).	  The	  view	  that	  neonates	  are	  less	  able	  to	  experience	  pain	  was	  once	  common	  in	  pediatric	  medicine,	  with	  human	  babies	  denied	  pain	  relief	  on	  the	  assumption	  that	  they	  lacked	  the	  anatomical	  and	  cognitive	  apparatuses	  thought	  necessary	  to	  experience	  pain	  (McGrath,	  2011).	  	  There	  is	  even	  evidence	  that	  pain	  experienced	  earlier	  in	  life	  may	  be	  more,	  not	  less	  intense	  (Anand	  and	  Hickey,	  1987),	  resulting	  in	  long-­‐term	  changes	  in	  central	  nervous	  system	  functioning	  and	  behavior	  (Shimada	  et	  al.,	  1990;	  Sternberg	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Additional	  cost	  was	  also	  expressed	  as	  a	  reason	  why	  pain	  relief	  should	  not	  be	  provided.	  Previous	  work	  has	  found	  that	  willingness	  of	  the	  farmer	  to	  pay	  was	  a	  strong	  predictor	  of	  analgesic	  use	  (Hewson	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  The	  use	  of	  the	  phrase	  “just	  pennies	  a	  shot”	  used	  in	  our	  introductory	  statement,	  may	  have	  biased	  participants,	  but	  we	  believe	  this	  to	  be	  fair	  description	  given	  that	  the	  price	  per	  calf	  for	  lidocaine	  treatment	  is	  estimated	  to	  be	  $0.46	  (Misch	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  The	  estimated	  cost	  of	  providing	  comprehensive,	  multi-­‐modal	  pain	  management	  for	  disbudding/dehorning	  (including	  an	  analgesic	  and	  sedative)	  is	  less	  than	  $4.00,	  representing	  approximately	  0.004%	  of	  the	  total	  estimated	  cost	  of	  raising	  a	    92 replacement	  dairy	  heifer	  (Gabler	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  	  These	  costs	  will	  vary	  by	  region,	  method	  used	  and	  the	  involvement	  required	  by	  the	  herd	  veterinarian.	  Some	  opponents	  argued	  correctly	  that	  gastrointestinal	  pathologies	  can	  result	  from	  non-­‐steroidal	  anti-­‐inflammatory	  drugs,	  however,	  this	  risk	  is	  associated	  with	  high	  dosages	  and	  prolonged	  use	  (Wallace,	  1997),	  both	  of	  which	  seem	  unlikely	  to	  occur	  in	  food	  animals.	  Moreover,	  selective	  cyclooxygenase-­‐2	  inhibitors	  (e.g.	  meloxicam)	  reduce	  this	  risk	  even	  further	  (Donnelly	  and	  Hawkey,	  1997).	  Concerns	  about	  the	  risk	  of	  drug	  residues	  in	  meat	  consumed	  by	  humans	  also	  seems	  remote	  given	  that	  dairy	  calves	  are	  unlikely	  to	  enter	  the	  food	  chain	  for	  months	  or	  years	  following	  treatment.	  “Bob”	  calves	  may	  be	  sent	  for	  slaughter	  at	  less	  than	  4	  weeks	  of	  age,	  but	  for	  these	  animals	  there	  is	  no	  reason	  for	  disbudding.	  The	  uncertain	  risks	  of	  using	  NSAIDS	  for	  pain	  relief	  in	  dairy	  calves	  at	  the	  time	  of	  disbudding/dehorning	  must	  be	  weighed	  against	  the	  certainty	  of	  allowing	  preventable	  pain	  as	  a	  result	  of	  not	  using	  them.	  	  Participants	  also	  indicated	  uncertainty	  about	  how	  the	  use	  of	  analgesics	  might	  affect	  organic	  dairy	  production.	  These	  concerns	  seem	  unfounded;	  regulations	  governing	  U.S.	  organic	  dairy	  production	  allow	  the	  use	  of	  most	  commonly	  recommended	  anesthetics	  and	  analgesics	  (CFR,	  2012).	  Canadian	  organic	  standards	  explicitly	  mandate	  pain	  control	  be	  used	  when	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  (CGSB,	  2006)	  as	  does	  EU	  Commission	  Regulation	  (EC)	  No	  889/2008	  governing	  organic	  production.	  Participants	  also	  indicated	  a	  desire	  for	  long-­‐term	  solutions	  to	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning,	  including	  the	  introduction	  of	  polled	  (hornless)	  genetics.	  The	  potential	  of	  polled	  genetics	  to	  replace	  the	  need	  to	  dehorn	  cattle	  has	  been	  suggested	  elsewhere	  (Long	  and	  Gregory,	  1978;	  Hoeschele,	  1990).	  This	  approach	  has	  been	  adopted	  in	  the	  U.S.	  beef	  industry	  where	  in	  2007	  more	  than	  85%	  of	  beef	  calves	  were	  born	  without	  horns	  -­‐	  up	  17%	  from	  1992	    93 (USDA,	  2008).	  The	  recently	  revised	  National	  Milk	  Producers	  Federation	  (NMPF)	  animal	  care	  manual	  recognizes	  the	  potential	  of	  polled	  dairy	  genetics	  to	  supplant	  dehorning	  (NMPF,	  2013).	  Given	  the	  obvious	  benefits	  of	  this	  approach	  for	  both	  dairy	  producers	  (i.e.	  reduced	  labor	  and	  improved	  public	  image)	  and	  dairy	  cattle	  (i.e.	  reduced	  pain),	  greater	  investment	  in	  this	  option	  seems	  prudent.	  Some	  participants	  also	  suggested	  that	  the	  need	  for	  hornless	  cattle	  resulted	  from	  a	  mismatch	  between	  housing	  and	  management.	  Instead	  of	  modifying	  the	  animal	  to	  fit	  the	  environment,	  they	  thought	  it	  preferable	  to	  change	  the	  environment	  to	  fit	  the	  animal	  (e.g.	  more	  extensive	  rearing,	  reduced	  stocking	  densities,	  less	  mixing,	  more	  stable	  group	  structures).	  Responses	  of	  this	  type	  may	  stem	  from	  beliefs	  about	  respecting	  the	  integrity	  or	  ‘telos’	  of	  the	  animals,	  of	  which	  dehorning	  may	  be	  seen	  as	  a	  violation	  (Bovenkerk	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Gavrell-­‐Ortiz,	  2004).	  Among	  dairy	  farmers	  who	  did	  not	  dehorn,	  Gottardo	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  found	  that	  the	  majority	  (74%)	  reported	  no	  difficulties	  in	  managing	  horned	  animals.	  Menke	  et	  al.	  (1999)	  found	  that	  horned	  cattle	  engaged	  in	  fewer	  agonistic	  behaviors	  than	  those	  without	  horns.	  However,	  some	  of	  the	  problems	  associated	  with	  keeping	  horned	  cattle	  may	  not	  arise	  until	  cattle	  are	  transported	  and/or	  mixed	  with	  unfamiliar	  animals	  (Shaw	  et	  al.,	  1976;	  Wythes	  et	  al.,	  1979),	  events	  that	  occur	  with	  increasing	  frequency	  on	  many	  modern	  dairy	  farms	  and	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  production	  phase.	  Participants	  in	  the	  current	  study	  did	  not	  voice	  concerns	  about	  regulatory	  restrictions	  limiting	  the	  availability	  of	  analgesic	  drugs,	  but	  these	  have	  been	  raised	  elsewhere	  (Schwartzkopf-­‐Genswein	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  To	  date,	  the	  U.S.	  Food	  and	  Drug	  Administration	  has	  not	  approved	  any	  drugs	  labeled	  for	  pain	  relief	  in	  food	  animals	  (Schwartzkopf-­‐Genswein	  et	  al.,	  2012),	  but	  veterinarians	  can	  prescribe	  drugs	  in	  a	  manner	  not	  specified	  on	  the	  label	  (“Extra	  Label	  Drug	  Use”	  or	  “ELDU”)	  provided	  certain	  conditions	    94 are	  met	  (Smith	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Smith,	  2013).	  Extensive	  ELDU	  for	  purposes	  other	  than	  pain	  relief	  has	  been	  documented	  elsewhere	  (Dewey	  et	  al.,	  1997;	  Sawant	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  In	  the	  U.S.,	  ELDU	  legislation	  was	  enacted	  so	  that	  veterinary	  practitioners	  could	  exercise	  their	  professional	  judgment	  to	  protect	  animal	  health	  and	  reduce	  suffering	  (USDA,	  1994).	  Controlling	  the	  pain	  associated	  with	  dehorning	  and	  disbudding	  would	  appear	  to	  justify	  such	  use.	  5.6	   Conclusion	  A	  large	  majority	  of	  respondents	  in	  every	  group	  and	  across	  every	  category	  -­‐	  including	  those	  closely	  affiliated	  with	  the	  dairy	  industry	  –	  believed	  pain	  relief	  should	  be	  provided	  when	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves.	  The	  reasons	  put	  forth	  by	  those	  who	  disagreed	  or	  were	  neutral	  on	  the	  issue	  were	  largely	  unsupported	  by	  available	  evidence.	  Despite	  this	  consensus	  provision	  of	  pain	  relief	  for	  dehorning	  remains	  low.	  	  	  Collectively	  our	  results	  point	  to	  the	  need	  for	  increased	  outreach	  efforts	  targeted	  at	  veterinarians	  and	  producers	  that	  promote	  awareness	  of	  the	  relevant	  science,	  regulations	  and	  pain	  management	  protocols.	  These	  efforts	  should	  address	  misconceptions	  surrounding	  the	  availability,	  safety,	  and	  costs	  associated	  with	  pain	  mitigation.	  Although	  veterinarians	  are	  able	  to	  provide	  pain	  control	  under	  extra-­‐label	  drug	  use,	  approval	  of	  additional	  analgesics	  for	  use	  in	  food	  animals	  is	  also	  needed.	  Collaborative	  efforts	  to	  increase	  the	  availability	  and	  adoption	  of	  polled	  dairy	  genetics	  should	  be	  pursued	  as	  this	  avoids	  the	  need	  for	  dehorning.	  	   	    95 Chapter	  6:	  Overview,	  limitations,	  and	  next	  Steps	  In	  Chapter	  1	  I	  summarized	  different	  theories	  of	  both	  human	  and	  non-­‐human	  welfare	  and	  reviewed	  the	  growing	  literature	  describing	  different	  conceptualizations	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  	  I	  argued	  that	  welfare	  is	  best	  classified	  as	  a	  thick	  concept	  –	  one	  that	  contains	  both	  descriptive	  and	  normative	  content.	  A	  number	  of	  conceptual	  questions	  regarding	  the	  nature	  of	  animal	  welfare	  were	  also	  identified	  and	  it	  was	  suggested	  that	  progress	  on	  these	  issues	  might	  be	  enhanced	  by	  the	  application	  of	  empirical	  methods	  adapted	  from	  the	  cognitive	  sciences.	  The	  lack	  of	  conceptual	  clarity	  surrounding	  important	  concepts	  such	  as	  naturalness	  and	  death	  were	  suggested	  as	  high	  priority	  candidates	  for	  such	  an	  approach.	  Naturalness	  is	  frequently	  cited	  among	  the	  most	  important	  factors	  influencing	  folk	  judgements	  about	  animal	  welfare,	  despite	  playing	  almost	  no	  role	  in	  discussions	  of	  human	  well-­‐being	  (Nordenfelt,	  2006).	  In	  fact,	  a	  strong	  case	  has	  been	  made	  that	  the	  concept	  itself	  is	  incoherent	  (Mill,	  1885).	  	  Similarly,	  some	  have	  argued	  that	  death	  is	  in	  fact	  welfare	  issue	  despite	  not	  being	  viewed	  as	  such	  by	  many	  scientists	  (DeGrazia,	  2016;	  Tannenbaum,	  2002).	  	  Chapter	  2	  provided	  an	  example	  of	  how	  empirical	  methods	  can	  be	  used	  to	  inform	  philosophical	  questions	  at	  the	  heart	  of	  animal	  welfare	  and	  ethics.	  Contrary	  to	  the	  predictions	  of	  mental	  state	  accounts	  of	  welfare,	  moral	  judgements	  about	  the	  life	  the	  animal	  was	  living	  exerted	  significant	  influence	  on	  attributions	  of	  welfare.	  This	  suggests	  that	  many	  animal	  welfare	  scientists	  may	  hold	  a	  peculiar	  concept	  of	  welfare.	  It	  could	  also	  be	  the	  case	  that	  explicit	  theoretical	  definitions	  of	  welfare	  endorsed	  by	  animal	  welfare	  scientists	  contrast	  with	  their	  actual	  understanding	  as	  determined	  by	  how	  they	  apply	  the	  concept	  to	  specific	  cases.	  One	  recent	  study,	  involving	  a	  sample	  of	  positive	  psychologists,	  found	  that	    96 their	  attributions	  of	  happiness	  were	  affected	  by	  non-­‐psychological	  factors	  despite	  having	  explicitly	  endorsed	  a	  definition	  of	  purely	  psychological	  definition	  of	  happiness	  (i.e.	  a	  net	  balance	  of	  positive	  over	  negatively-­‐valenced	  mental	  states;	  Phillips	  et	  al.,	  in	  press).	  	  Regardless,	  animal	  welfare	  scientists	  are	  a	  population	  worthy	  of	  closer	  scientific	  attention.	  This	  chapter	  also	  raised	  important	  questions	  about	  the	  role	  identity	  plays	  in	  discussions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  and	  ethics.	  It	  is	  generally	  assumed	  that	  for	  something	  to	  affect	  an	  animal’s	  welfare	  it	  must	  in	  some	  way	  affect	  the	  animal	  itself.	  However,	  this	  seemingly	  non-­‐controversial	  assumption	  depends	  on	  how	  we	  construe	  the	  nature	  of	  an	  animal.	  	  If	  we	  think	  of	  them	  as	  nothing	  more	  than	  collections	  of	  mental	  states,	  then	  physical	  damage	  or	  dysfunction	  cannot	  directly	  impact	  their	  welfare.	  However,	  if	  we	  take	  the	  view	  that	  animals	  are	  more	  than	  just	  minds,	  perhaps	  that	  they	  are	  embodied	  minds,	  then	  such	  factors	  may	  affect	  their	  welfare	  independent	  of	  any	  associated	  psychological	  effects.	  Another	  interesting	  possibility	  suggested	  by	  this	  research	  is	  that	  judgments	  of	  welfare	  can	  take	  on	  two	  distinct	  objects	  of	  evaluation	  -­‐	  the	  individual	  animal	  and	  its	  life.	  Some	  philosophers	  have	  observed	  that	  individual	  happiness	  and	  living	  a	  good	  life	  are	  not	  necessarily	  the	  same	  thing	  (Kagan,	  1992).	  Philosopher	  David	  Velleman	  (2009)	  has	  developed	  this	  point	  in	  greater	  detail,	  arguing	  that	  lives	  of	  gradual	  improvement	  are	  judged	  to	  be	  better	  lives	  than	  those	  of	  gradual	  degradation	  even	  when	  they	  contain	  the	  same	  quantity	  of	  welfare.	  Therefore	  it	  may	  be	  the	  case	  that	  animals	  living	  lives	  judged	  as	  morally	  bad	  (e.g.	  animals	  raised	  and	  killed	  for	  what	  are	  regarded	  as	  immoral	  purposes)	  can	  never	  achieve	  good	  welfare	  regardless	  of	  how	  well	  they	  are	  feeling	  and	  physically	  functioning.	  This	  would	  go	  some	  way	  toward	  explaining	  the	  ambivalence	  many	  animal	  liberationists	  express	  towards	  animal	  welfare	  research	  (Francione,	  1995).	  	    97 Chapter	  3	  explored	  the	  popular	  idea	  that	  there	  is	  an	  inverse	  relationship	  between	  farm	  size	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  	  Based	  on	  a	  review	  of	  more	  than	  100	  published	  paper	  papers,	  it	  was	  concluded	  that	  no	  clear	  relationship	  exists.	  In	  many	  cases,	  larger	  farms	  appeared	  to	  do	  a	  better	  job	  of	  ensuring	  a	  high	  degree	  of	  animal	  welfare	  than	  smaller	  farms.	  	  This	  conclusion	  is	  advanced	  with	  some	  hesitancy	  as	  it	  is	  based	  on	  a	  largely	  qualitative	  methodological	  approach.	  	  Statistical	  significance	  and	  the	  direction	  of	  the	  association	  were	  the	  primary	  evaluative	  considerations.	  Unfortunately,	  this	  approach	  overlooks	  crucial	  differences	  between	  studies	  in	  terms	  of	  sample	  and	  effect	  sizes.	  Proper	  meta-­‐analytic	  techniques	  that	  take	  these	  factors	  into	  account	  should	  be	  investigated	  (Vesterinen	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Publication	  bias	  is	  also	  likely	  to	  have	  affected	  the	  research	  that	  was	  available	  for	  this	  review.	  	  It	  has	  long	  been	  noted	  that	  null	  effects	  are	  much	  less	  likely	  to	  be	  published	  (Rosenthal,	  1979)	  and	  there	  is	  no	  indication	  that	  animal	  welfare	  science	  is	  any	  exception	  (van	  der	  Schot	  and	  Phillips,	  2013).	  Perhaps	  an	  even	  larger	  source	  of	  error	  resulted	  from	  the	  imprecision	  of	  our	  inclusion/exclusion	  criteria.	  While	  the	  conglomerate	  definition	  of	  animal	  welfare	  has	  the	  benefit	  of	  capturing	  a	  diverse	  array	  of	  ‘ethical	  concerns’,	  it	  also	  makes	  it	  remarkably	  difficult	  to	  conceive	  of	  welfare-­‐irrelevant	  variables	  (i.e.	  effects	  or	  associations	  that	  are	  unrelated	  to	  either	  biological	  functioning,	  affective	  states	  or	  natural	  living).	  Future	  literature	  reviews	  involving	  animal	  welfare	  should	  be	  more	  explicit	  is	  describing	  what	  the	  authors	  consider	  to	  be	  welfare-­‐relevant.	  Even	  better,	  they	  should	  state	  the	  type	  of	  variables	  that	  would	  be	  classified	  as	  welfare-­‐irrelevant.	  Finally,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  recognize	  that	  farm	  size	  is	  just	  one	  characteristic	  of	  agricultural	  intensification.	  Future	  research	  aimed	  at	  understanding	  public	  scepticism	  towards	  modern	  agricultural	  production	  should	  attempt	    98 to	  disaggregate	  the	  various	  features	  of	  intensification	  to	  identify	  their	  relative	  importance.	  This	  research	  should	  also	  consider	  how	  attitudes	  towards	  these	  features	  are	  likely	  to	  vary	  according	  to	  socio-­‐demographic	  factors	  such	  as	  socio-­‐economics	  status,	  political	  and	  economic	  ideology,	  familiarity	  with	  agriculture,	  rural-­‐urban	  living	  environment	  and	  business	  experience.	  Chapter	  4	  examined	  how	  perceptions	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare,	  support	  for	  regulations	  governing	  animal	  care	  and	  trust	  in	  farmers	  are	  influenced	  by	  attempts	  to	  restrict	  operational	  transparency.	  Exposure	  to	  information	  about	  ag-­‐gag	  was	  shown	  to	  diminish	  trust	  in	  farmers	  and	  lead	  to	  more	  negative	  perceptions	  of	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  as	  well	  as	  increased	  support	  for	  animal	  care	  regulations.	  This	  effect	  remained	  significant	  regardless	  of	  political	  orientation,	  dietary	  preference	  and	  living	  environment.	  It	  is	  not	  possible	  to	  comment	  on	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  the	  observed	  effects	  might	  persist	  over	  time	  or	  whether	  they	  might	  translate	  into	  actual	  behaviour	  (e.g.	  voting	  and	  purchasing).	  A	  measure	  of	  behavioural	  intention	  would	  have	  gone	  some	  way	  toward	  addressing	  this	  limitation.	  Moreover,	  participants	  in	  this	  study	  were	  recruited	  via	  Mechanical	  Turk,	  which	  has	  been	  shown	  to	  result	  in	  considerably	  more	  representative	  participants	  than	  standard	  in-­‐person	  convenience	  samples.	  However,	  it	  should	  also	  be	  noted	  that	  Mechanical	  Turk	  participants	  still	  tend	  to	  be	  underemployed,	  overeducated	  and	  more	  politically	  liberal	  than	  the	  general	  U.S.	  population	  (Paolacci	  and	  Chandler,	  2014).	  While	  this	  research	  demonstrated	  the	  detrimental	  effects	  of	  one	  particular	  response	  strategy	  to	  one	  particular	  type	  of	  crisis,	  future	  efforts	  should	  endeavour	  to	  go	  beyond	  identifying	  counterproductive	  crisis	  responses	  to	  understanding	  the	  constituents	  of	  effective	  crisis	  response	  strategies	  (those	    99 than	  minimize	  the	  loss	  of	  public	  trust)	  so	  that	  industry	  can	  respond	  better	  to	  inevitable	  future	  information	  shocks.	  Chapter	  5	  adopted	  a	  mixed-­‐method	  methodological	  approach	  to	  investigate	  a	  specific	  animal	  welfare	  issue	  -­‐	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves.	  Participants	  overwhelmingly	  believed	  that	  pain	  relief	  should	  be	  given	  and	  the	  reasons	  they	  gave	  to	  support	  their	  views	  were	  very	  diverse.	  Closer	  attention	  to	  the	  responses	  provided	  by	  those	  opposed	  to	  providing	  pain	  relief	  (mostly	  dairy	  producers),	  identified	  several	  obstacles	  to	  more	  widespread	  adoption	  of	  pain	  mitigation	  strategies	  that	  may	  be	  useful	  in	  extension	  efforts.	  	  Dehorning	  appears	  to	  be	  a	  rare	  example	  of	  an	  animal	  welfare	  issue	  where	  public-­‐industry	  agreement	  is	  high.	  	  Several	  caveats	  of	  this	  research	  are	  worth	  mentioning.	  First,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  resist	  the	  temptation	  to	  interpret	  these	  data	  as	  evidence	  that	  dehorning	  is	  significant	  or	  important	  to	  the	  subjects	  in	  our	  sample,	  let	  alone	  the	  wider	  population.	  Although	  people	  often	  hold	  general	  attitudes	  about	  high-­‐profile	  subjects,	  they	  are	  much	  less	  likely	  to	  have	  attitudes	  about	  specific	  industry	  practices	  such	  as	  dehorning	  (Herzog	  et	  al.,	  2001).	  This	  study	  assumed	  that	  subjects	  did	  not	  possess	  pre-­‐existing	  attitudes	  about	  dehorning	  hence	  the	  provision	  of	  background	  information	  was	  deemed	  as	  necessary	  for	  participants	  to	  make	  informed	  judgements.	  	  The	  inclusion	  of	  filter	  questions	  measuring	  familiarity	  with	  the	  practice;	  whether	  or	  not	  they	  have	  an	  opinion	  about	  it;	  and	  how	  strong	  their	  opinion	  is	  (Bishop	  et	  al.,	  1980;	  Krosnick	  and	  Petty,	  1995)	  could	  have	  been	  included	  to	  quantify	  the	  accuracy	  of	  this	  assumption.	  Moreover,	  the	  provision	  of	  information	  may	  have	  biased	  participant	  responses.	  	  An	  alternative	  way	  of	  addressing	  the	  issue	  of	  limited	  awareness	  and	  therefore	  concern	  would	  have	  been	  to	  incorporate	  several	  different	  information	  treatments	    100 into	  the	  study	  design	  (e.g.	  one	  biased	  in	  favour,	  one	  biased	  against	  and	  one	  non-­‐biased).	  This	  would	  make	  it	  possible	  to	  discern	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  framing	  may	  have	  biased	  responses.	  	  Even	  when	  people	  do	  possess	  attitudes	  there	  is	  no	  guarantee	  that	  they	  will	  report	  them	  honestly.	  Social	  desirability	  bias	  is	  the	  term	  used	  to	  describe	  the	  tendency	  of	  participants	  to	  respond	  in	  a	  manner	  that	  communicates	  a	  more	  socially	  acceptable	  self-­‐image,	  rather	  than	  what	  they	  actually	  think.	  One	  study	  found	  significant	  differences	  between	  indirect	  and	  direct	  measures	  of	  concern	  for	  animal	  welfare	  suggesting	  social	  desirability	  bias	  is	  a	  very	  serious	  issue	  (Lusk	  and	  Norwood,	  2010).	  The	  inclusion	  of	  indirect	  measures	  and/or	  validated	  scales	  measuring	  the	  tendency	  towards	  socially	  desirable	  responding	  (Marlow	  and	  Crowne,	  1960),	  are	  two	  viable	  means	  of	  addressing	  these	  concerns	  in	  future	  research.	  The	  research	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  addresses	  a	  diverse	  range	  of	  issues	  surrounding	  animal	  welfare	  and	  food	  animal	  production.	  	  In	  addition	  to	  providing	  contributions	  that	  will	  hopefully	  lead	  to	  further	  nuanced	  discussions	  about	  the	  lives	  of	  animals	  under	  our	  care	  it	  also	  demonstrated	  how	  social	  science	  methodologies	  could	  be	  used	  to	  address	  issues	  ranging	  from	  philosophical	  questions	  about	  the	  nature	  of	  animal	  welfare	  to	  specific	  policies	  and	  practices	  such	  as	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation	  and	  dehorning.	  	  	    101 References	  Adam,	  K.	  C.	  2011.	  Shooting	  the	  messenger:	  A	  common-­‐sense	  analysis	  of	  state	  ag-­‐gag	  legislation	  under	  the	  first	  amendment.	  Suffolk	  U.	  L.	  Rev.	  45:1129.	  	  Ajzen,	  I.	  2001.	  Nature	  and	  operation	  of	  attitudes.	  Annual	  Rev.	  Psychol.	  52:27–58.	  	  Al-­‐Rawashdeh,	  O.	  F.	  1999.	  Prevalence	  of	  ketonemia	  and	  associations	  with	  herd	  size,	  lactation	  stage,	  parity	  and	  postparturient	  diseases	  in	  Jordanian	  dairy	  cattle.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  40:117–125.	  	  Alban,	  L.	  1995.	  Lameness	  in	  Danish	  dairy	  cows:	  frequency	  and	  possible	  risk	  factors.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  22:213–225.	  	  ALCASDE.	  2009.	  Report	  on	  dehorning	  practices	  across	  EU	  member	  states.	  	  Accessed	  May	  20,	  2013.	  http://ec.europa.eu/food/animal/welfare/farm/docs/calves	  _alcasde_D-­‐2-­‐1-­‐1.pdf.	  	  	  Alexandrova,	  A.	  2015.	  Well-­‐being	  and	  philosophy	  of	  science.	  Philos.	  Compass.	  10:219–231.	  	  Allore,	  H.	  G.,	  P.	  A.	  Oltenacu,	  and	  H.	  N.	  Erb.	  1997.	  Effects	  of	  season,	  herd	  size,	  and	  geographic	  region	  on	  the	  composition	  and	  quality	  of	  milk	  in	  the	  Northeast.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  80:3040–3049.	  	  Alvåsen	  K.,	  A.	  Roth,	  M.	  Jansson	  Mork,	  C.	  Hallen	  Sandgren,	  P.	  T.	  Thomsen,	  and	  U.	  Emanuelson.	  2014.	  Farm	  characteristics	  related	  to	  on-­‐farm	  cow	  mortality	  in	  dairy	  herds:	  a	  questionnaire	  study.	  Animal.	  8:1735–1742.	  	  Alvåsen,	  K.,	  M.	  Jansson	  Mork,	  C.	  Hallen	  Sandgren,	  P.	  T.	  Thomsen,	  and	  U.	  Emanuelson.	  2012.	  Herd-­‐level	  risk	  factors	  asscoaited	  with	  cow	  mortality	  in	  Swedish	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy.	  Sci.	  95:4352–4362.	  	  Amiot	  C.	  E.,	  and	  B.	  E.	  Bastian.	  2017.	  Solidarity	  with	  animals:	  Assessing	  a	  relevant	  dimension	  of	  social	  identification	  with	  animals.	  PLoS	  ONE	  12:	  e0168184.	  	  	  Amory,	  J.	  R.,	  P.	  Kloosterman,	  Z.	  E.	  Barker,	  J.	  L.	  Wright,	  R.	  W.	  Blowey,	  and	  L.	  E.	  Green.	  2006.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  reduced	  locomotion	  in	  dairy	  cattle	  on	  nineteen	  farms	  in	  the	  Netherlands.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  89:1509–1515.	  	  Anand,	  K.	  J.,	  and	  P.	  R.	  Hickey.	  1987.	  Pain	  and	  its	  effects	  in	  the	  human	  neonate	  and	  fetus.	  N.	  Engl.	  J.	  Med.	  317:1321–1329.	  	  Andrade,	  S.	  B.,	  and	  I.	  Anneberg.	  2014.	  Farmers	  under	  pressure.	  Analysis	  of	  the	  social	  conditions	  of	  cases	  of	  animal	  neglect.	  J.	  Agr.	  Environ.	  Ethic.	  27:103–126.	  	  Anil	  S.	  S.,	  L.	  Anil,	  and	  J.	  Deen.	  2002	  Challenges	  of	  pain	  assessment	  in	  domestic	  animals.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  220:313–319.	    102 	  Animal	  Visuals,	  2015.	  Ag-­‐Gag	  Laws	  and	  Factory	  Farm	  Investigations	  Mapped.	  Accessed	  July	  14,	  2013.	  http://www.animalvisuals.org/projects/data/investigations.	  	  Anthony,	  R.	  2003.	  The	  ethical	  implications	  of	  the	  human-­‐animal	  bond	  on	  the	  farm.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  12:505–512.	  	  Antle,	  J.	  M.	  1999.	  Benefits	  and	  costs	  of	  food	  safety	  regulation.	  Food	  Policy.	  24:605–623.	  	  Appleby,	  M.	  C.,	  and	  P.	  T.	  Sandøe.	  2002.	  Philosophical	  debate	  on	  the	  nature	  of	  well-­‐being:	  implications	  for	  animal	  welfare.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  11:283–294.	  	  Archer,	  S.	  C.,	  F.	  McCoy,	  W.	  Wapenaar,	  and	  M.	  J.	  Green.	  2013.	  Association	  of	  season	  and	  herd	  size	  with	  somatic	  cell	  count	  for	  cows	  in	  Irish,	  English,	  and	  Welsh	  dairy	  herds.	  Vet.	  J.	  196:515–521.	  	  	  Arkins,	  S.	  1981.	  Lameness	  in	  dairy	  cows.	  Irish	  Vet.	  J.	  35:163–170.	  Auger,	  G.	  A.	  2014.	  Trust	  me,	  trust	  me	  not:	  an	  experimental	  analysis	  of	  the	  effect	  of	  transparency	  on	  organizations.	  J.	  Publ.	  Relat.	  Res.	  26:325–343.	  	  ASPCA,	  2012.	  Research	  shows	  americans	  overwhelmingly	  support	  investigations	  to	  expose	  animal	  abuse	  on	  industrial	  farms.	  Accessed	  July	  14,	  2015.	  https://www.aspca.org/aboutus/press-­‐releases/aspca-­‐research-­‐shows-­‐americans-­‐overwhelmingly-­‐supportinvestigations-­‐expose.	  	  Auger,	  G.	  A.	  2014.	  Trust	  me,	  trust	  me	  not:	  an	  experimental	  analysis	  of	  the	  effect	  of	  transparency	  on	  organizations.	  J.	  Public	  Relat.	  Res.	  26,	  325–343.	  	  AVMA.	  2012.	  Welfare	  implications	  of	  dehorning	  and	  disbudding	  of	  cattle.	  Accessed	  July	  14,	  2013.	  https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/LiteratureReviews/Documents	  /dehorning_cattle_bgnd.pdf.	  	  	  Balliet,	  D.,	  and	  P.	  A.	  Van	  Lange.	  2013.	  Trust,	  punishment,	  and	  cooperation	  across	  18	  societies:	  a	  meta-­‐analysis.	  Perspect.	  Psychol.	  Sci.,	  8:363–379.	  	  Barkema,	  H.	  W.,	  Y.	  H.	  Schukken,	  T.	  J.	  G.	  M.	  Lam,	  M.	  L.	  Beiboer,	  H.	  Wilmink,	  G.	  Benedictus,	  and	  A.	  Brand.	  1998.	  Incidence	  of	  clinical	  mastitis	  in	  dairy	  herds	  grouped	  in	  three	  categories	  by	  bulk	  milk	  somatic	  cell	  counts.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  81:411–419.	  	  Barkema,	  H.W.,	  M.	  J.	  Green,	  A.	  J.	  Bradley,	  and	  R.	  N.	  Zadoks.	  2009.	  Invited	  review:	  The	  role	  of	  contagious	  disease	  in	  udder	  health.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  92:4717–4729.	  	  Barker,	  Z.	  E.,	  K.	  A.	  Leach,	  H.	  R.	  Whay,	  N.	  J.	  Bell,	  and	  D.	  C.	  Main.	  2010.	  Assessment	  of	  lameness	  prevalence	  and	  associated	  risk	  factors	  in	  dairy	  herds	  in	  England	  and	  Wales.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  93:932–941.	  	    103 Barrientos,	  A.	  K.,	  N.	  Chapinal,	  D.	  M.	  Weary,	  E.	  Galo,	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  2013.	  Herd-­‐level	  risk	  factors	  for	  hock	  injuries	  in	  freestall-­‐housed	  dairy	  cows	  in	  the	  northeastern	  United	  States	  and	  California.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  96:3758–3765.	  	  	  Bartlett,	  P.	  C.,	  G.	  Y.	  Miller,	  S.	  E.	  Lance,	  and	  L.E.	  Heider.	  1992.	  Environmental	  and	  managerial	  determinants	  of	  somatic	  cell	  counts	  and	  clinical	  mastitis	  incidence	  in	  Ohio	  dairy	  herds.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  14:195–207.	  	  Batt,	  S.	  2009.	  Human	  attitudes	  towards	  animals	  in	  relation	  to	  species	  similarity	  to	  humans:	  A	  multivariate	  approach.	  Biosci.	  Horizons.	  2:180–90.	  	  Bastian,	  B.,	  S.	  Loughnan,	  N.	  Haslam,	  and	  H.	  R.	  	  Radke.	  2012.	  Don’t	  mind	  meat?	  The	  denial	  of	  mind	  to	  animals	  used	  for	  human	  consumption.	  Pers.	  Soc.	  Psycho.	  Bull.	  38:	  247–256.	  	  Batra,	  T.	  E.,	  E.	  B.	  Burnside,	  and	  M.	  G.	  Freeman.	  1971.	  Canadian	  dairy	  cow	  disposals:	  II.	  Effects	  of	  herd	  size	  and	  production	  level	  on	  dairy	  cow	  disposal	  patterns.	  Can.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  21:85–87.	  	  Beggs,	  D.	  S.,	  A.	  D.	  Fisher,	  E.	  C.	  Jongman,	  and	  P.	  E.	  Hemsworth.	  2015.	  A	  survey	  of	  Australian	  dairy	  farmers	  to	  investigate	  animal	  welfare	  risks	  associated	  with	  increasing	  scale	  of	  production.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  98:5330–5338.	  	  Bendixen,	  P.H.,	  D.	  Vilson,	  J.	  Ekesbo,	  and	  D.	  B.	  Astrand.	  1987.	  Disease	  frequencies	  in	  dairy	  cows	  in	  sweden.	  IV.	  Ketosis.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  5:99–109.	  	  Bentham,	  J.	  1879.	  An	  introduction	  to	  the	  principles	  of	  morals	  and	  legislation.	  Clarendon	  Press.	  	  Bermúdez,	  J.	  L.	  2003.	  Thinking	  without	  words.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  	  Berry,	  W.	  1977.	  The	  unsettling	  of	  America:	  Culture	  and	  agriculture.	  Avon.	  New	  York,	  NY.	  	  Bestman,	  M.	  W.	  P.,	  and	  J.	  P.	  Wagenaar.	  2003.	  Farm	  level	  factors	  associated	  with	  feather	  pecking	  in	  organic	  laying	  hens.	  Livest.	  Prod.	  Sci.	  80:133–140.	  	  Bewley,	  J.,	  R.	  W.	  Palmer	  and	  D.	  B.	  Jackson-­‐Smith.	  2001.	  An	  overview	  of	  experiences	  of	  Wisconsin	  dairy	  farmers	  who	  modernized	  their	  operations.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  84:717–729.	  	  Bishop,	  G.	  F.,	  R.	  W.	  Oldendick,	  A.	  J.	  Tuchfarber,	  and	  S.	  E.	  Bennett.	  1980.	  Pseudo-­‐opinions	  on	  public	  affairs.	  Public	  Opin.	  Q.	  44:198–209.	  	  Blau	  D.	  M.,	  B.	  J.	  McCluskey,	  S.	  R.	  Ladely,	  D.	  A.	  Dargatz,	  P.	  J.	  Fedorka-­‐Cray,	  K.	  E.	  Ferris,	  and	  M.	  L.	  Headrick.	  2005.	  Salmonella	  in	  dairy	  operations	  in	  the	  United	  States:	  Prevalence	  and	  antimicrobial	  drug	  susceptibility.	  J.	  Food	  Prot.	  68:696–702.	  	  Blomberg,	  O.	  2007.	  Disentangling	  the	  thick	  concept	  argument.	  N.	  European	  J.	  Phil.	  8:63–78.	  	    104 Blomqvist,	  K.	  1997.	  The	  many	  faces	  of	  trust.	  Scand.	  J.	  of	  Manag.	  13:271–286.	  	  Bock,	  B.	  B.,	  and	  M.	  M.	  van	  Huik.	  2007.	  Animal	  welfare:	  the	  attitudes	  and	  behaviour	  of	  European	  pig	  farmers.	  Brit.	  Food.	  J.	  109:931–944.	  	  Boivin,	  X.,	  J.	  Lensink,	  C.	  Tallet,	  and	  I.	  Veissier.	  2003.	  Stockmanship	  and	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  12:479–492.	  	  Bolhuis,	  J.	  E.,	  W.	  G.	  Schouten,	  J.	  W.	  Schrama,	  and	  V.	  M.	  Wiegant.	  2005.	  Behavioural	  development	  of	  pigs	  with	  different	  coping	  characteristics	  in	  barren	  and	  substrate-­‐enriched	  housing	  conditions.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.,	  93:213–228.	  	  Boogaard	  B.	  K.,	  S.	  J.	  Oosting,	  and	  B.	  B.	  Bock.	  2008.	  Defining	  sustainability	  as	  a	  socio-­‐cultural	  concept:	  Citizen	  panels	  visiting	  dairy	  farms	  in	  the	  Netherlands.	  Livest.	  Scie.	  117:24–33.	  	  Bovenkerk	  B.,	  F.	  W.	  A.	  Brom,	  and	  B.	   J.	  Van	  den	  Bergh.	  2002.	  Brave	  new	  birds:	  The	  use	  of	  ‘Animal	  Integrity’	  in	  animal	  ethics.	  Hastings	  Cent.	  Rep.	  32:16–22.	  	  Bracke,	  M.	  B.	  M.,	  Metz,	  J.	  H.	  M.,	  Dijkhuizen,	  A.	  A.,	  and	  B.	  M.	  Spruijt.	  2001.	  Development	  of	  a	  decision	  support	  system	  for	  assessing	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  in	  relation	  to	  husbandry	  systems:	  strategy	  and	  prototype.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  14:321–337.	  	  Bracke,	  M.	  B.	  M.,	  C.	  C.	  De	  Lauwere,	  S.	  M.	  Wind,	  and	  J.	  J.	  Zonerland.	  2013.	  Attitudes	  of	  Dutch	  pig	  farmers	  towards	  tail	  biting	  and	  tail	  docking.	  J.	  Agr.	  Environ.	  Ethic.	  26:847–868.	  	  Braddock,	  M.	  (2010).	  Constructivist	  experimental	  philosophy	  on	  well-­‐being	  and	  virtue.	  Southern.	  J.	  Philos.,	  48:295–323.	  	  Broad,	  G.	  M.	  2014.	  Animal	  Production,	  ‘ag-­‐gag’	  laws,	  and	  the	  social	  production	  of	  ignorance:	  Exploring	  the	  role	  of	  storytelling.	  Environ.	  Commun.	  10:1–19.	  	  Broom,	  D.	  M.	  1991.	  Animal	  welfare:	  concepts	  and	  measurement.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  69:4167–4175.	  	  Brouwer,	  F.	  2012.	  The	  Economics	  of	  Regulation	  In	  Agriculture:	  Compliance	  With	  Public	  and	  Private	  Standards.	  CABI.	  Wallingford,	  Oxfordshire,	  UK.	  	  Brown,	  C.	  C.,	  and	  J.	  L.	  Medoff.	  1989.	  The	  employer	  size-­‐wage	  effect.	  J.	  Polit.	  Econ.	  97:1027–1059.	  	  Bruijnis,	  M.	  R.	  N.,	  F.	  L.	  B.,	  Meijboom,	  and	  E.	  N.	  Stassen.	  2013.	  Longevity	  as	  an	  animal	  welfare	  issue	  applied	  to	  the	  case	  of	  foot	  disorders	  in	  dairy	  cattle.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  26:191–205.	  	  Brülde,	  B.	  2007.	  Happiness	  theories	  of	  the	  good	  life.	  J.	  Happiness.	  Stud.	  8:15–49.	  	  Bruun	  J.,	  A.	  K.	  Ersbøll,	  and	  L.	  Alban.	  2002.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  metritis	  in	  Danish	  dairy	  cows.	    105 Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  54:179–190.	  	  Buhrmester,	  M.,	  T.	  Kwang,	  and	  S.	  D.	  Gosling.	  2011.	  Amazon's	  Mechanical	  Turk	  a	  new	  source	  of	  inexpensive,	  yet	  high-­‐quality,	  data?.	  Perspect.	  Psychol.	  Sci.	  6:3–5.	  	  Burstin,	  K.,	  E.	  B.	  Doughtie,	  and	  A.	  Raphaeli.	  1980.	  Contrastive	  Vignette	  Technique:	  An	  indirect	  Methodology	  Designed	  to	  Address	  Reactive	  Social	  Attitude	  Measurement.	  J.	  Appl.	  Soc.	  Psychol.	  10:147–165.	  	  	  Busato,	  A.,	  P.	  Trachsel,	  and	  J.	  W.	  Blum.	  2000.	  Frequency	  of	  traumatic	  cow	  injuries	  in	  relation	  to	  housing	  systems	  in	  Swiss	  organic	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Vet.	  Med.	  A.	  47:221–229.	  	  Callahan,	  E.	  S.,	  and	  T.	  M.	  	  Dworkin.	  2000.	  The	  state	  of	  state	  whistleblower	  protection.	  Am.	  Bus.	  Law	  J.	  38:99–175.	  	  Campbell,	  D.	  T.	  1950.	  The	  indirect	  assessment	  of	  social	  attitudes.	  Psychol.	  Bull.	  47:15.	  	  Cardoso,	  C.	  S.,	  M.	  J.	  Hötzel,	  D.	  M.	  Weary,	  J.	  A.	  Robbins,	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  2016.	  Imagining	  the	  ideal	  dairy	  farm.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  99:1–9.	  	  Carruthers,	  P.	  1992.	  The	  animal	  issue:	  moral	  theory	  in	  practice.	  Cambridge	  University	  Press.	  	  CFI.	  2013.	  Center	  for	  Food	  Integrity:	  Consumer	  trust	  in	  the	  food	  system.	  The	  Center	  for	  Food	  Integrity,	  Gladstone,	  MO.	  	  Centner,	  T.	  J.	  2010.	  Limitations	  on	  the	  confinement	  of	  food	  animals	  in	  the	  United	  States.	  J.	  Agr.	  Environ.	  Ethic.	  23:469–486.	  	  CFR.	  2012	  Synthetic	  substances	  allowed	  for	  use	  in	  organic	  livestock	  production.	  Accessed	  July	  11,	  2013.	  http://bit.ly/livestock-­‐synthetics.	  	  	  CGSB.	  2006	  Organic	  Production	  Systems	  General	  Principles	  and	  Management	  Standards.	  Accessed	  August	  3,	  2013.	  http://www.tpsgc-­‐pwgsc.gc.ca/ongc-­‐cgsb/programme-­‐program/normes-­‐standards/internet/bio-­‐org/principes-­‐principles-­‐eng.html#a077.	  	  	  Chang	  L.,	  and	  J.	  A.	  Krosnick.	  2009.	  National	  surveys	  via	  RDD	  telephone	  interviewing	  versus	  the	  internet	  comparing	  sample	  representativeness	  and	  response	  quality.	  Public.	  Opin.	  Quart.	  73:641–678.	  	  Chapinal,	  N.,	  A.	  K.	  Barrientos,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  Von	  Keyserlingk,	  E.	  Galo,	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  2013.	  Herd-­‐level	  risk	  factors	  for	  lameness	  in	  freestall	  farms	  in	  the	  northeastern	  United	  States	  and	  California.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  96:318–328.	  	  Chapinal,	  N.,	  Y.	  Liang,	  D.	  M.	  Weary,	  Y.	  Wang,	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  2014.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  lameness	  and	  hock	  injuries	  in	  Holstein	  herds	  in	  China.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  97:4309–4316.	    106 	  Chaudhuri,	  A.,	  and	  M.	  B.	  Holbrook.	  2001.	  The	  chain	  of	  effects	  from	  brand	  trust	  and	  brand	  affect	  to	  brand	  performance:	  the	  role	  of	  brand	  loyalty.	  J.	  Marketing.	  65,	  81–93.	  	  Converse,	  P.E.	  1970.	  Attitudes	  and	  non-­‐attitudes:	  continuation	  of	  a	  dialogue.	  In	  The	  quantitative	  analysis	  of	  social	  problems.	  E.R.	  Tufte,	  ed.	  Addison-­‐Wesley,	  Mass.	  	  Crisp,	  R.	  2006.	  Hedonism	  reconsidered.	  Philos.	  Phenomen.	  Res.	  73:619–645.	  	  Crisp,	  R.	  2008.	  Well-­‐being.	  In	  The	  Stanford	  Encyclopedia	  of	  Philosophy.	  Edward	  N.	  Zalta,	  ed.	  Accessed	  Aug.	  29,	  2016.	  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/well-­‐being/	  	  Croney,	  C.	  C.,	  and	  S.	  T.	  	  Millman.	  2007.	  Board-­‐invited	  review:	  The	  ethical	  and	  behavioral	  bases	  for	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  legislation.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  85:556–565.	  	  Crowne,	  D.	  P.,	  and	  D.	  Marlowe.	  1960.	  A	  new	  scale	  of	  social	  desirability	  independent	  of	  psychopathology.	  J.	  Consult.	  Psychol.	  24:349.	  	  Cummings,	  K.	  J.,	  L.	  D.	  Warnick,	  K.	  A.	  Alexander,	  C.	  J.	  Cripps,	  Y.	  T.	  Grohn,	  P.	  L.	  McDonough,	  D.	  V.	  Nydam,	  and	  K.	  E.	  Reed.	  2009.	  The	  incidence	  of	  salmonellosis	  among	  dairy	  herds	  in	  the	  northeastern	  United	  States.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  92:3766–3774.	  	  Czekaj,	  T.G.,	  A.	  S.	  Nielsen,	  A.	  Henningsen,	  and	  B.	  Forkman.	  2013.	  The	  relationship	  between	  animal	  welfare	  and	  economic	  outcome	  at	  the	  farm	  level.	  IFRO	  Report	  222.	  Department	  of	  Food	  and	  Resource	  Economics,	  University	  of	  Copenhagen.	  	  	  Dairy	  Australia,	  2015.	  Cows	  and	  farms.	  Accessed	  Jan.	  11,	  2016.	  http://	  www.dairyaustralia.com.au/Markets-­‐and-­‐statistics/Farm-­‐facts/Cows-­‐and-­‐Farms.aspx	  	  	  Dairy	  New	  Zealand.	  2014.	  New	  Zealand	  Dairy	  Statistics	  2013-­‐2014.	  Accessed	  Jan.	  10,	  2016.	  http://www.dairynz.co.nz/media/1327583/nz-­‐dairy-­‐statistics-­‐2013-­‐2014-­‐web.pdf	  	  	  Danielson	  P.	  A.	  2010.	  Designing	  a	  machine	  to	  learn	  about	  the	  ethics	  of	  robotics:	  The	  N-­‐Reasons	  platform.	  Ethics.	  Inf.	  Technol.	  12:251–261.	  	  Darby,	  K.,	  M.	  T.	  Batte,	  S.	  Ernst,	  and	  B.	  Roe.	  2008.	  Decomposing	  local:	  a	  conjoint	  analysis	  of	  locally	  produced	  foods.	  Am.	  J.	  Agr.	  Econ.	  90:476–486.	  	  Davidson,	  D.	  1982.	  Rational	  animals.	  Dialectica.	  36:317–327.	  	  Davies	  G.	  F.,	  B.	  J.	  Greenhough,	  P.	  Hobson-­‐West,	  R.	  G.	  W.	  Kirk,	  K.	  Applebee,	  L.	  C.	  Bellingan,	  et	  al.	  2016.	  Developing	  a	  Collaborative	  Agenda	  for	  Humanities	  and	  Social	  Scientific	  Research	  on	  Laboratory	  Animal	  Science	  and	  Welfare.	  PLoS	  One	  11:	  e0158791.	  	  	  Davison	  H.	  C.,	  A.	  R.	  Sayers,	  R.	  P.	  Smith,	  S.	  J.	  Pascoe,	  R.	  H.	  Davies,	  J.	  P.	  Weaver.	  2006.	  Risk	  factors	  associated	  with	  the	  Salmonella	  status	  of	  dairy	  farms	  in	  England	  and	  Wales.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  159:871–880.	    107 	  Dawkins,	  M.	  S.	  1983.	  Battery	  hens	  name	  their	  price:	  consumer	  demand	  theory	  and	  the	  measurement	  of	  ethological	  ‘needs’.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  31:1195–1205.	  	  Dawkins,	  M.	  S.	  1998.	  Evolution	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  Q.	  Rev.	  Biol.	  73:305–328.	  	  Dawkins,	  M.	  S.	  1990.	  From	  an	  animal's	  point	  of	  view:	  motivation,	  fitness,	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  Behav.	  Brain.	  Sci.	  13:1–9.	  	  Dawkins,	  M.	  S.	  2012.	  Why	  animals	  matter:	  animal	  consciousness,	  animal	  welfare,	  and	  human	  well-­‐being.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  	  De	  Bakker,	  E.,	  C.	  De	  Lauwere,	  and	  M.	  Bokma-­‐Bakker.	  2012.	  ‘All	  that	  is	  solid	  melts	  into	  air’:	  the	  Dutch	  debate	  about	  factory	  farming.	  pp.	  181–186	  in:	  Climate	  change	  and	  sustainable	  development,	  eds.	  T.	  Potthast	  and	  S.	  Meisch.	  Wageningen:	  Academic	  Publishers.	  	  	  De	  Vries,	  M.,	  E.	  A.	  M.	  Bokkers,	  G.	  Van	  Schaik,	  B.	  Engel,	  T.	  Dijkstra,	  and	  I.	  J.	  M.	  de	  Boer.	  2014.	  Exploring	  the	  value	  of	  routinely	  collected	  herd	  data	  for	  estimating	  dairy	  cattle	  welfare.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  97:715–730.	  	  Dechow,	  C.D.,	  and	  R.	  C.	  Goodling.	  2008.	  Mortality,	  culling	  by	  sixty	  days	  in	  milk,	  and	  production	  profiles	  in	  high-­‐	  and	  low-­‐survival	  Pennsylvania	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  91:	  4630–4639.	  	  DeGrazia,	  D.	  1996.	  Taking	  animals	  seriously:	  mental	  life	  and	  moral	  status.	  Cambridge	  University	  Press.	  Cambridge,	  MA,	  USA.	  	  DeGrazia,	  D.	  2016.	  Sentient	  nonpersons	  and	  the	  disvalue	  of	  death.	  Bioethics.	  Accessed	  Spet.	  26,	  2016.	  https://philosophy.columbian.gwu.edu/sites/philosophy.columbian.gwu.edu	  /files/downloads/degrazia_sentientnonpersons%26death.pdf	  	  Dennett	  D.	  1995.	  Do	  animals	  have	  beliefs?	  In	  H.	  L.	  Roitblat	  and	  J.	  A.	  Meyer	  (eds.)	  Comparative	  Approaches	  to	  Cognitive	  Science.	  MIT	  Press,	  Cambridge,	  MA.	  	  Désiré,	  L.,	  A.	  Boissy,	  and	  I.	  Veissier.	  2002.	  Emotions	  in	  farm	  animals::	  a	  new	  approach	  to	  animal	  welfare	  in	  applied	  ethology.	  Behav.	  Processes.	  60:165–180.	  	  Dewey	  C.E.,	  B.	  D.	  Cox,	  B.	  E.	  Straw,	  E.	  J.	  Bush,	  and	  H.	  S.	  Hurd.	  1997.	  Associations	  between	  off-­‐label	  feed	  additives	  and	  farm	  size,	  veterinary	  consultant	  use,	  and	  animal	  age.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  31:133–146.	  	  Dippel,	  S.,	  M.	  Dolezal,	  C.	  Brenninkmeyer,	  J.	  Brinkmann,	  S.	  March,	  U.	  Knierim,	  and	  C.	  Winckler.	  2009.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  lameness	  in	  cubicle	  housed	  Austrian	  Simmental	  dairy	  cows.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  90:102–112.	  	  Dockès,	  A.	  C.,	  and	  F.	  Kling-­‐Eveillard.	  2006.	  Farmers'	  and	  advisers'	  representations	  of	  animals	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  Livest.	  Sci.	  103:243–249.	    108 	  Donnelly,	   M.	   T.	   and	   C.	   J.	   Hawkey.	   1997.	   COX-­‐II	   inhibitors	   -­‐	   a	   new	   generation	   of	   safer	  NSAIDs?	  Aliment.	  Pharmacol.	  Ther.	  11:227–236.	  	  	  Dorsey,	  D.	  2010.	  Three	  arguments	  for	  perfectionism.	  Noûs.	  44,	  59–79.	  	  Duffy,	  M.	  2009.	  Economies	  of	  size	  in	  production	  agriculture.	  J.	  Hunger	  Environ.	  Nutr.	  4:375–392.	  	  Duncan,	  I.	  J.,	  and	  J.	  C.	  Petherick.	  1991.	  The	  implications	  of	  cognitive	  processes	  for	  animal	  welfare.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  69:5017–5022.	  	  Duncan,	  I.J.H.	  and	  D.	  Fraser.	  1997.	  Understanding	  animal	  welfare.	  In:	  Appleby,	  M.C.,	  Hughes,	  B.O.	  (Eds.),	  Animal	  Welfare.	  CAB	  International,	  Wallingford,	  UK.	  	  Duncan,	  I.	  J.	  2004.	  A	  concept	  of	  welfare	  based	  on	  feelings.	  In	  G.	  J.	  Benson	  and	  B.	  E.	  Rollin	  (eds.)	  The	  Well-­‐being	  of	  Farm	  Animals:	  Challenges	  and	  Solutions.	  Blackwell,	  Ames,	  IA.	  	  Dutta,	  S.,	  and	  C.	  Pullig.	  2011.	  Effectiveness	  of	  corporate	  responses	  to	  brand	  crises:	  The	  role	  of	  crisis	  type	  and	  response	  strategies.	  J.	  Bus.	  Res.	  64,	  1281–1287.	  	  EFSA.	  2015.	  Scientific	  Opinion	  on	  the	  assessment	  of	  dairy	  cow	  welfare	  in	  small-­‐scale	  farming	  systems.	  EFSA	  Journal.	  13:4137.	  doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2015.4137.	  	  	  Ellis-­‐Iversen,	  J.,	  A.	  J.	  Cook,	  E.	  Watson,	  M.	  Nielen,	  L.	  Larkin,	  M.	  Wooldridge	  and	  H.	  Hogeveen.	  2010.	  Perceptions,	  circumstances	  and	  motivators	  that	  influence	  implementation	  of	  zoonotic	  control	  programs	  on	  cattle	  farms.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  93:276–285.	  	  Espejo,	  L.	  A.,	  and	  M.	  I.	  Endres.	  2007.	  Herd-­‐level	  risk	  factors	  for	  lameness	  in	  high-­‐producing	  holstein	  cows	  housed	  in	  freestall	  barns.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  90:306–314.	  	  Evans,	  S.,	  and	  R.	  Davies.	  1996.	  Case	  control	  study	  of	  multiple-­‐resistant	  Salmonella	  typhimurium	  DT104	  infection	  of	  cattle	  in	  Great	  Britain.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  139:557–558.	  	  Fabian,	  J.,	  R.	  A.	  Laven,	  and	  H.	  R.	  Whay.	  2014.	  The	  prevalence	  of	  lameness	  on	  New	  Zealand	  dairy	  farms:	  A	  comparison	  of	  farmer	  estimate	  and	  locomotion	  scoring.	  Vet.	  J.	  201:31–38.	  	  	  Fajt	  V.	  R.,	  S.	  A.	  Wagner	  and	  B.	  Norby.	  2011.	  Analgesic	  drug	  administration	  and	  attitudes	  about	  analgesia	  in	  cattle	  among	  bovine	  practitioners	  in	  the	  United	  States.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  238:755–767.	  	  Faulkner	  P.	  M.,	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  2000.	  Reducing	  pain	  after	  dehorning	  in	  dairy	  calves.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  83:2037–2041.	  	  	  Faye,	  B.,	  and	  F.	  Lescourret.	  1989.	  Environmental	  factors	  associated	  with	  lameness	  in	  dairy	  cattle.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  7:267–287.	  	  	    109 Feldman,	  F.	  2002.	  The	  good	  life:	  A	  defense	  of	  attitudinal	  hedonism.	  Philos.	  Phenomen.	  Res.	  65:604–628.	  	  Feldman,	  F.	  2004.	  Pleasure	  and	  the	  good	  life:	  Concerning	  the	  nature,	  varieties	  and	  plausibility	  of	  hedonism.	  Oxford	  University	  Press,	  NY,	  NY.	  	  Fernandez-­‐Cornejo,	  J.,	  A.	  K.	  Mishra,	  R.	  F.	  Nehring,	  C.	  Hendricks,	  M.	  Southern	  and	  A.	  Gregory.	  2007.	  Off-­‐farm	  income,	  technology	  adoption,	  and	  farm	  economic	  performance.	  No.	  7234.	  Economic	  Research	  Service,	  United	  States	  Department	  of	  Agriculture.	  	  Fetrow,	  J.,	  K.	  V.	  Nordlund,	  and	  H.	  D.	  Norman.	  2006.	  Invited	  review:	  culling:	  nomenclature,	  definitions,	  and	  recommendations.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  89:1896–1905.	  	  Fields,	  G.	  S.	  1975.	  Rural-­‐urban	  migration,	  urban	  unemployment	  and	  underemployment,	  and	  job-­‐search	  activity	  in	  LDCs.	  J.	  Dev.	  Econ.	  2:165–187.	  	  Fischhoff,	  B.,	  P.	  Slovic,	  and	  S.	  Lichtenstein.	  1980.	  Knowing	  what	  you	  want:	  Measuring	  labile	  values.	  In	  T.	  Wallsten	  (ed.)	  Cognitive	  processes	  in	  choice	  and	  decision	  behavior.	  Erlbaum.	  Hillsdale,	  NJ.	  	  	  Fisman,	  R.,	  &	  Khanna,	  T.	  1999.	  Is	  trust	  a	  historical	  residue?	  Information	  flows	  and	  trust	  levels.	  J.	  of	  Econ.	  Behav.	  Organ.	  38:79–92.	  	  Flaccus,	  G.	  2009.	  Suit:	  meatpacker	  used	  “downer	  cows”	  for	  four	  years.	  Associated	  Press.	  Accessed	  Mar.	  16,	  2014.	  http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2009/sep/24	  /us-­‐slaughterhouse-­‐abuse-­‐092409/	  	  Foer,	  J.	  S.	  2010.	  Eating	  Animals.	  Little	  Brown.	  New	  York,	  NY.	  	  Foot,	  P.	  2003.	  Natural	  goodness.	  Clarendon	  Press.	  	  Fossler,	  C.	  P.,	  S.	  J.	  Wells,	  J.	  B.	  Kaneene,	  P.	  L.	  Ruegg,	  L.	  D.	  Warnick,	  J.	  B.	  Bender,	  L.	  E.	  Eberly,	  S.	  M.	  Godden,	  and	  L.	  W.	  Halbert.	  2005.	  Herd-­‐level	  factors	  associated	  with	  isolation	  of	  Salmonella	  in	  a	  multi-­‐state	  study	  of	  conventional	  and	  organic	  dairy	  farms.	  I.	  Salmonella	  shedding	  in	  calves.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  70:279–291.	  	  Francione,	  G.	  L.	  1995.	  Animal	  rights	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  Rutgers	  L.	  Rev.	  48:397.	  	  Frank,	  N.	  A.,	  and	  J.	  B.	  Kaneene.	  1993.	  Management	  risk	  factors	  associated	  with	  calf	  diarrhea	  in	  Michigan	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  76:1313–1323.	  	  Frankena,	  K.,	  K.	  A.	  van	  Keulen,	  J.	  P.	  Noordhuizen,	  E.	  N.	  	  Noordhuizen-­‐Straasen,	  J.	  Gundelach,	  D.	  J.	  	  de	  Jong,	  and	  I.	  Saedt.	  1992.	  A	  cross-­‐sectional	  study	  into	  prevalence	  and	  risk	  indicators	  of	  digital	  haemorrhages	  in	  female	  dairy	  calves.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  14:1–12.	  	  Frankena,	  K.,	  K.	  A.	  van	  Keulen,	  J.	  P.	  Noordhuizen,	  E.	  N.	  Noordhuizen-­‐Straassen,	  J.	  Gundelach,	  D.	  J.	  de	  Jong,	  and	  I.	  Saedt.	  1993.	  A	  cross-­‐sectional	  study	  of	  prevalence	  and	  risk	  factors	  of	    110 dermatitis	  interdigitalis	  in	  female	  dairy	  calves	  in	  the	  Netherlands.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  17:137–144.	  	  Fraser,	  D.	  1995.	  Science,	  values	  and	  animal	  welfare:	  exploring	  the	  'inextricable	  connection'.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  4:103–117.	  	  Fraser,	  D.	  1999.	  Animal	  ethics	  and	  animal	  welfare	  science:	  bridging	  the	  two	  cultures.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.	  65:	  171–189.	  	  Fraser,	  D.	  2003.	  Assessing	  animal	  welfare	  at	  the	  farm	  and	  group	  level:	  the	  interplay	  of	  science	  and	  values.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  12:	  433–443.	  	  Fraser,	  D.	  2005.	  Animal	  welfare	  and	  the	  intensification	  of	  animal	  production:	  an	  alternative	  interpretation.	  Food	  and	  Agriculture	  Organisation	  of	  the	  United	  Nations,	  Rome,	  Italy.	  	  	  Fraser,	  D.	  2008.	  Animal	  welfare	  and	  the	  intensification	  of	  animal	  production.	  In	  The	  Ethics	  of	  Intensification.	  P.B.	  Thompson	  (ed.)	  Springer,	  Heidelberg,	  Germany.	  	  Fraser,	  D.,	  and	  I.	  J.	  Duncan.	  1998.	  'Pleasures',	  'pains'	  and	  animal	  welfare:	  toward	  a	  natural	  history	  of	  affect.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  7:383–396.	  	  Fraser,	  D.,	  and	  C.	  J.	  Nicol.	  2011.	  Preference	  and	  motivation	  research.	  In	  M.	  C.	  Appleby,	  J.A.	  Mench,	  I.	  A.	  S.	  Olsson,	  B.	  O.	  Hughes	  (eds.)	  Animal	  Welfare,	  CABI,	  Wallingford,	  England,	  UK.	  	  Fraser,	  D.,	  D.	  M.	  Weary,	  E.	  A.	  Pajor,	  and	  B.	  N.	  Milligan.	  1997.	  A	  scientific	  conception	  of	  animal	  welfare	  that	  reflects	  ethical	  concerns.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  6:187–205.	  	  Frewer,	  L.	  J.,	  A.	  Kole,	  S.	  M.	  Van	  De	  Kroon,	  and	  C.	  De	  Lauwere.	  2005.	  Consumer	  attitudes	  towards	  the	  development	  of	  animal-­‐friendly	  husbandry	  systems.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  18:345–367.	  	  Frewer,	  L.	  J.,	  Howard,	  C.,	  Hedderley,	  D.,	  and	  R.	  Shepherd.	  1996.	  What	  determines	  trust	  in	  information	  about	  food-­‐related	  risks?	  Underlying	  psychological	  constructs.	  Risk.	  Anal.	  16:473–486.	  	  Fulwider	  W.	  K.,	  T.	  Grandin,	  B.	  E.	  Rollin,	  T.	  E.	  Engle,	  N.	  L.	  Dalsted,	  and	  W.	  D.	  Lamm.	  2008.	  Survey	  of	  dairy	  management	  practices	  on	  one	  hundred	  thirteen	  north	  central	  and	  northeastern	  United	  States	  dairies.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  91:1686–1692.	  	  Gabler	  M.,	  P.	  R.	  Tozer,	  and	  A.	  J.	  Heinrichs.	  2000.	  Development	  of	  a	  cost	  analysis	  spreadsheet	  for	  calculating	  the	  costs	  to	  raise	  a	  replacement	  dairy	  heifer.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  83:1104–1109.	  	  Garber	  L.	  P.,	  M.	  D.	  Salman,	  H.	  S.	  Hurd,	  T.	  Keefe,	  J.	  L.	  Schlater.	  1994.	  Potential	  risk	  factors	  for	  Cryptosporidium	  infection	  in	  dairy	  calves.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  205:86–91.	  	    111 Gardner,	  I.	  A.,	  P.	  Willeberg,	  and	  J.	  Mousing,	  2002.	  Empirical	  and	  theoretical	  evidence	  for	  herd	  size	  as	  a	  risk	  factor	  for	  swine	  diseases.	  Anim.	  Health	  Res.	  Rev.	  3:43–55.	  	  Gavrell-­‐Ortiz	  S.	  E.	  2004.	  Beyond	  welfare:	  animal	  integrity,	  animal	  dignity,	  and	  genetic	  engineering.	  Ethics.	  Environ.	  9:94–120.	  	  Gehani,	  R.	  R.	  1998.	  Management	  of	  technology	  and	  operations.	  Wiley	  &	  Sons,	  New	  York,	  NY.	  	  George,	  K.	  A.,	  K.	  M.	  Slagle,	  R.	  S.	  Wilson,	  S.	  J.	  Moeller,	  and	  J.	  T.	  Bruskotter.	  2016.	  Changes	  in	  attitudes	  toward	  animals	  in	  the	  United	  States	  from	  1978	  to	  2014.	  Biol.	  Cons.	  201:237–242.	  	  	  Gonyou,	  H.	  W.	  1993.	  Animal	  welfare:	  definitions	  and	  assessment.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  6:37–43.	  	  Goodman,	  J.	  K.,	  C.	  E.	  Cryder,	  and	  A.	  Cheema.	  2013.	  Data	  collection	  in	  a	  flat	  world:	  The	  strengths	  and	  weaknesses	  of	  Mechanical	  Turk	  samples.	  J.	  Behav.	  Decis.	  Making.	  26:213–224.	  	  Gosling	  S.	  D.,	  S.	  Vazire,	  S.	  Srivastava,	  and	  O.	  P.	  John.	  2004.	  Should	  we	  trust	  web-­‐based	  studies?	  A	  comparative	  analysis	  of	  six	  preconceptions	  about	  internet	  questionnaires.	  Am.	  Psychol.	  59:93.	  	  Gottardo	  F.,	  E.	  Nalon,	  B.	  Contiero,	  S.	  Normando,	  P.	  Dalvit,	  and	  G.	  Cozzi.	  2011.	  The	  dehorning	  of	  dairy	  calves:	  Practices	  and	  opinions	  of	  639	  farmers.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  94:5724–5734.	  	  Government	  of	  the	  Netherlands.	  2013.	  Dutch	  Government	  position	  on	  scale	  of	  intensive	  livestock	  production.	  Accessed	  May	  20	  2015.	  https://www.government.nl/latest/news	  /2013/06/14/dutch-­‐government-­‐position-­‐on-­‐scale-­‐of-­‐intensive-­‐livestock-­‐production	  	  	  Green,	  L.	  E.,	  K.	  Lewis,	  A.	  Kimpton,	  and	  C.	  J.	  Nicol.	  2000.	  Cross-­‐sectional	  study	  of	  the	  prevalence	  of	  feather-­‐pecking	  in	  laying	  hens	  in	  alternative	  systems	  and	  its	  association	  with	  management	  and	  disease.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  147:233–238.	  	  Greenwald,	  A.	  G.,	  and	  M.	  R.	  Banaji.	  1995.	  Implicit	  social	  cognition:	  attitudes,	  self-­‐esteem,	  and	  stereotypes.	  Psychol.	  Rev.	  102:4.	  	  Gregoire,	  A.	  2002.	  The	  mental	  health	  of	  farmers.	  Occup.	  Med.	  52:471–476.	  	  Griffin,	  J.	  1986.	  Well-­‐being:	  Its	  meaning,	  measurement,	  and	  moral	  importance.	  	  Clarendon,	  Oxford,	  England.	  	  Groehn,	  J.	  A.,	  J.	  B.	  Kaneene,	  and	  D.	  Foster.	  1992.	  Risk	  factors	  associated	  with	  lameness	  in	  lactating	  dairy	  cattle	  in	  Michigan.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  14:77–85.	  	  Gulliksen,	  S.	  M.,	  K.	  I.	  Lie,	  T.	  Loken,	  and	  O.	  Osteras.	  2009.	  Calf	  mortality	  in	  Norwegian	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  92:2782–2795.	    112 	  Hadley	  G.	  L.,	  C.	  A.	  Wolf,	  and	  S.	  B.	  Harsh.	  2006.	  Dairy	  cattle	  culling	  patterns,	  explanations,	  and	  implications.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  89:2286–2296.	  	  Hadley,	  G.	  L.,	  S.	  B.	  Harsh,	  and	  C.	  A.	  Wolf.	  2002.	  Managerial	  and	  financial	  implications	  of	  major	  dairy	  farm	  expansions	  in	  Michigan	  and	  Wisconsin.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  85:2053–2064.	  	  Haidt,	  J.	  2001.	  The	  emotional	  dog	  and	  its	  rational	  tail:	  a	  social	  intuitionist	  approach	  to	  moral	  judgment.	  Psychol.	  Rev.	  108:814.	  	  Hall,	  C.,	  and	  V.	  Sandilands.	  2007.	  Public	  attitudes	  to	  the	  welfare	  of	  broiler	  chickens.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  16:499–512.	  	  Harper,	  G.,	  and	  S.	  Henson.	  2001.	  Consumer	  concerns	  about	  animal	  welfare	  and	  the	  	  impact	  on	  food	  choice.	  EU	  Fair	  CT98-­‐3678	  Final	  Report.	  Accessed	  Jan.	  16,	  2013.	  	  http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/animal/welfare/eu_fair_project_en.pdf.	  	  Harris,	  J.,	  C.	  D.	  Hibburt,	  G.	  A.	  Anderson,	  P.	  J.	  Younis,	  D.	  H.	  Fitspatrick,	  A.	  C.	  Dunni,	  I.	  W.	  Parsons,	  and	  N.	  R.	  McBeath.	  1988.	  The	  incidence,	  cost	  and	  factors	  associated	  with	  foot	  lameness	  in	  dairy	  cattle	  in	  southwestern	  Victoria.	  Aust.	  Vet.	  J.	  65:171–176.	  	  Harrison,	  R.	  1964.	  Animal	  Machines.	  Vincent	  Stuart,	  London.	  	  	  Hartman,	  D.	  A.,	  R.	  W.	  Everett,	  S.	  T.	  Slack,	  and	  R.	  G.	  Warner.	  1974.	  Calf	  mortality.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  57:576–578.	  	  Haybron,	  D.	  M.	  2008.	  The	  pursuit	  of	  unhappiness:	  the	  elusive	  psychology	  of	  well-­‐being.	  Oxford	  University	  Press,	  NY,	  NY.	  	  Haynes,	  R.	  P.	  2012.	  The	  myth	  of	  happy	  meat.	  The	  philosophy	  of	  food,	  39:161.	  	  Heathwood,	  C.	  2005.	  The	  problem	  of	  defective	  desires.	  Australas.	  J.	  Philos.	  83:487–504.	  	  Heerwegh,	  D.	  2009.	  Mode	  differences	  between	  face-­‐to-­‐face	  and	  web	  surveys:	  an	  experimental	  investigation	  of	  data	  quality	  and	  social	  desirability	  effects.	  Int.	  J.	  Public	  Opin.	  R.	  21:111–121.	  	  Heinrich	  A.,	  T.	  F.	  Duffield,	  K.	  D.	  Lissemore,	  and	  S.	  T.	  Millman.	  2010.	  The	  effect	  of	  meloxicam	  on	  behavior	  and	  pain	  sensitivity	  of	  dairy	  calves	  following	  cautery	  dehorning	  with	  a	  local	  anesthetic.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  93:2450–2457.	  	  Heleski	  C.	  R.,	  A.	  G.	  Mertig,	  and	  A.	  J.	  Zanella.	  2004.	  Assessing	  attitudes	  toward	  farm	  animal	  welfare:	  a	  national	  survey	  of	  animal	  science	  faculty	  members.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  82:2806–2814.	  	  Hemsworth,	  P.	  H.,	  D.	  J.	  Mellor,	  G.	  M.	  Cronin,	  and	  A.	  J.	  	  Tilbrook.	  2015.	  Scientific	  assessment	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  N.	  Z.	  Vet.	  J.	  63:24–30.	    113 	  Hemsworth,	  P.	  H.,	  and	  G.	  J.	  Coleman.	  2011.	  Human-­‐Livestock	  Interactions:	  The	  stockperson	  and	  the	  productivity	  and	  welfare	  of	  intensively-­‐farmed	  animals.	  CABI,	  Oxford,	  England,	  UK..	  	  Hemsworth,	  P.	  H.,	  and	  J.	  L.	  Barnett.	  1992.	  The	  effects	  of	  early	  contact	  with	  humans	  on	  the	  subsequent	  level	  of	  fear	  of	  humans	  in	  pigs.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.	  35:83–90.	  	  Hemsworth,	  P.	  H.,	  J.	  L.	  Barnett,	  and	  G.	  J.	  Coleman.	  1993.	  The	  human-­‐animal	  relationship	  in	  agriculture	  and	  its	  consequences	  for	  the	  animal.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  2:33–51.	  	  Henrich,	  J.,	  S.	  J.	  Heine	  and	  A.	  Norenzayan.	  2010.	  The	  weirdest	  people	  in	  the	  world?	  Behav.	  Brain	  Sci.,	  33:61–83.	  	  Hersh,	  M.	  A.	  2002.	  Whistleblowers—heroes	  or	  traitors?:	  Individual	  and	  collective	  responsibility	  for	  ethical	  behaviour.	  Annu.	  Rev.	  Control.	  26:243–262.	  	  Herzog,	  H.	  2010.	  Some	  we	  love,	  some	  we	  hate,	  some	  we	  eat:	  why	  it’s	  so	  hard	  to	  think	  straight	  about	  animals.	  Harper.	  NY,	  NY.	  	  Herzog,	  H.,	  A.	  Rowan,	  and	  D.	  Kossow.	  2001.	  Social	  attitudes	  and	  animals.	  In	  D.	  J.	  Salem	  and	  A.	  N.	  Rowan	  (eds.),	  The	  state	  of	  the	  animals	  2001.	  Humane	  Socity	  Press,	  Washington	  DC,	  USA.	  	  Herzog,	  H.	  A.,	  N.	  S.	  Betchart,	  and	  R.	  B.	  Pittman.	  1991.	  Gender,	  sex	  role	  orientation,	  and	  attitudes	  toward	  animals.	  Anthrozoös.	  4:184–191.	  	  Hess,	  S.,	  L.A.	  Bolos,	  R.	  Hoffmann,	  R.	  and	  Y.	  Surry.	  2014.	  Is	  animal	  welfare	  better	  on	  small	  farms?	  Evidence	  from	  veterinary	  inspections	  on	  Swedish	  farms.	  Proc.	  International	  Congress	  European	  Association	  of	  Agricultural	  Economists,	  Ljubljana,	  Slovenia.	  Accessed	  Mar.	  20,	  2016.	  http://purl.umn.edu/182781	  	  	  Heuwieser,	  W.,	  M.	  Iwersen,	  J.	  Gossellin,	  and	  M.	  Drillich.	  2010.	  Short	  communication:	  Survey	  of	  fresh	  cow	  management	  practices	  of	  dairy	  cattle	  on	  small	  and	  large	  commercial	  farms.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  93:1065–1068.	  	  Hewson	  C.	  J.,	  I.	  R.	  Dohoo,	  K.	  A.	  Lemke,	  and	  H.	  W.	  Barkema.	  2007.	  Canadian	  veterinarians’	  use	  of	  analgesics	  in	  cattle,	  pigs,	  and	  horses	  in	  2004	  and	  2005.	  Can.	  Vet.	  J.	  48:155–164.	  	  Hewson,	  C.	  J.	  2003.	  What	  is	  animal	  welfare?	  Common	  definitions	  and	  their	  practical	  consequences.	  Can.	  Vet.	  J.	  44:496.	  	  Hill,	  A.	  E.,	  A.	  L.	  Green,	  B.	  A.	  Wagner,	  and	  D.A.	  Dargatz.	  2009.	  Relationship	  between	  herd	  size	  and	  annual	  prevalence	  of	  and	  primary	  antimicrobial	  treatments	  for	  common	  diseases	  on	  dairy	  operations	  in	  the	  United	  States.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  88:264–277.	  	  Hoare,	  R.	  J.	  T.,	  and	  E.	  A.	  Roberts.	  1972.	  Investigations	  in	  mastitis	  problem	  herds.	  II.	  Effect	  of	  herd	  size,	  shed	  type,	  hygiene	  and	  management	  practices.	  Aust.	  Vet.	  J.	  48:661-­‐663.	    114 	  Hoe,	  F.	  G.	  H.,	  and	  P.	  L.	  Ruegg.	  2006.	  Opinions	  and	  practices	  of	  Wisconsin	  dairy	  producers	  about	  biosecurity	  and	  animal	  well-­‐being.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  89:2297–2308.	  	  Hoeschele,	  I.	  1990.	  Potential	  gain	  from	  insertion	  of	  major	  genes	  into	  dairy	  cattle.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  73:2601.	  	  Holzhauer,	  M.,	  C.	  Hardenberg,	  C.	  J.	  M.	  Bartels,	  and	  K.	  Frankena.	  2006.	  Herd-­‐and	  cow-­‐level	  prevalence	  of	  digital	  dermatitis	  in	  the	  Netherlands	  and	  associated	  risk	  factors.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  89:580–588.	  	  Huber	  J.,	  T.	  Arnholdt,	  E.	  Möstl,	  C.	  C.	  Gelfert,	  and	  M.	  Drillich.	  2013.	  Pain	  management	  with	  flunixin	  meglumine	  at	  dehorning	  of	  calves.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  96:132–140.	  	  Hurka,	  T.	  2010.	  The	  best	  things	  in	  life:	  A	  guide	  to	  what	  really	  matters.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	  	  Hurka,	  T.	  1993.	  Perfectionism.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	  	  Hurley,	  T.	  H.,	  P.	  F.	  Orazem,	  and	  J.	  Kliebenstein.	  1999.	  Structure	  of	  Wages	  and	  Benefits	  in	  the	  U.S.	  Pork	  Industry.	  Amer.	  J.	  Agr.	  Econ.	  81:144–63.	  	  Hursthouse,	  R.	  1999.	  On	  virtue	  ethics.	  Oxford	  Univerity	  Press.	  Oxford,	  UK.	  	  Huston,	  C.	  L.,	  T.	  E.	  Wittum,	  B.	  C.	  Love,	  and	  J.	  E.	  Keen.	  2002.	  Prevalence	  of	  fecal	  shedding	  of	  Salmonella	  spp	  in	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  220:645–649.	  	  Huxley	  J.	  N.,	  and	  H.	  R.	  Whay.	  2006.	  Current	  attitudes	  of	  cattle	  practitioners	  to	  pain	  and	  the	  use	  of	  analgesics	  in	  cattle.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  159:662–668.	  	  Hyde,	  J.,	  S.	  A.	  Cornelisse,	  and	  L.	  A.	  Holden.	  2011	  .	  Human	  resource	  management	  on	  dairy	  farms:	  Does	  investing	  in	  people	  matter.	  Econ.	  Bull.	  31:208–217.	  	  Jacobs,	  J.	  2011.	  Survey	  Finds	  Iowa	  Voters	  Oppose	  Prohibiting	  Secret	  Animal-­‐abuse	  Videos.	  Des	  Moines	  Register.	  Accessed	  Jan.	  16,	  2013.	  http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com	  /dmr/index.php/2011/03/22/survey-­‐finds-­‐iowa-­‐voters-­‐oppose-­‐prohibiting	  -­‐secret-­‐animalabuse-­‐videos/article.	  	  Jago,	  J.	  G.,	  and	  D.	  P.	  Berry.	  2011.	  Associations	  between	  herd	  size,	  rate	  of	  expansion	  and	  production,	  breeding	  policy	  and	  reproduction	  in	  spring	  calving	  dairy	  herds.	  Animal.	  5:1626–1633.	  	  Jahansoozi,	  J.	  2006.	  Organization-­‐stakeholder	  relationships:	  exploring	  trust	  and	  transparency.	  J.	  Manag.	  Dev.	  25:942–955.	  	  James,	  R.	  E.,	  M.	  L.	  McGilliard,	  and	  D.	  A.	  Hartman.	  1984.	  Calf	  mortality	  in	  Virginia	  Dairy	  Herd	  Improvement	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  67:908.	    115 	  Jenny,	  B.	  F.,	  G.	  E.	  Gramling,	  and	  T.	  M.	  Glaze.	  1981.	  Management	  factors	  associated	  with	  calf	  mortality	  in	  South	  Carolina	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  64:2284.	  	  Judge,	  T.	  A.,	  R.	  F.	  Piccolo,	  N.	  P.	  Podsakoff,	  J.	  C.	  Shaw	  and	  B.	  L.	  Rich.	  2010.	  The	  relationship	  between	  pay	  and	  job	  satisfaction:	  A	  meta-­‐analysis	  of	  the	  literature.	  J.	  Vocat.	  Behav.	  77:157–167.	  	  Kabagambe,	  E.	  K.,	  S.	  J.	  Wells,	  L.	  P.	  Garber,	  M.	  D.	  Salman,	  B.	  Wagner,	  and	  P.	  J.	  Fedorka-­‐Cray.	  2000.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  fecal	  shedding	  of	  Salmonella	  in	  91	  US	  dairy	  herds	  in	  1996.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  43:177–194.	  	  Kagan,	  S.	  1994.	  Me	  and	  my	  life.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  Aristotelian	  Society.	  94:309–324..	  	  Kagan,	  S.	  1992.	  The	  limits	  of	  well-­‐being.	  Soc.	  Philos.	  Policy.	  9:169–189.	  	  Kahneman,	  D.,	  and	  R.	  Sugden.	  2005.	  Experienced	  utility	  as	  a	  standard	  of	  policy	  evaluation.	  Environ.	  Resour.	  Econ.	  32:161–181.	  	  Kaneene,	  J.	  B.,	  and	  R.	  Miller.	  1994.	  Epidemiological	  study	  of	  metritis	  in	  Michigan	  dairy	  cattle.	  Vet.	  Res.	  25:253–257.	  	  Kang,	  J.,	  and	  G.	  Hustvedt.	  2014.	  Building	  trust	  between	  consumers	  and	  corporations:	  The	  role	  of	  consumer	  perceptions	  of	  transparency	  and	  social	  responsibility.	  J.	  Bus.	  Ethics.	  125:253–265.	  	  Katsoulos,	  P.	  D.,	  and	  G.	  Christodoulopoulos.	  2009.	  Prevalence	  of	  lameness	  and	  of	  associated	  claw	  disorders	  in	  Greek	  dairy	  cattle	  industry.	  Livest.	  Sci.	  122:354–358.	  	  Keller,	  S.	  2009.	  Welfarism.	  Philos.	  Compass.	  4:82–95.	  	  Kendall,	  H.	  A.,	  L.	  M.	  Lobao,	  and	  J.	  S.	  Sharp.	  2006.	  Public	  Concern	  with	  animal	  well-­‐being:	  place,	  social	  structural	  location,	  and	  individual	  experience.	  Rural.	  Sociol.	  71:399–428.	  	  Kielland,	  C.,	  E.	  Skjerve,	  O.	  Østerås,	  and	  A.	  J.	  Zanella.	  2010.	  Dairy	  farmer	  attitudes	  and	  empathy	  toward	  animals	  are	  associated	  with	  animal	  welfare	  indicators.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  93:2998–3006.	  	  Kielland,	  C.,	  L.	  E.	  Ruud,	  A.	  J.	  Zanella,	  and	  O.	  Østerås.	  2009.	  Prevalence	  and	  risk	  factors	  for	  skin	  lesions	  on	  legs	  of	  dairy	  cattle	  housed	  in	  freestalls	  in	  Norway.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  92:5487–5496.	  	  	  Kiliç,	  İ.,	  and	  Z.	  Bozkurt.	  2013.	  The	  Relationship	  between	  farmers’	  perceptions	  and	  animal	  welfare	  standards	  in	  sheep	  farms.	  Australas.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  26:1329.	  	  Kirby,	  D.	  2010.	  Animal	  factory:	  the	  looming	  threat	  of	  industrial	  pig,	  dairy,	  and	  poultry	  farms	  to	  humans	  and	  the	  environment.	  St.	  Martin’s	  Press.	  New	  York,	  NY.	    116 	  Kirchin,	  S.	  (ed.).	  2013.	  Thick	  concepts.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  Oxford,	  UK.	  	  Kirkden,	  R.	  D.,	  and	  E.	  A.	  	  Pajor.	  2006.	  Using	  preference,	  motivation	  and	  aversion	  tests	  to	  ask	  scientific	  questions	  about	  animals’	  feelings.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.	  100:29-­‐47.	  	  Klein-­‐Jöbstl	  D.,	  M.	  Iwersen,	  and	  M.	  Drillich.	  2014.	  Farm	  characteristics	  and	  calf	  management	  practices	  on	  dairy	  farms	  with	  and	  without	  diarrhea:	  a	  case-­‐control	  study	  to	  investigate	  risk	  factors	  for	  calf	  diarrhea.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  97:5110–5119.	  	  Knight,	  S.	  and	  L.	  Barnett.	  2008.	  Justifying	  attitudes	  towards	  animal	  use:	  A	  qualitative	  study	  of	  people’s	  views	  and	  beliefs.	  Anthrozoos	  21:31–42.	  	  Knobe,	  J.,	  &	  Nichols,	  S.	  (eds.)	  2013.	  Experimental	  philosophy.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	  	  Knowler,	  D.,	  and	  B.	  Bradshaw.	  2007.	  Farmers’	  adoption	  of	  conservation	  agriculture:	  A	  review	  and	  synthesis	  of	  recent	  research.	  Food	  Policy.	  32:25–48.	  	  Kossaibati,	  M.	  A.,	  M.	  Hovi,	  and	  R.	  J.	  Esslemont.	  1998.	  Incidence	  of	  clinical	  mastitis	  in	  dairy	  herds	  in	  England.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  143:649–653.	  	  Kraut,	  R.	  2009.	  What	  is	  good	  and	  why:	  The	  ethics	  of	  well-­‐being.	  Harvard	  University	  Press.	  Cambridge,	  MA,	  USA.	  	  Kraut,	  R.	  2011.	  Against	  absolute	  goodness.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	  	  Kreuter,	  F.,	  S.	  Presser,	  and	  R.	  Tourangeau.	  2008.	  Social	  desirability	  bias	  in	  CATI,	  IVR,	  and	  Web	  surveys	  the	  effects	  of	  mode	  and	  question	  sensitivity.	  Public.	  Opin.	  Quart.	  72:847–865.	  	  Krosnick,	  J.	  A.,	  and	  R.	  E.	  	  Petty.	  1995.	  Attitude	  strength:	  An	  overview.	  In	  R.	  E.	  Petty	  and	  J.	  A.	  Krosnick	  (eds.).	  Attitude	  strength:	  Antecedents	  and	  consequences.	  Hillsdale,	  NJ:	  Erlbaum.	  	  Krystallis,	  A.,	  M.	  D.	  de	  Barcellos,	  J.	  O.	  Kügler,	  W.	  Verbeke,	  and	  K.	  G.	  Grunert.	  2009.	  Attitudes	  of	  European	  citizens	  towards	  pig	  production	  systems.	  Livest.	  Sci.	  126:46–56.	  	  Kujala,	  M.,	  I.	  R.	  Dohoo,	  M.	  Laakso,	  C.	  Schnier,	  and	  T.	  Soveri.	  2009.	  Sole	  ulcers	  in	  Finnish	  dairy	  cattle.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  89:227–236.	  	  	  Lance,	  S.	  E.,	  G.	  Y.	  Miller,	  D.	  D.	  Hancock,	  P.	  C.	  Bartlett,	  L.	  E.	  Heider,	  and	  M.	  L.	  Moeschberger.	  1992.	  Effects	  of	  environment	  and	  management	  on	  mortality	  in	  preweaned	  dairy	  calves.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  201:1197–1202.	  	  Landfried,	  J.,	  2012.	  Bound	  &	  gagged:	  potential	  first	  amendment	  challenges	  to	  ag-­‐gag	  laws.	  Duke	  Environ.	  Law	  Policy	  Forum	  23:377.	  	  Lassen,	  J.,	  P.	  Sandøe,	  and	  B.	  Forkman.	  2006.	  Happy	  pigs	  are	  dirty!	  conflicting	  perspectives	    117 on	  animal	  welfare.	  Livest.	  Sci.	  103:221–230.	  	  Laurence,	  S.,	  and	  E.	  Margolis,	  1999.	  Concepts	  and	  cognitive	  science.	  Concepts:	  core	  readings.	  3:81.	  	  Laven	  R.	  A.,	  J.	  N.	  Huxley,	  H.	  R.	  Whay,	  and	  K	  J.	  Stafford.	  2009.	  Results	  of	  a	  survey	  of	  attitudes	  of	  dairy	  veterinarians	  in	  New	  Zealand	  regarding	  painful	  procedures	  and	  conditions	  in	  cattle.	  New.	  Zeal.	  Vet.	  J.	  57:215–220.	  	  Le	  Cozler,	  Y.,	  O.	  Recourse,	  E.	  Ganche,	  D.	  Giraud,	  J.	  Danel,	  M.	  Bertin,	  and	  P.	  Brunschwig.	  2012.	  A	  survey	  on	  dairy	  heifer	  farm	  management	  practices	  in	  a	  Western-­‐European	  plainland,	  the	  French	  Pays	  de	  la	  Loire	  region.	  J.	  Agr.	  Sci.	  150:518–533.	  	  Leach,	  K.	  A.,	  H.	  R.	  Whay,	  C.	  M.	  Maggs,	  Z.	  E.	  Barker,	  E.	  S.	  Paul,	  A.	  K.	  Bell,	  and	  D.	  C.	  Main.	  2010.	  Working	  towards	  a	  reduction	  in	  cattle	  lameness:	  1.	  Understanding	  barriers	  to	  lameness	  control	  on	  dairy	  farms.	  Res.	  Vet.	  Sci.	  89:311–317.	  	  Leggett,	  C.	  G.,	  N.	  S.	  Kleckner,	  K.	  J.	  Boyle,	  J.	  W.	  Dufield,	  and	  R.	  C.	  Mitchell.	  2003.	  Social	  desirability	  bias	  in	  contingent	  valuation	  surveys	  administered	  through	  in-­‐person	  interviews.	  Land.	  Econ.	  79:561–575.	  	  Lensink,	  J.,	  A.	  Boissy,	  and	  I.	  Veissier.	  2000.	  The	  relationship	  between	  farmers'	  attitude	  and	  behaviour	  towards	  calves,	  and	  productivity	  of	  veal	  units.	  Ann.	  Zootechnol.	  49:313–327.	  	  Leontides	  L.,	  C.	  Ewald,	  P.	  Willeberg.	  1994.	  Herd	  risk	  factors	  for	  serological	  evidence	  of	  Aujeszky’s	  disease	  virus	  infection	  of	  breeding	  sows	  in	  Northern	  Germany	  (1990-­‐1991),	  J.	  Vet.	  Med.	  B	  41:554–560.	  	  Leruste,	  H.,	  E.	  A.	  M.	  Bokkers,	  L.	  F.	  M.	  Heutinck,	  M.	  Wolthuis-­‐Fillerup,	  J.	  T.	  N.	  van	  der	  Werf,	  M.	  Brscic,	  G.	  Cozzi,	  B.	  Engel,	  C.	  G.	  van	  Reenen,	  and	  B.	  J.	  Lensink.	  2012.	  Evlauation	  of	  on-­‐farm	  veal	  calves’	  responses	  to	  unfamiliar	  humans	  and	  potential	  influencing	  factors.	  Animal.	  6:2003–2010.	  	  Lichtenstein,	  S.,	  and	  P.	  Slovic.	  1971.	  Reversals	  of	  preference	  between	  bids	  and	  choices	  in	  gambling	  decisions.	  J.	  Exp.	  Psychol.	  89:46.	  	  Lindstrom,	  U.	  B.,	  M.	  V.	  Bonsdorff,	  and	  J.	  Syvajarvi.	  1984.	  Factors	  affecting	  bovine	  ketosis	  and	  its	  association	  with	  non-­‐return	  rate.	  J.	  Sci.	  Agric.	  Soc.	  Finland.	  55:497–506.	  	  Linzey,	  A.,	  and	  P.	  A.	  Clarke.	  1990.	  Animal	  rights:	  A	  historical	  anthology.	  Columbia	  University	  Press.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	  	  Littlewood,	  K.	  E.,	  and	  D.	  J.	  Mellor.	  2016.	  Changes	  in	  the	  Welfare	  of	  an	  Injured	  Working	  Farm	  Dog	  Assessed	  Using	  the	  Five	  Domains	  Model.	  Animals.	  6:58.	  	  Livengood,	  J.,	  and	  E.	  Machery.	  2007.	  The	  folk	  probably	  don't	  think	  what	  you	  think	  they	  think:	  experiments	  on	  causation	  by	  absence.	  Midwest.	  Stud.	  Philos.	  31:107–127.	    118 	  Long	  C.	  R.,	  and	  K.	  E.	  Gregory.	  1978.	  Inheritance	  of	  the	  horned,	  scurred	  and	  polled	  condition	  in	  cattle.	  J.	  Hered.	  69:395–400.	  	  Lora,	  I.,	  P.	  Paparella,	  M.	  Brscic,	  and	  F.	  Gottardo.	  2014.	  Survey	  on	  mortality	  rate	  of	  young	  stock	  on	  dairy	  farms	  of	  the	  Province	  of	  Padova.	  Acta	  Agraria	  Kasposvariensis.	  18:69–74.	  	  Losinger,	  W.	  C.,	  and	  A.	  J.	  Heinrichs.	  1997.	  Management	  practices	  associated	  with	  high	  mortality	  among	  preweaned	  dairy	  heifers.	  J.	  Dairy	  Res.	  64:1–11.	  	  Loughnan,	  S.,	  N.	  Haslam,	  and	  B.	  Bastian.	  2010.	  The	  role	  of	  meat	  consumption	  in	  the	  denial	  of	  moral	  status	  and	  mind	  to	  meat	  animals.	  Appetite.	  55:156–159.	  	  Lund,	  V.,	  G.	  Coleman,	  S.	  Gunnarsson,	  M.	  C.	  Appleby,	  and	  K.	  Karkinen.	  2006.	  Animal	  welfare	  science—Working	  at	  the	  interface	  between	  the	  natural	  and	  social	  sciences.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.	  97:37–49.	  	  Lusk,	  J.	  L.,	  and	  F.	  B.	  Norwood.	  2010.	  Direct	  versus	  indirect	  questioning:	  an	  application	  to	  the	  well-­‐being	  of	  farm	  animals.	  Soc.	  Indic.	  Res.	  96:551–565.	  	  Lusk,	  J.	  L.,	  F.	  B.	  Norwood,	  and	  R.	  W.	  Pricket.	  2007.	  Consumer	  preferences	  for	  farm	  animal	  welfare:	  Results	  of	  a	  nationwide	  telephone	  survey,	  Working	  Paper,	  Department	  of	  Agricultural	  Economics,	  Oklahoma	  State	  University.	  	  Macaulay,	  T.	  B.	  1849.	  The	  history	  of	  England	  from	  the	  accession	  of	  James	  II.	  Harper.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA>	  	  MacDonald,	  J.	  M.,	  E.	  J.	  O’Donoghue,	  W.	  D.	  McBride,	  R.	  F.	  Nehring,	  C.	  L.	  Sandretto,	  and	  R.	  Mosheim.	  2007.	  Profits,	  costs,	  and	  the	  changing	  structure	  of	  dairy	  farming.	  Accessed	  Apr.	  10,	  2015.	  http://www.ers.usda.gov/media/188030/err47_1_.pdf	  	  	  MacDonald,	  J.	  M.,	  J.	  Cessna,	  and	  R.	  Mosheim.	  2016.	  Changing	  structure,	  financial	  risks,	  and	  government	  policy	  for	  the	  U.S.	  dairy	  industry.	  Accessed	  Apr.	  1,	  2016.	  http://www.ers.usda.gov/media/2027311/err205_errata.pdf	  	  	  Maeda,	  Y.,	  and	  M.	  Miyahara.	  2003.	  Determinants	  of	  trust	  in	  industry,	  government,	  and	  citizen's	  groups	  in	  Japan.	  Risk	  Anal.	  23:303-­‐310.	  	  Maher,	  P.,	  M.	  Good,	  and	  S.	  More.	  2008.	  Trends	  in	  cow	  numbers	  and	  culling	  rate	  in	  the	  Irish	  cattle	  population,	  2003	  to	  2006.	  Ir.	  Vet.	  J.	  61:455–463.	  	  Malone,	  T.,	  and	  J.	  Lusk.	  2016.	  Putting	  the	  chicken	  before	  the	  egg	  price:	  An	  ex	  post	  analysis	  of	  California's	  batter	  cage	  ban.	  J.	  Agr.	  Resource.	  Econ.	  41:518–532.	  	  Marceau,	  J.	  F.	  2015.	  Ag	  gag	  past,	  present,	  and	  future.	  Seattle	  U.	  L.	  Rev.	  38:1317.	  	    119 Marlow,	  D.,	  and	  D.	  P.	  Crowne.	  1961.	  Social	  desirability	  and	  response	  to	  perceived	  situational	  demands.	  J.	  Consult.	  Clin.	  Psychol.	  25:109.	  	  Martin,	  S.	  W.,	  C.	  W.	  Schwabe,	  and	  C.	  E.	  Franti.	  1975.	  Dairy	  calf	  mortality	  rate:	  influence	  of	  management	  and	  housing	  factors	  on	  calf	  mortality	  rate	  in	  Tulare	  County,	  California.	  Am.	  J.	  Vet.	  Res.	  36:1111–1114.	  	  Mattiello,	  S.,	  C.	  Klotz,	  D.	  Baroli,	  M.	  Minero,	  V.	  Ferrante,	  E.	  Canali.	  2009.	  Welfare	  problems	  in	  alpine	  dairy	  cattle	  farms	  in	  Alto	  Adige	  (Eastern	  Italian	  Alps).	  It.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  8:628–630.	  	  Mattiello,	  S.,	  M.	  Battini,	  E.	  Andreoli,	  M.	  Minero,	  S.	  Barbieri,	  and	  E.	  Canali.	  2010.	  Avoidance	  distance	  test	  in	  goats:	  a	  comparison	  with	  its	  application	  in	  cows.	  Small	  Rumin.	  Res.,	  91:	  215–218.	  	  Mayer,	  R.	  C.,	  J.	  H.	  Davis,	  and	  F.	  D.	  Schoorman.	  1995.	  An	  integrative	  model	  of	  organizational	  trust.	  Acad.	  Manage.	  Rev.	  20:709–734.	  	  Mays,	  N.,	  and	  C.	  Pope.	  2000.	  Assessing	  quality	  in	  qualitative	  research.	  Brit.	  Med.	  J.	  320:50.	  	  Mazumdar,	  D.	  1976.	  The	  rural-­‐urban	  wage	  gap,	  migration	  and	  the	  shadow	  wage.	  Oxford	  Econ.	  Pap.	  28:406–425.	  	  Mazurek	  M.,	  D.	  J.	  Prendiville,	  M.	  A.	  Crowe,	  I.	  Veissier,	  and	  B.	  Earley.	  2010.	  An	  on-­‐farm	  investigation	  of	  beef	  suckler	  herds	  using	  an	  animal	  welfare	  index	  (AWI).	  BMC	  Vet.	  Res.	  6:55.	  	  McConnel,	  C.	  S.,	  J.	  E.	  Lombard,	  B.	  A.	  Wagner,	  and	  F.	  B.	  Garry.	  2008.	  Evaluation	  of	  factors	  associated	  with	  increased	  dairy	  cow	  mortality	  on	  United	  States	  dairy	  operations.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  91:	  1423–1432.	  	  McGrath,	  P.	  J.	  2011.	  Science	  is	  not	  enough:	  The	  modern	  history	  of	  pediatric	  pain.	  Pain.	  152:2457–2459.	  	  McKendree,	  M.	  G.	  S.,	  C.	  C.	  Croney,	  and	  N.	  O.	  Widmar.	  2014.	  Effects	  of	  demographic	  factors	  and	  information	  sources	  on	  United	  States	  consumer	  perceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  92:3161–3173.	  	  McMeekan	  C.	  M.,	  K.	  J.	  Stafford,	  D.	  J.	  Mellor,	  R.	  A.	  Bruce,	  R.	  N.	  Ward,	  and	  N.	  G.	  Gregory.	  1999.	  Effects	  of	  a	  local	  anaesthetic	  and	  a	  nonsteroidal	  anti-­‐inflammatory	  analgesic	  on	  the	  behavioural	  responses	  of	  calves	  to	  dehorning.	  New	  Zeal.	  Vet.	  J.	  47:92–96.	  	  McMillan,	  F.	  D.	  2000.	  Quality	  of	  life	  in	  animals.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  216:1904–1910.	  	  Mee,	  J.F.,	  D.	  P.	  Berry,	  and	  A.	  R.	  Cromie.	  2008.	  Prevalence	  of,	  and	  risk	  factors	  associated	  with,	  perinatal	  calf	  mortality	  in	  pasture-­‐based	  Holstein-­‐Friesian	  cows.	  Animal.	  2:613–620.	  	    120 Mee,	  J.	  F.,	  D.	  P.	  Berry,	  and	  A.	  R.	  Cromie.	  2011.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  calving	  assistance	  and	  dystocia	  in	  pasture-­‐based	  Holstein–Friesian	  heifers	  and	  cows	  in	  Ireland.	  Vet.	  J.	  187:189–194.	  	  Mellor,	  D.	  J.	  2016.	  Updating	  animal	  welfare	  thinking:	  Moving	  beyond	  the	  “Five	  Freedoms”	  towards	  “a	  Life	  Worth	  Living”.	  Animals,	  6:21.	  	  Mellor	  D.	  J.,	  and	  T.	  J.	  Diesch.	  2006.	  Onset	  of	  sentience:	  the	  potential	  for	  suffering	  in	  fetal	  and	  newborn	  farm	  animals.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.	  100:48–57.	  	  Mench,	  J.	  A.	  1998.	  Thirty	  years	  after	  Brambell:	  whither	  animal	  welfare	  science?.	  J.	  	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  Sci.	  1:91–102.	  	  Menke	  C,	  S.	  Waiblinger,	  D.	  W.	  Folsch,	  and	  P.	  R.	  Wiepkema.	  1999.	  Social	  behaviour	  and	  injuries	  of	  horned	  cows	  in	  loose	  housing	  systems.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  8:243–258.	  	  Menzies,	  F.	  D.,	  D.	  G.	  Bryson,	  T.	  McCallion,	  and	  D.	  I.	  Matthews.	  1995.	  A	  study	  of	  mortality	  among	  suckler	  and	  dairy	  cows	  in	  Northern	  Ireland	  in	  1992.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  137:531–536.	  	  Miele,	  M.,	  I.	  Veissier,	  A.	  Evans,	  and	  R.	  Botreau.	  2011.	  Animal	  welfare:	  establishing	  a	  dialogue	  between	  science	  and	  society.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  20:103–117.	  	  Mill,	  J.	  S.	  1885.	  Nature,	  the	  utility	  of	  religion,	  and	  theism.	  Longmans,	  Green.	  	  Miller,	  R.	  H.,	  M.	  T.	  Kuhn,	  H.	  D.	  Norman,	  and	  J.	  R.	  Wright.	  2008.	  Death	  losses	  for	  lactating	  cows	  in	  herds	  enrolled	  in	  dairy	  herd	  improvement	  test	  plans.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  91:	  3710–3715.	  	  Milligan,	  B.	  N.,	  T.	  Duffield	  and	  K.	  Lissemore.	  2004.	  The	  utility	  of	  ketoprofen	  for	  alleviating	  pain	  following	  dehorning	  in	  young	  dairy	  calves.	  Can.	  Vet.	  J.	  45:140–143.	  	  Misch	  L.	  J.,	  T.	  F.	  Duffield,	  S.	  T.	  Millman,	  and	  K.	  D.	  Lissemore.	  2007.	  An	  investigation	  into	  the	  practices	  of	  dairy	  producers	  and	  veterinarians	  in	  dehorning	  dairy	  calves	  in	  Ontario.	  Can.	  Vet.	  J.	  48:1249–1254.	  	  Mugera,	  A.	  W.	  and	  V.	  Bitsch.	  2005.	  Managing	  labor	  on	  dairy	  farms:	  a	  resource-­‐based	  perspective	  with	  evidence	  from	  case	  studies.	  Int.	  Food	  Agribus.	  Man.	  8:79–98.	  	  Mulnix,	  J.	  W.,	  and	  M.	  J.	  Mulnix.	  2015.	  Happy	  Lives,	  Good	  Lives:	  A	  Philosophical	  Examination.	  Broadview	  Press.	  	  Nadler,	  A.,	  and	  I.	  Liviatan.	  2006.	  Intergroup	  reconciliation:	  Effects	  of	  adversary's	  expressions	  of	  empathy,	  responsibility,	  and	  recipients'	  trust.	  Pers.	  Soc.	  Psychol.	  B.	  32:459–470.	  	  NAWAC,	  2005	  Animal	  Welfare	  (Painful	  Husbandry	  Procedures)	  Code	  of	  Welfare.	  Code	  of	  Welfare	  No.	  7.	  National	  Animal	  Welfare	  Advisory	  Committee,	  Wellington,	  NZ.	  	    121 Neave,	  H.	  W.,	  R.	  R.	  Daros,	  J.	  H.	  C.	  Costa,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  2013.	  	  Pain	  and	  pessimism:	  Dairy	  calves	  exhibit	  negative	  judgment	  bias	  following	  hot-­‐iron	  disbudding.	  PLoS	  One.	  8:	  e80556.	  doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0080556	  	  Negowetti,	  N.	  E.	  2014.	  Opening	  the	  barnyard	  door:	  Transparency	  and	  the	  resurgence	  of	  ag-­‐gag	  and	  veggie	  libel	  laws.	  Seattle	  U.	  L.	  Rev.	  38:1345.	  	  NFACC.	  2009.	  Code	  of	  Practice	  for	  the	  Care	  and	  Handling	  of	  Dairy	  Cattle.	  Accessed	  Apr.	  10,	  2013.	  http://www.nfacc.ca/pdfs/codes/Dairy%20Code%20of%20Practice.pdf	  	  	  Ng,	  Y.	  K.	  2016.	  How	  welfare	  biology	  and	  commonsense	  may	  help	  to	  reduce	  animal	  suffering.	  Animal	  Sentience.	  1:1.	  	  Nielsen,	  T.	  D.,	  L.	  R.	  Nielsen,	  N.	  Toft,	  and	  H.	  Houe.	  2010.	  Association	  between	  bulk-­‐tank	  milk	  Salmonella	  antibody	  level	  and	  high	  calf	  mortality	  in	  Danish	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  93:304–310.	  	  NMPF.	  2013.	  Animal	  Care	  Reference	  Manual.	  Accessed	  July	  1,	  2013.	  http://	  www.nationaldairyfarm.com/sites/default/files/2013/FARM_manual_2013_WEB.pdf	  	  	  Nordenfelt,	  L.	  2006.	  Animal	  and	  human	  health	  and	  welfare:	  a	  comparative	  philosophical	  analysis.	  CABI.	  Oxford,	  UK.	  	  Nørgaard,	  N.	  H.,	  K.	  M.	  Lind,	  and	  J.	  F.	  Agger.	  1999.	  Cointegration	  analysis	  used	  in	  a	  study	  of	  dairy-­‐cow	  mortality.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  42:99–119.	  	  Norström,	  M.,	  E.	  Skjerve,	  and	  J.	  Jarp.	  2000.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  epidemic	  respiratory	  disease	  in	  Norwegian	  cattle	  herds.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  44:87–96.	  	  Nosek,	  B.	  A.,	  C.	  B.	  Hawkins,	  and	  R.	  S.	  Frazier.	  2011.	  Implicit	  social	  cognition:	  From	  measures	  to	  mechanisms.	  Trends.	  Cogn.	  Sci.	  15:152–159.	  	  Nozick,	  R.	  1974.	  Anarchy,	  state,	  and	  utopia.	  Basic	  books.	  	  	  Nussbaum,	  M.	  C.	  2004.	  Beyond	  compassion	  and	  humanity:	  Justice	  for	  nonhuman	  animals.	  In	  C.	  R.	  Sunstein	  and	  M.	  C.	  Nussbaum	  (eds.),	  Animal	  rights.	  Current	  debates	  and	  new	  direction.	  Oxford	  University	  Press,	  Oxford,	  UK.	  	  	  Nussbaum,	  M.	  2006.	  Frontiers	  of	  justice:	  disability,	  nationality,	  species	  membership.	  Harvard	  University	  Press.	  Cambridge,	  MA,	  USA.	  	  Ohbuchi,	  K.	  I.,	  M.	  Kameda,	  and	  N.	  Agarie.	  1989.	  Apology	  as	  aggression	  control:	  its	  role	  in	  mediating	  appraisal	  of	  and	  response	  to	  harm.	  J.	  Pers.	  Soc.	  Psychol.	  56:219.	  	  Oishi,	  S.,	  J.	  Graham,	  S.	  Kesebir,	  and	  I.	  C.	  Galinha.	  2013.	  Concepts	  of	  happiness	  across	  time	  and	  cultures.	  Pers.	  Soc.	  Psychol.	  B.	  39:559-­‐577.	  	    122 Oleggini,	  G.	  H.,	  L.	  O.	  Ely,	  and	  J.	  W.	  Smith.	  2001.	  Effect	  of	  region	  and	  herd	  size	  on	  dairy	  herd	  performance	  parameters.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.,	  84:1044–1050.	  	  Oppenheimer,	  D.	  M.,	  T.	  Meyvis,	  and	  N.	  Davidenko.	  2009.	  Instructional	  manipulation	  checks:	  detecting	  satisficing	  to	  increase	  statistical	  power.	  J.	  Exp.	  Soc.	  Psychol.	  45:867–872.	  	  Otten,	  N.	  D.,	  L.	  R.	  Nielsen,	  P.	  T.	  Thomsen,	  and	  H.	  Houe.	  2014.	  Register-­‐based	  predictors	  of	  violations	  of	  animal	  welfare	  legislation	  in	  dairy	  herds.	  Animal	  8:1963–1970.	  	  Oxender,	  W.	  D.,	  L.	  E.	  Newman,	  and	  D.	  A.	  Morrow.	  1973.	  Factors	  influencing	  dairy	  calf	  mortality	  in	  Michigan	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  162:458–462.	  	  Pace,	  K.	  M.,	  T.	  A.	  Fediuk,	  and	  I.	  C.	  Botero.	  2010.	  The	  acceptance	  of	  responsibility	  and	  expressions	  of	  regret	  in	  organizational	  apologies	  after	  a	  transgression.	  Corporate	  Communications.	  15:410–427.	  	  Paolacci,	  G.,	  and	  J.	  Chandler.	  2014.	  Inside	  the	  turk:	  understanding	  mechanical	  turk	  as	  a	  participant	  pool.	  Curr.	  Dir.	  Psychol.	  Sci.	  23:184–188.	  	  Parfit,	  D.	  1984.	  Reasons	  and	  persons.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  Oxford,	  UK.	  	  Persson,	  K.,	  and	  D.	  Shaw.	  2015.	  Empirical	  methods	  in	  animal	  ethics.	  J.	  Agr.	  Environ.	  Ethic.	  28:853–866.	  	  Peters,	  R.	  G.,	  V.	  T.	  Covello,	  and	  D.	  B.	  McCallum.	  1997.	  The	  determinants	  of	  trust	  and	  credibility	  in	  environmental	  risk	  communication.	  Risk	  Anal.	  17:43–54.	  	  Petersen,	  T.	  S.,	  and	  J.	  Ryberg.	  2014.	  Welfare	  hedonism	  and	  authentic	  happiness.	  In	  Encyclopedia	  of	  Quality	  of	  Life	  and	  Well-­‐Being	  Research.	  Springer.	  Netherlands.	  	  Phillips,	  J.,	  L.	  Misenheimer,	  and	  J.	  Knobe.	  2011.	  The	  ordinary	  concept	  of	  happiness	  (and	  others	  like	  it).	  Emotion	  Rev.	  3:320–322.	  	  Phillips,	  J.,	  S.	  Nyholm	  and	  S.	  Liao.	  2014.	  The	  good	  in	  happiness.	  Oxford	  Studies	  in	  Experimental	  Philosophy.	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  Oxford,	  UK.	  	  Phillps,	  J.,	  J.	  De	  Freitas,	  J.,	  Mott,	  C.,	  Gruber,	  J.,	  &	  Knobe,	  J.	  (In	  press).	  True	  happiness;	  The	  role	  of	  morality	  in	  the	  folk	  concept	  of	  happiness.	  	  PIMC.	  2004.	  Model	  code	  of	  practice	  for	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals–cattle.	  Accessed	  June,	  15,	  2013.	  http://www.publish.csiro.au/Books/download.cfm?ID=4831	  	  Pinedo,	  P.	  J.,	  A.	  De	  Vries,	  and	  D.	  W.	  Webb.	  2010.	  Dynamics	  of	  culling	  risk	  with	  disposal	  codes	  reported	  by	  Dairy	  Herd	  Improvement	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  93:2250–2261.	  	  Pinker,	  S.	  2011.	  The	  better	  angels	  of	  our	  nature:	  Why	  violence	  has	  declined.	  Viking.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	    123 	  Pollan,	  M.	  2006.	  The	  omnivore's	  dilemma:	  a	  natural	  history	  of	  four	  meals.	  Penguin	  Press.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	  	  Popper,	  K.	  2005.	  The	  logic	  of	  scientific	  discovery.	  Routledge.	  	  Potterton,	  S.	  L.,	  M.	  J.	  Green,	  K.	  M.	  Millar,	  H.	  R.	  Whay,	  and	  J.	  N.	  Huxley.	  2011.	  Risk	  factors	  associated	  with	  hair	  loss,	  ulceration,	  and	  swelling	  at	  the	  hock	  in	  freestall-­‐housed	  UK	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  94:2952–2963.	  	  	  Prickett,	  R.	  W.,	  F.	  B.	  Norwood,	  and	  J.	  L.	  Lusk.	  2010.	  Consumer	  preferences	  for	  farm	  animal	  welfare:	  results	  from	  a	  telephone	  survey	  of	  US	  households.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  19:	  335–347.	  	  R	  Core	  Team.	  2015.	  R:	  A	  language	  and	  environment	  for	  statistical	  computing.	  R	  Found.	  Stat.	  Comput.	  	  Raboisson	  D.,	  E.	  Maigne,	  P.	  Sans,	  G.	  Allaire,	  and	  E.	  Cahuzac.	  2014.	  Factors	  influencing	  dairy	  calf	  and	  replacement	  heifer	  mortality	  in	  France.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  97:202–211.	  	  Raboisson	  D.,	  F.	  Delor,	  E.	  Cahuzac,	  C.	  Gendre,	  P.	  Sans,	  and	  G.	  Allaire.	  2013.	  Perinatal,	  neonatal,	  and	  rearing	  period	  mortality	  of	  dairy	  calves	  and	  replacement	  heifers	  in	  France.	  J	  Dairy	  Sci.	  96:2913–2924.	  	  Raboisson,	  D.,	  E.	  Cahuzac,	  P.	  Sans,	  and	  G.	  Allaire,	  G.	  2011.	  Herd-­‐level	  and	  contextual	  factors	  influencing	  dairy	  cow	  mortality	  in	  France	  in	  2005	  and	  2006.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  94:1790–1803.	  	  Radke,	  A.	  2012.	  Do	  you	  support	  ‘ag-­‐gag’	  laws?	  Beef	  Magazine	  Blog.	  Accessed	  May,	  15,	  2013.	  http://beefmagazine.com/blog/do-­‐you-­‐support-­‐‘ag-­‐gag’-­‐laws	  	  Rawlins,	  B.L.	  2008.	  Measuring	  the	  relationship	  between	  organizational	  transparency	  and	  employee	  trust.	  Public	  Relat.	  J.	  2:1–21.	  	  Raz,	  J.	  1992.	  Rights	  and	  Individual	  Well-­‐Being.	  Ratio	  Juris,	  5:127–142.	  	  Reardon,	  T.	  and	  C.	  B.	  Barrett.	  2000.	  Agroindustrialization,	  globalization,	  and	  international	  development:	  an	  overview	  of	  issues,	  patterns,	  and	  determinants.	  Agric.	  Econ.	  23:195–205.	  	  Regan,	  T.	  2004.	  The	  case	  for	  animal	  rights.	  University	  of	  California	  Press.	  	  Rice,	  C.	  2015.	  Well-­‐being	  and	  animals.	  In	  G.	  Fletcher	  (ed.)	  The	  Routledge	  handbook	  of	  philosophy	  of	  well-­‐being.	  Routledge.	  NY,	  NY,	  USA.	  	  Richman,	  W.	  L.,	  S.	  Kiesler,	  S.	  Weisband,	  and	  F.	  Drasgow.	  1999.	  A	  meta-­‐analytic	  study	  of	  social	  desirability	  distortion	  in	  computer-­‐administered	  questionnaires,	  traditional	  questionnaires,	  and	  interviews.	  J.	  Appl.	  Psychol.	  84:754.	  	    124 Riemann,	  H.	  P.	  R.	  B.	  Larssen,	  E.	  Simensen.	  1985.	  Ketosis	  in	  Norwegian	  dairy	  herds	  –	  some	  epidemiological	  associations.	  Acta	  Vet.	  Scand.	  26:482–492.	  	  Röcklinsberg,	  H.,	  C.	  Gamborg,	  and	  M.	  Gjerris.	  2014.	  A	  case	  for	  integrity:	  gains	  from	  including	  more	  than	  animal	  welfare	  in	  animal	  ethics	  committee	  deliberations.	  Lab.	  Anim.	  48:61–71.	  	  Rodriguez-­‐Lainz,	  A.,	  P.	  Melendez-­‐Retamal,	  D.	  W.	  Hird,	  D.	  H.	  Read,	  and	  R.	  L.	  Walker.	  1999.	  Farm-­‐and	  host-­‐level	  risk	  factors	  for	  papillomatous	  digital	  dermatitis	  in	  Chilean	  dairy	  cattle.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  42:87–97.	  	  Roine,	  K.,	  and	  H.	  Saloniemi.	  1978.	  Incidence	  of	  some	  diseases	  in	  connection	  with	  parturition	  in	  dairy	  cows.	  Acta	  Vet.	  Scand.	  19:341–353.	  	  Rollin,	  B.	  E.	  1995.	  Farm	  animal	  welfare:	  social,	  bioethical,	  and	  research	  issues.	  Iowa	  State	  University	  Press.	  Ames,	  IA,	  USA.	  	  Rollin,	  B.	  E.	  2006.	  The	  regulation	  of	  animal	  research	  and	  the	  emergence	  of	  animal	  ethics:	  a	  conceptual	  history.	  Theor.	  Med.	  Bioeth.	  27:285–304.	  	  Rollin,	  B.E.	  1993.	  Animal	  welfare,	  science	  and	  value.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  6:44–50.	  	  	  Rosati,	  C.	  S.	  2009.	  Relational	  good	  and	  the	  multiplicity	  problem.	  Philos.	  Issues.	  19:205–234.	  	  Rosenthal,	  R.	  1979.	  The	  file	  drawer	  problem	  and	  tolerance	  for	  null	  results.	  Psychol.	  Bull.	  86:638.	  	  Rousseau,	  D.	  M.,	  S.	  B.	  Sitkin,	  R.	  S.	  Burt	  and	  C.	  Camerer.	  1998.	  Not	  so	  different	  after	  all:	  A	  cross-­‐discipline	  view	  of	  trust.	  Acad.	  Manage.	  Rev.	  23:393–404.	  	  Rowlands	  G.	  J.,	  A.	  M.	  Russell,	  and	  L.	  A.	  Williams.	  1983.	  Effects	  of	  season,	  herd	  size,	  management	  system	  and	  veterinary	  practice	  on	  the	  lameness	  incidence	  in	  dairy	  cattle.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  113:441–445.	  	  Rozin,	  P.,	  and	  E.	  B.	  Royzman.	  2001.	  Negativity	  bias,	  negativity	  dominance,	  and	  contagion.	  Pers.	  Soc.	  Psychol.	  Rev.	  5:296–320.	  	  Rushen,	  J.,	  A.	  A.	  Taylor,	  and	  A.	  M.	  de	  Passillé.	  1999.	  Domestic	  animals'	  fear	  of	  humans	  and	  its	  effect	  on	  their	  welfare.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.	  65:285–303.	  	  Rushen,	  J.,	  and	  A.	  M.	  de	  Passillé.	  2010.	  The	  importance	  of	  good	  stockmanship	  and	  its	  benefits	  for	  the	  animals.	  In:	  T.	  Grandin	  (ed.)	  Improving	  animal	  welfare:	  a	  practical	  approach.	  CABI,	  London,	  UK.	  	  Russell,	  R.	  A.,	  and	  J.	  M.	  Bewley.	  2013.	  Characterization	  of	  Kentucky	  dairy	  producer	  decision-­‐making	  behavior.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  96:4751–4758.	  	    125 Rutherford,	  K.	  M.	  D.,	  F.	  M.	  Langford,	  M.	  C.	  Jack,	  L.	  Sherwood,	  A	  .B.	  Lawrence,	  and	  M.	  J.	  Haskell.	  2008.	  Hock	  injury	  prevalence	  and	  associated	  risk	  factors	  on	  organic	  and	  nonorganic	  dairy	  farms	  in	  the	  United	  Kingdom.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  91:2265–2274.	  	  	  Sahota,	  A.	  2009.	  Overview	  of	  the	  global	  market	  for	  organic	  food	  and	  drink.	  In:	  H.	  Willer.	  and	  M.	  Yuseffi	  (eds.)The	  world	  of	  organic	  agriculture	  –	  statistics	  and	  emerging	  trends	  2009.	  Earthscan,	  London,	  UK.	  	  	  Saloniemi,	  H.,	  and	  K.	  Roine,	  K.	  1981.	  Incidence	  of	  some	  metabolic	  diseases	  in	  dairy	  cows.	  Nord.	  Vet.	  Med.	  33:	  289–296.	  	  Sandøe,	  P.,	  and	  H.	  B.	  	  Simonsen.	  1992.	  Assessing	  animal	  welfare:	  where	  does	  science	  end	  and	  philosophy	  begin?.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  1:257–267.	  	  Sawant	  A.	  A.,	  L.	  M.	  Sordillo,	  and	  B.	  M.	  Jayarao.	  2005.	  A	  survey	  on	  antibiotic	  usage	  in	  dairy	  herds	  in	  Pennsylvania.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  88:2991–2999.	  	  Schlosser,	  E.	  2001.	  Fast	  food	  nation:	  The	  dark	  side	  of	  the	  all-­‐American	  meal.	  Houghton	  Mifflin.	  Boston,	  MA,	  USA.	  	  Schmidt,	  K.	  2011.	  Concepts	  of	  animal	  welfare	  in	  relation	  to	  positions	  in	  animal	  ethics.	  Acta	  Biotheor.	  59:153–171.	  	  Schuppli	  C.	  A.,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  2014.	  Access	  to	  pasture	  for	  dairy	  cows:	  Responses	  from	  an	  on-­‐line	  engagement.	  J.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  92:5185–5192.	  	  Schwartz,	  G.,	  T.	  Kane,	  J.	  Joseph	  and	  J.	  T.	  Tedeschi.	  1978.	  The	  effects	  of	  remorse	  on	  the	  reactions	  of	  a	  harm-­‐doer.	  Brit.	  J.	  Soc.	  Psychol.	  17:293–297.	  	  Schwartzkopf-­‐Genswein	  K.	  S.,	  E.	  E.	  Fierheller,	  N.	  A.	  Caulkett,	  E.	  D.	  Janzen,	  E.	  A.	  Pajor,	  L.	  A.	  González	  and	  D.	  Moya.	  2012.	  Achieving	  pain	  control	  for	  routine	  management	  procedures	  in	  North	  American	  beef	  cattle.	  Anim.	  Frontiers	  2:52–58.	  	  Scudder,	  J.	  N.,	  and	  C.	  Bishop-­‐Mills.	  2009.	  The	  credibility	  of	  shock	  advocacy:	  Animal	  rights	  attack	  messages.	  Public	  Relat.	  Rev.,	  35:162–164.	  	  Seeborg,	  M.	  C.,	  Z.	  Jin,	  and	  Y.	  Zhu.	  2000.	  The	  new	  rural-­‐urban	  labor	  mobility	  in	  China:	  Causes	  and	  implications.	  J.	  Socio.	  Econ.	  29:39–56.	  	  Shahid,	  M.	  Q.,	  J.	  K.	  Reneau,	  H.	  Chester-­‐Jones,	  R.	  C.	  Chebel,	  and	  M.	  I.	  Endres.	  2015.	  Cow-­‐	  and	  herd-­‐level	  risk	  factors	  for	  on-­‐farm	  mortality	  in	  Midwest	  US	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  98:4401–4413.	  	  Sharma	  S.	  and	  R.	  Zhang.	  2014.	  China’s	  dairy	  dilemma:	  the	  evolution	  and	  future	  trends	  of	  China’s	  dairy	  industry.	  Institute	  for	  Agriculture	  and	  Trade	  Policy.	  	  Accessed	  Feb.	  20,	  2016.	  http://www.iatp.org/files/2014_02_25_DairyReport_f_web.pdf	  	  	    126 Shaw	  F.	  D.,	  R.	  I.	  Baxter	  and	  W.	  R.	  Ramsay.	  1976.	  The	  contribution	  of	  horned	  cattle	  to	  carcase	  bruising.	  Vet.	  Rec.	  98:255–257.	  	  Shimada	  C,	  S.	  Kurumiya,	  Y.	  Noguchi,	  and	  M.	  Umemoto.	  1990.	  The	  effect	  of	  neonatal	  exposure	  to	  chronic	  footshock	  on	  pain-­‐responsiveness	  and	  sensitivity	  to	  morphine	  after	  maturation	  in	  the	  rat.	  Behav.	  Brain	  Res.	  36:105–111.	  	  Shea,	  M.	  2014.	  Punishing	  animal	  rights	  activists	  for	  animal	  abuse:	  rapid	  reporting	  and	  the	  new	  wave	  of	  ag-­‐gag	  laws.	  Columbia	  J.	  Law	  Soc.	  Prob.	  48:	  337.	  	  Silva	  del	  Río,	  N.,	  S.	  Stewart,	  P.	  Rapnicki,	  Y.	  M.	  Chang,	  and	  P.	  M.	  Fricke.	  2007.	  An	  observational	  analysis	  of	  twin	  births,	  calf	  sex	  ratio,	  and	  calf	  mortality	  in	  Holstein	  dairy	  cattle.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  90:1255–1264.	  	  Simensen,	  E.,	  O.	  Østerås,	  K.	  E.	  Bøe,	  C.	  Kielland,	  L.	  E.	  Ruud,	  and	  G.	  Næss.	  2010.	  Housing	  system	  and	  herd	  size	  interactions	  in	  Norwegian	  dairy	  herds;	  associations	  with	  performance	  and	  disease	  incidence.	  Acta	  Vet.	  Scand.	  52:1.	  	  Simonsen,	  H.B.	  1996.	  Assessment	  of	  animal	  welfare	  by	  a	  holistic	  approach:	  behaviour,	  health	  and	  measured	  opinion.	  Act	  	  Agric.	  Scand.	  Sect.	  A.	  Anim.	  Sci.	  Suppl.	  27:91–96.	  	  	  Simkin,	  S.,	  K.	  Hawton,	  J.	  Fagg,	  and	  A.	  Malmberg.	  1998.	  Stress	  in	  farmers:	  a	  survey	  of	  farmers	  in	  England	  and	  Wales.	  Occup.	  Environ.	  Med.	  55:729–734.	  	  Simonsen,	  H.B.	  1996.	  Assessment	  of	  animal	  welfare	  by	  a	  holistic	  approach:	  behaviour,	  health	  and	  measured	  opinion.	  Acta	  Agric.	  Scand.	  A	  Anim.	  Sci.	  27:91–96.	  	  	  Singbo,	  A.G.,	  and	  B.	  Larue.	  2014.	  Scale	  economies	  and	  technical	  efficiency	  of	  Quebec	  dairy	  farms.	  Cahier	  de	  recherché	  working	  paper	  2014-­‐7.	  Université	  de	  Laval,	  Québec,	  Canada.	  	  Singer,	  P.	  2011.	  Practical	  ethics.	  Cambridge	  University	  Press.	  Cambridge,	  MA,	  USA.	  	  Skarstad,	  G.	  A.,	  L.	  Terragni,	  and	  H.	  Torjusen.	  2007.	  Animal	  welfare	  according	  to	  Norwegian	  consumers	  and	  producers:	  definitions	  and	  implications.	  Int.	  J.	  Sociol.	  Food	  Agric.	  15:74–90.	  	  Lichtenstein,	  S.,	  and	  P.	  Slovic,	  P.	  1971.	  Reversals	  of	  preference	  between	  bids	  and	  choices	  in	  gambling	  decisions.	  J.	  Exp.	  Psychol.	  89:46.	  	  Smith,	  G.	  2013.	  Extralabel	  use	  of	  anesthetic	  and	  analgesic	  compounds	  in	  cattle.	  Vet.	  Clin.	  N.	  Am.	  Food	  A.	  29:29–45.	  	  Smith	  G.	  W.,	  J.	  L.	  Davis,	  L.	  A.	  Tell,	  A.	  I.	  Webb,	  and	  J.	  E.	  Riviere.	  2008.	  Extralabel	  use	  of	  nonsteroidal	  anti-­‐inflammatory	  drugs	  in	  cattle.	  J.	  Am.	  Vet.	  Med.	  Assoc.	  232:697–701.	  	  Smith,	  J.	  W.,	  L.	  O.	  Ely,	  and	  A.	  M.	  Chapa.	  2000.	  Effect	  of	  region,	  herd	  size,	  and	  milk	  production	  on	  reasons	  cows	  leave	  the	  herd.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  83:2980–2987.	  	    127 Sogstad,	  A.	  M.,	  T.	  Fjeldaas,	  O.	  Østera,	  and	  K.	  P.	  Forshell.	  2005.	  Prevalence	  of	  claw	  lesions	  in	  Norwegian	  dairy	  cattle	  housed	  in	  tie	  stalls	  and	  free	  stalls.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  70:191–209.	  	  	  Solano,	  L.,	  H.	  W.	  Barkema,	  E.	  A.	  Pajor,	  S.	  Mason,	  S.	  J.	  LeBlanc,	  J.	  C.	  Zaffino	  Heyerhoff,	  C.	  G.	  R.	  Nash,	  D.	  B.	  Haley,	  E.	  Vasseur,	  D.	  Pellerin,	  J.	  Rushen,	  A.	  M.	  de	  Passillé,	  and	  K.	  Orsel.	  2015.	  Prevalence	  of	  lameness	  and	  associated	  risk	  factors	  in	  Canadian	  Holstein-­‐Friesian	  cows	  housed	  in	  freestall	  barns.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  98:6978–6991.	  	  	  Solbu,	  H.	  1983.	  Disease	  recrodings	  in	  Norwegian	  dairy	  cattle.	  I.	  Disease	  incidence	  and	  non-­‐genetic	  effects	  on	  mastitis,	  ketosis	  and	  milk	  fever.	  Z.	  Tierz.	  Zuechtungsbio.	  100:139–157.	  	  Somers,	  J.	  G.	  C.	  J.,	  K.	  Frankena,	  E.	  N.	  Noordhuizen-­‐Stassen,	  and	  J.	  H.	  M.	  Metz.	  2005a.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  digital	  dermatitis	  in	  dairy	  cows	  kept	  in	  cubicle	  houses	  in	  The	  Netherlands.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  71:11–21.	  	  Somers,	  J.	  G.	  C.	  J.,	  K.	  Frankena,	  E.	  N.	  Noordhuizen-­‐Stassen,	  and	  J.	  H.	  M.	  Metz.	  2005b.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  interdigital	  dermatitis	  and	  heel	  erosion	  in	  dairy	  cows	  kept	  in	  cubicle	  houses	  in	  The	  Netherlands.	  Prev.	  Vet.	  Med.	  71:23–34.	  	  Sørensen,	  B.	  T.,	  M.	  D.	  de	  Barcellos,	  N.	  V.	  Olsen,	  W.	  Verbeke,	  and	  J.	  Scholderer.	  2012.	  Systems	  of	  attitudes	  towards	  production	  in	  the	  pork	  industry:	  a	  cross-­‐national	  study.	  Appetite.	  59:885–897.	  	  Sørensen,	  J.	  T.,	  and	  D.	  Fraser.	  2010.	  On-­‐farm	  welfare	  assessment	  for	  regulatory	  purposes:	  Issues	  and	  possible	  solutions.	  Livest.	  Sci.	  131:1–7.	  	  Spalding,	  R.W.	  R.	  W.	  Everett,	  and	  R.H.	  Foote.	  1979.	  Fertility	  in	  New	  York	  artificially	  inseminated	  holstein	  herds	  in	  dairy	  herd	  improvement.	  J.	  Dairy	  Sci.	  58:718–723.	  	  Speicher,	  J.	  A.,	  and	  R.	  E.	  Hepp.	  1973.	  Factors	  associated	  with	  calf	  mortality	  in	  Michigan	  dairy	  herds.	  J.	  Am.	  Med.	  Vet.	  Assoc.	  162:463–466.	  	  Spooner,	  J.	  M.,	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli,	  and	  D.	  Fraser.	  2014a.	  Attitudes	  of	  Canadian	  citizens	  toward	  farm	  animal	  welfare:	  A	  qualitative	  study.	  Livest.	  Sci.	  163:150–158.	  	  Spooner,	  J.	  M.,	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli,	  and	  D.	  Fraser.	  2014b.	  Attitudes	  of	  Canadian	  pig	  producers	  toward	  animal	  welfare.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  27,	  569–589.	  	  Spooner,	  J.,	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli,	  D.	  Fraser.	  2012.	  Attitudes	  of	  Canadian	  beef	  producers	  toward	  animal	  welfare.	  Anim.	  Welf.	  21,	  273–283.	  	  Sripada,	  C.	  S.,	  and	  S.	  Konrath.	  2011.	  Telling	  more	  than	  we	  can	  know	  about	  intentional	  action.	  Mind	  Lang.	  26:353–380.	  	  Stafford	  K.	  J.,	  and	  D.	  J.	  Mellor.	  2005.	  Dehorning	  and	  disbudding	  distress	  and	  its	  alleviation	  in	  calves.	  Vet.	  J.	  169:	  337–349.	  	    128 Stafford	  K.	  J.	  and	  D.	  J.	  Mellor.	  2011.	  Addressing	  the	  pain	  associated	  with	  disbudding	  and	  dehorning	  in	  cattle.	  Appl.	  Anim.	  Behav.	  Sci.	  135:226–231.	  	  Statistics	  Canada.	  2015.	  The	  changing	  face	  of	  the	  Canadian	  hog	  industry.	  Accessed	  on	  Feb.	  20,	  2016.	  http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/96-­‐325x/2014001/article/14027-­‐eng.htm#a4	  	  	  Statistics	  Norway.	  2015.	  Statistics	  of	  agriculture.	  Accessed	  Mar.	  30,	  2016.	  https://	  www.ssb.no/en/stjord	  	  	  Stengärde,	  L.,	  J.	  Hultgren,	  M.	  Tråvén,	  K.	  Holtenius,	  and	  U.	  Emanuelson.	  2012.	  Risk	  factors	  for	  displaced	  abo