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Hard times come again Hill, Adam Stephen 2016

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HARD TIMES COME AGAINbyAdam Stephen HillB.A., Whitman College, 2002M.Mus., Western Washington University, 2010A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OFDOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTSinThe Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies(Music)THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA(Vancouver)April 2016©Adam Stephen Hill, 2016AbstractHard Times Come Again is a musical composition consisting of seven songs composed for alto voice, baritone voice, two violins, viola, cello, double bass, mandolin, banjo, guitar, and piano. In totality it is approximately thirty minutes in duration, and individual songs range from three to six minutes in duration. The songs take their text from poems constructed by the composer, along with poet Bren Simmers,  from oral  history of the Great Depression.  The musical  style of  the composition draws  on  both  folk  music  and  classical  music  influences,  with  specific  sub-genres,  such  as bluegrass, honky-tonk, and minimalism, also referenced.The written document puts the musical composition into personal and historical context. Aspects of the author's personal musical experience are discussed in the first chapter in relation to both folk music and classical music. A brief discussion of North American folk music as well as classical music that has drawn on folk music influences follows in the second chapter. The third chapter  discusses  musical  traits  of  the  composition  including  form,  text,  harmonic  language, rhythm, and texture, and the fourth chapter includes a brief aesthetic statement. A program note and a complete musical score of the composition are included as  appendices.iiPrefaceThis  dissertation  is  original,  unpublished,  independent  work  by  the  author,  Adam  Hill.  Bren Simmers contributed editorial suggestions in the formulation of the lyrical content of the songs. An earlier version of “This Is What Happened” was arranged for soprano, tenor, violin, cello, guitar, and piano; this version was performed by the Erato Ensemble on March 27, 2014 at the Orpheum Annex in Vancouver, British Columbia as part of the Sonic Boom Festival. iiiTable of ContentsAbstract...............................................................................................................................................................iiPreface................................................................................................................................................................iiiTable of Contents..............................................................................................................................................ivList of Tables.......................................................................................................................................................vList of Figures....................................................................................................................................................viList of Examples...............................................................................................................................................viiChapter 1: Introduction.....................................................................................................................................11.1 The Great Recession and My Return to Classical Music..........................................................11.2 Early Commercialization of Roots Music and The Great Depression....................................31.3 Hard Times and “Hard Times Come Again No More”..............................................................5Chapter 2: Influences and Precedents.............................................................................................................62.1 A Polystylistic Approach...............................................................................................................62.2 What is Folk Music?.......................................................................................................................82.3 Some Characteristics of North American Folk Music.............................................................132.4 Folk Music Influences on Composers of Classical Music.......................................................22Chapter 3: Form and Style in Hard Times Come Again.................................................................................293.1 Overall Formal Structure.............................................................................................................29 3.2  Lyrical Content.............................................................................................................................313.3 Instrumentation and Performance Considerations.................................................................343.4 Folk-like Forms.............................................................................................................................36 3.5 Less Folk-like Forms.....................................................................................................................433.6 Harmonic Language.....................................................................................................................513.7 Rhythmic Treatment.....................................................................................................................573.8 Melodic and Linear Treatment...................................................................................................61 3.9 Texture and Counterpoint...........................................................................................................63 Chapter 4: Closing Thoughts..........................................................................................................................694.1 An Aesthetic Statement................................................................................................................694.2 Coming Again...............................................................................................................................71References..........................................................................................................................................................72Appendix A: Programme Note......................................................................................................................76Appendix B: Musical Score.............................................................................................................................77“It Was Rough Going”........................................................................................................................79“This Is What Happened”..................................................................................................................93“One of My Father's”........................................................................................................................127“I Was Relieved”................................................................................................................................161“Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres”....................................................................................................188“I Had a Terrible Guilt”....................................................................................................................216“We Had So Little”............................................................................................................................231 ivList of TablesTable 1: Formal outline of Hard Times Come Again......................................................................................29vList of FiguresFigure 1: Quotations from the source text....................................................................................................31Figure 2: Quoted fragments in poetic form..................................................................................................32Figure 3.: Lyrics as they appear in the song.................................................................................................33Figure 4: Formal outlines of “It Was Rough Going” and “One of My Father's”....................................38Figure 5: Formal outline of “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres”...................................................................38Figure 6: Formal outline of “I Had a Terrible Guilt”...................................................................................46viList of ExamplesExample 1: Banjo part from “We Had So Little” (mm. 83 – 87).................................................................35Example 2: Guitar and bass parts from “It Was Rough Going” (mm. 52 – 71).......................................40Example 3: Banjo and bass parts from “One of My Father's” (mm. 96 – 116).........................................41Example 4: Guitar and bass parts from “One of My Father's” (mm. 166 – 171).....................................42Example 5: Fragmented narratives in “This Is What Happened” (mm. 40 -71).....................................45Example 6: Baritone part from “I Had a Terrible Guilt” (mm. 5 – 6 and mm. 43 – 44)..........................47Example 7: Alto and guitar parts from “One of My Father's” (mm. 24 – 34)..........................................51Example 8: Guitar and bass parts from “One of My Father's” (mm. 36 – 40).........................................52Example 9: Composite harmonies from “I Was Relieved” (mm. 86, 98, 104, and 110)..........................53Example 10: Banjo and guitar parts from “Three-Hundred-Acres” (mm. 40 and 91)...........................54Example 11: Piano part from “This Is What Happened” (mm. 65 – 67)..................................................55Example 12: Baritone and mandolin parts from “I Had a Terrible Guilt” (mm. 12 – 15)......................56Example 13: Grouping structure of the refrain from “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” (mm. 37 – 60)........................................................................................................................................58Example 14: Vocal melody from “This Is What Happened” (mm. 1 – 13)...............................................60Example 15: Vocal melody from refrain to “It Was Rough Going” (mm. 12 – 19).................................62Example 16: Imprecise unison and octave doublings in “This Is What Happened” (mm. 14 – 17).....64Example 17: Monophonic ending to “It Was Rough Going” (mm. 106 – 108)........................................65Example 18: Alto and baritone parts from “We Had So Little” (mm. 35 – 46)........................................66Example 19: Violin I and II, viola, and cello parts from “We Had So Little” (mm. 121 – 128).............67Example 20: Alto and banjo parts from “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” (mm. 37 – 40).....................68viiChapter 1: Introduction1.1 The Great Recession and My Return to Classical MusicAs 2007 came to a close, the United States was entering into an economic recession that would be more devastating than any of the previous ten recessions the country had faced since World War II (Aliber  2012: 52). Over the next two years, the unemployment rate rose to 10.0%,1 and countless people defaulted on mortgages and other loans and payments (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 2012: 2).  Contemporary  economists  have  taken  to  calling  this  turn  of  events  the  Great  Recession, referencing the troublesome times that followed the stock market crash of October 1929. Though the differences between the two eras regarding global impact and the effectiveness of governmental reactions are still being analyzed and debated, there is value in revisiting the stories of the Great Depression if only to inform our own navigation through troubled times in a modern age. In the last month of 2007, I was leaving a six week fellowship as an artist-in-residence at the Wurlitzer Foundation of New Mexico. I had spent my time there writing and recording an album of bluegrass-tinged folk songs. Though my undergraduate training in music composition focused on classical music,2 I had engaged with that world little since obtaining my degree.3 Most of the music I had written during the previous five years was for various rock and roll, bluegrass, jazz, or new-acoustic groups with which I had been performing. While in New Mexico, however, I did make a connection  with  the  Soundscapes  Chamber  Music  Series,  and  the  following  year  they  would 1 Though this figure is slightly lower than the unemployment rate of 10.8% that plagued the recession of the early 1980s, the long-term unemployment rate of the most recent recession was almost twice that of the 1980s (4.4% compared to 2.6%).2 Though imperfect,  I  use the term “classical music” not  to  describe music from the classical period,  but rather to describe the loose genre of music sometimes confusingly termed “concert music,” or sometimes pretentiously termed “art  music,”  and include in the definition of  this  term contemporary classical  music  that  is often rather vaguely referred to as “new music.” 3 I did join the bass sections of several semi-professional symphony orchestras on a number of occasions. 1premiere a song cycle I had composed for an operatic mezzo-soprano accompanied by jazz piano trio and string quartet. By all expectations, it appeared that 2008 would be a fruitful year; I had a busy tour schedule planned with a number of groups, including a gyspy-jazz-bluegrass ensemble, an alt-country-rock band, a folk and blues duo, and my own solo work performing songs from the album I had just recorded. Though as the saying goes, plans are meant to be broken.The  year  began  well  with  a  few  regional  weekend  dates  and  a  recording  session  in Lexington,  Kentucky,  for  which  the  airplane  tickets  had  been  bought  and contracts  negotiated months before.  Upon returning home,  I  embarked on a  series of  tours  throughout  the western United States. As is customary, the bookings had been arranged several months previously, and the economic viability of  the tour had been based on projected income versus projected costs.  The income  turned  out  to  be  roughly  as  expected,  but  the  costs  turned  out  to  be  well  above  the projections. The main culprit was the quickly rising price of gasoline; between February and July 2008, the average price for a gallon of gasoline in the United States rose from $3.08 to $4.11 (U.S. Energy  Information  Administration).4 For  a  musician  whose  income  depended  on  driving  a hundred miles or more every day, gasoline (or diesel fuel) was an unfortunate lifeblood, and the rise in costs had detrimental effects.5 There is another saying that goes: if you don't have much, you don't have much to lose. 4 The price of fossil fuels, of course, has had a momentous impact on the modern economy in many regards. The peak price of gasoline in 2008 simply illustrates how those of us who began working as travelling musicians in 2002 (or even earlier), when the average price of a gallon of gasoline was $1.42, were unprepared for a changing business model. 5 It should be noted that various groups were more and less dependent on the price of gasoline. The size of the ensemble and our instruments dictated the size of the vehicle in which we travelled. When working with a four piece band, including drums, travelling with a tour manager and a sound engineer, we rode in a gas guzzling bus outfitted with sleeping bunks, a “living room,” and a refrigerator. When working as a duo performing on acoustic instruments and small amplifiers, however, we could travel in a relatively fuel efficient station wagon, provided that we could find inexpensive or  free  accommodations.  More often than not  these differences  in luxuries  of  travel corresponded to increased revenue at the gig.2While I put my belongings into storage to avoid paying rent while on the road, I watched news stories of people losing their houses because their mortgages were beyond their reach. I watched my parents' retirement savings evaporate as they turned sixty-one, only a few years from quitting time. I watched as the dreams of so many people disappeared and a generation was taken by a feeling of fear  and  helplessness.  By  September,  I  had  enrolled  in  a  graduate  program  to  study  music composition, finding both a relatively steady method of income and a non-commercial relationship with making music. It took a little longer than I had anticipated to save the money needed to release the album that  I  had created in New Mexico,  but  when I  did,  in  2009,  several  of  the reviews appeared to  retroactively  foreshadow my turn  back  to  classical  music.  One  critic  noted  that  I “seem[ed] less like a folk musician and more like a folk composer” (Williams 2009), while another called the penultimate track of the record “the best non-country country song [he'd] ever heard” (Koutsoutis 2009).1.2 Early Commercialization of Roots Music and The Great DepressionIn 1923, Okeh released the first commercial 'hillbilly'6 record, which captured Fiddlin' John Carson performing “The Little Old Log Cabin in the Woods” and “The Old Hen Cackled and the Rooster's Going  to  Crow.”7 The  tremendously  positive  reception  to  Carson's  record  caused  a  wave  of recordings by Okeh and other record companies ready to capitalize on the newly popular 'hillbilly' 6 The term “hillbilly” was not always a preferred descriptor of the music by those who performed it, though it was the most common genre name used by those who sold it. Several other terms including “old-time” and “old-familiar” were used before the term “country” music came into wide acceptance in the mid-1940's (Malone 1993: 7). “Old-time” or “old-timey” are terms that are commonly used today to describe this genre of music. 7 In fact, a year before Carson's recording was made, Ick Robertson travelled to New York from his home in the rural south for a recording session. Though these recordings were likely the first documented example of “hillbilly” music on  phonograph  recording,  the  unadvertised  and  poorly  marketed  recordings  were  largely  forgotten  and  less influential to commercial trends than Carson's (Malone 1993: 74-75).3music, not unlike the previous rush to record African-American artists following the 1920 release of Mamie Smith's “Crazy Blues” (Lornell 1994: 77).  Largely using mobile recording studios, many record  companies  travelled  throughout  the  southern  United  States  to  collect  recordings  for commercial release. Musicians from the greater region would congregate in each town where a record company would temporarily set up shop. The resulting dissemination of vernacular music through records and radio broadcasts gave rural people in the United States for the first time an awareness of  both unique regional  differences  and overarching similarities in their  folk  musics (Rosenburg 2005: 19). This awareness allowed geographically isolated people to situate themselves as part of a larger community, and this sense of community would become crucial to surviving the hardships of the next decade.Following the stock market crash of October 1929, the American economy plunged into the Great  Depression,  and the recording industry did not escape its  impact.  Record sales dropped, hitting a low point in 1933, and several record companies went bankrupt (Rosenburg 2005: 26). Many early 'hillbilly' musicians from this era produced only a couple records before returning to non-musical  employment  and a  non-commercial  relationship  with their  music  making (Lornell 1994:  81).  The folk  genre,  however,  remained quite  fashionable.  The 1930's  were the  height  of popularity  for  cowboy  music,  a  relationship  that  Bill  Malone  attributes  to  the  “renewed consciousness of  and search for roots inspired by the Great Depression” (Malone 1993:  90-91).8 While popular music of the day escaped into a world of fantasy dominated by a luxurious New York lifestyle (Ford and Henderson 1994: 296), Depression-era country music centred thematically 8 Malone also goes into greater depth earlier in the work linking the styles of cowboy music and mountain music to the hillbilly genre, and this connection forms the thesis of Singing Cowboys and Musical Mountaineers: Southern Culture and  the Roots of Country Music.4around disappointment and tragedy. As Neil Rosenburg points out, “these were hard times, and the stories told by the songs were sad but true” (Rosenburg 2005: 27).1.3  Hard Times   and “Hard Times Come Again No More” The mid-nineteenth century saw its share of economic turmoil as well, often marked by anxieties similar to those that characterized the Great Depression. In 1854 an economic panic resulted from the failure of the Knickerbocker Savings Bank, causing a run on several banks in New York City (O Grada and White  2003: 218). That same year, two notable works of art shared similar titles: Charles Dickens' serialized novel Hard Times and Stephen Foster's song Hard Times Come Again No More. When the American historian Studs Terkel compiled an oral history of the Great Depression in 1970, he included an interview with a 14-year-old boy living on the streets of Chicago. The boy told Terkel:“It's so damn hard. Seems like everybody's takin' advantage of you. See, I never heard that word 'depression'  before.  They would all  just  say 'hard times' to me. It is still.” (Terkel 1970: 211) Terkel  titled  his  work  Hard  Times:  An  Oral  History  of  the  Great  Depression.  Though  the  Great Depression is now a story of the history books and we are experiencing a recovery from the most recent recession, it is impossible to deny that these hard times have and will come again. It is in acknowledgement of that cyclical nature, and perhaps in acknowledgement of a similar cyclical nature that has brought me back to classical music, that I title this piece of original music Hard Times  Come Again. 5Chapter 2: Influences and Precedents2.1 A Polystylistic Approach“The polystylistic tendency has always existed in concealed form in music, and continues to do so, because music that is stylistically sterile would be dead” (Schnittke 2002: 89). Indeed, music (like any art form) continues to grow and progress because those who create it are continually stimulated by new devices and techniques. As composers, we cannot ignore the music that has come before us; but we also cannot ignore that which exists around us. For better or for worse, I feel influenced by nearly every music that I  have ever heard in my life,  for it  has shaped, however subtly, what I experience as music. This definition of the concept renders polystylism in a diverse and interactive world as inevitable. A more useful definition of polystylism, however, might also address how an artist's use of multiple styles (whether intuitive or calculated and whether from across genre boundaries or varied dialects within a genre) in a work reflects the artist's lived musical experience rather than simply influences  based  upon  exposure.  The  degree  to  which  many  modern  composers  consider polystylism a priority rather than an inevitability makes a further discussion of this relationship between influence and experience a worthwhile endeavour.My  personal  musical  history  has  been  multifaceted,  and  many  composers  coming  to maturity in the age of Youtube and Spotify may empathize. The access to an unprecedented amount of recorded music is an overwhelming characteristic of our era. My musical experience, however, goes beyond simply being exposed to (and perhaps being an avid listener of) a wide array of music. As a performer, I  have participated in symphony orchestras,  rock and roll  bands,  jazz combos, 6bluegrass sessions, and hip-hop jams.9 When I entered graduate studies in music composition, I began focusing on writing in a genre that I had practically ignored for the previous six years of being a working professional musician. In the journey towards finishing a doctoral degree in music composition, I have sought to fully harness my personal voice, one that allows the multiplicities of my musical life to emerge in my compositions. Schnittke's concept of polystylistic methods, both quotational  and allusional  (and what  he refers to  as  a  hybrid of  the two),  draws a  distinction between  the  composer's  voice  and  an  “alien”  style.  This  particular  sense  of  otherness  cannot resonate  to  a  composer  who composes  polystylistically  because various  styles  legitimately  live within  himself.  Rather  than  considering  my  emerging10 compositional  voice  as  a  fusion  of influences,  I prefer to imagine my voice as a distillation of experiences. After all, a melting pot simply mixes substances together, while a still is selective in which elements it extracts. John Zorn addresses the question of polystylism aptly when he says: “Composers don't think in terms of boxes and genres. They just do what they do, and they love good music” (McCutchan 1999: 163).The polystylistic approach that I have pursued in  Hard Times Come Again,  however, goes beyond  the  intuitive  use  of  a  personal  voice  informed  by  an  eclectic  musical  life.  While  each movement in the song cycle certainly exhibits that subconscious sense of polystylism, there is a larger intentional polystylistic approach that exists across the movements. Referencing sub-genres of both folk music and classical music (among them bluegrass, old-time, honky-tonk, minimalism, 9 As I write this chapter, even, I periodically step away from my computer to practice on the double bass that stands in the corner of my studio. I do not play to prepare for an upcoming performance or to actively improve my technique but  just  to  gather  my thoughts,  and so  I  alternate  between pieces  that  are  comfortable  and familiar  to  me:  the “Menuet” from Bach's 1st Cello Suite, Rodgers and Hart's “My Romance,” Bob Marley's “Dem Belly Full,” and the traditional Irish jig “The Blackbird,” among other repertoire. 10 I  hope that I  will  continue to consider my voice as emerging for the length of  my career as a composer, for that perspective signifies the fortunate attitude of personal and artistic growth.7and jazz),  the  musical  styles  of  the  songs  reflect  the  various  emotions  expressed in  the lyrics, including romanticism, simplicity, suffering, relief, guilt, and acknowledgement. This more collage-like approach to multiple styles is  used to reflect the diversity within the narrative of the Great Depression, for in the words of Charles Jencks, “master narratives become impossible in a scientific age” (Jencks 1989: 36). In broad strokes, the musical style of the piece could be described as a fusion of folk music and classical music, but this view would be overly simplistic. Since the process of defining styles,  crucial  to defining their  fusion,  becomes more troublesome than the process of identifying their influence, I will discuss Hard Times Come Again by indicating musical sources of its elements rather than describing how it joins disparate musical genres.2.2 What is folk music?“Facile categorizations . . . are always problematic on closer view, of course, and 'folk' and 'classical' are amongst the most problematic of all” (Gelbart 2007: 1). Gelbart's idea that the transition from function to origin as a primary distinction in characterizing musical genre, which he dates back to the eighteenth-century,  is  important  in  explaining our  current  conceptions  of  folk  and classical music. Compare, for example, a contemporary performance of two tunes on a violin: “Sally Ann Johnson” and a “Gavotte” composed by Jean-Baptiste Lully. Many modern listeners might place these  two tunes  into  different  genres:  folk  music  and  classical  music,  respectively.  Both  tunes, however, share the function of being accompaniment for dancing, and Gelbart's argument would have a seventeenth-century listener placing these two tunes into the same genre. While Gelbart's research  provides  an  insightful  history  as  to  how  origin  has  come  to  replace  function  in  the 8conception of musical genre, it is also important to consider briefly how views towards the genre of folk music have changed over the past century. The study of folk music has gradually expanded to encompass more ideas of what the 'folk' actually accept as folk music rather than simply what the folklorists have defined as folk music.Some of the earliest studies of English language folk song, from the mid-nineteenth century, were conducted through the lens of  historical  literature,  equating ballad singing as a lifeline to ancient  poetry.  This  viewpoint  can be seen in the scholarship of  Francis  Child,  particularly  his collection English and Scottish Ballads, in which he published only the words to folk songs complete with poetic line counts. Twentieth-century folklorists, however, began to contemplate folk song as a living art form rather than simply as a link to the past, as D.K. Wilgus puts it: “the folk speaketh, not spake”  (Wilgus  1959:  54).  Thus,  early  North  American11 folk  song  studies  focused  more on the expressions  of  the  present  day  folk  than on the link  to  their  ancestors'  expressions.  They  did, however, still place a heavy emphasis on poetic value. John Lomax's first collection, Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads  from 1910, refers to the “Homeric quality [of] the cowboy's profanity” (Lomax 1927: ixxx), and though he does notate a handful of tunes the bulk of the work is text.  Cecil Sharp dutifully notated tunes while collecting folk songs throughout the Appalachian region in 1916, including musical notation for each song in his publication; but he, too, comments that many of  the  songs  “contain  all  the  essentials  of  genuine  poetry”  (Sharp  1960:  xxx).  As  technological advances  allowed  portable  tape  machines  to  be  brought  along  on  song  collecting  trips,  field recordings allowed for further analysis of musical style, and the focus of folk song studies shifted 11 In this context, and unfortunately many contexts, the term “North American” refers more to the European colonizers of North America than to the indigenous people of North America.9from the text to the music. The system of cantometrics, developed by Alan Lomax (John's son) in the early 1960s, formed an influential, if controversial,12 tool for comparing the musical style of folk musics around the world through 37 musical categories that sought to describe elements of melody, rhythm,  harmony,  and  timbre  (Lomax  2003:  252-254).  As  folk  music  has  continued  to  evolve alongside the folk that make it, the conception of what folk music is and how best to discuss it has, likewise, continued to evolve. In 1954 the International Folk Music Council offered this definition of folk music:“Folk music  is  the product  of  a  musical  tradition that  has  been evolved through a process of oral transmission. The factors that shape the tradition are: (1) continuity which link the present with the past; (2) variation which springs from the creative impulse of the individual or the group; and (3) selection by the community which determines the form or forms in which the music survives. The term does not cover composed popular music that has been taken over ready-made by a community and remains unchanged, for it is the refashioning and recreation of the music by the community that gives it its folk character.” (quoted in Grunning 2006: 10)Oral  transmission is  a  common inclusion in  the definition of  folk  music,  but  other less  formal definitions of folk music often additionally include the characteristic of anonymous origin. Both of these  features  are  worth  examining  in  part  because  of  the  discrepancy  that  they create  in  the conception of folk music by the folk who participated in these musical traditions as compared to the folklorists who studied the traditions.The concept  of  anonymous origin is  especially  problematic.  Even  those pieces  of  music passed through generations began at some point as a composition, whether that composition was intentional or improvised. “Lyrics are developed by individuals, and so are music and styles of 12 The system was not without its flaws, including its “failure to critically challenge mechanistic cultural determinism, Eurocentric  views  of  human  cultural  evolution,  and  Orientalist  legacies”  (Averill  2003:  245),  which  has  caused relatively few ethnomusicologists to adopt the system of coding.10instrumentation.  Earlier  music  became  'traditional'  only  through  'discovery'  by  urban intellectuals. . . . the people have always had their gifted poets, bards, and minstrels” (Gritzner 1994: 305). The requisite of anonymous origin only acknowledges that the author is not known, not that the author is not a single individual. In the concept of folk music being formed by a community, anonymous origin seems to be unimportant, as it does not address the particularly relevant criteria of being shaped and recreated by a community.  Furthermore, instances of  singularly composed songs being adopted into the folk music repertoire, and changed by various communities, are quite common. Though of little value to the Child-ballad scholars, many songs ordinarily referred to as traditional  songs  at  contemporary  jam  sessions  were  composed  by  a  singular  person. “Grandfather's Clock” by Henry Clay Work, “The Old Rugged Cross” by George Bennard, “The Baggage Coach Ahead” by Gussie Davis, and “Mid the Fields of Virginia” by Charles Harris are just a few of the examples, as Bill Malone points out.13 He goes further to discuss how these tunes were often re-imagined and reclaimed by the folk by “omit[ting] those words and chord progressions that  seemed  needlessly  'fancy'  or  superfluous,”  what  he  characterizes  as  the  'folk'  having “'democratized' the songs, making them more singable and acclimated to the sensibilities of the folk” (Malone 1993: 60). The  concept  of  anonymous  origin  has  further  complications  in  the  modern  era,  which revolve around the emergence of folk music as a commercial category and as a genre of original creation.  Following the folk  revival  of  the 1960s,14 many artists  that  largely  performed original 13 I  have  even  heard  jam  session  participants  refer  to  Ola  Belle  Reed's  composition  from  the  1970's,  “High  on  a Mountaintop,” as a traditional song, and Stan Rogers'  “Barrett's  Privateers,” from the same era, is  often similarly confused. 14 This era is often referred to as 'the' folk revival; however, considering the commercialization of folk music through recordings in the 1920s, what occurred in the 1960s might be seen as a second folk revival. A third folk revival in North America was seen in the wake of the 2000 release of Joel and Ethan Coen's film Oh Brother, Where Art Thou.11material, such as Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Townes Van Zandt, and Phil Ochs, were labelled as folk musicians. That label continues to be widely relevant at the time of writing, as exhibited by the fact that the Canadian Folk Music Awards include two categories for songwriter of the year (one in English and one in French). Even 2014 nominees for “Traditional Singer of the Year” Kim Beggs and Sarah Jane Scouten sing largely  original  music (Canadian Folk Music  Awards 2014).  It  is  quite evident that in the contemporary era, the 'folk' acknowledge not only traditional music, but also originally composed music as folk music.The issue of oral transmission is also problematic in the modern age, and some scholars have amended 'oral' to 'aural' to include an era in which sound recordings are widely available. While this sufficiently addresses the fact that many folk musicians (myself included) have learned some of their repertoire from recordings rather than in-person, it does not entirely solve the problem. The folk revival of the 1960s created such an interest in folk music that it also spawned an industry of instructional  records  and  books  that  have  continued  into  the  next  century.  As  early  as  1955, Folkways Records released Pete Seeger's instructional record The Folksinger's Guitar Guide. The liner notes  include  extensive  instructional  material  such  as  lyric  and  chord  charts,  drawings  and diagrams,  and  songs  notated  in  tablature  (Seeger  1955).  Homespun  Tapes  began  producing instructional  materials in 1967 and continues to put out video, audio,  and written instructional material at the time of writing (Homespun Music Instruction). In the late twentieth-century and the twenty-first-century,  then,  many  folk  musicians  have  learned  their  trade  not  from  an  oral transmission of traditional song, nor necessarily from an aural transmission of recorded song, but often from written materials. 12A quick survey of the schedules of any of the dozens of folk festivals that occur every year in North America will reveal that the definition of folk music has, perhaps, never been more nebulous as it is in the present. As Bruno Nettl points out, “the homogeneity of modern American life, and particularly the prominence of radio, television, and the recording industry, has also homogenized musical life to the extent that the old tripartite view of music (art, popular, and folk) has lost much of its meaning” (Nettl 1990: 258). Since a complete exploration of the history and current state of North American folk music is beyond the scope of this discussion, I will use the term 'folk music' to include both traditional music of anonymous origins along with individually composed music, as well as music transmitted both orally and through recordings. As a result, my definition of 'folk music' will resemble what many refer to as 'roots music,' as it will additionally include other genres either  encompassed  within  folk  music  (such  as  blues)  or  evolved  from  folk  music  (such  as bluegrass).2.3 Some Characteristics of North American Folk MusicIn order to aid the discussion of how various influences of folk music can be seen in  Hard Times  Come Again, as well as other pieces of music that have shaped my creative process, it is useful to identify  some  characteristics  of  North  American  folk  music.  I  will  address  particular  musical characteristics that  have most  influenced my creative work,  including acoustic  instrumentation, generally tonal harmonic and melodic structures, consistent pulse, regular metrical structures, and vocal  and  instrumental  performance  styles,  as  well  as  specific  deviations  from  these  norms commonly found within the tradition. A wide diversity of musical traits can found in folk music 13traditions  throughout  North  America,  and  further  diversity  can  be  seen  by  examining  the differences with which these traditions are engaged by amateur and professional music making communities.  Focusing  on  the  music  that  has  most  influenced  Hard  Times  Come  Again this discussion will primarily pertain to characteristics of traditional folk music from the Appalachian region as well as certain commercialized genres of music that have evolved from that folk music (such as bluegrass, country, and honky-tonk).The instruments used in American folk music are, like most folk musics, primarily acoustic instruments.  Stringed  instruments  are  the  most  common,  and  a  variety  of  them  are  utilized, including  fiddles,  guitars,  banjos,  mandolins,  and  dulcimers.  Bill  Monroe's  Bluegrass  Boys established the typical  quintet  instrumentation of  the  bluegrass  genre:  guitar,  banjo,  mandolin, fiddle, and string bass. Country groups have often included electric guitar in addition to, or in replacement of, the acoustic guitar and have also augmented the instrumentation to include a drum set. Several instruments played in the manner of a slide guitar, including the dobro, lap steel, and pedal steel, have also joined country and honky-tonk bands. The piano is less common, but present in some country and honky-tonk groups, though generally absent from bluegrass and old-timey ensembles.  In  Hard  Times  Come  Again I  explore  augmenting  the  traditional  bluegrass instrumentation with an expanded, more 'classical' bowed string section consisting of two violins (or fiddles), a viola, and a cello. Much of American folk music, not surprisingly, is stylistically similar to the folk musics of the  English  and  Scotch-Irish  people  that  colonized  the  Appalachian  region  of  North  America. Melodies are often diatonic using mostly triadic harmony in their accompaniment, and songs are 14unlikely to include change of tonal centre.15 Phrasing is often symmetrical, and pulses are generally divided into two equal parts.16 American folk music, however, has developed its own characteristics and, as Bruno Nettl points out, includes “more melodies in major, fewer pentatonic tunes, more songs in duple metre, and less use of accompaniment” (Nettl 1990: 267) than British folk music. North  American  folk  music  could  be  deceptively  characterized  as  harmonically  basic; Charles  Seeger  and  Ruth  Crawford  Seeger  have  observed  that  “traditionally,  few  chords  are required to accompany any one song” (Seeger and Crawford Seeger 1966: xviii), an influence that can be seen in Hard Times Come Again through substantial sections of the music utilizing only tonic, subdominant,  and dominant harmonies.  There are some unusual vertical  alignments present in North American folk music, however, that challenge this sense of simplicity. In her study of the fiddle-song tradition of West Virginia, Erynn Marshall finds instances where “the third and the seventh scale degrees of the song are often a semitone apart” (Marshall 2006: 151). These periods of dissonance, which do tend to resolve, add a level of vertical complexity that cannot be adequately characterized by the chord symbols in many folk-style songbooks.  Furthermore,  Marshall  finds appearances of 'blue notes' in West Virginian fiddle music; “the third, the seventh, and occasionally the tonic  are microtonally  changed” (Marshall  206:  151).  Her observations show that  while the music may seem diatonic at face value, there are more complex tonalities in play, and I explore this interplay between diatonicism and chromaticism most clearly in “This Is  What Happened,” the second song in Hard Times Come Again.  15 Notable exceptions to this include songs which switch between relative major and minor modes. This tonal structure is especially found in two-part fiddle tunes, such as “Blackberry Blossom,” where one section resides in the major mode and the other section begins in the minor mode but ends in the major mode.16 Again, there are exceptions here. Compound metres are found in 6/8 tunes, though the 9/8 slipjig, common to Irish fiddling tradition, is rare in North American folk music.15The illusion of  rhythmic simplicity is  also present in some discussions of American folk music.  Part  of  this  illusion  might  be  attributed  to  the  fact  that  many  of  the  song  books  that transcribe American folk songs are prescriptive rather than descriptive in nature. This method of notation might render a song's rhythms rather plain on the page that are, in practice, quite varied and complex. Ruth Crawford Seeger acknowledges this in her analysis of American folk song when she writes that “folk singers habitually divide beats and measures in . . . highly irregular ways. . . . Some of these are simple enough to be allowed inclusion in a singing book of this sort; many were, of  necessity,  excluded”  (Crawford  Seeger  1941:  61).  Much  of  the  presentation  of  simplicity  in American folk rhythms, then, seems 'necessary' because the folklorists don't believe that the 'folk' are capable of reading the rhythms that come naturally to them.17 Of course, the other benefit of prescriptive notation is that it allows each performer to adapt and alter the performance of the piece to suit their own personal interpretation. While  prescriptive  notation  explains  some  of  the  confusion  around  the  perception  of rhythmic simplicity in American folk music on an intra-phrasal level, there exists a more complex rhythmic structure on an inter-phrasal level as well, which I explore in several songs in Hard Times  Come  Again including “It  Was Rough Going” and “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres.” I  can  recall musicians in jam sessions referring to certain tunes as 'crooked;' this meant that the phrasing of the tune either added or dropped a beat (or two, depending on one's sense of the pulse18) from the regular symmetrical phrase. This is true of instrumental tunes like “Clinch Mountain Backstep” that 17 The 'folk' might not necessarily dispute their inability to read certain musical notation, at least on a personal level. I can recall  at least one conversation with a friend, much more commercially and popularly successful than I,  who responded to the charge of illiteracy (not from myself, but from a well-known American composer) with indifference.18 Because folk music is, for the most part, an unwritten music there are often discrepancies among players as to what constitutes one pulse.16include mixed metres.  Ruth Crawford Seeger goes further to identify vocal  songs,  such as “Po' Lazarus”  and “Johnny Stiles,”  that  prolong  or  contract  the  phrase  metrically,  contravening  the symmetry of the tune's phrasal construction (Crawford Seeger 2001: 55). In each of these examples, a notable characteristic of the metric irregularity is that it occurs at phrase endings or beginnings. While Crawford Seeger does illustrate instances where certain words are prolonged in the middle of a phrase, these words do not appear to be haphazardly chosen by the singer; rather, they seem to illuminate  a  grouping  structure  made  of  sub-phrases  within  the  phrase.  Furthermore,  these prolonged notes seem to differ from the use of a fermata in a classical  score, for one rhythmic characteristic of American folk music is a steady pulse which  “holds strictly to a tempo,  once it is started”  (Seeger  and  Crawford  Seeger  1966:  xviii). This  element  of  consistent  pulse  is  evident throughout Hard Times Come Again, with only a few specific exceptions which I will discuss further in Chapter 3. Though these aforementioned complexities of rhythm and harmony are surely present in the genre of American folk music, it is probably wise not to overemphasize their prevalence. While it is certainly easier to identify the unusual than the usual, it is more likely the usual that sustains the genre. Ruth Crawford Seeger struggled with this conundrum in her studies of American folk music style:“As a professional musician, my inclination was to ask: How 'different' is this  song?  Does  it  contain  irregularities  which  set  it  apart  as  something unusual, unique? These questions I could answer without difficulty. But . . . their opposites were not so easy. . . . How 'nice and common' (in one singer's words) is  it?  Of  that  sort  of  commonness  which keeps a  thing alive and growing? And where lies the dividing line between the common and the commonplace?” (Crawford Seeger 1941: xvii-xviii)17Like the subtle shifts  of  hypermeter in a Beethoven symphony,  these complexities are irregular occurrences that contribute to the overarching dramatic tension of the genre, subverting our sense of expectation not continually, but occasionally. And when these complexities are found, they tend to avoid the laboured sound of some modernist  compositions in  favour of  a  sense of  ease.  As Amanda Petrusich puts it, “good functional folk songs are . . . effortless to sing” (Petrusich 2008: 165).Putting styles of musical construction aside for a moment, it seems important to address styles of sound production, particularly singing. American folk singing differs from classical singing in aspects of timbre and word emphasis. Many folk singers seem to place little importance on the clear, open vowel sounds that predominate the 'bel canto' style of classical singing. In fact, among folk singers, if one's voice sounds “reedy or nasal, so much the better” (Crawford Seeger 1941: xx). Likewise, clear, crisp enunciation of syllabic boundaries can be masked by more natural speech-like pronunciation that might replace a written consonant with a sounded glottal stop, as in the word 'button,' for example. While not evident from the notation of the score in Hard Times Come Again, it is my expectation that the singers will adopt this approach to timbre and pronunciation.One particularly notable characteristic of American folk singing that distinguishes it from classical or popular singing, that can be seen reflected in the score to Hard Times Come Again through the sparsity of dynamic markings, is the lack of dramatic interpretation. In her suggestions for using Our Singing Country as a songbook, Ruth Crawford Seeger instructs the potential folk singer: “Do not  sing  'with  expression,'  or  make  an  effort  to  dramatize”  (Crawford  Seeger  1941:  xix).  Neil Rosenberg documents that this style of  singing carried over into the early commercial 'hillbilly' 18recordings, noting the “impersonality of delivery” and the fact that the “dynamics of the story were not carried over into the dynamic of singing; a humorous novelty item was performed in basically the same way as a serious sad song” (Rosenberg 2005: 22). Common examples of this discontinuity between subject matter and musical style can be seen in the sub-genre known as 'murder ballads,' which often combine stories of cold-blooded killing (sometimes of a loved one) with major key melodies and medium- or up-tempo bouncy rhythms.19 Styles  of  sound production  as  they  pertain  to  instruments  besides  the  voice  are  worth mentioning as well. Mandolins, not unlike their use in the classical style, are customarily played with a plectrum, while string bass (not a traditional folk instrument, but common enough in folk and  folk-derived  ensembles  today)  are  generally  played  pizzicato.  Guitars,  which  are  usually equipped with  steel  strings,  are  often played with  a  flatpick,  though sometimes played in  the fingerpicking style, with or without fingerpicks (plectrums that attach to the fingers of the right hand). In  Hard Times Come Again,  the mandolinist and guitarist are asked to play with flatpicks, while the bass part includes both arco and pizzicato sections.Banjos20 are played in two methods. The old-time clawhammer21 style, in which I write the banjo material for “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres,” involves a three stroke pattern that includes a stroke with the back nail of the index (or middle) finger followed by a light strum (or brush stroke) by all the fingers and finished with a stroke by the flesh of the thumb (usually on the short string). 19 “Tom Dula” (or “Tom Dooley) and “Banks of the Ohio” are two good examples that fit these characteristics. Many other murder ballads, such as “Little Sadie” and “Maddy Groves,” do employ the minor key, but still exhibit a dance tempo rhythmically.20 Most common to American folk music is the five string banjo rather than the four string banjo. Many of the traditional Appalachian banjos were fretless and strung with gut. While these are still played by some banjoists, fretted banjos strung with steel are now more common. 21 Also  variously  referred  to  as  frailing,  thumping,  beating,  knocking,  rocking,  racking,  rapping,  and  whomping (Conway 1995: 205).19The three-finger style of playing, which is popular in bluegrass, involves various combinations of alternations between strokes using the fleshy side (though often mediated by fingerpicks) of the thumb, index, and middle fingers. I write large sections of the banjo part for “One of My Father's,” the third song in Hard Times Come Again, in this three-finger style. The resulting sounds of each style are further influenced by the short fifth string, which is often used as a drone. This drone effect combined with  the  various  tuning  schemes  used  in  the  clawhammer  style  (useful  for  playing melodies  with the finger stroke while keeping dissonances  in the brush stroke to a  minimum) contributes to the banjo's role in American folk music as “a background of sonority rather than a sequence of chords” (Seeger and Crawford Seeger 1966: xviii).Fiddle playing is also worthy of discussion partly because of how the instrument, which is shared with the classical style, is played uniquely, and partly because of the way that classical music has in recent years come to influence folk styles of playing. Fiddle playing in the American folk music  style  could  be considered by  some listeners  as  rough around the edges.  Bow technique displays a set of values regarding sound quality that can result in a scratchiness of tone. Left hand technique  uses  little  or  no  vibrato,  which  minimally  masks  any  discrepancies  of  pitch.  These inflections of pitch, however, are often used to great effect, especially when combined with an open string to produce a near unison double stop. Slides and scoops also contribute to the less than exact orientation to an equal tempered scale of semitones. In  recent  years,  fiddle  playing  has  become  a  concert  and  contest  art  in  addition  to  a community activity as accompaniment to song or dance. This change in context has impacted the playing style of some fiddlers; imprecise intonation and tone that might be considered abrasive by a 20typical symphony-goer are less frequently considered acceptable practices among a professional class of fiddlers. Many young, aspiring folk fiddle players are just as likely to drill scale patterns as a classically trained violinist,  and in fact,  many fiddle players have had some classical training. Classical music's effect on folk style fiddle playing has resulted in what Peter Cooke refers to as “the Westernization of Western music” (quoted in Blaustein 1993: 269), and this effect might be heard in Hard Times Comes Again by the bowed instruments often sounding the most 'classical.' An increase in virtuosity among folk musicians is clearly not limited to fiddle players; the past several decades have seen guitarists,  mandolinists,  and even bassists  of  extraordinary skill  elevate the technical standards of their instruments. Nor is this trend unique to folk music, as similar trajectories can be seen in jazz and classical music. Exceptionally significant about this transformation in folk music, however, is not only the way it has changed stylistic elements of the genre, but also how it has created an exclusive elite rank of professional performers within a genre that is often characterized by its widely inclusive and amateur nature.   This description of North American folk music style is not intended to be exhaustive, by any means.  Rather,  it  should  simply  give  the  necessary  background  information  to  understand  a discussion of creative choices that I have made in Hard Times Come Again based on my experience as a performer in the genre of folk music. Furthermore, this brief discourse should help to create an environment in which an exploration of the interplay between 'folk' and 'classical'  styles can be initiated.212.4 Folk Music Influences on Composers of Classical MusicThe influence of folk music on classical composition is not a new practice. Many early composers wrote pieces based on the French folk tune “L'homme Armé,” and Mozart wrote variations on the French folk song “Ah, vous direr-je, maman,” though these examples use folk song more as source material than as a stylistic guide (a practice that I  avoid in  Hard Times Come Again). Amidst the national revivalism of the 19th century, the Bohemian composer Antonín Dvořák, who once said that “all of the great musicians have borrowed from the songs of the common people”22 (An Interview with Dvořák 1893: 72), turned to the folk music of his homeland for inspiration.23 The Moravian composer Leoš Janáček took interest in folk song a step further; in the 1880s he worked with the folklorist František Bartoš collecting folk songs and analyzing speech patterns of Moravian dialects (Zemanova 2002: 60). Roger Scrutton finds in Janáček's writings the theory that common chords can retain their individual identity even when ornamented with added tones or overlapping harmonies, thus allowing for an advancement of tonality based in a “deep psychology of musical connection” (Scrutton 2009: 167).24 In 1905, Béla Bartók and Zoltán Kodály began working together to investigate Hungarian folk  song,  and their  research would yield many transcriptions  and field  recordings (Erdely 1983: 51),25 as well as impact  their own compositional output.22 It is interesting to note that Dvořák admitted to not only borrowing from the songs of the common people from his native Bohemia, but also from African-American melodies, which he called “the folk songs of America” and to which he encouraged American composers to turn to for inspiration. 23 Bedřich Smetana is often similarly characterized as drawing on Bohemia for inspiration, perhaps mostly notably in Ma Vlast; however, according to Ralph Vaughn Williams, Smetana “denied that he owed anything to folk music” (Vaughn Williams 1956: 366).24 See Michael Brim Beckerman's Janáček as Theorist for a much more detailed discussion of Janáček's theories on musical perception, including his influential 'moment of chaos' theory.25 While  Bartók is  perhaps  more popularly  known as  an early  ethnomusicologist  (then  referred  to  as  comparative musicology) than  Kodály,  Kodály's doctoral dissertation, entitled “Strophic Structure of Hungarian Folk Song” had earned him a Ph.D. from the University of Budapest. An element of Kodály's theories that was particularly forward thinking at the time was his conception of folk song as “vocal text” where melody and poetry are intertwined and inseparable (Erdely 1983: 54).22Similar  to  composers  from  Moravia  and  Bohemia,  North  American  composers  were saturated with a historical canon of French, German, and Italian music. In the struggle to find a personal voice that reflected a North American culture, some American composers have also turned to folk music for guidance. This search for a voice more connected to a composer's specific personal existence is  not unlike my process in  Hard Times Come Again of  calling upon my lived musical experience for inspiration. One of the earliest prominent American composers, Edward MacDowell, turned not to the folk music of European colonizers, but to the music of Native Americans in his Indian  Suite, from  1896.  His  conception  of  Native  American  culture  and  music  was  largely theoretical, however, drawing mostly from Theodore Baker's dissertation entitled  On the Music of  the  North  American  Indians (Gardner  2004:  376).  Perhaps  one  of  the  most  unique  American composers,  Charles  Ives  was  influenced  by  a  tremendous  amount  of  diverse  musical  sources, ranging from European symphonic repertoire to North American folk song. When Henry Cowell, one of Ives' most dedicated champions, described Ives' authenticity as an American composer by his use of “folk materials” (quoted in Paul 2006: 406), he was likely referring more to Ives' invocation of a  folkish  style  complete  with  out-of-tune  pitches,  bends,  and slides,  than  to  his  quotations  of American popular songs, folk songs, and hymns.26 Later American composers would also attempt to mimic folk music style; Aaron Copland's string writing in Rodeo borrows the melody of the fiddle tune “Bonaparte's Retreat,” but the orchestral rendition loses the grit of true fiddling.27 Interestingly enough, Copland's turn to “imposed simplicity” during the Great Depression might be described as 26 It  is  interesting to note that some of the quoted material  in Ives' pieces were popular songs, from minstrel  show repertoire or Stephen Foster's songbooks, that have made their way into the folk music repertoire despite their having been singularly composed.  27 It is also interesting to note that in another ballet from the era, Appalachian Spring, Copland quotes the Shaker hymn “Simple Gifts,” which has, in my experience, been treated as a folk song.23an attempt to write music that would speak to the common man, the 'folk,' one might say (Crist 2003: 410). Though I use folk idioms in Hard Times Come Again primarily to craft an honest personal expression, I very much relate to the desire to be communicative that is implied by the use of a more direct musical language. In recent years,  several  American composers have written music that reveals folk music influences. Quite notable is the music of Paul Elwood. A banjo player himself, Elwood had won the 1986 Kansas State Bluegrass Banjo Competition before receiving his Ph.D. in music composition from the State University of New York – Buffalo in 1995, where he studied with David Felder28 (Elwood 2014). His piece Stanley Kubrick's Mountain Home, from 2001, combines a Pierrot ensemble29 with a bluegrass band and can be seen as a direct influence to the combination of a string quartet and a bluegrass band in the instrumentation of Hard Times Come Again. Elwood uses the two forces as separate entities at first, alternating between the 'classical'  musicians and the 'folk' musicians, with one striking exception; early on in the piece the banjo plays in unison with the vocal melody.30 As the piece progresses the two groups overlap, but their combination brings a chaotic atmosphere that  layers  more  abstract  harmonies  from  the  Pierrot  ensemble  atop  the  diatonic  tunes  of  the bluegrass band.31 While this technique produces a blend of the two sonic worlds, the two ensembles remain at odds throughout the piece, sounding never coordinated, and the piece ends with a similar 28 Elwood had previously studied with several well-known composers including Donald Erb, Charles Wuorinen, and Peter Maxwell Davies, among others.29 The Pierrot ensemble of  flute, clarinet, violin, cello,  and piano has become a common ensemble for contemporary classical music. In this piece, Elwood does not employ the doubling from  Pierre Lunaire, but he does use a soprano vocalist.30 Later on in the piece, the banjo accompanies the vocal melody in a more arpeggiated figure idiomatic to the instrument along  with  cello  and  piano.  Considering  that  Elwood  performs  the  banjo  part  on  the  recording,  and  in  many performances, it is perhaps not surprising that writes himself into more of the piece than the rest of the bluegrass band.31 I am quite certain that at least some of the material played by the bluegrass band are arrangements of traditional folk tunes; one tune appears at the beginning that I distinctly recognize but cannot place the name of. 24alternation of the forces that began it. Another noteworthy piece of Elwood's is Border Radio X, from 2006,  for  solo  banjo,  voice,32 and  live  electronics.33 This  piece  draws  less  on  folk  styles  of instrumental performance, using bowed banjo for textural effects that are then processed by the electronic component; however, the piece does invoke folksinging with sung quotations from the folk song “In the Pines.” Wayne Horvitz's  2004 composition  Joe  Hill,  16  Actions  for  Orchestra,  Voice,  and Soloists is another recent  example of  a  concert  piece  that alludes  to elements of  folk  music.  Much of the instrumentation  is  rather  conventional,34 but  the  inclusion  of  an  improvising  electric  guitarist indicates  that  the piece  was  written for  specific  performers  (the guitarist  is  Horvitz's  longtime collaborator, Bill Frisell). The importance of this aspect of the piece is that one of the vocalists for whom Horvitz writes is the bluegrass banjo player and singer, Danny Barnes. Barnes' singing, by nature  of  his  personal  style,  gives  the  piece  a  folk  flavour  by  utilizing  the  nasal  tone  and pronunciation indicative of North American folk music, much like what I ask the singers in Hard Times Come Again to adopt. Julia Wolfe's chamber piece Steel Hammer,  from 2009, is remarkable for its allusions to folk tradition in both its subject matter as well as aspects of its musical style. The piece is a musical dramatization in nine movements depicting the legendary American folk hero John Henry. In the program notes to the piece Wolfe recalls her admiration of Appalachian music as well as her first public musical performance, which was on the mountain dulcimer (Wolfe 2014). While the musical 32 The banjo player also performs the voice part.33 There is no commercial recording of this piece, but the reader can find view a performance by Joti Rockwell played on mandolin and banjo that has been posted on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L72juonnhaU. 34 I have not seen the score, but the recording sounds like a standard chamber orchestra with a small number of winds and brass.25style of  Steel Hammer is primarily minimalist with a predilection for driving rhythms and overt repetition rife with slowly changing variation, Wolfe does weave in musical images that reference folk styles.  In  the first  movement,  entitled “Some Say,”  the three female vocalists  are asked to perform grace notes that at times seem to resemble the yodelling characteristic of Jimmie Rodgers and other country singers. In the second movement, entitled “The States,” Wolfe calls on each of the instrumentalists  to  stomp  their  feet  and  asks  the  percussionist,  along  with  the  guitarist  and clarinetist, to play body percussion on their thighs and chests. Furthermore, the guitarist is asked to double on dulcimer and banjo. Interestingly enough, while Wolfe meticulously notates much of the score, the banjo part  is  liberally improvised.  In  “The States” she simply instructs the player to perform a “banjo riff,” a “bigger banjo riff,” or a “banjo country riff,” while in the sixth movement, entitled “Polly Ann – The Race,” she instructs the banjo player to begin playing a pattern and to add variation as the piece progresses (Wolfe 2009). While I have chosen in  Hard Times Come Again to compose specific lines for the banjo based upon my own research into performance styles for the instrument,  I  do  include sections  in the mandolin  and guitar parts  that  have some element of improvisation which may harness the same sense of naturalness that I presume Wolfe seeks. The work of composer Dan Trueman is also interesting in its debt to folk music, though as much to the music of Norway as to that of his native North America. In addition to being active as a composer of classical music, Trueman is a skilled computer programmer and an avid fiddler. Much of his work is focused on harnessing new sounds from the violin, and he utilizes the electric violin to  achieve  this  in  several  compositions.  Additionally,  his  discovery  of  the  Hardanger  fiddle,  a Norwegian folk  instrument  that  includes  drone strings,  has  had a  major  impact  on his  purely 26acoustic work; he has performed on it and composed for it  in a variety of ensembles (Trueman 2014). A particularly interesting aspect of how Trueman's experience as composer and performer interact  is  the  transcriptions  that  he  provides  to  several  of  his  own  recordings;  however,  a comparison of the printed version of “Fosclachtha” and the recorded performance of that tune by Trueman and Brittany Haas displays that stylistic characteristics such as slides, trills, and shakes are expected to be freely added by any potential performer (Trueman  2014, Haas and Trueman 2012).35 In a similar fashion, though I do not expect performers in Hard Times Come Again to add unwritten material  to  the  piece,  I  would  not  discourage  the  addition  of  stylistically  appropriate ornamentation.36 Finally,  the work of  Matt  McBane shows an interesting intersection of  classical  and folk music.  As a classically trained composer and violinist in the band Build, much of McBane's music combines the dictated precision of classical music with the frenetic rhythms of rock and roll. His chamber piece  Drawn, from 2013, is notable not for its musical style, but for its instrumentation. Drawn was composed for and premiered by the Jake Schepps Quintet. Led by Schepps on the banjo, the group shares its instrumentation with Bill Monroe's Bluegrass Boys, including guitar, fiddle, bass, and mandolin in addition to banjo. In the first, third, and fifth movements, McBane writes in a minimalist  style  that  focuses  on  groove,37 giving  each  player  a  carefully  crafted  role  in  the interlocking rhythms that create a swirling, energetic texture. Considering that Monroe's personal innovation  was  to  create  the bluegrass  genre  out  of  assigning  roles  to  each  instrument  in  the 35 In some ways this speaks to the state of fiddle culture in North America in the 21st century, where keen fiddlers are increasingly likely to learn new songs and technical tricks from recordings of international fiddle stars rather than in person from people in their close communities. 36 This is not unlike compositions that I have written for jazz orchestra, in which lead players of any given section are invited to guide other members of the band in the stylistic interpretation of the written lines. 37 In the second and fourth movements, McBane uses more atmospheric textures.27ensemble, which created a specific groove from interlocking rhythms, McBane's piece seems like a logical progression for this instrumentation. Drawn sets the groundwork for Hard Times Come Again by using these instruments in a 'concert' setting as well as by adapting the interlocking rhythmic qualities of bluegrass to a post-minimalist language. The course of musical history has shown a fruitful interaction between folk and classical music, with each influencing the other to various degrees. The result is a current culture in which one is likely to encounter both classical composers who are also folk musicians and folk musicians who perform Bach partitas.  This diverse and intertwined culture is where my musical  life as a composer and as a performer exists, and this is the context for Hard Times Come Again.28Chapter 3: Form and Style in  Hard Times Comes Again  3.1 Overall Formal StructureComposed  of  seven  songs  that  exist  independently,  but  also  contribute  to  a  greater  dramatic momentum when combined,  Hard Times Come Again fits best into the song-cycle genre. While the most  overtly  shared  characteristic  across  the  songs  is  the  subject  matter  of  the  text,  there  are additional continuities to be found in the tonal centres that form the boundaries between songs, as detailed in Table 1. Song NumberSong Title Approx. DurationInstrumentation Beginning KeyEnding Key1 It Was Rough Going 3 min. Baritone, Bass, Mandolin, Banjo, Guitar, PianoAM GM2 This Is What Happened 5 min. Alto, Baritone, Viola, Cello, Bass, Banjo, Guitar, PianoAM AM3 One of My Father's 5 min. Alto, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass, Mandolin, Banjo, GuitarDM EM4 I Was Relieved 5¼  min. Alto, Baritone, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass, Mandolin, Banjo, Guitar, PianoGM GM5 Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres3½ min. Alto, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass, Banjo, GuitarCM cm6 I Had a Terrible Guilt 3¼  min. Baritone, 2 Violins, Viola, Mandolin, Pianogme bm7 We Had So Little 6¼ min. Alto, Baritone, 2 Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass, Mandolin, Banjo, Guitar, Pianoe bm DM      Table 1: Formal outline of Hard Times Come AgainThe first two songs share the starting key of A major, and the second song's ending key of G major creates a dominant relationship to the third song's beginning key of D major. Similar shared and 29dominant relationships between keys of adjacent songs are found between the sixth and seventh song and the fourth and fifth song, respectively. Further structural organization can be seen in the varieties of instrumentation and duration among the songs. Only two songs, the fourth and seventh, utilize the the entire ensemble, while the remaining songs use various subsets of the ensemble. Furthermore, those songs that use the largest forces are also the longest in duration. The entire song cycle, then, can be divided into two dramatic halves that build to climaxes in the fourth and seventh songs, the second climax being the larger of the  two.  There  are other  musical  factors  besides  instrumentation and duration that  impact  the perception  of  musical  importance in  these  two songs  as  well,  but  those  elements  of  harmony, rhythm, and thematic development will be discussed further in later sections.Each song in the cycle also exists as an individual composition, with its own beginning and ending, capable of being performed apart from the remainder of the cycle. While the songs combine to create an overall  dramatic arc throughout the cycle,  each song has a self-contained dramatic contour as well. A variety of beginnings and endings are used which exhibit various levels of energy and definition of commencement or conclusion. The first song, “It Was Rough Going,” for example, begins  clearly  with  loud,  accented  chords  that  establish  the  rhythmic  pulse  and  tonality immediately. The fourth song, “I Was Relieved,” by contrast, begins with sustained chords, out of which the rhythmic pulse emerges. The seventh song, “We Had So Little,” concludes with a soft, but definite, authentic cadence, while the fifth song, “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres,” culminates in a half  cadence  that  insinuates  a  feeling  of  uncertainty.  Each  of  these  individual  forms  seeks  to complement the expression of the text, which constructs the dramatic tension of the piece through a 30series of vignettes rather than an overarching narrative.3.2 Lyrical contentEach song in Hard Times Come Again takes its text from a poem constructed of quotations from Studs Terkel's work of oral history Hard Times. Terkel examines the Great Depression through interviews with various people, some famous, some unknown, some who had lived through the Depression, and some who had heard about it from family members. The resulting work is a book that avoids a greater  narrative  in  favour  of  a  series  of  glimpses  into  what  life  was  like  during  the  Great Depression, and  Hard Times Come Again works in much the same way. Each song addresses one perspective of life during the Great Depression, and while the seven songs build upon each other to offer a wider view of the era, a tightly intertwined narrative is avoided.Developing the lyrical content of Hard Times Come Again was a multi-step process. Figures 1, 2, and 3 exhibit the process of arriving at the lyrical content for “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres.” After having digested Terkel's work through several readings, I compiled a list of quotations from the text. I subsequently selected fragments of quotations that shared similar themes, emotions, or perspectives and grouped them together, as shown in Figure 1.“320 acres of farm land, fine land, that my uncle owned and cleared, he lost it.”  (Terkel 1986: 214)“Men in the theater, whom I'd known, who had responsible positions.  Who had lost their jobs, lost their homes, lost their families.  And worse than anything else, lost belief in themselves. They were destroyed men.” (Terkel 1986: 381)“Even the good year was no good . . . .  The most valuable thing we lost was hope.  A man can endure a lot if he still has hope.” (Terkel 1986: 230)            Figure 1: Quotations from source text31Finally, I arranged these fragments into a poetic form,38 as shown in Figure 2.Three hundred twenty acres of farm land,fine land,my uncle owned and cleared. He lost it.Even the good year was no good.Men whom I'd known who had lost their jobs, lost their homes, lost their families. And worse than anything else lost belief in themselves.They were destroyed men. A man can endure a lot if he still has hope.Three hundred twenty acres of farm land,fine land,my uncle owned and cleared. The most valuable thing lost was hope.He lost it.            Figure 2: Quoted fragments in poetic formWhen composing each song, I treated each poetic text as I would any poem, liberally repeating words and occasionally reordering words or phrases, as exhibited in Figure 3.38 Occasionally, phrases were slightly changed through the omission of a word or two, but in most cases larger fragments remained entirely intact. In only one instance did I decide, on Simmers' advice, to change a word from the original citation; the second song uses the term “juke joint” rather than “gyp joint,” which appeared in Terkel's interview, to appeal to a modern, more politically correct audience. In this case, I believe that the adjusted version still captures the imagery of the original description.32Three-hundred-twenty acres of farm land, fine land, my uncle owned and cleared,three-hundred-twenty acres of farm land, fine land, my uncle owned and cleared.He lost it. Even the good year was no good.Men whom I'd known who'd lost their lobs, lost their homes, lost their fam'lies.And worse than anything else, lost belief in themselves.They were destroyed,they were destroyed,they were destroyed men.A man can endure a lot if he still has hope.Three-hundred-twenty acres of farm land, fine land, my uncle owned and cleared,three-hundred-twenty acres of farm land, fine land, my uncle owned and cleared.He lost it. Men whom I'd known who'd lost their jobs, lost their homes, lost their fam'lies.The most valuable thing we lost was hope.            Figure 3: Lyrics as they appear in the songThroughout these steps I worked closely with Canadian poet Bren Simmers to ensure that each poem and each song would exhibit the carefully thought-out choices of a trained wordsmith. One feature of this process that contributes to the absence of a single narrative throughout the work is the fact that each song contains pieces of several different interviews. Though the text was crafted by two people, it consists of the voices of more than two dozen.An additional aspect of this process that befits a piece drawing influences from both folk and classical  music  is  that  the  text  is,  by nature,  folksy.  Though the  typical  definition  of  the  'folk' emphasizes the 'common' person over the elite, the lyrics to these songs epitomize the language of the 'folk' by their conversational tone regardless of the identity of the original speaker. These lyrics, however, are also the result of careful construction; bulky and intellectual words and phrases are avoided  by  choice  as  much as  by  availability.  Consequently,  this  method  might  have more in common with  classical  music's  highly  constructed manner  than folk  music's  looser,  sometimes 33improvised, demeanour. The dichotomy that arises from simple, folksy language that is rigorously chosen and arranged falls into step with the duality of the music that invokes both folk and classical styles. 3.3 Instrumentation and Performance Considerations A further element that overtly alludes to both folk and classical idioms is the instrumentation for which Hard Times Come Again is composed. The score calls for eleven musicians consisting of two singers  (a  baritone  and  an  alto),  a  string  quartet  (two  violins,  viola,  and  cello),  double  bass, mandolin, banjo, guitar, and piano. The mandolin should be a folk style mandolin (either A-model or F-model) rather than a classical mandolin, and the guitar should be outfitted with steel strings and played with a flatpick. By combining folk instruments (guitar, banjo, mandolin) with classical instruments (piano, viola, cello),39 the ensemble offers sonic references to both styles of music. The ensemble, however, also includes an element of continuity, for all the instruments (besides voice) produce sound from vibrating strings.In assembling an ensemble to perform Hard Times Comes Again, I expect to encounter certain challenges. The piece requires three musicians (mandolin, banjo, and guitar) that should be able to play convincingly in the folk and bluegrass styles. In my experience, those musicians who can play in this style and also read traditional notation are less common, though they do exist.  For this reason, I anticipate that these players might learn the music in one of two alternate methods. The first method would involve written notation that utilizes tablature rather than traditional notes, as 39 To be fair, this categorization of folk instruments and classical instruments is overly simplistic, for it does not account for artists such as Bela Fleck or Chris Thile who play Bach on the banjo and mandolin, respectively; nor does it account for artists such as Nancy Blake or Rushad Eggleston, who play folk (and folk-derived) music on the cello. Additionally, this ensemble includes instruments such as violin/fiddle and voice which are commonly found in both styles of music.34shown in Example 1.Most  players  of  the  mandolin,  banjo,  and guitar  who are  comfortable  playing  in  the folk  and bluegrass tradition would be familiar with this notational method, and tablature has the added benefit  of  specifying  where  certain  notes  should  be  played  on  the  fingerboard.  The  standard notation  in  Example  1,  for  instance,  does  not  necessarily  indicate  that  the  figure  should  be performed as a roll,40 whereas that information is clearly conveyed in tablature notation. The other method  would  be  to  have  these  players  be  taught  their  parts  by  ear  which  would  then  be memorized. This may sound daunting at first to a classical musician, but it is a common enough practice  in  the folk  and bluegrass  world.  While  this  method can take considerably  more time, several rock and roll and new-acoustic bands have shown that intricate and complex multi-part compositions can be learned and performed in this way.  Furthermore, in Hard Times Come Again the mandolin, banjo, and guitar parts include sections that allow the players to improvise as they see fit. The  written  notation  offers  a  guide  to  the  general  groove  of  the  music,  and  the  harmony  is additionally notated with chord symbols. Giving the players some liberty to stray from the exact rhythms and voicings  on  the  page may  allow them to  play  what  they  feel  is  a  personal  and authentic expression in the folk or bluegrass style while still coordinating with the more strictly 40 The roll is a technique used in three-finger style banjo playing that is characterized by groups of successive notes played on adjacent strings. This often results in arpeggiated figures, like that in Example 1, though more scalar figures are also possible because of the banjo's tuning scheme.  35notated instruments. The vocalists should also be comfortable singing in a folk style rather than a classical style, and similar issues pertaining to literacy of written notation may arise. In this case, it would be assumed that the singers learn their parts by ear, possibly using recordings as learning tools. For those singers unfamiliar with what singing in a folk style means, I have included instructions in a performance note, however, it is undesirable to perform Hard Times Come Again using singers for whom the folk idiom is foreign territory. It is likely that those vocalists singing in a folk style will not have the capability to project at the same volume as those singers trained in a classical style, and for this reason all the musicians in the ensemble should be amplified. The choice to amplify the singers will allow them to sing in a natural manner, without strain, and achieve a dynamic balance with the ensemble. The amplification of the instrumentalists will help to smooth over any issues of balance between instruments of varying dynamic capabilities, but will also provide the perception of all the sound in the ensemble occupying the same sonic world.413.4 Folk-like formsThe  seven  songs  in  the  cycle  use  a  variety  of  forms  ranging  from  more  simple  two-part arrangements  to  more  elaborately  through-composed  constructions  based  on  thematic development. Though each of the songs blends stylistic elements of folk and classical music, the forms of the songs play a significant role in determining a song's character as belonging more in the 41 Of course, purely acoustic instruments and amplified acoustic instruments have different timbres, and this choice to amplify the musicians in the ensemble will result in what might be characterized as a modern sound rather than a traditional sound. Many ensembles working in the folk and bluegrass style utilize a single microphone approach, which mitigates some of the timbral differences associated with amplification of acoustic instruments. This approach requires  a  keen  sense  of  choreography  among  the  performers,  however,  and  the  stationary  aspect  of  certain instruments  in this ensemble (piano and cello) make this approach unreasonable. 36folk or classical genre. Common features of folk song forms, such as refrains or verses, identify certain songs as more folk-like from a formal perspective. Three songs in the cycle, “It Was Rough Going,” “One of My Father's,” and “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres,” fall into this category, though each also integrates musical characteristics less common to folk music. Two songs, “It Was Rough Going” and “One of My Father's,” have song forms that clearly contain a refrain section (that might be compared to a chorus in pop song structure).42 In both songs, this refrain is the first section of sung music in the piece (making it particularly 'hooky') as well as the last sung section of music, and both songs include the refrain one additional time in the middle of the piece. Both songs also include instrumental introductions, but that of “One of My Father's” is longer and more thematically related to the refrain material. “It Was Rough Going” has a twelve measure  introduction  divided  into  two  sections;  the  first  four  measures  consist  of  chordal punctuations and a unison riff,  while the following eight measures lead into the groove for the upcoming vocal refrain. “One of My Father's,” on the other hand, begins with eleven measures of a pizzicato string figure which sets up an instrumental rendition of the refrain played by the banjo at measure 12.43  Both songs employ melodically contrasting vocal sections that might be compared to a  verse  or  a  bridge  in  pop  song  structure,  though  the  repetition  separated  by  a  chorus  often associated with a verse is not present in either song, as shown in Figure 4.42 By pop song structure, I refer to the more modern song form consisting of chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-chorus rather than the AABA  structure that was so common to the songs of the Tin Pan Alley-era of popular songwriting. 43 The pizzicato string figure recurs in the final three measures of the song, as well as during the refrain at measure 85. It  also appears in an arco version during the last refrain at measure 173.37“Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” also uses a simple form consisting of two alternating parts, one of which has the 'hooky' characteristics analogous to a refrain (or chorus).44 This vocal section, which contains the words that title the song, is the first sung section of the song following a brief instrumental introduction, as shown in Figure 5, much like “It Was Rough Going” and “One of My Father's.”Unlike those songs, however, “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” consists of two alternating sections in 44 The other section provides contrast both harmonically and melodically, and it additionally is more open-ended formally, exhibited by the transitory modulation that occurs in the first occurrence and the extended coda-like second occurrence. 38relative major and minor keys,45 each of which occur only twice.46 This use of alternating sections in relative  key  relationships  is  not  uncommon  in  many  binary  form  folk  songs,  as  previously discussed; however, there are other matters of changing tonal centres in these three songs which run contrary to the folk-like character of their forms.All three of the previously mentioned songs include a change of tonal centre between the initial refrain and the final refrain, which challenges the simplicity of the folk-like forms. Changing tonal centres can be found in folk music; Erynn Marshall's analysis of Phyllis Marks' performance of “Redwing”  is  a  distinct  example  (Marshall  2006:  162).  Marks'  performance  seems to  exhibit  a wandering sense of tonic, however, while the songs in  Hard Times Come Again exhibit the more classical  trait  of  a  goal-oriented harmonic  journey.  “It  Was  Rough Going”  modulates  from the beginning key of A major to the ending key of G major through the use of chords borrowed from the parallel key of A minor, as shown in example 2. 45 Figure 5 uses the terms “refrain” and “verse” for these two alternating sections, although “verse” may be a less than perfect description of the minor key sections.46 The refrain section which begins with the words of the title contains an internal level of repetition such that one interpretation of the song's form might show this section occurring twice in succession (as AA'), in which case this section would be shown to occur four times throughout the entire song.39The G major harmony in measure 59 resolves to D major in the following measure, which might initially appear to be a plagal resolution to a new tonic. The introduction of C major47 in measure 64 begins to cloud that assurance (though also references the borrowed VII chord from the previous key). The appearance of the supertonic, A minor, in measure 70 finally leads to a half cadence in measure 71 that solidifies G major as the new key.“One of My Father's” also exhibits an ending tonal centre that lies a major second away from 47 The dominant seventh quality of the C major harmony here is more bluesy than functional. 40the beginning tonal centre, though it lies a step higher rather than lower. The modulatory journey in “One of My Father's,” from D major to E major, is also more circuitous than that of “It Was Rough Going,” arriving by way of a stopover in the key of A major (closely related to both D and E major), as shown in Example 3. The modulation uses harmonic vocabulary that might sound out of place in a folk song, namely a major triad built on the third scale degree. In measure 97, this F-sharp major chord acts as a half-step approach to the diatonic G major chord in measure 98, and the phrase concludes with a clear half cadence. This half-step chordal motion is repeated in measures 105-106, but this time followed by a B minor chord (whose mediant relationship to the G major chord is related to the earlier D 41major/F-sharp major relationship), which acts as a pivot chord leading to what appears to be a half cadence in F-sharp minor. The new 'tonic' of F-sharp minor is deceptive, however, as it functions instead as the submediant in A major, which emerges as the new key. Furthermore, the blurred sense of mode in the new key is deepened by deceptive resolutions in measures 116, 126, and 142. The ambiguous nature of the F-sharp minor harmony is also utilized in the next modulation where it acts as a pivot chord leading to a half cadence in the new key of E major, as shown in Example 4.The change of tonal centre in the fifth song, “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres,” from C major to E-flat major involves distantly related keys, however, the two halves of the song consist of a refrain in the major key (C and E-flat) followed by contrasting material in the relative minor key (A and  C),  such  that  the  beginning  and  ending  keys  have  a  parallel  relationship.  The  harmonic limitations of the banjo place additional importance on these particular tonal centres; only three major keys (C major, G major, and E-flat major) can be played on the banjo that allow the drone string to function as part of the tonic triad. Because of these limitations, the use of the banjo's drone string shapes much of the drama in this song, both harmonically and thematically. Harmonically, the  drone  string  creates  a  consonant  sonority  in  the  opening  key,  builds  tension  during  the modulatory transition as it is included in harmonically ambiguous diminished chords (made all the more ambiguous by the inclusion of the drone string), and finally delivers a sense of release when it 42emerges as the harmonious major third in the new tonic triad. Thematically, the banjo part is based on the role of the drone string in the clawhammer style, and that thumb stroke is doubled with harmonics in the violins, viola, and cello. Furthermore, the high energy clawhammer rhythm does not simply start and stop; instead, it emerges at the beginning of the song and dissolves at the end of the song. Throughout these multiple sections of varied tonality and texture, the droning G-string is a constant fixture in the music. “It Was Rough Going,” “One of My Father's,” and “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” each use formal structures that reference the folk genre. Melodically memorable, repeated refrains exhibit an essential  characteristic  for  folk  music:  the  ability  to  invite  listeners  to  participate  after  only  a minimal  number  of  hearings.48 These  songs,  however,  also  integrate  a  harmonic  journey,  a distinguishing component of many classical forms. While the tonal centres shift between repeated refrains, they are prepared through smooth modulations. As a result, a listener may be able to sing along to each refrain, not necessarily knowing that the actual pitches they sing are different. In this way, these three songs show a blending of folk and classical structures in which the most salient features are folk-like.3.5 Less Folk-like formsThe remaining four songs in the cycle use forms that allude to folk music much more subtly or not at all. “I Was Relieved” and “We Had So Little” are organized around thematic development and transformation. This formal trait, combined with each song's placement in the cycle, facilitates the 48 I have noticed some folk music audiences for whom I have performed that have begun singing along as soon as the middle of the first refrain in a song, even when never having heard the song before. This is one of the most joyful aspects of folk music to me.43perception of dramatic climax that occurs within the cycle at these points. “This Is What Happened” and “I Had a Terrible Guilt” illustrate more elusive forms. While they both utilize repetition as a method for establishing a sense of  cohesiveness,  this  repetition does not function as a folk-like refrain in an invitation to participate.  Perhaps the most folk-like of the four above-mentioned songs is “This Is What Happened,” as the repeated material most resembles a refrain. This sung material begins the song and is then immediately repeated. The same thematic material ends the piece, but in this occurrence it is played by the viola and cello. Unlike a true refrain, however, it never appears in full throughout the song, only  materializing  as  fragments.  This  fragmentation  is  a  distinguishing  feature  of  the  song  in general, as each singer's narrative is broken into pieces, which are interrupted by segments of the refrain, as shown in Example 5. 44In this way, the form of “This Is What Happened” alludes to folk song form, but in actuality it shows a deconstruction of that stylistic form. This deconstruction directly addresses questions of memory and truth,  particularly  when linked with the lyrics  of  the  'refrain':  “This  I  remember. 45Because this is what happened.” As Alan Lomax wrote, “folk song, like any serious art, deals with realities” (Lomax 1966: ix), but this song seeks to propose the idea that our memories are never as clear as our initial experiences. Past realities are always seen through the lenses of present realities, and this recollection is what allows for a diversity of realities to be expressed throughout the cycle. Not only was the Great Depression experienced in a variety of ways, but differences in experiences after the the Great Depression have effected the manner in which the era has been remembered by various observers. One  the  more  underrepresented  narratives,  at  least  in  stereotypes,  of  life  during  the Depression is examined in “I Had a Terrible Guilt.” This departure is addressed through musical characteristics such as harmonic language and orchestration that will be discussed later, but form also plays a role. The form is much more nebulous than that of a folk song. Though repetition of sections does occur, they occur with much more variation than might be found in a song form (necessitating the more classical  nomenclature of  A, A',  and A” rather than refrain),  as  seen in Figure 6. When the opening lyrics, “I had a terrible guilt,” repeat at measure 43, not only have the actual pitches changed, but a crucial interval has also changed. In the second version the melody appears to outline an E-flat major harmony where the original statement outlined a G minor harmony, as seen in Example 6. 46This alteration is  different than the harmonic changes in the above mentioned folk-like refrains since the melodic variation overtly effects the emotional characteristic of the phrase.  Furthermore, this  modification  is  more  salient  than  a  repetition  that  maintains  the  same  melodic  intervals transposed to a different tonal centre. In this way, the form of “I Had a Terrible Guilt” relies less on simple, exact repetition and more on development of materials.“I Was Relieved” and “We Had So Little” are also both typified by development of materials, and this aspect of each piece helps to contribute to the aforementioned sense of dramatic climax that occurs in these two songs.  Exhibiting a broad arch form (ABA'), “I Was Relieved” employs one of the basic forms in the cycle even though the song is the second longest in the cycle. The length of each section along with the limited amount of  material  presented gives the piece an expansive quality  despite  the  simplicity  of  the  formal  structure.  The  A sections  are  characterized  by  a harmonic  stasis,  and  in  the  opening  section  the  momentum  is  pulled  along  by  two  slowly developing elements. The first element is the melodic material sung by the voices, the full lyrical phrase emerging only one word at a time and marked by a considerable amount of repetition. The singers enter at measure 12 with three repetitions of the single word “I” before the phrase is allowed to  move  forward  with  “I  was”  at  measure  17.  Not  until  measure  69  is  the  lyrical  sentiment expressed in its entirety. The second aspect of slow development in this section is the interlocking rhythms  in  the  mandolin,  banjo,  guitar,  and  bass  parts,  which  begin  in  the  first  measure  as 47simultaneously struck chords. These chordal iterations begin to alternate by measure 15, and at measure 25 an interlocking groove is created from single notes in each part. Throughout the course of  the  A section,  this  rhythmic  structure  becomes  more  active,  and  the  harmony,  though  still statically centred around the pitch G, becomes more colourful with added tones.  The B section, which arrives at measure 86, contrasts with respect to harmonic progression, rhythmic material, and melodic presentation. While the mandolin, banjo, guitar, and bass maintain their collective role as a rhythm section, their individual roles are more self-sustaining and less reliant on the interplay of their rhythms to create the overall groove. Equally self-sustaining is the clarity  with  which  each  of  these  instruments  articulates  the  harmony  of  the  moment,  which progresses in large blocks ranging from six to twelve measures in length. The singers contrast with their earlier melodic presentation as well,  singing in a homophonic texture which progresses to octave doubling for the final phrase.   The return of the A section at measure 117 brings back the lyrical material from earlier in the  piece  as  well  as  the  static  harmony  centred  around  the  pitch  G.  The  vocalists  begin monophonically,  but  by  measure  126  they  are  alternating  iterations  of  the  phrase.  In  the instrumental ensemble both the sustained chords and the chordal alternations of the first A section return. Unlike the building up of the opening section, however, here the dynamic and dramatic characteristics create a fading away. This development of, departure from, and return to the musical materials in this piece create a dramatic journey far larger in scope than other songs in the cycle with  more  complex  forms.  In  part,  the  simplicity  of  form  allows  for  this  journey  to  take  on importance through the elongation of  each section in the temporal  realm. Because the material 48evolves slowly, it need not travel very far to feel like it has arrived. This sense of arrival is what helps to give the song a greater sense of dramatic climax in the overall form of the song-cycle.Similarly, “We Had So Little” undergoes a  musical journey within its form that gives it a greater sense of dramatic importance in the cycle. Unlike “I Was Relieved,” however, the form in “We Had So Little” has many parts that are tied together through the recurrence of two important themes. The two themes occur as the first and last sections that are sung, but their placement in the overall development of the piece gives quite different dramatic functions to their appearances. One theme offers a sense of familiarity while the other gives a sense of foreshadowing. This duality of repetition within the song along with the relative length within the cycle helps “We Had So Little” to deliver the emotional climax that brings closure to the cycle as a whole.The song begins with an introduction that carries more dramatic weight than any other in the cycle in part because of its length, twenty-six measures, and in part because of its harmonic motion, moving from E-flat minor to B-major. After arriving in the key of B-major, the first theme is presented by the baritone at measure 27 and is immediately repeated at measure 35 by both voices. This immediate repetition along with the repetition within the section's phrase structure gives this material the recognizable quality of a refrain, even though only one additional repetition occurs later in the song. When that repetition does occur, at measure 121, the first half of the phrase is not sung; instead it is played by the violins. Though the voices sing only the last phrase of the section, the occurrence has the recognizable qualities of a fully periodic event due to the great amount of repetition during the initial appearance of the material.  This section at measure 121 is also notable because the two repeating themes of the song are 49heard simultaneously. While the violins play the theme that matches the words “we had so little money in the bank,” the viola and cello play a variation on the final theme in the song. This ending theme is first heard at measure 48 in the string quartet, though the melodic line is masked by its being stated once in each instrument in an overlapping manner. At measure 88, the opening motive of  the  theme is  presented  in  a  harmonized  version  in  the  string  quartet,  but  it  dissolves  into counterpoint that again hides its totality. By its appearance at measure 121, the musical seed has been planted twice but never cultivated. The two themes sounding simultaneously elicit both senses of familiarity and foreshadowing since one theme has been heard only once (or twice, counting the immediate  repetition)  before  and  the other,  never  heard  in  full,  has  set  up  the  expectation  of development. Immediately  following  the  vocalists'  reiteration  of  the  opening  theme,  a  rhythmically energetic section gives the most overt statement of the final theme, at measure 135, in the piano and mandolin. When the theme is finally sung at measure 165, the tune is fully recognizable to listeners, and the coupling of lyrics with the music delivers an additional significant layer. Furthermore, this realization of the theme musically illustrates the lyrical allusion to a change “in point of view,” the words  that  are  sung  as  the  orchestration  shifts.  The  song's  form,  which  arrives  at  this  crucial moment  after  several  modulations  involving two repeated themes intertwined with other  non-repeating sections gives the song an understated grandiosity that can bring closure to a song-cycle examining the  historic struggles of hard times with the simple statement: “I just want one happy life, that's it.”503.6 Harmonic LanguageWhile  the  harmonic  language  used  throughout  Hard  Times  Come  Again shows  a  variety  of approaches towards vertical alignment, there are some commonalities that are prevalent in most, if not all, of the songs. Triadic and tonal chords are frequent, though they do not always progress in an order customary to common-practice harmonic theory. Moreover, added colour tones are often included  in  these  triadic  harmonies.  Sometimes  the  resulting  chord  clearly  appears  to  fit  into concepts of extended tertian harmony, while other times extended tertian harmony is implied but not fully realized (like many jazz voicings).  On occasion, vertical  alignments are based on non-tertian intervals, although in these instances elements of triadic harmony are often juxtaposed. Some of the clearest  examples of simple triadic harmony appear during moments in the score where the rhythm section is given instructions to “ad lib as desired.” The first refrain in “One of My Father's” uses only tonic, subdominant, and dominant triads, as shown in Example 7.51The melody sung by the alto is anchored in chord tones, and nearly all the non-chord tones could be easily assigned common-practice labels. In this way, the vertical alignment of pitches in this section of the song alludes overtly to the harmonic language of folk music. One aspect of this harmonic movement that does not strictly follow the conventions of common-practice progression, however, is the interplay of dominant and predominant space.  The dominant harmony is followed by the subdominant not once,  but twice,  and this harmonic movement functions to delay the ultimate resolution to the tonic at the end of the phrase. Shortly  following  the  passage  illustrated  in  Example  7,  one  can  find  the  use  of  triadic language that would be much more rare in folk music, if found at all. In measure 37, a major triad built on the third scale degree is  used;  and,  this  triad contains the raised fifth scale degree,  an uncommon pitch in folk music. This harmonic peculiarity was discussed previously in the context of the modulation shown in Example 3, and some parallels exist between the two occurrences (m. 37 and m. 97). In both instances, the third scale degree is used as a stepwise approach in the bass line to the fourth scale degree.  In measure 38, however, the fourth scale degree appears as part of a supertonic chord in first inversion, as shown in Example 8, rather than the subdominant triad found in measure 98.52The stepwise bass line continues upwards becoming a leading tone to the dominant chord, and the diminished triad carries  a  common-practice  secondary function.  This  passage points  towards a hybridity  of  styles,  the  chromatic  harmony,  indicative  of  classical  music,  pushing  the  diatonic boundaries commonly found in folk music. Extended tertian harmony is also used habitually throughout the song cycle, and a notably folk-like  occurrence  of  extended  tertian  harmony  can  be  found  in  “It  Was  Rough  Going.”  A dominant seventh harmony in measure 31 is adorned with a raised ninth (spelled as a minor third), and the tonic resolution in the following measure includes a lowered seventh. These non-diatonic tones allude to blues music, a significant influence on the honky-tonk and early rock and roll music that  inform  much  of  this  song's  musical  style.  Other  examples  of  extended  tertian  harmony resemble  voicings  commonly  found  in  jazz  music,  which  can  also  be  seen  as  an  evolutionary offspring of the blues style. Each of the four triadically based harmonies that appear in the B section of “I Was Relieved” includes added tones that can be interpreted as harmonic extensions regardless of their placement in the vertical structure of the chord voicing, as shown in Example 9.This particular section of the song, with its large blocks of 'jazzy' harmonies, exhibits the harmonic characteristics of modal jazz music,49 albeit in a more diatonic way that might suggest a hybridity 49 John Coltrane's “Impressions,” Miles Davis' “So What,” Freddie Hubbard's “Little Sunflower,” and Herbie Hancock's 53with folk music.  Several places in the song cycle exhibit the use of  a specific added tone within a traidic landscape that cannot be explained by the previous discussion. These instances are characterized by the instrumental limitations of the banjo, which employs a fifth string shorter than the other four. Because this string is not as readily stopped as the other four strings, the pitch of that string (in this piece, and in most banjo tunings, G) functions as a drone in most banjo music. This drone note plays a significant role in “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres,” which, as previously discussed, utilizes the clawhammer  technique  as  a  thematically  unifying  feature.  In  many  instances,  this  pitch  (G) functions within the diatonic realm and appears as an added tone in the harmony of the moment. This use of the drone pitch can be clearly seen in measure 40, where G becomes the ninth of the F-major harmony, as shown in Example 10.  Elsewhere, the drone pitch clashes with the harmony of the moment. In measure 91, the G-natural of the short  string clashes with the G-flat  in the A-diminished seventh harmony, adding to the dissonant tension in that section of the song.  There are other examples of  vertical  alignment in the song-cycle that stray further from triadic tonal harmony, and these vary in their method of organization. One example of non-triadic “Maiden Voyage” are just a few examples of jazz compositions that fall into this modal category. 54harmony that is constructed from triads can be found in “This Is What Happened.”50 The formal structure of the song, as previously discussed, is fragmented, and the piano's role in the piece is to blur  the  seams  between  those  fragments.  In  measure  65,  for  example,  the  piano  plays  an arpeggiated figure constructed of a B-major triad, a G-minor triad, and an F-sharp-minor triad (with the final note blurred by a half-step neighbouring tone),51 as shown in Example 11. The section before this figure resides clearly in F-major, while the section that follows sounds more vaguely, but perhaps most saliently, like C-major.52 The vagueness of tonal centre in the following section is caused in part by the fact that the voice and the guitar are operating in two different keys, and this juxtaposition simply adds to the sensation of  fragmentation that exists throughout the song. Elsewhere  in  the  song-cycle  juxtapositions  of  non-tonal  harmony  are  used  to  create  a musical  environment  that  sounds  very  unlike  folk  music.  This  sound-world  can  be  heard throughout “I Had a Terrible Guilt,” and it alludes to the stereotypically imagined distance between the 'folk' of Great Depression and the narrative of this song. As exhibited in the opening measures, 50 Another example of vertical alignment worth mentioning in “This Is What Happened” is the concurrent sounding of major and minor thirds and sevenths in the introduction. This is a direct musical reference to the research of Erynn Marshall discussed in Chapter 2.51 One could also hear a D-major triad in this construction since the D from the G-minor triad and the F-sharp and A from the F-sharp-minor triad are repeated. 52 Besides the C mixolydian scale from which the vocal melody is constructed in this section, the chromatically ascending banjo chords and the guitar's leading tones, to A, also blur the sense of tonality. Nevertheless, given the clear reference to the opening thematic material, the vocal melody points the listener's ear toward C-major.55the  piano part  is  typified by low octaves  in the left  hand and pandiatonically  moving chords, constructed of a second atop a third, in the right hand. The shape and density of these right hand chords develop throughout the song, and the piano's vertical arrangements are often referenced, though not doubled, in the violins and viola. Throughout the piece, the mandolin weaves between the vocal melody and the motivic use of rising sevenths, as shown in Example 12, and this motivic use of sevenths often clashes with the pandiatonic landscape in the other instruments. Though the harmonic language used in “I Had a Terrible Guilt” implies a distant relationship to the other songs in  the cycle,  references  to  tonal  construction are present.  In  the final  measure,  for example,  the mandolin uses the rising seventh motif to outline an E-flat-minor harmony. These moments of tonal reference ensure that the song's distance is not too far removed as to be excluded from the greater narrative.The harmonic language used throughout the song-cycle is generally consistent within each song, but varies across the seven songs. Despite the diverse approaches to vertical organization, there are overarching references to tonal construction, which helps to disclose the influence of folk music.  Also  clearly  present,  however,  are  harmonic  arrangements  that  betray  the  influence  of classical  and  jazz  music.  Combined  with  the  text,  this  variety  of  harmonic  language  aids  in expressing the multifaceted narrative of the era.563.7 Rhythmic TreatmentAs with other stylistic elements used in the song cycle, rhythmic elements in the various songs show influence of both folk music and classical music. Many of the songs are predominantly in 4/4 time, a metre that is common in American folk music, and several of the songs use the metrical device of 'crookedness' that gives many folk songs rhythmic interest. Most of the songs use the folk-like trait of  a  constant  pulse  from  first  note  to  last,  although  two  songs  employ  classical  performance techniques of  sectional  tempo changes and/or ritardando.  Additionally,  other songs use mixed metre in a fashion that would be uncharacteristic in folk music, but quite at home in contemporary classical music. Two songs that are most influenced by American folk rhythms are “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” and “It Was Rough Going.” Both songs have rather fast tempi, at 184 and 152 beats per minute,  respectively,  and  both  songs  maintain  an  unchanging  tempo  from  beginning  to  end. Additionally, both songs use a metre of 4/4 with occasional 'crooked' phrases. The refrain in “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” illustrates a clear example of an asymmetrical phrase structure that might be called 'crooked' by a folk musician. By examining the grouping structure of the refrain, three phrases can be found with lengths of thirty-two, thirty-two, and twenty-four beats, as shown in Example 13. 57Each of these phrases is also divided asymmetrically. The twenty-four beat phrase can be grouped into two groupings of eight beats and sixteen beats.  Each of the thirty-two beat phrases can be divided into two groupings of eighteen and fourteen beats, and each of these groups can be further broken into two groupings of eight beats and either ten beats or six beats. Through this analysis, several layers of asymmetry are apparent in the phrase structure of the refrain, and, specifically, what is notated as mixed metre is the source of the 'crooked' quality of the phrase. “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” also shows folk influence though its rhythmic treatment of the banjo and guitar material. The banjo plays in a clawhammer style throughout the song, and this results in a rhythmic pattern marked by a quarter note (or two eighth notes slurred) on beats one and three, and two eighth notes on beats two and four (the second of which is the short drone string).  The  compositional  application  of  this  clawhammer  material,  however,  reveals  classical influence as well, for the rhythmic pattern does not simply begin and end as it might in a folk song. Instead, the rhythmic pattern emerges, develops into the characteristic clawhammer rhythm, and 58then dissolves into its elements as the piece concludes. The notated guitar part also reveals folk rhythms characterized by bass notes in half notes with the remainder of the two beats filled by various combinations of eighth and quarter note strums.  This rhythmic pattern,  like the banjo's clawhammer material, emerges rather than begins. Unlike the banjo, however, the guitarist is given the freedom to improvise an accompanimental role throughout much of the piece, since the guitar's material is more bass oriented and less melodically oriented than the banjo's. Though a folk-like  'crookedness'  can be seen in the phrase  structures of  “It  Was Rough Going,” the rhythmic treatment of this song owes more to the honky-tonk and early rock and roll music that evolved out of the folk music of the southern United States. The piano, guitar, and bass parts show quite literal rhythmic influences from the genre, while the parts for banjo and mandolin, which were not commonly found in early rock and roll or honky-tonk music, are given invented rhythmic ideas based upon the genre. The bass and guitar parts are typified by a two measure pattern  that  shows  syncopated  elements,  and  the  downbeat  of  the  two  measures  is  usually articulated on the beat,  though occasional  anticipations  that  reinforce  the melodic  rhythm also occur. The piano part borrows from the constantly repeated eighth notes found in the playing of Jerry  Lee  Lewis  or  Little  Richard,  and  the  mandolin  takes  its  rhythmic  conception  from  this influence as well. The banjo part, marked by a hemiola pattern often using the minor and major third, brings to mind the playing of honky-tonk pianists such as Fats Domino and Jelly Roll Morton. A slightly more complex rhythmic irregularity that takes its influence from folk-music can be found  in  “This  Is  What  Happened.”  The  opening  section,  which  emulates  fiddle-song  in  its instrumentation  and  vertical  arrangement,  also  uses  elements  of  phrase  elongation  and 59compression, as discussed in the research of Ruth Crawford Seeger. As shown in Example 14, this section can be broken into three phrases, each of which would be four measures of equal length if symmetrically arranged. Instead of this more regular phrase structure, however, beats are added or subtracted at phrase boundaries.  The  first  phrase  adds  two  beats,  which  permits  the  singer  to  pause  on  the  word “remember” before taking a breath and continuing. The second phrase subtracts a beat,  as if to stress the importance of the next phrase. That final phrase adds one beat to the measure of rest that concludes it, allowing the solemn sentiment of the statement to sink in. Further  irregular  rhythmic  treatment  in  “This  Is  What  Happened,”  however,  betrays classical music influence as well. Apart from the opening section, mixed metre is used elsewhere in the  song  to  create  an  unpredictability  that  aids  in  the  blurring  of  seams  between fragmented sections.  Moreover,  tempo changes,  which are  quite  rare  in  folk  music,  are used to  propel the 60dramatic momentum out of the introduction and to ease the dramatic motion into the coda. Though most of the songs in the cycle utilize a steady tempo, brief uses of ritardando can also be seen in “One of My Father's.” These examples, along with mixed metre used in  “I Had a Terrible Guilt,” “I Was Relieved,” and “We Had So Little” show clear influences of both folk and classical music in the rhythmic approach to Hard Times Come Again.3.8 Melodic and Linear TreatmentIt is important to mention that while the compositional style of the song cycle is influenced by American folk music, there are no direct quotations of folk song in the piece. All the melodies are original creations, though many of them may evoke aspects of traditional repertoire. Like most folk music, many of the melodies in Hard Times Come Again share an easy singability. Melodic intervals larger than a perfect fourth are rare, although fifths and sixths do occur on occasion,53 and dissonant melodic intervals are generally avoided. The refrain to “It Was Rough Going” provides an excellent example of melodic treatment that is particularly folk influenced. As exhibited in Example 15, the range of the melodic line is relatively narrow; it spans only a minor seventh, reaching to the fourth scale degree at its upper limit and the fifth scale degree at its lower limit. 53 The third phrase in the refrain of “One of My Father's” is marked by a rising major sixth, for example. 61Melodic intervals of seconds and thirds are prevalent, excepting the fifth in measure 14 and the fourth in measure 16 that occur between phrases. All of the pitches, with the exception of C-natural, are not only diatonic, but pentatonic. The C-natural functions as a blue note, and this quality is reinforced in measure 14 by the slide from the C-natural to C-sharp. A similar slide can be seen in measure 16 between F-sharp and E. Analogous folk-like treatment of melodies, including restricted range and pitch material, use of slides and scoops, and use of blue notes to colour diatonicism, is also apparent in “This Is What Happened,” “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres,” “One of My Father's,” and “We Had So Little.”Elsewhere in the song-cycle, a departure from some of these folk-like melodic characteristics are used specifically to confront that voice of the 'folk.' As has been discussed previously, “I Had a Terrible Guilt” challenges this sentiment, and the treatment of melody in the song follows suit. While the vocal melodies do generally lie within a diatonic structure, the use of larger, less stepwise, melodic intervals occurs more often than in any other song in the cycle. Furthermore, melodic sixths are used motivically in the vocal theme and a melodic tritone also appears in this vocal melody. These intervallic traits might make this song less immediately singable by a large number of people, distancing its melodic style from that of folk music. Instrumentally, the use of a motive constructed of  successive  sevenths  in  the  mandolin,  previously  discussed  in  reference  to  its  harmonic 62implications, also contributes to this melodic distance from folk music. Melodic treatment in “I Was Relieved” also reveals more significant influence from classical music than from folk music, particularly in the opening A section. The melodic material is largely repetitive and fragmented; and, rather than being presented immediately, it slowly develops into the melodic statement that is  heard at  measure 69.  Once the melodic statement is  sung by the baritone, it is repeated exactly by the alto (although an octave higher) before the two voices overlay presentations  of  the  melody.  As  the  voices  deliver  the  melodic  statement,  another  classically influenced melodic element is superimposed; the string quartet plays a gesture constructed from a descending octatonic scale. Later in the piece, the voices reprise a variation of the melodic statement that  occurs  first  at  measure  69,  but  here  the  overlapping  structure  is  less  regular.  It  is  this unpredictability of the melodic structure that speaks most to its being at odds with folk music, for folk  music  often  has  predictable  qualities  in  order  to  encourage  a  participatory  environment. Whereas  many  moments  in  Hard  Times  Come  Again are  composed  with  consideration  for  this communal aspect,  other moments  seek to  allow a more personal,  individual expression for the performers. 3.9 Texture and CounterpointThough the textures vary from song to song, a melody-dominated homophonic texture is frequent throughout  much of  the  cycle  with a  vocal  melody accompanied by  a rhythmically  active  and harmonically supportive framework in the plucked strings. The bowed strings are often included with sustained tones and less often with rhythmically propulsive motives. At points in which no 63voice is singing at all, the bowed strings often take on the melodic role, many times in a thickened line texture.  An important  texture that takes  its  influence directly from folk  music is  the loose doubling of the vocal melody by certain instrumentalists,  particularly in the clawhammer banjo material as well as the fiddle-like material in the strings. More polyphonic counterpoint does occur on occasion, but polyphony is not the defining characteristic of the compositional style in  Hard Times Come Again. The most transparent textures that occur in the song cycle are monophonic, and these occur with only limited frequency in the piece. One instance can be seen in the opening to “This Is What Happened,” where the alto melody is doubled at pitch by the viola. When the baritone enters at measure 14, this voice is in turn doubled at pitch by the cello. A particularly striking characteristic of the monophonic texture in these two phrases is that all the voices are not always sounding the same pitch, as shown in Example 16. This phenomenon occurs in part because of the previously discussed co-existence of  major and minor  thirds  and  seventh,  which  emulates  West  Virginian  fiddle-song.  These  imprecision  of 64doubling also occurs, however, because the 'monophonic' lines are composed with rhythms that are at times slightly askew from each other. This looseness of rhythm is intended to complement the looseness of pitch alignment such that the result portrays four (or two) independent interpretations of the same monophonic line occurring simultaneously. Other instances of monophony are more conventional, as in “It Was Rough Going” at measure 106, as seen in Example 17.Here  the  entire  ensemble  presents  a  tutti  line  in  three  octaves,  and  the  monophonic  texture contributes to the loud dynamic in bringing an energetic and exciting closing to the song.  Homophonic  textures  are  much  more  common  throughout  the  song-cycle  than  are monophonic textures, and one example of a homophonic texture that takes its influence directly from folk music can be found in “We Had So Little.” Early in the piece, at measure 27, the baritone presents thematic material that is immediately repeated by the alto at measure 35. When the alto 65enters, the baritone sings a harmony line in the same rhythm and mostly similar contour. As shown in Example 18,  this  homophonic  texture  between the two  voices  is  particularly  notable  for  its abundance of perfect  intervals,  often approached in a manner contrary to conventional rules of counterpoint, which give bluegrass singing what many call a 'high and lonesome sound.'   One of the more thematic uses of  polyphony occurs in the same song with some of the same material utilized in similar ways. At measure 121, the refrain like material that was sung by the two voices at measure 35 is presented by the two violins, as shown in Example 19. 66A homophonic texture with many perfect intervals between the two violins resembles the vocal material in measure 35. Added to the texture at measure 121, however, is a second melodic line in the viola and cello; this melodic material foreshadows the final thematic presentation in the voices at measure 165. At measure 121, as elsewhere in the piece, contrapuntal rules governing avoidance of similar or parallel motion towards perfect intervals are largely ignored. Not to be misinterpreted as a disregard for the sense of independent line, this more loose treatment of contrapuntal writing gives the music a character of what Doc Watson calls “country counterpoint” (Watson).Two unique textures that reveal  influence of vocally derived folk accompaniment can be found in the banjo part  to “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” and the viola part to “This Is What Happened.”  Both  instances  involve  the  instrument  loosely  doubling  the  vocal  melody  with rhythmic embellishment characteristic of a folk style playing technique. In the refrain to “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres” at measure 37, the banjo plays a unison doubling with the alto melody. Because the vocal melody is sung to a speech-like rhythmic pattern and the clawhammer technique is subject to rhythmic limitations, the melodic pitches do not always align, as exhibited in Example 20. 67In measure 37, for instance, the melody changes pitch from E to F on the second half of the third beat, which allows the banjo to articulate this pitch at the same time as the singer by utilizing a hammer-on. In the following measure, however, the vocal melody changes from A to G on beat four, a strum stroke in clawhammer style, and the banjo articulates the pitch change half a beat earlier. In a  similar,  but  idiomatically  unique  way,  the  viola  adds  the  rhythmic  drive  of  shuffle  bowing technique to  the loose  doublings  with the baritone melody in  “This  Is  What  Happened.”  One occurrence of this texture can be seen at measure 106, and in this instance the viola doubles the baritone melody at an octave above. These two instances show how textures throughout the song cycle are generally motivated by rhythmic considerations. At times this condition results in the loose 'country counterpoint' that has been discussed above, and at times this rhythmic motivation results in an interlocking groove. These grooves  take on a  variety  of  characters,  from the rocking honky-tonk of  “It  Was  Rough Going” to the bluegrassy two step of “One of My Father's.” At other times the rhythmic grooves are more pulsating in a reference to minimalism, as in “I Was Relieved,” or more ethereal, as in the high strings in “Three-Hundred-Twenty Acres.” This discussion of texture, then, reiterates a prevailing concept in the discussion of form and style throughout the song-cycle—the concept of diversity. 68Chapter 4: Closing Thoughts4.1 An Aesthetic StatementAs an artist and as a musician, my primary concern is that of honest expression. Originality for the sake of newness can seem contrived, but by accessing each of our own unique wells of personal experience any artist can be original by being personal. The technological age makes an immense amount of shared information, both musical and otherwise, available to anyone. This access to ideas (artistic, political, philosophical, and economic) from around the world can begin to blur cultural boundaries  and elevate  the  importance of  the  individual  experience,  though as  James  Clifford points out, “persistent hope for the reinvention of difference risks downplaying the destructive, homogenizing effects of global economic and cultural centralization” (Clifford 1988: 15). It is all the more important in the face of this “cultural gray out,” as Alan Lomax calls it, to draw on personal authenticity of expression in art, rather than newness for newness' sake, in order to avoid “the smog of the phoney” (Lomax 2003: 285). It  is  my intention in  composing  Hard Times  Come  Again to  create  a  piece  of  music  that expresses a personal voice based upon my own musical experiences. The musical style of the piece might be described as metrical,  pulsed,  generally tonal,  and largely homophonic.  Alternately,  it could be described as 'folky' or even 'poppy,' and in the current musical landscape these labels could lead some to write the piece off as pedestrian. It is important to consider, though, that “a musical device  becomes  banal when it  is  borrowed,  but  not  earned”  (Scrutton  1997:  482).  Through my musical experience as an insider in both the culture of North American folk music and the culture of classical music, I trust that I have earned the permission to use these musical devices as my own 69personal expression in an honest and meaningful way. The enigma tangled up in the concept of authentic expression is that authenticity can often only be determined by the creator of the expression. The observer cannot fully parse the creator's intention, and so the observer can only guess as to the level of authentic expression. Interpretation is therefore equally if not more important than intention; after all, “aesthetic interest . . . is an interest in appearances: its object is . . . the revealed presence of the world—the world as it is encountered in our  experience”  (Scrutton  1997:  5).  Consequently,  it  is  also  my  intention  to  create  a  musical composition that intertwines the aesthetic of classical music with that of folk music. I, unfortunately, can only own my intention and not others' interpretation of the work, and so I can only express my hopes for how the work might be interpreted. I hope that the music is immediately graspable on a first listen, but that subsequent listenings continue to illuminate deeper connections. I hope that a listener might be invited to experience the piece in enraptured silence, but be equally comfortable tapping their feet and humming along. In short, I hope that the music will speak to an elite with a language of an everyman, and I hope that the music will speak eloquently to everyone.  In 1945, nearly seventy years before I began composing Hard Times Come Again, the folklorist A.L. Lloyd wrote:“Till recently it always seemed there was a clash between what was cultured and what was traditional, and it was reckoned that culture would win and the traditional would die out. Now it is not so clear, and it really looks as though there may be a blending of the two kinds. Each has something the other needs.” (Lloyd 1945: 17)As shown by the music of  some the previously discussed artists,  the blending to which Lloyd referred has continued into the next century. This era where genre distinction is less important than 70ever, from an aesthetic perspective,54 is the era in which I live as an artist. The lines in the sand between classical music, folk music, popular music, jazz music, rock music, and electronic music are being washed away with each new performance, as musicians of many genres continue to explore the musical expanse readily available to them in the information age. Similar blending can be seen in  other  art  forms  as  well;  novels  have  been  written  in  poetic  verse,  paintings  have  three dimensional protrusions. The word “dramedy” is a widely accepted term referring to a hybrid of comedy and drama among television programming. Hybridity is a defining characteristic of the twenty-first century so far, though I wish that  Hard Times Come Again  be categorized as neither classical music, folk music, nor a hybrid of the two, but simply as music. 4.2 Coming AgainAn  unusual  thing  happened  during  the  writing  of  this  piece:  the  price  of  gasoline  dropped dramatically. In January 2015, the global price of oil was roughly half of what it was only six months before (Blatchford 2015). In my new home of Canada, the national economy is heavily impacted by the price of oil, and some economists have issued less than rosy predictions for the near future. With uncertain prosperity ahead, the lessons of the Great Depression appear to be quite relevant still. Hard times, it seems, come again and again and again.54 Though certainly not from the economic perspective of anyone seeking to market or advertise music.71References“An Interview with Dvorak.” 1893. Musical Standard, Vol. 45, Issue 1512, pp. 72-73.Averill, Gage. 2003. “Cantometrics and Cultural Equality: The Academic Years” in Ronald D. Cohen, ed., Alan Lomax: Selected Writings 1934-1997. New York: Routledge.Beckerman, Michael Brim. 1994. Janacek as Theorist. Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press.Blatchford, Andy. January 26, 2015. “TD Bank slashes Canadian economic outlook over low oil, foresees second rate cut.” Vancouver Sun. http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Bank+cuts+economic+forecast+predicts+another+rate/10760985/story.html (last accessed January 27, 2015).Bureau of Labor Statistics. 2012. “BLS Spotlight on Statistics: the recession of 2007-2009.” http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2012/recession/pdf/recession_bls_spotlight.pdf (last accessed November 25, 2014).Canadian Folk Music Awards. “Nominees.” http://www.folkawards.ca/nominees/ (last accessed December 12, 2014).Child, Francis James, ed. 1864. English and Scottish Ballads. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company.Clifford, James. 1988.  The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth-Century Ethnography, Literature, and Art. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Conway, Cecelia. 1995. African Banjo Echoes in Appalachia: A Study of Folk Traditions. Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press. Crawford Seeger, Ruth.  1941.  “Preface” in John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax, eds., Our Singing Country: A Second Volume of American Ballads and Folk Songs. New York: The MacMillan Company.Crist, Elizabeth B. 2003. “Aaron Copland and the Popular Front,” in Journal of the American Musicological Society, Vol. 56, No. 2, pp. 409-465.Elwood, Paul. “Composer/Performer,” personal website. http://www.paul-elwood.com/live/ (last accessed December 20, 2014).Elwood, Paul. 2011. Stanley Kubrick's Mountain Home. CD Recording. St. Paul: Innova Recordings.72Erdely, Stephen. 1987. “Folk-Music Research in Hungary until 1950: The Legacy of Zoltan Kodaly and Bela Bartok,” Current Musicology, Vol. 0, Issue 43, pp. 51-61.Ford, Larry R. and Floyd M. Henderson. 1994. “The Image of Place in American Popular Music: 1890 – 1970” in George O. Carney, ed., Sounds of People and Places. Lanham: Rowan and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.Gardner, Kara Anne. 2004. “Edward MacDowell, Antimodernism, and 'Playing Indian' in the 'Indian Suite,' The Musical Quarterly, Vol. 87, Issue 3, pp. 370 – 422.Gelbart, Matthew. 2007. The Invention of 'Folk Music' and 'Art Music': emerging categories from Ossian to Wagner. New York: Cambridge University Press.Gritzner, Charles F. 1994. “Country Music: A Reflection of Popular Culture” in George O. Carney, ed., Sounds of People and Places. Lanham: Rowan and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.Gruning, Thomas R. 2006. Millennium Folk: American Folk Music since the Sixties. Athens: University of Georgia Press.Haas, Brittany and Dan Trueman. 2012. Criss Cross.  https://brittanddanband.bandcamp.com/album/ crisscross (last accessed December 30, 2014)Homespun Music Instruction. “Welcome to Homespun.” http://www.homespuntapes.com/welcome/html (last accessed December 15, 2014).Horvitz, Wayne. 2007. Wayne Horvitz: Joe Hill: 16 Actions for Orchestra, Voices, and Soloist. CD Recording. New York: New World Records.Koutsoutis, Costa. 2009. “Random Record Review – Adam Hill – Them Dirty Roads,” Fistfight at the Arthouse. https://fistfightatthearthouse.wordpress.com/2009/04/13/random-record-review-adam-hill-them-dirty-roads/ (last accessed November 23, 2014).Lloyd, A.L. 1945. Corn on the Cob: Popular and Traditional Poetry of the U.S.A. London: Fore Publications, LTD.Lomax, Alan. 2003. “Appeal for Cultural Equity” in Ronald D. Cohen, ed., Alan Lomax: Selected Writings 1934-1997. New York: Routledge.Lomax, Alan. 2003. “Song Structure and Social Structure” in Ronald D. Cohen, ed., Alan Lomax: Selected Writings 1934-1997. New York: Routledge.Lomax, John A. 1927. Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads. New York: The Macmillan Company.73Lornell, Christopher. 1994. “Spatial Perspectives on the Field Recording of Traditional American Music: A Case Study from Tennessee in 1928” in George O. Carney, ed., Sounds of People and Places. Lanham: Rowan and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.Malone, Bill C. 1993. Singing Cowboys and Musical Mountaineers: Southern Culture and the Roots of Country Music. Athens: University of Georgia Press.McCutchan, Ann. 1999. The Muse That Sings: Composers Speak About the Creative Process. New York: Oxford University Press.Nettl, Bruno. 1990. Folk and Traditional Music of the Western Continents, 3rd Edition. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Nettl, Bruno. 1976. Folk Music in the United States: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, rev. Helen Myers. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.Paul, David C. 2006. “From American Ethnographer to Cold War Icon: Charles Ives through the Eyes of Henry and Sidney Cowell,” in Journal of the Musicological Society, Vol. 59, No. 2, pp. 399-457.Rockwell, Joti. “Paul Elwood-BorderRadioX—Joti Rockwell, banjo and mandolin. 16th Annual Ussachevsky Festival 2008.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L72juonnhaU (last accessed December 20, 2014)Rosenberg, Neil V. 2005. Bluegrass: A History. Chicago: University of Illinois Press.Seeger, Charles, and Ruth Crawford Seeger. 1966. “Musical Forward” in Alan Lomax, ed., Folk Song U.S.A. New York: Signet Books.Scrutton, Roger. 1997. Aesthetics of Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Scrutton, Roger. 2009. Understanding Music: Philosophy and Interpretation. New York: Continuum International Publishing.Sharp, Cecil J. 1960. English Folk Songs from the Southern Applachians. London: Oxford University Press. Terkel, Studs. 1970. Hard Times: An Oral History of the Great Depression. New York: The New Press.Trueman, Dan. “Biography,”on personal website. http://www.manyarrowsmusic.com/bio.html (last accessed December 30, 2014)74Trueman, Dan. “Fosclachtha.” http://www.manyarrowsmusic.com/justthenotes/Fosclachtha.pdf (last accessed December 30, 2014)U.S. Energy Information Administration. http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashxn=pet&s=emm_epm0_pte_nus_dpg&f=m (last accessed November 24, 2014).Vaughn Williams, Ralph. 1956. “Historical Aspects of Nationalism in Music,” in Sam Morgenstern, ed., Composers on Music: An Anthology of Composers' Writings from Palestrina to Copland. New York: Pantheon.Watson, Arthel (Doc). “Doc Watson – 1991 – Black Mountain Rag.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdUrg2Cqxdw&x-yt-ts=1421914688&x-yt-cl=84503534 (last accessed January 26, 2015).Wilgus, D.K. 1959. Anglo-American Folksong Scholarship Since 1898. New Bruswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Williams, Nate. 2009. “Them Dirty Roads are rather nice,” Independent Clauses. http://independentclauses.com/them-dirty-roads-are-rather-nice/ (last accessed November 23, 2014)Wolfe, Julia. “Steel Hammer,” on personal website. http://juliawolfemusic.com/music/steel-hammer (last accessed December 30, 2014)Wolfe, Julia. 2009. Steel Hammer. http://www.musicsalesclassical.com/composer/work/1757/43057 (last accessed December 30, 2014)Wolfe, Julia, Bang on a Can All-Stars, and Trio Mediaeval. 2014. Steel Hammer. CD Recording. New York: Cantaloupe Music.  Zemanova, Mirka. 2002. Jancek: a composer's life. London: John Murray Publishers, Ltd.75Appendix A: Programme NoteIn late October 1929, the US stock market took a devastating plunge, losing more than a quarter of its value in a matter of days. The crash signified the beginning of a financial crisis that would last more than a decade and impact countries around the globe. Though the stereotypical imagery of life during the Great Depression includes dour faces of migrant workers standing in breadlines or well-suited businessmen leaping from skyscraper windows, actual personal experiences were varied. I recall  my grandmother telling me her story of moving from northern Ohio to Detroit,  where a dozen (or more) family members were living in a small house. Her most vivid memory of the Great Depression was a beautiful feathered hat. She had saved bits of her earnings for weeks and used them to purchase the hat rather than extra food to share among her family; that crowded house took a long time to forgive her. Hard Times Come Again takes its text from oral history of the Great Depression. Some of the words come from those recollecting their own experiences; some of the words come from stories that have been passed down from one generation to another.  Each song's words give a unique account of getting by when times were tough, and all the words are real tales from real people. Throughout the piece, folk music idioms are referenced, and these references are intended to reflect the commonplace language used in the text. After all, as Ruth Crawford Seeger and Charles Seeger wrote in the introduction to John and Alan Lomax's Folk Song U.S.A.,”folk song deals with realities.”76Hard Times Come Againfor two voices and chamber ensembleby Adam HillAppendix B:  Musical Score77Duration: 30-35 minutesInstrumentation:     Alto Voice     Baritone Voice     2 Violins     Viola     Cello     Bass     Mandolin     Banjo     Guitar     PianoThe text of the piece was constructed by the composer with the assistance of Bren Simmers out of interviews conducted by Studs Terkel and published as Hard Time: An Oral History of the Great Depression.Performance Notes:     All the performers should take care to adopt a North American or Appalachian folk style to the piece. For arco strings, this will result in little or no vibrato. For the guitarist, a steel string guitar should be used and played with a flatpick. For the mandolinist, it is preferable to use a folk style instrument (either an A or F model is suitable) rather than a classical style instrument. The banjo player should use standard tuning (g-D-G-B-D) throughout and should be able to play in both clawhammer and three-finger styles.     The singers should pay extra special attention to performing in a folk style, and for those performers unfamiliar with the direction, it may be useful to heed a few of Ruth Crawford Seeger`s instructions included in the preface to Our Singing Country:          "1. Do not hesitate to sing because you think your voice is not good -- i.e., has not been trained. These songs are better                                                                                                                                                                        sung in the manner of the natural than the trained (bel canto) voice. Do not try to smooth out  your voice. If it is reedy or nasal, so much the better.          3. Do not sing with expression, or make an effort to dramatize.          5. Do not hesitate to keep time with your foot. Unless otherwise indicated, sing with a fairly strong accent.          6. Do not punch or typewrite out  each tone. When two or more tones are to be sung to one syllable of text, bind them                         together rather than articulate each separately.          7. Do not make too much difference between major and minor degrees in songs containing both."     All instruments and voices should be lightly amplified using microphones and/or pickups. The voices and piano must use microphones for amplification, and the singers should both be comfortable "working the mic." For the remaining instruments it is preferable to be consistent in the method of amplification (i.e. either pickups or microphones), and this will help the ensemble have a well-blended sound.Programme Note:     In late October 1929, the United States stock market took a devastating plunge, losing more than a quarter of its value in a matter of days. The crash signified the beginning of a financial crisis that would last more than a decade and impact countries around the globe. Though the stereotypical imagery of life during the Great Depression includes dour faces of migrant workers standing in breadlines or well-suited businessmen leaping from skyscraper windows, actual personal experiences were varied. I recall my grandmother telling me her story of moving from northern Ohio to Detroit, where a dozen (or more) family members were living in a small house. Her most vivid memory of the Great Depression was a beautiful feathered hat. She had saved her earnings for weeks and used them to purchase the hat rather than food to share among her family; that crowded house took a long time to forgive her.     Hard Times Come Again takes it text from oral history of the Great Depression. Some of the words come from those recollecting their own experiences, some of the words come from stories that have been passed down from one generation to another. Each songs' words give a unique account of getting by when times were tough, and all the words are real tales from real people. Throughout the piece, folk music idioms are referenced, and these references are intended to reflect the commonplace language used in the text. 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You'd seeœ œ œ œ œ œ#∑Œ œœœœ Œœœœœ∑œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#- - - -??&&&&?#####################42424242424242BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.27 œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ Jœhun dreds of kids, youngœ œ Jœ œ Jœ∑Œ œœœœ Œ œœœœ∑27 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œn œ# œ ‰ Jœ œn œ#Jœ œ Jœ œ œ œkids, lots of 'em,œ œ œ .œ jœ∑Œ œœœœ Œ œœœœ∑œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Jœnlook ing for jobs, lookœ œ jœ œ jœ∑Œ œœœœ Œ œœœœ∑œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœnœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#œ œn œ œ œ œing for ex cite ment.œ œ œ œ œ œ∑Œ œœœœ Œ œœœœ∑œœœ œœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ# œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œœ œœ œœ- - -- -82ª ª??&&&&?#####################4242424242424244444444444444BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.31Œ œn œIt wasœ œœœ œœ œœ œœœœœœ œ œ œœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ31 œœœ#n œœœœœ œœFFœ# œ œ ‰ Jœ œ œrough go ing. You'd get aœ œ jœ œ jœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ ..˙˙œ. œœflœn œ# œ œœ˙˙˙n ...œœœ Jœœœ˙˙ ..œœjœœ32œ œ œ rœn œ# ‰ œ Jœlit tle re lief. You'd getœ œ œ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ∑œœ œœflœn œ# œ œwwwwwœ œ œ œ œ œa day's work now andœ œ Jœ œ Jœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ∑œ. œœflœn œ# œ œœ˙˙˙ ...œœœ Jœœœ˙˙˙ ...œœœ Jœœœ- - -??&&&&?#####################424242424242424444444444444442424242424242BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.35 œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Jœthen on the farm. That'sœ œ œ œ œ# œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ∑œœ œœfl œn œ# œ œœ35 ˙˙˙ ...œœœ Jœœœœ˙˙˙ ...œœœjœœœœ œ œ Œ ‰ Jœthe way peoœ œ Jœ œ Jœœœ œœ œœ œœjœœ œœfljœœ∑œœ œœfljœœ œœfljœœœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœœœœ œœœjœœœ œœœjœœœœ œ œ œple got aœ œ œ œjœœ œœfljœœ∑œœ œ œn œ#˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙ ‰ Jœ œlong, the wayœ ˙ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœn œ# œn œn œ# œ œn œ#œ ˙˙ œœflwwwnww- -83ª ª??&&&&?#####################4242424242424244444444444444BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.39 œ œ œ œpeo ple got aœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœ39 œœœn œœœ œœœ œœœœœ œœ œœ œœ˙ Ólong.œ œ jœ œ jœwwwwœn œ# œ œn œ# œ œn œ#œ. œœfljœ œ jœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œn œ#fffff40∑œ œ ˙∑œ œ œ œn œ œn œ# œœœ œœflœn œ œ# œœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œn œ# œ∑œ œ jœ œ jœ∑œn œ# œ œn œ# œ œ œnœœ. œœfljœ œ jœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œn œ#- -??&&&&?#####################BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.43∑œ œ œ œ œ œ∑œ œ œ œn œ œn œ# œœœ œœfl œ œ œ œ43 œœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œn œ# œ∑œ œ Jœ œ Jœ∑œn œ# œ œn œ# œ œn œ#œ œœ jœ œjœœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ œ œ œ œ∑œ œ œ œ œ œ œn œ#œœ œœ œn œ# œ œœœœœœn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœ œn œ# œ œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ jœ œ jœ∑œn œ# œ œn œ# œ œn œ#œ œœ jœ œjœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œn œ#84ª ª??&&&&?#####################BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.47∑œ œ œ œ œ œ∑œ œ œ œn œ œn œ# œœœ œœ œn œ œ# œ47 œœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œn œ# œ∑œ œ jœ œ Jœ∑œn œ œ œ œ œn œ# œœœ œœ jœ œjœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œn œ# œ∑œ œ œ œ œ∑œn œ# œ œ œn œn œ# œœœ œœ œ œ œ œœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ Jœ œ Jœ∑œn œ# œ œn œ# œ œ œœ œœ jœ œjœœœœœnn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œn œ#??&&&&?#####################BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.51∑œ œ œ œ œ œ∑œ œn œ# œ œ œ œn œ#œœ œœ œn œ# œ œœ51œœœnn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œn œ# œ œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ jœ œ jœ∑œn œ# œ œn œ# œn œn œ#œ œœ jœ œjœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ œ œ œ œ∑œ œn œ# œ œ œ œ œnœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œn œ# œ ‰ œn œ# œ∑œn œn jœ œ Jœ∑œn œn œ œ œ œn œ œœœœnn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœnn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœnn œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ85ª ª??&&&&?#####################BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.55∑œn œn œ œ œ∑œn œn œ œ œ œ œ œœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ55œœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœnn œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ∑œ œ jœ œ jœ∑œn œ# œ œn œ# œ œn œ#œ œœ jœ œjœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ œ œ œ œ∑œn œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#∑œn œn œ œ œ œ∑œn œn œ œ œn œ œ œœœœœnnnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnnn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœn œ œ œ œœn œœ œœ œœ∑œn œ œ œ œ œnÓ Œ ‰Jœœœn œn œ œ œœœœœœœœnnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœnn œœ œœ œœ œœ œœÏ??&&&&?#####################BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑œ œ jœ œ Jœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œœœœ jœ œœœœjœ60...œœœn Jœœœ ...œœœ Jœœœœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#ƒƒƒƒ60∑œ œ œ œ œœœn œœ œœ œœb œœ œœ œœn œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœn ...œœœ Jœœœnœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ jœ œ Jœœœn œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œœœœ jœ œœœœjœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ œ œ œœœn œœ œœn œœ# œœ ‰ Jœœ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ ˙˙˙œ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#86ª ª??&&&&?#####################BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.64∑œn œ Jœn œ jœœœn œœ œ œb œ œœ œœ œœœn œ œ œn œ œb œ œœnœœœœœnbœœœœœ jœnœœœœœjœœœœœ64œœœbn œœœ Jœœœ ...œœœœn œ œb œn œn œ œb œn∑œ œn œn œ œœœn œœb œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœn œ œ œn œ œb œ œœnœœœœœnbœœœœœ jœnœœœœœjœœœœœœœœbn ...˙˙˙œn œ œb œn œn œ œb œn∑œ œ jœ œ Jœœœ œœn œœ œœ# œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œœœœ jœ œœœœjœ...œœœ Jœœœ ...œœœ Jœœœbnœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#∑œ œ œ œ œœœ ‰ Jœœn œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœ Jœœœ ...œœœœ œ œn œ# œ œ œn œ#??&&&&?#####################nn#nn#nn#nn#nn#nn#nn#BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.68∑œn œ Jœn œ jœœœ œœn œœb œœ œœn œœ œœ œœœn œ œ œn œ œb œ œœnœœœœœnbœœœœœ jœnœœœœœjœœœœœ68‰ Jœœœœnnb œœœœ œœœœ ....œœœœ Jœœœœn#œn œ œb œn œn œ œb œn∑œ œn œn œ œœœbn œœn œœ œœb œœn œœ œœb œœnœn œ œ œn œ œb œ œœnœœœœœnbœœœœœ jœnœœœœœjœœœœœœœœœnnb œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœn œ œb œn œn œ œb œn∑œ œ œ œ œ œœœbn œœn œœ œœb œœn œœ œœ œœnœ œ œ œn œn œ œœnœœœœœnn œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ∑œ œ œ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ87ª ª??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.œ œ œ œ œ œFreight trains were a maz.œ jœ .œ jœwwwwwwwwwŒ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ˙ .œ Jœ72 œœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœ œœœwwFPPPPP72Jœ œ Jœ Jœ œ Jœing in those days..œ Jœœ œ œ œ∑∑œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœJœ .œ˙œœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ˙˙ ˙˙œ Œ ‰ Jœ œ œSo ma ny.œ jœ .œjœ∑∑‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ .œ Jœ‰ Jœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœwwœ œ œ jœ# œ Œ œn œrid ing the freight. When a‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ# œ∑∑jœœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœœ œœ œœ œœ#Jœœœ œœœb Jœœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœ œœ ˙˙- - - -??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.76 œ œ œ œ œ œ œtrain would stop in a small.œ Jœ .œ Jœ∑∑Œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœ˙ .œ Jœ76 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ˙˙ ..œœjœœJœ .œ ‰ Jœ œ œtown, and the bums‰ œ Jœ œ œ œ œ∑∑œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœJœ .œ ˙œœœn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ‰ ..œœ ˙˙Jœ œ Jœ Jœ ‰œ œ#got off, the pop.œ jœ .œ Jœ∑∑Œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ˙ .œ Jœœœb œœn œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ# œ œn œ Œu lat ion trip led.‰ Jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ∑∑œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœJœ‰ Jœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœww- - - -88ª ª??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.80 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œNo bo dy was real ly your en.œ jœ .œ Jœ∑∑Œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ˙ .œ Jœ80 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ Jœœœ œœœb Jœœœnwwœ œ ‰ Jœ Jœ œ Jœe my. These were guysJœ œ Jœ œ œ œ œ∑∑œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœJœ .œ˙œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœb œœœn˙˙ ˙˙œ œ œ Jœ œ Jœbwho did n't have work..œ jœ .œjœ∑∑‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ .œ Jœœœœb œœœ œœœ œœœ Jœœœ œœœ Jœœœ..˙˙ œœÓ Œ œWho'd‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ# œ∑∑jœœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœœ œœ œœ œœ#œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœ œœ œœ œœ- - - - - -??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.84 œ œ œ œ ‰ Jœ œ œprob ab ly work if there was.œ Jœ .œ Jœ∑∑Œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœ˙ .œ Jœ84 œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙˙ ..œœjœœœ œ Œ ‰ Jœ œ œwork. They were hard‰ œ Jœœ œ œ œ∑∑œœœ œœœb œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœJœ .œ ˙œœœœ œœœœ œœœœb œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ‰ ..œœ ˙˙Jœ œ Jœ ˙luck guys..œ Jœ œ œ∑∑‰ jœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙œœœœn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙˙ œœ œœ∑‰ Jœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ∑œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰ Jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ..˙˙ œœP- -89ª ª??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.88∑œ œ jœ œ jœœœœbn œœœn œœœœœœb œœœn œœœœœœb œœœnœb œn œ œb œn œ œb œnœœœœœœœœflJœ œjœœœ88Œ œœœbn ‰ œœœ Jœœœ˙˙ ˙˙fffff∑œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœb œœœn œœœœ œ œ œ œ œb œn œœœœœœœœœflœb œ œn œœœœ œœœbn œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœww∑œ œ jœ œ jœœœœbn œœœn œœœœœœb œœœn œœœœœœb œœœnœb œn œ œb œn œ œb œnœœœœœœœœflJœ œjœœœŒœœœbn ‰ œœœ Jœœœ˙˙ ˙˙Ó Œ œb œIt wasœ œ œ œ œ œ œ>œœœœœœnœœœœœœ œœœ# œœœœœœ>œ œ œ œ œœœ œœœ œœœ>œœœœœœœœflœœœœœœœœœbœœœœœœœœ>œœœ œœœbn œœœ œœœ œœœ# œœœ œœœ>..œœjœœœœ œœ œœ>??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.œn œ œ ‰ Jœ œ œrough go ing. You'd get aœ œ jœ œ jœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœ. œœflœb œn œ œœ92 wwwnwwFFFFF92 œ œ rœb œn œ ‰ œ Jœlit tle re lief. You'd getœ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœ œœflœb œn œ œ∑∑œ œ œ œ œ œa day's work now andœ œ jœ œjœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœ. œœœflœb œn œ œœ∑∑œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Jœthen on the farm. That'sœ œ œ œ œ# œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œœœfl œ œ œ œœÓ Œ ‰ JœœœÓ Œ ‰ jœœ- - -90ª ª??&&&&?#######42424242424242444444444444444242424242424244444444444444BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.96 œ œ œ Œ ‰ Jœthe way peoœ œ JœœJœœœœœœœœœœœœœ Jœœœœœœ˘Jœœœœœœœœœœœfljœœœœœœœœfljœœœœœœ œœfljœœ œœfljœœ96 œœœ œœœ˘Jœœœ œœœ˘Jœœœœœ œœfljœœ œœfljœœœœ œ œb œnple got aœ œ œ œJœœœœœœ˘Jœœœjœœœœœœœœjœœœœœœ œ œb œn˙˙˙˙˙˙˙ ‰ Jœ œlong, the wayœ ˙ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœb œn œn œb œn œ œb œnœ ˙˙ œœflwwwnwwœ œ œ œpeo ple got aœ œœœœœ œœœ œœœœœ œœœœœn œœœœœœœ- - - -??&&&&?#######44444444444444BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.100 ˙ Ólong,.œ jœ œ œ‰Jœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰ Jœb œn œ œb œn œjœ œœjœœ œœ œœfl100 wwwnwwÓ œ œ œ œpeo ple got aœ .>˙œœœœ....˙˙˙˙>œœœ...˙˙˙>œœœœœ.....˙˙˙˙˙>œœœn...˙˙˙>œœ..˙˙>œ Œ Ólong.œ œ jœ œ jœœœœbn œœœn œœœœœœb œœœn œœœœœœb œœœnœb œn œ œb œn œ œb œnœœœœœœœœflJœ œjœœœŒ œœœbn ‰ œœœ Jœœœ˙˙ ˙˙fffff-91ª ª??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.103∑œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœb œœœnœ œ œ œ œ œb œn œnœœœœœœœœflœb œ œn œ103 œœœ œœœbn œœœ œœœœœœb œœœ œœœ œœœww∑œ œ jœ œ jœœœœnbœœœnœœœœœœbœœœnœœœœœœbœœœnœb œn œn œb œn œ œb œnœœœœœœœœflJœ œjœœœŒœœœœbnb ‰œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙∑œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœœn œœœœœœœœœœn œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœflœb œ œn œœœœœœœœœbnn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œww??&&&&?#######BD.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.106∑‰ Jœ œn œ œ œb œ œb‰ Jœ œn œ œ œb œ œb‰ Jœ œn œ œ œb œ œb‰ Jœ œn œ œ œb œ œb106 ¿ œ œn œ œ œb œ œb∑∑œn œ œ œ Œ œœn œ œ œ Œ œœœœn æœn œ œ œ Œ œœœœn æœn œ œ œ Œ œœœœœn æœn œ œ œ Œ œœœœnÓ Œ œœ∑˙U œ œ œ œ>....˙˙˙˙n æUœœœœ>....˙˙˙˙n æUœœœœ>.....˙˙˙˙˙n æUœœœœœ>....˙˙˙˙U œœœœn>..˙˙Uœœ>ƒƒƒƒƒ92ª ª&?B??&&&?434343434343434343424242424242424242434343434343434343424242424242424242AltoBaritoneViolaCelloDouble BassBanjoGuitarPiano‰ jœ ˙This∑.˙≥∑∑∑∑∑∑Leisurely, but not too slowly (q = 132)ffœn œ œI re∑œ#≥ œ œ∑∑∑∑∑∑.˙mem∑.˙∑∑∑∑∑∑˙# Œber.∑˙# Œ∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œnBecause∑œ≤ œ#∑∑∑∑∑∑.˙this∑.˙∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œis what∑œ œ œ∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ# œ Œhap pened.∑œ# œn ˙∑∑∑∑∑∑- - -93This Is What HappenedAdam Hill&?B??&&&?424242424242424242434343434343434343444444444444444444434343434343434343ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.9Œ œI∑9Œ œ≥∑∑9∑∑9∑∑.˙don't∑.˙∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ# œwant to for∑œ œ# œ∑∑∑∑∑∑œ ˙Œget it.∑œ ˙ Œ∑∑∑∑∑∑ &∑∑∑∑∑∑∑www##ggggggggggggggggwww#°pi.˙This.˙This.˙≥.˙≥∑∑∑∑∑f14fœn œ œI reœ# œ œI reœ#≥ œn œ œ3jœ#≥.œ œ∑∑∑∑∑.˙mem.˙mem.˙.˙∑∑∑∑∑œ ˙#ber..˙#ber.œ ˙#.˙#∑∑∑∑∑-- -- -94&?B??&&&&444444444444444444434343434343434343424242424242424242ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.18Œ œ œ#Be causeŒ œ œnBe cause18Œ œ≥ œnŒ œ≥ œn∑18∑∑18∑∑.˙this.˙this.˙.˙∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œis whatœ œ œis whatœ œ œœ œ# œ∑∑∑∑∑˙# œhap pened.˙n œhap pened.˙n œœn ˙∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ#Iœ Œ œnIœ Œ œ#≥œ Œ œ≤∑∑∑∑∑˙ .œ jœdon't want˙ .œ jœdon't wantw.˙ œ∑∑∑∑∑œ œ# œto forœ œn œto forœ œn œœ œ#≤œ∑∑∑∑∑œ ˙get it,œ ˙get it,œ ˙œ ˙∑∑∑∑∑- - -- - -95&?B??&&&&424242424242424242434343434343434343444444444444444444434343434343434343444444444444444444434343434343434343ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.26Œ œn œIŒ œ#I26Œ œ#Œ œ∑26∑∑26∑∑.˙don't.˙don't.˙.˙∑∑∑∑∑œ œ# œwant to forœ œ# œwant to forœ œ# œœ œ# œ∑∑∑∑∑ ?œ ˙Œget it.œ œ œ ˙get it.œb œ .˙œ .˙∑∑∑∑Ó Œ*œ°F∑∑.˙.˙∑∑∑∑œ# œœ# œ4Picking it up q = 15230∑∑www∑Ó ˙˙˙˙˙#w∑w#Pppp∑∑.˙&.˙.˙∑.....˙˙˙˙˙ .˙œb œb œœ œn œ∑p--96&?&??&&&?444444444444444444ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.√√33∑∑33 .˙.˙.˙33 ...˙˙˙#gggg∑33 œ œ œ œ4∑p∑∑.œ Jœo œ.˙.˙.˙nŒ ‰ jœœœœœ## œœœœœ.˙.˙#∑f∑∑.˙∑∑∑Œ œœœœbœœœœ.˙∑∑∑∑.˙∑∑∑Œ œœœœbœœœœ.˙∑∑∑∑∑ B∑∑∑Œ œœœœbœœœœ.˙Œ Œ œb*∑∑∑Ó Œ ‰ Jœœ>∑∑∑wœb°œ Jœ œ Jœ∑pip97&?B??&&&?ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.39∑∑39 œœ œœ- œœ. œœ> œœ>∑Œ .˙39Œ ...˙˙˙#Œ ...˙˙˙##>w>39 w∑faccel.Ppizz.p∑Ó Œ œ œThey wereœœ œœ- œœ. ˙˙>∑˙ ˙˙ œœœ#œnŒ ...˙˙˙##w∑∑FfP∑Jœ œ Jœ Jœ œ Jœliv ing on the ca..˙˙ ‰ jœœ>Ó Œ ‰ jœœ>˙ .œ Jœœ œœœœœ œœœœ...˙˙˙Œ∑∑PPicking it up some more q = 16041ppP∑œ œ Œ œnal banks in..˙˙ œœ- œœ...˙˙ œœ- œœ.˙ ˙Jœ .œ œ œœœœ∑∑∑- -98&?B??&&&?434343434343434343444444444444444444434343434343434343ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.43∑œ .œ jœ œ œ œ3stink ing quar ters and43˙>˙Œ œœ- œœ...˙>˙ œœ- œœ.˙ œ œ43˙ œ œœœœ∑43∑∑∑.œ œ œ Óbar racks.jœœ œœ>jœœ œœ>Œ..˙>˙ œœœ ˙ œ˙ œœœœœ∑∑∑∑∑∑˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œœœ#˙Ó ˙˙˙˙˙#w∑∑FParco∑∑∑ww˙b ˙˙˙w∑∑∑∑∑.˙b.˙b...˙˙˙...˙˙˙b.˙∑Œ*œb°œbP∑∑∑.˙ Œ.˙ Œ˙ ˙wwwwœ œ# œ ˙3∑ppipipi- --99&?B??&&&?434343434343434343444444444444444444434343434343434343444444444444444444ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.49.˙This∑49∑∑∑49 .˙∑49.˙∑Pœ œ œI re∑∑∑∑.˙∑∑∑˙ ˙member.∑∑∑∑...˙˙˙gggg Œ.˙ŒÓ œ œ#∑ppi∑∑∑∑∑˙˙˙##ggggœo˙œœ#bœ# œb œ œ3∑∑∑Œ ˙˙>∑∑∑˙˙ Œ∑∑p∑∑œœ œœ- œœ. ˙˙∑Ó Œ œ∑˙˙#b˙˙˙∑∑pizz.F∑Ó Œ œ œEv 'ryœœ œœ- œœ. œœ œœ>∑œœ .œ JœÓ œœwww∑∑fPP- --100&?B??&&&?424242424242424242ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑Jœ œ Jœ œœmorning be fore56 ..˙˙ œœ- œœ.∑˙b .œ Jœ56œ œœœbœœ œ œœœœ∑56∑∑56P∑.˙ œdawn theyœœ œœ- œœ. œœ œœ- œœ.Œ ..˙˙>˙b œ œ˙ œ œœœbœ∑∑∑p∑˙ .œ Jœclimbed on to˙˙> œœ œœ-œœ.œœ œœ-œœ. ˙˙˙ ˙œ œœœœœœ œœœœ∑∑∑∑˙ ˙trucks boundœœ œœ- œœ. œœ> œœ- œœ.œœ ˙˙> œœ- œœ..œ Jœ œ œ˙ œ œœœœ∑∑∑∑˙ œ œfor the˙˙ œœ œœ- œœ.œœ ..˙>˙œ ˙ œœb œœ œ œ œœ œ∑∑∑∑˙ ˙bean fields.œœ œœ- œœ. ˙˙>˙˙ ˙>˙˙ ˙œ œœœœœ œ œœœœ∑∑∑- - -101&?B??&&&?424242424242424242444444444444444444434343434343434343ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.62∑∑62 ˙˙˙˙˙62jœ .œ∑62∑∑∑∑∑˙˙ ˙˙#˙ ˙#˙ ˙˙˙#Ó ˙˙˙˙˙#w∑∑Farco∑∑∑..˙˙.˙œœœ ˙n.....˙˙˙˙˙ .˙∑∑*∑∑∑.˙.˙∑.˙œ°œ# œ#œb4∑Pp∑∑∑.˙.˙Œ Œ œŒ Œ œœœb.˙œ œ œ#œ œ3∑pŒœ œbBe cause∑∑.˙.˙.˙...˙˙˙œ# œ ˙˙b∑piPpi-102&?B??&&&?444444444444444444ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.68.˙this∑68∑∑∑68 ...˙˙˙gggg.˙68∑∑Pœ œb œis what∑∑∑∑...˙˙˙#gggg..˙˙#b∑∑.˙hap∑∑∑∑...˙˙˙#gggg.˙∑∑˙Ópened.∑Œ ˙˙> œœ- œœ.∑∑wÓ ˙˙˙bw∑∑pppi∑∑œœ œœ- œœ. œœ œœ>∑Ó .œ Jœ∑Œ ...˙˙˙#nw∑∑pizz.∑Œ œ œ œIt would beœœ ..˙˙>∑œ œ œ œ œ∑w∑∑fP-103&?B??&&&?ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑.˙ œnight a74 œœ œœ- œœ. œœ œœ>Œ ..˙˙>˙ .œ Jœ74˙ œ œœœ œ∑74∑∑p74P∑˙ ˙gain when˙˙ œœ œœ- œœ.œœ œœ- œœ ˙˙˙ œ œœ œ œœœ œ ˙∑∑∑∑œ ˙ œthey got back..˙˙ œœ>œœ ˙˙> œœ- œœ.˙ œ œœ œœœœœ œœœ œ∑∑∑∑.˙ œtoœœ œœ- œœ. ˙˙˙˙ ˙˙˙ ˙œ œœœœ œ œ œœœ œ∑∑∑∑œ .˙quar ters.œœ ˙˙ Œœœ ˙˙> œœ- œœ.œ ˙ œœ œœœ œ ˙∑∑∑*∑∑∑w˙ ˙˙ ˙˙˙˙ ˙wœ°œ œ#œb œ œ œb3FPParcoF- -104&?B??&&&?ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.80∑∑80∑˙ ˙˙ ˙b˙ ˙b80∑wwwbw80 œœb Œœ œ∑∑∑∑˙ ˙˙˙ ˙∑Ó ˙˙˙#nwœb œb œ œ œ œ œœb35∑p∑∑∑ww∑Œ œœœ#nŒ œœœww∑F∑∑∑∑∑∑Œ œœœ#nŒ œœœ˙ ˙∑Ó ˙˙pÓ Œ œA∑∑∑Œ œ œ œ#Ó ˙˙˙˙ggggg˙ œ œ#∑∑fpizz.FF105&?B??&&&?ABVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.jœ œ jœ ˙work ing class∑85 œœ œœ- œœ. œœ œœ>œœ œœ- œœ. œœ œœ>.˙ œ85œœ œ œ œ œœœ#œŒ œœœ# Œ œœœw85∑∑85ppPœœ œ œ .œ jœthat weren't al lowed to∑œœ œœ- œœ.œœ œœ- œœ.œœ œœ- œœ. œœ œœ- œœ.˙ .œ Jœœ œœœ# œ œ œ œœœœŒ œœœ# Œ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑œ Œ Óeat∑œœ ˙˙>œœ- œœ.œœ ˙˙> œœ- œœ..˙ œœ œ œœ œ œœœ œŒ ...˙˙˙#.˙ œ∑∑Ó Œ œthe∑œœ œœ- œœ. ˙˙œœ œœ- œœ. ˙˙˙ œ œœ œ œœœ#œœ œœœ œŒ œœœ# Œ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑˙ .œjœfood it pro∑œœ œœ- œœ. œœœœœœ œœ- œœ. œœ œ˙ .œ Jœœ œœœ#œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ# Œ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑- - 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IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.8∑Œ ‰ jœ œ œ œ˙ ˙Œ ˙ œJœ .œ Jœ .œ˙ ˙8wæwww∑pipizz.pizz.pizz.pizz.fffPf∑œ œ œ œ œ œ˙ ˙œ ˙ œJœ .œ Jœ .œ˙ ˙wæ∑∑∑œ œ œ œ œ œ˙ ˙œ ˙ œJœ .œ Jœ .œ˙ ˙wæ∑∑∑˙jœ .œ.œ jœ jœ .œœ œ œ Jœ .œœ œ Jœ .œŒ œ œ œwwæœ œ œ œ∑pizz.ff∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœœœœœœœŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DF12ad lib as desired∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœœœ œ œ œœŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙G∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœœœœœœœŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙D∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ œ∑œœœœœœ œœŒ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙A128&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.16∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ16∑œœœœœœœœŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙G∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœœœœœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙A∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœœœœœœœŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙G∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœ œ œœœ œœŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœœœœœœœŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙A∑∑∑∑∑œn Œ œ# Œ∑œœœœœœ œœŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœœœœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œœœœœœœœŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙D∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œÓ ‰jœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ ˙˙˙‰ jœœœ œœœœœœ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙P129&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.œ œ œ œ jœ œ jœMon ey is one of my fath∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ24œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.∑Œ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DDf24ad lib as desiredœ œ œ œ œer's big val ues.∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ∑Œ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙GGœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œHe wish es he was a mil∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.∑Œ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DDœ œ œ Ólion aire,∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ.œœœœ.∑Œ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AAœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œhe wish es he was a mil∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ∑Œ œœœ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙GG- - - - - - - -130&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.29œ œ œ Œ œlion aire. But∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ29œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œœ œœœœœœ.∑Œ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AA˙ ˙I don't∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œœœœœœ.œœœœœœ.∑Œ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙GGœ ˙ œthink of∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.∑Œ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙jœ .œ Œ œmon ey in∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ∑Œ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙AAjœ .œ jœ .œthat way .∑∑∑Ó Œ ‰ Jœœn Œ œ# Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œœ œœœœœœ.∑Œ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙arcoP∑∑∑Ó Œ ‰ Jœœ œ Jœ .œœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.∑Œ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DDarcoP- - -131&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.35∑∑Ó Œ ‰ jœœ œ Jœ .œwœ œ œ œ35œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ.œœœœ.‰ Jœ œ œœœœœŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙arcoPF∑Ó Œ ‰ jœœ œ jœ .œwwœ Œ œ ŒŒ œ œ œ œ œœ .˙Œ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙arcoPFas written∑œ# œ jœ# œ jœ˙ .œ jœ˙ .œ Jœ˙# .œ Jœœ Œ œ Œ.æ˙ Œ‰Jœœ œœ œ œœŒ œœœœœ#Œ œœœœœ˙ ˙F#∑wwwwœ Œ œ ŒŒ æ˙ œ œœ .˙Œ œœœœœŒ œœœœœ˙ ˙Em/G∑ww#wwœ# Œ œ Œw# æ‰ jœ œ# œœœ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙# ˙G #dim∑jœn œ# . .>˙jœ# œ. .>˙jœ# œ. .>˙jœ# œ. .>˙œ Œ œ ŒÓ ‰ jœ œ œÓ ‰ Jœ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙AÓ ŒœMyŒ ¿ ˙Œ ¿ ˙Œ ¿ ˙Œ ¿˙œ Œ œ œbœ œ œ# œ ˙œ œ œ# œ ˙‰ jœœœœ œœœœœœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙132&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.jœ œ jœ jœ œjœfath er had been a saleswwwwœ Œ œ Œ42∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙GPpppp42œ œ œ œ œman all his∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙wlife.∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ ŒŒ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙DÓ Œœ œIn the∑∑∑∑œ ‰ Jœ œ œœ œ .æ˙œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙œ œ œ jœ œjœgreat fi nan cial per∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙Gœ œ œ œ œi od he sold∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ∑œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙- - - - - -133&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.48wbonds.∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ48Œ ‰ Jœ œ> œœœœ œœ œ œ œœŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AÓ Œ œA∑∑∑∑œ ‰ Jœ œ œ.œæ Jœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙jœ .œ œ œsalesman all his∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œwæœ œ œœ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙G/B˙ Œ œlife, a∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œæ˙ ‰ Jœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙A/C#jœ œ jœ .œ jœve ry suc cess ful∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œwwæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DPwone∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ..˙˙æ ‰ Jœœœ œœ œœœœŒ œœœŒ œœœœœœ˙ ˙GÓ jœ œjœev en though∑∑Ó Jœ œjœÓ jœ œ Jœœ ‰ jœ œ œœ œ œ œ jœ œ jœæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙pp- - - -134&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.55.œ jœ jœ œ jœhe had a∑∑˙ .œ jœ˙ .œ Jœœ Œ œ Œ55wæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙Bmœ œ jœ œ jœfifth grade ed u ca∑∑˙ Ó˙ Jœ œ Jœœ Œ œ Œæ˙ .œæ jœæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙œ .˙tion.∑∑∑.˙ œœ Œ œ Œœæ .æ˙œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙GF∑∑Ó Œ œŒ œ ˙wœ Œ œ Œwwæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœœœœœœœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙D/F#FF∑Œ œ ˙wwwœ Œ œ Œwwæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙EmF∑œ >˙ œœ >˙ œœ >˙ œœ >˙ œœ ‰ Jœ œ œwwæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙- - -135&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.61∑.˙ œ œ.˙ œ œ.˙ œ œ.˙ œ œœ Œ œ Œ61 wwæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙AffffÓ ŒœThe˙ Ó˙ Ó˙ Ó˙ Óœ ‰ jœ œ œwwww˙˙˙ Ó˙˙˙˙ ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙PPPPas written.˙ œhouse he∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ. Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙GGp63ad lib as desiredad lib as desired.œ jœ œ œworked for went∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ. Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙wbrokeŒ œ œ œ>œ œ œœ œ œ œ œŒ œ œ œ>œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ∑∑œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.œœœœŒ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙DDffÓ ŒœMy.œ œ œ ˙.œ Jœ ˙.œ œ œ ˙.œ Jœ ˙∑∑œ ‰ Jœ œ œŒ œœœœ.œœœœŒ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙136&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.67jœ œ jœ jœ œjœfath er had been a sales∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œ67Œ œœœœ. Œ œœœœ.œ œœœ œ œœœŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙GGœ œ œ œ œman all his∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ. Œ œœœœ.œœœ œ œœ œœŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙wlifeŒjœ# œ. œ> œœŒ jœ# œ. œ> œœ∑∑œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.œœœœŒ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œœŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AAÓ Œ œWentœ# œ .˙œ# œ .˙∑∑œ ‰ Jœ œ œŒ œœœœ.œœœœŒ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙.œ jœ jœ œ jœback to sel ling trucks∑∑˙ .œjœ˙ .œ jœœ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ. Œ œœœœ. œœœœœœœœ œ œœœŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙GG/BPP˙ ‰ jœ œ œbut there were∑∑wwœ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.œœœœŒ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙AA/C#- - -137&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.73œ œ jœ œ jœno trucks to be soldÓ .œ JœÓ .œ jœ˙ .œ Jœ˙ .œ Jœœ Œ œ Œ73Œ œœœœ.Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DDPPw.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œœ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ. œœœœ Œœœœœ. œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙GGÓ œ œThere were.˙Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œœ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ. œœœœ Œœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙wtimeswÓ ˙∑∑œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙EmEmpp.œ jœ œ œ œ3when we did n'twwwÓ ˙œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙ppwknowwwwwœ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ. Œ œœœœ. œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙GGppppPPPP-138&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.79∑Ó œ œÓ œ œÓ œ œÓ œ œœ Œ œ Œ79Œ œœœœ. œœœœ Œœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙ffff∑wwwwœ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙EmEm∑.œ Jœ œ œ œ3.œ jœ œ œ œ3.œ Jœ œ œ œ3.œ Jœ œ œ œ3œ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œœ Œ œ ŒŒ œœœœ.Œ œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AAFFFF∑œ œ jœ .œœ œ jœ .œœ œ jœ .œœ œ Jœ .œœ œ œ œŒ œœœœ.‰jœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙139&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.œ œ œ œ jœ œ jœMon ey is one of my fathwwwwœ Œ œ Œ84œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DDfppppF84œ œ œ œ œer's big val ues.Ó jœ .œŒ ˙ œÓ ˙Œ œ œ œ œœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙GGpizz.pizz.pizz.ffpizz.ffœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œHe wish es he was a milœ. Œ Óœ. Œ Óœ. Œ Óœ Œ Óœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙DDœ œ œ Ólion aire,Ó jœ .œŒ˙ œÓ ˙Œ œ œ œ œœ Œ œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ.œœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AA- - - - - -140&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.88œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œhewishes he was a milœ. Œ Óœ. Œ Óœ. Œ Óœ. Œ Óœ Œ œ Œ88œ œœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙GGœ œ œ Œ œlion aire. ButÓ jœ .œŒ˙ œÓ ˙Œ œ œ œ œœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œœ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AA˙ ˙I don'tœ. Œ Œ œœ. Œ Œ œœ. Œ Œ œœ. Œ Œ œœ Œ œ Œœœœœœ.œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙GGarcoarcoarcoarcoPPPPœ ˙ œthink of˙ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙jœ .œ Œ œmoney in.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙AAFFFFjœ .œ jœ .œthat way .˙ .œ Jœ˙ .œ jœ˙ .œ Jœ˙ .œ Jœœn Œ œ# Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œœ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙PPPP- - - -141&&&B??&&&##################AVln. IVln. 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IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.167∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œ#167jœ# œ œ œ œ jœ# œ œ œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œœ œ œ œ œ# œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙F#m∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ Œjœ# œ œ œ œ œ œn œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑∑∑œ Œ œ œœ œ œn œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ#Œ œœœ˙ ˙B∑Œ .˙#Œ .˙Œ .˙Œ .˙wwww#wwww#as written154&&&B??&&&####################################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.œ œ œ œ jœ œ jœMon ey is one of my fathwwwwœ Œ œ Œ172œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙EE172ad lib as desiredad lib as desiredœ œ œ œ œer's big val ues.Ó jœ .œŒ ˙ œÓ ˙Œœ œ œ œœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AAffffœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œHe wish es he was a milœ. Œ Óœ. Œ Óœ. Œ Óœ Œ Óœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙EEœ œ œ Ólion aire,Ó jœ .œŒ ˙ œÓ ˙Œ œ œ œ œœ Œ œ Œœœœœœ. œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙BB- - - - - -155&&&B??&&&####################################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.176œ ˙ œHe did theœ. Œ Œ œœ. Œ Œ œœ. Œ Œ œœ. Œ Œ œw176 wwwwwwwwwwwwwarcoas writtenas writtenwbest˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙wwwww∑wwwwww˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙w∑∑∑whewwww˙ ˙∑∑∑wcould.wwwww∑∑∑œU Œ ÓœU Œ ÓœU Œ ÓœU Œ ÓœU Œ ÓœU œ œ œŒU œœœœ. œœœœ. œœœœ.∑ŒU œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœpizz.156&&&B??&&&####################################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.œ ˙ œHe wish es∑∑∑wœ Œ œ Œ182œ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙AA182ad lib as desiredad lib as desired˙ œ œ œhe was a mil∑∑∑wœ Œ œ Œœœœœœ. œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙œ œ œ Ólion aire∑∑∑.˙ œœ Œ œ Œœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙BB∑∑∑∑˙ ˙œ Œ œ Œœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙œ ˙ œHe wish es∑∑wwœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ. œœœœ œ œœœœœœ. œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙C#mC#m- - - -157&&&B??&&&####################################AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.187˙ œ œ œhe was a mil∑∑wwœ Œ œ Œ187œœœœœ.œœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙œ œ œ Ólion aire∑∑.˙ œ.˙ œœ Œ œ Œœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙BB/D#Ó Œ œBut∑∑œ ˙ œ œœ ˙ œ œœ Œ œ Œœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœ.œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙˙ ˙I don't∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ Œ œ Œœœœœœ. œœœœœ.œ œ œ œœœœœŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙EEœ ˙ œthink of∑wwwœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œœ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙œ œ Œ Ómon ey,∑.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œœ Œ œ Œœ œœœœœœ.œœœœ œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙F #m7F #m7-- -158&&&B??&&&####################################AVln. IVln. 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IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.8∑∑8 ww#w#wwww#w>8 wwww#>wwwww>wwwww>8 www>ww>°ÏÏÏÏÏpipipipi∑∑wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww∑∑∑∑wwwwwwww∑∑∑∑∑∑∑˙˙˙˙˙˙˙œ Œ∑∑˙∑∑Pp˙# ŒI,∑..˙˙.˙..˙˙..˙˙Óœ∑∑.˙∑∑pizz.PP12 ∑∑..˙˙.˙..˙˙..˙˙.˙∑∑.˙∑∑∑˙# ŒI,..˙˙.˙..˙˙..˙˙˙ œ∑∑.˙∑∑PŒ .˙#I,∑www..˙˙Œ˙˙ Ó˙ ˙∑∑˙ ˙∑∑∏∏∑∑œœ Œ Œ.˙∑∑.˙Œ Œ œœ>∑.˙Œ ˙˙˙>..˙˙>°*∏∏FF162&?&&B&?&&&??444444444444444444444444434343434343434343434343ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.17∑œ# ˙ ŒI was,17∑∑∑∑˙ ˙17wwÓ Œ œœœœ>˙ ˙17∑∑FÓ ˙I∑Ó ˙∑∑∑wŒ ..˙˙>wwwww∑∑piw#was,Ó Œ œIwÓ Œ œw∑˙ ˙∑∑˙ ˙∑∑pipi˙ Ówwww∑˙ œ œ∑∑wÓ ˙˙˙>Œ ..˙˙>°fFFwI,Ó Œ œ#was,˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙∑ ?˙ ˙ww>Œ ...˙˙˙œ ˙ œ∑∑ffœ Œ Œ œIwœ -˙ œ-œ -˙ œ-œ -˙ œ-Œ-˙ œ-˙ ˙ww>Œ ....˙˙˙˙˙ ˙Ó ˙˙˙>Œ ..˙˙> &pi163&?&&B??&&&?&434343434343434343434343444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.23.˙#wasŒ Œ œI23 œ œ- œ-œ œ- œ-œ œ- œ-œ œ- œ-˙ œ23Œ ˙˙˙˙>Œ Œ œœœœœ>˙ œ23∑..˙˙ ?˙ œre˙# œwas reœ œ- œ- œ- œ œ œ œ œœ œ- œ- œ- œ œ œ œ œœ œ- œ- œ- œ œ œb œ œbœ œ- œ- œ- œ œ œ œ œb˙ œ˙˙˙˙ œœ˙˙˙˙˙ œ œ˙ œ..˙˙Œ ˙˙wlieved,wlieved,wwww˙ ˙œœœœ œjœ .œ..œœ jœ .œjœœœœœœ.˙wwwww°*PPPPffFF25˙ Ó˙ Ówwww.œJœ œœœ œ œ ˙œ œ œ œ œœ .˙∑∑pp∑∑.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œœ œ.œJœ.œjœ .œjœœ œ jœ œ jœœ œ ˙∑∑pppp∑∑∑∑∑∑œ ˙ œ˙ ˙.œ jœ œ œ œœ.˙∑∑--164&?&&B??&&&??ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.29∑∑29∑∑∑∑˙ ˙29œœ œjœ .œ..œœ jœ .œjœœœ.˙29∑∑PPPPÓ ˙IwI,∑∑∑∑.œJœ œœœ œ œ ˙œ œ œ œ œœ .˙∑∑PPwwas,w∑∑∑∑œ œ.œJœ.œjœ .œjœœ œ jœ œ jœœ œ ˙∑∑˙ Ó∑∑∑∑∑œ ˙ œ˙ ˙..œœ jœ œ œ œœ.˙∑∑∑Ó ˙I,∑∑∑∑˙ ˙œ œjœ .œ.œ jœ .œjœœ.˙∑∑˙ ˙#I was,w∑∑∑∑.œJœ œœœ œ œ ˙œ œ œ œ œœ .˙∑∑ww∑∑∑∑œ œ.œJœ.œjœ ..œœjœœ œ jœ œ jœœ œ ˙∑∑165&?&&B??&&&??ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.36∑Ó ˙I,36∑∑∑∑œ ˙ œ36˙ ˙.œ jœ œ œ œœ...˙˙˙36∑∑Œ œ ˙I was,w∑∑∑∑˙ ˙œ œjœ .œ.œ jœ .œ Jœœœ.˙∑∑wÓ ˙I∑∑∑∑.œJœ œœœ œ œ ˙œœ œ œ œ œœ .˙∑∑wwwas,∑∑∑∑œ œ.œJœ.œjœ .œjœœœ œ jœœœ jœœœœœ ˙∑∑FFÓ œ œ œ œI was re lieved,∑∑∑∑∑œ ˙ œ˙˙ œ œ..œœ jœ .œjœœ...˙˙˙∑ &∑w∑∑∑∑∑œ ˙ œ.˙ œœ œ œ .œ Jœ.œjœ ˙Ó Œ ‰ jœœ°>∑P-166&?&&B??&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.42∑Ó œ œ œ œI was re lieved,42∑∑∑∑Jœ .œ œ œ42jœ .œ .œ jœ.œ jœ œ œ˙ ˙42ww∑PÓ œ œ œ œI was re lieved,w∑∑∑∑˙ ˙œ œœ jœ.œ.œ jœ .œjœœ.˙Œ ‰ Jœœ> ˙˙∑PFwÓ œ œ œ œI was re lieved,∑∑∑Ó Œ ‰ Jœ.œJœ œœœ œ œ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œœ .˙∑∑Pp∑wÓ Œ œÓ œ œŒ œ ˙wœ œ.œJœ.œjœ .œjœœ œ jœ œ jœœ œ ˙∑∑PPP∑∑œ œ ˙wwwœ ˙ œ˙ œ œ.œ jœ .œ Jœœ.˙∑∑˙# Ówhen,∑wwwwœ ˙ œ.˙ œœ œ œ .œ Jœ.œjœ ˙∑∑F47 ∑Œ œ# ˙when the,œ Œ Óœ Œ Óœ Œ Óœ Œ ÓJœ .œ œ œjœ .œ .œ jœ.œ jœ œ œ˙ ˙∑∑ppppF- --167&?&&B??&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.49wwhen,˙ Ó49∑∑∑∑˙ ˙49œ œjœ ..œœ.œ jœ .œ Jœœœ.˙49∑∑∑Œ ˙ œ#when the,∑∑∑∑.œJœ œœœœ œœ ˙œœ œ œ œ œœ.˙∑∑˙ œ# œwhen the crash,˙ Ó∑∑∑∑œ œ.œJœ.œ jœ .œjœœ œ Jœ œ jœœ œ ˙∑∑ &œ Œ ÓŒ ˙ œwhen theŒ.æ˙Œ .˙#æŒ .˙#æŒ.˙æœ ˙ œ.œ jœ ˙.œ Jœ œ œ œœ.˙Œ...˙˙˙#>Œ*..˙˙#>°ppipipipi˙ œ œwhen the crash,.˙ œcrash,wæw# æw#æwæœ ˙ œ.˙ œœ œ œ .œ Jœ.œ Jœœœ ˙˙˙∑∑ ?PPPP˙Ó˙ ÓŒ œ> ÓŒ œ#> ÓŒ œ#> ÓŒ œ> ÓJœ œ Jœ œ œjœ .œ .œ jœ.œ jœ œ œ˙˙˙ ˙Œ ...˙˙˙#>Œ*..˙˙#>°ffffpizz.pizz.pizz.pizz.168&?&&B??&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.55Œ ˙ œwhen the,∑55Œ .˙Œ .˙#Œ .˙#Œ .˙˙.œJœ55œ œjœ .œ.œ jœ Jœ œjœœ.˙55∑∑arcoarcoarcoarcoPPPP˙ ÓŒ ˙ œwhen the,wwww.œJœ œœœ œœ ˙œ œœœ œ œœ.˙∑∑pppp˙ œ œwhen the crash,˙ ÓÓ Œ œ œ œ œ œ#Ó Œ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ#∑∑œ œ.œJœ.œ jœ .œjœœ œ Jœ œ jœœ œ ˙∑ ?∑PPœŒ ÓÓ ˙whenwwœ œ œ œ .œ# ˙‰ œ# œ œ# œ# œn ˙œ ˙ œ˙ œ œ..œœ Jœ œ œ œœ ˙ œŒ ...˙˙˙#>Œ* ..˙˙#>PPPÓ Œ œwhenœ œ ˙the crash∑∑∑∑œ ˙ œ..˙˙ œœ œ œ .œ Jœ.œjœ œ œwwwww169&?&&B??&&&??ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.60œ œ œ œthe crash came,˙ Œ œcame, when60∑∑∑∑Jœ œ Jœ œ œ60jœ .œ œ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ˙˙60∑∑˙ Œ œwhenœ œ ˙the crash∑∑∑∑œ œ ˙ œœ œ œ œ œjœ œjœ œ œœ˙ œ∑∑œ ˙ œ#the crash came,.˙ œcame,Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ#Ó Œ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ#∑∑˙.œJœœ œjœ ..œœ.œ jœ Jœ œjœœ.˙∑ &∑PPff˙ Œ œI˙ Ówwœ œ œ œ .œ# ˙‰ œ# œ œ# œ# œn ˙.œJœ œœœœ œœ ˙œ œ œ œ œœ.˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙## >Œ ....˙˙˙˙#>FPPF170&?&&B??&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.64˙ œ œwas re lieved,∑64Ó Œ œ∑∑∑œ œ.œJœ64.œ jœ .œjœœ œ Jœ œ jœœ œ ˙64wwwwwwwwpwŒ ˙ œwhen thewŒ .˙Ó Œœ∑ Bœ ˙ œ˙ œ œ.œ Jœ œ œ œœ ˙ œ∑∑ppPwœ .˙crashwwwŒ.˙œ ˙ œ..˙˙ œœ œœœ ..œœ Jœ.œjœ œ œ∑ ?∑pwwcame,.˙Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ ŒJœ œ Jœ œ œjœ .œ œ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ˙˙Ó ˙˙˙˙## >Ó ˙˙˙˙#>f∑Ó œ œ œ œI was re lieved∑∑∑∑ ?œ œ ˙ œœœ œ œ œ œjœ œ Jœœ œ œœ˙œœœwwwwwwwwf--171&?&&B??&&&??ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.√∑œ œ œ .œ jœwhen the crash came.69Ó œ œ œ œ .œ#Ó ‰ œ# œ œ# œ# œnÓ Œ œ œ œ œ œ#Ó Œ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ#œ œ .œ Jœ69œœ œjœ .œœœ œ œ Jœ œjœœœœœœ.˙69∑∑PPPPFFFF69∑œ Œ Œ œIœ ˙#>œœ >˙œœ ˙#>œœ >˙œ.œJœ œœœ œœ ˙œ œ œ œ œœ .˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙##Œ ....˙˙˙˙#°p∑œ œ œ ˙3was re leased.wwwwœ œ.œJœœœ œ .œjœœ œ œ jœ œ jœœ œ ˙∑∑Ó œ œ œ œI was re lievedwwwwwœ ˙ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ œœ ˙ œ∑∑ppppf--172&?&&B??&&&??ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.√ √73œ œ œ .œ jœwhen the crash came.∑73Ó œ œœœ .œ#Ó ‰ œ# œ œ# œ# œnÓ Œ œ œ œœ œ#Ó Œ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ#œ ˙ œ73.˙ œœ œ œjœ œ Jœ.œjœ œ œ73∑∑PPPPœ ŒI˙Ó œ œ œ œI was re lievedœ œ#>˙œ œ>˙œ œ#>˙œn œ>˙Jœ œ Jœ œ œjœ .œ œ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ˙˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙##Œ ....˙˙˙˙#œ œ œ ˙3was re leased.œ œ œ .œ jœwhen the crash came.˙ œ œœœ .œ#˙ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ# œn˙ Œ œ œ œ œ œ#˙ Œ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ#œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œjœ œjœ œ œœ˙ œ∑∑PPPPppppwœ Œ ˙Iœ .˙#>œ .>˙œ .˙#>œn .>˙.œ Jœœ œ œjœ œjœ jœ œjœjœ .œ œ œ œ œ˙ œœœŒ ....˙˙˙˙##Œ ....˙˙˙˙#--173&?&&B??&&&??ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.√77ÓI˙œ œ œ ˙3was re leased.77wwwwœ œ .œ Jœ77œ œjœ .œœ œœ Jœ œjœœ.˙77∑∑ppppœ œ œ ˙3was re leased.wÓ œ# œ# œn .œ3Ó ‰ œœœ œ# œ œ# œ#33Ó Œ ‰ œ# œn œ3∑.œJœœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ ˙ œ∑∑PPPwœ Œ ˙Iwwœ œ œ# .œ ˙3‰ œ œ# œ# .˙n3œ œ.œJœœ œ œ .œjœœ œ œ Jœ œ jœœ œ ˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙##Œ ....˙˙˙˙#PPffffwœ œ œ ˙3was re leased.Ó ‰ œ# œ# œn œ œÓ Œ œ œ œœÓ Œ ‰ œ œ∑œ œ œ œ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ..œœ jœ œ œ œœ ˙œœœ∑∑FFFÓI˙www#œ# œ .œ# ˙œ# œ œ# œ# .˙nœ ˙ œ..œœjœ œ œœ œ œjœ œ Jœ.œ Jœœœ œœœ œŒ....˙˙˙˙##>&Œ ....˙˙˙˙#>FF- --174&?&&B??&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.82œ œ œ ˙3was re leased.w82.˙ Œ˙ Œ œœ Œ ˙wJœ œ Jœ œ œ82jœ .œ œ œ œ..œœ jœ œ œ œ˙˙82Œ ....˙˙˙˙##>Œ ....˙˙˙˙#>&fffww˙ œ œ œ3œ œ œ œ œ3œ œ œ ˙3wœ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ˙œœœŒ....˙˙˙˙##>Œ ....˙˙˙˙#>?ƒf˙ Ó˙ Ó˙ œ œ>˙ œ œ>˙ œ œ>˙ œ œ>.œ Jœœ œ œjœ œjœ jœ œjœjœ œ jœ œ œ œ œ˙ œœ œŒ ....˙˙˙˙##>Œ ....˙˙˙˙#>∑∑œ ˙ œ# œ œ# œœ œ œ# œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ#œœ œ œ# œ# œ œ# œ œ œœ œ# œ# œ5œ# œ œ œ œ œ# œ# œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ# œ# œ œ# œœ56œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœwwww## >wwww### >ffff-175&?&&B??&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑∑86wwww.œb jœ œ œb86œbœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙86wwwwbwwwbb* °ƒƒƒƒƒƒƒƒƒ86∑∑wwwwœ œ ˙bœb œœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ ˙˙˙˙.˙b œ∑∑∑∑wwww.˙b œ œœb œœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙∑∑FFFFÓ Œ œIÓ Œ œI∑∑∑∑.œb jœ œb œœœbœœœœ.Œ œœœœ.œ œœœœbœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙∑∑ffFFFF˙n˙e˙ ˙ne∑∑∑∑.˙b œ œœb œœœœœœœœ. œœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙∑∑--176&?&&B??&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.91œ œ ˙ver sufœ œb ˙ver suf91∑∑∑∑˙b .œb Jœ91œœbœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙91∑∑.œ jœ œ Œfered..œ Jœ œ Œfered.∑Ó Œ ‰ œ œÓ ‰ œ œ œb œ œ œŒ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.œb jœ œ œbœœbœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙∑∑ &PPPÓ Œ œIÓ Œ œI‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ ˙œ œ œ œ .˙wbœ œb œ œb œœb œœœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œb œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙Ó˙˙˙>Ó*˙˙˙b>°FFFFFP˙ jœ .œgave up˙b Jœ .œgave upwwww.œb Jœ œ œ œœœbœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙∑∑- -- -177&?&&B??&&&&&ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.95˙ .œ jœmy il˙ .œ Jœmy il95∑∑∑∑.œb jœ œb œ95œb œœœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙95∑∑.˙ œlus ions..˙b œlus ions.∑∑∑Ó Œ ‰ œ œ.œb jœ œ œbœb œœœœœœœœ. œœœœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙∑∑FÓ Œ œ œWhen IÓ Œ œ œWhen IŒ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbŒ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ ˙œ œb œ œb œ œœb œœœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œb œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ˙b ˙∑∑*FFFfff˙ .œ jœlost my pos˙ .œ Jœlost my poswwww.œ Jœœ œœœœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙www>www>°ffffff98- -- ---178&?&&B??&&&&&ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.99jœ .œ Œ œses sions IJœ.œ Œ œses sions I99∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œ œ99œœœœœœ. œœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙99∑∑wfoundwfoundwÓ Œ œ∑∑˙ œ œ œœ œœœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑ffœ œ œ œmy cre aœ œ œ œmy cre awwÓ Œ œŒ .˙.œ Jœ œ œœœœœœœœœ. œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑Ffœ œ œ ˙3tiv i ty.œ œ œ ˙3tiv i ty.wwww B.œ Jœœ œœœœœœœ. œœœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑- - - - -- - - - -179&?&&BB?&&&&&ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.103Ó ‰ jœ œ œI had aÓ ‰ Jœ œ œI had a103 .œœ œ œb œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œb œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œ.œœ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ˙bœ œ œ œ œ103œ œœœœœœœœ. œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙103∑∑PFFFFPPPœ .œ œ œ œ ‰ jœfew bad hours, aœb .œ œ œ œ ‰ Jœfew bad hours, a.˙ œ œ œ œb.˙ œ œ œ œ.˙ œ œb œ œ.˙ œ œ œb œ˙ .œ Jœœ œœœœœ.œœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œœ œ œ œbŒ œœœbœœœ‰ jœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙wwwwwwb*fœ .œ œ ˙few bad years.œ .œ œ ˙few bad years.wwww.œ jœ œœœ œœœœœ.œ œœœœœœœ.œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœbœœœ‰ jœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙wwwwwwwb°ƒffff180&?&&BB?&&&&&ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.106Ó Œ œ œ3But IÓ Œ œ œ3But I106œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œœ œb œ œ œ œ œ œœb œ55Œœ œb œ œ œ œ œ œœb œ œ œ œ œ6Ó œ œ œ œ œ œb œœÓ Œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ106œ œœœœœb œœ.œ œœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œ‰ jœœœbœœœœœœ‰ jœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙106∑∑ ?ffff.œ jœ ˙found ex cite.œ Jœb ˙found ex citewwww.œ jœ .œ Jœœ œœœœœœb œœ. œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœbœœœœœœ‰ jœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙wwwwwwbƒƒƒƒœ œ Óment.œ œ Óment..˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.œ jœ œ œ œœ œœœœœœbœœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œb‰ jœœœbœœœœœœ‰ jœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙∑∑FFFFÓ œ œ œ œIt was an aÓ œ œ œ œIt was an awww&w.œ jœ œ œœ œœœœœœœœ.œœœœ.œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœbœœœœœœ‰ jœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙wwwwbww*&--- -- -181&?&&&B?&&&&&ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.√√110.œ Jœ œ Œwak en ing..œ Jœ œ Œwak en ing.110 .œ Jœ ˙.œ Jœ ˙.œ Jœ ˙.œ Jœ ˙˙ .œjœ110œ œœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ˙ ˙110Ó Œ œœœœ>Ó Œ œœ>°ffff‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3I felt I was be ing‰ Jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3I felt I was be ingwwww˙ œ œœ œœœœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ˙ ˙wwww>ww>˙ Œ œ œborn for the˙ Œ œ œborn for thewwwwœ œ œ.œ jœœ œœœœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙>˙˙ ˙˙˙>˙.˙ œfirst time..˙ œfirst time..˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œœ ˙ œœ œœœœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙œœœœ....˙˙˙˙>œœœœ ....˙˙˙˙>- - -- - -182&?&&&B?&&&&&424242424242424242424242ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.(√)(√)114 ww114 wwwwœ œ œ œ œ114œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œœœœœœœœ.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ114 ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙>˙˙˙˙˙˙>˙œ Œ Óœ Œ Ówwwwœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙˙˙> ˙˙˙˙>˙˙˙>˙ ˙˙˙>˙Ó œ œ œ œI was re leased.Ó œ œ œ œI was re leased.˙Ó˙Ó˙Ó B˙Ó ?œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ> œœœœ> ˙˙˙˙>œœœœ> œœœœ> ˙˙˙>˙ ?www>w>w>w>w>wwww>wwww>wwwww>www>ww>°*ffffƒƒƒƒƒ117wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww--183&?&&B??&&&&?424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444424242424242424242424242ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.119∑∑119 ˙˙˙˙˙119 ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙119 ˙˙˙˙˙PPPPÓ œ œ œ œI was re leased.Ó œ œ œ œI was re leased.Jœ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ jœ˙ Œ ‰ jœœ Œ Œ ‰ Jœ.œ ‰ Œ ‰ Jœ˙ .œ jœ>˙˙˙˙....œœœœjœœœœ>˙˙˙˙....œœœœ Jœœœœ>˙˙˙˙˙.....œœœœœjœœœœœ>˙˙˙ ...œœœ jœœœ>˙˙ ..œœ*jœœ>°fffffffffarcopipipipiwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww˙ Ó˙ Ówww.˙ Œwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwppœ œ# œ3I was reœ œ# œ3I was re˙œ Œ∑∑˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙*ppFFpwlieved,wlieved,Œ .˙#Œ .˙Œ .˙Œ .˙Œ .>˙Œ....˙˙˙˙# >Œ .....˙˙˙˙˙## >Œ .....˙˙˙˙˙##>Œ ...˙˙˙### >Œ ...˙˙˙>°FFFFFFFFFwwwwwwwwwww∑wwwwwwwwwwwpiŒ œ œ# œI was rew˙ Ó.˙Œ∑œ Œ Ów∑∑∑wwwwww*pipipipi-- ---184&?&&B??&&&&?424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444434343434343434343434343444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.127 ˙lieved∑127ŒœŒœŒ œŒ œœ> œ127∑∑Œ œœœ#>˙˙>127Œ œœ>˙˙°>pizz. arcoFFFPPPPw∑wwwwœ œ ˙∑∑...˙˙˙ œœœ..˙˙ œœ∑∑w˙ ˙# ˙3I was rewwwww∑∑wwwww∑∑˙ ˙#when,wlievedwwwwwwww#Ó ˙˙˙˙˙##wwwww∑∑FFw.˙ œ#when,wwww.˙ ŒŒ ...˙˙˙#∑∑Ó ŒœœÓ˙˙pppipipipi∑œ Œ Œ∑∑∑∑.>˙∑∑....˙˙˙˙>∑∑pizz.PP-185&?&&B??&&&&?444444444444444444444444424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.133wI∑133∑w∑∑˙ ˙133Ó Œ œœœ∑wwww133Ó ˙˙Œ*..˙˙>°PPpP˙# ˙was re∑w#w∑Ó ˙wwww∑www∑∑ppwlieved∑wwww˙ ˙˙˙˙ ˙˙Œ ...˙˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙˙∑∑pP˙ ˙#when˙ ˙#I was˙ ˙#˙ ˙#˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙∑∑wwwŒ ..˙˙wwP˙˙˙˙˙˙˙∑∑˙˙˙∑∑w˙ ˙re lievedwwww˙ ˙∑∑˙˙˙ ˙˙˙∑∑.˙ Œwœ ˙# œœ ˙ œœ ˙ œ#œ ˙ œB˙ ˙∑∑˙˙˙ ˙˙˙www##∑--186&?&&BB?&&&&?ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.√140wIw#when140 wwww.˙ œ140Œ ..˙˙Ó ˙˙˙˙www140∑wwwœ .˙Iwwww.˙ œ∑∑www∑∑wœ .˙#was.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ&.˙ œ#˙ ˙∑∑www∑∑.˙ œ#was,Ó Œ œrewwwwwÓ ˙˙˙∑ww∑∑pwwwwww.˙ œ∑wwwww..˙˙ œœ∑∑pwwleased.wwww˙ ˙∑∑˙˙ ˙˙∑∑arcopp∑wwwww.˙ œ∑∑˙˙ ˙˙∑∑Œ .I˙wwwwwwŒ ...˙˙˙Ó Œ œœœœww∑Ó*˙˙°ppipipipiœ ˙# œwas rewwwww˙ ˙∑∑wwww∑˙ ˙leased.wwwwww∑wwww∑∑wUwUwUwUwUwUwUwwoUwwUwwwwUwwU∑pi--187&&&B??&&4444444444444444AltoViolin IViolin IIViolaCelloDouble BassBanjoGuitar∑.˙ œÓ Œ œw∑∑Ó ˙∑Lively (q = 184)pppp∑˙ ˙˙ ˙wÓ˙∑Ó ˙∑p∑wwww∑Œ œœœ ˙∑∑œ ˙ œœ ˙ œwwwÓ ˙∑pPP∑˙ ˙˙ ˙wwwŒ œœœ ˙∑∑wwwwwÓ ˙Ó ˙˙˙wP∑œ Œ ˙œ Œ Óœ Œ ÓœŒ ÓœŒ ÓŒ œœœ ˙Œ ...˙˙˙wpipipipipiPP∑.œ jœ œ œ œŒ ‰ jœ ˙.œ jœ œ œ œÓ Œ œ∑Ó ˙Ó ˙˙˙wPPPFF∑.˙ œw.˙ œw∑Ó ˙Ó ˙˙˙Œ .˙PP188Three-Hundred-Twenty AcresAdam Hill&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.10∑10œ .˙wœ .˙wŒ.˙10Œ œœœ ˙Œ ...˙˙˙wP∑œ ˙ œwœ ˙ œwwÓ ˙Ó ˙˙˙wFF∑.˙ œw.˙ œwwŒ œœœ ˙Œ ...˙˙˙w∑wwwwwÓ ˙Ó ˙˙˙Œ .˙∑˙ Ó˙ Ó˙ Ó˙ Ó˙ÓŒ œœœ œ œœœ œŒ ...˙˙˙wpipipipipi∑∑Ó ˙w∑∑œ œœœ ˙Ó ˙˙˙˙wFPP∑.œ Jœ œœ.œ jœ œ œ.œ jœ œ œw∑Ó ˙Ó ˙˙˙˙wFFFFF∑œ .˙œ .˙œ .˙w∑Œ œœœ ˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙w189&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.18∑18 ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ww18Œ œœœ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙F∑˙ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œwwœ œœœ ˙Ó ˙˙˙˙w∑œ .˙œ .˙œ .˙wwŒ œœœ ˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙wfff∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙wwœ œœœ œ ˙Œ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙∑œ .˙œ .˙œ .˙wwœ œœœ œ œ œœœ œÓ ˙˙˙˙w∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙wwŒ œœœ ˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙w∑˙ Œ œ˙Œ œ˙ Œ œ˙ Ó˙ Óœ œœœ œ ˙Œ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙fffPPPPPf190&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.∑25œ -˙ œœ -˙ œœ -˙ œw∑25Œ œœœ ˙Ó ˙˙˙˙wFf25∑œ ˙ œœ- -˙ œœ ˙ œwÓ ˙œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙F∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙wŒ œœœ ˙Ó ˙˙˙˙w∑˙ jœ- œ- jœ-˙ jœ- œ- jœ-˙ jœ- œ-jœ-˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œœœ œ ˙Ó ˙˙˙˙wFFFPPFF∑œ ˙ œœ- -˙ œœ ˙ œœ .˙wœ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙Œ œœœ ˙Ó ˙˙˙w∑www˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œœœ œ ˙Ó ˙˙˙wf191&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.32∑32 jœ. œ>jœ œ œjœ. œ>jœ œ- œ-jœ. œ>jœ œ œww32Œ œœœ ˙Ó ˙˙˙˙wffffff∑œ ˙ œœ ˙ œœ ˙ œwwœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑˙ ˙-˙ -˙˙ ˙wwœ œ œœœ œ ˙Œ ˙˙˙ œœœ œœœw∑œ .˙œ .˙œ .˙wwœ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙∑wwwwwœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ ˙˙˙ œœœ œœœw192&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.jœ œ jœ jœ œ jœThree hun dred twen ty ac37.œjœ·( ˙·)w˙ .œ Jœoww37 œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙CfFFPPPPP37ad lib as desiredjœ œ jœ œ œ œres of farm land,w.œjœ·( ˙·)˙˙˙ .œ Jœ·(wœ œœœ œœ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙C/Dœ Œ.œjœ·(˙˙˙·)˙œ œœœ œŒ œœœ˙C/E˙ jœ .œfine land,˙·)˙˙ .œjœ·(.œ Jœo ˙wwœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙F- - -193&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.41Ó Œ œmy41˙ .œjœ·(˙·)˙w.œ Jœ·( ˙·)w41œ œœœ œ œ œœœœŒ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙jœ œ jœ œ œun cle owned and˙·)˙˙ .œjœ·(.œ Jœo ˙wwœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙G˙cleared,˙˙·)˙.œ Jœ·(˙œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ˙˙ Ó.œjœ·( ˙·)w˙ .œ Jœo˙·)˙wœ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙C C/G∑w.œjœ·( ˙·)˙ ˙˙ .œ Jœ·(wœ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙C/A C/B-194&&&B??&&424242424242424244444444444444444242424242424242AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.jœ œ jœ jœ œ JœThree hun dred twen ty ac46.œjœ·( ˙·)w˙ .œ Jœo˙·) ˙w46 œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙C C/D46Jœ œ Jœ œ œ œres of farm land,w.œjœ·( ˙·)˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(wœ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙C/E Cœ Œ.œjœ·(˙˙˙·)˙œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ˙C/EŒ .˙fine˙·) ˙˙ .œjœ·(.œ Jœo ˙wwœ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙FM(#4) FM(#4)/Djœ .œ Œ œland, my˙ .œjœ·(˙·)˙w.œ Jœ·( ˙·)wœ œ œœœ œ œ œœœœŒ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙F/C F/Ajœ œ jœ œ œunc le owned and˙·) ˙˙ .œjœ·(.œ Jœo ˙wwœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙G- - - -195&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.52œ œcleared, he52˙˙·)˙.œ Jœ·(˙52 œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ˙˙ ˙lost it..œjœ·( ˙·)w˙ .œ Jœo˙·)˙wœ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙F∑w.œjœ·( ˙·)˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(wœ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙F/Ejœ .œ jœ œ jœEv en the good.œ Jœo ˙w˙ .œ Jœo˙·) ˙∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœœœœœœ˙ ˙F/D F/Cœ œ œ œ œyear was now.œjœ·( ˙·)˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙G/B Gœ .˙good..œ Jœo ˙w˙ .œ Jœo˙·) ˙∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙Am-196&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.58∑58 w.œjœ·( ˙·)˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑58 œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw∑.œ Jœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·) ˙∑œ œ œœœ œœ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙∑w.œjœ·( ˙·)˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœw˙ jœ .œMen whom I'd.œ Jœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·) ˙∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙ffffff61œ œ jœ œ jœknown who'd lost their jobs,w.œ Jœo ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙197&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.63˙ œ œlost their63 .œ Jœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·) ˙∑63 œ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœœœœœŒ œœœœœœœœ˙ ˙˙ œ œ œhomes, lost their fam'w.œ Jœo ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙œ ˙ œlies. And.œ Jœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·) ˙∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœ Œœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œworse than an y thingw.œ Jœo ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœœœœœ Œœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙˙ Óelse,.œ Jœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·)˙∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙- - -198&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.68Ó œ œ œlost be lief68 w.œ Jœo ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑68 œ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ˙ ˙w.œJœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·)˙∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙˙ jœ .œin themw.œ Jœo ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙œ .˙selves..œJœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·)˙∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙- -199&&&B??&&4242424242424242444444444444444442424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.72∑72w.œ Jœo ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑72œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙∑.œJœo˙˙˙·)∑œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙∑˙ ˙˙ .œ Jœo.œJœ·( ˙·)w∑œ œœœ# œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœb ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙Do∑˙ .œJœo˙ ˙w.œJœ·( ˙·)∑œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙Am∑˙˙.œJœ·(˙∑œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙200&&&B??&&44444444444444444242424242424242444444444444444442424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.ÓT˙hey77w.œ Jœo ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑77œb œœœb œn œ œœœ œŒ œœœœbb Œ œœœœœœœœ˙ ˙Ao7ƒ77œ œwere.œJœo˙˙˙·)∑œb œœœb œn‰jœœœœbb œœœœœœœœ˙˙ ˙de˙ ˙˙ .œ Jœo.œJœ·( ˙·)w∑œ œœœ# œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœb ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙Dowstroyed,˙ .œJœo˙ ˙w.œJœ·( ˙·)∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœœœœœ Œœœœœ˙ ˙Amƒƒƒ.˙ Œ˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(.œJœ·( ˙·)w∑œ œ œœœ œœ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœœœœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙ƒ∑˙˙·)˙.œJœ·(∑œ œ œœœ# œ‰jœœœb œœœ œœœ˙Do-201&&&B??&&444444444444444442424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.83∑83.œJœo ˙w˙ .œJœ·(˙·) ˙∑83œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙AmÓ Œ œtheyw.œJœ·( ˙·)˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙˙.œJœo˙˙˙·)∑œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙.˙ œ#were de˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(.œJœ·( ˙·)w∑œb œœœb œn œ œ œœœ# œŒ œœœœbb Œ œœœb˙ ˙Ao7 Doœ .˙stroyed,˙ .œJœo˙·) ˙w.œJœ·( ˙·)∑œn œ œœœ œœ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙Amw˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(.œJœ·( ˙·)w∑œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙-202&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.89∑89˙ .œJœo˙·) ˙w.œJœ·( ˙·)∑89œb œœœb œn œ œ œœœ# œŒ œœœœbb Œ œœœb˙ ˙Ao7 DoÓ ˙they˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(.œJœ·( ˙·)w∑œn œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙Amœ ˙ œwere de˙ .œJœo˙·) ˙w.œJœ·( ˙·)∑œb œœœb œn œ œœœ œ‰jœœœœbb œœœœœœœœ ‰jœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙Ao7wstoyed˙ ˙˙ .œJœ·(.œJœ·( ˙·)w∑œ œœœb œ œb œœœ œ‰jœœœœbb œœœœœœœœ ‰jœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙w˙ .œjœ˙·) ˙w.œ Jœ·( ˙·∑œb œœœœ œ œœœœŒ œœœœb Œ œœœœ˙ ˙Gm93-203&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.94w94˙˙˙ .œJœ·(.œJœ·( ˙·)˙·)∑94œb œœœœ œ œ œœœœŒ œœœœb œœœœ ‰jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙w.œjœ ˙˙·) ˙˙ .œJœ·(∑∑œ œb œœœœ œ œ œœœœ‰jœœœœb œœœœ œœœœ ‰jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙.˙ Œmen.˙ .œjœ.œJœ·( ˙·)˙·) ˙∑∑œ œb œœœœ œ œœœœŒ œœœœb Œ œœœœ˙ ˙as written∑˙˙˙ .œJœ·(.œbJœ·( ˙·)∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœb œœœœŒ œœœœ˙ ˙Ó Œ œA.œjœ ˙˙·) ˙wb∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œÓ ˙˙˙˙bwf204&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.99˙ œ œ œman can en dure99w˙b .œjœ.œJœ·( ˙·)∑∑99 œ œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œÓ ˙˙˙˙˙bwfff.˙ œa.œjœ ˙˙˙bw∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œÓ ˙˙˙˙˙bw˙ Œ œ œlot if hew˙ .œ jœ.œ jœ ˙∑∑œ œœœn œ œ œ œœœ œŒ œœœœœnbŒ œœœœœ˙ ˙˙ œb œstill has.œjœ ˙˙˙w∑∑œ œœœn œ œ œ œœœ œÓ ˙˙˙˙˙bw˙˙˙˙∑∑œ œœœœŒ œœœœœb˙˙ ˙hope.wwwÓ˙·(Óo˙œb œœœ œ ˙wwwwbbFPPPPP∑˙b ˙˙ ˙w˙·wœb œœœ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙-205&&&B??&&4242424242424242444444444444444442424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.106∑106 ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙·w106œb œœœ œ ˙wwwwbb∑wwwb˙·wœb œœœ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙∑.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ˙·w˙b ˙˙˙wwwwbb∑˙˙˙˙·˙˙˙˙˙˙∑wbww˙·wœb œœœ ˙wwwww∑˙˙˙˙·˙˙b˙˙˙˙bb∑wwwb˙·wwwwbwwww∑UwUwUwU˙·U)wUwUwwwwUppppPp206&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.jœ œ jœ jœ œb JœbThree hun dred twen ty ac114 wb˙ .œ jœwb∑∑114 œ œœœbb œ œ œb œœœ œ∑PPPfF114Jœ œb Jœ œ œ œbres of farm land,w.˙œ˙ .œJœo∑∑œœœbb œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ∑œ Œ˙˙˙∑∑œb œ œœœbb œ∑˙b jœ .œbfine land,˙ .œ jœ·(wbœ .˙b∑∑œb œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œ∑- - -207&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.118Ó Œ œmy118 ..˙·) œ˙ .œjœw∑∑118 œb œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑jœ œ jœ œ œun cle owned andwb.˙œw∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œ∑˙bcleared,˙˙˙∑∑œb œœœ œ∑˙ Ówbw.œbJœo ˙∑∑œb œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œ∑∑wwœ .˙b∑∑œb œœœb œ œb œœœ œ∑-208&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Jœb œ Jœ Jœ œ JœbThree hun dred twen ty ac123wb˙b .œ jœ·(w∑∑123 œb œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œ∑123Jœ œb Jœ œb œb œres of farm land,˙ .œ jœo..˙·) œbw∑∑œb œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œ∑œ Œ˙˙˙∑∑œ œœœbb œ∑Œ .˙bfineœ.˙bwwb∑∑œb œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œ∑jœ .œb Œ œland, myw˙ .œ jœ·(w∑∑œ œb œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑- - -209&&&B??&&42424242424242424444444444444444AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.128 jœ œ jœ œ œunc le owned and128 w..˙·) œbw∑∑128 œ œœœb œ œ œ œœœ œ∑œb œbcleared, he˙˙˙∑∑œb œœœb œ∑˙b .œ jœlost it.wbw˙ .œjœ∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑˙ Ówww∑∑œb œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑∑www∑∑œ œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑-210&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.133Ó Œ ‰ JœMen133w˙ .œjœ∑∑∑133 œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑F ˙ œ œbwhom I'dww∑∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑134˙ ˙knownww∑∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑˙ Óww∑∑∑œ œ œœœb œ ˙∑P∑ww∑∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑211&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.138Œ œb œ œwho'd lost their138ww∑∑∑138œ œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑wjobs,˙ .œjœw∑∑∑Œ œœœb ˙∑œ ˙ œblost theirww∑∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑whomes,ww∑∑∑œ œ œœœb œ ˙∑∑wb˙ .œjœ∑∑∑œ œœœb œ œ œœœ œ∑212&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.143Œ ˙b œlost their143ww∑∑∑143Œ œœœb ˙∑.˙ œbfam' lies.ww∑∑∑œ œœœb œ ˙∑www∑∑∑Œ œœœb ˙∑∑˙ .œjœw∑∑∑Ó ˙∑p∑ww∑∑∑Œ œœœb ˙∑∑ww∑∑∑œ œœœb œ ˙∑∑wbw∑∑∑Ó ˙∑-213&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Bjo.Gtr.Œ œ ˙The most150ww∑∑∑150Œ œœœb ˙∑P150.œb jœ œ œval u' bleww∑∑∑Ó ˙∑wbthingw˙ .œjœ∑∑∑Œ œœœb ˙∑p∑ww∑∑∑Ó ˙∑Ów˙eww∑∑∑Ó ˙∑wlostwjœ‰ Œ Ów∑∑Œ œœœ ˙∑pw˙ .œ jœ·(Ó Œ ‰ jœw∑∑Ó ˙∑- -214&&&B??&&AVln. IVln. 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IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.19∑∑19 .˙Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ19∑‰ Jœ œ# œn œ œ# œ œ# œ œ# œww19 œœœ œ# œnœ œ# œœ# œ œœ##∑∑∑Ó œ œ#Œ œ# œ œ#œ œ# ˙nœ .˙#wÓ œn œœ#œ Œ Óœ ..˙˙#www###ww#ƒƒfffffff∑∑w#wwwwwww#Œ ‰ Jœ œ# œœ#œœ ˙˙˙# œœœ∑∑∑∑wwwwwœ œœ#...˙˙˙#Œ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ# œœœœ ˙˙˙# œœœ∑∑f∑∑.˙ œ#.˙ œ#.˙ œ#.˙ œ.˙ œ#Œ ...˙˙˙##Œ ‰ jœ# œ œ œ#œœœ˙˙˙˙## œœœœŒ ˙˙˙## œœœ∑ ?pizz.PPPPPFPPP234&?&&B??&&&&?############################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.24∑∑24 wwww˙ œ œ#24Œ ‰ œ œœ#˙˙˙#Œ ‰ œ# œ# œ œ# œ#œœœœ˙˙˙˙## œœœœ24...˙˙˙ œœœ##˙˙ œœ œ#F∑∑wwww˙ œ œ#Œ ...˙˙˙##Œ ‰Jœ œ# œœ#œœœœ˙˙˙˙## œœœœ...œœœjœœœ## œœœ œœœ˙˙ œœ œ#P∑∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙#˙ ˙#˙ œ œ#‰ ...œœœ## ˙˙˙‰ œ# œ œ# œ œ ‰ jœ#œœœœ˙˙˙˙## œœœ...œœœjœœœ## œœœ œœœ˙˙ œœ œ#pppp∑Jœ.œ œ œ œWe had so lit tlewwww˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œœœœœ ˙˙˙ œœœwjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œpPPpf27∑œ .œ œ œ œ Œmon ey in the bank,˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ œ œ˙ œ œœ œ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œœœœœ ˙˙˙ œœœwjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ- -235&?&&B??&&&&?############################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.29∑Jœ .œ œ œ œwe had so lit tle29 wwww˙ œ œ29‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œœŒ ˙˙˙˙˙œœœœœw29‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑œ .œ œ œ œ Œmon ey in the bank˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœŒ œœœ˙ ˙‰ œœœjœœœ ‰ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑œ œ œ Jœ œ œev en if the bank waswwwwœ œ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œœœœœ ˙˙˙ œœœwjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑.œ Jœ œ .œ œn œ#closed it did n't mat ter˙ ˙.˙ œ˙ ˙˙ œ œ˙ œ œ‰ ...œœœ‰ ...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙˙œœœœœw‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑œ Œ Ómuch˙ ˙wwwœ œ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœ ŒœœœJœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ œœœjœœœ ...œœœ˙ ˙‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ- - - - -236&?&&B??&&&&?############################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.34∑∑34 ˙ ‰ Jœ- œ- œ-˙ ‰ Jœ- œ- œ-˙ ‰ Jœ- œ- œ-˙ ‰ Jœ- œ- œ-jœ œ jœ œ œ œ34‰ œœœjœœœ ‰œœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œjœœœ ...œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙34 jœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œFFFFjœ .œ œ œ œWe had so lit tleJœ.œ œ œ œWe had so lit tle.>˙ œ>.>˙ œ>.>˙ œ>.>˙ œ>œ œ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œfPPPP35œ .œ œ œ œ Œmon ey in the bank,œ .œ œ œ œ Œmon ey in the bank,˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œjœœœœœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œjœ .œ œ œ œwe had so lit tleJœ.œ œ œ œwe had so lit tlewwwwœ œ œ œjœœœœœœ Jœœœ Jœœœœœœ Jœœœœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœœjœœœœjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœ˙ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ- - -- - -237&?&&B??&&&&?############################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.38 œ .œ œ œ œ Œmon ey in the bankœ .œ œ œ œ Œmon ey in the bank38 ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œ38Jœœœœœœ Jœœœ Jœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœjœœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ ˙38‰ œœœjœœœ ‰ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œœ œ œ jœ œ œev en if the bank wasœ œ œ Jœ œ œev en if the bank waswwwwœ œ œ œjœœœœœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ.œ jœ œ .œ œn œ#closed it did n't mat ter.œ Jœ œ .œ œ œclosed it did n't mat terwwwwœ œ œ œjœœœœœœ Jœœœ Jœœœ œœœ Jœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœœjœœœœjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœ˙ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œœ Œ Ómuch.œ Œ Ómuch.œ .˙.˙ œ.˙ œœ .˙œ œ œ œJœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œjœœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœœ œ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ- - - -- - - -238&?&&B??&&&&?############################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.42Jœ .œ œ œ œWe had so lit tleJœ.œ œ œ œWe had so lit tle42 œ .˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ .˙œ œ œ œ42 jœœœœœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œ42 jœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œjœ .œ .œ jœmon ey in theJœ .œ .œ Jœmon ey in thew˙ ˙w˙ ˙œ œ œ œjœœœœœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œwbankwbank˙ ˙w˙ ˙wœ œ œ œjœœœœœœ Jœœœ Jœœœ œœœ Jœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœœjœœœœjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœ˙ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œœ ‰ jœ œ .œ œn œ#it did n't mat terœ ‰ Jœ œ .œ œ œit did n't mat terwwwwœ œ œ œJœœœ œœœ Jœœœ Jœœœ œœœ Jœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœ˙ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ- - - -- - - -239&?&&B??&&&&?############################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.46œ Œ Ómuch.œ Œ Ómuch.46wwwwœ œ œ œ46Jœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œ46‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑˙ Ó˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œjœœœœœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œp∑∑‰ œ Jœ œœ œ œ˙ Óww.œ jœ œ œjœœœœœœjœœœjœœœœœœjœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œfp48∑∑.œ Jœ œ œ‰ œ Jœ œœ œ œ˙ Ów.œ jœ œ œ‰ œœœ Jœœœ Jœœœœœœ Jœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œfp240&?&&B??&&&&?############################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.50∑∑50 w.œ Jœ œ œ‰ œ jœ œ œ œ œ˙Ó.œn jœ œn œ50‰ œœœnJœœœ Jœœœœœœ Jœœœœ œ œ œn œ œ œ œ‰ œœœœnjœœœœjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœ˙n œ œ50‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙nn œœ œfp∑∑ww.œ Jœ œ œ &‰ œ Jœœ œ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ‰ œœœ Jœœœ Jœœœœœœ Jœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ œœœœjœœœœjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœ˙ œ œ‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œf∑∑wwnwn.œnJœ œ œn.œn jœ œn œ‰ œœœnn Jœœœ Jœœœ...œœœœn œ œn œnœnœ œ œ œ‰ œœœnnnjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙n œ œn‰ œœœnnjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙nn œœ œn∑∑˙ œ œn˙ œ œn˙n œ œ˙n œ œ &.œ jœ œ œŒ ˙˙nn 朜næœn œn œn œœ œ œ œ œ‰ œœnnjœœjœœ œœjœœ˙ œ œn‰ œœœnnjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œn241&?&&&&?&&&&?############################################################424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.54∑∑54‰ œn Jœœn œ‰ œn Jœ œnœn‰ œn Jœ œœn‰ œn jœ œ œn.œn jœ œn œ54 ˙˙nn æ˙˙næœn œn œn œn œ œ œ œ‰ œœœœnnnnjœœœœjœœœœ œœœœjœœœœ˙n œ œn54‰ œœœnnnjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙nn œœ œn∑∑w.˙ œ˙# ˙œ# œ Óœ œ œ œwwæœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙œœœœw‰ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑wœ œ œ Œœ Œ Ó∑œ œ œ œwwæœ œ ˙œœœœ˙˙˙˙œœœœwjœœœ œœœjœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑wn∑∑∑œ œ ˙wwn æ∑Œ ....˙˙˙˙bbbnŒ ....˙˙˙˙nnww∑∑w∑∑∑wwwn∑wwwwbwwwwww∑∑Œ œn∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑p242&?&&&&?&&&&?############################################################444444444444444444444444424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑Ó œ œI have60 w∑∑∑˙ ˙60∑jœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙60∑∑PPP60∑.œ Jœ Jœ œjœa re al fear.˙ Œ∑∑∑˙ œ œ∑œ œ œjœ œ JœŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑˙ ÓÓ œ œ∑∑∑˙ .œ jœ∑jœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑∑˙∑∑∑œ œ∑œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙∑∑∑Œ ˙ œI havew∑∑∑˙ ˙∑jœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑Ó Œ œa.œ Jœ œ œa re alÓ Œ œ∑∑∑.œ Jœ œ œ∑œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑- -243&?&&&&?&&&&?############################################################424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.66˙ œ œ œ œfear of be ingwfear,66 w∑∑∑˙ œ œ66∑jœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙66∑∑œ œ ˙trapped.w˙Ó∑∑∑.œ jœ œ œ∑œ œ œ jœ œ JœŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑∑Œ œ∑∑∑œ œ∑œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙∑∑∑Ó Œ œaw∑∑∑˙ ˙∑jœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑Œ ‰ jœ œ œa re al˙ Œ œfear, aw∑∑∑˙ œ œ∑œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑- -244&?&&&&?&&&&?############################################################424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.71.œ jœ jœ œ jœfear of be ing trappedwfear71∑∑∑∑˙ œ œ71∑jœ œ Jœ jœ œ JœŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙71∑∑œ ˙ œin to˙ Œ œaŒ œ˙∑∑∑.œ jœ œ œ∑œ œ œ jœ œ JœŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑.˙ œmore thanwfear,w∑∑∑œ ˙ œ∑jœ œ Jœ œœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑œ œ ˙I need.wÓ Œœ∑∑∑˙ ˙∑œ œ œ jœ œ JœŒ œœœœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑w∑w∑∑∑.œ Jœ œ œ∑jœ œ Jœ œœ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑∑˙∑∑∑œ œ∑œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙∑∑- -245&?&&&&?&&&&?############################################################444444444444444444444444424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno..œ Jœ ˙I've got.œ Jœ œ œI've got a77w∑∑∑˙ ˙77∑Jœ œ Jœ œœ œŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙77∑∑77.˙ Œ.œ Jœ œ œ œsuit on and that'sÓ Œ œ∑∑∑.œ jœ œ œ∑œ œ œ Jœ œ JœŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑∑œ œ œ œ œa bout all I.˙ œ∑∑∑.œ Jœ œ œ∑jœ œ Jœ œœ œŒ œœœœ œœœœŒ œœœœ œœœœ˙ ˙∑∑Œ ‰ jœ œ œ œI've gotwwant.w∑∑∑˙ ˙∑œ œ œ Jœ œ JœŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙∑∑œ œall I∑Œœ∑∑∑.œ Jœ∑œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ˙∑∑Pwwant.∑wÓ ˙∑∑˙ .œ Jœ∑œœ œ# œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœœ#œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœw∑∑ &P-246&?&&&&?&&&&&############################################################424242424242424242424242n####n####n####n####n####n####n####n####n####n####n####n####444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.83∑∑83wwŒ .˙∑.œ jœ œ œ83∑œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœœ#œœœœ‰ jœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙ ˙83Œ œ œœ#˙˙˙#jœ ..œœ ˙˙PP∑∑wwwnÓ Œ œ˙n œ œ˙˙˙˙nn æ ˙˙˙˙œ œ œn œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœn œœœ ‰jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙n ˙Œ œ œœ˙˙˙jœn ..œœ ˙˙Ppi∑∑wwnww.œ jœ œ œ....˙˙˙˙朜œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙ ˙Ó œ œœœœœŒ œ œœ ˙˙∑∑˙n ˙˙ ˙b˙ ˙n˙ ˙.œn jœ œb œnwwwwnnbnæœ œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœn œœœ œœœ‰ jœœœ œœœ œœœ˙n ˙Œ ‰Jœœœn œœœ œœœœ# œœ œœœ# œœœ œœœ∑∑œ Œœ Œœ Œœ Œ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙Œ œœœœ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙FF247&?&&&&?&&&&&################################################444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑∑88‰ œ Jœ œœ œ œ‰ œ Jœ œœ œ œ‰ œ jœ œ œ œ œ‰ œ jœ œ œ œ œ˙# ˙88‰....œœœœ ‰....œœœœwwwœœœœ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœ˙ ˙88 wwwwww?ffff88∑∑.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ˙ œ œŒ....˙˙˙˙Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœ˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ#jœœœ ...œœœ˙˙ œœ œf∑∑.˙ œ˙ ˙˙# ˙#.˙ œ.œ Jœ œ œn‰ ....œœœœ# ‰ ....œœœœ‰ œ œ œ# œœ ŒŒ ˙˙˙˙# œœœœwŒ ...˙˙˙#˙˙ œœ œ∑∑œ œ ˙.˙ œ#.˙ œœ œ ˙˙ ˙Œ....˙˙˙˙Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw‰ ...œœœ#jœœœ ...œœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑˙ ˙w#w B˙ ˙?.œ jœ œ œ‰....œœœœ ‰....œœœœ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœwjœœœ œœœ#jœœœjœœœ œœœjœœœ˙˙ œœ œ248&?&&B??&&&&?################################################ABVln. IVln. 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IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.105.˙ œall.˙ œall105wwww˙ ˙105‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœjœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw105‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ œœ œœ œ œ œ œthese kinds of things.œ œ œ œ œthese kinds of things.˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙#˙ ˙#‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœ#jœ œ Jœ œ# œ œŒ ˙˙˙ œœœ˙ ˙#‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ# Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙##wwwwww˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœjœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœ˙ ˙Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ œœ œFFFF252&?&&B??&&&&?################################################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑∑109˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ‰ jœ œ œ˙ ˙109‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœjœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœ˙ ˙109‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ œœ œ109∑∑œ ˙ œœ ˙ œœ ˙n œœ ˙ œ˙ ˙‰ ...œœœn ‰...œœœjœ œ Jœn œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙n œœœœ˙ ˙‰ œœœœn Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙∑∑.œ jœ œ œ.œ jœ œ œ.œ Jœ œ œ.œ Jœ œ œ˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ# ‰...œœœJœ œ Jœ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœ˙ ˙‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑˙ ‰ Jœ œ œ˙ ‰jœ œ œ˙ ‰ Jœ œ œ˙ ‰ Jœ œ œ˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœœ œ œ ˙œœœœ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœwJœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑˙ ‰ Jœ œ œ˙ ‰ jœ œ œn˙ ‰ Jœ œ œ˙ ‰ Jœ œ œ#˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœŒ ‰ œ œ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ Jœœœœ ....œœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑.˙ œ.˙ œ#.˙ œn.˙ œ˙# ˙#‰ ...œœœ ‰...œœœŒ ‰ œ œ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙n œœœœw#‰ œœœœ#n Jœœœœ Jœœœœ ....œœœœ˙˙## œœ œ253&?&&B??&&&&?################################################n###n###n###n###n###n###n###n###n###n###n###n###ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.115∑∑115 .œ Jœ œ œ.œ Jœ œ œ.œ jœ# œ œ.œ Jœn œ œ˙ ˙115‰ ...œœœn ‰...œœœ‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œnŒ ˙˙˙˙n œœœœw115‰ œœœœn Jœœœœ Jœœœœ ....œœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑œ ˙n œœ ˙ œœ ˙ œœ ˙ œn˙ ˙‰ ...œœœn ‰...œœœœ œ œ œn œ œ œœœœœ ˙˙˙˙n œœœœwJœœœœ œœœœn Jœœœœ Jœœœœ ....œœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑.œ Jœ Jœ œ Jœ#.œ Jœ Jœ œjœ.œ jœ jœ œjœ.œ Jœ# Jœ œ Jœ˙ ˙‰ ...œœœ# ‰...œœœŒ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œŒ ˙˙˙˙# œœœœwŒ œœœœ# Œ œœœœ˙˙ œœ œ∑∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙Œ œœœ Œœœœ‰ jœ œ œ œ œœ œÓ ˙˙˙˙#wÓ ˙˙˙˙#ww∑∑wwwnw˙ ˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙nŒ œ œ œÓ ˙˙˙˙˙nwÓ ˙˙˙ww∑∑.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ....˙˙˙˙n Œ....˙˙˙˙n Œ......˙˙˙˙˙˙n Œ˙˙˙˙n Ó..˙˙Œ254&?&&B??&&&&?####################################ABVln. IVln. 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IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.œŒ Ómuch.œ Œ Ómuch.133∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œ133œœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœ œ œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœœ œ œ œ133∑∑pizz.ffff133∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœœ œ œ œ∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œ‰ Jœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œ‰ œœ Jœœœœœœ∑ƒƒFFF∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œ# œœ œ œ œ œ œœn œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœn ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœœ œ œ œ..œœ Jœœ œœ œœ∑257&?&&B??&&&&?####################################ABVln. IVln. 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IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.141∑∑141∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œ141‰ Jœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œ141‰ œœ Jœœœœœœ∑∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œœœ˙˙ œœ∑∑∑wb æwæwn æwæœ œ œ œww# æœn œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ œœœœ#n jœœœœjœœœœœœœœjœœœœ˙ ˙Œ ....˙˙˙˙#nwwFFFF∑∑œ> Œ Óœ> Œ Óœ> Œ Óœ> Œ Óœ œ œ œœœ Œ Óœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œwwwwwwffff259&?&&B??&&&&?####################################n##n##n##n##n##n##n##n##n##n##n##n##ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.145∑∑145 wæwn æwbæwæœ œ œ œ145 ..˙˙#朜>œn œb œ œœ œ œ œœœœœ‰ œœœœ#n jœœœœjœœœœœœœœjœœœœ˙ ˙145Œ ˙˙˙˙#n œœœœwwFFFF∑∑œ>Œ˙œ> Œ ˙œ> Œ ˙œ> Œ ˙œ œ œ œœœ Œ Óœ œ œœœ œ œœœ œ œ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œwwwwwwƒƒƒƒffff∑∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙n ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œŒ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œŒœœ œœ œœww∑∑˙n ˙˙ ˙n˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œœœœœ œœ œœœ œ œœœ œœœœœ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œœœœœ œœ œœ∑∑Ó Œ ‰ JœSe.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œ.˙ Œœ œ œœ..˙˙ Œœ œœœ œœ œ œ‰ jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœ ‰jœœœœ œ œ œ..˙˙ Œ..˙˙ œœFFFF-260&?&&B??&&&&?########################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.∑œ œ œ Jœ .œ Jœcur i ty to me is150 ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œœ150‰jœœœœ ‰jœœœœ ‰ Jœœœœ ‰ Jœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœœ‰ jœœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœœœ œ œ œ150‰ œœœœjœœœœ ‰ œœœœjœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙150Ó Œ ‰ jœSeJœ œ Jœ ˙not what we have,˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œ‰Jœœœœ ‰ Jœœœœ ‰jœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ œœœœ œœœœœ œ œ œ‰ œœœœjœœœœ ‰ œœœœjœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙œ œ œ jœ .œ jœcur i ty to me isw˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœœ‰ jœœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ‰ œœœœjœœœœ ‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙jœ œ jœ ˙not what we have,Ó Œ ‰ JœSe˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ jœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœ‰ œœœœ œœœœ‰ œœœœ œœœœœ œ œ œ‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ ‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙- -- - --261&?&&B??&&&&?########################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.154wœ œ œ Jœ .œ Jœcur i ty to me is154˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œ154œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œœœœ œ œœ œœœœ‰ jœœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ154‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ ‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙Ó Œ ‰ jœSeJœ œ Jœ ˙not what we have,˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ œœ œ œœœœ‰ jœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœ‰ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œ ˙‰ œœœœ Jœœœœ ‰œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙œ œ œ jœ .œ jœcur i ty to me isw˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ‰ œœœœœœœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ‰œœœœ Jœœœœ ‰œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙jœ œ Jœ ˙not what we have,w˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ‰ œœœœœœœœ‰ œœœœœœœœ‰ œœœœ œœœœ‰ œœœœ œœœœœ œ œ œ‰œœœœ Jœœœœ ‰œœœœ Jœœœœ˙˙ ˙˙- -- --262&?&&B??&&&&?########################424242424242424242424242444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.158 ˙ Ó˙ Ó158 ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ158 œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙158‰ Jœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ˙˙ œœ œœ œœ∑∑œ .˙œ .˙œ .˙œ .˙œ .˙œœœœ....˙˙˙˙œ ...˙˙˙œœœœœ.....˙˙˙˙˙œœœœ ....˙˙˙˙œœ ..˙˙Œ œbutŒ œbutŒ œŒ œŒ œŒ œ∑∑∑∑∑∑PPPP.œ jœ œ œwhat we can.œJœ œ œwhat we can.œ Jœ ˙.œ Jœ ˙.œ Jœ ˙.œ Jœ ˙.œ Jœ ˙∑∑∑wwwwwPPœ ˙ œdo withœ ˙ œdo with˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙w∑∑∑wwwwwwout.wout..˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œw∑∑∑wwwww.˙U ŒU.˙UŒU˙ œU ŒU˙ œU ŒU˙ œU ŒU˙ œU ŒU.˙U ŒUÓ ŒU ŒUÓ ŒU ŒUÓ ŒU ŒU...˙˙˙U ŒU..˙˙U ŒU--263&?&&B??&&&&?########################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œWhat real ly hap pened was a‰ Jœ œ œ œ œœ œ œWhat real ly hap pened was a165∑∑∑∑.˙ œ165∑∑Œ ˙˙˙ œœœw165˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙A bit slower (q = 108)ppp165.œ jœ .œ œ œrev o lu tion,.œ Jœ .œ œ œrev o lu tion,∑∑∑∑˙ ˙∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙ww∑∑∑∑.˙ œ∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙∑∑∑∑∑∑˙ ˙∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwhat real ly hap pened was a‰ Jœ œ œ œ œœ œ œwhat real ly hap pened was a∑∑∑∑˙ ˙∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙.œ Jœ œ œrev o lu tion,.œ Jœ œ œrev o lu tion,∑∑∑∑˙ ˙∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙- - -- - - - -- - --- - - - - - --264&?&&B??&&&&?########################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.171˙ Ó˙ Ó171∑∑∑∑.˙ œ171∑∑Œ ˙˙˙ œœœw171˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙∑∑∑∑∑∑˙ ˙∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œwhat real ly hap pened was a‰Jœ œ œ œ œœ œ œwhat real ly hap pened was a∑∑∑∑.˙ œ∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙.œ Jœ œ œrev o lu tion,.œ Jœ œ œrev o lu tion,∑∑∑∑˙ ˙∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙œœœœw˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙‰ jœ œ œ œ jœ .œwhat real ly hap pened,‰Jœ œ œ œ Jœ.œwhat real ly hap pened,∑∑∑∑.˙ œ∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœwwwwwww˙ Ó˙ Ó∑∑∑∑w∑∑Œ ˙˙˙ œœœw˙˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙ww- -- -- - - - -- - - - -265&?&&B??&&&&?########################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.177‰ jœ œ œ œ Jœ .œWhat real ly hap pened,‰Jœ œ œœ Jœ .œWhat real ly hap pened,177∑∑∑∑.˙ œ177∑∑Œ ˙˙˙ œœœw177wwwwww˙ Ó˙ Ó∑∑∑∑w#∑∑Œ ˙˙˙ œœœw#˙˙˙˙# ˙˙˙˙ww##‰ jœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œWhat real ly hap pened was a‰ Jœ œ œ œ œœ œ œWhat real ly hap pened was a∑∑∑∑.˙ œ∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙˙œœœœœwwwwwwœ œ œ jœ œ jœrev o lu tion inœ œ œ Jœ œ Jœrev o lu tion in∑∑∑∑˙ ˙∑∑Œ ˙˙˙˙ œœœœwwwwwww.œ jœ œ œpoint of view,.œ Jœ œ œpoint of view,∑∑∑∑.œ Jœ œœ∑∑.....œœœœœjœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ....˙˙˙˙ œœœ..˙˙ œœ˙ Ó˙ Ó∑∑∑∑w∑∑wwwwwwwwww- - -- - ------ -- -266&?&&B??&&&&?########################434343434343434343434343444444444444444444444444ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.183‰ jœ œ œ .œ œ œ œa rev o lu tion in‰ Jœ œ œ .œ œ œ œa rev o lu tion in183∑∑Ó ˙‰ .œ ˙w183∑∑wwwww183wwwwwppcon sord.con sord..œ jœ œ œpoint of view..œ Jœ œ œpoint of view.Œ ‰ Jœ œ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ.˙ œ∑∑∑∑∑∑ppPPPPcon sord.con sord.wwwwww∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑˙ Œ˙ Œ˙ Œ˙ Œ∑∑∑∑∑∑œ œ œ .œ œ œ œI just want one hap py∑wwww∑∑∑∑∑∑pppp˙ Ólife,∑wwww∑∑∑∑∑∑- - -- - --267&?&&B??&&&&?########################ABVln. IVln. IIVla.Vc.D.B.Mdn.Bjo.Gtr.Pno.189∑œ œ œ .œ œ œ œI just want one hap py189 wwww∑189∑∑∑189∑∑∑˙ Ólife,wwww∑∑∑∑∑∑jœ œ jœ ˙I just wantJœ œ Jœ ˙I just wantwwww∑∑∑∑∑∑.œ jœ œ œone hap py.œ Jœ œ œone hap pywwww∑∑∑∑∑∑wlife,wlife,wwww∑∑∑∑∑∑˙ Ó˙ Ó˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙∑∑∑∑∑∑wthat'swthat'swwww∑∑∑∑∑∑wit.wit.wwww∑∑∑∑∑∑pipipipiwwwwww∑∑∑∑∑∑---268

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