Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Piercing memory – marking history : the National Women's March Against Poverty and the quilt Women United… Ursino, Joanne Marie 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2016_february_ursino_joanne.pdf [ 5.16MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0223195.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0223195-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0223195-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0223195-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0223195-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0223195-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0223195-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0223195-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0223195.ris

Full Text

	  	  	  	  	  PIERCING	  MEMORY	  –	  MARKING	  HISTORY	  	  THE	  NATIONAL	  WOMEN’S	  MARCH	  AGAINST	  POVERTY	  and	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  1996	  and	  2015	  	  by	  	  JOANNE	  MARIE	  URSINO	  B.A.	  Hons.,	  Brock	  University,	  1985	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  in	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  	  Master	  of	  Arts	  	  	  	  in	  The	  Faculty	  of	  Graduate	  and	  Postdoctoral	  Studies	  (Art	  Education)	  	  	  	  	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  	  December,	  2015	  	  	  ©	  Joanne	  Marie	  Ursino,	  2015	  	  Abstract	  	  The	  signature	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  marks	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  that	  took	  place	  in	  1996.	  	  The	  quilt	  top	  was	  created	  by	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams	  from	  Curve	  Lake	  First	  Nation	  and	  Joanne	  Ursino.	  	  The	  content	  on	  the	  quilt	  (text,	  photographs,	  and	  images)	  is	  of	  great	  significance	  in	  seeking	  to	  better	  understand	  a	  particular	  moment	  in	  the	  social	  justice	  movement	  in	  Canada.	  	  A	  unique	  moment	  when	  women	  across	  the	  country	  -­‐	  from	  divergent	  political,	  social	  and	  economic	  identities,	  backgrounds	  and	  relationships—worked	  together	  demanding	  an	  end	  to	  poverty	  under	  the	  political	  banner:	  “For	  Bread	  And	  Roses	  –	  For	  Jobs	  And	  Justice.”	  	  In	  the	  world	  of	  textiles,	  signature	  quilts,	  story	  quilts,	  political	  quilts	  and,	  more	  recently,	  the	  art	  quilt	  share	  a	  history	  that	  contributes	  to	  research	  in	  the	  field	  of	  narrative	  inquiry,	  feminist	  and	  queer	  discourse,	  and	  public	  art.	  	  This	  research	  study	  investigates	  how	  a	  practice	  of	  reflexive	  inquiry	  through	  the	  act	  of	  art	  making	  constitute	  a	  contribution	  to	  the	  public	  archive?	  	  It	  is	  both	  personal	  and	  political.	  	  The	  research	  is	  personal	  insofar	  as	  it	  is	  situated	  in	  a	  commitment	  to	  gender,	  sexual	  equality	  and	  studio	  art	  practice	  as	  a	  way	  of	  inquiring	  into	  and	  representing	  the	  world.	  	  It	  is	  political	  because	  it	  is	  anchored	  in	  the	  discourses	  of	  historical	  thinking,	  collective	  memory	  and	  contesting	  archives,	  mapping,	  materiality,	  material	  culture,	  making	  and	  coming	  to	  know	  through	  writing.	  	  It	  is	  an	  offering	  of	  meaning-­‐making	  through	  arts-­‐based	  research.	  	  I	  seek	  the	  unruly	  entanglements	  as	  I	  examine	  the	  liminal	  spaces	  in	  the	  materialities	  of	  writing	  and	  making	  and	  the	  intentional	  reading	  of	  post-­‐modern	  feminist	  and	  queer	  theory,	  arts-­‐based	  research	  and	  the	  challenge	  of	  data.	  	  The	  focus	  of	  this	  research	  study	  is	  on	  the	  location	  of	  the	  materiality	  of	  political	  action/praxis	  within	  the	  aesthetic	  realm.	  	  The	  quilt	  top	  was	  tucked	  away	  for	  almost	  twenty	  years.	  	  In	  returning	  to	  and	  un/finishing	  the	  artefact	  –	  making	  and	  quilting	  its	  layers	  is	  an	  integral	  act	  accompanying	  the	  writing	  of	  this	  thesis.	  	  Writing	  and	  stitching	  is	  an	  act	  of	  inquiry	  in	  and	  through	  the	  layers	  of	  meaning,	  matter	  and	  language.	  	  	  	  iiPreface	  	  Original	  artwork	  	  The	  quilt	  top	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  was	  co-­‐created	  by	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams	  from	  Curve	  Lake	  First	  Nation	  and	  Joanne	  Ursino.	  1	  	  Additional	  information	  about	  the	  art	  practice	  of	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams	  can	  be	  found	  at:	  http://www.pimaatisiwin-­‐quilts.com	  	  	  	  All	  photographs,	  needlework,	  ceramic	  pieces,	  intaglio	  and	  photopolymer	  prints	  were	  created	  by	  and	  are	  used	  with	  permission	  of	  the	  artist,	  Joanne	  Ursino.	  	  The	  photograph	  on	  page	  104	  was	  taken	  by	  Ticha	  Albino	  in	  collaboration	  with	  Joanne	  Ursino	  (Figure	  89).	  	  Consent	  was	  given	  by	  Joanne	  Ursino	  to	  appear	  in	  photographs	  (Figures	  1-­‐6,	  125).	  	  Nine	  photographs	  were	  taken	  by	  Blake	  Smith,	  and	  are	  duly	  noted	  and	  used	  with	  the	  permission	  of	  the	  artist	  (Figures	  1-­‐6,	  9,	  125,	  129,	  130).	  	  Some	  of	  the	  photographs	  on	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  were	  provided	  by	  staff	  members	  from	  the	  Canadian	  Labour	  Congress	  in	  1996.	  	  These	  photographs	  are	  incorporated	  among	  other	  images	  via	  a	  photo	  transfer	  process	  on	  to	  fabric.	  	  No	  images	  in	  this	  thesis	  can	  be	  reproduced	  without	  consent.	  Please	  contact	  Joanne	  Ursino	  at	  jmu310108@shaw.ca	  	  	  	  Preliminary	  research	  piercing	  memory	  –	  marking	  history	  1996/2014	  was	  shared	  with	  participants	  at	  the	  Graduate	  Symposium	  of	  the	  Canadian	  Association	  of	  Education	  through	  Art,	  October	  24,	  2014.	  	  	  	  	  	  iii	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  Curve	  Lake	  First	  Nations	  is	  located	  approximately	  25	  kilometers	  northeast	  of	  Peterborough,	  Ontario.	  	  	  iv	  Table	  of	  Contents	  	  Abstract	  ........................................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Preface	  ..........................................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Table	  of	  Contents	  ........................................................................................................................................	  iv	  List	  of	  Photographs	  .....................................................................................................................................	  vii	  Glossary	  ........................................................................................................................................................	  x	  List	  of	  Abbreviations	  ..................................................................................................................................	  xiii	  Acknowledgements	  ...................................................................................................................................	  xiv	  Dedication	  .................................................................................................................................................	  xvi	  Mapping	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  xvii	  Chapter	  1:	  Introduction	  ........................................................................................................................	  1	  Why	  quilts	  and	  quilting	  ............................................................................................................................	  1	  The	  draw	  of	  thread	  through	  time	  ............................................................................................................	  3	  The	  profound	  privilege	  of	  returning	  to	  school	  .........................................................................................	  5	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty:	  “For	  Bread	  and	  Roses,	  For	  Jobs	  and	  Justice”	  ..........................	  7	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  ....................................................................................................................	  8	  The	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  Quilt	  ..................................................................................................	  9	  What	  Does	  the	  Quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  Do?	  .......................................................................	  10	  “I	  was	  there.”	  .............................................................................................................................................	  12	  Signature,	  Story,	  Political	  and	  Art	  Quilts	  ...................................................................................................	  15	  Stitching	  .................................................................................................................................................	  18	  Writing	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  21	  Reading	  ..................................................................................................................................................	  23	  Stitching,	  Writing	  and	  Reading	  ..............................................................................................................	  24	  Chapter	  Outline	  .........................................................................................................................................	  25	  A	  note	  to	  the	  reader	  ...............................................................................................................................	  26	  detailing	  ............................................................................................................................................	  27	  Chapter	  2:	  Methodology,	  Literature,	  Data	  and	  Multimethods	  ............................................................	  28	  Methodology	  .............................................................................................................................................	  28	  Literature	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  29	  Data	  ...........................................................................................................................................................	  31	  Tidy	  and	  Messy	  ......................................................................................................................................	  32	  Inside	  and	  Outside	  .................................................................................................................................	  33	  Multimethods	  Research	  ............................................................................................................................	  39	  Thinking	  Historically	  (Chapter	  3)	  ............................................................................................................	  40	  A/r/tography	  (Chapter	  4)	  .......................................................................................................................	  41	  Reflexive	  Inquiry	  (Chapter	  5)	  ..................................................................................................................	  42	  twisting	  .............................................................................................................................................	  43	  	  	  v	  Chapter	  3:	   	  Thinking	  Historically	  ....................................................................................................	  44	  The	  Quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  and	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  ...............	  45	  Historical	  Significance	  ................................................................................................................................	  46	  Evidence	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  50	  Quilt	  Scholarship	  and	  Material	  Culture	  .....................................................................................................	  52	  Historical	  Perspectives	  ...............................................................................................................................	  57	  The	  Quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  and	  the	  Public	  Archive	  ............................................................	  61	  The	  Quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  and	  Critical	  Pedagogy	  .............................................................	  64	  Naming	  ..................................................................................................................................................	  65	  Praxis	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  67	  The	  Quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  and	  Intersectionality	  ..............................................................	  69	  Language	  ...............................................................................................................................................	  69	  Representation	  ......................................................................................................................................	  70	  Conclusion	  Un/folding	  ...............................................................................................................................	  71	  un/finishing	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  Quilt	  .........................................................................	  71	  making	  ..............................................................................................................................................	  74	  Chapter	  4:	   A/r/tography	  ...............................................................................................................	  75	  Needlework	  ............................................................................................................................................	  80	  Ceramics	  ................................................................................................................................................	  84	  Printmaking	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  87	  troubling	  ............................................................................................................................................	  89	  Conclusion	  Un/tangling	  .............................................................................................................................	  93	  meaning	  ............................................................................................................................................	  94	  Chapter	  5:	   Reflexive	  Inquiry	  ..........................................................................................................	  95	  Sites	  of	  Possibilities	  in	  Making	  and	  Writing	  ...............................................................................................	  95	  Reflexive	  Visual	  Journaling	  Alongside	  a	  Studio	  Art	  Practice	  ......................................................................	  97	  Notes	  on	  Reflexivity	  and	  the	  Narratives	  that	  Unfold	  in	  this	  Chapter	  ...................................................	  101	  Conclusion	  Un/ravelling	  ...........................................................................................................................	  125	  rocking	  .............................................................................................................................................	  126	  Chapter	  6:	   Findings	  .....................................................................................................................	  127	  stitching	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  129	  Returning	  .........................................................................................................................................	  130	  A	  Threading	  of	  Research	  Questions	  .........................................................................................................	  130	  Contributions	  to	  Scholarship	  and	  Academic	  Research	  ............................................................................	  131	  Additional	  Considerations	  .......................................................................................................................	  131	  persisting	  .........................................................................................................................................	  132	  	  	  	  	  vi	  Bibliography	  ....................................................................................................................................	  135	  Appendix	  1	  .......................................................................................................................................	  160	  From	  the	  Margins	  to	  the	  Mainstream	  de	  l’ombre	  à	  la	  lumière	  Appendix	  2	  .......................................................................................................................................	  161	  List	  of	  Demands:	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  1996	  Appendix	  3	  .......................................................................................................................................	  162	  Primary	  and	  Secondary	  Sources:	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  1996	  Appendix	  4	  .......................................................................................................................................	  164	  Speeches	  in	  the	  House	  of	  Commons:	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  Appendix	  5	  .......................................................................................................................................	  165	  Quilt	  Proposal:	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  Appendix	  6	  .......................................................................................................................................	  167	  Unfolding	  the	  Quilt	  Top:	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  Appendix	  7	  .......................................................................................................................................	  168	  Sample	  9-­‐patch	  	  	  vii	  List	  of	  Photographs	  	  Figure	   	   Title	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   Page	  Figure	  1	   	   untitled	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   xii	  Figure	  2	   	   untitled	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   xii	  Figure	  3	   	   untitled	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   xii	  Figure	  4	   	   untitled	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   xii	  Figure	  5	   	   untitled	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   xii	  Figure	  6	   	   untitled	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   xii	  Figure	  7	   	   roses	  and	  bread	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   xiv	  Figure	  8	   	   Bread	  and	  Roses	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  xvi	  Figure	  9	   	   untitled	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...	  xvii	  Figure	  10	   Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  (quilt	  top,	  front)	  ……………………………………………………………	  6	  Figure	  11	   section	  on	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ………………….	   8	  Figure	  12	   section	  on	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ………………….	   8	  Figure	  13	   section	  marking	  the	  start	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty,	  May	  1996	  ….	  9	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………………………..	   9	  Figure	  14	   section	  marking	  the	  arrival	  on	  Parliament	  Hill,	  conclusion	  of	  the	  ……………………………………	   9	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty,	  June	  1996	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  Figure	  15	   pinning	  and	  reading	  text	  squares	  ……………………………………………………………………………………	   13	  Figure	  16	   pinned	  text	  squares	  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   14	  Figure	  17	   un/fold	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  27	  Figure	  18	   hand	  dyed	  wool	  from	  vegetables	  grown	  on	  Musqueam	  land	  ………………………………………….	   30	  Figure	  19	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ………………………………………………………………..	   40	  Figure	  20	   needle	  book	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  41	  Figure	  21	   visual	  journal	  page	  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  42	  Figure	  22	   untitled	  (interior)	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  43	  Figure	  23	   untitled	  (exterior)	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  43	  Figure	  24	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  46	  Figure	  25	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ………………………………………………………………….	  46	  Figure	  26	   section	  commemorating	  the	  beginning	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  ……………	  47	  Poverty	  in	  Vancouver	  BC,	  May	  1996	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  Figure	  27	   section	  commemorating	  the	  Caravans	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty…	  47	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  Figure	  28	   section	  commemorating	  text	  square	  of	  the	  Western	  Caravan	  …………………………………………	  47	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  Figure	  29	   section	  commemorating	  text	  square	  of	  the	  Eastern	  Caravan	  ………………………………………….	   47	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  Figure	  30	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  49	  Figure	  31	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  49	  Figure	  32	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  50	  Figure	  33	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  50	  Figure	  34	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  51	  Figure	  35	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  51	  Figure	  36	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  51	  Figure	  37	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  52	  Figure	  38	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  52	  Figure	  39	   text	  square	  –	  demand	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………	  56	  Figure	  40	   text	  square	  –	  demand	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………	  56	  Figure	  41	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  57	  Figure	  42	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  57	  	  	  viii	  Figure	   	   Title	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   Page	  Figure	  43	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  61	  Figure	  44	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  61	  Figure	  45	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  63	  Figure	  46	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  63	  Figure	  47	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  64	  Figure	  48	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  64	  Figure	  49	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  64	  Figure	  50	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  64	  Figure	  51	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  65	  Figure	  52	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  65	  Figure	  53	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  66	  Figure	  54	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  66	  Figure	  55	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  66	  Figure	  56	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  66	  Figure	  57	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  67	  Figure	  58	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  67	  Figure	  59	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  68	  Figure	  60	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  68	  Figure	  61	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  69	  Figure	  62	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  69	  Figure	  63	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  70	  Figure	  64	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  70	  Figure	  65	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  71	  Figure	  66	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  71	  Figure	  67	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  72	  Figure	  68	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  72	  Figure	  69	   working	  pieces	  (cut	  linoleum)	  ………………………………………………………………………………………….	  74	  Figure	  70	   working	  pieces	  (sewing	  clay)	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………	  74	  Figure	  71	   working	  pieces	  (inked	  photopolymer	  plate)	  …………………………………………………………………….	  74	  Figure	  72	   troubling	  threads	  in	  method	  …………………………………..……………………………………………………….	  78	  Figure	  73	   gift	  for	  my	  mother	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  80	  Figure	  74	   sewing	  box	  notions	  ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  82	  Figure	  75	   scissor	  case	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  84	  Figure	  76	   mapping	  the	  back	  of	  the	  quilt	  3/3	  ……………………………………………………………………………………	  87	  Figure	  77	   troubling	  (copper	  plate)	  ……………………………………………………………………………………….…………	  89	  Figure	  78	   troubling	  (hard	  ground)	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  89	  Figure	  79	   troubling	  (aquatint)	  …………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  89	  Figure	  80	   section	  of	  back	  of	  quilt	  top,	  hand	  appliqué	  by	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams	  …………………………………	  89	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  Figure	  81	   troubling	  the	  signifier	  (1)	  ………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   89	  Figure	  82	   troubling	  the	  signifier	  (A/P)	  …………………………………………………………………………………………….	  89	  Figure	  83	   troubling	  the	  signifier	  (2)	  ………………………………………………………………………………………………..	   89	  Figure	  84	  	   troubling	  the	  signifier	  (3)	  3/3	  ………………………………………………………………………………………….	   90	  Figure	  85	   small	  art	  and	  love	  and	  beauty	  …………………………………………………………………………………………	  94	  Figure	  86	   folded	  quilt	  top	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………..	  102	  Figure	  87	   back	  of	  stitched	  quilt	  (example)	  ……………………………………………………………………………………….	  103	  Figure	  88	   cut-­‐out	  showing	  back	  of	  quilt	  top	  (example)	  ……………………………………………………………………	  103	  Figure	  89	   sanding	  wood	  intended	  for	  the	  quilt	  frame	  ……………………………………………………………………..	  104	  Figure	  90	   side	  view	  of	  visual	  journal	  pages	  …………………………………………………………………………………….	   105	  Figure	  91	   scissors	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  106	  Figure	  92	   annotated	  velum	  on	  top	  of	  photograph	  of	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  …………………….	  107	  Figure	  93	   camera	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  108	  	  	  ix	  Figure	   	   Title	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   Page	  Figure	  94	   Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  (quilt	  top	  with	  cutting	  lines)	  ……………….…………………………	  109	  Figure	  95	   back	  of	  stitched	  quilt	  (example)	  ………………………………………………………………………………………	  110	  Figure	  96	   front	  of	  stitched	  quilt	  (example)	  ………………………………………………………………………………………	  110	  Figure	  97	   annotated	  velum	  on	  top	  of	  stitched	  example	  ………………………………………………………………….	   111	  Figure	  98	   hopstitching	  ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………	   112	  Figure	  99	   visual	  journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  113	  Figure	  100	   visual	  journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  114	  Figure	  101	   visual	  journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  115	  Figure	  102	   visual	  journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  117	  Figure	  103	   visual	  journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  117	  Figure	  104	   sketch	  of	  idea	  ……………………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  118	  Figure	  105	   playing	  with	  piecing	  the	  back	  of	  the	  quilt	  (example)…………………………………………………………	  118	  Figure	  106	   playing	  with	  the	  idea	  of	  pinning	  squares	  to	  the	  back	  of	  the	  quilt	  (example)	  …………………….	  118	  Figure	  107	   figuring	  the	  cut/placement	  of	  the	  patting	  and	  piecing	  ……………………………………….……………	  119	  Figure	  108	   visual	  journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  120	  Figure	  109	   journal	  page	  ……………………………………….………………………………………………………………………….	   121	  Figure	  110	   journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………..	  121	  Figure	  111	   visual	  journal	  page	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………	  121	  Figure	  112	   piecing	  the	  back	  ……………………………………….…………………………………………………….………………	   122	  Figure	  113	   piecing	  not	  taken	  (1)	  ……………………………………….………………………………………………………………	  122	  Figure	  114	   piecing	  not	  taken	  (2)	  ………………………………….……………………………………………………………………	  122	  Figure	  115	   piecing	  not	  taken	  (3)	  ………………………………….……………………………………………………………………	  122	  Figure	  116	   piecing	  not	  taken	  (4)	  ………………………………….……………………………………………………………………	  122	  Figure	  117	   piecing	  not	  taken	  (5)	  ………………………………….……………………………………………………………………	  122	  Figure	  118	   stitching	  pieces	  of	  the	  backing………………………………….………………………………………………………	  123	  Figure	  119	   twist	  of	  the	  seam	  ………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………	  123	  Figure	  120	   back	  of	  quilt	  top	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ………………………………………………………….	  124	  Figure	  121	   draft	  piecing	  of	  the	  back	  of	  the	  quilt	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ……………………………	  124	  Figure	  122	   pieced	  batting	  on	  the	  back	  of	  the	  quilt	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  )………………………..	  124	  Figure	  123	   pieced	  backing	  with	  batting	  prior	  to	  basting	  the	  quilt	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …	  124	  Figure	  124	   untitled	  ………………………………….………………………………………………………………………………………..	  125	  Figure	  125	   untitled	  ………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………………….…	   126	  Figure	  126	   basting	  stitches	  ………………………………….……………………………………………………………………..……	   127	  Figure	  127	  	   roses	  for	  Alice	  ………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………..…	   129	  Figure	  128	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …….……………………….……………………………….…	  130	  Figure	  129	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  130	  Figure	  130	   untitled	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  front)	  ………………………………….………………………….	  133	  Figure	  131	   untitled	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  back)	  ………………………………….………………………….	  134	  Figure	  132	   From	  the	  Margins	  to	  the	  Mainstream	  de	  l’ombre	  à	  la	  lumière	  …………………………………..……	  160	  Figure	  133	   section	  commemorating	  banners	  on	  Parliament	  Hill	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ….	   163	  Figure	  134	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………………………………	  166	  Figure	  135	   text	  square	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  ………………………………………	  …………………………	  166	  Figure	  136	   section	  commemorating	  area	  in	  the	  Creative	  Strategies	  Tent	  for	  writing	  text	  squares	  …….	  166	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  Figure	  137	   map	  of	  Tent	  City	  (National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty)	  …………………………………………	  167	  Figure	  138	   Tent	  City	  in	  the	  early	  hours	  of	  the	  morning	  (National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty)	  …	  167	  Figure	  139	   sample	  9-­‐patch	  .………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………..	  168	  	  	  	  x	  Glossary	  	  (1)	   Quilting	  Terms	  	  Appliqué	  (applied	  work)	  The	  addition	  of	  fabrics	  or	  embroidered	  motifs	  to	  the	  surface	  of	  a	  ground	  material	  (quilt	  top)	  to	  form	  a	  design	  (Clabburn,	  1976,	  p.	  16).	  	  On	  the	  quilt	  top	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  there	  is	  both	  hand	  appliqué	   (completed	  by	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams)	  and	  machine	  appliqué	   (completed	  by	  Joanne	  Ursino).	  	  Patchwork	  The	  putting	  together,	  by	  one	  method	  or	  another	  (by	  hand	  and	  or	  machine),	  of	  pieces	  of	  material	  of	  different	  colours,	  types,	  and	  shapes	  to	  make	  a	  pleasing	  whole	  (Clabburn,	  1976,	  p.	  197).	  	  The	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  is	  based	  on	  the	  pattern	  trip	  around	  the	  world.	  	  It	  is	  machine	  pieced	  and	  the	  central	  motif	  is	  hand	  and	  machine	  appliquéd.	  	  Quilt	  A	  word	  often	  used	  to	  mean	  all	  bedspreads,	  but	  here	  (The	  Needleworker’s	  Dictionary),	  confined	  to	  those	  which	  are	  actually	  quilted	  (Clabburn,	  1976,	  p.	  219).	  	  Quilts	  are	  made	  from	  three	  layers:	  a	   top	   piece	   which	   is	   decorated,	   a	   layer	   of	   wadding	   (British	   tem)	   or	   batting	   (North	   American	  term)	  for	  warmth	  and	  placed	  in-­‐between,	  and	  a	  backing	  piece.	   	  These	  layers	  are	  held	  together	  with	  lines	  of	  stitching	  which	  can	  be	  worked	  in	  a	  grid,	  straight	  rows	  or	  elaborate	  patterns	  (Stanley	  &	  Watson,	  1996,	  p.	  21).	  	  Quilt	  frame	  For	  a	   smaller	  working	   surface,	   a	  quilt	   frame	  may	  be	  a	  14”	  wooden	  hoop	   that	  holds	   the	   three	  layers	  of	  the	  quilt—together	  and	  taut—so	  that	  it	  can	  be	  stitched.	  	  A	  floor	  frame	  offers	  a	  larger	  surface	  by	  which	  the	  three	  layers	  of	  a	  quilt	  are	  stretched	  for	  quilting.	  	  It	  is	  often	  the	  floor	  frame	  that	  is	  captured	  in	  images	  with	  women	  sitting	  around	  the	  quilt	  frame	  and	  working	  side	  by	  side.	  	  It	  is	  not	  necessary	  to	  quilt	  in	  a	  frame.	  	  Some	  individuals	  and	  groups	  have	  very	  strong	  preferences	  either	  way,	  based	  on	  the	  look	  and	  feel	  of	  the	  finished	  item	  and	  the	  desired	  experience.	  	  	  Quilting	  needle	  A	  short,	  sharp	  pointed	  needle	  available	  in	  sizes	  7	  to	  12	  (Clabburn,	  1976,	  p.	  220).	  	  Quilt	  top	  The	   front	   or	   top	   layer	   of	   a	   quilt.	   	   The	   quilt	   top	   is	   referred	   to	   in	   this	   thesis	   as	   a	   means	   of	  describing	  the	  un/finished	  nature	  of	  the	  object.	  	  In	  other	  words,	  the	  three	  layers	  have	  not	  been	  stitched	  together.	  	  Quilting	  The	  stitching	  together	  of	  two	  or	  three	  thicknesses	  of	  fabric	  to	  make	  something—a	  quilt—which	  can	  be	  warm,	  protective	  or	  purely	  decorative	  (Clabburn,	  1976,	  p.	  220).	  	  The	  adage	  that	  “a	  quilt	  is	  not	   a	   quilt	   until	   it’s	   quilted”,	   is	   a	   reference	   to	   the	   stitching	   required	   to	  make	   the	   integrated	  whole.	   	   The	   stitching	   through	   the	   three	   layers	   of	   material	   can	   be	   specifically	   referred	   to	   as	  quilting.	  	  The	  quilting	  stitch	  is	  often	  regarded	  as	  an	  even	  running	  stitch,	  the	  higher	  the	  number	  of	  stitches	  the	  more	  accomplished	  the	  quilter.	  	  	  xi	  (2)	   Sewing	  Basket	  and	  Notions	  	  Needle	  Pierce.	  	  Pull.	  	  The	  act	  of	  binding—of	  mark	  making.	  	  The	  tool	  to	  mend,	  stitch,	  fasten.	  There	  are	  many	  different	  types	  of	  needles.	  Using	  the	  appropriate	  needle	  for	  the	  task	  at	  hand	  can	  be	  a	  sign	  of	  mindfulness	  and	  skill.	  Maybe	  expediency.	  	  Maybe	  it	  does	  not	  matter,	  if	  it	  is	  about	  necessity.	  	  Needle	  book	  Keep.	  	  Care.	  	  Protect	  that	  which	  is	  fragile.	  	  Pin	  Keep	  from	  shifting.	  	  Mark	  place.	  	  Scissor	  Cut	  and	  shape.	  Know	  what	  scissor(s)	  are	  required	  in	  relation	  to	  intention.	  Trim.	  	  Undo.	  	  Sever.	  	  Cut	  away.	  	  End.	  	  Fabric	  Self	  and	  Other	  as	  fabric.	  	  A	  metaphor	  of	  mending	  and	  piecing	  together.	  So	  many	  types	  of	  fabric	  –	  mindful	  of	  their	  textures:	  fragility,	  needs	  and	  places	  where	  they	  come	  from.	  Worn	  and	  threadbare	  or	  fresh	  off	  the	  bolt.	  	  Each	  piece	  unique,	  with	  a	  story	  to	  unfold.	  	  Hoop	  and	  Frame	  Hold.	  	  Space	  for	  creation.	  	  Secure	  and	  adjust	  the	  tension.	  Taught	  or	  loose	  depending	  on	  the	  need.	  	  Alter	  the	  tension	  to	  make	  some	  (other)	  stitches	  possible.	  	  Measuring	  Tape	  and	  Ruler	  Dimensions	  of	  larger	  spaces—holding	  space—accommodating	  in	  the	  appropriate	  space	  for	  inclusion.	  Mindful	  of	  the	  time	  we	  take	  to	  speak	  (write).	  	  Listen.	  	  Smell.	  	  Touch.	  	  Measure.	  Be	  (a)ware	  of	  cadence,	  size,	  space.	  	  Cut	  against,	  with	  a	  straight	  narrative,	  with	  a	  curved	  narrative.	  	  Paper	  and	  Text[ile]	  Record	  upon.	  	  Make	  a	  pattern.	  	  Trace.	  	  Draw.	  	  Map.	  	  Memory.	  	  Short	  and	  long	  term.	  	  Pencil	  and	  Eraser,	  Pen	  Mark,	  erase	  and	  start	  over.	  	  Draft.	  	  Note	  and	  observe.	  	  Permanent.	  	  Label	  and	  archive	  for	  reference.	  	  Pincushion	  To	  know	  where	  things	  are.	  	  Thimble	  Push.	  	  Protect.	  	  Guide.	  	  Aid	  in	  the	  demand	  of	  practice,	  constancy	  and	  rhythm.	  	  Thread	  Secure	  hold.	  	  Make	  manifest	  the	  stitches.	  	  Mend.	  	  Tie.	  	  Knot.	  	  Perhaps	  embellish.	  	  	  xii	  (3)	   Gestures	  to	  Making	  	  	  	  Row	  1:	  Figures	  1	  (L),	  Figure	  2	  (R)	  Row	  2:	  Figures	  3	  (L),	  Figure	  4	  (R)	  	  	  Row	  3:	  Figures	  5	  (L),	  Figure	  6	  (R)	  untitled	  (1-­‐6)	  (cotton	  fabrics,	  cotton	  batting,	  threads,	  sewing	  notions)	  November	  2015	  photo	  credit:	  Blake	  Smith	  smoothing	  knotting	  threading	  pinning	  cutting	  basting	  	  	  xiii	  List	  of	  Abbreviations	  	  APEC	   Asia-­‐Pacific	  Economic	  Participation	  ASAP	   Academics	  Stand	  Against	  Poverty	  CLC	   Canadian	  Labour	  Congress	  CUPE	   Canadian	  Union	  of	  Public	  Employees	  CUPW	   Canadian	  Union	  of	  Postal	  Workers	  FFQ	   Fédération	  des	  femmes	  du	  Québec	  HRDC	   Human	  Resources	  Development	  Canada	  NAC	   National	  Action	  Committee	  on	  the	  Status	  of	  Women	  PSAC	   Public	  Service	  Alliance	  of	  Canada	  UBC	  	   University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  USW	   United	  Steelworkers	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  xiv	  Acknowledgements	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  7	  roses	  and	  bread	  from	  the	  series:	  Roses	  and	  Bread	  (intaglio,	  copper,	  soft	  ground,	  hand	  embroidered	  tarlatan,	  ink,	  mulberry	  paper)	  April	  2015	  	  Alice	   Olsen	   Williams,	   co-­‐creating	   the	   quilt	   top	   Women	   United	   Against	  Poverty	  with	  you,	  has	  been	  an	  honour	  and	  I	  am	  grateful	  for	  your	  generous	  engagement	  in	  this	  work.	  	  For	  the	  women	  in	  1996	  who	  put	  pens	  to	  fabric	  squares	  or	  sent	  notes	  to	  the	  “supporting	  wall”,	  and	  for	  all	  who	  were	  involved	  in	  organizing	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty,	  following	  in	  the	  footsteps	  of	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses:	  your	  messages	  and	  work	  inspire	  this	  offering.	  	  Dr.	   Dónal	   O’Donoghue,	   thank-­‐you	   for	   your	   profound	   guidance	   as	   my	  supervisor	   and	   for	   questions	   that	   continue	   unfolding,	   that	   invite	   rigorous	  scholarship	  and	  attend	   to	  making	  art.	   	  Dr.	  Pat	  O’Riley,	   thank-­‐you	   for	   your	  heartfelt	   teachings	  as	  a	   committee	  member	  and	   for	  unruly	  questions	   that	  were	  both	  personal	  and	  political.	  	  Dr.	  Sandrine	  Han,	  thank-­‐you	  for	  being	  the	  external	  examiner	  and	  for	  early	  conversations	  on	  borders	  and	  feminist	  art	  practices.	  	  Blake	   Smith,	   Anna	   Ryoo	   and	   Marie-­‐France	   Berard,	   thank-­‐you	   for	   making	  time	  in	  the	  midst	  of	  your	  own	  graduate	  studies	  to	  comment	  on	  my	  writing.	  	  And,	   Blake	   for	   your	   photographs.	   	   I	   hope	   these	   kindnesses	   are	   returned	  tenfold.	  	  To	  the	  students	  in	  art	  education,	  social	  justice	  and	  visual	  arts,	  I	  am	  grateful	  for	  the	  experiences	  we	  shared	  along	  the	  way	  and	  wish	  you	  all	  the	  best	   in	   your	   work	   and	   art	   practices.	   	   Basia	   Zurek,	   thank-­‐you	   and	   Happy	  Retirement!	  	  	  xv	  Marsha	  MacDowell,	   Lynne	  Swanson,	  Mary	  Worrall	  and	  Beth	  Donaldson	  at	  Michigan	   State	  University,	   I	   look	   forward	   to	   the	   publication	   of	   your	   book	  Quilts	  and	  Human	  Rights.	   	  Thank-­‐you	   for	   the	  warm	  welcome	  you	  offered,	  engaging	  discussion	  and	  for	  your	  work	  advancing	  quilt	  scholarship.	  	  Kate	  McInturff	  with	  the	  Canadian	  Centre	  for	  Policy	  Alternatives,	  thank-­‐you	  for	  your	  work	  on	  Making	  Women	  Count,	  and	  for	  taking	  the	  time	  to	  attend	  to	  my	  questions	  on	  women’s	  poverty.	  	  Over	  the	  years,	  it	  has	  been	  an	  honour	  to	  work	  alongside	  many	  in	  the	  trade	  union,	   feminist	   and	   queer	   movements	   as	   well	   as	   communities	   of	   artists,	  who	  have	  been	  unwavering	  in	  their	  commitment	  to	  social	  justice,	  solidarity,	  and	  friendship.	  	  I	  look	  forward	  to	  expressing	  my	  gratitude	  in	  person.	  	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams,	  Donna	  McDonagh,	  Sue	  Carter,	  Daniel	  Kinsella,	  Shawn	  Murphy,	  Amy	  Dame,	  Jacqui	  Hudson,	  Cathy	  Thomson	  and	  Anne	  Ursino,	  with	  gratitude	   for	   countless	   offerings	   -­‐	   and	   in	   this	   instance,	   for	   reading	   and	  commenting	  on	  earlier	   chapters	   and	  drafts	   of	   this	  work.	   	   Carlton	  Hughes.	  	  Johanne	   Labine,	   Penni	   Richmond	   and	   Sue	   Genge,	   thank-­‐you	   for	   pivotal	  conversations,	  long	  in	  advance	  of	  this	  writing.	  	  Dr.	   Janice	   Stewart	   and	  Dr.	  Mary	  Bryson,	   I	   am	  grateful	   for	   your	   generosity	  and	   insights	   on	   this	   journey.	   	   I	   would	   not	   have	   thought	   it	   possible	  otherwise.	  	  For	  my	  parents	  Anne	  and	  Don	  Ursino,	  artist	  and	  musician,	  teachers	  both	  –	  thank-­‐you	   for	   your	   love	  and	   support.	   	  Donna	  McDonagh,	  Cathy	  Thomson,	  Dominic	  Ursino	  -­‐	  Nigel	  Kurgan	  –	  and	  your	  families,	  it	  is	  wonderful	  to	  be	  part	  of	  your	  lives.	  	  Ticha	  Albino,	  thank-­‐you	  for	  your	  support	  and	  patience	  during	  my	  graduate	  studies.	  	  You	  have	  a	  heart	  of	  gold.	  	  I	  could	  not	  have	  done	  this	  without	  you.	  	  	  	  xvi	  Dedication	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  8	  Bread	  and	  Roses	  (intaglio,	  copper,	  hard	  ground,	  aquatint,	  ink,	  BFK	  Rives	  paper)	  April	  2015	  	  	  For	  why	  we	  marched.	  And,	  why	  must	  we	  still.	  	  	  	  	  And	  for	  Ana	  Nevé	  Caroline	  Grace	  Amelia,	  Anna	  and	  Elizabeth	  Joanna	  and	  Carolyn	  Paige	  and	  Mackenzie	  	  There	  will	  always	  be	  art	  supplies,	  music	  and	  a	  warm	  welcome	  waiting…	  	  	  xvii	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  9	  Untitled	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  back	  of	  quilt	  top)	  (cotton	  fabric,	  cotton	  batting,	  thread,	  glasshead	  pin)	  November	  2015	  photo	  credit:	  Blake	  Smith	  Mapping	  	  words	  echo	   	   	   	   	   clenched	  fist	  spool	  of	  thread	  unwound	   	   	   now	  tangling	  understanding	  text	   	   	   	   and	  grain	  of	  time	   	   	   	   	   	   and	  stitch	  cursive	  stroke	  pulls	   	   	   	   and	  pushes	  memory	  tension	  taught	  	   	   	   	   knot	  slipping	  touching	  to	  know	  	   	   	   in	  pierce	  and	  the	  count	  aching	  for	  understanding	  	   	   of	  global	  (pro)portions	  bread	  and	  roses2	   	   	   	   jobs	  and	  justice	  untold	  women	   	   	   	   	   	   brave	  the	  quilt	  is	  both	  	   	   	   	   	   	   self	  and	  other	  subject	  making	   	   	   	   	   	   object	  made	  demands	  of	  home	   	   	   	   	   demands	  on	  the	  street	  no/where	  	   	   	   edges	  and	  	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   lines	  and	  	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   curves	  now/here.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  2	  The	  poem	  (Bread	  and	  Roses	  by	  James	  Oppenheim	  (1911)	  has	  been	  the	  subject	  of	  recent	  writing	  by	  Robert	  Ross	  (2013)	  and	  John	  Zwick	  (as	  cited	  in	  Ross,	  2013,	  p.	  64),	  particularly	  concerning	  its	  historical	  origins.	  	  As	  a	  song,	  the	  lyrics	  have	  also	  been	  troubled	  (http://unionsong.com/u159.html).	  	  Tom	  Juravich	  and	  Teresa	  Healy	  revised	  and	  recorded	  a	  newer	  version	  in	  2006	  (http://www.cmkl.ca/tangled/aboutt.php).	  	  	  1	  Chapter	  1:	  Introduction	  	  Why	  quilts	  and	  quilting	  and	  what	  led	  me	  to	  undertake	  the	  work	  of	  this	  thesis	  are	  questions	  to	  address	  up	  front.	  	  The	  intention	  of	  the	  personal	  narrative	  in	  this	  chapter	  is	  to	  articulate	  a	  reflexive	  discussion	  and	  offer	  an	  account	  that	  situates	  the	  inquiry	  and	  the	  iterations	  that	  unfold	  in	  the	  chapters	  that	  follow.	  	  As	  a	  quick	  note,	  the	  overview	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  and	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt	  are	  discussed	  in	  the	  pages	  that	  follow	  this	  narrative.	  	  After	  which,	  the	  focus	  shifts	  to	  reading,	  writing	  and	  stitching	  and	  their	  interplay,	  as	  it	  relates	  to	  un/finishing	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty.	  Why	  quilts	  and	  quilting	  	  In	  the	  joy	  and	  anticipation	  that	  came	  with	  a	  long	  hoped	  for	  pregnancy,	  I	  began	  my	  first	  quilt	  in	  1990.	  	  At	  the	  beginning	  of	  the	  second	  trimester,	  I	  fell	  and	  the	  next	  day	  I	  miscarried.	  	  That	  loss,	  a	  moment	  in	  my	  life,	  led	  to	  the	  unfolding	  of	  countless	  moments	  of	  coming	  to	  know	  the	  bitter-­‐sweetness	  of	  dreams	  lost	  and	  different	  ones	  made.	  	  Immersed	  as	  I	  was	  in	  the	  love	  of	  family	  and	  friends,	  it	  was	  through	  the	  practice	  of	  quilting	  (including	  the	  making	  of	  a	  mourning	  quilt)	  that	  peace	  came	  along	  with	  a	  renewed	  sense	  of	  self.	  	  I	  attended	  classes,	  workshops	  and	  conferences,	  and	  read	  pattern	  magazines	  and	  books	  on	  the	  history	  and	  stories	  of	  quilts.	  	  I	  became	  a	  member	  of	  a	  quilting	  circle	  and	  joined	  the	  local	  quilting	  guild.	  	  Over	  the	  years,	  the	  nursery	  room	  I	  had	  anticipated	  became	  a	  studio.	  	  The	  rhythms	  of	  cutting,	  piecing,	  sewing,	  ironing,	  pinning,	  basting,	  quilting,	  and	  binding	  became	  integral	  to	  my	  way	  of	  being	  in	  the	  world.	  Through	  quilting,	  I	  could	  express	  myself	  visually.	  	  In	  fact,	  I	  now	  speak,	  write,	  and	  move	  in	  ways	  that	  reflect	  my	  experience	  as	  a	  quilter—I	  speak	  in	  snippets	  and	  measured	  phrases,	  the	  thoughts	  and	  metaphors	  that	  came	  from	  the	  materials	  and	  tools	  of	  my	  practice	  are	  now	  evident	  with	  pen	  on	  paper.	  	  In	  working	  with	  material	  fragments	  I	  share	  my	  stories,	  and	  the	  assemblages	  and	  stitches	  I	  offer	  the	  beholder	  are	  an	  invitation	  to	  piece	  their	  own.	  	  While	  I	  speak,	  my	  hands	  cut	  the	  air	  as	  if	  I	  was	  quilting,	  as	  if	  I	  was	  stitching	  words	  using	  thread	  pulled	  from	  my	  tongue.	  	  Even	  	  	  2	  this	  thesis	  reads	  as	  a	  piercing	  and	  piecing	  of	  quotes	  and	  texts—a	  push/pull	  of	  language	  and	  images	  to	  the	  narrative	  stitch	  and	  tension	  on	  the	  page.	  The	  first	  quilts	  I	  made,	  including	  the	  mourning	  quilt,	  were	  small	  samplers	  (pieced	  shapes	  and	  squares,	  based	  on	  patterns	  and	  structures	  of	  the	  traditional	  quilt)	  these	  quilts	  gave	  way	  to	  tens	  of	  thousands	  of	  stitches	  and	  eventually	  marked	  a	  departure	  from	  traditional	  patterns.	  	  I	  created	  numerous	  story	  quilts,	  political	  quilts,	  signature	  quilts	  and	  art	  quilts.	  	  They	  hang	  on	  walls,	  cover	  beds,	  lie	  folded	  on	  the	  arms	  of	  chairs	  or	  are	  tucked	  away	  in	  drawers	  and	  closets.	  These	  quilts	  are	  an	  archive	  of	  my	  life,	  my	  emerging	  sense	  of	  self,	  of	  loss,	  of	  love.	  	  As	  an	  archive	  of	  my	  acts	  of	  remembering	  they	  chronicle	  my	  life’s	  experiences	  and	  by	  extension	  are	  data.	  	  They	  address	  themes	  such	  as	  commemoration	  (coming	  out,	  women’s	  retreats,	  retirements,	  birthdays	  and	  adventures),	  loss	  (child	  bearing,	  break-­‐ups,	  HIV/AIDS),	  and	  love	  (home,	  babies,	  marriages).	  	  In	  addition,	  they	  are	  studies	  in	  patterns	  and	  colours	  and	  demonstrate	  an	  evolving	  studio	  art	  practice	  that	  has	  grown	  from	  fabrics	  and	  threads	  to	  the	  use	  of	  many	  other	  materials	  and	  work	  in	  book	  arts,	  ceramics	  and	  printmaking.	  	  This	  is	  a	  material	  practice	  that	  includes	  writing.	  While	  I	  was	  becoming	  more	  knowledgeable	  about	  and	  more	  skilful	  at	  quilting,	  I	  was	  also	  becoming	  more	  involved	  with	  the	  trade	  union	  movement.	  	  At	  the	  time,	  I	  was	  a	  member	  of	  the	  Public	  Service	  Alliance	  of	  Canada	  (PSAC).	  	  The	  PSAC	  represents	  more	  than	  170,000	  workers	  across	  Canada	  and	  around	  the	  world,	  negotiating	  collective	  agreements,	  representing	  human	  rights,	  health	  and	  safety	  and	  a	  range	  of	  other	  employment	  related	  issues	  on	  behalf	  of	  members	  working	  for	  the	  federal	  government	  and	  a	  host	  of	  other	  organizations.	  	  It	  is	  one	  of	  the	  largest	  unions	  in	  Canada	  and	  belongs	  to	  the	  Canadian	  Labour	  Congress.	  	  My	  quilts	  were	  made	  alongside	  a	  growing	  involvement	  and	  commitment	  to	  the	  trade	  union	  movement,	  which	  in	  turn	  led	  to	  the	  making	  of	  banners,	  carried	  on	  pickets	  lines	  and	  three	  signature	  quilts.	  	  It	  was	  through	  this	  work	  that	  making	  and	  quilting	  came	  to	  intersect	  with	  struggles	  in	  the	  social	  justice	  movement:	  women’s	  rights,	  the	  fight	  to	  end	  poverty	  and	  equality	  for	  queers.	  	  Inspired	  by	  the	  history	  of	  protest	  manifest	  in	  quilts	  and	  banners,	  I	  moved	  from	  the	  singularity	  of	  my	  own	  subjectivity	  to	  the	  making	  of	  signature	  quilts	  that	  reflected	  a	  larger,	  more	  diverse	  and	  collective	  community	  of	  voices	  with	  something	  to	  say.	  This	  thesis	  is	  situated	  in	  my	  commitment	  to	  social	  	  	  3	  justice	  and	  my	  commitment	  to	  a	  studio	  art	  practice	  as	  a	  way	  of	  inquiring	  into	  and	  representing	  the	  world.	  The	  draw	  of	  thread	  through	  time	  	  I	  became	  a	  trade	  union	  activist	  on	  the	  picket	  line.	  	  The	  1991	  National	  Strike	  was	  the	  largest	  strike	  by	  a	  single	  union	  in	  Canada	  and	  I	  walked	  the	  line	  in	  front	  of	  the	  doors	  at	  Place	  Du	  Portage	  in	  Hull,	  Quebec.	  	  The	  first	  banner	  I	  made	  was	  for	  that	  picket	  line	  and	  it	  read	  “Respect	  +	  Equité,”	  and	  represented,	  in	  part,	  my	  work	  in	  the	  field	  of	  employment	  equity.3	  	  Having	  begun	  years	  earlier,	  my	  engagement	  in	  the	  feminist	  movement	  was	  already	  strong.	  	  I	  was	  active	  in	  the	  field	  of	  development	  education	  (today	  I	  would	  use	  the	  term	  “social	  justice”)	  and,	  in	  particular,	  ending	  violence	  against	  women.	  	  My	  involvement	  in	  the	  feminist	  movement	  began	  during	  the	  second	  wave	  of	  feminism.	  	  It	  included	  classes	  in	  Women’s	  Studies	  as	  an	  undergraduate	  student	  and	  volunteer	  work	  with	  the	  YWCA	  in	  Toronto.	  	  As	  my	  involvement	  deepened	  in	  the	  early	  1990’s,	  I	  became	  part	  of	  the	  movement	  that	  embraced	  third	  wave	  feminism	  and	  the	  discourse	  on	  intersectionality.	  	  In	  1996,	  I	  moved	  from	  Ottawa	  to	  Vancouver	  in	  a	  deliberate	  shift	  away	  from	  national	  and	  policy	  oriented	  work	  to	  gain	  regional	  experience	  with	  an	  operational	  focus.	  	  This	  move	  from	  Ontario	  to	  British	  Columbia	  took	  place	  just	  after	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  that	  concluded	  on	  June	  15th.	  	  In	  the	  months	  that	  followed	  the	  march,	  I	  assembled	  the	  quilt	  top	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  co-­‐created	  with	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams	  from	  Curve	  Lake	  First	  Nations,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  first	  piecing	  of	  the	  From	  the	  Margins	  to	  the	  Mainstream4	  quilt	  while	  also	  completing	  a	  fabric	  panel	  for	  inclusion	  in	  the	  AIDS	  Memorial	  Quilt5	  honouring	  the	  life	  of	  a	  colleague	  (the	  panel	  design	  was	  created	  with	  a	  group	  of	  friends).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3	  I	  was	  a	  federal	  public	  service	  worker	  in	  the	  Employment	  Equity	  Branch	  of	  Human	  Resources	  Development	  Canada	  (HRDC).	  	  I	  worked	  with	  the	  Employment	  Equity	  Act	  and	  the	  Federal	  Contractor’s	  Program	  promoting	  the	  implementation	  and	  auditing	  of	  strategic	  initiatives	  both	  quantitative	  and	  qualitative	  that	  advanced	  the	  representation	  of	  designated	  equity	  groups	  in	  the	  workplace.	  	  From	  my	  days	  as	  an	  undergraduate	  student	  and	  for	  over	  a	  decade,	  my	  volunteer	  work	  and	  career	  aspirations	  were	  in	  the	  fields	  of	  social	  justice	  (international	  development)	  and	  conflict	  resolution.	  	  Work	  in	  employment	  equity	  resonated	  as	  a	  logical	  and	  practical	  means	  to	  reconcile	  the	  adage:	  think	  globally	  and	  act	  locally.	  4	  From	  the	  Margins	  to	  the	  Mainstream/de	  l’ombre	  à	  la	  lumière	  (also	  known	  as	  Speaking	  Her	  Piece),	  Public	  Service	  Alliance	  of	  Canada,	  Ottawa,	  ON,	  2003.	  	  On	  permanent	  display.	  	  See	  Appendix	  1.	  5	  “Peter’s	  Quilt”	  AIDS	  Memorial	  Panel,	  The	  Names	  Project,	  1996	  (Peter	  A.	  Brinton,	  C-­‐547;	  Section	  69	  of	  the	  Canadian	  Quilt).	  See:	  http://www.quilt.ca/section_69.html	  	  	  4	  The	  feminist	  movement’s	  anthem	  “the	  personal	  is	  political”	  nourished	  my	  deepening	  commitment	  to	  activism	  in	  the	  PSAC,	  my	  work,	  and	  my	  quilting.	  	  On	  behalf	  of	  my	  union,	  I	  participated	  in	  a	  range	  of	  social	  justice	  issues	  including	  pay	  equity,	  human	  rights	  in	  the	  workplace,	  and	  same-­‐sex	  benefits.	  	  By	  1999,	  I	  had	  been	  elected	  National	  Vice-­‐President	  for	  Equal	  Opportunities	  with	  the	  National	  Component	  of	  the	  PSAC	  where	  I	  served	  two	  consecutive	  three-­‐year	  terms.6	  	  As	  work	  in	  the	  union	  took	  more	  and	  more	  time,	  I	  had	  less	  time	  for	  stitching.	  	  When	  there	  was	  time,	  I	  worked	  on	  the	  quilt	  From	  the	  Margins	  to	  the	  Mainstream,	  completing	  it	  in	  May	  2000.	  	  The	  quilt	  top	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  remained	  tucked	  away	  although	  my	  promise	  to	  work	  on	  it	  remained	  a	  commitment	  to	  be	  reconciled.	  In	  2009,	  I	  left	  the	  federal	  public	  service	  and,	  as	  a	  result	  the	  PSAC,	  to	  accept	  a	  position	  with	  the	  (then)	  Equity	  Office	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  (UBC).	  	  At	  the	  time,	  it	  was	  a	  transition	  full	  of	  hope	  that	  comes	  from	  the	  expectation	  of	  meaningful	  work	  and	  an	  opportunity	  to	  bring	  experience	  to	  the	  task	  at	  hand.	  	  However,	  I	  began	  to	  question	  the	  value	  of	  my	  work	  in	  advancing	  employment	  equity	  on	  campus	  troubling	  the	  issues	  of	  representation	  and	  inclusion	  in	  the	  workplace.	  	  As	  well,	  I	  began	  to	  think	  about	  the	  value	  and	  direction	  of	  my	  commitment	  to	  my	  art	  practice	  and	  social	  justice	  work.	  	  So,	  I	  turned	  my	  attention	  to	  evening	  and	  weekend	  classes	  in	  community	  and	  expressive	  arts,	  as	  well	  as	  attending	  lunchtime	  lectures	  on	  social	  justice,	  democracy,	  issues	  of	  neo-­‐liberalism,	  critical	  race	  theory	  and	  curriculum	  studies.	  It	  was	  a	  time	  of	  reflection	  as	  I	  turned	  fifty.	  	  This	  included	  thoughts	  of	  un/finishing	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  especially	  in	  light	  of	  attacks	  on	  human	  rights	  in	  the	  hands	  of	  conservative,	  neo-­‐liberal	  governments	  in	  Victoria	  and	  Ottawa.	  	  Employment	  equity	  programs	  were	  being	  dismantled,	  the	  Canadian	  Census	  gutted	  and	  unions	  struggled	  on	  numerous	  fronts	  with	  the	  erosion	  of	  social	  programs	  and	  cuts	  to	  public	  services.	  	  I	  took	  the	  quilt	  top	  out,	  pinned	  it	  to	  the	  flannel	  wall	  in	  my	  studio	  (also	  the	  dining	  room)	  and	  in	  conversations	  with	  others,	  began	  to	  pen	  the	  proposal	  that	  later	  became	  the	  foundation	  for	  this	  thesis.	  	  In	  May	  2013,	  I	  was	  accepted	  into	  the	  graduate	  program	  in	  the	  Department	  of	  Curriculum	  and	  Pedagogy	  at	  UBC.	  	  In	  a	  turn	  of	  events	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  same	  month,	  the	  review	  of	  the	  Equity	  Office	  on	  campus	  was	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  6	  The	  National	  Component,	  now	  the	  Union	  of	  National	  Employees	  was	  the	  largest	  of	  the	  17	  groups	  of	  membership	  in	  the	  PSAC.	  	  At	  the	  time,	  the	  National	  Component	  represented	  upwards	  of	  25,000	  members.	  	  	  5	  completed	  and	  it	  was	  announced	  that	  my	  position	  among	  others	  was	  terminated.	  	  For	  the	  first	  time	  in	  twenty-­‐five	  years,	  I	  was	  without	  employment	  and	  a	  student.	  	  The	  profound	  privilege	  of	  returning	  to	  school	  	  	  In	  my	  graduate	  work	  in	  Art	  Education	  the	  commitment	  to	  a	  studio	  art	  practice	  was	  realized.	  	  It	  became	  stronger	  and	  more	  scholarly	  as	  I	  worked	  with	  theory,	  praxis	  and	  poesies.	  	  I	  took	  courses	  in	  textile	  design,	  ceramics	  and	  printmaking,	  as	  well	  as	  conceptual	  photography	  and	  artist	  books.	  	  It	  is	  my	  desire	  to	  research,	  make,	  write	  and	  offer	  a	  meaningful	  narrative	  that	  grapples	  with	  what	  a	  quilt	  does.	  	  To	  do	  this,	  I	  attend	  to	  my	  own	  subjectivity	  in	  order	  to	  situate	  this	  work	  in	  the	  discourses	  and	  discipline	  of	  academe	  as	  a	  way	  of	  inquiring	  into	  and	  representing	  the	  world.	  	  I	  unfold	  this	  work	  as	  a	  middle-­‐aged,	  queer,	  femme,	  white,	  graduate	  student.	  	  My	  lived	  experience,	  and	  the	  inquiry	  that	  comprises	  this	  thesis	  is	  emboldened	  by	  the	  dialectic	  of	  holding	  and	  not	  holding,	  having	  and	  not	  having.	  	  This	  work	  is	  a	  constant	  push	  and	  pull	  of	  then	  and	  now:	  a	  repetition	  of	  stitches	  and	  iteration	  of	  words	  made,	  unmade	  and	  remade.	  Stitching,	  reading	  and	  writing	  alongside	  the	  messages	  written	  by	  women	  on	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  resonates	  in	  ways	  unexpected	  at	  this	  time	  in	  my	  life.	  	  The	  return	  to	  the	  work	  on	  a	  quilt	  and	  reflection	  on	  a	  march	  that	  took	  place	  almost	  two	  decades	  earlier	  has	  been	  rich	  ground	  for	  this	  inquiry.	  	  It	  is	  a	  return	  in	  the	  sense	  of	  coming	  back	  to	  something	  -­‐	  an	  activity	  I	  said	  I	  would	  finish.	  	  And,	  it	  is	  more	  complicated.	  	  A	  wrestling	  of	  past	  moments	  that	  led	  to	  the	  creation	  and	  plan	  for	  stitching	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt—with	  this	  moment	  in	  the	  always	  present.	  	  I	  reckon	  with	  what	  it	  means	  to	  finish	  the	  quilt	  differently	  based	  on	  a	  deeper	  thinking,	  reading,	  writing	  and	  stitching	  practice	  that	  comes	  with	  the	  privilege	  and	  luxury	  of	  time,	  material	  resources	  and	  return	  to	  academia.	  	  And,	  I	  reckon	  with	  the	  idea	  of	  finishing	  the	  quilt—itself	  wrought	  with	  the	  push-­‐pull	  of	  completion	  alongside	  a	  coming	  to	  know	  that	  there	  is	  a	  continued	  un/folding	  and	  un/finishing	  in	  this	  offering.	  	  	  	  	  	  6	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  10	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  (quilt	  top,	  front)	  (cotton	  fabrics,	  thread)	  1997/2013	  	  	  7	  The	  following	  pages	  begin	  to	  situate	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  and	  the	  quilt	  top	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  in	  a	  reflection	  on	  the	  importance	  of	  signature	  quilts,	  alongside	  story	  quilts,	  political	  quilts	  and	  art	  quilts	  in	  the	  weave	  of	  narrative	  inquiry	  and	  the	  discourses	  of	  feminist	  art	  and	  the	  public	  archive.	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty:	  “For	  Bread	  and	  Roses,	  For	  Jobs	  and	  Justice”	  	  The	  national	  media	  ignored	  the	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  sponsored	  by	  NAC	  and	  the	  Canadian	  Labour	  Congress	  in	  the	  spring	  of	  1996.	  	  The	  march	  was	  an	  extraordinary	  event	  that	  took	  place	  over	  an	  entire	  month,	  with	  caravans	  visiting	  ninety	  communities	  and	  events	  involving	  almost	  50,000	  women.	  	  Yet	  the	  national	  media	  did	  not	  cover	  the	  march	  at	  all	  until	  it	  arrived	  in	  Toronto,	  where	  it	  was	  greeted	  by	  a	  large	  demonstration.	  	  (Rebick	  &	  Roach,	  1996,	  p.	  34)	  In	  mid-­‐May	  1996,	  caravans	  from	  the	  province	  of	  Quebéc,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  West,	  East	  and	  North	  crossed	  the	  country	  to	  converge	  on	  Parliament	  Hill	  on	  June	  15th,	  marking	  one	  of	  the	  largest	  demonstrations	  in	  Canadian	  history.	  	  Along	  the	  way,	  rallies	  and	  demonstrations	  were	  held	  in	  over	  90	  communities.	  	  The	  campaign,	  organized	  by	  the	  Canadian	  Labour	  Congress	  (CLC)	  and	  the	  National	  Action	  Committee	  on	  the	  Status	  of	  Women	  (NAC),	  carried	  momentum	  from	  the	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  initiated	  by	  the	  Fédération	  des	  femmes	  du	  Québec	  (FFQ)	  in	  1995	  known	  as	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  (Luxton,	  2001).	  	  The	  World	  March	  of	  Women	  followed	  these	  two	  events	  and	  took	  place	  around	  the	  globe	  in	  2000.7	  Taking	  the	  struggle	  for	  social	  justice	  to	  the	  streets—the	  struggle	  against	  poverty	  and	  the	  related	  demands	  that	  are	  entwined	  in	  this	  call—is	  to	  be	  awake	  to	  a	  moment	  when	  senses	  are	  enlivened,	  heartbeats	  quicken	  and	  there	  is	  the	  rush	  of	  knowing	  the	  purpose,	  strength	  and	  power	  in	  solidarity.	  	  The	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  occurred	  in	  the	  decade	  before	  the	  incredible	  advances	  in	  social	  media	  that	  have	  transformed	  our	  understanding	  and	  memory-­‐making	  of	  social	  justice	  on	  a	  national	  and	  global	  scale.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  7	  The	  4th	  International	  World	  March	  of	  Women	  was	  launched	  on	  March	  8,	  2015	  and	  concluded	  on	  October	  17,	  2015	  with	  events	  around	  the	  world.	  	  The	  fifteenth	  anniversary	  of	  the	  Women’s	  World	  March	  was	  commemorated	  in	  Québec,	  which	  also	  coincided	  with	  the	  twentieth	  anniversary	  of	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses.	  	  More	  information	  about	  these	  event	  can	  be	  found	  at:	  http://www.mmfqc.org/english	  	  	  8	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  11	  (L),	  Figure	  12	  (R)	  section	  on	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  1997	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  	  Du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses,	  pour	  changes	  des	  choses.	  (Séguin	  &	  Pedneault,	  1995)8	  	  In	  one	  of	  the	  few	  English	  language	  reflections	  on	  la	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses,	  that	  took	  place	  in	  1995,	  Féderation	  des	  femme	  du	  Québec	  (FFQ)	  leader,	  Françoise	  David”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Rebick,	  2005,	  pp.	  246-­‐249)	  reflects	  on	  the	  historic	  march	  that	  took	  place	  in	  Québec	  the	  year	  proceeding	  the	  1996	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty.	  	  She	  describes	  the	  climate	  in	  Québec,	  women’s	  funding	  cuts,	  changes	  to	  the	  structure	  of	  FFQ	  (groups	  and	  individuals),	  and	  provides	  an	  analysis	  of	  the	  FFQ’s	  lobbying	  efforts	  (they	  were	  excellent	  at	  lobbying,	  not	  at	  mobilizing	  the	  membership).	  	  She	  wrote,	  “the	  government	  has	  to	  have	  the	  sense	  that	  if	  your	  organization	  says	  something,	  there	  are	  a	  lot	  of	  women	  saying	  the	  same	  thing.	  	  For	  me	  that	  is	  a	  good	  lobby,	  supported	  by	  the	  strength	  of	  the	  membership”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Rebick,	  2005,	  p.	  247-­‐248).	  	  David	  further	  writes	  that	  for	  the	  FFQ	  to	  continue	  to	  function	  they	  had	  to	  work	  with	  women’s	  groups,	  which	  resulted	  in	  a	  changed	  structure	  and	  a	  focus	  on	  poverty,	  noting	  that	  “the	  rate	  of	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  8	  From	  the	  song	  “Du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses”,	  written	  by	  Marie-­‐Claire	  Séguin	  and	  Hèléne	  Pedneault	  written	  for	  the	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  in	  Quebec,	  1995.	  	  English	  translation:	  Bread	  and	  roses	  do	  change	  things.	  (as	  cited	  in	  Rebick,	  2005,	  p.	  245).	  	  	  	  9	  unemployment	  in	  Québec	  was	  14%.	  	  There	  was	  enormous	  poverty.	  	  When	  you	  talked	  about	  poverty	  it	  mobilized	  a	  lot	  of	  women”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Rebick,	  2005,	  p.	  248).	  	  In	  her	  account	  of	  the	  march	  she	  shared	  that	  it	  “captured	  the	  imagination	  of	  Québec”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Rebick,	  2005,	  p.	  247).9	  	  She	  details	  why	  the	  march	  was	  a	  success10	  and	  shares	  that	  the	  “the	  march	  was	  beautiful	  .	  .	  .	  so	  instead	  of	  placards,	  we	  had	  roses	  and	  ribbons,	  and	  the	  sun	  was	  shining.	  	  It	  was	  fabulous”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Rebick,	  2005,	  p.	  249).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  13	  (L)11	  section	  marking	  the	  start	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty,	  May	  1996	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  1997	  	  Figure	  14	  (R)	  section	  marking	  the	  arrival	  on	  Parliament	  Hill,	  conclusion	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty,	  June	  1996	  (Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty)	  1997	  	  The	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  Quilt	  	  We	  can	  posit,	  then,	  a	  quilt	  poetics	  as	  a	  model	  of	  creativity:	  a	  way	  of	  being	  in	  the	  world,	  a	  way	  of	  creating	  the	  world	  even,	  that	  is	  based	  on	  the	  making	  and	  meaning	  of	  quilts.	  	  (Witzling,	  2007,	  p.	  628.)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  9	  David	  shares	  that	  she	  was	  inspired	  by	  a	  television	  show	  about	  Martin	  Luther	  King	  Jr.	  and	  that	  organizing	  the	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses	  began	  soon	  after	  in	  1994.	  10	  She	  provides	  the	  following	  account	  of	  the	  Marche	  du	  pain	  et	  des	  roses:	  800	  women	  registered	  to	  march,	  women	  were	  housed	  and	  fed	  over	  the	  ten	  days	  of	  marching	  60	  cities	  and	  villages	  in	  Quebec	  were	  touched	  by	  the	  marchers,	  artists	  were	  involved	  throughout	  and	  that	  the	  march	  on	  the	  National	  Assembly	  gathered	  18,000-­‐20,000	  supporters	  (Rebick,	  2005,	  p.	  249).	  11	  This	  image	  was	  among	  those	  shared	  with	  me	  for	  the	  quilt,	  I	  note	  that	  it	  is	  cited	  in	  Our	  Times	  (courtesy	  of	  the	  Canadian	  Union	  of	  Postal	  Workers)	  Briskin,	  L.,	  Genge,	  S.,	  McPhail,	  M.,	  &	  Pollack,	  M.	  (2013,	  Feb).	  Making	  time	  for	  equality.	  Our	  Times,	  32	  p.	  36.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/docview/1322938020?accountid=14656.	  It	  was	  also	  an	  inspiration	  for	  the	  work	  of	  the	  intaglio	  print	  on	  p.	  xvi,	  Figure	  8.	  	  	  10	  Alice	  Olsen	  Williams	  from	  the	  Curve	  Lake	  First	  Nations	  and	  I	  created	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt	  top	  together.	  	  We	  have	  maintained	  an	  on-­‐going	  dialogue	  for	  the	  past	  nineteen	  years,	  which	  includes	  conversations	  on	  the	  piecing	  of	  the	  quilt	  and	  more	  recently	  on	  my	  intention	  for	  this	  work.	  	  Together	  we	  worked	  on	  the	  development	  of	  the	  proposal	  for	  this	  quilt,12	  purchase	  of	  materials	  (including	  a	  range	  of	  yellows	  and	  purples	  that	  were	  the	  colours	  chosen	  for	  the	  march)	  and	  invited	  hundreds	  of	  women	  to	  commemorate	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  by	  sharing	  messages	  on	  the	  fabric	  squares	  in	  the	  Creative	  Strategies	  tent.	  	  Alice	  completed	  the	  hand-­‐appliqué	  centre	  motif,	  which	  is	  based	  on	  one	  of	  the	  two	  posters	  for	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty.	  	  The	  appliqué	  is	  an	  image	  of	  a	  woman’s	  symbols	  with	  wheat	  and	  a	  rose,	  the	  symbols	  for	  bread	  and	  roses.	  	  I	  machine	  pieced	  and	  appliquéd	  the	  quilt	  top.	  	  The	  patchwork	  pattern	  was	  a	  deliberate	  choice	  and	  is	  based	  on	  the	  quilt	  design	  “trip	  around	  the	  world”	  (referencing	  intersectionality	  and	  global	  connection,	  as	  well	  as	  a	  tonal	  “x”	  radiating	  energy).	  	  The	  following	  are	  additional	  details	  about	  the	  quilt.	  	  More	  than	  400	  women	  contributed	  to	  this	  quilt	  by	  signing	  their	  names,	  the	  names	  of	  their	  families	  and	  ancestors	  on	  fabric	  squares	  and	  by	  sharing	  their	  reasons	  for	  participating	  in	  the	  march.	  	  They	  articulated	  their	  own	  demands	  and	  those	  of	  the	  march,13	  and	  wrote	  out	  the	  hopes	  that	  were	  brought	  into	  the	  light	  through	  this	  collective	  action.14	  What	  Does	  the	  Quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  Do?	  	  As	  an	  artefact	  of	  the	  every	  day,	  the	  quilt	  and	  this	  inquiry	  resonate	  with	  Cvetkovich’s	  (2003)	  argument	  that	  “it	  takes	  the	  documents	  of	  everyday	  life—oral	  history,	  personal	  photographs	  and	  letters,	  and	  ephemera—in	  order	  to	  insist	  that	  every	  life	  is	  worthy	  of	  preservation”	  (p.	  269).	  	  The	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  engages	  the	  imagination,	  documents	  a	  significant	  event	  in	  the	  history	  of	  Canada,	  the	  women’s	  movement	  and	  trade	  union	  movement	  and,	  it	  is	  evidence	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  12	  The	  proposal	  to	  make	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  was	  submitted	  to	  the	  National	  Women’s	  Committee	  of	  the	  Canadian	  Labour	  Congress	  in	  1996.	  	  Approval	  was	  granted	  and	  included	  display	  space	  in	  the	  Creative	  Strategies	  tent	  at	  Women’s	  Tent	  City	  in	  Ottawa	  on	  June	  14,	  1996	  and	  a	  financial	  contribution	  towards	  the	  cost	  of	  supplies.	  	  Background	  on	  the	  proposal	  is	  included	  in	  Appendix	  5.	  13	  The	  list	  of	  15	  demands	  are	  included	  in	  Appendix	  2.	  14	  Attending	  to	  the	  gesture	  of	  the	  mark	  and	  the	  power	  of	  the	  mark	  is	  pause	  for	  reflection	  in	  this	  inquiry.	  	  Helen	  Parrott	  (2012)	  writes	  that	  “marks	  surround	  us.	  	  They	  are	  fundamental	  to	  our	  lives	  and	  our	  learning.	  .	  .	  .	  Handwriting	  remains	  a	  powerful	  and	  personal	  form	  of	  mark-­‐making.	  .	  .	  .	  We	  use	  the	  expression	  ‘making	  a	  mark’	  to	  describe	  the	  attainment	  of	  recognition	  or	  distinction.	  Marks	  can	  indicate	  ownership	  of	  objects	  and	  places”	  (p.	  12).	  	  	  	  11	  that	  troubles	  a	  narrative	  of	  twenty	  years	  of	  neo	  liberalism.	  	  Moreover,	  as	  Donna	  Haraway	  (1998)	  asserts	  “the	  feminist	  standpoint	  theorists’	  goal	  of	  an	  epistemology	  and	  politics	  of	  engaged,	  accountable	  positioning	  remains	  eminently	  potent.	  	  The	  goal	  is	  better	  accounts	  of	  the	  world”	  (p.	  590).	  	  As	  such,	  a	  reading	  of	  the	  texts	  and	  images	  on	  this	  quilt	  further	  enhances	  an	  understanding	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  and	  the	  impact	  of	  poverty	  on	  women’s	  lives.	  The	  quilt	  top	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  is	  a	  record	  of	  political	  action.	  	  It	  is	  an	  object	  to	  be	  read	  and	  felt	  that	  speaks	  to	  the	  craft	  of	  stitching	  and	  quilting	  as	  a	  particular,	  and	  in	  this	  instance	  a	  gendered,	  engagement	  with	  the	  world	  and	  ways	  of	  knowing	  (Hardy,	  1994,	  p.	  54).	  	  It	  is	  also	  a	  record	  of	  political	  action	  that	  is	  in-­‐step	  with	  earlier	  convictions	  of	  feminist	  art.	  	  Griselda	  Pollock	  in	  honouring	  Rozsika	  Parker,	  reflected	  on	  the	  importance	  of	  the	  work	  that	  they	  did	  together	  stating	  that	  “if	  we	  did	  not	  archive	  the	  traces	  of	  the	  feminist	  moment	  in	  culture	  after	  1970,	  the	  main	  cultural	  institutions	  and	  libraries	  would	  not”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Barnett,	  2011,	  p.	  203).	  	  Together	  they	  wrote	  Framing	  Feminism:	  Art	  and	  the	  Women’s	  Movement	  (1987).	  	  Pollock	  notes	  that	  their	  endeavour	  was	  made	  possible	  because	  of	  Parker’s	  “collection	  of	  all	  invitations,	  flyers,	  handouts—all	  the	  ephemera	  of	  the	  working	  critic	  and	  the	  dedicated	  feminist	  responding	  to	  and	  making	  the	  effort	  to	  see,	  to	  understand,	  and	  write	  about	  this	  emerging	  culture	  of	  resistance”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Barnett,	  2011,	  p.	  203).	  Working	  with	  the	  quilt	  in	  this	  inquiry,	  I	  am	  aware	  of	  my	  identification	  with	  the	  trade	  union	  and	  feminist	  movements,	  and	  how	  one	  enables	  and	  is	  generative	  to	  the	  other.	  	  I	  can	  shut	  my	  eyes	  and	  image	  the	  morning	  that	  we	  gathered	  to	  march.	  	  It	  was	  incredible.	  	  The	  energy,	  the	  countless	  numbers	  of	  women	  and	  children,	  banners	  and	  flags	  waiving,	  I	  was	  with	  friends	  and	  family,	  there	  was	  purpose	  and	  solidarity	  in	  our	  steps.	  	  In	  looking	  back	  twenty	  years	  after	  the	  march	  I	  ask	  myself	  how	  the	  event	  continues	  to	  resonate	  in	  relation	  to	  the	  quilt	  today?	  	  This	  work	  has	  meaning	  for	  me	  personally	  and	  in	  community	  with	  others.	  	  Sue	  Campbell	  (2006)	  writes	  that	  “we	  share	  a	  past	  that	  we	  remember	  in	  highly	  individual	  ways	  while	  having	  together	  to	  determine	  its	  significance.	  	  Integrity	  as	  a	  personal/social	  virtue	  mirrors	  the	  nature	  of	  recollection	  as	  a	  complex	  personal/social	  activity”	  (p.	  374).	  	  In	  writing	  and	  stitching	  together	  the	  	  	  12	  pieces	  that	  inform	  this	  inquiry,	  I	  ask	  how	  my	  own	  methods	  of	  reflexivity	  can	  foster	  greater	  transparency	  through	  the	  act	  of	  remembering.	  	  In	  particular,	  I	  note	  Campbell’s	  (2006)	  call	  to	  attention	  that	  we	  must	  allow	  for	  some	  notion	  of	  rewitnessing	  in	  recollection.	  	  One	  of	  the	  demands	  of	  recollection	  is	  that	  we	  are	  prepared	  to	  be	  critically	  attentive	  to	  the	  concepts,	  narratives,	  feelings,	  and	  self-­‐conceptions	  through	  which	  we	  experience	  the	  past.	  (p.	  374)	  Writing	  this	  thesis	  is	  both	  an	  account	  and	  an	  act	  of	  being	  held	  to	  account.	  “I	  was	  there.”	  	  Quiltmaking	  remains	  an	  art	  form	  that	  powerfully	  documents	  women’s	  political	  lives	  and	  convictions.	  	  Quilters	  have	  had	  much	  to	  say	  and	  have	  spoken	  eloquently	  through	  their	  needlework.	  	  As	  the	  artistic	  and	  social	  value	  of	  quilts	  becomes	  more	  widely	  recognized,	  we	  hope	  that	  this	  medium	  will	  continue	  to	  be	  used	  to	  document,	  celebrate,	  influence	  and	  inspire.	  	  (Benson	  &	  Olsen,	  1987,	  p.	  15)	  	  Women’s	  history	  could	  be	  stated	  as	  the	  study	  of	  women	  in	  time	  (Tilly,	  1989).	  Moreover,	  women’s	  history	  grapples	  with	  the	  intention	  to	  be	  inclusive	  of	  gender	  and	  attentive	  to	  intersectionality	  (Brown,	  1997;	  Hinterberger,	  2007;	  Meade	  &	  Rupp,	  2013;	  Pierson,	  1991).	  	  Attention	  can	  be	  given	  to	  who	  was	  there	  and	  why.	  	  To	  this	  end,	  writing	  about	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt	  is	  a	  marker	  and	  like	  other	  signature	  quilts,	  it	  is	  an	  accounting	  of	  the	  presence	  of	  many	  in	  a	  moment	  (Barndt,	  2006;	  Sturken,	  1997).	  	  In	  the	  book	  Quilt	  Culture:	  Tracing	  the	  Pattern	  (Torsney	  &	  Elsey,	  1994),	  Anne	  Bower	  writes	  in	  the	  chapter	  “Reading	  Lessons”	  about	  the	  poet’s	  writing	  of	  a	  quilt,	  the	  colour	  and	  visual	  design	  of	  a	  quilt,	  and	  how	  the	  quilt	  becomes	  representative	  of	  a	  set	  of	  values.	  	  If	  we	  can	  read	  a	  quilt,	  she	  argues,	  then	  “we	  can	  read	  part	  of	  our	  own	  cultural	  history”	  (p.	  37).	  	  The	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt,	  offers	  the	  viewer	  a	  complicated	  narrative	  that	  also	  includes	  text	  as	  well	  as	  visual	  imagery.	  	  For	  example,	  the	  quilt	  contains	  messages	  written	  in	  20	  different	  languages.	  	  Many	  of	  the	  squares	  depict	  texts	  with	  reference	  to	  unions,	  women’s	  groups	  and	  other	  affiliations.	  	  There	  are	  numerous	  hand	  drawings	  that	  suggest	  relationships	  with	  First	  Nations	  communities,	  unions	  and	  women’s	  organizations,	  as	  well	  as	  women’s	  symbols,	  sketches	  of	  bread	  and	  roses,	  little	  self	  or	  other(s)	  portraits	  and	  children’s	  markings.	  	  Who	  reads	  it	  and	  how	  it	  is	  read	  locates	  the	  quilt	  and	  	  	  13	  its	  meaning	  in	  a	  contested	  space.	  	  In	  the	  work	  of	  thinking	  historically,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  take	  a	  critical	  approach	  when	  considering	  how	  discourses	  on	  gender,	  identity,	  representation,	  difference,	  power	  and	  politics	  are	  situated	  in	  the	  social	  justice	  movement	  in	  1996	  and	  today.	  Arguably,	  it	  is	  unusual	  that	  in	  the	  midst	  of	  a	  demonstration	  (in	  this	  instance	  the	  day	  before	  the	  march	  on	  Parliament	  Hill)	  women	  are	  invited	  to	  stop,	  take	  notice,	  and	  inscribe	  their	  names	  and	  why	  they	  were	  there	  in	  ink	  on	  fabric.	  The	  collective	  mapping	  of	  “I	  was	  here”	  and	  “I	  have	  something	  to	  say”	  brings	  the	  speech	  act	  to	  the	  textile.	  	  Marking	  the	  moment	  may	  have	  been	  unusual,	  but	  how	  it	  was	  done	  was	  not.	  	  In	  The	  Power	  of	  Cloth:	  Political	  Quilts	  1845-­‐1986,	  Jane	  Benson	  and	  Nancy	  Olsen	  (1987)	  share	  their	  research	  in	  the	  mounting	  of	  an	  exhibit	  at	  the	  Euphrat	  Gallery	  in	  Cupertino,	  California.	  	  The	  book	  that	  accompanies	  the	  March	  3	  to	  April	  19,	  1987	  exhibit	  documents	  twenty-­‐two	  quilts	  containing	  “explicit	  messages”	  (p.	  13),	  representing	  major	  issues	  and	  social	  movements	  that	  trouble	  the	  notion	  of	  the	  political	  and	  situates	  these	  quilts	  and	  the	  tradition	  of	  quiltmaking	  in	  the	  emerging	  discourse	  of	  feminist	  and	  contemporary	  art.	  	  With	  a	  twist	  of	  irony,	  Benson	  and	  Olsen	  write:	  “strange	  bedfellow:	  quilts,	  politics,	  the	  art	  world.	  	  The	  medium	  of	  quilting	  is	  at	  the	  vanguard	  of	  major	  art/political	  concerns:	  symbolism,	  context,	  and	  process”	  (Benson	  &	  Olsen,	  1987,	  p.	  10).	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  15	  pinning	  and	  reading	  text	  squares	  (Creative	  Strategies	  Tent,	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty)	  June	  14,	  1996	  Alice	  and	  I	  had	  cut	  the	  yellow	  and	  light	  purple	  shades	  of	  fabric	  in	  different	  sizes	  and	  placed	  the	  selection	  on	  a	  table	  where	  we	  explained	  the	  proposal	  for	  the	  quilt	  and	  invited	  women	  to	  participate.	  	  We	  provided	  tables,	  chairs,	  paper	  and	  pencils	  so	  the	  women	  could	  sit	  and	  draft	  their	  initial	  thoughts	  before	  turning	  their	  minds	  and	  hands	  to	  the	  permanent	  act	  of	  recording	  	  	  14	  on	  ink	  and	  fabric.	  	  After	  making	  their	  marks,	  women	  pinned	  the	  fabric	  pieces	  to	  the	  sheet	  that	  hung	  on	  the	  clothesline	  not	  far	  from	  the	  tables	  where	  they	  had	  been	  sitting.	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  16	  pinned	  text	  squares	  (Creative	  Strategies	  Tent,	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty)	  June	  14,	  1996	  Over	  the	  day,	  the	  space	  was	  filled	  with	  their	  messages	  and	  the	  light	  shone	  through	  the	  sheet	  and	  the	  squares	  of	  fabric	  looked	  like	  glass—it	  was	  beautiful.	  	  And,	  it	  became	  more	  and	  more	  interesting.	  	  Women	  often	  spoke	  together	  as	  they	  read	  (in	  some	  instances	  aloud)	  their	  writing	  and	  that	  of	  others.	  	  Sometimes	  women	  returned,	  bringing	  family	  and	  friends	  to	  participate	  as	  well.	  	  I	  think	  these	  moments	  provided	  an	  opportunity	  to	  feel	  a	  connection	  with	  each	  other	  in	  advance	  of	  the	  march	  on	  Parliament	  Hill	  the	  next	  day.	  	  Finally,	  larger	  fabric	  pieces	  that	  had	  been	  provided	  to	  the	  groups	  of	  women	  that	  had	  participated	  in	  the	  caravans	  travelling	  across	  the	  country,	  were	  pinned	  with	  the	  others	  on	  the	  sheet,	  providing	  more	  context	  to	  the	  events	  that	  had	  unfolded	  over	  the	  previous	  month.	  In	  my	  research,	  I	  have	  been	  guided	  in	  part	  by	  Meg	  Luxton’s	  (2001)	  work	  “Feminism	  as	  a	  Class	  Act:	  Working	  Class	  Feminism	  and	  the	  Women’s	  Movement	  in	  Canada”	  which	  is	  discussed	  in	  greater	  detail	  in	  Chapter	  2.	  	  Her	  writing	  situates	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty	  in	  a	  broader,	  sweeping	  narrative	  of	  the	  connections	  between	  the	  women’s	  movement	  and	  feminist	  trade	  unionists,	  the	  march	  is	  one	  manifestation	  of	  these	  relationships.	  	  Otherwise,	  I	  have	  not	  been	  able	  to	  locate	  a	  specific	  monograph	  that	  describes	  fully	  the	  events	  of	  the	  National	  Women’s	  March	  Against	  Poverty.	  	  Again	  in	  Chapter	  2,	  I	  reference	  various	  writers	  that	  discuss	  the	  march	  in	  order	  to	  explain	  its	  historical	  significance	  (Rebick	  &	  Roach,	  1996;	  Rebick	  	  	  15	  2005).	  	  Why	  is	  this	  important?	  	  One	  implication	  of	  material,	  textual	  documentation	  is	  that	  it	  is	  harder	  to	  erase.	  	  The	  march	  as	  depicted	  on	  the	  quilt	  becomes,	  as	  Freire	  (2000)	  and	  Kurcera	  (2010)	  argue,	  an	  account	  of	  existence	  in	  a	  statement	  embodied	  in	  the	  trace	  of	  the	  hand	  as	  an	  act	  of	  naming	  resistance	  and	  it	  is	  amplified	  as	  it	  is	  read	  (aloud)	  among	  others	  (Fisher,	  2010).	  	  The	  quilt	  as	  a	  collection	  of	  texts	  read	  as	  the	  voices	  of	  those	  gathered	  is	  not	  and	  never	  was	  intended	  to	  be	  read	  as	  an	  all-­‐inclusive	  narrative	  of	  the	  march;	  however,	  this	  thesis	  may	  allow	  me	  and	  others	  who	  engage	  with	  this	  quilt	  “to	  know	  ‘something’	  without	  claiming	  to	  know	  everything”	  (Richardson	  &	  St.	  Pierre,	  2005,	  p.	  961)	  about	  this	  significant	  moment	  in	  the	  history	  of	  social	  justice	  in	  Canada,	  and	  the	  women’s	  and	  trade	  union	  movements.	  The	  focus	  now	  shifts	  to	  stitching,	  writing	  and	  reading	  and	  the	  interplay	  between	  these	  activities	  in	  relation	  to	  un/finishing	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty.	  	  Here,	  is	  where	  I	  also	  begin	  to	  situate	  this	  work	  in	  a	  reflexive,	  inter-­‐modal	  studio	  art	  practice.	  	  While	  I	  mark	  this	  shift	  and	  beginning	  I	  am	  cognizant	  of,	  and	  grapple	  with	  the	  questions:	  what	  if	  the	  quilt	  top	  had	  not	  been	  tucked	  away	  for	  almost	  twenty	  years?	  	  Instead,	  if	  I	  had	  completed	  the	  quilt	  in	  a	  timely	  manner	  how	  might	  it	  have	  been	  useful	  in	  the	  public	  domain?	  	  How	  much	  more	  vibrant	  would	  the	  notion	  of	  “I	  was	  there”	  have	  resonated?	  	  The	  return	  to	  this	  work	  comes	  with	  a	  sigh.	  	  And,	  recognition	  of	  potentialities	  not	  unfolded	  then	  and	  the	  hope	  that	  different	  ones	  may	  now.	  Signature,	  Story,	  Political	  and	  Art	  Quilts	  	  In	  some	  cases,	  signature	  quilts	  are	  the	  only	  material	  evidence	  that	  documents	  the	  names	  of	  individuals	  who	  have	  a	  relationship	  to	  each	  other.	  Historians,	  genealogists,	  cultural	  anthropologists,	  sociologists	  and	  art	  historians	  are	  among	  those	  who	  use	  signature	  quilts	  in	  studies,	  for	  example,	  of	  family	  and	  community	  histories,	  social	  kinship	  relationships,	  and	  economic,	  religion,	  political	  and	  organizational	  histories.	  (Sikarskie,	  MacDowell,	  Alexander	  &	  Hornback,	  n.d.,	  pp.	  1-­‐2)	  	  Signature	  quilts	  “carry	  multiple	  signatures	  or	  names	  inked,	  stamped,	  embroidered	  and	  otherwise	  inscribed”	  and	  are	  “important	  primary	  historical	  documents	  that	  are	  of	  great	  interest	  and	  value	  for	  research	  in	  many	  disciplinary	  areas”	  (Sikarskie,	  MacDowell,	  Alexander	  &	  Hornback,	  n.d.,	  pp.	  1-­‐2).	  	  Signature	  quilts	  can	  also	  include	  messages,	  texts	  and	  images	  that	  address	  a	  wide	  range	  of	  issues,	  concerns,	  invitations,	  causes	  and	  sentiments.	  	  In	  the	  world	  of	  	  	  16	  textiles,	  signature	  quilts	  as	  well	  as	  story	  quilts,	  political	  quilts	  and,	  more	  recently,	  the	  art	  quilt	  share	  a	  history	  that	  contributes	  to	  research	  in	  the	  field	  of	  narrative	  inquiry,	  feminist	  and	  queer	  discourse	  and	  public	  art	  (Benson	  &	  Olsen,	  1987;	  Brodsky	  &	  Olin,	  2008;	  Broude	  &	  Garrard,	  1994;	  Chaich,	  2013;	  Fariello	  &	  Owen,	  2004;	  Ferarro,	  Hedges	  &	  Silber,	  1987;	  Hemmings,	  2012;	  hooks,	  1990;	  Lippard,	  1983;	  Lipsett,	  1985;	  MacDowell,	  M.,	  Richardson,	  J.,	  Worrall,	  M.,	  Sikarskie,	  A.	  &	  Cohen,	  S.,	  2013;	  Mainardi,	  1978;	  Morris	  III,	  2011;	  Prain,	  2014;	  Robinson,	  1983;	  Selvedge,	  2012;	  Sturken,	  1997;	  Torney	  &	  Ellis,	  1994;	  and	  Witzling,	  2009).	  What	  does	  a	  quilt	  do?	  	  Perhaps	  it	  depends	  on	  the	  quilt.	  	  A	  quilt	  may	  be	  as	  practical	  as	  fabric	  and	  batting	  stitched	  together	  to	  provide	  warmth.	  	  Through	  the	  design	  and	  use	  of	  materials	  a	  quilt	  may	  honour,	  commemorate	  and	  evoke	  memories—memories	  of	  others,	  distant	  places,	  another	  time.	  	  Quilts	  convey	  a	  story.	  	  And,	  the	  beholder	  coaxes	  out	  a	  story.	  	  As	  bell	  hooks	  shares	  about	  her	  grandmother’s	  quilts:	  Baba	  believed	  that	  each	  quilt	  had	  its	  own	  narrative—a	  story	  that	  began	  from	  the	  moment	  she	  considered	  making	  a	  particular	  quilt.	  	  The	  story	  was	  rooted	  in	  the	  quilt’s	  history,	  why	  it	  was	  made,	  why	  a	  particular	  pattern	  was	  chosen	  (hooks,	  2007,	  p.	  331).	  Melanie	  Miller	  notes,	  “working	  collectively,	  rather	  than	  independently,	  was	  one	  of	  feminism’s	  strategies.	  	  Feminism	  also	  encouraged	  the	  idea	  that	  art	  could/should	  be	  used	  for	  a	  social	  or	  political	  purpose,	  not	  just	  for	  the	  art	  gallery”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Kettle,	  2012,	  p.	  119).	  	  Miller’s	  comments	  resonate	  with	  the	  earlier	  statements	  on	  the	  contributions	  of	  feminist	  art	  from	  the	  1970’s.	  	  Lucy	  R.	  Lippard	  (1980)	  uses	  the	  web	  as	  a	  metaphor	  for	  a	  quilt,	  and	  writes	  that	  “expressing	  oneself	  as	  a	  member	  of	  a	  larger	  unity,	  or	  comm/unity,	  so	  that	  in	  speaking	  for	  oneself	  one	  is	  also	  speaking	  for	  those	  who	  cannot	  speak”	  (Lippard,	  1980,	  p.	  363).	  	  In	  this	  way,	  the	  quilt	  can	  be	  seen	  as	  an	  image	  that	  speaks	  to	  connectedness,	  inclusiveness	  and	  integration.	  	  Yet,	  as	  Lippard	  (1980)	  argues,	  	  “the	  notion	  of	  connections	  is	  also	  a	  metaphor	  for	  the	  breakdown	  of	  race,	  class	  and	  gender	  barriers,	  because	  it	  moves	  from	  its	  center	  in	  every	  direction”	  (Lippard,	  1980,	  p.	  364).	  	  The	  discussion	  of	  the	  visual	  metaphor	  of	  the	  quilt	  occurs	  at	  several	  points	  throughout	  this	  thesis,	  Lippard’s	  (1980)	  comments	  are	  noteworthy	  because	  she	  speaks	  to	  the	  quilt	  as	  a	  web	  of	  connections	  and	  the	  breakdown	  of	  barriers	  across	  marginalized	  groups,	  both	  of	  which	  are	  apt	  in	  relation	  to	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty.	  	  	  17	  The	  visual	  lines	  on	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt	  radiate	  from	  the	  centre	  image	  of	  the	  women’s	  symbol.	  	  And,	  it	  is	  possible	  to	  read	  the	  representation	  of	  women	  across	  race	  and	  class	  and	  gender	  and	  disability,	  and	  many	  other	  ways	  in	  which	  women	  have	  chosen	  to	  name	  who	  they	  are	  in	  both	  texts	  and	  images	  on	  the	  quilt.	  	  However,	  it	  is	  also	  up	  to	  the	  viewer	  to	  read	  the	  more	  complicated	  (active)	  meaning	  of	  breaking	  down	  barriers	  (intersectionality)	  and	  to	  see	  and	  feel	  what	  that	  means	  in	  relation	  to	  the	  intention	  of	  the	  march	  itself.	  	  In	  other	  words,	  there	  were	  demands	  the	  march	  articulated	  that	  addressed	  barriers	  for	  specific	  groups,	  this	  is	  important	  because	  both	  the	  march	  and	  the	  quilt	  were	  deliberate	  in	  not	  essentializing	  the	  representation	  of	  women.	  Lippard	  (1983)	  also	  situates	  quilts	  within	  the	  broader	  context	  of	  capitalism	  and	  class	  in	  relation	  to	  the	  discourse	  on	  high	  (fine)	  and	  low	  (craft)	  art,	  which	  includes	  an	  analysis	  of	  feminism,	  needlework	  (de/skilling),	  feminist	  art	  and	  questions	  who	  the	  audience	  is.	  	  She	  notes	  that	  “within	  the	  context	  of	  feminist	  opposition	  to	  patriarchal	  values	  and	  to	  the	  colonization/deconstruction	  of	  other	  cultures,	  the	  quilt	  form	  offers	  a	  proactive	  vehicle	  for	  outreach”	  (Lippard,	  1983,	  p.42).	  	  Again,	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  poverty	  complicates	  the	  visual	  metaphor	  for	  home	  and	  comfort	  in	  the	  private	  domain.	  	  The	  quilt	  belies	  the	  construct	  that	  everything	  is	  okay	  at	  home	  and	  makes	  public	  the	  very	  conditions	  that	  are	  most	  compromised	  for	  women	  (and	  often	  their	  families)	  who	  experience	  poverty:	  the	  lack	  of	  security,	  comfort	  and	  hope.	  	  Kate	  McInturff	  (2015)	  in	  her	  address	  on	  “Women’s	  Poverty	  in	  Canada”	  argues	  that	  women	  experience	  poverty	  differently,	  with	  specific	  barriers	  (including	  the	  wage	  gap	  and	  child	  care)	  and	  that	  these	  barriers	  must	  be	  understood	  in	  order	  to	  address	  women’s	  poverty.15	  	  These	  messages	  that	  McInturff	  reiterates	  today	  are	  evident	  and	  made	  public	  with	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty—twenty	  years	  earlier—along	  with	  many	  other	  messages	  that	  speak	  directly	  to	  the	  opposition	  to	  capitalism	  and	  decolonization,	  for	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  15	  Kate	  McInturff,	  Senior	  Researcher	  for	  the	  Canadian	  Centre	  for	  Policy	  Alternatives	  addressed	  the	  Canadian	  Women’s	  Foundation,	  on	  Women’s	  Poverty	  in	  Canada	  on	  June,	  9,	  2015,	  view	  at:	  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyEutxtj0U.	  	  In	  her	  remarks	  she	  spoke	  that	  poverty	  is	  not	  just	  about	  the	  numbers—it	  is	  about	  how	  it	  makes	  you	  feel—not	  just	  making	  ends	  meet—it	  is	  the	  constant	  insecurity,	  no	  control	  over	  planning	  for	  expenses	  (rent,	  groceries,	  child	  care)	  and	  little	  hope	  that	  this	  will	  change.	  	  In	  addition,	  she	  underlined	  the	  fact	  that	  women	  who	  are	  Aboriginal,	  women	  who	  have	  a	  disability,	  women	  who	  are	  racialized,	  women	  who	  are	  immigrants	  and	  or	  women	  who	  are	  over	  the	  age	  of	  65	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  live	  in	  poverty	  in	  Canada.	  	  	  	  18	  example	  federal	  and	  provincial	  cutbacks,	  protecting	  the	  environment,	  ending	  violence	  against	  women	  and	  challenging	  policies	  on	  refugees	  and	  immigration.	  Signature	  quilts,	  story	  quilts,	  political	  quilts,	  art	  quilts,	  and	  quilts	  in	  general	  have	  also	  been	  situated	  in	  literary	  and	  theoretical	  considerations	  of	  feminism	  (Chicago,	  2007,	  1980;	  Ferarro,	  Hedges	  &	  Silber,	  1987;	  Mainardi,	  1978;	  Robinson,	  1983;	  Torsney,	  &	  Elsey,	  1994),	  intersectionality	  and	  women’s	  writing	  (Aptheker,	  1989;	  Elsey,	  1993;	  Showalter,	  1986;	  Sohan,	  2015;	  Torsney	  &	  Elsey,	  1994;	  Walker,	  1994;	  Witzling,	  2007),	  politics	  and	  social	  justice	  (Adams,	  2014;	  Benson	  &	  Olsen,	  1987;	  Hillard,	  1994;	  James,	  2010;	  Ringgold,	  1995,	  1991;	  Sturken,	  1997;	  Williams,	  1996;),	  and	  curriculum	  and	  pedagogy	  (Flanner,	  2001;	  Otto,	  1997;	  Syed,	  2010).	  	  The	  quilt	  has	  been	  used	  as	  a	  metaphor	  for	  community,	  comfort	  and	  mourning	  (Morris	  III,	  2011;	  Ruskin,	  1988;	  Sturken,	  1997;)	  and,	  for	  reflections	  of	  communities,	  most	  notably	  the	  Gee’s	  Bend	  quilts	  (Beardsley,	  Arnett,	  Arnett,	  Livingston,	  2002;	  Thrasher,	  1997).	  The	  interpretation	  of	  quilts	  remains	  contested	  ground	  in	  the	  discourses	  on	  art	  and	  craft	  (Adamson,	  2008,	  2007;	  Benson	  &	  Olsen,	  1987;	  Bernick,	  1994;	  Chave,	  2008;	  Fariello,	  2011;	  Mainardi,	  1978;	  Peterson,	  2011;	  Roberts,	  2011;	  Sohan,	  2015).	  Stitching	  	  The	  stitch	  as	  an	  agent	  for	  mending,	  darning	  and	  reworking,	  echoes	  a	  tradition	  of	  oral	  storytelling,	  where	  words	  are	  passed	  on	  and	  told	  over	  and	  over	  again.	  (Kettle	  &	  McKeating,	  2012,	  p.	  206)	  	  Un/finishing	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt	  is	  an	  exploration	  of	  the	  practice	  of	  making.	  	  The	  work	  of	  stitching	  the	  quilt	  and	  writing	  to	  this	  inquiry	  is	  an	  offering	  that	  explores	  coming	  to	  know	  through	  arts-­‐based	  research.	  	  This	  work	  is	  an	  unfolding	  of	  the	  encounter	  with	  the	  object	  through	  inquiry	  and	  through	  it	  I	  explore	  the	  experience	  of	  stitching,	  writing	  and	  reading	  alongside	  the	  work	  of	  other	  artists	  notably	  Eve	  Sedgwick	  (2011)	  and	  Kimsooja	  (2013).	  	  To	  that	  end,	  I	  reflect	  on	  the	  work	  of	  Sedgwick	  (2011),	  who	  in	  the	  making	  of	  her	  art	  writes	  about	  her	  material	  practice	  and	  considerations	  of	  theory,	  which	  in	  this	  instance	  is	  about	  feeling	  grounded	  and	  suspended	  in	  agency.	  	  She	  writes:	  	  	  19	  there	  are	  second	  to	  second	  negotiations	  with	  the	  material	  properties	  of	  whatever	  I’m	  working	  on,	  and	  the	  questions	  “What	  will	  it	  let	  me	  do?”	  and	  “What	  does	  it	  want	  to	  do?”	  are	  in	  constant	  three-­‐way	  conversation	  with	  “What	  is	  that	  I	  want	  to	  do?”	  (Sedgwick,	  2011,	  p.	  83)	  As	  I	  work	  on	  the	  quilt,	  needle	  and	  thread	  in	  my	  hand,	  the	  act	  of	  stitching	  unfolds.	  I	  question	  how	  I	  work	  in	  response	  to	  and	  in	  relationship	  with	  the	  repeated	  encounters	  of	  reading	  and	  writing	  about	  the	  text	  and	  images	  on	  the	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  quilt.	  	  What	  gives	  in	  the	  push	  of	  the	  needle	  through	  fabric	  and	  then	  to	  the	  pen	  on	  the	  page?	  	  How	  does	  the	  practice	  of	  stitching	  inform	  the	  writing?	  	  I	  also	  turn	  to	  the	  writing	  of	  Pennina	  Barnett	  (2012)	  in	  her	  chapter	  “Folds,	  Fragments,	  Surfaces:	  Towards	  a	  Poetics	  of	  Cloth”	  where	  she	  writes	  alongside	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  (1987)	  and	  in	  relation	  to	  work	  by	  other	  artists.	  	  She	  writes	  of	  the	  constraints	  of	  the	  binary	  “either/or’”	  and	  asks	  what	  of	  “soft	  logics”	  and	  the	  realm	  of	  “and/and”	  (p.	  183).	  	  She	  writes	  to	  what	  is	  possible	  in	  the	  poetics	  of	  cloth:	  “the	  fragment	  bears	  withness	  to	  a	  broken	  whole:	  yet	  it	  also	  the	  cite	  of	  uncertainty	  from	  which	  to	  start	  over;	  it	  is	  where	  the	  mind	  extends	  beyond	  the	  fragile	  boundaries,	  beyond	  frayed	  and	  indeterminate	  edges	  ….	  The	  surface	  is	  a	  liminal	  space	  both	  inside	  and	  out	  a	  space	  of	  encounter”	  (p.	  188).	  	  I	  note	  this	  here,	  her	  writing	  along	  with	  the	  writing	  and	  stitching	  of	  Sedgwick	  (2011)	  and	  Kimsooja	  (2013)	  as	  an	  invitation	  to	  imagine	  stitching	  anew	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty.	  The	  intention	  in	  stitching/thread,	  writing/ink	  and	  reading	  is	  a	  narrative	  inquiry.	  	  It	  is	  a	  storying	  alongside	  theorizing	  and	  mixed	  methods	  in	  textuality,	  materiality	  and	  visuality.	  	  Stitching	  and	  writing	  share	  in	  the	  mark	  making	  (Kettle	  A.	  &	  McKeating,	  2012),	  mapping	  (Braidotti,	  2011)	  and	  the	  idea	  of	  the	  pivot	  (Aptheker,	  1989,	  p.	  12)	  of	  post-­‐process	  inquiry.	  	  Pollock	  (1988)	  interprets	  the	  pivot.	  	  She	  explains:	  	  “we	  have	  to	  imagine	  the	  worlds	  we	  inhabit	  from	  perspectives	  in	  which	  some	  people	  are	  centred	  and	  some	  are	  decentred	  in	  a	  perpetual	  movement	  of	  shifted	  centres	  of	  experience	  and	  unequal	  relations	  to	  power,	  language	  and	  self-­‐definition”	  (Pollock,	  1988,	  p.	  xxvii).	  	  How	  do	  I	  imagine	  and	  make	  the	  quilt	  account	  for	  then	  (1996)	  and	  now	  (2015)	  in	  the	  glide	  of	  the	  needle	  and	  the	  stroke	  of	  the	  pen?	  	  The	  stitching	  holds	  together	  the	  materials	  of	  the	  quilt—	  	  20	  literally.	  	  But,	  the	  stitch	  is	  also	  a	  guide	  to	  the	  eye.	  	  Nigel	  Cheney	  in	  a	  conversation	  with	  Jane	  McKeating	  describes	  the	  hand	  stitch	  as	  ‘like	  a	  highlighter	  pen.’	  	  Applied	  to	  the	  cloth,	  the	  stitch	  punctures	  and	  punctuates,	  heightens	  and	  distorts,	  even	  has	  a	  right	  and	  a	  wrong.	  .	  .	  .	  (A)	  means	  to	  imbue	  the	  cloth	  with	  ideas,	  illustrate	  stories,	  and	  embellish	  artefacts,	  it	  serves	  as	  a	  record	  of	  filled	  time	  (as	  cited	  in	  McKeating,	  2012,	  pp.	  29-­‐30).	  I	  worry	  the	  neatness	  and	  intention	  of	  my	  stitches	  in	  Chapter	  4.	  	  For	  the	  moment,	  the	  stitch	  with	  needle	  and	  thread	  in	  hand	  is	  not	  unlike	  the	  line	  with	  pen	  and	  ink	  in	  hand.	  	  The	  gesture,	  the	  flow,	  the	  marking	  can	  be	  both	  deliberate	  and	  not.	  	  It’s	  purpose	  meaningful	  for	  myself	  in	  the	  stitching,	  and	  altogether	  different	  for	  the	  one	  viewing.	  The	  stitch	  and,	  in	  turn,	  the	  quilt	  offers	  a	  narrative—	  an	  account	  that	  informs	  and	  shapes	  the	  analysis	  of	  difference	  and	  critical	  considerations,	  one	  that	  enables	  and	  activates	  all	  the	  senses.	  	  Noticing	  what	  the	  act	  of	  stitching	  (and	  as	  the	  work	  of	  this	  thesis	  progresses,	  unstitching)	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty	  does,	  is	  an	  opportunity	  to	  follow	  the	  threads	  of	  theory	  and	  practice.	  	  And,	  it	  is	  not	  only	  about	  the	  eye.	  	  Auslander	  (2005)	  in	  relation	  to	  material	  culture,	  writes	  that	  “people	  have	  always	  used	  all	  five	  of	  their	  senses	  in	  their	  intellectual,	  affective,	  expressive,	  and	  communicative	  practices…	  and	  used	  these	  senses	  differentially;	  sight,	  hearing,	  touch,	  taste,	  and	  smell	  each	  provide	  certain	  kinds	  of	  information	  (p.	  1016).	  	  What	  happens	  if	  it	  is	  more	  than	  the	  alignment	  of	  what	  each	  of	  the	  senses	  brings	  to	  the	  inquiry?	  	  I	  am	  reminded	  of	  this	  again,	  when	  I	  read	  Peter	  Cole	  and	  Pat	  O’Riley	  (2002)	  who	  write:	  “image,	  imagine,	  imagination	  is	  not	  just	  about	  seeing	  .	  .	  .	  .	  what	  about	  hearing	  colour	  or	  feeling	  its	  subtle	  shades”	  (p.	  133).	  	  In	  the	  work	  of	  journaling	  this	  inquiry	  a	  shift	  occurs	  from	  stories	  unfolding	  to	  considerations	  of	  structure	  and	  fluidity:	  making	  sense(s)	  comes	  into	  sharper	  focus	  in	  the	  writing.	  	  The	  ink	  is	  like	  the	  thread	  I	  stitch	  across	  the	  quilt—feeling	  the	  storying	  of	  others—women	  telling	  me	  about	  something	  I	  may	  not	  have	  seen	  but	  could	  hear,	  smell,	  taste	  and	  touch.	  In	  quilting,	  stitches	  are	  pulled	  down	  through	  the	  layers	  of	  the	  quilt	  top,	  batting	  and	  backing.	  	  Because	  I	  most	  often	  quilt	  alone	  in	  my	  home	  it	  tends	  to	  be	  a	  private,	  meditative	  and	  reflective/reflexive	  practice—a	  time	  when	  I	  think.	  	  When	  I	  am	  stitching,	  thinking	  includes	  both	  aesthetic	  and	  practical	  musings	  about	  the	  colour	  and	  weight	  of	  thread,	  where	  I	  should	  pierce	  	  	  21	  the	  fabric	  next,	  the	  number	  of	  stitches	  I	  need	  to	  make	  before	  I	  get	  to	  the	  end	  of	  the	  thread,	  and	  when	  to	  knot.	  	  I	  assess	  my	  stitches	  to	  see	  if	  they	  are	  even	  and	  whether	  the	  line	  of	  stitches	  has	  a	  good	  trajectory	  and	  the	  curves	  are	  smooth.	  I	  note	  the	  tension	  between	  control	  and	  chaos,	  counting	  and	  randomness,	  cut	  and	  frayed.	  	  Sometimes	  the	  stitches	  will	  not	  do	  and	  I	  take	  them	  out	  and	  start	  over.	  	  Ideas	  come	  too.	  Words	  and	  beyond	  words	  in	  the	  push-­‐pull	  of	  thread	  through	  fabric,	  the	  knot	  as	  punctuation,	  the	  needle	  piercing	  the	  fabric,	  thimbled	  finger	  pushing	  then	  stopping	  to	  pull	  the	  needle,	  repetition,	  securing	  stitches.	  Thoughts	  run	  through	  my	  mind	  and	  through	  my	  hand.	  	  I	  am	  curious	  about	  these	  moments	  and	  this	  work	  that	  is	  unfolding.	  	  When	  I	  think	  of	  the	  work	  of	  stitching—the	  artistic	  work	  involved,	  I	  think	  about	  how	  I	  am	  making	  meaning.	  	  To	  this	  end,	  Kester’s	  (2011)	  reflection	  on	  the	  labor	  of	  the	  artist	  is	  of	  note:	  “the	  artist’s	  labor,	  in	  the	  act	  of	  creation,	  marks	  an	  autonomous	  and	  free	  exercise	  of	  will,	  as	  beauty	  (or	  transgressive	  meaning)	  is	  extracted	  from	  the	  dose	  of	  quotidian	  reality”	  (Kester,	  2011,	  p.	  101).	  	  For	  me,	  the	  everyday	  is	  interrupted	  in	  this	  purpose/ful	  un/predictable	  rhythm	  of	  making	  and	  meaning	  through	  inquiry.	  Writing	  	  Nomadic	  writing	  longs	  instead	  for	  areas	  of	  silence,	  in	  between	  the	  official	  cacophonies,	  in	  a	  strong	  connection	  to	  radical	  nonbelonging,	  the	  asceticism	  of	  the	  desert	  and	  outsidedness.	  	  (Braidotti,	  2011,	  pp.	  44-­‐45)	  In	  this	  section	  on	  writing,	  I	  contemplate	  the	  processes	  to	  put	  in	  place	  for	  the	  visual	  journaling	  practice,	  while	  stitching	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty.	  	  I	  try	  out	  video	  taping	  myself	  talking	  aloud	  about	  making	  processes	  in	  a	  studio	  art	  practice.	  I	  question	  what	  it	  is	  to	  speak	  my	  thinking	  in	  the	  moment	  of	  making,	  rather	  than	  writing	  of	  the	  moment	  after.	  	  I	  talk	  about	  my	  thinking	  during	  the	  making	  and	  then	  play	  back	  the	  snippets	  noting	  and	  writing	  what	  I	  say/said	  and	  what	  I	  do/did.	  	  I	  collect	  information	  through	  the	  voice,	  eye	  and	  hand.	  	  I	  ask	  what	  writing	  does	  in	  this	  multimethod	  research	  and	  how	  writing	  differs	  across	  each	  of	  the	  methods	  that	  are	  unfolding.	  	  And,	  I	  take	  note	  of	  what	  others,	  particularly	  Elizabeth	  Adams	  St.	  Pierre	  (1979b;	  1995;	  2005)	  and	  Rosi	  Braidotti	  (2014)	  do	  in	  their	  writing	  as	  a	  possible	  guide	  for	  mine.	  	  	  22	  St.	  Pierre	  (1979b)	  writes	  that	  “in	  my	  study,	  I	  used	  writing	  as	  a	  method	  of	  data	  collection	  by	  gathering	  together,	  by	  collecting-­‐	  in	  the	  writing—all	  sorts	  of	  data	  I	  had	  never	  read	  about	  in	  interpretative	  qualitative	  textbooks,	  some	  of	  which	  I	  have	  called	  dream	  data,	  sensual	  data,	  emotional	  data,	  response	  data”	  (St.	  Pierre,	  1979b),	  “and	  memory	  data”	  (St.	  Pierre,	  1995).	  	  “My	  point	  here	  is	  that	  these	  data	  might	  have	  escaped	  entirely	  if	  I	  had	  not	  written;	  they	  were	  collected	  only	  in	  the	  writing”	  (Richardson	  &	  St.	  Pierre,	  2005,	  p.	  970.)	  	  She	  is	  writing	  in	  such	  a	  way	  that	  her	  writing	  becomes	  data,	  “I	  wrote	  my	  way	  into	  particular	  spaces	  that	  I	  could	  not	  have	  occupied	  by	  sorting	  data	  with	  a	  computer	  program	  or	  by	  analytical	  induction	  .	  .	  .	  .(B)reaking	  down	  conventional	  qualitative	  inquiry—between	  data	  collection	  and	  data	  analysis”	  (Richardson	  &	  St.	  Pierre,	  2005,	  p.	  970).	  	  “My	  writing	  moves	  me	  into	  an	  independent	  space	  where	  I	  see	  more	  clearly	  the	  interrelationships	  between	  and	  among	  peoples	  worldwide”	  (Richardson	  &	  St.	  Pierre,	  2005,	  p.	  966).	  	  The	  possibilities	  in	  my	  own	  writing	  practice	  are	  informed	  by	  her	  offering,	  she	  is	  breaking	  down	  the	  binary	  between	  data	  collection	  and	  analysis.	  	  In	  my	  case,	  it	  may	  be	  stitching	  and	  writing,	  not	  stitching	  or	  writing.	  Braidotti	  (2014)	  in	  reflecting	  on	  her	  writing	  practice,	  calls	  attention	  to	  its	  purpose	  claiming	  that	  especially	  academic	  writing	  “has	  to	  challenge	  and	  destabilize,	  intrigue	  and	  empower”	  (p.	  166).	  	  Braidotti	  (2014)	  further	  writes	  about	  the	  act	  of	  writing,	  that	  it	  is	  “about	  becoming”	  (p.171),	  and	  that	  this	  is	  the	  “emptying	  out	  the	  self,	  opening	  it	  out	  to	  possible	  encounters	  with	  the	  ‘outside’”	  (p.	  171).	  	  Writing	  alongside	  making	  and	  mindful	  of	  Braidotti’s	  (2014)	  reminder	  that	  nomadism	  refers	  to	  a	  “critical	  consciousness	  that	  resists	  settling	  into	  socially	  coded	  modes	  of	  thought	  and	  behaviour”	  (p.	  182).	  	  And,	  that	  stitching	  and	  reading	  the	  quilt	  can	  be	  a	  profound	  journey	  “without	  physically	  moving”	  (p.	  182).	  	  At	  the	  moment,	  the	  stitching,	  writing	  and	  reading	  of	  this	  inquiry	  takes	  place	  in	  my	  home,	  in	  what	  is	  typically	  the	  living	  and	  dining	  room	  of	  a	  small	  1920’s	  house	  that	  my	  partner	  and	  I	  rent	  in	  East	  Vancouver.16	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  16	  I	  am	  grateful	  for	  this	  lovely	  space,	  with	  bright	  windows	  facing	  north	  and	  east,	  floors	  that	  creak	  and	  kind	  neighbours	  that	  became	  friends.	  	  Their	  young	  daughter	  visits,	  learning	  to	  walk	  as	  she	  navigates	  piles	  of	  text	  books	  and	  boxes	  of	  notes,	  the	  ironing	  board	  and	  large	  working	  table	  that	  comes	  and	  goes	  depending	  on	  whether	  I	  am	  making	  or	  writing.	  	  There	  are	  chickens	  being	  raised	  next	  door,	  and	  on	  the	  occasions	  that	  I	  care	  for	  them,	  fresh	  eggs.	  	  This	  is	  something	  that	  I	  have	  never	  done	  before,	  feeding	  chickens.	  	  There	  are	  times	  that	  I	  drop	  my	  pen	  and	  run	  to	  the	  back	  door,	  thinking	  that	  there	  is	  a	  fox	  in	  the	  hen	  house	  for	  all	  the	  cackling.	  	  Only	  to	  realize,	  that	  they	  are	  busy	  laying	  eggs.	  	  I	  laugh	  at	  myself.	  	  There	  is	  an	  elementary	  school	  across	  the	  street—I	  set	  my	  breaks	  to	  the	  sound	  of	  the	  recess	  bells	  and	  children	  playing—9:00a.m.,	  10:25a.m.,	  12:30p.m.	  and	  3:00p.m.	  	  	  23	  Reading	  	  In	  this	  thesis,	  reading	  is	  a	  significant	  act	  of	  engagement.	  	  Not	  only	  with	  regard	  to	  the	  texts	  and	  works	  of	  art	  that	  inform	  this	  inquiry	  but	  also	  reading	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty.	  	  I	  think	  about	  this	  because	  I	  am	  both	  reading	  and	  I	  am	  offering	  writing	  and	  stitching	  for	  others	  to	  read.	  	  St.	  Pierre	  (1996)	  considers	  writing	  and	  reading	  and	  Grant	  Kester	  (2011)	  considers	  the	  glimpse	  of	  the	  promise	  and	  the	  (necessary)	  interrogative	  practices	  of	  reading	  and	  viewing.	  	  St.	  Pierre	  (1996)	  writes	  that	  “in	  trying	  to	  understand	  the	  theories	  that	  produce	  both	  the	  writing	  and	  the	  reading	  .	  .	  .	  we	  might	  risk	  an	  engagement	  with	  the	  other,	  acknowledge	  the	  counterargument,	  and	  be	  open	  to	  the	  theory	  we	  resist”	  (p.	  536).	  	  She	  goes	  further	  and	  calls	  attention	  to	  “being	  a	  responsible	  reader”(p.	  537)	  where	  the	  work	  in	  relation	  to	  writing	  and	  theory	  has	  the	  “power	  to	  inscribe	  and	  reinscribe	  lives”	  (p.	  537).	  	  I	  think	  about	  this,	  what	  if	  I	  am	  off	  the	  mark	  and	  the	  stitching	  does	  not	  invite	  the	  reader’s	  engagement?	  	  Kester	  (2011)	  writes	  that	  “the	  modern	  viewer	  is	  obliged	  to	  work—cognitively	  and	  perceptually—against	  the	  semantic	  resistance	  posed	  by	  the	  complex	  art	  object.	  	  In	  the	  presence	  of	  such	  works,	  he	  or	  she	  will	  experience,	  amazement,	  discomfort,	  shock,	  and	  outrage,	  while	  cultivating	  a	  more	  enlightened	  self-­‐reflective	  mode	  of	  subjectivity”	  (p.	  101).	  	  In	  relationship	  to	  and	  in	  juxtaposition	  with	  each	  other	  they	  trouble	  any	  sense	  of	  passivity—both	  are	  a	  call	  to	  participation:	  reader	  and	  read.	  	  Of	  note,	  is	  an	  underlying	  tension	  of	  the	  work	  involved	  (including	  the	  risk,	  difficulties,	  and	  subjective	  demands)	  in	  being	  mindful	  of	  the	  differences	  inherent	  in	  reading	  across	  theory,	  in	  research,	  mapping	  and	  in	  viewing	  art.	  	  Yet,	  these	  are	  the	  experiences	  that	  make	  the	  activity	  of	  reading	  and	  viewing	  possible	  and	  that	  underlie	  the	  relationalities	  of	  this	  work.	  	  Reading	  and	  viewing	  alongside	  the	  work	  of	  others	  becomes	  data	  to	  integrate	  in	  the	  process	  and	  practice	  of	  this	  inquiry	  through	  writing	  and	  stitching.	  Reading	  and	  stitching	  the	  texts	  inscribed	  on	  the	  quilt	  Women	  United	  Against	  Poverty,	  is	  also	  informed	  by	  the	  offerings	  of	  others	  who	  have	  written	  about	  their	  experiences	  in	  reading	  quilts.	  	  Of	  note	  is	  Marita	  Sturken’s	  work	  “Conversation	  with	  the	  Dead:	  Bearing	  Witness	  in	  the	  AIDS	  Memorial	  Quilt”	  (Sturken,	  1997),	  the	  writing	  of	  Brian	  Ott,	  Eric	  Aoki	  and	  Greg	  Dickinson	  in	  “Collage/Montage	  as	  Critical	  Practice,	  or	  How	  to	  ‘Quilt’/Read	  Postmodern	  Text(ile)s”	  (Morris	  III,	  	  	  24	  2011),	  which	  also	  focuses	  on	  the	  AIDS	  Memorial	  Quilt;	  and	  Mara	  Witzling	  in	  Quilt	  Language:	  Towards	  a	  Poetics	  of	  Quilting	  (Witzling,	  2009).	  	  As	  well	  as	  writing	  about	  quilts	  in	  specific	  exhibitions	  such	  as	  The	  Power	  of	  Cloth:	  Political	  Quilts	  1845-­‐1986	  by	  Benson	  and	  Olsen	  (1987);	  and	  Lippard’s	  writing	  in	  The	  Artist	  and	  the	  Quilt	  Project	  (Robinson,	  1983).	  	  These	  texts	  offer	  examples	  of	  how	  to	  read	  quilts	  and	  inform	  my	  narratives	  of	  text	  and	  the	  stitch.	  Stitching,	  Writing	  and	  Reading	  	  	  Feminists	  need	  to	  become	  fluent	  in	  a	  variety	  of	  styles,	  disciplinary	  angles	  and	  in	  many	  different	  dialects,	  jargons	  and	  languages.	  	  Relinquishing	  the	  image	  of	  sisterhood	  in	  the	  sense	  of	  a	  global	  similarity	  of	  women	  qua	  second	  sex,	  in	  favor	  or	  the	  recognition	  of	  the	  complexity	  of	  the	  semiotic	  and	  material	  conditions	  in	  which	  women	  operate.	  .	  .	  .	  Transdisciplinarity	  is	  an	  important	  feature.	  	  This	  means	  the	  crossing	  of	  disciplinary	  boundaries	  without	  concern	  for	  the	  vertical	  distinctions	  around	  which	  they	  have	  been	  organized.	  	  (Braidotti,	  2011,	  p.	  66)	  It	  has	  not	  been	  my	  practice	  to	  deliberately	  stop	  stitching	  and	  to	  then	  to	  read	  and	  write	  in	  a	  reflexive	  practice.	  	  I	  think	  that	  to	  read/view	  and	  feel/experience	  the	  quilt	  is	  a	  complicated	  exploration	  of	  relationality	  between	  stitch	  and	  text.	  	  To	  commit	  to	  a	  reflexive	  practice	  of	  inquiry	  as	  I	  stitch	  and	  (re)encounter,	  deconstruct/reconstruct,	  and	  write	  to	  the	  making	  of	  this	  quilt—to	  the	  women	  who	  marked	  why	  they	  stood	  in	  solidarity	  to	  end	  poverty—makes	  this	  work	  an	  act	  of	  trust	  “a	  method	  of	  inquiry	  to	  move	  into	  your	  own	  impossibility,	  where	  anything	  might	  happen	  and	  will”	  (Richardson	  &	  St.	  Pierre,	  2005,	  p.	  973).	  	  This	  is	  an	  act	  of	  trust	  of	  myself,	  of	  the	  quilt	  and	  the	  process.	  Influenced	  by	  Laurel	  Richardson	  and	  Gilles	  Deleuze,	  St.	  Pierre	  (2005)	  names	  her	  work	  in	  academia	  as	  nomadic	  inquiry	  explaining	  that	  “writing	  is	  thinking,	  writing	  is	  analysis,	  writing	  is	  indeed	  a	  seductive	  and	  tangled	  method	  of	  discovery”	  (as	  cited	  in	  Richardson	  &	  St.	  Pierre,	  2005,	  p.	  966).	  	  Over,	  the	  work	  of	  thesis,	  stitching,	  reading	  and	  writing	  something	  happens—this	  is	  the	  work	  of	  reflexive	  inquiry	  in	  Chapter	  5.	  	  Laurel	  Richardson	  (2005),	  in	  reflecting	  on	  the	  evolution	  of	  her	  writing	  practice	  states	  that	  it	  is	  (now)	  a	  process	  on	  “how	  to	  document	  becoming”	  (Richardson	  &	  St.	  Pierre,	  2005,	  p.	  966).	  	  	  25	  In	  writing	  through	  this	  inquiry,	  I	  ask:	  how	  do	  I	  write	  (read	  and	  stitch)	  to	  this	  becoming,	  Braidotti	  (2014),	  offers	  her	  thoughts	  on	  the	  enabling	  role	  of	  the	  imagination	  and	  its	  connection	  to	  memory	  “when	  you	  remember	  to	  become	  what	  you	  are—a	  subject-­‐in-­‐becoming—you	  actually	  reinvent	  yourself	  on	  the	  basis	  of	  what	  you	  hope	  you	  could	  become	  with	  a	  little	  help	  from	  your	  friends”	  (p.	  173).	  	  Trust,	  relationality,	  imagination,	  discovery	  and	  love	  become	  markers	  on	  this	  nomadic	  inquiry	  of	  stitching,	  writing	  and	  reading.	  	  St.	  Pierre	  (2014)	  writes	  about	  the	  writing	  she	  loves,	  that	  it	  “is	  always	  already	  a	  collaboration	  of	  exteriority	  in	  which	  one	  text	  folds	  into	  another	  as	  I	  think	  and	  write	  with	  the	  words	  of	  others	  not	  present,	  no	  more	  present	  than	  I	  am	  in	  writing”	  (p.	  376).	  	  I	  remember	  myself	  as	  the	  activist	  I	  was	  in	  1996	  alongside	  this	  inquiry	  of	  becoming.	  	  And,	  to	  do	  this	  with	  love.	  	  This	  reflection	  on	  stitching,	  writing	  and	  reading,	  informs	  my	  studio	  art	  and	  writing	  practice	  and	  is	  a	  way	  of	  inquiring	  into	  and	  representing	  the	  world.	  	  It	  is	  the	  beginning	  of	  an	  exploration	  of	  the	  mapping	  of	  meaning-­‐making	  through	  arts-­‐based	  research	  alongside	  the	  unruly	  entanglements	  I	  encounter	  as	  I	  examine	  the	  liminal	  spaces	  between	  the	  materialities	  of	  writing	  and	  making	  that	  are	  emergent	  during	  this	  inquiry.	  Chapter	  Outline	  	  Chapter	  2	  is	  a	  consideration	  of	  methodology,	  literature,	  data	  and	  multimethods	  research.	  	  The	  next	  three	  chapters	  focus,	  in	  turn,	  on	  each	  method:	  thinking	  historically	  (Chapter	  3),	  a/r/tography	  (Chapter	  4),	  and	  reflexive	  inquiry	  (Chapter	  5).	  	  Chapter	  6	  is	  an	  analysis	  of	  what	  happened	  through	  the	  research,	  making	  and	  writing.	  	  I	  dwell	  on	  the	  relationality	  and	  meaning	  that	  emerges	  and	  resonates	  in	  the	  work	  of	  the	  hand	  materially	  and	  textually.	  	  In	  the	  last	  few	  pages,	  I	  return	  to	  a	  consideration	  of	  the	  research	  questions	  further	  possibilities.	  	  26	  A	  note	  to	  the	  reader	  	  Located	  throughout	  the	  thesis	  there	  are,	  what	  I	  call,	  material	  fragments.	  	  They	  include	  images	  and	  poetic	  offerings.	  	  The	  material	  fragments	  are	  placed	  in	  between	  specific	  chapters	  of	  the	  thesis	  as	  a	  solidi,	  a	  moment	  of	  pause	  for	  the	  reader	  and	  to	  engage	  the	  “data	  in	  more	  and	  more	  complex	  ways,	  thereby	  complicating	  the	  making	  of	  meaning”	  (St.	  Pierre,	  1996,	  p.	  534).	  	  My	  efforts	  at	  poetic	  writing	  bring	  to	  mind	  that	  “most	  of	  us	  at	  best	  will	  be	  only	  almost	  poets”	  (Richardson,	  1993,	  p.	  705).	  	  I	  strive	  for	  becoming	  poetic	  and	  honour	  that	  there	  are	  moments	  where	  I	  too	  “was	  unable	  to	  shape	  the	  experience	  in	  prose	  without	  losing	  the	  experience”	  (Richardson,	  1993,	  p.	  697).	  	  27	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  17	  un/fold	  from	  the	  series:	  Piercing	  the	  Page	  (photopolymer	  print,	  ink,	  BFK	  Rives	  paper)	  March	  2014	  	  detailing	  	  soft	  yellow,	  light	  purples	  	  (cotton/a	  story	  in	  itself)	  hand	  cut	  angles	  (and	  curves)	  	  8’	  2”high	  6’	  2”wide	  (pieced	  top)	  	  	  450	  hands	  and	  then	  some	  text	  in	  micron	  archival	  ink	  (21	  squares	  across	  and	  28	  down)	  15	  squares	  x	  2	  (demands	  in	  French/English)	  21	  photo	  transfers	  	  	  	  gesturing	  to	  presence	  	  	  	  	  	  	  28	  Chapter	  2:	  Methodology,	  Literature,	  Data	  and	  Multimethods	  	  	  At	  the	  outset	  of	  this	  thesis,	  I	  stated	  that	  I	  seek	  the	  unruly	  entanglements	  as	  I	  examine	  the	  liminal	  spaces	  in	  the	  materialities	  of	  writing	  and	  making	  and	  the	  intentional	  reading	  of	  post-­‐modern	  feminist	  and	  queer	  theory,	  arts-­‐based	  research	  and	  the	  challenge	  of	  data.	  	  To	  do	  this,	  I	  adopt	  a	  multimethod	  approach	  and	  let	  go—and,	  in	  not	  being	  wound	  so	  tight	  to	  one	  way—I	  get	  lost	  in	  all	  that	  becomes	  tangled.	  	  In	  “getting	  lost”	  (Lather,	  2007,	  p.	  13),	  I	  am	  able	  to	  juxtapose	  experiences,	  practices	  and	  encounters	  and	  trouble	  this	  unfolding	  in	  a	  nomadic	  inquiry	  of	  reading,	  stitching	  (making)	  and	  writing.	  Methodology	  	  In	  Getting	  Lost:	  Feminists	  Efforts	  toward	  a	  Double(d)	  Science,	  Lather	  (2007)	  articulates	  a	  “methodology	  out	  of	  practice”	  (p.	  ix).	  	  She	  asks	  “what	  would	  practices	  of	  researchers	  look	  like	  that	  were	  a	  response	  to	  the	  call	  of	  the	  wholly	  other”	  (p.	  ix).	  	  And	  as	  a	  guide,	  I	  read	  her	  statement	  as	  a	  question:	  “What	  will	  have	  been	  said”	  (p.	  ix).	  	  This	  thesis	  is	  anchored	  in	  a	  commitment	  to	  social	  justice	  alongside	  considerations	  of	  post-­‐modern	  feminist	  methodology.	  	  I	  acknowledge	  myself	  as	  curious	  (p.	  9),	  open	  to	  possibilities	  and,	  in	  heeding	  Donna	  Haraway	  (2004)	  I	  locate	  myself	  (in	  all	  that	  is	  partial	  and	  fraught),	  in	  coming	  to	  know	  through	  critical	  inquiry	  (p.	  237).	  	  Hence,	  the	  articulation	  of	  my	  personal	  narrative	  at	  the	  beginning	  of	  Chapter	  1	  and	  a	  return	  to	  methodology	  as	  the	  later	  stages	  of	  this	  research	  unfolds.	  	  This	  inquiry	  continues	  to	  be	  an	  act	  of	  “getting	  lost”	  (p.xi),	  an	  iterative	  process	  that	  seeks	  the	  unruly	  entanglements	  of	  research,	  theory	  and	  politics	  (p.	  xi).	  	  Throughout	  the	  thesis,	  I	  attend	  to	  how	  I	  am	  situated	  as	  the	  inquiry	  unfolds.	  	  	  	  	  29	  Literature	  	  I	  look	  to	  the	  scholarship	  of	  Braidotti	  (2014,	  2011),	  St.	  Pierre	  (2014,	  2013a,	  2013b,	  2011,	  2010a,	  2010b,	  2000,	  1996),	  and	  Patti	  Lather	  (2007)	  who	  together,	  offer	  a	  consideration	  of	  research	  and	  writing	  in	  post-­‐modern	  feminist	  methodology.	  	  In	  particular,	  drawing	  upon	  their	  work	  with	  regard	  to	  nomadic	  inquiry	  and	  troubling	  methods	  that	  also	  incorporates	  the	  contributions	  of	  Gilles	  Deleuze	  and	  Felix	  Guattari	  (I	  also	  consider	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  (1987)	  on	  my	  own).	  	  In	  addition,	  the	  scholarship	  of	  Donna	  Haraway	  (2004)	  informs	  my	  understanding	  of	  being	  situated	  in	  this	  inquiry.	  	  Alongside	  post	  feminist	  scholarship,	  I	  turn	  to	  the	  scholarship	  in	  arts-­‐based	  research,	  in	  particular	  that	  of	  Dónal	  O’Donoghue	  (2015,	  2014),	  with	  regards	  to	  considerations	  of	  research	  and	  making	  in	  art;	  and	  to	  the	  scholarship	  of	  Rita	  Irwin,	  Stephanie	  Springgay	  and	  Alec	  de	  Cosson	  with	  regard	  to	  a/r/tography	  (2004,	  2008).	  	  I	  also	  look	  to	  the	  work	  of	  Grae