UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Language as a special signal : infants' neurological and social perception of native language, non-native… May, Lillian Anne 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2016_february_may_lillian.pdf [ 2.5MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0221483.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0221483-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0221483-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0221483-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0221483-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0221483-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0221483-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0221483-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0221483.ris

Full Text

	  LANGUAGE	  AS	  A	  SPECIAL	  SIGNAL:	  INFANTS’	  NEUROLOGICAL	  AND	  SOCIAL	  PERCEPTION	  OF	  NATIVE	  LANGUAGE,	  NON-­‐NATIVE	  LANGUAGE,	  AND	  LANGUAGE-­‐LIKE	  STIMULI	  	  	  	  by	  	  	  Lillian	  Anne	  May	  	  M.A.,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  2010	  	  	   	  	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGRES	  OF	  	  	  	  DOCTOR	  OF	  PHILOSOPHY	  	  	  in	  	  	  The	  Faculty	  of	  Graduate	  and	  Postdoctoral	  Studies	  	  	  (Psychology)	  	  	  	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  	  	  December	  2015	  	  	  	  ©	  Lillian	  Anne	  May,	  2015	   	  	   ii	  Abstract	  	  The	  capacity	  to	  acquire	  language	  is	  believed	  to	  be	  deeply	  embedded	  in	  our	  biology.	  As	  such,	  it	  has	  been	  proposed	  that	  humans	  have	  evolved	  to	  respond	  specially	  to	  language	  from	  the	  first	  days	  and	  months	  of	  life.	  The	  present	  thesis	  explores	  this	  hypothesis,	  examining	  the	  early	  neural	  and	  social	  processing	  of	  speech	  in	  young	  infants.	  	  	  In	  Experiments	  1-­‐4,	  Near-­‐Infrared	  Spectroscopy	  is	  used	  to	  measure	  neural	  activation	  in	  classic	  “language	  areas”	  of	  the	  cortex	  to	  the	  native	  language,	  to	  a	  rhythmically	  distinct	  unfamiliar	  language,	  and	  to	  a	  non-­‐speech	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  in	  newborn	  infants	  (Experiments	  1	  &	  2)	  as	  well	  as	  infants	  at	  4	  months	  of	  age	  (Experiments	  3	  &	  4)	  in.	  Results	  revealed	  that	  at	  birth,	  the	  brain	  responds	  specially	  to	  speech:	  bilateral	  anterior	  areas	  are	  activated	  to	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language,	  but	  not	  to	  the	  whistled	  surrogate	  form.	  Different	  patterns	  were	  observed	  in	  4	  month-­‐old	  infants,	  demonstrating	  how	  language	  experience	  influences	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  and	  non-­‐speech	  signals.	  	  	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  then	  turn	  to	  infants’	  perception	  of	  language	  as	  a	  marker	  of	  social	  group,	  asking	  whether	  infants	  at	  6	  and	  11	  month-­‐olds	  associate	  the	  speakers	  of	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  individuals	  of	  different	  ethnicities.	  Infants	  at	  11	  months—but	  not	  at	  6	  months—are	  found	  to	  look	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  versus	  English	  language	  (Experiments	  5,	  7).	  However,	  infants	  at	  the	  same	  age	  did	  not	  show	  any	  difference	  in	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  versus	  Spanish	  (Experiment	  6).	  Together,	  these	  results	  suggest	  that	  the	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  tested	  have	  learned	  a	  specific	  association	  between	  Asian	  individuals	  and	  Cantonese	  language.	  	  	  The	  experiments	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  thus	  demonstrate	  that	  from	  early	  in	  development,	  infants	  are	  tuned	  to	  language.	  Such	  sensitivity	  is	  argued	  to	  be	  of	  	   iii	  critical	  importance,	  as	  it	  may	  serve	  to	  direct	  young	  learners	  to	  potential	  communicative	  partners.	  	   	  	   iv	  Preface	  	  The	  work	  in	  this	  dissertation	  is	  my	  own,	  conducted	  in	  collaboration	  with	  colleagues	  as	  described	  below.	  	  Chapter	  1:	  Introduction	  	  I	  am	  the	  primary	  author	  of	  this	  chapter,	  with	  contributions	  from	  Dr.	  Janet	  F.	  Werker	  (supervisor).	  	  Chapters	  2	  &	  3:	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  	  The	  work	  on	  these	  chapters	  is	  the	  result	  of	  a	  collaboration	  between	  myself,	  Dr.	  Judit	  Gervain,	  Dr.	  Manuel	  Carreiras,	  and	  Dr.	  Janet	  F.	  Werker	  (supervisor).	  I	  am	  the	  primary	  author	  of	  this	  work:	  I	  originated	  the	  theoretical	  questions,	  finalized	  the	  experimental	  design,	  collected	  all	  data,	  and	  with	  Judit	  Gervain,	  analyzed	  the	  data.	  	  	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  2	  is	  currently	  under	  revision	  for	  publication,	  with	  myself	  as	  first	  author.	  	  Chapter	  4:	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  	  The	  work	  in	  this	  chapter	  is	  the	  result	  of	  a	  collaboration	  between	  myself,	  Dr.	  Andrew	  Baron,	  and	  Dr.	  Janet	  F.	  Werker.	  I	  am	  the	  primary	  author	  of	  this	  work:	  I	  originated	  the	  theoretical	  questions,	  collected	  data	  (along	  with	  help	  from	  undergraduate	  research	  assistant	  Gabriela	  De	  Lucca),	  analyzed	  all	  data,	  and	  wrote	  the	  current	  chapter.	  	  	  Chapter	  5:	  Conclusion	  	  	   v	  I	  am	  the	  primary	  author	  of	  this	  chapter,	  with	  contributions	  from	  Dr.	  Janet	  F.	  Werker	  (supervisor).	  	  	  	   	  	   vi	  Table	  of	  Contents	  	  	  Abstract	  ......................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Preface	  .......................................................................................................................................	  iv	  Table	  of	  Contents	  ...................................................................................................................	  vi	  List	  of	  Figures	  ..........................................................................................................................	  ix	  Acknowledgements	  ...............................................................................................................	  xi	  1	   Introduction	  .......................................................................................................................	  1	  1.1	   General	  Introduction	  ...............................................................................................................	  1	  1.2	   Language	  as	  a	  Special	  Signal	  .................................................................................................	  2	  1.2.1	   	  Neural	  Specialization	  for	  Language	  ........................................................................................	  3	  1.2.2	   Preference	  for	  Speech	  ...................................................................................................................	  6	  1.3	   The	  Native	  Language	  ...............................................................................................................	  8	  1.3.1	   Preference	  for	  the	  Native	  Language	  ........................................................................................	  8	  1.3.2	   Perceptual	  Narrowing	  ...................................................................................................................	  9	  1.4	   Language	  as	  a	  Cue	  to	  Social	  Groups	  ................................................................................	  10	  1.4.1	   Social	  Groups	  ...................................................................................................................................	  11	  1.4.2	   Language	  as	  a	  Social	  Signal	  .......................................................................................................	  13	  1.	  5	   Thesis	  Rationale	  ......................................................................................................................	  14	  1.5.1	   Part	  I:	  Infants’	  Neural	  Perception	  of	  Native,	  Non-­‐Native,	  and	  Whistled	  Surrogate	  Language	  ..........................................................................................................................................................	  14	  1.5.2	   Part	  II:	  Infants’	  Social	  Perception	  of	  Native	  and	  Non-­‐Native	  Language	  ................	  17	  2	   The	  Specificity	  of	  the	  Neural	  Response	  to	  Speech	  at	  Birth	  ...............................	  19	  2.1	   Introduction	  ...............................................................................................................................	  19	  2.2	   Experiment	  1	  .............................................................................................................................	  22	  2.2.1	   Methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  23	  2.2.2	   Results	  ................................................................................................................................................	  26	  2.2.3	   Discussion	  .........................................................................................................................................	  28	  2.3	   Experiment	  2	  .............................................................................................................................	  29	  	   vii	  2.3.1	   Methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  30	  2.3.2	   Results	  ................................................................................................................................................	  32	  2.3.3	   	  Discussion	  ........................................................................................................................................	  33	  2.4	   General	  Discussion	  .................................................................................................................	  34	  3	   Development	  of	  the	  Neural	  Response	  to	  Speech	  from	  Birth	  to	  4	  Months	  ...	  37	  3.1	   Introduction	  ...............................................................................................................................	  37	  3.2	   Experiment	  3	  .............................................................................................................................	  41	  3.2.1	   Methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  42	  3.2.3	   Results	  ................................................................................................................................................	  47	  3.2.4	   Discussion	  .........................................................................................................................................	  49	  3.3	   Experiment	  4	  .............................................................................................................................	  51	  3.3.1	   Methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  52	  3.3.2	   Results	  ................................................................................................................................................	  55	  3.3.3	   Discussion	  .........................................................................................................................................	  56	  3.4	   General	  Discussion	  .................................................................................................................	  57	  4	   Languages	  and	  Faces:	  Infants’	  Expectations	  of	  the	  Speakers	  of	  Native	  and	  Non-­‐Native	  Languages	  .........................................................................................................	  61	  4.1	   Introduction	  ...............................................................................................................................	  61	  4.2	   Experiment	  5	  .............................................................................................................................	  64	  4.2.1	   Methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  66	  4.2.2	   Results	  ................................................................................................................................................	  70	  4.2.3	   Discussion	  .........................................................................................................................................	  71	  4.3	   Experiment	  6	  .............................................................................................................................	  73	  4.3.1	   Methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  74	  4.2.2	   	  Results	  ...............................................................................................................................................	  74	  4.2.3	   Discussion	  .........................................................................................................................................	  76	  4.4	   Experiment	  7	  .............................................................................................................................	  76	  4.4.1	   Methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  79	  4.4.2	   Results	  ................................................................................................................................................	  81	  4.4.3	   Discussion	  .........................................................................................................................................	  85	  4.4	   General	  Discussion	  .................................................................................................................	  87	  	   viii	  5	   Conclusions	  ......................................................................................................................	  90	  5.1	   Summary	  of	  Results	  and	  Implications	  ............................................................................	  90	  5.2	   Future	  Directions	  ....................................................................................................................	  96	  5.3	   Concluding	  Statement	  ...........................................................................................................	  97	  References	  ...............................................................................................................................	  98	  Appendix	  ...............................................................................................................................	  116	  	  	   	  	   ix	  List	  of	  Figures	  	  Figure	  2.1	   Schematic	  illustration	  of	  optical	  channels	  over	  	  temporal	  regions	  of	  neonate	  cortex	  …………………………………………….	  24	   	  	  Figure	  2.2	   Example	  of	  the	  research	  design	  used	  in	  Experiments	  	   	   	  1	  and	  2	  ………………………………………………………………………………………	  25	  	  Figure	  2.3	   Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  in	  response	  to	  each	  	  language	  condition	  in	  Experiment	  1,	  compared	  	  between	  anterior	  and	  posterior	  temporal	  regions....................................	  28	  	  Figure	  2.4	   Samples	  of	  Spanish	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero	  waveforms	  	  and	  spectrograms	  ....................................................................................................	  31	  	  Figure	  2.5	   Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  in	  response	  to	  each	  	  language	  condition	  in	  Experiment	  2,	  compared	  	  between	  anterior	  and	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  ………………………...	  33	  	  Figure	  3.1	   Results	  for	  all	  infants	  who	  completed	  Experiment	  3	  	  and	  for	  all	  infants	  with	  complete	  data	  set	  for	  	  Experiment	  3	  ..............................................................................................................	  43	  	  Figure	  3.2	   Schematic	  of	  the	  probe	  set	  placement	  on	  the	  infant	  	  head	  in	  Experiments	  3	  and	  4	  ...............................................................................	  45	  	  Figure	  3.3	   Sample	  structure	  of	  a	  trial	  in	  Experiments	  3	  and	  4	  ...................................	  46	  	  Figure	  3.4	   Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  as	  observed	  in	  	  Experiment	  3	  ..............................................................................................................	  49	  	  Figure	  3.5	  	   Results	  for	  all	  infants	  who	  completed	  Experiment	  4,	  	  and	  for	  all	  infants	  with	  a	  complete	  data	  set	  for	  	  Experiment	  4	  ..............................................................................................................	  54	  	  Figure	  3.6	   Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  observed	  in	  	  Experiment	  4	  ..............................................................................................................	  55	  	  Figure	  4.1	   Schematic	  of	  an	  experimental	  trial	  in	  Experiments	  5,	  6,	  	  &	  7	  ...................................................................................................................................	  68	  	  Figure	  4.2	   Results	  from	  Experiment	  5	  ..................................................................................	  71	  	  Figure	  4.3	   Results	  from	  Experiment	  6	  ..................................................................................	  75	  	  	   x	  Figure	  4.4	   Areas	  of	  interest	  used	  to	  examine	  infants’	  detailed	  	  looking	  at	  the	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  in	  	  Experiment	  7	  ..............................................................................................................	  81	  	  Figure	  4.5	   Results	  from	  the	  novel	  group	  of	  11	  month-­‐olds	  tested	  	  (N=16)	  in	  Experiment	  7	  .........................................................................................	  82	  	  Figure	  4.6	   Proportion	  looking	  to	  Asian	  faces	  for	  combined	  	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7,	  separated	  	  by	  those	  infants	  whose	  parents	  reported	  regular	  	  exposure	  to	  1	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  	  individuals	  in	  their	  infant’s	  life,	  and	  infants	  whose	  	  parents	  reported	  no	  such	  exposure	  .................................................................	  84	  	  Figure	  4.7	   Infants’	  looking	  to	  areas	  of	  interest	  on	  Caucasian	  	  and	  Asian	  faces,	  for	  the	  combined	  sample	  of	  infants	  	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7	  ....................................................................................	  85	  	   	  	   xi	  Acknowledgements	  	  	  I	  owe	  great	  thanks	  to	  my	  thesis	  supervisor	  and	  graduate	  advisor,	  Janet	  Werker.	  Her	  support	  was	  central	  to	  the	  completion	  of	  this	  dissertation.	  She	  has	  pushed	  me	  to	  think	  deeply,	  encouraged	  me	  to	  continue	  onwards,	  and	  has	  continuously	  helped	  me	  to	  grow	  into	  a	  better	  researcher.	  	  	  I	  also	  thank	  my	  committee	  members	  for	  their	  advise	  and	  guidance	  on	  this	  dissertation:	  Geoffrey	  Hall,	  Andrew	  Baron,	  and	  Todd	  Handy	  have	  always	  been	  available	  and	  supportive	  when	  needed.	  	  	  Several	  research	  assistants	  helped	  with	  the	  collection	  and	  analysis	  of	  data	  included	  in	  this	  dissertation,	  for	  which	  I	  am	  incredibly	  grateful.	  Most	  notably,	  Tasia	  Tsatsanis,	  Fiona	  Brady,	  and	  Jessica	  Barclay	  tested	  infants	  in	  NIRS	  studies,	  and	  Gabriela	  De	  Lucca	  and	  Cassie	  Tam	  helped	  tested	  infants	  in	  the	  eyetracking	  procedure.	  	  Many	  other	  members	  of	  the	  UBC	  Infant	  Studies	  Centre,	  past	  and	  present,	  also	  deserve	  my	  thanks:	  Ali	  Bruderer,	  Kyle	  Danielson,	  Alexis	  Black,	  Nurit	  Gazit-­‐Gurel,	  Krista	  Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  Henny	  Yeung,	  Judit	  Gervain,	  Priya	  Kandhahai,	  Afra	  Foroud,	  Savannah	  Nijiboer,	  Julia	  Liebowicz,	  and	  Laurie	  Fais.	  Having	  this	  incredible	  community	  has	  made	  completing	  my	  dissertation	  possible.	  	  None	  of	  the	  work	  in	  this	  thesis	  would	  be	  possible	  without	  the	  willingness	  of	  the	  many	  families	  and	  infants	  who	  participated	  in	  the	  research.	  I	  am	  forever	  indebted	  to	  their	  service.	  	  	  Finally,	  a	  personal	  thanks	  to	  my	  parents	  and	  to	  my	  husband,	  Tod,	  for	  their	  unwavering	  support.	  	  	  	   1	  1	   Introduction	  	  	  And	  the	  Gileadites	  took	  the	  passages	  of	  Jordan	  before	  the	  Ephraimites:	  and	  it	  was	  so,	  that	  when	  those	  Ephraimites	  which	  were	  escaped	  said,	  Let	  me	  go	  over;	  the	  men	  of	  Gilead	  said	  unto	  him,	  Art	  thou	  an	  Ephraimite?	  If	  he	  said,	  Nay;	  Then	  said	  they	  unto	  him,	  Say	  now	  Shibboleth:	  and	  he	  said	  Sibboleth:	  for	  he	  could	  not	  frame	  to	  pronounce	  it	  right.	  –	  Judges	  12:5-­‐6	  	  	  1.1	   General	  Introduction	  	  	  Language	  is	  the	  classic	  shibboleth:	  its	  use	  can	  help	  to	  distinguish	  between	  members	  of	  different	  social	  groups,	  and	  help	  to	  identify	  individuals	  who	  are	  part	  of	  one’s	  own	  group.	  In	  my	  dissertation,	  I	  explore	  how	  language	  may	  serve	  as	  a	  shibboleth	  for	  young	  learners,	  in	  directing	  them	  towards	  relevant	  communicative	  signals	  and	  communicative	  partners.	  	  	  In	  their	  work,	  Spelke	  and	  Kinzler	  (2007)	  have	  proposed	  that	  reasoning	  about	  social	  groups	  is	  a	  system	  of	  core	  cognition.	  Like	  other	  core	  systems	  for	  reasoning	  about	  objects,	  number,	  actions,	  and	  space,	  this	  would	  suggest	  that	  infants	  are	  endowed	  from	  birth	  with	  special	  and	  specific	  capacities	  to	  represent	  social	  group	  categories,	  based	  upon	  their	  shared	  evolutionary	  history.	  Further,	  Spelke	  and	  Kinzler	  have	  theorized	  that	  for	  reasoning	  about	  social	  groups,	  language	  may	  serve	  as	  a	  particularly	  influential	  cue	  to	  membership.	  From	  an	  evolutionary	  standpoint,	  for	  most	  of	  human	  history	  language	  is	  likely	  to	  have	  been	  the	  most	  reliable	  sign	  with	  which	  to	  distinguish	  between	  communities:	  while	  social	  groups	  living	  nearby	  to	  each	  other	  were	  apt	  to	  be	  similar	  in	  other	  potential	  markers	  of	  social	  group	  such	  as	  race	  and	  ethnicity,	  neighboring	  social	  groups	  would	  commonly	  differ	  in	  language	  use	  or	  accent	  (Kinzler,	  Shutts,	  &	  Correll,	  2010;	  Kinzler	  &	  Spelke,	  2011;	  for	  further	  	   2	  background,	  see	  Cosmides,	  Tooby,	  &	  Kurzban,	  2003;	  Kurzban,	  Tooby,	  &	  Cosmides,	  2001).	  	  	  In	  support	  of	  the	  notion	  that	  infants	  are	  sensitive	  to	  language	  as	  a	  cue	  of	  social	  group	  membership,	  Kinzler,	  Spelke,	  and	  colleagues	  have	  conducted	  a	  line	  of	  research	  illustrating	  that	  infants	  prefer	  individuals	  who	  speak	  their	  native	  language.	  The	  researchers	  found	  that	  at	  five	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  look	  more	  at	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  their	  native	  language	  than	  at	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  an	  unfamiliar	  non-­‐native	  language,	  and	  at	  10	  months,	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  take	  a	  toy	  from	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  their	  native	  language	  than	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Kinzler,	  Dupoux,	  &	  Spelke,	  2007;	  Kinzler,	  Dupoux,	  &	  Spelke,	  2012;	  see	  also	  Pun,	  Diesendruck,	  Ferara,	  Hamlin,	  &	  Baron,	  under	  review).	  However,	  beyond	  this	  evidence	  of	  preference	  for	  speakers	  of	  the	  native	  language,	  little	  substantiation	  has	  been	  provided	  that	  young	  infants	  use	  language	  as	  an	  indicator	  of	  social	  group.	  	  	  In	  the	  following	  dissertation,	  I	  explore	  three	  themes	  related	  to	  infants’	  reasoning	  about	  language	  and	  social	  groups:	  1)	  infants’	  processing	  of	  language	  (both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar)	  as	  a	  special	  signal,	  2)	  infants’	  tuning	  to	  their	  native	  language,	  and	  3)	  infants’	  use	  of	  language	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership.	  If	  it	  is	  the	  case	  that	  language	  is	  a	  powerful	  indicator	  of	  an	  individual’s	  social	  group	  and	  that	  reasoning	  about	  social	  groups	  is	  a	  system	  of	  core	  cognition	  built	  into	  human	  development,	  evidence	  for	  all	  three	  should	  be	  present	  from	  early	  in	  life.	  	  	  1.2	   Language	  as	  a	  Special	  Signal	  	  Language	  in	  general	  can	  serve	  as	  a	  shibboleth	  to	  young	  learners.	  The	  use	  of	  language—whether	  familiar	  or	  unfamiliar—is	  a	  strong	  cue	  for	  identifying	  conspecifics,	  members	  of	  one’s	  own	  species	  who	  may	  be	  sources	  of	  relevant	  information.	  Indeed,	  Vouloumanos	  and	  colleagues	  (2009)	  have	  shown	  by	  5	  months	  	   3	  of	  age,	  infants	  appear	  to	  expect	  fellow	  humans	  to	  be	  associated	  with	  language,	  looking	  more	  to	  human	  versus	  monkey	  faces	  when	  played	  human	  speech	  versus	  monkey	  calls.	  	  	  One	  important	  aspect	  of	  using	  language	  as	  a	  shibboleth	  is	  tuning	  to	  the	  language	  signal	  itself.	  If	  language	  in	  general	  is	  privileged	  for	  helping	  direct	  humans	  towards	  potential	  communicate	  partners,	  evidence	  should	  exist	  for	  specialized	  processing	  for	  linguistic	  signals,	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar,	  from	  early	  in	  life.	  	  1.2.1	  	   Neural	  Specialization	  for	  Language	  	  Researchers	  have	  long	  known	  that	  the	  adult	  brain	  is	  specialized	  in	  its	  response	  to	  language.	  Functional	  specialization	  for	  language	  was	  first	  implicated	  in	  classic	  aphasia	  studies	  such	  as	  those	  by	  Broca	  in	  1861	  and	  Wernicke	  in	  1874,	  in	  which	  damage	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  was	  seen	  to	  cause	  difficulties	  with	  speech	  perception	  and	  production	  while	  similar	  damage	  to	  the	  right	  hemisphere	  did	  not	  appear	  to	  impact	  language	  use.	  In	  the	  century	  following,	  behavioural	  studies	  using	  dichotic	  listening	  tasks	  provided	  further	  support	  for	  the	  left	  hemisphere’s	  role	  in	  language	  processing.	  In	  such	  tasks,	  different	  sounds	  are	  presented	  to	  the	  left	  and	  right	  ears.	  Given	  that	  the	  brain	  is	  organized	  in	  a	  contralateral	  manner,	  information	  to	  the	  left	  ear	  is	  processed	  mainly	  by	  the	  brain’s	  right	  hemisphere	  and	  information	  to	  the	  right	  ear	  is	  processed	  mainly	  by	  the	  left	  hemisphere.	  Studies	  have	  found	  that	  adults	  typically	  respond	  faster	  and	  more	  accurately	  to	  language	  information	  when	  it	  is	  presented	  to	  the	  right	  ear	  versus	  to	  the	  left	  ear,	  implying	  that	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  is	  preferentially	  involved	  in	  speech	  processing	  (Kimura,	  1967).	  Critically,	  adults	  do	  not	  show	  a	  right	  ear	  advantage	  for	  all	  sounds	  in	  dichotic	  listening	  tasks:	  when	  music	  is	  presented,	  a	  left	  ear	  advantage	  is	  found.	  Together,	  this	  work	  on	  aphasia	  patients	  and	  with	  dichotic	  listening	  tasks	  set	  the	  stage	  for	  an	  early	  understanding	  of	  the	  left	  hemisphere’s	  role	  in	  language.	  	  	   4	  Over	  the	  last	  three	  decades,	  advances	  in	  neuroimaging	  technology	  have	  allowed	  for	  a	  more	  nuanced	  view	  of	  language	  processing	  in	  the	  brain.	  Researchers	  have	  employed	  techniques	  such	  as	  fMRI	  and	  PET	  to	  measure	  neural	  activation	  while	  adult	  subjects	  listen	  to	  and/or	  respond	  to	  language	  stimuli.	  Such	  studies	  have	  helped	  to	  further	  elucidate	  the	  brain	  regions	  involved	  in	  language	  perception	  and	  production,	  identifying	  regions	  that	  are	  activated	  in	  response	  to	  language	  in	  both	  left	  and	  right	  hemispheres	  (Price,	  2012).	  Moreover,	  two	  processing	  streams	  thought	  to	  organize	  activation	  across	  these	  regions	  have	  been	  recognized.	  The	  dorsal	  stream	  is	  believed	  to	  be	  involved	  in	  mapping	  speech	  sounds	  to	  articulation,	  while	  the	  ventral	  stream	  is	  believed	  to	  be	  involved	  in	  mapping	  speech	  sounds	  to	  meaning	  (Hickok	  &	  Poeppel,	  2007;	  Saur	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  	  	  Recent	  models	  of	  language	  processing	  have	  also	  suggested	  that	  the	  left	  and	  right	  hemispheres	  may	  play	  different	  roles	  in	  speech	  perception,	  and	  are	  dominant	  in	  processing	  different	  types	  of	  language	  information.	  Poeppel	  and	  colleagues	  (Poeppel,	  2003)	  have	  hypothesized	  that	  while	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  is	  principal	  in	  detecting	  rapidly	  changing	  features	  (~20-­‐40ms),	  such	  as	  those	  involved	  in	  phoneme	  transitions,	  the	  right	  hemisphere	  is	  principal	  in	  detecting	  changes	  in	  longer	  time	  windows	  (~150-­‐250ms),	  such	  as	  those	  involved	  in	  syllabic	  and	  prosodic	  information.	  Thus,	  depending	  on	  the	  type	  of	  language	  stimuli	  presented	  during	  an	  experimental	  procedure	  (ie,	  syllables	  and	  single	  words	  versus	  continuous	  speech),	  asymmetries	  may	  be	  seen	  in	  left	  versus	  right	  hemisphere	  involvement	  (Boemio,	  Fromm,	  Braun,	  &	  Poeppel,	  2005;	  Hickok	  &	  Poeppel,	  2007;	  Zatorre	  &	  Gandour,	  2008).	  A	  similar	  model	  put	  forth	  by	  Friederici	  and	  colleagues	  (Friederici	  &	  Alter,	  2004)	  has	  argued	  that	  while	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  predominantly	  processes	  segment-­‐level,	  lexical,	  and	  syntactic	  information,	  the	  right	  hemisphere	  is	  dominant	  in	  processing	  suprasegmental	  information.	  These	  influential	  models	  show	  how	  the	  field	  has	  moved	  to	  a	  more	  complex	  understanding	  of	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  language	  versus	  the	  earlier	  perspective	  that	  all	  language	  processing	  was	  done	  by	  the	  left	  hemisphere.	  However,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  while	  research	  has	  identified	  a	  distributed	  network	  of	  brain	  regions-­‐-­‐	  including	  regions	  in	  the	  right	  hemisphere—	   5	  that	  are	  involved	  in	  language	  processing,	  most	  neuroimaging	  studies	  have	  continued	  to	  find	  that	  in	  response	  to	  language	  stimuli	  there	  is	  typically	  greater	  activation	  overall	  in	  the	  left	  versus	  right	  hemispheres	  (Dehaene	  et	  al.,	  1997;	  Perani	  et	  al.,	  1996;	  Price,	  2012).	  	  	  Neuroimaging	  studies	  have	  also	  been	  used	  to	  examine	  brain	  activation	  to	  language	  versus	  non-­‐language	  signals.	  In	  adults,	  greater	  neural	  activation	  is	  seen	  in	  left	  hemisphere	  regions	  to	  speech	  versus	  white	  noise	  bursts	  and	  pure	  tones	  (Binder	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Zatorre,	  Evans,	  Meyer,	  &	  Gjedde,1992).	  However,	  these	  non-­‐language	  contrasts	  have	  been	  challenged	  as	  less	  than	  ideal,	  given	  that	  they	  lack	  the	  same	  level	  of	  complexity	  as	  speech.	  To	  address	  this	  issue,	  studies	  have	  compared	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  to	  more	  evenly	  matched	  non-­‐linguistic	  signals	  such	  as	  backwards	  language	  (Binder	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Perani	  et	  al.,	  1996),	  manipulated	  speech	  envelopes	  (Scott	  et	  al.,	  2000),	  and	  sine-­‐wave	  contours	  (Vouloumanos,	  Kiehl,	  Werker,	  &	  Liddle,	  2001).	  Using	  these	  improved	  control	  stimuli,	  research	  has	  continued	  to	  show	  greater	  activation	  in	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  in	  response	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech,	  suggesting	  that	  even	  when	  complexity	  is	  taken	  into	  account,	  the	  adult	  brain	  treats	  speech	  as	  a	  special	  signal.	  	  	  	  Studies	  have	  further	  suggested	  that	  specialized	  neural	  processing	  for	  speech	  is	  present	  from	  early	  in	  development.	  Like	  with	  adults,	  dichotic	  listening	  tasks	  testing	  newborn	  infants	  have	  a	  right-­‐ear/left-­‐hemisphere	  advantage	  for	  processing	  speech	  (Bertoncini	  et	  al.,	  1989;	  Best,	  Hoffman,	  &	  Glanville,	  1982).	  Moreover,	  neuroimaging	  studies	  using	  both	  Near-­‐Infrared	  Spectroscopy	  (NIRS)	  and	  functional	  Magnetic	  Resonance	  Imagery	  (fMRI)	  methodologies	  have	  demonstrated	  greater	  neural	  activation	  in	  young	  infants	  to	  language	  versus	  non-­‐linguistic	  backwards	  language	  and	  silence	  (Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  Dehaene,	  &	  Hertz-­‐Pannier,	  2002;	  Pena	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  	  	  	   	  	   6	  1.2.2	  Preference	  for	  Speech	  	  Evidence	  of	  specialized	  processing	  for	  language	  early	  in	  life	  also	  comes	  from	  work	  examining	  infants’	  listening	  preferences	  for	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐linguistic	  signals.	  Research	  conducted	  in	  the	  1980s	  was	  the	  first	  to	  show	  that	  infants	  listen	  more	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech:	  Columbo	  and	  Bundy	  (1981)	  compared	  4.5	  month-­‐old	  infants’	  preferences	  for	  speech	  to	  white	  noise,	  while	  Glenn,	  Cunningham,	  and	  Joyce	  (1981)	  compared	  9	  month-­‐olds’	  preferences	  for	  vocal	  singing	  to	  instrumental	  music.	  While	  both	  of	  these	  studies	  demonstrated	  a	  speech	  (or	  vocal	  singing)	  preference,	  the	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  they	  employed	  are	  problematic.	  As	  described	  in	  the	  previous	  section,	  white	  noise	  is	  less	  acoustically	  complex	  than	  spoken	  language,	  as	  is	  most	  instrumental	  music.	  These	  early	  studies	  thus	  left	  open	  the	  possibility	  that	  infants	  simply	  prefer	  listening	  to	  complex	  signals,	  and	  not	  to	  speech	  per	  se.	  	  	  	  To	  test	  infants’	  preference	  for	  speech	  while	  controlling	  for	  acoustic	  complexity,	  Vouloumanos	  and	  Werker	  (2004,	  2007)	  conducted	  a	  series	  of	  studies	  in	  which	  infants	  heard	  both	  spoken	  language	  and	  non-­‐speech	  sine-­‐wave	  contours.	  Importantly,	  the	  sine-­‐wave	  contours	  employed	  were	  acoustically	  complex	  and	  matched	  to	  speech	  stimuli	  in	  timing	  and	  fundamental	  frequency.	  The	  researchers	  found	  that	  despite	  this	  similarity	  between	  the	  signals,	  both	  2	  and	  7	  month-­‐old	  infants	  showed	  a	  clear	  preference	  for	  speech.	  	  Additionally,	  the	  privileged	  status	  for	  speech	  in	  infancy	  does	  not	  appear	  to	  be	  linked	  to	  language	  specific	  experience.	  In	  subsequent	  work,	  Shultz	  and	  Vouloumanos	  (2010)	  tested	  English-­‐exposed	  3	  month-­‐olds’	  preference	  for	  Japanese	  words	  versus	  other	  naturally-­‐occurring	  non-­‐speech	  signals,	  including	  human	  communicative	  vocalizations	  (such	  as	  laughter	  and	  sounds	  of	  agreement)	  and	  human	  non-­‐communicative	  vocalizations	  (such	  as	  coughing	  and	  throat-­‐clearing	  noises).	  Even	  though	  the	  infants	  tested	  in	  this	  study	  had	  no	  experience	  with	  the	  Japanese	  language,	  a	  preference	  for	  speech	  over	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  still	  emerged.	  Moreover,	  research	  by	  Krentz	  and	  Corina	  (2008)	  has	  demonstrated	  that	  infants	  show	  a	  	   7	  preference	  for	  language	  even	  beyond	  speech:	  both	  6	  and	  10	  month-­‐old	  hearing	  infants	  with	  no	  exposure	  to	  signed	  language	  prefer	  watching	  linguistic	  sign	  over	  non-­‐linguistic	  pantomime.	  	  	  Studies	  have	  also	  investigated	  the	  developmental	  origins	  of	  infants’	  speech	  preference.	  Using	  the	  same	  speech	  and	  sine-­‐wave	  stimuli	  employed	  with	  2	  and	  7	  month-­‐olds,	  Vouloumanos	  and	  Werker	  (2007)	  found	  that	  newborn	  infants	  only	  a	  few	  days	  old	  similarly	  prefer	  to	  listen	  to	  speech.	  Interestingly,	  however,	  newborn	  infants’	  preference	  for	  language	  appears	  to	  initially	  be	  broadly	  defined.	  Vouloumanos	  and	  colleagues	  (Vouloumanos,	  Hauser,	  Werker,	  &	  Martin,	  2010)	  observed	  that	  neonates	  show	  no	  preference	  for	  speech	  over	  rhesus	  monkey	  calls,	  and	  that	  similar	  to	  spoken	  language,	  neonates	  prefer	  rhesus	  monkey	  calls	  to	  sine-­‐wave	  contours.	  Not	  until	  they	  are	  2-­‐3	  months	  do	  infants	  prefer	  speech	  over	  monkey	  calls.	  This	  finding	  has	  been	  interpreted	  such	  that	  newborn	  infants	  may	  initially	  be	  responding	  to	  a	  range	  of	  complex	  signals	  that	  share	  spectral	  and	  temporal	  features	  with	  spoken	  language	  and	  are	  produced	  in	  a	  comparable	  manner.	  As	  infants	  grow	  more	  familiar	  with	  the	  spoken	  language	  during	  their	  first	  post-­‐uterine	  months	  of	  life,	  their	  listening	  preferences	  are	  thought	  to	  quickly	  tune	  to	  the	  properties	  of	  the	  language	  spoken	  round	  them.	  	  	  The	  research	  reviewed	  above	  suggests	  that	  humans	  respond	  to	  language	  as	  special	  signal	  from	  early	  in	  development.	  From	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life,	  infants	  prefer	  to	  listen	  to	  speech	  versus	  acoustically	  similar	  non-­‐speech	  signals,	  and	  in	  both	  adults	  and	  infants,	  the	  brain	  responds	  uniquely	  to	  speech.	  However,	  the	  exact	  specificity	  of	  early	  neural	  tuning	  to	  language	  has	  not	  been	  established.	  Little	  research	  to	  date	  has	  examined	  whether	  the	  infant	  brain	  responds	  similarly	  to	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language,	  as	  well	  as	  whether	  there	  is	  similar	  activation	  to	  language	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  language-­‐like	  signals.	  Such	  studies	  would	  serve	  to	  further	  elucidate	  the	  breadth	  of	  signals	  that	  can	  trigger	  a	  response	  in	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  brain,	  and	  establish	  how	  much	  of	  the	  neural	  activation	  to	  speech	  seen	  in	  young	  infants	  is	  due	  to	  familiarity.	  These	  issues	  are	  later	  addressed	  in	  Chapters	  2	  and	  3	  of	  this	  dissertation.	  	   8	  1.3	   The	  Native	  Language	  	  Recognizing	  language	  in	  general	  as	  a	  special	  signal	  is	  only	  part	  of	  what	  is	  necessary	  for	  young	  learners	  to	  identify	  the	  most	  useful	  communication	  and	  communicators.	  As	  the	  vast	  majority	  of	  infants’	  language	  learning	  will	  be	  with	  the	  particular	  sounds,	  words,	  and	  structure	  of	  the	  language	  spoken	  around	  them,	  infants	  must	  also	  come	  to	  perceive	  their	  native	  language	  and	  its	  speakers	  as	  especially	  significant.	  	  	  	  1.3.1	  Preference	  for	  the	  Native	  Language	  	  	  The	  previous	  sections	  reviewed	  research	  demonstrating	  that	  infants	  have	  a	  preference	  for	  language	  in	  general—preferring	  even	  languages	  they	  have	  no	  experience	  with	  over	  non-­‐language	  signals.	  However,	  beginning	  at	  birth,	  infants’	  preferences	  also	  show	  effects	  of	  their	  specific	  language	  environment.	  Fetal	  hearing	  is	  estimated	  to	  be	  fully	  developed	  by	  22-­‐26	  weeks	  gestation	  (Eisenberg,	  1976;	  Moore	  &	  Jeffrey,	  1994),	  and	  properties	  of	  the	  uterine	  wall	  allow	  for	  low	  frequency	  sounds	  to	  transmit	  to	  the	  fetal	  inner	  ear	  (Gerhardt	  et	  al.,	  1992;	  Sohmer	  &	  Freeman,	  2001).	  As	  such,	  much	  of	  the	  rhythmic	  and	  prosodic	  information	  of	  the	  native	  language	  is	  believed	  to	  be	  available	  to	  the	  fetus,	  along	  with	  limited	  phonetic	  information	  (Lecanuet	  &	  Granier-­‐Deferre,	  1993;	  Querleu,	  Renard,	  Versyp,	  Paris-­‐Delrue,	  &	  Crepin,	  1988).	  Indeed,	  previous	  research	  has	  shown	  that	  at	  the	  time	  they	  are	  born,	  infants’	  behaviour	  already	  reflects	  their	  prenatal	  language	  environment:	  newborn	  infants	  preferentially	  listen	  to	  the	  language	  they	  have	  heard	  in	  utero	  versus	  a	  rhythmically	  distinct	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  Burns,	  &	  Werker,	  2010;	  Mehler	  et	  al.,	  1988;	  Moon,	  Panneton-­‐Cooper,	  &	  Fifer,	  1993;	  Nazzi,	  Bertoncini,	  &	  Mehler,	  1998).	  	  	  As	  infants	  gain	  experience	  with	  their	  native	  language	  over	  their	  first	  months	  of	  life,	  their	  listening	  preferences	  become	  even	  more	  specific.	  At	  4-­‐5	  months,	  infants	  prefer	  listening	  to	  their	  native	  language	  over	  a	  non-­‐native	  language	  that	  shares	  the	  same	  rhythmical	  class	  (Bosch	  &	  Sebastian-­‐Galle,	  1997).	  At	  9	  months	  (but	  not	  at	  6	  	   9	  months),	  infants	  prefer	  listening	  to	  words	  that	  conform	  to	  the	  stress	  patterns	  and	  phonotactic	  rules	  (rules	  for	  the	  combinations	  of	  sounds)	  of	  their	  native	  language	  versus	  the	  structure	  of	  words	  in	  other	  languages	  (Jusczyk,	  Cutler,	  &	  Redanz,	  1993;	  Jusczyk,	  Friederici,	  Wessels,	  Svenkerud,	  &	  Jusczyk,	  1993)	  	  1.3.2	  Perceptual	  Narrowing	  	  Many	  aspects	  of	  infants’	  early	  language	  processing	  initially	  appear	  to	  be	  language-­‐general,	  such	  that	  they	  are	  not	  related	  to	  experience	  with	  any	  particular	  language.	  Regardless	  of	  whether	  they	  are	  familiar	  with	  the	  language	  of	  testing,	  newborn	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  discriminate	  between	  good	  and	  poor	  syllable	  forms	  (Bertoncini	  &	  Mehler,	  1981),	  between	  lexical	  content	  words	  and	  grammatical	  functor	  words	  (Shi,	  Werker,	  &	  Morgan,	  1999),	  between	  differing	  pitch	  contours	  (Nazzi,	  Floccia,	  &	  Bertoncini,	  1998),	  and	  between	  rhythmically	  distinct	  languages	  (Mehler	  et	  al.,	  1988;	  Nazzi,	  Bertoncini,	  &	  Mehler,	  1998).	  However,	  as	  infants	  become	  more	  experienced	  with	  their	  native	  language,	  their	  language	  processing	  has	  been	  shown	  to	  rapidly	  tune	  to	  the	  specific	  properties	  of	  their	  native	  language.	  This	  transition	  from	  more	  language-­‐general	  processing	  to	  more	  native-­‐language	  specific	  sensitivities	  has	  been	  termed	  “perceptual	  narrowing.”	  The	  classic	  case	  of	  perceptual	  narrowing	  is	  seen	  with	  speech	  sound	  discrimination:	  when	  tested	  on	  their	  ability	  to	  discriminate	  minimally-­‐different	  phonetic	  contrasts,	  infants	  6-­‐8	  months	  of	  age	  are	  able	  to	  distinguish	  contrasts	  used	  in	  their	  native	  language	  as	  well	  as	  contrasts	  from	  non-­‐native	  languages.	  Yet	  by	  10-­‐12	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  have	  difficulty	  discriminating	  between	  sounds	  that	  do	  not	  contrast	  meaning	  in	  their	  language,	  while	  continuing	  to	  successfully	  discriminate	  native	  language	  sounds	  (Kuhl,	  Williams,	  Lacerda,	  Stevens,	  &	  Lindblom,	  1992;	  Werker	  &	  Tees,	  1984;	  Saffran,	  Werker,	  &	  Werner,	  2006).	  Such	  perceptual	  narrowing	  for	  speech	  sounds	  is	  robust,	  having	  been	  demonstrated	  for	  infants’	  discrimination	  of	  consonants	  (Best,	  McRoberts,	  LaFleur,	  &	  Silver-­‐Isenstadt,	  1995;	  Werker	  &	  Tees,	  1984;	  Rivera-­‐Gaxiola,	  	   10	  Silva-­‐Pereyra,	  &	  Kuhl,	  2005),	  vowels	  (Kuhl	  et	  al.,	  1992;	  Polka	  &	  Werker,	  1994),	  and	  lexical	  tones	  (Mattock,	  Molnar,	  Polka,	  &	  Burnham,	  2008).	  	  	  Similar	  perceptual	  narrowing	  trajectories	  have	  also	  been	  reported	  in	  the	  domain	  of	  language	  processing	  for	  visual	  and	  audiovisual	  speech	  perception,	  infants’	  preference	  for	  words,	  and	  label	  learning.	  While	  four	  month-­‐old	  infants	  discriminate	  between	  silent	  faces	  speaking	  two	  different	  languages,	  by	  eight	  months	  they	  do	  so	  only	  if	  they	  are	  familiar	  with	  both	  languages	  (Weikum,	  Vouloumanos,	  Navarra,	  Soto-­‐Faraco,	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  &	  Werker,	  2007;	  see	  also	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  Albareda-­‐Castellot,	  Weikum,	  &	  Werker,	  2012).	  At	  six	  months,	  infants	  match	  non-­‐native	  and	  native	  language	  speech	  sounds	  to	  silent	  videos	  of	  faces	  articulating	  the	  sounds,	  but	  by	  11	  months	  do	  so	  only	  for	  sounds	  used	  in	  the	  native	  language	  (Pons,	  Lewkowicz,	  Soto-­‐Faraco,	  &	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  2009).	  And	  when	  mapping	  novel	  labels	  to	  objects,	  infants	  12-­‐14	  months	  of	  age	  can	  learn	  both	  native	  language	  labels	  and	  labels	  containing	  unfamiliar	  non-­‐native	  speech	  sounds,	  yet	  by	  20	  months,	  infants	  fail	  to	  learn	  non-­‐native	  labels	  in	  the	  same	  tasks	  they	  continue	  to	  succeed	  in	  learning	  native	  language	  labels	  (MacKenzie,	  Graham,	  Curtin,	  &	  Archer,	  2014;	  May	  &	  Werker,	  2014).	  In	  all	  of	  these	  cases,	  infants	  begin	  by	  showing	  language	  perception	  that	  is	  similar	  across	  all	  languages,	  but	  as	  they	  gain	  familiarity	  with	  the	  sounds	  and	  structures	  of	  their	  particular	  language,	  they	  show	  differential	  processing	  to	  its	  particular	  features.	  	  1.4	   Language	  as	  a	  Cue	  to	  Social	  Groups	  	  The	  previous	  sections	  have	  outlined	  research	  demonstrating	  that	  infants	  respond	  to	  both	  language	  in	  general	  as	  well	  as	  the	  native	  language	  in	  particular	  as	  special	  signals.	  However,	  language	  is	  not	  only	  sounds,	  symbols,	  and	  sets	  of	  rules,	  but	  is	  a	  medium	  used	  by	  individuals	  to	  communicate.	  As	  such,	  language	  carries	  social	  information,	  and	  moreover,	  can	  be	  used	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  the	  social	  group	  membership	  of	  its	  speakers.	  	  	   11	  1.4.1	   Social	  Groups	  	  Humans	  can	  be	  grouped	  on	  many	  dimensions,	  including	  race,	  age,	  gender,	  religion,	  language,	  preferences,	  and	  behaviours.	  Classifications	  on	  some	  dimensions	  are	  more	  fixed,	  based	  upon	  characteristics	  given	  by	  nature,	  such	  as	  race	  and	  gender.	  Other	  classifications	  are	  more	  fluid,	  based	  upon	  an	  individual’s	  choices	  and	  decisions,	  such	  as	  sports	  team	  affiliation	  and	  profession.	  Research	  has	  shown	  that	  for	  both	  types	  of	  social	  groupings,	  humans	  tend	  to	  perceive	  individuals	  from	  their	  own	  groups	  differently	  from	  individuals	  who	  are	  dissimilar	  to	  them.	  Most	  notably,	  studies	  have	  consistently	  indicated	  that	  there	  is	  a	  preference	  for	  and	  more	  positive	  attitudes	  towards	  ingroup	  members	  (Aboud,	  2003;	  Efferson,	  Lalive,	  &	  Fehr,	  2008;	  Fiske,	  1998;	  Hewstone,	  Rubin,	  &	  Willis,	  2002;	  Nosek,	  Banaji	  &	  Greenwald,	  2002;	  Tajfel,	  Billig,	  Bundy,	  &	  Flament,	  1971;	  Tajfel,	  1982).	  	  	  A	  classic	  demonstration	  of	  ingroup	  preference	  comes	  from	  work	  using	  the	  “Implicit	  Association	  Test,”	  in	  which	  subjects	  are	  presented	  with	  exemplars	  from	  two	  different	  social	  groups	  (i.e.	  Caucasian	  and	  African	  American	  faces)	  along	  with	  pleasant	  and	  unpleasant	  words.	  In	  different	  trial	  blocks,	  subjects	  are	  instructed	  to	  respond	  to	  certain	  combinations	  of	  social	  group	  exemplars	  and	  pleasant/unpleasant	  words	  (ie,	  to	  Caucasian	  faces	  +	  pleasant	  words	  in	  the	  first	  block,	  and	  to	  Caucasian	  faces	  +	  unpleasant	  words	  in	  the	  second	  block).	  Studies	  using	  this	  method	  have	  shown	  that	  response	  times	  tend	  to	  be	  shorter	  when	  ingroup	  exemplars	  are	  paired	  with	  pleasant	  words	  and	  outgroup	  exemplars	  are	  paired	  unpleasant	  words,	  versus	  when	  ingroup	  exemplars	  are	  with	  negative	  words	  and	  outgroup	  exemplars	  are	  with	  positive	  words	  (Greenwald,	  McGhee,	  &	  Schwartz,	  1998).	  This	  pattern	  of	  results	  has	  been	  interpreted	  as	  evidence	  for	  implicit	  positive	  associations	  with	  ingroup	  members	  and	  negative	  associations	  with	  outgroup	  members,	  and	  has	  been	  replicated	  in	  adults	  for	  categories	  of	  race	  (Greenwald,	  McGhee,	  &	  Schwartz,	  1998;	  Nosek,	  Banaji,	  &	  Greenwald,	  2002),	  gender	  (Nosek,	  Banaji,	  &	  Greenwald,	  2002),	  	   12	  religion	  (Rudman,	  Greenwald,	  Mellott,	  &	  Schwartz,	  1999),	  as	  well	  as	  groupings	  that	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  by	  researchers	  (Ashburn-­‐Nardo,	  Voils,	  &	  Monteith,	  2001).	  	  	  Many	  psychologists	  have	  been	  interested	  in	  the	  development	  of	  reasoning	  about	  social	  groups.	  The	  seminal	  “Robbers	  Cave”	  study	  conducted	  by	  Sherif	  and	  colleagues	  in	  1954	  provided	  one	  of	  the	  first	  clear	  demonstrations	  of	  ingroup	  preference	  in	  childhood	  (Sherif,	  Harvey,	  White,	  Hood,	  &	  Sherif,	  1954/1961).	  During	  a	  summer	  camp	  session,	  researchers	  divided	  11-­‐12	  year-­‐old	  boys	  into	  two	  groups	  through	  random	  assignment.	  For	  the	  first	  8	  days	  of	  the	  session,	  the	  groups	  were	  kept	  isolated,	  but	  were	  aware	  of	  each	  other’s	  existence.	  Following	  this	  isolation	  period,	  the	  groups	  were	  brought	  together	  to	  engage	  in	  competitive	  activities,	  such	  as	  baseball	  and	  tug-­‐of-­‐war.	  The	  researchers	  observed	  that	  during	  both	  the	  isolation	  and	  competition	  periods	  of	  the	  study,	  the	  groups	  expressed	  negative	  attitudes	  and	  hostility	  towards	  each	  other,	  even	  though	  there	  was	  nothing	  intrinsically	  different	  distinguishing	  the	  two	  factions.	  Subsequent	  empirical	  studies	  have	  also	  found	  evidence	  of	  ingroup	  preferences	  in	  children	  similar	  to	  those	  seen	  in	  adults	  (Aboud,	  1998;	  2003;	  Baron	  &	  Dunham,	  2015;	  Bigler,	  Jones,	  &	  Lobliner,	  1997;	  Cameron,	  Alvarez,	  Ruble,	  &	  Fuligni,	  2001;	  Hirschfeld,	  1996;	  Katz,	  1983;	  Nesdale	  &	  Flesser,	  2001).	  For	  instance,	  using	  a	  variation	  of	  the	  implicit	  association	  test	  adapted	  for	  children,	  ingroup	  preferences	  have	  been	  observed	  in	  elementary	  and	  preschool-­‐aged	  children	  for	  race	  (Baron	  &	  Banaji,	  2006),	  gender	  (Cvencek,	  Greenwald,	  &	  Melzoff,	  2011;	  Dunham,	  Baron,	  &	  Banaji,	  2015),	  religion	  (Heiphetz,	  Spelke,	  &	  Banaji,	  2013),	  and	  minimally	  assigned	  groups	  (Baron	  &	  Dunham,	  2015;	  Dunham,	  Baron,	  &	  Carey,	  2011).	  	  	  Some	  researchers	  have	  further	  argued	  that	  ingroup	  preferences	  are	  in	  place	  from	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life.	  Much	  of	  the	  evidence	  in	  support	  of	  this	  notion	  comes	  from	  work	  examining	  infants’	  looking	  patterns	  to	  exemplars	  of	  different	  social	  groups.	  At	  3	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  look	  more	  to	  faces	  that	  are	  the	  same	  race	  as	  their	  own	  or	  of	  the	  majority	  race	  in	  their	  community	  (Bar-­‐Haim,	  Ziv,	  Lamy,	  &	  Hodes,	  2006;	  Kelly	  et	  al.,	  2005),	  and	  to	  look	  more	  at	  faces	  who	  are	  the	  same	  gender	  	   13	  as	  their	  primary	  caregiver	  (Quinn,	  Yahr,	  Kuhn,	  Slater,	  &	  Pascalis,	  2002).	  However,	  it	  is	  unclear	  whether	  these	  looking	  patterns	  reflect	  a	  true	  positive	  association	  and	  preference	  for	  members	  one’s	  own	  ingroup	  similar	  to	  that	  observed	  in	  adults	  and	  older	  children,	  or	  if	  early	  social	  group	  preferences	  in	  infancy	  are	  merely	  driven	  by	  familiarity	  (for	  a	  similar	  argument,	  see	  Baron,	  2013;	  and	  Baron,	  Pun,	  &	  Dunham,	  in	  press).	  Thus	  while	  research	  clearly	  indicates	  that	  adults	  and	  older	  children	  are	  sensitive	  to	  social	  groups	  and	  show	  a	  positive	  association	  with	  members	  of	  their	  own	  ingroups,	  much	  still	  remains	  to	  be	  uncovered	  as	  to	  whether	  and	  to	  what	  degree	  the	  same	  sensitivity	  is	  present	  in	  young	  infants.	  	  	  1.4.2	  Language	  as	  a	  Social	  Signal	  	  As	  described	  previously,	  some	  researchers	  have	  argued	  that	  from	  an	  evolutionary	  standpoint,	  language	  might	  be	  a	  particularly	  reliable	  and	  powerful	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership	  (Hirschfeld	  &	  Gelman,	  1997;	  Spelke	  &	  Kinzler,	  2009;).	  And	  indeed,	  there	  is	  significant	  evidence	  that	  humans	  across	  development	  make	  judgments	  about	  individuals	  based	  upon	  their	  language	  use.	  	  	  In	  early	  work	  on	  this	  topic,	  Lambert	  and	  colleagues	  (Lambert,	  Hodgson,	  Gardner,	  &	  Fillenbaum,	  1960)	  exposed	  Canadian	  university	  students	  to	  recordings	  of	  English-­‐French	  bilingual	  speakers.	  When	  asked	  to	  rate	  speakers	  on	  a	  variety	  of	  measures	  such	  as	  intelligence	  and	  friendliness,	  English-­‐speaking	  subjects	  were	  more	  favourable	  towards	  the	  instances	  of	  speakers	  speaking	  English	  than	  to	  instances	  of	  the	  same	  speakers	  speaking	  French.	  Similar	  results	  were	  also	  obtained	  with	  Jewish	  and	  Arab	  subjects	  listening	  to	  Hebrew	  and	  Arabic	  (Lambert,	  Anisfeld,	  &	  Yeni-­‐Komshian,	  1965).	  	  	  Research	  has	  further	  indicated	  that	  a	  preference	  for	  speakers	  of	  one’s	  own	  native	  language	  begins	  early	  in	  life.	  As	  explained	  in	  the	  general	  introduction,	  Kinzler	  and	  colleagues	  (Kinzler,	  Dupoux,	  &	  Spelke,	  2007)	  have	  demonstrated	  that	  at	  5	  months,	  	   14	  infants	  look	  more	  to	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  their	  native	  language	  versus	  to	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  an	  unfamiliar	  language,	  and	  at	  10	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  take	  a	  toy	  from	  a	  speaker	  who	  had	  previously	  spoken	  their	  language.	  Building	  on	  this	  work,	  additional	  studies	  have	  continued	  to	  find	  evidence	  for	  infants’	  sensitivity	  to	  language	  use	  as	  a	  social	  cue:	  at	  14	  months,	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  more	  often	  imitate	  a	  native	  language	  speaker	  than	  an	  individual	  speaking	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Buttelmann,	  Zmyj,	  Saum,	  &	  Carpenter,	  2013),	  and	  at	  2.5	  years,	  children	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  preferentially	  share	  toys	  with	  native	  language	  speakers	  (Kinzler,	  Dupoux,	  &	  Spelke,	  2012).	  A	  recent	  study	  also	  found	  that	  7	  month-­‐old	  infants	  listened	  longer	  to	  tunes	  introduced	  by	  a	  native	  language	  speaker	  than	  those	  introduced	  by	  a	  speaker	  of	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Soley	  &	  Sebastian-­‐Galles,	  2015).	  	  	  1.	  5	   Thesis	  Rationale	  	  In	  the	  following	  dissertation,	  I	  examine	  infants’	  perception	  of	  language	  as	  a	  special	  communicative	  signal,	  with	  regard	  to	  both	  language	  in	  general	  and	  to	  the	  native	  language	  in	  particular.	  In	  the	  first	  part	  of	  my	  thesis,	  I	  explore	  whether	  infants	  show	  specialized	  neural	  processing	  of	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  at	  birth	  and	  at	  four	  months.	  Then,	  in	  the	  second	  part	  of	  my	  thesis,	  I	  ask	  whether	  infants	  have	  different	  expectations	  for	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  native	  language	  and	  non-­‐native	  languages.	  	  	  	  1.5.1	   Part	  I:	  Infants’	  Neural	  Perception	  of	  Native,	  Non-­‐Native,	  and	  Whistled	  Surrogate	  Language	  	  	  In	  the	  adult	  brain,	  distinct	  patterns	  of	  cortical	  activity	  are	  evoked	  when	  listening	  to	  the	  native	  language	  versus	  an	  unfamiliar	  language.	  Using	  PET,	  Perani	  and	  colleagues	  (1996)	  measured	  neural	  responses	  in	  Italian	  adults	  to	  their	  native	  language	  (Italian),	  a	  second	  language	  learned	  after	  the	  age	  of	  seven	  (English),	  and	  to	  a	  completely	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Japanese).	  While	  activation	  in	  traditional	  language	  	   15	  areas	  of	  left	  hemisphere	  temporal	  regions	  was	  found	  present	  in	  response	  to	  all	  language	  stimuli	  as	  compared	  to	  silent	  and	  backwards	  language	  controls,	  greater	  and	  more	  specialized	  responses	  in	  left	  hemisphere	  interior	  frontal	  and	  parietal	  occipital	  regions	  were	  observed	  only	  to	  the	  native	  language.	  These	  findings	  indicate	  that	  in	  adulthood,	  the	  brain	  responds	  specially	  to	  language	  in	  general,	  but	  that	  this	  response	  is	  also	  tuned	  in	  part	  to	  the	  native	  language.	  	  	  Recently,	  researchers	  have	  also	  begun	  comparing	  neural	  responses	  to	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  language	  in	  infancy.	  Like	  in	  adults,	  these	  studies	  have	  provided	  evidence	  both	  for	  activation	  to	  language	  generally,	  as	  well	  as	  patterns	  of	  activity	  specific	  to	  the	  native	  language.	  Using	  Near-­‐Infrared	  Spectroscopy	  to	  examine	  cortical	  activity	  in	  Japanese-­‐exposed	  neonates	  when	  listening	  to	  familiar	  Japanese	  and	  unfamiliar	  English	  languages,	  Sato	  and	  colleagues	  (Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012)	  found	  significant	  neural	  activation	  in	  response	  to	  both	  signals,	  but	  greater	  activation	  in	  left	  temporal	  regions	  to	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  Japanese	  yet	  no	  such	  difference	  for	  forward	  versus	  backward	  English.	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  and	  colleagues	  (Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2011)	  reported	  similar	  results	  with	  4	  month-­‐old	  infants,	  noting	  greater	  left	  lateralized	  activation	  in	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language	  as	  compared	  to	  non-­‐native	  language,	  as	  well	  as	  greater	  activation	  to	  both	  language	  conditions	  than	  to	  non-­‐speech	  conditions	  of	  scrambled	  language,	  emotional	  voice	  sounds,	  or	  monkey	  calls.	  	  	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  of	  my	  thesis	  examine	  neural	  activation	  in	  infants	  aged	  0-­‐4	  days	  (Experiments	  1	  &	  2)	  and	  4	  months	  (Experiments	  3	  &	  4)	  when	  listening	  to	  the	  native	  language,	  unfamiliar	  language,	  and	  a	  language-­‐like	  communicative	  signal.	  In	  this	  work,	  I	  explore	  whether	  activation	  evoked	  in	  response	  to	  native	  language	  differs	  from	  that	  to	  non-­‐native	  language,	  as	  well	  as	  whether	  any	  differences	  become	  more	  pronounced	  with	  age.	  It	  is	  hypothesized	  that	  as	  infants	  gain	  expertise	  with	  their	  native	  language,	  the	  neural	  response	  to	  familiar	  language	  will	  become	  more	  distinct	  and	  more	  lateralized	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  as	  compared	  to	  the	  response	  to	  non-­‐native	  language.	  Secondly,	  I	  test	  whether	  the	  neural	  response	  to	  non-­‐native	  language	  differs	  from	  that	  to	  a	  non-­‐speech	  communicative	  signal	  at	  each	  age,	  	   16	  investigating	  whether	  at	  birth	  and	  at	  4	  months	  of	  age	  the	  infant	  brain	  responds	  to	  language	  in	  general	  as	  a	  meaningful	  signal.	  I	  predict	  that	  throughout	  development,	  the	  infant	  brain	  will	  respond	  specially	  to	  spoken	  language	  as	  compared	  to	  non-­‐speech	  communication.	  	  	  1.5.1.1	   Near	  Infrared	  Spectroscopy	  	  To	  examine	  neural	  processing	  of	  language	  in	  young	  infants,	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  employ	  Near-­‐Infrared	  Spectroscopy	  (NIRS).	  NIRS	  is	  a	  neuroimaging	  technique	  that	  uses	  near-­‐infrared	  light	  shined	  through	  the	  head	  to	  assess	  the	  hemodynamic	  response	  to	  neuronal	  changes	  in	  the	  cortex.	  In	  a	  typical	  hemodynamic	  response,	  there	  is	  an	  increase	  in	  oxygenated	  hemoglobin	  and	  a	  corresponding	  (though	  lesser)	  decrease	  in	  deoxygenated	  hemoglobin.	  By	  using	  two	  wavelengths	  of	  light,	  NIRS	  is	  able	  to	  measure	  changes	  in	  both	  oxygenated	  and	  deoxygenated	  hemoglobin,	  although	  oxygenated	  responses	  have	  commonly	  been	  found	  to	  be	  the	  most	  robust	  (Aslin	  &	  Mehler,	  2005;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox	  Blasi,	  &	  Elwell,	  2009)	  	  	  Over	  the	  last	  two	  decades,	  NIRS	  has	  become	  a	  popular	  technique	  for	  examining	  neural	  activity	  in	  young	  infants.	  Compared	  to	  other	  neuroimaging	  methodologies,	  NIRS	  has	  several	  advantages,	  particularly	  with	  developmental	  populations.	  Compared	  with	  fMRI	  or	  PET,	  NIRS	  it	  is	  almost	  silent,	  and	  allows	  for	  some	  degree	  of	  movement	  in	  the	  subject.	  In	  contrast	  to	  EEG,	  NIRS	  provides	  better	  spatial	  localization	  (but	  reduced	  temporal	  localization;	  Aslin,	  2013;	  Gervain	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox	  Blasi,	  &	  Elwell,	  2009).	  Moreover,	  NIRS	  is	  particularly	  suited	  to	  young	  infants.	  While	  the	  light	  used	  to	  measure	  the	  hemodynamic	  response	  is	  only	  able	  to	  penetrate	  through	  the	  outer	  layers	  of	  the	  cortex	  and	  thus	  can	  only	  assess	  neural	  activity	  in	  these	  regions,	  young	  infants	  have	  significantly	  thinner	  skulls	  than	  adults,	  allowing	  for	  a	  greater	  portion	  of	  the	  brain	  to	  be	  assessed	  (approximately	  10-­‐15mm	  into	  the	  cortex;	  Gervain	  et	  al.	  2011).	  Moreover,	  as	  infants	  commonly	  have	  less	  hair	  than	  adults,	  the	  light	  sensors	  are	  able	  to	  make	  better	  contact	  with	  the	  skull,	  reducing	  noise	  in	  the	  neural	  signal	  collected.	  	  	   17	  Given	  these	  strengths,	  NIRS	  has	  been	  employed	  by	  many	  studies	  seeking	  to	  examine	  the	  functional	  localization	  of	  brain	  activity	  in	  infants,	  including	  in	  response	  to	  language	  (Gervain,	  &	  Macagno,	  Cogoi,	  Peña,	  &	  Mehler,	  2008;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003),	  social	  stimuli	  (Csibra	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  and	  multisensory	  information	  (Bortfeld,	  Fava,	  &	  Boas,	  2009).	  However,	  it	  is	  also	  important	  to	  note	  the	  limitations	  of	  this	  technology.	  First,	  as	  mentioned	  above,	  NIRS	  only	  measures	  activation	  in	  outer	  regions	  of	  the	  cortex,	  and	  cannot	  assess	  neural	  responses	  in	  deeper	  brain	  areas.	  Additionally,	  the	  regions	  measured	  by	  NIRS	  studies	  are	  customarily	  quite	  broad:	  the	  spatial	  resolution	  of	  NIRS	  is	  only	  around	  1	  cm2	  (Aslin,	  2013),	  and	  due	  to	  individual	  differences	  in	  head	  size	  and	  shape	  within	  a	  sample	  tested,	  it	  is	  difficult	  to	  determine	  whether	  the	  exact	  same	  underlying	  neural	  structures	  are	  being	  measured.	  As	  such,	  most	  NIRS	  studies	  examine	  activation	  over	  larger	  regions	  of	  interest,	  such	  as	  comparisons	  between	  hemispheres,	  or	  between	  large	  regions	  within	  hemispheres	  (ie,	  upper	  versus	  lower	  temporal	  regions,	  see	  May	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Moreover,	  recent	  work	  co-­‐registering	  or	  combining	  NIRS	  with	  MRI	  maps	  of	  the	  infant	  brain	  has	  suggested	  that	  with	  proper	  and	  consistent	  placement	  of	  NIRS	  probes	  on	  the	  infant	  scalp,	  researchers	  can	  be	  confident	  at	  least	  about	  the	  specific	  lobes	  and	  large	  areas	  thought	  to	  be	  involved	  are	  indeed	  those	  being	  assessed	  (Emberson,	  Richards,	  &	  Aslin,	  2015;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  	  	  1.5.2	  Part	  II:	  Infants’	  Social	  Perception	  of	  Native	  and	  Non-­‐Native	  Language	  	  	  In	  the	  second	  part	  of	  my	  thesis,	  I	  investigate	  infants’	  expectations	  about	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  languages.	  If	  infants’	  previously	  reported	  preference	  for	  speakers	  of	  their	  native	  language	  reflects	  an	  assumption	  that	  individuals	  who	  are	  associated	  with	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language	  are	  from	  different	  social	  groups,	  infants	  should	  also	  expect	  that	  individuals	  associated	  with	  native	  language	  be	  like	  members	  of	  their	  community	  in	  other	  aspects	  and	  individuals	  associated	  with	  non-­‐native	  language	  to	  be	  dissimilar	  to	  members	  of	  their	  community.	  Indeed,	  work	  with	  preschool-­‐aged	  children	  has	  	   18	  shown	  that	  children	  are	  more	  likely	  to	  indicate	  speakers	  of	  unfamiliar	  languages	  as	  minority	  race	  individuals,	  individuals	  wearing	  unusual	  clothing	  (clothing	  that	  is	  traditional	  to	  a	  culture	  other	  than	  the	  child’s	  own),	  and	  those	  living	  in	  unusual	  houses	  (dwellings	  that	  are	  traditional	  to	  a	  culture	  other	  than	  the	  child’s	  own;	  Hirschfeld	  &	  Gelman,	  1997).	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  test	  the	  developmental	  origins	  of	  these	  intuitions,	  examining	  whether	  young	  infants	  associate	  similar	  others	  with	  native	  language,	  and	  dissimilar	  individuals	  with	  non-­‐native	  language.	  As	  a	  manipulation	  of	  non-­‐language	  social	  group	  similarity,	  the	  racial	  background	  of	  individuals	  will	  either	  the	  same	  or	  different	  than	  the	  infants	  tested.	  It	  is	  hypothesized	  that	  infants	  will	  be	  more	  likely	  to	  associate	  familiar	  language	  with	  individuals	  of	  their	  own	  race,	  and	  be	  more	  likely	  to	  associate	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  individuals	  of	  unfamiliar	  or	  less	  familiar	  races.	  	  	  While	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  employ	  neuroimaging	  methods,	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  examine	  infants’	  social	  processing	  of	  language	  using	  behavioural	  measures.	  As	  little	  research	  to	  date	  has	  investigated	  infants’	  expectations	  of	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  different	  languages,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  first	  establish	  whether	  any	  behavioural	  patterns	  exist.	  However,	  as	  discussed	  later	  in	  the	  General	  Conclusions	  chapter	  (Chapter	  5),	  it	  will	  be	  a	  fruitful	  area	  of	  future	  study	  to	  test	  if	  and	  how	  infant’s	  neural	  processing	  of	  language	  signals	  is	  impacted	  by	  the	  social	  status	  of	  language	  speakers.	  	  	  	   	  	   19	  2	   The	  Specificity	  of	  the	  Neural	  Response	  to	  Speech	  at	  Birth	  	  2.1	   Introduction	  	  From	  the	  first	  days	  of	  life,	  the	  human	  brain	  responds	  to	  speech.	  Similar	  to	  what	  is	  observed	  in	  adults,	  temporal	  and	  frontal	  areas	  of	  the	  brain	  are	  activated	  in	  very	  young	  infants	  in	  response	  to	  spoken	  language,	  but	  not	  to	  non-­‐linguistic	  signals	  such	  as	  scrambled	  speech,	  sine-­‐wave	  contours,	  tones,	  monkey	  calls,	  and	  backwards	  speech	  (Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  Dehaene,	  &	  Hertz-­‐Pannier,	  2002;	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Perani	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Shutlz,	  Vouloumanos,	  Bennett,	  &	  Pelphy,	  2014;	  Taga,	  Homae,	  &	  Watanabe,	  2007).	  In	  many	  (Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  Dehaene,	  &	  Hertz-­‐Pannier,	  2002;	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Shulz	  et	  al.,	  2014),	  but	  not	  all	  (May,	  Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  Gervain,	  &	  Werker,	  2011;	  Perani	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Taga,	  Homae,	  &	  Watanabe,	  2007)	  studies,	  these	  effects	  are	  most	  pronounced	  in	  the	  left	  hemisphere.	  It	  is	  unknown,	  however,	  whether	  neural	  specialization	  for	  language	  in	  neonates	  is	  restricted	  to	  speech,	  or	  if	  broader	  perceptual	  biases	  underlie	  the	  initial	  human	  sensitivity	  to	  communicative	  signals.	  To	  address	  this	  question,	  here	  we	  compared	  neonate	  neural	  activation	  in	  response	  to	  forward	  and	  backward	  familiar	  spoken	  language	  (English),	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  (Spanish),	  and	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  “language”1	  (Silbo	  Gomero).	  	  	  Throughout	  history,	  whistled	  surrogate	  languages	  have	  evolved	  in	  several	  regions	  of	  the	  world,	  primarily	  to	  help	  groups	  better	  communicate	  over	  long	  distances.	  Unlike	  spoken	  languages,	  no	  known	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  is	  ever	  acquired	  as	  a	  first	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  Throughout	  this	  paper	  we	  will	  refer	  to	  whistled	  surrogate	  communication	  systems	  such	  as	  Silbo	  Gomero,	  as	  “whistled	  language”	  or	  “whistled	  surrogate	  language”,	  as	  these	  are	  the	  conventional	  term	  that	  have	  been	  used	  previously	  in	  the	  literature.	  It	  is	  important	  to	  note,	  however,	  that	  there	  is	  significant	  disagreement	  as	  to	  the	  linguistic	  status	  of	  such	  whistled	  forms,	  with	  many	  considering	  whistled	  languages	  not	  to	  be	  “true”	  or	  “natural”	  languages	  (see	  further	  Meyer,	  2005;	  Rialland,	  2005;	  Trujillo,	  1978).	  	  	   20	  language,	  but	  instead	  are	  learned	  as	  addition	  to	  the	  base	  language.	  As	  surrogates,	  whistled	  languages	  are	  transpositions	  of	  a	  base	  spoken	  language	  in	  which	  whistled	  contours	  replace	  speech	  sounds	  by	  way	  of	  conventionalized	  patterns	  (Rialland,	  2005;	  Trujillo,	  1978).	  This	  is	  done	  by	  whistling	  with	  the	  fingers	  between	  the	  lips,	  thus	  creating	  a	  signal	  that	  can	  be	  projected	  much	  further,	  but	  one	  that	  involves	  a	  very	  different	  means	  of	  production	  than	  spoken	  language	  (Rialland,	  2005).	  Whistled	  surrogate	  languages	  are	  very	  close	  in	  form	  to	  their	  base	  spoken	  languages,	  matched	  in	  structure,	  rhythm,	  prosody,	  and	  communicative	  intent.	  However,	  compared	  to	  spoken	  languages,	  whistled	  surrogate	  languages	  have	  limited	  phonetic	  systems	  and	  reduced	  acoustic	  complexity.	  Given	  that	  whistled	  surrogate	  languages	  are	  substitutive	  rather	  than	  primary	  languages,	  they	  are	  typically	  not	  considered	  “natural”	  language,	  as	  are	  spoken	  languages	  (Rialland;	  2005;	  Trujillo,	  1978,	  see	  also	  Hockett,	  1963).	  	  	  The	  most	  well-­‐studied	  of	  whistled	  surrogate	  languages	  is	  Silbo	  Gomero,	  a	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  of	  Spanish	  still	  in	  use	  in	  parts	  of	  the	  Canary	  Islands.	  The	  phonemic	  inventory	  of	  Silbo	  Gomero	  consists	  of	  approximately	  2-­‐3	  vowels	  (“acute”	  and	  “grave”	  vowels	  corresponding	  to	  the	  front	  vs.	  central/back	  vowels	  of	  spoken	  Spanish)	  and	  4-­‐9	  consonants	  (“grave,”	  “acute,”	  and	  “sharp”	  consonant	  distinctions	  corresponding	  to	  non-­‐coronal,	  anterior	  coronal,	  and	  posterior	  coronal	  consonant	  distinctions	  in	  spoken	  Spanish,	  as	  well	  as	  “interrupted,”	  “continuous,”	  and	  “gradual	  decay”	  consonant	  distinctions	  corresponding	  to	  place	  of	  articulation	  contrasts	  in	  spoken	  Spanish;	  Rialland,	  2005).	  Perception	  studies	  have	  demonstrated	  that	  adult	  Silbo	  Gomero	  users	  are	  able	  to	  identify	  whistled	  phonemes	  at	  above	  chance	  rates	  (Rialland,	  2005).	  Additionally,	  research	  has	  shown	  that	  with	  experience,	  the	  adult	  brain	  processes	  the	  whistled	  signal	  as	  linguistic:	  adult	  users	  of	  Silbo	  Gomero	  show	  similar	  activation	  in	  classic	  left	  hemisphere	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  cortex	  in	  response	  to	  both	  whistled	  Silbo	  Gomero	  and	  spoken	  Spanish	  (Carreiras,	  Lopez,	  Rivero,	  &	  Corina,	  2005).	  In	  contrast,	  Spanish	  monolinguals	  show	  specialized	  activation	  compared	  with	  baseline	  only	  to	  Spanish	  and	  not	  to	  Silbo	  Gomero,	  even	  though	  the	  same	  rhythm	  and	  prosody	  are	  shared	  across	  both	  forms.	  	  	   21	  What	  is	  unknown	  from	  this	  adult	  work	  is	  whether	  the	  presence	  of	  specialized	  neural	  activation	  in	  adult	  Silbo	  Gomero	  users	  is	  induced	  through	  their	  experience	  using	  the	  whistled	  surrogate	  language,	  or	  instead,	  whether	  the	  lack	  of	  specialized	  activation	  among	  individuals	  who	  do	  not	  use	  a	  whistled	  language	  is	  a	  result	  of	  loss	  or	  reorganization	  of	  an	  initially	  broader	  specialization	  present	  early	  in	  development.	  Consistent	  with	  this	  latter	  possibility,	  behavioural	  work	  has	  shown	  that	  broader	  perceptual	  biases	  may	  underlie	  the	  initial	  human	  sensitivity	  to	  communicative	  signals:	  newborn	  infants	  listen	  preferentially	  to	  both	  human	  speech	  and	  monkey	  calls	  over	  non-­‐language	  sounds,	  and	  only	  show	  a	  specific	  preference	  for	  human	  speech	  over	  monkey	  calls	  at	  3	  months	  (Vouloumanos	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Still,	  when	  the	  underlying	  neural	  substrates	  are	  probed,	  there	  may	  be	  evidence	  even	  in	  the	  neonate	  for	  specialized	  processing	  to	  spoken	  language.	  	  Whistled	  surrogate	  language	  thus	  provides	  an	  ideal	  signal	  with	  which	  to	  explore	  the	  precision	  of	  the	  initial	  neural	  specificity	  for	  language.	  While	  previous	  research	  examining	  the	  neonate	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  has	  used	  non-­‐speech	  stimuli	  that	  are	  either	  never	  used	  for	  communication	  by	  any	  species	  (e.g.	  backwards	  speech;	  synthetic	  sine-­‐wave	  speech)	  or	  non-­‐human	  animal	  calls	  (Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  Dehaene,	  &	  Hertz-­‐Pannier,	  2002;	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Perani	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Shultz	  et	  al.,	  2014),	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  is	  a	  non-­‐speech	  stimulus	  that	  is	  both	  natural	  and	  used	  by	  humans	  for	  communication.	  	  	  To	  test	  the	  hypothesis	  that	  the	  brain	  is	  specialized	  to	  respond	  only	  to	  spoken	  language,	  in	  two	  experiments	  we	  examined	  neonate	  neural	  activation	  in	  response	  to	  forward	  and	  backward	  familiar	  spoken	  language	  (English),	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  (Spanish),	  and	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  (Silbo	  Gomero).	  Neural	  activation	  was	  assessed	  using	  functional	  Near-­‐Infrared	  Spectroscopy	  (NIRS),	  through	  which	  cortical	  activity	  is	  measured	  via	  relative	  changes	  in	  the	  concentration	  of	  oxygenated	  and	  de-­‐oxygenated	  hemoglobin	  (Hb)	  following	  presentation	  of	  a	  stimulus.	  NIRS	  is	  an	  ideal	  method	  with	  which	  to	  examine	  neural	  processing	  in	  young	  	   22	  infants,	  as	  it	  is	  non-­‐invasive	  and	  has	  relatively	  good	  spatial	  localization	  (Aslin,	  2013;	  Gervain	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  Blasi,	  &	  Elwell,	  2010).	  It	  has	  been	  used	  extensively	  to	  explore	  brain	  activation	  in	  developmental	  populations	  for	  both	  cognitive	  (Baird	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Wilcox	  et	  al.,	  2008)	  and	  social	  processing	  (Grossmann	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  and	  is	  particularly	  well-­‐suited	  for	  investigating	  language	  perception	  because	  it	  is	  quiet	  and	  because	  the	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  brain	  are	  fairly	  shallow	  (Benavides-­‐Varela,	  Hochmann,	  Macagno,	  Nespor,	  &	  Mehler,	  2012;	  Bortfeld,	  Fava,	  &	  Boas,	  2009;	  Gomez	  et	  al.,	  2014;	  Gervain	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  May	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Sato,	  Sogabe,	  &	  Mazuka,	  2010).	  	  	  2.2	   Experiment	  1	  	  Experiment	  1	  compared	  neonates’	  responses	  to	  forward	  and	  backward	  segments	  of	  the	  language	  heard	  in	  utero	  (English)	  versus	  an	  unfamiliar-­‐-­‐	  and	  rhythmically	  distinct-­‐-­‐	  language	  (Spanish).	  In	  behavioural	  studies,	  newborn	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  discriminate	  languages	  from	  different	  rhythmical	  classes	  (Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  Burns,	  &	  Werker,	  2010;	  Mehler	  et	  al.,	  1988;	  Moon,	  Cooper,	  &	  Fifer,	  1993),	  thus	  the	  comparison	  of	  two	  rhythmically	  distinct	  languages	  was	  ideal	  for	  the	  current	  study.	  Previous	  studies	  examining	  the	  neural	  response	  in	  young	  infants	  to	  native	  versus	  non-­‐native	  language	  have	  illustrated	  that	  while	  there	  are	  effects	  of	  prenatal	  listening	  experience,	  specialized	  activation	  is	  seen	  in	  the	  neonate	  brain	  to	  both	  native,	  familiar	  language	  (the	  language	  heard	  in	  utero)	  and	  to	  unfamiliar-­‐-­‐	  and	  hence	  never	  before	  experienced—language	  (May	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  The	  goals	  of	  Experiment	  1	  were	  thus	  to	  extend	  these	  results	  to	  a	  new	  pair	  of	  languages	  and	  to	  identify	  regions	  of	  interest	  where	  neural	  activation	  was	  evoked	  in	  response	  to	  spoken	  language.	  	  	  	   	  	   23	  2.2.1	  Methods	  	  2.2.1.1	   Participants	  	  Data	  from	  24	  newborn	  infants	  (0-­‐3	  days	  postnatal,	  M=1.46	  days;	  14	  male,	  10	  female)	  was	  included	  in	  Experiment	  1.	  According	  to	  parental	  report,	  all	  infants	  were	  exposed	  to	  at	  least	  80%	  English	  in	  utero,	  and	  were	  unfamiliar	  with	  Spanish.	  An	  additional	  17	  infants	  were	  tested,	  but	  were	  excluded	  from	  analysis	  due	  to	  fussiness	  (10),	  insufficient	  data	  (5),	  or	  machine/computer	  errors	  (2).	  	  	  2.2.1.2	   Stimuli	  	  	  Two	  proficient	  female	  speakers	  of	  each	  language	  (English,	  Spanish)	  were	  recorded	  reading	  aloud	  from	  bilingual	  versions	  of	  the	  children’s	  books	  “The	  Paper	  Bag	  Princess”	  and	  “The	  Three	  Wishes”.	  From	  the	  recorded	  stories,	  eight	  15s	  (+-­‐1)	  segments	  of	  each	  language	  were	  selected,	  and	  backwards	  versions	  of	  all	  segments	  were	  generated	  using	  Praat	  (Boersma	  &	  Weenink,	  2011).	  	  	  2.2.1.3	   Procedure	  	  Neonates	  were	  tested	  in	  a	  silent,	  sound	  attenuated	  laboratory	  room	  at	  a	  local	  maternity	  hospital.	  Infants	  were	  either	  asleep	  or	  in	  a	  quiet	  state	  of	  rest	  for	  the	  duration	  of	  the	  study.	  A	  Hitachi	  ETG-­‐4000	  NIRS	  machine	  with	  a	  source	  detector	  separation	  of	  3	  cm	  and	  two	  continuous	  wavelengths	  of	  695	  and	  830	  nm	  was	  used,	  with	  a	  sampling	  rate	  of	  10Hz.	  The	  laser	  power	  was	  set	  at	  0.75mW.	  	  	  Two	  chevron-­‐shaped	  optical	  probes	  were	  placed	  over	  the	  participants’	  head:	  one	  probe	  over	  the	  left	  temporal	  region,	  and	  one	  probe	  over	  the	  matched	  right	  temporal	  region.	  Each	  probe	  contained	  9	  (5	  emitters	  and	  4	  detectors)	  1mm	  optical	  fibers,	  forming	  12	  optical	  channels	  for	  measurement	  (Figure	  2.1).	  Placement	  of	  the	  probes	  was	  based	  on	  surface	  landmarks	  on	  the	  neonate	  scalp,	  using	  the	  chevron	  design	  of	  	   24	  the	  probe	  to	  nestle	  above	  the	  ear	  on	  each	  hemisphere.	  Probes	  were	  kept	  in	  place	  using	  soft	  netting	  material.	  	  	  Figure	  2.1	  Schematic	  illustration	  of	  optical	  channels	  over	  temporal	  regions	  of	  neonate	  cortex.	  Channels	  1-­‐12	  were	  placed	  over	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  and	  channels	  13-­‐24	  over	  the	  right	  hemisphere.	  Red	  circles	  indicate	  emitter	  fibers,	  blue	  circles	  indicate	  detector	  fibers,	  and	  the	  numbered	  white	  boxes	  denote	  measurement	  channels.	  Yellow	  highlighted	  regions	  illustrate	  the	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  identified	  as	  specially	  responsive	  to	  native	  language	  and	  used	  as	  regions	  of	  interest.	  	  	  	  Eight	  sequential	  blocks	  of	  each	  language	  condition	  were	  presented,	  with	  each	  block	  comprised	  of	  approximately	  15	  seconds	  of	  language	  followed	  by	  25-­‐35	  seconds	  of	  silence.	  This	  relatively	  long,	  jittered	  silent	  period	  was	  included	  to	  allow	  the	  hemodynamic	  response,	  which	  is	  slower	  in	  the	  newborn,	  to	  return	  to	  baseline	  (Gervain	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  We	  employed	  a	  blocked	  presentation	  of	  stimuli	  in	  both	  studies,	  such	  that	  each	  infant	  heard	  all	  8	  blocks	  of	  a	  language	  condition	  consecutively.	  The	  order	  of	  the	  language	  conditions	  was	  counterbalanced	  across	  infants.	  Total	  testing	  time	  was	  24	  minutes	  (Figure	  2.2).	  	  	  	  	   25	  Figure	  2.2	  Example	  of	  the	  research	  design	  used	  in	  Experiments	  1	  and	  2.	  Order	  of	  languages	  presented	  was	  counterbalanced	  across	  infants	  (24	  orders).	  	  	  	  2.2.1.4	   Analyses	  	  Analyses	  were	  conducted	  to	  examine	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  and	  deoxygenated	  Hb	  from	  0	  to	  35	  seconds	  from	  the	  start	  of	  stimulation,	  averaged	  over	  the	  8	  blocks	  of	  each	  language	  condition.	  Data	  were	  band-­‐pass	  filtered	  between	  .01	  and	  .7	  Hz,	  and	  movement	  artifacts	  were	  removed	  by	  isolating	  blocks	  in	  which	  there	  was	  a	  change	  in	  concentration	  greater	  than	  0.1mmol	  x	  mm	  over	  a	  period	  of	  0.2sec.	  For	  each	  block,	  a	  baseline	  was	  established	  by	  linearly	  fitting	  the	  5s	  preceding	  the	  onset	  of	  the	  block	  and	  the	  5s	  occurring	  15s	  after	  the	  end	  of	  the	  block.	  This	  timeline	  is	  used	  to	  allow	  the	  hemodynamic	  response	  function	  that	  occurs	  in	  response	  to	  the	  experimental	  stimuli	  to	  return	  to	  the	  original	  steady	  state.	  Analyses	  then	  examined	  the	  change	  in	  both	  oxygenated	  and	  deoxygenated	  hemoglobin	  from	  between	  the	  pre-­‐stimulus	  and	  post-­‐stimulus	  baselines	  for	  each	  stimulus,	  and	  averaged	  these	  changes	  across	  all	  trials	  of	  a	  stimulus	  type.	  	  	  As	  oxygenated	  Hb	  has	  been	  found	  to	  be	  the	  strongest	  marker	  of	  neural	  activity	  in	  infant	  NIRS	  (Aslin,	  2013;	  Gervain	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  Blasi,	  &	  Elwell,	  2010),	  our	  	   26	  analyses	  were	  focused	  on	  this	  variable,	  although	  statistics	  for	  deoxyHb	  are	  reported	  as	  well.	  	  	  2.2.2	  Results	  	  Initial	  analyses	  were	  conducted	  to	  establish	  cortical	  regions	  of	  interest	  activated	  to	  the	  forward	  native	  language	  versus	  the	  silent	  baseline.	  Comparing	  each	  optical	  channel	  to	  baseline,	  we	  identified	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  areas	  as	  showing	  activation	  to	  the	  native	  language,	  in	  line	  with	  previous	  findings	  (Perani	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  May	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Of	  the	  12	  channels	  in	  the	  region	  of	  interest	  defined	  as	  anterior	  temporal	  areas,	  five	  channels	  showed	  significantly	  increased	  activation	  to	  forward	  native	  language	  (p<.05).	  Of	  the	  12	  channels	  defined	  as	  posterior	  temporal	  areas,	  only	  one	  showed	  increased	  activation	  to	  FW	  native	  language.	  Thus,	  we	  use	  the	  comparison	  between	  anterior	  temporal	  channels	  and	  posterior	  temporal	  channels	  as	  target	  regions	  of	  interest	  in	  subsequent	  analyses	  (see	  Figure	  2.1	  for	  regions	  defined).	  	  Data	  were	  then	  analyzed	  in	  a	  4	  factor	  repeated	  measures	  ANOVA:	  language	  (English	  vs	  Spanish),	  direction	  (forward	  vs	  backward),	  hemisphere	  (left	  vs	  right),	  and	  target	  region	  of	  interest	  (anterior	  temporal	  vs	  posterior	  temporal).	  There	  were	  no	  main	  effects	  for	  language,	  direction,	  or	  hemisphere,	  but	  there	  was	  a	  significant	  main	  effect	  for	  region	  (anterior,	  M=	  0.019,	  SD=	  0.029	  >	  posterior,	  M=	  0.003,	  SD=	  0.019,	  F(1,22)=	  12.404,	  p<.01,	  η2p=	  .361),	  and	  a	  significant	  interaction	  between	  region	  and	  direction	  (F(1,22)=	  6.928,	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .240).	  In	  response	  to	  forward	  language	  (both	  English	  and	  Spanish),	  we	  observed	  greater	  activation	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.029,	  SD=	  0.043)	  compared	  to	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.001,	  SD=	  0.043)	  (F(1,22)=	  23.321,	  p<.001,	  η2p=	  .515),	  but	  found	  no	  significant	  differences	  in	  activation	  between	  regions	  in	  response	  to	  backwards	  language	  (both	  English	  and	  Spanish,	  F(1,22)=	  .316,	  p>.50).	  In	  addition,	  a	  marginally	  significant	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  direction	  was	  seen	  (F(1,22)=	  2.976,	  p<.10,	  η2p=	  .119),	  	   27	  favoring	  greater	  activation	  in	  response	  to	  forward	  (M=	  0.019,	  SD=	  0.038)	  as	  compared	  to	  backwards	  English	  (M=	  -­‐0.004,	  SD=	  0.053)	  but	  not	  to	  forward	  (M=	  0.11,	  SD=	  0.053)	  versus	  backwards	  Spanish	  (M=	  0.018,	  SD=	  .043)	  .	  In	  target	  anterior	  temporal	  regions,	  there	  was	  a	  significant	  difference	  in	  activation	  between	  forward	  and	  backward	  English	  (forward,	  M=	  .0034,	  SD=	  0.053	  >	  backward,	  M=-­‐0.006,	  SD=	  0.072	  ,	  F(1,22)=	  4.589,	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .173),	  but	  not	  between	  forward	  and	  backward	  Spanish	  (F(1,22)=	  .002,	  p>.90).	  	  Results	  for	  deoxygenated	  Hb	  activation	  revealed	  a	  similar	  pattern.	  A	  three-­‐way	  interaction	  between	  language,	  direction,	  and	  region	  was	  observed,	  F(1,22)=	  5.763,	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .208.	  Follow-­‐up	  tests	  indicated	  that	  while	  there	  were	  no	  significant	  differences	  in	  deoxy	  Hb	  activation	  between	  region	  or	  direction	  in	  response	  to	  Spanish	  language	  segments,	  there	  was	  an	  interaction	  between	  direction	  and	  region	  to	  English	  segments,	  F(1,23)=	  6.426,	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .203.	  For	  FW	  English,	  deoxy	  Hb	  was	  significantly	  decreased	  (indicating	  more	  activation)	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  -­‐0.017,	  SD=	  0.034)	  versus	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  -­‐.009,	  SD=	  0.038)	  ,	  F(1,23)=	  4.976,	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .179,	  while	  no	  significant	  difference	  in	  deoxy	  Hb	  was	  found	  between	  region	  was	  found	  for	  BW	  English,	  p>.10.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   28	  Figure	  2.3	  Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  in	  response	  to	  each	  language	  condition	  in	  Experiment	  1,	  compared	  between	  anterior	  and	  posterior	  temporal	  regions.	  A	  significant	  interaction	  between	  region	  and	  direction	  was	  observed,	  F(1,22)=	  6.928,	  p=.015.	  Significantly	  more	  activation	  occurred	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  as	  compared	  to	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  in	  response	  to	  FW	  English	  (F(1,23)=	  11.533,	  p<.01)	  and	  FW	  Spanish	  (F(1,22)=	  14.667,	  p<.01),	  but	  not	  to	  BW	  English	  or	  Spanish	  (ps>.10).	  Error	  bars	  represent	  standard	  error	  of	  the	  mean.	  	  	  	  	  2.2.3	  Discussion	  	  Results	  from	  Experiment	  1	  demonstrate	  specialized	  neural	  processing	  in	  newborn	  infants	  for	  both	  the	  native	  and	  a	  rhythmically	  distinct	  non-­‐native	  language	  in	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  regions,	  supporting	  previous	  findings	  that	  activation	  in	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  neonate	  brain	  is	  evoked	  not	  only	  to	  the	  language	  experienced	  in	  utero,	  but	  also	  to	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  (May	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Our	  results	  also	  suggest	  that	  there	  may	  be	  a	  role	  for	  prenatal	  language	  experience,	  in	  that	  we	  observe	  marginally	  greater	  neural	  activation	  in	  response	  to	  forward	  versus	  backward	  native	  language,	  but	  no	  difference	  in	  activation	  to	  forward	  and	  backward	  -0.03-0.02-0.0100.010.020.030.040.05FW BW FW BWEnglish Spanishcc change (mmol x mm) Anterior Temporal RegionPosterior Temporal Region*	   *	  	   29	  unfamiliar	  language.	  This	  pattern	  of	  results	  was	  also	  reported	  in	  a	  study	  with	  Japanese-­‐exposed	  neonates	  (Sato	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  indicating	  that	  our	  findings	  are	  not	  driven	  solely	  by	  the	  acoustic	  features	  of	  the	  languages	  used	  in	  the	  present	  study.	  Instead,	  we	  hypothesize	  that	  only	  with	  prenatal	  experience	  the	  newborn	  brain	  distinguishes	  backwards	  language	  as	  non-­‐linguistic.	  Further	  research	  is	  needed	  to	  confirm	  this	  conclusion.	  	  2.3	   Experiment	  2	  	  In	  Experiment	  1,	  we	  observed	  that	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  areas	  of	  the	  newborn	  brain	  (areas	  that	  correspond	  to	  language	  areas	  in	  the	  adult	  brain)	  are	  activated	  to	  both	  the	  native	  language	  heard	  in	  utero	  as	  well	  as	  to	  a	  rhythmically	  dissimilar	  unfamiliar	  language.	  In	  Experiment	  2	  we	  then	  turn	  to	  our	  central	  question	  of	  interest,	  asking	  whether	  the	  range	  of	  signals	  that	  elicits	  activation	  in	  these	  target	  areas	  in	  the	  newborn	  brain	  is	  sufficiently	  broad	  as	  to	  include	  not	  only	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  but	  also	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  (Silbo	  Gomero).	  	  	  As	  described	  above,	  previous	  research	  has	  shown	  that	  the	  adult	  brain	  can	  process	  Silbo	  Gomero	  as	  linguistic,	  but	  only	  if	  there	  is	  experience	  with	  whistled	  language	  (Carreiras	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Similar	  patterns	  of	  brain	  activity	  to	  both	  spoken	  Spanish	  and	  whistled	  Silbo	  Gomero	  were	  observed	  in	  adult	  Silbo-­‐Gomero-­‐Spanish	  bilinguals,	  while	  specialized	  activation	  was	  seen	  only	  to	  spoken	  Spanish	  and	  not	  the	  whistled	  signal	  in	  Spanish-­‐only	  monolinguals.	  In	  Experiment	  2,	  we	  ask	  whether	  young	  infants	  who	  have	  no	  familiarity	  with	  whistled	  language	  likewise	  show	  specialized	  activation	  only	  to	  speech	  and	  not	  to	  whistled	  surrogate	  language,	  or	  if	  broad	  perceptual	  biases	  may	  underlie	  the	  initial	  neural	  preparedness	  for	  language.	  To	  address	  this	  question,	  we	  use	  the	  same	  procedure	  and	  design	  as	  Study	  1	  to	  examined	  neural	  activation	  in	  neonates	  to	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  (Spanish)	  versus	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  (Silbo	  Gomero).	  	  	   30	  2.3.1	   Methods	  	  2.3.1.1	   Participants	  	  Data	  from	  a	  new	  set	  of	  24	  neonates	  was	  included	  in	  Experiment	  2	  (0-­‐4	  days	  postnatal,	  M=1.21	  days;	  15	  males,	  9	  females).	  Parents	  reported	  that	  all	  infants	  heard	  at	  least	  80%	  English	  in	  utero,	  and	  had	  no	  experience	  with	  Spanish.	  An	  additional	  14	  infants	  were	  tested,	  but	  were	  excluded	  from	  analysis	  due	  to	  fussiness	  (11)	  or	  insufficient	  data	  (3).	  	  	  2.3.1.2	   Stimuli	  	  The	  Spanish	  stimuli	  from	  Experiment	  1	  were	  used.	  Silbo	  Gomero	  stimuli	  were	  recorded	  and	  selected	  in	  the	  same	  manner	  as	  described	  in	  Study	  1,	  from	  two	  female	  whistlers	  in	  the	  Canary	  Islands.	  A	  sample	  Silbo	  Gomero	  segment	  used	  in	  Experiment	  1	  can	  be	  heard	  at	  http://infantstudies.psych.ubc.ca/silbo.	  To	  illustrate	  the	  differences	  between	  spoken	  and	  whistled	  languages,	  waveforms	  and	  spectrograms	  from	  two	  sets	  of	  samples	  of	  Spanish	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero	  are	  presented	  in	  Figure	  3.	  For	  further	  information	  on	  the	  acoustic	  and	  phonetic	  structure	  of	  Sibo	  Gomero,	  see	  Rialland	  (2005).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   31	  Figure	  2.4	  Samples	  of	  Spanish	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero	  waveforms	  and	  spectrograms.	  Two	  sets	  of	  samples	  are	  presented:	  A)	  Spanish	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero	  samples	  matched	  for	  content,	  “el	  leñador”	  (the	  woodcutter),	  B)	  Spanish	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero	  samples	  matched	  for	  length	  (1.87	  seconds),	  Spanish:	  “hace	  mucho	  tiempo,	  un	  leñador	  y	  su”	  (a	  long	  time	  ago,	  a	  woodcutter	  and	  his),	  Silbo:	  “hace	  mucho	  tiempo”	  (a	  long	  time	  ago).	  	  	  	  2.3.1.3	   Procedure	  and	  Analyses	  	  The	  procedure	  and	  analyses	  were	  identical	  to	  Experiment	  1,	  using	  the	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  and	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  of	  identified.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   32	  2.3.2	   Results	  	  In	  Experiment	  2	  we	  observed	  a	  significant	  main	  effect	  for	  oxygenated	  Hb	  of	  language	  condition,	  with	  overall	  greater	  activation	  to	  Spanish	  (M=	  0.042,	  SD=	  0.039)	  versus	  Silbo	  Gomero	  (M=	  0.010,	  SD=	  0.035)	  (F(1,18)=	  13.055,	  p<.01,	  η2p=	  .420).	  Additionally,	  there	  was	  a	  significant	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  region	  (F(1,18)=	  6.755,	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .273):	  in	  response	  to	  Spanish	  (both	  forward	  and	  backward),	  greater	  activation	  was	  seen	  in	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.058,	  SD=	  0.048)	  than	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.026,	  SD=	  0.035)	  (F(1,18)=	  10.665,	  p<.01,	  η2p=	  .372),	  while	  there	  was	  no	  significant	  difference	  in	  activation	  between	  regions	  in	  response	  to	  Silbo	  Gomero	  (both	  forward	  and	  backwards;	  F(1,18)=	  .006,	  p>.50).	  We	  observed	  no	  significant	  change	  in	  oxy	  Hb	  activation	  from	  baseline	  in	  response	  to	  FW	  Silbo	  Gomero	  in	  any	  selected	  measurement	  channel	  (ps>.05),	  and	  only	  a	  significant	  change	  from	  baseline	  to	  BW	  Silbo	  Gomero	  in	  one	  measurement	  channel	  (channel	  9,	  p<.05,	  uncorrected;	  all	  other	  channels,	  ps>.05).	  	  No	  significant	  main	  effects	  or	  interactions	  were	  found	  for	  deoxygenated	  Hb.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   33	  Figure	  2.5	  Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  in	  response	  to	  each	  language	  condition	  in	  Experiment	  2,	  compared	  between	  anterior	  and	  posterior	  temporal	  regions.	  A	  significant	  interaction	  between	  region	  and	  language	  was	  observed,	  F(1,18)=	  6.755,	  p=.018.	  Significantly	  more	  activation	  occurred	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  as	  compared	  to	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  in	  response	  to	  Spanish	  (F(1,19)=	  6.028,	  p=.024),	  but	  not	  Silbo	  Gomero	  (p>.50).	  Error	  bars	  represent	  standard	  error	  of	  the	  mean.	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  2.3.3	  	   Discussion	  	  As	  seen	  in	  Experiment	  1,	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  in	  the	  neonate	  brain	  were	  activated	  in	  response	  to	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language.	  However,	  these	  same	  areas	  showed	  no	  response	  to	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  This	  pattern	  of	  results	  indicates	  that	  activation	  in	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  newborn	  brain	  is	  evoked	  by	  spoken,	  but	  not	  whistled,	  language.	  	  	  -0.04-0.0200.020.040.060.080.1FW BW FW BWSpanish Silbo Gomerocc change (mmol x mm)Anterior Temporal RegionPosterior Temporal Region*	  	   34	  2.4	   General	  Discussion	  	  Our	  results	  indicate	  that	  the	  human	  brain	  at	  birth	  is	  highly	  specialized	  to	  respond	  to	  speech,	  showing	  unique	  activation	  in	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  cortex	  to	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  but	  not	  to	  a	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  We	  observe	  specialized	  processing	  for	  both	  native	  and	  a	  rhythmically	  distinct	  non-­‐native	  language	  in	  target	  anterior	  temporal	  regions,	  demonstrating	  that	  the	  newborn	  brain	  is	  tuned	  to	  spoken	  language,	  regardless	  of	  whether	  the	  language	  is	  familiar.	  However,	  our	  results	  also	  suggest	  that	  familiarity	  does	  play	  a	  role	  in	  neural	  activation	  to	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  language	  signals:	  only	  to	  the	  familiar	  language	  does	  the	  newborn	  brain	  distinguish	  backwards	  language	  as	  non-­‐linguistic.	  As	  speech	  played	  backwards	  does	  leave	  components	  of	  the	  linguistic	  signal	  intact	  (such	  a	  vowel	  sounds),	  it	  may	  be	  that	  unless	  infants	  have	  had	  exposure	  to	  the	  forward	  stream	  of	  a	  language,	  they	  are	  unable	  to	  detect	  the	  unnaturalness	  of	  the	  backwards	  signal.	  A	  similar	  pattern	  of	  results	  has	  also	  been	  shown	  with	  Japanese	  newborn	  infants	  (Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012),	  where	  greater	  activation	  was	  seen	  to	  forward	  versus	  backward	  native	  language	  (Japanese)	  but	  not	  to	  forward	  versus	  backward	  non-­‐native	  language	  unfamiliar	  language	  (English).	  This	  concurrence	  of	  results	  implies	  that	  the	  pattern	  observed	  is	  unlikely	  driven	  by	  acoustic	  properties	  of	  the	  test	  languages	  used.	  	  	  These	  results	  address	  the	  unanswered	  question	  of	  why	  only	  bilingual	  Silbo-­‐Spanish	  adults,	  and	  not	  Spanish-­‐only	  adults,	  show	  activation	  in	  classic	  language	  areas	  to	  Silbo	  Gomero	  as	  measured	  by	  fMRI	  (Carreiras	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Together	  with	  the	  results	  of	  Carreiras	  et	  al’s	  study,	  our	  results	  indicate	  that	  experience	  with	  whistled	  language	  is	  necessary	  for	  the	  brain	  to	  process	  Silbo	  as	  a	  linguistic	  signal.	  Without	  such	  experience,	  the	  human	  brain	  fails	  to	  respond	  to	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  as	  experience.	  This	  finding	  is	  particularly	  compelling	  in	  the	  context	  of	  this	  and	  previous	  work	  showing	  that	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  does	  activate	  language	  areas	  in	  the	  newborn	  brain	  (May	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Hence,	  while	  experience	  is	  required	  to	  establish	  neural	  specialization	  for	  treating	  a	  surrogate	  whistled	  form	  as	  language,	  	   35	  experience	  is	  not	  required	  for	  the	  neonate	  brain	  to	  respond	  to	  never	  before	  heard	  speech	  as	  language.	  	  The	  findings	  from	  the	  present	  set	  of	  studies	  provide	  robust	  evidence	  that	  it	  is	  spoken	  language	  that	  selectively	  activates	  nascent	  language	  areas	  in	  the	  neonate	  brain,	  still	  unknown	  is	  what	  characteristics	  present	  in	  spoken	  language-­‐-­‐	  yet	  absent	  in	  whistled	  language—are	  necessary	  for	  the	  newborn	  brain	  to	  process	  a	  signal	  as	  linguistic.	  Spoken	  and	  whistled	  languages	  are	  similar	  in	  many	  ways:	  as	  noted	  above,	  Spanish	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero	  have	  the	  same	  prosody,	  rhythm,	  and	  syntactic	  structure.	  Both	  signals	  can	  be	  used	  to	  create	  infinite	  combinations	  of	  meaning	  (unlike,	  for	  example,	  commands	  used	  with	  dogs	  or	  dolphin	  calls),	  are	  composed	  of	  smaller	  semantic	  and	  phonemic	  units,	  and	  are	  acquired	  through	  traditional	  cultural	  transmission	  from	  person-­‐to-­‐person.	  Both	  involve	  changing	  the	  shape	  of	  the	  oral	  cavity	  to	  modify	  an	  airstream.	  However,	  due	  to	  the	  substitution	  of	  whistled	  contours	  for	  speech	  sounds	  and	  the	  difference	  in	  production,	  Silbo	  Gomero	  has	  a	  more	  limited	  phonetic	  repertoire	  and	  lacks	  the	  acoustical	  complexity	  of	  speech	  (Rialland,	  2005;	  Trujillo,	  1978).	  Moreover,	  unlike	  Spanish,	  Silbo	  Gomero	  is	  never	  acquired	  as	  a	  first	  language.	  Determining	  which	  of	  these	  factors	  is	  crucial	  in	  triggering	  the	  newborn	  brain	  to	  detect	  a	  signal	  as	  language	  is	  an	  area	  for	  future	  research.	  	  	  One	  possibility	  raised	  by	  the	  current	  result	  is	  that	  the	  specialized	  neural	  response	  to	  language	  at	  birth	  evolved	  solely	  for	  spoken	  language,	  such	  that	  the	  newborn	  brain	  does	  not	  respond	  to	  all	  other	  forms	  of	  language,	  including	  not	  only	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  (as	  evidenced	  by	  our	  results)	  but	  also	  signed	  language.	  Indeed,	  there	  is	  currently	  no	  research	  addressing	  whether	  the	  newborn	  brain	  responds	  similarly	  to	  spoken	  and	  signed	  language.	  Unlike	  whistled	  surrogate	  languages,	  sign	  languages	  are	  primary	  language	  systems.	  Moreover,	  they	  have	  complex	  phonemic	  inventories,	  and	  are	  learned	  as	  a	  native	  language	  from	  birth	  by	  many	  individuals	  in	  deaf	  communities.	  Additionally,	  due	  to	  the	  rapid	  opening	  and	  closing	  of	  manual	  articulators,	  sign	  languages	  are	  argued	  to	  have	  equivalent	  complexity	  to	  the	  acoustic	  complexity	  of	  speech	  (Petitto,	  1994).	  Exploring	  whether	  the	  newborn	  brain	  shows	  	   36	  similar	  activation	  in	  language	  regions	  to	  both	  spoken	  and	  signed	  languages	  would	  help	  establish	  whether	  it	  is	  the	  medium	  of	  communication	  or	  the	  characteristics	  of	  the	  signal	  that	  underlies	  the	  specialized	  neural	  activation	  to	  speech	  seen	  at	  birth.	  	  	  In	  summary,	  we	  found	  that	  in	  the	  first	  days	  of	  life,	  classic	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  brain	  are	  activated	  in	  response	  to	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language,	  but	  not	  to	  a	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  	  These	  findings	  provide	  the	  strongest	  evidence	  to	  date	  that	  the	  human	  brain	  is	  highly	  specialized,	  even	  at	  birth,	  to	  respond	  to	  speech.	  While	  previous	  research	  has	  shown	  that	  with	  sufficient	  experience,	  the	  language	  systems	  in	  the	  brain	  can	  become	  specialized	  for	  a	  range	  of	  types	  of	  sound	  that	  are	  used	  for	  language,	  including	  whistled	  language	  (Carreiras	  et	  al.,	  2005),	  our	  results	  reveal	  that	  experience	  is	  necessary	  to	  drive	  the	  specialized	  response	  to	  whistled	  speech.	  We	  show	  that	  at	  birth,	  the	  newborn	  brain	  responds	  specially	  to	  an	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  but	  not	  to	  whistled	  surrogate	  language,	  indicating	  that	  the	  human	  brain	  evolved	  to	  process	  only	  speech,	  not	  other	  forms	  of	  communication,	  as	  language	  As	  such,	  these	  findings	  transform	  our	  understanding	  of	  how	  evolution	  has	  prepared	  the	  human	  brain	  for	  acquiring	  language,	  and	  focus	  and	  direct	  future	  theorizing	  on	  the	  evolution	  of	  language.	  	  	   	  	   37	  3	   Development	  of	  the	  Neural	  Response	  to	  Speech	  from	  Birth	  to	  4	  Months	  	  3.1	   Introduction	  	  As	  demonstrated	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  from	  the	  first	  days	  of	  life,	  the	  human	  brain	  responds	  specially	  to	  speech.	  Anterior	  temporal	  areas	  of	  the	  newborn	  brain—areas	  similar	  to	  those	  associated	  with	  language	  processing	  in	  adults—are	  activated	  in	  newborn	  infants	  when	  listening	  to	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language,	  but	  not	  to	  a	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  The	  present	  chapter	  extends	  this	  work,	  asking	  how	  the	  neural	  response	  to	  language	  changes	  across	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life.	  Using	  the	  same	  stimuli	  employed	  with	  neonates,	  neural	  activation	  is	  examined	  in	  four-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  to	  their	  native	  language,	  a	  non-­‐native	  language,	  and	  a	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  By	  four	  months	  of	  age,	  the	  patterns	  of	  neural	  responses	  to	  spoken	  and	  whistled	  language	  are	  shown	  to	  be	  distinct	  from	  those	  observed	  at	  birth.	  	  	  At	  the	  time	  they	  enter	  the	  world,	  infants	  already	  have	  experience	  with	  both	  speech	  in	  general	  and	  their	  native	  language	  in	  particular.	  The	  fetal	  hearing	  system	  is	  estimated	  to	  be	  fully	  developed	  by	  23-­‐26	  weeks	  gestation,	  and	  many	  of	  the	  sounds	  and	  vibrations	  from	  their	  mother’s	  speech	  are	  available	  to	  the	  fetus	  in	  utero	  (Kisilevsky	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Lecanuet	  et	  al.,	  1987;	  Zimmer	  et	  al.,	  1993).	  Evidence	  of	  prenatal	  exposure	  is	  seen	  from	  soon	  after	  birth:	  newborn	  infants	  prefer	  to	  listen	  to	  the	  language	  spoken	  by	  their	  mother	  during	  pregnancy	  versus	  to	  a	  rhythmically	  distinct	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  Burns,	  &	  Werker,	  2010;	  Mehler	  et	  al	  1988;	  Nazzi,	  Bertoncini,	  &	  Mehler,	  1998),	  and,	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2,	  different	  patterns	  of	  neural	  activity	  are	  observed	  in	  neonates	  in	  response	  to	  the	  native	  versus	  a	  non-­‐native	  language	  (May	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  previous	  chapter).	  	  	  However,	  the	  in	  utero	  exposure	  infants	  have	  to	  language	  pales	  in	  comparison	  to	  the	  experience	  they	  obtain	  after	  birth.	  Thus,	  it	  is	  not	  surprising	  that	  infants	  soon	  begin	  	   38	  further	  specializing	  to	  the	  language	  (or	  languages)	  spoken	  around	  them.	  While	  at	  birth	  infants	  can	  discriminate	  and	  prefer	  their	  native	  language	  from	  a	  rhythmically	  distinct	  unfamiliar	  language,	  they	  cannot	  tell	  their	  native	  language	  apart	  from	  a	  rhythmically	  similar	  foreign	  language	  (ie,	  English-­‐exposed	  neonates	  can	  discriminate	  segment-­‐timed	  English	  from	  syllable-­‐timed	  French,	  but	  not	  segment-­‐timed	  English	  from	  segment-­‐timed	  Dutch).	  It	  is	  not	  until	  4-­‐5	  months	  of	  age	  that	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  prefer	  their	  native	  language	  to	  a	  non-­‐native	  language	  that	  shares	  the	  same	  rhythmical	  structure	  (Bosch	  &	  Sebastian-­‐Galles,	  1997;	  Nazzi,	  Jusczyk,	  &	  Johnson,	  2000).	  These	  results	  suggest	  between	  birth	  and	  4	  months,	  infants	  develop	  sensitivity	  to	  more	  than	  just	  the	  prosodic	  properties	  of	  their	  native	  language.	  	  Like	  their	  processing	  of	  native	  versus	  non-­‐native	  language,	  infants’	  perception	  of	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  has	  also	  been	  shown	  to	  change	  during	  the	  first	  months	  out	  of	  utero.	  While	  a	  preference	  for	  speech	  over	  non-­‐speech	  is	  seen	  at	  birth,	  infants’	  initial	  preference	  for	  speech	  appears	  to	  be	  broadly	  defined:	  newborn	  infants	  prefer	  speech	  to	  acoustically	  similar	  non-­‐speech	  sine-­‐wave	  contours,	  but	  have	  been	  found	  to	  show	  no	  preference	  for	  speech	  over	  rhesus	  monkey	  calls	  (Vouloumanos	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  By	  3	  months,	  however,	  infants’	  preference	  for	  speech	  is	  more	  specific,	  showing	  a	  preference	  for	  speech	  over	  both	  sine-­‐wave	  contours	  and	  monkey	  calls.	  	  	  Little	  is	  known	  about	  how	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  and	  language	  may	  differ	  at	  birth	  versus	  once	  an	  infant	  has	  amassed	  a	  few	  months	  of	  post-­‐natal	  language	  experience.	  In	  one	  recent	  study	  directly	  examining	  developmental	  changes	  in	  neural	  activity	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech,	  Shultz	  and	  colleagues	  (2014)	  used	  fMRI	  to	  measure	  brain	  activation	  in	  1-­‐	  to	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  sounds	  such	  as	  rhesus	  monkey	  calls,	  human	  communicative	  vocal	  sounds	  (i.e.,	  sounds	  of	  agreement,	  disgust),	  human	  non-­‐communicative	  vocal	  sounds	  (i.e.,	  coughs,	  throat	  clearing),	  and	  human	  non-­‐vocal	  sounds	  (i.e.,	  walking	  noises).	  The	  researchers	  found	  that	  left	  hemisphere	  temporal	  regions	  responded	  more	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  sounds	  across	  the	  1-­‐4	  month-­‐old	  sample,	  but	  that	  this	  difference	  	   39	  in	  activation	  became	  more	  pronounced	  with	  development.	  Specifically,	  while	  the	  response	  in	  left	  temporal	  brain	  regions	  to	  non-­‐speech	  sounds	  decreased	  with	  age,	  the	  response	  to	  speech	  stayed	  constant	  from	  1-­‐	  4	  months.	  	  	  Other	  potential	  developmental	  changes	  in	  the	  neural	  responses	  to	  language	  during	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life	  may	  be	  inferred	  from	  different	  studies	  examining	  brain	  activation	  at	  different	  ages.	  One	  possible	  developmental	  shift	  suggested	  is	  in	  the	  lateralization	  of	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  language	  stimuli.	  Neuroimaging	  studies	  with	  newborn	  infants	  have	  produced	  mixed	  results	  regarding	  the	  lateralization	  of	  neural	  activation	  to	  continuous	  speech:	  a	  number	  of	  studies	  have	  reported	  greater	  activation	  in	  the	  left	  versus	  right	  hemispheres	  (Cristia,	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai,	  &	  Dupoux,	  2014;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012,),	  while	  other	  studies	  have	  found	  no	  difference	  in	  activation	  between	  hemispheres	  (May	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Perani	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  previous	  chapter).	  In	  contrast,	  research	  with	  slightly	  older	  infants	  (i.e.,	  1-­‐4	  months)	  has	  much	  more	  consistently	  observed	  activation	  to	  continuous	  speech	  that	  is	  stronger	  in	  the	  left	  hemisphere,	  similar	  to	  what	  is	  classically	  seen	  in	  the	  adult	  brain	  (2mos—Dehaene-­‐Lambertz	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  3mos-­‐-­‐	  Dehaene-­‐Lambertz	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  4mos—Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  1-­‐4mos—Shultz	  et	  al,	  2014).	  These	  differences	  in	  lateralization	  results	  with	  neonates	  versus	  slightly	  older	  infants	  (and	  adults)	  suggest	  that	  hemispheric	  specialization	  to	  speech	  may	  develop—or	  become	  more	  pronounced,	  and	  easier	  to	  detect—as	  infants	  gain	  post-­‐natal	  experience	  with	  language.	  However,	  as	  these	  singular	  studies	  have	  used	  different	  methodologies	  and	  stimuli	  across	  ages,	  it	  is	  difficult	  to	  make	  any	  definitive	  conclusions.	  	  	  In	  the	  present	  set	  of	  studies,	  Near-­‐Infrared	  Spectroscopy	  was	  used	  to	  explore	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  and	  non-­‐speech	  stimuli	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants,	  using	  methodology	  and	  stimuli	  matched	  as	  closely	  as	  possible	  to	  those	  employed	  in	  Chapter	  1	  with	  newborn	  infants.	  In	  Experiment	  3,	  neural	  activation	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  was	  compared	  to	  forward	  and	  backward	  segments	  of	  their	  native	  language	  (English)	  and	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Spanish).	  In	  Experiment	  4,	  neural	  activation	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  was	  compared	  to	  forward	  and	  backward	  segments	  of	  an	  	   40	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  (Spanish)	  and	  an	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  (Silbo	  Gomero,	  described	  in	  detail	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter).	  As	  a	  reminder,	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  these	  same	  two	  comparisons	  were	  tested	  in	  newborn	  infants,	  and	  bilateral	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  were	  found	  to	  be	  activated	  in	  response	  to	  both	  the	  native	  language	  and	  the	  unfamiliar	  language,	  but	  not	  to	  the	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  In	  addition,	  some	  evidence	  that	  language	  experience	  impacts	  newborn	  neural	  activation	  to	  language	  was	  observed,	  such	  that	  only	  for	  the	  native	  language	  there	  was	  marginally	  greater	  activation	  to	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  stimuli.	  In	  testing	  slightly	  older	  infants	  at	  4-­‐months	  of	  age	  with	  corresponding	  methods	  and	  stimuli,	  the	  results	  from	  the	  present	  studies	  allow	  for	  investigation	  of	  developmental	  changes	  in	  the	  neural	  activation	  to	  native	  language,	  non-­‐native	  language,	  and	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  that	  may	  occur	  during	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life.	  	  	  Three	  potential	  developmental	  patterns	  were	  hypothesized	  to	  emerge	  between	  birth	  and	  four	  months.	  First,	  that	  the	  neural	  response	  to	  spoken	  language	  (and	  particularly	  to	  the	  native	  language)	  would	  become	  more	  left-­‐lateralized	  with	  age.	  While	  in	  Chapter	  2	  bilateral	  activation	  was	  seen	  in	  the	  neonate	  brain	  response	  to	  speech,	  based	  on	  the	  previous	  neuroimaging	  work	  with	  older	  infants	  described	  above,	  it	  was	  expected	  that	  by	  4	  months	  of	  age	  activation	  to	  speech	  would	  be	  stronger	  in	  the	  left	  versus	  right	  hemispheres.	  Second,	  it	  was	  hypothesized	  that	  the	  brain	  responses	  to	  the	  native	  language	  versus	  to	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  would	  become	  increasingly	  distinct	  with	  age.	  With	  neonates,	  marginally	  greater	  activation	  was	  found	  to	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  native	  language,	  while	  there	  was	  no	  effect	  of	  language	  direction	  in	  the	  response	  to	  unfamiliar	  language,	  yet	  no	  other	  effects	  of	  language	  experience	  were	  observed.	  Based	  on	  the	  significant	  post-­‐natal	  exposure	  to	  their	  native	  language	  infants	  have	  gained	  by	  4	  months,	  differential	  brain	  responses	  to	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language	  were	  predicted	  to	  be	  more	  pronounced	  at	  this	  age.	  Finally,	  it	  was	  hypothesized	  that	  at	  4	  months	  there	  would	  continue	  to	  be	  neural	  specialization	  for	  speech,	  such	  that	  as	  with	  newborn	  infants,	  4-­‐month-­‐olds	  would	  show	  greater	  activation	  to	  spoken	  language	  than	  to	  whistled	  surrogate	  	   41	  language.	  The	  first	  two	  of	  these	  hypotheses	  were	  evaluated	  in	  Experiment	  3,	  and	  the	  third	  in	  Experiment	  4.	  	  	  3.2	   Experiment	  3	  	  In	  Experiment	  3,	  neural	  activation	  in	  4	  month-­‐old	  infants	  was	  examined	  in	  response	  to	  their	  native	  language	  (English)	  and	  to	  a	  rhythmically	  distinct	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Spanish).	  As	  with	  the	  test	  of	  newborn	  infants	  reported	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  4-­‐month-­‐olds	  heard	  both	  forward	  and	  backwards	  segments	  of	  each	  language	  type.	  Backwards	  language	  stimuli	  have	  often	  been	  used	  as	  acoustically	  matched	  non-­‐language	  contrasts	  in	  studies	  examining	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  language,	  as	  speech	  played	  backwards	  disturbs	  the	  syllable	  structure	  and	  renders	  many	  of	  the	  phonemes	  such	  that	  they	  cannot	  be	  pronounced	  by	  the	  human	  vocal	  tract	  (Pena	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Perani	  et	  al.,	  1996).	  However,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  some	  of	  the	  language	  characteristics	  of	  forward	  speech	  are	  maintained	  in	  backwards	  speech,	  including	  some	  of	  the	  phonemes	  and	  some	  of	  the	  temporal	  characteristics	  (such	  as	  the	  duration	  of	  syllables	  and	  pauses).	  	  	  A	  previous	  study	  by	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  and	  colleagues	  (2011)	  also	  used	  NIRS	  to	  examine	  neural	  activation	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  Japanese-­‐exposed	  infants	  to	  a	  range	  of	  language	  and	  non-­‐language	  stimuli,	  including	  to	  the	  native	  language	  (Japanese)	  and	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  (English).	  The	  researchers	  found	  that	  activation	  to	  both	  languages	  was	  lateralized	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere,	  but	  that	  the	  magnitude	  of	  activation	  was	  greater	  to	  the	  native	  language	  than	  to	  the	  unfamiliar	  language.	  Thus,	  it	  was	  hypothesized	  that	  in	  Experiment	  3	  similar	  results	  would	  be	  observed,	  with	  the	  current	  study	  testing	  different	  languages	  (English	  and	  Spanish)	  and	  infants	  from	  a	  different	  language	  background	  (English	  in	  the	  present	  case).	  	  	  As	  much	  as	  possible,	  the	  stimuli	  and	  procedures	  used	  in	  Experiment	  3	  mirrored	  those	  employed	  with	  neonates	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter.	  However,	  while	  neonates	  	   42	  either	  slept	  through	  the	  study	  or	  were	  in	  a	  quiet	  state	  of	  rest,	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  were	  typically	  awake	  and	  alert.	  Thus,	  two	  fairly	  significant	  adjustments	  were	  made	  to	  accommodate	  the	  older	  infants:	  first,	  infants	  in	  the	  current	  study	  watched	  non-­‐object	  screen-­‐saver	  videos	  while	  listening	  to	  the	  language	  segments,	  and	  second,	  language	  segments	  were	  approximately	  10-­‐seconds	  in	  length	  versus	  the	  15-­‐seconds	  used	  with	  newborns.	  	  3.2.1	  Methods	  	  3.2.1.1	   Participants	  	  Data	  from	  22	  infants	  were	  included	  in	  the	  analyses	  for	  Experiment	  3	  (3	  months,	  15	  days	  -­‐	  4	  months,	  15	  days,	  Mage=	  4	  months,	  1.95	  days;	  14	  male,	  8	  female.	  An	  additional	  30	  infants	  completed	  the	  study,	  but	  were	  excluded	  from	  final	  analyses	  due	  to	  insufficient	  data	  (defined	  as	  not	  having	  useable	  data	  from	  each	  of	  the	  regions	  of	  interest	  in	  each	  hemisphere,	  for	  each	  language	  condition).	  The	  lack	  of	  useable	  data	  from	  these	  infants	  was	  likely	  due	  to	  excessive	  movement	  or	  too	  much	  hair	  for	  the	  laser	  to	  penetrate.	  Overall	  means	  of	  activation	  were	  similar	  between	  the	  infants	  with	  complete	  data	  included	  in	  the	  analyses	  and	  the	  data	  from	  all	  infants	  who	  completed	  the	  study,	  as	  shown	  in	  Figure	  3.1.	  Twenty-­‐nine	  infants	  did	  not	  complete	  the	  study	  due	  to	  fussiness	  and	  were	  likewise	  not	  included	  in	  the	  analyses.	  One	  infant	  was	  tested	  and	  completed	  the	  study,	  but	  due	  to	  a	  technical	  error,	  the	  data	  was	  not	  saved.	  	  All	  infants	  were	  reported	  by	  parents	  as	  hearing	  a	  minimum	  of	  80%	  English,	  with	  no	  exposure	  to	  Spanish.	  	  	  	  	  	   43	  Figure	  3.1	  Results	  for	  all	  infants	  who	  completed	  Experiment	  3	  and	  for	  all	  infants	  with	  complete	  data	  set	  for	  Experiment	  3.	  Fifty-­‐two	  infants	  completed	  Experiment	  3	  (number	  of	  infants	  with	  data	  for	  each	  data	  cell	  ranged	  from	  41	  to	  52),	  while	  22	  infants	  had	  complete	  data.	  	  	  	  3.2.2.2	   Stimuli	  	  Two	  proficient	  female	  speakers	  of	  each	  language	  (English,	  Spanish)	  were	  recorded	  reading	  aloud	  from	  bilingual	  versions	  of	  the	  children’s	  books	  “The	  Paper	  Bag	  Princess”	  and	  “The	  Three	  Wishes”.	  From	  the	  recorded	  stories,	  six	  10-­‐second	  (+-­‐1)	  -0.0100.010.020.030.040.050.060.070.080.09Anterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalFW BW FW BWEnglish Spanishcc change (mmol x mm)All InfantsLHRH-0.0100.010.020.030.040.050.060.070.080.09Anterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalFW BW FW BWEnglish Spanishcc change (mmol x mm)Infants with Complete DataLHRH	   44	  segments	  of	  each	  language	  were	  selected,	  and	  backwards	  versions	  of	  all	  segments	  were	  generated	  using	  Praat	  (Boersma	  &	  Weenink,	  2011).	  	  	  3.2.2.3	   Procedure	  	  Infants	  were	  tested	  in	  a	  sound-­‐attenuated	  room,	  seated	  on	  their	  caregiver’s	  lap	  in	  front	  of	  a	  television	  screen	  with	  a	  30x22in	  display.	  The	  majority	  of	  infants	  were	  awake	  and	  alert	  during	  the	  study,	  although	  a	  small	  number	  of	  infants	  slept	  or	  fed	  during	  a	  portion	  of	  the	  study.	  	  	  A	  Hitachi	  ETG-­‐4000	  NIRS	  machine	  with	  a	  source	  detector	  separation	  of	  3	  cm	  and	  two	  continuous	  wavelengths	  of	  695	  and	  830	  nm	  was	  used,	  with	  a	  sampling	  rate	  of	  10Hz.	  The	  laser	  power	  was	  set	  at	  0.75mW.	  A	  probe	  set	  was	  placed	  over	  the	  infant’s	  head,	  with	  12	  optical	  channels	  over	  the	  left	  temporal	  region,	  and	  12	  optical	  channels	  over	  the	  matched	  right	  temporal	  region.	  Each	  set	  of	  12	  optical	  channels	  contained	  9	  (5	  emitters	  and	  4	  detectors)	  1mm	  optical	  fibers	  (Figure	  3.2).	  Placement	  of	  the	  channels	  was	  based	  on	  surface	  landmarks	  on	  the	  infant	  scalp,	  placing	  the	  center	  probes	  directly	  over	  the	  infant’s	  ears.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   45	  Figure	  3.2	  Schematic	  of	  the	  probe	  set	  placement	  on	  the	  infant	  head	  in	  Experiments	  3	  and	  4.	  Channels	  1-­‐12	  were	  placed	  over	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  (channels	  3-­‐12	  used	  for	  analyses)	  and	  channels	  13-­‐24	  over	  the	  right	  hemisphere	  (channels	  15-­‐24	  used	  for	  analyses).	  Red	  circles	  indicate	  emitter	  fibers,	  blue	  circles	  indicate	  detector	  fibers,	  and	  the	  numbered	  white	  boxes	  denote	  measurement	  channels	  used	  for	  analysis.	  Yellow	  highlighted	  regions	  illustrate	  anterior	  temporal	  regions,	  and	  un-­‐highlighted	  regions	  constitute	  posterior	  temporal	  regions.	  	  	  	  Infants	  were	  presented	  with	  four	  language	  conditions	  (FW,	  BW	  English;	  FW,	  BW	  Spanish),	  each	  consisting	  of	  six	  sequential	  blocks.	  At	  the	  start	  of	  each	  block,	  a	  screensaver-­‐like	  video	  began	  playing	  on	  the	  television	  screen,	  and	  continued	  to	  play	  for	  5-­‐7	  seconds	  in	  silence	  (the	  length	  randomized	  across	  trials).	  After	  this	  time,	  the	  video	  continued	  and	  the	  language	  segment	  began,	  and	  continued	  for	  approximately	  10s.	  After	  the	  language	  segment	  ended,	  the	  video	  played	  for	  a	  final	  15-­‐20s	  (again,	  the	  length	  randomized	  across	  trials).	  In	  between	  each	  block,	  a	  silent	  attention	  getting	  video	  was	  shown,	  until	  the	  infant	  was	  ready	  to	  continue	  with	  the	  study.	  Between	  each	  language	  condition,	  a	  novel	  entertaining	  silent	  video	  clip	  was	  played	  to	  maintain	  infants’	  interest.	  	  	   46	  The	  order	  of	  language	  conditions	  was	  counterbalanced	  between	  infants	  (24	  orders	  in	  total).	  The	  orders	  of	  videos	  and	  segments	  within	  language	  conditions	  were	  randomized.	  Total	  testing	  time	  was	  approximately	  16	  minutes.	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.3	  Sample	  structure	  of	  a	  trial	  in	  Experiments	  3	  and	  4.	  Infants	  watched	  a	  screen	  saver	  video	  in	  silence	  for	  5-­‐7	  seconds,	  before	  the	  10-­‐second	  language	  stimuli	  began	  to	  play.	  The	  video	  continued	  during	  the	  language	  stimulation,	  and	  for	  15-­‐20	  seconds	  in	  silence	  after.	  In	  between	  trials,	  infants	  saw	  a	  silent	  attention-­‐getter	  video.	   	  	  3.2.2.4	   Analyses	  	  Data	  from	  10	  of	  the	  12	  optical	  channels	  from	  each	  hemisphere	  were	  analyzed	  (20	  channels	  total).	  Two	  channels	  from	  the	  top	  of	  the	  probe	  set	  on	  each	  hemisphere	  were	  excluded	  from	  analysis	  (4	  in	  total;	  see	  Figure	  3.2).	  Due	  to	  the	  configuration	  of	  the	  probe	  set,	  there	  was	  often	  no	  contact	  between	  the	  infant’s	  head	  and	  the	  probes	  where	  these	  four	  channels	  were	  located.	  	  	  	   47	  Changes	  in	  oxygenated	  and	  deoxygenated	  Hb	  were	  examined	  from	  the	  start	  of	  language	  stimulations	  to	  10	  seconds	  after	  the	  end	  of	  stimulation	  (20s	  after	  start),	  averaged	  over	  the	  6	  blocks	  of	  each	  language	  condition.	  Data	  were	  band-­‐pass	  filtered	  between	  .01	  and	  .6	  Hz.	  For	  each	  trial,	  a	  baseline	  fit	  was	  established	  by	  linearly	  fitting	  a	  5s	  pre-­‐trial	  baseline	  from	  before	  the	  language	  stimulation	  (during	  which	  the	  silent	  video	  screensaver	  was	  playing)	  and	  a	  5s	  post-­‐trial	  starting	  10s	  after	  the	  end	  of	  the	  language	  stimulation	  (with	  the	  silent	  video	  screensaver	  continuing	  to	  play).	  Movement	  artifacts	  were	  removed	  by	  isolating	  trials	  in	  which	  there	  was	  a	  change	  in	  concentration	  greater	  than	  0.1mmol	  x	  mm	  over	  a	  period	  of	  0.2sec.	  	  	  Analyses	  focused	  on	  oxygenated	  Hb,	  as	  it	  has	  been	  found	  to	  be	  the	  most	  consistent	  marker	  of	  neural	  activity	  in	  infants	  (Aslin,	  2012;	  Gervain	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  Blasi,	  &	  Elwell,	  2010).	  	  3.2.3	  Results	  	  Data	  were	  analyzed	  in	  a	  4	  factor	  repeated	  measures	  ANOVA	  comparing	  levels	  of	  activation	  across	  language	  (English	  vs	  Spanish),	  direction	  (forward	  vs	  backward),	  hemisphere	  (left	  vs	  right),	  and	  region	  (anterior	  temporal	  vs	  posterior	  temporal).	  For	  comparison	  with	  neonates,	  the	  same	  regions	  of	  interest	  used	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter	  with	  our	  newborn	  sample	  were	  employed,	  minus	  the	  channels	  at	  the	  top	  of	  the	  head	  removed	  from	  analyses	  due	  to	  little	  contact	  with	  the	  scalp	  in	  the	  configuration	  used	  with	  4-­‐month-­‐olds.	  	  No	  main	  effects	  of	  language,	  direction,	  or	  hemisphere	  were	  found.	  A	  significant	  main	  effect	  of	  region	  (F(1,21)=	  10.851,	  p<.01,	  η2p=	  .341)	  was	  observed,	  such	  that	  activation	  was	  greater	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.059,	  SD=	  0.038)	  than	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.033,	  SD=	  0.028).	  The	  interaction	  between	  region	  and	  direction	  was	  also	  found	  (F(1,21)=	  5.599,	  	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .210):	  for	  backwards	  language	  conditions,	  there	  was	  significantly	  greater	  activation	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  	   48	  regions	  (M=	  0.065,	  SD=	  0.038)	  versus	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.030,	  SD=	  0.033)	  ,	  F(1,21)=	  18.943,	  p<.001,	  η2p=	  .474while	  the	  same	  trend	  was	  non-­‐significant	  but	  in	  the	  same	  direction	  for	  forward	  language	  conditions	  (anterior	  temporal	  regions,	  M=	  0.053,	  SD=	  0.042,	  posterior	  temporal	  regions,	  M=	  0.037,	  SD=	  0.038,	  F(1,21)=	  2.822,	  p=.108,	  η2p=	  .118).	  	  	  A	  three-­‐way	  interaction	  was	  observed	  for	  language,	  hemisphere,	  and	  region	  (F(1,21)=	  8.405,	  p<.01,	  η2p=	  .286).	  In	  response	  to	  English	  stimuli,	  there	  was	  an	  effect	  of	  hemisphere	  only	  in	  the	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (F(1,21)=	  14.597,	  p<.01,	  η2p=	  .408),	  with	  greater	  activation	  in	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.048,	  SD=	  0.056)	  than	  in	  right	  hemisphere	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.007,	  SD=	  0.047)	  .	  No	  effect	  of	  hemisphere	  was	  seen	  in	  activation	  to	  English	  stimuli	  in	  the	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  (p>.05).	  In	  response	  to	  Spanish	  stimuli,	  no	  effects	  were	  observed	  for	  either	  hemisphere	  or	  region	  (p>.05).	  	  	  Finally,	  a	  marginal	  interaction	  was	  found	  between	  direction	  and	  hemisphere	  (F(1,21)=	  4.091,	  p=.056,	  η2p=	  .163).	  In	  response	  to	  forward	  language	  segments,	  greater	  activation	  was	  seen	  in	  the	  left	  (M=	  0.051,	  SD=	  0.038)	  versus	  right	  hemisphere	  (M=	  0.038,	  SD=	  0.033),	  F(1,21)=	  4.911,	  p<.05,	  η2p=	  .190,	  while	  no	  hemisphere	  differences	  were	  seen	  to	  backwards	  language	  segments,	  p>.05.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   49	  Figure	  3.4	  Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  as	  observed	  in	  Experiment	  3.	  Error	  bars	  represent	  standard	  error.	  	  	  	  3.2.4	  Discussion	  	  Two	  developmental	  changes	  were	  hypothesized	  to	  emerge	  in	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  native	  versus	  non-­‐native	  language	  between	  birth	  and	  four	  months	  of	  age:	  first,	  that	  activation	  to	  language	  (and	  particularly	  to	  the	  native	  language)	  would	  become	  left	  lateralized	  with	  age,	  and	  second,	  that	  the	  patterns	  of	  activation	  to	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  would	  become	  increasingly	  distinct	  with	  age.	  	  	  Evidence	  from	  Experiment	  3	  partially	  supports	  the	  first	  hypothesis:	  while	  no	  lateralization	  effects	  were	  seen	  in	  the	  previous	  study	  with	  neonates,	  here	  neural	  activation	  to	  the	  native	  language	  was	  found	  to	  be	  lateralized	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  in	  4	  month	  olds.	  However,	  no	  evidence	  of	  lateralization	  to	  the	  non-­‐native	  language	  was	  observed.	  This	  pattern	  of	  results	  suggests	  that	  while	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language	  becomes	  increasingly	  specialized	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere,	  neural	  activation	  to	  unfamiliar	  language	  remains	  more	  bilateral.	  While	  this	  finding	  differs	  slightly	  from	  that	  of	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.	  00.010.020.030.040.050.060.070.080.09FW BW FW BWEnglish Spanishcc change (mm x mmol)Anterior Temporal RegionPosterior Temporal Region00.010.020.030.040.050.060.070.080.09Anterior Temporal RegionPosterior Temporal RegionAnterior Temporal RegionPosterior Temporal RegionEnglish Spanishcc change (mm x mmol)LHRH** ** ** 	   50	  (2011),	  where	  researchers	  observed	  activation	  to	  both	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  to	  be	  left	  lateralized	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐olds,	  one	  possibility	  is	  that	  differences	  in	  the	  stimuli	  used	  (the	  current	  study	  used	  10-­‐second	  segments	  of	  fluid	  speech,	  while	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.	  used	  10-­‐second	  concatenations	  of	  short	  sentences)	  are	  related	  to	  this	  divergence	  in	  results.	  Additionally,	  the	  marginal	  finding	  in	  the	  present	  results	  of	  greater	  activation	  in	  left	  versus	  right	  hemispheres	  for	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  language	  segments	  of	  both	  languages	  may	  hint	  at	  results	  that	  are	  in	  line	  with	  those	  of	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai,	  but	  were	  not	  strong	  enough	  to	  emerge	  as	  statistically	  significant.	  	  The	  observed	  difference	  in	  lateralization	  to	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  in	  the	  present	  study	  also	  lends	  support	  to	  the	  second	  developmental	  change	  proposed,	  that	  brain	  responses	  to	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  language	  would	  grow	  increasingly	  distinct	  with	  age.	  This	  finding	  indicates	  that	  by	  4	  months	  of	  age	  the	  brain	  has	  further	  specialized	  in	  its	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language.	  However,	  there	  also	  appear	  to	  be	  ways	  that	  the	  infant	  brain	  still	  responds	  similarly	  to	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language,	  despite	  having	  significant	  post-­‐natal	  language	  experience	  with	  the	  native	  language.	  No	  differences	  were	  seen	  in	  the	  magnitude	  of	  activation	  to	  native	  versus	  non	  native	  language,	  or	  in	  the	  regions	  of	  the	  brain	  where	  activation	  was	  predominant,	  as	  to	  both	  languages	  the	  response	  was	  greater	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  than	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions.	  This	  pattern	  of	  results	  may	  reflect	  infants’	  still	  growing	  sensitivities	  to	  differences	  between	  their	  native	  language	  and	  non-­‐native	  languages	  at	  4	  months.	  Indeed,	  many	  studies	  have	  shown	  that	  infants’	  behavioral	  responses	  to	  various	  aspects	  of	  language	  other	  than	  rhythm	  do	  not	  become	  specialized	  to	  the	  native	  language	  until	  6-­‐12	  months,	  such	  as	  with	  phonetic	  discrimination	  (Werker	  &	  Tees,	  1984).	  It	  may	  be	  that	  if	  infants	  older	  that	  6-­‐12	  months	  were	  tested,	  more	  pronounced	  differences	  in	  the	  magnitude	  or	  location	  of	  activation	  to	  native	  versus	  non-­‐native	  languages	  would	  be	  observed,	  in	  that	  infants	  could	  detect	  not	  only	  rhythmical	  and	  prosodic	  differences	  between	  languages,	  but	  also	  differences	  in	  the	  speech	  sounds	  employed.	  	  	  	   51	  In	  addition	  to	  these	  hypothesized	  developmental	  changes,	  one	  further	  intriguing	  difference	  emerged	  between	  the	  newborn	  sample	  and	  the	  current	  study,	  in	  the	  interaction	  between	  region	  and	  direction.	  With	  neonates,	  we	  found	  that	  the	  effect	  of	  greater	  activation	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  versus	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  was	  only	  in	  response	  to	  forward	  language	  stimuli,	  but	  not	  to	  backwards	  language	  stimuli.	  Here,	  with	  four-­‐month-­‐olds,	  we	  observed	  the	  opposite:	  greater	  activation	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  versus	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  was	  only	  significant	  to	  backwards	  language	  stimuli.	  One	  potential	  explanation	  for	  this	  difference	  is	  that	  perhaps	  at	  4-­‐months,	  infants	  are	  exerting	  more	  neural	  effort	  to	  trying	  to	  figure	  out	  the	  unusual	  backwards	  language	  segments,	  resulting	  in	  greater	  neural	  activation	  to	  these	  stimuli	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions.	  Further	  research	  is	  needed	  to	  explore	  this	  developmental	  shift.	  	  	  	  3.3	   Experiment	  4	  	  The	  results	  from	  Experiment	  3	  indicate	  that	  between	  birth	  and	  4	  month	  of	  age,	  the	  infant	  brain	  becomes	  more	  lateralized	  in	  its	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language,	  but	  not	  to	  an	  unfamiliar	  language.	  Experiment	  4	  then	  turns	  to	  a	  related	  question,	  the	  development	  of	  neural	  activation	  to	  speech	  as	  compared	  to	  a	  non-­‐speech	  communication	  system.	  	  In	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  neural	  specialization	  for	  speech	  was	  seen	  to	  be	  present	  at	  birth,	  with	  significant	  neural	  activation	  observed	  to	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  in	  the	  neonate	  brain,	  but	  not	  to	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  Whistled	  surrogate	  language	  is	  a	  non-­‐speech	  communication	  system	  in	  which	  whistled	  contours	  replace	  speech	  sounds.	  As	  such,	  whistled	  surrogate	  languages	  share	  the	  same	  rhythm	  and	  prosody	  as	  their	  base	  spoken	  language,	  but	  have	  a	  different	  production	  system,	  reduced	  acoustical	  complexity,	  and	  reduced	  phonetic	  inventory.	  In	  the	  present	  study,	  the	  same	  whistled	  language	  was	  used	  as	  in	  the	  	   52	  previous	  chapter:	  Silbo	  Gomero,	  a	  surrogate	  of	  Spanish	  used	  in	  parts	  of	  the	  Canary	  Islands.	  	  	  Using	  identical	  methodology	  to	  Experiment	  3,	  infants	  in	  Experiment	  4	  heard	  segments	  of	  backwards	  and	  forward	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  (Spanish)	  and	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  (Silbo	  Gomero).	  As	  described	  in	  the	  introduction,	  a	  recent	  study	  by	  Shultz	  and	  colleagues	  (2014)	  used	  fMRI	  to	  examine	  brain	  activity	  in	  infants	  aged	  1-­‐4-­‐months	  to	  speech	  and	  non-­‐speech	  signals.	  The	  researchers	  found	  that	  specificity	  in	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  increased	  with	  age:	  while	  activation	  to	  speech	  sounds	  stayed	  constant	  across	  age,	  there	  was	  a	  negative	  correlation	  between	  age	  and	  the	  activation	  to	  non-­‐speech	  sounds.	  As	  this	  study	  is	  currently	  the	  only	  published	  study	  in	  the	  literature	  comparing	  neural	  activation	  in	  speech	  to	  non-­‐speech	  across	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life,	  in	  the	  present	  study	  it	  was	  predicted	  that	  greater	  activation	  would	  be	  observed	  to	  spoken	  versus	  whistled	  language,	  similar	  to	  that	  seen	  with	  neonates	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter.	  However,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  the	  non-­‐speech	  contrasts	  used	  by	  Shultz	  and	  colleagues	  (monkey	  calls,	  human	  vocal	  non-­‐speech	  communication,	  human	  vocal	  non-­‐communication,	  and	  human	  non-­‐vocal	  non-­‐communication)	  are	  quite	  distinct	  from	  whistled	  language,	  and	  moreover,	  the	  nature	  of	  the	  stimuli	  used	  by	  Shultz	  et	  al.	  and	  the	  current	  study	  differed	  significantly	  (individual	  words	  in	  the	  former	  versus	  15-­‐second	  segments	  of	  continuous	  speech	  in	  the	  latter).	  	  	  3.3.1	  Methods	  	  3.3.1.1	   Participants	  	  Data	  from	  25	  infants	  were	  included	  in	  the	  final	  analysis	  (3	  months,	  14days	  –	  4	  months,	  17days,	  Mage	  =	  4	  months,	  0.73	  days;	  15	  males,	  10	  females).	  An	  additional	  23	  infants	  completed	  the	  study,	  but	  did	  not	  have	  sufficient	  data	  (see	  Figure	  3.5	  for	  comparison	  of	  data	  between	  infants	  with	  sufficient	  data	  for	  all	  conditions	  versus	  all	  	   53	  infants	  who	  completed	  the	  study),	  and	  24	  infants	  were	  tested	  but	  did	  not	  complete	  the	  study	  due	  to	  fussiness	  (21)	  or	  a	  parent	  ending	  the	  study	  early	  (3).	  These	  infants	  were	  not	  included	  in	  the	  reported	  analysis.	  	  	  While	  most	  infants	  were	  awake	  and	  alert	  during	  the	  study,	  a	  small	  number	  of	  infants	  fed	  or	  slept	  during	  some	  portion	  of	  the	  study.	  All	  infants	  were	  reported	  by	  parents	  as	  hearing	  at	  least	  80%	  English,	  with	  no	  exposure	  to	  Spanish	  or	  any	  whistled	  language.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   54	  Figure	  3.5	  Results	  for	  all	  infants	  who	  completed	  Experiment	  4,	  and	  for	  all	  infants	  with	  a	  complete	  data	  set	  in	  Experiment	  4.	  Forty-­‐eight	  infants	  completed	  Experiment	  4	  (number	  of	  infants	  with	  data	  for	  each	  data	  cell	  ranged	  from	  38	  to	  47),	  while	  25	  had	  a	  complete	  data	  set.	  	  	  	  	  3.3.1.2	   Stimuli	  	  The	  same	  Spanish	  language	  stimuli	  used	  in	  Experiment	  3	  were	  also	  used	  in	  Study	  2.	  Silbo	  Gomero	  stimuli	  were	  recorded	  from	  two	  female	  whistlers	  in	  the	  Canary	  -0.02-0.0100.010.020.030.040.050.060.07Anterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalFW BW FW BWSpanish Silbo Gomerocc change (mmol x mm)Infants with Complete DataLHRH-0.02-0.0100.010.020.030.040.050.060.07Anterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalAnterior TemporalPosterior TemporalFW BW FW BWSpanish Silbo Gomerocc change (mmol x mm)All InfantsLHRH	   55	  Islands	  (different	  individuals	  than	  the	  Spanish	  speakers),	  and	  six	  10s	  (+/-­‐	  1s)	  segments	  were	  selected.	  Backwards	  segments	  were	  generated	  using	  Praat	  (Boersma	  &	  Weenink,	  2011).	  	  	  3.3.1.3	   Procedure	  and	  Analyses	  	  The	  procedure	  and	  analyses	  used	  were	  identical	  to	  that	  in	  Experiment	  3.	  	  	  3.3.2	  Results	  	  An	  overall	  main	  effect	  of	  region	  was	  observed	  (F(1,21)=	  16.119,	  p<.01,	  η2p=	  .402):	  across	  all	  language	  conditions	  and	  both	  hemispheres,	  greater	  activation	  occurred	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.047,	  SD=	  0.040)	  than	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions	  (M=	  0.014,	  SD=	  0.040).	  No	  other	  effects	  or	  interactions	  with	  language,	  direction,	  or	  hemisphere	  were	  significant	  (p>.05).	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.6	  Mean	  changes	  in	  oxygenated	  Hb	  observed	  in	  Experiment	  4.	  Error	  bars	  represent	  standard	  error.	  	  	  	  	  -0.02-0.0100.010.020.030.040.050.060.07FW BW FW BWSpanish Silbo Gomerocc change (mm x mmol)Anterior Temporal RegionPosterior Temporal Region* ** * + 	   56	  3.3.3	  Discussion	  	  Based	  on	  previous	  research	  examining	  infants’	  neural	  activation	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  (Shultz	  et	  al.,	  2014),	  in	  Experiment	  4	  it	  was	  hypothesized	  that	  4	  month-­‐old	  infants	  would	  show	  greater	  activation	  to	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  than	  to	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  However,	  a	  different	  pattern	  of	  results	  was	  found,	  in	  which	  similar	  activity	  was	  observed	  to	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  and	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  Activation	  was	  observed	  to	  both	  language	  conditions	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  regions,	  but	  with	  no	  differences	  between	  language	  conditions.	  This	  was	  distinct	  from	  the	  results	  observed	  previously	  with	  newborn	  infants,	  where	  greater	  activation	  occurred	  to	  unfamiliar	  language	  than	  to	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  	  	  One	  potential	  explanation	  for	  these	  results	  is	  that	  at	  4	  months,	  neural	  activation	  in	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  brain	  is	  triggered	  by	  language	  rhythm,	  regardless	  of	  the	  language	  form.	  While	  Spanish	  is	  spoken	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero	  is	  whistled,	  they	  share	  the	  same	  rhythm	  and	  prosody.	  Perhaps	  at	  this	  age,	  infants’	  linguistic	  processing	  is	  focused	  on	  this	  aspect	  of	  language,	  leading	  to	  similar	  neural	  processing	  of	  both	  signals.	  Indeed,	  many	  of	  the	  important	  language	  acquisition	  milestones	  in	  the	  first	  half	  of	  the	  first	  year	  of	  life	  are	  related	  to	  rhythm	  and	  prosody	  (i.e.,	  rhythmic	  discrimination,	  prosodic	  grouping;	  Mehler	  &	  Christophe,	  1994;	  Nazzi,	  Bertoncini,	  &	  Mehler,	  1998;	  Nazzi	  &	  Ramus,	  2003),	  while	  it	  is	  not	  until	  the	  second	  half	  of	  the	  first	  year	  that	  language	  developments	  tend	  to	  relate	  to	  the	  phonetic/phonemic	  patterns	  of	  language	  (i.e.,	  speech	  sound	  discrimination,	  phonotactic	  preferences;	  Werker	  &	  Tees,	  1984,	  Jusczyk	  et	  al.,	  1993).	  	  	  Another	  possibility	  is	  that	  the	  methods	  employed	  did	  not	  have	  sufficient	  sensitivity	  to	  detect	  any	  differences	  in	  neural	  activation	  to	  spoken	  versus	  whistled	  language.	  Recall	  that	  in	  adopting	  our	  methods	  from	  neonates	  to	  four-­‐month-­‐old	  infants,	  we	  shorted	  the	  duration	  of	  our	  language	  stimuli	  from	  15-­‐seconds	  to	  10-­‐seconds	  in	  length.	  Recent	  research	  by	  Cristia	  and	  colleagues	  (Cristia,	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai,	  &	  	   57	  Dupoux,	  2014)	  used	  NIRS	  to	  examine	  neural	  activation	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  in	  neonates,	  and	  unlike	  in	  previous	  research	  (previous	  chapter,	  Shultz	  et	  al.,	  2014),	  found	  no	  differences	  in	  the	  response	  to	  the	  different	  stimuli.	  The	  authors	  suggest	  that	  one	  reason	  this	  might	  be	  the	  case	  was	  that	  they	  used	  stimulation	  periods	  of	  10-­‐seconds,	  while	  previous	  NIRS	  work	  with	  neonates	  has	  used	  longer	  stimulation	  periods	  of	  15+-­‐seconds.	  However	  previous	  NIRS	  studies	  with	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  have	  successfully	  used	  10-­‐second	  language	  stimuli	  to	  detect	  differences	  in	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  (Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  so	  it	  is	  unlikely	  that	  this	  is	  an	  issue	  in	  the	  current	  study.	  	  	   	  	  3.4	   General	  Discussion	  	  In	  Experiment	  3,	  differing	  patterns	  of	  neural	  activation	  were	  observed	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  to	  the	  native	  language	  (English)	  versus	  to	  a	  non-­‐native	  language	  (Spanish).	  While	  activation	  to	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  was	  greater	  in	  anterior	  temporal	  areas	  than	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  areas,	  only	  to	  the	  native	  language	  was	  the	  brain	  response	  lateralized	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere-­‐-­‐	  specifically	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions.	  In	  Experiment	  4,	  similar	  patterns	  of	  neural	  activation	  were	  seen	  to	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  (Spanish)	  as	  well	  as	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  (Silbo	  Gomero).	  Taken	  together,	  these	  results	  indicate	  that	  at	  4	  months	  of	  age,	  the	  infant	  brain	  is	  specialized	  in	  its	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language,	  but	  interestingly,	  analogous	  activation	  is	  triggered	  to	  both	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  and	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  	  	  These	  findings	  are	  quite	  distinct	  from	  those	  observed	  previously	  with	  newborn	  infants	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter.	  In	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants,	  but	  not	  in	  neonates,	  the	  neural	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language	  was	  greater	  in	  the	  left	  hemisphere-­‐-­‐	  similar	  to	  what	  is	  classically	  observed	  in	  the	  adult	  brain.	  This	  developmental	  trend	  suggests	  that	  language	  experience	  may	  be	  necessary	  to	  drive	  the	  lateralization	  of	  language	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere,	  or	  at	  the	  very	  least,	  that	  language	  experience	  makes	  the	  left	  	   58	  lateralization	  to	  speech	  more	  pronounced	  and	  easier	  to	  detect.	  Interestingly,	  the	  left	  lateralization	  found	  in	  4	  month-­‐olds	  was	  specific	  to	  posterior	  temporal	  regions,	  regions	  that	  in	  adults	  are	  thought	  to	  be	  associated	  with	  semantic	  processing	  (Friederici	  &	  Alter,	  2004).	  One	  interpretation	  of	  this	  result	  is	  that	  by	  4	  months,	  infants	  are	  more	  sensitive	  to	  the	  meaning	  or	  meaningfulness	  of	  their	  native	  language,	  and	  it	  is	  this	  aspect	  of	  the	  language	  signal	  that	  drives	  left	  lateralization.	  The	  second	  key	  distinction	  between	  the	  results	  of	  the	  present	  study	  and	  those	  of	  the	  previous	  chapter	  was	  in	  activation	  to	  spoken	  versus	  whistled	  surrogate	  language:	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐olds,	  no	  difference	  was	  seen	  in	  the	  activation	  to	  these	  signals,	  while	  in	  neonates,	  activation	  was	  significantly	  reduced	  to	  the	  whistled	  language	  versus	  to	  the	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language.	  	  	  	  Three	  a	  priori	  hypotheses	  were	  proposed	  regarding	  neural	  activity	  to	  language	  at	  4	  months	  as	  tested	  in	  the	  present	  study.	  First,	  that	  the	  response	  to	  language—and	  the	  native	  language	  in	  particular-­‐-­‐	  would	  become	  more	  lateralized	  to	  the	  left	  hemisphere,	  as	  compared	  to	  the	  bilateral	  activation	  seen	  in	  neonates.	  As	  described	  above,	  this	  hypothesis	  was	  born	  out	  in	  Experiment	  3	  but	  only	  with	  regards	  to	  the	  native	  language.	  While	  activation	  to	  familiar	  language	  was	  greater	  in	  the	  left	  versus	  right	  hemisphere	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions,	  activation	  to	  unfamiliar	  language	  was	  bilateral.	  The	  second	  hypothesis	  raised	  was	  that	  the	  neural	  responses	  to	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  spoken	  languages	  would	  be	  more	  distinct	  at	  4-­‐month	  of	  age	  versus	  that	  previously	  observed	  in	  newborn	  infants,	  given	  older	  infants	  greater	  post-­‐natal	  experience	  with	  their	  native	  language.	  This	  hypothesis	  was	  again	  confirmed	  with	  the	  differential	  lateralization	  results.	  The	  third	  hypothesis	  related	  to	  the	  activation	  seen	  to	  spoken	  versus	  whistled	  surrogate	  language.	  Based	  on	  results	  from	  Shultz	  and	  colleagues	  (Shultz	  et	  al.,	  2014)	  showing	  increased	  specificity	  in	  the	  infant	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  versus	  non-­‐speech	  communicative	  and	  non-­‐communicative	  signals	  between	  1	  and	  4	  months	  of	  age,	  it	  was	  predicted	  in	  the	  present	  study	  that	  there	  would	  be	  greater	  activation	  to	  spoken	  language	  versus	  whistled	  language	  in	  4	  month-­‐olds,	  analogous	  or	  greater	  to	  what	  was	  previously	  observed	  with	  newborn	  infants.	  However,	  in	  the	  present	  study	  it	  was	  found	  that	  similar	  neural	  activity	  was	  	   59	  seen	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  to	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  and	  unfamiliar	  whistled	  language	  	  Several	  possible	  explanations	  exist	  to	  explain	  the	  present	  findings	  regarding	  activation	  to	  spoken	  versus	  whistled	  language.	  First,	  it	  may	  be	  that	  differences	  in	  the	  nature	  of	  the	  stimuli	  used	  in	  the	  current	  study	  (continuous	  speech)	  versus	  those	  employed	  by	  Shultz	  et	  al.	  (individual	  words)	  led	  to	  different	  developmental	  trajectories.	  Relatedly,	  it	  may	  be	  that	  the	  characteristics	  of	  the	  non-­‐speech	  stimuli	  used	  are	  important.	  Whistled	  surrogate	  language,	  used	  in	  the	  present	  study,	  is	  a	  non-­‐speech	  communicative	  signal	  that	  maintains	  the	  rhythm	  and	  prosody	  of	  its	  base	  spoken	  language.	  In	  contrast,	  the	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  employed	  by	  Shultz	  and	  colleagues	  were	  human	  communicative	  vocalizations,	  human	  non-­‐communicative	  vocalizations,	  and	  human	  non-­‐vocal	  sounds.	  None	  of	  these	  sounds	  contain	  any	  of	  the	  rhythmic	  or	  prosodic	  cues	  of	  language.	  This	  difference	  in	  the	  characteristics	  of	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  used	  implies	  that	  perhaps	  the	  language-­‐like	  rhythm	  and	  prosody	  of	  a	  non-­‐speech	  signal	  may	  be	  sufficient	  to	  trigger	  a	  “language”	  response	  in	  the	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  brain,	  while	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  with	  no	  language-­‐like	  rhythm	  and	  prosody	  fail	  to	  elicit	  the	  same	  activation,	  even	  if	  they	  are	  communicative	  and	  produced	  by	  humans.	  Interestingly,	  rhythm	  and	  prosody	  alone	  do	  not	  appear	  sufficient	  to	  trigger	  such	  activation	  in	  the	  neonate	  brain,	  as	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter	  it	  was	  shown	  that	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  elicited	  significantly	  less	  activation	  that	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  in	  newborn	  infants.	  	  	  	  The	  current	  studies	  demonstrate	  the	  necessity	  of	  exploring	  neural	  activation	  to	  speech	  and	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  across	  development.	  One	  important	  area	  for	  future	  research	  will	  be	  to	  further	  explore	  infants’	  neural	  responses	  at	  ages	  older	  than	  4	  months.	  Given	  that	  older	  infants	  will	  have	  increasingly	  more	  experience	  with	  their	  native	  language,	  it	  may	  be	  that	  the	  differential	  activation	  seen	  to	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language	  will	  continue	  to	  diverge	  with	  age.	  Additionally,	  many	  of	  the	  language	  developments	  that	  occur	  later	  in	  infancy	  relate	  to	  infants’	  perception	  of	  the	  sounds	  of	  their	  native	  language,	  such	  as	  with	  perceptual	  narrowing	  for	  	   60	  discrimination	  of	  non-­‐native	  phonemic	  contrasts	  occurring	  between	  6-­‐12	  months	  (Werker	  &	  Tees,	  1984).	  As	  such,	  it	  may	  be	  that	  how	  the	  infant	  brain	  processes	  language	  and	  language-­‐like	  signals	  at	  later	  ages	  is	  driven	  more	  by	  phonetic	  information.	  If	  this	  is	  the	  case,	  it	  might	  be	  predicted	  that	  in	  the	  second	  half	  of	  the	  first	  year	  of	  life,	  infants	  would	  show	  different	  patterns	  of	  brain	  activation	  to	  spoken	  and	  whistled	  language.	  	  	  Another	  avenue	  for	  future	  study	  will	  be	  to	  more	  specifically	  identify	  the	  brain	  regions	  measured	  by	  the	  NIRS	  signal	  in	  the	  current	  studies,	  perhaps	  through	  co-­‐registering	  or	  combining	  NIRS	  data	  with	  MRI	  scans	  (see	  Emberson,	  Richards,	  &	  Aslin,	  2015).	  This	  would	  allow	  for	  better	  comparison	  between	  the	  results	  obtained	  from	  neonates	  and	  4	  month-­‐olds,	  to	  confirm	  that	  the	  same	  approximate	  brain	  regions	  are	  measured	  across	  both	  ages.	  	  	  The	  results	  of	  the	  present	  studies	  illustrate	  the	  impact	  of	  post-­‐natal	  language	  experience	  on	  the	  infant	  brain	  response	  to	  speech.	  Between	  birth	  and	  four	  months	  of	  age,	  several	  changes	  in	  neural	  activity	  to	  language	  appear	  to	  occur.	  The	  brain	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language	  is	  shown	  to	  be	  lateralized	  at	  4	  months	  of	  age,	  versus	  bilateral	  activation	  in	  newborn	  infants.	  Moreover,	  the	  brain	  responses	  to	  spoken	  versus	  whistled	  language	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  shift	  with	  development:	  while	  at	  birth	  greater	  activation	  is	  seen	  to	  unfamiliar	  spoken	  language	  versus	  whistled	  surrogate	  language,	  at	  4	  months,	  equivalent	  activation	  is	  seen	  to	  both	  unfamiliar	  signals.	  Further	  research	  is	  needed	  to	  continue	  to	  examine	  how	  the	  brain	  response	  to	  speech	  and	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  changes	  throughout	  development.	  	  	  	   	  	   61	  4	   Languages	  and	  Faces:	  Infants’	  Expectations	  of	  the	  Speakers	  of	  Native	  and	  Non-­‐Native	  Languages	  	  4.1	   Introduction	  	  Infants’	  early	  sensitivities	  to	  differences	  between	  their	  native	  language	  and	  non-­‐native	  languages	  are	  well	  documented.	  At	  birth,	  infants	  prefer	  to	  listen	  to	  the	  language(s)	  heard	  in	  utero	  over	  rhythmically-­‐distinct	  unfamiliar	  languages	  (Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  Burns,	  &	  Werker,	  2010;	  Mehler	  et	  al.,	  1988),	  and	  by	  4	  months,	  prefer	  their	  native	  language	  even	  to	  a	  rhythmically	  similar	  non-­‐native	  language	  (Bosch	  &	  Sebastian-­‐Galles,	  1997;	  Nazzi,	  Jusczyk,	  &	  Johnson,	  2000).	  As	  demonstrated	  in	  the	  previous	  two	  chapters,	  infants	  show	  different	  patterns	  of	  neural	  activation	  in	  response	  to	  native	  versus	  non-­‐native	  language	  soon	  after	  birth;	  patterns	  that	  become	  more	  distinct	  across	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life	  (see	  also	  May	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Sato	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  At	  9	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  prefer	  to	  listen	  to	  word-­‐forms	  that	  adhere	  to	  their	  native	  language’s	  predominant	  stress	  pattern,	  and	  to	  sequences	  that	  are	  phonotactically	  legal	  in	  their	  native	  language	  (Jusczyk,	  Cutler,	  &	  Redanz,	  1993;	  Jusczyk	  et	  al.,	  1993).	  And	  while	  young	  infants	  are	  able	  to	  discriminate	  between	  virtually	  all	  native	  language	  speech	  sounds,	  by	  10-­‐12	  months,	  they	  often	  have	  difficulty	  doing	  so	  for	  non-­‐native	  language	  speech	  sounds	  not	  used	  to	  contrast	  meaning	  in	  their	  language	  (Saffran,	  Werker,	  &	  Werner,	  2006;	  Werker	  &	  Tees,	  1984).	  Together,	  these	  findings	  illustrate	  that	  from	  early	  in	  development,	  infants	  respond	  differently	  to	  language	  that	  is	  familiar	  to	  them	  versus	  to	  languages	  that	  are	  unfamiliar.	  	  	  However,	  language	  is	  more	  than	  just	  sounds	  and	  sentences—	  its	  primary	  function	  is	  a	  system	  used	  to	  communicate	  between	  individuals.	  As	  a	  social	  signal,	  language	  can	  provide	  information	  about	  it’s	  speakers,	  and	  may	  be	  used	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership.	  Indeed,	  research	  with	  preschool-­‐aged	  children	  has	  revealed	  expectations	  about	  the	  about	  the	  relationship	  between	  language	  use	  and	  social	  categories.	  Hirschfeld	  and	  Gelman	  (1997)	  presented	  3-­‐5	  year-­‐old	  children	  with	  	   62	  pairs	  of	  color	  drawings	  that	  contrasted	  on	  dimensions	  of	  race	  (a	  white	  individual	  vs	  a	  black	  individual),	  clothing	  (an	  individual	  wearing	  western	  apparel	  vs	  an	  individual	  wearing	  traditional	  non-­‐western	  apparel)	  and	  housing	  (a	  house	  with	  western	  architecture	  vs	  a	  house	  with	  non-­‐western	  architecture).	  In	  separate	  trials,	  children	  heard	  segments	  of	  their	  native	  language,	  English,	  or	  an	  unfamiliar	  language,	  Portuguese,	  and	  were	  asked	  to	  indicate	  which	  item	  of	  a	  given	  pair	  of	  images	  corresponded	  with	  the	  voice.	  The	  researchers	  found	  that	  children	  were	  more	  likely	  to	  select	  the	  white	  and	  western	  images	  when	  presented	  with	  English	  versus	  when	  presented	  with	  Portuguese,	  suggesting	  that	  as	  young	  as	  3	  years	  of	  age,	  children	  have	  different	  expectations	  about	  the	  social	  groups	  associated	  with	  their	  native	  language	  versus	  an	  unfamiliar	  language.	  	  	  In	  the	  present	  research	  we	  explored	  whether	  such	  intuitions	  exist	  even	  earlier	  in	  development.	  It	  has	  been	  proposed	  by	  some	  psychologists	  that	  sensitivity	  to	  social	  group	  membership	  is	  a	  system	  of	  core	  cognition,	  such	  that	  infants	  are	  predisposed	  from	  early	  in	  life	  to	  reason	  about	  and	  identify	  social	  categories	  (Kinzler	  &	  Spelke,	  2007;	  Spelke	  and	  Kinzler,	  2007).	  Evidence	  in	  support	  of	  this	  theory	  comes	  from	  work	  showing	  that	  young	  infants	  appear	  to	  respond	  differently	  to	  members	  of	  different	  social	  groups.	  By	  3	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  appear	  better	  able	  to	  discriminate	  between	  the	  faces	  of	  their	  own	  racial	  group	  than	  faces	  of	  a	  less	  familiar	  race	  (Sangrigoli	  &	  de	  Schonen,	  2004),	  and	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  look	  differently	  to	  own-­‐race	  faces	  versus	  other-­‐race	  faces	  (Bar-­‐Haim	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Kelly	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Kelly	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Liu	  et	  al.,	  2015).	  With	  regards	  to	  language	  use,	  studies	  have	  shown	  that	  at	  12	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  scan	  faces	  speaking	  their	  native	  language	  differently	  than	  faces	  speaking	  a	  non-­‐native	  language,	  looking	  proportionally	  more	  to	  the	  mouth	  than	  to	  the	  eyes	  of	  a	  native	  language	  speaker	  and	  more	  to	  the	  mouth	  than	  to	  the	  eyes	  of	  a	  non-­‐native	  language	  speaker	  (Kubicek	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Lewkowicz	  &	  Hansen-­‐Tift,	  2012).	  Moreover,	  young	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  prefer	  individuals	  who	  have	  spoken	  their	  native	  language:	  at	  5	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  look	  more	  to	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  their	  native	  language	  versus	  to	  an	  individual	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  an	  unfamiliar	  language,	  and	  at	  10	  months,	  	   63	  prefer	  to	  take	  a	  toy	  from	  a	  speaker	  who	  has	  previously	  spoken	  their	  language	  (Kinzler,	  Dupoux,	  &	  Spelke,	  2007;	  see	  also	  Buttelman	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Soley	  &	  Sebastian-­‐Galles,	  2015).	  	  Yet	  beyond	  this	  demonstration	  of	  preference,	  little	  is	  known	  about	  the	  expectations	  young	  infants	  have	  of	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  speakers.	  If	  infants’	  sensitivity	  to	  language	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership	  extends	  beyond	  preference	  for	  the	  familiar,	  it	  might	  be	  predicted	  that	  they	  expect	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  different	  languages	  to	  be	  distinct	  in	  other	  ways.	  A	  recent	  study	  by	  Uttley	  and	  colleagues	  (Uttley	  et	  al.,	  2013)	  examined	  whether	  this	  is	  the	  case,	  asking	  if	  infants	  differentially	  associate	  their	  native	  language	  and	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  individuals	  of	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  ethnicities.	  Using	  a	  between-­‐subjects	  design,	  researchers	  presented	  6	  month-­‐old	  English-­‐exposed	  infants	  with	  either	  Caucasian	  or	  Asian	  faces	  paired	  with	  English	  and	  Mandarin	  language.	  Results	  showed	  that	  infants	  who	  viewed	  Asian	  faces	  looked	  longer	  when	  the	  faces	  were	  paired	  with	  Mandarin	  versus	  when	  paired	  with	  English,	  but	  that	  infants	  who	  viewed	  Caucasian	  faces	  looked	  similarly	  across	  languages.	  The	  authors	  interpret	  these	  findings	  as	  evidence	  that	  the	  infants	  tested	  were	  sensitive	  to	  a	  relationship	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity,	  particularly	  for	  unfamiliar	  language	  and	  an	  unfamiliar	  ethnicity.	  However,	  multiple	  explanations	  exist	  for	  how	  infants	  come	  to	  perceive	  a	  relationship	  between	  Mandarin	  and	  Asian	  faces.	  Many	  Mandarin	  speaking	  individuals	  are	  of	  Asian	  descent,	  such	  that	  infants	  may	  have	  been	  exposed	  to	  this	  particular	  language-­‐ethnicity	  pairing.	  Thus,	  one	  possibility	  is	  that	  infants’	  association	  between	  Asian	  faces	  and	  Mandarin	  language	  as	  observed	  in	  Uttley	  et	  al.	  is	  the	  result	  of	  a	  specific	  learned	  pairing.	  A	  second	  and	  equally	  likely	  explanation	  is	  that	  infants	  may	  have	  used	  a	  more	  general	  bias	  in	  which	  they	  associate	  any	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  any	  unfamiliar	  (or	  less	  familiar)	  ethnicity,	  which	  would	  also	  result	  in	  the	  observed	  pattern	  of	  looking.	  	  	  The	  present	  set	  of	  studies	  was	  designed	  to	  explore	  infants’	  expectations	  about	  the	  ethnicity	  of	  individuals	  associated	  with	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  languages,	  as	  well	  as	  	   64	  to	  examine	  the	  ontogeny	  of	  such	  expectations.	  Experiment	  5	  first	  tested	  English-­‐exposed	  Caucasian	  6	  and	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants’	  associations	  between	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  individuals	  and	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  language.	  Experiment	  6	  then	  investigated	  the	  origins	  of	  observed	  language-­‐ethnicity	  associations	  at	  11	  months,	  while	  Experiment	  7	  consisted	  of	  a	  replication	  of	  the	  11	  month-­‐olds	  tested	  in	  Experiment	  5,	  providing	  a	  larger	  sample	  of	  infants	  with	  which	  to	  explore	  further	  analyses	  on	  the	  role	  of	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  different	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  and	  on	  infants’	  looking	  to	  areas	  of	  interest	  within	  the	  face	  stimuli.	  	  	  4.2	   Experiment	  5	  	  As	  described	  above,	  a	  recent	  study	  by	  Uttley	  and	  colleagues	  (2013)	  found	  that	  6	  month-­‐old	  infants	  looked	  more	  to	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Mandarian	  language	  versus	  when	  paired	  with	  English.	  Experiment	  5	  readdressed	  and	  expanded	  on	  this	  finding,	  testing	  infants	  of	  two	  ages	  (6	  and	  11	  months)	  with	  a	  different	  set	  of	  languages	  (English	  and	  Cantonese).	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  were	  selected	  as	  both	  languages	  are	  spoken	  in	  the	  city	  in	  which	  infants	  were	  tested:	  approximately	  68%	  of	  the	  population	  report	  speaking	  primarily	  English,	  while	  approximately	  6%	  report	  speaking	  primarily	  Cantonese	  (Statistics	  Canada,	  2012).	  Additionally,	  a	  different	  procedure	  from	  Uttley	  et	  al.	  was	  employed.	  Instead	  of	  a	  between-­‐subjects	  design	  where	  infants	  only	  saw	  faces	  of	  one	  ethnicity	  or	  heard	  only	  one	  language,	  all	  infants	  in	  Experiment	  5	  heard	  segments	  of	  both	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  while	  viewing	  paired	  presentations	  of	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  such	  that	  associations	  between	  both	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  could	  be	  examined	  within	  subjects.	  	  Evidence	  from	  past	  research	  has	  indicated	  that	  infants’	  patterns	  of	  looking	  to	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  race	  faces	  change	  across	  age.	  When	  3	  month-­‐old	  infants	  are	  presented	  with	  pairs	  of	  own-­‐race	  and	  other-­‐race	  faces,	  they	  typically	  show	  a	  preference	  for	  own-­‐race	  faces	  (Bar-­‐Haim	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Kelly	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  However,	  recent	  work	  has	  indicated	  that	  in	  the	  same	  type	  of	  preferential	  looking	  task,	  slightly	  	   65	  older	  infants	  at	  6	  months	  of	  age	  look	  for	  equal	  amounts	  of	  time	  at	  own-­‐race	  versus	  other-­‐race	  faces,	  and	  at	  9	  months,	  infants	  look	  more	  at	  other-­‐race	  versus	  own-­‐race	  faces	  (Liu	  et	  al.,	  2015).	  This	  developmental	  trajectory	  has	  been	  interpreted	  such	  that	  as	  infants	  develop,	  they	  gain	  greater	  experience	  with	  and	  become	  more	  familiar	  with	  own-­‐race	  faces.	  Thus	  when	  presented	  with	  pairs	  of	  own-­‐	  and	  other-­‐race	  faces,	  older	  infants	  become	  more	  likely	  to	  show	  a	  novelty	  preference	  for	  other-­‐race	  faces,	  versus	  the	  familiarity	  preference	  for	  own-­‐race	  faces	  seen	  in	  younger	  infants.	  Support	  for	  this	  interpretation	  comes	  from	  studies	  showing	  a	  similar	  developmental	  pattern	  with	  infants’	  looking	  to	  familiar	  versus	  novel	  objects	  (Houston-­‐Price	  &	  Nakai,	  2004).	  	  	  For	  the	  6	  month-­‐old	  infants	  tested	  in	  Experiment	  5,	  it	  was	  predicted	  that	  overall	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  would	  follow	  that	  of	  Liu	  et	  al.	  (2015),	  with	  infants	  looking	  equally	  at	  both	  races.	  For	  the	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants,	  no	  research	  to	  date	  has	  examined	  infants’	  preferential	  looking	  to	  a	  paired	  presentation	  of	  own-­‐race	  versus	  other-­‐race	  faces	  with	  infants	  at	  this	  age.	  Still,	  Liu	  and	  colleagues	  found	  that	  at	  9	  months,	  infants	  look	  more	  to	  other-­‐race	  faces	  than	  to	  own-­‐race	  faces.	  The	  same	  pattern	  of	  looking	  was	  therefore	  predicted	  for	  11	  month-­‐olds	  in	  the	  present	  study.	  The	  critical	  variable	  of	  interest	  for	  both	  ages,	  however,	  was	  how	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  would	  vary	  when	  faces	  were	  paired	  with	  English	  (familiar	  language)	  as	  compared	  with	  Cantonese	  (unfamiliar	  language).	  It	  was	  predicted	  that	  if	  infants	  have	  different	  expectations	  about	  the	  speakers	  and	  individuals	  associated	  with	  English	  and	  Cantonese,	  they	  would	  show	  different	  patterns	  of	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  the	  two	  languages.	  	  	  	   	  	   66	  4.2.1	  Methods	  	  4.2.1.1	   Participants	  	  Sixteen	  full-­‐term	  6	  month-­‐old	  infants	  (6	  Male,	  10	  Female;	  Mage=	  6m,18d,	  Age	  Range:	  5m,12d	  –	  7m,18d)	  and	  sixteen	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  (7	  male,	  9	  female;	  Mage	  =	  11m,7d,	  Age	  range:	  10m,18d	  –	  12m,8d)	  were	  included	  in	  Experiment	  5.	  Infants	  were	  initially	  recruited	  through	  contact	  with	  parents	  at	  the	  local	  maternity	  hospital	  and	  community	  referral,	  and	  were	  invited	  to	  participate	  in	  the	  present	  study	  when	  the	  infant	  reached	  the	  target	  age	  range.	  	  	  All	  infants	  were	  reported	  by	  their	  parent(s)	  to	  be	  hearing	  English	  at	  least	  90%	  of	  the	  time,	  and	  were	  of	  Caucasian/European	  ancestry.	  Eleven	  additional	  infants	  were	  tested	  but	  excluded	  from	  final	  analyses	  due	  to	  fussiness	  (3),	  poor	  calibration	  (4),	  experimenter	  error	  (1),	  or	  technical	  issues	  with	  the	  eyetracker	  (3).	  	  	  4.2.1.2	   Stimuli	  	  Two	  18-­‐second	  segments	  of	  each	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  were	  used	  as	  language	  stimuli.	  For	  each	  language,	  two	  female	  native	  speakers	  (two	  speakers	  of	  English	  and	  two	  Cantonese	  speakers)	  were	  recorded	  reading	  the	  English-­‐Chinese	  bilingual	  children’s	  book	  “The	  Mouse	  Bride”	  in	  a	  child-­‐directed	  manner.	  All	  speakers	  were	  of	  approximately	  the	  same	  age	  (early-­‐mid	  20s).	  From	  each	  speaker’s	  recordings,	  one	  18-­‐second	  segment	  comprising	  an	  uninterrupted	  utterance	  was	  selected.	  The	  two	  segments	  of	  each	  language	  were	  chosen	  such	  that	  they	  did	  not	  contain	  the	  same	  portion	  of	  the	  story.	  	  Pictures	  were	  taken	  of	  two	  Caucasian	  females	  and	  two	  East	  Asian	  (Chinese	  descent)	  females	  to	  be	  used	  as	  face	  stimuli.	  All	  four	  individuals	  were	  of	  approximately	  the	  same	  age	  (early-­‐mid	  20s),	  and	  were	  photographed	  wearing	  the	  same	  neutral-­‐	   67	  colored	  t-­‐shirt	  against	  a	  white	  background.	  None	  of	  the	  individuals	  used	  for	  face	  stimuli	  were	  the	  same	  speakers	  used	  for	  language	  stimuli.	  	  	  4.2.1.3	   Procedure	  	  Infants	  were	  tested	  in	  a	  darkened	  sound-­‐attenuated	  room,	  seated	  on	  the	  lap	  of	  their	  parent	  or	  caregiver,	  approximately	  90cm	  in	  from	  of	  a	  NEC	  99x56cm	  television	  screen.	  Parents/caregivers	  wore	  darkened	  sunglasses	  to	  limit	  any	  influence	  on	  their	  child’s	  reaction.	  Visual	  images	  were	  presented	  to	  the	  infant	  on	  the	  television	  screen,	  and	  auditory	  stimuli	  were	  played	  though	  Altec	  Lansing	  speakers	  situated	  on	  either	  side	  of	  the	  television	  screen	  so	  they	  would	  be	  perceived	  as	  presented	  at	  mid-­‐line.	  The	  speakers	  were	  hidden	  from	  the	  infant’s	  view	  by	  a	  black	  curtain,	  and	  played	  language	  stimuli	  at	  approximately	  65dB.	  An	  experimenter	  controlled	  the	  experiment	  from	  a	  laptop	  computer	  running	  PsyScope.	  Infants’	  looking	  times	  to	  the	  visual	  stimuli	  were	  collected	  via	  a	  Tobii	  X60	  eyetracker,	  placed	  approximately	  66cm	  in	  front	  of	  the	  infant,	  and	  recorded	  on	  the	  Tobii	  Studio	  program.	  	  	  Prior	  to	  beginning	  the	  experimental	  procedure,	  the	  infant’s	  eye	  gaze	  was	  calibrated	  using	  the	  Tobii	  Studio	  5-­‐point	  infant	  calibration.	  After	  calibration,	  a	  14-­‐second	  pre-­‐test	  trial	  consisting	  of	  a	  checkerboard	  and	  a	  ringing	  bell	  sound	  occurred,	  to	  accustom	  infants	  to	  the	  presentation	  of	  sounds	  and	  images.	  Infants	  were	  then	  presented	  with	  up	  to	  16	  experimental	  trials	  in	  a	  counterbalanced	  order.	  	  	  Each	  experimental	  trial	  began	  with	  one	  of	  the	  English	  or	  Cantonese	  language	  segments	  playing	  in	  conjunction	  with	  a	  video	  of	  a	  looming	  ball	  for	  4	  seconds.	  The	  display	  size	  of	  the	  ball	  video	  was	  72x56cm.	  After	  4	  seconds,	  the	  language	  segment	  continued	  to	  play,	  and	  the	  infant	  was	  presented	  with	  a	  still	  image	  of	  a	  pair	  of	  faces	  on	  the	  television	  screen.	  Each	  face	  pair	  consisted	  of	  one	  Caucasian	  face	  and	  one	  Asian	  face,	  with	  location	  to	  the	  left/right	  of	  the	  screen	  counterbalanced.	  Faces	  were	  presented	  on	  a	  black	  background,	  and	  were	  25cm	  by	  26cm	  in	  size	  and	  located	  11cm	  apart	  as	  viewed	  on	  the	  television	  screen.	  Language	  and	  face	  stimuli	  were	  presented	  	   68	  together	  for	  14	  seconds	  (thus	  the	  4	  second	  looming	  ball	  presentation	  plus	  the	  face	  presentation	  comprised	  the	  entire	  18	  second	  language	  segment).	  Between	  each	  trial,	  an	  attention-­‐getting	  video	  (a	  bouncing	  ball)	  was	  shown	  until	  the	  experimenter	  deemed	  the	  infant	  was	  attentive	  and	  looking	  at	  the	  screen.	  At	  the	  end	  of	  16	  experimental	  trials,	  a	  final	  post-­‐test	  trial	  occurred,	  consisting	  of	  the	  same	  checkerboard	  and	  ringing	  bell	  sound	  used	  in	  the	  pre-­‐test	  trial.	  	  	  Figure	  4.1	  Schematic	  of	  an	  experimental	  trial	  in	  Experiments	  5,	  6,	  &	  7.	  Infants	  heard	  language	  (either	  familiar	  or	  unfamiliar)	  for	  18	  seconds.	  For	  the	  first	  4	  seconds,	  language	  was	  presented	  with	  an	  attention-­‐getting	  looming	  ball,	  and	  for	  the	  final	  14	  seconds,	  with	  a	  static	  pair	  of	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces.	  	  	  	  	  	  Sixteen	  test	  orders	  were	  counterbalanced	  across	  infants.	  Each	  order	  consisted	  of	  two	  blocks	  of	  8	  trials,	  in	  which	  the	  second	  block	  was	  a	  repetition	  of	  the	  first	  block	  except	  that	  the	  left/right	  locations	  of	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  face	  pairs	  were	  swapped.	  Within	  each	  block,	  there	  were	  four	  English	  and	  four	  Cantonese	  trials	  presented	  in	  one	  of	  two	  counterbalanced	  orders	  (English-­‐Cantonese-­‐English-­‐Cantonese-­‐Cantonese-­‐English-­‐Cantonese-­‐English	  or	  Cantonese-­‐English-­‐Cantonese-­‐English-­‐	   69	  English-­‐Cantonese-­‐English-­‐Cantonese),	  and	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  were	  each	  located	  on	  the	  left	  and	  right	  sides	  of	  the	  screen	  four	  times	  in	  one	  of	  two	  counterbalanced	  orders	  (Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R-­‐Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R	  -­‐Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R-­‐Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R	  -­‐Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R	  -­‐Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R	  -­‐Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R	  -­‐Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R	  or	  Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R	  -­‐Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R	  -­‐Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R	  -­‐Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R	  -­‐Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R	  -­‐Asian	  L/Caucasian	  R	  -­‐Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R	  -­‐Caucasian	  L/Asian	  R).	  	  	  Following	  the	  experimental	  procedure,	  parents	  were	  given	  a	  questionnaire	  that	  assessed	  their	  child’s	  exposure	  to	  different	  languages	  and	  ethnicities.	  Parents	  were	  asked	  whether	  there	  were	  any	  non-­‐English	  speaking	  and	  non-­‐Caucasian	  family	  members,	  caregivers,	  and/or	  friends	  in	  their	  child’s	  life,	  and	  to	  provide	  estimates	  of	  how	  often	  and	  for	  how	  long	  the	  child	  saw	  these	  individuals.	  The	  questionnaire	  also	  inquired	  about	  the	  language	  and	  ethnic	  makeup	  of	  any	  baby	  groups	  attended,	  and	  of	  the	  family’s	  current	  and	  past	  neighborhoods	  (See	  Appendix	  A	  for	  a	  copy	  of	  the	  questionnaire).	  After	  answering	  these	  questions,	  parents	  were	  asked	  for	  overall	  estimates	  for	  the	  average	  percentage	  of	  how	  often	  their	  child	  heard	  English	  versus	  other	  languages,	  and	  how	  often	  their	  child	  was	  saw	  Caucasian	  individuals	  versus	  individuals	  of	  other	  ethnicities.	  	  	  Finally,	  parents	  of	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  completed	  the	  Level	  I	  MacArthur-­‐Bates	  Short-­‐form	  Vocabulary	  Checklist	  for	  their	  infant	  (Fenson	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  Parents	  of	  6	  month-­‐old	  infants	  did	  not	  complete	  this	  form,	  as	  it	  was	  not	  anticipated	  that	  infants	  at	  this	  age	  would	  have	  sizeable	  vocabularies.	  	  4.2.1.4	   Analyses	  	  	  While	  the	  study	  was	  initially	  designed	  for	  infants	  to	  view	  16	  trials	  in	  total,	  many	  infants	  were	  unable	  to	  complete	  all	  16	  trials	  due	  to	  fussiness.	  As	  the	  second	  block	  of	  8	  trials	  was	  a	  repetition	  of	  the	  first	  8	  trials,	  only	  results	  from	  the	  first	  8	  trials	  were	  	   70	  analyzed,	  and	  infants	  who	  completed	  8	  or	  more	  trials	  were	  included	  in	  the	  final	  analysis.	  	  The	  primary	  dependent	  variable	  was	  infants’	  proportion	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  during	  English	  versus	  Cantonese	  trials.	  To	  calculate	  proportion	  looking,	  infants’	  total	  length	  of	  fixations	  to	  each	  face	  within	  each	  trial	  was	  collected,	  using	  the	  Tobii	  Fixation	  Filter.	  Trials	  were	  discarded	  from	  analysis	  if	  the	  total	  fixation	  length	  to	  each	  face	  was	  less	  than	  1	  second.	  Proportion	  of	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  was	  computed	  as	  a	  ratio	  of	  fixation	  length	  to	  each	  face	  type	  divided	  by	  total	  fixation	  length	  to	  both	  faces,	  and	  then	  averaged	  across	  all	  remaining	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  trials	  for	  each	  infant.	  	  	  4.2.2	  Results	  	  A	  2x2x2	  repeated	  measures	  ANOVA	  was	  conducted	  to	  examine	  infants’	  proportion	  looking	  for	  the	  factors	  of	  language	  (English	  vs.	  Spanish)	  and	  ethnicity	  (Caucasian	  vs.	  Asian	  faces)	  across	  both	  age	  groups	  (6	  vs.	  11	  months).	  This	  analysis	  revealed	  a	  significant	  3-­‐way	  interaction	  between	  language,	  ethnicity,	  and	  age,	  p=.004,	  η2p=.250.	  Follow-­‐up	  analyses	  were	  then	  conducted	  on	  each	  age	  group	  individually.	  	  For	  6	  month-­‐old	  infants,	  a	  significant	  main	  effect	  of	  ethnicity	  was	  observed,	  p=.019,	  η2p=.314,	  such	  that	  infants	  looked	  more	  at	  Asian	  (M=	  0.550,	  SD=	  0.076)	  versus	  Caucasian	  (M=	  0.450,	  SD=	  0.076)	  faces.	  However,	  the	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity	  was	  not	  significant,	  p=.601,	  η2p=.019.	  	  	  For	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants,	  there	  was	  again	  a	  significant	  main	  effect	  of	  ethnicity	  (p=.028,	  η2p=.283),	  such	  that	  infants	  looked	  proportionally	  more	  overall	  to	  Asian	  (M=	  0.543,	  SD=	  0.072)	  versus	  Caucasian	  (M=.0457,	  SD=	  0.072)	  faces.	  The	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity	  was	  also	  significant,	  p=.001,	  η2p=.541.	  Follow	  up	  paired	  t-­‐tests	  revealed	  that	  while	  there	  was	  no	  difference	  in	  proportion	  looking	  to	  	   71	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  in	  English	  language	  trials	  (p=.985,	  d<.001),	  in	  Cantonese	  language	  trials	  infants	  looked	  significantly	  more	  to	  the	  Asian	  (M=	  0.587,	  SD=	  0.079)	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  (M=	  0.413,	  SD=	  0.079)	  (p=.001,	  d=.257).	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.2	  Results	  from	  Experiment	  5.	  Six	  month-­‐olds	  showed	  no	  difference	  in	  the	  pattern	  of	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  and	  Cantonese.	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  looked	  significantly	  more	  to	  Asian	  faces	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  (p=.001),	  but	  not	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  (p=.985).	  	  	  	  4.2.3	  Discussion	  	  In	  Experiment	  5,	  6	  month-­‐old	  infants	  were	  found	  to	  look	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  overall,	  but	  did	  not	  show	  a	  difference	  in	  looking	  to	  the	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  versus	  Cantonese	  language.	  Eleven	  month-­‐old	  infants	  similarly	  showed	  greater	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces,	  but	  in	  contrast	  to	  6	  month-­‐olds,	  looked	  differently	  at	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  and	  Cantonese.	  Specifically,	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  looked	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  hearing	  Cantonese,	  while	  when	  hearing	  English,	  infants	  looked	  similarly	  00.10.20.30.40.50.60.7English Cantonese English Cantonese6 months 11 monthsProportion of Total Fixation Length CaucasianAsian	   72	  to	  Asian	  and	  Caucasian	  faces.	  This	  data	  indicates	  that	  at	  11	  months—but	  not	  at	  6	  months-­‐-­‐	  infants	  perceive	  a	  relationship	  between	  Asian	  individuals	  and	  Cantonese	  language,	  or	  alternatively,	  a	  lack	  of	  a	  relationship	  between	  Caucasian	  individuals	  and	  Cantonese.	  Due	  to	  the	  nature	  of	  the	  proportion	  looking	  data	  used	  (in	  which	  infants’	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  are	  not	  independent),	  it	  is	  impossible	  to	  tease	  apart	  these	  two	  interpretations	  of	  the	  results	  based	  on	  the	  current	  study.	  	  Interestingly,	  the	  results	  with	  6	  month-­‐olds	  from	  the	  present	  study	  differ	  from	  those	  of	  Uttley	  et	  al.	  (2013),	  in	  which	  infants	  of	  the	  same	  age	  were	  found	  to	  look	  longer	  at	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Mandarin	  versus	  with	  English.	  One	  possibility	  that	  may	  explain	  this	  discrepancy	  is	  that	  perhaps	  the	  infants	  tested	  by	  Uttley	  and	  colleagues	  had	  more	  exposure	  to	  Mandarin-­‐speaking	  Asian	  individuals	  than	  the	  infants	  in	  the	  current	  study	  had	  to	  Cantonese-­‐speaking	  Asian	  individuals,	  or	  had	  such	  exposure	  at	  a	  younger	  age,	  and	  thus	  were	  sensitive	  to	  this	  language-­‐ethnicity	  pairing	  at	  an	  earlier	  age.	  As	  no	  information	  was	  provided	  on	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  other-­‐race	  faces	  and	  non-­‐native	  languages	  in	  Uttley	  et	  al.,	  additional	  research	  is	  needed	  to	  examine	  this	  prospect.	  	  	  Regardless,	  the	  data	  from	  Experiment	  5	  suggest	  that	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  are	  sensitive	  to	  a	  relationship	  between	  Asian	  individuals	  and	  Cantonese	  language.	  However,	  these	  findings	  of	  Experiment	  5	  still	  leave	  unanswered	  the	  question	  of	  how	  infants	  come	  to	  be	  sensitive	  to	  the	  relationships	  between	  languages	  and	  ethnicities.	  As	  described	  previously,	  it	  may	  be	  that	  infants	  only	  perceive	  specific	  associations	  that	  are	  based	  upon	  the	  language-­‐ethnicity	  pairings	  they	  have	  encountered	  in	  their	  environment.	  Indeed,	  the	  vast	  majority	  of	  Cantonese	  speakers	  are	  of	  Asian	  ethnicity.	  Moreover,	  the	  infants	  tested	  in	  the	  current	  set	  of	  studies	  are	  from	  a	  community	  with	  a	  large	  Asian	  population	  (approximately	  28%	  of	  the	  population	  are	  of	  East	  and	  Southeast	  Asian	  descent;	  Statistics	  Canada,	  2012),	  many	  of	  whom	  speak	  Cantonese.	  It	  is	  not	  unreasonable	  that	  infants	  raised	  in	  this	  environment	  might	  come	  to	  detect	  a	  correlation	  between	  Asian	  individuals	  and	  Cantonese	  from	  their	  daily	  experiences,	  and	  use	  this	  knowledge	  to	  direct	  looking	  in	  Experiment	  5.	  Alternatively,	  it	  may	  be	  	   73	  that	  infants	  rely	  on	  a	  more	  general	  bias	  to	  associate	  any	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  any	  unfamiliar	  ethnicity.	  Experiment	  6	  was	  thus	  designed	  to	  distinguish	  these	  possibilities.	  	  	  4.3	   Experiment	  6	  	  Results	  from	  Experiment	  5	  demonstrated	  that	  infants	  at	  11	  months—but	  not	  at	  6	  months-­‐-­‐	  differentially	  associate	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  language	  with	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces,	  looking	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  language.	  To	  examine	  whether	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants’	  association	  between	  Asian	  faces	  and	  Cantonese	  is	  the	  result	  of	  a	  specific	  learned	  association	  based	  on	  actual	  language-­‐ethnicity	  pairings	  in	  the	  infants’	  environment	  versus	  the	  result	  of	  a	  broader	  bias	  to	  associate	  any	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  individuals	  of	  an	  unfamiliar	  ethnicity,	  Experiment	  6	  was	  conducted.	  Experiment	  6	  employed	  the	  same	  methodology	  as	  Experiment	  5,	  except	  that	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  were	  paired	  with	  English	  and	  Spanish	  language.	  In	  contrast	  to	  Cantonese,	  very	  few	  Asian	  individuals	  speak	  Spanish	  –	  particularly	  in	  the	  community	  in	  which	  these	  infants	  are	  being	  tested,	  making	  it	  improbable	  that	  any	  association	  infants	  demonstrate	  between	  these	  faces	  and	  languages	  is	  due	  to	  specific	  experience.	  Thus,	  testing	  infants’	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  and	  Spanish	  allows	  us	  to	  explore	  the	  specificity	  of	  infants’	  expectations	  of	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  different	  languages,	  examining	  whether	  infants	  expect	  any	  unfamiliar	  language	  (ie,	  Spanish)	  to	  be	  associated	  with	  other-­‐race	  faces,	  or	  if	  infants	  have	  instead	  learned	  specific	  race-­‐language	  pairings	  from	  their	  environment.	  Based	  on	  the	  results	  of	  the	  previous	  study,	  only	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  were	  tested	  in	  Experiment	  6.	  	  	  	   	  	   74	  4.3.1	  Methods	  	  4.3.1.1	   Participants	  	  Data	  from	  16	  11-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  was	  included	  in	  Experiment	  6	  (6	  male,	  10	  female;	  Mage=	  11m,5d	  ,	  Age	  range:	  10m,16d	  –	  11m,29d).	  Infants	  were	  recruited	  in	  the	  same	  manner	  as	  Studies	  3a.	  All	  infants	  were	  reported	  by	  their	  parent(s)	  as	  hearing	  English	  at	  least	  90%	  of	  the	  time,	  and	  were	  of	  Caucasian/European	  ancestry.	  Four	  additional	  infants	  were	  tested,	  but	  were	  excluded	  from	  final	  analyses	  due	  to	  fussiness	  (2)	  or	  technical	  errors	  with	  the	  eyetracker	  (2).	  	  	  4.3.1.2	   Stimuli	  	  	  The	  stimuli	  used	  in	  Experiment	  6	  were	  the	  same	  as	  in	  Studies	  3a,	  except	  that	  Cantonese	  language	  stimuli	  were	  replaced	  by	  Spanish	  language	  stimuli.	  To	  create	  the	  Spanish	  stimuli,	  two	  female	  native	  Spanish	  speakers	  (early-­‐mid	  20s)	  were	  recorded	  reading	  Spanish	  translations	  of	  the	  children’s	  story	  The	  Mouse	  Bride	  in	  a	  child-­‐directed	  manner.	  From	  these	  recordings,	  one	  18-­‐second	  segment	  was	  chosen	  from	  each	  speaker,	  such	  that	  the	  segments	  did	  not	  overlap	  in	  content.	  	  	  4.2.1.3	   Procedure	  	  	  The	  same	  procedure	  used	  in	  Experiment	  5	  was	  employed,	  except	  that	  Cantonese	  language	  trials	  were	  replaced	  with	  Spanish	  language.	  	  	  4.2.2	  	   Results	  	  A	  2x2	  repeated	  measures	  ANOVA	  was	  conducted	  on	  infants’	  proportion	  looking	  time	  over	  the	  factors	  of	  language	  (English,	  Spanish)	  and	  ethnicity	  (Caucasian,	  Asian	  faces).	  A	  main	  effect	  of	  ethnicity	  was	  observed,	  p=.001,	  η2p=.509,	  such	  that	  infants	  looked	  overall	  more	  to	  Asian	  (M=	  0.561,	  SD=	  0.060)	  versus	  Caucasian	  (M=	  0.439,	  	   75	  SD=0.060)	  faces.	  The	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity	  was	  not	  significant,	  p=.741,	  η2p=.008	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.3	  Results	  from	  Experiment	  6.	  While	  11	  month-­‐olds	  looked	  significantly	  more	  at	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  overall	  (p=.001),	  no	  interaction	  was	  found	  with	  language	  (p=.741).	  	  	  	  To	  compare	  the	  effects	  in	  Experiment	  6	  with	  those	  observed	  in	  Experiment	  5,	  an	  ANOVA	  was	  conducted	  for	  infants’	  proportion	  looking	  across	  language	  and	  ethnicity	  with	  study	  as	  a	  between-­‐subject	  factor.	  A	  significant	  3-­‐way	  interaction	  was	  observed	  between	  language,	  ethnicity,	  and	  study,	  p=.005,	  η2p=.238.	  Follow	  up	  analyses	  examined	  effects	  separately	  for	  English	  language	  trials	  and	  unfamiliar	  language	  trials	  (Spanish	  for	  Experiment	  6	  vs	  Cantonese	  for	  Experiment	  5).	  For	  English	  language	  trials,	  there	  was	  a	  significant	  effect	  of	  ethnicity	  by	  study,	  p=.040,	  η2p=.133,	  such	  that	  infants	  looked	  proportionally	  more	  at	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  in	  Experiment	  6	  but	  not	  in	  Experiment	  5.	  In	  contrast,	  for	  unfamiliar	  language	  trials,	  there	  was	  no	  effect	  of	  study,	  p=.259,	  η2p=.042.	  	  	  	   	  00.10.20.30.40.50.60.7English SpanishProportion of Total Fixation Length CaucAsian	   76	  4.2.3	  Discussion	  	  The	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  tested	  in	  Experiment	  6	  did	  not	  show	  any	  difference	  in	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  versus	  when	  paired	  with	  Spanish.	  This	  contrasts	  with	  the	  results	  from	  Experiment	  5	  in	  which	  infants	  looked	  differentially	  at	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  versus	  Cantonese.	  These	  findings	  imply	  that	  infants	  do	  not	  simply	  associate	  any	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  faces	  of	  an	  unfamiliar	  or	  less-­‐familiar	  race.	  Instead,	  the	  findings	  observed	  in	  Experiment	  5	  in	  infants’	  greater	  looking	  to	  Asian	  faces	  with	  Cantonese	  language	  infants	  appears	  to	  be	  the	  result	  of	  a	  specific	  learned	  association	  based	  on	  the	  language-­‐ethnicity	  pairings	  infants	  see	  in	  their	  environment.	  	  4.4	   Experiment	  7	  	  Experiments	  5	  and	  6	  provided	  evidence	  that	  at	  11	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  are	  sensitive	  to	  an	  association	  between	  Cantonese	  language	  and	  Asian	  individuals	  but	  not	  to	  an	  association	  between	  Spanish	  language	  and	  Asian	  individuals.	  Given	  that	  the	  infants	  tested	  are	  from	  a	  metropolitan	  area	  with	  a	  large	  Cantonese-­‐speaking	  Asian	  population	  and	  very	  few	  Spanish-­‐speaking	  Asian	  individuals,	  this	  pattern	  of	  results	  suggests	  that	  the	  infants	  tested	  may	  have	  determined	  a	  specific	  language-­‐ethnicity	  association	  based	  on	  their	  surrounding	  environment.	  However,	  there	  is	  likely	  to	  be	  significant	  variation	  among	  infants	  in	  the	  amount	  of	  exposure	  they	  have	  to	  different	  languages	  and	  ethnicities,	  and	  from	  the	  previous	  studies	  it	  is	  unclear	  how	  much	  this	  individual	  experience	  may	  impact	  infants’	  sensitivity	  to	  the	  Cantonese-­‐Asian	  association.	  	  	  Previous	  research	  has	  shown	  that	  infants’	  experience	  can	  impact	  their	  responses	  to	  social	  groups.	  In	  Bar-­‐Haim	  et	  al.	  (2006),	  while	  3	  month-­‐old	  infants	  who	  were	  raised	  as	  part	  of	  a	  majority	  ethnicity	  in	  their	  community	  showed	  a	  preference	  for	  same-­‐race	  faces,	  infants	  of	  the	  same	  age	  who	  were	  part	  of	  a	  minority	  ethnicity	  and	  had	  frequent	  exposure	  to	  another	  ethnic	  group	  showed	  no	  such	  preference.	  Additionally,	  	   77	  recent	  work	  by	  Ellis	  and	  colleagues	  (Ellis,	  Xiao,	  Lee,	  &	  Oakes,	  under	  review)	  has	  found	  that	  6-­‐8	  month-­‐old	  infants	  from	  a	  more	  ethnically	  diverse	  community	  versus	  from	  a	  less	  ethnically	  diverse	  community	  show	  different	  patterns	  of	  scanning	  own-­‐race	  and	  other-­‐race	  faces.	  As	  these	  studies	  indicate	  that	  infants’	  exposure	  with	  individuals	  of	  a	  different	  ethnicity	  can	  impact	  their	  perception	  and	  processing	  of	  different	  racial	  groups,	  it	  might	  also	  be	  predicted	  that	  exposure	  might	  influence	  infants’	  sensitivity	  to	  associations	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity.	  One	  possibility	  is	  that	  only	  infants	  with	  significant	  exposure	  to	  individuals	  of	  other	  ethnicities	  and/or	  who	  speak	  other	  languages	  come	  to	  learn	  the	  association	  between	  Cantonese	  and	  Asian	  individuals	  observed	  in	  Experiment	  5.	  Alternatively,	  it	  may	  be	  that	  even	  minimal	  exposure	  to	  other	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  common	  to	  all	  infant	  raised	  in	  a	  diverse	  metropolitan	  area	  would	  have	  be	  sufficient	  for	  infants	  to	  realize	  the	  relationship	  between	  Cantonese	  and	  Asian	  individuals.	  	  Experiment	  7	  was	  thus	  conducted	  as	  a	  direct	  replication	  of	  Experiment	  5,	  in	  which	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  again	  saw	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  paired	  with	  segments	  of	  English	  and	  Cantonese.	  This	  replication	  allowed	  us	  to	  combine	  data	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7,	  providing	  a	  larger	  sample	  of	  infants	  with	  which	  to	  investigate	  the	  influence	  of	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  different	  ethnicities	  and	  languages	  on	  their	  looking	  patterns.	  In	  addition,	  the	  larger	  sample	  size	  of	  infants	  combined	  across	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7	  allowed	  us	  to	  examine	  infants’	  looking	  at	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  in	  greater	  detail.	  	  Several	  previous	  studies	  have	  shown	  that	  infants’	  scanning	  of	  faces	  varies	  based	  on	  their	  familiarity	  with	  the	  race	  of	  the	  face	  as	  well	  as	  the	  language	  being	  spoken	  by	  a	  talking	  face.	  Using	  still	  images,	  Liu	  et	  al.	  (2015)	  showed	  Asian	  infants	  pairs	  of	  own-­‐race	  and	  other-­‐race	  faces,	  and	  examined	  infants’	  proportion	  fixations	  to	  eyes,	  nose,	  and	  mouth	  regions.	  The	  researchers	  observed	  that	  6-­‐	  and	  9-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  made	  more	  gaze	  fixations	  to	  the	  mouth	  regions	  of	  other-­‐race	  faces	  than	  own-­‐race	  faces.	  Similar	  results	  have	  also	  been	  obtained	  using	  moving	  faces:	  Xiao	  et	  al.	  (Xiao,	  Xiao,	  Quinn,	  Anzures,	  &	  Lee,	  2013)	  found	  that	  9	  month-­‐old	  infants	  looked	  more	  to	  the	  	   78	  mouth	  region	  of	  silent	  talking	  other-­‐race	  versus	  own-­‐race	  faces,	  as	  well	  as	  looked	  more	  to	  the	  eyes	  regions	  of	  own-­‐race	  faces.	  Examining	  infants’	  looking	  to	  talking	  faces,	  Lewkowicz	  and	  Hansen-­‐Tift	  (2012)	  exposed	  4-­‐12	  month-­‐old	  English-­‐exposed	  infants	  to	  Caucasian	  faces	  speaking	  English	  and	  Spanish,	  and	  measured	  infants’	  scanning	  of	  eyes	  and	  mouth	  regions.	  The	  researchers	  found	  that	  for	  both	  languages,	  infants	  at	  4	  months	  looked	  more	  at	  the	  eyes	  region,	  at	  6	  months	  looked	  equally	  to	  eyes	  and	  mouth	  regions,	  and	  at	  8	  months	  looked	  more	  at	  the	  mouth	  region.	  Yet	  at	  12	  months,	  infants’	  scanning	  varied	  based	  on	  language:	  for	  faces	  speaking	  the	  native	  language,	  infants	  looked	  equally	  at	  eyes	  and	  mouth	  regions,	  but	  for	  faces	  speaking	  a	  non-­‐native	  language,	  infants	  looked	  more	  at	  the	  mouth	  (see	  also	  Kubicek	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  	  	  Building	  on	  this	  past	  work,	  in	  Experiment	  7	  area	  of	  interest	  analyses	  were	  conducted	  on	  infants’	  looking	  to	  eyes,	  mouth,	  and	  nose	  regions.	  However,	  as	  no	  studies	  to	  date	  have	  examined	  whether	  infants’	  scanning	  of	  own-­‐	  and	  other-­‐race	  faces	  changes	  in	  the	  context	  of	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  languages,	  no	  specific	  a	  priori	  hypotheses	  existed	  regarding	  infants’	  looking	  to	  the	  different	  regions	  of	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  or	  Cantonese.	  One	  possibility	  was	  that	  given	  previous	  results	  on	  infants’	  scanning	  of	  faces	  speaking	  native	  versus	  non-­‐native	  language,	  greater	  looking	  would	  be	  seen	  to	  the	  eyes	  versus	  the	  mouth	  for	  both	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  paired	  with	  English,	  and	  while	  greater	  looking	  to	  the	  mouth	  versus	  the	  eyes	  would	  be	  seen	  for	  both	  race	  faces	  paired	  with	  Cantonese.	  Alternatively,	  based	  on	  the	  results	  of	  studies	  examining	  infants’	  scanning	  of	  own	  versus	  other-­‐race	  faces,	  it	  might	  be	  expected	  that	  infants	  would	  look	  more	  to	  the	  mouth	  regions	  of	  Asian	  faces	  than	  Caucasian	  faces,	  regardless	  of	  language.	  Finally,	  it	  might	  also	  be	  predicted	  that	  infants’	  scanning	  would	  differ	  across	  both	  language	  and	  ethnicity.	  	  	  	   	  	   79	  4.4.1	  Methods	  	  4.4.1.1	   Participants	  	  Sixteen	  full-­‐term	  11-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  were	  tested	  (12	  male,	  4	  female;	  Mage=	  11m,9.75d,	  Age	  range:	  10m,16d	  –	  12m,13d).	  Infants	  were	  recruited	  in	  the	  same	  manner	  as	  Experiment	  5.	  	  	  All	  infants	  were	  reported	  by	  their	  parent(s)	  as	  hearing	  English	  at	  least	  90%	  of	  the	  time,	  and	  were	  of	  Caucasian/European	  ancestry.	  An	  additional	  17	  infants	  were	  tested,	  but	  were	  excluded	  from	  final	  analyses	  because	  of	  failure	  to	  provide	  sufficient	  data	  due	  to	  fussiness	  (5)	  or	  movement	  (1),	  poor	  calibration	  (5),	  parent	  interference	  (3),	  or	  technical	  issues	  with	  the	  eyetracker	  (3).	  	  	  4.4.1.2	   Stimuli	  and	  Procedure	  	  The	  stimuli	  and	  procedure	  were	  identical	  to	  those	  used	  in	  Experiment	  5.	  	  	  When	  completing	  the	  language/ethnicity	  exposure	  questionnaire,	  1	  parent	  abstained	  from	  estimating	  the	  overall	  percent	  of	  time	  their	  child	  was	  exposed	  to	  English	  versus	  other	  languages,	  and	  4	  parents	  abstained	  from	  estimating	  the	  overall	  percent	  of	  time	  their	  child	  was	  exposed	  to	  Caucasian	  individuals	  versus	  individuals	  of	  other	  ethnicities.	  All	  parents	  answered	  questions	  about	  the	  language	  use	  and	  ethnicity	  of	  family	  members,	  friends,	  and	  caregivers.	  	  	  4.4.1.3	   Analysis	  	  Primary	  analyses	  were	  conducted	  in	  the	  same	  manner	  as	  Experiment	  5.	  	  Secondary	  analyses	  were	  conducted	  on	  the	  effects	  of	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  different	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  and	  on	  infants’	  looking	  to	  areas	  of	  interest	  within	  the	  	   80	  faces.	  These	  analyses	  were	  performed	  using	  the	  combined	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7	  (N=32).	  	  	  The	  influence	  of	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  different	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  on	  their	  looking	  patterns	  was	  examined	  using	  three	  variables.	  We	  conducted	  analyses	  using	  parents’	  estimates	  of	  the	  overall	  percentage	  of	  time	  their	  child	  was	  exposed	  to	  English	  vs.	  other	  languages	  and	  the	  overall	  percentage	  of	  time	  their	  child	  was	  exposed	  to	  Caucasian	  individuals	  vs.	  individuals	  of	  other	  ethnicities.	  In	  addition,	  based	  upon	  parents’	  responses	  to	  the	  language/ethnicity	  questionnaire,	  infants	  were	  classified	  into	  two	  groups	  based	  on	  whether	  or	  not	  they	  had	  regular	  exposure	  to	  one	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  in	  their	  life.	  A	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individual	  was	  defined	  as	  a	  family	  member,	  caregiver,	  or	  friend	  that	  the	  parent	  reported	  the	  child	  saw	  more	  than	  1	  hour	  a	  week	  (on	  average)	  or	  more	  than	  “occasionally.”	  	  	  For	  region	  of	  interest	  analyses,	  regions	  were	  defined	  for	  eyes,	  mouth,	  and	  nose	  areas.	  Each	  region	  was	  drawn	  in	  a	  rectangle	  shape	  that	  encompassed	  the	  corresponding	  face	  area	  of	  all	  faces,	  and	  all	  three	  regions	  were	  of	  equal	  size	  (Figure	  5).	  ROI	  proportions	  were	  calculated	  by	  dividing	  the	  time	  the	  infant	  looked	  at	  the	  target	  region	  as	  a	  proportion	  of	  total	  looking	  to	  the	  face	  during	  a	  given	  trial	  (see	  Liu	  et	  al.	  2015).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   81	  Figure	  4.4	  Areas	  of	  interest	  used	  to	  examine	  infants’	  detailed	  looking	  at	  the	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  in	  Experiment	  7.	  Eyes,	  nose,	  and	  mouth	  regions	  were	  all	  of	  equal	  size.	  	  	  	  	  4.4.2	  Results	  	  4.4.2.1	   Primary	  Analysis	  	  As	  in	  Experiment	  5,	  a	  2x2	  repeated	  measures	  ANOVA	  was	  conducted	  on	  infants’	  proportion	  looking	  time	  for	  factors	  language	  (English	  vs.	  Cantonese)	  and	  ethnicity	  (Caucasian	  vs.	  Asian	  faces).	  A	  significant	  main	  effect	  of	  ethnicity	  was	  observed	  (p=.003,	  η2p=.452),	  where	  infants	  looked	  proportionally	  more	  to	  Asian	  (M=	  0.552,	  SD=	  0.060)	  versus	  Caucasian	  (M=	  0.448,	  SD=	  0.060)	  faces	  overall.	  The	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity	  was	  also	  significant,	  p=.030,	  η2p=.277.	  Follow	  up	  paired	  t-­‐tests	  revealed	  that	  while	  there	  was	  a	  marginal	  difference	  in	  looking	  more	  to	  Asian	  (M=	  0.533,	  SD=	  0.070)	  versus	  Caucasian	  (M=	  0.467,	  SD=	  0.070)	  faces	  during	  English	  trials	  (p=.081,	  d=.967),	  in	  Cantonese	  language	  trials,	  infants	  looked	  	   82	  significantly	  more	  to	  the	  Asian	  (M=	  0.572,	  SD=	  0.066)	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  (M=	  0.428,	  SD=	  0.066)	  (p=.001,	  d=2.261).	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.5	  Results	  from	  the	  novel	  group	  of	  11	  month-­‐olds	  tested	  (N=16)	  in	  Experiment	  7.	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  looked	  significantly	  more	  to	  Asian	  faces	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  (p=.001),	  but	  not	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  (p=.081).	  	  	  	  4.4.2.2	   Secondary	  Analyses	  	  The	  influence	  of	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  different	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  on	  looking	  time	  was	  examined	  using	  the	  combined	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7.	  For	  the	  first	  analyses,	  parents’	  estimated	  overall	  percent	  exposure	  to	  English	  and	  to	  Caucasian	  individuals	  were	  entered	  as	  covariates	  in	  separate	  ANOVAs	  examining	  infants’	  looking	  across	  language	  and	  ethnicity.	  In	  both	  ANOVAs,	  there	  were	  no	  significant	  interactions	  between	  looking	  and	  language/ethnicity	  exposure,	  ps>.250.	  	  	  For	  the	  next	  analysis,	  infants	  were	  classified	  as	  to	  whether	  parents	  reported	  they	  had	  regular	  exposure	  to	  one	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals.	  Fifteen	  of	  the	  32	  infants	  met	  the	  criterion	  for	  having	  such	  an	  individual	  (or	  individuals)	  in	  00.10.20.30.40.50.60.7English CantoneseProportion of Total Fixaton Length CaucasianAsian	   83	  their	  life.	  This	  variable	  was	  analyzed	  as	  a	  between-­‐subjects	  factor	  in	  an	  ANOVA	  along	  with	  the	  within-­‐subjects	  factors	  of	  language	  and	  ethnicity.	  A	  significant	  interaction	  between	  whether	  infants	  had	  a	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individual	  in	  their	  life	  and	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  emerged,	  p=.036,	  η2p=.139.	  Follow-­‐up	  tests	  revealed	  that	  while	  there	  was	  significantly	  greater	  overall	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  for	  infants	  who	  did	  not	  have	  a	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individual	  in	  their	  life	  (MAsian	  =	  0.570,	  SDAsian	  =	  0.085;	  MCaucasian	  =	  0.430,	  SDCaucasian=	  0.085;	  p<.001,	  η2p=.619),	  infants	  who	  did	  have	  one	  or	  more	  such	  individuals	  in	  their	  life	  showed	  no	  significant	  difference	  in	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  (p=.205).	  The	  3-­‐way	  interaction	  between	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  and	  language	  and	  ethnicity	  was	  non-­‐significant,	  p=.128,	  η2p=	  .075,	  but	  did	  reveal	  an	  interesting	  trend.	  Infants	  who	  had	  regular	  exposure	  to	  one	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  showed	  a	  significant	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity,	  p<.001,	  η2p=	  .658,	  such	  that	  they	  looked	  more	  at	  Asian	  faces	  during	  Cantonese	  trials	  (M=	  0.565,	  SD=	  0.076)	  as	  compared	  to	  English	  trials	  (M=	  0.480,	  SD=	  0.072).	  For	  infants	  who	  did	  not	  have	  regular	  exposure	  to	  a	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individual,	  the	  interaction	  was	  in	  the	  same	  direction	  with	  greater	  looking	  to	  Asian	  faces	  during	  Cantonese	  (M=	  0.592,	  SD=	  0.068)	  versus	  English	  language	  trials	  (M=	  0.548,	  SD=	  0.068),	  but	  with	  a	  lower	  effect	  size,	  p=.0501,	  η2p=	  .219.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   84	  Figure	  4.6	  Proportion	  looking	  to	  Asian	  faces	  for	  combined	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7,	  separated	  by	  those	  infants	  whose	  parents	  reported	  regular	  exposure	  to	  1	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  in	  their	  infant’s	  life,	  and	  infants	  whose	  parents	  reported	  no	  such	  exposure.	  Infants	  with	  regular	  exposure	  to	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  looked	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  versus	  when	  paired	  with	  English,	  p<.001,	  as	  did	  infants	  whose	  parents	  did	  not	  report	  regular	  exposure,	  p=.050.	  	  	  	  	  To	  examine	  infants’	  looking	  to	  areas	  of	  interest	  within	  the	  face	  stimuli,	  a	  2x2x3	  repeated	  measures	  ANOVA	  was	  conducted	  with	  the	  factors	  of	  language	  ,	  ethnicity,	  and	  region	  (proportion	  looking	  to	  eyes,	  mouth,	  and	  nose	  regions)	  using	  the	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  both	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7.	  A	  main	  effect	  of	  region	  was	  observed,	  p<.001,	  η2p=.425.	  Follow-­‐up	  tests	  revealed	  that	  infants	  looked	  proportionally	  more	  at	  nose	  regions	  (M=	  0.355,	  SD=	  0.209)	  than	  at	  eye	  regions	  (M=	  0.123,	  SD=	  0.204;	  p<.001,	  η2p=.424)	  and	  mouth	  regions	  (M=	  0.212,	  SD=	  0.204;	  p=.016,	  η2p=.172).	  There	  was	  no	  significant	  difference	  in	  looking	  to	  eye	  versus	  mouth	  regions	  (p=.113,	  η2p=.079).	  A	  significant	  interaction	  between	  language	  and	  region	  also	  emerged,	  p=.034,	  η2p=.201.	  Follow-­‐up	  tests	  revealed	  that	  proportion	  looking	  to	  the	  eyes	  was	  greater	  in	  English	  trials	  (M=	  0.145,	  SD=	  0.170)	  versus	  Cantonese	  trials	  (M=	  0.100,	  SD=	  0.119)	  ,	  p=.011,	  η2p=.193,	  while	  no	  effects	  of	  language	  were	  seen	  for	  the	  mouth	  00.10.20.30.40.50.60.7No Sig Non-Cauc (17)1+ Sig Non-Cauc (15)Proportion Fixation Length to  Asian FacesEnglishCantonese	   85	  (p=.249,	  η2p=.043)	  or	  nose	  regions	  (p=.986,	  η2p<.001).	  No	  significant	  interaction	  was	  observed	  between	  ethnicity	  and	  region	  (p=.754,	  η2p=.019)	  or	  in	  the	  3-­‐way	  interaction	  between	  language,	  ethnicity	  and	  region	  (p=.180,	  η2p=.108).	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.7	  Infants’	  looking	  to	  areas	  of	  interest	  on	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces,	  for	  the	  combined	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7.	  Across	  both	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  trials,	  infants	  made	  a	  greater	  proportion	  of	  fixation	  to	  the	  nose	  versus	  eyes	  (p<.001)	  and	  mouth	  regions	  (p=.016).	  Infants	  made	  a	  greater	  proportion	  of	  fixations	  to	  eyes	  regions	  when	  hearing	  English	  versus	  Cantonese	  (p=.011).	  	  	  	  	  4.4.3	  Discussion	  	  Results	  from	  Experiment	  7	  confirmed	  those	  from	  Experiment	  5:	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  looked	  differently	  to	  Caucasian	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  versus	  Cantonese.	  Similar	  to	  what	  was	  observed	  in	  Experiment	  5,	  this	  effect	  appears	  to	  be	  driven	  by	  greater	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 Caucasian Asian Caucasian Asian English Cantonese Proportion Looking to ROI Eyes Mouth Nose 	   86	  Cantonese,	  suggesting	  that	  infants	  specifically	  associate	  Cantonese	  language	  with	  Asian	  faces.	  	  	  The	  combined	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7	  allowed	  us	  to	  delve	  deeper	  into	  whether	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  individuals	  of	  other	  ethnicities	  and	  who	  speak	  other	  languages	  influences	  whether	  they	  are	  sensitive	  to	  the	  association	  between	  Cantonese	  and	  Asian	  individuals.	  These	  analyses	  indicated	  that	  infants	  whose	  parents	  reported	  regular	  exposure	  to	  one	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  as	  well	  as	  infants	  whose	  parents	  did	  not	  report	  such	  individuals	  in	  their	  child’s	  life	  looked	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  versus	  when	  paired	  with	  English.	  However,	  this	  effect	  was	  stronger	  (while	  non-­‐significantly	  so)	  for	  those	  infants	  who	  had	  regular	  experience	  with	  individuals	  of	  non-­‐Caucasian	  ethnicities.	  This	  suggests	  that	  while	  there	  appears	  to	  be	  a	  role	  for	  experience	  in	  forming	  infants’	  expectations	  that	  Asian	  individuals	  are	  associated	  with	  Cantonese,	  even	  infants	  with	  minimal	  exposure	  to	  other	  ethnicities	  still	  come	  to	  detect	  this	  association.	  	  	  Using	  the	  larger	  combined	  sample	  of	  infants	  from	  Experiments	  5	  and	  7,	  we	  also	  examined	  infants’	  proportion	  of	  fixations	  to	  eyes,	  nose,	  and	  mouth	  areas	  of	  interest	  on	  the	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces.	  For	  both	  ethnicities,	  infants	  made	  more	  fixations	  to	  the	  nose	  regions	  than	  to	  the	  eyes	  or	  mouth	  regions,	  although	  this	  did	  not	  vary	  whether	  the	  faces	  were	  paired	  with	  English	  or	  Cantonese.	  Infants	  did	  show	  an	  effect	  of	  language	  in	  their	  looking	  to	  the	  eyes	  region,	  such	  that	  they	  looked	  more	  to	  the	  eyes	  (of	  both	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces)	  when	  hearing	  English	  versus	  when	  hearing	  Cantonese.	  This	  finding	  is	  in	  line	  with	  work	  examining	  infants’	  looking	  to	  talking	  faces,	  in	  which	  12	  month-­‐old	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  look	  more	  to	  the	  eyes	  than	  to	  the	  mouth	  when	  viewing	  their	  native	  language	  versus	  a	  non-­‐native	  language	  (Kubicek	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Lewkowicz	  &	  Hansen-­‐Tift,	  2012).	  	  	  	  	   87	  4.4	   General	  Discussion	  	  In	  the	  present	  set	  of	  studies,	  we	  demonstrated	  that	  at	  11	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  have	  different	  expectations	  about	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  English	  (the	  native	  language)	  and	  Cantonese	  (a	  language	  unfamiliar	  to	  the	  infants).	  Specifically,	  infants	  looked	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  versus	  when	  paired	  with	  English.	  Interestingly,	  infants	  at	  the	  same	  age	  did	  not	  look	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Spanish,	  another	  unfamiliar	  language.	  As	  the	  infants	  tested	  in	  the	  current	  studies	  were	  raised	  in	  a	  metropolitan	  area	  with	  a	  sizeable	  Cantonese-­‐speaking	  Asian	  population,	  this	  pattern	  of	  results	  implies	  that	  infants	  have	  learned	  a	  specific	  language-­‐ethnicity	  association	  based	  on	  who	  they	  have	  encountered	  in	  their	  environment,	  rather	  than	  using	  a	  more	  general	  bias	  to	  associate	  any	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  individuals	  of	  an	  unfamiliar	  or	  less	  familiar	  ethnicity.	  	  	  Two	  other	  pieces	  of	  evidence	  support	  this	  notion	  of	  a	  learned	  association	  between	  Cantonese	  and	  Asian	  individuals.	  First,	  only	  11	  month-­‐old	  and	  not	  6	  month-­‐old	  infants	  showed	  evidence	  of	  this	  pairing,	  suggesting	  that	  infants	  may	  need	  to	  accumulate	  exposure	  to	  Cantonese	  and/or	  Asian	  individuals	  in	  order	  to	  form	  a	  connection	  between	  a	  language	  and	  ethnicity.	  Second,	  infants	  whose	  parents	  reported	  regular	  exposure	  to	  one	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  in	  their	  life	  more	  robustly	  showed	  differential	  looking	  to	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  versus	  English	  than	  did	  infants	  whose	  parents	  reported	  no	  such	  exposure.	  Taken	  together,	  these	  results	  suggest	  that	  between	  6	  and	  11	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  raised	  in	  an	  environment	  in	  which	  they	  have	  at	  least	  casual	  exposure	  to	  Cantonese-­‐speaking	  Asian	  individuals	  come	  to	  detect	  a	  relationship	  between	  the	  language	  and	  ethnicity.	  	  	  Another	  finding	  of	  note	  in	  the	  present	  work	  was	  infants’	  overall	  greater	  looking	  for	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces.	  This	  pattern	  was	  incredibly	  consistent,	  holding	  true	  across	  experiments	  and	  language	  conditions.	  A	  possibility	  raised	  by	  this	  result	  is	  	   88	  that	  perhaps	  the	  particular	  Asian	  faces	  used	  in	  the	  current	  studies	  were	  simply	  more	  attractive	  to	  infants	  than	  were	  the	  Caucasian	  faces.	  However,	  we	  argue	  that	  this	  is	  unlikely.	  In	  an	  additional	  unreported	  study,	  the	  same	  procedure	  from	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  was	  used	  to	  examine	  11	  month-­‐old	  Caucasian	  infants’	  looking	  to	  Black	  versus	  Asian	  faces	  (the	  same	  Asian	  faces	  from	  Experiments	  5-­‐7).	  Here,	  infants	  were	  found	  to	  look	  overall	  more	  to	  Black	  faces.	  Given	  that	  there	  is	  a	  very	  small	  Black	  population	  in	  the	  community	  in	  which	  infants	  are	  tested	  (<1%	  of	  the	  total	  population;	  Statistics	  Canada),	  this	  result	  suggests	  that	  infants’	  greater	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  in	  the	  current	  work	  reflects	  a	  novelty	  preference	  for	  unfamiliar	  or	  less	  familiar	  ethnicities	  and	  not	  a	  preference	  for	  the	  specific	  Asian	  face	  stimuli.	  Recent	  research	  also	  supports	  this	  interpretation.	  In	  their	  work,	  Liu	  et	  al.	  (2015)	  observed	  that	  while	  very	  young	  infants	  at	  3	  months	  typically	  show	  a	  familiarity	  preference	  for	  own-­‐race	  faces,	  by	  9	  months	  infants	  look	  more	  to	  other-­‐race	  faces	  in	  the	  same	  task	  with	  the	  same	  face	  stimuli.	  	  	  One	  limitation	  of	  the	  present	  studies	  is	  that	  only	  infants	  raised	  in	  a	  community	  with	  a	  large	  multicultural	  population	  were	  tested.	  As	  such,	  all	  the	  infants	  were	  likely	  to	  have	  had	  some	  exposure	  to	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  and	  non-­‐English	  languages.	  It	  will	  be	  important	  for	  future	  research	  to	  extend	  this	  work	  to	  other	  communities,	  including	  those	  in	  which	  infants	  have	  very	  little	  exposure	  to	  other	  ethnicities	  and	  languages.	  Based	  on	  the	  present	  findings,	  it	  might	  be	  predicted	  that	  infants	  in	  such	  communities	  would	  be	  less	  likely	  to	  show	  differential	  looking	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  and	  Cantonese	  at	  11	  months	  than	  were	  the	  infants	  in	  the	  current	  studies.	  However,	  empirical	  results	  are	  needed	  to	  confirm	  this	  hypothesis,	  perhaps	  utilizing	  novel	  methodologies	  that	  have	  been	  developed	  to	  precisely	  quantify	  infants’	  exposure	  (Sugden,	  Mohamed-­‐Ali,	  &	  Moulson,	  2014).	  	  	  In	  their	  work	  with	  preschool-­‐aged	  children,	  Hirschfeld	  and	  Gelman	  (1997)	  found	  that	  3-­‐5	  year-­‐olds	  were	  more	  likely	  to	  associate	  white	  versus	  black	  individuals	  with	  their	  native	  language	  (English)	  than	  with	  an	  unfamiliar	  language	  (Portuguese).	  Interestingly,	  this	  was	  true	  even	  though	  the	  researchers	  believed	  it	  was	  highly	  	   89	  unlikely	  any	  of	  the	  children	  tested	  had	  experience	  with	  black	  Portuguese-­‐speaking	  individuals.	  While	  the	  researchers	  did	  not	  further	  probe	  these	  results	  with	  other	  language-­‐ethnicity	  pairings,	  their	  findings	  indicate	  that	  the	  children	  associated	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  unfamiliar	  (or	  less	  familiar)	  ethnicity,	  even	  with	  no	  exposure	  to	  the	  particular	  language-­‐ethnicity	  association.	  This	  pattern	  of	  results	  differs	  from	  the	  present	  study,	  in	  which	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  were	  shown	  to	  only	  associate	  unfamiliar	  language	  with	  individuals	  of	  an	  unfamiliar/ethnicity	  when	  the	  pairing	  was	  one	  they	  were	  likely	  to	  have	  encountered	  in	  their	  environment.	  One	  possibility	  is	  that	  from	  early	  in	  life,	  infants	  have	  an	  expectation	  of	  a	  privileged	  relation	  between	  language	  and	  ethnicity	  that	  allows	  for	  rapid	  learning	  of	  language-­‐ethnicity	  associations	  in	  the	  infancy	  period.	  In	  turn,	  these	  specific	  associations	  may	  then	  be	  generalized	  to	  broader	  unfamiliar-­‐unfamiliar	  mappings	  at	  later	  ages.	  	  	  The	  notion	  that	  infants	  rapidly	  learn	  associations	  between	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  suggests	  that	  sensitivity	  to	  such	  pairings	  may	  be	  privileged	  for	  young	  learners.	  In	  their	  work,	  Spelke	  and	  Kinzler	  (2007)	  have	  suggested	  that	  reasoning	  about	  social	  groups	  may	  be	  an	  area	  of	  core	  knowledge	  for	  infants,	  such	  that	  similar	  to	  their	  reasoning	  about	  objects,	  actions,	  number,	  and	  space.	  These	  core	  domains	  have	  been	  proposed	  to	  be	  present	  throughout	  development,	  and	  help	  guide	  infants’	  and	  adults’	  thinking	  about	  the	  world.	  If	  this	  is	  the	  case,	  it	  would	  be	  expected	  that	  infants	  should	  respond	  to	  cues	  related	  to	  social	  groups—such	  as	  cues	  of	  language	  and	  ethnicity,	  and	  the	  associations	  between—from	  an	  early	  age,	  and	  without	  significant	  training.	  Future	  studies	  should	  thus	  be	  designed	  to	  probe	  the	  possibility	  that	  infants’	  reasoning	  about	  the	  relationships	  between	  languages	  and	  ethnicities	  is	  privileged.	  	  	  	   	  	   90	  5	   Conclusions	  	  The	  use	  of	  language	  is	  an	  essential	  human	  characteristic,	  and	  is	  believed	  to	  be	  deeply	  embedded	  in	  our	  biology.	  It	  has	  been	  proposed	  that	  humans	  have	  evolved	  to	  respond	  specially	  to	  language	  signals,	  and	  to	  perceive	  language	  use	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership.	  In	  my	  thesis	  I	  have	  explored	  this	  theory,	  investigating	  infants’	  neural	  and	  social	  perception	  of	  language.	  Here	  I	  review	  the	  results	  and	  implications	  of	  my	  experimental	  studies,	  and	  turn	  to	  directions	  for	  future	  research.	  	  	  5.1	   Summary	  of	  Results	  and	  Implications	  	  Previous	  studies	  have	  demonstrated	  that	  even	  in	  very	  young	  infants,	  the	  human	  brain	  responds	  specially	  to	  language.	  In	  infants	  at	  birth	  as	  well	  as	  at	  2	  months	  of	  age,	  neural	  activation	  has	  been	  observed	  in	  response	  to	  spoken	  language	  in	  temporal	  regions	  of	  the	  brain,	  areas	  long	  known	  to	  be	  associated	  with	  language	  processing	  in	  adults	  (Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  Dehaene,	  &	  Hertz-­‐Pannier,	  2002;	  Peña	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Perani	  et	  a.,	  2011).	  However,	  as	  pointed	  out	  earlier	  in	  this	  thesis,	  these	  studies	  have	  all	  employed	  the	  infants’	  native	  language	  to	  examine	  their	  neural	  responses.	  Given	  that	  fetal	  hearing	  is	  estimated	  to	  be	  fully	  developed	  by	  23-­‐26	  weeks	  gestation	  (Eisenberg,	  1976;	  Moore	  &	  Jeffrey,	  1994),	  and	  many	  aspects	  of	  speech	  are	  believed	  to	  be	  available	  to	  the	  fetus	  in	  utero	  (Lecanuet	  &	  Granier-­‐Deferre,	  1993;	  Querleu	  et	  al.,	  1988),	  these	  studies	  leave	  open	  the	  possibility	  that	  infants’	  early	  neural	  tuning	  to	  the	  native	  language	  might	  based	  on	  previous	  experience.	  	  	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  were	  thus	  conducted	  to	  explore	  the	  specificity	  of	  the	  infant	  brain	  response	  to	  language.	  Neural	  activation	  was	  measured	  in	  English-­‐exposed	  newborn	  infants	  (Experiments	  1	  and	  2)	  as	  well	  as	  4	  month-­‐olds	  (Experiments	  3	  and	  4)	  to	  English	  (familiar	  language),	  Spanish	  (unfamiliar	  language),	  and	  Silbo	  Gomero.	  Silbo	  Gomero	  is	  a	  non-­‐speech	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  of	  Spanish	  used	  in	  regions	  of	  the	  Canary	  Islands.	  It	  is	  matched	  to	  Spanish	  in	  rhythm	  and	  prosody,	  but	  has	  a	  substantially	  reduced	  phoneme	  inventory,	  less	  acoustic	  complexity,	  and	  a	  different	  	   91	  method	  of	  production	  (Rialland,	  2005).	  Comparing	  the	  neural	  activation	  that	  is	  evoked	  in	  response	  to	  the	  native	  language,	  a	  spoken	  unfamiliar	  language,	  and	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  thus	  allowed	  for	  an	  investigation	  into	  whether	  the	  brain	  at	  birth	  is	  tuned	  specifically	  to	  the	  language	  heard	  in	  utero,	  to	  spoken	  language	  in	  general,	  or	  possibly	  even	  more	  broadly	  to	  both	  language	  and	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  that	  share	  some	  of	  the	  properties	  of	  language.	  	  	  Results	  with	  neonates	  as	  well	  as	  4	  month-­‐old	  infants	  revealed	  activation	  to	  English	  and	  Spanish	  in	  bilateral	  temporal	  areas.	  However,	  at	  each	  age	  there	  were	  also	  effects	  of	  language	  familiarity.	  In	  neonates,	  different	  patterns	  of	  activation	  were	  seen	  to	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  language.	  While	  greater	  activation	  was	  observed	  to	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  English,	  there	  was	  no	  difference	  in	  activation	  to	  forward	  versus	  backwards	  Spanish.	  In	  4	  month-­‐olds,	  hemispheric	  differences	  were	  seen	  between	  languages.	  Activation	  to	  English	  was	  greater	  in	  the	  left	  versus	  right	  hemispheres	  in	  posterior	  temporal	  regions,	  while	  activation	  to	  Spanish	  was	  similar	  across	  hemispheres.	  	  	  The	  distinct	  patterns	  of	  activation	  to	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language	  in	  neonates	  and	  4	  month-­‐olds	  suggest	  that	  at	  both	  ages,	  the	  infant	  brain	  response	  to	  language	  is	  influenced	  by	  language	  experience.	  However,	  the	  fact	  that	  how	  activation	  differed	  between	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  was	  not	  the	  same	  across	  ages	  implies	  that	  sensitivity	  to	  language	  familiarity	  manifests	  in	  unique	  ways	  at	  birth	  and	  at	  4	  months.	  Further	  research	  is	  needed	  to	  investigate	  if	  and	  how	  these	  different	  patterns	  of	  brain	  activity	  to	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language	  at	  birth	  and	  4	  months	  might	  correspond	  to	  developmental	  differences	  in	  behaviour.	  Previous	  behavioural	  work	  has	  found	  that	  while	  newborn	  infants	  can	  discriminate	  their	  native	  language	  from	  a	  rhythmically	  dissimilar	  non-­‐native	  language,	  it	  is	  not	  until	  4-­‐5	  months	  of	  age	  that	  infants	  can	  discriminate	  their	  native	  language	  from	  a	  rhythmically	  similar	  non-­‐native	  language	  (Bosch	  &	  Sebastian-­‐Galle,	  1997;	  Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  Burns,	  &	  Werker,	  2010;	  Mehler	  et	  al.,	  1988;	  Moon,	  Panneton-­‐Cooper,	  &	  Fifer,	  1993;	  Nazzi,	  Bertoncini,	  &	  Mehler,	  1998).	  Perhaps	  the	  different	  patterns	  of	  	   92	  activation	  seen	  to	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  languages	  found	  here	  in	  neonates	  and	  4-­‐month-­‐olds	  are	  related	  to	  this	  established	  behavioural	  shift.	  	  	  The	  brain	  response	  to	  spoken	  language	  versus	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  also	  revealed	  developmental	  differences	  between	  neonates	  and	  4	  month-­‐olds.	  In	  neonates,	  greater	  activation	  was	  observed	  to	  spoken	  Spanish	  versus	  to	  whistled	  Silbo	  Gomero	  across	  both	  anterior	  and	  posterior	  temporal	  regions.	  In	  contrast,	  no	  difference	  in	  activation	  to	  these	  signals	  was	  seen	  in	  4	  month-­‐olds.	  One	  interpretation	  of	  this	  change	  is	  that	  perhaps	  distinct	  aspects	  of	  the	  language	  signal	  trigger	  specialized	  neural	  responses	  across	  development.	  It	  may	  be	  that	  newborn	  infants	  are	  attending	  to	  the	  phonetic	  and	  acoustic	  complexity	  of	  the	  language	  signal,	  such	  that	  only	  spoken	  language	  elicits	  activation	  in	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  cortex,	  while	  infants	  at	  4	  months	  are	  more	  focused	  on	  the	  rhythmic	  and	  prosodic	  properties	  of	  language,	  such	  that	  both	  spoken	  and	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  lead	  to	  similar	  neural	  processing.	  	  	  Differences	  between	  the	  findings	  of	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  and	  those	  of	  prior	  behavioural	  studies	  examining	  infants’	  listening	  preferences	  also	  provide	  support	  to	  the	  proposal	  that	  language	  processing	  is	  driven	  by	  distinct	  aspects	  of	  language	  (or	  language-­‐like)	  signals	  across	  development.	  In	  behavioural	  work,	  newborn	  infants	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  prefer	  listening	  equally	  to	  speech	  and	  rhesus	  monkey	  calls,	  while	  it	  is	  not	  until	  3	  months	  of	  age	  that	  infants	  appear	  to	  prefer	  speech	  over	  monkey	  calls	  (Vouloumanos	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  The	  neuroimaging	  results	  from	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  seemingly	  show	  a	  contrasting	  developmental	  pattern:	  while	  greater	  activation	  was	  seen	  in	  neonates	  to	  spoken	  language	  versus	  whistled	  surrogate	  language,	  in	  four	  month-­‐olds	  similar	  activation	  was	  observed	  to	  both	  signals.	  However,	  there	  are	  important	  differences	  between	  the	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  employed	  in	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  and	  the	  rhesus	  monkey	  calls	  used	  in	  past	  behavioural	  studies.	  Whistled	  surrogate	  language	  is	  similar	  to	  spoken	  language	  in	  rhythm	  and	  prosody,	  but	  not	  in	  acoustic	  or	  phonetic	  in	  complexity.	  In	  contrast,	  rhesus	  monkey	  calls	  are	  comparable	  to	  speech	  in	  acoustic	  complexity,	  but	  as	  	   93	  individual	  utterances,	  have	  little	  rhythmic	  or	  prosodic	  content.	  Given	  these	  dissimilarities,	  the	  comparison	  of	  findings	  from	  the	  present	  neuroimaging	  studies	  and	  past	  behavioural	  work	  suggests	  that	  newborn	  infants’	  language	  processing	  may	  be	  more	  driven	  by	  acoustic	  and	  phonetic	  features	  while	  4	  month-­‐olds’	  processing	  may	  be	  more	  driven	  by	  rhythmic	  and	  prosodic	  features.	  It	  will	  be	  an	  interesting	  avenue	  for	  future	  research	  to	  explore	  how	  neural	  activation	  to	  language	  can	  be	  evoked	  by	  different	  aspects	  of	  the	  language	  signal	  at	  different	  ages.	  	  	  The	  results	  from	  Experiment	  1-­‐4	  demonstrate	  that	  the	  infant	  brain	  responds	  to	  language	  as	  a	  special	  signal.	  This	  is	  true	  for	  language	  in	  general,	  as	  evidenced	  by	  neural	  activation	  evoked	  to	  both	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  language	  in	  classic	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  cortex,	  as	  well	  as	  for	  the	  native	  language	  in	  particular,	  as	  demonstrated	  by	  the	  different	  patterns	  of	  activation	  to	  native	  versus	  non-­‐native	  language	  present	  from	  the	  first	  days	  of	  life.	  These	  findings	  thus	  indicate	  that	  the	  human	  brain	  is	  tuned	  to	  respond	  specially	  to	  language	  from	  early	  in	  development.	  However,	  the	  question	  remains	  as	  to	  why	  this	  might	  be	  the	  case,	  and	  whether	  there	  is	  an	  adaptive	  advantage	  behind	  infants’	  specialized	  processing	  of	  language	  signals.	  One	  theory	  is	  that	  sensitivity	  to	  language	  may	  serve	  to	  direct	  young	  learners	  to	  potential	  communicative	  partners.	  Indeed,	  previous	  work	  has	  found	  that	  older	  infants	  expect	  spoken	  language	  to	  be	  associated	  with	  conspecifics.	  At	  5	  months,	  infants	  look	  more	  at	  human	  faces	  versus	  monkey	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  human	  language	  versus	  monkey	  calls	  or	  duck	  calls,	  and	  at	  6	  months,	  show	  surprise	  when	  speech	  is	  directed	  to	  objects	  instead	  of	  other	  humans	  (Legerstee,	  Barna,	  &	  DiAdamo,	  2000;	  Vouloumanos	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  However,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  infants	  at	  5-­‐6	  months	  of	  age	  have	  significant	  exposure	  to	  language	  being	  spoken	  by	  humans,	  such	  that	  their	  association	  of	  language	  with	  conspecifics	  might	  be	  driven	  by	  experience.	  To	  fully	  evaluate	  the	  theory	  that	  infants’	  early	  tuning	  to	  language	  is	  related	  to	  finding	  communicative	  partners,	  future	  studies	  should	  examine	  whether	  very	  young	  infants	  soon	  after	  birth	  similarly	  expect	  speech	  to	  be	  uniquely	  tied	  to	  fellow	  humans.	  Moreover,	  building	  upon	  the	  work	  in	  Experiments	  1-­‐4,	  future	  research	  could	  also	  	   94	  examine	  whether	  greater	  neural	  activation	  is	  evoked	  to	  spoken	  language	  when	  it	  is	  perceived	  to	  be	  produced	  by	  humans	  than	  by	  animals	  of	  other	  species.	  	  	  	  While	  tuning	  to	  language	  in	  general	  may	  serve	  to	  direct	  infants	  to	  conspecifics	  as	  potential	  communicative	  partners,	  a	  specific	  focus	  on	  the	  native	  language	  in	  particular	  can	  further	  lead	  infants	  to	  individuals	  from	  their	  own	  language	  community.	  Indeed,	  as	  noted	  earlier	  in	  this	  thesis,	  previous	  research	  has	  proposed	  that	  humans	  enter	  the	  world	  predisposed	  to	  perceive	  language	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership	  (Spelke	  &	  Kinzler,	  2008).	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  explored	  this	  claim,	  investigating	  whether	  infants	  have	  different	  expectations	  about	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  languages.	  	  	  	  In	  Experiments	  5-­‐7,	  infants	  at	  6	  and	  11	  months	  of	  age	  were	  tested	  on	  whether	  they	  associate	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  languages	  with	  individuals	  of	  different	  ethnicities.	  	  Results	  from	  Experiment	  5	  indicated	  that	  infants	  at	  11	  months—but	  not	  at	  6	  months-­‐-­‐	  looked	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  language	  versus	  when	  paired	  with	  English.	  However,	  in	  Experiment	  6,	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  looked	  similarly	  to	  Caucasian	  and	  Asian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  English	  and	  Spanish.	  These	  findings	  suggest	  that	  11	  month-­‐old	  infants	  are	  sensitive	  to	  a	  relationship	  between	  Asian	  individuals	  and	  Cantonese	  language,	  but	  not	  to	  a	  broader	  association	  between	  any	  unfamiliar/less	  familiar	  ethnicity	  and	  any	  unfamiliar	  language.	  As	  the	  infants	  tested	  are	  from	  a	  metropolitan	  area	  in	  which	  there	  is	  a	  sizeable	  Cantonese-­‐speaking	  Asian	  population,	  it	  is	  likely	  that	  they	  came	  to	  be	  sensitive	  to	  this	  pairing	  based	  on	  language-­‐ethnicity	  associations	  they	  have	  encountered	  in	  their	  environment.	  Following	  from	  this	  hypothesis,	  Experiment	  7	  served	  to	  replicate	  Experiment	  5	  as	  well	  as	  to	  enable	  examination	  of	  whether	  individual	  differences	  in	  infants’	  exposure	  to	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  influences	  their	  language-­‐ethnicity	  associations.	  Here	  it	  was	  found	  that	  both	  infants	  who	  had	  regular	  exposure	  to	  one	  or	  more	  significant	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals	  in	  their	  life	  as	  well	  as	  infants	  who	  had	  no	  such	  exposure	  looked	  more	  to	  Asian	  versus	  Caucasian	  faces	  when	  paired	  with	  Cantonese	  versus	  English	  language,	  but	  that	  this	  pattern	  was	  	   95	  (non-­‐significantly)	  stronger	  for	  infants	  who	  had	  significant	  exposure	  to	  non-­‐Caucasian	  individuals.	  Thus,	  results	  indicate	  that	  while	  the	  amount	  of	  exposure	  to	  other	  ethnicities	  may	  contribute	  to	  the	  strength	  of	  infants’	  language-­‐ethnicity	  associations,	  even	  those	  infants	  with	  minimal	  exposure	  appear	  to	  be	  sensitive	  to	  these	  pairings.	  	  	  The	  findings	  of	  Experiment	  5-­‐7	  indicate	  that	  at	  11	  months	  of	  age,	  infants	  are	  sensitive	  to	  language	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership.	  These	  results	  build	  upon	  and	  extend	  past	  work	  illustrating	  that	  infants	  prefer	  individuals	  who	  have	  previously	  spoken	  their	  native	  language	  over	  individuals	  who	  have	  previously	  spoken	  a	  non-­‐native	  language	  (Kinzler,	  Dupoux,	  and	  Spelke,	  2007).	  The	  present	  work	  indicates	  that	  it	  is	  likely	  more	  than	  just	  familiarity	  driving	  infants’	  preferences	  for	  native	  language	  speakers,	  such	  that	  by	  11	  months,	  infants	  appear	  to	  have	  a	  deeper	  understanding	  that	  different	  languages	  are	  associated	  with	  individuals	  who	  are	  distinct	  in	  other	  ways	  (such	  as	  ethnicity).	  However,	  the	  data	  from	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  suggest	  that	  infants’	  understanding	  of	  the	  relationships	  between	  language	  and	  social	  group	  is	  not	  abstract,	  but	  is	  instead	  learned	  through	  specific	  experiences.	  These	  results	  thus	  leave	  open	  the	  question	  of	  whether	  infants	  enter	  the	  world	  predisposed	  towards	  perceiving	  language	  as	  a	  cue	  to	  social	  group	  membership,	  or	  if	  this	  simply	  results	  from	  their	  exposure	  to	  individuals	  of	  different	  social	  groups	  speaking	  different	  languages.	  Yet	  even	  if	  this	  is	  the	  case	  that	  infants	  learn	  which	  languages	  correspond	  to	  which	  social	  groups	  through	  their	  experiences,	  the	  ability	  to	  pair	  together	  language	  and	  social	  group	  might	  still	  be	  privileged	  from	  early	  in	  development.	  Future	  studies	  could	  investigate	  if	  this	  is	  the	  case,	  examining	  whether	  infants	  given	  brief	  exposure	  to	  novel	  language-­‐social	  group	  pairings	  are	  able	  to	  rapidly	  detect	  and	  generalize	  these	  associations.	  	   96	  5.2	   Future	  Directions	  	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  of	  this	  thesis	  examined	  infants’	  neural	  processing	  of	  language	  while	  Experiments	  5-­‐7	  examined	  social	  processing.	  One	  important	  line	  for	  future	  research	  will	  be	  to	  combine	  these	  two	  lines	  of	  inquiry,	  asking	  whether	  infants’	  neural	  perception	  of	  language	  is	  influenced	  by	  the	  status	  of	  its’	  speaker.	  Are	  different	  patterns	  of	  brain	  activation	  elicited	  to	  familiar	  language	  and	  unfamiliar	  language	  when	  these	  signals	  are	  spoken	  by	  an	  individual	  of	  an	  infants’	  own	  ethnicity	  versus	  an	  unfamiliar	  ethnicity?	  A	  study	  exploring	  this	  question	  would	  serve	  to	  illuminate	  how	  infants’	  sensitivity	  to	  language	  speakers	  might	  impact	  the	  basic	  neural	  response	  to	  speech.	  If	  infants’	  perception	  of	  language	  use	  and	  social	  group	  are	  fully	  interrelated,	  it	  might	  be	  predicted	  that	  there	  would	  be	  greater	  activation	  in	  language	  areas	  of	  the	  brain	  to	  both	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  language	  when	  produced	  by	  ingroup	  members	  versus	  when	  produced	  by	  outgroup	  members.	  	  Relatedly,	  future	  research	  could	  also	  explore	  whether	  infants’	  neural	  responses	  to	  non-­‐language	  signals	  become	  more	  language-­‐like	  if	  such	  signals	  appear	  to	  be	  produced	  by	  a	  conspecific—or	  further,	  by	  a	  member	  of	  an	  infants’	  own	  social	  group.	  Recent	  work	  by	  Vouloumanos	  and	  colleagues	  has	  shown	  that	  at	  9	  months,	  infants	  respond	  differently	  to	  the	  speech-­‐like	  vocalizations	  spoken	  by	  parrot	  when	  paired	  with	  a	  human	  face	  versus	  a	  static	  checkerboard	  (Vouloumanos	  &	  Gelfand,	  2012).	  Similarly,	  Ferguson	  and	  Waxman	  (2014)	  have	  found	  that	  non-­‐speech	  sine-­‐wave	  tones	  can	  help	  to	  facilitate	  object	  categorization,	  but	  only	  when	  infants	  first	  view	  a	  scene	  in	  which	  these	  tones	  are	  used	  as	  communication	  between	  humans.	  Thus,	  it	  may	  be	  that	  if	  infants	  are	  led	  to	  perceive	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  such	  as	  the	  whistled	  surrogate	  language	  used	  in	  Experiments	  1-­‐4	  as	  being	  produced	  by	  humans	  (and	  by	  humans	  of	  their	  own	  social	  group),	  activation	  in	  language	  areas	  might	  shift	  to	  be	  more	  similar	  that	  seen	  in	  response	  to	  spoken	  language.	  It	  will	  be	  interesting	  for	  future	  studies	  to	  examine	  if	  this	  is	  the	  case,	  as	  well	  as	  to	  elucidate	  the	  boundaries	  on	  what	  non-­‐speech	  signals	  can	  be	  processed	  as	  linguistic	  by	  the	  infant	  brain.	  	  	   97	  In	  addition,	  while	  the	  neuroimaging	  studies	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  have	  focused	  on	  activation	  in	  temporal	  area	  language	  regions,	  another	  avenue	  for	  future	  study	  will	  be	  to	  examine	  if	  other	  areas	  of	  the	  infant	  brain	  are	  differentially	  activated	  to	  language	  and	  non-­‐language	  signals.	  Previous	  research	  has	  identified	  posterior	  temporal	  brain	  regions	  as	  specially	  responsive	  to	  social	  stimuli	  in	  young	  infants	  (Farroni	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Lloyd-­‐Fox	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  If	  human	  infants	  detect	  language—and	  the	  native	  language	  in	  particular-­‐-­‐	  as	  social	  communication	  from	  early	  in	  development,	  activation	  may	  be	  evoked	  in	  these	  areas	  to	  language	  signals.	  Moreover,	  such	  activation	  might	  be	  particularly	  strong	  when	  infants	  perceive	  language	  signals	  to	  be	  produced	  by	  conspecifics	  and/or	  ingroup	  members.	  	  	  5.3	   Concluding	  Statement	  	  William	  James	  famously	  described	  an	  infant’s	  environment	  as	  a	  “blooming,	  buzzing	  confusion.”	  Surrounded	  by	  different	  sounds,	  symbols,	  and	  people,	  it	  is	  crucial	  that	  young	  learners	  be	  able	  to	  detect	  relevant	  communicative	  signals	  and	  communicative	  partners.	  The	  studies	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  demonstrate	  that	  contrary	  to	  James’	  expectations,	  the	  beginnings	  of	  such	  an	  ability	  appear	  present	  at	  birth.	  At	  birth	  and	  at	  four	  months	  of	  age,	  the	  infant	  brain	  is	  shown	  to	  respond	  specially	  to	  language,	  but	  with	  different	  patterns	  of	  activation	  to	  familiar	  versus	  unfamiliar	  language.	  Moreover,	  at	  11	  months,	  infants	  are	  observed	  to	  have	  different	  expectations	  for	  the	  individuals	  associated	  with	  familiar	  and	  unfamiliar	  language.	  Together,	  this	  work	  demonstrates	  that	  both	  language	  and	  general	  and	  the	  native	  language	  in	  particular	  are	  perceived	  as	  special	  from	  early	  in	  development,	  and	  may	  serve	  as	  shibboleths,	  directing	  young	  learners	  to	  communicative	  signals	  and	  communicative	  partners.	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   98	  References	  	  Aboud,	  F.E.	  (1988).	  Children	  and	  Prejudice.	  New	  York:	  Blackwell.	  	  Aboud,	  F.E.	  (2003).	  The	  formation	  of	  in-­‐group	  favoritism	  and	  out-­‐group	  prejudice	  in	  young	  children:	  Are	  they	  distinct	  attitudes?.	  Developmental	  Psychology,	  39(1),	  48.	  	  Ashburn-­‐Nardo,	  L.,	  Voils,	  C.I.,	  &	  Monteith,	  M.J.	  (2001).	  Implicit	  associations	  as	  the	  seeds	  of	  intergroup	  bias:	  How	  easily	  do	  they	  take	  root?.	  Journal	  of	  Personality	  and	  Social	  Psychology,	  81(5),	  789.	  	  Aslin,	  R.N.	  (2013).	  Questioning	  the	  questions	  that	  have	  been	  asked	  about	  the	  infant	  brain	  using	  NIRS.	  Cognitive	  Neuropsychology,	  29,	  7-­‐33.	  	  	  Baird,	  A.A.,	  Kagan,	  J.,	  Gaudette,	  T.,	  Walz,	  K.A.,	  Hershlad,	  N.,	  &	  Boas,	  D.A.	  (2002).	  Frontal	  lobe	  activation	  during	  object	  permanence:	  Data	  from	  near-­‐infrared	  spectroscopy.	  NeuroImage,	  16(4),	  1120-­‐1126.	  	  Bar-­‐Haim,	  Y.,	  Ziv,	  T.,	  Lamy,	  D.,	  &	  Hodes,	  R.M.	  (2006).	  Nature	  and	  nurture	  in	  own-­‐race	  face	  processing.	  Psychological	  Science,	  17(2),	  159-­‐163.	  	  Baron,	  A.S.	  (2013).	  Bridging	  the	  gap	  between	  preference	  and	  evaluation	  during	  the	  first	  few	  years	  of	  life.	  In	  Banaji,	  M.R	  &	  Gelman,	  S.A.	  (2013).	  Navigating	  the	  social	  world:	  What	  infants,	  children	  and	  other	  species	  can	  teach	  us.	  New	  York:	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  	  Baron,	  A.S.,	  &	  Banaji,	  M.R.	  (2006).	  The	  development	  of	  implicit	  attitudes	  evidence	  of	  race	  evaluations	  from	  ages	  6	  and	  10	  and	  adulthood.	  Psychological	  Science,	  17(1),	  53-­‐58.	  	  	   99	  Baron,	  A.S.	  &	  Dunham,	  Y.	  (2015).	  Representing	  "Us"	  and	  "Them":	  Building	  blocks	  of	  intergroup	  cognition.	  Journal	  of	  Cognition	  and	  Development.	  DOI:	  10.1080/15248372.2014.1000459.	  	  	  Baron,	  A.S.,	  Pun.	  A.,	  &	  Dunham,	  Y.	  (in	  press).	  Conceptual	  foundations	  of	  social	  group	  preferences.	  In	  D.	  Barner	  &	  A.S.	  Baron	  (Eds),	  Core	  Knowledge	  and	  Conceptual	  Change.	  Oxford	  Series	  in	  Cognitive	  Development.	  Oxford,	  UK:	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  	  Benavides-­‐Varela,	  S.,	  Hochmann,	  J.,	  Macagno,	  F.,	  Nespor,	  M.,	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (2012).	  Newborn’s	  brain	  activity	  signals	  the	  origin	  of	  word	  memories.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  109(44),	  17908-­‐17913.	  	  	  Bertoncini,	  J.,	  Morais,	  J.,	  Bijeljac-­‐Babic,	  R.,	  McAdams,	  S.,	  Peretz,	  I.,	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (1989).	  Dichotic	  perception	  and	  laterality	  in	  neonates.	  Brain	  and	  Language,	  37(4),	  591-­‐605.	  	  Bertoncini,	  J.,	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (1981).	  Syllables	  as	  units	  in	  infant	  speech	  perception.	  Infant	  Behavior	  and	  Development,	  4,	  247-­‐260.	  	  Best,	  C.T.,	  Hoffman,	  H.,	  &	  Glanville,	  B.B.	  (1982).	  Development	  of	  infant	  ear	  asymmetries	  for	  speech	  and	  music.	  Perception	  &	  Psychophysics,	  31(1),	  75-­‐85.	  	  Best,	  C.T.,	  McRoberts,	  G.W.,	  LaFleur,	  R.,	  &	  Silver-­‐Isenstadt,	  J.	  (1995).	  Divergent	  developmental	  patterns	  for	  infants'	  perception	  of	  two	  nonnative	  consonant	  contrasts.	  Infant	  Behavior	  and	  Development,	  18(3),	  339-­‐350.	  	  Bigler,	  R.S.,	  Jones,	  L.C.,	  &	  Lobliner,	  D.B.	  (1997).	  Social	  categorization	  and	  the	  formation	  of	  intergroup	  attitudes	  in	  children.	  Child	  Development,	  68(3),	  530-­‐543.	  	  	   100	  Binder,	  J.R.,	  Frost,	  J.A.,	  Hammeke,	  T.A.,	  Bellgowan,	  P.S.,	  Springer,	  J.A.,	  Kaufman,	  J.N.,	  &	  Possing,	  E.T.	  (2000).	  Human	  temporal	  lobe	  activation	  by	  speech	  and	  nonspeech	  sounds.	  Cerebral	  Cortex,	  10(5),	  512-­‐528.	  	  Boemio,	  A.,	  Fromm,	  S.,	  Braun,	  A.,	  &	  Poeppel,	  D.	  (2005).	  Hierarchical	  and	  asymmetric	  temporal	  sensitivity	  in	  human	  auditory	  cortices.	  Nature	  Neuroscience,	  8(3),	  389-­‐395.	  	  Boersma,	  P.,	  &	  Weenink,	  D.	  (2010).	  {P}raat:	  doing	  phonetics	  by	  computer.	  	  Bortfeld,	  H.,	  Fava,	  E.,	  Boas,	  D.A.	  (2009).	  Identifying	  cortical	  lateralization	  of	  speech	  processing	  in	  infants	  using	  near-­‐infrared	  spectroscopy.	  Developmental	  Neuropsychology,	  34(1),	  52-­‐65.	  	  	  Bosch,	  L.,	  &	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  N.	  (1997).	  Native-­‐language	  recognition	  abilities	  in	  4-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  from	  monolingual	  and	  bilingual	  environments.	  Cognition,65(1),	  33-­‐69.	  	  Broca,	  P.	  (1861).	  Remarks	  on	  the	  seat	  of	  the	  faculty	  of	  articulated	  language,	  following	  an	  observation	  of	  aphemia	  (loss	  of	  speech).	  Bulletin	  de	  la	  Société	  Anatomique,	  6,	  330-­‐57.	  	  Buttelmann,	  D.,	  Zmyj,	  N.,	  Daum,	  M.,	  &	  Carpenter,	  M.	  (2013).	  Selective	  imitation	  of	  in-­‐group	  over	  out-­‐group	  members	  in	  14-­‐month-­‐old	  infants.	  Child	  Development,	  84(2),	  422-­‐428.	  	  Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  K.,	  Burns,	  T.C.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (2010).	  The	  Roots	  of	  Bilingualism	  in	  Newborns.	  Psychological	  Science,	  21(3),	  343-­‐348.	  	  	   101	  Cameron,	  J.A.,	  Alvarez,	  J.M.,	  Ruble,	  D.N.,	  &	  Fuligni,	  A.J.	  (2001).	  Children's	  lay	  theories	  about	  ingroups	  and	  outgroups:	  Reconceptualizing	  research	  on	  prejudice.	  Personality	  and	  Social	  Psychology	  Review,	  5(2),	  118-­‐128.	  	  Carreiras,	  M.,	  Lopez,	  J.,	  Rivero,	  F.,	  &	  Corina,	  D.	  (2005).	  Linguistic	  perception:	  neural	  processing	  of	  a	  whistled	  language.	  Nature,	  433(7021),	  31-­‐32.	  	  Colombo,	  J.,	  &	  Bundy,	  R.S.	  (1981).	  A	  method	  for	  the	  measurement	  of	  infant	  auditory	  selectivity.	  Infant	  Behavior	  and	  Development,	  4,	  219-­‐223.	  	  Cosmides,	  L.,	  Tooby,	  J.,	  &	  Kurzban,	  R.	  (2003).	  Perceptions	  of	  race.	  Trends	  in	  Cognitive	  Sciences,	  7(4),	  173-­‐179.	  	  Cristia,	  A.,	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai,	  Y.,	  &	  Dupoux,	  E.	  (2014).	  Responses	  to	  Vocalizations	  and	  Auditory	  Controls	  in	  the	  Human	  Newborn	  Brain.	  PloS	  One,	  9(12),	  e115162.	  	  Csibra,	  G.,	  Henty,	  J.,	  Volein,	  A.,	  Elwell,	  C.,	  Tucker,	  L.,	  Meek,	  J.,	  &	  Johnson,	  M.H.	  (2004).	  Near	  infrared	  spectroscopy	  reveals	  neural	  activation	  during	  face	  perception	  in	  infants	  and	  adults.	  Journal	  of	  Pediatric	  Neurology,	  2,	  85-­‐90.	  	  Cvencek,	  D.,	  Greenwald,	  A.G.,	  &	  Meltzoff,	  A.N.	  (2011).	  Measuring	  implicit	  attitudes	  of	  4-­‐year-­‐olds:	  The	  preschool	  implicit	  association	  test.	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Child	  Psychology,	  109(2),	  187-­‐200.	  	  Dehaene,	  S.,	  Dupoux,	  E.,	  Mehler,	  J.,	  Cohen,	  L.,	  Paulesu,	  E.,	  Perani,	  D.,	  ...	  &	  Le	  Bihan,	  D.	  (1997).	  Anatomical	  variability	  in	  the	  cortical	  representation	  of	  first	  and	  second	  language.	  Neuroreport,	  8(17),	  3809-­‐3815.	  	  Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  G.,	  Dehaene,	  S.,	  &	  Hertz-­‐Pannier,	  L.	  (2002).	  Functional	  neuroimaging	  of	  speech	  perception	  in	  infants.	  Science,	  298(5600),	  2013-­‐2015.	  	  	   102	  Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  G.,	  Montavont,	  A.,	  Jobert,	  A.,	  Allirol,	  L.,	  Dubois,	  J.,	  Hertz-­‐Pannier,	  L.,	  &	  Dehaene,	  S.	  (2010).	  Language	  or	  music,	  mother	  or	  Mozart?	  Structural	  and	  environmental	  influences	  on	  infants’	  language	  networks.	  Brain	  and	  Language,	  114(2),	  53-­‐65.	  	  Dunham,	  Y.,	  Baron,	  A.S.,	  &	  Carey,	  S.	  (2011).	  Consequences	  of	  “minimal”	  group	  affiliations	  in	  children.	  Child	  Development,	  82(3),	  793-­‐811.	  	  Dunham,	  Y.,	  Baron,	  A.S.,	  &	  Banaji,	  M.R.	  (2015).	  The	  development	  of	  implicit	  gender	  attitudes.	  Developmental	  Science,	  1-­‐9.	  DOI:10.1111/desc.12321.	  	  Efferson,	  C.,	  Lalive,	  R.,	  &	  Fehr,	  E.	  (2008).	  The	  coevolution	  of	  cultural	  groups	  and	  ingroup	  favoritism.	  Science,	  321(5897),	  1844-­‐1849.	  	  Eisenberg	  R.B.	  (1976).	  Auditory	  Competence	  in	  Early	  Life:	  The	  Roots	  of	  Communicate	  Behavior.	  Baltimore:	  University	  Park	  Press.	  	  Ellis,	  A.E.,	  Xiao,	  N.,	  Lee,	  K.,	  &	  Oakes,	  L.M.	  (under	  review).	  Daily	  experience	  with	  diversity	  and	  infants’	  face	  perception.	  	  	  Emberson,	  L.L.,	  Richards,	  J.E.,	  &	  Aslin,	  R.N.	  (2015).	  Top-­‐down	  modulation	  in	  the	  infant	  brain:	  Learning-­‐induced	  expectations	  rapidly	  affect	  the	  sensory	  cortex	  at	  6	  months.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  DOI:	  201510343.	  	  Farroni,	  T.,	  Chiarelli,	  A.M.,	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  Massaccesi,	  S.,	  Merla,	  A.,	  Di	  Gangi,	  V.,	  ...	  &	  Johnson,	  M.H.	  (2013).	  Infant	  cortex	  responds	  to	  other	  humans	  from	  shortly	  after	  birth.	  Scientific	  Reports,	  3.	  	  Fenson,	  L.,	  Pethick,	  S.,	  Renda,	  C.,	  Cox,	  J.	  L.,	  Dale,	  P.	  S.,	  &	  Reznick,	  J.S.	  (2000).	  Short-­‐form	  versions	  of	  the	  MacArthur	  communicative	  development	  inventories.	  Applied	  Psycholinguistics,	  21(01),	  95-­‐116.	  	   103	  	  Fiske,	  S.T.,	  &	  Neuberg,	  S.L.	  (1990).	  A	  continuum	  of	  impression	  formation,	  from	  category-­‐based	  to	  individuating	  processes:	  Influences	  of	  information	  and	  motivation	  on	  attention	  and	  interpretation.	  In	  M.	  P.	  Zanna	  (Ed.),	  Advances	  in	  Experimental	  Social	  Psychology	  (Vol.	  23,	  pp.	  1–74),	  New	  York:	  Academic	  Press.	  	  Friederici,	  A.D.,	  &	  Alter,	  K.	  (2004).	  Lateralization	  of	  auditory	  language	  functions:	  a	  dynamic	  dual	  pathway	  model.	  Brain	  and	  Language,	  89(2),	  267-­‐276.	  	  Gerhardt,	  K.J.,	  Otto,	  R.,	  Abrams,	  R.M.,	  Colle,	  J.J.,	  Burchfield,	  D.J.,	  &	  Peters,	  A.J.M.	  (1992).	  Cochlear	  microphones	  recorded	  from	  fetal	  and	  newborn	  sheep.	  American	  Journal	  of	  Otolaryngology,	  13,	  226–233	  	  Gervain,	  J.,	  Mehler,	  J.,	  Werker,	  J.F.,	  Nelson,	  C.	  .,	  Csibra,	  G.,	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  ...	  &	  Aslin,	  R.N.	  (2011).	  Near-­‐infrared	  spectroscopy:	  a	  report	  from	  the	  McDonnell	  infant	  methodology	  consortium.	  Developmental	  Cognitive	  Neuroscience,	  1(1),	  22-­‐46.	  	  Gervain,	  J.,	  Macagno,	  F.,	  Cogoi,	  S.,	  Peña,	  M.,	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (2008).	  The	  neonate	  brain	  detects	  speech	  structure.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  105(37),	  14222-­‐14227.	  	  Glenn,	  S.M.,	  Cunningham,	  C.C.,	  &	  Joyce,	  P.F.	  (1981).	  A	  study	  of	  auditory	  preferences	  in	  nonhandicapped	  infants	  and	  infants	  with	  Down's	  syndrome.Child	  Development,	  1303-­‐1307.	  	  Gomez,	  D.M.,	  Berent,	  I.,	  Benavides-­‐Varela,	  S.,	  Bion,	  R.A.H.,	  Cattarossi,	  L.,	  Nespor,	  M.,	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (2014).	  Language	  universals	  at	  birth.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  111(16),	  5837-­‐5841.	  	  	   104	  Greenwald,	  A.G.,	  McGhee,	  D.E.,	  &	  Schwartz,	  J.L.	  (1998).	  Measuring	  individual	  differences	  in	  implicit	  cognition:	  the	  implicit	  association	  test.	  Journal	  of	  Personality	  and	  Social	  Psychology,	  74(6),	  1464.	  	  Grossmann,	  T.,	  Johnson,	  M.H.,	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  Blasi,	  A.,	  Deligianni,	  F.,	  Elwell,	  C.,	  &	  Csibra,	  G.	  (2008).	  Early	  cortical	  specialization	  for	  face-­‐to-­‐face	  communication	  in	  human	  infants.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  Royal	  Society	  B:	  Biological	  Sciences,	  275(1653),	  2803-­‐2811.	  	  Heiphetz,	  L.,	  Spelke,	  E.S.,	  &	  Banaji,	  M.R.	  (2013).	  Patterns	  of	  implicit	  and	  explicit	  attitudes	  in	  children	  and	  adults:	  Tests	  in	  the	  domain	  of	  religion.	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Psychology:	  General,	  142(3),	  864.	  	  Hewstone,	  M.,	  Rubin,	  M.,	  &	  Willis,	  H.	  (2002).	  Intergroup	  bias.	  Annual	  Review	  of	  Psychology,	  53(1),	  575-­‐604.	  	  Hickok,	  G.,	  &	  Poeppel,	  D.	  (2007).	  The	  cortical	  organization	  of	  speech	  processing.	  Nature	  Reviews	  Neuroscience,	  8(5),	  393-­‐402.	  	  Hirschfeld,	  L.	  (1996).	  Race	  in	  the	  making:	  Cognition,	  culture,	  and	  the	  child’s	  construction	  of	  human	  kinds.	  Cambridge,	  MA,	  US:	  The	  MIT	  Press.	  	  Hirschfeld,	  L.A.,	  &	  Gelman,	  S.A.	  (1997).	  What	  young	  children	  think	  about	  the	  relationship	  between	  language	  variation	  and	  social	  difference.	  Cognitive	  Development,	  12(2),	  213-­‐238.	  	  Hockett,	  C.F.	  (1963).	  The	  problem	  of	  universals	  in	  language.	  Universals	  of	  Language,	  2,	  1-­‐29.	  	  Houston-­‐Price,	  C.,	  &	  Nakai,	  S.	  (2004).	  Distinguishing	  novelty	  and	  familiarity	  effects	  in	  infant	  preference	  procedures.	  Infant	  and	  Child	  Development,	  13(4),	  341-­‐348.	  	   105	  	  Jusczyk,	  P.W.,	  Cutler,	  A.,	  &	  Redanz,	  N.J.	  (1993).	  Infants'	  preference	  for	  the	  predominant	  stress	  patterns	  of	  English	  words.	  Child	  Development,	  64(3),	  675-­‐687.	  	  Jusczyk,	  P.W.,	  Friederici,	  A.D.,	  Wessels,	  J.M.,	  Svenkerud,	  V.Y.,	  &	  Jusczyk,	  A.M.	  (1993).	  Infants′	  sensitivity	  to	  the	  sound	  patterns	  of	  native	  language	  words.	  Journal	  of	  Memory	  and	  Language,	  32(3),	  402-­‐420.	  	  Katz,	  P.A.	  (1983).	  Developmental	  foundations	  of	  gender	  and	  racial	  attitudes.	  In	  R.	  L.	  Leahy	  (Ed.),	  The	  Child’s	  Construction	  of	  Social	  Inequality	  (pp.	  41–78).	  New	  York,	  NY:	  Academic	  Press.	  	  Kelly,	  D.J.,	  Quinn,	  P.C.,	  Slater,	  A.M.,	  Lee,	  K.,	  Ge,	  L.,	  &	  Pascalis,	  O.	  (2007).	  The	  other-­‐race	  effect	  develops	  during	  infancy	  evidence	  of	  perceptual	  narrowing.	  Psychological	  Science,	  18(12),	  1084-­‐1089.	  	  Kelly,	  D.J.,	  Quinn,	  P.C.,	  Slater,	  A.M.,	  Lee,	  K.,	  Gibson,	  A.,	  Smith,	  M.,	  ...	  &	  Pascalis,	  O.	  (2005).	  Three-­‐month-­‐olds,	  but	  not	  newborns,	  prefer	  own-­‐race	  faces.	  Developmental	  Science,	  8(6),	  F31-­‐F36.	  	  Kinzler,	  K.D.,	  Dupoux,	  E.,	  &	  Spelke,	  E.S.	  (2007).	  The	  native	  language	  of	  social	  cognition.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  104(30),	  12577-­‐12580.	  	  Kinzler,	  K.D.,	  Dupoux,	  E.,	  &	  Spelke,	  E.S.	  (2012).	  ‘Native’Objects	  and	  Collaborators:	  Infants'	  Object	  Choices	  and	  Acts	  of	  Giving	  Reflect	  Favor	  for	  Native	  Over	  Foreign	  Speakers.	  Journal	  of	  Cognition	  and	  Development,	  13(1),	  67-­‐81.	  	  Kinzler,	  K.D.,	  Shutts,	  K.,	  &	  Correll,	  J.	  (2010).	  Priorities	  in	  social	  categories.	  European	  Journal	  of	  Social	  Psychology,	  40(4),	  581-­‐592.	  	   106	  	  Kinzler,	  K.D.,	  &	  Spelke,	  E.S.	  (2007).	  Core	  systems	  in	  human	  cognition.	  Progress	  in	  Brain	  Research,	  164,	  257-­‐264.	  	  Kinzler,	  K.D.,	  &	  Spelke,	  E.S.	  (2011).	  Do	  infants	  show	  social	  preferences	  for	  people	  differing	  in	  race?	  Cognition,	  119,	  1-­‐9.	  	  Kisilevsky,	  B.S.,	  Hains,	  S.	  M.,	  Lee,	  K.,	  Xie,	  X.,	  Huang,	  H.,	  Ye,	  H.	  H.,	  ...	  &	  Wang,	  Z.	  (2003).	  Effects	  of	  experience	  on	  fetal	  voice	  recognition.	  Psychological	  Science,	  14(3),	  220-­‐224.	  	  Krentz,	  U.C.,	  &	  Corina,	  D.P.	  (2008).	  Preference	  for	  language	  in	  early	  infancy:	  the	  human	  language	  bias	  is	  not	  speech	  specific.	  Developmental	  Science,	  11(1),	  1-­‐9.	  	  Kubicek,	  C.,	  De	  Boisferon,	  A.	  H.,	  Dupierrix,	  E.,	  Lœvenbruck,	  H.,	  Gervain,	  J.,	  &	  Schwarzer,	  G.	  (2013).	  Face-­‐scanning	  behavior	  to	  silently-­‐talking	  faces	  in	  12-­‐month-­‐old	  infants:	  The	  impact	  of	  pre-­‐exposed	  auditory	  speech.	  International	  Journal	  of	  Behavioral	  Development,	  37(2),	  106-­‐110.	  	  Kuhl,	  P.K.,	  Williams,	  K.A.,	  Lacerda,	  F.,	  Stevens,	  K.N.,	  &	  Lindblom,	  B.	  (1992).	  Linguistic	  experience	  alters	  phonetic	  perception	  in	  infants	  by	  6	  months	  of	  age.	  Science,	  255(5044),	  606-­‐608.	  	  Kurzban,	  R.,	  Tooby,	  J.,	  &	  Cosmides,	  L.	  (2001).	  Can	  race	  be	  erased?	  Coalitional	  computation	  and	  social	  categorization.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  98(26),	  15387-­‐15392.	  	  Lambert,	  W.E.,	  Hodgson,	  R.C.,	  Gardner,	  R.C.,	  &	  Fillenbaum,	  S.	  (1960).	  Evaluational	  reactions	  to	  spoken	  languages.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Abnormal	  and	  Social	  Psychology,	  60(1),	  44.	  	  	   107	  Lambert,	  W.E.,	  Anisfeld,	  M.,	  &	  Yeni-­‐Komshian,	  G.	  (1965).	  Evaluation	  reactions	  of	  Jewish	  and	  Arab	  adolescents	  to	  dialect	  and	  language	  variations.	  Journal	  of	  Personality	  and	  Social	  Psychology,	  2(1),	  84.	  	  Lecanuet,	  J.P.,	  Granier-­‐Deferre,	  C.,	  DeCasper,	  A.	  J.,	  Maugeais,	  R.,	  Andrieu,	  A.	  J.,	  &	  Busnel,	  M.C.	  (1987).	  Perception	  et	  discrimination	  foetales	  de	  stimuli	  langagiers;	  mise	  en	  evidence	  a	  partir	  de	  la	  reactivite	  cardiaque;	  resultats	  preliminaires.	  Comptes	  Rendus	  de	  L'Académie	  des	  Sciences.	  Série	  3,	  Sciences	  de	  la	  Vie,	  305(5),	  161-­‐164.	  	  Legerstee,	  M.,	  Barna,	  J.,	  &	  DiAdamo,	  C.	  (2000).	  Precursors	  to	  the	  development	  of	  intention	  at	  6	  months:	  Understanding	  people	  and	  their	  actions.	  Developmental	  Psychology,	  36(5),	  627.	  	  Lewkowicz,	  D.J.,	  &	  Hansen-­‐Tift,	  A.M.	  (2012).	  Infants	  deploy	  selective	  attention	  to	  the	  mouth	  of	  a	  talking	  face	  when	  learning	  speech.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  109(5),	  1431-­‐1436.	  	  Liu,	  S.,	  Xiao,	  W.	  S.,	  Xiao,	  N.	  G.,	  Quinn,	  P.	  C.,	  Zhang,	  Y.,	  Chen,	  H.,	  ...	  &	  Lee,	  K.	  (2015).	  Development	  of	  visual	  preference	  for	  own-­‐versus	  other-­‐race	  faces	  in	  infancy.	  Developmental	  pPsychology,	  51(4),	  500.	  	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  Blasi,	  A.,	  Volein,	  A.,	  Everdell,	  N.,	  Elwell,	  C.E.,	  &	  Johnson,	  M.H.	  (2009).	  Social	  perception	  in	  infancy:	  a	  near	  infrared	  spectroscopy	  study.	  Child	  development,	  80(4),	  986-­‐999.	  	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  Blasi,	  A.,	  &	  Elwell,	  C.E.	  (2010).	  Illuminating	  the	  developing	  brain:	  the	  past,	  present	  and	  future	  of	  functional	  near	  infrared	  spectroscopy.	  Neuroscience	  and	  Biobehavior	  Review,	  34(3),	  269-­‐284.	  	  	   108	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  Blasi,	  A.,	  Everdell,	  N.,	  Elwell,	  C.E.,	  &	  Johnson,	  M.H.	  (2011).	  Selective	  cortical	  mapping	  of	  biological	  motion	  processing	  in	  young	  infants.	  Journal	  of	  Cognitive	  Neuroscience,	  23(9),	  2521-­‐2532.	  	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  Blasi,	  A.,	  Volein,	  A.,	  Everdell,	  N.,	  Elwell,	  C.E.,	  &	  Johnson,	  M.H.	  (2009).	  Social	  perception	  in	  infancy:	  a	  near	  infrared	  spectroscopy	  study.	  Child	  Development,	  80(4),	  986-­‐999.	  	  	  Lloyd-­‐Fox,	  S.,	  Richards,	  J.	  E.,	  Blasi,	  A.,	  Murphy,	  D.	  G.,	  Elwell,	  C.	  E.,	  &	  Johnson,	  M.H.	  (2014).	  Coregistering	  functional	  near-­‐infrared	  spectroscopy	  with	  underlying	  cortical	  areas	  in	  infants.	  Neurophotonics,	  1(2),	  025006-­‐025006.	  	  MacKenzie,	  H.K.,	  Graham,	  S.A.,	  Curtin,	  S.,	  &	  Archer,	  S.L.	  (2014).	  The	  flexibility	  of	  12-­‐month-­‐olds’	  preferences	  for	  phonologically	  appropriate	  object	  labels.	  Developmental	  Psychology,	  50(2),	  422.	  	  Mattock,	  K.,	  Molnar,	  M.,	  Polka,	  L.,	  &	  Burnham,	  D.	  (2008).	  The	  developmental	  course	  of	  lexical	  tone	  perception	  in	  the	  first	  year	  of	  life.	  Cognition,	  106(3),	  1367-­‐1381.	  	  May,	  L.,	  Byers-­‐Heinlein,	  K.,	  Gervain,	  J.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (2011).	  Language	  and	  the	  newborn	  brain:	  does	  prenatal	  language	  experience	  shape	  the	  neonate	  neural	  response	  to	  speech?.	  Frontiers	  in	  Psychology,	  2,	  DOI:	  10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00222.	  	  	  May,	  L.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (2014).	  Can	  a	  Click	  be	  a	  Word?:	  Infants'	  Learning	  of	  Non-­‐Native	  Words.	  Infancy,	  19(3),	  281-­‐300.	  	  Mehler,	  J.,	  &	  Christophe,	  A.	  (1994).	  Language	  in	  the	  infant's	  mind.Philosophical	  Transactions	  of	  the	  Royal	  Society	  B:	  Biological	  Sciences,346(1315),	  13-­‐20.	  	  	   109	  Mehler,	  J.,	  Jusczyk,	  P.,	  Lambertz,	  G.,	  Halsted,	  N.,	  Bertoncini,	  J.,	  &	  Amiel-­‐Tison,	  C.	  (1988).	  A	  precursor	  of	  language	  acquisition	  in	  young	  infants.	  Cognition,29(2),	  143-­‐178.	  	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai,	  Y.,	  van	  der	  Lely,	  H.,	  Ramus,	  F.,	  Sato,	  Y.,	  Mazuka,	  R.,	  &	  Dupoux,	  E.	  (2010).	  Optical	  brain	  imaging	  reveals	  general	  auditory	  and	  language-­‐specific	  processing	  in	  early	  infant	  development.	  Cerebral	  Cortex,	  bhq082.	  	  Minagawa-­‐Kawai,	  Y.,	  Matsuoka,	  S.,	  Dan,	  I.,	  Naoi,	  N.,	  Nakamura,	  K.,	  &	  Kojima,	  S.	  (2009).	  Prefrontal	  activation	  associated	  with	  social	  attachment:	  Facial-­‐emotion	  recognition	  in	  mothers	  and	  infants.	  Cerebral	  Cortex,	  19(2),	  284-­‐292.	  	  Moon,	  C.,	  Cooper,	  R.P.,	  &	  Fifer,	  W.	  P.	  (1993).	  Two-­‐day-­‐olds	  prefer	  their	  native	  language.	  Infant	  Behavior	  and	  Development,	  16(4),	  495-­‐500.	  	  Moore,	  D.R.,	  &	  Jeffery,	  G.	  (1994).	  Development	  of	  auditory	  and	  visual	  systems	  in	  the	  fetus.	  Textbook	  of	  Fetal	  Physiology,	  278-­‐286.	  	  Nazzi,	  T.,	  Bertoncini,	  J.,	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (1998).	  Language	  discrimination	  by	  newborns:	  toward	  an	  understanding	  of	  the	  role	  of	  rhythm.	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Psychology:	  Human	  Perception	  and	  Performance,	  24(3),	  756.	  	  Nazzi,	  T.,	  Floccia,	  C.,	  &	  Bertoncini,	  J.	  (1998).	  Discrimination	  of	  pitch	  contours	  by	  neonates.	  Infant	  Behavior	  and	  Development,	  21(4),	  779-­‐784.	  	  Nazzi,	  T.,	  Jusczyk,	  P.W.,	  &	  Johnson,	  E.K.	  (2000).	  Language	  discrimination	  by	  English-­‐learning	  5-­‐month-­‐olds:	  Effects	  of	  rhythm	  and	  familiarity.	  Journal	  of	  Memory	  and	  Language,	  43(1),	  1-­‐19.	  	  Nazzi,	  T.,	  &	  Ramus,	  F.	  (2003).	  Perception	  and	  acquisition	  of	  linguistic	  rhythm	  by	  infants.	  Speech	  Communication,	  41(1),	  233-­‐243.	  	   110	  	  Nesdale,	  D.,	  &	  Flesser,	  D.	  (2001).	  Social	  identity	  and	  the	  development	  of	  children's	  group	  attitudes.	  Child	  Development,	  72(2),	  506-­‐517.	  	  Nosek,	  B.A.,	  Banaji,	  M.,	  &	  Greenwald,	  A.G.	  (2002).	  Harvesting	  implicit	  group	  attitudes	  and	  beliefs	  from	  a	  demonstration	  web	  site.	  Group	  Dynamics:	  Theory,	  Research,	  and	  Practice,	  6(1),	  101.	  	  Peña,	  M.,	  Maki,	  A.,	  Kovac̆ić,	  D.,	  Dehaene-­‐Lambertz,	  G.,	  Koizumi,	  H.,	  Bouquet,	  F.,	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (2003).	  Sounds	  and	  silence:	  an	  optical	  topography	  study	  of	  language	  recognition	  at	  birth.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  100(20),	  11702-­‐11705.	  	  Perani,	  D.,	  Dehaene,	  S.,	  Grassi,	  F.,	  Cohen,	  L.,	  Cappa,	  S.	  F.,	  Dupoux,	  E.,	  ...	  &	  Mehler,	  J.	  (1996).	  Brain	  processing	  of	  native	  and	  foreign	  languages.	  Neuroreport,	  7(15-­‐17),	  2439-­‐2444.	  	  Perani,	  D.,	  Saccuman,	  M.	  C.,	  Scifo,	  P.,	  Anwander,	  A.,	  Spada,	  D.,	  Baldoli,	  C.,	  ...	  &	  Friederici,	  A.	  D.	  (2011).	  Neural	  language	  networks	  at	  birth.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  108(38),	  16056-­‐16061.	  	  Petitto,	  L.A.	  (1994).	  Are	  signed	  languages	  “real”	  languages?	  Evidence	  from	  American	  Sign	  Language	  and	  Langue	  des	  Signes	  Québecoise.	  Signpost	  (International	  Quarterly	  of	  the	  Sign	  Linguistics	  Association),	  7(3),	  1-­‐10.	  	  Poeppel,	  D.	  (2003).	  The	  analysis	  of	  speech	  in	  different	  temporal	  integration	  windows:	  cerebral	  lateralization	  as	  ‘asymmetric	  sampling	  in	  time’.	  Speech	  Communication,	  41(1),	  245-­‐255.	  	  	   111	  Polka,	  L.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (1994).	  Developmental	  changes	  in	  perception	  of	  nonnative	  vowel	  contrasts.	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Psychology:	  Human	  Perception	  and	  Performance,	  20(2),	  421.	  	  Pons,	  F.,	  Lewkowicz,	  D.	  J.,	  Soto-­‐Faraco,	  S.,	  &	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  N.	  (2009).	  Narrowing	  of	  intersensory	  speech	  perception	  in	  infancy.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  106(26),	  10598-­‐10602.	  	  Price,	  C.J.	  (2012).	  A	  review	  and	  synthesis	  of	  the	  first	  20years	  of	  PET	  and	  fMRI	  studies	  of	  heard	  speech,	  spoken	  language	  and	  reading.	  Neuroimage,	  62(2),	  816-­‐847.	  	  Pun,	  A.,	  Diesendruck,	  G.,	  Ferera,	  M.,	  Hamlin,	  J.K.,	  &	  Baron,	  A.S.	  (under	  review).	  Foundations	  of	  infants’	  social	  group	  evaluations.	  	  	  Querleu,	  D.,	  Renard,	  X.,	  Versyp,	  F.,	  Paris-­‐Delrue,	  L.,	  &	  Crèpin,	  G.	  (1988).	  Fetal	  hearing.	  European	  Journal	  of	  Obstetrics	  &	  Gynecology	  and	  Reproductive	  Biology,	  28(3),	  191-­‐212.	  	  Quinn,	  P.C.,	  Yahr,	  J.,	  Kuhn,	  A.,	  Slater,	  A.	  M.,	  &	  Pascalis,	  O.	  (2002).	  Representation	  of	  the	  gender	  of	  human	  faces	  by	  infants:	  a	  preference	  for	  female.	  Perception,	  31(9),	  1109.	  	  Rialland,	  A.	  (2005).	  Phonological	  and	  phonetic	  aspects	  of	  whistled	  languages.	  Phonology,	  22(2),	  237-­‐271.	  	  Rivera-­‐Gaxiola,	  M.,	  Silva-­‐Pereyra,	  J.,	  &	  Kuhl,	  P.K.	  (2005).	  Brain	  potentials	  to	  native	  and	  non-­‐native	  speech	  contrasts	  in	  7-­‐and	  11-­‐month-­‐old	  American	  infants.	  Developmental	  Science,	  8(2),	  162-­‐172.	  	  	   112	  Rudman,	  L.A.,	  Greenwald,	  A.G.,	  Mellott,	  D.S.,	  &	  Schwartz,	  J.L.	  (1999).	  Measuring	  the	  automatic	  components	  of	  prejudice:	  Flexibility	  and	  generality	  of	  the	  Implicit	  Association	  Test.	  Social	  Cognition,	  17(4),	  437-­‐465.	  	  Saffran,	  J.R.,	  Werker,	  J.F.,	  &	  Werner,	  L.A.	  (2006).	  The	  infant's	  auditory	  world:	  Hearing,	  speech,	  and	  the	  beginnings	  of	  language.	  Handbook	  of	  Child	  Psychology.	  	  Sangrigoli,	  S.,	  &	  De	  Schonen,	  S.	  (2004).	  Recognition	  of	  own-­‐race	  and	  other-­‐race	  faces	  by	  three-­‐month-­‐old	  infants.	  Journal	  of	  Child	  Psychology	  and	  Psychiatry,	  45(7),	  1219-­‐1227.	  	  Sato,	  H.,	  Hirabayashi,	  Y.,	  Tsubokura,	  H.,	  Kanai,	  M.,	  Ashida,	  T.,	  Konishi,	  I.,	  ...	  &	  Maki,	  A.	  (2012).	  Cerebral	  hemodynamics	  in	  newborn	  infants	  exposed	  to	  speech	  sounds:	  A	  whole-­‐head	  optical	  topography	  study.	  Human	  brain	  mapping,	  33(9),	  2092-­‐2103.	  	  Sato,	  Y.,	  Sogabe,	  Y.,	  &	  Mazuka,	  R.	  (2010).	  Development	  of	  hemispheric	  specialization	  for	  lexical	  pitch-­‐accent	  in	  Japanese	  infants.	  Journal	  of	  Cognitive	  Neuroscience,	  22(11),	  2503-­‐2513.	  	  	  Saur,	  D.,	  Kreher,	  B.W.,	  Schnell,	  S.,	  Kümmerer,	  D.,	  Kellmeyer,	  P.,	  Vry,	  M.S.,	  ...	  &	  Weiller,	  C.	  (2008).	  Ventral	  and	  dorsal	  pathways	  for	  language.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  105(46),	  18035-­‐18040.	  	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  N.,	  Albareda-­‐Castellot,	  B.,	  Weikum,	  W.M.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (2012).	  A	  bilingual	  advantage	  in	  visual	  language	  discrimination	  in	  infancy.	  Psychological	  Science,	  23(9),	  994-­‐999.	  	  Sherif,	  M.,	  Harvey,	  O.J.,	  White,	  B.J.,	  Hood,	  W.R.,	  &	  Sherif,	  C.W.	  (1961)	  Intergroup	  Conflict	  and	  Cooperation:	  The	  Robbers	  Cave	  Experiment.	  	  	   113	  Shi,	  R.,	  Werker,	  J.F.,	  &	  Morgan,	  J.L.	  (1999).	  Newborn	  infants’	  sensitivity	  to	  perceptual	  cues	  to	  lexical	  and	  grammatical	  words.	  Cognition,	  72(2),	  B11-­‐B21.	  	  Shultz,	  S.,	  &	  Vouloumanos,	  A.	  (2010).	  Three-­‐month-­‐olds	  prefer	  speech	  to	  other	  naturally	  occurring	  signals.	  Language	  Learning	  and	  Development,	  6(4),	  241-­‐257.	  	  Shultz,	  S.,	  Vouloumanos,	  A.,	  Bennett,	  R.H.,	  &	  Pelphy,	  K.	  (2014).	  Neural	  specialization	  for	  speech	  in	  the	  first	  months	  of	  life.	  Developmental	  Science,	  1-­‐9.	  	  	  Sohmer,	  H.,	  &	  Freeman,	  S.	  (2001).	  The	  pathway	  for	  the	  transmission	  of	  external	  sounds	  into	  the	  fetal	  inner	  ear.	  Journal	  of	  Basic	  and	  Clinical	  Physiology	  and	  Pharmacology,	  12(2),	  91-­‐100.	  	  Soley,	  G.,	  &	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  N.	  (2015).	  Infants	  Prefer	  Tunes	  Previously	  Introduced	  by	  Speakers	  of	  Their	  Native	  Language.	  Child	  Development.	  	  Spelke,	  E.S.,	  &	  Kinzler,	  K.D.	  (2007).	  Core	  knowledge.	  Developmental	  Science,	  10(1),	  89-­‐96.	  	  Statistics	  Canada.	  2012.	  Focus	  on	  Geography	  Series,	  2011	  Census.	  Statistics	  Canada	  Catalogue	  no.	  98-­‐310-­‐XWE2011004.	  Ottawa,	  Ontario.	  Analytical	  products,	  2011	  Census.	  Last	  updated	  October	  24,	  2012.	  	  Sugden,	  N.A.,	  Mohamed-­‐Ali,	  M.	  I.,	  &	  Moulson,	  M.C.	  (2014).	  I	  spy	  with	  my	  little	  eye:	  Typical,	  daily	  exposure	  to	  faces	  documented	  from	  a	  first-­‐person	  infant	  perspective.	  Developmental	  Psychobiology,	  56(2),	  249-­‐261.	  	  Taga,	  G.,	  Homae,	  F.,	  &	  Watanabe,	  H.	  (2007).	  Effects	  of	  source-­‐detector	  distance	  of	  near	  infrared	  spectroscopy	  on	  the	  measurement	  of	  the	  cortical	  hemodynamic	  response	  in	  infants.	  NeuroImage,	  38,	  452-­‐	  460.	  	   114	  	  Tajfel,	  H.	  (1982).	  Social	  psychology	  of	  intergroup	  relations.	  Annual	  Review	  of	  Psychology,	  33(1),	  1-­‐39.	  	  Tajfel,	  H.,	  Billig,	  M.G.,	  Bundy,	  R.P.,	  &	  Flament,	  C.	  (1971).	  Social	  categorization	  and	  intergroup	  behaviour.	  European	  Journal	  of	  Social	  Psychology,1(2),	  149-­‐178.	  	  Trujillo,	  C.R.	  (1978).	  Análisis	  lingüístico	  del	  Silbo	  Gomero.	  Universidad	  de	  La	  Laguna,	  Tenerife.	  	  Uttley,	  L.,	  De	  Boisferon,	  A.H.,	  Dupierrix,	  E.,	  Lee,	  K.,	  Quinn,	  P.C.,	  Slater,	  A.M.,	  &	  Pascalis,	  O.	  (2013).	  Six-­‐month-­‐old	  infants	  match	  other-­‐race	  faces	  with	  a	  non-­‐native	  language.	  International	  Journal	  of	  Behavioral	  Development,	  37(2),	  84-­‐89.	  	  Vouloumanos,	  A.,	  &	  Gelfand,	  H.M.	  (2013).	  Infant	  perception	  of	  atypical	  speech	  signals.	  Developmental	  Psychology,	  49(5),	  815.	  	  Vouloumanos,	  A.,	  Kiehl,	  K.A.,	  Werker,	  J.F.,	  &	  Liddle,	  P.F.	  (2001).	  Detection	  of	  sounds	  in	  the	  auditory	  stream:	  event-­‐related	  fMRI	  evidence	  for	  differential	  activation	  to	  speech	  and	  nonspeech.	  Journal	  of	  Cognitive	  Neuroscience,	  13(7),	  994-­‐1005.	  	  Vouloumanos,	  A.,	  Hauser,	  M.D.,	  Werker,	  J.F.,	  &	  Martin,	  A.	  (2010).	  The	  tuning	  of	  human	  neonates’	  preference	  for	  speech.	  Child	  Development,	  81(2),	  517-­‐527.	  	  Vouloumanos,	  A.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (2004).	  Tuned	  to	  the	  signal:	  the	  privileged	  status	  of	  speech	  for	  young	  infants.	  Developmental	  Science,	  7(3),	  270-­‐276.	  	  Vouloumanos,	  A.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (2007).	  Listening	  to	  language	  at	  birth:	  Evidence	  for	  a	  bias	  for	  speech	  in	  neonates.	  Developmental	  Science,	  10(2),	  159-­‐164.	  	  	   115	  Weikum,	  W.M.,	  Vouloumanos,	  A.,	  Navarra,	  J.,	  Soto-­‐Faraco,	  S.,	  Sebastián-­‐Gallés,	  N.,	  &	  Werker,	  J.F.	  (2007).	  Visual	  language	  discrimination	  in	  infancy.	  Science,	  316(5828),	  1159-­‐1159.	  	  Werker,	  J.F.,	  &	  Tees,	  R.C.	  (1984).	  Cross-­‐language	  speech	  perception:	  Evidence	  for	  perceptual	  reorganization	  during	  the	  first	  year	  of	  life.	  Infant	  Behavior	  and	  Development,	  7(1),	  49-­‐63.	  	  Wernicke,	  C.	  (1874).	  Der	  aphasische	  Symptomencomplex:	  eine	  psychologische	  Studie	  auf	  anatomischer	  Basis.	  Cohn	  &	  Weigert.	  	  Wilcox,	  T.,	  Bortfeld,	  H.,	  Woods,	  R.,	  Wruck,	  E.,	  &	  Boas,	  D.A.	  (2005).	  Hemodynamic	  response	  to	  featural	  changes	  in	  the	  occipital	  and	  inferior	  temporal	  cortex	  in	  infants:	  a	  preliminary	  methodological	  exploration.	  Developmental	  Science,	  11(3),	  361-­‐370.	  	  	  Xiao,	  W.S.,	  Xiao,	  N.G.,	  Quinn,	  P.	  C.,	  Anzures,	  G.,	  &	  Lee,	  K.	  (2013).	  Development	  of	  face	  scanning	  for	  own-­‐	  and	  other-­‐race	  faces	  in	  infancy.	  International	  Journal	  of	  Behavioral	  Development,	  37,	  100-­‐105.	  	  Zatorre,	  R.J.,	  Evans,	  A.C.,	  Meyer,	  E.,	  &	  Gjedde,	  A.	  (1992).	  Lateralization	  of	  phonetic	  and	  pitch	  discrimination	  in	  speech	  processing.	  Science,	  256(5058),	  846-­‐849.	  	  Zatorre,	  R.J.,	  &	  Gandour,	  J.T.	  (2008).	  Neural	  specializations	  for	  speech	  and	  pitch:	  moving	  beyond	  the	  dichotomies.	  Philosophical	  Transactions	  of	  the	  Royal	  Society	  B:	  Biological	  Sciences,	  363(1493),	  1087-­‐1104.	  	  Zimmer,	  E.Z.,	  Fifer,	  W.P.,	  Kim,	  Y.I.,	  Rey,	  H.R.,	  Chao,	  C.R.,	  &	  Myers,	  M.M.	  (1993).	  Response	  of	  the	  premature	  fetus	  to	  stimulation	  by	  speech	  sounds.	  Early	  Human	  Development,	  33(3),	  207-­‐215.	  	  	   116	  Appendix	  	  	  Language	  and	  ethnicity	  questionnaire	  given	  to	  parents	  of	  infants	  who	  participated	  in	  Experiments	  5-­‐7.	  	  	   Language	  and	  Ethnicity	  Questionnaire	  	  Personal Data 	  BABY	  ID:_______________________________________________	  	  	  	  DATE	  OF	  BIRTH:	  ________________________________________	  	  DATE	  OF	  EXPERIMENT:	  _________________________________	  	  LANGUAGES	  SPOKEN	  BY	  FAMILY:	   	   	   ETHNICITY	  OF	  FAMILY	  MEMBERS:	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  NOTES:	  	   	   	   	   	   NOTES:	  	  TYPICAL	  DAY	  LENGTH:	  Wake	  up	  time:	  ______	  Bed	  time:	  ________	  Typical	  day	  length	  (max	  24):	  ________	  	  PARENTS/CARETAKERS	  (e.g.,	  parents,	  grandparents,	  babysitters,	  etc.):	  Who	  spends	  time	  with	  the	  baby	  and	  what	  language	  do	  they	  speak	  	  	  	  Who?	   Language	  Spoken	   Ethnicity	   What	  ages?	   More	  than	  1	  hour	  per	  week	   Hours/Week	   Since	  When?	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   117	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  FAMILY	  (e.g.,	  grandparents,	  siblings,	  aunt,	  uncles	  etc.):	  	  Who	  spends	  time	  with	  the	  baby	  and	  what	  language	  do	  they	  speak	  To	  get	  an	  idea	  of	  the	  people	  in	  the	  baby’s	  life,	  and	  what	  languages	  they	  speak	  	  Who?	   Language	  Spoken	   Ethnicity	   What	  ages?	   More	  than	  1	  hour	  per	  week	   Hours/Week	   Since	  When?	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  VIDEO	  CONFERENCING/	  TV	  To	  get	  an	  idea	  of	  baby’s	  experience	  with	  people	  on	  screens	  Does	  the	  baby	  participate	  in	  video	  conferencing	  (e.g.	  Skype)?	  Y	  /	  N	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Watch	  TV?	  Y	  /	  N	  Who/Shows	   Language	   Ethnicity	   What	  ages?	   >	  1	  hour	  a	  week	   Hours/Week	   Since	  when?	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  FRIENDS	  	   Who?	   Language	  Spoken	   Ethnicity	   What	  ages?	   More	  than	  1	  hour	  per	  week	   Hours/Week	   Since	  When?	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  BABY	  GROUPS	  (play	  groups,	  story	  time,	  mom/baby	  classes,	  etc)	  Do	  you	  attend	  baby	  groups?	  Which?	   Language	  Spoken	   Ethnicity	   What	  ages?	   More	  than	  1	  hour	  per	  week	   Hours/Week	   Since	  When?	  	   118	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  DAYCARE	  Does	  your	  child	  attend	  daycare?	  Since	  when?	   Language	  Spoken	  	   Ethnicity	  of	  day	  care	  provider	   Hours/Week	  	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	  	  NEIGHBORHOOD	  AND	  PUBLIC	  AREA	  How	  often	  do	  you	  go	  outside	  with	  your	  baby?	  TRAVEL	  Has	  the	  child	  lived/vacationed	  in	  any	  country	  where	  s/he	  would	  hear	  a	  language	  other	  than	  English?	  	  If	  yes,	  Where?________________________________________________________________________	  	  When?______________________________________________________________________________	  	  And	  for	  How	  long?____________________________________________________________________	  	  TOTAL	  ESTIMATE:	  	  ..............	  %	  L1/	  ...................	  %	  L2/	  ...................%	  other	  	  	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  ...............	  %	  E1/....................	  %	  E2/....................%	  other	  	  	  Where?	   Languages	  Spoken	   Ethnicity	   Days/Week	   Hours/Day	   Since	  When?	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0221483/manifest

Comment

Related Items