Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

A Place for Us : a song cycle for amplified pop tenor and chamber ensemble James, Glenn 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2016_february_james_glenn.pdf [ 6.82MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0221368.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0221368-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0221368-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0221368-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0221368-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0221368-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0221368-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0221368-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0221368.ris

Full Text

A Place for UsA song cycle for amplified pop tenor and chamber ensemblebyGlenn JamesB.Mus., Wilfrid Laurier University, 2007M.Mus., University of Toronto, 2009A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OFTHE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OFDoctor of Musical ArtsinTHE FACULTY OF GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL STUDIES(Composition)THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA(Vancouver)December 2015© Glenn James, 2015iiAbstractA Place for Us is a song cycle for amplified pop tenor and chamber ensemble (amplified string quintet, piano, electric bass, and drum set). It is approximately twenty minutes in duration and is divided into ten short sections. The text was written in collaboration with writer Tamara Chandon. It explores a love story using elements of an archetypal hero’s journey narrative. The music incorporates an eclectic array of styles and focuses on rhythmic attributes such as groove, syncopation, and backbeat.PrefaceThis dissertation is an original, unpublished, and independent work by the author, Glenn James.iiiTable of ContentsivAbstract....................................................................................................................... iiPreface......................................................................................................................... iiiTable of Contents......................................................................................................... ivList of Figures.............................................................................................................. viAcknowledgements....................................................................................................... viiIntroduction................................................................................................................. 1Musical Background............................................................................................................... 1Compositional Intent............................................................................................................. 1Compositional Considerations............................................................................................. 2Terminology............................................................................................................................ 3Chapter 1: Research and Influences.............................................................................. 41.1 The Art/Popular Music Debate...................................................................................... 41.2 Adorno on Popular Music..............................................................................................  41.3 Popular Music as Art........................................................................................................ 51.4 Popular Music’s Influence on Twentieth-Century Art Music..................................... 51.5 Musical Influences...........................................................................................................  61.5.1 Owen Pallett, Sufjan Stevens, and Sigur Rós....................................................... 61.5.2 Influences on Instrumentation and Sound.......................................................... 61.5.3 Influences on Form................................................................................................. 71.5.4 Influences on Vocal Writing.................................................................................. 91.6 A Place for Us in Context................................................................................................ 9Chapter 2: Lyrics and Voice, Groove, and Rhythm.......................................................  122.1 Text...................................................................................................................................  122.2 Vocal Style and Amplification........................................................................................ 122.3 Amplification of the Ensemble....................................................................................... 132.4 Rhythm.............................................................................................................................. 142.5 Groove............................................................................................................................... 14vChapter 3: Macroscopic View of Rhythmic Attributes.................................................  173.1 Section 1 (mm. 1–113).................................................................................................... 173.2 Section 2 (mm. 114–145)............................................................................................... 183.3 Section 3 (mm. 146–202)............................................................................................... 183.4 Section 4 (mm. 203–287)..............................................................................................  213.5 Section 5 (mm. 288–320)............................................................................................... 213.6 Section 6 (mm. 321–341)............................................................................................... 213.7 Section 7 (mm. 342–374)............................................................................................... 243.8 Section 8 and 9 (mm. 375–385 and mm. 386–425).................................................... 243.9 Section 10 (mm. 426–445)............................................................................................. 24Chapter 4: Melodic Motives and Harmonic Materials................................................... 284.1 Motive A and Harmonic Analysis.................................................................................. 284.2 Motive B and Harmonic Analysis................................................................................... 294.3 Harmonic Analysis of Climax......................................................................................... 34Chapter 5: The Piano as Equal, Accompanist, and Internal Voice of the Protagonist.... 38Closing Remarks.......................................................................................................... 39Bibliography................................................................................................................. 40Appendix A: Lyrical Text.............................................................................................. 43Appendix B: Musical Score........................................................................................... 44List of FiguresviFigure 1: Basic backbeat rhythm................................................................................... 2Figure 2: A Place for Us, mm. 65-66............................................................................... 8Figure 3: A Place for Us, mm. 24-28............................................................................... 10Figure 4: Two examples of swung rhythms.................................................................... 15Figure 5: A Place for Us, mm. 13-19............................................................................... 17Figure 6: A Place for Us, mm. 85-88............................................................................... 18Figure 7: A Place for Us, mm. 96-98............................................................................... 19Figure 8: A Place for Us, mm. 146-152........................................................................... 20Figure 9: A Place for Us, mm. 170-172........................................................................... 20Figure 10: A Place for Us, mm. 181-183, ten., vlns., vla., drums..................................... 21Figure 11: A Place for Us, mm. 258-260......................................................................... 22Figure 12: A Place for Us, mm. 294-298......................................................................... 23Figure 13: A Place for Us, mm. 371-372......................................................................... 25Figure 14: A Place for Us, mm. 386-387, drums............................................................. 26Figure 15: A Place for Us, mm. 434-436......................................................................... 27Figure 16: A Place for Us, Motive A............................................................................... 28Figure 17: A Place for Us, mm. 5-8, piano...................................................................... 29Figure 18: A Place for Us, mm. 14-15............................................................................. 30Figure 19: Gradual rise to dominant, A Place for Us, mm. 69-114.................................. 31Figure 20: A Place for Us, mm. 158-161, piano.............................................................. 31Figure 21: A Place for Us, Motive B, mm. 213-216, piano.............................................. 32Figure 22: A Place for Us, mm.229-231, pno., ten., strings............................................. 33Figure 23: A Place for Us, mm.233-236, pno., ten., strings............................................. 33Figure 24: A Place for Us, mm.297-300, pno., ten., strings............................................. 34Figure 25: A Place for Us, mm.341-342.......................................................................... 35Figure 26: A Place for Us, mm.371-372.......................................................................... 36Figure 27: Neoromantic theme in strings...................................................................... 37Figure 28: Tritone substitution (in Bb major and E minor)........................................... 37AcknowledgementsThis work would not have been possible without the support and guidance of many people. Deep gratitude and thanks to:Dr. Stephen Chatman, for his mentorship, encouragement, and all those pots of coffee shared in his office during composition lessons. I feel incredibly fortunate to have had such an enthusi-astic and open-minded supervisor guide me on my journey to find my compositional voice and unite my split musical identities.The members of my committee, Dr. Dorothy Chang, Dr. Keith Hamel, and Dr. Nathan Hes-selink, for their inspiring instruction and mentorship, as well as their time and effort in the thoughtful and rigorous review of this work. My inspiring lyricist, editor, collaborator, and wife, Tamara Chandon, for the immeasurable number of hours spent discussing , debating , revising , and listening to this work and many more to come. viiIntroductionA Place for Us is a twenty-minute amplified chamber ensemble piece that is structured as a song cycle. The piece is scored for pop tenor1, piano, amplified string quintet, electric bass, drum set, and audio engineer. The text explores a love story using elements of an archetypal hero’s jour-ney narrative. Composed in a style that mixes art and popular music2 influences, A Place for Us seeks to distill a compositional voice that is expressive, contemporary, and authentic. This document contextualizes the conception and completion of A Place for Us through the discussion and analysis of the popular/art music debate, the development of emotional imme-diacy between the performance and listener, and the analysis of the work’s rhythmic and har-monic features.Musical BackgroundThis project was conceived as a challenge to my compositional process. I specifically pursued the challenge of aesthetically merging my two separate musical identities. Those musical iden-tities — one being the classically trained pianist, theorist, and composer and the other being the self-taught rock guitarist, singer, and pop songwriter — reflect a duality in my training and development as a musician in both academic and amateur environments. Previously, these iden-tities have existed independently of one another, though each one’s goal has been the same: to develop a voice that is unique and authentic in its exploration and expression of true feeling.Compositional IntentI set out to explore the relevance and resources of both musical identities and their associated genres (art and popular music) with the intent of blending the two to form a new aesthetic that would not be classifiable as art or popular music alone. In doing so, I endeavoured to unite my two identities to produce a work that would embody 1) emotionality through melody; 2) groove through backbeat; and 3) stylistic diversity while maintaining motivic and harmonic unity.1 A trained tenor comfortable singing falsetto and singing without vibrato.2 For the purposes of this document, I will use the terms “art” and “popular” music. See “Terminology” for full definitions.12Compositional ConsiderationsBefore starting work on the piece, it was essential for me to understand how both art and popu-lar music affect me on an emotional, physical, and intellectual level. To arrive at that under-standing, I divided my compositional and aesthetic approach into three categories:1. Vocal and emotional immediacy: In an effort to stay consistent with the popular music medium, the singer of the piece needed to sing the text and vocalise passages without vibrato. The reason for this non-vibrato requirement was twofold: to expose the singer’s voice for what it truly is; imperfections and all, and to prevent the singer from singing in the style of art song, musical theatre, or opera. When I reflected on the singers who have influenced me most as a songwriter , I realized that an artist’s vocal performance feels authentic when they are able to convey “…the impression to a listener that that listener’s experience of life is being validated, that the music is ‘telling it like it is’ for them.”3 Popular music’s potential to be emotional and accessible is largely due to the immediacy with which it is delivered in the recorded medium. For this reason, I would con-sider a recording to be the definitive version of A Place for Us. To emulate that closeness in live performance, I decided to have the entire ensemble amplified and mixed by an audio engineer both in studio and during live performances. The audio engineer controls each instrument’s volume and can magnify and diminish the immediacy or sense of proximity of each member of the ensemble. 2. Groove-based music: Most popular music is rooted in backbeat. In 4/4 time, the kick drums sound on beats one and three and the snare drum hits on two and four (see Fig. 1). I wanted to employ the participatory nature and physicality of these rhythmic elements and incorporate them into the piece.Figure 1: Basic backbeat rhythm3 Allan F. Moore. “Authenticity as Authentication” Popular Music, Vol. 21/2 (May 2002), 220.33. Polystylistic approach: I aimed to unite several stylistic aspects of Western art music, namely the song cycle form, through-composed style, and ensemble choice — with the more overt fea-tures of popular music discussed in categories 1 and 2 above. TerminologyThroughout this document, I will refer to art and popular music. I define art music as the Euro-pean tradition of Western art music. Popular music can be loosely defined as “a field distinct from ‘classical’ or ‘non-Western’ musics or jazz.”4 However, the popular music that I reference in my discussions and analyses can be narrowed down to rock music from the mid-twentieth century to the present day. I will also refer to crossover artists, which I define as artists who fall between the two distinctions of art and popular music.4 Allan F. Moore. Analyzing Popular Music. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 1.4Chapter 1: Research and InfluencesIn order to write A Place for Us, I needed to better understand the music that influenced my aesthetic and uncover the mechanics of those influences. This chapter aims to illuminate the academic and artistic influences that I researched before and during the compositional process.1.1 The Art/Popular Music DebateArt and popular music are often considered to be binary opposites and are pitted against one another using language such as skilled/amateur, complex/simplistic, and high/low art.5 To this day, popular music continues to fall under scrutiny, seen as a lesser art form by academic skep-tics and modernists. This criticism of popular music reached its height in the mid-twentieth century when modernism was at its peak. In this section, I will discuss key topics in popular music criticism and explain how some of these criticisms and value judgments informed the composition of A Place for Us and allowed for the creation of a work that seeks to embrace the richness that both genres have to offer.1.2 Adorno on Popular Music Despite having been written in the mid-twentieth century, Theodor Adorno’s criticisms of popular music still stand as foundational theories in the field of musicolog y. The ongoing relevance of those criticisms lies in understanding how the general audience assigns value to different types of music. Adorno’s foremost issue with popular music is its standardization. He describes popular music as simplistic, banal, and overly repetitive. In his 1941 essay On Popular Music, several aspects of popular music are criticized, including phrase lengths, simplistic har-monic language, and the symbolic characters represented in the hit songs of his day. For Ador-no, in order for a musical work to be considered art music it must achieve a complete unity in multiple levels of its structure, where “every detail derives its musical sense from the concrete totality of the piece which, in turn, consists of the life relationship of the details and never of a mere enforcement of a musical scheme.”6 In an almost Schenkerian sense, Adorno suggests that only art music is capable of possessing the hierarchical relationships that connect macro and microstructures, i.e. musical syntax, harmonic patterns, and motivic development. Adorno 5 Theodore Gracyk. Listening To Popular Music, Or, How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love Led Zeppelin. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007, 3.6 Theodor W. Adorno. “On Popular Music” In Essays on Music. Ed. Richard Leppert. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2002: 439.5argues that popular music structure is incapable of this hierarchy — its structure is schematic, with each section (verse, chorus, bridge) being substitutable and only functioning as “a cog in a machine”7 regardless of its content. He warns that popular music’s standardization com-bined with its trivial and unoriginal lyrical content may at first appear original but to be wary that this novelty is only an illusion that disguises popular music’s true monotony and banality through “a veneer of individual ‘effects.’”8 I propose that these effects that Adorno refers to as distractions have the potential to provide strong sonic identifiers that listeners use to identify the subtle nuances that determine the feel of a particular piece of music. The sonic identifier is essential to the listener’s identification and appreciation of popular music. Adorno’s flawed application of art music’s syntactical approach to analysis highlights the need for a more qualitative approach to the analysis of popular music, one that derives meaning and value from performance aspects such as intimacy, immediacy, nu-ance, and artistic authenticity. 1.3 Popular Music as ArtOver the last fifty to sixty years there has been a large-scale rise in stylistic eclecticism in popu-lar music. Rock music in the 1960s took a “move away from a determining social function towards a stress on the listening context and, concomitantly, an interest in non-popular musics, such as modern jazz, folk-protest and avant-garde music, which are musics for listening.”9 This kind of stylistic cross-pollination elevated rock’s status and blurred the lines between art and popular music. Popular music in the 1960s no longer belonged to the entertainment industry solely as a bought and sold commodity. It became an art of its own kind. Popular music’s trans-formation into an eclectic art form entreated its listeners to discern each song’s unique sonic identifiers and appreciate the interpretation of the performer(s) and/or ensemble(s) based on the nuances of the performance. 1.4 Popular Music’s Influence on Twentieth-Century Art Music Twentieth-century art music composers such as Igor Stravinsky, Peter Maxwell Davies, George 7 Theodor W. Adorno. “On Popular Music” In Essays on Music. Ed. Richard Leppert. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2002, 440.8 Ibid, 438.9 Richard Middleton. “Articulating Musical Meaning/Re-Constructing Musical History/Locating the ‘Popular’” Popular Music, Vol. 5, Continuity and Change (1985): 32.6Rochberg , and John Zorn (among many others) wrote polystylistic music that fostered the “…integration of ‘low’ and ‘high’ styles, of the ‘banal’ and the ‘recherché’ — that is, [creating ] a wider musical world and a general democratization of style.”10 In the latter half of the twenti-eth century, post-modern music sought to combine various musical styles while simultaneously reigniting neoclassical and neoromantic forms and harmonic languages. In an interview, composer and multi-instrumentalist John Zorn describes the wide array of mu-sical influences that inspired him: “…world music, jazz, funk, hard-core punk, classical music, every possible kind of music.” He believed that the musical variety of the twentieth century was “…the same one Mozart had. He made use of everything around him.”11 1.5 Musical Influences It would be near impossible to list all of the artists and musicians who have shaped my musical and artistic voice. As a continuation of the above discussion regarding crossover artists, the fol-lowing section will focus on my most prominent crossover influences and how they influenced the composition of A Place for Us. A brief contextualization of the piece will also be explored to see how it fits into the spectrum of contemporary art music. 1.5.1 Owen Pallett, Sufjan Stevens, and Sigur RósOwen Pallett (b.1979) is a Canadian composer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist. His music inspired me to seek out the true potential of solo string instruments (most often found in art music) and combine them with instruments usually used in popular music (electric guitar, electric bass, drum set, etc.). What was particularly attractive about Pallett’s eclectic orchestra-tion was the ways that popular music trademarks like small motivic riffs took on new life when played by orchestral instruments. In A Place for Us, the cello and double bass often double the electric bass while it plays idiomatic riffs, while the upper strings play a melody that would have otherwise been played by an electric guitarist.1.5.2 Influences on Instrumentation and SoundThe instrumentation in A Place for Us was inspired by Pallett’s 2006 album He Poos Clouds. 10 Alfred Schnittke, “Polystylistic Tendencies in Modern Music” in A Schnittke Reader, ed. Alexander Ivashkin, trans. John Goodliffe (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2002), 90.11 John Zorn. Interviewed by Ann McCutchan. The Muse That Sings: Composers Speak about the Creative Process. New York: Oxford UP, 1999.7Pallett’s core ensemble on this album consists of an amplified string quartet, piano/synth, electric bass, and assorted percussion. Other instruments such as trombone, harpsichord, con-certina, and accordion also make cameo appearances. Pallett’s syncopated vocal lines help to separate them from the string timbres he explores. The strings play a range of techniques like pizzicato, harmonics, spiccato, and col legno battuto — these techniques provide a wide array of texture to the neoclassical accompaniment. The inclusion of an audio engineer in the ensemble of A Place for Us was inspired by the mix-ing and balance achieved on He Poos Clouds. In A Place for Us, the audio engineer is an essential contributing member who controls dynamic and timbral nuances in the piece. The engineer is an equal collaborator rather than a supplemental addition to the group. He or she acts as a con-ductor of sorts, but with more direct and interactive control than traditional conductors have. With the ability to change the overall volume of each player, the engineer can remedy potential balance issues using compression and equalization during live performance. For example in mm. 65/6, the engineer would likely increase the volume of a quieter pizzicato notes in the lower strings to balance with the piano, electric bass, and drum set (see Fig. 2). 1.5.3 Influences on FormAnother key influence on A Place for Us is Sufjan Stevens (b. 1975), an American composer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist whose work spans multiple styles and mediums. The BQE (The Brooklyn-Queens Expressway), one of Stevens’ 2007 works, could be classified in the musical genre or subgenre of chamber pop. In this way, Stevens is similar to Pallett due to his use of a mixture of acoustic instruments, live electronics, and drum machines. In contrast to other work by Stevens, The BQE avoids the use of lyrics, voice, or any trace of songlike struc-tures. The piece demonstrates how a small, amplified chamber ensemble can explore a common theme through short and through-composed structures. What also makes it unique is its struc-ture: Stevens uses neoclassical titles for each movement, opening with Prelude and an Introduc-tory Fanfare, followed by a series of seven movements that are interrupted by Interludes I-III, and concluding with an appropriately titled Postlude. A close analysis of Stevens’ work revealed that: 1) songs structures are not always needed to unite popular music elements with neoclas-sical instrumentation, and 2) chamber ensembles do benefit from some form of off or onstage mixing to control the balance of the ensemble (in Stevens’ case, he was dealing with upwards of thirty-six performers). 8Figure 2: A Place for Us, mm. 65-669When considering form and orchestration for A Place for Us, The BQE reinforced my decisions to mic each of the players individually (using Piezo contact mics) and compose each section of the piece without the use of traditional song structures or schematic units such as verses or choruses.1.5.4 Influences on Vocal WritingThe diatonic clusters, overall harmonic language, and vocal stylizations of the pop tenor in A Place for Us are directly inspired by the band Sigur Rós. Rós is an Icelandic post-rock band known for its dense orchestrations of layered guitars, synthesizers, and strings. Rós is also known for its lead-singer Jónsi’s iconic high falsetto vocals sung in a combination of Icelan-dic and Vonlenska (Hopelandic). Vonlenska is an “invented language in which ( Jónsi) sings before lyrics are written to the vocals. It’s of course not an actual language by definition (no vocabulary, grammar, etc.), it’s rather a form of gibberish vocals that fits to the music and acts as another instrument.”12 This invented language resembles a vocalise exercise, wherein a singer performs a melody on open vowel sounds. The dramatic power of wordless melody is effective when used in combination with lyrics and is employed frequently by Sigur Rós. Jónsi’s vocal style spawned the idea for the duplicity of the pop tenor’s role in A Place for Us. The use of vocalise passages without lyrics helped to enhance the overall expressivity of the music and diversified the role of the vocalist in the ensemble — it allows the pop tenor to not only communicate the text, but also act as another contrapuntal line within the musical texture (see Fig. 3).1.6 A Place for Us in ContextIn addition to the influences mentioned above, it is also necessary to situate A Place for Us within art music as a whole, both contemporary and otherwise. Art music composers have in-corporated popular music styles such as jazz and rock into concert music since the early twenti-eth century. Stravinsky experimented with many styles of popular music and incorporated their forms, harmonic content, and rhythms into his works. A direct jazz and ragtime influence is quite noticable, for example, in early works such as Stravinsky’s A Soldier’s Tale (1918), 12 Sigur Rós. “Sigur Rós – Frequently Asked Questions (algengar spurningar)” Sigur Rós – Frequently Asked Questions (algengar spurningar) Web. 1 July 2015.10Figure 3: A Place for Us, mm. 24-2811Piano-Rag-Music (1919), and even later work like Ebony Concerto (1945).13 More recently, American composer Michael Daugherty (b. 1954) adopted elements of jazz and rock music into his concert pieces. In his Niagara Falls (1997) for symphonic band, he explores the blues scale (the minor pentatonic scale), which is commonly used in blues and rock music, as the main motivic riff for the entire piece. Daugherty also employs jazz-like riffs, glissandi, and improvisatory descending falls in the woodwinds and brass to mimic a common punctu-ated descending slide gesture, often found in jazz band music. The adoption of popular music elements in A Place for Us (i.e. backbeat, simplified harmonic vocabulary, use of amplified pop tenor and ensemble, and lyrical and thematic repetition) illustrates the way that eclectic stylis-tic influences helped to shape the piece’s aesthetic. Lamento (2012), a recent song cycle by Canadian composer Christos Hatzis (b. 1953), falls into many of the same categories as A Place for Us. The mediums, eclectic use of style, and per-formance setup in the two pieces are very similar. Lamento was performed by Canadian singer-songwriter and pop contralto Sarah Slean. Like A Place for Us, Lamento is largely through-composed and utilizes melodic and lyrical repetition. It was Lamento’s through-composed, multi-movement design and its adoption of amplified voice that encouraged me to compose A Place for Us as a through-composed work sung by an amplified pop tenor.13 Robert Siohan. Translated by Eric Walter White. Stravinsky. New York: Grossman Publishers, 1970, 85.12Chapter 2: Lyrics and Voice, Groove, and Rhythm In this chapter I will explain compositional considerations that impacted many of the aesthetic choices in A Place for Us. The roles of text and amplification will be explored, as will the work’s syncopation, backbeat, and groove. 2.1 Text Popular music’s lyrics are often ambiguous in order to draw listeners into a song’s mood or emotional headspace. In A Place for Us, the protagonist of the story (represented and voiced by the pop tenor) narrates the story through direct address to his lover. The use of text allows for specificity in the communication of thought and feeling , which would not be possible through music alone. The pop tenor as the protagonist is responsible for evoking intense emotion and drama using the text. In this ensemble, the pop tenor is the only one who has “the ability to articulate private but common desires, feelings and experiences into a shared public language. It demands that the performer have a real relation to his or her audience.”14 It was important for the text in A Place for Us to accurately capture the essence of the protagonist’s feelings without heavy-handedly telling the story as if it were a literal account of events. The text was written in collaboration with writer Tamara Chandon. Chandon and I focused our efforts on writing impressionistic text that would tell the shape of a story. The text uses the archetypal frame of a quest story to interpret the challenges and obstacles met by the pro-tagonist who seeks a sense of individuality and freedom within his relationship and the world beyond.2.2 Vocal Style and Amplification The tenor is tasked with performing the text both clearly and with his own stylistic interpreta-tion.He is encouraged to improvise vocally to discover the protagonist’s true sound. Beyond the notes of any vocal melody lies a world of subtlety in a singer’s arsenal — one example is the variety of aspirate and glottal onsets that affect the way vowels are produced and thus manipu-late the ways that words and musical phrases are performed.15 In most popular music, these 14 Lawrence Grossberg. We Gotta Get Out Of This Place. New York: Routledge, 1992, 207.15 Donna Soto-Morettini. Popular Singing and Style: 2nd Edition. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014, 83-100.13understated vocal expressions frequently require amplification in order to distinguish a sing-er’s subtle vocal distinctions in tone and timbre. Amplification allows the singer “to enter into the … dramatic fiction — in rock and soul song it is not only words but paralinguistic sounds (intonation, rhythm, vocal texture, dynamics) involved in the delivery of words that carry implications of character and circumstance.”16 In most trained singers, the abovementioned variations in vocal production tend to happen by accident. Singers know when and how to use vocal effects to enhance the expressive power of their performance and generate a sense of closeness or intimacy with the audience. While the vocal part in A Place for Us is written in traditional Western musical notation, I did not indi-cate the aforementioned pronunciation techniques, as they are basic vocal-awareness skills that are learned by most singers during their early instruction. The absence of these pronunciation instructions also highlights Western music notation’s focus on pitch, rhythm, and articulation, while showing little regard “…towards other parameters not easily expressed in traditional nota-tion (mostly ‘immediate’ aspects such as sound, timbre, electromusical treatment, ornamenta-tion, etc.), which are relatively unimportant — or ignored — in the analysis of art music but extremely important in popular music.”17 It is for these reasons that the singer is instructed to make his own interpretative choices for vocal timbre and inflection, keeping in mind the pro-tagonist’s character and the intense emotionality of his role.2.3 Amplification of the EnsembleIt is of paramount importance that the connection between the tenor and the audience not be unnecessarily affected by the performance space — factors such as reverb, ambiance, and absorption might undermine the goals of the piece. The amplification of the ensemble allows the engineer to capture all of the instruments’ unique and subtle timbral qualities to provide a better overall balance. Though mentioned earlier, it is worth revisiting the importance of the audio engineer in the performance of A Place for Us. The engineer is responsible for maintain-ing the balance of all of the instruments within the ensemble. This includes mixing , equalizing , compressing , and/or adding any effects (reverb, chorus, etc.) to any of the instrument tracks that could enhance the overall sound of the group. The engineer in this case is not a post-production role and thus separate from the instrumentalists — it is the role most integral to 16 Paul Clarke. “‘A Magic Science’: Rock Music as a Recording Art.” Popular Music, Vol. 3, Producers and Markets. (1983), 206.17 Philip Tagg. “Analysing Popular Music: Theory, Method and Practice” Popular Music, Vol. 2, Theory and Method. (1982), 42.14the making or breaking of the performance. It is for this reason that the engineer must work with the ensemble as an active member, providing input on matters of interpretation, dynam-ics, phrasing , and timbral production, shaping the sound of the group by maximizing dynamic contrast, and expanding the expressivity of the musical material. 2.4 RhythmRhythm is responsible for the way we perceive sound in time. It is perceived through the dura-tional ratios of the sounds we hear and “involves a mental grouping of one or more unaccented beats in relation to an accented.”18 As listeners, we typically hear musical beats in groups of 2 or 3 subdivided pulses. These pulse groups define how each beat is divided in time and viscerally effect the way listeners experience the meter or the feel of the music. Our perception of rhythm and meter is highly dependent on our musical and cultural back-grounds. For this reason, it was imperative to find a universal rhythmic signifier to reflect the protagonist’s moods. The most tactile and biological rhythm we perceive is arguably the heartbeat. It seemed appropriate to relate the pulse of each section (which I will refer to as music-pulse) with the heart rate of the protagonist. The music-pulse rate is not identical to the heart rate of the protagonist (which is good, given that the pulse of A Place for Us peaks at eighth-note=168!) but corresponds relationally to the heightened or lowered anxiety levels of the protagonist. 2.5 GrooveSince it was my compositional goal to bridge art and popular music, I based a majority of the drum set patterns on backbeat and groove rhythms known for conjuring a sense of forward motion in popular music. Music is a temporal art form and therefore possesses a structure and form of syntax. Charles Keil notes that most music, with the exception of Western art music, is based in performance practices. Performance-based music composition does not rely on either notational systems to facilitate its performances, nor systems of analysis to derive its musical meaning. Thus a meaningful musical performance can be interpreted as a felt phenomenon.Popular music is considered a performance-based music. In Keil’s essays on groove and 18 Leonard B. Meyer. 1956. Emotion and Meaning in Music. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 102.15participatory discrepancies (PDs)19 he obser ves that during live musical performances, micro-timing variations exist between players that contribute to a piece’s groove or rhyth-mic feel. In contrast to most harmonic or melodic analyses, which are completed through the study of musical notation, these micro-timings are a cumulative process that “…makes music come alive and induces listeners to movement, to a feelingful, corporeal participation in the ebb and flow of a given performance.”20 Groove’s complex construction of micro-tim-ings and common swing rhythms inspired me to adopt compound meter in A Place for Us to maximize the potential for generating these participatory responses in both the players and the listener.Figure 4: Two examples of swung rhythms21In Figure 4, Keil demonstrates how swing rhythms are approximated in notation. In actuality, the examples fail to capture what live drummers would play due to the multitude of possibili-ties for micro-timing variations within a swung rhythm. These examples only suggest two gen-eral ideas of what a drummer might play on the ride cymbal. It should be noted that the foun-dation of any particular groove or swing is largely determined by the interaction between the drummer and bass section; more specifically, how pushed ahead (“on-top style”) or pulled back (“lay-back style”) each of the players executes their part against the subdivided pulses of the beat.22 Beats 2 and 4, the backbeat, always align with the meter in both styles of playing. It is the accent of the “+” of beats 2 and 4 in the lay-back drumming style that generate a particular groove. These offbeat accents create “the operation of anacrusis at multiple levels of rhythmic 19 Charles Keil. Music Grooves: Essays and Dialogues. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994, 96-108.20 Matthew Butterfield. 2010. “Participatory Discrepancies and the Perception of Beats in Jazz.” Music Perception 27, No. 3: 157.21 Charles Keil. Music Grooves: Essays and Dialogues. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994, 61.22 Ibid, 61.16structure” and have the ability to “[drive] an effective groove.”23 What follows are specific ex-amples from A Place for Us that incorporate backbeat, groove, and syncopation with a primary focus on the drum set and bass sections.23 Matthew Butterfield. 2006. “The Power of Anacrusis: Engendered Feeling in Groove-Based Musics.” Music Theory Online 12, No. 4.17Chapter 3: Macroscopic View of Rhythmic Attributes In this section I highlight more specific and isolated incidents of 3 against 2 polyrhythm to demonstrate the way they generate a feeling of rhythmic ambiguity and syncopation that pro-pels the groove forward.3.1 Section 1 (mm. 1–113)The opening of A Place for Us begins with a drone in the lower strings. There is no overrid-ing pulse or distinguishable meter; each instrument enters delicately to produce a sustained diatonic cluster harmony. While the dotted-quarter beat is detectable, the subdivision remains elusive, as the beat is divided into both two and three in the strings and piano (see Fig. 5). A more consistent compound duple feel is established when the piano begins to play sixteenth-notes in mm. 38 before a more rhythmically active section begins in mm. 50. At this point, the drum set enters and strongly marks each downbeat with the kick drum. The kick drum divides the second beats of each bar into simple duplets and syncopated offbeats to create a sense of variety and activity in the rhythmic groove. Both beat divisions, duplets and triplets, are pre-sented equally in the tenor’s melody as well to create a sense of tension between the rhythms in the ensemble (see Fig. 6 and 7). Figure 5: A Place for Us, mm. 13-1918Figure 6: A Place for Us, mm. 85-883.2 Section 2 (mm. 114–145)Section 2 is a short song in simple duple meter. While it is pertinent to note the implementa-tion of backbeat in the drum set throughout this entire section, it is the triplet figures in the piano and syncopated vocals that are the most significant. The duplets in the tenor and drum set in Section 1 provide syncopated accents to establish the rhythmic groove. In this section, the piano’s eighth-note and sixteenth-note triplets act in a similar manner. The faster surface rhythm of the piano in conjunction with the drum set groove produces more rhythmic com-plexity and a faster music-pulse — in this case, the eighth-note triplets. The section concludes with the simple duple drum pattern, which builds rapidly in mm. 145 to the next section in compound duple meter, where the eighth-note remains consistent in tempo. 3.3 Section 3 (mm. 146–202)The tempo increases gradually in the first four measures to give the music a more forward-driv-en feel. The movement opens with the piano playing dotted-quarter notes to situate the listener within the different meter (from Section 2’s simple duple). The pulse underlying the beat is soon clarified when the piano plays an ascending arpeggio that delineates the subdivisions of the newly established beat (see Fig. 8). The first violin challenges the new compound meter by 19Figure 7: A Place for Us, mm. 96-9820articulating tenuto quarter notes against the newly established dotted quarter beat. Through-out this section the surface rhythm gradually increases and builds in textural density. The drum set plays a rhythmic groove in mm. 170 — an anxious and fast hi-hat pattern reminiscent of the opening section, not only for its use of hi-hat, but for its pairing with the bass section (see Fig. 9). This backbeat rhythm persists throughout this section and serves as a framework from which the tenor and upper strings contrast with consist duplet divisions of the beat (see Fig. 10). Figure 9: A Place for Us, mm. 170-172Figure 8: A Place for Us, mm. 146-15221Figure 10: A Place for Us, mm. 181-183, ten., vlns., vla., drums3.4 Section 4 (mm. 203–287) A slow backbeat groove in the drums marks the start of Section 4. This is the most rhythmical-ly repetitive section in A Place for Us — the bass section and drums play driving eighth-notes to establish the solid foundation for the rhythmic processes mentioned earlier (PDs, rhythmic nu-ances). This collective drive forward is exemplified in mm. 254-263 with strong use of hemiolas and offbeat accents in the strings (see Fig. 11). An interesting offbeat figure appears in the viola in mm. 284. This hocket-like accompaniment is played against both violins’ staccato eighth-notes and adds a rhythmic surface rhythm excitement that leads into the following section. 3.5 Section 5 (mm. 288–320)The first violin maintains eighth-note pulses by playing continuous staccatos as the rest of the ensemble accents loud shots on the downbeats of each measure (mm. 288–294). The syncopat-ed backbeat returns in mm. 296 as the tenor sings “There is a place for us” and the music grows toward a large ensemble climax in mm. 298 (see Fig. 12). 3.6 Section 6 (mm. 321–341)This short section is the second of the two songs in A Place for Us. Despite its AB form, much of the rhythmic interplay between the tenor, piano (marked piano rhythm ad. lib.), electric bass, and drum set are to be improvised and discovered by the performers. The final two measures of 22Figure 11: A Place for Us, mm. 258-26023Figure 12: A Place for Us, mm. 294-29824this section extend the harmony of the closing cadence and propel the music rapidly into the next, most turbulent sections of the piece.3.7 Section 7 (mm. 342–374)The opening five measures of this section are harmonically and rhythmically unstable. This is the only section in A Place for Us where the time signature is uneven. The 7/8 time in this pas-sage, mm. 342–47, occurs after a well established 4/4 section. Because the eighth-note pulse remains constant between the two time signatures, the uneven eighth-note groupings in the 7/8 measures give the impression that the downbeat of each measure arrives prematurely, because each measure has been shortchanged by one eighth. Finally, the music returns to 4/4 in mm. 348, as the music cadences in G minor and the tenor reenters. After the tenor repeats “I tore myself apart to find you,” the music briefly modulates to the relative major, Bb major, as the lyrics “I know there is a place we’re looking for” are sung. A 2/4 measure extends the closing cadence (mm. 368) and the ensemble vamps on a short chord progression that prolongs the G minor tonic. This ends the section with a solo piano passage accompanied by a highly synco-pated bass section and backbeat drum pattern (see Fig. 13).3.8 Section 8 and 9 (mm. 375–385 and mm. 386–425)Section 8 sets up the piece’s climax by doubling the tempo of the backbeat rhythm in the drum set. The eighth-note offbeats are further accented in the violins, electric bass, and snare drum while the kick drum, piano, and bass section strongly emphasize each downbeat. The perpetual arpeggiated motion in the piano and the hi-hat’s fast rhythm evoke the protagonist’s passion. This fast-paced doubled time propels the music into Section 9 when the drums revisit a drum pattern from previous sections of the piece (see Fig. 14). This familiar drum pattern under-scores the climax as the piano’s fast surface rhythm continues until the final section of the piece. The double bass supports the harmonic foundation of this section, predominantly play-ing the roots of each chord, while the cello and electric bass have more freedom, which adds rhythmic fluidity and variety to the backbeat groove in the drum set.3.9 Section 10 (mm. 426–445)The final section recalls some of the ambiguous rhythmic traits introduced at the beginning of the piece, such as sustained harmonies over offbeat entries and repeated syncopation. How-ever, unlike the opening , the closing section is firmly rooted in a duple backbeat, as well as 25Figure 13: A Place for Us, mm. 371-37226punctuated sixteenth-note figures in the bass section that situate the meter and tempo with more certainty (see Fig. 15).Figure 14: A Place for Us, mm. 386-387, drums27Figure 15: A Place for Us, mm. 434-43628Chapter 4: Melodic Motives and Harmonic Materials Most of the harmonic language, large-scale harmonic progressions, and tonal organization of A Place for Us were constructed from simple motivic ideas. 4.1 Motive A and Harmonic AnalysisAn important interval that appears often is the descending semitone, or more specifically the 4-3 suspension (or fa to mi) that resolves over a tonic pedal. This small interval is the begin-ning of Motive A (see Fig. 16) and makes its first complete appearance in the piano melody in mm. 20. Figure 16 shows that Motive A Frag (the first four notes) form a pitch collection. Motive A Frag appears often throughout A Place for Us in both melodic and harmonic form. While the descending semitone is the most significant interval used throughout the piece, the third and fourth notes of Motive A Frag (C# to B) are also adopted frequently. For example, the descending whole tone is outlined in the opening plagal harmony in the piano, only a few measures before Motive A’s appearance. Figure 16: A Place for Us, Motive AThe opening measures of A Place for Us are harmonically static and lack any clear melody or overt rhythm. Despite the unwavering notes in the strings and piano, a harmonic tension is implied in the voice leading. The voice leading in Motive A outlines the harmonic pattern that dominates a majority of the piece — namely, the alternation between D major (1st harmonic frame) and E minor (2nd harmonic frame). The E minor harmony is also outlined in the last three notes of Motive A (see Fig. 16). Additionally, Motive A’s intervals are presented in three places: the melody, inner voices, and bass lines. When the intervals function as harmonic mate-rial in the piece, the tonic and subtonic harmonies (D major/E minor) are often used in alter-nation with each another but can also be layered together to create diatonic clusters rooted on 29droning tonic pedals (see Fig. 17 and 18). Despite alternating between D major and E minor, the note E is of consistent melodic significance in many sections of the piece. The layered levels of motivic integration create a sense of dynamic tension and cohesion.Figure 17: A Place for Us, mm. 5-8, pianoWith the first tenor entry, the music unexpectedly transitions to the relative minor (B minor) in mm. 65, despite the earlier E minor pizzicato section. A descending whole tone line outlines the piano’s upper voice leading as pizzicato strings articulate repetitive syncopated pulses. The opening vocal phrase steadily rises to dominant harmony (mm. 65-113), where it lingers until the beginning of the next section (see Fig. 19). A long-awaited resolution from dominant to tonic is circumvented and instead deceptively resolves to a first inversion Bb major chord (or bVI6 relative to the original home key). The chord progression for this movement is largely an alternation between Bb major and A minor. This descending semitone motion of the bass line is a transposition of the descending semitone interval in Motive A. Most of this section consists of descending diatonic bass line motion.Due to the prevalence of descending major and minor 2nds in the melodic material, the har-monic vocabulary is also generated from much of Motive A’s pitch content. Many diatonic clus-ters appear in much of the piece’s harmonic content for this reason. For example, in the piano part in mm. 158-161 (see Fig. 20), the inner voices rise and fall in whole tones and semitones, creating a diatonic clustering in the harmonies above the bass line’s ascending motion toward dominant harmony. 4.2 Motive B and Harmonic AnalysisIn addition to the intervallic content of Motive A’s recurrence in melodic and inner voice pas-sages, the descending 2nds (major and minor) are often present in the bass line harmonies as well. For example, in mm. 213–230, the harmonies alternate between E minor and G major over a D in the bass. It is during this progression that Motive B is introduced on the piano. Mo-tive A and B return throughout the piece in many fragmented forms (see Fig. 21). The harmon-ic content in this section consists of two harmonies, E minor and a whole-tone step down to D, 30Figure 18: A Place for Us, mm. 14-1531Figure 19: Gradual rise to dominant, A Place for Us, mm. 69-114Figure 20: A Place for Us, mm. 158-161, piano32which is often harmonized as G/D or Bm/D. However the bass line is harmonized, the alter-nate chord to E minor should be heard as dominant and should serve as an opposing harmony to the section’s key center. The harmonic motion here is reversed compared to the opening progression, where D major is harmonically challenged when it ascends to E minor. In addition to this section’s E minor key center, a focus on the note E (herein E-note centricity) is prevalent in melodic passages, especially at the ends of phrases (see Fig. 22 and 23). The E-note centric-ity is consistent in other sections as well, for example in mm. 288, when it is re-harmonized in A major/F# minor and modulates to an A mixolydian mode (a common scale in rock and blues music). The mixolydian passage, due to its flattened scale degree 7, deceptively resolves to IV6 (of A major) in mm. 296, and through bVII in mm. 298/99, which tonicizes the music back to D major (see Fig. 24). Figure 21: A Place for Us, Motive B, mm. 213-216, piano33Figure 23: A Place for Us, mm.233-236, pno., ten., stringsFigure 22: A Place for Us, mm.229-231, pno., ten., strings34Figure 24: A Place for Us, mm.297-300, pno., ten., strings4.3 Harmonic Analysis of ClimaxAs mentioned in the preceding section on rhythm (3.7), Section 7 abruptly changes to 7/8 and interrupts the duple backbeat. What is harmonically jarring at this same point is the sudden change from A major to G minor (see Fig. 25). The harmonic and rhythmic material directly reflects the protagonist’s instability and anxieties in these measures. The harmonic rhythm slows down significantly during this section, changing every two to four measures. The tenor melody posts on the note D as the harmonies fluctuate between G minor and Eb flat major (bVI). The second part of the vocal phrase recalls the Bb major key center of Section 2 — the tenor sings “I know there is a place we’re looking for” (mm. 364–366). The text and harmonies are meant to represent hope and salvation for the protagonist. After this brief section that centers around Bb major, the music cadences in G minor and vamps on a repeated two-measure progression. The piano plays florid and syncopated descending lines that lock with the strings’ and drums’ rhythmic shots (see Fig. 26). After this vamp-like piano solo, there is a strong emphasis back toward the dominant of Bb major (V6/4). This dominant is prolonged, alternating between V6/4 and IV. This dominant prolongation builds tension and 35Figure 25: A Place for Us, mm.341-342evokes a feeling of unresolvedness, which is further heightened by a growing crescendo that builds to the piece’s final climax. A new neoromantic theme in E minor is played by the violins, viola, and piano. This theme also draws on Motive A Frag 1 with its use of the descending semi-tone as its first interval (see Fig. 27).The harmonic juxtaposition of E minor after a V6/4 of Bb major is somewhat jarring due to the overwhelming presence of E minor earlier on. In this case, the V6/4 of Bb major acts as a domi-nant tri-tone substitution for the dominant of E minor (see Fig. 28). The harmonic foundation of this section mirrors that of the previous G minor section, as the harmonies alternate from tonic to bVI. The final section focuses back on the piece’s D major/E minor cluster harmonies — this time beginning with E minor with a raised scale degree 6, similar to the modality of Section 4. The harmonies are closely related to those at the beginning and are largely based on motivic fragments of both Motive A and B.36Figure 26: A Place for Us, mm.371-37237Figure 27: Neoromantic theme in stringsFigure 28: Tritone substitution (in Bb major and E minor)38Chapter 5: The Piano as Equal, Accompanist, and Internal Voice of the ProtagonistDue to the amplification of each instrument in the ensemble, most instruments in A Place for Us have near-equal prominence in the overall sound of the group. Despite this, the piano plays a significant role in a chamber ensemble of this size and it takes on multiple roles over the course of the piece. I will briefly list three roles the piano plays in A Place for Us to offer insight into the compositional aesthetic of the piece. The first and most basic role the piano plays is that of an equal with the rest of the group — the piano shares contrapuntal lines, occasionally rises from the musical texture with melodic prece-dence, and participates in punctuating important harmonic, rhythmic, and structural events in the piece, all of which are in conjunction with the other performers in the group. In addition to contributing on an equal plane, it is worthwhile to note that the piano is the only instrument in the ensemble with the ability to produce spanned-out harmonic voicings. Because of this, the piano takes on a second role, the role of the accompanist. In this role, the piano provides supportive harmonic backdrops for much of the melodic and more rhythmically active sec-tions in the tenor, strings, and drums. Due to the piano’s ability to execute passages with a large separation between the hands, and thus a potentially large separation between the pitch-spaces that the hands occupy, a conscious effort was made to avoid the piano playing in unison with the string parts or tenor melodies too often. The third and final role the piano often plays is the most intrinsically tied to the compositional process of A Place for Us as a whole. As men-tioned at the beginning of this document, the initial goal in composing the piece was to unite my two musical identities: the composer and the songwriter. When setting out to write much of the melody and text for A Place for Us, much of the music was improvised and written at the piano itself — a tradition commonly practised by songwriters and composers alike. This tactile experience of composing at the piano resulted in the piano representing a subconscious inter-nal voice of the protagonist. Though this connection cannot be explicitly extrapolated from A Place for Us, it is still important to note that writing at the piano informed much of the compo-sitional process and thus the creation of a majority of the tenor/protagonist’s melody and text. 39Closing RemarksI approached this project with the hope of uniting two seemingly opposite aspects of my mu-sicality. I sought to locate a more authentic compositional voice by fusing influences from art and popular music and experimenting with a narrative structure. My hope was to create music that best expressed my truest emotions and genuine musical intentions. With its combina-tion of the immediacy of the voice, the participatory nature of groove rhythms, and a wealth of polystylistic influences, A Place for Us does not readily fit into one category or another; it is neither art music nor popular music. What I found in my research for A Place for Us was that certain musical and dramatic elements are shared by art and popular music. It was through my own conception and creation that I discovered methods to bind those elements into one work that crossed stylistic boundaries. My two musical identities have only just started to co-operate and collaborate. Going forward, I hope to write music that continues to dissolve the aesthetic barriers that separate art and popular music, capitalizing on the strengths of both genres and exploring the tensions in their differences.40BibliographyAdorno, Theodor W. “On Popular Music” in Essays on Music. Ed. Richard Leppert. Berkeleyand Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2002, 439.Butler, Mark J. Unlocking the Groove: Rhythm, Meter, and Musical Design in Electronic DanceMusic. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. 2006. Butterfield, Matthew. 2010. “Participatory Discrepancies and the Perception of Beats in Jazz.”Music Perception: An Interdisciplinary Journal Vol. 27, No. 3 (February 2010): 157-176.Butterfield, Matthew. 2006. “The Power of Anacrusis: Engendered Feeling in Groove-Based Musics.” Music Theory Online 12, No. 4. Web. 13 June 2015.Chester, Andrew. “Second thoughts on a rock aesthetic: The Band” New Left Review, 1/62 (August 1970): 75-82.Clarke, Eric F. Ways Of Listening. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.Clarke, Paul. “‘A Magic Science’: Rock Music as a Recording Art.” Popular Music, Vol. 3, Producers and Markets. (1983): 195-213. Danielsen, Anne. Musical Rhythm in the Age of Digital Reproduction. Farnham, Surrey, England: Ashgate, 2010.De Clercq, Trevor and Temperley, David. “A corpus analysis of rock harmony” Popular Music, Vol. 30/1 ( January 2011): 47-70.Everett, Walter. 2004. “Making sense of rock’s tonal systems” Music Theory Online. Web. 19 April 2015.George, Graham. “The Structure of Dramatic Music 1607-1909” The Musical Quarterly, Vol. 52/4 (October 1966): 465-482.Gracyk, Theodore. Listening To Popular Music, Or, How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love Led Zeppelin. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007.41Gracyk, Theodore. “The Aesthetics of Popular Music” The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ISSN 2161-0002. <http://www.iep.utm.edu/music-po/> 2 February 2015.Gracyk, Theodore. “Valuing and Evaluating Popular Music” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 57/2, Aesthetics and Popular Culture (Spring 1999): 205-220.Grossberg, Lawrence. “Boring Day in Paradise: Rock and Roll and the Empowerment of Everyday Life” Popular Music, Vol. 4, Performers and Audiences (1984): 225-258.Grossberg, Lawrence. We Gotta Get Out Of This Place. New York: Routledge, 1992.Hasty, Christopher Francis. Meter as Rhythm. New York: Oxford UP, 1997.Hennion, Antoine. “The Production of Success: An Anti-Musicology of the Pop Song” Popular Music, Vol. 3, Producers and Markets (1983): 159-193.Keil, Charles, and Stephen Feld. Music Grooves: Essays and Dialogues. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994.Keil, Charles. Urban Blues. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966.Madison, Guy, and George Sioros. “What Musicians Do to Induce the Sensation of Groove in Simple and Complex Melodies, and How Listeners Perceive It.” Frontiers in Psychology 5 (2014): 894. PMC. Web. 18 March 2015.Meyer, Leonard B. 1956. Emotion and Meaning in Music. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.McCutchan, Ann. The Muse That Sings: Composers Speak about the Creative Process. New York: Oxford UP, 1999.Middleton, Richard. “Articulating Musical Meaning/Re-Constructing Musical History/Locating the ‘Popular’” Popular Music, Vol. 5, Continuity and Change (1985): 5-43.Middleton, Richard. Voicing the Popular: On the Subjects of Popular Music. New York: Routledge, 2006.Moore, Allan F. Analyzing Popular Music. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.Moore, Allan. “Authenticity as Authentication” Popular Music, Vol. 21/2 (May 2002): 209-223.42Shepherd, John. “A Theoretical Model for the Sociomusicological Analysis of Popular Musics” Popular Music, Vol. 2, Theory and Method (1982): 145-177.Sigur  Rós. “Sigur  Rós – Frequently Asked Questions (algengar spurningar)” Sigur  Rós – Frequently Asked Questions (algengar spurningar). Web. 1 July 2015.Siohan, Robert. Translated by Eric Walter White. Stravinsky. New York: Grossman Publishers, 1970.Soto-Morettini, Donna. Popular Singing and Style: 2nd Edition. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014.Stephenson, Ken. What to Listen For in Rock: A Stylistic Analysis. New Haven: Yale University Press. 2002.Sufjan Stevens. Interviewed by Brandon Stosuy. It’s Sufjan Stevens’ Way or the Highway. <http://www.interviewmagazine.com/music/sufjan-stevens-bqe> 3 July 2015.Symes, Colin. “Beating up the Classics: Aspects of a Compact Discourse” Popular Music, Vol. 16/1 ( January 1997): 81-95.Tagg, Philip. “Analysing Popular Music: Theory, Method and Practice” Popular Music, Vol. 2, Theory and Method (1982): 37-67.Tagg, Philip. “Popular Music Studies versus the ‘Other’” Paper delivered on December 14, 1996 at symposium ‘Music and Life-world. Otherness and Transgression in the Culture of the 20th Century.’Temperley, David. “Syncopation in Rock: A Perceptual Perspective.” Popular Music, Vol. 18/1 (1999): 19–40.Van Der Merwe, Peter. Origins of the Popular Style: The Antecedents of Twentieth-Century Popular Music. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992. Weisethaunet, Hans. “Is There Such a Thing as the ‘Blue Note’?” Popular Music, Vol. 20/1 ( January 2001): 99-116.Zbikowski, Lawrence M. “Modelling the Groove: Conceptual Structure and Popular Music” Journal of the Royal Musical Association, Vol. 129, No. 2 (2004): 272-297.43Appendix A: Lyrical Textthere is no placefor us herein the darkin the cold darkno place, no place, no placewe can’t stay herewe could leave herefind something newa place for usa place for uswe will find itI knowwe’ve travelled farblisters on our feetbacks broke downbones burned uplooking and searchingwithout a maplost and blindblind and lostit is there?a place for usa place, a place for usI searched for youI searched for youI’ll stay with you foreverthere is a placea place for uswhen night fallswe wait in darknesswe wait in darknessin darknessgrey black night we ride out the darknessand wait for the lightthe rain fallsthe wind howlsI won’t sleepI won’t sleepI’ll watch over youI’ll watch over youwe were born scaredlive scaredwhy won’t you gowhy don’t you believe I know, I knowI know, I knowI know, I knowthere’s a place for usyou say that you are my prisonprisontake my lifehand down my sentenceI’ll stand trialaccept your condemnationyou sayyou are my prisonyou don’t knowyou don’t knowyou’re my freedomI tore myself apart to find youI tore myself apart to find youI tore myself upI tore myself upto come and find youto come and find youI found the wayI know there is a place we’re looking forwhen the dark fallswe’ll walk through the nightinto the sunrisewe’ll follow the lightwhen the dark fallswe’ll be togetherwe will find itin this placewe’ll stay we’ll stay togetherwe’ll stay foreverwe’ll stay together44A Place for UsA song cycle for amplified pop tenor and chamber ensembleMusic: Glenn JamesText: Tamara Chandon and Glenn James© 2015, Glenn James and Tamara ChandonAppendix B: Musical Score45InstrumentationPop tenor1Violin 1Violin 2ViolaCelloDouble bassPianoElectric bass guitarDrum setAmplificationAll instruments are amplified, with the exception of the drum set. The drum set can be ampli-fied if the performance space demands it. All string instruments (except electric bass guitar) are amplified using contact microphones. An audio engineer is recommended to balance the ensem-ble and add any post-production that may be needed.Drum Set Legend1 A trained tenor that is comfortable singing without vibrato in the falsetto range.°¢{Pop TenorViolin 1Violin 2ViolaVioloncelloContrabassPianoElectric BassDrum SetIn a peaceful sadnessq. = 50 ppppen dehorspp68686868686868686868&‹ ##Score in C∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑Music: Glenn JamesText: Tamara ChandonA Place for Usfor amplified pop tenor and chamber ensemble&##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑B## ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑≤?##≤ ≤-&##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑-?##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙™˙™˙™˙™œ™œ™˙™˙˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™Œ™ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™46°¢{°¢{Vc.Cb.Pno.7Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassMmhumming, breathe where necessaryp A11pppppppp986898689868986898689868986898689868?##≤-≥-≤ ≥?##≥-≤ ≥&##- -3 3?##&‹ ## ∑ ∑&##∑ ∑ ∑≤ ≥ ≤ ≥-&##∑ ∑≤≥ ≤ ≥-B## ∑≤ ≥ ≤ ≥-?##≤∑ ∑≤ ≥ ≤ ≥?##≤∑ ∑≤ ≥ ≤ ≥&##?##&∑?##∑ ∑ ∑œjœ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙™˙™˙™œ™œ™˙˙ ™™œ œ œœ ™ ˙˙ ™™œœœ ™™™œ œ œ œ œœœœ œj œœœ ™™™œ œ œ œ œœœœ ™™™™‰œœœœ™™ ˙˙™™Œ™ œ ™Œ™ œ ™Œ™Œ™œ™˙™˙™œ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œJœ œ™œ œ œ œ™œ™˙™œ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œj œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™˙™˙™ Œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œJ œ œ™œ œ œ œ™œ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œ™œ™œ™˙™˙™˙™˙™˙™˙˙˙˙ ™™™™ œœœœ ™™™™œœœœ ™™™™ ˙˙˙˙ ™™™™ Œ ™ ˙˙˙˙ ™™™™ œœœœ ™™™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™˙™˙™Œ™˙˙˙˙ ™™™™ Œ ™ œœœ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™˙˙˙ ™™™˙˙˙ ™™™Œ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™=47°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassMm Mm Mm19pppppdelicate, legatopp&‹ ##&##≥≤≥≤-≥&##≥≤≥≤-≥B##≥ ≤ ≥≤-≥?##≥-≤ ≥-?##≥-≤ ≥-&##--&##-?##Œ™œ™˙™œ™œ™œ™œjœ œ ™ ˙ ™ Œ ™ ‰ œ œJœ œjœ˙™œJœ œ ™ ˙ ™ œj œ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ œj œ œ ™ ˙ ™ œj œ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙™œj œ œ ™ ˙ ™ œJœ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙™˙™œ™œ™˙™œ™œ™˙™œ™œ™œœœœœœœœJœœœ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™œŒ™œ œ ˙ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œr œ ™ œ ™ œ œJ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œœœ ™™™ œœj œœ˙˙˙ ™™™˙˙˙ ™™™˙˙˙ ™™™œœœœœœœœœjœœ˙˙ ™™˙˙ ™™Œ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™Œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™48°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassMm Mm26ø ø986898689868986898689868986898689868&‹ ##&##≤--≥-≥-&##≤- -≥--B##≤- - ≤-≥- --≥-?##?##&##&##?##˙ ™ œ ™ Œ ™ Œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ Œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™˙™˙™œ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™˙™œ™œ™˙™˙™˙™œ™œ™˙™œ™ ‰™œ ™j œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œJœœœœœœjœjœ œ™ œ ™ œ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™˙™˙™˙™˙™˙™˙™œ™˙™œ™œ ™ œ ™ œœ™™ ˙˙™™ ‰™ œ ™Jœ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œœ ˙ ™ œœ œJœœœJœœJœ‰™ œ ™Jœ™ œ ™œœœjœœœjœœ ™™œœ ™™ œ ™˙˙ ™™˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ ‰ œœ˙˙ ™™œœ ™™ ˙ ™Œ ™ œ ™Œ™œ™˙™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™Œ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™49°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. Bassf33mfmfmfmfmfmfø ø&‹ ## ∑ ∑&##-≥≤&##≥ ≥ ≤B##≥ ≥?##≥ ≤?##≥ ≤&##&##??##-˙™œJœ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™Œ™˙™œ™œjœ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œ ™œ ™ œœjœœœœjœ ˙™œ™œ™˙™œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œ œ œ ˙ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ Œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙™˙™˙™Œ™œ™˙™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™œ™ œ œ œ ˙ ™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ˙˙ ™™˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ œ ™ œ ™ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙™œ™œJœ ˙™œ™œ™ œ ™Œ™˙ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™œ ™ œ œ œ ™50°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassOof39f ff ff fp f fp fff p&‹ ## ∑ ∑&##pizz.> > >&##pizz.>> >B##pizz.>>>?##≤pizz.>>?##≤∑&##- -?##>&?##œ™œ™ ˙ ™œ ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œJ‰ ‰œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œJ ‰ ‰ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œJ‰ ‰œ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙™ Œ ™ ‰ œ œJ ‰ ‰ œ ™ œ ™ Œ ™˙ ™Œ™‰œ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ œJ˙™‰œœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™ œ ™ ˙˙˙ ™™™˙™Œ™ŒœJœJœ œ ™ œ ™œ ™51°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. Bassp f p f43p f p fp f p fp f p fppf&##>≤arco∑≤.&##>≤arco∑≤.B##>≤arco∑≤.?##>≤arco∑≤.?##pizz.&##>&##>>?##œJ‰ ‰ Œ™‰œ œ‰ ‰œ œœjœj‰ ‰ Œ™‰œ œ‰ ‰œ œœjœœJ‰ ‰ Œ™‰œ œ‰ ‰œ œ œjœJ‰ ‰ Œ™‰œ œ‰ ‰ œ œœJ‰™ œ ™J œ ™‰™ œ ™J œ ™‰™ œ ™J œ ™‰™ œ ™J œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ œœj ‰ œjœ ™ œ ™œ ™ œœ ™™ œ ≈ ™œKr˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™52°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumspp47pppppp ffppp fpmp986898689868986898689868986898689868&##trem.&##trem.B##>trem.?##pizz.>>?##∑(pizz.)&##>&##>>??##>>/∑ ∑Œ™œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ ‰™ æææœ ™J æææœ ™Œ™œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ ‰™ æææœ ™Jæææœ ™Œ™œ ™˙™œ™ œ ™ ææ朜 ™™Œ™œ™˙™œ™ Œ ™ ‰ œ œŒ™ œ ™Œ™Œ™Œœjœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ™œœœ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™≈œœRœœœœ™™˙™ œ œ œ ≈ œRœœœœ≈œœrœœœœ ™™Œ™œ™œœœœ ™ ‰œœœœœ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œJÓ™ ¿ ¿ œ ™ œ53°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsff p p50ff p pff p pp p pppp sempre legato øf p686868686868686868&##.>.>. .>pizz.--&##.>.>. .>pizz.--B##.>.>. .>pizz.--?##>arco. .>pizz.--?##>---&##.>.>--3 3 3 3 3?##..>&> --3 3 3?##.>.>∑/>o +>oœ œ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ œ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™œ ™ œ ™œœœœ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ œ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™œ ™ œ ™œ œ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ œ‰ ‰ Œ™‰ ≈œ œœ ™ œ ™œ™ œ œ œj ‰ ‰ œ œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œ œ œ œ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™ œjœ ™ œ ™œœœœœœ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œœ ™™œœ‰ ‰ Œ™‰ œœœ œœœœ œœ™œ œœœœ œœœ™™œ™œ œ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™‰™ œ ™Jœ≈≈œR¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œ œ œ œ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈‰™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™Jœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈≈œR¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ54°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsmf ff mp f p53ff mp f pff mp f pmp f pmp f pff pp&##--arco.>.>pizz.arco≤&##--arco.>.>pizz. arco≤B##--arco.>.>pizz.arco≤?##---arcopizz..>.>arco≤?##---arco≤&##---> .>.>6&##--->.>.>∑&?##--/>> >o +>o>œ ™œ ™ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ ™œ ™œœ≈œœœ œ‰ ‰œœœœœœ œœ‰œœ ™œ ™œœ≈œœœ œ‰ ‰œœœœœœ œœ‰œœ™œ™‰ œ#jœœ œ≈œ œœœœnœœœ œœ ‰œœ ™œ ™‰œ#jœŒ™ œ œœnœœœ œœ ‰œœœ™™ œœ™™ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™‰œœœœœœœ ™™œœ ™™ œœ œœœj œœœœ œœœœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™œ ™œ ™œJœœœœJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™‰œ#jœœœ ™≈‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿≈≈œR¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿Œ™œ œ œ œ≈œJœœœ¿55°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsf(hammer on)f f56f(hammer on)f ff p mf ff p mf ff p mf fpesantefmf&##pizz.>>>&##pizz.>>>B##pizz.>arco>?##pizz.>arco>?##pizz.>arco>&##- - - - ->>&##> >œ?##∑>/> >>o>>o +>oœJ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ œ‰ ≈ œ œJ‰ ‰ ≈œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œœJ‰ ‰ Œ™œœ‰ ≈œ œj‰ ‰ ≈œ ™ œn œ œ œ œœJ‰ ‰ ‰œœ™ Œ ™ ≈œœœœœ≈œœ ™™ œ Œ ™œJ≈œ œ‰œœ™Œ™≈œœœœœ≈œ™œŒ™œJ‰ ‰œœœœ™Œ™≈œœœœœ≈œ ™ œn Œ ™œœ ™™ Œ ™œ œ œ œ œ œ# rœ œ œ œœ œ œœ ‰ ≈ œœ œœ ™™ Œ ™ œ# œ ™ œ œn œŒ™Œœ#rœ#jœ ‰ ≈œ œ™ Œ ™ œ# œ ™ œ œnœœJ ‰ ‰ Œ™≈œœ™™ œœnŒ™œ≈≈œR¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈≈œR¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œ œ œ≈¿ ¿œœœœœœœ≈œ ™ œ‰™¿ ™ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™J56°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsp59pmp f pmp ffpf&##> >∑>&##>∑> >B##pizz.>>>>?##pizz.>∑>?##pizz.>∑>&##>.>--&##>-∑.>??##palm mute∑ ∑./>o>+>o>œœ ‰ ‰œœJ‰™ œ ™Jœ™œ œ œœœ‰ ‰œœœœœ‰™œ ™j œ œ œ œ ™œœœœœœœœœœŒ™≈œ œœŒ™‰™ œ œ œ‰œœœœ≈œœœœ‰™ œ œ≈œ™œŒ™ œ œ œ œŒ™≈œ™ œœœ‰ ‰ ŒœœœœœJŒ™≈œœœœœœ‰™ œjœ ™J œ ™ œ œ œœœ ‰ ‰œœœbbœœj‰™ œrœ ™j œ ™Œ™ŒœJœ≈≈œRœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œœJœ ™¿ ¿ œ œ ¿ ≈≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ÆœJœ ™œœ¿ ¿≈≈œRœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈¿ ¿œœ¿œœJ57°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsf p f62f p ff p fmp f p ff p fffpp pfill ad lib.&##> >> >>>&##> >> > > >B##> > >>>>?##>>>?##>>&##>>∑?&...?##>>∑?##>>∑../> >> >>œœœœ œœ‰™ œ ™Jœ™œ œ œ≈œœ œœ≈œœœ≈ œœœœœœœœ œ‰™œ™Jœ ™œ œ œ ≈œœœœ≈œœœ≈œœœœœœœœœ‰ ≈œ™Jœ™ œ œ œ≈œœ œœ≈œœœœœ œœœœœ‰™ œ ™J≈œœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœ‰™ œ ™J≈œœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœŒ™≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœŒ™œœœœœœœœœœ‰œ œœŒ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰œ œ œ œ œ‰™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ58°¢{Ten.Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOomfOoB65mp ø ø ømfmf&‹ ##B##> > >?##> > >?##&##?##?##/>o +>oŒ™œ™˙ ™ Œ ™ œ ™‰œœœ≈œœœœŒ™‰™œ œ œ‰œœœ≈œœœœ‰œœœ ‰ œœœŒ™‰™ œ œ œ‰œœœ ‰œœœ‰œœœ≈œœœœŒ™‰™ œ ™J ‰œœœ≈œœœœœœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™˙ ™ œj˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ œ œ œ œœ™ œj ˙ ™œ≈œR¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œ ™ œ ™ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈‰™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™Jœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œR¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ ™59°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsTherefis no place68pedal sim.ø&‹ ##&##∑&##∑B##>?##>?##>&##?##?##∑ ∑/>o +>o>o +>o˙ ™ Œ ™ œ œ ™ œ ˙ ™‰œœœ≈œœœœ≈œ œ œ≈œœœ‰œœœ≈œœœœ≈œ œ œ≈œœœ‰™œ ™j œ ™ ‰œœœ≈œœœœŒ™œ™ œ ™‰™ œ ™Jœ ™‰œœœ≈œœœœŒ™œ™œ™‰™ œ ™J œ ™‰œœœ≈œœœœŒ™ œJ‰ ‰œœœ œœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœj˙™˙ ™ œj˙ ™œjœ œ™œ œ™œ ™≈‰™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™Jœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œR¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œ ™ œ ™ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈‰™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™J60°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.Drumsfor us here. In the dark71p f pp f ppø&‹ ##&##arco&##arcoB##>arco?##>?##>&##.>>?##>/>o +>oŒ™ œ œ ™ œœ™œJ‰ ‰ Œœ œ œ ™‰ œœœ≈œœœœŒ™ œ ™ œ≈ œ™œ™‰ œœœ≈œœœœŒ™ œœ™™ œœ ≈œ™œ™‰œœœ≈œœœœ≈œœœœJ‰ ‰ ‰™ œ ™Jœ ™‰œœœ≈œœœœ ≈œœœœJ‰ ‰œœœ œœ™™‰œœœ≈œœœœ≈œœœœJ‰ ‰œ ™ œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ˙ ™ ˙˙ ™™Œ ™ œœ ™™ œ œJ œ ™œ≈œR¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œ ™ œ ™ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈‰™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™Jœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œR¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ ™61°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsin the cold dark. Nomp74ff pf ppø ømp&‹ ## ∑&##∑&##∑B## ∑?##∑?##∑&##∑?##∑?##∑ ∑ ∑/>o +>o>o +>o>œ#J‰ ‰ ‰œ œœ œ ™œ™Œ™œ ™‰™œ™Jœ™Œ™‰™ Oœ ™™J Oœ ™™J‰™Œ™‰™œ™jœ™ ‰™ œ ™j œ ™ œ ™ œ ™‰™ œb ™Jœ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™œbœœb‰™ œ ™Jœn≈œrœœn œœ ‰™ œ ™Jœ™œ#™‰™ œ# ™J œ≈œRœnœ œœ‰™ œ ™J œ ™Œ™˙ ™ œœb ™™ œœœn ™™™ œœœ ™™™ ≈ œœ œœœœœœ œœ œœ ™™ œœ ™™˙˙˙bb ™™™œnœjœœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™≈œ œœœœœœ œ œœ ™≈‰™¿¿¿ ¿ ¿¿ œ ™Jœ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈œR¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿≈œ ™ œ ™ œ ™¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈‰™¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™Jœ ™¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿¿ ≈ œ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈≈¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿œR62°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsplace, no place. No78pp fpp ffffp&‹ ##&##∑. ... . ... . ..... ..... ..>.3&##∑.. .. ... .. . . ........>.3B## ∑ ∑arco.>?##∑ ∑arco.>?##∑ ∑arco.>&##∑..........3?##∑ ∑...?##.>/>>œ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™≈œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œœ œœ œ≈œœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœŒ™ŒœJŒ™ŒœJŒ™ŒœJ≈œœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœJœœœœœœœœ#œœœœ œ œœœ™œœœ œ œœjœœ œœœKrœœœœœœœœœœœœ ™≈ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈œ ™ œ ™ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈≈œRœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈≈œRœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈≈œR¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™œ ™63°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsplace. Wepcan't stay here.81pppppf pø øf pf p&‹ ## ∑&##&##B##?##-?##-&##>3?##>&3œœ ™™?##-/>˙™‰ œœ œJœ œJœ œ™‰œœœœœœœœœœœ˙ ™ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™‰ œœœœœœœœœ™˙™œJ‰ ‰ Œ™œœJœœœœœœœ™˙ ™ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™œ# ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™˙˙ ™™œœj‰ ‰ Œ™œ# ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙# ™ ˙n ™ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™œœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™™ œœœœJœœœœœœœœ™™ œœ œ œ œœ ™™ œœ ™™œœœ#œœœœœœ#œœœ ™™™ ˙˙˙™™™œœœœœœœœœ ™™™œ# ™ œ ™ œ ™œ#™ œ œ œ œ# œ œ ˙n ™œj‰ ‰ Œ™œ≈≈œ œ œ œ œœœRœ≈œœ œ œœ œœœœRœ≈œœ œ œ œ œœœRœœœœœœ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿Œ™¿ ¿ ¿ ‰ ¿ œ ™¿ ™ Œ ™64°¢°¢Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vc.Cb.E. BassDrumsWedeterminedmpcould leave here. Find some thing- new.85psincereppppfTen.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.E. BassDrumsAfplace for us. A89p&‹ ## 4&##&##∑ ∑ ∑arco?##∑ ∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑?##/∑ ∑ ∑&‹ ##&##. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 3 333 33&##---B## ∑ ∑---?##.---?##.---?##.>/Œ™œœœœ œ™Œ™‰™œ ™j œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™œ ™œ™œ ™œœœœ ™œ™œ ™œœœŒ™ œ œ œŒ™œ ™ œ ™Œ™œ ™ œ ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ ™œœ œ œ ™œœ œ œ œœœœœœœœŒ™‰¿ ¿Œ™ŒœJœ ™œ™ ˙ ™Œ™ œ ™‰œrœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰ ‰œ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ‰ ‰œrœ œ œ œ œ œ‰ ‰œ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ‰œ ™œ™œ ™œœœœ ™ œ‰œ œœJœJœœ™œ‰œ œœJœJœœjœ œ ™ ‰ œœ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ‰œ œœjœjœœjœ œ ™ ‰ œœ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ‰œ œœjœjœœœœ ™œœœ œ œœœœ œ œœ ™ œœœ ™œœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈ ≈™œRÔœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈≈™œRÔœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈≈™œRÔœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈≈™¿ ¿ ¿ œRÔ=65°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsplace for us.93fffffmpff&‹ ##&##. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 3 333 3&##-. . . . . . .3 3B##-?##. -?##. -&##∑ ∑&##∑ ∑ ∑?##/œœœ œ œ™œJ‰ ‰œ™ ˙ ™‰œrœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰œ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ‰ ‰œrœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰œJœ œjœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œJœ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™œjœ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™˙˙ ™™œjœ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œœ œœ™‰œœ™ œ ™ œ ™œœœœœœœœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈ ≈™ œRÔœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈ ≈™ œRÔœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈ ≈™¿ ¿ ¿ œRÔ66°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWeffwill find it. I96soloffsolofffffffffff&‹ ##&##> .>. .>.>> .>.>33 3 33333 3&##..>. .>.>. ..3 333 333 3B##..>.>?##. . ....>.>?##. . ....>.>&##>>>.>.>3 3 3 3 33 33 3 3 3 3&##>>>. . . .. .. .3 3 333 33 3?## .. . ...>/‰™ œ ™J œ ™ œ ™ œJœ œ™ŒœJœ™‰œœœœœ‰œœœœœœœ œ≈œœœœœ‰œ‰œœœœœ‰œœœœŒœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœ œœœœœ œ œ≈œœœœœœœœœœ ™œ œœœJœ œœJœ ™ œ œJœœœœœœ œœœœœjœ œœJœ™œ œJœ œ œ œœœœjœ œœJœ™œ œJœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœ≈œœœœœœ‰ ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœ œ œ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œœœjœœœJœ ™ œ œJœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™J ≈ ≈™ œRÔœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ≈™ œœ≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™œœ œ67°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsknow.99&‹ ## >&##..>->..>3 3 3333&##... .....>3B##-.. .. . . .>333?##- --?##---&##-333 3 3 3 3 3 3&##... .?-&?##/˙ ™˙™œœ≈œœœœœœœœœ œœœœ≈œœœœœœœ‰ ‰œJœœ‰œœœ≈œœœœœ™œ œJœœœœœ≈œ œœ œ œ œœ ™ œ œJœJœ œJœœœ ™ œœJœJœ œJœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ ‰œœ œ‰œœjœœœœjœœœ œ œ ™œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœœœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ œ≈™ œ œ≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™œ œ œ68°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums101ffffffffffff fffff ffpffffff9868986898689868986898689868986898689868&‹ ##&##. . .>. . . .>.>33 3&##. ..>. . ..>.>33 3B##. . .>..>.>33?##.>.>.. .>..>pizz.>3?##.>.>.>.>.>..>pizz.>3&##.> >3 3&##.>.>?3?##..>.>/>>∑3 3 3 3œ™œ ™ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™≈œ œœœœœ œœœœœœœœ‰œJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™≈œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œjœJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™≈œ œœœœœœœœœ‰OJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™œœœœ œ œœ‰ Œ™œ ™ Œ ™œ œœœ œ œœ‰ Œ™œ ™ Œ ™‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœ ™™™‰œœœœ‰œœœœœJ‰ ‰˙™œœœœœœœœœ‰œJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™œœjœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœJœ œœ œ œ œ‰69°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.DrumsOh.pSlowerq. = 45C103p fp pp fpp p fpp pppp fdying awaypon bell686868686868686868&‹ ## ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##harm.∑.&##∑harm.∑>B## ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑>?##∑ ∑ ∑arco∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑arco∑ ∑ ∑&##.m.s.>?##&?/∑>∑ ∑˙ ™ ˙ ™˙™Œ™ Oœn ™™Œ™ Oœ ™™ O˙ ™™Œ™œjœ œœjœ‰œ˙™œj‰ ‰ Œ™Oœ™™Œ™œœ ™™œœ ™™œœ ™™ Œ ™ O˙ ™™ O˙ ™™ OJ ‰ ‰ Œ ™œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ O˙ ™™ OœJ‰ ‰ Œ™œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™œ™œ™˙™œœœ ™™™Œ™ ˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™˙˙˙ ™™™Œ ™ ˙˙˙ ™™™œ œ œ œ œ œœ ™™ œœj œœ œœ œœJ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ™™ œœj œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™‰ œ œ œJ œœ™œ‰˙˙ ™™ Œ ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ‰ œ ™ ˙˙ ™™ œœ ‰ Œ ™ ˙˙ ™™˙˙˙ ™™™Œ™‰ æææ¿ ¿ ‰ ¿ ‰ Œ ™ ¿ ™ ¿ ™ ¿ ™ ¿ ™ ¿ ™70°¢{°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.ppp openingq = 72D111ppp openingppp openingppp p molto legatoø half-pedal as neededVln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Pno.E. BassDrumsfp118fpfppp444444444444&##∑ ∑ ∑ bb&##∑ ∑ ∑ bbB## ∑ ∑ ∑bb?##bb∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##bb?##bb∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&bb&bbBbb&bb∑--”“--33333333?bb∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?bb∑ ∑ ∑/∑ ∑>> >w w wwnÓ˙ w wwnw w wwn˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œjœ œ ™ œj œ œj œ ˙ ™ œœœœ œœœ w‰œjœœ œj œ™w˙˙ ™™˙˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙ ™™˙˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙ ™™˙˙˙ ™™™œ ™ ‰ œ˙ w wn œJ ‰ Œ Ów wwn œj‰ Œ Ó˙ ˙ wwn œj ‰ Œ Óœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙n˙ œœnœœ œœjœn˙n˙œœœ ™ œ‰œjœœ œœœœ ™ œ‰œ ™=71°¢{°¢{Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsp122Ten.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsWe'vemftrav elled- far. Blis ters- on our feet.125ff p?bb&bb- --33333?bb?bb/&‹ bb ∑ 3 3?bb∑ ∑&bb3?bb?bb/w wœ‰œj˙œœœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™ œJœJœ ™ œœœœœbœœœœœœn œœJœœœœnœœœn˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœ ˙˙n˙˙œjœ ™‰œnj˙ œ œ œ œ œ œJœ œJw¿œœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œ ™œœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œ ™œœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœœ ™œŒœœœ œJœ™ ‰œœœœœwœjœœnœœœjœœœœnœœœœœœœbœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœn ™™™œj œœœœœœœœœœœœœnjœœœœjœœœœnwwÓ˙˙wwÓœœœœnœjœ œjœœœ ™™œRœJœœJ˙œœn¿œœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œ ™œœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œ ™œœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœœ ™œ=72°¢{°¢{Ten.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsBacks broke down. Bones burned up.128mpmpmfmpmpTen.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsLookfing and search ing- with out- a131f&‹ bb 3 3?bb∑ ∑-?bb∑ ∑&bb. - -- ∏∏∏∏∏∏33?bb?bb/&‹ bb?bb5?bb&bb5 3 3?bb?bb/œŒ ‰œJœœ œ œŒœ œjœ œœ ˙™ Œ˙‰œ™wœœœœœœœjœœœœjœœœœœœœnœœœœJœœjœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœjœœœœœœjwwÓ œœœœwwÓœœnœwŒ ‰œœjœœjœœœœjœ ™™œRœJœ œJ˙œœn˙˙¿œœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œ ™œœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœœ ™œ œ œœ ™ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ ˙‰œ œ œ œœ ˙‰œj˙™œ˙™œ˙˙œœœœœ ˙˙ ™ œ ˙ ˙ wœœœœ ™™™™ œœœœj œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœ ™™™™ œr œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ ™™ œœj œœ œœ ˙w˙œ ™ œœœJ œœœ œœ˙™ œ ˙˙˙ œ œœ œœ ™ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ ™ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ ™ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿=73°¢{°¢{Ten.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsmap. Lostmfand134f mff mfsempre legatoppedal throughoutmfmfTen.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsblind. Blind and136&‹ bb?bb- .?bb.-.&bb6 6 6?bb?bb./&‹ bb?bb.?bb.&bb?bb?bb.33/œjœ ™ Ó ˙ ™ œœœ œ™œœJœ™ œn ™™œr œœœ œ œ ™œœJœ ™œ™™œRœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœnœnœœJœœœjœ™™œrœjœ™˙œnœœ¿œœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œœœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœœœ˙Ó˙ ™œœ™™œrœJœ œJœœ˙nœ ™™œRœJœ œJœœ˙nœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ˙œœnœœ œœœœ ™™œRœJœ œJœ™œJœœœœnœœ¿œœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œœœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœœœ=74°¢{{Ten.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumslost.138ppf plegatoppPno.Drums142686868&‹ bb ∑ ∑ ∑?bb∑ ∑ ∑?bb∑ ∑ ∑&bb - - - - ----3333 33ww?bb?bb∑/&bb- - -##3 3?bb- - -##- - - -/œjœ ™ Óœ Œ ÓœŒ Óœœœœ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙œœœœŒœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœwwœœ ™™™™ œœRœœœœœœ™™™™ œRœ œœww˙™ œ œ ™ œj œ œœ œJ w¿œœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œœœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœ¿œœœœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœœœœœ¿j¿Œ ‰™¿j ¿ œR¿œœœœœ˙˙n˙˙nwwn˙˙n˙˙˙n œœœœœœn œœœœœœœœœœnœ œœœœœwwwwwwœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ¿œœJœŒ¿œJœœJœŒœJœ¿‰ŒœJŒ¿œœœœœ¿œœJœ¿ ¿œJ¿œœœœœœ‰¿j¿ ¿¿œœœœœœœœ¿œœœœœœœœ=75°¢{°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Pno.DrumspSame tempoe = eq. = 48 Slightly fasterq. = 52accel.E146pmp° øVln. 1Vln. 2Vc.Pno.E. Bassmf p152mf ppfp mf6868686868&##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑. .-&##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑. .-&##3 33?##/&##-.∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##-.∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?##pizz.∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##3 3?##?##œjœ‰œ œ‰ ≈œœ‰œ œ™œjœ‰œ œ‰ ≈ œœ‰œ œ ™œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™œœœ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœœœœœ œ œ œ ™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ œœœj œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™œœ™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™œœ ™™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œœ ™™ œœœ œœœJœœœ™™™ œœœ ™™™œ ™¿j ¿ Œ ™ œ ™¿j ¿ Œ ™ œ ™¿j ¿ Œ ™ œ ™¿ ™ Œ ™ œ ™¿j ¿ Œ ™ œ ™¿j ¿ Œ ™œ‰œ œœœœJ‰ ‰ Œ™œ‰œ œœœœj‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™≈œ œ œ œ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™˙˙˙™™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ ™™™ œœœ™™™ œœ ™™ œœ œ œ œœœ ™™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ œ œ˙™˙™œœœ™™™œœœ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œ ™˙˙ ™™ œ ™Œ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ŒœJœ ™œ™œ ™ œ ™=76°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumspp f158pp fpp mfp mpen dehorsp fp pp mf&##∑ ∑ ∑.&##∑ ∑ ∑.?##∑ ∑ ∑arco?##pizz.>-arco.... .&##?##?##.-..../ooo3˙ ™ œœœœœœœœœœœ˙™œœœœœœœœjœ™ œ ™ œ ™ œJ œœ œJœJŒœ ™ œ ™ œ œJœJœœ ™œœœœJœœœœœœœœœ ™˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œœ ™ œj œ ™œ ™ œ ™œJœœ ™œ ™œœœœjœœJœœ ™œ œœ œœ œœœJœœjœœ ™™˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙˙ ™™ œ ™ ˙˙˙ ™™™ œ ™˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙ ™ œ ™œ œJœ™Œ™˙ ™œ ™ œ œj œ ™ œ ™ œ œœ œJ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œj¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œj‰™ œœœœ œJ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿œœ¿™œ œœ ™ œ ¿j ¿ ÆœJœ œ œ œœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿œJ¿¿ ¿œœ œ77°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsIsmpit there?163ff pff pff pffff pff p mpffff p&‹ ## ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##.∑ ∑ ∑ ∑pizz.&##-∑ ∑ ∑ ∑pizz.B## ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑pizz.3?##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑> .>?##.. .....∑ ∑ ∑pizz..> >&##>>?##œœœ ™™™?##... . . ...∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑>/∑ ∑ ∑> > >> > >œ ™ œ ™ œœ œ Œ ™≈œœœœœœœJ≈œœœœœœœœœœœŒ™≈œ œ œ œœ™œJœ œ ™ œJœ Œ™≈œ œ œ œŒ™ œ œ œœ œ œ œŒ™≈œ œ œ œœ™œœJœ ™ œ œ œ œ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ™ œ ™ œ ™ Œ ™œ ™≈ œœ œœœœœJœœj≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ™™™ œœœ™™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™œœœ ™™™œœœ ™™™ ˙˙ ™™˙ ™œœ ™™ œœ ™™ ˙ ™œœ ™ œœœ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœ ™™™œœœ ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ¿¿ ¿œJœœ œ¿¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿œ œœœœœœœœœ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ™ œ ™¿ ™ œ ™¿ ™ Œ ™78°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.DrumsAmfplace for us. A place a place170mfmfmfmfmfmf&‹ ##&##&##B##?##∑pizz.?##∑&##∑ ∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑&/∑Œ™‰ œœ œ ™ œ ™œœ œŒœ œ œœœœ œœœ ™œ œjŒ™ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œj‰ ‰œœœœœœœ œjŒ™œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œj‰ ‰œœœœœœœ œjŒ™œœœœœœœœœœ ™ œj ‰ ‰ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœj‰ ‰ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœj‰ ‰ œœœœœœœ˙˙ ™™˙˙˙ ™™™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿™œ œ œ œœ ™ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ79°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsfor us. Ah.174mpmpfffpmp&‹ ## ∑&##arco-&##arco-B##>?##>?##>&##> >6 6 6 6&##?> > >?##∑/œœ œ‰ Œ Œ™‰œœ™ œ ™ œJ‰ ‰ ≈ œœ œ≈œœœ≈œ œ œ‰œœ™ œ ™ œj ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ‰ œœ œœœœJ‰ ‰ ≈œœœ≈œœœœœœœ œJ‰ ‰œœœœœJ‰ ‰ ≈œœœœ™œ™œ œœœœJ‰ ‰œ œœœœJ‰ ‰ ≈œœœœ ™œ ™œ œœœœJ‰ ‰Œ™ œœœœœœ œœ œ œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœ œ œ œŒ™œœœœœœœ œœœ™ œ ™˙ ™œ œœœœ≈œ œ œœ ™œ ™œ œœœœ™¿ ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿™œ œ œ œœ ™ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœœ œ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿™œ œ œ œœ ™80°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums177ffffffff&‹ ##&##.>.>&##spiccatoB##spiccatoarco?##arco. > .>.>.>?##arco. > .>.>.>&##.> .>?##&.>?.>?##. > .>.>.>/œ™œJœ œ ™ œJœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ™œœœJœ œ œ œœ™ œ ™œ œ™œœœJœ œ œ œœ™œ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœJ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœJœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœJ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœjœ œ™œœœJœ œ œ œœ™œ™¿ ™œ œ œ œœœJ¿¿ ¿¿ ™œ œ œ œœ¿¿ ¿œJ81°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums179ffffffffffspff(fill ad lib)ff&‹ ## ∑&##&##.>.>B##&.>.>?##>>?##>>pizz.>&##”“?##&?##>>./>>>œ™Œ™≈œœœœœœœœœœœ œ™œ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ ™ œ ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœœ™œ™≈œœ ™™œœ≈œœRœœ≈œrœœœ œ œ≈œ≈œrœœœ œJ‰≈œ™œ≈œœRœœœ™‰ Œ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™≈œ™œ≈œœRœœœJ‰ Œ Œ≈œ ™ œ¿ ™ ¿ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ¿œœ ¿œœ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ82°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.DrumsIffsearched for you. I181f&‹ ##&##&##&##?##?##∑(pizz.)&##5“< >&##/‰œ œ œ œ œ ™œ™œ™‰™ œ ™Jœ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™œ™œ ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™œ™≈œœœ œ œ≈œ‰™ œ ™J≈œrœœœ œ œ≈œ≈œrœœœ œ œ‰œ ™œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙˙˙ ™™™™ œœ ™™œœœ ™™™¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ83°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.Drumssearched for you. I'll stay with you for ev- -183mp&‹ ## > >&##&##&##?##?##arco&##“< >&##/œ ™œ™œ ™≈œœœ œœœœœ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™≈œœœ œ œ≈œ≈œrœœœ œ ™≈ ≈œrœœœ œ œ≈œ≈œœœ œ œ ™œ™œœœ ™Œ™œ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙˙˙ ™™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ84°¢{{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.Drumser.- Ah.185fffffffffffTen.Pno.Theremfis a place A place formeno mosso188apologeticmp986898689868986898689868986898689868683868683868683868&‹ ##&##trem. >&##trem.>&##trem.>?##-?##∑&##>>>“< >3 3 3&##>/o o&‹ ## ∑ ∑ ∑&##&##?œJœ œ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ Œ ™œ ™œ™œ ™ æææ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œJ‰ ‰œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ æææ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œJ‰ ‰œ ™ œ ™œ™ æææ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œJ ‰ ‰≈œ œ œ œ≈œ≈œrœ œ œJ‰ ≈œrœ œ œ œ≈œ≈œœœœ™ ˙ ™ œJ‰ ‰œ ™ œJ‰ ‰œ™œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™™ œœœ™™™ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœ ˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœ ™™™˙˙˙˙ ™™™™ œœœ ™™™œœœœ ™™™™ ˙˙˙˙˙ ™™™™™ œœœœœ ™™™™™¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ™ Œ ™ Œ ™Œ™≈œœœœœ œ ™ Œ ™ Œ ™ Œœjœœ œ œ™œ≈œrœœ ™™ œœ™™ œœœ™™™ œœ™™ ˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™Œ™˙˙ ™™˙˙ ™™œœ ™™˙˙ ™™œœœœœj‰ ‰ Œ™œœ ™™˙ ™ œœ ™™ œ ™˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ Œ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™=85°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. Bassus. Oh.pOh.accel.196ppppppp legato&‹ ## ∑ ∑&##pizz.-∑-∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##pizz.-∑-∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##pizz.-∑-∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?##pizz.- - -∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?##pizz.- - -∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##?##∑?##œ ™ Œ ™ Œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ Œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™œ™Œ™œ™Œ™œ™Œ™œ™Œ™œ ™ Œ ™ œ ™ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™œœœœœ œ™œœ ™™ ‰ œœœ œ ˙ ™ Œ ™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ ™ Œ ™ ‰ œœœ œ œ ™ œ œ œ ™˙ ™Œ ™ œ ™ ˙˙ ™™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™˙ ™Œ ™ œ ™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙ ™‰ œ œ œ ™ ˙ ™‰ œ œ œ ™ ˙ ™‰ œ œ œj œ ˙ ™‰ œ œ ˙ ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™86°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOo.mfOh.q. = 56F203ppp pppp pppp ppp f ppp f pmf ø ømpmp&‹ ##&##arcopizz.-&##arcopizz.-&##arcoBpizz.-?##∑arco∑pizz.-?##∑arco∑pizz.-&##?##∑?##/˙ ™ œ ™ œœJ˙™œ™Œ™Œ™œ™˙™˙™˙™œ™Œ™œ™Œ™˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™Œ™œ™Œ™˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™Œ™œ ™ Œ ™˙n™œj‰ ‰ Œ™œ™ Œ ™˙n ™ œj ‰ ‰ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™œœœ ™™™ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ™™™ œœœj œœœ œœœ ™™™ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ ˙˙ ™™œœnn™™ ≈ œ œ œœn™ ≈ œn œ ™œœnn™™ ≈ œ œ œ˙n™œnjœ œœ œœn ™ œ œ œ œn j œ œœ œœnjœ˙ ™œœ œ‰œ œ œjœ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ87°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsAh.208ppp98989898989898989898&‹ ## ∑&##∑arco&##∑arcoB## ∑arco?##∑ ∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑&##?##∑ ∑?##/˙ ™ Œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™œ™Œ™˙™˙™œ™Œ™˙ ™ ˙ ™œ ™ Œ ™ ˙n ™ ˙ ™œ™ Œ ™œ™ Œ ™‰™œœœœœœ#œœ#œœœœ ™™™ œœ ™™œœœjœœœœœœ ™™™œœœœœœ ™™™ œœœœœœ≈œœœœœœ ™™™ ‰ œœœ œœœJœœœœœœJœœœ˙ ™‰ œ œ ˙ ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œn j œ œœ œœn œ ™œœjœ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ88°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWhenfnight falls.212f ppf ppf ppmfmfvoicefø ømfmf9868986898689868986898689868986898689868&‹ ## ∑ ∑ ∑&##∑&##∑B## ∑?##∑(pizz.)?##∑(pizz.)&##-3?##&- 3?##/œ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙™ œ ™ œJ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙ ™ œ ™ œJ ‰ ‰ Œ ™œ ™œ™ œ ™œ™˙ ™ œ ™ œJ ‰ ‰ Œ ™œ ™ œ ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJœ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰™œœnœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœœ ™œœœœ™œ œ™‰œœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœn™ œœœ ™™™ œœœn ™™™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œn œ œœnjœ œjœœjœ™˙ ™Œ œj œj œ œ œ œ ˙ ™œ œ ™ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œœ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œœ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ89°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWe wait in dark ness- We wait in dark ness-216mpmpmp&‹ ##&##&##B##?##?##&##&##??##/Œ™Œœjœ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œj ‰ ‰ Œ œj œ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™j ‰™ Œ ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™œ™ œ ™œ™œ™j ≈ ‰ Œ ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™j ≈ ‰ Œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œjœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ™œnœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œJœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™œnœ œ œ œ œ œ‰œ ™œœœJœ™œ™ œ œ œœœ œœœ œ œœœ œœ‰œ™œœœjœ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœ˙ ™‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œn œ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ90°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsin dark ness.- Greyffblack night220fffff fff fff ffmp ff° øff4868486848684868486848684868486848684868&‹ ## ∑ >&##>.>.>.>--&##--.>3 3 3B##.>.>.>--.>?##>arco--.>. .--?##>arco--.>. .--&##> >>>?3 3 3?##>>.>>?##--- -/>> >>œ ™œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œj˙ ™œ ™ œ œœ œ ™ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™œ ™œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œn œn œJ œ œ ™ œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœJœœ ™œ™œ œ œ œœœœnœœœj‰ ‰ ≈œœœœœœœnœœ œœ™œ ™œ œ œ œœœœnœœJ‰ ‰ ≈œœœœœœœnœœ œœ ™œ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœœ™™™™ œœœœjœœœœ ™™™™œœ™™ œœ ™™ œœ™™‰œœœœœœ œœœœœœœœnnœœjœœ œœ ™™œ œ œ œœœœnœœœnœœn≈œœœœœœœnœ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿ Œ ™ÆœJœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ¿ ™ ¿ ™ ¿œ ™ œ ™ œœ œœ¿ œ œ œ¿ ™ ¿ ¿ ¿ ‰™œ ™ œ œ œ91°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWe ride out the dark ness- and wait for the light.224ff fff fff f&‹ ## ∑ -&##>>∑ ∑>>>. .3 3 3&##>>∑ ∑> >>. .3 3 3B##>>∑> >>. .3 3 3?##. . . . . . .-- . . . . .?##. . ... . .-- . . . . .?##>>∑ ∑&?##. . .∑ ∑&?##...- -. ./‰œ œœœœ œœœœœKrœœœœ œ™Œ™≈œœœœœœœ œœ œœ≈œœ œ œœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœ œœ œœ≈œœ œ œœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœ œœ œœŒ™‰œœ≈œœ œ œœœœœœœœœ≈œ œ œ œœœœ œ œœ™œ ™ ≈œœ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ ™ œ ™≈œ œ œ œœnœœ œ œœ ™œ™≈œœ œ œœœœJœœ ™ œ ™œœœ ™™™ œœjœœ ™™˙™≈œœœœœœœœœnnœœ˙ ™≈œœœœœnœœ™ œœœœ ™ œ ™ ≈œœ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœ ™ œ ™≈‰™œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œœœ œœ œ œ¿ ™¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œœ œ≈‰™œœ œ¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œœœ œœ œ œ¿ ™¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œ œ œ92°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh. Oh.228f&‹ ##&##..>.>. . . .> .> .>3 3 3&##..>.. . .> .> .>3 3 3B##..>.. . ..> .> .>3 3 3?##.. ... . .. . ..>.>.>?##. . ... . . . . ..> .>.>&##∑.>.>.>.>.>.>&##∑.>.>.>.>.>?##. . . . . . .> > >/œ ™Œ™‰™ œ ™Jœ ™œ™œJœ œ ™≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœJ‰ ‰œ ™œ™≈œ œ œ œœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœJ‰ ‰œ ™œ™≈œœœœœœJœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœJ‰ ‰œ ™œ™≈œ œ œœœœ≈œœ œœœœœ œ œœ ™œ™≈ œ œ œœœœ≈ œ œ œœœœœ œ œœ ™œ™≈ œ œ œœœnœÓ Œ ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœÓ Œ ≈œœœœœœœœ‰œœ≈ œ œ œœœœœnœœœ œ œœ™œ ™ ≈ œ œ œ œ œn œ≈‰™œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œ œ œ œœ œ œ¿ ™¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œ œ œ≈‰™œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œ œ œ œ93°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsAh.231ff fff fff&‹ ## ∑&##.>.>.>.>>>. .3&##.>.>.>.> >>. .3B##.>.>.>.>. . .. . .. .3?##. . . .>. . . . . .>?##. . . .>. . . . . .>&##.>.>.>>3 3 3 3 3 3 3&##.>.>.>.>>3 33 3 3 3 3?##. . ..>. . .. . .>/œJ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™ œ ™≈œ œ œ œ‰œœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœJ‰ ‰ ‰œ œ≈œœœœœœœ‰œœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœJ‰ ‰ ‰œ œ≈œœœœœœœJ‰œœJœ œ œœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœ‰œ œ≈œ œ œ œj‰œJœ œ œœ ™ œ ™≈œ œ œŒœJ≈œ# œ œ œj‰œJœ œ œœ ™ œ ™≈œ# œ œŒœJ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœJ ‰ ‰ Œ™‰œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœJ‰ ‰ Œ™‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œ# œ œœ#j‰œœJœ œ œœ™ œ ™≈œ œ œJŒœœJœ œ œ¿ ™¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œ œ œ≈‰™œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œ œ œ œœ œ œ¿ ™¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œ œ œ94°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsff234ff pff pff pff pffffffff9868986898689868986898689868986898689868&‹ ##&##>>.>. . >≤3&##>>.>. . >≤3B##>>.>. ..>.>.>≤3?##...>. . ....> .>.>.>≤?##...>. . ....>.>.>.>&##> >> . . . .>.>.> >3 3 3 3 3 33 3 3&##> > >. . . .>.>.>?3 3 3?##...>. . ....>.>.>.>/> > >> > >œ ™œ™ œœœJœ œ ™ œ ™Œ™Œ™‰œJ‰ ≈œ œ œ œ‰œœJ‰œ œœœœ‰œŒ™ŒœJ‰œJ‰ ≈œœœœœœœœ‰œœJ‰œ œœœœ‰œŒ™Œœj‰œJ‰ ≈œ œ œ œ‰œJ‰œ œœœœ≈œœœœœœŒ™Œœj≈œœœœœJ≈œ œ œ œœœœ≈œ œ œŒ™ŒœJ≈œ#œœœœJ≈œ# œ œ œœœœ≈œ œ œŒ™Œ™‰œœ œ≈œœ ™™ œœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœ≈œœ ™™ œœ ≈œœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœ≈œœœœœœ Œ™Œ™≈œ#œœœœJ≈œ œ œ œœœœ≈œ œ œŒ™Œ™≈‰™œœ œ¿ ¿ ¿‰™œ ™ œœœœ≈‰™œ œ œ¿ ¿≈¿j ‰™œ ™ œ œ œ ≈œ œ œœœœœœœŒ™Œ™95°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh.pOh. Oh. Thempq. = 52G237pp mfpp mfpp mfp mp° ø øpp686868686868686868&‹ ##&##∑≤&##∑≤B## ∑≤?##∑ ∑ ∑&##>-- ∏∏∏∏∏∏ ∏∏∏∏∏∏œœ ™™œœj?##?##/œ‰ Œ™œ ‰ Œ™œ‰ Œ™Œ™Œ œJœ™Œ™Œ™Œœjœœœ œœœœ ™ Œ ™ Œ ™ Œ œj œœœ œœœœ™ Œ ™ Œ ™ Œ œJ œ œ œ œ œ œœ™Œ™˙™˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ œœ‰œœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœ œ œJœ œJœ œJœ œœ œ œ≈œrœ ™œ™œJœ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œJœ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œJœ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œJœ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿96°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsrain falls the wind howls I won't sleep.241pppppø&‹ ## > >&##-&##-B##-?##∑ ∑?##∑ ∑&##> >?##?##/œ œJœœjœjœ œJœ œœ œjœ œ ™œ ™ œj œ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œj œ œ ™œ™˙™œ ™ œj œ œ ™œ™ œ ™œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™œ ™ œ œŒ™‰™œ™jŒ™‰™ œ ™Jœœœœj≈œ œ œ œœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœj≈œ œ œ œœ œ œ‰œœœœœœœœ ™™œœœœœœ ™™œœ ™™œœœœœœŒœJœJœ œ œJœJœ˙™œœ œ œJœ œ ™œ Œ ™œj œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œJœ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œJœ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œJœ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿97°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsImfwon't sleep.244f pf pf pf pf pf mpf pf p4868486848684868486848684868486848684868&‹ ## ∑ ∑&##. .- -∑&##......--∑B##.. .. .. .. ..--∑?##... .... .. .--?##......--&##- -?##--&?##. . ....--/----œ™≈œrœœ ™ Œ ™œ ™œœœœœœœœœnœœ œœ™Œ™œœœœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœœœnœ œ™ Œ ™œ œœœœœnœœœœœœœnœ ™ Œ ™œ œœœœœnœœœœœœœn˙ ™ ˙ ™œ œœœœnœœœœn˙ ™ ˙ ™œœ ™™ œœœ‰œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœ ™™ œ œœ œœ ™™ Œ ™ ‰ œœ œœœœœJœ™ œ ™ œœœœœœœœœnn˙˙ ™™Œ ™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™œœœ ™™™œ œœœœnœœœœœœn˙ ™ ˙ ™œJœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿Œ™œœœ œ œ œœœœœœœœ œœœ¿œ¿œœœ≈¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™¿ ¿ ¿œœœ≈¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™98°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsI'll watch o verff- - - - you.248mp fmp fmp fmp fmp fffmp ff&‹ ##&##∑>3 3 3&##∑>3 3 3B## ∑. >?##.>?##.>&##>>>5 ”“œœœœ œœœœœœœœœ&##>>>œœœœœœœœœ?##>/3 3 3œ™œ™ œ ™ œ œ œ ˙ ™œ™œœœœœœœœœ œœ#œJœ œ ™œ™ œ œœœœœœœœœœ#œJœ œ™œ ™ œ œ œ œJœ œ™˙ ™ œ ™œ™ œJœ œ ™˙ ™ œ ™œ™ œJœ œ ™œœ ™™ œœ™™‰œœœœ œœœ œ˙˙ ™™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ˙ ™Œ ™ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œœ œ œ≈¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿j‰ ‰œœ œ œœœœœ œœœ œœ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™99°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh.251°&‹ ## -&##>> >&##>>>B##. >> >?##.>?##.>&##>“< >Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~œœœœ œœœœœœœœœ&##>Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~œœœœœœœ œœœœ?##/> >œ™œJœ œJœ œ™œ≈œœœ œJœœ ™ œjœJœœ≈œœœ œJœœ™ œjœJœœJœ œJœœ™ œjœJœœJœ œ ™œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ ≈ œœJœ œ ™œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ ≈ œœ™ œ œ œ œJœœ™ œ œ œ œJœœJœœœ œ œ≈œœ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ ≈ œœ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿œœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™œ ™100°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums253ffpø&‹ ## ∑&##> >&##. .> >.>. . .>B##.>.>.>.>. . .>. .>?##.>.>.>. .>?##.>.>.>. .>&##œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ&##œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ?##. . .>/œ™Œ™œ ™ œ œœœœœœœœ˙ ™œ ™≈œ œ œœœœœ œ œ œœŒ™œ™≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œ œ‰œ œ œ œ≈œ≈œ œ œŒ™≈œ œ‰œ œ œ œ≈œ≈œ œ œŒ™≈œ œ‰œ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ œ œŒ™≈œ œ‰œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿Œ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™101°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh255half-pedalas neededf en dehorsø&‹ ## ∑&##&##. .>. . . .>... .. . .>. .>B##. .>. . . .>.... .>..> . .>?##.>....>..>. .>?##.>....>..>. .>&##> > >> > >œœœœœœœœœœ&##Œ™œœœœ?##.>.>.> . .>/œœœ œJœœ ™ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœJœ≈œ œ œ œ œ œ œ≈œœœ œœœ œ‰œœ≈œœœœ‰≈œ œ œ œ œ œ œ≈œœœ œœœ œ‰œ≈œ œ‰‰œJ‰ ≈œœœ œœœ œ ‰œ≈œ œ‰‰œJ‰ ≈œœœ œœœ œ ‰œ≈œ œ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœœjœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œJ‰ ≈œœœ œœœ œ ‰œ≈œ œ‰œ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿œœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™102°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsI'll watch o ver- you. You, you.257ø ø ø ø&‹ ##&##≥>.>..≥&##.>...>..>B##.>...>..>. >. .>?##.>..>.>..>.>.>. .>?##.>..>.>..>.>.>. .>&##>>>>&##?##.>. .> .>..>.>.>. .>/‰œœœœœ œ™≈ œ™œ‰œœ œœœœœœœœ ™‰œjœœ œ‰œœœœœ œœœœœœ œœœœœ‰œœœœ‰œœJœœ≈œ œ‰œ œ‰ œœœœœœJœ≈œ œ‰œ œ‰ œœœœœœJœ≈œ œ‰œœœœœœ œœœ œœœœœœ œJœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ‰œœœœœœJœ≈œ œ‰œ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿œœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™103°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums259ffffffø ø ø&‹ ##&##>> >> . . . >&##>> >> . . . >B##. > . .>.> >> .>?##.>. .>. .>.>.>.>?##.>. .>.. >.>.>.>&##>>>> > > >>>&##>>?##.>.>.. >.>.>.>/˙™œJœ œ ™œ ™≈œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ≈œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœJœœ≈œ œ œ≈œ œœ œ œJœJœ≈œ œ œœ œœ œ œŒœJœJœ≈œ œ œœ œœ œ œ ŒœJ‰œœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœJœ≈œ œ œœ œœœ œ ŒœJœ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿œœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœ ™104°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums261(fill)&##. . . . .....3&##. . .>...>.>....3B##...>.. .>.....?##. . . . . .>3 3 3 3 3 3?##. . .>---&##>3&##>?##∑---/3 3 3≈œ œ œ≈œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ≈œœœ œ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœŒ™≈œœœ œ≈œ‰™œ™j œ ™ œ ™œœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰™œ™j œ ™ œ ™œ œ œ≈¿¿ ¿œœ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿¿ ¿ ¿™œ œœ œ œœ œœ œ105°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsff broaden263ffbroadenfff broadenfffff&##..>.> .>..>..> > >>&##..>... ..>>>B##. ..>. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .>?##...>>>3 3 3?##. ......> > > >&##.>.>.> .> .> .>∑ ∑&##. ..>. . .>.>.>∑ ∑?##/œœœœœœœœ˙™ œjœ™œœ ™œœ ™ œJœœœœœœœœ˙ ™ œjœ ™ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œJœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙™ œjœ™‰œ ™œœ ™‰œœ œœœœœœ˙™˙™˙™œœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙ ™™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙™™œ œœœ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œJœŒ™œ œ œœœ œ‰œjœ™œœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ ™œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ¿ ¿j ¿œ œœ‰œ ™¿j ¿ ¿j ¿œ œ œ‰œ ™¿j ¿ ¿j ¿œœœ‰¿j106°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumspp267pppppafter thoughtp ppf&##∑ ∑ ∑&##∑ ∑B##?##?##∑ ∑ ∑&##∑ ∑ ∑>∑ ∑3 3&##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/> >>∑ ∑ ∑˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™˙™˙™œ™œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙™˙™œj‰ ‰œ™˙™˙™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œ™œJœ‰œ œjœ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™Œ™‰œ˙ ™œ œJœJœ œJ‰ ‰ Œ™‰œœœœœœœœœœ ˙ ™œœœœœœ˙˙™™ ˙˙™™œ ™¿ ¿j ¿œœœ‰œ ™¿j ¿ ¿j ¿œœœ‰œ ™¿j ¿ ¿j ¿œœœ‰¿jœ œ¿ ¿‰ Œ™107°¢{Ten.Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.DrumsWepwere born scared. Live scared.274ppppppppppp&‹ ## ∑&##-B##-?##-?##-&##∑ ∑ ∑&##∑ ∑ ∑/-Œ™‰œœœ œœ œ ™ Œ ™œ™œ™ Œ ™˙™˙™˙™˙™œ™œjœ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œj œ˙™˙™˙™˙™œ™œjœ˙™œ™œjœ˙™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œJ ŒŒ™ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ™Œ™œœ™ œ ˙ ™¿œ œ œ¿‰œ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿‰œ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿‰œ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿‰œ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿‰œ¿108°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWhyfwon't you go?279fffffffffff(fill)f&‹ ##&##- . -.>.. ..6&##- .-.>....6B##- .-.. ....?## 3?##∑ ∑&##-> > >>> >3 3 3&##- >>> >3?##∑/Œ™‰œœ œJœœ ™˙™˙™œJœ œJœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙™œjœ œjœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙ ™ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ˙™œœœœœ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ˙ ™œœ ™ œ œ ™ œ œœœœœœœnœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœ™œ œ™œœœœœ‰œœœnœœœœ œ œ œ œ™ œœ™œŒ™≈œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ¿œ œ œ¿‰œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œœœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ109°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsWhy don't you be lieve?-282pppppsolo marcatofpmp&‹ ##&##... ...........&##. . ...............B##.... ...... .......?##.....&##.>...> >..>&##. .?>?##/œ™Œ™‰œœœœj˙™œœœœœœœœœ‰œœœ‰œœJ‰ ‰œœ#œœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ‰œ œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ‰œœœœœ‰œ œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰ ‰œ œ ™≈œœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ ™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ™œ œ œŒ™œ ™‰ œœ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿‰™œœœœœœœ œ œ‰¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿110°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrums285p&‹ ## ∑&##................&##................B##..................?##∑ ∑&##>>>> > >?##>>>>> >?##/˙™œJ‰ ‰ Œ™œœ‰œœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈ œ ≈œ˙ ™œœ œœœœœ ™ œJœ œJœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ ™ œJœ œJœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ ™œj œ œ ™œ ™ Œ ™œJœ œ ™‰ œ œ ™œJœ œ ™œ ™œ œ œ‰¿ ¿ ¿œ œ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ‰¿ ¿ ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ‰¿ ¿ ¿œ œ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿111°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsIfknow, I know. I know, IH288fffsoloff ff ff ffff ffffff&‹ ##&##........................&##.>.>∑.>.>.>B##-?##.>.>pizz.>arco.>.>pizz.>>?##>pizz.>>gliss.>>>&##.>.>.>.>?>&.>.>?##> >.>.>?##.>.>∑ ∑ ∑/> >>> >>>>> >> >> > >> >> > >Œ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ# ™ œ# ™œœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œœnœœœœœœœœ œœnœœœœœœœnœ œ‰ ‰ Œ™Œ™‰œj‰œj‰ ‰ ‰œj ‰œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œn ™ œ ™ ‰ œnœ œ‰ ‰ Œ™ œœJ‰ ‰ Œ™œ# œ‰ ‰ Œ™ œœJ‰ ‰ ‰œœœJ‰ ‰ Œ™ œJ‰ ‰ ‰ œœ#J‰ ‰œ ™‰œœ‰œ#œœœœ‰ ‰ Œ™ œœ œœ‰ ‰œœJ‰ ‰œœœœœœ‰ ‰œ ™ œœ##™™ œ ™ œœ ™™ œœ## ™™ œœ ™™œœœ‰ ‰ Œ™œœœ‰œœœœœœœ œ#œ#‰ ‰œœ‰ ‰œ#œ#‰ ‰œœœ#œ‰œ œ‰ ‰ Œ™¿ ¿ ‰ ‰œœœœœœœœ≈ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ¿ ¿‰ ‰œœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿‰ ‰œœœœœœœœ≈ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ¿ ¿‰ ‰œœœœœœœœ≈ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ112°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsknow. I know, I know.292spspspff&‹ ##&##..... . .. . .. .nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~&##.>.>.>. .. .3 3B##3?##arco.>.>.>.>.>.>.>.> .>.>.>.>?##> >&##>>?##?##∑>/> > > > > > > > > > > >œ™œn ™œ ™œ™ œj ˙ ™œœœ#œœ œœœœ#œœ‰œ œœœœ œœ œ˙ ™œj‰ ‰œj‰ ‰œj‰ ‰œ œœ œœœnœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœ ™ œ# ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œœ œ‰ ‰œ œ‰ ‰œ œ‰ ‰œ œ‰ ‰œn œ‰ ‰œ œ‰ ‰œJ‰ ‰œ œ‰ ‰œ œŒœ œœ ‰œnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ™™ œ# j œœ™™œœœ≈œœœœ‰œœœ‰œœœœœœ˙˙##™™Œ™‰œœœnœœœœœœœ¿¿ ¿œœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œœœœœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœœœ¿¿ ¿œœœœœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœœœ œ113°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsThere's a placefffor us.295ffffffff ff ff pp ffø øff&‹ ##&##. . ... . . . .... .. . >port.&##. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .>port.B##. ... .. .3 3 3?##-. . . . . . . . ... . .. ..>.....?##arco-. . . . . . . . . .... .&##- - - - - -. . . . . . . . .... .?##. . . .. . .?##>. . . . . . . . ..... .∑/> > >>˙# ™ œ ™Œ™‰œœœœœœ≈œRœ ™ œ ™ œJœ˙ ™œ œ œ≈œœ œ‰œ œ œœ≈œœ œ‰œ œ‰œj œ ™ œ ™˙ ™œ œ œ≈œ œ œ‰œ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ‰œ œ‰œj œ ™œ™œ#œœœœœœœœœ# ™˙ ™ œœœ ™ œ œ≈œœœœœ‰œœœœ‰œ™œ ™œ# ™œœ#™™ œœ œœ œœ ≈ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ ≈œœr œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ# ™ œ ™ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ‰œ œ œœ≈œRœJœœ œ‰˙™œœœ#œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œœœnœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœJœœœ ™™™ œœœ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ™™™œœ## ™™ œœ## ™™ œœj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ ≈œœr œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœJ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™ œœ ™™œ#œ#œ#œœœ# œœn ™™œ œ œ≈œ œ œ‰œ œ œœ≈œrœjœœ œ‰¿¿ ¿œœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œ œœœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ œœ¿¿ ¿œœœœ ™™ œ œœ œœ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ œ114°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums300fffmpfffmp&‹ ##&##. > . >>>>3 3 3&##. > . > .>.>>3B##.> .> >>3 3?##> >..>.>.>?##- .>.>.>&##>?##>>.>>?##∑>>>3 3 3/3 3 3˙™œ™œ‰≈œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœ≈œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ≈œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœœœœœœœœ‰œœœjœjœ œœ œŒ™‰ œ œ™ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœJœœJœœœœJœœŒ™œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ¿j ¿œ¿œJ¿ ¿¿œ œ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ115°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOo.mp302mpmpmpmpmpp&‹ ##&##----&##--- -B##.>. ..>. ..> .. .>..?##. .. .?##. . . . . . . . . . . . .&##3 3 3?##&?##. . . . . . . . . . . ../œ ™œ# ™œ# ™œ ™œ#™œ™œ ™œ# ™œ™œ# ™œ ™œ™œœnœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœ œœ œœ# œ œ œ œ œ≈œ# œ œ œ œ œ œœ#œœœ#œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ#œœœ#œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ#œ#œœœœœ#œ#œœœ#œœ# œ œ œ œ œ≈œ# œ œ œ œ œœŒœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ≈œ œŒœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ≈œ œœ œ œ116°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh.304ffø ø ø&‹ ##&##trem.>>&##trem.> >B##trem> >>>?##trem> >>>?##. . . . . . .>.>&##.>&##?.>?##. . . . . . .>.>/œ™œ ™ œ ™ Œ ™æææœ ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™æææœ ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™æææœ ™ æææœ# ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™æææœn ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™œn œ œ œ œ œ œJœ œJœœœœœ#œœnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœœœœœœœœœJœœœœœn œœœœœœœœœœœœj œœœœjœœœn œ œ œ œ œ œJœœ œJœœŒœ œ œ œœ œœœ œ œœ œ≈œ œ‰œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œœœœœ œ œ117°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh.mfYoufsay that you are my306ff f pff f pff f pff f pff f pff ffff fff&‹ ##&##>--&##> --B##--?##- . .?##- . .&##-----?##-----. .?##-/>3 3œœ œ œ ™ œ ™Œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œœ™œ ™œœœ œ#œ™œn ™ œ ™‰œœ ™œ™œJœœ ™œ™œœœ œ#œ ™œn™œ™‰œ# œ# ™ œ ™ œJœœn ™œ™œ#™ œ ™ œ ™‰œœ#™ œ ™ œJœ œ™œ# œ œœœ# œ œœœ ™ œJœ#œ™≈œ œ œ œ™ œ ™œ# œ œœœ# œ œœœ ™ œJœ#œ™≈œ œ œ œ™ œ ™œnœnœœœnœœœœœnœnœœœnœœœœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœJœœœœœœ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ œœœœœœœœœ™™™ œœœ ™™™˙˙## ™™Œ ™ œœ# œj œ œ œ œJ œ œ ™œ# ™ œ ™ œœj œœ œœ ™™œ œ œ œœ# œ œœœ# œ œœœ ™ œJœ#œ ™ ≈ œ œ œ œJ œ œ ™œ ™ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™ œœ¿ ¿ ¿ œ œœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ œœ¿j ¿118°¢{{Ten.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsprimpson- Pri son.-310p ppø ø ø øpmpPno.316ø4444&‹ ## ∑ ∑?##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑œ?##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##3?##&?##∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&##U U###&##U U? ###œ ™œ™ œ ™ Œ ™ œ ™œ™ œ ™ Œ ™‰ Œ™œ‰ Œ™œœ ™™ œœ™™œœœ ™™™ œ œ œ œ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœœ ™™™ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ Œ ™˙˙™™œœ ™™ œœ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙n ™™ œœ ™™ Œ ™˙™œJ¿j‰ ‰ Œ™œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œœ ™™ œœœ# ™™ ˙˙˙ ™™ œœ ™™ œœœ ™™ ˙˙˙ ™™ ˙˙˙ ™™=119{{Ten.Pno.DrumsTakepmy life. Hand down my sen -q = 78I321ppiano rhythmad. lib.pTen.Pno.E. BassDrumstence. I'll stand trial. Ac cept- your con dem- na- tion.- -328mp legato44444444&‹ ### ∑ ∑ ∑&###?###/∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&‹ ### 3&###33 3?###?###∑3/Óœ œ˙Óœœœœ#wwwwwww#wwwwwwwwww#wwwwww#wwnww wwww#wwnœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœœ¿ ¿œ ™œ œ¿ ¿œœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœ˙‰œjœœ ™˙ ™‰œjœœœœ#˙™œœœww˙˙˙œœœœœœœœœœ œœœ#™™™ œjœœœnwwnœœœœÓœœœœœœnœœœ#ww ˙˙ œœœœ˙˙#œœœœwwnœ œœœœœ™œ œ ˙#œ œœœ œœœn œœ¿ ¿œœ≈¿ ¿œ œœœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœœ¿ ¿œ ™œ œ¿ ¿œœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœ=120{°¢{Ten.Pno.E. BassDrumsYou say you are my pri son.- - You don't332Ten.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsknow, you don't know you're my free dom.- -337p&‹ ### 3&###3 33?###33?### ./&‹ ###?###∑ ∑ ∑&###?###?###/∑˙Ó Óœ ™ œJ˙ œœœw ˙Œœœ˙˙˙œœœœœœœœœœœ ™™™œjœœœœ˙˙˙#œœœœœœ˙˙˙˙nœœœnœœœœœœ˙˙˙ œœœœ˙˙˙ œœœœ˙˙‰œœ ™™˙˙#œ#œwwnŒ Œœ œœœ wwœ œ ™œœJœœjœ œ ™œœ œ#œ ™œ œœnœœ˙˙n˙nœ œ™œœJœœjœ¿ ¿œœ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœœ¿ ¿œ ™œœ¿ ¿œœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœœ¿ ¿œœ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ˙Œœœ˙‰ œœjœ™™ œRœ œœœœ ˙Óœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙bnœœœœœœ ™™™ œnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙## wwnnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœ ˙n˙ ˙˙ ™ œœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœœ¿ ¿œ ™œ œ¿ ¿œœ¿ ¿œ ™œ¿ ¿œ œœ=121°¢{°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsp f341p fp ffføffVln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.Drums343ø7878787878787878&###bb. . . .>..3&###bb. . . .>..3B###bbtrem.-?###bbtrem.-&###bb<b>?###&bb?###bb> >.>/∑&bb. . . ...3&bb. . . . . .3Bbb-?bb-&bb&bb/Óœœœœœœœœœ<b> œ œ œ œ œ œœœÓœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ æææ˙<b> œ ™œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ æææ˙<b> œ ™œœœjœœœœœœjœ œœœœœœœœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ<b> œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ<b>J‰ ‰ Óœ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ œ œ œ œœœœ œæææ˙ œ œJæææ˙ œ œJ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿=122°¢{°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.Drums344ø ø ø ø øVln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums345pø øp&bb. . . ...3&bb. .. . ..3Bbb-?bb-&bb#&bb/&bb. . . ... . . . ...3 3&bb... ... . . . . . ...Bbb--?bb- -?bb---&bb#&bb?bb--/3 3œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ œœ œœœœœœ#æææœ ™ æææœ œ#æææœ ™ æææœ œœœœœœœ œœœ œœœœjœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ#œœ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ œœœœœœœ œ œ œ œœœœœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœæææœ ™ æææœ œ# æææœ ™ æææœ œæææœ ™ æææœ œ æææœ ™ æææœ œ‰œ œJœ ™œ ™ œ œœ œœœœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™™ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœœœœœ ™™™œœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œ œJœœJœ œœœœœœœœœ œ ™¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ ™ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœ œ œ=123°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums347444444444444444444&bb. . . . . . .. .. .&bb. . . . . . . . . . .Bbb. . . .. . . .?bb. .?bb..&bb&bb?bb/3 3œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œæææœ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œæææœ ™ æææœ œ œœ ™ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœ ™™™ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ ™™™œœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ ™ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œœ œ œ124°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums348ffø ø øp444444444444444444&bb>.>.>.>.>&bb>.>.> .>.>Bbb>.>.>.>?bb.?bb.>.>.>.>&bb>#>>5&bb> > >?> >?bb/3 3æææ˙ œ œ œ œ#æææ˙ œ œ œ œæææ˙ œ œ œ œÓœ#œœœœœœœœœbÓœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœnœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œœœnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœKrœœœœœœœ œ œ œ125°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsff sf pJ349ff sf pff sf pff pff pfffø øfff&bb.........>. . . . . . . ...>>3 3&bb.........>....... ...>>3 3Bbb. . . . . . . . .>... . ....>>33?bb?bb&bb>>>.>.>.>>>>> >3 3?bb>.>>3?bb3/o o o> >>o>o o o>o>o>o>>œœœ≈œœœœœœ‰œœJœ œ œ≈œ œ œ œ œœœœœ Œ˙ ™œœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœjœœœœœœ≈œœœœœœœ œœœœœŒ˙ ™œ œœ≈œ œœœœœ‰œœ#jœœœ≈œ œœnœœœœnœœ#Œ˙ ™˙™ œ w œjwwww œjwœœ ™™ œœJœœJ œœ#œœœœnb#œœœœœœœœœœœœn ™™™™ œœJœœœœœœœœœŒœœ®œœœœœ®œœœœœœjœœJœJ œœ#jœjœœJœœœnœœ#œœœœ œJœnœj˙™ œ ˙ ™ œ ˙ ™ œ œj¿j¿ ™œ œœœœœœœœ‰¿œJœœœœ¿¿¿j¿ ™œ œ œœœœœœœ‰¿¿œJœœœœ œ¿œœœŒœœœœœœ‰¿œJ¿ ¿œœ°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums352fø ø øf&bb&bbBbb?bb?bbpizz.3 3&bb> >>3 3?bb3?bb3 3/oo> >>o>oo o o o o o o ow w ww w ww w wwwwœj˙ ™Œœ œ œ≈œœœœ œœœ‰œJœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœJœœ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœjœœJœJœ™œjœœJœ œœœœJœ ™ ˙wœ œ œ≈œœœœ œœœ‰œJœœœœœœœœ¿œ œ œŒœœœœœ‰¿œJœœœ¿ ¿ ¿j¿ ™œ œ œœœœœœ‰¿ ¿œJœœ¿j¿ ™œ œ œœœœœœ‰¿ ¿œJœœ127°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsIpvery close to mictore my self- a part- to find you.355pppppppp ppplegatoø øpp&‹ bb ∑ ∑&bb∑&bb∑Bbb?bbpizz.?bb∑ ∑&bb??bb∑ ∑?bb/o≈œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™w ww w˙ ˙ w œŒ Ó˙ ˙œœœœœŒ Œœ˙Œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰ œJœœ œ œœwww œœœœw¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿œœœ¿j¿ ÆœJœœœ œœœœ¿j¿¿œœœ¿œœœŒÆœJœœœ œœœœœœœ¿Œ Ó128°¢{°¢{Ten.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassI tore my self- a part- to find you. I tore my self- up, I tore my self- up to358pedal sim.ømpTen.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumscome and find you, to come and find you. Iffound the way.360fffff&‹ bb?bb?bb?bb?bb?bb∑&‹ bb?bbarco?bbarco?bb&?bb?bb/o o o o≈œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ˙Ó˙Œœ˙Ó˙Œœ‰ œJœœ œ œœœ‰ œJœœ œ œœœ˙˙˙wwÓ Œœœœœ œœ œœœœ œœ ™ Œ œ œ ™ œ œ˙Óœj˙˙ ™™ œ˙Óœj˙ ™œ‰œJœœœœœœ˙˙˙œœœ ™™™ œœœ œœœ œœwwœjœœJœJ œœJ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œjœ œœ˙ ™œÓ Œ ≈œœœ¿j¿ ™œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ‰¿ ¿œJœœ œ=129°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums362ffffffffffø øff&‹ bb&bb∑&bb∑Bbb∑?bb?bb&bb?bb?bb/o o o o o oœ ™œj˙ ˙ÓÓ ŒœœœœœœœœÓ ŒœœœœœœœœÓ Œœœœœœœœœw˙˙ ™™ œw˙™ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ™™™ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ™™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœjœœJœJ œœJœjœœJœJ œœJœœœ≈œ œ≈œœ ≈ œR‰œœ œ≈œ œ≈œœ œ¿j¿ ™œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ‰¿ ¿œJœœœ¿j¿ ™œ œ œœœœ œ œ œœ œÓœœœ œ œ œœ œœœœ œ œ œœœ œœ130°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsIffknow there is a place we're look ing- for364ffø ø øff&‹ bb&bb.>. . . .>.>. . ..>. . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .>. .. . ..&bb.> . . . .>.>. . . .>. . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .>. .. . ..Bbb.>. . . .>.>. . . .>. . . ... . . .. . . . . .. . . . .>. .. . ..?bb.>. . . .>.>. . . .>. . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .>. . . . ..?bb. .>. .>&bb?bb?bb>>>/> >>> > >> >>>Œœ œ œ œœœœœœ ˙bœœœœœ‰œ œ œ œœJ‰œœœœœ‰œ œ≈œ œ‰œœœœœ œ‰œœœœœ œœœb œ≈œ≈ œœœœœœœœœœœœ ‰œœœœœœœœœœj‰œœœœœœœœœœ ‰œn œ≈œ œ‰œb œœœœ œ‰œœœœœœœœœœ œœ œœ≈ œ≈œœœœœœœ‰œ œ œ œœj‰œœœœœ‰œ œ≈œ œ‰œb œœœœ œ‰œœœœœ œœnœœœœ≈œ≈œb œœœœœœ‰œ œ œ œœJ‰œœœœœ‰œ œ≈œ œ‰œœœœœ œ‰œœœœœœœ œb œ≈ œ≈œœœ œ‰œJœJ‰ ‰œJ˙˙˙ ˙b˙˙˙œœœr˙˙˙˙˙˙ œœœb˙˙˙˙˙˙œœœbbrœœœœœœœœœœœJœœœœJœœ™™ œœJ˙˙ ˙˙b˙˙œœbœœbœœœ œ‰œJœ≈œœœœœ ™ œœœ œ œœœ™ œ œœ œ œœbÓœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœŒ¿œœœœœœœ œ¿ ¿œ ™ œœœ œ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœœœ¿œœ œ ¿œ œœœœœŒœœœ œ ¿ ¿œœ œ¿ ¿œ œœ131°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsp mf367p mfp mfp mfp mffø øp mf244424442444244424442444244424442444&bb . . . . ...>- .>.>&bb. . . . ...>-.>.>Bbb. . . ... .>--.>.>?bb. . . ....>--. .?bb.>- - . .&bb.......--. . . .?bb--&. .. .?bb. - . ./>>> >>>o> 3 3 3‰œ œ œ œ≈œ≈œœnJ‰ Œ Œœœ™œ≈œr‰ Ó‰œ œ œ œ≈œ≈œ œJ‰ Œ Œœbœ ™ œ ≈ œr ‰ Ó‰œ œ œ œ≈œ≈œ œJ‰ Œœœœ ™œ≈œr‰ Ó‰œ œ œ œ≈œ≈œœJ‰ Œœœœœ™œœ œ œ Œ ‰œœ˙œJ‰ Œœœœ™œœ œ œ Œ ‰œœ˙˙˙˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœbœœœœnbbnœœœœ ™™™™œœœœ ≈ œœœœr ‰ œœœœ ™™™™ œœœœ ≈ œœœœr ‰˙˙Óœœbœœœnnœ ™œœn≈œœr‰œœ ™™œœ≈œœr‰œ ™ œ œ ≈ œ œ œJ‰ Œœœœ ™ œœ œ œ Œ ‰œœ¿¿œœœœ œ œ¿œœ œœœ¿œœ œ œœœ œœœ¿¿œœ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ≈ŒÆœRÔœ œ œ œœœœœ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ132°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums370legato&bb∑.>.>&bb∑.>.>Bbb∑.>.>?bb>?bb>&bb---3&bb- --3?bb>/> 3 3 3œ ™œ≈œr‰ Óœ™œ≈œr‰ Óœ ™œ≈œr‰ Óœb ™ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ ‰œ™œœ œ œ ‰ œJœ œœœœb ™ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ ‰œ™œœ œ œ ‰ œJœ œœœœbœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœnœœœœœœœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœb ™™™™™™™™ œœœœr œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œn œ œ œ œœb ™ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œ œœ™œœ œ œ ‰ œJœ œœœ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ‰¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œJœœ œœœ œ¿ ¿¿¿œ ™ œ œ œ≈Œ ÆœRÔœ œ œ œœœœœ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ133°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums372&bb.>.> 3 3 3 3&bb.>.>3 3 3 3Bbb.>.>3 33 3?bb. >.. .3?bb. >.. .3&bbb>> 3 3 3&bb>?bb. >.. .3/> 3 3 3œ™œ≈œr‰ Ó ‰œœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ™œ≈œr‰ Ó ‰œœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœb™œ≈œr‰ Ó ‰œœœœnœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœnœb™ œœœœ œœœœœœnj‰ ‰œjœœœb™ œœœœ œœœœœœnj‰ ‰œjœœœ‰™œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœR œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œn œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœn œ œ œœœœb ™™ œœ œœœ ˙˙˙œœœœœœœnœœœb™ œœœœ œœœœœœnJ‰ ‰œJœœ¿¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ‰¿ ¿œJ≈¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿¿¿œ ™ œ œ œ≈ŒÆœRÔœ œ œ œœœœœ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œœ œ134°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsff374ffff&bb>. . . . ..>&bb>. .>Bbb>.. >?bb>3?bb>3&bb> >&bb>?bb. >3/œ ™ œJœ œ œ œ œ œœœœ™ œJœ œ œœœ™ œJœœœ œœœbœœœ œœœœbœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœb™™™œœœj˙˙˙œœbœœœœ œœ¿¿œ ™ œ œ œ œœ‰¿™ ¿œJ¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ¿œ œ135°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWhenffthe dark375fffffffffff øffff&‹ bb&bb.>.>.>&bb.>.>.>Bbb.>.>.>.>.>.>.>?bb.>.>.>.>.>.>.>?bb.>.>.>.>.>.>.>&bb&bb?bb/Ó ‰ œJœ œ‰œœj‰œœjŒ™œœj‰œœj ‰œœj Œ™œœjœœœœ‰œœœœ‰ ≈œœ≈œœ≈œœ‰œ œ‰œ œ‰ ≈œ≈œ≈œ‰œ œ‰œ œ‰ ≈œ≈œ≈œ‰œ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœœ œ136°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsfalls we'll walk through the night.K376ffffff&‹ bb&bb>>&bb>Bbb->>?bb-> >?bb- > >&bb>&bb?bb-/œJœ œJœ œœ œŒ œœœœœ œœœœœœÓ œœœœœ œœœœœœ ™ œj œœœœ™œjœœœœ ™ œJœœœœjœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœjœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœœ œ137°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsIn to- the sun -377ø&‹ bb&bb.>.>.>>&bb>.>.>.>>Bbb.>.>.>.>.>.>.>?bb.>.>.>.>.>.>.>?bb.>.>.>.>.>.>.>&bb&bb?bb/œŒ ‰œjœœœ‰œJ‰œœœœŒ ‰œJœœœ‰œœœœŒ ‰œœJœœœœ≈œœ≈œœ≈œœŒœœœœ‰œ œ≈œ≈œ≈œŒœ œ‰œ œ≈œ≈œ≈œŒœ œ‰œ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœ œœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœœ œ138°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsrise- we'll fol low- the light.378ø&‹ bb&bb>>&bb>>Bbb.--?bb. . --?bb. . --&bb&bb?bb-/œJœœJœJœœ œœŒœœœœœ œœŒœœœœœ œœœœjœ œjœœœjœ œjœœœjœ œjœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœœ œ139°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh.f379ø ø&‹ bb&bb.>> > > > > > >>&bb. . . . .......Bbb.>.>.>.>.>>?bb.>.>.>.>.>>?bb.>.>.>.>.>>&bb&bb?bb/˙Œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœ‰ ≈œœR‰œœœ œ‰œ œ‰ ≈œR‰œœ œ‰œ œ‰ ≈œR‰œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœœ œ140°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWhen the dark380ø&‹ bb&bb> > > > > > > >&bb.>> .>> > .>>Bbb.>.>.>.>> .>>?bb.>.>.>.>> .>>?bb.>.>.>.> >.> >&bb&bb?bb>/˙™œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ ™ œ œ ™≈œ ™Jœ œ ™œœœœ‰œœœœ‰ ≈œœ ™™Jœœœœ ™™œœbœœ ‰œœœœ ‰ ≈œœ™™Jœœ™œb œ ‰ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ™Jœ œ™œ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœbœœbœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœbœbœ œœœ œœ ™œœ ™œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œœœ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœœ œ141°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsfalls we'll be to geth- -381ø&‹ bb&bb&bbBbb----?bb----?bb--&bb&bb?bb/o>>oo> > >o>o> > > >œJœ ™‰œJœ œ œæææœ ææææ˙ æææœæææœ ææææ˙ ææ朜œœ#œœœœœn˙˙nœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ#œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnœnœœœœœ¿ ¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œœ œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ œ œ142°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumser- - we will find it.382ppsppø ø ø ømpmp&‹ bb&bb-&bb-Bbb--&?bb--∑?bb--∑&bbb&bb?bb--/>>> >> >3 3œœ‰œJœœ œ˙ ™æææœ œ œ œrœ œ œ ˙ œæææœ œ œ œrœ œ œ ˙ œŒœœnŒœwŒœœnŒœŒ˙œœœœnœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœ œœœœœ œœœœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœnœœœœbœœœœœ œ œœŒ˙˙œœ˙˙™™œœœœœ≈œœ œ œœœ¿œ®œœœœœœœ¿¿¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿œ œ143°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Pno.E. BassDrumsOh.384p&‹ bb&bb&bb&bb&bb&bb?bb/Ó Œœœ˙ œœ˙ œ˙™œœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œœr˙ œrœJœ œJ¿œ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿144°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums385ffø&‹ bb #&bb#>>&bb#>>&bb>#?bb. . . . . . . .#.>.>?bb>#&bb#>>&bb> >? #>>?bb#/6wœJœœJœœ œœœjœœJœœ œœœJ æææœ ™ æææ˙Óœ<b> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ#Ó Œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœJœ ™ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ¿¿œ¿œ¿œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ145°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsffL386ffffffffffen dehors, sempre legatofø øfff&‹ #&#--&#- -&#--?#?#&#?#?#∑/o +> >> >o +w wœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ<n> œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œj œ œ œ œ˙ ˙wœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœŒw˙ ™œ≈¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œœ ™œ œ¿ ¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿ ¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿œ œœ¿¿ ¿ ¿œ œœœ146°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.DrumsInffthis388ø ø&‹ # ∑&#port.&#port.&# port.?#?#&#?#/o +> >> >o +Óœœœœœ™ œJ˙ ˙œœœ ™ œJ˙ ˙œœœ ™ œJ˙ ˙‰œj œœ œ œ‰œj œœ œœ˙ ˙wœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœ≈¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œœ ™œ œ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ¿ ¿¿¿œœœœ147°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsplace we'll stay. We'll390with growing intensitywith growing intensitywith growing intensitywith growing intensitywith growing intensityø øff with growing intensity&‹ # >&#-&#-&#-?#?#&#?#?#/o +> >> >o +˙™ œ œ ˙‰œ ™œœœœœ˙œœœœœœ˙œœœœœœ˙œœœœœ œ œ‰œj œœ œœ˙ ˙˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœ≈œœœœœœ≈œœœœœœ≈¿¿¿ ¿œ¿ ¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ ™œ œ¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿œ¿¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿œ œœ¿¿ ¿ ¿œœœœ148°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsstay to geth- er.-392ø ø&‹ #&#port..> .>&#port..>.>&# port..> .>?#.>.>3?#.>.>3&#> >?#>>?#>>.>.>3/o +> >> >o +˙™œœ˙Œœœœ™ œJ˙œœœœœœ ™ œJ˙œ œœœœœ ™ œJ˙ œ œœ‰œj œœ ™œ œœ™ ‰œj œœ œ œœœœœ˙ œ ™œ œœ™ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœ≈œœœœ ™œ ≈œ™j ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œœ≈¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œœ ™œ œ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œœ¿¿¿¿œœœœ149°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWe'll stay for ev- er.- -394ø ø ø øff&‹ #&#port.>&#port.>&#>?#?#&#?#?#>/o +> >> >o +Œ œœœ˙˙#œœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœœœ‰œœœœœœœœœ˙‰œœœœœ‰œj œœ œœœjœœjœjœœj˙ ˙˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœbœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœbœœwŒ™™œr˙œ≈œœœœœœ≈¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œœ ™œ œ¿ ¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿œ œœ¿¿ ¿ ¿œ œœ œ150°¢{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsWe'll stay to geth- er.- - -396pø&‹ #&#port.&#port.&#?#?#&#n?#&?#>>/o +> >> >o +Œœœœ˙˙œœœœ ˙˙œœœœ ˙˙˙˙˙˙œœœœ œœœjœœjœjœ ™˙ ˙˙ ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœnœœœn œœœœœœœœ œœœœœ≈œœœœ™œ œœ ™wœ≈¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œœ ™œ œ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿ ¿ ¿¿¿ ¿œ œœ¿¿¿¿œœœœ151°¢{{Ten.Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums398ppppppppø øpmpPno.pedalsim.404ø&‹ # ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑?#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&#&#?#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/>∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&#&#w˙ ™Œ˙™Œ˙ ™ŒÓœœ˙Óœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ˙˙˙ w˙˙˙ w˙˙˙œjœœjœjœœjwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwœ¿¿¿¿ ¿œ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿¿ ¿œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ¿ ¿ ™ ¿ Œ Ów˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙˙wwb˙˙œ ™ œ œ˙˙˙˙˙˙ wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww=152°¢{°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. Basspp413pppppppVln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. Bass418&#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&#∑ ∑B#∑?#&#&#?#&#&#B#?#&#&#?#wÓ Œœ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œÓ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙w w w w wœJœ œJœJœ ™ œœJœœœœJœœJœœ ™™ œœJœœœœJœœJœœ™™ œœJœœœœJœœJœœ ™™ œJœ œJœJœ ™wwwwwwwwwwwwwww˙ ™ œ ˙ ™œœjœ ™ ˙ ˙ ™ Œ œj œ ™ ‰ œ ™wwwwœ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙w w w wœœJœœœœJœœJœœ ™™ œœJœœœœJœœJœœ ™™ œJœ œJœJœ ™ œJœ œJœJœ ™wwwwwwwwwwww˙‰œ œjœjœ ™ œœ˙˙˙™ œ=153°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsppp422pppp&#U&#UB#∑U?#∑U&#U&#U?#U/∑ ∑ ∑Uww w˙ œ ™ œJœ˙œ w w˙ œ™œJ˙ ˙ ˙Ó Ó Œ™‰wwÓ Œ™‰œJœ œJœJœ ™ ww wwÓ Œ™‰wwwwwwwwwÓ Œ™‰œjw w œJ‰ Œ Ó Ó Œ™‰Ó Œ™≈œ œ154°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrumsppM426ppppppp&#&#B#?#. . .?#∑. . . .∑ ∑&#&#∑> >?#∑/w w ˙ ˙ ˙Ów w ˙ ˙ ˙ÓÓ ‰ œ#™w ˙ ˙# ˙ ÓÓ ‰œœ ™™ ww ˙˙Óœœ œ œ‰œjÓœ œ œ œŒ Ówœœ ˙ ™˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙˙#≈œ ™Jœœœœœœœœœ# ˙˙˙˙ŒwwwwÓœœœ ™ œœœ œ œ œ‰œJÓ Ó ≈œœœœœ ˙ ™Œ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿155°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Cb.Pno.E. BassDrums430&#&#B#?#∑. . . . . . . . . . .?#. . .∑ ∑ ∑&#∑&#∑ ∑ ∑?#/‰œ# œJ˙ œJœ#™œ œw w‰œ œJ˙ œJœ™œ œw w‰œ# œJ˙ œJœ# ™ œ œw ˙Óœœ œ œ‰œ œÓœ œ œ œ‰œjÓœ œŒ Óœœœœ‰œJÓ‰œœœœJœœœœ ™™ œœ≈œœœœ# ™™™™Jœœœœ™™™™ œœœœœœœœJœœœœ™™™Ó˙˙˙˙#wœœœœ‰œJÓ Óœœœœ#œœ™œŒ Ó˙˙™™Œ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿Œ œKrœœœœœœœÓ156°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumsppp434pppppp&#∑&#∑B#∑?#. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .&#&#?#/wŒ™ œJ ˙w#Œ™ œJ ˙wŒ™ œJ˙œ œ œ œ‰œ œÓœ œ œ œŒ Óœ œ œ œ‰œ œÓwœœ ˙ ™≈œœ™™Jœœ™™ œœœœJœœ™™wœœ ˙ ™wwwwwwww‰œJ≈œ œ œœœœ ™Jœ ™ œ œœjœ œ œ ww¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿157°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vla.Vc.Pno.E. BassDrums437ø ø&#-&#-B#-∑ ∑?#. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .&#&#?#/œJœ™˙ w wœJœ ™ ˙ w wœJœ™˙œ œ œ œ‰œjÓœ œ œ œ‰œ œÓœ œ œ œ‰œjÓ≈œœ™™Jœœ™™ œœœœJœœ ™™wœjœ œj˙œjw≈œœ#™™jœœ ™™œœœœjœœ ™™ ww wwŒ œ ™ œœ œ œ œ œjœ œ ™ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ˙¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœÓ158°¢{°¢{Vln. 1Vln. 2Vc.Pno.E. BassDrumspp440ppppppppVln. 1Vln. 2Pno.E. BassDrumsn442n&#”“&#?#. . .. .&#&#∑?#/&#U“< >&#U&#∑ ∑ ∑ ∑U&#∑ ∑U?#∑ ∑U/Uw ww wœ œ ‰ œJÓœ œŒ Óœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœwwœjœ™œ œ œ ˙œjww˙˙˙¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœÓw w w ˙Ów w w ˙Ó‰œrœJœœ ™ ˙ ˙Ówœ œj˙ ™ ww¿ ¿œœœœœ‰¿œJŒ¿ ¿ ¿œœœœÓ¿ ¿œœœœÓ¿ ¿œœœœÓ=159

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0221368/manifest

Comment

Related Items