UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Understanding industry and lay perspectives on dairy cattle welfare Ventura, Beth Ann 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2015_november_ventura_beth.pdf [ 1.31MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0220738.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0220738-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0220738-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0220738-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0220738-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0220738-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0220738-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0220738-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0220738.ris

Full Text

UNDERSTANDING	  INDUSTRY	  AND	  LAY	  PERSPECTIVES	  ON	  DAIRY	  CATTLE	  WELFARE	  	  by	  	  Beth	  Ann	  Ventura	  	  	  B.Sc.,	  Michigan	  State	  University,	  2007	  M.Sc.,	  University	  of	  Maryland,	  College	  Park,	  2009	  	  	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  	  	  DOCTOR	  OF	  PHILOSOPHY	  	  in	  	  THE	  FACULTY	  OF	  GRADUATE	  AND	  POSTDOCTORAL	  STUDIES	  	  (Animal	  Science)	  	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  	  (Vancouver)	  	  	  	  September	  2015	  	  	  ©	  Beth	  Ann	  Ventura,	  2015	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   ii	  Abstract	  	  	  The	  welfare	  of	  dairy	  cattle	  is	  of	  rising	  concern	  in	  North	  America.	  This	  thesis	  explores	  how	  stakeholders	  relevant	  to	  dairy	  production—including	  those	  working	  within	  but	  also	  those	  external	  to	  the	  industry—interpret	  issues	  around	  dairy	  cattle	  welfare,	  with	  the	  aim	  to	  unearth	  the	  root	  of	  disagreements	  and	  identify	  common	  values	  between	  diverse	  groups.	  Chapter	  1	  begins	  by	  exploring	  the	  relevant	  literature	  and	  identifies	  important	  gaps.	  Chapters	  2	  and	  3	  describe	  multi-­‐cohort	  focus	  groups	  of	  farmers,	  veterinarians,	  and	  other	  industry	  stakeholders.	  Chapter	  2	  investigates	  their	  interpretations	  of	  the	  priority	  welfare	  issues	  facing	  the	  dairy	  industry	  and	  demonstrates	  that	  these	  stakeholders	  hold	  a	  broad	  conception	  of	  animal	  welfare	  with	  the	  potential	  to	  link	  to	  values	  in	  broader	  society.	  Chapter	  3	  explores	  how	  these	  stakeholders	  perceive	  challenges	  to	  welfare	  and	  their	  desired	  solutions	  for	  change;	  it	  shows	  consensus	  for	  education,	  particularly	  in	  the	  form	  of	  peer-­‐led	  extension	  strategies,	  to	  address	  low	  welfare	  knowledge	  among	  farmers	  and	  veterinarians.	  Chapter	  4	  describes	  a	  survey	  of	  non-­‐farming	  citizens	  before	  and	  after	  touring	  a	  dairy	  farm	  and	  demonstrates	  that,	  as	  with	  industry	  stakeholders,	  citizens’	  animal	  welfare	  values	  are	  diverse.	  Chapter	  4	  also	  shows	  that	  citizens	  respond	  differently	  to	  learning	  more	  about	  dairy	  farming,	  with	  some	  becoming	  more	  concerned	  and	  others	  less	  so.	  Chapter	  5	  then	  describes	  the	  use	  of	  an	  online	  engagement	  tool	  to	  explore	  in	  greater	  depth	  what	  appears	  to	  be	  one	  of	  the	  most	  contentious	  practices	  in	  dairy	  production—that	  of	  early	  separation	  of	  the	  dairy	  calf	  from	  the	  cow.	  It	  illustrates	  that	  support	  of	  this	  practice	  varies	  markedly	  among	  stakeholder	  groups,	  but	  that	  people	  are	  often	  concerned	  with	  the	  same	  issues	  regardless	  of	  their	  stance,	  providing	  paths	  for	  	   iii	  compromise	  on	  practice	  and	  policy.	  Chapter	  6	  concludes	  with	  a	  summary	  of	  findings	  and	  recommendations,	  including:	  1)	  farmers	  should	  engage	  with	  veterinarians	  and	  researchers	  to	  help	  them	  adopt	  practices	  in	  better	  alignment	  with	  societal	  values	  (such	  as	  pain	  mitigation),	  2)	  industry	  decision	  makers	  should	  commit	  to	  transparency	  but	  also	  be	  prepared	  to	  listen	  and	  adapt	  to	  informed	  critiques,	  and	  3)	  researchers	  should	  explore	  engagement	  strategies	  to	  aid	  in	  conflict	  resolution	  between	  industry	  and	  lay	  citizens.	  	  	   	  	   iv	  Preface	  	  	   A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  1	  is	  in	  preparation	  for	  publication:	  Ventura,	  B.	  A.,	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  A	  review	  of	  industry	  and	  lay	  stakeholder	  views	  on	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  B.	  A.	  Ventura	  developed	  and	  researched	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  manuscript.	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  contributed	  as	  a	  typical	  primary	  supervisor,	  providing	  input	  on	  material	  and	  editing	  drafts.	  	   A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  2	  has	  been	  published:	  Ventura,	  B.	  A.,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  2015.	  Animal	  welfare	  concerns	  and	  values	  of	  stakeholders	  within	  the	  dairy	  industry.	  J.	  Agric.	  Environ.	  Ethics.	  28:109-­‐126.	  B.	  A.	  Ventura	  developed	  and	  researched	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  paper.	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  and	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  co-­‐authored	  this	  paper	  in	  the	  typical	  roles	  of	  supervisors,	  helping	  to	  interpret	  material	  and	  edit	  drafts.	  The	  project	  received	  research	  ethics	  board	  approval	  from	  UBC	  under	  certificate	  number:	  H12-­‐02429.	  	   A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  3	  has	  been	  submitted	  for	  publication:	  Ventura,	  B.	  A.,	  D.	  M.	  Weary,	  A.	  S.	  Giovanetti,	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk.	  Stakeholder	  perspectives	  on	  cattle	  welfare	  challenges	  and	  solutions.	  B.	  A.	  Ventura	  developed	  and	  researched	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  manuscript.	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  D.M.	  Weary	  acted	  in	  the	  typical	  roles	  of	  supervisors,	  providing	  input	  on	  interpretation	  and	  editing	  drafts.	  A.	  S.	  Giovanetti	  acted	  as	  a	  research	  assistant,	  assisting	  with	  data	  analysis	  and	  editing	  drafts.	  The	  project	  received	  research	  ethics	  board	  approval	  from	  UBC	  under	  certificate	  number:	  H12-­‐02429.	  	   A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  4	  is	  in	  preparation	  for	  publication:	  Ventura,	  B.	  A.,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  H.	  Wittman	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  Changes	  in	  animal	  welfare	  knowledge,	  	   v	  perceptions,	  concerns	  and	  values	  among	  citizens	  visiting	  a	  dairy	  farm.	  B.A.	  Ventura	  developed	  and	  researched	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  manuscript.	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  acted	  in	  the	  typical	  roles	  of	  supervisors,	  providing	  input	  on	  analysis	  and	  editing	  drafts.	  H.	  Wittman	  provided	  input	  on	  project	  design	  and	  edited	  drafts.	  This	  project	  received	  research	  ethics	  board	  approval	  from	  UBC	  under	  certificate	  number:	  H14-­‐01689.	  	  	   A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  5	  has	  been	  published:	  Ventura,	  B.	  A.,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli,	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary.	  2013.	  Views	  on	  contentious	  practices	  in	  dairy	  farming:	  The	  case	  of	  early	  cow-­‐calf	  separation.	  J.	  Dairy.	  Sci.	  96:6105-­‐6116.	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  developed	  the	  main	  ideas	  for	  this	  research.	  The	  research	  was	  developed	  in	  collaboration	  with	  Dr.	  Peter	  Danielson	  and	  the	  Norms	  Evolving	  in	  Response	  to	  Dilemmas	  (NERD)	  team	  at	  the	  UBC	  Centre	  for	  Applied	  Ethics.	  B.	  A.	  Ventura	  analyzed	  the	  data	  and	  developed	  the	  paper.	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  and	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  acted	  in	  the	  typical	  roles	  of	  supervisors	  and	  edited	  drafts.	  C.	  A.	  Schuppli	  acted	  as	  a	  co-­‐author	  and	  helped	  interpret	  the	  material.	  This	  project	  received	  research	  ethics	  board	  approval	  from	  UBC	  under	  certificate	  number:	  H12-­‐00126.	   	  	   vi	  Table	  of	  Contents	  	  Abstract	  .................................................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Preface	  ..................................................................................................................................................................	  iv	  Table	  of	  Contents	  .............................................................................................................................................	  vi	  List	  of	  Tables	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  viii	  List	  of	  Figures	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  ix	  Acknowledgements	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  x	  Dedication	  ...........................................................................................................................................................	  xi	  Prologue	  ................................................................................................................................................................	  1	  Chapter	  1:	   Introduction	  ..............................................................................................................................	  3	  1.1	   Research	  context	  ...............................................................................................................................	  3	  1.2	   Stakeholder	  conflict	  .........................................................................................................................	  5	  1.3	   Defining	  the	  need	  ..............................................................................................................................	  7	  1.4	   Definitions	  and	  terminology	  ........................................................................................................	  8	  1.5	   Industry	  stakeholder	  values	  .....................................................................................................	  12	  1.6	   Engagement	  between	  industry	  and	  lay	  stakeholders	  ....................................................	  27	  1.7	   Lay	  stakeholder	  values	  ................................................................................................................	  36	  1.8	   Gaps	  in	  the	  existing	  literature	  ..................................................................................................	  46	  1.9	   Thesis	  aims	  .......................................................................................................................................	  50	  Chapter	  2:	   Dairy	  industry	  animal	  welfare	  values	  and	  concerns	  ............................................	  51	  2.1	   Introduction	  .....................................................................................................................................	  51	  2.2	   Methods	  ..............................................................................................................................................	  53	  2.3	   Results:	  Concerns	  ...........................................................................................................................	  56	  2.4	   Results:	  Reasons	  .............................................................................................................................	  61	  2.5	   Discussion	  .........................................................................................................................................	  67	  2.6	   Study	  conclusions	  ..........................................................................................................................	  73	  Chapter	  3:	   Dairy	  industry	  perspectives	  on	  animal	  welfare	  challenges	  and	  solutions	  .	  74	  3.1	   Introduction	  .....................................................................................................................................	  74	  3.2	   Methods	  ..............................................................................................................................................	  76	  3.3	   Results	  and	  discussion	  .................................................................................................................	  80	  3.4	   Concluding	  remarks	  ....................................................................................................................	  106	  Chapter	  4:	   Changes	  in	  animal	  welfare	  knowledge,	  perceptions,	  concerns	  and	  values	  among	  citizens	  visiting	  a	  dairy	  farm	  ....................................................................................................	  108	  4.1	   Introduction	  ...................................................................................................................................	  108	  4.2	   Methods	  ............................................................................................................................................	  111	  4.3	   Results	  ..............................................................................................................................................	  119	  4.4	   Discussion	  .......................................................................................................................................	  131	  4.5	   Conclusion	  .......................................................................................................................................	  141	  Chapter	  5:	   Mixed	  stakeholder	  attitudes	  toward	  cow-­‐calf	  separation:	  a	  case	  study	  ...	  143	  5.1	   Introduction	  ...................................................................................................................................	  143	  5.2	   Methods	  ............................................................................................................................................	  146	  5.3	   Quantitative	  results	  ....................................................................................................................	  151	  5.4	   Qualitative	  results	  and	  discussion	  ........................................................................................	  154	  5.5	   General	  discussion	  and	  conclusions	  ....................................................................................	  163	  	   vii	  Chapter	  6:	   General	  discussion	  and	  recommendations	  ............................................................	  168	  6.1	   Overview	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  168	  6.2	   Success	  and	  limitations	  of	  research	  .....................................................................................	  170	  6.3	   Forward	  paths:	  recommendations	  and	  next	  steps	  ........................................................	  177	  6.4	   Conclusion	  .......................................................................................................................................	  181	  References	  .......................................................................................................................................................	  182	  Appendices	  ......................................................................................................................................................	  202	  Appendix	  A:	  Focus	  group	  interview	  guide—Guelph	  ...............................................................	  202	  Appendix	  B:	  Focus	  group	  interview	  guide—Madrid	  ...............................................................	  204	  Appendix	  C:	  Citizen	  farm	  tour	  survey	  ............................................................................................	  205	  	   	  	   viii	  List	  of	  Tables	  Table	  2.1	  Demographics	  of	  the	  participant	  sample	  (n=47)	  in	  the	  mixed	  dairy	  cattle	  industry	  stakeholder	  focus	  groups	  in	  Guelph,	  Ontario	  ..............................................	  55	  Table	  2.2	  Guelph	  focus	  group	  participants’	  reasoning	  discussed	  in	  the	  context	  of	  their	  priority	  animal	  welfare	  issues	  ..............................................................................................	  57	  Table	  3.1	  Demographics	  of	  the	  participant	  sample	  (n=50)	  in	  the	  veterinary	  stakeholder	  focus	  groups	  in	  Madrid,	  Spain	  ..............................................................................................	  78	  Table	  3.2	  Themes	  discussed	  by	  participants	  in	  the	  context	  of	  challenges	  to	  animal	  welfare	  (AW)	  and	  the	  proportion	  of	  focus	  groups	  from	  Guelph	  (n=5	  focus	  groups)	  and	  Madrid	  (n=6)	  in	  which	  each	  theme	  emerged	  ......................................	  81	  Table	  3.3	  Themes	  discussed	  by	  participants	  in	  the	  context	  of	  desired	  solutions	  for	  animal	  welfare	  (AW)	  challenges,	  and	  the	  proportion	  of	  focus	  groups	  from	  Guelph	  (n=5	  focus	  groups)	  and	  Madrid	  (n=6)	  in	  which	  each	  theme	  emerged	  95	  Table	  4.1	  Overview	  of	  dairy	  farm	  tour	  survey	  to	  measure	  citizens'	  perceptions,	  values,	  concerns	  and	  knowledge	  relative	  to	  dairy	  cattle	  welfare	  ......................................	  113	  Table	  4.2	  Description	  of	  participants	  who	  completed	  both	  'before'	  and	  'after'	  surveys	  for	  the	  dairy	  farm	  visit	  (n=50)	  ...........................................................................................	  115	  Table	  4.3	  Description,	  type	  and	  levels	  of	  demographic	  and	  response	  variables	  included	  in	  analysis	  of	  citizen	  responses	  before	  and	  after	  visiting	  the	  dairy	  farm	  ........	  118	  Table	  4.4	  Description	  of	  industry	  perception	  (IP)	  and	  FAW	  value	  themes	  and	  the	  percentage	  of	  participants	  referencing	  each	  theme	  before	  visiting	  the	  dairy	  farm	  ................................................................................................................................................	  121	  Table	  4.5	  Citizens'	  perceptions	  in	  response	  to	  the	  question,	  "Do	  dairy	  cattle	  have	  a	  good	  quality	  of	  life?"	  before	  and	  after	  visiting	  the	  dairy	  farm	  .........................................	  128	  Table	  5.1	  Number	  and	  proportion	  of	  participants	  (Groups	  1-­‐4,	  n=163)	  who	  supported	  (“yes”),	  opposed	  (“no”)	  or	  were	  “neutral”	  to	  early	  cow-­‐calf	  separation	  ..........	  152	  Table	  5.2	  Number	  and	  proportion	  of	  industry-­‐targeted	  participants	  (Group	  5,	  n=28)	  who	  supported	  (“yes”),	  opposed	  (“no”)	  or	  were	  “neutral”	  to	  early	  cow-­‐calf	  separation	  ...................................................................................................................................	  153	  Table	  5.3	  Reason	  themes	  and	  sub-­‐themes	  used	  by	  opponents	  and	  supporters	  of	  early	  cow-­‐calf	  separation	  .................................................................................................................	  155	  	  	   	  	   ix	  List	  of	  Figures	  Figure	  4.1.	  Percentage	  (%)	  of	  Canadian	  citizens	  with	  correct	  responses	  on	  dairy	  husbandry	  quiz	  questions,	  before	  and	  after	  the	  dairy	  farm	  visit	  ....................	  126	  	   	  	   x	  Acknowledgements	  	  The	  following	  people	  have	  made	  this	  thesis	  possible:	  	  Dan	  Weary,	  I	  cannot	  express	  what	  it	  has	  meant	  for	  me	  to	  learn	  from	  you.	  Your	  energy	  is	  inspiring	  and	  your	  joy	  for	  this	  field	  contagious.	  You	  are	  an	  outstanding	  scientist	  and	  a	  gifted	  thinker.	  You	  have	  driven	  me	  to	  be	  better	  than	  I	  thought	  I	  could	  be.	  	  Nina	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  your	  ceaseless	  support	  and	  encouragement	  have	  sustained	  me	  through	  this	  experience.	  Your	  dedication	  to	  animal	  welfare	  science	  is	  something	  I	  strive	  for.	  Thank	  you	  for	  your	  powerful	  example.	  	  	  David	  Fraser,	  by	  your	  example	  you	  have	  helped	  me	  become	  a	  deeper,	  more	  reflective	  thinker,	  not	  just	  in	  this	  field	  but	  also	  in	  life.	  It	  was	  my	  privilege	  to	  learn	  from	  you.	  	  	  Hannah	  Wittman,	  I	  am	  so	  grateful	  to	  you	  for	  lending	  your	  expertise,	  methodological	  rigor,	  and	  positive	  energy	  to	  me	  throughout	  my	  program.	  Our	  conversations	  have	  helped	  me	  look	  at	  my	  research	  through	  a	  wider	  lens.	  	  	  Chris	  McGill,	  you	  are	  the	  glue	  that	  keeps	  this	  wonderful	  program	  together.	  I	  cannot	  count	  how	  many	  times	  you’ve	  helped	  me	  throughout	  the	  years.	  Thank	  you	  for	  what	  you	  do	  for	  us.	  	  Special	  thanks	  to	  Cathy	  Schuppli,	  whose	  mentorship	  early	  in	  my	  program	  launched	  my	  scholarship	  in	  the	  social	  sciences;	  to	  Elisabeth	  Ormandy,	  my	  partner	  in	  crime	  throughout	  my	  years	  at	  UBC;	  to	  the	  rest	  of	  my	  fellow	  social	  scientists-­‐in-­‐training	  in	  the	  AWP,	  and	  to	  every	  student	  in	  the	  AWP,	  I	  have	  so	  enjoyed	  learning	  from	  and	  alongside	  you.	  	  My	  deepest	  thanks	  also	  to	  our	  wonderful	  research	  collaborators,	  without	  whom	  much	  of	  my	  research	  would	  not	  have	  happened:	  Ken	  and	  Barbara	  Leslie	  and	  Amy	  Stanton,	  for	  your	  assistance	  with	  the	  Guelph	  focus	  groups;	  Ana	  Giovanetti	  for	  your	  enthusiasm	  and	  help	  with	  coding;	  Katherine	  Knowlton	  and	  Gesa	  Busch	  for	  your	  help	  with	  the	  citizen	  project;	  and	  to	  my	  participants,	  for	  sharing	  your	  time	  and	  thoughts	  so	  openly	  with	  me.	  	  	  To	  my	  parents,	  your	  ceaseless	  support	  of	  me	  throughout	  my	  life	  has	  been	  priceless.	  Who	  and	  where	  I	  am	  is	  because	  of	  you.	  	  	  To	  Brian,	  my	  partner	  in	  every	  respect.	  Thank	  you	  for	  every	  sacrifice	  you	  made	  to	  help	  me	  follow	  my	  dreams.	  This	  thesis	  is	  also	  yours.	  	  And	  to	  the	  good	  people	  at	  every	  coffee	  dispensary	  in	  greater	  Vancouver,	  for	  keeping	  me	  awake	  long	  enough	  to	  do	  this	  crazy	  thing.	  	  	  Beth	  –	  Vancouver,	  2015	  	   xi	  Dedication	  	  This	  is	  for	  the	  ~2.5	  billion	  farm	  animals	  in	  North	  America,	  whose	  bodies	  we	  use	  to	  sustain	  our	  own.	  May	  we	  learn	  to	  honor	  your	  world	  and	  enable	  you	  to	  live	  the	  lives	  you	  deserve.	  	  	   1	  Prologue	  	   Until	  my	  doctorate,	  my	  academic	  training	  had	  focused	  on	  better	  understanding	  the	  needs	  of	  animals	  so	  we	  could	  better	  manage	  and	  house	  them.	  This	  is,	  of	  course,	  a	  vital	  activity	  and	  one	  in	  which	  I	  am	  proud	  to	  participate.	  As	  I	  neared	  the	  end	  of	  my	  Master’s	  degree,	  however,	  I	  realized	  that	  I	  wanted	  to	  be	  part	  of	  the	  brigade	  to	  help	  ensure	  that	  what	  we	  discover	  about	  animal	  welfare	  is	  actually	  put	  into	  practice.	  And	  the	  main	  barriers	  within	  the	  nexus	  between	  the	  creation	  of	  knowledge	  and	  its	  implementation	  are	  of	  course,	  human—those	  working	  along	  the	  livestock	  production	  chains,	  but	  also	  those	  external	  to	  it	  but	  who	  nonetheless	  benefit	  from	  its	  existence.	  	  	  Qualitative	  research	  demands	  recognition	  of	  a	  researcher’s	  underlying	  biases	  so	  they	  can	  be	  accounted	  for	  to	  the	  greatest	  extent	  possible,	  and	  so	  I	  recount	  mine	  here.	  I	  absolutely	  came	  into	  my	  PhD	  with	  an	  agenda:	  I	  wanted	  nothing	  less	  than	  to	  figure	  out	  how	  to	  change	  society’s	  behaviour	  toward	  animals,	  to	  begin	  to	  rectify	  the	  ways	  in	  which	  we	  have	  affected	  them.	  I	  wanted	  to	  charge	  in	  and	  tell	  consumers	  to	  buy	  more	  humanely	  produced	  animal	  products.	  I	  wanted	  to	  get	  on	  farms	  and	  start	  telling	  farmers	  that	  they	  should	  quit	  docking	  tails	  or	  start	  paying	  more	  attention	  to	  their	  calves,	  etc.	  	  	  Remarkably,	  those	  are	  really	  bad	  approaches	  to	  achieving	  any	  sort	  of	  meaningful	  change.	  And	  although	  I	  sort	  of	  knew	  that	  going	  in,	  it	  was	  not	  until	  I	  began	  to	  immerse	  myself	  in	  new	  research	  methodologies	  that	  I	  began	  to	  figure	  out	  why.	  	  	  In	  part,	  this	  was	  because	  I	  quickly	  learned	  that	  in	  order	  to	  even	  begin	  to	  understand	  how	  to	  change	  human	  behaviour,	  I	  needed	  to	  backtrack.	  One	  cannot	  change	  minds	  without	  first	  understanding	  those	  minds.	  And	  so	  I	  channeled	  my	  efforts	  to	  filling	  	   2	  in	  the	  gaps	  of	  what	  is	  known	  about	  some	  of	  the	  key	  cognitive	  constructs	  that	  may	  later	  help	  inform	  meaningful	  and	  effective	  strategies	  to	  improve	  animal	  welfare.	  	  The	  other	  part	  was	  that	  qualitative	  approaches	  are	  characterized	  by	  openness	  to	  the	  social	  and	  psychological	  phenomena	  under	  study,	  and	  that	  openness	  extends	  to	  the	  researcher’s	  own	  self.	  Becoming	  a	  qualitative	  researcher	  taught	  me	  to	  own	  my	  agenda.	  I	  learned	  to	  acknowledge	  my	  own	  biases	  and	  then	  to	  politely	  dismiss	  them.	  To	  let	  them	  sit	  next	  to	  me	  but	  not	  to	  let	  them	  direct	  me	  as	  I	  immersed	  myself	  in	  the	  data.	  This	  was	  not	  an	  entirely	  easy	  task,	  as	  it	  was	  often	  discomforting	  when	  the	  views	  of	  participants	  differed	  from	  my	  own.	  It	  was	  a	  lesson	  in	  humility	  to	  get	  to	  a	  place	  where	  I	  could	  recognize	  those	  views	  as	  equally	  valid,	  both	  in	  the	  context	  of	  my	  own	  research,	  but	  more	  critically,	  in	  the	  real	  life,	  real	  time	  debates	  about	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  In	  other	  words,	  I	  began	  to	  listen.	  	  This	  was	  essentially	  how	  I	  spent	  the	  past	  four	  years:	  listening	  to	  my	  participants	  and	  trying	  to	  understand	  what	  they	  were	  really	  saying.	  With	  listening	  came	  respect.	  And	  with	  respect	  came	  a	  commitment	  to	  ensuring	  that	  my	  participants’	  voices	  were	  heard,	  without	  filter	  or	  agenda.	  I	  have	  always	  been	  a	  better	  talker	  than	  a	  listener,	  despite	  my	  parents’	  best	  efforts	  and	  much	  to	  my	  dear	  husband’s	  dismay.	  I	  am	  not	  exactly	  proud	  that	  it	  took	  going	  through	  a	  doctoral	  program	  to	  really	  claim	  that	  skill,	  but	  I’ll	  take	  it.	  	   	  	   3	  Chapter	  1:	   Introduction	  	  1.1 Research	  context	  	   Livestock	  agriculture	  in	  North	  America1	  has	  transformed	  since	  WWII,	  with	  tremendous	  repercussions	  for	  the	  ways	  in	  which	  society	  produces	  and	  consumes	  animals.	  This	  change	  is	  characterized	  most	  notably	  by	  an	  increase	  in	  the	  efficiency	  of	  animal	  production,	  which	  in	  turn	  has	  lowered	  the	  cost	  of	  producing	  food.	  At	  the	  same	  time,	  however,	  the	  changing	  nature	  of	  animal	  production	  has	  generated	  concern	  about	  its	  effects	  on	  a	  number	  of	  externalities,	  including	  the	  environment,	  public	  health,	  rural	  communities,	  workers’	  rights,	  and	  the	  welfare	  of	  animals	  in	  the	  various	  production	  systems.	  	  	  	  To	  provide	  context	  for	  present-­‐day	  societal	  concerns	  about	  the	  welfare	  of	  farm	  animals	  and	  dairy	  cattle	  in	  particular,	  I	  briefly	  examine	  two	  broad	  agro-­‐societal	  trends	  that	  have	  marked	  the	  changing	  landscape	  of	  agriculture	  in	  North	  America	  since	  WWII:	  first,	  the	  widespread	  intensification	  of	  livestock	  (including	  dairy)	  production;	  and	  second,	  the	  societal	  exodus	  from	  rural	  to	  urban	  areas.	  1.1.1 	  Intensification	  and	  industrialization	  	  	   	  What	  makes	  the	  growth	  of	  the	  livestock	  sectors	  in	  Canada	  and	  the	  US	  over	  the	  past	  half	  century	  so	  interesting	  is	  that	  it	  generally	  cannot	  be	  attributed	  to	  a	  parallel	  growth	  in	  the	  number	  of	  animals	  produced,	  at	  least	  not	  for	  ruminant	  animals.2	  Rather,	  it	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  For	  the	  purposes	  of	  this	  thesis,	  ‘North	  America’	  is	  used	  to	  refer	  to	  Canada	  and	  the	  US	  only.	  	  2	  For	  the	  most	  part,	  the	  number	  of	  ruminant	  animals	  (raised	  primarily	  on	  forages,	  e.g.	  goats,	  sheep,	  and	  cattle),	  have	  generally	  decreased	  in	  Canada	  and	  the	  US	  in	  the	  last	  half-­‐century	  (FAO,	  2014).	  In	  contrast,	  the	  poultry	  and	  pork	  sectors	  –in	  which	  grain	  feeding	  is	  predominant—have	  seen	  major	  growth	  in	  the	  number	  of	  animals	  raised,	  e.g.	  two-­‐fold	  and	  six-­‐fold	  increases	  in	  turkey	  and	  chicken,	  respectively,	  in	  the	  US	  (Ollinger	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  	   4	  is	  productive	  output	  per	  animal	  that	  has	  increased,	  through	  an	  almost	  universal	  intensification	  of	  livestock	  husbandry.	  This	  intensification	  is	  characterized	  to	  a	  large	  extent	  by	  a	  move	  of	  animals	  indoors	  as	  well	  as	  automation	  of	  routine	  management	  practices,	  and	  further	  achieved	  through	  advances	  in	  genetics,	  nutrition,	  and	  housing	  (Fraser,	  2001;	  Mench,	  2008).	  	  For	  example,	  the	  American	  dairy	  industry	  has	  seen	  a	  4-­‐fold	  increase	  in	  milk	  yield	  between	  1944	  and	  2007	  (Capper	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  though	  both	  the	  number	  of	  farms	  and	  the	  total	  number	  of	  cows	  decreased	  within	  that	  same	  period.	  There	  were	  approximately	  21	  million	  cows	  on	  4.6	  million	  farms	  in	  1940	  (Blayney,	  2002).	  By	  2012	  dairy	  cows	  numbered	  just	  over	  9	  million	  on	  approximately	  51,000	  licensed	  farms	  (Hoard’s	  Dairyman,	  2012;	  NASS,	  2013).	  Summarizing	  the	  above	  in	  their	  paper	  on	  the	  state	  of	  the	  US	  dairy	  industry,	  von	  Keyserlingk	  et	  al.	  (2013)	  noted	  that	  “today’s	  dairy	  industry	  produces	  59%	  more	  milk	  with	  64%	  fewer	  cows,	  consuming	  77%	  less	  feed	  and	  65%	  less	  water	  per	  liter	  of	  milk	  produced	  compared	  with	  dairy	  production	  in	  1944,”	  (p.	  5406).	  	  1.1.2 	  The	  rural	  exodus	  	  Concurrent	  with	  the	  post-­‐WWII	  intensification	  of	  dairy	  production	  in	  Canada	  and	  the	  US	  has	  been	  the	  departure	  of	  the	  citizenry	  from	  rural	  to	  urban	  and	  semi-­‐urban	  areas.	  As	  livestock	  production	  consolidated	  and	  farming	  jobs	  and	  services	  became	  more	  scarce,	  people	  moved	  away	  from	  rural	  areas,	  with	  the	  result	  that	  today	  less	  than	  1%	  of	  the	  American	  workforce	  is	  actively	  engaged	  in	  farming	  as	  a	  career	  (Holecheck	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  as	  discussed	  in	  Guehlstorf,	  2008).	  	  This	  demographic	  shift	  has	  separated	  –	  both	  in	  place	  and	  in	  activity	  –	  the	  majority	  of	  the	  populace	  from	  food	  production,	  including	  regular	  contact	  with	  livestock	  	   5	  (Kendall	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  This	  in	  turn	  has	  meant	  that	  the	  actors	  (including	  the	  animals)	  that	  contribute	  to	  the	  production	  and	  associated	  supply	  of	  animal	  products	  have	  become	  largely	  invisible	  in	  the	  day-­‐to-­‐day	  life	  of	  most	  contemporary	  North	  Americans	  (see	  Kneen,	  1995).	  1.2 Stakeholder	  conflict	  	  	   It	  is	  within	  this	  context	  that	  society	  has	  become	  increasingly	  critical	  of	  the	  various	  livestock	  industries	  (including	  the	  dairy	  cattle	  industry3)	  with	  respect	  to	  the	  adequacy	  of	  care	  toward	  the	  animals	  in	  their	  systems	  (Mench,	  2008).	  As	  with	  the	  other	  livestock	  sectors,	  concerns	  about	  animal	  care	  have	  created	  tension	  between	  various	  stakeholder	  groups	  within	  as	  well	  as	  external	  to	  the	  dairy	  industry,	  including	  the	  public.	  In	  one	  sense	  these	  stakeholders	  can	  be	  seen	  as	  falling	  along	  a	  spectrum,	  with	  the	  most	  vehement	  on	  opposing	  ends	  in	  terms	  of	  their	  views	  as	  to	  whether	  dairy	  production	  is	  or	  is	  not	  humane.	  Fraser	  (2001)	  described	  this	  spectrum	  thus:	  	  “Opponents	  of	  animal	  production	  often	  use	  animal	  welfare	  as	  one	  of	  several	  elements	  in	  an	  effort	  to…create	  an	  alternative	  image	  of	  greedy,	  impersonal	  corporations”	  that,	  among	  other	  sins,	  exploit	  animals,	  while	  “some	  agricultural	  organizations	  have	  promoted	  a	  competing	  image,	  depicting	  animal	  agriculture	  as	  fully	  reflecting	  traditional	  pastoral	  and	  agrarian	  values,	  while	  benefiting	  from	  modern	  knowledge	  and	  technology.	  According	  to	  these	  neo-­‐traditional	  portrayals,	  modern	  farming	  is	  thoroughly	  beneficial	  for	  animal	  welfare,”	  (p.	  184).	  	  	  This	  dichotomization	  of	  the	  dairy	  and	  other	  livestock	  industries	  as	  either	  entirely	  benevolent	  or	  exploitative	  clearly	  oversimplifies	  the	  situation,	  and	  yet	  to	  date	  it	  has	  framed	  much	  of	  the	  interaction	  between	  industry	  and	  lay	  groups	  (Croney,	  2010).	  For	  example,	  in	  2013	  the	  practice	  of	  dehorning	  of	  dairy	  cattle	  made	  media	  headlines	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3	  Henceforth	  referred	  to	  as	  ‘the	  dairy	  industry.’	  	   6	  when	  a	  prominent	  Canadian	  actor	  critiqued	  the	  dairy	  industry	  in	  a	  letter	  to	  the	  National	  Milk	  Producers	  Federation	  for	  performing	  what	  he	  described	  as	  a	  “painful”	  and	  “barbaric	  practice,”	  (Huffington	  Post,	  2013).	  In	  response,	  some	  individuals	  circumvented	  the	  content	  of	  his	  critiques	  and	  chose	  instead	  to	  dismiss	  them	  based	  on	  his	  lack	  of	  affiliation	  with	  –and	  by	  default,	  assumed	  ignorance	  of—the	  dairy	  industry	  (Mess,	  2013).	  	  This	  type	  of	  exchange	  is	  problematic	  for	  a	  number	  of	  reasons.	  First,	  hyperbolic	  and	  inflammatory	  discourse	  distracts	  stakeholders	  from	  solving	  the	  issues	  at	  hand.	  Moreover,	  such	  polarization	  fuels	  frustration	  and	  distrust	  for	  sincere	  critics	  both	  within	  and	  outside	  the	  dairy	  industry.	  Erosion	  of	  stakeholder	  relationships	  in	  turn	  prevents	  groups	  from	  working	  together	  productively	  to	  form	  mutually	  satisfactory	  welfare	  standards	  and	  policies	  (or	  at	  least	  standards	  that	  different	  groups	  can	  live	  with).	  This	  in	  turn	  impedes	  resolution	  of	  the	  very	  real	  welfare	  challenges	  that	  exist	  on	  dairy	  farms	  today	  (for	  a	  review	  of	  key	  welfare	  issues	  in	  the	  dairy	  industry,	  see	  von	  Keyserlingk	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  	  Productive	  and	  effective	  stakeholder	  interaction	  about	  animal	  welfare	  issues	  is	  of	  further	  importance	  as	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  has	  become	  increasingly	  embedded	  into	  notions	  of	  sustainable	  agriculture	  (Boogaard	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  This	  means	  that	  in	  addition	  to	  environmental	  and	  economic	  considerations,	  livestock	  production	  should	  engage	  with	  the	  broad	  values	  held	  by	  society	  (Boogaard	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  von	  Keyserlingk	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  which	  shift	  over	  time	  as	  society	  evolves.	  As	  described	  by	  Boogaard	  et	  al.	  (2008),	  these	  shifting	  values	  may	  varyingly	  be	  expressed	  through	  the	  public’s	  goals	  for	  agriculture	  as	  well	  as	  its	  concerns	  about	  it.	  Hodges	  (2006)	  described	  the	  changing	  landscape	  of	  	   7	  societal	  goals	  for	  sustainable	  agriculture	  as	  looking	  “beyond	  cheap	  food.”	  Consumer	  surveys	  (Rauch	  and	  Sharp,	  2005;	  Prickett	  et	  al.,	  2010)	  support	  that	  the	  humane	  treatment	  of	  livestock	  has	  emerged	  as	  an	  integral	  part	  of	  that	  societal	  imperative.	  In	  this	  regard,	  negative	  interactions	  between	  stakeholders	  within	  and	  external	  to	  the	  dairy	  industry	  may	  erode	  public	  trust	  in	  dairy	  production	  (Brom,	  2000),	  particularly	  if	  the	  dairy	  industry	  does	  not	  engage	  with	  society	  about	  animal	  welfare	  concerns.	  1.3 Defining	  the	  need	  	   What	  is	  needed,	  then,	  is	  for	  stakeholders	  to	  effectively	  communicate	  and	  collaborate	  if	  they	  are	  to	  develop	  solutions	  to	  the	  welfare	  challenges	  present	  in	  the	  dairy	  industry	  today.	  The	  need	  to	  integrate	  multi-­‐stakeholder	  values	  has	  been	  a	  defining	  theme	  in	  the	  various	  calls-­‐to-­‐arms	  to	  address	  welfare	  challenges	  and	  improve	  societal	  sustainability	  among	  academics	  and	  slowly,	  the	  industry	  itself	  (de	  Greef	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Lusk	  and	  Norwood,	  2008;	  Croney,	  2010;	  Leeb,	  2011;	  Croney	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Maday,	  2013).	  And	  yet,	  effective	  communication	  and	  collaboration	  first	  require	  a	  solid	  understanding	  of	  the	  complexity	  of	  values	  and	  attitudes	  that	  people	  bring	  with	  them	  into	  debates	  about	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  (Kendall	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  Or	  as	  Kauppinen	  et	  al.	  (2010)	  commented,	  	  “understanding	  how	  different	  actors	  perceive	  [the	  concept	  of	  animal	  welfare]	  is	  a	  precondition	  for	  the	  successful	  improvement	  of	  [it],”	  	  (p.	  523).	  	  This	  chapter,	  then,	  will	  critically	  examine	  the	  existing	  research	  on	  stakeholder	  attitudes	  and	  values	  related	  to	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  I	  will	  demonstrate	  that	  an	  in-­‐depth	  understanding	  of	  stakeholder	  attitudes	  and	  values	  on	  this	  topic	  has	  only	  recently	  started	  to	  emerge.	  Moreover,	  much	  of	  the	  emerging	  knowledge	  results	  from	  research	  in	  Europe;	  there	  are	  comparatively	  few	  studies	  specific	  to	  the	  US	  and	  Canada	  as	  well	  as	  to	  	   8	  the	  dairy	  industry	  in	  particular.	  Ultimately,	  it	  is	  hoped	  that	  improving	  upon	  this	  knowledge	  will	  help	  identify	  areas	  of	  shared	  concern	  among	  diverse	  stakeholders.	  This	  in	  turn	  should	  aid	  in	  the	  creation	  of	  socially	  sustainable	  policy,	  as	  well	  as	  provide	  legitimate	  grounding	  for	  targeted	  solutions	  tailored	  to	  specific	  identified	  deficits	  in	  practice	  on	  farms.	  1.4 Definitions	  and	  terminology	  1.4.1 	  Attitudes,	  beliefs	  and	  values	  	   Kristensen	  and	  Jakobsen	  (2011)	  recently	  lamented	  that	  a	  “lack	  of	  consensus	  regarding	  what	  to	  call	  certain	  constructs”	  (p.	  5)	  exists	  in	  the	  emerging	  application	  of	  social	  science	  approaches	  in	  the	  animal	  welfare	  science	  literature.	  	  In	  light	  of	  this,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  first	  establish	  some	  consistency	  in	  what	  is	  meant	  by	  certain	  terms.	  	  The	  following	  discussion	  of	  attitudes,	  beliefs	  and	  values	  is	  thus	  presented	  within	  the	  context	  of	  two	  prominent,	  well-­‐regarded	  models	  from	  the	  social	  psychology	  and	  communication	  literatures:	  the	  Theory	  of	  Planned	  Behaviour	  (TPB)4	  and	  the	  Integrated	  Model	  of	  Behavioural	  Prediction	  (IMBP).	  These	  prevailing	  frameworks	  posit	  a	  causal	  chain	  of	  influence	  in	  which	  attitudes,	  influenced	  partially	  by	  one’s	  beliefs	  and	  values,	  affect	  behaviour.	  	  	  The	  TPB	  asserts	  that	  one’s	  intention	  to	  perform	  a	  particular	  behaviour	  is	  the	  most	  powerful	  predictor	  of	  that	  behaviour.	  Intention	  is	  in	  turn	  influenced	  by	  both	  attitudes	  and	  subjective	  norms,	  where	  subjective	  norms	  involve	  how	  a	  person	  perceives	  social	  pressure	  from	  peers	  to	  perform	  or	  eschew	  the	  behaviour	  in	  question	  (Ajzen	  and	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  4	  The	  TPB	  was	  originally	  developed	  by	  Fishbein	  and	  Ajzen	  (1975)	  as	  the	  Theory	  of	  Reasoned	  Action	  and	  later	  extended	  into	  its	  current	  form	  (Ajzen	  and	  Madden,	  1986).	  	  	   9	  Fishbein,	  1980).	  An	  attitude	  is	  a	  disposition	  to	  respond	  favorably	  or	  unfavorably	  to	  an	  attitude	  object,	  which	  can	  be	  anything	  concrete	  or	  abstract	  that	  a	  person	  is	  able	  to	  hold	  in	  mind	  (definition	  adapted	  from	  Cross,	  2005).	  For	  example,	  the	  general	  idea	  of	  a	  ‘factory	  farm,’	  a	  particular	  production	  practice,	  or	  even	  the	  dairy	  cow	  herself	  can	  all	  be	  considered	  attitude	  objects	  toward	  which	  people	  may	  hold	  positive	  or	  negative	  attitudes.5	  	  An	  attitude	  in	  turn	  is	  a	  partial	  function	  of	  the	  evaluation	  of	  the	  beliefs	  held	  about	  the	  behaviour	  as	  well	  as	  the	  strength	  of	  those	  beliefs.	  The	  study	  of	  attitudes	  then	  becomes	  useful	  because	  it	  can	  help	  reveal	  the	  values	  and	  beliefs	  that	  underlie	  them.	  According	  to	  Fishbein	  and	  Ajzen	  (1975),	  “beliefs	  represent	  the	  information	  [a	  person]	  has	  about	  the	  object,”	  such	  that	  beliefs	  link	  an	  object	  to	  some	  attribute.	  To	  use	  a	  welfare-­‐relevant	  example,	  a	  belief	  that	  “dehorning	  is	  painful”	  would	  link	  the	  psychological	  object	  “dehorning”	  to	  the	  attribute	  “is	  painful.”	  From	  this	  example	  it	  should	  be	  evident	  that	  beliefs	  are	  often	  evaluative	  in	  nature,	  meaning	  that	  they	  apply	  a	  value	  judgment	  (Bem,	  1970)	  and	  thus	  serve	  a	  value-­‐expressive	  function	  (Ajzen,	  2001).	  	  Values	  in	  turn	  are	  widely	  recognized	  as	  integral	  to	  both	  belief	  and	  attitude	  formation	  (Bem,	  1970;	  Seligman	  et	  al.,	  1996;	  Ajzen,	  2001).	  Values	  can	  be	  thought	  of	  as	  “desirable,	  trans-­‐situational	  goals…that	  serve	  as	  guiding	  principles	  in	  people’s	  lives…values	  [may	  be]	  used	  as	  anchors	  or	  cognitive	  sources	  from	  which	  attitudes	  may	  emerge,”	  (Seligman	  et	  al.,	  1996).	  Schwartz	  (1999)	  offered	  an	  alternative	  definition	  in	  which	  values	  are	  “criteria	  people	  use	  to	  select	  and	  justify	  actions	  and	  to	  evaluate	  people	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  5	  Terms	   like	   view	   and	   opinion	   are	   often	   used	   interchangeably	   with	   attitude,	   as	   they	   also	   designate	  valenced	  evaluations	  of	  the	  issue	  or	  object	  in	  question.	  Indeed	  the	  term	  opinion,	  for	  example,	  as	  a	  verbal	  expression	  of	  attitude,	  has	  been	  used	  as	  a	  proxy	  for	  attitude	  for	  decades	  (Thurstone,	  1931).	  	  	  	   10	  and	  events.”	  Boogaard	  et	  al.	  (2008)	  noted	  that	  this	  definition	  leaves	  something	  to	  be	  desired	  in	  the	  context	  of	  evaluating	  whether	  agricultural	  systems	  can	  be	  considered	  socially	  sustainable.	  Drawing	  from	  Thompson’s	  (1992)	  description	  of	  sustainability	  in	  relation	  to	  a	  series	  of	  ethically	  significant	  goals	  for	  agriculture,	  where	  sustainable	  agriculture	  is	  one	  “that	  meets	  our	  goals	  as	  a	  society”	  (Thompson,	  1992),	  Boogaard	  et	  al.	  (2008)	  described	  a	  value	  as	  “an	  aspect	  that	  people,	  i.e.	  citizens,	  use	  to	  evaluate	  that	  system,”	  (p.	  25).	  Finally,	  farm	  animal	  welfare	  in	  this	  sense	  has	  been	  described	  as	  one	  of	  many	  dimensions	  that	  may	  be	  “integrated	  into	  the	  values	  of	  humans,”	  (p.	  47;	  Hansson	  and	  Lagerkvist,	  2014).	  	  Farm	  animal	  welfare	  attitudes	  and	  behaviour	  	   The	  relationship	  between	  attitudes	  and	  behaviour	  has	  been	  explored	  in	  relation	  to	  the	  welfare	  of	  farm	  animals.	  A	  number	  of	  studies	  (see	  Waiblinger	  et	  al.,	  2006	  for	  a	  review)	  link	  the	  beliefs	  and	  attitudes	  of	  farmers	  and	  stockpersons	  with	  their	  behaviour	  toward	  animals	  in	  terms	  of	  handling	  (Hemsworth	  et	  al.,	  2000,	  2002;	  Waiblinger	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  management	  decisions	  (Waiblinger	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Hemsworth,	  2003)	  and	  a	  number	  of	  production	  (Seabrook	  and	  Wilkinson,	  2000)	  and	  animal	  welfare	  indicators	  (Hemsworth	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Waiblinger	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Vaarst	  and	  Sørensen,	  2009;	  Kielland	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Kaupinnen	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Attempts	  to	  modify	  behaviour	  by	  targeting	  underlying	  beliefs	  and	  attitudes	  have	  also	  met	  with	  some	  success:	  for	  example,	  Hemsworth	  et	  al.	  (2002)	  showed	  that	  stockpersons	  on	  Australian	  dairy	  farms	  who	  underwent	  cognitive	  behavioural	  therapy	  showed	  more	  positive	  beliefs	  about	  cow	  handling	  and	  used	  fewer	  negative	  tactics	  than	  did	  those	  at	  control	  farms.	  	   11	  Limitations	  of	  values,	  attitudes,	  and	  beliefs	  	   The	  Integrated	  Model	  of	  Behavioural	  Prediction	  (IMBP)	  is	  similar	  to	  the	  TPB	  except	  that	  it	  recognizes	  that	  variables	  external	  to	  an	  individual	  also	  play	  a	  significant	  role	  in	  influencing	  behaviour	  (Fishbein	  and	  Yzer,	  2003).	  This	  makes	  the	  IMBP	  relevant	  in	  addressing	  solutions	  to	  on-­‐farm	  welfare	  challenges,	  which	  are	  so	  often	  contingent	  on	  multiple	  actors	  working	  together	  within	  complex	  production	  systems.	  	  The	  IMBP	  dictates	  that	  a	  behaviour	  will	  likely	  occur	  if	  someone	  has	  the	  intention	  and	  skill	  to	  perform	  it	  and	  if	  there	  are	  no	  environmental	  constraints	  to	  performance	  (Fishbein	  and	  Yzer,	  2003).	  This	  addition	  of	  external	  variables	  implies	  that	  successful	  animal	  welfare	  interventions	  are	  dependent	  not	  only	  upon	  an	  individual’s	  internal	  intentions,	  but	  also	  upon	  the	  relevant	  environment.	  Thus,	  	  “if	  people	  have	  formed	  the	  desired	  intention	  but	  are	  not	  acting	  on	  it,	  a	  successful	  intervention	  will	  be	  directed	  at	  either	  skills	  building	  or	  at	  removing	  (or	  helping	  people	  overcome)	  environmental	  constraints….If	  strong	  intentions	  to	  perform	  the	  behaviour	  in	  question	  have	  not	  been	  formed,	  the	  model	  suggests	  that	  there	  are	  three	  primary	  determinants	  of	  intention:	  the	  attitude	  toward	  performing	  the	  behaviour,	  perceived	  norms…and	  one’s	  self-­‐efficacy...”	  (p.	  166-­‐167;	  Fishbein	  and	  Yzer,	  2003).	  1.4.2 Animal	  welfare	  	   That	  a	  range	  of	  values	  exists	  for	  what	  constitutes	  good	  quality	  of	  life	  for	  an	  animal	  is	  underscored	  by	  the	  diverse	  interpretations	  of	  animal	  welfare	  in	  the	  literature	  (Broom,	  1991;	  Duncan,	  1993;	  Rollin,	  1993).	  In	  light	  of	  this,	  it	  is	  especially	  important	  to	  establish	  a	  conceptual	  framework	  from	  which	  to	  organize	  and	  understand	  the	  literature	  on	  how	  stakeholders	  think	  about	  animal	  welfare.	  To	  this	  end,	  Fraser	  et	  al.’s	  (1997)	  multi-­‐dimensional	  conceptualization	  of	  animal	  welfare	  into	  three	  distinct	  but	  interrelated	  aspects–	  biological	  functioning	  (how	  an	  animal	  physically	  functions),	  	   12	  affective	  states	  (how	  an	  animal	  feels),	  and	  natural	  living	  (the	  degree	  to	  which	  an	  animal	  can	  live	  a	  natural	  life)	  —is	  appropriate.	  	  This	  framework	  is	  relevant	  because	  it	  incorporates	  the	  explicit	  and	  diverse	  values	  that	  people	  hold	  regarding	  what	  is	  necessary	  to	  ensure	  proper	  welfare.	  In	  doing	  so,	  it	  collates	  other	  prominent	  definitions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  into	  one	  holistic	  concept,	  including	  Broom’s	  (1991)	  focus	  on	  physical	  health	  and	  functioning,	  Duncan’s	  (1993)	  prioritization	  of	  an	  animal’s	  mental	  life,	  and	  Rollin’s	  (1993)	  emphasis	  on	  an	  animal’s	  ability	  to	  live	  in	  accordance	  with	  its	  telos.6	  	  1.5 Industry	  stakeholder	  values	  	  	   It	  is	  important	  to	  clarify	  what	  actors	  should	  be	  considered	  as	  stakeholders	  in	  the	  societal	  debate	  on	  farm	  animal	  welfare.	  I	  distinguish	  two	  broad	  categorizations:	  those	  working	  within	  the	  livestock	  industries	  in	  some	  capacity	  (henceforth	  referred	  to	  as	  ‘industry	  stakeholders’)	  and	  those	  external	  to	  them	  (referred	  to	  as	  ‘lay’	  or	  ‘public’	  stakeholders,	  see	  Section	  1.7	  of	  this	  chapter	  for	  further	  definition).	  I	  acknowledge	  that	  this	  distinction	  could	  be	  argued	  as	  arbitrary,	  not	  least	  because	  actors	  working	  within	  the	  livestock	  systems	  are	  also	  members	  of	  public	  society,	  and	  many	  actors	  hold	  multiple	  roles.	  My	  point	  is	  rather	  to	  draw	  a	  distinction	  between	  those	  with	  and	  without	  active	  working	  experience	  with	  livestock	  farming.	  	  I	  use	  the	  term	  ‘industry	  stakeholder’	  to	  describe	  any	  actor	  working	  within	  the	  livestock	  production	  chain	  as	  well	  as	  those	  whose	  work	  contributes	  to	  it.	  This	  includes	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  6	  Others	  have	  put	  forth	  alternative	  frameworks	  from	  which	  to	  conceptualize	  broadly	  shared	  animal	  welfare	  values.	  De	  Greef	  et	  al.	  (2006)	  for	  example	  suggested	  that	  avoidance	  of	  suffering	  and	  duty	  to	  care	  are	  two	  defining	  animal	  welfare	  values.	  However,	  I	  argue	  that	  at	  this	  point	  in	  time	  the	  source	  of	  stakeholder	  conflict	  is	  not	  that	  people	  do	  not	  share	  such	  broad	  values;	  few,	  for	  example,	  would	  disagree	  that	  animal	  suffering	  should	  be	  minimized.	  Values	  this	  broad	  are	  then	  unlikely	  to	  be	  sufficient	  in	  forming	  effective,	  i.e.	  implementable	  and	  enforceable,	  standards	  precisely	  because	  interpretation	  of	  what	  it	  is	  to	  suffer	  is	  subjective,	  and	  indeed,	  dependent	  upon	  whether	  one	  or	  more	  of	  the	  value-­‐laden	  aspects	  outlined	  by	  Fraser	  et	  al.	  (1997)	  are	  considered	  to	  have	  been	  met.	  	  	   13	  farmers	  (also	  referred	  to	  in	  this	  thesis	  as	  producers),	  industry	  representatives,	  livestock	  veterinarians,	  animal	  science	  faculty,	  and	  industry	  service	  providers.	  These	  actors	  may	  be	  considered	  as	  experts	  inasmuch	  as	  they	  have	  accumulated	  a	  unique	  body	  of	  knowledge	  and	  experience	  with	  livestock	  as	  a	  result	  of	  their	  respective	  roles.	  Their	  proximity	  to	  (and	  engagement	  with)	  the	  conditions	  in	  which	  farm	  animals	  are	  raised	  gives	  producers,	  for	  example,	  a	  unique	  perspective	  on	  the	  ethical	  debates	  on	  agricultural	  practices	  (Driessen,	  2012).	  As	  such,	  producers	  in	  particular	  are	  increasingly	  recognized,	  both	  in	  the	  literature	  and	  in	  the	  public	  eye,	  as	  critical	  stakeholders	  to	  improve	  animal	  welfare	  (Eurobarometer,	  2007;	  Feola	  and	  Binder,	  2010;	  Kauppinen	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Driessen,	  2012;	  Hansson	  and	  Lagerkvist,	  2014).	  	  In	  Canada	  and	  the	  US,	  producers	  and	  others	  working	  within	  the	  livestock	  industries	  are	  also	  relevant	  because	  on-­‐farm	  management	  practices	  are	  largely	  unlegislated,	  at	  least	  federally.7	  Rather,	  animal	  care	  standards	  and	  policies	  are	  typically	  spearheaded	  by	  industry-­‐affiliated	  stakeholders	  and	  are	  self-­‐regulated	  (or	  not	  regulated).	  Despite	  their	  potential	  to	  improve	  farm	  animal	  welfare,	  the	  voices	  of	  farmers	  and	  others	  working	  for	  the	  livestock	  industries	  have	  historically	  been	  largely	  absent	  from	  debates	  on	  the	  numerous	  ethical	  issues	  presented	  by	  modern	  agricultural	  production	  practices	  (Kauppinen	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Driessen,	  2012).	  The	  literature	  has	  begun	  to	  address	  questions	  about	  the	  attitudes	  and	  values	  of	  these	  stakeholders	  in	  the	  last	  two	  decades	  (e.g.	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Lund	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Bock	  and	  Van	  Huik,	  2007).	  However,	  the	  vast	  majority	  of	  research	  has	  focused	  on	  Europeans,	  with	  far	  less	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  7	  Though	  to	  some	  degree	  this	  is	  changing	  in	  the	  United	  States	  with	  the	  introduction	  of	  statewide,	  public	  	  referenda	  to	  ban	  certain	  livestock	  systems	  (see	  Mench,	  2008	  for	  a	  review).	  	  	   14	  attention	  to	  American	  or	  Canadian	  producers	  (Spooner	  et	  al.’s	  2012,	  2014b	  interviews	  of	  Canadian	  beef	  and	  pork	  producers	  being	  one	  of	  the	  few	  exceptions)	  and	  other	  relevant	  industry	  stakeholders	  (e.g.	  animal	  science	  and	  veterinary	  faculty	  [Heleski	  et	  al.,	  2004,	  2005]	  and	  livestock	  veterinarians	  [Hewson	  et	  al.,	  2007]).	  1.5.1 Producers	  	  Biological	  functioning	  	   Those	  involved	  with	  animal	  production	  have	  traditionally	  been	  shown	  to	  take	  a	  pragmatic	  approach	  toward	  animal	  welfare,	  in	  which	  aspects	  related	  to	  animals’	  biological	  functioning	  (e.g.	  nutrition,	  health,	  fertility,	  production)	  are	  often	  the	  most	  strongly	  emphasized	  (Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Lassen	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Verbeke,	  2009;	  Kaupinnen	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Silva	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  The	  notion	  that	  producers	  tend	  to	  primarily	  value	  the	  health-­‐related	  aspects	  of	  animal	  welfare	  seems	  to	  be	  first	  evident	  in	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al.’s	  (2002)	  landmark	  study	  of	  Dutch	  consumer	  and	  producer	  perceptions	  of	  the	  treatment	  of	  livestock.	  The	  farmers	  (in	  this	  case	  a	  mix	  of	  pig,	  broiler	  chicken,	  and	  beef	  cattle	  farmers)	  interviewed	  in	  that	  study	  talked	  about	  animal	  welfare	  mainly	  in	  terms	  of	  health	  and	  considered	  continued	  growth	  to	  indicate	  adequate	  welfare	  (Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al.’s	  (2002)	  findings	  have	  been	  borne	  out	  by	  a	  number	  of	  studies	  of	  European	  producer	  views	  of	  animal	  welfare	  (much	  of	  which	  have	  resulted	  from	  the	  European	  Union-­‐sponsored	  Welfare	  Quality®	  projects).	  From	  these	  studies	  it	  is	  clear	  that	  many	  farmers	  appear	  to	  use	  a	  number	  of	  biological	  parameters	  as	  proxies	  for	  animal	  welfare,	  most	  notably	  high	  productivity	  	  (Norwegian	  pig	  producers:	  Borgen	  and	  Skarstad,	  2007;	  a	  mix	  of	  Norwegian	  cattle,	  pig	  and	  poultry	  producers:	  Skarstad	  et	  al.,	  	   15	  2007;	  UK	  pig	  producers:	  Hubbard	  et	  al.,	  2007)	  and	  maintenance	  of	  health	  and	  general	  physical	  functioning	  (pig,	  chicken,	  and	  calf	  farmers:	  Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  European	  pig	  producers:	  Bock	  and	  van	  Huik,	  2007;	  UK	  pig	  producers:	  Hubbard	  and	  Scott,	  2011).	  	  By	  extension,	  many	  livestock	  producers	  consider	  their	  provisions	  to	  meet	  animals’	  biological	  needs	  –including	  thermal	  regulation,	  dry	  bedding,	  disease	  monitoring,	  and	  adequate	  feed	  and	  water	  –	  as	  indicative	  that	  they	  are	  doing	  a	  good	  job	  for	  animal	  welfare	  (Te	  Velde	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Spooner	  et	  al.,	  2014b).	  Take,	  for	  example,	  the	  collective	  view	  reached	  by	  focus	  groups	  of	  Dutch	  pig	  farmers	  that	  the	  “provision	  of	  adequate	  supply,	  such	  as	  food	  and	  water	  together	  with	  a	  good	  health	  care,	  makes	  good	  welfare,”	  (p.	  63;	  de	  Greef	  et	  al.	  2006).	  	  To	  the	  extent	  that	  information	  on	  the	  values	  of	  American	  or	  Canadian	  producers	  exists	  (and	  at	  this	  point,	  it	  is	  scant	  indeed),	  there	  is	  some	  evidence	  that	  these	  farmers	  are	  similarly	  health-­‐focused.	  For	  example,	  Spooner	  et	  al.	  (2014b)’s	  semi-­‐structured	  interviews	  with	  20	  Canadian	  pig	  producers,	  the	  majority	  of	  which	  operated	  confinement	  systems,	  revealed	  an	  overwhelming	  preoccupation	  with	  the	  health	  and	  productivity	  of	  their	  pigs.	  A	  similar	  focus	  on	  physical	  indicators	  of	  welfare	  (in	  this	  case,	  body	  condition)	  also	  emerged	  in	  Spooner	  et	  al.’s	  (2012)	  interviews	  with	  Canadian	  beef	  producers.	  	  The	  distinction	  between	  farmers’	  emphasis	  on	  biological	  performance	  and	  related	  implications	  for	  economic	  performance	  is	  hard	  to	  tease	  apart.	  A	  dominant	  trend	  throughout	  the	  studies	  reviewed	  above	  is	  that	  animal	  welfare	  and	  economics	  are	  inextricably	  linked	  for	  these	  farmers,	  such	  that	  the	  economic	  considerations	  embedded	  within	  caring	  for	  animals	  inevitably	  arise	  during	  conversations	  about	  animal	  welfare	  	   16	  (Hubbard	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Skarstad	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Kauppinen	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Spooner	  et	  al.,	  2012,	  2014b).	  Spooner	  et	  al.	  (2012)	  captured	  the	  complex,	  uneasy	  relationship	  between	  welfare	  and	  economics	  for	  Canadian	  beef	  producers;	  though	  these	  producers	  stressed	  the	  existence	  of	  economic	  restraints	  in	  their	  businesses,	  they	  also	  emphasized	  that	  economic	  considerations	  did	  not	  undermine	  the	  welfare	  status	  of	  their	  animals.	  This	  is	  a	  challenging	  concept	  to	  reconcile,	  particularly	  in	  light	  of	  critiques	  of	  animal	  agriculture	  that	  situate	  profit	  as	  superseding	  welfare	  considerations	  in	  every	  case	  (as	  discussed	  in	  Fraser,	  2008a	  and	  by	  participants	  from	  the	  study	  in	  Chapter	  5).	  	  Others	  have	  argued	  for	  a	  more	  nuanced	  perspective	  of	  producers’	  motivations,	  one	  that	  recognizes	  that	  producer	  decisions	  are	  “not	  always	  or	  ever	  necessarily	  aimed	  at	  the	  unique	  goal	  of	  profit,”	  (p.	  6;	  Willock	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  Driessen	  (2012),	  for	  example,	  proposed	  a	  view	  of	  producers	  in	  which	  they	  possess	  ‘mixed	  motives:’	  The	  activities	  of	  most	  farmers	  are	  not	  completely	  guided	  by	  concerns	  of	  efficiency	  and	  profit…The	  morality	  of	  their	  motives	  [may	  indeed	  be]	  most	  salient	  at	  moments	  when	  farmers	  diverge	  from	  what	  is	  economically	  required…but	  situating	  the	  ethics	  solely	  in	  these	  exceptions	  to	  the	  productionist	  rationality	  implies	  a	  portrayal	  of	  animal	  farming	  as	  basically	  unethical.	  To	  grant	  farmers	  a	  serious	  ethical	  stance	  requires	  an	  appreciation	  of	  their	  central	  aim:	  the	  efficient	  production	  of	  food.	  (p.170).	  	  He	  suggests	  that	  farmers	  may	  be	  viewed	  as	  holding	  a	  hybrid	  attitude	  toward	  welfare	  and	  economics	  in	  which	  genuine	  care	  for	  the	  animal	  exists	  in	  direct	  conjunction	  with	  the	  intent	  to	  harvest	  it	  (Driessen,	  2012).	  Other	  authors	  have	  also	  noted	  the	  complexity	  with	  which	  farmers	  approach	  animal	  welfare.	  For	  example,	  Lund	  et	  al.	  (2004),	  Kristensen	  and	  Enevoldsen	  (2008),	  and	  Kaupinnen	  et	  al.	  (2010)	  wrote	  of	  the	  variation	  in	  how	  farmers	  in	  their	  studies	  valued	  animal	  welfare,	  some	  for	  its	  instrumental	  value	  (in	  granting	  growth	  and	  ultimately	  economic	  health	  for	  their	  businesses),	  some	  for	  its	  	   17	  intrinsic	  value	  (in	  simply	  a	  duty	  to	  do	  the	  right	  thing),	  and	  some	  for	  both	  purposes.	  This	  juxtaposition	  of	  use	  and	  respect	  values	  toward	  animals	  borrows	  heavily	  from	  pastoralism,	  a	  prominent	  influence	  on	  modern	  Western	  moral	  approaches	  to	  animal	  use	  (Preece	  and	  Fraser,	  2000;	  Fraser,	  2008b).	  Observable	  in	  the	  second	  creation	  story	  of	  the	  Judeo-­‐Christian	  Bible	  (Genesis	  2),	  the	  pastoralist	  ethic	  condoned	  animal	  use	  but	  strongly	  emphasized	  ‘diligent	  care’	  be	  taken	  to	  ensure	  that	  animal	  needs	  were	  met	  (Fraser,	  2008b).	  	  Affective	  states	  The	  studies	  cited	  above	  demonstrate	  a	  widespread	  emphasis	  on	  health	  and	  performance	  among	  livestock	  producers,	  but	  recent	  work	  suggests	  that	  producers’	  conceptions	  of	  animal	  welfare	  are	  often	  multi-­‐dimensional	  and	  include	  a	  focus	  on	  affective	  states	  such	  as	  pain	  (Kaupinnen	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Vetouli	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Silva	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  	   	  Many	  livestock	  producers	  appear	  to	  have	  a	  complex	  and	  context-­‐dependent	  view	  of	  pain	  experienced	  by	  their	  animals.	  On	  the	  one	  hand,	  chronic	  painful	  conditions	  are	  often	  among	  producers’	  priority	  welfare	  concerns,	  such	  as	  lameness	  in	  dairy	  cows.	  For	  example,	  as	  part	  of	  a	  larger	  lameness	  intervention	  project,	  Leach	  et	  al.	  (2010a)	  asked	  farmers	  to	  rank	  their	  top	  three	  herd	  health	  concerns.	  Mastitis	  and	  lameness,	  both	  known	  painful	  conditions	  (Milne	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  O’Callaghan	  et	  al.,	  2003)	  were	  the	  conditions	  most	  often	  cited.	  While	  almost	  certainly	  these	  issues	  ranked	  highly	  in	  part	  because	  of	  performance	  effects,	  the	  companion	  paper’s	  finding	  that	  94%	  of	  respondent	  dairy	  farmers	  agreed	  that	  pain	  and	  suffering	  were	  either	  very	  or	  extremely	  important	  	   18	  outcomes	  of	  lameness	  suggests	  that	  concern	  for	  the	  cow	  certainly	  played	  a	  role	  in	  attitudes	  toward	  these	  conditions	  (Leach	  et	  al.,	  2010b).	  	  In	  contrast,	  others	  have	  indicated	  that	  producers	  tend	  to	  ascribe	  lower	  concern	  to	  pain	  ar