UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Novel mechanisms of fibrinolysis in health and disease De Asis, Kathleen Gayle 2014

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2014_september_deasis_kathleen.pdf [ 7.09MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0167455.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0167455-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0167455-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0167455-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0167455-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0167455-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0167455-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0167455-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0167455.ris

Full Text

  NOVEL MECHANISMS OF FIBRINOLYSIS  IN HEALTH AND DISEASE   by Kathleen Gayle De Asis B.M.L.Sc., The University of British Columbia, 2009   A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF  MASTER OF SCIENCE in  The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies  (Experimental Medicine)            THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver) May 2014 © Kathleen Gayle De Asis, 2014   ii  Abstract	   This  is  a  two‐part  thesis,  focusing  first on  a  clinical  and  then on  a biochemical  aspect of fibrinolysis, the process that dissolves blood clots.  Hyperfibrinolysis: An explanation for reduced cardiovascular disease in hemophilia patients Hemophilia  is  a  coagulation  disorder  where  factor  (F)  VIII  or  FIX  deficiency  results  in prolonged  bleeding.  Therapeutic  FVIII  or  FIX  replacement  has  lengthened  hemophilia  patient  life expectancy.  Interestingly, retrospective studies have demonstrated a  lower standard mortality risk from  cardiovascular disease  (CVD)  compared  to  the normal population  and  enhanced  fibrinolytic capability has been proposed as an explanation for this relative protection from CVD. Through the analysis of tissue‐type plasminogen activator (tPA), the initiator of fibrinolysis and two inhibitors of fibrinolysis: plasminogen activator  inhibitor‐1 (PAI‐1) and thrombin activatable fibrinolysis  inhibitor (TAFI),  the  current  study  showed  that  some  hemophilia  patients  have  reduced  inhibition  of  the fibrinolytic  pathway  compared  to  age  and  cardiovascular  risk  matched  controls.  A  trend  of hyperfibrinolysis was  also  seen  in hemophilia patients  through  accelerated plasma  clot  lysis with 50%  of  the  patients  having  at  least  a  2‐fold  enhancement,  and  22%  with  at  least  a  10‐fold enhancement.  Regulation of Clotting Factor Xa Auxiliary Cofactor Function in Fibrinolysis through β‐Peptide Excision We have  shown  that clotting  factor Xa  (FXa) cleaved by  the  fibrinolysis protease, plasmin (Pn), produces consecutive fragments, called FXaβ and Xa33/13. These both have newly exposed C‐terminal  lysines  (Lys)  that accelerate  tPA  in purified clot  lysis assays. However,  in plasma Xa33/13 rapidly loses this fibrinolytic function due to degradation. It is therefore important to define the role   iii  of four possible basic amino acid residues in generating FXaβ; Lys(K)427, Arg(R)429, K433 and K435. Using site directed mutagenesis, K435 was defined as the preferred cleavage site, while R429 was unfavourable.  K433  and  K435  were  found  to  be  important  for  RVV‐X  activation  and  β‐peptide cleavage  facilitates  the  production  of  Xa33/13.  Interestingly,  when  all  four  basic  residues  were mutated  to  Gln  (Q),  preventing  production  of  FXaβ,  an  unexpected  distal  cleavage  site  was demonstrated  to  also  enhance  Pn  generation.  Replacing  the  R429  with  lysine  generated  a hyperfibrinolytic species suggesting a potential novel therapeutic approach.   	  iv  Preface	 The fibrinolysis in hemophilia component of this dissertation (Chapter 3) is a part of a larger study: “Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease in Hemophiliacs” approved by the University of Calgary Ethics ID: E‐21650 and UBC Ethics ID: H09‐02426.  Plasma clot lysis assays in section 2.2.1 were carried out by Kim Talbot, a Senior Research Assistant in the Pryzdial lab, and subsequent analysis of these data was conducted by Kathleen De Asis.  v    Table	of	Contents	Abstract .................................................................................................................................................. ii Preface ................................................................................................................................................... iv Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................... v List of Tables ......................................................................................................................................... viii List of Figures .......................................................................................................................................... ix List of Symbols and Abbreviations ......................................................................................................... xi Acknowledgements .............................................................................................................................. xvi 1.  Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1  Hemostasis overview .............................................................................................................. 1 1.1.1  Coagulation ......................................................................................................................... 2 1.1.1  Physiological anticoagulation ............................................................................................. 7 1.1.2  Fibrinolysis .......................................................................................................................... 7 1.1.3  Auxiliary cofactor model of fibrinolysis ............................................................................ 10 1.1.3.1  Plasmin‐mediated factor Xa fragmentation ..................................................................... 12 1.1.4  Communication and crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis .............................. 15 1.1.4.1  Fibrinogen activation and fibrin degradation ............................................................... 15 1.1.4.2  Thrombin ...................................................................................................................... 19 1.1.4.3  Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor .................................................................. 19 1.1.4.4  Platelets and PAI‐1 ....................................................................................................... 22 1.1.4.5  Plasminogen and plasmin ............................................................................................. 22 1.1.4.6  Tissue‐type plasminogen activator ............................................................................... 25 1.2  Hemophilia and cardiovascular disease ............................................................................... 27 1.3  Thesis rationale and hypotheses .......................................................................................... 28 2.  Materials and Methods ................................................................................................................ 32 2.1  Materials ............................................................................................................................... 32 2.2  Hemophilia patient study ..................................................................................................... 33 2.2.1  Plasma clot lysis ............................................................................................................ 35 2.3  Proteins ................................................................................................................................. 35 2.4  Molecular biology of factor X ............................................................................................... 36   vi  2.4.1  Site‐directed mutagenesis ............................................................................................ 36 2.4.2  Stable expression of FX mutants .................................................................................. 38 2.4.3  Clone selection ............................................................................................................. 39 2.4.3.1  Factor X antigen quantification .................................................................................... 39 2.4.3.2  Factor Xa activity by prothrombin time ....................................................................... 39 2.4.3.3  Factor X specific activity ............................................................................................... 40 2.4.4  Large‐scale expression and purification of FX mutants by binding to anionic phospholipid vesicles .................................................................................................................... 40 2.5  rFX Procoagulant function .................................................................................................... 42 2.5.1  RVV‐X activation of rFX ................................................................................................. 42 2.6  rFX fibrinolytic function ........................................................................................................ 42 2.6.1  Plasmin‐mediated cleavage and Lys‐plasminogen binding .......................................... 42 2.6.2  Tissue‐type plasminogen activator‐mediated plasmin generation .............................. 43 3.  Hyperfibrinolysis in Hemophilia Patients ..................................................................................... 45 3.1  Overview and specific goals ................................................................................................. 45 3.2  Results .................................................................................................................................. 46 3.2.1  tPA, PAI‐1 and TAFI antigen .......................................................................................... 46 3.2.2  PAI‐1 activity ................................................................................................................. 49 3.2.3  Thrombin/thrombomodulin activatable pro‐TAFI and intrinsic carboxypeptidase N‐like activity .................................................................................................................................... 50 3.2.4  Overall fibrinolytic activity by plasma clot lysis assay .................................................. 52 3.3  Discussion ............................................................................................................................. 58 3.3.1  Effect on tPA, PAI‐1, and TAFI antigen levels ............................................................... 58 3.3.2  Effect on fibrinolysis inhibitors:  PAI‐1, TAFI, and carboxypeptidase activity .............. 59 3.3.3  Effect on plasma clot lysis ............................................................................................ 62 3.4  Summary ............................................................................................................................... 64 4.  Role of Factor Xa β‐peptide Excision in Fibrinolysis ..................................................................... 66 4.1  Overview and specific goals ................................................................................................. 66 4.2  Results .................................................................................................................................. 67 4.2.1  Molecular biology of factor X ....................................................................................... 67 4.2.2  rFX Procoagulant function ............................................................................................ 74 4.2.3  rFX fibrinolytic function ................................................................................................ 78   vii  4.3  Discussion ............................................................................................................................. 86 4.3.1  Effect on activation peptide cleavage .......................................................................... 86 4.3.2  Effect on specific activity .............................................................................................. 87 4.3.3  Effect on β‐peptide excision, Xa33 generation and 125I‐Pg binding.............................. 87 4.3.4  Effect on plasmin generation ....................................................................................... 91 4.4  Summary ............................................................................................................................... 93 5.  Future Studies ............................................................................................................................... 99 5.1  Bleeding diatheses and dissecting the intrinsic carboxypeptidase activity ......................... 99 5.2  Fibrinolytic potential of the hypercleavable β‐mutant and stabilized FXaα; stabilization of Xa33/13; C‐terminal sequencing of FXa fragments ........................................................................ 100 References .......................................................................................................................................... 102    	  viii  List	of	Tables	Table 1: Primers used for mutagenesis of F10 gene …..……………………………………………………………………36 Table 2: Clinical characteristics of the hemophilia patients enrolled in study ……………………………….…45 Table 3: Summary of fibrinolysis antigen results …...……………………………………………………………………….46 Table 4: Summary of fibrinolysis activity results ………………………………………………………………….….………51 Table 5: Summary of plasma clot lysis results ……………………………………………………………………..………….56 Table 6: Sequencing Results of FX mutant DNA .……………………………………………………………….…….………68       ix  List	of	Figures	Figure 1: The coagulation cascade .……………….……………………………………………………..…………………………..5 Figure 2: The fibrinolysis pathway …………………………..…………………………………………..……………………………9 Figure 3: Auxiliary cofactor fibrinolysis model ..……..………………………………………………………..……………..11 Figure  4:  Three  dimensional  models  of  FXa  highlighting  plasminogen  binding  sites  exposed  by plasmin cleavage ………………………………………………………………………….……………………………………….….……13 Figure 5: Plasmin cleavage of Factor Xa …………………………………………………………………..…………..…………14 Figure 6: Fibrinogen and fibrin structure …..…………………….………………………………………………….………….17 Figure 7: Fibrin degradation …..……………………………………………………………………………………………………….18 Figure 8: TAFI Activation and Inactivation …..………………………………………………………………………………….21 Figure 9: Plasminogen activation ...…………………………………………………………………………………………………24 Figure 10: Single chain and two chain forms of tPA ..…………………………………….………………………………..26 Figure 11: tPA, PAI‐1, and TAFI Ag levels are normal in adult male hemophilia patients ..………..……..48 Figure 12: Adult male hemophilia patients have decreased PAI‐1 activity ..……………………….……………49 Figure 13: Adult male hemophilia patients have decreased  thrombin/thrombomodulin activatable pro‐TAFI and increased intrinsic carboxypeptidase N‐like activity ……………………………….….………….….51 Figure 14: Plasma lysis example/Matched pair patient lyses faster than control …,……….….……….……53 Figure 15: Half lysis time in patients are not significantly shorter than in controls ……….…….…….……55 Figure  16:  No  significant  differences  found  in  half  lysis  time  nor  max  clot  turbidity  between severities of hemophilia ..……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….56 Figure 17: Factor Xa Mutants ………………………………………………………………………………………………..…….…68 Figure 18: FX antigen in media was quantified by densitometry …………………………………..……….….…...71 Figure 19: rFX clones were selected for high specific activity and antigen production ………….….….…72 Figure 20: rFX Purification by functional affinity binding to aPL ………………………………….……….….…..…73 Figure 21: Mutation of the β‐peptide cleavage site affects excision of the activation peptide by RVV‐X ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……….…...…..76 Figure 22: Specific activity of final selected clones ……………………………………………………….………..….……77   x  Figure 23: In the presence of CaCl2 and aPL, K435 is the prevalent Pn cleavage site ……….……….….…79 Figure 24: FXaβ and Xa33 fragments bind 125I‐Pg …………………………………………………………….……….….…81 Figure 25: R429K & KR4βQ have increased plasmin generation .………………………………….…………….…..84 Figure 26: Western blots from plasmin generation ……………………………………………………….………….…...85 Figure 27: Summary of FXa β‐peptide results .………………………………………………………………….………..…..95 Figure 28: Anionic phospholipid acts as an allosteric switch altering the β‐peptide cleavage site and affecting fibrinolytic function .……………………………………………………………………………………….………….…...96   	  xi  List	of	Symbols	and	Abbreviations	125I‐Pg: Radiolabelled plasminogen with Iodine‐125 Ab: antibody Ag: antigen APC: Activated protein C aPL: Anionic phospholipid AT: Antithrombin BSA: Bovine serum albumin Ca2+: Calcium ion CaCl2: Calcium chloride CO2: carbon dioxide CVD: Cardiovascular disease DMEM/F‐12: Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium supplemented with F‐12 nutrient mixture DMSO: Dimethyl sulfoxide EDTA: Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid EGF: Epidermal growth factor FBS: Fetal bovine serum FII: Prothrombin FIIa: Thrombin FIX: Factor IX FIXa: Activated factor IX FV: Factor V FVa: Activated factor V FVII: Factor VII   xii  FVIIa: Activated factor VII FVIII: Factor VIII FVIIIa: Activated factor VIII FX: Factor X FXa: Activated factor X FXaα: Intact activated factor X FXaβ: Activated factor X with a short C‐terminal peptide removed FXI: Factor XI FXIa: Activated factor XI FXIII: Factor XIII FXIIIa: Activated factor XIII Gla: γ‐carboxylated glutamic acid residue; aPL binding domain H2O2: Hydrogen peroxide H2SO4: Sulfuric acid HBS: 20 mM HEPES, 150 mM NaCl, pH 7.4 HEK: Human embryonic kidney HEPES: 4‐(2‐hydroxyethyl)‐1‐piperazine ethanesulfonic acid HK: High molecular weight kininogen HRP: Horseradish peroxidase ITS: Insulin‐transferrin‐selenium supplement K330: Lys 330; residue in autolysis loop of factor X K3βQ: Triple‐point factor X mutant; Lys427Gln/Lys433Gln/Lys435Gln K427: Lys 427; residue in factor Xa C‐terminal β‐peptide region K427Q: Lys 427 mutated to Gln in factor Xa   xiii  K433: Lys 433; residue in FXa C‐terminal β‐peptide region K433Q: Lys 433 mutated to Gln in factor Xa K435: Lys 435; residue in FXa C‐terminal β‐peptide region K435Q: Lys 435 mutated to Gln in factor Xa KK: Kallikrein KR4βQ: Quadruple point factor X mutant; Lys427Gln/Arg429Gln/Lys433Gln/Lys435Gln LB: Luria‐Bertani LMV: Large multilamellar vesicles (phospholipids) nFX: Commercial plasma derived factor X NO: Nitric Oxide OPD: O‐phenylenediamine dihydrochloride Opti‐MEM: Modified Eagle’s minimum essential medium (reduced serum) PAI‐1: Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 PAP: inactive plasmin/α‐2‐antiplasmin PC: Phosphatidylcholine PCR: Polymerase chain reaction PDB: Protein database PEG: Polyethylene glycol PK: Prekallikrein Pg: Plasminogen PGI2: Prostacyclin, vasodilator Pn: Plasmin Pro‐TAFI: Zymogen thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor PS: Phosphatidylserine   xiv  PT: Prothrombin time PVDF: Polyvinylidine difluoride PZ: Protein Z R429: Arg 429; residue in FXa C‐terminal β‐peptide region R429K: Arg 429 mutated to Lys in factor Xa R429Q: Arg 429 mutated to Gln in factor Xa rFX: recombinant factor X rpm: Revolutions per minute RVV‐X: Russell’s viper venom factor X activator S‐2251: Chromogenic substrate for plasmin SDS‐PAGE: Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Serpin: Serine protease inhibitor SUV: Small unilamellar vesicles (phospholipids) TAFIa: Activated thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor TAFIai: Inactivated thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor TBS: Tris‐buffered saline TBST: TBS with 0.1% Tween‐20 TF: Tissue factor TFPI: Tissue factor pathway inhibitor TMB: Tetramethylbenzidine tPA: Tissue‐type plasminogen activator vWF: von Willebrand factor WTFX: Wild‐type factor X (recombinant)   xv  Xa33/13: Factor Xa fragment containing a 33 kDa fragment non‐covalently linked to a 13kDa fragment Xa40: 40 kDa factor Xa fragment lacking the Gla domain α2AP: α ‐2‐antiplasmin εACA: ε‐aminocaproic acid   	  xvi  Acknowledgements	I would like to thank my supervisors Dr. Shannon Jackson and Dr. Edward Pryzdial for all of the advice and their patience with me during my studies. I appreciate the freedom to figure things out  on  my  own  while  receiving  valuable  guidance.  I  would  also  like  to  thank  my  supervisory committee: Dr. Edward Conway and Dr. Cedric Carter for their support and helpful suggestions. Thanks also to my fellow lab mates, Rolinda Carter, Scott Meixner, Dr. Michael Sutherland, Kimberley  Talbot,  Dr.  Ayo  Yila  Simon,  Dr.  Amanda  Vanden  Hoek,  and  Dr.  Edwin  Gershom, who brought  treats,  and  always  provided  a  good  laugh  and  insightful  talks  both work  and  non‐work related. And to the new grad students, Frank Lee and Brian Lin,  I wish you good  luck! I would also like  to  acknowledge  the  assistance  I  received  from  Valerie  Smith  and  Susan  Curtis  of  Dr.  Ross MacGillivray’s lab for which I am ever so grateful. My time here at the CBR has been unforgettable, and I will miss you all! Finally,  thanks  to my  friends  and  family  for  their unconditional  love  and encouragement, and for allowing me to de‐stress when things got overwhelming. I’m ready for the next chapter!  1  1. Introduction	1.1 Hemostasis	overview	Hemostasis is the physiological process of controlling bleeding and is made up of four parts: constitutive  anticoagulation,  primary  hemostasis,  coagulation,  and  fibrinolysis  (1).  Plasma components such as antithrombin (AT) maintain constitutive anticoagulation in order to prevent clotting from occurring when it is not needed (2). Upon vascular injury, blood flow is slowed by constriction  of  the  blood  vessels  allowing  platelets  to  adhere  to  the  sub‐endothelium  and aggregate,  forming  a  temporary  platelet  plug  to  quickly  stop  the  bleeding.  Coagulation  is initiated on TF bearing cells upon exposure  to blood, amplified as platelets become activated, and propagates on the activated platelet surface to form fibrin and stabilize the thrombus (3‐5). Once damage to the blood vessel has been repaired, the process can be reversed and the clot is broken  down  through  the  fibrinolysis  pathway.  Hemostatic  balance  is  once  again  shifted towards  anticoagulation.  When  the  delicate  balance  between  coagulation,  anticoagulation and/or  fibrinolysis  is  dysregulated,  a  number  of  health  problems  can  arise.  Cardiovascular disease  (CVD)  is  caused  by  undesired  coagulation  occurring  and  forming  thrombi which  can obstruct blood flow. On the other side of the balance, hemophilia A and B is caused by a lack of coagulation factors VIII or IX, respectively, and results in prolonged and excessive bleeding. Cardiovascular  disease  (CVD)  is  the  cause  of  an  estimated  17.1 million  deaths  annually worldwide  and  is  the  number  one  cause  of  death  globally  according  to  The World  Health Organization (6). One of the main causes of this disease is a thrombus, which cuts off the flow of blood and results in ischemic tissue damage, especially in the heart and in the brain. This gives rise to ischemic events such as myocardial infarctions and strokes. One form of treatment is to restore the blood flow by breaking up the thrombus and to prevent further thrombus formation   2  by  treatment  with  anti‐platelet  and  anticoagulant  agents.  Currently,  the  drug  of  choice administered to achieve this clot‐dissolving has been tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and  it has saved many lives (7,8). However, the time frame to administer tPA from onset of symptoms is  only  3‐4.5  hours  to  lessen  neurological  damage.  Furthermore,  a  side‐effect  of  tPA  is hemorrhage and some thrombi are resistant to tPA for poorly understood reasons (8‐10). For all of  these  reasons,  there has been  significant  research over many  years  into  creating  a better recombinant  tPA  and  possible  alternative  treatments  for  dissolving  thrombi.  In  order  to accomplish this, one must have a biochemical understanding of hemostasis.  1.1.1 Coagulation	The coagulation cascade ultimately  leads to fibrin deposition and thrombus formation. The pathway  can  be  loosely  described  as  Y‐shaped  with  two  upstream  pathways,  extrinsic  and intrinsic.  These meet  at  the  common  pathway  and  result  in  the  production  of  the  protease thrombin and the formation of the clot (Figure 1). First is the extrinsic pathway, or the “initiating pathway”  that  begins with  vascular  damage  exposing  subendothelial  tissue  factor  (TF).  This damage also  results  in  the exposure of anionic phospholipid  (aPL),  initially due  to recruitment and activation of platelets to the subendothelium. This  localizes the coagulation factors to the site of  injury and also allows  for  the  interaction between  factor VII  (FVII)  from  the circulation and TF. FVIIa and  its  cofactor TF  form  the extrinsic  tenase  complex with aPL and a  source of calcium  ion (Ca2+), and activates the substrate factor X (FX), to factor Xa (FXa) (11,12). TF‐FVIIa can  also  activate  FIX  to  IXa,  although  comparatively  poorly.  FXa  combines  with  FVa  (also activated  by  thrombin),  aPL  and  Ca2+  to  form  the  prothrombinase  complex, which  activates prothrombin  (FII)  to  thrombin  (FIIa).  The  initial  FIIa  that  is  generated  feeds  back  into  the amplifying  intrinsic  pathway  by  activating  FXI  to  FXIa, which  then  activates  FIX  to  FIXa  (13). Factor VIII (FVIII) is efficiently activated by thrombin to FVIIIa, which then serves as a cofactor for   3  FIXa and forms the intrinsic tenase complex with aPL and Ca2+, enhancing the activation of FX by FIXa by 57,000‐fold  in humans  (14,15). Deficiencies of  FVIII or  FIX  lead  to bleeding disorders respectively called hemophilia A or B, an aspect of my thesis work. The resulting thrombin also activates FXIII to FXIIIa, which is a transglutaminase that crosslinks the Lys and Gln side chains of fibrin  α‐  and  γ‐chains  to  form  an  irreversible  amide  bond  that  stabilizes  the  insoluble  fibrin hemostatic plug. In pathological circumstances, such as inherited thrombosis or trauma, recent evidence has suggested  that  the  upstream  contact  phase  of  the  coagulation  cascade may  be  involved  in amplifying clot  formation, where high‐molecular‐weight kininogen  (HK), prekallikrein  (PK), and factor  XII  (FXII)  form  a  FXIa‐activating  complex.  In  this  complex  both  prekallikrein  and  FXII become activated to kallikrein (KK) and FXIIa respectively. FXIIa from this upstream pathway can activate  factor  XI  (FXI)  to  FXIa  which  then  continues  downstream  as  the  intrinsic  pathway. Deficiencies of HK, PK, and FXII are not associated with excessive bleeding, and FXI deficiencies are mild  (16).  Interestingly,  Renné  et  al  demonstrated  that  FXII  knockout mice  had  normal hemostasis,  but  defective  thrombus  formation  (17).  Thus,  the  contact  phase  is  likely  not important for physiological hemostasis, but rather pathological thrombosis in vivo (18). The  role  of  both  the  extrinsic  and  intrinsic  pathways  is  the  activation  of  FX  to  FXa. Furthermore,  FXa  is  the  essential  protease  of  the  common  pathway  enzyme  complex, prothrombinase.  Thus,  regulation  of  FX  activation  is  central  to  coagulation  physiology  and pathology, emphasizing the importance of FX in its clotting role. In addition to a critical function in hemostasis, FX also plays a role  in the opposing  fibrinolysis pathway, which  is an  important focus of the current thesis.  The  cascade  model  simplifies  the  enzymatic  steps  and  is  useful  for  understanding coagulation of plasma in vitro; however it does not fully describe the process in vivo. The newer   4  cell‐based model of coagulation includes the role of two‐types of cells: TF‐bearing cells, such as fibroblasts  and monocytes,  and  platelets  (3‐5).  In  this model  there  are  three main  phases: initiation,  amplification,  and  propagation.  Initiation  occurs  upon  vascular  injury  as  in  the cascade’s extrinsic pathway where blood flow becomes exposed to a TF‐bearing cell. Circulating FVIIa binds to the TF and this complex catalyzes the activation of both FX and FIX. Any FXa that dissociates from the TF bearing cell  is  inhibited by tissue factor pathway  inhibitor (TFPI) or AT, ensuring  that FXa activity remains  localized  to the cell. FIXa  is  free to dissociate and bind to a nearby  platelet  (5).  On  the  TF‐bearing  cell,  FXa  binds  to  cofactor  FVa  forming  the prothrombinase complex and generates a small amount of FIIa that can dissociate and bind to a nearby platelet. This leads to the amplification phase, where FIIa: i) activates platelets exposing procoagulant aPL surface, ii) releases vWF from FVIII causing platelet adhesion and aggregation, and iii) activates FV, FVIII and FXI as in the cascade’s contact phase and intrinsic pathway. In the propagation phase, the activated coagulation factors generated  in the previous phases  localize on the procoagulant surface of activated platelets and form the intrinsic tenase, generating FXa which binds with FVa to form prothrombinase and generates  large amounts of FIIa directly on the platelet. This burst of FIIa cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin polymerizing into strands and forming the hemostatic plug.      5      6  Figure 1: The coagulation cascade The coagulation cascade is a series of enzymatic activations by which the body forms clots in order  to  stop  bleeding.  Two  interconnected  pathways  meet  at  a  final  common  pathway resulting  in  the deposition of  fibrin  and  clot  formation.  The  extrinsic pathway, or  “initiating” pathway,  begins with  vascular  damage  exposing  anionic  phospholipid  (green  phospholipids), which  localizes  the coagulation  factors needed  to  form extrinsic  tenase:  tissue  factor  (TF), FX, and FVIIa. This extrinsic  tenase activates FX to FXa  that then goes on to  form prothrombinase with  FVa  and  Prothrombin  (FII).  Prothrombinase  complex  activates  prothrombin  to  thrombin (FIIa) which then feeds back into the intrinsic pathway or “amplifying” pathway by activating FXI to FXIa, which activates FIX to FIXa. In this second pathway, the intrinsic tenase is formed with FVIIIa  (also activated by FIIa), FIXa and FX, activating  it  to FXa  similar  to  the extrinsic  tenase. Further upstream with contact phase, FXI can also be activated by the complex of FXIIa, high‐molecular‐weight kininogen (HK), and kallikrein (KK).      7  1.1.1 Physiological	anticoagulation	The balance between  coagulation and  fibrinolysis must be maintained  in order  to ensure clots  form only when and where  they are  required. Constitutive anticoagulation  is  in place  to maintain blood fluidity and prevent thrombus formation. The endothelium plays a major role in physiological  anticoagulation.  The  vascular  lumen  synthesizes  heparan  sulfate,  a  heparin‐like glycosaminoglycan  that  can bind AT. AT  is a  serine protease  inhibitor  (serpin)  that binds and neutralizes  the  serine  proteases  thrombin,  FIXa,  FXa,  FXIa,  FXIIa  (2).  Platelet  activation  and aggregation  is  also  inhibited  by  the  endothelium  by  the  release  of ADPase,  and  vasodilators prostacyclin  (PGI2)  and  nitric  oxide  (NO)  (1).  The  endothelial  cell  surface  also  expresses thrombomodulin which  serves as a  cofactor  for  thrombin activation of Protein C  to activated protein C (APC), a Vitamin K‐dependent serine protease (19). With protein S, endothelial protein C  receptor,  calcium and anionic phospholipid as  cofactors, APC proteolytically  inactivates FVa and  FVIIIa.  Tissue  factor  pathway  inhibitor  (TFPI)  reversibly  inhibits  the  extrinsic  tenase  by forming a complex with FXa. This Xa‐TFPI complex can subsequently inhibit the FVIIa‐TF complex within the same tenase by forming a quaternary TF/VIIa/Xa/TFPI complex (20). 1.1.2 Fibrinolysis		The  fibrinolysis  pathway  ultimately  leads  to  the  breakdown  of  fibrin  clots  into  soluble fragments (Figure 2). This is primarily done through cleavage by plasmin (Pn), which is the active form of plasminogen (Pg) (21). The dogma of fibrinolysis has been as follows: 1) Fibrin is the only required cofactor to enhance tPA‐mediated Pg activation to Pn. 2) Intact fibrin has co‐localizing binding  sites  for  tPA  and  the  substrate  Pg  (described  in  1.1.4.1)  to  initiate  low  levels  of  Pn generation.  3)  Limited  cleavage  of  fibrin  by  Pn  occurs  that  exposes  C‐terminal  lysines  (Lys), which “primes” the  fibrin clot. These C‐terminal Lys  form  integral components of new binding   8  sites  for  tPA  and  Pg.  4) More  tPA  and  Pg  binding,  and  faster  Pn  generation  are  enabled  on “primed” fibrin, ultimately allowing the Pn concentration to exceed the antifibrinolytic threshold for apparent “all‐or‐nothing” degradation of fibrin.  tPA  is  an  enzyme  that  cleaves  Pg  at  Arg  561  to  two  chains  linked  by  a  disulfide  bond, activating it to Pn. During the solubilisation process, the clot is systematically cleaved by Pn into well‐documented  fibrin  degradation  products  (FDP):  Fragment  X,  Y,  D,  E  and  D‐Dimer:E complexes.  Serpins  such  as  plasminogen  activator  inhibitor‐1  (PAI‐1)  and  α‐2‐antiplasmin (α2AP),  form  irreversible 1:1 complexes with  tPA and Pn  respectively. Thus, PAI‐1  inhibits  the conversion of Pg to active form Pn by forming a complex with tPA and blocking interaction with Pg.  Similarly,  α2AP  inhibits  plasmin  activity  by  forming  the  inactive  plasmin/α‐2‐antiplasmin (PAP) complex. Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis  inhibitor (pro‐TAFI)  is a proenzyme that when activated with proteolytic cleavage by the thrombin/thrombomodulin complex to TAFIa, cleaves C‐terminal  lysine and arginine residues on fibrin. The removal of these C‐terminal amino acids inhibits the binding and activation of Pg by tPA and decreases fibrinolytic activity.     9   Figure 2: The fibrinolysis pathway Fibrinolysis  is  the break‐down of  fibrin clots  into soluble  fragments. This  is primarily done through  cleavage by Pn, which  is  the active  form of Pg. Pg binds  to  fibrin or other  cofactors, where  it  is  activated  to Pn predominantly  through  cleavage by  tPA.  Serpins, PAI‐1  and  α2AP form  inhibition  complexes  tPA  and  Pn  respectively.  Pro‐TAFI  is  a  proenzyme  that  is proteolytically activated by FIIa to TAFIa, which  inhibits the activation of Pg by cleaving the C‐terminal lysine (K) constituent of the Pg and tPA binding sites on fibrin and other cofactors. 				  10  1.1.3 Auxiliary	cofactor	model	of	fibrinolysis	Previous work on the prothrombinase components FV and FX demonstrated that cleavage by Pn generates  fragments  that  can  serve as  cofactors  for  tPA, and accelerate Pn generation (22).  Pn  cleavage  of  FXa  yields  fragments  FXaβ  and  Xa33/13, which  contain  new  C‐terminal lysine residues that allow them to act as Pg receptors and accelerate tPA activity (22‐27).  Both FXaβ  and  Xa33/13  have  been  shown  to  enhance  tPA‐mediated  Pn  generation  as well  as  the dissolution  of  purified  fibrin  clots  at  physiological  concentrations  of  tPA  (24).  Pryzdial  et  al. demonstrated that Xa33/13 bound more Pg than FXaβ (23). However, FXaβ accelerated purified fibrin  clot  lysis  to  a  greater  extent  compared  to  Xa33/13,  and  in  unpublished  plasma  lysis experiments  (in  Dr.  Amanda  Vanden  Hoek’s  PhD  thesis  (28))  Xa33/13  did  not  enhance  tPA activity (24,28). As suggested by work from our  lab, a revised fibrinolysis model  is postulated that  includes auxiliary  cofactors:  1.  Proteins  in  the  vicinity of  the  clot provide C‐terminal  Lys before  those exposed on fibrin. 2. Pn cleaves FXa approximately 2‐orders of magnitude more effectively than fibrin  to expose C‐terminal Lys. 3. The FXaβ  functions as an auxiliary cofactor  to enhance  the initial Pn generation at the site of a clot that ultimately primes the fibrin for fast Pn generation and clot solubilisation (Figure 3). This model combines clotting and fibrinolysis proteins in a new way, with modulated clotting factors working towards the opposite goal, which is profibrinolysis. FV and FX along with aPL and Ca2+  form  the  prothrombinase  complex,  which  is  responsible  for  activating  the  substrate prothrombin into the important coagulation protein thrombin. It is rational that these two main components of the complex, which are localized to the site of the clot, are eventually modulated to enhance fibrinolysis as tPA cofactors and generate Pn.    11   Figure 3: Auxiliary cofactor fibrinolysis model Prothrombinase  generates  FIIa,  which  produces  fibrin  through  proteolytic  activation  of fibrinogen. Intact fibrin serves as a “slow” cofactor for tPA. Pg binds and is cleaved to generate a small  amount  of  initiating  Pn.  FXa  fragments,  such  as  Xa33/13  or  FXaβ  can  act  as  auxiliary cofactors  for tPA and provide additional sites  localized  to the clot,  for Pg and tPA to bind and generate a low level of Pn. This Pn goes on to cleave fibrin, exposing C‐terminal Lys (K) to more readily  activate  Pg  for  a  high  level  of  Pn  generation,  which  in  turn  results  in  faster  fibrin degradation.       12  1.1.3.1 Plasmin‐mediated	factor	Xa	fragmentation		In addition to the well‐established central role of FX in coagulation, our lab has shown that FX and FXa have fibrinolytic function by serving as an auxiliary cofactor for tPA. To acquire this activity, C‐terminal lysines must be exposed on FX or FXa, by proteolysis, which form Pg and tPA binding  sites  (Figure  4).  The  domain  structure  of  intact  FX  can  be  divided  into  an  activation peptide, anionic phospholipid  (aPL) binding or Gla domain, protease domain, and a β peptide (Figure 5). Upon activation to FXa, the activation peptide is excised leaving full‐length FXaα. This “α”  form  undergoes  proteolytic  excision  of  the  C‐terminal  β‐peptide  from  the  heavy‐chain, mediated by Pn or by autoproteolysis,  leaving a form of FXa called FXaβ. The precise cleavage site  rendering  this  “β”  form  is  unknown  and  therefore may  have  four  possible  different  C‐termini:  Lys  427  (K427),  Arg  429  (R429),  Lys  433  (K433),  and  Lys  435  (K435).  After  FXaβ  is produced,  further  proteolysis  can  occur  through  one  of  two  pathways.  In  the  presence  of calcium (CaCl2) and aPL, which favours binding of FXaα and FXaβ to the aPL, FXaβ is cleaved by Pn at Lys 330  (K330) to yield Xa33/13. The  latter has negligible plasma clotting activity. Under conditions that do not favour binding to aPL (i.e. In the absence of aPL or in the presence of the Ca2+‐chelator, ethylenediamine  tetraacetic acid  (EDTA)), FXaβ  is cleaved by Pn at Lys 43  (K43), which excises the Gla domain. Since the resulting cleavage product, Xa40 is non‐functional as a tPA cofactor (Figure 5), it is likely that FXaβ is first generated by cleavage at Arg 429 rather than one of the nearby Lys residues. Thus, in the auxiliary cofactor model of fibrinolysis, FXa function is proteolytically modulated  from procoagulant  to profibrinolytic by Pn and  this  conversion  is localized by the accessibility of aPL.      13      Figure 4: Three dimensional models of FXa highlighting plasminogen binding sites exposed by plasmin cleavage Two partial crystal structures of FXa (A: Protein Database (PDB) accession code 1HCG (29); B: PDB accession code 1XKA (30)  including the heavy chain (yellow) and part of the  light chain (green) were rastorized using Pymol software (www.pymol.org). Plasmin cleavage of FXa reveals potential  plasminogen  binding  sites:  the  β‐peptide  (Lys  in  cyan,  and  Arg  in  orange)  and  the autolysis loop (magenta) where Lys330 is cleaved to generate Xa33/13. Two models are shown here to demonstrate the variation of plasminogen binding site orientation  in different crystals (29).      BA   14   Figure 5: Plasmin cleavage of Factor Xa FX  is  activated  by  either  the  extrinsic  or  intrinsic  tenase  into  FXaα.  C‐Terminal  Lys  are fundamental for expression of fibrinolytic activity. It is unknown which basic amino acid is cleaved to convert  FXaα  into  FXaβ:  K427,  K433,  K435,  or  R429.  Furthermore,  it  is  unknown  if  there  is preferential  cleavage  by  plasmin  or  whether  β‐peptide  cleavage  is  necessary  prior  to  Xa33/13 generation. FXaα is cleaved by two pathways depending on whether it is bound to aPL. When bound to  aPL, C‐terminal  Lys  are  exposed, which  enables  fibrinolytic  activity.  The  first  cleavage product gives FXaβ, which could be at any of  three nearby Lys.   The second cleavage, when bound  to aPL gives Xa33/13, a  fibrinolytic species. When not on aPL, cleavage  is  likely at R429  to produce FXaβ and then Xa40, which cannot facilitate fibrinolysis.      15  1.1.4 Communication	and	crosstalk	between	coagulation	and	fibrinolysis	To simplify the  interpretation of already complicated data, coagulation and fibrinolysis are typically  studied  separately.  However  there  must  be  ample  communication  between  these opposing processes  to ensure sequential coordination and  indeed numerous  lines of evidence have revealed that they are connected. The pathways are similar in that they  involve enzymes, cofactors, and  inhibitors, and they both  follow a sequential cascade design with many protein interactions. Both pathways can be regulated through inhibition by serpins and other inhibitors or  amplification  using  positive  feedback mechanisms.  The main  difference  is  that  they  have opposing functions, but work together to maintain hemostatic balance by preventing excessive bleeding  as well  as  clotting.  There  are  two well‐documented  proteins  in  particular  that  are common between the two different processes: fibrin and thrombin. 1.1.4.1 Fibrinogen	activation	and	fibrin	degradation	 Circulating  fibrinogen  has  an  overall  dumbbell‐shaped  quaternary  structure  consisting  of two flanking D‐domains and a central E‐domain made up of three types of peptide chains: Aα, Bβ  and  γ. Monomeric  fibrinogen  is  converted  to  insoluble  fibrin  through  thrombin‐mediated cleavage  that  releases  N‐terminal  fibrinopeptides  A  and  B  from  the  Aα and  Bβ  chains (respectively),  which  exposes  sites  “A  &  B  knobs”  that  allow  the  fibrin  to  polymerize  with adjacent  fibrin molecules  at matching  “a &  b  holes”  in  the D  domain  (31)  (Figure  6).  Fibrin feedback regulates fibrinolysis and is thus strategically positioned in hemostasis. The hemostatic equilibrium  is  shifted  towards  coagulation,  forming  a  fibrin  network  that  serves  as  the hemostatic seal to stop bleeding due to vascular damage. Once the damage has been repaired,   16  the  balance  shifts  in  favour  of  fibrinolysis  to  dissolve  the  clot  and  restore  blood  flow.  Fibrin facilitates Pn activation and thus fibrin degradation by binding Pg and tPA (32,33). The conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin exposes two sites that bind Pg & tPA. Kringle domains are loops stabilized by 3 disulfide linkages that are key for C‐terminal binding interaction. The Aα chain 154–159 site of fibrin can bind to Kringle domains  located  in either Pg (Kringles 1‐3 of 5 total), or  in  tPA  (Kringle 2 of 2  total), but preferentially binds Pg  in  vivo because of a higher circulating  concentration  (31,34). The  γ  chain 312–324 binding  site only binds  tPA at  the  tPA finger domain (31,34) (Figure 6). Fibrin has also been shown to bind FXa at the Gla domain on Aα chain 82‐123 (35) (Figure 6). In  soluble  fibrinogen  or  monomeric  fibrin,  plasmin  cleaves  Aα  chains  at  the  D  domain terminal end to make Fragment X (D‐E‐D). Fragment X is cleaved through all three Aα, Bβ and γ chains in between the D & E domains to yield fragments Y (D‐E) & D. Fragment Y then becomes further  degraded  into  Fragment  E  and  a  second  Fragment  D  (36,37).  Cross‐linked  fibrin  is cleaved by plasmin  in a similar way, however  it also results  in a unique fragment called the D‐dimer  (Figure 7). The D‐dimer usually  remains complexed with an E domain because of FXIIIa covalent  crosslinking.  Fibrinogen  has minimal  to  no  effect  on  tPA mediated  Pn  generation, however fibrinogen still has both a high affinity Pg binding site and a tPA binding site  in the D domain (38).   17   Figure 6: Fibrinogen and fibrin structure Fibrinogen has a dumbbell shape of two D domains and a central E domain made of three peptide  chains: Aα,  Bβ  and  γ.  FIIa  activates  fibrinogen  to  fibrin  by  cleaving  and  releasing N‐terminal fibrinopeptides A and B exposing A & B knobs that fit into a & b holes of the D domain of adjacent fibrin molecules. The activation of fibrinogen to fibrin exposes two sites that bind Pg and tPA:  • Aα 154‐159  (D region) sequence  that can bind either  tPA  (via  the Kringle 2 domain) or Pg (via Kringles 1‐3). Aα 154‐159   can bind both Pg &  tPA, but preferentially binds Pg  in vivo because of a higher circulating concentration.  • γ312–324 (D region) only binds tPA, and binds at the tPA finger domain. FXa has been shown to also bind Fibrin at Aα 82‐123 (coiled region between D & E).   18   Figure 7: Fibrin degradation   In  soluble  fibrinogen  or  fibrin,  Pn  cleaves  α  chains  at  D  terminals  to make  fragment  X. Fragment X is then cleaved into Fragments Y & D. From this point, Fragment Y is further cleaved by  Pn  into  Fragment  E  and  a  second  Fragment  D.  Fragments  X,  Y,  D,  and  E  are measured clinically as fibrinogen degradation products (FDP). Pn cleaves  insoluble, cross‐linked fibrin  in a similar way as soluble fibrin, however results  in a unique  fragment called the D‐Dimer. The D‐dimer, usually remaining complexed with an E domain,  is the crosslinked D domains  from two distinct fibrin monomers, preserved together because of FXIIIa crosslinking      19  1.1.4.2 Thrombin	The prothrombinase complex consists of the protease FXa, cofactor FVa, and the precursor prothrombin. While  the  complex  is bound  to  aPL  in  the presence of  calcium, prothrombin  is cleaved  twice by FXa:  first at Arg 320  to meizothrombin,  then at Arg 271  into  the active  form thrombin  (11).  Thrombin  is  one  of  the  most  important  protease  in  the  entire  coagulation pathway  as  it  converts  fibrinogen  to  fibrin  and  activates upstream  clotting  factors  creating  a positive feedback to create even more thrombin and thus more fibrin for the clot. Thrombin  is also linked to fibrinolysis through thrombin/thrombomodulin‐mediated activation of TAFI, which inhibits fibrinolysis by preventing Pg binding and activation (12‐14). 1.1.4.3 Thrombin	activatable	fibrinolysis	inhibitor		Through TAFI,  thrombin protects  the  fibrin  clot  from premature degradation,  giving  it  an antifibrinolytic  property  in  addition  to  its  procoagulant  features.  TAFI,  also  known  as carboxypeptidase U or B2, is a 401 amino acid proenzyme secreted by the liver and circulates at approximately  5.0µg/ml  or  100nM  (1).  The  proenzyme,  pro‐TAFI  (39),  is  activated  through cleavage at Arg‐92 by  trypsin‐like enzymes,  such as  thrombin and plasmin  (40). Recombinant meizothrombin has  also been  shown  to be  a  potent  activator  of  TAFI when  complexed with thrombomodulin, however only 10% as effective as recombinant  thrombin  (41). The activated form TAFIa, has a binding pocket  (Asp257, Gly244, Ser207) within  the catalytic domain  for C‐terminal basic amino acids. With this pocket, TAFIa binds to the C‐terminal Lys exposed on fibrin and other cofactors and removes the Lys required for the amplification of Pg and tPA binding, thus inhibiting fibrinolysis (42). However,  in addition  to activation of pro‐TAFI,  thrombin can also  rapidly  inactivate TAFIa. Through  mutagenesis  experiments,  Boffa  et  al  have  shown  that  Arg‐302  is  the  thrombin cleavage site  in TAFIa  that  results  in  its  inactivation  to TAFIai  (43)  (Figure 8). This  inactivation   20  suggests  that  significant  antifibrinolysis may not be  achieved  through TAFIa due  to  the  short half‐life of 10 mins at the physiological temperature of 37°C, with  insufficient time to  induce a physiologically relevant antifibrinolytic effect (44). However, there have been studies supporting a physiological role for TAFIa as an inhibitor of fibrinolysis. Reditz et al. showed that in a canine model of electrically induced thrombosis in the coronary artery, TAFIa activity was increased in plasma samples during thrombosis and prolonged the time for reperfusion during thrombolytic therapy with tPA infusion (45). Rabbit models showed that using an inhibitor of TAFIa enhanced thrombolysis or reduced the amount of tPA needed to achieve lysis (46,47). Nesheim and Bajzar studied the activation of TAFI in vivo using a baboon E. coli‐induced sepsis model. In this sepsis model, different activators of TAFI, such as thrombin, thrombin/thrombomodulin and plasmin, were elevated. They  found  that  the  increase  in TAFIa  levels  correlated with E.  coli  in a dose‐dependent  manner  (from  106  to  108  CFU/kg)  and  with  the  use  of  a  monoclonal  antibody inhibiting  specific  activators  of  TAFI  showed  that  thrombin/thrombomodulin  was  the  main activator of TAFI (48,49). In humans, high total TAFI concentrations have been correlated with a 2‐fold  increase  in  risk  for  DVT  (50).  Antovic  et  al.  found  that  in  hemophilia  there  was  no difference  in  levels  of  total  TAFI  antigen,  however  Pro‐TAFI  was  significantly  reduced  in haemophilia  patients  compared  to  controls  (39).  In  severe  hemophilia,  significantly  higher concentrations  of  pro‐TAFI were  found  in more  severe  hemorrhagic  phenotypes  (6.2  μg/ml) compared to mild hemorrhagic (3.0 μg/ml) and non‐hemophilia groups (3.2 μg/ml) (51). Foley et al. found a correlation between TAFIa and thrombin generation, suggesting that both could be used to evaluate bleeding diathesis in hemophilia patients (52).     21  Figure 8: TAFI activation and inactivation TAFI is a carboxypeptidase B, an inhibitor of fibrinolysis acting to remove C‐terminal Lys sites that bind plasminogen and  tPA.  It primarily  circulates  in  the  zymogen  form  (pro‐TAFI), which then  is activated through cleavage at R92 by  trypsin‐like enzymes such as FIIa and plasmin.  In this project a  recombinant  thrombin/soluble  thrombomodulin  (IIa/sTM)  complex was used  to convert  TAFI  to  TAFIa.  TAFIa  has  a  short  half‐life  of  only  10mins  at  37°C,  and  becomes inactivated through thrombin cleavage at R302.      22  1.1.4.4 Platelets	and	PAI‐1	Platelets  are  anucleate  cells  derived  from  megakaryocytes.  Vascular  damage  causes subendothelial exposure of TF, and the cell adhesion ligands, collagen and von Willebrand factor (vWF), to blood, whereupon they come  into contact with platelets. Platelets are consequently activated, resulting  in shape change, pseudopod extension, secretion of granule contents, and aggregation. The  latter step  involves  fibrinogen and vWF as bridging molecules between cells. Through granule release, platelets regulate fibrinolysis. They release the tPA  inhibitor PAI‐1, to inactivate the ability to convert Pg to Pn. Only 10% of PAI‐1 from platelets is in the active form. Under physiological conditions the active form spontaneously converts to the latent form, which has  a  half‐life  of  approximately  2  hours  (53).  The  nonreactive  form  has  been  shown  to  be reactivated with denaturants, causing refolding (54). PAI‐1 is also secreted from endothelial cells into plasma, mostly  in  the active  form, but  the main physiologic  source  is platelets  (53). The normal range of PAI‐1 in (reference) plasma is ~26‐47ng/ml (55‐57) and baseline PAI‐1 activity is ~24 IU/ml (58). PAI‐1 levels were found to increase with age in women (59). Increased levels of PAI‐1 activity have been implicated in cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction, (60) coronary  artery disease,  (61)  and deep  vein  thrombosis  (62).  The opposite  could be  true  for hemophilia  patients,  in  that  decreased  levels  of  PAI‐1  activity may  enhance  fibrinolysis  and explain how patients with hemophiliac are protected against vascular disease. 1.1.4.5 Plasminogen	and	plasmin	The inactive precursor of Pn, Pg, circulates as a 90kDa, 791 amino acid glycoprotein with: an N‐terminal  signal  peptide,  activation  peptide,  five  Kringle  domains,  and  a  serine  protease domain (Figure 9). Plasminogen is activated to plasmin by tPA through cleavage at Arg 561 (63). The  activation  peptide  can  be  released  through  plasmin  cleavage  at  Lys  78  before  or  after activation yielding Lys‐Pg or Lys‐Pn, respectively.   However, Lys‐Pg  is activated at  least 10‐fold   23  more efficiently making physiological Glu‐Pn unlikely. Plasminogen binds    to    fibrin   at Kringle domains  1‐3  (31)  and  the  Lys‐plasminogen  form  has  been  shown  to  both  bind  fibrin  and becomes activated more readily than the Glu‐plasminogen form (64). Plasmin is the most important protease in the fibrinolysis pathway, as it is the main protease in fibrin degradation. It is a link to coagulation as it has been found to regulate the activation of clotting  factors  such  as  FV  and  FX  through  cleavage  at  specific  amino  acid  residues  (22,65). Previous studies  in the Pryzdial  lab and by collaborators have shown that FV and FX fragments from Pn digestion can act as auxiliary cofactors in fibrinolysis and enhance tPA activity.  In addition to TAFI and PAI‐1, fibrinolysis can also be inhibited through Pg and plasmin. The main  physiological  inhibitor  of  plasmin  is  α2AP,  a  452  amino  acid  serine  protease  inhibitor synthesized in the liver that can irreversibly bind plasmin and form a PAP complex (66,67). α2AP can also effectively bind the inactive form, Pg, preventing it from binding to fibrin (68).   24   Figure 9: Plasminogen activation The circulating form of Pg, Glu‐Pg has an activation peptide (AP), five Kringle domains (K1‐K5),  and  a  serine  protease  domain.  The AP  is  released  by  plasmin  cleavage  at  K78.  This  can happen either before or after activation by tPA yielding Lys‐Pg or Lys‐Pn.   Both Glu‐and Lys‐Pg are activated by tPA cleavage at R561, yielding a two‐chain disulfide‐linked enzyme plasmin.      25  1.1.4.6 Tissue‐type	plasminogen	activator	tPA, as the name suggests, is responsible for converting Pg to the active form plasmin. It is secreted by endothelial cells and circulates as a single chain 72 kDa, 572 amino acid glycoprotein in  the bloodstream at ~ 5µg/ml  (1).  It consists of an N‐terminal  finger‐like domain, epidermal growth  factor‐like  domain,  two  Kringle  domains,  and  a  serine  protease  domain.  Plasmin  can cleave  single  chain  tPA  at Arg 275  to  yield  a  two‐chain  form, which  is  approximately 10‐fold more active  (69)  (Figure 10). tPA Ag  levels have been  found  to  increase with age  in both men and women, from approximately 3 µg/L  in adults ~30 years old to 10 µg/L for those >60 years old (70). Binding of tPA to fibrin involves Kringle 2 and the finger domains (31,34).  Recombinant tPA is the main thrombolytic treatment for myocardial infarctions and strokes, and has  saved numerous  lives. However,  it  is not a perfect  therapeutic. There  is only a  small window  of  opportunity,  3‐4.5  hrs  from  the  onset  of  symptoms,  in  which  tPA  can  been administered with a greater chance for effective results (71‐73). Some patient clots are resistant to tPA, possibly due to increased levels of fibrinolysis inhibitors such as PAI‐1 (TAFI was found to have  no  correlation)  (74).  Another  theory  on  the  cause  of  a  clot  resistance  to  tPA  was investigated using clot turbidity and tPA fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) to follow fibrin localization.  These  investigators  found  that  the  presence  of  DNA  and  histones  caused  fibrin fibers  to  thicken,  less  tPA‐GFP  to bind, and  lysis  to proceed more slowly  (75). Furthermore, a supra‐physiological dosage of  tPA  is  given due  to  a  rapid  clearance  rate with  tPA half‐life of ~3mins,  (1) which can  result  in  systemic plasmin generation and possibly  lead  to hemorrhage (76,77).       26        Figure 10: Single chain and two chain forms of tPA tPA  circulates  in  the  single  chain  form  containing  an  N‐terminal  finger‐like  domain  (F), epidermal growth factor‐like domain (EGF), two Kringle domains, and a serine protease domain. It can be cleaved  into a  two‐chain disulfide‐linked enzyme  that  is approximately 10‐fold more active than the single chain form.      27  1.2 Hemophilia	and	cardiovascular	disease	Hemophilia A and B are bleeding disorders with affected individuals harboring a mutation in either Factor VIII (FVIII) or  IX (FIX) genes, respectively. This results  in a dysfunctional or absent FVIII  or  FIX  coagulation  protein  that  causes  variable  degrees  of  bleeding.  The  severity  of hemophilia is classified according to baseline FVIII or IX activity: mild (5‐40%), moderate (1‐5%) and  severe  (<1%). Current  replacement  therapies have decreased  the bleeding‐related death rate  enabling  the  hemophilia  population  to  dramatically  increase  life  expectancy  to  that equivalent  to,  or  approaching,  the  non‐hemophilia  population. Age‐related  disorders  such  as cardiovascular  disease  (CVD)  are  now  being  increasingly  reported  in  this  population. Retrospective  epidemiological  studies  have  suggested  that  hemophilia  patients  are  relatively protected  from  CVD  as  they  have  a  lower  risk  of mortality  from  CVD  compared  to  the  non‐hemophiliac  population  (78‐81).  The  standard  mortality  ratio  (SMR)  is  the  ratio  of  deaths observed  in a group  to  the expected deaths  in  the normal population and can be shown as a percentage. The  largest cohort consisting of 6018 people (HIV positive  individuals excluded)  in the  UK  from  1976‐1998  reported  a  38%  reduction  in  SMR with  no  difference  between  the severities  of  hemophilia  (82).  Sramek  et  al  observed  1012  mothers  of  known  hemophilia patients  in  the Netherlands  and  found  that  even  female  carriers  of  hemophilia, who  usually demonstrate modestly  reduced  or  normal  coagulation  factor  activity,    demonstrated  a  36% reduction in SMR, suggesting that this decrease in mortality may not only be due to coagulation factor  level  (83). Biere‐Rafi  et  al.  looked  at  cardiovascular  risk  assessment  (body mass  index, blood  pressure,  cholesterol  levels,  and  fasting  glucose  levels)  in  hemophilia  patients  to determine  if the protection was due to fewer CVD risk factors (84). They found that there was no difference in the prevalence of CVD risk factors in hemophilia patients compared to controls, suggesting  that  hypocoagulability  or  hyperfibrinolysis  may  be  reducing  the  cardiovascular   28  mortality  rates  in  hemophilia  patients.  Mosnier  et  al.  showed  that  plasma  lysis  times  in hemophilia patients were significantly faster and suggest that the severe bleeding in hemophilia is  a  “triple  defect”  involving  reduced  thrombin  generation  in  both  initiating  extrinsic  and amplifying intrinsic pathways, as well as decreased inhibition of fibrinolysis due to reduced TAFI activation (85). A study in Germany also found hyperfibrinolysis was the cause for more severe hemorrhagic phenotypes  among patients with hemophilia, with no difference  in  endogenous thrombin  potential,  (51)  and  this  hyperfibrinolysis may  also  provide  an  explanation  for  the protection from CVD in the same population.   1.3 Thesis	rationale	and	hypotheses	Hyperfibrinolysis:  An  explanation  for  reduced  cardiovascular  disease  in  patients  with hemophilia With  the advent of FVIII and FIX  replacement  therapy, hemophilia patients are aging and acquiring cardiovascular disease CVD. However, an as yet unknown characteristic appears to be protecting  this  population  from  CVD‐related  mortality  compared  to  the  non‐hemophilia population (78‐84).  The work in this thesis addresses this phenomenon at a molecular level and is exploratory  in this poorly understood area of hemophilia. Decreased thrombin generation  in various severities of hemophilia demonstrates a close relationship to baseline FVIII & FIX levels. In  hemophilia  A  patients,  thrombin  generation  has  been  shown  to  correlate  with  severity classified by FVIII activity  levels, but not to clinical severity based on frequency of hemorrhage (86). This suggests that other  factors contribute to  the bleeding  tendency, such as  fibrinolysis, platelet  activity,  protein  C  and  S,  TF,  and  properties  of  the  endothelial  wall.  Since  TAFI  is activated  by  thrombin/thrombomodulin,  it  is  anticipated  that  hemophilia  patients  will  have   29  lower levels of TAFIa compared to controls. This would be consistent with a previous study that observed  lower  levels of Pro‐TAFI  in hemophilia patients (39). With  less available Pro‐TAFI and decreased thrombin generation there  is consequently  less activation of Pro‐TAFI and  thus  less TAFIa produced.  In  addition  to decreased  thrombin  generation,  fibrinolytic  inhibitors  such  as TAFI and PAI‐1 also have an effect on bleeding tendency. Grunewald et al. studied a cohort of severe hemophilia patients with varying bleeding diatheses.  In severe hemophilia, significantly higher  concentrations  of  pro‐TAFI were  found  in more  severe  hemorrhagic  phenotypes  (6.2 μg/ml) compared to mild hemorrhagic (3.0 μg/ml) and non‐hemophilia groups (3.2 μg/ml). The increased levels of pro‐TAFI in severe hemophilia suggests the production of TAFI is in response to  the  increased  demand  from  incomplete  clot  formation  and  associated  bleeding  from increased fibrinolytic activity; however with decreased  levels of thrombin  in severe hemophilia there is less activation of TAFI leading to the loss of fibrinolytic inhibition (51). The same group also  found  that  a  higher  concentration  of  PAI‐1  was  found  in  more  severe  hemorrhagic phenotypes (16.9 AU/L) compared to milder hemorrhagic (8.9 AU/L) and non‐hemophilia groups (6.5  AU/L).  Grunewald  et  al.  explain  these  counterintuitive  PAI‐1  data  as  a  result  of  co‐stimulation of  the  fibrinolysis pathway alongside  the coagulation pathway  that  is enhanced  in response  to  the  severe  hemophilia  patient’s  deficiency  in  producing  stable  clots  (51).  They suggested  that hemophilia patients have  increased  levels of  tPA  (4.2ng/ml)  compared  to  the normal population (2.9ng/ml) and discovered that there was a further  increase  in tPA found  in the intensely hemorrhagic phenotype (7.5 ng/ml) (51). However, it is important to note that this group used an arbitrary method of assigning the “intensely hemorrhagic phenotype” based on the number of  joint bleeds  (>3  joints  affected),  and 19/21 patients had hepatitis C,  and  two patients  were  HIV  positive.  This  means  that  they  might  just  be  measuring  the  effects  of inflammation  caused by  the  arthropathy  and  viral  infections which has been  associated with   30  increased  levels of  tPA,PAI‐1  (87)  and  TAFI  (88).  Their  study was  limited  to  a  small  group of patients in one clinic and has not been confirmed or re‐assessed in another setting. This project will build upon their initial findings concerning tPA, PAI‐1 and TAFI. This research project is aimed at addressing several questions: 1. Do hemophilia patients have specific fibrinolysis protein antigen and activity levels that correlate with enhanced fibrinolysis? This might include: i) increased tPA, ii) decreased PAI‐1, and/or iii) decreased TAFI. 2. Do hemophilia patients exhibit evidence of enhanced fibrinolysis activity in comparison to age, gender and CVD risk factor matched controls? Hypothesis:  To  explain  the  lower  propensity  for  cardiovascular  disease,  hemophilia  patients have enhanced  fibrinolysis compared  to non‐hemophiliacs matched  for age, gender, and CVD risk factor. Hyperfibrinolysis may  include shorter plasma clot  lysis times, due to  increased tPA, decreased PAI‐1 or decreased TAFI levels. Regulation of Clotting Factor Xa Auxiliary Cofactor Function in Fibrinolysis through β‐Peptide Excision Previous  work  in  our  lab  has  suggested  that  the  proteolytic  fragment  of  FXa,  Xa33/13, enhances purified fibrin lysis as an auxiliary cofactor for tPA, which enhances plasmin generation for dissolving the clot (24). This is likely due to the two C‐terminal Lys that are exposed on this species  that  facilitate  Pg  binding  and  activation. However,  fibrinolysis  experiments  in  plasma have shown that there is no effect of Xa33/13 (28), although FXa is effective along with the XaAT complex (89), which is the likely source of Xa33/13 in plasma. Unpublished data have suggested that Xa33/13  is more susceptible  to  inactivation  than FXa or XaAT by a mechanism  in plasma   31  that does not exist  in  the purified  fibrinolysis assay. These data  furthermore  suggest  that  the fibrinolytic  activity  of  FXaβ  is more  stable  than  that  of  Xa33/13  and  enhances  fibrinolysis  in plasma. Interestingly, a mixture of purified FXaα and FXaβ is more active in purified fibrinolysis experiments  than  Xa33/13  for  poorly  understood  reasons,  further  complicated  by  the  latter associating more avidly with Pg (24). It is not yet known whether the C‐terminal arginine (R429) FXaβ would have the same enhancing effect, although this has been reasoned to be the form of FXaβ that is incapable of binding to Pg when generated in the absence of aPL‐binding (24) . This research project is aimed at addressing several questions: 1. Is FXaα cleaved preferentially at K427 R429, K433 or K435  to produce FXaβ and  is this affected by the presence or absence of CaCl2 and aPL?  2. Is  the  production  of  FXaβ  obligate  for  subsequent  K330  cleavage  resulting  in Xa33/13 generation? 3. Can  FXaβ  with  a  C‐terminal  Arg429  be  cleaved  by  Pn  at  K330  to  generate  the Xa33/13 fragment? Hypothesis:    Pn‐mediated  conversion  of  FXaα  to  profibrinolytic  FXaβ  will  be  facilitated  by preferential  cleavage  at  one  of  three  lysines  under  conditions  that  favour  aPL‐binding  and switched to predominantly cleave at the nearby Arg when not bound to aPL. β‐peptide excision will facilitate subsequent Pn‐mediated cleavage of K330 to generate Xa33/13.      	  32  2. Materials	and	Methods	2.1 Materials	Dr. Rodney Camire  generously provided  the pCMV4‐ss‐pro‐II‐FX  and pcDNA3.1 plasmids  (90). The  Stratagene  Quikchange  II  XL  site‐directed  mutagenesis  kit  was  purchased  from  Agilent Technologies  (California, USA)  and  primers were  ordered  from  Integrated DNA  Technologies (Iowa,  USA).  Ampicillin,  Opti‐Mem,  DMEM/F‐12,  fetal  bovine  serum  (FBS),  L‐glutamine, penicillin/streptomycin (pen/strep), trypsin, geneticin, and sodium chloride (NaCl) were bought from Gibco  (Invitrogen; California, USA). QIAprep spin miniprep kit was acquired  from Qiagen (Ontario,  Canada).  Lipofectamine  LTX  and  PLUS  reagent  were  obtained  from  Invitrogen (California,  USA).  Glycerol,  ethylenediaminetetraacetic  acid  (EDTA),  4‐(2‐hydroxyethyl)‐1‐piperazineethanesulfonic acid  (HEPES), dimethyl  sulphoxide  (DMSO), polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG 8000), bovine serum albumin (BSA), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) were all purchased  from Sigma‐Aldrich  (Missouri, USA). Vitamin K1 was acquired  from Baxter (Ontario,  Canada).  6‐well  plates,  96‐well  plates,  T‐75,  T‐150,  and  Hyperflasks  (10  layer)  cell culture  flasks were purchased  from Corning  (Massachusetts, USA) and triple  flasks  from Nalge Nunc  International  (New York, USA).  Insulin‐transferrin‐sodium  (ITS) was obtained  from Roche (Indiana, USA).  Polyvinylidene  fluoride  (PVDF) membranes,  Amicon  and Microcon  centrifugal filtration  devices,  and  regenerated  cellulose  ultrafiltration  membranes  were  bought  from Millipore  (Massachusetts, USA). The ECL‐Plus detection kit was purchased  from GE Healthcare (New  Jersey, USA).  Innovin was obtained  from  Siemens Healthcare  (Marburg, Germany).  The PageBlue PVDF stain was from Fermentas (Ontario, Canada). Pooled normal human plasma was obtained from both Affinity Biologicals Inc. (Ontario, Canada) and George King Bio‐medical, Inc. (Kansas, USA). FX‐immunodepleted plasma was obtained from Biopool International (California,   33  USA).  Chromogenic  substrates  S‐2251  was  from  Diapharma  Group  Inc  (Ohio,  USA).  Small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) and large multilamellar vesicles (LMV) consisting of 75:25 PC:PS were prepared by extrusion and quantified through the release of phosphorus as described previously (26). Iodogen used for labeling was obtained from Thermo Scientific, Rockford IL, USA.  2.2 Hemophilia	patient	study	Plasma was collected from 25 Calgary consenting hemophilia subjects with variable degrees of  either  FVIII  or  FIX  deficiency  invited  to  participate  in  a  prospective  study  evaluating endothelial function and the risk of ischemic heart disease under ethics approval U of C Ethics ID E‐21650, and in Vancouver, UBC Ethics ID: H09‐02426. These samples were collected by nurses at Foothills Hospital  in Calgary as part of a  larger study on the risk of  ischemic heart disease  in hemophilia  evaluating  endothelial  dysfunction  and  the  development  of  CVD  (91).    For  the control  group,  75  banked  plasmas  were  generously  shared  from  the  Firefighters  and  Their Endothelium study by Todd Anderson (92). The controls were matched 3:1 to patients according to  age,  gender,  and  cardiovascular  risk  profile  (diabetes,  hypertension,  cholesterol,  smoking habits,  family history of CVD). Neither  the patient nor control plasma  samples were collected specifically  for  this  study,  and were  not  collected  at  a  specific  time  of  day  nor  according  to venipuncture protocol specific for tPA, PAI‐1, or TAFI analysis. Plasma was drawn before factor replacement to obtain therapeutic trough levels and then stored at ‐80°C. Samples were thawed and aliquoted in order to minimize freeze‐thaw cycles that can cause an increase in PAI‐1. TAFIa is labile and plasma collection is preferentially collected in tubes containing anticoagulant (14.4 μg/mL  Heparin,  15.2  μM  ε‐aminocaproic  acid  (εACA);  American  Diagnostica  catalogue  ref:   34  452SCD3)  to maintain  stability.  This was  not  done  for  the  plasma  samples  evaluated  in  the current study and therefore endogenous TAFIa activity may be somewhat underestimated. IMUBIND® tPA, IMUBIND® Plasma PAI‐1, and IMUCLONE® TAFI ELISA kits and SPECTROLYSE® PAI  Activity  and  ACTICHROME®  TAFI  Activity  Assay  kits  were  purchased  from  American Diagnostica  (Stanford,  USA)  and  assays  were  conducted  according  to  the  manufacturers’ protocols.  In  each  IMUBIND®  or  IMUCLONE®  ELISA  kit  a  96‐well  plate  is  coated with  a  polyclonal primary antibody (Ab), which captures the antigen (Ag) of  interest from the plasma samples. A second polyclonal primary Ab  (same  as  the well‐coating Ab)  conjugated  to HRP binds  to  the captured Ag and reports on the antigen of interest according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The  SPECTROLYSE®  PAI  Activity  kit  is  a  two‐stage  indirect  assay  for  PAI‐1  activity  that measures residual tPA activity through Pn generation.  In the first stage, a fixed amount of tPA (40IU/ml) is added to react with the PAI‐1 present in the plasma sample. The sample is acidified with acetate buffer  to destroy any 2AP present  that might  interfere with  the Pn  that will be generated. In the second stage, residual tPA activity is measured through the addition of excess Pg. A chromogenic substrate for Pn activity  is used to measure the extent of Pg conversion by tPA. 1 IU PAI‐1 Activity = the amount of PAI‐1 that inhibits 1 IU of tPA (~1.45ng) The  ACTICHROME®  TAFI  Activity  Assay  kit  was  purchased  from  American  Diagnostica (Stanford, USA) with the intent to measure TAFIa activity as the name of the kit might suggest, but  was  found  to  not  be  designed  specifically  for measuring  TAFIa  activity,  but  rather  for thrombin/thrombomodulin activatable zymogen TAFI  (pro‐TAFI)  (39). Two  sets of  samples are assayed  simultaneously;  one  set  is  activated  by  adding  a  recombinant thrombin/thrombomodulin  complex,  and  the  other  is  not  preactivated.  Carboxypeptidase   35  activity  including  TAFIa  is measured  using  a  TAFI  substrate.  Intrinsic  carboxypeptidase N‐like activity was measured using the unactivated samples, and the difference between the activated and  unactivated  measurements  corresponded  to  the  pro‐TAFI  that  is  activatable  by  the recombinant thrombin/thrombomodulin complex.  2.2.1 Plasma	clot	lysis	To measure plasma  fibrinolysis,  clot  formation  in hemophilia and  control plasma  samples was induced using Innovin as a source of TF and aPL at a 1:16,000 dilution to allow participation of both branches of coagulation or at a 1:4000 dilution to exclude the FVIII‐dependent intrinsic pathway.    A  low  concentration  of  tPA  (75  pM)  was  added  to  be  within  the  physiologically relevant  range.  The  final  CaCl2  concentration was made  15 mM  to  overcome  the  citrate  in plasma. Patient and control samples were run in duplicate at 37 °C in 96‐well‐plates, sealed with a  transparent  adhesive  plastic  to  prevent  evaporation.  Clot  dissolution  was  followed  by measuring Raleigh  light scattering at 405nm using a SpectraMax microplate reader  (Molecular Devices) over several days. Half‐lysis times, the time it takes to reach 50% clot dissolution, were calculated using Graphpad Prism 4 software, and fitting the fibrinolysis data to a simple inverse sigmoidal curve.   2.3 Proteins	Single  chain  tPA was  purchased  from Genentech  (California, USA).  Fibrinogen  and  Lys‐Pg were  bought  from  Enzyme  Research  Laboratories  (Indiana,  USA).  Human  plasma‐derived proteins  including  FX,  FXa,  thrombin,  and  plasmin,  and  Russell’s  viper  venom‐derived  FX activator  (RVV‐X) were  purchased  from Haematologic  Technologies  Inc.  (Vermont, USA).  The monoclonal antibody specific for human FX(a) heavy chain was obtained from Green Mountain   36  Antibodies  (Vermont, USA). Peroxidase‐conjugated goat anti‐mouse  IgG used  for detection of FX(a)  and  various  fragments  by Western  blot was  purchased  from  Jackson  ImmunoResearch Laboratories (Pennsylvania, USA). Radiolabelled 125I‐Pg was prepared as described previously by the Pryzdial lab and did not exceed 200,000 dpm/µg (23).   2.4 Molecular	biology	of	factor	X	2.4.1 Site‐directed	mutagenesis	Seven factor X mutants were generated using the Quikchange site‐directed mutagenesis kit according  to manufacturer’s  protocol.  Single‐point mutants were made  by  replacing  Lys427, Arg429,  Lys433,  and  Lys435 with Gln  and Arg429 with  Lys. Gln was  chosen  instead of Ala  to preserve  the  size  of  the  side  chain while  still  neutralizing  the  positive  charge. A  triple  point mutant was made by mutating the three Lys 427, 433, and 435, to Gln, and a quadruple point mutant was  generated mutating  all  four  basic  residues  to Gln.  Primers were  designed  using Oligo solftware under the guidance of Valerie Smith from Dr. Ross MacGillivray’s  lab, and then primers were ordered from Integrated DNA Technologies (Table 1). Mutant  Forward Primer (5’‐3’)  Reverse Primer (5’‐3’) Lys427Gln (K427Q)  CGACAGGTCCATGCAAACCAGGGGC  GCCCCTGGTTTGCATGGACCTGTCG Arg429Gln (R429Q)  GGATCGACAGGTCCATGAAAACCCAGGGCTTGCCC CGGCAAGCCCTGGGTTTTCATGGACCTGTCGATCC Lys433Gln (K433Q)  GGCTTGCCCCAGGCCAAGAGCCATGCC GGCATGGCTCTTGGCCTGGGGCAAGCC Lys435Gln (K435Q)  GGCTTGCCCAAGGCCCAGAGCCATGCC GGCATGGCTCTGGGCCTTGGGCAAGCC Lys427Gln/Lys433Gln/ Lys435Gln (K3βQ) AGGTCCATGCAAACCAGGGGATTGCCCCAGGCCCAGAGCCATGCC GGCATGGCTGGCCTGGGGCAATCCCCTGGTTGCATGGACCT Lys427Gln/Arg429Gln/ Lys433Gln/Lys435Gln (KR4βQ) GACAGGTCCATGCAGACCCAGGGCTTGCCCCAGGCCCAGAGCCATGCCC GGGCATGGCTCTGGGCCTGGGGCAAGCCCTGGGTCTGCATGGACCTGTC Arg429Lys (R429K)  GACAGGTCCATGAAAACCAAGGGCTTGCCC GGGCAAGCCCTTGGTTTTCATGGACCTGTC   37   Table 1: Primers used for mutagenesis of F10 gene Five  single‐point  and  two multi‐point mutants  of  FX were  created  through  site‐directed mutagenesis. Oligo  software was  used  to  identify  optimal  forward  and  reverse  primers  that were obtained commercially  from  Integrated DNA Technologies  (IDT). The altered codons are highlighted  in  yellow  (Table  1),  with  the  nucleic  acid  that  was  changed  in  red.  The  silent mutation  for  Gly  (GCC   GGA)  in  the  K3βQ mutant  was  included  to  prevent  primer  loop formation.  The mutations were inserted into a plasmid containing the FX gene (F10), pCMV4‐ss‐pro‐II‐FX gifted by Dr. Rodney Camire. The signal sequence and propeptide of FX in the plasmid were replaced with  that of prothrombin  to  increase expression  (90). For each mutant, plasmid and primers were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then restriction enzyme Dpn I  was  used  to  digest  parental  DNA.  The  PCR  products  were  transformed  into  XL10‐Gold ultracompetent  cells  with  β‐mercaptoethanol.  Ampicillin  (10  μg/mL)‐Luria  Bertani  (LB)  agar plates, prepared the day before, were used to plate and colonize the cells. For each mutant, six colonies were selected and grown  in ampicillin‐LB media. Using the Qiagen mini‐prep kit, DNA was extracted and sequenced  to confirm  that mutation was successful and  the F10 gene was complete. Aliquots of cells for each mutant were stored in ampicillin‐LB media with 15% glycerol at ‐80°C.  Initial DNA work for the four single‐point mutations to Gln was done by Dr. Mitra Panahi, a former postdoctoral fellow in our laboratory, and the triple‐point mutant was done by Dr. Amanda Vanden Hoek, former PhD student from our laboratory.     38  2.4.2 Stable	expression	of	FX	mutants	Plasmid  pcDNA3.1 was  used  as  a  selectable marker  and  co‐transfected with  each  of  the mutant  F10‐containing  plasmids  into  human  embryonic  kidney  (HEK)  293  cells  using Lipofectamine  LTX with  and without  PLUS  reagent  according  to  the manufacturer’s  protocol. Transfection was  first attempted with Lipofectamine 2000, however  there were no  successful transfected cells due to high toxicity of this transfection reagent. HEK 293 cells were grown to ~80%  confluence  in  6‐well  plates  and  then  incubated  with  a  mixture  of  mutant  plasmid, Lipofectamine LTX (with and without PLUS reagent) and Opti‐Mem. Cells were allowed to grow overnight  at  37  °C  with  5  %  carbon  dioxide  (CO2),  and  then  replaced  with  growth media: DMEM/F‐12  supplemented with  5%  FBS,  1%  L‐Glu,  and  1%  pen/strep  and  allowed  to  grow overnight again under the same incubation conditions. Dead suspended cells were aspirated and discarded.  The  viable  adherent  cells were  lifted  using  0.25%  trypsin &  1mM  EDTA  and  then reseeded at various cell dilutions  in new 6‐well plates containing selection media: DMEM/F‐12 supplemented with  5%  FBS,  1%  L‐Glu,  and  1%  pen/strep,  6ug/ml Vit  K1  and  0.9%  geneticin. Geneticin is the selector used to destroy cells that do not have the selectable marker pcDNA3.1 plasmid. The cells were allowed to grow  for 2‐4 weeks until colonies  formed. Several colonies were selected for each mutant and each were seeded into T150 flasks for expansion to ~80‐90% confluency. These selected clones were reseeded  into triple flasks for expansion and a portion of these cells for each clone were frozen  in selection media with 5% DMSO for  later use. Once the  transfected  cells  reached  80‐90%  confluency  in  the  triple  flasks,  selection  media  was replaced  with  serum‐deprived  expression  media:  DMEM/F‐12  supplemented  with  insulin‐transferrin‐selenium (ITS), 1% L‐Glu, and 1% pen/strep, 6ug/ml Vit K1, and 0.9% geneticin. This conditioned media was collected and replaced daily for up to 2 weeks and stored at ‐80 °C for use in Western blots and activity assays.    39  2.4.3 Clone	selection	2.4.3.1 Factor	X	antigen	quantification	Conditioned  media  collected  from  each  clone  were  thawed  at  37  °C  and  analyzed  by Western blot in quadruplicate to quantify FX antigen expressed for each clone using a standard curve of known purified FX  (15ng–100ng) run on each gel. Compared to a conventional ELISA, this  method  is  preferable  because  it  also  enabled  evaluation  of  FX  fragmentation.  Media samples were diluted in sample buffer (Laemmli: 63 mM Tris‐HCl, 10% glycerol, 2% SDS, 0.01% Bromophenol  blue)  and  boiled  at  95  °C  for  5  mins.  The  samples  were  then  run  on  10% acrylamide gels by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS‐PAGE) and then  transferred  to  polyvinylidine  difluoride  (PVDF) membranes.  The  PVDF membranes were blocked using 5%  skim milk  in Tris‐buffered  saline with Tween  (TBST; Tris‐HCl  (50 mM), NaCl (150 mM), 0.05% Tween‐20)  for 1 hour, and  then  incubated with primary antibody  (20ng/ml mouse anti‐human FX heavy chain monoclonal antibody)  in 5%  skim milk  in TBST  for another hour.  The  excess  antibody  and  milk  were  washed  with  TBST  thrice  for  5  mins  and  then membranes were  incubated with secondary antibody  (20 ng/ml horseradish peroxidise  (HRP)‐conjugated goat anti‐mouse antibody) for 1 hour. The excess antibody was again washed with TBST  three  times  for  5 mins  and  then  ECL‐Plus  detection  kit was  used  to  visualize  bands  by chemiluminescence  using  a  ChemiGenius  imaging  system  and  GeneTools  software (PerkinElmer). 2.4.3.2 Factor	Xa	activity	by	prothrombin	time	Factor Xa  clotting  activity  in  collected  conditioned media  for  each  clone was determined using a prothrombin time (PT) assay. Aliquots were rapidly thawed at 37 °C and then diluted into 50μL HEPES‐buffered saline (HBS; HEPES (20 mM), NaCl (150 mM), at pH 7.4) and incubated for 1 min with  50  μL  of  FX‐immunodepleted  plasma  (BioPool)  at  37  °C.  100  μL  of  Innovin,  pre‐  40  warmed to 37 °C, was added to  initiate clotting and clotting time was measured by the halt  in motion of a metal ball in an ST4 coagulation analyzer (Diagnostica Stago). A standard curve was made with a  range of dilutions of normal plasma as well as a  second  standard  curve using a range of dilutions of normal plasma‐derived FX with known specific activity (HTI). 2.4.3.3 Factor	X	specific	activity	The  specific  activity  (units/mg)  was  calculated  for  each  clone  using  the  antigen quantification by Western blot and activity determined by PT. The FX activity in normal pooled reference plasma was used to define FX units per mL.  The activity of each clone in units/ml was calculated from the normal FX standard curve and then divided by the amount of FX antigen to obtain a specific activity  in units/mg. Several clones  for each mutant with  the highest specific activities and antigen production were  selected  for  large  scale expression and purification  for experiments.  2.4.4 Large‐scale	expression	and	purification	of	FX	mutants	by	binding	 to	anionic	phospholipid	vesicles	The stably transfected clones were thawed at 37°C and seeded into T‐150 flasks and allowed to  grow  to  ~80‐90%  confluency.  The  adherent  cells were  trypsinized  and  then  reseeded  into triple  flasks  and hyperflasks  for  expansion.   A portion of  these  cells were  frozen  in  selection media with 5% DMSO. The cells were then serum‐deprived with expression media as before and the conditioned media was collected daily for up to 3 weeks (until cells were dying) and stored at  ‐80°C.  Immediately  prior  to  purification,  the  conditioned media was  thawed  at  37°C  and centrifuged at 15,000 revolutions per minute (rpm) for 15min to remove cellular debris and then concentrated at 4°C in a stirred cell concentrator under nitrogen gas pressure with 10kDa cut‐off YM‐10  regenerated  cellulose  ultrafiltration  membrane,  and  then  further  concentrated  with   41  10kDa  cut‐off  Amicon  centrifugal  filter  device  according  to  the  manufacturer’s  protocol (Millipore),  Post translational γ‐glutamyl carboxylation of the FX Gla domain  is essential  for  functional FX as it is responsible for calcium‐dependent anionic phospholipid (aPL) binding. When calcium interacts with  the  Gla  domain  at  N‐terminal  residues  1‐11,  an  Ω  loop  is  formed  and  three hydrophobic  residues  Phe4,  Leu5,  & Met8  protrude,  enabling  an  interaction  with  aPL  (93). Incomplete carboxylation of  the Gla domain  is a common problem with  recombinant FX  (94). Wild‐type FX and recombinant FX with carboxylated Gla domain was purified from media using functional affinity purification by binding to aPL. rFX (250 nM) in media was incubated with CaCl2 (2.5 mM) and LMV (1 mM) for 5mins at room temperature, then centrifuged at 13,000 rpm for 5 mins to pellet bound rFX to LMV. The Supernatant was kept and stored at ‐20°C for subsequent Western blot analysis. The pellet was washed by centrifugation three‐times with CaCl2 (2.5mM) in HBS and  these washes were also kept and stored  for Western blot analysis. The  final pellet was resuspended with EDTA (5 mM) in HBS to dissociate the bound rFX from aPL and the sample was centrifuged at 13,000 rpm to pellet the LMV. Purified rFX  in EDTA (5 mM) was stored at  ‐80°C. All samples were quantified and evaluated by Western blot and  if necessary due  to  low yield  (<20  ng/µl),  concentrated  using  a  10kDa  cut‐off  Microcon  centrifugal  filter  device according  to manufacturer’s protocols  (Millipore). Purified commercial normal plasma derived FX (nFX) was also subjected to the same conditions and stored in EDTA (5 mM).       42  2.5 rFX	Procoagulant	function	 2.5.1 RVV‐X	activation	of	rFX		The purified  recombinant wild‐type FX  (WTFX),  recombinant β‐mutants  (rFX), and plasma‐derived nFX (200 nM) were incubated with RVV‐X (125 nM), CaCl2 (10 mM), and LMV (1 mM) for up to 30mins. Samples were taken at a range of time points and pipetted into Laemmli sample buffer to stop the reaction and then heated at 95 °C for 5 mins. The samples were run on 10% acrylamide SDS‐PAGE and  then  transferred  to PVDF  for Western blot analysis using  the  same protocol as in section 2.4.3.1.  2.6 rFX	fibrinolytic	function	 2.6.1 Plasmin‐mediated	cleavage	and	Lys‐plasminogen	binding	To establish  the  roles of  the  four basic  residues at  the  β‐peptide cleavage  site  in FXaα  to FXaβ conversion and generation of Xa33/13, plasmin‐mediated FXa fragmentation of each of the rFX mutants were  followed by plasmin  incubation  time course and Western blot analysis.  rFX (200  nM)  was  incubated  with  RVV‐X  (125  nM),  CaCl2  (10 mM),  and  LMV  (1 mM)  at  room temperature  for  a  period  of  time  optimized  for  each  mutant  to  minimize  FXaα  to  FXaβ conversion during  activation, while  still  allowing  for maximal  activation of  rFX.  The  rFXa was then incubated with plasmin (100nM) up to 30mins and samples were taken at a range of time points and immediately added to Laemmli sample buffer to stop the reaction. The samples were then run at 100ng total FX protein per lane on 10% acrylamide gels by SDS‐PAGE, transferred to PVDF membranes and Western blot analysis was  conducted as  in 2.4.3.1  to visualize  the FXa   43  fragments. A second set of activated rFX was incubated with plasmin (100 nM) in the presence of EDTA (20 mM) to observe the differing FXa fragmentation without CaCl2 (Figure 5). To  determine  which  of  the  basic  residues  in  the  β‐peptide  region  was  responsible  for binding Pg, and which of the FXa fragments could bind Pg, 125I‐Pg was used for  ligand blots on the same PVDF membranes used for Western blots. In order to have enough protein available to bind 125I‐Pg, 300ng of total FX protein per lane was loaded. Membranes were blocked overnight with bovine serum albumin (BSA; 10 mg/mL) in Tris‐buffered saline (TBS; Tris‐HCl (50 mM), NaCl (150 mM), at pH 7.4). The next day the PVDF membranes were probed with 125I‐Pg  (50nM) at room  temperature  for 1 hour.  The blots were  then washed  thrice with  TBS  and  then placed between transparencies. Sheets of XAR film (Kodak) were exposed to the membranes for up to 2‐3 weeks  in metal  film  cassettes with Quanta  III  intensifying  screens  (Dupont). The  film was developed  and  then  analysed  using  a  ChemiGenius  imaging  system.  Band  intensity  was standardized to a constant amount of nFXa for all Western and ligand blots. 2.6.2 Tissue‐type	plasminogen	activator‐mediated	plasmin	generation	To  compare  the  enhancing  ability  of  the  nFX, WTFX  and  different  rFX  β‐mutants  in  tPA‐mediated plasmin generation, the  increase of plasmin activity over time was measured using a chromogenic assay.  In a 96‐well  flat bottom plate, nFX, WTFX and  rFX  (100 nM)  in HBS/0.1% PEG‐8000 were incubated with RVV‐X (125 nM), CaCl2 (10 nM), and SUV (0.1 mM) to activate at room  temperature  for  10mins  to minimize  FXaα  to  FXaβ  conversion  during  activation.  Lys‐plasminogen  (0.5 µM) was added and then the reaction was  initiated with the addition of tPA (10 nM) and incubated up to 40 mins. At a range of time points, 10 μL samples were taken and added to 190 μL chromogenic substrate for plasmin S‐2251 (200uM substrate in HBS/PEG‐8000 and EDTA (20 mM)) and measured kinetically for 1 min at 405nm using SpectraMax microplate   44  reader  (Molecular Devices). At  the  same  time, another  set of 10  μL  samples were  taken and added to Laemmli sample buffer for Western blot analysis. Assays were done  in duplicate over three experiments and standard error of the mean and post‐hoc t‐tests comparing each group to one another were used to assess statistical significance.   	  45  3. Hyperfibrinolysis	in	Hemophilia	Patients	3.1 Overview	and	specific	goals	Enhanced  clot‐dissolving  (i.e.  fibrinolysis)  capabilities may  provide  an  explanation  for  the relative  protection  from  CVD  in  the  hemophilia  population.  This  has  led  us  to  analyze  the initiating enzyme of  fibrinolysis and  regulators of  the  fibrinolysis pathway.  tPA  initiates  fibrin clot  degradation  in  the  presence  of  a  C‐terminal  Lys‐containing  cofactor  by  activating  Pg  to plasmin (Pn). PAI‐1  is an  important tPA  inhibitor, which forms an  irreversible complex with the active site of tPA to prevent Pn generation. Activated TAFI (TAFIa) removes the C‐terminal lysine residues necessary  for Pg‐ and  tPA‐binding  to cofactors and  thus also  inhibits clot‐dissolution. Hemophilia patients generate lower levels of thrombin due to low FVIII & FIX levels. Since TAFI is activated by thrombin/thrombomodulin, it is anticipated that the hemophilia patients will have lower levels of TAFIa compared to controls. Hypothesis: To explain their lower propensity for cardiovascular disease, hemophilia patients have enhanced fibrinolysis, which reduces thrombosis.  Specific objectives are: 1. To determine whether there is a difference in specific fibrinolysis protein and activity levels between a cohort of hemophilia subjects and controls: i) tPA, ii) PAI‐1, and iii) TAFI. 2. To  determine  whether  patients  with  hemophilia  demonstrate  evidence  of  enhanced fibrinolysis activity  in  the clot  lysis assay,  in comparison  to age, gender and CV  risk  factor matched controls.     46  3.2 Results	The  clinical  characteristics  of  the  25  hemophilia  subjects  are  presented  in  Table  2.  The sample  included  a  broad  range  of  ages  with  approximately  one‐third  having  hemophilia  B (expected prevalence ~15‐20%) and 17/25 had mild‐moderate hemophilia.    Table 2: Clinical characteristics of the hemophilia patients enrolled in study Cardiovascular  risk  factors  were  used  to  match  three  control  individuals  for  each  patient. *Severity  is  classified  by  baseline  FVIII  or  FIX  level;  Mild  =  FVIII  or  FIX:  0.06‐0.40  IU/mL, Moderate = FVIII or FIX: 0.01‐0.05 IU/mL and Severe = FVIII or FIX: < 0.01 IU/mL.  3.2.1 tPA,	PAI‐1	and	TAFI	antigen	Antigen  levels of tPA, PAI‐1 and TAFI were measured  in the 25 hemophilia patient plasmas compared to 75 controls. The patient group includes both the hemophilia A and B patients and all severities. The mild and moderate severities were combined for simplicity since there were no differences between the two groups. The control group consists of three cardiovascular risk matched non‐hemophilia  individuals per patient.  IMUBIND® tPA,  IMUBIND® Plasma PAI‐1, and IMUCLONE®  TAFI  ELISA  kits were  purchased  from  American Diagnostica  (Stanford, USA)  and conducted according to the manufacturer’s protocols. There was no significant difference found between hemophilia patients  (A and B combined) and controls  for all three antigens:  tPA  (p = 0.428), PAI‐1 (p = 0.195), and TAFI (p = 0.230). Severe hemophilia patients were found to have a Age (years)  Median: 44 (IQR 37,55), Range: 24‐71 Type of Hemophilia  18 Hemophilia A, and 7 Hemophilia B *Severity of Hemophilia  12 Mild, 5 Moderate, 8 Severe Factor VIII or IX Usage (IU/kg/year)  Median: 129.5 (IQR 0,1110.5), Range: 0‐5235.5 Cardiovascular Risk Factors (Number of Patients, %) Diabetes  1, 4% Hypertension  4. 16% Elevated cholesterol  3, 12% Current smokers  3, 12% cigarette smokers, 1, 4% marijuana smoker Family History of CVD  7, 28%   47  significantly lower level of tPA Ag than the mild‐moderate patients (Mean: 2.9 ± 2.2 ng/ml, 6.0 ± 2.6 ng/ml  respectively; p < 0.01). PAI‐1 Ag was also  found  to be  significantly  lower  in  severe hemophilia  patients  compared  to mild‐moderate  patients  (Mean:  26.6  ±  6.8  ng/ml,  48.  3  ± 20.1ng/ml  respectively; p < 0.01). There was no significant difference  in TAFI Ag between  the mild‐moderate and the severe hemophilia groups (Table 3 and Figure 11).    Patient  Control  P Value (T Test) tPA Ag (ng/ml)  5.1 ± 2.7  5.7 ± 2.6  0.428 Mild‐Mod  Severe     6.0 ± 2.6  2.9 ± 2.2    Mild‐Mod vs Severe: p < 0.01 PAI‐1 Ag (ng/ml)  40.7 ± 17.9  46.4 ± 21.4  0.195 Mild‐Mod  Severe     48.3 ± 20.1  26.6 ± 6.8    Mild‐Mod vs Severe: p < 0.01 TAFI Ag (% Pooled Normal Plasma) 83.2 ± 14.8  78.0 ± 20.9  0.230 Mild‐Mod  Severe     86.6 ± 12.8  79.8 ± 18.9    Mild‐Mod vs Severe: p = 0.315  Table 3: Summary of fibrinolysis antigen results tPA, PAI‐1 and TAFI Ag were measured by ELISA and no difference was found between the patient and control groups. Severe hemophilia patients were found to have significantly  lower tPA and PAI‐1 Ag than the mild‐moderate patients.    48  Figure 11: tPA, PAI‐1, and TAFI Ag levels are normal in adult male hemophilia patients  tPA, PAI‐1, and TAFI Ag were measured using sandwich ELISA. The wells of a 96 well plate were coated with a primary antibody which captures  the Ag. A  second primary antibody,  this time conjugated to HRP binds the captured antigen.   49  *** *** 3.2.2 PAI‐1	activity	PAI‐1  Activity  was  measured  with  the  SPECTROLYSE®  PAI  Activity  kit  from  American Diagnostica  (Stanford, USA),  a  two‐stage  indirect  chromogenic  assay  conducted  according  to protocol. In the first stage, a fixed amount of tPA is added to react with PAI‐1 in the sample, and the sample is acidified to destroy α2AP. In the second stage, residual tPA activity is measured by adding  Pg  in  excess  and  using  a  chromogenic  substrate  for  Pn  to  measure  how  much  is converted by tPA. α2AP was removed in the first stage because it would bind and inhibit the Pn being generated and measured. PAI‐1 activity was significantly lower in the hemophilia patients compared  to  the  controls  assayed  (mean:  9.5  ±  7.1  IU/ml,  25.0  ±  20.9  IU/ml  respectively;  p <0.01)  (Figure  12  and  Table  4). When  stratified  according  to  severity  of  hemophilia,  PAI‐1 activity was found to be significantly  lower  in severe patients compared to patients with mild‐moderate hemophilia (Mean: 3.8 ± 2.8 IU/ml, 12.5 ± 7.3 IU/ml, respectively; p < 0.01).  Figure 12: Adult male hemophilia patients have decreased PAI‐1 activity  PAI‐1 Activity was measured using a two‐stage indirect chromogenic assay. In the first stage a fixed amount of tPA was added to react with PAI‐1 in the sample, and the sample was acidified to destroy α2AP. In the second stage, residual tPA activity was measured by adding Pg in excess and using a chromogenic substrate for Pn to measure how much is converted by tPA. α2AP was   50  removed  in  the  first  stage  because  it  would  bind  and  inhibit  the  Pn  being  generated  and measured. 3.2.3 Thrombin/thrombomodulin	 activatable	 pro‐TAFI	 and	 intrinsic	carboxypeptidase	N‐like	activity	ACTICHROME® TAFI Activity Assay kit was purchased from American Diagnostica (Standford, USA) with the  intent to measure TAFIa activity, but was found to not be properly designed for measuring only  TAFIa  activity, but  rather  for  thrombin/thrombomodulin  activatable  zymogen TAFI (pro‐TAFI). Two sets of samples are assayed simultaneously; one set is activated by adding a  recombinant  thrombin/thrombomodulin  complex,  and  the  other  is  left  unactivated. Carboxypeptidase activity  including activated TAFIa  is measured using a specific TAFI substrate from American Diagnostica.  Intrinsic Carboxypeptidase N‐like activity was measured using  the unactivated  samples,  and  the  difference  between  the  activated  and  unactivated  sets corresponds to the pro‐TAFI that  is activatable by the recombinant thrombin/thrombomodulin complex.  Thrombin/thrombomodulin activatable pro‐TAFI in the hemophilia patients was significantly lower  compared  to  the  controls  (mean: 39.6  ± 7.1  μg/ml, 44.2  ± 7.7  μg/ml  respectively; p  = 0.018). Conversely,  intrinsic  carboxypeptidase N‐like activity measured  in  the  same assay was significantly higher in the hemophilia patients compared to controls (mean: 11.9 ± 4.3 μg/ml, 7.6 ± 2.1 μg/ml respectively; p <0.01) (Figure 13 and Table 4). When stratified according to severity of  hemophilia,  patients  with  severe  hemophilia  had  significantly  lower thrombin/thrombomodulin  activatable  pro‐TAFI  compared  to  mild‐moderate  hemophilia patients  (32.4 ± 4.6  μg/ml, 42.3 ± 6.7  μg/ml  respectively; p < 0.01). There was no  significant difference  between  the  severities  of  hemophilia  in  intrinsic  carboxypeptidase  N‐like  activity (Mild‐Mod: 13.0 ± 3.1 μg/ml, Severe: 10.1 ± 7.1 μg/ml; p = 0.299)    51    Figure  13: Adult male  hemophiliacs  have  decreased  thrombin/thrombomodulin  activatable pro‐TAFI and increased intrinsic carboxypeptidase N‐like activity Two  sets  of  samples  are  assayed  simultaneously;  one  set  was  activated  by  adding  a formulated thrombin/thrombomodulin complex, and the other was  left unactivated. Activated TAFI was measured  using  a  specific  TAFI  substrate  that measures  carboxypeptidase  activity. Intrinsic carboxypeptidase N‐like activity was measured using the unactivated samples, and the difference  between  the  activated  and  unactivated  sets  corresponds  to  the  pro‐TAFI  that  is activatable by the thrombin/thrombomodulin complex.   * * ***  ***   52    Patient  Control  P Value (T Test) PAI‐1 Activity (IU/ml)  9.5 ± 7.1  25.0 ± 20.9  <0.01 Mild‐Mod  Severe     12.5 ± 7.3  3.8 ± 2.8    Mild‐Mod vs Severe:  p < 0.01 Thrombin/Thrombomodulin Activatable Pro‐TAFI (μg/ml) 39.6 ± 7.1  44.2 ± 7.7  0.018 Mild‐Mod  Severe     42.3 ± 6.7  32.4 ± 4.6    Mild‐Mod vs Severe: p < 0.01 Intrinsic Carboxypeptidase N‐like Activity (μg/ml) 11.9 ± 4.3  7.6 ± 2.1  <0.01 Mild‐Mod  Severe     13.0 ± 3.1  10.1 ± 7.1    Mild‐Mod vs Severe: p = 0.299  Table 4: Summary of fibrinolysis activity results PAI‐1 activity, activatable TAFI, and intrinsic carboxypeptidase activity were measured using American  Diagnostica  kits  according  to  manufacturer  protocols.  PAI‐1  Activity  and thrombin/thrombomodulin  activatable  pro‐TAFI  were  found  to  be  significantly  lower  in  the patients  compared  to  controls, with  the  lowest  levels  found  in  severe  patients  compared  to mild‐moderate patients.  Intrinsic carboxypeptidase N‐like activity was found to be significantly increased in patients.  3.2.4 Overall	fibrinolytic	activity	by	plasma	clot	lysis	assay	To observe overall fibrinolytic activity of hemophilia patients compared to controls, plasma lysis assays were conducted. TF‐containing Innovin at two different dilutions was used to initiate clot  formation  to allow participation of both  the  intrinsic and extrinsic  coagulation pathways. The 1  in 4,000 dilution of  Innovin contains a high TF concentration allowing one to model the FVIII  independent  extrinsic  pathway,  while  the  1  in  16,000  dilution  represents  the  FVIII dependent intrinsic pathway. A physiologically relevant concentration of tPA (75 pm) was added and Raleigh light scattering measuring clot turbidity was used to follow clot dissolution. Patient and control samples were run  in duplicate at 37°C  in 96‐well‐plates, sealed with a transparent adhesive  plastic  to  prevent  evaporation.  Clot  turbidity  was  measured  at  405  nm  using  a   53  SpectraMax microplate reader (Molecular Devices) over several days. Half‐lysis times, the time it takes  to  reach 50% clot dissolution, were calculated using Graphpad Prism 4  software  (Figure 14). Max OD represents the clot amount and structural density of the initial formed clot.   Figure 14: Plasma lysis example/Matched pair patient lyses faster than control This  is  an  example  of  a matched  pair  of  patient  and  control  results.  Clot  turbidity was measured  at  405nm  using  a  SpectraMax microplate  reader  (Molecular Devices)  over  several days. Half‐lysis  times,  the  time  it  takes  to  reach  50%  clot  dissolution, were  calculated  using Graphpad Prism 4 software.       54  There was no difference  found  in half  lysis  time nor max  clot  turbidity between plasmas clotted with 1:4000 dilution of  Innovin compared to a 1:16000 dilution  in both the hemophilia patients (1420 ± 501 mins, 1098 ± 366 mins respectively; p = 0.607)   and controls (1926 ± 491 mins,  1996  ±  642  mins,  respectively;  p  =  0.932).  A  relatively  small  sample  size  and  wide variability within both the hemophilia and control groups made it difficult to evaluate significant differences,  however  there  was  a  trend  of  hemophilia  patient  plasmas  having  enhanced fibrinolysis compared to controls  (mean: 833 ± 1188 mins, 1377 ± 1483 mins respectively; P = 0.134). 50% of patient plasmas  lysed at  least 2‐fold  faster  compared  to  controls, 39% had at least a 4‐fold enhancement, and 22% had as much as a 10‐fold enhancement. There was no significant  difference,  even  upon  detailed  analysis,  in  the  initial  clot  amount  and  structural density as represented by Max OD (mean: 0.5 ± 0.1, 0.5 ± 0.1 respectively; P = 0.209). There was also no difference between the different severities of hemophilia  in half  lysis time  (Mild‐Mod: 656 ± 923, Severe: 1387 ± 1751; p = 0.289) and Max OD (Mild‐Mod: 0.5 ± 0.1, Severe: 0.5 ± 0.1; p = 0.416). All plasma lysis data results are summarized in Figures 15 and 16, and Table 5.           55   Figure 15: Half lysis time in patients are not significantly shorter than in controls Half  lysis  times,  the  time  it  takes  to  reach  50%  clot  dissolution,  were  calculated  using Graphpad Prism 4  software. Max clot  turbidity  representing  initial clot amount and  structural density was measured by Max OD.      56   Figure 16: No significant differences  found  in half  lysis  time nor max clot  turbidity between severities of hemophilia Half  lysis  times  and Max  clot  turbidity were  calculated  as  in  Figure  15  and  stratified  by severity of hemophilia.       57    Patient  Control  P Value Innovin Dilution 1:4000  1:16000  1:4000  1:16000   Half Lysis Time (mins) 1420 ± 501  1098 ± 365  1926 ± 491  1996 ± 641  Patient: 0.607; Control: 0.932 833 ± 1188  1377 ± 1483  0.134 Mild‐Mod  Severe     656 ± 923  1387 ± 1750    Mild‐Mod Vs Severe: p = 0.289 Max OD  0.5 ± 0.1  0.6 ± 0.1  0.5 ± 0.1  0.5 ± 0.1  Patient: 0.115; Control: 0.390 0.5 ± 0.1  0.5 ± 0.1  0.209 Mild‐Mod  Severe     0.5 ± 0.1  0.5 ± 0.1    Mild‐Mod vs Severe:  p = 0.416  Table 5: Summary of plasma clot lysis results There was no significant differences  found  in half  lysis times or max OD between patients and  controls.  There  was  also  no  difference  between  the  two  dilutions  of  Innovin  which represented the involvement of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways.      58  3.3 Discussion	During the tainted blood tragedy of the 1980s and 1990s, many people who received blood products were  infected with HIV and hepatitis C. Hemophilia patients were among  those who depended on  these contaminated blood products, and  this population unfortunately  suffered great morbidity and/or  loss of  life.  In present day, the rigorous screening of blood donors and samples, as well as the use of recombinant factor replacement therapeutics instead of plasma‐derived  factors, have minimized  the  threat of pathogen  infection. We are now observing age‐related  disorders  in  hemophilia  patients  such  as  CVD,  for  which  people  with  inherited hemophilia have a decreased risk of mortality. This project has looked at markers of fibrinolysis, tPA,  PAI‐1,  and  TAFI,  as well  as  plasma  clot  lysis  in  hemophilia  patients  to  help  explain  the relative protection from CVD. 3.3.1 Effect	on	tPA,	PAI‐1,	and	TAFI	antigen	levels	 The tPA Ag levels of 5.1 ± 2.7 ng/ml and 5.7 ± 2.6ng/ml in patients and controls respectively were comparable to those previously in the literature (~5ng/ml) (1). It is unknown why there are lower  levels  of  tPA  in  patients  with  severe  hemophilia.  This  decrease  in  tPA  could  be  a compensatory response to increased bleeding risk in patients with severe hemophilia, achieved by reducing fibrinolysis. PAI‐1 Ag  levels of 40.65 ± 17.98 ng/ml and 46.39 ± 21.41 ng/ml  in patients and  controls respectively were also comparable  to  those of  reference plasma  levels published  in  literature (~26‐47ng/ml) (55‐57). It is unclear why there are lower levels of PAI‐1 Ag in severe hemophilia patients  compared  to  the  other  severities.  This  may  contribute  to  an  increased  bleeding diathesis in severe patients.    59  Quantification  of  TAFI  has  been  difficult  historically  because  of  the  lability  of  TAFIa.  The three  forms of TAFI: Pro‐TAFI, TAFIa, and TAFIai, are difficult  to measure  separately and as a result,  total  TAFI  Ag  is  measured  as  a  percentage  of  pooled  normal  plasma  (%PNP).  The conversion  from  %  PNP  (unit  of  measure  given  by  American  Diagnostica  kit)  to  μg/ml  is unknown. The TAFI Ag  levels 83.2 ± 14.8% PNP and 78.0 ± 20.9% PNP,  in patients and controls respectively,  fell  in  the  range of healthy  individuals 41‐259% PNP  (95). This  is consistent with previous  findings of normal total TAFI Ag  in hemophilia  (39). The wide range of TAFI Ag  levels found  in the  literature might be due to the ELISA kit from American Diagnostica measuring all forms of TAFI including those that have become inactive.  3.3.2 Effect	on	fibrinolysis	inhibitors:		PAI‐1,	TAFI,	and	carboxypeptidase	activity	 PAI‐1 activity of 25.0 ± 20.9 IU/ml in the controls was comparable to reference levels in the literature (~24 IU/ml) (58). PAI‐1 activity was significantly lower in the hemophilia patients at 9.5 ±  7.1  IU/ml  across  all  severities  compared  to  controls, with  the  lowest  levels  in  the  severe patients  at  3.8  ±  2.8  IU/ml.  Lower  PAI‐1  fibrinolysis  inhibitor  activity  might  contribute  to enhanced fibrinolysis in hemophilia patients. Severe patients had significantly lower levels than both the mild and moderate patients and this could also be contributing to  increased bleeding diatheses, although we did not have complete age of first bleed data, which has been found to correlate with bleeding heterogeneity (96).   This decrease  in PAI‐1 activity  in severe patients  is opposite  to what has been  found  in  the past with  regards  to hemorrhagic phenotypes  [more severe  hemorrhagic  phenotypes  (16.9  AU/L)  compared  to  mild‐moderate  hemorrhagic  (8.9 AU/L) and non‐hemophilia groups (6.5 AU/L)] (51). Thrombin/Thrombomodulin activatable pro‐TAFI in the hemophilia patients was significantly lower  compared  to  the  controls  (mean: 39.6  ± 7.1  μg/ml, 44.2  ± 7.7  μg/ml  respectively; p  =   60  0.018), and again was lowest in severe hemophilia patients at 32.4 ± 4.6 μg/ml. This decrease in pro‐TAFI in hemophilia is consistent with a previous study by Antovic et al (39). Lower levels of pro‐TAFI suggests there will be less TAFI activated and lower activity of this fibrinolysis inhibitor as well. This along with a  lower  level of PAI‐1 activity supports the hypothesis that hemophilia patients have hyperfibrinolysis due  to  less  inhibition  from  fibrinolysis  inhibitors.  In addition  to decreased  levels  of  fibrinolysis  inhibitors,  some  other  factors  that  could  contribute  to hyperfibrinolysis in hemophilia patients include:  Decreased  initial  clot  amount  ‐  lower  FVIII  and  FIX  activity,  especially  in  severe hemophilia  patients  would  lead  to  lower  generation  of  thrombin  and  thus decreased clot formation. Yet, in our experiments, max OD demonstrates that initial clot  turbidity  is  comparable  between  patients  and  controls  even  though  patient plasma was taken at therapeutic trough levels.   Weak clot structure ‐ Although clot turbidity is the same, perhaps if we visualize the patient  clots  under  a  scanning  electron  microscope  (SEM)  we  may  see  that hemophilia patients have  looser  clots of a  lower density. Other  studies  looked at clot  structure  by  SEM  in  hemophilia A  and  B  and  have  shown  that  the  clots  are porous with short, thick fibrin fibers and reduced polymerisation (97,98).   Increased Pg or Pn –  there has been no evidence of  this  in  the  literature as  these have not been measured specifically with regards to hemophilia patients.  Other cofactors  for  tPA and Pg  in  the vicinity of  the clot, such as FXa  fragments – discussed in the second project.  Grunewald  et  al  found  increased  tPA,  PAI‐1  and  TAFI  in  more  severe  hemorrhagic phenotypes within  the  severe hemophilia A  and B population  (51).   They  suggested  that  the   61  increased PAI‐1 activity is a response to their observed increased tPA antigen. The high levels of pro‐TAFI  is suggested by Grunewald et al to be a response to a greater demand for fibrinolytic inhibition  from  incomplete  clot  formation  and  associated bleeding. However, with decreased levels of  thrombin  in  severe hemophilia  there  is  less activation of TAFI  leading  to  the  loss of fibrinolytic  inhibition.  TAFI  is  also  known  to  play  an  anti‐inflammatory  role,  inhibiting  pro‐inflammatory mediators bradykinin, and complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a (99,100).  As mentioned earlier, the arbitrarily defined “intensely hemorrhage phenotype” which is based on the  number  of  joint  bleeds  (>3  joints  affected)  might  be  representative  of  a  group  with increased inflammation. Inflammation is associated with increased tPA, PAI‐1 (87) and TAFI (88), which  is  exactly what  they  observed  in  the  “intensely  hemorrhagic”  group.  Their  study was limited to a small group of patients in one clinic with confounding factors such as hepatitis C and HIV (19/21 had hepatitis C and 2 had HIV) and has not been confirmed or re‐assessed in another setting. Intrinsic  carboxypeptidase  N‐like  activity,  which  includes  both  TAFIa  and  plasma carboxypeptidase N was found to be significantly higher in the hemophilia patients compared to controls (mean: 11.9 ± 4.3 μg/ml, 7.6 ± 2.1 μg/ml respectively; p <0.01). Since zymogen TAFI was found  to be  lower  in patients,  this  increase  is  likely due  in most part  to  carboxypeptidase N (CPN) which  is  always  active  unlike  TAFI which  normally  circulates  as  a  zymogen  (101)  and spontaneously becomes inactive with a short half‐life of 10 mins. It is unclear why CPN would be increased in hemophilia while TAFI, also known as carboxypeptidase U or B2, is decreased. This could be a  compensatory effect  in hemophilia patients where CPN generation  is  increased  to take  over  the  role  of  the  lacking  carboxypeptidase  U.  While  both  have  been  shown  to significantly decrease plasminogen binding to cells at physiological plasma concentrations, only TAFIa  is able  to  inhibit whole blood clot  lysis  initiated by  tPA  (101). Thus, since CPN does not   62  inhibit clot lysis, our result of increased intrinsic carboxypeptidase activity in hemophilia patients does not contradict the conclusion of hemophiliacs having enhanced fibrinolysis due to reduced inhibition. 3.3.3 Effect	on	plasma	clot	lysis	 In the plasma clot lysis assays we looked at overall fibrinolysis activity in the hemophilia and control plasmas. Looking at the two different dilutions of Innovin allowed us to see the effect of FVIII on the rate of fibrinolysis. There was no difference between the two Innovin groups in half lysis times nor max clot turbidity  in both the hemophilia patients (p = 0.607) and controls (p = 0.932).  This  suggests  that  the  lower  level  of  FVIII  in  the  hemophilia  patients  is  sufficient  to generate the normal amount of initial clot, and that FVIII does not have an effect on fibrinolysis. Half  lysis  times  in  the hemophilia patients on average were 40%  shorter  than  in  the  controls (mean: 833 ± 1188 mins, 1377 ± 1483 mins  respectively; P = 0.134). 50% of patient plasmas lysed at  least 2‐fold  faster compared  to controls, 39% had at  least a 4‐fold enhancement, and 22%  had  as much  as  a  10‐fold  enhancement.  This  trend  supports  the  idea  that  hemophilia patients  have  enhanced  fibrinolysis, which  could  explain  their  relative  protection  from  CVD. There was  no  significant  difference  in  initial  clot  amount  and  density  as  shown  by Max OD, however  visualization with  SEM might  reveal  any  differences  in  density  of  the  clot  that  can contribute to faster clot dissolution (97,98). There was also no statistical difference between the different severities of hemophilia  in half  lysis time and Max OD, however there was a trend of mild patients having shorter lysis times. The mild patients were less likely to receive coagulation factor  replacement  or  prophylaxis,  and  this  may  be  a  reason  for  shorter  lysis  times.  Low numbers of samples and wide variation due to some patients being on coagulation replacement   63  therapy may have contributed to the lack of significant differences, but there was a visible trend in shorter lysis times in hemophilia patients compared to controls.      64  3.4 Summary	 Hemophilia patients have been shown to have a lower risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease  independent  of  their  baseline  coagulation  FVIII  or  FIX  level. We  hypothesized  that decreased  inhibition  of  fibrinolysis  or  hyperfibrinolysis  could  explain  this  relative  protection from cardiovascular disease death.  In  this  thesis,  I have evaluated  several key components of the fibrinolysis pathway, tPA, PAI‐1, and TAFI, both at the antigen and activity  levels, and also investigated  overall  fibrinolysis  by  measuring  plasma  clot  lysis.  There  were  no  significant differences  found  in  antigen  levels  for  tPA,  PAI‐1,  or  TAFI  between  hemophilia  patients  and cardiovascular risk matched‐controls. However, I have shown that there is a significant decrease in TAFI and PAI‐1 activity  in hemophilia patients. This decrease  in  fibrinolysis  inhibitor activity supports  the  hypothesis  that  hemophiliacs  have  enhanced  clot‐dissolving,  due  to  attenuated down‐regulation  of  fibrinolysis.  On  the  other  hand,  I  also  discovered  that  total  intrinsic carboxypeptidase activity, which predominantly includes plasma CPN, was higher in hemophilia patients compared to controls. The total  intrinsic carboxypeptidase activity,  is  likely comprised of mostly CPN, since  I have already shown that there are decreased  levels of zymogen TAFI  in hemophilia patients. TAFI circulates as a zymogen and once activated to TAFIa has a short half‐life of 10 mins, where it spontaneously becomes inactive. Conversely, CPN is always active; thus the  intrinsic  carboxypeptidase  activity  is  likely  due  to  the  always  active  CPN  rather  than  the short‐lived TAFIa. While both have been shown  to significantly decrease Pg binding  to cells at physiological plasma concentrations, only TAFIa is able to inhibit whole blood clot lysis initiated by  tPA  (101).  Since  CPN  does  not  inhibit  clot  lysis,  our  result  of  increased  intrinsic carboxypeptidase  activity  in  hemophilia  patients  does  not  contradict  the  conclusion  of hemophiliacs having enhanced fibrinolysis due to reduced inhibition.   65  I have also demonstrated the trend of enhanced fibrinolysis in hemophilia patients through faster plasma clot lysis in hemophilia patients than in controls. 50% of hemophilia patent plasma lysed 2‐fold faster than controls, and 22% had up to a 10‐fold enhancement. However, the small sample size and wide variation  in both sets of patients and controls might have contributed to the  lack  of  statistical  significance.  The  broad  range  of  plasma  clot  lysis  times  within  the hemophilia group alone could correlate to varying bleeding diathesis. We attempted to assess age of first clinical consequence as a measure of bleeding severity; however we were only able to gather data for five of the patients, which was insufficient to observe a correlation.  These findings suggest that lower levels of PAI‐1 activity and activatable TAFI are associated with  hyperfibrinolysis  in  hemophilia  patients.  This  is  supported  by  the  trend  toward  a more rapid fibrinolysis in hemophilia patient plasma. Overall these results suggest that independent of the severity of FVIII or FIX deficiency, hemophilia patients have enhanced fibrinolysis, a concept that requires further exploration as a potential explanation for relative protection from CVD as well as for heterogeneity in bleeding tendency.   	  66  4. Role	of	Factor	Xa	β‐peptide	Excision	in	Fibrinolysis	4.1 Overview	and	specific	goals	Previous work  in our  lab  has  shown  that  clotting  factor  Xa  (FXa)  fragments  can  serve  as cofactors for tPA that contribute to initiating plasmin generation. In particular, Pn‐mediated FXa fragments with newly exposed C‐terminal lysines, FXaβ and Xa33/13, have both been shown to enhance  fibrinolysis  in purified  fibrin  lysis  assays. My work  investigates  the  importance of  β‐peptide excision in fibrinolysis, which may be cleaved at four different basic amino acid residues by Pn, one of which is an arginine. Hypothesis: i)The β‐peptide, when cleaved at C‐terminal lysine (Lys), will be an effective auxiliary cofactor and enhance  fibrinolysis;  ii) The β‐peptide, when cleaved at C‐terminal arginine  (Arg) will not be an effective auxiliary cofactor given  that Arg only weakly binds  to Pg compared  to Lys;  iii)  If prevented from being excised, FXaα will not provide auxiliary cofactor activity unless cleaved by Pn at K330 to Xa33/13 (or elsewhere) exposing a C‐terminal lysine. Specific objectives are: 1. To determine  the  role of  the  four basic amino acid  residues  (K427, R429, K433, K435)  in FXaα to FXaβ conversion by plasmin in the presence or absence of aPL and EDTA  2. To  generate  the  “KR4βQ” mutant  that will  lack  all  four  basic  amino  acid  residues  for  β peptide cleavage to evaluate the requirement for β peptide excision in Xa33/13 generation; and  3. To generate  “R429K” mutant which will have  the Arg429  residue  changed  to  Lys,  leaving only Lys as a possible cleavage site for β peptide excision, and thus will only produce FXaβ with C‐terminal Lys.    67  4. To  quantify  the  function  and  compare  FXaα  (KR4βQ mutant),  FXaβ  with  C‐terminal  Lys (R429K), and FXaβ with C‐arginine (K3βQ) in: i. Xa40 or Xa33/13 generation by plasmin in the presence or absence of aPL & EDTA ii. Participation in fibrinolysis:  Pg binding, and Pg activation/Pn generation  4.2 Results	4.2.1 Molecular	biology	of	factor	X	4.2.1.1 Site‐directed	mutagenesis	and	expression	of	FX	mutants	 The seven FX mutants studied in this project were made through the combined efforts of Dr. Mitra Panahi, a former postdoctoral fellow in our laboratory, Dr. Amanda Vanden Hoek, former PhD student from our laboratory, and me (Figure 17). Initial DNA work for the four single point mutants  changing  Lys  or  Arg,  to  Gln  (K427Q,  R429Q,  K433Q,  and  K435Q), was  done  by  Dr. Panahi, and expression by Dr. Vanden Hoek and myself. Gln was chosen as a substitute, instead of the common Ala, to neutralize the basic residue positive charge so that size of the side chain could be preserved. DNA work for the triple point mutant changing the three Lys to Gln (K3βQ) was done by Dr. Vanden Hoek and expression was done by both of us. I completed all DNA and expression  work  for  the  fifth  single  point  mutant  altering  Arg429  to  Lys  (R429K)  and  the quadruple point mutant changing all four basic residues to Gln (KR4βQ), and also transfected a new  set of WTFX  clones  to  try  to  improve  the  activation  yield. DNA  from  six of  each of  rFX transfected (R429K and KR4βQ) were sequenced and a query was conducted with a basic  local alignment  search  tool  (BLAST)  for  FX  amino  acid  sequence using  Protein BlastX.  5 of  6 were successfully changed in each set (Table 6).   68  Figure 17: Factor Xa Mutants  Mutants Available From Pryzdial Lab Members: Single Point β Mutants ‐ K427Q, R429Q K433Q, or K435Q Each  have  one  of  the  basic  residues replaced  by  glutamine  (Q)  so  that  it cannot  be  cleaved  by  Pn  at  that  point (i.e.,  only  cleaves  after  the  other  three basic  residues). Through  this we can  find out whether one particular basic  residue specifically affects cleavage by Pn and the resulting tPA auxiliary cofactor activity. K3βQ Mutant All three Lys are replaced by Q, so that the only FXaβ  formed  by  Pn  cleavage  results  in  C‐terminal arginine (Arg) at residue 429. This will determine whether C‐terminal Arg also has tPA auxiliary cofactor activity, or  if Lys  is absolutely necessary for this function.  Mutants Generated For This Project: KR4βQ Mutant – stabilized α All  four of  the basic  residues  are  replaced by glutamine, thus preventing β peptide excision. This mutant will show whether the FXaα form can  confer  auxiliary  cofactor  activity,  and whether  β  peptide  excision  is  necessary  for Xa33/13 generation. R429K Mutant The  Arg  429  is  replaced  by  Lys,  leaving only Lys as a possible  cleavage  site  for  β peptide  excision,  and  thus  any  cleavage that produces  FXaβ will  give  rise  to  a C‐terminal  Lys.  This  mutant  may consequently have enhanced tPA cofactor activity compared to WTFXa. FXaα Gla Protease                     βK427, R429, K433, K435FXaβ Gla Protease                     βR429FXaβ Gla Protease                     βK427, K429, K433, K435FXaβ Gla Protease                     β  69  Mutant  Wild‐Type Amino Acid Sequence rFX Amino Acid Sequence  Success? Arg429Lys (R429K)  TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTKGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK Yes VTRFKDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVIT VTRFKDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTKGLPKAKSHAPEVIT Yes  No F10 sequence found with BLAST query No KDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPL KDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTKGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPL Yes QGDSGGPHVTRFKDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPK RGTAGARTSPASRTKYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAPLKWIDRSMKTKGLPQ Yes DTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK DTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTKGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK Yes Lys427Gln/Arg429Gln/ Lys433Gln/Lys435Gln (KR4βQ) TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMQTQGLPQAQSHAPEVITSSPLK Yes GPHVTRFKDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSH GPHVTRFKDTYFVTGIFSWGEGCAPKGKKTIFTSVSTFFLWI*RFM*NQFLFHANKH No VTRFKDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVIT VTRFKDTYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMQTQGLPQAQSHADPGLA Yes TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMQTQGLPQAQSHAPEVITSSPLK Yes TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMQTQGLPQAQSHAPEVITSSPLK Yes TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMKTRGLPKAKSHAPEVITSSPLK TYFVTGIVSWGEGCARKGKYGIYTKVTAFLKWIDRSMQTQGLPQAQSHAPEVITSSPLK Yes   70  Table 6: Sequencing Results of FX mutant DNA rFX mutant DNA was extracted with QIAprep spin miniprep kit  (Qiagen  ‐ Ontario, Canada) and sequenced. The DNA sequences were aligned for amino acid sequence using Protein Blast X on the PubMed website.   4.2.1.2 Clone	selection	 Several clone colonies of each  rFX were  isolated and grown  to ~80% confluence and  then serum deprived  in expression media  for protein production. Conditioned media was collected and analyzed by Western blot to quantify the FX antigen expressed for each clone. A standard curve of  titrated purified FX was used  to quantify antigen based on densitometry  (Figure 18). Factor Xa  clotting activity  for each  clone was estimated using  two  standard  curves of normal plasma  and  normal  FX  with  known  specific  activity  (HTI),  and  PT  measured  with  the  ST4 coagulation analyzer (Diagnostica Stago). Specific activity (units/mg) was used to represent the amount of  functional protein present  for each clone. This specific activity was calculated with the activity in units/ml from PT divided by FX antigen in mg/ml quantified by Western blot. For each mutant,  two  to  three clones were selected  that displayed a combination of high antigen production  and  high  specific  activity  for  large  scale  expression  and  purification  for  future experiments (Figure 19).     71  Figure 18: FX antigen in media was quantified by densitometry rFX mutants were expressed in transfected HEK 293 cells. rFX protein was collected in media and measured by quantitative Western blot analyses. A representative standard curve is shown after densitometry of titrated purified FX.       72   Figure 19: rFX clones were selected for high specific activity and antigen production rFX protein in media from each clone was  quantified by Western blot analysis and densitometry as in Figure 18. FXa activity was measured by prothrombin time assay. Specific activity was then calculated  from  the antigen and activity  for each clone. Two  to  three clones  for each mutant that  demonstrated  high  antigen  production  and  high  specific  activity, with  emphasis  on  the latter,  were  selected  for  large  scale  expression  and  purification  for  experiments  (circled  in green)      73  4.2.1.3 Large‐scale	expression	and	purification	of	FX	mutants	by	binding	to	anionic	phospholipid	vesicles	 Once  clones were  selected, production of each was  scaled up. To purify  functional WTFX and rFX β‐mutants from the conditioned media, we took advantage of the selective interaction of aPL with only a  fully  functional  γ‐glutamyl carboxylated Gla domain of FX. This allowed  the incompletely carboxylated form to be separated from the properly modified protein (Figure 20). Although variable for each clone, as much as 50% was not activatable by RVV‐X prior to removal by this aPL purification methodology.   Figure 20: rFX Purification by functional affinity binding to aPL rFX protein  in media was purified by  functional binding  to aPL. The Western blot shows a standard  of  purified  nFX  and  an  example  of  a  rFX  purification  at  each  step  protocol  after equilibration with aPL in the presence of CaCl2. The centrifugal supernatant washes were in the presence of CaCl2 and the final purified rFX was released into the supernatant with EDTA.      74  4.2.2 rFX	Procoagulant	function	4.2.2.1	RVV‐X	activation	of	rFX		 The purified WTFX and  rFX mutants, and nFX were  treated with RVV‐X  in  the presence of CaCl2 and aPL, and samples were taken at specific time points for Western blot analysis to follow the kinetics of activation.  Interestingly, mutation of  the  β‐peptide  cleavage  site was  found  to alter the efficiency of activation peptide excision by RVV‐X  (Figure 21). The K427Q and R429Q mutants showed WT‐like activation by RVV‐X. Compared to the other mutants, K433Q, K435Q, and quadruple point mutant KR4βQ,  resulted  in delayed excision of  the activation peptide by RVV‐X. There is no plasmin present in this experiment, thus any FXaα to FXaβ conversion is due to autoproteolysis alone. Comparison of the rate of FXaα to FXaβ conversion  is complicated by the differing rates of RVV‐X activation among the rFX mutants. Negative control KR4βQ mutant with all four possible β‐peptide excision sites changed to Gln remained in α‐form throughout the experiment. K3βQ mutant, with only R429 available for β‐peptide cleavage also remained in the α form suggesting that there is no autoproteolytic cleavage at R429. Thus, it was concluded that there  is no  autoproteolysis occurring  at  any  site other  than  the  three  Lys  K427,  K433,  K435. These  data  not  only  demonstrated  an  effect  of  the  β‐peptide  on  cleavage  of  the  activation fragment, but also established experimental parameters to treat the rFX with RVV‐X to optimize conversion to FXaα with minimal FXaβ to subsequently study the effects on plasmin‐mediated cleavage. 4.2.2.2	rFX	specific	activity	 The specific activity was derived using PT assays and antigen quantification for each of nine rFX  produced.  The WTFX  clone  that  was  selected,  had  comparable  specific  activity  to  nFX. Similar  to excision of  the activation  fragment by RVV‐X, mutation of  the  β‐fragment  cleavage   75  site  affected  FX  activity  in  the  PT  assay.  R429Q,  K427Q,  and  R429K  were  found  to  have somewhat  higher  specific  activities  than  nFX  and WTFX  by  as much  as  1.5‐fold  for  R429Q. Conversely, K435Q and KR4βQ appeared to be significantly  inhibited with only 10% PT activity compared to nFX (Figure 22).      76         Figure  21:  Mutation  of  the  β‐peptide  cleavage  site  affects  excision  of  the  activation peptide by RVV‐X FX was  treated with RVV‐X  in  the  presence of CaCl2  and  aPL.  Samples were  analysed by Western blot using a FX antibody. A. A sample Western blot of nFX demonstrating the cleavage of FX to FXaα and FXaβ. B. Western blot slices showing FX of all rFX mutants and plasma derived nFX. C. Western blot slices showing FXaα and FXaβ bands of all rFX mutants and nFX.    A B  C  77              Figure 22: Specific activity of final selected clones One clone of each mutant was selected and activity was measured by PT assays as in Figure 19.  The lower panel shows Western blot of the rFX from collected media used for quantification and demonstrating lack of FXa and other fragments. rFX antigen was measured using an average of four lanes (only one of four shown) with the same volume of media loaded for each mutant.    137 122.7166.278.418.0204.1187.777.711.3050100150200250nFXwtFXK427QK433QK435QR429QR429KK3βQKR4βQpCMV4FX Specific Activity (units/mg)  78   4.2.3 rFX	fibrinolytic	function	 4.2.3.1 	Plasmin‐mediated	cleavage	and	Lys‐plasminogen	binding	 Each of the activated rFX mutants  (200 nM) were  incubated with plasmin  (100 nM) under two conditions to observe the diverse FXa cleavage products that may arise: one in the presence of CaCl2 (10 mM) and aPL (1 mM), and another in the presence of EDTA (20 mM) and aPL (1 mM) (Figure  5).  Plasmin  digestion  time  courses  on  rFX  after  RVV‐X  pre‐treatment  for  the  optimal times determined above in media were subjected to Western blot analysis with 100ng total FX per  lane  (Figure 23). FXaα  to FXaβ conversion  results almost exclusively  in  these experiments from  Pn‐mediated  β‐peptide  excision  rather  than  autoproteolysis  (102).  KR4βQ  which  was designed to have no basic residues available  for cleavage  in the β‐peptide region remained as intact FXaα after 30mins. These blots also  showed  that  the  triple point mutant, K3βQ, which only  has  R429  available  for  cleavage, was  also  resistant  to  FXaβ  production, with  only  8‐9% conversion of  the FXaα after 30mins,  indicating  that  the R429  residue  is a highly unfavorable plasmin  cleavage  site. Of  the  single point mutants,  K435Q  FXaα persisted  the  longest  during plasmin treatment, suggesting that K435 is the preferred cleavage site in the presence of CaCl2 and aPL. Unexpectedly, the R429K mutant was the most susceptible to autoproteolytic cleavage of FXaα with ~40% already as FXaβ at 0 mins, meaning it converted during the initial treatment with  RVV‐X.  Neither  of  the  K3βQ  and  KR4βQ  mutants  generated  the  Xa33  fragment  after 30mins, and all of the other rFX mutants generated less Xa33 than nFX, indicating a prerequisite for β‐peptide removal prior to Xa33/13 production.      79           Figure 23: In the presence of CaCl2 and aPL, K435 is the prevalent Pn cleavage site  Activated rFX mutants (200 nM) in media were incubated with Pn (100 nM) in the presence of CaCl2 (10 mM) and aPL (1 mM). Samples were taken at specific time points and Western blot analyses were conducted using antibody to FX and scanned by densitometry. 100 ng of total FX is  loaded  into each  lane.   A. A sample blot of nFX demonstrating the cleavage of FXaα to FXaβ and Xa33. B. Western blot slices showing FXaα and FXaβ of all rFX mutants and plasma derived nFX. C. Western blot slices showing Xa33 of all rFX mutants and nFX.   A B  C  80  To  correlate  Pn‐mediated  rFXa  fragments  to  function  in  the  fibrinolysis  pathway,  125I‐Pg (50nM) binding was followed by ligand blotting with 300ng total FX per lane (Figure 24). Three‐times  the  previous  amount  of  FX  (as  in  Figure  23) was  used  in  order  to  visualize  the  125I‐Pg binding.  FXaβ fragments in all the mutants bound 125I‐Pg. In the presence of CaCl2 and aPL, the K435Q mutant showed a delay  in the disappearance of FXaα and subsequent Xa33 production and also revealed the least intense signal of 125I‐Pg binding of all the single point mutations. The R429Q mutant showed delayed Xa33 production and appeared to have the greatest amount of 125I‐Pg  bound  to  FXaβ.  Xa33  also  bound  125I‐Pg  for  all  the mutants,  with  K435Q  and  K3βQ revealing the least intense signal, although a proportionately high amount of Xa33 antigen was present for the former. Curiously the KR4βQ mutant, which has all four basic residues changed to Gln to prevent FXaα to FXaβ conversion, had a 125I‐Pg‐binding fragment that appeared to be the same size as FXaα on blot analysis, as well as a 125I‐Pg‐binding Xa33 fragment that did not appear in the unpurified plasmin digests. FXaα did not bind Pg in nFX, WTFX or any of the other mutants.  Under plasmin  incubation conditions  in the presence of EDTA, none of the FXa  fragments bound appreciably  to 125I‐Pg. The K3βQ mutant with only R429 available  for cleavage, showed FXaβ production. R429K demonstrated FXaβ production and  trace amounts of  125I‐Pg binding. There were also trace amounts of 125I‐Pg binding to a fragment of similar size to FXaα in KR4βQ. The R429Q mutant, which lacked the R429 cleavage site, was also able to generate FXaβ in the presence of EDTA, however there was still undetectable 125I‐Pg binding       81      A BC  82                     Figure 24: FXaβ and Xa33 fragments bind 125I‐Pg  RVV‐X‐treated rFX mutants (200 nM) were incubated with plasmin (100 nM) in the presence of CaCl2 (10 mM) and aPL (1 mM), or in the presence of EDTA (20 mM) and aPL (1 mM). Samples were  taken at specific  time points and  125I‐Pg was used  for  ligand blot. Western blot analyses were conducted simultaneously using a FX antibody. 300 ng of FX was loaded into each lane. A. A sample set of Western blots (WB) and 125I‐Pg ligand blots demonstrating the cleavage of FXaα to FXaβ and Xa33 or Xa40 in the presence of CaCl2 or EDTA. B. WB and 125I‐Pg ligand blot slices showing FXaα and FXaβ of all rFX mutants and plasma derived nFX demonstrating Pg binding in D E   83  the  presence  of  CaCl2  and  aPL.  C. WB  and  125I‐Pg  ligand  blot  slices  showing  Xa33  of  all  rFX mutants and nFX demonstrating Pg binding in the presence of CaCl2 and aPL. D. WB and 125I‐Pg ligand blot slices showing FXaα and FXaβ of all rFX mutants and nFX demonstrating Pg binding in the  presence  of  EDTA  and  aPL.  E. WB  slices  showing  FXaα  and  FXaβ  of  all  rFX mutants  and plasma derived nFX and  125I‐Pg  ligand blot demonstrating Pg binding  in  the presence of EDTA and aPL.  4.2.3.2 Effect	of	β‐peptide	cleavage	site	mutation	on	tissue‐type	plasminogen	activator‐mediated	plasmin	generation	 To compare the auxiliary cofactor activity of the nFXa, WTFXa and rFXa β‐peptide cleavage site mutants  in  tPA‐mediated plasmin generation, FX  (100 nM) was pre‐activated with RVV‐X (125 nM) as above, and then Lys‐Pg (0.5 µM) was added. The reaction was initiated with tPA (10 nM). Samples were evaluated in a chromogenic assay for Pn and by Western blot for FX antigen at the indicated times (Figure 25).  The greatest difference in Pn generation between WTFXa and several  rFXa mutants was  seen  at  the  30 min  time  point.  The  R429K mutant was  found  to significantly enhance plasmin generation by ~30% compared to WTFX after 30 (p = 0.01). KR4βQ was also found to further enhance plasmin generation compared to WTFX by ~45% at 30mins (p = 0.04). K435Q mutant showed decreased Pn generation compared to WTFX, showing ~20% at 30 mins  (p  = 0.01). Western blot  analysis on  these plasmin  generation  time  courses  showed K435Q was the slowest at converting FXaα to FXaβ with only 73% of total FX still remaining  in FXaα form by 30 mins (Figure 26).      84             Figure 25: R429K & KR4βQ have increased plasmin generation A. Western blot showing equal amounts of initial nFX, WTFX, and rFX Ag. B. FX (100 nM) was pre‐treated  with  RVV‐X  (125  nM)  in  the  presence  of  CaCl2  (10  nM),  and  SUV  (0.1  mM)  at  room temperature for 10 mins. Lys‐Pg (0.5 µM) was added and Pn generation  initiated with tPA (10 nM).  At  indicated times plasmin activity was measured using a chromogenic assay. The  left panel shows rFXa mutants  that  demonstrated  wild‐type  like  enhancement  of  Pn  generation  compared  to  no cofactor.  The  right  panel  shows  rFXa  mutants  that  showed  different  levels  of  enhancement compared to wild‐type. C. Pn generated at the 30 min time point which demonstrates the greatest variation among the rFX compared to WTFX. The asterisk (*) indicates significance of p < 0.05. C A B ***  85    Figure 26: Western blots from plasmin generation Samples  from  the plasmin activity assay  in Figure 25 were evaluated by Western blot analysis and quantified by densitometry.       86  4.3 Discussion	Pn‐mediated  cleavage  of  FXa  produces  fragments  FXaβ  and  Xa33/13  which  have  newly exposed C‐terminal Lys that accelerate tPA in purified fibrin clot lysis assays. However, in plasma clot  lysis, Xa33/13  is rapidly degraded and  loses this fibrinolytic function. Thus,  it appears that FXaβ is the fragment that is important for tPA auxiliary cofactor activity in vivo. The exact site of β‐peptide excision is currently unknown, and this project has looked at the role of the four basic amino acid residues potentially cleaved to generate FXaβ; K427, R429, K433 or K435. 4.3.1 Effect	on	activation	peptide	cleavage	 RVV‐X activation  time courses of  the nFX, WTFX, and  rFX  revealed  that activation peptide excision is affected by mutation of the β‐peptide cleavage site. RVV‐X binds at Ala417 to Leu431 on FX, which includes the β‐peptide residues K427 and R429 (103). However, mutation of these two residues in the K427Q and R429Q mutants had no effect on RVV‐X activation compared to wild‐type. The mutants  that did have an effect were  the K433Q, K435Q, and quadruple point mutant KR4βQ, which caused delayed activation peptide excision by RVV‐X. This suggests that the K433 and K435 sites may play a role in RVV‐X binding site and thus on FX activation. There is no plasmin  present  in  this  experiment,  thus  any  α  to  β  conversion  is due  to  autoproteolysis alone. Comparison of the rate of FXaα to FXaβ conversion  is complicated by the differing rates of  RVV‐X  activation  among  the  rFX mutants.  As  predicted,  the  KR4βQ mutant with  all  four possible  β‐peptide  excision  sites  changed  to  Q  remained  in  the  α  form  throughout  the experiment. The K3βQ mutant, with only R429 available for β‐peptide cleavage also remained in the α form suggesting that there is no autoproteolytic cleavage at R429. Thus, it was concluded that autoproteolysis may occur at Lys K427, K433, K435, but not at R429 in the presence of CaCl2 and aPL.    87  4.3.2 Effect	on	specific	activity	 PT assays and antigen quantification were used to derive specific activity in the nFX, WTFX, and rFX. The WTFX clone selected had similar specific activity to nFX. Mutation of the β‐peptide cleavage site was  found  to affect  the  specific activity of FX when clotting was  initiated by TF. R429Q, K427Q, and R429K mutants were found to have higher specific activities than nFX and WTFX with  the greatest at 1.5  fold  in R429Q. Conversely, K435Q and KR4βQ was  significantly inhibited with only 10% PT activity compared to nFX. This suggests that K435 plays an important role in FX procoagulant activity. Since these proteins were purified based on affinity for aPL, it is presumed that the extent of γ‐carboxylation  is comparable for each. Interestingly,  it should be noted that this novel method excluded a large proportion of the rFX that could not be activated by RVV‐X (not shown) and solved a significant technical challenge for this project. 4.3.3 Effect	on	β‐peptide	excision,	Xa33	generation	and	125I‐Pg	binding	 The conversion of FXaα to FXaβ in the Pn‐mediated cleavage time courses results from both Pn‐mediated  β‐peptide  excision  and  autoproteolysis  by  FXaα  and  FXaβ  (102).  However  the efficacy  of  Pn  is  3  orders  of magnitude  higher  than  autoproteolysis  and  the  relatively  high concentration of Pn used (2:1 FX:Pn ratio) ensured that β‐peptide cleavage was due to Pn. The KR4βQ mutant,  designed  to  have  no  basic  residues  available  for  cleavage  in  the  β‐peptide region, remained  in the  intact FXaα form after 30mins  in presence of aPL and CaCl2. The triple point mutant, K3βQ, which only has R429 available for Pn cleavage, was also resistant to FXaβ production,  with  only  8‐9%  conversion  of  the  FXaα  after  30mins,  indicating  that  the  R429 residue  is a highly unfavorable plasmin cleavage site. R429Q showed delayed Xa33 production and had the greatest amount of 125I‐Pg bound to FXaβ. These observations together suggest that R429 β cleavage site  is maintained  in a configuration  that  is protected  from proteolysis  in  the   88  presence  of  aPL  and  CaCl2.  Furthermore,  changing  the  unfavourable  R429  to  a  Lys  in  R429K produced a hypercleavable mutant that appeared to be the most susceptible to autoproteolytic cleavage with  approximately  40%  of  FXa  already  in  FXaβ  at  the  initial  time‐course  sampling point, having converted during  the  initial RVV‐X  treatment  in media when no Pn was present (Figure 23).  Of all the single point mutants, K435Q had the highest proportion of FXaα remaining by 30 mins  in  the  presence  of  aPL  and  CaCl2.  This was  consistent with  less  overall  125I‐Pg  binding compared  to  the other mutants. This persistence of FXaα  suggests  that K435  is  the preferred site of cleavage when FXa  is bound to aPL. In agreement with this conclusion, a previous study published only as an abstract over 2 decades ago  suggested  that K435  is  the probable major autolytic cleavage site in the production of FXaβ (104).  FXa  fragments, FXaβ and Xa33/13, have been previously shown  to bind Pg and C‐terminal Arg does not bind Pg. (23,25,26). The R429Q mutant is unavailable for plasmin cleavage at R429. Interestingly,  although  similar  to  R429Q  there  was  FXaβ  evident  during  the  experiment  for K433Q and K435Q, the correlation of 125I‐Pg binding differed for R429Q, which was observed to persist for 30 min. This may suggest that while the initial FXaβ for the other mutants had a Pg‐binding C‐terminal Lys, such as K435 or K433, a subsequent cleavage exposed R429 to disable this function as shown by the loss of 125I‐Pg to FXaβ in K433Q, K435Q, and even nFX. At present we do not have a way to test this hypothesis without a double point mutation. Nevertheless, the K3βQ data suggest that R429 is a poor Pn cleavage site for β‐peptide excision in the presence of aPL and CaCl2. The  cleavage of K435 excises a  large O‐linked  carbohydrate and  consequently exposes  R429  for  subsequent  β‐peptide  cleavage  (105‐107).  The  exact  site  of  O‐linkage  is unknown, but  the possible sites: serine 436, Ser 444, Ser445, or Thr443; are all C‐terminus  to   89  K435. The hypothesis that O‐linked carbohydrate causes steric hindrance to R429 cleavage can be  tested  in  the  future  using O‐glycosidase  to  remove  the  carbohydrate  on  FXaα.  This may change  Pn  cleavage  preference.  Commercial  concanavalin A  Jack‐bean  lectin  linked  to  biotin (108), which binds  the specific carbohydrates on  the β‐peptide would be used  to monitor  the deglycosidation. As a positive  control, we would expect  that only FXaα binds  to  the  lectin as FXaβ would have lost the O‐linked carbohydrate upon β‐peptide excision.    In addition to effects on FXaβ production, the mutations we studied affected subsequent cleavage  to  generate  Xa33/13.  In  the  plasmin  digest  experiments  using  rFX  in media,  all  rFX generated  less  Xa33/13  than  nFX  and  K3βQ  and  KR4βQ  did  not  produce  Xa33/13  fragments (Figure 23). From  this  the general conclusion  is  that β‐peptide cleavage  facilitates subsequent K330 cleavage producing Xa33. However, in the purified experiments in which we loaded more protein  in  the gel  for WB, the Xa33 band was visible  (Figure 24). There  is nevertheless a clear delay in 125I‐Pg binding to Xa33 from 1 min to 5 min in the K3βQ and KR4βQ suggesting that our initial conclusion was correct. K3βQ and KR4βQ had delayed Xa33 production consistent with inhibited  FXaβ  production.  Thus,  β‐cleavage  is  required  for  K330  cleavage.  The  K435Q  and R429Q mutants also had delayed Xa33‐binding to 125I‐Pg. The KR4βQ was designed  to  replace all  four available β‐peptides with non‐cleavable sites, thus stabilizing the FXaα‐form. FXaα does not bind to Pg as shown for nFX and in previous work by our lab (23,25,26).However, the FXaα that is derived from KR4βQ unexpectedly was found to bind to 125I‐Pg. There are two basic residues that might be responsible for a new fragment close to the β‐peptide region: K420 and R424. However a cleavage at one of these sites would result in a smaller fragment predicted to run lower than FXaβ on SDS‐PAGE, not comparable to FXaα. The more  feasible  explanation  is predicted  from  the  cDNA  sequence of  the  F10  gene, which   90  suggests that FXaα is anticipated to have a C‐terminal Lys (K448) (109,110). This has previously been  suggested  to be excised by  carboxypeptidases upon  secretion  from  cells  into plasma  to account  for  the  lack of Pg‐ binding  to nFXaα and nFX  (21,23,24). The constructs used here  to produce  rFX  indeed  encode  for  this C‐terminal  Lys.  The mutations  in KR4βQ may prevent  its excision  in  cell  culture  by  endogenous  enzymes  and  be  responsible  for  the  observed  lack  of interaction with 125I‐Pg.  In  the presence of  EDTA, none of  the  single point Gln mutations, WTFX or  nFX  plasmin‐mediated FXaβ that were produced bound significantly to 125I‐Pg, until R429 was mutated to Lys. Since  all mutants produced  still  enabled production of  FXaβ,  this observation  suggested  that R429  is the preferred Pn cleavage site  in the absence of aPL‐binding (Figure 4). In this context, aPL  could  be  localizing  the  fibrinolytic  role  of  FXa  and  acting  as  an  allosteric  transmolecular switch altering the cleavage site at the β‐locus from R429 to K435 providing fibrinolytic function only when aPL is exposed and providing a procoagulant surface (Figure 28). K3βQ with only R429 available produced FXaβ with trace amounts of 125I‐Pg binding. R429K  is  likely being cleaved at the  K429  site which  is  responsible  for  the  125I‐Pg  to  FXaβ  here.  Curiously  the R429Q mutant which has no R429 available produced a FXaβ, but had no 125I‐Pg binding. This suggests that an unpredicted Arg was cleaved rather than one of the three Lys, to account for the lack of 125I‐Pg binding. One possibility is that an additional site at nearby R424 may be involved when multiple mutations are introduced. This FXaβ could be from the suggested alternative Arg cleavage site, or is actually one of the expected Lys FXaβ in an orientation on the PVDF membrane with the Lys blocked  from  Pg  binding.  More  rigorous  solution  phase  studies  are  required  with  a homogeneous  orientation  of  FXaβ  with  C‐termini  exposed  for  binding  such  as  with  surface plasmon resonance experiments as done in the Pryzdial lab in the past (26,27).  For the KR4βQ   91  mutant,  the  FXaα  C‐terminal  Lys  K448 may  account  for  125I‐Pg‐binding,  as  also  suggested  to explain the experiment conducted in the presence of CaCl2. 4.3.4 Effect	on	plasmin	generation	   The tPA‐mediated plasmin generation experiments showed the tPA cofactor activity of the rFX mutants. The greatest effect of β‐peptide mutation on Pn generation was seen at the 30 min time point. R429K was designed to better understand the fibrinolytic enhancing function of FXa by changing the non‐Pg‐binding Arg into a Lys that could potentially bind Pg or tPA. The R429K mutant was found to significantly enhance plasmin generation by approximately 30% compared to WTFX (p = 0.01). Interestingly, the KR4βQ, which was not originally expected to have any Pg‐binding properties, was also found to further enhance plasmin generation compared to WTFX by 45% at 30mins (p = 0.04). K435Q showed reduced Pn generation compared to WTFX by 20% at 30  mins  (p  =  0.01),  but  still  enhanced  Pn  generation  compared  to  no  cofactor.  This  was consistent  with  the  Western  blot  analysis  on  these  plasmin  generation  time  courses  that showed K435Q also was the slowest at FXaα to FXaβ conversion with 73% of total FX remaining as FXaα by 30 mins (Figure 26). nFX, WTFX and all of the rFX mutants enhanced Pn generation compared  to  the  no  cofactor  control.  This  suggests  that  Xa33  generation  at  least  partially rescues C‐terminal Lys accessibility that was  lost due to K435Q mutation, which was slower  in FXaβ generation, to also enhance Pn generation.   The C‐terminal  Lys on  FXaβ enables Pg  receptor and  tPA  cofactor  function  in  fibrinolysis. There are  several Pg  receptors,  such as annexin A2  tetramer and Plg‐RKT  (111‐114),  that have been  reported  to activate Pg  to Pn and protect Pn  from  inhibitors  (115,116). However,  these have been predominantly  cell associated and  likely affect Pn  generation  in  tissue  remodeling rather than its fibrinolytic role. The Pg/Pn pathway is not just involved in fibrinolysis, but in cell   92  invasion and extracellular matrix  turnover as well  (117‐119). Common  to all  the Pg  receptors, including  FXa  fragments,  is  the  localization  of  the  Pg  and  activator  tPA  to  focus  the  Pn proteolytic activity only to the immediate environment.      93  4.4 Summary	 The auxiliary cofactor model of fibrinolysis (Figure 3) proposed by our  lab suggests that FX proteolytic fragments, FXaβ and Xa33/13, enhance fibrin clot dissolution by providing C‐terminal Lys   binding  sites  for sites Pg and  tPA  localized  to  the clot. These participate  in  fibrinolysis  to initially  increase  the  generation  of  Pn  by  tPA.  Both  FXaβ  and  Xa33/13  have  been  shown  to enhance  fibrinolysis  in purified  fibrin experiments, however,  in plasma  there  is no effect  from Xa33/13  (unpublished).  This  suggests  that  there  is  a  mechanism  in  plasma  that  rapidly inactivates Xa33/13 and FXaβ  is the predominant tPA accelerator. Prior to the work conducted comprising the current thesis, the site(s) of cleavage leading to β‐peptide excision was unknown, with  four possibilities: K427, R429, K433, and K435.  I  investigated  the  role of  these  four basic residues  in  FXaα  to  FXaβ  conversion  and  subsequent  participation  in  fibrinolysis  through mutagenesis and  followed, Pn‐mediated cleavage,  radiolabelled Pg binding, and  tPA‐mediated Pn generation. Our prior work demonstrated  that Pn and autoproteolysis may either produce FXaβ, although the former is many orders of magnitude on a molar basis more effective.  I demonstrated that mutating individual residues to Gln to prevent cleavage did not prevent Pn‐mediated FXaβ production, suggesting  that all  four can play a role  in β‐peptide excision  to varying degrees. K435Q, mutation  resulted  in persistence of FXaα when  treated with Pn. The loss  of  rapid  C‐terminal  Lys  accessibility  in  the  K435Q  mutant  was  reflected  by  decreased binding  to  125I‐Pg. These  results  suggest  that K435  is  the preferred  site  for Pn‐mediated FXaβ production under conditions that favour aPL‐binding On the other hand, R429Q demonstrated the greatest amount of 125I‐Pg binding to FXaβ and the R429K mutant was able to convert FXaα to FXaβ more quickly by autoproteolysis  than  the other rFX mutants and both FXaα and FXaβ bound 125I‐Pg. The K3βQ mutant, which only had the R429 site available for plasmin cleavage in   94  this  region was  the slowest  to produce FXaβ and did not bind  125I‐Pg. These  findings  together suggest that the R429 is an unfavourable plasmin cleavage site in the presence of aPL and CaCl2 and confirms that C‐terminal Arg is likely the basis for lack of binding previously observed when FXaβ  is  produced  in  the  absence  of  CaCl2  (23,25,26).  When  rFX,  K3βQ  and  KR4βQ  were converted to FXa and treated with Pn, they did not produce Xa33/13 fragments. This suggests that excision of the β‐peptide facilitates subsequent K330 cleavage producing Xa33/13.       95   Figure 27: Summary of FXa β‐peptide results Through  mutagenesis,  plasmin‐mediated  cleavage,  and  radiolabelled  Lys‐Pg  binding experiments, several conclusions can be made regarding the role of the basic residues in the β‐peptide region of FXa. First, K435  is the preferred β‐peptide cleavage site when FX  is bound to aPL. R429  is a poor β‐peptide cleavage site when bound to aPL. C‐Terminal β‐peptide excision facilitates Xa33 generation. A hypercleavable FX mutant, R429K, with an obligate C‐terminal Lys was  found  to enhance  tPA‐mediated Pn generation. And  lastly, we have also discovered  that there is a C‐terminal Lys on stabilized FXaα mutant which was also able to bind Pg and enhance Pn generation. K448 is predicted by cDNA, but not expected to exist in wild‐type FXaα because of the quick action of cellular carboxypeptidases. The quadruple mutation stabilizing FXaα likely caused a conformational change  in the folding of C‐terminal region preventing the cleavage of K448.   96                              97             Figure  28:  Anionic  phospholipid  acts  as  an  allosteric  switch  altering  the  β  cleavage  site  and affecting fibrinolytic function A. When  intact  FXaα  is  bound  to  aPL  in  the  presence  of  CaCl2,  a  signal  is  relayed  causing  a conformational change in the protease domain exposing K435 as the preferred plasmin cleavage site for β‐peptide excision. In the absence of aPL binding, R429 is the preferred plasmin cleavage site in the β locus. Probable C‐terminal amino acids corresponding to cleavage sites are indicated. B.  aPL  bound  FXaβ  has  a  C‐terminal  K435  that  can  bind  tPA  and  Pg  to  enhance  plasmin generation. In aPL unbound conditions, C‐terminal R429 FXaβ is unable to bind tPA and Pg and does not confer fibrinolytic function. C. FXaβ  is further cleaved by Pn, producing FXa fragments  in Xa33 and Xa40  in aPL bound and unbound  conditions  respectively.  Xa33  with  C‐terminal  K330  can  bind  tPA  and  Pg,  while  Xa40 cannot.     98  In the presence of EDTA, none of the plasmin‐mediated FXa fragments bound significantly to 125I‐Pg,  suggesting  that  R429  is  the  preferred  Pn  cleavage  site  in  the  absence  of  aPL  binding (Figure 4). The  trace amounts of  125I‐Pg binding  to FXaβ binding  in R429K mutant, and  to  the FXaα  in KR4βQ are due to a C‐terminal Lys. The R429Q and R429K mutants that  lack the R429 site were still able to generate FXaβ in the presence of EDTA.  This suggests that although R429 is the preferred β‐peptide cleavage site under these conditions, one of the three Lys can still be cleaved  to excise  the  β‐peptide, and  this  is  likely  responsible  for  the  trace amounts of  125I‐Pg binding we see here. For the KR4βQ mutant, the FXaα C‐terminal Lys K448 could be binding the 125I‐Pg.   Finally,  I  investigated  the  role  of  the  β‐peptide  residues  in  the  participation  of  FXa  in fibrinolysis as a tPA auxiliary cofactor through tPA‐mediated Pn generation experiments. R429K was designed  in an attempt  to  improve FXa as a  fibrinolytic enhancer by changing the non‐Pg binding R429 into Lys that could potentially bind and help activate Pg. We were successful in this venture with R429K enhancing plasmin generation by 30% compared to WTFX. Interestingly, the KR4βQ which has all four basic residues in the β‐peptide region turned off and is stabilized in the FXaα form, was also found to further enhance plasmin generation compared to WTFX by 45% at 30mins. This  further supports  the  idea  that FXaα has a C‐terminal Lys  in  this mutant, and  it  is also able to provide a site for Pg binding and activation. The K435Q mutant showed decreased Pn generation compared to WTFX supporting the conclusion that K435 is the preferred cleavage site  in  the β‐peptide cleavage region and  is predominantly responsible  for the participation of FXaβ  in  fibrinolysis.  These  mutants  warrant  further  study  in  clot  lysis  assays  to  see  their fibrinolytic potential.  	  99  5. Future	Studies	5.1 Bleeding	 diatheses	 and	 dissecting	 the	 intrinsic	 carboxypeptidase	activity	 I have shown here  that  there  is enhanced  fibrinolysis  in hemophilia patients compared  to age  and  cardiovascular  risk‐matched  controls  due  to  decreased  inhibition  of  the  fibrinolysis pathway from TAFI and PAI‐1. Also, there was a trend toward shorter overall plasma clot  lysis times  in  the hemophilia patients compared  to controls. However,  the small sample size of 25 patients  in the Calgary cohort was possibly a  limiting factor  in attaining statistical significance. Fortunately, Dr. Jackson has organized a study in Vancouver with a much larger cohort that will expand on what we have  learned from this small pilot study. The wide variation  in the plasma clot  lysis  within  the  hemophilia  group  alone  also  contributed  to  the  lack  of  statistical significance,  which  may  be  complicated  by  therapeutic  factors  remaining  in  the  patients’ circulation  at  the  time  of  blood  donation.  Future  studies  could  include  bleeding  scores  to account  for  the differences  in bleeding diatheses  in patients, and perhaps  increased bleeding will  correlate with  shorter plasma  clot  lysis  times. The way we  attempted  to  assign bleeding scores in this study was by patient age at the time of first clinical bleeding event, where earlier bleeding indicated a more severe phenotype. As evidenced by our difficulty with retrospectively gathering these data, a better measurement of bleeding tendency should be implemented such as  the  relatively  comprehensive  bleeding  questionnaire  used  to  diagnose  von  Willebrand disease (120). One can also attempt to normalize the clot  lysis times  in hemophilia patients by adding back purified FVIII or FIX to the plasma during clot formation. The elevated  intrinsic  carboxypeptidase activity  in hemophilia patients was an  interesting result that should be further explored  in more detail. I postulated that the majority of  intrinsic   100  carboxypeptidase  activity  identified was  likely CPN  rather  than  TAFIa. One  can exclude TAFIa with GEMSA and/or potato  tuber  carboxypeptidase  inhibitor  (PTCI)  to only measure CPN and determine whether CPN  is truly elevated  in hemophilia patients.  If this  is true, CPN  is possibly elevated as a compensatory mechanism for the decreased TAFI in hemophilia.  5.2 Fibrinolytic potential of  the hypercleavable  β‐mutant and  stabilized FXaα; stabilization of Xa33/13; C‐terminal sequencing of FXa fragments  Through mutagenesis of the β‐peptide region of FXa  I have shown that K435 plays a main role in β‐peptide excision and that R429 may be a hindrance to it. Specially designed fibrinolytic mutant  R429K  and  stabilized  FXaα  (KR4βQ)  mutant  further  enhance  tPA‐mediated  Pn generation  compared  to  nFX  and  the  other  β‐peptide  region mutants.  This  finding warrants further  investigation  into  the  functional  fibrinolytic activity of  these mutants  in purified  fibrin degradation  and  plasma  clot  lysis  assays. And  to  elaborate  on  Pryzdial  lab  alum Dr.  Vanden Hoek’s  research on  the  role of Lys330, new mutants can be made  from  these  β‐cleavage  site mutants  by  adding  the  Lys330Gln mutation  to  turn  off  Xa33/13  generation  and  to  prevent proteolytic  degradation  in  plasma.  This  could  lead  to  the  development  of  a  fibrinolytic therapeutic. C‐terminal  sequencing of  the  FXaβ  fragments  in  each of  the mutants would be useful  to unambiguously confirm that K435 is the preferred cleavage site, and that when it is not available R429 is cleaved site. Also C‐terminal sequencing of KR4βQ should be conducted to demonstrate that FXaα has a C‐terminal Lys as predicted  from cDNA  to explain our  125I‐Pg‐binding data. N‐terminal sequencing of  the β‐peptide has been attempted  in  the past by  the Pryzdial  lab, but was unsuccessful. A large quantity of the β‐peptide would be needed and purification of the β‐  101  peptide by  the O‐linked  carbohydrate was difficult due  to homogeneity. Another hurdle with this sequencing idea is that there is currently no standard method to do C‐terminal sequencing. There  are  various  novel  C‐terminal  sequencing  methods  including  manual  enzymatic carboxypeptidases,  acid  hydrolysis,  and  mass  spectrometry  (121‐125).  When  this  type  of sequencing  becomes  more  widely  available  it  can  help  confirm  the  cleavage  sites  I  have suggested here.  	 	  102  References	   1.    (2006) Hemostasis and Thrombosis Basic Principles and Clinical Practices, 5 Ed., Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia   2.   Shimada, K. and Ozawa, T. (1987) Modulation of glycosaminoglycan production and antithrombin III binding by cultured aortic endothelial cells treated with 4‐methylumbelliferyl‐beta‐D‐xyloside.   3.   Smith, S. A. (2009) J Vet. Emerg. Crit. Care. 19, 3‐10   4.   Hoffman, M. and Monroe, D. M. (2007) Hematol. Oncol. Clin. North Am. 21, 1‐11   5.   Hoffman, M. (2003) J Thromb Thrombolysis 16, 17‐20   6.   WHO Press (2011) World Health Organization. Fact Sheet N°317: Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs).   7.   Moser, M., Kohler, B., Schmittner, M., and Bode, C. (1998) Biodrugs 9, 455‐463   8.   Gravanis I and Tsirka, S. E. (2008) Expert Opin Ther Targets 12, 159‐170   9.   Meschia JF (2009) Mayo Clin Proc. 84, 3‐4   10.   Bell, W. R. (1997) Drugs 54 (supplement 3), 11‐17   11.   Furie, B. and Furie, B. C. (1992) N Engl J Med 326, 800‐806   12.   Davie, E. W. (1995) Thromb Haemost 74, 1‐6   13.   Colman, R. W., Marder, V. J., Salzman, E. W., and Hirsh, J. (1987) Hemostasis and thrombosis: basic principles and clinical practice, 2nd Ed., J.B.Lippincott Co., Philadelphia, PA   14.   Hultin, M. B. (1982) J Clin Invest. 69, 950‐958   15.   Fay, P. J. (2004) Blood Rev. 18, 1‐15   16.   Ponczek, M. B., Gailani, D., and Doolittle, R. F. (2008) J Thromb Haemost. 6, 1876‐1883   17.   Renne, T., Pozgajova, M., Gruner, S., Schuh, K., Pauer, H. U., Burfeinf, P., Gailani, D., and Nieswandt, B. (2005) J Exp. Med 202, 271‐281   18.   Renné, T. and Gailani, D. (2007) Expert Rev. Cardiovasc. Ther. 5, 733‐741   19.   Esmon, C. T. (1983) Blood 62, 1155‐1158   20.   Pendurthi, U. R., Rao, L. V., Williams, J. T., and Idell, S. (1999) Blood 94, 579‐586   103    21.   Cesarman‐Maus, G. and Hajjar, K. A. (2005) Br J Haematol 129, 307‐321   22.   Pryzdial, E. L. G., Bajzar, L., and Nesheim, M. E. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 17871‐17877   23.   Pryzdial, E. L. G. and Kessler, G. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16614‐16620   24.   Talbot, K., Meixner, S. C., and Pryzdial, E. L. G. (2010) biochem. biophys. acta 1804, 723‐730   25.   Pryzdial, E. L. G., Lavigne, N., Dupuis, N., and Kessler, G. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 8500‐8505   26.   Grundy, J. E., Lavigne, N., Hirama, T., MacKenzie, C. R., and Pryzdial, E. L. G. (2001) Biochem. 40, 6293‐6302   27.   Grundy, J. E., Hancock, M. A., Meixner, S. C., Mackenzie, C. R., Koschinsky, M. L., and Pryzdial, E. L. G. (2007) Thromb. Haemostasis 97, 38‐44   28.   Vanden Hoek, A. L. (2011) Novel function of coagulation factor Xa: Conversion into a clot-dissolving cofactor. University of British Columbia,   29.   Padmanabhan, K., Padmanabhan, K. P., Tulinsky, A., Park, C. H., Bode, W., Huber, R., Blankenship, D. T., Cardin, A. D., and Kisiel, W. (1993) J. Mol. Biol. 232, 947‐966   30.   Kamata, K., Kawamoto, H., Honma, T., Iwama, T., and Kim, S.‐H. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 6630‐6635   31.   Mosesson, M. W. (2005) Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 3, 1894‐1904   32.   Hoylaerts, M., Rijken, D. C., Lijnen, H. R., and Collen, D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257 (6), 2912‐2919   33.   Ranby, M. (1982) Biochim Biophys Acta 704, 461‐9   34.   Medved, L. and Nieuwenhuizen, W. (2003) Thromb Haemost. 89, 409‐419   35.   Iino, M., Takeya, H., Takemitsu, T., Nakagaki, T., Gabazza, E. C., and Suzuki, K. (1995) European Journal of Biochemistry 232, 90‐97   36.   Suenson, E., Bjerrum, P., Holm, A., Lind, B., Meldal, M., Selmer, J., and Petersen, L. C. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 22228‐222237   37.   Yakovlev, S., Makogonenko, E., Kurochkina, N., Nieuwenhuizen, W., Ingham, K., and Medved, L. (2000) Biochem. 39, 15730‐15741   38.   Bok, R. A. and Mangel, W. F. (1985) Biochem. 24, 3279‐3286   39.   Antovic, J., Schulman, S., Eelde A., and Blomback, M. (2001) Haemophilia 7, 557‐560   40.   Bajzar, L., Manuel, R., and Nesheim, M. E. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 14477‐14484   104    41.   Côte, H. C. F., Bajzar, L., Stevens, W. K., Samis, J. A., Morser, J., MacGillivray, R. T. A., and Nesheim, M. E. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272 (10), 6194‐6200   42.   Zhao, L., Buckman, B., Seto, M., Morser, J., and Nagashima, M. (2003) J Biol Chem 278, 32359‐32366   43.   Boffa, M. B., Bell, R., Stevens, W. K., and Nesheim, M. E. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 12868‐12878   44.   Boffa, M. B., Reid, T. S., Joo, E., Nesheim, M. E., and Koschinsky, M. L. (1999) Biochem J 38, 6547‐6558   45.   Redlitz, A., Nicolini, F. A., Malycky, J. L., Topol, E. J., and Plow, E. F. (1996) Circulation 93, 1328‐1330   46.   Minnema, M. C., Friederich, P. W., Levi, M., Von dem Borne, P. A., Mosnier, L. O., Meijers, J. C. M., Biemond, B. J., Hack, C. E., Bouma, B. N., and ten Cate, H. (1998) J Clin Invest. 101, 10‐14   47.   Nagashima, M., Werner, M., Wang, M., Zhao, L., Light, D. R., Pagila, R., Morser, J., and Verhallen, P. (2000) Thromb Res 98, 333‐342   48.   Binette, T. M., Taylor, F. B., Jr., Peer, G., and Bajzar, L. (2007) Blood 110, 3168‐3175   49.   Kim, P. Y., Kim, P. Y. G., Taylor, F. B., Jr., and Nesheim, M. E. (2012) J Thromb Thrombolysis 33, 412‐415   50.   van Tilburg, N. H., Rosendaal, F. R., and Bertina, R. M. (2000) Blood 95, 2855‐2859   51.   Grunewald, M., Siegemund, A., Grunewald, A., Konegan, A., Koksch, M., and Griesshammer, M. (2002) Haemophilia 8, 768‐775   52.   Foley, J. H., Nesheim, M. E., Rivard, G. E., and Brummel‐Ziedins, K. E. (2012) Haemophilia 18, 316‐322   53.   Declerck, P. J. and Gils, A. (2013) Semin Thromb Hemost. 39, 356‐364   54.   Hekman, C. M. and Loskutoff, D. J. (1985) J Biol Chem. 260, 11581‐11587   55.   Lee, M. H., Vosburgh, E., Anderson, K., and McDonagh, J. (1993) Blood 81, 2357‐2362   56.   Margaglione, M., Cappucci, G., d'Addedda, M., Colaizzo, D., Giuliani, N., Vecchione, G., Mascolo, G., Grandone, E., and Di Minno, G. (1988) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 18, 567   57.   American Diagnostica (2011) IMUBIND® Tissue PAI‐1 ELISA kit.   58.   Wang, L., Rockwood, J., Zak, D., Devaraj, S., and Jialal, I. (2008) Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 6, 149‐152   105    59.   Sundell, I. B., Nilsson, T. K., Rånby, M., Hallmans, G., and Hellsten, G. (1989) J Clin Epidemiol. 42, 719‐723   60.   Hamsten, A., Wiman, B., de Faire, U., and Blomback, M. (1985) N Engl J Med 313, 1557‐1563   61.   Meade, T. W., Ruddock, V., Stirling, Y., Chakrabarti, R., and Miller, G. J. (1993) Lancet 342, 1076‐1079   62.   Nilsson, I. M., Ljungner, H., and Tengborn, L. (1985) Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 290, 1453‐1456   63.   Collen, D. (1999) Thromb. Haemostasis 82, 259‐270   64.   Fredenburgh, J. C. and Nesheim, M. E. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267 (36), 26150‐26156   65.   Zeibdawi, A. R. and Pryzdial, E. L. G. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276 (23), 19929‐19936   66.   Collen, D. and Wiman, B. (1978) Blood 4, 563‐569   67.   Wiman, B., Almqvist, A., and Ranby, M. (1989) Fibrinolysis 3, 231‐235   68.   Sugiyama, N., Sasaki, T., Iwamoto, M., and Abiko, Y. (1988) Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 952, 1‐7   69.   Collen, D. and Lijnen, H. R. (2009) Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 29, 1151‐1155   70.   Rånby, M., Bergsdorf, N., Nilsson, T., Mellbring, G., and Winblad, B. B. G. (1986) Clin Chem. 32, 2160‐2165   71.   del Zoppo, G. J., Saver, J. L., Jauch, E. C., Adams, H. P., Jr., and on behalf of the American Heart Association Stroke Council (2009) Stroke 40, 2945‐2948   72.   Hacke, W., Kaste, M., Bluhmki, E., Brozman, M., Davalos, A., Guidetti, D., Larrue, V., Lees, K. R., Medeghri, Z., Machnig, T., Schneider, D., von Kummer, R., Wahlgren, N., and Toni, D. (2008) New England Journal of Medicine 359, 1317‐1329   73.   Lansburg, M. G., Bluhmki, E., and Thijs, V. N. (2009) Stroke 40, 2438‐2441   74.   Ribo, M., Montaner, J., Molina, C. A., Arenillas, J. F., Santamarina, E., and Alvarez‐Sabín, J. (2004) Thromb Haemost. 91, 1146‐1151   75.   Longstaff, C., Varjú, I., Sótonyi, P., Szabó, L., Krumrey, M., Hoell, A., Bóta, A., Varga, Z., Komorowicz, E., and Kolev, K. (2013) J Biol Chem. 288, 6946‐6956   76.   Benedict, C. R., Refino, C. J., Kevt, B. A., Pakala, R., Paoni, N. F., Thomas, G. R., and Bennett, W. F. (1995) Circulation 92, 3032‐3040   77.    (1993) N Engl J Med 329, 673‐682   106    78.   Tuinenburg A., Mauser‐Bunschoten E.P., Verhaar M.C., Biesma D.H., and Schutgens R.E. (2009) J Thromb Haemost. 7, 247‐254   79.   Plug, I., van der Born, J. G., Peters, M., Mauser‐Bunschoten E.P., de Goede‐Bolder, A., Heijnen, L., Smit, C., Willemse, J., and Rosendall, F. R. (2006) J Thromb Haemost 4, 510‐516   80.   Rosendaal, F. R., Varekamp, I., Smit, C., Brocker‐Vriends, A. H., van Dijck, H., Vandenbroucke, J. P., Hermans, J., Suurmeijer, T. P., and Briet, E. (1989) Br J Haematol 71, 71‐76   81.   Larsson, S. A. and Wiechel, B. (1983) Acta Med Scand. 214, 199‐206   82.   Darby, S. C., Kan, S. W., Spooner, R. J., Giangrande, P. L. F., Hill, F. G. H., and Hay, C. R. M. (2007) Blood 110, 815‐825   83.   Sramik, A., Kriek, M., and Rosendaal, F. R. (2003) Lancet 362, 351‐354   84.   Biere‐Rafi, S., Baarslag, M. A., Peters, M., Kruip, M. J., Kraaijenhagen, R. A., Den Heijer, M., Buller, H. R., and Kamphuisen, P. W. (2011) Thromb Haemost 105, 274‐278   85.   Mosnier, L. O., Lisman, T., van den Berg, H. M., Nieuwenhuis, H. K., Mejjers, J. C., and Bouma, B. N. (2001) Thromb Haemost 86, 1035‐1039   86.   Beltrán‐Miranda, C. P., Khan, A., Jaloma‐Cruz, A. R., and Laffan, M. A. (2005) Haemophilia 11, 326‐334   87.   Kopec, G., Moertl, D., Steiner, S., Stepien E., Mikolaiczyk, T., Podolec, J., Waligora, M., Stepniewski, J., Tomkiewicz‐Pajak, L., Guzik, and Podolec (2013) PloS One 8,   88.   Leung, L. L., Myles, T., Nishimura, T., Song, J. J., and Robinson, W. H. (2008) Mol. Immunol. 45, 4080‐4083   89.   Talbot, K., Meixner, S. C., and Pryzdial, E. L. G. (2013) biochem. biophys. acta (accepted),   90.   Camire, R. M., Larson, P. J., Stafford, D. W., and High, K. A. (2000) Biochem. 39, 14322‐14329   91.   Jackson, S. C., Brown, M., Spitzer, C., Odiaman, L., Fung, M., Anderson, T. J., and Poon M‐C. (2011) Impaired	microvascular	endothelial	function	in	adult	males with hemophilia.     92.   Anderson, T. J., Roberts, A. C., Hildebrand.K, Conradson, H. E., Jones, C., Bridge, P., Edworthy, S., Lonn, E., Verma, S., and Charbonneau, F. (2003) Can J Cardiol. 19, 61‐66   93.   Wang, S. X., Hur, E., Sousa, C. A., Brinen, L., Slivka, E. J., and Fletterick, R. J. (2003) Biochem. 42, 7959‐7966   94.   Sun YM., Jin DY., and Camire, R. M. S. D. (2005) Blood 106, 3811‐3815   95.   Chetaille, P., Alessi, M. C., Kouassi, D., Morange, P. E., and Juhan‐Vague, I. (2000) Thromb Haemost. 83, 902‐905   96.   ven den Gerg, H. M., De Groot, P. H. G., and Fischer, K. (2007) JTH 5 , 151‐156   107    97.   Antovic, A., Mikovic, D., Elezovic, I., Zabczyk, M., Hutenby, K., and Antovic, J. P. (2013) Thromb Haemost. 111,   98.   Wolberg, A. S., Allen, G. A., Monroe, D. M., Hedner, U., Roberts, H. R., and Hoffman, M. (2005) Br J Haematol. 131, 645‐655   99.   Boffa, M. B. and Koschinsky, M. L. (2007) Clin Biochem. 40, 431‐442   100.   Relia, B., Lustenberger, T., Puttkammer, B., Jakob, H., Morser, J., Gabazza, E. C., Takei, Y., and Marzi, I. (2013) Immunobiology 4, 470‐476   101.   Reditz, A., Tan, A. K., Eaton, D. L., and Plow, E. F. (1995) J Clin Invest. 96, 2534‐2538   102.   Pryzdial, E. L. G. and Kessler, G. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16621‐16626   103.   Chattopadhyay, A. and Fair, D. S. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11035‐11043   104.   Eby, C. S., Mullane, M. P., Porche‐Sorbet, R. M., and Miletich, J. P. (1992) Blood 80(10) Suppl 1, 306a   105.   Di Scipio, R. G., Hermodson, M. A., and Davie, E. W. (1977) Biochem. 16, 5253‐5260   106.   Fujikawa, K., Titani, K., and Davie, E. W. (1975) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 72, 3359‐3363   107.   Fujikawa, K., Coan, M. H., Legaz, M. E., and Davie, E. W. (1974) Biochem. 13, 5290‐5299   108.   Pitlick, F. A. (1975) J. Clin. Invest. 55, 175‐179   109.    (2011) Human F10 DNA and amino acid sequence. SeattleSNPs,   110.    (2013) P00742[41‐488], Coagulation factor X, Homo sapiens.   111.   Madureira, P. A., Surette, A. P., Pipps, K. D., Taboski, M. A. S., Miller, V. A., and Waisman, D. M. (2011) Blood 118, 4789‐4797   112.   Flood, E. C. and Hajjar, K. A. (2011) Vascular Pharmacology 54, 59‐67   113.   Hajjar, K. A., Jacovina, A. T., and Chacko, J. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 21191‐21197   114.   Gershom, E. S., Vanden Hoek, A. L., Meixner, S. C., Sutherland, M. R., and Pryzdial, E. L. G. (2012) Thromb Haemost 107, 760‐768   115.   Lighvani, S., Baik, N., Diggs, J. E., Khaldoyanidi, S., Parmer, R. J., and Miles, L. A. (2011) Blood 118, 5622‐5630   116.   Andronicos, N. M., Chen, E. I., Baik, N., Bai, H., Parmer, C. M., Kiosses, W. B., Kamps, M. P., Yates III, J. R., Parmer, R. J., and Miles, L. A. (2010) Blood 115, 1319‐1330   117.   Plow, E. F., Doeuvre, L., and Das, R. (2012) J Biomed Biotechnol 2012, 1‐6   108    118.   Felez, J., Miles, L. A., Fabregas, P., Jardi, M., Plow, E. F., and Lijnen, R. H. (1996) Thromb. Haemost. 76, 577‐584   119.   Miles, L. A. and Parmer, R. J. (2013) Semin Thromb Hemost 39, 329‐337   120.   O'Brien, S. H. (2012) Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2012, 152‐156   121.   Samyn, B., Sergeant, K., Castanheira, P., Faro, C., and Van Beeumen, J. (2005) Nat Methods. 2, 193‐200   122.   Bergman, T., Cederlund, E., Jornvall, H., and Fowler, E. (2003) C‐terminal sequence analysis.   123.   Miyazaki, K. and Tsugita, A. (2006) Proteomics 6, 2026‐033   124.   Fernandez Ocana, M., Jarvis, J., Parker, R., Bramley, P. M., Halket, J. M., Patel, R. K., and Neubert, H. (2005) Proteomics 5, 1209‐1216   125.   Nakazawa, T., Yamaguchi, M., Okamura, T. A., Ando, E., Nishimura, O., and Tsunasawa, S. (2008) Proteomics 8, 673‐685   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0167455/manifest

Comment

Related Items