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Pantaloons and petticoats : an analysis of Regency period costume design in Jon Jory's adaptation of… McCartney, Chanel 2014

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PANTALOONS AND PETTICOATS:  AN ANALYSIS OF REGENCY PERIOD COSTUME DESIGN IN JON JORY’S ADAPATION OF AUSTEN’S PRIDE AND PREJUDICE    by    CHANEL McCARTNEY  B.A (Honours), Queen’s University, 2012     A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF     MASTER OF FINE ARTS in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL STUDIES  (Theatre)     THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver)     APRIL 2014     © Chanel McCartney, 2014 ii  Abstract  This paper documents and describes the design process and final costume design for the University of British Columbia (UBC) production of Pride and Prejudice. The play was adapted by Jon Jory from Jane Austen's novel. The production ran as part of the  2013/2014 season in the Frederic Wood Theatre, from November 14th to November 30th,  2013.  The director was Lois Anderson and the stage manager was Renee Liyan Liu. The creative team included Shelby Bushell (Set and Properties), Chengyan Boon and Robert Gardiner (Lighting and Projections), and Scott Zechner (Sound Design). The costume advisor for the production was Jacqueline Firkins. iii Preface  I prepared the final designs, costume breakdown, and other paperwork that was used to build the show described herein, as shown in appendix A. The final costumes shown in photos in Chapter 2 were assembled, altered, and constructed by costume shop supervisor, Jodi Jacyk; assisted by Laura Fukumoto, Stephanie Kong and the 299/399 production students. Special thanks to Ivan Sayyers for allowing me to view his collection. The photos themselves are courtesy of Tim Matheson, the archival photographer for the production. The shots show the final combination of the costume design along with the set design of Shelby Bushell and the lighting design of Chengyan Boon and Robert Gardiner and the wonderfully talented actors of the cast. iv Table of Contents  Abstract ............................................................................................................................... ii Preface................................................................................................................................ iii Table of Contents............................................................................................................... iv List of Figures ......................................................................................................................v 1.    Introduction ..................................................................................................................1  1.1 Synopsis .............................................................................................................1  1.2 Production Concept............................................................................................1  1.3 Costume Design Concept...................................................................................2  2.    Design Analysis............................................................................................................3  2.1 Morgan Churla- Jane Bennet .............................................................................3  2.2 Nathan Cottell- Mr. Bennet................................................................................4  2.3 Thomas Elms- Officer/Servant/Col Fitzwilliam ................................................6  2.4 Catherine Ferguson- Kitty Bennet/Georgiana Darcy.........................................8  2.5 Sarah Harrison- Lydia Bennet/ Lambton Housekeeper ...................................10  2.6 Luke Johnson- Sir William Lucas/Mr. Collins ................................................12  2.6 Matt Kennedy- Mr. Darcy................................................................................14  2.7 Kat MacLaughlin- Elizabeth Bennet ...............................................................15  2.8 Daniel Meron- Mr. Bingley/Mr. Gardiner .......................................................17  2.9 Nick Preston-Mr. Wickham/Dancer ................................................................19  2.10 Bethany Stanley- Mrs. Bennet .......................................................................20  2.11 Nicole Yukiko- Miss Bingley/Mrs. Gardiner ................................................21  2.12 Naomi Vogt- Lady Catherine De Bourgh/ Permberly Housekeeper .............23  2.13 Natasha Zacher- Mary Bennet/Charlotte Lucas/Miss De Bourgh .................25  3.    Design Process ...........................................................................................................27  4.    Conclusion..................................................................................................................29  Bibliography .......................................................................................................................30 … Appendix A – Scene/Character Breakdown and Costume Breakdown.............................31 v LIST OF FIGURES  Figure 1 - Jane Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo ...................................................4  Figure 2 - Mr. Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo ....................................................5  Figure 3 - Col Fitzwilliam Final Rendering and Show Photo .............................................6  Figure 4 - Officer/Servant Show Photo ...............................................................................7  Figure 5 - Kitty Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo ..................................................8  Figure 6 - Georgiana Darcy Final Rendering and Show Photo ...........................................9  Figure 7 - Lydia Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo ...............................................10  Figure 8 - Lydia Show Photo & Lambton Housekeeper Show Photo ...............................11  Figure 9 - Sir William Lucas Final Rendering and Show Photo .......................................12  Figure 10 - Mr. Collins Final Rendering and Show Photo ................................................13  Figure 11 - Mr. Darcy Final Rendering and Show Photo ..................................................14  Figure 12 - Elizabeth Bennet Show Photo .........................................................................15  Figure 13 - Elizabeth Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo .......................................16  Figure 14 - Mr. Bingley Final Rendering and Show Photo ...............................................17  Figure 15 - Mr. Gardiner Final Rendering and Show Photo..............................................18  Figure 16 – Wickham Final Rendering and Show Photo ..................................................19  Figure 17 - Dancer Final Rendering and Show Photo .......................................................20  Figure 18 - Mrs. Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo ...............................................21  Figure 19 - Miss Bingley Final Rendering and Show Photo .............................................22  Figure 20 - Mrs. Gardiner Final Rendering and Show Photo ............................................23  Figure 21 - Lady Catherine De Bourgh Final Rendering and Show Photo (Adt 2)...........24  Figure 22 – Lady Catherine Show Photo (Act 1) ..............................................................24  Figure 23 - Permberly Housekeeper Show Photo ..............................................................25  Figure 24 - Mary Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo..............................................26  Figure 25 - Charlotte Lucas Final Rendering and Show Photo .........................................26  Figure 26 - Charlotte Collins and Miss Be Bourgh Show Photo .......................................271   1.   INTRODUCTION  Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice has often been adapted for the stage, film, and television. Jon Jory’s adaptation had its world premiere in a tri-production between Arizona Theatre Co., San Jose Repertory Theatre, and Alliance Theatre in 2006, and has been performed about 400 times since its premiere.  1.1      Synopsis  The play is a fast-paced series of events resembling a contemporary romantic comedy. Mr. Bennet opens the play by opening his book and, metaphorically, the stage. The members of the Bennet family, especially Elizabeth, directly address the audience to introduce characters or to progress the plot.  The story, set in 1813 Regency England, revolves around the romantic relationships and interactions between Darcy and Elizabeth, Bingley and Jane, Mr. and Mrs. Bennet, Mr. Collins and Charlotte, and Wickham and Lydia.  Over the course of the piece, Elizabeth and Darcy learn that first impressions are not always the best representation of a person’s character; and that pride and prejudice are poor tools when judging another’s character.  Austen explores the themes of manners, upbringing, morality, education, social status, and marriage.  Her characters reflect on their search for self-identity, love and marriage.  1.2     Production Concepts  The director’s main concept was to illustrate the different love stories between Mr. and Mrs. Bennet, Elizabeth and Darcy, Jane and Bingley, Lydia and Wickham and Charlotte and Mr. Collins, “consider[ing] the theme of self-knowledge and the degree of which the evolution of the self, through contact with another, creates the potential for a mature, lasting connection of mind, body and soul.” (Director’s notes; Pride and Prejudice program). I used the colour blue to represent self-realization or knowledge and pink to represent folly. We also explored the idea of familial love, looking directly at the Bennet family in relationship to Darcy’s and Bingley’s families. In this period, familial connections affected one’s social status and behaviour. This theme resonated especially within2  Darcy’s letter to Elizabeth and Lydia’s elopement, where the actions of one member affected the reputation of the whole family.  I used the stripes in the Bennet dresses and in Mr. Bennet’s cravat and vest to symbolize the Bennet clan while the colour green links Darcy and Lady Catherine, though not Georgiana. I wanted to connect her more with Lydia and folly, as they both elope with Wickham). I chose not to match Bingley and his sister because there is a disconnect between them. The actors often directly addressed the audience, breaking the fourth wall as they told the story. Shelby’s set incorporated this storytelling concept with the idea of using one basic space and a few furniture pieces as needed. Due to the abstract nature of the set, the costumes were used to place the story within the Regency period of the novel.  1.3    Costume Design Concepts  Although the set did not indicate a specific time or location, my costume designs placed the characters within the Regency period, specifically 1810-1815. However, because of the fast succession of scenes, some double casting, and limited borrowing opportunities, exact period specificity was not always possible. Therefore, I gave each character a base costume to which accessories were added. I chose fabrics, colours, and textures to communicate the characters’ stations in life.  Cottons, light colours, and/or stripes indicated middle to lower class.  Silk, wools, lace, and solid darker colours indicated the higher and/or richer class. This provided a distinction within a class hierarchy and helped exaggerate the segregation between Darcy’s social world and Elizabeth’s social world, which was also mirrored by the separate areas of the set, where the Netherfield platform was higher than the Longbourne one. Due to the romantic comedy and almost fairy-tale feel of the story, the costume colour palette was comprised primarily of watercolour pinks, blues, greens, purples and beiges. The colour palette and the romantic comedy essence of the play also lent a spring- like quality to the piece, so I dressed everyone in short sleeves and few jackets for travel. This palette was inspired by the watercolour illustrations of C.E Brooks for the 1907 printing of the novel. The colours for each costume were chosen to best compliment the respective actor.  Greens marked the Darcy pride.  Pinks and peaches represented the misguided folly of Mrs. Bennet, Lydia, Miss Bingley and Miss Darcy. Blue represented the journey of self-knowledge and evolution of Elizabeth, Mr. Bennet, Jane, and Bingley.3  However, because of the limited resources of small budget ($2500), the limited borrowing options, and the fast-pace nature of the script, this element of the design was not as fully realized as I would have liked. The design concept was an exploration of the research and execution of Regency period design within the context of the director’s vision of romantic love, familial love, and storytelling.  2. DESIGN ANALYSIS  I will discuss each costume design in terms of the rendering and the final show photos alphabetically by the actors’ last names including all roles played by each actor.  2.1- Morgan Chula- Jane Bennet  Jane Bennet is the eldest and prettiest of the Miss Bennets.  She is the daughter of a gentleman and inherited landowner in Herfordshire and she is about twenty-three years of age. She is a country-bred girl, gentle, easygoing, and shy. She attempts to see the best in people. In her development, she learns that not all people act with the best intentions, especially in her friendship with Miss Bingley. I approached Jane’s costume as an ideal of womanhood in that period. Women of the Bon Ton were admired for their beauty and fashion while their personalities were depicted as innocent, gentle, and demure. I dressed Jane in a pale yellow, Empire waist morning dress made from ribbed cotton gauze. The high neckline gave her the essence of modesty and reserve. The collar trim with the buttons focuses the eye toward her face with its slightly reflective quality, giving her a glow. The collar moved towards the back in a fairy wing-like look, giving her an ethereal angelic sense. The paleness of the yellow matched the tones in Brooks’ drawings. The trim on the hem and around the waist accentuated the silhouette and highlighted her figure, giving her the ideal body image of the period. Her only additional accessory was a blue pashmina that she used as a blanket when she was sick at Netherfield in Act 1. This device was meant to foreshadow her character development in relation to the family in that house.4  Her hair and make-up also reflected a sense of the ideal, ethereal woman. Lois and I discussed Jane’s hair as more windswept and natural as opposed to the placed grouping of ringlets near her temples. This hairstyle matched Bingley’s careless hairstyle.      Fig 1. Jane Bennet Rendering and Show Photo   2.2- Nathan Cottell – Mr. Bennet  Mr. Bennet opens the show, establishing himself as the head of the Bennet family. He is in his mid fifties and a gentleman by birth, having inherited his lands from his father. His character development emerges after his daughter’s elopement when their family reputation is threatened.  He realizes that he ignored his responsibility to provide for his children properly. I dressed Mr. Bennet in a light blue double-breasted cutaway tailcoat and a dark blue vest.  The blues represented both of the errors in life: his marriage to his silly wife and his irresponsibility towards his family. The dusty blue gave him a sense of age,5  implying that this is an older jacket that has been well worn.  The evidence of wear and tear also illustrated the poverty of the Bennets while the velvet on the jacket gave him a sense of past richness. I dressed him in socks and shoes rather than knee high boots because he is a reader and an intellectual rather than a huntsman.  The shoes also separated him from the younger men, who were primarily dressed in boots. Mr. Bennet’s cravat was striped with gold, connecting him with the striped theme within his family. The spectacles aged him further and supported his identity as an intellect.      Fig. 2. - Mr. Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo     He wore a grey top hat to indicate his return from London in Act 2. Unfortunately, resources dictated that the original straw hat be replaced with a top hat. The grey top hat added a darker aspect to his character, reflecting his hard self-critique as a father and provider. The overcoat that was cut would have added the weight of the social consequences on his shoulders.6  Nathan’s greyed hair and aging make-up at the forehead, eyes, and lips were a representation of his older age. His own unruly muttonchops and forward comb at the temples placed him within the period. Despite the director’s apprehensions with the aging make-up and greying hair, I think we found a successful balance by using lighter brown pencils and powders to make the actor look realistically mid fifties in 1813.  2.3 - Thomas Elms- Colonel Fitzwilliam/Officer/Servant  Colonel Fitzwilliam is the second son of an Earl and the nephew to Lady Catherine de Bourgh. He is a jovial and polite young man, similar in age to Darcy, and guardian of Georgiana. In their conversations, Fitzwilliam unknowingly provokes Elizabeth with his complaints of his second son status, as he cannot inherit his fortune and must work.                                       Fig. 3. – Col. Fitzwilliam Final Rendering and Show Photo7  I designed Fitzwilliam to be a slightly flamboyant, playful flirt. I loosely connected him to Beau Brummel, a popular dandy of the time, through the shape of his brown dress coat. It was trimmed at the collar with black velvet and, had time allowed, I would have added black velvet cuffs and more buttons to increase this sense of richness. Fitzwilliam also wore a grey brocade floral vest and slimmer fitted breeches to look more effeminate and less muscular. The brown tones helped Fitzwilliam fade into the set to prevent a visual competition with Darcy. He wore riding boots like all the other young men. He wore a black top hat and carried a walking stick with him outside to connect him with Lady Catherine and Darcy. I focused on Fitzwilliam’s and Elizabeth's perceptions of poverty to highlight Austen’s views of irony and hypocrisy in the upper class. The officer uniform matched Wickham’s as they are in the same regiment. The only difference was the addition of the red sash around Wickham’s hip to help set them apart. For a full description of the uniform, please see section 2.9. Thomas wore a black footman’s coat, which covered Fitzwilliam’s costume when he played the servant in Act 1.  He added a black hat to the coat when he played the Coachman in Act 2. The darker colours helped him fade into the darker set, while the lack of numerous pieces made the changes efficient.     Fig. 4. – Soldier/Servant Show Photo8  2.4- Catherine Ferguson – Kitty Bennet/Georgiana Darcy  Kitty Bennet is the second youngest sister. She is seventeen and best friends with her youngest sister, Lydia. Kitty is lively, silly, and idle. Although they are friends and family, Lydia outshines Kitty creating some competition between them. The director wanted the younger sisters’ dresses to look like hand-me-downs with added personal touches and trims. To facilitate this idea, Kitty’s dress was blue to tie her to Elizabeth's dress. The ribbed- like quality of the fabric connected her with the striped Bennet theme. The dress was an older stock item, giving it a second-hand, well-worn look. The mismatched blue tones in the shoes and the trims added to the illusion of her adding new trim to an old, faded dress. Her accessories added a sense of gaucheness to Kitty’s overall look. Her dull gold chain and pearl drop earrings were evening accessories paired with a day dress, which was considered unfashionable. Her shoes were fastened by long blue ribbons modelled after evening dancing slippers to show her attempts to appear fashionable.                                   Fig. 5. – Kitty Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo9  Kitty’s hair design came from Regency portraits of women posing in Greek costume. Kitty’s hair had a very youthful, romantic quality in the escaping curls, falling down her back and the period clusters at her temples. Her lips and cheeks had a strong pink colour to imply Kitty’s interest in rouge. Though out of fashion, it was still accessible. Overall, her appearance suggested a young girl trying to look older and prettier than she is. Since Georgiana was not fully seen onstage, she did not require a complete dress change.  I gave her a pink ribbon straw bonnet with feathers and birds and an integrated long brown haired wig that was tied off with a matching pink ribbon. This was part of a very early discussion with Lois about the loose hair being youthful, while the bonnet hid some of Kitty's face. The décor on the bonnet gave Georgiana the status and richness of Darcy’s family. The pink mirrored Lydia, representing folly and the foreshadowing of the elopement.     Fig. 6. – Georgiana Darcy Final Rendering and Show Photo10  2.5- Sarah Harrison – Lydia Bennet/Lambton Housekeeper  Lydia is the youngest of the Miss Bennets at fifteen.  She is the most energetic, silly, and jovial of her sisters. More than Kitty, Lydia represents flirtation, scandal and sexuality. She cares more about the state of being married than to whom she marries. She leads her family to ruination when she elopes with Wickham. In her costume, I focused on her ignorance and silliness.  Lydia wore a pink striped cotton dress with a lot of frippery, lace, and trim. The neckline was cut low and the hem of the dress was taken up to show a bit of ankle.  This was a revealing look for the period. Unlike Kitty, everything matched tastefully. The stripes connected her with the Bennet family. Lydia accessorized with a pink satin ribbon choker and pearl drop earrings similar to Kitty, but smaller and in better taste for daytime wear. Overall, her look showed a flirtatious, frivolous yet fashionable style.     Fig. 7. – Lydia Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo11  Lydia and Wickham were the only characters with wedding rings. The emphasis on a display of her status represented the importance she places on the show of being married rather than the actual lifetime commitment. I created a cap of pink dupioni and rosettes to illustrate Lydia’s lack of self-realized shame in regards to her elopement. It played on the traditional lace or white caps worn by the married woman in the show. As Housekeeper at Lambton, Sarah wore a servant’s cap and a full apron that covered the pink dress. The fabric had a rough texture, representative of her lower rank. If I had had the time, I would have added sleeves that could cover the pink ones or made a different apron without the stripes (so as not to inadvertently tie her to the Bennet family). However, for such a small character, the compromise was minimal.     Fig. 8. – Lydia Bennet Show Photo and Lambton Housekeeper Show Photo12  2.6- Luke Johnston- Sir William Lucas/ Mr. Collins  Sir William is a large, jolly, happy man with a warm heart and a genuine well- intentioned nature. He is a newly appointed knight and landowner due to his involvement in trade.  Sir William was considered lower in rank without a pedigreed family history. In this period, rich tradesmen were starting to rise to the upper class by earning titles or marrying into them. We decided early in the process that Sir William would be in a fat suit to age the actor's body shape. To emphasize his elevation of status and to incorporate Austen’s satirical voice, I dressed Sir William in a court wig. Although it was unfashionable for the time, it represented his misguided attempt to acclimatize himself to the upper class. His colours of mauve, greens, and browns were indicative of the English countryside, while the rich velvet, brocade, gold, and lace highlighted his wealth. The short vest, high waist pants and overly large coat, although comedic, played on how ill-fitted and alien he was to the upper class style.     Fig. 9. – Sir William Lucas Final Rendering and Show Photo13  Mr. Collins is a much thinner, very proper, self-important and stoic character whose analytical and serious personality adds comedy to the show. In his late twenties, he is a clergyman at Huntsford Park under the patronage of Lady Catherine de Bourgh of which he is extraordinarily proud. As a clergyman, Mr. Collins’ costume was black and white with no colour or patterns, a stark contrast to the multi-colour palette of the Bennets. The long vest and rounded shoulders of the long jacket made him look leaner and much shorter than the other young men. The breeches, socks, and shoes divided his legs to create the illusion that he is shorter. His large buckled shoes were slightly clownish. His wide brim hat with the gold buckle indicated his profession.  The glasses indicated his analytical intelligence. Though slightly Quaker overall, Mr. Collins is still identifiably an affected clergyman. The actor's natural curly hair was greased down and formed into a curl at the centre of his forehead, accentuating his widow’s peak and adding to the pointed and affected quality of the character.     Fig. 10. – Mr. Collins Final Rendering and Show Photo14  2.7 - Matt Kennedy- Mr. Darcy  Mr. Darcy is better connected and richer than Mr. Bennet.  However, he is an equal in terms of their status as pedigreed gentlemen and landowners with inherited estates. His character progression evolves through his relationship with Elizabeth. He learns that character is a stronger base for love than status or money. As the male lead and Elizabeth’s partner, I wanted to make sure Darcy’s costume was period accurate. I chose green for him and his relations to represent their pride. I found a green wool period coat in stock that fit Matt’s broad shoulders. The rich, textured wool coat with silver buttons, the light cotton cravat, the brocade silk green vest, and the beige, ribbed breeches with matching buttons all emphasized his wealth and status. The addition of a top hat indicated outdoor activity. Darcy always wore his hat outdoors to accord with rules of Regency dress. He used a walking stick when he was at Rosings to connect him with Fitzwilliam and Lady Catherine.    Fig. 11. - Mr. Darcy Final Rendering and Show Photo15  I diverged slightly from period accuracy to romanticize his figure.  His boots were looser around his calves with a larger heel and his breeches were more relaxed. Had resources allowed, I would have built a jacket for Matt that could fit the period shirt underneath for his entrance in Act 2 without his jacket. To add variety, I would also have preferred a Paris Beau hat, which was popular at the time, instead of the grey top hat. The director wanted Darcy to appear sexier and less combed down, so his hair was combed forward at the temples. His base theatre make-up was challenging to settle on because of his pale skin tone under certain lighting.  2.8- Kat McLaughlin- Elizabeth Bennet  As the heroine and the narrator of this piece, Elizabeth Bennet has a large character arc from her first opinion of Darcy to their marriage. She displays confidence, wit, and charm while she judges her neighbours’ actions. She is the second eldest daughter.  She is intelligent, mature, and energetic though not so pretty as her sister Jane. To me, she is the every-woman. She is easy to relate to and, in many cases, a woman to emulate. I dressed Elizabeth in blue to represent her journey of self- realization. She wore a blue striped cotton day dress with an Empire waist and the column shape of the period. The stripe pattern represented the family Bennet. Elizabeth did not leave the stage for the entire show, so her accessibility to accessories was limited. She had a dark pink Spencer jacket that she wore in scenes of travel, such as her trip to Pemberley where she accidentally meets Darcy and in his letter scene. The suggestion of pink in these scenes links her with folly.  Because she is the heroine, I wanted Elizabeth to be dressed in a perfect period silhouette. However, due to resource limitations and compromises, this was not possible. Both the             Fig. 12. - Elizabeth Bennet Show Photo16  corset and the demi corset were cut for the comfort of the actress.  This affected her posture and the fit of the dress. Her shoes were replaced with blue painted ballet slippers instead of decorated flats, which looked incongruous with the other footwear in the show. I kept Elizabeth blonde and Jane brunette as a statement against the social expectation that brunettes are more intelligent than blondes. Elizabeth’s hairstyle was a staple Regency look, with the ringlets framing the face at the temples and the rest pulled back into a bun. She followed some social conventions despite her criticism against them.    Fig. 13. - Elizabeth Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo17  2.9- Daniel Meron- Mr. Bingley/ Mr. Gardiner  Mr. Bingley is a youthful, handsome, charming man who treats everyone equally. He is the antithesis of Darcy’s cold pride. In the novel, Austen hints that the Bingley’s wealth originated the success of his tradesman father, placing him in a rich middle class. Despite the prejudice of Miss Bingley and Darcy towards the Bennets, Jane actually married beneath her class when she married Bingley.                                        Fig. 14. - Mr. Bingley Final Rendering and Show Photo   To represent this conflict of social status, I dressed Bingley in a deep navy tailcoat that symbolized his character’s development, with a gold brocade vest and a frothy lace cravat that indicated his wealth. Although he was fashionably dressed, his costume was meant to look as though social expectations have been imposed upon him. His nonchalant and eager to please nature suggests that, like Sir William, there should be a disconnect18  between his nature and his appearance. Bingley was an avid sportsman and therefore wore riding boots and breeches. We cut the top hat from the original design to reflect his carelessness for social conventions. His hair was completely swept back from the temples in a windswept fashion as opposed to the combed forward look. Mr. Gardiner is an older, protective and gruff man who is an attorney residing in Cheapside, London.  Mr. Gardiner is also an avid sportsman who enjoys travelling with his wife. Mr. Gardiner wore fewer textures and very little décor to represent the refined middle-class tradesman. As a sportsman, Mr. Gardiner wore a natural palette of whites, greens, blacks, and browns. The large buttons, collar, and dress coat gave him the essence of older age and build. Although we originally discussed a fat suit, there was no time during quick changes for it. The breeches and boots were the same as Mr. Bingley’s to simplify the change. The intended trouser change would have provided more variety. His only accessory was a grey top hat with a grisly, grey demi wig. This aged Mr. Gardiner and distinguished him from Mr. Bingley’s natural blonde hair. The wig, unlike Sir Williams, was meant to look like Mr. Gardiner’s own hair. S    Fig. 15. - Mr. Gardiner Final Rendering and Show Photo19  2.10- Nick Preston – Wickham/Dancer  Wickham is the antagonist in the play. He is a selfish, insidious, and unscrupulous man who lies, cheats, and gambles his way through life. He is Elizabeth’s other beau, although he elopes with her sister, damaging the Bennet family’s reputation. Wickham’s uniform is similar to the Royal marines dress coat and an officer’s uniform in 1790 or 1780. To represent his sins and separate him from Thomas’ officer, I tied a red scarf with tassels about the waist of Wickham’s military vest. Because of our lack of resources in British military uniforms pre WWI, I had to make some compromises in period accuracy.  I located two uniforms for Wickham and the officers that approximated the Regency styles and placed the two men in a cohesive look.S     Fig. 16. - Wickham Final Rendering and Show Photo  Lois added a dancer to the ball scenes when another partner was needed for choreography. We made him a well dressed but middle class yeoman or tenant farmer. His shape is period accurate though the colours are muted and the fabrics are plain and flat, with no pattern and little texture. This helps him fade into the background and let the main characters take prominence.20     Fig. 17. -Dancer Final Rendering and Show Photo    2.11- Bethany Stanley- Mrs. Bennet  Mrs. Bennet is a silly, frivolous woman whose only ambition in life is to see all of her five daughters well married. She is the daughter of a tradesman in Meryton. Her marriage to Mr. Bennet elevated her into the upper class. I chose the colour peach for her dress to tie her to Lydia, her favourite daughter.  It was a darker, more mature version of Lydia's pink dress. The striped pattern related her to the Bennet family. The line of the dress was period accurate but we added more gathering to the skirt to allude to a more maternal shape underneath. She has long sleeves, a dickie and a tippet covering her décolletage to suggest her mature age. The extra volume and accessories helped emphasize the exaggerated comical performance of the actress. The excess of lace in the cap, tippet, trim, handkerchief, and collar, demonstrated poor taste, as if the character is trying too hard to elevate herself. She wore the large lace cap like Lydia wore hers, as a satirical gesture toward the foolish self- importance they place on their married state.21  The director wanted the character’s hair underneath the cap to look messy, as if she is always stressed and frazzled over her daughters. We used light aging make up because, at thirty-five, Mrs. Bennet would show signs of aging near her eyes and lips.     Fig. 18. – Mrs. Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo    2.12- Nicole Yukiko- Caroline Bingley/ Mrs. Gardiner  Caroline Bingley is the daughter of a tradesman who must marry into the upper classes. Miss Bingley’s identity relies on her money and social connections. Caroline’s costume incorporated elements of orientalism to illustrate her ostentatiousness and careless cultural appropriation. She wore ornate clothes in an effort to look worldlier. The turban headpiece exemplified another country’s traditional headdress becoming a fashion statement. She wore it only in the ball scenes, as was proper for ornamentation during the period.22  The pink silk taffeta dress incorporated the oriental with its thick embroidered trim at the bust, the fringed tie at the Empire waist and the tassels on the skirt. The dress opened in an arch at the centre front to show the lace petticoat underneath, similar in cut to Lady Catherine’s dress. This connects her to the upper class look, which she tries to emulate. Her evening gown-like dress and her multitude of pearled jewellery further reflect her rich persona.    Fig. 19. - Miss. Bingley Final Rendering and Show Photo  Mrs. Gardiner is a middle-aged, smart, and quick-witted woman who lives with her tradesman husband in Cheapside, London. I dressed her in a purple cotton day dress. The exotic trim corresponded with her and her husband’s interests in travelling. The small amount of lace in her collar and trimming her sleeves indicated wealth without ostentation. The high collar and double, three quarter length sleeve covered her bust and arms suggesting her older age. The subtle difference in the shapes of the sleeves between Mrs. Gardiner and Mrs. Bennet indicated a difference between city and country styles. The slightly comical large cap addressed her married state and matched the exaggerated size of her husband’s coat. In23  the second act, she replaced the cap with a bonnet as she tours the country with her niece  outdoors.     Fig. 20. – Mrs. Gardiner Final Rendering and Show Photo    2.13- Naomi Vogt- Lady Catherine De Bourgh/Pemberly Housekeeper  Lady Catherine de Bourgh is the daughter of an earl and the widow of a knight. She is Mr. Darcy’s aunt and the sole owner of Rosings Park. Lady Catherine is a rich, snobby, crotchety old lady who patronizes her neighbours with her superior opinions. She is desperate to marry her daughter to Mr. Darcy to secure bloodlines and to prevent Elizabeth from marrying into her family. Lady Catherine plays a very masculine role. She owns property.  She is unmarried, rich, and always in control. Lady Catherine incorporates propriety with comedic execution as she attempts to control all those around her.  Her green taffeta overdress related her with Darcy and a shared familial pride. The pink trim suggested a touch of folly amid the seriousness with which she regards social propriety. The deep “V” neckline of the green dress and high neckline of the black dress shaped the body, making the bust longer, lower and less pronounced, reflecting an24     Fig. 21. – Lady Catherine Final Rendering and Show Photo (Act 2)  older silhouette. The black signified her status as a widow. The layering of dresses signified her upper class status.  The excessive jewellery and lace indicated wealth. The cane, high collar dickie, and long black sleeves also suggested advanced age. To play on the gender issues within Lady Catherine’s character and status, I added elements of frivolity in her hairstyle, the lace and pink hair bow, and the collar with the cameo. The pink and lace trims against the green and black juxtapose the male and female parts of her character and the gender expectations in Regency England. The bonnet in the second act reflects her outdoor travels to Longbourne. One of my biggest compromises due to lack of resources was cutting Lady Catherine’s corset.  She was a paradigm of proper social behaviour and a corset would have been vital for her wardrobe.   Fig. 22. – Lady Catherine Show  Photo (Act 1)25  As the Housekeeper, the overdress and dickie were removed to reveal a plain black dupioni dress. A light grey scarf covered her bust and a cap covered her hair. As a housekeeper and an older female servant, she would have dressed simply for modesty and occupational requirements.  2.14- Natasha Zacher- Mary Bennet/ Charlotte  Lucas/ Miss De Bourgh  Mary Bennet is the middle sister of the Bennet sisters. Mary is nerdy, bookish, and smart. She is socially awkward and plain. Mary’s costume allowed her to fade into the background as she does in her family. To differentiate her from her other characters, I dressed her in a full brown-stripped apron with an Empire waist over her Charlotte dress. The stripes on her    Fig. 23. – Pemberly  Housekeeper Show Photo apron related her to the Bennet family. The high neckline of her dress and shape of the top of the apron gave her a less defined shape, which made her seem younger and less physically developed. To emphasize her bookish character, I gave her glasses. Her ankle boots worked for both Mary and Charlotte, who would both have chosen practicality before fashion. To emphasize her youth, I put her hair in two French braids. Charlotte Lucas is the daughter of Sir William. She is expected to dress the part of the daughter of a knight. She is a pragmatic unromantic young lady. Part way through the story, she looses her identity through her marriage to Mr. Collins, becoming ridiculous because of her ridiculous husband. I dressed Charlotte in a silk dress with a touch of lace and a pleated hem.  The details looked rich but not frilly. The single-tone cream colour reflected Charlotte’s simplicity and lack of pretence. The droopy sleeves suggested her deflated hopes of a marriage. The horizontal movement of the embroidery on the dress gave the illusion of a more corpulent body underneath. The high cut neckline made the character seem dowdier.26  Her hair was pulled back into a tight bun, with no romantic curls. I added a cap with a fake brown-haired bun after she married Mr. Collins as was appropriate for married women of the period. The cap was comically large in scale to relate her to her laughable husband.   Fig. 24. - Mary Bennet Final Rendering and Show Photo    Fig 25. –Charlotte Lucus Final Rendering and Show Photo27  Lois added Miss de Bourgh in an act one reveal. Miss de Bourgh is an unattractive, sickly daughter of Lady Catherine. Like Georgiana, a bonnet with lace trim showed her wealth while it hid her face. I wrapped a pink shawl around her to imply her sickly constitution.  3. DESGIN PROCESS  From the very first designer and director meeting, Lois knew exactly what she wanted for the colours palette and the overall essence of the show. It was a relief to have a solid direction that was similar to my own interpretation of the script. Both of us agreed on the watercolour/pastel palette and the shiny, silk fabrics for the rich and cotton fabrics for    Fig. 26. – Miss De Bourgh  Show Photo the middle class or poorer characters. The play read very much like a contemporary romantic comedy and so the piece wanted to remain light, especially in colours and fabrics. We agreed on period Regency costume to meet the audience was expectations of the piece. The costumes were mostly realistic against a scenic background of symbolic books, establishing the director's vision that these characters emerged from the book. The preliminary designs explored the idea of incorporating the symbols of writing, paper, and books into the costumes. I had considered building the costumes from paper or paper-like fabrics and writing quotes from the novel. However, the limited resources of time and labour made the idea of building the entire show impossible. From prelims to finals, I focused on each character, their relationships with each other and their personal arcs through the story. My goal was to establish a base costume for each character where smaller accessories could be added as needed to accord with the pace of the show. Once we had agreed on colours and styles, but before we made a build plan, I  analyzed the script for quick changes and designed the pieces accordingly.28  The first items cut were the ball accessories and the trains on the dresses.  The box that the accessories would have been kept in was cut, giving us no easy location to stash easily accessible costume pieces. I had thought that small trains would be versatile: a happy medium between day dresses and ball gowns.  However, lack of stage space made trains impractical. The transitions were also too fast to allow for perfect period accuracy. My biggest compromise was relinquishing the full period corsets. Working in full period corsetry would have benefited the actresses by providing them an opportunity to understand the limitations of movement for Regency women. To accommodate actor comfort and to give the piece a more contemporary feel, Lois made the decision against the corsets and I had to concede. Corsets in all of the actresses’ sizes were also unavailable on our resources. I found a compromise by using the demi corsets. After sitting with Jodi and talking through each costume and breaking them down the limitations became more apparent. The costume stock at our disposal had very few dresses in this period, particularly in the sizes we needed.  We also lacked well-made riding boots for the men. Despite that, we were able to pull and alter the woman’s undergarments, the menswear, the bonnets, and accessories from our storage and other theatre companies in Vancouver. All but one dress underwent either a full build or a series of alterations that involved extensive reconstruction. Jodi built the new pieces while I managed and delegated the alterations. Laura and Stephanie helped with the build and we saved money by using the shop’s stock fabrics. Some of the purchases and builds also helped to increase the value of UBC’s costume stock, such as Darcy’s boots, the period dresses, the men’s shirts, the demi corsets with the added petticoats, and two full period corsets. Areas I could have improved in were getting my paper work done more quickly, being more organized, posting my costume plot publicly so that everyone in the shop could have access to it, taking better notes during fittings, and being more proactive about working through them promptly. I also think that I could have been more assertive had I had more confidence in my abilities and had I trusted my own judgment.29  4. CONCLUSION  The final show was successful in its representation of Regency period England through the lens of Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Jory’s stage adaptation. The costumes communicated the characters’ status and self-evolution through loving relationships. The colours and textures created a contemporary romantic comedy feel to the piece, keeping the drama light. I believe that all of the design elements, including the costume design, were essential in the success of the show, and supported the director’s consistent clear vision and detailed storytelling techniques.30  BILBLIOGRAPHY    Anderson, Lois. Director’s Notes. A Companion Guide to Pride and Prejudice. By  Theatre at UBC. Vancouver: Theatre at UBC, 2014. 3. Print.    Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Modern Library, 2000. Print.    Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. Adapted by Jon Jory. USA: Playscripts, Inc. 2006.  Print31  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  1	  of	  8 Character	   Act	  1:	  1813	   Shift	  1:	   Longbourn:	  Drawing	  9-­‐13:	  homely	  pursuits	   First	  ball:	  13-­‐15	  Mrs.	  Bennet	   x	  (10)	   x	  Elizabeth	   x	   x	  Jane	   x	   x:	  good	  sense;	  honesty;	  dances	  Mary	   x	    Kitty	   x	    Lydia	   x:	  prettiest	  hats;	  trimming	  a	  hat	    Charlotte	     Goergiana	     Miss	  Bingley	     Mrs	  Gardiner	     Lady	  CDB	     Housekeeper	           Mr	  Bennet	   x	   x	  Mr	  Darcy	    x:	  shocking	  rudeness;	  disagreeable;	  horrid;	  tall;	  high	  and	  conceited	  Mr	  Bingley	   a	  single	  young	  man	  of	  large	  fortune;	  4-­‐5	  grand	   x:	  sensible,	  good	  humored,	   lively,	  happy	  manners	  so	  much	  ease	  with	  such	  perfect	  good	  breeding;	  handsome	  Mr	  Collins	     Colonel	  Fitz	     Mr	  Gardiner	     Wickham	  soldier:	  Red	  reginmental	   jackets	     Sir	  William	     Ball	  guest	    x	  Officer	     32  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  2	  of	  8 Shift	  2:	   Shift	  3:	   Shift	  4:	  Second	  Ball:	  Home	  of	  Sir	  William	  16-­‐20	   Longbourn:Drawing	   room	  20-­‐	  21	   Netherfield	  21-­‐23	  x	   x	    x	   x:	  dirty	  stockings	   x:	  through	  mud;	  above	  ankles	  x:	  "as	  much	  as	  her	  nature	  will	  allow";	  "she	  takes	  time"	   x	   x:	  Slept	  ill,	  no	  well	  enough	  to	  leave;	  lying	  on	  chaise;	  flushed:	  drawn	     x	   x	    x:	  dances:	  "I	  once	  wore	  a	  gown	  with	  twelce	  ribbons	  and	  a	  double	  rosette"	   x	    x	        x	   x:	  reading	  letter:	  dining	  with	  brother	  and	  sundry	  officers	                    x	    x:	  grave	  propriety;	  extreme	  critical	  eye;	       x	              x:	  formerly	  in	  trade;	  made	  tolerable	  fortune	  and	  risen	  to	  knighthood	           33  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  3	  of	  8 Shift	  5:	   Shift	  6:	   Shift	  7:	  Netherfield	  Drawing	  23-­‐26	   Longbourn	  26-­‐28	   Walking	  to	  Meryton	  28-­‐30	   x	    x	   x:	  forthright	   x	   x:	  fetching/decorous;	        x	   x	   x	   x	        x	                      x	  x	     x	      x:	  a	  pastor	  of	  Church	  of	  England;	  cousin;	  good	  house;	  good	  money;	  clergyman;	  sensible?	   x	          x:	  officer	  (lt?);	  gentlemanlike	  appearance;	  fine	  countenance;	  a	  good	  figure;	  very	  pleasing	  address	           34  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  4	  of	  8 Shift	  8:	   Shift	  9:	   Shift	  10:	  Longbourn	  30-­‐31	   Gardens	  31-­‐	  34	   Blank	  34-­‐34	  x	     x	   x	   x	  x	    x-­‐	  moves	  away	  x	     x	     x	                 x:	  Second	  Level	  exits	              x	      very	  large	  property	  in	  Derbyshire;	  disagreeable;	   fortune/consequence;	   ill-­‐	  tempered	  man:	  considerable	  pride:	  liberal;	  generous;	  hospitable;	    sweet-­‐tempered,	   amiable,	  charming	    x	           x	   x:	  my	  father	  was	  Darcy's	  estate	  manager:	  irritated	  Darcy?	  (33)	             35  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  5	  of	  8 Shift	  11:	   Shift	  12:	   Shift	  13:	  Longbourn:	  34-­‐35	   Netherfield	  Ball:	  35-­‐39	   Longbourn:	  39-­‐43	   x	   x	  reenters(41)	  exits	  (43)	  x	   x:	  insolent?	   x:	  wit	  and	  vivacity;	  good	  sense	  and	  financial	  necessity	  forbids	  denial;	  I	  am	  not	  an	  elegant	  female	  intending	  to	  plague	  you.	  I	  am	  a	  rational	  creature	  speaking	  the	  truth	  from	  her	  heart"	  exits	  (41)	  foolish,	  headstrong	  girl.	  X(42)	  high	  spirits;	   x	        x	   x	      x	       x	  second	  level	   x	  "Wickham	  treated	  Darcy	  in	  infamous	  manner;	  most	  insolent	  thing"	  coldly	  moves	  away	                    x	  (42)	   x:	  Lizzy	  "We	  are	  each	  of	  an	  unsocial	  taciturn	  disposition,	  unwilling	  to	  speak	  unless	  we	  expect	  to	  say	  something	  that	  will	  amaze	  the	  whole	  room;	  prosterity?"	   x	  second	  level	   x	    x	  (34)	   x	   x	  	  exits	  (42)	  x(42)	  exits	  (43)	                    36  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  6	  of	  8 Shift	  14	   Shift	  15	   Shift	  16:	  March	  1814	  Longbourn	  43-­‐46	   Longbourn	  46-­‐47	   Mrs	  G's	  London	  Home	  47-­‐49	  x	     x	   x:	  I	  am	  not	  in	  love	  with	  Wickham	  but	  I	  count	  him	  as	  the	  most	  agreeable	  man	  I	  ever	  saw…	  All	  I	  can	  promise	  is	  not	  to	  be	  in	  a	  hurry."	  x	  x:	  you	  are	  too	  good	  (45)	   x:	  in	  London?	  Mrs	  G	  joins	  her	   x:	  London	  is	  agreeing	  with	  her?	     x	     x	     x:	  I	  am	  not	  a	  romantic;	  never	  was	     no	  equal	  for	  beauty,	  elegance	  and	  accomplishments;	   she	  is	  a	  child	     Letter:	  Gone	  for	  winter:	  she	  may	  wish	  wealth,	  consequence	    Deceived	  Jane	   x:	  enlivened	  the	  premises	  by	  distributing	  presents,	  describing	  new	  fasions	  and	  giving	  advice	   x:	              x	      Mr	  Darcy	  is	  the	  worst	  of	  men	       x	    x	      x:	  sensible;	  gentlemanlike	    "Let	  Wickham	  be	  your	  man.	  He	  is	  a	  pleasant	  sort	  of	  fellow	  and	  would	  jilt	  you	  credibly."	   Darcy's	  betrayal	  bcomes	  general	  knowledge	   A	  man	  in	  distressed	  circumstances	  has	  not	  time	  for	  the	  elegant	  decorums	  which	  others	  might	  observe.	  (Miss	  King)…	  I	  have	  a	  very	  poor	  opinion	  of	  young	  men	  from	  Derbyshire…	   I	  am	  sick	  of	  them	  all…	  Perhaps	  stupid	  men	  are	  the	  only	  ones	  worth	  knowing	  after	  all	           37  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  7	  of	  8 Shift	  17:	  Bare	  stage-­‐P-­‐LC	   Shift	  18:	   Shift	  19:	  Lady	  C's	  Drawing	  Room	  49-­‐53	   bare	  stage	  53	   Garden	  53-­‐55	     x:	  simly	  dressed?	   x	   x:	  RED	  CAPE	              x	   x	      if	  she	  has	  true	  darcy	  spirit	  she	  may	  like	  to	  have	  her	  own	  way.	  One	  of	  the	  most	  tactable	  creatures	  and	  a	  great	  fav	  with	  Miss	  B	                       x	    enjoy	  power	  of	  doing	  what	  he	  likes;	  Darcy	  is	  uncommonly	  kind	  to	  Bingley	  and	  takes	  a	  prodigious	  deal	  of	  care	  of	  him	     x	     x:	  second	  son	  of	  an	  earl	    x	                 38  Frederic Wood Theatre 2013 Season UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  C.D.	  August	  	  24,	  2013	  8	  of	  8 Shift	  20:	  Parsonage	  55-­‐58	   x:	  your	  social	  inferiority;	   I	  have	  never	  desired	  your	  good	  opinion,	  and	  you	  have	  certainly	  bestowed	  it	  most	  unwillingly.	  all	  loveliness	  and	  goodness	              worst	  kind	  of	  pride;	  against	  my	  will	  and	  reason,	  or	  rather	  in	  opposition	  to	  my	  character	  and	  inclination;	  your	  arrogance	  and	  selfish	  disdain	  for	  the	  feelings	  of	  others.	  open	  nature	         39  Frederic	  Wood	  Theatre	  2013	  Season	   UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  CD	  August	  24,	  2013	  1	  of	  4   Character	   Act	  2	   Shift	  1:	   Next	  morning-­‐	  Parsonage	  walk/grove	  59-­‐	  63	   Longbourn	  63-­‐67	  Mrs.	  Bennet	   want	  of	  propriety	  in	  manners	   x	  Elizabeth	   x;	  humiliated;	  blind;	  vain;	  shame;	  mortified;	   x	  Jane	   x-­‐opening;	   indifferent?	   x	  Mary	   forward;	  self-­‐willed	  carelessness;uncontrollable	   giddiness;	  ignorant;	  idle;	  vain	  x	  Kitty	   forward;	  self-­‐willed	  carelessness;uncontrollable	   giddiness;	  ignorant;	  idle;	  vain	  x;	  one	  dress	  for	  the	  new	  season-­‐	  unsuitable	  green;	  follow	  wherever	  Lydia	  leads	  Lydia	   forward;	  self-­‐willed	  carelessness;uncontrollable	   giddiness;	  ignorant;	  idle;	  vain	  x:	  ugly	  bonnet;	  exuberent	  spirits;	  spoiled	  fit;	  Charlotte	     Georgiana	   x	    Miss	  Bingley	   x-­‐opening	    Mrs	  Gardiner	     Lady	  CDB	     Housekeeper	           Mr	  Bennet	   misplaced	  wit	   x	  Mr	  Darcy	   x	   unhappy?;	   improved;	  Mr	  Bingley	   x-­‐opening	   undeserving?	  Mr	  Collins	     Colonel	  Fitz	     Mr	  Gardiner	     Wickham	  soldier:	  Red	  reginmental	   jackets	   x-­‐opening;	  hatefully	  mercenary?	   x	  Sir	  William	     Ball	  guest	     Officer	     40  Frederic	  Wood	  Theatre	  2013	  Season	   UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  CD	  August	  24,	  2013	  2	  of	  4   Shift	  2:	   Shift	  3:	   Shift	  4:	  Bare	  stage	  67-­‐68	   Carriage	  to	  Pemberley	  68-­‐69	   Pemberley	  69-­‐	  (ouside	  70)	  Inn?	  @	  72,-­‐	  75	  x	    x	  frantic	  x	   x	   x	  	  	  @73	  very	  ill;	  brown	  and	  coarse?	  Altered?	  Handsomest	  woman	  -­‐	  Darcy	  x	    x	  x	     x	     beautiful	  ornaments;	  purchased	  another	  new	  gown	  and	  parasol	    elopment	  -­‐	  lost	  forever;	       shy	  anf	  greatly	  civil	    still	  dislikes	  E	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   x	  x	   x	   x	      x-­‐	  pulltoy	  pulled	  by	  her	   x	  (69);	  pulltoy	  out	  71;	  enters	  72;	        x	       x(arrives);	   Very	  generous;	   perfectly	  well-­‐behaved,	   polite,	  unassuming;	   a	  little	  aloof	   ;	  not	  handsome	   but	  good	   featured;	  a	  little	  whimsical	   in	  civilities;	   overflowing	  with	  admiration	    no	  looks	  between	  B	  and	  G	  to	  indicate	  regard	        x	   x	   x	              41  Frederic	  Wood	  Theatre	  2013	  Season	   UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  CD	  August	  24,	  2013	  3	  of	  4   Shift	  5:	   Shift	  6:	   Shift	  7:	  Longbourn	  75-­‐78:	  The	  micheif	  of	  neglact	  and	  mistaken	  indulgence;	  a	  family	  so	  deranged;	  a	  father	  absent;	  a	  mother	  incapable	  of	  extertion	  Longbourn	  78-­‐79	   Bare	  stage	  79-­‐82	  x	   x	  wedding	  clothes:	  cambric,	  calico,	  muslin	  (78)	   x	  x	   x	   x	  x	   x	   x	  x	  (76)	  	  	  	  x	   x	  (79)	    x	   x	  (79)	   x	  x	  (sky?)	  thoughtless	   x	   x	  -­‐	  picks	  up	  Wickham	  (82)	       got	  over	  the	  most	  trying	  age	     x	    x	              x	  shocked	   x	  (79)	   x	    Guilty	  over	  Wickham?	  Doesn't	  want	  people	  to	  know	  about	  what	  he's	  done	  -­‐	  large	  sum	  of	  money	  owing	           x	  (75)	  	  	  	  	  	  x(77)	      x	  -­‐	  enter	  regular	  army	  quartered	  in	  the	  north	  (79)	   x	  (82);	  Wickham's	  worthlessness	   had	  not	  been	  well	  known;	  he	  simpers	   and	  smirks	  and	  makes	  love	  to	  us	  all	           42  Frederic	  Wood	  Theatre	  2013	  Season	   UBC's	  Theatre	  and	  Film	  Dept	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Scene/Character	   Breakdown	  Chanel	  McCartney,	  CD	  August	  24,	  2013	  4	  of	  4   Shift	  8:	   Shift	  9:	  Longbourn	  82-­‐88	   Outside	  Longbourn	  88-­‐End	  (95)	  x(84)	  	  	  x	   x	  x	   x:	  arts	  and	  allurments?	  Alliance	  a	  disgrace-­‐	  no	  family	  connections	  or	  fortune;	  obstinate,	  headstrong	  girl	  x;	  I	  assure	  you	  no	  pleasure	  or	  pain;	  see	  him	  with	  perfect	  indifference;	  can't	  stand	  gossip;	  sufer	  from	  mother's	  words;	  perfectly	  easy;	  weak?	  J&B:	  complying,	  easy,	  generous;	  goodness;	  happiness	  x	  x(84)	   x	  x(84)	  	  	  	  	  	  x	   x	            x	   x;	  sincerity	  and	  frankness?;	  not	  in	  habit	  to	  brook	   disappointment;	   pitiable	   situation;	  insulting/rude	        x	   x	  x	  (84);	  Mrs	  B	  hates	  sight	  of	  him;	  both	  received	  with	  tolerable	  ease	  and	  a	  propriety	  of	  behaviour,	   free	  from	  resentment	  or	  unnecessary	  complaisance;	  grave,	  silent,	  indifferent	  x	  x(84)	  	  	  x(dumb	  show)	     x	  (Letter)	              43  Frederic	  Wood	  Theatre	  Nov.	  12/13	  1	  of	  3	  UBC	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Costume	  Breakdown	  Designer:	  Chanel	  McCartney	  778-­‐870-­‐1976	  H.O.W:	  Jodi	  Jayck No.	   Actor/	  Actress	   Character	   Cos.	  No.	   Basic	  Costume	   Laundry	   From	   Extra	  Accessories	  (NO	  LAUNDRY)	  1	   Bethany	  Stanley	   Mrs	  Bennet	   1	   1/2	  corset	  and	  petticoat	   Handwash	   if	  nec./Dryclean	   Jacqueline	       2	   Chemise	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       3	   White	  Stockings	   Wash/Hang	  dry	   UBC	       4	   Peach	  Slippers	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       5	   Peach	  &	  Blue	  Cotton	  Long	  Sleeve	  Dress	   Pit	  pads	  wash/vodka	  spray	  if	  nec/Dry	  clean	   UBC	       6	   Ruffled	  Collar	  dickie	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       7	   Lace	  trangluar	  backed	  tuppet	   None	   UBC	       8	   Lace	  Handkerchief	   None	   Jacqueline	       9	   Lace	  off	  white	  cap	   None	   UBC	            2	   Morgan	  Churla	   Jane	   1	   1/2	  Corset	  and	  Petticoat	  with	  yellow	  pleated	  ruffle	   Vodka	  if	  Nec/Dryclean	   Jacqueline	       2	   Chemise	  with	  Yellow	  ribbon	   Wash/Dry	   Playhouse	   Blue	  Pashmina	  Shawl	  (UBC)	     3	   White	  	  Stockings	   Wash/Hang	  Dry	   UBC	       4	   Yellow	  Flats	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       5	   Yellow	  Cotton	  Dress	  with	  lace	  detail	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	            3	   Kat	  McLaughl	  in	   Elizabeth	   1	   Bra	   Hand	  Wash/Hang	  Dry	   her	  own	   Maroon	  Spencer	  (UBC)	  (Vodka	  Spray	  if	  nec)	     2	   Chemise	  with	  Blue	  Ribbon	   Wash/Dry	   Playhouse	       3	   nylon	  two	  toned	  Petticoat	   Vodka	  Spray/wash	   if	  nec/Dry	  Clean	   UBC	   Lace	  Parasol	  (UBC)	     4	   White	  Stockings	   Wash/hang	  dry	        5	   Ballet	  slipper	  shoes	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       6	   Blue	  Stripped	  Cotton	  Dress	   Vodka	  Spray/Dry	  Clean	   UBC	            4	   Natasha	  Zacher	   Mary/Charlotte/	  Miss	  De	  Bourgh	   1	   1/2	  Corset	  and	  Petticoat	  (Yellow	  and	  no	  trim)	   Vodka	  and	  Dry	  clean	   Jacqueline	     Basic	    2	   Chemise	   Wash/Dry	   Playhouse	       3	   Tights	   Wash/dry	   Her	  own	       4	   Brown	  Ankle	  Boots	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       5	   Off	  White	  Silk	  Dress	  with	  Pleated	  Trim	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	      Mary	   6	   Brown	  Stripped	  Apron	   None	   UBC	       7	   Full	  Round	  Rimmed	  Glasses	   None	   Jacqueline	      Charlotte	   8	   Mop	  Cap	  with	  Bun	  Wig	   None	   UBC	      Miss	  De	  Bourgh	   9	   Pashmina	   None	   UBC	       10	   Grey	  Bonnet	  with	  Trim	  and	  Hat	  Pin	  (UBC)	   None	   Jacqueline	            5	   Catherine	  Fergusso	   Kitty	   1	   Full	  Pink	  Floral	  Corset	   Vodka	  Spray/Dry	  Clean	   Jacqueline	       2	   Chemise	  (with	  little	  embroidered	   flowers)	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       3	   White	  Tights	   Wash/Hang	  Dry	   UBC	       4	   Light	  yellow	  nylon	  petticoat	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       5	   Periwinkle	  Blue	  with	  ribbon	  shoes	   Vodka	  Spray	   Chanel	       6	   Blue	  Cotton	  Overdress	  with	  Lace	  trim	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Drycleaning	   UBC	       6.5	   Gold	  pearl	  earrings	  and	  plain	  gold	  chain	   None	   UBC	      Georgiana	   7	   straw	  pink	  trimed	  Bonnet	  with	  long	  brown	  Wig	   None	   Jacqueline	            6	   Sarah	  Harrison	   Lydia	   1	   Bra	   wash/hang	  dry	   her	  own	   Pink	  Bonnet/Cap	  with	  Hat	  Pin	  (UBC)	     2	   Chemise	  with	  Pink	  Ribbon	   Wash/Dry	   Playhouse	   Ugly	  pink	  Bonnet	     3	   White	  Cotton	  Petticoat	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	   blue	  Bonnet	  with	  trim	  to	  attach	     4	   White	  Stockings	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       5	   Beige	  heeled	  slippers	  with	  strap	   Vodka	  Spray	   Arts	  Club	       6	   Pink	  Stripped	  Cotton	  Dress	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	       7	   Plain	  gold	  wedding	  band	   none	   Jacqueline	       8	   Pink	  Ribbon	  as	  necklace	   none	   UBC	      Housekeeper	   9	   Plain	  yellow-­‐y	  Mop	  Cap	   None	   Jacqueline	    44  Frederic	  Wood	  Theatre	  Nov.	  12/13	  2	  of	  3	  UBC	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Costume	  Breakdown	  Designer:	  Chanel	  McCartney	  778-­‐870-­‐1976	  H.O.W:	  Jodi	  Jayck No.	   Actor/	  Actress	   Character	   Cos.	  No.	   Basic	  Costume	   Laundry	   From	   Extra	  Accessories	  (NO	  LAUNDRY)	     10	   Blue	  Stripped	  Apron	   None	   UBC	            7	   Nicole	  Seykik	   Miss	  Bingley	   1	   1/2	  Corset	  with	  Lace	  Front	  Petticoat	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Cleaning	   Jacqueline	   Turban	  with	  Feather	  (UBC)	  (Miss	  Bingley)	     2	   Chemise	  with	  green	  ribbon	   Wash/Dry	   Playhouse	   Bonnet	  with	  Lace	  Trim	  (Jacqueline)	  and	  Hat	  Pin	  (UBC)(Mrs	  G)	     3	   White	  Cotton	  Stockings	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	   Large	  Mop	  Cap	  (Arts	  Club)	     4	   Beige	  Shoes	  with	  Gold	  Trim	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       5	   Pink	  Taffeta	  Over	  Dress	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	       7	   Pearl	  Necklace	  and	  4	  Pearl	  Bracelets	   None	   UBC	       7.5	   Black	  red	  jeweled	  tiara	   none	   Jacqueline	      Mrs	  Gardiner	   8	   Long	  Sleeve	  Purple	  Dress	  with	  Trim	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	       9	   Square	  Lace	  dickie	  with	  collar	   None	   UBC	            8	   Naomi	  Vogt	   Lady	  Catherine/	  Housekeeper	   1	   Bra	   Handwash/Hang	   dry	   UBC	       3	   Black	  Chemise	  with	  lace	   Wash/dry	   Playhouse	   Green	  Bonnet	  (Jacqueline)	     4	   Black	  Tights	   Wash/dry	   UBC	       5	   Black	  heeled	  Shoes	  with	  pink	  trim	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       6	   Black	  Dupinoi	  Silk	  Long	  Sleeved	  Dress	  (Housekeeper)	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Drycleaning	   UBC	       7	   cap	  with	  black	  ribbon/flat	   (Housekeeper)	   None	   Jacqueline	       7.5	   Grey	  scarf	  (Housekeeper)	   none	   UBC	       8	   Olive	  Green	  Overdress	  with	  pink	  sash	  and	  broach	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Drycleaning	   UBC	       9	   Lace	  standing	  collar	  dickie	  with	  Pink	  Cameo	  Broach	   None	   UBC	       10	   Lace	  Head	  piece	  with	  pink	  bow	   None	   UBC	       11	   Cane	   None	   Props	  UBC	       12	   6	  Rings	  and	  Pearl	  drop	  eaarings	  and	  2	  black	  bracelets	   none	   UBC	    9	   Nathan	  Cottell	   Mr	  Bennet	   1	   Under	  T-­‐Shirt	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	   Grey	  Top	  Hat	  (UBC)	     2	   White	  Cotton	  High	  Colour	  shirt	   Wash/Dry	   Jacqueline	       3	   Off	  White	  Breeches	   Vodka	  Spray/Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	       4	   Knee	  high	  ribbed	  socks	  with	  elastic	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       5	   Black	  Buckled	  Shoes	  with	  ribbon	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       6	   Light	  Blue	  double	  breasted	  Frock	  Coat	   Vodka	  Spray/Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	       7	   Stripped	  Silk	  Cravat	   none?	   UBC	       8	   Snowflake	  Cravat	  Pin	   none	   UBC	       9	   Gold	  Square	  rimmed	  glasses	   none	   UBC	            10	   Matt	  Kennedy	   Darcy	   1	   Long	  Sleeve	  Henley	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	   Grey	  and	  Black	  Top	  Hat	  (UBC)	     2	   White	  Collared	  Button	  down	  Dickie	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	   Walking	  Stick	  (UBC	  Props)	     2.5	   White	  collarless	  shirt	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       3	   Green	  Brocade	  Vest	   Vodka	  Spray/Dry	  Cleaning	   Bard	       4	   Green	  Frock	  Coat	   Vodka	  Spray/Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	       5	   Off	  White	  Breeches	   Vodka	  Spray/Dry	  Cleaning	   UBC	       6	   White	  wool	  like	  cotton	  Knee	  High	  Socks	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       7	   Black	  Riding	  Boots	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC	       8	   White	  Cotton	  Cravat	   None	   UBC	       9	   Red	  Cravat	  Pin	   None	   UBC	            11	   Daniel	  Meron	   Bingley/Gardiner	   1	   Under	  T-­‐Shirt	   Wash/Dry	    Top	  Hat	  (Arts	  Club)	  (G)	     2	   White	  High	  Collared	  Lace	  trim	  Shirt	   Wash/Dry	   Jacqueline	   Grizzly	  grey	  haired	  wig	     3	   Off	  White	  and	  Gold	  Brocade	  Vest	   Vodka/Dry	  Clean	   Bard	       4	   Navy	  Blue	  Frock	  Coat	   Vodka/Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       5	   Off	  White	  Breeches	   Vodka/Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       6	   off	  white	  wool	  like	  Cotton	  knee	  high	  Socks	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	    45  Frederic	  Wood	  Theatre	  Nov.	  12/13	  3	  of	  3	  UBC	  Pride	  and	  Prejudice	  Costume	  Breakdown	  Designer:	  Chanel	  McCartney	  778-­‐870-­‐1976	  H.O.W:	  Jodi	  Jayck No.	   Actor/	  Actress	   Character	   Cos.	  No.	   Basic	  Costume	   Laundry	   From	   Extra	  Accessories	  (NO	  LAUNDRY)	     7	   Black	  Boots	   Vodka	   IMS	       8	   Fluffy	  Lace	  Cravat	   None	   UBC	       9	   Green	  High	  Collared	  Vest	  (Gardiner)	   Vodka/Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       10	   Courdoroy	  Frock	  Coat	  (Gardiner)	   Vodka/Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       11	   Cotton	  Cravat	  (Gardiner)	   None	   UBC	            12	   Luke	  Johnson	   Sir	  William	   1	   Under	  T-­‐Shirt	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	   White	  Court	  Wig	  (UBC)	  (Sir	  W)	     2	   Beige	  Zip	  Up	  Fat	  Suit	   Hand	  Wash/	  Hang	  Dry	   UBC	   Black	  round	  glasses	  (Jacquline)	  (Collins)	     3	   White	  Billowy	  Shirt	   Wash/Dry	   Jacqueline	   Black	  Hat	  with	  buckle	  (UBC)	     4	   Silk	  cravat	  with	  Lace	   None	   UBC	       5	   Big	  Beige	  Breeches	  with	  Suspenders	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       6	   Grey	  Cotton	  Stockings	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       7	   Black	  Boots	  (Size	  9)	   Vodka	  Spray	   UBC?	       8	   Maroon	  Frock	  Coat	  with	  Lace	  Cuff	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       10	   1/2	  Green/Gold	  Vest	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   Bard	      Collins	   11	   Black	  Breeches	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       12	   Long	  Black	  Vest	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       13	   No	  Collar	  Black	  Frock	  Coat	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       14	   Buckle	  Black	  Shoes	   Vodka	  Spray	   Arts	  Club	            13	   Thomas	  Elms	    Officer	    1	   Under	  T-­‐shirt	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	   Black/Gold	  Tricorn	       2	   High	  Collared	  Cotton	  Military	  shirt	   Wash/Dry	   IMS	   Black	  Top	  Hat	  (Coachman	  and	  Col	  F)	     3	   White	  Breeches	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   IMS	   Walking	  Stick	     4	   Pink	  Knee	  high	  Socks	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       5	   Black	  Boots	   vodka	  spray	   IMS	       5.5	   White	  button	  down	  vest	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   IMS	       6	   Red/blue	  Coat	  with	  Trim	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   IMS	      Servant	   8	   Black	  Servant's	  Frock	  Coat	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	      Col	  Fitzwilliam	   9	   Cotton	  Cravat	  (Servant	  and	  Fitzw)	   none	   UBC	       9.5	   Stripped	  high	  collared	  cotton	  shirt	         10	   Reddish	  Brown	  Double	  Breasted	  Jacket	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   bard	       12	   Brocade	  Grey	  Vest	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       13	   Brown	  Breeches	   (Fitz/coachman)	   Vodka	  Spray/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	             14	   Nick	  Preston	    Farmer	    1	   Under	  T-­‐Shirt	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       2	   White	  Billowy	  Cotton	  Shirt	   Wash/Dry	   Jacqueline	       3	   Blue	  Jacket	  with	  Purple	  Lining	   Vodka/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       4	   Stripped	  Beige	  Blue	  Breeches	   Vodka/	  Dry	  Clean	   Jacqueline	       5	   Blue	  Double	  Breasted	  Vest	   Vodka/	  Dry	  Clean	   UBC	       6	   Off	  white	  cravat	  with	  lace	   None	   UBC	       7	   Cotton	  White	  Socks	   Wash/Dry	   UBC	       8	   Cotton	  Cravat	   None	   UBC	      Wickham	   9	   Red	  Coat	  with	  Trim	   Vodka/	  Dry	  Clean	   IMS	   Tricorn	  (IMS)	     10	   White	  Breeches	   Vodka/	  Dry	  Clean	   IMS	       10.5	   White	  button	  down	  vest	  with	  ties	   Vodka/	  Dry	  Clean	   IMS	       11	   Red	  Sash	   none	   IMS	       12	   Black	  Boots	   Vodka	   IMS	       13	   Wedding	  band	  gold	  plain	   None	   UBC	     

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