UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Clarinet ornamentation techniques influenced by the traditional use of an historical instrument : the… Milosevic, Milan 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2015_september_milosevic_milan.pdf [ 26.65MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0167278.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0167278-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0167278-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0167278-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0167278-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0167278-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0167278-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0167278-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0167278.ris

Full Text

CLARINET	  ORNAMENTATION	  TECHNIQUES	  INFLUENCED	  BY	  THE	  TRADITIONAL	  USE	  OF	  AN	  HISTORICAL	  INSTRUMENT	  –	  THE	  TÁROGATÓ	  	  	  by	  	  Milan	  Milosevic	  	  	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  	  	  DOCTOR	  OF	  MUSICAL	  ARTS	  in	  The	  Faculty	  of	  Graduate	  and	  Postdoctoral	  Studies	  (Orchestral	  Instrument)	  	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  	  May	  2015	  	  	  ©	  Milan	  Milosevic,	  2015	   ii	  Abstract	  	   There	  is	  very	  little	  literature	  available	  related	  to	  traditional	  ornamentation	  performance	  conventions	  from	  Eastern	  Europe.	  This	  dissertation	  thus	  explores	  the	  ornamentation	  performed	  on	  the	  tárogató,	  a	  Hungarian	  historical	  instrument,	  as	  the	  inspiration	  for	  new	  ornaments	  to	  be	  used	  both	  in	  existing	  and	  new	  compositions	  for	  the	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet.	  As	  a	  result	  of	  research	  and	  study	  awards	  received	  from	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  and	  the	  British	  Columbia	  Arts	  Council,	  I	  conducted	  fieldwork	  with	  Hungarian	  and	  neighbouring	  Romanian	  and	  Serbian	  folk	  performers	  in	  their	  natural	  performance	  environments.	  Throughout	  the	  twentieth	  century,	  such	  performers	  developed	  their	  own	  variety	  of	  music	  ornamentation	  and	  articulation	  methods	  on	  the	  tárogató	  related	  to	  several	  different	  cultural	  regions	  of	  current-­‐day	  Hungary,	  Romania,	  and	  Serbia.	  In	  this	  dissertation,	  these	  traditional	  ornaments	  are	  used	  as	  an	  inspiration	  to	  create	  six	  new	  different	  ornamental	  models.	  They	  can	  be	  performed	  on	  either	  the	  clarinet	  or	  tárogató.	  	  	   I	  begin	  by	  outlining	  the	  various	  interpretations	  of	  the	  most	  similar	  ornaments	  to	  my	  new	  models	  and	  the	  symbols	  used	  to	  depict	  them	  in	  related	  treatises	  used	  in	  Western	  Europe	  from	  the	  early	  seventeenth	  century	  until	  modern	  times.	  For	  the	  purpose	  of	  clarity	  and	  differentiation	  from	  the	  historical	  ornamental	  symbols	  most	  commonly	  used	  today,	  I	  designed	  a	  set	  of	  six	  new	  visual	  depictions	  of	  the	  ornaments,	  accompanied	  by	  a	  practical	  guide	  to	  the	  new	  side-­‐key	  and	  finger-­‐bounce	  fingerings	  and	  the	  resultant	  pitch	  measurements.	  I	  conclude	  with	  several	  compositional	  examples	  representing	  my	  suppositions	  on	  the	  most	  tasteful	  ornamental	  placements	  within	  the	  possible	  variety	  of	  musical	  contexts	  of	  traditional	  and	  contemporary	  origins.	  Such	  suppositions	  are	  not	  intended	  to	  change	  the	  texture	  or	  the	  original	  composers'	  suggestions	  on	  ornaments;	  	   iii	  rather,	  it	  is	  my	  wish	  to	  use	  them	  to	  underline	  and	  amplify	  the	  traditional	  style	  in	  which	  the	  piece	  is	  to	  be	  performed.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   iv	  Preface	  	   Unless	  otherwise	  noted,	  the	  author	  created	  all	  images	  in	  this	  dissertation.	  In	  chapters	  4	  and	  5,	  instrumental	  fingerings,	  notational	  values,	  microtonal	  pitch	  measurements,	  and	  notational	  tables	  are	  the	  original	  work	  of	  the	  author.	  For	  pitch	  measurements	  I	  used	  the	  orchestral	  tuner	  Korg	  OT-­‐120.	  I	  measured	  the	  intonation	  of	  two	  different	  clarinet	  models:	  a	  Buffet-­‐Crampon	  Elite,	  and	  a	  Backun	  MoBa.	  For	  measurements	  on	  the	  tárogató,	  I	  used	  the	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató,	  Golden	  Voice,	  North-­‐American	  model.	  For	  creating	  the	  ornamental	  notation,	  I	  used	  the	  software	  Finale	  2014c.	  And	  for	  designing	  the	  original	  visuals	  for	  the	  new	  music	  ornaments,	  I	  used	  Wacom	  Tablet	  Utility.	  	   I	  received	  permission	  from	  the	  authors	  Liz	  Mellish	  and	  Nick	  Green	  for	  use	  of	  the	  regional	  tárogató	  and	  saxophone	  map	  used	  in	  chapter	  2.	  To	  use	  the	  two	  tárogató	  images	  under	  the	  Accession	  numbers	  5453	  and	  5455	  in	  chapter	  2,	  I	  received	  consent	  from	  Dr.	  Darryl	  Martin,	  principal	  curator	  of	  the	  Musical	  Instrument	  Museums	  Edinburgh.	  Other	  images	  in	  the	  same	  chapter	  are	  in	  the	  public	  domain,	  with	  copyrights	  expired.	  For	  using	  the	  musical	  examples	  by	  composer	  Derek	  Bermel	  in	  chapter	  6,	  I	  received	  consent	  and	  permission	  by	  XPyre	  Music,	  administered	  by	  Songs	  of	  Peer,	  Ltd.	  Musical	  examples	  by	  Béla	  Bartók	  from	  Romanian	  Folk	  Dances	  in	  chapter	  6	  were	  used	  with	  permission	  by	  Universal	  Edition	  A.G.,	  Wien.	  Other	  examples	  in	  chapter	  6	  are	  used	  with	  permission	  by	  the	  composers.	  	  	  	   	  	   v	  Table	  of	  contents	  Abstract...................................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Preface....................................................................................................................................................	  iv	  Table	  of	  contents..................................................................................................................................	  v	  	  List	  of	  tables.........................................................................................................................................	  vii	  	  List	  of	  figures........................................................................................................................................	  ix	  List	  of	  videos.......................................................................................................................................	  xix	  Acknowledgments..............................................................................................................................	  xx	  Dedication...........................................................................................................................................	  xxi	  	  1	   Introduction..............................................................................................................................	  1	  1.1	   Background	  and	  motivation………………………………………………………………………	  1	  1.2	   Methodology	  and	  justification…………………………………………………………………...	  3	  1.3	   Dissertation	  overview……………………………………………………………………………….	  5	  	  2	   The	  history	  and	  development	  of	  the	  tárogató...............................................................	  7	  	   2.1	   The	  tárogató	  before	  1900………………………………………………………………………….	  7	  	   2.2	   The	  reformed	  tárogató	  after	  1900.…………………………………………………………..	  11	  	  3	   Historical	  ornamentation	  references	  to	  the	  clarinet	  ornamentation	  models	  1	  	   through	  6.................................................................................................................................	  22	  	   3.1	   Upper	  mordent……………………………………………………………………………………….	  23	  	   	   3.1.1	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  model	  1	  and	  model	  2……………………………...	  27	  	   	   3.1.2	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6…………………………………………………………………	  30	  	   3.2	   Snapped	  turn………………………………………………………………………………………….	  30	  	   3.2.1	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  3	  and	  model	  4…………………………………...	  31	  	   3.2.2	   Charged	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  5…………………………………………………….	  33	   	  	   vi	  4	   New	  ornamentation	  performance	  techniques	  for	  the	  clarinet.............................	  34	  	   4.1	   Flexible	  hand	  and	  key	  pressing	  fingering	  posture…………………………………….	  34	  	   4.2	   Ornamental	  fingering	  charts	  and	  notation	  for	  clarinet…………….………………..	  41	  4.2.1	  	  	  	  Charged	  upper	  mordents	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  fingering	  charts,	  in	  	  the	  mid-­‐throat	  and	  the	  upper-­‐chalumeau	  clarinet	  register…………….	  42	  4.2.2	   Charged	  upper	  mordents	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  fingering	  charts	  in	  	   the	  lower-­‐throat,	  upper-­‐chalumeau	  and	  the	  corresponding	  upper-­‐	   clarion	  clarinet	  register………………………………………………………………..	  49	  4.2.3	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  and	  charged	  snap	  fingering	  charts	  on	  the	  	   lower	  joint	  of	  the	  clarinet……………………………………………………………..	  61	  	  5	   Ornamental	  fingering	  charts	  and	  notation	  for	  the	  tárogató..................................	  69	  5.1	   Charged	  upper	  mordents	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  fingering	  charts	  in	  the	  first	  	   and	  second	  registers	  on	  the	  upper	  joint	  of	  the	  tárogató…………………………….	  69	  5.2	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  and	  charged	  snap	  fingering	  charts	  in	  the	  low	  and	  high	  	   tárogató	  register	  using	  the	  lower	  joint	  of	  the	  tárogató……………………………...	  80	  	  6	   Conclusion...............................................................................................................................	  85	  	   6.1	   Placement	  of	  the	  ornamental	  models	  in	  a	  musical	  context………………………..	  85	  	   6.2	   Reflections	  on	  the	  future…………………………………………………………………………	  97	  Bibliography........................................................................................................................................	  98	  	  	   	  	  	  	   	  	  	   	  	   vii	  List	  of	  tables	  	  Table	  4.1	   Tonal	  and	  the	  microtonal	  measurements,	  derived	  from	  pressing	  the	  right-­‐	  	   	   hand	  side-­‐keys	  in	  the	  clarinet	  throat	  registers………………………………………….	  39	  	  Table	  4.2	   Tonal	  and	  microtonal	  measurements,	  derived	  from	  pressing	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  	  	   	   side-­‐keys	  in	  the	  clarinet	  chalumeau	  and	  throat	  registers………………………….	  40	  	  Table	  4.3	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  with	  the	  resulting	  	   	  	   	   ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  C5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register,	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  	  	   	   second	  and	  third	  side-­‐key……………………………………………………………………….	  52	  	  Table	  4.4	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  with	  the	  resulting	  	   	  	   	   ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  B5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register,	  using	  the	  second	  and	  third	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  54	  	  Table	  4.5	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  	   	  	   	   ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  second	  and	  	  	   	   third	  side-­‐key…………………………………………………………………………………………	  56	  	  Table	  4.6	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  	   	  	   	   ascending	  intervals	  on	  an	  A5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  first	  and	  third	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  58	  	  Table	  4.7	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  	   	  	   	   ascending	  intervals	  on	  an	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  first	  and	  	  	   	   third	  side-­‐key…………………………………………………………………………………………	  60	  	  Table	  4.8	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  interval	  on	  a	  G5	  in	  the	  	  	   	   clarion	  register	  using	  the	  third	  side-­‐key…………………………………………………..	  61	  	  Table	  5.1	   Tonal	  and	  microtonal	  measurements	  derived	  from	  pressing	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  	  	   	   tárogató	  side-­‐keys	  in	  the	  low	  register……………………………………………………...	  69	  	  Table	  5.2	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  	  	   	   creates	  an	  ascending	  interval	  on	  a	  B5	  tone	  using	  the	  second	  side-­‐key……….	  73	  	  	   viii	  Table	  5.3	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  	  	   	   creates	  an	  ascending	  microtonal	  interval	  on	  a	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  tone	  using	  the	  second	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  75	  	  Table	  5.4	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  	  	   	   with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  microtonal	  interval	  on	  a	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  tone	  using	  the	  	  	   	   second	  side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………	  77	  	  Table	  5.5	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  	  	   	   results	  in	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  an	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  tone	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  79	  	  Table	  5.6	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  	  	   	   with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  G5	  tone	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  80	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   ix	  List	  of	  figures	  	  Figure	  2.1	   Eastern	  tárogatók	  and	  zurna:	  a)	  Beliczay	  tárogató;	  b)	  Bethlen’	  tárogató;	  c)	  	  	   	   Turkish	  zurna	  (Vasárnapi	  Ujság,	  1859)……………………………………………………...	  9	  Figure	  2.2	   The	  double-­‐reed	  tárogató,	  Hungarian	  shawm-­‐like	  instrument	  (Kuruc	  	   	  	   	   tárogató	  avagy	  töröksíp)…………………………………………………………………………	  10	  Figure	  2.3	   János	  Stowasser	  patent	  of	  September	  15,	  1897………………………………………..	  12	  	  Figure	  2.4	   Jozśef	  Schunda	  patent	  of	  September	  17,	  1897………………………………………….	  13	  	  Figure	  2.5	   Original	  W.	  J.	  Schunda	  Tárogató:	  circa	  1900-­‐1920.	  From	  Sir	  Nicholas	  	   	  	   	   Shackelton,	  Musical	  Instruments	  Museum,	  Edinburgh.	  Accession	  number,	  	  	   	   5455………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  14	  	  Figure	  2.6	   Original	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató.	  From	  Sir	  Nicholas	  Shackleton	  Collection,	  	  	   	   Musical	  Instruments	  Museum,	  Edinburgh.	  Accession	  number,	  5453…………	  15	  	  Figure	  2.7	   Romanian	  taragot	  (tárogató)	  and	  saxophone	  regional	  map,	  last	  updated	  in	  	  	   	   2005………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  16	  	  Figure	  2.8	   Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  -­‐	  Golden	  Voice,	  2013.	  Dedicated	  North-­‐American	  	  	   	   tárogató,	  made	  in	  part	  through	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  graduate	  	  	   	   research	  project	  collaboration………………………………………………………………...	  20	  	  Figure	  3.1	   Upper	  mordent	  symbol	  (snap	  or	  Schneller)……………………………………………...	  24	  	  Figure	  3.2	   Pralltriller	  (compact	  trill)	  or	  Abzug………………………………………………………….	  24	  	  Figure	  3.3	   C.P.E.	  Bach	  Essay,	  figure	  162……………………………………………………………………	  26	  	  Figure	  3.4	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  model	  1…………………………………………………………….	  28	  	  Figure	  3.5	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  with	  the	  staccatissimo	  at	  the	  end,	  model	  2….………	  28	  	  Figure	  3.6	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6,	  half	  trill	  on	  a	  C3	  on	  the	  clarinet……………………………	  30	  	  Figure	  3.7	   The	  most	  common	  music	  symbol	  for	  the	  turn…………………………………………..	  31	  	  	   x	  Figure	  3.8	   C.P.E.	  Bach	  Essay,	  Example	  in	  the	  original	  figure	  162………………………………..	  31	  	  Figure	  3.9	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  (compound	  ornament),	  model	  3………………………………	  32	  	  Figure	  3.10	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  (compound	  ornament),	  model	  4………………	  33	  	  Figure	  3.11	   	  Charged	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  5,	  on	  an	  A3	  on	  the	  clarinet………………………...	  33	  	  Figure	  4.1	   The	  tárogató	  and	  the	  clarinet	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys…………………………………..	  35	  	  Figure	  4.2	   The	  right-­‐hand	  index	  finger	  snap-­‐pressing	  practice	  routine	  and	  side-­‐key	  	  	   	   contact	  point…………………………………………………………………………………………..	  36	  	  Figure	  4.3	   The	  finger	  snap-­‐pressing	  open-­‐palm	  movement	  toward	  the	  clarinet	  side-­‐keys	  	   	   one,	  two	  and	  three………………………………………………………………………………….	  36	  	  Figure	  4.4	   The	  right-­‐hand	  index	  finger	  pressing	  contact	  points	  on	  the	  clarinet	  side-­‐keys	  	  	   	   one,	  two	  and	  three………………………………………………………………………………….	  37	  	  Figure	  4.5	   Bb4-­‐A#4	  throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key……….	  42	  	  Figure	  4.6	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  (Schneller	  or	  Pralltriller),	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐	  	   	   A#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  B4	  -­‐20,	  a	  minor	  second	  	  	  	   	   step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  20	  cents……………………………………….	  42	  	  Figure	  4.7	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  created	  by	  pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  B4	  -­‐20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  20	  cents….………………	  43	  	  Figure	  4.8	   A4	  throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key……………….	  43	  	  Figure	  4.9	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  A4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  	   	  	   	   third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A#4	  +20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  	  	   	   tone,	  plus	  20	  cents………………………………………………………………………………….	  44	  	  Figure	  4.10	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   an	  A.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A#4	  +20,	  a	  minor	  	   	  	   	   second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  20	  cents………………………………	  44	  	  	   xi	  Figure	  4.11	   Ab4-­‐G#4 throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  45	  	  Figure	  4.12	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  	  	   	   third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A#4	  +10,	  a	  major	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  	  	   	   tone,	  plus	  10	  cents………………………………………………………………………………….	  45	  	  Figure	  4.13	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  G#4	  +10,	  an	  	  	   	   ascending	  unison	  microtone	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  10	  	   	  	   	   cents…………………………………………………………………………….………………………..	  	  46	  	  Figure	  4.14	   G4	  open	  throat-­‐tone	  fingering	  using	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key…………..	  46	  	  Figure	  4.15	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  G4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4	  +20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  	  	   	   plus	  20	  cents…………………………………………………………………………………………..	  47	  	  Figure	  4.16	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  	  	   	   G4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  A4	  +20,	  perfect	  unison	  plus	  20	  	  	   	   cents,	  a	  microtonal	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone.	  Note	  A4	  used	  in	  this	  	  	   	   notational	  example	  is	  visual	  approximation……………………………………………..	  47	  	  Figure	  4.17	   Gb4-­‐F#4	  throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  48	  	  Figure	  4.18	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  F#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  right-­‐	  	   	   hand	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4,	  a	  minor	  third	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  	  	   	   tone………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  48	  	  Figure	  4.19	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   an	  F#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  Gb4	  +50,	  an	  ascending	  	  	   	   quartertone	  unison	  intervallic	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  50	  	  	   	   cents……………………………………………………………………………………………………....	  49	  	  Figure	  4.20	   	  F4	  throat	  tone	  and	  C5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  	  	   	   	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………	  50	  	  	   xii	  Figure	  4.21	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  F4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4	  -­‐25,	  a	  major	  third	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  	  	   	   minus	  25	  cents……………………………………………………………………………………….	  50	  	  Figure	  4.22	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   an	  F4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  Gb4,	  a	  minor	  second	  	  	   	   step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone……………………………………………………………….	  51	  	  Figure	  4.23	   E4	  throat	  tone	  and	  B5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  	  	   	   third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key……………………………………………………………………….	  52	  	  Figure	  4.24	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  E4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  leads	  to	  a	  G#4	  (+30),	  a	  major	  third	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  	  	   	   plus	  30	  cents…………………………………………………………………………………………..	  53	  	  Figure	  4.25	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   an	  E4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  F4	  +45,	  a	  major	  	  	   	   second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  45	  cents………………………………	  53	  	  Figure	  4.26	   Eb4-­‐D#4	  chalumeau	  and	  Bb5-­‐A#5,	  a	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  	   	   and	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key………………………………………………………………..	  54	  	  Figure	  4.27	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  Eb4-­‐D#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4	  -­‐45,	  an	  augmented	  fourth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  	  	   	   tone,	  minus	  45	  cents……………………………………………………………………………….	  55	  	  Figure	  4.28	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   Eb4-­‐D#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  F4,	  a	  major	  second	  	  	   	   step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone……………………………………………………………….	  55	  	  Figure	  4.29	   D4	  chalumeau	  and	  A5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  first	  and	  third	  	  	   	   ornamental	  side-­‐key……………………………………………………………………………….	  56	  	  Figure	  4.30	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  	  	   	   third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  G#4,	  an	  augmented	  fourth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  	  	   	   tone………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  57	  	  	   xiii	  Figure	  4.31	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  	  	   	   D4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  Eb3	  +45,	  a	  minor	  second	  	  	   	   step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  45	  cents………………………………………….	  57	  	  Figure	  4.32	   Db3-­‐C#3	  chalumeau	  and	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  first	  and	  	  	   	   the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key…………………………………………………………………	  58	  	  Figure	  4.33	   Charged	  upper	  mordents,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Db3-­‐C#3.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  	  	   	   third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  G#4	  -­‐45,	  perfect	  fifth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  	  	   	   minus	  45	  cents……………………………………………………………………………………….	  59	  	  Figure	  4.34	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  	  	   	   Db3-­‐C#3	  note.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  Eb4	  -­‐40,	  a	  major	  	  	   	   second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  40	  cents……………………………	  59	  	  Figure	  4.35	   C3	  chalumeau	  and	  G5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  third	  ornamental	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  60	  	  Figure	  4.36	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  C3.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  G4	  +30,	  a	  perfect	  fifth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  	  	   	   30	  cents………………………………………………………………………………………………....	  61	  	  Figure	  4.37	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  C3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  on	  a	  G5	  clarion	  	  	   	   register	  tone	  hole,	  using	  the	  left	  hand,	  the	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  	  	   	   (red	  dot)………………………………………………………………………………………………...	  62	  	  Figure	  4.38	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  C3	  using	  the	  fourth	  left	  hand	  	  	   	   finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  G5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  	   	   twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone………………………………………………………………	  63	  	  Figure	  4.39	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  C3………………………………………………………………...	  63	  	  Figure	  4.40	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  B3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  on	  Gb5-­‐F#5	  in	  	  	   	   the	  clarion	  register,	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  	  	   	   dot)………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  63	  	  Figure	  4.41	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  B3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  	  	   	   finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  Gb5-­‐F#5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  	  	  	   	   register	  is	  a	  twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  (red	  dot)……………………………..	  64	  	   xiv	  	  Figure	  4.42	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  B3	  tone………………………………………………………..	  64	  	  Figure	  4.43	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  Bb3-­‐A#3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  on	  an	  F5	  in	  	  	   	   the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  second	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  	  	   	   (red	  dot)………………………………………………………………………………………………...	  64	  	  Figure	  4.44	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  Bb3-­‐A#3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  	  	   	   second	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  F5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  	  	   	   register	  is	  a	  twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone……………………………………………	  65	  	  Figure	  4.45	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  Bb3-­‐A#3…………………………………………………………...	  65	  	  Figure	  4.46	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  an	  A3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register,	  and	  on	  E5	  in	  the	  	  	   	   clarion	  register	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  	  	   	   dot)………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  65	  	  Figure	  4.47	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  an	  A3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  	  	   	   finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  E5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  	  	   	   twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone………………………………………………………………	  66	  	  Figure	  4.48	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  an	  A3………………………………………………………………	  66	  	  Figure	  4.49	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  G3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  a	  D5	  in	  the	  	  	   	   clarion	  register	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  	  	   	   dot)………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  66	  	  Figure	  4.50	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  G3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  fourth	  	  	   	   finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  D5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  	   	   twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone………………………………………………………………	  67	  	  Figure	  4.51	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  G3………………………………………………………………..	  67	  	  Figure	  5.1	   C4	  fingering,	  using	  the	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐key…………………………………	  70	  	  Figure	  5.2	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  (Schneller	  or	  Pralltriller),	  models	  1	  and	  2	  in	  the	  low	  	  	   	   register	  on	  a	  C4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  C#4	  -­‐30,	  a	  minor	  	  	   	   second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  30	  cents…………………………...	  70	  	  	   xv	  Figure	  5.3	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  	  	   	   C4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  leads	  to	  the	  same	  ascending	  pitch	  	  	   	   relationship	  seen	  in	  figure	  5.2………………………………………………………………....	  71	  	  Figure	  5.4	   B4-­‐B5	  fingerings	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers,	  using	  the	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐	  	   	   key………………………………………………………………………………………………………....	  71	  	  Figure	  5.5	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  B4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  C4,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  	   	  	   	   tone………………………………………………………………………………………………………..	  72	  	  Figure	  5.6	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  	  	   	   B4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  the	  same	  pitch	  relation	  as	  	  	   	   seen	  in	  figure	  5.5…………………………………………………………………………………….	  72	  	  Figure	  5.7	   Bb-­‐A#4-­‐5	  tone	  in	  low	  and	  high	  register	  key	  fingering,	  using	  the	  second	  	  	  	   	   ornamental	  side-­‐key……………………………………………………………………………….	  73	  	  Figure	  5.8	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  	  	   	   second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  C4	  -­‐50,	  a	  major	  second	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  	  	   	   minus	  50	  cents……………………………………………………………………………………….	  74	  	  Figure	  5.9	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  	  	   	   Bb4-­‐A#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  the	  same	  microtonal	  	  	   	   pitch	  relation	  seen	  in	  figure	  5.8……………………………………………………………….	  74	  	  Figure	  5.10	   A4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  register	  key	  fingering,	  using	  the	  first	  and	  the	  second	  	  	   	   ornamental	  side-­‐key……………………………………………………………………………….	  75	  	  Figure	  5.11	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  A4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  B4	  +10,	  a	  major	  second	  step	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  	  	   	   10	  cents………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  76	  	  Figure	  5.12	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   an	  A4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  Bb4,	  a	  minor	  second	  	  	   	   above	  the	  principal	  tone………………………………………………………………………….	  76	  	  	   xvi	  Figure	  5.13	   Ab-­‐G#4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers,	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  ornamental	  	  	   	   side-­‐key………………………………………………………………………………………………….	  77	  	  Figure	  5.14	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  	  	   	   second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  B4	  -­‐20,	  a	  minor	  third	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  	  	   	   minus	  20	  cents……………………………………………………………………………………….	  78	  	  Figure	  5.15	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  	  	   	   an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  an	  A4	  +50,	  a	  minor	  	  	   	   second	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  50	  cents…………………………………………	  78	  	  Figure	  5.16	   G4-­‐G5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐	  	   	   key…………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  79	  	  Figure	  5.17	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  G4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  	  	   	   side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  Bb4	  +50,	  a	  minor	  third	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  50	  	  	   	   cents………………………………………………………………………………………………………	  79	  	  Figure	  5.18	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  	  	   	   G4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  an	  A4,	  a	  major	  second	  above	  	  	   	   the	  principal	  tone……………………………………………………………………………………	  80	  	  Figure	  5.19	   G4-­‐G5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers,	  using	  the	  left	  hand,	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  	  	   	   technique	  (red	  dot)…………………………………………………………………………………	  81	  	  Figure	  5.20	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  G4	  using	  the	  left	  hand,	  fourth	  	  	   	   finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot).	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  	  	   	   octave	  above	  the	  principal	  note……………………………………………………………….	  81	  	  Figure	  5.21	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  G4………………………………………………………………..	  81	  	  Figure	  5.22	   Gb–F#4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  using	  the	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  in	  	  	   	   the	  right-­‐hand	  (red	  dot)………………………………………………………………………….	  82	  	  Figure	  5.23	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  Gb4-­‐F#4	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  	  	   	   third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  	  	   	   octave	  above	  the	  principal	  note……………………………………………………………….	  82	  	  	   xvii	  Figure	  5.24	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  Gb4-­‐F#4…………………………………………………………	  82	  	  Figure	  5.25	   F4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  with	  the	  ornamental	  fingering	  using	  the	  	  	   	   second	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  in	  the	  right-­‐hand	  (red	  dot)……………………..	  83	  	  Figure	  5.26	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  model	  5	  on	  an	  F4	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  second	  	  	   	   finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  octave	  	  	   	   above	  the	  principal	  note………………………………………………………………………….	  83	  	  Figure	  5.27	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  an	  F4………………………………………………………………	  83	  	  Figure	  5.28	   E4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  with	  the	  ornamental	  fingering	  using	  the	  third	  	  	   	   finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  in	  the	  right-­‐hand	  (red	  dot)………………………………...	  84	  	  Figure	  5.29	   Charged	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  5	  on	  an	  E4	  using	  the	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  	  	   	   technique	  with	  the	  right-­‐hand.	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  	  	   	   octave	  above	  the	  principal	  note……………………………………………………………….	  84	  	  Figure	  5.30	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  an	  E4………………………………………………………………	  84	  	  Figure	  6.1	   Model	  1	  through	  model	  6,	  illustration	  chart	  for	  the	  fast	  and	  effective	  	   	  	   	   ornamentation	  placement	  within	  the	  musical	  texture………………………………	  87	  	  Figure	  6.2	   “Girl’s	  Dance”,	  by	  Božidar	  Milošević.	  mm.53-­‐74………………………………………..	  88	  	  Figure	  6.3	   “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”,	  Dance	  number	  5,	  Poargã	  româneascä,	  by	  Béla	  	  	   	   Bartók.	  mm.1-­‐28……………………………………………………………………………………..	  89	  	  Figure	  6.4	   “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”,	  Dance	  number	  6,	  Più	  allegro,	  Mãruntel,	  by	  Béla	  	  	   	   Bartók.	  mm.1-­‐28……………………………………………………………………………………..	  90	  	  Figure	  6.5	   “Thracian	  Sketches”	  by	  Derek	  Bermel,	  The	  use	  of	  model	  1	  through	  6,	  in	  	  	   	   the	  mm.104-­‐136…………………………………………………………….……………………….	  91	  	  Figure	  6.6	   “Thracian	  Sketches”	  by	  Derek	  Bermel.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  ornamentation	  model	  3,	  	   	   model	  4	  and	  model	  5	  in	  mm.137-­‐152………………………………………………………	  93	  	  Figure	  6.7	   “Duo”	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  (per	  taragoto	  e	  clarinetto),	  composed	  by	  Ana	  	  	   	   Sokolović	  and	  dedicated	  to	  Milan	  Milosevic.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  ornamentation	  	  	   	   model	  1,	  model	  5,	  and	  model	  6	  in	  mm.1-­‐10……………………………………………...	  94	  	   xviii	  	  Figure	  6.8	   “Duo”	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  (2014)	  composed	  by	  Ana	  Sokolović.	  The	  use	  	  	   	   of	  the	  ornamentation	  model	  1,	  model	  4,	  and	  model	  6	  in	  mm.32-­‐46…………...	  96	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   xix	  List	  of	  videos	  	  Milosevic,	  Milan.	  DMA	  Lecture.	  2015.	  Video	  file……………	  http://hdl.handle.net/2429/53100	  Milosevic,	  Milan.	  DMA	  Recital.	  2015.	  Video	  file…………….	  http://hdl.handle.net/2429/53100	   	  	   xx	  Acknowledgements	  I	  offer	  my	  deepest	  gratitude	  to	  many	  faculty	  and	  staff	  at	  UBC,	  and	  all	  of	  those	  who	  inspired	  me	  to	  begin	  and	  continue	  my	  diligent	  research	  on	  these	  exciting	  new	  ornamentation	  performance	  techniques.	  I	  extend	  particular	  thanks	  to	  my	  program	  supervisors,	  Prof.	  Jesse	  Read	  and	  Prof.	  Nathan	  Hesselink,	  who	  have	  supported	  me	  with	  patience	  and	  dedication	  since	  the	  beginning	  of	  this	  artistic	  and	  educational	  journey	  here	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  School	  of	  Music.	  I	  also	  wish	  to	  extend	  my	  sincerest	  gratitude	  to	  a	  number	  of	  individuals	  for	  the	  many	  fruitful	  insights	  gleaned	  from	  the	  research	  related	  to	  this	  dissertation,	  specifically	  Dr.	  Marc	  Naylor,	  England;	  Stephen	  Fox,	  Canada;	  Morrie	  Backun,	  Canada;	  Miklós	  Szabolcsi,	  Hungary;	  Nagy	  Csaba,	  Hungary;	  Bora	  Dugić,	  Serbia;	  Božidar	  Milošević,	  Serbia;	  Prof.	  Ivan	  Elezovic,	  USA;	  Dr.	  Sid	  Robinovitch,	  Canada;	  and	  Prof.	  Ana	  Sokolovic,	  Canada.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   xxi	  Dedication	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  To	  my	  wife	  Tamara,	  daughter	  Tea,	  and	  son	  Stefan	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   1	  1	   Introduction	  1.1	   Background	  and	  motivation	  I	  was	  born	  in	  1969	  in	  the	  Federal	  Republic	  of	  Yugoslavia	  at	  the	  crossroads	  of	  the	  Balkans.	  My	  hometown	  is	  now	  located	  in	  the	  independent	  state	  of	  Serbia	  with	  the	  capital	  city	  of	  Belgrade.	  As	  a	  young	  and	  promising	  clarinet	  student	  I	  went	  through	  the	  stages	  of	  the	  state-­‐provided	  education,	  which	  culminated	  in	  a	  tenured	  professional	  position	  in	  the	  Belgrade	  Philharmonic	  Orchestra	  from	  1990-­‐1999.	  This	  afforded	  me	  the	  opportunity	  to	  travel	  frequently	  and	  to	  explore	  and	  perform	  as	  a	  solo,	  chamber,	  and	  orchestral	  musician	  in	  many	  neighboring	  countries	  including	  Serbia,	  Macedonia,	  Romania,	  Bulgaria,	  and	  Hungary.	  	  Throughout	  my	  early	  musical	  career	  and	  before	  immigrating	  permanently	  to	  Canada,	  various	  traditional	  music	  styles	  influenced	  my	  artistic	  vision.	  My	  father,	  Mr.	  Božidar	  Milošević,	  was	  a	  performer	  and	  composer	  and	  had	  an	  interest	  in	  rare	  clarinet	  music.	  He	  conducted	  research	  on	  related	  performance	  practices	  of	  the	  prominent	  Bulgarian,	  Serbian,	  and	  Romanian	  folk	  music	  performers	  in	  the	  late	  1960s.	  I	  was	  exposed	  to	  his	  ideas	  and	  folk	  music	  performance	  practices	  from	  a	  very	  early	  age,	  and	  I	  have	  approached	  them	  with	  a	  genuine	  artistic	  curiosity	  during	  my	  professional	  career.	  	  A	  significant	  part	  of	  this	  dissertation	  is	  dedicated	  to	  uncovering	  the	  long-­‐neglected	  beauty	  and	  history	  of	  the	  Hungarian	  instrument,	  the	  tárogató.	  However,	  it	  is	  the	  performance	  practices	  of	  the	  cultural	  region	  of	  southern	  Romania	  that	  caught	  my	  special	  attention,	  and	  which	  inspired	  me	  to	  summarize	  and	  transfer	  such	  experiences	  for	  classically	  trained	  clarinet	  performers.	  In	  retrospect,	  my	  first	  and	  longest	  lasting	  impression	  of	  the	  tárogató	  stems	  from	  my	  visit	  to	  Russia	  with	  my	  participation	  in	  the	  Artistic	  Olympiad	  organized	  at	  the	  international	  state	  level	  in	  Moscow	  in	  August	  of	  1985.	  	  	   2	  As	  part	  of	  the	  Yugoslavian	  national	  artistic	  delegation,	  one	  of	  many	  scheduled	  concert	  exchanges	  led	  me	  to	  two	  different	  venues,	  having	  in	  common	  the	  tárogató	  instrument	  as	  the	  featured	  solo	  instrument	  accompanied	  by	  a	  small	  folk	  ensemble.	  I	  visited	  the	  Romanian	  music	  camp,	  featuring	  a	  performance	  of	  tárogató	  music	  in	  the	  doina-­‐style,1	  with	  its	  distinctly	  free,	  reflective,	  and	  slow	  melodies.	  Shortly	  after	  the	  introduction,	  the	  Romanian	  music	  tárogató	  player,	  in	  contrast,	  employed	  an	  entirely	  different	  style,	  enriched	  by	  highly	  demanding	  virtuosic	  playing	  techniques,	  which	  I	  had	  never	  experienced	  in	  my	  life	  before.	  It	  was	  only	  many	  years	  after	  that	  I	  realized	  that	  styles	  of	  playing	  were	  different	  in	  various	  parts	  of	  Romania,	  and	  no	  single	  tárogató	  playing	  style	  can	  be	  attributed	  to	  Romanian	  folklore	  as	  a	  whole.	  	  The	  primary	  focus	  of	  this	  dissertation	  is	  to	  explore	  and	  document	  the	  influential	  techniques	  of	  existing	  folk	  ornamentation	  practices	  for	  wind	  instruments	  in	  the	  traditional	  Eastern	  European	  repertoire	  and	  suggest	  their	  use	  in	  future	  compositions	  for	  the	  clarinet	  and	  the	  tárogató.	  The	  ensuing	  performance	  technique	  guide	  offers	  an	  accurate	  realization	  of	  each	  ornament	  depicted	  on	  a	  musical	  staff,	  which	  will	  be	  of	  interest	  both	  to	  composers	  and	  performers	  interested	  in	  incorporating	  this	  ornamentation	  performance	  style	  into	  their	  own	  musical	  vocabulary.	  My	  proposed	  embellishment	  method	  is	  based	  on	  the	  historical,	  theoretical,	  notational,	  and	  descriptive	  appropriation	  of	  folk	  ornamentation	  techniques,	  devised	  from	  a	  careful	  observation	  of	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  performance	  practice	  routines.	  The	  technique	  is	  designed	  to	  lead	  to	  an	  accelerated	  and	  accurate	  execution	  of	  the	  snap-­‐pressing	  side-­‐key	  and	  finger-­‐bounce	  ornamentation	  techniques.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  The	  folk	  song	  known	  as	  doina	  is	  widespread	  throughout	  major	  cultural	  regions	  of	  Romania	  and	  is	  	  	  	   3	  In	  addition,	  this	  dissertation	  will	  further	  the	  understanding	  of	  the	  proper	  realization	  of	  these	  highly	  florid	  and	  rapid	  ornaments	  in	  specific	  musical	  contexts.	  This	  will	  encourage	  clarinet	  performers	  to	  develop	  their	  understanding	  of	  the	  specific	  hand-­‐palm	  position	  and	  its	  related	  ornamentation	  fingerings	  in	  a	  stylistically	  appropriate	  manner.	  These	  techniques	  will	  facilitate	  such	  ornamental	  interpretations,	  applicable	  in	  a	  variety	  of	  appropriate	  musical	  styles.	  	  Preliminary	  research	  has	  already	  led	  to	  new	  music	  being	  written	  for	  the	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  in	  various	  solo	  and	  chamber	  music	  settings.	  Prof.	  Ivan	  Elezovic	  from	  Jackson	  State	  University	  (U.S.A.)	  was	  commissioned	  to	  compose	  a	  piece	  for	  tárogató	  and	  computer,	  “The	  Wind	  was	  There…”	  which	  premiered	  at	  Jackson	  State	  University	  on	  November	  7,	  2014.	  Prof.	  Ana	  Sokolovic	  from	  the	  University	  of	  Montreal	  composed	  and	  dedicated	  her	  “Duo”	  for	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  in	  November	  2014	  (an	  excerpt	  of	  her	  work	  is	  found	  in	  chapter	  6).	  And	  Mr.	  Sid	  Robinovitch	  composed	  his	  klezmer	  trio	  for	  clarinet,	  bassoon,	  and	  piano,	  “Klezmer	  in	  Granada,”	  in	  March	  of	  2012.	  Three	  of	  the	  aforementioned	  pieces	  are	  from	  Canadian	  composers	  and	  have	  been	  welcomed	  into	  the	  Canadian	  new	  music	  opus.	  All	  of	  these	  works	  used	  ornamentation	  techniques	  uncovered	  through	  this	  research	  and	  study.	  	  	  1.2	   Methodology	  and	  justification	  In	  June	  and	  July	  of	  2013,	  I	  completed	  a	  portion	  of	  my	  repertoire	  and	  performance	  research	  at	  the	  International	  Tárogató	  Society	  summer	  camp	  in	  the	  southwestern	  part	  of	  the	  Hungarian	  town	  of	  Eger.	  I	  also	  visited	  the	  city	  of	  Timisoara,	  Romania,	  very	  close	  to	  the	  Serbian	  border.	  In	  both	  places	  I	  worked	  with	  local	  tárogató	  artists,	  highly	  skilled	  performers	  who	  are	  relatively	  unknown	  outside	  of	  their	  local	  communities.	  In	  addition,	  and	  	  	   4	  all	  the	  while	  pursuing	  such	  research	  in	  Hungary	  and	  Romania,	  I	  was	  able	  to	  personally	  observe	  the	  problems	  of	  classifying	  these	  ornaments.2	  I	  recorded	  the	  realization	  of	  these	  ornaments	  using	  musical	  notation	  software	  for	  the	  purpose	  of	  examining	  and	  codifying	  various	  practices	  later.	  This	  field	  research	  then	  led	  me	  to	  local	  villages	  in	  the	  close	  vicinity	  of	  the	  larger	  cities	  I	  had	  initially	  visited.	  I	  then	  followed	  up	  on	  this	  field	  research	  with	  an	  independent	  study	  (2014)	  that	  targeted	  historical	  treatises	  that	  would	  provide	  further	  context	  for	  my	  work	  (these	  sources	  appear	  in	  later	  chapters).	  As	  a	  result	  of	  my	  interest	  in	  the	  history	  of	  the	  tárogató	  and	  appropriate	  performance	  practices,	  a	  new	  instrument	  from	  the	  renowned	  manufacturer	  in	  Hungary	  was	  born.	  The	  inventor	  of	  the	  tárogató	  from	  the	  late	  19th	  century	  decided	  to	  model	  their	  first	  North-­‐American	  model	  —	  nicknamed	  the	  Golden	  Voice	  —	  based	  upon	  my	  personal	  involvement	  and	  interest	  in	  sharing	  the	  tradition.	  During	  this	  process	  I	  suggested	  changes	  to	  the	  basic	  design	  and	  materials	  used.	  In	  addition,	  a	  related	  request	  about	  specific	  tuning	  adjustments	  and	  changes	  in	  mouthpiece	  specifications	  resulted	  in	  a	  new	  tárogató	  mouthpiece.	  This	  product	  prototype	  was	  designed	  for	  my	  testing,	  including	  possible	  suggested	  improvements	  in	  the	  future	  that	  stem	  from	  this	  research.	  	  The	  folk	  ornamentation	  techniques	  inspired	  by	  Romanian	  and	  Hungarian	  tárogató	  playing	  are	  highly	  florid.	  Generally	  speaking,	  these	  represent	  a	  very	  rapidly	  deployed	  set	  of	  decorative	  musical	  elements	  that	  serve	  to	  emphasize	  and	  embellish	  traditional	  melodies.	  This	  dissertation	  aims	  to	  increase	  the	  accessibility	  of	  this	  ornamentation	  for	  clarinetists,	  ultimately,	  allowing	  many	  more	  people	  to	  learn	  and	  develop	  such	  ornamentation	  in	  various	  musical	  styles.	  It	  is	  designed	  to	  help	  clarinetists	  and	  tárogató	  players	  to	  substitute	  a	  rather	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  2	  Research	  Grant	  from	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Graduate	  Studies	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  supported	  this	  research.	  	  	   5	  conventional	  set	  of	  common	  trills	  or	  turns	  in	  a	  piece	  with	  a	  newer	  and	  a	  wider	  variety	  of	  such	  embellishments.	  This	  research	  should	  offer	  a	  far	  greater	  range	  of	  embellishing	  performance	  effects	  and	  ways	  of	  applying	  them	  in	  various	  musical	  contexts	  with	  greater	  ease.	  	   Through	  my	  efforts,	  I	  hope	  to	  inspire	  future	  research	  into	  ornamentation	  techniques,	  in	  particular	  fingerings	  for	  the	  tárogató	  and	  the	  clarinet	  in	  the	  alternate	  manner,	  or	  German	  Albert	  system,	  as	  the	  ornaments	  are	  essentially	  executed	  in	  the	  same	  way.	  	   	  1.3	   Dissertation	  overview	  In	  this	  first	  chapter	  I	  have	  offered	  an	  explanation	  of	  my	  personal	  motives	  for	  the	  dissertation	  research	  and	  the	  related	  circumstances	  that	  led	  me	  to	  where	  I	  am	  today.	  I	  also	  provided	  a	  brief	  explanation	  of	  the	  importance	  and	  possible	  benefits	  to	  performers	  and	  composers	  in	  using	  the	  ornamentation	  models	  I	  have	  created,	  stemming	  from	  embellishment	  techniques	  I’ve	  observed	  and	  learned	  through	  field	  research	  in	  Romania,	  Serbia,	  and	  Hungary	  in	  June	  and	  July	  of	  2013.	  In	  the	  second	  chapter,	  I	  present	  the	  history	  and	  development	  of	  the	  tárogató	  and	  its	  late	  ninetieth-­‐century	  reformed	  iterations	  made	  and	  patented	  by	  two	  instrument	  inventors:	  János	  Stowasser	  on	  September	  15,	  1897,	  and	  József	  Schunda	  on	  September	  17,	  1897.	  As	  already	  alluded	  to,	  my	  research	  has	  led	  to	  collaboration	  with	  the	  Hungarian	  tárogató	  manufacturer.	  	  In	  the	  third	  chapter,	  I	  offer	  an	  explanation	  of	  specific	  ornamental	  models	  related	  to	  my	  research	  based	  on	  a	  comparative	  overview	  of	  historically	  related	  ornamentation	  	  	   6	  practices,	  stemming	  primarily	  from	  the	  treatises	  of	  Christian	  Philip	  Emanuel	  Bach,	  as	  well	  as	  some	  of	  his	  contemporaries.	  I	  also	  introduce	  new	  music	  illustrations	  for	  the	  possible	  use	  of	  the	  side	  keys	  and	  the	  finger-­‐bounce	  playing	  techniques	  on	  the	  clarinet	  and	  the	  tárogató.	  The	  illustrated	  techniques	  are	  notated	  in	  the	  following	  order:	  1)	  Charged	  upper	  mordent;	  2)	  Charged	  upper	  mordent	  with	  the	  staccatissimo	  on	  the	  end	  note;	  3)	  Trilled	  snapped	  turn;	  4)	  Extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn;	  5)	  Charged	  snapped	  turn;	  and	  6)	  Charged	  snap.	  	  In	  the	  fourth	  and	  fifth	  chapters,	  I	  cover	  detailed	  hand	  and	  finger	  technique	  positions	  for	  the	  ornamentation	  realization	  on	  the	  clarinet	  and	  the	  tárogató.	  Additionally,	  I	  provide	  fingering	  charts	  and	  describe	  the	  use	  of	  the	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  one	  to	  four	  for	  the	  clarinet,	  and	  one	  and	  two	  for	  the	  tárogató.	  	  I	  conclude	  in	  chapter	  six	  by	  presenting	  my	  views	  on	  the	  proper	  placement	  of	  the	  suggested	  ornament	  models	  1	  to	  6	  in	  various	  historical	  and	  contemporary	  music	  examples.	  This	  includes	  short	  excerpts	  from	  the	  new	  piece	  “Duo”	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  (per	  taragoto	  e	  clarinetto),	  composed	  by	  Prof.	  Ana	  Sokolovic	  of	  Montreal	  University.	  It	  is	  my	  hope	  that	  this	  research	  will	  motivate	  and	  inspire	  future	  interest	  in	  commissioning	  the	  new	  music	  for	  the	  tárogató	  alongside	  the	  possible	  inclusion	  of	  my	  ornamental	  models.	  Any	  further	  enhancement	  of	  the	  stated	  goals	  should	  be	  generated	  from	  the	  emerging	  interest	  in	  the	  tárogató	  as	  a	  newly	  introduced	  instrument	  to	  the	  North-­‐American	  community	  of	  performers	  and	  composers,	  who	  are	  always	  proactively	  searching	  for	  new	  and	  challenging	  expressive	  tools.	  	  	   	  	  	   7	  2	   The	  history	  and	  development	  of	  the	  tárogató	  	  In	  this	  chapter	  I	  briefly	  examine	  the	  origins	  of	  the	  tárogató,	  outlining	  the	  technical	  advances	  of	  various	  period	  instruments	  related	  to	  the	  emergence	  of	  the	  modern	  instrument	  as	  we	  see	  it	  today.	  For	  clarity,	  I	  will	  divide	  this	  historical	  overview	  into	  periods	  before	  and	  after	  1900	  AD.	  	  	  2.1	   The	  tárogató	  before	  1900	  The	  Hungarian	  tárogató	  is	  believed	  to	  have	  descended	  from	  the	  Persian	  zurna.	  Old	  Romanian	  chronicles	  often	  mention	  the	  surla,	  an	  ancient	  wind	  instrument	  related	  to,	  or	  identical	  with,	  the	  middle-­‐eastern	  zurna,	  which	  is	  a	  kind	  of	  shawm	  with	  a	  double	  reed	  (Alexandru	  1980,	  99).	  The	  Hungarian	  name	  tárogató	  is	  derived	  from	  that	  of	  the	  unrelated	  Turkish	  instrument	  the	  töröksip,	  synonymous	  with	  the	  later-­‐adopted	  name	  tarogoată	  in	  Romanian:	  The	  Turks	  introduced	  the	  tárogató	  to	  Eastern	  Europe	  in	  the	  late	  seventeenth	  century,	  discovered	  by	  West	  Europeans	  in	  1683,	  when	  the	  Turkish	  troops	  were	  defeated	  near	  Vienna.	  The	  tárogató	  was	  left	  behind	  in	  Austria	  along	  with	  Turkish	  coffee	  in	  abandoned	  Turkish	  belongings.	  (Welsh	  1929,	  46)	  	  Instruments	  by	  the	  name	  of	  zurna	  can	  still	  be	  heard	  in	  Macedonia,	  Bosnia,	  and	  Kosovo;	  the	  name	  of	  sournas	  in	  Greece;	  the	  name	  of	  surla	  in	  Romania;	  and	  the	  name	  surle	  in	  Albania	  (Jansen,	  2007).	  Examples	  and	  structural	  similarities	  of	  the	  tárogató	  predecessor	  based	  on	  the	  Turkish	  instrument	  the	  zurna	  can	  be	  observed	  in	  figure	  2.1.	  The	  (proto)	  tárogató’s	  particularly	  loud	  sound	  was	  used	  by	  the	  army	  of	  the	  Kingdom	  of	  Hungary,	  led	  by	  Prince	  Francis	  Ferenc	  Rákóczi	  II,	  in	  the	  kuruc	  soldiers	  uprising	  against	  the	  Austrians	  in	  a	  war	  that	  lasted	  eight	  years	  (1703-­‐1711).	  The	  instrument	  was	  used	  	  	   8	  effectively	  as	  a	  psychological	  weapon	  in	  battle;	  its	  sound	  was	  so	  intimidating	  that	  when	  the	  Austrians	  crushed	  the	  Hungarian	  uprising	  and	  resistance	  movement	  in	  the	  battle	  of	  Zsibó	  (current-­‐day	  Oradea,	  Romania)	  on	  November	  15,	  1705,	  Austrian	  Habsburg	  Emperor	  Leopold	  I	  and	  his	  successor	  Joseph	  I,	  King	  of	  Hungary	  (henceforth	  known	  as	  Holy	  Roman	  Emperor	  from	  1705)	  forbade	  the	  continued	  existence	  of	  the	  double-­‐reed	  tárogató.	  Joseph	  I	  demanded	  that	  all	  known	  tárogatós	  from	  that	  period	  be	  destroyed,	  and	  instrument	  production	  factories	  and	  manufacturing	  tools	  burned	  to	  the	  ground	  as	  a	  symbolic	  act	  of	  a	  new	  imperial	  rule.	  A	  reproduction	  of	  this	  instrument	  is	  found	  in	  figure	  2.2	  However,	  some	  tárogatós	  were	  hidden	  and	  survived	  in	  rural	  parts	  of	  Hungary.	  János	  Pap	  writes	  about	  the	  characteristics	  of	  the	  historical	  instrument	  and	  its	  further	  innovation	  in	  the	  late	  nineteenth	  century:	  The	  historical	  tárogató	  was	  a	  double-­‐reed	  conical-­‐bore	  instrument	  similar	  to	  a	  shawm	  or	  a	  Vienna	  oboe.	  Since	  all	  living	  traditions	  of	  playing	  the	  historical	  tárogató	  in	  Hungary	  had	  died	  out	  by	  the	  1830s,	  the	  name	  was	  recycled….	  If	  we	  were	  to	  truly	  reform	  the	  ancient	  tárogató,	  we	  would	  end	  up	  with	  the	  classical	  oboe	  or	  the	  piccolo	  heckelphone	  in	  their	  most	  authentic	  forms.	  (Pap,	  1999)	  	  	  Similar	  extant	  instruments	  include	  two	  shawms	  (the	  zurla	  and	  the	  sopile)	  from	  the	  former	  Yugoslavia,	  and	  the	  Spanish	  instrument	  the	  tiple,	  the	  somewhat	  more	  sophisticated	  keyed	  relative	  of	  the	  basically	  same	  type	  of	  double-­‐reed	  instrument.	  The	  tárogató’s	  influence	  spread	  to	  Western	  Europe	  in	  the	  French	  region	  of	  Breton,	  with	  the	  instrument	  named	  the	  bombarde.	  Also,	  we	  can	  find	  a	  similar	  instrument	  further	  south	  in	  Italy,	  called	  the	  piffaro.	  Other	  than	  the	  Hungarian	  proto-­‐tárogató,	  we	  find	  a	  related	  instrument	  in	  the	  city	  of	  Tashkent,	  former	  USSR,	  under	  the	  name	  of	  surnaj	  (Anonymous	  1976,	  44).	  	  The	  tarogoată	  (or	  tárogató),	  closer	  to	  what	  we	  see	  today,	  is	  the	  perfection	  of	  such	  an	  instrument	  made	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  nineteenth	  century	  in	  Budapest.	  The	  motivation	  behind	  	  	   9	  such	  a	  change	  was	  to	  reconstitute	  and	  modify	  the	  famous	  instrument	  of	  the	  legendary	  Hungarian	  kuruc	  soldiers.	  It	  was	  not	  uncommon	  to	  use	  a	  modified	  clarinet	  mouthpiece	  and	  a	  single	  reed,	  adapting	  it	  on	  a	  conical	  body	  like	  that	  of	  a	  soprano	  saxophone	  and	  using	  German	  fingering	  similar	  to	  the	  oboe.	  	  The	  tárogató	  sound	  and	  nostalgic	  character	  was	  well	  suited	  for	  mellow	  and	  lyrical	  doina	  songs.	  It	  was	  also	  performed	  with	  astonishing	  virtuosity	  in	  fast	  dances	  in	  certain	  parts	  of	  Romania,	  which	  promoted	  its	  spread	  to	  other	  provinces	  during	  the	  last	  quarter	  of	  the	  nineteenth	  century,	  most	  notably	  in	  the	  Romanian	  region	  of	  Transylvania	  (Alexandru	  1980,	  99).	  	  Figure	  2.1	   Eastern	  tárogatók	  and	  zurna:	  a)	  Beliczay	  tárogató;	  b)	  Bethlen’	  tárogató;	  c)	  Turkish	  zurna	  (Vasárnapi	  Ujság,	  1859)3	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3	  This	  image	  is	  in	  the	  public	  domain.	  	  	   10	  Figure	  2.2	   The	  double-­‐reed	  tárogató,	  Hungarian	  shawm-­‐like	  instrument	  (Kuruc	  tárogató	  avagy	  töröksíp)4	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  Today,	  preserved	  instruments	  from	  various	  historical	  periods	  are	  displayed	  in	  the	  Boosey	  &	  Hawkes	  collection	  of	  the	  Horniman	  Museum	  in	  London,	  and	  in	  the	  Sir	  Nicholas	  Shackelton	  Edinburgh	  Musical	  Instruments	  collection.	  Other	  exemplars	  exist	  in	  various	  private	  collections,	  and	  are	  sometimes	  presented	  at	  the	  International	  Tárogató	  Conference	  in	  either	  Eger	  or	  Vaja,	  small	  historical	  towns	  near	  Nyíregyháza	  in	  Hungary.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  4	  This	  image	  is	  in	  the	  public	  domain.	  	  	   11	  2.2	   The	  reformed	  tárogató	  after	  1900	  After	  1900	  the	  name	  tárogató	  was	  recycled	  to	  define	  a	  new	  type	  of	  instrument.	  This	  reformed	  tárogató	  can	  be	  compared	  to	  a	  soprano	  saxophone,	  as	  both	  Venzel	  József	  Schunda	  and	  János	  Stowasser	  designed	  the	  bore	  proportion	  similar	  to	  the	  modern	  soprano	  saxophone	  design,	  and	  they	  were	  probably	  previously	  influenced	  by	  it.	  However,	  unlike	  the	  soprano	  saxophone,	  the	  tárogató	  body	  was	  made	  out	  of	  wood,	  and	  key	  work	  was	  modeled	  on	  a	  simple	  German	  fingering	  system.	  János	  Pap	  has	  described	  these	  changes:	  Schunda	  V.	  József	  built	  a	  65-­‐	  to	  70-­‐cm-­‐long,	  conical	  instrument	  made	  from	  palisander	  wood	  with	  a	  clarinet-­‐like	  mouthpiece,	  that	  is,	  a	  soprano	  saxophone	  with	  contemporary	  German	  oboe	  key	  work.	  Schunda	  called	  his	  modified	  tárogató	  an	  "improved"	  tárogató	  and	  designed	  it	  for	  the	  millennial	  festivities	  in	  Hungary	  –	  the	  thousandth	  anniversary	  of	  Magyar	  settlement...	  I	  should	  also	  mention	  that	  the	  name	  "schundaphone"	  would	  have	  been	  more	  accurate	  for	  the	  instrument,	  since	  only	  the	  bore	  of	  this	  modified	  tárogató	  is	  related	  to	  the	  ancient	  tárogató...The	  clarinet	  was	  the	  most	  popular	  woodwind	  instrument	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  last	  century	  in	  Hungary.	  We	  can	  thus	  understand	  the	  application	  of	  the	  clarinet	  mouthpiece	  on	  the	  modified	  instrument.	  Moreover,	  it	  can	  be	  supposed	  that	  Schunda	  and	  János	  Stowasser	  wanted	  to	  build	  a	  German-­‐style	  wooden	  saxophone	  for	  the	  musicians	  of	  central	  Europe…	  The	  "schundaphone"	  tárogató	  gained	  success	  quickly	  thanks	  to	  its	  perfect	  acoustic	  features	  (for	  example,	  good	  responsiveness),	  to	  its	  name	  and	  its	  publicity.	  (Pap,	  1999)	  	  Others	  manufacturers	  have	  tried	  their	  own	  versions	  of	  the	  reformed	  tárogató	  based	  on	  similar	  specifications.	  One	  notable	  example	  is	  the	  French	  manufacturer	  of	  the	  tárogató,	  Jerome	  Thibouville	  Lamy,	  who	  made	  a	  copy	  of	  the	  instrument	  —	  stamped	  ‘Jetel-­‐sax’	  (i.e.,	  “J-­‐T-­‐L-­‐sax”)	  —in	  the	  1930s.	  These	  copied	  instruments	  were	  regarded	  as	  experimental	  curiosities,	  rather	  than	  mainstream	  instruments	  of	  the	  times	  (Baines	  1992,	  331).	  Figures	  2.3	  and	  2.4	  illustrate	  the	  tárogató	  instrument	  schematics	  as	  part	  of	  Schunda	  and	  János	  Stowasser’s	  instrument	  patent	  application.	  The	  basic	  model,	  still	  unperfected	  but	  reformed,	  shows	  many	  obvious	  acoustical	  design	  trials.	  Later	  designs	  would	  improve	  upon	  these	  schematics	  by	  adding	  the	  alternate	  fingering	  relative	  to	  the	  Böhm	  fingering	  system,	  	  	   12	  and	  by	  adding	  additional	  vent	  holes	  at	  the	  bottom	  of	  the	  instrument	  (missing	  on	  these	  first	  patent	  charts).	  Two-­‐rowed	  five	  acoustic	  holes	  were	  added,	  designed	  to	  stabilize	  the	  timbre	  as	  well	  as	  to	  refine	  the	  intonation	  balance	  of	  the	  tárogató.	  Images	  of	  both	  instruments	  are	  reproduced	  in	  figures	  2.5	  and	  2.6.	  Figure	  2.3	   János	  Stowasser	  patent	  of	  September	  15,	  18975	  (Jansen,	  2007)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  5	  This	  image	  is	  in	  the	  public	  domain.	  	  	   13	  Figure	  2.4	   Jozśef	  Schunda	  patent	  of	  September	  17,	  18976	  (Jansen,	  2007)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  6	  This	  image	  is	  in	  the	  public	  domain.	  	  	   14	  Figure	  2.5	   Original	  W.	  J.	  Schunda	  Tárogató,	  circa	  1900-­‐1920.	  From	  Sir	  Nicholas	  Shackelton,	  Musical	  Instruments	  Museum,	  Edinburgh.	  Accession	  number,	  54557	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  7	  Reproduction	  by	  permission	  of	  The	  University	  of	  Edinburgh,	  Musical	  Instruments	  Museum.	  	  	  	   15	  Figure	  2.6	   Original	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató.	  From	  Sir	  Nicholas	  Shackleton	  Collection,	  Musical	  Instruments	  Museum,	  Edinburgh.	  Accession	  number,	  54538	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  8	  Reproduction	  by	  permission	  of	  The	  University	  of	  Edinburgh,	  Musical	  Instruments	  Museum.	  	  	   16	  The	  tárogató	  quickly	  assumed	  a	  prominent	  (if	  not	  brief)	  role	  in	  the	  elitist	  rituals	  of	  Hungarian	  high	  society.	  The	  tárogató	  received	  its	  premiere	  in	  1900	  at	  the	  Paris	  World	  Expo,	  soon	  to	  gain	  a	  symbolic	  status	  in	  Hungarian	  aristocratic	  circles	  as	  the	  instrument	  of	  choice	  for	  Governor	  Miklós	  Horthy’s	  (Hungarian	  regent	  between	  World	  Wars	  I	  and	  II)	  ceremonies	  and	  entertainment	  (Pap,	  1999).	  And	  in	  the	  1920s	  the	  tárogató	  was	  brought	  to	  Banat	  (Romania),	  where	  it	  became	  very	  popular	  under	  the	  name	  taragot.	  Comparative	  use	  of	  the	  tárogató	  and	  saxophone	  (the	  tárogató’s	  later	  main	  competitor)	  in	  Romania	  after	  1920,	  until	  approximately	  the	  early	  twenty-­‐first	  century,	  is	  illustrated	  in	  the	  following	  map	  (figure	  2.7).	  	  Figure	  2.7	   Romanian	  taragot	  (tárogató)	  and	  saxophone	  regional	  map,	  last	  updated	  in	  2005	  (Mellish	  and	  Green	  2005)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Reproduction	  by	  permission	  of	  Liz	  Mellish	  and	  Nick	  Green.	  	  	  	   17	  Through	  newly	  established	  political	  measures	  after	  World	  War	  II,	  the	  Hungarian	  government	  effectively	  discontinued	  the	  trade	  of	  German	  woodwind	  instrument	  making.	  This	  resulted	  in	  the	  discontinued	  manufacture	  of	  the	  tárogató	  in	  Hungary	  for	  many	  decades	  to	  come.	  In	  fact,	  until	  the	  fall	  of	  the	  Berlin	  wall	  in	  the	  late	  1980s,	  state	  policy	  suppressed	  the	  creation	  and	  use	  of	  the	  tárogató.	  János	  Pap	  describes	  this	  time:	  This	  current	  phenomenon	  is	  interesting	  because	  after	  World	  War	  II	  until	  the	  1980s,	  the	  modified	  tárogató	  had	  been	  practically	  silenced	  by	  those	  governing	  official	  musical	  life	  in	  Hungary.	  It	  was	  proclaimed	  by	  communist	  regimes	  to	  be	  a	  nationalistic	  musical	  instrument	  for	  irredentists…it	  was	  forbidden	  to	  play	  it	  publicly,	  radio	  recordings	  disappeared,	  the	  instrument	  making	  companies	  were	  nationalized,	  etc.	  Thus,	  it	  was	  not	  accidental	  that	  the	  instrument's	  rebellious	  character	  survived	  in	  the	  folk	  music	  of	  Hungary.	  (Pap,	  1999)	  	  Regardless	  of	  such	  ideological	  and	  post-­‐WWII	  Hungarian	  communist	  regime	  cultural	  oppression,	  however,	  the	  reformed	  modern	  tárogató	  continued	  to	  be	  manufactured	  in	  the	  neighboring	  Eastern	  European	  countries	  of	  Romania	  and	  in	  the	  Northeastern	  part	  of	  Serbia,	  then	  part	  of	  the	  Socialist	  Federal	  Republic	  of	  Yugoslavia.	  It	  was	  adopted	  most	  readily	  into	  the	  folk	  music	  of	  Hungary,	  the	  Serbian	  region	  of	  Banat,	  Vojvodina,	  and	  the	  Romanian	  rural	  region	  of	  Transylvania.	  In	  the	  late	  twentieth	  century,	  however,	  the	  tárogató’s	  function	  within	  the	  ensemble	  has	  begun	  to	  be	  substituted	  with	  more	  readily	  available	  clarinets	  or	  more	  readily	  accessible	  saxophones	  (Fox,	  2004).	  The	  difficulty	  of	  playing	  the	  instrument	  is	  certainly	  a	  factor	  in	  such	  substitutions.	  According	  to	  János	  Pap,	  “Because	  playing	  the	  clarinet	  is	  easier	  than	  playing	  the	  double-­‐reed	  tárogató	  –	  the	  former	  uses	  a	  simpler	  blowing	  technique	  and	  more	  active	  breathing	  and	  has	  a	  large	  dynamic	  range	  and	  pitch	  range”	  (Pap,	  1999).	  	  After	  the	  fall	  of	  the	  Berlin	  Wall,	  and	  following	  the	  significant	  political	  changes	  resulting	  from	  the	  fall	  of	  the	  communist	  regimes	  in	  Eastern	  Europe,	  manufacturing	  of	  the	  	  	   18	  tárogató	  returned	  at	  the	  beginning	  of	  a	  twenty-­‐first	  century.	  This	  includes	  the	  original	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  factory	  in	  Budapest,	  Hungary,	  and	  by	  Josef	  Töth,	  a	  handcrafted	  manufacturer	  located	  in	  Hungary.	  Both	  of	  these	  small	  factories	  are	  producing	  high-­‐quality	  tárogató	  instruments	  based	  on	  the	  original	  blueprints	  and	  detailed	  specifications	  of	  the	  reformed	  instrument.	  	  Today,	  many	  contemporary	  western	  performers	  are	  interested	  in	  developing	  performance	  techniques	  related	  to	  folk,	  klezmer,	  jazz,	  and	  other	  forms	  of	  world	  music.	  In	  North	  America,	  some	  performers	  have	  adopted	  the	  tárogató,	  though	  generally	  only	  as	  a	  tool	  for	  satisfying	  their	  artistic	  and	  expressive	  curiosity,	  rather	  than	  integrating	  the	  instrument	  into	  more	  mainstream	  orchestral	  or	  band	  settings.	  This	  problem	  is	  amplified	  by	  the	  scarcity	  of	  published	  traditional	  Romanian	  and	  Hungarian	  folk	  music.	  The	  tradition	  of	  performing	  folk	  songs	  in	  Hungary	  and	  Romania	  is	  still	  passed	  down	  from	  generation	  to	  generation	  through	  an	  oral	  tradition.	  Prof.	  Michele	  Gingrass	  noted	  this	  in	  her	  research	  on	  the	  tárogató:	  One	  way	  musicians	  get	  to	  exchange	  different	  pieces	  is	  by	  traveling	  from	  town	  to	  town	  and	  playing	  for	  each	  other;	  moreover,	  folk	  musicians	  who	  learn	  their	  skills	  by	  ear	  early	  on	  from	  their	  parents	  or	  relatives,	  often	  find	  score	  reading	  unnecessary,	  and	  memorize	  countless	  pieces	  easily.	  (Gingrass	  1999,	  45)	  	  	  During	  the	  course	  of	  my	  research	  I	  worked	  with	  performers	  who	  successfully	  integrated	  very	  different	  tárogató	  performance	  techniques,	  of	  both	  Romanian	  folk	  and	  traditional	  Hungarian	  tárogató	  music,	  into	  their	  own	  performances	  to	  expand	  and	  enhance	  their	  own	  clarinet	  performance	  techniques.	  Notable	  efforts	  to	  promote	  this	  rarely	  used	  and	  uncommon	  instrument	  in	  the	  west	  include	  the	  work	  of	  Dr.	  Marc	  B.	  Naylor,	  who	  established	  The	  British	  Tárogató	  Association	  in	  2005;	  and	  Mr.	  Nagy	  Csaba	  from	  Hungary,	  who	  founded	  	  	   19	  the	  Rákóczi	  Tárogató	  Association	  and	  International	  Tárogató	  Congress,	  on	  February	  2,	  1992.	  	   The	  tárogató	  manufacturing	  apprentice	  and	  craft-­‐master,	  Ferenc	  Péczi	  (1913-­‐1992),	  took	  the	  tárogató	  tradition	  mantle	  under	  his	  leadership	  after	  the	  passing	  of	  the	  famous	  tárogató	  inventor,	  János	  Stowasser,	  Péczi’s	  former	  apprentice,	  Miklós	  Szabolcsi,	  continued	  in	  this	  production	  line	  from	  1992,	  to	  lead	  the	  tárogató’s	  progressive	  innovation	  and	  production	  into	  the	  twenty-­‐first	  century.	  Twenty	  years	  later	  Szabolcsi	  partnered	  with	  Dr.	  János	  Barcza	  establishing	  the	  factory’s	  new	  direction	  in	  2012.9	  	  Inspired	  by	  double	  and	  triple	  tonguing	  (also	  known	  as	  a	  multiple	  articulation	  clarinet	  technique),	  otherwise	  commonly	  used	  in	  Romanian	  folk	  tárogató	  music,	  Prof.	  Charles	  Neidich	  and	  Prof.	  Ayako	  Oshima	  developed	  the	  interchangeable	  technique	  of	  playing	  a	  single-­‐reed	  multiple	  articulation	  teaching	  method	  for	  the	  clarinet.	  It	  was	  a	  quite	  significant	  leap	  to	  transfer	  the	  multiple	  articulations	  onto	  the	  clarinet	  from	  the	  tárogató.	  This	  common	  tárogató	  technique,	  used	  in	  the	  Banat	  region	  of	  Romania	  and	  Serbia,	  is	  much	  easier	  to	  perform	  on	  the	  tárogató	  than	  on	  the	  clarinet,	  mostly	  for	  its	  lower	  air-­‐column	  resistance.	  Most	  recently,	  new	  tárogató	  production	  lines	  and	  models	  have	  emerged.	  In	  the	  spring	  of	  2013,	  the	  first	  North-­‐American	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  was	  manufactured.	  It	  was	  a	  significant	  outcome	  of	  my	  research	  into	  ornamentation	  models.	  The	  design	  of	  this	  instrument,	  officially	  nicknamed	  the	  Golden	  Voice	  (figure	  2.8),	  is	  based	  on	  technical	  and	  specific	  tuning	  requests	  as	  a	  result	  of	  my	  doctoral	  research.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  9	  Dr.	  Barcza	  was	  previously	  a	  co-­‐founder	  of	  the	  “Tarogato	  Műhely	  Kft,	  Tóth	  és	  Társa,”	  a	  small	  independent	  maker	  of	  the	  tárogató	  established	  in	  2002	  in	  Budapest,	  Hungary.	  Accessed	  July	  12,	  2014.	  http://www.tarogato.hu/	  -­‐	  !history/c1wlf.	  	  	  	   20	  Notable	  changes	  to	  the	  instrument	  include	  ergonomic	  adaptations,	  customization	  relative	  to	  the	  ornamental	  hand	  posture	  performance	  settings,	  and	  the	  tuning	  of	  the	  tárogató	  at	  ISO	  16,	  440	  Hz,	  the	  North-­‐American	  concert	  A	  tuning	  standard.	  The	  discrepancy	  between	  earlier	  Eastern	  European	  tuning	  (442-­‐444	  Hz)	  and	  the	  standardized	  pitch	  in	  North	  America	  and	  the	  United	  Kingdom	  made	  the	  tárogató	  previously	  unsuitable	  for	  performances	  in	  ensembles,	  therefore	  driving	  the	  instrument	  into	  relative	  obscurity	  and	  depriving	  it	  of	  a	  significant	  presence	  in	  the	  repertory	  known	  to	  performers,	  researchers,	  composers,	  educators,	  and	  conductors.	  	  	  Figure	  2.8	   Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  -­‐	  Golden	  Voice,	  2013.	  Dedicated	  North-­‐American	  tárogató,	  made	  in	  part	  through	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  graduate	  research	  project	  collaboration	  (Szabolcsi,	  2013)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  Reproduction	  by	  permission	  of	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató,	  Budapest,	  Hungary.	  	  	  	   21	  Today’s	  new	  and	  vastly	  improved	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  	  &	  Tóth	  és	  Társa	  modern	  instruments	  are	  made	  from	  cocobolo	  and	  granadilla	  wood.	  Cocobolo	  is	  used	  for	  the	  newly	  revamped	  and	  Hungarian	  made	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  North-­‐American	  production	  model.	  In	  the	  late	  1990s,	  Canadian	  manufacturer	  Mr.	  Stephen	  Fox	  constructed	  several	  handcrafted	  tárogatós	  in	  very	  small	  order	  numbers,	  but	  of	  very	  high	  quality	  and	  true	  to	  the	  original	  specifications	  (Fox,	  2004).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   22	  3	   Historical	  ornamentation	  references	  to	  the	  clarinet	  ornamentation	  	   models	  1	  through	  6	  	   To	  further	  the	  knowledge	  of	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  ornamental	  performance	  practices,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  understand	  traditional	  symbols	  and	  proper	  executions	  described	  in	  related	  historical	  treatises.	  This	  chapter	  reviews	  the	  history,	  treatment,	  and	  further	  development	  of	  embellishments	  related	  to	  this	  dissertation	  research.	  Two	  works	  in	  particular	  are	  worth	  mentioning	  in	  this	  context.	  The	  first	  is	  Carl	  Philipp	  Emanuel	  Bach’s	  Essay	  on	  the	  True	  Art	  of	  Playing	  Keyboard	  Instruments	  (Versuch	  über	  die	  wahre	  Art	  das	  Clavier	  zu	  spielen)	  of	  1753.	  The	  second	  is	  Joachim	  Johann	  Quantz’s	  On	  Playing	  the	  Flute	  (Versuch	  einer	  Anweisung	  die	  Flöte)	  of	  1752.	  They	  are	  still	  considered	  the	  most	  detailed	  and	  important	  educational	  manuals	  for	  ornamentation	  in	  late	  eighteenth-­‐century	  music,	  and	  they	  have	  been	  used	  for	  post-­‐Baroque	  ornamental	  interpretation	  to	  this	  day.	  	  	   C.	  P.	  E.	  Bach’s	  work	  was	  especially	  helpful	  for	  study	  and	  furthered	  my	  research	  into	  suggested	  ornamental	  treatments	  in	  the	  relevant	  traditional	  and	  contemporary	  repertoire.	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  established	  an	  instructional	  framework	  that	  provided	  unprecedented	  clarity	  for	  the	  ornamental	  placement	  and	  proper	  interpretation	  of	  ornamentation	  symbols	  of	  late	  eighteenth-­‐century	  music.	  In	  addition,	  he	  moved	  beyond	  the	  empirical	  technical	  execution	  of	  theoretical	  notational	  concepts	  and	  stressed	  the	  need	  to	  explore	  and	  capture	  the	  deep	  emotional	  content	  within	  the	  composition,	  so	  that	  such	  passions	  could	  be	  projected	  to	  and	  felt	  by	  listeners.	  His	  dedication	  to	  a	  description	  of	  the	  meaningful	  understanding	  of	  human	  emotions	  and	  musical	  context	  is	  clearly	  evident	  in	  his	  passionate	  appeal	  to	  connect	  the	  performer	  with	  the	  listener.	  Bach	  states	  that	  the	  performer	  must	  of	  necessity	  first	  feel	  all	  of	  	  	   23	  the	  affects	  that	  he	  hopes	  to	  arouse	  in	  his	  audiences,	  for	  the	  revealing	  of	  his	  own	  will	  stimulate	  a	  like	  emotion	  in	  the	  listener.	  For	  example,	  in	  languishing,	  sad	  passages,	  the	  performer	  must	  languish	  and	  grow	  sad	  (Bach	  1753,	  152).	  	  Bach	  goes	  further	  in	  his	  treatise	  to	  include	  singers	  and	  instrumentalists	  other	  than	  keyboardists:	  Singers	  and	  instrumentalists	  other	  than	  keyboardists,	  who	  wish	  to	  perform	  well,	  need	  most	  of	  our	  short	  embellishments	  just	  as	  much	  as	  we	  do.	  However,	  our	  ways	  are	  much	  more	  orderly	  than	  theirs,	  for	  keyboardists	  have	  given	  embellishments	  specific	  signs	  the	  more	  exactly	  to	  indicate	  the	  detailed	  performance	  of	  their	  compositions…	  study	  of	  ornamentation	  is	  much	  more	  taxing	  for	  them	  [singers	  and	  instrumentalists]	  than	  it	  is	  for	  the	  keyboardists.	  Their	  signs	  have	  grown	  ambiguous	  or,	  indeed,	  incorrect,	  a	  condition	  which	  even	  today	  causes	  many	  improprieties	  in	  performance.	  (Bach	  1753,	  152)	  	  	   In	  the	  sections	  that	  follow	  I	  will	  discuss	  the	  embellishments	  that	  pertain	  directly	  to	  my	  own	  work.	  	  3.1	   Upper	  mordent	  	  The	  upper	  mordent	  consists	  of	  two	  quickly	  played	  notes	  preceding	  the	  principal	  note.	  The	  first	  note	  is	  the	  same	  as	  the	  principal	  note,	  the	  second	  one,	  the	  scale	  degree	  above	  it;	  both	  are	  performed	  as	  quickly	  as	  possible.	  The	  principal	  note	  should	  always	  bear	  the	  accent.	  In	  C.P.E.	  Bach’s	  works	  the	  same	  sign	  was	  also	  used	  to	  indicate	  the	  shake	  ornament	  (Ham	  1914,	  11)	  (refer	  to	  figure	  3.1).	  Ornamental	  treatment	  of	  the	  mordent,	  however,	  has	  changed	  since	  the	  seventieth	  and	  eighteenth	  centuries.	  	  In	  the	  Baroque	  period,	  a	  mordent	  was	  considered	  a	  lower	  mordent	  by	  current	  standards	  of	  performance	  practice.	  An	  upper	  mordent,	  by	  comparison,	  was	  the	  equivalent	  of	  a	  Pralltriller	  (or	  Abzug)	  or	  Schneller	  (figure	  3.2)	  in	  the	  nineteenth	  century.	  At	  that	  time,	  the	  term	  mordent	  was	  used	  for	  what	  is	  now	  called	  the	  upper	  mordent	  (Taylor	  1989,	  93).	  	  	  	  	   24	  Figure	  3.1	   Upper	  mordent	  symbol	  (snap	  or	  Schneller)	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.2	   Pralltriller	  (compact	  trill)	  or	  Abzug	  (Donington	  1975,	  251)	  	  	  	  	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  (1753)	  referred	  to	  the	  upper	  mordent,	  also	  known	  as	  the	  snap	  or	  Schneller	  in	  eighteenth-­‐century	  keyboard	  performances,	  as	  one	  requiring	  assiduous	  practice,	  “because	  only	  the	  strongest,	  most	  dexterous	  fingers	  execute	  it	  effectively”	  (Bach	  1753,	  143).	  However,	  Bach	  continues	  to	  warn	  of	  the	  possible	  overemphasis	  on	  an	  isolated	  technique	  acquired,	  sharing	  words	  of	  caution:	  	  Keyboardists	  whose	  chief	  asset	  is	  mere	  technique	  are	  clearly	  at	  a	  disadvantage.	  A	  performer	  may	  have	  the	  most	  agile	  fingers,	  be	  competent	  at	  single	  and	  double	  trills,	  master	  the	  art	  of	  fingering,	  read	  skillfully	  at	  sight…and	  yet	  he	  may	  be	  something	  less	  than	  a	  clear,	  pleasing	  or	  stirring	  keyboardist.	  (Bach	  1753,	  147)	  	   Joachim	  Johann	  Quantz	  took	  this	  discussion	  further	  by	  reflecting	  on	  the	  frequency	  of	  ornament	  placements	  in	  a	  piece.	  He	  cautioned	  against	  ornaments	  being	  used	  too	  frequently	  in	  music,	  as	  they	  can	  become	  too	  much	  of	  a	  good	  thing	  by	  overwhelming	  the	  listener’s	  ear:	  “The	  rarest	  and	  most	  tasteful	  delicacies	  produce	  nausea	  if	  over-­‐indulged”	  (Quantz	  1752,	  99).	  This	  echoes	  as	  an	  important	  suggestion	  to	  be	  taken	  into	  account	  when	  considering	  the	  	  	   25	  proper	  placement	  of	  any	  of	  the	  proposed	  ornamental	  models	  1	  through	  6	  in	  this	  study	  (covered	  in	  greater	  detail	  in	  chapter	  6).	  Likewise,	  we	  see	  many	  similar	  sentiments	  on	  ornamentation	  overuse	  in	  other	  treatises	  related	  to	  the	  interpretation	  of	  French	  music	  in	  the	  seventeenth	  and	  eighteenth	  centuries:	  Hotteterre	  cautioned	  that	  only	  taste	  and	  practice	  could	  teach	  appropriate	  use	  of	  ornamentation.	  He	  and	  Corrette	  both	  advise	  to	  learn	  the	  ornaments	  by	  playing	  pieces	  which	  were	  marked,	  before	  becoming	  a	  gradually	  accustomed	  to	  do	  ornaments	  on	  the	  notes	  where	  they	  turn	  out	  best.	  Similarly,	  Montéclair	  considered	  it	  dangerous	  to	  use	  too	  many	  ornaments	  except	  in	  French	  airs,	  but	  even	  there	  with	  great	  discretion.	  (Mather	  1973,	  52)	  	  Regretfully,	  even	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  falls	  short	  of	  expanding	  beyond	  these	  remarks	  on	  a	  few	  important	  ornaments	  in	  his	  treatise.	  Such	  is	  also	  a	  pursuit	  of	  proper	  placements	  within	  the	  musical	  context,	  based	  on	  a	  supposition	  on	  a	  best	  understanding	  of	  performance	  practice	  traditions.	  Proper	  placement	  often	  proves	  to	  be	  the	  most	  important	  effort	  in	  reaching	  a	  genuine	  understanding	  of	  the	  nuanced	  character	  and	  style	  of	  music.	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  didn’t	  designate	  a	  particular	  symbol	  for	  the	  proper	  treatment	  of	  the	  upper	  mordent	  or	  snap.	  Instead,	  he	  wrote	  the	  following	  comparative	  instruction	  (depicted	  in	  figure	  3.3):	  Figure	  162,	  illustrates	  my	  unvariable	  notation	  of	  the	  short	  mordent	  in	  inversion,	  the	  upper	  tone	  of	  which	  is	  snapped…	  In	  its	  employment	  as	  well	  as	  its	  shape,	  it	  is	  the	  opposite	  of	  the	  mordent,	  but	  its	  tones	  are	  identical	  with	  those	  of	  the	  short	  trill…	  It	  is	  in	  effect	  a	  miniature-­‐unsuffixed	  trill.	  (Bach	  1753,	  142)	  	  The	  fewest	  number	  of	  repercussions	  to	  constitute	  a	  trill	  at	  all	  is	  two,	  giving	  four	  notes	  (one	  repercussion	  is	  an	  appoggiatura).	  This	  double	  repercussion	  is	  the	  half-­‐trill	  at	  its	  purest	  form	  in	  which	  its	  correct	  German	  name	  is	  Pralltriller	  (compact	  trill)…The	  theoretical	  interpretation	  (of	  the	  Pralltriller)…is	  on	  the	  beat,	  though	  tied.	  (Donnington	  1975,	  251)	  	  	  	  	  	   26	  Figure	  3.3	   C.P.E.	  Bach	  Essay,	  figure	  162	  (Bach	  1753,	  142)	  	  	   	  	  	   	  	  	   His	  suggested	  performance	  practice	  of	  a	  snap	  and	  other	  trills	  (upper	  mordent,	  figure	  3.1)	  depicted	  in	  figures	  3.1	  and	  3.2	  using	  the	  same	  symbol	  potentially	  creates	  confusion	  for	  the	  performer.	  To	  be	  fair,	  identifying	  and	  classifying	  the	  same	  or	  very	  similar	  ornament	  symbols	  over	  time	  proves	  to	  be	  a	  daunting	  task	  for	  the	  performer,	  but	  necessary	  for	  any	  researcher	  on	  ornamentation	  performance	  practices	  of	  today.	  Bach	  explains	  the	  proper	  snap	  performance,	  adding	  "It	  is	  different	  from	  all	  trills	  in	  that	  it	  is	  never	  enclosed	  and	  never	  appears	  under	  a	  slur”	  (Bach	  1753,	  142-­‐143).	  The	  snap	  is	  always	  played	  rapidly	  and	  appears	  only	  before	  quick,	  detached	  notes,	  to	  which	  it	  imparts	  brilliance	  while	  serving	  to	  fill	  them	  out.	  And	  because	  this	  ornament	  adds	  no	  dissonant	  color,	  its	  main	  function	  is	  rhythmic	  and	  not	  harmonic.	  These	  instructional	  passages	  form	  an	  important	  connection	  to	  my	  proposed	  ornaments,	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  model	  1,	  model	  2,	  and	  model	  6.	  Unlike	  C.P.E.	  Bach’s	  performance	  instructions,	  my	  folk	  ornament	  models	  are	  slurred	  types	  and	  represent	  a	  vastly	  faster	  and	  rhythmically	  modified	  iteration	  of	  Bach’s	  inverted	  mordent.	  Such	  charged	  upper	  mordents	  require	  the	  side-­‐key	  fast	  pressing	  or	  finger	  bouncing	  effect	  with	  an	  ensuing	  “sound-­‐popping”	  effect.	  This	  occurs	  when	  the	  side-­‐keys	  or	  bounced	  fingers	  are	  pressed	  and	  applied	  abruptly	  onto	  an	  instrument,	  sounding	  shortly	  articulated	  and	  almost	  percussive	  and	  unslurred.	  	  This	  is	  similar	  to	  a	  clarinet	  performer	  creating	  the	  operatic	  	  	   27	  oblique,	  compressed	  air	  staccato	  technique,	  instead	  of	  using	  the	  traditional	  single	  tonguing,	  single-­‐reed,	  woodwind	  instrumental	  technique	  of	  playing.	  	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  also	  made	  the	  following	  suggestion:	  	  “It	  is	  often	  necessary	  to	  play	  the	  following	  tones	  with	  a	  finger	  that	  will	  not	  interfere	  with	  the	  staccato	  character	  of	  the	  ornament”	  (Bach	  1753,	  143).	  Although	  he	  was	  referring	  to	  the	  keyboard,	  this	  proposed	  deliberation	  in	  fingering	  method	  placement	  for	  the	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  serves	  additionally	  to	  create	  an	  alternate	  staccato	  articulation	  character.	  	  3.1.1	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  model	  1	  and	  model	  2	  Because	  of	  the	  rapid	  nature	  of	  the	  embellishment	  in	  model	  1	  (figure	  3.4)	  and	  model	  2	  (figure	  3.5),	  actual	  microtonal	  intervallic	  relations	  are	  barely	  discernible	  by	  the	  auditory	  perception	  of	  the	  listener	  or	  performers	  alike.	  Difference	  between	  model	  1	  and	  model	  2	  is	  in	  the	  added	  staccatissimo	  note	  at	  the	  end	  of	  model	  2	  ornament.	  If	  performed	  at	  the	  desired	  speed	  of	  execution,	  which	  is	  close	  to	  an	  allegro	  with	  the	  quarter	  note	  at	  114	  to	  116	  beats	  per	  minute,	  the	  ornament	  series	  adds	  an	  unexpected	  agogic	  accent	  effect.	  This	  by-­‐product	  is	  somewhat	  similar	  to	  a	  more	  common	  multiple	  articulation	  technique	  effect,	  known	  as	  double	  and	  triple	  tonguing.	  This	  effect	  is	  even	  more	  pronounced	  in	  the	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  model	  2	  in	  (figure	  3.5),	  where	  the	  staccatissimo	  is	  applied	  on	  its	  final	  arrival	  note.	  This	  ornament	  creates	  simultaneously	  a	  melodic	  and	  percussive	  effect	  within	  a	  related	  music	  context	  as	  the	  “short	  half	  trill	  is	  always	  performed	  with	  the	  greatest	  attainable	  sharpness”	  (Bach	  1752,	  160).	  	  	  	  	  	  	   28	  Figure	  3.4	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  model	  1	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A4	  +20	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.5	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  with	  the	  staccatissimo	  at	  the	  end	  note,	  model	  2	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  The	  function	  of	  the	  half	  trill	  is	  scarcely	  harmonic;	  it	  is	  partly	  melodic;	  but	  it	  is,	  when	  short,	  primarily	  rhythmic.	  It	  must	  literally	  crackle.	  In	  order	  to	  be	  truly	  effective	  the	  upper	  tone	  must	  be	  snapped	  on	  its	  final	  appearance	  in	  the	  manner	  described,	  but	  with	  such	  exceeding	  speed	  that	  the	  individual	  tones	  will	  be	  heard	  only	  with	  difficulty.	  …	  It	  must	  be	  played	  with	  such	  speed	  that	  the	  listener	  will	  not	  feel	  that	  the	  note	  to	  which	  it	  is	  applied	  has	  lost	  any	  of	  its	  length.	  …	  It	  must	  not	  sound	  as	  frightening	  as	  it	  looks	  fully	  written	  out.	  (Bach	  1753,	  156)	  	  	   We	  see	  that	  the	  half	  trill	  and	  snap	  essentially	  use	  the	  same	  little	  notes,	  with	  a	  quick	  touch	  on	  the	  upper	  note	  and	  then	  a	  landing	  on	  the	  main	  note.	  As	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  calls	  the	  half	  trill	  an	  “enclosed,	  miniature,	  unsuffixed	  trill,”	  it	  is	  reasonable	  to	  conclude	  that	  they	  differ	  in	  that	  the	  snap	  is	  never	  used	  in	  a	  slur.	  Along	  with	  the	  absence	  of	  a	  slur,	  the	  snap	  also	  differs	  from	  the	  half	  trill	  in	  its	  metrical	  placement	  regarding	  the	  principal	  note.	  The	  half	  trill	  is	  best	  performed	  with	  the	  second	  of	  its	  upper	  note	  alterations	  placed	  on	  the	  principal	  note	  beat	  (Palmer	  2001,	  144).	  My	  proposed	  ornamentation	  models	  1,	  2,	  and	  6	  as	  illustrated	  in	  figures	  3.4	  through	  3.6	  therefore	  correspond	  to	  these	  two	  embellishments,	  yet	  are	  different	  (note	  that	  I	  have	  	  	   29	  added	  the	  lightening	  bolt	  and	  the	  triangle	  above	  the	  traditional	  symbol	  to	  visually	  distinguish	  such	  work	  from	  Bach’s).	  Neither	  exactly	  fits	  the	  proposed	  manner	  of	  execution	  or	  proper	  placement	  as	  described	  in	  treatises	  on	  ornamentation	  practice	  throughout	  history.	  To	  demonstrate	  this	  further,	  the	  charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2,	  on	  the	  pitch	  G4,	  are	  sounded	  by	  the	  snap-­‐pressing	  of	  the	  third	  side-­‐key,	  which	  creates	  an	  A4	  +20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone	  plus	  20	  cents.	  Its	  placement	  is	  on	  the	  beat,	  however,	  even	  though	  it	  is	  marked	  slurred.	  The	  percussive	  effect	  of	  the	  side-­‐key	  snap	  pressing	  or	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  creates	  an	  interruption	  similar	  to	  the	  one	  caused	  by	  tonguing,	  therefore	  sounding	  unslurred	  rather	  than	  legato	  as	  the	  notation	  implies.	  The	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  model	  1,	  or	  model	  2	  with	  the	  staccatissimo	  on	  an	  end	  note,	  are	  two	  ornaments	  that	  sound	  abruptly	  fast.	  They	  are	  not	  strictly	  flowing	  with	  traditional	  note	  values,	  typical	  for	  the	  traditional	  ornament	  bearing	  its	  name.	  Rather,	  they	  are	  configured	  with	  a	  notable	  tension	  on	  the	  slightly	  prolonged	  dotted	  thirty-­‐second	  note.	  Furthermore,	  before	  the	  arrival	  on	  the	  sixteenth	  staccatissimo	  end	  note	  in	  model	  2,	  the	  rhythmic	  effect	  of	  stretching	  and	  tension	  aimed	  at	  a	  sixteenth	  end	  note	  adds	  a	  sense	  of	  asymmetrical	  micro-­‐rhythmic	  structure	  within	  the	  overall	  musical	  rhythm.	  Judiciously,	  but	  evenly	  placed	  throughout	  a	  piece,	  they	  produce	  a	  sense	  of	  longing	  and	  hesitation,	  contributing	  toward	  the	  larger	  project	  of	  musical	  symbolism.	  	  Experienced	  folk	  music	  performers	  (whom	  I	  have	  met	  on	  many	  occasions),	  Mr.	  Bora	  Dugić	  (Serbian)	  on	  the	  folk	  instrument	  the	  frula,	  and	  Mr.	  Božidar	  Milošević	  (Serbian)	  on	  the	  clarinet,	  describe	  these	  musical,	  polyrhythmic	  imbalances	  in	  folk	  music	  as	  the	  symbolic	  interplay	  and	  dance	  of	  a	  young	  couple,	  often	  portrayed	  in	  folk	  dances	  from	  Eastern	  Europe.	  	  	   30	  The	  charged	  mordent	  creates	  a	  unique	  flavor	  within	  the	  piece,	  without	  which	  the	  proper	  character	  would	  be	  omitted	  and	  an	  otherwise	  satisfactory	  performance	  could	  fall	  short.	  	  	  3.1.2	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  	  	   Similar	  to	  models	  1	  and	  2,	  model	  6	  (as	  depicted	  in	  figure	  3.6)	  is	  performed	  by	  using	  the	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  execution	  style.	  There	  are	  a	  variety	  of	  possible	  uses	  for	  it	  in	  various	  musical	  styles,	  including	  the	  classical,	  standard	  repertoire	  in	  addition	  to	  a	  traditional	  or	  contemporary	  repertoire	  containing	  composer-­‐suggested	  ornaments.	  This	  technique	  is	  executed	  by	  the	  exchangeable	  use	  of	  either	  hand	  throughout	  the	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  instrument	  range,	  as	  it	  only	  produces	  scalar	  and	  in-­‐tune	  pitches,	  much	  like	  other	  conventional	  trills	  in	  these	  instrumental	  ranges.	  	  	  Figure	  3.6	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6,	  half	  trill	  on	  a	  C3	  on	  the	  clarinet	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3.2	   Snapped	  turn	  	   A	  turn	  is	  an	  abrupt	  ornamental	  figure	  structured	  of	  one	  note	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  followed	  by	  the	  principal	  note	  itself,	  and	  the	  note	  below	  the	  principal	  one,	  returning	  to	  the	  main	  note	  after.	  Marked	  by	  an	  S-­‐shaped	  musical	  symbol,	  turned	  on	  its	  side	  above	  the	  staff	  (figure	  3.7),	  the	  exact	  rhythm	  and	  pace	  at	  which	  the	  notes	  of	  a	  turn	  are	  performed	  is	  variable.	  The	  manner	  by	  which	  to	  best	  execute	  a	  turn	  depends	  on	  the	  musical	  context,	  a	  	  	   31	  specific	  stylistic	  convention,	  and	  overall	  good	  taste	  related	  to	  the	  period	  performance	  practice.	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  makes	  it	  clear	  that	  any	  non-­‐keyboard	  trill	  on	  short	  notes	  may	  be	  played	  as	  a	  snapped	  turn:	  “When	  a	  turn	  is	  introduced	  over	  detached	  notes	  it	  gains	  acuteness	  through	  the	  prefixing	  of	  a	  note	  whose	  pitch	  is	  the	  same	  as	  the	  decorated	  one…(the	  prefixed	  note)	  is	  always	  played	  with	  a	  very	  rapid	  stroke	  delivered	  by	  a	  stiff	  finger	  and	  immediately	  connected	  with	  the	  following	  snapped	  note”	  (Bach	  1753,	  125).	  It	  should	  be	  noted	  that	  aside	  from	  the	  keyboard,	  the	  snapped	  turn	  is	  sometimes	  indicated	  by	  the	  sign	  of	  a	  trill	  tr,	  and	  even	  in	  keyboard	  pieces	  often	  by	  the	  simple	  sign	  of	  the	  turn	  (refer	  to	  figure	  3.8)	  (Bach	  1753,	  126).	  	  	  Figure	  3.7	   The	  most	  common	  music	  symbol	  for	  the	  turn	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3.8	   C.	  P.	  E.	  Bach	  Essay,	  Example	  in	  the	  original	  figure	  162	  (Bach	  1753,	  143)	  	   	  	  	  	  	  The	  snapped	  turn	  offers	  a	  much	  smoother	  solution,	  even	  if	  it	  does	  break	  away	  from	  Bach’s	  rule	  of	  trying	  to	  begin	  all	  trills	  from	  the	  note	  above	  (Palmer	  2001,	  150).	  	  3.2.1	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  3	  and	  model	  4	  	   A	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  (as	  I	  am	  calling	  it)	  is	  an	  aggregate	  of	  a	  common	  trill,	  with	  the	  ascending	  note	  placed	  on	  the	  beat	  and	  beginning	  from	  the	  principal	  tone.	  It	  is	  in	  essence	  a	  	  	   32	  	  compound	  ornament,	  as	  it	  has	  two	  successive	  trill	  exchanges	  between	  the	  principal	  tone	  and	  a	  neighboring	  upper	  interval	  before	  flowingly	  directly	  to	  the	  snapped	  turn	  ornament.	  The	  basic	  version	  is	  model	  3,	  as	  found	  in	  figure	  3.9.	  A	  trill	  with	  a	  slightly	  extended	  number	  of	  note	  alterations	  in	  the	  trill	  part	  of	  the	  embellishment	  toward	  the	  upper	  adjacent	  note	  is	  also	  swiftly	  attached	  to	  the	  snapped	  turn,	  something	  I	  am	  calling	  an	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  4	  (as	  depicted	  in	  figure	  3.10).	  Visualizations	  of	  the	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4,	  are	  exemplified	  in	  this	  chapter	  using	  the	  pitch	  G4.	  In	  these	  examples,	  the	  fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  of	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4	  +20,	  perfect	  unison	  plus	  20	  cents,	  as	  a	  microtonal	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone.	  An	  A4	  used	  in	  this	  notational	  example	  is	  a	  visual	  notational	  approximation,	  and	  is	  measured	  by	  actually	  sounding	  close	  to	  20	  cents	  pitched	  higher	  than	  A4	  on	  most	  clarinet	  models.	  	  The	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  3	  (as	  depicted	  in	  figure	  3.9),	  is	  comprised	  of	  a	  distinctly	  fast	  trill	  with	  a	  two	  repercussions	  and	  turn,	  with	  the	  dotted	  sixty-­‐forth	  note,	  descending	  down	  to	  a	  note	  of	  a	  thirty-­‐eighth	  note	  value,	  before	  conclusively	  ascending	  back	  to	  a	  principal	  note.	  	  Figure	  3.9	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  (compound	  ornament),	  model	  3	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A4	  +20	  	  	   	  	   	  	  	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Trill	  (double	  trill	  repercussion)	  	  	  Snapped	  turn	  	  	  	   33	  	  Figure	  3.10	  	  	  	  Extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  (compound	  ornament),	  model	  4	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Extended	  trill	  (with	  the	  three	  trill	  repercussions)	  	  	  Snapped	  turn	  	  	  3.2.2	   Charged	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  5	  	  The	  charged	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  5	  (as	  depicted	  in	  figure	  3.11),	  is	  almost	  identical	  to	  the	  conventional	  snapped	  turn	  as	  defined	  in	  C.	  P.	  E.	  Bach’s	  treatise.	  On	  the	  clarinet	  or	  the	  tárogató	  it	  is	  performed	  by	  deploying	  the	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique,	  rather	  than	  using	  the	  ornamental	  side-­‐keys	  on	  either	  one	  of	  the	  instruments.	  	  Figure	  3.11	   Charged	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  5,	  on	  an	  A3	  on	  the	  clarinet	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	   34	  4	   New	  ornamentation	  performance	  techniques	  for	  the	  clarinet	  4.1	   Flexible	  hand	  and	  key	  pressing	  fingering	  posture	  This	  chapter	  investigates	  ornamental	  fingerings	  as	  a	  practice	  method.	  From	  hand	  and	  finger	  posture,	  to	  detailed	  tonal	  measurements	  and	  appropriate	  notation,	  I	  have	  developed	  charts	  that	  aim	  at	  making	  the	  proficient	  clarinet	  performer	  expand	  his/her	  technical	  range	  while	  introducing	  a	  previously	  unexplored	  tonal	  language	  of	  the	  clarinet	  side-­‐key	  use.	  The	  four	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  of	  the	  Boehm-­‐system	  clarinet	  are	  seldom	  used.	  The	  first	  side-­‐key	  (the	  most	  used	  of	  them	  all)	  has	  a	  standard	  fingering	  function,	  leading	  the	  performer	  from	  the	  tone	  D	  to	  a	  D#-­‐Eb	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register.	  Similarly,	  with	  the	  addition	  of	  the	  clarinet	  register	  key,	  the	  performer	  reaches	  an	  A#-­‐Bb	  in	  the	  clarion	  register.	  This	  key	  is	  also	  often	  used	  for	  the	  trills	  utilizing	  these	  notes	  in	  both	  registers.	  The	  other	  standard	  function	  for	  the	  side-­‐key	  is	  an	  alternate	  fingering	  for	  F#	  in	  the	  throat	  register.	  It	  is	  a	  combination	  of	  the	  simultaneously	  pressed	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  one	  and	  two,	  and	  left	  hand	  F	  key	  fingering.	  The	  same	  combination	  with	  the	  register	  key	  leads	  over	  the	  register	  break,	  from	  the	  clarion	  C	  to	  an	  unstable-­‐pitched	  altissimo	  C#.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  third	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐key	  is	  limited	  even	  more,	  as	  its	  most	  stable	  function	  is	  to	  rise	  from	  the	  throat	  A	  key	  to	  an	  A#.	  This	  alternate	  fingering	  is	  rarely	  used	  within	  the	  standard	  Western	  classical	  repertoire.	  It	  has	  a	  limited	  ascending	  step	  or	  leap	  functionality	  upon	  arrival	  to	  the	  third	  key,	  resulting	  in	  A#.	  Therefore,	  most	  clarinet	  performers	  refrain	  from	  using	  it	  for	  its	  dexterous	  limitations	  (in	  any	  possible	  ascending	  tonal	  alterations).	  	  	   35	  The	  most	  important	  use	  of	  the	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  is	  the	  ability	  to	  alternate	  notes	  in	  various	  ornamental	  combinations	  relative	  to	  the	  adjacent	  tone	  they	  are	  applied	  on.	  Most	  of	  these	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐key	  alterations	  are	  microtonal.	  	  To	  reach	  the	  desired	  speed	  and	  precision	  of	  force	  distribution	  on	  the	  clarinet	  side-­‐keys	  (figure	  4.1),	  the	  performer	  must	  first	  develop	  dexterity	  of	  the	  index	  finger	  movement	  and	  hand-­‐palm	  open	  hang	  position	  (figure	  4.2).	  	  Figure	  4.1	   The	  tárogató	  and	  the	  clarinet	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	   Before	  merging	  an	  ornamentation	  performance	  technique	  into	  performance	  practice,	  the	  performer	  should	  exercise	  this	  unconventional	  finger	  movement	  separately	  from	  the	  usual	  warm-­‐up	  routines	  and	  with	  no	  instrument	  in	  hand.	  The	  goal	  is	  to	  allow	  the	  right-­‐hand	  index	  finger	  to	  snap-­‐press	  and	  bounce	  onto	  a	  thumb	  of	  the	  same	  hand.	  Prior	  to	  applying	  it	  directly	  to	  the	  side-­‐keys	  of	  the	  instrument,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  achieve	  the	  natural	  feel	  of	  a	  whip-­‐like	  right-­‐hand,	  index	  finger	  motion,	  snapping	  against	  the	  thumb	  (refer	  to	  figure	  4.2).	  This	  technique	  is	  always	  used	  in	  the	  performance	  of	  the	  charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2.	  They	  should	  be	  performed	  using	  the	  third	  side-­‐key.	  	  	  	   36	  Figure	  4.2	   The	  right-­‐hand	  index	  finger	  snap-­‐pressing	  practice	  routine	  and	  side-­‐key	  contact	  point	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figures	  4.3	  and	  4.4	  show	  the	  use	  of	  the	  clarinet	  side-­‐keys	  number	  one,	  two,	  and	  three,	  similar	  to	  the	  finger	  snap-­‐pressing	  use	  of	  the	  side-­‐keys	  one	  and	  two	  on	  the	  tárogató.	  	  	  Figure	  4.3	   The	  finger	  snap-­‐pressing	  open-­‐palm	  movement	  toward	  the	  clarinet	  side-­‐keys	  one,	  two	  and	  three	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	   Through	  practice,	  the	  fingers	  move	  like	  the	  tip	  of	  a	  whip,	  quickly	  hitting	  the	  key,	  rather	  than	  firmly	  pressing	  the	  side-­‐key	  on	  the	  instrument.	  The	  velocity	  of	  the	  highly	  positioned	  index	  finger	  (in	  a	  semi-­‐open	  handed	  palm)	  is	  at	  one	  point	  increased	  by	  the	  abrupt	  stoppage	  of	  the	  twisted	  right	  hand	  wrist	  (see	  figure	  4.3).	  As	  the	  hand	  rapidly	  closes,	  the	  right-­‐hand	  finger	  continues	  forward	  and	  down,	  pressing	  the	  desired	  side-­‐key	  and	  	  	   37	  triggering	  the	  key	  opening	  and	  releasing	  the	  air	  from	  the	  column	  inside	  the	  instrument	  (see	  figure	  4.4).	  The	  sounding	  effect	  is	  percussive	  in	  nature,	  triggered	  by	  physical	  contact	  with	  the	  side-­‐key.	  Additionally,	  the	  performer	  achieves	  the	  actual	  sound	  of	  the	  adjacent	  tone	  or	  microtone.	  	  Figure	  4.4	   The	  right-­‐hand	  index	  finger	  pressing	  contact	  points	  on	  the	  clarinet	  side-­‐keys	  one,	  two	  and	  three	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  By	  sustaining	  the	  resulting	  tones	  created	  by	  firmly	  pressing	  the	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  on	  the	  clarinet	  (or	  the	  tárogató),	  the	  performer	  can	  accurately	  identify	  the	  pitches	  performed	  in	  the	  ornament	  and	  the	  microtonal	  intervals	  between	  the	  pitches	  of	  the	  ornament.	  This	  experimental	  measurement	  tracks	  the	  pitch	  accuracy	  throughout	  the	  performance	  of	  the	  ornament	  itself.	  I	  used	  a	  cent	  as	  a	  logarithmic	  unit	  for	  an	  interval	  measurement.	  The	  twelve-­‐tone	  equal	  temperament	  octave	  is	  divisible	  into	  twelve	  semitones,	  each	  divided	  into	  one	  hundred	  cents.	  The	  auditory	  psychological	  phenomenon	  of	  the	  “just	  noticeable	  difference”	  infers	  that	  a	  differing	  of	  pitch	  by	  five	  to	  six	  cents	  is	  perceptible	  to	  the	  human	  auditory	  system.	  Experimental	  studies	  have	  also	  shown	  that	  	  	   38	  sound	  quality	  (or	  timbre),	  volume,	  and	  frequency	  range	  further	  impacts	  the	  perception	  of	  micro	  intervallic	  relations	  and	  sensitivity	  to	  out-­‐of-­‐tune	  pitches.10	  	  For	  the	  purpose	  of	  the	  accurate	  measurements	  of	  intervals	  in	  the	  ornament,	  an	  orchestral	  tuner	  Korg	  OT-­‐120	  and	  notational	  software	  Finale	  2014c	  were	  used	  for	  this	  research.	  These	  charts	  are	  based	  on	  the	  supposition	  that	  most	  instruments	  used	  for	  the	  ornamentation	  performance	  will	  have	  a	  more	  or	  less	  consistent	  pitch	  and	  timbre.	  However,	  it	  is	  possible	  that	  varied	  intervalic	  measurements	  could	  occur	  in	  performance	  on	  different	  types	  of	  instruments.	  For	  the	  measurements	  offered,	  I	  used	  two	  significantly	  different	  classes	  and	  types	  of	  clarinets,	  and	  one	  modern	  tárogató	  built	  specifically	  for	  my	  research:	  the	  Buffet-­‐Crampon	  Bb	  clarinet,	  model	  Elite	  (1989);	  the	  MoBa	  Backun	  Grenadilla	  Bb	  clarinet	  (2014);	  and	  the	  Golden	  Voice,	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  (2014).	  The	  tables,	  figures,	  and	  graphs	  in	  this	  study	  display	  the	  resulting	  calculated	  median	  values	  using	  data	  collected	  from	  all	  three	  of	  these	  instruments.	  	  The	  notation	  comparison	  table	  chart	  is	  designed	  to	  accompany	  the	  visual	  learning	  method.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  10	  USD	  Internet	  Sensation	  &	  Perception	  Laboratory,	  Accessed	  on	  December	  23,	  2014,	  http://apps.usd.edu/coglab/WebersLaw.html	  	  	  	   39	  Table	  4.1	   Tonal	  and	  the	  microtonal	  measurements,	  derived	  from	  pressing	  the	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  in	  the	  clarinet	  throat	  registers	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  	  throat	  register	  tones	  	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Bb4-­‐A#4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nothing	  in	  line	  -­‐	   	  B4	  -­‐20	  cents	  m2	  -­‐20	  cents	  	  A4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  A#4	  +20	  cents	  m2	  +20	  cents	  	  G#4-­‐Ab4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  G#4	  +10	  cents	  	  P1	  +10	  cents	   	  A#4	  +10	  cents	  M2	  +10	  cents	  	  G4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  G4	  +20	  cents	  P1	  +20	  cents	   	  A4	  +20	  cents	  M2	  +20	  cents	  Source:	  Pitch	  and	  intervallic	  measurements	  generated	  using	  the	  Korg	  Orchestral	  Tuner	  OT-­‐120	  Controlled	  measurements	  are	  performed	  on	  Buffet	  Crampon	  Elite	  Bb	  clarinet	  &	  MoBa	  Backun	  Grenadilla	  Bb	  clarinet	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   40	  Table	  4.2	   Tonal	  and	  microtonal	  measurements,	  derived	  from	  pressing	  the	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  in	  the	  clarinet	  chalumeau	  and	  throat	  registers	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  	  chalumeau	  and	  throat	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  F#4-­‐Gb4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nothing	  in	  line	  -­‐	   	  F#4	  +50	  cents	  P1	  	  +50	  cents	   	  A4	  	  m3	  	  F4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  F#4-­‐Gb4	  m2	   	  A4	  -­‐25	  cents	  M3	  -­‐25	  cents	  	  E4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	   	  -­‐	   	  F4	  +45	  cents	  m2	  +45	  cents	   	  G#4	  +30	  cents	  M3	  +30	  cents	  	  D#4-­‐Eb4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  F4	  	  M2	   	  A4	  -­‐45	  cents	  Aug.	  4	  -­‐45	  cents	  	  D4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  D#4-­‐Eb4	  	  m2	   	  Nil.	  	  -­‐	   	  G#4-­‐Ab4	  Aug.	  4	  	  C#3-­‐Db3	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Eb4	  -­‐40	  cents	  M2	  -­‐40	  cents	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  G#4	  -­‐45	  cents	  P5	  -­‐45	  cents	  	  C3	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  G4	  +30	  cents	  P5	  +30	  cents	  	  Performers	  and	  composers	  alike	  should	  be	  aware	  that	  most	  upper	  intervals	  in	  the	  ornament	  are	  slightly	  out	  of	  tune,	  regardless	  of	  the	  apparent	  intervallic	  proximity.	  If	  performed	  very	  slowly,	  beside	  the	  micro-­‐tonality,	  the	  pitches	  sound	  relatively	  mute,	  inconsistent,	  and	  dark	  in	  timbre.	  The	  resulting	  intervals	  range	  from	  barely	  perceptible	  perfect	  unison	  increased	  by	  10	  to	  20	  cents,	  to	  a	  larger	  than	  a	  perfect	  fifth,	  in	  several	  instances.	  	  	  	   41	  For	  the	  purposes	  of	  any	  future	  experimental	  test	  simulation,	  any	  similarly	  advanced	  notational	  software	  platform	  can	  be	  used,	  offering	  sixty-­‐fourth	  note	  values	  and	  minute	  accuracy	  detail	  of	  the	  ornament’s	  execution	  in	  replay	  mode.	  The	  fast-­‐paced	  and	  precisely	  executed	  inner	  temporal	  values	  are	  necessary	  for	  the	  appropriate	  simulation	  of	  the	  charged	  upper	  mordents,	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns.	  	  It	  is	  important	  to	  maintain	  the	  consistency	  and	  pace	  in	  executing	  the	  ornament,	  regardless	  of	  the	  tempo	  of	  the	  piece.	  The	  accurate	  tempo	  of	  these	  ornaments	  is	  in	  quarter	  note	  values	  of	  114	  to	  116	  pulses	  per	  minute,	  as	  depicted	  in	  the	  figured	  notation,	  and	  they	  don’t	  relate	  to	  the	  tempo	  of	  the	  piece	  the	  ornaments	  appear	  in.	  This	  temporal	  asymmetry	  provides	  added	  aesthetical	  value,	  reinforcing	  the	  mysterious	  and	  unexpected	  imperfections	  of	  the	  melody	  while	  enriching	  the	  otherwise	  conservative,	  simple	  melodic	  structure.	  	  4.2	   Ornamental	  fingering	  charts	  and	  notation	  for	  the	  clarinet	  The	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  fingering	  charts	  serve	  as	  visual	  learning	  assistance	  in	  reaching	  the	  desired	  embellishment	  effect.	  These	  charts	  are	  divided	  into	  five	  different	  ornamentation	  groups,	  depicted	  in	  4.5–4.51,	  and	  5.1–5.30,	  respectively.	  In	  sections	  4.2.1	  and	  4.2.2,	  I	  illustrate	  the	  charged	  upper	  mordents,	  models	  1	  and	  2,	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  fingerings,	  models	  3	  and	  4,	  on	  the	  upper	  half	  joint	  of	  the	  clarinet	  body.	  The	  performer	  uses	  the	  right-­‐hand	  on	  the	  second	  and	  third	  side-­‐keys	  on	  the	  clarinet	  throat-­‐tones.	  Later	  charts	  depicting	  the	  upper	  chalumeau	  and	  the	  upper	  clarion	  register	  expand	  this	  technique	  further	  by	  occasionally	  using	  the	  first	  side-­‐key.	  	  	  	  	   42	  4.2.1	   Charged	  upper	  mordents	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  fingering	  charts,	  in	  the	  	   mid-­‐throat	  and	  the	  upper-­‐chalumeau	  clarinet	  register	  	  Figure	  4.5	   Bb4-­‐A#4	  throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	   	  	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.6	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  (Schneller	  or	  Pralltriller),	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4	  note.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  B4	  -­‐20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  20	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  B4	  -­‐20	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	   43	  Figure	  4.7	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4	  note.	  Fast-­‐trill	  created	  by	  pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  B4	  -­‐20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  20	  cents	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  B4	  -­‐20	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.8	   A4	  throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   44	  Figure	  4.9	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  A4	  note.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A#4	  +20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  20	  cents	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A#4	  +20	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   	  	   	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.10	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  an	  A	  note.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A#4	  +20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  20	  cents	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A#4	  +20	  	  	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   45	  Figure	  4.11	   Ab4-­‐G#4 throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.12	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A#4	  +10,	  a	  major	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  10	  cents	  	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A#4	  +10	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   46	  Figure	  4.13	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  G#4	  +10,	  an	  ascending	  unison	  microtone	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  10	  cents	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  G#4	  +10	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.14	   G4	  open	  throat-­‐tone	  fingering	  using	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   47	  Figure	  4.15	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  G4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4	  +20,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  20	  cents	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  A4	  +20	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.16	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  G4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  A4	  +20,	  perfect	  unison	  plus	  20	  cents,	  a	  microtonal	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone.	  Note	  A4	  used	  in	  this	  notational	  example	  is	  visual	  approximation	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A4	  +20	  	  	   	  	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   48	  Figure	  4.17	   Gb4-­‐F#4	  throat-­‐tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.18	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  F#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  right-­‐hand	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4,	  a	  minor	  third	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	  	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  A4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   49	  Figure	  4.19	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  an	  F#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  Gb4	  +50,	  an	  ascending	  quartertone	  unison	  intervallic	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  50	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Gb4	  +50	  	  	  	   	  	   	   	   	   	  	  	   4.2.2	   Charged	  upper	  mordents	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  fingering	  charts	  in	  the	  	   lower-­‐throat,	  upper-­‐chalumeau	  and	  the	  corresponding	  upper-­‐clarion	  	   clarinet	  register	  	   The	  use	  of	  the	  first	  and	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  in	  trilled	  snap	  turn	  and	  the	  double-­‐trilled	  snap	  turn	  differs	  from	  the	  proper	  embellishing	  use	  of	  the	  third	  side-­‐key.	  Rather,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  first	  and	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  resembles	  a	  traditional	  trill	  performance	  practice,	  further	  in	  this	  fingering	  chart	  called	  the	  snap-­‐pressing,	  side-­‐key	  or	  finger-­‐bounce	  trill	  technique.	  In	  this	  practice,	  the	  ornament	  is	  placed	  on	  the	  beat,	  and	  an	  evenly-­‐paced	  trill	  portion	  of	  the	  ornament	  is	  joined	  to	  the	  snapped	  turn	  to	  create	  the	  full	  embellishment.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   50	  Figure	  4.20	   	  F4	  throat	  tone	  and	  C5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.21	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  F4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4	  -­‐25,	  a	  major	  third	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  25	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  A4	  -­‐25	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   51	  Figure	  4.22	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  an	  F4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  Gb4,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Gb4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   Using	  the	  register	  key	  in	  addition	  to	  the	  fundamental	  and	  side-­‐key	  fingerings	  in	  the	  lower	  throat	  and	  upper	  chalumeau	  registers	  results	  in	  the	  twelve	  step-­‐up	  equivalent	  in	  the	  clarion	  register.	  However,	  the	  right-­‐hand	  finger	  snap-­‐pressing,	  and	  fast-­‐trill	  side-­‐keys	  pressing	  performance	  practice	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  leads	  to	  a	  different	  set	  of	  intervallic	  relations	  within	  the	  ornament.	  The	  tables	  below	  show	  the	  ascending	  adjacent	  tone	  pitch	  measurements	  in	  the	  clarion	  register.	  They	  describe	  tonal,	  microtonal,	  and	  intervallic	  relations	  created	  by	  ornaments	  performed	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  first,	  second,	  and	  third	  clarinet	  side-­‐keys.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   52	  Table	  4.3	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  C5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register,	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  second	  and	  third	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  clarion	  register	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  C5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nothing	  in	  line	  -­‐	   	  C#5	  -­‐10	  cents	  m2	  -­‐10	  cents	   	  D6	  +50	  cents	  M2	  +50	  cents	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.23	   E4	  throat	  tone	  and	  B5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   53	  Figure	  4.24	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  E4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  leads	  to	  a	  G#4	  (+30),	  a	  major	  third	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  30	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  G#4	  +30	  	   	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.25	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  an	  E4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  F4	  +45,	  a	  major	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  45	  cents	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  F4	  +45	  	  	   	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   54	  Table	  4.4	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  B5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register,	  using	  the	  second	  and	  third	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  clarion	  register	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  B5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  C5	  +20	  cents	  m2	  +20	  cents	   	  C#5	  +20	  cents	  M2	  +20	  cents	  	  	  Figure	  4.26	   Eb4-­‐D#4	  chalumeau	  and	  Bb5-­‐A#5,	  a	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  and	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   55	  Figure	  4.27	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  Eb4-­‐D#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  A4	  -­‐45,	  an	  augmented	  fourth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  45	  cents	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A4	  -­‐45	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.28	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  Eb4-­‐D#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  F4,	  a	  major	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  F4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   56	  Table	  4.5	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  second	  and	  third	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  clarion	  register	  tones	  	   	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  B5	  +40	  cents	  m2	  +40	  cents	   	  C5	  +30	  cents	  M2	  +40	  cents	  	  	  Figure	  4.29	   D4	  chalumeau	  and	  A5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  first	  and	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   57	  Figure	  4.30	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  G#4,	  an	  augmented	  fourth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  G#4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  Figure	  4.31	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  D4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  Eb3	  +45,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  45	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Eb4	  +45	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   58	  Table	  4.6	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  an	  A5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  first	  and	  third	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  clarion	  register	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  A5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Bb	  -­‐10	  cents	  m2	  -­‐10	  cents	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  B5	  -­‐10	  cents	  M2	  -­‐10	  cents	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.32	   Db3-­‐C#3	  chalumeau	  and	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  first	  and	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   59	  Figure	  4.33	   Charged	  upper	  mordents,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Db3-­‐C#3.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  G#4	  -­‐45,	  perfect	  fifth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  45	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  G#4	  -­‐45	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.34	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  Db3-­‐C#3	  note.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  creates	  an	  Eb4	  -­‐40,	  a	  major	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  40	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Eb4	  -­‐40	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   60	  Table	  4.7	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  an	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  first	  and	  third	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  clarion	  register	  tones	  	   	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  A5	  +50	  cents	  M2	  +50	  cents	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  A5	  +50	  cents	  M2	  +50	  cents	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.35	   C3	  chalumeau	  and	  G5	  clarion tone	  key	  fingering	  using	  the	  third	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   61	  Figure	  4.36	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  C3.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  creates	  a	  G4	  +30,	  a	  perfect	  fifth	  leap	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  30	  cents	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  G4	  +30	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Table	  4.8	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  interval	  on	  a	  G5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  third	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  clarinet	  clarion	  register	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Third	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  G5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  C#5	  	  +20	  cents	  M2	  +20	  cents	  	  	  	  4.2.3	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  and	  charged	  snap	  fingering	  charts	  on	  the	  lower	  	   joint	  of	  the	  clarinet	  	  In	  this	  section	  I	  illustrate	  the	  charged	  snapped	  turn	  and	  charged	  snap	  ornamental	  fingerings	  on	  the	  lower	  half	  joint	  of	  the	  clarinet.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  side-­‐keys	  is	  not	  applicable	  in	  this	  clarinet	  register.	  In	  the	  chalumeau	  and	  the	  clarion	  register	  the	  use	  of	  the	  fifth	  and	  sixth	  ornamental	  format	  is	  required	  with	  either	  a	  left	  or	  right-­‐hand	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  Both	  of	  these	  turns	  require	  the	  conventional	  use	  of	  the	  standard	  clarinet	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  It	  is	  possible	  to	  apply	  both	  model	  5	  and	  model	  6	  in	  the	  upper	  part	  of	  either	  the	  	  	   62	  clarinet	  or	  the	  tárogató.	  The	  direct	  tone	  hole	  finger-­‐bounce	  ornamental	  technique	  creates	  conventional	  equal	  temperament	  intervals,	  such	  that	  there	  are	  no	  microtonal	  relationships	  in	  either	  the	  chalumeau	  or	  clarion	  register.	  Model	  6	  introduces	  the	  same	  embellishment	  as	  model	  1,	  but	  requires	  the	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  without	  the	  side-­‐keys.	  On	  the	  clarinet	  this	  applies	  to	  E4	  in	  the	  throat	  and	  chalumeau	  register	  down	  to	  a	  G3,	  and	  from	  B4	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  down	  to	  a	  D4	  in	  the	  same	  register.	  The	  comparison	  of	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  ornamentation	  techniques	  enhances	  the	  unique	  sense	  of	  cultural	  authenticity	  and	  enriches	  the	  overall	  musical	  character	  in	  their	  performance	  practices.	  Combined	  with	  the	  other	  extended	  performance	  techniques	  (e.g.,	  multiple	  articulations),	  these	  ornamental	  techniques	  integrate	  different	  traditional	  performance	  styles	  that	  stem	  from	  Eastern	  European	  cultures.	  	  Figure	  4.37	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  C3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  on	  a	  G5	  clarion	  register	  tone	  hole,	  using	  the	  left	  hand,	  the	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot)	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	   63	  Figure	  4.38	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  C3	  using	  the	  fourth	  left	  hand	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  G5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.39	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  C3	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.40	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  B3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  on	  Gb5-­‐F#5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register,	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   64	  Figure	  4.41	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  B3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  Gb5-­‐F#5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  (red	  dot)	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.42	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  B3	  tone	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.43	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  Bb3-­‐A#3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  on	  an	  F5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  second	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot)	  	  	   	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   65	  Figure	  4.44	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  Bb3-­‐A#3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  second	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  F5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	   	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.45	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  Bb3-­‐A#3	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.46	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  an	  A3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register,	  and	  on	  E5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot)	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   66	  Figure	  4.47	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  an	  A3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  E5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.48	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  an	  A3	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.49	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  a	  G3	  in	  the	  chalumeau	  register	  and	  a	  D5	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot)	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   67	  Figure	  4.50	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  G3	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  D5	  ornament	  relative	  in	  the	  clarion	  register	  is	  a	  twelfth	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4.51	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  G3	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	   To	  summarize,	  all	  of	  these	  fingerings	  should	  be	  practiced	  on	  the	  high	  to	  low	  register	  fingering	  order,	  so	  that	  future	  possible	  placements	  within	  specific	  music	  material	  are	  seamless.	  Beginning	  with	  the	  Bb	  in	  the	  throat	  register,	  the	  performer	  should	  be	  able	  to	  practice	  models	  1	  to	  6,	  where	  appropriate,	  in	  a	  natural	  and	  flowing	  manner.	  By	  mastering	  this	  technique	  a	  performer	  should	  be	  able	  to	  rely	  on	  muscle	  memory	  and	  respond	  with	  proper	  placements	  quickly	  and	  deliberately	  in	  the	  music.	  The	  main	  focus	  is	  the	  overall	  musical	  texture,	  as	  these	  techniques	  are	  only	  added	  embellishments.	  Possible	  integration	  of	  these	  ornaments	  serves	  as	  a	  new	  foundation	  for	  further	  improvisatory	  exercises,	  as	  performers	  may	  very	  well	  develop	  and	  expand	  his/her	  own	  expressive	  musical	  vocabulary	  through	  knowledge	  of	  these	  new	  ornamentation	  techniques.	  	  	   68	  Composers	  might	  find	  a	  new	  appreciation	  for	  this	  unique	  set	  of	  uncommon	  embellishments,	  expanding	  their	  own	  compositional	  language.	  Each	  new	  gesture	  offers	  a	  distinctly	  authentic	  and	  consistent	  rhythmic	  structure,	  as	  well	  as	  different	  tonal	  palette	  built	  on	  a	  unique	  microtonal	  relationship.	  This	  variety	  of	  ornamentation	  is	  valuable	  supplemental	  melodic	  material	  that	  offers	  a	  unique	  sense	  of	  local	  colour	  and	  expressive	  flair.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	   69	  5	   Ornamental	  fingering	  charts	  and	  notation	  for	  the	  tárogató	  5.1	   Charged	  upper	  mordents	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  fingering	  charts	  in	  the	  first	  	   and	  second	  registers	  on	  the	  upper	  joint	  of	  the	  tárogató	  	  	  In	  this	  section	  I	  illustrate	  the	  performance	  of	  charged	  upper	  mordents	  and	  trilled	  snap	  turns	  using	  fingerings	  of	  models	  1	  through	  4	  on	  the	  upper	  joint	  of	  the	  tárogató.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  side-­‐key	  is	  limited	  to	  the	  first	  and	  second	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys.	  Tonal	  and	  microtonal	  measurements	  are	  provided	  in	  table	  5.1.	  	  Table	  5.1	   Tonal	  and	  microtonal	  measurements	  derived	  from	  pressing	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  tárogató	  side-­‐keys	  in	  the	  low	  register	  	  	  The	  tárogató	  low	  register	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  C4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nothing	  in	  line	  -­‐	   	  C#4	  -­‐30	  cents	  m2	  -­‐30	  cents	  	  B4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  C5	  M2	  	  Bb4-­‐A#4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  C5	  -­‐50	  cents	  M2	  -­‐50	  cents	  	  A4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Bb4	   	  B4	  +10	  cents	  M2	  +10	  cents	  	  Ab4-­‐G#4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  A4	  +50	  cents	  m2	  +50	  cents	   	  B4	  -­‐20	  cents	  m3	  -­‐20	  cents	  	  G4	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  A4	  M2	   	  Bb4	  +50	  cents	  m3	  +50	  cents	  Source:	  Pitch	  and	  intervallic	  measurements	  of	  the	  tárogató	  generated	  using	  the	  Korg	  Orchestral	  Tuner	  OT-­‐120.	  Measurements	  are	  performed	  on	  a	  Golden	  Voice	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató	  	  	  	  	  	   70	  Figure	  5.1	   C4	  fingering,	  using	  the	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	   	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.2	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  (Schneller	  or	  Pralltriller),	  models	  1	  and	  2	  in	  the	  low	  register	  on	  a	  C4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  C#4	  -­‐30,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  30	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  C#4	  -­‐30	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   71	  Figure	  5.3	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  C4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  leads	  to	  the	  same	  ascending	  pitch	  relationship	  seen	  in	  figure	  5.2	  	  	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  C#4	  -­‐30	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.4	   B4-­‐B5	  fingerings	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers,	  using	  the	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   72	  Figure	  5.5	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  B4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  C4,	  a	  minor	  second	  step	  up	  from	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  C4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.6	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  B4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  creates	  the	  same	  pitch	  relation	  as	  seen	  in	  figure	  5.5	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  C4	  	  	  	  	  	   	  Adding	  the	  register	  key	  to	  the	  standard	  low	  register	  tárogató	  fingerings	  results	  in	  an	  ornament	  an	  octave	  higher.	  Using	  the	  snap-­‐pressing	  trill	  technique	  on	  the	  side-­‐keys	  with	  the	  right-­‐hand	  results	  in	  the	  same	  embellishment	  an	  octave	  higher.	  Pitch	  measurements	  in	  table	  5.2	  show	  tonal	  and	  microtonal	  counterparts	  an	  octave	  above	  the	  low	  register.	  Together,	  tables	  5.1	  and	  5.2	  show	  the	  measured	  tonal	  and	  microtonal	  intervals	  created	  using	  the	  two	  available	  right-­‐hand	  side-­‐keys	  on	  the	  tárogató	  in	  the	  high	  register.	  	  	  	   73	  Table	  5.2	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  creates	  an	  ascending	  interval	  on	  a	  B5	  using	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  tárogató	  high	  register	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  B5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  C5	  m2	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.7	   Bb-­‐A#4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  register	  key	  fingering,	  using	  the	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   74	  Figure	  5.8	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  C4	  -­‐50,	  a	  major	  second	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  50	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  C4	  -­‐50	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.9	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  Bb4-­‐A#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  the	  same	  microtonal	  pitch	  relation	  seen	  in	  figure	  5.8	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  C4	  -­‐50	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   75	  Table	  5.3	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn	  creates	  an	  ascending	  microtonal	  interval	  on	  a	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  using	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  tárogató	  high	  register	  tones	  	   	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Nil.	  -­‐	   	  C5	  -­‐40	  cents	  M2	  -­‐40	  cents	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.10	   A4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  register	  key	  fingering,	  using	  the	  first	  and	  the	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   76	  Figure	  5.11	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  A4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  B4	  +10,	  a	  major	  second	  step	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  10	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  B4	  +10	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.12	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  an	  A4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  Bb4,	  a	  minor	  second	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Bb4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   77	  Table	  5.4	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  microtonal	  interval	  on	  a	  Bb5-­‐A#5	  using	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  tárogató	  high	  register	  tones	  	   	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  A5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  Bb5	  -­‐20	  cents	  m2	  -­‐20	  cents	   	  Bb5	  +20	  cents	  	  m2	  +20	  cents	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.13	   Ab-­‐G#4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers,	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   78	  Figure	  5.14	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  B4	  -­‐20,	  a	  minor	  third	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  minus	  20	  cents	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  B4	  -­‐20	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.15	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  an	  Ab4-­‐G#4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  an	  A4	  +50,	  a	  minor	  second	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  50	  cents	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A4	  +50	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   79	  Table	  5.5	   Charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  results	  in	  an	  ascending	  interval	  on	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  tárogató	  high	  register	  tones	  	   	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  Ab5-­‐G#5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  A5	  	  m2	   	  A5	  +10	  cents	  	  m2	  +10	  cents	  	  	  Figure	  5.16	   G4-­‐G5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  ornamental	  side-­‐key	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.17	   Charged	  upper	  mordent,	  models	  1	  and	  2	  on	  a	  G4.	  Snap-­‐pressing	  the	  second	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  a	  Bb4	  +50,	  a	  minor	  third	  above	  the	  principal	  tone,	  plus	  50	  cents	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Bb4	  +50	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   80	  Figure	  5.18	   Trilled	  snapped	  turn	  and	  extended	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  models	  3	  and	  4	  on	  a	  G4.	  Fast-­‐trill	  pressing	  the	  first	  side-­‐key	  sounds	  an	  A4,	  a	  major	  second	  above	  the	  principal	  tone	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  A4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Table	  5.6	   The	  high	  register	  tone	  in	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  and	  trilled	  snapped	  turn,	  with	  the	  resulting	  ascending	  intervals	  on	  a	  G5	  using	  the	  first	  and	  second	  side-­‐key	  	  	  The	  tárogató	  high	  register	  tones	  	  	  First	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	   	  Second	  side-­‐key	  pitch	  measurements	  	  G5	  Interval	  +/-­‐	   	  G#5	  m2	   	  G#5	  -­‐10	  cents	  	  m2	  -­‐10	  cents	  	  	  5.2	   Charged	  snap	  turn	  and	  charged	  snap	  fingering	  charts	  in	  the	  low	  and	  high	  	   tárogató	  register	  using	  the	  lower	  joint	  of	  the	  tárogató	  	   In	  this	  next	  section	  I	  illustrate	  the	  charged	  turn	  and	  charged	  snap	  turn	  fingerings	  on	  the	  lower	  half	  of	  the	  tárogató.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  side	  ornamental	  keys	  is	  not	  applicable	  in	  this	  segment	  of	  the	  instrument’s	  register.	  These	  low-­‐register	  embellishments	  are	  accomplished	  by	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand	  finger-­‐bounce	  ornament	  technique.	  A	  direct	  tone	  hole	  finger-­‐bounce	  motion	  performance	  technique	  produces	  an	  ornament	  with	  conventional	  neighboring	  tones	  in	  equal-­‐temperament	  intervals.	  No	  microtonal	  relationship	  is	  measured	  	  	   81	  with	  this	  ornament	  in	  either	  the	  low	  or	  high	  register	  of	  the	  tárogató.	  It	  is	  possible	  to	  use	  this	  technique	  with	  the	  upper	  joint	  of	  the	  tárogató.	  	  Figure	  5.19	   G4-­‐G5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers,	  using	  the	  left	  hand,	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot)	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.20	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  G4	  using	  the	  left	  hand,	  fourth	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  (red	  dot).	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  octave	  above	  the	  principal	  note	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	   	  	  	  Figure	  5.21	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  G4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   82	  Figure	  5.22	   Gb–F#4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  using	  the	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  in	  the	  right-­‐hand	  (red	  dot)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.23	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  notation,	  model	  5	  on	  a	  Gb4-­‐F#4	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  octave	  above	  the	  principal	  note	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.24	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  a	  Gb4-­‐F#4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   83	  Figure	  5.25	   F4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  with	  the	  ornamental	  fingering	  using	  the	  second	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  in	  the	  right-­‐hand	  (red	  dot)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.26	   Charged	  snapped	  turn	  on	  model	  5	  on	  an	  F4	  using	  the	  right-­‐hand,	  second	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique.	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  octave	  above	  the	  principal	  note	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.27	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  an	  F4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   84	  Figure	  5.28	   E4-­‐5	  in	  low	  and	  high	  registers	  with	  the	  ornamental	  fingering	  using	  the	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  in	  the	  right-­‐hand	  (red	  dot)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.29	   Charged	  snapped	  turn,	  model	  5	  on	  an	  E4	  using	  the	  third	  finger-­‐bounce	  technique	  with	  the	  right-­‐hand.	  The	  equivalent	  in	  the	  high	  register	  is	  an	  octave	  above	  the	  principal	  note	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  5.30	   Charged	  snap,	  model	  6	  on	  an	  E4	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	   85	  6	   Conclusion	  6.1	   Placement	  of	  the	  ornamental	  models	  in	  a	  musical	  context	  	  A	  number	  of	  pieces	  exist	  in	  the	  standard	  repertoire	  that	  could	  benefit	  from	  the	  application	  of	  the	  ornamental	  models	  presented	  in	  this	  dissertation.	  Examples	  include	  Bohuslav	  Martinu’s	  “Sonatina”	  for	  clarinet	  and	  piano	  (1956);	  Aram	  Khachaturian’s	  “Trio	  for	  clarinet,	  violin	  and	  piano”	  (1932);	  Nikola	  Resanović’s	  “alt.	  music.	  ballistix”	  (1995)	  for	  clarinet	  and	  tape;	  Béla	  Bartók’s	  “Sonatina”	  and	  “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances,”	  both	  composed	  in	  1915	  for	  piano	  solo	  and	  transcribed	  by	  Zoltán	  Székely	  for	  violin	  (or	  clarinet)	  and	  piano;	  Sid	  Robinovitch’s	  "Klezmer	  in	  Granada	  I	  &	  II”	  (2013)	  for	  clarinet,	  bassoon,	  and	  piano;	  and	  László	  Draskócz’s	  “Korondi	  Táncok”	  (1981)	  for	  clarinet	  and	  piano.	  And	  there	  are	  other	  original,	  re-­‐arranged,	  or	  redacted	  versions	  of	  folk	  inspired	  music—such	  as	  Georges	  Enesco	  and	  arranger	  E.	  Simon’s	  “Romanian	  Rhapsody	  Op.	  11,	  No.	  1”—that	  are	  promising	  for	  the	  use	  of	  these	  ornamentation	  models.	  The	  structural	  nature	  of	  these	  embellishments	  can	  be	  deceiving	  at	  first,	  as	  they	  may	  seem	  out-­‐of-­‐rhythm	  when	  observed	  outside	  of	  their	  original	  musical	  contexts.	  Therefore,	  one	  might	  come	  to	  the	  conclusion	  that	  they	  don’t	  appear	  applicable	  in	  most	  of	  the	  standard	  repertoire	  written	  for	  the	  clarinet.	  However,	  these	  sets	  of	  ornaments	  should	  help	  the	  overall	  flow	  of	  melodic	  ideas	  if	  executed	  with	  vigorous	  technical	  command	  and	  careful	  placement	  in	  respect	  to	  the	  actual	  ornament	  suggestions	  from	  the	  composer	  within	  the	  given	  musical	  texture.	  I	  present	  them	  as	  a	  substitute	  for	  the	  original	  ornaments,	  to	  create	  a	  variety	  for	  otherwise	  uniform	  and	  less	  elegant	  trill	  or	  mordent	  solutions	  relative	  to	  the	  overall	  attempt	  at	  stylistic	  authenticity.	  	  	   86	  The	  ornamental	  method	  in	  this	  dissertation	  is	  designed	  to	  serve	  a	  dual	  role.	  The	  first	  is	  to	  advance	  the	  existing	  embellishment	  instructions	  to	  performers,	  while	  the	  second	  is	  to	  offer	  an	  additional	  tool	  for	  composers.	  In	  this	  final	  chapter	  I	  provide	  notational	  examples	  and	  excerpts	  from	  the	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató	  literature	  to	  explain	  my	  artistic	  ideas	  about	  performance	  practice,	  and	  to	  illustrate	  the	  tasteful	  placement	  of	  these	  ornaments.	  My	  suggestions	  are	  not	  strict	  in	  the	  sense	  that	  any	  rigid	  patterns	  should	  be	  established	  within	  any	  particular	  repertoire.	  Rather,	  such	  ornaments	  should	  be	  used	  in	  a	  tasteful	  and	  well-­‐balanced	  manner,	  such	  that	  they	  do	  not	  dominate	  or	  distort	  the	  original	  melodic	  line	  and	  overall	  musical	  context.	  Examples	  reveal	  suggested	  and	  other	  possible	  options	  in	  guiding	  their	  use	  in	  the	  musical	  texture.	  They	  also	  demonstrate	  how	  such	  ornaments	  often	  create	  unexpected	  arrivals	  on	  an	  odd	  beat.	  	  My	  suggestions	  are	  based	  on	  personal	  research	  of	  traditional	  cultural	  interpretative	  strains	  within	  musical	  styles	  from	  the	  Eastern	  European	  regions	  of	  Serbia,	  Banat	  and	  Transylvania	  in	  Romania,	  the	  Thracian	  region	  of	  Bulgaria,	  and	  some	  parts	  of	  Greece	  and	  Macedonia.	  They	  are	  placed	  on	  the	  excerpts	  from	  the	  original	  pieces	  found	  in	  figures	  6.2	  to	  figure	  6.8.	  To	  begin,	  in	  figure	  6.1	  I	  provide	  an	  abbreviated	  sample	  of	  corresponding	  model	  numbers,	  with	  the	  ornament	  visualization	  and	  notation.	  This	  is	  intended	  to	  serve	  at-­‐a-­‐glance	  as	  a	  reminder	  primarily	  for	  composers.	  This	  chart	  might	  also	  be	  of	  some	  use	  for	  performance	  notes	  in	  the	  preface	  to	  a	  score,	  to	  clearly	  indicate	  what	  type	  of	  embellishment	  technique	  is	  required.	  Further	  listening	  and	  repertoire	  research	  is	  advised	  in	  order	  to	  create	  a	  nuanced	  sense	  of	  the	  traditional	  style	  for	  the	  performer	  who	  wishes	  to	  adapt	  such	  ornaments.	  	  	  	   87	  Figure	  6.1	   Model	  1	  through	  model	  6,	  illustration	  chart	  for	  the	  fast	  and	  effective	  ornamentation	  placement	  within	  the	  musical	  texture	  	  	  	  Model	  1	  &	  6	  	  	  	  	  	  Model	  2	  	  	  Model	  3	  	  	  Model	  4	  	  	  Model	  5	  	  	   	  In	  figure	  6.2	  we	  see	  the	  ornament	  model	  1	  and	  model	  6	  placements	  in	  an	  asymmetrical	  meter,	  with	  the	  ornament	  found	  on	  a	  downbeat	  on	  almost	  every	  second	  measure.	  The	  composer	  underlies	  the	  importance	  of	  odd	  numbered	  grouping	  in	  the	  measure	  and	  stresses	  the	  importance	  of	  the	  grouping	  of	  three	  eighth	  notes.	  The	  ornamental	  placement	  on	  weak	  beats	  suggests	  a	  playful,	  interruptive	  character,	  its	  unevenness	  creating	  a	  sense	  of	  exhilaration	  and	  a	  joyous	  dance-­‐like	  style.	  In	  his	  short	  performance	  note,	  the	  composer	  suggests	  that	  the	  piece	  should	  be	  performed	  imitating	  the	  structure	  of	  the	  Bulgarian	  sentence.	  He	  provides	  no	  proof	  of	  any	  measurable	  relation	  to	  this	  suggestion;	  rather,	  it	  is	  a	  reflection	  of	  his	  artistic	  impressions	  of	  the	  Bulgarian	  narrative	  character	  and	  syntax.	  	  	  	  	   88	  Figure	  6.2	   “Girl’s	  Dance”,	  by	  Božidar	  Milošević.	  mm.53-­‐7411	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   Compare	  this	  to	  the	  placements	  of	  such	  ornaments	  in	  the	  “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”	  of	  Béla	  Bartók,	  as	  illustrated	  in	  figure	  6.3.	  Here	  he	  suggests	  that	  grace	  notes	  be	  played	  on	  every	  off-­‐beat	  in	  the	  measure,	  stressing	  the	  otherwise	  weak	  second	  eighth	  note.	  He	  insists	  on	  this	  embellishment	  throughout	  the	  repetitive	  melodic	  line.	  Adding	  my	  own	  supposition	  to	  Bartok’s	  desire	  to	  embellish	  and	  create	  the	  dance-­‐like	  character	  of	  the	  piece,	  I	  use	  model	  1	  and	  model	  6,	  placing	  the	  ornament	  directly	  on	  the	  second	  eighth	  note,	  rather	  than	  as	  anticipation.	  This	  is	  not	  disruptive	  in	  achieving	  the	  desired	  effect,	  as	  it	  allows	  performers	  to	  achieve	  a	  greater	  speed	  in	  ornaments	  and	  a	  more	  varied	  flow	  of	  musical	  ideas.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  11	  Used	  by	  permission	  of	  the	  author,	  Božidar	  Milošević.	  	  	   89	  Figure	  6.3	   “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”,	  Dance	  number	  5,	  Poargã	  româneascä,	  by	  Béla	  Bartók.	  mm.1-­‐2812	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  12	  Used	  by	  permission	  of	  Universal	  Edition	  A.G.,	  Wien.	  	  	  	   90	  Figure	  6.4	   “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”,	  Dance	  number	  6,	  Più	  allegro,	  Mãruntel,	  by	  Béla	  Bartók.	  mm.1-­‐2813	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  In	  Béla	  Bartók‘s	  “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”	  Dance	  Number	  6,	  Mãruntel	  (figure	  6.4),	  I	  illustrate	  the	  appropriate	  placement	  of	  ornamental	  model	  1	  through	  model	  6	  as	  they	  could	  be	  performed	  on	  the	  clarinet	  or	  the	  tárogató.	  These	  ornamentation	  models	  provide	  alternatives	  for	  the	  grace	  notes	  or	  triplets	  Bartók	  first	  used	  in	  this	  piano	  piece.	  The	  sound	  of	  the	  appoggiaturas	  on	  a	  keyboard	  instrument	  would	  be	  articulated	  differently	  than	  what	  Zoltán	  Székely’s	  arrangement	  for	  the	  clarinet	  suggests.	  Here	  I	  imitate	  the	  more	  piano-­‐like,	  percussively	  accurate	  articulation	  sound	  by	  using	  the	  side-­‐key	  pressed	  charged	  upper	  mordent	  or	  charged	  snap	  with	  the	  finger-­‐bounce	  ornamental	  technique	  (as	  seen	  in	  figures	  6.3	  and	  6.4).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  13	  Used	  by	  permission	  of	  Universal	  Edition	  A.G.,	  Wien.	  	  	  	   91	  Figure	  6.5	   “Thracian	  Sketches”	  by	  Derek	  Bermel.	  The	  use	  of	  model	  1	  through	  6,	  in	  the	  mm.104-­‐13614	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  14	  Used	  by	  permission	  of	  XPyre	  Music	  administered	  by	  Songs	  of	  Peer,	  Ltd.	  	  	   92	  Composer	  and	  clarinetist,	  Derek	  Bermel,	  conducted	  field	  research	  into	  the	  authentic	  style	  of	  Bulgarian	  folk	  performances,	  compositional	  forms,	  and	  structures,	  incorporating	  such	  knowledge	  into	  his	  own	  work.	  Two	  outcomes	  of	  this	  research	  include:	  1)	  the	  solo	  clarinet	  piece	  “Thracian	  Sketches”	  (excerpts	  reproduced	  in	  figures	  6.5	  and	  6.6),	  and	  the	  related	  orchestral	  piece	  “Thracian	  Echoes.”	  These	  pieces	  were	  inspired	  by	  the	  musical	  styles	  and	  irregular	  rhythms	  from	  Bulgarian	  folk	  songs	  found	  in	  various	  regions	  of	  Bulgaria,	  and	  also	  from	  Greece.	  His	  program	  notes	  reflect	  on	  his	  research	  experiences:	  In	  August	  2001,	  I	  traveled	  to	  Plovdiv,	  Bulgaria,	  to	  study	  the	  Thracian	  folk	  style	  with	  clarinetist	  Nikola	  Iliev.	  Thracia	  is	  a	  region	  in	  Bulgaria,	  which	  stretches	  over	  the	  Rodopi	  Mountains	  and	  extends	  into	  Modern	  Greece.	  I	  spent	  several	  hours	  each	  day	  transcribing	  and	  memorizing	  the	  songs,	  Nikola's	  nephews	  Emil	  and	  Misha	  assisting	  by	  translating	  from	  Bulgarian	  to	  French	  or	  English….	  In	  this	  piece	  I	  bent	  the	  original	  Bulgarian	  modes	  into	  a	  whole	  tone	  melodic	  context	  while	  retaining	  much	  of	  the	  original	  rhythm	  and	  contour,	  especially	  the	  tendency	  to	  sustain	  tied	  mordents	  over	  the	  bar	  line	  in	  odd	  meters.	  	  	  …[I]	  began	  experimenting	  with	  phrases	  from	  several	  faster,	  instrumental	  songs	  —	  Paydushko	  Xhoro	  (5/8),	  Mizhka	  Richenitza	  (7/8),	  Daychovo	  Xhoro	  (9/8),	  and	  Krivo	  Pazardzhishko	  Xhoro	  (11/16)	  —	  once	  again,	  altering	  the	  modes.	  The	  piece	  begins	  in	  the	  lower	  register	  of	  the	  clarinet,	  and	  moves	  through	  the	  songs,	  increasing	  in	  velocity,	  range,	  and	  the	  complexity	  of	  rhythmic	  groupings	  as	  it	  progresses.	  I	  thought	  of	  “Thracian	  Sketches”	  as	  a	  minimalist	  form….	  (Bermel	  2003,	  01)	  	  	   Bermel’s	  performance	  notes	  go	  further	  in	  describing	  the	  proper	  ornamental	  performance	  and	  suggests	  using	  circular	  breathing.	  He	  does	  not,	  however,	  provide	  detailed	  instructions	  as	  to	  the	  speed	  of	  execution	  for	  mordents	  or	  reverse-­‐mordents.	  Bermel	  also	  does	  not	  suggest	  detailed	  placements	  or	  the	  exact	  character	  of	  these	  embellishments	  within	  the	  complex	  rhythmic	  and	  melodic	  structure:	  All	  mordents,	  reverse-­‐mordents,	  and	  grupetti	  are	  whole-­‐tone	  unless	  otherwise	  noted.	  Embellishments	  should	  be	  played	  toward	  the	  end	  of	  a	  note.	  The	  performer	  may	  choose	  to	  circular-­‐breathe,	  or	  may	  omit	  short,	  selected	  notes.	  (Bermel	  2003,	  01)	  	  	   93	  Figure	  6.6	   “Thracian	  Sketches”	  by	  Derek	  Bermel.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  ornamentation	  model	  3,	  model	  4	  and	  model	  5	  in	  mm.137-­‐152	  15	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  15	  Used	  by	  permission	  of	  XPyre	  Music	  administered	  by	  Songs	  of	  Peer,	  Ltd.	  	  	  	   94	  Figure	  6.7	   “Duo”	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  (per	  taragoto	  e	  clarinetto),	  composed	  by	  Ana	  Sokolović	  and	  dedicated	  to	  Milan	  Milosevic.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  ornamentation	  model	  1,	  model	  5,	  and	  model	  6	  in	  mm.1-­‐10	  16	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   Figure	  6.7	  shows	  the	  opening	  bars	  of	  Ana	  Sokolović’s	  “Duo”	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  (per	  taragoto	  e	  clarinetto),	  a	  composition	  dedicated	  to	  my	  ornamentation	  research.	  It	  stems	  from	  the	  collaboration	  of	  expanding	  compositional	  expressive	  tools	  (ornamental	  models	  in	  this	  dissertation)	  and	  reinvigorates	  the	  tárogató,	  a	  relatively	  unknown	  instrument	  to	  contemporary	  composers.	  This	  natural	  flow	  of	  mutually	  engaging	  ideas	  and	  curiosity	  led	  us	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  16	  Used	  by	  permission	  of	  the	  composer,	  Ana	  Sokolović.	  	  	   95	  to	  test	  the	  fundamentals	  of	  ornamentation	  and	  their	  practical	  application	  in	  contemporary	  music.	  To	  my	  knowledge,	  this	  is	  the	  first	  piece	  written	  for	  clarinet	  and	  tárogató,	  and	  the	  first	  to	  involve	  me	  as	  a	  performer	  in	  determining	  the	  placement	  of	  ornaments	  prior	  to	  formal	  scoring	  by	  the	  composer.	  My	  feedback	  in	  the	  decision-­‐making	  process	  was	  a	  test	  of	  our	  mutual	  trust	  and	  collaboration.	  Ana	  Sokolović	  writes:	  This	  piece	  is	  dedicated	  to	  many	  years	  of	  wonderful	  friendship	  and	  artistic	  collaboration	  with	  Milan	  Milosevic,	  dating	  back	  to	  the	  early	  1990s	  in	  Belgrade,	  former	  Yugoslavia.	  “Duo”	  is	  composed	  to	  communicate	  directly	  with	  his	  refined	  sense	  of	  innovation	  and	  dedication	  to	  his	  research	  in	  the	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  ornamentation	  techniques,	  as	  being	  a	  subject	  of	  his	  doctoral	  research	  at	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  In	  this	  piece,	  I	  wanted	  to	  explore	  the	  close	  writing	  between	  the	  clarinet	  and	  the	  tárogató.	  Written	  in	  the	  same	  register,	  with	  the	  same	  accentuation	  marks	  and	  similar	  dynamic	  range,	  adding	  a	  gentle	  touch	  from	  Balkan	  folklore,	  this	  dance-­‐like	  interplay	  between	  two	  closely	  related	  woodwind	  instruments	  should	  show	  us	  their	  similarities,	  as	  well	  as	  their	  distinct	  differences.	  Milan’s	  new	  ornamentation	  models,	  stemming	  from	  his	  research,	  are	  used	  as	  an	  integral	  part	  of	  my	  compositional	  language.	  Their	  accurate	  and	  the	  most	  appropriate	  placements	  are	  based	  on	  his	  exceptional	  performance	  feedback	  over	  the	  past	  year,	  and	  continued	  communication	  over	  Skype.	  (Sokolović	  2015,	  01)	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   96	  Figure	  6.8	   “Duo”	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  (2014)	  composed	  by	  Ana	  Sokolović.	  The	  use	  of	  the	  ornamentation	  model	  1,	  model	  4,	  and	  model	  6	  in	  mm.32-­‐46	  17	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  6.2	   Reflections	  on	  the	  future	  This	  research	  topic	  on	  the	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet	  ornamentation	  ensued	  almost	  naturally	  from	  the	  beginning.	  By	  taking	  into	  consideration	  my	  personal	  history	  and	  cultural	  background,	  the	  question	  arose	  organically	  of	  how	  to	  create,	  adapt,	  and	  connect	  the	  Eastern-­‐European	  ornamentation	  techniques	  to	  various	  traditional	  and	  contemporary	  musical	  contexts.	  I	  am	  hopeful	  that	  such	  efforts	  to	  produce	  practical	  instructions	  on	  these	  unconventional	  ornamentation	  performance	  techniques	  will	  be	  of	  benefit	  to	  others.	  These	  informative	  learning	  tools	  further	  the	  existing	  knowledge	  of	  instrumental	  ornamentation	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  17	  Used	  by	  permission	  of	  the	  composer.	  	  	   97	  practices	  and	  provide	  new	  fingerings	  and	  a	  variety	  of	  practical	  applications.	  Most	  of	  these	  performance	  techniques	  are	  significantly	  different	  from	  those	  learned	  by	  classically	  trained	  performers.	  My	  intention	  was	  to	  identify	  and	  document	  these	  unique	  ornamentations	  and	  to	  suggest	  idiomatic	  solutions	  for	  their	  proper	  placement	  within	  the	  music.	  	  As	  a	  performer	  I	  am	  particularly	  pleased	  to	  have	  had	  a	  hand	  in	  bringing	  back	  the	  tárogató,	  offering	  new	  possible	  artistic	  avenues	  for	  various	  adaptations,	  as	  well	  as	  possible	  inspiration	  for	  creating	  new	  music.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	   98	  Bibliography	  	  Alexandru,	  Tiberiu.	  1980.	  Romanian	  Folk	  Music.	  Bucharest:	  Musical	  Publishing	  House.	  	  	  Anonymous.	  1976.	  “Musical	  Instruments	  of	  the	  World.”	  In	  An	  Illustrated	  Encyclopedia,	  	   44.	  London:	  Paddington	  Press.	  	  Baines,	  Antony.	  1992.	  The	  Oxford	  Companion	  to	  Musical	  Instruments.	  New	  York:	  Oxford	  University	  Press.	  	  	  Bach,	  Carl	  Philipp	  Emanuel.	  1949	  (1753).	  Essay	  on	  the	  True	  Art	  of	  Playing	  Keyboard	  Instruments.	  Translated	  and	  edited	  by	  William	  J.	  Mitchell.	  New	  York:	  Norton.	  	  Bermel,	  Derek.	  2003.	  Thracian	  Sketches.	  Program	  and	  performance	  notes.	  New	  York:	  Peer	  	   Music	  Classical.	  	  Donington,	  Robert.	  1975.	  The	  Interpretation	  of	  Early	  Music.	  London:	  Faber	  and	  Faber.	  	  Fox,	  Stephen.	  2004.	  “The	  Tárogató”	  	  	   http://www.sfoxclarinets.com/Tarogatoart.html.	  Accessed	  July	  12,	  2014.	  	  Gingrass,	  Michele.	  1999.	  “The	  Tarogato:	  A	  Forgotten	  Instrument?”	  The	  	  	   Clarinet	  Vol.	  27/1:	  45.	  	  Ham,	  Albert.	  1914.	  Musical	  Ornaments	  and	  Graces	  and	  their	  interpretation,	  as	  used	  by	  Bach,	  	  Handel	  and	  other	  composers	  of	  the	  17th	  and	  18th	  centuries.	  London:	  Novello	  and	  Company.	  	  Jansen,	  Henk.	  2007.	  A	  Brief	  History	  of	  the	  Tarogato.	  	  	   http://www.11thmuse.com/history.html.	  Accessed	  October	  11,	  2014.	  	  Mather,	  B.	  Betty.	  1973.	  Interpretation	  of	  French	  Music	  from	  1675	  to	  1775,	  For	  Woodwind	  and	  	  Other	  Performers.	  New	  York:	  McGinnis	  &	  Marx.	  	  Mellish,	  Liz	  and	  Nick	  Green.	  [n.d.]	  Taragot	  and	  Saxophone	  Regional	  Map.	  	   http://www.eliznik.org.uk/RomaniaMusic/taragot&saxophone-­‐map.htm.	  Accessed	  	   January	  03,	  2015.	  	  Neumann,	  Frederick.	  1983.	  Ornamentation	  in	  Baroque	  and	  Post-­‐Baroque	  Music,	  With	  	  	   Special	  Emphasis	  on	  J.	  S.	  Bach.	  Princeton:	  Princeton	  Paperbacks.	  	  Pap,	  János.	  1999.	  The	  Tárogató	  and	  Central	  Eastern	  Europe.	  	  http://archive.today/Lzl5m.	  Accessed	  October	  11,	  2014.	  	  	  	   99	  Palmer,	  Kris.	  2001.	  Ornamentation	  According	  to	  C.P.E.	  Bach	  and	  J.	  J.	  Quantz.	  City:	  	   Bloomington,	  IN:	  The	  1st	  Books	  Library.	  	  Quantz,	  Johann	  Joachim.	  1966	  [1752].	  On	  Playing	  the	  Flute.	  Translated	  by	  Edward	  R.	  Reilly).	  	   New	  York:	  MacMillan.	  	  Sokolović,	  Ana.	  2014.	  Duo,	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet,	  program	  note.	  Unpublished	  	   manuscript.	  	  Szabolcsi,	  Miklós.	  2013.	  Stowasser	  J.	  Tárogató.	  	   http://www.tarogato.hu/	  -­‐	  !history/c1wlf.	  Accessed	  July	  12,	  2014.	  	  Taylor,	  Eric.	  1989.	  The	  AB	  Guide	  to	  Music	  Theory.	  London:	  Associated	  Board	  of	  the	  	  	   Royal	  Schools	  of	  Music.	  	  Welsh,	  Alfred	  H.	  1929.	  “The	  Tárogató:	  Its	  History	  and	  Details”.	  Leading	  Note	  Volume	  1/2:	  	   46.	  	  	  Scores	  	  Milosevic,	  Bozidar.	  1975.	  "Girl’s	  Dance",	  Balkan	  Impressions.	  2nd	  Edition.	  Belgrade:	  Litho	  Art	  	   Studio.	  	  Bartók,	  Béla.	  1915.	  “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”,	  Dance	  5,	  Poargã	  româneascä.	  Wien:	  	   Universal	  Edition,	  A.G.	  	  Bartók,	  Béla.	  1915.	  “Romanian	  Folk	  Dances”,	  Dance	  6,	  Mãruntel.	  Wien:	  Universal	  Edition,	  	   A.G.	  	  Bermel,	  Derek.	  2003.	  "Thracian	  Sketches".	  New	  York:	  Peer	  Musical	  Classical.	  	  Sokolović,	  Ana.	  2014.	  "Duo",	  for	  tárogató	  and	  clarinet.	  Unpublished	  manuscript.	  	  	  	  	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0167278/manifest

Comment

Related Items