Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Creation of subjectivity in spaces of crisis : a case study in Daneshjoo Park, Tehran, Iran Kermanian, Sara 2014

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2014_september_kermanian_sara.pdf [ 13.78MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0167227.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0167227-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0167227-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0167227-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0167227-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0167227-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0167227-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0167227-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0167227.ris

Full Text

CREATION	  OF	  SUBJECTIVITY	  IN	  SPACES	  OF	  CRISIS:	  	  A	  CASE	  STUDY	  IN	  DANESHJOO	  PARK,	  TEHRAN,	  IRAN	  	   by	  Sara	  Kermanian	  	  B.Arch.,	  The	  University	  of	  Tehran,	  2010	  	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  	  MASTER	  OF	  ADVANCED	  STUDIES	  IN	  ARCHITECTURE	  in	  THE	  FACULTY	  OF	  GRADUATE	  AND	  POSTDOCTORAL	  STUDIES	  (Advanced	  Studies	  in	  Architecture)	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  	  	  May	  2014	  	  ©	  Sara	  Kermanian,	  2014	  ii	  	  Abstract	  	  Public	  spaces	  are	  known	  to	  be	  spaces	  of	  social	  interaction,	  communication,	  or	  public	  actions.	  However,	  many	  of	  the	  public	  spaces	  involved	  in	  the	  current	  unrests	  in	  the	  Middle	  East,	  were	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  before	  they	  turned	  into	  spaces	  of	  revolution	  or	  civil	  war.	  In	  this	  research,	  I	  examine	  the	  role	  of	  public	  spaces	  in	  their	  condition	  of	  crisis	  on	  the	  creation	  of	  the	  subjectivity	  of	  their	  constituents	  and	  the	  limits	  and	  possibilities	  of	  these	  spaces	  for	  the	  formation	  of	  critical	  moments	  of	  thinking.	  	  I	  explore	  the	  answers	  of	  my	  questions	  through	  the	  ethnographic	  study	  of	  one	  example	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis:	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  in	  Tehran.	  The	  data	  I	  use	  mainly	  comes	  from	  my	  personal	  observations	  and	  dialogues	  with	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  during	  the	  seven	  years	  of	  my	  using	  the	  park	  from	  2005	  to	  2012.	  Other	  sources	  of	  information	  include	  people's	  memories	  or	  comments	  about	  the	  park	  published	  on	  their	  weblogs	  or	  Facebook,	  maps,	  urban	  policies,	  the	  penal	  code	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  and	  public	  media.	  	  	  The	  result	  of	  this	  research	  shows	  that	  political	  power’s	  way	  for	  using	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  to	  manipulate	  people’s	  subjectivity	  passes	  through	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities.	  It	  also	  shows	  that	  the	  diversity	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  that	  forms	  in	  the	  condition	  of	  crisis	  can	  lead	  to	  the	  formation	  of	  “involuntary	  moments	  of	  thinking”	  and	  break	  the	  boundaries	  of	  subjectification.	  	  iii	  	  Preface	  	  This	  dissertation	  is	  original,	  unpublished,	  independent	  work	  by	  author,	  Sara	  Kermanian.	  iv	  	  Table	  of	  Contents	  	  Abstract	  ..................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Preface	  ...................................................................................................................................	  iii	  Table	  of	  Contents	  ...................................................................................................................	  iv	  List	  of	  Tables	  ..........................................................................................................................	  ix	  List	  of	  Figures	  ..........................................................................................................................	  x	  Acknowledgements	  ..............................................................................................................	  xiii	  Chapter	  1:	  Introduction	  ...........................................................................................................	  1	  1.1	   A	  historical	  moment	  ..........................................................................................................	  1	  1.2	   Raising	  the	  questions	  ........................................................................................................	  1	  1.3	   The	  importance	  of	  discussion	  ...........................................................................................	  2	  1.4	   Subjectivity,	  power,	  and	  space	  .........................................................................................	  3	  1.5	   Exploring	  the	  context	  ........................................................................................................	  8	  1.6	   Chapters	  summery	  ............................................................................................................	  9	  1.6.1	   Chapter	  Two	  ...............................................................................................................	  9	  1.6.2	   Chapter	  Three	  ..........................................................................................................	  10	  1.6.3	   Chapter	  Four	  ............................................................................................................	  10	  1.6.4	   Chapter	  Five	  .............................................................................................................	  11	  1.6.5	   Chapter	  Six	  ...............................................................................................................	  11	  Chapter	  2:	  Space	  for	  Whom	  ...................................................................................................	  12	  2.1	   The	  Emergence	  of	  Crisis	  ..................................................................................................	  15	  v	  	  2.1.1	   Before	  the	  Revolution	  (1967-­‐1978)	  .........................................................................	  15	  2.1.2	   The	  Revolutionary	  Period	  (1979)	  .............................................................................	  18	  2.1.3	   The	  Islamic	  Republic’s	  Cultural	  Revolution	  and	  its	  Aftermath	  (1980-­‐1997)	  ............	  19	  2.1.4	   Current	  Condition	  (1997-­‐Current	  Time)	  ...................................................................	  21	  2.2	   Conflicts	  and	  Sources	  of	  Powe	  ........................................................................................	  24	  2.2.1	   State,	  Civil	  Society	  and	  Minorities	  ............................................................................	  25	  2.2.2	   Molar	  and	  Molecular	  Types	  of	  Power	  ......................................................................	  27	  Chapter	  3:	  The	  Battle	  over	  Hegemony	  ...................................................................................	  30	  3.1	   The	  Machine	  of	  the	  Park	  .................................................................................................	  31	  3.2	   Politics	  of	  Identity	  ...........................................................................................................	  32	  3.2.1	   Normative	  Self	  and	  the	  Ignorance	  of	  Minority	  Identities	  ........................................	  33	  3.2.2	   The	  Civil	  Society	  .......................................................................................................	  34	  3.2.3	   Homosexuals	  ............................................................................................................	  34	  3.2.4	   Unequal	  Right	  to	  the	  Public	  Space	  ...........................................................................	  35	  3.3	   Spatial	  Intervention	  .........................................................................................................	  37	  3.3.1	   The	  Cultural	  Revolution	  ...........................................................................................	  38	  3.3.2	   Discipline:	  Policing	  Forces	  ........................................................................................	  38	  3.3.3	   Removing	  Minorities	  ................................................................................................	  39	  3.3.4	   Occupying	  the	  Plaza	  .................................................................................................	  39	  3.3.5	   The	  Construction	  of	  the	  Mosque	  .............................................................................	  43	  3.3.6	   The	  Construction	  of	  the	  Metro	  Station	  ....................................................................	  46	  vi	  	  3.3.7	   Demolishing	  the	  Food	  Outlet	  Area	  ...........................................................................	  47	  3.3.8	   Removing	  Pedestrians	  ..............................................................................................	  47	  3.3.9	   The	  Project	  is	  Ongoing:	  Imaging	  the	  Utopia	  ............................................................	  51	  3.4	   Limits	  of	  the	  Space	  of	  the	  Political	  Power	  .......................................................................	  53	  Chapter	  4:	  All	  against	  One	  .....................................................................................................	  56	  4.1	   Space	  of	  Resistance	  .........................................................................................................	  56	  4.2	   Encounters:	  Tactics,	  Actions	  and	  Conceptions	  ................................................................	  58	  4.2.1	   Civil	  Society	  versus	  the	  Political	  Power	  ....................................................................	  58	  4.2.2	   Minorities	  versus	  the	  Political	  Power	  .......................................................................	  61	  4.2.3	   The	  Civil	  Society	  versus	  Minorities	  ...........................................................................	  62	  4.3	   Suppressor	  Utopias	  .........................................................................................................	  66	  4.3.1	   The	  Political	  Power’s	  Utopia	  ....................................................................................	  67	  4.3.2	   The	  Civil	  Society’s	  Utopia	  .........................................................................................	  68	  4.3.3	   All	  against	  One	  .........................................................................................................	  69	  4.3.4	   Do	  minorities	  have	  a	  Utopia?	  ...................................................................................	  70	  4.4	   Limits	  of	  Molecular	  Power	  ..............................................................................................	  70	  Chapter	  5:	  One	  Self’s	  Space	  as	  Another’s	  ...............................................................................	  73	  5.1	   Daneshjoo	  Park:	  Narratives	  and	  Images	  .........................................................................	  74	  5.1.1	   Narrative	  Self	  ...........................................................................................................	  75	  5.1.2	   Narratives	  of	  Minorities	  ...........................................................................................	  76	  5.1.3	   The	  Metaphor	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  ............................................................................	  76	  vii	  	  5.1.4	   Images	  of	  Inside	  .......................................................................................................	  78	  5.2	   Three	  States	  of	  Spatial	  experiences	  ................................................................................	  79	  5.2.1	   Narrative	  Experiences	  ..............................................................................................	  79	  5.2.2	   Fragmented	  Experiences	  ..........................................................................................	  80	  5.2.3	   Situated	  Experiences	  ................................................................................................	  81	  5.2.4	   Intersubjectivity	  of	  Spatial	  Experiences	  ...................................................................	  83	  5.3	   Difference	  and	  Narratives	  ...............................................................................................	  84	  5.3.1	   The	  Twin	  Multiplicity	  ................................................................................................	  86	  5.3.2	   Narratives	  and	  Dogmatic	  Images	  .............................................................................	  86	  5.3.3	   On	  the	  Land	  of	  Larval	  Self	  ........................................................................................	  88	  5.3.4	   Involuntary	  Moments	  of	  Thinking	  ............................................................................	  90	  Chapter	  6:	  Conclusion	  ............................................................................................................	  94	  6.1	   Self	  and	  space	  .................................................................................................................	  94	  6.2	   Limitations	  and	  possibilities	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  ...............................................................	  95	  6.2.1	   Limitations	  ...............................................................................................................	  95	  6.2.2	   Possibilities	  ...............................................................................................................	  97	  6.3	   Moving	  forward	  ..............................................................................................................	  98	  6.3.1	   On	  the	  collapse	  of	  a	  historical	  moment	  ...................................................................	  98	  6.3.2	   On	  the	  definition	  of	  public	  spaces	  ...........................................................................	  99	  6.3.3	   On	  designing	  and	  planning	  for	  public	  ....................................................................	  100	  6.3.4	   On	  methodology	  ....................................................................................................	  100	  viii	  	  Bibliography	  ........................................................................................................................	  101	  Web	  Publications	  ................................................................................................................	  105	  	  	   	  ix	  	  List	  of	  Tables	  	  Table	  2-­‐1.	  Different	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  and	  their	  ideas	  about	  the	  presence	  of	  other	  groups	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  27	  	   	  x	  	  List	  of	  Figures	  	  Figure	  2-­‐1.	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  and	  Enghelab	  Axes	  .....................................................................................	  12	  Figure	  2-­‐2.	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  as	  a	  transit	  hub:	  two	  Bus	  Rapid	  Transit	  line	  and	  one	  subway	  line	  cross	  at	  this	  cross	  road	  ..............................................................................................................................	  13	  Figure	  2-­‐3.	  The	  evolution	  of	  built	  up	  areas	  in	  Tehran	  ..................................................................	  17	  Figure	  2-­‐4.	  The	  dialog	  between	  two	  sides	  of	  the	  park	  before	  the	  1979	  Revolution	  ....................	  18	  Figure	  2-­‐5.	  The	  opposition	  of	  two	  sides	  of	  the	  park	  after	  the	  Revolution	  ...................................	  20	  Figure	  2-­‐6.	  Major	  universities	  and	  cultural	  facilities	  in	  the	  neighborhood	  ..................................	  21	  Figure	  2-­‐7.	  Locating	  the	  areas	  occupied	  by	  users	  of	  the	  park	  ......................................................	  24	  Figure	  3-­‐1.	  The	  plaza	  is	  occupied	  by	  plainclothes	  in	  the	  night	  after	  the	  current	  presidential	  election,	  June	  2013	  ......................................................................................................................	  41	  Figure	  3-­‐2.	  The	  23rd	  Fajr	  International	  Theater	  Festival,	  a	  street	  theater	  performance,	  January	  2014	  .............................................................................................................................................	  41	  Figure	  3-­‐3.	  A	  Tazie	  performance	  (a	  religious	  theater	  performed	  in	  Muharram),	  August	  2013	  ...	  42	  Figure	  3-­‐4.	  Tazie	  performance	  (a	  religious	  theater	  performed	  in	  Muharram),	  August	  2013	  ......	  42	  Figure	  3-­‐5.	  The	  condition	  of	  the	  mosque	  at	  the	  south	  of	  the	  park	  ..............................................	  44	  Figure	  3-­‐6.	  The	  first	  alternative	  for	  the	  mosque	  ..........................................................................	  45	  Figure	  3-­‐7.	  Fluid	  Motion	  Architects	  diagram	  of	  the	  maximum	  height	  of	  the	  mosque	  .................	  45	  Figure	  3-­‐8.	  Fluid	  Motion	  Architect’s	  alternative	  ..........................................................................	  45	  Figure	  3-­‐9.	  The	  mosque	  under	  construction,	  July	  2013	  ...............................................................	  46	  xi	  	  Figure	  3-­‐10.	  People’s	  public	  ceremony	  after	  Iran’s	  National	  Football	  team	  entrance	  to	  the	  World	  Cup,	  beside	  the	  City	  Theater,	  June	  2013	  ......................................................................................	  48	  Figure	  3-­‐11.	  The	  diagram	  of	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  underpass	  .......................................................................	  48	  Figure	  3-­‐12.	  Blocking	  the	  pedestrian	  access	  to	  the	  street,	  January	  2014	  ....................................	  49	  Figure	  3-­‐13.	  Imam	  Hussein	  Square,	  March	  2013	  .........................................................................	  50	  Figure	  3-­‐14.	  Imam	  Hussein	  Square,	  November	  2012	  ...................................................................	  50	  Figure	  3-­‐15.	  The	  diagram	  of	  spatial	  interventions	  in	  the	  park	  .....................................................	  51	  Figure	  3-­‐16.	  The	  municipality’s	  further	  plan	  for	  the	  park	  ............................................................	  52	  Figure	  3-­‐17.	  Bringing	  the	  spatial	  influence	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  to	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  Park	  ...........	  53	  Figure	  4-­‐1.	  Top-­‐left:	  8	  March	  2006,	  feminists	  rally,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad	  ....................................	  60	  Figure	  4-­‐2.	  Top-­‐right:	  June	  2013,	  moderate	  Islamists	  and	  reformists’	  candidates	  supporters,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad	  .....................................................................................................................	  60	  Figure	  4-­‐3.	  Bottom-­‐left:	  June	  2013,	  fundamentalists’	  candidate	  supporters,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  60	  Figure	  4-­‐4.	  Bottom-­‐right:	  June	  2013,	  moderate	  Islamists	  and	  reformists’	  candidates	  supporters,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad	  .....................................................................................................................	  60	  Figure	  4-­‐5.	  The	  municipal	  plan	  for	  Daneshjoo	  Park:	  the	  political	  power’s	  ideal	  map	  ..................	  67	  Figure	  4-­‐6.	  Artists'	  ideal	  park	  	  .......................................................................................................	  68	  Figure	  5-­‐1.	  Narrative	  representations:	  when	  subjects	  represent	  their	  identity	  explicitly,	  their	  narrative	  can	  be	  read	  by	  others	  ...................................................................................................	  78	  xii	  	  Figure	  5-­‐2.	  Codified	  representations:	  when	  subjects	  codify	  their	  identity,	  others	  conceive	  them	  as	  fragmented	  images.	  .................................................................................................................	  79	  Figure	  5-­‐3.	  Narrative	  experiences	  ................................................................................................	  80	  Figure	  5-­‐4.	  Fragmented	  experiences:	  minorities’	  codes	  are	  redrawn	  by	  others	  as	  images	  and	  are	  experienced	  as	  fragmented	  moments.	  ........................................................................................	  81	  Figure	  5-­‐5.	  Situated	  experiences	  ..................................................................................................	  83	  xiii	  	  Acknowledgements	  	  My	  warmest	  gratitude	  to	  Sherry	  McKay	  and	  Steven	  Taubeneck	  for	  their	  generous	  feedback	  and	  moral	  support	  throughout	  the	  field	  collection,	  analysis,	  and	  writing	  stages	  of	  this	  work.	  Thank	  you	  to	  Matthew	  Soules	  for	  reading	  and	  providing	  valuable	  feedback	  on	  this	  thesis.	  	  	  	  Thank	  you	  to	  my	  colleagues	  at	  Arkhe	  Co-­‐op,	  specially	  Saeid	  Hashemi	  and	  Parsa	  Kermanian,	  for	  their	  enthusiasm	  and	  encouragement	  as	  I	  completed	  this	  research.	  Thank	  you	  to	  my	  wonderful	  friend	  Zahra	  Hosseini	  whose	  helpful	  feedbacks	  and	  contribution	  have	  been	  invaluable	  to	  this	  project.	  	  	  And	  thank	  you	  to	  my	  parents,	  for	  their	  love	  and	  encouragement.	  	   1 Chapter	  1: Introduction	  	  In	  this	  introduction,	  I	  first	  point	  out	  the	  importance	  of	  a	  historical	  moment	  and	  raise	  two	  rather	  theoretical	  questions	  based	  on	  a	  problem	  in	  understanding	  the	  importance	  of	  the	  role	  of	  public	  spaces	  in	  this	  historical	  moment.	  Second,	  I	  give	  an	  introductory	  explanation	  of	  the	  theoretical	  background	  upon	  which	  I	  want	  to	  construct	  my	  argument.	  Third,	  I	  will	  bring	  these	  two	  questions	  to	  the	  context	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  a	  public	  space	  in	  Tehran,	  where	  I	  want	  to	  seek	  answers	  to	  my	  questions.	  Finally,	  I	  will	  give	  a	  brief	  overview	  of	  what	  is	  going	  to	  be	  discussed	  in	  each	  chapter.	  	  1.1 A	  historical	  moment	  A	  turning	  point	  in	  the	  history	  of	  the	  Middle	  East	  came	  in	  2010.	  A	  series	  of	  protests,	  initiated	  by	  the	  Arab	  Spring	  in	  that	  year	  and	  followed	  by	  Turkey's	  uprising	  in	  Taksim	  Gezi	  Park	  in	  2013,	  swept	  through	  different	  countries	  of	  the	  region.	  Previously,	  in	  2009,	  the	  Green	  Movement	  had	  arisen	  in	  Iran,	  in	  objection	  to	  the	  presidential	  election	  of	  2009.	  Even	  though	  the	  aim,	  target,	  and	  motivation	  of	  these	  movements	  were	  different,	  they	  had	  an	  "urban"	  characteristic	  in	  common	  and	  they	  turned	  Middle	  Eastern	  cities	  into	  landscapes	  of	  contest.	  Cities	  produced,	  accommodated,	  and	  reproduced	  these	  protests	  and	  the	  subjectivity	  promoting	  them:	  contradictions	  and	  issues	  of	  urban	  life	  motivated	  people	  to	  protest;	  urban	  areas	  accommodated	  protests;	  and	  the	  reporting	  of	  urban	  spaces,	  broadcasted	  on	  other	  kinds	  of	  media,	  recovered	  a	  form	  of	  social	  consciousness.	  	  	  1.2 Raising	  the	  questions	  The	  rather	  deep	  connection	  between	  urban	  spaces	  and	  social	  movements	  brought	  about	  an	  old,	  yet	  unanswered,	  question	  about	  space:	  what	  is	  the	  role	  of	  space	  in	  the	  creation	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  the	  social	  consciousness	  of	  constituents?	  However,	  the	  Arab	  Spring	  as	  well	  as	  the	  Green	  Movement	  in	  Iran	  lost	  their	  primary	  social	  solidarity	  after	  a	  while,	  and	  ended	  in	  passivity	  or	  contests	  between	  different	  groups	  of	  protestors,	  either	  between	  supporters	  of	  governments	  and	  oppositions	  to	  them,	  or	  between	  different	  groups	  of	  oppositions.	  Considering	  	   2 this	  transformation	  the	  question	  finds	  another	  aspect:	  what	  are	  the	  limitations	  of	  space	  and	  spatial	  practices	  in	  the	  creation	  of	  the	  subjectivity	  of	  space’s	  constituents?	  	  1.3 The	  importance	  of	  discussion	  These	  two	  questions	  provide	  the	  foundation	  of	  this	  research;	  however,	  instead	  of	  talking	  about	  space	  in	  general	  or	  contested	  spaces,	  I	  want	  to	  focus	  on	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  for	  particular	  reasons.	  First	  and	  foremost,	  the	  long	  history	  of	  the	  sociology	  of	  critical	  capacity	  has	  testified	  to	  the	  role	  of	  moments	  of	  crisis	  in	  the	  evolution	  and	  creation	  of	  subjectivity.	  Following	  a	  Gramscian	  concept,	  if	  there	  is	  a	  chance	  for	  going	  beyond	  the	  hegemony,	  it	  lies	  in	  social	  conflict.	  For	  Gramsci,	  “hegemony”	  or	  “the	  dominance	  of	  one	  form	  of	  praxis	  against	  others”	  –the	  contest	  between	  different	  states	  of	  praxis-­‐-­‐cannot	  be	  overcome	  without	  the	  self-­‐awareness	  of	  all	  social	  groups,	  including	  subaltern	  subjects.	  This	  self-­‐awareness	  is	  necessary	  if,	  in	  the	  dialectic	  of	  revolution/restoration,	  revolutionary	  forces	  are	  to	  overcome	  the	  current	  hegemony	  of	  restorative	  forces.	  If	  revolutionary	  forces	  cannot	  become	  the	  predominant	  force,	  either	  the	  current	  hegemony	  would	  continue	  its	  existence,	  or	  a	  third	  force	  would	  dominate	  the	  destructive	  balance	  of	  two	  other	  forces.	  In	  either	  case,	  one	  can	  notify	  the	  reduction	  in	  the	  level	  of	  social	  conflicts.	  	  Second,	  contests	  come	  from	  crisis.	  Many	  of	  the	  spaces	  that	  are	  known	  as	  contested	  landscapes	  were	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  before	  they	  turned	  into	  a	  battlefield,	  or	  returned	  to	  their	  functions	  as	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  in	  everyday	  life.	  Different	  people	  who	  had	  different,	  apparently	  contradictory,	  interests	  claimed	  public	  spaces.	  In	  order	  to	  study	  the	  condition	  of	  contested	  spaces,	  their	  causes	  and	  probable	  fortune,	  one	  has	  to	  study	  their	  previous	  condition	  when	  they	  were	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  This	  research	  explores	  the	  relation	  between	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  and	  the	  subjectivity	  of	  their	  constituents;	  how	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  subjectify	  their	  constituents’	  agency	  and	  the	  limitations	  and	  potentials	  of	  these	  spaces	  for	  the	  creation	  of	  what	  Deleuze	  calls	  "involuntary	  moments	  of	  thinking"	  or	  moments	  of	  going	  beyond	  subjectification.	  	  	   3 1.4 Subjectivity,	  power,	  and	  space	  Before	  explaining	  the	  relation	  of	  subjectivity	  to	  space	  and	  spatial	  experiences,	  the	  definition	  of	  subjectivity	  should	  be	  clarified.	  There	  is	  a	  sharp	  distinction	  between	  Rousseau's	  individual	  self	  and	  Foucault's	  subjectivity,	  which	  is	  defined	  through	  its	  relation	  with	  power.	  Any	  theory	  that	  defines	  subjectivity	  independent	  from	  its	  context	  consequently	  denies	  the	  relation	  between	  space	  and	  subjectivity.	  Vise	  versa,	  in	  talking	  about	  the	  relation	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  the	  built	  environment,	  one	  has	  to	  acknowledge	  subjectivity	  is	  contextual	  and	  based	  on	  social	  relations.	  	  	  However,	  by	  simply	  saying	  that	  subjectivity	  is	  contextual	  makes	  nothing	  any	  clearer	  because	  the	  definition	  of	  “context”	  should	  be	  clarified	  as	  well.	  Does	  context	  refer	  to	  a	  society's	  structure	  and	  relations	  of	  power,	  or	  to	  the	  communications	  of	  people	  outside	  the	  relations	  of	  power?	  Does	  it	  include	  the	  previous	  contexts	  a	  subject	  has	  encountered	  and	  that	  have	  formed	  their	  subjectivity?	  I	  will	  argue	  that	  the	  complexity	  of	  social	  relations	  in	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  particularly	  spaces	  in	  which	  minorities	  confront	  civil	  society,	  forces	  us	  to	  consider	  different	  interpretations	  of	  self	  and	  subjectivity,	  even	  though	  all	  of	  them	  should	  be	  studied	  based	  on	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  power.	  	  	  	  Foucault	  demonstrates	  that	  subjectivity	  is	  the	  product	  of	  culture	  and	  power.	  For	  Foucault,	  subjectivity	  does	  not	  have	  a	  "true"	  meaning	  independent	  from	  one’s	  social	  experiences.	  He	  says:	  “The	  individual	  is	  not	  to	  be	  conceived	  as	  a	  sort	  of	  elementary	  nucleus,	  a	  primitive	  atom,	  a	  multiple	  and	  inert	  material	  on	  which	  power	  comes	  to	  fasten	  or	  against	  which	  it	  happens	  to	  strike,	  and	  in	  so	  doing	  subdues	  or	  crushes	  individuals.	  […]	  The	  individual	  is	  an	  effect	  of	  power,	  and	  at	  the	  same	  time,	  or	  precisely	  to	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  it	  is	  that	  effect,	  it	  is	  the	  element	  of	  its	  articulation.	  The	  individual	  which	  power	  has	  constituted	  is	  at	  the	  same	  time	  its	  vehicle.”	  (Foucault	  1981,	  p.98)	  	  	  	  With	  this	  interpretation	  of	  power,	  Foucault	  introduces	  power	  as	  an	  action	  upon	  action,	  something	  that	  is	  not	  exclusive	  to	  the	  political	  power	  but	  is	  everywhere	  and	  rules	  all	  human	  	   4 relations.	  Yet	  the	  great	  form	  of	  power	  Foucault	  argues	  is	  the	  dominant	  power	  that	  spreads	  its	  ideology	  via	  institutions	  such	  as	  family,	  school,	  church,	  prison,	  and	  clinic.	  This	  is	  in	  line	  with	  what	  Althusser	  said	  before	  him,	  which	  is	  that	  ideology	  needs	  subjectivity	  and	  produces	  it	  through	  institutions.	  Institutions	  define	  the	  concepts	  of	  “normal	  self”	  and	  “criminal”–	  as	  the	  counter	  point	  of	  the	  normal	  self.	  In	  this	  sense,	  a	  criminal	  is	  a	  mode	  of	  subjectivity,	  whose	  behaviors	  are	  deviated	  from	  normal	  standards.	  	  "This	  takes	  place	  not	  just	  at	  the	  level	  of	  crime,	  but	  in	  the	  most	  trivial	  behavior:	  running	  in	  a	  crowded	  street,	  laughing	  too	  loud,	  shouting	  in	  public	  are	  all	  seen	  as	  potentially	  dangerous,	  and	  are	  notionally	  connected	  with	  violence	  and	  crime,	  especially	  in	  social	  groups	  that	  are	  already	  considered	  suspect,	  like	  teenagers"	  (Mansfield,	  2000,	  p.61).	  	   Such	  a	  subject	  is	  not	  free	  in	  any	  of	  his	  acts	  even	  in	  running	  in	  a	  street,	  because	  his	  actions	  have	  meanings	  with	  regard	  to	  power	  relations.	  This	  idea	  opposes	  ideas	  that	  consider	  subjectivity	  as	  something	  internal	  like	  Rousseau's	  free	  individual:	  	  "What	  makes	  us	  such	  an	  effective	  ‘vehicle’	  for	  power	  is	  the	  very	  fact	  that	  we	  seek	  to	  see	  ourselves	  as	  free	  of	  it	  and	  naturally	  occurring.	  For	  Foucault,	  Rousseau’s	  free	  and	  autonomous	  individual	  is	  not	  merely	  an	  alternative,	  outmoded	  theory	  of	  subjectivity,	  a	  quaint	  forerunner	  to	  contemporary	  discussions.	  This	  very	  model	  is	  the	  one	  that	  allows	  power	  to	  conceal	  itself,	  and	  to	  operate	  so	  effectively"	  (Ibid,	  p.54).	  	  	  The	  counterpart	  of	  being	  the	  effective	  vehicle	  for	  power	  is	  to	  embrace	  the	  reality	  of	  one’s	  subjectivity	  and	  to	  resist	  against	  power	  for	  going	  beyond	  its	  forces.	  Thus,	  another	  state	  of	  subjectivity	  for	  Foucault	  is	  the	  one	  that	  is	  defined	  by	  its	  resistance	  against	  power:	  if	  power	  works	  at	  the	  level	  of	  subject,	  it	  could	  be	  best	  resisted	  at	  this	  level.	  What	  makes	  people	  able	  to	  overcome	  power	  is	  the	  solidarity	  of	  their	  resistances:	  	  "There	  exists	  an	  international	  citizenry	  that	  has	  its	  rights,	  and	  has	  its	  duties,	  and	  that	  is	  committed	  to	  rise	  up	  against	  every	  abuse	  of	  power,	  no	  matter	  who	  the	  author,	  no	  	   5 matter	  who	  the	  victims.	  After	  all,	  we	  are	  all	  ruled,	  and	  as	  such,	  we	  are	  in	  solidarity"	  (Foucault,	  1991,	  p.79).	  	  	  Foucault's	  understanding	  of	  relations	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  power	  appreciates	  the	  importance	  of	  space	  in	  the	  creation	  and	  manipulation	  of	  subjectivities.	  If	  subjectivity	  is	  something	  about	  the	  relation	  of	  power	  and	  subject,	  which	  happens	  in	  the	  outside	  world,	  thus	  the	  mediums	  through	  which	  a	  subject	  is	  controlled	  and	  ruled	  should	  be	  studied	  meticulously;	  among	  which	  Foucault	  pays	  particular	  attention	  to	  the	  built	  environment.	  He	  studies	  the	  spatial	  organization	  of	  institutions	  of	  power	  and	  argues	  the	  importance	  of	  space	  in	  controlling	  subjects	  in	  the	  modern	  era.	  But	  what	  Foucault	  does	  not	  pay	  attention	  to	  is	  the	  fact	  that	  that	  different	  identities	  are	  not	  all	  ruled	  the	  same,	  thus	  neither	  are	  the	  effects	  of	  spatial	  organization	  the	  same	  on	  all	  of	  them,	  nor	  is	  there	  an	  essential	  solidarity	  between	  their	  acts	  of	  resistance.	  In	  other	  words,	  Foucault	  does	  not	  pay	  enough	  attention	  to	  the	  relation	  of	  identity	  and	  subjectivity.	  	  The	  relation	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  identity	  is	  paid	  attention	  to	  best	  in	  Ricoeur’s	  concept	  of	  self.	  Ricoeur	  argues	  that	  self	  is	  narrative:	  the	  configuration	  of	  one’s	  memories,	  future,	  present,	  and	  past,	  that	  is	  formed	  in	  response	  to	  others’	  narratives	  and	  in	  communication	  with	  them.	  The	  narrative	  self	  brings	  one's	  ipse	  and	  idem,	  identity	  and	  subjectivity	  together	  and	  gives	  a	  convergence	  image	  of	  all	  the	  different	  experiences	  that	  one	  has	  been	  through.	  Narratives	  are	  not	  configured	  so	  that	  subjects	  can	  know	  only	  themselves	  better;	  they	  are	  also	  intended	  to	  let	  subjects	  represent	  their	  identities	  to	  another.	  So	  no	  one's	  narrative	  is	  configured	  in	  isolation	  with	  that	  of	  others;	  instead,	  there	  is	  a	  dialogue	  between	  narratives.	  In	  this	  sense,	  self	  (and	  subjectivity)	  is	  not	  only	  narrative,	  but	  also	  communicative	  and	  inter-­‐subjective.	  	  	  	  The	  inter-­‐subjectivity	  of	  the	  narrative	  self	  shows	  that	  Ricoeur's	  self	  is	  contextual	  as	  well.	  Self	  is	  not	  produced	  in	  isolation.	  Not	  only	  have	  others	  played	  a	  role	  as	  audiences	  of	  one’s	  narrative,	  but	  they	  had	  also	  been	  influential	  in	  the	  creation	  of	  one’s	  former	  actions,	  which	  are	  as	  well	  current	  memories.	  This	  is	  to	  say	  that	  narratives	  are	  reconfiguring	  with	  our	  aging.	  Our	  memories,	  as	  well	  as	  expectations,	  include	  a	  series	  of	  actions	  and	  images;	  each	  of	  them	  is	  defined	  with	  	   6 respect	  to	  others.	  Thus,	  narratives	  are	  contextual,	  and	  grow	  in	  response	  to	  various	  contexts	  one	  has	  experienced,	  or	  expect	  to	  experience,	  in	  one’s	  lifetime.	  	  	  Even	  though	  Ricoeur’s	  argument	  demonstrates	  that	  self	  is	  contextual–	  because	  it	  is	  communicative	  and	  inter	  subjective	  -­‐	  but	  it	  does	  not	  consider	  the	  role	  of	  power	  and	  the	  social	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  in	  the	  formation	  of	  self.	  In	  Ricoeur's	  point	  of	  view,	  it	  is	  not	  power	  that	  limits	  subjects,	  but	  the	  dependency	  of	  one’s	  narrative	  self	  upon	  another’s.	  He	  does	  not	  mention	  whether	  it	  makes	  any	  difference	  in	  the	  configuration	  of	  the	  narrative	  self	  if	  both	  sides	  of	  the	  communication	  do	  not	  have	  equal	  power,	  same	  gender,	  and	  class,	  ethnic	  or	  religious	  identities.	  What	  happens	  if	  he	  does	  not	  allow	  another	  to	  communicate	  with	  him?	  What	  kind	  of	  communication	  could	  be	  formed	  between	  a	  prisoner	  and	  a	  torturer,	  a	  "criminal"	  and	  a	  "normal	  self"?	  	  	  It	  is	  almost	  impossible	  to	  study	  different	  mutual	  relations	  of	  constituents	  in	  public	  spaces,	  particularly	  in	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  without	  studying	  the	  asymmetry	  of	  the	  power	  of	  different	  identities	  and	  their	  proximity	  to	  the	  normative	  self.	  After	  all,	  crises	  and	  contests	  happen	  when	  one	  group	  is	  inclined	  to	  apply	  its	  power	  to	  another.	  This	  inclination	  partly	  happens	  because	  not	  only	  subjectivities	  but	  also	  identities	  are	  institutionalized	  and	  hierarchized	  by	  power.	  The	  difference	  is	  that	  any	  new	  ideology	  starts	  to	  produce	  its	  desirable	  subjectivity	  but	  cannot	  remove	  people’s	  memories.	  What	  they	  can	  do	  with	  people’s	  memories	  and	  the	  stable	  part	  of	  their	  identity	  left	  from	  the	  past	  is	  to	  institutionalize	  them	  and	  bring	  them	  into	  the	  order	  of	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities.	  The	  dialogue	  between	  what	  has	  remained	  from	  the	  past	  and	  the	  subjectivity	  produced	  by	  new	  political	  power	  could	  ameliorate	  the	  power	  of	  memories	  in	  the	  long	  term.	  Bridging	  between	  the	  narrative	  of	  the	  power-­‐subject	  and	  the	  narrative	  self	  is	  one	  way	  in	  which	  I	  want	  to	  begin	  in	  analyzing	  social	  relations	  in	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  	  Foucault’s	  self	  goes	  beyond	  the	  limitations	  of	  the	  structure	  through	  his	  act	  of	  resistance	  against	  power.	  Ricoeur’s	  self	  evaluates	  by	  the	  same	  cause	  that	  produces	  its	  limitations:	  the	  otherness	  of	  his	  narrative	  self.	  But	  the	  asymmetry	  of	  the	  power	  of	  different	  identities	  that	  I	  have	  	   7 described	  indicates	  that	  more	  attention	  should	  be	  paid	  to	  the	  matter	  of	  diversity	  and	  difference.	  The	  self	  is	  influenced	  by	  being	  an	  element	  in	  the	  complex	  network	  of	  different	  selves	  who	  have	  to	  resist	  not	  only	  against	  the	  dominant	  power	  but	  also	  against	  each	  other,	  which	  indicates	  that	  they	  are	  at	  under	  the	  influence	  of	  macro	  and	  micro	  power	  at	  the	  same	  time.	  Micro	  power	  is	  not	  only	  about	  institutions	  of	  power	  but	  exists	  wherever	  things	  and	  humans	  confront	  each	  other	  and	  assemblages	  form.	  The	  concept	  of	  assemblage,	  that	  I	  will	  come	  back	  to	  in	  Chapter	  Two,	  suggests	  that	  subject	  and	  object,	  power	  and	  subject	  of	  power,	  and	  different	  regimes	  of	  signs	  involved	  in	  the	  distribution	  of	  different	  forms	  of	  power	  are	  not	  separated	  from	  each	  other;	  they	  are	  multiple	  and	  inseparable	  at	  the	  same	  time.	  "There	  is	  no	  longer	  a	  tripartite	  division	  between	  a	  field	  of	  reality	  (the	  world)	  and	  a	  field	  of	  representation	  (the	  book)	  and	  a	  field	  of	  subjectivity	  (the	  author).	  Rather,	  an	  assemblage	  establishes	  connections	  between	  certain	  multiplicities	  drawn	  from	  these	  orders,	  so	  that	  a	  book	  has	  no	  sequel	  nor	  the	  world	  as	  its	  object,	  nor	  one	  of	  several	  authorities	  as	  its	  subject.	  In	  short,	  we	  think	  that	  one	  cannot	  write	  sufficiently	  in	  the	  name	  of	  an	  outside”	  (Deleuze	  and	  Guattari,	  1987,	  p.23).	  	  For	  Deleuze,	  as	  with	  Foucault,	  self	  does	  not	  have	  a	  "true"	  definition	  inside	  its	  existence;	  rather	  it	  is	  shaped	  by	  means	  of	  exterior	  forces	  that	  suppress	  it.	  Inasmuch	  as	  self	  and	  subjectivity	  are	  about	  a	  subject's	  relation	  with	  the	  outside,	  they	  form	  in	  their	  relations	  with	  power	  and	  in	  response	  to	  other	  selves	  who	  have	  a	  particular	  position	  in	  power	  relations.	  But	  the	  self	  does	  not	  summarize	  the	  complexity	  of	  his	  relation	  with	  the	  outside	  world	  in	  the	  form	  of	  a	  narrative	  merely;	  even	  though	  narratives	  define	  one	  level	  of	  the	  self,	  they	  do	  not	  define	  it	  in	  its	  entirety.	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari’s	  aim	  is	  to	  see	  the	  complexity,	  the	  mixture,	  and	  multiplicity	  of	  interpretations.	  They	  clarify	  the	  contradiction	  between	  stable	  and	  dynamic	  identities	  and	  introduce	  subjectivity	  as	  a	  difference-­‐based	  concept;	  which	  means	  that	  if	  subjectivity	  is	  something	  about	  the	  outside,	  it	  is	  more	  about	  diversity	  and	  differences,	  rather	  than	  identical	  elements	  of	  one’s	  internal	  world.	  Having	  this	  in	  mind,	  they	  suggest	  the	  complete	  abandonment	  of	  the	  idea	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  introduce	  the	  rhizomatic	  mechanism	  of	  assemblages	  of	  desire	  as	  the	  state	  of	  "no	  subjectification"	  (1987,	  p.22).	  	  	   8 	  This	  concept	  of	  subjectivity	  as	  something	  about	  an	  outside,	  something	  that	  forms	  in	  its	  relation	  with	  others	  and	  has	  no	  existence	  in	  its	  own	  memories,	  emphasizes	  the	  connection	  between	  subjectivity	  and	  spatiality	  even	  more	  than	  does	  Foucault’s	  formulation.	  It	  also	  connects	  different	  qualities	  of	  subjectivity	  to	  the	  different	  types	  of	  spatiality	  it	  forms.	  	  Deleuze	  connects	  the	  concepts	  of	  virtual,	  actual,	  and	  intensive	  self,	  to	  virtual,	  actual	  and	  intensive	  spaces	  –	  as	  will	  be	  discussed	  in	  Chapter	  Four.	  Deleuze’s	  virtual,	  actual	  and	  intensive	  self	  show	  not	  only	  the	  limitations	  of	  the	  world	  of	  representation	  in	  which	  selves	  are	  organized	  based	  on	  their	  identical	  narratives,	  to	  be	  easily	  controlled	  and	  ruled,	  but	  also	  the	  possibility	  of	  going	  back	  to	  the	  world	  of	  differences.	  As	  actual	  and	  virtual,	  narratives	  and	  inseparable	  differences	  turn	  into	  each	  other	  constantly,	  self,	  at	  best,	  can	  resonate	  between	  the	  narrative	  and	  non-­‐narrative	  world	  and	  remain	  in	  the	  intensive	  space	  between	  the	  world	  of	  orders	  and	  disorders,	  similarities	  and	  inseparable	  differences.	  	  1.5 Exploring	  the	  context	  These	  three	  concepts	  of	  self	  will	  be	  applied	  to	  my	  study	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  wherever	  they	  are	  needed.	  The	  path	  I	  take	  in	  this	  research	  is:	  separating	  different	  narratives	  of	  space;	  categorizing	  them	  based	  on	  their	  power;	  showing	  the	  differences	  between	  the	  way	  narratives	  of	  different	  constituents	  are	  represented,	  based	  on	  the	  legitimacy	  and	  the	  power	  of	  their	  identity	  promoting	  them;	  mutual	  relations	  of	  these	  different	  identities	  and	  experiences;	  and	  then	  looking	  for	  lines	  of	  flight	  –	  creative	  moments	  in	  which	  desire	  (and	  thought)	  are	  set	  free	  from	  the	  boundaries	  of	  structure.	  In	  short	  I	  want	  to	  create	  a	  dialogue	  between	  subjectivity,	  inter-­‐subjectivity,	  and	  non-­‐subjectification	  of	  involuntary	  moments	  of	  thinking;	  a	  complexity	  that	  is	  inseparable	  with	  the	  very	  nature	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  	  	  I	  study	  the	  relation	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  in	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  with	  the	  identity	  and	  formation	  of	  the	  subjectivity	  of	  constituents	  of	  space,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  limits	  and	  possibilities	  of	  these	  spaces	  for	  the	  creation	  of	  moments	  of	  thinking	  in	  the	  case	  study	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  in	  Tehran.	  The	  data	  I	  will	  use	  mainly	  come	  from	  my	  personal	  observations	  and	  dialogues	  with	  constituents	  of	  the	  	   9 park	  during	  the	  seven	  years	  of	  my	  using	  of	  the	  park	  from	  2005	  to	  2012.	  Other	  sources	  of	  information	  include	  people's	  memories	  or	  comments	  about	  the	  park	  published	  on	  their	  weblogs	  or	  Facebook,	  maps,	  urban	  policies,	  the	  penal	  code	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  and	  public	  media.	  	  	  	  The	  result	  of	  my	  work	  is	  a	  response	  to	  the	  two	  previously	  mentioned	  questions	  applied	  to	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  as	  well	  as	  a	  theoretical	  framework	  for	  studying	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  The	  aim	  of	  the	  framework	  is	  to	  open	  up	  the	  complexity	  of	  these	  spaces	  and	  to	  propose	  a	  way	  through	  which	  their	  limits	  and	  potentials	  should	  be	  studied.	  Thus,	  this	  research	  is	  not	  a	  deductive	  argument	  to	  prove	  certain	  answers	  that	  could	  be	  applied	  to	  all	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  Rather,	  it	  wants	  to	  follow	  an	  inductive	  reasoning	  and	  to	  suggest	  a	  framework,	  a	  method	  that	  tables	  all	  the	  parameters	  for	  studying	  the	  relation	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  	  	  	  1.6 Chapters	  summery	  1.6.1 Chapter	  Two	  In	  Chapter	  Two	  I	  show	  elements	  and	  subjects	  involved	  in	  the	  crises	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  by	  disarticulating	  these	  crises.	  To	  do	  so,	  I	  study	  different	  stages	  of	  the	  process	  of	  turning	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  into	  a	  space	  of	  crisis.	  Ever	  since	  its	  construction,	  the	  park's	  spatial	  and	  physical	  environment	  has	  been	  changed	  due	  to	  the	  social	  and	  political	  transformations	  of	  the	  country;	  with	  each	  change	  the	  park	  has	  gradually	  turned	  the	  park	  into	  a	  space	  of	  crisis.	  The	  geographical	  location	  of	  the	  park	  at	  the	  heart	  of	  Tehran’s	  downtown	  has	  made	  it	  more	  vulnerable	  to	  influences	  by	  social	  and	  political	  change.	  Studying	  these	  changes,	  which	  have	  happened	  during	  a	  period	  of	  over	  thirty	  years,	  and	  which	  have	  put	  the	  park	  in	  the	  midst	  of	  social	  crisis,	  is	  a	  way	  of	  identifying	  different	  groups	  involved	  in	  these	  crises.	  	  	  I	  borrow	  Gramscian	  terminology	  in	  State	  and	  Civil	  Society	  to	  categorize	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  based	  on	  the	  power	  of	  the	  social	  group	  they	  belong	  to:	  political	  power	  (representatives),	  civil	  society,	  minorities	  and	  subaltern,	  each	  of	  which	  would	  have	  different	  sub	  categories	  based	  on	  	   10 smaller,	  yet	  communal,	  sources	  of	  identities.	  The	  conflicts	  and	  crisis	  between	  each	  of	  these	  groups	  will	  be	  mentioned	  briefly	  in	  this	  chapter.	  	  Chapter	  Two	  connects	  identities	  to	  power-­‐based	  subjectivities,	  and	  seeks	  to	  show	  how	  identities	  have	  been	  connected	  to	  the	  present	  hierarchy	  of	  power.	  The	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  is	  in	  line	  with	  the	  need	  of	  power	  to	  produce	  its	  desired	  subjectivities.	  This	  provides	  a	  basis	  for	  my	  further	  arguing	  that	  the	  crisis	  between	  different	  narratives	  of	  the	  park	  is	  not	  separated	  from	  relations	  of	  power	  and	  narratives	  of	  identities.	  	  1.6.2 Chapter	  Three	  Chapter	  Three,	  studies	  different	  dimensions	  of	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  in	  the	  park:	  the	  way	  political	  power	  expands	  its	  domination	  over	  the	  park	  in	  macro	  and	  micro	  levels	  and	  the	  way	  the	  other	  wing	  of	  power,	  the	  civil	  society,	  responds	  to	  the	  political	  power’s	  actions.	  	  The	  battle	  of	  the	  hegemony	  of	  the	  park	  introduces	  the	  park	  as	  a	  Foucauldian	  institution	  of	  power:	  an	  assemblage	  in	  which	  power	  tries	  to	  transform	  macro	  politics	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  to	  micro	  level	  of	  everyday	  live	  of	  public	  spaces	  through	  every	  way	  possible.	  Chapter	  Three	  studies	  those	  different	  ways	  such	  as	  spatial	  organization,	  policies,	  law,	  direct	  intervention	  of	  policing	  forces	  etc.	  and	  the	  way	  the	  civil	  society	  resists	  against	  them.	  	  	  1.6.3 Chapter	  Four	  Chapter	  Four	  argues	  that	  the	  civil	  society	  of	  the	  park	  and	  political	  power,	  two	  wings	  of	  power,	  have	  marginalized	  minorities,	  the	  social	  groups	  of	  the	  park.	  I	  first	  explain	  how	  the	  Islamic	  Republic’s	  macro	  politics	  of	  identity	  have	  influenced	  micro	  social	  relations	  of	  minorities	  and	  civil	  society.	  Then	  I	  explain	  the	  vulnerable	  condition	  of	  minorities	  by	  comparing	  ideal	  maps	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  political	  power	  of	  the	  park	  and	  studying	  how	  these	  maps	  would	  affect	  minorities’	  access	  to	  the	  park.	  	  	  	   11 1.6.4 Chapter	  Five	  Having	  an	  eye	  on	  all	  the	  information	  that	  has	  been	  discussed	  so	  far,	  in	  Chapter	  Five	  I	  explain	  how	  the	  asymmetry	  of	  power	  of	  different	  identities	  has	  led	  to	  different	  types	  of	  spatial	  representations;	  and	  how	  the	  diversity	  of	  spatial	  representations	  lead	  to	  the	  formation	  of	  different	  spatial	  experiences.	  Chapter	  Four	  is	  a	  theoretical	  investigation	  that	  wants	  to	  connect	  different	  states	  of	  self	  –	  which	  I	  opened	  up	  in	  this	  introduction	  –	  to	  spatial	  practices	  and	  experiences,	  which	  are	  argued	  in	  Chapters	  One	  to	  Three.	  Based	  on	  this	  theoretical	  investigation,	  Chapter	  Four	  suggests	  what	  the	  potentials	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  for	  the	  creation	  of	  involuntary	  moments	  of	  thought	  would	  be.	  	  1.6.5 Chapter	  Six	  Chapter	  Six	  is	  the	  conclusion	  chapter.	  It	  answers	  the	  questions	  of	  the	  introduction	  and	  explains	  how	  these	  answers	  can	  influence	  the	  ways	  we	  deal	  with	  public	  spaces.	  	  	   12 Chapter	  2: Space	  for	  Whom	  	  	  Located	  at	  the	  Crossroad	  of	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  and	  Enghelab	  Streets,	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  the	  focal	  point	  of	  several	  social	  groups	  in	  the	  heart	  of	  Tehran.	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  and	  Enghelab	  are,	  respectively,	  the	  main	  south-­‐north	  and	  east-­‐west	  axes	  of	  Tehran.	  While	  the	  former	  connects	  upper	  and	  lower	  class	  vicinities,	  the	  latter	  separates	  them.	  Moreover,	  two	  separate	  lanes	  for	  bus	  rapid	  transit	  (BRT	  lanes)	  and	  one	  metro	  line	  that	  pass	  through	  these	  streets	  cross	  at	  this	  point	  and	  turn	  the	  crossroad	  to	  an	  important	  transit	  hub	  in	  the	  City.	  	  	  	  Figure	  2-­‐1.	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  and	  Enghelab	  Axes	  	   13 	  Figure	  2-­‐2.	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  as	  a	  transit	  hub:	  two	  Bus	  Rapid	  Transit	  line	  and	  one	  subway	  line	  cross	  at	  this	  cross	  road1	  	  With	  a	  population	  of	  around	  8.3	  million	  and	  surpassing	  12	  million	  in	  the	  wider	  metropolitan	  area	  (according	  to	  the	  2011	  National	  Population	  and	  Housing	  Census)	  Tehran	  is	  Iran's	  largest	  city.	  The	  city	  has	  been	  the	  subject	  of	  mass	  migration	  during	  the	  20th	  and	  21st	  centuries,	  which	  has	  been	  effective	  in	  producing	  the	  class	  and	  cultural	  diversity	  of	  the	  city’s	  social	  structure.	  Thus,	  it	  is	  not	  hard	  to	  imagine	  how	  diverse	  the	  population	  of	  a	  park	  at	  the	  center	  of	  the	  city	  could	  be.	  People	  from	  all	  over	  the	  city,	  from	  different	  classes	  and	  cultural	  backgrounds	  might	  come	  to	  the	  center	  of	  the	  city	  and	  sit	  for	  a	  while	  on	  one	  of	  the	  benches	  or	  around	  the	  pools	  of	  the	  park.	  Other	  important	  factors	  in	  the	  diversity	  of	  users	  of	  the	  park	  include	  the	  presence	  of	  the	  City	  Theatre	  in	  the	  park	  and	  many	  other	  cultural	  and	  educational	  sites	  in	  the	  neighborhood.	  	  	  	  It	  is	  not	  only	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  who	  believe	  that	  this	  park	  is	  a	  social	  issue	  but	  so	  too	  do	  the	  municipality	  and	  the	  government.	  On	  June	  24,	  2013,	  Mehr	  News	  -­‐	  a	  pro-­‐government	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  Map	  from	  Wikimapia	  	   14 news	  agency-­‐	  published	  a	  report	  about	  Danehsjoo	  Park	  entitled	  “remembrance	  for	  a	  forgotten	  agreement.”	  The	  author	  of	  the	  report	  enumerated	  several	  “problems”	  of	  the	  Park,	  including	  the	  existence	  of	  gays	  and	  subalterns,	  and	  noted	  the	  forgotten	  agreement	  about	  removing	  the	  sources	  or	  removing	  the	  gays,	  subalterns,	  and	  drug	  dealers	  from	  the	  park.	  The	  encounter	  of	  people	  of	  different	  social	  groups,	  for	  the	  author	  of	  the	  report,	  was	  a	  problem	  that	  must	  be	  solved.	  He	  tried	  to	  justify	  the	  problem	  not	  by	  giving	  examples	  of	  how	  the	  security	  of	  one	  group	  was	  threatened	  by	  others,	  but	  by	  asserting	  people’s	  inclination	  for	  separation.	  	  	  	  	  The	  park	  is	  composed	  of	  two	  parts:	  the	  eastern	  part	  and	  the	  area	  of	  the	  City	  Theater,	  which	  is	  to	  the	  west.	  The	  eastern	  part	  is	  designed	  on	  the	  rectangular	  geometry	  of	  Persian	  Gardens,	  with	  a	  focal	  pool	  connecting	  aqueducts,	  which	  are	  surrounded	  by	  trees.	  The	  western	  part	  breaks	  the	  rigid	  geometry	  of	  the	  eastern	  part	  in	  the	  circular	  lines	  of	  the	  cylindrical	  structure	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  its	  adjacent	  plaza	  and	  pool.	  In	  contradiction	  with	  the	  traditional	  Persian	  Gardens,	  the	  palace	  –	  the	  City	  Theater-­‐	  is	  not	  located	  at	  the	  focal	  point	  of	  the	  main	  axis	  but	  is	  recessed	  and	  turns	  its	  face	  to	  the	  street,	  instead	  of	  the	  park.	  This	  retreatment	  provides	  enough	  space	  for	  the	  plaza	  and	  the	  area	  around	  the	  building.	  I	  will	  come	  back	  to	  the	  spatial	  organization	  of	  the	  park	  in	  the	  second	  chapter.	  	  	  	  The	  diversity	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  has	  put	  different	  social	  groups	  in	  each	  other’s	  midst;	  a	  juxtaposition	  which	  has	  led	  to	  the	  generation	  of	  social	  conflicts	  between	  them.	  Different	  groups	  have	  occupied	  different	  sides	  of	  the	  park;	  thus,	  it	  is	  not	  only	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  two	  sides	  of	  the	  park	  that	  are	  immensely	  different	  but	  so	  too	  are	  the	  constituents	  with	  in	  each	  side.	  The	  first	  step	  in	  understanding	  the	  limitations	  and	  potentials	  of	  space	  in	  the	  creation	  of	  the	  subjectivity	  of	  its	  constituents	  is	  Knowing	  different	  social	  groups	  involved	  in	  the	  conflicts	  in	  the	  park	  and	  the	  contradictions	  between	  their	  rights	  to	  space.	  This	  chapter	  explores	  the	  notions	  of	  the	  emergence	  of	  conflicts	  in	  space	  by	  studying	  the	  variations	  in	  the	  composition	  of	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  through	  the	  park’s	  different	  historical	  periods.	  After	  identifying	  all	  of	  the	  groups	  involved	  in	  social	  conflicts,	  they	  will	  be	  categorized	  according	  to	  their	  source	  of	  power	  and	  these	  categories	  will	  be	  studied	  in	  the	  following	  two	  chapters.	  	   15 	  2.1 The	  Emergence	  of	  Crisis	  2.1.1 Before	  the	  Revolution	  (1967-­‐1978)	  The	  Park	  was	  built	  in	  1967	  during	  the	  Pahlavi	  period	  as	  a	  part	  of	  Tehran’s	  expansion	  plan.	  According	  to	  unofficial	  narratives,	  before	  this	  period	  the	  area	  was	  on	  the	  margins	  of	  the	  city	  and	  was	  occupied	  by	  slums.	  At	  an	  unknown	  date	  a	  garden	  was	  built	  in	  the	  area,	  which	  was	  replaced	  by	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  in	  1967.	  The	  park	  was	  first	  called	  “Pahlavi	  Park”	  after	  the	  name	  of	  the	  Pahlavi	  Dynasty,	  and	  was	  at	  the	  intersection	  of	  Pahlavi	  and	  Shah	  Reza	  (the	  name	  of	  the	  founder	  of	  the	  Pahlavi	  Dynasty)	  streets.	  After	  the	  Revolution	  Pahlavi	  Street	  was	  renamed	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  taking	  the	  name	  of	  Muslim’s	  last	  Imam,	  and	  Shah	  Reza	  Street’s	  became	  Enghelab,	  which	  means	  revolution	  in	  Farsi.	  	  Prior	  to	  this	  and	  by	  1956	  the	  city	  was	  growing	  around	  its	  central,	  older	  core.	  Wealthy	  neighborhoods,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  royal	  palace,	  were	  located	  at	  Gholhak	  and	  Tajrish	  -­‐	  northern	  districts	  far	  from	  the	  city	  limits.	  As	  cultural	  facilities	  were	  located	  in	  the	  center,	  people	  of	  the	  wealthy	  districts	  wanted	  to	  have	  their	  own	  gathering	  places	  at	  the	  center.	  According	  to	  the	  statement	  by	  Afkhami	  (Shargh	  Newspaper,	  2014,	  No.	  1671,	  p.7),	  the	  City	  Theater’s	  architect,	  by	  1960,	  there	  was	  a	  garden	  at	  the	  current	  place	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  called	  Shahrdari	  (Municipality)	  Café	  Garden.	  The	  café	  was	  located	  at	  the	  corner	  of	  the	  garden	  and	  its	  tables	  were	  arranged	  in	  this	  open	  area.	  The	  Café	  was	  the	  stamping	  ground	  of	  many	  writers	  and	  intellectuals	  of	  that	  time.	  At	  the	  weekends,	  circus	  performers	  and	  street	  actors	  performed	  plays	  to	  amuse	  the	  wealthy	  people	  who	  used	  to	  gather	  in	  this	  café	  and	  garden.	  	  	  The	  idea	  of	  designing	  the	  park	  and	  the	  City	  Theater	  thought	  up	  by	  the	  municipality	  and	  Farah	  Diba’	  office	  -­‐	  the	  king’s	  wife-­‐,	  approximately	  at	  a	  same	  time;	  even	  though	  the	  construction	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  started	  after	  the	  inauguration	  of	  the	  park.	  According	  to	  the	  rumors,2	  the	  Park	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  2	  Also	  Majid	  Sedghi	  says:	  “Daneshjoo	  Park,	  at	  Shahreza	  -­‐Enghelab-­‐	  Street,	  which	  was	  a	  place	  for	  homosexuals'	  gatherings	  from	  a	  long	  time	  ago,	  turned	  into	  a	  space	  for	  gatherings	  of	  different	  political	  groups.”	  http://asre-­‐nou.net/1386/day/17/m-­‐hamjensgerayan.html	  (In	  Persian,	  Translation	  from	  the	  author)	  	   16 was	  officially	  designed	  for	  the	  recreation	  of	  a	  group	  of	  wealthy	  people,	  most	  of	  whom	  were	  powerful	  as	  well	  -­‐	  military	  men	  and	  those	  who	  had	  a	  close	  relation	  with	  the	  court.	  This	  group	  of	  people	  had	  particular	  recreational	  habits	  and	  there	  were	  specific	  public	  spaces	  and	  clubs	  for	  them.	  Obviously,	  the	  park	  was	  partly	  built	  for	  their	  cultural	  activities;	  regarding	  the	  expensive	  price	  of	  theater	  tickets,	  the	  theater	  audiences	  belonged	  –and	  still	  belong-­‐	  to	  the	  upper	  classes.	  Most	  of	  the	  artists	  were,	  and	  are,	  from	  these	  classes	  as	  well.	  However,	  according	  to	  the	  rumors,	  the	  park	  was	  also	  built	  for	  gatherings	  of	  those	  among	  this	  wealthy	  and	  powerful	  group	  who	  were	  homosexual.	  The	  architect	  of	  the	  park,	  Bijan	  Saffari,	  an	  Iranian	  painter	  and	  architect	  who	  held	  many	  cultural	  positions	  at	  that	  time,	  was	  himself	  a	  homosexual	  and	  had	  the	  first	  explicit,	  if	  not	  official,	  gay-­‐marriage	  in	  the	  history	  of	  modern	  Iran.3	  Whether	  this	  rumor	  was	  true	  or	  not,	  the	  park	  was	  used	  as	  the	  meeting	  place	  of	  homosexuals	  from	  the	  very	  first	  days	  of	  its	  inauguration.	  Other	  groups	  were	  also	  using	  the	  space,	  even	  though	  at	  different	  hours,	  and	  most	  of	  them	  were	  from	  the	  same	  social	  position	  –the	  foresaid	  wealthy	  and	  powerful	  group.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3	  Islamic	  Revolution	  Document	  Center,	  irdc.ir	  (In	  Persian,	  translation	  from	  the	  author)	  	   17 Figure	  2-­‐3.	  The	  evolution	  of	  built	  up	  areas	  in	  Tehran4	  	  	  A	  few	  years	  after	  the	  construction	  of	  the	  park,	  the	  construction	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  was	  completed	  at	  the	  west	  side	  of	  the	  site	  and	  the	  City	  Theater	  was	  officially	  inaugurated	  in	  1972	  by	  performing	  Chekhov’s	  The	  Cherry	  Orchard.	  The	  inauguration	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  effectively	  divided	  the	  park	  into	  two	  parts:	  the	  area	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  that	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  City	  Theater	  building	  and	  its	  surrounding	  landscape	  were	  designed	  by	  Ali	  Sardar	  Afkhami	  who	  had,	  like	  Bijan	  Saffari,	  a	  friendship	  with	  Farah	  Diba,	  the	  Shah’s	  wife.	  Farah	  paid	  great	  attention	  to	  the	  development	  of	  art	  in	  different	  fields	  and	  almost	  all	  art	  and	  cultural	  organizations,	  such	  as	  the	  City	  Theater,	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Fine	  Art	  of	  the	  University	  of	  Tehran	  and	  the	  Museum	  of	  Contemporary	  Arts,	  were	  launched	  by	  her	  direct	  instigation.	  Therefore,	  it	  cannot	  be	  said	  that	  the	  theater	  was	  in	  contradiction	  with	  the	  cultural	  environment	  of	  other	  parts	  of	  the	  Park	  at	  that	  time.	  The	  specific	  class	  for	  whom	  the	  park	  was	  built	  seems	  to	  be	  the	  major	  users	  of	  the	  theater	  as	  well.	  	  	  	  The	  building	  was	  designed	  as	  an	  introversive	  cylindrical	  volume	  with	  the	  minimum	  interaction	  with	  its	  surrounding.	  As	  Afkhami	  stated	  in	  his	  interview	  with	  Shargh	  Newspaper	  on	  14	  February	  2014,	  he	  designed	  the	  building	  as	  a	  cylinder,	  because	  he	  thought	  that	  considering	  the	  open	  view	  of	  the	  site	  from	  all	  directions,	  the	  building	  should	  be	  equally	  seen	  from	  all	  perspectives.	  He	  said:	  “I	  did	  not	  want	  the	  building	  to	  have	  only	  one	  façade	  so	  that	  in	  future	  any	  one	  could	  build	  anything	  behind	  it.	  I	  wanted	  the	  building	  to	  have	  façades	  from	  all	  directions”	  (Afkhami).	  Afkhami	  continued	  by	  asserting	  that	  he	  hates	  glass	  and	  travertine,	  particularly	  he	  believes	  these	  materials	  are	  not	  compatible	  with	  Iranian	  traditional	  architecture.	  Thus,	  he	  excessively	  used	  brickwork	  and	  tiling	  on	  the	  facades	  of	  the	  City	  Theater.	  By	  reducing	  the	  meaning	  of	  traditional	  Iranian	  architecture	  to	  the	  use	  of	  brick	  as	  the	  main	  material,	  and	  by	  letting	  the	  ambitious	  idea	  of	  “nothing	  should	  be	  built	  behind	  my	  building”	  to	  be	  the	  main	  concept	  for	  his	  designing,	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  4	  Tehran	  Municipality,	  Public	  and	  International	  Relations	  Department,	  http://en.tehran.ir/Default.aspx?tabid=98,	  website	  materials	  are	  allowed	  to	  be	  used	  by	  referring	  to	  the	  link	  and	  following	  terms	  of	  use	  of	  the	  website	  –	  that	  have	  been	  followed.	  	   18 Afkhami	  did	  not	  give	  even	  brief	  attention	  to	  the	  necessity	  of	  the	  interaction	  between	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  the	  park.	  He	  simply	  denied	  understanding	  what	  problems	  the	  City	  Theater	  would	  be	  faced	  with,	  if	  it	  cannot	  converse	  with	  its	  environment.	  Even	  in	  his	  current	  interview	  with	  Shargh	  Newspaper,	  he	  did	  not	  mention	  that	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  the	  park	  were	  designed	  and	  built	  together	  and	  it	  is	  clear	  that	  the	  two	  parts	  are	  designed	  and	  built	  in	  complete	  ignorance	  to	  each	  other’s	  existence.	  However,	  as	  I	  mentioned	  above,	  the	  homogeneity	  of	  users	  of	  both	  poles	  of	  the	  park	  before	  the	  Revolution	  merged	  both	  parts;	  so	  until	  the	  1979	  Revolution	  decomposed	  the	  population	  of	  the	  park,	  the	  problem	  of	  the	  incompatibility	  of	  two	  parts	  of	  the	  park	  had	  not	  been	  discovered.	  	  Figure	  2-­‐4.	  The	  dialog	  between	  two	  sides	  of	  the	  park	  before	  the	  1979	  Revolution	  	  2.1.2 The	  Revolutionary	  Period	  (1979)	  The	  homogeneity	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  has	  been	  broken	  several	  times	  since	  its	  construction.	  The	  first	  break	  happened	  during	  the	  years	  of	  the	  1979	  Revolution	  that	  led	  to	  the	  rise	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic.	  Due	  to	  the	  presence	  of	  the	  University	  of	  Tehran	  and	  Amir	  Kabir	  University	  of	  Technology	  in	  the	  neighborhood,	  whose	  students	  were	  involved	  in	  the	  Revolution,	  the	  whole	  neighborhood	  was	  a	  key	  place	  for	  people's	  protests.	  The	  geographical	  position	  of	  the	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  crossroad	  at	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  city	  intensified	  its	  important	  role	  in	  the	  Revolution,	  changed	  the	  composition	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  and	  turned	  the	  park	  into	  a	  space	  where	  people	  of	  different	  social	  groups	  encounter	  one	  another.	  	  	  	   19 2.1.3 The	  Islamic	  Republic’s	  Cultural	  Revolution	  and	  its	  Aftermath	  (1980-­‐1997)	  In	  1980,	  in	  order	  to	  fortify	  the	  foundations	  of	  their	  young	  government,	  Islamic	  forces	  decided	  to	  purge	  academies	  of	  western	  and	  non-­‐Islamic	  influences.	  The	  main	  reason	  behind	  this	  demand	  was	  that	  Leftists	  forces	  dominated	  the	  higher	  education	  of	  that	  time;	  most	  of	  whom	  had	  made	  a	  political	  contribution	  to	  the	  1979	  Revolution	  and	  had	  opposed	  to	  Khomeini’s	  rise	  to	  power.	  From	  1980	  to	  1983,	  under	  the	  supervision	  of	  The	  Supreme	  Cultural	  Revolution	  Council	  (SCRC)5	  universities	  were	  officially	  closed	  and	  their	  reopening	  became	  possible	  only	  after	  the	  banning	  of	  several	  books	  and	  purging	  of	  thousands	  of	  students	  and	  lecturers.	  These	  proceedings	  are	  called	  the	  Cultural	  Revolution	  in	  the	  literature	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic,	  and	  the	  Cultural	  Invasion	  in	  the	  literature	  of	  the	  oppositions.	  	  	  In	  1983	  the	  first	  draft	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Penal	  Code	  was	  approved	  and	  contributed	  to	  the	  definition	  of	  the	  concept	  of	  the	  normative	  self	  for	  Iran.	  These	  two	  occurrences,	  followed	  by	  the	  mass	  execution	  of	  political	  prisoners	  in	  1988,	  demolished	  the	  public	  sphere	  of	  society.	  Not	  only	  academies,	  but	  also	  all	  spaces	  contributing	  to	  the	  concept	  of	  public,	  became	  the	  right	  of	  certain	  social	  groups	  who	  were	  supporters	  of	  Islamic	  Republic	  policies;	  thus,	  a	  period	  of	  political	  passivity	  dominated	  the	  country,	  which	  lasted	  for	  about	  two	  decades.	  	  	  The	  second	  change	  in	  the	  composition	  of	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  occurred	  after	  these	  cultural	  transformations.	  On	  one	  hand,	  according	  to	  the	  Islamic	  Penal	  Codes	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic,	  homosexuality	  is	  not	  allowed	  in	  Iran	  and	  is	  the	  subject	  to	  certain	  punishments	  	  (I	  will	  come	  back	  to	  these	  cultural	  policies	  in	  the	  next	  chapter).	  This	  has	  limited	  homosexuals’	  right	  to	  space,	  as	  they	  cannot	  reveal	  their	  identity	  freely.	  On	  the	  other	  hand,	  the	  Cultural	  (1980–1987)	  that	  purged	  universities	  of	  opposition	  and	  non-­‐Islamic	  forces	  changed	  the	  composition	  of	  university	  students	  and	  consequently	  influenced	  the	  composition	  of	  the	  constituents	  at	  the	  both	  poles	  of	  the	  Park	  (the	  park	  and	  the	  City	  Theatre	  area).	  The	  Theater	  started	  to	  operate	  under	  the	  supervision	  of	  the	  Ministry	  of	  Culture	  and	  Islamic	  Guidance.	  Many	  military	  men	  and	  people	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  5	  SCRC	  still	  exists	  and	  is	  one	  of	  the	  most	  powerful	  council’s	  in	  defining	  the	  instances	  of	  censorship	  and	  Internet	  filtration.	  	   20 with	  close	  relations	  with	  the	  Pahlavi’s	  court	  who	  were	  previously	  users	  of	  the	  park	  and	  the	  City	  Theater	  had	  been	  killed6	  after	  the	  Revolution	  or	  their	  property	  had	  been	  confiscated.	  The	  new	  bourgeoisie’s	  self-­‐representation	  went	  along	  with	  the	  new	  political	  condition	  of	  an	  Islamic	  country.	  	  	  	  As	  the	  city	  was	  growing	  fast,	  Enghelab	  Street	  became	  the	  border	  between	  the	  south	  and	  north	  of	  the	  city.	  Other	  universities	  were	  built	  in	  that	  area	  and	  the	  Enghelab	  axis	  continued	  as	  a	  cultural	  axis	  that	  started	  at	  Enghelab	  Square	  and	  ended	  beyond	  the	  Park	  at	  Amir	  Kabir	  University	  of	  Technology	  to	  the	  East.	  People	  from	  different	  classes,	  different	  cultural	  backgrounds	  or	  with	  different	  moral	  values	  came	  to	  the	  center	  of	  the	  city	  and	  this	  inundation	  put	  the	  Park	  at	  the	  focal	  point	  of	  many	  social	  conflicts.	  	  	  Figure	  2-­‐5.	  The	  opposition	  of	  two	  sides	  of	  the	  park	  after	  the	  Revolution	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  6	  Many	  others	  who	  had	  not	  any	  relation	  with	  the	  royal	  palace	  but	  had	  affiliation	  to	  opposition	  parties	  were	  also	  executed.	  	   21 	  Figure	  2-­‐6.	  Major	  universities	  and	  cultural	  facilities	  in	  the	  neighborhood7	  	  2.1.4 Current	  Condition	  (1997-­‐Current	  Time)	  The	  rise	  of	  reformists	  broke	  the	  political	  passivity	  that	  had	  encompassed	  the	  country	  since	  the	  Cultural	  Revolution	  in	  1977.	  	  “Almost	  two	  decades	  after	  the	  Revolution,	  the	  quest	  of	  Iranians	  for	  a	  distinct	  cultural	  identity	  produced	  a	  new	  socio-­‐political	  movement,	  which	  although	  retaining	  the	  critical	  language	  of	  the,	  incorporated	  a	  democratic	  rhetoric,	  and	  directed	  the	  critique	  inward.	  Since	  the	  presidential	  elections	  of	  May	  1997,	  an	  intensifying	  fascination	  has	  emerged,	  bent	  on	  exposing	  the	  internal	  diversities	  of	  the	  Islamic	  nation	  via	  a	  critical	  language.	  There	  is	  an	  increasing	  acknowledgement	  of	  the	  need	  of	  smaller	  identity	  groups	  and	  sub-­‐cultures	  to	  seek	  expression	  and	  be	  tolerated	  within	  the	  constraints	  of	  the	  dominant	  religious	  (Shia)	  culture.”	  (Alinejad,	  2002,	  p.25-­‐6)	  Alinejad	  continues	  by	  explaining	  that	  this	  socio-­‐political	  movement,	  called	  the	  Eslahat	  (reform)	  Movement,	  revived	  the	  public	  sphere	  and	  gave	  the	  less	  dominant	  cultures	  the	  possibility	  of	  representing	  themselves.	  By	  Khatami’s	  victory	  in	  the	  presidential	  election	  in	  1997,	  a	  middle-­‐	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  7	  Map	  from	  Wikimapia	  	   22 ranking	  cleric	  overcame	  a	  conservative	  and	  a	  more	  powerful	  rival;	  the	  middle	  class	  assumed	  they	  had	  found	  a	  new	  place	  and	  voice.	  The	  public	  sphere,	  for	  the	  first	  time	  after	  the	  rise	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic,	  turned	  into	  the	  space	  of	  political	  life	  of	  different	  social	  groups.	  	  “These	  groups	  tend	  to	  appropriate	  Islam	  in	  order	  to	  come	  to	  public	  life	  as	  active	  political	  protagonists,	  while	  pledging	  loyalty	  to	  the	  widely	  shared	  and	  'highly	  endeared'	  Shia	  faith	  and	  culture	  as	  the	  cornerstone	  of	  national	  identity.	  Their	  contention	  is,	  rather,	  over	  the	  social,	  economic	  and	  political	  privileges,	  which	  are	  increasingly	  seen	  as	  'national	  resources'	  monopolized	  by	  certain	  individuals,	  families	  and	  social	  groups	  (the	  Shia	  clergy)	  through	  claims	  to	  exclusive	  authority	  over	  the	  dominant	  faith	  and	  culture.”	  (Ibid,	  p.26)	  Since	  Khatami	  accelerated	  the	  process	  of	  economic	  privatization	  in	  the	  country,	  the	  middle	  class	  became	  more	  powerful	  than	  before.	  This,	  in	  addition	  to	  their	  loyalty	  to	  the	  Shia	  faith	  and	  Iranian	  national	  identity,	  caused	  the	  inequality	  of	  different	  group’s	  right	  to	  the	  public	  sphere.	  People	  who	  did	  not	  have	  enough	  political	  and	  economic	  power,	  or	  who	  found	  that	  the	  reformists	  movement	  was	  not	  a	  good	  representative	  of	  their	  demands	  –	  because	  they	  were	  not	  loyal	  to	  either	  the	  Shia	  faith	  or	  the	  national	  identity	  -­‐	  were	  outsiders	  of	  the	  public	  sphere.	  The	  presence	  of	  different	  social	  groups	  in	  the	  public	  sphere	  and	  their	  unequal	  right	  to	  space	  turned	  many	  public	  spaces	  into	  spaces	  of	  social	  conflicts.	  	  Consequently,	  the	  rapid	  waves	  of	  change	  in	  the	  years	  after	  the	  Revolution	  have	  changed	  the	  composition	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park’s	  constituents	  and	  turned	  it	  into	  a	  particular	  space	  for	  the	  encounter	  of	  people	  from	  different	  social	  groups.	  The	  park’s	  geographical	  position	  in	  the	  city	  and	  its	  metaphoric	  meaning	  of	  being	  a	  symbol	  of	  homosexuals’	  identity	  have	  brought	  people	  from	  the	  margins,	  minorities	  and	  subalterns,	  to	  the	  middle	  and	  have	  put	  them	  beside	  other	  social	  groups	  and	  classes.	  	  At	  this	  moment	  in	  time	  the	  most	  numerous	  and	  visible	  of	  these	  groups	  are	  users	  of	  the	  City	  Theatre	  (artists	  and	  audiences)	  or	  patrons	  of	  art,	  most	  of	  them	  from	  the	  upper	  classes	  that	  use	  the	  area	  around	  the	  building	  for	  their	  gatherings.	  The	  second	  important	  group	  of	  constituents	  is	  	   23 homosexuals.	  Even	  though	  they	  are	  obliged	  to	  conceal	  their	  identity,	  they	  still	  come	  to	  the	  park	  because	  their	  identity	  is	  tied	  up	  with	  this	  space.8	  Based	  of	  my	  personal	  observation	  from	  2005	  to	  2012,	  other	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  and	  the	  report	  of	  Mehr	  News	  report	  published	  on	  25	  June	  2013,	  include	  students	  of	  adjacent	  universities,	  elderly	  inhabitants	  of	  the	  neighborhood	  who	  usually	  gather	  around	  the	  main	  pool	  of	  the	  park,	  and	  families	  who	  bring	  their	  children	  to	  the	  playground,	  which	  is	  located	  at	  the	  most	  isolated	  spot	  of	  the	  park.	  	  	  In	  addition	  to	  these	  permanent	  constituents,	  the	  park	  usually	  contains	  several	  passers-­‐by.	  The	  opening	  of	  the	  metro	  station	  at	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  crossroad	  in	  2011	  has	  multiplied	  the	  number	  of	  passers-­‐by	  who	  stop	  at	  the	  park	  for	  a	  while.	  Other	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  include	  child	  laborers	  and	  drug	  dealers.	  From	  the	  focal	  point	  of	  the	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  crossroad,	  child	  laborers	  appearing	  as	  vendors	  travel	  through	  the	  north-­‐south	  and	  the	  east-­‐west	  axis	  via	  bus	  routes	  to	  sell	  their	  stuff	  along	  public	  transportation	  systems	  and	  nearby	  public	  spaces	  -­‐	  such	  as	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  Drug	  dealers,	  whose	  presence	  in	  space	  is	  not	  hidden	  to	  anyone,	  are	  considered	  one	  of	  the	  threats	  to	  the	  social	  health	  of	  the	  park.	  This	  is	  not	  to	  say	  that	  spaces	  of	  these	  groups	  are	  completely	  separated,	  but	  the	  density	  of	  each	  of	  these	  groups	  is	  higher	  in	  one	  particular	  district	  of	  the	  park.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  8	  There	  are	  two	  pages	  in	  facebook	  with	  the	  name	  “Daneshjoo	  Park.”	  One	  of	  them	  publishes	  the	  City	  Theater’s	  news	  and	  the	  other	  one	  is	  in	  defense	  of	  LGBT’s	  rights.	  This	  shows	  that	  how	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  a	  symbol	  for	  the	  identity	  of	  these	  two	  groups	  of	  constituents.	  The	  admin	  of	  the	  second	  page	  states	  that	  he	  has	  used	  this	  name	  because	  he	  think	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  a	  symbol	  for	  homosexual’s	  identity	  in	  Iran	  and	  although	  they	  have	  other	  meeting	  places,	  none	  of	  them	  is	  symbolically	  as	  well	  known	  as	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  	  	   24 	  Figure	  2-­‐7.	  Locating	  the	  areas	  occupied	  by	  users	  of	  the	  park	  	  2.2 Conflicts	  and	  Sources	  of	  Powe	  The	  existence	  of	  Crisis	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  not	  something	  hard	  to	  prove.	  Spending	  a	  couple	  of	  hours	  in	  the	  site,	  observing	  people's	  behavior,	  their	  suspicion	  of	  interactions,	  child	  laborers	  passing	  through	  the	  park,	  drug	  dealers	  trying	  to	  find	  their	  customers	  without	  being	  pointed	  out	  by	  others,	  and	  occasional	  fights	  between	  people	  or	  between	  the	  park	  guards	  and	  people	  mark	  the	  severity	  of	  tensions	  in	  space.	  More	  important	  than	  anything	  else,	  the	  severity	  of	  conflicts	  is	  clear	  in	  the	  constituent’s	  inclination	  toward	  the	  removal	  of	  other	  social	  groups.	  	  	  According	  to	  the	  report	  of	  Mehr	  News,	  published	  in	  25	  June	  2013,	  people	  demand	  the	  removal	  from	  space	  of	  three	  groups:	  “individuals	  with	  sexual	  disorders,	  drug	  dealers	  and	  addicts,	  and	  child	  laborers.”	  As	  Mehr	  News	  is	  a	  pro-­‐government	  media,	  it	  does	  not	  mention	  that	  many	  constituents	  also	  demand	  the	  removal	  of	  the	  policing	  forces	  and	  plainclothes	  police	  from	  space;	  	   25 a	  demand	  that	  people	  assert	  in	  their	  personal	  web	  pages.9	  In	  general,	  all	  constituents	  agree	  on	  the	  necessity	  of	  the	  removal	  of	  drug	  dealers	  and	  addicts	  from	  the	  park,	  but	  they	  have	  different	  ideas	  about	  the	  removal	  of	  other	  groups.	  	  2.2.1 State,	  Civil	  Society	  and	  Minorities	  The	  presence	  of	  different	  social	  groups	  in	  the	  park	  caused	  social	  conflicts	  that	  have	  been	  expressed	  in	  the	  media	  as	  well	  as	  in	  people's	  behavior	  in	  the	  park.	  In	  order	  to	  prevent	  any	  confusion,	  in	  this	  study,	  power,	  such	  as	  policing	  forces,	  plainclothes	  police,	  plainclothes	  forces	  of	  the	  Intelligence	  Ministry,	  and	  the	  municipality	  is	  considered	  as	  one	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park.	  Thus,	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  refer	  to	  power,	  artists,	  fans	  of	  art,	  elderly,	  families,	  people	  of	  the	  neighborhood	  and	  homosexuals.	  Other	  users	  of	  the	  park,	  which	  are	  not	  permanent	  constituents,	  include	  subalterns,	  drug	  dealers,	  and	  passers-­‐by.	  	  	  In	  State	  and	  the	  Civil	  Society	  Gramsci	  argues	  that	  the	  power	  of	  the	  state	  is	  divided	  between	  two	  spheres:	  "the	  political	  society"	  and	  the	  "civil	  society"	  (Gramsci,	  1971,	  p.245).	  The	  sphere	  of	  the	  political	  (the	  police,	  the	  army,	  legal	  system,	  etc.)	  is	  what	  is	  usually	  considered	  as	  power	  or	  the	  political	  power	  and	  is	  governed	  by	  force.	  The	  sphere	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  (the	  family,	  the	  education	  system,	  trade	  unions,	  etc.)	  is	  what	  is	  called	  "private"	  and	  it	  is	  ruled	  through	  consent.	  The	  civil	  society,	  on	  one	  hand,	  is	  where	  the	  bourgeoisie	  and	  the	  political	  power	  reproduce	  their	  culture,	  but	  on	  the	  other	  hand	  it	  is	  the	  space	  of	  the	  production	  of	  thoughts	  that	  oppose	  the	  political	  power	  so	  as	  to	  have	  a	  larger	  share	  of	  the	  hegemony.	  	  	  Gramsci	  identifies	  social	  groups	  who	  are	  excluded	  from	  a	  society’s	  established	  structures	  of	  political	  representation,	  which	  means	  they	  do	  not	  have	  a	  voice	  in	  the	  society	  in	  which	  they	  live.	  	  Gramsci	  calls	  these	  groups	  "subalterns,"	  a	  term	  that	  has	  been	  used	  subsequently	  in	  postcolonial	  studies	  of	  African	  and	  Middle	  Eastern	  studies	  particularly.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  9	  I	  have	  also	  heard	  these	  demands	  from	  different	  constituents	  in	  all	  the	  years	  I	  was	  going	  to	  the	  park,	  from	  2005	  to	  2012.	  	  	   26 The	  results	  of	  data	  gathered	  from	  people’s	  personal	  web	  pages	  as	  well	  as	  Mehr	  News	  reports,	  show	  that	  although	  different	  constituents	  have	  different	  ideas	  about	  the	  main	  problems	  in	  the	  park,	  three	  main	  streams	  are	  observable	  among	  constituents	  who	  belonged	  to	  the	  political	  power	  of	  the	  state,	  the	  civil	  society	  or	  minorities,	  regarding	  their	  opinion	  about	  other	  groups’	  right	  to	  space.	  	  	  While	  different	  groups	  of	  minorities	  and	  the	  state	  have	  different	  ideas	  about	  the	  removal	  of	  specific	  constituents,	  the	  ideas	  are	  more	  diverse	  within	  the	  civil	  society.	  This	  is	  quite	  predictable	  as	  the	  civil	  society	  does	  not	  have	  a	  homogenous	  texture	  and	  is	  composed	  of	  different	  classes,	  institutions	  and	  social	  groups	  that	  differ	  in	  the	  level	  of	  their	  hegemony	  and	  their	  correspondence	  with	  the	  framework	  of	  the	  normative	  self.	  	  	  Within	  the	  park,	  the	  elderly	  and	  families	  have	  shown	  less	  inclination	  to	  struggle	  with	  the	  power	  of	  either	  the	  state	  or	  the	  other	  sectors	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  but	  they	  show	  an	  inclination	  to	  struggle	  with	  minorities.	  The	  condition	  has	  been	  different	  for	  students,	  City	  Theater	  artists,	  and	  patrons	  of	  the	  arts,	  who	  are	  other	  groups	  of	  the	  civil	  society.	  They	  tend	  to	  struggle	  with	  both	  the	  political	  power	  and	  minorities.	  They	  also	  want	  to	  remove	  other	  non-­‐intrusive	  groups	  of	  the	  park	  and	  have	  the	  whole	  park	  as	  the	  landscape	  of	  the	  City	  Theater.	  	   	  	   27 	  Social	  Groups	   Sources	  of	  Power	   Contests	  Theater	  Artists	   	   • The	  removal	  of	  child	  laborers	  • The	  removal	  of	  policing	  forces	  	  • The	  removal	  of	  homosexuals	  	  Patrons	  of	  Art	   	   • Separation	  from	  all	  other	  social	  groups	  Students	   The	  Civil	  Society	   	  Families	   	   • The	  removal	  of	  homosexuals	  • The	  removal	  of	  drug	  dealer	  Elderly	   	   	  Trans/Homosexuals	   Minorities	   • The	  removal	  of	  policing	  forces	  • The	  removal	  of	  drug	  dealers,	  pimps	  and	  abusers	  Subalterns	   	   	  Policing	  Forces	   The	  State	   • The	  removal	  of	  homosexuals	  • The	  removal	  of	  child	  laborers	  • Controlling	  the	  civil	  society’s	  public	  actions	  Plainclothes	   	   	  Table	  2-­‐1.	  Different	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  and	  their	  ideas	  about	  the	  presence	  of	  other	  groups	  	  2.2.2 Molar	  and	  Molecular	  Types	  of	  Power	  Although	  political	  power	  imposes	  its	  power	  over	  space	  mostly	  at	  the	  molar	  level	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  at	  the	  molecular	  level,	  this	  is	  not	  rigid	  and	  both	  of	  the	  state	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  might	  impose	  or	  want	  to	  impose	  their	  power	  at	  both	  molar	  and	  molecular	  levels.	  In	  A	  Thousand	  Plateau	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  state:	  	   28 "Every	  society,	  and	  every	  individual,	  are	  thus	  plied	  by	  both	  segmentarities	  simultaneously:	  one	  molar,	  the	  other	  molecular.	  If	  they	  are	  distinct,	  it	  is	  because	  they	  do	  not	  have	  the	  same	  terms	  or	  the	  same	  relations	  or	  the	  same	  nature	  or	  even	  the	  same	  type	  of	  multiplicity.	  If	  they	  are	  inseparable,	  it	  is	  because	  they	  coexist	  and	  cross	  over	  into	  each	  other.	  The	  configurations	  differ,	  for	  example,	  between	  the	  primitives	  and	  us,	  but	  the	  two	  segmentarities	  are	  always	  in	  presupposition.	  In	  short,	  everything	  is	  political,	  but	  every	  politics	  is	  simultaneously	  a	  macropolitics	  and	  a	  micropolitics."	  (Deleuze	  &	  Guattari,	  1987,	  p.213)	   This	  research,	  therefore,	  will	  find	  its	  way	  through	  a	  Gramscian-­‐Deleuzian	  framework.	  First,	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  are	  categorized	  as	  the	  political	  power,	  the	  civil	  society,	  and	  minorities.	  Second,	  the	  micro	  and	  macro	  politics	  of	  their	  space	  and	  spatial	  experiences	  will	  be	  studied.	  Micro	  and	  macro	  politics	  of	  space	  find	  their	  meaning	  in	  social	  relations	  among	  different	  constituents.	  Thus,	  although	  the	  two	  following	  chapters	  are	  named	  after	  spaces	  of	  certain	  users,	  it	  does	  not	  mean	  that	  we	  can	  separate	  the	  space	  of	  one	  from	  the	  others.	  It	  also	  does	  not	  mean	  that	  the	  difference	  between	  the	  type	  of	  power	  of	  the	  state	  and	  that	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  is	  a	  difference	  in	  their	  scale.	  More	  precisely,	  this	  research	  will	  try	  to	  avoid	  four	  errors	  about	  the	  segmentarity	  of	  power	  that	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  identify:	  "The	  first	  [error]	  is	  axiological	  and	  consists	  in	  believing	  that	  a	  little	  suppleness	  is	  enough	  to	  make	  things	  "better."	  But	  microfascisms	  are	  what	  make	  fascism	  so	  dangerous,	  and	  fine	  segmentations	  are	  as	  harmful	  as	  the	  most	  rigid	  of	  segments.	  The	  second	  is	  psychological,	  as	  if	  the	  molecular	  were	  in	  the	  realm	  of	  the	  imagination	  and	  applied	  only	  to	  the	  individual	  and	  interindividual.	  But	  there	  is	  just	  as	  much	  social-­‐Real	  on	  one	  line	  as	  on	  the	  other.	  Third,	  the	  two	  forms	  are	  not	  simply	  distinguished	  by	  size,	  as	  a	  small	  form	  and	  a	  large	  form;	  although	  it	  is	  true	  that	  the	  molecular	  works	  in	  detail	  and	  operates	  in	  small	  groups,	  this	  does	  not	  mean	  that	  it	  is	  any	  less	  coextensive	  with	  the	  entire	  social	  field	  than	  molar	  organization.	  Finally,	  the	  qualitative	  difference	  between	  the	  two	  lines	  does	  not	  preclude	  their	  boosting	  or	  cutting	  into	  each	  other;	  	   29 there	  is	  always	  a	  proportional	  relation	  between	  the	  two,	  directly	  or	  inversely	  proportional."	  (Deleuze	  &	  Guattari,	  1987,	  p.215)	  	  These	  four	  admonishments,	  as	  we	  will	  see,	  determine	  that	  both	  limits	  and	  possibilities	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  are	  more	  complex	  and	  that	  the	  difference	  between	  them	  is	  in	  neither	  scale,	  nor	  their	  reality	  –in	  contrast	  with	  Lefebvre’s	  triad	  of	  space.	  Instead,	  it	  considers	  the	  diversity	  of	  subjects	  and	  sources	  of	  power,	  and	  provides	  a	  context	  for	  bringing	  the	  connections	  between	  people’s	  identity	  and	  spatial	  experiences,	  as	  well	  as	  local	  limits	  and	  possibilities	  into	  consideration.	  	  	   30 Chapter	  3: The	  Battle	  over	  Hegemony	  	  In	  The	  Production	  of	  Space,	  Lefebvre	  considers	  three	  modalities	  of	  space	  as	  “representation	  of	  space,”	  “spatial	  practices,”	  and	  “representational	  spaces.”	  “Representation	  of	  space”	  is	  the	  space	  of	  “professionals”	  and	  “technocrats,”	  (Merrifield,	  1923,	  p.523)	  the	  space	  of	  those	  who	  organize	  space,	  and	  as	  Zieleniec	  remarks,	  control	  the	  way	  space	  is	  represented	  (Zieleniec,	  2007,	  p.74).	  The	  second	  modality,	  spatial	  practices,	  determines	  the	  space	  of	  "flow”,	  the	  whole	  flow	  of	  individuals,	  groups	  of	  people	  and	  products.	  It	  is	  the	  space	  of	  the	  reproduction	  of	  capitalism’s	  social	  relations.	  It	  attaches	  other	  spaces	  to	  one	  another	  and	  makes	  a	  paradoxical	  association	  between	  “perceived	  space,”	  “daily	  reality”	  and	  “urban	  reality.”	  Thus,	  spatial	  practices	  conceal	  a	  society’s	  space	  and	  manifest	  it	  as	  a	  whole	  (Lefebvre,	  1991,	  p.38).	  The	  last	  modality	  of	  space	  is	  “representational	  space.”	  This	  is	  the	  “directly	  lived”	  space	  of	  “inhabitants”	  and	  “users,”	  who	  via	  their	  imagination	  try	  to	  make	  space	  livable.	  Lefebvre	  argues	  that	  representational	  spaces	  are	  “imagined	  or	  utopian	  spaces	  produced	  from	  cultural	  and	  social	  forces	  and	  associated	  with	  ritual,	  symbol,	  tradition,	  myth,	  desire,	  dream,	  etc”	  (Zieleniec,	  2007,	  p.75).	  	  	  	  According	  to	  Lefebvre,	  "order"	  is	  produced	  in	  a	  certain	  level	  to	  be	  used	  in	  another	  by	  certain	  subjects	  who	  have	  a	  particular	  engagement	  with	  power.	  As	  far	  as	  the	  political	  power	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  are	  two	  poles	  of	  power,	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  between	  them	  is	  determinative	  in	  the	  formation	  of	  relations	  play	  and	  in	  the	  production	  of	  space.	  No	  representation	  is	  a	  mere	  decision	  of	  technocrats;	  rather	  it	  is	  the	  result	  of	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  between	  the	  state	  and	  the	  civil	  society.	  Depending	  on	  the	  balance	  of	  power	  between	  the	  power	  of	  the	  state	  with	  that	  of	  the	  civil	  society,	  their	  decision’s	  might	  be	  less	  or	  more	  influential.	  	  The	  complexity	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  starts	  from	  this	  very	  point	  that	  the	  civil	  society	  has	  a	  power	  that	  let	  him	  come	  into	  a	  battle	  with	  the	  political	  power	  and	  demand	  his	  right	  on	  the	  production	  of	  space.	  More	  precisely	  those	  classes	  and	  social	  groups,	  who	  have	  powerful	  representatives	  and	  are	  able	  to	  bargain	  with	  power	  over	  their	  right	  to	  space,	  are	  actors	  in	  both	  spectacles	  of	  the	  space	  of	  power	  and	  lived	  space.	  Following	  this	  Gramscian	  attitude,	  the	  space	  	   31 of	  power	  is	  necessarily	  the	  space	  of	  a	  battle	  over	  hegemony.	  "Representation	  of	  space"	  is	  not	  simply	  the	  space	  of	  organizing	  and	  dominating	  lived	  space;	  rather	  it	  is	  the	  space	  of	  social	  conflicts	  between	  the	  state	  and	  civil	  society.	  	  	  3.1 The	  Machine	  of	  the	  Park	  A	  more	  complex	  image	  would	  come	  into	  mind,	  if	  following	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari,	  we	  consider	  that	  neither	  state	  nor	  civil	  society	  are	  simply	  one	  assemblage	  but	  are	  multiple	  and	  have	  different	  institutions	  within	  them.	  This	  is	  important	  in	  understanding	  the	  multi-­‐layer	  structure	  of	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  multiple	  number	  of	  assemblages	  associated	  in	  its	  production.	  Together,	  all	  these	  assemblages	  produce	  the	  machine	  of	  the	  park,	  a	  complex	  composition	  of	  different	  assemblages	  and	  segmentarities	  of	  power	  that	  expresses	  the	  meaning	  of	  "public"	  as	  a	  combination	  of	  conflicts	  and	  contradictions.	  In	  this	  way,	  "public"	  would	  never	  form	  until	  multiple	  regimes	  of	  signs	  come	  together	  and	  the	  direct	  result	  of	  such	  a	  multiplicity	  would	  be	  different	  languages	  that	  might	  not	  be	  understandable	  by	  speakers	  of	  others	  regimes	  of	  signs.	  Let	  us	  assume	  that	  in	  such	  a	  condition	  some	  regimes	  of	  signs	  might	  try	  to	  eliminate	  others	  -­‐	  in	  a	  colonial	  attitude	  -­‐	  and	  come	  back	  to	  the	  less	  complex	  model	  of	  segmentarity	  that	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  articulated.	  For	  example,	  the	  colonizer	  language	  and	  architecture	  dominates	  the	  language	  and	  architecture	  of	  colonized	  countries	  and	  in	  some	  cases	  became	  the	  major	  language	  of	  that	  area;	  or	  as	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  argue	  in	  Capitalism	  and	  Schizophrenia,	  social	  and	  capitalist	  assemblages	  usually	  dominate	  other	  smaller	  assemblages	  and	  force	  them	  to	  obey	  their	  regulations.	  Those	  assemblages	  that	  deploy	  the	  colonial	  attitude	  are	  those	  who	  have	  the	  most	  powerful	  abstract	  machines	  at	  their	  heart	  and	  impose	  their	  domination	  via	  different	  methods.	  	  	  	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari’s	  concept	  of	  “assemblage,”	  which	  is	  a	  more	  developed	  model	  of	  Foucault’s	  diagrammatic	  portrayal	  of	  the	  “panopticon,”	  is	  a	  diagram	  of	  a	  system	  within	  which	  a	  central	  source	  of	  power	  defines	  and	  controls	  social	  relations	  and	  acts.	  Assemblages	  transform	  the	  molar	  form	  of	  power	  to	  the	  molecular	  form.	  The	  job	  of	  the	  assemblage	  is	  to	  turn	  explicit	  commands	  of	  the	  abstract	  machine	  into	  a	  system	  of	  rules,	  punishments,	  and	  meanings.	  	   32 Therefore,	  the	  structure	  of	  an	  assemblage	  consists	  of	  a	  series	  of	  transformations	  “from	  explicit	  commands	  to	  order-­‐words	  as	  implicit	  presuppositions;	  from	  order-­‐words	  to	  the	  immanent	  acts	  or	  the	  incorporeal	  transformations	  they	  express;	  and	  from	  there	  to	  the	  assemblages	  of	  enunciation	  whose	  variable	  they	  are.”	  (Deleuze	  and	  Guattari,	  1987,	  p.83)	  	  	  Thus,	  not	  only	  civil	  society	  is	  a	  principle	  actor	  in	  the	  spectacle	  of	  the	  space	  of	  power,	  but	  also	  the	  very	  position	  of	  the	  abstract	  machine,	  the	  generator	  of	  explicit	  commands,	  at	  the	  heart	  of	  the	  assemblage	  causes	  all	  regimes	  of	  signs	  to	  contain	  seeds	  of	  power	  relations	  at	  the	  level	  of	  the	  lived	  space.	  In	  this	  way,	  civil	  society	  can	  play	  active	  roles	  in	  affecting	  the	  political	  power’s	  decisions	  about	  spatial	  planning	  and	  designing	  and	  force	  them	  to	  change	  their	  attitude;	  the	  political	  power’s	  policies	  can	  affect	  social	  relations	  between	  people	  and	  consequently	  their	  spatial	  experiences.	  In	  this	  chapter,	  I	  show	  how	  the	  political	  power	  -­‐the	  municipality-­‐	  has	  tried	  to	  affect	  the	  park	  at	  a	  molar	  level	  via	  rules,	  punishments,	  explicit	  commands	  and	  physical	  intervention	  in	  the	  body	  of	  the	  park	  and	  how	  civil	  society	  has	  played	  its	  active	  role	  in	  the	  representation	  of	  space.	  	  	  3.2 Politics	  of	  Identity	  The	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  and	  different	  groups	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  began	  with	  the	  rise	  of	  the	  new	  government.	  After	  the	  rise	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic,	  the	  ruling	  class	  articulated	  its	  ideology	  in	  the	  framework	  of	  Islam	  and	  nationalism.	  This	  ideology	  defined	  a	  certain	  normative	  self	  and	  tried	  to	  establish	  its	  presence	  throughout	  society,	  forcing	  people	  to	  obey	  its	  framework	  by	  changing	  rules	  and	  cultural	  policies.	  The	  new	  rules	  and	  policies	  ignored	  the	  identity	  of	  minorities	  or	  considered	  them	  as	  illegal	  in	  several	  cases,	  such	  as	  in	  the	  case	  of	  homosexuals.	  The	  domain	  of	  these	  policies	  and	  rules	  was	  on	  both	  molar	  and	  molecular	  levels.	  In	  the	  molar	  level	  they	  imposed	  through	  law	  or	  the	  spatial	  structure	  of	  cities	  (the	  former	  was	  particularly	  imposed	  on	  gender	  minorities	  and	  the	  latter	  was	  particularly	  imposed	  on	  ethnic	  minorities.)	  In	  the	  molecular	  level,	  on	  the	  other	  hand,	  new	  rules	  and	  policy	  objective	  was	  to	  restructure	  the	  social	  relations	  of	  people	  in	  their	  everyday	  life.	  In	  this	  section,	  I	  want	  to	  explain	  how	  the	  framework	  of	  self	  was	  defined	  and	  how	  it	  affected	  social	  relations	  in	  the	  park.	  	   33 However,	  the	  molar	  effects	  of	  these	  policies	  are	  a	  basic	  concept	  that	  will	  be	  referred	  to	  through	  the	  entire	  research.	  	  	  	  3.2.1 Normative	  Self	  and	  the	  Ignorance	  of	  Minority	  Identities	  The	  rise	  of	  Islamic	  Republic	  brought	  about	  a	  series	  of	  social	  transformations.	  The	  concept	  of	  “normative	  self”	  was	  defined	  from	  the	  beginning	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  and,	  as	  I	  explained,	  imposed	  its	  domination	  over	  the	  country	  including	  the	  Cultural	  Revolution.	  In	  his	  book,	  The	  Discourse	  of	  Identity	  and	  the	  Islamic	  Revolution	  of	  Iran,	  Iranian	  historian	  Nazari	  argues	  that	  the	  1979	  revolution	  led	  to	  a	  transformation	  in	  the	  discourses	  of	  identity.	  He	  states	  that	  in	  denying	  previous	  diverse	  sources	  of	  identities	  based	  on	  nationalism,	  Marxism,	  modernism	  or	  different	  forms	  of	  western	  culture,	  the	  Islamic	  Revolution	  introduced	  a	  unifying	  Shi'a	  identity	  around	  which	  the	  whole	  society	  was	  to	  be	  allied.	  He	  also	  believes	  that	  the	  former	  diversity	  of	  identities	  turned	  into	  a	  crisis	  of	  identity	  in	  Iranian	  society	  (Nazari,	  2008,	  p.72).	  	  Nazeri’s	  book	  was	  published	  by	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  Document	  Center	  Publication	  in	  2008	  to	  represent	  the	  ideology	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic.	  Thus,	  its	  deliberate	  neglecting	  of	  the	  role	  of	  other	  social	  groups	  in	  the	  success	  of	  the	  1979	  Revolution,	  and	  calling	  the	  diversity	  of	  identities	  as	  a	  “crisis”	  can	  reflect	  the	  idea	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  supporters	  about	  the	  validity	  of	  identities	  outside	  the	  concept	  of	  the	  normative	  self.	  	  	  Jalil	  Karimi	  examined	  in	  an	  academic	  essay	  much	  of	  the	  research,	  including	  many	  dissertations,	  which	  have	  examined	  the	  discourses	  of	  identity	  in	  Iranian	  universities	  after	  the	  establishment	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic.	  He	  states	  that	  the	  major	  sources	  of	  identity	  that	  have	  been	  studied	  by	  academic	  researchers	  are	  “the	  Persian	  language,	  Shi'a,	  Islam,	  oriental	  culture,	  Sufism,	  modernity	  and	  the	  national	  history”	  (Jalil	  Karimi,	  2011,	  p.29).	  He	  continues	  that	  most	  of	  the	  theoretical	  research	  has	  not	  paid	  attention	  to	  sub-­‐national	  identities	  (such	  as	  ethnic,	  gender	  or	  race	  identities).	  These	  sources	  of	  identities	  have	  been	  considered	  mostly	  in	  empirical	  research	  (Ibid,	  p.53).	  	  	   34 On	  one	  hand,	  we	  can	  see	  that	  not	  only	  minorities	  and	  subalterns	  have	  been	  eliminated	  from	  the	  political	  structure,	  but	  also	  their	  identities	  have	  been	  neglected	  as	  well.	  Gender,	  class,	  and	  ethnic	  identities	  are	  three	  main	  sources	  by	  which	  one	  can	  define	  this	  situation	  of	  exclusion	  in	  Iranian	  society;	  all	  of	  them	  are	  also	  neglected	  in	  academic	  research.	  Karimi	  testifies	  that	  even	  gender	  is	  a	  new	  phenomenon	  in	  discourses	  of	  identity	  in	  academic	  research.	  Therefore,	  a	  normative	  self	  in	  official	  discourses	  of	  identity	  is	  defined	  as	  a	  Muslim	  Iranian	  person.	  This	  normative	  self	  is	  advertised	  through	  the	  media.	  It	  colonizes	  other	  identities,	  and	  is	  the	  subject	  for	  whom	  Iranian	  cities	  should	  be	  built.	  	  	  3.2.2 The	  Civil	  Society	  As	  I	  explained	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  the	  middle	  class	  body	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  found	  its	  power	  through	  the	  reform	  movement	  that	  led	  to	  their	  victory	  in	  the	  presidential	  election	  of	  1997.	  They	  imposed	  themselves	  on	  the	  discourse	  of	  identity,	  still	  with	  no	  objection	  to	  the	  Islamic	  framework	  of	  the	  normative	  self.	  Thus,	  concepts	  such	  as	  “religious-­‐intellectual”	  and	  “tradition	  and	  secularism”	  developed	  in	  the	  discourse	  of	  identity.	  Nazeri,	  after	  neglecting	  minorities’	  identities,	  states	  that	  after	  the	  revolutionary	  period,	  reformists	  and	  liberals	  played	  roles	  in	  the	  formation	  of	  the	  new	  discourse	  of	  identity.	  	  3.2.3 Homosexuals	  The	  denial	  of	  minorities’	  identities	  by	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  discourse	  of	  identity	  could	  be	  best	  exemplified	  by	  President	  Mahmoud	  Ahmadinejad’s	  assertion	  at	  Columbia	  University	  on	  September	  24,	  2007	  where	  in	  answer	  to	  the	  question:	  	  "Iranian	  women	  are	  now	  denied	  basic	  human	  rights	  and	  your	  government	  has	  imposed	  draconian	  punishments	  including	  execution	  on	  Iranian	  citizens	  who	  are	  homosexuals.	  Why	  are	  you	  doing	  those	  things?"	  he	  replied:	  "We	  don't	  have	  homosexuals,	  like	  in	  your	  country.	  I	  don't	  know	  who	  told	  you	  that."10	  One	  of	  his	  assistants	  later	  said	  that	  he	  was	  misquoted	  and	  what	  he	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  10	  http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/09/24/us.iran/index.html	  	   35 actually	  said	  was	  that	  "compared	  to	  American	  society,	  we	  don't	  have	  many	  homosexuals."11	  	  	  Not	  only	  homosexuals’	  identity	  is	  denied	  or	  at	  best	  ignored	  in	  Iran,	  homosexuality	  is	  the	  subject	  of	  certain	  punishments	  such	  as	  imprisonment,	  corporal	  punishment,	  and	  in	  the	  case	  of	  “sodomy,”	  execution.	  The	  concept	  of	  the	  normative	  self	  provides	  a	  framework	  such	  that	  the	  legitimacy	  of	  other	  identities	  is	  defined	  according	  to	  their	  correspondence	  with	  it.	  If	  one	  layer	  of	  one’s	  identity	  shows	  obvious	  contradiction	  with	  the	  normative	  self,	  that	  person	  will	  be	  considered	  as	  an	  illegitimate	  being	  and	  might	  not	  be	  able	  to	  reveal	  his	  identity.	  Homosexuals,	  obviously,	  have	  one	  of	  the	  most	  illegitimate	  identities	  of	  all	  according	  to	  the	  normative	  self	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic.	  Undoubtedly,	  it	  would	  be	  wrong	  to	  consider	  homosexuals’	  condition	  in	  Iran	  a	  clear	  declaration	  of	  all	  minorities’	  condition;	  but	  it	  is	  just	  an	  example	  of	  people	  who	  are	  not	  considered	  as	  “normal.”	  	  	  3.2.4 Unequal	  Right	  to	  the	  Public	  Space	  In	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  I	  explained	  how	  Iran	  experienced	  an	  era	  of	  the	  decline	  of	  the	  public	  life	  after	  the	  rise	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic,	  which	  had	  lasted	  for	  about	  two	  decades	  until	  the	  reformists	  won	  the	  presidential	  election	  in	  1997.	  As	  I	  explained	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  Alinejad	  claims	  that	  minorities’	  urban	  life	  revived	  after	  this	  era	  and	  the	  public	  sphere	  came	  back	  to	  life.	  I	  want	  to	  argue	  that	  the	  revitalization	  of	  public	  life	  was	  not	  an	  equal	  right	  given	  to	  all	  citizens.	  As	  we	  can	  see	  from	  the	  politics	  of	  identities	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic,	  identities	  are	  not	  considered	  as	  equal	  and	  their	  inequality	  has	  led	  to	  unequal	  public	  lives.	  	  By	  reformists	  winning	  presidential	  power,	  privatization	  accelerated	  in	  Iran,	  which	  strengthen	  the	  power	  of	  the	  middle	  classes	  and	  forced	  governments	  to	  expand	  the	  limited	  boundaries	  of	  their	  “normative	  self”	  and	  to	  grant	  civil	  society	  more	  rights	  than	  before.	  The	  revitalization	  of	  the	  public	  sphere	  and	  the	  power	  of	  the	  middle	  class	  were	  partly	  depended	  on	  Iran’s	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  11	  http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/10/10/us-­‐iran-­‐gays-­‐idUSBLA05294620071010	  	   36 engagement	  in	  joining	  the	  World	  Trade	  Organization.	  Iran	  officially	  submitted	  an	  application	  to	  WTO	  on	  19	  July	  1996,	  which	  was	  then	  re-­‐submitted	  several	  times	  until	  it	  was	  approved	  on	  26	  May	  2005.	  By	  that	  time,	  Iran’s	  national	  economic	  system	  was	  not	  ready	  for	  the	  competitive	  market	  of	  the	  neo-­‐liberal	  economy.	  The	  government’s	  attempt	  was	  to	  facilitate	  the	  process	  of	  liberalization	  of	  goods	  and	  market	  in	  the	  country	  and	  to	  eliminate	  insufficient	  industries	  that	  mounted	  resistance	  to	  the	  process	  of	  liberalization	  and	  leaded	  powerful	  lobbying	  groups	  to	  delay	  the	  process.	  The	  government,	  thus,	  realized	  they	  need	  a	  plan	  that	  defines	  clearly,	  the	  responsibilities	  of	  all	  the	  organs	  involved	  in	  this	  process	  of	  liberalization.12	  	  	  Another	  reason	  for	  that	  delay	  between	  1996	  and	  2005	  was	  the	  United	  States	  using	  its	  veto	  power.	  Nevertheless,	  the	  “liberalization	  of	  goods	  and	  services	  market”	  that	  was	  accelerated	  within	  the	  presidency	  of	  the	  first	  Reformist’s	  president,	  partly,	  if	  not	  completely,	  revived	  the	  middle	  class’s	  right	  to	  the	  city	  and	  public	  sphere.	  The	  same	  right,	  however,	  was	  not	  given	  to	  minorities	  and	  subalterns.	  	  I	  want	  to	  argue	  that	  in	  general,	  the	  political	  power	  undertook	  three	  main	  strategies	  in	  dealing	  with	  different	  constituents	  of	  the	  park.	  As	  for	  families,	  elderly,	  and	  those	  whose	  identity	  fits	  with,	  or	  has	  no	  contradiction	  with,	  the	  concept	  of	  the	  “normative	  self,”	  the	  political	  power’s	  aim	  is	  to	  provide	  a	  more	  secure	  place	  for	  them.	  As	  for	  those	  parts	  of	  the	  Civil	  Society	  who	  are	  in	  a	  battle	  with	  the	  political	  power	  over	  gaining	  the	  control	  of	  the	  space,	  -­‐theater	  artists	  and	  patrons	  of	  art-­‐	  the	  political	  power’s	  policy	  is	  to	  control	  them.	  Political	  power	  cannot	  remove	  that	  part	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  from	  space;	  rather,	  the	  political	  power	  tries	  to	  control	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  their	  actions	  in	  space.	  But	  the	  political	  power’s	  policy	  toward	  homosexuals	  and	  subalterns	  is	  to	  remove	  them	  from	  space.	  The	  government	  has	  undertaken	  a	  similar	  attitude	  in	  dealing	  with	  drug	  dealers.	  I	  will	  prove	  these	  statements	  by	  studying	  and	  analyzing	  the	  political	  power’s	  spatial	  intervention	  in	  the	  park.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  12	  http://www.irantradlaw.com	  (In	  Persian,	  translation	  from	  the	  author)	  	   37 Before	  explaining	  the	  government’s	  spatial	  intervention	  in	  the	  park,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  the	  politics	  of	  identities	  are	  the	  best	  example	  of	  how	  molar	  and	  molecular	  levels	  are	  deeply	  connected	  and	  that	  we	  cannot	  talk	  about	  one	  without	  another.	  That	  is	  why	  the	  molar	  level	  decisions	  of	  changing	  international	  relations	  and	  national	  economy	  in	  order	  to	  join	  the	  WTO	  have	  affected	  the	  politics	  of	  identity	  and	  cultural	  policies	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  and	  affected	  the	  urban	  life	  of	  the	  small	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  in	  Tehran.	  	  	  3.3 Spatial	  Intervention	  In	  The	  Subject	  and	  Power,	  Foucault	  argues	  that	  the	  objective	  of	  his	  studies	  is	  not	  only	  to	  study	  power	  but	  also	  “the	  history	  of	  human	  objectification.”	  Power	  objectifies	  human	  subjectivity	  via	  three	  modes:	  “science,”	  “dividing	  practice,”	  and	  by	  means	  of	  the	  human	  being	  himself,	  which	  Foucault	  calls	  “the	  domain	  of	  sexuality”	  (Foucault,	  1982,	  p.777-­‐778).	  In	  the	  same	  year	  and	  in	  his	  interview	  with	  Paul	  Rabinow	  he	  mentions	  the	  important	  of	  space	  in	  objectifying	  human	  beings	  from	  18th	  century	  on.	  Before,	  1975,	  in	  Discipline	  and	  Punish:	  the	  Birth	  of	  the	  Prison,	  he	  explains	  how	  all	  three	  modes	  of	  objectification	  went	  hand	  in	  hand	  to	  objectify	  human	  subjectivity	  in	  the	  panopticon	  of	  prisons.	  	  	  	  The	  diagram	  of	  the	  Panopticon	  can	  best	  show	  how	  power	  –in	  its	  Foucauldian	  definition-­‐	  can	  use	  space	  to	  objectify	  human	  beings.	  In	  a	  panopticon,	  all	  acts	  of	  a	  subject	  could	  be	  observed	  from	  the	  standpoint	  of	  the	  watchtower.	  Subjects	  are	  segregated	  and	  are	  unable	  to	  have	  social	  interactions.	  Thus,	  not	  only	  power	  is	  represented	  in	  space	  explicitly,	  but	  also	  its	  affect	  on	  people’s	  subjectivity	  and	  identity	  by	  power’s	  reproducing	  of	  itself	  in	  the	  molecular	  level	  of	  social	  interactions.	  	  	  But	  what	  if	  we	  remove	  the	  walls	  between	  the	  prison	  sections?	  Would	  the	  subject	  be	  free	  from	  power’s	  observation?	  A	  quick	  answer	  is	  no	  because	  prisoners	  know	  that	  someone	  is	  watching	  them.	  Thus,	  their	  social	  interaction	  would	  be	  a	  response	  to	  the	  power	  watching	  them	  all	  the	  time.	  What	  happens	  if	  our	  place	  of	  study	  does	  not	  have	  a	  watchtower	  in	  the	  middle?	  What	  	   38 force	  might	  objectify	  human	  subjectivity	  and	  manipulate	  his	  social	  interactions?	  Now	  we	  have	  to	  go	  for	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari’s	  assemblage.	  	  Power	  uses	  all	  the	  tools	  it	  has	  to	  manipulate	  space	  to	  control	  people’s	  right	  to	  space	  in	  a	  certain	  way	  corresponds	  with	  the	  ideology	  of	  the	  ruling	  class.	  But	  we	  live	  in	  a	  world	  of	  multiple	  assemblages	  and	  the	  regimes	  of	  signs	  produced	  by	  them.	  Signs	  refer	  to	  each	  other	  and,	  as	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  point	  out,	  we	  can	  discover	  the	  notion	  of	  signs	  by	  tracking	  the	  connections	  between	  signs.	  	  As	  regimes	  of	  signs	  are	  linguistic	  forms	  of	  the	  abstract	  machines’	  commands,	  by	  tracking	  the	  connection	  between	  regimes	  of	  signs,	  we	  can	  see	  how	  the	  power	  of	  the	  abstract	  machine	  is	  expanded	  and	  multiplied	  in	  different	  molar	  and	  molecular	  levels.	  We	  can	  also	  see	  the	  relation	  between	  different	  abstract	  machines.	  	  3.3.1 The	  Cultural	  Revolution	  The	  first	  intervention	  of	  the	  Islamic	  republic	  in	  the	  park	  was	  an	  indirect	  result	  of	  its	  politics	  of	  identity	  and	  cultural	  policies	  that	  changed	  the	  composition	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park.	  In	  the	  previous	  chapter	  I	  explained	  how	  the	  Cultural	  Revolution	  and	  the	  formation	  of	  the	  concept	  of	  “normative	  self”	  changed	  the	  composition	  of	  constituents	  of	  the	  park.	  As	  Majid	  Sedghi	  says:	  	  	  “Daneshjoo	  Park,	  at	  Shahreza	  -­‐Enghelab-­‐	  Street,	  which	  was	  a	  place	  for	  homosexuals'	  gatherings	  from	  a	  long	  time	  ago,	  turned	  into	  a	  space	  for	  gatherings	  of	  different	  political	  groups;	  but	  when	  the	  new	  government	  eradicated	  opposition	  social	  groups	  after	  the	  Revolution,	  the	  park	  turn	  into	  a	  space	  for	  homosexuals	  meeting	  for	  a	  second	  nou.net) -asretime.”	  (  	  3.3.2 Discipline:	  Policing	  Forces	  As	  for	  the	  second	  step,	  a	  police	  office	  was	  built	  in	  the	  park.	  Not	  as	  tall	  as	  the	  watchtower,	  but	  the	  permanent	  presence	  of	  the	  policing	  forces	  was	  the	  statement	  of	  the	  state	  to	  remind	  citizens	  that	  their	  actions	  are	  observed	  and	  they	  have	  to	  act	  in	  a	  certain	  way.	  The	  presence	  of	  policing	  forces	  also	  contains	  a	  declaration	  of	  social	  segregation.	  If	  we	  approve	  that	  crime,	  in	  	   39 every	  society,	  is	  an	  act	  that	  will	  bring	  punishment,	  we	  should	  approve	  that	  in	  the	  eyes	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic	  homosexuals	  are	  criminal,	  because	  their	  act	  will	  bring	  them	  punishment.	  Also	  if	  we	  approve	  that	  one	  function	  of	  policing	  forces	  is	  to	  protect	  “citizens”	  against	  the	  threat	  of	  “criminals”	  we	  can	  see	  how	  the	  presence	  of	  policing	  forces	  is	  an	  implicit	  statement	  to	  the	  “criminal”	  that	  they	  should	  stay	  away	  from	  other	  citizens.	  Homosexuals	  are	  the	  most	  fragile	  group	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  but	  different	  social	  groups	  were	  subject	  to	  the	  policing	  forces	  harassment	  in	  different	  historical	  periods.	  	  In	  addition	  to	  policing	  forces,	  plainclothes	  forces,	  either	  plainclothes	  police	  or	  forces	  of	  the	  Intelligence	  Ministry,	  are	  usually	  present	  in	  the	  park,	  particularly	  in	  the	  case	  of	  public	  events.	  They	  are	  not	  only	  present	  in	  this	  park,	  but	  also	  in	  all	  public	  places.	  Their	  presence	  remarks	  that	  people	  cannot	  easily	  trust	  each	  other	  because	  everyone	  can	  be	  a	  plainclothes	  enforcer.	  	  	  3.3.3 Removing	  Minorities	  Through	  the	  last	  ten	  years,	  policing	  forces	  have	  attacked	  homosexuals	  several	  times,	  forced	  them	  to	  quit	  the	  park.	  The	  last	  one	  occurred	  in	  early	  2013	  and	  forced	  homosexuals	  to	  change	  their	  stamping	  ground	  to	  the	  nearest	  crossroad	  after	  the	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr.	  These	  are	  not	  only	  homosexuals	  that	  the	  political	  power	  wants	  to	  remove	  from	  space	  but	  also	  subalterns	  such	  as	  child	  laborers.	  The	  removal	  of	  child	  laborers	  has	  always	  been	  a	  part	  of	  the	  municipality’s	  plan	  for	  removing	  vendors	  and	  beggars	  from	  the	  city.	  These	  acts	  of	  removal	  show	  that	  the	  government’s	  intention	  is	  not	  to	  control	  minorities	  but	  to	  remove	  them	  from	  the	  public	  sphere,	  separate	  them	  from	  the	  rest	  of	  the	  society.	  	  	  3.3.4 Occupying	  the	  Plaza	  Direct	  manipulation	  of	  the	  plaza	  in	  front	  of	  the	  City	  Theater,	  using	  it	  for	  certain	  cultural	  programs,	  and	  as	  you	  can	  see	  in	  the	  image	  for	  keeping	  plainclothes	  in	  public	  events,	  are	  others	  ways	  of	  dominations.	  The	  plaza	  in	  front	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  is	  another	  case	  for	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  between	  the	  state	  and	  the	  civil	  society.	  As	  long	  as	  the	  space	  of	  the	  political	  power	  matters,	  the	  plaza	  is	  exactly	  an	  example	  of	  that	  open,	  multi-­‐functional	  space	  that	  Lefebvre	  mentions	  in	  The	  	   40 Production	  of	  Space	  as	  the	  spaces	  of	  interference	  of	  power	  in	  public	  spaces.13	  This	  interference	  happens	  through	  cultural	  events	  and	  street	  theatre,	  which	  are	  celebrated	  in	  the	  plaza.	  Each	  of	  these	  groups	  wants	  to	  use	  the	  plaza	  as	  their	  own	  stage	  of	  spectacle.	  No	  doubt,	  the	  political	  power	  is	  more	  successful	  in	  its	  interference	  as	  it	  has	  the	  upper	  hand	  in	  the	  balance	  of	  power.	  The	  political	  power	  uses	  the	  space	  for	  public	  events	  usually	  in	  religious	  ceremonies	  and	  street	  theater	  with	  religious	  content.	  It	  also	  uses	  the	  plaza	  in	  public	  events	  as	  the	  focal	  points	  for	  the	  concentration	  of	  security	  guards	  and	  policing	  forces.	  The	  picture	  below	  shows	  that	  the	  plaza	  is	  occupied	  by	  the	  plainclothes	  forces	  in	  the	  night	  after	  the	  current	  presidential	  election	  –	  2013-­‐	  were	  people	  were	  celebrating	  the	  winning	  of	  the	  monetarists’	  candidate	  who	  had	  the	  support	  of	  reformists.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  13	  In	  Production	  of	  Space	  Lefebvre	  states	  that:	  “there	  is	  no	  getting	  around	  the	  fact	  that	  the	  bourgeoisie	  still	  has	  the	  initiative	  in	  its	  struggle	  for	  (and	  in)	  space	  .	  .	  .	  The	  state	  and	  each	  of	  its	  constituent	  institutions	  call	  for	  spaces	  –	  but	  spaces	  which	  they	  can	  then	  organize	  according	  to	  their	  specific	  requirements	  .	  .	  .	  here	  we	  see	  the	  polyvalence	  of	  social	  space,	  its	  ‘reality’	  at	  once	  formal	  and	  material.	  Though	  a	  product	  to	  be	  used,	  to	  be	  consumed,	  it	  is	  also	  a	  means	  of	  production;	  networks	  of	  exchange	  and	  flows	  of	  raw	  materials	  and	  energy	  fashion	  space	  and	  are	  determined	  by	  it.”	  (Lefebvre,	  1991:	  56,	  85)	  By	  this	  statement,	  Lefebvre	  explains	  that	  polyvalence	  of	  space	  is	  a	  characteristic	  that	  allows	  bourgeoisie	  to	  manipulate	  space	  according	  to	  different	  situations	  and	  requirements;	  in	  the	  same	  way,	  open	  public	  plazas	  and	  multifunctional	  public	  spaces,	  should	  not	  be	  observed	  as	  simply	  spaces	  of	  social	  interactions	  and	  democratic	  relations.	  Zielnic	  in	  Space	  and	  Social	  Theory	  go	  further	  and	  explains	  how	  the	  whole	  concept	  of	  conflict	  in	  space	  could	  be	  explained	  according	  to	  struggle	  over	  regulating	  and	  controlling	  these	  spaces:	  “[t]he	  implications	  of	  this	  for	  the	  analysis	  of	  social	  space	  will	  be	  demonstrated	  later	  but	  will	  be	  shown	  to	  reside	  in	  the	  control,	  organization	  and	  design	  of	  space	  for	  different	  functions	  and	  practices.	  Who	  owns	  and	  ultimately	  regulates	  the	  activities	  that	  can	  occur	  or	  are	  allowed	  in	  space	  is	  rooted	  in	  a	  process	  that	  enhances	  the	  contradictions	  and	  conflicts	  inherent	  in	  its	  production.	  There	  are	  many	  public	  spaces	  where	  such	  conflicts	  and	  contradictions	  between	  different	  conceptions	  and	  practices	  are	  focused	  in	  specific	  locations.	  The	  contradictions	  between	  notions	  of	  space	  as	  neutral	  and	  objective	  and	  those	  that	  consider	  space	  to	  be	  the	  product	  of	  historically	  situated	  processes	  (including	  that	  of	  ideology	  and	  power)	  is,	  as	  Lefebvre	  argues,	  fundamental	  for	  understanding	  its	  production.”	  (Zielnic,	  2007:	  71)	  	  	   41 	  Figure	  3-­‐1.	  The	  plaza	  is	  occupied	  by	  plainclothes	  in	  the	  night	  after	  the	  current	  presidential	  election,	  June	  201314	  	  Figure	  3-­‐2.	  The	  23rd	  Fajr	  International	  Theater	  Festival,	  a	  street	  theater	  performance,	  January	  201415	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  14	  Photo	  by	  the	  author	  15	  Photo	  by	  Saeid	  Hashemi,	  the	  photographer	  permission	  is	  obtained	  	   42 	  Figure	  3-­‐3.	  A	  Tazie	  performance	  (a	  religious	  theater	  performed	  in	  Muharram),	  August	  201316	  	  Figure	  3-­‐4.	  Tazie	  performance	  (a	  religious	  theater	  performed	  in	  Muharram),	  August	  201317	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  16	  Photo	  by	  Foad	  Ashtari,	  Mehr	  News	  Agency,	  	  http://www.mashreghnews.ir/fa/news/237541/,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted.	  17	  Photo	  by	  Foad	  Ashtari,	  Mehr	  News	  Agency,	  	  http://www.mashreghnews.ir/fa/news/237541/,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted.	  	   43 	  3.3.5 The	  Construction	  of	  the	  Mosque	  In	  2004,	  when	  the	  former	  president	  of	  Iran,	  Mahmoud	  Ahmadinejad	  was	  the	  mayor	  of	  Tehran,	  the	  municipality	  decided	  to	  build	  a	  mosque	  behind	  the	  City	  Theater.	  Before	  this,	  the	  area	  officially	  served	  as	  the	  City	  Theater's	  parking.	  The	  idea	  of	  designing	  a	  mosque	  just	  behind	  the	  City	  Theater,	  which	  was	  a	  clear	  statement	  of	  the	  municipality's	  hegemony	  over	  civil	  society	  by	  occupying	  one	  of	  their	  most	  controversial	  public	  spaces,	  sparked	  protests	  by	  the	  theatre	  artists	  and	  patrons	  of	  arts.	  It	  was	  partly	  because	  the	  City	  Theater	  had	  a	  claim	  on	  owning	  the	  land	  of	  the	  parking.	  	  	  The	  first	  design	  of	  the	  mosque,	  by	  the	  traditional	  architect	  Abdolhamid	  Noghrekar,	  suggested	  a	  traditional	  mosque	  with	  a	  dome	  two	  and	  a	  half	  times	  higher	  than	  the	  height	  of	  the	  City	  Theater.	  That	  design	  was	  intended	  to	  state	  its	  domination	  over	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  the	  park.	  The	  design	  faced	  with	  the	  artists	  society's	  objection	  and	  intensified	  the	  conflicts	  between	  the	  municipality	  and	  the	  City	  Theater	  custodians.	  	  	  	  The	  conflicts	  suspended	  the	  process	  of	  construction.	  In	  2008	  the	  Ahmadinejad,	  the	  mayor	  of	  Tehran,	  became	  president	  and	  Ghalibaf,	  a	  conservative	  technocrat,	  became	  the	  new	  mayor.	  Ghalibaf	  was	  one	  of	  the	  candidates	  who	  lost	  the	  presidential	  election	  to	  Ahmadinejad	  and	  wanted	  to	  attract	  the	  support	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  so	  put	  himself	  forward	  for	  the	  next	  election	  (he	  did	  so	  and	  lost	  again	  in	  the	  2013	  election).	  Under	  his	  governance,	  a	  rapid	  wave	  of	  construction	  and	  renovation	  swept	  the	  city	  away,	  even	  though	  most	  of	  the	  projects	  suffered	  a	  low	  quality.	  As	  a	  part	  of	  this	  wave,	  Fluid	  Motion	  Architects	  was	  invited	  to	  suggest	  another	  alternative	  for	  the	  mosque.	  	  	  Fluid	  Motion	  Architects	  is	  a	  firm	  loyal	  to	  a	  postmodern	  agenda	  of	  designing.	  As	  Reza	  Daneshmir,	  the	  head	  of	  the	  firm,	  states,	  at	  the	  beginning,	  they	  tried	  to	  revise	  the	  previous	  suggested	  design	  but	  as	  they	  have	  found	  it	  completely	  wrong	  put	  it	  aside.	  He	  states:	  "we	  realized	  that	  if	  a	  mosque	  is	  going	  to	  be	  built	  beside	  the	  City	  Theater,	  this	  should	  be	  a	  part	  of	  the	  City	  Theater's	  	   44 landscape	  and	  should	  work	  with	  the	  park	  properly."	  The	  new	  governors	  of	  the	  municipality	  accepted	  Fluid	  Motion	  Architects’	  suggestion	  and	  the	  construction	  of	  the	  building,	  in	  spite	  of	  the	  opposition	  of	  religious	  forces	  to	  the	  "non-­‐Islamic"	  design	  of	  the	  building,	  has	  started	  and	  continues	  to	  the	  present	  day.	  	  	  The	  construction	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  marks	  a	  clear	  battle	  between	  the	  state	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  over	  the	  hegemony	  on	  space.	  The	  construction	  of	  a	  mosque	  on	  a	  crowded	  crossroad	  that	  can	  hardly	  tolerate	  its	  existing	  population	  is	  with	  no	  doubt	  a	  political	  statement.	  The	  civil	  society's	  success	  in	  preventing	  the	  construction	  of	  an	  extravagant	  traditional	  mosque	  might	  seem	  a	  big	  achievement;	  but	  the	  truth	  is	  that	  in	  whatever	  shape	  it	  has	  been	  built,	  it	  is	  still	  a	  mosque	  and	  will	  be	  governed	  by	  religious	  forces.	  The	  presence	  of	  the	  mosque	  will	  increase	  the	  presence	  of	  plainclothes	  in	  the	  park	  and	  is	  a	  declaration	  of	  the	  priority	  of	  the	  right	  and	  its	  "normative	  self"	  on	  public	  spaces.	  	  	  Figure	  3-­‐5.	  The	  condition	  of	  the	  mosque	  at	  the	  south	  of	  the	  park18	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  18	  Map	  from	  Wikimapia	  	   45 	  Figure	  3-­‐6.	  The	  first	  alternative	  for	  the	  mosque19	  	  Figure	  3-­‐7.	  Fluid	  Motion	  Architects	  diagram	  of	  the	  maximum	  height	  of	  the	  mosque20	  	   	  Figure	  3-­‐8.	  Fluid	  Motion	  Architect’s	  alternative21	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  19	  http://www.fma-­‐co.com,	  Vali-­‐e-­‐Asr	  Mosque	  project,	  the	  permission	  is	  obtained.	  20	  http://www.fma-­‐co.com,	  Vali-­‐e-­‐Asr	  Mosque	  project,	  the	  permission	  is	  obtained.	  21	  http://www.fma-­‐co.com,	  Vali-­‐e-­‐Asr	  Mosque	  project,	  the	  permission	  is	  obtained.	  	   46 	  Figure	  3-­‐9.	  The	  mosque	  under	  construction,	  July	  201322	  	  3.3.6 The	  Construction	  of	  the	  Metro	  Station	  The	  construction	  of	  the	  metro	  station	  of	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  crossroad,	  inaugurated	  in	  2011,	  added	  a	  large	  number	  of	  temporary	  users	  to	  the	  population	  of	  the	  park.	  In	  order	  to	  control	  the	  population	  and	  possible	  conflicts	  between	  them,	  the	  number	  of	  policing	  forces	  in	  the	  park	  and	  around	  the	  metro	  station	  increased.	  It	  also	  led	  to	  the	  seasonal	  presence	  of	  moral	  guards23,	  which	  work	  under	  the	  authority	  of	  Tehran’s	  Police	  Department.	  Like	  the	  case	  of	  the	  mosque,	  the	  artists’	  society	  reacted	  to	  this	  municipality’s	  decision	  with	  objection.	  However,	  the	  station	  was	  built	  in	  spite	  of	  their	  disagreement.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  22	  Photo	  by	  the	  author	  23	  Moral	  Guards	  are	  seasonal	  guards	  for	  controlling	  swomen’s	  hijab.	  They	  usually	  work	  in	  hot	  seasons.	  Their	  presence	  is	  not	  permanent	  and	  highly	  depends	  on	  the	  political	  condition	  of	  the	  time.	  	   47 3.3.7 Demolishing	  the	  Food	  Outlet	  Area	  Previously	  a	  semi-­‐open	  food	  outlet	  area	  was	  located	  at	  almost	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  park	  (number	  7	  on	  figure	  15).	  The	  food	  outlet	  area	  had	  been	  in	  the	  park	  for	  a	  long	  time	  (at	  least	  for	  the	  last	  ten	  years),	  although	  its	  structure	  and	  organization	  changed	  several	  times.	  Until	  2008	  it	  used	  to	  be	  the	  place	  for	  the	  meetings	  of	  student	  political	  activists.	  After	  that	  time,	  it	  was	  reorganized	  to	  a	  more	  supervised	  area	  with	  a	  temporary	  structure.	  The	  temporary	  structure	  of	  the	  area	  was	  finally	  dissembled	  in	  2014,	  approximately	  at	  the	  same	  as	  the	  inauguration	  of	  the	  underpass	  and	  the	  removal	  of	  pedestrians	  from	  the	  ground	  level	  of	  the	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad.	  Behnaz	  Aminzadeh	  and	  Dokhi	  Afshar	  believe	  that	  this	  cafeteria	  was	  a	  place	  for	  drug	  dealer	  gatherings,	  but	  according	  to	  my	  personal	  experience	  of	  being	  in	  that	  space	  for	  about	  eight	  years,	  drug	  dealers	  were	  only	  one	  of	  the	  groups	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  food	  outlet	  area.	  	  	  3.3.8 Removing	  Pedestrians	  Cutting	  the	  relation	  between	  the	  crossroad	  and	  the	  park	  and	  pushing	  pedestrians	  to	  an	  underground	  level	  is	  the	  most	  current	  action.	  The	  intersection	  is	  one	  of	  the	  most	  crowded	  crossroads	  in	  Tehran.	  The	  government	  solution	  for	  the	  problem	  of	  traffic	  was	  to	  push	  pedestrians	  to	  the	  underground	  level.	  In	  the	  inauguration	  day	  of	  the	  underpass	  in	  January	  2014,	  the	  municipality	  stated:	  “This	  underpass	  is	  not	  only	  a	  civil	  construction	  but	  should	  be	  considered	  as	  a	  cultural	  structure	  in	  the	  urban	  geography	  of	  Tehran.”24	  This	  statement	  makes	  their	  main	  objective	  even	  clearer.	  Currently	  most	  public	  ceremonies	  in	  Tehran	  have	  been	  mobile.	  People	  come	  to	  the	  street	  in	  their	  cars.	  Get	  stuck	  in	  the	  traffic	  they	  have	  made,	  they	  park	  their	  cars,	  get	  out	  and	  celebrate	  the	  event.	  In	  such	  a	  condition,	  people	  who	  do	  not	  have	  car	  stand	  in	  the	  public	  spaces	  beside	  the	  streets,	  or	  sometimes	  in	  pedestrian	  ways.	  The	  pedestrian	  way	  beside	  the	  plaza	  of	  the	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  has	  had	  such	  a	  function	  in	  public	  events.	  Blocking	  the	  connection	  between	  the	  street	  and	  the	  pedestrian	  way	  would	  restrict	  social	  interactions	  even	  more.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  24	  http://www.khabaronline.ir	  (In	  Persian,	  Translation	  from	  the	  author)	  	   48 	  Figure	  3-­‐10.	  People’s	  public	  ceremony	  after	  Iran’s	  National	  Football	  team	  entrance	  to	  the	  World	  Cup,	  beside	  the	  City	  Theater,	  June	  201325	  	  Figure	  3-­‐11.	  The	  diagram	  of	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  underpass26	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  25	  Photo	  by	  the	  author	  26	  http://94.232.175.116/ViewText.aspx?Id=4429,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted.	  	   49 	  Figure	  3-­‐12.	  Blocking	  the	  pedestrian	  access	  to	  the	  street,	  January	  201427	  	  	  The	  importance	  of	  limiting	  pedestrian	  access	  at	  the	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  crossroad	  will	  become	  clearer	  if	  we	  compare	  it	  with	  Imam	  Hossein	  Square,	  another	  urban	  space	  that	  has	  currently	  been	  completely	  pedestrianized.	  Imam	  Hossein	  Square	  is	  located	  at	  the	  east	  end	  of	  Enghelab	  Street	  and	  has	  reconstructed	  over	  the	  last	  five	  years.	  That	  square	  was	  surrounded	  by	  a	  bus	  loop,	  taxi	  station,	  and	  shopping	  centers.	  It	  did	  not	  contain	  any	  special	  political	  activities	  involving	  pedestrians.	  During	  the	  last	  five	  years,	  the	  square	  has	  been	  reconstructed	  as	  a	  huge	  arena	  for	  pedestrians	  and	  all	  vehicles	  are	  meant	  to	  pass	  through	  the	  underground	  way.	  Of	  course	  the	  scale	  of	  this	  square	  is	  far	  bigger	  than	  the	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  street,	  where	  its	  smaller	  dimensions	  allowed	  a	  tunnel	  to	  be	  built	  beneath	  it	  for	  vehicles;	  but	  the	  current	  huge	  scale	  of	  the	  square	  was	  made	  by	  the	  destruction	  of	  many	  buildings	  around	  it.	  Even	  all	  the	  southern	  streets	  that	  end	  at	  the	  square	  are	  now	  pedestrianized	  and	  no	  cars	  can	  go	  through	  them.	  The	  main	  and	  only	  function	  of	  the	  arena	  is	  for	  religious	  ceremonies	  and	  events.	  Despite	  all	  the	  differences	  in	  the	  scale	  of	  the	  two	  projects,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  notice	  when	  and	  where	  pedestrians	  are	  given	  the	  right	  to	  be	  on	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  27	  http://isna.ir/fa/imageReport/92102212452/,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted.	  	   50 the	  ground	  and	  when	  their	  right	  is	  taken	  away	  from	  them.	  Imam	  Hussein	  square	  was	  built	  to	  be	  the	  spectacle	  of	  the	  representation	  of	  the	  normative	  self	  of	  the	  Islamic	  republic	  and	  that	  is	  the	  main	  reason	  it	  could	  have	  such	  a	  connection	  with	  the	  body	  of	  the	  city.	  	  Figure	  3-­‐13.	  Imam	  Hussein	  Square,	  March	  201328	  	  Figure	  3-­‐14.	  Imam	  Hussein	  Square,	  November	  201229	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  28	  Photo	  by	  Mohamad	  Akbari,	  http://baghban65.persianblog.ir/post/705/,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted.	  29	  Photo	  by	  Amir	  Karami,	  http://www.mashreghnews.ir/fa/news/173275/,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted.	  	   51 30	  Figure	  3-­‐15.	  The	  diagram	  of	  spatial	  interventions	  in	  the	  park	  1:	  Power’s	  domination	  over	  the	  plaza	  2:	  The	  construction	  of	  the	  police	  office	  3:	  the	  construction	  of	  the	  library	  4:	  The	  construction	  of	  the	  praying	  room	  5:	  The	  construction	  of	  the	  mosque	  6:	  The	  construction	  of	  the	  metro	  station	  7:	  Demolishing	  the	  cafeterias	  8:	  Putting	  up	  the	  fence	  between	  the	  pedestrian	  and	  the	  street	  	  3.3.9 The	  Project	  is	  Ongoing:	  Imaging	  the	  Utopia	  Whatever	  intervention	  the	  municipality	  has	  done	  in	  the	  park	  it	  has	  been	  a	  part	  of	  a	  bigger	  project.	  The	  municipal	  government	  has	  announced	  several	  times	  in	  the	  past	  few	  years	  that	  they	  want	  to	  a	  build	  a	  cultural	  pedestrian	  way	  from	  the	  City	  Theater	  to	  the	  Vahdat	  Hall	  –	  a	  theater	  and	  music	  salon	  near	  to	  the	  City	  Theater	  marked	  as	  2	  in	  the	  image	  below.	  The	  official	  agreement	  was	  made	  between	  the	  social	  and	  cultural	  deputy	  of	  the	  ministry	  and	  the	  art	  deputy	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Culture	  and	  Guidance	  Ministry	  in	  December	  2013	  (mardomsalari.com).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  30	  Map	  from	  Wikimapia	  	   52 	  	  Figure	  3-­‐16.	  The	  municipality’s	  further	  plan	  for	  the	  park31	  	  Having	  lost	  its	  connection	  with	  the	  street,	  the	  cultural	  pedestrian	  way	  –Roodaki	  Cultural	  Pedestrian	  Way-­‐	  is	  an	  attempt	  to	  bring	  the	  spatial	  influence	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  to	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  Park	  so	  that	  it	  could	  affect	  the	  whole	  space.	  Whoever	  dominates	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  the	  Plaza,	  would	  establish	  his	  hegemony	  over	  the	  cultural	  pedestrian	  way	  and	  consequently	  the	  whole	  park.	  It	  is	  the	  government’s	  attempt,	  that	  anyone	  who	  is	  a	  threat	  to	  this	  “cultural	  environment”	  must	  leave	  the	  park.	  More	  precisely,	  it	  is	  their	  attempt	  to	  make	  one	  united	  body	  out	  of	  the	  complex-­‐of-­‐several-­‐bodies	  of	  the	  park.	  Reshaping	  the	  diagram	  of	  space	  as	  one	  body	  with	  one	  brain,	  that	  even	  if	  could	  not	  be	  posited	  at	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  park	  in	  the	  way	  the	  watchtower	  of	  the	  panopticon	  was,	  it	  could	  be	  drawn	  into	  the	  heart	  of	  the	  space	  and	  push	  abject	  constituents	  outside.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  31	  Map	  from	  Wikimapia	  	   53 The	  street	  that	  the	  Roodaki	  Cultural	  Pedestrian	  Way	  is	  supposed	  to	  pass	  through	  is	  the	  locus	  of	  many	  foreign	  embassies.	  The	  presence	  of	  policing	  forces	  at	  the	  entrance	  of	  these	  embassies	  would	  support	  the	  security	  of	  the	  cultural	  space	  to	  be	  protected	  from	  any	  suspicious	  individual.	  Inasmuch	  as	  alleys	  on	  the	  eastern	  side	  of	  the	  park	  are	  known	  to	  be	  other	  spots	  of	  gay,	  homosexuals	  and	  transsexuals	  meetings,	  the	  construction	  of	  the	  Roodaki	  Cultural	  Pedestrian	  Way	  is	  supposed	  to	  remove	  them	  from	  alleys	  nearby	  as	  well.	  	  	  Figure	  3-­‐17.	  Bringing	  the	  spatial	  influence	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  to	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  Park	  	  	  3.4 Limits	  of	  the	  Space	  of	  the	  Political	  Power	  Foucault	  remarks	  that	  the	  political	  power	  does	  whatever	  it	  can	  to	  objectify	  human	  being	  by	  intervening	  their	  space,	  their	  bodies,	  and	  subjectivities.	  Spaces	  are	  manipulated	  in	  a	  way	  to	  apply	  the	  power’s	  commands	  and	  orders	  on	  bodies	  and	  subjectivities.	  An	  assemblage,	  thus,	  forms	  as	  a	  series	  of	  limitations,	  organizes	  both	  space	  and	  constituents	  within	  as	  different	  parts	  of	  the	  same	  body	  in	  the	  framework	  of	  limitations	  produced.	  The	  abstract	  machine	  of	  the	  political	  power	  deploys	  its	  power	  over	  space	  in	  several	  stages	  including	  codifying	  its	  power	  in	  law,	  using	  law	  for	  defining	  different	  social	  groups’	  right	  to	  space,	  splitting	  people	  and	  space	  into	  smaller	  controllable	  parts,	  assigning	  policing	  forces	  to	  guard	  the	  performance	  of	  law	  and	  limiting	  people’s	  access	  to	  the	  public	  space.	  	  	  	   54 In	  The	  Right	  to	  The	  City,	  David	  Harvey	  rethinks	  the	  concept	  of	  the	  right	  to	  the	  city,	  which	  was	  introduced	  by	  Lefebvre.	  Harvey	  starts	  his	  argument	  by	  questioning	  the	  relation	  of	  the	  production	  of	  space	  and	  “well-­‐being”	  of	  human	  beings.	  “Has	  the	  astonishing	  pace	  and	  scale	  of	  urbanization	  over	  the	  last	  hundred	  years	  contribute	  to	  human	  well-­‐being?”	  (Harvey,	  2008,	  p.23)	  He	  then	  quotes	  Robert	  Park’s	  description	  of	  city	  “[The	  city	  is]	  man’s	  most	  successful	  attempt	  to	  remake	  the	  world	  he	  lives	  in	  more	  after	  his	  heart’s	  desire.	  But	  if	  the	  city	  is	  the	  world	  which	  man	  created,	  it	  is	  the	  world	  in	  which	  he	  is	  henceforth	  commanded	  to	  live.	  Thus,	  indirectly,	  and	  without	  any	  clear	  sense	  of	  the	  nature	  of	  his	  task,	  in	  making	  the	  city	  man	  has	  remade	  himself.”	  (Robert	  park,	  1967,	  p.3)	  	  Based	  on	  this	  concept	  of	  the	  association	  of	  the	  production	  of	  space	  and	  human	  being’s	  subjectivity,	  Harvey	  explains:	  “The	  right	  to	  the	  city	  is	  far	  more	  that	  the	  individual	  liberty	  to	  access	  urban	  resources.	  It	  is	  a	  right	  to	  change	  ourselves	  by	  changing	  the	  city.	  It	  is,	  moreover,	  a	  common	  rather	  than	  an	  individual	  right	  since	  this	  transformation	  inevitably	  depends	  upon	  exercise	  of	  a	  collective	  power	  to	  reshape	  the	  process	  of	  urbanization.	  The	  freedom	  to	  make	  and	  remake	  our	  cities	  and	  ourselves	  is,	  I	  want	  to	  argue,	  one	  of	  the	  most	  precious	  yet	  most	  neglected	  of	  our	  human	  rights.”	  (Harvey,	  2008,	  p.23)	  	  The	  right	  to	  the	  city’s	  first	  condition	  is	  for	  the	  subject	  to	  be	  given	  the	  right	  of	  having	  an	  urban	  life	  and	  participating	  in	  the	  process	  of	  the	  production	  of	  space.	  The	  attitude	  of	  power	  is	  based	  on	  controlling,	  limiting	  and	  guarding	  public	  spaces,	  not	  only	  limiting	  people’s	  individual	  liberty,	  but	  also	  as	  Harvey	  remarks,	  limiting	  their	  common	  evaluation.	  It	  prevents	  the	  evolution	  of	  people’s	  subjectivity	  by	  blocking	  their	  interaction	  with	  space	  and	  their	  collective	  life.	  	  	   55 Depending	  on	  the	  political	  condition	  of	  the	  society,	  the	  civil	  society	  might	  have	  the	  chance	  to	  resist	  against	  the	  political	  power	  and	  expand	  its	  domination	  over	  some	  parts	  of	  space.	  The	  civil	  society	  might	  get	  back	  some	  of	  its	  lost	  right	  in	  its	  battle	  with	  the	  political	  power,	  but	  it	  is	  not	  about	  minorities	  as	  they	  do	  not	  have	  enough	  power	  to	  be	  a	  part	  of	  the	  battle.	  Thus	  the	  right	  to	  space,	  as	  the	  common	  life	  of	  the	  whole	  society,	  can	  never	  form.	  The	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  is	  in	  contradiction	  with	  the	  right	  to	  the	  city.	  This	  is	  partly	  due	  to	  the	  political	  power’s	  direct	  intervention,	  but	  the	  role	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  in	  limiting	  the	  creation	  of	  subjectivity	  in	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  is	  the	  subject	  of	  the	  next	  chapter.	  	  	  	  	  	   56 Chapter	  4: All	  against	  One	  	  4.1 Space	  of	  Resistance	  Foucault	  explains	  that	  individuals	  and	  groups	  use	  tactics	  and	  strategies	  to	  struggle	  against	  the	  hegemony	  of	  political	  power.	  Although	  “[e]ach	  struggle	  develops	  around	  a	  particular	  source	  of	  power,	  all	  of	  them	  [struggles]	  are	  in	  line	  with	  each	  other.”	  He	  continues	  that	  in	  spite	  of	  the	  geographical	  discontinuity	  “as	  soon	  as	  we	  struggle	  against	  exploitation,	  the	  proletariat	  not	  only	  leads	  the	  struggle	  but	  also	  defines	  its	  targets”	  (Foucault	  and	  Deleuze,	  1977,	  p.216).	  Thus,	  with	  all	  the	  struggles	  that	  women,	  prisoners,	  homosexuals,	  or	  hospital	  patients	  begin,	  “they	  naturally	  enter	  as	  allies	  of	  the	  proletariats”	  (Ibid).	  Deleuze	  continues	  that	  when	  revolutionary	  acts	  “arise	  from	  the	  complaints	  and	  demands	  of	  those	  concerned	  [it]	  is	  no	  longer	  a	  reform	  but	  revolutionary	  action	  that	  questions	  (expressing	  the	  full	  force	  of	  its	  partiality)	  the	  totality	  of	  power	  and	  the	  hierarchy	  that	  maintains	  it”	  (Ibid,	  209).	  This	  revolutionary	  act,	  in	  line	  with	  the	  revolutionary	  act	  of	  proletariats	  and	  all	  others	  who	  fight	  with	  the	  particularized	  power,	  form	  an	  alliance	  between	  these	  groups.	  This	  alliance	  gives	  them	  the	  ability	  to	  question	  the	  totality	  of	  power	  and	  to	  overcome	  it.	  It	  turns	  spaces	  of	  repression,	  such	  as	  prisons,	  into	  a	  space	  of	  resistance	  against	  the	  dominant	  power.	  	  In	  spite	  of	  Deleuze	  and	  Foucault’s	  arguments	  explaining	  the	  notion	  of	  molecular	  power	  and	  the	  reproduction	  of	  macro	  power	  at	  the	  micro	  level,	  this	  conversation	  manifests	  a	  lack	  of	  attention	  to	  the	  fascistic	  power	  of	  molecular	  power.	  It	  considers	  how	  one	  type	  of	  segmentarity,	  the	  molecular	  power,	  has	  the	  potential	  to	  rise	  against	  the	  molar	  (the	  way	  social	  movements	  struggle	  with	  political	  power)	  but	  does	  not	  consider	  the	  inherent	  limitations	  of	  the	  molecular	  power	  (because	  the	  political	  power	  is	  reproduced	  at	  the	  molecular	  level	  and	  controls	  people’s	  social	  relations).	  On	  one	  hand,	  Deleuze	  and	  Foucault’s	  subject-­‐effect	  is	  described	  as	  a	  part	  of	  an	  immense	  discontinuous	  network.	  No	  matter	  if	  this	  subject	  is	  a	  minority	  or	  a	  subaltern	  or	  how	  much	  he	  is	  repressed	  or	  what	  the	  ideology	  of	  his	  society	  is,	  he	  can,	  in	  Deleuze’s	  terminology,	  make	  himself	  a	  body	  without	  organs,	  struggle	  against	  power	  and	  express	  himself	  affirmatively	  –	  and	  not	  representatively.	  The	  conversation	  does	  not	  consider	  the	  effects	  of	  years	  of	  	   57 imprisonment	  on	  a	  prisoner’s	  ability	  of	  opposition.	  It	  does	  not	  consider	  how	  decades	  of	  exploitation	  might	  have	  disarmed	  women	  or	  homosexuals	  and	  made	  them	  unable	  to	  claim	  their	  rights.	  On	  the	  other	  hand,	  the	  argument	  optimistically	  considers	  that	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  minorities’	  fight	  against	  power	  would	  be	  in	  line	  with	  each	  other,	  once	  those	  concerned	  demand	  their	  right	  and	  speak	  on	  their	  own	  behalf.	  It	  does	  not	  consider	  the	  possibility	  that	  what	  the	  civil	  society	  is	  demanding	  might	  be	  in	  contrast	  with	  that	  of	  minorities.32	  	  	  The	  condition	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  demonstrates	  that	  not	  all	  tactics	  lead	  to	  social	  change	  and	  not	  all	  struggles	  against	  power	  are	  in	  one	  direction.	  The	  diversity	  of	  tactics	  that	  different	  constituents	  deploy	  manifest	  that	  their	  spatial	  experiences	  are	  different	  and	  sometimes	  even	  in	  contrast	  with	  each	  other.	  This	  diversity	  of	  tactics,	  experiences,	  and	  therefore	  struggles	  in	  and	  over	  space,	  is	  what	  has	  been	  neglected	  in	  the	  conversation	  between	  Foucault	  and	  Deleuze.	  This	  conversation	  manifests	  explicitly	  their	  lack	  of	  attention	  to	  the	  context	  and	  the	  diversity	  of	  identities.	  In	  spaces	  of	  encounters	  and	  crisis,	  subjects	  are	  from	  different	  social,	  political,	  and	  economic	  positions.	  These	  spaces	  are	  not	  like	  prisons	  where	  all	  repressed	  people	  inside	  them	  have	  one	  reason	  for	  alliance.	  What	  prevents	  the	  formation	  of	  alliance	  between	  different	  social	  groups	  in	  these	  spaces	  is	  not	  only	  the	  molar	  class	  differences	  on	  the	  domination	  of	  policing	  forces,	  but	  also	  the	  molecular	  power	  that	  rules	  social	  interactions	  of	  people	  in	  their	  everyday	  lives.	  Everyday	  lives	  of	  different	  constituents,	  thus,	  are	  not	  a	  banal	  context	  to	  be	  filled	  with	  positive	  social	  relations	  that	  can	  bring	  mutual	  understanding.	  Rather	  it	  is	  pre-­‐occupied	  and	  pre-­‐constructed	  as	  a	  part	  of	  the	  social	  structure	  and	  is	  affected	  by	  the	  molar	  power	  of	  the	  state.	  The	  hierarchical	  structure	  of	  the	  society	  that	  has	  put	  different	  classes	  and	  social	  groups	  in	  the	  midst	  of	  each	  other	  has	  reproduced	  itself	  at	  the	  molar	  level	  and	  is	  supported	  by	  the	  upper	  classes	  and	  those	  of	  higher	  status.	  I	  want	  to	  argue	  that	  the	  molecular	  power	  that	  regulates	  the	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  32	  In	  their	  conversation,	  Deleuze	  and	  Foucault	  argue	  (Foucault	  and	  Deleuze,	  1977),	  the	  proletariats	  struggle	  with	  power	  as	  the	  leading	  political	  struggle	  in	  each	  society.	  My	  research	  does	  not	  intend	  to	  argue	  the	  leading	  role	  of	  proletariats	  struggle	  in	  other	  social	  movements.	  My	  only	  aim	  is	  to	  show	  the	  contradiction	  of	  the	  majority	  of	  the	  civil	  society’s	  struggle	  with	  power	  with	  that	  of	  minorities,	  to	  show	  the	  conflict	  between	  their	  expectations	  of	  public	  spaces.	  I	  also	  intend	  to	  suggest	  that	  the	  opposition	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  with	  minorities	  of	  the	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  reflects	  the	  same	  opposition	  in	  the	  totality	  of	  Iranian	  society.	  This	  opposition	  not	  only	  prevents	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  to	  act	  as	  a	  public	  space	  of	  resistance,	  but	  also	  prevents	  the	  public	  sphere	  of	  the	  society	  to	  form.	  	  	   58 relations	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  minorities	  is	  no	  less	  repressive	  than	  the	  authority	  of	  the	  state.	  This	  way	  the	  civil	  society,	  by	  following	  the	  political	  power’s	  attitude	  in	  colonizing	  minorities,	  bans	  not	  only	  minorities’	  right	  to	  public	  spaces,	  but	  also	  themselves’	  –as	  the	  right	  to	  space	  is	  a	  common	  and	  therefore	  mutual	  right.	  A	  meticulous	  study	  of	  the	  different	  tactics	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  deploy	  and	  comparing	  their	  tactics	  and	  ideals	  with	  that	  of	  the	  state	  are	  a	  means	  of	  proving	  my	  claim.	  	  4.2 Encounters:	  Tactics,	  Actions	  and	  Conceptions	  4.2.1 Civil	  Society	  versus	  the	  Political	  Power	  The	  civil	  society,	  as	  I	  tried	  to	  emphasize,	  is	  a	  complex	  composition	  of	  different	  groups	  and	  classes.	  We	  cannot	  identify	  the	  civil	  society	  by	  referring	  to	  one	  unified	  set	  of	  actions,	  tactics,	  and	  conceptions.	  The	  civil	  society	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  divided	  to	  two	  major	  poles:	  people	  who	  are	  affiliated	  with	  the	  City	  Theater,	  either	  as	  artists	  or	  as	  patrons	  of	  art;	  and	  people	  who	  are	  not	  affiliated	  with	  the	  City	  Theater,	  such	  as	  families	  and	  the	  elderly,	  who	  usually	  occupy	  the	  eastern	  side	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  former	  spends	  most	  of	  its	  time	  in	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  is	  one	  of	  the	  two	  groups	  that	  have	  the	  park	  as	  a	  symbol	  of	  their	  identity	  –the	  other	  group	  is	  homosexuals.	  That	  is	  why	  they	  are	  directly	  influenced	  by	  the	  interventions	  of	  political	  power	  in	  the	  park.	  The	  custodians	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  have	  a	  power	  that	  distinguishes	  them	  from	  other	  groups	  of	  the	  civil	  society;	  this	  power	  lets	  them	  resist	  against	  the	  municipality’s	  policies.	  In	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  I	  explained	  how	  the	  City	  Theater	  artists	  claimed	  their	  disagreement	  with	  the	  municipality’s	  decisions	  and	  forced	  the	  municipality	  to	  revise	  their	  decisions.	  The	  power	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  has	  forced	  the	  municipality	  to	  consult	  with	  the	  City	  Theater	  custodians	  about	  spatial	  intervention	  in	  the	  park.	  But	  patrons	  of	  the	  arts	  and	  students	  that	  use	  the	  area	  around	  the	  building	  for	  their	  gatherings	  and	  meetings	  do	  not	  have	  the	  same	  power.	  They	  cannot	  claim	  their	  right	  to	  space	  and	  have	  their	  institutions	  to	  support	  them.	  	  	  Moreover,	  the	  civil	  society	  has	  tried	  to	  expand	  its	  domination	  over	  space	  by	  competing	  with	  the	  political	  power	  over	  occupying	  the	  plaza	  in	  front	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  representing	  their	  identity	  there.	  The	  political	  power	  has	  tried	  to	  occupy	  the	  plaza	  through	  different	  ways,	  	   59 including	  assigning	  policing	  forces	  in	  the	  area	  in	  the	  event	  of	  political	  protests	  or	  ceremonies,	  performing	  religious	  street	  theater,	  cultural	  exhibitions,	  etc.	  However,	  artists	  have	  never	  agreed	  with	  the	  municipality	  on	  its	  interventions.	  One	  of	  the	  artists	  of	  the	  City	  Theater,	  in	  his	  interview	  with	  Mehr	  News,	  criticizes	  the	  municipality’s	  action	  in	  the	  plaza	  and	  says	  that	  these	  exhibitions	  are	  irrelevant	  to	  the	  cultural	  environment	  of	  the	  City	  Theater.	  He	  continues	  that	  in	  spite	  of	  the	  artists’	  society	  objection,	  the	  municipality	  has	  not	  stopped	  its	  cultural	  intervention	  in	  this	  area.	  Even	  though	  that	  the	  civil	  society	  complains	  that	  they	  have	  not	  participated	  in	  decision-­‐making	  about	  the	  park,	  the	  artists	  are	  still	  the	  most	  powerful	  group	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  among	  minorities	  in	  the	  park.	  	  	  The	  area	  around	  the	  city	  theater	  and	  in	  front	  of	  the	  park	  in	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Street	  is	  also	  one	  of	  the	  focal	  points	  of	  political	  protest	  by	  the	  civil	  society.	  Most	  of	  the	  participants	  of	  the	  political	  actions	  in	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  crossroad	  and	  in	  front	  of	  the	  park	  are	  not	  necessarily	  permanent	  constituents	  of	  the	  park,	  which	  can	  improve	  the	  social-­‐political	  importance	  of	  this	  space	  in	  the	  struggle	  between	  the	  political	  power	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  of	  the	  city	  at	  a	  greater	  scale.	  During	  the	  lead	  up	  to	  the	  presidential	  elections	  in	  June	  2013,	  the	  plaza	  was	  the	  focal	  point	  of	  the	  political	  activities	  of	  supporters	  of	  different	  candidates.	  Previously,	  the	  plaza	  was	  also	  the	  place	  where	  the	  tensions	  between	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  state	  appeared.	  	  	   60 	  Figure	  4-­‐1.	  Top-­‐left:	  8	  March	  2006,	  feminists	  rally,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad33	  Figure	  4-­‐2.	  Top-­‐right:	  June	  2013,	  moderate	  Islamists	  and	  reformists’	  candidates	  supporters,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad34	  Figure	  4-­‐3.	  Bottom-­‐left:	  June	  2013,	  fundamentalists’	  candidate	  supporters,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad35	  Figure	  4-­‐4.	  Bottom-­‐right:	  June	  2013,	  moderate	  Islamists	  and	  reformists’	  candidates	  supporters,	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad36	  	  The	  elderly	  and	  families,	  most	  of	  who	  live	  in	  the	  neighborhood	  around	  the	  park,	  barely	  come	  into	  conflict	  with	  power.	  They	  try	  to	  be	  as	  ignorant	  as	  possible	  to	  whatever	  is	  going	  on	  around	  them.	  When	  they	  notice	  a	  conflict	  between	  policing	  forces	  and	  other	  users,	  or	  between	  other	  social	  groups,	  they	  barely	  intervene.	  Furthermore,	  they	  believe	  that	  the	  presence	  of	  the	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  33	  	  Photo	  by	  Arash	  Ashoorinia,	  http://www.khosoof.com/,	  the	  permission	  is	  obtained.	  34	  	  Photo	  by	  Fatemeh	  Behboudi,	  http://www.en.mehrnews.com/,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted. 35	  Photo	  by	  Hadi	  Hirbodvash,	  http://english.farsnews.com,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted. 36	  Photo	  by	  Fatemeh	  Behboudi,	  http://www.en.mehrnews.com/,	  the	  use	  of	  the	  website	  content	  is	  permissible	  with	  the	  source	  quoted.	  	   61 policing	  forces	  can	  guarantee	  the	  security	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  police	  office	  is	  located	  near	  the	  playground	  and	  police	  officers	  and	  park	  guards	  walk	  around	  the	  area	  two	  or	  three	  times	  in	  the	  rush	  hours	  of	  the	  evening	  and	  banish	  suspicious	  people,	  particularly	  young	  men.	  Families	  themselves	  collaborate	  with	  policing	  forces	  and	  report	  to	  them	  the	  existence	  of	  suspicious	  persons,	  or	  young	  bachelor	  men	  in	  the	  playground,	  so	  the	  police	  can	  come	  and	  expel	  them.	  	  4.2.2 Minorities	  versus	  the	  Political	  Power	  	  For	  the	  political	  power,	  the	  presence	  of	  homosexuals	  in	  the	  park	  is	  a	  “social	  harm.”	  The	  Director	  of	  Social	  and	  Cultural	  Affairs	  of	  the	  Fourth	  Area	  of	  Tehran	  Municipality	  says:	  “the	  most	  important	  social	  harm	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  is	  the	  presence	  of	  two	  groups	  of	  people	  with	  sexual	  disorders	  [homosexuals	  and	  transsexuals]	  and	  also	  runaways	  and	  prostitutes	  that	  could	  be	  categorized	  under	  the	  same	  category.”	  (Mehrnews.com)	  	  Such	  a	  point	  of	  view	  has	  caused	  the	  removal	  of	  minorities	  to	  be	  one	  of	  the	  major	  priorities	  of	  the	  political	  power	  in	  its	  plans	  for	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  What	  power	  do	  minorities	  have	  to	  resist	  against	  the	  political	  power	  or	  to	  claim	  a	  battle	  against	  it?	  It	  depends	  on	  the	  particular	  social	  condition	  of	  that	  minority	  group	  in	  the	  society,	  but	  in	  the	  case	  of	  this	  park,	  it	  can	  claim	  none.	  Neither	  homosexuals	  nor	  subalterns	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  have	  a	  way	  undertake	  the	  act	  of	  resistance.	  As	  for	  subalterns,	  they	  usually	  come	  from	  slums	  around	  Tehran.	  They	  do	  not	  have	  a	  union	  or	  syndicate	  to	  protect	  their	  rights.	  Some	  of	  them	  are	  Afghan	  refugees	  and	  do	  not	  have	  an	  ID	  card.	  As	  precarious	  as	  their	  position	  is,	  they	  prefer	  to	  avoid	  encounter	  with	  policing	  forces;	  even	  though	  occasionally	  the	  municipality	  and	  policing	  forces	  try	  to	  remove	  them	  from	  space	  as	  their	  existence	  is	  annoying	  and	  undesirable	  for	  users	  of	  this	  public	  space.	  	  As	  for	  gay	  homosexuals,	  the	  main	  minority	  group	  of	  the	  park	  whose	  identity	  is	  tied	  up	  with	  the	  park,	  we	  can	  hardly	  talk	  about	  their	  act	  of	  resistance	  as	  well.	  They	  cannot	  come	  into	  discussion	  with	  the	  municipality	  or	  artists’	  society	  over	  their	  right	  to	  space;	  neither	  can	  they	  occupy	  the	  plaza	  and	  hoist	  their	  flags.	  The	  park	  is	  a	  symbol	  of	  their	  identity	  and	  their	  presence	  in	  the	  park	  is	  as	  historical	  as	  the	  artists	  -­‐	  and	  even	  more	  so	  -­‐	  but	  they	  cannot	  reveal	  their	  identity	  as	  it	  will	  	   62 cost	  them	  penalties.	  After	  president	  Ahmadinejad’s	  denial	  of	  the	  existence	  of	  homosexuals	  in	  Iran,	  Reza,	  a	  gay	  homosexual,	  in	  his	  interview	  with	  The	  New	  York	  Times	  on	  29	  September	  2007,	  indicated	  that	  to	  be	  a	  homosexual	  in	  Iran,	  one	  has	  to	  hide	  his	  identity	  even	  from	  his	  or	  her	  own	  family.	  He	  continued	  by	  stating,	  “you	  can	  have	  a	  secret	  gay	  life	  as	  long	  as	  you	  don’t	  become	  an	  activist	  and	  start	  demanding	  rights”	  a	  problem	  that	  Reza	  truly	  understands	  is	  not	  only	  that	  of	  homosexuals	  but	  other	  minority	  and	  subaltern	  groups	  such	  as	  “workers	  and	  feminists”	  As	  well.	  Keeping	  “a	  low	  profile”	  is	  the	  only	  way	  for	  homosexuals	  to	  live	  in	  peace	  in	  Iran	  and	  as	  New	  York	  Times	  stated,	  it	  was	  probably	  for	  the	  best	  that	  the	  president	  denied	  the	  existence	  of	  homosexuals	  in	  Iran	  because	  this	  might	  help	  them	  to	  be	  left	  alone.37	  	  4.2.3 The	  Civil	  Society	  versus	  Minorities	  The	  civil	  society,	  with	  all	  the	  power	  it	  has,	  is	  another	  force	  for	  colonizing	  minorities.	  The	  majority	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  demands	  for	  either	  the	  removal	  of	  minorities	  from	  space	  or	  the	  separation	  of	  their	  own	  space.	  The	  battle	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  against	  the	  political	  power	  is	  not	  in	  line	  with	  the	  minorities’	  resistance.	  Thus,	  the	  minorities	  have	  to	  resist	  against	  both	  poles	  of	  power,	  state	  and	  the	  civil	  society,	  at	  the	  same	  time.	  Even	  though	  they	  have	  to	  resist	  against	  both	  poles	  of	  power,	  they	  do	  not	  have	  the	  “power”	  to	  initiate	  a	  struggle	  or	  a	  protest.	  They	  have	  to	  deploy	  certain	  tactics	  so	  they	  can	  remain	  in	  space	  under	  the	  existing	  circumstances.	  	  For	  the	  civil	  society,	  as	  for	  the	  political	  power,	  the	  presence	  of	  homosexuals	  is	  the	  most	  important	  problem	  of	  the	  park.	  Their	  presence	  is	  a	  social	  issue	  and	  the	  government	  should	  separate	  them	  from	  the	  rest	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park.	  They	  are	  even	  a	  bigger	  problem	  for	  the	  social	  health	  of	  the	  park,	  than	  drug	  dealers	  and	  addicts.	  According	  to	  the	  Mehr	  News	  report,	  68	  men	  and	  32	  women	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  were	  asked	  in	  a	  survey	  about	  their	  opinion	  of	  the	  most	  important	  problems	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  results	  showed	  that	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  believe	  that	  the	  presence	  of	  people	  with	  "sexual	  disorders"	  is	  the	  most	  important	  problem	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  participant	  announced	  the	  presence	  of	  "drug	  dealers	  and	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  37	  http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/30/world/middleeast/30gays.html?_r=0	  	   63 addicts"	  and	  "child	  laborers"	  to	  be	  the	  second	  and	  the	  third	  important	  problems	  that	  the	  park	  is	  faced	  with.38	  	  These	  "social	  issues"	  have	  had	  a	  negative	  influence	  on	  the	  reputation	  of	  the	  park	  and	  caused	  people	  to	  state	  they	  are	  not	  so	  willing	  to	  come	  to	  this	  space.	  In	  the	  same	  report	  by	  Mehr	  News,	  a	  woman	  who	  lives	  in	  the	  neighborhood	  states	  that	  the	  park	  has	  brought	  many	  social	  issues	  to	  their	  neighborhood	  and	  "her	  student	  daughter	  is	  afraid	  of	  passing	  through	  the	  park."	  Moreover,	  a	  social	  researcher	  who	  has	  worked	  on	  the	  park	  says:	  "many	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  suffer	  from	  mental	  disorders;	  they	  endanger	  the	  security	  of	  the	  park	  and	  even	  a	  veiled	  woman	  cannot	  feel	  secure	  in	  this	  apace"	  (mehrnews.com).	  Having	  all	  these	  in	  mind,	  one	  would	  be	  surprised	  to	  see	  the	  dense	  population	  of	  the	  park.	  However,	  this	  density	  is	  divided	  into	  smaller	  groups	  that	  avoid	  interacting	  with	  each	  other.	  	  One	  cannot	  even	  make	  sure	  why	  the	  civil	  society	  is	  so	  afraid	  of	  the	  presence	  of	  homosexuals	  and	  subalterns.	  The	  presence	  of	  subalterns	  probably	  presents	  the	  civil	  society	  with	  a	  moral	  challenge.	  It	  shows	  them	  the	  undesirable	  naked	  face	  of	  the	  class	  division	  in	  their	  society.	  The	  civil	  society	  also	  feels	  and	  talks	  about	  this	  feeling	  in	  its	  daily	  conversations,	  that	  it	  is	  not	  "civilized"	  having	  subalterns	  in	  the	  urban	  landscape	  of	  their	  city.	  However,	  their	  problem	  with	  homosexuals	  and	  transsexuals	  is	  different.	  A	  theater	  student	  that	  comes	  to	  the	  City	  Theater	  for	  three	  or	  four	  times	  a	  week	  says:	  "coming	  into	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  means	  that	  you	  are	  attaching	  yourself	  to	  a	  series	  of	  social	  problems.	  Although	  I	  come	  here	  often,	  I	  have	  never	  gone	  to	  the	  other	  side	  of	  the	  park."	  Another	  user	  of	  the	  park	  believes	  that	  one	  has	  to	  avoid	  having	  eye	  contact	  with	  people	  in	  this	  park;	  “if	  you	  look	  people	  in	  the	  eye,	  they	  think	  you	  are	  one	  of	  them"	  (mehrnews.com).	  	  In	  21	  February	  2010,	  a	  blogger	  wrote	  in	  his	  weblog	  “Coffee	  and	  Cigarette”	  a	  post	  entitled	  “Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  forbidden.”	  In	  his	  post,	  he	  mentioned	  that	  currently	  he	  had	  noticed	  the	  presence	  of	  homosexuals	  in	  the	  park.	  He	  had	  realized	  this	  fact	  by	  paying	  attention	  to	  the	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  38	  http://www.mehrnews.com/detail/news/2083749	  (In	  Persian,	  translation	  by	  the	  author)	  	   64 "disgusting	  faces"	  of	  "men	  [who]	  put	  on	  makeup."	  He	  thought	  that	  homosexuals	  “look	  at	  all	  guys	  as	  if	  they	  are	  one	  of	  them”	  and	  it	  is	  "embarrassing"	  passing	  by	  them.	  He	  continued	  by	  asking,	  "Is	  it	  morally	  correct	  to	  have	  these	  disorders	  in	  the	  cultural	  environment	  of	  the	  City	  Theater?"	  and	  he	  suggested	  to	  the	  artists'	  society	  to	  "move	  the	  City	  Theater	  to	  another	  place."	  Fifteen	  of	  the	  whole	  23	  people	  that	  commented	  on	  this	  post	  approved	  his	  point	  of	  view.	  They	  believed	  that	  even	  if	  homosexuals	  are	  some	  "sick	  people"	  who	  must	  be	  helped,	  their	  presence	  in	  a	  cultural	  public	  space	  that	  all	  "normal	  people"	  come	  and	  go	  to	  is	  undesirable.	  Three	  of	  the	  comments	  were	  neutral	  and	  among	  5	  others	  that	  opposed	  the	  blogger's	  opinion,	  three	  of	  them	  were	  homosexual	  and	  two	  others	  showed	  only	  a	  sympathy	  with	  homosexuals	  rather	  than	  defending	  their	  rights	  (ohhumans.wordpress.com).	  	  	  The	  artists	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  are	  even	  more	  unsatisfied	  with	  the	  social	  problems	  due	  to	  the	  diversity	  of	  the	  population	  of	  the	  park.	  They	  usually	  refuse	  to	  go	  to	  the	  eastern	  side	  of	  the	  park.	  Even	  in	  their	  literature,	  they	  distinguish	  between	  the	  two	  parts	  of	  the	  park;	  when	  they	  say	  "the	  park”	  they	  mean	  the	  eastern	  side	  of	  the	  park.	  They	  avoid	  interacting	  with	  other	  people	  in	  the	  park	  and	  usually	  come	  and	  go	  at	  certain	  times.	  They	  want	  to	  be	  separated	  from	  others.	  In	  his	  interview	  with	  Mehrnews,	  Hussein	  Mosafer,	  a	  theater	  artist,	  objects	  to	  the	  adjacency	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  He	  mentions	  that	  about	  a	  decade	  ago	  the	  City	  Theater	  custodians	  suggested	  the	  construction	  of	  an	  artistic	  wall	  to	  separate	  the	  building	  from	  its	  environment.	  He	  continues	  by	  stating	  that	  this	  suggestion	  was	  not	  accepted	  by	  the	  municipality	  because	  the	  City	  Theater	  artists	  have	  not	  participated	  enough	  in	  decision-­‐makings.	  	  The	  civil	  society's	  intension	  in	  removing	  "social	  issues"	  form	  the	  face	  of	  the	  park	  is	  even	  severer	  than	  that	  of	  the	  state.	  In	  spite	  of	  the	  ongoing	  battle	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  state,	  they	  are	  each	  other's	  allies	  when	  they	  want	  to	  remove	  minorities.	  The	  cultural	  hierarchy	  of	  the	  Islamic	  republic,	  which	  is	  defined	  around	  the	  pivot	  of	  the	  normative	  self,	  has	  influenced	  the	  civil	  society	  in	  molecular	  level.	  The	  abstract	  machine	  of	  the	  political	  power	  has	  reproduced	  its	  several	  regimes	  of	  signs	  in	  different	  levels	  and	  colonized	  subjects	  by	  forcing	  them	  to	  obey	  it,	  either	  intentionally	  or	  unintentionally.	  	   65 	  Minorities	  on	  the	  other	  hand,	  and	  as	  I	  said	  before,	  do	  not	  have	  the	  power	  to	  initiate	  a	  struggle.	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  a	  symbol	  of	  gays'	  identity	  in	  Tehran,	  is	  among	  the	  most	  famous	  parks	  in	  Tehran	  “where	  gays	  meet	  and	  where	  gay	  prostitutes	  seek	  customers.	  ‘It	  does	  not	  take	  them	  even	  10	  minutes	  to	  get	  picked	  up,'	  said	  Amir,	  24,	  a	  graphic	  designer	  who	  is	  gay.	  'There	  are	  men	  from	  every	  class,'	  he	  said.	  'Some	  of	  them	  are	  bisexual	  and	  call	  it	  being	  naughty’”	  (nytimes.com).	  However,	  they	  are	  free,	  as	  long	  as	  they	  are	  keeping	  their	  gay	  life	  a	  secret	  from	  not	  only	  the	  government	  but	  also,	  their	  families,	  relatives	  and	  society.	  They	  codify	  their	  identity	  and	  hide	  behind	  their	  codes.	  They	  do	  not	  talk	  affirmatively	  because	  they	  are	  not	  legitimate	  beings.	  They	  represent	  their	  existence	  in	  the	  form	  of	  codes,	  and	  they	  codify	  their	  space	  as	  well.	  For	  going	  inside	  their	  society	  it	  is	  not	  only	  enough	  to	  know	  their	  codes;	  one	  has	  to	  have	  their	  codes	  like	  tattoos	  on	  a	  body.	  	  	  For	  homosexuals	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  every	  bench	  and	  spot	  in	  the	  Park,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  behavior	  of	  people	  of	  their	  society,	  has	  specific	  meaning.	  For	  example,	  those	  who	  take	  off	  their	  shoes	  and	  sit	  on	  a	  bench	  crossing	  their	  legs	  are	  thought	  to	  be	  pimps	  or	  pederasts.39	  These	  people	  are	  fixed	  users	  of	  the	  Park,	  sitting	  in	  almost	  the	  same	  spots	  every	  day;	  but	  if	  someone	  tries	  to	  ask	  about	  their	  identity,	  they	  would	  deny	  their	  identity	  and	  even	  complain	  about	  the	  inappropriate	  cultural	  environment	  of	  the	  park.	  Even	  though	  they	  have	  to	  codify	  their	  identity,	  they	  have	  their	  own	  story	  of	  space.	  Hamed,	  the	  administrator	  of	  the	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  page	  of	  Facebook	  (the	  one	  that	  defends	  LGBT's	  rights)	  says:	  “I	  did	  not	  know	  that	  there	  was	  such	  a	  place	  where	  gays	  find	  each	  other.	  One	  day	  my	  brother	  told	  me	  about	  the	  Park.	  Neither	  my	  brother	  nor	  other	  members	  of	  my	  family	  knew	  I	  am	  [a]	  gay.	  But	  I	  was	  so	  happy	  that	  I	  have	  finally	  found	  somewhere	  to	  find	  other	  homosexuals.”	  He	  continues,	  saying	  that	  he	  has	  memories	  of	  all	  areas	  of	  the	  Park,	  as	  he	  had	  many	  relationships	  with	  people	  who	  have	  met	  here	  for	  several	  years.	  However,	  just	  like	  many	  other	  homosexuals,	  he	  thinks	  that	  the	  Park	  is	  no	  more	  a	  secure	  place	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  39	  The	  semiology	  of	  the	  park	  has	  never	  been	  comprehensively	  studied.	  However,	  permanent	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  are	  usually	  aware	  of	  the	  meaning	  of	  these	  signs.	  My	  interpretation	  of	  a	  semiology	  of	  the	  park	  is	  based	  on	  my	  own	  observation	  and	  conversations	  with	  different	  constituents,	  particularly	  with	  homosexuals	  or	  those	  who	  had	  any	  kind	  of	  sexual	  relation	  or	  affair	  with	  homosexuals	  of	  the	  park.	  	   66 for	  them	  to	  come:	  “the	  policing	  forces	  are	  always	  there.	  But	  the	  main	  danger	  comes	  from	  pimps	  and	  abusers.	  That	  is	  why	  I	  do	  not	  come	  to	  the	  Park	  anymore”	  (facebook.com).	  	  	  Homosexuals	  have	  their	  own	  narrative	  of	  space.	  They	  find	  each	  other	  easily	  and,	  in	  spite	  of	  what	  other	  people	  say,	  they	  do	  not	  intend	  to	  pick	  up	  people	  outside	  their	  society,	  as	  it	  will	  reveal	  their	  identity.	  Probably	  pimps	  would	  do	  that,	  but	  they	  are	  a	  problem	  for	  homosexuals	  themselves.	  However,	  no	  one	  even	  pays	  attention	  to	  what	  threatens	  their	  lives	  and	  their	  right	  to	  space;	  instead,	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  state	  consider	  their	  existence	  a	  threat	  for	  normative	  selves.	  In	  codifying	  their	  identity,	  homosexuals	  destroy	  the	  slightest	  possibility	  that	  their	  narrative	  might	  be	  read	  by	  others.	  However,	  by	  preventing	  minorities’	  right	  to	  space,	  the	  civil	  society	  limits	  its	  right	  to	  space	  as	  well.	  I	  will	  come	  back	  to	  this	  point	  in	  the	  next	  chapter.	  	  	  4.3 Suppressor	  Utopias	  The	  conceptions	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  and	  their	  statements	  that	  I	  have	  mentioned	  so	  far,	  suggest	  their	  mental	  maps	  of	  their	  ideal	  space.	  These	  maps	  mainly	  represent	  the	  ideal	  spaces	  of	  artists	  and	  patrons	  of	  the	  arts,	  and	  reveal	  that	  the	  park	  is	  a	  symbol	  of	  their	  identity	  and	  a	  part	  of	  the	  narrative	  of	  their	  daily	  lives.	  On	  the	  other	  hand,	  political	  power	  has	  been	  intervening	  in	  the	  spatial	  organization	  of	  the	  park	  according	  to	  its	  ideal	  map.	  The	  comparison	  of	  the	  ideal	  maps	  of	  the	  political	  power	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  can	  better	  show	  the	  cooperation	  of	  molar	  and	  molecular	  power	  in	  colonizing	  minorities	  and	  limiting	  their	  access	  to	  public	  space.	  	  	   67 4.3.1 The	  Political	  Power’s	  Utopia	  	  Figure	  4-­‐5.	  The	  municipal	  plan	  for	  Daneshjoo	  Park:	  the	  political	  power’s	  ideal	  map	  	  The	  first	  diagram,	  the	  diagram	  of	  Tehran’s	  Municipal	  master	  plan	  for	  the	  park,	  shows	  the	  ideal	  map	  of	  the	  political	  power	  	  as	  I	  explained	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter.	  The	  map	  is	  based	  on	  two	  principles	  followed	  by	  political	  power	  in	  dealing	  with	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park:	  removing	  minorities	  and	  controlling	  civil	  society.	  In	  order	  to	  fulfill	  these	  objectives,	  the	  municipality	  has	  followed	  a	  plan	  to	  turn	  the	  multi-­‐layered	  composition	  of	  the	  park	  into	  one	  united	  body.	  The	  united	  body	  of	  the	  park	  is	  supposed	  to	  eliminate	  conflicts	  by	  expanding	  one	  set	  of	  norms	  through	  different	  parts	  of	  the	  park.	  As	  it	  is	  marked	  in	  the	  map,	  by	  constructing	  the	  Rudaki	  Cultural	  Pedestrian	  Way,	  they	  want	  to	  let	  the	  “brain's”	  [the	  City	  Theatre]	  orders	  flow	  through	  the	  body	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  municipality	  hopes	  that	  if	  the	  City	  Theater	  users'	  came	  to	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  park,	  minorities	  would	  be	  forced	  to	  leave	  because	  they	  would	  lose	  their	  territories.	  This	  is	  far	  more	  intelligent	  than	  the	  idea	  of	  the	  construction	  of	  an	  artistic	  wall	  between	  two	  parts	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  pedestrian	  way,	  which	  would	  be	  marked	  by	  artwork	  and	  sculpture	  is	  supposed	  to	  bring	  most	  of	  the	  park	  and	  the	  area	  around	  it	  under	  control.	  Such	  a	  totalitarian	  attitude	  can	  transform	  molar	  power	  into	  molecular	  power;	  so	  the	  abstract	  machine’s	  commands	  would	  influence	  people’s	  social	  interactions.	  It	  would	  not	  be	  completely	  understandable	  until	  we	  noticed	  that	  in	  Iran	  theaters	  work	  under	  the	  supervision	  of	  the	  Ministry	  of	  Islamic	  Culture	  and	  the	  battle	  of	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  state	  exists	  even	  at	  the	  level	  of	  the	  custodians	  of	  the	  City	  Theater.	  By	  bringing	  the	  whole	  park	  under	  the	  hegemony	  of	  the	  City	  Theater,	  whoever	  could	  	   68 have	  the	  cultural	  domination	  on	  the	  ministry	  and	  institutions	  working	  under	  its	  supervision,	  would	  have	  their	  hegemony	  over	  space	  and	  molecular	  social	  interactions	  of	  constituents.	  	  	  4.3.2 The	  Civil	  Society’s	  Utopia	  In	  1998	  the	  Iranian	  Artists'	  House	  (Khane	  Honarmandan)	  was	  built	  in	  the	  Artists’	  Park.	  The	  Iranian	  Artists’	  House	  building	  is	  a	  cultural	  complex	  composed	  of	  Theater	  and	  multi-­‐functional	  salons	  and	  art	  galleries.	  The	  building	  is	  the	  renovation	  of	  an	  existing	  building	  from	  the	  first	  Pahlavi	  period.	  The	  area	  around	  it	  was	  also	  a	  private	  garden	  in	  the	  previous	  regime,	  which	  was	  renovated	  as	  a	  public	  park	  in	  1996.	  The	  building	  is	  located	  at	  the	  heart	  of	  the	  park.	  The	  location	  of	  the	  site	  in	  an	  upper	  middle	  class	  neighborhood	  than	  that	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  and	  the	  extroverted	  characteristic	  of	  the	  building	  are	  important	  elements	  in	  the	  deeper	  connection	  between	  the	  park	  and	  the	  cultural	  facilities.	  The	  Artists'	  Park	  constituents	  are	  mostly	  artists	  and	  art	  students;	  this	  homogeneity	  distinguishes	  the	  park	  and	  the	  condition	  of	  the	  building	  within	  it	  from	  Danehsjoo	  Park	  and	  the	  condition	  of	  the	  City	  Theater.	  After	  its	  construction,	  the	  building	  and	  the	  environment	  of	  the	  park	  around	  it	  were	  admired	  by	  the	  artists’	  society	  and	  were	  compared	  with	  the	  environment	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  The	  Artists’	  House	  has	  also	  a	  café	  and	  restaurant	  that	  famous	  celebrities	  and	  patrons	  of	  artists	  use	  frequently.	  This	  is	  completely	  in	  contradiction	  with	  the	  food	  outlets	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  which	  no	  celebrity	  uses.	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  4-­‐6.	  Artists’	  ideal	  park	  	  	   69 Based	  on	  the	  artists'	  society's	  ideal	  space,	  their	  ideal	  map	  for	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  could	  be	  drawn	  as	  the	  image	  above:	  a	  homogeneous	  space	  in	  which	  all	  actions	  take	  place	  under	  the	  shadow	  of	  the	  City	  Theater.	  This	  objective	  requires	  the	  building	  to	  be	  more	  extroverted	  and	  to	  ‘move’	  to	  the	  middle	  of	  the	  park,	  so	  it	  can	  converse	  with	  the	  environment	  and	  influence	  it	  from	  all	  directions.	  This	  desire	  suggests	  a	  different	  attitude	  from	  that	  governing	  the	  objective	  of	  the	  architect	  of	  the	  building.	  The	  architects'	  aim,	  as	  I	  quoted	  in	  the	  previous	  chapter,	  was	  to	  make	  a	  building	  visible	  from	  everywhere.	  But	  the	  artists'	  society	  wants	  to	  have	  a	  building	  where	  everything	  could	  be	  under	  its	  supervision,	  like	  the	  watchtower	  of	  the	  panopticon.	  The	  totalitarian	  attitude	  of	  the	  municipality's	  map	  is	  remarkable	  in	  this	  map	  as	  well:	  removing	  narratives	  of	  minorities,	  making	  a	  one	  body-­‐brain	  out	  of	  the	  diversity	  of	  narratives,	  and	  transforming	  molar	  into	  molecular.	  Both	  of	  the	  maps	  follow	  a	  similar	  colonial	  attitude;	  however,	  the	  municipality's	  map	  is	  practical	  while	  the	  artists'	  one	  is	  ideal.	  Nevertheless,	  the	  City	  Theater	  custodians	  have	  accepted	  the	  municipality's	  plan;	  a	  decision	  that	  shows	  how	  deeply	  the	  ideals	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  state	  about	  the	  removal	  of	  minorities	  are	  in	  line.	  It	  also	  shows	  how	  both	  state	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  intend	  to	  control	  each	  other;	  because	  in	  both	  of	  the	  maps,	  whoever	  has	  the	  domination	  over	  the	  cultural	  policies	  of	  the	  City	  Theater	  would	  be	  the	  one	  and	  only	  voice	  in	  its	  environment	  as	  well.	  	  4.3.3 All	  against	  One	  There	  is	  no	  guarantee	  that	  even	  if	  any	  of	  the	  ideal	  maps	  were	  realized	  in	  the	  park,	  the	  objectives	  would	  be	  accomplished.	  The	  importance	  of	  the	  ideal	  maps	  is	  that	  they	  give	  a	  basis	  for	  comparing	  the	  political	  power	  and	  the	  civil	  society’s	  ideas	  about	  the	  presence	  of	  minorities	  in	  space.	  They	  show	  how	  the	  majority	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  of	  the	  park	  is	  against	  the	  presence	  of	  minorities.	  They	  also	  show	  that	  even	  though	  artists	  are	  repressed	  by	  the	  political	  powers	  and	  are	  limited	  by	  censorship	  laws,	  when	  it	  comes	  to	  their	  coexistence	  with	  minorities	  in	  the	  same	  space,	  they	  are	  willing	  to	  collaborate	  with	  their	  own	  enemy,	  the	  political	  power,	  to	  remove	  minorities.	  This	  is	  the	  main	  reason	  why	  Foucault	  and	  Deleuze's	  prediction	  cannot	  come	  true	  in	  this	  case,	  the	  alliance	  between	  the	  minorities	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  is	  far	  weaker	  that	  the	  alliance	  between	  civil	  society	  and	  political	  power.	  The	  political	  power	  has	  gained	  this	  alliance	  by	  	   70 keeping	  some	  groups	  as	  minorities,	  pushing	  them	  to	  the	  margins	  of	  the	  public	  sphere,	  and	  distinguishing	  them	  from	  the	  civil	  society.	  This	  strategy	  of	  the	  political	  power	  has	  nullified	  public	  spaces	  and	  has	  limited	  their	  potential	  for	  the	  creation	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  the	  evaluation	  of	  social	  consciousness.	  Public	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  in	  which	  crisis	  is	  the	  result	  of	  the	  encounter	  of	  minorities	  and	  the	  civil	  society,	  are	  where	  the	  "reality"	  of	  the	  relations	  of	  state,	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  minorities	  come	  to	  the	  surface.	  These	  spaces	  are	  not	  the	  pages	  of	  intellectual	  magazines	  in	  which	  everyone	  can	  talk	  in	  defense	  of	  minorities’	  right	  for	  intellectual	  purposes.	  They	  are	  where	  basic	  social	  contradictions	  come	  to	  the	  surface,	  and	  that	  is	  why	  studying	  these	  spaces	  is	  not	  only	  a	  way	  of	  understanding	  why	  a	  particular	  "public	  space"	  does	  or	  does	  not	  work	  properly,	  but	  also	  is	  a	  way	  of	  realizing	  whether	  the	  "public	  sphere"	  can	  be	  created	  in	  a	  society	  and	  be	  the	  space	  of	  resistance	  or	  not.	  	  	  4.3.4 Do	  minorities	  have	  a	  Utopia?	  Homosexuals,	  as	  the	  main	  minority	  group	  of	  the	  park	  have	  different	  ideas.	  They	  want	  to	  stay	  in	  this	  space,	  because	  this	  is	  a	  part	  of	  their	  identity.	  Even	  though	  most	  of	  them	  do	  not	  use	  this	  space	  often,	  because	  the	  site	  is	  full	  of	  pimps	  and	  abusers	  and	  they	  do	  not	  have	  security	  in	  and	  around	  the	  park,	  they	  still	  insist	  on	  coming	  occasionally	  and	  using	  the	  metaphoric	  characteristic	  of	  space	  on	  their	  web	  pages	  or	  media.	  They	  are	  not	  satisfied	  with	  the	  presence	  of	  policing	  forces,	  and	  have	  had	  conflicts	  with	  them,	  but	  they	  cannot	  represent	  their	  dissatisfaction	  and	  identity	  explicitly;	  neither	  can	  they	  say	  how	  their	  ideal	  space	  should	  be.	  Hamed	  -­‐	  the	  administrator	  of	  the	  Facebook	  page	  that	  I	  have	  mentioned	  –	  thinks	  that	  if	  he	  is	  given	  the	  chance	  to	  change	  the	  space,	  he	  wants	  to	  establish	  the	  park	  as	  the	  symbol	  of	  their	  existence	  and	  wants	  their	  flag	  to	  be	  raised	  in	  the	  plaza,	  instead	  of	  existing	  sculptures	  and	  banners.	  Having	  a	  space	  in	  which	  he	  would	  not	  be	  compelled	  to	  codify	  his	  identity	  is	  the	  only	  idea	  he	  has,	  and	  as	  long	  as	  he	  is	  not	  given	  the	  chance	  to	  do	  so,	  his	  further	  intentions	  would	  remain	  unsaid.	  	  4.4 Limits	  of	  Molecular	  Power	  I	  finished	  the	  previous	  chapter	  by	  concluding	  that	  the	  political	  power	  has	  intervened	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  and	  limited	  spatial	  experiences	  of	  constituents	  via	  the	  application	  of	  certain	  	   71 regulations,	  spatial	  interventions,	  and	  cultural	  policies	  based	  on	  the	  political	  and	  economic	  structure	  of	  the	  Islamic	  Republic.	  I	  explained	  how	  these	  interventions	  have	  changed	  the	  composition	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  and	  have	  turned	  the	  park	  into	  a	  space	  of	  social	  conflicts.	  However,	  manipulating	  the	  composition	  of	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  was	  not	  the	  only	  consequence	  of	  their	  policies.	  They	  restructured	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  in	  society	  and	  supported	  it	  by	  the	  law.	  The	  penal	  code	  of	  Iran,	  as	  I	  introduced	  with	  some	  example	  of	  its	  articles	  about	  homosexuals,	  is	  a	  book	  of	  laws	  based	  on	  people's	  identity	  and	  social	  status.	  There	  are	  different	  penal	  and	  civil	  codes	  for	  men	  and	  women,	  Muslims	  and	  followers	  of	  religious	  minorities,	  homosexuals	  and	  straights.	  The	  differences	  between	  people's	  identities	  that	  I	  call	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities40,	  governs	  people's	  social	  relations	  and	  reproduces	  transforms	  the	  molar	  into	  the	  molecular	  level.	  	  As	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  mention:	  "What	  makes	  fascism	  dangerous	  is	  its	  molecular	  or	  micropolitical	  power,	  for	  it	  is	  a	  mass	  movement:	  a	  cancerous	  body	  rather	  than	  a	  totalitarian	  organism.	  American	  film	  has	  often	  depicted	  these	  molecular	  focal	  points;	  band,	  gang,	  sect,	  family,	  town,	  neighborhood,	  vehicle	  fascisms	  spare	  no	  one."	  (Deleuze	  and	  Guattari,	  2004,	  p.215)	    Here	  we	  are	  not	  prone	  to	  a	  totalitarian	  regime,	  but	  rather,	  a	  thousand	  plateaus	  of	  totalitarianism.	  It	  brings	  the	  macro	  politics	  and	  infrastructures	  to	  the	  city	  and	  causes	  every	  level	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  to	  be	  the	  space	  of	  the	  domination	  of	  power.	  Not	  only	  civil	  society	  intentionally	  or	  unintentionally	  begins	  the	  repression	  of	  minorities	  through	  "band,	  gang,	  family,	  town,	  neighborhood,"	  but	  also	  minorities	  deny	  their	  identity	  and	  repress	  it	  themselves.	  Thus,	  it	  is	  only	  the	  molecular	  fascism	  that,	  as	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  explain,	  "provides	  an	  answer	  to	  the	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  40	  I	  intentionally	  do	  not	  use	  the	  term	  social	  hierarchy,	  because	  social	  hierarchy	  demonstrates	  the	  classification	  of	  people	  based	  on	  their	  socio-­‐economic	  status.	  In	  this	  case,	  even	  though	  there	  has	  been	  a	  relation	  between	  the	  economic	  backwardness	  of	  some	  minority	  group	  sand	  their	  identity	  as	  a	  minority,	  the	  relation	  has	  not	  been	  concrete.	  In	  the	  case	  of	  homosexuals,	  and	  based	  on	  the	  NY	  times	  report,	  homosexuals	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  are	  from	  different	  classes	  and	  social	  status	  and	  their	  colonized	  identity	  has	  not	  led	  to	  their	  economic	  repression	  necessarily.	  	   72 global	  question:	  Why	  does	  desire	  desire	  its	  own	  repression,	  how	  can	  it	  desire	  its	  own	  repression?"	  (Ibid)  In	  this	  thousand	  plateaus	  of	  repression	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  different	  identities	  are	  organized	  in	  a	  hierarchical	  way;	  upper	  layers	  repress	  lower	  layers	  and	  each	  layer	  repressed	  people	  within	  it.	  Some	  identities,	  such	  as	  that	  of	  homosexuals,	  have	  found	  a	  negative	  meaning.	  One	  has	  not	  only	  to	  avoid	  being	  negative,	  but	  to	  avoid	  being	  with	  negative	  identities	  as	  well.	  What	  do	  people	  with	  "negative"	  identities	  do	  in	  their	  daily	  lives?	  No	  one	  is	  sure	  about	  that	  because	  "they	  have	  mental	  illnesses"	  and	  one	  can	  expect	  everything	  from	  a	  mentally	  ill	  person.	  Thus,	  the	  civil	  society	  avoids	  interacting	  with	  minorities	  and	  minorities	  codify	  themselves.	  This	  codification	  strengthens	  the	  fragmented	  images	  of	  minorities	  in	  civil	  society’s	  mind	  and	  causes	  civil	  society	  to	  be	  afraid	  of	  interacting	  with	  them.	  Families	  want	  their	  children	  to	  not	  see	  strange	  people;	  artists	  want	  a	  wall	  to	  block	  any	  visual	  contact	  with	  the	  outer	  world;	  any	  group	  represses	  its	  own	  member	  so	  as	  to	  not	  see	  more	  of	  these	  confusing	  images.	  The	  park	  becomes	  a	  machine	  of	  repression,	  a	  condition	  in	  which	  it	  would	  be	  hard	  to	  talk	  about	  a	  right	  to	  space.	  However,	  as	  Deleuze	  and	  Guattari	  conclude:	   	  "The	  masses	  certainly	  do	  not	  passively	  submit	  to	  power;	  nor	  do	  they	  "want"	  to	  be	  repressed,	  in	  a	  kind	  of	  masochistic	  hysteria;	  nor	  are	  they	  tricked	  by	  an	  ideological	  lure.	  Desire	  is	  never	  separable	  from	  complex	  assemblages	  that	  necessarily	  tie	  into	  molecular	  levels,	  from	  microformations	  already	  shaping	  postures,	  attitudes,	  perceptions,	  expectations,	  semiotic	  systems,	  etc.	  […]	  It's	  too	  easy	  to	  be	  antifascist	  on	  the	  molar	  level,	  and	  not	  even	  see	  the	  fascist	  inside	  you,	  the	  fascist	  you	  yourself	  sustain	  and	  nourish	  and	  cherish	  with	  molecules	  both	  personal	  and	  collective."	  (Ibid)	  	  	   73 Chapter	  5: One	  Self’s	  Space	  as	  Another’s	  	  The	  function	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  a	  public	  space,	  is	  not	  only	  undermined	  by	  the	  authority	  of	  those	  with	  political	  power	  in	  Iran:	  the	  micro	  power	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  there	  is	  even	  more	  influential	  in	  controlling	  the	  free	  actions	  of	  minorities.	  In	  other	  words,	  public	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  are	  in	  fact	  compositions	  of	  a	  thousand	  plateaus	  of	  control,	  rather	  than	  a	  giant	  machine	  of	  totalitarianism.	  The	  solidarity	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  political	  power	  is	  built	  against	  their	  common	  enemy,	  a	  policy	  that	  could	  be	  seen	  in	  different	  levels	  of	  the	  society	  of	  this	  study.	  This	  policy	  is	  an	  attempt	  to	  cover	  the	  diversity	  of	  the	  society	  of	  the	  park:	  on	  one	  hand	  there	  are	  all	  the	  legal	  selves	  which	  are	  represented	  as	  different	  variations	  of	  the	  narrative	  of	  the	  normative	  self:	  sometimes	  artists,	  sometimes	  neighbors,	  etc;	  on	  the	  other	  hand,	  who	  must	  be	  removed	  However,	  what	  the	  civil	  society	  does	  not	  consider	  is	  that	  by	  attempting	  to	  remove	  minorities,	  they	  are	  restricting	  their	  own	  right	  to	  space,	  as	  the	  right	  to	  the	  city	  is	  a	  common	  right,	  rather	  than	  an	  individual	  one:	  “The	  right	  to	  the	  city	  is	  far	  more	  than	  the	  individual	  liberty	  to	  access	  urban	  resources:	  it	  is	  a	  right	  to	  change	  ourselves	  by	  changing	  the	  city.	  It	  is,	  moreover,	  a	  common	  rather	  than	  an	  individual	  right	  since	  this	  transformation	  inevitably	  depends	  upon	  exercise	  of	  a	  collective	  power	  to	  reshape	  the	  process	  of	  urbanization.	  The	  freedom	  to	  make	  and	  remake	  our	  cities	  and	  ourselves	  is,	  I	  want	  to	  argue,	  one	  of	  the	  most	  precious	  yet	  most	  neglected	  of	  our	  human	  rights.”	  (Harvey,	  2008,	  p.23)	  	  	  The	  question,	  after	  all	  of	  these	  limitations,	  is:	  are	  there	  any	  possibilities	  in	  the	  heterogeneous	  landscape	  of	  diversity	  of	  the	  park?	  I	  want	  to	  claim	  yes;	  if	  there	  is	  any	  chance	  for	  space	  -­‐	  in	  its	  Lefebvrian	  definition	  as	  social	  relations,	  to	  go	  beyond	  its	  limitation	  it	  is	  in	  the	  diversity	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  of	  constituents	  that	  leads	  to	  the	  diversity	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  of	  each	  of	  the	  individuals.	  The	  form	  of	  diversity	  that	  I	  have	  studied	  in	  this	  research	  is	  based	  on	  the	  most	  dominant	  layer	  of	  identity	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  the	  park	  and	  the	  power	  of	  the	  social	  group	  they	  belong	  to.	  In	  order	  to	  prove	  this	  claim,	  I	  will	  determine	  first	  the	  relationship	  between	  	   74 people’s	  identities	  and	  their	  spatial	  experiences,	  then	  I	  will	  explain	  Ricoeur's	  concept	  of	  "narrative	  self,"	  a	  concept	  by	  which	  Ricoeur	  introduces	  identity	  as	  narrative,	  inter-­‐subjective,	  and	  convergent.	  Based	  on	  Ricoeur's	  conceptualizaton,	  I	  will	  argue	  that	  spatial	  experiences	  are	  inter-­‐subjective	  as	  they	  are	  deeply	  associated	  with	  people's	  identity.	  However,	  the	  differences	  between	  the	  power	  of	  different	  identities	  have	  led	  to	  the	  formation	  of	  various	  spatial	  experiences,	  many	  of	  them	  are	  not	  narrative,	  but	  rather	  fragmented	  and	  larval.	  Then	  I	  will	  compare	  Ricoeur's	  narrative	  self	  with	  Deleuze's	  larval	  self	  to	  demonstrate	  that	  not	  only	  are	  the	  larval	  selves	  inter-­‐subjective,	  but	  they	  also	  have	  a	  potential	  for	  bringing	  subjects	  to	  lines	  of	  flight,	  a	  realm	  that	  all	  of	  the	  aforesaid	  totalitarian	  and	  controlling	  policies	  try	  to	  prevent.	  	  	  5.1 	  Daneshjoo	  Park:	  Narratives	  and	  Images	  As	  we	  have	  seen	  so	  far,	  there	  are	  major	  differences	  between	  spatial	  experiences	  –	  daily	  life	  experiences,	  conceptions,	  representations,	  tactics,	  etc.	  –	  of	  people	  of	  different	  groups	  of	  the	  park;	  a	  fact	  which	  is	  not	  exclusive	  to	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  Minorities	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  do	  not	  experience	  space	  in	  the	  same	  way	  as	  its	  civil	  society	  does.	  These	  experiences	  are	  dissimilar	  for	  different	  groups	  within	  the	  civil	  society	  as	  well:	  families	  experience	  space	  in	  divergent	  ways	  from	  that	  of	  children,	  artists,	  student,	  or	  passers-­‐by.	  The	  daily	  lives	  of	  constituents	  in	  space,	  their	  conceptions	  of	  space	  and	  the	  way	  they	  represent	  their	  space,	  depend	  on	  not	  only	  their	  identity	  but	  also	  their	  social	  status	  compared	  to	  other	  constituents	  with	  whom	  they	  have	  shared	  space.	  Generally	  there	  are	  two	  parameters	  involved	  in	  defining	  the	  quality	  of	  constituent	  spatial	  experiences:	  their	  position	  with	  regard	  to	  the	  park	  –	  whether	  they	  are	  a	  permanent	  constituent,	  a	  passer-­‐by,	  or	  an	  outsider	  who	  experiences	  space	  as	  an	  image	  or	  a	  metaphor-­‐	  and	  the	  power	  of	  their	  identity.	  However,	  selves	  are	  not	  created	  in	  isolation.	  Identities,	  and	  therefore	  the	  quality	  of	  each	  group’s	  spatial	  experiences,	  are	  highly	  influenced	  by	  other	  groups’	  identities	  and	  spatial	  experiences.	  The	  way	  people	  of	  different	  identities	  represent	  their	  differently	  experienced	  spatial	  occupations	  or	  encounters,	  influences	  others	  experiences.	  Thus,	  one	  cannot	  easily	  separate	  one's	  space	  from	  another's,	  as	  Ricoeur	  remarks,	  one	  cannot	  separate	  ones	  identity	  from	  another’s	  so	  easily,	  as	  human’s	  identities	  are	  rather	  inter-­‐subjective.	  	   75 5.1.1 Narrative	  Self	  The	  inter-­‐subjectivity	  of	  humans’	  identities	  is	  best	  determined	  in	  Ricoeur’s	  concept	  of	  the	  “narrative	  self.”	  “Narrative	  is	  often	  seen	  as	  the	  fundamentally	  human	  way	  of	  organizing	  the	  world	  and	  at	  the	  very	  core	  of	  who	  we	  are	  as	  individuals	  and	  communities”	  (Jackson,	  2010,	  p.494).	  Ricoeur	  states	  that	  the	  identity	  that	  one	  has	  by	  the	  virtue	  of	  his	  or	  her	  idem-­‐	  and	  ipse-­‐identities	  is	  a	  narrative	  identity.	  This	  is	  how	  we	  bring	  our	  past,	  present	  and	  future	  together,	  configure	  it,	  and	  narrate	  it	  for	  others.	  As	  the	  act	  of	  narrating	  always	  has	  an	  audience,	  which	  means	  one	  narrates	  his/her	  identity	  for	  another,	  narrative	  identity	  is	  inter-­‐subjective.	  He	  explains	  that	  although	  we	  are	  free	  enough	  to	  define	  our	  positions	  in	  these	  narratives,	  the	  inter-­‐subjective	  nature	  of	  our	  identity	  limits	  our	  actions	  and	  conceptions.	  Ricoeur's	  analysis	  of	  the	  narrative	  self,	  brings	  in	  four	  conclusions	  that	  introduce	  both	  limits	  and	  potentials:	  “Because	  my	  personal	  identity	  is	  a	  narrative	  identity,	  I	  can	  make	  sense	  of	  myself	  only	  in	  and	  through	  my	  involvement	  with	  others.	  In	  my	  dealings	  with	  others,	  I	  do	  not	  simply	  enact	  a	  role	  or	  function	  that	  has	  been	  assigned	  to	  me.	  I	  can	  change	  myself	  through	  my	  own	  efforts	  and	  can	  reasonably	  encourage	  others	  to	  change	  as	  well.	  Nonetheless,	  because	  I	  am	  an	  embodied	  existence	  and	  hence	  have	  inherited	  both	  biological	  and	  psychological	  constraints,	  I	  cannot	  change	  everything	  about	  myself.	  And	  because	  others	  are	  similarly	  constrained,	  I	  cannot	  sensibly	  call	  for	  comprehensive	  changes	  in	  them.	  Though	  I	  can	  be	  evaluated	  in	  a	  number	  of	  ways,	  e.g.,	  physical	  dexterity,	  verbal	  fluency,	  technical	  skill,	  the	  ethical	  evaluation	  in	  the	  light	  of	  my	  responsiveness	  to	  others,	  over	  time,	  is,	  on	  the	  whole,	  the	  most	  important	  evaluation.”	  (plato.stanford.edu)	  	  	  	  The	  potentials	  and	  limits	  of	  narrative	  identity	  for	  the	  evolution	  of	  human	  beings	  rely	  on	  its	  inter-­‐subjective	  nature.	  Different	  constituents’	  narratives	  of	  space,	  which	  are	  bound	  with	  their	  narrative	  self,	  define	  spatial	  experiences	  as	  inter-­‐subjective	  that	  have	  the	  same	  limits	  and	  	   76 potentials.	  But	  as	  we	  have	  seen	  not	  all	  constituents	  are	  able	  to	  represent	  their	  identities	  as	  narrative.	  Are	  their	  narratives	  missed	  from	  the	  inter-­‐subjective	  realm	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  or	  do	  their	  representations	  influence	  other	  constituents’	  narratives	  in	  the	  same	  way?	  	  5.1.2 Narratives	  of	  Minorities	  The	  identity	  that	  Ricoeur	  introduces	  depends	  upon	  diversity;	  inherent	  differences	  are	  overlooked	  in	  the	  interest	  of	  coming	  into	  an	  integrity.	  As	  Declan	  Sherrin,	  in	  Deleuze	  and	  Ricoeur:	  Disavowed	  Affinities	  and	  the	  Narrative	  Self,	  says:	  “Identity	  is	  the	  actualization	  of	  differences.	  […]	  [T]he	  self	  represents	  a	  cloth	  woven	  of	  difference	  but	  one	  cloth	  nevertheless”	  (Sherrin,	  2009,	  p.62).	  But	  can	  one	  really	  absorb	  all	  the	  narratives	  of	  other	  people,	  consider	  them	  as	  the	  audience	  of	  one’s	  own	  narrative	  and	  weave	  one	  unified	  cloth?	  The	  narratives	  of	  the	  subalterns	  and	  minorities	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  as	  I	  have	  explained,	  are	  not	  understood	  in	  terms	  of	  narrative.	  When	  an	  identity	  is	  not	  represented	  as	  a	  narrative,	  it	  would	  not	  be	  understood	  as	  a	  narrative.	  The	  question	  is	  whether	  there	  is	  a	  connection	  between	  narrative	  representations	  and	  non-­‐narrative	  representations.	  	  	  Minorities	  are	  not	  capable	  of	  representing	  their	  narratives	  explicitly;	  rather,	  they	  have	  to	  hide	  behind	  their	  codes.	  As	  for	  subalterns,	  they	  also	  do	  not	  have	  the	  power	  of	  representing	  their	  narratives	  either.	  The	  people	  outside	  the	  narrative	  of	  minorities	  do	  not	  necessarily	  perceive	  these	  codes,	  not	  in	  the	  same	  way	  that	  minorities	  recognize	  them.	  Codes	  provide	  frames,	  to	  be	  filled	  with	  “dogmatic	  images”	  of	  minorities	  in	  the	  civil	  society’s	  mind.	  These	  images	  might	  be	  similar	  with	  codes	  in	  appearance,	  but	  not	  necessarily	  in	  meaning.	  I	  will	  come	  back	  to	  the	  concept	  of	  dogmatic	  images	  and	  its	  relation	  with	  the	  narrative	  self	  later;	  but	  before	  that,	  I	  want	  to	  skim	  other	  kinds	  of	  narratives	  and	  images	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  	  	  5.1.3 The	  Metaphor	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  a	  symbol	  for	  the	  identity	  of	  theater	  artists	  and	  homosexuals.	  But	  the	  metaphoric	  characteristic	  of	  the	  park	  is	  mainly	  about	  its	  affiliation	  with	  gay/	  homosexual	  identity.	  My	  first	  encounter	  with	  the	  Park	  goes	  back	  to	  my	  childhood,	  when	  I	  was	  living	  in	  a	  city	  	   77 in	  the	  west	  of	  Iran	  and	  far	  from	  the	  capital.	  I	  remember	  a	  little	  boy,	  a	  friend	  of	  my	  brother,	  who	  used	  to	  make	  fun	  of	  children	  who	  came	  back	  from	  their	  travel	  to	  Tehran	  by	  telling	  them:	  “I	  have	  heard	  you	  were	  seen	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park.”	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  was	  always	  been	  famous	  as	  the	  meeting	  place	  of	  homosexuals.	  The	  boy	  used	  this	  metaphor	  to	  humiliate	  the	  sexual	  identity	  of	  other	  children.	  This	  metaphoric	  use	  of	  the	  park	  has	  been	  reflected	  in	  media	  as	  well.	  In	  2011,	  Mehran	  Modiri,	  a	  well-­‐known	  Iranian	  comedian,	  made	  a	  comic	  video	  clip	  about	  Iranian	  foreign	  TV	  channels,	  which	  are	  broadcasted	  in	  Iran	  illegally.	  In	  this	  video,	  he	  ridiculed	  homosexuals	  and	  used	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  as	  a	  metaphor	  for	  homosexuality	  and	  a	  sign	  of	  derision.	  Even	  though	  the	  video	  has	  been	  harshly	  criticized	  as	  an	  act	  of	  violation	  against	  homosexuals’	  and	  women’s	  right,	  it	  has	  been	  carved	  into	  people’s	  mind	  as	  the	  image	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  	  	  The	  metaphor	  of	  the	  park	  is	  not	  a	  cloth	  woven	  of	  all	  narratives	  of	  the	  park.	  It	  does	  not	  even	  introduce	  one	  of	  the	  narratives	  of	  the	  park	  entirely.	  What	  this	  metaphor	  best	  represents	  is	  the	  vague	  image	  of	  minorities	  in	  the	  minds	  of	  civil	  society.	  The	  metaphor	  exaggerates	  some	  signs	  and	  codes	  to	  indicate	  the	  existence	  of	  a	  crisis	  between	  minorities	  and	  civil	  society	  and	  the	  abnormality	  of	  minorities	  in	  the	  civil	  society’s	  point	  of	  view.	  It	  attributes	  a	  negative	  meaning	  to	  the	  park	  that	  displaces	  the	  park,	  makes	  it	  a	  metaphor	  for	  “social	  issues”	  in	  its	  broader	  concept.	  This	  negative	  reputation	  attributed	  to	  space	  is	  reflected	  ironically	  in	  a	  short	  story	  published	  in	  Neyestan	  magazine	  in	  1986	  by	  Seyyed	  Mehdi	  Shojaie.	  In	  his	  short	  story,	  entitled	  “Daneshjoo	  Park,”	  Shojaiae	  narrates	  the	  story	  of	  a	  taxi	  driver	  who	  picks	  up	  a	  girl	  who	  wants	  to	  go	  to	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  The	  driver	  seems	  to	  have	  been	  unaware	  of	  the	  metaphor	  of	  the	  Park	  as	  a	  place	  of	  prostitution.	  After	  picking	  her	  up,	  he	  realizes	  that	  the	  girl	  does	  not	  want	  to	  go	  to	  the	  Park.	  She	  is	  a	  prostitute	  and	  used	  the	  name	  of	  the	  Park	  metaphorically.	  Then	  he	  finds	  out	  that	  she	  is	  actually	  a	  student,	  but	  because	  the	  tuition	  of	  her	  university	  is	  too	  high,	  she	  works	  as	  a	  prostitute	  to	  earn	  money	  for	  her	  university	  tuition.	  The	  story	  ends	  by	  the	  man	  kicking	  the	  girl	  out	  of	  the	  taxi,	  grumbling	  that	  people	  like	  her	  have	  ruined	  “our”	  culture.	  The	  story	  is	  full	  of	  contradictions	  and	  exaggerations,	  but	  what	  is	  important	  here	  is	  that	  the	  Park	  is	  not	  particularly	  the	  place	  of	  female	  prostitutes,	  but	  the	  lack	  of	  understanding	  of	  the	  narratives	  of	  others	  and	  having	  partial	  images	  of	  the	  codes	  some	  users	  of	  the	  Park	  reveal,	  have	  caused	  the	  author	  of	  this	  	   78 story	  to	  understand	  and	  experience	  space	  in	  this	  negative	  way.	  The	  feature	  of	  metaphors	  that	  gives	  them	  the	  potential	  to	  refer	  to	  something	  greater	  than	  themselves,	  to	  leap	  toward	  another	  greater	  objective,	  is	  now	  applied	  to	  the	  park.	  The	  park	  on	  its	  own	  has	  found	  a	  metaphoric	  existence	  that	  can	  exist	  outside	  and	  beyond	  its	  context.	  	  5.1.4 Images	  of	  Inside	  Beside	  the	  metaphors	  of	  Danehsjoo	  Park,	  minorities’	  codified	  living	  in	  space	  is	  another	  means	  of	  producing	  images	  for	  its	  constituents.	  As	  I	  explained,	  subjects	  who	  are	  illegal	  or	  have	  minimal	  power,	  have	  to	  codify	  their	  presence	  in	  space.	  These	  codes	  are	  readable	  by	  subjects	  of	  the	  same	  assemblage,	  but	  not	  necessarily	  for	  outsiders.	  Outsiders,	  as	  I	  will	  explain	  latter,	  attribute	  their	  own	  pre-­‐supposition	  to	  these	  codes;	  what	  in	  the	  language	  of	  Deleuze	  is	  called	  “dogmatic	  images.”	  The	  first	  influence	  of	  fragmented	  images	  is	  that	  they	  reinforce	  people’s	  fear	  of	  the	  presence	  of	  minorities	  in	  space,	  a	  fear	  that	  is	  attested	  to	  by	  the	  considering	  of	  minorities	  as	  criminals	  in	  the	  penal	  code	  of	  Iran.	  	  Figure	  5-­‐1.	  Narrative	  representations:	  when	  subjects	  represent	  their	  identity	  explicitly,	  their	  narrative	  can	  be	  read	  by	  others	  	   79 	  Figure	  5-­‐2.	  Codified	  representations:	  when	  subjects	  codify	  their	  identity,	  others	  conceive	  them	  as	  fragmented	  images.	  	  5.2 Three	  States	  of	  Spatial	  experiences	  Danehsjoo	  Park	  is	  lived,	  conceived,	  and	  perceived	  not	  only	  as	  multi-­‐narratives,	  but	  also	  as	  images	  and	  metaphors.	  Depending	  on	  whether	  subjects	  belong	  to	  any	  of	  the	  narratives	  of	  the	  park	  or	  not,	  whether	  they	  stand	  between	  different	  narratives	  or	  between	  images,	  the	  quality	  of	  their	  spatial	  experiences,	  their	  conceptions	  of	  space,	  and	  the	  way	  they	  are	  influenced	  by	  space	  would	  be	  diverse.	  In	  general,	  I	  categorize	  these	  three	  states	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  as:	  narrative,	  fragmented	  and	  situated	  experiences.	  I	  will	  demonstrate	  these	  three	  states	  first	  and	  then	  I	  will	  bring	  them	  back	  to	  the	  concept	  of	  molar	  and	  molecular	  by	  comparing	  Ricoeur’s	  narrative	  self	  and	  Deleuze’s	  larval	  self.	  	  	  5.2.1 Narrative	  Experiences	  Once	  positioned	  in	  space,	  people	  of	  different	  groups	  find	  and	  write	  their	  own	  narratives	  of	  place.	  The	  plot	  of	  the	  narrative,	  Ricoeur	  states:	  “grasp[s]	  together	  and	  integrates	  into	  one	  whole	  and	  complete	  story	  multiple	  and	  scattered	  events,	  thereby	  schematizing	  the	  intelligible	  signification	  attached	  to	  the	  narrative	  as	  a	  whole”	  (Ricoeur,	  1984,	  p.x).	  To	  do	  so,	  one	  detects	  those	  who	  are	  from	  the	  same	  identity	  group	  as	  oneself.	  Others	  are	  both	  peripheral	  characters	  in	  one’s	  narrative	  or	  audiences	  of	  one’s	  narrative.	  For	  artists,	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  the	  narrative	  of	  their	  profession-­‐based	  social	  life,	  for	  homosexuals	  it	  is	  the	  narrative	  of	  their	  sexual-­‐based	  social	  life	  and	  so	  on.	  The	  importance	  of	  these	  narratives	  in	  their	  life	  keeps	  them	  in	  the	  Park	  in	  spite	  of	  	   80 all	  the	  tensions	  and	  conflicts.	  However,	  we	  cannot	  easily	  say	  that	  there	  is	  a	  dialogue	  between	  narratives	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  with	  those	  of	  minorities,	  as	  minorities	  do	  not	  create	  an	  anecdote	  of	  their	  narratives	  for	  those	  who	  do	  not	  belong	  to	  their	  own	  groups.	  They	  codify	  their	  narrative;	  therefore,	  narratives	  of	  one	  group	  turn	  into	  the	  generator	  of	  images	  for	  other	  groups;	  images	  that	  are	  only	  partially	  true	  and	  do	  not	  reflect	  all	  layers	  of	  one’s	  narrative	  of	  and	  in	  space.	  Such	  Images	  cause	  fear	  and	  tension	  and	  close	  the	  particular	  form	  of	  interaction	  that	  could	  lead	  to	  the	  formation	  of	  the	  “narrative	  self”	  that	  Ricoeur	  articulates.	  	  	  	  Figure	  5-­‐3.	  Narrative	  experiences	  	  5.2.2 Fragmented	  Experiences	  Images	  are	  the	  results	  of	  experiencing	  spaces	  of	  others,	  from	  a	  position	  inside	  another	  narrative.	  Images	  could	  be	  formed	  in	  one’s	  mind	  due	  to	  either	  the	  metaphoric	  characteristic	  of	  space	  or	  others’	  codified	  spaces	  from	  inside	  the	  park	  or	  outside	  it.	  The	  first	  kind	  of	  images	  is	  the	  result	  of	  the	  metaphoric	  identity	  given	  to	  space,	  which	  I	  explained	  as	  the	  metaphor	  of	  Danehsjoo	  Park.	  When	  space	  is	  tied	  to	  specific	  identities	  metaphorically,	  it	  is	  experienced	  virtually,	  outside	  and	  before	  it	  is	  experienced	  actually,	  yet	  both	  of	  them	  are	  real	  experiences.	  For	  example,	  space	  is	  experienced	  from	  outside	  of	  the	  Park	  where	  the	  space	  of	  the	  park	  is	  used	  metaphorically	  for	  humiliation	  in	  stories,	  art	  works,	  TV	  series	  and	  people’s	  daily	  conversation.	  Incomplete	  and	  imaginary	  experiences	  of	  spaces	  of	  an	  ‘other’	  could	  be	  the	  result	  of	  a	  metaphoric	  meaning	  of	  space	  that	  attributes	  a	  negative	  reputation	  to	  the	  Park.	  	  	   81 	  Even	  though	  these	  two,	  metaphors	  and	  images,	  produce	  major	  kinds	  of	  fragmented	  experiences,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  all	  narratives,	  even	  those	  that	  are	  represented	  explicitly,	  could	  be	  understood	  as	  images.	  Narratives	  could	  find	  metaphoric	  meaning	  through	  time	  and	  metaphors	  could	  be	  understood	  as	  images.	  Also	  any	  subjective	  and/or	  incomplete	  reading	  of	  the	  narratives	  of	  others	  could	  produce	  fragmented	  images	  of	  one	  narrative	  in	  another’s	  mind.	  	  	  	  Figure	  5-­‐4.	  Fragmented	  experiences:	  minorities’	  codes	  are	  redrawn	  by	  others	  as	  images	  and	  are	  experienced	  as	  fragmented	  moments.	  	  5.2.3 Situated	  Experiences	  With	  the	  exception	  of	  my	  first	  confrontation	  with	  the	  Park	  as	  a	  metaphor	  in	  my	  childhood,	  my	  other	  experiences	  did	  not	  belong	  to	  any	  of	  these	  categories	  of	  dominated	  narratives	  of	  space.	  I	  was	  in	  a	  situation	  between	  all	  narratives.	  Being	  in	  situations,	  to	  me,	  was	  not	  only	  a	  matter	  of	  being	  in	  the	  Park.	  My	  position	  in	  the	  Park	  was	  the	  result	  of	  my	  identity	  in	  the	  society	  in	  which	  I	  lived.	  I	  was	  in	  a	  situation	  between	  narratives,	  which	  I	  wanted	  to	  reject,	  and	  the	  identity	  I	  wanted	  to	  make	  for	  myself.	  Regardless	  of	  whether	  I	  was	  successful	  or	  it	  was	  just	  my	  utopian	  idea;	  I	  experienced	  space	  from	  a	  position	  between	  the	  narratives	  and	  images	  of	  others.	  I	  did	  not	  assume	  the	  Park	  was	  something	  wrong	  in	  my	  city	  that	  should	  be	  removed.	  Yes,	  there	  was	  a	  	   82 grand	  plot	  that	  the	  ruling	  class	  had	  written	  to	  organize	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities–	  this	  is	  what	  governments	  deny	  but	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  reveal.	  But	  the	  existence	  of	  the	  grand	  plot	  did	  not	  gather	  all	  elements	  together.	  Instead,	  the	  story	  of	  the	  Park	  is	  the	  story	  of	  separations,	  and	  departures,	  and	  the	  multiplicity	  of	  lines	  of	  flight.	  	  	  When	  a	  group	  cannot	  reveal	  its	  narrative	  in	  its	  configured	  form	  and	  has	  to	  codify	  it,	  in-­‐between	  narrative	  situations	  are	  barely	  formed.	  This	  is	  perhaps	  the	  major	  limitation	  on	  the	  formation	  of	  “narrative”	  experiences	  in	  their	  inter-­‐subjective	  and	  common	  concept.	  But	  one	  can	  position	  oneself	  between	  narratives	  and	  the	  images	  of	  other.	  But	  as	  images	  of	  minorities	  generally	  have	  negative	  meaning	  for	  other	  constituents,	  they	  stay	  inside	  their	  own	  sphere	  and	  understand	  the	  narratives	  and	  spaces	  of	  others	  from	  a	  position	  inside	  their	  own	  narrative.	  They	  experience	  narrative	  experiences,	  but	  their	  narratives	  are	  formed	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  certain	  “others.”	  It	  is	  more	  a	  dogmatic	  narrative,	  far	  less	  fluid	  than	  Ricoeur’s	  expectation.	  	  	  As	  I	  quoted	  from	  the	  Coffee	  and	  Cigarette	  weblog,	  people	  usually	  want	  to	  avoid	  encounters	  with	  other	  identities.	  An	  excellent	  evidence	  for	  this	  claim	  is	  that,	  as	  the	  Mehr	  News	  report	  stated,	  most	  people	  think	  that	  the	  presence	  of	  homosexuals,	  and	  not	  drug	  dealers	  or	  pimps,	  is	  the	  biggest	  problem	  of	  the	  Park.	  It	  seems	  that	  people	  are	  more	  afraid	  of	  losing	  the	  validity	  and	  legitimacy	  of	  their	  identity	  than	  physical	  threats	  in	  space.	  They	  prefer	  to	  come	  and	  go	  at	  the	  same	  time,	  sit	  in	  the	  same	  place	  and	  avoid	  interaction	  or	  in-­‐between	  narrative	  situations.	  They	  lose	  many	  of	  the	  possible	  spatial	  experiences	  that	  would	  need	  a	  displacement	  from	  their	  own	  narrative	  to	  in-­‐between	  narrative	  situations.	  This	  is	  how	  the	  ruling	  class	  controls	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  and	  crisis	  between	  identities	  in	  multi-­‐cultural	  public	  places.	  	   83 	  Figure	  5-­‐5.	  Situated	  experiences	  	  5.2.4 Intersubjectivity	  of	  Spatial	  Experiences	  As	  Ricoeur	  points	  out,	  “selfhood	  of	  oneself	  implies	  otherness	  to	  such	  an	  intimate	  degree	  that	  one	  cannot	  be	  thought	  of	  without	  the	  other”	  (Ricoeur,	  1992,	  p.3)	  Therefore,	  selfhood	  “is	  primarily	  an	  I	  who	  speaks	  to	  a	  you”	  (Ibid,	  41).	  Similarly,	  there	  is	  a	  here,	  to	  confront	  a	  there,	  a	  now,	  to	  demarcate	  a	  then.	  The	  subject	  in	  the	  Park	  is	  in	  his	  own	  narrative,	  the	  story	  of	  “I,”	  “here;”	  but	  at	  the	  same	  time	  he	  is	  in	  the	  space	  of	  others,	  in	  the	  space	  of	  artists,	  homosexuals,	  the	  elderly,	  or	  students	  who	  live	  “there,”	  in	  their	  own	  world,	  which	  is	  different	  from	  that	  of	  “mine.”	  For	  Ricoeur	  the	  encounter	  of	  you	  and	  I	  is	  the	  encounter	  of	  two	  different	  narratives,	  but	  even	  metaphors	  and	  images	  have	  the	  power	  of	  affecting	  one’s	  subjectivity	  by	  defining	  an	  “other”	  for	  it.	  This	  is	  the	  story	  of	  others	  that	  turns	  the	  Park	  into	  a	  metaphor	  and	  displaces	  oneself	  from	  one’s	  own	  secure	  condition,	  putting	  one	  in	  the	  insecure	  position	  of	  others.	  It	  also	  displaced	  me	  as	  a	  little	  girl;	  put	  me	  in	  a	  strange	  world	  of	  unknown	  people	  who	  were	  not	  “normal.”	  	  	  	  Space	  on	  its	  own	  is	  an	  “other”	  which	  defines	  “self”	  among	  other	  “others.”	  However,	  spaces	  of	  others	  can	  produce	  different	  configurations	  of	  space	  that	  might	  play	  the	  role	  of	  “others”	  in	  defining	  one’s	  identity.	  This	  way,	  living	  in	  space	  would	  be	  in	  the	  form	  of	  living	  in	  an	  inter-­‐subjective	  environment.	  Spaces	  of	  others	  are	  not	  spaces	  that	  one	  must	  leave	  one’s	  own	  space	  	   84 to	  enter.	  Actually,	  it	  is	  impossible	  to	  separate	  one’s	  spatial	  experiences	  from	  that	  of	  others.	  There	  is	  a	  dialectical	  relation	  of	  the	  space	  of	  oneself	  and	  the	  space	  of	  others	  that	  determines	  spatial	  experiences	  and	  the	  way	  subjectivity	  is	  affected	  through	  the	  encounter	  of	  narratives	  and	  identities.	  In	  this	  way,	  relations	  of	  power	  flow	  from	  one’s	  space	  to	  another’s,	  regulate	  social	  relations	  and	  put	  struggles	  against	  power	  in	  contrast	  with	  each	  other.	  	  	  However,	  as	  subjects	  represent	  their	  narratives	  differently,	  the	  spaces	  of	  others	  are	  experienced	  in	  various	  ways.	  Those	  who	  have	  the	  chance	  to	  represent	  themselves	  may	  be	  understood	  affirmatively.	  Of	  course,	  no	  narrative	  is	  read	  as	  it	  is	  written.	  The	  process	  of	  reading,	  as	  Ricoeur	  points	  out,	  is	  the	  “re-­‐configuration”	  of	  what	  is	  already	  configured.	  Nevertheless,	  re-­‐configuration	  does	  not	  disintegrate	  the	  existence	  of	  the	  narrative.	  In	  cases	  where	  the	  spaces	  of	  others	  are	  codified,	  a	  subject	  experiences	  them	  as	  fragmented	  images;	  hence,	  there	  would	  be	  neither	  a	  configuration	  nor	  a	  re-­‐configuration.	  Instead,	  there	  would	  be	  a	  collage	  of	  fragmented	  images.	  Here,	  in	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  what	  undermines	  social	  conflict	  is	  the	  collage	  of	  the	  fragmented	  images,	  because	  fragmented	  images	  are	  produced	  due	  to	  the	  controlling	  power	  of	  the	  molecular	  and	  the	  totalitarian	  attitude	  of	  molar	  powers	  for	  removing	  the	  narrative	  of	  minorities	  from	  space.	  	  5.3 Difference	  and	  Narratives	  On	  one	  hand,	  there	  is	  an	  "attachment	  between	  ones’	  "identity"	  and	  spatial	  experiences.	  On	  the	  other	  hand,	  one's	  "identity"	  is	  inter-­‐subjective	  and	  comes	  from	  the	  dialogue	  between	  one’s	  narrative	  and	  that	  of	  others.	  In	  other	  words,	  identity	  is	  generated	  from	  differences	  and	  the	  survival	  of	  ones’	  narrative	  self	  depends	  upon	  the	  existence	  of	  others’.	  But	  if	  this	  is	  true,	  why	  do	  some	  identities	  try	  to	  remove	  others	  and	  limit	  others'	  experiences;	  this	  is	  an	  action	  that	  might,	  in	  a	  Ricoeurian	  approach,	  risk	  their	  own	  formation	  and	  evolution.	  This	  question	  would	  become	  an	  important	  discourse	  when	  we	  talk	  about	  public	  spaces	  whose	  nature	  and	  function	  is	  associated	  with	  "diversity"	  and	  "differences."	  The	  differences	  between	  narrative	  and	  non-­‐narrative	  spatial	  experiences	  are	  best	  understood	  if	  we	  consider	  different	  concepts	  of	  self	  behind	  them.	  	  	   85 	  Ricoeur’s	  narrative	  self	  stands	  upon	  differences,	  which	  are	  unified	  as	  one	  narrative.	  Deleuze’s	  larval	  self,	  on	  the	  contrary,	  is	  a	  difference-­‐based	  self	  that	  exists	  prior	  to	  narrative	  selves.	  Ricoeur	  and	  Deleuze's	  selves	  are,	  without	  doubt,	  different	  and	  pre-­‐assume	  different	  kinds	  of	  subjectivities	  as	  their	  guidelines.	  Do	  these	  differences	  make	  them	  incomparable?	  Declan	  Sheerin,	  in	  his	  book	  Ricoeur	  and	  Deleuze:	  Disavowed	  Affinities	  and	  the	  Narrative	  Self,	  remarks	  that	  the	  comparative	  study	  of	  Deleuze	  and	  Ricoeur’s	  selves	  is	  not	  only	  possible	  but	  also	  necessary,	  as	  this	  comparison	  would	  clarify	  two	  different	  approaches	  to	  the	  connection	  of	  moral	  and	  ethical	  values.	  Sheerin	  says:	  	  “As	  morality	  is	  the	  actualization	  of	  the	  ethical	  aim	  so	  also	  is	  identity	  the	  actualization	  of	  difference.	  In	  Oneself	  as	  Another	  and	  Time	  and	  Narrative	  Ricoeur’s	  philosophy	  of	  difference,	  though	  present,	  repeatedly	  collapses	  into	  identity.	  Indeed,	  there	  is	  always	  the	  Kantian	  presumption	  of	  oneself	  that	  draws	  difference	  together.	  In	  This	  sense,	  the	  self	  represents	  a	  cloth	  woven	  of	  difference	  but	  one	  cloth	  nevertheless.”	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.62,	  63)	  	  The	  ethical	  basis	  of	  one’s	  identity	  that	  Sheerin	  mentions	  is	  what	  gives	  identity	  a	  social	  and	  political	  dimension;	  and	  this	  social	  and	  political	  quality	  is	  the	  main	  reason	  for	  the	  asymmetry	  of	  the	  power	  of	  different	  identities	  that	  blocks	  the	  dialogue	  of	  different	  narratives:	  a	  paradox	  that	  Ricoeur	  was	  reluctant	  to	  consider.	  The	  asymmetry	  of	  the	  power	  of	  different	  identities	  emphasizes	  the	  importance	  of	  simultaneous	  consideration	  of	  both	  narratives	  and	  non-­‐narrative	  experiences	  in	  public	  spaces.	  The	  questions	  such	  as	  whether	  some	  identities	  have	  the	  right	  to	  exile	  others	  from	  space	  or	  not	  and	  why	  some	  identities	  have	  the	  power	  to	  claim	  their	  right	  to	  a	  space	  and	  others	  do	  not	  have	  that	  power,	  are	  inherently	  ethical	  questions;	  question	  which	  are	  supported	  by,	  and	  mirrored	  on,	  the	  social	  hierarchy	  of	  the	  society.	  Thus,	  even	  though	  Ricoeur's	  narrative	  self	  seems	  to	  configure	  a	  moral	  discourse,	  the	  quality	  of	  interaction	  between	  oneself	  and	  another	  depends	  on	  the	  social	  status	  of	  both	  of	  the	  identities	  involved	  in	  the	  interaction.	  	  	  	   86 5.3.1 The	  Twin	  Multiplicity	  In	  explaining	  the	  relation	  of	  narrative	  and	  difference,	  Deleuze	  uses	  Bergson’s	  theory	  of	  multiplicity.	  Bergson	  argues	  that	  multiplicity	  and	  difference	  are	  of	  two	  different	  kinds	  that	  explain	  the	  existence	  of	  two	  different	  states	  of	  self:	  difference	  in	  degree	  and	  difference	  in	  kind.	  Difference	  in	  degree	  is	  actual,	  quantitative,	  simultaneous,	  homogenous,	  discontinuous	  and,	  more	  important	  for	  my	  argument,	  spatial.	  Difference	  in	  kind	  marks	  order	  and	  is	  supposed	  to	  mark	  differentiations	  in	  space,	  provide	  a	  kind	  of	  spatiality	  that	  makes	  space	  readable	  and	  controllable.	  The	  difference	  in	  kind,	  on	  the	  other	  hand,	  is	  virtual,	  qualitative,	  successive,	  heterogeneous,	  continuous	  and	  about	  duration	  (Deleuze,	  1994,	  p.	  30,	  31,	  38).	  Based	  on	  his	  twin	  multiplicity,	  Bergson	  introduces	  “the	  two	  aspects	  of	  self”:	  virtual	  and	  actual,	  “one	  the	  site	  of	  the	  lightening	  flash…,	  the	  other	  the	  site	  of	  the	  narrative”	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.77).	  	  “[When]	  our	  ego	  comes	  in	  contact	  with	  the	  external	  world	  at	  the	  surface;	  our	  successive	  sensations,	  although	  dissolved	  into	  one	  another,	  retain	  something	  of	  the	  mutual	  externality	  which	  belongs	  to	  their	  objective	  causes;	  and	  thus	  our	  superficial	  psychic	  life	  comes	  to	  be	  pictured	  without	  any	  great	  effort	  as	  set	  out	  in	  a	  homogenous	  medium”	  (Bergson,	  2001,	  p.125).	  Based	  on	  Bergson’s	  argument,	  Sheerin	  claims:	  “It	  is	  here	  that	  we	  are	  story	  and	  narrative,	  from	  here	  that	  we	  tell	  and	  are	  told	  as	  configurations	  and	  reconfigurations,	  as	  mimesis2	  and	  mimesis3.	  It	  is	  where	  we	  'betake	  [ourselves]	  to	  a	  symbolic	  substitute',	  [Bergson,	  2001,	  124]	  and	  if	  we	  delve	  deeper	  into	  consciousness,	  then	  we	  must	  perform	  even	  greater	  degrees	  of	  symbolic	  representation	  to	  alter	  the	  states	  of	  consciousness	  so	  that	  they	  may	  be	  represented	  or	  'set	  out	  in	  space'	  [ibid].”	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.77)	  	  5.3.2 Narratives	  and	  Dogmatic	  Images	  Bergson's	  understanding	  of	  space	  as	  quantitative	  order	  is	  a	  reduction	  of	  the	  later	  Lefebvrian	  interpretation	  in	  which	  space	  is	  not	  separated	  from	  social	  relations	  that	  include	  both	  the	  actual	  and	  virtual.	  However,	  the	  importance	  of	  Bergson’s	  argument	  is	  that	  it	  shows	  how	  narrative	  	   87 representation,	  whose	  study	  is	  usually	  considered	  as	  qualitative	  in	  research	  methods,	  is	  in	  line	  with	  "quantitative"	  and	  "numerical"	  methods,	  as	  all	  of	  them	  are	  about	  bringing	  subjects	  into	  order	  and	  conceal	  what	  lies	  beneath	  the	  structure.	  Narrative	  representations,	  Deleuze	  believes,	  arrest	  becoming	  into	  frozen	  being,	  turn	  the	  difference-­‐based	  self	  into	  a	  "dead	  narrative."	  But	  what	  is	  the	  criterion	  of	  this	  categorizing	  that	  as	  Bergson	  says	  homogenizes	  the	  undetermined	  fundamental	  self?	  	  	  In	  Difference	  and	  Repetition,	  Deleuze	  argues	  that	  the	  self's	  attempt	  at	  narrativising	  unnarratives,	  in	  order	  to	  bring	  him	  into	  his	  familiar	  order,	  led	  to	  the	  production	  of	  “dogmatic	  images	  of	  thought.”	  Dogmatic	  images	  attribute	  one	  quality	  to	  all	  subjects	  that	  are	  assumed	  to	  be	  of	  one	  kind.	  Deleuze	  challenges	  these	  images	  by	  remarking	  the	  difference	  between	  objective	  and	  subjective	  presuppositions	  of	  thought.	  For	  example	  the	  Kantian	  dogmatic	  image	  of	  thought:	  “presents	  three	  levels:	  (1)	  the	  image	  of	  a	  naturally	  upright	  thought	  that	  knows	  what	  it	  means	  to	  think;	  (2)	  the	  image	  of	  thought	  as	  the	  unity	  and	  harmony	  of	  all	  the	  other	  faculties	  …	  .	  And	  (3)	  a	  transcendental	  model	  of	  recognition	  that	  aligns	  itself	  with	  the	  form	  of	  the	  same	  and	  presumes	  the	  same	  object	  for	  all	  faculties	  and	  the	  possibility	  of	  error	  if	  ‘one	  faculty	  confuses	  one	  of	  its	  objects	  with	  a	  different	  object	  of	  another	  faculty’	  [Deleuze,	  1994,	  p.216-­‐17]."	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.71,2)	  	  	  Deleuze	  argues	  that	  even	  though	  these	  dogmatic	  images	  try	  to	  present	  themselves	  as	  objective	  facts,	  they	  are	  full	  of	  subjective	  presuppositions.	  In	  fact,	  all	  the	  dogmatic	  images,	  which	  try	  to	  give	  a	  normative	  definition,	  follow	  three	  presuppositions	  that	  Deleuze	  enumerated	  about	  Kant’s	  dogmatic	  image	  of	  thought.	  Nevertheless,	  dogmatic	  images	  define	  the	  boundaries	  and	  order	  of	  narratives.	  They	  also	  narrativise	  illegal	  beings	  -­‐	  those	  who	  are	  not	  already	  in	  the	  framework	  of	  the	  dogmatic	  image	  –	  and	  force	  them	  to	  obey	  the	  rules	  and	  the	  order	  that	  dogmatic	  images	  dictate.	  	  	  	  	   88 To	  be	  more	  precise,	  here	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  we	  are	  prone	  to	  two	  different	  kinds	  of	  dogmatic	  images:	  one	  that	  defines	  the	  normative	  self,	  and	  the	  one	  that	  defines	  normative	  public	  spaces.	  These	  images,	  which	  are	  connected	  to	  one	  another,	  define	  public	  spaces	  as	  the	  place	  of	  the	  presence	  of	  different	  variations	  of	  the	  normative	  self;	  a	  sphere	  in	  which	  there	  is	  no	  room	  for	  illegal-­‐beings	  and	  uncivilized	  minorities.	  Moreover,	  these	  two	  images	  are	  in	  line	  with	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  in	  Iran;	  an	  ordering	  of	  identities	  that	  gives	  more	  power	  to	  normative	  selves	  than	  to	  minorities.	  Thus,	  dogmatic	  images	  are	  the	  bases	  of	  an	  “ideal”	  spatial	  organization	  of	  the	  park:	  the	  way	  in	  which	  different	  narratives	  are	  separated	  and	  people	  are	  categorized	  in	  their	  different	  stories.	  But	  what	  about	  those	  whose	  narratives	  are	  not	  represented	  affirmatively?	  Deleuze	  argues	  that	  one	  of	  the	  main	  functions	  of	  dogmatic	  images	  is	  to	  narrativize	  un-­‐narratives.	  In	  Danehsjoo	  Park,	  in	  a	  similar	  way,	  we	  can	  see	  that	  what	  makes	  people	  afraid	  of	  minorities	  and	  reluctant	  to	  accept	  their	  presence	  in	  their	  own	  society,	  are	  the	  dogmatic	  images	  of	  their	  thought.	  The	  images	  they	  attribute	  to	  minorities’	  space	  are	  the	  negative	  of	  the	  dogmatic	  images	  of	  the	  normative	  self:	  if	  the	  normative	  self	  is	  the	  dogmatic	  image	  of	  what	  a	  normal	  person	  should	  look	  like,	  the	  negative	  of	  this	  thought	  defines	  how	  an	  abnormal	  self	  looks.	  The	  same	  is	  true	  about	  the	  normative	  public	  space.	  Thus,	  images	  of	  minorities	  in	  the	  civil	  society’s	  mind	  are	  rooted	  in	  the	  same	  ground	  as	  the	  civil	  society’s	  narrative	  selves.	  However,	  these	  images	  can	  provide	  different	  spatial	  experiences,	  as	  they	  are	  reminders	  of	  that	  the	  multiplicity	  lies	  beneath	  the	  order	  of	  narratives	  and	  images.	  	  	  5.3.3 On	  the	  Land	  of	  Larval	  Self	  "Beneath	  the	  world	  of	  representations	  lies	  presupposed	  this	  world	  of	  multiplicity;”	  Sheerin	  remarks	  and	  continues,	  “beneath	  the	  narrative	  self	  swarms	  the	  multiplicitous	  larvae”	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.70).	  In	  the	  world	  of	  representation	  “[s]pace	  and	  time	  display	  oppositions	  (and	  limitations)	  only	  on	  the	  surface,	  but	  they	  presuppose	  in	  their	  real	  depth	  far	  more	  voluminous,	  affirmed	  and	  distributed	  differences	  which	  cannot	  be	  reduced	  to	  the	  banality	  of	  the	  negative”	  (Deleuze,	  1994,	  p.51).	  Larval	  self	  exists,	  before	  the	  configuration	  of	  narrative	  selves	  in	  the	  world	  of	  representations	  and	  obligations	  of	  spatial	  orders.	  “In	  the	  land	  of	  larval	  selves,”	  differences	  are	  qualitative	  and	  ones’	  territory	  could	  neither	  be	  distinguished	  from	  another’s,	  nor	  oneself’s	  	   89 identity	  from	  another’s.	  Manuel	  De	  Landa,	  in	  Intensive	  Science	  and	  Virtual	  Philosophy,	  compares	  Deleuze's	  larval	  self	  to	  the	  process	  of	  embryogenesis	  of	  an	  egg:	  "The	  metaphor	  is	  that	  of	  a	  fertilized	  egg	  prior	  to	  it’s	  unfolding	  into	  a	  fully	  developed	  organism	  with	  differentiated	  tissues	  and	  organs.	  (A	  process	  known	  as	  embryogenesis.)	  While	  in	  essentialist	  interpretations	  of	  embryogenesis	  tissues	  and	  organs	  are	  supposed	  to	  be	  already	  given	  in	  the	  egg	  (preformed,	  as	  it	  were,	  and	  hence	  having	  a	  clear	  and	  distinct	  nature)	  most	  biologists	  today	  have	  given	  up	  preformism	  and	  accepted	  the	  idea	  that	  differentiated	  structures	  emerge	  progressively	  as	  the	  egg	  develops.	  The	  egg	  is	  not,	  of	  course,	  an	  undifferentiated	  mass:	  it	  possesses	  an	  obscure	  yet	  distinct	  structure	  defined	  by	  ones	  of	  biochemical	  concentration	  and	  by	  polarities	  established	  by	  the	  asymmetrical	  position	  of	  the	  yolk	  (or	  nucleus).	  But	  even	  though	  it	  does	  possess	  the	  necessary	  biochemical	  material	  and	  genetic	  information,	  these	  materials	  and	  information	  do	  not	  contain	  a	  clear	  and	  distinct	  blueprint	  of	  the	  final	  organism."	  (De	  Landa,	  2002,	  p.8,	  9)	  	  Deleuze	  wants	  self	  to	  come	  back	  to	  the	  body	  without	  organs	  of	  the	  larval	  self,	  or	  at	  least,	  to	  resonate	  between	  the	  land	  of	  narrative	  self	  and	  the	  land	  of	  larval	  self.	  This	  resonating	  between	  the	  two	  lands	  is	  what	  makes	  a	  distinction	  between	  Deleuze’s	  ontology	  and	  Bergson’s:	  Deleuze’s	  ontology	  includes	  three	  different	  types	  of	  differences:	  actual,	  virtual	  and	  intensive.	  Intensive	  difference	  is	  what	  distinguishes	  Deleuze’s	  approach	  in	  observing	  “self”	  from	  that	  of	  Ricoeur.	  Deleuze	  detects	  self	  as	  a	  “non-­‐signifying	  machine.”	  Sheerin	  explains:	  “[W]ith	  Deleuze,	  we	  position	  ourselves	  differently	  toward	  the	  self	  than	  we	  did	  with	  Ricoeur.	  For	  the	  latter	  (and	  his	  forebears)	  we	  asked	  the	  question:	  'What	  is	  the	  self?'	  This	  provides	  one	  specific	  way	  of	  reading	  the	  self	  where	  you	  see	  it	  'as	  a	  box	  with	  something	  inside	  and	  start	  looking	  for	  what	  it	  signifies…and	  you	  annotate	  and	  interpret	  and	  question'	  the	  self	  in	  this	  regard.	  But	  there	  is	  another	  approach	  and	  that	  is	  to	  see	  the	  self	  as	  a	  'non-­‐signifying	  machine'	  	   90 where	  the	  only	  questions	  to	  pose	  are	  'Does	  it	  work,	  and	  how	  does	  it	  work?"	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.65)	  	  	  Intensive	  multiplicity,	  which	  occupies	  “intensive	  space,”	  remakes	  the	  process	  through	  which	  differences	  are	  positioning	  in	  an	  order;	  virtual	  turns	  into	  actual;	  differences	  are	  clarified,	  mimesis	  2	  joins	  mimesis	  3	  and	  narratives	  are	  configured.	  The	  quality	  of	  intensive	  space	  varies	  through	  the	  process;	  as	  the	  further	  we	  go	  from	  diversity,	  the	  actual	  spatial	  organization	  would	  be	  clearer;	  the	  more	  we	  come	  closer,	  the	  domination	  of	  the	  virtual	  larval	  self	  would	  be	  more	  remarkable.	  Thus,	  boundaries	  in	  intensive	  space	  are	  not	  solid	  and	  bold.	  They	  do	  not	  start	  and	  ends	  at	  clear	  points;	  a	  vague	  quality	  makes	  intensive	  space	  the	  opposite	  of	  the	  extensive	  space	  of	  the	  world	  of	  representations	  that	  is	  defined	  by	  its	  dimensions	  and	  borders.	  The	  borders	  and	  thresholds	  of	  the	  intensive	  space	  are	  rather	  chaotic	  and	  critical,	  and	  on	  which	  materiality	  and	  absurdity	  encounter.	  	  	  Deleuze	  believes	  that	  the	  end	  of	  the	  process	  of	  intensive	  difference	  is	  the	  dead	  narrative,	  the	  realm	  of	  dogmatic	  images.	  For	  going	  beyond	  dogmatic	  images,	  we	  need	  “involuntary	  moments	  of	  thought”	  (Deleuze,	  1994,	  p.175,	  181).	  	  “Something	  in	  the	  world	  forces	  us	  to	  think.	  This	  something	  is	  an	  object	  not	  of	  recognition	  but	  of	  a	  fundamental	  encounter.	  [Whatever	  is	  encountered]	  may	  be	  grasped	  in	  a	  range	  of	  affective	  tones:	  wonder,	  love,	  hatred,	  suffering.	  In	  whichever	  tone,	  its	  primary	  characteristic	  is	  that	  it	  can	  only	  be	  sensed”	  (Ibid,	  139).	  	  5.3.4 Involuntary	  Moments	  of	  Thinking	  Difference	  is	  the	  basic	  element	  for	  the	  emergence	  of	  “involuntary	  moments	  of	  thinking”	  that	  Deleuze	  points	  out.	  The	  basis	  of	  this	  process	  is	  an	  analogy	  between	  different	  things;	  thus	  in	  order	  to	  reach	  those	  moments,	  one	  should	  be	  posited	  in	  the	  context	  of	  multiplicity.	  Deleuze	  	   91 poses	  a	  question:	  "Is	  it	  enough	  to	  multiplicity	  multiply	  representations	  in	  order	  to	  obtain	  such	  effects?"	  (Ibid,	  p.	  56)	  His	  answer	  is	  no:	  	  “Infinite	  representations	  include	  precisely	  an	  infinity	  of	  representations	  -­‐	  either	  by	  ensuring	  the	  convergence	  of	  all	  points	  of	  view	  on	  the	  same	  object	  or	  the	  same	  world,	  or	  by	  making	  all	  moments	  properties	  of	  the	  same	  self.	  In	  either	  case,	  it	  maintains	  a	  unique	  center	  which	  gathers	  and	  represents	  all	  the	  others,	  like	  the	  unity	  of	  series	  which	  governs	  or	  organizes	  its	  terms	  and	  their	  relations	  once	  and	  for	  all”	  (Ibid,	  p.56).	  	  What	  is	  needed	  for	  the	  emergence	  of	  moments	  of	  thinking	  is	  an	  a-­‐centric	  difference;	  an	  encounter	  with	  unrepresented	  representations	  that	  hint	  at	  the	  multiplicity	  of	  larval	  self.	  “Deleuze	  argues	  that	  such	  potential	  forces	  are	  at	  play	  within	  ourselves,	  waiting	  for	  the	  experience	  of	  'violence'	  of	  an	  encounter;	  a	  violence	  that	  could	  develop	  to	  the	  point	  in	  which	  all	  the	  faculties	  of	  though	  no	  longer	  converge,	  but	  diverge	  from	  their	  fundamental	  differences.	  	  “In	  this	  non-­‐dogmatic	  image	  of	  thought	  forged	  on	  the	  terra	  incognita	  of	  the	  Looking-­‐Glass	  world,	  the	  objects	  of	  Wonderland	  are	  no	  longer	  understood	  by	  Alice	  through	  representation	  but	  by	  way	  of	  explication,	  for	  the	  object	  is	  a	  sign,	  an	  internal	  difference	  pointing	  toward	  something	  other	  than	  itself”	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.94	  -­‐75).	  	  If	  one	  read	  objects	  of	  wonderland,	  images	  that	  are	  in	  contrast	  with	  our	  narratives,	  in	  a	  non-­‐signifying	  way	  in	  which	  everything	  refers	  to	  “difference”	  instead	  of	  a	  particular	  meaning,	  one	  would	  reach	  the	  moments	  of	  crisis:	  moments	  of	  hatred,	  anger,	  sympathy,	  wondering	  etc.	  The	  “violence”	  of	  these	  moments,	  of	  course,	  is	  not	  pleasant,	  but	  provides	  a	  leap,	  a	  platform	  for	  movement	  from	  the	  land	  of	  territories	  to	  the	  deterritorialized	  space	  of	  larval	  self;	  from	  solid	  to	  fluid;	  from	  Ricoeurian	  One	  Self’s	  as	  Another,	  to	  an	  inter-­‐subjective	  realm	  in	  which	  “configuration”	  is	  not	  needed	  for	  one	  to	  be	  a	  part	  of	  others’	  identities.	  	  	  	   92 “Movement,	  for	  its	  part,	  implies	  a	  plurality	  of	  centers,	  a	  superposition	  of	  perspectives,	  a	  tangle	  of	  points	  of	  view,	  a	  coexistence	  of	  moments	  which	  essentially	  distort.	  Look	  for	  moments	  of	  involuntary	  feeling	  representation:	  paintings	  or	  sculptures	  are	  already	  such	  'distorters',	  forcing	  us	  to	  create	  movement	  that	  is	  to	  combine	  a	  penetrating	  view,	  or	  to	  ascend	  and	  descend	  within	  the	  space	  as	  we	  move	  through	  it”	  (Deleuze,	  1004,	  p.56).	  	  The	  importance	  of	  "painting"	  and	  "sculpture"	  remarks	  on	  the	  importance	  of	  the	  images	  of	  minorities’	  carved	  on	  the	  civil	  society's	  mind	  one	  more	  time.	  Fragmented	  images	  that	  the	  civil	  society	  has	  of	  minorities'	  space,	  might	  be	  the	  result	  of	  their	  dogmatic	  images	  of	  normative	  self	  and	  normative	  public	  space,	  but	  could	  go	  beyond	  what	  the	  civil	  society	  might	  have	  wanted,	  because	  they	  remark	  on	  differences,	  disorders,	  contradiction.	  They	  situate	  one’s	  self	  in	  the	  midst	  of	  differences	  and	  make	  one	  question	  the	  validity	  of	  the	  order	  one	  lives	  in.	  These	  questions,	  both	  moral	  and	  ethical,	  bring	  subjects	  back	  to	  the	  intensive	  space	  of	  transition.	  Narratives	  dissolve	  into	  differences,	  differences	  organize	  in	  the	  form	  of	  narratives,	  an	  endless	  process	  of	  transition	  between	  the	  points	  of	  certainty	  and	  uncertainty.	  This	  action	  would	  answer	  a	  question	  that	  Sheerin	  raises:	  “Yet	  if	  we	  are	  weavers	  of	  words	  and	  stories	  are	  woven	  together,	  is	  the	  narrative	  self	  of	  ipse	  and	  idem	  identities	  interlude	  then	  unwoven	  as	  it	  is	  woven,	  or	  it	  is	  over-­‐woven?	  Do	  tears	  appear,	  are	  ends	  frayed,	  are	  our	  stories	  of	  ourselves	  ripped	  down	  the	  middle	  or	  shredded	  by	  new	  weavings?”	  (Sheerin,	  2009,	  p.62,	  63)	  	  Narratives	  contain	  information	  about	  fundamental	  differences	  of	  the	  larval	  self:	  the	  memisis2.	  This	  information,	  even	  though	  limited	  in	  the	  boundaries	  of	  their	  narratives,	  can	  reveal	  not	  only	  differences,	  but	  also	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  the	  identities,	  the	  structure	  that	  support	  dogmatic	  images,	  and	  the	  reproduction	  of	  the	  hierarchical	  structure	  in	  the	  molecular	  level.	  The	  folding	  line	  of	  all	  the	  social,	  cultural,	  and	  historical	  narratives,	  which	  has	  become	  clear	  to	  us	  by	  the	  act	  	   93 of	  violence	  of	  “distorter”	  images,	  puts	  subjects	  in	  the	  lines	  of	  flight	  -­‐	  creative	  escapes	  from	  the	  standardization,	  oppression,	  and	  stratification	  of	  society.	  Lines	  of	  flight	  “are	  directions	  rather	  than	  destinations	  and	  they	  lead	  to	  the	  living	  of	  life	  on	  some	  different	  plane	  or	  in	  some	  different	  territory”	  (Deleuze	  &	  Guattari,	  2004,	  p.338).	  From	  the	  platform	  of	  these	  lines,	  one	  can	  transit	  from	  one	  territory	  to	  another;	  deterritorialize	  him	  or	  herself	  without	  being	  trapped	  in	  the	  absolute,	  unchangeable	  dogmatic	  images	  of	  thought.	  	  	  	  	   	   94 Chapter	  6: Conclusion	  	  In	  the	  introduction	  I	  raised	  two	  questions:	  what	  is	  the	  relation	  of	  power-­‐based	  subjectivity	  and	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  and	  what	  are	  the	  limits	  and	  possibilities	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  for	  the	  creation	  of	  what	  Deleuze	  calls	  “involuntary	  moments	  of	  thought.”	  Here,	  I	  explore	  the	  answer	  of	  these	  questions	  based	  on	  my	  studies	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  I	  will	  then	  comment	  briefly	  on	  how	  these	  answers	  can	  influence	  the	  perspective	  of	  different	  disciplines	  dealing	  with	  public	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  about	  these	  spaces.	  	  6.1 Self	  and	  space	  Subjectivity	  is	  defined	  by	  power,	  and	  identities	  are	  hierarchized	  by	  it.	  The	  most	  important	  way	  through	  which	  power	  uses	  public	  spaces	  as	  a	  medium	  to	  manipulate	  subjectivity	  is	  by	  passing	  through	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities.	  The	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  causes	  the	  asymmetry	  of	  power	  of	  different	  identities.	  This	  asymmetry	  dictates	  a	  particular	  spatial	  organization	  in	  which	  spaces	  of	  different	  social	  groups	  are	  separated	  by	  virtual	  boundaries.	  Even	  though	  the	  boundaries	  are	  not	  solid	  and	  are	  merged	  into	  each	  other,	  the	  quality	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  varies	  from	  the	  space	  of	  one	  group	  to	  that	  of	  another.	  People	  at	  two	  sides	  of	  the	  virtual	  boundaries	  think	  about	  each	  other	  in	  a	  particular	  way:	  the	  way	  power	  demanded.	  	  	  Moreover,	  the	  asymmetry	  of	  power	  of	  different	  identities	  assumes	  space	  as	  the	  right	  of	  certain	  groups,	  and	  leads	  to	  presuppositions	  about	  minorities.	  These	  presuppositions	  strengthen	  the	  distinction	  between	  normal	  and	  abnormal/criminal	  selves	  and	  influence	  people’s	  behaviors	  and	  perceptions	  about	  one	  another.	  Thus,	  one	  cannot	  talk	  about	  the	  relation	  of	  subjectivity	  and	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  without	  considering	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  of	  their	  constituents	  and	  therefore	  what	  attaches	  their	  identity	  to	  particular	  spaces	  so	  that	  the	  hierarchy	  would	  become	  an	  issue.	  	  	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  has	  created	  a	  symbolic	  attachment	  to	  the	  identity	  of	  its	  permanent	  constituents.	  These	  people	  are	  attached	  to	  space	  due	  to	  four	  different,	  rather	  connected	  	   95 reasons:	  the	  existence	  of	  physical	  elements	  [the	  City	  Theater,	  close-­‐by	  universities,	  etc.],	  the	  presence	  of	  people	  from	  their	  own	  social	  group,	  history	  and	  memory,	  and	  the	  conflicts	  of	  identities	  of	  different	  permanent	  and	  contemporary	  constituents.	  	  	  The	  last	  one,	  the	  conflict	  of	  identities,	  is	  the	  one	  that	  connects	  subjectivity	  to	  identity.	  The	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  that	  power	  intensifies	  in	  order	  to	  manipulate	  subjects	  leads	  to	  conflicts	  between	  constituents.	  These	  conflicts	  strengthen	  people’s	  attachment	  to	  space.	  None	  of	  them	  want	  to	  lose	  the	  battle	  of	  identities,	  so	  they	  keep	  on	  presenting	  themselves	  in	  space,	  in	  spite	  of	  their	  dissatisfaction	  of	  its	  environment.	  Thus,	  in	  public	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  the	  more	  people’s	  identities	  are	  attached	  to	  space,	  the	  more	  their	  subjectivity	  could	  be	  manipulated	  by	  power.	  	  	  6.2 Limitations	  and	  possibilities	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  Most	  of	  the	  limitations	  and	  possibilities	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  as	  an	  example	  of	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  for	  the	  creation	  of	  involuntary	  moments	  of	  thought	  comes	  from	  the	  third	  type	  of	  attachment	  between	  their	  identity	  and	  the	  space	  they	  occupy:	  attachment	  through	  conflicts.	  The	  conflict	  between	  identities,	  in	  its	  turn,	  is	  the	  consequence	  of	  the	  asymmetry	  of	  power	  of	  different	  identities.	  	  	  6.2.1 Limitations	  I	  have	  identified	  four	  sources	  for	  the	  limitation	  and	  manipulation	  of	  actions	  and	  subjectivities	  of	  the	  constituents	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park:	  the	  political	  power,	  the	  micro	  power,	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony,	  and	  the	  injustice	  in	  representations	  and	  actions.	  These	  four	  sources,	  however,	  could	  be	  studied	  about	  other	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  as	  well.	  	  	  The	  first	  source	  of	  limitations	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  political	  power.	  Political	  power	  expands	  its	  domination	  over	  space	  through	  macro	  level	  policies,	  law	  and	  penal	  codes,	  direct	  spatial	  interventions,	  policing	  forces,	  etc.	  Political	  power	  has	  also	  developed	  a	  controlling	  system	  in	  the	  park	  that	  transforms	  macro	  policies	  into	  the	  micro	  level	  of	  social	  relations	  in	  everyday	  life.	  The	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  supports	  the	  extension	  of	  macro	  power	  in	  micro	  level.	  	   96 	  The	  micro	  level	  of	  social	  interactions,	  thus,	  is	  the	  second	  source	  of	  limitations	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park.	  The	  hierarchy	  of	  identities,	  which	  is	  supported	  by	  policies	  and	  laws,	  produces	  tension	  between	  people.	  When	  that	  hierarchy	  finds	  its	  spatial	  organization,	  the	  tensions,	  as	  I	  explained	  above,	  draw	  virtual	  boundaries	  between	  spaces	  of	  different	  social	  groups.	  What	  strengthens	  these	  boundaries	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  people’s	  dogmatic	  images	  about	  each	  other	  that	  lead	  to	  a	  sense	  of	  animosity	  and	  fear.	  Therefore,	  regular	  people,	  unintentionally,	  play	  the	  role	  of	  policing	  forces	  in	  controlling	  each	  other’s	  behaviors.	  Moreover,	  the	  civil	  society	  tries	  to	  remove	  minorities	  that	  are	  considered	  as	  abnormal	  selves	  from	  space.	  This	  micro	  level	  power	  plays	  a	  more	  important	  role	  in	  controlling	  public	  spaces	  than	  macro	  level	  power.	  	  	  The	  third	  source	  of	  limitations	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  of	  the	  park	  and	  political	  power.	  Even	  though	  this	  battle	  is	  a	  battle	  for	  the	  freedom	  of	  the	  civil	  society	  of	  the	  park,	  it	  has	  attacked	  minorities’	  right	  to	  space.	  Since	  the	  right	  to	  space	  is	  a	  communal	  right,	  reducing	  minorities’	  freedom	  will	  deprive	  the	  civil	  society	  from	  their	  right	  to	  space	  as	  well.	  The	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  a	  battle	  between	  the	  political	  power	  and	  the	  civil	  society’s	  desired	  orders	  for	  narratives	  of	  space;	  thus,	  minorities	  and	  subalterns	  are	  neglected	  or	  denied	  in	  either	  of	  them.	  In	  the	  absence	  of	  minorities	  and	  subalterns,	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony	  of	  the	  park	  is	  not	  a	  progressive	  act	  of	  movement.	  Rather,	  it	  is	  another	  level	  of	  controlling	  and	  repression.	  	  The	  forth	  source	  of	  limitations	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  is	  the	  injustice	  in	  representations	  and	  spatial	  experiences	  between	  different	  constituents.	  The	  asymmetry	  of	  power	  among	  different	  identities	  causes	  an	  injustice	  in	  representation:	  minorities	  cannot	  represent	  themselves	  affirmatively	  and	  have	  to	  codify	  their	  identity	  and	  presence	  in	  space.	  Inasmuch	  as	  these	  representations	  that	  I	  am	  talking	  about	  are	  shown	  in	  actions,	  the	  injustice	  is	  not	  only	  about	  the	  right	  to	  representation	  but	  also	  the	  right	  to	  free	  actions	  and	  practices	  in	  space.	  When	  minorities	  cannot	  represent	  their	  identity	  freely,	  it	  shows	  that	  their	  spatial	  practices	  are	  limited	  as	  well.	  	  	   97 This	  injustice	  in	  representation	  and	  free	  actions	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  blocks	  the	  possibility	  of	  interaction	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  minorities,	  and	  brings	  fear	  and	  tension	  for	  the	  civil	  society.	  The	  civil	  society’s	  fear	  of	  minorities	  intensifies	  their	  inclination	  to	  remove	  minorities	  from	  space	  or	  to	  separate	  their	  own	  space	  from	  that	  of	  minorities.	  All	  of	  these	  actions	  show	  that	  injustice	  on	  the	  level	  of	  representation	  and	  spatial	  practice	  is	  one	  of	  the	  main	  reasons	  of	  limitations	  of	  public	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  	  6.2.2 Possibilities	  Possibilities	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  in	  the	  creation	  of	  involuntary	  moments	  of	  thought	  are	  consequences	  of	  the	  contradictions	  that	  its	  limitations	  produce.	  Even	  though	  the	  political	  power	  and	  the	  civil	  society	  of	  the	  park’s	  desire	  is	  to	  reduce	  the	  crises	  of	  the	  park	  by	  removing	  minorities,	  sometimes	  their	  attempts	  lead	  to	  completely	  opposite	  results.	  As	  long	  as	  minorities	  are	  not	  removed	  [in	  other	  words,	  as	  long	  as	  space	  is	  still	  public]	  the	  limitation	  they	  suffer	  from	  increases	  the	  chance	  for	  the	  generation	  of	  moments	  of	  critical	  thinking.	  As	  I	  explained	  in	  Chapter	  Four,	  this	  is	  the	  result	  of	  the	  different	  nature	  of	  images	  and	  narrative	  kinds	  of	  representations.	  	  Images	  could	  be	  sources	  of	  tension	  between	  different	  constituents,	  but	  their	  presence	  shows	  the	  diversity	  and	  hints	  to	  the	  continuous	  world	  of	  differences	  that	  lies	  beneath	  the	  order	  of	  the	  world	  of	  representations.	  Even	  though	  the	  order	  of	  the	  world	  of	  representations	  is	  power’s	  way	  to	  expand	  the	  domination	  of	  its	  desired	  narrative	  on	  space,	  it	  could	  be	  a	  source	  of	  critical	  thinking	  when	  the	  subject	  encounters	  the	  fundamental	  contradictions	  it	  reveals:	  some	  parts	  are	  missing	  from	  the	  puzzle	  of	  narratives	  and	  are	  replaced	  by	  unclear	  images.	  Such	  encounters	  make	  people	  undermine	  the	  rigidity	  of	  structure	  and	  think	  about	  the	  legitimacy	  of	  minorities	  and	  their	  right	  to	  space.	  So	  they	  will	  be	  conveyed	  to	  the	  world	  in	  which	  differences	  are	  not	  a	  source	  of	  crisis	  because	  differences	  are	  not	  hierarchized.	  This	  is	  the	  virtual	  space	  of	  Deleuze	  that	  I	  explained	  in	  the	  Chapter	  Four.	  	  	  	   98 6.3 Moving	  forward	  The	  conclusions	  I	  have	  mentioned	  suggest	  that	  different	  fields	  of	  studies	  that	  are	  dealing	  with	  public	  spaces	  revise	  their	  expectations	  and	  understanding.	  The	  conclusions	  suggest	  that	  more	  attention	  should	  be	  paid	  to	  the	  relation	  of	  public	  spaces	  to	  diversity,	  and	  the	  importance	  of	  the	  way	  we	  deal	  with	  diversity	  in	  the	  formation	  of	  the	  democratic	  characteristic	  that	  public	  spaces	  should	  have.	  	  6.3.1 On	  the	  collapse	  of	  a	  historical	  moment	  I	  started	  this	  research	  by	  mentioning	  a	  historical	  moment:	  the	  current	  Middle	  Eastern	  protests	  and	  the	  collapse	  of	  many	  of	  them	  into	  conflicts,	  civil	  wars	  or	  passivity.	  I	  suggested	  that	  in	  order	  to	  understand	  the	  reasons	  for	  these	  collapses	  and	  the	  role	  of	  public	  spaces	  in	  the	  rise	  and	  the	  fall	  of	  those	  movements,	  one	  should	  return	  to	  the	  urban	  life	  of	  these	  spaces,	  before	  their	  historical	  moment,	  or	  after	  that	  in	  the	  time	  of	  passivity,	  when	  they	  were	  institutions	  of	  power	  and	  spaces	  of	  crisis.	  	  On	  one	  hand,	  the	  conflict	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  minorities	  in	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  shows	  that	  people	  repress	  each	  other.	  The	  aim	  of	  the	  battle	  of	  hegemony,	  protests	  and	  riots	  of	  civil	  society	  has	  been	  to	  expand	  the	  domination	  of	  civil	  society’s	  own	  narrative.	  Once	  the	  civil	  society’s	  movement	  reaches	  a	  point	  that	  minorities	  can	  participate	  in	  it,	  the	  civil	  society	  changes	  its	  attitude.	  The	  conflict	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  minorities	  changes	  the	  target	  of	  civil	  society’s	  riots	  and	  replaces	  the	  struggle	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  political	  power	  by	  the	  struggle	  between	  the	  civil	  society	  and	  minorities.	  Another	  option	  is	  that	  the	  first	  battle,	  between	  civil	  and	  politic	  power,	  comes	  into	  passivity	  because	  of	  the	  insufficient	  power	  of	  the	  civil	  society,	  its	  refusal	  to	  make	  alliance	  with	  minority	  groups,	  and	  their	  fear	  that	  minorities	  might	  become	  the	  ultimate	  winners.	  	  	  On	  the	  other	  hand,	  as	  long	  as	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identities	  exists,	  public	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  as	  a	  type	  of	  institution	  of	  power,	  in	  contrast	  with	  what	  Foucault	  states,	  will	  not	  necessarily	  turn	  into	  spaces	  of	  social	  unity.	  To	  be	  more	  particular,	  public	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  as	  institutions	  of	  power,	  	   99 would	  never	  turn	  into	  spaces	  of	  unity	  as	  long	  as	  narratives	  of	  minorities	  are	  not	  removed	  from	  them;	  and	  once	  minorities	  are	  removed	  from	  spaces	  of	  crisis,	  we	  can	  not	  talk	  about	  them	  as	  public	  spaces	  any	  more.	  	  	  6.3.2 On	  the	  definition	  of	  public	  spaces	  In	  the	  introduction,	  I	  raised	  a	  question:	  why	  do	  public	  spaces	  that	  are	  supposed	  to	  be	  spaces	  of	  social	  interaction,	  in	  some	  cases,	  turn	  into	  spaces	  of	  crisis?	  Studying	  Daneshjoo	  Park	  by	  means	  of	  the	  Deleuzian	  approach	  to	  the	  philosophy	  of	  diversity	  shows	  that	  this	  question	  is	  a	  fallacy	  because	  it	  is	  based	  on	  subjective	  presumptions.	  The	  first	  presumption,	  which	  has	  a	  long	  history	  in	  social	  and	  political	  thought,	  which	  includes	  Arendt’s	  concept	  of	  the	  public	  realm	  and	  Habermas’s	  public	  sphere,	  considers	  public	  spaces	  as	  spaces	  of	  social	  interactions.	  This	  is	  an	  overstatement,	  a	  dogmatic	  image,	  which	  points	  to	  the	  second	  presumption	  about	  constituents	  of	  public	  space:	  a	  public	  man	  is	  a	  person	  capable	  of	  communicative	  interaction,	  and	  if	  his	  interests	  are	  in	  contrast	  with	  others,	  he	  negotiates	  with	  them	  in	  a	  civilized	  manner	  to	  come	  into	  an	  agreement.	  Thus,	  a	  public	  space,	  as	  Hamerbas	  explains	  in	  The	  Theory	  of	  Communicative	  Action	  is	  the	  place	  of	  “communicative	  action”	  where	  interactions,	  negotiations,	  and	  agreements	  take	  place.	  These	  dogmatic	  images	  downplay	  the	  importance	  of	  diversity	  in	  public	  spaces	  and	  conceive	  them	  as	  “a	  cloth	  woven	  of	  difference	  but	  one	  cloth	  nevertheless”	  (Sherrin,	  2009,	  p.62).	  	  Furthermore,	  how	  can	  people	  interact	  in	  a	  civilized	  way	  when	  they	  do	  not	  have	  equal	  civil	  rights	  and	  power?	  	  Embracing	  the	  matter	  of	  “diversity”	  and	  “difference”	  in	  public	  spaces,	  we	  should	  admit	  that	  public	  spaces	  are	  less	  about	  agreements	  than	  about	  crisis	  and	  even	  contests.	  These	  crises	  take	  away	  the	  possibility	  of	  social	  interactions	  but	  what	  is	  the	  democratic	  purpose	  of	  social	  interactions	  if	  they	  require	  the	  removal	  of	  certain	  social	  groups	  from	  space.	  These	  all	  suggest	  a	  revision	  in	  our	  understanding	  of	  the	  meaning	  of	  public	  spaces	  and	  the	  constituents	  we	  expect	  to	  occupy	  them.	  Spaces	  of	  crisis	  are	  not	  only	  one	  type	  of	  public	  spaces,	  as	  long	  as	  the	  hierarchy	  of	  identity	  exists,	  public	  spaces	  are	  all	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  and	  their	  limits	  and	  possibilities	  should	  be	  embraced	  at	  the	  same	  time.	  	   100 	  6.3.3 On	  designing	  and	  planning	  for	  public	  Revising	  the	  meaning	  of	  public	  spaces	  will	  lead	  to	  a	  different	  attitude	  in	  designing	  and	  planning	  for	  public.	  Above	  all,	  it	  means	  that	  considering	  diversity	  is	  not	  equal	  to	  considering	  all	  of	  the	  narratives	  of	  space.	  Embracing	  diversity	  means	  that	  all	  the	  narrative	  and	  non-­‐narrative	  states	  of	  selves	  and	  spatial	  experiences	  should	  be	  regarded	  and	  predicted.	  	  Moreover,	  if	  the	  built	  environment	  wants	  to	  intentionally	  be	  effective	  in	  the	  production	  of	  involuntary	  moments	  of	  thought,	  it	  has	  to	  have	  the	  possibility	  of	  being	  the	  space	  of	  encounter.	  If	  there	  were	  no	  open	  public	  space	  at	  the	  current	  location	  of	  the	  park,	  I	  would	  say:	  “let’s	  open	  up	  this	  space.”	  However,	  the	  park	  exists,	  but	  the	  acts	  of	  reducing	  its	  diversity,	  as	  described	  in	  this	  thesis,	  have	  demolished	  the	  social	  and	  historical	  role	  it	  could	  play.	  	  	  6.3.4 On	  methodology	  And	  last	  but	  not	  least,	  the	  complexity	  of	  public	  spaces	  of	  crisis	  and	  the	  diversity	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  within	  them	  open	  up	  a	  discussion	  that	  suggests	  a	  revision	  in	  the	  methodology	  of	  studying	  the	  production	  of	  space.	  After	  disarticulation	  of	  the	  composition	  of	  Daneshjoo	  Park,	  what	  remains	  is	  not	  Lefebvre’s	  three	  levels	  of	  space	  of	  power,	  lived	  space	  and	  spatial	  practices.	  Instead,	  what	  remain	  are	  different	  states	  of	  spatial	  experiences:	  narratives,	  images/metaphors,	  and	  situations	  between	  them.	  Each	  of	  these	  three	  states	  contains	  micro	  and	  macro	  power,	  a	  space	  of	  power	  and	  lived	  space	  at	  the	  same	  time.	  Studying	  space	  based	  on	  the	  diversity	  of	  spatial	  experiences	  considers	  the	  diversity	  of	  subjects	  and	  specifications	  of	  different	  social	  groups,	  something	  that	  is	  missed	  in	  objective	  readings	  of	  space.	  However,	  this	  is	  only	  the	  beginning	  of	  an	  argument	  whose	  aim	  is	  to	  connect	  public	  spaces	  to	  the	  matter	  of	  diversity,	  minorities’	  right	  to	  space,	  and	  involuntary	  moments	  of	  though	  in	  order	  to	  move	  toward	  defining	  radical	  democratic	  public	  spaces	  in	  the	  controversial	  context	  of	  Middle	  Eastern	  cities.	  	   101 Bibliography	  	  Arendt,	  Hannah.	  The	  Human	  Condition.	  Chicago:	  University	  of	  Chicago	  Press,	  1998.	  	  	  Bayat,	  Asef.	  “Tehran:	  Paradox	  City.”	  New	  Left	  Review.	  66	  (2010):	  99.	  	  	  Bergson,	  Henri	  and	  Frank	  Lubecki	  Pogson.	  Time	  and	  Free	  Will:	  An	  Essay	  on	  the	  Immediate	  Data	  	  	  	  	  	   of	  Consciousness.	  New	  York:	  S.	  Sonnenschein	  &	  co.,	  1910.	  	  	  Butler,	  Chris,	  Dr.	  Henri	  Lefebvre:	  Spatial	  Politics,	  Everyday	  Life	  and	  the	  Right	  to	  the	  City.	  Milton	  	   Park,	  Abingdon,	  Oxon:	  Routledge,	  2012.	  	  	  Certeau,	  Michel	  de.	  The	  Practice	  of	  Everyday	  Life.	  Berkeley:	  University	  of	  California	  Press,	  1988.	  	  	  Deleuze,	  Gilles.	  Difference	  and	  Repetition.	  London:	  Athlone	  Press,	  1994.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Foucault.	  Paris:	  Éditions	  de	  Minuit,	  1986.	  	  	  Deleuze,	  Gilles,	  and	  Felix	  Guattari.	  Anti-­‐Oedipus:	  Capitalism	  and	  Schizophrenia.	  New	  York:	  	   Viking	  Press,	  1977.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Anti-­‐Oedipus:	  Capitalism	  and	  Schizophrenia.	  Minneapolis:	  University	  of	  Minnesota	  Press,	  	   1987.	  	  	  Deleuze,	  Gilles,	  and	  David	  Lapoujade.	  Two	  Regimes	  of	  Madness:	  Texts	  and	  Interviews	  1975-­‐	   1995.	  New	  York:	  Semiotext(e),	  2006.	  	  	  Dovey,	  Kim.	  Framing	  Places:	  Mediating	  Power	  in	  Built	  Form.	  New	  York:	  Routledge,	  1999.	  	  	  Entrikin,	  J.	  Nicholas.	  The	  Betweenness	  of	  Place:	  Towards	  a	  Geography	  of	  Modernity.	  	   Basingstoke:	  Macmillan	  Education,	  1991.	  	  	  Foucault,	  Michel.	  Language,	  Counter-­‐Memory,	  Practice:	  Selected	  Essays	  and	  Interviews.	  Ithaca,	  	   N.Y:	  Cornell	  University	  Press,	  1977.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  "The	  Subject	  and	  Power."	  Critical	  Inquiry	  8.4	  (1982):	  777-­‐95.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐	  "Of	  Other	  Spaces."	  Diacritics	  16.1	  (1986).	  	  Foucault,	  Michel,	  and	  James	  D.	  Faubion.	  Power.	  3	  Vol.	  New	  York:	  New	  Press,	  2000.	  	  	   102 Gramsci,	  Antonio	  and	  Derek	  Boothman.	  Further	  Selections	  from	  the	  Prison	  Notebooks.	  London:	  	   Electric	  Book	  Co,	  2001.	  	  Habermas,	  Jürgen.	  The	  Theory	  of	  Communicative	  Action.	  Boston:	  Beacon	  Press,	  1984.	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  On	  the	  Pragmatics	  of	  Social	  Interaction:	  Preliminary	  Studies	  in	  the	  Theory	  of	  Communicative	  	   Action.	  Cambridge,	  Mass:	  MIT	  Press,	  2001.	  	  	  Harvey,	  David.	  Consciousness	  and	  the	  Urban	  Experience.	  1.	  Vol.	  Oxford:	  Blackwell,	  1985.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  The	  Condition	  of	  Postmodernity:	  An	  Enquiry	  into	  the	  Origins	  of	  Cultural	  Change.	  Oxford	  UK:	  	   Blackwell,	  1990.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Clarendon	  Lectures	  in	  Geography	  and	  Environmental	  Studies:	  New	  Imperialism.	  Oxford	  	   University	  Press,	  2003.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Spaces	  of	  Global	  Capitalism.	  London:	  Verso,	  2006.	  	  	  Heidari,	  Arash.	  “The	  Discourse	  of	  Crisis	  and	  Iranians'	  Cultural	  Identity.”	  (Gofteman-­‐e	  Bohran	  va	  	   Hoviat-­‐e	  Farhangi-­‐e	  Iranian)	  Tehran:	  Bahar	  	   newspaper	  187,	  (2013).	  (In	  Persian)	  	  Hoy,	  David	  Couzens,	  and	  Thomas	  McCarthy.	  Critical	  Theory.	  Cambridge,	  Mass.,	  USA:	  Blackwell	  	   Publishers,	  1994.	  	  	  Jaar,	  Alfredo,	  Antonio	  Gramsci,	  and	  Fondazione	  Antonio	  Ratti.	  The	  Aesthetics	  of	  Resistance:	  	   Estetica	  Della	  Resistenza.	  Barcelona:	  Fondazione	  Antonio	  Ratti,	  2005.	  	  	  Jameson,	  Fredric.	  The	  Political	  Unconscious:	  Narrative	  as	  a	  Socially	  Symbolic	  Act.	  Ithaca,	  N.Y:	  	   Cornell	  University	  Press,	  1981.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Postmodernism,	  Or,	  the	  Cultural	  Logic	  of	  Late	  Capitalism.	  Durham:	  Duke	  University	  Press,	  	   1991.	  	  	  Jaynes,	  Julian.	  The	  Origin	  of	  Consciousness	  in	  the	  Breakdown	  of	  the	  Bicameral	  Mind.	  Boston:	  	   Houghton	  Mifflin,	  1977.	  	  	  Karimi,	  Jalil.	  “Sociology	  and	  the	  Problematic	  of	  Iran	  Identity,	  analysis	  of	  empirical	  and	  	   theoretical	  studies	  on	  identity.”	  (Jame-­‐e	  Shenasi	  va	  Moshkel-­‐e	  Hoviat-­‐e	  Irani)	  Tehran:	  	   National	  Studies	  Journal	  1	  (2011)	  28-­‐61.	  (In	  	  Persian)	  	  Kingwell,	  Mark.	  Concrete	  Reveries:	  Consciousness	  and	  the	  City.	  Toronto:	  Viking	  Canada,	  2008.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  The	  World	  we	  Want:	  Virtue,	  Vice,	  and	  the	  Good	  Citizen.	  Toronto:	  Viking,	  2000.	  	  	  	   103 Kohn,	  Margaret.	  Radical	  Space:	  Building	  the	  House	  of	  the	  People.	  Ithaca,	  N.Y:	  Cornell	  University	  	   Press,	  2003.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Brave	  New	  Neighborhoods.	  New	  York,	  NY:	  Routledge,	  2004.	  	  	  Lahiji,	  Nadir.	  The	  Political	  Unconscious	  of	  Architecture:	  Re-­‐Opening	  Jameson's	  Narrative.	  	   Burlington,	  VT:	  Ashgate,	  2011.	  	  	  Lefebvre,	  Henri.	  The	  Production	  of	  Space.	  Cambridge,	  Mass.,	  USA:	  Blackwell,	  1991.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  The	  Urban	  Revolution.	  Minneapolis:	  University	  of	  Minnesota	  Press,	  2003.	  	  	  Lefebvre,	  Henri,	  Eleonore	  Kofman,	  and	  Elizabeth	  Lebas.	  Writings	  on	  Cities.	  Cambridge,	  Mass:	  	   Blackwell,	  1996.	  	  	  Lefebvre,	  Henri,	  and	  Inc	  ebrary.	  Rhythmanalysis:	  Space,	  Time,	  and	  Everyday	  Life.	  New	  York:	  	   Continuum	  International	  Publishing,	  2004.	  	  	  Lefebvre,	  Henri,	  Neil	  Brenner,	  and	  Stuart	  Elden.	  State,	  Space,	  World:	  Selected	  Essays.	  	   Minneapolis:	  University	  of	  Minnesota	  Press,	  2009.	  	  	  Mansfield,	  Nick.	  Subjectivity:	  Theories	  of	  the	  Self	  from	  Freud	  to	  Haraway.	  New	  York:	  New	  York	  	   University	  Press,	  2000.	  	  	  Mark	  Kingwell.	  "The	  Prison	  of	  "Public	  Space"."	  Literary	  Review	  of	  Canada	  16.3	  (2008):	  18.	  	  Merrifield,	  Andrew.	  "Place	  and	  Space:	  A	  Lefebvrian	  Reconciliation."	  Transactions	  of	  the	  Institute	  	   of	  British	  Geographers	  18.4	  (1993):	  516-­‐31.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.Merrifield,	  Andy.	  Henri	  Lefebvre:	  A	  Critical	  Introduction.	  New	  York:	  Routledge,	  2006.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Henri	  Lefebvre:	  A	  Critical	  Introduction.	  New	  York:	  Routledge,	  2006.	  	  	  Nazari,	  Ali	  Ashraf.	  The	  Discourse	  of	  Identity	  and	  the	  Islamic	  Revolution	  of	  Iran.	  (Gofteman-­‐e	  	   Hoviat	  va	  Enghelab-­‐e	  Eslami-­‐e	  Iran)Tehran:	  Islamic	  Republic	  Document	  Center	  	   Publication,	  2008.	  (In	  Persian)	  	  Peter	  D.	  Thomas.	  The	  Gramscian	  Moment:	  Philosophy,	  Hegemony	  and	  Marxism	  Historical	  	   Materialism	  Book	  24.	  NL:	  Brill,	  2009.	  	  	  Ricoeur,	  Paul.	  Time	  and	  Narrative.	  Chicago:	  University	  of	  Chicago	  Press,	  1984.	  	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Time	  and	  Narrative.	  Chicago:	  University	  of	  Chicago	  Press,	  1990.	  	  	  	   104 -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Oneself	  as	  another.	  Chicago:	  University	  of	  Chicago	  Press,	  1992.	  	  	  Sheerin,	  Declan.	  Deleuze	  and	  Ricoeur:	  Disavowed	  affinities	  and	  the	  narrative	  self.	  Continuum,	  	   2009.	  	  Simmel,	  Georg,	  and	  Donald	  Nathan	  Levine.	  On	  Individuality	  and	  Social	  Forms:	  Selected	  Writings.	  	   Chicago:	  University	  of	  Chicago	  Press,	  1971.	  	  	  Thomas,	  Peter	  D.	  The	  Gramscian	  Moment:	  Philosophy,	  Hegemony	  and	  Marxism.	  Leiden: 	   BRILL,	  2009.	  	  West-­‐Pavlov,	  Russell.	  Space	  in	  Theory:	  Kristeva,	  Foucault,	  Deleuze.	  7	  Vol.	  New	  York,	  NY:	  Rodopi,	  	   2009.	  	  	  Winslade,	  John.	  "Tracing	  Lines	  of	  Flight:	  Implications	  of	  the	  Work	  of	  Gilles	  Deleuze	  for	  Narrative	  	   Practice."	  Family	  process	  48.3	  (2009):	  332-­‐46.	  	  	  Wrong,	  Dennis	  Hume.	  Power,	  its	  Forms,	  Bases	  and	  Uses.	  New	  York:	  Harper	  and	  Row	  Publishers,	  	   1979.	  	  	  Zieleniec,	  Andrzej	  Jan	  Leon.	  Space	  and	  Social	  Theory.	  Los	  Angeles:	  SAGE	  Pub,	  2007.	  	  	  	   105 Web	  Publications	  	  	  Appelbaum,	  Stuart,	  and	  Benjamin	  Weinthal.	  “Iran:	  Still	  Hostile	  to	  Gays.”	  The	  New	  	   York	  	   Times.	  19	  Nov.	  2013.	  Web.	  12	  April.	  2014.	  	   http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/iran-­‐	   hostile-­‐gays-­‐article-­‐	   1.1521730	  	  “A	  Response	  to	  Mashreghnews	  Report	  About	  the	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Mosque.”	  Shafaf.	  25	  Dec	  	   2012.	  	   Web.	  24	  Feb.	  2014.	  (In	  Persian)	  	  Arjomandi,	  Ismaiel.	  “Mashregh’s	  report	  of	  Vali-­‐e-­‐Asr	  Mosque:	  A	  mosque	  that	  is	  	   sacrificed	  for	  	   the	  City	  Theater.”	  Mashreghnews.	  23	  December.	  2012.	  Web.	  24	  	   Feb.	  2014.	  	   <http://www.mashreghnews.ir/fa/news/179992>	  (In	  Persian)	  	  Cooper,	  Helen.	  “Ahmadinejad,	  at	  Columbia,	  Parries	  and	  Puzzles.”	  The	  New	  York	  	   Times.	  25	  	   September,	  2007.	  Web.	  15	  March.	  2014.	  	   http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/25/world/middleeast/25iran.html	  	  “Daneshjoo	  Park’s	  Major	  Issues:	  Reminding	  a	  Forgotten	  Agreement.”	  Mehrnews.	  25	  	   June.	  	   2013.	  	   Web.	  20	  Aug.	  2013.	  	   <http://www.mehrnews.com/detail/news/2083749>	  (In	  	   Persian)	  	  Fatahi,	  Nazila.	  “Despite	  Denials,	  Gays	  Insist	  They	  Exist,	  if	  Quietly,	  in	  Iran.”	  The	  New	  York	  Times.	  	   30	  Sep.	  2007.	  Web.	  15	  March.	  2014.	  	   http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/30/world/middleeast/30gays.html?_r=0	  	  Sedghi,	  Majid.	  “Homosexuals	  Difficult	  Position	  in	  Iran.”	  Asre-­‐nou.	  7	  Jan.	  2008.	  Web.	  	   24	  Feb.	  	   2024.	  <http://asre-­‐nou.net/1386/day/17/m-­‐hamjensgerayan.html>	  	   (In	  Persian)	  	  “The	  Contrast	  of	  Compromise	  and	  Resistance	  in	  Vali-­‐e	  Asr	  Crossroad.”	  Khavarestan.	  	   7	  May.	  	   2014.	  24	  Feb.	  2014.	  <http://khavarestan.ir/news/1668	  >	  (In	  Persian)	  	  “The	  Municipal’s	  Readiness	  for	  the	  Construction	  of	  Rudaki	  Cultural	  Pedestrian	  Way.”	  	   Mardomsalari.	  25	  Dec.	  2013.	  Web.	  24	  Feb.	  2014.	  	   <http://www.mardomsalari.com/template1/News.aspx?NID=180764>	  (In	  	   Persian)	  	  	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0167227/manifest

Comment

Related Items