Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Harnessing chaperone-mediated autophagy for the degradation of endogenous proteins Fan, Xuelai 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2015_february_fan_xuelai.pdf [ 94.74MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0167106.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0167106-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0167106-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0167106-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0167106-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0167106-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0167106-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0167106-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0167106.ris

Full Text

HARNESSING	  CHAPERONE-­‐MEDIATED	  AUTOPHAGY	  FOR	  THE	  DEGRADATION	  OF	  ENDOGENOUS	  PROTEINS	  by	  Xuelai	  Fan	  B.Sc.,	  Peking	  University,	  2009	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  	  DOCTOR	  OF	  PHILOSOPHY	  in	  The	  Faculty	  of	  Graduate	  and	  Postdoctoral	  Studies	  (Neuroscience)	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  	  January	  2015	  ©	  Xuelai	  Fan,	  2015	    ii ABSTRACT	  Rapid	  and	  reversible	  methods	  for	  altering	  the	  function	  of	  endogenous	  proteins	  are	  not	  only	  indispensable	  tools	  for	  probing	  complex	  biological	  systems,	  but	  may	  potentially	  drive	  the	  development	  of	  new	  therapeutics	  for	  the	  treatment	  of	  human	  diseases.	  Genetic	  approaches	  have	  provided	  insights	  into	  protein	  function,	  but	  are	  limited	  in	  speed,	  reversibility	  and	  spatiotemporal	  control.	  To	  overcome	  these	  limitations,	  we	  have	  developed	  a	  peptide-­‐based	  method	  to	  degrade	  a	  given	  endogenous	  protein	  at	  the	  post-­‐translational	  level	  by	  harnessing	  chaperone-­‐mediated	  autophagy,	  a	  major	  intracellular	  protein	  degradation	  pathway	  mediated	  by	  the	  lysosome.	  This	  thesis	  presents	  the	  design	  and	  validation	  of	  SNIPER	  (Selective	  Native	  Protein	  ERadication)	  for	  use	  in	  cultured	  cells	  as	  well	  as	  in	  intact	  animals.	  	  Specifically,	  we	  demonstrate	  the	  specificity,	  efficacy	  and	  generalizability	  of	  SNIPER	  by	  showing	  efficient	  knockdown	  of	  various	  proteins,	  including	  death-­‐associated	  protein	  kinase	  1	  (160	  kDa),	  scaffolding	  protein	  PSD-­‐95	  (95	  kDa)	  and	  α-­‐synuclein	  (19	  kDa),	  with	  their	  respective	  SNIPER	  peptides	  in	  cell	  lines	  and	  rat	  neuronal	  cultures.	  Moreover,	  we	  examine	  the	  characteristics	  of	  SNIPER-­‐mediated	  protein	  knockdown	  and	  found	  that	  the	  level	  of	  protein	  knockdown	  is	  dose-­‐,	  time-­‐	  and	  lysosome-­‐dependent.	  Furthermore,	  we	  demonstrate	  that	  SNIPER	  efficiently	  knocked	  down	  a	  dephosphorylated	  subpopulation	  of	  a	  given	  protein	  while	  sparing	  its	  phosphorylated	  form,	  attesting	  to	  the	  specificity	  of	  the	  method.	  Finally,	  using	  a	  rat	  model	  of	  focal	  ischemic	  stroke,	  we	  show	  that	  a	  single	  intravenous	  injection	  of	  a	  SNIPER	  peptide	  efficiently	  knocked	  down	  a	  death-­‐promoting	    iii protein	  in	  the	  brains	  of	  freely	  moving	  rats	  and	  protected	  the	  rat	  brain	  from	  ischemic	  injury.	  	  Taken	  together,	  SNIPER	  is	  a	  robust	  and	  convenient	  research	  tool	  for	  manipulating	  the	  levels	  of	  endogenous	  proteins	  in	  situ,	  and	  may	  also	  lead	  to	  the	  development	  of	  novel	  protein	  knockdown–based	  therapeutics	  for	  treating	  human	  diseases.	  	  	  	  	    iv PREFACE	  Much	  of	  the	  work	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  has	  been	  published,	  and	  as	  evidenced	  by	  multiple	  authorships	  listed	  below,	  is	  the	  result	  of	  collaborations	  between	  my	  colleagues	  and	  myself.	  In	  the	  interest	  of	  space,	  this	  thesis	  only	  contains	  work	  that	  I	  was	  heavily	  involved	  in.	  	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  4	  was	  published	  as	  a	  review	  article:	  Fan	  X,	  Jin	  WY	  and	  Wang	  YT	  (2014a).	  The	  NMDAR	  multi-­‐protein	  complex:	  a	  multifunctional	  machine	  in	  the	  CNS.	  Front.	  Cell.	  Neurosci.	  8:160.	  doi:	  10.3389/fncel.2014.00160	  	  My	  colleague	  and	  I	  were	  responsible	  for	  writing	  the	  initial	  manuscript	  draft,	  which	  was	  modified	  by	  Dr.	  Yu	  Tian	  Wang	  and	  later	  edited	  for	  consistency	  by	  myself.	  	  Results	  presented	  in	  Chapters	  3-­‐5	  were	  published	  in:	  Fan	  X*,	  Jin	  WY*,	  Lu	  J,	  Wang	  J,	  Wang	  YT	  (2014b).	  Rapid	  and	  reversible	  knockdown	  of	  endogenous	  proteins	  by	  peptide-­‐directed	  lysosomal	  degradation.	  Nature	  Neuroscience.	  17(3):471-­‐80.	  doi:10.1038/nn.3637	  (*	  equal	  contribution)	  	  Fan	  X,	  Jin	  WY,	  Lu	  J,	  and	  Wang	  YT	  (2014).	  Peptide-­‐mediated	  degradation	  of	  a	  death-­‐inducing	  kinase	  as	  a	  therapy	  for	  stroke.	  Canadian	  Association	  for	  Neuroscience,	  2014.	  	  Fan	  X,	  Jin	  WY,	  Lu	  J,	  Wang	  J	  and	  Wang	  YT	  (2012,	  2013).	  Development	  of	  a	  targeting	  peptide-­‐directed	  protein	  degradation	  (TPDPD)	  system	  for	  rapid	  and	  reversible	    v knockdown	  of	  endogenous	  proteins.	  Canadian	  Association	  for	  Neuroscience,	  2013;	  Society	  for	  Neuroscience,	  2012.	  	  I	  was	  jointly	  responsible	  with	  Dr.	  Yu	  Tian	  Wang	  in	  the	  design	  of	  the	  experiments,	  and	  mainly	  responsible	  for	  performing	  the	  experiments	  and	  analyzing	  the	  data.	  The	  animal	  work	  presented	  in	  Fan	  et	  al.,	  2014b	  is	  a	  collaborative	  effort	  between	  my	  colleague	  and	  myself.	  I	  was	  chiefly	  responsible	  for	  writing	  the	  manuscript,	  with	  modifications	  from	  Dr.	  Yu	  Tian	  Wang.	  	  	  A	  version	  of	  Chapter	  6	  was	  published	  as	  a	  protocol	  article,	  for	  which	  I	  was	  the	  primary	  author.	  Fan	  X	  and	  Wang	  YT	  (2015).	  SNIPER	  Peptide-­‐mediated	  degradation	  of	  endogenous	  proteins.	  Current	  Protocols	  in	  Chemical	  Biology.	  7:1-­‐16.	  	  All	  animal	  work	  conducted	  was	  approved	  by	  the	  UBC	  Animal	  Care	  Committee,	  following	  the	  MCAo	  protocol	  A07-­‐0151.	  	  	  	    vi TABLE	  OF	  CONTENTS	  	  ABSTRACT	  ...................................................................................................................	  ii	  PREFACE	  ....................................................................................................................	  iv	  TABLE	  OF	  CONTENTS	  ................................................................................................	  vi	  LIST	  OF	  TABLES	  ........................................................................................................	  xii	  LIST	  OF	  FIGURES	  .....................................................................................................	  xiii	  LIST	  OF	  ABBREVIATIONS	  .........................................................................................	  xv	  LIST	  OF	  PLASMIDS	  ..................................................................................................	  xxi	  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS	  ........................................................................................	  xxiii	  DEDICATION	  ...........................................................................................................	  xxv	  CHAPTER	  1:	  INTRODUCTION	  .....................................................................................	  1	  1.1	   OVERVIEW	  ...............................................................................................................................	  1	  1.2	   PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  BY	  GENE	  TARGETING	  ..............................................................	  3	  1.2.1	   CONVENTIONAL	  GENETIC	  KNOCKOUT	  ....................................................................................	  3	  1.2.2	   CONDITIONAL	  GENETIC	  KNOCKOUT	  .....................................................................................	  5	  1.2.3	   TARGETED	  GENOME	  EDITING	  ...................................................................................................	  7	  1.3	   PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  BY	  RNA	  TARGETING	  ................................................................	  9	  1.3.1	   ANTI-­‐SENSE	  OLIGONUCLEOTIDES	  (ASO)	  ................................................................................	  9	  1.3.2	   RNA	  INTERFERENCE	  (RNAi)	  .......................................................................................................	  11	    vii 1.4	   PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  AT	  THE	  POST-­‐TRANSLATIONAL	  LEVEL	  .............................	  13	  1.4.1	   THE	  UPS	  .........................................................................................................................................	  15	  1.4.2	   THE	  ALS	  .........................................................................................................................................	  16	  1.4.2.1	   MACROAUTOPHAGY	  ...........................................................................................................	  17	  1.4.2.2	   CMA	  .......................................................................................................................................	  20	  1.4.2.3	   ENDOSOMAL	  MICROAUTOPHAGY	  (e-­‐MI)	  .....................................................................	  26	  1.4.2.4	   CROSSTALK	  BETWEEN	  PROTEOLYTIC	  SYSTEMS	  .........................................................	  26	  1.4.3	   PRIMARY	  AND	  SECONDARY	  DEGRONS	  .................................................................................	  30	  1.4.4	   POST-­‐TRANSLATIONAL	  REGULATION	  OF	  DEGRONS	  ..........................................................	  32	  1.4.5	   TRANS-­‐TARGETING	  VIA	  PROTEIN-­‐PROTEIN	  INTERACTION	  ..............................................	  33	  1.5	   EXAMPLES	  OF	  DIRECT	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  METHODS	  ......................................	  34	  1.5.1	   PHYSICAL	  LINKAGE	  TO	  A	  DEGRON	  ..........................................................................................	  35	  1.5.2	   DEGRADATION	  BY	  TRANS-­‐TARGETING	  .................................................................................	  39	  1.5.3	   LIMITATIONS	  OF	  CURRENT	  DEGRON-­‐BASED	  KNOCKDOWN	  METHODS	  ......................	  44	  1.6	   RATIONALE	  AND	  HYPOTHESIS	  ........................................................................................	  46	  1.6.1	   THE	  CORE	  CONSTITUENTS	  OF	  SNIPER	  PEPTIDES	  ................................................................	  47	  1.6.2	   OBJECTIVE	  1:	  SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  RECOMBINANT	  PROTEINS	  .........	  49	  1.6.3	   OBJECTIVE	  2:	  SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  NATIVE	  PROTEINS	  IN	  PRIMARY	  NEURONAL	  CULTURES	  .........................................................................................................................	  50	  1.6.4	   OBJECTIVE	  3:	  FUNCTIONAL	  CONSEQUENCES	  OF	  SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  IN	  VITRO	  AND	  IN	  VIVO	  ...............................................................................................	  51	  CHAPTER	  2:	  MATERIALS	  AND	  METHODS	  ................................................................	  59	  2.1	   CELL	  CULTURE	  .....................................................................................................................	  59	  2.1.1	   HUMAN	  EMBRYONIC	  KIDNEY	  293	  (HEK	  293)	  CELL	  MAINTENANCE	  .................................	  59	  2.1.2	   TRANSFECTION	  AND	  DRUG	  TREATMENT	  OF	  HEK	  CELLS	  .................................................	  60	    viii 2.1.3	   STORAGE	  OF	  HEK	  293	  CELLS	  .....................................................................................................	  61	  2.1.4	   PRIMARY	  NEURONAL	  CULTURE	  ..............................................................................................	  61	  2.1.5	   DRUG	  TREATMENT	  OF	  PRIMARY	  CULTURED	  NEURONS	  ...................................................	  63	  2.2	   CELL	  AND	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  ......................................................................................	  64	  2.2.1	   HEK	  293	  CELL	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  -­‐	  WHOLE	  CELL	  LYSATE	  ............................................	  64	  2.2.2	   PRIMARY	  NEURON	  CULTURE	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  -­‐	  WHOLE	  CELL	  LYSATE	  ...............	  65	  2.2.3	   PRIMARY	  NEURON	  CULTURE	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  –	  NUCLEAR	  FRACTIONATION	  ...	  65	  2.2.4	   PRIMARY	  NEURON	  CULTURE	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  –	  MITOCHONDRIAL	  FRACTIONATION	  ...................................................................................................................................	  67	  2.2.5	   ANIMAL	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  -­‐	  LYSATE	  ...............................................................................	  68	  2.2.6	   ANIMAL	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  –	  PERFUSION	  AND	  FIXATION	  ..........................................	  69	  2.3	   PROTEIN	  AND	  PEPTIDE	  ANALYSIS	  ..................................................................................	  70	  2.3.1	   PROTEIN	  CONCENTRATION	  ....................................................................................................	  70	  2.3.2	   ELECTROPHORESIS	  AND	  WESTERN	  BLOT	  ANALYSIS	  .........................................................	  71	  2.3.3	   CO-­‐IMMUNOPRECIPITATION	  (CO-­‐IP)	  ....................................................................................	  73	  2.3.4	   HIS-­‐TAGGED	  PROTEIN	  PURIFICATION	  AND	  COOMASSIE	  BLUE	  STAINING	  ..................	  74	  2.3.5	   SEQUENCES	  OF	  SYNTHETIC	  PEPTIDES	  ..................................................................................	  76	  2.4	   CELL	  DEATH	  ANALYSIS	  .....................................................................................................	  76	  2.5	   HISTOLOGY,	  IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY,	  AND	  IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY	  .......	  77	  2.5.1	   2,3,5-­‐TRIPHENYLTETRAZOLIUM	  CHLORIDE	  (TTC)	  STAINING	  ............................................	  77	  2.5.2	   FLUORO-­‐JADE	  B	  STAINING	  ......................................................................................................	  78	  2.5.3	   HEMATOXYLIN	  (MAYER’S)	  AND	  EOSIN	  Y	  STAINING	  ..........................................................	  78	  2.5.4	   IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY	  –	  LAMP-­‐1	  ....................................................................................	  79	  2.5.5	   IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY	  –	  DAPK1	  ....................................................................................	  80	  2.6	   SIRNA	  KNOCKOUT,	  RNA	  ISOLATION	  AND	  RT-­‐PCR	  .....................................................	  81	    ix 2.6.1	   SIRNA	  KNOCKOUT	  AND	  POLY-­‐CHAIN	  REACTION	  (PCR)	  ....................................................	  81	  2.6.2	   TOTAL	  RNA	  ISOLATION	  WITH	  TRIZOL	  ................................................................................	  82	  2.6.3	   DNA	  ELECTROPHORESIS	  AND	  REAL-­‐TIME	  PCR	  (RT-­‐PCR)	  .................................................	  83	  2.7	   GENETIC	  ENGINEERING	  ....................................................................................................	  85	  2.7.1	   PLASMID	  AND	  MINIGENE	  SOURCE	  .........................................................................................	  85	  2.7.2	   PLASMID	  AMPLIFICATION,	  PURIFICATION	  AND	  STORAGE	  .............................................	  86	  2.7.3	   MINIGENE	  ANNEALING	  ............................................................................................................	  87	  2.7.4	   SITE-­‐DIRECTED	  MUTAGENESIS	  ..............................................................................................	  87	  2.7.5	   RESTRICTION,	  PURIFICATION	  AND	  LIGATION	  ...................................................................	  88	  2.7.6	   PLASMID	  PRODUCTION	  ...........................................................................................................	  90	  2.7.6.1	   PLASMIDS	  FOR	  GFP	  KNOCKDOWN	  ................................................................................	  90	  2.7.6.2	   PLASMIDS	  FOR	  Α-­‐SYNUCLEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  .............................................................	  90	  2.7.6.3	   PLASMIDS	  FOR	  DAPK1	  KNOCKDOWN	  ...........................................................................	  94	  2.8	   ANIMAL	  MODELS	  ...............................................................................................................	  97	  2.8.1	   EXPERIMENTAL	  ANIMALS	  ........................................................................................................	  97	  2.8.2	   MIDDLE	  CEREBRAL	  ARTERIAL	  OCCLUSION	  (MCAO)	  .........................................................	  97	  CHAPTER	  3:	  SNIPER-­‐FACILITATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  RECOMBINANT	  PROTEINS	  ..................................................................................................................................	  103	  3.1	   INTRODUCTION	  .................................................................................................................	  103	  3.2	   RESULTS	  ..............................................................................................................................	  104	  3.2.1	   KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  CTM-­‐LINKED	  GREEN	  FLUORESCENT	  PROTEIN	  (GFP)	  IN	  HUMAN	  CELLS.	  ......................................................................................................................................................	  104	  3.2.2	   SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  RECOMBINANT	  Α-­‐SYNUCLEIN	  .........................	  106	  3.2.3	   SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  RECOMBINANT	  ACTIVATED	  DAPK1	  ................	  107	    x 3.2.4	   PLACING	  CTM	  AT	  THE	  TERMINUS	  OF	  SNIPER	  INCREASES	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  EFFICIENCY	  .............................................................................................................................................	  109	  CHAPTER	  4:	  SNIPER-­‐FACILITATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  ENDOGENOUS	  PROTEINS	  ...................................................................................................................................	  122	  4.1	   INTRODUCTION	  .................................................................................................................	  122	  4.2	   KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  NATIVE	  DAPK1	  WITH	  RECOMBINANT	  PEPTIDES	  IN	  CULTURED	  NEURONAL	  CELLS	  ......................................................................................................................	  124	  4.3	   KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  NATIVE	  DAPK1	  WITH	  SYNTHETIC	  PEPTIDES	  IN	  CULTURED	  NEURONAL	  CELLS	  ......................................................................................................................	  126	  4.4	   ELUCIDATING	  THE	  MECHANISM	  OF	  SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN.	  ............................................................................................................................	  128	  4.5	   SNIPER-­‐FACILITATED	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  IS	  GENERALIZABLE	  ......................	  130	  4.5.1	   PEPTIDE-­‐FACILITATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  NATIVE	  PSD-­‐95	  ..............................................	  130	  4.5.2	   PEPTIDE-­‐FACILITATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  Α-­‐SYNUCLEIN	  AND	  ITS	  MUTANTS	  .............	  131	  4.6	   SNIPER-­‐FACILITATED	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  IS	  SPECIFIC	  ....................................	  134	  4.7	   A	  SINGLE	  CTM	  REPEAT	  IN	  SNIPER	  PEPTIDES	  IS	  SUFFICIENT	  FOR	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  .............................................................................................................................	  137	  CHAPTER	  5:	  NEUROPROTECTION	  BY	  DAPK1	  KNOCKDOWN	  IN	  VITRO	  AND	  IN	  VIVO	  ..........................................................................................................................	  161	  5.1	   INTRODUCTION	  .................................................................................................................	  161	  5.2	   SNIPER-­‐FACILITATED	  DAPK1	  KNOCKDOWN	  PROTECTS	  AGAINST	  OXIDATIVE	  STRESS	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  163	    xi 5.3	   SNIPER-­‐PEPTIDE	  KNOCKS	  DOWN	  DAPK1	  IN	  THE	  CORTEX	  FOLLOWING	  EXCITOTOXIC	  STIMULI	  ............................................................................................................	  164	  5.4	   SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  DAPK1	  KNOCKDOWN	  IS	  A	  NEUROPROTECTIVE	  .....................	  165	  CHAPTER	  6:	  DISCUSSION	  AND	  CONCLUSIONS	  .....................................................	  175	  6.1	   OVERALL	  SIGNIFICANCE	  ..................................................................................................	  175	  6.2	   METHODOLOGY	  ................................................................................................................	  176	  6.2.1	   CTM	  IS	  A	  DEGRON	  FOR	  CMA	  ..................................................................................................	  176	  6.2.2	   GENERALIZABILITY	  AND	  PREDICTABILITY	  .........................................................................	  180	  6.2.3	   SPECIFICITY	  ................................................................................................................................	  181	  6.2.4	   TOXICITY	  ....................................................................................................................................	  183	  6.3	   CLINICAL	  APPLICABILITY	  ...............................................................................................	  184	  6.3.1	   PEPTIDE	  DELIVERY	  ...................................................................................................................	  184	  6.3.2	   STROKE	  .......................................................................................................................................	  185	  6.3.3	   APPLICATION	  AND	  SAFETY	  ....................................................................................................	  187	  6.4	   POTENTIAL	  LIMITATIONS	  AND	  FUTURE	  DIRECTIONS	  ............................................	  188	  6.4.1	   PEPTIDE	  STABILITY	  ...................................................................................................................	  188	  6.4.2	   TARGETED	  DELIVERY	  ..............................................................................................................	  190	  6.5	   CONCLUDING	  REMARKS	  .................................................................................................	  191	  REFERENCES	  .............................................................................................................	  192	  APPENDICES	  ............................................................................................................	  233	  	    xii LIST	  OF	  TABLES	  	  Table	  1-­‐1.	  Post-­‐translational	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  ...................................................	  55	  Table	  2-­‐1.	  Primary	  antibodies	  .................................................................................................	  100	  Table	  2-­‐2.	  Synthetic	  peptide	  sequences	  ................................................................................	  102	  	  	    xiii LIST	  OF	  FIGURES	  	  Figure	  1-­‐1	  Schematic	  of	  SNIPER-­‐peptide	  mediated	  knockdown.	  .........................................	  58	  Figure	  3-­‐1	  CTM-­‐directed	  protein	  degradation.	  ......................................................................	  113	  Figure	  3-­‐2	  Time-­‐dependent	  CTM-­‐directed	  knockdown	  of	  GFP.	  ..........................................	  115	  Figure	  3-­‐3	  SNIPER-­‐mediated	  dose-­‐dependent	  knockdown	  of	  α-­‐synuclein.	  .......................	  116	  Figure	  3-­‐4	  SNIPER-­‐mediated	  dose-­‐dependent	  knockdown	  of	  DAPK1.	  ...............................	  117	  Figure	  3-­‐5	  Enhancing	  DAPK1	  degradation	  with	  a	  C-­‐terminal	  CTM	  SNIPER	  peptide.	  ........	  119	  Figure	  4-­‐1	  Activation	  of	  DAPK1	  and	  binding	  to	  GluN2B	  following	  NMDA	  treatment.	  .....	  138	  Figure	  4-­‐2	  A	  recombinant	  DAPK1-­‐targeting	  peptide	  specifically	  degrades	  activated	  endogenous	  DAPK1	  in	  neuronal	  culture.	  ..............................................................................	  139	  Figure	  4-­‐3	  Dose-­‐dependent	  knockdown	  of	  DAPK1	  by	  the	  synthetic	  SNIPER	  peptide	  TAT-­‐GluN2BCTM.	  ............................................................................................................................	  141	  Figure	  4-­‐4	  TAT-­‐GluN2BCTM	  does	  not	  alter	  DAPK1	  mRNA	  levels.	  ....................................	  142	  Figure	  4-­‐5	  Pep1-­‐mediated	  intracellular	  delivery	  of	  the	  synthetic	  GluN2BCTM	  peptide	  specifically	  knocks	  down	  activated	  DAPK1	  in	  cultured	  neurons.	  .......................................	  143	  Figure	  4-­‐6	  TAT-­‐GluN2BCTM–induced	  degradation	  of	  DAPK1	  reduces	  DAPK1	  levels	  in	  various	  subcellular	  compartments	  in	  neuron	  cultures.	  .......................................................	  145	  Figure	  4-­‐7	  Macroautophagy	  inhibition	  cannot	  rescue	  SNIPER-­‐peptide	  mediated	  protein	  knockdown.	  .............................................................................................................................	  147	    xiv Figure	  4-­‐8	  siRNA-­‐directed	  knockdown	  of	  LAMP-­‐2A	  reduces	  TAT-­‐GluN2BCTM	  induced DAPK1	  degradation.	  ................................................................................................................	  149	  Figure	  4-­‐9	  SNIPER	  peptide-­‐mediated	  knockdown	  of	  PSD-­‐95	  and	  α-­‐synuclein	  in	  cultured	  neurons.	  ....................................................................................................................................	  151	  Figure	  4-­‐10	  α-­‐synuclein	  (ΔDQ)	  and	  α-­‐synuclein	  A53T	  are	  degraded	  by	  TAT-­‐βsynCTM.	  .	  153	  Figure	  4-­‐11	  α-­‐synuclein	  (ΔDQ)	  and	  α-­‐synuclein	  A53T	  are	  degraded	  by	  co-­‐transfected	  FLAG-­‐βsyn36CTM	  in	  HEK	  293	  cells.	  .....................................................................................	  155	  Figure	  4-­‐12	  TAT-­‐GluN2BCTM	  is	  specific	  for	  DAPK1.	  ...........................................................	  157	  Figure	  4-­‐13	  SNIPER	  peptides	  were	  non-­‐toxic	  24h	  after	  treatment.	  .....................................	  158	  Figure	  4-­‐14	  A	  single	  CTM	  repeat	  is	  sufficient	  for	  α-­‐synuclein	  knockdown.	  .......................	  159	  Figure	  5-­‐1	  TAT-­‐GluN2Bct-­‐CTM	  knocks	  down	  H2O2-­‐activated	  DAPK1,	  protecting	  neurons	  against	  H2O2-­‐induced	  neurotoxicity	  in	  neuronal	  cultures.	  ................................................	  169	  Figure	  5-­‐2	  TAT-­‐GluN2BCTM	  knocks	  down	  DAPK1	  in	  the	  cortex	  of	  animals	  following	  KA	  treatment.	  .................................................................................................................................	  171	  Figure	  5-­‐3	  TAT-­‐GluN2BCTM	  specifically	  knocks	  down	  DAPK1	  in	  ischemic	  brain	  areas	  and reduces	  neuronal	  damage	  in	  the	  MCAo	  model	  of	  focal	  ischemia	  in	  rats.	  ..........................	  172	  	  	    xv LIST	  OF	  ABBREVIATIONS	  3-­‐MA	   3-­‐methyladenine	  ACC	   Animal	  Care	  Committee	  AGO2	   Argonaute	  protein	  2	  AID	   Auxin-­‐responsive	  degron	  ALS	   Autophagy-­‐lysosome	  system	  APC	   Anaphase-­‐promoting	  complex	  ASO	   Anti-­‐sense	  oligonucleotides	  ATG	   Autophagy-­‐related	  genes	  BBB	   Blood	  brain	  barrier	  CCA	   Common	  carotid	  artery	  CMA	   Chaperone-­‐mediated	  autophagy	  CNS	   Central	  nervous	  system	  CTM	   CMA	  targeting	  motif	  CPP	   Cell	  penetrating	  peptide	    xvi CRISPR	   Clustered	  regularly	  interspaced	  short	  palindromic	  repeat	  CRY2	   Cryptochrome	  2	  dsRNA	   Double-­‐stranded	  RNA	  DAPK1	   Death-­‐associated	  protein	  kinase	  1	  DB	   Dissection	  buffer	  DEPC	   Diethylpyrocarbonate	  DHFR	   Dihydrofolate	  reductase	  DMEM	   Dulbecco’s	  modified	  eagle	  medium	  ECA	   External	  carotid	  artery	  EF1a	   Elongation	  factor	  1a	  ESC	   Embryonic	  stem	  cell	  FBS	   Fetal	  bovine	  serum	  FKBP12	   FK506	  and	  rapamycin-­‐binding	  protein	  12	  GFAP	   Glial	  fibrillary	  acidic	  protein	  GSK-­‐3β	   Glycogen	  synthase	  kinase	  3β	  HD	   Huntington’s	  disease	    xvii HGP	   Human	  Genome	  Project	  HPLC	   High	  performance	  liquid	  chromatography	  Hsc70	   Heat	  shock	  cognate	  70	  Htt	   Huntingtin	  ICA	   Internal	  carotid	  artery	  i.c.v.	   Intracerebroventricular	  i.n.	   Intranasal	  i.p.	   Intraperitoneal	  IPTG	   Isopropyl	  β-­‐D-­‐1-­‐thiogalactopyranoside	  KA	   Kainic	  acid	  LAMP1	   Lysosome-­‐associated	  membrane	  protein	  1	  LAMP2	   Lysosome-­‐associated	  membrane	  protein	  2	  LID	   Ligand-­‐induced	  degradation	  LMP	   Lysosomal	  membrane	  protein	  LOVE	   Light-­‐oxygen-­‐voltage	  loxP	   Locus	  of	  X-­‐over	  P1	    xviii MCAo	   Middle	  cerebral	  arterial	  occlusion	  MetAP-­‐2	   Methionine	  aminopeptidase-­‐2	  mHtt	   Mutant	  huntingtin	  MS	   Mass	  spectrometry	  MTX	   Methotrexate	  NMDA	   N-­‐methyl	  D-­‐aspartate	  NMDAR	   N-­‐methyl	  D-­‐aspartate	  Receptor	  NP	   Neurobasal	  plating	  media	  OCT	   Optimal	  Cutting	  Temperature	  PBD	   Protein	  binding	  domain	  PD	   Parkinson’s	  disease	  PDL	   Poly-­‐D-­‐lysine	  PEG	   Polyethylene	  glycol	  PepA	   Pepstatin	  A	  PFA	   Paraformaldehyde	  PKM2	   Pyruvate	  kinase	  embryonic	  M2	  isoform	    xix POI	   Protein-­‐of-­‐interest	  PROTACs	   Proteolysis	  targeting	  chimeric	  molecules	  PSD	   Post-­‐synaptic	  density	  PVDF	   Polyvinyl	  difluoride	  RISC	   RNAi-­‐induced	  silencing	  complex	  RNAi	   RNA	  interference	  RNase	  A	   Ribonuclease	  A	  RNase	  H	   Ribonuclease	  H	  ROS	   Reactive	  oxygen	  species	  rtTA	   Reverse	  tetracycline-­‐responsive	  transactivator	  SCF	   Skp1–Cullin–F-­‐box	  protein	  SDS-­‐PAGE	   Sodium	  dodecyl	  sulfate	  polyacrylamide	  gel	  electrophoresis	  siRNA	   Short	  interfering	  RNA	  shRNA	   Short	  hairpin	  RNA	  SNIPER	   Selective	  native	  protein	  eradication	  TALEN	   Transcription	  activator-­‐like	  effector	  nucleases	    xx TTC	   2,3,5-­‐Triphenyltetrazolium	  chloride	  UPS	   Ubiquitin-­‐proteasome	  system	  ZFN	   Zinc-­‐finger	  nucleases	  	    xxi LIST	  OF	  PLASMIDS	  pcDNA3.0	  pEGFP-­‐N2	  CTM-­‐GFP	  CTM-­‐A1Q2-­‐GFP	  CTM-­‐Q1A2-­‐GFP	   	  CTM-­‐A1A2-­‐GFP	  (mCTM-­‐GFP)	  Flag-­‐βsyn-­‐degron	  Flag-­‐βsyn36	  Flag-­‐βsyn36CTM	  Flag-­‐βsyn36KFERQ	  Flag-­‐βsyn36QKILD	  Flag-­‐βsyn36QRFFE	  Flag-­‐βsyn36KFERQKILD	  Flag-­‐βsyn36QKILDQRFFE	  Flag-­‐βsyn36KFERQQRFFE	    xxii WT	  HA-­‐α-­‐synuclein	  HA-­‐α-­‐synuclein	  (A53T)	  HA-­‐α-­‐synuclein	  (ΔDQ)	  GluN2Bct-­‐CTM-­‐GFP	  GluN2Bct-­‐GFP	  HA-­‐GluN2Bct-­‐CTM	  HA-­‐GluN2Bct-­‐CTMm	  6X	  His-­‐TAT-­‐GluN2Bct-­‐CTM	  6X	  His-­‐TAT-­‐GluN2Bct	  Flag-­‐DAPK1	  Flag-­‐DAPK1(ΔCaM)	    xxiii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS	  First,	  I’d	  like	  to	  thank	  my	  graduate	  supervisor	  Dr.	  Yu	  Tian	  Wang	  for	  his	  excellent	  guidance	  and	  patient	  supervision.	  His	  passion	  for	  scientific	  research	  and	  extraordinarily	  keen	  eye	  towards	  key	  outstanding	  problems	  in	  the	  field	  is	  particularly	  inspiring.	  His	  critical	  thinking	  and	  rigorous	  logic	  in	  experimental	  design	  and	  data	  interpretation	  will	  leave	  long-­‐lasting	  impact	  on	  my	  future	  research	  endeavors.	  I	  would	  also	  like	  to	  thank	  my	  committee	  members	  Dr.	  Brian	  MacVicar,	  Dr.	  Terry	  Snutch	  and	  Dr.	  Ann	  Marie	  Craig,	  as	  well	  as	  my	  program	  head	  Dr.	  Tim	  O’Conner	  for	  their	  invaluable	  guidance	  and	  constructive	  advice	  for	  my	  project.	  I	  would	  also	  like	  to	  thank	  Dr.	  Brian	  MacVicar	  and	  Dr.	  Lynn	  Raymond	  for	  graciously	  offering	  me	  the	  opportunity	  to	  study	  in	  their	  laboratories	  during	  rotations	  in	  my	  first	  year	  of	  PhD	  studies.	  	  My	  PhD	  training	  would	  not	  be	  possible	  if	  not	  for	  the	  generosity	  of	  multiple	  organizations	  for	  offering	  me	  financial	  support,	  including:	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Four-­‐Year	  Fellowship,	  the	  Izaak	  Walton	  Killam	  Memorial	  Doctoral	  Scholarship	  and	  Travel	  Award,	  the	  College	  for	  Interdisciplinary	  Studies	  Award,	  the	  CIHR	  Training	  Program	  in	  Neurobiology	  and	  Behaviour	  Fellowship	  and	  the	  Graduate	  Entrance	  Scholarship.	  Various	  travel	  awards	  have	  allowed	  me	  to	  present	  my	  work	  at	  national	  and	  international	  conferences,	  including	  the	  Canadian	  Association	  for	  Neuroscience	  Travel	  Award	  and	  College	  for	  Interdisciplinary	  Studies	  Travel	  Award.	  Finally,	  I’d	  like	  to	  thank	  the	  Canadian	  Science	  Writers’	  Association	  for	  offering	  me	  the	  Banff	  Science	  Award	  and	  the	  Banff	    xxiv Centre	  for	  a	  substantial	  scholarship	  for	  the	  Banff	  Centre’s	  Science	  Communications	  Program,	  which	  helped	  broaden	  my	  scope	  as	  a	  scientist	  and	  science	  communicator.	  The	  work	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  would	  not	  have	  been	  possible	  without	  the	  help	  and	  support	  of	  my	  colleagues.	  I	  would	  particularly	  like	  to	  thank	  Ester	  Yu,	  Dr.	  Shu	  Zhang,	  Dr.	  Jie	  Lu,	  Dr.	  Loren	  Oschipok	  and	  Dr.	  Yuan	  Ge	  for	  patiently	  helping	  me	  orient	  to	  the	  laboratory.	  I	  am	  especially	  indebted	  to	  Yuping	  Li	  for	  years	  of	  her	  technical	  assistance	  and	  care.	  I	  have	  also	  received	  invaluable	  advice	  from	  Dr.	  Lidong	  Liu	  over	  the	  years.	  I	  would	  also	  like	  to	  thank	  my	  labmates	  Wu	  Yang	  Jin,	  Kim	  Girling	  and	  Peter	  Axerio-­‐Cilies	  for	  excellent	  collaborations,	  discussions	  and	  troubleshooting	  during	  my	  PhD	  studies,	  and	  for	  keeping	  my	  spirits	  up	  when	  experiments	  fail.	  I	  was	  fortunate	  to	  (co)supervise	  many	  talented	  summer	  students,	  including	  Brandon	  Chau,	  Nelson	  Lu	  and	  Sam	  Sedyim.	  	  	  Last	  but	  not	  least,	  I	  would	  like	  to	  thank	  my	  brilliant	  parents	  Dr.	  Ping	  Liang	  and	  Dr.	  Ming	  Fan	  for	  giving	  me	  the	  best	  education	  in	  my	  childhood	  and	  for	  their	  eternal	  unconditional	  love	  and	  support.	  	    xxv DEDICATION	  	  For	  A.K.,	  B.A.	  and	  my	  parents.	  For	  always	  being	  there.	    1 CHAPTER	  1: INTRODUCTION	  	  1.1 OVERVIEW	  In	  1990,	  the	  Human	  Genome	  Project	  (HGP)	  launched	  a	  global	  effort	  to	  increase	  our	  understanding	  of	  basic	  human	  physiology	  and	  genetically	  inherited	  diseases.	  With	  the	  completion	  of	  its	  final	  phase	  in	  2004,	  anticipation	  was	  high	  that	  the	  genetic	  information	  gathered	  would	  propel	  biomedical	  research	  aimed	  at	  elucidating	  the	  function	  of	  gene	  products,	  including	  RNAs	  and	  proteins.	  The	  HGP	  was	  also	  predicted	  to	  allow	  systematic	  identification	  of	  key	  heritable	  factors	  that	  contribute	  to	  disease,	  thus	  opening	  new	  avenues	  for	  drug	  discovery.	  Indeed,	  as	  many	  as	  5,000-­‐10,000	  new	  drug	  targets	  may	  exist	  in	  the	  genome	  according	  to	  some	  estimations	  (Drews,	  1998).	  	  Despite	  further	  advances	  in	  genomic	  and	  proteomic	  tools	  over	  the	  past	  two	  decades,	  our	  understanding	  of	  the	  function	  of	  individual	  proteins	  and	  protein	  complexes	  remains	  rudimentary.	  A	  common	  approach	  in	  biomedical	  research	  to	  interrogate	  protein	  function	  is	  to	  use	  loss-­‐of-­‐function	  studies,	  that	  is,	  to	  examine	  phenotypes	  developed	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  a	  protein-­‐of-­‐interest	  (POI).	  Current	  methods	  that	  seek	  to	  eliminate	  endogenous	  proteins	  either	  operate	  at	  the	  genetic	  level	  or	  via	  direct	  degradation	  at	  the	  post-­‐translational	  level.	  While	  immensely	  useful,	  these	  techniques	  often	  require	  manipulation	  of	  the	  genome	  or	  the	  introduction	  of	  external	  genetic	  constructs	  to	  the	  target	  organism.	  Thus,	  as	  explained	  in	  detail	  below,	  these	  methods	  are	  limited	  in	  their	  speed,	  reversibility	    2 and	  tunability.	  	  Unfortunately,	  these	  limitations	  have	  hindered	  the	  translation	  from	  gene	  sequence	  data	  to	  drug	  candidates.	  An	  emerging	  approach	  in	  drug	  development	  is	  to	  destroy	  –	  rather	  than	  inhibit	  –	  disease-­‐related	  proteins	  in	  cells,	  particularly	  those	  that	  cannot	  be	  targeted	  by	  conventional	  small	  molecule	  inhibitors	  (Neklesa	  and	  Crews,	  2012).	  These	  undruggable	  proteins	  constitute	  roughly	  85%	  of	  the	  human	  proteome	  (Russ	  and	  Lampel,	  2005)	  and	  include	  oncogene	  products	  as	  well	  as	  proteins	  involved	  in	  protein-­‐aggregation	  disorders.	  Compelling	  evidence	  from	  pre-­‐clinical	  studies	  suggest	  that	  knockdown	  of	  such	  proteins	  has	  excellent	  potential	  as	  a	  therapeutic	  strategy;	  however	  with	  current	  protein	  knockdown	  approaches	  this	  is	  not	  yet	  achievable	  in	  a	  clinical	  setting,	  illustrating	  the	  need	  for	  novel	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  ready	  for	  clinical	  translation.	  An	  ideal	  protein	  knockdown	  system	  should	  be	  efficient,	  highly	  specific,	  rapid,	  reversible	  and	  tunable,	  with	  minimal	  perturbation	  to	  the	  endogenous	  cellular	  milieu.	  In	  this	  chapter,	  I	  will	  first	  review	  DNA-­‐	  and	  RNA-­‐based	  protein	  knockdown	  strategies	  and	  discuss	  their	  limitations.	  Next,	  I	  will	  provide	  an	  overview	  of	  cellular	  protein	  degradation	  systems	  and	  review	  key	  components	  of	  these	  systems	  that	  are	  harnessed	  by	  existing	  methods	  of	  protein	  knockdown	  that	  operate	  at	  the	  post-­‐translational	  level.	  I	  will	  then	  describe	  and	  evaluate	  a	  select	  few	  of	  such	  direct	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  and	  discuss	  their	  limitations.	  Finally,	  I	  will	  introduce	  the	  peptide-­‐based	  protein	  knockdown	  system	  SNIPER	  (Selective	  Native	  Protein	  Eradication)	  developed	  during	  the	  course	  of	  my	  studies	  and	  discuss	  the	  rationale	  behind	  the	  design	  of	  the	  system.	    3 1.2 PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  BY	  GENE	  TARGETING	  1.2.1 CONVENTIONAL	  GENETIC	  KNOCKOUT	  Targeted	  gene	  knockout	  through	  homologous	  recombination	  in	  mice	  has	  undoubtedly	  become	  the	  “gold	  standard”	  for	  determining	  gene	  function	  in	  mammals.	  This	  approach	  often	  involves	  mutating	  or	  deleting	  a	  gene-­‐of-­‐interest	  and	  evaluating	  its	  role	  through	  the	  resulting	  phenotype.	  Gene	  knockout	  provides	  a	  means	  to	  break	  down	  complex	  biological	  phenomena	  into	  manageable	  parts	  for	  individual	  study.	  By	  synthesizing	  numerous	  such	  studies	  we	  may	  be	  able	  to	  obtain	  a	  detailed	  overall	  picture	  of	  a	  particular	  biological	  process	  (Austin	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Capecchi,	  2005).	  	  Conventional	  gene	  knockout	  involves	  permanently	  inactivating	  a	  gene-­‐of-­‐interest	  in	  embryonic	  stems	  cells	  (ESCs)	  through	  homologous	  recombination.	  ESCs	  with	  the	  desired	  modifications	  are	  then	  injected	  into	  very	  early	  embryos,	  which	  are	  then	  transplanted	  into	  a	  donor	  mouse	  (Capecchi	  1989).	  Mice	  developed	  from	  these	  embryos	  are	  heterozygous,	  carrying	  one	  wild-­‐type	  and	  one	  disrupted	  allele.	  Subsequent	  inter-­‐breeding	  between	  these	  chimeras	  produces	  homozygous	  knockout	  mice	  with	  both	  alleles	  disrupted.	  To	  date,	  these	  genetic	  studies	  have	  identified	  the	  function	  of	  over	  7,000	  mammalian	  genes	  (White	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  attesting	  to	  the	  power	  of	  gene	  knockout	  as	  a	  research	  tool.	  Nevertheless,	  several	  limitations	  exist.	  First,	  disrupting	  essential	  genes	  for	  normal	  development	  can	  lead	  to	  embryonic	  lethality	  of	  the	  transformed	  embryo.	  This	  precludes	  the	  analysis	  of	  gene	  functions	  in	  later	  stages	  of	    4 embryonic	  development	  and	  in	  adulthood.	  Given	  that	  such	  genes	  may	  serve	  different	  functions	  during	  different	  periods	  of	  development,	  they	  may	  still	  be	  involved	  in	  the	  pathogenesis	  of	  human	  diseases.	  The	  number	  of	  such	  genes	  is	  not	  insubstantial:	  an	  estimated	  15%	  of	  all	  knockout	  mice	  carry	  germline	  mutations	  that	  result	  in	  pre-­‐term	  or	  pre-­‐adult	  lethality	  (Müller,	  2011).	  	  Second,	  the	  phenotype	  resulting	  from	  a	  single	  null	  mutation	  can	  heavily	  depend	  on	  the	  genetic	  background	  of	  the	  mouse	  strain	  (Wolfer	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  and	  the	  wide	  variety	  of	  endogenous	  traits	  native	  to	  inbred	  strains	  of	  mice	  may	  further	  confound	  interpretation	  of	  the	  mutant	  phenotype	  (Crabbe	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Doetschman,	  2009).	  Technicalities	  aside,	  perhaps	  the	  most	  intractable	  problems	  arise	  from	  the	  dynamic	  nature	  of	  biological	  systems.	  One	  such	  problem	  is	  genetic	  pleiotropy,	  in	  which	  one	  gene	  controls	  several	  distinctive	  and	  seemingly	  unrated	  phenotypic	  traits	  (Wagner	  and	  Zhang,	  2011).	  Conversely,	  knocking	  down	  a	  single	  gene	  may	  not	  produce	  a	  phenotypical	  outcome	  due	  to	  redundancy	  in	  the	  biological	  system	  (Barbaric	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Similarly,	  a	  single	  gene	  can	  produce	  multiple	  variants	  of	  a	  protein	  due	  to	  alternative	  splicing	  and	  post-­‐translational	  modifications.	  Moreover,	  proteins	  can	  participate	  in	  multiple	  cellular	  pathways	  and	  thus	  perform	  more	  than	  one	  biological	  function.	  Although	  with	  modern	  gene	  technology,	  specific	  splice	  forms	  can	  be	  targeted	  by	  gene	  knockout,	  and	  specific	  post-­‐translational	  modifications	  may	  be	  abolished	  with	  gene	  knock-­‐in,	  in	  most	  cases	  all	  variants	  of	  a	  gene	  product	  are	  eliminated,	  thus	  making	  it	  difficult	  to	  tease	  apart	  the	  different	  roles	  of	  a	  gene	  (Banaszynski	  and	  Wandless,	  2006).	  Finally,	  cellular	  and	    5 molecular	  compensation	  may	  occur	  during	  development,	  effectively	  masking	  the	  phenotype	  and	  making	  interpretation	  of	  such	  experiments	  difficult.	  1.2.2 CONDITIONAL	  GENETIC	  KNOCKOUT	  Conditional	  genetic	  knockout	  circumvents	  some	  of	  these	  problems	  by	  restricting	  control	  of	  gene	  expression	  in	  a	  temporal,	  spatial	  and	  tissue-­‐	  or	  cell-­‐type	  specific	  manner.	  Perhaps	  the	  most	  widely	  used	  technology	  today	  is	  the	  Cre-­‐loxP	  (locus	  of	  X-­‐over	  P1)	  site-­‐specific	  recombination	  system	  (Sauer	  and	  Henderson,	  1988;	  Nagy,	  2000),	  which	  uses	  bacteriophage	  Cre-­‐recombinase	  to	  excise	  all	  DNA	  sequences	  located	  between	  two	  directly	  repeated	  loxP	  sites.	  Generally,	  the	  two	  loxP	  sites	  are	  genetically	  inserted	  around	  an	  essential	  exon	  in	  a	  gene-­‐of-­‐interest	  in	  one	  animal	  strain,	  while	  the	  Cre-­‐expressing	  construct	  is	  introduced	  into	  another	  strain;	  crossing	  the	  animals	  results	  in	  gene	  excision	  (Gu	  et	  al.,	  1994).	  Cre	  transcription	  can	  be	  further	  rendered	  cell-­‐type	  specific	  and/or	  inducible	  by	  placing	  it	  under	  the	  control	  of	  a	  cell-­‐type	  specific	  and/or	  small	  molecule-­‐responsive	  promoter.	  A	  classic	  example	  of	  such	  a	  system	  involves	  the	  use	  of	  rtTA	  (reverse	  tetracycline-­‐responsive	  transactivator)	  to	  control	  the	  expression	  of	  Cre.	  rtTA	  is	  inert	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  doxycycline	  and	  activates	  once	  the	  drug	  becomes	  available.	  A	  cell	  type-­‐specific	  promoter	  limits	  the	  expression	  of	  rtTA	  to	  defined	  cell	  lineages.	  Thus,	  an	  injection	  of	  doxycycline	  activates	  rtTA	  in	  a	  particular	  population	  of	  cells,	  which	  induces	  cell-­‐type	  specific	  Cre	  expression	  and	  subsequent	  Cre-­‐mediated	  deletion	  of	  loxP-­‐flanked	  DNA	  (Utomo	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  With	    6 the	  development	  of	  a	  high-­‐throughout	  gene-­‐targeting	  pipeline	  for	  the	  generation	  for	  conditional	  alleles,	  the	  International	  Knockout	  Mouse	  Consortium	  (IKMC)	  has	  thus	  far	  generated	  more	  than	  1,700	  mutant	  mouse	  strains	  for	  use	  in	  biomedical	  research,	  most	  of	  them	  conditional	  (Skarnes	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Bradley	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Although	  sophisticated	  in	  design,	  the	  inducible	  Cre-­‐loxP	  system	  is	  not	  without	  shortcomings.	  Given	  that	  gene	  deletion	  often	  relies	  on	  loxP	  flanking	  a	  single	  exon,	  unidentified	  alternative	  transcriptional	  start	  sites	  may	  allow	  the	  protein	  to	  continue	  to	  be	  translated	  even	  after	  successful	  recombination.	  Indeed,	  there	  are	  cases	  where	  protein	  levels	  persist	  despite	  demonstrated	  recombination	  in	  vivo	  (Turlo	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Once	  a	  gene-­‐of-­‐interest	  is	  excised,	  the	  deletion	  process	  is	  complete	  and	  irreversible,	  thus	  precluding	  examination	  of	  the	  effects	  of	  gene	  dosage.	  Furthermore,	  an	  investigation	  of	  40	  cre	  mouse	  strains	  found	  a	  number	  of	  issues	  with	  cre	  function,	  including	  inconsistent	  recombination	  between	  littermates,	  differential	  cre	  activity	  depending	  on	  the	  gene’s	  parental	  origin	  and	  unexpected	  activity	  in	  off-­‐target	  tissues	  (Heffner	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  The	  design	  and	  generation	  of	  cre	  mouse	  lines	  is	  time-­‐consuming	  as	  genetic	  deletion	  may	  take	  days	  or	  even	  weeks	  (Kuhn	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  In	  higher	  eukaryotic	  cells,	  the	  efficacy	  of	  homologous	  recombination	  is	  low,	  ranging	  from	  1	  in	  106	  to	  1	  in	  107	  (Kim	  and	  Kim,	  2014).	  Finally,	  as	  genetic	  deletion	  targets	  precursors	  (i.e.	  DNA)	  rather	  than	  the	  final	  protein	  product,	  phenotypical	  changes	  may	  not	  be	  measurable	  until	  the	  pool	  of	  already	  synthesized	  proteins	  is	  degraded	  via	  normal	  turnover,	  which	  becomes	  problematic	  for	  proteins	  with	  long	  half-­‐lives.	    7 1.2.3 TARGETED	  GENOME	  EDITING	  An	  exciting	  new	  approach	  to	  genomic	  engineering	  is	  the	  use	  of	  programmable	  nucleases,	  which	  contain	  a	  sequence-­‐specific	  DNA-­‐binding	  domain	  and	  a	  nonspecific	  DNA	  cleavage	  module	  (Gaj	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  These	  nucleases	  induce	  double	  stranded	  breaks	  in	  defined	  DNA	  sites,	  which	  enhances	  the	  efficacy	  of	  homologous	  recombination	  by	  at	  least	  two-­‐fold	  (Rouet	  et	  al.,	  1994),	  and	  enables	  targeted	  mutagenesis	  or	  gene	  knockout	  through	  error-­‐prone	  non-­‐homologous	  end	  joining	  or	  homology-­‐directed	  repair	  (Bibikova	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  There	  are	  currently	  three	  classes	  of	  genome	  editing	  nucleases:	  zinc-­‐finger	  nucleases	  (ZFNs),	  transcription	  activator-­‐like	  effector	  nucleases	  (TALENs)	  and	  clustered	  regularly	  interspaced	  short	  palindromic	  repeat	  (CRISPR)–CRISPR-­‐associated	  system	  (Cas)	  (Urnov	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Bedell	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Cong	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Mali	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  All	  three	  types	  of	  nucleases	  introduce	  cleavages	  at	  specific	  chromosomal	  DNA	  sites,	  which	  activates	  the	  endogenous	  DNA-­‐repair	  system	  and	  results	  in	  targeted	  genomic	  editing	  (for	  a	  review,	  see	  Kim	  and	  Kim,	  2014).	  	  Programmable	  nucleases	  enable	  the	  manipulation	  of	  virtually	  any	  gene	  in	  multiple	  animal	  model	  systems	  (Gaj	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  These	  nucleases	  have	  been	  successfully	  used	  to	  generate	  gene-­‐knockout	  cell	  lines	  and	  animal	  models	  for	  the	  analysis	  of	  the	  glycoproteome	  (Steentoft	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  protein	  methylation	  (Kernstock	  et	  al.,	  2012)	  and	  neurodegeneration	  (Schmid	  and	  Haass,	  2013).	  Furthermore,	  the	  therapeutic	  potential	  of	  these	  methods	  has	  also	  been	  demonstrated.	  For	  example,	  ZFNs	  have	  been	  used	  to	  knockdown	  mutant	  huntingtin	  (mHtt)	  in	  a	  mouse	  model	  of	  Huntington’s	  disease	  (HD)	  (Garriga-­‐Canut	  et	  al.,	    8 2012)	  and	  to	  correct	  a	  α-­‐synuclein	  mutation	  in	  human	  induced	  pluripotent	  cell	  derived	  from	  patients	  with	  Parkinson’s	  disease	  (PD)	  (Soldner	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  The	  field	  of	  targeted	  genome	  editing	  is	  still	  in	  its	  infancy,	  but	  the	  technique	  has	  the	  potential	  to	  revolutionize	  biomedical	  research	  and	  enable	  gene	  therapy	  in	  humans.	  However,	  these	  methods	  have	  several	  notable	  limitations	  with	  regards	  to	  protein	  knockdown.	  First,	  the	  genome-­‐editing	  efficacy	  of	  each	  engineered	  nuclease	  is	  widely	  variable,	  and	  there	  are	  currently	  no	  reliable	  methods	  to	  predict	  nuclease	  activity	  prior	  experimentation	  (Kim	  and	  Kim,	  2014).	  Second,	  all	  three	  types	  of	  nucleases	  can	  cause	  off-­‐target	  mutations	  (Pattanayak	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Fu	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  For	  example,	  a	  single	  CRISPR-­‐Cas	  nuclease	  may	  recognize	  and	  mutate	  a	  collection	  of	  DNA	  sites	  that	  differ	  to	  the	  target	  site	  by	  up	  to	  five	  nucleotides	  (Fu	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  suggesting	  that	  there	  may	  be	  thousands	  of	  potential	  off-­‐target	  sites.	  Third,	  the	  optimal	  delivery	  of	  engineered	  nucleases	  remains	  a	  problem	  for	  efficient	  in	  vivo	  implementation.	  Currently,	  transient	  transfection	  is	  used	  to	  deliver	  plasmid	  DNAs	  encoding	  the	  engineered	  nucleases	  into	  cell	  lines	  (Urnov	  et	  al.,	  2005),	  and	  microinjection	  into	  single-­‐cell	  embryos	  is	  used	  to	  generate	  knockout	  animals	  (Niu	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Viral	  transfection	  is	  the	  most	  common	  delivery	  method	  for	  in	  vivo	  application,	  but	  carries	  the	  risk	  of	  immunogenicity,	  toxicity,	  and	  in	  the	  case	  of	  non-­‐episomal	  vectors,	  insertional	  mutagenesis.	  More	  efficient	  delivery	  systems	  will	  have	  to	  be	  developed	  before	  these	  nucleases	  can	  be	  used	  for	  gene	  editing	  in	  the	  treatment	  of	  human	  diseases.	    9 1.3 PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  BY	  RNA	  TARGETING	  1.3.1 ANTI-­‐SENSE	  OLIGONUCLEOTIDES	  (ASO)	  In	  the	  late	  1970s,	  Zamecnik	  and	  Stephenson	  made	  the	  discovery	  that	  an	  exogenous	  13-­‐mer	  DNA	  sequence	  complementary	  to	  a	  RNA	  sequence	  in	  the	  Rous	  sarcoma	  virus	  blocked	  viral	  protein	  translation	  and	  inhibited	  viral	  replication	  (Zamecnik	  and	  Stephenson,	  1978).	  This	  discovery	  laid	  the	  foundation	  of	  anti-­‐sense	  technology.	  Today,	  ASOs	  have	  become	  one	  of	  the	  most	  successful	  methods	  used	  in	  the	  laboratory	  to	  suppress	  the	  transmission	  of	  genetic	  information.	  The	  concept	  underlying	  ASOs	  is	  fairly	  straightforward:	  a	  short	  DNA	  sequence	  (13-­‐25mer)	  designed	  to	  complement	  a	  target	  mRNA,	  once	  introduced	  to	  the	  cell,	  stops	  mRNA	  translation	  and	  thus	  blocks	  the	  synthesis	  of	  the	  POI.	  In	  contrast,	  the	  biological	  processes	  behind	  ASO-­‐induced	  inhibition	  are	  numerous	  and	  complex.	  The	  most	  commonly	  studied	  “classical”	  ASOs	  (antisense	  gapmer	  oligonucleotides)	  recruit	  Ribonuclease	  H	  (RNase	  H),	  an	  enzyme	  that	  degrades	  RNA	  in	  RNA-­‐DNA	  duplexes,	  to	  cleave	  target	  mRNAs	  (Dias	  and	  Stein,	  2002;	  Bennett	  and	  Swayze,	  2010).	  An	  offshoot	  of	  antisense	  gapmer	  oligonucleotides	  is	  the	  external	  guide	  sequence	  –	  short	  oligonucleotides	  that	  form	  tRNA-­‐like	  structures	  –	  that	  binds	  to	  the	  targeted	  mRNA	  and	  induces	  cleavage	  by	  RNase	  P	  (Kole	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Advances	  in	  nucleotide	  chemistry	  over	  the	  years	  have	  led	  to	  the	  design	  of	  cleavage-­‐independent	  ASOs.	  For	  example,	  translation-­‐suppressing	  (steric-­‐blocking)	  oligonucleotides	  block	  mRNA	  sequences	  near	  the	  translation	  initiation	  site,	  hindering	    10 mRNA	  binding	  to	  ribosome	  and	  thus	  inhibiting	  protein	  translation	  (Stirchak	  et	  al.,	  1989).	  Splice-­‐switching	  oligonucleotides	  restrict	  the	  splicing	  machinery	  from	  accessing	  the	  targeted	  pre-­‐mRNA	  and	  prevent	  the	  production	  of	  undesirable	  splice	  variants	  (Roberts	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Disterer	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  	  ASOs	  have	  been	  utilized	  in	  numerous	  studies	  to	  degrade	  disease-­‐associated	  proteins	  in	  protein	  accumulation	  disorders.	  For	  example,	  a	  recent	  study	  used	  ASOs	  to	  target	  human	  huntingtin	  (Htt)	  in	  a	  transgenic	  mouse	  model	  of	  HD	  (Kordasiewicz	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  A	  single	  intracerebroventricular	  (i.c.v.)	  infusion	  of	  an	  Htt-­‐targeting	  ASO	  into	  symptomatic	  HD	  transgenic	  mice	  significantly	  decreased	  the	  total	  levels	  of	  Htt	  mRNA	  and	  protein,	  and	  delayed	  disease	  progression	  for	  at	  least	  9	  months	  after	  the	  initial	  bolus	  treatment	  (Kordasiewicz	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  ASOs	  have	  also	  been	  successfully	  used	  to	  specifically	  target	  the	  mHtt	  allele	  while	  leaving	  the	  wild-­‐type	  allele	  intact,	  thus	  eliminating	  only	  the	  pathogenic	  protein	  variant	  (Hu	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  	  Despite	  numerous	  successful	  applications	  in	  animal	  models	  of	  disease,	  ASOs	  have	  two	  major	  problems	  that	  limit	  their	  prospects	  for	  clinical	  application:	  poor	  cellular	  uptake	  and	  chemistry-­‐dependent	  toxicity.	  Although	  numerous	  transporters,	  including	  cationic	  liposomes	  and	  polymers,	  have	  been	  developed	  to	  improve	  intracellular	  delivery,	  tissue	  penetration	  remains	  an	  unresolved	  problem	  (Dias	  and	  Stein,	  2002).	  ASOs	  have	  also	  been	  reported	  to	  stimulate	  the	  immune	  system,	  increasing	  B	  cell	  activation	  and	  secretion	  of	  inflammatory	  cytokines	  (Krieg	  et	  al.,	  1995),	  in	  a	  structure-­‐	  and	  sequence-­‐dependent	    11 manner.	  Furthermore,	  the	  hefty	  cost	  of	  synthesizing	  ASOs	  may	  also	  be	  prohibitive	  for	  long-­‐term	  use	  in	  a	  clinical	  setting.	  1.3.2 RNA	  INTERFERENCE	  (RNAi)	  RNAi	  is	  a	  natural	  biological	  process	  that	  regulates	  gene	  expression	  and	  provides	  an	  innate	  defense	  mechanism	  against	  invading	  viruses	  and	  transposable	  elements	  (Davidson	  and	  McCray,	  2011).	  The	  field	  of	  RNAi	  stemmed	  from	  the	  Nobel	  Prize-­‐winning	  discovery	  that	  double-­‐stranded	  RNAs	  (dsRNAs)	  can	  trigger	  silencing	  of	  complementary	  mRNA	  sequences	  in	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  (Fire	  et	  al.,	  1998).	  Shortly	  thereafter,	  RNAi	  was	  discovered	  in	  mice	  using	  synthesized	  21-­‐23	  mer	  dsRNAs,	  or	  small	  interfering	  RNAs	  (siRNAs)	  (McCaffrey	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  and	  the	  method’s	  therapeutic	  potential	  was	  demonstrated	  a	  year	  later	  (Song	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  	  RNAi	  agents	  include	  dsRNA,	  short	  hairpin	  RNA	  (shRNA)	  and	  artificial	  miRNA.	  Each	  agent	  differs	  in	  size,	  utility,	  packaging	  and	  delivery,	  and	  enters	  at	  different	  points	  in	  the	  innate	  RNAi	  pathway.	  In	  research	  using	  cultured	  cells,	  the	  most	  common	  delivery	  method	  is	  to	  directly	  transfect	  21-­‐22nt	  siRNAs	  into	  cells	  to	  induce	  gene	  silencing.	  These	  synthetic	  siRNAs	  often	  lack	  5’	  triphosphates	  and	  contain	  appropriate	  3’	  overhangs	  to	  minimize	  host	  immune	  system	  activation.	  Once	  inside	  the	  cell,	  the	  siRNA	  associates	  with	  Argonaute	  protein	  2	  (AGO2)	  within	  the	  precursor	  RNAi-­‐induced	  silencing	  complex	  (pre-­‐RISC).	  The	  non-­‐targeting	  passenger	  strand	  is	  cleaved,	  and	  the	  mature	  RISC,	  harboring	  the	    12 guide	  strand,	  associates	  with	  the	  target	  mRNA	  to	  induce	  its	  cleavage	  (Meister	  and	  Tuschl,	  2004).	  In	  contrast	  to	  linear	  siRNAs,	  shRNA	  and	  artificial	  miRNAs	  are	  packaged	  into	  plasmids	  and	  delivered	  into	  isolated	  cells	  or	  animals	  via	  viral	  infection	  (Rubinson	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Once	  expressed,	  shRNA	  and	  miRNAs	  are	  processed	  in	  the	  nucleus	  into	  pre-­‐miRNAs,	  which	  are	  then	  transported	  into	  the	  cytoplasm	  and	  cut	  into	  linear	  miRNA-­‐miRNA*	  duplexes	  by	  a	  complex	  that	  contains	  the	  endoribonuclease	  Dicer.	  This	  duplex	  is	  then	  processed	  in	  the	  same	  manner	  as	  siRNAs	  to	  achieve	  target	  mRNA	  cleavage	  or	  translational	  inhibition	  (Paddison	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  A	  detailed	  description	  of	  the	  mechanisms	  behind	  RNAi	  is	  beyond	  the	  scope	  of	  this	  thesis,	  and	  readers	  are	  encouraged	  to	  refer	  to	  a	  recent	  review	  (Wilson	  and	  Doudna,	  2013).	  Recent	  efforts	  have	  developed	  single-­‐stranded	  siRNAs	  (ss-­‐siRNAs)	  with	  increased	  stability	  and	  enhanced	  cellular	  uptake	  (Lima	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Nawy,	  2012).	  The	  single-­‐strand	  RNAi	  approach	  was	  used	  successfully	  to	  knockdown	  mHtt	  in	  the	  HdhQ150/Q7	  heterozygous	  mouse	  model	  of	  HD	  following	  i.c.v.	  infusion	  for	  28	  days	  (Yu	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Although	  RNAi	  has	  promising	  therapeutic	  potential,	  there	  are	  several	  problems	  preventing	  its	  rapid	  clinical	  adoption.	  First,	  although	  siRNAs	  are	  designed	  to	  fully	  complement	  a	  single	  mRNA	  transcript,	  they	  may	  inadvertently	  hybridize	  to	  off-­‐target	  mRNAs	  (Jackson	  et	  al.,	  2003)	  and	  confound	  the	  interpretation	  of	  the	  resulting	  phenotype.	  This	  problem	  is	  more	  pronounced	  for	  artificial	  miRNAs	  that	  complement	  to	  mRNA	    13 targets	  via	  a	  six	  nucleotide	  	  “seed	  region”.	  Second,	  siRNAs	  are	  prone	  to	  degradation	  and	  have	  a	  short	  duration	  of	  activity	  (Scaggiante	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Although	  viral-­‐mediated	  expression	  of	  shRNA	  can	  prolong	  protein	  knockdown,	  the	  use	  of	  viral	  vectors	  carries	  the	  risk	  of	  insertional	  mutagenesis	  or	  triggering	  aberrant	  gene	  expression	  (Castanotto	  and	  Rossi,	  2009).	  Furthermore,	  some	  viral	  vectors	  (e.g.	  adenoviral	  vectors)	  infect	  cells	  at	  multiple	  copies	  per	  cell.	  This	  may	  lead	  to	  a	  higher	  dose	  of	  the	  expressed	  RNAi	  agent	  and	  cause	  saturation	  of	  the	  RNAi	  machinery	  (Grimm	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  Third,	  given	  that	  RNAi	  is	  a	  natural	  defense	  mechanism	  against	  pathogens,	  it	  inherently	  carries	  the	  risk	  of	  inducing	  the	  anti-­‐viral	  response	  (Judge	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Fourth,	  despite	  significant	  advancements	  in	  siRNA	  carriers	  (Whitehead	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  the	  systemic	  delivery	  of	  RNAi	  agents	  remains	  clinically	  challenging.	  	  	  Finally,	  because	  RNAi	  –	  as	  well	  as	  gene	  targeting	  and	  ASOs	  described	  above	  –	  targets	  nucleotide	  precursors	  and	  not	  protein	  end	  products,	  measurable	  decreases	  in	  protein	  levels	  will	  only	  occur	  after	  the	  pre-­‐existing	  pool	  of	  the	  relevant	  protein	  is	  degraded,	  thus	  causing	  a	  significant	  time	  lag	  between	  treatment	  and	  phenotypic	  response.	  	  1.4 PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  AT	  THE	  POST-­‐TRANSLATIONAL	  LEVEL	  Protein	  turnover	  in	  cells	  is	  a	  highly	  selective	  and	  tightly	  regulated	  process	  that	  serves	  to	  maintain	  cellular	  homeostasis	  by	  eliminating	  misfolded	  or	  damaged	  proteins	  that	  would	  otherwise	  interfere	  with	  cell	  viability	  and	  function	  (Goldberg,	  2003;	  Mizushima	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Dantuma	  and	  Bott,	  2014).	  Multiple	  proteolytic	  systems	  work	  in	  tandem	  to	  protect	    14 proteomic	  homeostasis,	  ranging	  from	  simple	  extracellular	  proteases	  (e.g.	  digestive	  proteases)	  to	  highly	  elaborate	  proteolytic	  machineries	  such	  as	  the	  ubiquitin-­‐proteasome	  system	  (UPS)	  and	  the	  autophagy-­‐lysosome	  system	  (ALS).	  Generally	  speaking,	  in	  eukaryotes	  the	  UPS	  is	  involved	  in	  targeted	  protein	  degradation	  while	  the	  ALS	  degrades	  substrates	  in	  bulk.	  However,	  it	  should	  be	  noted	  that	  both	  proteolytic	  systems	  are	  capable	  of	  selective,	  one-­‐by-­‐one	  protein	  degradation	  (Cuervo	  and	  Wong,	  2013).	  The	  molecular	  machineries	  underlying	  the	  UPS	  and	  ALS	  have	  been	  extensively	  characterized,	  and	  this	  knowledge	  provides	  the	  basis	  of	  harnessing	  these	  proteolytic	  systems	  for	  targeted	  protein	  knockdown	  at	  the	  post-­‐translational	  level.	  	  Given	  that	  the	  SNIPER	  method	  developed	  in	  this	  thesis	  relies	  on	  chaperone-­‐mediated	  autophagy	  (CMA),	  a	  process	  involving	  the	  lysosome,	  I	  will	  only	  briefly	  review	  our	  current	  understanding	  of	  the	  UPS,	  as	  well	  as	  other	  degradation	  pathways	  mediated	  by	  the	  ALS.	  This	  bird’s	  eye	  view	  of	  proteolytic	  systems	  is	  important	  given	  that	  CMA	  does	  not	  function	  in	  isolation;	  instead,	  it	  has	  extensive	  crosstalk	  with	  other	  proteolytic	  systems	  that	  becomes	  especially	  important	  to	  consider	  in	  cases	  of	  disease	  (Korolchuk	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Park	  and	  Cuervo,	  2013;	  Yang	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  Furthermore,	  given	  that	  most	  direct	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  utilize	  the	  UPS,	  an	  overview	  of	  this	  pathway	  will	  provide	  the	  knowledge	  basis	  necessary	  to	  evaluate	  such	  methods.	  In	  sum,	  the	  focus	  of	  the	  following	  sections	  is	  on	  CMA;	  for	  a	  comprehensive	  review	  of	  the	  UPS	  and	  macroautophagy,	  see	  (Lecker,	  2006;	  Bhattacharyya	  et	  al.,	  2014)	  and	  (Feng	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  respectively.	  	  	    15 1.4.1 THE	  UPS	  The	  UPS	  is	  the	  major	  proteolytic	  pathway	  responsible	  for	  the	  regulated	  degradation	  of	  short-­‐lived	  proteins,	  as	  well	  as	  proteins	  in	  the	  nucleus	  and	  endoplasmic	  reticulum	  (Baumeister	  et	  al.,	  1998;	  Vembar	  and	  Brodsky,	  2008).	  Generally	  speaking,	  the	  degradation	  of	  UPS	  substrates	  is	  a	  multi-­‐step	  process	  that	  centers	  on	  the	  addition	  of	  ubiquitin,	  a	  small	  (8.5kDa)	  globular	  protein,	  to	  substrate	  proteins	  through	  a	  covalent	  bond	  that	  involves	  a	  lysine	  residue	  in	  the	  substrate	  (Wong	  and	  Cuervo,	  2010a).	  A	  notable	  exception	  is	  ornithine	  decarboxylase,	  which	  is	  directly	  degraded	  by	  the	  26S	  proteasome	  subunit	  without	  the	  need	  for	  ubiquitination	  (Janse,	  2004a;	  Erales	  and	  Coffino,	  2014).	  In	  fact,	  this	  direct	  proteasomal	  degradation	  mechanism	  has	  been	  harnessed	  to	  design	  a	  proteasome-­‐dependent,	  ubiquitin-­‐independent	  protein	  knockdown	  method	  (Matsuzawa	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  	  The	  conjugation	  of	  ubiquitin	  to	  a	  substrate	  protein	  requires	  the	  actions	  of	  three	  enzymes	  (Hershko	  and	  Ciechanover,	  1998).	  In	  the	  first	  step,	  ubiquitin	  binds	  to	  an	  ubiquitin-­‐activating	  enzyme	  (E1)	  in	  an	  ATP-­‐dependent	  process,	  and	  is	  subsequently	  transferred	  to	  the	  active	  site	  of	  one	  of	  many	  ubiquitin-­‐conjugating	  enzymes	  (E2).	  Finally,	  a	  substrate-­‐specific	  ubiquitin-­‐ligase	  enzyme	  (E3)	  catalyzes	  the	  transfer	  of	  E2-­‐linked	  ubiquitin	  to	  the	  substrate	  protein	  (Bhattacharyya	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Because	  ubiquitin	  itself	  contains	  seven	  lysine	  residues,	  the	  process	  can	  be	  repeated	  to	  form	  polyubiquitin	  chains	  with	  diverse	  topologies.	  Notably,	  the	  particular	  mode	  of	  ubiquitin	  linkage	  determines	  the	  fate	  of	  a	  protein	  (Komander	  and	  Rape,	  2012).	  In	  the	  case	  of	  UPS-­‐mediated	  degradation,	  proteins	    16 tagged	  with	  a	  linear	  chain	  of	  at	  least	  four	  ubiquitin	  molecules	  are	  generally	  recognized	  as	  UPS	  substrates	  (Jentsch	  and	  Schlenker,	  1995).	  	  The	  selection	  of	  substrates	  for	  UPS	  degradation	  is	  largely	  dependent	  on	  the	  specificity	  of	  E3	  enzymes,	  a	  large	  (>1000)	  family	  of	  ligases	  that	  bear	  little	  structural	  or	  chemical	  similarity	  between	  its	  members	  (Staub,	  2006).	  E3	  enzymes	  select	  proteins	  for	  degradation	  by	  either	  directly	  binding	  to	  the	  substrate	  through	  protein-­‐protein	  interactions	  or	  indirectly	  through	  adaptor	  chaperones,	  such	  as	  Hsp70	  or	  Hsp90	  (Rosser	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  The	  large	  diversity	  of	  E3	  ligases	  enables	  the	  cell	  to	  individually	  regulate	  the	  levels	  of	  a	  variety	  of	  UPS	  substrate	  proteins.	  Furthermore,	  there	  are	  around	  100	  types	  of	  E2	  enzymes,	  which	  may	  further	  confer	  substrate	  selectivity	  (Staub,	  2006).	  As	  explained	  in	  Chapter	  1.5,	  many	  research	  groups	  have	  harnessed	  the	  selectivity	  of	  the	  UPS	  system	  to	  design	  methods	  that	  directly	  target	  POIs	  for	  UPS	  degradation.	  1.4.2 THE	  ALS	  Lysosomes	  are	  highly	  acidic	  (pH	  4.6-­‐5.0),	  single	  membrane-­‐bound	  organelles	  that	  function	  as	  a	  major	  terminal	  degradative	  compartment	  in	  the	  cell	  (Luzio	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  The	  lysosome	  is	  a	  fusogenic	  organelle,	  as	  demonstrated	  by	  its	  ability	  to	  fuse	  with	  late	  endosomes	  and	  autophagosomes	  to	  create	  hybrid	  organelles	  in	  which	  the	  bulk	  of	  the	  cargo	  is	  degraded	  (Luzio	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  The	  normal	  functions	  of	  lysosomes	  depend	  on	  two	  main	  classes	  of	  proteins:	  acid	  hydrolases	  and	  lysosomal	  membrane	  proteins	  (LMPs).	  To	  date,	  over	  50	  substrate-­‐selective	  hydrolases	  have	  been	  discovered,	  the	  collective	  action	  of	    17 which	  confer	  lysosomes	  with	  total	  catabolic	  ability	  (Saftig	  and	  Klumperman,	  2009).	  LMPs	  are	  integral	  proteins	  that	  mainly	  reside	  on	  the	  lysosomal	  limiting	  membrane	  and	  serve	  diverse	  functions,	  including	  acidification	  of	  the	  lysosomal	  lumen,	  internalization	  of	  protein	  substrates	  from	  the	  cytosol	  and	  fusion	  of	  limiting	  membranes	  (Eskelinen	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  The	  most	  abundant	  LMPs	  are	  lysosome-­‐associated	  membrane	  proteins	  1	  and	  2	  (LAMP1	  and	  LAMP2).	  Although	  the	  functions	  of	  LAMP1	  can	  be	  substituted	  by	  the	  structurally	  homologous	  LAMP2,	  the	  converse	  process	  is	  not	  feasible.	  This	  is	  because	  LAMP2	  serves	  several	  specific	  non-­‐redundant	  roles,	  including	  lysosomal	  biogenesis,	  lysosome	  enzyme	  targeting	  and	  CMA	  (Cuervo	  and	  Dice,	  2000a;	  Eskelinen	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Autophagy	  refers	  to	  the	  lysosomal	  degradation	  of	  intracellular	  components	  (Mizushima	  and	  Komatsu,	  2011).	  There	  are	  three	  major	  autophagic	  pathways	  that	  differ	  in	  the	  mechanism	  by	  which	  substrates	  are	  delivered	  into	  the	  lysosome:	  macroautophagy,	  microautophagy	  and	  CMA.	  These	  three	  main	  types	  of	  autophagy	  can	  be	  further	  subdivided	  depending	  on	  the	  nature	  of	  the	  cargo	  and/or	  the	  stimuli	  that	  trigger	  their	  degradation.	  Microautophagy	  and	  CMA	  deliver	  substrates	  directly	  into	  the	  lysosomal	  lumen	  (Yamamoto	  and	  Yue,	  2014),	  while	  macroautophagy	  first	  segregates	  substrates	  into	  de	  novo	  vesicles	  prior	  fusing	  with	  the	  lysosome.	  	  1.4.2.1 MACROAUTOPHAGY	  Macroautophagy	  is	  by	  far	  the	  best-­‐characterized	  autophagic	  pathway	  (Yang	  and	  Klionsky,	  2010).	  This	  pathway	  requires	  the	  synthesis	  of	  multilamellar	  vesicles	  (autophagosomes)	    18 around	  to-­‐be-­‐degraded	  substrates	  and	  their	  surrounding	  cytosol.	  The	  autophagosome	  then	  matures	  and	  traffics	  to	  the	  perinuclear	  area,	  where	  it	  fuses	  with	  the	  lysosome	  to	  deliver	  its	  cargo.	  The	  core	  macroautophagy	  machinery	  is	  composed	  of	  more	  than	  30	  proteins	  encoded	  by	  autophagy-­‐related	  genes	  (ATGs),	  most	  of	  which	  are	  conserved	  through	  evolution	  (Harris	  and	  Rubinsztein,	  2011).	  	  Macroautophagic	  degradation	  centers	  on	  the	  formation	  of	  the	  autophagosome	  and	  consists	  of	  four	  phases:	  initiation,	  elongation,	  maturation	  and	  fusion	  (Feng	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Yamamoto	  and	  Yue,	  2014).	  The	  process	  begins	  with	  the	  formation	  of	  a	  cup-­‐shaped	  isolation	  membrane	  in	  the	  cytoplasm,	  a	  process	  dependent	  on	  the	  Ulk1	  complex	  and	  Beclin1-­‐Vsp34	  kinase.	  The	  membrane	  then	  elongates	  and	  envelops	  the	  cargo,	  which	  requires	  Atg9	  and	  two	  ubiquitin-­‐like	  conjugation	  systems	  (Mizushima	  et	  al.,	  2008)	  and	  results	  in	  the	  lipidation	  of	  LC3.	  Once	  formed,	  the	  autophagosome	  travels	  along	  microtubules	  towards	  the	  perinuclear	  area,	  and	  finally	  fuses	  with	  lysosomes	  to	  form	  the	  hybrid	  amphisomes	  that	  matures	  into	  autophagolysosomes,	  in	  which	  the	  cargo	  is	  degraded.	  Of	  note,	  a	  non-­‐canonical	  form	  of	  macroautophagy	  that	  does	  not	  require	  LC3	  lipidation	  has	  been	  discovered	  in	  embryonic	  tissue	  (Nishida	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  Although	  macroautophagy	  was	  initially	  considered	  to	  be	  non-­‐specific,	  it	  is	  now	  recognized	  that	  adaptor	  proteins	  known	  as	  selectivity	  adaptors	  can	  promote	  the	  selective	  degradation	  of	  aggregated	  proteins	  and	  organelles.	  Adaptor	  proteins	  identified	  thus	  far	  include	  p62,	  NBR1,	  Nix,	  NDP52,	  Alfy	  and	  OPTN	  (Mijaljica	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Johansen	  and	  Lamark,	  2014).	  Selective	  macroautophagy	  was	  originally	  thought	  to	  only	  exist	  in	    19 mammalian	  cells;	  however,	  a	  recent	  study	  identified	  a	  similar	  mechanism	  in	  yeast,	  suggesting	  this	  pathway	  is	  evolutionarily	  conserved	  (Lu	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Certain	  destabilizing	  motifs	  on	  the	  surface	  of	  the	  cargo	  are	  either	  directly	  recognized	  by	  adaptor	  proteins	  to	  initiate	  degradation,	  or	  (in	  most	  cases)	  first	  modified	  by	  ubiquitin	  via	  the	  actions	  of	  E3-­‐like	  ligases.	  Adaptor	  proteins	  are	  bifunctional	  molecules	  that	  contain	  an	  ubiquitin-­‐conjugating	  domain	  and	  a	  binding	  site	  for	  the	  autophagosomal	  protein	  Atg8	  (LC3)	  (Klionsky	  and	  Schulman,	  2014).	  Thus	  adaptor	  proteins	  tether	  the	  ubiquitinated	  substrate	  to	  the	  ALS	  machinery	  for	  degradation.	  Protein	  aggregates,	  such	  as	  those	  formed	  by	  mHtt,	  are	  often	  degraded	  in	  this	  way	  (Jentsch	  and	  Schlenker,	  1995;	  Lu	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  	  While	  higher	  in	  specificity	  than	  classical	  macroautophagy	  (bulk	  degradation	  after	  nutrient	  starvation),	  the	  selectivity	  of	  receptor-­‐mediated	  macroautophagy	  is	  far	  lower	  than	  that	  of	  the	  UPS.	  This	  is	  in	  part	  due	  to	  the	  basic	  mechanism	  of	  substrate	  sequestration	  in	  macroautophagy,	  in	  that	  cytosolic	  components	  are	  unavoidably	  segregated	  with	  the	  cargo	  for	  degradation.	  Thus	  it	  is	  unlikely	  that	  macroautophagy	  is	  capable	  of	  targeting	  a	  single	  protein	  for	  degradation,	  and	  accordingly,	  the	  pathway	  is	  not	  suitable	  for	  utilization	  in	  methods	  aimed	  at	  selective	  protein	  knockdown.	  Nevertheless,	  there	  is	  considerable	  interest	  in	  enhancing	  macroautophagy	  activity	  as	  a	  therapeutic	  approach	  for	  proteinopathies	  such	  as	  neurodegenerative	  disorders	  (Rubinsztein	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  This	  manipulation	  would	  be	  especially	  useful	  in	  later	  stages	  of	  disease	  whereby	  aberrant	  protein	  accumulation	  inhibits	  lysosomal	  function.	  An	  example	  is	  HD,	  in	  which	  a	  primary	  failure	  in	  macroautophagy	  results	  in	  increased	  protein	  load	  for	    20 the	  CMA	  system	  (Koga	  et	  al.,	  2011a;	  Qi	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  It	  is	  conceivable	  that	  under	  such	  pathological	  states,	  a	  combinatorial	  approach	  that	  includes	  targeted	  degradation	  of	  disease-­‐causing	  proteins	  and	  reversing	  macroautophagy	  failure	  may	  synergistically	  enhance	  the	  elimination	  of	  undesirable	  proteins.	  To	  this	  end,	  a	  macroautophagy-­‐enhancing	  peptide	  has	  been	  identified	  (Shoji-­‐Kawata	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  	  1.4.2.2 CMA	  Unlike	  macroautophagy,	  CMA	  has	  so	  far	  only	  been	  identified	  in	  mammalian	  cells	  (Kaushik	  and	  Cuervo,	  2012).	  CMA	  is	  unique	  amongst	  the	  autophagy	  pathways	  in	  that	  its	  substrate	  proteins	  are	  identified	  individually	  through	  a	  recognition	  motif	  in	  the	  primary	  amino	  acid	  sequence	  (Dice,	  1990).	  This	  motif	  is	  recognized	  by	  the	  chaperone	  heat	  shock	  cognate	  70	  (hsc70),	  which	  delivers	  the	  substrate	  to	  the	  lysosomal	  limiting	  membrane.	  The	  protein	  is	  then	  unfolded	  (Salvador	  et	  al.,	  2000)	  before	  being	  shuttled	  into	  the	  lysosomal	  lumen	  through	  the	  LAMP-­‐2A	  receptor	  (Cuervo	  and	  Dice,	  2000a).	  Hence,	  the	  three	  major	  events	  in	  CMA	  are:	  (1)	  selected	  identification	  of	  individual	  substrates,	  (2)	  protein	  unfolding	  and	  (3)	  translocation	  into	  the	  lysosome	  through	  receptor-­‐specific	  binding.	  	  1.4.2.2.1 The	  CMA	  targeting	  motif	  CMA	  was	  first	  discovered	  through	  an	  observation	  that	  nutrient	  removal	  degrades	  a	  select	  population	  of	  proteins	  via	  a	  lysosomal-­‐dependent	  pathway	  in	  liver	  cells	  (Backer	  et	  al.,	  1983;	  Dice,	  1987).	  Unlike	  macroautophagy,	  which	  is	  also	  activated	  by	  serum	  deprivation,	  the	  newly	  identified	  selective	  proteolytic	  pathway	  did	  not	  require	  the	  formation	  of	    21 autophagosomes.	  Subsequent	  biochemical	  and	  genetic	  analysis	  revealed	  that	  all	  CMA	  substrates	  contain	  a	  pentapeptide	  motif	  that	  is	  necessary	  and	  sufficient	  for	  targeting	  to	  the	  CMA	  pathway	  (Dice,	  1990;	  Kaushik	  and	  Cuervo,	  2012).	  This	  motif	  was	  subsequently	  named	  the	  CMA	  targeting	  motif	  (CTM).	  Mutation	  of	  the	  CTM	  in	  the	  prototypical	  CMA	  substrate	  Ribonuclease	  A	  (RNase	  A)	  prevented	  its	  depletion	  by	  the	  lysosome	  in	  response	  to	  serum	  removal	  (Dice,	  1990),	  and	  addition	  of	  the	  motif	  to	  non-­‐CMA	  substrates	  is	  sufficient	  for	  their	  recognition	  by	  the	  CMA	  system	  as	  a	  substrate	  (Koga	  et	  al.,	  2011b;	  Fan	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  	  The	  CTM	  is	  based	  on	  the	  chemical	  properties	  of	  its	  constituent	  amino	  acids	  rather	  than	  a	  specific	  sequence	  (Dice,	  1990).	  The	  motif	  is	  made	  up	  of	  five	  amino	  acids	  including	  a	  positively	  charged	  residue	  (K,	  R),	  a	  hydrophobic	  residue	  (I,	  L,	  V,	  F),	  a	  negatively	  charged	  residue	  (D,	  E),	  another	  positively	  charged	  or	  hydrophobic	  residue,	  and	  a	  glutamine	  (Q)	  on	  either	  side	  of	  the	  pentapeptide.	  The	  Q	  residue	  is	  critically	  important	  as	  mutating	  it	  to	  an	  alanine	  (A)	  eliminates	  the	  targeting	  ability	  of	  the	  motif	  (Dice,	  1990;	  Cuervo,	  2004;	  Fan	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Of	  note,	  an	  early	  report	  suggests	  that	  in	  some	  cases	  Q	  may	  be	  replaced	  with	  N	  (Dice,	  1990),	  although	  this	  was	  not	  further	  examined.	  	  The	  location	  of	  the	  CTM	  on	  the	  substrate	  protein	  is	  flexible,	  with	  the	  only	  requirement	  being	  that	  it	  is	  exposed	  and	  available	  for	  chaperone	  binding	  (Kaushik	  and	  Cuervo,	  2012).	  Unlike	  other	  degradation	  signals	  that	  are	  only	  added	  to	  a	  substrate	  prior	  degradation	  (e.g.	  ubiquitin),	  the	  CTM	  is	  always	  present	  in	  the	  substrate.	  Thus	  the	  degradation	  of	  CMA	  substrates	  most	  likely	  depends	  on	  the	  accessibility	  of	  the	  CTM.	  For	  example,	  substrates	    22 that	  harbor	  hidden	  CTMs	  may	  only	  gain	  the	  ability	  to	  attract	  chaperones	  following	  partial	  unfolding	  (Kiffin	  et	  al.,	  2004),	  dissociation	  from	  a	  protein	  complex	  (Cuervo	  et	  al.,	  1995)	  or	  release	  from	  intracellular	  membranes	  or	  subcellular	  compartments	  (Yang	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  	  An	  earlier	  analysis	  revealed	  that	  ~30%	  of	  cytosolic	  proteins	  contain	  CTMs	  in	  their	  primary	  sequences	  (Kaushik	  and	  Cuervo,	  2012).	  As	  membrane	  proteins	  cannot	  be	  directly	  translocated	  into	  lysosomes,	  this	  pool	  of	  proteins	  is	  thought	  to	  lack	  CTMs	  (Kaushik	  and	  Cuervo	  2012).	  However,	  our	  initial	  in	  silico	  screen	  for	  all	  probable	  CTM	  combinations	  in	  various	  excitatory	  and	  inhibitory	  membrane	  receptor	  proteins	  revealed	  the	  presence	  of	  one	  or	  more	  putative	  CTM	  sequences	  (Appendix	  B).	  Whether	  these	  motifs	  have	  biological	  functions	  in	  the	  cell	  remains	  to	  be	  seen.	  The	  functionality	  of	  the	  CTM	  may	  also	  be	  regulated	  via	  post-­‐translational	  modifications.	  In	  this	  case,	  the	  CTM	  is	  only	  partially	  complete	  under	  basal	  conditions	  and	  post-­‐translational	  modifications	  (e.g.	  phosphorylation)	  provide	  a	  missing	  amino	  acid	  residue	  to	  make	  it	  functional.	  For	  example,	  the	  glycolytic	  enzyme	  embryonic	  M2	  isoform	  of	  pyruvate	  kinase	  (PKM2)	  contains	  a	  pre-­‐CTM	  with	  a	  lysine	  residue	  in	  place	  of	  the	  critical	  glutamine	  residue;	  acetylation	  of	  the	  lysine	  residue	  (which	  mimics	  glutamine)	  completes	  the	  motif	  and	  channels	  its	  degradation	  through	  CMA	  (Lv	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Similarly,	  CMA-­‐mediated	  degradation	  of	  the	  N-­‐terminal	  region	  of	  Htt	  requires	  phosphorylation	  followed	  by	  acetylation	  to	  complete	  its	  CTM	  (Thompson	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  Finally,	  an	  oxidized	  histidine	  behaves	  as	  a	  negative	  aspartic	  acid	  residue,	  which	  may	  complete	  a	  CTM	  during	  oxidative	  stress	  and	  contribute	  to	  protein	  quality	  control	  (Massey	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  In	  sum,	  post-­‐  23 translational	  modification	  increases	  the	  pool	  of	  potential	  CMA	  substrates	  and	  provides	  a	  way	  to	  regulate	  their	  degradation.	  A	  single	  copy	  of	  the	  CTM	  is	  sufficient	  for	  lysosomal	  targeting	  (Dice,	  1990).	  However,	  multiple	  copies	  of	  CTM	  may	  confer	  additional	  advantages.	  For	  example,	  different	  CTMs	  in	  the	  same	  protein	  may	  become	  exposed	  under	  different	  stimuli,	  and	  thus	  allow	  the	  protein	  to	  be	  conditionally	  degraded.	  Furthermore,	  for	  proteins	  that	  undergo	  cleavage	  to	  release	  functional	  peptides,	  multiple	  CTMs	  may	  ensure	  the	  complete	  degradation	  of	  these	  resulting	  peptides	  by	  CMA.	  	  1.4.2.2.2 Regulation	  of	  CMA	  by	  hsc70	  and	  LAMP-­‐2A	  The	  CTM	  is	  recognized	  by	  hsc70,	  a	  multifunctional	  chaperone	  that	  also	  participates	  in	  other	  cellular	  processes	  such	  as	  protein	  folding,	  protein	  complex	  disassembly	  and	  protein	  trafficking	  (Liu	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Thus	  far	  hsc70	  is	  the	  only	  chaperone	  identified	  to	  mediate	  CMA	  substrate	  targeting	  (Chiang	  et	  al.,	  1989),	  although	  it	  also	  plays	  a	  role	  in	  chaperone-­‐assisted	  selective	  macroautophagy	  (Arndt	  et	  al.,	  2010)	  and	  endosomal	  microautophagy	  (Sahu	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  The	  diverse	  roles	  of	  hsc70	  may	  in	  part	  depend	  on	  the	  particular	  set	  of	  co-­‐chaperones	  it	  associates	  with,	  which	  in	  the	  case	  of	  CMA	  include	  hsp90,	  CHIP,	  BAG1	  and	  hop	  (Agarraberes	  and	  Dice,	  2001).	  The	  chaperone	  complex	  delivers	  the	  substrate	  to	  the	  lysosome	  and	  assists	  in	  the	  unfolding	  of	  the	  protein	  substrate	  before	  subsequent	  translocation	  into	  the	  lysosomal	  lumen.	  Unfolding	  of	  CMA	  substrates	  is	  not	  required	  for	    24 binding	  to	  the	  lysosome	  membrane,	  but	  is	  absolutely	  necessary	  for	  translocation	  (Salvador	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  Binding	  of	  CMA	  substrates	  at	  the	  lysosomal	  membrane	  is	  mediated	  by	  a	  KRHH	  motif	  on	  the	  cytosolic	  tail	  of	  the	  LAMP-­‐2A	  receptor	  (Cuervo	  and	  Dice,	  2000a).	  LAMP-­‐2A	  is	  one	  of	  the	  three	  splice	  variants	  encoded	  by	  the	  lamp2	  gene,	  and	  differs	  from	  LAMP-­‐2B	  and	  LAMP-­‐2C	  in	  its	  transmembrane	  and	  cytosolic	  domains.	  Only	  LAMP-­‐2A	  is	  involved	  in	  CMA	  (Cuervo	  and	  Dice,	  2000a).	  Under	  basal	  conditions,	  LAMP-­‐2A	  is	  present	  on	  the	  lysosomal	  membrane	  in	  a	  monomeric	  form.	  Upon	  substrate	  binding,	  LAMP-­‐2A	  transiently	  oligomerizes	  into	  a	  complex	  of	  roughly	  700kDa,	  a	  process	  regulated	  by	  the	  coordinated	  activity	  of	  glial	  fibrillary	  acidic	  protein	  (GFAP),	  elongation	  factor	  1	  a	  (EF1a),	  and	  lipids	  on	  the	  lysosomal	  membrane	  (Bandyopadhyay	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  2010).	  Despite	  its	  name,	  GFAP	  is	  an	  intermediate	  filament	  protein	  involved	  in	  establishing	  the	  intracellular	  cytoplasmic	  framework,	  and	  has	  been	  identified	  in	  multiple	  cell	  types	  and	  tissues	  in	  addition	  to	  glia	  (Morini	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Upon	  substrate	  translocation	  through	  the	  complex	  and	  release	  into	  the	  lysosomal	  lumen,	  the	  complex	  dissociates	  back	  into	  LAMP-­‐2A	  monomers	  with	  the	  help	  of	  lysosomal	  hsp90.	  Substrate	  interaction	  with	  LAMP-­‐2A	  is	  the	  rate-­‐limiting	  step	  of	  CMA,	  and	  CMA	  activity	  is	  mainly	  regulated	  by	  the	  number	  of	  LAMP-­‐2A	  monomers	  on	  the	  lysosomal	  membrane	  (Cuervo	  and	  Dice,	  2000b),	  as	  well	  as	  the	  efficiency	  of	  its	  multimerization	  (Bandyopadhyay	  et	  al.,	  2008).	    25 In	  addition	  to	  LAMP-­‐2A,	  CMA	  activity	  is	  secondarily	  regulated	  by	  the	  presence	  of	  lysosome-­‐associated	  hsc70	  in	  the	  lysosomal	  lumen.	  Only	  a	  fraction	  of	  lysosomes	  contain	  lysosomal	  hsc70,	  and	  thus	  based	  on	  its	  presence	  lysosomes	  are	  either	  CMA	  competent	  or	  incompetent	  (Agarraberes	  et	  al.,	  1997).	  Although	  only	  20%	  of	  all	  lysosomes	  are	  CMA-­‐competent	  under	  basal	  conditions,	  the	  pathway	  is	  basally	  operational	  in	  most	  mammalian	  cells,	  and	  its	  normal	  function	  is	  critical	  for	  maintaining	  cellular	  homeostasis.	  Indeed,	  blocking	  CMA	  in	  mouse	  fibroblasts	  increased	  their	  sensitivity	  to	  stressors	  (Massey	  et	  al.,	  2006),	  and	  inhibition	  of	  CMA	  with	  aging	  (Cuervo	  and	  Dice,	  2000c;	  Zhang	  and	  Cuervo,	  2008)	  or	  dietary	  lipids	  (Rodriguez-­‐Navarro	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Rodriguez-­‐Navarro	  and	  Cuervo,	  2012)	  leads	  to	  alterations	  in	  lipid	  metabolism	  and	  protein	  catabolism.	  CMA	  becomes	  a	  larger	  player	  in	  proteolysis	  after	  exposure	  to	  cellular	  stressors	  such	  as	  nutrient	  deprivation	  or	  oxidative	  stress	  (Dohi	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Under	  such	  conditions	  CMA	  is	  upregulated	  through	  a	  variety	  of	  mechanisms,	  such	  as	  increased	  LAMP-­‐2A	  transcription	  and	  insertion	  into	  the	  lysosomal	  membrane,	  decreased	  proteolysis,	  as	  well	  as	  an	  increased	  number	  (up	  to	  80%)	  of	  lysosomes	  with	  lysosomal	  hsc70	  (Kiffin	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Koga	  et	  al.,	  2011a).	  As	  such,	  CMA	  may	  be	  particularly	  effective	  at	  degrading	  substrates	  under	  conditions	  of	  cellular	  stress.	  Similar	  to	  the	  UPS,	  the	  selectivity	  of	  CMA	  allows	  the	  removal	  of	  specific	  proteins	  without	  perturbing	  its	  neighbors,	  thus	  making	  CMA	  an	  efficient	  protein	  quality	  control	  system	  for	  degrading	  damaged	  proteins	  or	  surplus	  protein	  subunits	  in	  protein	  complexes	  (Cuervo	  and	  Wong,	  2013).	  Thus	  far,	  there	  is	  no	  evidence	  suggesting	  that	  CMA	  can	  be	  saturated	  by	  its	  normal	  substrates.	    26 1.4.2.3 ENDOSOMAL	  MICROAUTOPHAGY	  (e-­‐MI)	  The	  presence	  of	  CTM	  is	  absolutely	  required	  for	  the	  degradation	  of	  a	  protein	  by	  CMA.	  However,	  having	  a	  CTM	  alone	  does	  not	  guarantee	  CMA	  as	  the	  only	  degradation	  pathway.	  A	  recent	  study	  demonstrated	  that	  hsc70	  can	  also	  route	  CTM-­‐containing	  proteins	  to	  the	  late	  endosome	  for	  degradation	  through	  e-­‐MI	  (Sahu	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  e-­‐MI	  is	  a	  type	  of	  microautophagy	  that	  occurs	  in	  late	  endosomes,	  which	  can	  degrade	  proteins	  either	  in	  bulk	  or	  selectively	  (Kaushik	  and	  Cuervo,	  2012).	  Similar	  to	  CMA,	  selective	  e-­‐MI	  also	  relies	  on	  the	  presence	  of	  CTM	  in	  a	  substrate	  protein	  and	  the	  actions	  of	  hsc70.	  However,	  the	  two	  processes	  differ	  with	  regards	  to	  substrate	  internalization,	  in	  that	  e-­‐MI	  does	  not	  require	  LAMP-­‐2A.	  Instead,	  the	  substrate-­‐hsc70	  complex	  directly	  binds	  to	  the	  phospholipid	  phosphatidylserine	  at	  the	  endosomal	  membrane	  through	  hydrophobic	  residues	  in	  hsc70.	  Importantly,	  e-­‐MI	  does	  not	  require	  unfolding	  of	  the	  substrate	  for	  substrate	  degradation	  (Sahu	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  and	  thus	  may	  potentially	  be	  able	  to	  degrade	  protein	  aggregates.	  Thus	  far	  e-­‐MI	  has	  only	  been	  described	  in	  dendritic	  cells	  and	  fibroblasts,	  and	  its	  contribution	  to	  protein	  homeostasis	  in	  other	  cell	  lineages	  and	  tissues	  remains	  to	  be	  seen.	  	  1.4.2.4 CROSSTALK	  BETWEEN	  PROTEOLYTIC	  SYSTEMS	  An	  important	  aspect	  when	  considering	  the	  physiological	  roles	  of	  CMA	  is	  that	  it	  does	  not	  function	  in	  isolation.	  CMA	  activity	  is	  tightly	  coordinated	  with	  other	  forms	  of	  autophagy,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  UPS	  (Wong	  and	  Cuervo,	  2010b;	  Park	  and	  Cuervo,	  2013).	  Notably,	  a	  given	  protein	  may	  undergo	  multiple	  degradation	  routes	  depending	  on	  the	  cell	  type,	  the	  cellular	    27 environment	  and	  its	  post-­‐translational	  modification	  state.	  As	  such,	  when	  designing	  a	  protein	  knockdown	  system	  that	  utilizes	  CMA,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  also	  consider	  the	  potential	  contributions	  of	  other	  interacting	  proteolytic	  systems.	  Recent	  studies	  have	  uncovered	  many	  levels	  of	  functional	  interaction	  between	  the	  UPS	  and	  ALS.	  First,	  changes	  in	  one	  pathway	  may	  affect	  the	  activity	  of	  another,	  an	  interaction	  particularly	  noticeable	  in	  neurodegenerative	  diseases.	  For	  example,	  accumulation	  and	  aggregation	  of	  mHtt	  down	  regulates	  macroautophagy,	  which	  results	  in	  the	  compensatory	  upregulation	  of	  CMA	  (Koga	  et	  al.,	  2011a;	  Qi	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Although	  initially	  capable	  of	  maintaining	  proteome	  stability,	  CMA	  activity	  decreases	  with	  age	  (Rodriguez-­‐Navarro	  and	  Cuervo,	  2012),	  which	  may	  contribute	  to	  the	  progression	  of	  the	  disease.	  Similarly,	  cells	  activate	  macroautophagy	  in	  response	  to	  CMA	  blockage	  (Massey	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Kaushik	  et	  al.,	  2008),	  which	  helps	  to	  temporarily	  maintain	  proteome	  homeostasis.	  Pharmacological	  blockage	  of	  UPS	  often	  results	  in	  the	  compensatory	  upregulation	  of	  both	  macroautophagy	  (Pan	  et	  al.,	  2008)	  and	  CMA	  (Koga	  et	  al.,	  2011a).	  	  In	  contrast	  to	  the	  bi-­‐directional	  crosstalk	  between	  macroautophagy	  and	  CMA,	  the	  interaction	  between	  the	  UPS	  and	  macroautophagy	  seems	  to	  be	  unidirectional.	  Here,	  blocking	  macroautophagy	  reduces	  UPS	  activity,	  possibly	  due	  to	  the	  aberrant	  accumulation	  of	  p62,	  which	  competes	  for	  the	  19S	  proteasome	  subunit	  with	  UPS	  substrates	  and	  thereby	  decreases	  the	  entry	  of	  other	  proteins	  into	  the	  proteosomal	  core	  (Korolchuk	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  Under	  such	  circumstances	  CMA	  becomes	  crucially	  important	  for	  maintaining	  cellular	  homeostasis.	  	    28 Interestingly,	  in	  contrast	  to	  the	  many	  studies	  that	  characterize	  how	  blockage	  of	  one	  system	  influences	  the	  others,	  there	  is	  little	  research	  on	  how	  upregulating	  one	  system	  changes	  the	  activity	  of	  other	  proteolytic	  systems.	  There	  is	  some	  evidence	  suggesting	  that	  chemical	  upregulation	  of	  macroautophagy	  does	  not	  modify	  UPS	  of	  CMA	  activity,	  and	  that	  the	  general	  upregulation	  of	  CMA	  in	  cultured	  cells	  does	  not	  affect	  UPS	  or	  macroautophagy	  efficiency	  (Park	  and	  Cuervo,	  2013).	  Thus	  the	  crosstalk	  between	  these	  proteolytic	  systems	  seems	  to	  mainly	  have	  a	  compensatory	  function.	  A	  second	  level	  of	  interaction	  is	  that	  the	  same	  protein	  may	  be	  used	  or	  degraded	  by	  multiple	  proteolytic	  systems.	  For	  example,	  wild-­‐type	  α-­‐synuclein	  is	  normally	  degraded	  by	  both	  UPS	  and	  CMA	  in	  neurons,	  whereas	  its	  aggregated	  forms	  are	  preferentially	  degraded	  by	  macroautophagy	  (Stefanis	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Webb	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Cuervo,	  2004).	  UPS	  and	  ALS	  also	  require	  the	  actions	  of	  many	  same	  components	  for	  their	  normal	  functioning,	  such	  as	  ubiquitin	  and	  various	  chaperones	  (e.g.	  hsc70),	  as	  well	  as	  effector	  molecules	  such	  as	  E3	  ligases.	  For	  example,	  ubiquitin	  is	  required	  for	  both	  UPS	  and	  selective	  macroautophagy	  as	  described	  in	  Chapters	  1.4.1	  and	  1.4.2.1,	  whereas	  hsc70	  is	  involved	  in	  CMA,	  e-­‐MI	  and	  chaperone-­‐assisted	  selective	  autophagy.	  The	  factors	  that	  route	  a	  given	  substrate	  to	  one	  system	  or	  another	  remain	  unknown.	  	  Finally,	  one	  proteolytic	  pathway	  may	  directly	  regulate	  the	  activity	  of	  another	  by	  degrading	  its	  components.	  As	  with	  all	  other	  cellular	  proteins,	  those	  that	  make	  up	  the	  UPS	  and	  autophagy	  machinery	  also	  undergo	  normal	  turnover.	  The	  catalytic	  core	  of	  the	  proteasome	  is	  degraded	  by	  macroautophagy	  during	  nutrient	  starvation,	  which	  in	  part	    29 contributes	  to	  the	  down	  regulation	  of	  UPS	  under	  those	  circumstances	  (Cuervo	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  A	  similar	  link	  exists	  between	  the	  UPS	  and	  CMA,	  in	  that	  the	  26S	  proteasome	  is	  a	  CMA	  substrate	  (Kaushik	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Furthermore,	  ubiquitin	  has	  been	  found	  in	  the	  lumen	  of	  autophagosomes	  and	  CMA-­‐capable	  lysosomes	  (Rothenberg	  et	  al.,	  2010),	  suggesting	  that	  ALS	  may	  contribute	  to	  the	  turnover	  of	  ubiquitin.	  Similarly,	  the	  macroautophagy	  adaptor	  protein	  p62	  undergoes	  degradation	  through	  the	  UPS	  (Komatsu	  and	  Ichimura,	  2010).	  	  	  	  Much	  remains	  to	  be	  understood	  regarding	  the	  rules	  that	  govern	  the	  interplay	  amongst	  various	  proteolytic	  systems.	  In	  particular,	  functional	  compensation	  has	  been	  discovered	  in	  a	  growing	  number	  of	  protein	  aggregation	  diseases,	  illustrating	  the	  importance	  of	  considering	  such	  interactions	  when	  designing	  methods	  that	  aim	  to	  eliminate	  disease-­‐causing	  proteins	  as	  a	  therapeutic	  approach.	  In	  particular,	  it	  is	  critically	  important	  to	  consider	  the	  stage	  of	  the	  disease	  and	  select	  an	  appropriate	  (i.e.	  upregulated)	  proteolytic	  system	  for	  targeted	  protein	  degradation,	  while	  avoiding	  systems	  that	  are	  already	  inhibited.	  In	  the	  case	  of	  HD,	  routing	  mHtt	  to	  CMA	  may	  be	  the	  most	  appropriate	  approach,	  as	  macroautophagy	  and	  UPS	  failure	  occur	  early	  on	  in	  the	  disorder	  (Koga	  et	  al.,	  2011a).	  In	  contrast,	  in	  later	  stages	  of	  PD	  it	  may	  be	  most	  beneficial	  to	  upregulate	  macroautophagy	  to	  eradicate	  protein	  aggregates,	  as	  they	  are	  not	  amenable	  to	  UPS	  or	  CMA	  degradation.	  	  In	  terms	  of	  developing	  protein	  knockdown	  technology,	  the	  UPS	  and	  CMA	  pathways	  are	  perhaps	  the	  best	  routes	  for	  targeted	  protein	  degradation	  due	  to	  their	  exquisite	  selectivity.	    30 The	  process	  of	  substrate	  selection	  for	  both	  UPS	  and	  CMA	  relies	  on	  the	  addition	  or	  exposure	  of	  certain	  motifs	  to	  various	  chaperones.	  Motifs	  that	  signal	  protein	  degradation	  are	  called	  protein	  destruction	  signals,	  or	  degrons.	  One	  characteristic	  of	  degrons	  is	  that	  they	  confer	  metabolic	  instability	  when	  artificially	  linked	  to	  an	  otherwise	  stable	  protein	  (Dohmen,	  2000).	  It	  is	  this	  transferability	  of	  degrons	  that	  forms	  the	  basis	  for	  utilizing	  endogenous	  proteolytic	  systems	  for	  targeted	  protein	  knockdown.	  1.4.3 PRIMARY	  AND	  SECONDARY	  DEGRONS	  	  A	  fundamental	  question	  regarding	  intracellular	  protein	  degradation	  is	  how	  specific	  proteins	  are	  recognized	  and	  degraded	  by	  various	  proteolytic	  systems	  with	  highly	  characteristic	  half-­‐lives	  (Goldberg,	  2003).	  Early	  work	  suggested	  that	  global	  structural	  features,	  such	  as	  the	  molecular	  mass	  or	  isoelectric	  point,	  determine	  the	  rate	  of	  turnover	  (Goldberg	  and	  Dice,	  1974).	  However,	  later	  analyses	  demonstrated	  only	  a	  weak	  correlation	  between	  gross	  physical-­‐chemical	  properties	  and	  protein	  stability	  (Dice,	  1987).	  It	  is	  now	  widely	  accepted	  that	  localized	  features,	  rather	  than	  global	  structure,	  are	  the	  primary	  determinants	  that	  mark	  a	  protein	  for	  degradation.	  These	  local	  destabilizing	  structures	  that	  render	  proteins	  metabolically	  unstable	  are	  commonly	  referred	  to	  as	  degrons	  (Varshavsky,	  1992).	  Specifically,	  degrons	  are	  (1)	  any	  minimal	  element	  within	  a	  protein	  that	  is	  sufficient	  for	  the	  recognition	  and	  degradation	  by	  a	  proteolytic	  system,	  and	  (2)	  an	  element	  that	  is	  transferable	  to	  any	  protein	  to	  confer	  metabolically	  instability	  (Dohmen,	  2000).	  Primary	  degrons	  are	  sequences	  or	  structures	    31 within	  a	  substrate	  protein	  that	  directly	  bind	  to	  components	  of	  a	  proteolytic	  system	  for	  targeted	  degradation.	  In	  contrast,	  secondary	  degrons	  attach	  to	  the	  substrate	  and	  function	  as	  adaptor	  signals	  to	  recruit	  components	  necessary	  for	  degradation.	  For	  example,	  the	  polyubiquitin	  chain	  is	  a	  secondary	  degron	  targeting	  the	  substrate	  for	  UPS	  destruction.	  Primary	  degrons	  in	  the	  UPS	  are	  extremely	  diverse	  in	  terms	  of	  their	  chemical	  and	  structural	  properties,	  and	  many	  have	  been	  exploited	  for	  use	  in	  protein	  knockdown	  methods.	  The	  best-­‐characterized	  degron	  in	  the	  UPS	  is	  arguably	  the	  N-­‐degron,	  first	  discovered	  in	  yeast.	  By	  systematically	  changing	  the	  N-­‐terminal	  residue	  of	  a	  series	  of	  otherwise	  identical	  β-­‐galactosidase	  substrates,	  it	  was	  observed	  that	  these	  test	  substrates	  dramatically	  differed	  in	  their	  stability	  (Lévy	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  This	  difference	  in	  half-­‐lives	  was	  due	  to	  the	  different	  binding	  affinities	  of	  N-­‐terminal	  residues	  to	  Ubr1,	  an	  E3	  ligase	  that	  recruits	  the	  protein	  for	  UPS	  degradation.	  The	  observation	  that	  certain	  N-­‐terminal	  amino	  acids	  confer	  metabolic	  instability	  was	  subsequently	  named	  the	  N-­‐end	  rule,	  and	  the	  exposed	  N-­‐terminal	  region	  of	  a	  substrate	  sufficient	  for	  UPS-­‐targeting	  was	  termed	  the	  N-­‐degron	  (Hwang	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Kim	  and	  Kim,	  2014).	  	  In	  contrast	  to	  N-­‐degrons	  that	  recruit	  simple	  E3	  ligases,	  PEST	  sequences	  and	  KEN	  boxes	  are	  degrons	  that	  bind	  to	  E3	  ligase	  complexes,	  such	  as	  the	  SCF	  complex	  (Skp1,	  Cullin,	  F-­‐box	  protein)	  and	  APC	  (Anaphase-­‐Promoting	  Complex)	  (Rechsteiner	  and	  Rogers,	  1996;	  Pfleger	  and	  Kirschner,	  2000).	  Another	  interesting	  example	  of	  a	  sequence-­‐based	  degron	  is	  the	  C-­‐terminal	  region	  of	  ornithine	  decarboxylase,	  which	  recruits	  the	  protein	  antizyme	  for	  direct	  proteasomal	  degradation	  without	  the	  need	  for	  ubiquitination	  (Matsuzawa	  et	  al.,	    32 2005).	  As	  described	  in	  detail	  in	  Chapter	  1.5,	  all	  three	  primary	  degrons	  have	  been	  used	  in	  targeted	  protein	  degradation	  methods.	  	  In	  addition	  to	  primary	  amino	  acid	  sequence	  motifs	  that	  confer	  instability,	  localized	  structural	  elements	  can	  also	  serve	  as	  degrons.	  For	  example,	  exposure	  of	  hydrophobic	  residues	  is	  considered	  a	  hallmark	  of	  a	  misfolded	  or	  unfolded	  protein,	  which	  is	  subsequently	  recognized	  by	  the	  cellular	  protein	  quality	  control	  machinery	  and	  eliminated	  through	  UPS	  (Neklesa	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Neklesa	  and	  Crews,	  2012).	  An	  example	  of	  a	  protein	  knockdown	  method	  based	  on	  increasing	  local	  hydrophobicity	  is	  described	  in	  Chapter	  1.5.	  	  	  1.4.4 POST-­‐TRANSLATIONAL	  REGULATION	  OF	  DEGRONS	  Phosphorylation	  is	  a	  widely	  used	  strategy	  for	  regulating	  sequence-­‐based	  degrons	  (Dohmen,	  2000).	  For	  example,	  phosphorylation	  of	  β-­‐catenin,	  a	  multifunctional	  protein	  essential	  for	  the	  Wnt	  signaling	  pathway	  and	  cell-­‐cell	  adhesion	  (Gottardi,	  2004),	  by	  glycogen	  synthase	  kinase	  3β	  (GSK-­‐3β)	  triggers	  its	  ubiquitination	  by	  the	  SCF	  complex	  and	  subsequent	  degradation	  by	  the	  proteasome	  (Xu	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  GSK-­‐3β	  activity	  is	  inhibited	  in	  many	  types	  of	  cancer,	  which	  results	  in	  aberrant	  accumulation	  of	  dephosphorylated	  β-­‐catenin	  in	  the	  cytosol	  and	  contributes	  to	  carcinogenesis	  (Liu	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  Furthermore,	  as	  mentioned	  above,	  post-­‐translational	  modifications	  to	  an	  incomplete	  CTM	  may	  complete	  it	  and	  result	  in	  the	  degradation	  of	  the	  substrate.	  In	  contrast,	  phosphorylation	  can	  also	  inhibit	  proteolysis.	  For	  example,	  the	  ectopic	  expression	  of	  the	  oncogene	  Mos	  induces	  phosphorylation	  of	  the	  transcriptional	  activator	    33 c-­‐Jun	  in	  its	  PEST	  region,	  which	  results	  in	  the	  stabilization	  of	  c-­‐Jun	  (Okazaki	  and	  Sagata,	  1995).	  In	  sum,	  post-­‐translational	  modifications	  provide	  an	  additional	  level	  of	  regulation	  in	  both	  the	  UPS	  and	  ALS.	  These	  examples	  from	  nature	  also	  suggest	  a	  means	  to	  design	  “cryptic”	  degrons	  for	  use	  in	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  –	  that	  is,	  to	  introduce	  an	  inactive	  protein-­‐knockdown	  construct	  into	  the	  cell	  and	  conditionally	  trigger	  target	  protein	  degradation	  under	  circumstances	  in	  which	  the	  cryptic	  degron	  is	  completed	  and/or	  exposed.	  1.4.5 TRANS-­‐TARGETING	  VIA	  PROTEIN-­‐PROTEIN	  INTERACTION	  A	  primary	  destruction	  signal	  can	  be	  a	  complex	  structural	  feature	  that	  involves	  more	  than	  one	  polypeptide.	  For	  example,	  a	  polypeptide	  with	  an	  N-­‐degron	  can	  trigger	  the	  degradation	  of	  a	  protein	  that	  contains	  lysine	  residues	  (for	  ubiquitin	  acceptance)	  but	  lack	  a	  degron	  sequence.	  In	  this	  case,	  the	  N-­‐degron	  acts	  catalytically	  to	  initiate	  degradation	  of	  a	  quasi-­‐UPS	  substrate	  that	  contains	  ubiquitin	  acceptor	  sites	  (Johnson	  et	  al.,	  1990).	  In	  other	  words,	  a	  degron-­‐bearing	  peptide	  may	  trigger	  the	  degradation	  of	  non-­‐substrates	  through	  peptide-­‐protein	  interaction.	  Interestingly,	  trans-­‐targeting	  does	  not	  prohibit	  the	  selective	  degradation	  of	  a	  given	  protein	  in	  a	  multi-­‐protein	  complex	  (Schrader	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  	  In	  terms	  of	  physiological	  function,	  trans-­‐targeting	  may	  provide	  a	  means	  to	  efficiently	  target	  a	  greater	  variety	  of	  substrates	  through	  the	  actions	  of	  a	  limited	  number	  of	  E3	  ligases.	  An	  example	  is	  the	  SCF	  complex,	  which	  contains	  F-­‐box	  proteins,	  Cullin1,	  RBX1	  and	  Skp1.	  The	  SCF	  selects	  substrates	  trans-­‐targeting,	  in	  which	  different	  F-­‐box	  proteins	  in	  the	    34 complex	  selectively	  bind	  to	  a	  given	  proteolytic	  substrate	  and	  tethers	  the	  substrate	  to	  the	  UPS	  for	  degradation	  (Patton	  et	  al.,	  1998;	  Sakamoto	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Sakamoto,	  2003).	  	  Trans-­‐targeting	  is	  widely	  used	  in	  the	  turnover	  of	  cellular	  proteins.	  For	  example,	  the	  tumour	  suppressor	  protein	  p53	  is	  ubiquitinated	  and	  dramatically	  degraded	  following	  association	  with	  the	  HIV-­‐16	  E6,	  the	  latter	  of	  which	  tethers	  p53	  to	  E6-­‐AP;	  E6-­‐E6AP	  together	  functions	  as	  a	  E3	  ligase	  that	  degrades	  p53	  (Scheffner	  et	  al.,	  1993).	  The	  levels	  of	  the	  transcriptional	  factor	  c-­‐Fos	  is	  reduced	  after	  forming	  a	  heterodimeric	  complex	  with	  a	  phosphorylated	  c-­‐Jun	  (Tsurumi	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  Similar	  mechanisms	  have	  been	  discovered	  in	  Escherichia	  coli	  (Neher	  et	  al.,	  2003),	  Xenopus	  (Stewart	  et	  al.,	  1994)	  and	  Saccharomyces	  cerevisiae	  (Yaglom	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  In	  terms	  of	  targeted	  protein	  knockdown,	  trans-­‐targeting	  provides	  a	  biological	  basis	  for	  the	  idea	  that	  a	  degron-­‐bearing	  protein	  knockdown	  agent	  may	  degrade	  its	  target	  protein	  via	  peptide-­‐protein	  interaction.	  As	  illustrated	  in	  the	  above	  examples,	  trans-­‐targeting	  allows	  for	  the	  specific	  degradation	  of	  endogenous	  proteins	  without	  perturbing	  their	  interacting	  partners.	  Thus	  it	  is	  conceivable	  that	  by	  engineering	  trans-­‐targeting	  peptides	  for	  a	  given	  POI,	  we	  may	  be	  able	  to	  degrade	  it	  in	  a	  highly	  specific	  manner.	  1.5 EXAMPLES	  OF	  DIRECT	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  METHODS	  The	  discovery	  of	  degrons	  and	  trans-­‐targeting	  has	  allowed	  many	  research	  groups	  to	  utilize	  natural	  or	  synthetic	  degrons	  for	  targeted	  protein	  knockdown.	  Although	  varied	  in	  their	  specific	  design,	  the	  methods	  can	  be	  summarized	  as	  follows,	  based	  on	  their	  overall	    35 strategy:	  1)	  direct	  linkage	  of	  a	  degron	  to	  the	  target	  protein,	  and	  2)	  localization	  of	  the	  target	  protein	  to	  various	  components	  of	  the	  UPS	  (E2,	  E3	  and	  proteasome)	  via	  an	  adaptor	  construct.	  The	  first	  strategy	  requires	  alterations	  to	  the	  target	  protein,	  whereas	  the	  second	  strategy	  in	  theory	  can	  target	  endogenous,	  unmodified	  proteins	  for	  degradation.	  Representative	  direct	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  are	  presented	  in	  Table	  1-­‐1,	  and	  key	  examples	  are	  discussed	  in	  detail	  below.	  1.5.1 PHYSICAL	  LINKAGE	  TO	  A	  DEGRON	  In	  1994,	  Varshavsky	  and	  coworkers	  demonstrated	  the	  first	  strategy	  that	  rapidly	  and	  reversibly	  controls	  the	  stability	  of	  a	  recombinant	  protein	  with	  an	  engineered	  degron.	  Starting	  with	  a	  dihydrofolate	  reductase	  (DHFR)	  mutant,	  in	  which	  the	  wild-­‐type	  N-­‐terminal	  valine	  (V)	  was	  replaced	  by	  a	  destabilizing	  arginine	  (R)	  according	  to	  the	  N-­‐end	  rule,	  the	  team	  screened	  for	  temperature-­‐sensitive	  mutants	  that	  were	  stable	  at	  23°C	  but	  rapidly	  degraded	  at	  37°C.	  The	  resulting	  mutant	  (R-­‐DHFRts)	  was	  linked	  to	  Cdc28,	  a	  protein	  involved	  in	  maintaining	  cell	  cycle	  oscillations.	  R-­‐DHFRts-­‐Cdc28	  was	  functional	  at	  23°C,	  but	  showed	  no	  activity	  at	  37°C	  due	  to	  its	  rapid	  degradation	  via	  the	  N-­‐end	  rule	  (Dohmen	  et	  al.,	  1994).	  This	  method	  has	  been	  widely	  used	  to	  study	  the	  function	  of	  multiple	  proteins	  in	  yeast	  (Kanemaki	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  However,	  due	  to	  the	  requirement	  for	  a	  temperature	  change	  to	  induce	  degradation,	  it	  is	  not	  ideal	  for	  use	  in	  mammalian	  cells.	  	  In	  a	  later	  study	  the	  team	  engineered	  a	  novel	  R-­‐DHFR*	  mutant	  to	  generalize	  the	  applicability	  of	  the	  method	  to	  mammalian	  cells.	  Target	  proteins	  linked	  to	  this	  novel	    36 degron	  were	  stable	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  the	  R-­‐DHFR*	  high-­‐affinity	  ligand	  methotrexate	  (MTX),	  but	  were	  rapidly	  degraded	  upon	  withdrawal	  of	  the	  drug	  (Johnston	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  This	  study	  represents	  the	  first	  “drug-­‐off”	  protein	  degradation	  system,	  and	  paved	  the	  way	  for	  small-­‐molecule	  controlled	  protein	  knockdown	  methods.	  The	  development	  of	  destabilizing	  domains	  represents	  another	  key	  effort	  in	  engineering	  novel	  small-­‐chemical	  controlled	  degrons	  for	  use	  in	  targeted	  protein	  knockdown.	  FKBP12	  (FK506	  and	  rapamycin-­‐binding	  protein),	  rapamycin	  and	  FRB	  associate	  into	  a	  well-­‐characterized	  ternary	  complex	  (Banaszynski	  et	  al.,	  2005);	  to	  minimize	  the	  biological	  effects	  of	  rapamycin	  on	  mTOR,	  a	  bump-­‐hole	  strategy	  is	  often	  used	  to	  design	  rapamycin	  analogues	  that	  bind	  to	  mutated	  FRB	  (FRB*)	  or	  FKBP	  (FBKP*)	  with	  higher	  affinity	  than	  to	  their	  wild-­‐type	  counterparts.	  While	  using	  MaRap,	  an	  engineered	  small	  molecule	  structurally	  related	  to	  rapamycin,	  to	  mislocalize	  FRB*-­‐GSK-­‐3β	  via	  MaRap-­‐FRB*-­‐FKBP	  binding	  in	  mice,	  Stankunas	  and	  coworkers	  noticed	  decreased	  levels	  of	  FRB*-­‐GSK-­‐3β	  compared	  to	  the	  otherwise	  identical	  fusion	  with	  wild-­‐type	  FRB.	  The	  levels	  of	  FRB*-­‐GSK-­‐3β	  were	  restored	  upon	  addition	  of	  MaRap	  (Stankunas	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  This	  observation	  led	  the	  team	  to	  further	  explore	  engineered	  destabilizing	  domains.	  Error	  prone	  PCR	  was	  used	  to	  screen	  for	  FKBP	  mutants	  that	  conferred	  metabolic	  instability	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  a	  designer	  small	  molecule	  called	  Shield-­‐1.	  The	  resulting	  degron,	  FKBP*,	  was	  covalently	  linked	  to	  the	  N-­‐terminal	  of	  proteins	  of	  various	  sizes,	  functions	  and	  cellular	  localizations.	  These	  fusion	  proteins	  were	  stable	  and	  functional	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  Shield-­‐1	  and	  were	  rapidly	  degraded	  upon	  withdrawal	  of	  the	  ligand	  via	  the	  UPS	  in	  a	  dose-­‐  37 dependent	  manner.	  FKBP*	  was	  also	  capable	  of	  conferring	  instability	  when	  linked	  to	  the	  C-­‐terminal	  of	  a	  target	  protein,	  although	  the	  efficacy	  was	  lower	  than	  N-­‐terminal	  linkage	  (Banaszynski	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  	  The	  FKBP*	  degron	  was	  later	  modified	  for	  in	  vivo	  use.	  HCT116	  cancer	  cells	  were	  transfected	  with	  FKBP*-­‐linked	  interleukin-­‐2	  (IL-­‐2)	  and	  xenografted	  into	  nude	  mice.	  Daily	  intraperitoneal	  (i.p.)	  injections	  of	  Shield-­‐1	  stabilized	  the	  tumour	  suppressing	  IL-­‐2	  fusion	  protein	  and	  decreased	  tumour	  burden	  compared	  to	  saline-­‐treated	  animals	  (Banaszynski	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Two	  additional	  destabilizing	  domains	  were	  later	  engineered	  using	  a	  similar	  approach:	  1)	  a	  mutated	  E.coli	  DHFR,	  which	  destabilizes	  a	  linked	  protein	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  small	  molecule	  ligand	  trimethoprim	  (Iwamoto	  et	  al.,	  2010),	  and	  2)	  a	  mutated	  Estrogen	  Receptor	  Ligand	  Binding	  Domain,	  which	  destabilizes	  a	  linked	  protein	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  the	  small	  molecule	  CMP8	  (Miyazaki	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  	  Constant	  application	  of	  the	  ligand	  is	  necessary	  to	  maintain	  protein	  function	  in	  all	  approaches	  that	  utilize	  destabilizing	  domains.	  This	  becomes	  problematic	  when	  studying	  the	  products	  of	  essential	  genes,	  as	  continuous	  drug	  application	  may	  accumulate	  and	  eventually	  lead	  to	  toxicity.	  A	  novel	  approach	  that	  compliments	  these	  destabilizing	  domains	  is	  the	  ligand-­‐induced	  degradation	  (LID)	  system.	  The	  LID	  domain	  contains	  an	  FKBP*	  mutant	  that	  expresses	  a	  19-­‐residue	  peptide	  at	  its	  C-­‐terminal.	  In	  the	  absence	  of	  Shield-­‐1,	  this	  peptide	  binds	  to	  the	  FKPB*	  active	  site	  and	  stabilizes	  the	  LID-­‐linked	  protein.	  The	  addition	  of	  Shield-­‐1	  displaces	  the	  peptide	  from	  the	  activate	  site,	  and	  the	  liberated	  peptide	  functions	  as	  a	  UPS	  degron	  via	  the	  actions	  of	  the	  critical	  residues	  RRRG	  (Bonger	  et	    38 al.,	  2011).	  This	  represents	  a	  novel	  small-­‐molecule	  controlled	  “drug-­‐on”	  system,	  in	  which	  addition	  of	  the	  ligand	  induces	  protein	  degradation.	  An	  alternative	  approach	  to	  designing	  degrons	  de	  novo	  is	  to	  utilize	  the	  hydrophobicity	  protein	  quality	  control	  response.	  As	  described	  in	  Chapter	  1.4.3,	  local	  areas	  of	  increased	  hydrophobicity	  are	  efficient	  degrons	  that	  mark	  proteins	  for	  UPS	  degradation.	  One	  such	  method	  utilizes	  the	  commercially	  available	  HaloTag-­‐dehalogenase	  system,	  in	  which	  HaloTag	  is	  linked	  to	  a	  POI.	  HaloTag	  binds	  to	  the	  hydrophobic	  compound	  HyT,	  which	  increases	  the	  hydrophobicity	  of	  the	  fusion	  protein	  and	  thereby	  triggers	  its	  degradation	  via	  UPS	  (Neklesa	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  As	  HyT	  is	  bacterial	  in	  origin,	  this	  system	  is	  unlikely	  to	  induce	  toxicity	  when	  used	  in	  mammalian	  cells	  due	  to	  bio-­‐orthogonality.	  In	  addition	  to	  chemical	  approaches,	  there	  is	  now	  also	  considerable	  interest	  in	  combining	  optogenetics	  with	  a	  degron	  system	  to	  achieve	  light-­‐induced	  protein	  degradation.	  One	  such	  approach	  involves	  linking	  a	  target	  protein	  to	  CIB1,	  a	  protein	  that	  rapidly	  dimerizes	  with	  the	  cryptochrome	  2	  (CRY2)	  protein	  from	  Arabidopsis	  upon	  exposure	  to	  blue	  light.	  By	  fusing	  the	  CRY2	  protein	  to	  the	  SCF	  complex,	  light-­‐induced	  dimerization	  helps	  to	  tether	  the	  target	  protein	  to	  the	  SCF	  complex,	  resulting	  in	  UPS-­‐mediated	  degradation	  (Labella	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  Although	  complicated	  in	  design,	  this	  approach	  takes	  full	  advantage	  of	  the	  high	  spatial	  and	  temporal	  resolution	  of	  optogenetics	  in	  regulating	  protein	  stability.	  Furthermore,	  as	  CRY2	  may	  be	  expressed	  in	  specific	  cell	  types	  and/or	  brain	  areas,	  this	  approach	  may	  also	  achieve	  cell-­‐lineage	  specific	  protein	  knockdown.	  In	  addition	  to	  CRY2,	    39 light-­‐inducible	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  that	  rely	  on	  the	  light-­‐oxygen-­‐voltage	  (LOVE)	  domain	  of	  plants	  have	  also	  been	  developed	  (Bonger	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  In	  sum,	  the	  metabolic	  stability	  of	  proteins	  can	  be	  controlled	  in	  a	  ligand-­‐dependent	  manner	  by	  linking	  the	  POI	  to	  a	  small	  molecule-­‐controlled	  degron.	  This	  strategy	  can	  induce	  the	  rapid	  and	  reversible	  degradation	  of	  cytosolic	  and	  membrane	  proteins	  in	  an	  on-­‐and-­‐off	  manner	  with	  excellent	  dose-­‐	  and	  time-­‐dependency.	  The	  positioning	  of	  the	  degron	  is	  flexible	  in	  most	  of	  these	  methods,	  in	  that	  they	  allow	  both	  C-­‐	  and	  N-­‐terminal	  linkage.	  However,	  the	  above	  approaches	  are	  only	  useful	  for	  degrading	  genetically	  modified	  proteins	  and	  thus	  cannot	  target	  endogenous	  proteins	  for	  degradation.	  This	  severely	  limits	  the	  use	  of	  these	  methods	  in	  examining	  protein	  function	  in	  situ,	  as	  well	  as	  their	  potential	  as	  therapeutics	  for	  protein	  aggregation	  disorders.	  1.5.2 DEGRADATION	  BY	  TRANS-­‐TARGETING	  	  The	  knockdown	  of	  endogenous	  proteins	  is	  often	  achieved	  by	  utilizing	  bifunctional	  molecules	  that	  bind	  to	  and	  target	  the	  POI	  to	  the	  UPS	  for	  degradation.	  One	  prominent	  example	  of	  such	  a	  strategy	  utilizes	  a	  family	  of	  adaptor	  molecules	  called	  proteolysis	  targeting	  chimeric	  molecules	  (PROTACs).	  PROTACs	  contain	  a	  small	  chemical	  ligand	  specific	  for	  a	  given	  target	  protein,	  which	  is	  tethered	  to	  a	  short	  peptide	  sequence	  that	  binds	  to	  an	  E3	  ligase	  (for	  example,	  SCFβTCRP	  	  and	  SCFVBL-­‐Cul2	  have	  been	  utilized)	  via	  a	  linker	  (Sakamoto	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Jang	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Cyrus	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  PROTACs	  catalyze	  the	  degradation	  of	  a	  target	  protein	  through	  trans-­‐targeting	  via	  the	  actions	  of	  a	  particular	  SCF	    40 E3	  ligase.	  In	  a	  proof-­‐of-­‐concept	  study,	  Protac-­‐1,	  which	  contains	  the	  ligand	  OVA	  for	  methionine	  aminopeptidase-­‐2	  (MetAP-­‐2),	  successfully	  degraded	  MetAP-­‐2	  via	  the	  UPS	  in	  Xenopus	  Oocyte	  extracts	  following	  microinjection	  into	  the	  cell	  (Sakamoto	  et	  al.,	  2001).	  Later	  improvements	  added	  a	  poly-­‐arginine	  domain	  to	  the	  original	  design	  to	  allow	  PROTACs	  to	  penetrate	  the	  plasma	  membrane,	  and	  this	  new	  generation	  of	  cell-­‐permeant	  PROTAC	  was	  shown	  to	  effectively	  degrade	  recombinant	  androgen	  receptor	  in	  mammalian	  cell	  lines	  (Sakamoto	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  To	  further	  increase	  the	  efficiency	  of	  PROTACs,	  a	  two-­‐headed	  version	  was	  later	  synthesized	  and	  validated	  (Cyrus	  et	  al.,	  2010),	  and	  a	  recent	  study	  described	  a	  phosphorylation-­‐based	  PROTAC	  strategy	  for	  the	  conditional	  knockout	  of	  fibroblast	  growth	  factor	  receptor	  substrate	  2α	  and	  phosphatidylinositol-­‐3-­‐kinase	  (Hines	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  A	  major	  advantage	  of	  this	  technique	  is	  that	  PROTACs	  can	  be	  used	  to	  degrade	  unmodified	  endogenous	  proteins,	  utilizing	  a	  variety	  of	  E3	  ligases.	  As	  the	  expression	  of	  E3	  enzymes	  is	  somewhat	  tissue	  specific,	  PROTAC	  may	  potentially	  achieve	  protein	  knockdown	  in	  a	  particular	  tissue	  type.	  However,	  the	  method	  is	  contingent	  on	  the	  existence	  of	  small	  chemical	  ligands	  that	  selectively	  bind	  to	  the	  POI	  with	  high	  affinity.	  Thus,	  the	  method	  is	  limited	  to	  degrading	  proteins	  for	  which	  a	  small	  molecule	  ligand	  can	  be	  identified	  (i.e.	  druggable	  proteins).	  	  To	  circumvent	  the	  requirement	  for	  small	  molecule	  ligands,	  Zhou	  and	  Hadley	  developed	  a	  novel	  protein-­‐protein	  interaction	  based	  approach.	  As	  with	  first	  generation	  PROTACs,	  this	  system	  also	  relies	  on	  the	  SCFβTrCP	  E3	  ligase.	  The	  F-­‐box	  protein	  component	  of	  SCF	  is	  a	    41 bidirectional	  molecule	  that	  binds	  to	  a	  given	  substrate	  through	  a	  WD40	  domain	  and	  to	  the	  Skp1/Cullin	  component	  through	  an	  F-­‐box	  domain	  (Zhou	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  In	  this	  method,	  a	  protein-­‐protein	  interaction	  domain	  that	  binds	  to	  the	  target	  protein	  was	  genetically	  tagged	  to	  a	  natural	  F-­‐box	  protein.	  In	  a	  proof-­‐of-­‐concept	  study,	  adenoviral	  delivery	  of	  an	  engineered	  F-­‐box	  protein	  containing	  a	  binding	  domain	  for	  p107	  rapidly	  degraded	  endogenous	  p107	  via	  UPS	  in	  cervical	  carcinoma	  C33A	  cells;	  however,	  the	  structurally	  similar	  pRB	  protein	  was	  also	  degraded,	  highlighting	  the	  importance	  of	  selecting	  target	  protein-­‐specific	  binding	  domains	  in	  designing	  degradation	  constructs	  (Zhou	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  	  A	  similar	  protein-­‐protein	  interaction	  based	  strategy	  has	  been	  used	  successfully	  in	  vitro	  (Su	  et	  al.,	  2003)	  and	  in	  vivo	  (Cong	  et	  al.,	  2003)	  to	  selectively	  knockdown	  the	  nuclear-­‐cytosolic	  subpopulation	  of	  β-­‐catenin	  involved	  in	  Wnt	  signaling,	  without	  perturbing	  the	  pool	  of	  β-­‐catenin	  involved	  in	  cell	  adhesion.	  Notably,	  two	  improvements	  were	  made.	  First,	  a	  glycine-­‐serine	  linker	  was	  added	  between	  the	  protein-­‐binding	  domain	  and	  the	  F-­‐box	  component	  to	  increase	  the	  flexibility	  of	  the	  construct	  and	  enhance	  binding	  efficacy	  to	  β-­‐catenin.	  Second,	  the	  construct	  incorporated	  multiple	  repeats	  of	  the	  binding	  domain	  to	  increase	  specificity	  (Su	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  This	  result	  clearly	  demonstrates	  the	  superior	  selectivity	  of	  protein-­‐protein	  interactions,	  as	  opposed	  to	  small	  molecule-­‐protein	  binding,	  in	  targeting	  a	  specific	  subpopulation	  of	  a	  given	  protein	  for	  selective	  degradation.	  	  However,	  a	  major	  problem	  with	  the	  above	  approach	  is	  that	  the	  native	  WD40	  domain	  in	  the	  chimeric	  F-­‐box	  protein	  retains	  the	  ability	  target	  endogenous	  WD40-­‐binding	  proteins	    42 for	  knockdown,	  which	  may	  lead	  to	  off-­‐target	  effects.	  Accordingly,	  the	  WD40	  domain	  was	  removed	  in	  later	  studies	  to	  increase	  specificity	  (Zhang	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Liu	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  	  An	  alternative	  strategy	  to	  decrease	  off-­‐target	  effects	  while	  still	  harnessing	  the	  SCF	  E3	  ligase	  system	  is	  to	  introduce	  non-­‐mammalian	  SCF	  E3	  ligases	  into	  mammalian	  cells	  to	  facilitate	  protein	  knockdown.	  To	  this	  end,	  components	  of	  the	  Drosophila	  melanogaster	  SCF	  system	  was	  expressed	  in	  mammalian	  cells,	  and	  a	  chimeric	  Drosophila	  F-­‐box	  protein	  was	  engineered	  to	  contain	  a	  single-­‐domain	  antibody	  fragment	  to	  GFP.	  The	  system	  could	  then	  be	  used	  to	  degrade	  any	  GFP-­‐fusion	  protein	  via	  the	  SCF	  ubiquitin-­‐proteasome	  pathway	  (Caussinus	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Nishimura	  and	  coworkers	  developed	  a	  similar	  strategy	  utilizing	  a	  plant-­‐based	  SCF	  ligase	  to	  facilitate	  protein	  knockdown.	  Plants	  have	  a	  unique	  system	  whereby	  SCF-­‐mediated	  degradation	  is	  induced	  following	  the	  addition	  of	  Auxin,	  a	  plant	  hormone.	  In	  this	  strategy,	  the	  target	  protein	  was	  genetically	  linked	  to	  an	  Auxin-­‐responsive	  degron	  (AID),	  which	  couples	  to	  the	  plant	  SCFTIR1	  complex	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  Auxin,	  and	  the	  chimeric	  protein	  was	  rapidly	  degraded	  (~30min)	  via	  the	  UPS	  pathway	  upon	  addition	  of	  Auxin	  (Nishimura	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Holland	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Notably,	  the	  degree	  of	  target	  protein	  degradation	  was	  dose-­‐dependent	  and	  could	  be	  easily	  controlled	  by	  altering	  the	  levels	  of	  Auxin	  (Nishimura	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  Compared	  to	  using	  mammalian	  SCF	  E3	  ligases	  for	  protein	  degradation,	  the	  methods	  described	  above	  are	  expected	  to	  have	  fewer	  off-­‐target	  effects.	  However,	  both	  methods	  require	  the	  introduction	  of	  two	  genetic	  constructs	  (the	  non-­‐mammalian	  SCF	  system	  and	    43 the	  GFP–	  or	  AID–tagged	  target	  protein),	  thus	  complicating	  the	  experiment	  and	  limiting	  their	  use	  as	  therapeutics.	  	  Post-­‐translational	  modifications,	  such	  as	  phosphorylation,	  are	  crucially	  important	  in	  regulating	  protein	  function,	  yet	  experimental	  tools	  designed	  to	  dissect	  the	  specific	  function	  of	  a	  certain	  post-­‐translationally	  modified	  form	  of	  a	  given	  protein	  are	  limited.	  To	  explore	  the	  potential	  of	  direct	  protein	  knockdown	  in	  targeting	  a	  subpopulation	  of	  modified	  proteins	  for	  degradation,	  Zhang	  and	  colleagues	  engineered	  a	  SCF	  complex	  that	  contains	  a	  protein-­‐binding	  domain	  specific	  for	  the	  hypophosphorylated	  form	  of	  p107.	  By	  eliminating	  the	  F-­‐box	  WD40	  domain	  and	  using	  the	  minimal	  binding	  sequence	  required	  for	  p107,	  the	  construct	  specifically	  degraded	  hypo–,	  but	  not	  hyper-­‐phosphorylated	  p107	  (Zhang	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Interestingly,	  p107	  associates	  with	  cyclinA	  and	  cdk2	  into	  a	  complex,	  nevertheless,	  the	  construct	  did	  not	  perturb	  the	  level	  of	  either	  p107-­‐binding	  protein,	  suggesting	  that	  protein-­‐protein	  interaction	  based	  direct	  protein	  knockdown	  can	  be	  selective	  for	  a	  component	  in	  a	  multi-­‐protein	  complex	  (Zhang	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  This	  seminal	  proof-­‐of-­‐concept	  study	  strongly	  suggests	  that	  by	  using	  rational	  design,	  direct	  protein	  knockout	  may	  be	  used	  to	  interrogate	  the	  functions	  of	  a	  certain	  post-­‐translationally	  modified	  form	  of	  a	  given	  protein-­‐of-­‐interest.	  	  Notably,	  all	  methods	  that	  rely	  on	  E3	  ligases	  for	  protein	  knockdown	  require	  that	  the	  target	  protein	  contains	  exposed	  lysine	  residues	  for	  ubiquitination,	  sufficient	  molecular	  mass	  for	  efficient	  binding	  to	  E2	  enzymes	  and	  the	  proteasome,	  as	  well	  as	  a	  less	  compact	  structure	  for	  subsequent	  unfolding.	    44 In	  addition	  to	  localization	  to	  E3	  ligases,	  methods	  have	  also	  been	  developed	  to	  tether	  a	  given	  protein	  to	  E2	  enzymes	  (Gosink	  and	  Vierstra,	  1995)	  or	  to	  the	  proteasome	  itself	  (Janse,	  2004a;	  Matsuzawa	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  The	  latter	  approach	  bypasses	  the	  need	  for	  ubiquitination	  of	  the	  POI,	  and	  is	  particularly	  useful	  for	  proteins	  without	  lysine	  residues.	  An	  elegant	  demonstration	  of	  such	  a	  method	  utilizes	  ornithine	  decarboxylase	  (molecular	  weight:	  51kDa),	  which	  following	  the	  addition	  of	  the	  protein	  antizyme,	  directly	  binds	  to	  the	  26S	  subunit	  of	  the	  proteasome	  for	  degradation.	  Matsuzawa	  and	  coworkers	  linked	  a	  protein-­‐binding	  domain	  to	  the	  N-­‐terminal	  of	  ornithine	  decarboxylase	  via	  a	  linker,	  and	  expression	  of	  this	  construct	  successfully	  targeted	  POIs	  for	  proteasomal	  degradation	  in	  cultured	  cells	  (Matsuzawa	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  1.5.3 LIMITATIONS	  OF	  CURRENT	  DEGRON-­‐BASED	  KNOCKDOWN	  METHODS	  Compared	  to	  DNA–	  or	  RNA–based	  techniques,	  methods	  that	  directly	  degrade	  proteins	  at	  the	  post-­‐translational	  level	  are	  rapid	  and	  reversible.	  Most	  methods	  have	  excellent	  dose–	  and	  time–dependency,	  thus	  allowing	  the	  examination	  of	  protein	  function	  in	  a	  graded	  manner	  and	  across	  developmental	  stages.	  Further	  temporal	  control	  of	  protein	  knockdown	  is	  realized	  by	  small	  molecule	  ligands,	  and	  both	  drug-­‐on	  and	  drug-­‐off	  systems	  (Banaszynski	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Nishimura	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Bonger	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Neklesa	  et	  al.,	  2013)	  have	  been	  developed.	  Despite	  these	  advantages	  over	  genetic	  protein	  knockout	  methods,	  however,	  there	  are	  three	  main	  limitations	  with	  these	  techniques.	    45 First,	  methods	  that	  require	  direct	  linkage	  of	  the	  POI	  to	  a	  degron	  are	  not	  suitable	  for	  knocking	  down	  unmodified	  proteins	  in	  cells	  or	  animals	  in	  situ	  (Dohmen	  et	  al.,	  1994;	  Banaszynski	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Bonger	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  This	  is	  problematic	  for	  both	  basic	  research	  and	  therapeutic	  development.	  The	  covalent	  addition	  of	  components	  necessary	  to	  induce	  POI	  degradation	  may	  interfere	  with	  the	  normal	  localization,	  stability	  and	  function	  of	  the	  POI	  (Giepmans,	  2006).	  The	  requirement	  for	  genetic	  modification	  also	  precludes	  the	  use	  of	  these	  methods	  in	  knocking	  down	  native	  pathogenic	  proteins,	  thus	  limiting	  their	  therapeutic	  potential.	  Second,	  although	  methods	  that	  induce	  protein	  knockdown	  via	  trans-­‐targeting	  are	  capable	  of	  knocking	  down	  unmodified	  proteins,	  the	  bifunctional	  adaptors	  that	  tether	  a	  POI	  to	  UPS	  components	  are	  generally	  too	  large	  to	  penetrate	  the	  plasma	  membrane.	  In	  many	  cases,	  viral	  infection	  of	  the	  agents	  is	  required	  for	  use	  in	  cultured	  cells	  and	  animals	  (Zhang	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Matsuzawa	  et	  al.,	  2005),	  and	  the	  substantial	  size	  of	  these	  adapters	  increases	  the	  chance	  of	  immunogenicity.	  Third,	  given	  that	  current	  degron-­‐based	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  require	  the	  proteasome	  for	  degradation,	  they	  may	  fail	  in	  cases	  in	  which	  proteasomal	  function	  is	  compromised.	  In	  particular,	  these	  methods	  may	  not	  be	  able	  to	  degrade	  aberrantly	  accumulated	  pathogenic	  proteins	  in	  proteinopathies	  such	  as	  neurodegenerative	  disorders,	  as	  proteasomal	  dysfunction	  occurs	  early	  during	  pathogenesis.	  It	  is	  conceivable	  that	  UPS-­‐dependent	  protein	  knockdown	  therapies	  would	  not	  only	  fail	  under	  such	  circumstances,	    46 but	  may	  also	  be	  detrimental	  to	  cell	  survival	  as	  they	  further	  stress	  the	  already	  dysfunctional	  UPS	  system.	  1.6 RATIONALE	  AND	  HYPOTHESIS	  Rapid	  and	  reversible	  methods	  for	  altering	  the	  expression	  level	  of	  endogenous	  proteins	  are	  not	  only	  indispensable	  tools	  for	  studying	  complex	  biological	  systems,	  but	  may	  potentially	  drive	  the	  development	  of	  new	  therapeutics	  for	  the	  treatment	  of	  human	  diseases.	  Techniques	  that	  regulate	  the	  level	  of	  protein	  expression	  by	  targeting	  DNA	  or	  mRNA	  have	  revolutionized	  our	  understanding	  of	  protein	  function	  (Lewandoski,	  2001;	  Dykxhoorn	  and	  Lieberman,	  2005),	  but	  are	  often	  plagued	  by	  problems	  such	  as	  lack	  of	  specificity,	  speed,	  and	  tunability	  (Banaszynski	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  Furthermore,	  the	  dearth	  of	  efficient	  systemic	  delivery	  systems	  stymies	  their	  use	  for	  the	  treatment	  of	  human	  diseases.	  	  Protein	  degradation	  techniques	  that	  act	  at	  the	  post-­‐translational	  level	  have	  the	  ability	  to	  overcome	  some	  of	  the	  limitations	  of	  gene	  knockout,	  allowing	  rapid,	  reversible	  and	  graded	  protein	  knockdown.	  However,	  many	  techniques	  require	  the	  genetic	  manipulation	  of	  the	  target	  protein	  and/or	  viral	  infection	  of	  the	  targeting	  agents,	  thus	  severely	  constraining	  their	  potential	  for	  clinical	  adoption.	  Ideally,	  protein-­‐knockdown	  methods	  should	  allow	  the	  specific	  targeting	  of	  unmodified,	  endogenous	  proteins	  for	  degradation	  in	  a	  rapid,	  reversible	  and	  controllable	  manner	  without	  increasing	  stress	  to	  cellular	  proteolytic	  systems.	  The	  aim	  of	  this	  thesis	  is	  to	  develop	  such	  a	  method,	  using	  peptides	  as	  the	  protein-­‐knockdown	  agent.	  In	  this	  section,	  I	  will	  explain	  the	    47 rationale	  behind	  the	  design	  of	  SNIPER	  peptides	  and	  outline	  the	  steps	  to	  evaluate	  and	  improve	  on	  the	  method.	  	  1.6.1 THE	  CORE	  CONSTITUENTS	  OF	  SNIPER	  PEPTIDES	  We	  propose	  to	  use	  a	  multi-­‐functional	  peptide	  containing	  a	  protein-­‐binding	  domain	  (PBD)	  and	  a	  degron	  as	  the	  protein-­‐knockdown	  agent.	  The	  choice	  of	  utilizing	  peptides	  rather	  than	  small	  molecules	  is	  to	  enhance	  the	  generalizability	  and	  specificity	  of	  the	  method.	  Although	  small	  molecule	  drugs	  have	  been	  traditionally	  favoured	  over	  peptidergic	  agents	  due	  to	  their	  excellent	  pharmacokinetics	  and	  stability,	  their	  use	  is	  limited	  to	  proteins	  for	  which	  binding	  pockets	  can	  be	  found.	  As	  illustrated	  by	  PROTACs,	  a	  small-­‐ligand	  approach	  greatly	  limits	  the	  number	  of	  proteins	  amenable	  to	  targeted	  knockdown	  (Jang	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Carmony	  and	  Kim,	  2012).	  In	  contrast,	  it	  is	  now	  possible	  to	  identify	  binding	  domains	  for	  any	  given	  POI.	  The	  simplest	  method	  is	  to	  search	  protein-­‐protein	  interaction	  databases	  (BIOGRID,	  Rivas)	  and/or	  the	  literature	  for	  well-­‐characterized	  protein-­‐protein	  interaction	  domains,	  from	  which	  SNIPER	  peptides	  may	  be	  designed.	  For	  proteins	  without	  a	  known	  binding	  partner,	  a	  wide	  array	  of	  genetic	  and	  cell	  biology	  tools	  exist	  to	  identify	  potential	  binding	  candidates,	  such	  as	  yeast	  two-­‐hybrid	  assay,	  affinity	  purification	  and	  mass	  spectrometry,	  co-­‐immunoprecipitation	  and	  genome-­‐wide	  assays	  (Nero	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Once	  a	  potential	  binding	  partner	  is	  identified,	  peptide	  arrays	  can	  be	  used	  to	  further	  identify	  crucial	  amino	  acids	  stretches	  involved	  in	    48 the	  interaction	  for	  use	  as	  the	  protein-­‐binding	  domain	  of	  SNIPER	  peptides.	  Finally,	  binding	  peptides	  for	  a	  given	  POI	  may	  also	  be	  rationally	  designed	  using	  available	  computer	  frameworks	  (Grigoryan	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Das	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  Notably,	  protein-­‐protein	  interactions	  often	  depend	  on	  small	  clusters	  of	  key	  residues	  at	  the	  binding	  interface	  (London	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Mason,	  2010).	  Peptides	  designed	  around	  these	  hot	  spots	  are	  capable	  of	  highly	  specific	  high	  affinity	  binding	  to	  the	  POI	  (Dev,	  2004;	  London	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  The	  ability	  to	  use	  short	  protein-­‐binding	  domains	  decrease	  the	  overall	  length	  of	  the	  SNIPER	  peptide	  and	  facilitates	  its	  synthesis.	  	  Compared	  to	  small	  molecule	  ligands,	  peptidergic	  binding	  domains	  are	  not	  confined	  to	  a	  limited	  amount	  of	  binding	  pockets,	  and	  thus	  they	  can	  target	  non-­‐druggable	  sites	  of	  a	  given	  POI.	  This	  greatly	  increases	  selectivity	  and	  is	  particularly	  useful	  in	  the	  case	  of	  targeting	  a	  member	  of	  a	  protein	  family	  for	  degradation.	  For	  example,	  protein	  kinases	  with	  a	  ~60%	  overlap	  in	  their	  primary	  sequences	  have	  a	  high	  probability	  of	  binding	  to	  the	  same	  small	  molecule	  ligand	  (Vieth	  et	  al.,	  2005),	  thus	  prohibiting	  the	  use	  of	  small	  molecules	  in	  targeting	  a	  given	  member	  for	  degradation.	  However,	  by	  using	  peptide	  ligands	  that	  bind	  to	  sequences	  unique	  to	  each	  kinase,	  it	  may	  be	  possible	  to	  specifically	  eliminate	  a	  given	  member	  of	  a	  protein	  kinase	  family.	  The	  second	  core	  constituent	  of	  the	  SNIPER	  peptide	  is	  the	  degron,	  which	  recruits	  components	  of	  a	  proteolytic	  system	  to	  facilitate	  degradation.	  Multiple	  degrons	  have	  been	  identified	  for	  the	  UPS	  and	  ALS.	  However,	  given	  that	  existing	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  require	  degradation	  through	  the	  proteosome,	  a	  CMA-­‐based	  degradation	  system	  would	    49 not	  only	  complement	  current	  methods,	  but	  would	  also	  be	  especially	  powerful	  under	  pathological	  conditions	  in	  which	  the	  proteasome	  is	  inhibited.	  Due	  to	  these	  reasons,	  we	  opted	  to	  use	  CTM	  as	  the	  degron	  in	  our	  peptide-­‐based	  protein	  knockdown	  approach.	  Thus,	  the	  central	  mechanism	  of	  SNIPER	  relies	  on	  trans-­‐targeting.	  Specifically,	  our	  working	  hypothesis	  is:	  the	  SNIPER	  peptide,	  once	  introduced	  into	  the	  cell	  (Chapter	  1.6.3),	  will	  bind	  to	  the	  target	  protein	  through	  peptide-­‐protein	  interaction	  via	  its	  PBD,	  and	  the	  CTM	  directs	  the	  peptide-­‐protein	  complex	  to	  the	  lysosome	  for	  degradation	  via	  CMA	  (Figure	  1-­‐1).	  1.6.2 OBJECTIVE	  1:	  SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  RECOMBINANT	  PROTEINS	  As	  described	  in	  Chapter	  1.4.2.2,	  targeted	  protein	  degradation	  through	  CMA	  is	  mediated	  by	  the	  CTM.	  Given	  that	  CTM	  is	  transferrable	  (Koga	  et	  al.,	  2011b)	  and	  that	  CMA	  is	  upregulated	  in	  cases	  whereby	  the	  UPS	  is	  inhibited,	  we	  hypothesize	  that	  a	  peptide	  containing	  the	  CTM	  and	  a	  binding	  sequence	  specific	  for	  a	  target	  protein	  can	  degrade	  the	  protein	  through	  CMA,	  even	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  proteasomal	  inhibition.	  To	  potentially	  increase	  degradation	  efficiency,	  we	  designed	  a	  composite	  CTM	  (KFERQKILDQRFFE)	  from	  three	  natural	  CTMs	  identified	  from	  RNase	  A	  (KFERQ)	  (Backer	  et	  al.,	  1983),	  hsc70	  (QKILD)	  (Cuervo	  and	  Dice,	  2000a)	  and	  hemoglobin	  (QRFFE)	  (Slot	  et	  al.,	  1986).	  In	  this	  aim	  we	  will	  use	  a	  recombinant	  protein	  system	  to	  provide	  proof-­‐of-­‐concept	  that	  1)	  direct	    50 tagging	  with	  the	  CTM	  renders	  a	  protein	  metabolically	  unstable	  and	  2)	  a	  SNIPER	  peptide	  can	  direct	  a	  given	  POI	  for	  CMA	  degradation	  via	  peptide-­‐protein	  interaction.	  	  1.6.3 OBJECTIVE	  2:	  SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  KNOCKDOWN	  OF	  NATIVE	  PROTEINS	  IN	  PRIMARY	  NEURONAL	  CULTURES	  The	  blood-­‐brain	  barrier	  (BBB)	  and	  cellular	  plasma	  membrane	  pose	  a	  challenge	  for	  the	  intracellular	  delivery	  of	  macromolecules.	  Previous	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  have	  circumvented	  this	  problem	  by	  using	  viral	  delivery	  of	  their	  protein-­‐knockdown	  agents.	  While	  effective,	  the	  use	  of	  viral	  vectors	  is	  not	  only	  technically	  cumbersome	  but	  also	  limits	  their	  use	  as	  therapeutics.	  Cell-­‐penetrating	  peptides	  (CPPs)	  are	  a	  family	  of	  membrane-­‐permeant	  peptides	  capable	  of	  delivering	  biologically	  active	  cargo	  across	  the	  BBB	  and	  plasma	  membrane	  of	  cells	  in	  a	  highly	  efficient	  manner	  (Morris	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  There	  are	  two	  main	  classes	  of	  CPPs	  based	  on	  their	  physical	  chemical	  properties	  and	  internalization	  mechanisms.	  The	  first	  class	  is	  amphipathic	  CPPs,	  such	  as	  Pep-­‐1	  (Morris	  et	  al.,	  2001),	  that	  encapsulate	  their	  cargo	  through	  non-­‐covalent	  bonds	  and	  penetrate	  into	  the	  cell	  by	  forming	  a	  transient	  transmembrane	  pore-­‐like	  structure	  (Deshayes	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  The	  second	  class	  is	  polycationic	  CPPs,	  such	  as	  TAT	  (Vivès	  et	  al.,	  1997),	  which	  are	  directly	  attached	  to	  the	  cargo	  through	  covalent	  bounds	  and	  enter	  the	  cell	  via	  direct	  penetration	  and/or	  endocytosis	  (Gump	  and	  Dowdy,	  2007).	  Both	  classes	  of	  CPPs	  have	  been	  successfully	    51 utilized	  to	  deliver	  a	  wide	  range	  of	  biologically	  active	  macromolecules	  in	  vitro	  and	  in	  vivo	  (Morris	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Lim	  and	  Gleeson,	  2011;	  Koren	  and	  Torchilin,	  2012).	  TAT	  is	  by	  far	  the	  best-­‐characterized	  CPP.	  This	  sequence	  is	  derived	  from	  the	  membrane	  transduction	  domain	  (47-­‐57)	  of	  the	  HIV	  1	  Tat	  protein	  after	  it	  was	  found	  that	  full	  length	  Tat	  could	  be	  readily	  taken	  up	  by	  cells	  (Vivès	  et	  al.,	  1997).	  Since	  then,	  TAT	  has	  been	  repeatedly	  demonstrated	  to	  be	  safe	  and	  effective	  at	  delivering	  active	  biomolecules	  across	  the	  BBB	  and	  plasma	  membrane	  in	  animals	  (Schwarze,	  1999;	  Ahmadian	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Brebner,	  2005;	  Wong	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Taghibiglou	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Fan	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Most	  importantly,	  the	  use	  of	  TAT	  in	  peptidergic	  therapeutics	  has	  been	  validated	  in	  a	  recent	  successful	  phase	  2B	  clinical	  trial	  (Hill	  et	  al.,	  2012),	  with	  phase	  3	  in	  progress.	  	  Based	   on	   the	   demonstrated	   delivery	   efficacy	   of	   CPPs,	   we	   hypothesize	   that	   SNIPER	  peptides	  can	  be	  easily	  delivered	  into	  the	  interior	  of	  primary	  cultured	  neurons	  with	  the	  use	  of	  CPP,	  thus	  circumventing	  the	  need	  for	  viral	  infection.	  In	  this	  aim	  we	  will	  also	  examine	  the	  characteristics	   of	   SNIPER-­‐mediated	   degradation	   of	   native	   proteins,	   including	   time-­‐and	  dose-­‐dependency,	  as	  well	  as	  reversibility	  and	  toxicity.	  1.6.4 OBJECTIVE	  3:	  FUNCTIONAL	  CONSEQUENCES	  OF	  SNIPER-­‐MEDIATED	  PROTEIN	  KNOCKDOWN	  IN	  VITRO	  AND	  IN	  VIVO	  A	  major	  challenge	  in	  protein	  knockdown	  technology	  is	  to	  target	  endogenous	  proteins	  in	  the	  central	  nervous	  system	  (CNS)	  for	  rapid	  and	  controllable	  degradation	  in	  animal	  models	  of	  human	  diseases.	  Such	  a	  method	  would	  be	  especially	  useful	  for	  targeting	    52 pathogenic	  proteins	  in	  neurodegenerative	  disorders	  or	  death-­‐inducing	  proteins	  in	  brain	  injuries	  for	  degradation.	  Ischemic	  stroke,	  for	  example,	  activates	  multiple	  cell-­‐death	  signaling	  pathways,	  eventually	  leading	  to	  neuronal	  death	  and	  loss	  of	  brain	  function	  (Lai	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  By	  elucidating	  the	  molecular	  cascades	  that	  precede	  irreversible	  cell	  death,	  multiple	  key	  death-­‐signaling	  kinases	  have	  been	  identified	  as	  viable	  targets	  for	  neuroprotective	  interventions	  (Osuga	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Bright	  and	  Mochly-­‐Rosen,	  2005;	  Zhuang	  and	  Schnellmann,	  2006;	  Tu	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Coffey,	  2014;	  Coultrap	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  	  Pro-­‐death	  kinases	  are	  particularly	  interesting	  drug	  targets	  as	  their	  activity	  is	  dependent	  on	  the	  disease-­‐state;	  that	  is,	  they	  are	  normally	  inactive	  but	  activate	  following	  cytotoxic	  insults	  to	  the	  brain	  (Shamloo	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Furthermore,	  pro-­‐death	  kinases	  often	  serve	  as	  convergence	  points	  for	  different	  death-­‐inducing	  pathways	  (Hara	  and	  Snyder,	  2007;	  Pei	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Accordingly,	  inhibiting	  the	  activity	  of	  a	  given	  pro-­‐death	  kinase	  blocks	  multiple	  neurotoxic	  pathways	  and	  is	  thereby	  an	  attractive	  strategy	  for	  neuroprotection.	  Furthermore,	  increasing	  evidence	  shows	  that	  many	  kinases	  involved	  in	  acute	  neuronal	  death	  also	  participate	  in	  the	  gradual	  neuronal	  loss	  seen	  in	  neurodegenerative	  diseases	  (Flight,	  2013;	  Hilgeroth,	  2013;	  Coffey,	  2014),	  making	  them	  excellent	  candidates	  for	  intervention.	  Unfortunately,	  most	  kinases	  are	  undruggable	  by	  conventional	  small	  molecules	  (Crews,	  2010).	  However,	  as	  many	  pro-­‐death	  kinases	  have	  known	  binding	  partners	  with	  clearly	  defined	  interaction	  sites,	  it	  may	  be	  possible	  to	  engineer	  SNIPER	  peptides	  that	  target	  activated	  kinases	  for	  CMA	  degradation	  and	  thereby	  prevent	  cell	  death.	  	    53 Recent	  efforts	  have	  identified	  death-­‐associated	  kinase	  1	  (DAPK1)	  as	  a	  key	  mediator	  of	  ischemic	  cell	  death	  (Shamloo	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Hainsworth	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Tu	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Following	  an	  ischemic	  insult,	  DAPK1	  activates	  and	  binds	  to	  the	  GluN2B	  subunit	  of	  the	  N-­‐Methyl	  D-­‐Aspartate	  Receptor	  (NMDAR)	  and	  enhances	  NMDAR-­‐mediated	  currents	  and	  excitotoxicity	  (Tu	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Furthermore,	  DAPK1	  also	  inhibits	  pro-­‐survival	  pathways	  by	  sequestering	  ERK	  in	  the	  cytoplasm,	  thereby	  inhibiting	  the	  nuclear	  translocation	  of	  ERK	  and	  subsequent	  transcription	  of	  survival	  genes	  (Chen	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  In	  addition,	  DAPK1	  may	  also	  inhibit	  the	  Akt	  pro-­‐survival	  pathway	  via	  its	  phosphorylation	  and	  inactivation	  of	  CaMKK	  (Schumacher	  et	  al.,	  2004),	  the	  latter	  of	  which	  activates	  Akt	  (Yano	  et	  al.,	  1998).	  	  DAPK1	  is	  also	  involved	  in	  mediating	  cell	  death	  through	  non	  NMDAR-­‐dependent	  pathways,	  including	  oxidative	  stress	  through	  a	  JNK	  pathway	  (Eisenberg-­‐Lerner	  and	  Kimchi,	  2007)	  and	  inflammation	  via	  the	  formation	  of	  the	  NLRP3	  inflammasome	  and	  generation	  of	  IL-­‐1	  (Turner-­‐Brannen	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Yang	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Furthermore,	  aberrant	  DAPK1	  activation	  has	  also	  been	  show	  to	  contribute	  to	  neuronal	  damage	  in	  epilepsy	  (Henshall	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Araki	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Henshall	  et	  al.,	  2004)	  and	  Alzheimer’s	  disease	  (Kim	  et	  al.,	  2014),	  and	  knocking	  out	  DAPK1	  confers	  resistance	  to	  cell	  death	  from	  ER	  stress	  (Gozuacik	  et	  al.,	  2008)	  or	  ceramide	  (Pelled	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  For	  a	  review	  on	  the	  role	  of	  DAPK1	  in	  neuronal	  cell	  death,	  see	  (Fujita	  and	  Yamashita,	  2014).	  In	  this	  aim	  we	  will	  first	  determine	  the	  feasibility	  and	  efficacy	  of	  our	  method	  in	  knocking	  down	  DAPK1	  in	  vivo.	  We	  will	  next	  examine	  the	  phenotypic	  outcome	  of	  knocking	  down	  DAPK1,	  using	  a	  cellular	  model	  of	  oxidative	  stress	  and	  an	  animal	  model	  of	  stroke.	  Given	    54 the	  crucial	  role	  of	  DAPK1	  in	  mediating	  stroke-­‐induced	  neuronal	  death,	  we	  hypothesize	  that	  SNIPER-­‐mediated	  knockdown	  of	  active	  DAPK1	  is	  neuroprotective	  in	  vitro	  and	  in	  vivo.	  These	  proof-­‐of-­‐concept	  experiments	  will	  facilitate	  the	  design	  of	  novel	  therapeutics	  based	  on	  SNIPER-­‐facilitated	  degradation	  of	  pathogenic	  proteins	  in	  vivo.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	    55 Table	  1-­‐1.	  Post-­‐translational	  protein	  knockdown	  methods	  Strategy	   Mechanism	   Organism	   Regulation	   Reference	  N-­‐terminal	  rule	  	   Arg-­‐DHFRts	   Yeast	   Yes	   Dohmen	  et	  al.,	  1994	  N-­‐terminal	  rule	   Arg-­‐DHFR*	   Mammalian	  cells	  Yes,	  MTX	   Lévy	  et	  al.,	  1999	  E2	  co-­‐localization	  E2-­‐PBD	  tethers	  POI	  to	  E2	  Cell	  extracts	   No	   Gosink	  and	  Vierstra,	  1995	  E3	  co-­‐localization	  F	  box-­‐PBD	  tethers	  POI	  to	  SCFβTrCP	  	  Yeast,	  mammalian	  cells	  No	   Zhou	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Su	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Cong	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Liu	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Zhang	  et	  al.,	  2003 E3	  co-­‐localization	  Ubiquibodies	  target	  POI	  to	  CHIP	  Mammalian	  cells	  No	   Portnoff	  et	  al.,	  2014	    56 Strategy	   Mechanism	   Organism	   Regulation	   Reference	  E3	  co-­‐localization	  Bi-­‐functional	  molecule	  with	  PBD	  tethers	  POI	  to	  cIAP	  	  Mammalian	  cells	  No	   Itoh	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  2011;	  2012	  E3	  co-­‐localization	  AID	  tethers	  POI	  to	  SCFTIR1	  	  Yeast,	  mammalian	  cells	  Yes,	  auxin	  	   Nishimura	  et	  al.,	  2009	  E3	  co-­‐localization	  SCFNSmlb	  -­‐vhhGFP4	  targets	  GFP-­‐POI	  	  	  Drosophila,	  mammalian	  cells	  No	   Caussinus	  et	  al.,	  2011	  E3	  co-­‐localization	  PROTAC-­‐ligand	  tethers	  POI	  to	  E3	  Cell	  extracts,	  mammalian	  cells	  No	   Sakamoto	  et	  al.,	  2001,	  2003;	  Cyrus	  et	  al.	  2010;	  Hines	  et	  al.,	  2013	  Proteasome	  co-­‐localization	  POI-­‐FRB	  and	  proteasome-­‐FKBP	  dimerization	  Yeast	   Yes,	  rapamycin	  	  Janse,	  2004b	    57 Strategy	   Mechanism	   Organism	   Regulation	   Reference	  Proteasome	  co-­‐localization	  ODC-­‐PBD	  directs	  POI	  to	  proteasome	  Mammalian	  cells	  Yes,	  antizyme	  	  Matsuzawa	  et	  al.,	  2005	  Destabilizing	  domain	  POI-­‐destabilizing	  domain	  Mammalian	  cells,	  animals	  Yes	  (MaRap,	  Shield-­‐1,	  TMP	  or	  CMP8)	  	  Stankunas	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Banaszynski	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  2008;	  Iwamoto	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Miyazaki	  et	  al.,	  2012	  Destabilizing	  domain	  POI-­‐cryptic	  destabilizing	  domain	  (LID)	  Mammalian	  cells	  Yes	  (Shield-­‐1	  or	  light)	  	  Bonger	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  2014	  Increase	  hydrophobicity	  HaloTag-­‐POI	   Mammalian	  cells,	  mice	  Yes,	  HyT	  or	  HALTS1	  	  Neklesa	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  2013	  CMA	   Adaptor	  tethers	  mHtt	  (N-­‐term	  90aa)	  to	  lysosome	  Mammalian	  cells,	  mice	  No	   Bauer	  et	  al.,	  2010	  	    58 Figure	  1-­‐1	  Schematic	  of	  SNIPER-­‐peptide	  mediated	  knockdown.	  Schematic	  diagram	  illustrating	  the	  design	  of	  SNIPER-­‐peptide	  mediated	  protein	  degradation.	  Following	  administration,	  the	  peptide	  enters	  the	  cell	  through	  its	  cell	  penetrating	  peptide	  (CPP)	  domain,	  binds	  to	  the	  target	  protein	  via	  its	  protein	  binding	  domain	  (PBD),	  and	  chaperones	  the	  peptide-­‐protein	  complex	  to	  the	  lysosome	  for	  degradation	  via	  its	  chaperone-­‐mediated	  autophagy	  targeting	  motif	  (CTM).	  (Source:	  Fan	  and	  Wang,	  Current	  Protocols	  in	  Chemical	  Biology	  2015)	  	  	  	  	  	    59 CHAPTER	  2: MATERIALS	  AND	  METHODS	  2.1 CELL	  CULTURE	  2.1.1 HUMAN	  EMBRYONIC	  KIDNEY	  293	  (HEK	  293)	  CELL	  MAINTENANCE	  The	  HEK	  293	  cell	  line	  was	  maintained	  in	  10cm	  Petri	  dishes	  containing	  Dulbecco’s	  Modified	  Eagle	  Medium	  (DMEM;	  Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #10566-­‐016)	  supplemented	  with	  10%	  fetal	  bovine	  serum	  (FBS;	  Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #10099-­‐141)	  in	  an	  incubator	  set	  at	  37	  ̊C	  with	  5%	  CO2.	  The	  cells	  were	  monitored	  daily	  and	  medium	  was	  changed	  every	  2-­‐3	  days.	  	  Once	  cells	  reached	  80%	  confluence	  they	  were	  passaged	  into	  new	  dishes	  to	  sustain	  growth.	  Briefly,	  after	  removal	  of	  the	  medium,	  cells	  were	  incubated	  with	  3mL	  Trypsin	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #25200-­‐072)	  in	  DMEM	  in	  the	  incubator	  until	  they	  detached	  from	  the	  bottom	  of	  the	  dish.	  Trypsin	  was	  then	  neutralized	  with	  3mL	  complete	  growth	  media,	  and	  the	  cells	  were	  pelleted	  by	  centrifugation	  at	  1,000rpm	  for	  3.5min	  and	  the	  old	  medium	  removed.	  Cells	  were	  then	  re-­‐suspended	  in	  7mL	  fresh	  complete	  growth	  media	  by	  pipetting	  up-­‐and-­‐down	  with	  a	  5mL	  pipette.	  Finally,	  1mL	  of	  re-­‐suspended	  HEK	  293	  cells	  was	  transferred	  to	  a	  new	  10cm	  dish	  containing	  10mL	  fresh	  complete	  growth	  medium	  for	  further	  maintenance,	  and	  0.5mL	  of	  HEK	  293	  cells	  were	  used	  for	  each	  well	  in	  a	  6-­‐well	  plate	  for	  transfection	  the	  following	  day.	  All	  cells	  were	  returned	  to	  the	  incubator	  and	  further	  monitored	  for	  confluency	  and	  health.	    60 2.1.2 TRANSFECTION	  AND	  DRUG	  TREATMENT	  OF	  HEK	  CELLS	  Lipofectamine	  2000(Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #15338-­‐500)	  was	  used	  for	  the	  transfection	  of	  plasmid	  DNA	  into	  HEK	  293	  cells	  according	  to	  the	  manufacturer’s	  instructions	  with	  a	  few	  modifications.	  Briefly,	  for	  each	  well	  in	  a	  6-­‐well	  plate,	  2μg	  of	  plasmid	  DNA	  was	  diluted	  in	  125μL	  Opti-­‐MEM	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #31985-­‐070)	  in	  a	  sterilized	  Eppendorf	  tube.	  2μL	  of	  Lipofectamine	  was	  diluted	  in	  another	  125μL	  Opti-­‐MEM	  and	  allowed	  to	  rest	  without	  agitation	  at	  room	  temperature	  for	  5min.	  The	  two	  solutions	  were	  then	  mixed	  and	  rested	  for	  20min	  at	  room	  temperature.	  Across	  all	  experimental	  conditions	  the	  total	  amount	  of	  plasmid	  DNA	  was	  equalized	  with	  the	  pcDNA3.0	  vector.	  The	  plasmid-­‐Lipofectamine	  complex	  solution	  was	  then	  added	  drop-­‐by-­‐drop	  into	  each	  well	  of	  HEK	  293	  cells	  containing	  750μL	  fresh	  complete	  growth	  media.	  Transfected	  cells	  were	  returned	  to	  the	  incubator	  for	  either	  24h	  or	  48h	  before	  harvesting	  for	  immunoblot	  analysis	  (see	  Chapter	  2.3.2).	  	  Serum	  deprivation	  was	  initiated	  by	  replacing	  complete	  growth	  media	  with	  1mL	  serum-­‐free	  DMEM	  after	  transfection	  to	  enhance	  CMA	  activity.	  3-­‐methyladenine	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #M9281)	  was	  dissolved	  in	  water	  with	  gentle	  heating	  and	  used	  at	  10mM	  to	  inhibit	  macroautophagy.	  MG132	  (Biomol,	  cat.	  #PI102-­‐0025)	  was	  dissolved	  in	  DMSO	  and	  used	  at	  5μM	  to	  inhibit	  proteasomal	  activity.	  Ammonium	  chloride	  (NH4Cl;	  Sigma,	  cat.	  #A0171)	  was	  dissolved	  in	  water	  and	  used	  at	  20mM	  concentration	  to	  inhibit	  lysosomal	  activity.	  Pepstatin	  A	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #	  P5318)	  was	  dissolved	  in	  DMSO	  and	  used	  at	  10μM	  to	  inhibit	  the	  two	  primary	  lysosome	  enzymes,	  cathepsin	  D	  and	  E	  (Cataldo	  and	  Nixon,	  1990;	  Bauer	  et	  al.,	    61 2010).	  Control	  conditions	  included	  either	  DMSO	  or	  water.	  All	  treatments	  were	  initiated	  18hrs	  after	  transfection.	  2.1.3 STORAGE	  OF	  HEK	  293	  CELLS	  HEK	  293	  cells	  were	  stored	  in	  liquid	  nitrogen.	  Briefly,	  cells	  grown	  to	  80-­‐90%	  confluence	  were	  trypsinized	  and	  centrifuged	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2.1.1.	  Following	  removal	  of	  the	  media,	  cells	  were	  re-­‐suspended	  with	  1mL	  solution	  containing	  90%	  complete	  growth	  media	  and	  10%	  DMSO.	  The	  cells	  were	  then	  pipetted	  into	  2mL	  freezer	  tubes,	  wrapped	  in	  Tena	  underpads	  for	  extra	  insulation	  and	  placed	  at	  -­‐20	  ̊C	  for	  2h	  before	  being	  transferred	  to	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  –80	  ̊C	  refrigerator	  for	  overnight	  cooling.	  The	  freezer	  tubes	  were	  transferred	  to	  liquid	  nitrogen	  the	  next	  day	  for	  long-­‐term	  storage.	  2.1.4 PRIMARY	  NEURONAL	  CULTURE	  Dissociated	  cultures	  of	  rat	  cortical	  or	  hippocampal	  neurons	  were	  prepared	  from	  Sprague-­‐Dawley	  rat	  embryos	  collected	  from	  timed	  pregnant	  rats	  E18-­‐E19	  after	  fertilization	  on	  the	  day	  of	  culture.	  Mothers	  were	  sacrificed	  by	  overdosing	  with	  3.5mL	  25%	  urethane	  solution	  and	  the	  lower	  abdomen	  was	  cleaned	  with	  70%	  ethanol.	  An	  incision	  was	  made	  through	  the	  skin	  and	  muscle	  of	  the	  abdomen	  to	  expose	  the	  uterus,	  which	  was	  then	  removed	  in	  situ	  and	  placed	  in	  a	  sterile	  10cm	  culture	  dish	  with	  ice-­‐cold	  HBSS	  Dissection	  Buffer	  (DB).	  The	  recipe	  of	  which	  is	  as	  follows:	  	    62 HBSS	  Dissection	  Buffer	  (DB)	  500mL	  1x	  HBSS	  (without	  Ca2+	  and	  Mg2+,	  Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #14170-­‐112)	  10g	  glucose	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #G7528)	  2.5g	  sucrose	  (Fisher,	  cat.	  #FL030297)	  1.78g	  Hepes	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #H3784)	  Adjusted	  to	  pH=	  7.37–7.43	  and	  osmolarity=310-­‐320	  mOsm	  Filter	  to	  sterilize.	  Using	  sterile	  procedures,	  the	  uterus	  was	  opened	  and	  the	  embryos	  transferred	  to	  a	  new	  pre-­‐chilled	  10cm	  Petri	  dish.	  The	  brain	  of	  each	  embryo	  was	  carefully	  removed	  and	  the	  cortex	  was	  dissected	  out	  under	  a	  microscope	  and	  placed	  in	  a	  fresh	  10cm	  culture	  dish	  containing	  ice-­‐cold	  DB.	  To	  digest	  the	  tissue,	  DB	  was	  replaced	  with	  2-­‐4mL	  of	  pre-­‐warmed	  0.25%	  Trypsin-­‐EDTA	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #25200-­‐072)	  and	  the	  dish	  was	  placed	  into	  37°C	  incubator	  for	  30	  minutes.	  Trypsin	  was	  then	  inactivated	  by	  adding	  8-­‐10mL	  of	  warm	  DMEM	  media	  (with	  10%	  FBS)	  and	  the	  mixture	  was	  transferred	  to	  sterile	  15mL	  Falcon	  tube	  and	  allowed	  to	  sit	  for	  2-­‐3min	  for	  dissociated	  cells	  to	  settle	  to	  the	  bottom	  of	  the	  tube.	  The	  media	  was	  then	  removed	  and	  replaced	  with	  10mL	  of	  fresh	  DMEM	  (with	  10%	  FBS)	  twice.	  After	  the	  last	  wash,	  cells	  were	  gently	  titrated	  and	  centrifuged	  for	  45-­‐50s	  at	  2,500rpm.	  The	  wash	  media	  was	  then	  removed,	  and	  cells	  were	  re-­‐suspended	  in	  Neurobasal	  Plating	  media	  (NP).	  The	  recipe	  of	  which	  is	  as	  follows:	    63 Neurobasal	  Plating	  media	  (NP)	  487.75	  mL	  Neurobasal	  Media	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #21103)	  0.5	  mM	  GlutaMAXTM-­‐I	  Supplement	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #	  35050-­‐06)	  2%	  B27	  supplement	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #17504044)	  25μM	  glutamic	  acid	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #G8415)	  	  Cell	  number	  was	  then	  determined	  with	  a	  hemocytometer,	  and	  cells	  were	  plated	  onto	  poly-­‐D-­‐lysine	  (PDL;	  Sigma,	  cat.	  #P7280)-­‐coated	  tissue	  culture	  plates	  with	  the	  following	  densities:	  6.0×106	  for	  10cm	  dishes,	  9.0×105	  for	  35mm	  dishes	  1.5×105	  for	  12-­‐well	  plates,	  and	  2.0×105	  for	  24-­‐well	  plates.	  After	  2d	  in	  culture,	  two-­‐thirds	  of	  the	  media	  was	  removed	  and	  replaced	  with	  equal	  volume	  of	  Neurobasal	  Feeding	  media	  (NF:	  Neurobasal	  Media	  488.75	  mL,	  GlutaMAXTM-­‐I	  0.5	  mM,	  B27	  2%).	  Cells	  were	  maintained	  by	  performing	  a	  media	  swap	  as	  described	  above	  every	  4	  days	  until	  use.	  2.1.5 DRUG	  TREATMENT	  OF	  PRIMARY	  CULTURED	  NEURONS	  Primary	  neurons	  were	  cultured	  until	  14d	  in	  vitro	  before	  treatment	  with	  N-­‐methyl	  D-­‐aspartate	  (NMDA;	  Tocris,	  cat.	  #Asc-­‐052),	  H2O2	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #H1009),	  D–(-­‐)-­‐2-­‐Amino-­‐5-­‐phosphonopentanoic	  acid	  (D-­‐AP5;	  Ascent	  Sci,	  cat.	  #Asc-­‐003),	  Catalase	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #C1345)	  or	  saline	  control.	  Before	  treatment,	  conditioned	  media	  was	  removed	  and	  saved	  in	  a	  50mL	  Falcon	  tube	  and	  fresh	  Neurobasal	  Feeding	  media	  was	  added.	  In	  experiments	  involving	  peptide	  treatment,	  the	  peptides	  were	  added	  to	  the	  culture	  media	  for	  1h	  to	  allow	    64 penetration	  into	  the	  cells.	  D-­‐AP5	  and	  Catalase	  were	  added	  30min	  prior	  H2O2	  treatment	  to	  allow	  penetration.	  Cells	  were	  then	  treated	  with	  NMDA	  (50μM)	  or	  H2O2	  (300mM)	  for	  30min	  in	  the	  incubator.	  To	  end	  the	  treatment,	  the	  media	  was	  aspirated	  and	  cells	  were	  washed	  once	  with	  warm	  PBS.	  Finally,	  conditioned	  media	  was	  added	  back	  to	  the	  cultures	  and	  cells	  were	  kept	  in	  the	  incubator	  at	  37°C,	  5%	  CO2	  until	  harvesting.	  2.2 CELL	  AND	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  2.2.1 HEK	  293	  CELL	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  -­‐	  WHOLE	  CELL	  LYSATE	  To	  collect	  HEK	  cells	  for	  immunoblot	  analysis,	  DMEM	  media	  was	  removed	  and	  cells	  were	  washed	  with	  1mL	  ice-­‐cold	  phosphate-­‐buffered	  saline	  (PBS)	  for	  each	  well	  in	  a	  6-­‐well	  plate.	  PBS	  was	  then	  removed	  and	  replaced	  with	  500μL	  ice-­‐cold	  radio-­‐immuno-­‐precipitation	  assay	  (RIPA)	  buffer.	  Phosphate-­‐buffered	  saline	  (PBS)	  137mM	  NaCl	  2.7mM	  KCl	  10mM	  Na2HPO4	  	  1.8mM	  KH2PO4	  Adjust	  to	  pH7.4,	  autoclave	  and	  cool	  prior	  use	  Radio-­‐immuno-­‐precipitation	  assay	  (RIPA)	  buffer	  150mM	  NaCl	  0.3%	  deoxycholic	  acid	  sodium	  50mM	  Tris	  (pH	  8)	    65 1mM	  EDTA	  1.0%	  Triton	  X-­‐100	  Adjust	  to	  pH7.4	  	  Halt	  Protease	  Phosphatase	  Inhibitor	  (ThermoFisher,	  cat.	  #PI78442)	  	  Cells	  were	  immediately	  scraped	  off	  the	  plate	  with	  specialized	  cell	  scrapers	  and	  collected	  into	  1.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tubes.	  The	  tubes	  were	  then	  kept	  on	  ice	  for	  30min	  and	  then	  centrifuged	  at	  14,000rpm	  for	  10min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  to	  precipitate	  cell	  debris.	  The	  supernatant	  was	  transferred	  into	  a	  new	  1.5mL	  Eppondorf	  tube	  and	  stored	  at	  -­‐20	  ̊C	  until	  further	  use.	  2.2.2 PRIMARY	  NEURON	  CULTURE	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  -­‐	  WHOLE	  CELL	  LYSATE	  To	  collect	  primary	  neurons	  for	  immunoblot	  analysis,	  Neurobasal	  Feeding	  media	  was	  removed	  and	  cells	  were	  washed	  with	  ice-­‐cold	  PBS,	  lysed	  in	  400μL	  RIPA	  buffer	  supplemented	  with	  0.1%SDS	  and	  centrifuged	  to	  remove	  cell	  debris	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2.2.1.	  The	  supernatant	  was	  transferred	  into	  a	  new	  1.5mL	  Eppondorf	  tube	  and	  stored	  at	  -­‐20	  ̊C	  until	  further	  use.	  2.2.3 PRIMARY	  NEURON	  CULTURE	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  –	  NUCLEAR	  FRACTIONATION	  To	  collect	  neuronal	  tissue	  for	  nuclear	  fractionation	  and	  subsequent	  immunoblot	  analysis,	  neurons	  were	  cultured	  in	  10cm	  dishes	  for	  14d.	  Plates	  were	  washed	  2X	  with	  7mL	  ice	  cold	  PB	  each	  time,	  and	  900μL	  Buffer	  A	  was	  added	  to	  each	  plate.	  	  	    66 Buffer	  A	  10mM	  HEPES-­‐KOH	  	  10mM	  KCl	  10mM	  EDTA	  1mM	  DTT	  	  0.4%	  NP40	  1.5mM	  MgCl2	  Halt	  Protease	  Phosphatase	  Inhibitor	  (ThermoFisher,	  cat.	  #PI78442)	  	  Adjust	  to	  pH7.9	  Plates	  were	  rocked	  at	  150rpm	  on	  a	  platform	  rotator	  for	  20min	  and	  lysates	  were	  collected	  into	  1.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tubes.	  For	  each	  sample,	  100μL	  of	  lysate	  was	  saved	  as	  whole-­‐cell	  lysate	  control.	  The	  remainder	  was	  centrifuged	  at	  14,000rpm	  for	  3min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  to	  precipitate	  the	  crude	  nuclear	  fraction	  into	  a	  pellet	  (the	  crude	  nuclear	  fraction).	  The	  supernatant,	  which	  is	  the	  crude	  cytosolic	  fraction,	  was	  then	  transferred	  into	  a	  new	  tube	  and	  centrifuged	  at	  14,000rpm	  for	  10min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  to	  clear	  the	  cytosolic	  fraction.	  The	  supernatant	  was	  transferred	  into	  a	  new	  1.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tube	  and	  saved	  at	  -­‐20	  ̊C	  until	  further	  use.	  To	  purify	  the	  nuclear	  fraction,	  the	  original	  pellet	  was	  washed	  with	  1mL	  Buffer	  A	  by	  gently	  pipetting	  up-­‐and-­‐down,	  and	  centrifuged	  at	  14,000g	  for	  3min	  at	  4	̊  C	  to	  pellet	  the	  nuclei.	  The	  washing	  buffer	  was	  discarded	  and	  150μL	  of	  Buffer	  B	  was	  added	  to	  each	  pellet	  and	  gently	  vortexed	  to	  detach	  and	  homogenize	  the	  pellet.	  	  	  	    67 Buffer	  B	  20mM	  HEPES-­‐KOH	  400mM	  NaCl	  1mM	  EDTA	  10%	  glycerol	  1mM	  DTT	  Halt	  Protease	  Phosphatase	  Inhibitor	  (ThermoFisher,	  cat.	  #PI78442)	  	  Adjust	  to	  pH7.9	  Each	  nuclei	  sample	  was	  further	  lysed	  by	  rocking	  on	  ice	  at	  150rpm	  for	  2h	  in	  Buffer	  B,	  and	  vortexed	  gently	  for	  10s	  every	  30min.	  Finally,	  the	  soluble	  nuclear	  fraction	  was	  obtained	  by	  centrifuging	  the	  sample	  at	  14,000rpm	  for	  5min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  and	  stored	  at	  -­‐20	  ̊C	  until	  use.	  2.2.4 PRIMARY	  NEURON	  CULTURE	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  –	  MITOCHONDRIAL	  FRACTIONATION	  To	  collect	  neuronal	  tissue	  for	  mitochondrial	  fractionation	  and	  subsequent	  immunoblot	  analysis,	  neurons	  were	  cultured	  in	  10cm	  dishes	  for	  14d.	  Mitochondria	  isolation	  was	  performed	  using	  the	  ThermoScientific	  kit	  (cat.	  #89874)	  according	  to	  the	  manufacturer’s	  instructions.	  Briefly,	  cells	  were	  treated	  with	  trypsin	  and	  collected	  into	  2mL	  Eppendorf	  tubes,	  and	  then	  pelleted	  by	  centrifuging	  at	  850g	  for	  2min	  at	  4	̊  C.	  To	  lyse	  the	  cells,	  800μL	  Reagent	  A	  was	  added	  to	  each	  sample	  and	  subsequently	  vortexed	  at	  medium	  speed	  for	  5s	  before	  a	  2min	  incubation	  period	  on	  ice.	  Cell	  lysis	  was	  terminated	  by	  the	  addition	  of	  10μL	  Reagent	  B	  and	  vortexing	  at	  maximum	  speed	  for	  5s.	  Each	  sample	  was	  then	  incubated	  on	  ice	  for	  5min	  and	  vortexed	  at	  maximum	  speed	  every	  minute.	  To	  yield	  the	  crude	  cytosolic	    68 fraction,	  800μL	  of	  Reagent	  C	  was	  added	  to	  each	  sample,	  followed	  by	  centrifuging	  each	  sample	  at	  700g	  for	  10min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  and	  transferring	  the	  supernatant	  into	  a	  new	  tube.	  To	  pellet	  the	  mitochondria,	  the	  supernatant	  was	  centrifuged	  at	  3,000g	  for	  15min	  at	  4	  ̊C.	  The	  pellet	  was	  then	  washed	  with	  an	  additional	  500μL	  of	  Reagent	  C	  and	  centrifuged	  at	  12,000g	  for	  5min	  at	  4	  ̊C.	  The	  mitochondria	  pellet	  was	  immediately	  mixed	  with	  4X	  sample	  buffer	  boiled	  on	  a	  95	̊  C	  heating	  block	  for	  immunoblot	  analysis.	  4X	  Sample	  Buffer	  50%	  glycerol	  125mM	  Tris-­‐HCl	  (pH	  6.8)	  4%	  SDS	  0.08%	  Bromophenol	  Blue	  Add	  5%	  β-­‐mercaptomethanol	  prior	  use	  2.2.5 ANIMAL	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  -­‐	  LYSATE	  To	  obtain	  brain	  tissue	  for	  immunoblot	  analysis,	  each	  rat	  was	  sacrificed	  with	  an	  overdose	  of	  urethane	  (3g/kg,	  i.p.).	  To	  minimize	  blood	  flow	  to	  the	  brain,	  the	  heart	  was	  stopped	  by	  a	  blunt	  force	  to	  the	  chest	  and	  the	  head	  was	  quickly	  displaced	  with	  scissors.	  The	  skull	  was	  carefully	  removed	  with	  a	  bone	  cutter	  and	  the	  brain	  gently	  harvested	  and	  place	  into	  a	  pre-­‐chilled	  brain	  mold.	  	  The	  brain	  was	  then	  coronally	  sectioned	  into	  2mm-­‐thick	  slices	  and	  stained	  with	  2,3,5-­‐triphenyltetrazolium	  chloride	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2.5.1	  to	  identify	  areas	  damaged	  by	  middle	  cerebral	  arterial	  occlusion.	  Infarct	  areas	  and	  contralateral	  control	  areas	  were	    69 excised	  with	  surgical	  scissors	  and	  homogenized	  in	  1mL	  ice-­‐cold	  lysis	  buffer	  (RIPA	  buffer	  with	  0.1%SDS	  and	  protease	  inhibitor	  cocktail)	  via	  roughly	  30	  strokes	  with	  a	  plastic	  homogenizer	  until	  the	  tissue	  completely	  dispersed.	  The	  samples	  were	  then	  sequentially	  passed	  five	  times	  through	  a	  16-­‐,	  18-­‐,	  21-­‐,	  23-­‐	  and	  25-­‐gauge	  needle	  (with	  a	  1mL	  syringe),	  and	  then	  left	  on	  ice	  and	  placed	  in	  a	  4	  ̊C	  refrigerator	  overnight	  for	  further	  lysis.	  Cellular	  debris	  was	  removed	  by	  centrifuging	  at	  4	  ̊C	  at	  14,000rpm	  for	  10min	  the	  next	  day,	  and	  the	  supernatant	  was	  collected	  and	  kept	  in	  -­‐80	  ̊C	  until	  use.	  2.2.6 ANIMAL	  TISSUE	  COLLECTION	  –	  PERFUSION	  AND	  FIXATION	  Each	  animal	  was	  anesthetized	  with	  urethane	  (1.5g/kg,	  i.p.)	  and	  brain	  tissue	  was	  fixed	  via	  an	  intra-­‐cardiac	  perfusion	  procedure.	  A	  V-­‐shaped	  incision	  through	  the	  skin	  and	  underlying	  muscles	  was	  made	  starting	  at	  the	  sternum	  to	  expose	  the	  abdominal	  cavity	  and	  diaphragm,	  as	  well	  as	  part	  of	  the	  chest	  cavity.	  The	  diaphragm	  was	  carefully	  cut	  away	  to	  expose	  the	  beating	  heart.	  The	  chest	  wall	  was	  deflected	  upwards	  over	  the	  head	  of	  the	  animal	  and	  held	  in	  place	  by	  a	  large	  hemostat	  to	  fully	  expose	  the	  chest	  cavity.	  The	  heart	  was	  held	  in	  place	  with	  a	  small	  hemostat	  and	  a	  cannula	  running	  saline	  was	  gently	  inserted	  into	  the	  left	  ventricle	  and	  clamped	  in	  place.	  The	  right	  atrium	  was	  quickly	  cut	  open	  by	  small	  surgical	  scissors	  to	  facilitate	  outflow	  of	  the	  circulating	  blood.	  A	  small	  incision	  to	  the	  tip	  of	  the	  tail	  was	  made	  to	  facilitate	  observation	  of	  blood	  outflow,	  which	  typically	  clears	  after	  perfusing	  with	  250-­‐300mL	  of	  saline.	  The	  saline	  was	  then	  switched	  to	  paraformaldehyde	  (PFA)	  solution	  (4%	  PFA	  in	  PBS)	  and	  each	  rat	  is	  perfused	  with	  250mL	  PFA	  solution	  or	  until	  completely	  stiff.	  	    70 The	  head	  was	  displaced	  with	  scissors.	  The	  skull	  was	  carefully	  removed	  with	  a	  bone	  cutter	  and	  the	  brain	  gently	  harvested	  and	  place	  into	  a	  50mL	  Falcon	  tube	  filled	  with	  4%	  PFA	  solution	  and	  kept	  in	  a	  4	  ̊C	  refrigerator	  overnight.	  The	  brains	  were	  then	  transferred	  to	  a	  30%	  sucrose	  solution	  (in	  4%	  PFA)	  in	  50mL	  Falcon	  tubes	  until	  they	  sunk	  to	  the	  bottom	  to	  achieve	  cryoprotection.	  The	  brains	  were	  then	  carefully	  rinsed	  with	  PBS,	  wrapped	  in	  aluminum	  foil	  and	  placed	  at	  -­‐80	  ̊C	  for	  at	  least	  1h	  prior	  slicing.	  	  Cryoprotected	  brains	  were	  covered	  in	  Optimal	  Cutting	  Temperature	  (OCT)	  compound	  (Tissue-­‐Tek	  CRYO-­‐OCT,	  cat.	  #4583)	  and	  sliced	  with	  a	  cryostat	  into	  30μm	  thick	  coronal	  sections	  at	  -­‐20	  ̊C	  chamber	  temperature.	  The	  sections	  were	  kept	  in	  0.1M	  PB	  at	  4	  ̊C	  until	  they	  were	  used	  for	  immunohistochemistry	  staining	  for	  DAPK1	  (Chapter	  2.5.5)	  or	  Fluoro-­‐Jade	  B	  staining	  for	  degenerating	  neurons	  (Chapter	  2.5.2).	  2.3 PROTEIN	  AND	  PEPTIDE	  ANALYSIS	  2.3.1 PROTEIN	  CONCENTRATION	  Protein	  concentration	  was	  determined	  with	  the	  Lowry	  method,	  using	  Bio-­‐Rad	  DC	  Protein	  Assay	  Kit	  (Bio-­‐Rad,	  cat.	  #500-­‐0112)	  according	  to	  the	  manufacturer’s	  instructions.	  Briefly,	  protein	  standards	  were	  made	  from	  powered	  BSA	  solubilized	  in	  RIPA	  buffer	  through	  serial	  dilutions,	  yielding	  BSA	  solutions	  of	  the	  following	  concentrations:	  10mg/mL,	  5mg/mL,	  2.5mg/mL,	  1.25mg/mL,	  0.625mg/mL	  and	  0.31mg/mL.	  To	  calculate	  a	  standard	  curve,	  10μL	  of	  each	  protein	  standard	  was	  mixed	  with	  10μL	  Reagent	  S,	  100μL	  Reagent	  A	  and	  890μL	  Reagent	  B	  in	  a	  plastic	  cuvette.	  Similarly,	  10μL	  Reagent	  S,	  100μL	  Reagent	  A	  and	  800μL	    71 Reagent	  B	  was	  added	  to	  10μL	  of	  each	  protein	  sample.	  The	  preparations	  were	  rested	  at	  room	  temperature	  for	  20min	  to	  allow	  color	  to	  develop,	  and	  subsequently	  measured	  with	  a	  Biochrom	  Ultrospec	  60	  at	  750nm	  to	  obtain	  the	  standard	  curve	  and	  the	  concentration	  of	  each	  protein	  sample.	  2.3.2 ELECTROPHORESIS	  AND	  WESTERN	  BLOT	  ANALYSIS	  Proteins	  were	  separated	  by	  sodium	  dodecyl	  sulfate	  polyacrylamide	  gel	  electrophoresis	  (SDS-­‐PAGE)	  and	  transferred	  to	  polyvinyl	  difluoride	  (PVDF)	  membranes.	  The	  membranes	  were	  blocked	  with	  5%	  skim	  milk,	  and	  then	  sequentially	  incubated	  with	  primary	  and	  secondary	  antibodies	  prior	  detection	  of	  protein	  bands	  by	  chemiluminescent	  imaging.	  SDS-­‐PAGE	  gels	  (1.5mm-­‐thick,	  10-­‐wells)	  were	  made	  using	  standard	  cast	  racks	  (BIO-­‐RAD,	  cat.	  #165-­‐8000).	  Each	  gel	  consisted	  of	  a	  bottom	  10%	  acrylamide	  separating	  gel	  (4.0mL	  of	  distilled	  water,	  3.3mL	  of	  30%	  acrylamide	  solution,	  2.5mL	  of	  1.5M	  Tris	  pH8.8,	  100μL	  of	  10%	  SDS,	  50μL	  of	  10%	  APS,	  and	  5μL	  of	  TEMED)	  and	  a	  top	  5%	  stacking	  gel	  (2.82mL	  of	  distilled	  water,	  0.83mL	  of	  30%	  acrylamide	  solution,	  1.25mL	  of	  0.5M	  Tris	  pH	  6.8,	  50μL	  of	  10%	  SDS,	  50μL	  of	  10%	  APS,	  and	  5μL	  of	  TEMED).	  A	  10-­‐well	  comb	  was	  inserted	  into	  the	  stacking	  gel	  prior	  solidifying	  to	  generate	  loading	  wells.	  Gels	  were	  then	  washed	  with	  distilled	  water,	  wrapped	  in	  wet	  tissue	  and	  stored	  at	  4	  ̊C	  until	  use.	  	  Protein	  samples	  for	  immunoblot	  analysis	  were	  prepared	  by	  mixing	  30μL	  of	  protein	  sample	  with	  10μL	  of	  4X	  sample	  buffer	  and	  boiled	  on	  a	  95	̊  C	  heat	  block	  for	  5min.	  Samples	  were	  then	  centrifuged	  at	  14,000rpm,	  4	  ̊C	  for	  1min	  and	  allowed	  to	  cool	  prior	  loading	  onto	  SDS-­‐  72 PAGE	  gels.	  To	  facilitate	  protein	  identification,	  8μL	  of	  PageRuler	  Prestained	  Protein	  Ladder	  (ThermoScientific,	  cat.	  #SM0671)	  was	  also	  loaded	  onto	  the	  gel.	  Gels	  were	  subsequently	  subjected	  to	  electrophoresis	  in	  running	  buffer	  (25mM	  Tris	  base,	  190mM	  glycine,	  and	  0.1%	  SDS	  at	  pH	  8.3)	  at	  100V	  for	  stacking	  gel	  and	  140V	  for	  separating	  gel.	  	  Gels	  were	  then	  rinsed	  with	  distilled	  water	  and	  placed	  into	  transfer	  buffer	  (25mM	  Tris	  base,	  190mM	  glycine,	  and	  20%	  methanol	  at	  pH	  8.3).	  PVDF	  membranes	  (Immobilon-­‐P	  Transfer	  Membrane,	  Millipore,	  #IPVH00010)	  were	  activated	  by	  incubating	  in	  methanol	  for	  2min,	  after	  which	  they	  were	  immersed	  in	  transfer	  buffer	  until	  use.	  Each	  gel	  was	  carefully	  secured	  into	  a	  transfer	  cassette	  and	  placed	  into	  the	  transfer	  chamber	  with	  an	  ice	  pack.	  The	  transfer	  apparatus	  was	  then	  moved	  into	  a	  4	  ̊C	  cold	  room	  and	  proteins	  were	  transferred	  at	  110V	  for	  60-­‐90min.	  	  After	  completing	  the	  transfer,	  PVDF	  membranes	  were	  rinsed	  in	  Tris-­‐buffered	  saline	  with	  Triton	  X-­‐100	  (TBST)	  and	  blocked	  with	  5%	  skim	  milk	  in	  TBST	  for	  1h.	  The	  membranes	  were	  then	  rinsed	  with	  TBST	  and	  incubated	  with	  a	  primary	  antibody	  (diluted	  in	  3%	  BSA	  in	  PBS	  and	  0.01%	  NaN3)	  in	  the	  4	  ̊C	  cold	  room	  overnight	  with	  constant	  agitation.	  	  TBST	  50mM	  Tris-­‐HCl	  150mM	  NaCl	  0.01%	  TritonX-­‐100	  Adjust	  to	  pH7.4	  Following	  primary	  antibody	  incubation,	  each	  membrane	  was	  washed	  3X	  5min	  with	  TBST	    73 and	  incubated	  with	  HRP-­‐conjugated	  secondary	  antibodies	  for	  1h	  at	  room	  temperature	  with	  agitation	  (mouse	  IgG-­‐HRP:	  Perkin-­‐Elmer,	  cat.	  #NEF8822001EA;	  rabbit	  IgG-­‐HRP:	  Perkin-­‐Elmer,	  cat.	  #NEF812001EA;	  rat	  IgG-­‐HRP:	  Amersham,	  cat.	  #NA935;	  diluted	  1:5000	  in	  3%	  skim	  milk	  in	  TBST).	  After	  another	  3X5min	  washes	  with	  TBST,	  each	  membrane	  was	  treated	  with	  1mL	  Luminata	  Crescendo	  Western	  HRP	  substrate	  (Fischer;	  cat.	  #WBLUR0500)	  to	  detect	  protein	  bands	  via	  chemiluminescent	  imaging.	  	  The	  primary	  antibodies	  used	  for	  the	  work	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  are	  listed	  in	  Table	  2-­‐1.	  	  2.3.3 CO-­‐IMMUNOPRECIPITATION	  (CO-­‐IP)	  Cells	  were	  cultured	  on	  10cm	  dishes	  in	  preparation	  for	  Co-­‐IP.	  Each	  dish	  was	  washed	  2X	  with	  5mL	  ice-­‐cold	  PBS,	  and	  1mL	  RIPA	  buffer	  (with	  protease	  inhibitor	  cocktail)	  was	  subsequently	  added	  to	  each	  plate.	  Cells	  were	  scraped	  from	  the	  dishes	  with	  specialized	  cell	  scrapers,	  collected	  into	  1.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tubes	  and	  allowed	  to	  rest	  on	  ice	  for	  30min.	  The	  lysates	  were	  then	  passed	  3X	  through	  a	  27-­‐gauge	  needle	  and	  then	  centrifuged	  at	  14,000rpm	  for	  10min	  at	  4	̊  C	  to	  precipitate	  cell	  debris.	  Protein	  concentration	  was	  measured	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2.3.1.	  Protein	  G	  Sepharose	  beads	  (GE	  Healthcare,	  cat.	  #17-­‐0618-­‐01)	  were	  used	  for	  monoclonal	  and/or	  mouse	  primary	  antibodies,	  while	  Protein	  A	  Sepharose	  CL-­‐4B	  (GE	  Healthcare,	  cat.	  #17-­‐0780-­‐01)	  were	  used	  for	  polyclonal	  and/or	  rabbit	  antibodies.	  To	  prepare	  Protein	  A	  beads,	  100mg	  of	  powder	  was	  mixed	  with	  1mL	  PBS	  and	  rotated	  at	  4	  ̊C	  for	  4h.	  To	  precipitate	  the	  beads,	  each	  tube	  was	  centrifuged	  at	  2,000rpm	  for	  1min.	  The	  beads	  were	  washed	  three	    74 times	  by	  re-­‐suspending	  in	  1mL	  of	  PBS,	  incubating	  on	  ice	  for	  5min	  and	  then	  centrifuging	  as	  described	  above	  each	  time.	  Protein	  G	  beads	  were	  washed	  in	  the	  same	  way	  prior	  use.	  To	  eliminate	  proteins	  that	  directly	  bind	  to	  the	  beads,	  samples	  were	  pre-­‐cleared	  by	  adding	  10μL	  of	  the	  appropriate	  beads	  to	  1μg	  of	  protein	  sample	  and	  rotated	  at	  4	  ̊C	  for	  1h.	  Samples	  were	  then	  centrifuged	  at	  2,000rpm	  for	  1min	  and	  transferred	  into	  a	  new	  tube.	  4μg	  of	  the	  appropriate	  normal	  IgG	  (rabbit:	  Santa	  cruz,	  cat.	  #sc-­‐2027;	  mouse:	  Santa	  cruz,	  cat.	  #sc-­‐2025)	  or	  4μg	  of	  primary	  antibody	  was	  added	  to	  each	  sample	  and	  rotated	  at	  4	  ̊C	  overnight.	  	  The	  following	  day	  60μL	  of	  Protein	  A	  or	  G	  beads	  were	  added	  to	  each	  tube	  and	  the	  samples	  were	  rotated	  for	  4h	  at	  4	  ̊C.	  Beads	  were	  precipitated	  by	  centrifuging	  each	  tube	  at	  2,000rpm	  for	  1min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  and	  discarding	  the	  supernatant.	  The	  beads	  were	  then	  washed	  three	  times	  as	  follows:	  500μL	  of	  RIPA	  buffer	  was	  added	  to	  each	  tube	  to	  re-­‐suspend	  the	  beads,	  which	  were	  then	  incubated	  on	  ice	  for	  5min	  prior	  centrifuging	  at	  2,000rpm	  for	  1min	  to	  collect	  the	  beads.	  A	  30-­‐gauge	  needle	  was	  used	  to	  completely	  remove	  wash	  buffer	  each	  time.	  	  To	  elute	  the	  proteins	  from	  the	  beads,	  26μL	  of	  PBS	  and	  12.5μL	  of	  4X	  sample	  buffer	  was	  added	  to	  each	  tube	  and	  heated	  at	  95	  ̊C	  for	  5min	  on	  a	  heating	  block.	  Beads	  were	  deposited	  by	  centrifuging	  at	  2,000rpm	  for	  1min	  and	  the	  supernatant	  was	  used	  for	  immunoblot	  analysis.	  2.3.4 HIS-­‐TAGGED	  PROTEIN	  PURIFICATION	  AND	  COOMASSIE	  BLUE	  STAINING	  The	  6X	  his-­‐tagged	  peptides	  Tat-­‐GluN2Bct-­‐CTM	  and	  Tat-­‐GluN2Bct	  were	  purified	  with	  HisPur	  Ni-­‐NTA	  Resin	  (Thermo	  Scientific,	  cat.	  #88221)	  in	  a	  gravity-­‐flow	  column	  according	    75 to	  the	  manufacturer’s	  protocol.	  Briefly,	  BL21	  bacteria	  were	  transformed	  with	  plasmid	  DNA	  and	  incubated	  in	  a	  37	  ̊C	  shaker	  spinning	  at	  250rpm	  until	  the	  absorbance	  of	  the	  solution	  reached	  0.6,	  measured	  at	  600nm.	  Isopropyl	  β-­‐D-­‐1-­‐thiogalactopyranoside	  (IPTG;	  BioShop,	  cat.	  #IPT001)	  was	  added	  to	  a	  final	  concentration	  of	  1mM	  and	  the	  flask	  was	  returned	  to	  the	  shaker	  for	  5h.	  The	  bacteria	  pellet	  was	  obtained	  by	  centrifuging	  at	  4,000rpm	  for	  20min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  and	  discarding	  the	  supernatant.	  	  To	  purify	  6X	  his-­‐tagged	  peptides,	  bacteria	  pellets	  were	  lysed	  via	  sonication	  in	  10mL	  ice-­‐cold	  PBS	  containing	  1%	  protease-­‐phosphatase	  inhibitor	  cocktail	  (Halt	  Protease	  Phosphatase	  Inhibitor,	  ThermoFisher,	  cat.	  #PI78442).	  Protein	  extract	  was	  purified	  by	  centrifuging	  at	  13,000rpm	  for	  10min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  to	  remove	  debris,	  and	  then	  mixed	  with	  Equilibration	  Buffer	  (20mM	  sodium	  phosphate,	  300mM	  sodium	  chloride,	  10mM	  imidazole	  at	  pH7.4)	  so	  that	  the	  final	  volume	  reached	  10mL.	  At	  the	  same	  time,	  resin	  columns	  were	  equilibrated	  with	  3mL	  of	  Equilibration	  Buffer.	  The	  protein	  extract	  mixture	  was	  then	  added	  to	  the	  column	  and	  allowed	  to	  drain	  by	  gravity	  flow.	  The	  flow-­‐through	  was	  collected	  in	  a	  tube.	  The	  resin	  was	  then	  washed	  2X	  with	  5mL	  Wash	  Buffer	  (25mM	  imidazole	  in	  PBS,	  pH7.4)	  each	  time	  and	  the	  flow-­‐through	  was	  collected	  in	  new	  collection	  tubes.	  His-­‐tagged	  proteins	  were	  eluted	  from	  the	  resin	  three	  times,	  each	  time	  using	  3mL	  of	  Elution	  Buffer	  (250mM	  imidazole	  in	  PBS,	  pH7.4).	  Each	  fraction	  was	  collected	  in	  a	  separate	  tube.	    76 To	  test	  for	  peptide	  purity,	  the	  eluted	  samples	  were	  mixed	  with	  4X	  sample	  buffer	  and	  separated	  on	  a	  SDS-­‐PAGE	  gel	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2.3.2.	  The	  gel	  was	  incubated	  in	  100mL	  of	  Coomassie	  Blue	  solution	  	  (0.1%	  Coomassie	  R-­‐250	  in	  40%	  ethanol	  and	  10%	  acetic	  acid)	  at	  room	  temperature	  for	  2h	  with	  constant	  agitation,	  and	  then	  rinsed	  with	  distilled	  water	  and	  subsequently	  destained	  at	  room	  temperature	  overnight	  in	  100mL	  destaining	  solution	  (10%	  ethanol	  and	  7.5%	  acetic	  acid).	  The	  gel	  was	  photographed	  once	  the	  desired	  background	  was	  achieved.	  2.3.5 SEQUENCES	  OF	  SYNTHETIC	  PEPTIDES	  Synthetic	  SNIPER	  peptides	  were	  synthesized	  in	  house	  using	  the	  Prelude	  peptide	  synthesizer	  or	  obtained	  from	  GL	  Biochem	  (Shanghai)	  in	  powered	  form.	  Each	  peptide	  stock	  was	  stored	  in	  -­‐80	̊  C	  prior	  use.	  Stock	  peptide	  solutions	  were	  obtained	  by	  dissolving	  a	  certain	  amount	  of	  peptide	  in	  sterile	  ddH2O,	  and	  each	  stock	  solution	  stored	  in	  aliquots	  to	  avoid	  freeze-­‐thaw	  cycles.	  A	  list	  of	  peptides	  used	  in	  the	  work	  presented	  in	  this	  thesis	  can	  be	  found	  in	  Table	  2-­‐2.	  2.4 CELL	  DEATH	  ANALYSIS	  To	  control	  for	  SNIPER	  peptide	  toxicity,	  cell	  death	  was	  measured	  with	  the	  Sigma	  In	  Vitro	  Toxicology	  Assay	  Kit	  based	  on	  lactate	  dehydrogenase	  (LDH)	  release	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #TOX7)	  according	  to	  the	  manufacturer’s	  protocol.	  Briefly,	  the	  LDH	  assay	  mixture	  was	  made	  by	  mixing	  equal	  volumes	  of	  LDH	  assay	  substrate	  solution,	  LHD	  assay	  dye	  solution	  and	  1X	  LDH	  assay	  cofactor	  solution	  (prepared	  with	  25mL	  ddH2O/bottle	  and	  stored	  at	  -­‐80	̊  C).	  The	    77 mixture	  was	  kept	  on	  ice	  before	  use.	  To	  initiate	  the	  reaction,	  in	  a	  Costar	  96-­‐well	  EIA/RIA	  plate	  (Fisher,	  cat.#0720035),	  100μL	  of	  LDH	  assay	  solution	  was	  added	  to	  50μL	  cell	  culture	  media.	  Each	  sample	  was	  tested	  in	  duplicates.	  50μL	  of	  ddH2O	  was	  used	  as	  a	  negative	  control.	  For	  positive	  control,	  100μL	  of	  LDH	  assay	  lysis	  solution	  was	  added	  to	  cells	  in	  1mL	  cell	  culture	  media	  and	  returned	  to	  the	  incubator	  for	  45min.	  Media	  was	  then	  collected	  and	  briefly	  spun	  down	  to	  pellet	  the	  debris,	  and	  50μL	  of	  the	  supernatant	  was	  used	  as	  positive	  control.	  	  The	  plate	  was	  covered	  with	  aluminum	  foil	  and	  placed	  on	  a	  heated	  shaker	  (300rpm,	  25	̊  C)	  for	  30-­‐60min.	  Absorbance	  was	  measure	  spectrophotometrically	  with	  a	  microplate	  reader	  (mQuant,	  Bio-­‐TEK	  instruments)	  at	  a	  wavelength	  of	  490nm,	  and	  background	  absorbance	  was	  measured	  at	  690nm.	  2.5 HISTOLOGY,	  IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY,	  AND	  IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY	  2.5.1 2,3,5-­‐TRIPHENYLTETRAZOLIUM	  CHLORIDE	  (TTC)	  STAINING	  To	  aid	  the	  visualization	  of	  ischemic	  damage,	  coronal	  brain	  slices	  (2mm	  thick)	  were	  placed	  sequentially	  (rostral	  to	  caudal)	  into	  each	  well	  of	  a	  6-­‐well	  plate	  containing	  freshly	  made	  1%	  TTC	  solution	  in	  ddH2O.	  The	  tissue	  plate	  was	  wrapped	  in	  aluminum	  foil	  and	  brain	  slices	  were	  stained	  for	  15min	  at	  room	  temperature	  without	  agitation,	  after	  which	  they	  were	  removed	  from	  the	  solution	  and	  photographed.	  	    78 2.5.2 FLUORO-­‐JADE	  B	  STAINING	  PFA-­‐fixed	  coronal	  brain	  slices	  (30μm	  thick)	  were	  float-­‐stained	  in	  Fluoro-­‐jade	  B	  solution	  (Millipore,	  cat.	  #AG310)	  to	  label	  degenerating	  neurons.	  	  Slices	  were	  washed	  3X	  10min	  with	  PBS	  and	  equilibrated	  in	  100%	  ethanol	  for	  3min,	  and	  subsequently	  re-­‐hydrated	  with	  70%	  ethanol	  for	  1min	  and	  ddH2O	  for	  1	  min.	  To	  decrease	  background	  staining,	  slices	  were	  floated	  in	  0.06%	  KMnO4	  solution	  (prepared	  in	  ddH2O)	  for	  15min	  at	  room	  temperature	  with	  gentle	  shaking	  and	  then	  rinsed	  with	  ddH2O	  for	  1min.	  Slices	  were	  subsequently	  incubated	  in	  0.001%	  Fluoro-­‐Jade	  B	  solution	  (diluted	  from	  a	  0.01%	  stock	  solution	  in	  180μL	  0.1%	  acetic	  acid)	  for	  40min	  with	  gentle	  agitation,	  and	  then	  washed	  3X	  1min	  with	  ddH2O	  prior	  mounting	  onto	  glass	  slides	  in	  the	  dark	  room.	  The	  slides	  were	  allowed	  to	  dry	  overnight	  away	  from	  light,	  and	  were	  cleared	  in	  3X	  2min	  xylene	  and	  mounted	  with	  Permount	  media	  (Fischer	  Scientific,	  cat.	  #SP15-­‐500)	  the	  following	  day.	  Images	  of	  the	  hippocampus	  were	  taken	  using	  a	  fluorescent	  microscope,	  and	  the	  number	  of	  Fluoro	  Jade-­‐positive	  neurons	  was	  counted	  at	  10X	  magnification	  using	  the	  Image	  J	  particle	  analyzer.	  2.5.3 HEMATOXYLIN	  (MAYER’S)	  AND	  EOSIN	  Y	  STAINING	  PFA-­‐fixed	  coronal	  brain	  slices	  (30μm	  thick)	  were	  mounted	  and	  dried	  on	  glass	  slides	  prior	  staining.	  Slides	  were	  stained	  with	  0.1%	  Mayer’s	  Hematoxylin	  solution	  (Sigma,	  cat.	  #MHS1)	  for	  15	  min	  away	  from	  light	  in	  a	  50mL	  Falcon	  tube.	  Slices	  were	  then	  rinsed	  for	  5min	  under	  tap	  water	  before	  they	  were	  briefly	  tapped	  dry	  and	  dipped	  12	  times	  into	  0.5%	  Eosin	  Y	    79 (Sigma,	  E4009-­‐5G)	  solution	  in	  95%	  ethanol.	  Slides	  were	  then	  washed	  by	  dipping	  into	  ddH2O	  until	  the	  eosin	  stopped	  streaking,	  and	  then	  sequentially	  dehydrated	  with	  50%	  and	  70%	  ethanol	  at	  10	  dips	  per	  concentration.	  Slides	  were	  then	  equilibrated	  in	  95%	  ethanol	  for	  30s	  and	  100%	  ethanol	  for	  1min,	  and	  then	  cleared	  2X	  1min	  with	  xylene	  before	  mounting	  with	  Permount	  (Fischer	  Scientific,	  cat.	  #SP15-­‐500)	  media.	  2.5.4 IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY	  –	  LAMP-­‐1	  COS7	  cells	  were	  cultured	  on	  PDL-­‐treated	  coverslips	  in	  24-­‐well	  tissue	  plates	  and	  transfected	  with	  either	  WT-­‐GFP	  or	  CTM-­‐GFP	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2.1.2.	  One	  day	  after	  transfection	  the	  cells	  were	  washed	  twice	  with	  ice-­‐cold	  PBS	  and	  fixed	  with	  4%	  PFA	  solution	  for	  1h	  at	  37	  ̊C.	  They	  were	  subsequently	  washed	  three	  times	  with	  PBS	  for	  5min	  each	  time.	  Cells	  were	  permeablized	  with	  0.25%	  TritonX-­‐100	  in	  PBS	  for	  5min	  without	  agitation	  and	  rinsed	  for	  5min	  with	  PBS.	  	  The	  coverslips	  were	  then	  transferred	  onto	  a	  container	  lined	  with	  parafilm.	  Cells	  were	  blocked	  with	  10%	  BSA	  in	  PBS	  for	  30min	  at	  37	  ̊C	  without	  agitation,	  and	  then	  incubated	  with	  primary	  antibody	  (anti	  LAMP-­‐1,	  Abcam,	  cat.	  #ab13523)	  diluted	  1:100	  in	  3%	  BSA	  in	  PBS	  overnight	  at	  4	  ̊C	  with	  agitation.	  The	  next	  day,	  cells	  were	  washed	  six	  times	  with	  PBS	  for	  2min	  each	  time	  with	  gentle	  agitation.	  They	  were	  next	  incubated	  in	  Molecular	  Probes	  Alexa	  Fluor	  555	  secondary	  antibody	  (1:1000	  dilution	  in	  3%	  BSA,	  Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #21428)	  at	  37	  ̊C	  for	  45min,	  and	  washed	  again	  6X	  2min	  with	  PBS.	  	    80 To	  help	  visualize	  the	  nuclei,	  cells	  were	  stained	  with	  DAPI	  (4',6-­‐diamidino-­‐2-­‐phenylindole;	  1:500	  in	  PBS)	  at	  room	  temperature	  for	  10min	  without	  agitation,	  and	  then	  washed	  6X	  2min	  before	  mounting	  on	  glass	  slides	  with	  ProLong	  Gold	  Antifade	  Reagent	  (Molecular	  Probes,	  cat.	  #P36930).	  The	  slides	  were	  dried	  overnight	  in	  a	  cabinet	  away	  from	  light	  before	  imaging	  with	  Leica	  DMIRE2.	  2.5.5 IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY	  –	  DAPK1	  PFA-­‐fixed	  coronal	  brain	  slices	  (30μm	  thick)	  were	  float-­‐stained	  for	  immunohistochemical	  labeling.	  Slices	  were	  washed	  with	  0.1M	  PBS	  for	  3X	  10min	  with	  gentle	  agitation,	  before	  being	  simultaneously	  blocked	  and	  permeablized	  at	  room	  temperature	  for	  30min	  in	  a	  solution	  containing	  0.1M	  PBS,	  1%	  BSA	  and	  0.2%	  Triton	  X-­‐100.	  They	  were	  subsequently	  rinsed	  with	  0.1M	  PBS/0.5%	  BSA	  for	  3X	  10min	  with	  agitation,	  and	  incubated	  in	  anti-­‐DAPK1	  antibody	  (diluted	  1:100	  in	  0.1M	  PBS	  and	  0.5%BSA,	  Sigma,	  cat.#	  D1319x)	  for	  3d	  in	  the	  4	̊  C	  cold	  room	  with	  constant	  gentle	  agitation.	  The	  slices	  were	  then	  washed	  3X	  10min	  in	  0.1M	  PBS/0.5%BSA	  and	  subsequently	  incubated	  in	  Molecular	  Probes	  Alexa	  Fluor	  488	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #11034)	  secondary	  antibody,	  diluted	  1:1000	  in	  0.1M	  PBS/0.5%	  BSA	  overnight	  in	  the	  4	  ̊C	  cold	  room	  with	  gentle	  agitation.	  Slices	  were	  then	  washed	  3X	  10min	  in	  0.1M	  PBS/0.5%	  BSA	  with	  agitation,	  and	  then	  mounted	  onto	  glass	  slides	  and	  air-­‐dried	  overnight	  away	  from	  light.	  Finally,	  slides	  were	  mounted	  with	  coverslips	  with	  Fluoromount-­‐G	  (SoutherBiotech,	  cat.	  #0100-­‐01).	  Whole-­‐brain	  images	  were	  obtained	  under	  a	  fluorescent	  microscope.	    81 2.6 SIRNA	  KNOCKOUT,	  RNA	  ISOLATION	  AND	  RT-­‐PCR	  2.6.1 SIRNA	  KNOCKOUT	  AND	  POLY-­‐CHAIN	  REACTION	  (PCR)	  To	  silence	  Lamp2a	  expression,	  siRNA	  targeting	  the	  cytosolic	  tail	  of	  Lamp2a	  were	  synthesized	  through	  Invitrogen	  Custom	  Primers	  with	  the	  following	  sequence:	  Lamp2a	  siRNA:	  5’	  –	  AUA	  UCC	  AGU	  AUG	  AUG	  GCG	  CUU	  [dT][dT]	  –	  3’	  Duplex	  siRNA	  powder	  was	  re-­‐suspended	  in	  RNase-­‐free	  water	  to	  make	  a	  20μM	  solution	  and	  stored	  at	  -­‐20	  ̊C	  until	  further	  use.	  Primary	  cortical	  neurons	  were	  cultured	  in	  24-­‐well	  plates	  as	  described	  in	  Chapter	  2.1.4	  until	  6	  div.	  Lamp2a	  siRNA	  (60pmol)	  and	  Silencer	  negative	  control	  siRNA	  (60pmol,	  Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #AM4611)	  were	  transfected	  into	  neurons	  using	  Genlantis	  GeneSilencer	  siRNA	  transfection	  reagent	  (cat.	  #T500750)	  according	  to	  the	  manufacturer’s	  protocol	  as	  follows.	  In	  one	  1.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tube,	  1.8μL	  of	  reagent	  was	  added	  to	  18.2μL	  Opti-­‐MEM;	  in	  another	  tube,	  60pmol	  siRNA	  was	  diluted	  with	  5μL	  diluent	  and	  Opti-­‐MEM	  was	  added	  to	  a	  total	  volume	  of	  20μL.	  The	  two	  solutions	  were	  mixed	  together	  and	  equilibrated	  at	  room	  temperature	  for	  10min,	  and	  then	  overlayed	  onto	  neurons	  in	  1mL	  NF.	  Cells	  were	  returned	  to	  the	  incubator	  for	  6h,	  after	  which	  the	  transfection	  reagents	  were	  replaced	  with	  complete	  growth	  media.	  Cells	  were	  harvested	  for	  immunoblotting	  and	  PCR	  analysis	  72h	  later.	  	    82 The	  level	  of	  Lamp2a	  transcripts	  were	  tested	  with	  PCR	  to	  confirm	  successful	  knockdown.	  Lamp2a	  primers	  (10μM)	  sequences	  were	  as	  follows:	  Lamp2a	  sense:	  5’–	  GGT	  CTC	  AAG	  CGC	  CAT	  CAT	  AC	  –	  3’	  	  Lamp2a	  antisense:	  5’–	  GAT	  GCC	  CCT	  CTG	  GGA	  AGT	  TC	  –	  3’	  The	  PCR	  reaction	  solution	  contained	  the	  following	  components:	  10X	  Taq	  Buffer	  (1μL),	  cDNA	  (1μL),	  Actb	  primers	  (0.2μL	  each),	  Lamp2a	  primers	  (0.2μL	  each),	  25mM	  MgCl2	  solution	  (0.6μL),	  10mM	  dNTP	  solution	  (0.2μL),	  5000U/mL	  Taq	  polymerase	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #10342-­‐053)	  (0.1μL)	  and	  ddH2O	  up	  to	  10μL	  final	  volume.	  The	  PCR	  program	  was	  set	  as	  follows:	  1	  cycle	  of	  95	  ̊C	  for	  3min;	  20	  cycles	  of	  95	  ̊C	  for	  30s,	  50	  ̊C	  for	  30s,	  72	  ̊C	  for	  1min;	  1	  cycle	  of	  72	  ̊C	  for	  10min.	  PCR	  products	  were	  subjected	  to	  electrophoresis	  on	  a	  2%	  agarose	  DNA	  gel	  in	  TBE	  buffer	  (0.045M	  Tris-­‐borate,	  0.001M	  EDTA)	  at	  100V	  for	  10min.	  	  The	  DNA	  gel	  was	  made	  by	  dissolving	  agarose	  powder	  in	  TBE	  buffer	  by	  microwaving	  the	  mixture	  in	  an	  Erlenmeyer	  flask	  for	  1.5min;	  once	  slightly	  cooled,	  SYBR	  Safe	  DNA	  Gel	  Stain	  (Life	  technologies,	  cat.	  #S33102)	  was	  added	  (1:10,000	  dilution)	  and	  mixed	  by	  swirling	  the	  solution.	  The	  mixture	  was	  poured	  into	  a	  standard	  gel	  box	  and	  covered	  with	  aluminum	  foil	  while	  the	  gels	  set.	  2.6.2 TOTAL	  RNA	  ISOLATION	  WITH	  TRIZOL	  Prior	  to	  RNA	  extraction,	  all	  solutions	  and	  pipette	  tips	  were	  treated	  with	  0.1%	  diethylpyrocarbonate	  (DEPC)	  and	  autoclaved	  to	  remove	  RNases.	  Primary	  cortical	  neurons	  were	  cultured	  in	  6-­‐well	  plates	  until	  14	  div.	  Complete	  growth	  media	  was	  removed	  and	  cells	    83 were	  incubated	  in	  1mL	  TRIzol	  reagent	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #15596)	  per	  well	  for	  5min	  with	  agitation	  to	  homogenize	  the	  tissue.	  Samples	  were	  then	  collected	  into	  1.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tubes	  and	  0.2mL	  of	  chloroform	  was	  added	  to	  each	  tube,	  followed	  by	  15s	  of	  shaking	  to	  mix	  and	  2min	  of	  incubation	  at	  room	  temperature.	  Samples	  were	  then	  centrifuged	  at	  12,000g	  for	  15min	  at	  room	  temperature	  to	  allow	  phase	  separation.	  The	  upper	  aqueous	  phase	  (containing	  total	  RNA)	  was	  carefully	  transferred	  to	  a	  fresh	  tube	  and	  0.5mL	  of	  isopropyl	  alcohol	  was	  added	  to	  each	  tube	  and	  mixed	  with	  the	  sample.	  After	  10min	  of	  incubation	  at	  room	  temperature,	  the	  samples	  were	  centrifuged	  at	  12,000g	  for	  20min	  at	  4	  ̊C	  to	  pellet	  total	  RNA.	  After	  removing	  the	  supernatant,	  the	  pellet	  was	  washed	  with	  1mL	  75%	  ethanol	  by	  vortexing,	  and	  the	  wash	  solution	  was	  discarded	  after	  centrifuging	  at	  7,500g	  for	  5min	  at	  4	  ̊C.	  	  The	  total	  RNA	  pellet	  was	  air-­‐dried	  for	  10min	  and	  dissolved	  in	  40mL	  RNase-­‐free	  water	  by	  passing	  the	  solution	  a	  few	  times	  through	  a	  pipette	  tip	  and	  incubating	  for	  10min	  in	  a	  60	  ̊C	  water	  bath.	  2.6.3 DNA	  ELECTROPHORESIS	  AND	  REAL-­‐TIME	  PCR	  (RT-­‐PCR)	  DNA	  digestion,	  reverse	  transcription	  and	  real-­‐time	  PCR	  were	  completed	  with	  the	  SuperScript	  One-­‐Step	  RT-­‐PCR	  System	  (Invitrogen,	  cat.	  #10928-­‐042)	  according	  to	  the	  manufacturer’s	  instructions.	  	  To	  digest	  DNA,	  the	  following	  were	  added	  to	  an	  RNase-­‐free,	  0.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tube:	  RNA	  sample	  (1mg),	  10X	  DNase	  I	  Reaction	  Buffer	  (1μL),	  DNase	  I	  Amp	  Grade,	  1U/mL	  (1μL)	  and	    84 DEPC-­‐treated	  water	  to	  10μL.	  Samples	  were	  incubated	  for	  15min	  at	  room	  temperature.	  To	  inactivate	  DNase	  I,	  1μL	  of	  25mM	  ETDA	  solution	  was	  added	  to	  the	  reaction	  mixture	  followed	  by	  heating	  for	  10min	  in	  a	  65	̊  C	  water	  bath.	  For	  reverse	  transcription,	  the	  following	  reagents	  were	  added	  into	  a	  nuclease-­‐free	  0.5mL	  Eppendorf	  tube:	  500μg/mL	  OligodT12-­‐18	  (1μL),	  total	  RNA	  (1μg),	  10mM	  dNTP	  mix	  (1μL)	  and	  nuclease-­‐free	  water	  up	  to	  12μL.	  The	  mixture	  was	  then	  heated	  to	  65	  ̊C	  in	  a	  water	  bath	  for	  5min	  and	  quickly	  chilled	  on	  ice.	  Following	  brief	  centrifuging,	  the	  following	  were	  added	  to	  the	  mixture:	  5X	  First-­‐Strand	  Buffer	  (4μL),	  0.1M	  DTT	  (2μL),	  40U/μL	  RNaseOUT	  (1μL).	  The	  tubes	  were	  then