UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Dopamine and PDF signaling modulate habituation to repeated activation of a polymodal nociceptor in caenorhabditis… Ardiel, Evan 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2015_september_ardiel_evan.pdf [ 4.23MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0166150.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0166150-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0166150-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0166150-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0166150-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0166150-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0166150-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0166150-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0166150.ris

Full Text

	  	  	  DOPAMINE	  AND	  PDF	  SIGNALING	  MEDIATE	  HABITUATION	  TO	  REPEATED	  ACTIVATION	  OF	  A	  POLYMODAL	  NOCICEPTOR	  IN	  CAENORHABDITIS	  ELEGANS	  	  	  	  by	  	  EVAN	  ARDIEL	  	  	  	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  	  DOCTOR	  OF	  PHILOSOPHY	  	  	  in	  	  	  THE	  FACULTY	  OF	  GRADUATE	  AND	  POSTDOCTORAL	  STUDIES	  	  (Neuroscience)	  	  	  	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  	  	  	  April	  2015	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  © Evan Ardiel, 2015 	   ii	  Abstract	  Habituation	  is	  a	  highly	  conserved	  phenomenon	  that	  remains	  poorly	  understood	  at	  the	  molecular	  level.	  Invertebrate	  model	  systems,	  like	  C.	  elegans,	  can	  be	  a	  powerful	  tool	  for	  understanding	  this	  fundamental	  process.	  To	  expand	  our	  knowledge	  of	  habituation	  I	  developed	  a	  high-­‐throughput	  learning	  assay	  using	  real-­‐time	  computer	  vision	  software	  for	  behavioral	  tracking	  and	  optogenetics	  for	  stimulation	  of	  a	  C.	  elegans	  polymodal	  nociceptor	  pair,	  ASHL	  and	  ASHR.	  These	  cells	  are	  especially	  interesting	  in	  the	  context	  of	  habituation	  because	  of	  the	  diversity	  and	  salience	  of	  the	  stimuli	  they	  detect.	  Photoactivation	  of	  ASH	  promoted	  backward	  locomotion	  and	  persistent	  stimulation	  altered	  the	  magnitude	  of	  this	  response	  in	  a	  manner	  consistent	  with	  the	  key	  behavioral	  characteristics	  of	  habituation.	  The	  decrement	  in	  reversal	  duration	  was	  readily	  reversed	  by	  a	  dishabituating	  stimulus,	  in	  this	  case	  non-­‐localized	  mechanosensory	  input	  detected	  by	  the	  touch	  receptor	  neurons.	  In	  addition	  to	  altering	  the	  response	  properties,	  repeated	  ASH	  activation	  suppressed	  spontaneous	  reversals	  and	  accelerated	  forward	  movement.	  Food	  and	  dopamine	  signaling	  (bas-­‐1,	  cat-­‐4,	  cat-­‐2,	  trp-­‐4)	  promoted	  responding	  to	  persistent	  ASH	  activation	  and	  I	  identified	  the	  D1-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor,	  DOP-­‐4,	  as	  the	  key	  mediator.	  Neuropeptide	  synthesis	  mutants	  (egl-­‐3	  and	  egl-­‐21)	  displayed	  impaired	  plasticity	  for	  a	  variety	  of	  behavioral	  metrics,	  prompting	  me	  to	  perform	  an	  RNAi	  screen	  targeting	  neuropeptide	  receptors.	  From	  this	  screen,	  I	  implicated	  pigment	  dispersing	  factor	  (PDF)	  signaling	  in	  habituation	  of	  response	  latency	  and	  duration.	  Failure	  to	  avoid	  some	  stimuli	  detected	  by	  ASH	  could	  be	  fatal	  for	  C.	  elegans,	  so	  why	  	   iii	  do	  the	  reversal	  responses	  habituate?	  My	  data	  indicate	  that	  habituation	  is	  part	  of	  a	  strategy	  to	  promote	  dispersal.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   iv	  Preface	  This	  dissertation	  is	  original	  unpublished	  work.	  I	  was	  the	  lead	  investigator	  for	  the	  projects	  discussed	  in	  chapters	  2	  and	  3.	  Giles	  AC	  was	  involved	  in	  the	  early	  stages	  of	  concept	  formation.	  Lee	  A,	  Huen	  M,	  Yu	  A,	  Liang	  A,	  and	  McEwan	  A	  constructed	  strains	  or	  reagents	  for	  the	  project.	  Giles	  AC	  and	  Yu	  A	  contributed	  to	  data	  collection.	  Rankin	  CH	  was	  the	  supervisory	  author	  throughout.	  Portions	  of	  the	  introductory	  chapter	  are	  modified	  from	  a	  review	  paper	  on	  which	  I	  am	  the	  primary	  author:	  Ardiel,	  E.L.,	  Rankin,	  C.H.	  (2010)	  An	  elegant	  mind:	  learning	  and	  memory	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Learn	  Mem,	  17(4):191-­‐201.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   v	  Table	  of	  contents	  Abstract	  ..........................................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Preface	  ...........................................................................................................................................................	  iv	  Table	  of	  contents	  ........................................................................................................................................	  v	  List	  of	  tables	  ...............................................................................................................................................	  vii	  List	  of	  figures	  ............................................................................................................................................	  viii	  Acknowledgements	  ..................................................................................................................................	  ix	  Dedication	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  x	  1.	  Introduction	  .............................................................................................................................................	  1	  1.1	  Habituation	  ......................................................................................................................................................	  1	  1.2	  C.	  elegans	  ...........................................................................................................................................................	  5	  1.3	  C.	  elegans	  habituates	  ....................................................................................................................................	  7	  1.3.1	  Mechanosensory	  habituation	  .........................................................................................................	  7	  1.3.2	  Chemosensory	  habituation	  ...........................................................................................................	  13	  1.4	  ASH:	  Polymodal	  nociceptors	  .................................................................................................................	  15	  1.4.1	  Molecules,	  circuits,	  behaviors	  ......................................................................................................	  15	  1.4.2	  Modulation	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  23	  1.5	  Conclusion	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  29	  1.6	  General	  methods	  ........................................................................................................................................	  30	  1.6.1	  Strains	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  30	  1.6.2	  Behavioral	  tracking	  ..........................................................................................................................	  31	  1.6.3	  Statistics	  ................................................................................................................................................	  32	  2.	  Role	  of	  food	  and	  dopamine	  in	  habituation	  ..............................................................................	  34	  2.1	  Introduction	  .................................................................................................................................................	  34	  2.2	  Methods	  ..........................................................................................................................................................	  36	  2.2.1	  Strains	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  36	  2.2.2	  Behavioral	  tracking	  ..........................................................................................................................	  37	  2.2.3	  Nose	  touch	  ............................................................................................................................................	  37	  2.2.4	  Octanol	  exposure	  ..............................................................................................................................	  38	  2.3	  Results	  .............................................................................................................................................................	  38	  2.3.1	  Population	  assay	  for	  repeated	  ASH	  activation	  .....................................................................	  38	  2.3.2	  Generalization	  of	  photoactivation	  and	  naturally	  sensed	  stimuli	  .................................	  40	  2.3.3	  Dishabituation	  ....................................................................................................................................	  41	  2.3.4	  Dopamine	  signaling	  slows	  habituation	  ...................................................................................	  43	  2.3.5	  DOP-­‐4	  signaling	  slows	  habituation	  	  ..........................................................................................	  46	  2.3.6	  Habituation	  promotes	  dispersal	  .................................................................................................	  47	  2.4	  Discussion	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  48	  3.	  Role	  of	  PDF	  signaling	  in	  habituation	  ..........................................................................................	  63	  3.1	  Introduction	  .................................................................................................................................................	  63	  3.2	  Methods	  ..........................................................................................................................................................	  65	  3.2.1	  Strains	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  65	  3.2.2	  Plasmid	  construction	  .......................................................................................................................	  66	  3.2.3	  RNAi	  ........................................................................................................................................................	  68	  3.3	  Results	  .............................................................................................................................................................	  69	  	   vi	  3.3.1	  glr-­‐1	  phenotypes	  	  ..............................................................................................................................	  69	  3.3.2	  Loss	  of	  egl-­‐3	  suppresses	  glr-­‐1	  ......................................................................................................	  70	  3.3.3	  GPCR	  RNAi	  suppressor	  screen	  	  ...................................................................................................	  72	  3.3.4	  PDF	  signaling	  mediates	  habituation	  	  ........................................................................................	  73	  3.3.5	  PDFR-­‐1	  functions	  in	  neurons	  and	  muscle	  	  .............................................................................	  75	  3.3.6	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  dispersal	  to	  persistent	  sensory	  input	  	  ...................................	  77	  3.4	  Discussion	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  79	  4.	  Discussion	  ............................................................................................................................................	  100	  4.1	  A	  new	  high-­‐throughput	  habituation	  assay	  	  ..................................................................................	  101	  4.2	  Similarities,	  differences,	  and	  interactions	  of	  converging	  circuits	  	  ......................................	  105	  4.3	  Conclusion	  ...................................................................................................................................................	  109	  References	  ................................................................................................................................................	  111	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   vii	  List	  of	  tables	  Table	  3.1	  GPCR	  loss	  of	  function	  phenotypes	  ...............................................................................	  96	  Table	  3.2	  Expression	  pattern	  of	  pdfr-­‐1	  and	  Cre	  promoters.	  ................................................	  98	  Table	  3.3	  PDFR-­‐1	  rescue	  experiment	  summary.	  .......................................................................	  99	  	   	  	  	   viii	  List	  of	  figures	  Figure	  1.1	  Wiring	  diagram	  for	  tap	  and	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversals	  .......................................	  33	  Figure	  2.1	  Plasticity	  of	  reversal	  responses	  	  .................................................................................	  53	  Figure	  2.2	  Shift	  in	  foraging	  behaviors	  	  ...........................................................................................	  54	  Figure	  2.3	  Spontaneous	  recovery	  from	  training	  ........................................................................	  55	  Figure	  2.4	  Generalization	  of	  stimuli	  ................................................................................................	  56	  Figure	  2.5	  Dishabituation	  ....................................................................................................................	  57	  Figure	  2.6	  Dopamine	  signaling	  promotes	  responding	  ............................................................	  58	  Figure	  2.7	  Loss	  of	  dop-­‐4	  recapitulates	  cat-­‐2	  phenotype	  ........................................................	  59	  Figure	  2.8	  Locomotory	  behavior	  of	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  ...........................................................	  61	  Figure	  2.9	  Habituation	  training	  promotes	  dispersal	  ...............................................................	  62	  Figure	  3.1	  Phenotypes	  for	  glutamate	  transmission	  mutants	  ...............................................	  83	  Figure	  3.2	  Suppression	  of	  the	  glr-­‐1	  phenotypes	  ........................................................................	  85	  Figure	  3.3	  Neuropeptide	  synthesis	  mutants	  ...............................................................................	  86	  Figure	  3.4	  GPCR	  RNAi	  screen	  .............................................................................................................	  87	  Figure	  3.5	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  habituation	  ........................................................................	  88	  Figure	  3.6	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  phenotype	  ..............................................................................................	  89	  Figure	  3.7	  Restoring	  pdfr-­‐1	  expression	  .........................................................................................	  90	  Figure	  3.8	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  dispersal	  .............................................................................	  92	  Figure	  3.9	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  dispersal	  during	  habituation	  training	  ...................	  93	  Figure	  3.10	  Persistent	  sensory	  input	  promotes	  dispersal	  	  ...................................................	  95	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   ix	  Acknowledgments	  	   Thank	  you	  first	  of	  all	  to	  my	  supervisor,	  Dr.	  Catharine	  Rankin,	  for	  years	  of	  advice	  and	  opportunities	  and	  for	  creating	  a	  lab	  where	  students	  are	  encouraged	  to	  explore	  their	  ideas	  and	  have	  fun.	  To	  my	  lab	  mates,	  past	  and	  present,	  thank	  you	  for	  all	  sorts	  of	  support,	  I	  feel	  so	  fortunate	  to	  have	  formed	  lifelong	  friendships	  here.	  I	  am	  especially	  grateful	  to	  Andrew	  for	  allowing	  me	  to	  join	  and	  expand	  on	  this	  project.	  Tiffany,	  Conny,	  Lee,	  Tahereh,	  Andrea,	  and	  Troy,	  let’s	  keep	  collaborating!	  I	  have	  had	  the	  pleasure	  of	  working	  with	  many	  excellent	  undergraduate	  students	  as	  well,	  several	  have	  contributed	  directly	  to	  this	  project:	  Myron,	  Andy,	  Alex	  L,	  and	  Alex	  Y.	  Thank	  you	  to	  committee	  members	  and	  comprehensive	  examiners	  for	  guiding	  my	  research	  at	  key	  junctures.	  I	  have	  benefitted	  greatly	  from	  being	  surrounded	  by	  incredible	  scientists	  at	  every	  level	  of	  training	  in	  the	  UBC	  Neuroscience	  and	  Vancouver	  C.	  elegans	  communities.	  A	  special	  thank	  you	  to	  Kurt	  Haas	  and	  Eric	  Aamodt	  for	  career	  and	  science	  advice.	  This	  research	  would	  not	  have	  been	  possible	  without	  data,	  strains,	  and	  reagents	  generously	  shared	  by	  others,	  specifically	  the	  Moerman,	  Schafer,	  Lockery,	  Bargmann,	  and	  Xu	  labs.	  	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  academic	  supports,	  many	  friends	  and	  family	  have	  helped	  me	  succeed	  (whether	  they	  knew	  it	  or	  not)	  by	  ensuring	  my	  life	  had	  more	  than	  the	  one	  dimension.	  Thank	  you	  especially	  to	  my	  family,	  Beth,	  Bob,	  Anna,	  and	  Liam,	  for	  a	  lifetime	  of	  support	  and	  encouragement	  and	  to	  the	  Chang’s	  for	  welcoming	  me	  into	  their	  family.	  Finally,	  thank	  you	  to	  my	  partner	  (best	  friend	  and	  psychologist),	  Sabrina	  Chang,	  for	  believing	  in	  me	  and	  inspiring	  me	  with	  your	  passionate	  pursuit	  of	  whatever	  you	  set	  your	  mind	  to.	  	  	   x	  	  	  	  	  	  	     To my Mom 	  	  	   1	  1.	  Introduction	  1.1	  Habituation	  Habituation	  is	  a	  non-­‐associative	  form	  of	  learning	  characterized	  by	  a	  decremented	  response	  to	  repeated	  stimulation	  that	  cannot	  be	  explained	  by	  adaptation	  or	  fatigue.	  It	  can	  be	  observed	  in	  organisms	  across	  phylogeny	  and	  in	  diverse	  behavioral	  and	  cellular	  responses.	  It	  is	  often	  considered	  a	  “cognitive	  building-­‐block”	  and	  the	  basis	  of	  selective	  attention.	  Consistent	  with	  this	  fundamental	  role,	  deficits	  in	  habituation	  are	  associated	  with	  a	  variety	  of	  neuropsychiatric	  disorders,	  including	  autism	  and	  schizophrenia	  (Kleinhans	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Braff	  et	  al.,	  1992).	  The	  first	  scientific	  report	  of	  habituation	  (although	  they	  did	  not	  call	  it	  that)	  was	  by	  Peckham	  &	  Peckham	  in	  1887.	  They	  studied	  an	  acoustic	  startle	  response	  of	  garden	  spiders,	  which	  dropped	  on	  a	  line	  of	  silk	  at	  the	  sound	  of	  a	  tuning	  fork,	  but	  decreased	  the	  duration	  of	  this	  response	  with	  repeated	  stimulation.	  Similar	  decreases	  in	  behaviors	  following	  repeated	  stimulation	  were	  reported	  for	  a	  wide	  range	  of	  organisms	  and	  assays.	  In	  a	  landmark	  paper	  in	  1966,	  Spencer	  and	  Thompson	  outlined	  nine	  common	  characteristics	  of	  habituation.	  These	  were	  recently	  revised	  and	  a	  tenth	  was	  added	  (Rankin	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  The	  key	  points	  from	  each	  characteristic	  follow:	  1) Repeated	  stimulation	  results	  in	  a	  decrease	  in	  responding	  to	  an	  asymptotic	  level	  (habituation)	  that	  may	  be	  preceded	  by	  facilitated	  responding	  (sensitization).	  	  2) The	  response	  can	  at	  least	  partially	  recover	  (spontaneous	  recovery).	  	   2	  3) More	  pronounced	  response	  decrement	  can	  be	  induced	  by	  multiple	  training	  sessions	  (potentiation	  of	  habituation).	  4) More	  rapid	  stimulation	  results	  in	  more	  pronounced	  response	  decrement	  and	  more	  rapid	  recovery.	  5) Less	  intense	  stimulation	  results	  in	  more	  pronounced	  response	  decrement.	  6) Continued	  stimulation	  at	  asymptotic	  response	  levels	  can	  alter	  subsequent	  behavior.	  7) The	  response	  decrement	  shows	  some	  stimulus	  specificity.	  	  8) A	  different	  stimulus	  can	  facilitate	  the	  decremented	  response	  to	  the	  original	  stimulus	  (dishabituation).	  	  9) Repeated	  presentations	  decrease	  the	  effectiveness	  of	  the	  dishabituating	  stimulus	  (habituation	  of	  dishabituation).	  10) 	  Decremented	  responses	  can	  persist	  for	  hours,	  days,	  or	  weeks	  (long-­‐term	  habituation).	  Several	  of	  these	  characteristics	  are	  especially	  important	  for	  distinguishing	  habituation	  from	  adaptation,	  fatigue,	  or	  even	  injury.	  Most	  notably	  characteristic	  #8,	  that	  the	  response	  decrement	  is	  readily	  reversed	  by	  a	  dishabituating	  stimulus,	  highlights	  habituation	  as	  an	  attentional	  process.	  In	  contrast,	  other	  potential	  causes	  of	  decrement,	  such	  as	  sensory	  adaptation	  or	  motor	  fatigue,	  can	  only	  recover	  with	  sufficient	  time	  away	  from	  the	  stimulus.	  In	  addition,	  a	  more	  pronounced	  decrement	  to	  less	  intense	  stimulation	  and	  a	  faster	  recovery	  following	  more	  rapid	  stimulation	  (characteristics	  #4	  and	  5)	  is	  the	  opposite	  of	  what	  would	  be	  predicted	  for	  adaptation,	  fatigue,	  or	  injury.	  Finally,	  fatigue	  and	  injury	  can	  be	  ruled	  out	  if	  the	  decrement	  does	  	   3	  not	  generalize	  to	  another	  cue	  that	  elicits	  a	  similar	  behavior	  (characterstic	  #7).	  A	  decremented	  response	  may	  not	  display	  all	  ten	  features,	  but	  to	  qualify	  as	  habituation	  it	  is	  essential	  to	  rule	  out	  these	  other	  potential	  causes.	  	  The	  aim	  of	  this	  dissertation	  is	  to	  expand	  our	  mechanistic	  understanding	  of	  short-­‐term	  habituation.	  Despite	  its	  omnipresence	  and	  conservation	  over	  hundreds	  of	  millions	  of	  years	  of	  evolution,	  the	  cellular	  and	  molecular	  processes	  underlying	  short-­‐term	  habituation	  remain	  poorly	  understood.	  Researchers	  have	  therefore	  turned	  to	  invertebrate	  model	  systems	  to	  help	  understand	  this	  fundamental	  phenomenon	  (reviewed	  in	  Kandel,	  2004;	  Twick	  et	  al.,	  2014;	  Bozorgmehr	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  In	  the	  1960s,	  Kandel	  and	  colleagues	  began	  studying	  learning	  in	  the	  marine	  mollusk,	  Aplysia.	  Touching	  the	  large	  shell-­‐less	  sea	  slug’s	  siphon	  results	  in	  a	  protective	  reflex	  in	  which	  the	  siphon	  and	  gill	  are	  retracted.	  Repeated	  touching	  habituates	  this	  response,	  while	  a	  pinch	  to	  the	  neck	  or	  an	  electric	  shock	  to	  the	  tail	  dishabituates	  it	  (Pinsker	  et	  al.,	  1970).	  The	  predicted	  locus	  of	  plasticity	  is	  the	  presynaptic	  side	  of	  sensory	  neuron-­‐to-­‐motor	  neuron	  synapses,	  as	  habituation	  training	  does	  not	  affect	  the	  spiking	  of	  sensory	  cells,	  but	  decreases	  the	  number	  of	  synaptic	  vesicles	  released	  (Kupfermann	  et	  al.,	  1970;	  Castellucci	  et	  al.,	  1970;	  Castellucci	  &	  Kandel,	  1974;	  Cohen	  et	  al.,	  1997).	  It	  is	  unclear	  what	  underlies	  the	  depression	  of	  the	  sensory	  neuron	  synapses,	  but	  several	  hypotheses	  have	  been	  put	  forth,	  including	  inactivation	  of	  the	  calcium	  currents	  required	  for	  synaptic	  vesicle	  release	  (Klein	  et	  al.,	  1980),	  depletion	  of	  the	  readily	  releasable	  pool	  (Gingrich	  &	  Byrne,	  1985;	  Bailey	  and	  Chen,	  1988),	  and	  silencing	  of	  individual	  vesicle	  release	  sites	  	   4	  (Gover	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  The	  advantage	  of	  Aplysia	  is	  the	  ability	  to	  relate	  behavioral	  plasticity	  to	  changes	  at	  specific	  synapses	  of	  identified	  neurons.	  	  In	  the	  1970s,	  Benzer	  and	  colleagues	  began	  a	  genetic	  dissection	  of	  learning	  in	  the	  fruit	  fly,	  Drosophila	  melanogaster.	  They	  established	  an	  associative	  learning	  assay	  and	  conducted	  a	  forward	  genetic	  screen,	  identifying	  the	  first	  learning	  mutant	  (Quinn	  et	  al.,	  1974;	  Dudai	  et	  al.	  1976).	  Non-­‐associative	  habituation	  assays	  were	  subsequently	  developed	  for	  a	  variety	  of	  stimuli	  (i.e.	  visual,	  chemical,	  and	  mechanical)	  and	  behaviors	  (e.g.	  proboscis	  and	  leg	  extension).	  Several	  molecular	  components	  have	  been	  implicated	  in	  habituation	  using	  multiple	  assays,	  including	  (i)	  Dunce	  and	  Rutabaga,	  which	  degrade	  and	  synthesize	  cAMP	  (respectively;	  Duerr	  &	  Quinn,	  1982;	  Engel	  &	  Wu,	  1996),	  (ii)	  potassium	  channel	  subunits,	  including	  Slowpoke,	  Shaker,	  Hyperkinetic,	  and	  Ether	  a	  go	  go	  (Engel	  &	  Wu,	  1998;	  Joiner	  et	  al.,	  2007),	  (iii)	  kinases,	  including	  cGMP-­‐dependent	  protein	  kinase,	  Foraging	  (Engel	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Scheiner	  et	  al.,	  2004)	  and	  calcium-­‐calmodulin	  dependent	  kinase	  II,	  CaMKII	  (Jin	  et	  al.,	  1998;	  Sadanandappa	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  and	  (iv)	  a	  synaptic	  vesicle-­‐clustering	  phosphoprotein,	  Synapsin	  (Godenschwege	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Sadanandappa	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  One	  of	  the	  best	  understood	  habituating	  circuits	  in	  any	  system	  mediates	  the	  fly’s	  attenuated	  avoidance	  of	  persistent	  volatile	  repellents,	  wherein	  odorant-­‐selective	  projection	  neurons	  dampen	  their	  own	  responsivity	  by	  potentiating	  inhibitory	  interneurons	  (Twick	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Cell-­‐specific	  gene	  rescue	  and	  knockdown	  has	  demonstrated	  that	  Rutabaga/adenylyl	  cyclase,	  CaMKII,	  and	  Synapsin	  induce	  presynaptic	  facilitation	  in	  these	  interneurons,	  which	  co-­‐release	  GABA	  and	  glutamate,	  acting	  on	  GABAA	  and	  NMDA	  receptors	  on	  the	  projection	  neurons	  (Das	  et	  	   5	  al.,	  2011;	  Sadanandappa	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  How	  these	  components	  and	  the	  recurrent	  inhibition	  circuit	  motif	  apply	  to	  other	  habituating	  behaviors	  remains	  to	  be	  seen,	  but	  it	  is	  certainly	  distinct	  from	  the	  depression	  of	  excitatory	  synapses	  described	  for	  Aplysia.	  There	  are	  likely	  many	  mechanistic	  explanations	  for	  habituation	  and	  the	  best	  chance	  for	  a	  thorough	  characterization	  relies	  on	  the	  use	  of	  genetic	  model	  organisms	  with	  tractable	  nervous	  systems.	  	  1.2	  C.	  elegans	  At	  about	  the	  same	  time	  that	  Kandel	  was	  beginning	  his	  work	  with	  Aplysia,	  Sydney	  Brenner	  chose	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  as	  an	  ideal	  organism	  in	  which	  to	  study	  development	  and	  the	  nervous	  system	  (Brenner,	  1974).	  Today,	  this	  transparent	  nematode	  is	  one	  of	  the	  world's	  best-­‐understood	  metazoan	  thanks	  to	  the	  ongoing	  work	  of	  a	  very	  productive	  and	  collaborative	  research	  community.	  	  The	  worm’s	  small	  size	  (approx.	  1	  mm),	  short	  life	  cycle	  (<3	  d),	  and	  ease	  of	  cultivation	  make	  it	  well-­‐suited	  for	  the	  laboratory,	  and	  its	  mode	  of	  reproduction	  is	  ideal	  for	  genetic	  analysis,	  as	  self-­‐fertilizing	  hermaphrodites	  can	  be	  easily	  inbred	  or	  crossed	  with	  males.	  Furthermore,	  the	  worm's	  transparency	  grants	  easy	  access	  to	  cells	  for	  imaging,	  optogenetics,	  and	  ablation.	  Morphologically,	  C.	  elegans	  is	  relatively	  simple	  and	  its	  development	  is	  highly	  deterministic.	  As	  a	  result,	  the	  complete	  cell	  lineage	  and	  neural	  wiring	  diagram	  was	  elucidated;	  each	  adult	  hermaphrodite	  has	  only	  959	  cells,	  302	  of	  which	  are	  neurons	  forming	  about	  5000	  chemical	  synapses,	  600	  gap	  junctions,	  and	  2000	  neuromuscular	  junctions,	  the	  locations	  of	  which	  are	  largely	  consistent	  between	  animals	  (Sulston	  &	  Horvitz,	  1977;	  Sulston	  et	  al.,	  1983;	  White	  et	  al.,	  1986).	  	   6	  C.	  elegans	  is	  currently	  the	  only	  organism	  with	  a	  completed	  wiring	  diagram	  of	  the	  nervous	  system.	  C.	  elegans	  was	  the	  first	  multi-­‐cellular	  organism	  to	  have	  its	  genome	  sequenced.	  Released	  in	  1998,	  the	  100	  million	  base	  pair	  sequence	  has	  now	  been	  extraordinarily	  well	  annotated	  (Gerstein	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  After	  almost	  50	  years	  of	  random	  and	  more	  recently	  targeted	  genetic	  lesions,	  there	  is	  a	  vast	  library	  of	  mutant	  strains	  that	  can	  be	  conveniently	  stored	  as	  frozen	  stocks,	  with	  loss-­‐of-­‐function	  alleles	  available	  for	  an	  estimated	  2/3	  of	  the	  20,514	  protein-­‐coding	  genes	  (Thompson	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  In	  addition	  to	  mutants,	  there	  are	  bacterial	  libraries	  available	  for	  targeting	  most	  genes	  through	  systemic	  RNAi	  by	  feeding	  (Timmons	  &	  Fire,	  1998;	  Kamath	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Importantly,	  it	  is	  estimated	  that	  40%	  of	  these	  genes	  have	  human	  orthologs	  (Shaye	  &	  Greenwald,	  2011).	  Although	  the	  specific	  neural	  circuits	  and	  behaviors	  differ	  between	  worms	  and	  humans,	  the	  cellular	  processes	  of	  plasticity	  are	  likely	  to	  be	  largely	  conserved	  across	  phylogeny.	  	  With	  its	  invariant	  cell	  lineage	  and	  reproducible	  connectome,	  C.	  elegans	  was	  initially	  viewed	  as	  a	  genetically	  hardwired	  automaton.	  The	  deterministic	  development	  of	  the	  worm's	  nervous	  system	  would	  seem	  to	  limit	  its	  usefulness	  as	  a	  model	  to	  study	  behavioral	  plasticity,	  but	  the	  worm	  has	  demonstrated	  its	  extreme	  sensitivity	  to	  experience.	  C.	  elegans	  can	  learn	  the	  environmental	  features	  that	  predict	  good	  food,	  bad	  food,	  no	  food,	  or	  aversive	  stimuli,	  allowing	  worms	  to	  chemotax,	  thermotax,	  or	  aerotax	  to	  more	  favorable	  environments.	  It	  seems	  that	  every	  sensory	  modality	  studied	  can	  mediate	  learning.	  Thus,	  its	  deterministic	  development	  becomes	  its	  greatest	  asset,	  as	  researchers	  can	  study	  behaviors	  in	  a	  	   7	  population	  of	  animals	  with	  essentially	  the	  same	  nervous	  system.	  The	  power	  of	  C.	  elegans	  as	  a	  genetic	  model	  has	  led	  to	  considerable	  insights	  into	  the	  cellular	  and	  molecular	  mechanisms	  underlying	  learned	  behaviors.	  	  	  1.3	  C.	  elegans	  habituates	  1.3.1	  Mechanosensory	  habituation	  Rankin	  et	  al.	  (1990)	  were	  the	  first	  to	  characterize	  learning	  and	  memory	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  They	  studied	  plasticity	  of	  the	  reversal	  response	  elicited	  by	  non-­‐localized	  mechanosensory	  input	  from	  a	  tap	  to	  the	  side	  of	  the	  Petri	  plate.	  The	  magnitude	  of	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response	  is	  around	  1	  mm	  (roughly	  the	  length	  of	  the	  animal),	  but	  this	  can	  change	  in	  a	  manner	  consistent	  with	  the	  characteristics	  of	  habituation	  outlined	  by	  Spencer	  &	  Thompson	  (1966).	  Repeated	  taps	  attenuates	  both	  the	  likelihood	  of	  reversing	  and	  the	  magnitude	  of	  the	  response	  (characteristic	  #	  1;	  Rankin	  et	  al.,	  1990).	  This	  decrement	  spontaneously	  recovers	  over	  several	  minutes	  (characteristic	  #2;	  Rankin	  &	  Broster;	  1992)	  or	  a	  brief	  electric	  shock	  can	  be	  used	  as	  a	  dishabituating	  stimulus	  to	  facilitate	  responding	  towards	  baseline	  levels	  (characteristic	  #8;	  Rankin	  et	  al.,	  1990).	  The	  decrement	  is	  stimulus	  specific,	  as	  repeated	  tapping	  does	  not	  affect	  the	  reversal	  response	  elicited	  by	  noxious	  heat	  (characteristic	  #7;	  Wicks	  &	  Rankin,	  1997).	  The	  decrement	  is	  more	  pronounced	  in	  a	  second	  habituation	  session	  one	  hour	  after	  initial	  habituation	  (characteristic	  #	  3;	  Lau	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Rankin,	  2000).	  Shorter	  intervals	  between	  tap	  (10s	  versus	  60s)	  results	  in	  a	  faster	  and	  deeper	  decrement	  (characteristic	  #4;	  Rankin	  &	  Broster;	  1992),	  as	  does	  decreasing	  the	  force	  of	  the	  tap	  (characteristic	  #	  5;	  Timbers	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  Continued	  tapping	  at	  the	  asymptotic	  	   8	  response	  level	  delays	  the	  onset	  of	  spontaneous	  recovery,	  but	  not	  its	  rate	  (characteristic	  #6;	  Rankin	  and	  Broster;	  1992)	  and	  with	  the	  appropriate	  training	  regime	  (e.g.,	  20	  taps	  at	  a	  60s	  interval	  over	  four	  sessions	  with	  1	  h	  rest	  periods	  between	  each)	  a	  decremented	  response	  can	  persist	  for	  up	  to	  48h	  (characteristic	  #10;	  Beck	  &	  Rankin,	  1995;	  Rose	  &	  Rankin,	  2006).	  This	  thorough	  behavioral	  characterization	  greatly	  facilitated	  investigations	  into	  the	  underlying	  cellular	  processes	  of	  tap	  habituation.	  Laser	  ablation	  was	  used	  to	  define	  the	  neuronal	  circuitry	  underlying	  the	  tap-­‐withdrawal	  response.	  Chalfie	  et	  al.	  (1985)	  had	  previously	  used	  laser	  ablation	  to	  determine	  which	  neurons	  were	  mediating	  the	  worm's	  reversal	  response	  to	  anterior	  touch	  and	  its	  forward	  acceleration	  response	  to	  posterior	  touch.	  The	  tap	  activates	  both	  the	  anterior	  and	  posterior	  mechanosensory	  neurons	  and	  using	  the	  circuits	  described	  by	  Chalfie	  et	  al.	  (1985)	  in	  conjunction	  with	  the	  neural	  wiring	  diagram	  (White	  et	  al.	  1986),	  Wicks	  and	  Rankin	  (1995)	  identified	  the	  mechanosensory	  cells	  (ALM,	  AVM,	  PLM,	  and	  PVD)	  and	  interneurons	  (AVD,	  AVA,	  AVB,	  PVC,	  and	  DVA)	  mediating	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response	  (Fig.	  1.1).	  Ablation	  of	  the	  posterior	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  (PLML	  and	  PLMR)	  facilitated	  reversal	  responses,	  while	  ablation	  of	  the	  anterior	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  (ALML,	  ALMR	  and	  AVM)	  promoted	  forward	  accelerations	  in	  response	  to	  tap.	  Thus,	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response	  arises	  from	  an	  integration	  of	  two	  competing	  subcircuits.	  By	  ablating	  the	  anterior	  or	  the	  posterior	  touch	  receptor	  neurons,	  Wicks	  and	  Rankin	  (1996)	  showed	  that	  the	  behavioral	  output	  of	  each	  subcircuit	  habituates	  with	  repeated	  stimulation.	  Importantly,	  the	  	   9	  acceleration	  and	  reversal	  responses	  habituate	  with	  distinct	  kinetics	  that	  integrate	  in	  a	  manner	  consistent	  with	  tap	  habituation	  in	  the	  intact	  animal.	  	  In	  2003,	  Suzuki	  et	  al.	  demonstrated	  that	  repeated	  activation	  could	  alter	  the	  response	  properties	  of	  the	  touch	  receptor	  neurons.	  Using	  a	  genetically	  encoded	  calcium	  reporter	  they	  found	  that	  repeatedly	  poking	  the	  anterior	  of	  the	  worm	  with	  a	  glass	  probe	  causes	  a	  cell-­‐wide	  reduction	  in	  calcium	  response	  in	  the	  anterior	  touch	  receptor	  neuron,	  ALM.	  A	  similar	  reduction	  in	  calcium	  response	  follows	  repeated	  stimulation	  of	  the	  posterior	  touch	  cell,	  PLM	  (Kindt	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Thus,	  attenuation	  of	  touch	  cell	  excitability	  with	  repeated	  activation	  correlates	  with	  decreased	  behavioral	  responding	  to	  tap.	  To	  test	  if	  habituation	  arose	  from	  a	  desensitization	  of	  the	  mechanoreceptor,	  O'Hagan	  et	  al.	  (2005)	  used	  whole-­‐cell	  patch-­‐clamp	  recording	  to	  measure	  mechanoreceptor	  currents	  in	  the	  posterior	  touch	  cell	  (PLM)	  of	  larval	  animals.	  They	  found	  that	  repeatedly	  poking	  the	  cell	  body	  with	  a	  glass	  probe	  had	  no	  effect	  on	  the	  touch-­‐evoked	  mechanoreceptor	  current.	  This	  finding	  suggests	  that	  the	  loci	  of	  plasticity	  are	  downstream	  of	  mechanotransduction.	  Consistent	  with	  this	  hypothesis,	  bypassing	  mechanotransduction	  does	  not	  block	  habituation,	  as	  the	  reversal	  response	  elicited	  by	  optogenetic	  activation	  of	  the	  touch	  cells	  undergoes	  a	  robust	  decrement	  with	  repeated	  photostimulation	  (Nagel	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Leifer	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Timbers	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  	  Mutant	  analysis	  of	  candidate	  genes	  has	  led	  to	  some	  mechanistic	  insights	  into	  habituation	  of	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response.	  Rankin	  and	  Wicks	  (2000)	  reported	  the	  first	  learning	  mutant	  for	  this	  assay,	  eat-­‐4.	  EAT-­‐4,	  the	  C.	  elegans	  ortholog	  of	  the	  mammalian	  vesicular	  glutamate	  transporter	  (VGLUT1),	  is	  expressed	  in	  38	  of	  the	  118	  	   10	  anatomically	  defined	  neuron	  classes,	  including	  the	  touch	  cells	  underlying	  the	  touch	  withdrawal	  response	  (Serrano-­‐Saiz,	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  A	  loss-­‐of-­‐function	  eat-­‐4	  mutant	  had	  a	  wild-­‐type	  initial	  response	  to	  tap,	  but	  habituated	  more	  quickly	  at	  both	  a	  10	  and	  60s	  interstimulus	  interval	  and	  failed	  to	  dishabituate	  following	  a	  brief	  electric	  shock.	  This	  suggests	  that	  modulation	  of	  glutamate	  release	  is	  an	  important	  component	  of	  mechanosensory	  habituation	  and	  dishabituation.	  Upstream	  of	  glutamate	  release,	  Cai	  et	  al.	  (2009)	  identified	  a	  K+	  channel	  (KHT-­‐1)	  and	  an	  accessory	  subunit	  (MPS-­‐1)	  with	  a	  potential	  role	  in	  regulating	  attenuation	  of	  sensory	  cell	  excitability.	  Expressed	  in	  the	  anterior	  (ALM)	  and	  posterior	  (PLM)	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  (Bianchi	  et	  al.	  2003),	  mps-­‐1	  encodes	  a	  single-­‐pass	  transmembrane	  protein	  belonging	  to	  the	  vertebrate	  KCNE	  family	  that	  modulates	  pore-­‐forming	  K+	  channels.	  Loss	  of	  mps-­‐1	  function	  decreases	  tap-­‐withdrawal	  responses,	  a	  phenotype	  that	  can	  be	  rescued	  by	  expressing	  either	  wild-­‐type	  MPS-­‐1	  or	  a	  variant	  with	  an	  inactivated	  kinase	  domain	  (Cai	  et	  al.	  2009).	  Although	  they	  have	  a	  wild-­‐type	  response,	  the	  worms	  with	  inactivated	  MPS-­‐1	  are	  deficient	  in	  habituation	  to	  tap	  at	  both	  short	  and	  long	  interstimulus	  intervals,	  requiring	  10	  times	  more	  taps	  to	  habituate	  and	  recovering	  almost	  instantaneously.	  Cai	  et	  al.	  (2009)	  showed	  that	  MPS-­‐1	  kinase	  activity	  inhibits	  KHT-­‐1	  K+	  currents	  and	  that	  the	  two	  proteins	  form	  a	  complex	  in	  touch	  receptor	  neurons.	  They	  proposed	  that	  repeated	  activation	  of	  the	  touch	  cells	  results	  in	  autophosphorylation	  of	  the	  KHT-­‐1–MPS-­‐1	  complex,	  thus	  diminishing	  K+	  flux	  and	  prolonging	  the	  duration	  of	  mechanoreceptor	  potentials.	  This	  is	  predicted	  to	  slow	  recovery	  of	  EGL-­‐19	  (the	  L-­‐type	  calcium	  channel	  mediating	  touch-­‐evoked	  calcium	  	   11	  currents;	  Suzuki	  et	  al.	  2003),	  thereby	  dampening	  cell	  excitability.	  How	  the	  kinase	  activity	  of	  MPS-­‐1	  is	  activated	  by	  repeated	  mechanical	  stimulation	  is	  unknown.	  The	  kinetics	  of	  habituation	  to	  tap	  is	  dependent	  upon	  the	  context	  in	  which	  the	  stimuli	  are	  given.	  In	  the	  laboratory,	  worms	  are	  reared	  on	  agar	  Petri	  plates	  with	  a	  bacterial	  food	  source.	  When	  tested	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  the	  bacteria,	  the	  proportion	  of	  worms	  responding	  to	  tap	  decreases	  more	  rapidly	  with	  repeated	  stimulation	  at	  a	  10s	  interstimulus	  interval	  i.e.,	  worms	  habituate	  to	  tap	  faster	  when	  stimulated	  off	  of	  food	  (note	  that	  in	  this	  case	  the	  effect	  is	  on	  response	  frequency,	  there	  was	  no	  modulation	  of	  response	  magnitude;	  Kindt	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Mutants	  in	  which	  dopaminergic	  signaling	  is	  disrupted	  habituate	  to	  tap	  with	  the	  rapid	  kinetics	  of	  wild-­‐type	  worms	  tested	  off	  of	  food	  (Sanyal	  et	  al.	  2004;	  Kindt	  et	  al.	  2007).	  It	  was	  hypothesized	  that	  the	  texture	  of	  bacterial	  lawns	  stimulates	  dopamine	  release,	  which	  alters	  the	  functional	  properties	  of	  the	  touch	  cells	  through	  the	  D1-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor,	  DOP-­‐1	  (Sawin	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Sanyal	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Kindt	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Indeed,	  calcium-­‐imaging	  experiments	  in	  various	  mutant	  backgrounds	  revealed	  that	  dopamine	  slows	  the	  decrement	  of	  touch-­‐evoked	  calcium	  currents	  in	  ALM	  via	  intracellular	  calcium	  release	  and	  PKC	  activity	  downstream	  of	  a	  Gq/PLC-­‐β	  signaling	  cascade	  (Kindt	  et	  al.	  2007).	  Thus,	  more	  rapid	  habituation	  kinetics	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  food	  correlates	  with	  more	  rapid	  attenuation	  of	  ALM	  excitability.	  The	  molecules	  described	  thus	  far	  have	  been	  implicated	  in	  tap	  habituation	  as	  candidate	  genes.	  To	  identify	  novel	  pathways	  mediating	  tap	  habituation,	  Xu	  et	  al.	  (2002)	  conducted	  a	  forward	  genetic	  screen,	  identifying	  several	  slow	  habituating	  strains,	  although	  the	  causative	  mutations	  remain	  unknown.	  A	  genetic	  screen	  for	  	   12	  chemosensory	  adaptation	  (Colbert	  &	  Bargmann,	  1995)	  identified	  a	  yet	  uncloned	  gene,	  adp-­‐1,	  which	  has	  subsequently	  been	  shown	  to	  exhibit	  a	  tap	  habituation	  phenotype	  (Swierczek	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  suggesting	  alleles	  identified	  in	  other	  such	  screens	  may	  shed	  light	  on	  habituation	  of	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response.	  As	  part	  of	  his	  PhD	  thesis,	  Dr.	  Andrew	  Giles	  characterized	  tap	  habituation	  in	  522	  strains	  which	  each	  harbored	  an	  identified	  mutation	  in	  a	  gene	  predicted	  to	  function	  in	  the	  nervous	  system.	  By	  quantifying	  habituation	  rate	  and	  asymptotic	  level	  of	  responding	  for	  multiple	  behavioral	  metrics,	  including	  proportion	  of	  animals	  reversing	  and	  their	  response	  duration	  and	  speed,	  dozens	  of	  strains	  were	  identified	  with	  altered	  habituation.	  Notably,	  the	  habituation	  measures	  and	  behavioral	  metrics	  were	  genetically	  dissociable,	  i.e.	  there	  were	  strains	  with	  deficits	  specific	  to	  habituation	  rate	  or	  final	  asymptotic	  level	  for	  one	  or	  more	  of	  the	  behavioral	  metrics	  (reversal	  probability,	  duration,	  or	  speed).	  Further	  epistatic	  and	  cell-­‐specific	  rescue	  experiments	  are	  needed,	  but	  a	  picture	  is	  beginning	  to	  emerge	  of	  the	  processes	  underlying	  habituation	  of	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response.	  Despite	  being	  touted	  as	  the	  “simplest”	  form	  of	  learning,	  habituation	  is	  mediated	  by	  multiple	  mechanisms	  and	  sensitive	  to	  training	  protocol	  and	  context.	  Some	  of	  the	  underlying	  processes	  are	  expected	  to	  be	  conserved	  across	  phylogeny,	  while	  others	  may	  be	  C.	  elegans	  or	  even	  circuit	  specific.	  	  1.3.1	  Chemosensory	  habituation	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response,	  other	  C.	  elegans	  behaviors	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  habituate.	  Colbert	  and	  Bargmann	  (1995)	  observed	  that	  continuous	  	   13	  exposure	  of	  C.	  elegans	  to	  an	  attractive	  odorant	  eventually	  results	  in	  a	  loss	  of	  chemotactic	  response	  to	  that	  odorant.	  The	  molecular	  mechanisms	  underlying	  decremented	  chemosensory	  responding	  have	  been	  intensely	  investigated	  and	  consist	  of	  several	  signaling	  cascades	  dependent	  on	  the	  odorant,	  neuron,	  and	  assay	  (L’Etoile	  &	  Bargmann,	  2000;	  L’Etoile	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Kuhara	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Matsuki	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Palmitessa	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Hirotsu	  &	  Iino,	  2005;	  Miyahara	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Kaye	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Juang	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  O'Halloran	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Lee	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  In	  most	  cases,	  chemosensory	  adaptation	  has	  not	  been	  distinguished	  from	  habituation.	  To	  qualify	  as	  habituation,	  the	  decremented	  response	  to	  the	  chemical	  cue	  (characteristic	  of	  habituation	  #1)	  should	  be	  readily	  reversed	  following	  a	  novel	  or	  noxious	  stimulus,	  that	  is,	  by	  a	  dishabituating	  stimulus	  (characteristic	  of	  habituation	  #8).	  Thus,	  a	  habituated	  animal	  can	  still	  sense	  the	  stimulus	  but	  is	  not	  responding,	  whereas	  an	  adapted	  animal	  cannot	  sense	  the	  stimulus	  until	  it	  is	  removed	  and	  sufficient	  time	  has	  passed	  for	  recovery.	  Bernhard	  and	  van	  der	  Kooy	  (2000)	  demonstrated	  that	  worms	  both	  habituate	  and	  adapt	  to	  odorants.	  First,	  they	  showed	  that	  chemotaxis	  to	  a	  point	  source	  of	  diacetyl	  is	  diminished	  by	  pre-­‐exposure	  to	  0.001%	  or	  100%	  diacetyl,	  but	  not	  0.01%	  or	  25%.	  A	  dishabituating	  stimulus	  (centrifugation)	  returns	  to	  baseline	  the	  decremented	  response	  of	  worms	  pre-­‐exposed	  to	  0.001%	  diacetyl,	  but	  not	  those	  pre-­‐exposed	  to	  100%	  diacetyl,	  suggesting	  that	  worms	  habituate	  to	  0.001%	  diacetyl	  and	  adapt	  to	  100%	  diacetyl.	  Prolonged	  exposure	  to	  benzaldehyde	  also	  results	  in	  decreased	  attraction,	  however	  the	  decrement	  is	  inhibited	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  (Nuttley	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  suggesting	  a	  learned	  association,	  making	  worms	  less	  likely	  to	  ignore	  benzaldehyde	  if	  it	  is	  predictive	  of	  an	  appetitive	  stimulus.	  This	  behavior	  	   14	  begins	  to	  blur	  the	  lines	  between	  associative	  and	  context	  dependent,	  non-­‐associative	  learning	  (Pereira	  &	  van	  der	  Kooy,	  2012).	  	  It	  is	  essential	  to	  probe	  multiple	  circuits	  to	  evaluate	  the	  generalizability	  of	  mechanistic	  insights.	  The	  propensity	  to	  move	  in	  a	  chemical	  gradient	  is	  a	  higher	  order	  behavioral	  metric	  than	  directly	  quantifying	  the	  response	  to	  a	  discrete	  stimulus,	  like	  a	  plate	  tap.	  C.	  elegans	  use	  at	  least	  two	  distinct	  behavioral	  strategies	  for	  chemotaxis:	  (1)	  klinokinesis,	  a	  biased	  random	  walk	  with	  large	  and	  randomly	  oriented	  turns	  to	  promote	  directional	  change	  (Pierce-­‐Shimomura	  et	  al.,	  1999)	  and	  (2)	  klinotaxis,	  a	  continuous	  adjustment	  with	  small	  and	  directed	  turns	  to	  align	  with	  the	  gradient	  (Iino	  &	  Yoshida,	  2009).	  Studies	  typically	  just	  compute	  a	  chemotaxis	  index	  based	  on	  the	  distribution	  of	  animals	  in	  a	  gradient	  at	  a	  single	  time	  point,	  as	  opposed	  to	  deconstructing	  locomotion	  into	  the	  component	  sub-­‐behaviors.	  However,	  despite	  the	  differences	  in	  modality	  and	  behavioral	  metric,	  at	  least	  one	  learning	  mutant	  identified	  with	  a	  chemotaxis	  assay	  (adp-­‐1),	  also	  had	  a	  tap	  habituation	  deficit	  (Colbert	  &	  Bargmann,	  1995;	  Swierczek	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  I	  chose	  to	  investigate	  habituation	  of	  the	  reversal	  response	  elicited	  by	  the	  polymodal	  nociceptor,	  ASH.	  ASH	  elicits	  a	  similar	  response	  as	  the	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  that	  detect	  tap.	  However	  ASH	  senses	  diverse	  and	  even	  lethal	  stimuli	  and	  I	  therefore	  anticipated	  some	  similarities	  and	  some	  differences	  underlying	  the	  plasticity	  of	  these	  partially	  overlapping	  circuits.	  	  	  	  	   15	  1.4	  ASH:	  Polymodal	  nociceptors	  1.4.1	  Molecules,	  circuits,	  behaviors	  Detecting	  and	  appropriately	  responding	  to	  noxious	  stimuli	  is	  of	  critical	  importance	  to	  the	  survival	  of	  all	  organisms.	  Mechanisms	  of	  plasticity	  in	  these	  neural	  circuits	  are	  thus	  likely	  to	  have	  evolved	  early	  and	  be	  conserved	  across	  phyla.	  Cells	  that	  detect	  aversive	  or	  painful	  stimuli	  are	  called	  nociceptors.	  Many	  nociceptors	  are	  unusual	  sensory	  receptors	  in	  that	  they	  respond	  to	  sensory	  input	  in	  more	  than	  one	  modality,	  i.e.	  chemical,	  mechanical,	  and	  thermal	  stimuli	  in	  the	  noxious	  range	  (Bessou	  and	  Perl,	  1969;	  Ochoa	  and	  Torebjork,	  1989).	  These	  polymodal	  nociceptors	  may	  be	  expected	  to	  utilize	  unique	  strategies	  to	  modulate	  responses	  to	  diverse	  and	  salient	  sensory	  inputs.	  C.	  elegans	  has	  neurons	  that	  are	  functionally	  analogous	  to	  mammalian	  polymodal	  nociceptors.	  One	  class	  consists	  of	  the	  bilaterally	  symmetrical	  ASH	  neurons,	  ASHL	  and	  ASHR.	  Their	  cell	  bodies	  are	  in	  the	  lateral	  ganglia	  of	  the	  head	  and	  they	  project	  dendritic	  processes	  to	  the	  worm’s	  principle	  sensory	  organ,	  the	  amphids.	  Situated	  on	  either	  side	  of	  the	  mouth,	  each	  amphid	  is	  composed	  of	  two	  non-­‐neuronal	  support	  cells	  and	  the	  ciliated	  endings	  of	  12	  neurons,	  eight	  of	  which	  (including	  ASH)	  make	  direct	  contact	  with	  the	  environment	  through	  a	  pore	  in	  the	  cuticle.	  Here	  ASH	  detects	  a	  variety	  of	  aversive	  stimuli,	  including	  several	  volatile	  and	  water-­‐soluble	  compounds,	  as	  well	  as	  osmotic	  pressure	  and	  physical	  contact	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Kaplan	  and	  Horvitz,	  1993;	  Bargmann	  et	  al.,	  1990).	  Activation	  of	  ASH	  by	  these	  aversive	  stimuli	  elicits	  a	  rapid	  withdrawal	  response	  that	  often	  ends	  with	  a	  large	  directional	  change	  known	  as	  an	  omega	  turn.	  Habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  avoidance	  behaviors	  is	  the	  focus	  of	  this	  dissertation.	  I	  will	  first	  introduce	  the	  cellular	  	   16	  and	  circuit	  mechanisms	  underlying	  the	  response	  itself	  and	  follow	  with	  a	  discussion	  on	  its	  plasticity.	  Several	  assays	  have	  been	  developed	  to	  study	  avoidance	  behavior	  mediated	  by	  ASH.	  For	  a	  nose	  touch	  response,	  an	  eyelash	  is	  laid	  in	  front	  of	  a	  crawling	  animal	  so	  the	  tip	  of	  the	  nose	  contacts	  the	  hair	  at	  a	  90o	  angle	  (Kaplan	  and	  Horvitz,	  1993).	  For	  volatile	  compounds,	  a	  hair	  dipped	  in	  the	  repellent	  is	  held	  at	  the	  nose	  (without	  contacting	  it)	  until	  the	  worm	  crawls	  backward	  (Chao	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  For	  chemo-­‐avoidance	  of	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents,	  a	  small	  (nl)	  drop	  of	  the	  compound	  is	  dripped	  on	  or	  in	  front	  of	  a	  crawling	  worm	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  These	  methods	  directly	  assay	  the	  reversal	  response	  of	  individual	  animals,	  but	  there	  are	  also	  indirect	  measures	  of	  avoidance	  behavior	  that	  can	  be	  applied	  to	  populations.	  Chemotaxis	  assays	  can	  be	  used	  to	  quantify	  the	  propensity	  of	  the	  population	  to	  move	  down	  a	  volatile	  or	  soluble	  repellent	  gradient	  (Troemel	  et	  al.,	  1997)	  or	  for	  soluble	  repellents,	  the	  propensity	  of	  the	  population	  to	  avoid	  quadrants	  containing	  the	  compound	  (Wicks	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  A	  barrier	  of	  soluble	  repellent	  can	  also	  be	  “painted”	  on	  the	  agar	  surface	  and	  the	  rate	  of	  crossing	  assayed.	  The	  barrier	  may	  separate	  the	  worms	  from	  some	  attractant	  or	  simply	  enclose	  a	  small	  area	  (Culotti	  &	  Russell,	  1978;	  Bargmann	  et	  al.,	  1990).	  Individual	  and	  population	  assays	  have	  been	  used	  to	  identify	  cells	  and	  molecules	  required	  for	  ASH-­‐mediated	  avoidance.	  	  Laser	  ablation	  studies	  first	  implicated	  ASH	  in	  avoidance	  behavior	  to	  a	  variety	  of	  aversive	  stimuli,	  with	  secondary	  sensory	  neurons	  usually	  facilitating	  or	  sometimes	  antagonizing	  the	  response.	  For	  example,	  the	  residual	  nose	  touch	  response	  in	  animals	  lacking	  ASH	  is	  nearly	  completely	  abolished	  by	  the	  loss	  of	  FLP	  	   17	  and	  OLQ	  mechanosensory	  neurons	  (Kaplan	  and	  Horvitz,	  1993),	  while	  AWB	  and	  ADL	  olfactory	  neurons	  contribute	  to	  the	  ASH-­‐mediated	  escape	  response	  from	  volatile	  repellent	  1-­‐octanol	  (Chao	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  In	  contrast,	  reversals	  elicited	  by	  ASH-­‐sensed	  SDS	  detergent	  are	  antagonized	  by	  activation	  of	  chemosensory	  neurons	  in	  the	  tail,	  PHA	  and	  PHB	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  The	  role	  of	  ASH	  as	  a	  polymodal	  nociceptor	  is	  highly	  conserved	  over	  evolutionary	  time,	  as	  the	  anatomically	  similar	  pair	  of	  neurons	  in	  other	  free-­‐living	  and	  even	  parasitic	  nematodes	  is	  also	  required	  for	  avoidance	  of	  a	  variety	  of	  aversive	  stimuli	  (Srinivasan	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Ketschek	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Forbes	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  While	  laser	  ablation	  and	  cell-­‐specific	  mutant	  rescue	  studies	  demonstrated	  the	  necessity	  of	  ASH	  in	  many	  avoidance	  responses,	  direct	  depolarization	  demonstrated	  its	  sufficiency,	  inducing	  reversals	  with	  all	  the	  hallmarks	  of	  the	  natural	  response.	  This	  was	  first	  shown	  by	  expression	  of	  a	  leaky	  glutamate	  receptor	  in	  ASH,	  which	  approximately	  doubled	  the	  rate	  of	  reversals	  (Zheng	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  Ectopic	  expression	  of	  the	  mammalian	  cation	  channel,	  TRPV1,	  allowed	  for	  drug-­‐inducible	  activation	  of	  ASH	  with	  capsaicin,	  which	  elicits	  a	  rapid	  reversal	  response	  (Tobin	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  	  More	  recently,	  optogenetic	  activation	  of	  ASH	  has	  been	  used	  to	  simulate	  aversive	  stimuli	  with	  light	  (Guo	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Husson	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  	  The	  final	  step	  in	  defining	  ASH	  as	  a	  polymodal	  nociceptor	  was	  to	  monitor	  cellular	  activity	  with	  exposure	  to	  naturally	  occurring	  cues.	  Expressing	  a	  genetically	  encoded	  calcium	  indicator	  in	  ASH,	  Hilliard	  et	  al.	  (2005)	  observed	  rapid	  increases	  in	  intracellular	  calcium	  at	  the	  soma	  in	  response	  to	  a	  variety	  of	  noxious	  stimuli,	  including	  quinine,	  denatonium,	  SDS,	  copper,	  glycerol,	  distilled	  water,	  and	  nose	  	   18	  touch.	  These	  responses	  were	  unaffected	  by	  the	  loss	  of	  a	  gene	  required	  for	  synaptic	  release	  (unc-­‐13),	  implicating	  ASH	  as	  the	  primary	  sensor.	  The	  length	  of	  the	  cellular	  response	  increased	  with	  exposure	  duration	  to	  repellents,	  with	  calcium	  levels	  peaking	  after	  a	  few	  seconds	  and	  slowly	  declining	  towards	  baseline	  over	  30s.	  This	  suggests	  that	  ASH	  responds	  to	  the	  presence	  of	  cues,	  as	  opposed	  to	  changes	  in	  concentration,	  but	  adapts	  during	  prolonged	  exposure.	  Chronis	  et	  al.	  (2007)	  observed	  the	  sustained	  calcium	  response	  during	  copper	  or	  glycerol	  exposure,	  but	  also	  noted	  a	  transient	  increase	  in	  calcium	  levels	  upon	  stimulus	  removal.	  Using	  GCaMP3,	  Kato	  et	  al.	  (2014)	  demonstrated	  that	  ASH	  neurons	  can	  respond	  to	  subsecond	  stimulus	  fluctuations,	  but	  the	  ability	  to	  sustain	  these	  responses	  varied	  across	  stimuli,	  with	  responses	  to	  high	  osmolarity	  (glycerol	  and	  NaCl)	  persisting	  longer	  than	  responses	  to	  copper,	  quinine,	  or	  dihydrocaffeic	  acid.	  	  ASH	  expresses	  genes	  specific	  to	  the	  different	  modalities	  it	  detects.	  In	  some	  cases	  the	  sensory	  transduction	  machinery	  has	  been	  identified.	  For	  example,	  the	  DEG/ENaC	  protein	  DEG-­‐1	  is	  the	  major	  mechanotransduction	  channel	  (Geffeney	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  TMC-­‐1	  is	  the	  sodium-­‐sensitive	  ion	  channel	  for	  salt	  sensation	  (Chatzigeorgiou	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  the	  G	  protein–coupled	  receptor	  SRI-­‐14	  is	  an	  olfactory	  receptor	  for	  diacetyl	  (Taniguchi	  et	  al.,	  2014),	  and	  the	  G	  protein–coupled	  receptor,	  DCAR-­‐1,	  is	  the	  candidate	  receptor	  for	  water-­‐soluble	  repellent	  dihydrocaffeic	  acid	  (Aoki	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Modality-­‐specific	  pathways	  also	  mediate	  downstream	  signal	  transduction,	  for	  example	  the	  novel	  cytosolic	  protein	  OSM-­‐10	  is	  essential	  for	  the	  behavioral	  and	  cellular	  response	  to	  osmotic	  shock,	  but	  not	  nose	  touch	  or	  volatile	  or	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005),	  while	  the	  inositol	  	   19	  1,4,5-­‐trisphosphate	  receptor,	  encoded	  by	  itr-­‐1,	  is	  essential	  for	  avoidance	  from	  nose	  touch	  and	  benzaldehyde,	  but	  not	  osmotic	  shock	  (glycerol	  or	  fructose)	  or	  volatile	  or	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents	  (Walker	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  and	  finally,	  the	  novel	  WD-­‐40	  repeat	  protein	  QUI-­‐1	  is	  required	  for	  avoidance	  of	  volatile	  and	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents,	  but	  not	  nose	  touch	  or	  osmotic	  shock	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.	  2004;	  Fukuto	  2004).	  Modality-­‐specific	  signaling	  downstream	  of	  sensory	  transduction	  remains	  poorly	  understood.	  Signal	  transduction	  for	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  converges	  on	  the	  TRPV-­‐related	  cation-­‐selective	  channel	  partners,	  OSM-­‐9	  and	  OCR-­‐2,	  which	  co-­‐localize	  to	  the	  apical	  cilia	  of	  ASH.	  Originally	  identified	  in	  a	  forward	  genetic	  screen	  for	  osmotic	  shock	  insensitivity,	  OSM-­‐9	  has	  since	  been	  shown	  to	  be	  essential	  for	  the	  behavioral	  and	  cellular	  (calcium	  transients	  at	  soma)	  responses	  to	  most,	  if	  not	  all,	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  (Colbert	  et	  al,	  1997;	  Tobin	  et	  al,	  2002;	  Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  TRP	  channels	  have	  also	  been	  linked	  to	  pain	  sensation	  in	  mammals	  (Levine	  &	  Alessandri-­‐Haber,	  2007)	  and	  expression	  of	  mammalian	  TRPV4	  in	  ASH	  was	  able	  to	  rescue	  some,	  but	  not	  all	  of	  the	  deficits	  associated	  with	  loss	  of	  OSM-­‐9	  –	  the	  TRPV4	  transgene	  restored	  sensitivity	  to	  osmotic	  and	  mechanical	  inputs,	  but	  not	  to	  a	  volatile	  repellent	  (Liedkte	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Polyunsaturated	  fatty	  acids	  are	  thought	  to	  comprise	  the	  upstream	  signaling	  cascade	  activating	  OSM-­‐9/OCR-­‐2	  channels	  (Kahn-­‐Kirby	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  Consistent	  with	  a	  role	  in	  initiating	  cell	  excitation,	  OSM-­‐9	  is	  dispensable	  for	  reversal	  responses	  elicited	  by	  direct	  depolarization	  of	  ASH	  in	  transgenic	  animals	  using	  capsaicin	  to	  activate	  mammalian	  TRPV1	  or	  blue	  light	  to	  activate	  the	  light-­‐gated	  cation	  channel,	  Channelrhodopsin-­‐2	  (ChR2;	  Tobin	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Guo	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  In	  contrast,	  responses	  elicited	  by	  these	  direct	  depolarization	  approaches	  are	  	   20	  dependent	  on	  more	  downstream	  processes	  required	  for	  signal	  transmission,	  like	  the	  vesicular	  glutamate	  transporter	  encoded	  by	  eat-­‐4	  (Tobin	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Guo	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  I	  will	  now	  describe	  the	  cells	  and	  circuits	  to	  which	  ASH	  signals.	  Based	  on	  the	  wiring	  diagram	  and	  laser	  ablation	  of	  candidate	  neurons,	  the	  bilaterally	  symmetrical	  AVA,	  AVD,	  and	  AVE	  neurons	  were	  hypothesized	  to	  be	  the	  command	  interneurons	  that	  drive	  backward	  locomotion	  via	  electrical	  and	  chemical	  output	  onto	  the	  excitatory	  cholinergic	  A	  and	  B	  motor	  neurons	  that	  control	  body	  wall	  muscles	  (White	  et	  al.,	  1976;	  Chalfie	  et	  al.,	  1985;	  Wicks	  et	  al.,	  1996).	  Consistent	  with	  this	  model,	  calcium	  increases	  in	  AVA	  and	  AVE	  temporally	  correlate	  with	  backward	  locomotion	  (Ben	  Arous	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Chronis	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Kawano	  et	  al.,	  2011)	  and	  their	  optogenetic	  activation	  elicits	  backwards	  locomotion	  (Schmitt	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Stirman	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  ASH	  has	  direct	  chemical	  synapses	  onto	  the	  reverse	  command	  interneurons,	  with	  a	  total	  of	  6	  onto	  AVA,	  9	  onto	  AVD,	  and	  3	  onto	  AVE	  (Fig.	  1.1;	  White	  et	  al.,	  1986).	  Laser	  ablation	  of	  reverse	  command	  interneurons	  decreases	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  to	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  (Piggott	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Functional	  ablation	  in	  adults	  has	  ruled	  out	  developmental	  deficits	  associated	  with	  larval	  cell	  ablation.	  Responses	  to	  osmotic	  shock	  were	  impaired	  by	  hyperpolarization	  of	  the	  reversal	  command	  interneurons	  using	  histamine	  treatment	  on	  transgenic	  worms	  with	  cell-­‐specific	  expression	  of	  a	  Drosophila	  histamine-­‐gated	  chloride	  channel	  (Pokala	  et	  al.,	  2014),	  while	  optogenetic	  hyperpolarization	  of	  command	  interneurons	  impaired	  responding	  to	  optogenetic	  activation	  of	  ASH	  (Husson	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  The	  functional	  connection	  between	  ASH	  and	  AVA	  has	  been	  quite	  well	  studied.	  Voltage-­‐clamping	  AVA,	  Mellem	  et	  al.	  (2002)	  were	  able	  to	  record	  inward	  synaptic	  currents	  	   21	  following	  a	  nose	  touch,	  which	  activates	  ASH	  in	  addition	  to	  mechanosensitive	  FLP	  and	  OLQ	  neurons.	  In	  an	  all-­‐optical	  approach,	  Guo	  et	  al.	  (2009)	  used	  a	  high-­‐power	  epifluorescence	  light	  source	  and	  a	  digital-­‐light-­‐processing	  mirror	  array	  to	  specifically	  excite	  ChR2	  in	  ASH	  while	  simultaneously	  monitoring	  calcium	  levels	  via	  G-­‐CaMP	  activity	  with	  low	  intensity	  and	  intermittent	  488	  nm	  laser	  light,	  thus	  preventing	  crosstalk	  with	  ChR2	  (which	  has	  an	  excitation	  spectrum	  that	  overlaps	  with	  G-­‐CaMP).	  Using	  this	  setup,	  they	  observed	  evoked	  calcium	  transients	  in	  AVA	  and	  AVD	  that	  were	  dependent	  on	  the	  vesicular	  glutamate	  transporter	  expressed	  in	  ASH,	  EAT-­‐4	  (Lee	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  Combining	  the	  approaches,	  Lindsay	  &	  Lockery	  (2011)	  used	  photo-­‐electrophysiology	  to	  record	  synaptic	  currents	  in	  AVA	  evoked	  by	  optogenetic	  activation	  of	  ASH.	  By	  adjusting	  irradiance	  intensity,	  they	  were	  able	  to	  demonstrate	  graded	  synaptic	  connectivity	  between	  ASH	  and	  AVA.	  The	  currents	  were	  partially	  blocked	  by	  simultaneous	  application	  of	  glutamate	  antagonists	  CNQX	  and	  MK-­‐801.	  While	  most	  other	  sensory	  neurons	  of	  the	  amphid	  signal	  through	  one	  or	  two	  layers	  of	  interneurons,	  ASH	  is	  directly	  connected	  to	  the	  reversal	  command	  interneurons,	  allowing	  for	  rapid	  escape	  responses.	  	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  stimulatory	  circuit	  mediated	  by	  the	  reversal	  command	  interneurons	  AVA,	  AVD,	  and	  AVE,	  Piggott	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  propose	  a	  parallel	  disinhibitory	  circuit	  in	  which	  ASH	  activation	  of	  AIB	  inhibits	  the	  second-­‐layer	  interneuron	  pair,	  RIM,	  relieving	  the	  tonic	  suppression	  of	  reversals	  that	  occurs	  during	  locomotion	  (Fig.	  1.1).	  Consistent	  with	  this	  model,	  laser	  ablation	  of	  both	  the	  stimulatory	  and	  disinhibitory	  pathways	  decreased	  the	  probability	  of	  nose	  touch	  and	  osmotic	  avoidance	  reversal	  responses	  even	  more	  than	  loss	  of	  either	  pathway	  alone.	  	   22	  Monitoring	  calcium	  concentration	  in	  freely	  moving	  worms,	  Piggott	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  observed	  a	  calcium	  efflux	  in	  RIM	  in	  response	  to	  nose	  touch,	  but	  an	  influx	  in	  response	  to	  osmotic	  shock.	  The	  difference	  between	  the	  stimuli	  may	  be	  mediated	  by	  modality-­‐specific	  output	  of	  ASH	  or	  the	  secondary	  sensory	  neurons	  recruited	  for	  nose	  touch	  versus	  osmotic	  shock.	  Interestingly,	  reversal	  responses	  could	  be	  elicited	  by	  inhibition	  of	  RIM	  with	  halorhodopsin	  or	  by	  activation	  of	  RIM	  with	  ChR2	  (Guo	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Piggott	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Animals	  lacking	  AVA,	  AVD,	  and	  AVE	  still	  reversed	  to	  RIM	  inhibition,	  but	  did	  not	  reverse	  to	  RIM	  activation,	  suggesting	  that	  the	  stimulatory	  and	  disinhibitory	  pathways	  are	  parallel	  circuits	  with	  cross-­‐talk.	  Recording	  voltage	  signals	  through	  current	  clamp,	  a	  nose	  touch	  was	  seen	  to	  elicit	  a	  depolarizing	  signal	  in	  ASH,	  AVA,	  and	  AIB,	  but	  a	  hyperpolarizing	  signal	  in	  RIM	  that	  was	  dependent	  on	  AIB.	  Consistent	  with	  hypotheses	  from	  earlier	  behavioral	  analysis	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1995;	  Maricq	  et	  al.,	  1995;	  Mellem	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  the	  EPSPs	  in	  AVA	  and	  AIB	  required	  GluR1	  homolog,	  GLR-­‐1,	  while	  the	  IPSP	  in	  RIM	  was	  mediated	  by	  the	  glutamate-­‐gated	  Cl-­‐	  channel	  subunit	  encoded	  by	  avr-­‐14.	  While	  RIM	  activation	  likely	  elicits	  reversals	  via	  AVA,	  it	  is	  unclear	  how	  the	  disinhibitory	  circuit	  promotes	  backward	  crawling.	  It	  is	  tempting	  to	  speculate	  though	  that	  it	  occurs	  as	  a	  result	  of	  RIM’s	  connection	  with	  the	  forward	  command	  interneuron	  AVB.	  It	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  several	  other	  interneurons	  are	  well	  positioned	  to	  modulate	  both	  the	  stimulatory	  and	  disinhibitory	  circuits.	  	  	  	  	  	   23	  1.4.2	  Modulation	  The	  focus	  of	  this	  dissertation	  is	  the	  plasticity	  of	  the	  ASH-­‐mediated	  avoidance	  response.	  There	  are	  currently	  three	  factors	  known	  to	  modulate	  this	  response,	  quiescence,	  feeding	  state,	  and	  prior	  exposure.	  	  	  Quiescence	  Behavioral	  quiescence	  is	  a	  sleep-­‐like	  state	  characterized	  by	  decreased	  locomotion	  and	  feeding.	  It	  occurs	  during	  the	  lethargus	  period	  that	  precedes	  larval	  molting	  and	  with	  satiety	  in	  adults	  (Van	  Buskirk	  &	  Sternberg,	  2007;You	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  It	  can	  also	  be	  induced	  by	  overexpression	  of	  EGF-­‐like	  ligand	  LIN-­‐3	  (Van	  Buskirk	  &	  Sternberg,	  2007).	  Quiescent	  animals	  are	  slow	  to	  respond	  to	  ASH	  activation,	  but	  this	  can	  be	  reversed	  if	  the	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimulus	  is	  preceded	  by	  mechanical	  stimulation	  to	  “wake”	  worms	  up	  (Raizen	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Cho	  &	  Sternberg,	  2014).	  Monitoring	  calcium	  currents	  in	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit,	  Cho	  &	  Sternberg	  (2014)	  demonstrated	  that	  ASH	  responded	  less	  to	  both	  copper	  and	  glycerol	  during	  lethargus,	  as	  did	  the	  downstream	  reversal	  command	  interneurons	  AVA	  and	  AVD.	  In	  addition,	  responding	  in	  AVA	  and	  AVD	  lose	  synchrony	  during	  lethargus.	  Importantly,	  prior	  mechanical	  stimulation	  restored	  behavioral	  responding,	  as	  well	  as	  coordination	  of	  AVA	  and	  AVD,	  without	  affecting	  responsivity	  of	  ASH.	  This	  demonstrates	  that	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit	  is	  modulated	  at	  the	  sensory,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  interneuron	  level	  to	  delay	  responses	  during	  lethargus.	  	  	  	  	   24	  Feeding	  state	  Feeding	  state	  affects	  a	  number	  of	  C.	  elegans	  behaviors	  and	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  has	  also	  been	  shown	  to	  alter	  the	  worm’s	  reversal	  response	  to	  stimuli	  sensed	  by	  ASH.	  Dopamine	  and	  serotonin	  are	  neuromodulators	  regulating	  many	  C.	  elegans	  food-­‐related	  behaviors.	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  showed	  that	  reversal	  responses	  to	  three	  different	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents	  sensed	  by	  ASH	  (CuCl2,	  glycerol,	  and	  primaquine)	  are	  more	  likely	  if	  animals	  are	  tested	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  or	  just	  exogenous	  dopamine,	  but	  not	  exogenous	  serotonin.	  As	  predicted,	  a	  dopamine	  deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant	  behaves	  on	  food	  as	  though	  tested	  in	  its	  absence,	  a	  phenotype	  that	  can	  be	  rescued	  by	  the	  introduction	  of	  exogenous	  dopamine.	  Reversal	  responses	  can	  also	  be	  promoted	  off	  of	  food	  by	  optogenetic	  activation	  of	  the	  dopaminergic,	  but	  not	  the	  serotonergic	  neurons.	  Imaging	  calcium	  transients	  in	  ASH,	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  showed	  that	  food	  and	  dopamine	  potentiate	  responses	  to	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents.	  An	  invertebrate-­‐specific	  dopamine	  GPCR,	  DOP-­‐4,	  is	  required	  in	  ASH	  for	  dopamine’s	  influence	  on	  both	  the	  cellular	  and	  behavioral	  response.	  	  Modulation	  of	  ASH	  avoidance	  behavior	  is	  somewhat	  modality-­‐specific.	  In	  stark	  contrast	  to	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents,	  disrupted	  dopamine	  signaling	  actually	  facilitates	  responses	  to	  a	  volatile	  repellent	  detected	  by	  ASH,	  i.e.	  reaction	  time	  to	  octanol	  is	  accelerated	  in	  a	  dopamine	  deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant	  (Ferkey	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Wragg	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  This	  effect	  is	  mediated	  by	  DOP-­‐3	  (a	  D2-­‐like	  dopamine	  GPCR)	  signaling	  in	  the	  sensory	  neuron	  (Ezak	  &	  Ferkey,	  2010).	  The	  time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  to	  dilute	  octanol	  is	  however	  delayed	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  food	  (Chao	  et	  al.,	  2004),	  approximately	  doubling	  from	  5	  to	  10s.	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  slowed	  reaction	  	   25	  time,	  Harris	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  observed	  that	  the	  responses	  are	  larger	  and	  more	  likely	  to	  result	  in	  a	  trajectory	  change.	  Like	  dopamine,	  serotonin	  can	  also	  signal	  the	  presence	  of	  food.	  Animals	  unable	  to	  synthesize	  serotonin	  respond	  to	  octanol	  on	  food	  as	  though	  tested	  in	  its	  absence,	  a	  deficit	  that	  can	  be	  ameliorated	  by	  supplementing	  serotonin	  (Chao	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Harris	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  C.	  elegans	  has	  at	  least	  nine	  serotonergic	  neurons	  and	  Harris	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  identified	  the	  NSM	  pair	  as	  a	  key	  source	  of	  serotonin	  for	  food	  modulation	  of	  octanol	  avoidance.	  Three	  different	  serotonin	  GPCRs	  have	  been	  implicated,	  SER-­‐5	  functions	  in	  ASH,	  while	  MOD-­‐1	  and	  SER-­‐1	  function	  in	  downstream	  interneurons	  (Harris	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Zahratka	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  In	  ASH,	  serotonin	  is	  hypothesized	  to	  facilitate	  avoidance	  behavior	  by	  promoting	  the	  release	  of	  neuropeptides	  encoded	  by	  nlp-­‐3,	  which	  genetic,	  but	  not	  biochemical,	  evidence	  suggests	  signal	  through	  NPR-­‐17	  (Harris	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Zahratka	  et	  al.	  (2014)	  recently	  demonstrated	  that	  serotonin	  potentiates	  octanol-­‐evoked	  depolarization	  of	  ASH,	  but	  reduces	  somal	  calcium	  transients.	  Food	  and	  serotonin	  also	  promote	  nose	  touch	  responding	  (Chao	  et	  al.,	  2004),	  but	  serotonin	  does	  not	  alter	  touch	  evoked	  calcium	  transients	  at	  the	  ASH	  soma	  (Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  an	  earlier	  study	  by	  the	  same	  group	  had	  reported	  that	  the	  cellular	  response	  was	  dependent	  on	  serotonin;	  Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Food	  modulation	  of	  the	  avoidance	  response	  is	  therefore	  surprisingly	  complex,	  dependent	  on	  both	  the	  modality	  and	  intensity	  of	  the	  stimulus.	  	  The	  stimulatory	  effects	  of	  food	  and	  serotonin	  on	  octanol	  avoidance	  are	  counteracted	  by	  both	  octopamine	  and	  its	  biosynthetic	  precursor	  tyramine,	  the	  monoamines	  thought	  to	  transmit	  the	  starvation	  signal.	  Octopamine	  is	  often	  	   26	  considered	  the	  invertebrate	  counterpart	  to	  norepinephrine	  based	  on	  its	  structural	  similarity	  and	  homology	  of	  its	  receptors.	  The	  biosynthetic	  enzyme	  required	  for	  octopamine	  synthesis,	  tyramine	  β-­‐hydroxylase	  (TBH-­‐1)	  is	  expressed	  in	  a	  single	  pair	  of	  interneurons,	  RIC	  (Alkema	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  The	  biosynthetic	  enzyme	  required	  for	  tyramine	  synthesis,	  tyrosine	  decarboxylase	  (TDC-­‐1),	  is	  additionally	  expressed	  in	  the	  RIM	  interneuron	  pair	  (Alkema	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Despite	  their	  limited	  release	  sites,	  octopamine	  and	  tyramine	  activate	  global	  peptidergic	  signaling	  cascades	  to	  inhibit	  octanol	  avoidance	  (for	  review	  see	  Mills	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Komuniecki	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  In	  the	  model,	  tyramine’s	  effect	  depends	  on	  GPCR	  TYRA-­‐3	  in	  ASI	  (Hapiak	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  while	  octopamine	  acts	  on	  two	  GPCRs	  expressed	  in	  ASH,	  OCTR-­‐1	  and	  SER-­‐3,	  and	  also	  on	  the	  SER-­‐6	  GPCR	  expressed	  in	  at	  least	  three	  other	  sensory	  neurons,	  AWB,	  ADL,	  and	  ASI	  (Wragg	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Mills	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Stimulation	  by	  octopamine	  and	  tyramine	  is	  thought	  to	  promote	  the	  release	  of	  neuropeptides	  from	  AWB	  (NLP-­‐9),	  ADL	  (NLP-­‐7,	  NLP-­‐8),	  and	  ASI	  (NLP-­‐1,	  NLP-­‐6,	  NLP-­‐7,	  NLP-­‐9)	  that	  ultimately	  signal	  to	  several	  neurons	  to	  inhibit	  the	  initiation	  of	  reversals.	  	  	  Prior	  exposure	  While	  there	  is	  a	  growing	  literature	  on	  its	  modulation	  by	  food,	  considerably	  less	  is	  known	  of	  the	  mechanisms	  by	  which	  experience	  alters	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit.	  This	  is	  the	  primary	  focus	  of	  this	  dissertation.	  In	  1999,	  Hart	  et	  al.	  reported	  that	  administering	  40	  nose	  touches	  in	  rapid	  succession	  decreased	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding.	  This	  prior	  mechanosensory	  stimulation	  to	  the	  nose	  did	  not	  affect	  the	  time	  to	  reverse	  to	  octanol	  or	  the	  degree	  to	  which	  worms	  were	  retained	  by	  an	  	   27	  osmotic	  ring.	  Similarly,	  the	  time	  to	  respond	  to	  octanol	  more	  than	  tripled	  after	  two	  15s	  exposures	  to	  it,	  but	  pre-­‐exposure	  to	  octanol	  had	  no	  observable	  effect	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  a	  nose	  touch	  response.	  Thus,	  the	  decrement	  to	  persistent	  aversive	  cues	  detected	  by	  ASH	  was	  at	  least	  partially	  stimulus-­‐specific.	  For	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents,	  Hilliard	  et	  al.	  (2005)	  demonstrated	  a	  rapid	  decrease	  in	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  CuCl2	  over	  10	  stimuli	  administered	  at	  a	  10s	  interval.	  Responses	  mostly	  recovered	  over	  5min.	  A	  similar	  decrement	  was	  induced	  by	  a	  1	  min	  prolonged	  exposure,	  which	  had	  minimal,	  if	  any	  effect	  on	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  glycerol,	  again	  suggesting	  some	  degree	  of	  stimulus-­‐specificity.	  Monitoring	  calcium	  currents	  in	  ASH,	  Hilliard	  et	  al.	  (2005)	  showed	  that	  the	  behavioral	  decrement	  correlated	  with	  a	  decrease	  in	  cellular	  responsiveness	  and	  that	  this	  was	  also	  true	  in	  a	  mutant	  lacking	  synaptic	  release	  (unc-­‐13).	  Therefore,	  ASH	  displays	  a	  cell-­‐intrinsic	  and	  reversible	  decrement	  in	  responding	  with	  repeated	  or	  prolonged	  exposure	  to	  a	  water-­‐soluble	  repellent.	  GPC-­‐1,	  one	  of	  two	  C.	  elegans	  G-­‐proteinγ-­‐	  subunits,	  had	  previously	  been	  implicated	  in	  behavioral	  adaptation	  to	  soluble	  attractants	  (Jansen	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  prompting	  Hilliard	  et	  al.	  (2005)	  to	  test	  its	  role	  in	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responding.	  For	  soluble	  repellents,	  the	  degree	  of	  decrement	  was	  also	  reduced	  by	  its	  loss,	  both	  in	  terms	  of	  the	  ASH	  cellular	  response	  and	  behavioral	  avoidance.	  Another	  mechanistic	  insight	  comes	  from	  a	  recent	  study	  by	  Lindy	  et	  al.	  (2014)	  showing	  that	  the	  behavioral	  decrement	  associated	  with	  prolonged	  exposure	  to	  hypertonicity	  depends	  on	  the	  ability	  of	  TRPV-­‐like	  channel	  OSM-­‐9	  to	  flux	  calcium.	  To	  examine	  the	  structure-­‐function	  relationship	  of	  the	  OSM-­‐9	  selectivity	  filter,	  Lindy	  et	  al.	  (2014)	  rescued	  OSM-­‐9	  expression	  in	  ASH	  using	  several	  mutagenized	  variants.	  OSM-­‐9	  Y604F	  	   28	  was	  especially	  interesting	  because	  it	  did	  not	  flux	  calcium,	  but	  still	  supported	  behavioral	  responding,	  indicating	  another	  cation	  (presumably	  Na+)	  could	  drive	  avoidance	  behavior.	  Although	  their	  naïve	  response	  was	  intact,	  worms	  expressing	  Y604F	  differed	  from	  wild-­‐type	  in	  that	  their	  responses	  remained	  robust	  after	  prolonged	  exposure	  to	  hypertonicity.	  Therefore	  the	  OSM-­‐9	  calcium	  flux	  is	  dispensable	  for	  ASH	  activation,	  but	  essential	  for	  plasticity	  of	  the	  response.	  How	  calcium	  and	  GPC-­‐1	  support	  decremented	  responding	  remains	  to	  be	  determined.	  Decreased	  cellular	  responsivity	  to	  specific	  stimuli	  suggests	  that	  ASH	  can	  adapt,	  however	  it	  is	  unclear	  if	  the	  avoidance	  circuit	  can	  also	  habituate	  to	  repeated	  stimuli.	  Furthermore,	  the	  behavioral	  metric	  typically	  scored	  in	  these	  assays	  is	  response	  probability	  and	  it	  is	  unknown	  what	  other	  behavioral	  plasticity	  is	  associated	  with	  persistent	  exposure	  to	  aversive	  stimuli.	  As	  with	  tap	  habituation,	  food	  promotes	  responding	  to	  repeated	  ASH	  activation.	  As	  described	  above,	  food	  is	  known	  to	  affect	  naïve	  responding,	  but	  with	  a	  sufficiently	  intense	  stimulus,	  modulation	  by	  food	  is	  only	  apparent	  with	  persistent	  exposure.	  Specifically,	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  showed	  that	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  10	  mM	  CuCl2	  was	  initially	  unaffected	  by	  feeding	  state,	  but	  with	  repeated	  or	  prolonged	  exposure	  responses	  persisted	  longer	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food.	  Calcium	  imaging	  in	  ASH	  correlated	  with	  the	  behavioral	  data,	  suggesting	  food	  is	  acting	  upstream	  of	  cell	  excitability	  to	  promote	  responding	  following	  persistent	  ASH	  activation.	  Exogenous	  dopamine	  mimicked	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  for	  behavioral	  and	  cellular	  responses	  and	  a	  dopamine-­‐deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant	  behaved	  on	  food	  as	  if	  tested	  in	  its	  absence.	  	  	   29	  1.5	  Conclusion	  Habituation	  is	  a	  fundamental	  form	  of	  learning	  that	  remains	  poorly	  understood	  at	  the	  cellular	  and	  molecular	  level.	  C.	  elegans	  is	  an	  excellent	  model	  system	  in	  which	  to	  investigate	  this	  highly	  conserved	  phenomenon.	  The	  escape	  response	  elicited	  by	  polymodal	  nociceptors	  ASHL	  and	  ASHR	  is	  well	  studied	  at	  the	  molecular,	  cellular	  and	  circuit	  levels.	  ASH	  is	  interesting	  in	  the	  context	  of	  habituation	  because	  of	  the	  diversity	  and	  salience	  of	  the	  cues	  it	  detects,	  including	  some	  that	  are	  potentially	  lethal	  for	  C.	  elegans.	  Parallels	  can	  be	  drawn	  between	  this	  circuitry	  and	  pain	  sensation	  in	  mammals,	  most	  notably	  the	  importance	  of	  OSM-­‐9,	  the	  functional	  homologue	  of	  mammalian	  TRPV4	  (Liedtke	  et	  al.,	  2003)	  and	  the	  modulation	  by	  monoamines	  and	  neuropeptides	  (Mills	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Previous	  research	  reported	  a	  decrement	  in	  responding	  to	  persistent	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  This	  is	  striking,	  as	  noxious	  sensory	  input	  should	  always	  be	  important	  to	  attend	  to.	  To	  better	  understand	  the	  response	  decrement	  associated	  with	  repeated	  ASH	  activation,	  I	  set	  out	  to	  establish	  a	  high-­‐throughput	  habituation	  assay	  using	  real-­‐time	  computer	  vision	  software	  for	  detailed	  behavioral	  tracking	  during	  learning.	  Once	  wild-­‐type	  behavior	  is	  fully	  characterized,	  a	  high-­‐throughput	  assay	  facilitates	  the	  discovery	  of	  key	  molecules	  using	  forward	  or	  reverse	  genetic	  screens.	  With	  molecular	  components	  implicated	  in	  a	  particular	  process,	  the	  tractable	  nervous	  system	  of	  C.	  elegans	  allows	  them	  to	  be	  placed	  in	  the	  underlying	  circuitry	  to	  reveal	  how	  sensory	  information	  is	  processed	  to	  affect	  behavior.	  The	  objectives	  of	  my	  research	  are	  therefore:	  	   30	  1) To	  establish	  a	  high-­‐throughput	  habituation	  assay	  for	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses.	  2) To	  identify	  molecular	  components	  mediating	  behavioral	  plasticity.	  	  	  1.6	  General	  methods	  1.6.1	  Strains	  Animals	  were	  maintained	  on	  nematode	  growth	  medium	  (NGM)	  seeded	  with	  Escherichia	  coli	  (OP50)	  as	  described	  in	  Brenner	  (1974).	  Two	  integrated	  Channelrhodopsin-­‐2	  (ChR2)	  transgenes	  (gifts	  from	  William	  Schafer,	  MRC	  Laboratory	  of	  Molecular	  Biology)	  were	  used	  in	  these	  studies.	  One	  transgene	  drove	  ChR2	  with	  the	  sra-­‐6	  promoter,	  which	  expresses	  strongly	  in	  ASH	  and	  more	  weakly	  in	  a	  pair	  of	  sensory	  neurons	  (ASI)	  and	  interneurons	  (PVQ;	  Troemel	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  The	  other	  transgene	  employed	  intersecting	  promoters	  and	  FLP	  Recombinase	  to	  specifically	  target	  ChR2	  to	  ASH	  (ASHp::ChR2),	  as	  reported	  by	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  and	  independently	  confirmed	  by	  another	  research	  group	  (Schmitt	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  The	  strain	  with	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgene	  showed	  robust	  responding	  at	  irradiances	  well	  below	  the	  threshold	  for	  the	  C.	  elegans	  innate	  response	  to	  blue	  light	  (for	  behavioral	  experiments	  I	  used	  70	  µW/mm2).	  The	  ASHp::ChR2	  strain	  required	  increased	  irradiance	  (I	  used	  250	  µW/mm2)	  and	  therefore	  experiments	  with	  this	  strain	  were	  performed	  in	  a	  background	  lacking	  LITE-­‐1,	  a	  native	  C.	  elegans	  short-­‐wavelength	  light	  receptor	  (Ward	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Edwards	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  The	  increased	  sensitivity	  of	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  strain	  was	  most	  likely	  caused	  by	  elevated	  ChR2	  levels	  in	  ASH,	  as	  the	  off-­‐target	  neuron	  classes	  are	  not	  predicted	  to	  elicit	  rapid	  escape	  	   31	  responses.	  In	  most	  cases	  both	  strains	  were	  tested	  and	  complementary	  results	  were	  taken	  as	  evidence	  for	  a	  behavioral	  consequence	  of	  ASH	  activation.	  The	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgene	  was	  used	  for	  mutant	  analysis,	  except	  when	  the	  gene	  of	  interest	  was	  located	  on	  chromosome	  X,	  where	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgene	  was	  integrated	  (sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  was	  integrated	  on	  chromosome	  V).	  Throughout,	  “control”	  refers	  to	  one	  of	  two	  strains:	  AQ2235	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114[gpa-­‐13p::FLPase	  +	  sra-­‐6p::FTF::ChR2::YFP]	  for	  experiments	  with	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgene	  or	  VG61	  yvIs1[sra-­‐6p::ChR2::YFP	  +	  unc-­‐122p::GFP]	  for	  experiments	  with	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgene.	  Mutants	  were	  obtained	  from	  the	  Caenorhabditis	  Genetics	  Center	  and	  Japan's	  National	  BioResource	  Project	  for	  the	  nematode.	  	  1.6.2	  Behavioral	  tracking	  NGM	  plates	  were	  spread	  with	  50-­‐100µL	  E.	  coli	  OP50	  liquid	  culture	  mixed	  with	  all-­‐trans	  retinal	  (ATR;	  or	  equal	  volume	  of	  ethanol	  vehicle)	  for	  a	  final	  plate	  concentration	  of	  5µM	  ATR.	  Plates	  were	  stored	  at	  room	  temperature	  in	  the	  dark	  for	  24-­‐48	  hours	  before	  use.	  For	  age-­‐synchronized	  colonies,	  gravid	  adults	  were	  left	  3-­‐6	  h	  to	  lay	  20-­‐80	  eggs	  before	  being	  removed	  from	  the	  plate.	  Animals	  were	  reared	  at	  20oC	  and	  tested	  3	  or	  4	  days	  after	  hatching.	  Behavioral	  tracking	  typically	  occurred	  directly	  on	  the	  rearing	  plates,	  in	  which	  case	  the	  mean	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  ±	  SEM	  is	  reported	  in	  the	  figure	  legend.	  Transgenic	  strains	  with	  extra-­‐chromosomal	  arrays	  were	  reared	  similarly,	  but	  30-­‐40	  animals	  were	  picked	  (based	  on	  expression	  of	  a	  fluorescent	  co-­‐injection	  marker)	  to	  ATR-­‐containing	  food	  plates	  24h	  before	  testing,	  with	  control	  strains	  similarly	  handled.	  	  	   32	  Multi-­‐Worm	  Tracker	  software	  (version	  1.2.0.2)	  was	  used	  for	  stimulus	  delivery	  and	  image	  acquisition	  (Swierczek	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Following	  a	  3	  to	  5min	  acclimatization	  phase,	  stimuli	  were	  presented	  using	  custom	  built	  LED	  rings	  capable	  of	  illuminating	  6	  mm	  or	  3.5	  mm	  (diameter)	  Petri	  plates	  from	  above	  with	  uniform	  blue	  light	  (max	  =	  70μW/mm2	  or	  250μW/mm2,	  respectively).	  An	  orange	  filter	  prevented	  the	  blue	  light	  from	  entering	  the	  camera.	  Taps	  were	  delivered	  by	  an	  electromagnetic	  tubular	  push	  solenoid.	  Offline	  analysis	  with	  Choreography	  software	  (version	  1.3.0_r1035;	  Swierczek	  et	  al.,	  2011)	  used	  “-­‐-­‐shadowless”,	  “-­‐-­‐minimum-­‐time	  20”,	  and	  “-­‐-­‐minimum-­‐move-­‐body	  2”	  filters	  with	  “-­‐-­‐each-­‐id	  all”	  and	  “-­‐-­‐speed-­‐window	  0.1”	  output	  options	  to	  obtain	  “-­‐-­‐bias,speed,x,y”	  data	  for	  all	  valid	  objects.	  The	  MeasureReversal	  plugin	  was	  used	  to	  identify	  reversals	  occurring	  within	  3s	  (dt=3)	  of	  the	  light	  pulse	  onset.	  	  	  1.6.3	  Statistics	  	   Custom	  MatLab	  scripts	  organized	  and	  analyzed	  the	  Choreography	  output	  files.	  Student’s	  t-­‐tests	  and	  one-­‐way	  ANOVAs	  with	  Tukey's	  honestly	  significant	  difference	  (HSD)	  criterion	  were	  used	  to	  compare	  the	  responses	  between	  strains	  and	  treatments.	  For	  response	  probability,	  tests	  compared	  the	  mean	  from	  the	  proportion	  of	  worms	  responding	  on	  each	  plate	  (n	  =	  number	  of	  plates	  tested).	  For	  magnitude	  metrics	  (i.e.	  duration,	  latency,	  and	  displacement)	  data	  were	  combined	  across	  plates	  and	  collective	  means	  were	  compared	  (n	  =	  number	  of	  animals	  tested).	  For	  all	  statistical	  tests,	  α	  was	  0.05.	  	  	   33	  	  	  Figure	  1.1.	  Wiring	  diagram	  depicting	  the	  interconnectivity	  of	  the	  primary	  neuron	  classes	  underlying	  tap	  and	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversals.	  With	  the	  exception	  of	  unpaired	  AVM,	  all	  sensory	  and	  inter-­‐neuron	  classes	  in	  the	  circuit	  comprise	  two	  cells,	  while	  there	  are	  9	  DA,	  7	  DB,	  12	  VA,	  and	  11	  VB	  motor	  neurons.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  !sensory!!inter!!motor!!Synapses!!5/10!!11/20!!>20!!Gap!junc8ons!!2/4!!5/10!!>10!ASH!AIB!DB!VB!DA!VA!RIM!AVA!AVD!AVE!PVC!AVB!ALM!AVM! PLM!Backward!!movement! Forward!movement!!Touch!receptor!!!!neurons!!Command!!!!!interneurons!Disinhibitory!!!!circuit!!!A!&!B!motor!!!!!neurons!	   34	  2.	  Role	  of	  food	  and	  dopamine	  in	  habituation	  2.1	  Introduction	  ASH	  neurons	  are	  functionally	  analogous	  to	  mammalian	  polymodal	  nociceptors,	  as	  the	  pair	  detects	  a	  variety	  of	  aversive	  stimuli,	  including	  volatile	  and	  non-­‐volatile	  repellents,	  as	  well	  as	  osmotic	  pressure	  and	  physical	  contact	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Kaplan	  and	  Horvitz,	  1993;	  Bargmann	  et	  al.,	  1990).	  These	  cells	  are	  especially	  interesting	  in	  the	  context	  of	  habituation	  because	  of	  the	  diversity	  and	  salience	  of	  the	  stimuli	  they	  detect.	  Repeated	  or	  prolonged	  exposure	  to	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  result	  in	  a	  decreased	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  that	  is	  mostly	  stimulus	  specific	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  There	  are	  several	  limitations	  associated	  with	  studying	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversal	  responses	  using	  the	  classical	  aversion	  assays.	  Although	  ASH	  detects	  a	  variety	  of	  stimuli,	  none	  of	  them	  are	  easily	  administered	  discretely	  to	  an	  entire	  population	  of	  worms	  simultaneously.	  To	  investigate	  the	  reversal	  response	  directly,	  experiments	  using	  naturally	  occurring	  cues	  must	  be	  conducted	  one	  worm	  at	  a	  time,	  producing	  a	  bottleneck	  for	  large-­‐scale	  studies.	  Furthermore,	  the	  precise	  timing	  and	  intensity	  of	  these	  stimuli	  are	  difficult	  to	  control.	  This	  is	  significant	  for	  learning	  assays,	  as	  both	  the	  interstimulus	  interval	  and	  the	  strength	  of	  the	  stimulus	  are	  known	  to	  affect	  habituation.	  In	  addition,	  the	  naturally-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  activate	  secondary	  sensory	  neurons	  known	  to	  contribute	  to	  or	  antagonize	  the	  response.	  	  In	  an	  attempt	  to	  circumvent	  the	  issues	  described	  above,	  I	  adapted	  a	  recently	  developed	  automated	  behavioral	  analysis	  setup,	  The	  Multi-­‐Worm	  Tracker	  (Swierczek	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  for	  use	  in	  optogenetic	  experiments.	  In	  optogenetics,	  light	  is	  	   35	  used	  to	  manipulate	  or	  monitor	  the	  activity	  of	  cells	  expressing	  a	  genetically	  encoded	  light-­‐sensitive	  protein.	  In	  nervous	  systems,	  a	  light-­‐gated	  cation	  channel	  can	  be	  used	  to	  depolarize	  neurons,	  thus	  allowing	  precise	  temporal	  control	  of	  a	  genetically	  defined	  subset	  of	  cells.	  The	  nervous	  system	  of	  C.	  elegans	  is	  optically	  and	  genetically	  accessible	  and	  was	  one	  of	  the	  first	  to	  be	  targeted	  for	  optogenetic	  manipulation	  in	  awake	  and	  behaving	  animals	  (Nagel	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  In	  the	  high-­‐throughput	  learning	  assay	  developed	  in	  this	  chapter,	  ASH	  is	  repeatedly	  photoactivated	  with	  Channelrhodopsin-­‐2	  (ChR2),	  a	  blue	  light-­‐gated	  cation	  channel	  (Nagel	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  This	  approach	  negates	  the	  problems	  of	  previously	  described	  single-­‐worm	  assays,	  as	  ASH	  can	  be	  depolarized	  in	  an	  entire	  population	  of	  worms	  simultaneously	  with	  whole-­‐plate	  illumination	  at	  defined	  time-­‐points	  and	  intensities.	  The	  response	  of	  dozens	  of	  worms	  can	  then	  be	  quantified	  automatically	  using	  the	  Multi-­‐Worm	  Tracker,	  which	  offers	  an	  unprecedented	  ability	  to	  generate	  highly	  detailed	  behavioral	  data	  for	  large	  numbers	  of	  animals.	  Furthermore,	  using	  ChR2	  to	  bypass	  normal	  sensory	  transduction	  prevents	  adaptation	  at	  this	  level	  and	  therefore	  behavioral	  plasticity	  can	  be	  attributed	  to	  more	  downstream	  mechanisms.	  By	  dissecting	  behavior	  into	  multiple	  components	  I	  uncovered	  a	  suite	  of	  changes	  characteristic	  of	  habituation	  and	  sensitization	  that	  together	  acted	  to	  promote	  dispersal.	  I	  found	  that	  the	  D1-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor,	  DOP-­‐4,	  modulated	  this	  dispersal	  as	  a	  function	  of	  feeding	  state.	  	  	  	  	   36	  2.2	  Methods	  2.2.1	  Strains	  The	  ChR2	  transgenes	  were	  crossed	  into	  BZ873,	  CB1112,	  CX10,	  GR1321,	  LX636,	  LX702,	  MT8943,	  MT13113,	  RB665,	  RB785,	  RB1254,	  RB1680,	  TQ1716,	  TU253,	  and	  VM3109	  to	  generate	  the	  following	  strains:	  	  VG53	  glr-­‐1(ky176);	  yvIs1	  VG54	  mec-­‐4(u253);	  yvIs1	  VG224	  cat-­‐2(e1112);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG231	  tdc-­‐1(n3419);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG233	  tph-­‐1(mg280);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG236	  dop-­‐3(ok295);	  yvIs1	  VG237	  dop-­‐1(vs101);	  yvIs1	  VG238	  dop-­‐1(ok398);	  yvIs1	  VG240	  dop-­‐2(vs105);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG241	  dop-­‐5(ok568);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG248	  dop-­‐4(ok1321);	  yvIs1	  VG249	  dop-­‐6(ok2090);	  yvIs1	  VG284	  bas-­‐1(ad446);	  cat-­‐4(e1141);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG388	  trp-­‐4(sy695);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG389	  trp-­‐4(sy695);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114;	  xuEx584[dat-­‐1p::trp-­‐4-­‐sl2-­‐YFP	  +	  unc-­‐122p::GFP]	  VG515	  osm-­‐9(ky10);	  yvIs1	  	   37	  The	  dop-­‐4	  rescue	  plasmids	  (a	  gift	  from	  William	  Schafer,	  MRC	  Laboratory	  of	  Molecular	  Biology,	  and	  described	  in	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011)	  were	  co-­‐injected	  into	  the	  gonad	  of	  VG248	  adult	  hermaphrodites	  with	  pCFJ90	  (myo-­‐2p::mCherry;	  Frøkjær-­‐Jensen	  et	  al.,	  2008)	  for	  use	  as	  a	  visible	  marker	  and	  pBluescript	  to	  make	  the	  total	  DNA	  concentration	  100ng/ul	  (Mello	  et	  al.,	  1991).	  The	  following	  strains	  were	  generated	  by	  microinjection:	  	  VG384	  dop-­‐4(ok1321);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx96[gpa-­‐13p::dop-­‐4(35ng/ul)	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry(5ng/ul)]	  VG394	  dop-­‐4(ok1321);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx98[dop-­‐4p::dop-­‐4(35ng/ul)	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry(3ng/ul)].	  	  2.2.2	  Behavioral	  tracking	  See	  general	  methods	  section	  of	  Chapter	  1	  for	  details.	  To	  evaluate	  the	  effect	  of	  food,	  20min	  prior	  to	  testing	  animals	  were	  picked	  from	  their	  rearing	  plates	  to	  an	  unseeded	  NGM	  transfer	  plate	  where	  they	  remained	  for	  several	  minutes	  to	  crawl	  away	  from	  residual	  E.	  coli	  before	  being	  transferred	  to	  a	  plate	  spread	  0.5	  to	  2	  hours	  earlier	  with	  either	  50ul	  OP50	  liquid	  culture	  or	  just	  the	  LB.	  	  	  2.2.3	  Nose	  touch	  The	  nose	  touch	  assay	  was	  conducted	  on	  rearing	  plates	  with	  the	  experimenter	  blind	  to	  strain	  (glr-­‐1	  +	  or	  -­‐)	  or	  treatment	  (ATR	  +	  or	  -­‐).	  Nose	  touch	  sensitivity	  was	  assayed	  within	  30s	  of	  the	  last	  light	  pulse.	  Positive	  responses	  were	  defined	  as	  	   38	  reversals	  elicited	  by	  contact	  with	  an	  eyebrow	  hair	  placed	  perpendicular	  to	  the	  direction	  of	  forward	  motion	  (Kaplan	  and	  Horvitz,	  1993).	  	  	  2.2.4	  Octanol	  exposure	  Four	  3ul	  drops	  of	  30%	  1-­‐octanol	  or	  the	  ethanol	  vehicle	  were	  placed	  on	  the	  Petri	  plate	  lid	  of	  rearing	  plates.	  The	  plates	  were	  sealed	  with	  parafilm	  and	  the	  Multi-­‐Worm	  Tracker	  was	  used	  to	  monitor	  responses	  elicited	  by	  ChR2	  activation.	  	  	  2.3	  Results	  2.3.1	  Population	  assay	  for	  repeated	  ASH	  activation	  To	  stimulate	  an	  entire	  population	  simultaneously	  with	  precise	  temporal	  and	  intensity	  regulation	  I	  used	  optogenetics	  in	  combination	  with	  a	  real-­‐time	  computer	  vision	  system,	  the	  Multi-­‐Worm	  Tracker	  (Swierczek,	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Using	  a	  custom	  built	  LED	  light	  ring,	  reversal	  responses	  to	  2s	  blue	  light	  pulses	  were	  detected	  in	  the	  majority	  of	  animals	  with	  ChR2	  expressed	  in	  ASH	  and	  fed	  the	  essential	  opsin	  co-­‐factor,	  ATR.	  To	  examine	  the	  plasticity	  of	  this	  response,	  light	  pulses	  were	  administered	  every	  10s	  for	  5min.	  Figure	  2.1A	  depicts	  speed	  profiles	  for	  50	  representative	  animals	  over	  the	  first	  and	  final	  20s	  of	  the	  assay.	  Blue	  light	  illumination	  promoted	  reversal	  behavior,	  but	  only	  in	  the	  population	  fed	  ATR.	  Training	  had	  a	  variety	  of	  behavioral	  consequences	  that	  were	  quantified	  with	  several	  metrics.	  In	  terms	  of	  the	  probability	  of	  responding,	  the	  majority	  of	  animals	  typically	  reversed	  to	  each	  stimulus	  of	  the	  assay	  (Fig.	  2.1B),	  however	  with	  repeated	  stimulation,	  responses	  were	  of	  decreased	  duration	  (i.e.	  time	  spent	  moving	  	   39	  backwards;	  Fig.	  2.1C)	  and	  slowed	  reaction	  time	  (Fig.	  2.1D).	  The	  ~0.5s	  increase	  in	  response	  latency	  could	  not	  fully	  account	  for	  the~1.5s	  decrease	  in	  response	  duration,	  suggesting	  they	  are	  independent	  metrics.	  	  There	  were	  also	  changes	  to	  locomotory	  behaviors	  during	  the	  periods	  between	  stimuli.	  Examining	  the	  3s	  window	  immediately	  preceding	  a	  stimulus,	  I	  quantified	  the	  proportion	  of	  animals	  moving	  forward,	  backward,	  or	  paused.	  With	  repeated	  stimulation,	  the	  behavioral	  state	  of	  the	  population	  shifted,	  such	  that	  more	  time	  was	  spent	  moving	  forward	  with	  a	  decreased	  likelihood	  of	  either	  pausing	  or	  reversing	  (Fig.	  2.2A).	  In	  addition	  to	  increased	  prevalence,	  the	  speed	  of	  forward	  movement	  was	  also	  increased	  (Fig.	  2.2B).	  This	  shift	  in	  locomotory	  behavior	  was	  dependent	  on	  photocurrents	  through	  ChR2,	  as	  it	  did	  not	  occur	  on	  plates	  without	  ATR	  (Fig.	  2.2).	  The	  overall	  pattern	  of	  behavioral	  change	  was	  the	  same	  for	  the	  strain	  expressing	  ChR2	  by	  the	  sra-­‐6	  promoter.	  	  To	  evaluate	  the	  spontaneous	  recovery	  from	  the	  30	  light	  pulses	  I	  waited	  intervals	  of	  varying	  duration	  (20s,	  40s,	  70s,	  or	  130s)	  before	  administering	  a	  31st	  stimulus.	  Responses	  had	  not	  recovered	  if	  a	  single	  stimulus	  was	  omitted	  (i.e.	  a	  20s	  recovery),	  but	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  between	  recovery	  intervals	  for	  both	  reversal	  duration	  (F(3,542)	  =	  18.5,	  p	  <	  0.0001)	  and	  latency	  (F(3,542)	  =	  4.0,	  p	  =	  0.008)	  metrics.	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  reversals	  had	  returned	  towards	  baseline	  over	  130s,	  as	  responses	  after	  this	  interval	  were	  of	  increased	  duration	  and	  decreased	  latency	  as	  compared	  to	  responses	  after	  only	  a	  20s	  recovery	  period	  (p	  <	  0.05;	  Fig.	  2.3A,B).	  The	  decrement	  was	  therefore	  reversible	  with	  a	  time	  constant	  similar	  to	  previous	  reports	  using	  naturally-­‐sensed	  	   40	  stimuli	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Monitoring	  locomotion	  over	  the	  130s	  recovery	  period,	  there	  was	  also	  a	  shift	  toward	  the	  pre-­‐assay	  distribution	  of	  forward,	  backward,	  and	  paused	  movement	  (Fig.	  2.3C),	  as	  well	  as	  a	  deceleration	  of	  forward	  speed	  (Fig.	  2.3D).	  	  2.3.2	  Generalization	  of	  photoactivation	  and	  naturally	  sensed	  stimuli	  ChR2	  photocurrents	  peak	  in	  milliseconds	  and	  then	  decay	  to	  a	  steady	  state	  in	  a	  phenomenon	  known	  as	  desensitization	  or	  inactivation	  (Nagel	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Light	  adaptation	  refers	  to	  the	  reduction	  in	  peak	  current	  (but	  not	  steady	  state	  current)	  that	  occurs	  with	  repetitive	  light	  pulses	  (Lórenz-­‐Fonfría	  &	  Heberle,	  2014).	  If	  decremented	  behavioral	  responding	  	  arose	  from	  light	  adaptation	  of	  ChR2,	  then	  the	  consequence	  of	  repeated	  ASH	  photoactivation	  should	  not	  generalize	  to	  naturally	  occurring	  cues.	  I	  tested	  this	  hypothesis	  in	  a	  nose	  touch	  assay	  preceded	  by	  twenty	  2s	  light	  pulses	  presented	  every	  10s.	  ATR-­‐fed	  ChR2	  transgenic	  animals	  were	  less	  likely	  to	  reverse	  following	  a	  head-­‐on	  collision	  with	  an	  eyelash	  (25%)	  than	  unstimulated	  controls	  (78%)	  or	  stimulated	  animals	  reared	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  ATR	  (91%;	  Fig.	  2.4A),	  indicating	  that	  the	  change	  was	  occurring	  downstream	  of	  ChR2	  photocurrents.	  The	  experimental	  group’s	  level	  of	  responding	  to	  nose	  touch	  was	  comparable	  to	  a	  nose	  touch-­‐defective	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  (19%;	  Fig	  2.4A;	  Maricq	  et	  al.,	  1995;	  Hart	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  In	  a	  complementary	  experiment,	  a	  3min	  exposure	  to	  a	  volatile	  repellent	  detected	  by	  ASH,	  octanol,	  had	  the	  same	  behavioral	  consequence	  as	  repeated	  ASH	  photoactivation,	  i.e.	  compared	  to	  vehicle,	  octanol	  pre-­‐exposure	  decreased	  the	  duration	  (t(198)	  =	  6.9,	  p	  =	  0.00001)	  and	  increased	  the	  latency	  (t(198)	  =	  2.6,	  p	  =	  0.01)	  of	  reversal	  responses	  elicited	  by	  ASH	  photoactivation	  (Fig.	  2.4B).	  As	  a	  negative	  	   41	  control,	  I	  tested	  a	  mutant	  lacking	  OSM-­‐9,	  the	  TRPV-­‐like	  channel	  required	  for	  initiating	  cell	  excitation	  to	  most	  (if	  not	  all)	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli.	  For	  the	  osm-­‐9	  mutant,	  responses	  for	  the	  octanol	  and	  vehicle	  pre-­‐exposed	  groups	  were	  indistinguishable	  both	  in	  terms	  of	  duration	  (t(139)	  =	  1.3,	  p	  =	  0.20)	  and	  latency	  (t(139)	  =	  0.29,	  p	  =	  0.77).	  These	  experiments	  demonstrate	  bi-­‐directional	  generalization	  of	  photoactivation	  and	  naturally	  sensed	  cues,	  confirming	  that	  the	  behavioral	  decrement	  is	  not	  simply	  light	  adaptation	  of	  ChR2	  photocurrents	  and	  validating	  the	  use	  of	  optogenetics.	  	  2.3.3	  Dishabituation	  A	  habituated	  animal	  can	  sense	  the	  persistent	  stimulus	  but	  is	  suppressing	  naïve	  responding,	  whereas	  an	  adapted	  animal	  cannot	  sense	  the	  stimulus	  until	  sufficient	  time	  has	  passed	  for	  recovery.	  Habituated	  responses	  are	  readily	  reversed	  in	  a	  phenomenon	  known	  as	  dishabituation,	  which	  distinguishes	  habituation	  from	  sensory	  adaptation	  or	  fatigue.	  I	  tested	  whether	  a	  tap	  to	  the	  side	  of	  the	  Petri	  plate	  could	  dishabituate	  responses	  following	  repeated	  photoactivation	  of	  ASH.	  Tap	  was	  chosen	  because	  it	  could	  be	  discretely	  applied	  to	  the	  entire	  population	  simultaneously.	  Furthermore,	  the	  interneurons	  and	  motor	  neurons	  mediating	  the	  tap-­‐withdrawal	  response	  are	  mostly	  overlapping	  with	  those	  required	  for	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversals	  (Wicks	  &	  Rankin,	  1995;	  Guo	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Guo	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Piggott	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  To	  test	  for	  dishabituation	  I	  repeatedly	  illuminated	  two	  groups	  at	  a	  10s	  interstimulus	  interval	  for	  5min	  and	  then	  waited	  20s	  before	  administering	  a	  final	  2s	  light	  pulse.	  One	  group	  was	  given	  a	  tap	  10s	  into	  the	  20s	  recovery	  period.	  This	  non-­‐	   42	  localized	  mechanical	  stimulus	  acted	  as	  a	  dishabituating	  cue	  since	  tapped	  animals	  responded	  with	  longer	  reversals	  to	  the	  subsequent	  light	  pulse	  than	  untapped	  controls,	  t(257)	  =	  4.4,	  p	  <	  0.00001,	  which	  showed	  no	  appreciable	  spontaneous	  recovery	  over	  20s	  (Fig.	  2.5A).	  Although	  reversal	  duration	  was	  facilitated	  by	  tap,	  reaction	  time	  was	  not,	  t(257)	  =	  0.7,	  p	  =	  0.46	  (Fig.	  2.5B).	  This	  suggests	  that	  the	  plasticity	  underlying	  these	  two	  metrics	  arises	  from	  distinct	  processes.	  The	  effect	  of	  repeated	  ASH	  photoactivation	  on	  response	  latency	  may	  either	  represent	  sensory	  adaptation	  or	  fatigue	  or	  tap	  may	  not	  be	  an	  appropriate	  dishabituating	  stimulus	  for	  this	  metric.	  	  The	  tap	  withdrawal	  response	  is	  mediated	  by	  five	  body	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  located	  along	  the	  length	  of	  the	  animal	  (Wicks	  and	  Rankin	  1995).	  Although	  ablation	  of	  ASH	  neurons	  does	  not	  impact	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response	  (Wicks	  and	  Rankin	  1995),	  it	  is	  a	  mechanosensor	  and	  could	  potentially	  detect	  the	  agar	  vibrations.	  To	  confirm	  that	  the	  body	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  are	  the	  source	  of	  the	  dishabituating	  signal,	  a	  mec-­‐4	  loss-­‐of-­‐function	  mutation	  was	  used	  to	  specifically	  render	  them	  insensitive	  to	  mechanical	  stimuli	  (O’Hagan	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Comparing	  reversal	  duration	  for	  the	  first,	  final,	  and	  dishabituated	  light	  pulse,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  for	  both	  control	  (F(2,694)	  =	  205.9,	  p	  <	  0.00001)	  and	  the	  mec-­‐4	  mutant	  (F(2,592)	  =	  89.5,	  p	  <	  0.00001;	  Fig.	  2.5C).	  However,	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  final	  and	  dishabituated	  responses	  were	  indistinguishable	  in	  the	  mutant	  background	  (p	  >	  0.05).	  The	  decremented	  responding	  of	  the	  mec-­‐4	  mutant	  could	  therefore	  not	  be	  facilitated	  by	  tap.	  In	  	   43	  summary,	  sensory	  input	  detected	  by	  the	  touch	  cells	  can	  dishabituate	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit.	  Recently,	  Cho	  &	  Sternberg	  (2014)	  demonstrated	  that	  anterior	  or	  posterior	  body	  touch	  hastens	  the	  slowed	  reaction	  time	  associated	  with	  ASH	  activation	  during	  quiescence.	  Calcium	  imaging	  suggested	  that	  touch	  facilitated	  responding	  by	  increasing	  synchrony	  in	  the	  command	  interneurons.	  Although	  I	  found	  that	  input	  from	  body	  touch	  cells	  did	  not	  affect	  habituated	  reaction	  times,	  it	  did	  facilitate	  reversal	  duration.	  Promoting	  synchrony	  among	  command	  interneurons	  may	  explain	  how	  tap	  facilitates	  reversal	  duration	  in	  the	  dishabituation	  assay,	  especially	  if	  habituation	  training	  disrupts	  coordinated	  activity,	  as	  occurs	  during	  quiescence	  (Cho	  &	  Sternberg,	  2014).	  	  	  2.3.4	  Dopamine	  signaling	  slows	  habituation	  As	  described	  in	  chapter	  1,	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  has	  been	  found	  to	  slow	  the	  decrement	  in	  response	  probability	  following	  repeated	  or	  prolonged	  exposure	  to	  CuCl2,	  a	  water-­‐soluble	  repellent	  detected	  by	  ASH	  (Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Calcium	  transients	  in	  ASH	  matched	  the	  behavioral	  data,	  with	  a	  more	  rapid	  decline	  in	  cellular	  responding	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  food.	  Our	  habituation	  assay	  allowed	  us	  to	  test	  whether	  food	  was	  also	  modulating	  the	  avoidance	  circuit	  downstream	  of	  cell	  excitation,	  as	  ChR2	  photocurrents	  bypassed	  the	  native	  transduction	  machinery.	  Comparing	  the	  same	  behavioral	  metric	  as	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011;	  i.e.	  response	  probability),	  I	  found	  that	  populations	  tested	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  food	  were	  less	  likely	  to	  respond	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus	  than	  populations	  tested	  on	  a	  thin	  bacterial	  lawn,	  t(10)	  =	  3.2,	  p	  =	  0.009	  (Fig.	  	   44	  2.6A).	  However,	  initial	  responses	  were	  not	  affected	  by	  feeding	  state	  in	  this	  assay,	  t(10)	  =	  0.9,	  p	  =	  0.38.	  Although	  all	  other	  experiments	  in	  this	  chapter	  were	  conducted	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  a	  bacterial	  lawn,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  the	  food+	  condition	  for	  Fig.	  2.6A	  referred	  to	  a	  thin,	  nearly	  invisible	  bacterial	  lawn	  that	  had	  been	  spread	  with	  liquid	  culture	  at	  most	  2	  hours	  before	  testing	  (as	  in	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  in	  contrast	  with	  Fig.	  2.1	  or	  Figure	  2.6B,	  C,	  and	  D,	  where	  animals	  were	  tested	  directly	  on	  their	  rearing	  plate	  with	  a	  much	  thicker	  bacterial	  lawn.	  The	  fact	  that	  repeated	  photoactivation	  recapitulated	  the	  rapid	  decrement	  in	  responding	  off	  of	  food	  that	  had	  been	  observed	  by	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  demonstrated	  that	  food	  was	  not	  only	  promoting	  responses	  upstream,	  but	  also	  downstream	  of	  ASH	  excitation.	  	  Receptors	  for	  serotonin	  (SER-­‐1,	  SER-­‐5,	  and	  MOD-­‐1),	  dopamine	  (DOP-­‐3	  and	  DOP-­‐4),	  octopamine	  (OCTR-­‐1,	  SER-­‐3,	  and	  SER-­‐6),	  and	  tyramine	  (TYRA-­‐3)	  have	  all	  been	  found	  to	  alter	  naïve	  responding	  to	  a	  variety	  of	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  as	  a	  function	  of	  feeding	  state	  (Harris	  et	  al,	  2010;	  Harris	  et	  al,	  2009;	  Ezak	  and	  Ferkey,	  2010;	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Mills	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  The	  molecular	  underpinning	  of	  this	  phenomenon	  is	  complex,	  involving	  neuromodulators	  operating	  at	  multiple	  levels	  in	  the	  circuit	  (Harris	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Komuniecki	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  To	  assess	  the	  role	  of	  monoamine	  neurotransmitters	  in	  the	  modulation	  of	  habituation,	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgene	  was	  crossed	  into	  strains	  with	  a	  mutation	  in	  tph-­‐1,	  cat-­‐2,	  or	  tdc-­‐1,	  which	  encode	  tryptophan	  hydroxylase,	  tyrosine	  hydroxylase,	  and	  tyrosine	  decarboxylase,	  enzymes	  required	  for	  the	  biosynthesis	  of	  serotonin,	  dopamine,	  and	  tyramine/octopamine,	  respectively	  (Lints	  &	  Emmons,	  1999;	  Sze	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Alkema	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  In	  terms	  of	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus,	  a	  one-­‐	   45	  way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  the	  four	  strains,	  F(3,20)	  =	  15.6,	  p	  =	  0.0001.	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  cat-­‐2	  mutant	  had	  a	  decreased	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  assay	  (p	  <	  0.05),	  while	  tph-­‐1	  and	  tdc-­‐1	  mutants	  were	  indistinguishable	  from	  control	  (p	  >	  0.05;	  Fig.	  2.6B).	  The	  serotonin-­‐	  and	  dopamine-­‐deficient	  mutants	  actually	  had	  opposite	  phenotypes,	  as	  habituation	  training	  diminished	  the	  importance	  of	  serotonin	  in	  the	  aversion	  response:	  the	  tph-­‐1	  mutant	  was	  more	  likely	  to	  respond	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus	  than	  to	  the	  first,	  t(10)	  =	  4.0,	  p	  =	  0.003.	  Loss	  of	  both	  dopamine	  and	  serotonin	  in	  a	  cat-­‐4;	  bas-­‐1	  double	  mutant	  (Loer	  &	  Kenyon,	  1993)	  resulted	  in	  a	  rapid	  habituation	  phenotype	  that	  was	  similar	  to	  the	  dopamine	  deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant	  (Fig.	  2.6C)	  and	  reminiscent	  of	  animals	  tested	  in	  the	  absence	  of	  food	  (Fig.	  2.6A).	  Although	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus	  was	  decreased	  in	  the	  cat-­‐4;	  bas-­‐1	  double	  mutant	  compared	  to	  control,	  t(10)	  =	  6.9,	  p	  <	  0.0001,	  initial	  response	  probability	  was	  unaffected	  by	  the	  simultaneous	  loss	  of	  dopamine	  and	  serotonin,	  t(10)	  =	  0.5,	  p	  =	  0.63.	  Together	  these	  data	  suggest	  that	  dopamine	  signaling	  promoted	  responding	  to	  repeated	  ASH	  activation,	  while	  an	  appropriate	  serotonin/dopamine	  balance	  was	  essential	  for	  a	  robust	  naïve	  response.	  	  C.	  elegans	  has	  eight	  dopaminergic	  neurons	  in	  three	  classes,	  CEP,	  ADE,	  and	  PDE.	  The	  texture	  of	  the	  bacterial	  food	  source	  is	  thought	  to	  activate	  these	  dopaminergic	  neurons	  directly	  requiring	  the	  mechanosensitive	  TRPN	  channel,	  TRP-­‐4	  (Li	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Kindt	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  The	  trp-­‐4	  mutant,	  like	  the	  dopamine	  deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant,	  habituated	  more	  quickly	  than	  control	  to	  repeated	  photoactivation	  of	  ASH	  (Fig.	  2.6D).	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  dopaminergic	  neurons,	  TRP-­‐4	  is	  expressed	  in	  at	  least	  2	  classes	  of	  interneurons,	  including	  DVA,	  where	  it	  functions	  as	  a	  stretch	  	   46	  receptor	  for	  proprioceptive	  feedback	  (Li	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  To	  better	  localize	  site	  of	  action,	  the	  trp-­‐4	  mutant	  was	  compared	  with	  control	  and	  a	  strain	  expressing	  trp-­‐4	  cDNA	  exclusively	  in	  dopaminergic	  neurons.	  Evaluating	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  the	  three	  strains,	  F(2,21)	  =	  8.0,	  p	  =	  0.0027.	  	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  trp-­‐4	  mutant	  had	  a	  decreased	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  assay	  (p	  <	  0.05),	  while	  the	  trp-­‐4	  mutant	  with	  TRP-­‐4	  restored	  to	  dopamine	  neurons	  was	  indistinguishable	  from	  control	  (p	  >	  0.05;	  Fig.	  2.6D).	  	  Thus,	  the	  texture	  of	  the	  bacterial	  food	  source	  stimulates	  dopamine	  release,	  which	  promotes	  responding	  (i.e.	  slows	  habituation)	  to	  persistent	  aversive	  stimuli	  by	  modulating	  the	  avoidance	  circuit	  downstream	  of	  ASH	  excitation.	  	  	  2.3.5	  DOP-­‐4	  slows	  habituation	  To	  identify	  the	  receptor	  through	  which	  food	  and	  dopamine	  slowed	  habituation,	  I	  evaluated	  loss-­‐of-­‐function	  phenotypes	  for	  known	  (dop-­‐1,	  dop-­‐2,	  dop-­‐3,	  and	  dop-­‐4)	  and	  potential	  (dop-­‐5	  and	  dop-­‐6)	  dopamine	  GPCRs.	  All	  mutants	  tested	  were	  indistinguishable	  from	  control	  animals	  for	  initial	  responding	  probability	  and	  only	  loss	  of	  DOP-­‐4,	  an	  invertebrate-­‐specific	  D1-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor	  (Sugiura	  et	  al.,	  2005),	  recapitulated	  the	  rapid	  habituation	  phenotype	  of	  the	  dopamine-­‐deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant	  (Fig.	  2.7A).	  To	  confirm	  it	  as	  the	  causative	  mutation	  and	  to	  implicate	  ASH	  as	  the	  site	  of	  action,	  genomic	  dop-­‐4	  was	  reintroduced	  to	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  under	  control	  of	  its	  own	  or	  a	  gpa-­‐13	  promoter.	  A	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  strains	  for	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  	   47	  stimulus,	  F(3,23)	  =	  18.2,	  p	  <	  0.00001.	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  with	  expression	  restored	  by	  the	  dop-­‐4	  promoter	  was	  indistinguishable	  from	  control	  (p	  >	  0.05)	  and	  more	  likely	  to	  respond	  than	  either	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  or	  the	  mutant	  expressing	  dop-­‐4	  by	  the	  gpa-­‐13	  promoter	  (p	  <	  0.05).	  Monitoring	  behavior	  and	  calcium	  transients,	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  previously	  reported	  that	  DOP-­‐4	  functioned	  upstream	  of	  ASH	  excitability	  to	  increase	  naïve	  sensitivity	  of	  ASH	  to	  water-­‐soluble	  repellents	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food.	  DOP-­‐4	  therefore	  acts	  both	  in	  ASH	  to	  modulate	  naïve	  sensitivity	  as	  a	  function	  of	  feeding	  state	  and	  in	  downstream	  neurons	  to	  promote	  responding	  to	  repeated	  stimulation.	  	  The	  very	  low	  number	  of	  animals	  responding	  in	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  background	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  assay	  made	  it	  difficult	  to	  assess	  habituation	  of	  response	  magnitude	  metrics,	  i.e.	  duration	  and	  latency.	  Loss	  of	  the	  DOP-­‐4	  receptor	  did	  however	  affect	  the	  locomotory	  behavior	  during	  the	  periods	  between	  stimuli.	  Examining	  the	  3s	  window	  immediately	  preceding	  a	  stimulus,	  the	  proportion	  of	  time	  spent	  moving	  forward	  increased	  across	  the	  assay	  similarly	  to	  control	  (Fig.	  2.8A),	  but	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  moved	  forward	  at	  a	  faster	  speed	  after	  the	  final	  stimulus	  (t(257)	  =	  2.4,	  p	  =	  0.017;	  Fig.	  2.8B).	  	  2.3.6	  Habituation	  training	  promotes	  dispersal	  The	  behavioral	  plasticity	  associated	  with	  repeated	  ASH	  activation	  (i.e.	  accelerating	  forward	  speed	  and	  inhibiting	  reversals)	  would	  be	  expected	  to	  promote	  dispersal.	  Indeed,	  analyzing	  20s	  worm	  track	  trajectories	  I	  observed	  increased	  displacement	  over	  the	  duration	  of	  the	  assay	  (Fig.	  2.9).	  Consistent	  with	  its	  decreased	  	   48	  likelihood	  of	  reversing	  to	  ASH	  activation	  and	  elevated	  forward	  speed,	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  travelled	  even	  further	  than	  control	  in	  the	  final	  20s	  of	  the	  assay	  (t(185)	  =	  7.5,	  p	  <	  0.00001).	  	  2.4	  Discussion	  I	  established	  a	  new	  C.	  elegans	  learning	  assay	  combining	  optogenetics	  to	  simulate	  naturally	  sensed	  stimuli	  with	  real-­‐time	  computer	  vision	  software	  for	  highly	  detailed	  behavioral	  analysis.	  Repeated	  photoactivation	  of	  ASH	  had	  several	  effects	  on	  C.	  elegans	  behavior,	  including	  slowing	  reaction	  time	  and	  decreasing	  response	  duration.	  To	  test	  that	  a	  behavioral	  decrement	  qualifies	  as	  habituation,	  it	  is	  essential	  to	  rule	  out	  other	  potential	  causes,	  like	  adaptation,	  fatigue,	  or	  injury.	  In	  this	  case	  I	  also	  needed	  to	  confirm	  that	  our	  ectopic	  sensory	  transduction	  machinery,	  i.e.	  ChR2,	  was	  not	  adapting	  with	  repeated	  activation.	  This	  was	  supported	  by	  my	  behavioral	  data	  showing	  that	  repeated	  photoactivation	  decremented	  responding	  to	  a	  naturally	  sensed	  stimulus	  (i.e.	  nose	  touch;	  Fig.	  2.4).	  Furthermore,	  dishabituating	  mechanosensory	  input	  could	  facilitate	  the	  decrement	  (Fig.	  2.5),	  confirming	  it	  qualified	  as	  habituation.	  There	  are	  several	  advantages	  of	  this	  habituation	  assay.	  Firstly,	  by	  using	  ChR2	  photocurrents	  to	  activate	  ASH,	  the	  sensory	  transduction	  machinery	  of	  ASH	  was	  bypassed,	  therefore	  preventing	  adaptation	  at	  this	  level	  and	  allowing	  us	  to	  probe	  downstream	  mechanisms	  of	  behavioral	  plasticity.	  Secondly,	  I	  specifically	  activated	  ASH	  and	  could	  therefore	  rule	  out	  a	  contribution	  from	  secondary	  sensory	  neurons	  known	  to	  contribute	  to	  avoidance	  behavior.	  Finally,	  I	  was	  able	  to	  quantify	  multiple	  behavioral	  metrics	  of	  a	  population	  receiving	  a	  	   49	  consistent	  and	  discrete	  stimulus.	  Habituation	  studies	  typically	  probe	  a	  single	  response	  metric,	  but	  as	  I	  show	  here,	  behaviors	  are	  rarely	  defined	  by	  one	  dimension.	  	  	  Earlier	  work	  using	  naturally	  occurring	  cues	  demonstrated	  that	  persistent	  exposure	  to	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  results	  in	  a	  decreased	  likelihood	  of	  behavioral	  responding	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Monitoring	  calcium	  currents	  in	  ASH,	  Hilliard	  et	  al.	  (2005)	  showed	  that	  the	  decrease	  in	  behavioral	  response	  correlates	  with	  a	  decrease	  in	  cellular	  responsiveness,	  to	  CuCl2	  at	  least,	  and	  that	  the	  behavioral	  and	  cellular	  decrement	  are	  dependent	  on	  GPC-­‐1,	  a	  Gγ	  also	  involved	  in	  behavioral	  adaptation	  to	  soluble	  attractants	  (Jansen	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  Decreased	  cellular	  responsiveness	  to	  specific	  compounds	  suggests	  that	  ASH	  can	  adapt	  to	  aversive	  stimuli	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Hart	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  Adaptation	  at	  the	  level	  of	  stimulus	  detection	  can	  occur	  in	  parallel	  with	  more	  downstream	  mechanisms	  of	  habituation.	  Consistent	  with	  this	  concept,	  previous	  assays	  have	  reported	  much	  more	  rapid	  decrements	  in	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  than	  those	  observed	  here,	  where	  I	  prevented	  adaptation	  by	  bypassing	  sensory	  transduction.	  Furthermore,	  loss	  of	  gpc-­‐1	  or	  osm-­‐9	  caused	  no	  obvious	  phenotypes	  in	  my	  optogenetic-­‐based	  assay	  (data	  no	  shown),	  despite	  being	  implicated	  in	  ASH	  adaptation	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Lindy	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  By	  deconstructing	  the	  behavioral	  response,	  I	  demonstrated	  explicitly	  that	  an	  ASH-­‐mediated	  avoidance	  response	  could	  habituate.	  Dopamine	  signaling	  promoted	  responding	  during	  habituation	  training	  and	  I	  identified	  the	  invertebrate	  specific	  D1-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor,	  DOP-­‐4,	  as	  a	  key	  mediator.	  Dopamine	  is	  a	  neuromodulator	  frequently	  implicated	  in	  neural	  and	  behavioral	  plasticity,	  a	  role	  for	  dopamine	  signaling	  has	  also	  been	  proposed	  for	  	   50	  habituation	  in	  mammals	  (Lloyd	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Consistent	  with	  this	  model,	  mesolimbocortical	  and	  nigrostriatal	  dopaminergic	  neurons	  respond	  to	  unconditioned	  salient	  and	  arousing	  sensory	  input	  (Horvitz,	  2000).	  In	  C.	  elegans,	  dopamine	  modulates	  a	  variety	  of	  behaviors,	  including	  locomotion	  (Sawin	  et	  al.,	  2000;	  Hills	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Vidal-­‐Gadea	  et	  al.,	  2011)	  and	  learning	  (Kimura	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Voglis	  &	  Tavernarakis,	  2008;	  Hukema	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Sanyal	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Bettinger	  &	  McIntiire,	  2004).	  Kindt	  et	  al.	  (2007)	  worked	  out	  the	  cellular	  pathway	  by	  which	  dopamine	  signaling	  attenuates	  habituation	  of	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  –	  mechanosensory	  dopaminergic	  neurons	  respond	  to	  the	  texture	  of	  the	  bacterial	  lawn	  and	  DOP-­‐1	  functions	  in	  the	  body	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  to	  promote	  cell	  excitability	  by	  intracellular	  calcium	  release	  and	  PKC	  activity	  downstream	  of	  a	  Gq/PLC-­‐β	  cascade.	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  also	  found	  that	  dopamine	  signaling	  slows	  the	  response	  decrement	  following	  persistent	  exposure	  to	  a	  water-­‐soluble	  repellent,	  CuCl2,	  however	  they	  did	  not	  observe	  a	  dop-­‐4	  phenotype.	  DOP-­‐4	  signaling	  may	  modulate	  habituation	  to	  some,	  but	  not	  all	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli.	  Alternatively,	  a	  habituation	  phenotype	  for	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  may	  have	  been	  masked	  by	  sensory	  adaptation	  to	  CuCl2.	  Our	  optogenetic	  approach	  removes	  the	  contribution	  from	  adaption	  to	  specifically	  evaluate	  habituation,	  which	  may	  better	  reveal	  the	  dop-­‐4	  phenotype.	  	  DOP-­‐4	  plays	  a	  role	  in	  the	  transition	  from	  thrashing-­‐like	  swimming	  in	  liquid	  to	  crawling	  on	  agar	  (Vidal-­‐Gadea	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  a	  qualitatively	  distinct	  gait	  in	  which	  animals	  maintain	  an	  S-­‐shaped	  posture	  with	  deeper	  and	  slower	  dorsal-­‐ventral	  bends	  (Pierce-­‐Shimomura	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  It	  is	  possible	  that	  the	  circuitry	  underlying	  this	  	   51	  transition	  also	  drives	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responding,	  as	  the	  elicited	  reversal	  can	  be	  considered	  a	  gait	  transition	  from	  forward	  to	  backward	  crawling.	  Although	  DOP-­‐4	  was	  not	  required	  for	  the	  naïve	  reversal	  response,	  habituation	  training	  induced	  an	  altered	  behavioral	  state	  in	  which	  dopamine,	  as	  opposed	  to	  serotonin,	  promoted	  responding.	  As	  with	  the	  naïve	  response	  to	  ASH	  activation,	  the	  opposite	  gait	  transition	  (crawl	  to	  swim)	  was	  dependent	  on	  a	  serotonin-­‐dopamine	  balance.	  Dopamine	  plays	  an	  evolutionarily	  conserved	  role	  in	  motor	  pattern	  selection	  and	  in	  humans,	  loss	  of	  dopaminergic	  neurons	  causes	  the	  motor	  symptoms	  characteristic	  of	  Parkinson’s	  disease.	  	  Future	  work	  will	  need	  to	  define	  the	  site	  of	  DOP-­‐4	  function	  for	  both	  habituation	  and	  the	  swim	  to	  crawl	  gait	  transition.	  Failure	  to	  avoid	  certain	  stimuli	  detected	  by	  ASH	  could	  be	  fatal	  for	  C.	  elegans.	  Why	  then	  do	  reversal	  responses	  habituate?	  My	  data	  show	  that	  different	  behavioral	  components	  show	  unique	  patterns	  of	  plasticity	  following	  repeated	  ASH	  activation,	  with	  habituation	  being	  just	  part	  of	  a	  strategy	  to	  promote	  dispersal	  from	  a	  dangerous	  locale.	  However,	  the	  avoidance	  circuit	  must	  balance	  this	  more	  long-­‐term	  goal,	  with	  the	  short-­‐term	  goal	  of	  evading	  noxious	  stimuli.	  The	  increased	  response	  latency	  associated	  with	  habituation	  may	  be	  a	  strategy	  to	  strike	  a	  balance	  between	  these	  long	  and	  short-­‐term	  goals.	  Given	  the	  graded	  connection	  between	  ASH	  and	  reversal	  command	  interneurons	  (Lindsay	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  loss	  of	  an	  early	  immediate	  reversal	  response	  would	  allow	  animals	  to	  ignore	  less	  intense	  stimuli,	  like	  nose	  touch,	  while	  maintaining	  sensitivity	  to	  more	  serious	  threats,	  like	  osmotic	  shock.	  By	  promoting	  reversal	  responses,	  DOP-­‐4	  signaling	  prioritizes	  evasion	  over	  dispersal	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  a	  bacterial	  food	  source.	  The	  dual-­‐process	  theory	  states	  that	  stimulation	  	   52	  induces	  both	  local	  circuit	  habituation	  and	  an	  organism-­‐wide	  state	  of	  sensitization	  (Groves	  &	  Thompson,	  1970).	  Sensitization	  may	  well	  be	  reflected	  in	  the	  shift	  in	  locomotion	  pattern	  induced	  by	  habituation	  training.	  A	  persistent	  aversive	  stimulus	  elicits	  the	  optimal	  escape	  strategy	  –	  minimize	  non-­‐essential	  backward	  movement	  and	  accelerate	  forward.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   53	  Figure	  2.1.	  Plasticity	  of	  reversal	  responses	  elicited	  by	  repeated	  ChR2	  activation	  in	  ASH.	  (A)	  Representative	  raster	  plots	  depicting	  the	  behavioral	  state	  of	  50	  animals	  at	  the	  beginning	  (left)	  and	  end	  (right)	  of	  training.	  Pixels	  are	  color	  coded	  for	  velocity	  with	  negative	  values	  corresponding	  to	  backward	  locomotion.	  Black	  bars	  indicate	  2s	  of	  whole-­‐plate	  illumination	  with	  blue	  light	  at	  250μW/mm2.	  (B-­‐D)	  Three	  different	  response	  metrics	  for	  reversals	  elicited	  by	  thirty	  2s	  light	  pulses	  administered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  White	  circles	  show	  the	  median,	  box	  limits	  indicate	  the	  25th	  and	  75th	  percentile,	  whiskers	  extend	  1.5	  times	  the	  interquartile	  range	  from	  the	  25th	  and	  75th	  percentiles,	  and	  polygons	  represent	  density	  estimates	  of	  the	  data	  (n=48	  plates,	  25±0.5	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate).	  Dotted	  line	  denotes	  median	  response	  to	  stimulus	  1.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  5 10 15 20 25 30012StimulusReversal latency (s)5 10 15 20 25 300246Reversal duration (s)Stimulus5 10 15 20 25 3000.51StimulusProportion reversing    0">0.8"mm/s"<*0.8"mm/s"A"B"ATR+"ATR'"C"D"	   54	  	  Figure	  2.2.	  Shift	  in	  foraging	  behaviors	  during	  the	  interstimulus	  intervals.	  (A)	  Proportion	  of	  the	  population’s	  time	  spent	  moving	  forward,	  backward,	  or	  not	  at	  all	  during	  the	  3s	  interval	  immediately	  preceding	  each	  stimulus	  delivered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  (B)	  Speed	  of	  worms	  moving	  forward	  during	  the	  same	  3s	  intervals.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  n=6	  plates	  with	  23±1.6	  and	  20±0.9	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  ATR+	  and	  ATR-­‐	  conditions,	  respectively.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  ATR+% ATR&%10 20 3000.20.40.60.81Proportion timeInterstimulus10 20 3000.20.40.60.81Proportion timeInterstimulus20 40 60 80 100 12000.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Proportion timeInterstimulus  backwardpauseforwardA%B%10 20 3000.050.10.150.20.25Speed (mm/s)Interstimulus interval  ATR+ATR−20 300.240.681Proportion timeInterstimulus	   55	  	  	  Figure	  2.3.	  Spontaneous	  recovery	  from	  training	  with	  thirty	  2s	  light	  pulses	  delivered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  (A,B)	  Reversal	  duration	  and	  latency	  responses	  to	  a	  2s	  light	  pulse	  at	  one	  of	  4	  recovery	  time	  points	  following	  training.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means	  (24.5±0.6	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate)	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  The	  dash-­‐dot	  line	  is	  the	  naïve	  response	  level	  and	  the	  dashed	  line	  is	  the	  habituated	  level.	  #,	  &,	  and	  ¥	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups.	  (C)	  Above:	  Representative	  raster	  plots	  depicting	  the	  behavioral	  state	  of	  50	  animals	  for	  10s	  at	  early	  (left)	  and	  late	  (right)	  recovery.	  Pixels	  are	  color	  coded	  for	  speed	  with	  negative	  values	  corresponding	  to	  backward	  locomotion.	  Below:	  Distribution	  of	  foraging	  behaviors	  following	  training	  (n=6	  plates	  with	  24.0±1.2	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate).	  (D)	  Forward	  speed	  deceleration	  following	  habituation	  training	  (n=6	  plates	  with	  24.0±1.2	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate).	  Dashed	  line	  is	  pre-­‐training	  speed.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  20 40 70 13000.51Reversal latency (s)Recovery time (s)20 40 70 1300123Recovery time (s)Reversal duration (s)40 80 12000.20.40.60.81Proportion timeRecovery time (s)20 40 60 80 100 12000.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Proportion timeInterstimulus  backwardpauseforwardA" B"C"#" #&"&"¥"#" #"#&"&"    0">0.8"mm/s"<*0.8"mm/s"<)0.8" >0.8"mm/s"0" D"40 80 12000.050.10.150.2Recovery time (s)Speed (mm/s)	   56	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  2.4.	  Generalization	  of	  natural	  stimuli	  and	  those	  simulated	  with	  optogenetics.	  (A)	  Nose	  touch	  responses	  were	  inhibited	  by	  training	  (stim	  =	  2s	  light	  pulse	  x	  20	  at	  0.1Hz).	  The	  majority	  of	  naive	  worms	  crawled	  backwards	  after	  a	  head-­‐on	  collision	  with	  an	  eyelash,	  but	  for	  worms	  reared	  on	  ATR,	  the	  likelihood	  of	  a	  nose	  touch	  response	  was	  significantly	  reduced	  by	  prior	  ASH	  photoactivation.	  .	  #	  and	  	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  (n=41,	  56,	  46,	  52	  animals/group).	  (B)	  Pre-­‐exposure	  to	  octanol	  (oct)	  decremented	  the	  duration	  and	  increased	  the	  latency	  of	  reversals	  elicited	  by	  ChR2	  photocurrents,	  as	  compared	  with	  pre-­‐exposure	  to	  the	  ethanol	  vehicle	  (veh).	  Circles	  are	  plate	  averages,	  crosses	  are	  population	  averages	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  Control	  and	  osm-­‐9	  had	  36.3±5.3	  and	  27.1±4.0	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate,	  respectively.	  Asterisks	  and	  n.s.	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  and	  indistinguishable	  comparisons,	  respectively.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  veh oct veh oct00.20.40.60.8Reversal latency (s)1 2 3 400.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Proportion reversing!" +" +" !"+" +" !" +"+" +" +" !"S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"1 2 3 40.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.Proportion reversing!" +" !"+" +" +"+" +" !" !"S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"A" B"1 2 3 400.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Proportion reversing!" +" +" !"+" +" !" +"+" +" +" !"S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"1 2 30.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.Proportion reversing!" +" !"+" +" +"+" +" !" !"S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"1 2 3 400.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Proportion reversing!" +" +" !"+" +" !" +"+" +" +" !"S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"1 2 3 40.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.Proportion reversing!" +" !"+" +" +"+" +" !" !"S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"1 2 3 400.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Proportion reversing!" +" +" !"+" " ! +" " +" !S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"1 2 3 40.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.Proportion reversing!" +" !"+" " +"" " " !S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"s%m"ATR"glr,1"1 2 3 400.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Proportion reversing!" " "+" !+"S%mula on""ATR""glr!1"1 2 3 40.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.Proportion reversing!" " " "+" " "+" " ! !"S%mula%on""ATR""glr!1"*"osm,9"veh oct veh oct01234Reversal duration (s)osm,9"*"n.s."n.s."#"#"&"&"	   57	  	  Figure	  2.5.	  Sensory	  input	  from	  body	  touch	  receptors	  acts	  as	  a	  dishabituating	  cue.	  (A,B)	  A	  tap	  after	  training	  diminished	  the	  decrement	  in	  reversal	  duration	  without	  influencing	  response	  latency.	  The	  dash-­‐dot	  line	  is	  the	  initial	  response	  level	  and	  the	  dashed	  line	  is	  the	  habituated	  response	  level.	  The	  asterisk	  denotes	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups.	  23.8±1.4	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate.	  (C)	  Duration	  of	  the	  reversal	  response	  elicited	  by	  the	  initial	  and	  final	  2s	  light	  pulse	  of	  training	  and	  the	  response	  after	  a	  dishabituating	  tap.	  The	  decrement	  of	  a	  touch	  insensitive	  mec-­‐4	  mutant	  was	  not	  dishabituated	  by	  tap.	  Control	  and	  mec-­‐4	  groups	  had	  37.1±1.8	  and	  29.5±1.4	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate,	  respectively.	  #,	  &,	  and	  ¥	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  Data	  in	  2.5A,B	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background	  and	  data	  in	  2.5C	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  no tap tapped0123Reversal duration (s)no tap tapped00.20.40.60.81Reversal latency (s)A" B"C"+" mec)4"initial final dishab initial final dishab0246Reversal duration (s)*"#"&"¥"#"&" &"	   58	  	  	  Figure	  2.6.	  Dopamine	  signaling	  promotes	  responding	  during	  habituation	  training.	  (A)	  Comparing	  populations	  off	  of	  food	  with	  those	  tested	  on	  a	  very	  thin	  bacterial	  lawn	  (n=6	  plates	  with	  19.2±1.3	  and	  18.8±2.1	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  food+	  and	  food-­‐	  conditions,	  respectively).	  (B,C)	  Loss	  of	  monoamine	  biosynthetic	  enzymes	  altered	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  (n=6	  plates).	  For	  (B),	  the	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  19.5±1.3,	  20.3±1.3,	  23.8±1,	  and	  23±2	  for	  +,	  tph-­‐1,	  cat-­‐2,	  and	  tdc-­‐1,	  respectively.	  For	  (C),	  the	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  20.3±2.1,	  21±1.4,	  and	  22±2.2	  for	  +,	  cat-­‐2,	  and	  bas-­‐1;cat-­‐4,	  respectively.	  (D)	  Loss	  of	  trp-­‐4	  recapitulated	  the	  dopamine	  deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant	  phenotype	  and	  could	  be	  rescued	  by	  expression	  in	  dopaminergic	  neurons	  (n=8	  plates).	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Time (s)Proportion reversing  +tph−1cat−2tdc−10 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Proportion reversingTime (s)  +cat−2bas−1;cat−40 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Time (s)Proportion reversing  food+food−0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Time (s)Proportion reversing  +trp−4trp−4;Ex[dat−1p::trp−4]C" D"A" B"#"&"#"&"#"&"#"#"#"&"&"#"	   59	  	  Figure	  2.7.	  Loss	  of	  dop-­‐4	  recapitulates	  the	  phenotype	  of	  a	  dopamine	  deficient	  cat-­‐2	  mutant.	  (A)	  Proportion	  of	  the	  population	  responding	  relative	  to	  control	  to	  the	  initial	  (top)	  and	  30th	  (bottom)	  2s	  light	  pulse	  delivered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  The	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  50±2,	  58.8±4.6,	  62.8±3.1,	  27.8±1,	  55±1.2,	  19.8±2.6,	  24.3±1.2,	  and	  55.8±2.2	  for	  cat-­‐2,	  dop-­‐1(vs101),	  dop-­‐1(ok398),	  dop-­‐2,	  dop-­‐3,	  dop-­‐4,	  dop-­‐5,	  and	  dop-­‐6,	  respectively.	  Representative	  raster	  plots	  depicting	  control	  and	  dop-­‐4	  responses	  to	  the	  initial	  (top)	  and	  final	  (bottom)	  stimulus.	  Pixels	  are	  color	  coded	  for	  speed	  with	  negative	  values	  corresponding	  to	  backward	  locomotion.	  Black	  bars	  indicate	  2s	  of	  whole-­‐plate	  illumination	  with	  blue	  light	  at	  70μW/mm2.	  (B)	  Proportion	  of	  animals	  responding	  to	  each	  stimulus	  of	  habituation	  training,	  with	  reintroduction	  of	  dop-­‐4	  (dop-­‐4p::dop-­‐4)	  rescuing	  the	  rapid	  response	  decrement,	  but	  not	  if	  expression	  is	  restricted	  to	  ASH	  (gpa-­‐13p::dop-­‐4).	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 20000.51Proportion reversing(relative to control)20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 20000.51Proportion reversing(relative to control)cat−2 vs101 ok398 dop−2 dop−3 dop−4 dop−5 dop−6 dop−100.51Proportion reversing (relative to control)cat−2 vs101 ok398 dop−2 dop−3 dop−4 dop−5 dop−6 dop−100.51Proportion reversing (relative to control)A"B"+"+"dop(4"dop(4"    0">0.8"mm/s"<*0.8"mm/s"<(0.8" >0.8"mm/s"0"0 50 100 150 200 250 30000.20.40.60.81Time (s)Proportion reversing  +dop−4dop−4;Ex[dop−4p::dop−4]dop−4;[gpa−13p::dop−4]ini4al"final"&"#"#"&"*" *"	   60	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  Data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background,	  except	  for	  dop-­‐2	  and	  dop-­‐5	  mutants	  in	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   61	  	  Figure	  2.8.	  Locomotory	  behavior	  of	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant.	  (A)	  Proportion	  of	  the	  population’s	  time	  spent	  moving	  forward	  during	  the	  3s	  interval	  immediately	  preceding	  each	  stimulus	  delivered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  (B)	  Speed	  of	  worms	  moving	  forward	  during	  the	  same	  3s	  intervals.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  final	  datapoint.	  n=4	  plates	  for	  each	  strain	  with	  61±2.4	  and	  19.8±2.6	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  +	  and	  dop-­‐4,	  respectively.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  5 10 15 20 25 3000.20.40.60.81Proportion time forwardInterstimulus interval5 10 15 20 25 3000.050.10.150.20.250.3Interstimulus intervalSpeed (mm/s)  +dop−4A" B"#"&"15 20 25 300.050.10.150.20.250.3Intersti ulus intervalSpeed (mm/s)  +dop−4	   62	  	  Figure	  2.9.	  Habituation	  training	  promotes	  dispersal.	  (A)	  Representative	  trajectories	  of	  50	  animals	  during	  the	  initial	  (left)	  and	  final	  (right)	  20s	  of	  habituation	  training.	  Tracks	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  colors	  and	  start	  points	  were	  set	  to	  center.	  (B)	  Displacement	  (shortest	  distance	  between	  the	  start	  and	  endpoint)	  over	  20s	  intervals	  during	  habituation	  training.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  final	  datapoint.	  n=4	  plates	  for	  each	  strain	  with	  61±2.4	  and	  19.8±2.6	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  +	  and	  dop-­‐4,	  respectively.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  0 100 200 30001234Time (s)Displacement (mm)  +dop−4dop$4&ini)al&A B#&&&final&+&1&mm&	   63	  3.	  Role	  of	  PDF	  signaling	  in	  habituation	  3.1	  Introduction	  In	  chapter	  2,	  I	  described	  the	  validation	  of	  a	  high-­‐throughput	  habituation	  assay	  for	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses	  and	  how	  it	  was	  used	  to	  explore	  the	  attenuation	  of	  habituation	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  via	  dopamine	  signaling	  through	  DOP-­‐4.	  In	  this	  chapter,	  I	  identify	  a	  neuropeptide	  receptor	  and	  its	  ligands	  that	  promote	  dispersal	  and	  habituation	  of	  response	  magnitude.	  	  Neuropeptides	  play	  key	  roles	  in	  a	  wide	  variety	  of	  processes	  and	  their	  importance	  in	  learning	  and	  memory	  is	  an	  emerging	  trend.	  It	  is	  predicted	  that	  the	  C.	  elegans	  genome	  has	  119	  neuropeptide	  precursor	  genes	  that	  can	  be	  processed	  into	  over	  250	  peptides	  (Li	  &	  Kim,	  2008).	  In	  addition	  to	  the	  insulin/IGF	  receptor	  tyrosine	  kinases	  encoded	  by	  daf-­‐2,	  there	  are	  over	  100	  predicted	  neuropeptide	  G	  protein-­‐coupled	  receptors,	  the	  majority	  of	  which	  remain	  orphaned	  and	  functionally	  uncharacterized	  (Frooninckx	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  Insulin	  signaling	  has	  an	  especially	  prominent	  role	  in	  C.	  elegans	  behavioral	  plasticity	  (Chen	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Lin	  et	  al.,	  2010;	  Vellai	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Tomioka	  et	  al.,	  2006;	  Kodama	  et	  al.,	  2006),	  likely	  because	  of	  the	  use	  of	  feeding	  state	  as	  an	  unconditioned	  stimulus	  in	  associative	  learning	  paradigms.	  However,	  non-­‐associative	  habituation	  assays	  have	  also	  been	  shown	  to	  depend	  on	  neuropeptide	  signaling.	  For	  example,	  prolonged	  exposure	  to	  a	  volatile	  attractant	  detected	  by	  AWC	  results	  in	  a	  decreased	  attraction	  to	  that	  odorant	  that	  can	  be	  reversed	  with	  a	  dishabituating	  stimulus	  (Colbert	  &	  Bargmann,	  1995;	  Pereira	  &	  van	  der	  Kooy,	  2012).	  Chalasani	  et	  al.	  (2010)	  found	  that	  the	  decreased	  attractiveness	  was	  dependent	  on	  NLP-­‐1,	  a	  buccalin-­‐related	  peptide	  expressed	  in	  AWC.	  Based	  on	  the	  	   64	  expression	  pattern	  of	  orphan	  neuropeptide	  GPCRs	  they	  managed	  to	  link	  NLP-­‐1	  with	  the	  NPR-­‐11	  GPCR	  using	  mutant	  analysis	  followed	  by	  biochemical	  confirmation.	  Expressing	  nlp-­‐1	  in	  AWC	  sensory	  neurons	  and	  npr-­‐11	  in	  AIA	  interneurons	  rescued	  the	  habituation	  deficits	  associated	  with	  each	  mutant.	  They	  propose	  a	  neuropeptide	  feedback	  loop,	  whereby	  NLP-­‐1	  released	  from	  the	  AWC	  sensory	  neurons	  acts	  on	  AIA	  to	  induce	  release	  of	  insulin-­‐like	  peptide	  INS-­‐1,	  which	  signals	  back	  to	  AWC	  to	  modulate	  odor	  sensitivity.	  In	  mechanosensory	  habituation,	  worms	  tapped	  80	  times	  at	  a	  60s	  interval	  can	  remember	  training	  for	  at	  least	  12h	  (Li	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  It	  is	  hypothesized	  that	  repeated	  taps	  recruit	  dense-­‐core	  vesicles	  to	  the	  synaptic	  terminals	  of	  the	  body	  touch	  cells,	  leading	  to	  increased	  release	  of	  a	  neuropeptide,	  FLP-­‐20	  and	  smaller	  reversal	  responses.	  Short-­‐term	  tap	  habituation	  may	  also	  be	  dependent	  on	  neuropeptide	  signaling,	  based	  on	  the	  slowed	  habituation	  phenotype	  of	  a	  neuropeptide	  synthesis	  mutant	  (egl-­‐21)	  that	  was	  one	  of	  the	  522	  strains	  tested	  as	  part	  of	  Dr.	  Andrew	  Giles’	  PhD	  thesis.	  	  	   In	  addition	  to	  their	  role	  in	  learning,	  neuropeptides	  have	  also	  proven	  to	  be	  important	  modulators	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responding.	  As	  described	  in	  chapter	  1,	  for	  octanol	  avoidance,	  NLP-­‐3	  peptides	  promote	  responding	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  (Harris	  et	  al.,	  2010),	  while	  NLP-­‐6,	  NLP-­‐7,	  NLP-­‐8,	  and	  NLP-­‐9	  peptides	  inhibit	  responses	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  octopamine	  (Mills	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  The	  importance	  of	  neuropeptides	  in	  the	  modulation	  of	  ASH	  avoidance	  responses	  was	  first	  appreciated	  by	  Kass	  et	  al.	  (2001),	  who	  in	  a	  suppressor	  screen	  for	  glr-­‐1	  nose	  touch	  insensitivity	  identified	  an	  allele	  of	  egl-­‐3,	  which	  encodes	  a	  proprotein	  convertase	  required	  for	  the	  synthesis	  of	  neuropeptides	  (Gomez-­‐Saladin	  et	  al.,	  1994;	  Husson	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  	   65	  Suppression	  of	  glr-­‐1	  phenotypes	  could	  be	  rescued	  by	  restoring	  egl-­‐3	  expression	  in	  a	  subset	  of	  interneurons	  downstream	  of	  ASH,	  including	  the	  AVA,	  AVD,	  and	  AVE	  reversal	  command	  interneurons	  (Kass	  et	  al.,	  2001).	  Inspired	  by	  this	  result,	  Mellem	  et	  al.	  (2002)	  demonstrated	  that	  loss	  of	  egl-­‐3	  also	  suppressed	  the	  increased	  response	  latency	  for	  glr-­‐1-­‐independent	  responding	  to	  osmotic	  shock.	  They	  also	  showed	  that	  the	  egl-­‐3	  suppression	  of	  glr-­‐1	  phenotypes	  is	  absolutely	  dependent	  on	  NMDA	  glutamate	  receptor	  subunit,	  NMR-­‐1	  and	  that	  glutamate	  currents	  in	  AVA	  and	  AVD	  are	  unaffected	  by	  the	  loss	  of	  egl-­‐3.	  Based	  on	  these	  findings	  they	  proposed	  that	  loss	  of	  neuropeptides	  caused	  an	  increased	  concentration	  of	  synaptic	  glutamate,	  which	  activated	  extrasynaptic	  NMDA	  receptors.	  However,	  the	  key	  neuropeptides	  were	  never	  identified.	  	  	   Using	  the	  assay	  described	  in	  chapter	  2,	  I	  too	  identified	  glr-­‐1	  phenotypes	  that	  could	  be	  suppressed	  by	  an	  egl-­‐3	  allele.	  To	  identify	  the	  relevant	  neuropeptide	  signal(s),	  I	  conducted	  a	  targeted	  RNAi	  suppressor	  screen	  against	  known	  and	  potential	  neuropeptide	  GPCRs.	  Based	  on	  this	  screen	  I	  implicated	  pigment	  dispersing	  factor	  (PDF)	  neuropeptide	  signaling	  in	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses.	  	  3.2	  Methods	  3.2.1	  Strains	  The	  ChR2	  transgenes	  were	  crossed	  into	  FX04393,	  KP1580,	  LSC27,	  MT1241,	  MT6308,	  TU3595,	  VC671,	  VC2609,	  VM3109,	  and	  VM3804	  to	  generate	  the	  following	  strains:	  	  	   66	  VG186	  lin-­‐15b(n744);	  sid-­‐1(pk3321)	  yvIs1;	  uIS72[unc-­‐119p::sid-­‐1	  +	  mec-­‐18p::GFP	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG222	  egl-­‐21(n611);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG223	  glr-­‐1(ky176);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG227	  nmr-­‐1(ak4);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG232	  eat-­‐4(ky5);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG234	  egl-­‐3(ok979);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG244	  egl-­‐3(ok979);	  glr-­‐1(ky176);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG250	  glr-­‐1(ky176);	  GLR-­‐1::GFP;	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG264	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  lite-­‐1(ce314)	  ljIs114	  VG380	  pdf-­‐2(tm4393);	  yvIs1	  VG382	  pdf-­‐1(tm1996);	  yvIs1	  VG383	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  yvIs1	  VG393	  pdf-­‐2(tm4393);	  pdf-­‐1(tm1996);	  yvIs1	  	  For	  cAMP	  overexpression	  in	  pdfr-­‐1	  positive	  neurons,	  pSF180	  [pdfr-­‐1p::ACY-­‐1(P260S)-­‐sl2-­‐mCherry	  (50ng/ul)]	  was	  injected	  into	  the	  gonad	  of	  the	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant	  VG393.	  For	  pdfr-­‐1	  rescue	  experiments,	  pSF134	  [pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  (35ng/ul)]	  was	  co-­‐injected	  with	  one	  of	  several	  nCre	  expressing	  plasmids	  (1ng/ul)	  for	  cell-­‐specific	  Cre-­‐lox	  recombination	  in	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  VG383.	  pSF180,	  pSF134,	  and	  two	  of	  the	  seven	  nCre	  expressing	  plasmids	  (pSF11	  [tag-­‐168p::nCre]	  &	  pSF176	  [eat-­‐4p::nCre])	  were	  gifts	  from	  Cori	  Bargmann	  (The	  Rockefeller	  University)	  and	  are	  described	  in	  more	  detail	  in	  Flavell	  et	  al.	  (2013).	  Also	  co-­‐injected	  was	  pCFJ90	  	   67	  (myo-­‐2p::mCherry	  (2ng/ul);	  Frøkjær-­‐Jensen	  et	  al.,	  2008)	  for	  use	  as	  a	  visible	  marker	  and	  pBluescript	  to	  make	  the	  total	  DNA	  concentration	  100ng/ul	  (Mello	  et	  al.,	  1991).	  The	  following	  strains	  were	  generated	  by	  microinjection:	  VG411,	  VG412	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  	  yvIs1;	  yvEx[pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  +	  glr-­‐1p::nCre	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG434,	  VG438,	  VG441	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx[pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  +	  eat-­‐4p::nCre	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG442,	  VG443,	  VG446	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx[pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  +	  npr-­‐1p::nCre	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG447,	  VG448,	  VG449	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  yvIs1;yvEx[pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  +	  tag-­‐168p::nCre	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG481,	  VG82,	  VG483,	  VG484	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx[pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  +	  gcy-­‐36p::nCre	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG485,	  VG486,	  VG487,	  VG488	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx[pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  +	  myo-­‐3p::nCre	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG492	  pdf-­‐1(tm1996);	  pdf-­‐2(tm4393);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx152[pdfr-­‐1p::ACY-­‐1(P260S)-­‐sl2-­‐mCherry	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  VG507,	  VG508,	  VG509,	  VG510	  pdfr-­‐1(ok3425);	  yvIs1;	  yvEx[pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1.d-­‐sl2-­‐GFP]	  +	  ocr-­‐4p::nCre	  +	  myo-­‐2p::mCherry]	  	  3.2.2	  Plasmid	  construction	  	   To	  generate	  the	  nCre	  expression	  vectors,	  promoters	  were	  subcloned	  into	  plasmid	  pSF11	  [tag-­‐168p::nCre],	  cut	  with	  FseI	  and	  AscI.	  	  	   68	  A	  2kb	  myo-­‐3	  promoter	  was	  amplified	  from	  plasmid	  KP#1866	  (a	  gift	  from	  Josh	  Kaplan,	  Harvard	  University)	  using	  oligos	  5’-­‐CTTAACGGCCGGCCTGTGTGTGATTGCTTTTTCACAATC-­‐3’	  and	  5’-­‐ACACTTGGCGCGCCTCTAGATGGATCTAGTGGTCGTGGG-­‐3’.	  A	  2.7kb	  glr-­‐1	  promoter	  was	  amplified	  from	  plasmid	  pSH128	  (a	  gift	  from	  Alexander	  Gottschalk,	  Goethe	  University	  Frankfurt)	  using	  oligos	  5’-­‐CTTAACGGCCGGCCTTTCAAGTGTCCTGTTGTC-­‐3’	  and	  	  5’-­‐ACACTTGGCGCGCCTGTGAATGTGTCAGATTGG-­‐3’.	  A	  3.4kb	  npr-­‐1	  promoter	  was	  amplified	  from	  N2	  genomic	  DNA	  using	  oligos	  	  5’-­‐CTTAACGGCCGGCCAAACGCAGTTGGCACAAAG-­‐3’	  and	  	  5’-­‐ACACTTGGCGCGCCTTGGCCTATGTCTGAAATTT-­‐3’.	  A	  1.1kb	  gcy-­‐36	  promoter	  was	  amplified	  from	  N2	  genomic	  DNA	  using	  oligos	  	  5’-­‐CTTAACGGCCGGCCATGATGTTGGTAGATGGGGTTTGG-­‐3’	  and	  	  5’-­‐ACACTTGGCGCGCCTGTTGGGTAGCCCTTGTTTGAATTT-­‐3’.	  A	  4.8kb	  ocr-­‐4	  promoter	  was	  amplified	  from	  N2	  genomic	  DNA	  using	  oligos	  	  5’-­‐CTTAACGGCCGGCCTCAAAGACCTTGGCTCCAC-­‐3’	  and	  	  5’-­‐ACACTTGGCGCGCCTAATACAAGTTAGATTCAGAGA-­‐3’.	  	  3.2.3	  RNAi	  	   Systemic	  RNAi	  was	  performed	  essentially	  as	  described	  previously	  (Kamath	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Kamath	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  Briefly,	  RNAi	  plates	  were	  composed	  of	  NGM	  agar,	  1	  mM	  IPTG,	  and	  5	  µM	  ATR	  seeded	  with	  overnight	  liquid	  culture	  of	  E.	  coli	  strain	  HT115	  carrying	  either	  control	  plasmid	  L4440	  or	  an	  RNAi	  vector	  targeting	  egl-­‐3	  or	  one	  of	  57	  	   69	  GPCRs.	  One	  or	  two	  days	  after	  seeding,	  VG186	  adults	  were	  bleached	  onto	  the	  RNAi	  plates	  and	  the	  first	  generation	  adults	  were	  tested	  behaviorally.	  	  	  3.3	  Results	  3.3.1	  glr-­‐1	  phenotypes	  	  Of	  the	  known	  stimuli	  detected	  by	  ASH,	  only	  the	  nose	  touch	  response	  appears	  to	  be	  absolutely	  dependent	  on	  the	  AMPA	  glutamate	  receptor	  subunit	  and	  GluR1	  homolog,	  GLR-­‐1	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1995;	  Maricq	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  Although	  they	  do	  not	  respond	  to	  nose	  touch,	  animals	  lacking	  glr-­‐1	  are	  able	  to	  initiate	  backward	  locomotion	  to	  osmotic	  shock,	  albeit	  with	  an	  increased	  latency	  (Mellem	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  It	  is	  hypothesized	  that	  the	  ASH	  output	  evoked	  by	  a	  nose	  touch	  is	  insufficient	  to	  elicit	  a	  response	  in	  animals	  lacking	  GLR-­‐1	  function,	  but	  that	  other	  glutamate	  receptors	  are	  recruited	  for	  more	  intense	  stimuli,	  like	  osmotic	  shock.	  Using	  the	  optogenetic-­‐based	  habituation	  assay	  developed	  in	  chapter	  2,	  I	  tested	  glutamate	  transmission	  mutants	  lacking	  the	  AMPA	  receptor	  subunit,	  GLR-­‐1,	  the	  NMDA	  receptor	  subunit,	  NMR-­‐1,	  or	  the	  glutamate	  vesicular	  transporter,	  EAT-­‐4	  (Fig.	  3.1).	  In	  terms	  of	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  initial	  stimulus,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  strains,	  F(3,20)	  =	  28.1,	  p	  <	  0.00001.	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  eat-­‐4	  mutant	  had	  a	  decreased	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  (p	  <	  0.05),	  while	  glr-­‐1	  and	  nmr-­‐1	  mutants	  were	  indistinguishable	  from	  control	  (p	  >	  0.05).	  Although	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  was	  unaffected	  by	  the	  loss	  of	  nmr-­‐1	  or	  glr-­‐1,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  these	  strains	  for	  reaction	  time,	  F(2,239)	  =	  8.2,	  p	  =	  0.0004.	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  	   70	  was	  slower	  to	  respond	  than	  either	  the	  control	  or	  the	  nmr-­‐1	  mutant	  (p	  <	  0.05;	  Fig.	  3.1B).	  In	  terms	  of	  the	  final	  stimulus,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  again	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  strains	  for	  the	  probability	  of	  responding,	  F(3,20)	  =	  69.2,	  p	  <	  0.00001.	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  assay,	  the	  control	  animals	  were	  more	  likely	  to	  respond	  than	  either	  the	  eat-­‐4	  or	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  (p	  <	  0.05;	  Fig.	  3.1C).	  The	  phenotypes	  associated	  with	  the	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  could	  be	  at	  least	  partially	  rescued	  by	  expressing	  a	  GLR-­‐1::GFP	  transgene	  from	  the	  glr-­‐1	  promoter	  –	  compared	  to	  the	  mutant,	  the	  rescue	  strain	  was	  faster	  to	  respond	  to	  the	  initial	  stimulus	  (t(179)	  =	  5.8,	  p	  <	  0.00001;	  Fig	  3.2A)	  and	  more	  likely	  to	  respond	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus	  (t(8)	  =	  4.2,	  p	  =	  0.003;	  3.2A;	  Fig	  3.2B).	  In	  summary,	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  animals	  expressing	  ChR2	  in	  ASH	  initially	  reversed	  to	  a	  2s	  blue	  light	  pulse	  with	  a	  slowed	  reaction	  time,	  however	  this	  glr-­‐1-­‐independent	  response	  did	  not	  persist	  with	  repeated	  stimulation.	  Loss	  of	  the	  glutamate	  vesicular	  transporter,	  EAT-­‐4,	  dramatically	  impaired	  the	  probability	  of	  a	  reversal	  response,	  while	  loss	  of	  NMDA	  receptor	  subunit	  NMR-­‐1	  had	  no	  discernable	  effect.	  In	  naïve	  animals	  other	  glutamate	  receptor	  subunits	  can	  compensate	  for	  the	  loss	  of	  GLR-­‐1,	  but	  with	  repeated	  stimulation,	  reversals	  require	  this	  major	  excitatory	  receptor	  subunit.	  Based	  on	  these	  results,	  I	  hypothesized	  that	  ASH	  habituation	  was	  associated	  with	  decreased	  glutamatergic	  signaling.	  	  	  3.3.2	  Loss	  of	  egl-­‐3	  suppresses	  glr-­‐1	  	  	   Blocking	  neuropeptide	  synthesis	  with	  a	  mutant	  allele	  of	  egl-­‐3	  had	  previously	  been	  shown	  to	  suppress	  the	  glr-­‐1	  phenotype	  associated	  with	  nose	  touch	  and	  	   71	  osmotic	  shock	  (Kass	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Mellem	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  Consistent	  with	  these	  results,	  I	  found	  that	  the	  glr-­‐1;	  egl-­‐3	  double	  mutant	  responded	  more	  quickly	  to	  initial	  ASH	  photoactivation	  than	  the	  glr-­‐1	  single	  mutant	  (t(128)	  =	  3.8,	  p	  =	  0.0002;	  3.2A),	  and	  was	  more	  likely	  to	  respond	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus	  (t(8)	  =	  4.5,	  p	  =	  0.002;	  Fig.	  3.2C).	  Like	  control	  animals,	  the	  egl-­‐3	  single	  mutant	  maintained	  a	  high	  probability	  of	  responding	  across	  the	  trial,	  however	  loss	  of	  egl-­‐3	  did	  impair	  habituation	  of	  response	  latency,	  as	  the	  mutant	  had	  a	  faster	  reaction	  time	  than	  control	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus	  (t(211)	  =	  5.9,	  p	  <	  0.00001;	  Fig	  3.2D).	  To	  confirm	  that	  this	  response	  latency	  habituation	  phenotype	  could	  be	  attributed	  to	  a	  loss	  of	  neuropeptide	  signaling,	  the	  ChR2	  transgene	  was	  crossed	  into	  a	  strain	  with	  a	  mutation	  in	  the	  gene	  encoding	  EGL-­‐21,	  a	  major	  carboxypeptidase	  required	  for	  the	  synthesis	  of	  most	  neuropeptides	  (Jacob	  &	  Kaplan,	  2003;	  Husson	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  In	  terms	  of	  the	  probability	  of	  responding,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  no	  significant	  difference	  between	  strains	  for	  the	  initial	  stimulus,	  F(2,15)	  =	  0.8,	  p	  =	  0.48,	  and	  although	  a	  difference	  was	  detected	  for	  the	  final	  stimulus,	  F(2,15)	  =	  4.1,	  p	  =	  0.04,	  a	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparison	  indicated	  that	  neither	  the	  egl-­‐3	  nor	  egl-­‐21	  mutant	  differed	  from	  control	  (p	  >	  0.05;	  Fig.	  3.3A).	  However,	  the	  neuropeptide	  synthesis	  mutants	  did	  have	  a	  deficit	  in	  response	  latency	  habituation,	  as	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  found	  the	  strains	  to	  be	  indistinguishable	  for	  the	  initial	  stimulus,	  F(2,244)	  =	  0.6,	  p	  =	  0.54,	  but	  not	  for	  the	  final	  stimulus	  F(2,298)	  =	  11.6,	  p	  =	  0.00001.	  A	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparison	  indicated	  faster	  reaction	  times	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  assay	  for	  both	  mutant	  strains	  (p	  <	  0.05;	  Fig.	  3.3B).	  In	  summary,	  loss	  of	  egl-­‐3	  or	  egl-­‐21	  did	  not	  affect	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  across	  the	  assay,	  but	  the	  reaction	  time	  of	  the	  mutants	  did	  not	  slow	  to	  the	  same	  degree	  as	  control	  with	  repeated	  	   72	  stimulation,	  suggesting	  that	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversals	  is	  mediated	  by	  neuropeptide	  signaling.	  	  3.3.3	  GPCR	  RNAi	  suppressor	  screen	  	   To	  identify	  the	  neuropeptide	  signal	  responsible	  for	  the	  egl-­‐3	  and	  egl-­‐21	  habituation	  phenotypes,	  I	  used	  systemic	  RNAi	  to	  knockdown	  known	  and	  potential	  neuropeptide	  receptors	  in	  a	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  background.	  The nervous system of C. elegans is generally refractory to RNAi by feeding, but can be sensitized by neuron-specific expression of the dsRNA channel, SID-1, in a lin-15b mutant background (Calixto et al., 2010). While the previous experiments of this chapter used a ChR2 transgene dependent on FLP	  Recombinase	  to	  specifically	  target	  expression	  to	  ASH	  (Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  a	  more	  responsive	  strain	  with	  the	  sra-6p::ChR2 transgene was used for the RNAi screen. The	  sra-­‐6	  promoter	  expresses	  strongly	  in	  ASH	  and	  more	  faintly	  in	  a	  pair	  of	  sensory	  neurons	  (ASI)	  and	  interneurons	  (PVQ;	  Troemel	  et	  al.,	  1995).	  The	  pattern	  of	  behavioral	  plasticity	  in	  this	  strain	  is	  the	  same	  as	  the	  strain	  with	  ChR2	  expression	  restricted	  to	  ASH	  (as	  discussed	  in	  chapter	  2).	  As	  had	  been	  seen	  with	  the	  mutant	  allele,	  RNAi	  knockdown	  of	  egl-­‐3	  suppressed	  the	  slowed	  reaction	  time	  of	  the	  naïve	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  (t(139)	  =	  5.7,	  p	  <	  0.00001;	  Fig	  3.4A),	  as	  well	  as	  its	  decreased	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  (t(4)	  =	  6.9,	  p	  =	  0.002;	  Fig.	  3.4B).	  I	  evaluated	  the	  loss	  of	  function	  phenotype	  for	  57	  GPCRs.	  In	  figures	  3.4C	  and	  3.4D	  the	  RNAi	  clones	  are	  ranked	  by	  the	  degree	  to	  which	  they	  decreased	  response	  latency	  to	  the	  initial	  stimulus	  and	  increased	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus,	  respectively.	  Knocking	  down	  egl-­‐3	  had	  the	  biggest	  effect	  for	  both	  	   73	  measures	  and,	  after	  correcting	  for	  multiple	  comparisons	  (values	  corresponding	  to	  |z-­‐scores|	  >	  4.46	  were	  considered	  distinct	  from	  the	  control	  distribution;	  p	  <	  (0.05/57=)	  0.0008,	  two-­‐tailed),	  I	  identified	  one	  other	  clone	  for	  each	  measure	  that	  was	  statistically	  distinguishable	  from	  the	  control.	  Knockdown	  of	  npr-­‐26	  reduced	  naïve	  response	  latency	  	  (Fig	  3.4A,C),	  while	  knockdown	  of	  pdfr-­‐1	  resulted	  in	  an	  increased	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  at	  the	  end	  of	  the	  assay	  (Fig	  3.4B,D).	  Table	  3.1	  lists	  the	  z-­‐scores	  of	  all	  RNAi	  clones	  for	  three	  different	  metrics	  for	  the	  first	  and	  last	  stimulus	  of	  the	  assay,	  i.e.	  response	  probability,	  latency,	  and	  duration.	  Because	  my	  focus	  was	  in	  understanding	  the	  plasticity	  of	  the	  behavior,	  I	  followed	  up	  on	  the	  role	  of	  pdfr-­‐1	  in	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses.	  	  3.3.4	  PDF	  signaling	  mediates	  habituation	  	   The	  PDFR-­‐1	  receptor	  has	  three	  known	  ligands	  encoded	  by	  two	  precursor	  genes,	  pdf-­‐1	  (encodes	  PDF-­‐1a	  and	  PDF-­‐1b)	  and	  pdf-­‐2	  (encodes	  PDF-­‐2;	  Janssen	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Using	  available	  loss	  of	  function	  alleles,	  I	  tested	  pdfr-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐1,	  and	  pdf-­‐2	  single	  mutants,	  as	  well	  as	  a	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant.	  Evaluating	  the	  magnitude	  of	  the	  response	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  the	  strains,	  both	  in	  terms	  of	  reversal	  duration	  (F(4,806)	  =	  10.5,	  p	  <	  0.00001)	  and	  latency	  (F(4,806)	  =	  22.5,	  p	  <	  0.00001).	  For	  both	  response	  metrics,	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  reduced	  habituation	  relative	  to	  control	  for	  both	  the	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant	  and	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  single	  mutant	  (p	  <	  0.05),	  but	  not	  for	  the	  pdf-­‐1	  or	  pdf-­‐2	  single	  mutant	  (p	  >	  0.05;	  Fig.	  3.5A,B).	  Importantly,	  the	  habituation	  deficit	  cannot	  be	  attributed	  to	  differences	  in	  naïve	  responding,	  as	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  	   74	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  initial	  response	  of	  both	  the	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant	  and	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  single	  mutant	  is	  indistinguishable	  from	  control	  for	  both	  response	  metrics	  	  (p	  >	  0.05).	  These	  data	  suggest	  that	  the	  PDF	  ligands	  function	  redundantly	  via	  PDFR-­‐1	  to	  promote	  habituation	  of	  response	  magnitude.	  	  As	  is	  typical	  for	  secretin-­‐like	  receptors,	  PDFR-­‐1	  is	  thought	  to	  signal	  through	  Gαs	  to	  stimulate	  cAMP	  synthesis	  from	  ATP.	  Indeed,	  HEK239	  cells	  expressing	  PDFR-­‐1	  show	  a	  dose-­‐dependent	  increase	  in	  cAMP	  levels	  with	  PDFR-­‐1	  activation	  (Janssen	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Furthermore,	  Flavell	  et	  al.	  (2013)	  were	  able	  to	  ameliorate	  a	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  locomotion	  phenotype	  by	  stimulating	  cAMP	  synthesis	  in	  pdfr-­‐1	  expressing	  neurons.	  In	  an	  attempt	  to	  associate	  the	  pdf-­‐1;	  pdf-­‐2	  mutant	  habituation	  phenotype	  with	  loss	  of	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling,	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  promoter	  was	  used	  to	  drive	  expression	  of	  a	  constitutively	  active	  adenylyl	  cyclase	  (ACY-­‐1(P260S);	  Saifee	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Flavell	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  which	  catalyzes	  the	  conversion	  of	  ATP	  to	  cAMP	  and	  pyrophosphate.	  Comparing	  the	  initial	  response	  of	  control,	  the	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant,	  and	  the	  double	  mutant	  expressing	  ACY-­‐1(P260S),	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  no	  significant	  difference	  among	  the	  strains,	  both	  in	  terms	  of	  reversal	  duration	  (F(2,198)	  =	  2.6,	  p	  =	  0.07)	  and	  latency	  (F(2,198)	  =	  0.9,	  p	  =	  0.42).	  Therefore,	  chronic	  elevation	  of	  cAMP	  in	  pdfr-­‐1	  expressing	  cells	  did	  not	  simply	  induce	  a	  habituated	  state.	  Comparing	  the	  final	  responses,	  a	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  the	  strains	  for	  reversal	  latency	  (F(2,208)	  =	  12.1,	  p	  =	  0.00001;	  Fig	  3.5C),	  but	  not	  duration	  (F(2,208)	  =	  2.7,	  p	  =	  0.07;	  Fig	  3.5D).	  Considering	  only	  response	  latency,	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  indicated	  that	  the	  strain	  with	  constitutively	  active	  ACY-­‐1	  was	  indistinguishable	  from	  control	  (p	  >	  0.05),	  with	  both	  initiating	  responses	  more	  	   75	  slowly	  than	  the	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant	  (p	  <	  0.05).	  Stimulating	  cAMP	  synthesis	  in	  the	  appropriate	  cells	  could	  therefore	  compensate	  for	  loss	  of	  the	  PDF	  ligands,	  suggesting	  PDF	  signaling	  is	  permissive	  (rather	  than	  instructive)	  for	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses.	  The	  mutant	  analysis	  of	  PDF	  signaling	  was	  done	  using	  the	  control	  strain	  with	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgene,	  which	  causes	  off-­‐target	  expression	  of	  ChR2	  in	  ASI	  and	  PVQ.	  However,	  ASI	  and	  PVQ	  express	  PDF-­‐1	  and	  PDFR-­‐1,	  respectively	  (Janssen	  et	  al.,	  2009;	  Barrios	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  The	  potential	  implications	  of	  off-­‐target	  ChR2	  expression	  was	  evaluated	  with	  the	  ASH-­‐specific	  ChR2	  transgene	  (ASHp::ChR2;	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  I	  found	  that	  the	  habituation	  phenotypes	  associated	  with	  pdfr-­‐1	  were	  still	  apparent	  when	  ChR2	  expression	  was	  restricted	  to	  ASH	  	  (Fig.	  3.6)	  –	  for	  the	  final	  stimulus,	  the	  mutant	  responded	  more	  quickly	  than	  control	  (t(165)	  =	  2.4,	  p	  =	  0.02)	  with	  a	  longer-­‐lasting	  reversal	  (t(165)	  =	  2.8,	  p	  =	  0.005).	  An	  essential	  role	  for	  ASI	  and	  PVQ	  involvement	  was	  thereby	  ruled	  out.	  	  3.3.5	  PDFR-­‐1	  functions	  in	  neurons	  and	  muscle	  PDFR-­‐1	  is	  expressed	  in	  all	  body	  wall	  muscle	  cells,	  as	  well	  as	  in	  neurons	  in	  the	  head	  and	  tail	  (Janssen	  et	  al.,	  2008;	  Barrios	  et	  al.,	  2012).	  In	  an	  attempt	  to	  identify	  where	  PDFR-­‐1	  functions	  to	  promote	  habituation,	  I	  used	  the	  intersectional	  promoter	  rescuing	  strategy	  (and	  several	  reagents)	  described	  by	  Flavell	  et	  al.	  (2013),	  in	  which	  different	  Cre	  recombinase	  expression	  vectors	  are	  co-­‐injected	  with	  inverted	  and	  floxed	  pdfr-­‐1	  cDNA	  driven	  by	  a	  pdfr-­‐1	  promoter.	  Full	  rescue	  was	  defined	  as	  scores	  distinct	  from	  the	  mutant	  and	  statistically	  indistinguishable	  from	  the	  control	  and	  	   76	  partial	  rescue	  was	  defined	  as	  scores	  distinct	  from	  both	  mutant	  and	  control.	  Pan-­‐neuronal	  expression	  of	  Cre	  (tag-­‐168	  promoter)	  rescued	  the	  response	  latency	  phenotype	  in	  3	  out	  of	  3	  lines	  tested	  (Fig	  3.7A).	  In	  contrast,	  restoring	  pdfr-­‐1	  expression	  in	  the	  body	  wall	  muscle	  (myo-­‐3	  promoter)	  only	  partially	  rescued	  the	  response	  latency	  phenotype	  in	  1	  out	  of	  4	  lines	  (Fig	  3.7C).	  Despite	  having	  normal	  habituation	  of	  response	  latency,	  reversal	  duration	  was	  not	  rescued	  in	  any	  of	  the	  3	  strains	  with	  pan-­‐neuronal	  Cre	  expression	  (Fig.	  3.7B).	  However,	  1	  of	  the	  4	  muscle	  expression	  lines	  displayed	  a	  partial	  rescue	  (Fig.	  3.7D).	  Reversal	  duration	  habituation	  may	  be	  more	  sensitive	  to	  cAMP	  concentration	  in	  neurons	  or	  require	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling	  in	  both	  neurons	  and	  muscle.	  These	  data	  demonstrate	  that	  the	  latency	  and	  duration	  response	  metrics	  are	  dissociable,	  even	  if	  mediated	  by	  the	  same	  molecular	  component,	  i.e.	  pdfr-­‐1.	  To	  identify	  key	  neurons	  for	  response	  latency	  habituation,	  5	  different	  Cre	  expression	  plasmids	  (npr-­‐1p::Cre,	  glr-­‐1p::Cre,	  eat-­‐4p::Cre,	  gcy-­‐36p::Cre,	  and	  ocr-­‐4p::Cre)	  with	  partially	  overlapping	  expression	  patterns	  were	  used	  to	  restore	  PDFR-­‐1	  expression	  to	  subsets	  of	  cells,	  as	  summarized	  in	  Table	  3.2.	  Lines	  expressing	  Cre	  by	  the	  npr-­‐1	  and	  eat-­‐4	  promoters	  partially	  rescued	  the	  response	  latency	  habituation	  phenotype	  (Fig	  3.7C).	  These	  promoters	  intersect	  with	  each	  other	  and	  pdfr-­‐1	  in	  PQR,	  PHA,	  and	  PHB.	  PQR	  and	  the	  other	  two	  npr-­‐1	  and	  pdfr-­‐1	  intersecting	  cell	  classes	  (URX	  and	  OLQ)	  were	  targeted	  for	  Cre-­‐expression	  with	  gcy-­‐36	  and	  ocr-­‐4	  promoters,	  as	  were	  two	  of	  the	  other	  eat-­‐4	  and	  pdfr-­‐1	  intersecting	  cell	  classes	  (PVQ	  and	  URY)	  with	  the	  glr-­‐1	  promoter.	  However,	  none	  had	  any	  effect	  on	  response	  latency	  habituation	  (Fig	  3.7C),	  making	  PHA	  and/or	  PHB	  the	  most	  likely	  cells	  for	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling	  to	  promote	  habituation.	  Their	  involvement	  will	  need	  to	  be	  	   77	  confirmed	  using	  a	  rescue	  strain	  with	  more	  restricted	  PDFR-­‐1	  expression.	  PHA	  and	  PHB	  are	  sensory	  neurons	  of	  the	  phasmid	  sensilla	  in	  the	  worm’s	  tail.	  Previous	  work	  demonstrated	  that	  at	  least	  one	  chemical	  repellent	  (SDS)	  detected	  by	  ASH	  also	  activates	  PHA	  and/or	  PHB	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  PHA/PHB	  neurons	  inhibit	  reversals	  elicited	  by	  ASH,	  thereby	  allowing	  integration	  of	  sensory	  input	  from	  the	  head	  and	  tail	  to	  prevent	  animals	  from	  backing	  into	  aversive	  compounds.	  PHA/PHB	  may	  be	  similarly	  stimulated	  by	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling	  to	  inhibit	  responding	  to	  persistent	  ASH	  activation.	  Other	  neurons	  are	  likely	  involved,	  as	  pan-­‐neuronal	  Cre	  expression	  fully	  rescued	  the	  behavioral	  deficit	  that	  could	  only	  be	  partially	  rescued	  by	  Cre	  expresson	  with	  npr-­‐1	  or	  eat-­‐4	  promoters.	  	  	  3.3.6	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  dispersal	  to	  persistent	  sensory	  input	  Previous	  mutant	  analyses	  suggest	  that	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  roaming	  over	  dwelling	  behavior	  in	  both	  hermaphrodites	  and	  males	  (Meelkop	  et	  al.,	  2012;Flavell	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Barrios	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  This	  behavior	  has	  been	  attributed	  to	  sensory,	  motor,	  and	  interneurons,	  as	  well	  as	  muscle	  (Flavell	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Barrios	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Choi	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  I	  measured	  basal	  locomotion	  by	  quantifying	  displacement	  over	  the	  30s	  window	  immediately	  preceding	  the	  habituation	  assay	  for	  pdfr-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐1,	  and	  pdf-­‐2	  single	  mutants,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant.	  A	  one-­‐way	  ANOVA	  showed	  a	  significant	  difference	  among	  strains	  (F(4,750)	  =39.9,	  p	  <	  0.00001).	  Tukey’s	  HSD	  comparisons	  revealed	  three	  distinguishable	  levels,	  control	  populations	  travelled	  further	  than	  all	  other	  strains	  (p	  <	  0.05),	  while	  the	  pdf-­‐1	  and	  pdf-­‐2	  single	  mutants	  travelled	  further	  than	  the	  double	  mutant	  or	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  single	  mutant	  (p	  <	  0.05;	  Fig.	  	   78	  3.8A,B).	  Therefore,	  consistent	  with	  previously	  described	  locomotion	  deficits	  (Meelkop	  et	  al.,	  2012;	  Flavell	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  I	  found	  that	  the	  PDF	  ligands	  functioned	  partially	  redundantly	  to	  promote	  displacement	  via	  the	  PDFR-­‐1	  receptor.	  Evaluating	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  rescue	  lines	  described	  above,	  pdfr-­‐1	  expression	  in	  neurons	  completely	  rescued	  the	  spontaneous	  locomotion	  phenotype,	  while	  expression	  in	  muscle	  partially	  rescued	  it	  (Fig.	  3.8C).	  I	  also	  observed	  partial	  rescue	  with	  lines	  in	  which	  npr-­‐1,	  glr-­‐1,	  or	  eat-­‐4	  promoters	  drove	  Cre	  (Fig.	  3.8C).	  These	  three	  promoters	  do	  not	  intersect	  in	  any	  one	  class	  of	  neuron,	  suggesting	  a	  distributed	  circuit	  for	  PDFR-­‐1	  function.	  Rescuing	  basal	  locomotion	  without	  affecting	  habituation	  (as	  in	  the	  line	  expressing	  Cre	  by	  the	  glr-­‐1	  promoter)	  rules	  out	  locomotion	  deficits	  as	  the	  cause	  of	  the	  habituation	  phenotype.	  	  In	  chapter	  2,	  I	  demonstrated	  that	  repeated	  ASH	  activation	  promoted	  dispersal	  behavior.	  As	  discussed	  above,	  PDF	  promotes	  dispersal	  during	  spontaneous	  locomotion.	  I	  evaluated	  dispersal	  behavior	  during	  habituation	  training	  by	  measuring	  displacement	  over	  the	  first	  and	  final	  30s	  of	  the	  assay.	  Within-­‐strain	  comparisons	  revealed	  an	  increase	  in	  control	  animals,	  t(267)	  =	  13.7,	  p	  <	  0.00001,	  that	  was	  not	  apparent	  for	  either	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant,	  t(344)	  =	  0.3,	  p	  =	  0.75,	  or	  the	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2	  double	  mutant	  ,	  t(169)	  =	  0.6,	  p	  =	  0.56	  (Fig.	  3.9A,B).	  The	  pdfr-­‐1	  phenotype	  was	  also	  apparent	  with	  the	  ASH-­‐specific	  ChR2	  transgene,	  as	  displacement	  was	  higher	  at	  the	  end	  versus	  the	  start	  of	  the	  assay	  for	  the	  control,	  t(190)	  =	  6.1,	  p	  <	  0.00001,	  while	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  exhibited	  the	  opposite	  trend	  (Fig.3.10A).	  Evaluating	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  rescue	  lines	  described	  above,	  I	  found	  that	  the	  dispersal	  increase	  could	  be	  mediated	  by	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling	  in	  neurons	  or	  muscle	  (Fig	  3.9C).	  	   79	  Restoring	  PDFR-­‐1	  expression	  in	  muscle	  most	  reliably	  rescued	  the	  deficit	  in	  stimulation-­‐induced	  dispersal.	  The	  results	  for	  each	  rescue	  line	  for	  each	  metric	  can	  be	  found	  in	  Table	  3.3.	  	  	   Light	  entrainment	  of	  circadian	  rhythms	  in	  Drosophila	  is	  dependent	  on	  PDF	  signaling	  (Renn	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  Thus,	  illumination	  as	  a	  stimulus	  was	  a	  potentially	  important	  confound	  of	  my	  assay.	  Although	  wild-­‐type	  controls	  or	  retinal	  negative	  ChR2	  transgenic	  worms	  did	  not	  reverse	  to	  the	  light	  stimulus,	  I	  could	  not	  rule	  out	  illumination	  in	  combination	  with	  repeated	  ASH	  activation	  initiating	  a	  PDF	  signaling	  cascade	  to	  promote	  dispersal.	  I	  therefore	  tested	  the	  habituation	  of	  a	  behavior	  that	  could	  be	  elicited	  without	  the	  use	  of	  light,	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response.	  I	  demonstrated	  for	  the	  first	  time	  that	  repeated	  taps	  also	  promoted	  dispersal,	  as	  the	  displacement	  of	  the	  control	  population	  was	  higher	  over	  the	  final	  30s	  of	  the	  assay	  than	  during	  the	  first	  30s,	  (t(163)	  =	  5.8,	  p	  <	  0.00001).	  This	  behavioral	  change	  was	  dependent	  on	  PDFR-­‐1,	  as	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  displayed	  the	  opposite	  trend	  (Fig.	  3.10B).	  Persistent	  sensory	  activity	  therefore	  promotes	  dispersal	  via	  PDF	  signaling	  in	  at	  least	  two	  neural	  circuits.	  	  	  3.4	  Discussion	  Phenotypes	  associated	  with	  neuropeptide	  synthesis	  mutants,	  egl-­‐3	  and	  egl-­‐21,	  inspired	  me	  to	  perform	  a	  targeted	  RNAi	  screen	  to	  identify	  the	  key	  neuropeptides	  and	  their	  receptors.	  This	  screen	  led	  me	  to	  PDFR-­‐1	  and	  its	  ligands,	  encoded	  by	  pdf-­‐1	  and	  pdf-­‐2,	  which	  were	  essential	  for	  normal	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses.	  PDF	  signaling	  is	  highly	  conserved	  across	  the	  protostomian	  evolutionary	  lineage.	  	   80	  First	  discovered	  in	  crustaceans,	  the	  Pigment-­‐Dispersing-­‐Hormones	  were	  named	  for	  their	  role	  in	  regulating	  the	  daily	  cycles	  of	  color	  change	  (Rao	  &	  Riehm,	  1993).	  The	  PDF	  receptors	  are	  distantly	  related	  to	  mammalian	  calcitonin	  GPCRs	  and	  vasoactive	  intestinal	  peptide	  receptors.	  The	  mammalian	  vasoactive	  intestinal	  peptide	  receptor	  and	  Drosophila	  PDF	  receptor	  have	  conserved	  function	  in	  the	  regulation	  of	  arousal	  and	  circadian	  rhythms	  (Kunst	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Janssen	  et	  al.	  (2008)	  provided	  the	  first	  functional	  characterization	  of	  PDF	  signaling	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  They	  reported	  that	  loss	  of	  pdf-­‐1,	  the	  precursor	  gene	  that	  encodes	  ligands	  PDF-­‐1a	  and	  PDF-­‐1b,	  resulted	  in	  slow	  moving	  animals	  with	  elevated	  rates	  of	  spontaneous	  reversals	  and	  directional	  changes,	  a	  deficit	  mimicked	  by	  overexpression	  of	  the	  other	  PDF	  neuropeptide,	  encoded	  by	  precursor	  pdf-­‐2.	  Consistent	  with	  antagonistic	  action	  of	  the	  ligands,	  Meelkop	  et	  al.	  (2012)	  found	  that	  loss	  of	  pdf-­‐2	  suppressed	  the	  pdf-­‐1	  mutant’s	  locomotion	  phenotype.	  However,	  Flavell	  et	  al.	  (2013)	  found	  that	  the	  pdf-­‐2	  mutation	  exasperated	  it,	  a	  relationship	  I	  also	  observed	  with	  the	  displacement	  metric.	  This	  is	  indicative	  of	  partially	  redundant	  ligands.	  	  The	  PDF	  gene	  is	  expressed	  in	  sensory,	  inter-­‐	  and	  motor	  neurons	  (Janssen	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  but	  it	  remains	  to	  be	  determined	  which	  are	  releasing	  PDF	  ligands	  to	  promote	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversals.	  Of	  particular	  interest	  are	  those	  neurons	  co-­‐expressing	  pdf-­‐1	  and	  pdf-­‐2	  (AIM,	  PHA,	  PHB,	  PQR,	  PVP,	  PVT,	  RID)	  and	  those	  with	  which	  ASH	  has	  direct	  synaptic	  output	  (ADA,	  ASK,	  AVB,	  AVD,	  PVP,	  RIM,	  RMG).	  PVP	  is	  the	  only	  neuron	  class	  that	  meets	  both	  criteria.	  In	  terms	  of	  site	  of	  action,	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling	  in	  neurons	  appears	  essential	  for	  robust	  habituation	  of	  response	  latency,	  but	  not	  response	  duration	  –	  with	  the	  phasmid	  neurons	  PHA	  	   81	  and/or	  PHB	  being	  the	  best	  candidates	  (Fig.	  3.7).	  Consistent	  with	  previous	  reports,	  I	  identified	  a	  more	  distributed	  PDFR-­‐1	  circuit	  regulating	  spontaneous	  locomotion	  (Fig	  3.8C;	  Flavell	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Barrios	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Choi	  et	  al.,	  2013),	  while	  signaling	  in	  neurons	  and	  muscle	  appears	  to	  promote	  dispersal	  with	  repeated	  ASH	  activation	  (Table	  3.3).	  	  In	  Drosophila	  PDF	  signaling	  is	  a	  key	  regulator	  of	  the	  circadian	  cycle	  via	  rhythmic	  release	  from	  a	  small	  group	  of	  central	  clock	  cells,	  the	  ventral	  lateral	  neurons,	  to	  promote	  arousal	  during	  waking	  (Renn	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Kunst	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Although	  C.	  elegans	  displays	  circadian	  rhythms	  in	  locomotion	  and	  abiotic	  stress	  resistance	  (Saigusa	  et	  al.,2002;	  Kippert	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  the	  underlying	  mechanism	  is	  unclear.	  C.	  elegans	  homologues	  of	  the	  Drosophila	  clock	  genes	  are	  thought	  to	  control	  developmental	  timing,	  e.g.	  lin-­‐42	  (period),	  tim-­‐1	  (timeless),	  and	  kin-­‐20	  (doubletime;	  Jeon	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Banerjee	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Choi	  et	  al.	  (2013)	  showed	  that	  secretion	  of	  PDF-­‐1	  neuropeptides	  is	  developmentally	  regulated.	  During	  the	  lethargus	  period	  that	  precedes	  larval	  molting,	  less	  PDF-­‐1::YFP	  fusion	  proteins	  accumulate	  in	  the	  scavenger	  cells	  of	  the	  body	  cavity.	  Reduced	  PDF-­‐1	  secretion	  is	  thought	  to	  underlie	  the	  behavioral	  quiescence	  associated	  with	  this	  period,	  as	  it	  could	  be	  blocked	  by	  forced	  PDF-­‐1	  release.	  In	  adulthood,	  PDF	  also	  signals	  arousal,	  promoting	  roaming	  over	  dwelling	  behavior,	  with	  apparently	  spontaneous	  switching	  between	  these	  states	  occurring	  every	  several	  minutes	  	  (Flavell	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  It	  is	  unclear	  what	  internal	  drives	  mediate	  the	  abrupt	  transitions	  during	  spontaneous	  locomotion,	  but	  my	  data	  suggest	  that	  the	  roaming	  state	  associated	  with	  PDF	  signaling	  can	  also	  be	  induced	  by	  persistent	  sensory	  input,	  i.e.	  repeated	  activation	  of	  ASH.	  	  	   82	  	   In	  summary,	  habituation	  training	  induces	  a	  roaming	  state	  by	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling	  in	  muscle	  and	  neurons,	  while	  signaling	  in	  neurons	  mediates	  habituation	  of	  response	  latency.	  Other	  neuropeptides	  are	  likely	  involved,	  as	  loss	  of	  PDFR-­‐1	  did	  not	  totally	  abrogate	  habituation,	  as	  was	  seen	  with	  neuropeptide	  synthesis	  mutants	  egl-­‐3	  and	  egl-­‐21.	  Persistent	  sensory	  input	  as	  arousing	  stimuli	  is	  not	  unique	  to	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit,	  as	  tap	  habituation	  also	  promotes	  PDFR-­‐1	  dependent	  dispersal.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   83	  	  Figure	  3.1.	  Naive	  response	  and	  habituation	  phenotypes	  for	  glutamate	  transmission	  mutants.	  (A)	  Representative	  raster	  plots	  depicting	  the	  behavioral	  state	  at	  the	  beginning	  (left)	  and	  end	  (right)	  of	  training.	  Pixels	  are	  color	  coded	  for	  speed	  with	  negative	  values	  corresponding	  to	  backward	  locomotion.	  Black	  bars	  indicate	  2s	  of	  whole-­‐plate	  illumination	  with	  blue	  light	  at	  250μW/mm2.	  (B)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  from	  the	  onset	  of	  the	  first	  stimulus	  in	  a	  habituation	  series.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  (C)	  Proportion	  of	  the	  population	  reversing	  to	  each	  of	  30	  two	  second	  light	  pulses	  administered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  The	  glr-­‐1	  independent	  response	  did	  not	  persist	  across	  the	  assay.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  The	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  24±1.7,	  23.5±1.4,	  23.3±1.7,	  and	  11.2±1.8	  for	  +,	  glr-­‐1,	  nmr-­‐1,	  and	  eat-­‐4,	  respectively.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Proportion reversingTime (s)  0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Proportion reversingTime (s)  +eat−4glr−1nmr−1+ glr−1 nmr−100.511.52Initial response latency (s)#"&"#"#"&"+"glr$1&nmr$1&eat$4&s&m"1" s&m"2" s&m"29" s&m"30"A"C"B"    0">0.8"mm/s"<*0.8"mm/s"<10.8" >0.8"mm/s"0"#"&"	   84	  based	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   85	  	  Figure	  3.2.	  The	  glr-­‐1	  phenotypes	  can	  be	  suppressed	  by	  expressing	  GLR-­‐1	  or	  knocking	  out	  egl-­‐3.	  (A)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  from	  the	  onset	  of	  the	  first	  stimulus	  in	  a	  habituation	  series.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #,	  &,	  and	  ¥	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups.	  (B	  and	  C)	  Proportion	  of	  the	  population	  reversing	  to	  each	  of	  30	  two	  second	  light	  pulses	  administered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  (D)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  from	  the	  onset	  of	  each	  stimulus.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  The	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  29±1.3,	  28±1.5,	  29.4±1.2,	  16±1.3,	  and	  16.4±0.9	  for	  +,	  glr-­‐1,	  glr-­‐1;GLR-­‐1::GFP,	  glr-­‐1;egl-­‐3,	  and	  egl-­‐3,	  respectively.	  #,	  &,	  and	  ¥	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  reaction	  time	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Proportion reversingTime (s)+ glr−1 glr−1; glr−1; egl−300.511.52Initial response latency (s)+GLR−1::GFPegl−300.511.52Initial response latency (s)+glr−1glr−1;glr−1;egl−300.511.52Initial response latency (s)+glr−1glr−1;glr−1;egl−300.511.52Initial response latency (s)+glr−1glr−1;glr−1;egl−300.511.52Initial response latency (s)+GLR−1::GFPegl−300.511.52Initial response latency (s)+GLR−1::GFPegl−300.511.52Initial response latency (s)lr lr ; lr ; l..Initial response latency (s)#"&"¥"&"#" #"¥"¥"0 100 200 300020406080100Proportion reversingTime (s)  +glr−1glr−1;GLR−1::GFP0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.811.2Response latency (s)Time (s)  +egl−3#"&"A" B"C" D"0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Proportion reversingTime (s)  #"&"0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81  data1+glr−1glr−1;egl−3egl−30 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81  data1+glr−1glr−1;egl−3egl−3#"#"	   86	  	  Figure	  3.3.	  Neuropeptide	  synthesis	  mutants	  do	  not	  display	  habituation	  of	  response	  latency.	  (A)	  Proportion	  of	  the	  population	  reversing	  to	  each	  of	  30	  two	  second	  light	  pulses	  administered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  (B)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  from	  the	  onset	  of	  each	  stimulus.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  reaction	  time	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  n=4	  plates	  for	  each	  strain	  with	  29.3±1.7,	  12.8±1.9,	  and	  14.7±1.7	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  +,	  egl-­‐3,	  and	  egl-­‐21,	  respectively.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Time (s)Proportion reversing  +egl−3egl−210 100 200 30000.20.40.60.811.2Response latency (s)Time (s)  +egl−3egl−21#"&"A" B"&"	   87	  	  Figure	  3.4.	  GPCR	  RNAi	  screen.	  (A)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  from	  the	  onset	  of	  the	  first	  stimulus	  and	  (B)	  proportion	  of	  animals	  reversing	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus	  for	  populations	  fed	  RNAi	  clones	  to	  knock	  down	  egl-­‐3	  or	  one	  of	  57	  GPCRs.	  Each	  circle	  is	  the	  mean	  of	  3	  plates,	  with	  multiple	  replicates	  for	  the	  control	  and	  egl-­‐3	  targeting	  vector.	  Dashed	  lines	  mark	  upper	  and	  lower	  critical	  values	  (i.e.	  |z-­‐score|	  =	  4.46).	  (C)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  to	  the	  initial	  stimulus	  for	  animals	  fed	  the	  RNAi	  clones	  that	  decreased	  reaction	  time.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #,	  &,	  and	  ¥	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups.	  (D)	  Proportion	  of	  the	  population	  reversing	  to	  each	  stimulus	  for	  animals	  fed	  the	  RNAi	  clones	  that	  increased	  the	  probability	  of	  a	  reversal	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  likelihood	  of	  responding	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  npr−26 pdfr−10.511.52Initial response latency (s)0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.81Time (s)Proportion reversing  glr−1glr−1;egl−3(RNAi)glr−1;pdfr−1(RNAi)00.511.52Initial response latency (s)glr$1;"egl$3(RNAi)"glr$1"glr$1;"npr$26(RNAi)"#"&"&"#"¥"pdfr−1 npr−2600.20.40.60.81Final proportion reversing0 10 20 30 40 50 60 7000.20.40.60.81Proportion reversingTime (s)  controlegl−3(RNAi)GPCR(RNAi)0 10 20 30 40 50 60 7000.20.40.60.81Proportion reversingTime (s)  controlegl−3(RNAi)GPCR(RNAi)C"D"A" B"#"	   88	  	  Figure	  3.5.	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  habituation.	  (A	  and	  C)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  from	  the	  onset	  of	  each	  of	  30	  two	  second	  light	  pulses	  administered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  (B	  &	  D)	  Reversal	  duration	  for	  each	  stimulus.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  response	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  n=	  4	  (A	  &	  B)	  or	  3	  (C	  &	  D)	  plates	  per	  strain.	  For	  (A	  &	  B)	  the	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  71±8.1,	  44±3.3,	  42.8±4.3,	  32.8±1.3,	  and	  21.8±3.6	  for	  +,	  pdfr-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐2,	  and	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2,	  respectively.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.811.21.4Response latency (s)Time (s)0 100 200 300012345Reversal duration (s)Time (s)  +pdfr−1pdf−1pdf−2pdf−1;pdf−20 100 200 30000.20.40.60.811.21.4Response latency (s)Time (s)0 100 200 300012345Time (s)Reversal duration (s)  +pdf−1;pdf−2pdf−1;pdf−2;ACY−1(gof)A" B"C" D"#"&"#"#"&"#"&"#"#"&"&"0 100 200 300012345Time (s)Reversal duration (s)  +pdf−1;pdf−2pdf−1;pdf−2;ACY−1(gof)#"	   89	  	  	  Figure	  3.6.	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  phenotype	  in	  control	  strain	  with	  ChR2	  expression	  restricted	  to	  ASH.	  (A)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  from	  the	  onset	  of	  each	  of	  30	  two-­‐second	  light	  pulses	  administered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  (B)	  Reversal	  duration	  for	  each	  stimulus.	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  reaction	  time	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  n=6	  plates	  per	  strain	  with	  22.5±1	  and	  13±1.7	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  +	  and	  pdfr-­‐1,	  respectively.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  0 100 200 30000.20.40.60.811.21.4Response latency (s)Time (s)0 100 200 30001234Reversal duration (s)Time (s)  +pdfr−1#"&"#"&"A" B"0 100 200 30001234Reversal duration (s)Time (s)  +pdfr−1	   90	  	  Figure	  3.7.	  Restoring	  pdfr-­‐1	  expression	  can	  rescue	  the	  mutant	  habituation	  phenotypes.	  (A)	  Time	  to	  initiate	  a	  reversal	  and	  (B)	  reversal	  duration	  to	  each	  stimulus	  for	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutants	  with	  expression	  restored	  to	  neurons	  (pdfr-­‐1;Ex[tag-­‐168p::Cre	  +	  pdfr-­‐1p::inv[pdfr-­‐1]])	  compared	  to	  control	  (+)	  or	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  (pdfr-­‐1).	  Mean	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  n	  =	  2-­‐3	  plates.	  #	  and	  &	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups	  based	  on	  the	  response	  to	  the	  final	  stimulus.	  Degree	  to	  which	  each	  Cre	  expression	  plasmid	  rescued	  (C)	  response	  latency	  and	  (D)	  reversal	  duration	  habituation	  phenotypes	  of	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  coinjected	  with	  inverted	  and	  floxed	  0 100 200 300012345Reversal duration (s)Time (s)0 100 200 30000.511.5Response latency (s)Time (s)#"&"#"&"A" B"C"D"0 50 100 150 200 250 30000.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Response latency (s)Time (s)  +pdfr−1pdfr−1;tag−168p::Cre0 50 100 150 200 250 30000.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.91Response latency (s)Time (s)  +pdfr−1pdfr−1;tag−168p::Cretag−168glr−1 eat−4 npr−1 gcy−36 ocr−4 myo−3−1−0.500.511.5Percent rescue (x100)tag−168glr−1 eat−4 npr−1 gcy−36 ocr−4 myo−3−1−0.500.511.5Percent rescue (x100)&"¥"¥" ¥"¥"Cre"promoter:"Cre"promoter:"&"#"	   91	  pdfr-­‐1	  cDNA.	  Mean	  response	  to	  the	  final	  five	  stimuli	  normalized	  with	  1	  as	  control	  and	  0	  as	  mutant	  for	  animals	  tested	  on	  the	  same	  day.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  &	  and	  ¥	  denote	  complete	  and	  partial	  rescue,	  respectively.	  2-­‐4	  lines	  were	  tested	  for	  each	  Cre	  expression	  plasmid.	  Where	  applicable,	  data	  from	  a	  rescuing	  line	  is	  presented.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   92	  	  Figure	  3.8.	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  dispersal	  during	  spontaneous	  locomotion.	  (A)	  Representative	  trajectories	  of	  50	  animals	  during	  the	  30s	  immediately	  preceding	  the	  habituation	  assay.	  Tracks	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  colors	  and	  start	  points	  were	  set	  to	  center.	  (B)	  Displacement	  (shortest	  distance	  between	  the	  start	  and	  endpoint)	  during	  the	  same	  period.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  The	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  71±8.1,	  44±3.3,	  42.8±4.3,	  32.8±1.3,	  and	  21.8±3.6	  for	  +,	  pdfr-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐2,	  and	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2,	  respectively.#,	  &,	  and	  ¥	  denote	  statistically	  distinguishable	  groups.	  (C)	  Degree	  to	  which	  each	  Cre	  expression	  plasmid	  rescued	  the	  spontaneous	  dispersal	  phenotype	  of	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  coinjected	  with	  inverted	  and	  floxed	  pdfr-­‐1	  cDNA.	  Displacement	  over	  the	  30s	  immediately	  preceding	  the	  habituation	  assay	  normalized	  with	  1	  as	  control	  and	  0	  as	  mutant	  responses	  for	  animals	  tested	  on	  the	  same	  day.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  &	  and	  ¥	  denote	  complete	  and	  partial	  rescue,	  respectively.	  2-­‐4	  lines	  were	  tested	  for	  each	  Cre	  expression	  plasmid.	  Where	  applicable,	  data	  from	  a	  rescuing	  line	  is	  presented.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  +" pdf$1&pdf$2& pdfr$1&pdf$1;pdf$2&+ pdf−1 pdf−2 pdf−1; pdfr−100.511.5Displacement (mm)+ pdf−1 pdf−2 pdf−1; pdfr−100.511.5Displacement (mm)#"&"¥" ¥"#"A" B"C"1mm"tag−168 glr−1 eat−4 npr−1 gcy−36 ocr−4 myo−3−0.500.511.52Percent rescue (x100)¥"&"&"&"&"Cre"promoter:"	   93	  	  Figure	  3.9.	  PDF	  signaling	  promotes	  dispersal	  during	  habituation	  training.	  (A)	  Representative	  trajectories	  during	  a	  20s	  interval	  at	  the	  beginning	  (0-­‐20s),	  middle	  (140-­‐160s),	  and	  end	  (280-­‐300s)	  of	  the	  habituation	  assay	  with	  30	  two	  second	  light	  pulses	  delivered	  at	  0.1Hz.	  Tracks	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  colors	  and	  start	  points	  were	  set	  to	  center.	  (B)	  Displacement	  (shortest	  distance	  between	  the	  start	  and	  endpoint)	  over	  the	  first	  (left)	  and	  last	  (right)	  30s	  of	  the	  assay	  for	  the	  PDF	  signaling	  mutants.	  The	  number	  of	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  was	  71±8.1,	  44±3.3,	  42.8±4.3,	  32.8±1.3,	  and	  21.8±3.6	  for	  +,	  pdfr-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐1,	  pdf-­‐2,	  and	  pdf-­‐1;pdf-­‐2,	  respectively.	  (C)	  Displacement	  over	  the	  first	  (left)	  and	  last	  (right)	  30s	  of	  the	  assay	  for	  the	  pdfr-­‐1	  mutant	  rescue	  lines.	  2-­‐4	  lines	  were	  tested	  for	  each	  Cre	  expression	  plasmid.	  Where	  applicable,	  data	  from	  a	  rescuing	  line	  is	  presented.	  #	  denotes	  a	  significant	  increase	  in	  024Displacement (mm)tag−168 glr−1 eat−4 npr−1 gcy−36 ocr−4 myo−3024Displacement (mm)1mm#+#pdfr)1#0)20s# 140)160s# 280)300s#pdfr%1:#########A#B#C# ########+###############)###############)################)################)###############)###############)################)###############)#########################################tag)168######glr)1########eat)4########npr)1######gcy)3#######ocr)4########myo)3#Cre#promoter:#+###############pdf)1###########pdf)2###########pdf)1;##########pdfr)1#+###############pdf)1###########pdf)2###########pdf)2##########pdfr)1#pdfr)1p::inv[pdfr)1]#	   94	  displacement	  (one-­‐tailed,	  p	  <	  0.05,	  with	  Bonferroni	  correction	  for	  multiple	  comparisons)	  over	  the	  assay.	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  sra-­‐6p::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   95	  	  Figure	  3.10.	  Persistent	  sensory	  input	  promotes	  dispersal.	  Displacement	  (shortest	  distance	  between	  the	  start	  and	  endpoint)	  over	  the	  first	  (left)	  and	  last	  (right)	  30s	  of	  an	  assay	  with	  repeated	  (A)	  ASH-­‐specific	  photoactivation	  (22.5±1	  and	  13±1.7	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  +	  and	  pdfr-­‐1,	  respectively)	  and	  (B)	  repeated	  plate	  taps	  (42±3.2	  and	  36±7.9	  animals	  tracked	  per	  plate	  for	  +	  and	  pdfr-­‐1,	  respectively).	  Circles	  are	  plate	  means,	  crosses	  are	  population	  means	  +/-­‐	  SEM.	  #	  denotes	  a	  significant	  increase.	  All	  data	  from	  the	  ASHp::ChR2	  transgenic	  background.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  + pdfr−100.511.522.5Displacement (mm)A"#"+ pdfr−100.511.522.533.5Displacement (mm)#"B"	   96	  Table	  3.1.	  GPCR	  loss	  of	  function	  phenotypes	  for	  three	  behavioral	  metrics	  for	  the	  initial	  and	  final	  stimulus	  reported	  as	  Z-­‐scores	  based	  on	  the	  control	  distribution.	  	  	  	  	  initial final initial final initial finalI"3C12 ckr$1 0.70 "2.53 0.16 "1.99 1.47 0.79I"3M14 nmur$4 0.57 "2.55 "0.59 "0.29 0.42 1.09I"6K10 ntr$1 0.91 "2.87 0.50 "1.65 0.11 "0.77II"1G01 nmur$2 1.50 "1.07 "3.83 1.66 0.10 "0.23II"1G18 frpr$14 0.59 "2.18 "1.78 0.22 "0.23 1.67II"6M20 npr$20 0.04 "2.49 1.12 2.83 "0.48 "0.92II"8P03 dmsr$3 1.62 "2.06 "3.74 1.69 1.50 0.49II"9C14 npr$34 0.56 "3.59 1.43 1.00 3.08 2.10II"9K23 dmsr$6 "0.26 "2.20 "0.28 0.09 "1.44 0.18III"1B07 ckr$2 "0.15 0.49 "2.06 "0.54 1.52 0.36III"1H14 npr$15 3.45 "1.08 "1.91 "1.78 0.36 0.63III"3D23 pdfr$1 "1.96 4.59 1.01 1.81 "0.55 0.60III"4H24 F59B2.13 0.48 "0.44 "1.02 0.01 "0.06 1.41III"4N22 npr$29 0.15 "0.10 "0.22 "1.05 "1.29 "0.55III"5C01 tkr$1 "0.74 "0.64 0.28 0.45 0.91 2.10III"5H08 dmsr$5 "0.23 "1.20 "0.32 1.42 "0.20 0.36IV"2L21 tkr$3 "1.62 "2.99 0.88 3.19 "0.01 "0.26IV"3K17 tkr$2 0.34 "2.95 "2.06 2.13 "0.09 2.19IV"3L02 npr$35 0.08 "2.79 0.80 2.09 "0.39 "0.83IV"3L09 npr$2 0.84 0.16 "2.62 "2.50 0.25 0.45IV"4P04 npr$27 1.04 0.00 "1.58 "0.46 "1.28 0.82IV"6I19 npr$3 1.14 "2.35 "1.53 "0.01 1.13 "0.50IV"7G21 srsx$25 1.33 0.54 0.11 "0.82 "0.16 1.50IV"8G18 npr$26 0.86 "0.23 "4.67 0.53 0.80 0.54IV"8M21 npr$32 "0.04 "2.68 0.32 0.25 0.64 0.06V"1G19 T22H9.1 1.81 "0.04 0.96 0.47 0.03 0.33V"4P14 dmsr$12 0.71 0.30 0.05 0.00 "0.30 0.93V"5A11 dmsr$14 "1.25 "1.04 "0.56 0.04 "0.80 "0.71V"5A13 dmsr$13 0.85 0.14 "2.93 0.17 "0.31 1.35V"5C05 frpr$18 0.52 0.17 "1.09 "1.88 0.66 0.07V"5G08 srsx$24 0.07 0.39 "1.02 "1.54 "1.23 1.37V"5L13 frpr$3 1.32 1.54 "3.00 "2.11 "1.31 "0.16V"6O06 frpr$6 2.03 1.83 "1.24 "0.92 "1.32 1.18V"7B04 npr$25 1.44 "0.07 "3.94 "0.40 1.28 0.81V"7D16 dmsr$1 0.74 0.35 "1.86 "0.30 "0.25 "0.30V"7D24 T11F9.1 1.71 2.18 "0.31 "0.98 "1.04 0.63Geneservice-location Target- Proportion-reversing Reversal-latency Reversal-duration	   97	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  initial final initial final initial final!0.02 5.99 !8.43 !9.94 !4.05 2.62!0.29 7.24 !8.39 !10.51 !4.23 1.832.70 5.76 !10.86 !11.01 !2.01 3.38V!8N12 frpr$5 !0.05 !0.22 !0.13 1.43 !0.33 !0.20V!8O10 frpr$15 0.34 !0.97 !0.58 2.42 0.70 0.57X!1K03 npr$19 0.43 0.10 !0.97 0.26 1.17 1.43X!2E06 npr$16 0.58 !2.83 !0.89 0.14 !0.61 !1.26X!2F18 npr$1 !1.13 !2.35 !0.20 0.81 1.91 1.55X!2N15 nmur$3 !0.72 1.22 !0.94 0.20 0.22 0.20X!3J02 npr$8 !0.23 !1.08 !1.34 0.02 !0.74 !0.38X!4C24 npr$28 0.73 0.13 !2.13 0.06 1.92 1.48X!4D19 nmur$1 !0.02 !0.68 0.77 !0.28 3.84 1.72X!4F14 npr$18 !0.71 !2.76 2.14 1.27 1.05 2.20X!4M14 frpr$8 !0.60 0.17 0.79 !1.26 1.53 1.54X!4N13 npr$7 0.07 !0.85 0.02 !1.41 1.67 1.82X!5E05 npr$6 2.02 2.72 !0.27 !0.45 !0.15 1.37X!5P24 npr$4 1.76 1.82 1.04 !2.46 !0.76 2.33X!6I21 npr$10 0.38 0.14 1.41 0.70 !1.50 0.98X!6J14 sprr$2 0.43 3.07 0.11 0.16 !0.83 0.88X!7C08 npr$33 1.14 0.63 !0.89 !0.79 !0.86 !0.11X!7H14 npr$24 0.74 0.55 2.69 2.50 1.59 0.19X!7J08 frpr$7 !0.04 !1.25 1.98 3.23 0.33 1.36X!7M11 F59D12.16 0.69 0.55 0.79 !1.26 !0.33 !0.20X!7P13 npr$21 0.96 0.27 !0.26 !2.03 0.76 1.56Reversal,latency Reversal,durationV!7G01 egl$3Geneservice,location Target, Proportion,reversing	   98	  Table	  3.2.	  Reported	  expression	  pattern	  of	  pdfr-­‐1	  and	  the	  7	  promoters	  used	  to	  drive	  Cre.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  pdfr%1 tag%168 glr%1 eat%4 npr%1 gcy%36 ocr%4 myo%3OLQ x x " " x " x "URX x x " " x x " "PQR x x " x x x " "PHA x x " x x " " "PHB x x " x x " " "ALM x x " x " " " "AVM x x " x " " " "FLP x x " x " " " "OLL x x " x " " " "PLM x x " x " " " "URY x x x x " " " "PVQ x x x x " " " "AVD x x x " " " " "PVC x x x " " " " "RME x x x " " " " "Other6neurons x x x x x x " "Muscle x " " " " " " xReferenceJanssen(et(al.,(2008;Barrios(et(al.,(2012Ishihara(&(Katsura,(unpublishedMaricq(et(al.,(1995;Hart(et(al.,(1995Serrano"Saiz(et(al.,(2013Coates(&(de(Bono,(2002Cheung(et(al.,(2004Tobin(et(al.,(2002Miller(et(al.,(1983	   99	  Table	  3.3.	  PDFR-­‐1	  rescue	  experiments	  summary.	  	  	  	  	  Cre$promoter Strain Latency$habituationDuration$habituationSpontaneous$dispersalHabituated$dispersalVG447 ++ & ++ +tag$168 VG448 ++ & ++ &VG449 + & ++ +VG411 & & ++ &VG412 & & & &VG434 + & ++ &eat$4 VG438 & & & &VG441 & & + &VG442 + & ++ &npr$1 VG443 & & & &VG446 + & ++ +VG481 & & & &VG482 & & & &VG483 & & & +VG484 & & & &VG507 & & & &ocr$4 VG508 & & & &VG509 & & & &VG510 & & & &VG485 & & + +VG486 & & & +VG487 & & & +VG488 + + + +glr$1gcy$36myo$3	   100	  4.	  Discussion	  Habituation	  is	  a	  fundamental	  process	  poorly	  understood	  at	  the	  cellular	  and	  molecular	  levels.	  Taking	  advantage	  of	  the	  tractable	  nervous	  system	  of	  C.	  elegans,	  I	  have	  developed	  novel	  insights	  into	  habituation	  by	  investigating	  responses	  elicited	  by	  a	  pair	  of	  polymodal	  nociceptors,	  ASHL	  and	  ASHR.	  The	  ASH	  neuron	  class	  is	  especially	  interesting	  in	  the	  context	  of	  habituation	  because	  of	  the	  diversity	  and	  salience	  of	  cues	  it	  detects.	  The	  objectives	  of	  this	  research	  were:	  	  1) To	  establish	  a	  high-­‐throughput	  habituation	  assay	  for	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses.	  2) To	  identify	  molecular	  components	  mediating	  behavioral	  plasticity.	  In	  chapter	  2,	  I	  demonstrated	  that	  repeated	  ASH	  photoactivation	  caused	  behavioral	  plasticity	  meeting	  two	  of	  the	  key	  characteristics	  for	  habituation	  set	  out	  by	  Spencer	  and	  Thompson	  (1966).	  Specifically,	  that	  “repeated	  application	  of	  a	  stimulus	  results	  in	  a	  progressive	  decrease	  in	  some	  parameter	  of	  a	  response	  to	  an	  asymptotic	  level”	  and	  “presentation	  of	  a	  different	  stimulus	  results	  in	  an	  increase	  of	  the	  decremented	  response	  to	  the	  original	  stimulus.”	  I	  found	  that	  repeated	  photoactivation	  caused	  shorter	  reversal	  responses	  that	  could	  be	  facilitated	  by	  a	  tap	  to	  the	  side	  of	  the	  Petri	  plate.	  Thus	  the	  decrement	  could	  not	  be	  explained	  by	  sensory	  adaptation	  or	  fatigue.	  Instead	  of	  focusing	  on	  just	  one	  parameter	  of	  the	  response,	  I	  characterized	  locomotion	  throughout	  training	  and	  identified	  a	  suite	  of	  behavioral	  changes	  associated	  with	  repeated	  ASH	  activation.	  Habituation	  is	  typically	  viewed	  as	  a	  way	  to	  free	  up	  limited	  cognitive	  resources,	  but	  my	  data	  highlights	  a	  different	  perspective,	  i.e.	  habituation	  as	  part	  of	  a	  shifting	  behavioral	  strategy,	  in	  this	  case	  to	  	   101	  promote	  dispersal.	  Towards	  objective	  2,	  I	  identified	  two	  key	  signaling	  pathways	  that	  sculpted	  the	  behavioral	  plasticity.	  Food	  and	  dopamine	  promoted	  responding	  via	  DOP-­‐4	  (chapter	  2),	  while	  PDF	  signaling	  promoted	  habituation	  of	  response	  latency	  and	  duration	  (chapter	  3).	  	  	  4.1	  A	  new	  high-­‐throughput	  habituation	  assay	  Studying	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversals	  by	  way	  of	  the	  drop	  test,	  nose	  touch,	  or	  “stink-­‐on-­‐a-­‐stick”	  single	  worm	  assays	  is	  labor	  intensive,	  furthermore	  the	  stimulus	  strength	  and	  timing	  is	  difficult	  to	  control.	  I	  adapted	  the	  Multi-­‐Worm	  Tracker	  to	  accommodate	  optogenetic	  experiments,	  allowing	  for	  precise	  temporal	  and	  intensity	  regulation	  of	  a	  stimulus	  that	  could	  be	  administered	  to	  an	  entire	  population	  simultaneously.	  This	  greatly	  enhanced	  the	  reproducibility	  and	  throughput	  of	  the	  assay,	  with	  a	  significant	  gain	  in	  behavioral	  detail.	  In	  addition,	  by	  bypassing	  the	  native	  sensory	  transduction	  machinery,	  I	  prevented	  sensory	  adaptation	  and	  with	  combinatorial	  genetics	  could	  specifically	  target	  ASH	  without	  activating	  secondary	  sensory	  neurons	  known	  to	  contribute	  to	  avoidance	  of	  aversive	  stimuli.	  This	  was	  useful	  for	  evaluating	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses,	  but	  it	  also	  represents	  an	  important	  deviation	  from	  normal	  neural	  activity.	  The	  primary	  value	  of	  this	  assay	  lies	  in	  the	  gains	  in	  throughput	  and	  behavioral	  detail.	  Hypotheses	  generated	  with	  optotogenetics	  should	  be	  validated	  using	  naturally	  sensed	  stimuli	  whenever	  possible.	  Caveats	  of	  the	  optogenetic	  approach	  are	  addressed	  in	  more	  detail	  below.	  There	  are	  two	  main	  issues:	  (1)	  that	  the	  control	  worms	  are	  not	  wild-­‐type	  and	  (2)	  that	  the	  stimulus	  is	  simulated	  with	  light.	  	  	   102	  Optogenetic	  experiments	  require	  targeting	  light-­‐sensitive	  proteins	  to	  cells	  that	  normally	  do	  not	  express	  them.	  Overexpression	  of	  any	  foreign	  protein	  can	  alter	  the	  structure,	  function,	  or	  survival	  of	  cells.	  However	  expression	  of	  ChR2	  in	  ASH	  did	  not	  noticeably	  alter	  responses	  elicited	  by	  a	  naturally	  sensed	  stimulus,	  i.e.	  nose	  touch	  (Fig.	  2.4A).	  Another	  concern	  is	  the	  mutations	  caused	  by	  integration	  of	  the	  transgenes.	  This	  was	  controlled	  for	  by	  the	  use	  of	  two	  strains	  in	  which	  the	  transgene	  for	  ChR2	  expression	  integrated	  at	  different	  sites	  in	  the	  genome.	  The	  use	  of	  these	  two	  strains	  also	  supports	  the	  robustness	  of	  the	  results,	  as	  the	  strains	  differed	  in	  several	  ways.	  One	  strain	  expressed	  ChR2	  strongly	  in	  ASH	  and	  weakly	  in	  two	  classes	  of	  off-­‐target	  cells,	  while	  the	  other	  had	  ChR2	  restricted	  to	  ASH.	  The	  ASH-­‐specific	  strain	  had	  lower	  ChR2	  expression	  levels	  and	  had	  to	  be	  illuminated	  with	  increased	  irradiance,	  which	  required	  a	  lite-­‐1	  mutant	  background	  (lite-­‐1	  encodes	  a	  native	  C.	  elegans	  short-­‐wavelength	  light	  receptor;	  Edwards	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Despite	  these	  differences,	  the	  two	  strains	  displayed	  the	  same	  patterns	  of	  behavior	  in	  the	  assays	  described	  and	  were	  similarly	  affected	  by	  the	  subset	  of	  mutant	  alleles	  tested	  in	  both,	  i.e.	  cat-­‐2,	  glr-­‐1,	  eat-­‐4,	  egl-­‐3,	  egl-­‐21,	  and	  pdfr-­‐1.	  Thus,	  the	  effects	  of	  repeated	  ASH	  photoactivation	  are	  consistent	  between	  genetic	  backgrounds,	  stimulus	  intensities,	  and	  ChR2	  transgenes.	  But	  how	  do	  they	  relate	  to	  naturally	  sensed	  stimuli?	  Optogenetics	  has	  been	  used	  extensively	  to	  simulate	  natural	  neural	  activity,	  but	  it	  is	  important	  to	  consider	  the	  caveats	  associated	  with	  photoactivation.	  The	  first	  issue	  is	  the	  use	  of	  light	  itself,	  which	  could	  cause	  photodamage	  or	  even	  just	  alter	  neural	  activity	  by	  heating.	  Light	  could	  also	  be	  detected	  by	  native	  receptors.	  My	  LED	  system	  delivered	  very	  low	  intensity	  blue	  light	  (max	  250	  µW/mm2),	  but	  to	  control	  	   103	  for	  illumination	  I	  evaluated	  the	  behavior	  of	  wild-­‐type	  as	  well	  as	  retinal-­‐negative	  transgenic	  worms.	  Neither	  control	  displayed	  any	  appreciable	  behavioral	  response	  to	  repeated	  illumination.	  The	  second	  issue	  relates	  to	  the	  photocurrent	  itself,	  which	  deviates	  from	  native	  signal	  transduction	  in	  terms	  of	  kinetics,	  localization,	  and	  ion	  content.	  This	  may	  be	  especially	  relevant	  for	  neurons	  with	  graded	  transmission,	  like	  ASH,	  where	  the	  extent	  of	  depolarization	  is	  directly	  correlated	  with	  the	  photocurrent,	  as	  opposed	  to	  spiking	  neurons,	  which	  need	  only	  be	  depolarized	  to	  threshold	  before	  a	  digital	  action	  potential	  is	  generated	  by	  native	  channels.	  Finally,	  there	  are	  also	  differences	  at	  the	  circuit	  level,	  as	  secondary	  sensory	  neurons	  normally	  co-­‐activated	  with	  ASH	  may	  play	  a	  role	  in	  decoding	  input.	  Furthermore,	  adaptation	  normally	  occurs	  in	  parallel	  with	  habituation	  and	  removing	  this	  component	  by	  bypassing	  sensory	  transduction	  could	  have	  significant	  impacts	  on	  behavioral	  plasticity.	  Thus	  a	  major	  limitation	  of	  this	  assay	  is	  the	  inability	  to	  assess	  the	  role	  of	  adaptation	  in	  habituation.	  Despite	  these	  caveats,	  the	  optogenetic	  approach	  recapitulated	  observations	  from	  experiments	  using	  naturally	  sensed	  cues.	  Most	  notably	  the	  dopamine-­‐dependent	  slowed	  decrement	  in	  responding	  to	  persistent	  CuCl2	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  (Ezcurra	  et	  al.	  2011)	  and	  the	  suppression	  of	  the	  glr-­‐1	  mutant’s	  nose	  touch	  and	  osmoavoidance	  deficits	  by	  loss	  of	  egl-­‐3	  (Kass	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Mellem	  et	  al.,	  2002).	  It	  is	  impossible	  to	  know	  how	  ASH	  photoactivation	  was	  perceived	  by	  the	  animals,	  but	  genetic	  analysis	  of	  glutamate	  transmission	  mutants	  suggested	  it	  was	  not	  experienced	  as	  a	  nose	  touch,	  as	  Hart	  et	  al.	  (1995)	  and	  Maricq	  et	  al.	  (1995)	  demonstrated	  that	  reversals	  elicited	  by	  nose	  touch	  depend	  on	  GLR-­‐1.	  For	  osmotic	  shock,	  Mellem	  et	  al.	  (2002)	  observed	  that	  the	  glr-­‐1	  mutant	  responded	  to	  ASH	  	   104	  photoactivation	  with	  a	  slowed	  reaction	  time,	  as	  I	  observed	  here,	  suggesting	  the	  photostimulus	  was	  more	  akin	  to	  osomotic	  pressure.	  Taken	  together,	  the	  experiments	  reported	  here	  demonstrate	  that	  the	  use	  of	  optogenetics	  to	  simulate	  naturally	  sensed	  stimuli	  is	  a	  valid	  and	  useful	  model	  for	  studying	  habituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses.	  It	  is	  worth	  noting	  that	  most	  habituation	  assays	  are	  only	  approximations	  of	  reality	  because	  of	  the	  use	  of	  unnaturally	  consistent	  and	  reliable	  stimuli.	  	  As	  part	  of	  a	  collaborative	  side	  project,	  I	  also	  used	  an	  optogenetic	  approach	  to	  provide	  a	  mechanistic	  insight	  into	  habituation	  to	  tap	  (Timbers	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  We	  had	  observed	  tap	  habituation	  rates	  increasing	  throughout	  adulthood	  and	  hypothesized	  that	  this	  was	  caused	  by	  decreased	  sensitivity	  to	  mechanical	  stimuli	  in	  older	  animals,	  as	  one	  of	  the	  key	  characteristics	  of	  habituation	  is	  an	  inverse	  relationship	  between	  stimulus	  intensity	  and	  rate	  of	  decrement	  (characteristic	  #5;	  Spencer	  &	  Thompson,	  1966;	  Rankin	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  To	  test	  this	  hypothesis,	  transduction	  machinery	  was	  bypassed	  using	  ChR2	  activation	  in	  the	  body	  touch	  cells	  to	  simulate	  tap.	  As	  predicted,	  habituation	  to	  these	  simulated	  taps	  does	  not	  change	  across	  adulthood,	  suggesting	  that	  the	  aging	  effect	  is	  mediated	  by	  a	  decline	  in	  sensitivity	  upstream	  of	  cell	  excitation.	  This	  was	  confirmed	  by	  adjusting	  the	  force	  of	  the	  tap,	  which	  had	  a	  more	  profound	  effect	  on	  the	  habituation	  of	  younger	  animals.	  Behavioral	  analysis	  of	  many	  neural	  circuits	  could	  benefit	  from	  the	  gains	  in	  stimulus	  control,	  throughput,	  and	  quantification	  granted	  by	  the	  coupling	  of	  optogenetics	  and	  the	  Multi-­‐Worm	  Tracker.	  	  	  	   105	  4.2	  Similarities,	  differences,	  and	  interactions	  of	  converging	  circuits	  	   I	  set	  out	  to	  study	  habituation	  of	  a	  behavioral	  response	  similar	  to	  the	  reversal	  elicited	  by	  plate	  taps.	  ASH	  activation	  promotes	  reversals	  that	  depend	  on	  circuitry	  partially	  overlapping	  with	  that	  mediating	  the	  tap	  withdrawal	  response.	  However	  ASH	  detects	  diverse	  and	  potentially	  lethal	  cues	  and	  I	  therefore	  anticipated	  some	  degree	  of	  divergence	  for	  habituation	  of	  the	  two	  circuits.	  Like	  ASH,	  activation	  of	  the	  body	  touch	  cells	  by	  tap	  elicits	  a	  backward	  crawling	  response	  that	  often	  ends	  in	  a	  directional	  change	  known	  as	  an	  omega	  turn.	  There	  is	  however	  differences	  at	  the	  behavioral	  level,	  for	  example	  reversals	  elicited	  by	  the	  body	  touch	  cells	  are	  typically	  larger	  and	  are	  also	  associated	  with	  a	  suppression	  of	  head	  oscillations	  that	  occurs	  with	  some,	  but	  not	  all	  ASH	  sensed	  stimuli	  (Alkema	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Piggott	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Although	  the	  reversal	  responses	  are	  mediated	  by	  a	  largely	  overlapping	  set	  of	  interneurons	  (most	  notably	  AVA,	  AVD,	  and	  RIM),	  the	  sensory	  cells	  signal	  to	  these	  synaptic	  partners	  differently.	  While	  glutamatergic	  transmission	  from	  ASH	  drives	  a	  reversal	  response,	  neurotransmitter	  release	  from	  the	  body	  touch	  cells	  primarily	  modulates	  the	  reversal	  mediated	  by	  gap	  junction	  coupling	  to	  the	  command	  interneurons	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Mellem	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Chalfie	  et	  al.,	  1985;	  Wicks	  &	  Rankin,	  2000).	  Furthermore,	  the	  non-­‐localized	  agar	  vibration	  evoked	  by	  tap	  activates	  both	  a	  forward	  and	  backward	  drive,	  the	  integration	  of	  which	  determines	  the	  behavioral	  outcome	  (Wicks	  &	  Rankin,	  1995).	  I	  therefore	  expected	  some	  similarities	  and	  some	  differences	  with	  respect	  to	  habituation	  of	  these	  converging	  circuits.	  	   106	  	   The	  first	  immediately	  obvious	  difference	  is	  that	  compared	  with	  ASH	  photoactivation,	  the	  probability	  of	  a	  reversal	  declines	  more	  readily	  with	  repeated	  taps	  or	  with	  taps	  simulated	  via	  photoactivation	  of	  the	  body	  touch	  cells	  (Nagel	  et	  al.,	  2005;	  Timbers	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  However,	  using	  naturally	  sensed	  stimuli	  others	  have	  shown	  a	  rapid	  decline	  in	  the	  probability	  of	  responding	  to	  repeated	  or	  prolonged	  ASH	  activation	  (Hilliard	  et	  al.,	  2005;Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  This	  decrement	  is	  likely	  caused	  by	  decreased	  sensitivity	  to	  the	  stimulus	  (i.e.	  sensory	  adaptation)	  that	  cannot	  occur	  with	  photostimulation.	  Therefore,	  for	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit	  adaptation	  and	  habituation	  normally	  occur	  in	  parallel	  to	  primarily	  affect	  the	  probability	  and	  magnitude	  (respectively)	  of	  the	  response,	  whereas	  repeated	  taps	  causes	  habituation	  downstream	  of	  sensory	  transduction	  that	  decreases	  both	  the	  likelihood	  and	  magnitude	  of	  the	  response.	  	   For	  both	  ASH	  and	  the	  body	  touch	  cells,	  the	  presence	  of	  food	  promotes	  responding	  to	  repeated	  stimulation	  through	  elevated	  dopamine	  levels	  (Kindt	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  For	  tap	  habituation	  this	  is	  mediated	  by	  D1-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor	  DOP-­‐1	  attenuating	  the	  decrease	  in	  touch	  cell	  excitability	  to	  repeated	  stimulation	  (Kindt	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  While	  dopamine	  also	  slows	  the	  rate	  of	  response	  decrement	  to	  repeated	  CuCl2	  exposures	  in	  the	  presence	  of	  food,	  the	  relevant	  receptor	  had	  not	  been	  identified	  (Ezcurra	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Using	  the	  high-­‐throughput	  optogenetic	  assay	  described	  in	  chapter	  2,	  I	  implicated	  the	  invertebrate-­‐specific	  dopamine	  receptor	  DOP-­‐4.	  The	  deficits	  of	  each	  dopamine	  receptor	  appear	  to	  be	  assay-­‐specific,	  as	  loss	  of	  DOP-­‐4	  did	  not	  effect	  tap	  habituation	  (data	  not	  shown)	  and	  loss	  of	  DOP-­‐1	  did	  not	  affect	  habituation	  of	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit	  (Fig.	  2.7).	  	   107	  The	  rapid	  habituation	  phenotype	  of	  the	  dop-­‐4	  mutant	  could	  not	  be	  rescued	  by	  restoring	  expression	  in	  ASH,	  suggesting	  that	  unlike	  DOP-­‐1,	  DOP-­‐4	  was	  not	  functioning	  in	  the	  sensory	  neuron	  itself.	  Although	  DOP-­‐1	  and	  DOP-­‐4	  are	  both	  thought	  to	  be	  D1-­‐like	  receptors,	  DOP-­‐4	  belongs	  to	  an	  invertebrate	  specific	  subfamily,	  which	  includes	  the	  Drosophila	  receptor,	  DAMB,	  and	  the	  Apis	  mellifera	  receptor,	  DOP-­‐2	  (Sugiura	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  DOP-­‐4	  expression	  has	  been	  reported	  in	  ASG,	  AVL,	  CAN,	  and	  PQR,	  pharyngeal	  neurons	  I1	  and	  I2,	  as	  well	  as	  vulva,	  intestine,	  rectal	  glands,	  and	  rectal	  epithelial	  cells	  (Sugiura	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  The	  site	  of	  DOP-­‐4	  function	  is	  still	  under	  investigation.	  Although	  habituation	  of	  both	  responses	  is	  modulated	  by	  food	  and	  dopamine,	  the	  key	  dopamine	  receptors	  and	  their	  site	  of	  action	  differ.	  Other	  organisms	  should	  be	  tested	  to	  determine	  if	  dopaminergic	  modulation	  of	  habituation	  is	  shared	  across	  phylogeny.	  	   	  Knowledge	  gleaned	  from	  tap	  habituation	  studies	  should	  be	  evaluated	  with	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit	  and	  vice	  versa.	  For	  example,	  in	  the	  touch	  cells,	  autophosphorylation	  by	  the	  potassium	  channel	  accessory	  subunit	  MPS-­‐1	  promotes	  habituation	  (Cai	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  MPS-­‐1	  is	  also	  expressed	  in	  ASH,	  where	  it	  is	  thought	  to	  associate	  with	  K+	  channel	  KVS-­‐1	  (Bianchi	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  As	  was	  done	  for	  tap	  (Cai	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  habituation	  of	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  circuit	  should	  be	  tested	  with	  the	  mps-­‐1	  mutant	  expressing	  a	  kinase	  dead	  variant.	  The	  other	  uncloned	  tap	  habituation	  mutants,	  i.e.	  adp-­‐1	  and	  hab-­‐1	  (Swierczek	  et	  al.,	  2011;	  Xu	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  should	  also	  be	  tested	  in	  this	  new	  assay.	  Downstream	  of	  DOP-­‐1,	  Kindt	  et	  al.	  (2007)	  implicated	  a	  Gq/PLC-­‐β	  signaling	  cascade	  by	  showing	  loss	  of	  EGL-­‐30	  and	  EGL-­‐8	  phenocopied	  the	  loss	  of	  DOP-­‐1.	  A	  similar	  approach	  could	  be	  used	  to	  define	  the	  relevant	  pathway	  	   108	  downstream	  of	  DOP-­‐4,	  starting	  with	  a	  mutant	  analysis	  of	  Gαsubunit	  orthologs	  for	  Gq	  (egl-­‐30),	  Go	  (goa-­‐1),	  and	  Gs	  (gsa-­‐1).	  Conversely,	  findings	  originating	  from	  the	  ASH	  avoidance	  assay	  may	  be	  relevant	  for	  tap	  habituation.	  Indeed,	  I	  found	  that	  repeated	  taps	  also	  promoted	  dispersal	  and	  that	  this	  was	  dependent	  on	  PDFR-­‐1	  signaling	  (Fig.	  3.10).	  The	  pdfr-­‐1	  rescue	  lines	  described	  in	  chapter	  3	  should	  be	  evaluated	  with	  repeated	  taps	  to	  compare	  sites	  of	  action.	  As	  demonstrated	  by	  DOP-­‐1	  and	  DOP-­‐4,	  not	  all	  molecular	  components	  of	  habituation	  are	  predicted	  to	  generalize	  to	  all	  circuits	  and	  some	  are	  not	  great	  candidates,	  for	  example	  loss	  of	  glutamate	  vesicular	  transporter	  EAT-­‐4	  results	  in	  rapid	  tap	  habituation,	  but	  simply	  impairs	  naïve	  responding	  to	  all	  ASH-­‐sensed	  stimuli	  (Hart	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Mellem	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Guo	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  The	  use	  of	  multiple	  habituation	  assays	  is	  necessary	  for	  testing	  the	  generalizability	  of	  mechanistic	  insights.	  	   The	  successful	  use	  of	  tap	  to	  dishabituate	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses	  demonstrates	  an	  interaction	  between	  these	  two	  converging	  circuits.	  Interestingly,	  the	  opposite	  interaction	  does	  not	  occur,	  that	  is	  ASH	  photoactivation	  does	  not	  dishabituate	  the	  tap-­‐withdrawal	  response	  (data	  not	  shown).	  Rather	  than	  reversing	  the	  habituation	  process,	  sensory	  input	  from	  the	  touch	  cells	  appears	  to	  facilitate	  ASH-­‐mediated	  reversals	  by	  recruiting	  a	  sensitizing	  mechanism	  that	  gets	  superimposed	  on	  the	  decrement.	  The	  major	  piece	  of	  evidence	  for	  this	  is	  the	  inability	  for	  dishabituation	  to	  accelerate	  recovery	  to	  baseline,	  i.e.	  although	  a	  dishabituating	  plate	  tap	  facilitates	  decremented	  responses,	  the	  time	  to	  reach	  baseline	  is	  indistinguishable	  from	  spontaneously	  recovering	  controls	  (data	  not	  shown).	  Furthermore,	  in	  naïve	  animals	  tap	  facilitates	  responses	  above	  baseline	  with	  a	  	   109	  similar	  time	  course	  to	  dishabituation,	  approximately	  1min	  (data	  not	  shown).	  Evidence	  for	  dishabituation	  as	  a	  superimposed	  facilitatory	  process	  has	  also	  been	  reported	  in	  other	  systems,	  for	  example	  the	  cat	  leg	  flexion	  reflex	  (Spencer	  et	  al.,	  1966;	  Groves	  &	  Thompson	  1970),	  the	  leech	  shortening	  reflex	  (Ehrlich	  et	  al.	  1992;	  Sahley	  et	  al.	  1994),	  and	  the	  Aplysia	  gill-­‐	  and	  siphon-­‐withdrawal	  reflexes	  (Carew	  et	  al.	  1971;	  Cohen	  et	  al.	  1997;	  Antonov	  et	  al.	  1999;	  Hawkins	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  So	  far	  the	  mechanism	  underlying	  sensitization	  and	  dishabituation	  of	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses	  is	  unknown,	  as	  the	  behaviors	  were	  intact	  in	  all	  mutants	  tested	  to	  date,	  except	  touch	  insensitive	  mec-­‐4	  mutants.	  A	  potential	  mechanistic	  clue	  comes	  from	  Cho	  &	  Sternberg	  (2014),	  who	  demonstrated	  that	  body	  touch	  promotes	  coordinated	  interneuron	  activity	  to	  facilitate	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responding	  during	  quiescence,	  a	  period	  of	  reduced	  responsivity	  (Raizen	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  A	  similar	  phenomenon	  may	  underlie	  dishabituation	  and	  sensitization.	  	  	  4.3	  Conclusion	  Habituation	  is	  typically	  framed	  as	  a	  process	  allowing	  animals	  to	  ignore	  irrelevant	  stimuli	  in	  order	  to	  free	  up	  limited	  cognitive	  resources	  (Rankin	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  However,	  my	  data	  highlight	  the	  need	  for	  a	  broader	  interpretation.	  Careful	  behavioral	  analysis	  of	  an	  intact	  freely	  moving	  animal	  revealed	  that	  habituation	  could	  not	  be	  sufficiently	  described	  by	  the	  decrement	  of	  any	  single	  response	  metric,	  as	  it	  is	  so	  often	  reduced.	  Repeated	  stimulation	  actually	  induced	  a	  suite	  of	  behavioral	  changes	  that	  are	  at	  least	  partially	  genetically	  dissociable,	  but	  together	  define	  the	  state	  of	  the	  organism.	  For	  persistent	  ASH	  photoactivation,	  reversal	  responses	  are	  	   110	  largely	  maintained,	  but	  their	  duration	  shortens	  and	  reaction	  time	  slows,	  while	  the	  motile	  fraction	  of	  the	  population	  and	  its	  speed	  increases.	  Together	  these	  changes	  promote	  displacement,	  suggesting	  that	  in	  this	  case	  habituation	  is	  not	  so	  much	  about	  ignoring	  sensory	  input,	  as	  it	  is	  part	  of	  a	  shifting	  strategy	  prioritizing	  dispersal.	  Although	  this	  interpretation	  is	  not	  expected	  to	  generalize	  to	  every	  habituating	  circuit,	  my	  approach	  highlights	  the	  value	  of	  detailed	  behavioral	  analysis	  of	  an	  intact,	  freely	  moving	  animal.	  	  By	  dissecting	  behavior	  into	  multiple	  metrics,	  I	  identified	  two	  pathways	  that	  shaped	  the	  plasticity	  -­‐	  dopamine	  and	  PDF	  signaling.	  Dopamine	  promoting	  ASH-­‐mediated	  responses	  is	  reminiscent	  of	  its	  role	  signaling	  salience	  in	  mammals	  (Horvitz,	  2000),	  while	  the	  arousing	  influence	  of	  invertebrate	  PDF	  neuropeptides	  are	  mirrored	  by	  mammalian	  vasoactive	  intestinal	  peptide,	  whose	  receptors	  are	  similar	  in	  sequence	  to	  PDFR-­‐1	  (Kunst	  et	  al.,	  2015).	  Habituation	  is	  not	  a	  single	  process;	  rather,	  it	  comprises	  multiple	  mechanisms	  operating	  at	  different	  levels	  of	  neural	  circuits.	  While	  some	  mechanisms	  may	  be	  vertebrate-­‐specific,	  others	  are	  more	  conserved.	  For	  example,	  the	  large	  conductance	  voltage-­‐	  and	  calcium-­‐activated	  potassium	  (BK)	  channel	  mediates	  short-­‐term	  habituation	  in	  mice,	  flies,	  and	  worms	  (Engel	  &	  Wu,	  1998;	  Typlt	  et	  al.,	  2013).	  The	  best	  chance	  for	  a	  complete	  characterization	  of	  mechanisms	  of	  habituation	  relies	  on	  the	  continued	  use	  of	  diverse	  genetic	  model	  organisms	  with	  tractable	  nervous	  systems.	  	  	  	  	  	   111	  References	  	  Alkema,	  M.	  J.,	  Hunter-­‐Ensor,	  M.,	  Ringstad,	  N.,	  &	  Horvitz,	  H.	  R.	  (2005).	  Tyramine	  functions	  independently	  of	  octopamine	  in	  the	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  nervous	  system.	  Neuron,	  46(2),	  247-­‐260.	  	  Antonov,	  I.,	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.,	  &	  Hawkins,	  R.	  D.	  (1999).	  The	  contribution	  of	  facilitation	  of	  monosynaptic	  PSPs	  to	  dishabituation	  and	  sensitization	  of	  the	  Aplysia	  siphon	  withdrawal	  reflex.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  19(23),	  10438-­‐10450.	  	  Aoki,	  R.,	  Yagami,	  T.,	  Sasakura,	  H.,	  Ogura,	  K.,	  Kajihara,	  Y.,	  Ibi,	  M.,	  et	  al.	  (2011).	  A	  seven-­‐transmembrane	  receptor	  that	  mediates	  avoidance	  response	  to	  dihydrocaffeic	  acid,	  a	  water-­‐soluble	  repellent	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  31(46),	  16603-­‐16610.	  	  Bailey,	  C.	  H.,	  &	  Chen,	  M.	  (1988).	  Morphological	  basis	  of	  short-­‐term	  habituation	  in	  Aplysia.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  8(7),	  2452-­‐2459.	  	  Banerjee,	  D.,	  Kwok,	  A.,	  Lin,	  S.	  Y.,	  &	  Slack,	  F.	  J.	  (2005).	  Developmental	  timing	  in	  C.	  elegans	  is	  regulated	  by	  kin-­‐20	  and	  tim-­‐1,	  homologs	  of	  core	  circadian	  clock	  genes.	  Developmental	  Cell,	  8(2),	  287-­‐295.	  	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.,	  Thomas,	  J.	  H.,	  &	  Horvitz,	  H.	  R.	  (1990).	  Chemosensory	  cell	  function	  in	  the	  behavior	  and	  development	  of	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Cold	  Spring	  Harbor	  Symposia	  on	  Quantitative	  Biology,	  55,	  529-­‐538.	  	  Barrios,	  A.,	  Ghosh,	  R.,	  Fang,	  C.,	  Emmons,	  S.	  W.,	  &	  Barr,	  M.	  M.	  (2012).	  PDF-­‐1	  neuropeptide	  signaling	  modulates	  a	  neural	  circuit	  for	  mate-­‐searching	  behavior	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Nature	  Neuroscience,	  15(12),	  1675-­‐1682.	  	  Beck,	  C.	  D.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (1995).	  Heat	  shock	  disrupts	  long-­‐term	  memory	  consolidation	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Learning	  &	  Memory	  (Cold	  Spring	  Harbor,	  N.Y.),	  2(3-­‐4),	  161-­‐177.	  	  Ben	  Arous,	  J.,	  Tanizawa,	  Y.,	  Rabinowitch,	  I.,	  Chatenay,	  D.,	  &	  Schafer,	  W.	  R.	  (2010).	  Automated	  imaging	  of	  neuronal	  activity	  in	  freely	  behaving	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience	  Methods,	  187(2),	  229-­‐234.	  	  Bernhard,	  N.,	  &	  van	  der	  Kooy,	  D.	  (2000).	  A	  behavioral	  and	  genetic	  dissection	  of	  two	  forms	  of	  olfactory	  plasticity	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans:	  Adaptation	  and	  habituation.	  Learning	  &	  Memory,	  7(4),	  199-­‐212.	  	  Bessou,	  P.,	  &	  Perl,	  E.	  R.	  (1969).	  Response	  of	  cutaneous	  sensory	  units	  with	  unmyelinated	  fibers	  to	  noxious	  stimuli.	  Journal	  of	  Neurophysiology,	  32(6),	  1025-­‐1043.	  	  	   112	  Bettinger,	  J.	  C.,	  &	  McIntire,	  S.	  L.	  (2004).	  State-­‐dependency	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Genes,	  Brain,	  and	  Behavior,	  3(5),	  266-­‐272.	  	  Bianchi,	  L.,	  Kwok,	  S.	  M.,	  Driscoll,	  M.,	  &	  Sesti,	  F.	  (2003).	  A	  potassium	  channel-­‐MiRP	  complex	  controls	  neurosensory	  function	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Biological	  Chemistry,	  278(14),	  12415-­‐12424.	  	  Bozorgmehr,	  T.,	  Ardiel,	  E.	  L.,	  McEwan,	  A.	  H.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (2013).	  Mechanisms	  of	  plasticity	  in	  a	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  mechanosensory	  circuit.	  Frontiers	  in	  Physiology,	  4,	  88.	  	  Braff,	  D.	  L.,	  Grillon,	  C.,	  &	  Geyer,	  M.	  A.	  (1992).	  Gating	  and	  habituation	  of	  the	  startle	  reflex	  in	  schizophrenic	  patients.	  Archives	  of	  General	  Psychiatry,	  49(3),	  206-­‐215.	  	  Brenner,	  S.	  (1974).	  The	  genetics	  of	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Genetics,	  77(1),	  71-­‐94.	  	  Cai,	  S.	  Q.,	  Wang,	  Y.,	  Park,	  K.	  H.,	  Tong,	  X.,	  Pan,	  Z.,	  &	  Sesti,	  F.	  (2009).	  Auto-­‐phosphorylation	  of	  a	  voltage-­‐gated	  K+	  channel	  controls	  non-­‐associative	  learning.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  28(11),	  1601-­‐1611.	  	  Calixto,	  A.,	  Chelur,	  D.,	  Topalidou,	  I.,	  Chen,	  X.,	  &	  Chalfie,	  M.	  (2010).	  Enhanced	  neuronal	  RNAi	  in	  C.	  elegans	  using	  SID-­‐1.	  Nature	  Methods,	  7(7),	  554-­‐559.	  	  Carew,	  T.	  J.,	  Castellucci,	  V.	  F.,	  &	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.	  (1971).	  An	  analysis	  of	  dishabituation	  and	  sensitization	  of	  the	  gill-­‐withdrawal	  reflex	  in	  aplysia.	  The	  International	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  2(2),	  79-­‐98.	  	  Castellucci,	  V.,	  Pinsker,	  H.,	  Kupfermann,	  I.,	  &	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.	  (1970).	  Neuronal	  mechanisms	  of	  habituation	  and	  dishabituation	  of	  the	  gill-­‐withdrawal	  reflex	  in	  aplysia.	  Science,	  167(3926),	  1745-­‐1748.	  	  Castellucci,	  V.	  F.,	  &	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.	  (1974).	  A	  quantal	  analysis	  of	  the	  synaptic	  depression	  underlying	  habituation	  of	  the	  gill-­‐withdrawal	  reflex	  in	  aplysia.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  71(12),	  5004-­‐5008.	  	  Chalasani,	  S.	  H.,	  Kato,	  S.,	  Albrecht,	  D.	  R.,	  Nakagawa,	  T.,	  Abbott,	  L.	  F.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (2010).	  Neuropeptide	  feedback	  modifies	  odor-­‐evoked	  dynamics	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  olfactory	  neurons.	  Nature	  Neuroscience,	  13(5),	  615-­‐621.	  	  Chalfie,	  M.,	  Sulston,	  J.	  E.,	  White,	  J.	  G.,	  Southgate,	  E.,	  Thomson,	  J.	  N.,	  &	  Brenner,	  S.	  (1985).	  The	  neural	  circuit	  for	  touch	  sensitivity	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  5(4),	  956-­‐964.	  	  	  	   113	  Chao,	  M.	  Y.,	  Komatsu,	  H.,	  Fukuto,	  H.	  S.,	  Dionne,	  H.	  M.,	  &	  Hart,	  A.	  C.	  (2004).	  Feeding	  status	  and	  serotonin	  rapidly	  and	  reversibly	  modulate	  a	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  chemosensory	  circuit.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  101(43),	  15512-­‐15517.	  	  Chatzigeorgiou,	  M.,	  Bang,	  S.,	  Hwang,	  S.	  W.,	  &	  Schafer,	  W.	  R.	  (2013).	  tmc-­‐1	  encodes	  a	  sodium-­‐sensitive	  channel	  required	  for	  salt	  chemosensation	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Nature,	  494(7435),	  95-­‐99.	  	  Chen,	  Z.,	  Hendricks,	  M.,	  Cornils,	  A.,	  Maier,	  W.,	  Alcedo,	  J.,	  &	  Zhang,	  Y.	  (2013).	  Two	  insulin-­‐like	  peptides	  antagonistically	  regulate	  aversive	  olfactory	  learning	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Neuron,	  77(3),	  572-­‐585.	  	  Cheung,	  B.	  H.,	  Arellano-­‐Carbajal,	  F.,	  Rybicki,	  I.,	  &	  de	  Bono,	  M.	  (2004).	  Soluble	  guanylate	  cyclases	  act	  in	  neurons	  exposed	  to	  the	  body	  fluid	  to	  promote	  C.	  elegans	  aggregation	  behavior.	  Current	  Biology,	  14(12),	  1105-­‐1111.	  	  Cho,	  J.	  Y.,	  &	  Sternberg,	  P.	  W.	  (2014).	  Multilevel	  modulation	  of	  a	  sensory	  motor	  circuit	  during	  C.	  elegans	  sleep	  and	  arousal.	  Cell,	  156(1-­‐2),	  249-­‐260.	  	  Choi,	  S.,	  Chatzigeorgiou,	  M.,	  Taylor,	  K.	  P.,	  Schafer,	  W.	  R.,	  &	  Kaplan,	  J.	  M.	  (2013).	  Analysis	  of	  NPR-­‐1	  reveals	  a	  circuit	  mechanism	  for	  behavioral	  quiescence	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Neuron,	  78(5),	  869-­‐880.	  	  Chronis,	  N.,	  Zimmer,	  M.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (2007).	  Microfluidics	  for	  in	  vivo	  imaging	  of	  neuronal	  and	  behavioral	  activity	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Nature	  Methods,	  4(9),	  727-­‐731.	  	  Coates,	  J.	  C.,	  &	  de	  Bono,	  M.	  (2002).	  Antagonistic	  pathways	  in	  neurons	  exposed	  to	  body	  fluid	  regulate	  social	  feeding	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Nature,	  419(6910),	  925-­‐929.	  	  Cohen,	  T.	  E.,	  Kaplan,	  S.	  W.,	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.,	  &	  Hawkins,	  R.	  D.	  (1997).	  A	  simplified	  preparation	  for	  relating	  cellular	  events	  to	  behavior:	  Mechanisms	  contributing	  to	  habituation,	  dishabituation,	  and	  sensitization	  of	  the	  aplysia	  gill-­‐withdrawal	  reflex.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  17(8),	  2886-­‐2899.	  	  Colbert,	  H.	  A.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (1995).	  Odorant-­‐specific	  adaptation	  pathways	  generate	  olfactory	  plasticity	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Neuron,	  14(4),	  803-­‐812.	  	  Colbert,	  H.	  A.,	  Smith,	  T.	  L.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (1997).	  OSM-­‐9,	  a	  novel	  protein	  with	  structural	  similarity	  to	  channels,	  is	  required	  for	  olfaction,	  mechanosensation,	  and	  olfactory	  adaptation	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  17(21),	  8259-­‐8269.	  	  	   114	  Culotti,	  J.	  G.,	  &	  Russell,	  R.	  L.	  (1978).	  Osmotic	  avoidance	  defective	  mutants	  of	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Genetics,	  90(2),	  243-­‐256.	  	  Das,	  S.,	  Sadanandappa,	  M.	  K.,	  Dervan,	  A.,	  Larkin,	  A.,	  Lee,	  J.	  A.,	  Sudhakaran,	  I.	  P.,	  et	  al.	  (2011).	  Plasticity	  of	  local	  GABAergic	  interneurons	  drives	  olfactory	  habituation.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  108(36),	  E646-­‐54.	  	  Dudai,	  Y.,	  Jan,	  Y.	  N.,	  Byers,	  D.,	  Quinn,	  W.	  G.,	  &	  Benzer,	  S.	  (1976).	  Dunce,	  a	  mutant	  of	  drosophila	  deficient	  in	  learning.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  73(5),	  1684-­‐1688.	  	  Duerr,	  J.	  S.,	  &	  Quinn,	  W.	  G.	  (1982).	  Three	  drosophila	  mutations	  that	  block	  associative	  learning	  also	  affect	  habituation	  and	  sensitization.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  79(11),	  3646-­‐3650.	  	  Edwards,	  S.	  L.,	  Charlie,	  N.	  K.,	  Milfort,	  M.	  C.,	  Brown,	  B.	  S.,	  Gravlin,	  C.	  N.,	  Knecht,	  J.	  E.,	  et	  al.	  (2008).	  A	  novel	  molecular	  solution	  for	  ultraviolet	  light	  detection	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  PLoS	  Biology,	  6(8),	  e198.	  	  Ehrlich,	  J.	  S.,	  Boulis,	  N.	  M.,	  Karrer,	  T.,	  &	  Sahley,	  C.	  L.	  (1992).	  Differential	  effects	  of	  serotonin	  depletion	  on	  sensitization	  and	  dishabituation	  in	  the	  leech,	  hirudo	  medicinalis.	  Journal	  of	  Neurobiology,	  23(3),	  270-­‐279.	  	  Engel,	  J.	  E.,	  &	  Wu,	  C.	  F.	  (1996).	  Altered	  habituation	  of	  an	  identified	  escape	  circuit	  in	  drosophila	  memory	  mutants.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  16(10),	  3486-­‐3499.	  	  Engel,	  J.	  E.,	  &	  Wu,	  C.	  F.	  (1998).	  Genetic	  dissection	  of	  functional	  contributions	  of	  specific	  potassium	  channel	  subunits	  in	  habituation	  of	  an	  escape	  circuit	  in	  drosophila.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  18(6),	  2254-­‐2267.	  	  Engel,	  J.	  E.,	  Xie,	  X.	  J.,	  Sokolowski,	  M.	  B.,	  &	  Wu,	  C.	  F.	  (2000).	  A	  cGMP-­‐dependent	  protein	  kinase	  gene,	  foraging,	  modifies	  habituation-­‐like	  response	  decrement	  of	  the	  giant	  fiber	  escape	  circuit	  in	  drosophila.	  Learning	  &	  Memory,	  7(5),	  341-­‐352.	  	  Ezak,	  M.	  J.,	  &	  Ferkey,	  D.	  M.	  (2010).	  The	  C.	  elegans	  D2-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor	  DOP-­‐3	  decreases	  behavioral	  sensitivity	  to	  the	  olfactory	  stimulus	  1-­‐octanol.	  PloS	  One,	  5(3),	  e9487.	  	  Ezcurra,	  M.,	  Tanizawa,	  Y.,	  Swoboda,	  P.,	  &	  Schafer,	  W.	  R.	  (2011).	  Food	  sensitizes	  C.	  elegans	  avoidance	  behaviours	  through	  acute	  dopamine	  signalling.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  30(6),	  1110-­‐1122.	  	  Ferkey,	  D.	  M.,	  Hyde,	  R.,	  Haspel,	  G.,	  Dionne,	  H.	  M.,	  Hess,	  H.	  A.,	  Suzuki,	  H.,	  et	  al.	  (2007).	  C.	  elegans	  G	  protein	  regulator	  RGS-­‐3	  controls	  sensitivity	  to	  sensory	  stimuli.	  Neuron,	  53(1),	  39-­‐52.	  	   115	  Flavell,	  S.	  W.,	  Pokala,	  N.,	  Macosko,	  E.	  Z.,	  Albrecht,	  D.	  R.,	  Larsch,	  J.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (2013).	  Serotonin	  and	  the	  neuropeptide	  PDF	  initiate	  and	  extend	  opposing	  behavioral	  states	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Cell,	  154(5),	  1023-­‐1035.	  	  Forbes,	  W.	  M.,	  Ashton,	  F.	  T.,	  Boston,	  R.,	  Zhu,	  X.,	  &	  Schad,	  G.	  A.	  (2004).	  Chemoattraction	  and	  chemorepulsion	  of	  strongyloides	  stercoralis	  infective	  larvae	  on	  a	  sodium	  chloride	  gradient	  is	  mediated	  by	  amphidial	  neuron	  pairs	  ASE	  and	  ASH,	  respectively.	  Veterinary	  Parasitology,	  120(3),	  189-­‐198.	  	  Frokjaer-­‐Jensen,	  C.,	  Davis,	  M.	  W.,	  Hopkins,	  C.	  E.,	  Newman,	  B.	  J.,	  Thummel,	  J.	  M.,	  Olesen,	  S.	  P.,	  et	  al.	  (2008).	  Single-­‐copy	  insertion	  of	  transgenes	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Nature	  Genetics,	  40(11),	  1375-­‐1383.	  	  Frooninckx,	  L.,	  Van	  Rompay,	  L.,	  Temmerman,	  L.,	  Van	  Sinay,	  E.,	  Beets,	  I.,	  Janssen,	  T.,	  et	  al.	  (2012).	  Neuropeptide	  GPCRs	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Frontiers	  in	  Endocrinology,	  3,	  167.	  	  Fukuto,	  H.	  S.,	  Ferkey,	  D.	  M.,	  Apicella,	  A.	  J.,	  Lans,	  H.,	  Sharmeen,	  T.,	  Chen,	  W.,	  et	  al.	  (2004).	  G	  protein-­‐coupled	  receptor	  kinase	  function	  is	  essential	  for	  chemosensation	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Neuron,	  42(4),	  581-­‐593.	  	  Geffeney,	  S.	  L.,	  Cueva,	  J.	  G.,	  Glauser,	  D.	  A.,	  Doll,	  J.	  C.,	  Lee,	  T.	  H.,	  Montoya,	  M.,	  et	  al.	  (2011).	  DEG/ENaC	  but	  not	  TRP	  channels	  are	  the	  major	  mechanoelectrical	  transduction	  channels	  in	  a	  C.	  elegans	  nociceptor.	  Neuron,	  71(5),	  845-­‐857.	  	  Gerstein,	  M.	  B.,	  Lu,	  Z.	  J.,	  Van	  Nostrand,	  E.	  L.,	  Cheng,	  C.,	  Arshinoff,	  B.	  I.,	  Liu,	  T.,	  et	  al.	  (2010).	  Integrative	  analysis	  of	  the	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  genome	  by	  the	  modENCODE	  project.	  Science,	  330(6012),	  1775-­‐1787.	  	  Gingrich,	  K.	  J.,	  &	  Byrne,	  J.	  H.	  (1985).	  Simulation	  of	  synaptic	  depression,	  posttetanic	  potentiation,	  and	  presynaptic	  facilitation	  of	  synaptic	  potentials	  from	  sensory	  neurons	  mediating	  gill-­‐withdrawal	  reflex	  in	  aplysia.	  Journal	  of	  Neurophysiology,	  53(3),	  652-­‐669.	  	  Godenschwege,	  T.	  A.,	  Reisch,	  D.,	  Diegelmann,	  S.,	  Eberle,	  K.,	  Funk,	  N.,	  Heisenberg,	  M.,	  et	  al.	  (2004).	  Flies	  lacking	  all	  synapsins	  are	  unexpectedly	  healthy	  but	  are	  impaired	  in	  complex	  behaviour.	  The	  European	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  20(3),	  611-­‐622.	  	  Gomez-­‐Saladin,	  E.,	  Wilson,	  D.	  L.,	  &	  Dickerson,	  I.	  M.	  (1994).	  Isolation	  and	  in	  situ	  localization	  of	  a	  cDNA	  encoding	  a	  Kex2-­‐like	  prohormone	  convertase	  in	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Cellular	  and	  Molecular	  Neurobiology,	  14(1),	  9-­‐25.	  	  Gover,	  T.	  D.,	  Jiang,	  X.	  Y.,	  &	  Abrams,	  T.	  W.	  (2002).	  Persistent,	  exocytosis-­‐independent	  silencing	  of	  release	  sites	  underlies	  homosynaptic	  depression	  at	  sensory	  synapses	  in	  aplysia.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  22(5),	  1942-­‐1955.	  	  	   116	  Groves,	  P.	  M.,	  &	  Thompson,	  R.	  F.	  (1970).	  Habituation:	  A	  dual-­‐process	  theory.	  Psychological	  Review,	  77(5),	  419-­‐450.	  	  Guo,	  Z.	  V.,	  Hart,	  A.	  C.,	  &	  Ramanathan,	  S.	  (2009).	  Optical	  interrogation	  of	  neural	  circuits	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Nature	  Methods,	  6(12),	  891-­‐896.	  	  Hapiak,	  V.,	  Summers,	  P.,	  Ortega,	  A.,	  Law,	  W.	  J.,	  Stein,	  A.,	  &	  Komuniecki,	  R.	  (2013).	  Neuropeptides	  amplify	  and	  focus	  the	  monoaminergic	  inhibition	  of	  nociception	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  33(35),	  14107-­‐14116.	  	  Harris,	  G.,	  Korchnak,	  A.,	  Summers,	  P.,	  Hapiak,	  V.,	  Law,	  W.	  J.,	  Stein,	  A.	  M.,	  et	  al.	  (2011).	  Dissecting	  the	  serotonergic	  food	  signal	  stimulating	  sensory-­‐mediated	  aversive	  behavior	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  PloS	  One,	  6(7),	  e21897.	  	  Harris,	  G.	  P.,	  Hapiak,	  V.	  M.,	  Wragg,	  R.	  T.,	  Miller,	  S.	  B.,	  Hughes,	  L.	  J.,	  Hobson,	  R.	  J.,	  et	  al.	  (2009).	  Three	  distinct	  amine	  receptors	  operating	  at	  different	  levels	  within	  the	  locomotory	  circuit	  are	  each	  essential	  for	  the	  serotonergic	  modulation	  of	  chemosensation	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  29(5),	  1446-­‐1456.	  	  Hart,	  A.	  C.,	  Kass,	  J.,	  Shapiro,	  J.	  E.,	  &	  Kaplan,	  J.	  M.	  (1999).	  Distinct	  signaling	  pathways	  mediate	  touch	  and	  osmosensory	  responses	  in	  a	  polymodal	  sensory	  neuron.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  19(6),	  1952-­‐1958.	  	  Hart,	  A.	  C.,	  Sims,	  S.,	  &	  Kaplan,	  J.	  M.	  (1995).	  Synaptic	  code	  for	  sensory	  modalities	  revealed	  by	  C.	  elegans	  GLR-­‐1	  glutamate	  receptor.	  Nature,	  378(6552),	  82-­‐85.	  	  Hawkins,	  R.	  D.,	  Cohen,	  T.	  E.,	  &	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.	  (2006).	  Dishabituation	  in	  aplysia	  can	  involve	  either	  reversal	  of	  habituation	  or	  superimposed	  sensitization.	  Learning	  &	  Memory,	  13(3),	  397-­‐403.	  	  Hilliard,	  M.	  A.,	  Apicella,	  A.	  J.,	  Kerr,	  R.,	  Suzuki,	  H.,	  Bazzicalupo,	  P.,	  &	  Schafer,	  W.	  R.	  (2005).	  In	  vivo	  imaging	  of	  C.	  elegans	  ASH	  neurons:	  Cellular	  response	  and	  adaptation	  to	  chemical	  repellents.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  24(1),	  63-­‐72.	  	  Hilliard,	  M.	  A.,	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.,	  &	  Bazzicalupo,	  P.	  (2002).	  C.	  elegans	  responds	  to	  chemical	  repellents	  by	  integrating	  sensory	  inputs	  from	  the	  head	  and	  the	  tail.	  Current	  Biology,	  12(9),	  730-­‐734.	  	  Hilliard,	  M.	  A.,	  Bergamasco,	  C.,	  Arbucci,	  S.,	  Plasterk,	  R.	  H.,	  &	  Bazzicalupo,	  P.	  (2004).	  Worms	  taste	  bitter:	  ASH	  neurons,	  QUI-­‐1,	  GPA-­‐3	  and	  ODR-­‐3	  mediate	  quinine	  avoidance	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  23(5),	  1101-­‐1111.	  	  Hills,	  T.,	  Brockie,	  P.	  J.,	  &	  Maricq,	  A.	  V.	  (2004).	  Dopamine	  and	  glutamate	  control	  area-­‐restricted	  search	  behavior	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  24(5),	  1217-­‐1225.	  	   117	  Hirotsu,	  T.,	  &	  Iino,	  Y.	  (2005).	  Neural	  circuit-­‐dependent	  odor	  adaptation	  in	  C.	  elegans	  is	  regulated	  by	  the	  ras-­‐MAPK	  pathway.	  Genes	  to	  Cells	  :	  Devoted	  to	  Molecular	  &	  Cellular	  Mechanisms,	  10(6),	  517-­‐530.	  	  Horvitz,	  J.	  C.	  (2000).	  Mesolimbocortical	  and	  nigrostriatal	  dopamine	  responses	  to	  salient	  non-­‐reward	  events.	  Neuroscience,	  96(4),	  651-­‐656.	  	  Hukema,	  R.	  K.,	  Rademakers,	  S.,	  &	  Jansen,	  G.	  (2008).	  Gustatory	  plasticity	  in	  C.	  elegans	  involves	  integration	  of	  negative	  cues	  and	  NaCl	  taste	  mediated	  by	  serotonin,	  dopamine,	  and	  glutamate.	  Learning	  &	  Memory,	  829-­‐836.	  	  Husson,	  S.	  J.,	  Clynen,	  E.,	  Baggerman,	  G.,	  Janssen,	  T.,	  &	  Schoofs,	  L.	  (2006).	  Defective	  processing	  of	  neuropeptide	  precursors	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  lacking	  proprotein	  convertase	  2	  (KPC-­‐2/EGL-­‐3):	  Mutant	  analysis	  by	  mass	  spectrometry.	  Journal	  of	  Neurochemistry,	  98(6),	  1999-­‐2012.	  	  Husson,	  S.	  J.,	  Liewald,	  J.	  F.,	  Schultheis,	  C.,	  Stirman,	  J.	  N.,	  Lu,	  H.,	  &	  Gottschalk,	  A.	  (2012).	  Microbial	  light-­‐activatable	  proton	  pumps	  as	  neuronal	  inhibitors	  to	  functionally	  dissect	  neuronal	  networks	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  PloS	  One,	  7(7),	  e40937.	  	  Iino,	  Y.,	  &	  Yoshida,	  K.	  (2009).	  Parallel	  use	  of	  two	  behavioral	  mechanisms	  for	  chemotaxis	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  29(17),	  5370-­‐5380.	  	  Jacob,	  T.	  C.,	  &	  Kaplan,	  J.	  M.	  (2003).	  The	  EGL-­‐21	  carboxypeptidase	  E	  facilitates	  acetylcholine	  release	  at	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  neuromuscular	  junctions.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  23(6),	  2122-­‐2130.	  	  Jansen,	  G.,	  Weinkove,	  D.,	  &	  Plasterk,	  R.	  H.	  (2002).	  The	  G-­‐protein	  gamma	  subunit	  gpc-­‐1	  of	  the	  nematode	  C.elegans	  is	  involved	  in	  taste	  adaptation.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  21(5),	  986-­‐994.	  	  Janssen,	  T.,	  Husson,	  S.	  J.,	  Lindemans,	  M.,	  Mertens,	  I.,	  Rademakers,	  S.,	  Ver	  Donck,	  K.,	  et	  al.	  (2008).	  Functional	  characterization	  of	  three	  G	  protein-­‐coupled	  receptors	  for	  pigment	  dispersing	  factors	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Biological	  Chemistry,	  283(22),	  15241-­‐15249.	  	  Janssen,	  T.,	  Husson,	  S.J.,	  Meelkop,	  E.,	  Temmerman,	  L.,	  Lindemans,	  M.,	  Verstraelen,	  K.,	  et	  al.	  (2009).	  Discovery	  and	  characterization	  of	  a	  conserved	  pigment	  dispersing	  factor-­‐like	  neuropeptide	  pathway	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neurochemistry,	  111(1),	  228-­‐241.	  	  Jeon,	  M.,	  Gardner,	  H.	  F.,	  Miller,	  E.	  A.,	  Deshler,	  J.,	  &	  Rougvie,	  A.	  E.	  (1999).	  Similarity	  of	  the	  C.	  elegans	  developmental	  timing	  protein	  LIN-­‐42	  to	  circadian	  rhythm	  proteins.	  Science,	  286(5442),	  1141-­‐1146.	  	  	   118	  Jin,	  P.,	  Griffith,	  L.	  C.,	  &	  Murphey,	  R.	  K.	  (1998).	  Presynaptic	  calcium/calmodulin-­‐dependent	  protein	  kinase	  II	  regulates	  habituation	  of	  a	  simple	  reflex	  in	  adult	  drosophila.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  18(21),	  8955-­‐8964.	  	  Joiner,	  M.	  A.,	  Asztalos,	  Z.,	  Jones,	  C.	  J.,	  Tully,	  T.,	  &	  Wu,	  C.	  F.	  (2007).	  Effects	  of	  mutant	  drosophila	  K+	  channel	  subunits	  on	  habituation	  of	  the	  olfactory	  jump	  response.	  Journal	  of	  Neurogenetics,	  21(1-­‐2),	  45-­‐58.	  	  Juang,	  B.	  T.,	  Gu,	  C.,	  Starnes,	  L.,	  Palladino,	  F.,	  Goga,	  A.,	  Kennedy,	  S.,	  et	  al.	  (2013).	  Endogenous	  nuclear	  RNAi	  mediates	  behavioral	  adaptation	  to	  odor.	  Cell,	  154(5),	  1010-­‐1022.	  	  Kahn-­‐Kirby,	  A.	  H.,	  Dantzker,	  J.	  L.,	  Apicella,	  A.	  J.,	  Schafer,	  W.	  R.,	  Browse,	  J.,	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.,	  et	  al.	  (2004).	  Specific	  polyunsaturated	  fatty	  acids	  drive	  TRPV-­‐dependent	  sensory	  signaling	  in	  vivo.	  Cell,	  119(6),	  889-­‐900.	  	  Kamath,	  R.	  S.,	  Fraser,	  A.	  G.,	  Dong,	  Y.,	  Poulin,	  G.,	  Durbin,	  R.,	  Gotta,	  M.,	  et	  al.	  (2003).	  Systematic	  functional	  analysis	  of	  the	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  genome	  using	  RNAi.	  Nature,	  421(6920),	  231-­‐237.	  	  Kamath,	  R.	  S.,	  Martinez-­‐Campos,	  M.,	  Zipperlen,	  P.,	  Fraser,	  A.	  G.,	  &	  Ahringer,	  J.	  (2001).	  Effectiveness	  of	  specific	  RNA-­‐mediated	  interference	  through	  ingested	  double-­‐stranded	  RNA	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Genome	  Biology,	  2(1).	  	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.	  (2004).	  The	  molecular	  biology	  of	  memory	  storage:	  A	  dialog	  between	  genes	  and	  synapses.	  Bioscience	  Reports,	  24(4-­‐5),	  475-­‐522.	  	  Kaplan,	  J.	  M.,	  &	  Horvitz,	  H.	  R.	  (1993).	  A	  dual	  mechanosensory	  and	  chemosensory	  neuron	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  90(6),	  2227-­‐2231.	  	  Kass,	  J.,	  Jacob,	  T.	  C.,	  Kim,	  P.,	  &	  Kaplan,	  J.	  M.	  (2001).	  The	  EGL-­‐3	  proprotein	  convertase	  regulates	  mechanosensory	  responses	  of	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  21(23),	  9265-­‐9272.	  	  Kato,	  S.,	  Xu,	  Y.,	  Cho,	  C.	  E.,	  Abbott,	  L.	  F.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (2014).	  Temporal	  responses	  of	  C.	  elegans	  chemosensory	  neurons	  are	  preserved	  in	  behavioral	  dynamics.	  Neuron,	  81(3),	  616-­‐628.	  	  Kawano,	  T.,	  Po,	  M.	  D.,	  Gao,	  S.,	  Leung,	  G.,	  Ryu,	  W.	  S.,	  &	  Zhen,	  M.	  (2011).	  An	  imbalancing	  act:	  Gap	  junctions	  reduce	  the	  backward	  motor	  circuit	  activity	  to	  bias	  C.	  elegans	  for	  forward	  locomotion.	  Neuron,	  72(4),	  572-­‐586.	  	  Kaye,	  J.	  A.,	  Rose,	  N.	  C.,	  Goldsworthy,	  B.,	  Goga,	  A.,	  &	  L'Etoile,	  N.	  D.	  (2009).	  A	  3'UTR	  pumilio-­‐binding	  element	  directs	  translational	  activation	  in	  olfactory	  sensory	  neurons.	  Neuron,	  61(1),	  57-­‐70.	  	   119	  Ketschek,	  A.	  R.,	  Joseph,	  R.,	  Boston,	  R.,	  Ashton,	  F.	  T.,	  &	  Schad,	  G.	  A.	  (2004).	  Amphidial	  neurons	  ADL	  and	  ASH	  initiate	  sodium	  dodecyl	  sulphate	  avoidance	  responses	  in	  the	  infective	  larva	  of	  the	  dog	  hookworm	  anclyostoma	  caninum.	  International	  Journal	  for	  Parasitology,	  34(12),	  1333-­‐1336.	  	  Kimura,	  K.	  D.,	  Fujita,	  K.,	  &	  Katsura,	  I.	  (2010).	  Enhancement	  of	  odor	  avoidance	  regulated	  by	  dopamine	  signaling	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  30(48),	  16365-­‐16375.	  	  Kindt,	  K.	  S.,	  Quast,	  K.	  B.,	  Giles,	  A.	  C.,	  De,	  S.,	  Hendrey,	  D.,	  Nicastro,	  I.,	  et	  al.	  (2007).	  Dopamine	  mediates	  context-­‐dependent	  modulation	  of	  sensory	  plasticity	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Neuron,	  55(4),	  662-­‐676.	  	  Kippert,	  F.,	  Saunders,	  D.	  S.,	  &	  Blaxter,	  M.	  L.	  (2002).	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  has	  a	  circadian	  clock.	  Current	  Biology,	  12(2),	  R47-­‐9.	  	  Klein,	  M.,	  Shapiro,	  E.,	  &	  Kandel,	  E.	  R.	  (1980).	  Synaptic	  plasticity	  and	  the	  modulation	  of	  the	  Ca2+	  current.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Biology,	  89,	  117-­‐157.	  	  Kleinhans,	  N.	  M.,	  Johnson,	  L.	  C.,	  Richards,	  T.,	  Mahurin,	  R.,	  Greenson,	  J.,	  Dawson,	  G.,	  et	  al.	  (2009).	  Reduced	  neural	  habituation	  in	  the	  amygdala	  and	  social	  impairments	  in	  autism	  spectrum	  disorders.	  The	  American	  Journal	  of	  Psychiatry,	  166(4),	  467-­‐475.	  	  Kodama,	  E.,	  Kuhara,	  A.,	  Mohri-­‐Shiomi,	  A.,	  Kimura,	  K.	  D.,	  Okumura,	  M.,	  Tomioka,	  M.,	  et	  al.	  (2006).	  Insulin-­‐like	  signaling	  and	  the	  neural	  circuit	  for	  integrative	  behavior	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Genes	  &	  Development,	  20(21),	  2955-­‐2960.	  	  Komuniecki,	  R.,	  Harris,	  G.,	  Hapiak,	  V.,	  Wragg,	  R.,	  &	  Bamber,	  B.	  (2012).	  Monoamines	  activate	  neuropeptide	  signaling	  cascades	  to	  modulate	  nociception	  in	  C.	  elegans:	  A	  useful	  model	  for	  the	  modulation	  of	  chronic	  pain?	  Invertebrate	  Neuroscience,	  12(1),	  53-­‐61.	  	  Kuhara,	  A.,	  Inada,	  H.,	  Katsura,	  I.,	  &	  Mori,	  I.	  (2002).	  Negative	  regulation	  and	  gain	  control	  of	  sensory	  neurons	  by	  the	  C.	  elegans	  calcineurin	  TAX-­‐6.	  Neuron,	  33(5),	  751-­‐763.	  	  Kunst,	  M.,	  Tso,	  M.	  C.,	  Ghosh,	  D.	  D.,	  Herzog,	  E.	  D.,	  &	  Nitabach,	  M.	  N.	  (2014).	  Rhythmic	  control	  of	  activity	  and	  sleep	  by	  class	  B1	  GPCRs.	  Critical	  Reviews	  in	  Biochemistry	  and	  Molecular	  Biology,	  1-­‐13.	  	  Kupfermann,	  I.,	  Castellucci,	  V.,	  Pinsker,	  H.,	  &	  Kandel,	  E.	  (1970).	  Neuronal	  correlates	  of	  habituation	  and	  dishabituation	  of	  the	  gill-­‐withdrawal	  reflex	  in	  aplysia.	  Science,	  167(3926),	  1743-­‐1745.	  	  	   120	  Lau,	  H.	  L.,	  Timbers,	  T.	  A.,	  Mahmoud,	  R.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (2013).	  Genetic	  dissection	  of	  memory	  for	  associative	  and	  non-­‐associative	  learning	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Genes,	  Brain,	  and	  Behavior,	  12(2),	  210-­‐223.	  	  Lee,	  J.	  I.,	  O'Halloran,	  D.	  M.,	  Eastham-­‐Anderson,	  J.,	  Juang,	  B.	  T.,	  Kaye,	  J.	  A.,	  Scott	  Hamilton,	  O.,	  et	  al.	  (2010).	  Nuclear	  entry	  of	  a	  cGMP-­‐dependent	  kinase	  converts	  transient	  into	  long-­‐lasting	  olfactory	  adaptation.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  107(13),	  6016-­‐6021.	  	  Lee,	  R.	  Y.,	  Sawin,	  E.	  R.,	  Chalfie,	  M.,	  Horvitz,	  H.	  R.,	  &	  Avery,	  L.	  (1999).	  EAT-­‐4,	  a	  homolog	  of	  a	  mammalian	  sodium-­‐dependent	  inorganic	  phosphate	  cotransporter,	  is	  necessary	  for	  glutamatergic	  neurotransmission	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  19(1),	  159-­‐167.	  	  Leifer,	  A.	  M.,	  Fang-­‐Yen,	  C.,	  Gershow,	  M.,	  Alkema,	  M.	  J.,	  &	  Samuel,	  A.	  D.	  (2011).	  Optogenetic	  manipulation	  of	  neural	  activity	  in	  freely	  moving	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Nature	  Methods,	  8(2),	  147-­‐152.	  	  L'Etoile,	  N.	  D.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (2000).	  Olfaction	  and	  odor	  discrimination	  are	  mediated	  by	  the	  C.	  elegans	  guanylyl	  cyclase	  ODR-­‐1.	  Neuron,	  25(3),	  575-­‐586.	  	  L'Etoile,	  N.	  D.,	  Coburn,	  C.	  M.,	  Eastham,	  J.,	  Kistler,	  A.,	  Gallegos,	  G.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (2002).	  The	  cyclic	  GMP-­‐dependent	  protein	  kinase	  EGL-­‐4	  regulates	  olfactory	  adaptation	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Neuron,	  36(6),	  1079-­‐1089.	  	  Levine,	  J.	  D.,	  &	  Alessandri-­‐Haber,	  N.	  (2007).	  TRP	  channels:	  Targets	  for	  the	  relief	  of	  pain.	  Biochimica	  Et	  Biophysica	  Acta,	  1772(8),	  989-­‐1003.	  	  Li,	  C.,	  &	  Kim,	  K.	  (2008).	  Neuropeptides.	  WormBook	  :	  The	  Online	  Review	  of	  C.Elegans	  Biology,	  1-­‐36.	  	  Li,	  C.,	  Timbers,	  T.	  A.,	  Rose,	  J.	  K.,	  Bozorgmehr,	  T.,	  McEwan,	  A.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (2013).	  The	  FMRFamide-­‐related	  neuropeptide	  FLP-­‐20	  is	  required	  in	  the	  mechanosensory	  neurons	  during	  memory	  for	  massed	  training	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Learning	  &	  Memory,	  20(2),	  103-­‐108.	  	  Li,	  W.,	  Feng,	  Z.,	  Sternberg,	  P.	  W.,	  &	  Xu,	  X.	  Z.	  (2006).	  A	  C.	  elegans	  stretch	  receptor	  neuron	  revealed	  by	  a	  mechanosensitive	  TRP	  channel	  homologue.	  Nature,	  440(7084),	  684-­‐687.	  	  Liedtke,	  W.,	  Tobin,	  D.	  M.,	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.,	  &	  Friedman,	  J.	  M.	  (2003).	  Mammalian	  TRPV4	  (VR-­‐OAC)	  directs	  behavioral	  responses	  to	  osmotic	  and	  mechanical	  stimuli	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  100	  Suppl	  2,	  14531-­‐14536.	  	  	   121	  Lin,	  C.	  H.,	  Tomioka,	  M.,	  Pereira,	  S.,	  Sellings,	  L.,	  Iino,	  Y.,	  &	  van	  der	  Kooy,	  D.	  (2010).	  Insulin	  signaling	  plays	  a	  dual	  role	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  memory	  acquisition	  and	  memory	  retrieval.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  30(23),	  8001-­‐8011.	  	  Lindsay,	  T.	  H.,	  Thiele,	  T.	  R.,	  &	  Lockery,	  S.	  R.	  (2011).	  Optogenetic	  analysis	  of	  synaptic	  transmission	  in	  the	  central	  nervous	  system	  of	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Nature	  Communications,	  2,	  306.	  	  Lindy,	  A.	  S.,	  Parekh,	  P.	  K.,	  Zhu,	  R.,	  Kanju,	  P.,	  Chintapalli,	  S.	  V.,	  Tsvilovskyy,	  V.,	  et	  al.	  (2014).	  TRPV	  channel-­‐mediated	  calcium	  transients	  in	  nociceptor	  neurons	  are	  dispensable	  for	  avoidance	  behaviour.	  Nature	  Communications,	  5,	  4734.	  	  Lints,	  R.,	  &	  Emmons,	  S.	  W.	  (1999).	  Patterning	  of	  dopaminergic	  neurotransmitter	  identity	  among	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  ray	  sensory	  neurons	  by	  a	  TGFbeta	  family	  signaling	  pathway	  and	  a	  hox	  gene.	  Development,	  126(24),	  5819-­‐5831.	  	  Lloyd,	  D.	  R.,	  Medina,	  D.	  J.,	  Hawk,	  L.	  W.,	  Fosco,	  W.	  D.,	  &	  Richards,	  J.	  B.	  (2014).	  Habituation	  of	  reinforcer	  effectiveness.	  Frontiers	  in	  Integrative	  Neuroscience,	  7,	  107.	  	  Loer,	  C.	  M.,	  &	  Kenyon,	  C.	  J.	  (1993).	  Serotonin-­‐deficient	  mutants	  and	  male	  mating	  behavior	  in	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  13(12),	  5407-­‐5417.	  	  Lórenz-­‐Fonfría	  &	  Haberle.	  (2014).	  Channelrhodopsin	  unchained:	  structure	  and	  mechanism	  of	  a	  light-­‐gated	  cation	  channel.	  Biochimica	  et	  Biophysica	  Acta,	  1837(5),	  626-­‐642.	  	  Maricq,	  A.	  V.,	  Peckol,	  E.,	  Driscoll,	  M.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (1995).	  Mechanosensory	  signalling	  in	  C.	  elegans	  mediated	  by	  the	  GLR-­‐1	  glutamate	  receptor.	  Nature,	  378(6552),	  78-­‐81.	  	  Matsuki,	  M.,	  Kunitomo,	  H.,	  &	  Iino,	  Y.	  (2006).	  Goalpha	  regulates	  olfactory	  adaptation	  by	  antagonizing	  gqalpha-­‐DAG	  signaling	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  103(4),	  1112-­‐1117.	  	  Meelkop,	  E.,	  Temmerman,	  L.,	  Janssen,	  T.,	  Suetens,	  N.,	  Beets,	  I.,	  Van	  Rompay,	  L.,	  et	  al.	  (2012).	  PDF	  receptor	  signaling	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  modulates	  locomotion	  and	  egg-­‐laying.	  Molecular	  and	  Cellular	  Endocrinology,	  361(1-­‐2),	  232-­‐240.	  	  Mellem,	  J.	  E.,	  Brockie,	  P.	  J.,	  Zheng,	  Y.,	  Madsen,	  D.	  M.,	  &	  Maricq,	  A.	  V.	  (2002).	  Decoding	  of	  polymodal	  sensory	  stimuli	  by	  postsynaptic	  glutamate	  receptors	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Neuron,	  36(5),	  933-­‐944.	  	  Mello,	  C.	  C.,	  Kramer,	  J.	  M.,	  Stinchcomb,	  D.,	  &	  Ambros,	  V.	  (1991).	  Efficient	  gene	  transfer	  in	  C.elegans:	  Extrachromosomal	  maintenance	  and	  integration	  of	  transforming	  sequences.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  10(12),	  3959-­‐3970.	  	   122	  Miller,	  D.	  M.,3rd,	  Ortiz,	  I.,	  Berliner,	  G.	  C.,	  &	  Epstein,	  H.	  F.	  (1983).	  Differential	  localization	  of	  two	  myosins	  within	  nematode	  thick	  filaments.	  Cell,	  34(2),	  477-­‐490.	  	  Mills,	  H.,	  Hapiak,	  V.,	  Harris,	  G.,	  Summers,	  P.,	  &	  Komuniecki,	  R.	  (2012).	  The	  interaction	  of	  octopamine	  and	  neuropeptides	  to	  slow	  aversive	  responses	  in	  C.	  elegans	  mimics	  the	  modulation	  of	  chronic	  pain	  in	  mammals.	  Worm,	  1(4),	  202-­‐206.	  	  Mills,	  H.,	  Wragg,	  R.,	  Hapiak,	  V.,	  Castelletto,	  M.,	  Zahratka,	  J.,	  Harris,	  G.,	  et	  al.	  (2012).	  Monoamines	  and	  neuropeptides	  interact	  to	  inhibit	  aversive	  behaviour	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  31(3),	  667-­‐678.	  	  Miyahara,	  K.,	  Suzuki,	  N.,	  Ishihara,	  T.,	  Tsuchiya,	  E.,	  &	  Katsura,	  I.	  (2004).	  TBX2/TBX3	  transcriptional	  factor	  homologue	  controls	  olfactory	  adaptation	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Journal	  of	  Neurobiology,	  58(3),	  392-­‐402.	  	  Nagel,	  G.,	  Brauner,	  M.,	  Liewald,	  J.	  F.,	  Adeishvili,	  N.,	  Bamberg,	  E.,	  &	  Gottschalk,	  A.	  (2005).	  Light	  activation	  of	  channelrhodopsin-­‐2	  in	  excitable	  cells	  of	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  triggers	  rapid	  behavioral	  responses.	  Current	  Biology,	  15(24),	  2279-­‐2284.	  	  Nagel,	  G.,	  Szellas,	  T.,	  Huhn,	  W.,	  Kateriya,	  S.,	  Adeishvili,	  N.,	  Berthold,	  P.,	  et	  al.	  (2003).	  Channelrhodopsin-­‐2,	  a	  directly	  light-­‐gated	  cation-­‐selective	  membrane	  channel.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  100(24),	  13940-­‐13945.	  	  Nuttley,	  W.	  M.,	  Atkinson-­‐Leadbeater,	  K.	  P.,	  &	  Van	  Der	  Kooy,	  D.	  (2002).	  Serotonin	  mediates	  food-­‐odor	  associative	  learning	  in	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditiselegans.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  99(19),	  12449-­‐12454.	  	  Ochoa,	  J.,	  &	  Torebjork,	  E.	  (1989).	  Sensations	  evoked	  by	  intraneural	  microstimulation	  of	  C	  nociceptor	  fibres	  in	  human	  skin	  nerves.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Physiology,	  415,	  583-­‐599.	  	  O'Hagan,	  R.,	  Chalfie,	  M.,	  &	  Goodman,	  M.	  B.	  (2005).	  The	  MEC-­‐4	  DEG/ENaC	  channel	  of	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  touch	  receptor	  neurons	  transduces	  mechanical	  signals.	  Nature	  Neuroscience,	  8(1),	  43-­‐50.	  	  O'Halloran,	  D.	  M.,	  Altshuler-­‐Keylin,	  S.,	  Lee,	  J.	  I.,	  &	  L'Etoile,	  N.	  D.	  (2009).	  Regulators	  of	  AWC-­‐mediated	  olfactory	  plasticity	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  PLoS	  Genetics,	  5(12),	  e1000761.	  	  Palmitessa,	  A.,	  Hess,	  H.	  A.,	  Bany,	  I.	  A.,	  Kim,	  Y.	  M.,	  Koelle,	  M.	  R.,	  &	  Benovic,	  J.	  L.	  (2005).	  Caenorhabditus	  elegans	  arrestin	  regulates	  neural	  G	  protein	  signaling	  and	  olfactory	  adaptation	  and	  recovery.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Biological	  Chemistry,	  280(26),	  24649-­‐24662.	  	  	   123	  Pereira,	  S.,	  &	  van	  der	  Kooy,	  D.	  (2012).	  Two	  forms	  of	  learning	  following	  training	  to	  a	  single	  odorant	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  AWC	  neurons.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  32(26),	  9035-­‐9044.	  	  Pierce-­‐Shimomura,	  J.	  T.,	  Chen,	  B.	  L.,	  Mun,	  J.	  J.,	  Ho,	  R.,	  Sarkis,	  R.,	  &	  McIntire,	  S.	  L.	  (2008).	  Genetic	  analysis	  of	  crawling	  and	  swimming	  locomotory	  patterns	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  105(52),	  20982-­‐20987.	  	  Pierce-­‐Shimomura,	  J.	  T.,	  Morse,	  T.	  M.,	  &	  Lockery,	  S.	  R.	  (1999).	  The	  fundamental	  role	  of	  pirouettes	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  chemotaxis.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  19(21),	  9557-­‐9569.	  	  Piggott,	  B.	  J.,	  Liu,	  J.,	  Feng,	  Z.,	  Wescott,	  S.	  A.,	  &	  Xu,	  X.	  Z.	  (2011).	  The	  neural	  circuits	  and	  synaptic	  mechanisms	  underlying	  motor	  initiation	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Cell,	  147(4),	  922-­‐933.	  	  Pinsker,	  H.,	  Kupfermann,	  I.,	  Castellucci,	  V.,	  &	  Kandel,	  E.	  (1970).	  Habituation	  and	  dishabituation	  of	  the	  gill-­‐withdrawal	  reflex	  in	  aplysia.	  Science,	  167(3926),	  1740-­‐1742.	  	  Pokala,	  N.,	  Liu,	  Q.,	  Gordus,	  A.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (2014).	  Inducible	  and	  titratable	  silencing	  of	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  neurons	  in	  vivo	  with	  histamine-­‐gated	  chloride	  channels.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  111(7),	  2770-­‐2775.	  	  Quinn,	  W.	  G.,	  Harris,	  W.	  A.,	  &	  Benzer,	  S.	  (1974).	  Conditioned	  behavior	  in	  drosophila	  melanogaster.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  71(3),	  708-­‐712.	  	  Raizen,	  D.	  M.,	  Zimmerman,	  J.	  E.,	  Maycock,	  M.	  H.,	  Ta,	  U.	  D.,	  You,	  Y.	  J.,	  Sundaram,	  M.	  V.,	  et	  al.	  (2008).	  Lethargus	  is	  a	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  sleep-­‐like	  state.	  Nature,	  451(7178),	  569-­‐572.	  	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (2000).	  Context	  conditioning	  in	  habituation	  in	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Behavioral	  Neuroscience,	  114(3),	  496-­‐505.	  	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.,	  Abrams,	  T.,	  Barry,	  R.	  J.,	  Bhatnagar,	  S.,	  Clayton,	  D.	  F.,	  Colombo,	  J.,	  et	  al.	  (2009).	  Habituation	  revisited:	  An	  updated	  and	  revised	  description	  of	  the	  behavioral	  characteristics	  of	  habituation.	  Neurobiology	  of	  Learning	  and	  Memory,	  92(2),	  135-­‐138.	  	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.,	  Beck,	  C.	  D.,	  &	  Chiba,	  C.	  M.	  (1990).	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans:	  A	  new	  model	  system	  for	  the	  study	  of	  learning	  and	  memory.	  Behavioural	  Brain	  Research,	  37(1),	  89-­‐92.	  	  	   124	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.,	  &	  Broster,	  B.	  S.	  (1992).	  Factors	  affecting	  habituation	  and	  recovery	  from	  habituation	  in	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Behavioral	  Neuroscience,	  106(2),	  239-­‐249.	  	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.,	  &	  Wicks,	  S.	  R.	  (2000).	  Mutations	  of	  the	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  brain-­‐specific	  inorganic	  phosphate	  transporter	  eat-­‐4	  affect	  habituation	  of	  the	  tap-­‐withdrawal	  response	  without	  affecting	  the	  response	  itself.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  20(11),	  4337-­‐4344.	  	  Rao,	  K.	  R.,	  &	  Riehm,	  J.	  P.	  (1993).	  Pigment-­‐dispersing	  hormones.	  Annals	  of	  the	  New	  York	  Academy	  of	  Sciences,	  680,	  78-­‐88.	  	  Renn,	  S.	  C.,	  Park,	  J.	  H.,	  Rosbash,	  M.,	  Hall,	  J.	  C.,	  &	  Taghert,	  P.	  H.	  (1999).	  A	  pdf	  neuropeptide	  gene	  mutation	  and	  ablation	  of	  PDF	  neurons	  each	  cause	  severe	  abnormalities	  of	  behavioral	  circadian	  rhythms	  in	  drosophila.	  Cell,	  99(7),	  791-­‐802.	  	  Rose,	  J.	  K.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (2006).	  Blocking	  memory	  reconsolidation	  reverses	  memory-­‐associated	  changes	  in	  glutamate	  receptor	  expression.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  26(45),	  11582-­‐11587.	  	  Sadanandappa,	  M.	  K.,	  Blanco	  Redondo,	  B.,	  Michels,	  B.,	  Rodrigues,	  V.,	  Gerber,	  B.,	  VijayRaghavan,	  K.,	  et	  al.	  (2013).	  Synapsin	  function	  in	  GABA-­‐ergic	  interneurons	  is	  required	  for	  short-­‐term	  olfactory	  habituation.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  33(42),	  16576-­‐16585.	  	  Sahley,	  C.	  L.,	  Modney,	  B.	  K.,	  Boulis,	  N.	  M.,	  &	  Muller,	  K.	  J.	  (1994).	  The	  S	  cell:	  An	  interneuron	  essential	  for	  sensitization	  and	  full	  dishabituation	  of	  leech	  shortening.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  14(11	  Pt	  1),	  6715-­‐6721.	  	  Saifee,	  O.,	  Metz,	  L.	  B.,	  Nonet,	  M.	  L.,	  &	  Crowder,	  C.	  M.	  (2011).	  A	  gain-­‐of-­‐function	  mutation	  in	  adenylate	  cyclase	  confers	  isoflurane	  resistance	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Anesthesiology,	  115(6),	  1162-­‐1171.	  	  Saigusa,	  T.,	  Ishizaki,	  S.,	  Watabiki,	  S.,	  Ishii,	  N.,	  Tanakadate,	  A.,	  Tamai,	  Y.,	  et	  al.	  (2002).	  Circadian	  behavioural	  rhythm	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Current	  Biology,	  12(2),	  R46-­‐7.	  	  Sanyal,	  S.,	  Wintle,	  R.	  F.,	  Kindt,	  K.	  S.,	  Nuttley,	  W.	  M.,	  Arvan,	  R.,	  Fitzmaurice,	  P.,	  et	  al.	  (2004).	  Dopamine	  modulates	  the	  plasticity	  of	  mechanosensory	  responses	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  23(2),	  473-­‐482.	  	  Sawin,	  E.	  R.,	  Ranganathan,	  R.,	  &	  Horvitz,	  H.	  R.	  (2000).	  C.	  elegans	  locomotory	  rate	  is	  modulated	  by	  the	  environment	  through	  a	  dopaminergic	  pathway	  and	  by	  experience	  through	  a	  serotonergic	  pathway.	  Neuron,	  26(3),	  619-­‐631.	  	  	   125	  Scheiner,	  R.,	  Sokolowski,	  M.	  B.,	  &	  Erber,	  J.	  (2004).	  Activity	  of	  cGMP-­‐dependent	  protein	  kinase	  (PKG)	  affects	  sucrose	  responsiveness	  and	  habituation	  in	  drosophila	  melanogaster.	  Learning	  &	  Memory,	  11(3),	  303-­‐311.	  	  Schmitt,	  C.,	  Schultheis,	  C.,	  Pokala,	  N.,	  Husson,	  S.	  J.,	  Liewald,	  J.	  F.,	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.,	  et	  al.	  (2012).	  Specific	  expression	  of	  channelrhodopsin-­‐2	  in	  single	  neurons	  of	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  PloS	  One,	  7(8),	  e43164.	  	  Serrano-­‐Saiz,	  E.,	  Poole,	  R.	  J.,	  Felton,	  T.,	  Zhang,	  F.,	  De	  La	  Cruz,	  E.	  D.,	  &	  Hobert,	  O.	  (2013).	  Modular	  control	  of	  glutamatergic	  neuronal	  identity	  in	  C.	  elegans	  by	  distinct	  homeodomain	  proteins.	  Cell,	  155(3),	  659-­‐673.	  	  Shaye,	  D.	  D.,	  &	  Greenwald,	  I.	  (2011).	  OrthoList:	  A	  compendium	  of	  C.	  elegans	  genes	  with	  human	  orthologs.	  PloS	  One,	  6(5),	  e20085.	  	  Srinivasan,	  J.,	  Durak,	  O.,	  &	  Sternberg,	  P.	  W.	  (2008).	  Evolution	  of	  a	  polymodal	  sensory	  response	  network.	  BMC	  Biology,	  6,	  52-­‐7007-­‐6-­‐52.	  	  Stirman,	  J.	  N.,	  Crane,	  M.	  M.,	  Husson,	  S.	  J.,	  Gottschalk,	  A.,	  &	  Lu,	  H.	  (2012).	  A	  multispectral	  optical	  illumination	  system	  with	  precise	  spatiotemporal	  control	  for	  the	  manipulation	  of	  optogenetic	  reagents.	  Nature	  Protocols,	  7(2),	  207-­‐220.	  	  Sugiura,	  M.,	  Fuke,	  S.,	  Suo,	  S.,	  Sasagawa,	  N.,	  Van	  Tol,	  H.	  H.,	  &	  Ishiura,	  S.	  (2005).	  Characterization	  of	  a	  novel	  D2-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor	  with	  a	  truncated	  splice	  variant	  and	  a	  D1-­‐like	  dopamine	  receptor	  unique	  to	  invertebrates	  from	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Journal	  of	  Neurochemistry,	  94(4),	  1146-­‐1157.	  	  Sulston,	  J.	  E.,	  &	  Horvitz,	  H.	  R.	  (1977).	  Post-­‐embryonic	  cell	  lineages	  of	  the	  nematode,	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Developmental	  Biology,	  56(1),	  110-­‐156.	  	  Sulston,	  J.	  E.,	  Schierenberg,	  E.,	  White,	  J.	  G.,	  &	  Thomson,	  J.	  N.	  (1983).	  The	  embryonic	  cell	  lineage	  of	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Developmental	  Biology,	  100(1),	  64-­‐119.	  	  Suzuki,	  H.,	  Kerr,	  R.,	  Bianchi,	  L.,	  Frokjaer-­‐Jensen,	  C.,	  Slone,	  D.,	  Xue,	  J.,	  et	  al.	  (2003).	  In	  vivo	  imaging	  of	  C.	  elegans	  mechanosensory	  neurons	  demonstrates	  a	  specific	  role	  for	  the	  MEC-­‐4	  channel	  in	  the	  process	  of	  gentle	  touch	  sensation.	  Neuron,	  39(6),	  1005-­‐1017.	  	  Swierczek,	  N.	  A.,	  Giles,	  A.	  C.,	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.,	  &	  Kerr,	  R.	  A.	  (2011).	  High-­‐throughput	  behavioral	  analysis	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Nature	  Methods,	  8(7),	  592-­‐598.	  	  Sze,	  J.	  Y.,	  Victor,	  M.,	  Loer,	  C.,	  Shi,	  Y.,	  &	  Ruvkun,	  G.	  (2000).	  Food	  and	  metabolic	  signalling	  defects	  in	  a	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  serotonin-­‐synthesis	  mutant.	  Nature,	  403(6769),	  560-­‐564.	  	  	   126	  Taniguchi,	  G.,	  Uozumi,	  T.,	  Kiriyama,	  K.,	  Kamizaki,	  T.,	  &	  Hirotsu,	  T.	  (2014).	  Screening	  of	  odor-­‐receptor	  pairs	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  reveals	  different	  receptors	  for	  high	  and	  low	  odor	  concentrations.	  Science	  Signaling,	  7(323),	  ra39.	  	  Thompson,	  O.,	  Edgley,	  M.,	  Strasbourger,	  P.,	  Flibotte,	  S.,	  Ewing,	  B.,	  Adair,	  R.,	  et	  al.	  (2013).	  The	  million	  mutation	  project:	  A	  new	  approach	  to	  genetics	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Genome	  Research,	  23(10),	  1749-­‐1762.	  	  Thompson,	  R.	  F.,	  &	  Spencer,	  W.	  A.	  (1966).	  Habituation:	  A	  model	  phenomenon	  for	  the	  study	  of	  neuronal	  substrates	  of	  behavior.	  Psychological	  Review,	  73(1),	  16-­‐43.	  	  Timbers,	  T.	  A.,	  Giles,	  A.	  C.,	  Ardiel,	  E.	  L.,	  Kerr,	  R.	  A.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (2013).	  Intensity	  discrimination	  deficits	  cause	  habituation	  changes	  in	  middle-­‐aged	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Neurobiology	  of	  Aging,	  34(2),	  621-­‐631.	  	  Timmons,	  L.,	  &	  Fire,	  A.	  (1998).	  Specific	  interference	  by	  ingested	  dsRNA.	  Nature,	  395(6705),	  854.	  	  Tobin,	  D.,	  Madsen,	  D.,	  Kahn-­‐Kirby,	  A.,	  Peckol,	  E.,	  Moulder,	  G.,	  Barstead,	  R.,	  et	  al.	  (2002).	  Combinatorial	  expression	  of	  TRPV	  channel	  proteins	  defines	  their	  sensory	  functions	  and	  subcellular	  localization	  in	  C.	  elegans	  neurons.	  Neuron,	  35(2),	  307-­‐318.	  	  Troemel,	  E.	  R.,	  Chou,	  J.	  H.,	  Dwyer,	  N.	  D.,	  Colbert,	  H.	  A.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (1995).	  Divergent	  seven	  transmembrane	  receptors	  are	  candidate	  chemosensory	  receptors	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Cell,	  83(2),	  207-­‐218.	  	  Troemel,	  E.	  R.,	  Kimmel,	  B.	  E.,	  &	  Bargmann,	  C.	  I.	  (1997).	  Reprogramming	  chemotaxis	  responses:	  Sensory	  neurons	  define	  olfactory	  preferences	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Cell,	  91(2),	  161-­‐169.	  	  Twick,	  I.,	  Lee,	  J.	  A.,	  &	  Ramaswami,	  M.	  (2014).	  Olfactory	  habituation	  in	  drosophila-­‐odor	  encoding	  and	  its	  plasticity	  in	  the	  antennal	  lobe.	  Progress	  in	  Brain	  Research,	  208,	  3-­‐38.	  	  Typlt,	  M.,	  Mirkowski,	  M.,	  Azzopardi,	  E.,	  Ruth,	  P.,	  Pilz,	  P.K,.	  &	  Schmid,	  S.	  (2014).	  Habituation	  of	  reflexive	  and	  motivated	  behavior	  in	  mice	  with	  deficient	  BK	  channel	  function.	  Frontiers	  in	  Integrative	  Neuroscience,	  7(79).	  	  Van	  Buskirk,	  C.,	  &	  Sternberg,	  P.	  W.	  (2007).	  Epidermal	  growth	  factor	  signaling	  induces	  behavioral	  quiescence	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Nature	  Neuroscience,	  10(10),	  1300-­‐1307.	  	  Vellai,	  T.,	  McCulloch,	  D.,	  Gems,	  D.,	  &	  Kovacs,	  A.	  L.	  (2006).	  Effects	  of	  sex	  and	  insulin/insulin-­‐like	  growth	  factor-­‐1	  signaling	  on	  performance	  in	  an	  associative	  learning	  paradigm	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Genetics,	  174(1),	  309-­‐316.	  	  	   127	  Vidal-­‐Gadea,	  A.,	  Topper,	  S.,	  Young,	  L.,	  Crisp,	  A.,	  Kressin,	  L.,	  Elbel,	  E.,	  et	  al.	  (2011).	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  selects	  distinct	  crawling	  and	  swimming	  gaits	  via	  dopamine	  and	  serotonin.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  National	  Academy	  of	  Sciences	  of	  the	  United	  States	  of	  America,	  108(42),	  17504-­‐17509.	  	  Voglis,	  G.,	  &	  Tavernarakis,	  N.	  (2008).	  A	  synaptic	  DEG/ENaC	  ion	  channel	  mediates	  learning	  in	  C.	  elegans	  by	  facilitating	  dopamine	  signalling.	  The	  EMBO	  Journal,	  27(24),	  3288-­‐3299.	  	  Walker,	  D.	  S.,	  Vazquez-­‐Manrique,	  R.	  P.,	  Gower,	  N.	  J.,	  Gregory,	  E.,	  Schafer,	  W.	  R.,	  &	  Baylis,	  H.	  A.	  (2009).	  Inositol	  1,4,5-­‐trisphosphate	  signalling	  regulates	  the	  avoidance	  response	  to	  nose	  touch	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  PLoS	  Genetics,	  5(9),	  e1000636.	  	  Ward,	  A.,	  Liu,	  J.,	  Feng,	  Z.,	  &	  Xu,	  X.	  Z.	  (2008).	  Light-­‐sensitive	  neurons	  and	  channels	  mediate	  phototaxis	  in	  C.	  elegans.	  Nature	  Neuroscience,	  11(8),	  916-­‐922.	  	  White,	  J.	  G.,	  Southgate,	  E.,	  Thomson,	  J.	  N.,	  &	  Brenner,	  S.	  (1986).	  The	  structure	  of	  the	  nervous	  system	  of	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Philosophical	  Transactions	  of	  the	  Royal	  Society	  of	  London.Series	  B,	  Biological	  Sciences,	  314(1165),	  1-­‐340.	  	  Wicks,	  S.	  R.,	  de	  Vries,	  C.	  J.,	  van	  Luenen,	  H.	  G.,	  &	  Plasterk,	  R.	  H.	  (2000).	  CHE-­‐3,	  a	  cytosolic	  dynein	  heavy	  chain,	  is	  required	  for	  sensory	  cilia	  structure	  and	  function	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Developmental	  Biology,	  221(2),	  295-­‐307.	  	  Wicks,	  S.	  R.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (1995).	  Integration	  of	  mechanosensory	  stimuli	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  15(3	  Pt	  2),	  2434-­‐2444.	  	  Wicks,	  S.	  R.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (1996).	  The	  integration	  of	  antagonistic	  reflexes	  revealed	  by	  laser	  ablation	  of	  identified	  neurons	  determines	  habituation	  kinetics	  of	  the	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  tap	  withdrawal	  response.	  Journal	  of	  Comparative	  Physiology.A,	  Sensory,	  Neural,	  and	  Behavioral	  Physiology,	  179(5),	  675-­‐685.	  	  Wicks,	  S.	  R.,	  &	  Rankin,	  C.	  H.	  (1997).	  Effects	  of	  tap	  withdrawal	  response	  habituation	  on	  other	  withdrawal	  behaviors:	  The	  localization	  of	  habituation	  in	  the	  nematode	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Behavioral	  Neuroscience,	  111(2),	  342-­‐353.	  	  Wragg,	  R.	  T.,	  Hapiak,	  V.,	  Miller,	  S.	  B.,	  Harris,	  G.	  P.,	  Gray,	  J.,	  Komuniecki,	  P.	  R.,	  et	  al.	  (2007).	  Tyramine	  and	  octopamine	  independently	  inhibit	  serotonin-­‐stimulated	  aversive	  behaviors	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans	  through	  two	  novel	  amine	  receptors.	  The	  Journal	  of	  Neuroscience,	  27(49),	  13402-­‐13412.	  	  Xu,	  X.,	  Sassa,	  T.,	  Kunoh,	  K.,	  &	  Hosono,	  R.	  (2002).	  A	  mutant	  exhibiting	  abnormal	  habituation	  behavior	  in	  Caenorhabditis	  elegans.	  Journal	  of	  Neurogenetics,	  16(1),	  29-­‐44.	  	  	   128	  Zahratka,	  J.	  A.,	  Williams,	  P.	  D.,	  Summers,	  P.	  J.,	  Komuniecki,	  R.,	  &	  Bamber,	  B.	  (2014).	  Serotonin	  differentially	  modulates	  ca++	  transients	  and	  depolarization	  in	  a	  C.	  elegans	  nociceptor.	  Journal	  of	  Neurophysiology,	  jn.00665.2014.	  	  Zheng,	  Y.,	  Brockie,	  P.	  J.,	  Mellem,	  J.	  E.,	  Madsen,	  D.	  M.,	  &	  Maricq,	  A.	  V.	  (1999).	  Neuronal	  control	  of	  locomotion	  in	  C.	  elegans	  is	  modified	  by	  a	  dominant	  mutation	  in	  the	  GLR-­‐1	  ionotropic	  glutamate	  receptor.	  Neuron,	  24(2),	  347-­‐361.	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0166150/manifest

Comment

Related Items