UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Colour matters : coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) prefer and are less aggressive in darker coloured.. Gaffney, Leigh Phillippa 2014

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2015_february_gaffney_leigh.pdf [ 778.58kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0166085.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0166085-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0166085-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0166085-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0166085-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0166085-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0166085-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0166085-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0166085.ris

Full Text

COLOUR	  MATTERS:	  COHO	  SALMON	  (ONCORHYNCHUS	  KISUTCH)	  PREFER	  AND	  ARE	  LESS	  AGGRESSIVE	  IN	  DARKER	  COLOURED	  TANKS	  by	  Leigh	  Phillippa	  Gaffney	  B.Sc.,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  2012	  A	  THESIS	  SUBMITTED	  IN	  PARTIAL	  FULFILLMENT	  OF	  THE	  REQUIREMENTS	  FOR	  THE	  DEGREE	  OF	  MASTER	  OF	  SCIENCE	  	  in	  THE	  FACULTY	  OF	  GRADUATE	  AND	  POSTDOCTORAL	  STUDIES	  (Applied	  Animal	  Biology)	  	  	  THE	  UNIVERSITY	  OF	  BRITISH	  COLUMBIA	  (Vancouver)	  December	  2014	  ©Leigh	  Phillippa	  Gaffney,	  2014	  	   ii	  Abstract	  	   Fish	  are	  capable	  of	  colour	  vision	  and	  certain	  colours	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  growth	  and	  survival,	  skin	  colour,	  stress	  response,	  and	  reproduction.	  Beyond	  these	  physiological	  consequences,	  colour	  has	  also	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  aggression	  levels,	  which	  is	  a	  widespread	  problem	  in	  aquaculture.	  The	  compatibility	  of	  fish	  with	  tank	  colour	  has	  been	  largely	  neglected	  within	  the	  aquaculture	  industry.	  Common	  practice	  is	  to	  use	  light	  blue	  tanks	  but	  there	  is	  no	  scientific	  basis	  for	  this	  choice.	  	  Closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  provide	  a	  good	  model	  to	  investigate	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  fish.	  Though	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  provide	  the	  opportunity	  for	  full	  control	  of	  environmental	  conditions,	  little	  research	  to	  date	  has	  investigated	  which	  parameters	  within	  these	  systems	  promote	  fish	  welfare.	  The	  aim	  of	  this	  study	  was	  to	  assess	  preferences	  of	  coho	  salmon	  for	  tank	  colour	  and	  determine	  the	  effects	  of	  colour	  on	  aggression.	  Coho	  salmon	  (n=100)	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  to	  10	  tanks,	  each	  bisected	  to	  allow	  fish	  to	  choose	  between	  two	  colours.	  Using	  a	  Latin-­‐square	  design,	  each	  tank	  was	  tested	  with	  each	  of	  the	  following	  colour	  choices:	  blue	  vs.	  white,	  light	  grey,	  dark	  grey,	  and	  black,	  as	  well	  as	  black	  vs.	  white,	  light	  grey,	  dark	  grey,	  and	  a	  mixed	  dark	  grey/black	  pattern.	  Fish	  showed	  a	  strong	  preference	  for	  black	  over	  all	  other	  tank	  background	  options	  (p	  <	  0.0001)	  with	  the	  exception	  of	  pattern,	  which	  was	  still	  significant	  but	  slightly	  less	  strong	  (p	  <	  0.01).	  	  Moreover,	  darker	  colours	  in	  the	  environment	  resulted	  in	  lower	  rates	  of	  aggressive	  behaviours	  compared	  to	  lighter	  colours	  (p	  <	  0.0001).	  These	  results	  present	  the	  first	  evidence	  that	  darker	  tanks	  are	  preferred	  by	  and	  decrease	  overall	  tank	  aggression	  levels	  in	  salmonids.	  	  	  	   iii	  Preface	  	   All	  research	  and	  associated	  methods	  were	  approved	  by	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Animal	  Care	  Committee	  (Certificate	  Number:	  A13-­‐0210).	  Leigh	  Gaffney	  and	  Drs.	  M.A.G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  D.	  Weary,	  and	  J.G.	  Richards	  designed	  the	  experiment	  collaboratively.	  J.G.	  Richards	  supplied	  the	  coho	  salmon	  and	  lab	  space.	  The	  execution	  of	  the	  experiment	  and	  data	  collection	  was	  performed	  by	  Leigh	  Gaffney.	  Leigh	  Gaffney	  and	  B.	  Franks	  analyzed	  the	  data.	  Drs.	  M.A.G.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  D.	  Weary,	  and	  J.G.	  Richards	  supervised	  data	  analysis,	  interpretation,	  and	  manuscript	  preparation.	  	  	  	   	  	   	  iv	  Table	  of	  Contents	  Abstract	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  ii	  Preface	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  iii	  Table	  of	  Contents	  .................................................................................................................................iv	  List	  of	  Figures	  ........................................................................................................................................vi	  Acknowledgements	  ...........................................................................................................................	  vii	  Chapter	  1:	  Introduction	  ......................................................................................................................	  1	  1.1	  Overview	  .....................................................................................................................................................	  1	  1.2	  Natural	  history	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  1	  1.3	  Salmonids	  in	  aquaculture	  .....................................................................................................................	  2	  1.3.1	  Closed-­‐containment	  recirculating	  aquaculture	  systems	  .....................................................................	  4	  1.4	  Assessing	  animal	  welfare	  ......................................................................................................................	  5	  1.4.1	  Affective	  states	  in	  fish	  .........................................................................................................................................	  6	  1.5	  Aggression	  in	  salmonids	  ........................................................................................................................	  7	  1.6	  The	  effect	  of	  colour	  on	  fish	  ....................................................................................................................	  8	  1.6.1	  The	  effect	  of	  colour	  on	  aggression	  ................................................................................................................	  8	  1.6.2	  The	  effect	  of	  colour	  on	  stress	  and	  growth	  .................................................................................................	  9	  1.6.3	  Tank	  colour	  in	  aquaculture	  ............................................................................................................................	  11	  1.7	  Vision	  in	  fish	  ............................................................................................................................................	  12	  1.8	  Measuring	  colour	  ...................................................................................................................................	  13	  1.9	  Preference	  testing	  ..................................................................................................................................	  14	  1.10	  Objectives	  and	  hypotheses	  ...............................................................................................................	  15	  v	  Chapter	  2:	  Colour	  matters:	  coho	  salmon	  (Oncorhynchus	  kisutch)	  prefer	  and	  are	  less	  aggressive	  in	  darker	  coloured	  tanks	  ..........................................................................................	  17	  2.1	  Introduction	  .............................................................................................................................................	  17	  2.2	  Materials	  and	  methods	  .........................................................................................................................	  19	  2.2.1	  Ethics	  statement	  .................................................................................................................................................	  19	  2.2.2	  Animals	  and	  housing	  .........................................................................................................................................	  20	  2.2.3	  Experimental	  procedures	  ...............................................................................................................................	  21	  2.2.4	  Statistical	  methods	  .............................................................................................................................................	  22	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  2.2.4.1	  Tank	  colour	  preference	  .....................................................................................................................	  23	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  2.2.4.2	  Aggressive	  acts	  ......................................................................................................................	  23	  2.3	  Results	  .......................................................................................................................................................	  24	  2.3.1	  Tank	  colour	  preference	  ....................................................................................................................................	  24	  2.3.2	  Aggressive	  acts	  ....................................................................................................................................................	  24	  2.4	  Discussion	  .................................................................................................................................................	  25	  2.5	  Conclusion	  ................................................................................................................................................	  28	  Chapter	  3:	  General	  discussion	  and	  conclusions	  ......................................................................	  33	  4.1	  Contributions	  and	  implications	  ........................................................................................................	  33	  4.2	  Limitations	  and	  future	  research	  .......................................................................................................	  35	  4.3	  Conclusions	  ..............................................................................................................................................	  39	  References	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  40	  vi	  List	  of	  Figures	  Figure	  2.1:	  Box	  plots	  of	  average	  number	  of	  fish	  located	  on	  each	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  (per	  10-­‐minute	  trial)	  for	  (a)	  blue-­‐comparison	  preference	  trials	  and	  (b)	  black-­‐comparison	  preference	  trials.	  Each	  tank	  contained	  10	  fish.	  ................................................................................	  29	  Figure	  2.2:	  Total	  number	  of	  aggressive	  acts	  occurring	  on	  each	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  (per	  10-­‐minute	  trial)	  in	  relation	  to	  fish	  density	  (n=10)	  for	  blue-­‐	  and	  black-­‐comparison	  trials.	  Fill	  of	  dots	  corresponds	  to	  side	  colour	  and	  dots	  with	  X	  represent	  the	  dark	  grey/black	  pattern	  sides.	  Grey	  lines	  connect	  the	  two	  sides	  of	  a	  tank	  in	  a	  single	  trial.	  ...........................	  31	  Figure	  2.3:	  Total	  number	  of	  aggressive	  acts	  occuring	  on	  the	  blue	  and	  black	  sides	  of	  the	  tanks	  for	  white,	  light	  grey,	  and	  dark	  grey	  comparisons	  (n=60;	  6	  trials,	  10	  tanks)	  ..........	  32	  vii	  Acknowledgements	  First	  and	  foremost,	  I	  would	  like	  to	  thank	  my	  supervisors	  Nina	  von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  Dan	  Weary	  who	  have	  taught	  me	  all	  I	  know	  in	  research	  and	  animal	  welfare.	  Their	  passion	  and	  endless	  encouragement	  has	  pushed	  me	  intellectually,	  provided	  me	  with	  amazing	  opportunities,	  and	  allowed	  me	  to	  follow	  my	  interests	  in	  fish	  welfare-­‐	  an	  emerging	  field	  in	  the	  program.	  I	  am	  also	  thankful	  for	  Drs	  Colin	  Brauner	  and	  Jeffrey	  Richards	  who	  provided	  me	  with	  fish,	  access	  to	  the	  InSEAS	  lab	  facilities,	  and	  valuable	  guidance	  during	  my	  experiment	  and	  thesis	  preparation.	  I	  would	  also	  like	  to	  thank	  Becca	  Franks	  for	  acting	  as	  a	  great	  mentor	  to	  me,	  helping	  with	  my	  endless	  manuscript	  edits	  and	  always	  offering	  encouragement.	  A	  very	  special	  thank-­‐you	  to	  Betsy	  Robertson	  for	  all	  the	  hours	  she	  helped	  me	  in	  the	  lab	  rotating	  and	  arranging	  those	  annoying	  magnets	  and	  pieces	  of	  laminated	  poster	  board.	  I	  am	  also	  extremely	  thankful	  for	  the	  help	  and	  guidance	  provided	  to	  me	  by	  Josh	  Emerman	  and	  Victor	  Chang-­‐	  my	  go-­‐to	  fish	  experts!	  	  With	  love,	  I	  thank	  my	  family	  (Mum,	  Dad,	  and	  Bryana)	  and	  friends,	  who	  have	  endlessly	  supported	  me	  in	  every	  way	  imaginable.	  I	  would	  especially	  like	  to	  thank	  Garth	  Covernton	  for	  supporting	  me	  unconditionally,	  coming	  in	  on	  weekends	  to	  help	  me	  in	  the	  lab	  (even	  when	  it	  was	  sunny	  outside),	  and	  for	  always	  knowing	  how	  to	  make	  me	  laugh!	  	  Finally,	  I	  would	  like	  to	  thank	  all	  the	  students	  in	  the	  AWP	  for	  all	  the	  advice,	  laughs,	  and	  endless	  intellectual	  discussions	  at	  the	  lunch	  table.	  My	  experience	  as	  a	  master’s	  student	  has	  been	  highly	  rewarding	  and	  I	  am	  immensely	  grateful	  that	  my	  committee	  members	  agreed	  to	  take	  me	  on	  as	  a	  student.	  	  1	  Chapter	  1:	  Introduction	  1.1	  Overview	  This	  thesis	  seeks	  to	  assess	  coho	  salmon	  preferences	  for	  tank	  colour	  and	  the	  effect	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  fish	  aggression;	  potential	  determinants	  of	  the	  welfare	  of	  salmon	  in	  closed-­‐containment	  aquaculture.	  This	  introductory	  chapter	  sets	  the	  stage	  by	  briefly	  reviewing	  the	  natural	  history	  of	  coho	  salmon	  and	  the	  use	  of	  salmonids	  in	  aquaculture,	  highlighting	  closed-­‐containment	  systems.	  Secondly,	  animal	  welfare	  assessments	  and	  the	  capacity	  for	  fish	  to	  experience	  pain	  and	  fear	  will	  be	  discussed.	  	  Salmon	  aggression	  and	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  aggression	  levels,	  as	  well	  as	  other	  aspects	  of	  fish	  will	  be	  then	  be	  reviewed	  followed	  by	  a	  section	  on	  fish	  vision,	  measuring	  colour,	  and	  preference	  testing.	  Lastly,	  the	  overall	  objectives	  and	  hypothesis	  of	  this	  study	  will	  be	  stated.	  	  1.2	  Natural	  history	  Coho	  salmon	  (Oncorhynchus	  kisutch)	  are	  one	  of	  the	  seven	  recognised	  species	  of	  Pacific	  salmon	  (Sandercock,	  1991).	  Their	  natural	  range	  includes	  the	  far	  east	  of	  Russia	  around	  the	  Bering	  Sea,	  over	  to	  Alaska,	  and	  along	  the	  west	  coast	  of	  North	  America	  down	  to	  California	  (Hart,	  1973).	  The	  life	  history	  of	  coho	  salmon	  begins	  as	  adult	  fish	  migrate	  from	  the	  sea	  into	  streams,	  during	  the	  fall	  months,	  where	  they	  deposit	  their	  eggs	  into	  gravel	  (Sandercock,	  1991).	  As	  soon	  as	  they	  finish	  spawning,	  the	  male	  and	  female	  adult	  salmon	  die	  (Shapovalov	  and	  Taft,	  1954).	  After	  the	  eggs	  incubate	  during	  winter	  in	  the	  gravel,	  free-­‐swimming	  coho	  fry	  emerge	  in	  the	  spring.	  Fry	  tend	  to	  emerge	  at	  night	  and	  begin	  to	  school	  immediately	  (Sandercock,	  1991).	  As	  they	  mature,	  individuals	  break	  off	  from	  the	  school	  and	  	   2	  acquire	  their	  own	  territories	  for	  feeding	  (Shapovalov	  and	  Taft,	  1954).	  Once	  territories	  have	  been	  established,	  juvenile	  coho	  begin	  to	  engage	  in	  intraspecific	  aggressive	  behaviours	  in	  the	  form	  of	  territory	  defense	  and	  hierarchy	  establishment	  (Shapovalov	  and	  Taft,	  1954).	  Juvenile	  coho	  generally	  feed	  on	  other	  fry	  and	  on	  drifting	  invertebrates,	  such	  as	  ants,	  flies,	  and	  assorted	  larva	  (Shapovalov	  and	  Taft,	  1954).	  	  	   The	  juvenile	  coho’s	  primary	  predators	  in	  the	  stream	  include	  fellow	  coho	  and	  other	  salmon	  species,	  as	  well	  as	  garter	  snakes	  and	  birds	  such	  as	  kingfishers	  and	  great	  blue	  herons	  (Shapovalov	  and	  Taft,	  1954).	  After	  a	  year	  or	  more	  in	  the	  stream,	  sometime	  between	  March	  and	  April,	  the	  salmon	  begin	  their	  seaward	  migration	  downstream,	  undergoing	  a	  metamorphic	  process	  called	  smoltification	  (Sandercock,	  1991).	  When	  they	  reach	  the	  ocean,	  coho	  spend	  approximately	  18	  months	  at	  sea	  feeding	  and	  growing	  before	  reaching	  sexual	  maturity	  (Shapovalov	  and	  Taft,	  1954).	  Mature	  adults	  exhibit	  a	  “homing	  instinct”	  and	  travel	  back	  to	  their	  freshwater	  stream	  of	  origin	  to	  spawn	  (Sandercock,	  1991).	  	  	  1.3	  Salmonids	  in	  aquaculture	  	  	   Aquaculture,	  as	  defined	  by	  the	  Food	  and	  Agriculture	  Organization	  of	  the	  United	  Nations,	  is	  the	  farming	  of	  aquatic	  organisms,	  with	  human	  consumption	  being	  the	  most	  common	  reason	  for	  harvest	  (FAO,	  2014).	  Over	  the	  past	  20	  years,	  aquaculture	  has	  expanded	  worldwide	  and	  this	  growth	  is	  expected	  to	  continue	  (Naylor	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  World	  demand	  for	  fish	  and	  fishery	  products	  is	  projected	  to	  increase	  by	  almost	  45	  million	  tonnes	  to	  187	  million	  tonnes	  by	  2030	  with	  aquaculture	  supplying	  the	  majority	  of	  this	  growth	  and	  accounting	  for	  over	  50%	  of	  global	  fish	  production	  (FAO,	  2014).	  	  	   3	  	   Although	  a	  variety	  of	  organisms	  such	  as	  molluscs,	  crustaceans,	  and	  aquatic	  plants,	  are	  reared	  in	  aquaculture,	  over	  half	  of	  all	  aquaculture	  production	  is	  finfish	  farming	  (FAO,	  2014).	  Currently,	  Atlantic	  salmon	  (Salmo	  salar)	  are	  the	  most	  globally	  produced	  species	  of	  salmonid	  and	  are	  primarily	  farmed	  in	  Canada,	  Norway,	  Chile,	  Scotland,	  and	  Australia	  (FAO,	  2014).	  Atlantic	  salmon	  became	  popular	  due	  to	  a	  number	  of	  factors,	  including	  market	  demand,	  high	  growth	  rates,	  low	  aggression	  and	  high	  disease	  resistance	  (Masser	  and	  Bridger,	  2007;	  Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013).	  	  	   To	  date,	  the	  industry	  standard	  has	  been	  to	  raise	  salmonids	  in	  land-­‐based	  recirculating	  aquaculture	  systems	  until	  smoltification.	  After	  this,	  the	  smolts	  are	  transferred	  to	  open	  ocean	  net-­‐pens	  to	  continue	  their	  growth	  until	  they	  become	  market-­‐sized	  adults.	  Ocean	  net-­‐pen	  systems	  typically	  consist	  of	  6-­‐24	  floating,	  mesh,	  cage-­‐like	  structures,	  made	  of	  plastic,	  steel	  or	  aluminum,	  that	  are	  anchored	  to	  the	  ocean	  floor	  (Masser	  and	  Bridger,	  2007).	  They	  are	  located	  in	  sheltered	  bays	  and	  fjords	  where	  they	  are	  protected	  from	  extreme	  currents	  and	  storms	  (Masser	  and	  Bridger,	  2007).	  It	  is	  now	  well	  recognized,	  however,	  that	  this	  form	  of	  production	  has	  multiple	  negative	  impacts	  on	  the	  ocean	  environment	  e.g.,	  organic	  waste	  release,	  fish	  escapes,	  and	  disease	  threats	  to	  natural	  populations	  (Black,	  2001).	  Several	  alternative	  aquaculture	  methods	  that	  avoid	  these	  negative	  impacts	  have	  been	  proposed.	  The	  most	  feasible	  and	  fastest	  growing	  alternative	  is	  land-­‐based,	  closed-­‐containment	  aquaculture	  (Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011).	  	  	   In	  British	  Columbia,	  Canada,	  there	  is	  a	  growing	  interest	  in	  culturing	  native,	  Pacific	  salmonids	  (e.g.	  coho	  salmon,	  Oncorhynchus	  kisutch),	  as	  an	  alternative	  to	  non-­‐native	  Atlantic	  salmonids	  (Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013).	  Coho	  salmon	  provide	  better	  opportunities	  4	  for	  niche	  marketing,	  thus	  generating	  more	  profit	  with	  higher	  prices	  per	  kilogram	  of	  fish	  (Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013).	  As	  a	  result,	  the	  industry	  is	  interested	  in	  investigating	  the	  culture	  of	  post-­‐smolt	  coho	  salmon	  in	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  (Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013).	  	  1.3.1	  Closed-­‐containment	  recirculating	  aquaculture	  systems	  Closed-­‐containment	  recirculating	  aquaculture	  systems	  use	  large,	  circular,	  fiberglass	  tanks	  that	  are	  arranged	  close	  together,	  on	  land,	  in	  modules.	  In	  contrast	  to	  ocean	  net-­‐pens,	  they	  physically	  separate	  fish	  from	  the	  external	  environment	  so	  there	  are	  no	  vectors	  for	  disease,	  pathogen	  or	  parasite	  transfer	  between	  wild	  and	  farmed	  salmonid	  populations	  (Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013).	  Considering	  these	  systems	  are	  land-­‐based,	  the	  modules	  must	  be	  located	  in	  proximity	  to	  a	  sufficient	  supply	  of	  either	  groundwater	  or	  seawater	  (Masser	  and	  Bridger,	  2007)	  that	  is	  continuously	  pumped	  into	  the	  tanks	  and	  is	  constantly	  recirculated.	  Water	  quality	  is	  maintained	  through	  various	  means,	  including	  mechanical	  and	  biological	  filtration,	  ultraviolet	  (UV)-­‐sterilization,	  heat	  exchange	  pumps,	  oxygen	  injection,	  and	  drainage	  of	  solid	  wastes	  through	  the	  tank	  bottoms.	  Through	  this	  constant	  treatment	  and	  recirculation	  of	  water	  within	  the	  tanks,	  these	  systems	  can	  reuse	  98%	  of	  their	  input	  water	  (Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013).	  Land-­‐based	  closed-­‐containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  also	  offer	  more	  control	  over	  tank	  conditions	  such	  as	  salinity,	  temperature,	  ammonia,	  CO2,	  stocking	  density,	  and	  product	  quality	  (Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011).	  Surprisingly,	  little	  research	  to	  date	  has	  addressed	  the	  environmental	  parameters	  within	  closed	  containment	  systems	  that	  are	  needed	  to	  ensure	  high	  levels	  of	  fish	  welfare.	  Improved	  fish	  welfare	  has	  the	  potential	  to	  improve	  industry	  production	  quality	  and	  quantity	  as	  well	  	   5	  as	  public	  perception	  and	  product	  acceptance	  (Broom,	  1998;	  Southgate	  and	  Wall,	  2001;	  FSBI,	  2002).	  Thus,	  science-­‐based	  recommendations	  on	  conditions	  to	  ensure	  good	  welfare	  in	  closed	  containment	  systems	  has	  the	  potential	  to	  greatly	  influence	  the	  long-­‐term	  success	  of	  the	  industry.	  	  	  1.4	  Assessing	  animal	  welfare	  	  	   Animal	  welfare	  scientists	  use	  multiple	  indicators	  to	  assess	  animal	  welfare,	  with	  most	  adopting	  the	  following	  three	  categories:	  1)	  biological	  functioning	  and	  physical	  health,	  2)	  emotional	  or	  affective	  states,	  and	  3)	  the	  animals’	  ability	  to	  lead	  reasonably	  natural	  lives	  and	  to	  perform	  natural	  behaviours	  (Fraser	  et	  al.,	  1997).	  With	  the	  rapid	  expansion	  of	  fish	  aquaculture,	  the	  welfare	  of	  farmed	  fish	  has	  received	  increasing	  attention	  (Ashley,	  2007).	  However,	  the	  majority	  of	  studies	  on	  fish	  welfare	  in	  aquaculture	  have	  focused	  on	  the	  biological	  functioning	  of	  fish,	  addressing	  issues	  such	  as	  growth	  rates,	  flesh	  quality,	  injury,	  disease,	  and	  reproductive	  problems	  that	  are	  bad	  for	  the	  fish	  and	  also	  for	  farm	  efficiency	  and	  quality	  (e.g.	  Schreck	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Kristiansen	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Poli	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  However,	  good	  animal	  welfare	  goes	  beyond	  just	  physical	  health.	  It	  also	  involves	  the	  ability	  of	  an	  animal	  to	  express	  natural	  behaviours	  and	  a	  lack	  of	  mental	  suffering	  from	  pain,	  fear,	  etc.	  The	  three	  categories	  of	  animal	  welfare	  do	  overlap	  and	  there	  are	  issues	  with	  measuring	  and	  focusing	  on	  a	  single	  category	  (Fraser	  et	  al.,	  1997;	  von	  Keyserlingk	  et	  al.,	  2009).	  Thus,	  the	  best	  solutions	  for	  improving	  the	  welfare	  of	  fish	  in	  closed	  containment	  systems	  should	  address	  all	  three	  categories	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  Unfortunately,	  scientific	  research	  addressing	  these	  aspects	  of	  fish	  welfare	  is	  lagging	  behind	  studies	  of	  biological	  functioning.	  	  	  	   6	  1.4.1	  Affective	  states	  in	  fish	  	  	   Some	  authors	  have	  argued	  that	  fish	  are	  unable	  to	  experience	  negative	  affective	  states	  (Rose,	  2002);	  this	  argument	  is	  based	  on	  fish	  lacking	  a	  neocortex,	  the	  region	  of	  the	  brain	  linked	  to	  the	  emotional	  component	  of	  pain	  in	  mammals.	  However,	  there	  is	  a	  growing	  body	  of	  physiological,	  behavioural,	  and	  anatomical	  evidence	  indicating	  that	  fish	  are	  able	  to	  experience	  pain	  and	  fear	  (e.g.	  Braithwaite	  and	  Huntingford,	  2004;	  Sneddon,	  2002,	  Sneddon	  et	  al.	  2003a,b;	  Dunlop	  and	  Laming,	  2005).	  Research	  has	  confirmed	  the	  presence	  of	  nociceptors	  in	  the	  head	  and	  face	  of	  teleost	  fish,	  such	  as	  trout	  (Sneddon,	  2002;	  Sneddon	  et	  al.,	  2003a,b).	  This	  indicates	  that	  fish	  have	  the	  needed	  neuroanatomy	  and	  neurophysiology	  to	  perceive	  and	  process	  information	  about	  stimuli,	  such	  as	  mechanical	  pressure	  or	  temperature	  that	  could	  cause	  pain	  in	  humans.	  Furthermore,	  studies	  conducted	  by	  Sneddon	  et	  al.	  (2003a,b)	  demonstrated	  that	  rainbow	  trout	  react	  to	  pain	  stimuli	  and	  display	  fear	  responses.	  Fish	  received	  injections	  in	  their	  lips	  with	  saline	  (control),	  bee	  venom,	  and	  acetic	  acid;	  in	  addition,	  some	  fish	  received	  morphine	  (an	  analgesic).	  The	  fish	  that	  received	  morphine	  spent	  less	  time	  rubbing	  their	  face	  against	  the	  tank	  enclosure	  and	  more	  time	  eating,	  indicating	  that	  these	  responses	  are	  pain	  specific.	  Fear	  responses	  were	  measured	  as	  the	  amount	  of	  time	  fish	  spent	  avoiding	  a	  novel	  object	  temporarily	  placed	  in	  its	  tank.	  The	  fish	  that	  received	  bee	  venom	  and	  acetic	  acid	  injections	  had	  a	  reduced	  fear	  response	  compared	  to	  fish	  that	  received	  saline	  and	  morphine	  injections.	  These	  results	  suggest	  that	  nociceptive	  stimulation	  preoccupies	  the	  fishes’	  attention	  and	  reduces	  the	  amount	  of	  attention	  directed	  at	  responding	  to	  the	  fear	  of	  the	  novel	  object.	  Studies	  have	  also	  shown	  that	  teleost	  fish	  produce	  complex	  behaviours	  and	  have	  the	  capacity	  for	  simple	  mental	  representations	  and,	  as	  such,	  they	  have	  the	  potential	  to	  experience	  pain	  (Rodriguez	  et	  al.,	  	   7	  1994;	  Braithwaite,	  1998;	  Odling-­‐Smee	  and	  Braithwaite,	  2003b;	  Laland	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Kelley	  and	  Magurran,	  2003).	  Considering	  this	  evidence,	  affective	  states	  should	  be	  considered	  when	  describing	  fish	  welfare	  in	  aquaculture.	  	  	  1.5	  Aggression	  in	  salmonids	  	  	   As	  juvenile	  salmonids	  become	  territorial,	  they	  form	  social	  dominance	  hierarchies	  (Ellis	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Ashley,	  2007).	  Thus,	  increasing	  fish	  density	  generally	  increases	  social	  stress	  (Schreck	  et	  al.,	  1997;	  Ellis	  et	  al.,	  2002)	  and	  aggressive	  behaviours	  between	  conspecifics,	  such	  as	  charging,	  chasing,	  and	  biting	  (Abbott	  and	  Dill,	  1985;	  Turnbull	  et	  al.,	  1998,	  2005).	  These	  aggressive	  interactions	  are	  often	  the	  primary	  cause	  of	  fin	  and	  skin	  damage	  in	  fish	  (Abbott	  and	  Dill,	  1985;	  Turnbull	  et	  al.,	  1998,	  2005).	  	  	   Fin	  damage	  refers	  to	  injury,	  or	  loss,	  of	  the	  tissue	  in	  the	  rayed	  fins	  of	  fish	  (Latremouille,	  2003).	  A	  study	  conducted	  by	  Chervova	  (1997)	  demonstrated	  experimentally	  that	  fish	  fins	  are	  capable	  of	  nociception.	  Thus,	  injury	  to	  fin	  tissue	  is	  probably	  associated	  with	  pain.	  The	  fins	  of	  salmonids	  serve	  important	  functions	  for	  locomotion	  and	  intraspecific	  communication	  (Abbott	  and	  Dill,	  1985;	  Pelis	  and	  McCormick,	  2003);	  thus,	  fin	  damage	  has	  the	  potential	  to	  affect	  behaviour.	  In	  contrast,	  skin	  damage	  refers	  to	  injury	  of	  the	  epidermis	  of	  a	  fish,	  including	  scale	  loss,	  wounds	  and	  ulcers	  (Bouck	  and	  Smith,	  1979).	  Skin	  damage	  can	  result	  in	  a	  loss	  of	  body	  water	  and	  changed	  ion	  balance,	  which	  produces	  an	  osmotic	  stress	  that	  can	  be	  life	  threatening	  (Bouck	  and	  Smith,	  1979).	  Both	  fin	  and	  skin	  damage	  have	  the	  potential	  to	  cause	  inflammation	  and	  pain,	  and	  represent	  routes	  for	  pathogens	  leading	  to	  infection,	  illness,	  and	  reduced	  survival	  in	  salmon	  (Schneider	  and	  Nicholson,	  1980;	  Ashley,	  2007).	  	  In	  consideration	  of	  these	  factors,	  determining	  the	  mechanisms	  and	  factors	  	   8	  associated	  with	  lowered	  intraspecific	  aggression	  has	  the	  potential	  to	  improve	  the	  welfare	  of	  fish.	  	  	  1.6	  The	  effect	  of	  colour	  on	  fish	  	  1.6.1	  The	  effect	  of	  colour	  on	  aggression	  	  	   In	  a	  number	  of	  different	  fish	  species,	  certain	  colours	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  aggression	  levels.	  For	  example,	  black	  tank	  backgrounds	  decreased	  agonistic	  behaviour	  and	  social	  stress	  in	  pairs	  of	  Arctic	  charr	  (Salvelinus.alpinus;	  Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2002)	  and	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus;	  Merighe	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  	  	   Some	  teleost	  fish	  have	  the	  ability	  to	  adjust	  the	  colour	  of	  their	  skin	  in	  response	  to	  background	  colour	  (e.g.	  Baker	  et	  al.,	  1985;	  Fujimoto	  et	  al.,	  1991;	  Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  The	  two	  peptide	  hormones	  released	  from	  the	  pituitary,	  α	  -­‐MSH	  (α-­‐melanocyte-­‐stimulating	  hormone)	  and	  MCH	  (melanin-­‐concentrating	  hormone),	  are	  involved	  in	  the	  long-­‐term	  hormonal	  control	  of	  colour	  changes	  in	  fish	  skin	  (Imanpoor	  and	  Abdollahi,	  2011).	  When	  fish	  are	  placed	  on	  a	  white	  background,	  MCH	  is	  released	  and	  α	  -­‐MSH	  is	  inhibited,	  causing	  a	  concentration	  of	  pigments	  in	  the	  dermal	  melanphores	  of	  the	  skin	  leading	  to	  an	  overall	  paling	  of	  the	  fish	  (Imanpoor	  and	  Abdollahi,	  2011).	  In	  contrast,	  black	  backgrounds	  result	  in	  the	  activation	  of	  the	  MSH	  cells	  and	  the	  increased	  release	  of	  α	  -­‐MSH	  into	  the	  blood	  stream,	  making	  fish	  skin	  darker	  in	  colour	  (Imanpoor	  and	  Abdollahi,	  2011).	  	  	   In	  salmonids	  and	  Arctic	  charr,	  lightening	  of	  the	  skin	  and	  eyes	  signals	  social	  dominance,	  while	  darkening	  signals	  social	  subordination	  (Keenleyside	  and	  Yamamoto,	  	   9	  1962;	  O’Connor	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2000,	  2002).	  Thus,	  a	  darker	  coloured	  fish	  may	  represent	  less	  of	  a	  threat	  and	  elicit	  less	  aggression	  than	  a	  conspecific	  displaying	  paler	  body	  coloration.	  Höglund	  et	  al.	  (2002),	  compared	  pairs	  of	  Arctic	  charr	  (Salvelinus	  alpinus),	  and	  showed	  that	  fish	  interacting	  on	  a	  white	  background	  displayed	  initial	  pale	  colouration	  and	  high	  levels	  of	  aggressive	  behaviour	  while	  fish	  interacting	  on	  a	  black	  background,	  displayed	  initial	  dark	  colouration	  and	  a	  lower	  frequency	  of	  aggressive	  interactions.	  While	  some	  of	  the	  fish	  on	  the	  white	  background	  became	  subordinate	  and	  took	  on	  a	  darker	  body	  colouration,	  the	  subordinate	  fish	  on	  the	  black	  background	  did	  not	  show	  any	  additional	  darkening.	  This	  result	  suggests	  that	  the	  use	  of	  dark	  tank	  colour	  has	  the	  potential	  to	  reduce	  aggressive	  behaviour	  and	  social	  stress	  in	  Arctic	  charr.	  To	  my	  knowledge,	  however,	  this	  has	  never	  been	  tested	  in	  any	  other	  fish	  species.	  	  1.6.2	  The	  effect	  of	  colour	  on	  stress	  and	  growth	  	  	   In	  addition	  to	  aggression	  levels,	  a	  number	  of	  studies	  have	  demonstrated	  that	  various	  coloured	  tank	  lights	  impact	  fish	  stress	  responses	  and	  growth.	  	  An	  experiment	  conducted	  by	  Volpato	  and	  Barreto	  (2001),	  for	  example,	  exposed	  groups	  of	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus)	  to	  green,	  blue,	  or	  white	  coloured	  environments	  by	  covering	  the	  light	  source	  with	  coloured	  cellophane	  (green	  or	  blue;	  no	  cellophane	  was	  used	  for	  white	  light).	  Certain	  fish	  were	  then	  confined	  to	  a	  small	  area	  of	  the	  tank	  with	  an	  opaque	  partition	  to	  induce	  a	  stress	  response.	  Confinement	  was	  shown	  to	  increase	  cortisol	  levels	  in	  fish	  held	  in	  green	  and	  white	  light,	  but	  no	  effect	  occurred	  when	  these	  fish	  were	  maintained	  under	  blue	  light.	  Blue	  light	  was	  thus	  shown	  to	  prevent	  an	  increase	  of	  stress-­‐induced	  cortisol	  in	  Nile	  tilapia	  and	  was	  the	  recommended	  colour.	  In	  contrast,	  Karakatsouli	  et	  al.	  (2012)	  failed	  to	  conclude	  whether	  10	  European	  sea	  bass	  (Dicentrarchus	  labrax)	  were	  more	  or	  less	  stressed	  in	  blue	  or	  white	  environmental	  light	  conditions.	  In	  another	  study	  by	  Karakatsouli	  et	  al.	  (2010),	  the	  effect	  of	  white,	  red	  and	  blue	  lights	  on	  the	  growth	  of	  scaled	  and	  mirror	  common	  carp	  species	  (Cyprinus	  carpio)	  was	  compared.	  Results	  of	  this	  study	  showed	  that	  specific	  growth	  rate,	  weight	  gain,	  and	  feed	  efficiency	  were	  positively	  affected	  by	  red	  light	  and	  blue	  light	  at	  low	  and	  high	  stocking	  densities	  of	  scaled	  common	  carp,	  respectively.	  For	  mirror	  common	  carp,	  however,	  the	  coloured	  light	  sources	  did	  not	  induce	  many	  differences	  in	  growth	  performance.	  Conversely,	  red	  light,	  in	  comparison	  to	  blue,	  violet,	  red,	  green,	  and	  yellow	  light,	  limited	  weight	  gain	  for	  individually	  held	  Nile	  tilapia	  and	  increased	  weight	  heterogeneity	  for	  groups	  of	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus;	  Luchiari	  and	  Freire,	  2009).	  Lastly,	  blue	  light	  was	  shown	  to	  have	  negative	  growth	  effects	  for	  rainbow	  trout	  (Oncorhynchus	  mykiss),	  especially	  after	  8	  weeks	  under	  experimental	  conditions,	  while	  blue	  light	  seemed	  to	  be	  favourable	  in	  gilthead	  seabream	  (Sparus	  aurata)	  (Karakatsouli	  et	  al.,	  2007).	  Tank	  substrate	  colour	  has	  also	  been	  shown	  to	  influence	  fish	  growth.	  For	  example,	  the	  presence	  of	  blue	  and	  red-­‐brown	  substrates,	  in	  comparison	  with	  green	  or	  no	  substrate,	  was	  shown	  to	  enhance	  growth	  in	  gilthead	  seabream	  (Sparus	  aurata;	  Batzina	  and	  Karakatsouli,	  2012).	  	  Lastly,	  tank	  wall	  colour	  has	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  the	  stress	  response	  and	  growth	  of	  a	  number	  of	  fish	  species.	  For	  example,	  Barcellos	  et	  al.	  (2009)	  revealed	  that	  jundiá	  (Rhamdia	  quelen),	  either	  in	  the	  blue	  or	  white	  tanks,	  presented	  similar	  amounts	  of	  whole-­‐body	  cortisol	  (a	  glucocorticoid	  hormone	  released	  in	  response	  to	  stress)	  after	  exposure	  to	  an	  acute	  stressor	  (pursuit	  with	  a	  net	  for	  60	  seconds).	  However,	  when	  shelters	  that	  provided	  hiding	  	   11	  places	  for	  the	  fish	  were	  added	  to	  the	  tanks,	  the	  fish	  kept	  in	  the	  blue	  tanks	  had	  the	  lowest	  cortisol	  concentrations	  compared	  to	  the	  fish	  kept	  in	  the	  white	  tanks	  after	  exposure	  to	  the	  acute	  stressor.	  Similarly,	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus)	  and	  summer	  flounder	  (Paralichthys	  dentatus)	  were	  shown	  to	  have	  reduced	  cortisol	  levels	  when	  maintained	  in	  darker	  blue	  and	  red	  coloured	  tanks	  with	  the	  highest	  levels	  of	  cortisol	  detected	  in	  light	  blue	  tanks	  (McLean	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  The	  greatest	  overall	  weight	  increases	  for	  Nile	  tilapia	  and	  summer	  flounder	  were	  also	  observed	  for	  fish	  held	  in	  the	  red	  tanks	  (McLean	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  In	  contrast,	  Imanpoor	  and	  Abdollahi	  (2011)	  saw	  a	  higher	  final	  body	  mass	  and	  a	  lower	  stress	  response	  for	  juvenile	  Caspian	  kutum	  (Rutilus	  kutum)	  reared	  in	  yellow	  tanks,	  as	  opposed	  to	  red,	  blue,	  white	  or	  black	  tanks.	  Finally,	  for	  juvenile	  barramundi	  (Lates	  calcarifer),	  Ullmann	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  showed	  that	  mean	  fish	  weight	  in	  red	  and	  yellow	  tanks	  was	  significantly	  greater	  than	  that	  of	  green	  and	  blue	  tanks.	  Interestingly	  enough,	  Ullmann	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  also	  looked	  at	  fish	  preference	  for	  tank	  colour	  using	  square	  aquaria	  divided	  into	  four	  quadrants	  lined	  with	  red,	  yellow,	  green,	  or	  blue	  colour.	  Juvenile	  barramundi	  were	  found	  to	  have	  an	  inherent	  preference	  for	  the	  blue	  and	  green	  quadrants.	  	  	  1.6.3	  Tank	  colour	  in	  aquaculture	  	  	   The	  majority	  of	  studies	  on	  the	  effects	  of	  colour	  on	  fish	  have	  focused	  on	  how	  they	  influence	  aggression	  levels,	  stress	  responses	  and	  growth.	  Salmonid	  compatibility	  with	  tank	  colour,	  however,	  has	  been	  largely	  neglected	  and	  to	  my	  knowledge	  no	  study	  to	  date	  has	  examined	  tank	  colour	  preference	  in	  any	  species	  of	  salmon.	  	  Although	  it	  is	  possible	  to	  have	  tanks	  fabricated	  in	  any	  colour,	  the	  most	  popular	  tank	  colour	  for	  fish	  in	  land-­‐based	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  in	  North	  America	  is	  light	  blue.	  A	  total	  of	  four	  tank	  	   12	  suppliers	  and	  manufacturers	  were	  surveyed	  via	  telephone	  interview	  to	  determine	  the	  most	  common	  tank	  color	  sold.	  Fabricators	  and	  suppliers	  included	  D&T	  Fiberglass	  Inc.	  (Sacramento,	  CA,	  USA),	  PR	  Aqua	  Supplies	  Ltd.	  (Nanaimo,	  BC,	  Canada),	  AgraMarine	  Holdings	  (Powell	  River,	  BC,	  Canada),	  and	  Marine	  Harvest	  (Canada,	  Campbell	  River,	  BC,	  Canada).	  It	  is	  unclear	  why	  light	  blue	  is	  the	  most	  popular	  colour	  choice	  but	  it	  likely	  took	  place	  without	  any	  considerations	  of	  the	  spectral	  sensitivities	  of	  fish	  (McLean	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  	  	  1.7	  Vision	  in	  fish	  	  	   Salmon	  rely	  almost	  entirely	  on	  vision	  to	  detect	  movements	  and	  colour	  changes	  associated	  with	  prey,	  predators,	  and	  mates	  (Stradmeyer	  and	  Thorpe,	  1987;	  Levine	  and	  MacNichol	  Jr,	  1982).	  Furthermore,	  photic	  environments	  vary	  widely	  in	  marine	  and	  freshwater	  environments,	  ranging	  from	  almost	  full	  sunlight	  at	  the	  waters	  surface	  to	  very	  little	  light	  in	  the	  deep	  ocean	  (Levine	  and	  MacNichol	  Jr,	  1982).	  The	  spectrum	  of	  light	  available	  ranges	  from	  a	  broad	  spectrum	  of	  ultraviolet	  (UV)	  to	  the	  far	  red	  at	  the	  surface	  and	  narrows	  to	  blue	  wavelengths	  of	  460–480	  nm	  in	  the	  deep	  (Levine	  and	  MacNichol	  Jr,	  1982).	  This	  range	  in	  photic	  environment	  probably	  helped	  to	  drive	  the	  evolution	  of	  visual	  systems	  in	  fish.	  	  	   The	  vertebrate	  retina	  contains	  both	  rod	  and	  cone	  cells	  (Fein	  and	  Szuts,	  1982).	  The	  highly	  sensitive	  rod	  cells	  are	  responsible	  for	  vision	  at	  low	  light	  levels	  and	  provide	  monochromatic	  vision	  while,	  cone	  cells	  are	  colour	  sensitive	  and	  are	  active	  in	  bright	  light	  conditions	  (Bowmaker,	  1995).	  The	  rod	  and	  cone	  cells	  of	  fish	  contain	  visual	  pigments	  composed	  of	  a	  protein	  (opsin)	  attached	  to	  a	  chromophore	  (the	  aldehyde	  of	  vitamin	  A,	  retinal)	  (Bowmaker,	  1995).	  These	  visual	  pigments	  are	  sensitive	  to	  ultraviolet	  (UV)	  	   13	  wavelengths,	  as	  well	  as	  short,	  medium,	  and	  long	  wavelengths	  (Temple	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Thus,	  fish	  are	  capable	  of	  colour	  vision	  and	  the	  visual	  pigments	  of	  fish	  exhibit	  one	  of	  the	  greatest	  ranges	  among	  vertebrates.	  	  	   The	  visual	  pigments	  of	  fish	  are	  maximally	  sensitive	  to	  a	  specific	  region	  of	  the	  spectrum	  and	  can	  be	  altered	  as	  fish	  develop	  and	  undergo	  ontogenetic	  or	  seasonal	  migrations	  to	  different	  environments	  with	  varying	  light	  conditions	  (Temple	  et	  al.,	  2006,	  2008).	  Coho	  salmon,	  for	  example,	  shift	  their	  spectral	  sensitivity	  seasonally	  by	  changing	  their	  vitamin	  A1	  and	  vitamin	  A2	  chromophore	  ratio	  with	  A2	  increasing	  during	  winter	  and	  decreasing	  in	  summer	  (Temple	  et	  al.,	  2006).	  Coho	  salmon	  also	  shift	  their	  spectral	  sensitivity	  ontogenetically	  by	  altering	  the	  opsin	  expression	  in	  their	  medium	  wavelength-­‐sensitive	  and	  long	  wavelength-­‐sensitive	  cones	  (Temple	  at	  al.,	  2008).	  Based	  on	  these	  findings,	  coho	  possess	  one	  of	  the	  most	  naturally	  flexible	  vertebrate	  visual	  pigment	  systems	  discovered	  to	  date	  (Temple	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  	  	  1.8	  Measuring	  colour	  	   Although	  studies	  have	  looked	  at	  the	  effects	  of	  environmental	  light,	  substrate,	  and	  tank	  colour	  on	  fish,	  no	  study	  to	  date	  has	  provided	  detailed	  descriptions	  of	  the	  colours	  used	  in	  the	  experiments	  or	  justified	  the	  selection	  of	  those	  particular	  colours.	  For	  example,	  to	  look	  at	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  the	  growth	  rates	  and	  stress	  responses	  of	  juvenile	  Caspian	  kutum	  (Rutilus	  kutum),	  Imanpoor	  and	  Abdollahi	  (2011)	  compared	  yellow,	  red,	  blue,	  white	  and	  black	  tanks.	  However,	  they	  did	  not	  justify	  their	  choice	  of	  tank	  colours	  or	  provide	  a	  detailed	  description	  of	  these	  colours.	  One	  possible	  way	  to	  describe	  tank	  colour	  is	  	   14	  to	  use	  the	  HSV	  model,	  following	  Smith	  (1978),	  which	  describes	  colour	  in	  three	  dimensions:	  hue,	  saturation,	  and	  value.	  	  	   Hue	  defines	  pure	  colour	  in	  terms	  of	  “green”,	  “red”,	  and	  “blue”	  or	  mixtures	  of	  two	  pure	  colours	  such	  as	  “red-­‐blue”	  (=”purple”).	  Hue	  is	  measured	  as	  an	  angle	  on	  the	  colour	  wheel	  in	  degrees	  ranging	  from	  0°	  to	  360°.	  Every	  degree	  corresponds	  to	  a	  single	  color,	  for	  example,	  0°	  is	  red,	  45°	  is	  a	  shade	  of	  orange	  and	  55°	  is	  a	  shade	  of	  yellow.	  	  	   Saturation	  describes	  the	  intensity	  of	  a	  colour.	  More	  saturation	  equates	  to	  more	  pigment	  and	  a	  brighter	  more	  vivid	  colour.	  Saturation	  is	  measured	  in	  %	  and	  ranges	  from	  0	  to	  100%.	  Thus,	  0%	  represents	  a	  shade	  of	  grey	  between	  black	  and	  white	  and	  100%	  represents	  an	  intense	  colour.	  	  	   Value	  is	  essentially	  the	  relative	  lightness	  of	  a	  colour.	  Less	  value	  equates	  to	  a	  darker	  colour	  while	  more	  value	  represents	  a	  lighter	  colour.	  Value	  varies	  from	  0%	  (black;	  the	  total	  absence	  of	  transmitted	  or	  reflected	  light)	  to	  100%	  (white;	  the	  total	  transmission	  or	  reflection	  of	  light	  at	  all	  visible	  wavelengths).	  	  	   A	  colour	  is	  fully	  specified	  by	  listing	  the	  three	  numbers	  for	  hue,	  saturation,	  and	  value	  in	  order.	  For	  example,	  black	  would	  be	  represented	  by	  0°,	  0%,	  0%,	  white	  would	  be	  0°,	  0%,	  100%,	  and	  dark	  grey	  would	  be	  0°,	  0%,	  45%.	  The	  industry	  standard	  blue	  tanks	  used	  in	  the	  current	  study	  measured	  200.4°,	  22.8%,	  and	  85%.	  	  1.9	  Preference	  testing	  	   Preference	  tests	  allow	  animals	  to	  choose	  between	  environments	  or	  resources	  and	  	   15	  are	  used	  to	  make	  inferences	  about	  animal	  motivation	  and	  welfare	  (e.g.	  Hughes	  and	  Black,	  1973;	  Fraser,	  1985;	  Tucker	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  This	  experimental	  paradigm	  has	  been	  successfully	  applied	  in	  many	  species	  helping	  determine,	  for	  example,	  the	  best	  environmental	  temperature	  for	  sows	  (Phillips	  et	  al.,	  2000),	  lighting	  type	  and	  intensity	  for	  poultry	  (Widowski	  et	  al.,	  1992;	  Davis	  et	  al.,	  1999),	  type	  of	  bedding	  and	  flooring	  (Tucker	  et	  al.,	  2003)	  or	  housing	  system	  (Legrand	  et	  al.,	  2009)	  for	  dairy	  cows,	  and	  nesting	  material	  for	  laboratory	  mice	  (Van	  de	  Weerd	  et	  al.,	  1997).	  The	  simplest	  experiment	  of	  this	  kind	  involves	  giving	  an	  animal	  the	  choice	  between	  two	  different	  resources	  or	  environmental	  conditions.	  The	  environment	  or	  resource	  that	  the	  animal	  chooses	  more	  frequently,	  consumes	  a	  larger	  amount	  of,	  or	  spends	  more	  time	  in,	  is	  taken	  to	  be	  preferred.	  This	  technique	  could	  prove	  to	  be	  useful	  for	  determining	  fish	  preferences	  for	  tank	  colours.	  	  	   Preference	  tests	  have	  been	  subject	  to	  a	  number	  of	  criticisms	  (e.g.	  Dawkins,	  1983;	  Duncan,	  1992;	  Fraser	  and	  Matthews,	  1997;	  Fraser,	  2008).	  Firstly,	  preference	  tests	  must	  account	  for	  internal	  and	  external	  variables,	  such	  as	  temperature,	  age	  of	  the	  animal,	  and	  time	  of	  day,	  as	  they	  have	  the	  potential	  to	  influence	  the	  motivational	  state	  of	  animals	  (Fraser,	  2008).	  Preference	  tests	  should	  also	  consider	  the	  past	  experiences	  of	  animals	  because	  animals	  may	  prefer	  environments	  they	  are	  used	  to	  (Fraser,	  2008).	  This	  can	  be	  addressed	  by	  controlling	  the	  amount	  of	  exposure	  to	  a	  certain	  environment	  at	  an	  early	  age	  and	  the	  amount	  of	  exposure	  to	  each	  option	  within	  a	  preference	  test	  (Dawkins,	  1983).	  Preference	  tests	  must	  also	  use	  options	  that	  an	  animal	  has	  the	  capacity	  to	  distinguish	  between	  (Fraser	  and	  Matthews,	  1997).	  Lastly,	  animals	  do	  not	  always	  make	  choices	  that	  are	  best	  for	  their	  long-­‐term	  welfare	  (Dawkins,	  1983).	  Preference	  tests	  must	  be	  designed	  to	  account	  for	  these	  criticisms	  and	  interpreted	  with	  caution.	  	  16	  1.10	  Objectives	  and	  hypotheses	  Manufacturing	  the	  tanks	  used	  in	  land-­‐based	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  in	  different	  colours	  is	  easy	  to	  do	  and	  may	  benefit	  fish	  welfare	  by	  reducing	  aggression.	  However,	  there	  appears	  to	  be	  no	  work	  investigating	  whether	  salmonid	  species	  show	  a	  preference	  for	  a	  particular	  tank	  colour	  and	  whether	  different	  colours	  elicit	  differences	  in	  coho	  salmon	  aggression.	  	  The	  first	  aim	  of	  this	  thesis	  was	  to	  assess	  coho	  salmon	  preferences	  for	  tank	  colour	  using	  a	  preference	  test.	  The	  second	  aim	  was	  to	  determine	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  aggression	  (charging	  and	  chasing).	  As	  previous	  research	  had	  shown	  beneficial	  effects	  of	  dark	  tanks	  (O’Connor	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2000,	  2002;	  Merighe	  et	  al.,	  2004),	  we	  hypothesized	  that	  coho	  salmon	  would	  prefer	  darker	  tank	  backgrounds	  to	  lighter	  backgrounds	  and	  that	  darker	  tanks	  would	  reduce	  aggression.	  	  	   17	  Chapter	  2:	  Colour	  matters:	  coho	  salmon	  (Oncorhynchus	  kisutch)	  prefer	  and	  are	  less	  aggressive	  in	  darker	  coloured	  tanks	  	  	  2.1	  Introduction	  	   Fish	  are	  capable	  of	  colour	  vision	  (Cheng	  and	  Flamarique,	  2004)	  and	  can	  be	  profoundly	  affected	  by	  the	  colour	  of	  their	  environment.	  Certain	  colours	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  growth	  and	  survival	  (e.g.	  Boeuf	  and	  Le	  Bail,	  1999;	  Head	  and	  Malison,	  2000;	  Ruchin,	  2004;	  Giri	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  skin	  colour	  (Van	  der	  Salm	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Imanpoor	  and	  Abdollahi,	  2011),	  stress	  response	  (Head	  and	  Malison,	  2000;	  Volpato	  and	  Barreto,	  2001;	  Szisch	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  and	  reproduction	  (Naor	  et	  al.,	  2003;	  Boulcott	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Beyond	  these	  physiological	  consequences,	  tank	  colour	  has	  also	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  aggression	  levels	  (Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Merighe	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  The	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  aggression	  pose	  a	  major	  welfare	  concern	  as	  aggression	  is	  a	  prevalent	  side-­‐effect	  of	  housing	  animals	  in	  captive	  groups	  (Ashley,	  2007).	  	  As	  nearly	  all	  fish	  are	  socially	  housed,	  determining	  which	  colours	  are	  most	  effective	  at	  reducing	  aggression	  and	  the	  mechanisms	  involved	  is	  therefore	  central	  to	  advancing	  our	  understanding	  of	  fish	  welfare.	  	  	   Previous	  research	  has	  suggested	  that	  black	  backgrounds	  may	  reduce	  aggressive	  behaviour	  and	  social	  stress	  over	  white	  tanks	  in	  pairs	  of	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus;	  Merighe	  et	  al.,	  2004)	  and	  Arctic	  charr	  (S.	  alpinus;	  Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2000,	  2002).	  Aggressive	  acts	  between	  fish	  in	  aquaculture	  systems,	  such	  as	  charging	  and	  chasing,	  are	  common	  and	  may	  lead	  to	  fin	  and	  skin	  damage	  (Abbott	  and	  Dill,	  1985;	  Turnbull	  et	  al.,	  1998,	  2005).	  	   18	  Damaged	  epithelial	  structures	  may	  also	  provide	  routes	  for	  infection,	  and	  reduce	  survival	  in	  fish	  (Schneider	  and	  Nicholson,	  1980;	  Ashley,	  2007).	  	  Despite	  colour	  having	  a	  profound	  impact	  on	  fish	  behaviour	  and	  biological	  functioning,	  the	  compatibility	  of	  fish	  with	  tank	  colour	  has	  been	  largely	  neglected	  within	  the	  aquaculture	  industry.	  While	  it	  is	  possible	  to	  have	  tanks	  manufactured	  in	  any	  colour,	  in	  North	  America,	  the	  most	  popular	  colour	  of	  tank	  for	  fish	  aquaculture	  is	  light	  blue.	  The	  origin	  of	  this	  colour	  selection	  is	  unclear	  but	  likely	  took	  place	  without	  any	  considerations	  of	  fish	  preferences	  (McLean	  et	  al.,	  2008).	  Atlantic	  salmon	  (Salmo	  salar)	  are	  the	  most	  produced	  species	  of	  fish	  in	  aquaculture	  (FAO,	  2014)	  but	  there	  is	  a	  growing	  interest	  in	  farming	  other	  salmonids,	  including	  coho	  salmon,	  Oncorhynchus	  kisutch	  (Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013).	  The	  standard	  practice	  has	  been	  to	  raise	  post-­‐smolt	  salmonids	  in	  open	  ocean	  net-­‐pens	  (Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011);	  however,	  there	  have	  been	  negative	  environmental	  impacts	  associated	  with	  this	  form	  of	  production	  e.g.,	  organic	  waste	  release,	  fish	  escapes,	  and	  disease	  threats	  to	  natural	  populations	  (Black,	  2001).	  Several	  alternative	  aquaculture	  methods	  have	  been	  proposed	  with	  the	  most	  feasible	  and	  fastest	  growing	  alternative	  being	  a	  land-­‐based,	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  system	  (Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011).	  Closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  provide	  a	  good	  model	  to	  investigate	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  salmon.	  These	  systems	  provide	  the	  opportunity	  to	  control	  conditions	  such	  as	  salinity,	  temperature,	  ammonia,	  CO2,	  stocking	  density,	  and	  tank	  colour	  (Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011;	  Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013),	  yet	  surprisingly	  little	  is	  known	  regarding	  the	  	   19	  optimal	  parameters	  for	  salmon	  growth	  and	  no	  work	  to	  date	  has	  addressed	  fish	  welfare	  under	  these	  conditions.	  	  Preference	  tests	  allow	  animals	  to	  choose	  between	  environments	  or	  resources	  and	  are	  used	  to	  make	  inferences	  about	  animal	  motivation	  and	  welfare	  (e.g.	  Hughes	  and	  Black,	  1973;	  Fraser,	  1985;	  Tucker	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  The	  simplest	  experiment	  of	  this	  kind	  involves	  giving	  an	  animal	  the	  choice	  between	  two	  different	  resources	  or	  environmental	  conditions.	  The	  environment	  or	  resource	  that	  the	  animal	  chooses	  more	  frequently,	  consumes	  a	  larger	  amount	  of,	  or	  spends	  more	  time	  in,	  is	  taken	  to	  be	  preferred.	  This	  technique	  may	  be	  useful	  for	  determining	  fish	  preferences	  for	  tank	  colour.	  	  Thus,	  the	  first	  aim	  of	  the	  current	  study	  was	  to	  assess	  preferences	  of	  coho	  salmon	  for	  tank	  colour	  using	  a	  preference	  test.	  Our	  second	  aim	  was	  to	  determine	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  aggression	  (charging	  and	  chasing).	  As	  previous	  research	  had	  shown	  beneficial	  effects	  of	  dark	  tanks	  (Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2000,	  2002;	  Merighe	  et	  al.,	  2004),	  we	  predicted	  that	  coho	  salmon	  would	  prefer	  darker	  backgrounds	  and	  that	  access	  to	  these	  darker	  environments	  would	  reduce	  aggression.	  	  2.2	  Materials	  and	  methods	  2.2.1	  Ethics	  statement	  	   This	  protocol	  was	  approved	  by	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Animal	  Care	  Committee	  (application	  number:	  A13-­‐0210).	  All	  experimental	  procedures	  were	  performed	  in	  accordance	  with	  the	  Canadian	  Council	  on	  Animal	  Care	  guidelines	  on	  care	  and	  use	  of	  fish	  in	  research.	  For	  ethical	  reasons	  we	  used	  surplus	  fish	  from	  another	  experiment	  that	  were	  20	  culled	  for	  reasons	  of	  low	  body	  weights.	  2.2.2	  Animals	  and	  housing	  One	  hundred,	  2-­‐year-­‐old	  coho	  salmon	  (mixed	  sex,	  mean	  ±	  s.d.	  weight	  100	  ±	  5	  g)	  were	  obtained	  from	  a	  collaborating	  research	  laboratory	  (InSEAS	  aquatic	  research	  facility,	  Department	  of	  Zoology,	  UBC,	  Vancouver,	  BC,	  Canada)	  and	  originally	  purchased	  from	  Target	  Marine	  Hatcheries	  Ltd.	  (Sechelt,	  BC,	  Canada).	  	  Although	  the	  mean	  weight	  of	  the	  fish	  used	  in	  this	  experiment	  is	  lower	  than	  what	  has	  been	  previously	  reported	  in	  the	  literature	  for	  coho	  salmon	  of	  similar	  age	  (e.g.	  Devlin	  et	  al.,	  1999;	  Vøllestad	  and	  Quinn,	  2003)	  previous	  work	  indicates	  that	  the	  social	  dynamics	  and	  dominance	  hierarchies	  of	  fish	  are	  re-­‐established	  when	  fish	  are	  re-­‐grouped	  (e.g.	  Buchheim	  and	  Hixon,	  1992;	  Huntingford	  and	  Garcia	  de	  Leaniz,	  1997;	  Webster	  and	  Hixon,	  2000;	  Whiteman	  and	  Côté,	  2003)	  and	  thus	  body	  weight	  will	  not	  be	  considered	  further.	  Fish	  were	  randomly	  assigned	  to	  groups	  of	  ten,	  each	  housed	  in	  a	  circular	  600	  L,	  107	  cm	  diameter	  (0.7m3),	  light	  blue,	  fiber	  glass	  tanks	  (D&T	  Fiberglass	  Inc.,	  Sacramento,	  CA,	  USA).	  The	  10	  tanks	  were	  serviced	  by	  a	  freshwater	  recirculating	  system	  providing	  mechanical	  and	  biological	  filtration,	  UV-­‐sterilization,	  and	  oxygen	  injection	  (components	  were	  supplied	  by	  Integrated	  Aqua	  Systems,	  Inc.,	  Escondido,	  CA,	  USA).	  During	  the	  experiment,	  mortality,	  water	  temperature,	  dissolved	  oxygen	  content,	  and	  pH	  were	  measured	  daily	  and	  ammonia-­‐N	  was	  measured	  weekly.	  Water	  temperature	  was	  maintained	  between	  8	  and	  12°C.	  The	  dissolved	  oxygen	  content	  of	  the	  water	  was	  kept	  between	  70-­‐90%,	  pH	  between	  6.0	  and	  6.8	  and	  ammonia-­‐N	  was	  less	  than	  0.5	  ppt.	  The	  average	  water	  flow	  rate	  was	  360	  L/min.	  Tanks	  were	  cleaned	  once	  a	  week.	  	  	   21	  	   Fish	  were	  hand	  fed	  with	  a	  commercially	  available	  pelleted	  diet	  (Transfer	  Plus	  3.0MM	  and	  4.0MM,	  Skretting	  Canada,	  Vancouver,	  BC,	  Canada)	  once	  daily	  from	  Monday	  to	  Saturday	  at	  1000h;	  no	  food	  was	  given	  on	  Sunday.	  All	  experimental	  populations	  were	  housed	  under	  a	  10-­‐h	  light;	  14-­‐h	  dark	  cycle	  (lights	  on	  and	  off	  at	  0730h	  and	  1700h,	  respectively).	  To	  ensure	  even	  light	  distribution	  in	  each	  tank	  and	  to	  avoid	  complications	  due	  to	  room	  lighting,	  a	  full	  spectrum	  daylight	  fluorescent	  lamp	  (CFL	  T2	  23W	  Daylight	  Bulb,	  Globe	  Electric,	  Montreal,	  QC,	  Canada)	  was	  suspended	  1	  m	  above	  the	  center	  of	  each	  tank	  and	  light	  intensity	  was	  adjusted	  to	  410	  lx	  at	  water	  surface.	  	  	  2.2.3	  Experimental	  procedures	  	   The	  interior	  sides	  and	  base	  of	  each	  of	  the	  10	  light	  blue	  experimental	  tanks	  were	  lined	  with	  laminated	  paper	  (InPrint	  Graphics	  &	  Copying	  Ltd.,	  Vancouver,	  BC,	  Canada)	  varying	  in	  pigmentation:	  black	  (0°,	  0%,	  0%;	  hue,	  saturation,	  value,	  respectively),	  white	  (0°,	  0%,	  100%),	  light	  grey	  (0°,	  0%,	  85%),	  dark	  grey	  (0°,	  0%,	  45%),	  and	  a	  mixed	  dark	  grey/black	  sponge	  pattern.	  The	  industry	  standard,	  original	  blue	  tank	  background	  had	  a	  hue	  of	  200.4°,	  a	  saturation	  of	  22.8%,	  and	  a	  value	  of	  85%	  (the	  same	  %	  value	  as	  the	  light	  grey	  laminated	  sheets).	  Sixteen	  1.27cm	  x	  0.32cm	  magnets	  (Rare-­‐Earth	  Circular	  Magnets,	  Lee	  Valley	  Tools	  Ltd.	  and	  Veritas	  Tools	  Inc.,	  Vancouver,	  BC,	  Canada)	  were	  used	  to	  hold	  the	  laminated	  pieces	  of	  paper	  in	  place	  in	  each	  tank.	  To	  habituate	  fish	  to	  each	  of	  the	  conditions,	  tanks	  were	  lined	  with	  each	  background	  option	  for	  a	  total	  of	  3	  days	  before	  preference	  testing	  began.	  Order	  of	  exposure	  was	  set	  by	  a	  replicated	  5x5	  Latin	  square.	  	  	   Blue-­‐trial	  preference	  tests	  of:	  blue	  versus	  white,	  blue	  versus	  light	  grey,	  blue	  versus	  dark	  grey,	  and	  blue	  versus	  black;	  as	  well	  as,	  black-­‐trial	  preference	  tests	  of:	  black	  versus	  	   22	  white,	  black	  versus	  light	  grey,	  black	  versus	  dark	  grey,	  and	  black	  versus	  dark	  grey/black	  sponge	  pattern,	  were	  conducted	  in	  each	  of	  the	  10	  tanks.	  All	  tanks	  were	  split	  into	  two	  to	  provide	  fish	  a	  choice	  of	  background	  colour.	  For	  example,	  in	  one	  treatment,	  black	  and	  white	  laminated	  sheets	  were	  used	  on	  the	  two	  sides	  of	  the	  tank.	  To	  avoid	  an	  effect	  of	  side	  on	  preferences,	  colour	  placement	  was	  alternated	  across	  the	  10	  tanks	  (e.g.	  white	  was	  on	  the	  left	  and	  black	  was	  on	  the	  right	  in	  tanks	  1,	  3,	  5,	  7,	  9;	  black	  was	  on	  the	  left	  and	  white	  was	  on	  the	  right	  in	  tanks	  2,	  4,	  6,	  8,	  10).	  The	  positions	  of	  the	  fish	  in	  each	  tank	  were	  video	  recorded	  from	  above	  using	  a	  Microsoft	  LifeCam	  StudioTM	  webcam	  (Redmon,	  WA,	  USA).	  Experimental	  trials	  began	  15	  minutes	  after	  the	  camera	  was	  placed	  above	  the	  tank	  to	  control	  for	  disturbances.	  The	  fish	  in	  each	  tank	  were	  recorded	  for	  a	  total	  of	  10	  min,	  starting	  at	  1100h.	  Videos	  were	  scored	  using	  scan	  sampling	  at	  30-­‐second	  intervals	  to	  determine	  the	  number	  of	  fish	  on	  each	  side	  of	  the	  tank,	  yielding	  20	  observations/trial.	  The	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  that	  the	  fish	  spent	  most	  time	  on	  determined	  the	  ‘preferred’	  side.	  If	  the	  fish	  straddled	  the	  two	  sides,	  the	  recorded	  position	  was	  that	  where	  the	  head	  was	  located.	  Videos	  were	  scored	  continuously	  for	  aggressive	  acts	  (charging,	  a	  rapid	  dart	  towards	  another	  fish	  with	  attempts	  to	  bite	  the	  other	  fish,	  and	  chasing,	  rapid	  pursuit	  of	  another	  fish)	  through	  out	  each	  10-­‐minute	  trial.	  The	  number	  of	  aggressive	  acts	  occurring	  on	  each	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  was	  recorded.	  	  	  2.2.4	  Statistical	  Methods	  2.2.4.1	  Tank	  colour	  preference	  	   To	  determine	  side	  preferences	  in	  the	  blue-­‐	  and	  black-­‐trials,	  we	  ran	  one-­‐sample	  t-­‐tests	  to	  see	  whether	  the	  mean	  number	  of	  fish	  on	  the	  preferred	  side	  exceeded	  5,	  indicating	  preference.	  	   23	  2.2.4.1	  Aggressive	  acts	  	   To	  model	  aggression,	  we	  applied	  multilevel	  models,	  which	  control	  for	  repeated	  testing	  of	  tanks	  and	  avoid	  pseudoreplication,	  with	  a	  Poisson	  error	  structure	  and	  a	  log	  link,	  which	  appropriately	  model	  the	  non-­‐normality	  of	  count	  data	  (Gelman	  and	  Hill,	  2006;	  Rabe-­‐Hesketh	  and	  Skrondal,	  2008;	  Snijders	  and	  Bosker,	  2012).	  Generalized	  multilevel	  models	  assume	  asymptotic	  sampling	  distributions	  and	  therefore	  use	  z-­‐statistics	  to	  test	  for	  the	  significance	  of	  fixed	  effects.	  For	  large	  sample	  sizes,	  such	  as	  the	  ones	  in	  the	  models	  presented	  here,	  the	  consequence	  of	  violating	  this	  assumption	  is	  minimal	  (Bolger	  and	  Laurenceau,	  2013).	  	  	  	   We	  modeled	  aggression	  on	  a	  given	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  using	  tank	  and	  trial	  as	  random	  effects	  and	  the	  following	  fixed	  effects.	  Firstly,	  to	  test	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  aggression	  on	  a	  given	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  was	  determined	  by	  how	  dark	  the	  background	  was,	  we	  created	  a	  darkness	  variable	  such	  that	  white	  was	  scored	  as	  0	  and	  black	  was	  scored	  as	  1.	  	  Intermediate	  colours	  were	  assigned	  scores	  depending	  on	  their	  brightness	  value	  referred	  to	  in	  the	  methods.	  Secondly,	  we	  created	  indicator	  variables	  (0	  or	  1)	  for	  (i)	  blue	  and	  (ii)	  pattern	  backgrounds	  to	  account	  for	  effects	  of	  blue	  and	  pattern	  backgrounds	  beyond	  how	  dark	  they	  were.	  Thirdly,	  to	  test	  the	  extent	  to	  which	  aggression	  on	  a	  given	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  was	  determined	  by	  how	  dark	  the	  opposite	  (non-­‐preferred)	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  was,	  we	  included	  the	  darkness	  score	  of	  the	  opposite	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  as	  an	  additional	  variable.	  Finally,	  as	  densities	  were	  highest	  on	  the	  preferred	  side	  and	  thus	  created	  a	  confound	  for	  modeling	  aggression	  on	  a	  given	  side	  of	  the	  tank,	  we	  controlled	  for	  average	  fish	  density	  (preference)	  on	  that	  side	  of	  the	  tank.	  	  24	  To	  model	  overall	  aggression	  within	  a	  trial,	  we	  specified	  tank	  as	  a	  random	  effect	  and	  predicted	  total	  aggression	  with	  (i)	  whether	  the	  test	  was	  a	  blue-­‐trial	  or	  a	  black-­‐trial	  and	  (ii)	  whether	  the	  comparison	  colour	  was	  white,	  light	  grey,	  or	  dark	  grey.	  	  For	  all	  data	  processing,	  modeling,	  and	  plotting,	  we	  used	  R	  v.	  3.1.0	  (R	  Core	  Team,	  2014)	  and	  the	  following	  packages:	  plyr	  (Wickham,	  2011),	  reshape	  (Wickham,	  2007),	  and	  lme4	  (Bates	  et	  al.,	  2014).2.3	  Results	  2.3.1	  Tank	  colour	  preference	  The	  fish	  showed	  a	  strong	  preference	  for	  darker	  backgrounds.	  Pair-­‐wise	  comparisons	  for	  the	  blue-­‐trials	  revealed	  that	  fish	  did	  not	  prefer	  blue	  over	  white	  (df	  =	  9,	  t	  =	  0.47,	  p	  >	  .6),	  but	  tended	  to	  prefer	  light	  grey	  over	  blue	  (df	  =	  9,	  t	  =	  2.22,	  p	  <	  .1),	  and	  preferred	  dark	  grey	  and	  black	  over	  blue	  (df	  =	  9,	  t	  =	  5.63,	  p	  <	  .001,	  and	  df	  =	  9,	  t	  =	  13.06,	  p	  <	  .0001,	  respectively;	  Fig.	  2.1a).	  In	  the	  black-­‐trials,	  the	  fish	  showed	  a	  strong	  preference	  for	  the	  black	  background	  over	  all	  other	  options	  (pair-­‐wise	  comparisons:	  df’s	  =	  9;	  all	  t’s	  >	  11,	  p	  <	  .0001,	  except	  pattern:	  t	  =	  3.66,	  p	  <	  .01;	  Fig.	  2.1b).	  In	  fact,	  all	  10	  tanks	  in	  all	  trials	  showed	  a	  unanimous	  preference	  for	  the	  black	  background	  for	  all	  options	  other	  than	  dark	  patterned	  background.	  	  2.3.2	  Aggressive	  Acts	  As	  dark	  colours	  were	  preferred,	  fish	  densities	  were	  highest	  on	  the	  darker	  side	  of	  the	  tank,	  so	  the	  effect	  of	  colour	  on	  aggression	  was	  tested	  controlling	  for	  density.	  	  After	  controlling	  for	  the	  effects	  of	  fish	  density,	  our	  results	  provide	  the	  first	  evidence	  that	  both	  25	  background	  colours	  affected	  the	  total	  amount	  of	  aggression	  behaviour	  observed	  within	  a	  specific	  tank.	  Specifically,	  darker	  backgrounds	  not	  only	  decreased	  aggression	  on	  the	  focal-­‐side,	  but	  also	  decreased	  aggression	  on	  the	  comparison-­‐side	  as	  well	  (effect	  of	  focal	  side	  darkness:	  z	  =	  4.27,	  p	  <	  .0001;	  effect	  of	  comparison-­‐side-­‐darkness:	  z	  =	  13.50,	  p	  <	  .0001;	  Fig.	  2.2).	  	  Thus,	  conditions	  on	  the	  preferred	  side	  also	  affected	  behaviour	  on	  the	  non-­‐preferred	  side.	  For	  example,	  Figure	  2.2	  shows	  that	  when	  4	  of	  the	  10	  fish	  were	  on	  the	  blue	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  (fish	  density	  of	  4),	  aggression	  on	  the	  blue	  side	  was	  much	  lower	  when	  it	  was	  paired	  with	  black	  than	  when	  it	  was	  paired	  with	  white.	  Collectively	  across	  all	  trials,	  this	  phenomenon	  resulted	  in	  lower	  overall	  rates	  of	  aggressive	  behaviours	  in	  the	  black	  trials	  compared	  to	  the	  blue	  trials	  (z	  =	  18.57,	  p	  <	  .0001;	  Fig.	  2.3).	  2.4	  DiscussionOur	  assessment	  of	  preference	  was	  based	  on	  a	  disproportionate	  number	  of	  fish	  occupying	  one	  side	  of	  the	  test	  tank.	  The	  fish	  in	  our	  study	  showed	  a	  clear	  preference	  for	  black	  backgrounds	  over	  all	  other	  colour	  options	  and	  for	  darker	  colours	  in	  general.	  	  The	  preference	  for	  darker	  colours	  may	  be	  explained,	  in	  part,	  by	  the	  feeding	  habits	  of	  coho	  salmon.	  Salmon	  rely	  almost	  entirely	  on	  vision	  to	  detect	  their	  prey,	  which	  are	  mostly	  drifting,	  light-­‐coloured	  invertebrates	  (Keenleyside,	  1962;	  Stradmeyer	  and	  Thorpe,	  1987).	  It	  is	  likely	  that	  these	  prey	  are	  easier	  to	  detect	  against	  a	  dark	  background	  (Naas	  et	  al.,	  1996).	  	  Additionally,	  bright	  environments,	  especially	  those	  without	  cover,	  may	  induce	  a	  stress	  response	  (Volpato	  et	  al.,	  2001).	  Fish	  tend	  to	  seek	  and	  hide	  in	  dark	  environments	  when	  anxious	  (Chaouloff	  et	  al.,	  1997;	  Steenbergen	  et	  al.,	  2011),	  likely	  as	  a	  form	  of	  anti-­‐26	  predator	  behaviour	  (Fraser	  et	  al.,	  1993).	  Thus,	  fish	  preference	  for	  black	  tanks	  may	  also	  be	  related	  to	  protective,	  escape	  behaviours.	  Salmonids	  switch	  from	  diurnal	  to	  nocturnal	  foraging	  when	  water	  temperatures	  drop	  below	  about	  10	  °C	  (Fraser	  and	  Metcalfe,	  1997),	  such	  that	  fish	  take	  shelter	  in	  crevices	  during	  the	  day	  (Rimmer	  et	  al.,	  1983)	  and	  emerge	  to	  feed	  at	  night	  (Fraser	  et	  al.,	  1993;	  Fraser	  and	  Metcalfe,	  1997).	  Water	  temperatures	  for	  this	  experiment	  ranged	  from	  8-­‐12°C;	  thus,	  it	  is	  possible	  that	  the	  preference	  for	  darker	  tanks	  is	  related	  to	  a	  change	  in	  foraging	  behaviour	  and	  might	  be	  even	  stronger	  at	  colder	  temperatures.	  In	  our	  study,	  darker	  backgrounds	  were	  also	  shown	  to	  reduce	  fish	  aggression	  levels,	  regardless	  of	  where	  the	  aggression	  took	  place	  (on	  the	  darker	  side	  or	  on	  the	  lighter	  side).	  Salmonids	  are	  naturally	  territorial,	  and	  aggressive	  behaviours	  (charging	  and	  chasing)	  are	  known	  to	  increase	  with	  increasing	  density	  (Ashley,	  2007).	  Aggression	  is	  thus	  of	  particular	  concern	  in	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  (Marchesan	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Determining	  the	  factors	  associated	  with	  aggression	  may	  have	  great	  potential	  to	  improve	  the	  welfare	  of	  fish	  reared	  in	  these	  systems.	  	  Salmonids,	  like	  other	  teleost	  fish,	  have	  the	  ability	  to	  adjust	  the	  colour	  of	  their	  skin	  in	  response	  to	  changes	  in	  background	  colour	  (Baker	  et	  al.,	  1981;	  Fujimoto	  et	  al.,	  1991;	  O’Connor	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  In	  salmon,	  darkening	  of	  the	  skin	  and	  eyes	  signals	  social	  subordination,	  while	  lightening	  of	  the	  skin	  signals	  dominance	  (Keenleyside	  and	  Yamamoto,	  1962;	  Abbott	  et	  al.,	  1985;	  O’Connor	  et	  al.,	  1999).	  Thus,	  a	  darker	  fish	  may	  represent	  less	  of	  a	  threat	  and	  elicit	  less	  aggression	  than	  a	  conspecific	  displaying	  paler	  body	  coloration.	  A	  study	  conducted	  by	  Höglund	  et	  al.	  (2002),	  comparing	  pairs	  of	  Arctic	  charr	  (Salvelinus	  alpinus),	  27	  showed	  that	  fish	  interacting	  on	  a	  white	  background	  displayed	  initial	  pale	  colouration	  and	  high	  levels	  of	  aggressive	  behaviour	  while	  fish	  interacting	  on	  a	  black	  background,	  displayed	  initial	  dark	  colouration	  and	  a	  lower	  frequency	  of	  aggressive	  interactions.	  While	  some	  of	  the	  fish	  on	  the	  white	  background	  became	  subordinate	  and	  took	  on	  a	  darker	  body	  colouration,	  the	  subordinate	  fish	  on	  the	  black	  background	  did	  not	  show	  any	  additional	  darkening.	  These	  findings	  may	  explain	  why	  darker	  backgrounds	  in	  our	  study	  not	  only	  decreased	  aggression	  on	  the	  focal	  side,	  but	  also	  decreased	  aggression	  on	  the	  comparison-­‐side	  of	  the	  tank.	  Black	  backgrounds	  may	  have	  caused	  the	  fish	  within	  the	  tanks	  to	  take	  on	  darker	  body	  colourations,	  reducing	  overall	  aggression	  throughout	  the	  tank.	  	  Preference	  tests	  allow	  animals	  to	  express	  their	  priorities,	  giving	  us	  insight	  into	  what	  is	  important	  to	  them	  (Fraser	  and	  Matthews,	  1997);	  they	  are	  widely	  used	  in	  the	  welfare	  literature,	  for	  example,	  to	  assess	  flooring	  temperatures	  for	  sows	  (Phillips	  et	  al.,	  2000),	  lighting	  type	  and	  intensity	  for	  poultry	  (Widowski	  et	  al.,	  1992;	  Davis	  et	  al.,	  1999),	  bedding	  for	  dairy	  cows	  (Tucker	  et	  al.,	  2003),	  and	  nesting	  material	  for	  laboratory	  mice	  (Van	  de	  Weerd	  et	  al.,	  1997).	  However,	  the	  results	  of	  preference	  tests	  vary	  with	  context	  (Fraser,	  2008)	  including	  the	  animal’s	  previous	  experiences	  (Dawkins,	  1977).	  Moreover,	  animals	  do	  not	  always	  make	  choices	  that	  are	  best	  for	  their	  long-­‐term	  health	  and	  welfare	  (Duncan,	  1978).	  Results	  from	  preference	  tests	  must	  therefore	  be	  interpreted	  with	  much	  care.	  For	  example,	  the	  data	  from	  this	  study	  could	  have	  led	  to	  conflicting	  interpretations.	  The	  fish	  preferred	  the	  darker	  sides,	  but	  were	  also	  observed	  to	  engage	  in	  more	  aggressive	  acts	  on	  those	  sides.	  However,	  the	  higher	  frequency	  of	  aggressive	  interactions	  observed	  on	  the	  black	  sides	  was	  explained	  entirely	  by	  the	  greater	  fish	  densities.	  Moreover,	  accounting	  for	  the	  higher	  densities	  revealed	  the	  reverse	  pattern:	  darker	  colours	  actually	  decreased	  28	  aggression.	  Thus,	  once	  we	  controlled	  for	  differences	  in	  fish	  density,	  our	  results	  clearly	  showed	  that	  the	  presence	  of	  dark	  backgrounds	  decreased	  aggression	  on	  both	  the	  focal	  and	  comparison-­‐side	  of	  the	  tanks	  causing	  an	  overall	  decrease	  in	  aggression	  and	  thus,	  improved	  fish	  welfare.	  	  2.5	  Conclusions	  Coho	  salmon	  prefer	  dark	  tanks,	  and	  when	  these	  fish	  are	  housed	  with	  access	  to	  black	  backgrounds	  they	  show	  reduced	  agonistic	  behaviour.	  The	  growing	  interest	  in	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  means	  that	  there	  is	  increasing	  need	  to	  understand	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  fish	  welfare	  and	  behaviour.	  	  29	  (a)	  30	  (b)	  Figure	  2.1:	  Box	  plots	  of	  average	  number	  of	  fish	  located	  on	  each	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  (per	  10-­‐minute	  trial)	  for	  (a)	  blue-­‐comparison	  preference	  trials	  and	  (b)	  black-­‐comparison	  preference	  trials.	  Each	  tank	  contained	  10	  fish.	  31	  Figure	  2.2:	  Total	  number	  of	  aggressive	  acts	  occurring	  on	  each	  side	  of	  the	  tank	  (per	  10-­‐minute	  trial)	  in	  relation	  to	  fish	  density	  (n	  =	  10)	  for	  blue-­‐	  and	  black-­‐comparison	  trials.	  Fill	  of	  dots	  corresponds	  to	  tank	  side	  colour	  and	  dots	  with	  X	  represent	  the	  dark	  grey/black	  pattern	  sides.	  Grey	  lines	  connect	  the	  two	  sides	  of	  a	  tank	  in	  a	  single	  trial.	  	  32	  Figure	  2.3:	  Total	  number	  of	  aggressive	  acts	  occurring	  on	  the	  blue	  and	  black	  sides	  of	  the	  tanks	  for	  white,	  light	  grey,	  and	  dark	  grey	  comparisons	  (n	  =	  60;	  6	  trials,	  10	  tanks).	  33	  Chapter	  3:	  General	  discussion	  and	  conclusions	  3.1	  Contributions	  and	  implications	  Although	  the	  welfare	  of	  farmed	  fish	  is	  receiving	  increased	  attention	  in	  the	  literature	  (Ashley,	  2007),	  the	  majority	  of	  studies	  on	  fish	  welfare	  have	  focused	  on	  measures	  of	  biological	  functioning	  (e.g.	  Schreck	  et	  al.,	  2001;	  Kristiansen	  et	  al.,	  2004;	  Poli	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  However,	  good	  animal	  welfare	  goes	  beyond	  just	  physical	  health;	  it	  also	  involves	  the	  ability	  of	  an	  animal	  to	  express	  natural	  behaviours	  and	  a	  lack	  of	  mental	  suffering	  from	  negative	  emotional	  states,	  such	  as	  pain	  and	  fear.	  Unfortunately,	  scientific	  research	  addressing	  these	  aspects	  of	  fish	  welfare	  is	  lagging	  behind	  studies	  of	  biological	  functioning.	  	  Colour	  can	  affect	  the	  biological	  functioning	  of	  certain	  fish	  species,	  influencing	  growth	  rates,	  stress	  responses,	  and	  aggression.	  For	  example,	  the	  use	  of	  different	  coloured	  lights	  held	  above	  fish	  tanks	  and	  substrates	  within	  tanks	  have	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  cortisol	  levels	  and	  growth	  rates	  of	  several	  species,	  including	  scaled	  common	  carp	  (Cyprinus	  carpio;	  Karakatsouli	  et	  al.,	  2010),	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus;	  Volpato	  and	  Barreto,	  2001;	  Luchiari	  and	  Pirhonen,	  2009),	  rainbow	  trout	  (Oncorhynchus	  mykiss;	  Karakatsouli	  et	  al.,	  2007),	  and	  gilthead	  seabream	  (Sparus	  aurata;	  Karakatsouli	  et	  al.,	  2007;	  Batzina	  and	  Karakatsouli,	  2012).	  Tank	  wall	  colour	  has	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  stress	  responses	  and	  growth	  rates	  in	  jundiá	  (Cachoeira	  Jundiá;	  Barcellos	  et	  al.,	  2009),	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus;	  McLean	  et	  al.,	  2008),	  summer	  flounder	  (Paralichthys	  dentatus;	  McLean	  et	  al.,	  2008),	  and	  juvenile	  Caspian	  kutum	  (Rtilus	  frisii	  Kutum;	  Ullmann	  et	  al.,	  2011).	  Tank	  wall	  colour	  has	  also	  been	  shown	  to	  affect	  fish	  aggression.	  For	  example,	  black	  tank	  backgrounds	  decreased	  aggressive	  behaviour	  and	  social	  stress	  in	  pairs	  of	  Arctic	  charr	  (Salvelinus	  alpinus;	  34	  Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2000)	  and	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus;	  Merighe	  et	  al.,	  2004).	  No	  study	  to	  date,	  however,	  has	  looked	  at	  tank	  colour	  preference	  and	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  aggression	  in	  any	  species	  of	  salmon.	  	  	  Salmonids	  are	  the	  most	  produced	  species	  of	  fish	  in	  aquaculture	  (FAO,	  2014)	  and	  there	  is	  growing	  interest	  in	  cultivating	  post-­‐smolt	  coho	  salmon	  in	  land-­‐based,	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  (Canada	  House	  of	  Commons,	  2013;	  Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011).	  Aggression	  is	  a	  major	  concern	  in	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  and	  is	  often	  the	  primary	  cause	  of	  fin	  and	  skin	  damage	  in	  fish	  (Ashley,	  2007).	  Fin	  and	  skin	  damage	  have	  the	  potential	  to	  cause	  inflammation	  and	  pain,	  and	  may	  lead	  to	  infection,	  reduced	  survival	  in	  salmon,	  and	  a	  decrease	  in	  aquaculture	  production	  and	  product	  quality	  (Schneider	  and	  Nicholson,	  1980;	  Ashley,	  2007;	  Stien	  et	  al.,	  2013;	  Abbott	  and	  Dill,	  1985;	  Turnbull	  et	  al.,	  1998,	  2005).	  Closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  provide	  a	  good	  model	  to	  examine	  the	  effects	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  salmon.	  The	  aims	  of	  the	  current	  study	  were	  to	  assess	  coho	  salmon	  preference	  for	  tank	  colour	  and	  determine	  the	  effect	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  aggression	  levels.	  We	  predicted	  that	  darker	  tank	  backgrounds	  would	  be	  preferred	  by	  coho	  salmon	  and	  would	  reduce	  aggression.	  	  The	  results	  from	  this	  study	  support	  our	  hypotheses.	  This	  thesis	  presents	  the	  first	  evidence	  that	  salmonids	  have	  a	  strong	  preference	  for	  darker	  tank	  backgrounds	  to	  lighter	  backgrounds	  and	  that	  darker	  backgrounds	  reduce	  aggression	  levels.	  This	  thesis	  shows	  that	  tank	  colour	  matters	  to	  fish	  and	  can	  alter	  social	  behaviour	  in	  the	  immediate	  vicinity,	  as	  well	  as	  in	  an	  adjacent	  area.	  Specifically,	  darker	  backgrounds	  not	  only	  decreased	  fish	  aggression	  on	  the	  focal-­‐side,	  but	  also	  decreased	  aggression	  on	  the	  comparison-­‐side.	  My	  work	  provides	  35	  evidence	  that	  darker	  tanks	  improve	  the	  welfare	  of	  coho	  salmon	  living	  in	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  and	  contributes	  to	  the	  basic	  literature	  on	  fish	  welfare.	  Considering	  the	  growing	  interest	  in	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture,	  the	  results	  of	  this	  thesis	  have	  the	  potential	  to	  improve	  the	  welfare	  of	  countless	  numbers	  of	  fish.	  	  3.2	  Limitations	  and	  future	  research	  Although	  outcomes	  of	  this	  study	  provide	  novel	  contributions	  to	  the	  literature	  on	  colour	  preference	  and	  how	  colours	  present	  in	  the	  immediate	  environment	  affect	  aggressive	  behaviour,	  there	  were	  some	  limitations	  that	  should	  be	  addressed	  in	  future	  research.	  One	  limitation	  was	  that	  the	  fish	  used	  in	  this	  study	  were	  kept	  under	  a	  relatively	  narrow	  range	  of	  environmental	  conditions.	  	  Preference	  tests	  depend	  on	  context,	  thus	  external	  and	  internal	  variables	  such	  as,	  temperature,	  age	  of	  the	  animal,	  or	  time	  of	  the	  year,	  must	  be	  considered	  (Fraser,	  2008).	  Preferences	  may	  also	  fluctuate	  in	  response	  to	  changing	  variables;	  for	  example,	  pigs	  prefer	  to	  rest	  on	  straw	  in	  the	  morning	  when	  it	  is	  cold,	  but	  not	  in	  the	  evening	  when	  it	  is	  warmer	  (Steiger	  et	  al.,	  1979).	  The	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  system	  that	  I	  had	  access	  to	  supplied	  recirculating	  water	  to	  the	  ten,	  0.7m3	  tanks	  used	  in	  the	  study	  and	  to	  ten	  larger,	  5.6m3	  tanks,	  involved	  in	  a	  different	  study.	  Therefore,	  the	  water	  quality	  conditions	  of	  our	  tanks	  were	  interconnected.	  Another	  experiment	  investigated	  the	  effects	  of	  varying	  water	  salinity	  levels	  and	  temperatures	  on	  the	  growth	  of	  coho	  salmon	  and	  required	  that	  the	  salinity	  and	  temperature	  be	  maintained	  at	  0ppt	  and	  between	  8	  and	  12°C,	  respectively,	  throughout	  all	  tanks.	  In	  the	  case	  of	  wild	  coho	  salmon,	  the	  majority	  of	  their	  first	  year	  of	  life	  is	  spent	  living	  in	  freshwater	  streams,	  after	  which	  they	  migrate	  to	  the	  ocean,	  undergoing	  a	  metamorphic	  process	  called	  smoltification	  (Sandercock,	  1991).	  Thus,	  the	  	   36	  salinity	  of	  water	  ranges	  from	  0ppt	  (freshwater)	  to	  35ppt	  (saltwater)	  and	  temperature	  ranges	  from	  0°C	  to	  25°C	  during	  the	  lifecycle	  of	  a	  wild	  coho	  salmon	  (Sandercock,	  1991).	  Considering	  the	  visual	  pigments	  of	  coho	  salmon	  are	  maximally	  sensitive	  to	  a	  specific	  region	  of	  the	  spectrum	  and	  can	  be	  altered	  as	  fish	  develop	  and	  undergo	  migration	  (Cheng	  and	  Flamarique,	  2004;	  Temple	  et	  al.,	  2006,	  2008),	  changes	  in	  water	  salinity	  or	  temperature	  may	  affect	  how	  coho	  salmon	  react	  to	  different	  tank	  colours.	  	  I	  suggest	  that	  future	  work	  look	  at	  how	  colour	  affects	  aggression	  levels	  and	  colour	  preferences	  in	  coho	  salmon	  held	  in	  differing	  water	  salinity	  and	  temperature	  levels.	  Closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  would	  serve	  as	  an	  ideal	  model	  for	  this	  investigation	  as	  they	  offer	  complete	  control	  over	  tank	  colour,	  water	  salinity,	  and	  water	  temperature.	  	  Unfortunately	  the	  nature	  of	  the	  experimental	  paradigm	  used	  in	  the	  present	  study	  was	  only	  able	  to	  determine	  preference	  for	  specific	  tank	  colour	  and	  not	  motivation.	  In	  other	  words,	  to	  make	  a	  choice	  in	  my	  experiment,	  the	  fish	  simply	  swam	  to	  their	  preferred	  side	  of	  the	  tank;	  there	  was	  little	  indication	  of	  the	  importance	  of	  this	  choice	  to	  the	  individual	  fish.	  My	  prediction,	  however,	  is	  that	  fish	  were	  highly	  motivated	  to	  spend	  time	  on	  the	  darker	  side	  of	  the	  tank;	  for	  example,	  I	  observed	  fish	  trying	  to	  lift	  up	  the	  black	  laminated	  pieces	  of	  poster	  board	  held	  against	  the	  tank	  walls	  in	  order	  to	  hide	  underneath	  them.	  In	  some	  cases,	  fish	  pushed	  the	  magnets	  away	  from	  the	  edges	  of	  the	  poster	  board	  to	  swim	  underneath.	  Unfortunately,	  I	  was	  not	  able	  to	  reliably	  score	  these	  interactions,	  as	  they	  cannot	  be	  seen	  using	  video.	  In	  the	  future,	  it	  would	  be	  beneficial	  to	  assess	  the	  strength	  of	  coho	  salmon	  preference	  for	  darker	  tank	  backgrounds	  using	  a	  motivational	  test.	  A	  recent	  study	  by	  Galhardo	  et	  al.	  (2011)	  adapted	  a	  push-­‐door	  to	  quantify	  motivation	  in	  a	  cichlid	  fish,	  the	  Mozambique	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  mossambicus).	  The	  males	  of	  this	  species	  have	  strong	  	   37	  snouts	  and	  are	  thus	  suited	  to	  push.	  The	  fish	  were	  required	  to	  work	  the	  door	  (push/touch)	  at	  an	  ascending	  cost	  in	  order	  to	  have	  access	  to	  food	  and	  social	  partners.	  The	  measurements	  of	  motivation	  included	  latency	  to	  open	  the	  door,	  work	  attention	  and	  maximum	  price	  paid.	  From	  my	  own	  observations,	  I	  predict	  that	  coho	  salmon	  could	  also	  be	  trained	  to	  push	  objects.	  Thus,	  this	  study	  design	  could	  be	  used	  to	  assess	  the	  motivation	  of	  coho	  salmon	  to	  gain	  access	  to	  different	  coloured	  tank	  environments.	  	  Another	  limitation	  was	  that	  it	  was	  difficult	  to	  identify	  the	  actions	  of	  individual	  fish	  on	  video.	  I	  was	  unable	  to	  determine	  whether	  some	  fish	  were	  initiating	  more	  aggressive	  acts	  than	  others	  or	  whether	  certain	  fish	  had	  stronger	  or	  weaker	  preferences	  for	  the	  various	  tank	  colours.	  It	  would	  thus	  be	  useful	  to	  attach	  tags	  to	  the	  caudal	  fins	  of	  fish	  to	  better	  track	  the	  movements	  of	  individuals.	  Höglund	  et	  al.	  (2002)	  used	  caudal	  fin	  tags	  successfully	  in	  an	  experiment	  with	  Arctic	  charr	  (Salvelinus	  alpinus)	  to	  differentiate	  between	  the	  aggressive	  acts	  of	  individuals	  interacting	  on	  white	  or	  black	  backgrounds.	  Similarly,	  the	  use	  of	  tags	  could	  help	  determine	  whether	  coho	  salmon	  show	  individual	  variation	  and	  whether	  this	  has	  an	  affect	  on	  aggression	  or	  colour	  preference	  in	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems.	  	  Compared	  with	  previous	  research	  on	  the	  effect	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  aggression	  in	  pairs	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus;	  Merighe	  et	  al.,	  2004)	  and	  Arctic	  charr	  (S.	  alpinus;	  Höglund	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  I	  used	  relatively	  large	  groups	  of	  fish	  (10	  fish	  per	  tank)	  and	  tank	  sizes	  (0.7m3)	  for	  the	  behavioural	  observations	  of	  aggression	  in	  my	  experiment.	  The	  stocking	  density	  of	  my	  tanks,	  measured	  using	  the	  weight	  of	  fish	  per	  unit	  volume	  of	  the	  tanks	  (expressed	  as	  kg	  fish	  m−3),	  was	  approximately	  14	  kg	  m−3	  (compared	  to	  approximately	  3	  kg	  m-­‐3	  used	  in	  the	  other	  studies).	  However,	  the	  number	  of	  fish	  and	  the	  size	  of	  each	  tank	  in	  my	  	   38	  study	  was	  considerably	  smaller	  than	  what	  is	  normally	  used	  in	  commercial	  salmonid	  aquaculture	  farms,	  where	  stocking	  densities	  in	  excess	  of	  80	  kg	  m−3	  are	  common	  (Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011).	  Salmonids	  are	  naturally	  territorial,	  and	  aggressive	  behaviour	  is	  known	  to	  increase	  with	  increasing	  density	  (Ellis	  et	  al.,	  2002;	  Turnbull	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  Thus,	  I	  predict	  that	  tank	  colour	  would	  have	  an	  even	  greater	  impact	  on	  aggression	  levels	  in	  these	  larger,	  more	  densely	  stocked	  tanks.	  There	  is	  a	  considerable	  amount	  of	  evidence	  linking	  high	  stocking	  density	  with	  decreased	  fish	  welfare	  in	  rainbow	  trout	  (O.	  mykiss).	  For	  example,	  high	  density	  has	  been	  shown	  to	  cause	  decreased	  growth	  and	  reductions	  in	  food	  intake	  (Refstie,	  1977;	  Holm	  et	  al.,	  1990;	  Boujard	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  increased	  fin	  erosion	  and	  skin	  damage	  (Ellis	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  a	  reduced	  immune	  capacity	  (Ellis	  et	  al.,	  2002),	  and	  differences	  in	  swimming	  behaviours	  (Anras	  and	  Lagardere,	  2004).	  Given	  the	  known	  effects	  of	  higher	  stocking	  densities	  on	  fish	  aggression,	  I	  recommend	  that	  future	  work	  on	  the	  effect	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  salmonid	  aggression	  be	  conducted	  at	  higher	  densities	  more	  similar	  to	  those	  found	  on	  commercial	  farms.	  	  Although	  the	  results	  of	  my	  thesis	  show	  that	  black	  tanks	  are	  preferred	  and	  decrease	  overall	  tank	  aggression	  levels	  in	  coho	  living	  in	  closed	  containment	  systems,	  I	  was	  not	  able	  to	  assess	  growth	  in	  relation	  to	  tank	  colour.	  Fish	  growth	  rates	  and	  product	  quality	  are	  two	  of	  the	  most	  important	  issues	  for	  fish	  farmers	  (Thorarensen	  and	  Farrell,	  2011).	  Therefore,	  testing	  the	  effect	  of	  tank	  colour	  on	  the	  growth	  and	  incidence	  of	  fin	  and	  skin	  damage	  in	  coho	  salmon	  reared	  in	  commercial	  scale	  closed	  containment	  aquaculture	  systems	  would	  be	  a	  logical	  next	  step.	  To	  test	  this,	  juvenile	  fish	  could	  be	  reared	  until	  adulthood	  in	  either	  blue	  (industry	  standard	  blue)	  or	  black,	  fully	  lined	  tanks.	  At	  the	  end	  of	  the	  rearing	  period,	  all	  fish	  would	  be	  slaughtered.	  Individuals	  would	  then	  be	  weighed	  and	  externally	  examined	  for	  39	  amounts	  and	  severity	  of	  skin	  and	  fin	  damages.	  The	  tank	  colour	  associated	  with	  the	  highest	  fish	  weights	  (highest	  fish	  growth	  rates)	  and	  lowest	  amounts	  of	  fin	  and	  skin	  damages	  would	  represent	  the	  best	  tank	  colour	  for	  the	  aquaculture	  industry.	  Given	  my	  own	  findings,	  I	  predict	  that	  black	  tanks	  would	  result	  in	  less	  aggression	  overall,	  leading	  to	  lower	  amounts	  of	  fin	  and	  skin	  damage.	  	  3.3	  Conclusions	  The	  results	  from	  my	  study	  show	  that	  black	  tanks	  are	  the	  preferred	  tank	  background	  colour	  for	  coho	  salmon.	  Black	  tanks	  were	  also	  associated	  with	  an	  overall	  lower	  number	  of	  aggressive	  acts	  than	  the	  industry	  standard,	  blue	  tanks.	  I	  recommend	  the	  adoption	  of	  black	  tanks	  for	  coho	  aquaculture	  in	  closed	  containment	  systems.	  The	  emerging	  interest	  for	  on-­‐land,	  closed	  containment	  systems	  opens	  up	  an	  opportunity	  toward	  application	  of	  the	  suggested	  tank	  colour	  changes.	  It	  is	  encouraging	  that	  a	  simple	  change	  of	  fish	  rearing	  environment	  (such	  as	  the	  colour	  of	  tank	  used)	  may	  have	  multiple	  beneficial	  aspects	  for	  fish	  and	  producers.	  A	  small	  change	  in	  aquaculture	  procedures	  can	  reduce	  aggression	  levels	  in	  reared	  fish	  and	  hence	  improve	  fish	  welfare	  and	  likely	  also	  economic	  return.	  	  40	  References	  Abbott,	  J.C.	  and	  L.M.	  Dill	  (1985)	  Patterns	  of	  aggressive	  attack	  in	  juvenile	  steelhead	  trout	  (Salmo-­‐Gairdneri).	  Canadian	  Journal	  of	  Fisheries	  and	  Aquatic	  Sciences.	  42:1702-­‐1706.	  Anras,	  M.L.B.	  and	  J.P.	  Lagardere	  (2004)	  Measuring	  cultured	  fish	  swimming	  behaviour:	  first	  results	  on	  rainbow	  trout	  using	  acoustic	  telemetry	  in	  tanks.	  Aquaculutre.	  240:175-­‐186.	  Ashley,	  P.J.	  (2007)	  Fish	  welfare:	  Current	  issues	  in	  aquaculture.	  Applied	  Animal	  Behaviour	  Science.	  104:199-­‐235.	  Baker,	  B.	  I.	  and	  T.A.	  Rance	  (1981)	  Differences	  in	  concentrations	  of	  plasma	  cortisol	  in	  the	  trout	  and	  the	  eel	  following	  adaptation	  to	  black	  or	  white	  backgrounds.	  Journal	  of	  Endocrinology.	  89:135-­‐140.	  Barcellos,	  L.J.G.,	  L.C.	  Kreutz,	  C.	  Souza,	  L.B.	  Rodriguez,	  I.	  Fioreze,	  R.M.	  Quevedo,	  L.	  Cericato,	  A.B.	  Soso,	  M.	  Fagundes,	  J.	  Conrad,	  L.A.	  Lacerda	  and	  S.	  Terra	  (2004)	  Haematological	  changes	  in	  Jundia	  (Rhamdia	  quelen)	  after	  acute	  and	  chronic	  stress	  caused	  by	  usual	  aquacultural	  management,	  with	  emphasis	  on	  immunosuppressive	  effects.	  Aquaculture.	  237:229-­‐236.	  	  Bates,	  D.,	  M.	  Maechler,	  B.	  Bolker	  and	  S.	  Walker	  (2014)	  _lme4:	  Linear	  mixed-­‐effects	  models	  using	  Eigen	  and	  S4_.	  R	  package	  version	  1.1-­‐7.	  [WWW	  Document]	  URL:	  http://CRAN.R-­‐project.org/package=lme4	  (accessed	  4.10.14)	  Batzina,	  A.	  and	  N.	  Karakatsouli	  (2012)	  The	  presence	  of	  substrate	  as	  a	  means	  of	  environmental	  enrichment	  in	  intensively	  reared	  gilthead	  seabream	  Sparus	  aurata:	  growth	  and	  behavioural	  effects.	  Aquaculture.	  370-­‐371:54–60.	  Black,	  K.D.	  (2001)	  Environmental	  Impact	  of	  Aquaculture.	  Sheffield	  Academic	  Press,	  Sheffield,	  England,	  UK	  (2001),	  228	  pp.	  Boeuf,	  G.	  and	  P.Y.	  Le	  Bail	  (1999)	  Does	  light	  have	  an	  influence	  on	  fish	  growth?	  	  Aquaculture.	  177:129-­‐152.	  Bolger,	  N.,	  and	  J.-­‐P.	  Laurenceau	  (2013).	  Intensive	  Longitudinal	  Methods:	  An	  Introduction	  to	  Diary	  and	  Experience	  Sampling	  Research	  (Methodology	  in	  the	  Social	  Sciences).	  The	  Guilford	  Press.	  p.	  256.	  Bouck,	  G.R.	  and	  S.D.	  Smith	  (1979)	  Mortality	  of	  experimentally	  de-­‐scaled	  smolts	  of	  coho	  salmon	  (Oncorhynchus-­‐kisutch)	  in	  fresh	  and	  salt-­‐water.	  Transactions	  of	  the	  American	  Fisheries	  Society.	  108:67-­‐69.	  	   41	  Boujard,	  T.,	  L.	  Labbé	  and	  B.	  Aupérin	  (2002)	  Feeding	  behaviour,	  energy	  expenditure	  and	  	   growth	  of	  rainbow	  in	  relation	  to	  stocking	  density	  and	  food	  accessibility.	  Aquaculture	  	   Research.	  33:1233-­‐1242.	  Boulcott,	  P.D.,	  K.	  Walton	  and	  V.A.	  Braithwaite	  (2005)	  The	  role	  of	  ultraviolet	  wavelengths	  in	  	   the	  mate-­‐choice	  decisions	  of	  female	  three-­‐spined	  sticklebacks.	  Journal	  of	  	   Experimental	  Zoology.	  208:1453-­‐1458.	  	  Bowmaker,	  J.K.	  (1995)	  The	  visual	  pigments	  of	  fish.	  Progress	  in	  Retinal	  and	  Eye	  Research.	  	   15:1-­‐31.	  Braithwaite,	  V.A.	  (1998)	  Spatial	  memory,	  landmark	  use	  and	  orientation	  in	  fish.	  pp	  86-­‐102.	  	   In:	  S.D.	  Healy	  (ed.)	  Spatial	  Representations	  in	  Animals.	  Oxford	  University	  Press:	  	   Oxford,	  UK.	  	  	  Braithwaite,	  V.A.	  and	  F.A.	  Huntingford	  (2004)	  Fish	  and	  welfare:	  do	  fish	  have	  the	  capacity	  	   for	  pain	  perception	  and	  suffering?	  Animal	  Welfare.	  13:	  87-­‐	  92.	  Broom,	  D.	  (1998)	  Fish	  welfare	  and	  the	  public	  perception	  of	  farmed	  fish.	  pp	  89-­‐91.	  In:	  C.	  	   Nash	  and	  V.	  Julien,	  (eds.),	  Report	  Aquavision	  ’98.	  The	  Second	  Nutreco	  Aquaculture	  	   Business	  Conference	  Stavanger	  Forum,	  Norway,	  13-­‐15	  May	  1998.	  Buchheim,	  J.R.	  and	  M.A.	  Hixon	  (1992)	  Competition	  for	  shelter	  holes	  in	  the	  coral	  reef	  fish	  	   Acanthemblemaria-­‐spinosa	  metselaar.	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Marine	  Biology	  and	  	   Ecology.164:45-­‐54.	  Canada	  House	  of	  Commons	  (2013)	  Closed	  Containment	  Salmon	  Aquaculture.	  Report	  of	  the	  	   Standing	  Committee	  on	  Fisheries	  and	  Oceans,	  First	  Session,	  41st	  Parliament,	  March	  	   2013.	  [WWW	  Document]	  URL:	  http://www.fao.org/3/a-­‐i3720e.pdf	  (accessed	  	   21.10.14).	  Chaouloff,	  F.,	  M.	  Durand,	  P.	  Mormède	  (1997)	  Anxiety-­‐	  and	  activity-­‐related	  effects	  of	  	   diazepam	  and	  chlordiazepoxide	  in	  the	  rat	  light/dark	  and	  dark/light	  tests.	  	   Behavoural	  Brain	  Research.	  85:27-­‐35.	  Cheng,	  C.L.	  and	  I.N.	  Flamerique	  (2004)	  New	  mechanism	  for	  modulating	  colour	  vision;	  single	  	   cones	  start	  making	  a	  different	  opsin	  as	  young	  salmon	  move	  to	  deeper	  waters.	  	   Nature.	  428:279.	  Chervova,	  L.S.	  (1997)	  Pain	  sensitivity	  and	  behavior	  of	  fishes.	  Journal	  of	  Ichthyology.	  37:	  98-­‐	   102.	  	  Davis,	  N.,	  N.	  Prescott,	  C.	  Savory	  and	  C.	  Wathes	  (1999)	  Preferences	  of	  growing	  fowls	  for	  	   different	  light	  intensities	  in	  relation	  to	  age,	  strain	  and	  behaviour.	  Animal	  Welfare.	  	   8:193-­‐203.	  Dawkins,	  M.S.	  (1977)	  Do	  hens	  suffer	  in	  battery	  cages?	  Environmental	  preferences	  and	  	   welfare.	  Animal	  Behaviour.	  225:1034-­‐1046.	  	  42	  Dawkins,	  M.S.	  (1983)	  The	  current	  status	  of	  preference	  tests	  in	  the	  assessment	  of	  animal	  welfare.	  pp	  20-­‐26.	  In:	  S.H.	  Baxter,	  M.R.	  Baxter	  and	  J.A.C.	  MacCormack	  (eds.),	  Farm	  animal	  housing	  and	  welfare.	  Martinus	  Nijhoff,	  The	  Hague.	  	  	  Devlin,	  R.	  H.,	  J.	  I.	  Johnsson,	  D.	  E.	  Smailus,	  C.	  A.	  Biagi,	  E.	  Jönsson	  and	  B.	  Th	  Björnsson	  (1999)	  Increased	  ability	  to	  compete	  for	  food	  by	  growth	  hormone-­‐transgenic	  coho	  salmon	  Oncorhynchus	  kisutch	  (Walbaum).	  Aquaculture	  Research.	  30:479-­‐482.	  	  Duncan,	  I.J.H.	  (1992)	  Measuring	  preferences	  and	  the	  strength	  of	  preference.	  Poultry	  Science.	  71:658-­‐663.	  Duncan,	  I.J.H.	  (1978)	  The	  interpretation	  of	  preference	  tests	  in	  animal	  behaviour	  (letter	  to	  the	  Editor).	  Applied	  Animal	  Ethology.	  4:197-­‐200.	  Dunlop,	  R.	  and	  P.	  Laming	  (2005)	  Mechanoreceptive	  and	  nociceptive	  responses	  in	  the	  central	  nervous	  system	  of	  goldfish	  (Carassius	  auratus)	  and	  trout	  (Oncorhynchus	  mykiss).	  Journal	  of	  Pain.	  6:561-­‐568.	  Ellis,	  T.,	  B.	  North,	  A.P.	  Scott,	  N.R.	  Bromage,	  M.	  Porter	  and	  D.	  Gadd	  (2002)	  The	  relationships	  between	  stocking	  density	  and	  welfare	  in	  farmed	  rainbow	  trout.	  Journal	  of	  Fish	  Biology.	  61:493-­‐531.	  Fein,	  A.	  and	  E.Z.	  Szuts	  (1982)	  Photoreceptors:	  Their	  Role	  in	  Vision.	  Cambridge	  University	  Press,	  Cambridge,	  UK.	  .	  Food	  and	  Agricultural	  Organization	  of	  the	  United	  Nations	  (2014)	  The	  State	  of	  World	  Fisheries	  and	  Aquaculture:	  Opportunities	  and	  Challenges.	  [WWW	  Document]	  URL:	  http://www.fao.org/3/a-­‐i3740t.pdf	  (accessed	  10.11.14).	  Fraser,	  D.	  (1985)	  Selection	  of	  bedded	  and	  unbedded	  areas	  by	  pigs	  in	  relation	  to	  environmental	  temperature	  and	  behaviour.	  Applied	  Animal	  Behaviour	  Science.	  14:117-­‐126.	  Fraser,	  D.	  (2008)	  Understanding	  Animal	  Welfare:	  The	  Science	  in	  its	  Cultural	  Context.	  Wiley-­‐	  Blackwell,	  Oxford.	  Fraser,	  D.	  and	  L.R.	  Matthews	  (1997)	  Preference	  and	  motivational	  testing.	  pp	  159-­‐173.	  In:	  M.C.	  Appleby	  and	  B.O.	  Hughes	  (eds.),	  Animal	  Welfare.	  CAB	  International,	  Wallingford.	  	  Fraser,	  D.,	  D.M.	  Weary,	  E.A.	  Pajor	  and	  B.N.	  Milligan	  (1997)	  A	  scientific	  conception	  of	  animal	  welfare	  that	  reflects	  ethical	  concerns.	  Animal	  Welfare.	  6:187-­‐205.	  Fraser,	  N.H.C.,	  and	  N.B.	  Metcalfe	  (1997)	  The	  costs	  of	  becoming	  nocturnal:	  feeding	  efficiency	  in	  relation	  to	  light	  intensity	  in	  juvenile	  Atlantic	  Salmon.	  Functional	  Ecology.	  11:385-­‐391.	  43	  Fraser,	  N.H.C.,	  N.B.	  Metcalfe	  and	  J.E.	  Thorpe	  (1993)	  Temperature-­‐dependent	  switch	  between	  diurnal	  and	  nocturnal	  foraging	  in	  salmon.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  Royal	  Society	  B.	  252:135-­‐139.	  	  FSBI	  (2002)	  Fish	  Welfare.	  Briefing	  Paper	  2,	  Fisheries	  Society	  of	  the	  British	  Isles,	  Granta	  Information	  Systems.	  [WWW	  Document]	  URL:	  http://www.fsbi.org.uk/assets/brief-­‐welfare-­‐refs.pdf	  (accessed	  5.10.14).	  Fujimoto,	  M.,	  T.	  Arimoto,	  F.	  Mosichita	  and	  T.	  Naitoh	  (1991)	  The	  background	  adaptation	  of	  the	  flatfish,	  Paralichthys	  olivaceus.	  Physiology	  and	  Behaviour.	  50:185-­‐188.	  Gelman,	  A.,	  and	  J.	  Hill	  (2006)	  Data	  Analysis	  Using	  Regression	  and	  Multilevel/Hierarchical	  Models.	  Cambridge:	  Cambridge	  University	  Press.	  Galhardo,	  L.,	  O.	  Almeida	  and	  R.F.	  Oliveira	  (2011)	  Measuring	  motivation	  in	  a	  cichlid	  fish:	  an	  adaptation	  of	  the	  push-­‐door	  paradigm.	  Applied	  Animal	  Behaviour	  Science.	  130:60-­‐70.	  Giri,	  S.S.,	  S.K.	  Sahoo,	  B.B.	  Sahu,	  A.K.	  Sahu,	  S.N.	  Mohanty,	  P.K.	  Mukhopadhyay	  and	  S.	  Ayyappan	  (2002)	  Larval	  survival	  and	  growth	  in	  Wallago	  attu	  (Bloch	  and	  Schneider):	  effects	  of	  light,	  photoperiod	  and	  feeding	  regimes.	  Aquaculture.	  	  213:151-­‐161.	  Hart,	  J.L.	  (1973)	  Pacific	  fishes	  of	  Canada.	  Bulletin	  of	  the	  Fisheries	  Research	  Board	  of	  Canada.	  180:740	  pp.	  Head,	  A.B.	  and	  J.A.	  Malison	  (2000)	  Effects	  of	  lighting	  spectrum	  and	  disturbance	  level	  	  on	  the	  growth	  and	  stress	  responses	  of	  yellow	  perch	  Perca	  flavescens.	  Journal	  of	  the	  World	  Aquaculture	  Society.	  31:73-­‐80.	  Holm,	  C.J.,	  T.	  Refstie	  and	  S.	  Bø	  (1990)	  The	  Effect	  of	  fish	  density	  and	  feeding	  regimes	  on	  individual	  growth	  rate	  and	  mortality	  in	  rainbow	  trout	  (Oncorhynchus	  	   mykiss).	  Aquaculture.	  89:	  225-­‐232.	  	  Höglund,	  E.,	  P.H.M.	  Balm	  and	  S.	  Winberg	  (2000)	  Skin	  darkening,	  a	  potential	  social	  signal	  in	  subordinate	  Arctic	  charr	  (Salvelinus	  alpinus):	  the	  regulatory	  role	  of	  brain	  monoamines	  and	  pro-­‐opiomelanocortin-­‐derived	  peptides.	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Biology.	  203:1711-­‐1721.	  	  Höglund,	  E.,	  P.H.M.	  Balm	  and	  S.	  Winberg	  (2002)	  Behavioural	  and	  neuroendocrine	  effects	  of	  environmental	  background	  colour	  and	  social	  interaction	  in	  Arctic	  charr	  (Salvelinus	  alpinus).	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Biology.	  205:2535-­‐2543.	  Hughes,	  B.O.	  and	  A.J.	  Black	  (1973)	  The	  preference	  of	  domestic	  hens	  for	  different	  types	  of	  battery	  cage	  floor.	  British	  Poultry	  Science.	  14:615-­‐619.	  Huntingford,	  F.A.	  and	  C.	  Garcia	  de	  Leaniz	  (1997)	  Social	  dominance,	  prior	  residence	  and	  the	  acquisition	  of	  profitable	  feeding	  sites	  in	  juvenile	  Atlantic	  salmon.	  Journal	  of	  Fish	  Biology.	  51:1009–1014.	  	   44	  Imanpoor,	  M.R.	  and	  M.	  Abdollahi	  (2011).	  Effects	  of	  tank	  color	  on	  growth,	  stress	  response	  	   and	  skin	  color	  of	  juvenile	  Caspian	  kutum	  Rtilus	  frisii	  Kutum.	  Global	  Veterinaria.	  	   6:118-­‐125.	  	  Karakatsouli,	  N.,	  S.E.	  Papoutsoglou,	  G.	  Pizzonia,	  G.	  Tsatsos,	  A.	  Tsopelakos,	  S.	  Chadio,	  	   D.	  	   Kalogiannis,	  C.	  Dalla,	  A.	  Polissidis	  and	  Z.	  Papadopoulou-­‐Daifoti	  (2007)	  	  Effects	  of	  	   light	  spectrum	  on	  growth	  and	  physiological	  status	  of	  gilthead	  seabream	  Sparus	  	   aurata	  and	  rainbow	  trout	  Oncorhynchus	  mykiss	  reared	  under	  recirculating	  system	  	   conditions.	  Aquacultural	  Engineering.	  36:302-­‐309.	  Karakatsouli,	  N.,	  E.S.	  Papoutsoglou,	  N.	  Sotiropoulos,	  D.	  Mourtikas,	  T.	  Stigen	  Martinsen	  and	  	   S.E.	  Papoutsoglou	  (2010)	  Effects	  of	  light	  spectrum,	  rearing	  density	  and	  light	  	   intensity	  on	  growth	  performance	  of	  scaled	  and	  mirror	  common	  carp	  Cyprinus	  carpio	  	   reared	  under	  recirculating	  system	  conditions,	  Aquacultural	  Engineering.	  42:121-­‐	   127.	  Karakatsouli,	  N.,	  P.	  Katsakoulis,	  G.	  Leondaritis,	  D.	  Kalogiannis,	  S.E.	  Papoutsoglou,	  S.	  Chadio,	  	   N.	  Sakellaridis	  (2012)	  Acute	  stress	  response	  of	  European	  sea	  bass	  Dicentrarchus	  	   labrax	  under	  blue	  and	  white	  light.	  Aquaculture.	  364-­‐365:48-­‐52.	  	  Keenleysidme,	  H.	  A.	  and	  F.	  T.	  Yamammoto	  (1962)	  Territorrial	  behaviour	  of	  juvenile	  Atlantic	  	   salmon	  (Salmo	  salar	  L.).	  Behaviour.	  19:139-­‐169.	  	  Kelley,	  J.L.	  and	  A.E.	  Magurran	  (2003)	  Learned	  predator	  recognition	  and	  antipredator	  	   responses	  in	  fishes.	  Fish	  and	  Fisheries.	  4:216-­‐226.	  Kristiansen,	  T.S.,	  A.	  Ferno,	  J.C.	  Holm,	  L.	  Privitera,	  S.	  Bakke	  and	  J.E.	  Fosseidengen	  (2004)	  	   Swimming	  behaviour	  as	  an	  indicator	  of	  low	  growth	  rate	  and	  impaired	  	  welfare	  in	  	   Atlantic	  halibut	  (Hippoglossus	  hippoglossus	  L.)	  reared	  at	  three	  stocking	  densities.	  	   Aquaculture.	  230:137-­‐151.	  Laland	  K.N.,	  C.	  Brown	  and	  J.	  Krause	  (2003)	  Learning	  in	  fishes:	  from	  three-­‐second	  memory	  	   to	  culture.	  Fish	  and	  Fisheries.	  4:199-­‐202.	  Latremouille,	  D.N.	  (2003)	  Fin	  erosion	  in	  aquaculture	  and	  natural	  environments.	  Reviews	  in	  	   Fisheries	  Science.	  11:315-­‐335.	  	  Legrand,	  A.	  L.,	  M.	  A.	  G.	  von	  Keyserlingk	  and	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  (2009)	  Preference	  and	  usage	  of	  	   pasture	  versus	  free-­‐stall	  housing	  by	  lactating	  dairy	  cattle.	  Journal	  of	  Dairy	  Science.	  	   92:3651-­‐3658.	  	  Levine,	  J.S.	  and	  E.F.	  MacNichol	  Jr.	  (1982)	  Color	  vision	  in	  fishes.	  Scientific	  America.	  246:140-­‐	   149.	  Luchiari,	  A.C.	  and	  F.A.M.	  Freire	  (2009)	  Effects	  of	  environmental	  colour	  on	  growth	  of	  	  Nile	  	   tilapia,	  Oreochromis	  niloticus	  (Linnaeus,	  1758),	  maintained	  individually	  or	  in	  groups.	  	   Journal	  of	  Applied	  Ichthyology.	  25:162-­‐167.	  	   45	  Marchesan,	  M.,	  M.	  Spoto,	  L.	  Verginella	  and	  E.A.	  Ferrero	  (2005)	  Behavioural	  effects	  of	  	   artificial	  lights	  on	  fish	  species	  of	  commercial	  interest.	  Fisheries	  Research.	  73:171-­‐185.	  Masser,	  M.P.	  and	  C.J.	  Bridger	  (2007)	  A	  review	  of	  cage	  aquaculture:	  North	  America.	  pp	  102-­‐	   125.	  In:	  M.	  Halwart,	  D.	  Soto	  and	  J.R.	  Arthur	  (eds.),	  Cage	  aquaculture	  –	  Regional	  	   reviews	  and	  global	  overview.	  FAO	  Fisheries	  Technical	  Paper	  No.	  498.	  Rome,	  FAO	  	   (2007),	  241	  pp.	  	  McLean,	  E.,	  P.	  Cotter,	  C.	  Thain	  and	  N.	  King	  (2008)	  Tank	  colour	  impacts	  performance	  of	  	   cultured	  fish.	  Ribarstvo.	  2:43-­‐54.	  Merighe,	  G.K.F.,	  E.M.	  Pereira-­‐da-­‐Silva,	  J.A.	  Negrao	  and	  S.	  Ribeiro	  (2004)	  Effect	  of	  	   background	  color	  on	  the	  social	  stress	  of	  Nile	  tilapia	  (Oreochromis	  niloticus).	  Revista	   Brasileira	  de	  Zootecnia.	  33:828-­‐837.	  Naas,	  K.,	  I.	  Huse	  and	  J.	  Iglesias	  (1996)	  Illumination	  in	  first	  feeding	  tanks	  for	  marine	  fish	  	   larvae.	  Aquacultural	  Engineering.	  15:291-­‐300.	  	  Naor,	  A.,	  N.	  Segev,	  K.	  Bressler,	  A.	  Peduel,	  E.	  Hadas	  and	  B.	  Ron	  (2003)	  The	  influence	  of	  the	  	   pineal	  organ	  and	  melatonin	  on	  the	  reproductive	  system	  and	  of	  light	  intensity	  and	  	   wavelength	  on	  melatonin	  in	  the	  gilthead	  sea	  bream	  (Sparus	  aurata).	  The	  Israeli	  	   Journal	  of	  Aquaculture.	  55:230.	  Naylor,	  R.L.,	  R.J.	  Goldberg,	  J.H.	  Primavera,	  N.	  Kautsky,	  M.C.	  Beveridge,	  J.	  Clay,	  C.	  Folk,	  J.	  	   Lubchenco,	  H.	  Mooney	  and	  M.	  Troell	  (2000)	  Effect	  of	  aquaculture	  on	  world	  fish	  	   supplies.	  Nature.	  405:1017-­‐1024.	  O’Connor,	  K.	  I.,	  N.B.	  Metcacalfe	  and	  A.C.	  Taylor	  (1999).	  Does	  darkening	  signal	  	  submission	  in	  	   territorial	  contests	  between	  juvenile	  Atlantic	  salmon,	  Salmo	  salar?	  Animal	  	   Behaviour.	  58:1269-­‐1276.	  	  Odling-­‐Smee,	  L.	  and	  V.A.	  Braithwaite	  (2003b)	  The	  role	  of	  learning	  in	  fish	  orientation.	  Fish	  	   and	  Fisheries.	  4:235-­‐246.	  Pelis,	  R.M.	  and	  S.D.	  McCormick	  (2003)	  Fin	  development	  in	  stream-­‐	  and	  hatchery-­‐reared	  	   Atlantic	  Salmon.	  Aquaculture.	  220:525-­‐536.	  Phillips,	  P.A.,	  D.	  Fraser	  and	  B.	  Pawluczuk	  (2000)	  Floor	  temperature	  preference	  of	  sows	  at	  	   farrowing.	  Applied	  Animal	  Behaviour	  Science.	  67:59-­‐65.	  Poli,	  B.M,	  G.	  Parisi,	  F.	  Scappini,	  G.	  Zampacavallo	  (2005)	  Fish	  welfare	  and	  quality	  as	  affected	  	   by	  pre-­‐slaughter	  and	  slaughter	  management.	  Aquaculture	  International.	  13:29-­‐49.	  Rabe-­‐Hesketh,	  S.,	  and	  A.	  Skrondal	  (2008)	  Multilevel	  and	  Londgitudinal	  Modeling	  Using	  Stata	  (2nd	  ed.).	  College	  Station,	  TX,	  Stata	  Press.	  	   46	  R	  Core	  Team	  (2014).	  R:	  A	  language	  and	  environment	  for	  statistical	  computing.	  R	  Foundation	  for	  Statistical	  Computing,	  Vienna,	  Austria.	  	  [WWW	  Document]	  URL:	  http://www.R-­‐project.org/	  (accessed	  9.10.14).	  Refstie,	  T.	  (1997)	  Effect	  of	  density	  on	  growth	  and	  survival	  of	  rainbow	  trout.	  Aquaculture.	  	   11:329-­‐334.	  Rimmer,	  D.	  M.,	  U.	  Paim	  and	  R.L.	  Saunders	  (1983)	  Autumnal	  habitat	  shift	  of	  juvenile	  Atlantic	  	   salmon	  (Salmo	  salar)	  in	  a	  small	  river.	  Canadian	  Journal	  of	  Fisheries	  and	  Aquatic	  	   Sciences.	  40:671–680.	  	  Rodríguez,	  F.,	  E.	  Durán,	  J.P.	  Vargas,	  B.	  Torres	  and	  C.	  Salas	  (1994)	  Performance	  of	  goldfish	  	   trained	  in	  allocentric	  and	  egocentric	  maze	  procedures	  suggest	  the	  presence	  of	  a	  	   cognitive	  mapping	  system	  in	  fishes.	  Animal	  Learning	  and	  Behaviour.	  10:108-­‐114	  Rose,	  J.D.	  (2002)	  The	  neurobehavioral	  nature	  of	  fishes	  and	  the	  question	  of	  awareness	  and	  	   pain.	  Reviews	  in	  Fisheries	  Science.	  10:1-­‐38.	  Ruchin,	  A.B.	  (2004)	  Influence	  of	  colored	  light	  on	  growth	  rate	  of	  juveniles	  of	  fish.	  Fish	  	   Physiology	  and	  Biochemistry.	  30:175-­‐178.	  Sandercock,	  F.K.	  (1991)	  Life	  history	  of	  coho	  salmon	  Oncorhynchus	  kisutch.	  pp	  397-­‐445.	  In:	  	   Groot,	  C.	  and	  I.	  Margolis	  (eds.),	  Pacific	  salmon	  life	  histories.	  UBC	  Press,	  Vancouver,	  	   BC	  (1991),	  567	  pp.	  Schneider,	  R.	  and	  B.	  Nicholson	  (1980)	  Bacteria	  associated	  with	  fin	  rot	  disease	  in	  hatchery-­‐	   reared	  Atlantic	  salmon	  (Salmo	  salar).	  Canadian	  Journal	  of	  Fisheries	  and	  Aquatic	  	   Sciences.	  37:1505-­‐1513.	  Schreck,	  C.B.,	  B.L.	  Olla	  and	  M.W.	  Davis	  (1997)	  Behavioural	  response	  to	  stress.	  pp.	  145–170.	  	   In:	  G.	  Iwama,	  A.	  Pickering,	  J.	  Sumpter	  and	  C.	  Schreck	  (eds.),	  Fish	  Stress	  and	  Health	  in	  	   Aquaculture.	  Cambridge	  University	  Press,	  Cambridge,	  UK.	  	  Schreck,	  C.B.,	  W.	  Contreras-­‐Sanchez	  and	  M.S.	  Fitzpatrick	  (2001)	  Effects	  of	  stress	  on	  fish	  	  	   reproduction,	  gamete	  quality,	  and	  progeny.	  Aquaculture.	  197:3-­‐24.	  Shapovalov,	  L.	  and	  A.C.	  Taft	  (1954)	  The	  life	  histories	  of	  the	  Steelhead	  Trout	  (Salmo	  	   gairdneri)	  and	  Silver	  Salmon	  (Oncorhynchus	  kisutch)	  with	  special	  reference	  to	  	   Waddell	  Creek,	  California,	  and	  recommendations	  regarding	  their	  management.	  	   California	  Department	  of	  Fish	  and	  Game.	  Fisheries	  Bulletin.	  98:1-­‐375.	  	  Smith,	  A.	  R.	  (1978)	  Color	  Gamut	  Transform	  Pairs.	  Computer	  Graphics.	  12:12-­‐19.	  Sneddon,	  L.U.	  (2002)	  Anatomical	  and	  electrophysiological	  analysis	  of	  the	  trigeminal	  	  nerve	  	   in	  a	  teleost	  fish,	  Oncorhynchus	  mykiss.	  Neuroscience	  Letters.	  319:167-­‐171.	  Sneddon,	  L.U.,	  V.A.	  Braithwaite	  and	  M.J.	  Gentle	  (2003a)	  Do	  fish	  have	  nociceptors?	  Evidence	  	   for	  the	  evolution	  of	  a	  vertebrate	  sensory	  system.	  Proceedings	  of	  the	  Royal	  Society	  of	  	   London,	  Series	  B.	  Biological	  Sciences.	  270:1115-­‐1121.	  47	  Sneddon,	  L.U.,	  V.A.	  Braithwaite	  and	  M.J.	  Gentle	  (2003b)	  Novel	  object	  test:	  examining	  	  pain	  and	  fear	  in	  the	  rainbow	  trout.	  Journal	  of	  Pain.	  4:431-­‐440.	  Snijders,	  T.	  A.	  B.,	  and	  R.J.	  Bosker	  (2012)	  Multilevel	  Analysis:	  An	  introduction	  to	  basic	  and	  advanced	  multilevel	  modeling.	  Thousand	  Oaks,	  CA,	  SAGE	  Publications.	  2:354.	  Southgate,	  P.	  and	  T.	  Wall	  (2001)	  Welfare	  of	  farmed	  fish	  at	  slaughter.	  In	  Practice.	  23:277-­‐284.	  Stradmeyer,	  L.	  and	  J.E.	  Thorpe	  (1987)	  Feeding	  behaviour	  of	  wild	  Atlantic	  salmon,	  Salmo	  salar,	  L.,	  parr	  in	  mid-­‐	  to	  later	  summer	  in	  a	  Scottish	  stream.	  Aquaculture	  and	  Fisheries	  Management.	  18:33-­‐49.	  	  Steenbergen,	  P.J.,	  M.K.	  Richardson	  and	  M.K.	  Champagne	  (2011)	  Patterns	  of	  avoidance	  behaviours	  in	  the	  light/dark	  preference	  test	  in	  young	  juvenile	  zebrafish:	  a	  pharmacological	  study.	  Behavioural	  Brain	  Research.	  222:15-­‐25.	  Steiger,	  A.,	  B.	  Tschanz,	  P.	  Jakob,	  and	  E.	  Scholl	  (1979)	  Behavioral	  studies	  of	  fattening	  pigs	  on	  different	  floor	  coverings	  and	  with	  a	  varying	  rate	  of	  stocking.	  Schweizer	  Archiv	  Fur	  Tierheilkunde	  No.	  121:109-­‐126.	  	  Szisch,	  V.,	  A.L.	  Van	  der	  Salm,	  S.E.	  Wendelaar	  Bonga	  and	  M.	  Pavlidis	  (2002)	  Physiological	  colour	  changes	  in	  the	  red	  porgy,	  Pagrus	  pagrus,	  following	  adaptation	  to	  blue	  lighting	  spectrum.	  Fish	  Physiology	  and	  Biochemistry.	  27:1-­‐8.	  Tucker,	  C.	  B.,	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  and	  D.	  Fraser	  (2003)	  Effects	  of	  three	  types	  of	  free-­‐stall	  surfaces	  on	  preferences	  and	  stall	  usage	  by	  dairy	  cows.	  Journal	  of	  Dairy	  Science.	  86:521-­‐529.	  Temple,	  S.	  E.,	  E.M.	  S.	  Ramsden,	  T.J.	  Haimberger,	  W.M.Roth	  and	  C.W.	  Hawryshyn	  (2006).	  Seasonal	  cycle	  in	  vitamin	  A1/A2-­‐based	  visual	  pigment	  composition	  during	  the	  life	  history	  of	  coho	  salmon	  (Oncorhynchus	  kisutch).	  Journal	  of	  Comparative	  Physiology.	  A,	  Neuroethology,	  Sensory,	  Neural,	  and	  Behavioral	  Physiology.	  192:301-­‐313.	  	  Temple,	  S.	  E.,	  S.D.	  Ramsden,	  T.J.	  Haimberger,	  K.M.	  Veldhoen,	  N.J.	  Veldhoen,	  N.L.	  Carter,	  W.M.	  Roth	  and	  C.W.	  Hawryshyn	  (2008).	  Effects	  of	  exogenous	  thyroid	  hormones	  on	  visual	  pigment	  composition	  in	  coho	  salmon	  (Oncorhynchus	  kisutch).	  Journal	  of	  Experimental	  Biology.	  211:2134-­‐2143.	  	  Thorarensen,	  H.	  and	  A.P.	  Farrell	  (2011)	  The	  biological	  requirements	  for	  post-­‐smolt	  Atlantic	  salmon	  in	  closed-­‐containment	  systems.	  Aquaculture.	  312:1-­‐14.	  Tucker,	  C.	  B.,	  D.	  M.	  Weary	  and	  D.	  Fraser	  (2003)	  Effects	  of	  three	  types	  of	  free-­‐stall	  surfaces	  on	  preferences	  and	  stall	  usage	  by	  dairy	  cows.	  Journal	  of	  Dairy	  Science.	  86:521-­‐529.	  Turnbull,	  J.F.,	  C.E.	  Adams,	  R.H.	  Richards,	  R.H.	  and	  D.A.	  Robertson	  (1998)	  Attack	  site	  and	  resultant	  damage	  during	  aggressive	  encounters	  in	  Atlantic	  salmon	  (Salmo	  salar	  L.)	  parr.	  Aquaculture.	  159:345-­‐353.	  48	  Turnbull,	  J.,	  A.	  Bell,	  C.	  Adams,	  J.	  Bron	  and	  F.	  Huntingford	  (2005)	  Stocking	  density	  and	  welfare	  of	  cage	  farmed	  Atlantic	  salmon:	  application	  of	  a	  multivariate	  analysis.	  Aquaculture.	  243:	  121-­‐132.	  Ullmann,	  J.F.P.,	  T.	  Gallagher,	  N.S.	  Hart,	  A.	  Barnes,	  R.P.	  Smullen,	  S.P.	  Collin	  and	  S.E.	  Temple	  (2011)	  Tank	  colour	  increases	  growth,	  and	  alters	  colour	  preference	  and	  spectral	  sensitivity,	  in	  barramundi	  (Lates	  calcarifer).	  Aquaculture.	  322-­‐323:235–240.	  Van	  der	  Salm,	  A.L.,	  M.	  Martinez,	  G.	  Flik	  and	  S.E.	  Wendelaar	  Bonga	  (2004)	  Effects	  of	  husbandry	  conditions	  on	  the	  skin	  colour	  and	  stress	  response	  of	  red	  porgy	  Pagrus	  pagrus.	  Aquaculture.	  241:371-­‐386.	  Van	  de	  Weerd,	  H.A.,	  P.L.P.	  van	  Loo,	  L.F.M.	  van	  Zutphen,	  J.M.	  Koolhaas	  and	  V.	  Baumans	  (1997)	  Preferences	  for	  nesting	  material	  as	  environmental	  enrichment	  for	  laboratory	  mice.	  Laboratory	  Animals.	  31:133-­‐143.	  Vøllestad,	  L.A.,	  and	  T.P.	  Quinn	  (2003)	  Trade-­‐off	  between	  growth	  rate	  and	  aggression	  in	  juvenile	  coho	  salmon,	  Oncorhynchus	  kisutch.	  Animal	  Behaviour.	  66:561-­‐568.	  Volpato,	  G.L.	  and	  R.E.	  Barreto	  (2001)	  Environmental	  blue	  light	  prevents	  stress	  in	  the	  fish	  Nile	  tilapia.	  Brazilian	  Journal	  of	  Medical	  and	  Biological	  Research.	  34:1041–1045.	  von	  Keyserlingk,	  M.A.G.,	  J.	  Rushen,	  A.M.	  de	  Passille	  and	  D.M.	  Weary	  (2009)	  Invited	  review:	  The	  welfare	  of	  dairy	  cattle-­‐-­‐key	  concepts	  and	  the	  role	  of	  science.	  Journal	  of	  Dairy	  Science.	  92:4101-­‐4111.	  	  Webster,	  M.S.	  and	  M.A.	  Hixon	  (2000)	  Mechanisms	  and	  individual	  consequences	  of	  intraspecific	  competition	  in	  a	  coral	  reef	  fish.	  Marine	  Ecology	  Progress	  Series.	  196:187-­‐194.	  Wickham,	  H.	  (2007)	  Reshaping	  data	  with	  the	  reshape	  package.	  Journal	  of	  Statistical	  Software.	  21(12).	  Wickham,	  H.	  (2011)The	  Split-­‐Apply-­‐Combine	  Strategy	  for	  Data	  Analysis.	  Journal	  of	  Statistical	  Software.	  40:1-­‐29.	  [WWW	  Document]	  URL:	  http://www.jstatsoft.org/v40/i01/	  (accessed	  5.10.14).	  Whiteman,	  E.A.,	  and	  I.M.	  Côté	  (2003)	  Dominance	  hierarchies	  in	  group-­‐living	  cleaning	  gobies:	  causes	  and	  foraging	  consequences.	  Animal	  Behaviour.	  67:239-­‐247.	  Widowski,	  T.M.	  (1992)	  The	  preferences	  of	  hens	  for	  compact	  fluorescent	  over	  	  incandescent	  lighting.	  Journal	  of	  Animal	  Science.	  72:203-­‐211.	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0166085/manifest

Comment

Related Items