UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

A new platform for studying human balance control : design, validation, and experiments Huryn, Thomas Peter 2012

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2012_spring_huryn_thomas.pdf [ 5.74MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0105189.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0105189-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0105189-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0105189-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0105189-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0105189-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0105189-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0105189-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0105189.ris

Full Text

A NEW PLATFORM FOR STUDYING HUMAN BALANCE CONTROL: DESIGN, VALIDATION, AND EXPERIMENTS  by Thomas Peter Huryn B.A.Sc., The University of British Columbia, 2009  A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF APPLIED SCIENCE in The Faculty of Graduate Studies (Mechanical Engineering)  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver) April 2012  © Thomas Peter Huryn, 2012  Abstract   Abstract  This  thesis  provides  insight  and  novel  tools  for  investigation  into  the  neuromotor  control  of  human  standing balance. To maintain upright standing, the human body integrates sensory inputs and activates  lower  limb  muscles  in  a  coordinated  manner.  Balance  control  mechanisms  are  not  well  understood,  largely  due  to  the  lack  of  experimental  tools.  Existing  devices  modify  sensory  information  or  mechanically  disturb  the  body;  however,  both  approaches  can  induce  unnatural  corrective  responses.  One  approach  that  does  not  perturb  normal  control  mechanisms  is  to  allow  humans  to  balance  in  an  immersive physics simulator, but no appropriate tool has been available. Furthermore, control models  that  describe  unperturbed  (quiet)  standing  are  typically  evaluated  in  computer  simulations  and  rarely  experimentally tested by activating human muscles. This thesis presents two studies that seek to answer  the  questions:  a)  Can  we  engage  humans  in  an  immersive  balancing  task  decoupled  from  their  body  mechanics? b) Which control models accurately characterize standing balance?  The  first  study  validates  the  design  of  a  novel  robotic  system  that  enables  subjects  to  safely  balance  according to a programmable physical model. When programmed with a subject’s own body mechanics,  results show that the torque‐angle relationship (load stiffness) is similar to that of normal standing, and  that  load  stiffness  increases,  as  expected,  with  increasing  sway  frequency.  By  providing  decoupled  control  over  balance  physics,  this  system  enables  novel  investigations  into  the  neural  mechanisms  of  human standing.  The  second  study  evaluates  proposed  control  models  for  quiet  standing  within  a  control  loop  that  stimulates  human  muscle  actuation.  Two  factors  differentiate  the  models:  activation  type  and  delay‐ reducing  prediction.  All  evaluated  models  successfully  balance  in  the  absence  of  natural  muscle  activation  but  increase  corrective  activity  and  mechanical  effort  relative  to  natural  standing.  Intermittent activation reduces stimulation energy but increases sway. Prediction reduces sway for the  intermittent  case  only.  To  develop  more  accurate  control  models,  future  work  is  recommended  to  reduce  sway  during  intermittent  activation,  reduce  feedback  gains,  increase  predictor  compensation,  and vary the setpoint angle.  This  work  contributes  to  the  understanding  of  balance  neurophysiology  and  may  lead  to  improved  control models for body movement in healthy and balance‐impaired individuals.      ii     Preface   Preface  This thesis introduces the topic of human balance control and, in Chapter 1, provides a literature review  of key physiological concepts, modelling techniques, and experimental technologies.  Chapter  2  describes  the  design  and  validation  of  the  novel  robotic  balance  platform,  RISER:  Robot  for  Interactive Sensory Engagement and Rehabilitation. The majority of its content is reproduced from: T. P.  Huryn, B. L. Luu, H. F. M. Van der Loos, J.‐S. Blouin, and E. A. Croft. Investigating human balance using a  robotic  motion  platform.1 In  this  work,  I  was  responsible  for  the  overall  development  of  the  motion  platform, including driving software, mechanical alterations, and instrumentation. The software design  proceeded  from  the  initial  work  of  H.  F.  M.  Van  der  Loos.  B.  L.  Luu  and  I  conducted  the  validation  experiments, and I was responsible for writing the manuscript. H. F. M. Van der Loos, J.‐S. Blouin, and  E. A. Croft provided supervision and consultation throughout the development of the motion platform.   Following publication of the initial system design, the RISER motion platform was further improved and  validated. The validation experiments are described in detail in: B. L. Luu, T. P. Huryn, H. F. M. Van der  Loos, E. A. Croft, and J.‐S. Blouin. Validation of a robotic balance system for investigations in the control  of human standing balance.2 In this work, I was responsible for developing improvements to the motion  platform system, including implementation of lead compensation, force plate dynamic calibration, and  virtual passive stiffness. These contributions are described in the Epilogue section of Chapter 2.  The  experiments  in  Chapter  2  were  conducted  with  approval  from  the  UBC  Clinical  Research  Ethics  Board (H09‐00987: Study of Human Balance Physiology using a Robotic Motion Simulator).  Chapter 3 describes experiments investigating the control of human standing using muscle stimulation.  The  experiments  in  Chapter  3  were  conducted  with  approval  from  the  UBC  Clinical  Research  Ethics  Board (H10‐03068: Balance Control Models). Chapter 4 concludes this thesis by reflecting on the overall  contributions and recommending future work.                                                                1   © 2010 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from T. P. Huryn, B. L. Luu, H. F. M. Van der Loos, J.‐S. Blouin, and E. A.  Croft,  Investigating  Human  Balance  Using  a  Robotic  Motion  Platform,  Proceedings,  2010  IEEE  International  Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2010.  2  B. L. Luu, T. P. Huryn, H. F. M. Van der Loos, E. A. Croft, and J.‐S. Blouin, Validation of a robotic balance system for  investigations in the control of human standing balance, IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation  Engineering, August 2011.   iii     Appendix A describes the detailed design of the balance control system developed for the experiments  in  Chapter  3.  Appendix  B  presents  supplemental  results  to  those  presented  in  Chapter  3.  Appendix  C  provides an overview of the hardware and software architecture for the RISER motion platform.         iv     Table of Contents   Table of Contents    Abstract ......................................................................................................................................................... ii  Preface .......................................................................................................................................................... iii  Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................................... v  List of Tables ................................................................................................................................................. ix  List of Figures ................................................................................................................................................. x  Glossary ....................................................................................................................................................... xii  Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................................... xiv  1   Introduction and Literature Review ..................................................................................................... 1  1.1   Motivation and Overall Objectives ............................................................................................... 1   1.2   Outline of Thesis ........................................................................................................................... 4   1.3   Literature Review ......................................................................................................................... 5   1.3.1   Efference .............................................................................................................................. 5   1.3.2   Afference .............................................................................................................................. 6   1.3.3   Signal Conduction ................................................................................................................. 6   1.3.4   Control Modelling ................................................................................................................. 7   1.3.5   Investigative Techniques .................................................................................................... 10   1.3.6   FES in Balance Research ..................................................................................................... 11   1.3.7   Applied Balance Technology ............................................................................................... 12   1.4  2   Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 14   Balance Platform System Design ........................................................................................................ 16  2.1   Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 17   2.2   Balance System Model ............................................................................................................... 18   v     2.3   2.3.1   Mechanical Equipment and Instrumentation .................................................................... 20   2.3.2   Software Driver and Data Compensation ........................................................................... 21   2.4   3   System Setup and Design ........................................................................................................... 20   Experiments ................................................................................................................................ 24   2.4.1   Methodology ...................................................................................................................... 24   2.4.2   Load Stiffness Results ......................................................................................................... 26   2.5   Discussion ................................................................................................................................... 28   2.6   Future Work ............................................................................................................................... 30   2.6.1   Balance Simulation Development ...................................................................................... 30   2.6.2   Future Experiments ............................................................................................................ 30   2.7   Conclusion .................................................................................................................................. 32   2.8   Epilogue ...................................................................................................................................... 33   2.9   Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 36   Experimental Evaluation of Human Balance Control Models ............................................................ 37  3.1   Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 38   3.2   Methods ..................................................................................................................................... 39   3.2.1   Participants ......................................................................................................................... 40   3.2.2   Balance Control Loop ......................................................................................................... 40   3.2.3   Instrumentation .................................................................................................................. 42   3.3   Control Loop Components ......................................................................................................... 43   3.3.1   Body Mechanics .................................................................................................................. 44   3.3.2   Angle Controller .................................................................................................................. 44   3.3.3   Control Action Regulator .................................................................................................... 45   3.3.4   State Predictor .................................................................................................................... 45   3.3.5   Torque Loop........................................................................................................................ 46   3.4   Experimental Protocol ................................................................................................................ 47  vi      3.4.1   Natural Standing ................................................................................................................. 48   3.4.2   Torque Loop Calibration ..................................................................................................... 48   3.4.3   Controlled Standing ............................................................................................................ 48   3.4.4   Neural Blocks ...................................................................................................................... 49   3.4.5   Data Collection and Processing .......................................................................................... 50   3.5   3.5.1   General Results ................................................................................................................... 52   3.5.2   Sway .................................................................................................................................... 58   3.5.3   Actuation ............................................................................................................................ 59   3.6   4   Results ........................................................................................................................................ 52   Discussion ................................................................................................................................... 61   3.6.1   Continuous vs. Intermittent Activation .............................................................................. 61   3.6.2   No Predictor vs. Predictor .................................................................................................. 62   3.6.3   Validation by Neural Block ................................................................................................. 63   3.6.4   Consideration of PD Gains .................................................................................................. 63   3.6.5   Limitations .......................................................................................................................... 64   3.7   Recommendations ...................................................................................................................... 65   3.8   Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 66   Conclusions and Future Work ............................................................................................................ 68  4.1   Overall Contributions ................................................................................................................. 68   4.1.1   Contribution 1: RISER motion platform .............................................................................. 68   4.1.2   Contributions 2 and 3: Closed‐loop system and evaluation for control models ................ 69   4.2   Future Work ............................................................................................................................... 71   4.2.1   Balance Control System Modifications ............................................................................... 71   4.2.2   Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology ............................................................................ 73   References .................................................................................................................................................. 75  Appendix A: Development of the Balance Control System ........................................................................ 82  vii     A.1   Body Mechanics .......................................................................................................................... 83   A.2   Angle Controller .......................................................................................................................... 86   A.3   Control Action Regulator ............................................................................................................ 87   A.4   State Predictor ............................................................................................................................ 88   A.5   Active Torque Generation Loop ................................................................................................. 89   A.6   Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 92   Appendix B: Supplementary Results .......................................................................................................... 94  Appendix C: RISER Documentation ............................................................................................................ 99  C.1   System Overview ........................................................................................................................ 99   C.2   Software Architecture ................................................................................................................ 99   C.3   Sequence of Operations ........................................................................................................... 100      viii     List of Tables   List of Tables  Table 2.1: Parameters for forceplate data compensation ......................................................................... 23  Table 2.2: Physical data for test subjects ................................................................................................... 25  Table 2.3: Summarized load stiffness results ............................................................................................. 28  Table 3.1: Unblocked group mean data by experimental condition. ......................................................... 58  Table 3.2: Statistical comparisons between experimental conditions ....................................................... 59  Table B.1: Unblocked group mean data by experimental condition .......................................................... 95  Table B.2: Blocked group mean data by experimental condition .............................................................. 95   ix     List of Figures   List of Figures  Figure 1.1: Senses and muscle activation during standing balance ............................................................. 1  Figure 1.2: Ankle plantarflexion ................................................................................................................... 6  Figure 1.3: Balance control modelled as a closed‐loop system ................................................................... 8  Figure 1.4: Decoupling the balance control loop ....................................................................................... 11  Figure 1.5: Various motion platforms used to study balance .................................................................... 13  Figure 1.6: RISER: Robot for Interactive Sensory Engagement and Rehabilitation .................................... 15  Figure 2.1: Control loop for balance simulator .......................................................................................... 19  Figure 2.2: Inverted pendulum system implemented in software ............................................................. 20  Figure 2.3: Relevant geometry, motion, forces, and moments affecting the forceplate .......................... 22  Figure 2.4: Angle measurement using laser distance sensor. .................................................................... 25  Figure 2.5: Raw load stiffness data for two subjects .................................................................................. 27  Figure 2.6: Normalized load stiffness results ............................................................................................. 29  Figure 2.7: Examples of customized physical conditions that can be implemented using RISER .............. 32  Figure 2.8: Representative load stiffness curves before and after RISER modifications ........................... 35  Figure 3.1: Schematic representation of experimental methodology ....................................................... 40  Figure 3.2: Balance control loop overview ................................................................................................. 42  Figure 3.3: Experimental setup for electrical stimulation .......................................................................... 43  Figure 3.4: Block diagram for the torque loop ........................................................................................... 47  Figure 3.5: Example sequence for controlled standing trials ..................................................................... 49  Figure 3.6: Sway and torque data vs. time ................................................................................................. 54  Figure 3.7: Power spectral densities for sway angle and dynamic torque ................................................. 55  Figure 3.8: Dynamic torque vs. time .......................................................................................................... 56  Figure 3.9: Stimulation level vs. time ......................................................................................................... 57  Figure 3.10: Interaction plots for measures with significant interactions ................................................. 60  Figure A.1: Balance control system with five key components .................................................................. 82  Figure A.2: Forward simulation by the state predictor .............................................................................. 89  Figure A.3: Torque loop used to drive muscle stimulation ........................................................................ 90  Figure A.4: Stimulation level and measured ankle torque during open‐loop torque map calibration ...... 91  Figure A.5: Fitted surface representing the open‐loop torque map .......................................................... 92   x     Figure B.1: Sway angle vs. time for all subjects and all conditions ............................................................ 96  Figure B.2: Power spectral density for all subjects and all conditions ....................................................... 97  Figure B.3: Control torque and measured ankle torque vs. time ............................................................... 98  Figure C.1: Hardware setup diagram for RISER motion platform ............................................................ 102  Figure C.2: Software architecture diagram for RISER ............................................................................... 103  Figure C.3: Software architecture diagram for balance simulation state ................................................ 104  Figure C.4: Front panel for RISER driving software on host computer .................................................... 105  Figure C.5: Front panel for RISER driving software on PXI computer ...................................................... 106   xi     Glossary   Glossary  A‐P: Anteroposterior, the anatomical direction for “forward‐backward” sway during upright standing  Afference: The transmission of sensory signals to the CNS   Anthropometric: Relating to a physical measurement of the human body  CN: Continuous, No predictor (a type of control model condition)  CNS:  Central  Nervous  System,  the  human  body’s  “control‐centre”  that  receives  afferent  signals  from  sensory organs and transmits efferent signals to muscles  COM: Centre of Mass location of the human body, referring to the weighted average location of all body  mass components  COP:  Centre  of  Pressure,  the  centroid  of  the  pressure  distribution  of  body  weight  over  the  support  surface; in this thesis COP refers to the point on the forceplate where the standing body weight can be  represented  by  a  single  vertical  force,  rather  than  a  combination  of  a  couple  moment  (due  to  ankle  torque) and a vertical force (acting through the ankles)  CP: Continuous, with Predictor (a type of control model condition)  DOF: Degree(s) of Freedom  Efference: The transmission of motor signals from the CNS to muscles  EMG: Electromyography, a technique for measuring the electrical activity within a muscle  FES: Function Electrical Stimulation, a technique for activating muscles by applying electrical current  Hamming window: A type of window function used in signal processing for segmenting and weighting  time‐series data prior to frequency‐domain analysis  IN: Intermittent, No predictor (a type of control model condition)  IP: Intermittent, with Predictor (a type of control model condition)  LQR: Linear Quadratic Regulator  xii     Load stiffness: The torque versus sway angle relationship during upright human standing  M‐L: Mediolateral, the anatomical direction for “left‐right” sway during upright standing  Passive stiffness: The stiffness of the human ankle joint in the absence of muscle activation (measured  as change in torque per change in angle)  Proprioception:  A  physiological  source  of  sensory  information  about  the  relative  movement  of  body  segments  PSD: Power Spectral Density  SD: Standard Deviation  RISER: Robot for Interactive Sensory Engagement and  Rehabilitation, a 6‐axis robotic  motion platform  developed at UBC for investigations into the control of human balance  RMS: Root Mean Square  ZOH: Zero‐Order Hold, a method for converting between continuous‐ and discrete‐time signals        xiii     Acknowledgements   Acknowledgements  I would like to thank H. F. M. Van der Loos, J.‐S. Blouin, and E. A. Croft for their tireless supervision and  for providing much‐needed perspective throughout the research journey.  My  sincere  gratitude  goes  to  AJung  Moon  for  her  patience  and  grace  throughout  hours  of  informal  statistical  consultation.  I  would  also  like  to  thank  Billy  Luu  for  the  many  insightful  conversations  that  expanded my understanding of human balance physiology, and for his relentless questioning of whether  or not I knew what I was doing; because of which I learned what I was doing.  Many thanks go to all the researchers in the UBC CARIS Lab, who have always been available to bounce  ideas back and forth. In particular, I would like to acknowledge Eric Pospisil for taking up the torch on  development of the RISER platform and for being an all‐around great person.  My heartfelt gratitude goes to my family, who have never ceased to love and support me.  Most of all, I give thanks to the creator of the universe, because of whom there exist all the things in life  worth questioning, studying, and pursuing.     xiv     1  Introduction and Literature Review     Introduction and Literature Review  1.1  Motivation and Overall Objectives   The ability to stand upright is fundamental for most people, yet the underlying means by which humans  balance are not well understood [1]. When standing, the human body is a mechanically unstable system  and, unless muscles provide frequent corrective actions, gravity will cause the body to fall. As shown in  Figure 1.1, humans have multiple senses that provide information about movement, such as sway angle,  to the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS then uses this information to activate muscles in order to  remain  upright.  When  sway  is  small,  the  body  rotates  primarily  about  the  ankles,  and  the  lower  limb  muscles provide most of the corrections needed to maintain standing balance. This thesis investigates  the  control  of  standing  balance.  The  focus  of  this  work  is  on  a  particular  form  of  balance  called  quiet  standing, which occurs when sway is small and no external perturbation is applied to the body.     Figure  1.1:  Senses  and  muscle  activation  during  standing  balance.  The  central  nervous  system  (CNS)  receives  information  about  body  movement  from  three  major  senses:  vision,  vestibular,  and  proprioception.  Muscle  activity, primarily at the calf muscles, acts to keep the body upright. How the CNS uses information about sway movement in order to produce muscle activation is not well understood.     1     In an effort to understand the relationship between muscle activation and sway motion in the forward‐ backward (anteroposterior, A‐P) direction, many control models have been proposed [2]. These models  are differentiated by many factors (e.g., rate of control actions, closed‐loop delay, and feedback gains),  and contrasting models can reproduce different features of standing balance (e.g., range of sway angle  or standard deviation of ankle torque). Balance control is typically modelled as a continuous closed‐loop  system, however measured muscle movements and the inherent oscillatory nature of quiet standing [3]  lead  to the  question:  is quiet standing better modelled as a system with intermittent control actions?  Moreover, time delays within the CNS and the mechanical instability of the body necessitate some form  of anticipatory motor command to maintain balance. This is confirmed by measured muscle movements  and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of muscle activation [4]. Most closed‐loop models of balance  control use velocity feedback of sway angle to generate a motor command with positive phase, however  a  mechanism  that  predicts  future  body  movements  may  be  more  appropriate  [5].  This  leads  to  the  question: are anticipatory motor commands better modelled by feedback of sway angle and velocity or  by a predictive mechanism?  Different  control  models  are  typically  evaluated  purely  by  computer  simulation,  where  model  parameters  are  easily  adjusted,  however  this  approach  has  limitations:  a)  it  removes  an  important  component  of  the  balance  control  loop:  the  dynamics  of  human  muscle  [6],  and  b)  unmeasurable  internal noise needs to be explicitly added to the simulated balance system for it to behave naturally [2].  Furthermore, simulation often fails to capture the full complexity of the physiological balance system;  normal  balance  control  is  affected  by  conditions  such  as  the  available  sensory  information  (e.g.,  eyes  open versus closed), the instructions given to a subject (e.g., to stand “still” versus “at ease”), and the  physical  task  being  performed  (e.g.,  standing  versus  sitting,  the  size  and  stability  of  the  supporting  platform).  An alternative to pure computer simulation is to evaluate standing balance with free‐standing subjects.   Although sensory information and task instruction can be easily modified, the balance physics (i.e., the  mechanical plant) are limited by the mechanics of a subject’s body. That is, subjects balance with their  own height, weight, and inertia. Changing a subject’s balance mechanics requires additional apparatus  (e.g.,  a  backpack  for  increasing  weight  and  a  counter‐balanced  harness  system  for  reducing  weight).  Some potential experiments require complicated apparatus to be designed and implemented for each  physical parameter to be investigated. For example, to investigate how vestibular reflexes respond to an  instantaneous reduction in the body’s inertia, one would need an active mechanism that adds energy to  2     the  body’s  sway  but  does  not  apply  a  sudden  disturbance  (e.g.,  a  jerk  motion)  when  it  initializes.  To  investigate  how  the  CNS  identifies  and  adapts  between  balancing  and  non‐balancing  conditions,  one  would require a system that can smoothly and imperceptibly transition between normal balance physics  and  pre‐recorded  sway  motions.  Developing  such  apparatus  can  be  time‐consuming  and  costly.  Moreover,  methods  for  identifying  the  balance  control  mechanisms  typically  apply  sensory  or  mechanical  disturbances  to  the  subject.  However,  this  can  perturb  the  balance  control  system  and  induce  compensatory  responses  that  do  not  exist  during  quiet  standing  [7].  Prior  to  the  work  in  this  thesis,  no  balance  investigation  tool  existed  for  implementing  different  physical  conditions  quickly,  reliably, and without the need to design or calibrate additional mechanical apparatus.  If  a  subject  could  be  engaged  in  a  balancing  task  with  customizable  balance  mechanics  and  without  disruption  to  the  normal  control  mechanisms,  researchers  would  have  an  additional  tool  to  study  the  control  of  balance.  A  tool  for  customizing  balance  mechanics  in  a  straightforward  and  precise  way,  without the need for additional apparatus, would increase the feasibility of using augmented‐mechanics  for balance experiments and rehabilitation. Moreover, implementing a closed loop system that includes  the complexity of human muscles would provide a novel means for evaluating control models of quiet  standing.   This thesis seeks to answer two questions:  1)   Can  we  engage  humans  in  a  whole‐body  balancing  task  that  is  decoupled  from  the  actual  mechanics of their body?   2)   What  types  of  control  models  are  better  for  describing  the  physiological  control  of  quiet  standing?   Driven by these two research questions, the work in this thesis is divided into two corresponding parts:  The first part of this thesis addresses Question 1 through the development of a robotic motion platform  for  configurable  whole‐body  balance  tasks  (Chapter  2).  The  second  part  of  this  thesis  addresses  Question 2 by:    developing a closed‐loop system that incorporates the robotic motion platform and configurable  control elements to investigate standing balance with muscles activated by electrical stimulation  (Chapter 3), and   3       comparing  the  performance  of  different  types  of  control  models  for  standing  with  muscles  activated by electrical stimulation (Chapter 3).   The work described in this thesis is intended to provide future researchers with advanced tools to study  the  mechanisms  underlying  the  control  of  human  standing  balance.  The  goal  of  this  work  is  to  contribute  to  an  improved  understanding  of  human  balance,  and  ultimately  to  advance  rehabilitation  techniques and technology that improve the quality of life for people with balance impairments.   1.2  Outline of Thesis   This thesis is organized into four chapters and four appendices:  Chapter  1:  Introduction  and  Literature  Review  presents  the  motivation  and  background  for  balance  control research and a review of relevant literature, focusing on the physiology, modelling, and research  technology for balance control.  Chapter  2:  Balance  Platform  System  Design  presents  the  design  and  validation  of  a  novel  robotic  platform  (RISER:  Robot  for  Interactive  Sensory  Engagement  and  Rehabilitation)  used  to  investigate  human standing. The majority of the content of Chapter 2 has been published in [8]. As a self‐contained  work, this chapter includes introductory material related to balance investigation devices and discusses  the results of validation experiments.  Chapter  3:  An  Experimental  Evaluation  of  Human  Balance  Control  Models  presents  a  self‐contained  study that proposes and investigates hypotheses related to two key factors in balance control models:  activation‐type  and  prediction.  This  chapter  describes  the  design  of  a  closed‐loop  balance  control  system  that  incorporates  the  RISER  motion  platform  developed  in  Chapter  2,  describes  controlled  standing experiments that investigate the hypotheses, and concludes with a discussion of experimental  findings.  Chapter 4: Conclusions and Future Work reflects on the contributions of this thesis, recommends future  work, and discusses potential applications in rehabilitation and assistive technology.  Appendix A: Development of the Balance Control System presents the detailed design of the closed‐loop  balance control system used in the experiments described in Chapter 3.   4     Appendix  B:  Supplementary  Results  presents  supplemental  results  from  the  experiments  described  in  Chapter 3.  Appendix C: RISER Documentation provides an overview of the hardware and software architecture for  the  RISER  motion  platform  that  is  described  in  Chapter  2  and  used  in  the  experiments  described  in  Chapter 3.   1.3  Literature Review   This  section  presents  literature  motivating  the  overall  work  in  this  thesis  by  highlighting  three  areas:  balance control physiology (efference, afference, and signal conduction), control modelling, and applied  technology in balance research. Chapters 2 and 3 provide additional background material specific to the  development of the robotic balance platform and the closed‐loop balance control system, respectively.  1.3.1  Efference   The central nervous system (CNS) receives input from multiple senses (afference) and transmits output  to multiple muscles (efference) in order to keep the human body standing. The CNS stimulates muscles  via  electrical  signals  (action  potentials)  that  activate  motor  nerves  and  cause  muscle  contractions.  Repeated  action  potentials  will  produce  sustained  muscle  contraction  and  mechanical  force.  During  quiet standing, the restoring torque that enables balance is primarily actuated by the triceps surae (calf  muscles)—the  gastrocnemius  and  the  soleus.  As  shown  in  Figure  1.2,  these  muscles  are  connected  to  the foot through the Achilles tendon and, via contraction, produce a rotational torque about the ankle  joint in the plantarflexing “toe‐down” direction.   5       Figure  1.2:  Ankle  plantarflexion.  Contraction  of  the  triceps  surae  (calf  muscles)  causes  the  foot  to  plantarflex,  generating torque about the ankle joint.     1.3.2  Afference   Multiple afferent sources (i.e., senses) provide the CNS with information about body movement. Vision,  proprioception, and vestibular systems are commonly regarded as the major sources of information for  maintaining a standing posture [1], [9]. Visual information conveys the body’s position and velocity with  respect to the surrounding space. The vestibular system, located in the inner ear, has two components:  a)  the  semicircular  canals,  which  measure  rotational  acceleration,  and  b)  the  otoliths,  which  measure  linear accelerations and orientation with respect to gravity. Proprioceptive sensors provide information  about motion at the ankle; spindle receptors in the calf muscles can signal muscle length (type II) and  velocity (type Ia), and the Golgi tendon organ (GTO) can provide an indication of muscle force (i.e., ankle  torque).  Additional  sources  of  proprioceptive  information  include  mechanoreceptors  throughout  the  body that can potentially detect movement of any part of the body. In particular, cutaneous receptors in  the feet can indicate ankle torque (indirectly, by responding to pressure) while cutaneous receptors near  joints such as the ankle, hip, or knee can indicate the relative movement of body segments.  1.3.3  Signal Conduction   How the CNS maps between body movement and muscle stimulation is a subject of continued research  interest. The coordinated control seems to involve both simple reflex reactions and complex interactions  via descending inputs from the brain, though not necessarily cognitive input (e.g., vestibular signals via  the lower brain stem). Signal delays are present throughout the CNS as a result of the electromechanical  6     transduction between neurons and higher processors in the brain. Vette et al. describe three pure time  delays  of  relevance  to  the  closed‐loop  control  of  human  standing:  a)  feedback  from  senses  to  CNS  processing  centres  (approximately  40  ms),  b)  motor  command  processing  and  transmission  to  the  muscles  (unknown  duration,  estimated  30‐130  ms),  and  c)  muscle  stimulation  to  the  onset  of  muscle  force  production  (approximately  10  ms)[10].  This  puts  the  pure  closed  loop  time  delay  somewhere  between 80 and 180 ms. Kiemel et al. report a pure closed loop delay of 128 ms based on model fitting  to experimental data [11]. In addition to pure time delays, the balance control loop includes frequency‐ dependent  phase  delay  due  to  the  ankle  torque  generation  process.  Masani  et  al.  described  the  dynamics  of  torque  generation  as  a  low‐pass  filter  and  showed  that  the  induced  phase  delay  corresponds to an effective time delay between 200 and 380 ms [6].  1.3.4  Control Modelling   The complete balance control system can be modelled as a closed loop, as shown in Figure 1.3. A motor  command  is  sent  from  the  CNS  (balance  controller)  to  the  muscles,  which  are  typically  modelled  by  a  second‐order,  low‐pass  filter  with  critical  damping  [6],  [12].  The  biomechanics  of  quiet  standing  are  frequently  modelled  as  an  inverted  pendulum  [13].  As  the  body  sways  forward  and  backward  (A‐P  movement in the sagittal plane), the body’s centre of mass (COM) rotates at a fixed distance about the  ankle joints.   7       Figure  1.3:  Balance  control  modelled as  a  closed‐loop  system (adapted  from  [14]).  The  balance  controller is  a  model for the CNS, the main control centre that receives information regarding body movement from various sensors  and  generates  motor  commands  to  muscles  that  move  the  body.  The  state,  x,  is  a  vector  containing movement information for multiple body segments, depending on the complexity of the biomechanical model used. For an inverted pendulum, the state vector typically contains the angle and angular velocity of the body rotating about the ankles.     Most models do not include the dynamics of sensory feedback, instead they assume that the body has a  well‐tuned  method  for  receiving  and  interpreting  raw  feedback  signals;  therefore  modelling  of  the  sensor dynamics is commonly incorporated into the overall CNS balance controller [2]. When the body is  modelled  as  an  inverted  pendulum,  the  control  portion  is  most  often  modelled  as  an  error  controller  with feedback gains applied to the angle and velocity of the body’s COM. In this approach, the balance  controller  is  modelled  as  a  proportional‐derivative  (PD)  or  proportional‐integral‐derivative  (PID)  controller [1], [2].  The body slowly sways (oscillates) at about 0.16 Hz during quiet standing [15]. A common assumption is  that internal noise exists within the closed‐loop system (e.g., conflicting information from various senses  and intrinsic  perturbations due to body functions such as breathing) and produces sway  in the  body’s  movement. Kuo showed that fine‐tuned noise parameters can describe sway covariance during altered  sensory conditions [14]. Bottaro et al., however, believe that sway fluctuations during quiet standing are  more  likely  the  result  of  an  intermittent  stabilization  process  that  produces  bounded  stability  rather  than asymptotic stability [16]. This hypothesis is backed by evidence from Loram et al., who have shown  that:  a)  intermittent  activation  is  a  strategy  naturally  employed  by  the  human  body  for  non‐standing  tasks [17], [18], b) it explains how ankle stiffness is, on average, below the value necessary to prevent  falling due to gravity [19], and c) ultrasound imaging confirms that calf muscles are adjusted by ballistic   8     impulses  that  not  only  stabilize  upright  standing,  but  may  induce  the  majority  of  sway  motion  [3].  Although  Loram  et  al.  report  a  single  average  rate  for  muscle  adjustments  [3],  Bottaro  et  al.  propose  that intermittent activation is more closely modelled by a limited‐resolution mechanism that produces  stabilizing  actions  only  when  sway  movement  exceeds  detectable  thresholds  [20].  The  concept  of  limited‐resolution is consistent with the fact that sensory feedback has perceptibility thresholds [21].   Counter  to  the  intermittent  activation  hypothesis,  van  der  Kooij  and  de  Vlugt  provided  evidence  that  postural  feedback  responses  are  best  modelled  by  continuous  mechanisms  [22].  In  their  study,  they  simulated  various  types  of  intermittent  controllers  during  perturbed  standing  but  ruled  out  fixed‐rate  intermittent processes because, relative to a continuous process with noise, they do not account as well  for  the  observed  frequency  content  of  postural  responses.  However,  they  also  showed  that  for  small  perturbations,  intermittent  activation  driven  by  sway  thresholds  did  match  well  to  experimentally  determined frequency content. Their results indicate that when perturbations are low (i.e., approaching  quiet  standing),  both  continuous  activation  and  threshold‐driven  intermittent  activation  are  physiologically valid.  As described by Loram et al., intermittent muscle control is closely linked to the concept of anticipation  of  COM  movement  [3],  [5].  Because  the  balance  system  includes  time  delays  and  the  mechanics  are  inherently  unstable,  some  form  of  “anticipatory”  control  needs  to  occur.  Gatev  and  others  have  physiologically  confirmed  this  by  showing  that  EMG  signals  tend  to  precede  sway  motions  [23].  Furthermore, it was demonstrated by Loram et al. that calf muscle movement is paradoxical; corrective  motions tend to precede sway angle, such that muscles move on‐average in  the opposite  direction of  sway  [4].  This  result  rules  out  a  basic  stretch  reflex  as  the  primary  source  of  muscle  activation,  and  verifies that some form of anticipation is required. The nature of an anticipatory mechanism is not clear,  and two main theories exist: that control is driven by velocity feedback or an internal‐model predictor.  Masani and  others have  shown that velocity feedback indeed allows for a preceding motor command  during standing due to the phase advance of a controller with derivative gain [24]. However, Gawthrop  et  al.  believe  that  prediction  within  the  CNS  offers  a  better  explanation  [5].  In  their  experiments,  subjects  used  a  joystick  to  balance  an  inverted  pendulum  by  hand.  By  fitting  non‐predictive  and  predictive  models  to  physiological  impulse  response  data,  they  found  that  non‐predictive  models  generate  unfeasibly  low  estimates  for  the  pure  time  delay  in  the  system.  In  order  to  implement  prediction,  the  CNS  would  require  an  internal  model  of  the  system  and  knowledge  of  recent  motor  commands  to  forward‐estimate  the  movement  state  of  the  body.  Such  a  predictor  has  been  used  in  9     various  literature  for  balance  control  modelling  [25],  [26]  and  overcomes  the  limitation  of  the  Smith  predictor,  which  is  commonly  used  in  engineering  control  systems  but  is  unfeasible  for  an  unstable  mechanical system like the human body [5].  1.3.5  Investigative Techniques   Van  der  Kooij  et  al.  provide  a  thorough  overview  of  the  many  different  methods  employed  by  researchers  to  study  the  control  of  quiet  and  perturbed  standing  [2].  In  their  review,  they  compare  methods  using  a  generalized  model  for  balance  control  about  the  ankles  in  the  sagittal  plane.  They  confirm that the balance system needs to be studied in a closed‐loop state, and that failure to consider  that  the  relationship  between  signals  (e.g.,  sway  angle  and  torque)  is  dependent  on  the  closed‐loop  dynamics leads to inaccurate system identification. They consider only the continuous control condition,  suggesting  that  intermittent  activation  is  possible,  but  attributing  movement  during  quiet  standing  entirely to unmeasurable internal noise. Theoretically, the system identification techniques discussed in  their paper should be able to identify both pure and phasic time delays, but not distinguish between a  small, pure time delay and one that has been reduced by prediction. Consequently, they do not consider  the possibility of prediction as a compensatory mechanism for system delays.   Centre‐of‐mass  location  ( centre‐of‐pressure  location  (  ,  measured  as  COM  angle  or  projected  position  on  a  support  surface),  ),  ankle  torque,  and  electromyographic  (EMG)  signals  are  typical   measures  for  human  standing,  and  analysis  is  separated  into  two  categories:  system  identification  techniques (input‐output relationships between components in response to external perturbation) and  descriptive measures (viewing the system as a “black box” that encapsulates unknown internal noise). In  all cases of system identification, external disturbances (e.g., moving base of support, force applied to  body,  or  noise  applied  to  sensory  feedback)  with  a  particular  frequency  content  are  applied  to  the  closed‐loop  system  at  one  point,  and  output  is  measured  at  another  point,  and  the  transfer  function  (which  contains  gain  and  phase  at  various  frequencies,  also  called  the  “sensitivity  function”)  between  input and output is estimated from the power spectral densities of input and output data. For recreating  the  natural  mechanisms  of  quiet  standing,  only  the  unknown  internal  noise  and  disturbances  are  considered,  therefore  measures  such  as  frequency  content  (power  spectral  density)  are  suitable  for  describing the closed‐loop control of quiet standing.  Fitzpatrick  et  al.  assert  that  methods  that  introduce  sensory  or  mechanical  disturbances  risk  evoking  large compensatory mechanisms to prevent falling, and that balance control in this perturbed state may  10     not  reflect  the  normal  balance‐keeping  processes  of  the  CNS  during  quiet  standing  [7].  To  study  unperturbed balance control, they decoupled balance control mechanisms and normal body mechanics  by  having  a  subject  stabilize  an  inverted  pendulum  with  mass  and  COM  height  that  matched  the  subject’s own body. The apparatus coupled the inverted pendulum to a subject’s feet, so that subjects  stabilized the body‐like load of the pendulum by adjusting ankle torque while the upper body remained  motionless. Fitzpatrick et al. used this system to study balance control when body motions that affect  the vestibular system are removed [9], [21]. Their experiments show that a system that decouples the  normal  sensory  inputs  and  motor  outputs  during  normal  standing  can  provide  key  insight  into  the  unperturbed control of balance. Figure 1.4 shows a representation of decoupling between the control  mechanisms and mechanics of standing balance.     Figure  1.4:  Decoupling  the  balance  control  loop.  The  vertical  dotted  line  represents  the  potential  decoupling between  the  body’s  natural  mechanisms  of  balance  control  and  the  mechanics  of  body  movement.  This  decoupling  can  be  achieved  by  using  a  system  that  replaces  the  relationship  between  ankle  torque  and  body  sway,  thereby  replacing  the  balance  mechanics  (right‐side  of  the  diagram),  while  leaving  the  body’s  natural  control mechanisms intact (left‐side of the diagram).     1.3.6  FES in Balance Research   Functional  electrical  stimulation  (FES)  makes  it  possible  to  artificially  activate  muscles,  permitting  inclusion of muscle dynamics in a software‐driven control loop. FES has been used by many researchers  to achieve desired force or motion trajectories [27], [28] and to maintain balance [29–31]. FES balance  control  is  typically  motivated  by  the  goal  of  achieving  long  periods  of  standing  for  persons  with  11     paraplegia or balance impairments [29], [30], [32]. However, FES can also be used to better understand  the  control  of  balance  itself  by  implementing  naturally  identified  control  models  and  including  the  destabilizing  dynamics  of  the  true  physiological  system  [10].  Masani  et  al.  identified  the  dynamics  of  neuromuscular  torque  generation  as  the  major  source  of  instability  during  quiet  standing  [6],  making  muscle  dynamics  an  essential  component  in  control  model  testing.  Intermittent  control  models  are  noticeably absent from implementations of FES balance control. Direct comparisons between different  control models have been limited to assessing their performance in numerical simulations. For example,  van  der  Kooij  et  al.  [22]  simulated  a  variety  of  balance  control  models  (including  continuous  and  intermittent types) and compared their ability to reproduce frequency patterns measured for perturbed  human standing (as described in Section 1.3.4 above).   1.3.7  Applied Balance Technology   It is of research interest to have a method for engaging human subjects in a balancing task that engages  the normal neural pathways of standing balance while allowing an experimenter to modify the physics  of  the  task  without  an  explicit  perturbation  [7].  This  would  provide  researchers  with  an  additional  method for understanding the control mechanisms underlying standing balance. Prior to the work in this  thesis,  a  platform  for  systematically  decoupling  the  physics  of  balance  from  a  subject’s  body  (as  represented in Figure 1.4) and enabling customizable balance tasks did not exist.   Motion  devices  developed  to  study  human  balance  have  often  had  a  rehabilitation  focus,  allowing  researchers  to  experiment  with  new  methods  of  therapy  for  clinical  populations  such  as  stroke  survivors. This section discusses several devices used to study balance. These devices all enable subjects  with full or limited motor function to balance in a safe environment with various constraints or assistive  features. Figure 1.5 shows three different motion platforms developed for balance research.  The Wobbler (Figure 1.5, left), developed by Donaldson et al., braces subjects above the ankle, enabling  closed‐loop  balance  control  by  electrical  stimulation  of  the  plantarflexors  [33].  The  Wobbler  has  been  used  for  a  number  of  studies  into  ankle‐driven  standing  using  FES,  with  the  goal  of  enabling  unsupported standing for paraplegic subjects and other people with balance impairments. The Wobbler  constrains the body to move about the ankles and provides a method for rotating the base of support,  however it does not provide any method for modifying the physics of balance.  Multi‐axis  platforms  such  as  the  CAREN  system  [34](Figure  1.5,  centre),  enable  balance  and  gait  investigations  by  moving  the  support  surface  and  modifying  visual  information.  As  discussed  by  12     Fitzpatrick  et  al.  [7],  perturbing  the  balance  system  with  mechanical  motions  may  engage  different  neural  pathways  and  compensatory  responses  than  those  present  during  quiet  standing,  limiting  the  usefulness  of  such  platforms  for  investigating  the  control  of  quiet  standing.  These  platforms  have  the  ability to immerse users in a virtual reality environment that may facilitate the assessment and training  of balance and gait, however such work is outside the scope of this thesis.  The  multipurpose  rehabilitation  frame  (MRF,  Figure  1.5,  right),  developed  by  Matjačić  et  al.,  enables  sway  motion  in  the  forward‐backward  (anteroposterior,  A‐P)  and  left‐right  (mediolateral,  M‐L)  directions,  with  motors  on  both  axes  [35].  The  motors  can  be  driven  to  assist  like  springs  or  provide  disturbing torque impulses. The purpose of the MRF is to provide support during balance and facilitate  different  balance  strategies.  In  theory,  the  MRF  could  be  adapted  to  modify  balance  mechanics,  however certain full body motions are not possible (e.g., enabling rotation about a point other than the  ankles) and no method for reprogramming the balance physics is reported.   Figure  1.5:  Various  motion  platforms  used  to  study  balance.  From  left  to right:  Wobbler3,  CAREN4,  and  the  multipurpose rehabilitation frame (MRF)5.                                                                  3   Image  reproduced,  with  permission,  from:  Hunt,  K.  J.,  Munih,  M.,  &  Donaldson,  N.,  Feedback  control  of  unsupported standing in paraplegia. I. Optimal control approach, IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering,  December 1997.  4  Image reproduced, with permission, from: Makssoud, H. E., Richards, C. L., & Comeau, F., Dynamic control of a  moving platform using the CAREN system to optimize walking in virtual reality environments, Annual International  Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, September 2009.   13     The RISER motion platform [8], [36] (shown in Figure 1.6 and described in Chapter 2 of this thesis) allows  researchers  to  study  human  balance  under  a  wide  range  of  experimental  conditions  and  provides  capabilities beyond those of previously‐developed balance investigation devices. Built upon a 6‐degree‐ of‐freedom  (6‐DOF)  motion  base,  the  RISER  platform  engages  a  user  in  a  balance  task  in  which  the  mechanical  relationship  between  ankle  torque  and  sway  angle  is  defined  by  a  programmable  physical  system. The physics are modifiable, allowing researchers to change balance physics in subtle or drastic  ways.  The  platform  keeps  subjects  safe  while  engaged  in  balance  tasks,  with  programmable  motion  limits and up to 6‐DOF movement. RISER applies no external perturbation to subjects, but provides the  option  for  doing  so  in  a  precise,  programmable  way  (using  the  LabVIEWTM  graphical  programming  environment). Input from  the subject is received via two 6‐axis forceplates beneath  the feet,  typically  measuring ankle torque. Additional input channels can be incorporated, e.g., using force from a subject’s  finger in order to explore the effects of using non‐archetypal muscles for balance. Typically, motions are  actively  driven  by  a  subject’s  ankle  torque,  however  the  system  enables  playback  of  predefined  trajectories, and even smooth switching between active control and trajectory playback. In the future,  the  system  will  also  facilitate  changes  to  three  main  sensory  inputs:  ankle  proprioception,  vision,  and  the vestibular system.   1.4  Summary   This  thesis  considers  the  control  of  human  standing  balance.  The  development  of  the  RISER  motion  platform is motivated by the desire to better understand the control of quiet standing through the use  of  non‐perturbing  investigation  techniques,  filling  the  gap  left  by  current  balance  investigation  technology. Moreover, the work also aims to extend research of closed‐loop balance control models by  developing and utilizing a configurable system for evaluating factors of activation‐type and prediction,  which  have  not  been  systematically  investigated  for  closed‐loop  control  that  incorporates  human  muscle  physiology.  This  work  will  provide  the  tools  and  methods  for  novel  investigations  into  balance  control, and further understanding toward appropriate models for the control of quiet standing.                                                                                                                                                                                                    5   Image  reproduced,  with  permission,  from:  Matjacić,  Z.,  &  Bajd,  T.,  Arm‐free  paraplegic  standing‐‐Part  II:  Experimental results, IEEE transactions on rehabilitation engineering, June 1998.   14       © 2010 IEEE  Figure  1.6:  RISER:  Robot  for  Interactive  Sensory  Engagement  and  Rehabilitation,  developed  for  advanced  investigation into the control of human balance.6                                                                      6   Image reproduced, with permission, from T. P. Huryn, B. L. Luu, H. F. M. Van der Loos, J.‐S. Blouin, and E. A. Croft,  Investigating Human Balance Using a Robotic Motion Platform, 2010 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and  Automation, May 2010.   15     2     Balance Platform System Design  Balance Platform System Design7  This chapter describes a robotic motion platform developed to address the first research question of this  thesis:  Can  we  engage  humans  in  a  whole‐body  balancing  task  that  is  decoupled  from  the  actual  mechanics  of  their  body?  Specifically,  this  chapter  describes  the  system  design  and  validation  for  the  robotic  motion  platform  named  RISER  (Robot  for  Interactive  Sensory  Engagement  and  Rehabilitation).  As described in Chapter 1, this platform provides a novel method for studying human balance control; it  recreates the physics of balance via a programmable virtual model, enabling subjects to engage in a safe  and customizable balancing task.  This  platform serves as the physics component of a balance  control  system  used  in  Chapter  3:  Experimental  Evaluation  of  Human  Balance  Control  Models.  Moreover,  the  work in this chapter establishes a software environment for reconfigurable real‐time control (described  in Appendix C). This directly enables the development of the balance control system components that  are presented in Chapter 3 and described in detail in Appendix A.  Videos of the RISER platform in operation can be viewed online at:   http://www.youtube.com/user/CarisLab (search keywords: MOOG, RISER)                                                                     7   The majority of the content of Chapter 2 has been published in [8]:   © 2010 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from T. P. Huryn, B. L. Luu, H. F. M. Van der Loos, J.‐S. Blouin, and E. A.  Croft,  Investigating  Human  Balance  Using  a  Robotic  Motion  Platform,  2010  IEEE  International  Conference  on  Robotics and Automation, May 2010.   16     2.1  Introduction   The  human  body  integrates  sensory  information  from  the  vestibular  (located  in  the  inner  ear),  visual,  and  somatosensory  (skin,  muscle,  and  joint  receptors)  systems  to  maintain  upright  balance.  Although  normal balancing requires minimal voluntary effort by a healthy adult, this motor behaviour may pose  significant challenges for elderly populations [37] or persons suffering from neuromuscular impairments,  including incomplete spinal cord injury, stroke, or Parkinson’s disease. Deficient balancing behaviour can  limit a person’s ability to stand upright as well as perform more complex tasks such as walking.  In spite of its ubiquitous nature, the method by which the human body integrates sensory information  to produce an appropriate motor command for balance is not well understood, despite recent scientific  advances [38], [39]. Related physiology studies that aim to better understand sensori‐motor integration  during balance control [40] have led to further attempts to characterize the control behaviour of people  with  balancing  deficits,  e.g.,  [10].  Clinicians  and  rehabilitation  engineers  can  utilize  such  models  to  develop methods for assessment and retraining of standing balance.  Traditionally, there have been two key methods of investigating human balance control: i) by measuring  changes  in  system  behaviour  due  to  a  controlled  change  in  sensory  feedback  (e.g.,  with  or  without  vision), and ii) by measuring compensatory reflex response to an applied perturbation [39], [41]. Both  methods have several limitations. In the first case, adjustment of sensory inputs causes a change in the  statistical properties of the task itself by changing a subject’s perception of how the task operates. This  has  been  shown  to  cause  adaptation  in  sensorimotor  control  systems  [41],  [42],  indicating  a  reorganization of the fundamental control scheme used to perform the task. In the second case, large or  sudden perturbations of the balance system (e.g., a sudden push, or an auditory beep) may introduce  large compensatory mechanisms that are not necessarily active during normal standing [7].  If a subject could perform a balance simulation task that engages the same neural pathways as during  natural  standing,  one  could  better  investigate  the  processes  involved  in  normal  balance.  This  chapter  presents the system design for a novel robotic platform that simulates a natural standing task. The aim  of this work is to develop a motion platform capable of adjusting balancing dynamics in order to avoid  the confounding effects caused by a change in the statistical task environment [7], [9], [43]. The robotic  motion  platform  (RISER:  Robot  for  Interactive  Sensory  Engagement  and  Rehabilitation)  is  intended  to  provide  full  control  over  dynamic  balancing  parameters,  enabling  investigations  into  sensorimotor  integration under a variety of sensory inputs and balancing parameter configurations. The first goal of  17     this  project  is  to  create  a  robotic  platform  that  can  mimic  natural  standing  for  any  subject.  This  is  achieved by matching the relationship between ankle torque and standing angle (i.e., the load stiffness  curve) for a subject [7], [17].  The  robotic  motion  platform  is  also  developed  for  rehabilitative  applications.  Current  rehabilitative  therapy  often  focuses  on  activating  and  strengthening  the  muscles  involved  in  balance  control.  However, this style of treatment may fail to engage core neural processes that drive muscle behaviour.  This  is  particularly  relevant  to  balance  behaviour,  which  requires  less  cortical  drive  compared  to  voluntary activation of the same muscles [44]. Hence, traditional rehabilitation may be inadequate for  relearning  or  improving  balance  control.  The  Lokomat®  by  Hocoma  AG  (Zurich,  Switzerland)  is  an  example  of  a  robotic  assistive  device  that  improves  locomotion  training  for  patients  with  spinal  cord  injuries  by  mimicking  normal  gait.  Standing  and  walking,  however,  involve  fundamentally  different  neural processes, and at present there is no equivalent device that assists human balance training. One  robotic  balance  device  presented  by  Takahashi  et  al.  [45]  detects  a  subject’s  body  position  and  automatically restores posture. However, this device does not require subjects to actively control their  balance. In contrast, the robotic balance simulator presented herein can engage users in a customizable  balancing task to facilitate proper motor learning.  Section 2.2 presents the balance simulation control loop, which includes the inverted pendulum model  used to replicate human balance physics. Section 2.3 describes the mechanical, electronic, and software  components used to implement such a system. Section 2.4 details the experiments used to verify system  capability,  and  present  and  discuss  the  results.  Sections  2.5  and  2.6  conclude  with  a  discussion  of  the  future  work  related  to  the  balance  simulator  and  a  review  of  the  advantages  offered  over  previous  balance investigation devices.   2.2  Balance System Model   The robotic motion platform is designed to replicate the physical sensation of human balance in the A‐P  pitch (forward‐backward) direction. Prior work has shown that the balancing physics of human standing  are closely modelled as an inverted pendulum [7], [17], [46]. An inverted pendulum (see Figure 2.1b) is  an  unstable  mechanical  system  in  which  a  near‐vertical  rod  (assumed  to  have  zero  mass)  has  a  rotational pin joint at its bottom end and a large mass at its top. A balancing task is simulated by having  test  subjects  experience  inverted  pendulum‐like  dynamics  and  attempt  to  balance  the  system  by  modulating their ankle torque.  18       © 2010 IEEE  Figure 2.1: Control loop for balance simulator (clockwise from top): a) forceplate measures ankle torque applied by  subject;  b)  a  computer  calculates  motion  and  position  of  an  inverted  pendulum  with  the  same  torque applied;  c)  the  motion  platform  moves  in  pitch  direction  to  match  the  position  of  the  inverted  pendulum; control loop repeats as subject moves with platform and adjusts ankle torque.     As  shown  in  Figure  1.6,  a  subject  stands  on  top  of  a  motion  platform  and  is  securely  fastened  to  an  adjustable backplate rigidly mounted on the platform. A forceplate beneath the subject’s feet measures  the torque applied by both ankles. The ankle torque information is sent to a computer that interprets  the  torque  information  as  if  it  were  applied  to  an  inverted  pendulum.  The  computer  calculates  the  rotational  motion  of  such  a  system,  and  commands  the  motion  platform  to  move  in  response  to  this  torque.  The  subject  experiences  the  motion  of  the  platform  and  reacts  by  adjusting  ankle  torque  in  order  to  restore  the  system  to  unstable  equilibrium.  Figure  2.1  schematically  shows  the  complete  control loop.  Figure  2.2  shows  a  block  diagram  representation  of  the  inverted  pendulum  model  implemented  in  software.     19       © 2010 IEEE  Figure 2.2: Inverted pendulum system implemented in software.    Parameters   and   are the mass and length, respectively, of the desired pendulum model, and   is the  gravitational  constant 9.81 m/s2. For the experiments performed,   and    are the subject’s  mass and  distance from ankle to hip (approximate centre of mass).    ∗   is the mass moment of inertia,   where   is the radius of gyration. For an inverted pendulum, the radius of gyration is equal to the centre  of mass length (i.e.,   ). For the purposes of this work, this equivalence is assumed to hold true for   the human  body. This is a common assumption within human balance studies [7], [9], [39], [41], [43],  [46], [47], however further investigation is required to determine the true relationship between   and    for the human body.  ankles.    is the externally applied torque, equal to the torque applied by a subject’s    is the moment applied due to gravity. As shown in Figure 2.2, the acceleration of the   inverted pendulum is calculated as           (2.1)      and angular position ( ) is derived by integrating twice. The rotation axis is programmatically set to pass  through the subject’s ankles. Pitch angle is constrained to stay safely within configurable limits.   2.3  System Setup and Design   2.3.1  Mechanical Equipment and Instrumentation   The robotic motion platform is composed of a 6‐axis motion platform, forceplate, and multiple driving  computers. A laser analog sensor is used to measure pitch angle during experiments.  A  6‐axis  motion  base  (6DOF2000E,  MOOG,  East  Aurora,  NY,  USA)  capable  of  500  deg/s2  acceleration  actuates  rotational  motion  in  the  A‐P  pitch  direction.  The  motion  base  uses  6  ball‐screw  belt‐driven   20     linear actuators with an onboard computer and position control loop. The motion platform has a rigid  back  support  that  can  be  adjusted  to  rest  against  all  subjects  in  their  normal  standing  posture  (see  Figure 1.6).   All real‐time computations, data acquisition, and communication with the motion base are performed  by a PXI‐8196 embedded controller and PXI‐6289 DAQ board, with BNC‐2090A connector block and PXI‐ 1031 chassis (hardware from National Instruments, Austin, TX). Data communication occurs over a 100  Mbit/s  dedicated  network  connected  to  the  motion  base,  PXI  terminal,  and  an  additional  host  PC  terminal.  Reaction  forces  and  moments  beneath  a  subject’s  feet  are  recorded  using  an  OR6‐7‐1000  6‐axis  forceplate  with  MSA‐6  amplifier  unit  (hardware  from  AMTI,  Watertown,  MA,  USA).  An  analog  laser  distance  sensor  (LM100,  A‐Tech,  Toronto,  ON,  Canada;  70  µm  resolution)  measures  balancing  angle.  2.3.2  Software Driver and Data Compensation   The  driver  software  manages  data  acquisition,  computation  of  balancing  task  physics,  and  60  Hz  data  communication  with  the  motion  base.  Software  is  written  in  the  LabVIEW  8.5  graphical  programming  environment (National Instruments, Austin, TX).  2.3.2.1 Forceplate Data Compensation  The forceplate measures forces and torques applied by a test subject’s feet. Since the forceplate is fixed  to the motion platform it is also affected by platform acceleration and displacement. Figure 2.3 shows  the relevant geometry, motion, forces, and moments affecting forceplate measurements. The moment  applied at the ankle is computed from an analysis of forceplate mechanics.    21       © 2010 IEEE  Figure 2.3: Relevant geometry, motion, forces, and moments affecting the forceplate.     With  the  effective  zero  moment  point  (ZMP)  of  the  forceplate  located  below  the  top  surface  of  the  plate,  forces  acting  in  the  surge  direction  (see  Figure  2.1c  and  Figure  2.3)  generate  a  measurable  moment in the pitch direction. Surge forces occur due to three different effects:  1. a subject’s feet applying shear stress forward or backward,  2. a component of gravity pulling on the upper forceplate at non‐zero pitch angles, and  3. a reaction force due to linear acceleration of the upper forceplate mass.  Equation (2.2) relates these components to the measured force in the surge direction.           (2.2)     Each of the surge force components acts at a particular distance from the ZMP, generating a moment in  the pitch direction. In addition to the surge force effects, the measured pitch moment is also a function  of:  1. the moment applied by a subject’s feet, and  2. the reaction moment due to rotational acceleration of the upper forceplate mass.  22     These forces and moments are related according to (2.3):   ∗       ∗     (2.3)     By  commanding  the  motion  platform  along  sine  wave  trajectories  in  the  pitch  axis,  with  different  subjects fastened in place, the moment applied by a subject’s feet was observed to be a function of both  the pure ankle torque and a gravity moment due to approximately 2% of the subject’s weight applied to  the forceplate. There was no measurable effect due to the subject’s rotational inertia (i.e., the backplate  and straps bore all the reaction moment due to the subject’s inertia). Therefore, the moment applied by  the feet on the forceplate was estimated as:   0.02       sin     (2.4)     The distance of the ZMP below the top surface of the forceplate,  , is a calibrated value provided by  the  manufacturer.  The  mass  of  the  upper  forceplate,   ,  was  measured  by  zeroing  the  forceplate,   holding  it  upside  down,  and  dividing  the  measured  vertical  force  by 2 .  The  distance,   ,  from  the   centre of mass of the upper forceplate to the ZMP was measured by moving the motion platform (with  unloaded forceplate on top) to various static pitch angles and measuring the generated pitch moment.  Values for the forceplate parameters are reported in Table 2.1. Linear acceleration of the forceplate was  computed as:   ∗          (2.5)     The  distance,   ,  from  the  centre  of  rotation  to  the  centre  of  mass  of  the  upper  forceplate  is  a   function of the subject’s measured ankle height (as shown in Table 2.2).  Table 2.1: Parameters for forceplate data compensation  mfp Ifp z0     dZCM  = = = =  15.1 kg 0.23 kg·m2 0.043 m 0.030 m     23     Combining (2.2) through (2.5) leads to the implicit solution for    that is applied to the pendulum   model  as  shown  in  Figure  2.2.  For  trials  where  the  motion  platform  and  forceplate  remain  in  a  fixed  horizontal position (relative to ground), all acceleration and angle terms are zero, and (2.3) simplifies to   ∗            (2.6)     2.3.2.2 Data Flow & System Delay  Forceplate data are acquired at 2 kHz and filtered using a second‐order, low‐pass Butterworth filter with  5  Hz  cutoff.  The  data  are  down‐sampled,  via  averaging,  to  match  the  control  rate  determined  by  the  motion  platform  (nominally  60  Hz).  The  delay  between  position  command  and  position  feedback  (for  motion  within  actuator  velocity  and  acceleration  limits)  was  measured  by  cross‐correlation  to  be  7  sample periods, or 117 ms. The delay term shown in Figure 2.2 causes a software computational delay  of one sample period, or 17 ms. The delay due to forceplate input filtering was measured to be 3 sample  periods, or 50 ms. Summing all components, the aggregate delay of the balance control loop was found  to be 183 ms. A description of the software architecture for controlling the RISER balance simulation is  provided in Appendix C.   2.4  Experiments   Experiments  were  performed  to  assess  the  ability  of  the  RISER  motion  platform  to  replicate  load  stiffness curves for natural standing.  2.4.1  Methodology   Six healthy male subjects participated in this study. Measured physical data are presented in Table 2.2.  Each subject’s centre of mass (COM) was approximated to be located at the anterior superior iliac spine.  All  subjects  were  barefoot  during  the  experiment.  Pitch  angle  was  measured  using  a  laser  distance  sensor  (see  Figure  2.4),  sampled  at  60  Hz  to  match  the  control  rate  of  the  platform,  and  computed  according to (2.7):      tan     (2.7)  24           During  experiments,  a  laser‐reflective  white  surface  was  fixed  below  the  subject’s  kneecap  using  an  elastic strap, and the laser was positioned approximately 7 cm horizontally away from the surface. The  distances    and    were measured using an L‐square ruler with approximately 1 mm accuracy.     © 2010 IEEE  Figure 2.4: Angle measurement using laser distance sensor.    Table 2.2: Physical data for test subjects  © 2010 IEEE  Subject  ID   Length       Age   Mass [kg]   Ankle‐  dRCM [m]   COM [m]   A   27  59.98  0.815  0.078   B   24  76.94  0.940  0.098   C   32  77.25  0.905  0.083   D   24  82.09  0.920  0.093   E   24  72.70  1.000  0.093   F   23  71.77  0.905  0.088         25     2.4.1.1 Load Stiffness during Natural Balancing  Subjects were instructed to stand still in a normal, relaxed position with the motion platform stationary  and  the  backplate  moved  out  of  contact  with  their  body.  The  forceplate  was  zeroed  with  the  subject  standing  in  this  relaxed  position.  The  angle  measured  at  this  time  was  used  as  the  zero‐reference  position.  Subjects  were  then  instructed  to  sway  forward  and  backward  within  a  comfortable,  self‐ determined range without lifting toes or heels from the forceplate. The torque versus angle relationship  (i.e., load stiffness of the human body) was recorded over 5 full periods of sway.  2.4.1.2 Load Stiffness during Balance Simulation  The subject was securely fastened to the backplate using a seatbelt‐type strap placed around the chest  and  waist  (Figure  1.6).  Subjects  were  instructed  to  keep  their  feet  planted  in  the  same  location  immediately  following  the  natural  balance  experiment.  In  this  experiment,  load  stiffness  was  determined with the balance simulator engaged and the subject actively controlling the position of the  motion platform as described in Section 2.2.  Prior to measuring load stiffness, subjects were given up to 15 minutes to familiarize themselves with  balancing on the simulator. Subjects were instructed to balance normally with no data being recorded,  until they were comfortable with the task and able to balance the motion platform without hitting angle  limits (6° anterior, 3° posterior, from vertical) for at least 30 seconds.  Load stiffness was determined from the torque versus angle relationship recorded as subjects balanced  on  the  simulator.  Subjects  were  instructed  to  rotate  the  motion  platform  forward  and  backward  in  a  slow controlled manner for 5 full periods of (pitch) rotation.  2.4.2  Load Stiffness Results   Raw  data  for  the  best‐  and  worst‐  matched  load  stiffness  are  presented  in  Figure  2.5.  The  best‐  and  worst‐  matched  load  stiffness  plots  correspond  to  the  lowest  and  highest  percent‐difference,  respectively,  between  the  load  stiffness  slopes  generated  during  natural  balance  and  balance  simulation. Subjects A and F exhibited load stiffnesses that were, respectively, 1.3 Nm/deg (14.9%) and  4.0  Nm/deg  (35.4%)  stiffer  during  the  balance  simulation  than  during  natural  balance.  Both  subjects  showed greater variability during the balance simulation; the average R2 value was 0.98 (SD 0.0082) for  natural balance but only 0.76 (SD 0.082) during balance simulation. Table 2.3 summarizes the raw load  stiffness  results  obtained  for  all  subjects.  As  described  in  the  previous  section,  the  zero  angle  26     corresponds to the relaxed standing angle of each subject. Torque values plotted in Figure 2.5 are the  negative of    (Figure 2.2), such that load stiffness values presented in Table 2.3 and Figure 2.6 are   positive.  Across subjects, the normalized mean load stiffness was 12.9 ± 0.4 Nm/deg for natural balance and 15.4  ± 1.1 Nm/deg for the balance simulation condition (Figure 2.6), a difference of 2.6 ± 1.2 Nm/deg (20.1 ±  9.7%).        © 2010 IEEE  Figure 2.5: Raw load stiffness data for two subjects (A and F). Load stiffness during natural balance is shown in  black and during balance simulation is shown in grey.        27     Table 2.3: Summarized load stiffness results © 2010 IEEE  Natural Balance  Balance Simulation     Test  Subject   2.5  Load  Stiffness   Load  2  R   (Nm/deg)   Stiffness   R2   (Nm/deg)   A   8.8  0.98  10.2  0.92  B   13.2  0.98  17.0  0.75  C   13.2  0.99  15.1  0.73  D   13.1  0.97  15.4  0.70  E   13.4  0.97  14.7  0.70  F   11.3  0.97  15.3  0.77  Discussion   Subjects were able to balance successfully on this simulator based on an inverted pendulum model, with  similar  load  stiffness  curves.  The  differences  between  the  balance  simulation  results  and  the  baseline  natural  standing  results  (particularly  the  decrease  in  R2  values)  may  be  due  to  reduced  ankle  proprioception,  passive  stiffness  effects,  control  loop  delay,  and  approximations  in  the  underlying  physical model. Since the relative angle between feet and legs was held constant, ankle proprioception  was limited to force feedback from muscle contraction and skin sensation, rather than muscle spindle  afferent signals that code for muscle length and velocity. The reduction of sensory feedback could cause  greater variability, as suggested  by [9]. Moreover,  during normal standing, ankle  motion  stretches the  calf  muscle‐tendon  unit  to  produce  passive  stiffness  [17],  [19],  [48],  thereby  reducing  the  amount  of  torque that must be actively produced by the ankle in order to overcome gravity. In this study, passive  stiffness had no effect during the balance simulation as the ankle was held in a fixed position. Therefore,  larger motor units may have been recruited and muscle firing frequency may have increased in order to  generate higher force output. This would lead to a reduction in fine motor control and may account for  some of the increased variability observed in this study.   28       © 2010 IEEE  Figure  2.6:  Normalized  load  stiffness  results  for  all  6  subjects  (grey)  with  group  data  shown  as  mean  ±S.D.  (black). Data were normalized to each subject’s predicted load stiffness: mgL (in Nm/deg), where m = subject  mass, L = ankle to centre of mass length, and g = gravitational acceleration (9.81 m/s2); normalized data were  then multiplied by the group mean load stiffness from the natural balance trials.     The  greater  variability  in  load  stiffness  during  the  balance  simulation  may  also  be  due  to  the  183  ms  control loop delay described in Section 2.2. The presence of loops in the load stiffness data (Figure 2.5)  suggests hysteresis is occurring; delayed motion feedback could cause subjects to perpetually overshoot  the  torque  required  to  hold  the  motion  platform  at  a  desired  angle,  leading  to  oscillatory  corrective  behaviour instead of controlled linear motion.  As  described  in  Section  2.2,  the  inertia  of  the  physical  model  was  calculated  as   ∗   with  the   radius of gyration,  , equal to the length between the subject’s ankles and approximate centre of mass,  . Since the calculation for mass moment of inertia integrates the squared distance from rotation point  to mass distributed along  a person’s  height, the true radius of gyration is likely greater than  . Loram  and Lakie [17] found  that  using an inverted pendulum model  was valid for standing  motions with low  accelerations  where  inertial  effects  could  be  neglected.  Their  results  also  showed  similarly  large  load  stiffness  variability  when  subjects  balanced  a  real  inverted  pendulum.  Therefore,  when  calculating  inertia of the underlying model, the true radius of gyration calculated for a given subject may produce a  more  linear  load  stiffness  curve.  If  the  inertia  were  increased,  as  would  be  the  case  for   ,   accelerations would be reduced and standing sway would be expected to decrease.   29     2.6  Future Work   2.6.1  Balance Simulation Development   Continued development of the RISER motion platform includes reducing the overall control loop delay  and  incorporating  passive  ankle  stiffness  and  viscous  damping.  Future  work  will  also  investigate  the  validity  of  the  inverted  pendulum  model  for  describing  human  balance  dynamics.  Analyzing  torque  versus angle data for natural human standing will be used to identify a transfer function describing the  human  balance  plant,  and  determine  empirical  values  for  inertia,  viscous  damping,  and  static  load  stiffness.  A  mechanical  system  identification  of  the  MOOG  motion  base  will  be  used  as  a  basis  for  feedforward predictive model control in order to reduce the effective delay from the motion platform.  2.6.2  Future Experiments   Future  experiments  will  involve  a  wider  range  of  subjects  of  different  ages  and  genders.  Additionally,  sensory augmentation will be used to further study the human balance system:  1. Electrodes can be fixed behind a subject’s ears in order to  electrically stimulate the vestibular  system  and  provide  a  pure  vestibular  error.  Vestibular  stimulation  can  be  provided  using  galvanic or stochastic currents [49], [50].  2. A 160‐degree parabolic display (Elumens VisionStation) can be used to control a subject’s visual  input. An Ascension Technologies Flock of Birds® sensor can track a subject’s head and the visual  display can be adjusted to simulate the effect of an immersive 3‐dimensional environment.  3. A  motorized  foot  stabilization  platform  can  be  added  to  adjust  foot  orientation  and  control  ankle proprioception.  The 6‐axis robot allows for multi‐axis balance motions, including the ability to select and change sway  direction  as  desired.  Future  tests  may  utilize  this  capability  to  study  human  balance  control  under  unnatural  or  changing  task  mechanics;  e.g.,  ankle  torque  in  the  A‐P  (pitch)  direction  could  be  used  to  control balance motions in the M‐L (roll) direction.  The  RISER  motion  platform  provides  a  single  platform  that  can  be  used  for  an  array  of  customized  balance  experiments.  Although  custom  mechanical  systems  can  be  designed  for  specific  balance  conditions (e.g., by using a weight‐supporting harness or a pendulum coupled to a subject’s feet), the  RISER platform allows different balance modes to be implemented quickly, precisely, safely, and without  the  need  to  design  or  calibrate  additional  mechanical  apparatus.  Moreover,  the  physics  are  30     reprogrammable  using  physically  intuitive  parameters  such  as  mass,  height,  gravity,  and  viscous  damping. Several examples of customized physics are shown in Figure 2.7. To facilitate further balance  experiments, the real‐time driving software (overviewed in Appendix C) has been further enhanced to  allow modification of the balance task in real‐time: a) by changing physical parameters during balance  (e.g., mass increasing by 20% over 5 seconds), or b) by pseudo‐randomly switching between real‐time  control (normal balance simulation) and playback of pre‐recorded sway motions.  The ability of the RISER platform to easily adjust physical conditions opens up a wide range of possible  experiments and allows researchers to answer many questions related to balance physiology, such as:  How  do  reflex  gains  (e.g.,  muscle  responses  to  vestibular  stimulation)  change  in  response  to  varying  physical conditions? Under what physical conditions are balance reflexes attenuated or amplified? Can a  human  perceive  the  difference  between  real‐time  balancing  (i.e.,  when  sensorimotor  control  is  congruent) and brief periods of pre‐recorded balance motions (i.e., when motor actions do not produce  the expected sensory feedback)? Do reflex gains adapt instantaneously to changes in balance physics?  What does balance control adaptation reveal about the use of an internal model in the control system?  Do control models that accurately describe the control of quiet standing continue to hold true when the  physics are modified?  Questions  related  to  congruent  sensorimotor  control  are  currently  being  investigated  using  the  RISER  motion platform, and will be described in a forthcoming publication by B. L. Luu et al.   31     Normal   Standing on stilts   standing        Standing on the   Standing in water   moon         Reverse gravity   Standing with a   (balancing a stable   heavy backpack     pendulum)     Figure 2.7: Examples of customized physical conditions that can be implemented using RISER.       2.7  Conclusion   This chapter reported on a robotic motion platform developed for investigating human balance control.  The system enables subjects to balance according to the physics of an inverted pendulum model with  configurable  physical  parameters.  To  the  best  of  the  author’s  knowledge,  this  is  the  first  system  to  enable true simulation of a balancing task that allows researchers to study the mechanisms of human  balance control in a configurable task environment without applying external perturbation. The work in  this chapter achieved the first goal in development of the simulator by showing that test subjects with  different physical parameters can balance on the motion platform and generate a load stiffness curve  that approximates natural standing. Passive stiffness, reduced ankle proprioception, system delay, and  approximations  in  the  balance  simulation  model  may  account  for  the  increased  variability  and  load  stiffness observed during balance simulations. Future development will focus on reducing control loop  delay and improving the system model used to govern balance dynamics.   32     2.8  Epilogue   The work described in Sections 2.1 through 2.7 was published in [8]. Several modifications were made to  the RISER motion platform subsequent to this publication:     Lead  compensation  applied  to  the  position  command  sent  to  the  MOOG  motion  base:  The  commanded  pitch  angle  was  modified  using  a  weighted‐slope  extrapolation,  reducing  overall  system  delay  by  approximately  83  ms  (measured  using  cross‐correlation).  This  increased  the  responsiveness between input ankle torque and output sway angle, allowing subjects to better  control their balance on RISER and reducing load stiffness variability (described below).     Removal of the forceplate data filter: Removing this filter further reduced overall system delay  by eliminating the effective 50 ms phase delay described in Section 2.3.2.2 above. Similar to the  lead compensation strategy, this also helped to reduce load stiffness variability.     Virtual passive ankle stiffness: Passive torque was applied to the virtual model of the inverted  pendulum  as  an  exponential  function  of  the  sway  angle.  This  added  torque  was  intended  to  correct  for  the  absence  of  natural  passive  torque,  caused  by  the  reduction  in  ankle  motion  during balance on RISER. Although this provided a small amount of mechanical assistance during  standing,  the  addition  of  virtual  passive  stiffness  did  not  have  a  significant  effect  on  the  load  stiffness results or the subjective perception of control, as discussed in [36].     Revised  forceplate  data  compensation  (dynamic  calibration):  The  method  for  calibrating  the  forceplate,  and  for  calibrating  the  two  forceplates  in  the  experiments  described  in  Chapter  3,  was  modified  in  order  to  reduce  the  uncertainty  in  the  calibration  parameters  (i.e.,  four  coefficients  were  fitted  directly  to  force  and  moment  data  measured  for  different  sway  frequencies). This “dynamic calibration” reduced the overall uncertainty in the estimate of the  measured ankle torque during RISER motion.   The lead compensation, virtual passive stiffness, and dynamic calibration are described in detail in [36].  Additionally,  these  modifications  are  reflected  in  the  balance  control  system  design  that  is  detailed  in  Appendix  A.  Representative  load  stiffness  curves,  generated  before  and  after  the  aforementioned  system modifications, are presented in  Figure 2.8. The similarity  between the load‐stiffness curves for  natural  standing  and  for  balance  simulation  shows  a  clear  improvement  due  to  the  system  modifications.  As  described  in  Section  2.4.2  above,  the  average  R2  value  was  0.76  (SD  0.082)  for  the  original  balance  simulation  (based  on  data  from  6  subjects).  Following  the  system  modifications,  the   33     average R2 value increased to 0.94 (SD 0.051) for the improved balance simulation (based on data from  10 subjects). This R2 value is very close to the value obtained for natural balance (0.98), confirming that  subjects can balance on RISER nearly as well as they can with their own body. The reader should note  that this result was obtained while balancing without ankle motion, as described in Section 2.5 above. R2  performance would be expected to further increase with the addition of motorized foot platforms that  recreate normal ankle motions.  The reader should also note several changes in sign convention for analyses subsequent to this chapter.  These changes relate to the sign of the body angle and the torque about the ankle. The sign convention  used in Chapter 2 corresponds to the default positive pitch direction for RISER’s 6‐DOF motion base. The  convention was changed in later studies to achieve better correspondence with the positive directions  of body angle and torque used in other balance control literature:    In Chapter 2: body angle is considered negative in the forward leaning (anterior) direction, and  ankle torque is considered negative during plantarflexion (pushing toes down).     In Chapter 3 and Appendix A: body angle is considered positive in the forward leaning direction,  and ankle torque is considered positive during plantarflexion.     In [36]: body angle is considered negative in the forward leaning direction, and ankle torque is  considered positive during plantarflexion.   34     Figure 2.8: Representative load stiffness curves before and after RISER modifications. Data are shown for natural  standing (blue) and during balance simulation (red), generated before (left) and after (right) the improvements described in [36]. Ideally, load stiffness curves are identical between the balance simulator and natural standing. The load stiffness curve for the balance simulator after modifications (red line, right side) is nearly identical to  that  of  natural  standing  (blue  line,  right  side),  showing  a  clear  performance  improvement  over  the  original system (left side). For additional comparisons, refer to the load stiffness curves presented in Figure 2.5 (original)  and Figure 4 of Luu et al. [36] (improved).     Having shown that RISER can successfully recreate natural balance mechanics, subsequent experiments  use the platform angle (which is easily accessible in the real‐time software) as the measurement of the  body’s sway angle and omit using the laser distance measurement that was described in Section 2.4.1  above. This simplifies the experimental setup and removes the potential error caused by knee flexion,  which can cause the laser‐reflective surface to move unexpectedly during standing. However, a method  to measure the body’s COM during natural standing (i.e., when RISER remains stationary and a subject  stands  on  the  forceplate  without  being  strapped  to  the  backboard)  is  still  needed.  As  described  by  Lafond  et  al.  [51]  and  in  Section  3.4.5  below,  data  measured  by  the  forceplate  can  be  filtered  to  estimate  the  body’s  COM  angle.  Therefore,  the  experiments  described  in  Chapter  3  use  filtered  forceplate data instead of laser measurement to compute sway angle during natural standing.   35     2.9  Summary   This chapter described the system design and validation for the robotic motion platform named RISER.  Modifications and further  validation work occurred subsequent  to the system  design  described in this  chapter (summarized in Section 2.8 and detailed in [36]). The work in this chapter and in [36] validated  that  the  RISER  platform  is  able  to  recreate  the  physics  of  balance  in  a  way  that  is  decoupled  from  a  subject’s  natural  body  mechanics.  In  the  next  chapter  of  this  thesis,  the  RISER  platform  is  used  to  provide  a  safe  experimental  setup  and  controlled  balance  mechanics  in  an  experiment  that  studies  different control models for quiet standing.        36     3     Experimental Evaluation of Human Balance Control Models  Experimental Evaluation of Human Balance  Control Models  This  chapter  describes  an  experimental  study  that  investigates  the  second  research  question  of  this  thesis:  What  types  of  control  models  are  better  for  describing  the  physiological  control  of  quiet  standing?    To  address  this  question,  this  study  evaluates  the  performance  of  different  control  models  that  actively  balance  a  human  subject.  Chapter  2  presented  the  development  of  the  RISER  motion  platform  and  validation  of  its  ability  to  engage  subjects  in  a  reconfigurable  balance  task.  The  experiments described herein rely on the RISER platform to provide a safe balancing environment where  the  balance  mechanics  are  programmed  according  to  the  physical  parameters  of  each  subject.  RISER  implements the balance mechanics in a closed‐loop control system with the subjects’ muscle activation  driven  by  electrical  stimulation.  The  purpose  of  this  work  is  to:  a)  demonstrate  that  representative  control  models for quiet  standing can  balance the  human body  in a control loop that includes  muscle  activation, and b) characterize the effects of two factors—intermittent activation and prediction—in the  modelling  of  quiet  standing.    In  this  chapter,  five  key  balance  control  system  components  are  introduced: the body mechanics, the angle controller, the control action regulator, the state predictor,  and the torque generation loop. Appendix A provides the detailed design and implementation for each  of  these  components.  Appendix  C  overviews  the  hardware  and  software  architecture  used  for  the  experimental setup. The chapter is presented as a self‐contained study, including methods, hypotheses,  experimental results, and conclusions. This chapter completes the studies undertaken in this thesis and  is followed by Chapter 4: Conclusions and Future Work. Appendix B provides supplemental results from  the experiments described in this chapter.     37     3.1  Introduction   The human body is an inherently unstable system that requires active muscle adjustments to maintain  upright  standing.  During  quiet  standing,  balance  control  is  primarily  achieved  by  adjustments  in  the  torque at the ankles. Transmission delays related to sensory processing and muscle activation [6] push  the  system  toward  instability  and  increase  the  difficulty  of  the  balance  control  task.  Two  factors  that  pertain  to  the  modelling  of  human  balance  control  remain  in  question:  1)  Activation  type:  Is  ankle  torque  adjusted  continuously  or  intermittently?  2)  Prediction:  Does  the  central  nervous  system  (CNS)  compensate for time delays by predicting the effects of motor commands? Answering these questions  will provide insight toward an appropriate model for the physiological control of quiet standing.  Muscle activation within the balance control system is most often modelled as a continuous process, in  which sway feedback is constantly monitored and the corrective torque is always varying [10], [22], [24],  [41],  [52].  Corrective  control  actions  may,  however,  occur  intermittently  [16],  [18],  [20],  [53–55].  Intermittent  activation  appears  to  be  driven  either  by  low‐frequency  updates  [53]  or  by  sensory  thresholds  [56],  and  predisposes  the  system  to  more  sway  compared  to  a  system  with  continuous  activation [20]. Van der Kooij and de Vlugt showed that for unperturbed standing, both continuous and  intermittent  activation  (driven  by  sway  position  and  velocity  thresholds)  produce  postural  responses  with  frequency  content  similar  to  natural  standing  [22].  Loram  et  al.  explain  that  a  balance  control  system  with  intermittent  activation  makes  more  economical  actions,  and  thereby  exerts  less  control  effort,  than  a  continuous  process  [18].  Consequently,  it  is  of  research  interest  to  compare  control  models with intermittent and continuous activation, in order to help determine which type best models  the control of quiet standing.  In addition to activation‐type, prediction may be an important factor for modelling the control of quiet  standing.  A  predictive  mechanism  within  the  CNS  could  combine  knowledge  of  body  dynamics  and  recent  motor  commands  to  produce  an  estimate  of  system  state  that  is  compensated  for  time  delays  [26], [57]. An effective predictor would be expected to reduce the overall loop delay, thereby improving  system stability and reducing  the amplitude of sway. In support  of a CNS predictor, Loram et al. have  shown  that,  during  quiet  standing,  muscle  movements  exhibit  anticipatory  behaviour  that  cannot  be  explained  by  stretch  reflexes  [4].  However,  Masani  and  colleagues  have  shown  that  a  proportional  derivative (PD) controller (i.e., with gains applied to feedback position and velocity) can produce sway  and torque behaviour that resembles natural standing without the need for a predictive mechanism to   38     overcome pure loop delay [10], [24]. Gawthrop et al., however, assert that models with prediction offer  a  better  fit  to  the  pure  time  delays  observed  during  non‐standing  balance  tasks  [5].  The  continued  uncertainty about the existence of a predictor evidences the need for new comparisons between control  models with and without prediction, to help determine which condition best models the control of quiet  standing.  Balance control models are typically evaluated in computer simulations (using induced disturbances and  noise  to  excite  the  system)  but  rarely  experimentally  tested  by  activating  human  muscles  in  order  to  maintain  standing.  The  neuromuscular  dynamics  of  torque  generation  are  considered  to  be  a  major  source  of  instability  during  quiet  standing  [6],  making  muscle  dynamics  an  important  component  in  control  model  testing.  Function  electrical  stimulation  (FES)  makes  it  possible  to  artificially  activate  muscles,  permitting  inclusion  of  the  biological  muscle  mechanics  in  a  control  loop  that  tests  different  proposed  controller  models.  Previous  implementations  of  controlled  standing  (i.e.,  where  a  computerized control model drives muscle stimulation in order to keep a person standing) have used a  single type of control model in a closed‐loop system with minimal delay [29–31], rather than one that  includes the dynamics of the true physiological system with its inherent time delays [10]. Intermittent  control models are noticeably absent from previous implementations of controlled standing, and direct  comparisons between different control types are limited to computer simulations [22].  In  light  of  these  gaps  in  the  literature,  the  present  study  seeks  to  validate  and  compare  several  representative  control  models  for  driving  human  calf  muscles  in  order  to  maintain  unperturbed  standing.  Using  a  robotic  motion  platform  [8],  [36]  that  engages  subjects  in  a  safe  balancing  task,  the  experiments described in this chapter test control models with continuous and intermittent activation,  with  and  without  a  predictive  element  designed  to  reduce  loop  delay.  These  experiments  were  performed with normal healthy subjects, using electrical stimulation to activate calf muscles. A subset of  subjects received a neural block of the stimulated calf muscle in order to verify that the control models  stabilize balance in the absence of natural muscle activation.   3.2  Methods   To  evaluate  the  effects  of  intermittent  activation  and  prediction,  four  control  model  conditions  were  tested:  continuous  with  no  predictor  (CN),  continuous  with  predictor  (CP),  intermittent  with  no  predictor  (IN),  and  intermittent  with  predictor  (IP).  A  schematic  representation  of  the  experimental  methodology is shown in Figure 3.1.  39     Figure  3.1:  Schematic  representation  of  experimental  methodology for  balance  control  model  testing.  Four  control model types are tested by switching between continuous and intermittent activation, with or without a  predictor  (CN  condition  is  shown).  Two  computer  programs,  coupled  by  the  torque  generated  at  a  subject’s  ankle and the feedback of sway angle, are used to implement a closed‐loop balance control system. Computer  program  #1  implements  the  control  model.  Computer  program  #2  implements  the  body  mechanics  according the to the RISER real‐time balance simulation described in Chapter 2. These components are described further in Section 3.3 below.     3.2.1  Participants   Experiments  were  performed  with  12  healthy  subjects  between  the  ages  of  21  and  36  (2  females,  10  males, mean age 27.3 yrs; SD 4.3), with masses ranging from 53 to 113 kg (mean 74.9 kg; SD 15.7). The  center of mass heights, measured via a balance board, were between 83 and 101 cm (mean 90.6 cm; SD  5.8) above the ankle joint. Four subjects repeated the overall experiment with a neural‐block applied to  the  common  peroneal  and  tibial  nerves  by  an  anaesthesiologist.  All  experimental  procedures  were  approved by the University of British Columbia’s human research ethics board and all subjects provided  written informed consent before participating.  3.2.2  Balance Control Loop   For this experiment, quiet standing is modelled as a closed‐loop control system that keeps the body near  a desired angle. The model assumes that the CNS monitors the angle and velocity of sway and provides  corrective  action  by  varying  the  torque  at  the  ankles  [2].  During  natural  standing  the  inverted‐ pendulum‐like  body  leans  slightly  forward  at  all  times,  allowing  a  single  muscle  group,  the   40     plantarflexors,  to  maintain  balance  via  contraction  and  relaxation  [19].  The  balance  control  loop  is  shown in Figure 3.2.  Each component of the balance control loop is explicitly implemented. Loop components are presented  briefly here and described in detail in Appendix A. The CNS is modelled primarily as a controller of A‐P  body angle, the fundamental component of the balance loop that keeps the body from falling over. For  control  models  with  intermittent  activation,  a  control  action  regulator  limits  how  often  the  torque  output from the angle controller is updated within the loop. For control models with prediction, a state  predictor feeds back an estimate of anticipated balance angle. The torque output (  ) from the control   action regulator represents the motor command sent by the CNS to a muscle. During experiments, ankle  torque  is generated via electrical stimulation of  the  calf muscles. The relationship between the motor  command and the actual torque developed at the ankles ( ) is captured in the loop component labeled  active torque generation. The mechanics of body sway are implemented as an inverted pendulum, using  the RISER motion platform discussed in Chapter 2.   41       Figure  3.2:  Balance  control  loop  overview.  1)  The  mechanics  of  body  load  and  passive  ankle  properties  are implemented  via  the  RISER  motion  platform,  which  causes  a  subject  to  sway  according  to  the  physics  of  an inverted pendulum. 2) The angle controller is designed to keep a constant setpoint angle (  ). Depending on   the control model being tested, 3) a control action regulator can intermittently update control torque (  ), and  4) a state predictor can compensate for loop delay. These optional components are highlighted by the dashed outlines. 5) Torque is generated at the ankle via closed‐loop electrical stimulation of the calf muscles.     3.2.3  Instrumentation   Subjects  balanced  using  the  RISER  motion  platform,  described  in  Chapter  2.  In  this  experiment,  two  force  plates  (OR6‐7‐1000,  AMTI,  Watertown,  MA,  USA)  measured  reaction  forces  and  torques  at  the  feet.  A  PXI‐8108  controller  with  PXI‐6229  data  acquisition  system  recorded  forceplate  data  at  60  Hz  42     (hardware  from  National  Instruments,  Austin,  TX,  USA).  The  system  computed  ankle  torque  from  the  moment measured in the pitch direction, while accounting for the effect of forces in the A‐P direction  and motions of the platform as described in [36]. A constant current stimulator (DS5, Digitimer, Welwyn  Garden City, England) and surface electrodes (3M™ 1180 adhesive electrosurgical plate, conducting area  approximately 130 cm2) placed over the triceps surae muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) of the right  leg provided electrical stimulation (see Figure 3.3). The stimulator applied a monophasic square wave at  50 Hz in 750 µs pulses with a current amplitude ranging from 0 to 50 mA (as described in Section 3.4.2  below).       Figure 3.3: Experimental setup for electrical stimulation. Surface electrodes stimulated the triceps surae muscles  of the right leg, generating torque about the ankle.      3.3  Control Loop Components   The  balance  control  loop  consists  of  5  main  components:  Body  mechanics,  angle  controller,  control  action regulator, state predictor, and torque loop (see Figure 3.2). The following section describes the  design of each component. Detailed descriptions are provided in Appendix A.   43     3.3.1  Body Mechanics   The  mechanics  of  body  sway  are  defined  by  the  relationship  between  ankle  torque  and  angle,  represented by the following equation of motion and its corresponding Laplace transfer function:      1  →     	.   (3.1)     Here,   is the  torque acting at the ankles, a combination of active and passive  components  [10], [19],  [58], [59] and     refers to the moving mass of the body, which includes all mass above the feet. The   term   represents  the  height  of  the  body’s  centre  of  mass  (COM)  above  the  ankles,   is  the  mass  moment  of  inertia  of  the  body  about  the  ankle  joint,   is  the  viscous  damping  of  the  ankles,  and   is  gravitational acceleration (9.81 m/s2). If the body is held motionless in space (  and   equal to zero) the  torque  is  proportional  to  angle  by  a  gain  of   ,  known  as  the  body’s  load  stiffness,  or  the  critical   level of stiffness [59].  Body  sway  mechanics  are  implemented  using  the  RISER  motion  platform  (Figure  3.2)  described  in  [8],  [36].  The  RISER  platform  engages  subjects  in  a  balance  task  by  simulating  the  mechanical  load  of  the  body as an inverted pendulum and swaying in the A‐P direction in response to ankle torque, measured  by force plates beneath the feet. The angular displacement,  , is software‐limited to 6° forward and 3°  backward from vertical. RISER virtually adds passive torque (  ) since the ankles do not rotate and calf   contraction  is  approximately  isometric.  The  mass  and  height  parameters  of  the  simulated  inverted  pendulum  were  programmed  to  match  those  measured  for  each  subject,  with  inertia  set  to  ( 1.119  ) and    set to 0.971 times the total body mass, based on normalized anthropometric data   [60]. The body’s COM height,  , was measured relative to the subject’s ankles by having the subject lie  supine on a rigid board and adjusting the fulcrum beneath, as described in [36]. Ankle damping was set  to 0.1 Nm/(°/s) for all subjects [19].  3.3.2  Angle Controller   The  angle  controller  applies  gravity  compensation  to  the  setpoint  angle  and  a  proportional‐derivative  (PD) gain to the angular error in order to determine the corrective torque signal for maintaining balance.  The  gravity  compensation term,   , matches the static load stiffness required to hold the  body at   the  setpoint  angle,  and  sets  the  theoretical  steady‐state  closed  loop  gain  to  1  (i.e.,  the  setpoint  and  output angle should be equal at steady‐state). The PD gains (   and   ) were selected for each subject  44      based on a linear‐quadratic regulator (LQR) designed to minimize activation energy, as suggested by [11]  	1 rad‐2		0; 	0		1 s2∙rad‐2 ,   (  10  N‐2∙m‐2).  The  LQR  design  was  based  on  the  mechanical  plant   function  in  (2.1).  All  of  the  selected  PD  gains  fell  within  the  robust‐space  mapping  identified  in  [24].  Across subjects, the selected PD gains produced a stable system with a 20° phase margin, according to  the  Nyquist  criterion,  for  the  theoretical  closed‐loop  system  with  83  ms  pure  loop  delay  and  torque  generation modelled as a 2nd order filter (delay and filter are described in Section 3.3.4 below).   3.3.3  Control Action Regulator   The control action regulator determines when  of    (the input to the torque loop) is updated to the value    (output from the angle controller). During continuous control mode operation (conditions CN and   CP), the torque value computed by the angle  controller is sent directly to the torque loop (  ).   During  intermittent  control  mode  operation  (conditions  IN  and  IP),  bounded  stability  is  imposed  by  limiting  updates  to    depending  on  the  instantaneous  angle  and  velocity  of  the  body.  At  each  time   instant, the probability of triggering a control update is equal to the probability density function (PDF)  presented in [20]. This PDF depends on angle and velocity thresholds, and is highest when sway angle is  far above or below the setpoint and moving quickly away from it. Following an update, the value of    is   held constant for 150 ms to approximately match the minimum contact duration observed by Loram et  al.  [18]  during  intermittent  control  of  an  inverted  pendulum.  This  defines  the  minimum  period  of  a  controller adjustment, however longer periods of controller activity can occur if bursts fire successively.  At all other times (i.e., after the 150 ms period has elapsed and prior to another update occurring)  set  to  70%  of  the  torque  required  to  hold  at  the  setpoint  angle  (0.7 ∙  ∙   is   )  based  on  average   ankle impedance values reported by [59].  3.3.4  State Predictor   During  “predictor”  mode  operation  (conditions  CP  and  IP),  a  predictive  mechanism  improves  the  estimate  of  the  feedback  angle  and  velocity  to  reduce  the  overall  closed‐loop  system  delay.  The  predictor estimates future balance angles ( (  ) by forward‐simulating the effects of motor commands   ) on the delayed feedback signal ( ), as described in [26]. The present implementation differs in two   ways:  1)  The discretized dynamics include the programmed balance physics, shown in (2.1) , and the torque  generation  (   to   )  estimated  as  a  second‐order  filter  with  damping  coefficient  0.7  and  5  Hz   cutoff, as per [20].  45     2)  Five  forward  simulation  steps  are  used  to  overcome  an  estimated  pure  delay  of  83  ms  (5  sample  periods).  This  delay  was  estimated  from  pilot  data  that  showed  a  consistent  time  delay  of  80  ms  between a step change in    and the onset of a change in ankle torque  . This delay is a summation   of the time taken for the driving software to generate a change in the stimulation level, the muscle  to  respond  to  the  stimulation,  and  the  ankle  torque  to  be  measured  by  the  driving  software.  Consequently, this delay is the only pure time delay in the implemented balance control loop and  excludes  any  phase  delay  due  to  ankle  torque  generation  (as  described  in  Section  1.3.3  above).  A  value  of  80  ms  is  consistent  with  the  lower  bound  of  the  physiological  closed‐loop  delay  (also  described  in  Section  1.3.3  above)  and  the  total  loop  delay  considered  in  previous  balance  control  studies [6], [31].  Predicted velocity is calculated post‐hoc by differentiating predicted angle over the previous time‐step.  A cross‐correlation function (CCF) was used to validate the relative time advance of the state predictor.  Adding the predictor caused the motor command (  ) to precede sway angle ( ) by an additional 47 ms   for the CP condition and 50 ms for the IP condition (average of blocked and unblocked data). This time  shift is approximately 40% less than the 83 ms design value. The effectiveness of the state predictor is  discussed with the limitations of this study in Section 3.6.5.  3.3.5  Torque Loop   Ankle torque is controlled using a nested closed‐loop system [29], [30], [32], [61–65] with a proportional  error  controller  (  )  and  a  feedforward  component,  as  shown  in  Figure  3.4.  The  feedforward   component  is  similar  to  [28].  The  feedforward  open‐loop  torque  map  is  designed  to  approximate  the  inverse ankle torque plant and account for hysteresis caused by residual contractions. It was calibrated  for each subject by stimulating the calf muscle at various current levels and recording ankle torque, as  described  in  Section  3.4.2  below.  A  third‐order  by  third‐order  polynomial  surface  function,  least‐ squares‐fit to the recorded data, outputs an updated value of stimulation current (in mA) as a function  of the desired ankle torque and the present stimulation level. The torque recorded from the right side  forceplate is fed back into the torque loop and applied to the virtual body mechanics.   46       Figure  3.4:  Block  diagram  for  the  torque  loop.  A  nested  control loop  is  used  to  drive  muscle  stimulation to  achieve  the  desired  ankle  torque.  Since  the  torque  loop  only  stimulates  the  calf  muscles  of  the  right  leg,  the desired control torque (  ) for balancing the body is halved at the input, and the generated torque (  )   is doubled on the output.     To validate the performance of the torque loop, the desired control torque (  ) was compared to the   generated torque ( ) recorded during the validation trials, and present results averaged across blocked  and unblocked data.   trailed  7.1)  of    by an average phase shift of 94 ms  (SD 20).  RMS  error was 12% (SD   ,  after  removing  the  average  phase  shift.  The  average   was  1.03  (SD  0.052)  times   ,   verifying that the average gain of the torque‐loop is close to unity.   3.4  Experimental Protocol   The  overall  experiment  consisted  of  3  experimental  phases:  Natural  standing,  torque‐loop  calibration,  and controlled standing. Several subjects repeated the experiment with a neural block applied to their  right  leg.  Data  from  the  controlled  standing  trials  (described  in  3.4.3  below)  are  used  to  test  two  hypotheses  related  to  the  expected  effects  of  intermittent  activation  and  prediction  (described  in  Section 3.1 above):  H1)   Controlled  standing  with  intermittent  muscle  activation  exhibits  larger  sway  and  requires  less  electrical stimulation than controlled standing with a continuous model.   H2)   The addition of a predictor to the selected balance models results in improved balance stability,  evidenced by reduced mechanical effort and lower standard deviation of sway.   The protocol for each phase of the experiment is described in the sections below.   47     3.4.1  Natural Standing   Trials with no stimulation were used to determine natural standing behaviour on level ground. Subjects  stood freely with each foot on a stationary, level forceplate for 30 to 60 s. The recorded vertical force  was used to compute subject mass. The summed ankle torque on both forceplates was averaged over  approximately 30 s and used to determine setpoint angle (in radians) as  3.4.2  /  .   Torque Loop Calibration   The  torque‐loop  described  in  Section  3.3.5  above  was  calibrated  for  each  subject.  Each  subject  was  instructed  to  relax  both  legs  while  receiving  electrical  stimulation  to  the  right‐leg  calf  muscles.  Calibration involved three steps:  Determining stimulation limits: For safety and effective torque generation, the stimulation current was  limited to an experimentally determined range. The lower stimulation limit was the lowest current level  for  which  a  torque  response  was  observed.  The  upper  current  limit  was  the  highest  current  level  for  which the subject felt comfortable (up to a maximum of 50 mA).  Open‐loop torque mapping: Muscles were stimulated for up to 90 s at pseudo‐random levels between  the  upper and lower  current limits. A  surface function was fitted to  the recorded  data and integrated  into  the  torque  loop.  A  detailed  description  of  the  torque  mapping  is  described  in  Section  B.5  of  Appendix A.  Validation:  The  torque‐loop  operated  in  closed‐loop  mode  to  track  a  pre‐recorded  torque  trajectory.  The error gain  3.4.3   was set to unity and varied heuristically if tracking error was large.   Controlled Standing   Subjects stood barefoot on the forceplates and were comfortably and securely strapped to the motion  platform’s  back  support  (see  Figure  3.2).  Each  subject  was  instructed  to  relax  while  a  control  model  drove  electrical  stimulation  of  the  right‐leg  calf  muscles  in  order  to  maintain  balance  of  the  RISER  platform. Each controller type (CN, CP, IN, and IP) was presented to a subject 3 times, for a total of 12  controller  instances,  in  randomized  order.  Subjects  rested  between  trials  to  prevent  muscle  fatigue.  Each trial ended after 60 s of data recording or when the platform contacted an angular limit. Controlled  standing trials that lasted less than 15 s were not considered to have achieved stable balance and were  excluded  from  data  analysis.  Figure  3.5  shows  an  example  of  the  controlled  standing  trials  for  one  subject.  48       Figure 3.5: Example sequence for controlled standing trials. All 4 controller types were presented in each of the  3  sessions  for  a  total  of  12  controller  instances.  Each  instance  of  a  controller  was  used  for  one  or  more consecutive trials, until a trial lasted longer than 30 s or 10 trials had been attempted. Controller instances were separated  by  alternating  long  and  short  breaks.  The  sequence  of  controllers  presented  in  each  session  was randomized, however controllers that followed a short break in one session were made to follow a long break in the subsequent session.     3.4.4  Neural Blocks   In order to verify that the control models stabilize balance in the absence of natural muscle activation,  four participants received a regional neural block of the superficial peroneal and tibial nerves in the right  leg.  The  procedure,  performed  by  an  anaesthesiologist,  removed  proprioception  below  the  knee  and  removed the subject's ability to control the calf muscles used to stand. The common peroneal and tibial  nerves  were  identified  via  ultrasound,  posteriorly  at  the  level  of  the  popliteal  fossa.  Using  sterile  technique,  10‐20  mL  each  of  0.5%  bupivicaine  and  1%  lidocaine  with  epinephrine  were  infiltrated  around each of the two nerves to provide a block lasting at least 120 minutes. The block was deemed  complete when no EMG activity was detected and the subject reported no sensation in the lower leg.  Standardized  clinical  tests  for  motor  ability  were  used  to  verify  the  completeness  of  the  block  before  and during testing8. Subjects who participated in neural blocked experiments did so at least one week  apart from able‐bodied experiments.                                                                 8   Standard techniques for evaluating toe and foot strength using a 0‐5 scale are described on the following website  (accessed March 31, 2012): http://www.neuroexam.com/neuroexam/content.php?p=29   49     3.4.5  Data Collection and Processing   Measures  related  to  sway  and  actuation  are  used  to  compare  the  performance  of  the  four  different  control models. Sway measures include the standard deviation (SD), range, and frequency components  of  sway  angle  ( ).  Actuation  measures  include:  the  frequency  components  and  SD  of    (defined   below), which characterize the rate and variability of corrections made by the controller; the mean and  SD  of   (defined  below),  which  describe  overall  mechanical  effort;  and  the  mean  level  of  electrical  stimulation delivered to the leg. Variables are defined as follows:     refers  to  the  total  ankle  torque,  including  the  virtual  passive  stiffness  added  for  controlled  standing.      is  the  static  torque  required  to  hold  the  body  at  the  neutral  standing  setpoint  angle  ∙  .    is  specific  to  each  subject  and  used  to  normalize  measures  of  mechanical   effort prior to generating group means.     is  the  torque  required  to  hold  the  body  steady  at  the  current  sway  angle.  It  is  equal  to  ∙ , the  critical  stiffness multiplied  by  the sway angle.    varies proportionally  to the   sway angle during standing.     is the dynamic torque that causes the body to change position during balance, accelerating  the body’s inertia while overcoming ankle damping. Rearranging Equation (3.1),  .    Torque and angle are standard measures for describing the mechanics of a rotational system, and are  therefore  the  primary  measures  used  in  data  analysis.  In  the  context  of  balancing,  the  location  of  the  centre of pressure (  ) and centre of mass (  ), projected onto the support surface, are commonly   used in lieu  of torque and angle, respectively. The  following equations map  between these measures:  ∙  and   ⁄  ∙  ⁄  .  In  the  case  of  natural  standing,  the  angle  of  the   body’s COM is not explicitly measured. Rather, it is computed by low‐pass filtering  ⁄ to  the  physics  of  the  body,  equivalent  to  filtering  damping  is  negligibly  small,    to  find    according    as  described  in  [51].  If  ankle    is  proportional  to  the  angular  acceleration  of  the  body.  This  is   mechanically  equivalent  to  the  proportional  relationship  between  the    difference  and   horizontal acceleration [66].   50     3.4.5.1 Data Processing  The following describes the  calculation of each  comparison  measure. The term “all trials” refers  to all  trials for a given subject and test condition. The term “trajectory” refers to the set of data points for a  given trial:    Calculation of sway angle ( ) SD: The mean was removed from the sway trajectory for each trial.  The mean‐removed trajectories from all trials were concatenated and the SD was computed for  the concatenated trajectory.     Calculation of sway angle ( ) range: A range value was calculated for each trial as the maximum  minus minimum sway angle. The range values from all trials were compiled, and the maximum  range value in the set was considered to be the sway range.     Calculation of mean and peak frequency components of    and   : Each trial was segmented   into 15 s windows with 75% overlap. The mean was removed from each segment and the power  spectral  density  (PSD)  was  computed  using  a  1024‐point  fast  Fourier  transform  (FFT)  with  a  standard  Hamming  window  to  reduce  spectral  leakage.  The  PSD  was  averaged  across  all  segments  from  all  trials.  Figure  3.7  shows  the  average  PSD  plotted  for  a  single  subject  for  all  experimental conditions. The peak frequency component is the frequency for which the average  PSD amplitude is  maximal. The mean frequency component is  the centroidal frequency of the  PSD,  calculated  as   ∙  ⁄∑  ,  where   is  a  vector  of  frequency  values  and    is  a   vector containing the corresponding PSD amplitudes.    Calculation of ankle torque ( ) and dynamic torque (  ) SD: The mean was removed from the   torque  trajectory  for  each  trial.  The  mean‐removed  trajectories  from  all  trials  were  concatenated  and  the  SD  was  computed  for  the  concatenated  trajectory.  The  SD  was  normalized as a percentage of     (defined above).   Calculation  of  mean  ankle  torque  ( ):  The  mean  was  removed  from  the  torque  trajectory  for  each trial. The mean‐removed trajectories from all trials were concatenated and the mean was  computed for the concatenated trajectory. The mean was normalized as a percentage of      (defined above).    Calculation of Stimulation Mean: The stimulation current data (measured in mA) from all trials  were concatenated and the mean was computed for the concatenated trajectory. The mean was  multiplied by (50 Hz)∙(750 µs) to compute the average charge delivery per second.   51     3.4.5.2 Statistical analysis  A  2x2  repeated‐measures  ANOVA  determined  the  significant  effects  of  the  two  factors:  intermittent  activation (intermittent vs. continuous) and prediction (predictor vs. no predictor). Interactions between  factors  were  decomposed  using  a  post‐hoc  Tukey  method  to  account  for  multiple  comparisons.  The  significance  level  was  set  at  =0.05.  Where  interaction  was  significant,  the  effects  were  decomposed  into pair‐wise comparisons of CN vs. CP and IN vs. IP. This was done to show the specific effect of adding  a predictor to either a continuous or intermittent control model.   3.5  Results   Distinct  sway  patterns  were  observed  for  natural  standing  (medium  sway,  low  frequency),  continuous  controlled  standing  (small  sway,  high  frequency),  and  controlled  standing  with  intermittent  activation  (large sway, high frequency). These results are evident in Figure 3.6, which plots sway angle and ankle  torque for a representative subject. For all controlled standing conditions, sway typically varied about a  static  angle,  whereas  the  mean  sway  angle  during  natural  standing  varied  slowly  over  time.  Furthermore, during natural standing, the ankle torque   closely matched  standing   distinctly  varied  about   , whereas for controlled   .  The  differences  due  to  adding  a  predictor  are  more  subtle,   though a predictor typically produced more frequent corrective activity. Figure 3.7 shows the frequency  content  for  sway  angle  and  dynamic  torque  (  )  for  a  representative  subject.  These  results  are   described further in the sections below. Example plots are shown for dynamic torque in Figure 3.8 and  for stimulation level in Figure 3.9.  3.5.1  General Results   All implemented controllers (continuous and intermittent, with and without a predictor) achieved stable  closed‐loop  balance  by  activating  the  subject’s  muscles  for  both  unblocked  and  blocked  subjects.  This  result  demonstrated  that  the  controllers  themselves,  as  opposed  to  the  subject’s  voluntary  or  involuntary  muscle  contractions,  were  responsible  for  maintaining  balance.  Controlled  standing  was  generally successful since all 12 subjects were balanced by most of the controller conditions.  For unblocked experiments, 11/12 subjects were balanced by the CN controller for a duration between  15 and 60 s (mean 46 s; SD 10), 12/12 by the CP controller (mean 40 s; SD 13), 11/12 by the IN controller  (mean 43 s; SD 13), and 10/12 by the IP controller (mean 47 s; SD 12). Since three unblocked subjects   52     were  not  successfully  balanced  by  at  least  one  controller  condition,  the  unblocked  statistical  analysis  used data from nine subjects only.   For  blocked  experiments,  4/4  subjects  were  balanced  by  the  CN  controller  for  a  duration  between  15  and 60 s (mean 51 s; SD 10), 4/4 by the CP controller (mean 34 s; SD 22), 3/4 by the IN controller (mean  50  s;  SD  7),  and  4/4  by  the  IP  controller  (mean  38  s;  SD  11).  Since  one  subject  was  not  successfully  balanced by all controller conditions, the blocked statistical analysis used data from three subjects only.  Table 3.1 presents the group mean data for all controller conditions for the unblocked population. Table  3.2  presents  the  statistical  effects  of  intermittent  activation  and  prediction  for  both  blocked  and  unblocked data sets.     53     Figure 3.6: Sway and torque data vs. time. Sway angle ( , bold grey line) and ankle torque ( , thin black line) are  shown for one representative subject for conditions of natural standing and unblocked controlled standing with 4  types  of  control  models.  The  figure  is  scaled  such that  the  sway  angle  line  corresponds  to  required to hold the body steady, equal to  natural  standing,   and   ∙ ) for comparison between    (the  torque    and ankle torque ( ). For   are  nearly  superimposed.  Comparing  continuous  and  intermittent  conditions,   sway  and  torque  variations  were  statistically  greater  for  the  intermittent  conditions.  Refer  to  Table  3.1  for  results across all subjects.   54          Figure 3.7: Power spectral densities for sway angle and dynamic torque. The frequency content of sway angle ( ,  solid  blue  line)  and  dynamic  torque  (  ,  dotted  red  line)  are  shown  for  one  representative  subject  for   conditions of natural and unblocked controlled standing. Amplitudes are normalized for comparison of relative  frequency  content.  Comparing  conditions  with  and  without  a  predictor,  the  addition  of  a  predictor  shows statistically  higher  frequencies  for   .  Comparing  continuous  and  intermittent  conditions,  the  intermittent  conditions produces statistically higher frequencies for sway angle and statistically lower frequencies for   .   Refer to Table 3.1 for results across all subjects.        55     Figure  3.8:  Dynamic  torque  vs.  time.  Dynamic  torque (  )  is  shown for  one  representative  subject  for   conditions  of  natural  and  unblocked  controlled  standing  (same  subject  and  trials  as  shown  in  Figure  3.6).  For  natural  standing,    is  nearly  zero.  Comparing  continuous  and  intermittent  conditions,  dynamic  torque   variations  were  statistically  greater  for  the  intermittent  conditions.  Comparing  conditions  with  and  without  a  predictor, the addition of a predictor produces higher frequency oscillation. Refer to Table 3.1 for results across  all subjects.        56     Figure 3.9: Stimulation level vs. time. The level of stimulation current is shown for one representative subject for conditions  of  unblocked  controlled  standing  (same  subject  and  trials  as  shown  in  Figure  3.6).  Intermittent  conditions show recurring intervals where stimulation is zero and statistically lower average stimulation current, relative to continuous conditions. Refer to Table 3.1 for results across all subjects.            57     Table  3.1:  Unblocked  group  mean  data  by  experimental  condition. The  variable   is  the  body  angle  during  balance,    is the dynamic torque, and   is the torque at the ankle (including passive component). All data are  presented as group mean ± SD across all subjects. Measures of mechanical effort are normalized as percentages  of the setpoint holding torque,   .                  Continuous   Intermittent   Natural Standing   No Predictor (CN)   Predictor (CP)   No Predictor (IN)   Predictor (IP)   0.21 ± 0.06   0.16 ± 0.08   0.16 ± 0.07   0.46 ± 0.25   0.32 ± 0.12   4.1 ± 0.7   4.2 ± 1.1   4.2 ± 1.0   6.0 ± 1.0   5.4 ± 1.2    Peak frequency (Hz)   0.098 ± 0.088   0.112 ± 0.085   0.069 ± 0.023   0.294 ± 0.321   0.241 ± 0.264    Mean frequency (Hz)   0.164 ± 0.041   0.347 ± 0.174   0.332 ± 0.172   0.494 ± 0.123   0.558 ± 0.206    Peak frequency (Hz)   0.397 ± 0.110   1.284 ± 0.649   2.167 ± 0.493   1.139 ± 0.147   1.441 ± 0.341    Mean frequency (Hz)   0.852 ± 0.182   1.646 ± 0.341   2.139 ± 0.201   1.284 ± 0.201   1.491 ± 0.240   1.7 ± 0.8   7.1 ± 6.9   9.4 ± 6.9   27.5 ± 12.5   22.6 ± 7.1   7.0 ± 3.0   9.6 ± 6.8   11.4 ± 7.0   36.5 ± 17.0   28.0 ± 7.8   97.9 ± 1.6   101.4 ± 7.5   101.2 ± 7.2   115.3 ± 9.2   111.2 ± 8.8   n/a   0.83 ± 0.29   0.85 ± 0.27   0.69 ± 0.21   0.70 ± 0.18   Sway measures   Std. dev. (°)   Range (°)   Actuation measures    Std. dev. (% of    Mean (% of   )  )    Std. dev. (% of  )   Stimulation Mean (mA)     3.5.2  Sway   Intermittent  activation  tended  to  increase  the  size  and  frequency  of  sway.  Prediction  tended  to  decrease sway size for the intermittent condition only.  Sway size (SD and range of  ) was similar between the continuous controllers and natural standing (see  Table 3.1), but significantly larger for intermittent activation (p<0.01, see Table 3.2). When a predictor  was added, the range of sway remained fairly constant but sway SD significantly decreased (p<0.05). The  reduction  of  sway  SD  showed  an  interaction  trend  (p=0.057)  and  factor  decomposition  revealed  that  adding a predictor reduced sway SD primarily for the intermittent case only (p=0.053, see top‐left plot in  Figure 3.10).   Sway  frequency  content  was  significantly  increased  by  intermittent  activation  (p<0.05),  with  mean  frequency of sway increased by 40‐70% relative to continuous. The mean sway frequency was lowest for  natural standing, roughly 2 times greater for continuous conditions, and 3 times greater for intermittent  activation.   58     For each significant effect on sway measures in the unblocked data, the direction of the mean shift was  consistent with the data from blocked subjects (see Table 3.2). It should be noted, however, that most  of the effects were not statistically significant for the blocked subject data, which used data from only  three subjects.   Table  3.2:  Statistical  comparisons  between  experimental  conditions.  A  single  asterisk  indicates  significance  at p<0.05  and  two  asterisks  indicates  significance  at  p<0.01.  Mean  differences  show  the  main  effects  due  to  intermittent  activation  and prediction  (intermittent  relative  to continuous, predictor  relative  to no  predictor). Arrows indicate the sign of mean differences that have significance below 0.05. Statistics were generated using a 2x2  repeated‐measures  ANOVA  (for  blocked  and  unblocked  data)  and  interactions  were  decomposed  using  a post‐hoc Tukey method (for unblocked data only).       Mean Differences  Intermittent vs. Continuous      Sway measures   Unblocked   Blocked       Interaction Significance  p‐values (for unblocked only)   Predictor vs. No Predictor         Unblocked   Decomposition   Blocked     Interaction    Std. dev. (°)     0.213**   0.132     ‐0.057*   ‐0.112   0.057    Range (°)    1.540**   0.671   ‐0.254   ‐0.456   0.188    Peak frequency (Hz)    0.114*   0.706*   ‐0.042   0.118   0.780    Mean frequency (Hz)    0.185*   0.208   0.005   0.041   0.257     ‐0.487**   ‐0.559*     0.526**   0.343   0.102    0.342**   Actuation measures   Peak frequency (Hz)   CP vs. CN   IP vs. IN   0.999   0.053    Mean frequency (Hz)    ‐0.539**   ‐0.739*   0.180   0.045*   0.003**   0.226    Std. dev. (% of    15.336**   17.026*   ‐1.664   0.155   0.029*   0.956   0.047*    19.950**   20.875**   ‐3.439   ‐2.496   0.016*   1.000   0.012*    12.130**   5.153   ‐1.755   ‐1.635   0.326    ‐0.129**   ‐0.168*   0.003   ‐0.004           )    Std. dev. (% of   Mean (% of   )   )   Stimulation Mean (mA)              0.800        3.5.3  Actuation   Intermittent  activation  tended  to  increase  the  level  of  mechanical  effort,  decrease  the  frequency  of  corrective activity, and decrease the average stimulation energy. Prediction tended to decrease the level  of  mechanical  effort  (for  the  intermittent  condition  only)  and  increase  the  frequency  of  corrective  activity.  The level of mechanical effort (SD of    and SD of  ) was smallest for natural standing, roughly 4 to 6   times  greater  for  continuous  conditions,  and  13  to  16  times  greater  for  intermittent  activation  (see  Figure 3.6 and Figure 3.8). Adding a predictor reduced the mechanical effort, but the effects (reduced SD  59     of    and  )  were  not  statistically  significant.  However,  these  measures  showed  a  significant   interaction  (p<0.05),  and  factor  decomposition  revealed  that  adding  a  predictor  significantly  reduced  mechanical effort for the intermittent case only (p<0.05, see bottom two plots in Figure 3.10).  Intermittent activation increased the mean ankle torque (p<0.01), indicating that subjects, on average,  balanced slightly more forward (anterior) than for continuous conditions.  The  frequency  of  corrective  activity  (peak  and  mean    frequency)  was  lowest  for  natural  standing,   greater for intermittent activation, and greatest for continuous control. The frequency components of   are the only measures for which intermittent activation, relative to continuous control, improved  resemblance  to  natural  standing.  Peak  and  mean    frequency  were  significantly  reduced  by   intermittent  activation  (p<0.01),  with  mean  frequency  of    reduced  by  20‐30%  relative  to   continuous.     Figure  3.10:  Interaction  plots  for  measures  with  significant  interactions.  Vertical  bars  indicate  95%  confidence intervals for the means. C = continuous, I = intermittent. A single asterisk indicates pairwise significance below 0.05. A dagger symbol indicates pairwise significance below 0.1.     Furthermore,  the  frequency  of  corrective  activity  was  significantly  increased  by  a  predictor  (p<0.01),  with mean frequency of  of  mean    increased by 16‐30% relative to the no‐predictor condition. The increase    frequency  showed  a  significant  interaction  (p<0.05)  and  factor  decomposition  revealed  60      that adding a predictor significantly increased corrective activity for the continuous case only (p<0.01,  see top‐right plot in Figure 3.10).  Finally,  stimulation  energy  was  significantly  reduced  by  intermittent  activation  (p<0.01),  with  mean  stimulation  current  reduced  by  17%  relative  to  continuous.  In  Figure  3.9,  continuous  conditions  show  sustained  levels  of  electrical  stimulation,  whereas  intermittent  conditions  show  recurring  intervals  where stimulation current is zero.  For each significant effect on actuation measures in the unblocked data, the direction of the mean shift  was  consistent  with  the  blocked  data  (see  Table  3.2).  Most  of  these  effects  were  also  statistically  significant for the blocked data.   3.6  Discussion   This  study  set  out  to  evaluate  the  effects  of  two  factors  in  balance  control  modelling—intermittent  activation and prediction—based on measures of sway and actuation. For balance control models with  parameters  guided  by  published  literature,  results  showed  that:  a)  continuous  control  more  closely  produces  the  sway  and  mechanical  effort  of  natural  standing  (relative  to  intermittent  activation),  b)  intermittent  activation  requires  less  stimulation  energy  and  more  closely  produces  the  frequency  of  control corrections of natural standing (relative to continuous control), c) prediction reduces sway and  mechanical effort when sway is already large, and d) prediction increases the rate of corrective activity.  The following discussion reflects on the hypotheses, aims to explain the effects that were observed, and  identifies the limitations of this study.  3.6.1  Continuous vs. Intermittent Activation   As  hypothesized  in  H1,  intermittent  activation  exhibited  larger  sway  and  required  less  electrical  stimulation than the continuous model. By definition, intermittent activation removes the need for the  controller to continuously correct for small deviations in sway, but it also allows the system to sway far  more than during natural standing.   The results confirm that intermittent activation is a viable control option for balancing the human body.  To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first time intermittent activation has been used in a  control loop for successful FES controlled standing. Although continuous control produced sway size and  mechanical effort that more closely resembled natural standing,  intermittent  activation  produced two  characteristic  effects  of  natural  standing:  1)  reduced  rate  of  controller  corrections  (   frequencies  61      were lowest for natural standing, see Table 3.1) and 2) reduced stimulation energy, which is consistent  with the idea that the body optimizes control effort [11].   It  may  seem  counterintuitive  that  intermittent  activation  reduced  the  stimulation  energy  while  increasing the fluctuations in mechanical effort. The following explanations are offered: a) allowing the  controller breaks between bursts of stimulation removes the need to adjust for every small fluctuation  in  sway,  as  a  continuous  controller  is  constrained  to  do  [18],  and  b)  at  low  frequencies,  torque  fluctuations  are  dynamically  coupled  to  sway,  and  large  sway  directly  results  from  large  intermittent  thresholds. In other words, the on/off behaviour of an intermittent controller results in more efficient  control actions, while still correcting the system when required (i.e., when sway approaches an angle or  velocity threshold). This also explains why intermittent activation reduced the frequency components of   (the  controller  made  fewer  adjustments  for  small,  noisy  sway  fluctuations)  and  increased  the  frequency of sway (the intermittent thresholds that were selected predispose the system to large sway  fluctuations at a relatively high frequency). If intermittent thresholds are reduced, the controller would  be  expected  to  make  smaller  but  more  frequent  corrections.  Further  experimentation  is  required  to  determine  if  reduced  thresholds  would  still  generate  efficient  control  actions  (i.e.,  reduced  average  stimulation)  while  shifting  the  frequency  content  to  be  more  like  natural  standing  (i.e.,  the  higher  frequency corrections have sufficiently small amplitude to resemble natural control).  The  measured  mean  frequency  of    (~1.3  Hz)  is  consistent  with  intermittent  unidirectional  muscle   adjustments  occurring  in  intervals  of  ~400  ms  (1.25  Hz)  [53].  The  fact  that  natural  standing  showed  a  lower  mean    frequency  (0.85  Hz,  see  Table  3.1)  suggests  that  the  method  used  to  estimate  sway   angle during  natural standing (i.e., filtering ankle  torque as described in Section 3.4.5 above) may not  produce an accurate estimate of frequency content. This is discussed further in Section 3.6.5 below.  3.6.2  No Predictor vs. Predictor   As  hypothesized  in  H2,  the  addition  of  a  predictor  reduced  sway  size  and  mechanical  effort;  however  these  effects  were  only  applicable  for  control  models  with  intermittent  activation.  Although  reducing  loop  delay  improves  the  theoretical  stability  of  the  system,  the  results  suggest  that  a  predictor  offers  significant performance improvement only when coupled with intermittent activation.  Adding  a  predictor  also  increased  the  rate  of  controller  corrections  (see    frequencies  in  Table  3.2   and Figure 3.10). This is likely caused by noise in the feedback angle generated by the state predictor.  This  noise  is  amplified  by  the  PD  gains  in  the  angle  controller,  which  generates  higher  frequency  62     components in the commanded torque signal. The increase in mean    frequency was significant only   for continuous activation, validating that intermittent activation  is less susceptible  to system noise, as  described  by  Loram  et  al.  [18].  Intermittent  activation  samples  the  feedback  angle  at  a  low  sampling  rate, effectively eliminating the noise from a predictor while still benefitting from the reduced feedback  delay.  This  explains  why  the  predictor  showed  significant  improvement  only  when  coupled  with  intermittent activation.  The results confirm that a predictor is not required to achieve balance. A PD controller will add positive  phase to a system and generate a motor command that appears to precede sway [24], [67], therefore a  preceding  motor  command  does  not  indicate  the  existence  of  a  predictor  [2].  In  this  experiment,  the  computed  time‐shift  between  the  motor  command,   ,  and  sway  was  175  ms  (SD  47)  for  the  CN   condition.  This  is  close  to  155  ms  (SD  46)  reported  by  [24]  for  EMG  preceding  sway  during  normal  standing. This result merely shows that the combination of sway frequency and PD gains for the balance  control system presented here puts the time‐shift close to a measured physiological value without the  need for a predictor.  3.6.3  Validation by Neural Block   This  experiment  uniquely  compared  able‐bodied  and  blocked  subjects  and  demonstrated  that  the  significant  effects  due  to  intermittent  activation  and  prediction  were  consistent  between  both  sets  of  subjects.  This  leads  the  author  to  conclude  that  the  unblocked  results  (including  the  ability  of  all  controllers  to  maintain  standing)  are  valid  despite  the  potential  influence  of  voluntary  or  involuntary  contractions in this condition.  3.6.4  Consideration of PD Gains   For the continuous control conditions (CN and CP), the  than for natural standing, and the    frequencies were roughly 2 to 5 times larger    SD was more than 4 times larger. In general, increased resonant   frequency and oscillation (overshoot) are characteristic of a system with high proportional gain,  To assess the validity of the    gains used in this experiment, one can consider the effect of   .   on the   resonant  frequency  of  the  closed‐loop  system.  The  mean  sway  frequency  for  the  CN  condition  was  0.347 Hz (Table 3.1). A bode plot for the closed‐loop system (see Appendix A, Equation A.10) reveals a  resonant frequency of 0.343 Hz (average across subjects, assuming 1:1 torque generation). The similarity  between these values indicates that, in practice, the system tends to oscillate near resonance. In pursuit   63     of natural standing behaviour, one can propose a new    gain with the mean sway frequency matched   to natural standing (0.164 Hz). In simulation, this corresponds to a  in a   /   value reduced by 33%. This results    ratio of 0.47 s, which is nearly identical to that of the stability‐optimized gain pair reported   by [24]. However the original   /   ratio (0.32 s) remains closer to the normalized physiological value   (0.36 s) reported by [68].  These  results  suggest  that  LQR  gains,  suggested  by  [11],  may  be  too  high  for  a  single  link  inverted  pendulum system, and that reducing the    value would reduce control effort (   SD and frequency)   closer to natural performance.  3.6.5  Limitations   This  study  was  limited  by  using  only  one  type  of  intermittent  activation  and  one  set  of  predictor  parameters.  Although  the  general  findings  (i.e.,  the  effects  of  the  factors)  are  not  expected  to  differ  based on small changes in the parameters, it would be appropriate to test a wider range of parameters  for both factors.  Another limitation was the low number of subjects with statistically useful data. The statistical analysis  (a 2x2 repeated‐measures ANOVA) could only use data from subjects who were balanced successfully in  all control conditions. For the unblocked experiments, data from only 9 out of 12 subjects could be used.  For the blocked experiments, data from only 3 out of 4 subjects could be used. In future experiments  the author recommends using greater numbers of participants to increase the likelihood of generating  statistically significant results.  The  sway  angle  during  natural  standing  was  estimated  by  filtering  the  measured  ankle  torque,  as  described  by  Lafond  et  al.  [51].  Although  Lafond  et  al.  showed  that  this  method  can  estimate  quiet  standing COM trajectories with low RMS error, it may not produce high fidelity in the frequency domain.     If this is the case, the computed measures for the peak and mean frequencies of sway angle and   (which  is  a  function  of  the  sway  angle)  would  be  less  reliable  for  the  natural  standing  condition.  For  future  experiments  that  use  frequency  measures  to  compare  control  model  performance  to  natural  standing,  the  author  recommends  either:  a)  directly  measuring  the  body’s  COM  angle  during  natural  standing (e.g., by optical tracking or accelerometer‐based motion capture), or b) implementing a filter‐ type method that ensures fidelity with the frequency components of sway.   64     The state predictor advanced the feedback angle by only ~40% of the designed time‐shift. In spite of this  limitation,  the  addition  of  the  predictor  still  produced  significant  effects  (see  Table  3.2).  The  author  attributes  the  limited  time‐shift  to  inaccuracy  of  the  internal  model  used  in  the  state  predictor.  Specifically,  the  filter  used  to  represent  the  muscle  mechanics  may  have  had  too  high  of  a  damping  factor or too low of a cutoff frequency, causing attenuation of higher frequency torque components in  the  predictor’s  internal  model  of  torque  generation.  An  improved  system  model  for  the  torque  loop  could  be  generated  from  the  input‐output  data  (   and  )  collected  during  torque  loop  validation.   Furthermore,  the  state  predictor  can  be  modified  to  incorporate  an  adaptive  Kalman  filter,  as  in  [26],  that continuously corrects for process noise and errors in the internal model. This would be expected to  improve the predictor by enabling it to make more accurate predictions of balance angle.  Due  to  the  physiological  time  delays  between  muscle  stimulation  and  torque  production,  it  is  nearly  impossible  to  control  ankle  stiffness  directly  using  closed‐loop  control  of  ankle  torque.  True  stiffness  control  would  require  either  feedback  indicative  of  ankle  stiffness  (e.g.,  ultrasound  imaging  of  musculotendon length) or a highly‐accurate open‐loop model of ankle stiffness as a function of electrical  stimulation  parameters.  Either  method  is  outside  the  scope  of  this  work,  but  development  of  such  methods  would  allow  for  much  finer  muscle  control  and  may  enable  better  resemblance  between  controlled standing and natural standing.   3.7  Recommendations   Although  the  continuous  conditions  (CN,  CP)  more  closely  reproduced  the  sway  size  and  torque  variation  during  natural  standing,  the  author  recommends  further  experiments  using  the  IP  control  model,  based  on  the  following  resemblances  to  natural  standing:  Intermittent  activation  reduces  the  amount of corrective activity by the controller (   frequency and average electrical stimulation), and   adding  prediction  to  an  intermittent  controller  reduces  both  the  mechanical  effort  and  sway.  An  IP  control  model  also  allows  the  most  flexibility  in  control  parameters:  adjusting  the  intermittent  thresholds, hold time on control output, and time‐advance of a predictor allows an IP model to test a  wide range of parameters that may be optimized to resemble the natural controller. Furthermore, the  author  expects  that  reduced  angle  and  velocity  thresholds  for  the  IP  model  will  produce  better  resemblance  to  natural  standing  by  reducing  sway  and  the  accompanying  fluctuations  in  torque.  Theoretically,  a  predictor  provides  “extra  stability”  or  phase  margin,  allowing  the  system  to  remain   65     stable with reduced    gain and providing an additional “tuning knob” for tuning controlled standing to   resemble natural standing.  Further work is recommended to assess whether intermittent activation can reduce overall mechanical  effort. Asai et al. used simulations to show that intermittent controllers permit reduced PD gains [54].  Although the experiments in this thesis kept PD gains constant, it would be useful to determine whether  a control model with reduced PD gains can improve the resemblance between intermittently controlled  standing and natural standing by reducing fluctuations in mechanical torque.  Finally,  natural  sway  is  predominantly  low  frequency,  with  peak  and  mean  components  below  0.2  Hz  (see  Table  3.1).  Consequently,  this  study  is  limited  by  implementing  controllers  that  hold  a  constant  angle. Varying the setpoint of the controller could allow for easier comparison with natural standing by  making  controlled  standing  predominantly  low  frequency  as  well.  Alternatively,  sway  data  for  natural  standing  could  have  been  high‐pass  filtered  prior  to  spectral  analysis,  but  it  is  unclear  which  low‐ frequency  components  are  best  characterized  by  a  “wandering”  setpoint,  and  which  components  emerge as a result of CNS controller behaviour; therefore the filter design would be somewhat arbitrary  and  may  remove  important  controller‐dependent  features.  Explicitly  varying  the  setpoint  would  arguably  overcome  this  limitation  by  allowing  any  low  frequency  controller‐dependent  behaviour  to  persist while biasing the power spectral density toward that of natural standing. A wandering setpoint  would also predispose the system to movement, which could emphasize the performance effects of a  state predictor (as discussed in Section 3.6.2 above).   3.8  Summary   This work is the first to compare control models with and without intermittent activation and prediction  under  identical  conditions  in  a  controlled  standing  context,  and  the  first  to  demonstrate  the  use  of  intermittent activation to drive FES‐controlled standing.  This study showed that models with intermittent and continuous activation are able to stably balance  subjects  by  activating  human  calf  muscles  using  FES  with  surface  electrodes.  Intermittent  activation  increases  sway  but  reduces  control  effort.  The  author  believes  that  a  modified  form  of  intermittent  activation  has  the  potential  to  produce  sway  that  resembles  natural  standing.  Adding  a  predictor,  although  unnecessary  for  simply  maintaining  balance,  improves  performance  only  when  coupled  with  intermittent activation. Using a predictor in future experiments is expected to allow for wider variation   66     of parameters such as feedback gains and intermittent activation thresholds. Results suggest, however,  that prediction presents a tradeoff between delay‐reduction and added feedback noise.  Future  work  is  aimed  at  improving  the  overall  controlled  standing  performance  and  resemblance  to  natural  standing.  The  author  recommends  implementing  intermittent  activation  with  reduced  sway  thresholds,  utilizing  a  state  predictor  designed  to  account  for  greater  loop  delay,  reducing    gain  by   33%, and explicitly varying the setpoint angle at a low frequency (~0.16 Hz).  Long term goals involve using control models to provide balance assistance during everyday tasks and  rehabilitation. For these contexts, the models presented here for quiet standing should be extended to  control for larger postural disturbances by incorporating advanced internal modelling and movement of  body segments above the ankle.        67     4     Conclusions and Future Work  Conclusions and Future Work  This  chapter  summarizes  the  overall  contributions  of  the  thesis  by  reflecting  on  the  motivation  and  research questions presented in Chapter 1. This thesis concludes by recommending future work with the  balance  investigation  tools  that  have  been  developed  and  discussing  potential  applications  in  rehabilitation and assistive technology.   4.1  Overall Contributions   This  thesis  provides  tools  for  novel  investigations  into  human  balance  control,  and  further  understanding of appropriate models for the control of quiet standing. Three specific contributions are  identified from this work:  C1)   The development of a robotic motion platform for reconfigurable balance tasks.   C2)   Characterization of the main effects of intermittent activation and prediction in  the  control of  human standing.   C3)   The  development  of  a  closed‐loop,  real‐time  system  for  investigating  standing  via  programmable control models with muscles activated by FES.   The following section discusses these contributions by reflecting on the research questions presented in  Chapter 1 (i.e., questions Q1 and Q2 below).   4.1.1  Contribution 1: RISER motion platform   As identified in Chapter 1, there are limitations in the current methods for investigating balance control.  Specifically,  existing  tools  and  methods  for  system  identification  involve  perturbing  the  body  in  ways  that  may  evoke  large  compensatory  responses  that  do  not  accurately  reflect  the  control  of  quiet  standing. A non‐perturbing method for studying balance control is to engage subjects in a balancing task  that engages the normal neural pathways of quiet standing but modifies task physics. However, prior to  the  work  in  this  thesis,  a  device  that  can  systematically  modify  the  physics  of  balance  did  not  exist.  68     Recognizing the limitations in current balance investigation technology, and motivated by the desire to  better  understand  the  control  of  quiet  standing  through  non‐perturbing  investigation  techniques,  Chapter 1 posed the question:  Q1:  Can  we  engage  humans  in  a  whole‐body  balancing  task  that  is  decoupled  from  the  actual  mechanics of their body?  Chapter  2  addressed  Q1  by  describing  the  development  of  the  RISER  motion  platform,  which  allows  investigators  to  modify  the  mechanics  of  balance  while  keeping  subjects  engaged  in  an  immersive  balance  task.  Validation  experiments  answered  Q1  affirmatively  by  showing  that  the  platform  can  successfully recreate balance mechanics in a way that is decoupled from subjects’ natural biomechanics.  The  RISER  platform  represents  Contribution  1:  development  of  a  robotic  motion  platform  for  reconfigurable balance tasks. The RISER platform, unlike existing balance investigation platforms (such  as  CAREN,  MRF,  and  Wobbler,  presented  in  Chapter  1),  enables  the  unique  ability  to  modify  balance  mechanics without any explicit perturbation. RISER is the first platform to allow different balance modes  to  be  implemented  quickly,  precisely,  safely,  and  without  the  need  to  design  or  calibrate  additional  mechanical apparatus. Moreover, the physics are reprogrammable using physically intuitive parameters  such  as  mass,  height,  gravity,  and  viscous  damping.  The  platform  specifically  benefits:  a)  balance  researchers wishing to augment task physics while keeping subjects engaged in closed‐loop control, and  b) clinicians designing novel balance rehabilitation, training, and diagnosis modalities (discussed further  in Section 4.2 below).  A key limitation of the RISER platform (as described in Chapter 2) is that it keeps the angle between a  subject’s  foot  and  body  constant,  which  modifies  the  effects  of  ankle  proprioception  and  passive  stiffness.  To  overcome  this  limitation,  researchers  at  the  UBC  CARIS  Lab  have  developed  a  secondary  motion  platform  for  independently  rotating  the  feet  relative  to  the  body  angle.  This  work  was  performed by E. R. Pospisil, separately from the work described in this thesis, and will be described in a  forthcoming publication.  4.1.2  Contributions 2 and 3: Closed‐loop system and evaluation for control models   As identified in Chapter 1, there are gaps in scientific understanding of how to best model the control  mechanisms  of  quiet  standing.  Specifically,  two  factors  remain  in  question:  the  activation‐type   69     (intermittent  or  continuous)  and  the  existence  of  a  predictor.  Recognizing  these  gaps  in  the  understanding of human balance control, Chapter 1 posed the question:  Q2: What types of control models are better for describing the physiological control of quiet standing?  Chapter 3 addressed Q2 by comparing the effects of two factors—activation‐type and prediction—in a  control  loop  that  incorporates  human  muscle  physiology.  This  study  helped  to  answer  Q2  by  showing  the following:  a) Continuous (relative to intermittent) activation more closely produces the sway and mechanical  effort  of  natural  standing.  This  is  consistent  with  most  balance  control  models  presented  in  literature, which use continuous activation and tune noise parameters to achieve resemblance  with natural sway [2].  b) Intermittent  activation  produced  two  important  effects  (relative  to  continuous  activation):  reduced activation energy and reduced frequency of control corrections. These effects indicate  economical  control  actions,  a  characteristic  demonstrated  by  natural  motor  control  [18],  demonstrating  that  intermittent  activation  may  be  physiological.  Based  on  these  effects,  the  author believes that a modified form of intermittent activation has the potential to more closely  resemble natural standing than a continuous controller.  c) Intermittent  activation  produced  sway  that  was  significantly  larger  than  natural  standing.  Increased  movement  is  consistent  with  the  expected  behaviour  of  a  bounded‐stability  system  [20].  However,  the  level  of  sway  increase  is  more  of  an  indication  that  activation  boundaries  were too large, rather than an indication that intermittent activation is not physiological.  d) While  it  was  difficult  to  conclude  that  the  predictor  more  closely  mimics  physiological  responses,  the  results  demonstrated  that  adding  a  predictor  reduces  sway  when  activation  is  intermittent.  This  is  consistent  with  the  work  of  Loram  et  al.,  who  assert  that  intermittent  activation  and  prediction  work  together  to  generate  the  paradoxical  muscle  movements  observed during quiet standing [3], [69].  e) In  theory,  a  predictor  has  the  practical  advantage  of  increasing  system  stability  by  reducing  closed‐loop  delay.  However,  results  indicated  that  the  predictor  generates  feedback  noise,  which  can  potentially  destabilize  a  system.  Consequently,  the  author  recommends  further  testing with predictive control models in order to characterize the trade‐off between noise and  delay‐reduction.   70     Although  this  study  was  limited  in  the  range  of  parameters  tested  (e.g.,  intermittent  activation  type,  thresholds,  predictor  advance,  feedback  gains)  it  provided  key  insight  into  the  main  effects  of  intermittent activation and prediction, which will help to guide further investigation into answering Q2,  and  may  also  provide  design  direction  for  technology  that  assists  standing.  These  findings  represent  Contribution  2:  Characterization  of  the  main  effects  of  intermittent  activation  and  prediction  in  the  control of human standing.  In  order  to  test  different  control  models,  Chapter  3  developed  a  closed‐loop  balance  control  system  (detailed  in  Appendix  A)  that  enables  reconfiguration  of  control  elements  and  activates  human  calf  muscles  using  FES.  This  system  can  be  programmed  with  any  theoretical  control  model  for  standing,  providing a tool for researchers to test balance control models while keeping muscle physiology in the  loop.  As  described  in  Chapter  1,  control  models  are  typically  evaluated  and  compared  using  purely‐ virtual  computer  simulations,  where  idealized  conditions  may  not  accurately  reflect  the  complexity  of  activating  human  muscles.  The  developed  closed‐loop  system  overcomes  this  limitation,  and  consequently the work in Chapter 3 is the first to systematically compare different control model factors  using  a  closed  loop  that  includes  the  activation  of  human  muscles.  This  work  is  also  the  first  to  demonstrate the viability of using intermittent activation to control standing with muscles activated by  FES,  which  may  help  to  improve  assisted‐standing  technology  for  persons  with  paraplegia  and  those  with  balance  impairments.  The  closed‐loop  balance  control  system  represents  Contribution  3:  The  development  of  a  closed‐loop,  real‐time  system  for  investigating  standing  via  programmable  control  models with muscles activated by FES.   4.2  Future Work   4.2.1  Balance Control System Modifications   Advanced  torque  tracking:  The  torque  loop  described  in  Chapter  3  encapsulates  the  complexities  of  torque generation and enables the angle controller to output corrective torque commands. The design  uses  a  proportional  controller  with  feedforward  torque  mapping.  The  mapping  is  designed  to  compensate for the nonlinearities of ankle torque production as a function of electrical stimulation of  the  calf  muscle.  Although  effective  torque  tracking  was  achieved,  researchers  pursuing  balance  experiments with human muscles in the loop may wish to use a more complex closed‐loop controller for  ankle  torque  that  utilizes  gain‐scheduling  and  local  models  of  stimulated  muscle  dynamics  [64],  [70].  Methods that utilize this approach may exhibit reduced calibration time and improved torque tracking  71     during  controlled  standing  experiments.  Further  experimentation  is  required  to  substantiate  a  significant advantage.  Dorsiflexor  activation:  The  experiments  in  Chapter  3  activated  plantarflexor  (toe  down)  muscles  only.  Activation of the antagonistic dorsiflexors, primarily the tibialis anterior muscle, would improve torque  control, particularly for sharply decreasing ankle torques. Jaime et al. demonstrated impressive torque  tracking with this method [65]. Because the body's center of mass naturally rests forward of the ankle  joint, in this work the author judged that dorsiflexor stimulation would not be crucial enough to justify  the  added  experimental  complexity  (i.e.,  instrumentation,  calibration,  and  subject  fatigue).  As  demonstrated in Chapter 3, dorsiflexion is not essential for maintaining quiet standing. In some trials of  controlled standing, however, the experiment halted when the subject “fell” backwards, indicating that  plantarflexion  did  not  decrease  quickly  enough  to  correct  the  motion.  Therefore,  simple  dorsiflexor  stimulation—designed  to  briefly  counter  sustained  plantarflexor  contractions  only  when  rapid  torque  reduction is required—could prolong controlled standing experiments.  Derived balance mechanics: In this thesis, the mechanics of quiet standing are modelled as an inverted  pendulum, with the body as a single rigid link rotating about the ankles. In natural standing, however,  the  body  has  limited  stiffness  about  the  knee,  hip,  arm,  and  neck  joints,  allowing  small  deflections  of  body  segments  above  the  ankle.  Consequently,  the  inverted  pendulum  model  may  oversimplify  the  actual  relationship  between  the  centre  of  mass  angle  and  the  ankle  torque  for  each  subject.  In  particular, it may overestimate the body’s effective inertia, causing attenuation of the higher frequency  sway components. Subject‐specific mechanics could be derived during natural standing using decoupled  measurements of ankle torque and body segment angles (e.g., with optical tracking). Programming the  RISER  system  with  subject‐specific  mechanics  may  improve  the  resemblance  between  controlled  standing and natural standing.  Balance  augmentation:  On‐going  development  of  the  RISER  system  includes  implementing  additional  configurability  of  the  variables  involved  in  human‐controlled  standing.  This  development  is  aimed  at  allowing experimenters to augment the sensory information received by a subject balancing on RISER:  visual  information  using  head‐mounted  3‐D  visual  displays,  ankle  proprioception  using  rotating  foot  platforms, and vestibular information using electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerves. Additionally,  the  RISER  system  can  be  configured  for  alternate  motion  paradigms,  e.g.,  sway  in  the  M‐L  (left‐right)  direction,  or  balance  motion  that  seamlessly  transitions  between  pre‐recorded  trajectories  and  active  control via ankle torque.  72     4.2.2  Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology   Rehabilitation  and  training:  The  RISER  platform  has  strong  potential  for  rehabilitation  and  training  purposes. The physics are modifiable, allowing subjects to actively engage in a customized balance task.  The physics can be programmed to reflect normal standing or augmented conditions, such as standing in  reduced  gravity,  on  a  surfboard,  or  on  a  playground  swing.  Input  from  the  subject  is  received  via  forceplates  beneath  the  feet,  typically  measuring  ankle  torque.  Experimenters  can  modify  the  input  channels, e.g., giving full control to just one ankle, or balancing based on the weight distributed to each  leg. RISER typically applies no external perturbations to subjects, but experimenters can program it to do  so. Collaboration with physiatrists and kinesiologists will lead to the design of clinical experiments that  utilize these capabilities to implement novel rehabilitation and motor learning exercises.  Considerations for unsupported standing: This thesis has considered a control model for quiet standing  in the absence of external perturbation. For practical FES‐supported standing, the control model would  need  to  account  for  expected  and  unexpected  disturbances.  A  feedforward  process  with  internal  modelling would provide a means to account for expected postural adjustments, such as arm‐reaching  or bending at the hips [71–74]. A switching controller could account for large unexpected disturbances,  for  example,  by  activating  hip  motion  when  the  COM  location  approaches  the  limits  of  the  base  of  support  [75].  Use  of  FES‐supported  standing  in  daily  life  would  require  extensive  consideration  of  practical factors such as muscle fatigue, transition to other actions (e.g., standing to walking), and the  possible effects of interaction with intact physiological control [76].  Prevention  of  falls  for  elder  persons:  A  simple  but  practical  application  of  FES‐assisted  standing  is  the  prevention  of  falls  for  elder  persons.  Mackey  and  Robinovitch  have  shown  that  the  reaction  time  between  a  balance  disturbance  and  the  onset  of  ankle  torque  production  is  a  key  factor  for  fall  prevention [77]. They report physiological reaction times of roughly 127 ms for elder persons and 100  ms for younger adults. The balance control system developed in Chapter 3 showed a response time of  only 80 ms (step change in    to the onset of a change in  ), indicating that FES‐assistance could reduce   reaction  times  for  elder  persons  by  roughly  one  third  (faster  than  that  of  a  younger  adult),  thereby  improving ankle‐strategy balance recovery and preventing falls.    * * *   73     In summary, the contributions of this thesis can be applied by researchers and clinicians wishing to use a  configurable motion platform for balance investigation, rehabilitation, and training. Future work on the  closed‐loop  balance  control  system  will  add  the  ability  to  augment  sensory  information,  develop  new  modes of balance physics, and investigate control models that accurately resemble the natural control  mechanisms of human standing.  This thesis provides new tools and insight into the control of human balance. Ultimately, this work will  help  advance  techniques  and  technologies  to  improve  the  quality  of  life  for  people  with  balance  impairments.      74     References   References  [1]   R. J. Peterka, “Simplifying the complexities of maintaining balance,” IEEE Engineering in Medicine  and Biology Magazine, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 63‐68, Mar. 2003.   [2]   H. van der Kooij, E. van Asseldonk, and F. C. T. van der Helm, “Comparison of different methods  to identify and quantify balance control,” Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 145, no. 1‐2, pp.  175‐203, Jun. 2005.   [3]   I. D. Loram, C. N. Maganaris, and M. Lakie, “Human postural sway results from frequent, ballistic  bias impulses by soleus and gastrocnemius,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 564, no. 1, pp. 295‐ 311, Apr. 2005.   [4]   I. D. Loram, C. N. Maganaris, and M. Lakie, “Paradoxical muscle movement in human standing,”  The Journal of Physiology, vol. 556, no. 3, pp. 683‐9, May 2004.   [5]   P.  Gawthrop,  I.  D.  Loram,  and  M.  Lakie,  “Predictive  feedback  in  human  simulated  pendulum  balancing,” Biological Cybernetics, vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 131‐46, Aug. 2009.   [6]   K.  Masani,  A.  H.  Vette,  N.  Kawashima,  and  M.  R.  Popovic,  “Neuromusculoskeletal  torque‐ generation process has a large destabilizing effect on the control mechanism of quiet standing,”  Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 100, no. 3, pp. 1465‐75, Sep. 2008.   [7]   R. C. Fitzpatrick, J. L. Taylor, and D. I. McCloskey, “Ankle stiffness of standing humans in response  to  imperceptible  perturbation:  reflex  and  task‐dependent  components,”  The  Journal  of  Physiology, vol. 454, pp. 533‐47, Aug. 1992.   [8]   T. P. Huryn,  B. L.  Luu, H.  F.  M. Van  der Loos, J.‐S. Blouin, and E.  A. Croft, “Investigating human  balance  using  a  robotic  motion  platform,”  2010  IEEE  International  Conference  on  Robotics  and  Automation, pp. 5090‐5095, May 2010.   [9]   R.  C.  Fitzpatrick,  D.  K.  Rogers,  and  D.  I.  McCloskey,  “Stable  human  standing  with  lower‐limb  muscle afferents providing the only sensory input,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 480, pp. 395‐ 403, Oct. 1994.   [10]   A.  H.  Vette,  K.  Masani,  and  M.  R.  Popovic,  “Implementation  of  a  physiologically  identified  PD  feedback controller for regulating the active ankle torque during quiet stance,” IEEE Transactions  on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 235‐43, Jun. 2007.   [11]   T. Kiemel, Y. Zhang, and J. J. Jeka, “Identification of neural feedback for upright stance in humans:  stabilization  rather  than  sway  minimization,”  The  Journal  of  Neuroscience,  vol.  31,  no.  42,  pp.  15144‐53, Oct. 2011.   [12]   P.  Bawa  and  R.  B.  Stein,  “Frequency  response  of  human  soleus  muscle,”  Journal  of  Neurophysiology, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 788‐93, Jul. 1976.  75      [13]   J. W. Smith, “The forces operating at the human ankle joint during standing,” Journal of Anatomy,  vol. 91, no. 4, pp. 545‐64, Oct. 1957.   [14]   A. D. Kuo, “An optimal state estimation model of sensory integration in human postural balance,”  Journal of Neural Engineering, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. S235‐49, Sep. 2005.   [15]   V.  M.  Zatsiorsky  and  M.  Duarte,  “Instant  equilibrium  point  and  its  migration  in  standing  tasks:  rambling and trembling components of the stabilogram,” Motor Control, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 28‐38,  Jan. 1999.   [16]   A. Bottaro, M. Casadio, P. G. Morasso, and V. Sanguineti, “Body sway during quiet standing: is it  the residual chattering of an intermittent stabilization process?,” Human Movement Science, vol.  24, no. 4, pp. 588‐615, Aug. 2005.   [17]   I. D. Loram and M. Lakie, “Human balancing of an inverted pendulum: position control by small,  ballistic‐like, throw and catch movements,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 540, no. 3, pp. 1111‐ 1124, Mar. 2002.   [18]   I. D. Loram, H. Gollee, M. Lakie, and P. Gawthrop, “Human control of an inverted pendulum: Is  continuous  control  necessary?  Is  intermittent  control  effective?  Is  intermittent  control  physiological?,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 589, no. 2, pp. 307‐324, Nov. 2010.   [19]   I. D. Loram and M. Lakie, “Direct measurement of human ankle stiffness during quiet standing:  the intrinsic mechanical stiffness is insufficient for stability,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 545,  no. 3, pp. 1041‐53, Dec. 2002.   [20]   A.  Bottaro,  Y.  Yasutake,  T.  Nomura,  M.  Casadio,  and  P.  G.  Morasso,  “Bounded  stability  of  the  quiet standing posture: an intermittent control model,” Human Movement Science, vol. 27, no. 3,  pp. 473‐95, Jun. 2008.   [21]   R.  C.  Fitzpatrick  and  D.  I.  McCloskey,  “Proprioceptive,  visual  and  vestibular  thresholds  for  the  perception of sway during standing in humans,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 478, pp. 173‐86,  Jul. 1994.   [22]   H.  van  der  Kooij  and  E.  de  Vlugt,  “Postural  responses  evoked  by  platform  pertubations  are  dominated by continuous feedback,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 98, no. 2, pp. 730‐43, Aug.  2007.   [23]   P.  Gatev,  S.  Thomas,  T.  Kepple,  and  M.  Hallett,  “Feedforward  ankle  strategy  of  balance  during  quiet stance in adults,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 514 ( Pt 3, pp. 915‐28, Feb. 1999.   [24]   K.  Masani,  A.  H.  Vette,  and  M.  R.  Popovic,  “Controlling  balance  during  quiet  standing:  proportional  and  derivative  controller  generates  preceding  motor  command  to  body  sway  position observed in experiments,” Gait & Posture, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 164‐72, Feb. 2006.   [25]   H. van der Kooij, R. Jacobs, B. Koopman, and H. Grootenboer, “A multisensory integration model  of human stance control,” Biological Cybernetics, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 299‐308, May 1999.  76      [26]   H. van der Kooij, R. Jacobs, B. Koopman, and F. C. T. van der Helm, “An adaptive model of sensory  integration in a dynamic environment applied to human stance control,” Biological Cybernetics,  vol. 84, no. 2, pp. 103‐15, Feb. 2001.   [27]   N.  Sharma,  C.  M.  Gregory,  and  W.  E.  Dixon,  “Predictor‐based  compensation  for  electromechanical  delay  during  neuromuscular  electrical  stimulation,”  IEEE  Transactions  on  Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 601‐11, Dec. 2011.   [28]   L. A. Johnson and A. J. Fuglevand, “Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation,” Journal  of Neural Engineering, vol. 8, no. 1, p. 016009, Feb. 2011.   [29]   W. Holderbaum, K. J. Hunt, and H. Gollee, “H∞ robust control design for unsupported paraplegic  standing: experimental evaluation,” Control Engineering Practice, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 1211‐1222,  Nov. 2002.   [30]   H. Gollee, K. J. Hunt, and D. E. Wood, “New results in feedback control of unsupported standing  in paraplegia,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 12, no. 1,  pp. 73‐80, Mar. 2004.   [31]   A.  H.  Vette,  K.  Masani,  K.  Nakazawa,  and  M.  R.  Popovic,  “Neural‐mechanical  feedback  control  scheme generates physiological ankle torque fluctuation during quiet stance,” IEEE Transactions  on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 86‐95, Feb. 2010.   [32]   K.  J.  Hunt,  “Control  of  paraplegic  ankle  joint  stiffness  using  FES  while  standing,”  Medical  Engineering & Physics, vol. 23, no. 8, pp. 541‐555, Oct. 2001.   [33]   N. Donaldson, M. Munih, G. F. Phillips, and T. A. Perkins, “Apparatus and methods for studying  artificial  feedback‐control  of  the  plantarflexors  in  paraplegics  without  interference  from  the  brain,” Medical Engineering & Physics, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 525‐535, Sep. 1997.   [34]   A.  Lees,  J.  Vanrenterghem,  G.  Barton,  and  M.  Lake,  “Kinematic  response  characteristics  of  the  CAREN moving platform system for use in posture and balance research,” Medical Engineering &  Physics, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 629‐35, Jun. 2007.   [35]   Z.  Matjačić,  I.  L.  Johannesen,  and  T.  Sinkjaer,  “A  multi‐purpose  rehabilitation  frame:  a  novel  apparatus for balance training during standing of neurologically impaired individuals,” Journal of  Rehabilitation Research and Development, vol. 37, no. 6, pp. 681‐91, 2000.   [36]   B. L. Luu, T. P. Huryn, H. F. M. Van der Loos, E. A. Croft, and J.‐S. Blouin, “Validation of a robotic  balance system for investigations in  the  control of  human standing  balance,” IEEE  Transactions  on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 382‐90, Aug. 2011.   [37]   S. Ushida, J. Terashita, and H. Kimura, “Switching structural biomechanical model of multisensory  integration during human quiet standing,” in 2004 43rd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control  (CDC) (IEEE Cat. No.04CH37601), 2004, pp. 959‐965 Vol.1.   77     [38]   A.  D.  Kuo,  “An  optimal  control  model  of  human  balance:  can  it  provide  theoretical  insight  to  neural  control  of  movement?,”  in  Proceedings  of  the  1997  American  Control  Conference  (Cat.  No.97CH36041), 1997, vol. 5, pp. 2856‐2860.   [39]   H.  van  der  Kooij,  S.  Donker,  M.  de  Vrijer,  and  F.  C.  T.  van  der  Helm,  “Identification  of  human  balance  control  in  standing,”  2004  IEEE  International  Conference  on  Systems,  Man  and  Cybernetics, pp. 2535‐2541, 2004.   [40]   M.  Cenciarini  and  R.  J.  Peterka,  “Stimulus‐dependent  changes  in  the  vestibular  contribution  to  human postural control,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 95, no. 5, pp. 2733‐50, May 2006.   [41]   R. C. Fitzpatrick, D. Burke, and S. C. Gandevia, “Loop gain of reflexes controlling human standing  measured with the use of postural and vestibular disturbances,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol.  76, no. 6, pp. 3994‐4008, Dec. 1996.   [42]   D. W. Franklin and D. M. Wolpert, “Specificity of reflex adaptation for task‐relevant variability,”  The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 28, no. 52, pp. 14165‐75, Dec. 2008.   [43]   R. C. Fitzpatrick, D. Burke, and S. C. Gandevia, “Task‐dependent reflex responses and movement  illusions  evoked  by  galvanic  vestibular  stimulation  in  standing  humans,”  The  Journal  of  Physiology, vol. 478, pp. 363‐72, Jul. 1994.   [44]   B.  L.  Luu,  J.‐S.  Blouin,  and  R.  C.  Fitzpatrick,  “Changes  in  cortical  activity  and  perceived  muscle  force during balance and non‐balance tasks,” in Society for Neuroscience. 39th Annual Conference  Proceedings of the,, 2009, p. 662.3.   [45]   Y.  Takahashi,  H.  Takahashi,  K.  Sakamoto,  and  S.  Ogawa,  “Human  balance  measurement  and  human posture assist robot design,” in SICE 99. Proceedings of the 38th SICE Annual Conference.  International Session Papers, 1999, pp. 983‐988.   [46]   I. D. Loram, S. M. Kelly, and M. Lakie, “Human balancing of an inverted pendulum: is sway size  controlled  by  ankle  impedance?,”  The  Journal  of  Physiology,  vol.  532,  no.  3,  pp.  879‐91,  May  2001.   [47]   Y. C. Pai and J. Patton, “Center of mass velocity‐position predictions for balance control,” Journal  of Biomechanics, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 347‐54, Apr. 1997.   [48]   I.  D.  Loram,  C.  N.  Maganaris,  and  M.  Lakie,  “The  passive,  human  calf  muscles  in  relation  to  standing:  the  non‐linear  decrease  from  short  range  to  long  range  stiffness,”  The  Journal  of  Physiology, vol. 584, no. 2, pp. 661‐75, Oct. 2007.   [49]   R. C. Fitzpatrick and B. L. Day, “Probing the human vestibular system with galvanic stimulation,”  Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 96, no. 6, pp. 2301‐16, Jun. 2004.   [50]   C.  J.  Dakin,  G.  M.  L.  Son,  J.  T.  Inglis,  and  J.‐S.  Blouin,  “Frequency  response  of  human  vestibular  reflexes characterized by stochastic stimuli,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 583, no. 3, pp. 1117‐ 27, Sep. 2007.  78      [51]   D.  Lafond,  M.  Duarte,  and  F.  Prince,  “Comparison  of  three  methods  to  estimate  the  center  of  mass during balance assessment,” Journal of Biomechanics, vol. 37, no. 9, pp. 1421‐6, Sep. 2004.   [52]   T.  Kiemel,  A.  J.  Elahi,  and  J.  J.  Jeka,  “Identification  of  the  plant  for  upright  stance  in  humans:  multiple movement patterns from a single neural strategy,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 100,  no. 6, pp. 3394‐406, Dec. 2008.   [53]   I.  D.  Loram,  P.  Gawthrop,  and  M.  Lakie,  “The  frequency  of  human,  manual  adjustments  in  balancing an inverted pendulum is constrained by intrinsic physiological factors,” The Journal of  Physiology, vol. 577, no. 1, pp. 417‐32, Nov. 2006.   [54]   Y. Asai, Y. Tasaka, K. Nomura, T. Nomura, M. Casadio, and P. G. Morasso, “A model of postural  control  in  quiet  standing:  robust  compensation  of  delay‐induced  instability  using  intermittent  activation of feedback control,” PloS ONE, vol. 4, no. 7, p. e6169, Jan. 2009.   [55]   J.  J.  Collins  and  C.  J.  De  Luca,  “Open‐loop  and  closed‐loop  control  of  posture:  a  random‐walk  analysis of center‐of‐pressure trajectories,” Experimental Brain Research, vol. 95, no. 2, pp. 308‐ 18, Jan. 1993.   [56]   C. Eurich and J. Milton, “Noise‐induced transitions in human postural sway,” Physical Review E,  vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 6681‐6684, Dec. 1996.   [57]   P.  G.  Morasso,  L.  Baratto,  R.  Capra,  and  G.  Spada,  “Internal  models  in  the  control  of  posture,”  Neural Networks, vol. 12, no. 7‐8, pp. 1173‐1180, Oct. 1999.   [58]   P.  G.  Morasso  and  V.  Sanguineti,  “Ankle  muscle  stiffness  alone  cannot  stabilize  balance  during  quiet standing,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 88, no. 4, pp. 2157‐2162, Oct. 2002.   [59]   M.  Casadio,  P.  G.  Morasso,  and  V.  Sanguineti,  “Direct  measurement  of  ankle  stiffness  during  quiet  standing:  implications  for  control  modelling  and  clinical  application,”  Gait  &  Posture,  vol.  21, no. 4, pp. 410‐24, Jun. 2005.   [60]   D. A. Winter, Biomechanics and Motor Control of Human Movement, 3rd ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley,  2005.   [61]   K.  J.  Hunt,  H.  Gollee,  R.‐P.  Jaime,  and  N.  Donaldson,  “Design  of  feedback  controllers  for  paraplegic  standing,”  IEE  Proceedings  ‐  Control  Theory  and  Applications,  vol.  148,  no.  2,  p.  97,  2001.   [62]   K.  J.  Hunt,  M.  Munih,  and  N.  Donaldson,  “Feedback  control  of  unsupported  standing  in  paraplegia. I. Optimal control approach,” IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 5,  no. 4, pp. 331‐340, 1997.   [63]   M. Munih, N. Donaldson, K. J. Hunt, and F. M. Barr, “Feedback control of unsupported standing in  paraplegia. II. Experimental results,” IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 5, no.  4, pp. 341‐352, 1997.   79     [64]   K.  J.  Hunt,  M.  Munih,  N.  Donaldson,  and  F.  M.  Barr,  “Optimal  control  of  ankle  joint  moment:  toward unsupported standing in paraplegia,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 43, no.  6, pp. 819‐832, Jun. 1998.   [65]   R.‐P.  Jaime,  Z.  Matjačić,  and  K.  J.  Hunt,  “Paraplegic  standing  supported  by  FES‐controlled  ankle  stiffness,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 10, no. 4, pp.  239‐48, Dec. 2002.   [66]   D. A. Winter, A. E. Patla, F. Prince, M. G. Ishac, and K. Gielo‐Perczak, “Stiffness control of balance  in quiet standing,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 80, no. 3, pp. 1211‐1221, 1998.   [67]   K.  Masani,  M.  R.  Popovic,  K.  Nakazawa,  M.  Kouzaki,  and  D.  Nozaki,  “Importance  of  body  sway  velocity  information  in  controlling  ankle  extensor  activities  during  quiet  stance,”  Journal  of  Neurophysiology, vol. 90, no. 6, pp. 3774‐82, Dec. 2003.   [68]   R. J. Peterka, “Sensorimotor integration in human postural control,” Journal of Neurophysiology,  vol. 88, no. 3, pp. 1097‐118, Sep. 2002.   [69]   I. D. Loram, C. N. Maganaris, and M. Lakie, “Active, non‐spring‐like muscle movements in human  postural  sway:  how  might  paradoxical  changes  in  muscle  length  be  produced?,”  The  Journal  of  Physiology, vol. 564, no. 1, pp. 281‐93, Apr. 2005.   [70]   K. J. Hunt, M. Munih, N. Donaldson, and F. M. Barr, “Investigation of the Hammerstein hypothesis  in the modeling of electrically stimulated muscle,” IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering,  vol. 45, no. 8, pp. 998‐1009, Aug. 1998.   [71]   D.  M.  Wolpert,  Z.  Ghahramani,  and  M.  I.  Jordan,  “An  internal  model  for  sensorimotor  integration,” Science, vol. 269, no. 5232, pp. 1880‐2, Sep. 1995.   [72]   R. Johansson, P.‐A. Fransson, and M. Magnusson, “Optimal coordination and control of posture  and movements,” Journal of Physiology, vol. 103, no. 3‐5, pp. 159‐77, 2009.   [73]   Y. P. Shimansky, “Spinal motor control system incorporates an internal model of limb dynamics,”  Biological Cybernetics, vol. 83, no. 4, pp. 379‐89, Oct. 2000.   [74]   A. D. Kuo, “An optimal control model for analyzing human postural balance,” IEEE Transactions  on Biomedical Engineering, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 87‐101, Jan. 1995.   [75]   Y. Kanamiya, S. Ota, and D. Sato, “Ankle and hip balance control strategies with transitions,” in  2010 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2010, pp. 3446‐3451.   [76]   P. H. Veltink and N. Donaldson, “A perspective on the control of FES‐supported standing,” IEEE  Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 109‐112, Jun. 1998.   [77]   D. C. Mackey and S. N. Robinovitch, “Mechanisms underlying age‐related differences in ability to  recover balance with the ankle strategy,” Gait & Posture, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 59‐68, Jan. 2006.   80     [78]   A.  M.  Moseley,  J.  Crosbie,  and  R.  Adams,  “Normative  data  for  passive  ankle  plantarflexion‐‐ dorsiflexion flexibility,” Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 514‐21, Jul. 2001.    81     Appendix A: Development of the Balance Control System   Appendix  A:  Development  of  the  Balance  Control System  Chapter 3 modelled human balance as a control loop that includes actuation of human calf muscles. Five  key  system  components  were  introduced  and  used  in  the  experiments  in  Chapter  3:  the  body  mechanics,  the  angle  controller,  the  control  action  regulator,  the  state  predictor,  and  the  torque  generation loop. This appendix is divided into five sections, each of which describes the detailed design  and implementation of a system component. Figure A.1 shows the complete balance control system.   Figure A.1: Balance control system with five key components: The angle controller, the control action regulator,  the state predictor, the torque generation loop, and the body mechanics.   82     A.1  Body Mechanics  The  mechanics  of  A‐P  body  sway  are  defined  by  the  relationship  between  ankle  torque  and  angle,  represented  by  the  following  equation  of  rotational  motion  and  its  corresponding  Laplace  transfer  function:      1  →     	.   (A.1)      is  the  torque  acting  at  the  ankles,  a  combination  of  active  and  passive  components  [10],  [19],  [58],   refers to the moving mass of the body, which includes all mass above the feet.   is   [59]. The term   the height of the body’s centre of mass above the ankles,   is the mass moment of inertia of the body  about  the  ankle  joint,   is  the  viscous  damping  of  the  ankles,  and   is  gravitational  acceleration  (9.81  m/s2). Sway angle ( ) is considered positive when the body leans forward, and torque ( ) is considered  positive  during  plantarflexion,  which  holds  the  body  upright  during  forward  lean.  Figure  A.1  depicts  angle and torque in their positive directions.  If the body is held dynamically stable in space (  and   equal to zero) torque is proportional to angle by  the factor   lim       , known as the body’s load stiffness, or the critical level of stiffness [59]:   →  1    1  →  ∙    (A.2)      Body  sway  mechanics  were  implemented  using  the  RISER  platform  described  in  Chapter  2  [8]  and  further  validated  in  [36].  The  RISER  platform  engages  a  subject  in  a  balance  task  by  simulating  the  mechanical load of the body and swaying in the A‐P direction in response to ankle torque, measured by  force  plates  beneath  the  feet.  Subjects  are  supported  on  the  RISER  platform  with  the  backboard  adjusted to their natural standing angle, such that when the platform is horizontal, the subject’s body  leans  slightly  forward  at  an  angle,  virtually  adds  passive  torque  (  ,  which  is  typically  close  to  3°.  As  described  in  [36],  RISER   )  since  ankles  do  not  rotate  and  calf  contraction  is  approximately   isometric. The added torque is based on passive stiffness data from [78], normalized to subject mass  ,  and implemented as:   83        .  0.19     .  ,   (A.3)      are  in  radians.   such  that  passive  torque  increases  exponentially  during  forward  lean.   and   When  the  platform  is  horizontal,  the  subject’s  body  is  at  its  natural  standing  angle  and  a  real  passive  torque exists at the ankle. Consequently, Equation (A.3) includes an offset such that zero virtual passive  .   torque is added when the body angle   is equal to   The mass and height parameters of the pendulum are programmed to match those measured for each  subject,  with  inertia  set  to  (  =  1.119  )  and    set  to  0.971  times  the  total  body  mass,  as  per   normalized  anthropometric  data  [60].  The  body’s  centre‐of‐mass  (COM)  height,  ,  is  measured  as  the  distance between the subject’s ankles and COM. Ankle damping,  , is set to 0.1 Nm/(°/s) for all subjects  [19].  The  transfer  function    in  Equation  (A.1)  is  implemented  in  software  by  first  rearranging  into   state‐space form (using state vector        ):         0  →  →  1  1  0 1  0     .   0  (A.4)   (A.5)      The state‐space  dynamics  (matrices   and  ) are converted  to a discrete system via a  zero‐order hold  (ZOH), using a sample time of 16.6 ms, to produce matrices    and   . The discretized system dynamics   .   (A.6)   are solved at each time step according to the equation:   1          In practice, the balance physics can apply an offset to the state vector,  , in order to decouple the angle  of the platform from the angle of the virtual pendulum. At each time step, a state offset   prior to solving Equation (A.6), then subtracted from      1   is added to   1  afterward:   .   (A.7)   84           Typically, the virtual pendulum is offset several degrees forward of vertical, at an angle corresponding to  0 . Consequently, when the platform is   the subject’s natural standing angle, such that  level (  0), the virtual pendulum is rotated forward at angle  ∙  exert a torque equal to   , and the subject must    in order to hold this position. This arrangement is desirable   because  subjects  are  supported  on  the  RISER  platform  with  the  backboard  adjusted  to  their  natural  standing  angle  (leaning  slightly  forward),  therefore  physical  correspondence  is  achieved  when  holding  the platform at horizontal requires the same torque as holding the body at   .   Chapter 2 reported a time delay of 117 ms between the commanded angle (sent from the RISER driving  software  to  the  motion  base  computer)  and  the  measured  feedback  angle  of  the  RISER  platform.  It  is  important to note that this delay applies only to the physical (not virtual) motion of RISER, therefore it  does not affect the angle feedback to the balance controller used during controlled standing. However,  in  order  to  minimize  the  delay  for  the  human‐controlled  balance  experiments  described  in  [36],  lead  compensation  was  incorporated  to  reduce  the  time  between  the  actual  and  desired  positions9.  The  commanded angle is modified by a weighted linear extrapolation of the desired position based on the  previous trajectory:   ∗ 0.5 ∗       0.25 ∗  0.25 ∗     (A.8)      where   is  the  desired  angle,    is  the  commanded  angle,   is  the  number  of  time‐steps  to  project   ahead,  and   is  the  discrete  time  index,  where   0 corresponds  to  the  current  time  step.  Equation   (A.8) was tuned by heuristically varying the three  ‐difference coefficients in order to achieve effective  delay reduction without added noise. As described in [36],   is typically set to 5, and a cross‐correlation  between  actual  and  desired  positions  shows  that  the  total  system  delay  is  reduced  to  approximately  41.5 ms.                                                                 9   A  description  of  the  lead  compensation  design  is  reproduced  here,  with  permission,  from  [36]:  B.  L.  Luu,  T.  P.  Huryn, H. F. M. Van der Loos, E. A. Croft, and J.‐S. Blouin, Validation of a robotic balance system for investigations  in  the  control  of  human  standing  balance,  IEEE  Transactions  on  Neural  Systems  and  Rehabilitation  Engineering,  August 2011. © 2011 IEEE.   85     A.2  Angle Controller  The angle controller is the fundamental component of the balance system that prevents the body from  falling  over.  It  applies  feedforward  gravity  compensation  for  a  desired  setpoint  angle  (  )  and  a   proportional‐derivative (PD) gain to the angular error in order to determine the corrective torque signal  for maintaining balance. The PD controller is designed as:        (A.9)        where    and    are  the  gains  applied  to  the  angular  position  error  and  angular  velocity  error,   respectively.  Based  on  the  positive  directions  for  torque  and  angle,  the  negative  sign  is  necessary  to  output control torque in the correct direction. The feedforward compensation, equal to   , matches   the  static  load  stiffness  required  to  hold  the  body  at  a  desired  setpoint  angle,  and  has  the  effect  of  setting  the  theoretical  steady‐state  closed  loop  gain  to  1  as  shown  below.  The  closed  loop  transfer  function is computed as:  ∙       1  1  .   (A.10)      Substituting Equations (A.1) and (A.9) for    and   , respectively, yields:   1 1  1  1 1  1  (A.11)      .        The steady‐state gain is found by setting the Laplace variable s to zero:      lim →  1   (A.12)   86           As  suggested  by  [11],  a  linear‐quadratic  regulator  (LQR)  designed  to  minimize  activation  energy  computed PD controller gains for each subject. The MATLABTM LQR function used parameters Q = [1 0; 0  1], R = 106, and N=0. The  system model parameter  matrices,   and  , used to  design the LQR are  the  same used to define the balance mechanics in Equation (A.1):  0       1  0 1  .   ,  (A.13)      Phase margin (PM) is a measure used to assess the theoretical stability of a PD controlled system [14],  [24].  Based  on  normalized  body  parameters  from  [24],  the  LQR‐designed  PD  gains  produced  a  stable  system with  20° phase margin, according to the Nyquist criterion, for the theoretical closed‐loop system  with 83 ms pure loop delay (as described in Chapter 3, Section 3.3.4) and torque generation modelled as  a 2nd order filter (described in Section B.4 below). Closed‐loop delays reduce a system’s PM toward zero,  representing the Nyquist threshold for instability. The theoretical system with perfect torque production  remains stable (PM > 0) for pure loop delay less than 190 ms. These PD gains fall within the robust‐space  mapping identified by [24], who also reported a similar maximum loop delay.   A.3  Control Action Regulator  The control action regulator determines when   (input to the torque loop) is updated to the value of   (output  from  the  angle  controller).  When  operating  in  continuous  control  mode,  the  torque  value  computed  by  the  angle  controller  is  sent  directly  to  the  torque  loop  (  ).  When  operating  in   intermittent  control  mode,  bounded  stability  is  achieved  by  limiting  updates  to   depending  on  the  instantaneous angle and velocity of the body. At each time instant, the likelihood of triggering a control  update is equal to the probability density function presented by [20]:   ,       erf  √2  ∙ erf  √2  ,   (A.14)      such that the probability of triggering is highest when the angle is far above or below the setpoint angle  and  moving  quickly  away  from  it.  The  threshold  values,    =  0.0028  rad  (0.16°),    =  0.0034  rad/s   (0.195°/s), are taken from [20], based on experimental data from natural standing. Following an update,  the value of   is held constant for 150 ms. At all other times (i.e., after the 150 ms period has elapsed  87     and prior to another update occurring)   is set to 70% of the torque required to hold at the setpoint  angle (0.7 ∙  ∙  ) based on relative ankle stiffness values reported by [59].   A.4  State Predictor  A predictive mechanism is designed to improve the estimate of the feedback angle and velocity (i.e., the  system  state)  in  order  to  reduce  the  overall  closed‐loop  system  delay.  The  predictor  estimates  future  balance angle ( ) by forward‐simulating the effects of motor commands (  ) on the delayed feedback   signal ( ), similar to the linear predictor described in [26]. In addition to having knowledge of the ZOH   and   discretized  body  dynamics  (matrices    described  in  Section  B.1  above),  this  implementation   differs from that of [26] by including an estimate of the torque generation (   to  ) as a second‐order   filter with damping coefficient  =0.7 and cutoff frequency Ω=5 Hz, as per [20].  The forward‐simulation is presented graphically in Figure A.2. We use k to represent the discrete time  index, where   0 corresponds to the current time step. The initial condition,   the feedback angle and velocity,    and    is set to   , at the current time step. The state predictor then estimates    steps forward. At each step, the estimate of system state is updated according to the discrete state  space equation:  1       1  ∗  ∗  ,   (A.15)      where   is the torque command from the angle controller after passing through the second‐order filter.   is similarly calculated at each time step:  1 1       ∗  ∗  ,   (A.16)      where    is  the  torque  command  from  the  angle  controller,  and    and    are  the  ZOH  discretized   state‐space matrices describing the torque generation filter:  Ω 2 Ω       Ω     (A.17)      88     with   and Ω parameters defined above.   Figure  A.2: Forward  simulation  by  the state  predictor  utilizes past  output  from the angle  controller  ( knowledge of body mechanics (matrices   ,   ,   , and   ) to produce a state estimate,   )  and   , which is   compensated for N‐time steps of system delay.     The  velocity  output    from  the  state  predictor  is  very  noisy  and,  if  input  to  a  PD  controller,   introduces large noise into the system. Therefore, the predicted velocity sent to the angle controller is  calculated post‐hoc by differentiating the predicted angle:  1       0.0166     (A.18)      A.5  Active Torque Generation Loop  In  order  to  include  human  muscles  in  the  balance  control  loop,  functional  electrical  stimulation  (FES)  stimulates the plantarflexing calf muscles of the right leg. The resulting ankle torque is measured by a  forceplate and fed back into the system as input to the virtual body mechanics. The torque generation  loop  is  designed  to  achieve  a  desired  ankle  torque  by  modulating  the  level  of  stimulation  current.  Ideally,  the  torque  loop  produces  1:1  output  between  loop system with a proportional error controller (   and   .  The  torque  loop  is  a  nested  closed‐  ) and a feedforward component, as shown in Figure   A.3.  A  similar  nested  loop  design  was  used  by  [29],  [30],  [32],  [61–65].  The  summed  output  from  the  89     error controller and feedforward components is a stimulation current ( , in milliamps) that defines the  height of a train of monophasic current pulses sent through surface electrodes placed over the triceps‐ surae muscles of the right leg. The stimulated muscles contract and produce plantarflexion torque about  the ankle. The torque recorded from the right side forceplate is fed back into the torque loop. Since the  torque  loop  only  stimulates  the  calf  muscles  of  the  right  leg,  the  desired  control  torque  ( balancing  the  body  is  halved  at  the  input,  and  the  generated  torque  (  )  for   )  is  doubled  on  the   output.   Figure A.3: Torque loop used to drive muscle stimulation to achieve a desired ankle torque.     The gain of the error controller is typically set to unity, but can be adjusted to reduce tracking error for  following a torque trajectory. The open‐loop torque map is designed to approximate the inverse ankle  torque plant and account for hysteresis caused by residual contractions. It outputs an updated value of  stimulation  current  (in  mA)  as  a  function  of  the  desired  ankle  torque  and  the  previous  level  of  stimulation:   ,          (A.19)      If  the  desired  torque  is  below  a  threshold  value  (equal  to  the  lowest  relaxed  standing  torque  of  the  subject) output is zero. Output is software limited to an upper limit determined for each subject.  The  open‐loop  torque  map  is  calibrated  for  each  subject  by  stimulating  at  various  current  levels  and  recording ankle torque. Each current level is held constant for 1.5 seconds before transitioning to a new  value.  Values  are  pseudo‐randomized  with  adjustable  resolution  (typically  2‐3  mA)  in  order  to  sample  the 2‐dimensional space of starting stimulation level (  ) and delta (change in) stimulation level (∆ ),   between experimentally determined current limits (e.g., between 10 and 50 mA). Figure A.4 shows an  example  plot  for  the  applied  stimulation  current  and  measured  ankle  torque  during  the  torque  map  90     calibration procedure. For each pair of    and ∆ , a corresponding torque value ( ) is computed as the   average ankle torque between 0.5 and 0.6 s after the step in stimulation.       Figure A.4: Stimulation level and measured ankle torque during open‐loop torque map calibration for a single  subject.     The recorded data are least squares fit to a third order by third order polynomial surface function using  the left‐side divide operator in MATLABTM:      \∆  1     (A.20)         where  ∙  indicates a column array of data points, and the result   is an array of coefficients,    to   .   The resulting 3rd order polynomial surface function is:     ∆  ,  .   (A.21)   An example of the fitted surface function is shown in Figure A.5.   91         Figure  A.5:  Fitted  surface  representing  the  open‐loop  torque  map for  a  single  subject.  The  surface  defines  a  change in the level of the stimulation current (in mA) as a function of the desired ankle torque and the present  level of stimulation. Note that the delta stimulation increases monotonically for higher desired torque and lower starting stimulation. Circles indicate raw subject data.     Equation (A.21) is rearranged and multiplied by a unit delay to solve for the open‐loop torque mapping  presented in Equation (A.19):   1       	.   (A.22)      A.6  Summary  This appendix described the design and implementation of the balance control loop system components  presented in Chapter 3 and shown in Figure A.1. Together these five components create a closed‐loop  92     system that allows various balance control models to be tested while including human calf muscles in  the control loop, as per the experiments in Chapter 3.        93        Appendix B: Supplementary Results  Appendix B: Supplementary Results  This appendix presents results from the experiments described in Chapter 3 that supplement the results  presented in that chapter. This appendix contains the following items:    Tabulated  group  mean  results  for  all  experimental  conditions,  for  unblocked  and  blocked  experiments (note: Table B.1 is shown in Chapter 3 and reproduced here for completeness)        Sway angle vs. time for all subjects and experimental conditions     Power spectral density (PSD) for all subjects and experimental conditions     Example plot of control torque and measured right‐side ankle torque vs. time for one subject     94     Table  B.1:  Unblocked  group  mean  data  by  experimental  condition. The  variable   is  the  body  angle  during  balance,    is the dynamic torque, and   is the torque at the ankle (including passive component). All data are  presented as group mean ± SD across all subjects. Measures of mechanical effort are normalized as percentages of the setpoint holding torque,   .        UNBLOCKED DATA       Continuous   Intermittent   Natural Standing   No Predictor (CN)   Predictor (CP)   No Predictor (IN)   Predictor (IP)   0.21 ± 0.06   0.16 ± 0.08   0.16 ± 0.07   0.46 ± 0.25   0.32 ± 0.12   4.1 ± 0.7   4.2 ± 1.1   4.2 ± 1.0   6.0 ± 1.0   5.4 ± 1.2    Peak frequency (Hz)   0.098 ± 0.088   0.112 ± 0.085   0.069 ± 0.023   0.294 ± 0.321   0.241 ± 0.264    Mean frequency (Hz)   0.164 ± 0.041   0.347 ± 0.174   0.332 ± 0.172   0.494 ± 0.123   0.558 ± 0.206    Peak frequency (Hz)   0.397 ± 0.110   1.284 ± 0.649   2.167 ± 0.493   1.139 ± 0.147   1.441 ± 0.341    Mean frequency (Hz)   0.852 ± 0.182   1.646 ± 0.341   2.139 ± 0.201   1.284 ± 0.201   1.491 ± 0.240   1.7 ± 0.8   7.1 ± 6.9   9.4 ± 6.9   27.5 ± 12.5   22.6 ± 7.1   7.0 ± 3.0   9.6 ± 6.8   11.4 ± 7.0   36.5 ± 17.0   28.0 ± 7.8   97.9 ± 1.6   101.4 ± 7.5   101.2 ± 7.2   115.3 ± 9.2   111.2 ± 8.8   n/a   0.83 ± 0.29   0.85 ± 0.27   0.69 ± 0.21   0.70 ± 0.18   Sway measures   Std. dev. (°)   Range (°)   Actuation measures    Std. dev. (% of    Mean (% of   )  )    Std. dev. (% of  )   Stimulation Mean (mA)     Table B.2: Blocked group mean data by experimental condition. The variable  is the body angle during balance,    is  the  dynamic  torque,  and   is  the  torque  at  the  ankle  (including  passive  component).  All  data  are presented as group mean ± SD across all subjects. Measures of mechanical effort are normalized as percentages of the setpoint holding torque,   .       BLOCKED DATA          Continuous   Intermittent   Natural Standing   No Predictor (CN)   Predictor (CP)   Natural Standing   No Predictor (CN)   0.31 ± 0.07  0.19 ± 0.05  0.19 ± 0.09  0.47 ± 0.24   0.26 ± 0.06  Sway measures   Std. dev. (°)   4.5 ± 0.6  4.5 ± 0.5  4.4 ± 0.7  5.8 ± 0.4   4.9 ± 0.4   Peak frequency (Hz)   0.074 ± 0.029  0.353 ± 0.588  0.441 ± 0.765  0.647 ± 0.408   0.927 ± 0.620   Mean frequency (Hz)   0.161 ± 0.025  0.765 ± 0.495  0.709 ± 0.508  0.697 ± 0.231   0.857 ± 0.139   Peak frequency (Hz)     0.588 ± 0.292  1.574 ± 0.327  1.927 ± 0.391    1.137 ± 0.034   1.368 ± 0.294   Mean frequency (Hz)   0.966 ± 0.190  1.874 ± 0.465  2.003 ± 0.370  1.195 ± 0.111   1.416 ± 0.271  2.1 ± 0.9  12.5 ± 7.8  14.3 ± 7.3  30.8 ± 5.8   29.4 ± 4.5  9.4 ± 1.3  15.5 ± 6.6  16.6 ± 6.8  39.9 ± 9.3   34.7 ± 6.3  109.0 ± 18.7  107.9 ± 3.8  107.6 ± 7.1  114.9 ± 1.9   112.1 ± 3.3  n/a   1.21 ± 0.27  1.19 ± 0.25  1.08 ± 0.24   1.00 ± 0.30   Range (°)   Actuation measures    Std. dev. (% of  )    Std. dev. (% of   Mean (% of   )   )   Stimulation Mean (mA)   95       Figure  B.1:  Sway  angle  vs.  time  for  all  subjects  and  all  conditions.  Vertical  limits  on  each  plot  are  set  to  three  degrees  above  and  below  each  subject’s setpoint angle.   96       Figure B.2: Power spectral density for all subjects and all conditions. The frequency contents of sway angle ( , blue line) and dynamic torque (  , red line)   for  each  subject  are  shown  as  the  average  across  all  trials  of  the  same  experimental  condition.  Amplitudes  are  normalized  for  comparison  of  relative  frequency content.   97     Figure  B.3:  Control  torque  and  measured  ankle  torque  vs.  time.  Torque  data  are  plotted  for  a  single  subject  (same subject and trials as shown in Figure 3.6). The control torque (thin blue line) is the desired torque for the right‐side  ankle  (equal  to  half  the  output  from  the  control  action  regulator)  and  the  measured  ankle  torque (thick  red  line)  is  the  torque  measured  for  the  right‐side  ankle.  For  the  intermittent  conditions,  the  discrete  changes  in  control  torque  and  150  ms  holding  periods  are  visible.  The  figure  also  shows  the  delay  between  a  change in the control torque and the resulting change in measured ankle torque.           98        Appendix C: RISER Documentation  Appendix C: RISER Documentation  This  appendix  provides  an  overview  of  the  hardware  and  software  architecture  for  the  RISER  motion  platform. A brief description of the system operation is also included.   C.1   System Overview   The RISER motion platform is based on a 6‐DOF motion platform (6DOF2000E, MOOG, East Aurora, NY,  USA)  driven  by  three  computers:  the  host  computer  (a  PC  running  LabVIEWTM  2010  software  on  the  Microsoft  Windows  XP  operating  system),  the  PXI  computer  (a  NI‐8108  embedded  controller  running  LabVIEWTM  Real‐Time  10  software),  and  the  motion  base  computer  (running  a  MOOG  170‐131m  proprietary  operating  system).  These  three  computers  are  connected  by  a  dedicated  network  switch  (DGS‐1008G, D‐Link, Taipei, Taiwan). A schematic of the overall hardware structure is shown in Figure  C.1. The three computers serve the following primary functions:    HOST computer: Operator input and system controls.     PXI computer: Implementation of real‐time computations for the simulation of balance physics  and control models.     Motion base computer (MBC): Inverse kinematics and servoing of the MOOG motion platform.   The  forceplates  mounted  on  the  6‐DOF  motion  base  measure  forces  and  moments  at  a  subject’s  feet  and  send  analog  voltage  signals  to  a  data  acquisition  system  (DAQ,  NI‐6229,  National  Instruments,  Austin,  TX)  connected  to  the  PXI  computer.  This  input  is  used  by  the  balance  simulation  and  motion  control  software  on  the  PXI  to  compute  the  desired  motion  of  the  platform.  The  output  motion  commands  are  sent  by  the  PXI  computer  to  the  MBC  which  controls  the  motion  platform.  A  sample  operation  sequence  is  provided  in  Section  C.3.  For  experiments  that  involve  electrical  stimulation,  a  separate  control  loop  on  the  PXI  drives  the  DAQ  which  outputs  analog  voltage  data  to  an  electrical  stimulator  (DS5,  Digitimer,  Welwyn  Garden  City,  England).  The  stimulator  generates  the  commanded  current through surface electrodes that are placed over a subject’s calf muscles.   C.2   Software Architecture   The architecture for the driving software (running on the host and PXI computers) is shown in Figure C.2.  This software was designed by the author using the NI LabVIEW graphical programming language.  99     The  host  computer  implements  a  polling  loop  that  receives  button  presses  and  updates  system  parameters  as  the  user  interacts  with  the  front  panel  shown  in  Figure  C.4.  The  core  of  the  host‐side  driving software is a state machine that transitions the RISER system through a series of states such as  idle, engaged, balance simulation, ridefile playback, parking, stopping, etc.  The  PXI  computer  implements  a  main‐loop  which  operates  at  approximately  60  Hz  (driven  by  UDP  updates  from  the  MBC).  Within  this  loop  is  a  case‐structure  containing  actions  that  depend  on  the  system state. These actions determine the method by which forceplate data and position feedback are  used  to  compute  a  new  position  command  to  the  MOOG  motion  base.  During  the  balance  simulation  state, this loop executes a real‐time simulation of balance mechanics (e.g., an inverted pendulum). The  state‐specific actions for the balance simulation state are shown in Figure C.3.  The MBC software is proprietary to MOOG and consequently is not documented in this thesis. The MBC  initiates communication with the PXI computer by writing its current position (  ) to a UDP channel at   a  nominal  rate  of  60  Hz.  The  MBC  continuously  reads  new  position  commands  written  by  the  PXI  computer,  performs  an  inverse  kinematics  computation  to  determine  the  required  lengths  for  the  six  linear actuators, and servos to the desired position.   C.3   Sequence of Operations   A typical sequence of operations is described here to provide context to the software architecture: The  operator inputs balance parameters (e.g., mass, inertia, and damping) to the host computer through the  host‐side  front  panel  shown  in  Figure  C.4.  The  front  panel  displays  a  series  of  context‐dependent  buttons  that  transition  the  RISER  system  into  the  balance  simulation  state.  The  host  computer  sends  system‐state and balance parameter information to the PXI computer using LabVIEWTM shared network  variables.  The  PXI  computer  uses  this  information  to  perform  a  real‐time  simulation  of  an  inverted  pendulum that moves in response to ankle torque measured by the forceplates (see balance simulation  process in Figure C.3). The PXI computer writes the computed pendulum angle to a UDP (user datagram  protocol) channel that is read by the MBC. The MBC servos the MOOG motion base in order to achieve  the desired balance angle.  The  operator  can  also  view  and  interact  with  the  front  panel  for  the  software  running  on  the  PXI  computer. The PXI front panel, shown in Figure C.5, is visible on the host computer screen and primarily  provides indicators for the overall system performance (see Figure C.5 region A). This front panel also   100     provides  a  limited  set  of  parameters  related  to  control  model  simulations,  including  controller  type  (intermittent or continuous) and state predictor (see Figure C.5 region B), both of which were used in  the experiments described in Chapter 3.   101     Figure C.1: Hardware setup diagram for RISER motion platform.     102       Figure  C.2:  Software  architecture  diagram  for  RISER.  The  host  computer  (bottom)  handles  the  majority  of  the  user input, including transitioning through machine states and reading the parameters that define the balance mechanics. The PXI computer handles the real‐time balance simulation and execution of closed loop balancing with control models. A triple‐line indicates a data stream containing multiple variables.      103     Figure  C.3:  Software  architecture  diagram  for  balance simulation state. The  top  section  shows  the  simulation  process  for  balance  control  models.  The  bottom section shows the simulation process for the balance mechanics (e.g., an inverted pendulum). As described in Chapter 2 of this thesis, the input to  the balance simulation is measured ankle torque and the output of the simulation is the computed balance angle, which is sent to the motion base as a  position command.      104     Figure C.4: Front panel for RISER driving software on host computer. The host‐side front panel is the primary user interface for operating RISER. A) The front  panel  presents  context‐specific  buttons  for  safely  and  easily  transitioning  RISER  through  different  motion  states  (e.g.,  simulating  balance  or  tracking  a  predefined  motion  trajectory).  B)  High‐priority  buttons  allow  the  motion  platform  to  be  parked  and/or  stopped  at  any  time.  C)  The  front  panel  also  provides input for the physical parameters that define the mechanics of the balance simulation (e.g., mass, inertia, gravity, etc.).     105     Figure C.5: Front panel for RISER driving software on PXI computer. The PXI‐side front panel primarily provides: A) indicators for system performance and B)  a limited set of controls for modifying system operation.         106     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0105189/manifest

Comment

Related Items