UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Sparks of Union Samandari, Farshid 2014

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2014_spring_samandari_farshid.pdf [ 15.81MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0103419.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0103419-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0103419-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0103419-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0103419-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0103419-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0103419-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0103419-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0103419.ris

Full Text

SPARKS OF UNIONbyFarshid SamandariBachelor of General Studies, Indiana University, 1999Master of Music, University of British Columbia, 2007A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OFTHE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OFDOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTSinThe Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies(Composition)THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA(Vancouver)April 2014c© Farshid Samandari 2014AbstractThis document delves into the precept of unity in diversity from a musical per-spective, in order to replace the timeworn aesthetic norms with ones that may inducea music befitting the fabric of our contemporary global village. It deals with the con-temporary musical zeitgeist from this perspective and examines the transformationsin musical substance derived from the copious changes in dissemination since the in-formation revolution. It also presents Sparks of Union, a 20-minute composition for tenWestern instruments and interactive electronics. This composition aims to focus ondifferent musical languages in search of polarizing and uniting elements, and exploresfree interactions between the different musical elements. As a result it strives to createnew sonorities derived from a fully democratic multicultural interaction.iiPrefaceThis is an original work by composer Farshid Samandari. The electronic com-ponent of the piece uses some open-source plugins and software to generate sound:Michael Norris’s Spectral DroneMaker and Spectral Tracing plugins from http://www.michaelnorris.info/software/soundmagic-spectral.html and Dr Keith Hamel’s UBCMax/MSP/Jitter Toolbox from http://www.opusonemusic.net/muset/toolbox.html.iiiTable of ContentsAbstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iiPreface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iiiTable of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ivList of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viAcknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ixDedication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xChapter 1. Cultural Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.3 Allusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41.4 Implications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Chapter 2. Formal Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.1 Overall Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.2 Detailed Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92.3 Golden Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192.4 Alternate Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24Chapter 3. Melodic Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273.1 Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273.2 Rhythm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283.3 Polyphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31ivTABLE OF CONTENTS3.4 Musical Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353.5 Musical Intersections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37Chapter 4. Harmonic Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424.1 Symmetries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424.2 Interaction with Melody . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464.3 Spectral Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494.4 Extended Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55Chapter 5. Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575.1 Role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575.2 Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59Chapter 6. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63Appendix A. Sparks of Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69Appendix B. Seating Arrangement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166Appendix C. Tables of Formal Divisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167Appendix D. Diagrams of Proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170Appendix E. Morse Code Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171Appendix F. Modes and Scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172vList of Figures1.1 Sparks of Union mm.1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52.1 Developmental sectional formal design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.2 Sparks of Union mm.6-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102.3 Sparks of Union mm.60-63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112.4 χ melody . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122.5 “Unity” set to Morse code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132.6 Centre of the symmetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132.7 Sparks of Union - strings mm.304-316 combination of the Morse code andUnity” set to Morse code and χ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142.8 Sparks of Union mm.411-414 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152.9 Relation of codai to γ and δ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162.10 Rotation process of the triangle pattern mm.431-478 . . . . . . . . . . . . 162.11 Relations of the pitch content of mm.45-50 and β . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172.12 Relations of the pitch content of mm.208-211 and β . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172.13 Relations of the pitch content of mm.269-274 and β . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182.14 β used as the supporting material in the flute part mm.257-260 . . . . . . 182.15 Symmetry in the pitch material of mm.28-292 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192.16 Real and analogous golden ratio durations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202.17 Harmonic flow and pace mm.432-489 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212.18 Time-points of the primary and the secondary voices mm.60-65 . . . . . 222.19 Time-points of the primary and the secondary voices mm.70-75 . . . . . 232.20 Fibbonacci based time-points control the fugal entries in mm.252-256 . . 232.21 Similarities of β, γ, and δ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242.22 Two alternate formal analysis of Sparks of Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25viLIST OF FIGURES3.1 Complementary (023468) hexachords of mm.4-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283.2 Rhythmic acceleration mm.2-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293.3 Polyrhythm between the ensemble and Max/MSP mm.76-80 . . . . . . . 293.4 Sparks of Union mm.129-132 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303.5 Inexact augmentation in the flute part m.29-34 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303.6 Rhythms with the added values in the contrabass part mm.413-420 . . . 313.7 Brief canon mm.2-3 alluding to aural training technique . . . . . . . . . . 313.8 Sparks of Union mm.26-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323.9 Sparks of Union mm.57-59 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333.10 Strings mm.145-152 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343.11 Pitch relations of different modal elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353.12 Fugal entries of mm.252-256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363.13 Sparks of Union mm.11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373.14 Sparks of Union mm.16-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393.15 Sparks of Union mm.44-46 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403.16 Sparks of Union mm.3-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414.1 Symmetries of the woodwinds in mm.293-295 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434.2 Inversion symmetries of the strings mm.87-90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434.3 Simultaneous transposition and inversion relations m.3 . . . . . . . . . . 444.4 Quartal chord progression m.243 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444.5 Voice leading mm.333-335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454.6 Succession of quintal chords in Max/MSP part mm.244-271 . . . . . . . . 454.7 Sparks of Union mm.379-383 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464.8 Sparks of Union mm.431-435 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474.9 Sparks of Union mm.441-445 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484.10 (0247) chords mm.298-299 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494.11 Sonogram of a ney playing an embellished C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504.12 Sparks of Union mm.189-193 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514.13 Ney’s spectrum defines the pitch content m.318 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514.14 Voice leading of the closing section mm.537-542 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524.15 Shakuhachi’s spectrum defines the pitch content mm.498-499 . . . . . . . 524.16 Sonogram of a shakuhachi playing a D with breathy attack . . . . . . . . . 53viiLIST OF FIGURES4.17 Shakuhachi’s spectrum defines the pitch content m.81 . . . . . . . . . . . . 544.18 Sonogram of a shakuhachi playing a B with muraiki . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544.19 Sparks of Union mm.325-327 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565.1 Intensifying tension between the ensemble and Max/MSP mm.70-87 . . . 585.2 View of the Max/MSP patch for Sparks of Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595.3 Sparks of Union mm.47-53 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61B.1 Seating arrangement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166C.1 Formal proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167C.2 A section formal proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167C.3 A′ section formal proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168C.4 A′′ section formal proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168C.5 A′′′ section formal proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168C.6 D′ formal design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169C.7 Alternate interpretation of form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169C.8 Form analysis as a rondo-sonata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169D.1 Linear presentation of the sectional proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170D.2 Linear presentation of the alternate form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170D.3 Fibonacci relationships in section repetitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170E.1 Morse code signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171F.1 Miyako scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172F.2 Dastga¯h-e-dasˇti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172F.3 Dastga¯h-e-cˇaha¯rga¯h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173F.4 Maqa¯m nawa athar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173F.5 Maqa¯m kurd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173F.6 Hsi¯n t.ubu¯ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173viiiAcknowledgementsI offer my lasting gratitude to Dr. Keith Hamel, Dr. Stephen Chatman and Dr.Dorothy Chang, as well as Dr. Robert Pritchard for their inspiration, support andguidance throughout this journey. I also thank Dr. Mehran Rouhani, Professor Hain-oosh Makarian for their inspirational musical training, the late Dr. Parviz Javid, thelate Professor Sohrab Dustdar and Professor Ali Orang for cohesive expansion of myvision and appreciation of different cultures and true meaning of unity in diversity,and last not least the late Bahman Samandari and Yaran-i-Iran for their exemplarypersistence and living inspiration for excellence.I thank the University of British Columbia for its Fellowship Funding.Special thanks are owed to my late father who taught me how to ask difficult ques-tions and openly embraced my ceaseless queries, my mother who is the embodimentof diligence and tenacity, my late grandfather for his determination and my sisters fortheir thorough support.ixDedicationTo my parents and Jamaloddin KhanjanixChapter 1Cultural Considerations1.1 IntroductionSparks of Union is a 20-minute composition for ten musicians and interactive elec-tronics.1 The ensemble is comprised of a woodwind quintet (flute, oboe, B[ clarinet,bassoon and French horn), four string instruments (violin, viola, violoncello and con-trabass) and one percussion.Sparks of Union emphasizes the polarity of different musical languages and stylesderived from diverse cultural backgrounds. As well, the piece explores the dichotomyof electroacoustic and acoustic media. Electronic sounds compete and complement,disagree and converse with the live instruments; I consider the electronics to be anequal member of the ensemble.The piece is composed in a developmental sectional form. It starts with a briefintroduction of four main sonorities that are developed and expanded throughout thecomposition. Each section of the composition presents different motivic materials, andis based on a different musical language, ranging from chromatic to microtonal modalmusic. Over the course of the composition different musics influence and transform thesonorities and rhythmic content of one another. The temporal proportions of the piece(both in micro and macro scale) are derived from the golden ratio system. The harmoniclanguage is comprised of various systems of pitch symmetries. Occasionally, theharmonic materials are modelled after the spectral content of instruments associatedwith the cultural sources of the music.1Electroacoustic sounds are generated through a Max/Msp patch, labelled in the score as MAX.11.2. Philosophy1.2 PhilosophyUnity has played an important role shaping every artistic design. Often estab-lishing unity among the parts has been confused with forming uniformity betweenthe parts, presuming an objectively formulated “right” that could simply discredit allthe other solutions as “wrong.”2 I believe that unity can be reached from diversityof sources. Unity in diversity implies thorough interaction of distinct components toform a cohesive whole similar to flowers of a garden.3In modern times introducing foreign elements to music is often associated withnationalism, exoticism or parody. In these cases, form, harmony, even ursatz andurlinie, are designed without serious consideration to the cultural content; the culturalfeatures are often superimposed on a Eurocentric compositional design. “In certaincases of musical hybridity, sounds and styles are piled on top of one another and theresult is a frenetic mix in which the hybrid-not its quality but its mere presence-ismore important than any of its constitutive elements.”4 Often such musical hybridityinvolves a space of liminality, which replaces any genuine interaction between theconstituent parts.Sparks of Union aims neither to celebrate national pride as Jana´cˇek, VaughanWilliams, or Copland did,5 nor to exhibit exotic sonorities as found in works of manycomposers of the early 20th century,6 nor to superimpose musics as found in the worksof Mahler or Ives7 to create a “sonic tourism,”8 nor to create a universal musical lan-2This mind-set is not a dated historical practice. Even renowned 20th century theorist Adornoconsidered music as “a fixed autonomous object. . . a container of quasi-sacred truth-knowledge to berevealed. . . analogous to the reach and might of the culture. . . ”(Tenzer, 2006, 8).3“Consider the flowers of a garden. Though differing in kind, color, form, and shape. . . this diversityincreaseth their charm, and addeth unto their beauty” (‘Abdul-Baha´, 1977, 103).4White, 2012, 195.5Each of these composers made important contributions to the music literature, yet each had devotedtheir careers to nationalism (see Berger (1945), Hollander (1955), and Onderdonk (1999)).6Just to name a couple: Puccini’s Turandot shows influence of Chinese melodies, and Debussy’sPagodes is inspired by gamelan (Locke, 2007, 483-483).7Mahler’s image of world “consisted of a multitude of heterogeneous elements. . . drawn fromdifferent ethnic and cultural traditions, high and low, in a vast social and national turmoil” (Schorske,1983, 36-37).8Taylor, 1997.21.2. Philosophyguage to sacrifice “difference on the altar of Universal.”9 Moreover, as a composer, Ido not invoke hybridity as a means to create my own aesthetic identity.10Sparks of Union aims to create a musical framework for a democratic dialogue andan egalitarian interaction among different musical languages. Democratic dialogue andegalitarian interaction are not intended as political terms, rather they refer to the equalopportunities to present diverse musical languages and to have those musics influenceone another. Unlike Mahler and Ives who “subverted musical order”11 to present autopia open to “the repressed musics of the common man,”12 I merely wish to presentthe music of our new, integrated world. This piece represents music of a world shapedby the information revolution and the new immediacies of advanced communication.13I do not intend to create complete equality in my music. All musical material isprocessed through a composer’s subjective disposition and does not receive exactlythe same treatment, so an absolute objective equality within a musical composition isimpossible. My aesthetic choices as “the cultural mediator”14 directly reflect my ownpersonal experiences and encounters. However, I hope that my efforts presenting mypersonal experience may lead to a broader, even universal attention.In Sparks of Union, all the musical material, regardless of their cultural sources, aretreated similarly. On one level, they interact and directly transform one another. Onanother level, structural elements of each part interact and indirectly transform surfaceelements. To guarantee impartiality in this process, throughout the piece, except for afew basic acoustic models, nothing remains immutable. Each musical material evolvesand both influences and is influenced by the other materials.My aesthetics stem from a strong belief in unity in diversity.15 I consider that acohesive work of art groups and coordinates “diversity of parts” 16 into a unity. I9White, 2012, 193.10As Feld criticizes as an opportunity “to claim full spatiotemporal terrain of that identity as anartistic palette” (Feld, 1996, 2).11Schorske, 1983, 20.12Schorske, 1983, 21.13This approach has been called the “planetization”(Teilhard de Chardin, 1964, 129).14White, 2012, 198.15Unity in diversity is a philosophical precept which aims for unity while avoiding uniformity andembraces diversity while avoiding fragmentation.16Plotinus, 1969, 58.31.3. Allusionsbelieve that “the earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens.”17 Similarly, Iconsider different cultures and musics merely as different “fruits of one tree.”18 I donot intend to undermine the existing foundations of music, but to broaden and toremould these principles in a manner consonant with the needs of an ever-changingworld.19 In this vein, my approach to unity repudiates excessive centralization of onemusic, and disclaims all attempts to impose musical uniformity.20As a composer, I honour different musical models yet only allow them to informmy compositional decisions, not to regulate its form, flow or content. Unlike Bartokwho directly uses materials from his collected folk songs in composing the Dance Suite(Sz. 77),21 I only hint to a range of genres not to any distinctive pre-existing piece ofmusic. Moreover unlike Dance Suite, Sparks of Union brings together different musicallanguages honouring tolerance and cultural diversity rather than a singular culture.22Diversity of different aesthetics and contexts would intrinsically lead to tension.My solutions for such conflicts are local. They rely on wholly interacting differentconstituent parts.23 Thus, not only present elements but also their cultural contextualfeatures play an active role in such resolutions.1.3 AllusionsThis work alludes only to certain elements of specific cultures. These allusionsare selected for purely musical reasons and have no geopolitical implications. Theseelements are used without any cultural, historical or hermeneutic intentions. Thesecultural subtexts often have different meanings in their original ‘home ground’ andwithin the ‘other’ contexts.2417Baha´’u’lla´h, 1976, 250.18ibid.19Universal House of Justice, 1985, 10.20ibid.21Griffiths, 1984, 107.22White, 2012, 190.23My method is modelled after Teilhard de Chardin’s “planetary approach” in which balance isattained through “total ‘reflection’ of itself upon itself”(Teilhard de Chardin, 1964, 129).24Palmberg and Kirkegaard, 2002, 11.41.3. AllusionsSparks of Union merely involves an overall hermeneutic subtext at the crossroadsof acoustics and electronics, and the intersections of cultural and intellectual musics.25The spatial notation at the opening of the piece and its multilayered texture alludesto the emerging framework for such cultural dialogues. The emerging synthetic padpresents the growing critical role of technology to facilitate realization of an inclusivedemocratic discourse. Moreover, it alludes to the historical role of the tape, catalyzingrefined sonic confluence of different musical genres (figure 1.1).Figure 1.1: Sparks of Union mm.1-225Here “cultural” music simply refers to the music inspired or influenced by folk and tradition.51.4. ImplicationsMy choice of the cultural constituents used in Sparks of Union is certainly notcomprehensive. When selecting materials, I tried to be both inclusive and impartialwithin the limitations of the composition’s duration and instrumental forces. I haveincluded at least one musical representative of every continent. Furthermore, thesemusical elements all are selected from secular instrumental genres since they tendto have less subtext and innuendo. Within this musical fabric, the intersection ofmaterials from different sources implies no cultural judgement, nor does it imply aninherent dominance of one culture over another.Moreover, I do not take a moral stand in the “purists and syncretists”26 debate. Iappreciate the significance of traditional musics in in their authentic forms, as a muse-umized art form, as purists deem appropriate. However, as a composer, I await newworks and attempt towards creating compositions that expand the musical pallette,as syncretists expect. As Blacking and Nattiez do, I consider that any sonic objectis neutral.27 In this debate, I consider that along purely musical matters composers’intention and their extent of upholding moral values in the process of music-makingplays an important role.281.4 ImplicationsSparks of Union celebrates the contemporary information revolution and its fun-damental impact on shaping the contemporary world. This piece is a proactive by-product of the 21st-century global village. Thus it intends to bridge the chasm betweencultures by creating a musical marriage between the diverse musical languages. Un-like many fusions that have taken place in the past, which often had stemmed fromdisproportionate fusions or forced marriages,29 this composition attempts to merge26Blacking, 1995, 148-157.27In Nattiez’s words, music is “niveau neutre” (Nattiez and Dunsby, 1975).28See (Nattiez and Dunsby, 1975) and (Blacking, 1995, 148-157).29Forced musical marriage dates back to the first national invasions, colonialism and slavery ofother nations. “Music fusion is inexorable and something of an advance guard for actual geneticfusion: no human intolerance nor any reservations about propriety stopped Spanish melodies fromeloping with West African rhythms to form rumba in racist, socially segregated, late-nineteenth-centuryHavana”(Tenzer, 2006, 17).61.4. Implicationsculture in a peaceful, respecting and free atmosphere. Perhaps this piece represents aglimpse of a future where all cultures can not only coexist neutrally but also correlateamiably and eventually collaborate and conjoin to shape a new musical legacy.The interplay between acoustic and electroacoustic sound in Sparks of Union is acombination of different approaches. Sparks of Union mainly continues the lineage ofJonathan Harvey’s Bhakti and Keith Hamel’s Krishna’s Flute. Both these works useelectronics as a distinct medium - either as an orchestra or an instrument - and areinfluenced by cultural elements. Also both use direct cultural influences mainly asextramusical elements. However, these elements have left impressions in the surfaceand structural level of both compositions. Sparks of Union is also influenced by theimaginary cultures in R. Murray Schafer’s works such as Apocalypsis and Lusto whereelectroacoustic sounds are blended with the ensemble. This piece is also inspired bythe groundbreaking works of Iranian composer Alireza Mashayekhi who has been apioneer in creating new sonorities and extending Persian musical instruments, throughprocessing and combining traditional acoustic sonorities with electronics in his tapeand electroacoustic compositions (e.g., Shur or Mithra).As a musician, I pursue new compositions that aim to expand the musical lexiconby introducing fresh modes of cultural expression and extend our sonic palette. Iappreciate works that do not exploit any music and uphold and demonstrate moralvalues. As a composer, in the same manner that I aim to fully develop every musicalidea in my work, I strive to recognize, understand and honour the cultural constituentsof my music.Ultimately as the “matchmaker”30 in this “reproductive sonic tryst,”31 I wantto present an example of deliberate interaction among a group of distinct musics.“‘Music’- making is a special kind of social action which can have important conse-quences for other kinds of social action.”32 This piece aims to materialize an existingoverall abstract scheme into a pragmatic plan and devise a platform for proactive socialaction.30Tenzer, 2006, 17.31ibid.32Blacking, 1995, 223.7Chapter 2Formal Considerations2.1 Overall FormSparks of Union continues the lineage of Western chamber compositions in its struc-tured approach to musical form, orchestration, and harmonic language. The pieceis composed in a developmental sectional form. In this form, the sections are clearlydefined but there is continuous development of the primary musical material through-out all sections. This form allows systematic interaction and balanced dialogue notonly within the various motivic materials, but also across diverse musical languagesand techniques. At times the music is composed for a small chamber ensemble, withvirtuosic lines and delicate extended techniques (mm.111-130), while at others it isscored as a chamber orchestral piece (mm.75-90).On a macro scale, Sparks of Union is divided into two main parts marked by anoticeable caesura at m.336 - at the golden section - followed by an abridged reprise.33The piece is composed of four primary musical materials. Materials A and D eachconsist of music from several distinct genres while materials B and C each presentsmusic from a single genre. The overall form of Sparks of Union is shown below.34Figure 2.1: Developmental sectional formal design33See the section 2.3.34See Appendix C.1 and Appendix D.1 for analysis and linear presentation of these ratios.82.2. Detailed FormEach restatement of a section (e.g., A′ or B′) is expanded through development andinteraction with material from other sections. The development of A involves trans-forming and expanding each of its subsections to create an increasing sense of unity.Development of the other sections, however, involves transforming and diversifyingtheir distinct musical languages, and abridging their phrases and subsections, creatingan increasing sense of diversity. The second and the third returns of A (A′′ and A′′′) areseparated by the reprise of D and followed by the closing section. The closing sectionincludes two codas (mm.400-430 and mm.506-585) separated by a reinstatement of C.352.2 Detailed FormWhile B and C each presents a distinct singular musical language, A incorporatesfour distinct musical genres: α m.1, β mm.2-3, γ mm.4-5, and δ mm.6-10. Due toits high degree of diversity, the musical material of A reappears and transforms morethan any other section. The opening (α) focuses on transition from unpitched tones ofpercussion, indeterminate pitches and rhythms in the strings and the French horn to asustained pitch D. The pitch collection and melodic gestures used in β projects a miyakoscale.36 Inγ, elements of polytonality and whole tone materials are combined to projecta unique dodecaphonic musical language. The musical language of δ resembles thatof γ; however, the emphasis on fifths and octaves, the fugal texture, and an increasedfocus on one timbre form a distinctive polytonal language (figure 2.2). All thesesections have common motivic cells. For instance, if we label the opening set class ofβ (<2, 4, 5>) as P, then in mm.4-5 (δ) the set class (013) appears a few times in the oboepart as <5, 2, 3> (that is I5P) and <6, 8, 9> (that is T4P). Even at m.6, γ concludes with<t, 8, 7> (that is I0P).35Only the unwavering focus on materials from C justifies marking mm.430-506 as reinstatementof C, otherwise as in figure 2.22 the closing section could be perceived as two consecutive codas(mm.400-506, and mm.506-585).36Miyako is an urban Japanese pentatonic scale made of two tetrachords of the same family. Itstempered interval structure is < 2, 1, 4, 1 > (Malm, 1976, 178; Malm, 1986, 40-41); see Appendix F.1.92.2. Detailed FormFigure 2.2: Sparks of Union mm.6-7The pitch collection used in B (mm.11-26) is inspired by the dasˇti.37 It also is thesuperset of the miyako scale used in β. C (mm.27-44) has the same pitch material as β.This section with its micro-canons and heterophony presents a very distinct texture,with some references to interlocking lines of gamelan music. Moreover, while A has asectional form, B appears in a through-composed form with a melodic cadence (forud)38in dasˇti and C has a binary form. The first part of C (mm.27-37) concludes on a quartalchord functioning as a half cadence, and the second part is closed by a modal cadencein Locrian on E in m.44.D has two subsections (mm.90-114 and mm.115-130). Both use similar motivic cellsto γ and β. Here, the motivic cell set (013) appears several times and informs boththe melody and the harmony. In mm.90-95, this set class appears as <8, 5, 6> (ItP)37Dastga¯h-e-dasˇti /dashti/ is one of the main seven Persian modal dastga¯h (system). Its temperedinterval structure is < 1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2 > (Farhat, 1990, 39); see Appendix F.2.38Literally means descent or cadence. It denotes a melodic cadence with a relatively fixed patternthat is paired with each subset of a dastga¯h (Farhat, 1990, 25).102.2. Detailed Formin the violin part and <3, 4, 1> (T-1P) and <4, 1, 2> (I6P) in the flute music. Later inmm.114-115 it emerges as <3, 2, 0> (T-2P) and <2, 0, e> (I4P). Moreover, D creates atwelve-tone texture in a manner that is similar to γ and it has a similar transparenttexture. However, the electronics have a more interactive role in D, where there is livesignal processing of the individual wind instruments.Figure 2.3: Sparks of Union mm.60-63112.2. Detailed FormIn addition to the musical materials discussed above, three other musical materialsare introduced in the various restatements of A. The first of these is φ (mm.60-67, seefigure 2.3). The musical language of this section is derived from the twelve-tone systemused in γ. However, this material focuses on the (013) set class as a distinct motif.In this section, accented, robust chords similar to the chord presented in m.3 form aforceful counterpoint against the more lyrical primary voice. Solo flute, occasionallydoubled by clarinet, presents the primary line. Oboe, bassoon, French horn and doublebass play a secondary line consisting of harmonic symmetries centred on I3, I7, I9 andIe.In a later restatement of A (mm.212-230) a melodic line (χ) is played by the strings(figure 2.4). This melody is related to β and is inspired by Moroccan Andalusianmusic.39 This is a call and response: a call by the string pizzicati in octaves, suggestingthe frail resonance of ’u¯d ramal,40 followed by a response through the muted Frenchhorn, evoking the nasal tone of ghait.a41 accompanied by a texture of glissandi derivedfrom motivic gestures of δ. Ironically, while the call concludes with a melodic cadenceon D (the modal tonic), the response cadences on A (the modal centre of the secondtetrachord).Figure 2.4: χ melodyAnother set of new material is introduced in m.293 just before the golden section ofthe piece (in D′). The primary line of this section is a rhythmic motive inspired by thetitle of the piece set to the Morse code. In mm.293-302, the bass drum merely relays39Moroccan Andalusian music is a fusion of Arabic maqa¯m and African scales and sensibilities. Thisline is inspired by hsi¯n t.ubu¯’- which often appears in equal temperament - or its Arabic ancestor maqa¯mkurd on A that has similar pitches as aeolian in D. Its tempered interval structure is < 1, 2, 2, 2,1, 2, 2 >(Davis and Plenkers, 2013); see Appendix F.5 & F.6.40A Moroccan small, four-string, short-necked, plucked lute (Schuyler, 2013).41Or ghayt.a; a Moroccan double-reed aerophone (Schuyler, 2013).122.2. Detailed Form“unity” four times (figure 2.5) once for each of the four cardinal directions. Then thedrum changes its pulsing pattern (mm.303-309) to encode ”sparks of unity.”42Figure 2.5: “Unity” set to Morse codeIn mm.304-308, the Morse code rhythm is superimposed on the χ melody. Here,the viola presents the primary line of χ. This melody is supported by the T2 trans-positional symmetries in the violin and the cello parts.43 The combination of thisrhythm and melody generates the symmetric expansion of the melody into chords,transforms the melodic flow, alters the modality, and creates a new sonic (modal) ex-perience. Moreover, the Morse code message upon interacting with the intricacies ofthe melodic line is transformed to encode the ultimate message: ”sparks of union.“Gradual transformation of the message represents the different phases of the progres-sive process that in time must lead to a meaningful cultural union and a sensibleinter-cultural interaction. The contrabass joins the strings from m.309 to expand theT14 transpositional symmetry. With this addition, four distinct lines briefly form It,I0, and I2 inversions successively to outline a shadow line (mm.309-310) that acts asthe centre of the symmetry. This line anticipates G in the following measures, whichconstitutes a smooth transition to the next section. While the inversions of all thesechords are the same, at times the exact centre of the symmetry for the outer lines isdifferent from that of the inner voices. In figure 2.6 the smaller noteheads reflect thecentre of the symmetry for the inner voices.Figure 2.6: Centre of the symmetry42See Appendix E.1 for the complete demonstration of Morse code-inspired rhythms.43At first, this relation in mm.304-308 is a T14. However from the third beat of m.305 the cello playsan octave lower than its designed octave, thus cello part is a T26.132.2. Detailed FormFigure 2.7: Sparks of Union - strings mm.304-316 combination of the Morse code and ”Unity”set to Morse code and χ142.2. Detailed FormThe following measures (mm.311-316) contain fragmentation, parallel intervalsand chordal textures. They also make references to other motives in anticipation ofthe dramatic closing of D′ which signifies the golden mean of the entire work.More new material appears in the codai (mm.400-430; figure 2.8). This music isrelated to C but has a more transparent texture and an active harmonic language that issimilar toγ . Despite the rhapsodic surface of this melodic line and its accompaniment,the recurrence of the pitch content is fairly cyclical: every phrase completes the twelvetone aggregate. M.415, m.420, m.423, m.427, and m.430 each mark the completion ofthe aggregate.Figure 2.8: Sparks of Union mm.411-414Though it is presenting new musical material, codai aims to conclude and connectthe different musics that have been presented throughout Sparks of Union. Furtheranalysis demonstrates how this new material is closely related to the different musicsintroduced so far. The melodic set class of this music is related to δ while its harmonicsupport is derived from γ. For example, in mm.412-413 the harmony is similar to m.4;152.2. Detailed Formit is based on (026) and (024) trichords. Here the melody is closely related to m.6; itprojects a (0237) set class followed by a (016) set class.Figure 2.9: Relation of codai to γ and δThe final new material presented in the composition is the rotation process intro-duced in C′′ (mm.431-478) as the accompaniment. The triangle introduces a distinctrotating rhythmic pattern (figure 2.10). First rotations appear after playing the patterntwice, then from the sixth iteration rotation appears after the third repetition. Also,due to the metric modulation that appears at m.448, written note values change tomaintain the pulse.Figure 2.10: Rotation process of the triangle pattern mm.431-478162.2. Detailed FormThe nature and the extent of the transformation of every section is relative toits musical content and structure. Such changes occur most frequently and are mostdiscernible in A. Both its abrupt sectional form and the inherent tension of the differentmusical languages used inA require more time for development and interaction amongits components. For instance, A′ starts with a musical rivalry betweenβ andγ (mm.45-50). To allow such a discourse, this section (mm.45-50) is twice as long as the originalβ, and the pitch content is expanded by means of I0 symmetry that is presented in theMax/MSP part rhythmic ostinato (figure 2.11). However, as this section constitutesonly 1/6th of A′ and does not focus enough on β, more attention on β is given in A′′.Figure 2.11: Relations of the pitch content of mm.45-50 and βIn A′′(mm.206-284) the subsections appear in the original order. Here β is exploredmore thoroughly. It appears in mm.206-212 and later in mm.271-284. Even mm.252-264 includes faint allusions to β in the secondary voice. In mm.206-212, while theflute plays a slightly prolonged version of the transposed melody, the clarinet plays acounterpoint derived from the incomplete T7 and T-2 transpositions of the original βmusic (mm.2-3) based on the miyako in D (figure 2.12).Figure 2.12: Relations of the pitch content of mm.208-211 and βWhen the same material returns towards the end of A′′ (mm.271-284), β is treateddifferently. Here the violin line is based on the original scale plus two additional pitches172.2. Detailed Form(C and G). These notes act as the centre of the symmetry for this scale and melody. Theviola line is based on a T9 transposition of the original scale (figure 2.13). While eachof these complete recurrences of β have their own distinct developmental features,both last much longer than its initial appearance (mm.2-3): mm.206-212 is twice aslong, and mm.271-284 is almost three times longer than the original appearance of thismelody.Figure 2.13: Relations of the pitch content of mm.269-274 and βThe β theme also returns in the flute part mm.257-260 as the supporting material.Its motivic gestures are analogous to the integral motives of β, yet the pitches projectOCT(0,2) as in δ. In this iteration, the pitch content appears almost symmetric aroundthe original tonal centre. In this line F] is replaced by the chromatic appogiatura F aspart of the modal climactic tessitura cadence (figure 2.14).Figure 2.14: β used as the supporting material in the flute part mm.257-260Unlike A, the musical phrases of the other sections become shorter and their struc-tures become more sectional when they reappear. At times, elements from the othermusics affect each of these essentially unilingual materials. For example, while D isfairly austere and calm, D′ is quite agitated and is divided into four distinct subsec-tions: mm.284-292; mm.293-303; mm.304-310; and mm.311-336 (See Appendix C.6). In182.3. Golden Ratiofact, D′ not only enfolds a new musical material, it also alludes to certain componentsof A. These new and borrowed elements are integrated into the fabric of D to forman amalgam. Namely, the Morse code pattern and χ melody are combined with theoriginal D material. The pitch material of mm.284-292 also delineates I0 symmetry(figure 2.15).Figure 2.15: Symmetry in the pitch material of mm.284-2922.3 Golden RatioMacro and micro temporal proportions of this piece are influenced by the Fibonacciseries. In other words, Golden ratio informs the proportions of the composition. Therelation between α, β, γ, and δ is proportional to 34, 13, 21, and 34 - all of which arenumbers from this series. The temporal relations based on the approximate actualdurations of the main sections are almost proportional to 8, 5, 5, 13, 13, 8, 13, 21, 21,13, 8, 13 and 21. The unit value of these sections is nearly 8 seconds, so consecutivelythese sections last approximately 64, 40, 40, 104, etc. seconds each.44To avoid predictability, the durations of these sections are systematically altered:irregularly shrunk or prolonged. For example, B is longer than its ratio (41” rather than40”); but D and codaii are both shorter than their preset durations (103” rather than104” and 151” instead of 168”). Clearly, as the piece advances the extent of discrepancyfrom the expected proportions becomes more substantial. These deviations alter ourexpectations of when sectional events will happen. Sometimes the event is delayed intime and sometimes it appears before we are expecting it.44See Appendix C.1 for durations and Appendix D.1 for a linear presentation of these ratios.192.3. Golden RatioSparks of Union uses only the first eight Fibonacci numbers and their multiples.45The macro relations are based on only four sequential numbers. The major dramaticdivision of this piece occurs at the golden section and creates a 13:8 proportion betweenthe two major sections of the piece: the first part lasts for roughly 13’13” followed bythe next for around 8’8”. These two sections are punctuated by a caesura and therestatement of the opening material α. Moreover, while the second part is shorter intime, its sections are fewer and its phrases longer. Thus, its music is more continuousand stylistic changes are less frequent. This creates an illusion that the two parts arealmost equal in duration.Each section is prolonged in return to allow time for its local development. Oftenthe temporal ratio of a new reprise is the next number in the Fibonacci series, untilthe duration reaches the maximum proportion of 21. For instance, the duration of Acorresponds to 8, A′ to 13, then A′′ and A′′′ to 21.46 The duration of C′ is analogous tothe duration of C′′. The only exception from this pattern is D that maintains the sameduration throughout.Golden ratios strictly govern the temporal proportions of only some parts of thepiece. In order that the music doesn′t become too predictable, some sections arecondensed and some are expanded. The family of A is almost organized by the goldenmean ratios.47 For instance, A′′ (mm.206-284) has subsections that successively lastnearly16”, 24”, 38”, 24”, 40” and 27”. These durations correspond nearly to 2, 3, 5, 3,5 and 3. Figure 2.16 shows the affinity of these ratios:Figure 2.16: Real and analogous golden ratio durations45{1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34}.46See Appendix D.3.47See appendices C.2, C.3, C.4, C.5 for detailed analysis of their subsection and the contents ofeach.202.3. Golden RatioIn addition to regulating the form, Fibonacci numbers determine the pace of theharmonic rhythm in some parts of the piece. For example, the harmonic rhythm in C′′is organized by multiples of these numbers (figure 2.17).Figure 2.17: Harmonic flow and pace mm.432-489Fibonacci numbers also determine the time-point of the individual notes for someof the motives.48 For instance, the primary voice presented by the flute mm.62-65(partly doubled by the clarinet) has a rhythmic structure derived from this series. Inmm 60-65, the oboe, bassoon, French horn and contrabass (later joined by the clarinetand the violin) present a secondary voice which is also based on time-points definedby numbers from this series.49 The rhythmic events in these two voices are based onthe following pattern of eighth note durations In figure 2.18, the flute presents primaryvoice (H) from downbeat of m.62, and the oboe the secondary line (N), from upbeat ofm.60.48That is the time from one note attack to the next attack in the same instrument.49The secondary voice begins on the fourth beat of m.60 and the primary voice on the downbeat ofm.62.212.3. Golden RatioFigure 2.18: Time-points of the primary and the secondary voices mm.60-65A similar method informs the time-points of both the primary voice (clarinet,violoncello, and contrabass) and the secondary voice (bassoon and French horn) inmm.70-75 (figure 2.19). Here, from the second beat of m.70, the cello presents primaryvoice (H), and the bassoon the secondary line (N), initially resembling a homophonictexture based on the following number of eighth notes:222.3. Golden RatioFigure 2.19: Time-points of the primary and the secondary voices mm.70-75Fibonacci numbers even affect the entry time of the answers in the fugal texture ofmm.252-256 (figure 2.20). These time-points exactly correspond to 5, 3, 2 and 1 quarternotes. Intensification of the textural density in a rate governed by these numberscreates a sense of stretto. This intensification draws us toward the ending of the firstsection of the piece.Figure 2.20: Fibonacci based time-points control the fugal entries in mm.252-256232.4. Alternate Analysis2.4 Alternate AnalysisThere are many common musical elements in the four subsections of A, eventhough each is associated with a distinct musical genre. They all focus on a numberof similar set classes - namely (013), (016), (015) and (026), and they all use similarangular intervallic and rhythmic gestures. A closer scrutiny of the opening lines of β,γ, and δ reveals many common traits and related set class motives (figure 2.21). Forexample, similar set classes appear in all these three subsections; or similar ascendinggestural curve encapsulates and informs most frequent musical gestures in these threemusics.Figure 2.21: Similarities of β, γ, and δThese congruities encourage another formal analysis, where the above mentionedsections are regarded as subsections of large compound sections. In this interpretation242.4. Alternate Analysisof the form, the principle cadences of the piece direct the formal analysis. Suchanalysis may introduce the mirage of another large scale design. This analysis depictsa complex form consisting of two rounded binaries, a ternary and a binary (the twocodas) or perhaps just three ternaries and a binary. Such divisions create sectionswhich demonstrate a highly symmetrical pattern among their durations informed bythe Fibonacci numbers: 13 5 13 | 13 8 13 | 21 13 21 | 21 21 || (see figure 2.22 and AppendixC table 7 for such alternate analysis).Figure 2.22: Two alternate formal analysis of Sparks of UnionThe symmetric cadence of mm.89-90 (It, I6, and I2) brings the rounded binary i toclosure. As ii gradually starts from stasis, the perceived duration of i is slightly longerthan its actual duration- 34 units of time rather than its actual 31. ii then concludeswith a progression of (016), (026), (036), (015) trichords to a (06) dyad which soundsincomplete or suspended thus resembling a half cadence. ii also takes 34 units - almostequal to i .iii begins with an ostinato of alternating (016) trichords - I6 related. This sectionmarks 55 units when it concludes with the symmetric cadence of mm.398-399 on I4(sequentially I2, It, I7, and I4).50 Each coda takes approximately 21 units of time. Codairesolves to an I0 symmetry around C4, codaii then concludes with It around B3.This analysis has an obvious shortcoming: none of the significant moments aremarked any differently from the inner subdivisions. For instance, even the prominentcaesura at the golden mean of the piece m.336 appears within iii, rather than in a morestrategic point in time. Thus the internal cadence of iii is far stronger than its finalending.50In the violin part of m.398 A replaces A[ to create a brighter sonority.252.4. Alternate AnalysisSparks of Union also assimilates a sonata-rondo form (see figure 2.22 and appendixC table 7 and 8). In such formal analysis the refrain phrase (u) includes five distinctmusics, namely α (m.1), β (mm.2-3), γ (mm.4-5), δ (mm.6-10) and B (mm.11-26).Thus in every return, u presents some or all of its components. For instance, u′′onlydevelops material from B. Moreover, while the refrain has five subsections, the piecehas only two distinct couplets that alternate and develop in return. This view of theform oversimplifies relations and features of different musical materials. It classifiesdistinct musical materials such as β and B in the same category while it can neitherexplain their disproportionate durations (1:5), nor justify their dissimilar treatment(unlike B, β appears frequently and fuses with almost all the other musics). B hasmore in common with the other couplets - C and D. Moreover, because the harmonicprocesses in Sparks of Union are quite distinct from those of any classical form, usingdated classical terminology seems inadequate. While these alternate analyses haveshortcomings, they do represent legitimate alternative perceptions of the work.26Chapter 3Melodic Language3.1 PitchSparks of Union presents short moments that include pitch collections informedby different musical styles. For instance, the Japanese miyako scale informs the pitchcontent of mm.2-3, and the muraiki51 technique inspires the breathy tone of the windsand a typical Japanese angular musical gesture shapes the motive.In Sparks of Union, relations between different pitch collections follows commonuniversal musical relations. Here, common tones are the most prevalent method toexpand modal boundaries or modulate to new systems. For instance, the Japanesemiyako scale of mm.2-3 is a subset of the Persian dastga¯h-e-dasˇti introduced in mm.11-26. In mm.145-152, chromatic change of two notes leads to a transition from dasˇtito a combination of dastga¯h-e-Cˇaha¯rga¯h52 and maqa¯m nawa athar53 (see figure 3.10). Inmm.4-5, D as a common tone connects (013) and (014) motives of mm.2-3 to present atwelve-tone system. Another relation that links different pitch materials are inversionand transposition. For instance, in mm.4-5 two complementary (023468) hexachordsare I5 -related (figure 3.1).In Sparks of Union the pitch content of main melodic line (even the chromaticornaments) often has direct connection to one cultural music. However, the pitchcontent of the supporting lines is free from boundaries of modalities. These parts use a51This is an idiosyncratic shakuhachi technique, when the performer blows a diffused air stream tocreate a loud wind sound (Miki, 2008, 43).52Dastga¯h-e-Cˇaha¯rga¯h /chehargah/ is one of the main seven Persian modal dastga¯h. Its temperedinterval structure is <1, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 1> (Farhat, 1990, 56 ; see Appendix F.3).53Maqa¯m is a generic Middle Eastern mode and its position on the general scale. Arabic Maqa¯m nawaathar consists of a pentachord and a tetrachord: < 2, 1, 3, 1, 1, 3, 1 > (see Appendix F.4).273.2. Rhythmfar larger collection of pitches that are based on harmonic symmetries or are informedby spectral procedures.Figure 3.1: Complementary (023468) hexachords of mm.4-5Macro level design of the pitch content relates to micro level pitch content. Thefirst section of Sparks of Union uses D as its central pitch, and it cadences on B (m.336).After the caesura, the music starts with C] as the central pitch, and eventually ends onB (m.585). These central pitches present a (013) trichord which is the first and the mostcommon trichord in this piece.3.2 RhythmSparks of Union at times sets up delicate changes in tempo. For example, mm.1-2exhibit a fluid transition from senza misura to a metric music. This change resemblesthe gradual emergence of a sense of pulse in Indian music moving form alap to jhor.54Principal accents in mm.2-7 evoke the design and structure of the rhythmic accelerationtechnique used in Persian zurkhaneh music to mark gradual acceleration (figure 3.2).55As in zurkhaneh music, also while the pulse of the accompaniment accelerates, themelody remains free from that prevalent rhythm, creating a polyrhythmic texture.54In Indian music alap is the opening piece introducing a raga. Alap essentially is senza misura withno sense of time. It is often followed by jhor which is a slow free rhythm. In other words, jhor has somesense of pulse, though it is not bound by any tala¯ (Deva, 1973, 34-35).55Zurkhaneh literally means “house of strength.” It is the traditional gymnasium of urban Persia. Therituals of zurkhaneh have mystic connotations and are led by chanting and drumming (Chehabi, 2013).283.2. RhythmFigure 3.2: Rhythmic acceleration mm.2-7At m.4 and m.6 the tempo becomes expressive and free then strict again, reminiscentof the floating rhythm of traditional Persian chant over a steady pulse. This floatingrhythm is presented as a polyrhythm in mm.77-88 where the ensemble speeds up atm.77 and m.85 while while Max/MSP continues with a 74 steady rhythm and staticpulse (figure 3.3).Figure 3.3: Polyrhythm between the ensemble and Max/MSP mm.76-80Sparks of Union also involves abrupt changes in tempo (mm.336-337) and scalarritardando (mm.579-583). However, in this piece the most common technique forchanging tempo is to use metric modulations. Some metric modulations are preparedwith superimposed instrumental cues as in mm.10-11 where triplets of the contrabassanticipate the succeeding tempo. Some other metric modulations are set by the su-perposed electronic cues. Quintuplets of the Max/MSP part at m.44, m.130 or m.206foreshadow the 5:4 acceleration. In these cases, synthesized signals set the subsequenttempo to match the exact assigned tempo and briefly align the ensemble with thestrict machine-based ostinatos accompanying the following section. For instance, theMax/MSP part at m.130 cues the new tempo and plays a similar pattern to the snaredrum in the following measures (figure 3.4).293.2. RhythmFigure 3.4: Sparks of Union mm.129-132There are other cases of metric modulation without preparatory cues. For instance,mm.242-243 presents a 5:6 and mm.283-284 a 7:5 tempo change. Also, there areoccasions where change in tempi is based on more complex rational numbers. Forinstance, mm.37-38 contains a 12:11, mm.310-311 a 15:14, and mm.582-583 a 23:24 shiftin pulse. In such cases the tempo change is not even marked as metric modulation.Figure 3.5: Inexact augmentation in the flute part m.29-34303.3. PolyphonyThere are also cases of rhythmic augmentation and rhythms with the added value.Figure 3.5 demonstrates an example of inexact augmentation of the flute micro-motif.The contrabass line (mm.413-421) includes rhythms with added values first byprolonging E[ and then from m.416 through adding notes both at the end and in themiddle of this musical gesture (figure 3.6).Figure 3.6: Rhythms with the added values in the contrabass part mm.413-4203.3 PolyphonyAnother technique used in Sparks of Union is species counterpoint. There are manyinstances of melodic imitation and canonic textures. Imitation is a common composi-tional technique, which also alludes to the aural process of learning by imitation. Abrief canon appears in mm.2-3 (at unison and the octave in figure 3.7) and returns inm.6 with a more complex design, with the two real descending fifth imitations.Figure 3.7: Brief canon mm.2-3 alluding to aural training technique313.3. PolyphonyThe double canon in mm.28-32 weaves an intricate texture similar to a microp-olyphony (figure 3.8). The flute, oboe, and cello form one canon, while the clarinetand viola present the other canon. Both canons are in unison. The clarinet and violacanon emerges from the delicate tapestry of the other canon and the pedal notes. Thismicropolyphony of diverse materials preserves the individuality of different genreswhile creating unity within this diversity.Figure 3.8: Sparks of Union mm.26-31323.3. PolyphonyAt times, imitations do not repeat exact intervals and are merely gestural or rhyth-mic imitations. In mm.57-58 the flute and the bassoon successively configure theirimitations of the clarinet and the oboe lines to fit their own range and idiosyncrasies(figure 3.9). The flute makes the range of the imitated gesture narrower, changes theorder of the notes of the T5 of the clarinet line, and even replaces some notes. Thebassoon widens the span in its response. The bassoon line also involves octave dis-placement: in m.58 the arpeggio is an octave lower than its planned register, namelyD2 has replaced D4.Figure 3.9: Sparks of Union mm.57-59Bimodal fugal technique in mm.145-152 (figure 3.10) transforms the modal linesin dasˇti - derived from B material. Here, the fugal texture involves two inverted T10canons (between the cello and viola and between the contrabass and violin). Here, the333.3. Polyphonytonal centre of dasˇti is transposed from D to G.56 Even the modal collection is appendedwith three chromatic tones (F] A[ B). While A[ could appear in the climactic tetrachordof dasˇti in G, the other added tones are alien to this dastga¯h, and suggest modulation,namely the violin line is probably in a tempered dastga¯h-e-cˇaha¯rga¯h in G. The violapart then partially resembles some musical figures and gestures of both the Persiandastga¯h-e-cˇaha¯rga¯h and the Arabic maqa¯m nawa athar. Thus briefly the viola and violinmusic are in a liminal modal state against the cello and contrabass who play definitelydasˇti music.Figure 3.10: Strings mm.145-15256Historically each Persian mode would appear with only two possible tonal centres (for male andfemale singers). The concept of tonal transposition of a dastga¯h to new tonalities was introducedover a century ago along number of other innovations including adopting the Western notation andreformation of the traditional orchestra (Zonis (1973) , and Farhat (1990)).343.4. Musical Transformations3.4 Musical TransformationsAll processes, techniques and musical systems gradually transfigure each other.For instance, the miyako scale of mm.2-3 (< D, E, F, A, B[ >) in its recurrence in m.43includes an augmented fourth (G]). The added note demonstrates some features of theArabic maqa¯m nawa athar and transforms P (the opening cell of β) to engender (014).A partial T4 relation connects P - a (013) set class - and its transformed (014) set class(figure 3.11).Figure 3.11: Pitch relations of different modal elementsThe fugal texture of mm.252-260 exhibits a course of transformation in the intervallicrelations of the answers to the subject (figure 3.12). The first answer is a T7 of the subject,the second answer then is a T7 of the first one or a T2 of the subject. The third answeris then a T2 of the second answer or a T4 of the subject. Here, we gradually transformfrom a traditional transposition interval (T7) to transpositions (T2 and T4) that arecommonplace in Sparks of Union.353.4. Musical TransformationsFigure 3.12: Fugal entries of mm.252-256The Persian inspired melody in mm.11-26 (B) is spiced with irregular metric accentsand asymmetrical phrasing foreign to its original style.57 Here the drum line addsanother layer of typical Persian mixed meters that pulsate regularly between 68 and34 meters. Also, the bass line from m.11 maps a 44 hypermeter (figure 3.13). B in itsnext appearance is mainly transformed through fragmentation and stutter technique(mm.159-162).57The melodic line involves some syncopations that delineate clear meter changes. Mm.14-16 couldbe seen as 442434 .363.5. Musical IntersectionsFigure 3.13: Sparks of Union mm.11-153.5 Musical IntersectionsAt the intersection of different musical styles, I try to use a “planetary”58 approachthrough in-depth analysis of musical materials and impartial interaction betweenthe various musical elements from the surface level to the structural level. Thus,techniques and processes of one style are applied to the others. For instance, mm.16-26 (figure 3.14) present several such interactions: the violin uses the Western octavedisplacement technique to highlight a few notes of its dasˇti line in mm.17-19 in adifferent register than its original; the clarinet secondary line of mm.16-21 entails an58Teilhard de Chardin, 1964, 129.373.5. Musical Intersectionsidiomatic shakuhachi59 technique: the prolonged pedal notes with wide vibrato andthe ending phrases with the descending glissandi in m.18 and 21.60 Mm.20-26 alsopresents an organic synthesis of a Persian cadential pattern61 and the Indian additiverhythmic tiha¯i. Here, the music evolves through a 4:3 rhythmic augmentation onlyafter playing the pattern twice rather than the traditional three times. Moreover, anirregular prolongation phrase alien to both genres is interjected in m.18. Finally, ascustomary in Persian music, the closing pattern repeats once more.Mm.13-15 presents a line that resembles a metric dara¯mad62 of dastga¯h-e-dasˇti. Here,even the assigned timbre resounds the somber and dark tone of Persian kamanche´.63Stylistic encounters are sometimes juxtaposed (mm.4-5), and at other times there is atransition involving anticipation or dovetailing. For example, the new musical materialat m.13 is prepared in the contrabass through resounding the second pitch of the dasˇtiga¯m (E [).64At other times there is no transition but an intense aesthetic assembly, oreven a stylistic clash, as different styles are presented at once: mm.45-46 presents thefirst such encounter. In this section, each material has been mildly modified to betteradapt to the others. As presented in figure 3.15, pitch content of β is modified and themelodic activity of γ is reduced so that it functions as background material.59Shakuhachi is the Japanese, Zen Buddhist, end-blown bamboo flute (Miki, 2008, 35).60It resembles otoshi, a shakuhachi technique in which performer lowers the pitch (Miki, 2008, 45).61Two common cadential patterns in traditional Persian chant are standing on or resounding thefinalis’ neighbouring tone and/or repeating a two measure step-wise phrase twice (Massoudieh, 1997,56-57).62In Persian music, dara¯mad is a gusˇe - a melodic model or a work - that opens and establishes adastga¯h (Farhat, 1990, 22).63A Persian four-string vertical fiddle.64This should be performed as the Persian microtone flat: koron ( [) . Ga¯m - from French termgamme - is an arbitrary concept in Persian music made for study purposes only (Farhat, 1990, 25-26;see Appendix F.2).383.5. Musical IntersectionsFigure 3.14: Sparks of Union mm.16-25393.5. Musical IntersectionsFigure 3.15: Sparks of Union mm.44-46On the third beat of m.3, music is halted by a whole tone cluster {3,5,7} embeddedin the midst of the chord {3,4,5,7,9,t} (figure 3.16). This cluster is separate from thestaccato I2 symmetries of (4 t) and (5 9) among the strings and the winds throughits different register, its longer duration and its distinct dynamic shape. The clusterbecomes a harmonic pad and supports the transition from an unfinished modal lineto a twelve-tone one. The woodwind trio in mm.4-5 projects two complementarywhole tone chords: m.4 expands the existing whole tone cluster to {1,3,7,9,e} and thenm.5 projects its complementary set: {0,2,6,8,t}. Eventually it is transformed into adiminished seventh chord based on the outer tritone of m.3 (4 t).403.5. Musical IntersectionsFigure 3.16: Sparks of Union mm.3-5In the passage from m.3 to m.10 musical material transforms from dodecaphony tobimodal material to a Persian mode. Furthermore, there is a textural transformationas the music gradually changes from heterophony (mm.3-4) to homophony (mm.5-6)and then to polyphony (mm.6-10).41Chapter 4Harmonic Language4.1 SymmetriesMy harmonic language is based mainly on intervallic symmetries around differentdynamic or static pitch centres.65 For example, in mm.304-308 the viola is the centreof a dynamic symmetry (see figure 2.7). Such parallel symmetric motion (in m.304: I4,I0, I4, I8, I4, I0, I4) accentuates the viola part and appears as a natural expansion of amonody on that melodic material. As the contrabass joins in (m.308), it expands thesymmetry and shifts the centre of the symmetry to an illusory line (see figure 2.6).In mm.293-295, despite apparent contrary melodic motions, the flute and bassoonand the oboe and French horn form a static I9 symmetry (figure 4.1). This symmetryis the transference of the clarinet descending melody (F - E and B - B[) to chordalstructures (mm.293-294). This symmetry is interrupted by an abrupt I3 in m.294 andresumes in m.295. Eventually, as the French horn introduces the primary voice andchanges the texture in m.296, the symmetry alters and eventually in m.298 transformsto (0247) chords.65While dynamic pitch centre here refers to inversion symmetry around a melodic line, static pitchcentre has a set pitch as the centre of symmetry.424.1. SymmetriesFigure 4.1: Symmetries of the woodwinds in mm.293-295In mm.87-89 the music has changing inversion symmetries (figure 4.2). A sequenceof I5, It, I6 in the strings concludes with I0 and is prolonged by a (024) chord in thewoodwinds. The same sequence returns from m. 89 and cadences on a C quintalchord.Figure 4.2: Inversion symmetries of the strings mm.87-90434.1. SymmetriesThese symmetries are occasionally used to reflect or introduce another element.For instance, the distinct chord of m.3 consists of a T1 projection of <D E A> set classto <E[ F B[>, as well as an I7 symmetry amongst them (figure 4.3). I7 delineates (E[ F)as the centre of the symmetry, or alludes to E [, that appears in m.7 (figure 2.2).Figure 4.3: Simultaneous transposition and inversion relations m.3Another family of chords used in this piece are equidistant chords or equidistantsymmetries. Sparks of Unity includes secundal, quartal and quintal chords.66 A quartalchord appears as the closing chord as well as in m.37 or m.585. Mm.243-247 present aprogression of three quartal chords, which first appears as an inversion (figure 4.4).Figure 4.4: Quartal chord progression m.243Some secundal chords (024) appear in woodwinds in m.88 and (0246) in m.3.Secundal chords also appear with added notes as (0247) in mm.298-299, or as (02479)66Here quartal and quintal chords are distinguished by their forming intervals as well as their distinctvoice leading charachteristics.444.1. Symmetriesin mm.333-336 (figure 4.5). The voice leading of these chords conforms both to aquintal or that of a secundal chord with some added notes.Figure 4.5: Voice leading mm.333-335In mm.244-271, electronics present a succession of quintal chords (figure 4.6). Dueto their high registers and subtle motion, these synthetic sonorities mainly appear as atimbral effect rather than as explicit chords and harmonies. Nevertheless, they play arole defining the harmonic map of that section.Figure 4.6: Succession of quintal chords in Max/MSP part mm.244-271Similarly, mm.379-383 consists of nine-part symmetric quintal chords interspersedby (025) passages. In this section, the oboe serves as the centre of symmetry for these(01235789t) vertical sets (figure 4.7).454.2. Interaction with MelodyFigure 4.7: Sparks of Union mm.379-3834.2 Interaction with MelodyIn Sparks of Union, the quintal and the quartal chords are often peppered withvarious non-chord tones as in tonal harmony. For example, while in mm.432-441 the464.2. Interaction with Melodyensemble presents Gma7, the bassoon and contrabass open their line with a (B[ - B)scoop, then they present various kinds of added notes (figure 4.8). In m.434 they playan incomplete neighbour tone (A), then in mm.435-436 present two passing tones (Eand D]). This line (<9, 6, 4, 3>) delineates (0136) motivic cell, which is the I0 of thecello’s motive in mm.6-7 (δ) and the T6 of the viola music in m.67-69 (γ).Figure 4.8: Sparks of Union mm.431-435Similarly in mm.441-454 and mm.466-480, while the harmonies are based on asuccession of quintal chords, various added notes enrich the palette and the texture.For instance, in mm.441-445, while the harmony projects <6 8 e 1>, a quintal chordbased on B, the clarinet, cello and French horn continue micro-canons that resonateGma7 as a suspension against the new chords (figure 4.9). At the same time, the bassoonand contrabass play a melodic line that includes various non-chord tones. In mm.441-443, this line projects a (013467) hexachord, which is comprised of a pair of I1 related474.2. Interaction with Melody(014) trichords-namely <3 4 7> and <6 9 t>. By mm.444-445 this line converges withthe main harmony and plays <e 8>.Figure 4.9: Sparks of Union mm.441-445Non-western modal lines are free from any direct chordal implications. However,a combination of tessitura, voice leading rules and the rich timbre of the traditional484.3. Spectral Considerationsinstruments construe a harmonic motion. In this piece, modal structures and melodiclines also inform the harmonic language and define some harmonic symmetries. Modalmotivic cells such as (026), (016) (024), and (025) appear quite often as trichords, attimes with modal and non-modal extensions. Sometimes, these motifs appear first asa line, and then gradually transform into a chord. For example, (024) initially appearsin mm.3-4 as both a cluster and a melody in the supporting lines of β and γ. Later, itreturns as T14 transpositional symmetry in mm.304-308 as (024) and then with morevoices as (0246) in mm.308-310 (see figure 2.7). The (024) chord also appears with amodal extension as (0247) in mm.298-299 (figure 4.10).Figure 4.10: (0247) chords mm.298-299The I6 alternating (016) ostinato in the Max/MSP part in mm.206-232, namely <t 94> and <2 9 8>, also creates a harmonic stasis to emphasize (D - E) motion and thus E[as the centre of the symmetry. The chamber ensemble projects resolution on differentpitch centres, so a nebulous harmonic environment is formed which ironically turnsthis harmonic stasis into a segue to the next music.4.3 Spectral ConsiderationsI performed spectral analyses on three short fragments of shakuhachi and ney67 soloperformances. I extracted the predominant pitch content from the overtones presentin these fragments. This information informed some of my decisions in shaping the67The Persian oblique rim-blown bamboo flute.494.3. Spectral Considerationsindividual harmonies and in designing the orchestration of some of the melodic lines.At times, the ensemble imitates the timbres of these fragments. In m.2, the combinationof the flute and clarinet playing with airy tones and with flutter-tongue is reminiscentof shakuhachi’s muraiki and flutter-tongue tone. In other places, the data derived fromthe spectral analyses briefly defines the vertical pitch content.Figure 4.11 is a sonogram of a ney playing a single ornate note. This sonogrampresents that from 1”- 3”, ney embellishes C4 with a wide vibrato. At 2’40” ney’s mainspectrum consists of (B3 B4 F]4 B5 E[5 G5 A5 C6). In mm.189-192, shown in figure 4.12,the winds are playing a vertical < 3 7 9 0 > pitch collection which is the upper portionof the ney’s spectrum. This pattern reflects a certain voicing of (0258) pitch class set.Figure 4.11: Sonogram of a ney playing an embellished CThe last chord in m.190 presents voicing parallel to the upper five partials of theanalysis which forms a (02458)-though the fourth partial is missing. M.191 presentsthree upper partials as (025). When the bassoon returns, the woodwinds presentanother set of the (0258) tetrachord with a new orchestration.504.3. Spectral ConsiderationsFigure 4.12: Sparks of Union mm.189-193The ney spectrum informs other parts of the music as well. For instance, m.318presents this pentachord with some minimal variations (figure 4.13). The three upperpartials resonate as a chord (5 7 t) and the other two notes are presented in the clarinetmelody. The strings then double the lower, stronger partials in octaves.Figure 4.13: Ney’s spectrum defines the pitch content m.318514.3. Spectral ConsiderationsThis voicing also influences the orchestration and the pitch content of the closingmaterial mm.537-542 (figure 4.14). In mm.537-538, we hear a (01356) pentachord thatgradually transforms by changing one note at a time to a (02458) set in mm.539-540and to a (02357) in mm.541-542.Figure 4.14: Voice leading of the closing section mm.537-542The other two sources of spectral information are taken from sonograms of twodistinct samples of shakuhachi. Figure 4.16 is a sonogram of a shakuhachi playing D5with a breathy attack. The airy tone quality of the performance creates a wealth ofovertones. In 0.25”-0.50” of this sonogram, the most resonant partials are (D5 A5 D6 G6G]6 B[6), though the upper partials never appear in tandem. This hexachord appearspartially in mm.498-499 progression (figure 4.15).Figure 4.15: Shakuhachi’s spectrum defines the pitch content mm.498-499The timbral complexity of this example gradually reduces to the most prominentovertones (fifth and octave) and these are heard in the closing cadence of the piece(mm.583-585).524.3. Spectral ConsiderationsFigure 4.16: Sonogram of a shakuhachi playing a D with breathy attackFigure 4.17 presents the spectral analysis of the other shakuhachi sample-a long Bgradually changing through muraiki technique. At 3”- 4”, this sonogram shows thepresence of (G]4 B5 F6 G6 B6 D7 E[7). The muraiki technique even resonates somesubharmonics of B5. This assortment of tones has similarities to the m.318 (02458)hexachord, though its constituents never appear as a single chord. The first halfof m.81 delineates an orchestrated T7 instance of this hexachord. This instance is atransfiguration of the voicing of this overtone series. Here E[ appears as a passing tonein the upper voices, rather than a subharmonic in the bass register.534.3. Spectral ConsiderationsFigure 4.17: Shakuhachi’s spectrum defines the pitch content m.81Figure 4.18: Sonogram of a shakuhachi playing a B with muraikiWhile I considered using non-Western instruments such as the shakuhachi and neyin the ensemble, I chose to confine the ensemble to conventional Western acousticinstruments. The reasons for this decision are twofold. First, it is difficult to balance544.4. Extended Techniquesthe acoustic qualities of these instruments with their western counterparts; they oftenhave limited dynamic ranges and some have very delicate tones. Secondly, performersof these instruments often have limited experience playing in conducted ensembleswith complex notated parts and extended techniques. As well, the focus of thiscomposition is on the blending of different cultures and musical genres rather than onthe novelty of unusual instrumental timbres.684.4 Extended TechniquesIn this piece, extended techniques mostly appear in the primary voices as a distinctsoloist feature. To name a few: the oboe plays smorzato69 in m.112 to open a solo lineand concludes that phrase with a wide vibrato in m.116. Individual string instrumentsplay sul ponticello, al tallone to create a raucous tone in mm.252-256. The French horngradually changes its timbre from open to stopped in mm.290-291, and plays widevibratos with and without mute in mm.436-452.Extended techniques also appear in combinations with the other instruments. Inm.2 as well as m.580 to replicate the airy tone of shakuhachi, both the flute and theclarinet play flutter tongue on a tone which transforms from a purely air sound to aregular tone. Extended techniques are sometimes combined to create a new mixedtimbre. In mm.231-232, various glissandi of different string instruments join to forma wash of glissando. An unusual sonic texture is created in mm.325-327 where multi-phonics in the flute and the oboe are combined with harmonics in the violin and violaand guitar-like pizzicati in the contrabass join (figure 4.19).68In my experience as a composer who has written for and closely worked with more than twodozen of the non-Western instruments, most of them have sophisticated, delicate timbres well-suitedfor solo lines with a fairly limited dynamic range. Also, as the focus of their musical training is for soloperformance, playing in an ensemble poses other limitations for the players and the ensemble.69“Single-stroke vibrato” which “creates sudden surges in volume” (Van Cleve, 2004, 73).554.4. Extended TechniquesFigure 4.19: Sparks of Union mm.325-327Extended techniques even appear in a supporting role. For example, the bassoonplays a timbral trill in mm.104-105, and the French horn gradually transforms its timbrefrom stopped to open in mm.107-109 as background sonority.To enhance the sonic experience with a spatial component, the ensemble is seatedas three distinct mixed trios (see Appendix B). This seating allows individual tim-bres to assume distinct spatial characters analogous to the panning of the electronics.Moreover, this seating will spread the strings’ timbre to create a warmer blend withthe woodwinds.56Chapter 5Electronics5.1 RoleIn Sparks of Union, the use of electronics connotes the role that technological ad-vancements have had in the global dissemination of various media. The wide avail-ability of sound and image from different parts of the world has changed what usedto be an unusual and exotic experience to something that is merely a click away.70As well, the electronics in Sparks of Union are used in increasingly complex ways torepresent the gradual and continual progress of these technologies in society.Besides their symbolic function, electronic sonorities have various roles through-out this piece. These range from processing the acoustic sounds of the individualinstruments to generating distinct digital tones. At times the electronics forms a back-ground drone, and at others it moves to the forefront as an essential feature of thecomposition. In the opening of the piece (see figure 1.1) electronics only play a dronegenerated through Frequency Modulation (FM) synthesis.71 On the downbeat of m.45(see figure 3.15) a B1+ message starts some minimal processing of the cello throughto m.70. Unlike the opening synthetic tones, these sonorities are quite dynamic andgenerated through live processing of the cello sound. Nevertheless, the role of thisprocessing is subordinate to the sonorities of the live ensemble.At times, the electronics takes on a more directive role, leading the ensemble withrhythmic layers, and at others it competes with the ensemble to build rhythmic or70Some scholars propose that “ubiquitous recording media and computer technology accelerate thismixing and destabilize not just Western music’s centrality but also the notational literacy” (Tenzer, 2006,4).71FM synthesis (or Frequency Modulation synthesis) is a form of audio synthesis where the timbreof a simple waveform is changed by modulating its frequency.575.1. Roleharmonic tension. In mm.44-45 and mm.130-131 (see subsequently figure 3.15 and3.4) through the rhythmic synthesized ostinato, electronics set the new tempo and leadthe ensemble through a metric modulation to new tempi.The 4 + 3 electronic ostinato that starts on downbeat of m.70 creates a polymeterfrom m.74 as the ensemble switches to a different meter. As the ensemble acceleratesin m.77, the polymeter escalates to a polytempo that involves a 13:12 pulse tension.This tension resolves only when the electronic part stops in m.87 as the ensembleaccelerates again (14:13 ratio or 7:6 in comparison to the ostinato). As demonstrated inthe diagram below, in mm.75-87 a gradual intensification of tension is created betweenthe changing accelerating meters of the ensemble and Max/MSP’s steady ostinato.Figure 5.1: Intensifying tension between the ensemble and Max/MSP mm.70-87Another role of the electronics is live processing of the individual and groups ofinstruments. These are indicated in the score by control marks such as in m.45: B1+,cello mic, process on (see figure 3.15). This marking indicates that a reverberated cellosound will be sent to different speakers in the hall. This alters the static placement ofinstrumental sounds by moving those sounds to different locations in the hall. It alsochanges the timbre of instruments as digital reverbration is added to the sound. Forexample, the resultant tone of the violas pizzicati in mm.51-66 is deeper and richer intimbre than its source.From m.159 with an E1+ marker in the score, , the scope of live processing extendsto include more fundamental metamorphosis of the acoustic sounds. Max/MSP buildsa pad of spectral drones from the sound of the string instruments. Here, Max/MSPassumes a more active role as it creates new compound timbres. A similar processcan be heard beginning on the downbeat of m.194 where spectral drone and spectraltracing functions process woodwinds sounds.585.2. Implementation5.2 ImplementationThe implementation of the electroacoustic part of Sparks of Union involves a Max/MSPpatch that is run by a computer performer who is seated on stage and who followsthe conductor’s baton. The computer performer is responsible for triggering andcontrolling all electroacoustic sounds throughout the composition. These include bothsynthetic sounds generated through FM synthesis and processed instrumental sounds.The Max/MSP patch is designed for a quadraphonic system with two speakers in frontof the stage and two at back of the hall so that the electronic sounds fill the acousticspace rather than coming from within the ensemble.Figure 5.2: View of the Max/MSP patch for Sparks of UnionThe patch includes an FM signal generator and a number of digital effects proces-sors that operate on the live instruments. Every musical instrument except for thepercussion is miked closely (see Appendix B for the microphone labels map). The595.2. Implementationcomputer performer follows the score and manually triggers the electronics events bypressing buttons on the patch or on an external midi controller.The score has a part for MAX notated on three staves and includes both prescriptiveand descriptive information. It indicates what the computer performer is required todo (e.g., perform an action on the patch) and describes what the resulting sound willbe. FM generated midi sounds are represented at sounding pitch with circled numberswhich refer to on-screen buttons that will start the given midi notes with the set timbre,volume, panning, and rhythm. Some of synthesized events produce single notes, whileothers produce long sequences of notes.While the rhythm and timbre are both fixed, the computer performer can adjust thevolume and refine the panning of the computer-generated sounds to accommodatethe acoustic characteristics of the hall.The live processing effects are indicated on a single staff with a verbal description(e.g., cello mic On) with a circled symbol that identifies the relevant on-screen button.Each instrument′s microphone can be turned on or off from within the patch and itssignal can be routed to a software reverberator.Other circled acronyms in the score refer to the other on-screen buttons that initiatedifferent effects. For instance, E1+ means toggle the spectral drone on. These effectsonly process the mixed signal from microphones that are currently on. Figure 5.3shows a passage in which the electronic part transitions from a one rhythmic ostinatoto another, and then introduces some processing to the viola part (m.50).While I designed and built the Max/MSP patch, I used some existing patchesfrom UBC Max/MSP/Jitter Toolbox72 and the spectral processing plugins developed byMichael Norris.7372Most of these patches are written by Dr. Keith Hamel. For full credits please check: http://www.opusonemusic.net/muset/toolbox.html.73I am using Michael Norris′ Spectral DroneMaker and Spectral Tracing plugins: http://www.michaelnorris.info/software/soundmagic-spectral.html.605.2. ImplementationFigure 5.3: Sparks of Union mm.47-5361Chapter 6ConclusionOver the past ten years, I have written compositions for various combinations ofWestern and non-Western instruments. These works include to the clouds a bird, adouble concerto for the koto and shakuhachi; axiom praxis, a concerto for the sho; birds,a song cycle for tenor, alto and intercultural orchestra; and through the fissure, a tapecomposition for sampled intercultural orchestra. These earlier works provide me witha wealth of experience in dealing with, combining and juxtaposing different musicallanguages within the same work. In Sparks of Union, I have exclusively used traditionalwestern instruments and I have focused on the dialogue among different musicallanguages, styles and genres. The work explores the concept of unity in diversity andproposes a new approach to musical composition inspired by our contemporary globalsociety. As well, Sparks of Union explores the dichotomy of acoustic and electroacousticmedia and reflects the influence that current technology has on our lives.Sparks of Union represents a new approach to composition that reflects the contem-porary musical milieu of our global village. It creates new sonorities and new musicaltextures that arise from the interactions and intersections of diverse musical languagesfrom our shared cultural heritages.62Bibliography‘Abdul-Baha´ 1969. Paris Talks: Addresses Given by ‘Abdul-Baha´ in 1911. London: Baha´’ı´Publishing Trust.‘Abdul-Baha´ 1977. The Tablets of the Divine Plan. Wilmette, IL: Baha´’ı´ Publishing Trust.Adler, S. and P. Hesterman 2002. The study of orchestration. New York: W.W. Norton.Agawu, K. 1995. African rhythm: a Northern Ewe Perspective. CUP Archive.Agawu, K. 2009. Music as Discourse: Semiotic Adventures in Romantic Music. New York:Oxford University Press.Appadurai, A. 1996. Modernity al large: cultural dimensions of globalization, Volume 1.Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Archer, William Kay, e. 1964. The Preservation of Traditional Forms of the Learned andPopular Music of the Orient and the Occident. Urbana: University of Illinois Instituteof Communications Research.Arom, S., M. Thom, B. Tuckett, and R. Boyd 1991. African polyphony and polyrhythm:musical structure and methodology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Backus, J. 1977. The acoustical foundations of music. New York: W.W. Norton.Baha´’ı´ International Community 1995. The Prosperity for Humankind. Haifa: Baha´’ı´World Centre.Baha´’u’lla´h 1976. Gleanings from the Writings of Baha´’u’lla´h. Wilmette, IL: Baha´’ı´ Pub-lishing Trust.Berger, A. V. 1945. The music of aaron copland. The Musical Quarterly 31(4), 420–447.63BibliographyBlacking, J. 1995. Music, culture, and experience: Selected papers of John Blacking. Chicago:University of Chicago Press.Chehabi, E. H. Web. 22 August 2013. Encyclopaedia Iranica, Chapter Zur-K¯a¯na.Columbia University Press. http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/zur-kana.Chernoff, J. M. 1979. African rhythm and African sensibility: Aesthetics and social action inAfrican musical idioms. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Cook, P. R. 2001. Music, Cognition, and Computerized Sound: An Introduction to Psychoa-coustsics. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT press.Cook, P. R. 2007. Real Sound Synthesis for Interactive Applications (Book & CD-ROM).Wellesley, Mass.: AK Peters, Ltd.Cope, D. 1991. Computers and musical style. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Cope, D. 2000. New directions in music. Prospect Heights, Ill.: Waveland Press.Davis, R. and L. J. Plenkers Web. 22 August 2013. Grove Music Online. Oxford MusicOnline, Chapter Tunisia. Oxford University Press. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/subscriber/article/grove/music/45998.De Lio, T. 1988. Circumscribing the Open Universe. Lanham, Md.: University Press ofAmerica.Deva, B. C. 1973. An introduction to Indian music. New Delhi: Publications Division,Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India.Dodge, C. and T. A. Jerse 1997. Computer Music: synthesis, composition and performance.New York: Schirmer Books.During, J. 1988. La musique traditionnelle de l’Azerbayjan et la science des muqams, Vol-ume 80. Baden-Baden: V. Koerner.Ellis, A. 1885. On the musical scales of the various nationalism. Journal of the SocietyofArts 38(3), 485–527.Erickson, R. 1977. Sound Structure in Music. Berkeley: University of California Press.64BibliographyErlmann, V. 1999. Music, modernity, and the global imagination: South Africa and the West.New York: Oxford University Press.Ernst, D. 1977. The evolution of electronic music. New York: Schirmer Books.Farhat, H. 1990. The dastgah concept in Persian music. New York: Cambridge UniversityPress.Farmer, H. G. 1939. Studies in oriental musical instruments. Glasgow: Civic Press.Farraj, J. and S. Abu Shumays Web. 22 August 2013. Maqam world. http://www.maqamworld.com.Farrell, G. 1997. Indian music and the West. New York: Oxford University Press.Feld, S. 1996. Pygmy pop. a genealogy of schizophonic mimesis. Yearbook for TraditionalMusic 28, 1–35.Frith, S. 1989. World music, politics and social change: Papers from the InternationalAssociation for the Study of Popular Music. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Gerson-Kiwi, E. 1963. The Persian Doctrine of Dastgah-Composition: a PhenomenologicalStudy in Musical Modes. Tel Aviv: Israel Music Institute.Griffiths, P. 1984. Barto´k. London: Dent.Halfyard, J. 2007. Berio’s Sequenzas: essays on performance, composition and analysis.Burlington, VT: Ashgate.Hamel, K. Web. 22 August 2013. UBC Max/MSP/Jitter Toolbox. http://www.opusonemusic.net/muset/toolbox.html.Heifetz, R. J. 1989. On the wires of our nerves: the art of electroacoustic music. LewisburgPa.: Bucknell University Press.Hollander, H. 1955. The music of leos janacek–its origin in folklore. The MusicalQuarterly 41(2), 171–176.Kennan, K. W. and D. Grantham 2002. The technique of orchestration. Upper SaddleRiver, N.J.: Prentice Hall.65BibliographyKruth, P. and H. Stobart 2007. Sound, Volume 11. Cambridge: Cambridge UniversityPress.Labi, G. 2003. Theoretical Issues in African Music: Exploring Resources in Creativity,Volume 53. Bayreuth: Breitinger.Lambert, C. 1966. Music ho!: a study of music in decline. London: Faber.Locke, R. P. 2007. A broader view of musical exoticism. The Journal of Musicology 24(4),477–521.Lundberg, D., K. Malm, O. Ronstro¨m, and A. A. Sundqvist 2000. Musik, medier,mångkultur: fo¨ra¨ndringar i svenska musiklandskap. Stockholm: Gidlunds Fo¨rlag.Malm, W. P. 1976. Japanese music and musical instruments. Rutland, Vt.: C.E. Tuttle.Malm, W. P. 1986. Six hidden views of Japanese music. Berkley, CA: University ofCalifornia Press.Malm, W. P., C. B. Field, and M. Raupach 1996. Music cultures of the Pacific, the NearEast, and Asia. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.Manning, P. 2004. Electronic and computer music. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Massoudieh, M. T. 1997. The Vocal Radif of Traditional Iranian Music According to theVersion of Mahmoud Karimi: Transcription and Analyses. Tehran: Iranian Music Asso-ciation.McLuhan, M. 1962. Gutenberg Galaxy: the Making of Typographic Man. New York: NewAmerican Library.Messiaen, O. 1944. Technique de mon langage musical. Paris: A. Leduc.Miki, M. 2008. Composing for Japanese instruments. Rochester, NY: University RochesterPress.Nattiez, J.-J. and J. M. Dunsby 1975. Fondements d’une se´miologie de la musique.Perspectives of New Music 15(2), 226–233.66BibliographyNettl, B. and C. M. Babiracki 1992. The Radif of Persian Music: Studies of Structure andCultural Context in the Classical Music of Iran. Champaign, Ill.: Elephant & Cat.Ng, K. and P. Nesi 2008. Interactive multimedia music technologies. Hershey, PA: Infor-mation Science Reference.Norris, M. Web. 22 August 2013. Spectral plugins. http://www.michaelnorris.info/software/soundmagic-spectral.html.Onderdonk, J. 1999. Vaughan Williams and the Modes. Folk Music Journal 7(5), 609–626.Palmberg, M. and A. Kirkegaard 2002. Playing with identities in contemporary music inAfrica. Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet.Pellman, S. 1994. An introduction to the creation of electroacoustic music. Belmont, Calif.:Wadsworth Publishing Company.Plotinus 1969. The Enneads. London: Faber & Faber.Raichel, D. R. 2000. The science and applications of acoustics. New York: Springer.Ranade, A. D. 2006. Music Contexts: A Concise Dictionary of Hindustani Music. NewDelhi: Promilla & Co.Richards, P. 2001. A pan-african composer? coleridge-taylor and africa. Black MusicResearch Journal 21(2), 235–260.Roads, C. 1997. Musical signal processing. Exton, PA: Swets & Zeitlinger.Roads, C. 2001. Microsound. Cambridge: MIT Press.Rowe, R. 1993. Interactive music systems: machine listening and composing. Cambridge:MIT Press.Rowe, R. 2001. Machine musicianship. Cambridge: MIT press.Schorske, C. E. 1983. Mahler and ives: Populist archaism and musical innovation.Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 37(1), 20–39.67BibliographySchuyler, P. Web. 22 August 2013. Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online, ChapterMorocco. Oxford University Press. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/subscriber/article/grove/music/19156.Sexton, J. 2007. Music, sound and multimedia: from the live to the virtual. Edinburgh:Edinburgh University Press.Taylor, T. D. 1997. Global pop: World music, world markets. New York: Routledge.Teilhard de Chardin, P. 1964. The future of man. London: Collins.Tenzer, M. 2006. Analytical studies in world music. New York: Oxford University Press.Thrasher, A. R. 2008. Sizhu instrumental music of south China: Ethos, theory and practice.Leiden; Boston: Brill.Titon, J. T. 1992. Worlds of music: an introduction to the music of the world’s peoples. NewYork: Schirmer Books.Truax, B. 1984. Acoustic communication. Norwood, N.J.: Ablex Pub. Corp.Universal House of Justice 1985. The promise of world peace. Haifa: Baha´’ı´ World Centre.Van Cleve, L. 2004. Oboe unbound: contemporary techniques, Volume 8. Lanham, Md.:Scarecrow Press.White, B. W. 2012. Music and Globalization: Critical Encounters. Bloomington: IndianaUniversity Press.Wishart, T. 1996. On sonic art. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.Wright, O. 1978. The Modal System of Arab and Persian Music AD 1250-1300. New York:Oxford University Press.Xenakis, I. 1992. Formalized music: thought and mathematics in composition. Stuyvesant,NY: Pendragon Press.Zicarelli, D. 1997. Max/MSP Software. San Francisco: Cycling ’74.Zonis, E. 1973. Classical Persian music: an introduction. Cambridge: Harvard UniversityPress.68Appendix ASparks of Unionduration: 21’21”a chamber composition forflute/alto/piccolo, oboe, B[ clarinet, bassoon, French horn,violin, viola, violoncello, contrabass, percussion and computerc© Farshid Samandari, January 201469Performance notes: all the beats should be treated equally, there are no downbeats: continue the tremolo or the flutter tongue without any accent: gradually transform the tone from regular to harmonic, from normal to airy: music inside the box shall be repeated until the rest : play the highest pitch on the instrument, even if  it is unfocused toneαtrem.rit. : free time, umeasured: gradually make the tremolo more sparsedotted slursbroken tiesbroken barlines: wide irregular (timing) vibratoSeating ArrangementAppendix A. Sparks of Union70grotesque wide vibratoPercussion         :  play on the rim/edge of  the instrumentcaxixi/ egg shaker; slaps stick (whip); woodblock; temple blocks (set of  five);triangle; finger cymbals (zils) ; medium suspended cymbal; large tam-tam; snare drum; medium tom-tom; bass drum; stick for scratching tam-tam/cymbal; cello bow; soft mallets; hard mallets; soft beaters for tam-tam :  slap tongue, lip pizzicato. It is produced by puffing short tones with the tongue, without any air pressure from the lungs:  tongue ram is created by closing the mouthpiece with the whole mouth and then making a big and rapid movement with the tongue, against the teeth.The easiest way is to simply say "HT!"(1 player): bow on the tailpiece to create a quiet resonant sound  : air sound through a diffuse air stream above the embouchure hole: air sound with a more discernible pitch: play (bowed or pizz) behind the bridge to create a high squeaky sound* All pizzicati should be treated as sempre l.v. : irregular and spasmodic oscillation around apitch to create an unfocused pitch Woodwinds*  Flute needs B foot joint and doubles alto and piccoloStringsAppendix A. Sparks of Union71Program notes        Sparks of  Union  aims to focus on different musical languages derived from different backgrounds in search of  polarizing and uniting elements. Moreover, it deals with the contemporary musical zeitgeist from the global village perspective and examines the transformations in musical substance derived from the copious changes in dissemination since the information revolution. As well, it explores the dichotomy of  electroacoustic and acoustic media. Sparks of  Union is composed in a developmental sectional form using four main sonorities. In this piece different musics influence and transform the sonorities and rhythmic content of  one another. The temporal proportions of  Sparks of  Union are derived from the golden ratio system; and its harmonic language is comprised of  various systems of  pitch symmetries. Occasionally, the harmonic materials are modeled after the spectral content of  instruments associated with cultural sources of  the music. A1+/-A2+/-A3+/-B1+/-B2+/-B3+/-C1+/-C2+/-C3+/-S+/-W+/-T+/-E1+/-E2+/-E3+/-:  violin mic On/Off:  bass mic On/Off:  oboe mic On/Off:  cello mic On/Off:  French horn mic On/Off:  clarinet mic On/Off:  viola mic On/Off:  bassoon mic On/Off:  flute mic On/Off:  strings' mics On/Off:  wood winds mics On/Off:  all mics On/Off:  spectral drone On/Off:  spectral tracing On/Off:  echo On/OffMax/MSP triggersAppendix A. Sparks of Union72°¢°¢{°¢© Farshid Samandari, January 2014.FluteOboeClarinet in BbBassoonFrench HornPercussionViolinViolaVioloncelloContrabassMax/Mspmfenigmatic lento q=48, fierymfpp ff pp ffppp mfmfmfmfpp p444444444444444444444444&Transposed Score α ∑20" Flt. norm.Farshid SamandariSparks of Union&α ∑ ∑&α ∑ Flt. norm.?α ∑ ∑&α ó ëcuivré 20" ëó cuivré ∑/α Caxixi/ egg shaker ∑&α è è è è ∑ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍBα è è è è ∑ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ? ≠α ∑?α ∑ ∑?FM SYNTHα ∑Pad like tone colour ∑?α 1æææO æææœ ™ œœ œb fiœj œæææO æææœ ™ œ# œœ+˙ 1 ‰ +˙ 1J ‰æææ˙ ‰œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ˙˙ wAppendix A. Sparks of Union73°¢°¢{°¢°¢{Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vla.Vc.MAXsff tempo rubato, pastoral 5pp mf p mfsffpp ppp pffffOb.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXtempo giusto, vigorousff f mfmfmf p& ∑ ∑3& 3 3& ∑ ∑? 3& 3B « ∑ ∑? « ∑ ∑?& ∑&B arco? arco? pizz 3? 2œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œÆb ‰ ŒŒ Œ ˙ fiœjœ œb œ œ ˙b œ>b œn œb œn œb œ œ œn ™ œ# œ œb œb œnœ ™ fiœ# jœj œ' ‰ ŒŒ Œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ™ œbJ œ œbJ œ œ# ™Œ Œ ˙b œb ˙b œn ™ œj œ œj œ œ ™Œ Œ œ ‰ ŒŒ Œ œ ‰ Œ˙ Œ ŒŒ ‰ œ œ œ œ# œb ™ œn œ# œ œ œ œ# œ# ™ œ# œ œ# ™Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œn œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ# ™ œ# œ œŒ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ# ™ œn œ# œ# ˙˙ ˙ ˙ œ œB œ œwœb r œ ™™ ˙ ww=Appendix A. Sparks of Union74°¢{°¢°¢°¢{°¢Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf10mf fmf fff mfBsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXppp mf([qp  ]e=qaa z) andante q=72, elegiac  15mfp mfmfmf3434343434343434343434343434/ Triangle ∑ ∑ 3&ù 3 3B 3 3 3? nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~ 3? 3 3?? molto vib.& ∑ ∑ ?/Mid Tom Bass Drum press the membrane with hand& ∑ ∑ espressivoB ∑ ∑ espressivo? ∑ ∑ espressivo?? 3Œ Œ œ œ œœ# ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ# œ# ™ œœ œ œ# œ# œœ≥b œœ≥ œœ≥# œœ≥ œ œ# œ# ˙˙ Œœ ‰ Œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œ# œ# œb œœ œ œ# œ# œn œ# œb œn œœœœ ™™ Œœ# œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ# ™ œ# œ œ# œ# œ# œn œ# œ# œn œb œ# ˙ ŒœB œ œ œ œ œB œ œ œ œB ™ œJ œB œ ™ œjwwbb ww wwŒ Œ œ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™Œ ˙ œ Œ Œ œ ˙Œ Œ œ œJ œ œJ œ œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ‰ eœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œb œ œ œb œ œ œ œ ™ ‰‰ eeœ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ ‰‰ œeee∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ ˙ œ ≈ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ ‰œ œB ™ œJ œB œ œB œ œ œB œ œB ™ œJ œB œ œB ™ œbJ˙˙=Appendix A. Sparks of Union75°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢{°¢Cl.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXppp mf 20ppp mfmf p p mf p mfp mf p mfp mf p mfFl.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXppp mf 25ppppp mfpp mfpp mfp mf& molto vib. û? molto vib. ∑ ∑/Mid Tom Bass Drum& 3 3B 3 3? 3??& s LL s ss ,ss9 gliss.& û ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ molto vib./Mid Tom Bass Drum ∑& 3 3 3 3 3 3B 3 3 3 3 3 3? 3??Œ ˙ ˙ ™ ˙ œ Œ ‰ ≈ œ œ ˙ ™Œ ˙ ˙ ™ ˙ œœj œ œj œ œ œ œ œJ œ œJ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œJ œŒ eœ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ ≈ œb œ ™ œb œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œb œ œ ™ œ œ œ œb œ œjŒ œee∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ ≈ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œb œ œ ™ œ œ œ œb œ œJŒ œeee∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ ™ œ ™ ≈ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œb œ œ ™ ˙˙ œ œJœB œ œB œ œ œB œ œB ™ œJ œB œ œB ™ œbJ œB œ œB˙B ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ˙ Œ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œ œ œ œ œJ œ œJ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ˙ ‰ œ œb œ œj œ ™ œbJ œJ œ œ œj œ œ œ œB œ œ œ œ œ œ œB œ œ œ˙ ‰ œ œb œ œJ œ ™ œbJ œJ œ œ œJ œ œ œ œB œ œ œ œ œ œ œB œ œ œ˙ ‰ œ œb ˙ Œ ‰ œ œ œJ ˙ ™ ˙b ™œ œ œB œ œB ™ œJ œB œ œB ™ œbJ œB œ œB œ œ œB œb=Appendix A. Sparks of Union76°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf mpmeno mosso q=66, luminous  30mp mfppp mfmf pp mf pp mfpp mf pp mf ppppmpmfmpmf78 2478 2478 2478 2478 2478 2478 2478 2478 2478 2478 24& 3& ∑ ∑ 3& ∑ 3? smorzatoï ó ï ¿? ∑/Mid Tom Bass Drum ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ sul tasto 3B sul tasto a punta d'arco sul tasto 3? ∑ ∑ sul D 3? ∑ ∑ pizz–?˙ ™ ˙ ™™ œb œj fiœj‰ œb œJ œ fiœjœJ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œJŒ Œ Œ œbJ œ œ œ fiœjœJ œJ œ œJ fiœjœ œ œ˙ ™™ ˙ Œ ™ œn œ œ# œ œ# ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ˙ Œ Œ œ œ œ œb œJ ‰ Œ ™ ˙ œ œ ˙Œ Œ œ ™ ˙ ‰ œ ˙ œ œ ˙æææ˙ æææ˙œ Œ Œ ‰ œb œj œ œ œ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œœ Œ œ> ˙ œ ™ œb œ œœ Œ œb œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰œ Œ Œ œObb Oœ Oœ Oœ Oœb Oœ Oœ Oœb Oœ Oœ Oœ˙ ™ ˙ Œ œ ˙Appendix A. Sparks of Union77°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf 35p mfp mfpmf pp3434343434343434343434& 3& smorzato ¿3 3 3& 3 3??/Mid Tom Bass Drum ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑3B 3 3 ∑ ∑3 3? (sul D) ¿ ∑ ∑3 3? – – – – ∑ ∑? 4œ œ œ œJ œ œJ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ ™ œJ œJ œ œ ˙ ™œJ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œJ œ ™ œœ œJ œ ™œj œ œJ œ œ> œ œ ‰ œ œJ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ ˙ ™œ œ œ œb œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ ™œ œ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ™æææ˙œ œ œ œœ œ œJ œ œJ œ œ> œ œ œOb œO œO œO œOb j ŒOœ Oœb Oœ Oœ Oœ Oœb Oœ Oœ Oœ OœbJ O˙Œ œ Œ œb Œ œ ˙ ˙Appendix A. Sparks of Union78°¢°¢{°¢°¢{Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Cb.MAXmf p mf p mfcome sopra q=72, compelling  mf p mf p mfmf mf mf mfFl.Ob.Cl.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXMAXmf(qaa z=qaa z)con moto q=90, vicious   45 mfmfmf mfmf mfp44444444444444444444444444444444& ∑& ∑&? ∑? ∑ ∑ &? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ pizz –?& 5 Flt. norm.& ∑& ∑ ∑B ∑ gliss.? ∑ Sul Gpizz? arco gliss.& 5 5ÿ◊ ∑ ∑? ›B1+? saw wave timbre/ ∑ Cello mic, process on ∑‰ œ œ ™ ‰ œ œb ™ ˙ ™ œ ˙ ˙ œ œfiœj‰ œ œb ™ fiœj‰ œ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ˙ ˙b œ œfiœj‰ œ œ# ™ fiœj‰ œ# œ ™ Œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ‰ œ œ œœ ˙ œŒ Œ œ ˙ œ ˙ ‰ œ œJ œ ™ œb œ ˙‰ œ œ ™ œJ œ œ ™ ‰ œ ™ œ ˙ Œ‰ œ œ œJœ œ ˙ Œ Œ ‰æææ æææO æææœ ™™ œ œ œb ™ fiœj œJ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œb ˙ Œ Œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œb ™ œJ˙# ™ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙fiœj fiœjœJ œ fiœj fiœjœJ fiœjœJ œ fiœj fiœjœJ œ fiœjœ œœ∏∏∏∏ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏‰ ˙ ™™ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙bŒ Œ œœœ.Æb œœœ.Æ œœœ.Æ œœœ.b œœœ. œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.V Œ Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union79°¢°¢{°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp mfp mf mfpFl.Ob.Cl.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.MAXMAXmfpiù mosso q=96   50 mffpp mf ppp& s L L sss s,s7 s LL ss s ,s s5 7&& èB b? Sul G??›& ∑&&Triangle ∑ 3 3/ ∑ ∑ ∑& sul ponticelloB ∑ Sul Cpizz Sul C Sul C Sul C? Sul G Sul G?› 6 C1+/ ∑ Viola mic, process on ∑ ∑˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰ ˙ ˙˙bœ œ œ œ œ# ˙ œ ˙ Œ œ œb œ œj œn ™ œJœ ™ fiœjœj œ#J œn ™ ˙ Œ Œ wœb ™™ œr œ œb œ# œb ™ œ œ œ œ# œ# œ œ˙ œb ˙˙fiœjœœj∏∏∏∏ œ fiœj fiœjœJ fiœjœJ œ fiœj fiœjœJ œ fiœjœ œœ∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœj‰ œ œ fiœj fiœjœJ œ fiœj fiœjœJ fiœjœJ œ fiœjœJœ œ œ# œJ œ ™ ˙b œn œ œ œ œb ™ œ Œ Œ Œœœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ Œww Œ ˙ œ œ œ.- Œ Œ˙ œ Œ Œ ˙n œ Œ ˙ œb œ œ.- Œ Œœ œ œœ ™ œ fiœj œœœ ™ œ.-# fiœj œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ.- fiœj œb ™ œœœ œ œ ŒO˙bb O˙ œ Oœ œ Oœ ™™ Oœb ™™ Oœ O˙ Œ Oœbb Oœbb O˙bbfiœj fiœjœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœj œ fiœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj œjfiœjœ fiœj fiœjœ œ fiœj fiœj‰ œ œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ™ fiœjœ ™ fiœjœ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ™œœœ.b œœœ. œœœ. œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ. œœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ.V Œ Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union80°¢°¢{°¢°¢{Fl.Cl.Vln.Vla.Vc.MAX55Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf f fmf f fmf mf mfmf&& gliss.& 3 3B Sul C Sul C? Sul G?›&& 3 3&? ∑ 3 3& 3B Sul C Sul C Sul C Sul C? Sul G Sul G? ∑ Sul Epizz?›Œ Œ œ ™ œj œ ˙ ™ Œ œ# ™ œ# ™œ ≈ œ œ# œb œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™Œ Œ Oœ ™™ Oœbb J Oœ O˙b œ œ œb œ œ œb œ œ œfiœj œ fiœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœj œ fiœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏fiœjœ ™ fiœjœJ fiœj fiœj‰ œ œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ™ fiœjœ ™ fiœjœJ fiœj fiœj‰ œ œŒ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ. œœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ.˙ œ œ œb œb œb œ œn œ œ# ‰ œ# œ# œ ˙b ™Œ Œ Œ ‰ ≈ œœœ ˙b œR œ ™™ œ œ œb œ œ œ œ fiœb jœœ œ œ œ œ# œ œb œ ‰ œb œ œ ‰ œ œb ˙ ™ œn‰ ≈ œœœ ˙b œ œ ™ œ œ œ œb œJ œ ™œ œ œ œb Œ œb œ ˙n œb œ ˙b ™fiœj fiœjœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœj œ fiœj œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœj œ œœj∏∏∏∏ Œ fiœj‰ œ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ™ fiœjœ ™ fiœjœ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ™fiœj˙ Œ fiœjœ fiœj˙ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ™Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ. œœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ.=Appendix A. Sparks of Union81°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXMAXff sff ff sff60sff sff f sff sffsff ff sffsff sff f sff sffsff sff f sff mf sffff sff sffsff mfsff mfsff sff f sff sfffmf& Flt. norm. Flt. norm.3&& Flt.?& ¿/Bass Drum&B?? arco&7 ÿ◊?›/ Viola VolumeCello Volume ∑ ∑ ∑œ œ œ œ ˙ œ ™ ‰ æææœ# æææœ æææœ æææœ æææœJ œÆb æææœJ æææœ æææœ æææœb ‰æææ æææœ æææœ æææœ æææœ œÆb˙b Œ œ' ‰ œ' œj œb œn œj œÆ ‰ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œÆ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ ™ Œ ‰ œ' æææœ#J æææœ æææœ æææœ æææœ Œ Œ œ'fiœb j˙ Œ œ' ‰ œ' œj œ œ œj œ' ‰ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ'Œ Œ Œ œ' ‰ œ' œj œb œb œj œ' ‰ œ+ œ# œj œ ™ œ œo'Œ ˙ Œ ‰ œ> fi¿j‰ ¿ ‰ fi¿j‰ ¿ œj œ> ™ Œ fi¿j¿ ˙ fi¿j¿ œ>œn ˙# ™ ˙ ™ Œ ‰ œÆb ‰ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œÆbœœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ Œ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ Œ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏fiœj˙ Œ œÆ ‰ œÆ œJ œb œ œj œ' ‰ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ'w ˙ œ# œ w Œ Œ Œ œbŒ œœœ.>b œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.> œœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ. Œ œœœ.>b œœœ. ŒŒ Œ Œ VAppendix A. Sparks of Union82°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXMAXff 65f ff f p mff ff ff ffpp& Flt. Flt. norm. Flt. norm. Flt. norm. Flt. 3&& Flt. 3?&/Bass Drum ∑&B??&◊< >?›/ ∑ ∑ Viola Volume‰ æææœ æææœ æææœJ æææœb æææœJ æææœ ‰ æææœb œ æææœb œ æææœ ‰ œ œn œ æææœ æææœ æææœbœbJ œb œJ œ ‰ œ œb ™ œJ œJ œb ™ œ œb œ Œœj œ œj œ ‰ œ œ ™ œj œj œ ™ œ œ œ æææœ æææœ ææ朜J œ œj œ ‰ œ œ ™ œJ œJ œ ™ œ œ œ Œœb j œb œj œ ‰ œ œb ™ œbJ œJ œb ™ œ œb œ Œ‰ œ œj Œ Œ œ œ œ œj Œ ŒœbJ œb œbJ œ ‰ œb œb ™ œnJ œJ œb ™ œ œb œ Œœœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ Œ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏œj œb œj œ ‰ œ œb ™ œJ œJ œ ™ œ œb œ Œw w ˙ ™ Œœœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.> œœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ. Œ œœœ.>b œœœ. ŒŒ Œ Œ VAppendix A. Sparks of Union83°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢{Fl.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vla.Vc.MAXMAXmfmfmfmf mfmfppFl.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXMAX70sff mfsff mf mfsff mf mfmfsff mfsff mfmf34 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 34& norm. 3& norm. 3?/Bass Drum ∑ ∑B arco Sul D flautando3??› C1-/ Viola mic, process off ∑ Cello Volume& ∑ ∑&?&B pizz Sul G? arco??B1-8 repeat the figure 8 timesÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ/ Cello mic, process off ∑ ∑æææœJ œb ObJ œ œ œ œb œ œ œb œJ œ ™ O œ œb ™ œn ™ œbJæææœJ œ ObJ œ# œ œ œn œ œ œ œJ œ ™ O# œ œb ™ œn ™ œJfiœj fiœjœ. œ. fiœj‰ œ. Œ fiœj fiœj‰ œ. fiœjœ. ‰ fiœjœ. ‰ œ. ‰ Œ fiœj fiœjœ. œ. fiœj‰ œ. Œ fiœj‰ œ.fi¿j fi¿j¿ ¿ fi¿j fi¿j‰ ¿ ¿ ‰ fi¿j‰ ¿Œ Œ fiœ œ œ ˙ œeb œ œ œœ ™™ œœb ™™ œJ œb œ œJ œb ™˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏œœœ.b œœœ. Œ œœœ.> œœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ. Œ œœœ.b œœœ. ŒV Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ V˙ Œ ŒŒ œ'n ‰ œb œb j œ œn œ# œ ‰ œ œj œ# ™Œ œ'b ‰ œb œj œ ˙# Œ Œ œJ œ ™Œ œ' ‰ œ+ œ+n j œ+ +˙# Œ Œ œJ œ ™œJ œb ™ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ ™™∏∏∏∏ fiœj fiœj‰ œ œ fiœj œ œœ∏∏∏∏œœ∏∏∏∏ œ' ‰ œ œ# j œ œn œ œ ‰ œ œj œ# ™Œ œ' ‰ œ œ# j œ œn œ œ Œ Œ Œœœœ.>b œœœ. Œ Œ œœœ.b œœœ. ŒV Œ Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union84°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp mf sff mfpiù mosso q=104   75p mf sff mfmfp sfmf sff mfmf sff mfsff mf34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 44& ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑&?&/Bass Drum ∑ ∑ ∑& norm.B ∑ ∑???› ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍœ ™ œbJ fiOb jœ# œ œ œb œ œÆ ‰ œ# ™œ ™ œbJ œ# œ œ œb œ œÆ ‰ œ ™œ œ œ œj œ# œ œ# j œ œn œ# œ œ œ# ™ œj œ Œ Œœ œ ™ œJ œ ™ œ œJ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™˙ ‰ œ œ ™ œ œJ ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ ™Œ Œ æææœ œ Œ ŒŒ Œ œ œj œ# œ œ# j œ œb œ œ œ œ# ™ œj eeeœ'∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ# ™œœ∏∏∏∏ Œ Œ Œ Œ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ'∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏œ œb œ œj œ# œ œ# j œ œb œ œ œ œ# ™ œJ eeœ'∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ# ™Œ Œ œ œj œ# œ œ# j œ œb œ œ œ œ# ™ œJ ˙ ™Appendix A. Sparks of Union85°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXf80mfmff mff mff mf4444444444444444444444& 3 Flt.&& gliss.?& ∑ con sordino/Bass Drum ∑& nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 3B arco? nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ gliss.? gliss.?› Œ Œ qstart of the 6th repetitionÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍœb ™ œnJ œJ œ# ™ ˙ œ# œb œ œ# œ œJ œ# ™ œb æææœn ™ æææœb ‰ æææœ ™œ ™ œbJ œ fiœjœ œJ œ> œJ œ ‰ œ œ œ.# œb œ œ# œ œ œ#J œb œJ ˙#Œ Œ Œ fiœj œ> œ ™ œj œ> œj œ ‰ fiœjœ œ# œ.# œ œ œ# œ œ ˙# ˙œ ™ œbJ œ œ œJ œ> œj œ ‰ œ œ œ.# œb œ œ# œ œ ˙# ˙b˙ Œ Œ fiœj fiœjœ. œ. fiœj‰ œ.# Œ fiœj fiœj‰ œ. fiœjœ. ‰ fiœjœ. ‰ œ.# ‰ ŒŒ Œ ˙ fi¿j fi¿j¿. ¿. fi¿j‰ ¿. Œ fi¿j fi¿j‰ ¿. fi¿j¿. ‰ fi¿j¿. ‰ ¿. ‰ Œœb ™ eeeœj∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œJ œ# ™ ˙˙ œœ# œb œ œ# œ œJ œ# ™ eeœb œn ™ œb œJ œ ™œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ Œ ‰ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ˙˙∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ Œ Œ œb œ œJ œ# ™œb ™ eœj∏∏∏∏ œj œ# œœ ˙b ™ œb œ ˙ ™ œ œj œ ™ œb ™ œJwn ˙b ™ œb œ ˙ ™ œb œJ œ ™ œ# ™ œb jAppendix A. Sparks of Union86°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf 85pp p34 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 24& 3 norm. ,3 3& , ,& , ,3? , ,3& senza sordina/Bass Drum hold the membrane and release after attack& 33 3B gliss.? gliss.? gliss.?› Œ Œ Œ beat 6 of 7th cycleqÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍæææœ æææœ# æææœb œ æææœ ™ æææœ æææœ# æææœb æææœ æææœ# æææ˙ œb œ œJ œ# œnJ œ œ œœJ œb ™ œ ™ œ#J œ ˙ œb œ ˙n œn œ˙n œ ™ œj œ ˙# œ œ ˙# ˙ œ˙n œ ™ œb j œ ˙# œ œ ˙# ˙ œfiœj fiœjœ. œ. fiœj‰ œ. Œ fiœj fiœj‰ œ. fiœjœ. ‰ fiœjœ. ‰ œ. ‰ Œ fiœj fiœjœ. œ. fiœj‰ œ. Œ fiœj˙Œ Œ û˙ æææw æææ˙™ æææ˙œ œ# œb œ œ ™ œ œ# œb œ œ# ˙ œb œn œJ œ# œnJ œ œœ œœ#nœb œ œJ œ# ™ œœb ™™ œœbJ œœJ œœ ™™ ˙˙ œœ# œœ ™™ œjœ œ œJ œ ™ œœb ™™ œœbJ œœJ œœ ™™ ˙˙ œœn œœ ™™ œjœ œ œj œ# ™ œœb ™™ œœb j œœj œœ ™™ ˙˙ œœ œœ ™™ œjAppendix A. Sparks of Union87°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXf mf sff mf sff mf sff mf sfsfp mf p sf psf mf sf mfsf mf sf mfsf mf sf mfsf mf sf mfppp p44 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 4444 24 34 44& #Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ più mosso q=112   & #Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~& nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~? nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~& ∑ cuivré/Bass Drum to Wood Block& ∑B??& ∑ ∑ &› 9?› ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ ∑ ∑˙ œ> Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ> œb œ œ> Œ Œœ# œ# œ# œb œ œb œ# œ> Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ>b œb œ œ> Œ Œ˙ œ>b Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ>b œb œ œ> Œ Œ˙b œ>b Œ ˙ ˙ œ> Œ Œœ œ w 1 Œ ŒŒ æææœ œ> œ ≈ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ ≈ æææ˙ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œeeeœ>∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ œ# œeee∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œb œ œ ™ ‰ eeeœ>∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ œ# œœ Œ eeeœ>b∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ œ ™ œJ œ ™ ‰ eeeœ>b∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ œ Oœœ Œ eeeœ>∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œb œ ™ œJ œ ™ ‰ eeeœ>∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œb œœ Œ œeee>∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œb œ ™ œbJ œ ™ ‰ œeee>∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ ‰ œb œ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union88°¢°¢{°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Cl.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXMAXp pp pmeno mosso q=84, vivid90 95pp pp mp pp mp poo pp p ppp pPicc.Cl.Perc.Vln.Vc.MAX100ppp p pp pp44 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2424 34 24 4424 34 24 4424 34 24 4424 34 24 4424 34 24 4424 34 24 44& to Piccolo ∑ ∑ piccolo& ∑ ∑ ∑ ,& sul tastoB sul tasto ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&› B3+ C3+/ ∑ ∑ Clarinet mic, process on Flute mic, process on ∑&&/Wood Block To S. D. ∑ ∑ ∑&? ∑ ∑ 33&›~˙o o˙ ~wo œ# ˙ ™ œ ˙# ‰ œŒ Œ ˙ w œ œb ˙ œn˙ ™ œb ˙ ™ œ ˙ ™ œ# w œ ™ œbJ ˙ œb ™ œbJ ˙O˙ ™™ Oœbb O˙ ™™ Oœb O˙ ™™™™ Oœ#J ~w ~w˙ Œ Œ˙ Œ ŒŒ Œ V Œ Œ Œ V Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ˙ œ œ œ œœ œ œ ‰ ˙ œ œ œ ™ œ# j ˙ ˙#˙ Œ œœœœœ œ ˙# ‰ œ œ œb œ ‰ œb ˙œœœœœ Œ Œ Œ œœœœœ Œ ‰ œœœœœ˙ ˙ œn ˙ ™ ˙ œJ œ ™ œ œb˙ œ œ œ œb œn œ œ œ# œJ œb ™e=Appendix A. Sparks of Union89°¢°¢{°¢°¢{Picc.Cl.Bsn.Vln.Vc.Cb.MAXpp p 105pp p mfpppPicc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.MAXo tempo rubato, receptive and candidpo pp mfpp mfpp ppppp mf p4444444444444444 343434343434343434& ,& smorzato ¿? ∑ ∑ ï ó ï ó&? 3 pizz ∑ ∑ ∑? ∑ pizz ∑ ∑ ∑&› 10 C2+/ ∑ Bassoon mic, process on ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&? 3&& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&› 11?› ∑ ∑ ∑ A3+/ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Oboe mic, process on‰ ˙n ™™ w œ ‰ œb œ# ™ œn j œ ‰ œn œb œœœ œn œ ™ œJ œ œ#wn œœ œ ˙ œ ‰ œb œb ™ œnJ œ ‰ œ# œ ™ œ œœœœœ œ œbw w ‰ œ ™ ˙bœ ™ œbJ ˙ œb ™ œbJù ˙ w ˙ œJ œb ™ ˙ ˙œ# œ œb ˙˙ www∏∏∏∏∏∏wwww∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ wwwwwwwŒ Œ V Œœ ‰ œ ˙ w# ˙ ™ Œ Œ Œ Œ œbœ ‰ œb œœœ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ Œ œ ˙ œj œ ™ w‰ œ ˙ œ œ ™ œJ œ œ œb œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ ˙Œ Œ +˙ w œo œ# ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ww Œ wwwwwwww wŒ V Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union90°¢{°¢{°¢{Ob.Bsn.Hn.MAXmf 115oooPicc.Ob.Cl.MAXp mf o120oppp mfPicc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.MAXpp mf pp mf125mf o pp mf ppp34 44 24 4434 44 24 4434 44 24 4434 44 24 4434 44 24 44343434344444444444& smorzato ¿ 3 33 3? ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑&› 12?› ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑3& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ 7 gliss.&›& ∑ 3 3& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑7 5& ∑ ∑3 3? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ B&›œ œb œ œb œœ ˙n œb ˙ fiœj ˙b œ ˙ Œ œœœœ ˙ ™ ≈œœœœœ ˙ ˙ ˙b˙ ™ ˙ Œ Œ wwwwwwwbbbbœ ˙b ˙ Œ ŒŒ Œ Œ œ œ œœ œb ˙ Œ œb j œ œj œ œb wœ fiœj œœ ™ ˙ œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ˙ œœ œ# œ œû ‰ œ œ œ ˙Œ Œ O O ™ Œ Œ ˙ œ œb œ œ ™ œ˙ œ œ œb ˙ ™œ ™ œœœœ˙ œ œœœœ œœ˙œ œ ™ œ# jœ ˙ Œ Œ Œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ ˙Œ Œ ˙==Appendix A. Sparks of Union91°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢{°¢Picc.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXo mf(qaa z=qaa z)allegro q=105, evocative130 o mfmf o mfmfmfmfpp mfmfPicc.Cl.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp f mf p135p f mf pp mf mfmfmf34343434343434343434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 34& 5&B 3 ∑ ∑3/Snare Drum ∑ ∑B ∑ ∑ espressivo? ∑ ∑ B arco espressivo? ∑ ∑ pizz&› 13 & ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ? ∑ 5 ∑ ∑&&/Snare Drum& ∑ ∑ espressivoB ∑ espressivoB ∑ espressivo?& ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍw ˙ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ. œ. Œ œ. œ. Œ œ. œ.w ˙ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ. œ. Œ œ. œ. Œ œ. œ.œb œb œb œb œ ˙b ˙ Œ Œ œj œ œj Œ Œ œj œ œj Œ Œ‰ eeœ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œœœ œ Œ Œ ≈ œb œ œ œ œ œ‰ eeeœ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ ˙ œ Œ Œ ≈ œb œ œ œ œ œœ œB ™ œJ œ œ œB ™ œJ œæœœœœœœœ ˙˙˙˙˙˙˙ ææ朜œœœœœŒ Œ ¿J ¿ æææ¿Œ œ. œ. œb œ. Œ œj œ ™ Œ œJ œ œ ™ œJ œ ™ œŒ œ. œ. œb œ. ‰ ‰ œJ œ ™ Œ œJ œ œ ™ œJ œ ™ œœ œ ‰ œ Œ ‰ æææœ ™ œj œ œ ™ Œ œj œ œj Œ Œ œ œŒ ‰ eœ∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ≈ œ>b œ œ œb œ œ œœ ˙ Œ ‰ eeœ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ≈ œ>b œ œ œ œ œ œœ ˙ Œ ‰ eeeœ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ ˙ Œ ≈ œ>b œ œ œ œ œ œœ œB ™ œJ ˙B œ œB ™ œJ œB œ œB ‰ œ œB œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union92°¢°¢{°¢Picc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf 140mfmfmfmf mp mfmf mp mfmf mp mf& ∑ ∑& ∑& ∑ ∑B ∑ ?/Snare Drum To S. C.&BB?& A3- C2- C3- B3-ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ/ Oboe mic, process off Bassoon mic, process off ∑ Flute mic, process off Clarinet mic, process offœ œ Œ œ.> œ œ œ Œ Œœ œ œ ˙ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œb œ œ œ fiœjœ ‰ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ˙œ œ Œ œ.> œ œ œ Œ Œœ.> œ ™ œj œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ. œ ™ œ.J œ‰ œ Œ ‰ æææœ œj œ œ ™ Œ œj œ œj Œ Œ œ œ ‰ œ Œ Œ˙ Œ eœ∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ ≈ œb œ ™ œb œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œb ™ œ œb œ œ œ ≈ œb œ ™ œ˙ Œ œee∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ ≈ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œb ™ œ œb œ œ œ ≈ œb œ ™ œ˙ Œ eeeœ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ ˙ œ ≈ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œb ™ œ œb œ œ œ ≈ œb œ ™ œœB ™ œJ œB œ œB ™ œJ œB œ œB ‰ œ œB œ œB ™ œJ œBŒV Œ V Œ Œ Œ V Œ Œ V Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union93°¢°¢{°¢°¢{Ob.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp f mf f145f mf f mfff ffmfCl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXf mf f150f mf fmf ff p f44 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2424 3424 3424 3424 3424 3424 3424 34& ∑?&BB &? ∑?› ∑ 14& ∑?& fB& ?? arco?›˙b ™ ˙ ™ œ œ œ œ. Œœ. œ ™ œj œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ ‰ œb ‰ œ œœJ œ œ œJ œJ œb œJ ææ朜 œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ æææ˙˙ æææ˙b ææ朜 æææœbœJ œ œ œJ œJ œb œJ ææ朜 œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ Œ ‰ œeeeb∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ# œ œ œ ˙œJ œ œ œJ œJ œb œ ‰ ‰ eœb∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œb œ œ œ œ œbœ œB ™ œJ œB œ œB ‰ œ œB œ œŒ Œ œ œ œj œ œ œj œ œb j œ œ œœb j œŒ Œ œ. ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ. ‰ œ Œœ. ‰ œ.b ‰ ‰ œ. œ.b ‰ œ. ‰ œb ‰ œ œ œ. ‰ Œ Œæææ˙b Œ ‰ eeœb∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ# œ œ œ# ˙ O˙ œ# œO œ# œb œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œb œ œ œ# œ œb œ œ œn œb œ œ œn œ# œ ™ fiœ œ œ œ œb œ œ#œ œ œ œb ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œe∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ œ œ ˙Œ ‰ œeeeb∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œb œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œœb j œ œj œ œœbb œ œ# œœ# œœj œœ## œœj œœ œœ## j œœ œœ œœj=Appendix A. Sparks of Union94°¢°¢{Picc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXff mfmf ff fmf fmf f& ∑ ∑& ∑&?& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&B???›fiœr œb œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ‰ œ œbfiœr œb œ œ ™ œ ‰ œb ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œb Œ‰ œ œj ‰ œ Œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ fiœrœ ‰ œ œ œ ™œb ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ# œ# œ œ# œ œ Œ Œ fiœrœ œ œœ œ œn œb œ œ œn œ# œ Oœ ™™ œeeeb∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ# œ œ œ# ˙œ œ œ# ˙ œ œ œb œ œ œ# œ œb œ œ œn œeeeb∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ# œ ™ œ œ# œ ™ œnœ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œJ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œee#∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ# œ# œ œ œœb ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œb œ fiœr œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙ œeee∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œœœ## œœœœJ œœ œœj œœ œœœœ œœ œœœœ œœ œœJ œœ œœœœJ œœœœ œœœœJ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœJAppendix A. Sparks of Union95°¢°¢{°¢Picc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAX155sppmf f sppsppf sppppp pmf f sppmf f sppmf f sppspp4444444444444444444444& ∑&&?& ∑/Suspended Cymbal ∑ ∑ ∑ to Bass Drum& 3B? 3??›œb œb œ œ ˙b œ œb œ œ œ œ ™ œ ˙ ™‰ œb œj ‰ œ Œ œb ‰ œ ‰ œb ‰ œ œ ˙b ™‰ œ œj ‰ œ Œ œ ‰ fiœ œœ ‰ œ# œ# œ œ œ# œ ˙ ™œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ ™‰ œ> œ œ# œ# œ œ ˙# Œ ˙ ™æææ˙ Œœ œ œb œ œ œ# œ œb œ ™ œnJ œ# œ œb œ# œ œeee œ œ# œ œ œ æææ˙˙ ™™œ œ œ# œ ˙b œ#J œ ™ œb œeee œ# œ œ œ# œ æææ˙˙b ™™œ ™ eeœb∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œb œn œ œb œ ˙ œ œb œb œ œ œb œb œeee# œb œn œ# æææ˙˙# ™™œ ™ œ œ eœ∏∏∏∏∏ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙b ™œœœœbbb œœœœJ œœœœ œœœœJ œœœœ œœœœbbb œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœJ œœœœ#### œœœœJ œœœœ œœ## j œœ œœ œœœœœ### JAppendix A. Sparks of Union96°¢°¢{°¢Picc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXff pmaestoso q=80, transient 160ff pff pff pp p off pp p offff pp mpff pp mpff pp mpffpp44 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 34&&& 3? smorzato ¿&/Bass Drum To Cax. ∑ ∑& pizz arco sul tastoB pizz arco sul tasto? pizz arcosul tasto? ∑ ∑?› S+ E1+ ∑ ∑/ Strings mic onSpectral drone on ∑ ∑œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œb œj œ fiœjœ ‰ œ œœ Œ Œ Œ Œ fiœj‰ œb œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œœ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œn œ œ œ ‰ œœ Œ œ œ œJ ˙ ˙ œ ˙œ ˙ ™ w œ ˙>˙ Œ Œœœ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ Œ ‰ œeee œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœb Œ Œ œ œ œ ‰ œeee œ ˙ œ œ œ ˙ ≈ œb œœœ# Œ Œ Œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ Œ Œ ‰ œeee œ œ# œ œ œœb Œ Œ Œœœœœœ##### Œ Œ ŒV Œ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union97°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢Picc.Ob.Cl.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.165ppppp ppppppmp mpPicc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.Cb.mp 170mpp pp mfpp p pp p pp pp pp44 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 34&& smorzato ¿&/Caxixi/egg shaker To Tri. ∑ ∑&B?? sul tasto3/ Spectral Drone Volume ∑ ∑ ∑&& 3& 3?& ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ sul tasto? sul tastoœ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œJ œ œj ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ fiœj‰ œ œjœ œ œ fiœj œ œ œ ™ œJ ‰ œ œ œ œ fiœj‰ œn œJ œœ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ ™ œJ ‰ ‰ œj œ œJ ‰ œ œ ‰ ‰ œn ™‰ æææœ Œ ‰ œ æææœ ˙œ ≈ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# œ ˙ ™œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ≈ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# ˙ ™fiœj œ œ# œ# ˙ œ œ# ˙# ˙ ™ œ œ ˙Œ Œ Vœ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ fiœjœj œ œj Œ fiœjœj œ œj ‰ fiœjœj œ œ ‰ œ> œœ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œJ œ ‰ fiœj‰ œ œ ™ œJ œ ™ ‰ œ œJ œ> œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ>œ œ# œ# œ œ Œ œ# ˙ œ# j œ# ™ œ œ ˙ ‰ œ# œ# œ ‰ œ># œ# œ#˙b œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ ™ ˙b ™Œ Œ œ œ# œ œ ‰ Œ ˙# ™ ˙ ˙ œ ˙bœn œb ™ œ# j ˙n ™ ˙# ™ ˙ ˙ œ ˙b=Appendix A. Sparks of Union98°¢°¢°¢°¢{Picc.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Vln.Vc.Cb.mfmfmf mf mfmfmfOb.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vc.Cb.MAXmf175mfp4444444444444458 2458 2458 2458 2458 2458 2458 24& To A. Fl.& -ïïóïñïoE♭F 2-ÆV&?& ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ pizz? pizz& ∑ ∑&?&? ∑ — ∑? ∑ – ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ 15”“œJ œ ™ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ™ œ#J œ ™ œJ œ Œœ ™ œJ ‰ œ œ ˙# wwo## wwoœ ‰ œ># œ œ# œ Œ œ># œ œ#J œ# ™ ˙# œ# ‰ œ# œ# œ# œ œ#J œ# œ#J˙ ™ ˙b œ# ˙ œ# œb œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ#œ ˙ ˙ œ# w œb œ Œ Œœ ˙ ˙ œ# w œb œ Œ Œœ# œ# œœ œ# œ# œ#J œ# œ ™œ# ™ œ# j œ ™ œ# j œ œ# œ# œ# j œ ™ Œ Œ œ# œ# œ# œ œ# j œ# œ# œ#˙ ‰ œ# ™ œ ™ œ# j œ ™ œj œ œ ‰ œ# œ# œ# œJ œ# œ# œœœ œ#Œ ‰ œ# œ# œ ™ œ#J œ# ™ ‰ œ#J œ ™ œ# Œ ™ Œ œ ™‰ œ œ# j Œ Œ œ œ ™‰ œ œ#J Œ Œ œ œ ™Œ œ# ™=Appendix A. Sparks of Union99°¢°¢{°¢°¢{A. Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vc.Cb.MAXmf p mf180 p mfp mf pA. Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vc.Cb.MAX185mf o24 3424 3424 3424 3424 3424 3424 3424 34&& 3& 3? 3&? ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑& “< >& 3&&?&? ∑ ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑&“< > ∑ ∑‰ œ œ# œ œ# œ# œ# œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ# ‰ œ# œ# œ œœ# œ œ Œ ‰ œ# œ# ˙# ‰ œ# œ# œ œ œ#J œ# œ œ#œj œ ™ œ# ‰ œ œ# ˙ ‰ œ# œ# œ# œ œ# j œ# œ œ# œ#œ# œ# œ# œ œ œ# œ# œ ‰ œ# œ ™ œ# œ# œ# œ œ#J œ#œ# œ# œ œ# j œ# ™ œ# j œ ™ œ# œ# œ# œ œ# œ# œ# œœb œ Œ œ# œbœb œ Œ œ# œb˙ œ ™ œ#J ˙ ™ œ ™ œ# ™œ#J œ# œ œ# œ# œ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ œ œJ œ# œJ œ œJ œ# œJœ œ œ# œ# œ ‰ œ# j œ# œ# j œ œ# j œ œ.# j œJ œ# œ ™œ# œ# œ œ# œ# œ# œ# œ# œ# œ# œ œ# œ# œ# œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ# œ# œœ œ# œ# œ# œ# œ œ# œ œ œ œ#J œ# œj œ œ# œ. œ.# œ# œ ™ œjœ œ# ™ ‰ ˙# ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™‰ œ œ# ™‰ œ œ# ™˙ ™ œ ‰ Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union100°¢°¢°¢{°¢A. Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf o pp mf190mf o pp mfmf o pp mfmf o mfmfmfmfmfA. Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.mf o pp mp195mf o pp mpmf o pp mpo pp mpmf o pp mpmfpp mp44444444444444& ∑ 3& ∑ 3& ∑ 3? ∑ B 3& pizz— arco ∑ ∑B –pizz arco ∑ ∑? – arco ∑ ∑? – arco ∑ ∑& 3 3& E♭-ñïïïïïo1-∑V 3 3& 3 3B ? 3 3& ∑ con sordino/Triangle ∑ ∑ W+ E2+ ∑/ ∑ ∑ Wood winds mics onSpectral drone on , Spectral tracing on Spectral Drone VolumeSpectral tracing Volume ∑˙ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ- Œ œb œ œ œJœ œ œ ™ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œb œ œb œ- Œ œb œ œ œjœ œ.# œ# Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œœ œ# œ œb œ œ œj˙ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ# œ# œ# œ Œ Œ Œ œ# œ#J‰ œ Œ ‰ œj œœ œœb ‰ œ œœ ˙˙b‰ œ Œ ‰ œj œœ œœb ‰ œ œœ ˙˙b‰ œœ Œ ‰ œ ˙ ‰ œ œœ ˙˙b‰ œœ Œ ‰ œb Œ œœ ‰ œb ˙ ™œ# œ# œ ˙ œ œ# Œ Œ Œ œ œ œ ˙# Œ œ# œ œ# j œ> œ# œ œ œ# œ#œb œ œb ˙˙ob œœ œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ#J ˙ ™ Œ œ# œ œ#J œ> œ# œ œ œ# œ#œb œ œb ˙ œ œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ# ˙b Œ œb œ œn j œ>b œb œb œ œb œnœ œ# œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œn œ œ# œ œ# Œ œ# œ œ#J œ> œ# œ œ œ# œ#œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ ™ Œ ˙# ™ œŒ ˙ ™ Œ œ œ œV Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ V Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union101°¢°¢°¢{°¢A. Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.f mf200f mff mff p f p mff p f p mfA. Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXmp p mfmp p mfmp p mfp mp pp mp pppp p34343434343434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 44& 33 3& 33 3& 33 3? 3 subito subito3 3& ∑ subito ?/Triangle ∑ ∑&& ∑ smorzato ¿&?? &/Triangle ∑ To Tam-tam ∑?› ∑ 16œ œ# œ œ œ#J œ œ# œ œ# œ ™ œJ œ# œ# œ œ# œ œ œ ‰ œ# œ# ™ ‰ ‰ œ# œJ œ Œœ œ# œ œ œ#J œ œ# œ œ# œ ™ œJ œ# œ# œ œ# œ œ fiœ# jœ ‰ œ# œ ™ ‰ fiœ# j‰ œ# œJ œ Œœb œb œb œ œb j œ œ œb œb œb ™ œJ œb œ œb œb œb œ fiœb jœ ‰ œb œ ™ ‰ fiœb j‰ œ œbJ œ Œœ œ# œ œ œ# j œ œ# œ œ# œ ™ œJ œ# œ# œ œ# œ œ ˙ œ# ™ ‰ ˙b œb Œ˙ ˙# œ ™ œ# j œj œ# ‰ ˙n œb ŒŒ Œ ˙ Œ Œ ˙‰ œ# œ ™ ‰ œ# œ ™ œj œ# œ ™ œ# ˙fiœ# j‰ œ# œ ™ œ# œ œ œ œ# œfiœb j‰ œ œb ™ Œ œ œb œ œ œb ˙ ‰ œb œ œb œb˙b œb ˙n ‰ œ# œJ œ ™ œ œ ˙#˙ œ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ‰ œb ™ œbŒ Œ ‰ œ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙˙# ™™=Appendix A. Sparks of Union102°¢{°¢°¢{°¢A. Fl.Ob.Cl.Hn.Perc.MAXo mf(qaa z=qaa z)con moto q=100, vicious   205 oo mf ppp pA. Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAX210p mfp mfmf p mf p mfmf p p mfo444444444444& 5 ∑ Flt. norm.& ∑ ∑& ∑ Flt.& smorzato ¿ ?/Tam-tam ∑ ∑?› 17 5& 3 3& ∑ smorzato ¿ 3& norm.? smorzato ¿ smorzato ¿?/Tam-tam ∑ l.v.?› ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ/ ∑ ∑ Strings Volume˙# œJ œ œJ ˙ Œ Œ æææO æææO æææœ ™ œœ˙ œJ œ# œJ ˙ Œ Œ˙b œb œ ˙ Œ Œ æææ~˙b œb œ ˙ œœ ˙ œœ œ. Œ ˙w w˙˙˙# ™™™ Œ Œ Œ œœœ.b œœœ.# œœœ. Œ œœœ.# œœœ.b Œ œœœ.b œœœ.# œœœ. Œ˙b fiœr ˙ fiœrœ œ œ œb ˙ Œ œ ™ œj œ œ œ œb ŒŒ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œææ朙 œ# œ ˙ ˙ Œ œ œ œ œ œ# œ ˙ fiœ# r œ Œœ œ œ æææ˙ ˙b Œ œ'> œb œ œ Œw œ Œ Œ Œ ˙ ˙Œ Œ ˙ Œ Œ Œ œœœœ.# œœœ.b Œ œœœ. œœœ.# œœœ.b Œ Œ Œ Œ V=Appendix A. Sparks of Union103°¢{°¢°¢{°¢Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp p mf< e = e > 215p mp fmp fmp fmp f oHn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp220 p pppp38 48 3838 48 3838 48 3838 48 3838 48 3838 48 3838 48 3838 48 3848 3848 3848 3848 3848 3848 3848 3848 38? ∑ ∑ ∑/Tam-tam to Bass drum∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& pizz arco pizzB pizz arco pizz? pizz arco pizz? pizz arco pizz?› S- W-ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ/ Strings mic off ∑ Winds Volume Winds mic off ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ &/Bass Drum ∑ ∑ ∑& 3B 3? 3? 3?› E2- E1-ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ/ ∑ Spectral tracing off ∑ Spectral drone off ∑ ∑˙ Œ Œ œ ™ œJ œwŒ Œ œj œ ‰ œj œ œb œ œ œ œœj∏∏∏∏ œ œœ.∏∏∏∏ ≈ œ. ≈ ‰ œœj∏∏∏ œŒ Œ œj œ ‰ œj œ œb œ œ œ œœj∏∏∏∏ œ œœ. ≈ œ. ≈ ‰ œœj∏∏∏∏ œŒ Œ œj œ ‰ œj œ œb œ œ œ œœJ∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œœ. ≈ œ. ≈ ‰ œœJ∏∏∏ œŒ Œ œj œ ‰ œj œ œb œ œ œ œœJ∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œœ. ≈ œ. ≈ ‰ œœj∏∏∏ œV Œ Œ Œ Œ V V ‰œ ™ œ ™ ‰ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ‰ ¿œœb j∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏ œj œ œ œ œ œj œœj∏∏∏∏ œ œœ∏∏∏∏ œ œ œœj∏∏∏ œœœb j∏∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œj œ œ œ œ œj œœj∏∏∏∏ œ œœ∏∏∏∏ œ œ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœœb j∏∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œj œ œ œ œ œJ œœJ∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œœ∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œœJ∏∏∏ œœœb j∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏ œj œ œ œ œ œj œœJ∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œœ∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œœj∏∏∏ œV ‰ V ‰=Appendix A. Sparks of Union104°¢{°¢°¢{°¢Hn.B. D.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf225 pff mff mff mfHn.B. D.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAX230pp mfmf fff mf ff mf f34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 34& ∑/Bass Drum& ∑ arco molto espressivo gliss.B arco molto espressivo gliss. 3? arco molto espressivo gliss.??› ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ& ∑ ∑/Bass Drum& 3 3 gliss. gliss. gliss.B 3 & gliss. & gliss.? 3 3 gliss. gliss. gliss.? arco gliss.?› ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍŒ Œ œ. œ Œ œ.J œ. œ.j œ. œ. œ. Œ fiœjœ.J œ ‰ Œ¿ ™ ‰ ¿ ™ fiœjœ œ fiœj fiœjœj œ fiœjœj œj œ fiœjœ fiœjœj œj œ fiœjœ fiœjœjœœb j∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏ ‰ œ ™ Œ ‰ œœœœœ œ œ œb ˙œœb j∏∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ ™ ‰ œœœœ œb œ œ œ œJ œ ™ œ œ œ> œ œœœb j∏∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ ™ Œ Œ ‰ œœœœ œb œ ˙ œ œ œœœb j∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏ ‰ œ ™ œœb∏∏∏∏ œ œœj∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏ œœ# j∏∏∏∏ œJ œ œœ∏∏∏ œœb j∏∏∏∏ œJ œ œœ∏∏∏ œœb j∏∏∏∏fiœjœJ œ fiœjœj œ Œ Œ fiœj fiœj‰ œ ˙fiœjœ œ fiœj fiœjœj œ fiœj fiœjœj œ fiœj fiœj fiœjœ œ œ fiœjœ fiœj fiœjœ œ œ fiœjœj œ ™ fiœjœj œ ™ œ œœ œ œ> œ œ œ œ> ˙# œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œJ œJ œ œ#Jœ œ ˙ œ> ˙ ™ œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ œ#œ> œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ ‰ œœ œœ ˙ œ ˙ œ œœœ∏∏∏∏ œb œœj∏∏∏ œœ#∏∏∏ œœj∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏ œœ∏∏∏∏ ‰ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œŒ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union105°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢°¢Cl.Bsn.B. D.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf mf fmeno mosso q=96, decisive   235mf mfp mf fmf fmf fmfpA. Fl.Cl.Bsn.B. D.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.pp f p mf240 f pf pppf mff mfff34 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 24 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 34& ∑ 3?/Bass Drum& 3& 3? 3? gliss.& 18&& 3?/Bass Drum&& B? 3 ∑ 3? ∑ 3œ.># œ- Œ œ.># œ- Œ ‰ œ œj œ# ™ œ œ# œn œ# œ œb œ œb œn œŒ Œ œ œ Œ Œ Œ œ œ œ# œ œ œb œb œ ™ œjœ ˙ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ Œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ# œ# œ œ ˙ œ œJ œ# ™ œ œ œ# ˙ œ œœ œ œ œ# œ# œ œ ˙ œ œJ œ# ™ œ œ œ# ˙ œ œœ ™ œ#J œœ ‰ œœœ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ# ™ œ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ# œ œ œ#˙ œœ œœœ∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ# œ# œ œ œ# œ œ œb œb œ ™ œJ˙ ™ ˙ œ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ Œ˙# ™ œ ˙ œb ™ œ œ œ œb j œ œj œ œœ# œ œ œ# ˙ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# Œœ# œ ˙ ˙ œ œJ œ ™ œ# œ œ œ ŒŒ œ œ Œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ æææœ˙ œ ˙ ‰ œœœœ œ ™ œœ œœææ朜 ææ朜 ææ朜 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ˙ œ ˙ Œ ‰ œœœœ œb œœ œœææ朜 ææ朜 ææ朜 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ ˙ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ# œnœ# œ ˙ ˙ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ# œn=Appendix A. Sparks of Union106°¢°¢{°¢°¢{A. Fl.B. D.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXomeno mosso q=80, concluding   245p ppffppp pVln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXo250 ooo fpp p34 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 24& to Flute ∑ ∑/Bass Drum ∑& 3B 3? 3 3? 3 pizz.& ∑ &› 19& ∑ ∑B ∑ ∑? & ? ∑ ∑? arco ∑ al tallonesul ponticello ¿&› 21? ∑ & 20œ ™ œ ™ ˙ œ Œ˙ æææœ ˙ œ æææœ ˙œ Oœbb O˙ O˙ O˙ ˙# Oœ## œ Oœ œ Oœ œ ™ œ# œœ Oœbb O˙ O˙# O˙ ˙ œ ™™ œ œ#œ œn ˙ ˙#e Œ œ œ œb ˙˙ œ ™™ œ œ#œ œn ˙ ˙ œ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ ˙ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ œ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙#œœ ™™™™ œ œ# œ ™ œb œ#J ˙ ™œ# ™™ œ œ# œ ™ œ œ#J ˙ ™œ# ™™ œ œ ˙ ™ ˙b ™œ œ# œœ œ# œ œn œn ˙ ˙b ™ œ œ œ# œ œ# œ# œœ˙˙˙˙˙ ˙˙˙˙˙##Œ Œ œœœœbb=Appendix A. Sparks of Union107°¢°¢{°¢°¢{Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXpp mf255 fff mfmf fFl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXff mf fff mfmf24 34 24 34 4424 34 24 34 4424 34 24 34 4424 34 24 34 4424 34 24 34 4424 34 24 34 4424 34 24 34 444444444444444444?& ∑ ∑ ∑ al tallonesul ponticello ¿B ∑ ∑ al tallonesul ponticello ¿? ∑ al tallonesul ponticello ¿? sul ponticelloal tallone ¿&› 22&& Flt.? ∑&B al tallonesul ponticello ¿? al tallonesul ponticello ¿?&› 23&Œ œ ˙ ™ ˙ ˙ œŒ œ œ œ œb œ œ œbœ œ œ œ# œ# œ# œ# ˙ Œœ œ œ œ# œ# œ# œ œ ˙ ˙ Œ˙ ˙ ™ ˙ œ œ œ# œ œ# œ# œ œ˙˙˙˙˙fiOjæææœ æææœ Œ Œ ‰ ≈ œ# æææœ æææœ ™™ œRw˙n ™ œ œ# œ œ œ œ# ˙n ™ œb œ# œ œb œ œ#˙ œ œ œ œ# œ# œ# œ# œJ fiœ# jœ œJ œ ™ fiœj œb jœ œ œ œ œ# œ# œ# œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™™ œb rw ˙ ˙˙˙˙˙˙## ˙˙˙˙=Appendix A. Sparks of Union108°¢°¢{°¢°¢{Fl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXfmf f fFl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXf 265f f f& norm. ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑& gliss. ∑B gliss. ∑?? gliss.&› 24&& ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑& ∑B? ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑&› 25&æææœb ™ œæææœ æææœ æææœ ™ œ œ œ ˙ ŒŒ Œ Œ œ.># œ- ‰ œ. œ. œ. œ Œw œ> ˙ Œ Œ Œ œœ≥j œœ≥ ™™œj œ œb j œj œ ™ œ> ˙ Œ Œ œœœ≥j œœ≥ ™™ Œœ œ œ œb ™ œ œ w w wœ ˙b ™ œ>b ˙ ™ w w˙˙˙˙˙#˙˙˙˙bŒ œ ˙ œ œ ˙w wŒ Œ Œ ‰ œœ≥ ˙˙ Œ ‰ œœ≥ ˙˙ Œ Œœœ≥j œœ≥ ™™ ‰ œœ≥b œœ≥ œœ≥ ˙˙≤ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œœœ≥ ˙˙ Œ ‰ œœœ≥ œœœ≥ ™™™ œœ≥b jw ww ˙˙˙˙˙## ˙˙˙˙=Appendix A. Sparks of Union109°¢{°¢°¢{Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf 270mfffFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.MAXpp p pp ppp p pp ppp p pp ppp p pp ppp mfpp mfff& ∑ ∑3B ∑? pizz ∑ ∑? pizz ∑ ∑&›&&&&?& norm. 3B norm. & B3? ∑ ∑ pizz&› 26 ∑ ∑ ∑& ?Ÿ◊ ∑ ∑œœ≥b j œœ≥ œ≥j œ≤ ™ ‰ œœ œ œ œ œœ ˙˙˙ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œœ≥ œ ™ œœJ œœœ ™™™ œœœbJŒ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ# œœ œ# œ˙ Œ‰ œ œ œ# œœ œ# œ˙ œ ˙ Œw wb w wb˙ œ> œ w ˙ œ> œ ww ˙ ™™ œj w ˙ ™™ œjw ˙ ™™ œb j w ˙ ™™ œjŒ Œ Œ æææœ æææ˙ œ œ œ ™™ fiœj ˙ œ ™™ œ≥R œ œ œ ˙ Œ˙˙ Œ æææœ æææ˙ œ# œ œ ™™ O˙ Oœ# ™™™™ œ≥r œ# œ œ# ˙ ŒŒ Œ œ ™ œ# œœ œ œb œ ™ ˙bœœœœœœbb ‰ Œ Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union110°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXpp p pp p275pp p pp ppp p pp ppp p pp ppp pppmfpp mfpp mfmfff3434343434343434343434&&&?& ∑ ∑/Temple Blocks ∑ ∑& pizz sul ponticelloarco3B sul ponticello3? arco & sul ponticello3? ∑ ∑ arcosul ponticello3?› ∑ ∑ ∑ 26Ÿ◊w wb w wb˙ œ> œ w ˙ œ> œ ww ˙ ™™ œ.'j w ˙ ™™ œ.'jw ˙ ™™ œ.'b j w ˙ ™™ œ.'b jŒ Œ Œ ‰ œ wŒ œ ™ œœœ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ œŒ Œ œ ™ œ œ# œ Œ œ ™ œ œ# Œ Œ œ≤ œ œ ˙ œb œ ˙ Œæææ˙ œ œ œb ™™ fiœj˙ œ ™™ œ≥r œ≤ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ Œæææ˙ œ œb œb ™™ fiœj ˙ œ ™™ œ≥b r œ≤ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ Œœ≤ œ œ ˙ œb œ ˙ Œœœœœœœbb ‰ Œ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union111°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.pp mp mf p mf280pp mp mf p mfpp mf p mfpp mf p mfpp mf pppmpmp34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 44&&&?& ∑ senza sordini/Temple Blocks ∑& sul A3B pizz& ∑ ∑ ? pizz? ∑ ∑ pizz˙ O œ œ œ ˙ ™ œ œ œ ™ œ> ‰ ˙# ™˙ ™ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ> ‰ ˙ ™˙ ™ w œ> ‰ ˙# ™˙ ™ w œ>b ‰ ˙n ™Œ Œ œ+b œ+b œo>b ‰ +˙ ™Œ œ œ Œ œ œ œœ œ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ ˙ œœb œœŒ œ ™ œ œ# œ Œ œ ™ œ Œ œ ™™ œ ™™ œ ™™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™‰ œ ™ ‰ œ ™ ≈ œ œ ≈ œ œŒ œb ™ œ ™ œ ™ œbAppendix A. Sparks of Union112°¢°¢{°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp mf più mosso q=112, polemial  mfp mfp mf ppp mf mfmfp mfp mfpCl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXmf285 mf mfp34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 44& ∑& 3 3 ∑& ∑?& norm.& ∑B arco ∑? pizz arco ∑? ∑ ∑?› ∑ 27 (q=112)& 5 5 3? 5 3& 3/Bass Drum?›w ˙ ˙œ> œ œb œ œ œ œb œ œ œ œ ˙w# ˙ ˙wb ˙ ˙ Œ Œ œw+ +˙ +˙# ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™˙ œ œ ˙ ˙œ ™™ œ ™™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ˙b ˙‰ œ ™ ‰ œ ™ ≈ œ œ ≈ œ œ ˙b ˙≈ œ ™ ≈ ≈ œ ™ ≈ ≈ œ ™ ≈ ≈ œ ™ ≈ Œ Œ Œ œœ. œœ. œœ. œœœ.Œ Œ Œ œœ œ# œ œ œbJ œ œ# j œ ™ œJ œ œ.# œ. œ. œ.b œ œ œb œ> œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œb ™ œj œ œœ. œ. œ. œ.b œb œb œ œ œb œb˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ œb œ ™ ‰ œ ˙ œœj œ œj œ œ ææœ œ œ œ œ ææœ œj œ œj œ œj œ œj œœœœ. œœœœ. Œ Œ œœ. œœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœœœ. Œ Œ œœ. œœ.=Appendix A. Sparks of Union113°¢{°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXpp290pp mf pp mfp mf ppFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXmf pp mfpp mfpp mfmf pp mfpp mffp mf44 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 444444444444444444& ∑ ∑& 3& 3? B&/Bass Drum?›& 3&&B ?3&/Bass Drum?› W+ E3+ ∑/ ∑ Wood winds mic OnEcho On ∑Œ ˙œb ™ œb j fiœ œœ œ œ ™ œ œ œb œ œb ˙ œ œj œb ™œ ™ ‰ œ œ œb ‰ Œ ˙ œ> œ œ œ ™ œ ˙œ ™ œ ˙b Œ œb ™ œJ œJ œb ™ œ ˙œb ˙ Œ w+ œ o˙œj œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œj œj œ œj œœœœ. œœœ. œœœœ. Œ Œ œœ. œœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœœœ. Œœb œb œb œb œ œb œb Œ ‰ œ ˙ œ.># ‰ Œ œ>b ‰ Œœb ™ œJ œJ œ ™ Œ ‰ œ ˙ œ.># ‰ Œ œ>n ‰ Œœ œ> œ œJ œ ™ Œ ‰ œ ˙ œ.># ‰ Œ œ>b ‰ Œœb œb œb œb œ œb œb Œ ‰ œ ˙ œ.>b ‰ Œ œ> ‰ Œwb Œ ‰ œ ˙ œ.>b ‰ Œ œ>b ‰ Œœ œ œ œj œ œj ≈ œ œ œ Œ ≈ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ ≈ œ ™ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ œ œŒ œœ. œœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœœœ. Œ ŒV Œ Œ V=Appendix A. Sparks of Union114°¢{°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.pp mf ff ff295 pp mf ff ffpp mf ff ffpp mf ff ffpp mf mf ff p f ff mf sfp mfmpFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.f 300fff mf fmf f mf f34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 4444 34 44&&&?&/Bass Drum B2+*/ French Horn mic On, NOT Connected to Echo∑ ∑ ∑& 3 5& 3 5& 5 5 5? 3 5& 3 3/Bass Drum˙b œ œ.> Œ Œ Œ Œ œ.> ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ.> ‰ œ.> ‰ Œ œ>b œ>˙b œ œ.> Œ Œ Œ Œ œ.>b ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ.>b ‰ œ.> ‰ Œ œ>b œ>˙b œ œ.> Œ Œ Œ Œ œ.> ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ.> ‰ œ.> ‰ Œ œ> œ>˙# œ œ.> Œ Œ Œ Œ œ.>b ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ.>b ‰ œ.> ‰ Œ œ># œ>#˙# œ œ.> Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.>b ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ.> Œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œb‰ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ ≈ œ ™ ‰ ≈ œ œ> œ ™ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ œ ≈Œ Œ Œ Vœb œ.>b ‰ œ.> ‰ ‰ œ.> ‰ œ.> Œ œJ œ œ# œ# œ œ œ.b œ.n œ.# œ. œœb œ.>b ‰ œ.> ‰ ‰ œ.> ‰ œ.>b ‰ œn œn œ#J œ# œ œ.b œ.n œ.# œ. ˙œb œ.> ‰ œ.> ‰ œb œb œ œb œ œnJ œb œJ œb œ ≈ œ.# œ. œ. œ.b œ ™ œ. œ.bœ œ.># œ œ œ œ# œ œ# ˙ ˙# ˙b œ œ ≈ œ.n œ. œ. œ.b˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙b ˙ œ ˙#≈ ≈ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ Œ ≈ œ ≈ œ œ ™ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ™ ≈ œ œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union115°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.pp ff 305pp ffpp ffpp ffpp ffpp f fffOb.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.p fff44444444444444444444& 3 ∑ ∑& 3 ∑ ∑& 3 ∑ ∑? 3 ∑ ∑& 3 ∑ ∑/Bass Drum& ∑ ∑B ∑ ∑? E3- ∑ B2- ∑W- B2*/ Echo Off French Horn mic Off,  Wood wind mic Off ∑ ∑& ∑ -C♯ ïïïïññ -?oV o? 3/Bass Drum& al talloneB al tallone? al tallone? ∑ ∑ arco al talloneœ œ œ ˙ œÆ> ‰ Œ Œ Œœ œ œb ˙b œÆ>b ‰ Œ Œ Œœ œ œ ˙ œ'> ‰ Œ Œ Œœb œ œb ˙ œ'> ‰ Œ Œ Œœ œ œb ˙ œ'> ‰ Œ Œ Œ‰ œ Œ œ ≈œœ ≈œ œœœ ‰ œœ‰ œ ≈œ ™ ≈ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œœ ‰ œœœœ œ œb ≈ ‰ œœœœ œb œ œ œ œ‰ ≈ œœœœ œ œ≈ ‰ œœœœ œ ™ œ≈ ‰œ œ œb ≈ ‰ œœœb œb œ œ œ œ‰ ≈ œœœœ œ œ≈ ‰ œ œ ™ œ≈ ‰œ œb œb ≈ ‰ œœœbn œb œ œb œ œ‰ ≈ œœb œ œ≈ ‰ œ œb ™ œ≈ ‰V Œ Œ Œ V Œ Œ ŒŒ Œ ˙˙o ˙˙o ™™™™ ‰œbJ œ œJ œ œ œ œ fiœjœ œ œ fiœj œ œ Œ fiœj œJ œ fiœj fiœjœbJ œ Œœ ™ œ ‰ œ Œ œ œ œ ≈ œ ™ ≈ œ œ œ Œ ≈ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ ≈ œ ™ ‰ ≈ œœ ™ œb œ ™ ≈ ‰ œ œ œ ≈ ‰ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ≈ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ ™œ ™ œb œ ™ ≈ ‰ œ œ œ ≈ ‰ œb ™ œ œ œ œ ≈ ‰ œb œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ ™œb ™ œb œ ™ ≈ ‰ œb œb œ ≈ ‰ œb ™ œ œ œb œ ≈ ‰ œb œb œ œ œb ‰ ≈ œb œ œb œ ‰ ≈ œb ™Œ Œ Œ ≈ œb ™=Appendix A. Sparks of Union116°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXpiù mosso q=120, vicious   310pp f p f ppf p f pppp fpmpp f pp f pp f pp fppp p ppp p34 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 4434 44 34 44& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& -ñïïïïï oE♭ 1-∑V o -ïïïïññ-o?C♯ V o o -ñïïïïï-oE♭ 1-∑V& ï-oooooï(R) ï-oooooo(R)5? ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ con sordino/Bass Drum to Tam-tam to Snare Drum∑& norm.B norm.? norm.? norm. pizz&› 28 29wwobb ˙˙o ™™ ˙˙o ˙˙o œœo ™™ ‰ œœobbfiœj‰ œ œ fiœj fiœjœJ œ ‰ Œ œ œ œ# œ œ ww œœ ™™ ‰ œœŒ ˙# ™ œ ˙# Œ œ ™ œ œ‰ œ œ ‰ œ ™ ¿ ¿ ¿ ≈ œ ™ Œ Œ wœ ≈ ‰ œ œ ‰ ≈ œb ™ œ ™ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ ™ ææ朜 ‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ Œ Œœ ≈ ‰ œ œ ‰ ≈ œb ™ œb ™ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ ™ ææ朜 ‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ Œ Œœ ≈ ‰ œb œ ‰ ≈ œ# ™ œ ™ œ œ ‰ ≈ œb ™ ææ朜 ‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ Œ Œœb ≈ ‰ œb œ ‰ ≈ œn ™ œ ™ œ œ ‰ ≈ œb ™ ææ朜b ‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ™ œ œŒ ˙˙˙bbb ™™™ ˙˙˙ ™™™ Œ ˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union117°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp f315f ff ffpf mf mp pf mf mp pf mf mp p mff mfppp p4444444444444444444444& ∑ ∑ s LL sssss,9& o o -ïïóïñïoE♭F -Æ2V o& ï-oooooo(R)pp? ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑/Snare Drum ∑ to Caxixi&B? pizz? pizz&› 28 ∑ ∑˙# ˙˙# wwwwo ˙˙o ™™™™ ‰ wwo## wwoww ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰ ww ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ.b˙ Œ Œ Œ œ œ œ ¿ œ ¿ œ Œ ¿ œ œ œ œ æææ˙™‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œb œ œ ™ œ‰ œb œ œ ™ œ‰ œ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ ‰ œœ œb ™ œ œ œ œ œb ™ œ‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œb œ œ ™ œ‰ œb œ œ ™ œ‰ œ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ ‰ œœ œb ™ œ œ œ œ œb ™ œ‰ œ œb œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ‰ œ œ œb ™ œ‰ œ œ œ ™ œb œ œ œ œ ™ ‰ œœ œ ™ œ œ œb œ œ ™ œ œb‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œb œ œ ™ œ‰ œb œ œ ™ œ‰ œ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ ™ ‰ œœ œb ™ œ œ œ œ œb ™ œ œ˙˙˙bbb ™™™ œœœ ˙˙˙ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union118°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXpp mfmeno mosso q=116, fiery 320pp mfmfmfpppppp pp mfp pp mfmfmfmf34 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 44& Flt.& ∑& 3? ∑ ∑ 5& ∑/Caxixi ∑ to Tam-tam& 5B? « pizz sul tasto 3 pizz norm.? « pizz sul tasto 3? 30 ∑ ∑ ∑ww Œ ˙ œ œ œ œb œ œ œb œb œ œb æææ˙bŒ ˙ œ œ œ œb œ ˙ œbJ œ ™œ'b œ' œ. œ' œ.- œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œb œ œ ˙ œbJ œ ™œ.b œ. œ.b œ. œ. œ. ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ˙Œ ˙ ˙b ˙ Œ Œæææœ ‰ ‰ æææœ Œ Œ æææœ ‰ æææœ ‰ Œ Œ ŒŒ Œ æ˙ æ˙ œ œj œO ™™ œ œ œ œ œ œbJ œ ™Œ Œ æ˙ æ˙ œ œJ Oœb ™™ O˙b O˙bbœb œ œb œ œ œ œ œb œ œb œ œ œbJ œb ™ œJ œ ™ ˙bœb œ œb œ œ œ œ œb œ œb œ œ œb j œb ™ ˙ œJ œ ™Œ œœbb ‰ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union119°¢°¢°¢°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf pancora meno mosso q=108, unforeseeno po mp ppp ppp mp mfFl.Ob.Cl.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.325mf ppmf p& L L5 ï óóïóïï7 s LL sss,ss9& ∑ ∑ -ïïóïñïoE♭F 2-ÆV& smorzato ¿3 5/Tam-tamwith finger l.v. to Finger Cymbal ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ sul tastoB sul tasto 3 33? ∑? ∑ ∑& L L ï óïïóóó65 7 s LL sssss,9& E♭-ïïñïïïo1 V-∑ o&/Finger Cymbal ∑ ∑ with hard mallet&B? pizz T+ ∑/ ∑ ∑ all mics OnŒ ˙ œœ ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰ ˙# ˙˙# ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰˙ ™ Œ wwo##˙# ™ Œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œn ™ œJ œ œœœ œ ˙ œj œ œw w œ ™ œJ ˙ ˙b œ œb œŒ Œ ˙ œ œ œ œb ˙n ˙ œn ˙# œ ˙ œ# œbw w Œ Œ ˙w w˙b ˙˙b ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰ ˙# ˙˙#˙˙ ™™™™ ‰ wwobb ˙˙o ™™™™ ‰œ ™ ≈ œ œ Œ fiœj œj œb œn j Œ fiœ# j‰ œ œb fiœ# j‰ œ œb Œwœ ˙ ™ ~wbb ~w#˙ ˙ ˙ ˙˙b ˙˙ O˙bbw œb œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œb V Œ Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union120°¢°¢°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.330pppFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.fmp mpp p2424242424242424 4424 4424 4424 4424 4424 4424 4424 44& 5L Lï ïïóóóï7& -ñïïïïï o?E♭ 2V∑ -C♯ ïïïïññ -?oV& 3? 3/Finger Cymbal  to Tam-tam ∑ ∑& sul tastoB& s LL sssss,9& o o -ñïïïïï o?E♭ 2 V∑ o&? B& 3 33 3B 3 33? ∑ arco? ∑ ∑ arcoww œœ ™™ ‰ ˙ wwwwonn ww œœ ™™ ‰ ˙˙oŒ fiœb j‰ œb œb ™ fiœb j fiœb jœb j œb ‰ œb ™ œb œ œb fiœb jœb œ œb fiœb jœj œb ™Œ fiœ# j‰ œ# œ# ™ œJ œ# œ'# j œ ™ œ œ# œ fiœjœ œ# œn fiœjœJ œ ™œ œ ˙ ™‰ œœ ˙# œ œ œ œJ œ# ™ œ ™ œJ œ œO˙ ™™ Oœnn Oœ Oœb OœJ Oœ#n ™™ Oœ## ™™ Oœ#J Oœ Oœœœ ™™ ‰ ˙# ˙˙# ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰˙˙o œœo ™™ ‰ ˙˙onn wwofiœb j‰ œb œb œbJ œb ™ ˙b fiœb j œb ™ ‰ ˙bfiœj‰ œ# œ œJ œ# ™ ˙ w#œJ œ# ™ œ œ œœ œ ˙# œ œ œ œœ œ# ˙ œ#O˙ O˙ O˙## Oœ œ œ œœ œ# ˙ œ#w ww=Appendix A. Sparks of Union121°¢°¢{°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.ancora meno mosso q=100mfmfp pFl.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXpplargo q=40, evocative pp pp ppp pppppp p343434343434& L L ï ïóïïïó9& -ïñïïïïo?E♭ 2V∑&B?/ Tam-tam ∑ ∑ l.v.& 3 3B 3 3?? E3+ E1+/ Echoe On ∑ spectral drone On&α 24"&αBα?α con sordino &/Tam-tamα?› α 31˙ ˙˙ ww ˙˙ ™™ Œ˙˙ ™™™™ ‰ wwonn ˙˙ ™™ Œw w ˙ ™ Œ˙ ™™ ‰ w# ˙ ™ Œw# w ˙ ™ Œwœœ œœ# œœ œœ ™™ œœ#J œœ œœ# œœ œœ ™™ œJ ˙# ™ Œœœ œœ# œœ œœ ™™ œœ#J œœ œœ# œœ œœ ™™ œJ ˙# ™ Œw w ˙ ™ Œw w ˙ ™ ŒV Œ Œ Œ V Œ Œ Œ~# w Œ~# w Œ˙# œ ™™ œ# œ ˙ ˙# Œ˙# œ ™™ œ# œ˙ ˙# Œw ww# w# w#=Appendix A. Sparks of Union122°¢{°¢°¢{Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXmplargo q=50, trembling 340mp mpmp mppFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.MAXpp mpp mpp mp34 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 444444444444444444& ∑ ∑ ∑&& ∑B& ∑ senza sordini 3/Tam-tam ∑ ∑ to Bass drum and     mid Tom& 32 32 32?›&& 5& 5B ? 5&& 32 32 32 32 32?› E3- E1-/ Echo Off, spectral drone Off ∑Œ ≈ œ# œ œŒ Œ ≈ œ# œ# œ ˙ œ# œ ≈ œ# œ œ ™ œ œ#Œ Œ ≈ œ œ# œ œ ˙# Œ ≈ œ œb œbœ# œ# œ ™ ˙ œ œ# ˙ œ ≈ œ# œ œ ™ œ œ#‰ œ# œ œ œ Œ ˙# ™ œ# œ œ#æææ˙™ æææ˙œœœœ.>### ‰ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œœœœ.>### Œ Œ Œ ‰ œœœœ.>###œ ˙# œ œJ œ œ#J ˙œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ# ˙ œn œ œb œb œ œb œbœb ˙b œ œJ œb œJ œ ™ œb œ œb œ œbœ ≈ œ œ# œ œJ œ œ#J œ œ œ# œ# œ# œ# œ# œ# ™œ# œ œ ™ œ œ# ™ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# œ# œ# œ ™Œ Œ œœœœ.>### ‰ ‰ œœœœ.> Œ œœœœ.>### ‰ œœœœ.> ‰ œœœœ.> ‰V Œ Œ Œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union123°¢{°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXmp f345 ffffpp mp ppFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXallegro q.=50, fierce 350fmp p mf mp p mf p383838383838383838 6838 6838 6838 6838 6838 6838 68& nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~5 3& nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3& nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3? nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3&/Mid Tom Bass Drum 5 5 5& 32 32 32 32 32 ∑?›& 3:2q3& 3:2q3& 3:2q3? ∑ ∑ 3:2q&/Mid Tom Bass Drum?›œ œ# œ# œ# œ œ# ™ ˙# ˙ œœ œœœ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙ ™™ œb œb œ œœ œb œn œ# ˙n œ# œ œœ fiœ ™jœ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙# ™™ œb œb œ œbœb ‰ œ œJ œ ™ ˙# œ# œ œœœ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙# ™™ œb œb œ œœ ‰ œ# ˙ ˙# œœ œœœ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙# ™™ ‰œ œb ≈ œb œ œb ™ ˙b Œ ‰ œb œ ™ œ# œ# œ# œ# œ# œ ™ œŒ æææœ æææœ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙œœœœ.>### ‰ œœœœ.> ‰ ‰ œœœœ.> Œ Œ œœœœ.>### ‰ ‰ œœœœ.> Œœb ™ œ œb œ œ œ œ>J œb œ œ œb Œ œ>J œbJ œœb ™ œ œb œ œb œ œ>J œb œ œb œb Œ œ>nJ œbJ œœb ™ œ œb œ œ œ œ>J œb œ œ œb Œ œ>J œbJ œœb œ œ œb Œ œ>J œbJ œœb ‰ Œ ≈ œb œb ‰ ≈ œb œb œ œ œb ≈ œb œb ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ œbœj æææœ œ œ æææœ æææœ œ œ œ œ æææœ æææœ œ œ ‰ æææœ œ œ œ œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union124°¢{°¢°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.MAXmf ppiù mosso q.=54 355mf pmf pmf pmf ppp mf mpFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vc.Cb.MAXfq.=54, frantic 360ffff p f p fff f&&&?&/Mid Tom Bass Drum?› S-/ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Strings Off& 3 3& 3 3& 3 3? 3 3/Mid Tom Bass Drum? « « « « « « « « « «? « « « « « « « « « « « «?›œJ œb ‰ œ œb fiœb jœ œb ‰ œJ œb œ œb œ fiœb jœb ‰ œ œb fiœb j œJ œb fiœb j œbJ œb fiœj fiœb jœJ œb ‰œbJ œb ‰ œ œb fiœb jœ œb ‰ œbJ œb œ œb œ fiœb jœb ‰ œb œb fiœb j œbJ œb fiœb j œbJ œb fiœj fiœb jœJ œb ‰œJ œb ‰ œ œb fiœb jœ œb ‰ œJ œb œ œb œ fiœb jœb ‰ œ œb fiœb jœJ œb fiœb j œbJ œb fiœj fiœb jœJ œb ‰œJ œb ‰ œ œb fiœb jœ œb ‰ œJ œb œ œb œ fiœb jœb ‰ œ œb fiœb jœJ œb fiœb j œb j œb fiœj fiœb jœj œb ‰œJ œb ‰ œ œb œ œb ≈ œ œJ œ œ œb œ œb ‰ ‰ Œ œJ œb œj œn œ# j œn ‰æææœ ‰ œ œ æææœ fiœjæææœ œ œ œ fiœjœJ œ œ œ fiœjœ œ œ œ œ œ fiœjœ œ œ œ fiœj‰ œ œ œV Œ ŒŒ ™ œb œb œb œ ‰ œb œb œb ™ fiœb jœb œ œb œb œJ œb fiœb jœJ œb œ fiœb j œbJ œb ‰ ‰ œ œ œŒ ™ œb œb œb œ ‰ œb œb œb ™ fiœb jœn œb œb œb œbJ œb fiœb j œbJ œb œ fiœb j œbJ œb ‰ ‰ œb œ œbŒ ™ œb œb œb œ ‰ œb œb œb ™ fiœb jœb œ œb œb œJ œ fiœb jœJ œb œ fiœb j œbJ œb ‰ ‰ œb œ œŒ ™ œb œb œb œ ‰ œb œb œb ™ fiœb jœb œ œb œb œJ œ fiœb jœJ œb œ fiœb j œb j œb ‰ ‰ œ œ œœ œ œ fiœjœ œ œ œ œ œ fiœjœ œ œ œ œ œ fiœjœ œ œ æææœ œJ œ œJ æææœ œJ œ œJŒ ™ ‰ ‰ œb œb ™ Œ ™ ‰ ‰ œb œb ‰ ‰ ‰ œb œ ‰ ‰ œ œbJ ‰ œJ œ ‰ ‰‰ œb œb ‰ ‰ œ œb ™ Œ ™ ‰ ‰ œb œb ‰ ‰ ‰ œb œ ‰ ‰ œ œbJ ‰ œJ œ ‰ ‰=Appendix A. Sparks of Union125°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vc.Cb.MAXmf ffmf ffmf ffmf ffp f p fOb.Perc.Vln.Cb.f365ppp mpf fp3838383838& 3& 3& Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3? 3/Mid Tom Bass Drum? « « « « pizz 3? « « « « pizz 3?›& ∑/Mid Tom Bass Drum& arco sul ponticello? W- B2- A2+ arco/ Winds and french horn Off Contrabass On ∑ ∑ ∑œ œ œb œ œ ‰ œb ™ œ œ œb œ œ œb œb œ œ œb fiœb j fiœb jœnJ œb ™œ œ œb œ œ ‰ œb ™ œ ™™ œ œ œb œ œ œb fiœb j fiœb jœnJ œb ™œ œ œb œ œ ‰ œ ™ œb œ œ œb œ œ œb œb œ œb fiœb j fiœb jœnJ œb ™œ œ œb œ œ ‰ œb ™ œ œ œ œb fiœb j fiœb jœn j œb ™œ œ œ fiœjœ œ œ æææœ œJ œ œJ æææœ œj œJ ææ朜 œb ‰ Œ œJ œb ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œb œ œb ‰ Œ ™œ œb ‰ Œ œJ œb ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œb œ œb ‰ Œ ™ ‰Œ œ œ œ œ œb ™ œ œ œn œ# œ œ œ œæææœ ™ æææœ ™ æææœ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™Œ œ œ œ œ œb ™ œ ™ œ ™ œœnn œœ# œœJ ‰ œ#J œ œœœ œŒ ™ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ ˙b ™ œ œn œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ#V Œ V=Appendix A. Sparks of Union126°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXf mp mfancora più mosso q=88, crispmp ff mff mp mfmp mff mfp mfp mp mfp mpp p p24 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 2424 34 24& ∑& ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑? ∑/Mid Tom Bass Drum To Tam-tam ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑B ∑? ∑ ∑ arco??‹ C2+ ∑ E1+ ∑ ∑ A3+33 B3+/ Bassoon On spectral drone On ∑ Clarinet & Oboe On ∑œbJ œb œbJ œn œ# fiœ# jœ# ‰ œ#J œ# fiœ# j œ#J œ fiœ# j œ#J œ# fiœ# j œJœ# fiœ œ œ œ# œ ˙ fiœ# j œ#J œ# œ# œ œ# œ# œ fiœ# j œ# j œ# fiœ# jœjœb œb œ œb œb fiœb j œbJ œ fiœb j œb j œ fiœb j œn jœ# j œ œ# j œ œ# fiœjœ ‰ œ# j œ fiœj œj œ fiœj œ# j œn fiœjœjœ ™ ˙œ ™ ˙ fiœj œ#J œ# fiœ# j œ#J œ# fiœ# j œ#J œ# fiœ# j œJœ#J œ œ#J œ œ# œ ‰ O˙## ™™ œO œO##O˙ O˙## ™™ Oœ Oœ##œ œ œ œ œ ˙ O˙ fiœj œ#J œ fiœj œ#J œ# fiœjœj œn fiœjœj˙V ‰ V Œ V Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union127°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAX375pp mfpppppppppp343434343434343434343434& 3 3& 3 3& 3 3? 3 3& ∑ ∑ ¯/Mid Tom Bass Drum ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑B ∑ ∑???‹ A3- B3- A2-/ Clarinet & Oboe Off Contrabass Off ∑fiœ# j œ# ‰ œ# œ# œ œ# œ# fiœ# jœ œ# œ# fiœ# j œ#J œ# fiœ# j œ#J œ# ‰ œ# œ# œ# ‰ œ# œ# œfiœ# j œ# ‰ œ# œ# œ œ# œ# fiœ# jœ œ# œ# fiœ# j œ# œ# fiœ# jœ œ œ œ# œ# ‰ œ œ# œ# œ# ‰ œ# œ# œfiœb j œb ‰ œ# œ# œ œ# œ# fiœ# jœ œ œ œ# œb fiœb j œbJ œb fiœb j œb j œb ‰ œb œb œb œb ‰ œb œb œnfiœj œ# ‰ œ œ œ œ# œ fiœjœ œ fiœjœ ™ œ-> œ# j œ fiœj œ# j œ ‰ œ œ# œ ‰ œ œ# œ+˙# ™ +˙ ™˙# ˙O˙ O˙O˙ O˙ O˙ ™™ O˙ ™™fiœj˙ ˙ O˙ ™™ O˙ ™™V Œ Œ Œ V Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union128°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmppffffffmfpp mp383838383838383838383838& α ∑16"3& α ∑3& α ∑3? α flap3 ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ& α ∑/Tam-tam ∑ α l.v. To Whip& overpressureα repeat independentlyÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍB overpressureα repeat independentlyÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ? αgrotesque wide vibrato? α ∑?‹ αC2-34/ ∑ α Bassoon Offœ# œ# œ œ# fiœ# j fiœ# jœ œ œ œ#œ# œ# œ œ# fiœ# j fiœ# jœ œ œ#œ# œ# œ œ# fiœ# j fiœ# jœ œ œ œ#œ œ# œ œ fiœj fiœjœ œ œ# Œ ¿b ¿ ¿ ‰˙ Œ wŒ Œ h.v ‰u ŒŒ Œ h.v ‰u ŒœO ˙ wO˙ ™™ ˙ ˙VAppendix A. Sparks of Union129°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.sff sff f sff fcon moto q=104, firmsff sff f sff fsff sff f sff mf fsff sff f sff mf fsff sff f sff ffsff sff f sff fsff sff f sff fsff sff f sff fsff sff f sff f38 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 3838 34 38 44 34 38& 7&& 3 3 7? 3 3& 3 3/Whip ∑ To Bass Drum ∑& 7B &?? E1-/ spectral drone Off ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑œÆ ‰ œÆ œ œ# œ# ‰ œÆ ‰ Œ Œ œ>b ™ œ œ œ# œ œb œn œ œb œ>n œb œn œœ'# ‰ œ'# œ œ œ ‰ œ'# ‰ Œ Œ œ> ™ œ œ. Œ œ>œÆ ‰ œÆ œ œ# œ# ‰ œÆ œÆ œ' œ'# œ'n œ' œ'# œ'n œ>n ™ œ œ œ# œ œb œn œ œb œ>n œb œn œœ' ‰ œ' œ œ œ ‰ œÆ œÆ œÆ œÆ œÆb œ' œ'# œ'b œ> ™ œ# œ. Œ œ>bœ'# ‰ œ'# œ œ œ ‰ œ'# œ' œ' œ' œ'b œ' œ'# œ'b œ> ™ œb œ. Œ œ>œ ™ œ ˙ ˙ ™ ŒœÆ ‰ œeeeÆ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ# œ# ‰ œÆ ‰ Œ Œ œ># ™ œ œ œ œ œb œn œ œb œ> œ# œ œœÆ# ‰ eeeœ'#∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ# ‰ œÆ# ‰ Œ Œ œ># ™ œ# œ. Œ œ>œÆ# ‰ eeeœ'#∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ ‰ œÆ# ‰ Œ Œ œ> ™ œ# œ. Œ œ>œÆ ‰ eeœ'∏∏∏∏∏ œ œ œ ‰ œÆ ‰ Œ Œ œ> ™ œ# œ.b Œ œ>bV ‰Appendix A. Sparks of Union130°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.sff f p385sff f psff f psff f psff f pmf f psff f psff f psff f psff f p38 24 3438 24 3438 24 3438 24 3438 24 3438 24 3438 24 3438 24 3438 24 3438 24 34& ë3& ë3& ë3? ë3& ë3/Mid Tom Bass Drum 3 ë& al tallone ë3& al tallone ë3? al tallone ë3? al tallone ë3œÆ>b ‰ œ>n œÆ># ‰ œÆ># œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ> œÆ># œÆ># œÆ> œÆ># ‰ œÆ># ‰ œ# ™œÆ> ‰ œ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ>b œÆ> œÆ> œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> ‰ œ ™œÆ>b ‰ œ>n œÆ># ‰ œÆ># œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ> œÆ># œÆ># œÆ> œÆ># ‰ œÆ># ‰ œ# ™œÆ> ‰ œ>b œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ>b œÆ> ‰ œÆ>b œÆ>b œÆ> œÆ> œÆ>b œÆ> ‰ œÆ> ‰ œ ™œ'> ‰ œ> œ'> ‰ œ'>j œ> ™ œ'> œ'> œ'># œ'># œ'># œ'># ‰ œ'> ‰ œ ™œÆ> ‰ œ> œÆ> œ œÆ> œÆ> ææœÆ> œj æææœ œÆ> œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> ‰ æææœ ™œÆ>b ‰ œ>n œÆ># ‰ œÆ># œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ> œÆ># œÆ> œÆ> œÆ># ‰ œÆ># ‰ œ ™œÆ># ‰ œ> œÆ># ‰ œÆ># œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ># œÆ> œÆ> œÆ>b œÆ>b œÆ> ‰ œÆ># ‰ œ ™œÆ> ‰ œ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ>b œÆ>b œÆ> œÆ> œÆ> œÆ> ‰ œÆ> ‰ œ ™œÆ> ‰ œ>b œÆ> ‰ œÆ> œÆ>b œÆ> ‰ œÆ># œÆ> œÆ> œÆ>b œÆ>b œÆ> ‰ œÆ> ‰ œb ™Appendix A. Sparks of Union131°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXsff fp sff390sff fp sffsff fp sffsff fp sff mfsff ff p sffsff sff pp psff p mfsff p mfsff p mfsff p mff p sff24 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 3424 34 24 58 34& ë ∑ ∑3& ë ∑ ∑3& ë ∑ ∑3? ë3&Mid Tom Bass Drum ë ∑ ∑/ ∑ ∑& ∑ pizz arco& ∑ B pizz arco? ∑ pizz arco? ∑ pizz arco pizz arco?‹ 35 ë ∑ ∑œÆ> ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ> œb œ œ# œ œ œÆ># ‰ Œ Œœ'># ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ> œ œb œ œ œb œÆ> ‰ Œ ŒœÆ> ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ> œ œn œ# œb œ œ'># ‰ Œ Œœ'> ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ> œ œn œ# œb œ œ'># ‰ Œ œ œb œ>b ‰ œn œ# ™œ'># ‰ ˙# ˙ ™ ˙ œ' ‰ Œ Œœœ> Œ Œ œÆ> ‰ æææ˙ æææœ œ> œ œœœ œ œœœ œœÆ> Œ Œ Œ œ œ ‰ œœ ™™ œœb œœ> œ œœ# œ œœ œœÆ># ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ œ ‰ œœ ™™ œœb œœ> œ œœ# œœ œJœÆ># ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ œb ‰ œœ ™™ œœ œœ> œ œœ# œœ ™™œÆ> ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ œ ‰ œ ™ œ œ># œ œ# œ# ™Œ ˙˙# ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ œœ' ‰ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union132°¢°¢°¢°¢°¢Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.395Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.pp mp400pp mppp mpp mf fp mf fp mf fp mf f34 24 34 58 4434 24 34 58 4434 24 34 58 4434 24 34 58 4434 24 34 58 4434 24 34 58 4444444444444444?/Mid Tom Bass Drum ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& 3 3 3B 3 3 3 3? 3 3?& ∑? ∑? ∑& 33B 3? 3? 3œ ˙ ˙ œb ™ ‰ ˙b ™ ˙ ‰æææ˙™œb œ œ œ# œœ œ# œb œ œ œb œ œ œb œ œJ œ# ‰ œb œ œ ˙# ‰œ œ œ œb œ œ œœb œ œ œ œb œ œ œb œJ œ ‰ œ œb œ ˙ ‰œœ œ œ œb œb œ œ œb œ œ œbJ œ ‰ œ œ œb ˙ ‰œ ˙ œ œ œ œJ œb ‰ œ œ œ ˙b ‰w ww ww w˙˙ ˙˙b œ œ œ œb œnJ œ œJ œœ≥ œ œ œ œ# œ# ™ œ# œ œ# ™˙˙ ˙˙b ‰ œ œ œ œ œJ œb ™ œœ œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œ˙˙ ˙˙b ˙˙ ‰ œ œ œ œb œnJ œ ‰ ˙˙˙ ˙˙b ˙˙ ™™ œ œ œ œb œ œn ˙ œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union133°¢°¢°¢°¢Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf405mf fVln.Vla.Vc.Cb.f mf410mf mfmfBsn.Hn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.p mfpp pp mf p mfp mf p mfp mf p mfmf3434343434 24 34 44 5834 24 34 44 5834 24 34 44 5834 24 34 44 5858 24 34 4458 24 34 4458 24 34 4458 24 34 4458 24 34 4458 24 34 44&ù 3B 3? nŸ~~~~~~~~~~~ 3?& 3 3B 3 3? 3 3 3 3? 3 3?&&B?? pizz 3 – 3 –œb ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ# œ# ™ œœ≥# œ# œ œ≥# œb œ œ œœ≥b œœ≥b œœ≥ œœ≥# œœ≥b ˙#œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ# œ# œ œ≥# œ≥# œ≥b œœJ œ# ™ œœb œœ≥ œœ≥# œœ≥# œœ≥b œ# œ# œnœ# œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ# ™ œ# œ œœ≥# œœ≥# œœ≥b œœ≥n œ#J œ# œ œ≥ œb œ# œ œ≥ œœ#˙ ™ œ œb ˙b œ œb œb w˙b œ œ# œ# œœb œœ œ œ œb œ# ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙b ™œ# œb œn œœœ œb œœ ˙ œ œ œb œ# œ œ w ˙b ˙˙œœb ˙ œ œ œ œb œ œ œb œ# œ œœœ œb œ ™ œJ œœœ œb œ œ# œJ œb œJ œJ œ# œbJœ œ# œœ ˙b ˙# œ œb œ# œ ˙ ˙# ™ œ# ˙ ˙˙ œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œ ˙ ‰ œ œ œ# œ œb œJ œ# ™ ‰ œ œbŒ Œ œj ˙ œ'> Œ ‰ œ.# œ œ'> Œ Œœb œ œ# ™ œ.≤bJ ‰ œb ™ œ ˙ ˙b ˙˙˙ œ.≤#J ‰ œ ™ œ ˙ ˙ ˙œ œb œ.≤J ‰ œ ™ œ ˙b ˙ ˙b˙˙b ‰ ˙ œ œ œb ‰ œ# œb œ œ œb Œ==Appendix A. Sparks of Union134°¢°¢°¢°¢{Fl.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.p mf415mfmfp mf p mf pp mf p mf pp mf p mf pFl.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf 420p mf p mfp mf p mfp mf p mf p mf pp mf p mf p mf pp mf p mf p mf ppp34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 44&&? 3 3 3& &&B?? 3 – 3 –&&?& ¿ con sordino ∑ ∑&B?? – 3 – –3&› 36 37 38 39 40 41 &˙# ˙ ˙# ˙ ˙ ˙#Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ# œ œ œ# Œ Œ ‰ œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ# œ ‰ œ œœ# œ#J œ# œ œ Œ œ# œ ˙# Œ œ# œ œ œœ.# j œ ™ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ+.# œ œ œ. Œ œ.b Œ‰ œ ™ ˙ w ˙ ˙‰ œ ™ ˙# ˙ ˙# ˙b ˙‰ œb ™ ˙ ˙b ˙ ˙ ˙bœ#J œb ™ œ œ œb Œ ‰ œ# œb œ œ œ œb Œ Œœ œb œb œb œ œn œ œ ˙b œ ™ œ ™ œ# ™ œ ™œ# œ# ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ# ™œ œ ˙# œ Œ ˙b œb ™ œb ™ œb ™ œ ™œ.bJ œb œbJ œ œ œ. Œ Œ Œ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙# œb ™ œ ™ œb ™ œ ™˙ ˙# ˙ ˙b œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙# ˙b ˙ ˙# œb ™ œ ™ œb ™ œ# ™œ#J œn œ#J Œ œn œ œ œb Œ Œ œb œ œb œ œ œ# œn ‰ œ œ# œŒ Œ Œ œœÆb œœÆ Œ Œ Œ œœÆbb œÆ Œ Œ œÆ œÆ#=Appendix A. Sparks of Union135°¢°¢°¢°¢°¢°¢Fl.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf mp425omfmf omfmf omfmf oFl.Ob.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Cb.mfmf p mfmp mfomp mf44 24 4444 24 4444 24 4444 24 4444 24 4444 24 4444 24 4444 24 4444 24 44&& ∑ ∑? ∑ 3 3& ∑ ∑/Triangle ∑ 3 ∑& ∑ ∑B 33? ∑ ∑? 3 ∑3& ∑& 3?/Triangle 33&B ∑ ∑? arco˙ œ ™ œ œ# œœ œ# ™ O># œ œ ™ œJ œ œ# ‰ œ œ# œœ Ob o˙b o˙O O˙o o˙O˙b ˙ ˙ Œ Œ˙b œ œn œ# œ ™ ˙b œ# ‰ œœ œ# œ ™ œbJœj œ ™ ‰ œ œj ˙b Œ Œœj œ œj Œ œ ˙ œ˙ œ œ ˙b Œ Œ˙ œ œ ˙b œ œ# œœœœ œ#J œb œœ œœb œœ œœ˙ ˙ ˙b Œ ŒŒ Œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ Œ œ œ œJ œ Œo˙b o˙ o˙ o˙ o˙ o˙ o˙ o˙Œ ‰ œ# œ œ œ ˙b œ œ# œ ‰ œ œ œ# œ# œ# œn œ# œ# œj œ ™˙ œb œ œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ. œ.Œ Œ œ œ œj œj œ œj œj œ œj Œ œ œ œ œŒ Œ œœb# œœ œœn œœb ˙˙b ˙˙ ™™ œ œ œ œ# œbœœ ˙# ™Œ Œ ˙˙b œœ ™™ œœnn J œ œ œ# Oœ## OœJ Oœ# ™™=Appendix A. Sparks of Union136°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Cb.MAXppiù mosso q=108430 po pp ppp pp p ppp pppFl.Ob.Bsn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Cb.MAXmf p 435mf pmfmf p mfmf p p& ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑? 3 3 with hard mallet l.v. ∑/Finger CymbalTriangle 3 3 3& ∑B ∑ ∑ ∑ &? gliss.&› ∑ ∑ with approximate tempo *  42 3 3& 33& 33?/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑/ 3 3& 5 5& 33? gliss.&›* MAX's sequence of notes generated from m.431 to m.454 do not need to be synchronized with the ensemble.    3 3 3 3Œ Œ ‰ œ ™‰ œ# œœœ ˙b œn œJ œ ™ ˙# Œ ‰ œ ˙œ. œ. œ Œ Œ ‰ œ. œ. œ. œ. œ.# œ# œ œb w Œ ˙b œnwŒ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj˙ œœœ œb œ ˙ ™ Œ Œ Œ œŒ Œ Œ ‰ œOœ ™™ œJ ˙ œ O˙# ™™ Œ Œ ˙b ˙ œ>b œnŒ ‰ œ# œ ™ œ#J œ œ œ#J œ# œJ œ œœ œ œ œ# œ ‰ œ œ>J œ# ™ œ œ#J œ ‰ œ œ œ˙ œ# ™ ‰ œ œ> œ# œ œ œJ œ ‰ œ œJ œ# œJw ‰ œ ˙ œ œ# ˙ œ ™ œ# jŒ Œ Œ œœ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ™ œJ œ ™ œ#J œ ‰ œ œ œ> œ# œ œ œR œ# œ ‰ œ œ œ˙ œJ œ ™ œ# ™ ‰ œ œ> œ# œ œ œ#J œ ‰ œw ‰ œ œ œ ™ œ#J ˙ œ ™ œ#JœJ œ# œJ œ# œ# œ œ# œ œ œ# œ ™ œ#J œ œ œ#J œ# œJ œ œ=Appendix A. Sparks of Union137°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf mp pmf mp pp mf mpmp mfmfmf ppmf p mf pmf p mf pmf mpmf mp mfpp p p p& 33& 33&?&/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑/ 3 3& 33& 33? &? gliss.&› B2+3 B1+3 E1+ 3 A2+ C2+3 3 3/ French Horn mic OnCello mic OnSpectral drone On ∑ ∑ Contrabass & Bassoon mic Onœ œ ‰ œ ˙ œ ™ œ#J ‰ œ œ> œ œ# œ> œ# œJ œ œ œ œ. ‰ œ œ‰ œ ™ œ œ œ œ# ‰ œ œ> œ œ# œ> œ# œJ œ œ œ œ. ‰ œ ˙‰ œ# ˙ ™ œ ™ œj ˙ œ>j œ# ‰ ‰ œ ™ œj ˙ ™ œ# jœ ™ ‰ ˙n ˙b ™ œ œ ™ œ# j ˙ œ# œ œ# œ œ œ'>n Œw# œ ˙ ™ œ# Œ ˙ ˙ ™ œ#Œ Œ ˙ Œ ˙ ™‰ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œj œ œ œ œœ# œ ‰ ˙ œJ œ œJ œ# ‰ œ œ> œ œ œ# œ> œ# œ œ œ œJ œJ œ œJ Œ œœJ œ# œJ ‰ œ ™ œ œ œ œ# ‰ œ œ> œ œ# œ> œ# œJ œ œ œ œ. ‰ œŒ ˙ ™ ˙ ˙ œ œ# Œ œ œ ˙ ™œ œ># ˙ ˙b ™ œ œ ™ œb j ˙ œ# œ œ# œ œJ œÆ>n ‰œJ œ# œJ œ# œ# œ œ# œ ™ œ#J œ œ# œ. œ# œ# œJ œ œ œ#J œ œ œ œ#J œ# œ#J œ œ#V V V Œ V Œ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union138°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf f mf440mf f mfp mf ff mfp mfmffmf f mfmf f mfp mf ff mfmf& 3 3 3& 3 3 3&? 3&/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑ ∑/ 3 3 3 3& 53 3& 3 3 3&? gliss. 3&› 3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3 3œ œ œ# ˙ ˙ œJ œ# œ œ œ# œ# œJ œ# ‰ œ# œ œ#J œ œ#œJ œ# ™ œ œ œ œJ œ# ˙ œ# œ# œJ œ# ‰ œ># œ œ#J œ œ# ‰ œ#œ ™ ˙# ‰ œ ™ œ#J ˙ œJ œ ™ œj œ# ™ œ ‰ œ œj œ# ™œ œ œ œ# œ ™ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ ˙ ˙b œ œ' œ œ# œœ ˙# ‰ œ œ ˙# ™ ˙ ˙# ‰ œ ™ ˙#wœ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œœ ™ œJ ˙# œJ œ ™ œ œ# œJ œ ™ œ#J œJ œ# œ œ œ ‰ œ# œ œR œ# œ œ#˙ œJ œ# ™ œ œ œ œJ œ# ˙ œ# œ# œJ œ# ‰ œ># œ œ#J œ˙# ˙ ‰ œ ™ ˙ œ ˙ œ# œ ‰ œ ™ œœ œ œ œ# œ ™ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ œ œ> ˙b œ œÆ œ œ# œœ. œ# œ# œJ œ œ œ#J œ œ œ œ#J œ# œ#J œ œ œJ œ œ# œJ œ œ œ œJ œ œ#J œ œ œJ œ œ# œJ œ œ œAppendix A. Sparks of Union139°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmp p< q = q. >445f mfmf pppmpmpmf24 6824 6824 6824 6824 6824 6824 6824 6824 6824 6824 6824 68& 3& 3&? ∑ ∑&/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑/ 3 3 3 3 3& 3& 3&? ∑ ∑&› 3 33 3 3 3‰ œ# œ œ# œ# œJ œ œ œ# œ ‰ œ># œ œ# œ œ# œ œ œ œ# œ ™ ‰ œœ œ# œ# ™ œJ œ œ#J œ ‰ œ># œ œ# œ œ# œ ˙ ˙# ‰ œ œ ™w œ ‰ œ œj œ# ™ œj œ ™ œj œ# ™ ˙ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œb ˙n ™ ˙ œ'# Œ ‰ œ'# ‰ Œ œ'w ‰ œ ™ ˙# ˙ ˙# ˙ ˙ ™Œ Œ Œ œ ‰ œ ™ Œ Œ ˙ ™œ œ œ œ œ≈œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈œ‰ ‰ ≈œœ ‰ œ># œ œJ œ# œ#J œ œJ œ œ# ™ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ œ# œ œ ™ œ#J œ ™ œ ™ ≈≈œœ# ‰ œ# œ œ# œ# ™ œJ œ œ#J œ ‰ œ# œ œ# œ œ# œ ˙ ˙# ™w œ ‰ œ ™ œ# œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ™ œ ™œb ˙n ™ ˙ œÆ# Œ ‰ œÆ# ‰ Œ œÆœ#J œ œ#J œ œ œJ œ œ# œJ œ œ œ œJ œ œ#J œ œ œJ œ œ# œJ œ œ œ œ#J œ œ#J œ œ œ œ#Appendix A. Sparks of Union140°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf p450pmf pp mf mff mf ppp&&&? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& con sordino/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑ ∑/&&&? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑&›œ ™ œ ™ œ œJ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ‰ œ> ™ œ ™œ ™ œ œJ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ‰ œ> ™ ˙ ™œ ™ œ# ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ># ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ> ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ# ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™˙# Œ ˙# ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ# ™ œ ™ œ ™Œ ™ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ Œ ™ œ ™‰ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ≈ œ ≈ œ ≈ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ≈ œœ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ> œ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ> ™ œ ™ œ ‰ œ> ™ œ ™ œ ™‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ>J ˙ ™ œ ™ œ> ™ œ ‰ œ> ™œ ™ œ# ™ œ ‰ ‰ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œ œ œ# œ ™ œ# ™ œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ ™ œ# ™ œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ ™ œ# ™Appendix A. Sparks of Union141°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf p mf455mf p mfmfmfmfmf pmf pmf p mfp mf p mfmf p mfmfp&&&? ∑ ∑& ∑/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/&& gliss.& ?? ∑ ∑&›œ ™ œb ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ ˙ ™ ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ œb ™˙b ™ ˙ ™ ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ ˙ ™ ˙b ™œ ‰ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ ˙ ™ ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™‰ œ œ œj œb œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œ ™ Œ ™ ‰ œ œ œj œ œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™≈œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ Œ ™ Œ œjŒ ≈œ‰ œ ‰ œ ≈œ‰ œ ≈œ ≈œ ≈œ≈œ‰ œ ‰ œ ≈œ‰ ‰ ≈œ ‰ œ ≈œ‰ œ œ œ œ ≈œ‰ ‰ ≈œ˙ œb ˙ œ ˙ ‰ œ œJ œ œ ™ œ ‰ œ œ ˙ œbœ ™ œb ™ ˙ ™ ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ ˙ ™ ˙b ™>˙ ™ ˙ ™ ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ ˙ ™ ˙b ™‰ œ œ œJ œb œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ ≈‰Appendix A. Sparks of Union142°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.p mf f460 465p mf fp mf fp mf fp mf fmf mfmf p mfp mf fp mf fp mf fp mf f&&&?&/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/&&??œ ™ ‰ œ ˙b ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ> œb ™ œ œJ œ œ œb‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œbJ œ ™ ‰ œ> œb œ ™ œJ œ œj œ ˙b ™œ ™ ‰ œ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ> ™ œ ™ ˙ œ œJ œ œ ™‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œb j œ ™ Œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ> œb ™ œ œJ œ œ œb‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œj œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™Œ ™ ≈œ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ Œ ™‰ œ ‰ œ ≈œ ‰ œ ≈œ≈œ≈œ≈œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ≈œ ‰ ‰ ≈œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ≈œ ≈ ≈œ ≈œjœ ™ ‰ œ ˙b ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œ> œb œ ™ œJ œ œJ œ œb ™ œJ œ‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œb j œ ™ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ> œb ™ œ œj œ œ œb‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œb j œ ™ œ ™ œ> ™ œb ™ ˙ œ œj œ œb ™‰ œ œ ™ œ ™ ‰ œ œ œb j œ ™ ‰ œ> œb œ ™ œj œ œj œ ˙ ™Appendix A. Sparks of Union143°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf 470mfmfmff mff p mfmfmfmfmf&&&?&/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑ ∑/&&??œ ‰ œ ™ œb ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œb ™ œ ™ Œ ™ œJ œb œ ˙œ ‰ œ œbJ œJ œ œ ™ œJ œb œ ™ ‰ œ œJ œb œJ œ œ œJœ ‰ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ ™ œ œ> œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œnJ œ ™ ‰ œ œ‰ œ œb œJ œ ™ œ œJ œJ œb œ ™ ‰ œ œb œJ Œ œ œbœ ™ œb ™ œ ™ œ ‰ ˙ œb œ ˙ œ ‰ œ ™≈ œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ Œ ™ ‰ ‰ œŒ œj ≈ œ ™ œ ≈ œ ≈ œ ≈ œ ≈ œ ‰ œ Œ œj ≈ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ ‰ ‰œ œbJ œ ™ œ ˙ œ ˙b Œ ˙ ˙b œœ ™ œ ™ œb ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ œbJ œ ™ œ ™ Œ ™ œ ™ œb ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™œ ™ ≈ œ ™ œb œ œ ™ ˙ œ ™ œ œbJ œ ™ œ œbJ œJ œ ‰ œ˙b œ œb ˙ œ œb œ ˙b œ œb œ ‰ œAppendix A. Sparks of Union144°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf f< e = e >mf fmf fmf fmf fp mfp p mfmf fmf fmf fmf f444444444444444444444444& ∑ Flt. norm.3& ∑& ∑? ∑& ∑/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑/& ∑ 3& ∑? ∑? A2- ∑B1- B2- C2-/ ∑ Cello, French horn, Contrabass, Bassoon mic Off ∑ ∑˙ œb Œ æææœb æææœb æææœb æææ˙b æææ˙b ˙bœ ™ œb ™ Œ ˙b œb œ œb œb œbœ œ œ œ ™ Œ œb œ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ œb œ œ œb œ˙ ™ Œ œb œ œb ™ œ œb œ ™ œb ˙ ™œb ™ œ ™ Œ ˙b ™ wbŒ ‰ ≈ œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ˙≈ œ ‰ œ Œ œj ≈ œ ™ œ ™ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ Œ ≈ œ ™ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ ™ œ ™ œ ≈ œ œœ ˙ Œ æææœb æææœb æææœb æææ˙b æææ˙b ˙b˙ ™ Œ æææœb æææœJ æææœb ™ æææœb ™ æææœbJ æææœ æææœbœb œj œ ™ Œ æææœb æææœJ æææœb æææœbJ æææœbJ æææœb ™ æææœb ™ œbJœJ œb œ ™ Œ ˙b ™ wbV Œ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union145°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.f mf475f mff mfmfmfp mff mff mfmfmfp p& subito 3 3 3& subito 3 3& 3 3? subito ∑ ∑&/Finger CymbalTriangle ∑ ∑ ∑/ To B. D.& subito 3 3 3& B subito 3 3? « « « «? B1+ E3+/ ∑ Cello mic OnEcho On ∑ ∑œb Œ ‰ œ>b œb œb œJ œb œJ œb œJ œ ‰ œ œJ œb œb œJ œb œ œ œb œbœb Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ>bJ œb œbJ œ œbJ œ œb œ œb œJ œ ™ œb œb œb jœ Œ Œ Œ œ>bJ œb œJ œ œbJ œ œ œ œb œJ œ ™ œb œ œbJ œ œ œbœ œb ˙ œb ˙ Œ Œœ œ œ ˙b ‰ œb ™ Œ œb œ ‰ ‰ œb œ Œ œb ™ ‰ ‰ œb ™Œ Œ ≈ œ‰ Œ≈œ ™ œ ‰ œ ≈œ ™ ‰ ≈œ‰ œ ≈ œ‰ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ ™ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ œ Œ œ ≈œ ‰ ‰ Œœb Œ ‰ œ>b œb œb œJ œb œJ œb œJ œ œ œJ œb œb œJ œb œ œ œb œbæææœb Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ‰ œ>b œb œb œj œb œb œ œb œ œ œ œb œj œbœ œb Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ ≈ œb ‰ ‰ œ Œ ‰ œb Œ Œ ‰ ≈ œb Œ Œ Œœj œb ™ ˙b œ œb ˙ œb œ ™ œbJ ˙ ˙b œJ œb ™V V Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union146°¢°¢{°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.480mfmf mpmff mf f mfp mfBsn.Hn.Perc.Vc.Cb.485mfpmf& ∑ ∑3& 3 ∑3& 3 3 ∑? ∑ ∑& ∑senza sord.& pizz arco gliss.3B pizz ∑ ∑3? « arco gliss. 3? E3- B1-/ ∑ Echo OffCello mic Off ∑ ∑? 3 3&/Bass Drum ∑? 3? pizzœ œb œ œ œb œ œb œJ œb ™ Œ Œœ œ œb œJ œb œ œb œ œ œb œb œb œ.n ‰ Œ œ'> ‰ Œ Œ ŒœJ œ œ œb œ œn œb ˙ œ.n ‰ Œ œ'> ‰ Œ Œ ŒŒ Œ œ# ™ œ#J ˙ ‰ œ> œŒ Œ ˙# œ œ œ œ# œ ‰ œ# ˙#œ œb œ œ œb œ œb œJ œb ™ œœœ ‰ Œ Œ Œ ˙ ˙ ˙#œb œb œb œ œb œ œb œ œb œb œb œœœn ‰ ŒŒ Œ ˙b Œ Œ ˙ ˙ ˙# ‰ œ# ™ œn œ# œ œ#œ ˙b ™ ˙b ™ œb ˙ ˙b œ ˙b ™V V Œ Œœ œ œ# œ# ˙ œ ™ œ#J œJ œ ™ œ œ# œ ™ ‰ œ œ# œ œ œ# œ# œ œ# œ#Jœ œ# ˙# œ œ# Œ œ# œ# œ œ œ ‰ œ# œ ˙# œ œ# ˙ œ# œ> ‰‰ œ Œ Œ Œ ˙ ™ ‰ œ w ‰ œ Œ Œ Œœ œ# œJ œ ™ œ# Œ ˙# œJ œ ™ œ ™ œ#J œ œ# œ œ œ œ# œ# j œ œ œj œ œ# jœ œb ˙ ™ Œ ‰ œ# œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ# ™ œJ ˙ ˙# œJ œ œJ Œ œ#=Appendix A. Sparks of Union147°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp f490p fp fp fp ffp fp fp fp fp mf mf2424242424242424242424& ∑& ∑& ∑?&/Bass Drum ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑B ∑ arco?? arco? ∑ 43 44 45 ∑ 45Ÿ◊œ# Œ ‰ œ ‰ ˙b œJ œÆ> ‰ œ# œ œ ™ œÆ># Œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œÆ>œ# Œ ‰ œ ‰ ˙b œJ œ'> ‰ œ# œ œ ™ œÆ># Œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œÆ>œ Œ ‰ œb ‰ ˙ œj œ'># ‰ Œ Œ œ œb œb ™ œ'>n ‰ œb œ œb œ œÆ>bœJ œ œJ œ œ# œ# Œ ‰ œ ‰ ˙b œJ œÆ> ‰ œ# œ œ ™ œÆ># Œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œÆ>‰ œ># ‰ œ># œ> ‰ œ># ‰ œ# Œ ‰ œn ‰ ˙ œj œ'> ‰ Œ Œ œ# œ œ ™ œ'># ‰ œn œ# œ œ# œÆ>Œ œ ‰ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œÆ>œ Œ ‰ œb ‰ ˙# œJ œÆ>n ‰ œ œ œ ™ œÆ># Œ œn œ# œ œ œ œÆ>œ# Œ ‰ œ ‰ ˙ œJ œÆ> ‰ œ# œ œ ™ œÆ># Œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œÆ>œ œ# Œ Œ œ# Œ ‰ œ ‰ ˙ œJ œÆ> ‰ Œ Œ œ# œ œ ™ œÆ># ‰ œ œ œ œ# œÆ>œ ™ œJ œJ œ# ™ œ# Œ ‰ œ ‰ ˙b œJ œÆ> ‰ œ# œ œ ™ œÆ># Œ œ œ# œ œ# œ œÆ>œ# Œ ‰ œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œ'> ‰ Œ Œ Œ œ'>Appendix A. Sparks of Union148°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXp mf p f495p mf p fp mf p fp mf p fp mf p fpp mf p fp mf p fp mf p fp mfp2424242424242424242424& 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~& 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~& 3 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~? 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~& 3 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~/Bass Drum 3 to Snare Drum ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~B 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~? 3 3 Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~? 3 pizz 3 3? 43◊< > ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑œÆ># ‰ Œ Œ œ œ œb œ# ˙ œ œ# ˙ œÆ> ‰ œÆ>#œÆ># ‰ œ œ œb œ# ˙ œ œ# Œ Œ ˙ œÆ> ‰ œÆ>#œÆ> ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œb œ# œ œ ™ œJ œJ œ# ‰ ˙ œÆ> ‰ œÆ>#œÆ># ‰ Œ Œ œ œ œb œ# ˙ œ œ# ˙ œÆ> ‰ œ'>#>˙# ‰ œ œ œn œ# œ œ ™ œj œj œ# ‰ ˙# œ'> ‰ œ'>#œÆ> œ œ œ ŒœÆ> ‰ œ œ œb œn ˙ œ œ ˙ ˙# œÆ># ‰ œÆ>#œÆ># ‰ Œ Œ œ œ œn œ# ˙ œ œ# ˙ œÆ> ‰ œÆ>œÆ># ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œJ œJ œ# ‰ ˙# œÆ> ‰ œÆ>bœÆ># ‰ œ œ œb œ# ˙ œ œ# ˙ œ œ# œn œ œ# œœ# ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union149°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.p500 505mf pmf ppmf pppmfmf pmfp f pp44 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 2444 24& 3 3 3& ∑& ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/Snare Drum ∑ ∑& ∑ pizzB ∑ pizz arco? pizz? 3 C3+ arco/ ∑ Flute mic On ∑ ∑ ∑œÆ> œÆ># ‰ œÆ œÆ# œÆn œÆ œÆ# Œ œÆ œÆb œÆn œb œ œb œ ˙ ˙œÆ> œÆ># ‰ œ'> ‰ ‰ œ'> œ'> ‰ œ'># œ'> Œ œ'> ‰ œÆ>b ‰ œb ˙bœÆ> œÆ> ‰ œ'> ‰ ‰ œ'># œ'> ‰ œ'># œ'> Œ fiœ>jœ'># ‰ œ'> ‰ Œ Œ ŒœÆ> œÆ># ‰ ˙ ˙œÆ> œ'># ‰ ˙ ˙¿ ‰ ‰ ¿ ¿ ‰ ¿ ‰ æææ˙ æææwœÆ>b œÆ> ‰ œœœœ ™™™™ œœœœ# j œœœœ œœœœb œœœœn Œ œœœœ œœœœ Œ Œ ŒœÆ> œÆ># ‰ œœœœb ™™™™ œœœœj œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ Œ œœœœ œœœœb œ ˙œÆ>b œÆ> ‰ œb œ œ œœœœb ™™™™ œœœœj œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ Œ œœœœ œœœœb Œ Œ Œœ œb œn œb œ œb œ ‰ œ œJ œ œ œb œ œ# œ ˙ ˙V Œ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union150°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXf mf mf510f mfff ff pfmff mf f pf mff mf mfmf24 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 6824 34 68& ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑/Snare Drum ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ pizz —B b? arco? ∑ ∑ ∑ pizz –? 46 ∑Ÿ◊ C3- ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/ ∑ ∑ Flute mic Off ∑ ∑ ∑œÆ> Œ ˙b ™ œÆ> ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œÆ>#˙ ˙ ™ ˙ ™fiœ# j œ œJ œ œ œ#œÆ># Œ œÆ> ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œÆ>#œ'># Œ ˙ ™ ˙ Œ ˙ ™ ˙ Œœ Œ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ# j˙ ˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™˙ ™fiœ# j ˙# ˙ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ>#J œb œ ˙ ™œ'># Œ ˙ ™ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ#Jœ'># Œ V Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union151°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf mf f f515f mf f mfmf f mfmf mf f mfp mffmf mf f mfffmf mf f mf& ∑ ∑&& ∑? ∑& ∑/Snare Drum ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 3:2q to Temple Blocks& ∑B ∑ ∑? ∑? ∑Œ ™ ‰ ‰ œÆ> œÆ> ‰ ‰ œÆ> ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ‰ œ œ œ# œfiœj œb ™ œb œ œ œJ œ œ ™ ≈ œ œb ™ œ>n ‰ ‰ Œ œb œ œJ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰œ œJ œ ™ œ ™ ≈ œ œ œ#J œ# ™ œ'># ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ‰ œ ™ œ#Œ ™ ‰ ‰ œÆ> œÆ># ‰ ‰ œÆ> ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ ™ œ# œ œb œ ™Œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ ‰ œ# œ ™ œ œj œ ™œ œ œ ŒŒ ™ œ ™ œ# ™ œj œ œb ™ œ ™ œ# œj Œ ™Œ ™ ‰ œ œ œ œn ˙# ™ œ ™ œ ™˙b ™ ˙ ™ œ ™ œ# ™ œ# ™ œ# ™Œ ™ œ ™ ˙ ™ œ# ™ œJ œ œ# ™ œ# ™Appendix A. Sparks of Union152°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAX< q. = q > 520f mfpmf ppmff mfmfmfppp p pp4444444444444444444444& ∑2& ∑2& ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑/Temple Blocks ∑ ∑ to Caxixi ∑& ∑ arco 3 ∑ ∑B 3 gliss.? ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑&› ∑ ∑ 47œ ™ œ œ# œ ™ œ#J œ ™ œnJ ˙ ˙# ˙ Œ Œœb œ œ œ œ ‰ œn œ ™ œ#J ˙ ˙ ˙# ™ Œœ ™ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ ™ œJ ˙ ˙ ˙ ™ Œœ ™ œ# œ œb œ Œ Œ Œœ# ™ œ œj œ ‰ œ œ ™ œj ˙ ˙ ˙ ™™ ‰Œ œ œ æææ˙ æææ˙ Œ Œ‰ œ œb ˙# œ# œJ œ# ˙ Œœ ™ Œ ™ ‰ œ œb ˙# œ œJ œb œ œ ™ œ# œ ˙# œ œ# œJ œ# ™ ˙‰ œ œb ˙# œ# œ ˙ œ w wŒ œ œ ˙b wŒ ˙# ™ w wAppendix A. Sparks of Union153°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXf mf 525p mfp f mffp mfppmfmf mfmf mfmf34 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 2434 24& 3&&? 3&/Caxixi ∑ ∑ to Triangle ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ sul tastoB pizz arco sul tasto? pizz?&› ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑‰ œ œœ œ# œb ˙ œ ˙ ™ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ œ ˙ œJ œ# ™ ˙ ™w# ‰ œn œb ˙n ™ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ# œ ˙ œJ œ ™ ˙ ™‰ œ# ™ œ œ œ œ ˙ ™ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ œ ˙ œJ œ# ™ ˙ ™Œ Œ œb œb œb œ# ™ œ ™ œ# œ ˙# œ ™ ‰ Œ ‰ ≈œ ˙# œ œ ˙# ™˙ ‰ œ ™ œ œ ˙ ™ œ ™ ‰ ‰ œ œ# w ˙ ™Œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ ≈œŒ Œ ‰ œ œ ˙# ™ œ ˙# ™w# ‰ œ ™ ˙# œ ™ œ# j Œ Œ ˙# ™ œ ˙# ™Œ Œ ‰ œ# ™ w œ ™ ‰ Œ Œ œ# œ ‰ œ# ™ œ ˙b˙ ‰ œ# ™ œ#J œ ™ ˙# œ ™ œ#J Œ Œ œ# œ ‰ œ# ™ œ ˙bwbAppendix A. Sparks of Union154°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmpmp f pp mpf mpmf f pp mpmppmpmpp fp f mf mpppp pp p p24 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 3424 34 44 24 34& 530&&?&/Triangle ∑ to Suspended Cymbal∑ ∑& ∑ ∑B ∑ ∑? ∑ ∑ ∑ pizz. 3? 3 — arco ∑&› C3+ ∑ A1+ 48 E1+ 49 ∑/ Flute  mic On Violin  mic On Spectral drrone On ∑ ∑‰ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ œ ‰ œ w ˙‰ œ# ™ ˙# œ œ œ ˙# œ ‰ œ œ ™ œ#J ˙ ˙‰ œ# œ œ# œ œ ˙ ™ ˙ œ ‰ œ w ˙#‰ œ# ™ œ ‰ œ œ œ# ˙ œ ‰ œ# ˙ ™ œn ˙‰ œ ™ ˙ ™ ˙ œ ‰ œb ˙ ™ œ ˙˙ Œ Œ ‰ œ ™˙ ™ ˙ œJ œ ™ œ ˙ œ ‰‰ Oœ O˙ O˙ ™™ Oœ Oœ Oœ Oœb O˙œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ‰ œ œb œ œb œj œ# ‰ œ œ œ œ# œn ‰ œ œ ˙n ™Œ Œ œ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ ™V Œ V Œ Œ V Œ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union155°¢°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vc.Cb.p mfp mfp mfp mfp mfpp mf mfp f mf pFl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Vc.Cb.mf mp mf 540mf mfmf mf pp mfpp mf pp mfpp mf pp mf34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 3434 44 34& 535&&?&? arco pizz 3? pizz arco3& espressivo 3& espressivo 3& espressivo? ∑& ∑ ∑? ∑ arco?œ ™ ‰ Œ ˙# ™ ˙ ˙# ˙ ™ Œœ ™ ‰ Œ ˙# œ œ>n ˙ ™ œ> œb wœ ™ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ ˙ ™ œb wœ ™ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ w ˙ ˙#œ ™ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ w œ ˙ ™˙ ™ ˙ ™ w œ œ œ œ ˙#Œ ‰ œb œ œn œb œb œ œ œ œ ™ œb j œn œ ˙ ˙#‰ œb œ˙ ™ ˙ ≈ œb œ œ œb ˙ Œ ‰ ≈ œb œ ™ œ œ œ œb œ ™ œ œ œb ˙˙ Œ ≈œœ ˙ ™ œ œb œ œ ˙ Œ ‰ ≈ œb œ œ œb œ œ œ œ œb œœ˙ Œ Œ Œ ≈ œ>œ ˙ œ ‰ ≈œ œ œ Œ œ œ ™ œj œ œ ™ œ˙ ™ Œ œb œ œ œ ™ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ ™˙ ™ Œ Œ ˙ œ ˙ ™wwn ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ww˙ Œ Œ wwn ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ww=Appendix A. Sparks of Union156°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.pmeno mosso q=100 545pp mf pp ppp mf pp mf pp ppp mf pp mf ppppp pp ppp pmfmfpp mf pp mf pp mfpp mf pp mf pp34 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 4434 44&&&?&/Suspended Cymbal ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 3B ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & 3? 3?œ œb œ œ œ ≈ œb œ ™ œb œ ™ œ œb œ œ œb wb ˙ Œ œœ ™ œ œb œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈œ œb ˙ œ œ œb ˙b ˙ ™ Œœ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œœ ™ œ œb ˙ ™ w ˙ Œ œœ ˙b ˙b ™ ˙ ™ wb ˙ Œ œœ ˙b ˙ ™ ˙b ™ wb ˙ ™ ŒŒ æææ˙ æææ˙ Œ Œ æææ˙ æææ˙™ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ œ œŒ Œ Œ œ œ œ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙b ™™ ww ˙˙ Œ œ œb œ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙ ™™ ˙˙b ™™ ww ˙˙ ™™ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union157°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.f 550mf pffmf ppp pp fp fp fmf pp34 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 44& ∑& espressivo& ∑? ∑& con sordino/Suspended Cymbal ∑ with stick edge of the cymbal3 to Tam-tam ∑ ∑ fifififiscratch with a nail& subito ∑& subito ∑? subito ∑? B2+/ French horn mic On ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑˙ œ ‰ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ‰ œb œJ œ ™ ˙b œ ‰Œ Œ ≈œœ œ œ ≈ œb œ œ Œ ≈ œb œœ ˙b œ ˙ ‰ œ ˙˙ œ ‰ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ‰ œb œj œ ™ ˙ œ ‰˙b œ ‰ œ ˙ œ œb œ œ ‰ œ œj œ ™ ˙b œ ‰Œ Œ ≈œœ œ œ ≈ œb œ œ Œ ≈ œb œœ ˙ œ ˙ ‰ œ ˙¿> Y Y ˙˙ œJ œ ™ ˙ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œJ œ ™ ˙ œ ‰˙b œJ œ ™ ˙ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œJ œ ™ ˙ œ ‰˙b œJ œ ™ ˙ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œJ œ ™ ˙ œ ‰Œ Œ ≈œœ œ œ ≈ œb œ œ Œ ≈ œb œœ ˙b œ ˙ ‰ œ ˙Œ V Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union158°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf p mf f 555mfmf p mf fmf p mf fmfppp pmf p mf fmf p mf fmf p mf fmfp44 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 3444 34&&&?&/Tam-tam ∑ ∑&&?? T+/ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ All mics On‰ œ> ™ œ œ ˙ ™ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ> ˙ œJ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ œnJ œ Œœ œb œ œ œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œb œ ˙ ‰ œb œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ™ œnJ œ Œ‰ œ> ™ œ œ ˙ ™ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ> ˙ œJ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ œb j œ Œ‰ œ>b ™ œ œ ˙b ™ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ> ˙b œJ œ ™ œ œb œ ™ œb j ˙œ œb œ œ ™ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œb œ ˙ ‰ œb œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ™ œnJ ˙æææw æææw æææw‰ œ> ™ œ œ ˙ œ ‰ Œ œ> œ ˙ œ œJ œ œJ ˙ œ ™ œJ ˙‰ œ> ™ œ œ ˙b œ ‰ Œ œ> œb ˙ œ œj œ œj ˙ œ ™ œJ ˙‰ œ>b ™ œ œ ˙b œ ‰ Œ œ> œb ˙ œ œJ œ œJ ˙ œ ™ œ# j ˙œ œb œ œ ™ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œb œ ˙ ‰ œb œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ™ œnJ ˙Œ Œ Œ VAppendix A. Sparks of Union159°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXfffp fp fp fp fp fmfp34 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 3434 24 44 24 34& 3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3560& 3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3& 3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3? subito ∑& ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑/Tam-tam ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑& subito& subito? subito? subito?‹ E1+ ∑ 50 51 52/ Spectral Drone On ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑Œ œ œ œb Œ œJ œb œJ œ œ œn ‰ Œ œJ œ Œ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œJ œ œbJ œŒ œ œ œb Œ œJ œb œJ œ œ œn ‰ Œ œJ œ Œ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œJ œ œbJ œŒ œ œ œb Œ œJ œb œJ œ œ œn ‰ Œ œJ œ Œ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œJ œ œbJ œœ> œb ˙ œ ™ œ œb j ˙ ˙ Œ Œœ> œb ˙ œ ™ œ œbJ ˙ ˙ œJ œ ™ œ œœ> œb ˙ œ ™ œ œbJ ˙ ˙ œj œ ™ œ œœ> œb ˙ œ ™ œ œbJ ˙ ˙ œJ œ ™ œ œœ> œb ˙ œ ™ œ œb j ˙ ˙ œj œ ™ œ œŒ ‰ œ œb j ˙ w ˙V Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union160°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.MAXmf565mfmff p mff p mfpf mff mfmfmf34 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 3434 44 34 24 34& ∑3 3 3& ∑3 3 3& ∑3 3 3? ∑ ∑ 3 3& ∑ ∑ 3 3/Tam-tam ∑ ∑  to Finger Cymbal/Zils to Tam tam∑ ∑& pizz arco 3& pizz arco 3? 3? ∑?‹ 53 ∑ ∑ ∑Œ œ œ œb Œ œb œ œ Œ Œ œb œ œ œ œJ Œ œ œ ˙ ŒŒ œ œ œb Œ œb œ œ Œ Œ œb œ œ œ œj Œ œ œ ˙ ŒŒ œ œ œb Œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œj Œ œ œ ˙ ŒœJ œ ˙ Œ œb œ œ ˙ Œ ‰ ‰ œb œœj œ ˙ Œ œb œ œ ˙ Œ ‰ ‰ œb œw ˙ ™œJ œb ™ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ ˙b ˙b œ œ œb œ ‰ œ œ ˙b ŒœJ œb ™ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ ˙b ˙b œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ˙ ŒœJ œb ™ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ œb œ œ ‰ œ œb ˙ Œœj œb ™ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ Œ Œ Œ œ œb ˙ Œ˙ ™ ˙ œ œ ˙ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union161°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.p f mf 570p f mfp f mff mff mfppp p mf pp mfp f mfp f mfp f mfp f mfmf24 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 4424 34 44&&&?&/Tam-tam to Snare drum ∑ to Suspended Cymbal&&?? T+/ ∑ ∑ all mics Volume ∑ ∑ ∑œ ™ œ>J Œ ‰ œ œ ‰ Œ œb ™ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ™ œ>J Œ ‰ œ œ œœ ™ œ>J Œ ‰ œb œ ‰ Œ œ ™ œbJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ™ œ>J Œ ‰ œ œ œœ ™ œ>j Œ ‰ œb œ ‰ Œ œb ™ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ™ œ>j Œ ‰ œ œ œœ ‰ œ œ œ ˙ œ.>b ‰ œ.> ‰ ‰ œ.> Œ ‰ œb œ œ œb œ# œ œb œœ ‰ œ œ œ ˙ œ.>b ‰ œ.> ‰ ‰ œ.> Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ œæææœ ™ œj Œ œ.> ‰ œ.> ‰ ‰ œ.> æææ˙™ æææ˙ æææœ œ> œ> Œœ ™ œ>j Œ ‰ œ# œ ‰ Œ œb ™ œJ œ œb œ ‰ Œ œb ™ œ>nJ Œ ‰ œ œ œbœ ™ œ>J Œ ‰ œ œ ‰ Œ œb ™ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ™ œ>J Œ ‰ œ œ œœ ™ œ>j Œ ‰ œ œ ‰ Œ œb ™ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ™ œ>j Œ ‰ œ œb œœ ™ œ>j Œ ‰ œ œ ‰ Œ œb ™ œJ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ™ œ>J Œ ‰ œ œb œV Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union162°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.p575pppppppppmf44 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 4444 34 24 44&&&?&/Suspended Cymbal to Tam-tam&&?? E1+/ ∑ Spectral drone Volume ∑œ ‰ œb œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œb ™ œJ œ Œœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ ™ œJ œ Œœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ ™ œbJ œ Œœ œb œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ# œ œb œ œ ‰ œn œ œnœ œ# œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ# œ œb œ œ ‰ œn œ œnŒ ‰ ¿ ¿ ‰ ¿ ‰ ¿ ‰ ¿ ‰ ¿ ¿ ‰ ¿ ¿ ‰ ¿ ‰ ¿ ‰œ ‰ œ œ œb ‰ Œ œb œn Œ ‰ œ œ œ ™ œbJ œ Œœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œb ™ œj œ Œœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œb œ Œ ‰ œb œ œ ™ œj œ Œœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œb œ Œ ‰ œb œ œ ™ œj œ ŒŒ V Œ Œ ŒAppendix A. Sparks of Union163°¢°¢°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.mf f mfmeno mosso q=96, fiery580mf f pp pmf f mf pmf f pp pmf f ppp mfmf f ppp pp pmf f ppp pp pmf f ppp pp pmf f ppp pp p34 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 4434 24 44& Flt. norm.& ∑ ∑& Flt. norm.? ∑ ∑& ∑ ∑ senza sordino/Tam-tam ∑ ∑ ∑& ∑& B ∑? ∑? ∑‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ Œ ‰ æææO æææ˙™ æææœ ™ œ# œ œ œ# œ ™™ œ ™ œ# œ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ œ# ˙ œ#‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ Œ ‰ æææO# æææ˙# ™ æææœ ™ œ# œ œ œ# œ# ™™ œ œ˙ œn ‰ Œ ˙ ™ œ ˙ œ˙ œn ‰ Œ ˙ ™ Œ Œ Œ œŒ æææ˙™ æææ˙™‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ w œ ˙ œ‰ œb œ œ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ w œ ˙ œ#‰ œb œ œ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ w œ ˙ œ#‰ œb œ œ ‰ Œ ˙ ™ w# œ ˙ œAppendix A. Sparks of Union164°¢°¢{°¢Fl.Ob.Cl.Bsn.Hn.Perc.Vln.Vla.Vc.Cb.fancora meno mosso q=92 585mf fmf fmf ffpp p mf fffff&&&?&/Tam-tam&B?? T- E1-/ ∑ ∑ Spectral drone Offall mics Off ∑Uœ œ ™ œ œ œ# œ œ# ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ Œ wUœ œ ™ œ œ œ# œ œ# ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ Œ wU#˙ ™ œ®œ œ œ# œ# œ# ˙# ˙# œ ˙ Œ wU#˙ ™ œ®œ œ œ œ# œ# ˙ ˙# œ ˙ Œ wU#˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ Œ Œ wU#w w Œ ˙ ™ wU˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ Œ wwU˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ Œ wwU#˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ Œ wwU#˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ Œ wUŒ Œ Œ VAppendix A. Sparks of Union165Appendix BSeating ArrangementFigure B.1: Seating arrangement166Appendix CTables of Formal DivisionsFigure C.1: Formal proportionsFigure C.2: A section formal proportions167Appendix C. Tables of Formal DivisionsFigure C.3: A′ section formal proportionsFigure C.4: A′′ section formal proportionsFigure C.5: A′′′ section formal proportions168Appendix C. Tables of Formal DivisionsFigure C.6: D′ formal designFigure C.7: Alternate interpretation of formFigure C.8: Form analysis as a rondo-sonata169Appendix DDiagrams of ProportionsFigure D.1: Linear presentation of the sectional proportionsFigure D.2: Linear presentation of the alternate formFigure D.3: Fibonacci relationships in section repetitions170Appendix EMorse Code SignalsFigure E.1: Morse code signals171Appendix FModes and ScalesMiyako scale. A common Japanese modal scale which has often been confused withthe koto tuning method: hirajo¯shi that is based on the same pitches (Malm, 1976, 178;Malm, 1986, 40-41).Figure F.1: Miyako scaleDastga¯h-e-dasˇti. This is a Persian system of several related modes, which sharecommon notes. There are certain defined accidentals as the music moves from onegusˇe (mode) of the system to the next. In this example of dasˇti, the starting note is Fand the finalis is D. Below is a theoretical representation of ga¯m-e-dasˇti (Farhat, 1990,39).Figure F.2: Dastga¯h-e-dasˇtiDastga¯h-e-cˇaha¯rga¯h. This is a Persian system of several related modes, which sharecommon notes. The starting note is A [and the finalis is C. Below is a theoreticalrepresentation of ga¯m-e-cˇaha¯rga¯h (Farhat, 1990, 56).172Appendix F. Modes and ScalesFigure F.3: Dastga¯h-e-cˇaha¯rga¯hMaqa¯m nawa athar. This Arabic maqa¯m (mode) is made of a pentachord and a fewdistinct tetrachords, and trichords (called ajnas) which are used during modulation.Also note that this is a tempered scale (Farraj and Abu Shumays (2013)).Figure F.4: Maqa¯m nawa atharMaqa¯m kurd. This is an Arabic maqa¯m made of several three-note and four-notesub-modes (ajnas) and starting with an{AB[C}trichord called kurd jins (Farraj andAbu Shumays (2013)).Figure F.5: Maqa¯m kurdHsi¯n t.ubu¯. This is a system based on north African melodic modes called t.ubu¯ (sing.t.ab), or more recently referred to as maqa¯m. “The melodies may be in fixed or infree rhythm; if metered, they are based on characteristic rhythmic-metric cycles withdistinct patterns of accentuation.” In recent years, these modes also appear in temperedform as well (Davis and Plenkers (2013)).Figure F.6: Hsi¯n t.ubu¯173

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0103419/manifest

Comment

Related Items