You may notice some images loading slow across the Open Collections website. Thank you for your patience as we rebuild the cache to make images load faster.

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

The effect of agitation on the penetration depth of sodium hypochlorite into dentinal tubules. Davis, Shannon Lisa 2013

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2013_fall_davis_shannon.pdf [ 6.32MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0073976.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0073976-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0073976-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0073976-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0073976-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0073976-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0073976-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0073976-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0073976.ris

Full Text

THE	
  EFFECT	
  OF	
  AGITATION	
  ON	
  THE	
  PENETRATION	
   DEPTH	
  OF	
  SODIUM	
  HYPOCHLORITE	
   INTO	
  DENTINAL	
  TUBULES	
   	
    by	
   Shannon	
  Lisa	
  Davis	
   	
   D.M.D.,	
  The	
  University	
  of	
  Saskatchewan,	
  1995	
   M.B.A.,	
  Haskayne	
  School	
  of	
  Business,	
  University	
  of	
  Calgary,	
  2005	
   	
   A	
  THESIS	
  SUBMITTED	
  IN	
  PARTIAL	
  FULFILLMENT	
   OF	
  THE	
  REQUIREMENTS	
  FOR	
  THE	
  DEGREE	
  OF	
   	
   MASTER	
  OF	
  SCIENCE	
   in	
   THE	
  FACULTY	
  OF	
  GRADUATE	
  STUDIES	
   (Craniofacial	
  Science)	
   	
   THE	
  UNIVERSITY	
  OF	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
   (Vancouver)	
   	
   July	
  2013	
   	
   ©	
  Shannon	
  Lisa	
  Davis,	
  2013	
   	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Abstract	
   Objective:	
  The	
  aim	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  was	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  difference	
  in	
  irrigant	
  penetration	
   into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  of	
  6%	
  NaOCl	
  using	
  the	
  EndoActivator®,	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  and	
   EndoVac®	
  and	
  to	
  compare	
  them	
  with	
  the	
  standard	
  side-­‐vented	
  ProRinse®	
  needle.	
   Methods:	
  Sixty	
  extracted	
  anterior	
  teeth	
  with	
  single	
  canals	
  were	
  accessed	
   conventionally,	
  the	
  pulp	
  tissue	
  removed	
  and	
  canal	
  patency	
  verified	
  using	
  minimal	
   instrumentation.	
  Crystal	
  Violet	
  dye	
  was	
  placed	
  in	
  the	
  canals	
  for	
  5	
  days	
  followed	
  by	
   instrumentation	
  of	
  the	
  canals	
  to	
  standard	
  shape	
  with	
  ProTaper	
  rotary	
  files	
  to	
  size	
  F4	
   using	
  1ml	
  of	
  6%	
  NaOCl	
  used	
  between	
  each	
  file.	
  	
  The	
  teeth	
  were	
  divided	
  into	
  four	
  groups	
   and	
  each	
  agitation	
  system	
  was	
  used	
  with	
  6%	
  NaOCl	
  as	
  per	
  manufacturers	
   recommendations.	
  Each	
  tooth	
  was	
  mounted	
  in	
  acrylic	
  and	
  cut	
  into	
  1	
  mm	
  thick	
  section	
   perpendicular	
  to	
  the	
  long	
  axis	
  of	
  the	
  tooth	
  using	
  the	
  Isomet®	
  Linear	
  Precision	
  Saw	
   (Censico	
  International	
  Pvt.	
  Ltd.)	
  The	
  sections	
  were	
  analyzed	
  with	
  a	
  Nikon®	
  Eclipse®	
   Microscope	
  at	
  40x	
  magnification	
  and	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  was	
  measured	
  with	
  the	
  NIS	
   Elements™	
  Software	
  (Nikon	
  Corporation).	
   Results:	
  The	
  maximum	
  penetration	
  depth	
  for	
  the	
  ProRinse®	
  side-­‐vented	
  needle,	
   EndoActivator	
  and	
  EndoVac	
  irrigation	
  methods	
  occurred	
  in	
  the	
  coronal	
  third	
  of	
  the	
   canal.	
  However,	
  the	
  maximum	
  penetration	
  depth	
  for	
  the	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
   Ultrasonic	
  System	
  occurred	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  third.	
  With	
  regard	
  to	
  NaOCl	
  Penetration	
  area,	
   the	
  coronal	
  and	
  middle	
  thirds	
  showed	
  better	
  area	
  penetration	
  than	
  the	
  apical	
  third	
  in	
  all	
   irrigation	
  groups.	
   Conclusions:	
  The	
  irrigation	
  methods	
  may	
  affect	
  the	
  highest	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
   into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  at	
  different	
  areas	
  of	
  the	
  root	
  canal	
  position.	
   	
    	
   ii	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Preface	
   	
   Dr.	
  Markus	
  Haapasalo	
  devised	
  the	
  concept	
  and	
  design	
  of	
  this	
  research	
  project,	
  “The	
   Effect	
  of	
  Agitation	
  on	
  the	
  Penetration	
  Depth	
  of	
  Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
  in	
  Dentinal	
   Tubules”.	
  	
  	
   	
   This	
  project	
  was	
  performed	
  with	
  the	
  guidance	
  of	
  both	
  Dr.	
  M.	
  Haapasalo	
  and	
  Dr.	
  Y.	
  Shen.	
   	
  	
   Shannon	
  Davis	
  performed	
  the	
  research	
  project,	
  including	
  all	
  of	
  the	
  sample	
  preparation,	
   microscopic	
  image	
  photography	
  and	
  preparation	
  of	
  the	
  thesis	
  manuscript	
  with	
  editing	
   by	
  Dr.	
  Markus	
  Haapasalo	
  and	
  Dr.	
  Ya	
  Shen.	
   	
   The	
  relative	
  contribution	
  of	
  collaboration	
  for	
  this	
  project	
  was:	
  	
   Dr.	
  Shannon	
  Davis	
  60%,	
  Dr.	
  Ya	
  Shen	
  20%,	
  and	
  Dr.	
  Markus	
  Haapasalo	
  20%.	
  	
   	
   This	
  study	
  was	
  approved	
  by	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Office	
  of	
  Research	
   Services,	
  Clinic	
  Research	
  Ethics	
  Board	
  (Certificate	
  Number:	
  H12-­‐00300).	
   	
   This	
  research	
  was	
  supported	
  in	
  part	
  by	
  the	
  Canadian	
  Academy	
  of	
  Endodontics	
  and	
  the	
   American	
  Association	
  of	
  Endodontists.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    iii	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   Abstract	
  ..............................................................................................................................................	
  ii	
   Preface	
  ...............................................................................................................................................	
  iii	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
  ...........................................................................................................................	
  iv	
   List	
  of	
  Tables	
  ..................................................................................................................................	
  vii	
   List	
  of	
  Figures	
  ................................................................................................................................	
  viii	
   List	
  of	
  Abbreviations	
  .....................................................................................................................	
  ix	
   Acknowledgements	
  .........................................................................................................................	
  x	
   Dedication	
  ........................................................................................................................................	
  xi	
   Chapter	
  1:	
  Literature	
  Review	
  ......................................................................................................	
  1	
   1.1	
  Introduction	
  .........................................................................................................................................	
  1	
   1.2	
  Endodontic	
  Treatment	
  .....................................................................................................................	
  3	
   1.2.1.	
  Mechanical	
  Instrumentation	
  ...................................................................................................................	
  3	
   1.2.2.	
  Endodontic	
  Irrigation	
  .................................................................................................................................	
  5	
   1.2.3.	
  Effect	
  of	
  Agitation	
  on	
  Irrigation	
  .............................................................................................................	
  8	
   1.2.4.	
  Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
  ..................................................................................................................................	
  9	
   1.2.4.1	
  Properties	
  ................................................................................................................................................................	
  10	
   1.2.4.2.	
  Limitations	
  .............................................................................................................................................................	
  11	
    1.3	
  Methods	
  of	
  Irrigant	
  Delivery	
  .......................................................................................................	
  12	
   1.3.1.	
  Needle	
  Irrigation	
  ........................................................................................................................................	
  12	
   1.3.1.1.	
  Properties	
  ...............................................................................................................................................................	
  12	
   1.3.1.2.	
  Limitations	
  .............................................................................................................................................................	
  13	
    1.3.2.	
  EndoActivator®	
  ..........................................................................................................................................	
  15	
    	
    iv	
    1.3.2.1.	
  Properties	
  ...............................................................................................................................................................	
  15	
   1.3.2.2.	
  Limitations	
  .............................................................................................................................................................	
  16	
    1.3.3.	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  ..............................................................................................................................	
  17	
   1.3.3.1.	
  Ultrasonic	
  Properties	
  ........................................................................................................................................	
  17	
   1.3.3.2.	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  Properties	
  .................................................................................................................	
  19	
   1.3.3.3.	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  Limitations	
  ...............................................................................................................	
  19	
    1.3.4.	
  EndoVac®	
  ......................................................................................................................................................	
  20	
   1.3.4.1.	
  Properties	
  of	
  Apical	
  Negative	
  Pressure	
  .....................................................................................................	
  20	
   1.3.4.2.	
  EndoVac®	
  Properties	
  .........................................................................................................................................	
  21	
   1.3.4.3.	
  	
  EndoVac®	
  Limitations	
  ......................................................................................................................................	
  22	
    1.4.	
  Irrigation	
  Dynamics	
  .......................................................................................................................	
  23	
   1.4.1.	
  Apical	
  Preparation	
  Size/Taper	
  ............................................................................................................	
  23	
   1.4.2.	
  Irrigant	
  Volume	
  ..........................................................................................................................................	
  24	
   1.4.3.	
  Needle	
  Size	
  and	
  Depth	
  of	
  Placement	
  .................................................................................................	
  25	
   1.4.4.	
  	
  Irrigant	
  Flow	
  Dynamics	
  .........................................................................................................................	
  26	
   1.4.5.	
  Apical	
  Patency	
  .............................................................................................................................................	
  27	
   1.5	
  Dentinal	
  Tubules	
  .............................................................................................................................	
  27	
   1.5.1.	
  Dentinal	
  Tubule	
  Properties	
  ...................................................................................................................	
  27	
   1.5.2.	
  Dye	
  Penetration	
  .........................................................................................................................................	
  28	
   1.6	
  Objectives	
  ...........................................................................................................................................	
  29	
   1.7	
  Hypothesis	
  .........................................................................................................................................	
  30	
    	
  Chapter	
  2:	
  Material	
  and	
  Methods	
  ...........................................................................................	
  31	
   2.1	
  Experimental	
  Design	
  ......................................................................................................................	
  31	
   2.2	
  Tooth	
  Selection	
  and	
  Preparation	
  ...............................................................................................	
  31	
   2.3	
  Experimental	
  Groups	
  .....................................................................................................................	
  32	
   2.4	
  Sectioning	
  of	
  the	
  Teeth	
  ..................................................................................................................	
  34	
    	
    v	
    2.5	
  Microscopic	
  Evaluation	
  .................................................................................................................	
  34	
   2.6	
  Quadrant	
  Evaluation	
  ......................................................................................................................	
  36	
   2.7	
  Statistical	
  Analysis	
  ..........................................................................................................................	
  38	
    Chapter	
  3:	
  Results	
  .........................................................................................................................	
  39	
   3.1	
  Comparison	
  of	
  Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  for	
  Experimental	
  Groups	
  ................................................	
  39	
   3.2	
  Maximum	
  Penetration	
  Depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  by	
  Location	
  and	
  Group	
  ......................................	
  42	
   3.2.1.	
  Differences	
  by	
  Location	
  ..........................................................................................................................	
  43	
   3.2.2.	
  Differences	
  by	
  Technique	
  ......................................................................................................................	
  44	
   3.3.	
  NaOCl	
  Affected	
  Quadrants	
  by	
  Group	
  Compared	
  ...................................................................	
  45	
    Chapter	
  4:	
  Discussion	
  ..................................................................................................................	
  47	
   Chapter	
  5:	
  Conclusion	
  .................................................................................................................	
  54	
   References	
  .......................................................................................................................................	
  56	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    	
    vi	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  List	
  of	
  Tables	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Table	
  1.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  by	
  Location	
  &	
  Surface.	
  .............................	
  39	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Table	
  2.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  in	
  Coronal	
  Location	
  by	
  Surface	
  ............	
  40	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Table	
  3.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  in	
  Middle	
  Location	
  by	
  Surface	
  ..............	
  40	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Table	
  4.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  in	
  Apical	
  Location	
  by	
  Surface	
  ...............	
  41	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Table	
  5.	
  Maximum	
  Mean	
  Penetration	
  Depth	
  by	
  Group	
  and	
  Location	
  ...................................	
  42	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Table	
  6.	
  Percentage	
  NaOCl	
  Penetration	
  by	
  Group	
  &	
  Location	
  .................................................	
  45	
    	
   	
    	
    	
    vii	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  List	
  of	
  Figures	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  1.	
  A.	
  	
  Side-­‐Vented	
  Needle.	
  ...........................................................................................................	
  12	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  1.	
  B.	
  ProRinse®	
  Side-­‐Vented	
  Needle	
  ......................................................................................	
  12	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  2.	
  	
  Irrigant	
  Flow	
  Trajectories	
  According	
  to	
  Velocity	
  Magnitude.	
  ..............................	
  13	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  3.	
  	
  Needle	
  Placement	
  Limited	
  by	
  Canal	
  Taper.	
  ..................................................................	
  14	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  4.	
  	
  Apical	
  Vapor	
  Lock	
  ....................................................................................................................	
  14	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  5.	
  	
  EndoActivator®	
  Sonic	
  Agitation	
  System.	
  .......................................................................	
  16	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  6.	
  	
  EndoActivator®	
  at	
  Rest	
  &	
  In	
  Motion.	
  ...............................................................................	
  16	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  7.	
  	
  Acoustic	
  Streaming	
  Around	
  Ultrasonically	
  Activated	
  File	
  .....................................	
  17	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  8.	
  	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  Ultrasonic	
  System	
  ...................................................................	
  19	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  9.	
  	
  EndoVac®	
  Components	
  ..........................................................................................................	
  22	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  10.	
  Depth	
  of	
  Placement	
  for	
  Needle	
  and	
  Irrigant	
  Agitation	
  Devices	
  ..........................	
  26	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  11.	
  	
  Increased	
  Dentinal	
  Sclerosis	
  With	
  Age	
  ........................................................................	
  28	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  12.	
  	
  Irregular	
  Dye	
  Penetration	
  Around	
  the	
  Canal	
  ............................................................	
  29	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  13.	
  	
  Isomet®	
  5000	
  Linear	
  Precision	
  Saw	
  ..............................................................................	
  34	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  14.	
  	
  Nikon	
  Eclipse	
  Microscope	
  ..................................................................................................	
  35	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  15.	
  NIS	
  Elements™	
  Photographs	
  at	
  Magnification	
  (40x)	
  ..............................................	
  35	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  16.	
  Quadrant	
  Measurement	
  .......................................................................................................	
  36	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  17.	
  Experimental	
  Flowchart	
  ......................................................................................................	
  37	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  18.	
  	
  Number	
  of	
  Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  (out	
  of	
  60)	
  by	
  Location	
  in	
  the	
  Canal	
  ....................	
  41	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  19.	
  Maximum	
  Mean	
  Penetration	
  Depth	
  by	
  Group	
  and	
  Location	
  ...............................	
  43	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  20.	
  Median	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  by	
  Technique	
  ....................................................................	
  44	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  21.	
  NaOCl	
  Affected	
  Quadrants	
  by	
  Group	
  &	
  Location	
  ......................................................	
  45	
    	
    viii	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  List	
  of	
  Abbreviations	
    	
    N……………………………………………………30	
  Gauge	
  ProRinse®	
  Side	
  Vented	
  Irrigation	
  Needle	
   PUS……………………………………………….….ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  Ultrasonic	
  Irrigant	
  System	
   EA……………………………………………………………….........EndoActivator®	
  Sonic	
  Irrigant	
  System	
   ISO………………….…………………………………………………International	
  Standards	
  Organization	
   EV………………………….………………………………….…………EndoVac®	
  Irrigant	
  Agitation	
  System	
   EDTA………………………………………………………………………..Ethylenediaminetetraacetic	
  Acid	
   CUI…………………………………………………………………..………	
  Continuous	
  Ultrasonic	
  Irrigation	
   CFD………………………………………………………………………..……Computational	
  Fluid	
  Dynamics	
   PUI…………………………………………………………………………………	
  Passive	
  Ultrasonic	
  Irrigation	
   MDI………………………………………………………………………..………….Manual	
  Dynamic	
  Irrigation	
   Microscope………………………………………………………..…………….Nikon®	
  Eclipse®	
  Microscope	
   ANP……………………………………………………………………..……………….Apical	
  Negative	
  Pressure	
   NaOCl…………………………………………………………………………...……………Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
   MDT………………………………………………………………………………………….….Master	
  Delivery	
  Tip	
   H2O2………………………………………………………………………………………….…..Hydrogen	
  Peroxide	
   NiTi………………………………………………………………………………………………..….Nickel	
  Titanium	
   CHX………………………………………………………………………………………………………Chlorhexidine	
   Ga……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……Gauge	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    	
    ix	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Acknowledgements	
   I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  everyone	
  who	
  has	
  made	
  my	
  time	
  at	
  UBC	
  a	
  positive	
  experience.	
  	
   Thank	
  you	
  to	
  both	
  Dr.	
  Haapasalo	
  and	
  Dr.	
  Shen	
  for	
  your	
  research	
  ideas,	
  showing	
  me	
  how	
   to	
  work	
  in	
  the	
  research	
  lab	
  cutting	
  teeth,	
  learning	
  to	
  take	
  microscopic	
  pictures	
  and	
  also	
   for	
  providing	
  me	
  with	
  feedback	
  and	
  assistance	
  throughout	
  my	
  project.	
  	
   Thanks	
  also	
  to	
  Zhejun	
  who	
  helped	
  me	
  numerous	
  times	
  in	
  the	
  lab	
  when	
  my	
  equipment	
   stopped	
  working	
  and	
  also	
  for	
  showing	
  me	
  how	
  to	
  improve	
  my	
  microscopic	
  images.	
   I’d	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  to	
  Dr.	
  Coil	
  who	
  was	
  not	
  only	
  on	
  my	
  research	
  committee	
  but	
  sat	
  by	
  my	
   side	
  during	
  my	
  first	
  surgery,	
  guiding	
  me	
  with	
  patience	
  and	
  understanding.	
  I	
  appreciated	
   the	
  time	
  you	
  were	
  in	
  the	
  clinic	
  with	
  us.	
  	
  Your	
  positive	
  attitude	
  and	
  calm	
  demeanor	
  were	
   excellent	
  attributes	
  in	
  a	
  mentor.	
   I	
  wish	
  to	
  thank	
  Dr.	
  Almeida	
  for	
  being	
  on	
  my	
  committee,	
  offering	
  worthwhile	
  suggestions	
   and	
  feedback	
  and	
  for	
  also	
  truly	
  listening	
  to	
  what	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  say.	
  You	
  are	
  certainly	
  more	
   than	
  just	
  an	
  educator.	
  You	
  are	
  a	
  person	
  who	
  does	
  not	
  do	
  what	
  is	
  easy,	
  you	
  do	
  what	
  is	
   right	
  and	
  for	
  that	
  I	
  have	
  tremendous	
  respect	
  for	
  you.	
  	
   I	
  also	
  want	
  to	
  thank	
  Lois,	
  Shauna	
  and	
  Francisco	
  for	
  always	
  going	
  beyond	
  their	
  job	
   description	
  to	
  assist	
  us	
  by	
  either	
  finding	
  that	
  missing	
  piece	
  of	
  dental	
  equipment,	
  to	
  share	
   a	
  laugh	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  day	
  or	
  to	
  offer	
  a	
  shoulder	
  to	
  cry	
  on	
  during	
  difficult	
  days.	
  Thanks	
   for	
  always	
  doing	
  your	
  best	
  and	
  supporting	
  us.	
  We	
  will	
  not	
  forget	
  it.	
   Thanks	
  to	
  my	
  fantastic	
  classmates	
  for	
  the	
  times	
  you	
  helped	
  me	
  and	
  for	
  the	
  times	
  we	
   shared.	
  I	
  was	
  blessed	
  to	
  have	
  Marina	
  in	
  my	
  class,	
  as	
  she	
  is	
  a	
  gracious	
  individual	
  always	
   abundantly	
  helpful	
  and	
  kind.	
  Thanks	
  Mark	
  &	
  Ellen	
  for	
  sharing	
  your	
  study	
  notes.	
  You	
   saved	
  me	
  countless	
  hours	
  of	
  time	
  by	
  providing	
  an	
  organized	
  review,	
  which	
  was	
   immensely	
  helpful.	
  Thanks	
  also	
  to	
  Christine	
  for	
  helping	
  me	
  with	
  my	
  research	
  statistics.	
  	
   I’d	
  also	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  my	
  remaining	
  classmates:	
  	
  There	
  isn’t	
  one	
  of	
  you	
  who	
  didn’t	
  help	
   me	
  in	
  some	
  way	
  by	
  assisting	
  me	
  during	
  a	
  surgery,	
  sending	
  me	
  research	
  articles,	
  lending	
   me	
  your	
  notes	
  or	
  by	
  some	
  small	
  act	
  of	
  kindness.	
  Thank	
  you	
  Les,	
  Agmar,	
  Abdullah,	
   Bassim,	
  Rene,	
  Frédéric,	
  Mohsen,	
  Houman,	
  Wei,	
  Neda	
  and	
  James.	
   Thanks	
  also	
  to	
  all	
  the	
  support	
  staff	
  who	
  made	
  my	
  life	
  easier-­‐Peter,	
  who	
  always	
  helped	
   me	
  with	
  my	
  IT	
  issues	
  and	
  to	
  Theresa	
  and	
  Lisa	
  who	
  kept	
  our	
  lives	
  “on	
  track”.	
  	
  	
    	
    x	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Dedication	
   I	
  have	
  been	
  given	
  this	
  opportunity	
  to	
  fulfill	
  my	
  lifelong	
  desire	
  of	
  becoming	
  an	
   endodontist	
  and	
  for	
  that	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  tremendously	
  blessed.	
  Only	
  through	
  God’s	
  grace	
   has	
  this	
  opportunity	
  been	
  provided	
  to	
  me.	
  I	
  am	
  eternally	
  thankful.	
   I	
  dedicate	
  this	
  body	
  of	
  work	
  to	
  my	
  husband,	
  Kelsey.	
  	
  Although	
  others	
  have	
  guided	
  me	
   along	
  my	
  path	
  to	
  achieve	
  this	
  goal	
  it	
  was	
  you	
  who	
  made	
  it	
  possible	
  by	
  putting	
  your	
   career	
  on	
  hold	
  to	
  follow	
  me	
  to	
  Vancouver	
  and	
  for	
  keeping	
  things	
  together	
  at	
  home	
  while	
   I	
  was	
  consumed	
  by	
  my	
  studies.	
  Thank	
  you	
  for	
  being	
  my	
  best	
  friend	
  and	
  for	
  supporting	
   me	
  in	
  realizing	
  my	
  dream.	
  Although	
  we	
  have	
  had	
  numerous	
  challenges	
  on	
  our	
  BC	
   adventure	
  I	
  am	
  happy	
  that	
  those	
  difficult	
  moments	
  only	
  strengthened	
  our	
  relationship	
   and	
  has	
  made	
  our	
  union	
  even	
  stronger.	
  	
   I	
  also	
  dedicate	
  this	
  to	
  my	
  daughter,	
  Kaitlyn	
  who	
  was	
  only	
  six	
  years	
  old	
  when	
  we	
  moved	
   here	
  but	
  adjusted	
  happily	
  because	
  we	
  have	
  been	
  together	
  as	
  a	
  family.	
  Thank	
  you	
  Kaitlyn	
   for	
  your	
  happy,	
  chirpy	
  little	
  voice	
  each	
  morning	
  awakening	
  us	
  to	
  your	
  positive	
  energy	
   and	
  busy	
  little	
  spirit.	
   Lastly,	
  I	
  dedicate	
  this	
  to	
  my	
  mother,	
  Katie	
  Violet	
  Fiddler.	
  Thanks	
  for	
  making	
  me	
  believe	
   that	
  I	
  could	
  do	
  anything	
  I	
  wanted,	
  if	
  I	
  worked	
  for	
  it.	
  I	
  believed	
  you	
  and	
  have	
  achieved	
  my	
   dream.	
  	
   	
    	
    	
    xi	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  Chapter	
  1:	
  Literature	
  Review	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.1	
  Introduction	
   In	
  1891,	
  W.D.	
  Miller	
  hypothesized	
  a	
  correlation	
  between	
  bacteria	
  and	
  apical	
   periodontitis	
  (Ring,	
  2002)	
  that	
  was	
  later	
  confirmed	
  in	
  1965	
  (Kakehashi	
  et	
  al.,	
  1965).	
   Kakehashi	
  showed	
  that	
  pulp	
  necrosis	
  would	
  develop	
  in	
  rats	
  that	
  had	
  germs	
  within	
  their	
   root	
  canal	
  system	
  but	
  pulp	
  necrosis	
  did	
  not	
  occur	
  in	
  germ	
  free	
  rats.	
  	
  Later	
  studies	
   (Sundqvist	
  G.,	
  1979;	
  Moller	
  et	
  al.,	
  1981)	
  further	
  confirmed	
  the	
  bacterial	
  etiology	
  of	
  apical	
   periodontitis.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  now	
  generally	
  accepted	
  that	
  bacteria	
  are	
  the	
  major	
  etiologic	
  factor	
  in	
   the	
  development	
  of	
  apical	
  periodontitis	
  due	
  to	
  widespread	
  evidence	
  (Molander	
  et	
  al.,	
   1998;	
  Lin	
  et	
  al.	
  2006;	
  Fabricus	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  Further,	
  literature	
  has	
  shown	
  that	
  teeth	
   obturated	
  with	
  negative	
  bacterial	
  cultures	
  have	
  a	
  better	
  healing	
  prognosis	
  than	
  those	
   obturated	
  after	
  a	
  positive	
  bacterial	
  culture	
  (Sjögren	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
   The	
  fundamental	
  aim	
  of	
  endodontic	
  treatment	
  is	
  therefore	
  the	
  prevention	
  or	
   eradication	
  of	
  apical	
  periodontitis	
  followed	
  by	
  obturation	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  system.	
  Obturation	
   with	
  sealer	
  and	
  gutta-­‐percha	
  further	
  reduces	
  remaining	
  microorganisms	
  in	
  two	
  ways:	
  by	
   antimicrobial	
  activity	
  of	
  the	
  sealer	
  (Heling	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998;	
  Siqueira	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000)	
  and	
  by	
   rendering	
  them	
  harmless	
  by	
  entombing	
  them	
  (Sundqvist	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998),	
  where	
  the	
  bacteria	
   are	
  deprived	
  of	
  nutrition	
  and	
  space	
  to	
  multiply.	
  The	
  eradication	
  of	
  apical	
  periodontitis	
  is	
   achieved	
  by	
  removal	
  of	
  pulp	
  tissue,	
  bacteria,	
  and	
  bacterial	
  byproducts.	
  This	
  is	
  achieved	
  in	
   two	
  key	
  steps:	
  mechanical	
  debridement	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  followed	
  by	
  canal	
  irrigation.	
  	
   Mechanical	
  instrumentation	
  is	
  generally	
  achieved	
  through	
  the	
  used	
  of	
  hand	
  and	
  rotary	
   instrumentation	
  (Siqueira	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999)	
  and	
  is	
  critical	
  to	
  bacterial	
  reduction	
  of	
  infected	
   	
    1	
    canals,	
  where	
  instrumentation	
  alone	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  reduce	
  the	
  number	
  of	
   microorganisms	
  by	
  up	
  to	
  1000	
  fold	
  (Byström	
  &	
  Sundqvist,	
  1981).	
  	
  Canals	
  cannot,	
  however,	
   be	
  rendered	
  bacteria	
  free	
  with	
  instrumentation	
  alone	
  (Ørstavik	
  et	
  al.,	
  1991;	
  Shuping	
  et	
  al.,	
   2000;	
  Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  The	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  instrumentation	
  in	
  removing	
  bacteria	
  is	
   hindered	
  by	
  the	
  composition	
  of	
  the	
  microbial	
  flora	
  (Kayaoglu	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004),	
  local	
  factors	
   which	
  may	
  favor	
  bacterial	
  growth	
  (oxygen	
  and	
  nutrient	
  availability),	
  host	
  defenses	
  and	
   whether	
  or	
  not	
  the	
  bacteria	
  are	
  mature	
  and	
  act	
  synergistically	
  (biofilm)	
  (Siqueira	
  et	
  al.,	
   2002).	
  The	
  complexity	
  of	
  the	
  root	
  canal	
  system,	
  with	
  prevalent	
  system	
  types	
  in	
  different	
   teeth	
  and	
  race,	
  further	
  decreases	
  the	
  outcome	
  of	
  mechanical	
  instrumentation	
  (Alavi	
  et	
  al.,	
   2002;	
  Gulabivala	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005).	
  	
  In	
  fact,	
  up	
  to	
  thirty	
  five	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  walls	
  are	
   untouched	
  after	
  mechanical	
  instrumentation	
  (Byström	
  et	
  al.,	
  1981;	
  Peters	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001;	
   Mayer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  	
  An	
  area	
  of	
  particular	
  interest	
  are	
  the	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  as	
  they	
  offer	
   bacteria	
  a	
  microenvironment	
  beyond	
  host	
  defense	
  mechanisms	
  and	
  beyond	
  systemically	
   administered	
  antibiotics	
  where	
  they	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  thrive	
  (Oguntebi,	
  1994;	
  Love	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002;	
   Chivatxaranukul	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Thus,	
  the	
  irrigation	
  phase	
  of	
  canal	
  cleaning	
  is	
  more	
   important	
  than	
  ever.	
  Fortunately,	
  mechanical	
  instrumentation	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  shapes	
  the	
  canal	
   and	
  enlarges	
  it	
  so	
  that	
  irrigants	
  can	
  gain	
  access	
  to	
  the	
  canal	
  to	
  further	
  reduce	
  the	
  bacterial	
   load.	
  The	
  importance	
  of	
  mechanochemical	
  canal	
  preparation	
  was	
  recognized	
  even	
  before	
   Kakehashi	
  documented	
  the	
  association	
  between	
  bacteria	
  and	
  apical	
  periodontitis	
  (Stewart,	
   1955).	
   Endodontic	
  irrigation	
  functions	
  to	
  remove	
  dentinal	
  debris	
  generated	
  by	
  mechanical	
   instrumentation,	
  to	
  dissolve	
  inorganic	
  and	
  organic	
  components	
  from	
  the	
  canal	
  and	
  to	
  aid	
  in	
   lubrication	
  during	
  instrumentation	
  (Haapasalo,	
  2005).	
  Of	
  all	
  irrigant	
  functions	
  its	
  most	
   	
    2	
    crucial	
  purpose	
  is	
  the	
  supplementary	
  elimination	
  of	
  bacteria	
  and	
  bacterial	
  remnants	
  (such	
   as	
  the	
  endotoxin	
  of	
  gram	
  negative	
  bacteria)	
  from	
  the	
  canal.	
  Together	
  mechanical	
   instrumentation	
  and	
  irrigation	
  are	
  the	
  basis	
  of	
  mechanochemical	
  preparation,	
  which	
  work	
   to	
  eliminate	
  apical	
  periodontitis.	
   Irrigation	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  is	
  achieved	
  by	
  instrumenting	
  the	
  canal	
  to	
  an	
  apical	
  size	
  that	
  allows	
   for	
  adequate	
  irrigant	
  access	
  (Ram,	
  1977;	
  Falk	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005),	
  by	
  using	
  the	
  correct	
  diameter	
  of	
   needle	
  for	
  the	
  canal	
  taper	
  (Chow,	
  1983)	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  needle	
  reaches	
  the	
  depth	
  (Hsieh	
  et	
  al.,	
   2007)	
  where	
  a	
  large	
  volume	
  of	
  irrigant	
  that	
  is	
  frequently	
  replenished	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  (Siqueira	
   et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  Irrigation	
  strategies	
  designed	
  to	
  eliminate	
  canal	
  bacteria	
  should	
  also	
  eliminate	
   microorganisms	
  within	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  as	
  research	
  has	
  shown	
  that	
  canal	
  bacteria	
  are	
  able	
   to	
  penetrate	
  tubules	
  to	
  a	
  depth	
  of	
  1000	
  μm	
  (Haapasalo	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  	
  One	
  such	
  bacterium	
  is	
   Enterococcus	
  faecalis,	
  a	
  gram-­‐positive	
  facultative	
  anaerobe,	
  which	
  can	
  produce	
  a	
  dense	
   infection	
  of	
  the	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  and	
  is	
  associated	
  with	
  persistent	
  apical	
  inflammation	
   (Sundqvist	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998;	
  Molander	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.2	
  Endodontic	
  Treatment	
   	
  	
  1.2.1.	
  Mechanical	
  Instrumentation	
  	
   Technological	
  advancements	
  aimed	
  at	
  improving	
  the	
  cleaning	
  and	
  shaping	
  of	
  the	
   canal	
  have	
  led	
  to	
  a	
  movement	
  away	
  from	
  the	
  ISO	
  standard	
  2	
  percent	
  taper	
  (0.02mm	
  per	
   mm)	
  stainless	
  steel	
  hand	
  instrument.	
  New	
  instruments	
  (hand	
  and	
  rotary	
  instruments)	
   made	
  with	
  innovative	
  metallurgical	
  properties	
  and	
  novel	
  designs	
  have	
  led	
  to	
  faster	
  canal	
   preparation-­‐utilizing	
  instruments	
  possessing	
  greater	
  flexibility	
  (Glossen	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
   Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  In	
  vitro	
  studies	
  show	
  that	
  NiTi	
  instruments	
  lead	
  to	
  more	
  centered	
   	
    3	
    preparations	
  with	
  less	
  canal	
  straightening,	
  reducing	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  iatrogenic	
  complications	
   due	
  to	
  the	
  inflexibility	
  of	
  stainless	
  steel	
  files	
  (Gambill	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996;	
  Baumann,	
  2004).	
   Canal	
  instrumentation	
  results	
  in	
  mechanical	
  debridement	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  and	
  the	
   removal	
  of	
  both	
  vital	
  and	
  necrotic	
  tissue.	
  Instrumentation	
  also	
  provides	
  a	
  continuously	
   tapering	
  funnel	
  from	
  the	
  coronal	
  aspect	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  to	
  the	
  apical	
  constriction,	
  which	
   creates	
  space	
  for	
  irrigants	
  to	
  work	
  within	
  the	
  canal	
  (Khademi	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Zehnder	
  et	
  al.,	
   2011).	
  	
  Ideally	
  these	
  irrigants	
  will	
  reach	
  the	
  lateral	
  canals,	
  intercanal	
  connections,	
  fins	
   and	
  deltas	
  that	
  are	
  just	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  configurations	
  that	
  exist	
  (Hess	
  et	
  al.,	
  1925;	
   Cambruzzi	
  et	
  al.,	
  1983).	
  Canal	
  variations	
  have	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  have	
  more	
  influence	
  on	
   changes	
  that	
  occur	
  during	
  preparation	
  than	
  the	
  instrumentation	
  techniques	
  themselves	
   (Peters	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001;	
  Vertucci,	
  2005).	
  This	
  means	
  that	
  despite	
  our	
  best	
  efforts	
  to	
  clean	
  all	
   parts	
  of	
  the	
  canal,	
  our	
  instruments	
  are	
  unable	
  to	
  negotiate	
  the	
  canal	
  complexities	
  that	
   harbor	
  bacteria	
  (Al-­‐Ali	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
   Numerous	
  studies	
  show	
  overwhelming	
  evidence	
  that	
  none	
  of	
  our	
  current	
  mechanical	
   instrumentation	
  methods	
  completely	
  eradicate	
  bacteria	
  (Shuping	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Siqueira	
   et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  A	
  study	
  by	
  Byström	
  and	
  Sundqvist	
  (1981)	
  showed	
  that	
  even	
  after	
  four	
   treatments	
  of	
  mechanical	
  instrumentation	
  and	
  irrigation	
  with	
  saline,	
  bacteria	
  remained	
   in	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  cases.	
  In	
  fact,	
  studies	
  have	
  shown	
  that	
  despite	
  the	
  newer	
  and	
  faster	
   instruments	
  on	
  the	
  market	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  designed	
  with	
  improved	
  metallurgic	
   properties	
  and	
  claims	
  of	
  better	
  canal	
  cleaning	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  significant	
  difference	
  that	
  has	
   been	
  shown	
  in	
  the	
  reduction	
  of	
  canal	
  bacteria	
  (Hülsmann	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  Siqueira	
  et	
  al.,	
   1999;	
  Yin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
    	
    4	
    For	
  this	
  reason,	
  irrigation	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  performed	
  with	
  thoughtful	
   diligence	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  correct	
  type	
  of	
  irrigants	
  are	
  utilized	
  (Berber	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
   Mohammadi	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Zhang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010),	
  in	
  the	
  correct	
  way	
  so	
  as	
  to	
  optimize	
  their	
   contact	
  with	
  microorganisms	
  that	
  remain	
  in	
  the	
  canal	
  after	
  instrumentation	
  and	
  so	
  that	
   they	
  may	
  reach	
  areas	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  untouched	
  by	
  instrumentation	
  (Abou-­‐Rass	
  et	
  al.,	
  1981;	
   Palazzi	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
   	
   	
  	
  1.2.2.	
  Endodontic	
  Irrigation	
   Endodontic	
  irrigation	
  flushes	
  dentinal	
  debris,	
  formed	
  during	
  instrumentation,	
  out	
  of	
   the	
  canal.	
  Various	
  irrigants	
  work	
  differently,	
  some	
  removing	
  organic	
  remnants	
  and	
   others	
  removing	
  inorganic	
  remnants	
  from	
  the	
  canal.	
  	
  Irrigation	
  also	
  reduces	
  canal	
   bacteria	
  and	
  the	
  efficacy	
  of	
  bacterial	
  reduction	
  depends	
  upon	
  the	
  type	
  of	
  irrigant	
  used	
   (Camps	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Wang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
   During	
  instrumentation	
  a	
  deposit	
  of	
  dentin	
  filings	
  and	
  pulp	
  tissue	
  remnants	
  is	
   produced	
  along	
  canal	
  walls	
  called	
  smear	
  layer	
  (Torabinejad	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  This	
  smear	
   layer	
  can	
  prevent	
  irrigants	
  from	
  reaching	
  the	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  but	
  is	
  easily	
  penetrated	
   by	
  bacteria	
  and	
  may	
  offer	
  protection	
  to	
  biofilms	
  along	
  the	
  canal	
  walls	
  (Akpata	
  et	
  al.,	
   1982;	
  Love	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  Further,	
  the	
  remaining	
  smear	
  layer	
  may	
  predispose	
  root	
  fillings	
   to	
  leakage	
  (Kouvas	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
  Therefore,	
  the	
  ideal	
  irrigant	
  would	
  be	
  capable	
  of	
   penetrating	
  and	
  removing	
  smear	
  layer,	
  have	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
  effectively	
  kill	
  microbes	
   within	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  yet	
  would	
  be	
  systemically	
  nontoxic	
  and	
  not	
  damaging	
  to	
   periodontal	
  tissues.	
  Some	
  of	
  the	
  ideal	
  properties	
  of	
  an	
  irrigant	
  would	
  include	
  the	
   following:	
  	
   •  Facilitate	
  debris	
  removal	
  from	
  canal	
   	
    5	
    •  Act	
  as	
  a	
  lubricant	
  to	
  reduce	
  instrument	
  friction	
  during	
  preparation	
    •  Facilitate	
  dentin	
  removal	
  (lubricant)	
    •  Dissolve	
  inorganic	
  tissue	
  (dentin)	
    •  Penetrate	
  to	
  the	
  canal	
  periphery	
  &	
  into	
  tubules	
    •  Dissolve	
  organic	
  matter	
  (dentin	
  collagen,	
  pulp	
  tissue,	
  biofilm)	
    •  Kill	
  bacteria	
  and	
  yeast	
  (also	
  in	
  biofilm)	
    •  Not	
  irritate	
  or	
  damage	
  vital	
  periapical	
  tissue	
  (not	
  caustic	
  or	
  cytotoxic)	
    •  Not	
  weaken	
  tooth	
  structure	
   	
    	
    	
    (Haapasalo	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
    	
   None	
  of	
  the	
  irrigants	
  available	
  on	
  the	
  market	
  possess	
  all	
  of	
  these	
  properties	
  so	
   different	
  irrigants	
  are	
  used	
  to	
  achieve	
  these	
  aims.	
  Commonly	
  more	
  than	
  one	
  irrigant	
  is	
   used,	
  usually	
  one	
  after	
  the	
  other	
  with	
  the	
  aim	
  of	
  reducing	
  organic	
  and	
  inorganic	
  matter	
   and	
  dentinal	
  debris	
  (Abbott	
  et	
  al.,	
  1991;	
  Yoshida	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  The	
  most	
  widely	
  used	
   irrigant	
  is	
  NaOCl	
  as	
  it	
  satisfies	
  more	
  of	
  the	
  ideal	
  irrigant	
  properties	
  than	
  any	
  other	
   irrigant.	
  NaOCl	
  can	
  dissolve	
  organic	
  and	
  necrotic	
  tissue	
  (Naenni	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004),	
  is	
  a	
  broad-­‐ spectrum	
  antiseptic	
  (Zehnder,	
  2006)	
  and	
  can	
  inactivate	
  endotoxin	
  (da	
  Silva	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
   NaOCl	
  does	
  not	
  remove	
  smear	
  layer,	
  however,	
  and	
  for	
  that	
  reason	
  other	
  irrigants	
  are	
   utilized.	
  EDTA	
  is	
  one	
  other	
  irrigant	
  commonly	
  employed	
  to	
  remove	
  smear	
  layer	
  so	
  that	
   dentinal	
  tubules	
  can	
  be	
  exposed	
  (Hülsmann	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003;	
  Zehnder	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005;	
  Mello	
  et	
  al.,	
   2010).	
  	
  There	
  are	
  numerous	
  irrigants	
  on	
  the	
  market	
  and	
  some	
  of	
  these	
  include	
  CHX,	
   MTAD,	
  H2O2	
  and	
  Qmix.	
  Further	
  details	
  about	
  NaOCl	
  will	
  be	
  discussed,	
  as	
  it	
  was	
  the	
   irrigant	
  used	
  in	
  this	
  research	
  study.	
   	
    6	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Because	
  canal	
  bacteria	
  still	
  persist	
  after	
  mechanochemical	
  treatment	
  of	
  the	
  canal,	
   (Siqueira	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Chavez	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003;	
  Sakamoto	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007)	
  adjunctive	
  treatments	
   have	
  been	
  sought	
  as	
  limitations	
  of	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  have	
  been	
  identified	
  (Gu	
  et	
   al.,	
  2009).	
  Some	
  of	
  the	
  drawbacks	
  of	
  manual	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  include	
  weak	
  mechanical	
   flushing	
  action,	
  inaccessibility	
  to	
  canal	
  irregularities,	
  delivery	
  of	
  irrigant	
  limited	
  to	
  1mm	
   beyond	
  needle	
  tip	
  (Ram,	
  1977),	
  placement	
  limited	
  to	
  canal	
  taper	
  (Chow,	
  1983),	
  risk	
  of	
   apical	
  extrusion	
  (Hülsmann	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000)	
  and	
  the	
  inability	
  to	
  overcome	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
   gas	
  bubbles	
  ahead	
  of	
  the	
  advancing	
  irrigant	
  front	
  known	
  as	
  the	
  ‘vapor	
  lock	
  effect’	
  (Gu	
  et	
   al.,	
  2009;	
  Tay	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  better	
  irrigation	
  methods	
  have	
  been	
  sought.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  In	
  the	
  early	
  1990’s,	
  Keir	
  reported	
  improved	
  canal	
  debridement	
  (Keir	
  et	
  al.,	
  1990)	
   when	
  he	
  utilized	
  canal	
  brushes	
  in	
  an	
  active	
  brushing	
  and	
  rotary	
  motion.	
  In	
  that	
  study	
  the	
   brush	
  bristles	
  were	
  claimed	
  to	
  extend	
  into	
  canal	
  fins	
  and	
  deltas	
  not	
  normally	
  reached	
  by	
   instrumentation	
  alone.	
  Although	
  the	
  EndoBrush®	
  was	
  not	
  able	
  to	
  reach	
  full	
  working	
   length	
  due	
  to	
  its	
  size,	
  it	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  many	
  studies	
  that	
  encouraged	
  research	
  for	
  the	
   development	
  of	
  new	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  systems.	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Root	
  canal	
  irrigation	
  is	
  either	
  performed	
  as	
  a	
  manual	
  technique	
  or	
  with	
  a	
  machine-­‐ assisted	
  agitation	
  device.	
  Manual	
  irrigation	
  techniques	
  include	
  positive	
  pressure	
   irrigation	
  (commonly	
  done	
  with	
  a	
  syringe	
  and	
  side-­‐vented	
  needle),	
  manual	
  pumping	
  of	
  a	
   gutta	
  percha	
  point	
  in	
  an	
  irrigant	
  filled	
  canal	
  also	
  known	
  as	
  manual	
  dynamic	
  irrigation	
   (MDI)(Huang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008,	
  McGill	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008)	
  and	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  brush-­‐covered	
  needles	
   (Ribeiro	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
  Machine	
  assisted	
  agitation	
  devices	
  are	
  numerous.	
  Some	
  of	
  these	
   mechanical	
  systems	
  include	
  continuous	
  irrigation	
  during	
  instrumentation,	
  sonic	
  (Sabins	
   et	
  al.,	
  2003)	
  and	
  ultrasonic	
  (Mayer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002)	
  systems,	
  apical	
  negative	
  pressure	
   	
    7	
    devices	
  (de	
  Gregorio	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Cohenca	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010),	
  laser	
  methods	
  of	
  irrigation	
  (de	
   Groot	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Peters	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  and	
  electrochemically-­‐activated	
  solutions	
   (Solovyeva	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Marais	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
   Sonic	
  and	
  ultrasonic	
  agitation	
  methods,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  apical	
  negative	
  pressure	
  irrigation	
   will	
  be	
  discussed	
  in	
  detail	
  and	
  compared	
  with	
  standard,	
  side-­‐vented	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  as	
   these	
  irrigation	
  methods	
  pertain	
  to	
  the	
  research	
  at	
  hand.	
   	
   	
  	
  1.2.3.	
  Effect	
  of	
  Agitation	
  on	
  Irrigation	
   Various	
  techniques	
  have	
  been	
  proposed	
  for	
  canal	
  irrigation,	
  some	
  of	
  them	
  simply	
   extruding	
  irrigant	
  into	
  the	
  canal	
  and	
  others	
  used	
  in	
  different	
  ways	
  to	
  agitate	
  the	
  irrigants	
   with	
  the	
  goal	
  of	
  improving	
  canal	
  disinfection	
  (Jiang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Jiang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
   Research	
  has	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  the	
  constant	
  renewal	
  of	
  irrigant	
  with	
  agitation	
  cycles	
   avoids	
  saturation,	
  precipitation	
  of	
  particles,	
  and	
  favors	
  enhanced	
  debris	
  removal	
  from	
  the	
   canal	
  (Nadalin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Caron	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Ribeiro	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
   The	
  chemical	
  removal	
  of	
  organic	
  tissue	
  by	
  NaOCl	
  occurs	
  by	
  the	
  release	
  of	
  hypochlorous	
   acid,	
  which	
  reacts	
  to	
  insoluble	
  proteins	
  by	
  formation	
  of	
  soluble	
  polypeptides,	
  amino	
  acids	
   and	
  other	
  by-­‐products	
  (Baumgartner	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  Only	
  by	
  the	
  regular	
  exchange	
  of	
  the	
   irrigant	
  may	
  this	
  chemical	
  reaction	
  be	
  enhanced.	
  Large	
  volumes	
  of	
  irrigant	
  coupled	
  with	
   its	
  frequent	
  exchange	
  not	
  only	
  removes	
  superficial	
  debris	
  but	
  replenishes	
  the	
  chemical	
   activity	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  which	
  becomes	
  depleted	
  upon	
  reacting	
  with	
  organic	
  tissue	
   (Baumgartner	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
   Sustained	
  irrigant	
  replenishment	
  and	
  mechanical	
  agitation	
  is	
  directly	
  related	
  to	
  the	
   dissolution	
  capacity	
  of	
  dental	
  tissues	
  by	
  NaOCl,	
  as	
  has	
  been	
  demonstrated	
  by	
  research	
   	
    8	
    (Spanó	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001;	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Baratto-­‐Filho	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  With	
  the	
  obvious	
   benefits	
  of	
  irrigant	
  agitation,	
  better	
  debris	
  removal	
  and	
  irrigant	
  exchange,	
  several	
  new	
   types	
  of	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  systems	
  have	
  been	
  developed.	
  Ones	
  pertinent	
  to	
  the	
  research	
  at	
   hand	
  will	
  be	
  discussed.	
   	
  	
  1.2.4.	
  Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
    	
    The	
  most	
  widely	
  used	
  irrigant	
  in	
  endodontics	
  (Siqueira	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998;	
  Mohammadi	
  et	
   al.,	
  2008),	
  NaOCl	
  degrades	
  tissues	
  by	
  the	
  following	
  chemical	
  reactions:	
  chloramination,	
   amino	
  acid	
  neutralization	
  and	
  saponification	
  (Estrela	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002;	
  Gomes-­‐Filho	
  et	
  al.,	
   2008).	
  To	
  state	
  it	
  simply,	
  NaOCl	
  is	
  capable	
  of	
  degrading	
  organic	
  tissue,	
  neutralizing	
   amino	
  acids	
  and	
  breaking	
  down	
  fatty	
  acids	
  (which	
  helps	
  to	
  reduce	
  surface	
  tension).	
   The	
  use	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  as	
  a	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigant	
  is	
  primarily	
  responsible	
  for	
  the	
  elimination	
  of	
   most	
  microorganisms	
  in	
  an	
  infected	
  canal	
  system	
  (Ringel	
  et	
  al.,	
  1982;	
  Kuruvilla	
  et	
  al.,	
   1998).	
  In	
  fact,	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  said	
  that	
  only	
  NaOCl	
  is	
  capable	
  of	
  rendering	
  bacteria	
  nonviable	
   and	
  eradicating	
  biofilm	
  (Clegg	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  It	
  is	
  somewhat	
  ironic	
  that	
  the	
  most	
   antibacterial	
  irrigant	
  in	
  endodontics	
  is	
  also	
  the	
  most	
  inexpensive	
  irrigant	
  (with	
  a	
   reasonably	
  long	
  shelf	
  life)	
  (Clarkson	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998;	
  Clarkson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  Studies	
  have	
   verified	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  significant	
  reduction	
  in	
  canal	
  bacteria	
  after	
  instrumentation	
  with	
   NaOCl	
  compared	
  with	
  saline	
  (Ørstavik	
  et	
  al.,	
  1991;	
  Shuping	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Arias-­‐Moliz	
  et	
  al.,	
   2009).	
    	
    9	
    	
    1.2.4.1	
  Properties	
   	
  The	
  properties	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  can	
  be	
  affected	
  by	
  changes	
  to	
  its	
  pH	
  (normally	
  a	
  pH	
  of	
  12),	
   concentration,	
  exposure	
  time,	
  and	
  temperature	
  (Christensen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Stojicic	
  et	
  al.,	
   2010).	
  These	
  factors,	
  which	
  affect	
  NaOCl	
  properties,	
  can	
  be	
  summarized	
  as	
  follows:	
   • Lowering	
  the	
  pH	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  below	
  7.5	
  results	
  in	
  reduced	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  (Christensen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Rossi-­‐Fedele	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
   • Decreasing	
  the	
  concentration	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  results	
  in	
  less	
  tissue	
  dissolution-­‐the	
  best	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  antibacterial	
  power	
  is	
  found	
  at	
  a	
  concentration	
  of	
  5.25%	
  (Hand	
  et	
  al.,	
  1978)	
  or	
  full	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  strength	
  (which	
  is	
  now	
  6%).	
   • 	
  Increased	
  contact	
  time	
  results	
  in	
  better	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  (Moorer	
  et	
  al.,	
  1982).	
   • 	
  Higher	
  temperatures	
  also	
  lead	
  to	
  improved	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  (Berutti	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996;	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Zou	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
   • Higher	
  volumes	
  and	
  continuous	
  replenishment	
  are	
  required	
  as	
  NaOCl	
  becomes	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  deactivated	
  via	
  the	
  dissolution	
  process	
  (Baker	
  et	
  al.,	
  1975;	
  Moorer	
  et	
  al.,	
  1982;	
  Lima	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
   • Agitation	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  leads	
  to	
  increased	
  debridement	
  and	
  antimicrobial	
  capabilities	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  (Cameron	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  Sjögren	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
   Research	
  has	
  shown	
  that	
  the	
  concentration	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  significant	
  factor	
  in	
  terms	
   of	
  its	
  antibacterial	
  effect	
  (Byström	
  et	
  al.,	
  1985).	
  More	
  important	
  are	
  the	
  volume,	
  contact	
   time,	
  and	
  its	
  ability	
  to	
  reach	
  pulp	
  tissue	
  and	
  bacteria	
  within	
  the	
  complex	
  recesses	
  of	
  the	
   canal	
  anatomy	
  (Haapasalo	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Continuous	
  replenishment	
  and	
  agitation	
  further	
   increase	
  the	
  efficacy	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  yet	
  are	
  not	
  a	
  guarantee	
  of	
  complete	
  microbial	
  elimination	
  of	
   the	
  canal	
  (Lima	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
   	
    10	
    1.2.4.2.	
  Limitations	
  	
   NaOCl	
  has	
  a	
  high	
  surface	
  tension	
  (75	
  dynes/cm),	
  which	
  may	
  affect	
  its	
  ability	
  to	
   penetrate	
  dentin	
  (Giardino	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006),	
  does	
  not	
  remove	
  the	
  inorganic	
  components	
  of	
   smear	
  layer	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  ineffective	
  versus	
  resistant	
  biofilm	
  bacteria.	
  Research	
  has	
  shown	
   poorer	
  in-­‐vivo	
  antimicrobial	
  performance	
  compared	
  with	
  in-­‐vitro	
  testing;	
  diminished	
   clinical	
  performance	
  is	
  likely	
  due	
  to	
  canal	
  complexity	
  and	
  inactivating	
  substances	
  such	
   as	
  periapical	
  exudate,	
  pulp	
  tissue,	
  dentin	
  and	
  bacterial	
  biomass	
  (Haapasalo	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
   Unlike	
  other	
  irrigants,	
  NaOCl	
  is	
  not	
  substantive	
  (White	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997)	
  so	
  it	
  must	
  be	
  in	
   contact	
  with	
  tissues	
  or	
  bacteria	
  to	
  be	
  effective.	
   Some	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  concerning	
  aspects	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  are	
  its	
  toxicity	
  and	
  the	
  potential	
   complications	
  that	
  can	
  occur	
  with	
  its	
  extrusion	
  into	
  periradicular	
  tissues	
  (Hülsmann	
  et	
   al.,	
  2000).	
  NaOCl	
  also	
  has	
  a	
  detrimental	
  effect	
  on	
  dentin	
  elasticity	
  and	
  flexural	
  strength	
   (Sim	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001;	
  Marending	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007),	
  which	
  may	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  development	
  of	
   vertical	
  root	
  fracture	
  (Qian	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
   When	
  NaOCl	
  is	
  mixed	
  with	
  CHX	
  a	
  brownish	
  precipitate	
  forms.	
  Recent	
  research	
  has	
   shown	
  that	
  this	
  precipitate,	
  one	
  thought	
  to	
  be	
  cytotoxic	
  and	
  possibly	
  carcinogenic	
   (Basrani	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Basrani	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
  is	
  not	
  parachloroanaline	
  (Thomas	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010);	
   yet	
  one	
  should	
  avoid	
  mixing	
  these	
  reagents	
  together	
  as	
  the	
  resulting	
  precipitate	
  is	
   difficult	
  to	
  remove	
  and	
  may	
  hinder	
  canal	
  cleaning.	
   	
    	
    	
    11	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.3	
  Methods	
  of	
  Irrigant	
  Delivery	
   	
  	
  1.3.1.	
  Needle	
  Irrigation	
   	
    1.3.1.1.	
  Properties	
  	
   Conventional	
  irrigation	
  with	
  syringes	
  is	
  still	
  widely	
  accepted	
  by	
  both	
  general	
   practitioners	
  and	
  endodontists.	
  This	
  type	
  of	
  irrigation	
  is	
  accomplished	
  through	
  the	
  use	
  of	
   various	
  sized	
  needles	
  or	
  cannulas	
  that	
  are	
  use	
  to	
  dispense	
  irrigant	
  into	
  the	
  canal.	
  Needles	
   can	
  be	
  open-­‐ended	
  or	
  closed-­‐ended	
  with	
  side-­‐vented	
  channels	
  (Kahn	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  	
  Due	
  to	
   concerns	
  about	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  irrigant	
  extrusion	
  and	
  doubts	
  regarding	
  fluid	
  dynamic	
  efficacy,	
   side-­‐vented	
  needles	
  were	
  developed	
  with	
  a	
  closed-­‐end	
  (Fig.	
  1.A.).	
  It	
  was	
  hoped	
  that	
  side-­‐ vented	
  needles	
  would	
  improve	
  fluid	
  hydrodynamics	
  and	
  be	
  safer	
  (Hauser	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  As	
   with	
  all	
  needles,	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  that	
  they	
  not	
  bind	
  within	
  the	
  canal	
  but	
  instead	
  that	
  the	
   needle	
  remain	
  loose	
  during	
  irrigation	
  to	
  allow	
  debris	
  to	
  be	
  flushed	
  coronally	
  and	
  to	
   prevent	
  irrigant	
  extrusion	
  (Brown	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Desai	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
   	
    	
    	
    	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  1.	
  A.	
  	
  Side-­‐Vented	
  Needle.	
   Boutsioukis	
  et	
  al.	
  (2007)	
  IEJ	
  Vol.	
  4(9).	
   	
    	
   	
    	
   	
   	
    	
   	
   	
  Figure	
  1.	
  B.	
  ProRinse®	
  Side-­‐Vented	
  Needle	
   (with	
  attached	
  tubing)	
    	
    12	
    Needles	
  continue	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  most	
  utilized	
  method	
  of	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  due	
  to	
  low	
  cost	
   and	
  easy	
  handling.	
  One	
  can	
  easily	
  determine	
  the	
  volume	
  of	
  irrigant	
  delivered	
  and	
  the	
   depth	
  of	
  needle	
  placement	
  (van	
  der	
  Sluis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  ProRinse®	
  side	
  vented	
  needles	
   were	
  used	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  (Fig.	
  1.B.)	
   1.3.1.2.	
  Limitations	
  	
   Despite	
  the	
  advantages	
  of	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  via	
  needles,	
  needles	
  are	
  generally	
  known	
  to	
   have	
  a	
  weak	
  mechanical	
  flushing	
  action.	
  The	
  likelihood	
  of	
  needle	
  delivered	
  irrigants	
   reaching	
  isthmi,	
  fins	
  or	
  deltas	
  is	
  slim	
  making	
  thorough	
  debridement	
  improbable	
  (Nair	
  et	
   al.,	
  2005;	
  Susin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Studies	
  have	
  shown	
  that	
  irrigant	
  is	
  only	
  delivered	
  1mm	
   deeper	
  than	
  the	
  tip	
  of	
  the	
  needle	
  (Boutsioukis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009)(Fig.	
  2),	
  that	
  the	
  depth	
  of	
   needle	
  placement	
  is	
  limited	
  by	
  the	
  taper	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  (Ram,	
  1977;	
  Chow,	
  1983)(Fig.	
  3)	
  and	
   that	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  is	
  unable	
  to	
  overcome	
  the	
  vapor-­‐lock	
  phenomena	
  at	
  the	
  apical	
  part	
   of	
  the	
  canal	
  (de	
  Gregorio	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)(Fig.	
  4	
  E).	
  	
  	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  2.	
  	
  Irrigant	
  Flow	
  Trajectories	
  According	
  to	
  Velocity	
  Magnitude.	
   Boutsioukis	
  et	
  al.	
  (2009)	
  IEJ	
  Vol.	
  42.	
   	
   	
    13	
    	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  3.	
  	
  Needle	
  Placement	
  Limited	
  by	
  Canal	
  Taper.	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Chow	
  (1983)	
  JOE	
  Vol.9	
  (11).	
    	
    	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  4.	
  	
  Apical	
  Vapor	
  Lock	
   Prevents	
  Irrigant	
  Flow	
  Apically	
  in	
  Positive-­‐Pressure	
  Needle	
  Irrigation	
  (E).	
   De	
  Gregorio	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010)	
  JOE	
  Vol.	
  36	
  (7).	
    	
    	
    14	
    Factors	
  shown	
  to	
  improve	
  syringe	
  irrigant	
  efficacy	
  include:	
  use	
  of	
  smaller	
  gauge	
   needles,	
  large	
  irrigant	
  volume	
  and	
  closer	
  approximation	
  to	
  the	
  apex	
  with	
  placement	
   (Sedgley	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005;	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
   The	
  degree	
  of	
  canal	
  curvature	
  is	
  another	
  constraint	
  of	
  needle	
  irrigation.	
  	
  Canals	
  with	
  a	
   high	
  degree	
  of	
  curvature	
  tend	
  to	
  be	
  instrumented	
  to	
  a	
  smaller	
  size,	
  limiting	
  the	
  apical	
   placement	
  of	
  the	
  syringe	
  and	
  the	
  volume	
  of	
  irrigant	
  reaching	
  the	
  apical	
  third	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
   (Sedgley	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005).	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  efforts	
  to	
  find	
  better	
  methods	
  of	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  have	
   been	
  explored	
  and	
  there	
  are	
  now	
  numerous	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  systems	
  on	
  the	
  market	
   (Townsend	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009)	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  1.3.2.	
  EndoActivator®	
   	
    1.3.2.1.	
  Properties	
   The	
  EA	
  is	
  a	
  cordless,	
  battery-­‐powered	
  handpiece	
  with	
  a	
  sonic	
  motor.	
  The	
  sonic	
  motor	
   provides	
  options	
  of	
  2,000,	
  6,000	
  and	
  10,000	
  cycles	
  per	
  minute	
  (cpm)	
  and	
  there	
  are	
   activator	
  tips	
  in	
  three	
  sizes	
  (15/.02,	
  25/.04,	
  and	
  35/.04)	
  (Figs.	
  5	
  &	
  6).	
  The	
  manufacturer	
   recommends	
  that	
  the	
  EA	
  be	
  used	
  after	
  the	
  canal	
  has	
  been	
  instrumented	
  and	
  irrigated	
  by	
   manual	
  syringe	
  irrigation.	
  	
  Tronstadt	
  et	
  al.	
  (1985)	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  to	
  report	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  a	
   sonic	
  instrument	
  for	
  endodontics.	
  The	
  tips	
  of	
  the	
  EA	
  are	
  activated	
  via	
  sonic	
  energy	
  (6	
   kHz)	
  in	
  an	
  irrigant	
  filled	
  canal	
  for	
  30-­‐60	
  seconds/canal	
  (Jensen	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999;	
  Sabins	
  et	
  al.,	
   2003).	
   	
   	
    	
    15	
    	
   Figure	
  5.	
  	
  EndoActivator®	
  Sonic	
  Agitation	
  System.	
   Haapasalo	
  et	
  al.	
  (2012)	
  Endo	
  Topics	
  Vol.	
  22	
  (1).	
   	
   	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  6.	
  	
  EndoActivator®	
  at	
  Rest	
  &	
  In	
  Motion.	
   Haapasalo	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010)	
   Dent	
  Clin	
  N	
  Am	
  Vol.	
  54	
  (2).	
   	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  cleaning	
  efficacy	
  of	
  the	
  EA	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  promising	
  by	
  research	
  where	
  it	
  was	
   shown	
  to	
  be	
  equally	
  effective	
  as	
  the	
  ultrasonically	
  activated	
  irrigant	
  system	
  (Jensen	
  et	
   al.,	
  1999).	
  	
  Other	
  research	
  has,	
  however,	
  shown	
  it	
  to	
  be	
  only	
  marginally	
  better	
  than	
   needle	
  irrigation	
  in	
  canal	
  debridement	
  (Johnson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  Regardless	
  of	
  its	
   comparison	
  to	
  other	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  systems,	
  sonically	
  powered	
  agitation	
  devices	
  are	
   mainly	
  regarded	
  as	
  an	
  improvement	
  over	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  (Nair	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
   	
    1.3.2.2.	
  Limitations	
   Sonic	
  instruments	
  operate	
  at	
  a	
  lower	
  frequency	
  (1-­‐8	
  kHz)	
  than	
  ultrasonic	
   instruments	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  reduced	
  number	
  of	
  nodes	
  travelling	
  down	
  the	
  instrument	
   Therefore;	
  they	
  produce	
  smaller	
  shear	
  stresses	
  (Ahmad	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987)	
  than	
  ultrasonics.	
   Additionally,	
  the	
  micro-­‐acoustic	
  streaming	
  and	
  cavitation	
  seen	
  with	
  ultrasonic	
  irrigant	
   systems,	
  is	
  limited	
  in	
  sonic	
  instruments	
  (Huffaker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Studies	
  of	
  canals	
  with	
  a	
   	
    16	
    higher	
  degree	
  of	
  curvature	
  restrict	
  the	
  movement	
  and	
  vibratory	
  motion	
  of	
  the	
  tips	
   leading	
  to	
  less	
  efficient	
  cleaning	
  (Walmsley	
  et	
  al.,	
  1989).	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  1.3.3.	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  	
  	
   1.3.3.1.	
  Ultrasonic	
  Properties	
   Ultrasonics	
  can	
  be	
  described	
  as	
  acoustic	
  energy	
  with	
  a	
  frequency	
  that	
  is	
  greater	
  than	
   the	
  upper	
  limit	
  of	
  human	
  hearing	
  (>	
  20	
  kHz).	
  This	
  high	
  frequency	
  energy	
  is	
  used	
  in	
   endodontic	
  treatment,	
  after	
  mechanical	
  instrumentation,	
  to	
  transmit	
  the	
  energy	
  from	
  a	
   file	
  to	
  an	
  irrigant	
  in	
  the	
  canal.	
  The	
  file	
  oscillates	
  within	
  the	
  irrigant	
  creating	
  cavitation	
  	
   and	
  microacoustic	
  streaming	
  of	
  the	
  irrigant,	
  which	
  improves	
  canal	
  debridement	
  (Gu	
  et	
   al.,	
  2009)(Fig.	
  7).	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  7.	
  	
  Acoustic	
  Streaming	
  Around	
  Ultrasonically	
  Activated	
  File	
   In	
  Water	
  (left)	
  and	
  Schematic	
  Drawing	
  (right).	
   Ahmad	
  et	
  al.	
  (1987)	
  JOE	
  Vol.	
  13(10).	
   	
    	
    17	
    Richman	
  first	
  introduced	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  utilizing	
  ultrasonics	
  in	
  endodontics	
  in	
  1957	
   (Richman,	
  1957),	
  but	
  it	
  was	
  Martin	
  that	
  first	
  discovered	
  a	
  ‘sonosynergism’	
  of	
  cleaning	
   and	
  disinfecting	
  the	
  canal	
  system	
  when	
  irrigants	
  were	
  used	
  in	
  conjunction	
  with	
   ultrasonics	
  (Martin,	
  1976).	
  Files	
  can	
  be	
  ultrasonically	
  activated	
  within	
  the	
  canal	
  and	
  can	
   be	
  active	
  (cut	
  dentin)	
  or	
  passive	
  (no	
  dentinal	
  cutting),	
  which	
  is	
  also	
  known	
  as	
  passive	
   ultrasonic	
  irrigation	
  (PUI).	
  The	
  files	
  operate	
  with	
  transverse	
  vibration	
  and	
  have	
  a	
   characteristic	
  pattern	
  of	
  nodes	
  and	
  antinodes	
  along	
  their	
  length	
  (Walmsley,	
  1987;	
   Walmsley	
  et	
  al.,	
  1989).	
  Currently,	
  ultrasonics	
  is	
  only	
  utilized	
  to	
  agitate	
  irrigant	
  as	
  their	
   use	
  to	
  cut	
  dentin	
  proved	
  impossible	
  to	
  control	
  (Lumley	
  et	
  al.,	
  1993).	
  Furthermore,	
  PUI	
   works	
  best	
  when	
  it	
  does	
  not	
  contact	
  the	
  canal	
  wall	
  at	
  all	
  as	
  doing	
  so	
  results	
  in	
  a	
   reduction	
  of	
  acoustic	
  streaming	
  and	
  cavitation	
  (Ahmad	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
   The	
  beneficial	
  effects	
  of	
  ultrasonics	
  are	
  primarily	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  large	
  hydrodynamic	
   shear	
  stresses	
  generated	
  by	
  the	
  acoustic	
  microstreaming	
  that	
  occurs	
  around	
  the	
   oscillating	
  file	
  (Ahmad	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  Plotino	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  Transient	
  cavitation	
  also	
  occurs	
   with	
  ultrasonics	
  where	
  high-­‐speed	
  flow	
  gradients	
  cause	
  the	
  creation	
  of	
  bubbles,	
  which	
   expand	
  and	
  then	
  collapse.	
  It	
  is	
  thought	
  that	
  such	
  cavitation	
  may	
  contribute	
  to	
  canal	
   debridement	
  much	
  like	
  the	
  benefits	
  of	
  cavitation	
  seen	
  in	
  industrial	
  ultrasound	
  cleaning	
   (Mohalkar	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  Sabins	
  et	
  al.	
  (2003)	
  found	
  that	
  ultrasonic	
  agitation	
  produced	
   significantly	
  cleaner	
  canals	
  than	
  did	
  sonic	
  agitation.	
  The	
  enhanced	
  flushing	
  action	
  by	
   using	
  ultrasound	
  is	
  well	
  documented	
  (Cunningham	
  et	
  al.,	
  1982;	
  Stock,	
  1991;	
  Lumley	
  et	
   al.,	
  1993)	
  where	
  more	
  bacterial	
  spores	
  and	
  dentin	
  debris	
  were	
  removed	
  during	
   ultrasonic	
  irrigation	
  than	
  hand	
  irrigation	
  (Gutarts	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005;	
  Burleson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
   Carver	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
   	
    18	
    1.3.3.2.	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  Properties	
   PUS	
  uses	
  continuous	
  ultrasonic	
  irrigation	
  (CUI)	
  at	
  40	
  kHz	
  for	
  simultaneous	
   continuous	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  and	
  ultrasonic	
  activation	
  unlike	
  passive	
  ultrasonic	
   irrigation	
  (PUI),	
  which	
  requires	
  intermittent	
  replenishment	
  of	
  irrigant	
  between	
   ultrasonic	
  file	
  activations.	
  	
  The	
  CUI	
  device	
  has	
  a	
  rigid	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  needle	
  with	
  an	
   outside	
  diameter	
  of	
  0.5mm	
  (equivalent	
  to	
  a	
  size	
  50	
  file)(van	
  der	
  Sluis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007)(Fig.	
   9).	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  the	
  large	
  needle	
  size,	
  enlargement	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  to	
  a	
  size	
  40	
  is	
  required	
  to	
   prevent	
  canal	
  wall	
  contact	
  so	
  that	
  ultrasonic	
  acoustic	
  streaming	
  can	
  occur	
  (Ahmad	
  et	
  al.,	
   1987).	
   	
   	
    	
  	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    Figure	
  8.	
  	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  Ultrasonic	
  System	
   	
   	
   The	
  benefits	
  of	
  continuous	
  irrigant	
  flow	
  are	
  to	
  prevent	
  root	
  overheating	
  which	
  can	
    be	
  detrimental	
  to	
  paradental	
  tissues,	
  improved	
  cleaning	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  and	
  enhanced	
   tissue	
  dissolution	
  as	
  the	
  irrigant	
  temperature	
  increases	
  (Cameron,	
  1988;	
  Carrasco	
  et	
  al.,	
   2004).	
   1.3.3.3.	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  Limitations	
   The	
  reduced	
  efficiency	
  of	
  ultrasonic	
  irrigation	
  has	
  been	
  documented	
  in	
  narrow,	
   curved	
  and	
  less	
  tapered	
  canals	
  (Krell	
  et	
  al.,	
  1988;	
  Stock,	
  1991);	
  more	
  remaining	
  debris	
  is	
   	
    19	
    seen	
  in	
  curved	
  canals	
  versus	
  straight	
  canals	
  after	
  irrigation	
  (Lee	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  van	
  der	
   Sluis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005).	
  This	
  remaining	
  debris	
  is	
  the	
  result	
  of	
  the	
  rigid	
  ultrasonic	
  needle	
  that	
  is	
   prevented	
  from	
  penetrating	
  the	
  canal	
  more	
  than	
  1	
  to	
  2	
  mm	
  into	
  the	
  orifice	
  before	
  canal	
   wall	
  contact	
  (Adcock	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Malentacca	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  several	
  studies	
   have	
  demonstrated	
  the	
  limited	
  ability	
  of	
  the	
  PUS	
  to	
  reduce	
  canal	
  bacteria	
  and	
  debris	
   better	
  than	
  conventional	
  needle	
  irrigation.	
  The	
  restricted	
  canal	
  debridement	
  can	
  be	
   attributed	
  to	
  needle	
  rigidity,	
  the	
  frequency	
  of	
  curved	
  canals	
  and	
  the	
  inability	
  to	
   determine	
  when	
  the	
  needle	
  is	
  contacting	
  the	
  canal	
  wall	
  (Heard	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  Mayer	
  et	
  al.,	
   2002;	
  Harrison	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
   Additionally,	
  the	
  debridement	
  and	
  cleansing	
  effects	
  of	
  microacoustic	
  streaming	
  and	
   cavitation	
  only	
  occur	
  in	
  liquid.	
  The	
  reaction	
  between	
  NaOCl	
  and	
  tissue	
  results	
  in	
  the	
   formation	
  of	
  gas	
  bubbles,	
  which	
  become	
  trapped	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  third	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  forming	
   a	
  fluid	
  barrier	
  known	
  as	
  apical	
  vapor	
  lock.	
  This	
  fluid	
  barrier	
  prevents	
  cavitation	
  and	
   microacoustic	
  streaming	
  from	
  taking	
  place	
  (Schoeffel,	
  2008).	
  Only	
  apical	
  negative	
   pressure	
  systems	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  overcome	
  the	
  vapor	
  lock	
  phenomenon.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  1.3.4.	
  EndoVac®	
   	
    1.3.4.1.	
  Properties	
  of	
  Apical	
  Negative	
  Pressure	
  	
   Until	
  2006	
  all	
  irrigant	
  systems	
  on	
  the	
  market	
  extruded	
  irrigant	
  outward,	
  otherwise	
   known	
  as	
  positive	
  pressure	
  irrigation.	
  Up	
  to	
  this	
  point,	
  research	
  was	
  clear	
  that	
  close	
   approximation	
  of	
  the	
  cannula/needle	
  to	
  the	
  working	
  length	
  would	
  be	
  critical	
  for	
  apical	
   debridement	
  of	
  tissue,	
  debris	
  and	
  bacteria.	
  Naturally,	
  this	
  close	
  positioning	
  of	
  the	
  needle	
   to	
  the	
  apical	
  foramen	
  was	
  a	
  concern	
  and	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  concern	
  to	
  this	
  day.	
  The	
  risk	
   	
    20	
    of	
  irrigant	
  extrusion	
  is	
  high	
  and	
  the	
  subsequent	
  complications	
  (pain,	
  tissue	
  edema,	
   trismus,	
  ecchymosis,	
  tissue	
  necrosis,	
  hyperesthesia,	
  paresthesia	
  and	
  nerve	
  anesthesia)	
   can	
  be	
  serious	
  and	
  in	
  some	
  cases	
  permanent	
  (Hülsmann	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
   In	
  2006,	
  a	
  novel	
  irrigant	
  system,	
  called	
  EndoVac	
  ®	
  (EV)	
  was	
  introduced	
  which	
  utilized	
   apical	
  negative	
  pressure	
  (Fukumoto	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  	
  This	
  system	
  utilizes	
  a	
  suction	
  tip	
   placed	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  an	
  irrigant	
  filled	
  canal,	
  drawing	
  irrigant	
  down	
  the	
  canal	
  to	
  the	
   suction	
  tip,	
  overcoming	
  the	
  vapor	
  lock	
  phenomenon	
  and	
  eliminating	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  irrigant	
   extrusion	
  (Parente	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Mitchell	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
   	
    1.3.4.2.	
  EndoVac®	
  Properties	
   The	
  EV	
  consists	
  of	
  a	
  combined	
  delivery/evacuation	
  tip	
  also	
  called	
  the	
  master	
  delivery	
   tip	
  (MDT)	
  that	
  is	
  attached	
  to	
  a	
  syringe	
  containing	
  the	
  irrigant	
  and	
  high-­‐speed	
  suction.	
   Additionally,	
  there	
  are	
  also	
  two	
  suctioning	
  cannulas	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  placed	
  to	
  working	
  length	
   to	
  suction	
  fluid	
  from	
  the	
  deepest	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  canal.	
  Initially	
  the	
  macrocannula	
  (ISO	
  size	
   55)	
  is	
  used	
  to	
  suction	
  large	
  bits	
  of	
  debris	
  remaining	
  in	
  the	
  canal,	
  which	
  is	
  then	
  followed	
   by	
  the	
  microcannula	
  (ISO	
  size	
  32).	
  	
  The	
  cannula	
  suction	
  encourages	
  the	
  flow	
  of	
  the	
   irrigant	
  to	
  travel	
  down	
  the	
  canal	
  where	
  it	
  is	
  then	
  suctioned	
  in	
  and	
  then	
  up	
  the	
  cannula.	
   The	
  canals	
  must	
  be	
  shaped	
  to	
  a	
  minimum	
  size	
  of	
  35	
  to	
  accommodate	
  the	
  microcannula	
   (Miller	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Abarajithan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  The	
  microcannula	
  contains	
  12	
  microscopic	
   holes	
  of	
  0.1mm	
  diameter	
  (Fig.	
  10).	
   	
   	
    	
    21	
    	
   Figure	
  9.	
  	
  EndoVac®	
  Components	
   Macrocannula	
  (Upper	
  Left),	
  Microcannula	
  (Upper	
  Right),	
  Master	
  Delivery	
  Tip	
  (Lower	
  Left),	
   and	
  Microcannula	
  (Lower	
  Right).	
  	
  Haapasalo	
  (2010)	
  Dent	
  Clin	
  N	
  Am.,	
  Vol.	
  54	
  (2).	
   	
   	
   Whether	
  or	
  not	
  this	
  new	
  type	
  of	
  negative	
  pressure	
  irrigation	
  system	
  is	
  superior	
  to	
   positive	
  pressure	
  devices	
  is	
  controversial.	
  There	
  is	
  research	
  indicating	
  that	
  the	
   antimicrobial	
  efficiency	
  of	
  EV	
  is	
  not	
  any	
  better	
  than	
  conventional	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  (Brito	
   et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Miller	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Pawar	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012);	
  yet	
  other	
  research	
  states	
  that	
  EV	
   clearly	
  leads	
  to	
  greater	
  canal	
  cleaning	
  (Nielsen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Shin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Siu	
  et	
  al.,	
   2010).	
  	
  Some	
  research	
  simply	
  states	
  that	
  at	
  the	
  very	
  least	
  EV	
  improves	
  the	
  antimicrobial	
   efficacy	
  of	
  irrigants	
  (Hockett	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Cohenca	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.3.4.3.	
  	
  EndoVac®	
  Limitations	
   The	
  EV	
  System	
  has	
  numerous	
  components,	
  which	
  can	
  be	
  somewhat	
  challenging	
  to	
  set	
   up	
  and	
  includes	
  various	
  tubes	
  and	
  different	
  cannulas.	
  All	
  components	
  must	
  be	
  properly	
   connected	
  prior	
  to	
  usage.	
  	
   There	
  are	
  also	
  specific	
  requirements	
  with	
  using	
  the	
  EV	
  System	
  prior	
  to	
  use	
  or	
  system	
   fluid	
  mechanics	
  will	
  not	
  work	
  appropriately	
  and	
  there	
  is	
  increased	
  risk	
  of	
  irrigant	
   	
    22	
    extrusion.	
  These	
  requirements	
  include	
  a	
  minimum	
  canal	
  shape	
  of	
  35/.04	
  to	
  working	
   length	
  and	
  the	
  user	
  must	
  ensure	
  the	
  following	
  is	
  performed:	
   • The	
  user	
  must	
  ensure	
  there	
  is	
  an	
  intact	
  clinical	
  crown	
  with	
  an	
  access	
  opening	
  of	
  at	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  least	
  6-­‐8mm	
  from	
  cavosurface	
  angle	
  to	
  pulp	
  floor	
  for	
  proper	
  fluid	
  mechanics.	
  	
   • The	
  irrigant	
  stream	
  must	
  be	
  directed	
  at	
  an	
  axial	
  wall	
  45°	
  from	
  canals	
  axial	
  plane	
  in	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  molars,	
  60°	
  in	
  premolars	
  and	
  90°	
  in	
  anterior	
  teeth	
  or	
  positive	
  pressure	
  can	
  be	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  created	
  in	
  the	
  pulp	
  canal	
  increasing	
  risk	
  of	
  extrusion.	
   • The	
  master	
  delivery	
  tip	
  must	
  never	
  be	
  placed	
  closer	
  than	
  5mm	
  from	
  the	
  coronal	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  opening	
  of	
  the	
  pulp	
  canal.	
   • The	
  master	
  delivery	
  tip	
  and	
  macrocannula	
  must	
  be	
  used	
  before	
  using	
  the	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  microcannula	
  as	
  the	
  microcannula	
  pores	
  can	
  be	
  easily	
  plugged	
  with	
  debris.	
  If	
  the	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  microcannula	
  becomes	
  plugged	
  a	
  new	
  one	
  must	
  be	
  placed.	
  	
  	
   (Schoeffel,	
  2007;	
  Schoeffel,	
  2008;	
  Schoeffel,	
  2009)	
    	
   	
  	
  	
  1.4.	
  Irrigation	
  Dynamics	
  	
   	
  	
  1.4.1.	
  Apical	
  Preparation	
  Size/Taper	
    Over	
  the	
  years	
  research	
  has	
  established	
  that	
  more	
  bacteria	
  can	
  be	
  removed	
  from	
  the	
   canal	
  when	
  the	
  irrigant	
  (NaOCl)	
  is	
  delivered	
  closer	
  to	
  the	
  working	
  length	
  (Sedgley	
  et	
  al.	
   2005).	
  Delivery	
  in	
  close	
  proximity	
  to	
  the	
  apical	
  constriction	
  can	
  only	
  be	
  accomplished	
   when	
  the	
  size	
  or	
  taper	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  can	
  accommodate	
  the	
  delivery	
  device	
  being	
  utilized.	
   Specifically,	
  irrigation	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  efficacious	
  with	
  increased	
  size	
  and	
   taper	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  (Card	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002;	
  Falk	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005).	
   Irrigant	
  flow	
  is	
  limited	
  by	
  increased	
  canal	
  curvature.	
  One	
  study	
  of	
  canals	
  with	
  a	
  24	
  to	
   28	
  degree	
  of	
  curvature	
  instrumented	
  to	
  a	
  size	
  27/.04	
  showed	
  remaining	
  bacteria	
  of	
   	
    23	
    approximately	
  50%	
  after	
  irrigation	
  (with	
  NaOCl).	
  When	
  these	
  canals	
  were	
  then	
   instrumented	
  to	
  a	
  size	
  46/.04	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  significant	
  improvement	
  in	
  irrigant	
  efficacy	
   (Nguy	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  It	
  was	
  discovered	
  that	
  increased	
  canal	
  curvatures	
  cause	
  irrigant	
  flow	
   to	
  be	
  impeded	
  resulting	
  in	
  reducing	
  flushing	
  ability	
  and	
  decreased	
  mechanical	
  efficacy	
   (Boutsioukis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  relationship	
  between	
  apical	
  canal	
  taper	
  and	
  irrigant	
  volume	
  is	
  clear.	
  When	
  there	
   is	
  a	
  larger	
  canal	
  taper,	
  more	
  irrigant	
  can	
  be	
  flushed	
  apically	
  (Baugh	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005;	
  Brunson	
   et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  This	
  allows	
  more	
  debris	
  to	
  be	
  flushed	
  from	
  the	
  canal,	
  allows	
  more	
  irrigant	
   exchange	
  and	
  faster	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  (Stojicic	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Although	
  an	
  increased	
   apical	
  size	
  allows	
  for	
  more	
  effective	
  irrigation,	
  this	
  is	
  not	
  always	
  practical	
  in	
  a	
  curved	
   canal.	
  Such	
  canal	
  enlargement	
  increases	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  root	
  perforation,	
  root	
  fracture	
  and	
   results	
  in	
  weakened	
  root	
  structure	
  (Albrecht	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Lim	
  et	
  al.,	
  1985).	
  The	
  canals	
  in	
   the	
  teeth	
  used	
  in	
  this	
  research	
  were	
  instrumented	
  with	
  ProTaper®	
  rotary	
  NiTi	
  files	
  to	
  a	
   final	
  size	
  of	
  F4	
  equivalent	
  to	
  an	
  iso	
  size	
  40/.06.	
   	
   	
  	
  1.4.2.	
  Irrigant	
  Volume	
   NaOCl	
  molecules	
  that	
  are	
  involved	
  in	
  reactions	
  to	
  break	
  down	
  pulp	
  tissue	
  and	
   bacteria	
  are	
  quickly	
  consumed,	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  decline	
  in	
  activity.	
  Therefore,	
  continuous	
   replenishment	
  with	
  fresh	
  NaOCl	
  is	
  required	
  to	
  continue	
  the	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  and	
  to	
  also	
   assist	
  with	
  removal	
  of	
  dissolved	
  tissue	
  remnants	
  (Clarkson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Stojicic	
  et	
  al.,	
   2010).	
  	
   The	
  solvent	
  action	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  affects	
  exposed	
  pulp	
  tissue	
  through	
  available	
  chlorine	
   molecules.	
  Deeper	
  tissues	
  are	
  protected	
  from	
  the	
  effects	
  of	
  chlorine	
  and	
  are	
  only	
   dissolved	
  once	
  the	
  tissues	
  surrounding	
  them	
  are	
  gone.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  new	
  available	
   	
    24	
    chlorine	
  molecules	
  are	
  required	
  through	
  replenishment	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  (Senia	
  et	
  al.,	
  1971;	
   Spanó	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001)	
  to	
  reach	
  successively	
  deeper	
  tissue	
  layers.	
   	
   	
  	
  1.4.3.	
  Needle	
  Size	
  and	
  Depth	
  of	
  Placement	
   The	
  size	
  of	
  the	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  device	
  is	
  limited	
  to	
  the	
  size	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  at	
  working	
   length.	
  Prior	
  examination	
  of	
  the	
  interrelationship	
  between	
  irrigant	
  device	
  and	
  canal	
  size	
   has	
  shown	
  that	
  insertion	
  depth	
  of	
  the	
  irrigation	
  needle	
  closer	
  to	
  its	
  substrate	
  is	
  most	
   favorable	
  for	
  canal	
  irrigation	
  (Shen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  There	
  is	
  better	
  fluid	
  exchange	
  that	
   occurs	
  with	
  usage	
  of	
  smaller	
  needles.	
  The	
  deeper	
  penetration	
  into	
  the	
  canal	
  that	
  is	
   possible	
  with	
  smaller	
  size	
  needles	
  results	
  in	
  better	
  cleaning	
  (Ram,	
  1977:	
  Kahn	
  et	
  al.,	
   1995).	
  	
   There	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  shift	
  of	
  thought	
  regarding	
  mechanical	
  instrumentation	
  from	
  its	
  main	
   role	
  as	
  one	
  of	
  primarily	
  a	
  debriding	
  function,	
  to	
  one	
  regarded	
  more	
  as	
  a	
  radicular	
  access	
   for	
  irrigation	
  (Huang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Bronnec	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Irrigation	
  devices	
  relevant	
  to	
  this	
   study	
  and	
  their	
  size	
  are	
  shown	
  in	
  Figure	
  10.	
   	
   	
    	
    25	
    	
   Figure	
  10.	
  Depth	
  of	
  Placement	
  for	
  Needle	
  and	
  Irrigant	
  Agitation	
  Devices	
   	
    	
    	
  	
  1.4.4.	
  	
  Irrigant	
  Flow	
  Dynamics	
   The	
  design	
  of	
  the	
  needle	
  tip	
  influences	
  flow	
  pattern,	
  flow	
  velocity	
  and	
  apical	
  wall	
   pressure.	
  These	
  parameters	
  are	
  important	
  for	
  irrigation	
  effectiveness	
  and	
  safety	
  (Shen	
   et	
  al.	
  2010).	
  	
  Recent	
  developments	
  in	
  computational	
  fluid	
  dynamics	
  (CFD)	
  technology	
   had	
  enabled	
  these	
  basic	
  parameters	
  to	
  be	
  simulated.	
  This	
  technology	
  enables	
  complex	
   numerical	
  simulation	
  of	
  canal	
  irrigation	
  so	
  the	
  effects	
  of	
  needle	
  tip	
  design	
  can	
  be	
  studied	
   (Hsieh	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Boutsioukis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
   CFD	
  analysis	
  has	
  shown	
  that	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  a	
  needle	
  side	
  vent	
  results	
  in	
  a	
  17-­‐19%	
   reduction	
  in	
  apical	
  pressure.	
  Closure	
  of	
  the	
  end	
  in	
  a	
  side-­‐vented	
  needle	
  further	
  reduces	
   apical	
  pressure	
  by	
  a	
  2.5	
  to	
  3.0-­‐fold	
  decrease	
  (Shen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  Clearly,	
  there	
  is	
  less	
  risk	
   of	
  apical	
  irrigant	
  extrusion	
  with	
  closed-­‐ended	
  endodontic	
  needles	
  but	
  there	
  is	
  a	
   compromise	
  that	
  comes	
  with	
  increased	
  safety.	
  The	
  irrigant	
  only	
  extends	
  a	
  short	
  distance	
   	
    26	
    (between	
  1-­‐3mm)	
  apically	
  from	
  the	
  needle	
  tip,	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  diminished	
  apical	
  pressure,	
   when	
  placed	
  3mm	
  from	
  the	
  apex	
  in	
  a	
  straight	
  canal	
  (Boutsioukis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Shen	
  et	
  al.,	
   2010).	
  This	
  means	
  that	
  irrigants	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  delivered	
  closer	
  to	
  working	
  length	
  (to	
  be	
   effective),	
  which	
  may	
  abrogate	
  the	
  safety	
  benefits	
  of	
  reduced	
  apical	
  pressure.	
   Irrigant	
  velocity,	
  alongside	
  the	
  needle,	
  on	
  canal	
  walls	
  shows	
  variable	
  patterns	
   dependent	
  on	
  the	
  needle	
  design.	
  The	
  flow	
  observed	
  in	
  side-­‐vented	
  needles	
  on	
  the	
   opposing	
  wall	
  to	
  the	
  vent/opening	
  was	
  observed	
  as	
  very	
  low,	
  approaching	
  zero.	
  	
  As	
  a	
   result	
  of	
  this	
  reduced	
  flow,	
  the	
  side	
  opposing	
  the	
  vent	
  was	
  significantly	
  less	
  clean	
  than	
   the	
  side	
  facing	
  the	
  vent	
  (Huang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Shen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  The	
  side	
  adjacent	
  to	
  the	
   opening,	
  however,	
  benefited	
  from	
  a	
  higher	
  Reynolds	
  number	
  (indicative	
  of	
  a	
  more	
   turbulent	
  fluid	
  flow)	
  and	
  a	
  higher	
  shear	
  stress,	
  which	
  is	
  conducive	
  in	
  removal	
  of	
  surface-­‐ adherent	
  bacterial	
  biofilm	
  (Gulabivala	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  1.4.5.	
  Apical	
  Patency	
    	
    Studies	
  have	
  shown	
  that	
  maintaining	
  apical	
  patency	
  with	
  a	
  size	
  10	
  file	
  1mm	
  beyond	
   the	
  WL	
  results	
  in	
  more	
  canals	
  having	
  improved	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  to	
  the	
  apical	
  third	
  of	
  the	
   canal.	
  It	
  has	
  been	
  postulated	
  that	
  the	
  patency	
  file	
  facilitates	
  removal	
  of	
  the	
  air	
  bubble	
  or	
   vapor	
  lock	
  effect	
  (Vera	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Vera	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012)	
  thus	
  allowing	
  more	
  irrigant	
  to	
   reach	
  the	
  full	
  working	
  length	
  of	
  the	
  canal.	
  	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.5	
  Dentinal	
  Tubules	
   	
  	
  1.5.1.	
  Dentinal	
  Tubule	
  Properties	
   With	
  increasing	
  age	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patent	
  tubules	
  decreases	
  at	
  a	
  statistically	
   significant	
  rate	
  due	
  to	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  peritubular	
  dentin	
  that	
  occurs	
  over	
  time	
  (Bang	
  and	
   	
    27	
    Ramm,	
  1970).	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  tubules	
  also	
  varies	
  with	
  location;	
  there	
  are	
  statistically	
   less	
  tubules	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  dentin	
  compared	
  with	
  midroot,	
  cervical	
  or	
  coronal	
  dentin	
  of	
   the	
  root	
  (Carrigan	
  et	
  al.,	
  1984)(Fig.12).	
  	
  	
  	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   Figure	
  11.	
  	
  Increased	
  Dentinal	
  Sclerosis	
  With	
  Age	
   in	
  25	
  and	
  80	
  Yr.	
  Old	
  Individuals	
  (A	
  and	
  B,	
  Respectively).	
   Carrigan	
  et	
  al.	
  (1984),	
  JOE	
  Vol.	
  10	
  (8).	
   	
   In	
  the	
  apical	
  dentin	
  advanced	
  sclerotic	
  changes	
  are	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  tubules	
  where	
  the	
   peritubular	
  dentin	
  becomes	
  more	
  mineralized	
  with	
  increasing	
  age	
  (Love,	
  2004).	
  This	
   results	
  in	
  the	
  ultimate	
  obliteration	
  of	
  dentinal	
  tubules.	
  The	
  relatively	
  few	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
   present	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  dentin	
  may	
  explain	
  the	
  high	
  success	
  rate	
  of	
  endodontic	
  therapy;	
   there	
  are	
  fewer	
  tubules	
  in	
  which	
  microbes	
  can	
  live	
  (Carrigan	
  et	
  al.,	
  1984;	
  Orstavik	
  et	
  al.,	
   2004;	
  Love,	
  2004;	
  Kakoli	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  1.5.2.	
  Dye	
  Penetration	
   Penetration	
  of	
  dye	
  within	
  the	
  canal	
  is	
  better	
  in	
  the	
  coronal	
  and	
  middle	
  thirds	
  due	
  to	
  a	
   decrease	
  in	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  from	
  coronal	
  dentin	
  to	
  apical	
  dentin	
  (near	
  the	
  pulp),	
   ranging	
  from	
  40,	
  000/mm2	
  in	
  the	
  coronal	
  to	
  14,	
  400/mm2	
  in	
  the	
  apical.	
  	
  Additionally,	
  the	
   irregular	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  secondary	
  dentin	
  and	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  cementum-­‐like	
  tissue	
  in	
   	
    28	
    the	
  apical	
  root	
  dentin	
  (Mjör	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001)	
  may	
  also	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  decreased	
  dye	
   penetration	
  in	
  apical	
  region	
  of	
  the	
  canal.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   In	
  older	
  individuals,	
  whom	
  have	
  more	
  peritubular	
  dentin	
  (sclerosis),	
  Thaler	
  et	
  al.	
   found	
  there	
  to	
  be	
  decreased	
  dentine	
  permeability	
  with	
  age	
  that	
  did	
  not	
  follow	
  a	
  uniform	
   pattern.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  dye	
  penetration	
  into	
  the	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  was	
  not	
  equally	
   distributed	
  but	
  found	
  deeper	
  in	
  the	
  bucco-­‐lingual	
  direction	
  compared	
  with	
  the	
  mesio-­‐ distal	
  direction	
  (Thaler	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008)(Fig.12).	
  	
   	
   	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  12.	
  	
  Irregular	
  Dye	
  Penetration	
  Around	
  the	
  Canal	
   Light	
  Microscope	
  Pictures	
  Showing	
  Two	
  Samples	
  of	
  Middle	
  Root	
  Sections	
   (a)	
  Maximum	
  Penetration	
  bucco-­‐lingually	
  as	
  sclerosis	
  primarily	
  occurs	
  in	
  the	
  mesio-­‐distal	
   direction	
  (b)	
  Irregular	
  Dye	
  Penetration.	
  Thaler	
  et	
  al.	
  (2008)	
  IEJ,	
  Vol.	
  41(12).	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.6	
  Objectives	
   The	
  aims	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  are	
  to:	
  	
  	
   1.  To	
  compare	
  the	
  efficacy	
  of	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  systems	
  to	
  conventional	
  needle	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  irrigation	
  in	
  the	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  at	
  specific	
  locations	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  within	
  the	
  canal.	
  	
   	
    29	
    2.  To	
  understand	
  how	
  these	
  agitation	
  systems	
  function.	
    3.  To	
  gain	
  an	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  benefits	
  and	
  limitation	
  of	
  these	
  agitation	
  systems	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  compared	
  to	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation.	
   4.  To	
  assess	
  the	
  clinical	
  implications	
  in	
  usage	
  of	
  these	
  devices.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  1.7	
  Hypothesis	
   	
  The	
  use	
  of	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  methods	
  will	
  be	
  more	
  effective	
  in	
  facilitating	
  the	
  deeper	
   penetration	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  than	
  can	
  occur	
  with	
  a	
  conventional	
  side-­‐vented	
   needle.	
    	
    	
    30	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  Chapter	
  2:	
  Material	
  and	
  Methods	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.1	
  Experimental	
  Design	
   This	
  in	
  vitro	
  study	
  was	
  designed	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  into	
   dentinal	
  tubules	
  using	
  the	
  EV,	
  PUS,	
  and	
  the	
  EA	
  irrigation	
  agitation	
  systems	
  and	
  to	
   compare	
  them	
  with	
  the	
  conventional	
  needle	
  irrigation.	
  Two	
  parameters	
  were	
  measured	
   and	
  analyzed:	
  (1)	
  the	
  maximum	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  on	
  the	
  basis	
  of	
  technique	
   and	
  location	
  within	
  the	
  canal,	
  and	
  (2)	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  surfaces	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  wall	
  affected	
   by	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  compared	
  with	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  surfaces	
  penetrated	
  by	
  dye.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.2	
  Tooth	
  Selection	
  and	
  Preparation	
  	
   This	
  study	
  was	
  conducted	
  using	
  non-­‐endodontically	
  treated	
  extracted	
  human	
  teeth	
   (maxillary	
  1st	
  premolars,	
  canines,	
  lateral	
  incisors,	
  central	
  incisors	
  and	
  mandibular	
   canines)	
  that	
  had	
  mature	
  apices	
  and	
  intact	
  crowns.	
  Sixty	
  teeth	
  were	
  selected.	
  The	
  root	
   curvatures	
  were	
  measured	
  externally	
  against	
  a	
  protractor	
  and	
  teeth	
  with	
  curvatures	
  less	
   than	
  15	
  degrees	
  were	
  chosen.	
  The	
  root	
  lengths	
  ranged	
  between	
  14	
  to	
  24mm	
  and	
  the	
   width	
  of	
  the	
  roots	
  at	
  the	
  CEJ	
  was	
  between	
  4-­‐8mm;	
  both	
  were	
  measured	
  with	
  a	
  ruler.	
   Only	
  canals	
  where	
  apical	
  patency	
  could	
  be	
  achieved	
  were	
  selected.	
  The	
  teeth	
  were	
   stored	
  in	
  a	
  0.01%	
  NaOCl	
  solution	
  at	
  room	
  temperature.	
   A	
  standard	
  access	
  cavity	
  preparation	
  was	
  made	
  in	
  each	
  tooth	
  and	
  the	
  working	
  length	
   determined	
  by	
  insertion	
  of	
  a	
  size	
  10	
  stainless-­‐steel	
  K	
  file	
  (Dentsply	
  Maillefer,	
  Tulsa,	
  OK)	
   into	
  the	
  canal	
  until	
  the	
  instrument	
  tip	
  was	
  just	
  visible	
  at	
  the	
  apical	
  foramen.	
  A	
  barbed	
   broach	
  (Dentsply	
  Tulsa	
  Dental)	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  remove	
  the	
  bulk	
  of	
  the	
  pulp	
  tissue.	
  Canal	
   patency	
  was	
  verified	
  by	
  a	
  squirt	
  of	
  sterile	
  water	
  from	
  the	
  apical	
  foramen.	
  The	
  outer	
  root	
   	
    31	
    surface	
  was	
  then	
  wrapped	
  with	
  latex	
  rubber	
  (to	
  create	
  a	
  seal	
  between	
  the	
  root	
  and	
  the	
   suction	
  device)	
  and	
  then	
  placed	
  over	
  a	
  high-­‐speed	
  suction	
  and	
  crystal	
  violet	
  dye	
  (BD	
   Diagnostic	
  Systems,	
  Sparks,	
  MD)	
  was	
  syringed	
  into	
  the	
  canal	
  with	
  a	
  needle.	
  This	
  was	
   done	
  until	
  the	
  dye	
  was	
  seen	
  flowing	
  from	
  the	
  apical	
  end	
  of	
  each	
  root	
  for	
  5	
  seconds.	
  The	
   teeth	
  were	
  then	
  immersed	
  in	
  dye	
  for	
  five	
  days.	
  After	
  5	
  days,	
  the	
  teeth	
  were	
  removed	
   from	
  the	
  dye	
  and	
  rinsed	
  in	
  tap	
  water	
  for	
  10	
  minutes.	
  The	
  teeth	
  were	
  wiped	
  dry,	
  the	
   foramen	
  sealed	
  with	
  laboratory	
  wax	
  and	
  the	
  roots	
  were	
  painted	
  with	
  varnish	
  to	
  create	
  a	
   closed	
  system	
  simulating	
  the	
  clinical	
  situation.	
   The	
  canals	
  were	
  then	
  instrumented	
  using	
  ProTaper®	
  rotary	
  niti	
  files	
  (S1-­‐S2-­‐F1-­‐F2-­‐ F3-­‐F4)(Dentsply	
  Tulsa	
  Dental)	
  using	
  a	
  crown-­‐down	
  technique.	
  Each	
  file	
  was	
  used	
  for	
  30	
   seconds.	
  Prior	
  to	
  each	
  instrument	
  change,	
  1ml	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  was	
  placed	
  in	
  the	
  canal	
  using	
  a	
   30	
  gauge	
  side-­‐vented	
  needle	
  (ProRinse®,	
  Dentsply	
  Tulsa	
  Dental).	
  The	
  total	
  time	
  of	
   instrumentation	
  was	
  3	
  minutes	
  and	
  the	
  total	
  volume	
  of	
  6%	
  NaOCl	
  was	
  6	
  ml.	
  The	
  final	
   apical	
  size	
  was	
  F4	
  (40/.06).	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.3	
  Experimental	
  Groups	
   The	
  teeth	
  were	
  randomly	
  assigned	
  to	
  four	
  experimental	
  groups.	
  Each	
  experimental	
   group	
  was	
  irrigated	
  with	
  one	
  of	
  four	
  irrigant	
  methods	
  using	
  6%	
  NaOCl.	
  A	
  digital	
   peristaltic	
  pump	
  (Reglo	
  Digital	
  MS-­‐2/8,	
  Ismatec®,	
  Wertheim-­‐Mondfelt,	
  Germany)	
  was	
   utilized	
  to	
  deliver	
  the	
  irrigant.	
   • Group	
  1:	
  (n=15):	
  EndoActivator®.	
  The	
  teeth	
  were	
  irrigated	
  with	
  a	
  side	
  vented	
  needle	
   at	
  a	
  rate	
  2.5ml/15	
  sec	
  placed	
  1mm	
  from	
  working	
  length	
  and	
  then	
  sonically	
  agitated	
   for	
  30	
  seconds	
  with	
  the	
  EA	
  placed	
  1	
  mm	
  from	
  working	
  length.	
  The	
  size	
  25/.04	
   	
    32	
    polymer	
  tip	
  was	
  used	
  at	
  10,000	
  cpm.	
  This	
  was	
  performed	
  two	
  times.	
  	
  Volume	
  of	
   NaOCl:	
  5ml.	
   • Group	
  2:	
  (n=15):	
  ProUltra®	
  PiezoFlow™	
  System.	
  The	
  teeth	
  were	
  irrigated	
  with	
  the	
  PUS	
   at	
  a	
  rate	
  15ml/min	
  for	
  1	
  min,	
  inserted	
  75%	
  to	
  working	
  length.	
  The	
  ultrasonic	
  energy	
   and	
  the	
  irrigant	
  dispensing	
  occurred	
  simultaneously;	
  continuous	
  ultrasonic	
  irrigation	
   (CUI).	
  Volume	
  of	
  NaOCl:	
  15ml.	
   • Group	
  3:	
  (n=15):	
  EndoVac®.	
  The	
  teeth	
  were	
  irrigated	
  with	
  apical	
  negative	
  pressure	
   using	
  the	
  MDT	
  and	
  the	
  macrocannula	
  for	
  5ml/min	
  for	
  1	
  min,	
  slight	
  up	
  and	
  down	
   motion,	
  placed	
  just	
  short	
  of	
  binding.	
  Volume	
  of	
  NaOCl:	
  5ml.	
   • Group	
  4:	
  (n=15):	
  ProRinse®side-­‐vented	
  needle.	
  The	
  teeth	
  were	
  irrigated	
  with	
  positive	
   pressure	
  at	
  a	
  rate	
  of	
  5ml	
  of	
  6%	
  NaOCl/min	
  for	
  1	
  min.	
  The	
  needle	
  was	
  placed	
  1	
  mm	
   from	
  working	
  length.	
  Volume	
  of	
  NaOCl:	
  5ml.	
   The	
  volume	
  of	
  6%	
  NaOCl	
  used	
  with	
  irrigant	
  method	
  was	
  not	
  standardized	
  but	
  instead	
   followed	
  manufacturers	
  recommendations	
  for	
  flow	
  rate	
  and	
  irrigant	
  volume.	
  Therefore,	
   the	
  total	
  volume	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  used	
  with	
  the	
  EA,	
  EV	
  &	
  N	
  experimental	
  groups	
  was	
  11ml	
  while	
   the	
  total	
  volume	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  used	
  with	
  PUS	
  experimental	
  group	
  was	
  21ml.	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  teeth	
  were	
  then	
  rinsed	
  in	
  tap	
  water	
  and	
  dried	
  with	
  paper	
  towel.	
  The	
  coronal	
   portion	
  of	
  each	
  tooth	
  was	
  mounted	
  in	
  acrylic	
  resin	
  to	
  facilitate	
  sectioning.	
  	
   	
    	
    	
    33	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.4	
  Sectioning	
  of	
  the	
  Teeth	
  	
   The	
  acrylic	
  end	
  of	
  each	
  sample	
  was	
  mounted	
  in	
  the	
  Isomet®	
  5000	
  Linear	
  Precision	
   Saw	
  (Buehler,	
  Illinois,	
  USA)(Fig.	
  13)	
  and	
  sectioned	
  in	
  1	
  mm	
  thick	
  slices	
  perpendicular	
  to	
   the	
  long	
  axis	
  of	
  the	
  tooth.	
  The	
  first	
  sample	
  was	
  the	
  apical	
  most	
  sample	
  and	
  the	
  last	
   sample	
  was	
  the	
  most	
  coronal	
  sample.	
  Each	
  section	
  was	
  placed	
  in	
  a	
  plastic	
  sample	
  vial	
   and	
  labeled	
  by	
  tooth	
  number	
  and	
  section	
  such	
  that	
  the	
  tooth	
  number	
  and	
  section	
  were	
   easily	
  identifiable.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   ® Figure	
  13.	
  	
  Isomet 	
  5000	
  Linear	
  Precision	
  Saw	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.5	
  Microscopic	
  Evaluation	
   Each	
  section	
  was	
  positioned	
  on	
  a	
  microscope	
  slide	
  and	
  evaluated	
  with	
  the	
  Nikon®	
   Eclipse®	
  Microscope	
  (Nikon	
  Instruments,	
  Tokyo,	
  Japan)(Fig.14)	
  at	
  40	
  times	
   magnification.	
  The	
  apical	
  side	
  of	
  each	
  sample	
  was	
  evaluated	
  and	
  photographed	
  with	
  the	
   NIS	
  Elements™	
  Software	
  (Nikon	
  Instruments,	
  Tokyo,	
  Japan).	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
    34	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  14.	
  	
  Nikon	
  Eclipse	
  Microscope	
   	
   The	
  penetration	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  was	
  measured	
  with	
  the	
  NIS-­‐Elements™	
  software.	
  The	
   measurement	
  was	
  made	
  in	
  micrometer	
  (μm)	
  units	
  for	
  all	
  four	
  groups	
  at	
  levels	
  3,	
  5	
  and	
   7mm	
  from	
  working	
  length	
  (WL)	
  for	
  the	
  apical	
  surface	
  of	
  each	
  sample	
  (Fig.	
  15).	
  The	
   samples	
  were	
  identified	
  by	
  location	
  in	
  the	
  canal;	
  samples	
  3,	
  5,	
  and	
  7mm	
  from	
  WL	
  were	
   called	
  apical,	
  middle	
  and	
  coronal,	
  respectively.	
  	
   	
    A	
    	
    B	
    C	
    Figure	
  15.	
  NIS	
  Elements™	
  Photographs	
  at	
  Magnification	
  (40x)	
   at	
  3mm	
  (A),	
  5mm(B)	
  and	
  7mm	
  (C)	
  from	
  working	
  length.	
   	
   	
    	
   	
    35	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.6	
  Quadrant	
  Evaluation	
   Quadrants	
  were	
  defined	
  as	
  mesial,	
  distal,	
  buccal	
  and	
  lingual	
  quadrants;	
  each	
  quadrant	
   was	
  measured	
  as	
  a	
  sector	
  equal	
  to	
  one	
  quarter	
  of	
  a	
  circle	
  (Fig.	
  16).	
  	
  The	
  quadrants	
  that	
   were	
  affected	
  by	
  NaOCl	
  were	
  defined	
  as	
  the	
  quadrants	
  out	
  of	
  four	
  that	
  were	
  visibly	
   bleached	
  white.	
  The	
  quadrants	
  that	
  were	
  penetrated	
  by	
  dye	
  were	
  defined	
  as	
  quadrants	
   out	
  of	
  four	
  that	
  were	
  visibly	
  dyed	
  purple.	
  	
   Percentage	
  of	
  quadrants	
  affected	
  by	
  bleach	
  was	
  calculated	
  as:	
   The	
  number	
  of	
  quadrants	
  affected	
  by	
  NaOCl	
  /	
  number	
  of	
  quadrants	
  penetrated	
  by	
  dye.	
  	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  16.	
  Quadrant	
  Measurement	
   	
    	
    	
    	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    36	
    	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  17.	
  Experimental	
  Flowchart	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    37	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.7	
  Statistical	
  Analysis	
   Statistical	
  analysis	
  was	
  performed	
  in	
  SPSS	
  16.0	
  (SPSS	
  Inc.	
  Chicago,	
  IL,	
  USA)	
  for	
   Windows.	
   The	
  experimental	
  groups	
  were	
  statistically	
  compared	
  for	
  dye	
  penetration	
  to	
  determine	
   if	
  there	
  were	
  significant	
  differences	
  between	
  them.	
  The	
  Pearson	
  Chi-­‐Square	
  test	
  was	
   performed	
  for	
  each	
  experimental	
  group	
  based	
  on	
  location	
  (coronal,	
  middle	
  or	
  apical)	
  in	
   the	
  canal.	
   Means	
  and	
  standard	
  deviations	
  of	
  maximum	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  depth	
  were	
  calculated	
   and	
  recorded.	
  Homogeneity	
  of	
  variance	
  was	
  determined	
  using	
  Levene’s	
  test.	
  Two-­‐way	
   ANOVA	
  was	
  applied	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
  maximum	
  penetration	
  depth	
  at	
  each	
  location	
  in	
  the	
   canal	
  with	
  location	
  and	
  technique	
  as	
  factors.	
  A	
  significance	
  level	
  of	
  0.05	
  was	
  used.	
  One-­‐ Way	
  ANOVA	
  with	
  post	
  hoc	
  analysis	
  with	
  LSD	
  adjustment	
  were	
  made	
  within	
  each	
  group	
  to	
   obtain	
  further	
  sub-­‐group	
  comparisons	
  (e.g.	
  EV	
  coronal	
  versus	
  EV	
  apical).	
  	
   For	
  the	
  affected	
  quadrant	
  analysis,	
  the	
  penetration	
  areas	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  (quadrants	
  bleached	
   white/quadrants	
  stained	
  by	
  dye)	
  were	
  scored	
  from	
  0	
  (no	
  penetration)	
  to	
  4	
  (four	
  areas	
   penetration)	
  as	
  ordinal	
  data.	
  The	
  Pearson	
  Chi-­‐square	
  test	
  with	
  Cochran-­‐Mantel-­‐Haenszel	
   (CMH)	
  method	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  test	
  for	
  significant	
  differences	
  among	
  treatment	
  groups	
   separately	
  at	
  each	
  location	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  and	
  for	
  all	
  different	
  treatments.	
  A	
  significance	
   level	
  of	
  0.05	
  was	
  used.	
    	
    	
    	
    38	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Chapter	
  3:	
  Results	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3.1	
  Comparison	
  of	
  Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  for	
  Experimental	
  Groups	
   The	
  four	
  experimental	
  groups	
  were	
  compared	
  for	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  quadrants	
  that	
   exhibited	
  dye	
  penetration.	
  This	
  step	
  confirmed	
  there	
  were	
  no	
  statistically	
  significant	
   differences	
  in	
  dye	
  penetration	
  between	
  the	
  groups,	
  so	
  that	
  comparisons	
  could	
  be	
  made	
   between	
  them.	
  The	
  chi-­‐square	
  test	
  was	
  performed	
  comparing	
  each	
  group	
  by	
  location	
  in	
   the	
  canal	
  (coronal,	
  middle,	
  and	
  apical).	
  	
  The	
  p	
  values	
  for	
  each	
  location	
  were	
  >0.05	
   indicating	
  that	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  statistically	
  significant	
  difference	
  in	
  dye	
  penetration	
  between	
   the	
  groups	
  based	
  on	
  location	
  (coronal,	
  middle	
  or	
  apical)	
  in	
  the	
  canal.	
  The	
  Chi-­‐Square	
  Test	
   results	
  by	
  location:	
  	
   Coronal	
  (comparing	
  all	
  four	
  experimental	
  groups)(p=0.764)	
   	
  Middle	
  (comparing	
  all	
  four	
  experimental	
  groups)(p=0.291)	
   	
  Apical	
  (comparing	
  all	
  four	
  experimental	
  groups)(p=0.535)	
   	
   A	
  comparison	
  of	
  the	
  quadrant	
  dye	
  penetration	
  for	
  each	
  location	
  (coronal,	
  middle	
  and	
   apical)	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  surface,	
  which	
  presented	
  dye	
  penetration,	
  is	
  shown	
  in	
  Tables	
  1,2,	
  3	
  &	
  4	
   and	
  Figure	
  18.	
  	
   	
   Table	
  1.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  by	
  Location	
  &	
  Surface.	
    	
   	
    39	
    Table	
  2.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  in	
  Coronal	
  Location	
  by	
  Location	
  &	
  Surface	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Table	
  3.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  in	
  Middle	
  Location	
  by	
  Surface	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    40	
    Table	
  4.	
  Experimental	
  Groups-­‐Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  in	
  Apical	
  Location	
  by	
  Surface	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    	
   Figure	
  18.	
  	
  Number	
  of	
  Dyed	
  Quadrants	
  (out	
  of	
  60)	
  by	
  Location	
  in	
  the	
  Canal	
   	
    	
    	
    	
    41	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3.2	
  Maximum	
  Penetration	
  Depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  by	
  Location	
  and	
  Group	
   The	
  penetration	
  depth	
  was	
  only	
  calculated	
  for	
  the	
  quadrants	
  which	
  had	
  dye	
   penetration.	
  The	
  means	
  and	
  standard	
  deviations	
  of	
  maximum	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  depth	
   were	
  calculated	
  (Table	
  2).	
  The	
  groups	
  were	
  tested	
  for	
  homogeneity	
  of	
  variances	
  using	
  the	
   Levene’s	
  Test	
  (p=0.210),	
  which	
  indicated	
  that	
  the	
  variances	
  were	
  homogenously	
   distributed.	
  Since	
  the	
  data	
  was	
  normally	
  distributed,	
  parametric	
  tests	
  were	
  used	
  to	
   compare	
  the	
  groups.	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  Two-­‐Way	
  ANOVA	
  was	
  performed	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  experimental	
  groups	
  considering	
   location	
  (coronal,	
  middle,	
  apical)	
  and	
  experimental	
  groups	
  (N,	
  EA,	
  PUS,	
  EV)	
  as	
  factors.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   Table	
  5.	
  Maximum	
  Mean	
  Penetration	
  Depth	
  by	
  Group	
  and	
  Location	
    	
    	
  	
   	
    	
    	
    42	
    	
  	
  	
  3.2.1.	
  Differences	
  by	
  Location	
   The	
  maximum	
  mean	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  for	
  each	
  group	
  and	
  location	
  is	
  shown	
   in	
  Figure	
  19.	
  	
  When	
  comparing	
  the	
  penetration	
  by	
  location,	
  only	
  the	
  EV	
  group	
  showed	
   statistically	
  significant	
  differences.	
  Post	
  hoc	
  test	
  were	
  performed	
  (p<0.05)	
  and	
  the	
  results	
   indicated	
  statistically	
  significant	
  differences	
  in	
  the	
  maximum	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
   for	
  the	
  EV	
  group	
  between	
  the	
  coronal	
  and	
  apical	
  locations	
  (indicated	
  by	
  *	
  in	
  Table	
  2).	
  	
   Despite	
  the	
  non-­‐significance	
  of	
  the	
  differences	
  between	
  locations,	
  data	
  shows	
  that	
  in	
   general,	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  higher	
  penetration	
  at	
  the	
  coronal	
  level,	
  followed	
  by	
  middle	
  and	
  then	
   apical.	
  This	
  phenomenon	
  was	
  only	
  different	
  for	
  the	
  PUS	
  group,	
  where	
  the	
  middle	
  area	
  was	
   the	
  one	
  with	
  the	
  highest	
  penetration	
  followed	
  by	
  the	
  apical	
  and	
  then	
  coronal,	
  as	
  seen	
  in	
   Figure	
  18.	
   	
    Figure	
  19.	
  Maximum	
  Mean	
  Penetration	
  Depth	
  by	
  Group	
  and	
  Location	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    	
    43	
    	
  	
  	
  3.2.2.	
  Differences	
  by	
  Technique	
   The	
  maximum	
  mean	
  penetration	
  depth	
  by	
  group	
  shows	
  that	
  the	
  highest	
  mean	
   penetration	
  was	
  found	
  for	
  the	
  N,	
  followed	
  by	
  EA,	
  then	
  EV	
  and	
  finally	
  the	
  PUS.	
  When	
   comparing	
  these	
  groups	
  by	
  location,	
  we	
  found	
  a	
  p-­‐value	
  greater	
  than	
  0.05	
  (p=0.215)	
   showing	
  that	
  the	
  difference	
  between	
  the	
  experimental	
  groups	
  was	
  not	
  statistically	
   significant.	
  	
   The	
  One-­‐Way	
  ANOVA	
  (p>	
  0.05)	
  was	
  performed	
  to	
  evaluate	
  subgroup	
  comparisons.	
   The	
  median	
  penetration	
  depth	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  each	
  group	
  (N,	
  EA,	
  EV,	
  PUS),	
  all	
   locations	
  combined.	
  Although	
  all	
  locations	
  were	
  combined	
  there	
  was	
  still	
  no	
  statistically	
   significant	
  difference	
  between	
  groups.	
  These	
  results	
  may	
  be	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  higher	
  variability	
   within	
  each	
  group	
  as	
  seen	
  by	
  the	
  large	
  confidence	
  intervals	
  indicating	
  greater	
  levels	
  of	
   variance	
  within	
  the	
  penetration	
  depth	
  for	
  each	
  group	
  (Figure	
  20).	
    N	
    Figure	
  20.	
  Median	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  by	
  Technique	
   	
    	
   	
    	
    44	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3.3.	
  NaOCl	
  Affected	
  Quadrants	
  by	
  Group	
  Compared	
   Overall,	
  the	
  technique	
  that	
  resulted	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  NaOCl	
  affected	
  (bleached	
  white)	
   quadrants	
  by	
  location	
  was	
  determined	
  by	
  counting	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  affected	
   quadrants	
  and	
  comparing	
  them	
  to	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  dyed	
  quadrants	
  (stained	
  purple).	
  The	
   highest	
  number	
  of	
  quadrants	
  bleached	
  white	
  (compared	
  to	
  dyed	
  quadrants)	
  occurred	
  in	
   the	
  coronal	
  with	
  the	
  EA,	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  third	
  with	
  the	
  EV	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  with	
  the	
  EA.	
   These	
  findings	
  can	
  be	
  seen	
  in	
  Table	
  3	
  as	
  percentage	
  penetration	
  calculated	
  as	
  percentage	
   of	
  bleached	
  /dyed	
  quadrants	
  and	
  is	
  shown	
  in	
  Figure	
  21.	
   	
   Table	
  6.	
  Percentage	
  NaOCl	
  Penetration	
  by	
  Group	
  &	
  Location	
    	
    	
    	
   Figure	
  21.	
  NaOCl	
  Affected	
  Quadrants	
  by	
  Group	
  &	
  Location	
    	
    	
   	
    45	
    The	
  Pearson	
  Chi-­‐square	
  test	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  compare	
  experimental	
  groups	
  by	
  location	
   within	
  the	
  canal	
  (coronal,	
  middle,	
  apical)(p=0.872)	
  and	
  then	
  by	
  technique	
  (N,	
  EA,	
  PUS,	
   EV)(p=0.675).	
  This	
  test	
  shows	
  that	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  statistically	
  significant	
  difference	
  in	
   percentage	
  penetration	
  (NaOCl	
  affected	
  quadrants/dyed	
  quadrants)	
  between	
  groups	
  or	
   by	
  location	
  within	
  the	
  canal.	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    	
    46	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Chapter	
  4:	
  Discussion	
   	
  The	
  present	
  study	
  was	
  conducted	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  effect	
  of	
  agitation	
  on	
  the	
  penetration	
   depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  at	
  a	
  microscopic	
  level.	
  To	
  date	
  there	
  have	
  been	
  very	
   few	
  studies	
  that	
  have	
  evaluated	
  the	
  penetration	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  at	
  a	
   microscopic	
  level.	
  In	
  2010,	
  Zou	
  et	
  al.	
  did	
  a	
  study	
  examining	
  the	
  penetration	
  of	
  irrigants	
   (NaOCl)	
  into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  without	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  agitation.	
  A	
  microscopic	
  examination	
  was	
   performed	
  and	
  the	
  maximum	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  into	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  was	
  300	
   μm.	
  Prior	
  research	
  has	
  shown	
  that	
  E.	
  faecalis	
  can,	
  however,	
  penetrate	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  to	
   up	
  to	
  a	
  depth	
  of	
  1000	
  μm	
  (Haapasalo	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  	
  Therefore,	
  adjuncts	
  to	
  standard	
  needle	
   irrigation	
  have	
  been	
  sought.	
  Agitation	
  of	
  the	
  irrigant	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  enhance	
  the	
   removal	
  of	
  canal	
  debris	
  and	
  to	
  reduce	
  irrigant	
  saturation	
  (Nadalin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Ribeiro	
  et	
   al.,	
  2011).	
  Therefore,	
  the	
  current	
  microscopic	
  study	
  was	
  performed	
  to	
  ascertain	
  if	
   agitation	
  would	
  improve	
  the	
  penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  in	
  dentinal	
  tubules.	
  Our	
  study	
   was	
  created	
  to	
  simulate	
  the	
  clinical	
  use	
  of	
  commonly	
  utilized	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  systems	
   and	
  to	
  compare	
  them	
  with	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
   depth.	
  The	
  access	
  openings	
  made	
  in	
  the	
  teeth	
  simulated	
  the	
  size	
  and	
  shape	
  of	
  the	
  access	
   openings	
  made	
  in	
  vivo;	
  the	
  access	
  cavities	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  accommodate	
  instrumentation	
   files	
  without	
  binding	
  along	
  canal	
  walls	
  and	
  provided	
  space	
  to	
  act	
  as	
  a	
  reservoir	
  for	
  canal	
   irrigant.	
  This	
  reservoir	
  allowed	
  a	
  volume	
  of	
  irrigant	
  to	
  be	
  available	
  for	
  replenishment,	
   which	
  is	
  clinically	
  relevant	
  for	
  proper	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  (Druttman	
  and	
  Stock,	
  1989).	
   Many	
  studies	
  remove	
  the	
  coronal	
  and/or	
  apical	
  sections	
  of	
  the	
  extracted	
  tooth,	
  which	
   would	
  have	
  an	
  impact	
  on	
  the	
  replenishments	
  of	
  irrigants	
  in	
  the	
  canal.	
  	
  To	
  avoid	
  these	
   problems,	
  in	
  the	
  current	
  study,	
  the	
  apical	
  end	
  of	
  each	
  root	
  was	
  covered	
  with	
  wax	
  to	
  create	
   	
    47	
    a	
  closed	
  environment	
  to	
  simulate	
  a	
  typical	
  clinical	
  setting.	
  In	
  vivo	
  there	
  are	
  tissues	
   surrounding	
  the	
  root	
  and	
  as	
  a	
  result	
  the	
  canal	
  behaves	
  as	
  a	
  closed-­‐end	
  channel;	
  this	
   results	
  in	
  the	
  formation	
  of	
  a	
  vapor	
  lock	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  during	
  irrigation	
   (Tay	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  By	
  closing	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  each	
  canal,	
  as	
  we	
  did	
  perform	
  in	
  our	
  study,	
  all	
  of	
   the	
  teeth	
  had	
  limited	
  irrigant	
  replacement	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  as	
  occurs	
  with	
  a	
   closed	
  system	
  and	
  the	
  canals	
  were	
  as	
  earlier	
  stated	
  standardized	
  and	
  like	
  in	
  vivo	
   parameters.	
   In	
  the	
  present	
  study,	
  the	
  deepest	
  mean	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  in	
  the	
  coronal	
  and	
  middle	
   locations	
  occurred	
  with	
  N;	
  the	
  deepest	
  mean	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  location	
   occurred	
  with	
  the	
  EA.	
  With	
  all	
  irrigant	
  methods,	
  the	
  best	
  mean	
  penetration	
  depth	
   occurred	
  coronally,	
  followed	
  by	
  the	
  middle,	
  then	
  the	
  apical	
  location.	
  Despite	
  these	
   differences,	
  none	
  of	
  this	
  data	
  showed	
  a	
  statistically	
  significant	
  difference.	
  A	
  study	
  with	
  the	
   same	
  methodology	
  and	
  a	
  larger	
  sample	
  size	
  may	
  be	
  required	
  to	
  identify	
  some	
  changes	
  as	
   the	
  data	
  showed	
  a	
  tendency	
  to	
  this	
  similar	
  pattern.	
  In	
  a	
  study	
  by	
  Nair	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010),	
  similar	
   results	
  were	
  found,	
  where	
  all	
  methods	
  showed	
  the	
  best	
  debris	
  removal	
  in	
  the	
  coronal	
   third,	
  followed	
  by	
  the	
  middle	
  third,	
  then	
  finally	
  the	
  apical	
  third.	
  Nair	
  et	
  al.	
  examined	
   debris	
  removal	
  in	
  the	
  canal	
  after	
  using	
  the	
  EA,	
  F-­‐files	
  (plastic	
  polymer	
  rotary	
  file)	
  and	
   passive	
  ultrasonic	
  activation	
  (PUS).	
  The	
  EA	
  cleaned	
  the	
  apical,	
  middle	
  and	
  coronal	
  thirds	
   of	
  the	
  canal	
  better	
  than	
  the	
  other	
  irrigant	
  methods.	
  The	
  EA	
  was	
  significantly	
  better	
  in	
  the	
   apical	
  and	
  middle	
  thirds	
  for	
  debris	
  removal	
  than	
  the	
  F-­‐files.	
  It	
  should	
  be	
  noted	
  that	
  the	
  EA	
   is	
  only	
  utilized	
  after	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation.	
  Another	
  study	
  by	
  Pawar	
  et	
  al.	
  (2012)	
   demonstrated	
  that	
  antimicrobial	
  efficacy	
  of	
  EV	
  comparable	
  to	
  that	
  of	
  standard	
  needle	
   irrigation.	
  Further,	
  Johnson	
  et	
  al.	
  (2012)	
  showed	
  that	
  sonic	
  irrigation	
  to	
  be	
  no	
  better	
  for	
   	
    48	
    debris	
  debridement	
  than	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation.	
  The	
  result	
  of	
  this	
  study,	
  which	
   supports	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation,	
  is	
  clearly	
  supported	
  by	
  prior	
  research	
   studies.	
   The	
  finding	
  of	
  our	
  current	
  study	
  showed	
  that	
  N	
  delivery	
  of	
  irrigant	
  is	
  comparable	
  to	
   that	
  of	
  EV,	
  EA	
  and	
  PUS	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  irrigant	
  penetration	
  in	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  may	
  be	
   explained	
  by	
  limitations	
  that	
  occur	
  with	
  irrigation	
  of	
  teeth	
  in	
  general.	
  Retrospectively,	
  we	
   hypothesize	
  that	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  the	
  teeth	
  were	
  an	
  important	
  factor	
  limiting	
  dye	
  penetration.	
   Previous	
  research	
  has	
  shown	
  that	
  with	
  increasing	
  age	
  there	
  is	
  increased	
  peritubular	
   dentin	
  that	
  can	
  impede	
  dye	
  and	
  irrigant	
  penetration	
  within	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  (Bang	
  et	
  al.,	
   1970;	
  Love,	
  2004).	
  Further,	
  research	
  has	
  also	
  shown	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  higher	
  level	
  of	
   sclerosis	
  in	
  some	
  racial	
  groups	
  (Malaysian),	
  which	
  would	
  also	
  lead	
  to	
  less	
  NaOCl	
   penetration	
  (Whittaker	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  The	
  inability	
  to	
  select	
  teeth	
  of	
  similar	
  age	
  (and	
  tubule	
   sclerosis)	
  may	
  have	
  biased	
  our	
  groups	
  in	
  term	
  of	
  irrigant	
  penetration,	
  which	
  is	
  a	
   limitation	
  of	
  the	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  penetration	
  depth	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  research.	
  We	
  hypothesize	
   that	
  a	
  smaller	
  particle	
  size	
  other	
  than	
  crystal	
  violet	
  dye	
  could	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  improve	
  the	
   current	
  methodology.	
  	
   The	
  second	
  consideration	
  is	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  not	
  possible	
  to	
  standardize	
  the	
  solutions	
   extracted	
  teeth	
  have	
  been	
  stored	
  in	
  prior	
  to	
  being	
  donated.	
  Teeth	
  left	
  in	
  solutions	
  with	
  a	
   pH	
  that	
  is	
  not	
  neutral	
  for	
  long	
  periods	
  of	
  time	
  will	
  have	
  variable	
  dentin	
  permeability	
   (Correr	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006),	
  which	
  could	
  have	
  affected	
  the	
  penetration	
  of	
  both	
  dye	
  and	
  NaOCl.	
   This	
  may	
  have	
  nullified	
  the	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  study.	
  Further,	
  the	
  variation	
  in	
  canal	
   morphology	
  (Vertucci,	
  2005)	
  found	
  within	
  teeth	
  also	
  makes	
  it	
  difficult	
  to	
  standardize	
   teeth;	
  after	
  instrumenting	
  ovoid	
  and	
  round	
  canals	
  there	
  is	
  differing	
  amounts	
  of	
  remaining	
   	
    49	
    debris	
  in	
  the	
  canal	
  (Paqué	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
  which	
  can	
  impede	
  irrigant	
  penetration.	
  Therefore,	
   teeth	
  instrumented	
  with	
  more	
  ovoid	
  shaped	
  canals	
  may	
  have	
  had	
  less	
  irrigant	
   penetration	
  due	
  to	
  higher	
  debris	
  levels	
  in	
  the	
  canal.	
  This	
  is	
  also	
  a	
  limitation	
  of	
  our	
  study	
   and	
  results	
  should	
  be	
  analyzed	
  carefully.	
  	
  Still,	
  we	
  believe	
  that	
  studies	
  using	
  natural	
  teeth	
   have	
  a	
  high	
  value	
  and	
  are	
  likely	
  closer	
  to	
  clinical	
  practice.	
   An	
  interesting	
  finding	
  for	
  the	
  PUS	
  was	
  the	
  deepest	
  penetration	
  occurring	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
   location	
  unlike	
  other	
  studies	
  that	
  have	
  shown	
  comparative	
  penetration	
  in	
  the	
  coronal	
  and	
   middle	
  third	
  for	
  the	
  PUS	
  (Castelo-­‐Baz	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  In	
  the	
  research	
  performed	
  by	
  Castelo-­‐ Baz	
  et	
  al.	
  (2012)	
  the	
  PUS	
  was	
  moved	
  in	
  an	
  up	
  and	
  down	
  motion	
  throughout	
  the	
  irrigation	
   procedure	
  which	
  is	
  most	
  likely	
  why	
  the	
  penetration	
  of	
  irrigant	
  was	
  similar	
  6	
  mm	
  and	
  4	
   mm	
  from	
  working	
  length.	
  In	
  our	
  research	
  study	
  the	
  PUS	
  was	
  held	
  at	
  one	
  position	
   throughout	
  irrigation,	
  which	
  is	
  likely	
  why	
  the	
  irrigant	
  penetration	
  at	
  7mm	
  was	
  not	
  as	
   deep	
  as	
  was	
  observed	
  at	
  5	
  mm	
  from	
  working	
  length.	
  In	
  addition	
  the	
  PUS	
  was	
  the	
  only	
   group	
  to	
  utilize	
  21	
  mm	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  (as	
  per	
  manufacturer’s	
  recommendations)	
  while	
  the	
   other	
  groups	
  only	
  received	
  11	
  mm	
  of	
  NaOCl.	
  This	
  larger	
  volume	
  of	
  irrigant,	
  held	
  at	
  one	
   position,	
  was	
  likely	
  the	
  reason	
  that	
  the	
  PUS	
  showed	
  the	
  deepest	
  penetration	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
   location.	
  	
   When	
  we	
  analyzed	
  the	
  dye	
  and	
  NaOCl	
  penetration	
  by	
  quadrant	
  the	
  results	
  were	
   interesting.	
  	
  The	
  NaOCl	
  affected	
  quadrant	
  calculation	
  was	
  determined	
  by	
  comparing	
  the	
   number	
  of	
  irrigant-­‐penetrated	
  quadrants/number	
  of	
  quadrants	
  dyed.	
  The	
  quadrants	
   were	
  defined	
  as	
  mesial,	
  distal,	
  buccal	
  and	
  lingual	
  quadrants;	
  each	
  quadrant	
  was	
  measured	
   as	
  a	
  sector	
  equal	
  to	
  one	
  quarter	
  of	
  a	
  circle.	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  significant	
   difference	
  in	
  percentage	
  penetration	
  depth	
  between	
  irrigant	
  methods.	
  This	
  non-­‐ 	
    50	
    significant	
  finding	
  may	
  be	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  way	
  in	
  which	
  the	
  quadrants	
  were	
  examined	
  where	
   the	
  placement	
  of	
  the	
  circle	
  over	
  the	
  microscopic	
  photos	
  was	
  subjective	
  in	
  that	
  the	
   quadrants	
  may	
  have	
  been	
  shifted	
  slightly	
  to	
  the	
  right	
  or	
  left	
  for	
  each	
  tooth	
  (from	
  the	
  line	
   angles	
  joining	
  the	
  four	
  surfaces-­‐mesial,	
  buccal,	
  distal,	
  lingual).	
  This	
  would	
  have	
  resulted	
  in	
   the	
  percentage	
  penetration	
  score	
  calculation	
  that	
  less	
  accurate.	
  Another	
  limitation	
  was	
   the	
  irregular	
  penetration	
  of	
  crystal	
  violet	
  dye	
  and	
  the	
  deeper	
  penetration	
  found	
  in	
  the	
   bucco-­‐lingual	
  direction	
  compared	
  with	
  the	
  mesio-­‐distal	
  direction,	
  which	
  was	
  also	
  seen	
  in	
   a	
  previous	
  study	
  (Paqué	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  This	
  lack	
  of	
  equal	
  penetration	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  root	
   sections	
  has	
  been	
  previously	
  correlated	
  to	
  advanced	
  age	
  (Thaler	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008),	
  race	
   (Whittaker	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996)	
  and	
  less	
  numerous	
  and	
  smaller	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  in	
  this	
  region.	
   Irrigants	
  in	
  the	
  canal	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  penetrate	
  dentinal	
  tubules,	
  which	
  are	
  filled	
  with	
  liquid,	
   by	
  passive	
  diffusion	
  (Spreter	
  von	
  Kreudenstein	
  &	
  Stüben,	
  1955).	
  Diffusion	
  through	
  the	
   dentinal	
  tubules	
  is	
  controlled	
  by	
  physical	
  factors	
  including	
  dentinal	
  diffusional	
  surface	
   area,	
  dentin	
  thickness,	
  temperature,	
  widening	
  of	
  tubules	
  and	
  by	
  the	
  size,	
  charge,	
   concentration	
  and	
  water	
  or	
  lipid	
  solubility	
  of	
  the	
  diffusing	
  substance	
  (Galvan	
  et	
  al.,	
  1994).	
   As	
  a	
  result,	
  it	
  was	
  not	
  possible	
  to	
  measure	
  the	
  NaOCl	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  3mm	
  of	
  each	
  root	
  and	
  in	
   some	
  of	
  the	
  mesial	
  and	
  distal	
  quadrants	
  more	
  coronally	
  located	
  where	
  sclerosis	
   prevented	
  dye	
  penetration.	
  Future	
  studies	
  using	
  dye	
  penetration	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  suitable	
  for	
   evaluating	
  irrigant	
  penetration	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  third	
  of	
  the	
  root	
  unless	
  the	
  donor	
  age	
  is	
   known	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  apical	
  sclerosis/dye	
  penetration	
  can	
  be	
  standardized.	
  Although	
  the	
   apical	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  did	
  not	
  allow	
  dye	
  penetration,	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  penetrability	
  in	
  this	
  area	
   may	
  also	
  suggest	
  less	
  penetration	
  of	
  microorganisms	
  in	
  this	
  region	
  as	
  well.	
  It	
  has	
  been	
   reasoned	
  by	
  some	
  research	
  that	
  the	
  increasing	
  dentinal	
  sclerosis	
  that	
  occurs	
  with	
  time	
   	
    51	
    may	
  be	
  one	
  reason	
  for	
  better	
  clinical	
  outcomes	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  treatment	
  in	
  older	
  patients	
   (Ørstavik	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  Perhaps	
  irrigation	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  third	
  of	
  the	
  canal	
  is	
  not	
  as	
  critical	
  as	
   once	
  presumed	
  (Vasiliadis	
  et	
  al.,	
  1983;	
  Mjor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  Our	
  results	
  would	
  agree,	
  since	
   there	
  was	
  a	
  smaller	
  number	
  of	
  quadrants	
  penetrated	
  with	
  dye,	
  which	
  would	
  also	
  mean	
   sclerotic	
  and	
  less	
  penetrated	
  by	
  bacteria.	
  	
   In	
  addition,	
  research	
  has	
  shown	
  decreased	
  ultimate	
  tensile	
  strength	
  (UTS)	
  of	
  dentin	
  in	
   areas	
  of	
  increased	
  peritubular	
  dentin	
  (as	
  occurs	
  with	
  aging),	
  leading	
  to	
  increased	
   brittleness	
  (Arola	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  The	
  increased	
  mineralization	
  seen	
  with	
  aging	
  results	
  in	
   diminished	
  crack	
  growth	
  resistance	
  (Koester	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  This	
  may	
  be	
  the	
  reason	
  vertical	
   root	
  fractures	
  (VRF)	
  start	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  root.	
  	
  We	
  hypothesize,	
  based	
  on	
  the	
   various	
  mesial	
  and	
  distal	
  quadrants,	
  which	
  were	
  not	
  penetrated	
  by	
  dye,	
  that	
  this	
  could	
   have	
  an	
  impact	
  on	
  fracture	
  direction.	
  It	
  would	
  be	
  interesting	
  to	
  see	
  future	
  studies	
   comparing	
  dentinal	
  properties	
  of	
  buccal/lingual	
  dentin	
  to	
  mesial/distal	
  dentin	
  to	
  see	
  why	
   VRFs	
  are	
  more	
  common	
  in	
  the	
  buccolingual	
  direction	
  where	
  there	
  is	
  less	
  sclerosis	
  and	
   brittleness	
  than	
  occurs	
  mesiodistally.	
  One	
  would	
  speculate	
  that	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  more	
   strength	
  in	
  the	
  buccal	
  and	
  lingual	
  dentin	
  where	
  there	
  is	
  less	
  brittleness,	
  but	
  this	
  is	
  not	
  the	
   case.	
   The	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  conflicts	
  with	
  the	
  findings	
  of	
  other	
  studies	
  (Townsend	
  et	
  al.,	
   2009;	
  Shin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Jiang	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012),	
  where	
  one	
  irrigant	
  method	
  has	
  been	
   demonstrated	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  effective	
  than	
  the	
  other	
  methods	
  in	
  that	
  study.	
  Such	
  results,	
   indicating	
  one	
  irrigant	
  method	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  most	
  efficacious,	
  may	
  be	
  caused	
  by	
  the	
  challenges	
   encountered	
  with	
  irrigation	
  studies.	
  The	
  evaluation	
  of	
  irrigant	
  methods	
  is	
  difficult	
  and	
   studies	
  are	
  problematic	
  to	
  compare	
  since	
  research	
  methodologies	
  determining	
  irrigant	
   	
    52	
    efficacy	
  have	
  not	
  been	
  established.	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  irrigation	
  studies	
  measure	
  a	
  plethora	
  of	
   irrigant	
  parameters;	
  where	
  each	
  parameter	
  is	
  identified	
  as	
  an	
  indicator	
  for	
  irrigant	
   effectiveness.	
  These	
  measured	
  parameters	
  include	
  debris	
  removal	
  (Ribeiro	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012),	
   microbial	
  reduction	
  (Pawar	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012),	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  (Malentacca	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012),	
  fluid	
   dynamics	
  (Boutsioukis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
  and	
  irrigant	
  penetration	
  (Zou	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009)	
  within	
  the	
   canal.	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  these	
  various	
  parameters,	
  studies	
  utilize	
  varying	
  volumes	
  of	
  irrigant,	
   different	
  irrigant	
  types	
  and	
  variable	
  irrigation/agitation	
  times.	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  every	
  study	
   must	
  be	
  examined	
  closely	
  to	
  see	
  what	
  parameters	
  are	
  being	
  measured	
  to	
  identify	
  the	
   study’s	
  clinical	
  relevance.	
  For	
  example,	
  the	
  microcannula	
  of	
  the	
  EV	
  can	
  become	
  easily	
   plugged.	
  Since	
  the	
  microcannula	
  is	
  used	
  at	
  working	
  length	
  to	
  aspirate	
  irrigant,	
  it	
  is	
   important	
  to	
  ensure	
  the	
  small	
  pores	
  (0.1mm	
  diameter)	
  remain	
  free	
  of	
  debris.	
  Some	
   studies	
  have	
  reported	
  the	
  EV	
  as	
  an	
  effective	
  method	
  of	
  irrigation	
  (Nielsen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007)	
  in	
   terms	
  of	
  facilitating	
  the	
  best	
  debris	
  removal	
  compared	
  to	
  other	
  irrigant	
  methods	
  while	
   other	
  studies	
  report	
  the	
  EV	
  to	
  be	
  no	
  better	
  than	
  standard	
  N	
  irrigation	
  (Brito	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009)	
   in	
  the	
  reduction	
  of	
  intracanal	
  bacteria.	
  Although	
  each	
  of	
  these	
  studies	
  had	
  three	
  cycles	
  of	
   microirrigation,	
  neither	
  mentioned	
  checking	
  the	
  pores	
  for	
  clogging.	
  It	
  can	
  be	
  speculated	
   that	
  the	
  EV	
  system	
  may	
  have	
  performed	
  better	
  in	
  one	
  study	
  than	
  another	
  simply	
  due	
  to	
   the	
  amount	
  of	
  debris	
  remaining	
  in	
  the	
  canal,	
  which	
  may	
  have	
  caused	
  pore	
  clogging,	
  during	
   microirrigation.	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  it	
  is	
  hard	
  to	
  ascertain	
  if	
  the	
  microcannula	
  is	
  free	
  of	
  debris	
   during	
  microirrigation	
  between	
  research	
  studies.	
   	
    	
    	
    53	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Chapter	
  5:	
  Conclusion	
   This	
  study	
  supports	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  with	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  the	
  EA	
  (sonic	
  agitation	
   method)	
  to	
  enhance	
  irrigation	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
  third.	
  The	
  study	
  of	
  endodontic	
  irrigation	
  is	
   evolving	
  with	
  newer	
  methods	
  being	
  developed	
  with	
  the	
  intent	
  of	
  reaching	
  the	
  fins,	
  apical	
   ramifications	
  and	
  deltas	
  that	
  are	
  difficult	
  to	
  reach	
  by	
  standard	
  needle	
  irrigation	
  alone.	
   The	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  these	
  new	
  systems	
  is	
  difficult	
  to	
  ascertain	
  as	
  the	
  standardization	
  of	
   research	
  methods	
  is	
  challenging	
  and	
  our	
  reliance	
  on	
  in	
  vitro	
  testing,	
  where	
  we	
  can	
  never	
   be	
  completely	
  confident	
  that	
  the	
  results	
  will	
  be	
  conveyed	
  to	
  the	
  clinical	
  setting.	
  It	
  can	
  be	
   said	
  however,	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  clear	
  that	
  the	
  simpler	
  the	
  irrigation	
  system	
  the	
  better.	
  	
  A	
  recent	
   survey	
  by	
  the	
  American	
  Association	
  of	
  Endodontists	
  (AAE)	
  found	
  that	
  only	
  forty	
  five	
   percent	
  of	
  members	
  said	
  they	
  used	
  agitation	
  adjuncts	
  to	
  enhance	
  irrigation	
  efficacy	
   (Dutner	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  Clearly,	
  simpler	
  agitation	
  methods,	
  rather	
  than	
  more	
  costly	
  and	
   complex	
  ones,	
  may	
  have	
  a	
  chance	
  of	
  reaching	
  the	
  hands	
  of	
  the	
  remaining	
  fifty	
  five	
   percent	
  of	
  AAE	
  members	
  who	
  do	
  not	
  currently	
  use	
  agitation	
  with	
  irrigation	
  at	
  all.	
  The	
  EV	
   system	
  is	
  not	
  only	
  cumbersome	
  to	
  use,	
  requiring	
  at	
  least	
  two	
  people	
  to	
  hold	
  all	
  the	
   devices,	
  it	
  is	
  costly	
  since	
  the	
  microcannula	
  can	
  become	
  easily	
  clogged.	
  The	
  ProUltra	
   Piezoflow	
  is	
  good	
  in	
  theory,	
  as	
  the	
  cavitation	
  and	
  microacoustic	
  streaming	
  have	
  been	
   shown	
  effective	
  in	
  cleaning	
  the	
  canal	
  system	
  (especially	
  in	
  the	
  isthmuses	
  and	
  canal	
   ramifications).	
  The	
  benefits	
  of	
  acoustic	
  streaming	
  and	
  cavitation,	
  however,	
  quickly	
   become	
  diminished	
  or	
  prevented	
  when	
  the	
  needle	
  contacts	
  the	
  canal	
  wall.	
  It	
  is	
  well	
   known	
  that	
  the	
  most	
  commonly	
  treated	
  teeth	
  in	
  endodontics	
  are	
  the	
  posterior	
  teeth	
  and	
   few	
  of	
  these	
  have	
  straight	
  canals.	
  Therefore,	
  if	
  you	
  cannot	
  feel	
  the	
  needle	
  touching	
  the	
   wall	
  you	
  are	
  really	
  using	
  a	
  needle	
  at	
  only	
  75%	
  to	
  working	
  length.	
  As	
  for	
  the	
   	
    54	
    EndoActivator,	
  this	
  system	
  goes	
  hand	
  in	
  hand	
  with	
  needle	
  delivery	
  of	
  the	
  irrigant.	
  The	
   flexible	
  polymer	
  tips	
  of	
  the	
  EA	
  easily	
  follow	
  the	
  canal	
  curvature	
  without	
  instrumenting	
   the	
  canal	
  and	
  sends	
  sonic	
  energy	
  into	
  the	
  canal	
  for	
  further	
  debris	
  removal	
  in	
  the	
  apical	
   third.	
  Clearly	
  the	
  EA	
  and	
  N	
  go	
  together	
  and	
  are	
  affordable,	
  easy	
  to	
  use	
  and	
  efficacious	
  in	
   cleaning	
  the	
  canal.	
  	
   The	
  field	
  of	
  endodontic	
  irrigation	
  continues	
  to	
  expand	
  with	
  novel	
  irrigation	
  methods	
   including	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  nanoparticles.	
  	
  Chitosan	
  nanoparticulates	
  and	
  zinc	
  oxide	
   nanoparticulates	
  have	
  demonstrated	
  significant	
  antibiofilm	
  properties	
  lasting	
  up	
  to	
   three	
  months	
  (Shrestha	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
  in	
  duration.	
  	
  These	
  nanoparticles	
  can	
  be	
  delivered	
   to	
  dental	
  hard	
  tissue	
  by	
  high	
  intensity	
  focused	
  ultrasound	
  (HIFU)(Ohl	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
  and	
   recent	
  research	
  has	
  reported	
  that	
  nanoparticles	
  can	
  also	
  reinforce	
  dentin	
  collagen	
   (Shrestha	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  Since	
  nanoparticles	
  can	
  be	
  delivered	
  by	
  ultrasonic	
  energy	
  it	
   would	
  be	
  worthwhile	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
  delivery	
  of	
  nanoparticles	
  by	
  sonic	
  energy	
  (such	
  as	
   the	
  EA).	
  Still,	
  these	
  methods	
  have	
  to	
  go	
  through	
  various	
  studies	
  with	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
   methodologies.	
  As	
  shown	
  in	
  our	
  current	
  study,	
  small	
  changes	
  in	
  the	
  methodology	
  and	
   the	
  use	
  of	
  real	
  teeth	
  may	
  show	
  that	
  new	
  technologies	
  are	
  sometimes	
  only	
  more	
   cumbersome	
  and	
  expensive,	
  with	
  the	
  same	
  final	
  efficiency.	
  As	
  mentioned	
  before,	
  the	
   easier	
  the	
  irrigant	
  delivery	
  system	
  is	
  to	
  use,	
  the	
  more	
  likely	
  it	
  is	
  to	
  be	
  used.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
  	
    	
   	
    55	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  References	
   Abarajithan,	
  M.,	
  Dham,	
  S.,	
  Velmurugan,	
  N.,	
  Valerian-­‐Albuquerque,	
  D.,	
  Ballal,	
  S.,	
  &	
   Senthilkumar,	
  H.	
  (2011).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  EndoVac	
  irrigation	
  system	
  with	
  conventional	
   irrigation	
  for	
  removal	
  of	
  intracanal	
  smear	
  layer:	
  an	
  in	
  vitro	
  study.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
   medicine,	
  oral	
  pathology,	
  oral	
  radiology,	
  and	
  endodontics,	
  112(3),	
  407–411.	
  	
   	
   Abbott,	
  P.	
  V.,	
  Heijkoop,	
  P.	
  S.,	
  Cardaci,	
  S.	
  C.,	
  Hume,	
  W.	
  R.,	
  &	
  Heithersay,	
  G.	
  S.	
  (1991).	
  An	
  SEM	
   study	
  of	
  the	
  effects	
  of	
  different	
  irrigation	
  sequences	
  and	
  ultrasonics.	
  International	
   Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  24(6),	
  308–316.	
   	
   Abou-­‐Rass,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Oglesby,	
  S.	
  W.	
  (1981).	
  The	
  effects	
  of	
  temperature,	
  concentration,	
  and	
   tissue	
  type	
  on	
  the	
  solvent	
  ability	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  7(8),	
   376–377.	
  	
   	
   Abou-­‐Rass,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Piccinino,	
  M.	
  V.	
  (1982).	
  The	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  four	
  clinical	
  irrigation	
   methods	
  on	
  the	
  removal	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  debris.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
  and	
  oral	
   pathology,	
  54(3),	
  323–328.	
   	
   Abou-­‐Rass,	
  M.	
  &	
  Patonai,	
  F.J.	
  (1982).	
  The	
  effects	
  of	
  decreasing	
  surface	
  tension	
  on	
  the	
  flow	
   of	
  irrigating	
  solution	
  in	
  narrow	
  root	
  canals.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
  and	
  oral	
   pathology,	
  53(5),	
  524-­‐526.	
   	
   Adcock,	
  J.	
  M.,	
  Sidow,	
  S.	
  J.,	
  Looney,	
  S.	
  W.,	
  Liu,	
  Y.,	
  McNally,	
  K.,	
  Lindsey,	
  K.,	
  &	
  Tay,	
  F.	
  R.	
  (2011).	
   Histologic	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  Canal	
  and	
  Isthmus	
  Debridement	
  Efficacies	
  of	
  Two	
  Different	
   Irrigant	
  Delivery	
  Techniques	
  in	
  a	
  Closed	
  System.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  37(4),	
  544–548.	
  	
   	
   Ahmad,	
  M.,	
  Pitt	
  Ford,	
  T.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Crum,	
  L.	
  A.	
  (1987).	
  Ultrasonic	
  debridement	
  of	
  root	
  canals:	
   acoustic	
  streaming	
  and	
  its	
  possible	
  role.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  13(10),	
  490–499.	
   	
   Akpata,	
  E.	
  S.,	
  &	
  Blechman,	
  H.	
  (1982).	
  Bacterial	
  Invasion	
  of	
  Pulpal	
  Dentin	
  Wall	
  in	
  vitro.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Dental	
  Research,	
  61(2),	
  435–438.	
   	
  	
   Al-­‐Ali,	
  M.,	
  Sathorn,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Parashos,	
  P.	
  (2012).	
  Root	
  canal	
  debridement	
  efficacy	
  of	
  different	
   final	
  irrigation	
  protocols.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  45(10),	
  898–906.	
   	
   Alani,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Al-­‐Hashimi,	
  W.	
  (2012).	
  A	
  study	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  cleaning	
  efficiency	
  of	
  three	
   different	
  irrigation	
  devices	
  at	
  different	
  root	
  canal	
  levels	
  (An	
  in	
  vitro	
  study).	
  J	
  Bagh	
  College	
   Dentistry,	
  23,	
  1–6.	
   	
   Alavi,	
  A.	
  M.,	
  Opasanon,	
  A.,	
  Ng,	
  Y.-­‐L.,	
  &	
  Gulabivala,	
  K.	
  (2002).	
  Root	
  and	
  canal	
  morphology	
  of	
   Thai	
  maxillary	
  molars.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  35(5),	
  478–485.	
  	
   	
   Albrecht,	
  L.	
  J.,	
  Baumgartner,	
  J.	
  C.,	
  &	
  Marshall,	
  J.	
  G.	
  (2004).	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  apical	
  debris	
   removal	
  using	
  various	
  sizes	
  and	
  tapers	
  of	
  ProFile	
  GT	
  files.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  30(6),	
   425–428.	
  	
   	
   56	
    Alves,	
  F.	
  R.	
  F.,	
  Almeida,	
  B.	
  M.,	
  Neves,	
  M.	
  A.	
  S.,	
  Moreno,	
  J.	
  O.,	
  Rôças,	
  I.	
  N.,	
  &	
  Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.,	
  Jr.	
   (2011).	
  Disinfecting	
  Oval-­‐shaped	
  Root	
  Canals:	
  Effectiveness	
  of	
  Different	
  Supplementary	
   Approaches.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  37(4),	
  496–501.	
  	
   	
   Amato,	
  M.,	
  Vanoni-­‐Heineken,	
  I.,	
  Hecker,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Weiger,	
  R.	
  (2011).	
  Curved	
  versus	
  straight	
   root	
  canals:	
  the	
  benefit	
  of	
  activated	
  irrigation	
  techniques	
  on	
  dentin	
  debris	
  removal.	
  Oral	
   Surgery,	
  Oral	
  Medicine,	
  Oral	
  Pathology,	
  Oral	
  Radiology,	
  and	
  Endodontology,	
  111(4),	
  529– 534.	
  	
   	
   Arias-­‐Moliz,	
  M.	
  T.,	
  Ferrer-­‐Luque,	
  C.	
  M.,	
  Espigares-­‐García,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Baca,	
  P.	
  (2009).	
   Enterococcus	
  faecalis	
  biofilms	
  eradication	
  by	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigants.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   35(5),	
  711–714.	
  	
   	
   Baker,	
  N.	
  A.,	
  Eleazer,	
  P.	
  D.,	
  Averbach,	
  R.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Seltzer,	
  S.	
  (1975).	
  Scanning	
  electron	
   microscopic	
  study	
  of	
  the	
  efficacy	
  of	
  various	
  irrigating	
  solutions.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   1(4),	
  127–135.	
  	
   	
   Baratto-­‐Filho,	
  F.,	
  de	
  Carvalho,	
  J.	
  R.,	
  Fariniuk,	
  L.	
  F.,	
  Sousa-­‐Neto,	
  M.	
  D.,	
  Pécora,	
  J.	
  D.,	
  &	
  da	
   Cruz-­‐Filho,	
  A.	
  M.	
  (2004).	
  Morphometric	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  different	
   concentrations	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  associated	
  with	
  rotary	
  instrumentation	
  for	
  root	
   canal	
  cleaning.	
  Braz	
  Dent	
  J,	
  15(1),	
  36–40.	
   	
   Basrani,	
  B.	
  R.,	
  Manek,	
  S.,	
  Mathers,	
  D.,	
  Fillery,	
  E.,	
  &	
  Sodhi,	
  R.	
  N.	
  S.	
  (2010).	
  Determination	
  of	
   4-­‐chloroaniline	
  and	
  its	
  derivatives	
  formed	
  in	
  the	
  interaction	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  and	
   chlorhexidine	
  by	
  using	
  gas	
  chromatography.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(2),	
  312–314.	
  	
   	
   Basrani,	
  B.	
  R.,	
  Manek,	
  S.,	
  Sodhi,	
  R.	
  N.,	
  Fillery,	
  E.,	
  &	
  Manzur,	
  A.	
  (2007).	
  Interaction	
  between	
   Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
  and	
  Chlorhexidine	
  Gluconate.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  33(8),	
  4–4.	
  	
   	
   Baugh,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Wallace,	
  J.	
  (2005).	
  The	
  role	
  of	
  apical	
  instrumentation	
  in	
  root	
  canal	
  treatment:	
   a	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  literature.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  31(5),	
  333–340.	
   	
   Baumgartner,	
  J.	
  C.,	
  &	
  Ibay,	
  A.	
  C.	
  (1987).	
  The	
  Chemical	
  Reactions	
  of	
  Irrigants	
  Used	
  for	
  Root	
   Canal	
  Debridement.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  13(2),	
  47–51.	
  	
   	
   Baumgartner,	
  J.	
  C.,	
  &	
  Mader,	
  C.	
  L.	
  (1987).	
  A	
  scanning	
  electron	
  microscopic	
  evaluation	
  of	
   four	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation	
  regimens.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  13(4),	
  147–157.	
   	
   Baumann,	
  M.	
  A.	
  (2004).	
  Nickel-­‐titanium:	
  options	
  and	
  challenges.	
  Dental	
  Clinics	
  of	
  North	
   America,	
  48(1),	
  55-­‐67.	
   	
   Berber,	
  V.	
  B.,	
  Gomes,	
  B.	
  P.	
  F.	
  A.,	
  Sena,	
  N.	
  T.,	
  Vianna,	
  M.	
  E.,	
  Ferraz,	
  C.	
  C.	
  R.,	
  Zaia,	
  A.	
  A.,	
  &	
   Souza-­‐Filho,	
  F.	
  J.	
  (2006).	
  Efficacy	
  of	
  various	
  concentrations	
  of	
  NaOCl	
  and	
  instrumentation	
   techniques	
  in	
  reducing	
  Enterococcus	
  faecalis	
  within	
  root	
  canals	
  and	
  dentinal	
  tubules.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  39(1),	
  10–17.	
  	
   	
   	
   57	
    Berutti,	
  E.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Marini,	
  R.	
  R.	
  (1996).	
  A	
  scanning	
  electron	
  microscopic	
  evaluation	
  of	
  the	
   debridement	
  capability	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  at	
  different	
  temperatures.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  22(9),	
  4–4.	
  	
   Berutti,	
  E.,	
  Marini,	
  R.,	
  &	
  Angeretti,	
  A.	
  (1997).	
  Penetration	
  ability	
  of	
  different	
  irrigants	
  into	
   dentinal	
  tubules.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  23(12),	
  725–727.	
  	
   	
   Boutsioukis,	
  C.,	
  Lambrianidis	
  T.,	
  Vasiliadis	
  L.	
  (2007).	
  Clinical	
  relevance	
  of	
  standardization	
   of	
  endodontic	
  irrigation	
  needle	
  dimensions	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  ISO	
  9626:	
  1991	
  and	
  9626:	
   1991/Amd	
  1:	
  2001	
  specification.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  40	
  (9),	
  700-­‐706.	
   	
   Boutsioukis,	
  C.,	
  Gogos,	
  C.,	
  Verhaagen,	
  B.,	
  Versluis,	
  M.,	
  Kastrinakis,	
  E.,	
  &	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
   M.	
  (2010a).	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
  apical	
  preparation	
  size	
  on	
  irrigant	
  flow	
  in	
  root	
  canals	
  evaluated	
   using	
  an	
  unsteady	
  Computational	
  Fluid	
  Dynamics	
  model.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
   Journal,	
  43(10),	
  874–881.	
  	
   	
   Boutsioukis,	
  C.,	
  Lambrianidis,	
  T.,	
  &	
  Kastrinakis,	
  E.	
  (2009).	
  Irrigant	
  flow	
  within	
  a	
  prepared	
   root	
  canal	
  using	
  various	
  flow	
  rates:	
  a	
  Computational	
  Fluid	
  Dynamics	
  study.	
  International	
   Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  42(2),	
  144–155.	
  	
   	
   Boutsioukis,	
  C.,	
  Verhaagen,	
  B.,	
  Versluis,	
  M.,	
  Kastrinakis,	
  E.,	
  Wesselink,	
  P.	
  R.,	
  &	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
   L.	
  W.	
  M.	
  (2010b).	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  irrigant	
  flow	
  in	
  the	
  root	
  canal	
  using	
  different	
  needle	
  types	
   by	
  an	
  unsteady	
  computational	
  fluid	
  dynamics	
  model.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(5),	
  875– 879.	
  	
   	
   Brito,	
  P.	
  R.	
  R.,	
  Souza,	
  L.	
  C.,	
  de	
  Oliveira	
  PhD,	
  J.	
  C.	
  M.,	
  Alves,	
  F.	
  R.	
  F.,	
  De-­‐Deus,	
  G.,	
  Lopes,	
  H.	
  P.,	
  &	
   Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.	
  (2009a).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  the	
  Effectiveness	
  of	
  Three	
  Irrigation	
  Techniques	
  in	
   Reducing	
  Intracanal	
  Enterococcus	
  faecalis	
  Populations:	
  An	
  In	
  Vitro	
  Study.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  35(10),	
  1422–1427.	
  	
   	
   Brito,	
  P.	
  R.	
  R.,	
  Souza,	
  L.	
  C.,	
  Machado	
  de	
  Oliveira,	
  J.	
  C.,	
  Alves,	
  F.	
  R.	
  F.,	
  De-­‐Deus,	
  G.,	
  Lopes,	
  H.	
  P.,	
   &	
  Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.,	
  Jr.	
  (2009b).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  the	
  Effectiveness	
  of	
  Three	
  Irrigation	
   Techniques	
  in	
  Reducing	
  Intracanal	
  Enterococcus	
  faecalis	
  Populations:	
  An	
  In	
  Vitro	
  Study.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  35(10),	
  1422–1427.	
  	
   	
   Bronnec,	
  F.,	
  Bouillaguet,	
  S.,	
  &	
  Machtou,	
  P.	
  (2010).	
  Ex	
  vivo	
  assessment	
  of	
  irrigant	
   penetration	
  and	
  renewal	
  during	
  the	
  cleaning	
  and	
  shaping	
  of	
  root	
  canals:	
  a	
  digital	
   subtraction	
  radiographic	
  study.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  43(4),	
  275–282.	
  	
   	
   Brown,	
  D.	
  C.,	
  Moore,	
  B.	
  K.,	
  Brown,	
  C.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Newton,	
  C.	
  W.	
  (1995).	
  An	
  in	
  vitro	
  study	
  of	
  apical	
   extrusion	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  during	
  endodontic	
  canal	
  preparation.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  21(12),	
  587–591.	
  	
   	
   Brunson,	
  M.,	
  Heilborn,	
  C.,	
  Johnson,	
  D.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Cohenca,	
  N.	
  (2010).	
  Effect	
  of	
  Apical	
  Preparation	
   Size	
  and	
  Preparation	
  Taper	
  on	
  Irrigant	
  Volume	
  Delivered	
  by	
  Using	
  Negative	
  Pressure	
   Irrigation	
  System.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(4),	
  721–724.	
  	
   	
   	
   58	
    Buck,	
  R.,	
  Eleazer,	
  P.	
  D.,	
  Staat,	
  R.	
  H.	
  (1999).	
  In	
  vitro	
  disinfection	
  of	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  by	
   various	
  endodontic	
  irrigants.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  25(12),	
  786-­‐788.	
   	
   Burleson,	
  A.,	
  Nusstein,	
  J.,	
  Reader,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Beck,	
  M.	
  (2007).	
  The	
  In	
  Vivo	
  Evaluation	
  of	
   Hand/Rotary/Ultrasound	
  Instrumentation	
  in	
  Necrotic,	
  Human	
  Mandibular	
  Molars.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  33(7),	
  782–787.	
  	
   	
   Bystrom,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Sundqvist,	
  G.	
  (1981).	
  Bacteriologic	
  evaluation	
  of	
  the	
  efficacy	
  of	
  mechanical	
   root	
  canal	
  instrumentation	
  in	
  endodontic	
  therapy.	
  European	
  Journal	
  of	
  Oral	
  Sciences,	
   89(4),	
  321–328.	
  	
   	
   Bystrom,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Sundqvist,	
  G.	
  (1985).	
  The	
  antibacterial	
  action	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  and	
   EDTA	
  in	
  60	
  cases	
  of	
  endodontic	
  therapy.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  18(1),	
  35–40.	
   Cambruzzi,	
  J.	
  V.,	
  &	
  Marshall,	
  F.	
  J.	
  (1983).	
  Molar	
  endodontic	
  surgery.	
  Journal	
  (Canadian	
   Dental	
  Association),	
  49(1),	
  61.	
   	
   Cameron,	
  J.	
  A.	
  (1987).	
  The	
  synergistic	
  relationship	
  between	
  ultrasound	
  and	
  sodium	
   hypochlorite:	
  a	
  scanning	
  electron	
  microscope	
  evaluation.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  13(11),	
   541–545.	
  	
   	
   Cameron,	
  J.	
  A.	
  (1988).	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
  ultrasonic	
  endodontics	
  on	
  the	
  temperature	
  of	
  the	
  root	
   canal	
  wall.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  14(11),	
  554–559.	
  	
   	
   Camps,	
  J.,	
  Pommel,	
  L.,	
  Aubut,	
  V.,	
  Verhille,	
  B.,	
  Satoshi,	
  F.,	
  Lascola,	
  B.,	
  &	
  About,	
  I.	
  (2009).	
   Shelf	
  life,	
  dissolving	
  action,	
  and	
  antibacterial	
  activity	
  of	
  a	
  neutralized	
  2.5%	
  sodium	
   hypochlorite	
  solution.	
  Oral	
  Surgery,	
  108(2),	
  e66-­‐e73.	
   	
   Card,	
  S.	
  J.,	
  Sigurdsson,	
  A.,	
  Orstavik,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Trope,	
  M.	
  (2002).	
  The	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  increased	
   apical	
  enlargement	
  in	
  reducing	
  intracanal	
  bacteria.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  28(11),	
  779– 783.	
  	
   	
   Caron,	
  G.,	
  Nham,	
  K.,	
  Bronnec,	
  F.,	
  &	
  Machtou,	
  P.	
  (2010).	
  Effectiveness	
  of	
  Different	
  Final	
   Irrigant	
  Activation	
  Protocols	
  on	
  Smear	
  Layer	
  Removal	
  in	
  Curved	
  Canals.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  36(8),	
  1361-­‐1366.	
  	
   	
   Carrasco,	
  L.	
  D.,	
  Pécora,	
  J.	
  D.,	
  &	
  Fröner,	
  I.	
  C.	
  (2004).	
  In	
  vitro	
  assessment	
  of	
  dentinal	
   permeability	
  after	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  ultrasonic-­‐activated	
  irrigants	
  in	
  the	
  pulp	
  chamber	
  before	
   internal	
  dental	
  bleaching.	
  Dental	
  Traumatology:	
  official	
  publication	
  of	
  International	
   Association	
  for	
  Dental	
  Traumatology,	
  20(3),	
  164–168.	
  	
   	
   Carrigan,	
  P.	
  J.,	
  Morse,	
  D.	
  R.,	
  Furst,	
  M.	
  L.,	
  &	
  Sinai,	
  I.	
  H.	
  (1984).	
  A	
  scanning	
  electron	
   microscopic	
  evaluation	
  of	
  human	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  according	
  to	
  age	
  and	
  location.	
  Journal	
   of	
  Endodontics,	
  10(8),	
  359–363.	
  	
   	
    	
    59	
    Carver,	
  K.,	
  Nusstein,	
  J.,	
  Reader,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Beck,	
  M.	
  (2007).	
  In	
  Vivo	
  Antibacterial	
  Efficacy	
  of	
   Ultrasound	
  after	
  Hand	
  and	
  Rotary	
  Instrumentation	
  in	
  Human	
  Mandibular	
  Molars.	
  Journal	
   of	
  Endodontics,	
  33(9),	
  1038–1043.	
  	
   	
   Chavez	
  de	
  Paz,	
  L.	
  E.,	
  Dahlén,	
  G.,	
  Molander,	
  A.,	
  Moller,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Bergenholtz,	
  G.	
  (2003).	
  Bacteria	
   recovered	
  from	
  teeth	
  with	
  apical	
  periodontitis	
  after	
  antimicrobial	
  endodontic	
  treatment.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  36(7),	
  500–508.	
  	
   	
   Castelo-­‐Baz,	
  P.,	
  Martín-­‐Biedma,	
  B.,	
  Cantatore,	
  G.,	
  Ruíz-­‐Piñón,	
  M.,	
  Bahillo,	
  J.,	
  Rivas-­‐Mundiña,	
   B.,	
  Varela-­‐Patiño,	
  P.	
  (2012).	
  In	
  vitro	
  comparison	
  of	
  passive	
  and	
  continuous	
  ultrasonic	
   irrigation	
  in	
  simulated	
  lateral	
  canals	
  of	
  extracted	
  teeth.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  38(5),	
   688-­‐691.	
   	
   Chhabra,	
  R.	
  S.,	
  Huff,	
  J.	
  E.,	
  Haseman,	
  J.	
  K.,	
  Elwell,	
  M.	
  R.,	
  &	
  Peters,	
  A.	
  C.	
  (1991).	
   Carcinogenicity	
  of	
  p-­‐chloroaniline	
  in	
  rats	
  and	
  mice.	
  Food	
  and	
  chemical	
  toxicology:	
  an	
   international	
  journal	
  published	
  for	
  the	
  British	
  Industrial	
  Biological	
  Research	
  Association,	
   29(2),	
  119–124.	
   	
   Chivatxaranukul,	
  P.,	
  Dashper,	
  S.	
  G.,	
  &	
  Messer,	
  H.	
  H.	
  (2008).	
  Dentinal	
  tubule	
  invasion	
  and	
   adherence	
  by	
  Enterococcus	
  faecalis.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  41(10),	
  873–882.	
  	
   	
   Chow,	
  T.	
  W.	
  (1983).	
  Mechanical	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  9(11),	
  475–479.	
   	
  	
   Christensen,	
  C.	
  E.,	
  McNeal,	
  S.	
  F.,	
  &	
  Eleazer,	
  P.	
  (2008).	
  Effect	
  of	
  lowering	
  the	
  pH	
  of	
  sodium	
   hypochlorite	
  on	
  dissolving	
  tissue	
  in	
  vitro.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  34(4),	
  449–452.	
   	
  	
   Clarkson,	
  R.	
  M.,	
  &	
  Moule,	
  A.	
  J.	
  (1998).	
  Sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  and	
  its	
  use	
  as	
  an	
  endodontic	
   irrigant.	
  Australian	
  dental	
  journal,	
  43(3),	
  250–256.	
   	
   Clarkson,	
  R.	
  M.,	
  Moule,	
  A.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Podlich,	
  H.	
  M.	
  (2001).	
  The	
  Shelf-­‐Life	
  of	
  Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
   Irrigating	
  Solutions.	
  Australian	
  dental	
  journal,	
  46(4),	
  269–276.	
   	
   Clarkson,	
  R.	
  M.,	
  Moule,	
  A.	
  J.,	
  Podlich,	
  H.,	
  Kellaway,	
  R.,	
  Macfarlane,	
  R.,	
  Lewis,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Rowell,	
  J.	
   (2006).	
  Dissolution	
  of	
  porcine	
  incisor	
  pulps	
  in	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  solutions	
  of	
  varying	
   compositions	
  and	
  concentrations.	
  Australian	
  dental	
  journal,	
  51(3),	
  245–251.	
   	
   Clegg,	
  M.	
  S.,	
  Vertucci,	
  F.	
  J.,	
  Walker,	
  C.,	
  Belanger,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Britto,	
  L.	
  R.	
  (2006).	
  The	
  Effect	
  of	
   Exposure	
  to	
  Irrigant	
  Solutions	
  on	
  Apical	
  Dentin	
  Biofilms	
  In	
  Vitro.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   32(5),	
  434–437.	
  	
   	
   Cohenca,	
  N.,	
  Heilborn,	
  C.,	
  Johnson,	
  J.	
  D.,	
  Flores,	
  D.	
  S.	
  H.,	
  Ito,	
  I.	
  Y.,	
  &	
  da	
  Silva,	
  L.	
  A.	
  B.	
  (2010).	
   Apical	
  negative	
  pressure	
  irrigation	
  versus	
  conventional	
  irrigation	
  plus	
  triantibiotic	
   intracanal	
  dressing	
  on	
  root	
  canal	
  disinfection	
  in	
  dog	
  teeth.	
  Oral	
  Surgery,	
  Oral	
  Medicine,	
   Oral	
  Pathology,	
  Oral	
  Radiology,	
  and	
  Endodontology,	
  109(1),	
  e42–e46.	
   	
  	
   	
   60	
    Correr,	
  G.	
  M.,	
  Alonso,	
  C.	
  B.,	
  Grando,	
  M.F.,	
  Borges,	
  A.	
  F.,	
  Puppin-­‐Rontani,	
  R.	
  M.	
  (2006).	
  Effect	
   of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  on	
  primary	
  dentin-­‐A	
  scanning	
  electron	
  microscopy	
  (SEM)	
   evaluation.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Dentistry,	
  34(7),	
  454-­‐459.	
   	
   Cunningham,	
  W.	
  T.,	
  Martin,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Forrest,	
  W.	
  R.	
  (1982).	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
   débridement	
  by	
  the	
  endosonic	
  ultrasonic	
  synergistic	
  system.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
   and	
  oral	
  pathology,	
  53(4),	
  401–404.	
   	
   Da	
  Silva,	
  L.	
  A.	
  B.,	
  Leonardo,	
  M.	
  R.	
  M.,	
  Assed,	
  S.	
  S.,	
  &	
  Filho,	
  M.	
  M.	
  T.	
  (2004).	
  Histological	
  study	
   of	
  the	
  effect	
  of	
  some	
  irrigating	
  solutions	
  on	
  bacterial	
  endotoxin	
  in	
  dogs.	
  Braz	
  Dent	
  J,	
  15(2),	
   109–114.	
   	
   De	
  Gregorio,	
  C.,	
  Estevez,	
  R.,	
  Cisneros,	
  R.,	
  Paranjpe,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Cohenca,	
  N.	
  (2010).	
  Efficacy	
  of	
   Different	
  Irrigation	
  and	
  Activation	
  Systems	
  on	
  the	
  Penetration	
  of	
  Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
   into	
  Simulated	
  Lateral	
  Canals	
  and	
  up	
  to	
  Working	
  Length:	
  An	
  In	
  Vitro	
  Study.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  36(7),	
  1216–1221.	
  	
   	
   De	
  Groot,	
  S.	
  D.,	
  Verhaagen,	
  B.,	
  Versluis,	
  M.,	
  Wu,	
  M.	
  K.,	
  Wesselink,	
  P.	
  R.,	
  &	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
   M.	
  (2009).	
  Laser-­‐activated	
  irrigation	
  within	
  root	
  canals:	
  cleaning	
  efficacy	
  and	
  flow	
   visualization	
  -­‐	
  De	
  Groot	
  -­‐	
  2009	
  -­‐	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal	
  -­‐	
  Wiley	
  Online	
  Library.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  42(12),	
  1077–1083.	
  	
   	
   Desai,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Himel,	
  V.	
  (2009).	
  Comparative	
  Safety	
  of	
  Various	
  Intracanal	
  Irrigation	
  Systems.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  35(4),	
  545–549.	
  	
   	
   Druttman	
  A.	
  C.	
  S.,	
  &	
  Stock	
  C.	
  J.	
  R.	
  (1989).	
  An	
  in	
  vitro	
  comparison	
  of	
  ultrasonic	
  and	
   conventional	
  methods	
  of	
  irrigant	
  replacement.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  22(4),	
   174-­‐178.	
   	
   Dutner,	
  J.,	
  Mines,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Anderson,	
  A.	
  (2012).	
  Irrigation	
  Trends	
  among	
  American	
   Association	
  of	
  Endodontists	
  Members:	
  A	
  Web-­‐based	
  Survey.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   38(1),	
  37–40.	
   Estrela,	
  C.,	
  Estrela,	
  C.,	
  Barbin,	
  E.,	
  Spano,	
  J.,	
  Marchesan,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Pecora,	
  J.	
  (2002).	
  Mechanism	
   of	
  Action	
  of	
  Sodium	
  Hypochlorite.	
  Braz	
  Dent	
  J,	
  13(2),	
  113–117.	
   	
   Fabricius,	
  L.,	
  Dahlén,	
  G.,	
  Sundqvist,	
  G.,	
  Happonen,	
  R.P.,	
  &	
  Möller,	
  A.	
  J.	
  R.	
  (2006).	
  Influence	
   of	
  residual	
  bacteria	
  on	
  periapical	
  tissue	
  healing	
  after	
  chemomechanical	
  treatment	
  and	
   root	
  filling	
  of	
  experimentally	
  infected	
  monkey	
  teeth.	
  European	
  journal	
  of	
  oral	
  sciences,	
   114(4),	
  278–285.	
  	
   	
   Falk,	
  K.	
  W.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Sedgley,	
  C.	
  M.	
  C.	
  (2005).	
  The	
  influence	
  of	
  preparation	
  size	
  on	
  the	
   mechanical	
  efficacy	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation	
  in	
  vitro.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  31(10),	
  742– 745.	
  	
   	
    	
    61	
    Fukumoto,	
  Y.,	
  Kikuchi,	
  I.,	
  Yoshioka,	
  T.,	
  Kobayashi,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Suda,	
  H.	
  (2006).	
  An	
  ex	
  vivo	
   evaluation	
  of	
  a	
  new	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation	
  technique	
  with	
  intracanal	
  aspiration.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  39(2),	
  93–99.	
  	
   	
   Galvan,	
  D.,	
  Ciarlone,	
  A.,	
  Pashley,	
  D.	
  H.,	
  Kulid,	
  J.C.,	
  Primack,	
  P.D.,	
  Simpson,	
  M.D.	
  (1994).	
   Effect	
  of	
  smear	
  layer	
  removal	
  on	
  the	
  diffusion	
  permeability	
  of	
  human	
  roots.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  20(2),	
  83-­‐86.	
   Gambarini,	
  G.,	
  De	
  Luca,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Gerosa,	
  R.	
  (1998).	
  Chemical	
  stability	
  of	
  heated	
  sodium	
   hypochlorite	
  endodontic	
  irrigants.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  24(6),	
  432–434.	
  	
   	
   Gambill,	
  J.	
  M.	
  J.,	
  Alder,	
  M.	
  M.,	
  &	
  del	
  Rio,	
  C.	
  E.	
  C.	
  (1996).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  nickel-­‐titanium	
  and	
   stainless	
  steel	
  hand-­‐file	
  instrumentation	
  using	
  computed	
  tomography.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  22(7),	
  7–7.	
  	
   	
   Giardino,	
  L.,	
  Ambu,	
  E.,	
  Becce,	
  C.,	
  Rimondini,	
  L.,	
  &	
  Morra,	
  M.	
  (2006).	
  Surface	
  Tension	
   Comparison	
  of	
  Four	
  Common	
  Root	
  Canal	
  Irrigants	
  and	
  Two	
  New	
  Irrigants	
  Containing	
   Antibiotic.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  32(11),	
  3–3.	
  	
   	
   Glossen,	
  C.	
  R.	
  C.,	
  Haller,	
  R.	
  H.	
  R.,	
  Dove,	
  S.	
  B.	
  S.,	
  &	
  del	
  Rio,	
  C.	
  E.	
  C.	
  (1995).	
  A	
  comparison	
  of	
   root	
  canal	
  preparations	
  using	
  Ni-­‐Ti	
  hand,	
  Ni-­‐Ti	
  engine-­‐driven,	
  and	
  K-­‐Flex	
  endodontic	
   instruments.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  21(3),	
  6–6.	
  	
   	
   Gomes-­‐Filho,	
  J.	
  E.,	
  Aurelio,	
  K.,	
  De	
  Moraes	
  Costa,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Bernabe,	
  P.	
  (2008).	
  Comparison	
  of	
   the	
  Biocompatibility	
  of	
  Different	
  Root	
  Canal	
  Irrigants.pdf.	
  J	
  Appl	
  Oral	
  Sci,	
  16(2),	
  137–144.	
   	
   Gu,	
  L.-­‐S.,	
  Kim,	
  J.	
  R.,	
  Ling,	
  J.,	
  Choi,	
  K.	
  K.,	
  Pashley,	
  D.	
  H.,	
  &	
  Tay,	
  F.	
  R.	
  (2009).	
  Review	
  of	
   Contemporary	
  Irrigant	
  Agitation	
  Techniques	
  and	
  Devices.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  35(6),	
   791–804.	
  	
   	
   Gulabivala,	
  K.,	
  Ng,	
  Y.L.,	
  Gilbertson,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Eames,	
  I.	
  (2010).	
  The	
  fluid	
  mechanics	
  of	
  root	
   canal	
  irrigation.	
  Physiological	
  Measurement,	
  31(12),	
  R49–R84.	
  	
   	
   Gulabivala,	
  K.,	
  Patel,	
  B.,	
  Evans,	
  G.,	
  &	
  Ng,	
  Y.L.	
  (2005).	
  Effects	
  of	
  mechanical	
  and	
  chemical	
   procedures	
  on	
  root	
  canal	
  surfaces.	
  Endodontic	
  Topics,	
  10(1),	
  103–122.	
   	
   Gutarts,	
  R.,	
  Nusstein,	
  J.,	
  Reader,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Beck,	
  M.	
  (2005).	
  In	
  vivo	
  debridement	
  efficacy	
  of	
   ultrasonic	
  irrigation	
  following	
  hand-­‐rotary	
  instrumentation	
  in	
  human	
  mandibular	
  molars.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  31(3),	
  166–170.	
  	
   	
   Haapasalo,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Orstavik,	
  D.	
  (1987).	
  In	
  vitro	
  Infection	
  and	
  of	
  Dentinal	
  Tubules.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Dental	
  Research,	
  66(8),	
  1375–1379.	
   	
  	
   Haapasalo,	
  M.,	
  Endal,	
  U.,	
  Zandi,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Jeffrey	
  M	
  Coil	
  DMD,	
  M.	
  P.	
  (2005).	
  Eradication	
  of	
   endodontic	
  infection	
  by	
  instrumentation	
  and	
  irrigation	
  solutions.	
  Endodontic	
  Topics,	
   10(1),	
  77–102.	
  	
   	
   	
   62	
    Haapasalo,	
  M.,	
  Qian,	
  W.,	
  Portenier,	
  I.,	
  &	
  Waltimo,	
  T.	
  (2007).	
  Effects	
  of	
  Dentin	
  on	
  the	
   Antimicrobial	
  Properties	
  of	
  Endodontic	
  Medicaments.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  33(8),	
  917– 925.	
   	
   Haapasalo,	
  M.,	
  Shen,	
  Y.,	
  Qian,	
  W.,	
  &	
  Gao,	
  Y.	
  (2010).	
  Irrigation	
  in	
  Endodontics.	
  Dental	
  Clinics	
   of	
  North	
  America,	
  54(2),	
  291–312.	
  	
   Haapasalo,	
  M.,	
  Shen,	
  Y.	
  (2012).	
  Current	
  therapeutic	
  options	
  for	
  endodontic	
  biofilms.	
   Endodontic	
  Topics,	
  22	
  (1),	
  79-­‐98.	
   	
   Hand,	
  R.	
  E.,	
  Smith,	
  M.	
  L.,	
  &	
  Harrison,	
  J.	
  W.	
  (1978).	
  Analysis	
  of	
  the	
  effect	
  of	
  dilution	
  on	
  the	
   necrotic	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  property	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  4(2),	
   60–64.	
  	
   	
   Harrison,	
  A.	
  J.,	
  Chivatxaranukul,	
  P.,	
  Parashos,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Messer,	
  H.	
  H.	
  (2010).	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
   ultrasonically	
  activated	
  irrigation	
  on	
  reduction	
  of	
  Enterococcus	
  faecalis	
  in	
  experimentally	
   infected	
  root	
  canals.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  43(11),	
  968–977.	
  	
   	
   Hauser,	
  V.,	
  Braun,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Frentzen,	
  M.	
  (2007).	
  Penetration	
  depth	
  of	
  a	
  dye	
  marker	
  into	
   dentine	
  using	
  a	
  novel	
  hydrodynamic	
  system	
  (RinsEndo).	
  International	
  Endodontic	
   Journal,	
  40(8),	
  644–652.	
   	
   Heard,	
  F.,	
  &	
  Walton,	
  R.	
  E.	
  (1997).	
  Scanning	
  electron	
  microscope	
  study	
  comparing	
  four	
  root	
   canal	
  preparation	
  techniques	
  in	
  small	
  curved	
  canals.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
   30(5),	
  323–331.	
  	
   	
   Heling,	
  I.,	
  &	
  Chandler,	
  N.	
  P.	
  (1998).	
  Antimicrobial	
  effect	
  of	
  irrigant	
  combinations	
  within	
   dentinal	
  tubules.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  31(1),	
  8–14.	
   	
   Hess,	
  W.,	
  &	
  Zurcher,	
  E.	
  (1925).	
  The	
  Anatomy	
  of	
  the	
  Root-­‐Canals	
  of	
  the	
  Teeth	
  of	
  the	
   Permanent	
  and	
  Deciduous	
  Dentitions.	
  (Vol.	
  1925).	
  New	
  York:	
  William	
  Wood	
  &	
  Co.	
   	
   Hockett,	
  J.	
  L.	
  J.,	
  Dommisch,	
  J.	
  K.	
  J.,	
  Johnson,	
  J.	
  D.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Cohenca,	
  N.	
  N.	
  (2008).	
  Antimicrobial	
   efficacy	
  of	
  two	
  irrigation	
  techniques	
  in	
  tapered	
  and	
  nontapered	
  canal	
  preparations:	
  an	
  in	
   vitro	
  study.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  34(11),	
  1374–1377.	
  	
   	
   Howard,	
  R.	
  K.,	
  Kirkpatrick,	
  T.	
  C.,	
  Rutledge,	
  R.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Yaccino,	
  J.	
  M.	
  (2011a).	
  Comparison	
  of	
   Debris	
  Removal	
  with	
  Three	
  Different	
  Irrigation	
  Techniques.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   37(9),	
  1301–1305.	
  	
   	
   Howard,	
  R.	
  K.,	
  Kirkpatrick,	
  T.	
  C.,	
  Rutledge,	
  R.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Yaccino,	
  J.	
  M.	
  (2011b).	
  Comparison	
  of	
   Debris	
  Removal	
  with	
  Three	
  Different	
  Irrigation	
  Techniques.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   37(9),	
  1301–1305.	
  	
   	
   Hsieh,	
  Y.	
  D.,	
  Gau,	
  C.	
  H.,	
  Kung	
  Wu,	
  S.	
  F.,	
  Shen,	
  E.	
  C.,	
  Hsu,	
  P.	
  W.,	
  &	
  Fu,	
  E.	
  (2007).	
  Dynamic	
   recording	
  of	
  irrigating	
  fluid	
  distribution	
  in	
  root	
  canals	
  using	
  thermal	
  image	
  analysis.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  40(1),	
  11–17.	
  	
   	
   63	
    	
   Huang,	
  T.	
  Y.,	
  Gulabivala,	
  K.,	
  &	
  Ng,	
  Y.L.	
  (2008).	
  A	
  bio-­‐molecular	
  film	
  ex-­‐vivo	
  model	
  to	
   evaluate	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  canal	
  dimensions	
  and	
  irrigation	
  variables	
  on	
  the	
  efficacy	
  of	
   irrigation.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  41(1),	
  60-­‐71.	
  	
   Huffaker,	
  S.	
  K.,	
  Safavi,	
  K.	
  E.,	
  Spangberg,	
  L.	
  S.	
  W.,	
  &	
  Kaufman,	
  B.	
  (2010).	
  Influence	
  of	
  a	
   Passive	
  Sonic	
  Irrigation	
  System	
  on	
  the	
  Elimination	
  of	
  Bacteria	
  from	
  Root	
  Canal	
  Systems:	
  A	
   Clinical	
  Study.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(8),	
  1315–1318.	
  	
   	
   Hülsmann,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Hahn,	
  W.	
  (2000).	
  Complications	
  during	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation-­‐-­‐literature	
   review	
  and	
  case	
  reports.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  33(3),	
  186–193.	
  	
   	
   Hülsmann,	
  M.,	
  Heckendorff,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Lennon,	
  A.	
  (2003).	
  Chelating	
  agents	
  in	
  root	
  canal	
   treatment:	
  mode	
  of	
  action	
  and	
  indications	
  for	
  their	
  use.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
   36(12),	
  810–830.	
   	
   Hülsmann,	
  M.,	
  Rümmelin,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Schäfers,	
  F.	
  (1997).	
  Root	
  canal	
  cleanliness	
  after	
   preparation	
  with	
  different	
  endodontic	
  handpieces	
  and	
  hand	
  instruments:	
  a	
  comparative	
   SEM	
  investigation.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  23(5),	
  301–306.	
  	
   	
   Jensen,	
  S.	
  A.,	
  Walker,	
  T.	
  L.,	
  Hutter,	
  J.	
  W.,	
  &	
  Nicoll,	
  B.	
  K.	
  (1999).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  the	
  cleaning	
   efficacy	
  of	
  passive	
  sonic	
  activation	
  and	
  passive	
  ultrasonic	
  activation	
  after	
  hand	
   instrumentation	
  in	
  molar	
  root	
  canals.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  25(11),	
  735–738.	
  	
   	
   Jiang,	
  L.M.,	
  Lak,	
  B.,	
  Eijsvogels,	
  L.	
  M.,	
  Wesselink,	
  P.,	
  &	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
  M.	
  (2012).	
   Comparison	
  of	
  the	
  Cleaning	
  Efficacy	
  of	
  Different	
  Final	
  Irrigation	
  Techniques.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  38(6),	
  838–841.	
  	
   	
   Jiang,	
  L.-­‐M.,	
  Verhaagen,	
  B.,	
  Versluis,	
  M.,	
  &	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
  M.	
  (2010).	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  a	
   Sonic	
  Device	
  Designed	
  to	
  Activate	
  Irrigant	
  in	
  the	
  Root	
  Canal.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   36(1),	
  143–146.	
  	
   	
   Johnson,	
  M.,	
  Sidow,	
  S.	
  J.,	
  Looney,	
  S.	
  W.,	
  Lindsey,	
  K.,	
  Niu,	
  L.-­‐N.,	
  &	
  Tay,	
  F.	
  R.	
  (2012).	
  Canal	
  and	
   Isthmus	
  Debridement	
  Efficacy	
  Using	
  a	
  Sonic	
  Irrigation	
  Technique	
  in	
  a	
  Closed-­‐canal	
   System.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  38(9),	
  1265–1268.	
   	
  	
   Kahn,	
  F.	
  H.	
  F.,	
  Rosenberg,	
  P.	
  A.	
  P.,	
  &	
  Gliksberg,	
  J.	
  J.	
  (1995).	
  An	
  in	
  vitro	
  evaluation	
  of	
  the	
   irrigating	
  characteristics	
  of	
  ultrasonic	
  and	
  subsonic	
  handpieces	
  and	
  irrigating	
  needles	
  and	
   probes.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  21(5),	
  4–4.	
  	
   	
   Kakehashi,	
  S.,	
  Stanley,	
  H.	
  R.,	
  &	
  Fitzgerald,	
  R.	
  J.	
  (1965).	
  The	
  effects	
  of	
  surgical	
  exposures	
  of	
   dental	
  pulps	
  in	
  germ-­‐free	
  and	
  conventional	
  laboratory	
  rats.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
   and	
  oral	
  pathology,	
  20(3),	
  340–349.	
   	
   Kakoli,	
  P.,	
  Nandakumar,	
  R.,	
  Romberg,	
  E.,	
  Arola,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Fouad,	
  A.	
  F.	
  (2009).	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
  age	
   on	
  bacterial	
  penetration	
  of	
  radicular	
  dentin.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  35(1),	
  78–81.	
  	
   	
   	
   64	
    Keir,	
  D.	
  M.,	
  Senia,	
  E.	
  S.,	
  &	
  Montogomery,	
  S.	
  (1990).	
  Effectiveness	
  of	
  a	
  Brush	
  in	
  Removing	
   Postinstrumentation	
  Canal	
  Debris.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  16(7),	
  323–327.	
  	
   Khademi,	
  A.,	
  Yazdizadeh,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Feizianfard,	
  M.	
  (2006).	
  Determination	
  of	
  the	
  Minimum	
   Instrumentation	
  Size	
  for	
  Penetration	
  of	
  Irrigants	
  to	
  the	
  Apical	
  Third	
  of	
  Root	
  Canal	
   Systems.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  32(5),	
  417–420.	
  	
   	
   Kouvas,	
  V.,	
  Liolios,	
  E.,	
  Vassiliadis,	
  I.,	
  Parissis-­‐Messimeris,	
  S.,	
  &	
  Boutsioukis,	
  A.	
  (1998).	
   Influence	
  of	
  smear	
  layer	
  on	
  depth	
  of	
  penetration	
  of	
  three	
  endodontic	
  sealers:	
  an	
  SEM	
   study.	
  Dental	
  Traumatology:	
  official	
  publication	
  of	
  International	
  Association	
  for	
  Dental	
   Traumatology,	
  14(4),	
  191–195.	
  	
   	
   Krell,	
  K.	
  V.,	
  Johnson,	
  R.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Madison,	
  S.	
  (1988).	
  Irrigation	
  patterns	
  during	
  ultrasonic	
  canal	
   instrumentation.	
  Part	
  I.	
  K-­‐type	
  files.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  14(2),	
  65–68.	
  	
   	
   Kuga,	
  M.	
  C.	
  M.,	
  Gouveia-­‐Jorge,	
  É.	
  É.,	
  Tanomaru-­‐Filho,	
  M.	
  M.,	
  Guerreiro-­‐Tanomaru,	
  J.	
  M.	
  J.,	
   Bonetti-­‐Filho,	
  I.	
  I.,	
  &	
  Faria,	
  G.	
  G.	
  (2011).	
  Penetration	
  into	
  dentin	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
   associated	
  with	
  acid	
  solutions.	
  Oral	
  Surgery,	
  112(6),	
  e155-­‐e159.	
  	
   	
   Kuruvilla,	
  J.	
  R.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Kamath,	
  M.	
  P.	
  M.	
  (1998).	
  Antimicrobial	
  activity	
  of	
  2.5%	
  sodium	
   hypochlorite	
  and	
  0.2%	
  chlorhexidine	
  gluconate	
  separately	
  and	
  combined,	
  as	
  endodontic	
   irrigants.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  24(7),	
  472-­‐475.	
  	
   	
   Lee,	
  S.J.,	
  Wu,	
  M.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Wesselink,	
  P.	
  R.	
  (2004).	
  The	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  syringe	
  irrigation	
  and	
   ultrasonics	
  to	
  remove	
  debris	
  from	
  simulated	
  irregularities	
  within	
  prepared	
  root	
  canal	
   walls.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  37(10),	
  672–678.	
   	
  	
   Lim,	
  K.	
  C.,	
  &	
  Webber,	
  J.	
  (1985).	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  preparation	
  on	
  the	
  shape	
  of	
  the	
   curved	
  root	
  canal.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  18(4),	
  233–239.	
   	
   Lima,	
  K.	
  C.,	
  Fava,	
  L.	
  R.,	
  &	
  Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.	
  (2001).	
  Susceptibilities	
  of	
  Enterococcus	
  faecalis	
   biofilms	
  to	
  some	
  antimicrobial	
  medications.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  27(10),	
  616–619.	
  	
   	
   Lin,	
  L.	
  M.	
  L.,	
  Di	
  Fiore,	
  P.	
  M.	
  P.,	
  Lin,	
  J.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Rosenberg,	
  P.	
  A.	
  P.	
  (2006).	
  Histological	
  Study	
  of	
   Periradicular	
  Tissue	
  Responses	
  to	
  Uninfected	
  and	
  Infected	
  Devitalized	
  Pulps	
  in	
  Dogs.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  32(1),	
  34-­‐38.	
  	
   	
   Love,	
  R.	
  M.	
  (2004).	
  Invasion	
  of	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  by	
  root	
  canal	
  bacteria.	
  Endodontic	
  Topics,	
   9(1),	
  52–65.	
   	
   Love,	
  R.	
  M.,	
  &	
  Jenkinson,	
  H.	
  F.	
  (2002).	
  Invasion	
  of	
  dentinal	
  tubules	
  by	
  oral	
  bacteria.	
  Critical	
   Reviews	
  in	
  Oral	
  Biology	
  &	
  Medicine,	
  13(2),	
  171–183.	
  	
   	
   Lumley,	
  P.	
  J.	
  P.,	
  Walmsley,	
  A.	
  D.	
  A.,	
  Walton,	
  R.	
  E.	
  R.,	
  &	
  Rippin,	
  J.	
  W.	
  J.	
  (1993).	
  Cleaning	
  of	
   oval	
  canals	
  using	
  ultrasonic	
  or	
  sonic	
  instrumentation.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  19(9),	
  453– 457.	
  	
   	
   	
   65	
    Malentacca,	
  A.	
  A.,	
  Uccioli,	
  U.	
  U.,	
  Zangari,	
  D.	
  D.,	
  Lajolo,	
  C.	
  C.,	
  &	
  Fabiani,	
  C.	
  C.	
  (2012).	
  Efficacy	
   and	
  safety	
  of	
  various	
  active	
  irrigation	
  devices	
  when	
  used	
  with	
  either	
  positive	
  or	
  negative	
   pressure:	
  an	
  in	
  vitro	
  study.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  38(12),	
  1622–1626.	
   Marais,	
  J.	
  T.,	
  &	
  Williams,	
  W.	
  P.	
  (2001).	
  Antimicrobial	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  electro-­‐chemically	
   activated	
  water	
  as	
  an	
  endodontic	
  irrigation	
  solution.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
   34(3),	
  237–243.	
   	
   Marending,	
  M.,	
  Luder,	
  H.	
  U.,	
  Brunner,	
  T.	
  J.,	
  Knecht,	
  S.,	
  Stark,	
  W.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Zehnder,	
  M.	
  (2007).	
   Effect	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  on	
  human	
  root	
  dentine-­‐mechanical,	
  chemical	
  and	
  structural	
   evaluation.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  40(10),	
  786–793.	
  	
   	
   Martin,	
  H.	
  (1976).	
  Ultrasonic	
  disinfection	
  of	
  the	
  root	
  canal.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
   and	
  oral	
  pathology,	
  42(1),	
  92–99.	
   	
   Mayer,	
  B.	
  E.,	
  Peters,	
  O.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Barbakow,	
  F.	
  (2002).	
  Effects	
  of	
  rotary	
  instruments	
  and	
   ultrasonic	
  irrigation	
  on	
  debris	
  and	
  smear	
  layer	
  scores:	
  a	
  scanning	
  electron	
  microscopic	
   study.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  35(7),	
  582–589.	
   	
   McGill,	
  S.	
  S.,	
  Gulabivala,	
  K.	
  K.,	
  Mordan,	
  N.	
  N.,	
  &	
  Ng,	
  Y.-­‐L.	
  Y.	
  (2008).	
  The	
  efficacy	
  of	
  dynamic	
   irrigation	
  using	
  a	
  commercially	
  available	
  system	
  (RinsEndo)	
  determined	
  by	
  removal	
  of	
  a	
   collagen	
  “bio-­‐molecular	
  film”	
  from	
  an	
  ex	
  vivo	
  model.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
   41(7),	
  602–608.	
  	
   	
   Mello,	
  I.,	
  Alvarado	
  Kammerer,	
  B.,	
  Yoshimoto,	
  D.,	
  Skelton	
  Macedo,	
  M.	
  C.,	
  &	
  Humberto	
   Antoniazzi,	
  J.	
  (2010).	
  Influence	
  of	
  Final	
  Rinse	
  Technique	
  on	
  Ability	
  of	
   Ethylenediaminetetraacetic	
  Acid	
  of	
  Removing	
  Smear	
  Layer.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(3),	
   512–514.	
  	
   	
   Miller,	
  T.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Baumgartner,	
  J.	
  C.	
  (2010).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  the	
  Antimicrobial	
  Efficacy	
  of	
   Irrigation	
  Using	
  the	
  EndoVac	
  to	
  Endodontic	
  Needle	
  Delivery.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   36(3),	
  509–511.	
  	
   	
   Mitchell,	
  R.	
  P.,	
  Yang,	
  S.E.,	
  &	
  Baumgartner,	
  J.	
  C.	
  (2010).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  Apical	
  Extrusion	
  of	
   NaOCl	
  Using	
  the	
  EndoVac	
  or	
  Needle	
  Irrigation	
  of	
  Root	
  Canals.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   36(2),	
  338–341.	
  	
   	
   Mjör,	
  I.	
  A.,	
  Smith,	
  M.	
  R.,	
  Ferrari,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Mannocci,	
  F.	
  (2001).	
  The	
  structure	
  of	
  dentine	
  in	
  the	
   apical	
  region	
  of	
  human	
  teeth.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  34(5),	
  346–353.	
   	
   Mohammadi,	
  Z.	
  (2008).	
  Sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  in	
  endodontics:	
  an	
  update	
  review.	
   International	
  dental	
  journal,	
  58(6),	
  329–341.	
  	
   	
   Moholkar,	
  V.	
  S.,	
  Warmoeskerken,	
  M.,	
  Ohl,	
  C.	
  D.,	
  &	
  Prosperetti,	
  A.	
  (2004).	
  Mechanism	
  of	
   mass-­‐transfer	
  enhancement	
  in	
  textiles	
  by	
  ultrasound.	
  Aiche	
  Journal,	
  50,	
  58–64.	
  	
   	
   	
    66	
    Molander,	
  A.,	
  Reit,	
  C.,	
  Dahlén,	
  G.,	
  &	
  Kvist,	
  T.	
  (1998).	
  Microbiological	
  status	
  of	
  root-­‐filled	
   teeth	
  with	
  apical	
  periodontitis.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  31(1),	
  1–7.	
  	
   	
   Moorer,	
  W.	
  R.,	
  &	
  Wesselink,	
  P.	
  R.	
  (1982).	
  Factors	
  promoting	
  the	
  tissue	
  dissolving	
   capability	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  15(4),	
  187–196.	
  	
   	
   Möller,	
  A.	
  J.,	
  Fabricius,	
  L.,	
  Dahlén,	
  G.,	
  Ohman,	
  A.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Heyden,	
  G.	
  (1981).	
  Influence	
  on	
   periapical	
  tissues	
  of	
  indigenous	
  oral	
  bacteria	
  and	
  necrotic	
  pulp	
  tissue	
  in	
  monkeys.	
   Scandinavian	
  journal	
  of	
  dental	
  research,	
  89(6),	
  475–484.	
   	
   Munoz,	
  H.	
  R.,	
  &	
  Camacho-­‐Cuadra,	
  K.	
  (2012).	
  In	
  Vivo	
  Efficacy	
  of	
  Three	
  Different	
  Endodontic	
   Irrigation	
  Systems	
  for	
  Irrigant	
  Delivery	
  to	
  Working	
  Length	
  of	
  Mesial	
  Canals	
  of	
  Mandibular	
   Molars.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  38(4),	
  445–448.	
  	
   	
   Nadalin,	
  M.	
  R.,	
  da	
  Cruz	
  Perez,	
  D.	
  E.,	
  Vansan,	
  L.	
  P.,	
  Paschoala,	
  C.,	
  Souza-­‐Neto,	
  M.	
  D.	
  O.,	
  &	
   Saquy,	
  P.	
  C.	
  S.	
  (2009).	
  Effectiveness	
  of	
  different	
  final	
  irrigation	
  protocols	
  in	
  removing	
   debris	
  in	
  flattened	
  root	
  canals.	
  Braz	
  Dent	
  J,	
  20(3),	
  211–214.	
   	
   Naenni,	
  N.,	
  Thoma,	
  K.,	
  &	
  Zehnder,	
  M.	
  (2004).	
  Soft	
  tissue	
  dissolution	
  capacity	
  of	
  currently	
   used	
  and	
  potential	
  endodontic	
  irrigants.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  30(11),	
  785–787.	
  	
   	
   Nair,	
  P.	
  N.	
  R.,	
  Henry,	
  S.,	
  Cano,	
  V.,	
  &	
  Vera,	
  J.	
  (2005).	
  Microbial	
  status	
  of	
  apical	
  root	
  canal	
   system	
  of	
  human	
  mandibular	
  first	
  molars	
  with	
  primary	
  apical	
  periodontitis	
  after	
  “one-­‐ visit”	
  endodontic	
  treatment.	
  Oral	
  Surgery,	
  Oral	
  Medicine,	
  Oral	
  Pathology,	
  Oral	
  Radiology,	
   and	
  Endodontology,	
  99(2),	
  231–252.	
  	
   	
   Nair,	
  U.	
  P.,	
  Natera,	
  M.,	
  Koscso,	
  K.,	
  Pillai,	
  P.,	
  Varella,	
  C.	
  H.,	
  &	
  Pileggi,	
  R.	
  (2010).	
  Comparative	
   Evaluation	
  of	
  Three	
  Different	
  Irrigation	
  Activation	
  on	
  Debris	
  Removal	
  from	
  Root	
  Canal	
   Systems.	
  The	
  Internet	
  Journal	
  of	
  Dental	
  Science,	
  9(2),	
  67-­‐70.	
   	
   Nguy,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Sedgley,	
  C.	
  (2006).	
  The	
  influence	
  of	
  canal	
  curvature	
  on	
  the	
  mechanical	
  efficacy	
   of	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation	
  in	
  vitro	
  using	
  real-­‐time	
  imaging	
  of	
  bioluminescent	
  bacteria.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  32(11),	
  1077–1080.	
  	
   	
   Nielsen,	
  B.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Craig	
  Baumgartner,	
  J.	
  (2007).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  the	
  EndoVac	
  System	
  to	
   Needle	
  Irrigation	
  of	
  Root	
  Canals.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  33(5),	
  611–615.	
  	
   	
   Oguntebi,	
  B.	
  R.	
  (1994).	
  Dentine	
  tubule	
  infection	
  and	
  endodontic	
  therapy	
  implications.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  27(4),	
  218–222.	
   	
   Ohl,	
  S.	
  W.,	
  Khoo,	
  B.	
  C.,	
  Kishen,	
  A.	
  (2010).	
  Characterizing	
  bubble	
  dynamics	
  created	
  by	
  high	
   intensity	
  focused	
  ultrasound	
  for	
  the	
  delivery	
  of	
  antibacterial	
  nanoparticles	
  into	
  a	
  dental	
   hard	
  tissue.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Engineering	
  in	
  Medicine,	
  224(11),	
  1285-­‐1296.	
   	
    	
    67	
    Orstavik,	
  D.	
  D.,	
  Kerekes,	
  K.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Molven,	
  O.	
  O.	
  (1991).	
  Effects	
  of	
  extensive	
  apical	
  reaming	
   and	
  calcium	
  hydroxide	
  dressing	
  on	
  bacterial	
  infection	
  during	
  treatment	
  of	
  apical	
   periodontitis:	
  a	
  pilot	
  study.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  24(1),	
  1–7.	
  	
   	
   Orstavik,	
  D.,	
  Qvist,	
  V.,	
  &	
  Stoltze,	
  K.	
  (2004).	
  A	
  multivariate	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  outcome	
  of	
   endodontic	
  treatment.	
  European	
  journal	
  of	
  oral	
  sciences,	
  112(3),	
  224–230.	
  	
   	
   Palazzi,	
  F.,	
  Morra,	
  M.,	
  Mohammadi,	
  Z.,	
  Grandini,	
  S.,	
  &	
  Giardino,	
  L.	
  (2011).	
  Comparison	
  of	
   the	
  surface	
  tension	
  of	
  5.25%	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  solution	
  with	
  three	
  new	
  sodium	
   hypochlorite-­‐based	
  endodontic	
  irrigants.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  45(2),	
  129– 135.	
  	
   	
   Paqué,	
  F.,	
  Luder,	
  H.	
  U.,	
  Sener,	
  B.,	
  &	
  Zehnder,	
  M.	
  (2006).	
  Tubular	
  sclerosis	
  rather	
  than	
  the	
   smear	
  layer	
  impedes	
  dye	
  penetration	
  into	
  the	
  dentine	
  of	
  endodontically	
  instrumented	
   root	
  canals.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  39(1),	
  18–25.	
   	
   Paqué,	
  F.,	
  Balmer,	
  M.,	
  Attin,	
  T.,	
  Peters,	
  O.	
  A.	
  (2010).	
  Preparation	
  of	
  Oval-­‐shaped	
  Root	
   Canals	
  in	
  Mandibular	
  Molars	
  Using	
  Nickel-­‐Titanium	
  Rotary	
  Instruments:	
  A	
  Micro-­‐ computed	
  Tomography	
  Study.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(4),	
  703-­‐707.	
   	
   Paragliola,	
  R.,	
  Franco,	
  V.,	
  Fabiani,	
  C.,	
  Mazzoni,	
  A.,	
  Nato,	
  F.,	
  Tay,	
  F.	
  R.,	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010).	
  Final	
   rinse	
  optimization:	
  influence	
  of	
  different	
  agitation	
  protocols.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   36(2),	
  282–285.	
  	
   	
   Parente,	
  J.	
  M.,	
  Loushine,	
  R.	
  J.,	
  Susin,	
  L.,	
  Gu,	
  L.,	
  Looney,	
  S.	
  W.,	
  Weller,	
  R.	
  N.,	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010).	
  Root	
   canal	
  debridement	
  using	
  manual	
  dynamic	
  agitation	
  or	
  the	
  EndoVac	
  for	
  final	
  irrigation	
  in	
  a	
   closed	
  system	
  and	
  an	
  open	
  system.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  43(11),	
  1001–1012.	
  	
   	
   Pataky,	
  L.	
  L.,	
  Iványi,	
  I.	
  I.,	
  Grigár,	
  A.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Fazekas,	
  A.	
  A.	
  (2002).	
  Antimicrobial	
  efficacy	
  of	
   various	
  root	
  canal	
  preparation	
  techniques:	
  an	
  in	
  vitro	
  comparative	
  study.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  28(8),	
  603–605.	
   	
   Pawar,	
  R.,	
  Alqaied,	
  A.,	
  Safavi,	
  K.,	
  Boyko,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Kaufman,	
  B.	
  (2012).	
  Influence	
  of	
  an	
  Apical	
   Negative	
  Pressure	
  Irrigation	
  System	
  on	
  Bacterial	
  Elimination	
  during	
  Endodontic	
  Therapy:	
   A	
  Prospective	
  Randomized	
  Clinical	
  Study.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  38(9),	
  1177–1181.	
   	
   Peters,	
  O.	
  A.	
  O.,	
  Laib,	
  A.	
  A.,	
  Göhring,	
  T.	
  N.	
  T.,	
  &	
  Barbakow,	
  F.	
  F.	
  (2001).	
  Changes	
  in	
  root	
   canal	
  geometry	
  after	
  preparation	
  assessed	
  by	
  high-­‐resolution	
  computed	
  tomography.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  27(1),	
  1–6.	
  	
   	
   Peters,	
  O.	
  A.,	
  Bardsley,	
  S.,	
  Fong,	
  J.,	
  Pandher,	
  G.,	
  &	
  DiVito,	
  E.	
  (2011).	
  Disinfection	
  of	
  Root	
   Canals	
  with	
  Photon-­‐initiated	
  Photoacoustic	
  Streaming.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  37(7),	
   1008–1012.	
  	
   Plotino,	
  G.,	
  Pameijer,	
  C.,	
  Grande,	
  N.	
  M.,	
  &	
  Somma,	
  F.	
  (2007).	
  Ultrasonics	
  in	
  Endodontics:	
  A	
   Review	
  of	
  the	
  Literature.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  33(2),	
  81–95.	
  	
   	
   	
   68	
    Qian,	
  W.,	
  Shen,	
  Y.,	
  &	
  Haapasalo,	
  M.	
  (2011).	
  Quantitative	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  effect	
  of	
  irrigant	
   solution	
  sequences	
  on	
  dentin	
  erosion.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  37(10),	
  1437–1441.	
  	
   	
   Ram,	
  Z.	
  (1977).	
  Effectiveness	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
  and	
  oral	
   pathology,	
  44(2),	
  306–312.	
   Ribeiro,	
  E.	
  M.,	
  Silva-­‐Sousa,	
  Y.	
  T.	
  C.,	
  Souza-­‐Gabriel,	
  A.	
  E.,	
  Sousa-­‐Neto,	
  M.	
  D.,	
  Lorencetti,	
  K.	
  T.,	
   &	
  Silva,	
  S.	
  R.	
  C.	
  (2011).	
  Debris	
  and	
  smear	
  removal	
  in	
  flattened	
  root	
  canals	
  after	
  use	
  of	
   different	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  protocols.	
  Microscopy	
  Research	
  and	
  Technique,	
  75(6),	
  781– 790.	
  	
   	
   Richman,	
  M.	
  J.	
  (1957).	
  The	
  use	
  of	
  ultrasonics	
  in	
  root	
  canal	
  therapy	
  and	
  root	
  resection.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Dental	
  Medicine,	
  12,	
  12-­‐18.	
   Ring,	
  M.	
  E.	
  (2002).	
  W.	
  D.	
  Miller.	
  The	
  pioneer	
  who	
  laid	
  the	
  foundation	
  for	
  modern	
  dental	
   research.	
  The	
  New	
  York	
  state	
  dental	
  journal	
  .	
  New	
  York	
  State	
  Dental	
  Journal,	
  (68),	
  34–37.	
   	
   Ringel,	
  A.	
  M.,	
  Patterson,	
  S.	
  S.,	
  Newton,	
  C.	
  W.,	
  Miller,	
  C.	
  H.,	
  &	
  Mulhern,	
  J.	
  M.	
  (1982).	
  In	
  vivo	
   evaluation	
  of	
  chlorhexidine	
  gluconate	
  solution	
  and	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  solution	
  as	
  root	
   canal	
  irrigants.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  8(5),	
  200–204.	
  	
   	
   Rossi-­‐Fedele,	
  G.,	
  Guastalli,	
  A.	
  R.,	
  Doğramacı,	
  E.	
  J.,	
  Steier,	
  L.,	
  &	
  De	
  Figueiredo,	
  J.	
  A.	
  P.	
  (2011).	
   Influence	
  of	
  pH	
  changes	
  on	
  chlorine-­‐containing	
  endodontic	
  irrigating	
  solutions.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  44(9),	
  792–799.	
  	
   	
   Sabins,	
  R.	
  A.,	
  Johnson,	
  J.	
  D.,	
  &	
  Hellstein,	
  J.	
  W.	
  (2003).	
  A	
  comparison	
  of	
  the	
  cleaning	
  efficacy	
   of	
  short-­‐term	
  sonic	
  and	
  ultrasonic	
  passive	
  irrigation	
  after	
  hand	
  instrumentation	
  in	
  molar	
   root	
  canals.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  29(10),	
  674–678.	
   	
  	
   Saito,	
  D.,	
  de	
  Toledo	
  Leonardo,	
  R.,	
  Rodrigues,	
  J.	
  L.	
  M.,	
  Tsai,	
  S.	
  M.,	
  Höfling,	
  J.	
  F.,	
  &	
  Gonçalves,	
   R.	
  B.	
  (2006).	
  Identification	
  of	
  bacteria	
  in	
  endodontic	
  infections	
  by	
  sequence	
  analysis	
  of	
   16S	
  rDNA	
  clone	
  libraries.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medical	
  Microbiology,	
  55(Pt	
  1),	
  101–107.	
  	
   	
   Sakamoto,	
  M.,	
  Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.,	
  Rôças,	
  I.	
  N.,	
  &	
  Benno,	
  Y.	
  (2007).	
  Bacterial	
  reduction	
  and	
   persistence	
  after	
  endodontic	
  treatment	
  procedures.	
  Oral	
  microbiology	
  and	
  immunology,	
   22(1),	
  19–23.	
  	
   	
   Schneider,	
  S.	
  W.	
  S.	
  (1971).	
  A	
  comparison	
  of	
  canal	
  preparations	
  in	
  straight	
  and	
  curved	
  root	
   canals.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
  and	
  oral	
  pathology,	
  32(2),	
  271–275.	
   	
   Schoeffel,	
  G.	
  J.	
  (2007).	
  The	
  EndoVac	
  method	
  of	
  endodontic	
  irrigation:	
  safety	
  first.	
   Dentistry	
  today,	
  26(10),	
  1-­‐7.	
   	
   Schoeffel,	
  G.	
  J.	
  (2008a).	
  The	
  EndoVac	
  method	
  of	
  endodontic	
  irrigation,	
  Part	
  3:	
  System	
   components	
  and	
  their	
  interaction.	
  Dentistry	
  today,	
  27(8),	
  106-­‐111.	
   	
   	
    69	
    Schoeffel,	
  G.	
  J.	
  (2008b).	
  The	
  EndoVac	
  method	
  of	
  endodontic	
  irrigation,	
  part	
  2-­‐-­‐efficacy.	
   Dentistry	
  today,	
  27(1),	
  82–87.	
   	
   Schoeffel,	
  G.	
  J.	
  (2009).	
  The	
  EndoVac	
  method	
  of	
  endodontic	
  irrigation:	
  Part	
  4,	
  Clinical	
  use.	
   Dentistry	
  today,	
  28(6),	
  64–67.	
   	
   Sedgley,	
  C.,	
  Applegate,	
  B.,	
  Nagel,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Hall,	
  D.	
  (2004).	
  Real-­‐Time	
  Imaging	
  and	
   Quantification	
  of	
  Bioluminescent	
  Bacteria	
  in	
  Root	
  Canals	
  In	
  Vitro.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
   30(12),	
  893–898.	
   	
  	
   Sedgley,	
  C.,	
  Nagel,	
  A.	
  C.,	
  Hall,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Applegate,	
  B.	
  (2005).	
  Influence	
  of	
  irrigant	
  needle	
  depth	
   in	
  removing	
  bioluminescent	
  bacteria	
  inoculated	
  into	
  instrumented	
  root	
  canals	
  using	
  real-­‐ time	
  imaging	
  in	
  vitro.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  38(2),	
  97–104.	
   	
   Senia,	
  E.	
  S.,	
  Marshall,	
  F.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Rosen,	
  S.	
  (1971).	
  The	
  solvent	
  action	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
   on	
  pulp	
  tissue	
  of	
  extracted	
  teeth.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
  and	
  oral	
  pathology,	
  31(1),	
   96–103.	
  	
   	
   Shen,	
  Y.,	
  Gao,	
  Y.,	
  Qian,	
  W.,	
  Ruse,	
  N.	
  D.,	
  Zhou,	
  X.,	
  Wu,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Haapasalo,	
  M.	
  (2010).	
  Three-­‐ dimensional	
  numeric	
  simulation	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigant	
  flow	
  with	
  different	
  irrigation	
   needles.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(5),	
  884–889.	
  	
   	
   Shrestha,	
  A.,	
  Zhilong,	
  S.,	
  Gee,	
  N.	
  K.,	
  Kishen,	
  A.	
  (2010).	
  Nanoparticulates	
  for	
  antibiofilm	
   treatment	
  and	
  effect	
  of	
  aging	
  on	
  its	
  antibacterial	
  activity.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(6),	
   1030-­‐1035.	
   Shrestha,	
  A.	
  A.,	
  Hamblin,	
  M.	
  R.,	
  Kishen,	
  A.	
  A.	
  (2012).	
  Characterization	
  of	
  a	
  conjugate	
   between	
  rose	
  bengal	
  and	
  chitosan	
  for	
  targeted	
  antibiofilm	
  and	
  tissue	
  stabilization	
  effects	
   as	
  a	
  potential	
  treatment	
  of	
  infected	
  dentin.	
  Antimicrobial	
  agents	
  and	
  Chemotherapy,	
   56(9),	
  4876-­‐4884.	
   	
   Shin,	
  S.	
  J.,	
  Kim,	
  H.	
  K.,	
  Jung,	
  I.	
  Y.,	
  Lee,	
  C.	
  Y.,	
  Lee,	
  S.J.,	
  &	
  Kim,	
  E.	
  (2010).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  the	
   cleaning	
  efficacy	
  of	
  a	
  new	
  apical	
  negative	
  pressure	
  irrigating	
  system	
  with	
  conventional	
   irrigation	
  needles	
  in	
  the	
  root	
  canals.	
  YMOE,	
  109(3),	
  479–484.	
  	
   	
   Shuping,	
  G.	
  B.,	
  Orstavik,	
  D.,	
  Sigurdsson,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Trope,	
  M.	
  (2000).	
  Reduction	
  of	
  intracanal	
   bacteria	
  using	
  nickel-­‐titanium	
  rotary	
  instrumentation	
  and	
  various	
  medications.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  26(12),	
  751–755.	
  	
   	
   Sim,	
  T.	
  P.	
  T.,	
  Knowles,	
  J.	
  C.	
  J.,	
  Ng,	
  Y.-­‐L.	
  Y.,	
  Shelton,	
  J.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Gulabivala,	
  K.	
  K.	
  (2001).	
  Effect	
  of	
   sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  on	
  mechanical	
  properties	
  of	
  dentine	
  and	
  tooth	
  surface	
  strain.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  34(2),	
  120–132.	
  	
   	
   Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.,	
  Jr,	
  Lima,	
  K.	
  C.,	
  Magalhães,	
  F.	
  A.	
  C.,	
  Lopes,	
  H.	
  P.,	
  &	
  de	
  Uzeda,	
  M.	
  (1999).	
   Mechanical	
  reduction	
  of	
  the	
  bacterial	
  population	
  in	
  the	
  root	
  canal	
  by	
  three	
   instrumentation	
  techniques.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  25(5),	
  332–335.	
  	
   	
   	
   70	
    Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.,	
  Lima,	
  K.	
  C.,	
  Magalhaes,	
  F.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Milton	
  de	
  Uzeda,	
  D.	
  (2002).	
  Efficacy	
  of	
   Instrumentation	
  Techniques	
  and	
  Irrigation	
  Regimens	
  in	
  Reducing	
  the	
  Bacterial	
   Population	
  within	
  Root	
  Canals.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  181–184.	
  	
   	
   Siqueira,	
  J.	
  F.,	
  Rôças,	
  I.	
  N.,	
  Favieri,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Lima,	
  K.	
  C.	
  (2000).	
  Chemomechanical	
  reduction	
  of	
   the	
  bacterial	
  population	
  in	
  the	
  root	
  canal	
  after	
  instrumentation	
  and	
  irrigation	
  with	
  1%,	
   2.5%,	
  and	
  5.25%	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  26(6),	
  331–334.	
  	
   Siu,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Baumgartner,	
  C.	
  (2010).	
  Comparison	
  of	
  the	
  Debridement	
  Efficacy	
  of	
  the	
  EndoVac	
   Irrigation	
  System	
  and	
  Conventional	
  Needle	
  Root	
  Canal	
  Irrigation	
  In	
  Vivo.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Endodontics,	
  36(11),	
  1782–1785.	
  	
   	
   Sjögren,	
  U.	
  U.,	
  Figdor,	
  D.	
  D.,	
  Persson,	
  S.	
  S.,	
  &	
  Sundqvist,	
  G.	
  G.	
  (1997).	
  Influence	
  of	
  infection	
   at	
  the	
  time	
  of	
  root	
  filling	
  on	
  the	
  outcome	
  of	
  endodontic	
  treatment	
  of	
  teeth	
  with	
  apical	
   periodontitis.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  30(5),	
  297–306.	
  	
   	
   Sjögren,	
  U.,	
  &	
  Sundqvist,	
  G.	
  (1987).	
  Bacteriologic	
  evaluation	
  of	
  ultrasonic	
  root	
  canal	
   instrumentation.	
  Oral	
  Surgery,	
  Oral	
  Medicine,	
  Oral	
  Pathology,	
  63(3),	
  366–370.	
  	
   	
   Solovyeva,	
  A.	
  M.,	
  &	
  Dummer,	
  P.	
  M.	
  (2000).	
  Cleaning	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  root	
  canal	
  irrigation	
   with	
  electrochemically	
  activated	
  anolyte	
  and	
  catholyte	
  solutions:	
  a	
  pilot	
  study.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  33(6),	
  494–504.	
   	
   Spanó,	
  J.	
  C.,	
  Barbin,	
  E.	
  L.,	
  Santos,	
  T.	
  C.,	
  Guimarães,	
  L.	
  F.,	
  &	
  Pécora,	
  J.	
  D.	
  (2001a).	
  Solvent	
   action	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  on	
  bovine	
  pulp	
  and	
  physico-­‐chemical	
  properties	
  of	
   resulting	
  liquid.	
  Braz	
  Dent	
  J,	
  12(3),	
  154–157.	
   	
   Spanó,	
  J.	
  C.,	
  Barbin,	
  E.	
  L.,	
  Santos,	
  T.	
  C.,	
  Guimarães,	
  L.	
  F.,	
  &	
  Pécora,	
  J.	
  D.	
  (2001b).	
  Solvent	
   action	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  on	
  bovine	
  pulp	
  and	
  physico-­‐chemical	
  properties	
  of	
   resulting	
  liquid.	
  Braz	
  Dent	
  J,	
  12(3),	
  154–157.	
   	
   Spoleti,	
  P.,	
  Siragusa,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Spoleti,	
  M.	
  J.	
  (2003).	
  Bacteriological	
  evaluation	
  of	
  passive	
   ultrasonic	
  activation.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  29(1),	
  12–14.	
  	
   	
   Stewart,	
  G.	
  (1955).	
  The	
  importance	
  of	
  chemomechanical	
  preparation	
  of	
  the	
  root	
  canal.	
   Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
  and	
  oral	
  pathology,	
  8(9),	
  993–997.	
   	
   Stock,	
  C.	
  J.	
  (1991).	
  Current	
  status	
  of	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  ultrasound	
  in	
  endodontics.	
  International	
   dental	
  journal,	
  41(3),	
  175–182.	
   	
   Stojicic,	
  S.,	
  Zivkovic,	
  S.,	
  Qian,	
  W.,	
  Zhang,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Haapasalo,	
  M.	
  (2010).	
  Tissue	
  dissolution	
  by	
   sodium	
  hypochlorite:	
  effect	
  of	
  concentration,	
  temperature,	
  agitation,	
  and	
  surfactant.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(9),	
  1558–1562.	
  	
   	
   Sundqvist,	
  G.	
  G.,	
  Figdor,	
  D.	
  D.,	
  Persson,	
  S.	
  S.,	
  &	
  Sjögren,	
  U.	
  U.	
  (1998).	
  Microbiologic	
  analysis	
   of	
  teeth	
  with	
  failed	
  endodontic	
  treatment	
  and	
  the	
  outcome	
  of	
  conservative	
  re-­‐treatment.	
   YMOE,	
  85(1),	
  86–93.	
  	
   	
   71	
    Sundqvist,	
  G.	
  K.,	
  Eckerbom,	
  M.	
  I.,	
  Larsson,	
  A.	
  P.,	
  &	
  Sjögren,	
  U.	
  T.	
  (1979).	
  Capacity	
  of	
   anaerobic	
  bacteria	
  from	
  necrotic	
  dental	
  pulps	
  to	
  induce	
  purulent	
  infections.	
  Infection	
  and	
   immunity,	
  25(2),	
  685–693.	
   	
   Susin,	
  L.,	
  Liu,	
  Y.,	
  Yoon,	
  J.	
  C.,	
  Parente,	
  J.	
  M.,	
  Loushine,	
  R.	
  J.,	
  Ricucci,	
  D.,	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010).	
  Canal	
  and	
   isthmus	
  debridement	
  efficacies	
  of	
  two	
  irrigant	
  agitation	
  techniques	
  in	
  a	
  closed	
  system.	
   International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  43(12),	
  1077–1090.	
  	
   Tay,	
  F.	
  R.,	
  Gu,	
  L.-­‐S.,	
  Schoeffel,	
  G.	
  J.,	
  Wimmer,	
  C.,	
  Susin,	
  L.,	
  Zhang,	
  K.,	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010).	
  Effect	
  of	
   Vapor	
  Lock	
  on	
  Root	
  Canal	
  Debridement	
  by	
  Using	
  a	
  Side-­‐vented	
  Needle	
  for	
  Positive-­‐ pressure	
  Irrigant	
  Delivery.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(4),	
  745–750.	
  	
   	
   Thaler,	
  A.,	
  Ebert,	
  J.,	
  Petschelt,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Pelka,	
  M.	
  (2008).	
  Influence	
  of	
  tooth	
  age	
  and	
  root	
   section	
  on	
  root	
  dentine	
  dye	
  penetration.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  41(12),	
  1115– 1122.	
  	
   	
   Thomas,	
  J.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Sem,	
  D.	
  S.	
  (2010).	
  An	
  In	
  Vitro	
  Spectroscopic	
  Analysis	
  to	
  Determine	
   Whether	
  Para-­‐Chloroaniline	
  Is	
  Produced	
  from	
  Mixing	
  Sodium	
  Hypochlorite	
  and	
   Chlorhexidine.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(2),	
  315–317.	
  	
   	
   Torabinejad,	
  M.,	
  Handysides,	
  R.,	
  Khademi,	
  A.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Bakland,	
  L.	
  K.	
  (2002).	
  Clinical	
   implications	
  of	
  the	
  smear	
  layer	
  in	
  endodontics:	
  A	
  review.	
  Oral	
  surgery,	
  oral	
  medicine,	
  and	
   oral	
  pathology,	
  94(6),	
  658-­‐666.	
  	
   	
   Townsend,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Maki,	
  J.	
  (2009).	
  An	
  In	
  Vitro	
  Comparison	
  of	
  New	
  Irrigation	
  and	
  Agitation	
   Techniques	
  to	
  Ultrasonic	
  Agitation	
  in	
  Removing	
  Bacteria	
  From	
  a	
  Simulated	
  Root	
  Canal.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  35(7),	
  1040–1043.	
  	
   	
   Tronstad,	
  L.,	
  Barnett,	
  F.,	
  Schwartzben,	
  L.,	
  &	
  Frasca,	
  P.	
  (1985).	
  Effectiveness	
  and	
  safety	
  of	
  a	
   sonic	
  vibratory	
  endodontic	
  instrument.	
  Endodontics	
  &	
  dental	
  traumatology,	
  1(2),	
  69–76.	
   	
   van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
  M.,	
  Gambarini,	
  G.,	
  Wu,	
  M.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Wesselink,	
  P.	
  R.	
  (2006).	
  The	
  influence	
  of	
   volume,	
  type	
  of	
  irrigant	
  and	
  flushing	
  method	
  on	
  removing	
  artificially	
  placed	
  dentine	
   debris	
  from	
  the	
  apical	
  root	
  canal	
  during	
  passive	
  ultrasonic	
  irrigation.	
  International	
   Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  39(6),	
  472–476.	
   	
   van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
  M.,	
  Versluis,	
  M.,	
  Wu,	
  M.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Wesselink,	
  P.	
  R.	
  (2007).	
  Passive	
  ultrasonic	
   irrigation	
  of	
  the	
  root	
  canal:	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  literature.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
   40(6),	
  415–426.	
  	
   	
   van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
  M.,	
  Wu,	
  M.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Wesselink,	
  P.	
  R.	
  (2005).	
  The	
  efficacy	
  of	
  ultrasonic	
   irrigation	
  to	
  remove	
  artificially	
  placed	
  dentine	
  debris	
  from	
  human	
  root	
  canals	
  prepared	
   using	
  instruments	
  of	
  varying	
  taper.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  38(10),	
  764–768.	
   	
   Vasiliadis,	
  L.	
  L.,	
  Darling,	
  A.	
  I.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Levers,	
  B.	
  G.	
  B.	
  (1983).	
  The	
  histology	
  of	
  sclerotic	
  human	
   root	
  dentine.	
  Archives	
  of	
  Oral	
  Biology,	
  28(8),	
  693–700.	
   	
   	
   72	
    Vera,	
  J.,	
  Arias,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Romero,	
  M.	
  (2011).	
  Effect	
  of	
  Maintaining	
  Apical	
  Patency	
  on	
  Irrigant	
   Penetration	
  into	
  the	
  Apical	
  Third	
  of	
  Root	
  Canals	
  When	
  Using	
  Passive	
  Ultrasonic	
  Irrigation:	
   An	
  In	
  Vivo	
  Study.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  37(9),	
  1276–1278.	
  	
   	
   Vera,	
  J.,	
  Hernández,	
  E.,	
  Romero,	
  M.,	
  Arias,	
  A.,	
  &	
  van	
  der	
  Sluis,	
  L.	
  W.	
  M.	
  (2012).	
  Effect	
  of	
   Maintaining	
  Apical	
  Patency	
  on	
  Irrigant	
  Penetration	
  into	
  the	
  Apical	
  Two	
  Millimeters	
  of	
   Large	
  Root	
  Canals:	
  An	
  In-­‐Vivo	
  Study.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  38(10),	
  1340–1343.	
   Vertucci,	
  F.	
  J.	
  (2005).	
  Root	
  canal	
  morphology	
  and	
  its	
  relationship	
  to	
  endodontic	
   procedures.	
  Endodontic	
  Topics,	
  10(1),	
  3–29.	
   	
   Von	
  Kreudenstein,	
  S.,	
  Stüben,	
  J.	
  (1955).	
  Dentinstoffwechselstudien	
  III.	
  Mitteilung:	
  Die	
   thermische	
  Methode	
  zum	
  Nachweis	
  des	
  Dentinliquors.	
  Deutsche	
  Zahna	
  ̈rztliche	
  Zeitschrift	
   10,	
  1178–82.	
  	
   	
   Walmsley,	
  A.	
  D.	
  (1987).	
  Ultrasound	
  and	
  root	
  canal	
  treatment:	
  the	
  need	
  for	
  scientific	
   evaluation.	
  International	
  Endodontic	
  Journal,	
  20(3),	
  105–111.	
   	
   Walmsley,	
  A.	
  D.,	
  &	
  Williams,	
  A.	
  R.	
  (1989).	
  Effects	
  of	
  constraint	
  on	
  the	
  oscillatory	
  pattern	
  of	
   endosonic	
  files.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  15(5),	
  189–194.	
   	
  	
   Wang,	
  Z.,	
  Shen,	
  Y.,	
  Ma,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Haapasalo,	
  M.	
  (2012).	
  The	
  Effect	
  of	
  Detergents	
  on	
  the	
   Antibacterial	
  Activity	
  of	
  Disinfecting	
  Solutions	
  in	
  Dentin.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  38(7),	
   948–953.	
  	
   	
   White,	
  R.	
  R.	
  R.,	
  Hays,	
  G.	
  L.	
  G.,	
  &	
  Janer,	
  L.	
  R.	
  L.	
  (1997).	
  Residual	
  antimicrobial	
  activity	
  after	
   canal	
  irrigation	
  with	
  chlorhexidine.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  23(4),	
  229-­‐231.	
  	
   	
   Whittaker,	
  D.	
  K.	
  D.,	
  &	
  Bakri,	
  M.	
  M.	
  M.	
  (1996).	
  Racial	
  variations	
  in	
  the	
  extent	
  of	
  tooth	
  root	
   translucency	
  in	
  ageing	
  individuals.	
  Archives	
  of	
  Oral	
  Biology,	
  41(1),	
  15–19.	
  	
   	
   Yin,	
  X.	
  X.,	
  Cheung,	
  G.	
  S.	
  P.	
  G.,	
  Zhang,	
  C.	
  C.,	
  Masuda,	
  Y.	
  M.	
  Y.,	
  Kimura,	
  Y.	
  Y.,	
  &	
  Matsumoto,	
  K.	
  K.	
   (2010).	
  Micro-­‐computed	
  Tomographic	
  Comparison	
  of	
  Nickel-­‐Titanium	
  Rotary	
  versus	
   Traditional	
  Instruments	
  in	
  C-­‐Shaped	
  Root	
  Canal	
  System.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(4),	
  5– 5.	
   	
  	
   Yoshida,	
  T.,	
  Shibata,	
  T.,	
  Shinohara,	
  T.,	
  Gomyo,	
  S.,	
  &	
  Sekine,	
  I.	
  (1995).	
  Clinical	
  evaluation	
  of	
   the	
  efficacy	
  of	
  EDTA	
  solution	
  as	
  an	
  endodontic	
  irrigant.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  21(12),	
  2– 2.	
  	
   	
   Young,	
  G.	
  R.,	
  Parashos,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Messer,	
  H.	
  H.	
  (2007).	
  The	
  principles	
  of	
  techniques	
  for	
  cleaning	
   root	
  canals.	
  Australian	
  dental	
  journal,	
  52(1	
  Suppl),	
  S52–63.	
   	
   Zehnder,	
  M.	
  (2006).	
  Root	
  canal	
  irrigants.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  32(5),	
  389–398.	
  	
   	
   Zehnder,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Paque,	
  F.	
  (2011).	
  Disinfection	
  of	
  the	
  root	
  canal	
  system	
  during	
  root	
  canal	
  re-­‐ treatment.	
  Endo	
  Topics,	
  19,	
  58–73.	
  	
   	
   73	
    	
   Zehnder,	
  M.,	
  Schmidlin,	
  P.,	
  Sener,	
  B.,	
  &	
  Waltimo,	
  T.	
  (2005).	
  Chelation	
  in	
  root	
  canal	
  therapy	
   reconsidered.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  31(11),	
  817–820.	
  	
   	
   Zhang,	
  K.,	
  Kim,	
  Y.	
  K.,	
  Cadenaro,	
  M.,	
  Bryan,	
  T.	
  E.,	
  Sidow,	
  S.	
  J.,	
  Loushine,	
  R.	
  J.,	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010).	
   Effects	
  of	
  different	
  exposure	
  times	
  and	
  concentrations	
  of	
  sodium	
   hypochlorite/ethylenediaminetetraacetic	
  acid	
  on	
  the	
  structural	
  integrity	
  of	
  mineralized	
   dentin.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(1),	
  105–109.	
  	
   	
   Zou,	
  L.,	
  Shen,	
  Y.,	
  Li,	
  W.,	
  &	
  Haapasalo,	
  M.	
  (2010).	
  Penetration	
  of	
  sodium	
  hypochlorite	
  into	
   dentin.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Endodontics,	
  36(5),	
  793–796.	
   	
    	
    74	
    

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0073976/manifest

Comment

Related Items