Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Medical nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding pain management Wong, Michelle 2012

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2013_spring_wong_michelle.pdf [ 1.23MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0073486.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0073486-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0073486-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0073486-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0073486-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0073486-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0073486-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0073486-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0073486.ris

Full Text

	
   	
   	
   MEDICAL	
  NURSES’	
  KNOWLEDGE	
  AND	
  ATTITUDES	
   REGARDING	
  PAIN	
  MANAGEMENT	
   by	
  Michelle	
  Wong	
  BScN.,	
  York	
  University,	
  2007	
  	
  A	
  THESIS	
  SUBMITTED	
  IN	
  PARTIAL	
  FULFILLMENT	
  OF	
  	
  THE	
  REQUIREMENTS	
  FOR	
  THE	
  DEGREE	
  OF	
  	
  MASTER	
  OF	
  SCIENCE	
  IN	
  NURSING	
   in	
   The	
  Faculty	
  of	
  Graduate	
  Studies	
  	
   (Nursing)	
  	
  	
  THE	
  UNIVERSITY	
  OF	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
  (Vancouver)	
  	
  December	
  2012	
  	
   ©	
  Michelle	
  Wong,	
  2012	
   	
   	
  	
   ii	
   Abstract	
   Unrelieved	
  pain	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  common	
  complaints	
  by	
  medical	
  patients	
  and	
  can	
  greatly	
  affect	
  their	
  health	
  outcomes	
  and	
  quality	
  of	
  life.	
  Medical	
  patients	
  account	
  for	
  a	
  large	
  portion	
  of	
  hospitalized	
  older	
  patients	
  and	
  pain	
  is	
  widespread	
  among	
  this	
  population.	
  Nurses	
  spend	
  the	
  most	
  time	
  with	
  patients	
  and	
  are	
  well	
  placed	
  to	
  assess	
  and	
  effectively	
  manage	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain,	
  however	
  nurses’	
  poor	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  can	
  significantly	
  hindered	
  patients’	
  pain	
  management	
  outcomes.	
  	
  This	
  study	
  explored	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  units	
  in	
  a	
  hospital	
  located	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  BC.	
  	
  There	
  were	
  75	
  nurses	
  who	
  completed	
  the	
  “Pain	
  Questionnaire.”	
  The	
  study	
  revealed	
  moderate	
  (69.04%)	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  about	
  pain	
  management	
  from	
  the	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  survey	
  regarding	
  pain.	
  Registered	
  nurses	
  and	
  bachelors	
  prepared	
  nurses	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  have	
  statistically	
  significant	
  higher	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  levels	
  and	
  attitudes.	
  Knowledge	
  deficits	
  were	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  areas	
  of	
  underestimation	
  of	
  pain,	
  pharmacology,	
  addiction,	
  withdrawal,	
  substance	
  abuse,	
  and	
  cancer	
  related	
  pain.	
  Nurses	
  have	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  attribute	
  less	
  pain	
  to	
  patients	
  suffering	
  from	
  chronic	
  conditions	
  than	
  to	
  those	
  suffering	
  from	
  acute	
  conditions.	
  Pain	
  associated	
  with	
  diabetes	
  and	
  renal	
  diseases,	
  chronic	
  conditions	
  often	
  found	
  in	
  aging	
  adults,	
  were	
  viewed	
  the	
  most	
  negatively.	
  A	
  focus	
  on	
  changing	
  the	
  culture	
  of	
  care,	
  and	
  towards	
  evolving	
  the	
  nursing	
  practice	
  to	
  one	
  of	
  more	
  accountability	
  for	
  pain	
  management,	
  will	
  enhance	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain,	
  and	
  most	
  importantly	
  will	
  reduce	
  patient	
  pain	
  and	
  improve	
  quality	
  of	
  care.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   iii	
   Preface	
   An	
  ethics	
  certificate	
  of	
  expedited	
  approval	
  was	
  obtained	
  from	
  the	
  UBC/Providence	
  Health	
  Care	
  Research	
  Ethics	
  Board	
  for	
  this	
  study.	
  The	
  UBC/PHC	
  REB	
  number	
  is	
  H11-­‐03236.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   iv	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   Abstract…....................................................................................................................................ii	
   Preface........................................................................................................................................iii	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents.....................................................................................................................iv	
   List	
  of	
  Tables...........................................................................................................................vii	
   List	
  of	
  Figures.........................................................................................................................viii	
   List	
  of	
  Charts.............................................................................................................................ix	
   Acknowledgments…………………………………………………………………………………………...x	
  	
   1.	
   CHAPTER	
  1	
   	
  	
   INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………….1	
  1.1	
   Significance	
  of	
  the	
  Problem…………………………………………...……….………..3	
  	
   1.2	
   Significance	
  to	
  Nursing……………………………………………………………………4	
  1.3	
   Purpose………………………………………………………………………………………….5	
  1.4	
   Research	
  Questions……………………………….………….…………………………….6	
  1.5	
   Summary………………………………………………..…..…………………………………..6	
  	
   2.	
   CHAPTER	
  2	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   REIVEW	
  OF	
  THE	
  LITERATURE……………………………………………………………….7	
  2.1	
   Pain	
  Pathophysiology………………………………………………………………….…..7	
  2.1.1	
   Pain	
  Defined.………………………………………………………………………..7	
  2.1.2	
   Acute	
  Pain	
  …………………………………………………………………………...8	
  2.1.3	
   Nociceptive	
  Pain…………………………………………………………………..9	
  2.1.4	
   Chronic	
  Pain………………………………………………………………….……..9	
  2.1.5	
   Neuropathic	
  Pain……………………………………………………..…………..9	
  2.2	
   Pain	
  in	
  Older	
  Adults…………..……...……….…………………………….…..………..10	
  2.3	
   Impact	
  of	
  Pain	
  in	
  Older	
  Adults.……...…………………………………….…….…..12	
  2.4	
   Attitudes	
  and	
  Misconceptions	
  Toward	
  Pain	
  and	
  Aging..……............……13	
  2.5	
   Prevalence	
  of	
  Pain	
  in	
  Patients	
  in	
  the	
  Medical	
  Unit……...……….…………..15	
  2.6	
   Nurses’	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pain……...……….……….....17	
  2.7	
   Misconceptions	
  Over	
  Opioid	
  Use….....……….………………………………….....21	
  2.8	
   Pain	
  Analgesia	
  Practice……...……….……………………………………………..…..22	
  2.9	
  	
   Factors	
  Influencing	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  in	
  Pain	
  Management...23	
  2.9.1	
   Education……...……….…..……...………………..…….…..……...……….…..23	
  2.9.2	
   Area	
  of	
  Specialty	
  ……...……….…..……...……………………….……….…..24	
  2.9.3	
   Organizational	
  Barriers……...……….…..……...…………………..….…..25	
  2.10	
   Summary……...……….…..……...…………………………………………………..….…..28	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   v	
   3.	
   CHAPTER	
  3	
  	
   METHODOLOGY…………………………………………………………………………………..30	
  	
   3.1	
   Design…………………………………………………………………………..………………30	
  	
   3.2	
   Setting…………………………………..……………………………………………………...30	
  	
   3.3	
   Sampling…………………………………..…………………………………………………..31	
  	
   3.4	
   Instrumentation……..……………………………………..……...………………………32	
  	
   	
   3.4.1	
   Demographic	
  Profile	
  (DP)….…………………………….....………………32	
  	
   	
   3.4.2	
   Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  (KASRP)…..33	
  	
   	
   3.4.3	
   Clinical	
  Decision	
  Making	
  Questionnaire	
  in	
  Pain	
  (CDMPQ)…….34	
  	
   3.5	
   Ethical	
  Considerations…………………………………………………………………..35	
  	
   3.6	
   Recruitment	
  and	
  Data	
  Collection.…………………………………………………..36	
  	
   3.7	
   Data	
  Analysis………………………………………………………………………………..39	
  	
   3.8	
   Test	
  to	
  Determine	
  Normality…………………………………………………………39	
  	
   3.9	
   Reliability……..……………………………………..……………………………………….40	
  	
   	
   3.9.1	
   KASRP……………………………………………………………………………….40	
  3.9.2	
   CDMPQ………………………………………………………………………………41	
  	
   3.10	
   Validity……..……………………………………..……………………………………..…….41	
  	
   	
   3.10.1	
   KASRP……………………………………………………………………………….41	
  	
   	
   3.10.2	
   CMDPQ.……………………………………………………………………………..42	
  	
   3.11	
   Analysis	
  of	
  Research	
  Questions……..……………………………………..………..42	
  	
   	
   3.11.1	
   Research	
  Question	
  1.……..…………………………………………………...43	
  	
   3.11.2	
   Research	
  Question	
  2	
  ………………………………………………………….43	
  3.11.3	
   Research	
  Question	
  3……..……………………………………………………44	
  3.11.4	
   Research	
  Question	
  4……..……..……………………………………………..44	
  	
   3.12	
   Summary……………………………………………………………………………………...45	
  	
  	
   4.	
   CHAPTER	
  4	
   RESULTS……………………………………………………………………………………………..46	
  	
   4.1	
   Response	
  Rate.……………………………………………………………………………..46	
  4.2	
   Demographic	
  Profile	
  of	
  Nurses.…………………………………..…………………48	
  	
   4.3	
   Research	
  Question	
  1……………………………………………………………….…….51	
  	
   	
   4.3.1	
   Older	
  Adults	
  on	
  the	
  Medical	
  Unit……..…………..……………………..54	
  4.3.2	
   Pharmacology.…………………………………..……………………………….54	
  	
   4.3.3	
   Cancer	
  Related	
  Pain..………………………..………………………………...55	
  	
   	
   	
  4.3.4	
   Addiction,	
  Withdrawal,	
  and	
  Substance	
  abuse……………...…...…..56	
  4.4	
   Research	
  Question	
  2………………………………………………………..……………56	
  4.5	
   Research	
  Question	
  3……………………………………………………..………………59	
  	
   4.5.1	
   Gender……………...……………………………………………………………….59	
  	
   4.5.2	
   Age	
  Distribution………………..……………………………………………….59	
  	
   	
  4.5.3	
   Professional	
  Qualification…………….…..…………………………………60	
  	
   4.5.4	
   Educational	
  Level………………..……………………………………………..60	
  	
   4.5.5	
   Years	
  of	
  Professional	
  Nursing	
  Experience…..…………………….…61	
  	
   4.5.6	
   Pain	
  Education………………………………………………………………...…61	
  	
   4.5.7	
   Frequency	
  of	
  Caring	
  for	
  Patients	
  in	
  Pain…...…………………………62	
  	
   4.6	
   Research	
  Question	
  4………………………………………………………………...…...62	
   	
   	
  	
   vi	
   	
   4.7	
   Conclusion.…………………………………………………………………………….…….65	
  	
   4.8	
   Summary……………………………………………………………………………………..65	
   	
   5.	
   CHAPTER	
  5	
   	
   DISCUSSION…………………………………………………………………………………..…….67	
  	
   5.1	
   Demographics	
  of	
  Participants………………………………………..………..……..67	
  	
   5.2	
   Registered	
  Nurses	
  and	
  Bachelor’s	
  Education...………………………..………68	
  	
   	
   5.2.1	
   LPN	
  Scope	
  of	
  Practice..………………………………………………….…….69	
  5.3	
   Medical	
  Nurses’	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  Management	
  in	
  Older	
  Adults..….……..………………….……………………….….70	
  	
   	
   5.3.1	
   Underestimation	
  of	
  Pain…………………………………………………..…71	
  	
   	
   5.3.2	
   Poor	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Opioids….……………72	
  	
   	
   5.3.3	
   Cancer	
  Associated	
  Pain……………….……….……….……….……...….…74	
  5.3.4	
   Addiction,	
  Withdrawal,	
  and	
  Substance	
  abuse………………………75	
  	
   5.4	
   Preconceived	
  Notions	
  Regarding	
  Pain………….……….……….…..……..……76	
  5.4.1	
   Older	
  Adults…...…………………………………………………….…………....76	
  5.4.2	
   Chronic	
  Conditions	
  versus	
  Acute	
  Condition…….…….……….…….77	
  5.4.3	
   Psychological	
  Symptoms	
  Associated	
  with	
  Chronic	
  Pain	
  Conditions………………………………………………………………………….79	
  5.5	
   Implications	
  for	
  Nursing……..……………………………………..………………….80	
  	
   	
   5.5.1	
   Nursing	
  Practice…………………………………………………………...........80	
  	
   	
   5.5.2	
   Nursing	
  Education……………………………..……………………………....81	
  5.5.3	
   Administration……………………………..…………………………………....83	
  5.6	
   Limitations	
  of	
  the	
  Study…...………………………..…………………….………..…..83	
  5.7	
   Strengths	
  of	
  the	
  Study……………………………..………………………………….…84	
  5.8	
   Recommendation	
  for	
  Future	
  Research…..………………………..…………..…84	
  5.9	
   Summary……………………………..………………………….…..……………………..…85	
  	
   	
   REFERENCES………………………………………………………………………………………………….86	
  	
   APPENDICES……………………………………………………………………………………………..…105	
  Appendix	
  A	
   Invitation	
  Letter	
  To	
  Participants	
  …………………………………………………106	
  Appendix	
  B	
   Demographic	
  Profile...…………………………………………………………………109	
  Appendix	
  C	
   Nurses	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  	
  Management.………………………………………………………………………………111	
  Appendix	
  D	
   The	
  Clinical	
  Decision-­‐Making	
  Questionnaire	
  in	
  Pain	
  Management…117	
  Appendix	
  E	
   Additional	
  Resources	
  About	
  Pain	
  Management……………………...……..119	
  Appendix	
  F	
   Letter	
  of	
  Initial	
  Contact……………………..………………………………………...121	
  Appendix	
  G	
   Advertisement.…………………………………………………………………………...124	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   vii	
   	
   List	
  of	
  Tables	
  	
  Table	
  1	
   Demographic	
  Profile	
  of	
  Nurses………………………………………………………50	
  Table	
  2	
   Distributions	
  of	
  Scores	
  for	
  the	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Questionnaire	
  Regarding	
  Pain…………………………………………….…………51	
  	
  Table	
  3	
   Ranking	
  of	
  Questions	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  from	
  Least-­‐Correctly	
  to	
  Most-­‐Correctly	
  Answered………………………………………………………………………52	
  	
  Table	
  4	
   Nursing	
  Assessments	
  for	
  Patient	
  A	
  and	
  Patient	
  B……………………………57	
  Table	
  5	
   Nursing	
  Intervention	
  for	
  Patient	
  A	
  and	
  Patient	
  B……………………..……..58	
  Table	
  6	
   Clinical	
  Decision	
  Making	
  Pain	
  Questionnaire	
  -­‐	
  Nurses	
  Distribution	
  of	
  Their	
  Time	
  and	
  Energy	
  Managing	
  a	
  Patient’s	
  Pain……………….………….63	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   viii	
   	
   List	
  of	
  Figures	
  	
  Figure	
  1	
   	
  Flow	
  Diagram	
  of	
  Participant	
  Recruitment..……………………………………47	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   ix	
   	
  	
   List	
  of	
  Charts	
  	
  Figure	
  1	
   	
  Maximum	
  Time	
  and	
  Energy	
  Expended	
  on	
  Patient’s	
  Pain	
  (5	
  on	
  a	
  1-­‐5	
  scale)………………………………………………………………………………………………..64	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   x	
   Acknowledgments	
   	
   I	
  offer	
  my	
  sincere	
  gratitude	
  to	
  the	
  many	
  individuals	
  who	
  have	
  assisted	
  me	
  in	
  completing	
  this	
  thesis.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  challenging	
  progress	
  and	
  I	
  am	
  grateful	
  to	
  say	
  I	
  am	
  finally	
  done!	
  	
  	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  my	
  supervisor	
  Dr.	
  Tarnia	
  Taverner.	
  Thank	
  you	
  for	
  sharing	
  your	
  knowledge,	
  your	
  constant	
  encouragement	
  and	
  support!	
  Thank	
  you	
  	
  Dr.	
  Anne	
  Dewar	
  for	
  your	
  amazing	
  dedication	
  and	
  guidance.	
  Thank	
  you	
  Jan	
  Muir	
  for	
  showing	
  me	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  managing	
  pain.	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  all	
  the	
  nurses	
  who	
  have	
  showed	
  kindness,	
  care,	
  and	
  dedication	
  to	
  their	
  patients.	
  	
  	
   I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  my	
  friends	
  in	
  Toronto	
  and	
  the	
  new	
  friends	
  I	
  have	
  met	
  in	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  	
   To	
  my	
  parents,	
  thank	
  you	
  for	
  supporting	
  me	
  throughout	
  my	
  life	
  in	
  whatever	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  pursue.	
  	
  	
  	
   To	
  Coby,	
  you	
  are	
  my	
  silly	
  furry	
  buddy.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   1	
   Chapter	
  1	
   	
   Introduction	
   Pain	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  distressing	
  symptoms	
  for	
  both	
  patients	
  and	
  caregivers	
  (Gloth,	
  2001).	
  While	
  there	
  are	
  technological	
  advances,	
  extensive	
  research,	
  and	
  evidenced	
  based	
  practice	
  guidelines	
  to	
  manage	
  pain	
  adequately	
  (Registered	
  Nurses	
  Association	
  of	
  Ontario	
  (RNAO),	
  2002a;	
  Bell	
  &	
  Duffy,	
  2009;	
  JCAHO,	
  2011),	
  patients	
  continue	
  to	
  suffer	
  from	
  inadequate	
  pain	
  management	
  (Herr,	
  Titler,	
  Schilling	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  Older	
  adults	
  are	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  suffer	
  from	
  pain	
  than	
  younger	
  people	
  (Miller,	
  1996)	
  and	
  one	
  in	
  five	
  adults	
  suffer	
  from	
  chronic	
  pain	
  (Moulin,	
  Clark,	
  Speechley,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002.)	
  Pain	
  affects	
  almost	
  one	
  quarter	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  living	
  at	
  home	
  (Statistics	
  Canada,	
  2008)	
  and	
  more	
  than	
  80%	
  of	
  nursing	
  home	
  residents	
  (Helme	
  &	
  Gibson,	
  2001).	
  Older	
  adults	
  in	
  hospitals	
  and	
  long	
  term	
  care	
  facilities	
  experience	
  pain	
  almost	
  on	
  a	
  regular	
  basis,	
  which	
  severely	
  limits	
  their	
  quality	
  of	
  life	
  (Statistics	
  Canada,	
  2008).	
  	
  Unrelieved	
  pain	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  common	
  complaints	
  by	
  patients	
  and	
  can	
  greatly	
  affect	
  an	
  individual’s	
  function,	
  mood,	
  sleep,	
  and	
  relationships	
  with	
  family	
  and	
  loved	
  ones	
  (Gureje,	
  Von	
  Korff,	
  Simon,	
  &	
  Gater,	
  1999;	
  Moulin,	
  Clark,	
  Speechley,	
  Morley-­‐Forster,	
  1999;	
  Schopflocher	
  &	
  Jovey,	
  2010).	
  The	
  economic	
  impact	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  Canada	
  costs	
  more	
  than	
  $6	
  billion	
  per	
  year	
  in	
  direct	
  health	
  costs	
  and	
  an	
  astounding	
  $37	
  billion	
  per	
  year	
  in	
  productivity	
  costs	
  related	
  to	
  job	
  loss	
  and	
  sick	
  days	
  (Phillips	
  &	
  Schopflocher,	
  2008).	
   	
   	
  	
   2	
   The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  chronic	
  pain	
  increases	
  with	
  age	
  (Blyth	
  March,	
  Barnabic	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001),	
  making	
  chronic	
  pain	
  more	
  evident	
  in	
  the	
  older	
  population	
  as	
  comorbid	
  conditions	
  multiply	
  (Ross	
  &	
  Crook,	
  1998;	
  Smith,	
  Elliott,	
  Chambers,	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999;	
  Cohen-­‐Masfield	
  &	
  Lipson,	
  2002).	
  For	
  older	
  adults,	
  including	
  those	
  in	
  the	
  acute	
  care	
  hospitals,	
  more	
  than	
  80%	
  have	
  pre-­‐existing	
  chronic	
  medical	
  conditions	
  such	
  as	
  arthritis,	
  cancer,	
  diabetes	
  and	
  obesity	
  that	
  contribute	
  to	
  their	
  different	
  sources	
  and	
  types	
  of	
  pain	
  (Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  By	
  the	
  year	
  2031,	
  between	
  8.9	
  to	
  9.4	
  million	
  people,	
  representing	
  almost	
  a	
  quarter	
  of	
  Canada’s	
  total	
  population	
  will	
  be	
  made	
  up	
  of	
  seniors	
  (aged	
  65	
  or	
  older),	
  which	
  will	
  nearly	
  double	
  their	
  population	
  of	
  13%	
  in	
  2005	
  (Statistics	
  Canada,	
  2008).	
  With	
  a	
  rapidly	
  aging	
  population,	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  need	
  to	
  focus	
  on	
  treating	
  their	
  pain	
  appropriately.	
  	
  This	
  study	
  will	
  explore	
  medical	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  an	
  acute	
  care	
  Vancouver	
  hospital.	
  The	
  thesis	
  is	
  structured	
  into	
  five	
  chapters.	
  The	
  first	
  chapter	
  describes	
  the	
  background	
  to	
  the	
  problem	
  and	
  the	
  significance	
  to	
  nursing.	
  The	
  introduction	
  chapter	
  provides	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  and	
  research	
  questions	
  to	
  best	
  identify	
  the	
  aim	
  of	
  the	
  study.	
  Chapter	
  Two	
  provides	
  the	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  literature	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  and	
  the	
  background	
  of	
  pain	
  physiology	
  and	
  pathology.	
  It	
  further	
  describes	
  pain	
  specifically	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  unit	
  and	
  factors	
  that	
  have	
  influenced	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  management.	
  The	
  current	
  factors	
  and	
  barriers	
  to	
  poor	
  management,	
  as	
  well,	
  the	
  myths	
  and	
  misconceptions	
  of	
  pain	
  held	
  by	
  nurses	
  are	
  reviewed.	
  Chapter	
  Three	
  reviews	
  the	
  research	
  design,	
  methodology,	
  and	
  ethical	
  considerations.	
  Chapter	
  Four,	
  the	
  results	
  chapter,	
  describes	
  the	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  data	
  to	
  answer	
  the	
  research	
   	
   	
  	
   3	
   questions.	
  Chapter	
  Five	
  provides	
  the	
  discussion	
  of	
  the	
  results,	
  implications	
  for	
  nursing	
  practice,	
  and	
  recommendations	
  for	
  future	
  research.	
  	
  	
   1.1	
   Significance	
  of	
  the	
  Problem	
  Despite	
  the	
  evidence	
  based	
  practices	
  and	
  guidelines	
  surrounding	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  (RNAO,	
  2002),	
  pain	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  inadequately	
  treated.	
  Medical	
  patients	
  account	
  for	
  a	
  large	
  portion	
  of	
  hospitalized	
  older	
  patients	
  and	
  pain	
  is	
  widespread	
  among	
  this	
  population	
  (Dix,	
  Sandhar,	
  Murdoch,	
  MacIntrye,	
  2004;	
  Whelan,	
  Jin	
  &	
  Meltzer,	
  2004;	
  Sawyer,	
  Haslam,	
  Daines,	
  &	
  Stilos,	
  2010).	
  However	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  are	
  often	
  focused	
  on	
  the	
  diagnosis	
  and	
  disease	
  process,	
  leaving	
  medical	
  patients	
  to	
  suffer	
  in	
  pain	
  (Liu,	
  So,	
  &	
  Fong,	
  2008).	
  Many	
  studies	
  have	
  focused	
  on	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  specialty	
  areas	
  such	
  as	
  surgery	
  and	
  intensive	
  care	
  (Watt-­‐Watson,	
  Stevens,	
  Katz	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Wang	
  &	
  Tsai,	
  2010)	
  while	
  the	
  non-­‐surgical	
  areas	
  have	
  been	
  over	
  looked.	
  In	
  contrast	
  to	
  surgical	
  and	
  post	
  anesthetic	
  care	
  units	
  (PACU),	
  many	
  medical	
  units	
  do	
  not	
  have	
  guidelines,	
  performance	
  measures,	
  or	
  mandated	
  pain	
  scales	
  (Franco,	
  Sprung	
  &	
  Trentman,	
  2005;	
  Helfand	
  &	
  Freeman,	
  2009;	
  Royal	
  College	
  of	
  Anesthetics,	
  2010),	
  which	
  contributes	
  to	
  decreased	
  pain	
  awareness	
  in	
  these	
  units.	
  Resources	
  for	
  acute	
  pain	
  services	
  and	
  pain	
  specialist	
  are	
  few	
  and	
  are	
  often	
  reserved	
  for	
  the	
  postoperative	
  or	
  critically	
  ill	
  patient	
  (Jovey,	
  2008).	
  Medical	
  patients	
  who	
  suffer	
  pain	
  often	
  have	
  their	
  pain	
  disregarded	
  by	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  and	
  receive	
  inadequate	
  pain	
  management	
  compared	
  to	
  non-­‐medical	
  patients.	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   4	
   1.2	
   Significance	
  to	
  Nursing	
  	
  Nurses	
  spend	
  the	
  most	
  time	
  with	
  patients	
  and	
  are	
  well	
  placed	
  to	
  assess	
  and	
  effectively	
  manage	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain.	
  Nurses	
  play	
  a	
  key	
  role	
  in	
  on-­‐going	
  pain	
  assessment,	
  initiation	
  and	
  evaluation	
  of	
  pain	
  treatment	
  (Lewthwaite,	
  Jabusch,	
  Wheeler	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  However,	
  several	
  studies	
  (Ferrell,	
  McGuire,	
  &	
  Donovan,	
  1993;	
  Gibbs,	
  1995;	
  McCaffrey	
  &	
  Rolling	
  Ferrell,	
  1995;	
  Brunier,	
  Carson,	
  &	
  Harrison,	
  1995;	
  McCaffrey	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  1997;	
  Liu,	
  So,	
  &	
  Fong,	
  2007;	
  Drayer,	
  Henderson,	
  Reidenbery,	
  1999;	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  have	
  shown	
  that	
  nurses’	
  inadequate	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  have	
  significantly	
  hindered	
  patients’	
  pain	
  management	
  outcomes.	
  	
  Older	
  persons	
  in	
  hospital	
  who	
  experience	
  an	
  exacerbation	
  of	
  their	
  pain	
  from	
  existing	
  chronic	
  conditions	
  will	
  be	
  at	
  greater	
  risk	
  for	
  impairment	
  if	
  pain	
  is	
  not	
  well	
  managed	
  (Inouye,	
  2006).	
  Older	
  adults	
  face	
  additional	
  challenges	
  of	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management	
  when	
  clinicians’	
  lack	
  knowledge	
  and	
  hold	
  poor	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  and	
  aging	
  (Herr	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Coker,	
  Papaioannou,	
  Turpie,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Chapman,	
  2010).	
  It	
  is	
  hoped	
  that	
  raising	
  awareness	
  on	
  this	
  issue	
  can	
  reduce	
  the	
  older	
  person’s	
  suffering	
  and	
  improve	
  their	
  care.	
  Nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  skill,	
  collaboration	
  with	
  the	
  interdisciplinary	
  team,	
  and	
  education	
  for	
  patients	
  and	
  families	
  will	
  create	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management	
  care	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   5	
   1.3	
   Purpose	
  The	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  quantitative	
  exploratory	
  study	
  is:	
  1.	
  	
   To	
  explore	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  medical	
  units;	
  2.	
  	
   To	
  access	
  the	
  nurses’	
  assessment,	
  documentation,	
  and	
  intervention	
  regarding	
  patients’	
  in	
  pain;	
  3.	
   To	
  explore	
  the	
  factors	
  that	
  influence	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain;	
  4.	
  	
   To	
  discover	
  nurses’	
  perceived	
  notions	
  regarding	
  patients’	
  condition/diagnosis	
  of	
  age	
  and	
  how	
  that	
  may	
  influence	
  their	
  decision-­‐making	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
  The	
  study	
  presented	
  in	
  this	
  thesis	
  is	
  intended	
  to	
  add	
  to	
  the	
  current	
  body	
  of	
  literature,	
  provide	
  evidence,	
  inform	
  inquiry	
  and	
  stimulate	
  interest	
  in	
  pain	
  management	
  among	
  nurses	
  and	
  other	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  setting.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   6	
   1.4	
   Research	
  Questions	
  The	
  following	
  research	
  questions	
  have	
  been	
  asked	
  to	
  address	
  the	
  objectives	
  of	
  the	
  study:	
  1.	
   What	
  are	
  the	
  medical	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  levels	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults?	
  	
  2.	
  	
   After	
  reading	
  a	
  written	
  description	
  of	
  patients	
  in	
  pain,	
  what	
  are	
  the	
  nurses’	
  assessment,	
  documentation,	
  and	
  intervention	
  surrounding	
  a	
  patient	
  in	
  pain?	
  3.	
   What	
  are	
  the	
  factors	
  influencing	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain?	
  4.	
   What	
  are	
  the	
  preconceived	
  notions	
  regarding	
  a	
  patient’s	
  diagnosis	
  or	
  age	
  that	
  influence	
  nurse’s	
  decision	
  making	
  regarding	
  the	
  management	
  of	
  pain?	
  	
   1.5	
   Summary	
  This	
  chapter	
  described	
  the	
  challenges	
  and	
  difficulties	
  that	
  surround	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  The	
  next	
  chapter	
  will	
  review	
  the	
  current	
  literature	
  of	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  pain	
  management,	
  and	
  the	
  misconceptions	
  towards	
  pain	
  and	
  aging.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   7	
   Chapter	
  2	
   Review	
  of	
  the	
  Literature	
   The	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  literature	
  focused	
  on	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  setting,	
  specifically	
  older	
  adults	
  who	
  typically	
  are	
  patients	
  in	
  these	
  units.	
  Further	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  research	
  will	
  present	
  the	
  attitudes	
  and	
  misconceptions	
  towards	
  pain	
  and	
  aging.	
  A	
  large	
  concentration	
  is	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  nurse’s	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  unit.	
  Pain	
  pathophysiology,	
  pain	
  pathways,	
  pharmacology,	
  and	
  pain	
  analgesic	
  practice	
  are	
  also	
  reviewed.	
  	
  	
   2.1	
   Pain	
  Pathophysiology	
  	
   2.1.1	
   	
  Pain	
  Defined	
  Everyone	
  has	
  experienced	
  pain	
  and	
  will	
  suffer	
  from	
  more	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  future.	
  Pain	
  management	
  can	
  provide	
  relief	
  and	
  improve	
  function,	
  but	
  is	
  often	
  misunderstood	
  and	
  can	
  mean	
  different	
  things	
  to	
  different	
  people.	
  	
  The	
  International	
  Association	
  for	
  the	
  Study	
  of	
  Pain	
  (IASP)	
  describes	
  pain	
  as	
  always	
  being	
  subjective	
  and	
  each	
  person	
  learns	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  the	
  word	
  pain	
  through	
  past	
  injury	
  or	
  experiences	
  (IASP,	
  2011).	
  A	
  definition	
  of	
  pain	
  widely	
  used	
  in	
  nursing	
  describes	
  the	
  subjective	
  nature	
  of	
  pain	
  was	
  first	
  coined	
  by	
  Margo	
  McCaffrey	
  as	
  “whatever	
  the	
  experiencing	
  person	
  says	
  it	
  is,	
  existing	
  whenever	
  she/he	
  says	
  it	
  does”	
  (McCaffrey,	
  1968,	
  p.	
  95).	
  	
  	
  Pain	
  is	
  subjective	
  in	
  nature	
  and	
  there	
  are	
  multiple	
  levels	
  of	
  pain.	
  “Total	
  pain”,	
  is	
  the	
  consideration	
  of	
  physical,	
  emotional,	
  psychosocial	
  and	
  cognitive	
  influences	
  on	
  pain	
  (Jovey,	
  2008).	
  Memories,	
  emotions,	
  and	
  interpretation	
  of	
  pain	
  input	
  make	
  pain	
   	
   	
  	
   8	
   a	
  unique,	
  subjective,	
  sensory	
  experience	
  (Jovey,	
  2008).	
  Melzack	
  (1996)	
  described	
  the	
  “neuromatrix	
  theory”	
  of	
  pain,	
  which	
  originate	
  in	
  the	
  brain,	
  is	
  comprised	
  of	
  a	
  large	
  network	
  of	
  neurons	
  and	
  has	
  specialized	
  neurons	
  for	
  sensory	
  events	
  such	
  as	
  injury	
  to	
  the	
  body	
  (Melzack,	
  1996).	
  The	
  body	
  experiences	
  different	
  qualities	
  and	
  experiences,	
  which	
  is	
  determined	
  genetically	
  or	
  based	
  on	
  sensory	
  outputs	
  that	
  can	
  product	
  output	
  or	
  in	
  some	
  cases	
  abnormal	
  or	
  no	
  output.	
  For	
  example,	
  in	
  phantom	
  leg	
  pain,	
  the	
  brain	
  attempts	
  to	
  send	
  out	
  messages	
  to	
  move	
  the	
  absent	
  limb	
  and	
  send	
  out	
  abnormal	
  patterns	
  that	
  result	
  in	
  shooting	
  pain	
  (Melzack,	
  1996).	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  treat	
  the	
  problem	
  of	
  pain	
  by	
  the	
  correct	
  diagnosis.	
  However	
  treatment	
  of	
  pain	
  is	
  not	
  always	
  as	
  simply	
  having	
  surgery	
  to	
  remove	
  an	
  appendix	
  for	
  the	
  treatment	
  of	
  abdominal	
  pain	
  or	
  increasing	
  the	
  current	
  pain	
  medication.	
  As	
  there	
  are	
  various	
  causes	
  of	
  pain,	
  sometimes	
  unknown,	
  it	
  often	
  results	
  in	
  various	
  classifications	
  of	
  pain	
  and	
  their	
  appropriate	
  management.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   2.1.2	
   Acute	
  Pain	
  Acute	
  pain	
  is	
  recent	
  in	
  onset,	
  transient	
  in	
  nature	
  and	
  can	
  last	
  from	
  several	
  minutes	
  to	
  several	
  days	
  and	
  usually	
  goes	
  away	
  as	
  the	
  healing	
  occurs	
  (usually	
  less	
  than	
  30	
  days)	
  (Jovey,	
  2008).	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   9	
   2.1.3	
   Nociceptive	
  Pain	
  Nociceptive	
  pain	
  refers	
  to	
  pain	
  caused	
  by	
  direct	
  stimulation	
  of	
  peripheral	
  nociceptors	
  (Jovey,	
  2008).	
  It	
  is	
  usually	
  localized	
  and	
  responds	
  to	
  treatment	
  (Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  Examples	
  of	
  nociceptive	
  pain	
  are	
  surgery,	
  trauma	
  from	
  falls	
  or	
  a	
  finger	
  prick.	
  	
   	
   2.1.4	
   Chronic	
  Pain	
  Chronic	
  pain	
  “persists	
  beyond	
  the	
  usual	
  course	
  of	
  an	
  acute	
  illness	
  or	
  healing	
  time	
  of	
  an	
  injury	
  (usually	
  beyond	
  three	
  to	
  six	
  months)”	
  (Jovey,	
  2008,	
  p.	
  14).	
  It	
  is	
  often	
  accompanied	
  by	
  “emotional	
  symptoms	
  such	
  as	
  depressive	
  symptoms,	
  but	
  objective	
  physiological	
  signs	
  may	
  sometimes	
  be	
  absent”	
  (Jovey,	
  2008,	
  p.	
  14).	
  Chronic	
  pain	
  “is	
  often	
  associated	
  with	
  functional	
  loss,	
  mood	
  and	
  behavior	
  changes,	
  and	
  reduced	
  quality	
  of	
  life”	
  (Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008,	
  para.	
  6).	
  Pain	
  management	
  may	
  not	
  mean	
  a	
  cure	
  from	
  the	
  pain,	
  but	
  rather	
  a	
  way	
  for	
  long-­‐term	
  management	
  of	
  living	
  with	
  the	
  condition,	
  and	
  minimizing	
  the	
  effects	
  pain	
  can	
  cause	
  on	
  functioning	
  and	
  normal	
  activities	
  of	
  life.	
  	
  	
   2.1.5	
   Neuropathic	
  Pain	
  	
  Neuropathic	
  pain	
  refers	
  to	
  pain	
  caused	
  by	
  damage	
  to	
  the	
  peripheral	
  or	
  central	
  nervous	
  system	
  (Hogar	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  It	
  is	
  usually	
  “more	
  diffuse	
  and	
  less	
  responsive	
  to	
  analgesic	
  medications”	
  (Hogar	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008,	
  Background	
  section,	
  para.	
  5).	
  Examples	
  of	
  neuropathic	
  pain	
  that	
  are	
  problematic	
  for	
  the	
  older	
  adults	
   	
   	
  	
   10	
   include:	
  diabetic	
  neuropathies,	
  cerebrovascular	
  accident	
  and	
  chemotherapy	
  treatment	
  for	
  cancer	
  (Moulin,	
  2008).	
  	
   	
   2.2	
   Pain	
  in	
  Older	
  Adults	
  	
   Pain	
  both	
  acute	
  and	
  chronic	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  most	
  commonly	
  reported	
  problem	
  for	
  hospitalized	
  older	
  adults,	
  suffering	
  from	
  pain	
  (Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  Fifty	
  percent	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  have	
  reported	
  experiencing	
  chronic	
  pain	
  and	
  80%	
  of	
  nursing	
  home	
  residents	
  reported	
  experiencing	
  pain	
  (Helme	
  &	
  Gibson,	
  2001).	
  Chronic	
  pain	
  tends	
  to	
  be	
  constant,	
  ranging	
  from	
  moderate	
  to	
  severe	
  intensity	
  and	
  is	
  often	
  multifactorial	
  and	
  multifocal	
  (Brattberg	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  A	
  Canada	
  wide	
  health	
  survey	
  of	
  adults	
  65	
  to	
  74	
  years	
  old	
  in	
  the	
  community	
  with	
  chronic	
  pain	
  revealed	
  that	
  28%	
  of	
  were	
  in	
  mild	
  pain,	
  55%	
  reported	
  moderate	
  pain	
  and	
  17%	
  were	
  in	
  severe	
  pain	
  (Miller,	
  1996;	
  Moulin,	
  2002).	
  	
  A	
  longitudinal	
  study	
  of	
  806	
  older	
  adults	
  (80	
  years	
  or	
  older)	
  was	
  surveyed	
  during	
  their	
  hospital	
  admission	
  and	
  up	
  to	
  one	
  year	
  after	
  hospitalization.	
  The	
  researchers	
  found	
  45.8%	
  (n	
  =	
  369)	
  of	
  patients	
  reported	
  pain	
  sometime	
  during	
  their	
  hospitalization,	
  19%	
  experienced	
  moderate	
  or	
  extremely	
  severe	
  pain	
  and	
  12.9%	
  were	
  dissatisfied	
  with	
  their	
  pain	
  control	
  (Desbiens	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  Two	
  months	
  later,	
  49%	
  continued	
  to	
  experience	
  pain	
  of	
  the	
  614	
  patients	
  that	
  responded	
  and	
  16.8%	
  reported	
  extremely	
  severe	
  pain.	
  One	
  year	
  later,	
  pain	
  was	
  reported	
  for	
  greater	
  than	
  one	
  half	
  (53.8%)	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  (223	
  patients	
  out	
  of	
  416	
  patients	
  who	
  responded),	
  and	
  17.5%	
  of	
  patient’s	
  reported	
  extreme	
  pain.	
  Desbiens	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1997)	
  study	
  reveals	
   	
   	
  	
   11	
   that	
  the	
  oldest	
  patients	
  are	
  suffering	
  from	
  pain	
  frequently	
  and	
  are	
  dissatisfied	
  with	
  their	
  pain	
  control.	
  	
  The	
  prevalence	
  and	
  severity	
  of	
  pain	
  is	
  likely	
  higher	
  than	
  reported	
  as	
  older	
  adults	
  usually	
  under	
  report	
  their	
  pain	
  because	
  of	
  misinterpretation	
  of	
  pain	
  language	
  (for	
  example	
  using	
  “hurt”	
  instead	
  of	
  “pain”)	
  and	
  difficulty	
  using	
  pain	
  scales	
  (IASP,	
  2011).	
  Although	
  older	
  adults	
  have	
  reduced	
  sensitivity	
  to	
  noxious	
  stimuli	
  due	
  to	
  age	
  related	
  changes	
  in	
  the	
  function	
  of	
  the	
  nociceptive	
  pathways,	
  it	
  does	
  not	
  mean	
  their	
  pain	
  is	
  less	
  severe	
  (Helme	
  &	
  Gibson,	
  2011;	
  IASP,	
  2011).	
  Therefore	
  it	
  is	
  essential	
  that	
  clinicians	
  working	
  with	
  older	
  adults	
  recognize	
  their	
  pain.	
  	
  Many	
  older	
  adults	
  have	
  multiple	
  medical	
  conditions;	
  more	
  than	
  80%	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  have	
  chronic	
  medical	
  conditions	
  that	
  are	
  associated	
  with	
  pain	
  (Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  Furthermore,	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  chronic	
  pain	
  conditions	
  is	
  associated	
  with	
  increasing	
  age.	
  For	
  example,	
  arthritis	
  affects	
  just	
  4%	
  of	
  people	
  under	
  age	
  45,	
  while	
  45%	
  of	
  people	
  aged	
  65	
  years	
  and	
  older	
  are	
  affected	
  by	
  the	
  condition	
  (Miller,	
  1996).	
  Similarly	
  people	
  65	
  years	
  old	
  or	
  older	
  have	
  higher	
  rates	
  of	
  heart	
  disease	
  (17%	
  vs.	
  1%)	
  and	
  diabetes	
  (11%	
  vs.	
  1%)	
  compared	
  to	
  those	
  less	
  than	
  45	
  years	
  of	
  age	
  (Miller,	
  1996).	
  Other	
  common	
  examples	
  of	
  chronic	
  pain	
  conditions	
  associated	
  with	
  advanced	
  age	
  are;	
  osteoarthritis,	
  back	
  pain,	
  cerebrovascular	
  accident,	
  chronic	
  bronchitis/emphysema,	
  stomach/intestinal	
  ulcers,	
  fibromyalgia,	
  cancer	
  and	
  peripheral	
  vascular	
  disease	
  (IASP,	
  2010).	
  Understanding	
  the	
  epidemiology	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  regarding	
  their	
  disease	
  and	
  illness	
  process	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  help	
  clinicians	
  understand	
  the	
  extent	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   12	
   2.3	
   Impact	
  of	
  Pain	
  in	
  Older	
  Adults	
  	
  	
   Pain	
  has	
  many	
  health	
  implications	
  for	
  older	
  adults	
  and	
  can	
  severely	
  limit	
  their	
  quality	
  of	
  life.	
  It	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  that	
  the	
  secondary	
  conditions	
  related	
  to	
  pain	
  can	
  lead	
  to	
  depression,	
  suicide	
  risks,	
  anxiety,	
  weight	
  loss,	
  sleep	
  disturbance,	
  all	
  burdens	
  that	
  can	
  improve	
  with	
  effective	
  pain	
  management	
  (AGS	
  Panel,	
  2002).	
  	
   The	
  relationship	
  between	
  depression	
  and	
  chronic	
  pain	
  has	
  been	
  well	
  documented	
  (Kroenke	
  &	
  Price,	
  1993;	
  Magni,	
  Marchetti,	
  Moreschi	
  et	
  al.,	
  1993;	
  Arnstein,	
  Caudill,	
  Mandle	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999).	
  Patients	
  with	
  pain	
  are	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  depressed	
  than	
  patients	
  without	
  pain,	
  and	
  have	
  double	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  suicide	
  (Tang	
  &	
  Crane	
  2006;	
  Cheatle,	
  2011).	
  The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  depression	
  may	
  be	
  enhanced	
  in	
  the	
  older	
  adults	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  multiple	
  chronic	
  pain	
  comorbidities	
  and	
  sometimes	
  the	
  symptoms	
  of	
  depression	
  and	
  chronic	
  pain	
  may	
  overlap	
  or	
  co-­‐exist	
  (Cohen-­‐Mansfield	
  &	
  Marx,	
  1993).	
  Compared	
  to	
  other	
  diseases	
  of	
  the	
  heart	
  and	
  lung,	
  chronic	
  pain	
  has	
  been	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  worse	
  quality	
  of	
  life	
  (Schopflocher,	
  Jovey	
  et	
  al.	
  2010).	
  	
   Inadequate	
  management	
  of	
  pain	
  from	
  surgery	
  such	
  as	
  hip	
  replacement	
  can	
  lead	
  to	
  increased	
  confusion,	
  slower	
  recovery	
  and	
  poorer	
  function	
  (Morrison	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  Uncontrolled	
  pain	
  can	
  significantly	
  decrease	
  the	
  rate	
  of	
  healing,	
  increase	
  the	
  rate	
  of	
  complications	
  and	
  compromise	
  immune	
  function	
  (MacLellan,	
  2009;	
  Elcigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  If	
  pain	
  is	
  left	
  untreated	
  it	
  can	
  lead	
  to	
  huge	
  financial	
  costs	
  including	
  longer	
  hospital	
  stays,	
  increased	
  rates	
  of	
  re-­‐hospitalization,	
  increased	
  outpatient	
  visits,	
  and	
  may	
  severely	
  complicate	
  a	
  patient’s	
  recovery	
  (Huang,	
  2001).	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   13	
   2.4	
   Attitudes	
  and	
  Misconceptions	
  Toward	
  Pain	
  and	
  Aging	
  Older	
  adults	
  are	
  undertreated	
  for	
  pain,	
  which	
  is	
  often	
  due	
  to	
  misconceptions	
  from	
  both	
  health	
  care	
  providers	
  and	
  older	
  adults	
  themselves	
  that	
  pain	
  is	
  a	
  normal	
  part	
  of	
  aging	
  (Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  The	
  reasons	
  for	
  the	
  under	
  treatment	
  of	
  pain	
  are	
  multifaceted	
  and	
  often	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  attitudes	
  and	
  beliefs	
  toward	
  pain	
  and	
  aging	
  (Kaasalainen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  First,	
  older	
  patients	
  may	
  underreport	
  pain	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  perceptions	
  of	
  pain	
  and	
  pain	
  medications.	
  Significant	
  life	
  events	
  such	
  as	
  a	
  death	
  of	
  a	
  spouse,	
  retirement	
  from	
  their	
  job,	
  or	
  their	
  loss	
  of	
  independence,	
  may	
  alter	
  their	
  views	
  on	
  pain	
  (Helme	
  &	
  Gibson,	
  2001).	
  The	
  psychosocial	
  issues	
  may	
  play	
  a	
  factor	
  in	
  the	
  influence	
  and	
  expression	
  of	
  an	
  older	
  adult’s	
  pain.	
  Older	
  adults	
  may	
  view	
  themselves	
  as	
  stoic	
  and	
  describe	
  themselves	
  growing	
  up	
  in	
  a	
  generation	
  that	
  endures	
  pain	
  (Kumar	
  &	
  Allcock,	
  2008)	
  and	
  thus	
  may	
  hesitate	
  to	
  reveal	
  their	
  pain	
  level,	
  when	
  in	
  fact	
  it	
  could	
  be	
  a	
  warning	
  sign	
  of	
  injury	
  or	
  disease	
  (Stoller,	
  Forster,	
  &	
  Portugal,	
  1993).	
  Patients	
  may	
  also	
  have	
  concerns	
  about	
  the	
  potential	
  side	
  effects	
  of	
  opioids	
  such	
  as	
  constipation	
  or	
  may	
  feel	
  that	
  pain	
  is	
  humiliating	
  and	
  a	
  burden	
  to	
  their	
  family	
  and	
  friends	
  (Kumar	
  &	
  Allcock,	
  2008;	
  Chapman,	
  2010).	
  Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2010)	
  found	
  that	
  older	
  patients	
  did	
  not	
  want	
  to	
  bother	
  their	
  nurses	
  with	
  pain	
  requests	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  perception	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  nurses.	
  Older	
  patients	
  who	
  perceived	
  their	
  nurse	
  as	
  busy,	
  inconsiderate	
  or	
  inpatient	
  were	
  reluctant	
  to	
  speak	
  to	
  them	
  regarding	
  their	
  pain	
  (Yates,	
  Dewar	
  &	
  Fentiman,	
  1995).	
  Researchers	
  also	
  found	
  that	
  patients	
  were	
  reluctant	
  to	
  report	
  pain	
  and	
  feared	
  that	
  opioids	
  were	
  addictive	
  or	
  too	
  dangerous	
  (Kaasalainen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Eligicil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   14	
   Second,	
  older	
  adults	
  are	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  suffer	
  from	
  illness	
  such	
  as	
  delirium	
  or	
  dementia.	
  Almost	
  half	
  of	
  hospitalized	
  adults	
  are	
  older	
  than	
  65	
  years	
  old	
  and	
  up	
  to	
  56%	
  of	
  these	
  will	
  experience	
  delirium,	
  either	
  at	
  admission	
  or	
  at	
  some	
  point	
  during	
  their	
  hospital	
  stay	
  (Inouye,	
  2006).	
  Pain	
  in	
  a	
  cognitively	
  impaired	
  older	
  adult	
  may	
  decrease	
  their	
  ability	
  to	
  communicate	
  pain	
  or	
  they	
  may	
  express	
  themselves	
  differently	
  (Taverner,	
  2005).	
  Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2010)	
  conducted	
  an	
  exploratory	
  mixed	
  methods	
  design	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
  nurse’s	
  barriers	
  to	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  on	
  an	
  acute	
  medical	
  unit	
  in	
  Canada.	
  Nurses	
  described	
  language	
  barriers,	
  cognitive	
  impairment	
  and	
  sensory	
  problems	
  as	
  common	
  patient	
  related	
  barriers	
  to	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  Older	
  patients,	
  especially	
  those	
  with	
  cognitive	
  impairment	
  may	
  have	
  difficulty	
  with	
  completing	
  the	
  zero-­‐to-­‐ten	
  numeric	
  pain	
  rating	
  scale	
  (Herr,	
  Bjoro,	
  Steffensmeier,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
   Health	
  care	
  professionals	
  are	
  often	
  reluctant	
  to	
  use	
  opioids	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  for	
  fear	
  of	
  precipitating	
  confusion	
  and	
  delirium	
  (Jovey,	
  1998).	
  A	
  study	
  of	
  older	
  patients	
  who	
  had	
  undergone	
  surgery	
  for	
  hip	
  fractures,	
  revealed	
  that	
  postoperative	
  delirium	
  was	
  correlated	
  with	
  high	
  pain	
  scores	
  regardless	
  of	
  whether	
  or	
  not	
  they	
  were	
  cognitively	
  intact	
  or	
  impaired	
  (Lynch	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
  Another	
  common	
  fear	
  is	
  opioids	
  will	
  precipitate	
  falls	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  A	
  study	
  of	
  1000	
  disabled	
  older	
  women	
  revealed	
  that	
  falls	
  risks	
  increased	
  with	
  pain	
  and	
  risk	
  for	
  falls	
  were	
  lower	
  for	
  women	
  who	
  used	
  all	
  types	
  of	
  analgesic’s	
  daily	
  (Leveille,	
  Bean,	
  Bandeen-­‐Roche	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  Cognitive	
  impairment	
  and	
  poor	
  attitudes	
  about	
  older	
  adults	
  can	
  be	
  challenges	
  to	
  achieving	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   15	
   	
   2.5	
   Prevalence	
  of	
  Pain	
  in	
  Patients	
  in	
  the	
  Medical	
  unit	
  Older	
  adults	
  make	
  up	
  a	
  significant	
  portion	
  of	
  hospitalized	
  patients,	
  and	
  an	
  even	
  higher	
  percentage	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  medical	
  units	
  (Dix	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Whelan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Gregory	
  &	
  Haigh,	
  2008;	
  Sawyer,	
  Haslam,	
  Daines,	
  &	
  Stilos,	
  2010).	
  Dix	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2004)	
  captured	
  the	
  prevalence	
  and	
  severity	
  of	
  pain	
  of	
  patients	
  (n	
  =	
  1594)	
  in	
  a	
  United	
  Kingdom	
  hospital	
  of	
  four	
  major	
  specialties	
  (medicine,	
  surgery,	
  orthopedics,	
  elderly	
  care).	
  General	
  medicine	
  made	
  up	
  one	
  third	
  of	
  the	
  sample	
  (n	
  =	
  503)	
  and	
  had	
  the	
  second	
  highest	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  who	
  rated	
  their	
  pain	
  on	
  the	
  numerical	
  scale	
  as	
  6	
  or	
  more	
  out	
  of	
  a	
  0-­‐10	
  point	
  scale.	
  The	
  older	
  care	
  unit	
  had	
  the	
  highest	
  percentage	
  of	
  patients	
  with	
  intermediate	
  or	
  severe	
  pain,	
  while	
  surgery	
  was	
  rated	
  third	
  on	
  the	
  list.	
  On	
  the	
  medical	
  unit,	
  43%	
  of	
  patients	
  were	
  experiencing	
  pain	
  and	
  12%	
  reported	
  unbearable	
  pain.	
  Only	
  16%	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  patients	
  indicated	
  that	
  pain	
  relief	
  was	
  a	
  top	
  priority,	
  39%	
  wanted	
  more	
  information	
  about	
  pain	
  relieving	
  measures,	
  and	
  29%	
  wanted	
  fewer	
  side	
  effects	
  from	
  the	
  pain	
  medication.	
  Patients	
  on	
  all	
  the	
  units	
  reported	
  unbearable	
  pain,	
  however	
  medical	
  patients	
  experienced	
  the	
  highest	
  percentage	
  of	
  unbearable	
  pain	
  (12.5%)	
  compared	
  to	
  surgical	
  (10.5%)	
  and	
  orthopedic	
  (5%)	
  patients.	
  This	
  research	
  illustrated	
  that,	
  not	
  only	
  can	
  pain	
  occur	
  in	
  any	
  unit	
  in	
  the	
  hospital,	
  it	
  is	
  occurring	
  in	
  medical	
  patients	
  and	
  they	
  are	
  suffering	
  from	
  even	
  greater	
  amounts	
  of	
  pain	
  than	
  surgical	
  or	
  orthopedic	
  patients,	
  where	
  pain	
  is	
  typically	
  prevalent	
  (Dix	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  A	
  similar	
  prospective	
  cohort	
  study	
  of	
  hospitalized	
  patients	
  (n	
  =	
  5584)	
  in	
  US	
  found	
  a	
  considerable	
  percentage	
  (59%)	
  of	
  medical	
  patients	
  were	
  experiencing	
  pain,	
  with	
  28%	
  experiencing	
  severe	
  pain	
   	
   	
  	
   16	
   (Whelan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  Interestingly,	
  6.7%	
  of	
  patients	
  thought	
  their	
  physician	
  did	
  not	
  do	
  anything	
  to	
  relieve	
  the	
  pain,	
  while	
  almost	
  18%	
  of	
  patients	
  thought	
  that	
  their	
  physician	
  did	
  less	
  than	
  everything	
  they	
  could.	
  It	
  is	
  clear	
  that	
  pain	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  common	
  occurrence	
  in	
  medical	
  patients	
  and	
  they	
  are	
  suffering	
  from	
  unnecessary	
  discomfort.	
  All	
  patients,	
  regardless	
  of	
  ward	
  specialty,	
  should	
  be	
  considered	
  as	
  high	
  risk	
  for	
  pain	
  (Whelan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
   	
   Prior	
  studies	
  have	
  included	
  medical	
  patients	
  with	
  other	
  areas	
  of	
  specialty	
  to	
  study	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  pain	
  (Melotti,	
  Samolsky-­‐Dekel,	
  Ricchi,	
  &	
  Chiari,	
  2004;	
  Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  A	
  large	
  Canadian	
  teaching	
  hospital	
  (Sawyer,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
  conduced	
  a	
  cross	
  sectional	
  survey	
  of	
  patients	
  from	
  surgery	
  (n	
  =	
  74),	
  medicine	
  (n	
  =	
  20),	
  and	
  long	
  term	
  care	
  (n	
  =	
  4)	
  in	
  the	
  year	
  2006	
  and	
  again	
  in	
  2007.	
  Disturbingly,	
  after	
  the	
  study	
  was	
  repeated,	
  the	
  study	
  found	
  the	
  percentage	
  of	
  those	
  in	
  pain	
  to	
  be	
  much	
  greater	
  in	
  2007	
  than	
  in	
  2006	
  (84%	
  vs.	
  71%).	
  Also	
  in	
  the	
  2007	
  study,	
  a	
  higher	
  percentage	
  of	
  patients	
  had	
  experienced	
  severe	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  24	
  hours	
  that	
  significantly	
  interfered	
  with	
  their	
  general	
  activity,	
  walking,	
  mood,	
  relationships,	
  sleep,	
  and	
  enjoyment	
  of	
  life	
  (26%	
  vs.	
  14%).	
  However	
  in	
  the	
  2007	
  study,	
  patients	
  were	
  quite	
  satisfied	
  in	
  their	
  overall	
  pain	
  treatment	
  as	
  the	
  longest	
  time	
  to	
  receive	
  pain	
  medication	
  ranged	
  from	
  11	
  to	
  30	
  minutes	
  on	
  average.	
  Although	
  41%	
  of	
  patients	
  reported	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  time	
  when	
  the	
  pain	
  medication	
  did	
  not	
  relieve	
  the	
  pain	
  and	
  they	
  requested	
  something	
  different	
  or	
  more	
  to	
  relieve	
  the	
  pain,	
  the	
  mean	
  time	
  to	
  change	
  the	
  dose	
  was	
  between	
  1	
  to	
  2	
  hours.	
  Of	
  the	
  15	
  patients	
  who	
  were	
  not	
  satisfied	
  with	
  their	
  pain	
  management,	
  these	
  patients	
  commented	
  about	
  staff	
   	
   	
  	
   17	
   knowledge	
  deficits	
  and	
  indicated	
  that	
  they	
  wished	
  to	
  know	
  more	
  about	
  the	
  pain	
  medication	
  they	
  received	
  and	
  its	
  side	
  effects.	
  	
  Melotti	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2004)	
  conducted	
  a	
  similar	
  study	
  in	
  a	
  large	
  urban	
  Italian	
  hospital.	
  Of	
  the	
  516	
  medical	
  patients,	
  49%	
  experienced	
  pain,	
  and	
  24%	
  experienced	
  severe	
  pain.	
  This	
  is	
  comparable	
  to	
  a	
  45%	
  prevalence	
  rate	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  surgical	
  wards	
  in	
  this	
  hospital.	
  	
  	
  These	
  cross	
  sectional	
  hospital	
  wide	
  surveys	
  (Melotti	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010)	
  indicate	
  attention	
  must	
  be	
  given	
  to	
  the	
  medical	
  ward.	
  	
  	
   2.6	
   Nurses’	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  	
   Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2008)	
  reported	
  the	
  pain	
  management	
  practices	
  for	
  older	
  adults	
  (n	
  =	
  78)	
  in	
  six	
  Canadian	
  acute	
  medical	
  care	
  units.	
  The	
  mean	
  age	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  participating	
  was	
  78	
  years	
  old	
  and	
  34%	
  were	
  identified	
  as	
  cognitively	
  impaired	
  by	
  nurses.	
  They	
  were	
  admitted	
  for	
  various	
  medical	
  conditions	
  (myocardial	
  infraction,	
  congestive	
  heart	
  failure,	
  cellulitis,	
  falls,	
  chronic	
  obstructive	
  pulmonary	
  disease,	
  pneumonia),	
  which	
  are	
  not	
  necessarily	
  associated	
  with	
  high	
  levels	
  of	
  pain.	
  The	
  findings	
  discovered	
  nurses	
  were	
  unaware	
  of	
  the	
  patients’	
  pain,	
  even	
  though	
  70%	
  of	
  the	
  patients’	
  were	
  in	
  pain.	
  Kaasalainen	
  and	
  Crook	
  (2004)	
  conducted	
  a	
  study	
  of	
  130	
  long	
  term	
  residents	
  with	
  varying	
  levels	
  of	
  cognitive	
  impairment	
  and	
  found	
  that	
  the	
  reliability	
  of	
  verbal	
  reports	
  decreases	
  with	
  cognitive	
  impairment	
  and	
  was	
  only	
  reliable	
  in	
  people	
  with	
  mild	
  to	
  moderate	
  impairment.	
  Older	
  patients	
  also	
  tend	
  to	
  underreport	
  their	
  pain	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  perception	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  pain	
  (Kaasalainen	
  et	
  al.	
  2007;	
  Coker	
  et	
  al.	
  2010).	
  Findings	
  revealed	
  that	
  70%	
  of	
  patients	
  were	
  experiencing	
  pain,	
  and	
  only	
  57%	
  reported	
  pain	
  to	
  their	
  nurse.	
  A	
  chart	
  audit	
   	
   	
  	
   18	
   discovered	
  that	
  although	
  more	
  than	
  one	
  half	
  the	
  patients	
  reported	
  pain,	
  almost	
  one	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  did	
  not	
  receive	
  an	
  analgesic	
  even	
  though	
  pharmacological	
  medication	
  was	
  ordered	
  as	
  needed	
  (Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  only	
  a	
  third	
  of	
  the	
  documentation	
  related	
  to	
  pain	
  assessment	
  was	
  completed	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  24	
  hours	
  and	
  only	
  two	
  reports	
  were	
  related	
  to	
  non-­‐pharmacological	
  interventions	
  (repositioning	
  and	
  warm	
  blankets).	
  According	
  to	
  the	
  panel	
  of	
  pain	
  experts,	
  only	
  41%	
  of	
  patients	
  had	
  appropriate	
  pain	
  management	
  documented	
  (Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  Pain	
  is	
  a	
  persistent	
  problem	
  in	
  these	
  medical	
  units	
  as	
  a	
  gap	
  of	
  knowledge,	
  skill,	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  the	
  staff	
  were	
  evident.	
  	
  	
   Despite	
  clinical	
  guidelines	
  on	
  pain	
  management,	
  assessment	
  of	
  acute	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  inadequate	
  (Herr,	
  Titler,	
  Schilling	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Chapman,	
  2010).	
  Medical	
  records	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  from	
  acute	
  care	
  settings	
  (n	
  =	
  709)	
  found	
  nurses	
  (n	
  =	
  179)	
  did	
  not	
  routinely	
  assess	
  patients	
  for	
  pain	
  or	
  pain	
  location	
  every	
  4	
  hours	
  (Herr	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  Five	
  percent	
  of	
  patients	
  during	
  the	
  most	
  acute	
  stage	
  of	
  pain	
  following	
  admission	
  were	
  not	
  assessed.	
  Although	
  the	
  majority	
  (97.7%)	
  of	
  nurses	
  agreed	
  patients	
  should	
  be	
  routinely	
  assessed	
  every	
  4	
  hours,	
  30.8%	
  of	
  nurses	
  reported	
  that	
  they	
  sometimes	
  routinely	
  assess	
  cognitively	
  impaired	
  adults	
  while	
  almost	
  70%	
  of	
  nurses	
  reported	
  they	
  always	
  routinely	
  assess	
  pain	
  in	
  cognitively	
  impaired	
  adults.	
  Interestingly	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  (93.6%)	
  believed	
  that	
  using	
  pain	
  assessment	
  scales	
  was	
  the	
  preferred	
  method	
  to	
  assessing	
  older	
  adults.	
  However	
  only	
  41.9%	
  of	
  nurses	
  reported	
  they	
  always	
  used	
  a	
  pain	
  rating	
  scale	
  and	
  the	
  remaining	
  58.1%	
  reported	
  only	
  using	
  the	
  pain	
  scale	
  sometimes.	
  During	
  the	
  first	
  24	
  hours,	
  37%	
  of	
  all	
  patients	
  were	
  assessed	
  every	
  four	
  hours,	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  following	
  24	
   	
   	
  	
   19	
   hours,	
  only	
  30%	
  of	
  patients	
  were	
  assessed	
  adequately	
  for	
  pain.	
  This	
  study	
  demonstrated	
  that,	
  pain	
  was	
  not	
  being	
  assessed	
  and	
  reassessed	
  according	
  to	
  current	
  evidenced	
  based	
  practice	
  guidelines	
  (JCAHO,	
  2000).	
  An	
  interview	
  of	
  nursing	
  home	
  residents,	
  found	
  only	
  25%	
  (19	
  out	
  of	
  77)	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  their	
  pain	
  management	
  by	
  their	
  health	
  care	
  provider	
  (Picker	
  Institute	
  Europe,	
  2007).	
  Nurses	
  reported	
  that	
  the	
  greatest	
  challenge	
  was	
  difficulty	
  communicating	
  with	
  patients	
  and	
  poor	
  assessment	
  of	
  pain	
  behaviours	
  (Herr	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  Nurses	
  need	
  to	
  regularly	
  assess	
  older	
  adults’	
  pain,	
  especially	
  those	
  with	
  cognitive	
  impairments	
  and	
  include	
  them	
  in	
  their	
  pain	
  management	
  (Chapman,	
  2010).	
  Today,	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  has	
  not	
  improved.	
  Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2008)	
  investigated	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  levels	
  and	
  attitudes	
  (n	
  =	
  143)	
  in	
  a	
  medical	
  setting	
  in	
  Hong	
  Kong	
  and	
  the	
  factors	
  that	
  may	
  influence	
  their	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes.	
  The	
  study	
  revealed	
  poor	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management,	
  as	
  the	
  nurses’	
  average	
  score	
  on	
  the	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  (KASRP)	
  was	
  48%.	
  When	
  analyzing	
  specific	
  questions,	
  there	
  were	
  discrepancies	
  between	
  the	
  participants’	
  attitudes	
  and	
  practices.	
  For	
  example,	
  while	
  71%	
  believed	
  self-­‐report	
  was	
  the	
  most	
  accurate	
  indication	
  of	
  pain,	
  only	
  1.4%	
  believed	
  that	
  patients	
  never	
  over-­‐reported	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  pain	
  they	
  had.	
  The	
  questionnaire	
  contained	
  two	
  similar	
  case	
  studies	
  with	
  patients	
  reporting	
  the	
  same	
  level	
  of	
  pain,	
  but	
  expressed	
  discomfort	
  differently.	
  Nurses	
  believed	
  the	
  patient	
  who	
  expressed	
  more	
  grimacing	
  was	
  suffering	
  more.	
  Furthermore,	
  71%	
  of	
  participants	
  believed	
  that	
  the	
  patient	
  should	
  endure	
  the	
  least	
  amount	
  of	
  pain	
  possible,	
  however	
  64%	
  would	
  advise	
  patients	
  to	
  use	
  non-­‐pharmacology	
  techniques	
  alone	
  instead	
  of	
   	
   	
  	
   20	
   concurrently	
  with	
  pain	
  medications	
  (Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  The	
  nurses	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  showed	
  a	
  deficit	
  in	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  and	
  misconceptions	
  about	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
  A	
  study	
  of	
  514	
  nurses	
  from	
  a	
  large	
  Canadian	
  tertiary	
  hospital	
  that	
  specialized	
  in	
  medical,	
  surgery,	
  oncology,	
  emergency	
  room,	
  and	
  outpatient	
  units,	
  found	
  more	
  than	
  94%	
  of	
  nurses	
  accepted	
  the	
  patient’s	
  self-­‐report	
  of	
  pain	
  (Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  Self-­‐report	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  accurate	
  and	
  reliable	
  indicator	
  for	
  pain,	
  making	
  it	
  crucial	
  for	
  patients	
  to	
  communicate	
  their	
  pain	
  and	
  even	
  more	
  essential	
  for	
  nurses	
  to	
  ask	
  and	
  respond	
  appropriately	
  to	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  (RNAO,	
  2002a).	
  Nurses	
  and	
  physicians	
  may	
  distrust	
  their	
  patient’s	
  subjective	
  experience,	
  or	
  doubt	
  marginalized	
  or	
  less	
  powerful	
  groups	
  (Peter	
  &	
  Watt-­‐Watson,	
  2002).	
  Interestingly,	
  in	
  1995	
  McCaffrey	
  and	
  Ferrell	
  found	
  25%	
  of	
  nurses	
  thought	
  patients’	
  overrated	
  their	
  pain.	
  Pain	
  management	
  has	
  traditionally	
  been	
  a	
  role	
  of	
  the	
  anesthetists,	
  however	
  acute	
  care	
  pain	
  teams	
  have	
  been	
  established	
  as	
  the	
  multi-­‐disciplinary	
  approach	
  has	
  been	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  effective	
  for	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management	
  (Brown	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999).	
  Gregory	
  and	
  Haigh	
  (2007)	
  captured	
  the	
  range	
  of	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  on	
  pain	
  management	
  on	
  a	
  multi-­‐disciplinary	
  health	
  care	
  team,	
  consisting	
  of	
  registered	
  nurses	
  (n	
  =	
  192),	
  non-­‐registered	
  health	
  care	
  assistants	
  (n	
  =	
  101),	
  physicians	
  (n	
  =	
  36),	
  pharmacists	
  (n	
  =	
  20),	
  and	
  physiotherapists	
  (n	
  =	
  58)	
  caring	
  for	
  medical	
  patients	
  in	
  an	
  acute	
  care	
  UK	
  hospital.	
  Overall	
  the	
  multi-­‐disciplinary	
  medical	
  staff	
  had	
  greater	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  with	
  an	
  overall	
  mean	
  score	
  of	
  82.5%.	
  However	
  when	
  analyzing	
  non-­‐registered	
  nurses,	
  80%	
  of	
  non-­‐registered	
  health	
  care	
  assistants	
  relied	
  on	
  vital	
  signs	
  and	
  behavior	
  to	
  verify	
  patient’s	
  statement	
  of	
  severe	
  pain	
  and	
  40%	
  have	
  never	
  used	
  a	
  pain	
  scale.	
  In	
  addition,	
  only	
  20%	
  of	
  health	
  care	
  assistants	
  found	
  regular	
  medication	
   	
   	
  	
   21	
   to	
  be	
  more	
  effective	
  than	
  “as	
  needed”	
  medication	
  and	
  all	
  non-­‐registered	
  nurses	
  thought	
  patients	
  couldn’t	
  sleep	
  in	
  pain.	
  RNs	
  fared	
  much	
  better,	
  with	
  an	
  average	
  score	
  of	
  72.6	
  %	
  on	
  their	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes,	
  which	
  may	
  be	
  because	
  36%	
  attended	
  pain	
  management	
  education.	
  RNs	
  results	
  were	
  comparable	
  to	
  physiotherapist	
  and	
  pharmacist	
  (75-­‐80%),	
  while	
  physicians	
  scored	
  the	
  highest	
  (82.5%)	
  (Gregory	
  &	
  Haigh,	
  2007).	
  	
  	
  	
   2.7	
   Misconceptions	
  Over	
  Opioid	
  Use	
  There	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  concerns	
  about	
  opioid	
  use	
  as	
  Gregory	
  and	
  Haigh,	
  (2007)	
  found	
  that	
  over	
  a	
  third	
  of	
  RNs	
  were	
  reluctant	
  to	
  administer	
  opioids	
  and	
  80%	
  of	
  non-­‐registered	
  nurses	
  discouraged	
  it	
  and	
  thought	
  opioids	
  should	
  be	
  avoided	
  in	
  the	
  older	
  adults.	
  This	
  is	
  consistent	
  with	
  other	
  research,	
  as	
  nurses	
  lacked	
  knowledge	
  in	
  pharmacology	
  and	
  answered	
  poorly	
  on	
  pharmacology	
  question	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  by	
  McCaffrey	
  and	
  Ferrell,	
  (2008).	
  (Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Elicigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  In	
  another	
  large	
  study	
  of	
  400	
  nurses	
  by	
  McCaffrey	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2000)	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  large	
  tendency	
  for	
  nurses’	
  personal	
  opinion	
  of	
  opioids	
  to	
  influence	
  their	
  choice	
  of	
  analgesia.	
  	
  In	
  a	
  study	
  undertaken	
  by	
  Elcigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2011)	
  about	
  15%	
  (n	
  =	
  17)	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  were	
  reluctant	
  to	
  give	
  opioids	
  for	
  fear	
  of	
  addiction	
  and	
  respiratory	
  depression.	
  Most	
  patients	
  taking	
  opioids	
  do	
  not	
  become	
  addicted	
  to	
  them,	
  which	
  is	
  characterized	
  by	
  loss	
  of	
  control,	
  using	
  drugs	
  despite	
  the	
  consequences,	
  and	
  obsession	
  with	
  obtaining	
  and	
  using	
  the	
  drugs.	
  However	
  patients	
  can	
  develop	
   	
   	
  	
   22	
   dependence	
  to	
  the	
  drug	
  if	
  stopped	
  abruptly	
  (Schneider,	
  2011).	
  Nurses	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  misunderstand	
  the	
  difference	
  between	
  dependence	
  and	
  addiction	
  (McCaffrey	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  1995).	
  	
  	
  	
   2.8	
   Pain	
  Analgesia	
  Practice	
  Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2010)	
  found	
  that	
  physician’s	
  prescribing	
  practices	
  for	
  medical	
  and	
  surgical	
  patients	
  appeared	
  to	
  differ	
  in	
  a	
  large	
  Canadian	
  hospital.	
  While	
  the	
  surgical	
  patients	
  were	
  given	
  round	
  the	
  clock	
  medication	
  and	
  80%	
  (58	
  out	
  of	
  73)	
  received	
  PRN	
  analgesics,	
  only	
  50%	
  (12	
  out	
  of	
  24)	
  medical	
  and	
  long	
  term	
  patients	
  were	
  prescribed	
  as	
  required	
  (PRN)	
  analgesics,	
  and	
  only	
  14%	
  of	
  the	
  possible	
  PRN	
  orders	
  were	
  administered	
  in	
  the	
  previous	
  12-­‐24	
  hours.	
  Furthermore,	
  different	
  classes	
  of	
  analgesics	
  (opioids,	
  non-­‐opioids,	
  NSAID,	
  gabapentin)	
  were	
  prescribed	
  much	
  less	
  frequently	
  in	
  medical	
  patients	
  than	
  in	
  surgical	
  patients.	
  	
  A	
  study	
  of	
  nursing	
  home	
  patients	
  (n	
  =	
  4003)	
  with	
  cancer	
  reported	
  daily	
  pain	
  (Bernabei,	
  Gambassi,	
  Lapane,	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
  This	
  study	
  found	
  that	
  of	
  those	
  with	
  pain,	
  16%	
  received	
  a	
  non-­‐opioid,	
  32%	
  received	
  a	
  weak	
  opioid,	
  and	
  only	
  26%	
  received	
  a	
  strong	
  opioid	
  such	
  as	
  morphine.	
  Patients	
  85	
  years	
  and	
  older	
  were	
  least	
  likely	
  to	
  receive	
  morphine	
  and	
  or	
  any	
  other	
  analgesics.	
  Despite	
  the	
  frequency	
  of	
  pain,	
  more	
  than	
  a	
  quarter	
  of	
  patients	
  did	
  not	
  receive	
  any	
  analgesic	
  agent	
  (Bernabei,	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
  	
  Evidence	
  for	
  hesitation	
  of	
  giving	
  opioids	
  was	
  found	
  in	
  a	
  study	
  of	
  postoperative	
  coronary	
  artery	
  bypass	
  grafting	
  (CABG)	
  surgery	
  in	
  an	
  academic	
   	
   	
  	
   23	
   teaching	
  hospital	
  in	
  Toronto.	
  Although	
  a	
  top	
  rated	
  Canadian	
  hospital,	
  only	
  33%	
  (67	
  out	
  of	
  202)	
  of	
  the	
  ordered	
  dose	
  of	
  pain	
  medication	
  was	
  given,	
  with	
  approximately	
  50%	
  of	
  patients	
  continuing	
  to	
  report	
  moderate	
  to	
  severe	
  pain	
  on	
  post-­‐operative	
  day	
  five,	
  just	
  prior	
  to	
  discharge	
  (Watt-­‐Watson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  analgesics	
  given	
  by	
  nurses	
  were	
  inadequate,	
  despite	
  patient’s	
  high	
  pain	
  intensity	
  ratings.	
  Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2010),	
  found	
  50%	
  of	
  medical	
  patients	
  were	
  prescribed	
  PRN	
  orders	
  for	
  analgesia,	
  yet	
  only	
  14%	
  of	
  the	
  possible	
  PRN	
  orders	
  were	
  administered.	
  	
  	
   2.9	
  Factors	
  Influencing	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  in	
  Pain	
   Management	
   2.9.1	
  Education	
  Using	
  the	
  KASRP,	
  as	
  an	
  instrument,	
  Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1995)	
  and	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2011)	
  conducted	
  studies	
  in	
  large,	
  urban	
  tertiary	
  hospitals	
  in	
  Canada,	
  to	
  explore	
  registered	
  nurse’s	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  they	
  found	
  a	
  positive	
  correlation	
  between	
  higher	
  position,	
  education	
  and	
  knowledge	
  of	
  pain.	
  Clinical	
  educators,	
  clinical	
  nurse	
  specialists,	
  and	
  nursing	
  unit	
  directors	
  scored	
  significantly	
  higher	
  than	
  RNs,	
  and	
  nurses	
  with	
  masters	
  or	
  bachelor	
  degrees	
  scored	
  significantly	
  higher	
  than	
  diploma	
  prepared	
  nurses	
  (Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2011)	
  conducted	
  a	
  descriptive	
  study	
  in	
  a	
  Midwestern	
  Canadian	
  hospital	
  with	
  nurses	
  on	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  units	
  including	
  medicine	
  and	
  found	
  49%	
  (n	
  =	
  324)	
  achieved	
  a	
  score	
  of	
  80%	
  or	
  more	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP,	
  which	
  was	
  significantly	
  positive	
  in	
  younger	
  nurses,	
  with	
  less	
  work	
  experience	
  and	
  a	
  bachelor’s	
  education.	
  Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008	
  (n	
  =	
  143)	
  found	
  education	
  level	
  was	
  insignificantly	
  associated	
  with	
  increased	
  knowledge	
  and	
  good	
  attitudes	
   	
   	
  	
   24	
   about	
  pain	
  management.	
  Furthermore,	
  nurses	
  with	
  more	
  professional	
  clinical	
  experience	
  	
  (p	
  =0	
  .006),	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  apply	
  their	
  knowledge	
  to	
  daily	
  practice	
  (p	
  =	
  .032)	
  had	
  a	
  higher	
  percentage	
  score	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  than	
  those	
  with	
  less	
  clinical	
  experience	
  (Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2008)	
  attributed	
  low	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  to	
  lack	
  of	
  formal	
  pain	
  education	
  in	
  nursing	
  school,	
  and	
  suggested	
  that	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  is	
  developed	
  in	
  the	
  clinical	
  setting.	
  Research	
  found	
  nursing	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  seems	
  to	
  be	
  improving	
  in	
  Canada.	
  Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1995)	
  found	
  a	
  KASRP	
  mean	
  passing	
  score	
  of	
  41%,	
  while	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2011)	
  had	
  a	
  mean	
  passing	
  score	
  of	
  79%.	
  Interestingly,	
  a	
  survey	
  of	
  Canadian	
  university	
  professional	
  programs	
  of	
  medicine,	
  nursing,	
  dentistry,	
  pharmacy,	
  and	
  veterinary,	
  found	
  two-­‐thirds	
  of	
  these	
  facilities	
  could	
  not	
  identify	
  specific	
  teaching	
  on	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  undergraduate	
  curriculum,	
  with	
  veterinarian	
  students	
  having	
  two	
  to	
  five	
  times	
  more	
  education	
  about	
  pain	
  management	
  than	
  students	
  of	
  nursing	
  and	
  medicine	
  (Watt-­‐Watson,	
  McGillion,	
  &	
  Hunter,	
  2007).	
  	
   2.9.2	
   Area	
  of	
  Specialty	
  	
  Nurses	
  working	
  in	
  specialty	
  areas,	
  such	
  as	
  oncology,	
  have	
  been	
  found	
  to	
  have	
  greater	
  knowledge	
  of	
  pain	
  management	
  compared	
  to	
  nurses	
  on	
  the	
  general	
  units	
  (Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Al-­‐Shear	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  The	
  results	
  are	
  not	
  usual	
  as	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  greater	
  emphasis	
  on	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  the	
  oncology	
  and	
  surgical	
  populations	
  (Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  In	
  contrast,	
  Brown	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1999)	
  found	
  nurses	
  (n	
  =	
  246)	
  working	
  in	
  various	
  units	
  in	
  a	
  hospital	
  in	
  USA	
  revealed	
  no	
  statistically	
  significant	
   	
   	
  	
   25	
   difference	
  in	
  the	
  KASRP	
  scores	
  based	
  on	
  clinical	
  specialty	
  or	
  practice	
  setting.	
  However,	
  the	
  response	
  rate	
  was	
  poor	
  (26	
  out	
  of	
  1000)	
  and	
  the	
  mean	
  KASRP	
  score	
  was	
  65%,	
  significantly	
  limiting	
  the	
  data.	
  Yet,	
  the	
  data	
  recognized	
  that	
  inadequate	
  knowledge	
  in	
  pain	
  management	
  continues	
  to	
  exist,	
  even	
  though	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  nurses’	
  rated	
  their	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  as	
  good	
  (Brown	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999).	
  Prevalence	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  medical	
  units	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  high,	
  which	
  identifies	
  problems	
  related	
  to	
  inadequate	
  knowledge	
  and	
  misguided	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  management	
  (Dix	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Whelan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Gregory	
  &	
  Haigh,	
  2008;	
  Sawyer,	
  Haslam,	
  Daines,	
  &	
  Stilos,	
  2010).	
  	
   2.9.3	
   Organizational	
  Barriers	
  Despite	
  the	
  common	
  occurrence	
  of	
  acute	
  pain	
  and	
  the	
  huge	
  impact	
  pain	
  has	
  on	
  the	
  individual	
  and	
  the	
  economy,	
  the	
  resources	
  dedicated	
  to	
  pain	
  resources	
  and	
  treatment	
  in	
  Canada	
  are	
  insufficient.	
  Aside	
  from	
  major	
  teaching	
  hospitals,	
  few	
  hospitals	
  have	
  Acute	
  Pain	
  Services	
  (APS)	
  or	
  Advanced	
  Practice	
  Nurses	
  (APN)	
  specializing	
  in	
  pain,	
  and	
  the	
  wait	
  times	
  for	
  admission	
  to	
  interdisciplinary	
  pain	
  management	
  programs	
  can	
  be	
  years	
  in	
  some	
  provinces	
  (Jovey,	
  2008).	
  	
  The	
  shortfalls	
  and	
  resources	
  are	
  even	
  more	
  prominent	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  units,	
  where	
  for	
  decades	
  the	
  assumption	
  has	
  been	
  that	
  in-­‐patients	
  medical	
  units	
  have	
  their	
  pain	
  well	
  managed	
  compared	
  to	
  surgical	
  in-­‐patients	
  (Sawyer	
  et	
  al,	
  2010).	
  The	
  establishment	
  of	
  the	
  APS	
  has	
  clearly	
  made	
  postsurgical	
  pain	
  and	
  trauma	
  a	
  priority,	
  while	
  seemingly	
  abandoning	
  medical	
  patients.	
  In	
  1990,	
  UK	
  multidisciplinary	
  acute	
  pain	
  teams	
  were	
  established	
  primarily	
  for	
  “pain	
  after	
  surgery”	
  strengthening	
  the	
  link	
  between	
  surgery	
  and	
  pain,	
  while	
  passing	
  over	
  all	
  other	
  areas	
  of	
  the	
  hospital	
   	
   	
  	
   26	
   (Royal	
  College	
  of	
  Anesthetists,	
  2010).	
  Although	
  the	
  college	
  has	
  proposed	
  liaison	
  with	
  other	
  units	
  and	
  health	
  care	
  teams,	
  they	
  have	
  mandated	
  that	
  all	
  PACU	
  staff	
  be	
  trained	
  in	
  basic	
  pain	
  management	
  and	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  use	
  protocols,	
  while	
  only	
  an	
  individual	
  staff	
  member	
  in	
  the	
  non-­‐surgical	
  clinical	
  areas	
  are	
  designated	
  as	
  competent	
  to	
  provide	
  safe	
  and	
  effective	
  pain	
  management	
  (Royal	
  College	
  of	
  Anesthetists,	
  2010).	
  In	
  Canada,	
  similar	
  APS	
  and	
  education	
  have	
  focused	
  on	
  post-­‐operative	
  care	
  and	
  with	
  anesthesia	
  staff	
  working	
  primarily	
  with	
  PACU	
  staff	
  (McMaster	
  University,	
  2011).	
  Educational	
  efforts	
  to	
  bring	
  change	
  not	
  in	
  the	
  immediate	
  care	
  of	
  the	
  APS	
  have	
  been	
  slow	
  and	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  unusual	
  to	
  find	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  APS	
  working	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  setting,	
  unless	
  requested	
  for	
  a	
  consultation.	
  	
  In	
  a	
  large	
  USA	
  study	
  involving	
  twenty-­‐five	
  hospitals,	
  it	
  was	
  found	
  that	
  patient’s	
  had	
  significantly	
  lower	
  pain	
  levels	
  in	
  hospitals	
  with	
  an	
  APS	
  than	
  in	
  hospitals	
  without	
  an	
  APS	
  (Miaskowski,	
  Crews,	
  Ready,	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999).	
  One	
  of	
  the	
  largest	
  studies	
  conducted	
  in	
  Canada	
  involving	
  fifty-­‐six	
  university-­‐teaching	
  hospitals,	
  found	
  multidisciplinary	
  team	
  approaches	
  and	
  on-­‐going	
  staff	
  rounds	
  have	
  been	
  vital	
  for	
  communication	
  and	
  patient	
  outcomes	
  (Zimmerman	
  &	
  Stewart,	
  1993).	
  Seventy	
  five	
  percent	
  of	
  nurses	
  indicated	
  that	
  lack	
  of	
  access	
  to	
  professionals	
  who	
  practice	
  specialized	
  pain	
  treatment	
  methods	
  and	
  difficulty	
  in	
  contacting	
  or	
  communicating	
  with	
  the	
  physician	
  were	
  significant	
  barriers	
  to	
  pain	
  management	
  (Elicigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  Many	
  nurses	
  had	
  a	
  strong	
  knowledge	
  base,	
  however	
  they	
  were	
  challenged	
  by	
  organizations	
  that	
  did	
  not	
  support	
  their	
  knowledge	
  (Wilson,	
  2007).	
  For	
  example,	
  nurses	
  often	
  recognize	
  a	
  patient	
  is	
  in	
  pain,	
  but	
  may	
  lack	
  decision-­‐	
  making	
  skills	
  related	
  to	
  pain	
  management	
  specifically	
  in	
  medications	
  (Wilson,	
  2007).	
  Although	
   	
   	
  	
   27	
   health	
  care	
  providers	
  expressed	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  pain	
  management	
  to	
  their	
  patients,	
  only	
  50%	
  of	
  medical	
  units	
  and	
  80%	
  of	
  surgical	
  unit	
  had	
  a	
  PRN	
  order	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesic	
  (Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  Research	
  has	
  indicated	
  that	
  not	
  having	
  pain	
  management	
  policies,	
  procedures,	
  or	
  guidelines	
  are	
  a	
  barrier	
  to	
  the	
  nurses’	
  abilities	
  to	
  carry	
  out	
  optimal	
  pain	
  assessment	
  and	
  management	
  	
  (Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Elicigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  The	
  APS	
  has	
  led	
  to	
  important	
  changes	
  in	
  procedures	
  and	
  policies,	
  including	
  special	
  categories	
  of	
  nurses	
  such	
  as	
  clinical	
  nurse	
  specialist	
  (CNS)	
  and	
  nurse	
  practitioners	
  (NP)	
  who	
  have	
  prescribing	
  abilities.	
  These	
  nurses	
  positively	
  influence	
  pain	
  management	
  practice	
  within	
  the	
  institutions	
  by	
  providing	
  supports	
  for	
  medical	
  and	
  nursing	
  staff,	
  through	
  education,	
  and	
  assistance	
  implementing	
  standardized	
  clinical	
  pain	
  guidelines	
  (Musclow,	
  Sawhney,	
  &	
  Watt-­‐Watson,	
  2002).	
  As	
  well,	
  APN’s	
  specializing	
  in	
  pain	
  described	
  their	
  role	
  as	
  positively	
  contributing	
  to	
  continuity	
  of	
  care,	
  committing	
  to	
  quality	
  improvements,	
  providing	
  nursing	
  consults	
  for	
  difficult	
  pain	
  management	
  issues,	
  and	
  acting	
  as	
  a	
  patient	
  advocate	
  (Musclow	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  Evidence-­‐based	
  approaches,	
  standardized	
  orders	
  and	
  protocols	
  are	
  essential	
  to	
  ensuring	
  consistent	
  standards	
  of	
  care,	
  upholding	
  the	
  criteria	
  of	
  professional	
  practice,	
  and	
  to	
  improving	
  patient	
  care	
  outcomes	
  (Canadian	
  Nurses	
  Association,	
  2011).	
  	
  	
  Physicians	
  may	
  act	
  as	
  a	
  barrier	
  to	
  the	
  nurses’	
  ability	
  to	
  better	
  manage	
  a	
  patient’	
  pain.	
  In	
  a	
  study	
  undertaken	
  by	
  Van	
  Niekerk	
  and	
  Martin	
  (2003),	
  more	
  than	
  one-­‐third	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  indicated	
  that	
  insufficient	
  cooperation	
  by	
  physicians	
  and	
  inadequate	
  prescriptions	
  of	
  analgesic	
  medications	
  added	
  to	
  their	
  difficulty	
  to	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management.	
  Numerous	
  studies	
  have	
  reported	
  high	
  patient	
  to	
  nurse	
   	
   	
  	
   28	
   ratios,	
  which	
  added	
  to	
  the	
  difficulty	
  in	
  finding	
  sufficient	
  time	
  for	
  health	
  teaching	
  patients	
  (Puls-­‐McColl,	
  Holden,	
  Buschmann,	
  2001;	
  Van	
  Niekerk	
  &	
  Martin,	
  2003;	
  Elcigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  Initiation	
  and	
  reinforcement	
  of	
  pain	
  education	
  can	
  occur	
  at	
  many	
  times	
  during	
  a	
  patient’s	
  hospital	
  stay.	
  Nurses	
  provide	
  pain	
  education	
  during	
  a	
  patient’s	
  hospital	
  stay	
  to	
  prevent	
  and	
  recognize	
  the	
  side	
  effects	
  of	
  analgesic	
  and	
  enforce	
  good	
  pain	
  management	
  techniques.	
  Without	
  organizational	
  and	
  colleague	
  support	
  of	
  nurse’s	
  knowledge	
  to	
  make	
  decisions	
  and	
  affect	
  change,	
  nurses	
  can	
  lead	
  to	
  feelings	
  of	
  tension,	
  learned	
  helplessness	
  and	
  low	
  self-­‐efficacy	
  (Wilson,	
  2007).	
  	
  	
   2.10	
   Summary	
  There	
  has	
  been	
  extensive	
  investigation	
  of	
  knowledge	
  and	
  assessment	
  practices	
  of	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  nursing,	
  specifically	
  in	
  the	
  surgical	
  area.	
  Despite	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  suffering	
  from	
  cognitive	
  impairment	
  and	
  chronic	
  conditions,	
  resources	
  to	
  support	
  their	
  pain	
  management,	
  such	
  as	
  clinicians,	
  research	
  and	
  education	
  have	
  been	
  poor	
  (Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Acute	
  pain	
  services	
  are	
  mainly	
  reserved	
  for	
  postsurgical	
  patients	
  and	
  rarely	
  do	
  they	
  assess	
  medical	
  patients,	
  unless	
  requested	
  (Dix	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Jovey,	
  2008).	
  Pain	
  is	
  a	
  significant	
  component	
  of	
  patient	
  care	
  and	
  nurses	
  have	
  a	
  responsibility	
  for	
  ensuring	
  patient	
  comfort,	
  especially	
  for	
  older	
  adults	
  who	
  have	
  comorbid	
  conditions,	
  fewer	
  supports,	
  and	
  at	
  a	
  higher	
  risk	
  for	
  delirium	
  (Miller,	
  1996;	
  Inouye,	
  2006;	
  IASP,	
  2011).	
  As	
  stated	
  in	
  the	
  Code	
  of	
  Ethics	
  (CNA,	
  2008),	
  nurses	
  need	
  to	
  relieve	
  pain	
  and	
  suffering	
  that	
  includes	
  appropriate	
  and	
  effective	
  pain	
  management	
  to	
  allow	
  the	
  patients	
  to	
  live	
  with	
  dignity.	
  Nurses	
  have	
  a	
  critical	
  responsibility	
  of	
  treating	
  acute	
  pain;	
  to	
  not	
  only	
  decrease	
  suffering	
  and	
   	
   	
  	
   29	
   maximize	
  healing,	
  but	
  to	
  minimize	
  the	
  chance	
  of	
  acute	
  pain	
  developing	
  into	
  chronic	
  pain.	
  Therefore,	
  nurses	
  need	
  to	
  carefully	
  examine	
  their	
  knowledge,	
  attitudes,	
  and	
  barriers	
  that	
  influence	
  everyday	
  decision-­‐making	
  in	
  pain	
  management	
  to	
  improve	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  care	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  units.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   30	
   Chapter	
  3	
  	
   Methodology	
  	
   	
   The	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  section	
  is	
  to	
  describe	
  the	
  research	
  design,	
  setting,	
  sampling,	
  data	
  collection,	
  and	
  participant	
  recruitment	
  used	
  in	
  this	
  research	
  study.	
  The	
  data	
  analysis	
  plans	
  and	
  testing	
  of	
  normality,	
  including	
  reliability	
  and	
  validity	
  of	
  the	
  instrumentation	
  are	
  presented	
  in	
  this	
  chapter.	
  Furthermore,	
  the	
  ethical	
  considerations	
  for	
  this	
  study	
  will	
  be	
  discussed.	
  	
  	
   3.1	
   Design	
  A	
  quantitative,	
  descriptive,	
  cross-­‐sectional	
  design	
  guided	
  this	
  research.	
  This	
  study	
  invited	
  all	
  registered	
  nurses	
  (RNs)	
  and	
  licensed	
  practical	
  nurses	
  (LPNs)	
  working	
  on	
  five	
  medical	
  units	
  in	
  a	
  metro	
  Vancouver	
  tertiary	
  care	
  teaching	
  hospital	
  to	
  complete	
  a	
  questionnaire	
  on	
  their	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain.	
  The	
  “Pain	
  Questionnaire”	
  (Appendix	
  A,	
  B,	
  C,	
  D,	
  E)	
  was	
  distributed	
  to	
  nurses	
  working	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  units.	
  	
  	
   3.2	
   Setting	
  A	
  large	
  tertiary	
  teaching	
  hospital	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  was	
  selected	
  as	
  the	
  study	
  site	
  because	
  it	
  is	
  representative	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  Vancouver.	
  In	
  2010,	
  B.C.	
  Statistics	
  estimated	
  there	
  were	
  642,843	
  people	
  living	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  and	
  2,328,000	
  people	
  living	
  in	
  the	
  greater	
  Vancouver	
  area.	
  Vancouver	
  is	
  a	
  very	
  diverse	
  multicultural	
  city,	
  with	
  fifty	
  one	
  percent	
  of	
  residents	
  considered	
  as	
  a	
  visible	
  minority	
  group	
  (Hamilton,	
   	
   	
  	
   31	
   2008).	
  The	
  hospital	
  primarily	
  serves	
  the	
  local	
  community	
  and	
  patients	
  from	
  across	
  British	
  Columbia	
  and	
  Yukon.	
  The	
  diverse	
  and	
  large	
  volume	
  of	
  patients	
  the	
  hospital	
  serves	
  is	
  thought	
  to	
  expose	
  nurses	
  to	
  the	
  complexity	
  of	
  pain	
  that	
  the	
  patients	
  may	
  experience	
  and	
  for	
  which	
  nurses	
  provide	
  care.	
  	
  The	
  medical	
  units	
  care	
  for	
  patients	
  with	
  various	
  illnesses	
  and	
  conditions	
  such	
  as:	
  gastrointestinal	
  bleeds,	
  anemia,	
  chronic	
  obstructive	
  pulmonary	
  disease	
  (COPD),	
  acute	
  renal	
  failure,	
  hematology,	
  cellulitis,	
  congestive	
  heart	
  failure,	
  Crohn’s	
  disease,	
  ulcerative	
  colitis,	
  diabetes,	
  malnutrition,	
  osteomyelitis,	
  cerebrovascular	
  accident,	
  hypokalemia,	
  and	
  failure	
  to	
  thrive	
  (J.	
  Santucci,	
  personal	
  communication,	
  November	
  17,	
  2011)	
  were	
  selected.	
  There	
  are	
  115	
  beds	
  for	
  patients,	
  with	
  patient	
  occupancy	
  rate	
  usually	
  of	
  90%	
  or	
  more	
  at	
  any	
  given	
  time	
  (J.	
  Santucci,	
  personal	
  communication,	
  September	
  21,	
  2012).	
  The	
  medical	
  units	
  have	
  one	
  operations	
  leader	
  (manager),	
  five	
  clinical	
  nurse	
  leaders,	
  and	
  two	
  clinical	
  nurse	
  educators.	
  	
   	
   3.3	
   Sampling	
  The	
  hospital	
  was	
  selected	
  to	
  obtain	
  an	
  adequate	
  sample	
  size	
  and	
  be	
  representative	
  of	
  a	
  nursing	
  staff	
  mix	
  of	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs,	
  which	
  provide	
  direct	
  nursing	
  care	
  to	
  adults	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  units.	
  The	
  target	
  sample	
  for	
  this	
  study	
  was	
  approximately	
  150	
  regular	
  full	
  time	
  and	
  40	
  casual	
  nurses’	
  employed	
  as	
  medical	
  RNs	
  or	
  LPNs	
  (S.	
  Chutskoff,	
  personal	
  communication,	
  May	
  14,	
  2012).	
  In	
  these	
  units,	
  RNs	
  typically	
  worked	
  12-­‐hour	
  shifts,	
  while	
  LPNs	
  worked	
  8-­‐hour	
  shifts.	
  The	
  average	
  nurse-­‐to-­‐patient	
  ratio	
  was	
  1:4	
  or	
  1:5	
  and	
  there	
  were	
  four	
  RNs	
  and	
  two	
  LPNs	
  on	
  each	
  unit,	
  which	
  is	
  consistent	
  across	
  the	
  24-­‐hour	
  time	
  (J.	
  Santucci,	
  personal	
   	
   	
  	
   32	
   communication,	
  November	
  17,	
  2011).	
  One	
  of	
  these	
  medical	
  units	
  had	
  reserved	
  beds	
  for	
  four	
  chronic	
  pain	
  in-­‐patients.	
  	
  To	
  ensure	
  eligibility	
  the	
  participants	
  were	
  required	
  to	
  meet	
  the	
  following	
  inclusion	
  criteria:	
  i)	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs	
  employed	
  and	
  working	
  full	
  time,	
  part-­‐time,	
  or	
  casual	
  at	
  the	
  study	
  site;	
  ii)	
  caring	
  for	
  medical	
  patients	
  and	
  iii)	
  may	
  or	
  may	
  not	
  have	
  had	
  education	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  Exclusion	
  criteria:	
  nursing	
  students	
  and	
  care	
  aids.	
  	
   	
   3.4	
   Instrumentation	
  	
  The	
  Pain	
  Questionnaire	
  was	
  comprised	
  of	
  three	
  parts:	
  i)	
  Demographic	
  Profile	
  (DP);	
  ii)	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  (KASRP)	
  (Ferrell	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2008);	
  iii)	
  Clinical	
  Decision-­‐Making	
  in	
  Pain	
  Questionnaire	
  (CDMPQ)	
  (Brockopp,	
  Ryan,	
  &	
  Warden,	
  2003).	
  	
   3.4.1	
   Demographic	
  Profile	
  (DP)	
  The	
  demographic	
  profile	
  (Appendix	
  B)	
  contained	
  seven	
  questions	
  and	
  was	
  designed	
  by	
  the	
  co-­‐investigator	
  (MW).	
  It	
  requested	
  information	
  regarding	
  the	
  participants:	
  (i)	
  Age;	
  (ii)	
  Gender	
  (iii)	
  Professional	
  qualification	
  (RN	
  or	
  LPN)	
  (iv)	
  Level	
  of	
  education;	
  (v)	
  Years	
  of	
  professional	
  experience;	
  (vi)	
  Attendance	
  at	
  pain	
  management	
  education;	
  (vii)	
  Frequency	
  of	
  caring	
  for	
  patients	
  with	
  pain.	
  The	
  demographic	
  profile	
  was	
  designed	
  to	
  understand	
  the	
  background	
  of	
  the	
  participants	
  when	
  analyzing	
  the	
  variables	
  that	
  may	
  affect	
  their	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   33	
   	
   3.4.2	
   Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  (KASRP)	
  The	
  KASRP	
  (McCaffrey	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  2008),	
  a	
  38-­‐item	
  survey	
  tool	
  was	
  modified	
  for	
  this	
  study.	
  The	
  questionnaire	
  contains	
  20	
  questions	
  that	
  require	
  true	
  or	
  false	
  answers,	
  14	
  multiple-­‐choice	
  questions,	
  and	
  two	
  case	
  studies	
  that	
  measure	
  the	
  variables	
  of	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  in	
  pain	
  management	
  (Appendix	
  C).	
  Two	
  questions	
  regarding	
  pain	
  in	
  children	
  were	
  removed	
  because	
  the	
  participants	
  only	
  cared	
  for	
  adult	
  patients.	
  A	
  pharmacological	
  medication	
  question	
  on	
  Vicodin	
  ®,	
  an	
  American	
  trade	
  name	
  was	
  removed	
  to	
  include	
  only	
  the	
  medication	
  dosage	
  and	
  equivalency	
  such	
  as	
  hydrocodone,	
  which	
  is	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  Canadian	
  health	
  care	
  system.	
  The	
  tool	
  was	
  further	
  divided	
  into	
  pharmacologic,	
  non-­‐pharmacologic,	
  assessment,	
  and	
  five	
  items	
  related	
  to	
  cancer	
  pain.	
  	
  The	
  KASRP	
  also	
  consists	
  of	
  two	
  case	
  studies.	
  They	
  illustrate	
  two	
  patients	
  who	
  describe	
  the	
  same	
  level	
  of	
  pain,	
  however	
  one	
  patient	
  is	
  described	
  as	
  smiling	
  and	
  the	
  other	
  patient	
  is	
  described	
  as	
  grimacing.	
  The	
  participants	
  are	
  asked	
  to	
  then	
  record	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  using	
  a	
  verbal	
  analogue	
  scale	
  with	
  0	
  representing	
  no	
  pain	
  and	
  10	
  representing	
  the	
  worst	
  pain.	
  The	
  case	
  study	
  evaluated	
  the	
  nurses’	
  assessments	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  intensity	
  and	
  the	
  resulting	
  pharmacologic	
  intervention.	
  The	
  questionnaire	
  consisted	
  of	
  all	
  closed-­‐ended	
  items.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   34	
   3.4.3	
   Clinical	
  Decision-­‐Making	
  Questionnaire	
  in	
  Pain	
  (CDMPQ)	
  The	
  CDMPQ	
  (Appendix	
  D)	
  designed	
  by	
  Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2003)	
  was	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  assumption	
  that	
  nurses	
  have	
  preconceived	
  notions	
  about	
  certain	
  individuals	
  and	
  how	
  biases	
  may	
  influence	
  their	
  decision-­‐making	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  Given	
  that	
  all	
  the	
  patients	
  have	
  the	
  same	
  degree	
  of	
  pain,	
  but	
  with	
  different	
  causes	
  such	
  as;	
  cancer,	
  substance	
  abuse,	
  AIDS,	
  multiple	
  trauma,	
  suicide	
  attempt,	
  renal	
  disease,	
  diabetes,	
  general	
  surgery,	
  chronic	
  pain,	
  laparoscopic	
  surgery	
  or	
  an	
  older	
  adult,	
  the	
  participants	
  had	
  to	
  rate	
  the	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  they	
  would	
  spend	
  to	
  manage	
  the	
  pain	
  on	
  a	
  scale	
  (1	
  =	
  little	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  to	
  5	
  =	
  maximum	
  time	
  and	
  energy).	
  Since	
  the	
  medical	
  patient	
  population	
  had	
  various	
  diagnoses,	
  diseases	
  and	
  ages,	
  the	
  CDMPQ	
  survey	
  was	
  thought	
  to	
  be	
  appropriate	
  to	
  capture	
  the	
  degree	
  of	
  bias	
  towards	
  certain	
  patient	
  groups.	
  	
  Studies	
  have	
  shown	
  that	
  health	
  care	
  providers	
  make	
  treatment	
  decisions	
  based	
  on	
  their	
  pre-­‐conceived	
  notions	
  regarding	
  a	
  patient’s	
  socioeconomic	
  status,	
  background,	
  culture	
  (Macpherson,	
  2009),	
  ethnicity	
  (Mayberry,	
  Mili,	
  Ofili,	
  2000),	
  and	
  gender	
  (Hoffman	
  &	
  Tarzian,	
  2001).	
  Studies	
  of	
  HIV/AIDS	
  positive	
  patients	
  (Rintamaki,	
  Scott,	
  Kosenko,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Zukoski	
  &	
  Thorburn,	
  2009)	
  found	
  health	
  care	
  providers	
  displayed	
  behaviour	
  indicative	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  disease	
  from	
  lack	
  of	
  eye	
  contact	
  to	
  refusing	
  to	
  provide	
  treatment.	
  Also	
  as	
  Taylor,	
  Skleton	
  &	
  Butcher	
  (1984)	
  found	
  nurses	
  have	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  attribute	
  less	
  pain	
  to	
  patients	
  suffering	
  from	
  chronic	
  conditions	
  than	
  to	
  those	
  suffering	
  from	
  acute	
  conditions.	
  Patients’	
  diseases	
  and	
  diagnoses	
  limit	
  pain	
  relief.	
  Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2003)	
  found	
  nurses	
  would	
  devote	
  the	
  greatest	
  amount	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  to	
  patients	
  with	
  pain	
  associated	
  with	
   	
   	
  	
   35	
   cancer,	
  and	
  the	
  lowest	
  amount	
  of	
  energy	
  and	
  time	
  on	
  older	
  patients,	
  or	
  on	
  patients	
  with	
  pain	
  associated	
  with	
  substance	
  abuse.	
  	
  	
   3.5	
   Ethical	
  Considerations	
  Ethical	
  approval	
  was	
  obtained	
  from	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Behavioural	
  Research	
  Ethics	
  Board	
  (BREB)	
  and	
  Providence	
  Health	
  Care	
  Hospital	
  Review	
  Board	
  (Appendix	
  H).	
  Research	
  ethics	
  committee	
  and	
  research	
  governance	
  procedures	
  were	
  adhered	
  to.	
  	
  The	
  study	
  invitation	
  letter	
  (Appendix	
  A)	
  indicated	
  that	
  participation	
  was	
  entirely	
  voluntary	
  and	
  confidentiality	
  and	
  anonymity	
  would	
  be	
  guaranteed.	
  Participants	
  were	
  aware	
  the	
  information	
  from	
  the	
  study	
  was	
  part	
  of	
  a	
  requirement	
  for	
  a	
  master	
  of	
  nursing	
  degree	
  and	
  the	
  research	
  results	
  may	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  nursing	
  publications	
  or	
  presentations.	
  	
  A	
  separate	
  signed	
  consent	
  form	
  was	
  not	
  needed,	
  as	
  the	
  returned	
  questionnaire	
  was	
  taken	
  as	
  evidence	
  of	
  implied	
  consent	
  (UBC	
  BREB,	
  Section	
  9.6,	
  2005).	
  The	
  participants	
  were	
  aware	
  that	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  minimal	
  risk	
  and	
  harm	
  associated	
  with	
  this	
  study.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  compensation	
  for	
  the	
  study,	
  however	
  a	
  chocolate	
  was	
  included	
  in	
  each	
  pain	
  questionnaire	
  package	
  as	
  a	
  token	
  of	
  appreciation	
  of	
  the	
  participant’s	
  time	
  and	
  consideration	
  in	
  the	
  study.	
  Participants	
  were	
  made	
  aware	
  they	
  were	
  not	
  obliged	
  to	
  complete	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  and	
  could	
  stop	
  at	
  any	
  time.	
  The	
  participants	
  were	
  given	
  the	
  contact	
  information	
  of	
  the	
  investigators,	
  UBC	
  Research	
  Information	
  Line,	
  and	
  St.	
  Paul’s	
  Ethics	
  board	
  in	
  case	
  they	
  had	
  further	
  questions	
  or	
  concerns	
  about	
  the	
  study.	
   	
   	
  	
   36	
   No	
  names	
  were	
  collected	
  and	
  participants	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  put	
  the	
  completed	
  questionnaires	
  into	
  a	
  sealed	
  envelope	
  to	
  maintain	
  anonymity.	
  Questionnaires	
  were	
  numbered	
  for	
  identification	
  and	
  data	
  coding	
  purposes	
  only.	
  The	
  data	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  were	
  kept	
  in	
  a	
  locked	
  cabinet	
  at	
  the	
  co-­‐investigators	
  (MW)	
  home	
  and	
  data	
  were	
  inputted	
  into	
  the	
  password	
  protected	
  computer	
  for	
  data	
  analysis	
  and	
  only	
  those	
  on	
  the	
  research	
  committee	
  had	
  access	
  to	
  the	
  data.	
  Data	
  was	
  	
  	
  kept	
  in	
  a	
  password	
  protected	
  hard	
  drive	
  kept	
  by	
  the	
  co-­‐investigator	
  and	
  original	
  data	
  stored	
  will	
  be	
  stored	
  in	
  the	
  UBC	
  School	
  of	
  Nursing	
  with	
  the	
  principal	
  investigator	
  for	
  up	
  to	
  five	
  years	
  for	
  accurate	
  and	
  retrievable	
  results	
  required	
  by	
  UBC’s	
  REB	
  policy	
  #85	
  (UBC	
  REB,	
  2008).	
  No	
  identifying	
  factors	
  were	
  stored	
  as	
  data.	
  	
  	
  As	
  a	
  researcher	
  and	
  nurse	
  working	
  at	
  the	
  study	
  site,	
  the	
  co-­‐investigator	
  (MW)	
  made	
  sure	
  that	
  results	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  were	
  anonymous	
  and	
  confidential.	
  The	
  ethical	
  procedure	
  was	
  upheld	
  to	
  help	
  protect	
  the	
  research	
  study,	
  participants,	
  and	
  institutions	
  involved.	
  	
   	
   3.6	
   Recruitment	
  and	
  Data	
  Collection	
  Data	
  were	
  collected	
  through	
  paper	
  questionnaires.	
  Questionnaires	
  continue	
  to	
  be	
  used	
  as	
  an	
  effective	
  method	
  of	
  obtaining	
  information	
  from	
  large	
  population	
  participation,	
  particularly	
  from	
  health	
  professionals	
  (Edwards	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  The	
  manager	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  unit	
  reported	
  that	
  the	
  nurses	
  do	
  not	
  regularly	
  access	
  their	
  email	
  accounts;	
  therefore	
  paper	
  over	
  email	
  delivery	
  of	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  was	
  seen	
  as	
  the	
  best	
  option	
  to	
  obtaining	
  the	
  highest	
  response	
  rate	
  (S.	
  Chutskoff,	
  personal	
  communications,	
  February	
  13,	
  2012).	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   37	
   The	
  questionnaire	
  consisted	
  of	
  a	
  set	
  of	
  documents:	
  An	
  invitation	
  letter	
  (Appendix	
  A),	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  survey	
  (Appendix	
  B,	
  C,	
  D)	
  and	
  additional	
  resources	
  about	
  pain	
  management	
  (Appendix	
  E).	
  The	
  invitation	
  letter,	
  a	
  strategy	
  to	
  increase	
  recruitment	
  (Walonick,	
  2004),	
  invited	
  participation	
  and	
  described	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  the	
  study.	
  An	
  “Additional	
  resources”	
  document	
  was	
  provided	
  to	
  encourage	
  on-­‐going	
  learning,	
  as	
  nurses	
  are	
  required	
  to	
  continue	
  professional	
  development	
  to	
  meet	
  the	
  College	
  of	
  Registered	
  Nurses	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (CRNBC)	
  competency	
  requirements.	
  The	
  “	
  Additional	
  resources”	
  document	
  contained	
  information	
  on	
  nursing	
  associations	
  and	
  interest	
  groups	
  such	
  as	
  Pain	
  B.C.,	
  Canadian	
  Pain	
  Coalition,	
  and	
  Canadian	
  Pain	
  Society,	
  these	
  are	
  useful	
  websites	
  that	
  nurses	
  could	
  go	
  to	
  for	
  more	
  knowledge	
  and	
  information	
  on	
  the	
  evolving	
  field	
  of	
  pain.	
  Participants	
  were	
  also	
  able	
  to	
  contact	
  people	
  on	
  the	
  research	
  committee	
  for	
  further	
  information	
  regarding	
  pain.	
  	
  	
  The	
  data	
  collection	
  period	
  was	
  one	
  month	
  from	
  June	
  2012	
  to	
  July	
  2012.	
  First,	
  the	
  co-­‐investigator	
  obtained	
  support	
  from	
  the	
  manager	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  unit	
  (Appendix	
  F)	
  and	
  the	
  clinical	
  nurse	
  leader	
  (CNL)	
  of	
  each	
  unit.	
  Advertisements	
  (Appendix	
  G)	
  regarding	
  the	
  research	
  study	
  were	
  posted	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  wards	
  in	
  places	
  visible	
  to	
  nursing	
  staff.	
  	
  In	
  each	
  medical	
  unit,	
  two	
  baskets	
  were	
  set	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  nursing	
  boardroom,	
  one	
  basket	
  labeled	
  “Pain	
  Questionnaires”	
  contained	
  the	
  envelopes	
  of	
  blank	
  questionnaires,	
  and	
  the	
  basket	
  next	
  to	
  it	
  was	
  labeled	
  “Completed	
  Questionnaire.”	
  In	
  addition,	
  the	
  pain	
  questionnaire	
  packages	
  were	
  also	
  given,	
  in	
  person,	
  to	
  medical	
   	
   	
  	
   38	
   nurses	
  at	
  their	
  place	
  of	
  work	
  to	
  improve	
  response	
  rates.	
  Completed	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  returned	
  in	
  a	
  provided	
  sealed	
  envelope	
  to	
  ensure	
  confidentiality.	
  Questionnaires	
  with	
  non-­‐monetary	
  incentive	
  (OR	
  =	
  1.19)	
  were	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  returned	
  (Edwards	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  Therefore,	
  a	
  strategy	
  to	
  increase	
  recruitment	
  was	
  to	
  have	
  chocolate	
  and	
  donuts	
  provided	
  along	
  with	
  the	
  pain	
  questionnaire	
  package.	
  The	
  co-­‐investigator	
  introduced	
  the	
  study	
  to	
  groups	
  of	
  nurses	
  during	
  nursing	
  report	
  meetings	
  and	
  personally	
  approached	
  medical	
  nurses	
  every	
  one	
  to	
  two	
  days.	
  The	
  co-­‐investigator	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  explain	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  and	
  clarify	
  any	
  questions.	
  Face-­‐to-­‐face	
  contact	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  best	
  approach	
  to	
  achieving	
  the	
  highest	
  rate	
  of	
  return	
  (Badger	
  &	
  Werrett,	
  2004),	
  and	
  personal	
  contact	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  positive	
  effect	
  on	
  response	
  rates	
  for	
  the	
  self-­‐completed	
  questionnaire	
  (Polit	
  &	
  Beck,	
  2008).	
  Many	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  work	
  in	
  different	
  medical	
  nursing	
  units	
  and	
  their	
  shifts	
  vary,	
  so	
  displaying	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  packages	
  in	
  the	
  nursing	
  boardroom	
  had	
  the	
  advantage	
  of	
  maximizing	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  completed	
  questionnaires	
  and	
  allowed	
  the	
  staff	
  to	
  participate	
  on	
  their	
  own	
  time.	
  Returned	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  collected	
  every	
  one	
  to	
  two	
  days.	
  	
  Consent	
  was	
  assumed	
  if	
  the	
  nurses	
  completed	
  and	
  returned	
  the	
  questionnaire.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  deadline	
  date	
  listed	
  on	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  as	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  reduce	
  response	
  rate	
  (McColl,	
  Jacoby,	
  &	
  Thomas,	
  et	
  al.	
  2001).	
  The	
  pain	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  removed	
  when	
  the	
  response	
  rate	
  dropped	
  to	
  zero	
  after	
  a	
  five-­‐day	
  period.	
  Answers	
  to	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  were	
  posted	
  in	
  the	
  nursing	
  conference	
  room	
  after	
  data	
  collection	
  was	
  complete.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   39	
   3.7	
   Data	
  Analysis	
  The	
  quantitative	
  data	
  from	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  were	
  analyzed	
  using	
  Statistical	
  Package	
  for	
  the	
  Social	
  Sciences	
  Version	
  20	
  (SPSS	
  Inc.,	
  Chicago,	
  IL).	
  Participants’	
  responses	
  were	
  coded	
  and	
  inputted	
  into	
  the	
  SPSS	
  spreadsheet.	
  A	
  census	
  survey	
  was	
  conducted	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  nurses;	
  therefore	
  a	
  power	
  analysis	
  was	
  not	
  conducted.	
  Descriptive	
  statistics	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  determine	
  normality	
  of	
  the	
  data.	
  Statistical	
  significance	
  was	
  set	
  at	
  p	
  ≤	
  0.05.	
  The	
  following	
  describes	
  the	
  analytical	
  process	
  used	
  to	
  investigate	
  the	
  research	
  questions.	
  	
   	
   3.8	
   Test	
  to	
  Determine	
  Normality	
  	
  Before	
  the	
  data	
  were	
  analyzed,	
  the	
  data	
  set	
  was	
  verified	
  and	
  corrected	
  for	
  errors	
  and	
  missing	
  data.	
  Descriptive	
  statistics	
  provided	
  information	
  concerning	
  the	
  normality	
  of	
  the	
  total	
  data	
  (n	
  =	
  75).	
  The	
  skewness	
  was	
  -­‐0.277,	
  slightly	
  negative,	
  which	
  indicated	
  a	
  clustering	
  of	
  scores	
  at	
  the	
  higher	
  end.	
  The	
  kurtosis	
  was	
  0.071,	
  slightly	
  positive,	
  which	
  indicated	
  more	
  peaked	
  data	
  that	
  was	
  clustered	
  in	
  the	
  centre	
  and	
  longer	
  thinner	
  tails.	
  Distributions	
  are	
  considered	
  perfectly	
  normal	
  if	
  both	
  skewness	
  and	
  kurtosis	
  have	
  a	
  value	
  of	
  zero,	
  which	
  is	
  uncommon	
  in	
  social	
  sciences	
  (Pallant,	
  2007).	
  Since	
  the	
  kurtosis	
  and	
  skewness	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  were	
  close	
  to	
  zero	
  it	
  was	
  interpreted	
  as	
  reasonably	
  acceptable	
  distributed	
  data.	
  	
  By	
  comparing	
  the	
  trimmed	
  mean	
  (M=	
  26.11)	
  with	
  the	
  original	
  mean	
  (M	
  =	
  26.01),	
  it	
  showed	
  both	
  numbers	
  were	
  very	
  similar	
  and	
  therefore	
  the	
  extreme	
  scores	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  a	
  strong	
  influence	
  on	
  the	
  mean.	
  Additionally,	
  the	
  mean	
  and	
  median	
  had	
   	
   	
  	
   40	
   almost	
  the	
  same	
  value,	
  a	
  mesokurtic	
  finding,	
  and	
  further	
  indicated	
  a	
  normal	
  distribution.	
  	
  The	
  test	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  normality	
  of	
  the	
  distribution	
  of	
  scores	
  for	
  the	
  total	
  KASRP	
  sample	
  was	
  determined	
  by	
  the	
  Kolmogorov-­‐Smirnov	
  statistic,	
  where	
  a	
  non-­‐significant	
  (p	
  ≤	
  .05)	
  result	
  indicates	
  normality	
  (Pallant,	
  2007).	
  The	
  Kolmogorov-­‐Smirnov	
  value	
  for	
  the	
  KASRP	
  score	
  was	
  0.097.	
  In	
  the	
  Q-­‐Q	
  plot,	
  a	
  reasonable	
  straight	
  line	
  was	
  seen	
  and	
  the	
  de-­‐trended	
  normal	
  Q-­‐Q	
  plot	
  found	
  no	
  real	
  clustering	
  of	
  points,	
  with	
  most	
  points	
  collecting	
  near	
  the	
  zero	
  line,	
  both	
  suggested	
  a	
  normal	
  distribution.	
  	
  The	
  histogram	
  appeared	
  normal	
  with	
  a	
  slightly	
  positive	
  skew,	
  while	
  the	
  boxplot	
  found	
  no	
  outliers	
  from	
  the	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  Overall,	
  from	
  examining	
  the	
  histogram,	
  boxplot,	
  and	
  descriptive	
  statistic,	
  the	
  data	
  met	
  the	
  assumption	
  to	
  use	
  parametric	
  tests	
  for	
  scoring	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  The	
  CDMPQ	
  final	
  scores	
  also	
  met	
  the	
  assumptions	
  to	
  use	
  parametric	
  tests,	
  as	
  the	
  Kolmogorov-­‐Smirnov	
  value	
  was	
  0.237;	
  there	
  were	
  no	
  outliers;	
  the	
  Q-­‐Q	
  plots	
  demonstrated	
  a	
  straight	
  line;	
  and	
  the	
  de-­‐trended	
  normal	
  Q-­‐Q	
  plot	
  found	
  no	
  real	
  clustering	
  of	
  points.	
  	
   	
   3.9	
   Reliability	
   3.9.1	
   KASRP	
  (Ferrell	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2008)	
  In	
  the	
  study	
  by	
  Ferrell	
  &	
  McCaffrey	
  (2008),	
  stability	
  of	
  the	
  instrument	
  was	
  established	
  by	
  re-­‐testing	
  the	
  KASRP	
  in	
  a	
  group	
  of	
  staff	
  nurses	
  (n	
  =	
  60).	
  Test	
  re-­‐test	
  reliability	
  found	
  the	
  correlation	
  coefficient	
  to	
  be	
  acceptable	
  (r	
  	
  >	
  0.80).	
  Internal	
   	
   	
  	
   41	
   consistency	
  reliability	
  was	
  established	
  with	
  a	
  Cronbach	
  alpha	
  coefficient	
  of	
  0.70	
  (Ferrell	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2008).	
  	
   3.9.2	
   CDMPQ	
  (Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003)	
  A	
  sample	
  of	
  29	
  nurses	
  that	
  completed	
  the	
  CDMPQ,	
  found	
  a	
  good	
  re-­‐test	
  reliability,	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  correlation	
  coefficient	
  value	
  of	
  0.84	
  (Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  The	
  Cronbach’s	
  alpha	
  coefficient	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  was	
  0.92,	
  suggesting	
  excellent	
  internal	
  consistency.	
  	
  	
  	
   3.10	
   Validity	
   3.10.1	
  	
  KASRP	
  (Ferrell	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2008)	
  	
   Since	
   its	
   development	
   in	
   1987,	
   researchers	
   have	
   extensively	
   tested	
   the	
  KASRP	
   on	
   nurses	
   and	
   other	
   health	
   professionals,	
   such	
   as	
   physiotherapists	
   and	
  physicians	
  (McCaffrey	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  1994;	
  Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Wilson,	
  2007;	
  Ferrell	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2008,	
  Wang	
  &	
  Tsai,	
  2010;	
  Lewthwaite,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Al-­‐Shear	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  The	
  instrument	
  has	
  been	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  pre-­‐test	
  and	
  post-­‐test	
  evaluation	
  for	
  educational	
  programs	
  and	
  pain	
  education	
  courses,	
  and	
  has	
  undergone	
  psychometric	
  testing.	
  	
  The	
  contents	
  in	
  the	
  KASRP	
  included	
  current	
  standards	
  of	
  pain	
  management	
  from	
  the	
  American	
  Pain	
  Society,	
  World	
  Health	
  Organization,	
  and	
  the	
  Agency	
  for	
  Health	
  Care	
  Policy	
  and	
  Research.	
  The	
  construct	
  validity	
  of	
  the	
  KASRP	
  was	
  confirmed	
  by	
  comparing	
  the	
  scores	
  of	
  nurses	
  with	
  various	
  levels	
  of	
  expertise,	
  student	
  nurses,	
  new	
  graduate	
  nurse,	
  oncology	
  nurses,	
  specialty	
  nurses,	
  and	
  senior	
  pain	
  experts.	
  A	
  higher	
  score	
  was	
  found	
  with	
  greater	
  nursing	
  expertise	
  (Ferrell	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2008).	
   	
   	
  	
   42	
   3.10.2	
  	
  CDMPQ	
  (Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003)	
  Based	
  on	
  literature	
  and	
  quality	
  improvement	
  data	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  consistently	
  shown	
  that	
  preconceived	
  notions	
  exist	
  towards	
  patients	
  in	
  nine	
  diagnosis	
  categories	
  and	
  towards	
  older	
  adults	
  (Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  Five	
  nursing	
  pain	
  management	
  experts	
  established	
  content	
  validity.	
  The	
  questionnaire	
  was	
  tested	
  on	
  157	
  new	
  graduates	
  and	
  experienced	
  nurses	
  working	
  in	
  medical-­‐surgical,	
  critical	
  care;	
  as	
  well	
  265	
  nursing	
  students	
  from	
  all	
  four	
  years	
  of	
  a	
  university	
  bachelor’s	
  nursing	
  program	
  were	
  included	
  (Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  Patients	
  with	
  the	
  following	
  diagnoses:	
  cancer,	
  substance	
  abuse,	
  attempted	
  suicide	
  and	
  older	
  adults	
  were	
  selected	
  for	
  the	
  CDMPQ	
  because	
  they	
  were	
  patients	
  generally	
  seen	
  on	
  the	
  units	
  and	
  evoked	
  preconceived	
  notions	
  (Brockopp,	
  Downey,	
  Powers	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  	
   3.11	
   Analysis	
  of	
  Research	
  Questions	
  The	
  following	
  section	
  describes	
  the	
  process	
  and	
  data	
  analysis	
  used	
  to	
  address	
  each	
  research	
  question.	
  The	
  demographics	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  were	
  also	
  analyzed	
  to	
  determine	
  frequency,	
  percentage,	
  mean,	
  and	
  standard	
  deviation	
  (Table	
  1).	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   43	
   3.11.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Research	
  Question	
  1:	
  What	
  is	
  the	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
   of	
  nurses	
  within	
  select	
  medical	
  units	
  in	
  an	
  acute	
  care	
  tertiary	
  hospital	
  in	
   Vancouver?	
  	
  This	
  research	
  question	
  required	
  descriptive	
  analysis	
  and	
  the	
  investigators	
  determined	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  best	
  addressed	
  using	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  The	
  mean,	
  standard	
  deviation	
  (SD),	
  range	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  were	
  analyzed.	
  The	
  frequency	
  and	
  percentage	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  analyze	
  the	
  distribution	
  of	
  the	
  data	
  among	
  the	
  nursing	
  characteristics.	
  The	
  distributions	
  of	
  scores	
  and	
  frequency	
  for	
  the	
  KASRP	
  are	
  displayed	
  in	
  Table	
  2.	
  Questions	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  were	
  evaluated	
  individually	
  to	
  determine	
  areas	
  of	
  strengths	
  or	
  gaps	
  in	
  knowledge.	
  This	
  has	
  been	
  presented	
  in	
  table	
  form	
  (Table	
  3)	
  in	
  order	
  of	
  the	
  least	
  correct	
  responses	
  to	
  the	
  most	
  correct	
  responses.	
  The	
  questions	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  older	
  patients	
  were	
  examined	
  to	
  determine	
  areas	
  for	
  improvement.	
  	
  	
   3.11.2	
  	
  Research	
  Question	
  2:	
  After	
  reading	
  a	
  written	
  description	
  of	
  patients	
  in	
  pain,	
  what	
  are	
  the	
  nurses’	
  assessment,	
  documentation,	
  and	
  intervention	
  surrounding	
  a	
  patient	
  in	
  pain?	
  This	
  question	
  was	
  analyzed	
  by	
  assessing	
  the	
  KASRP	
  case	
  studies	
  (McCaffrey	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  2008).	
  This	
  case	
  study	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
  nurse’s	
  assessment,	
  documentation	
  and	
  intervention	
  surrounding	
  two	
  very	
  similar	
  patients.	
  The	
  case	
  studies	
  portrayed	
  two	
  patients	
  who	
  described	
  their	
  pain	
  level	
  as	
  8	
  out	
  of	
  10	
  on	
  the	
  numerical	
  pain	
  scale,	
  however	
  one	
  patient	
  was	
  smiling	
  and	
  the	
  other	
  patient	
  was	
  grimacing.	
  The	
  physician	
  ordered	
  analgesia,	
  “morphine	
  IV	
  1-­‐3mg	
  q1hr	
  PRN	
  pain	
   	
   	
  	
   44	
   relief”	
  for	
  both	
  patients.	
  The	
  nurses	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  based	
  on	
  their	
  assessment,	
  document	
  the	
  patients’	
  pain	
  on	
  numerical	
  pain	
  scale	
  from	
  0	
  to	
  10,	
  and	
  determine	
  the	
  appropriate	
  pain	
  medication	
  intervention.	
  Overall,	
  the	
  data	
  analyzed	
  the	
  frequency	
  and	
  percentage	
  of	
  each	
  response,	
  displayed	
  in	
  table	
  format	
  (Table	
  5	
  and	
  Table	
  6).	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs	
  were	
  analyzed	
  separately	
  due	
  to	
  different	
  scope	
  of	
  practices	
  regarding	
  administering	
  IV	
  medications.	
  	
  	
   3.11.3	
  Research	
  Question	
  3:	
  What	
  are	
  the	
  factors	
  influencing	
  knowledge	
  level	
   and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain?	
  This	
  question	
  explored	
  the	
  impact	
  demographics	
  played	
  on	
  the	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  Age	
  and	
  education	
  of	
  nurses	
  were	
  analyzed	
  using	
  one-­‐way	
  between-­‐groups	
  analysis	
  of	
  variance	
  (ANOVA).	
  The	
  independent	
  sample	
  t-­‐test	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  analyze	
  gender,	
  professional	
  qualification	
  of	
  the	
  nurse,	
  and	
  attendance	
  at	
  various	
  types	
  of	
  pain	
  education.	
  Pearson’s	
  correlation	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  describe	
  the	
  strength	
  and	
  direction	
  of	
  the	
  relationship	
  between	
  years	
  of	
  clinical	
  experience	
  and	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  	
  	
   3.11.4	
  	
  Research	
  Question	
  4:	
  What	
  are	
  the	
  preconceived	
  notions	
  regarding	
  a	
   patient’s	
  diagnosis	
  or	
  age	
  that	
  influence	
  nurse’s	
  decision	
  making	
  regarding	
   the	
  management	
  of	
  pain?	
  This	
  question	
  was	
  descriptive	
  in	
  nature	
  and	
  was	
  analyzed	
  by	
  obtaining	
  the	
  mean,	
  range,	
  standard	
  deviation,	
  and	
  percentage	
  each	
  participant	
  chose	
  to	
  spend	
  the	
  most	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  managing	
  the	
  pain	
  of	
  a	
  certain	
  patient’s	
   	
   	
  	
   45	
   condition/disease.	
  The	
  information	
  is	
  displayed	
  in	
  Table	
  6	
  for	
  each	
  patient’s	
  condition,	
  and	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  a	
  nurse	
  would	
  choose	
  to	
  spend	
  managing	
  their	
  pain.	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  participants	
  who	
  would	
  expend	
  the	
  maximum	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  on	
  a	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  (5,	
  on	
  a	
  1-­‐5	
  scale)	
  are	
  displayed	
  in	
  Chart	
  1.	
  	
   3.12	
   Summary	
  	
   The	
  methodology	
  section	
  described	
  the	
  design	
  and	
  procedure	
  used	
  to	
  capture	
  the	
  medical	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain.	
  The	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  section	
  was	
  to	
  describe	
  the	
  study	
  site,	
  description	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  nurses,	
  and	
  how	
  recruitment	
  was	
  achieved.	
  The	
  data	
  procedure	
  and	
  protection	
  of	
  human	
  subjects	
  were	
  also	
  described.	
  The	
  following	
  chapter	
  will	
  describe	
  the	
  results	
  and	
  data	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  study.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   46	
   Chapter	
  4	
   Results	
   This	
  chapter	
  describes	
  the	
  demographics	
  of	
  the	
  participants,	
  response	
  rate,	
  and	
  the	
  results	
  of	
  the	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  questionnaire.	
  Results	
  will	
  be	
  presented	
  using	
  charts,	
  tables,	
  and	
  figures.	
  Analysis	
  to	
  determine	
  statistical	
  significance	
  of	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  scores	
  by	
  demographic	
  variables	
  will	
  also	
  be	
  presented.	
  	
  	
   4.1	
   Response	
  Rate	
  	
   A	
  total	
  of	
  145	
  pain	
  questionnaire	
  packages	
  were	
  delivered	
  across	
  the	
  five	
  medical	
  units,	
  and	
  83	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  returned,	
  a	
  response	
  rate	
  of	
  57%.	
  Of	
  the	
  returned	
  questionnaires,	
  eight	
  participants	
  failed	
  to	
  complete	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  or	
  had	
  left	
  pages	
  unanswered	
  (question	
  18	
  to	
  22	
  from	
  the	
  KASRP	
  and	
  the	
  CDMPQ)	
  and	
  therefore	
  were	
  withdrawn	
  from	
  the	
  study,	
  resulting	
  in	
  75	
  participants,	
  a	
  final	
  response	
  rate	
  of	
  52%.	
  Of	
  the	
  remaining	
  data	
  that	
  fit	
  the	
  criteria,	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  96%	
  (n	
  =	
  72)	
  completion	
  rate	
  for	
  the	
  KASRP	
  section	
  and	
  a	
  93%	
  (n	
  =	
  70)	
  completion	
  rate	
  for	
  the	
  CDMPQ	
  section.	
  Figure	
  1	
  outlines	
  the	
  recruitment	
  process	
  for	
  the	
  data	
  collection	
  and	
  the	
  response	
  rate.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   47	
   Figure	
  1	
   	
  	
  Flow	
  Diagram	
  of	
  Participant	
  Recruitment	
   	
   	
   Note:	
  CNL	
  =	
  clinical	
  nurse	
  leader	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   48	
   It	
  is	
  generally	
  recognized	
  that	
  obtaining	
  a	
  high	
  response	
  rate	
  with	
  nurses	
  is	
  challenging	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  limited	
  time	
  and	
  busy	
  shift	
  work	
  patterns.	
  In	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  postal	
  surveys	
  for	
  nurses,	
  Ford	
  and	
  Bammer	
  (2009)	
  found	
  the	
  primary	
  reasons	
  nurses	
  did	
  not	
  respond	
  were	
  lack	
  of	
  time	
  or	
  losing	
  the	
  questionnaire,	
  despite	
  the	
  intention	
  to	
  complete	
  it.	
  Other	
  reasons	
  for	
  non-­‐response	
  by	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  were	
  perceived	
  lack	
  of	
  relevance	
  to	
  their	
  practice	
  (Edwards	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002),	
  the	
  time	
  required	
  to	
  complete	
  the	
  questionnaire,	
  and	
  concern	
  about	
  question	
  bias	
  (Murphy,	
  1993).	
  Similar	
  questionnaires	
  using	
  the	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  had	
  response	
  rates	
  of	
  24.9%	
  (Hornbury	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005),	
  43%	
  (Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  and	
  51%	
  (Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995).	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  nursing	
  research	
  over	
  the	
  past	
  decade	
  found	
  a	
  response	
  rate	
  of	
  60%	
  to	
  be	
  desirable	
  across	
  all	
  methodologies	
  (Badger	
  &	
  Werrett,	
  2005)	
  and	
  response	
  rates	
  lower	
  than	
  65%	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  norm	
  (Polit	
  &	
  Beck,	
  2008),	
  therefore	
  in	
  this	
  research	
  study,	
  a	
  response	
  rate	
  of	
  57%	
  can	
  be	
  considered	
  adequate.	
   	
   4.2	
   Demographic	
  Profile	
  of	
  Nurses	
  (see	
  Table	
  1)	
  	
   Out	
  of	
  the	
  75	
  participants,	
  54	
  (72%)	
  were	
  RNs	
  and	
  21	
  (28%)	
  were	
  LPNs,	
  this	
  accurately	
  reflected	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  wards,	
  as	
  the	
  ratio	
  of	
  RNs	
  to	
  LPNs	
  is	
  4:1.	
  Among	
  the	
  respondents,	
  there	
  were	
  62	
  females	
  (82.7%)	
  and	
  13	
  (17.3%)	
  males.	
  There	
  were	
  45.3%	
  (n	
  =	
  34)	
  of	
  nurses	
  between	
  the	
  ages	
  of	
  20	
  to	
  29,	
  32%	
  	
  (n	
  =	
  24)	
  between	
  the	
  ages	
  of	
  30-­‐39,	
  18.7%	
  (n	
  =	
  14)	
  between	
  the	
  ages	
  of	
  40	
  to	
  49	
  years,	
  and	
  4%	
  (n	
  =	
  3)	
  between	
  the	
  ages	
  of	
  50-­‐59	
  years	
  old.	
  The	
  mean	
  number	
  of	
  years	
  of	
  professional	
  experience	
  as	
  a	
  nurse	
  was	
  5.15	
  years	
  (M	
  =	
  3;	
  SD	
  =	
  5.7).	
  	
  The	
   	
   	
  	
   49	
   years	
  of	
  experience	
  ranged	
  from	
  new	
  graduate	
  to	
  23	
  years.	
  About	
  one-­‐third	
  (32.4%)	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  had	
  a	
  year	
  or	
  less	
  of	
  clinical	
  experience	
  and	
  more	
  than	
  half	
  (54.1	
  %)	
  of	
  the	
  sample	
  had	
  three	
  or	
  less	
  of	
  years	
  experience.	
  Fifty-­‐two	
  nurses	
  (69.3%)	
  had	
  a	
  bachelor’s	
  degree,	
  21	
  had	
  a	
  diploma	
  (28%),	
  and	
  two	
  (2.7%)	
  had	
  a	
  doctorate.	
  There	
  were	
  48	
  (88.9%)	
  RNs	
  with	
  a	
  bachelor’s	
  degree,	
  5	
  (9.3%)	
  had	
  a	
  diploma,	
  and	
  1	
  (1.9%)	
  had	
  a	
  doctorate.	
  	
  There	
  were	
  16	
  (76.2%)	
  of	
  LPNs	
  with	
  diplomas,	
  4	
  (19%)	
  had	
  a	
  bachelor’s	
  degree,	
  and	
  1	
  (4.8%)	
  had	
  a	
  doctorate.	
  	
  	
   About	
  66.7%	
  (n	
  =	
  50)	
  of	
  nurses	
  had	
  attended	
  a	
  conference,	
  in-­‐hospital	
  training	
  or	
  workshop	
  in	
  pain	
  management	
  since	
  completing	
  their	
  nursing	
  programs.	
  During	
  a	
  typical	
  work	
  week	
  about	
  half	
  (50.7%)	
  of	
  nurses	
  “always”	
  worked	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
  pain,	
  while	
  40%	
  (n	
  =	
  30)	
  of	
  nurses	
  “often”	
  (more	
  than	
  2	
  patients)	
  worked	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
  pain.	
  Only	
  one	
  person	
  (1.3%)	
  did	
  not	
  work	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
  pain,	
  and	
  four	
  (6.7%)	
  stated	
  they	
  “occasionally”	
  worked	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
  pain.	
  Table	
  1	
  illustrates	
  the	
  characteristics	
  of	
  the	
  sample,	
  attendance	
  of	
  various	
  educational	
  courses	
  in	
  pain,	
  and	
  frequency	
  of	
  caring	
  for	
  patients	
  in	
  pain.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   50	
   Table	
  1	
  	
   	
   Demographic	
  Profile	
  of	
  Nurses	
   	
  	
  Characteristics	
  (n	
  =	
  75)	
  	
   	
  Frequency	
   	
  Percentage	
  (%)	
   	
  Mean	
  (SD)	
  	
  Years	
  of	
  professional	
  experience	
  as	
  a	
  nurse	
  	
   	
  5.15	
  (5.71)	
  Age	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  20-­‐29	
  years	
  old	
  	
  	
  	
  30-­‐39	
  years	
  old	
  	
  	
  	
  40-­‐49	
  years	
  old	
  	
  	
  	
  50-­‐59	
  years	
  old	
   34	
  24	
  14	
  3	
   45.3	
  32	
  18.7	
  4	
   	
  	
   Gender	
  	
  	
  	
  Female	
  	
  	
  	
  Male	
   62	
  13	
   82.7	
  17.3	
   	
  Professional	
  qualification	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Registered	
  Nurse	
  	
  	
  	
  Licensed	
  Practical	
  Nurse	
   54	
  21	
   72	
  28	
   	
  Educational	
  Level	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  Diploma	
  	
  	
  	
  Bachelor’s	
  degree	
  	
  	
  	
  Master’s	
  degree	
  	
  	
  	
  Doctorate	
  	
   21	
  52	
  0	
  2	
   28	
  69.3	
  0	
  2.7	
   	
   Attendance	
  at	
  any	
  course	
  in	
  pain	
  management	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  No	
  	
  	
  	
  Yes	
   25	
  50	
   33.3	
  66.7	
   	
  Frequency	
  of	
  caring	
  for	
  patients	
  in	
  pain	
  	
  	
  	
  Never	
  	
  	
  	
  Occasionally	
  (1-­‐2	
  patients)	
  	
  	
  	
  Often	
  (3	
  patients)	
  	
  	
  	
  Always	
  (>	
  3	
  patients)	
   1	
  5	
  30	
  38	
  	
   1.3	
  6.7	
  40	
  50.7	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   51	
   	
   4.3	
   Research	
  Question	
  1:	
  What	
  are	
  the	
  medical	
  nurses’	
   knowledge	
  levels	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
   older	
  adults?	
  The	
  tool	
  used	
  to	
  address	
  this	
  question	
  was	
  the	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  (McCaffrey	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  2008).	
  On	
  average,	
  nurses	
  scored	
  69.04%,	
  the	
  median	
  was	
  69.73%	
  and	
  the	
  standard	
  deviation	
  was	
  11.61.	
  The	
  scores	
  ranged	
  from	
  34.21%	
  to	
  94.74%.	
  The	
  distribution	
  of	
  scores	
  for	
  the	
  KASRP	
  is	
  illustrated	
  in	
  Table	
  2.	
  The	
  largest	
  frequency	
  of	
  participants	
  (n	
  =	
  26,	
  36%)	
  scored	
  between	
  70-­‐79%.	
  	
  	
   Table	
  2	
   Distributions	
  of	
  Scores	
  for	
  the	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Questionnaire	
  	
   Regarding	
  Pain	
  Percent	
  Correct	
   N	
  (%)	
  80-­‐100	
   10	
  (14)	
  70-­‐79	
   26	
  (36)	
  60-­‐69	
   19	
  (26)	
  50-­‐59	
   15	
  (21)	
  Below	
  50	
   2	
  (3)	
   Note:	
  N	
  =	
  72	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   52	
   The	
  ranking	
  of	
  the	
  least-­‐correctly	
  to	
  most-­‐correctly	
  answered	
  questions	
  of	
  the	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  are	
  presented	
  in	
  Table	
  3.	
  The	
  questions	
  were	
  examined	
  individually	
  and	
  those	
  related	
  to	
  older	
  adults	
  were	
  further	
  evaluated;	
  these	
  include	
  pharmacology;	
  cancer	
  related	
  pain;	
  and	
  addiction,	
  withdrawal,	
  and	
  substance	
  abuse.	
  	
  	
   Table	
  3	
   	
   Ranking	
  of	
  Questions	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  from	
  Least-­‐Correctly	
  to	
  Most-­‐Correctly	
  Answered	
  	
  Rank	
   	
  N	
   	
  Question	
  Number	
   	
  Question	
  	
   	
  N	
  	
  Correct	
  (%)	
  	
  	
  1	
   	
  68	
   	
  28	
   	
  The	
  likelihood	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  developing	
  clinically	
  significant	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  in	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  new	
  comorbidity	
   	
  11.8	
  	
  2	
   71	
  	
   23	
  	
   The	
  recommended	
  route	
  of	
  administration	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesics	
  for	
  patients	
  with	
  persistent	
  cancer-­‐related	
  pain	
   23.9	
  3	
   70	
   18	
   Oxycodone	
  5	
  mg	
  +	
  acetaminophen	
  325	
  mg	
  PO	
  is	
  approximately	
  equal	
  to	
  10	
  mg	
  of	
  morphine	
  PO	
   	
   34.3	
  4	
   72	
   36	
   The	
  manifestation	
  of	
  the	
  abrupt	
  discontinuation	
  of	
  an	
  opioid,	
  physical	
  dependence	
  	
   34.7	
  5	
   72	
   5	
   Aspirin	
  and	
  other	
  NSAIDS	
  are	
  not	
  effective	
  analgesics	
  for	
  painful	
  bone	
  metastases	
   38.9	
  6	
   71	
   33	
   How	
  likely	
  is	
  it	
  that	
  patients	
  who	
  develop	
  pain	
  already	
  have	
  an	
  alcohol	
  and	
  or	
  drug	
  abuse	
  problem	
   39.4	
  7	
   71	
   37A	
   The	
  action	
  a	
  nurse	
  would	
  take	
  for	
  patient	
  in	
  relaxed	
  manner	
  and	
  reports	
  pain	
  of	
  8.	
   42.3	
  8	
   63	
  	
   9	
   Promethazine	
  (Phenergan)	
  and	
  hydroxyzine	
  (Atarax)	
  are	
  reliable	
  potentiators	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesics.	
   	
   44.4	
  9	
   72	
   35	
   The	
  time	
  to	
  peak	
  effect	
  for	
  morphine	
  given	
  orally	
  	
   52.3	
  10	
   71	
   21	
   Benzodiazepines	
  are	
  not	
  effective	
  pain	
  relievers	
  unless	
  the	
  pain	
  is	
  due	
  to	
  muscle	
  spasms	
   53.5	
  11	
   69	
   38B	
   The	
  action	
  a	
  nurse	
  would	
  take	
  for	
  patient	
  in	
  distress	
  and	
  reports	
  pain	
  of	
  8	
   53.6	
  12	
   72	
   6	
   Respiratory	
  depression	
  rarely	
  occurs	
  in	
  patients	
  who	
  have	
  been	
  receiving	
  stable	
  doses	
  of	
  opioids	
  over	
  a	
  period	
  of	
  months	
  	
   54.2	
   	
   	
  	
   53	
   	
  Rank	
   	
  N	
   	
  Question	
  Number	
  	
   	
  Question	
   	
  N	
  Correct	
  (%)	
  	
  	
  13	
   	
  66	
   	
  26	
   	
  Equivalence	
  of	
  30mg	
  oral	
  morphine	
  given	
  every	
  q	
  4	
  hours	
   	
  57.6	
  14	
   69	
   11	
   Morphine	
  has	
  a	
  dose	
  ceiling	
   59.4	
  15	
   72	
   19	
   If	
  the	
  source	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  is	
  unknown,	
  opioids	
  should	
  not	
  be	
  used	
  during	
  the	
  pain	
  evaluation	
  period	
  as	
  this	
  could	
  mask	
  the	
  correct	
  diagnosis	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
   62.5	
  16	
   70	
   30	
   Which	
  medication	
  is	
  useful	
  in	
  the	
  treatment	
  of	
  cancer	
  pain	
   62.3	
  17	
   71	
   8	
   The	
  usual	
  duration	
  of	
  analgesia	
  of	
  1-­‐2mg	
  of	
  morphine	
  IV	
  is	
  4-­‐5	
  hours.	
   64.8	
  18	
   71	
   4	
   Patient’s	
  may	
  sleep	
  in	
  spite	
  of	
  severe	
  pain	
  	
   71.8	
  19	
   72	
   24	
   The	
  recommended	
  route	
  administration	
  of	
  opioids	
  analgesic	
  for	
  patient’s	
  with	
  brief,	
  severe,	
  pain	
  of	
  sudden	
  onset	
  such	
  as	
  trauma	
  or	
  postoperative	
  pain	
  	
   72.2	
  20	
   74	
   34	
   The	
  time	
  to	
  peak	
  effect	
  for	
  morphine	
  given	
  IV	
   74.7	
  21	
   72	
   1	
   Vital	
  signs	
  are	
  always	
  reliable	
  indicators	
  of	
  the	
  intensity	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
   76.4	
  	
  22	
   70	
   25	
  	
   The	
  drug	
  of	
  choice	
  for	
  the	
  treatment	
  of	
  prolonged	
  moderate	
  to	
  severe	
  pain	
  for	
  cancer	
  patients	
   75.1	
  23	
   72	
   2	
   Patient’s	
  who	
  can	
  be	
  distracted	
  from	
  pain	
  usually	
  do	
  not	
  have	
  severe	
  pain	
   86.1	
  24	
   71	
   37	
   Rate	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  with	
  relaxed	
  state	
  on	
  pain	
  scale	
   87.3	
  25	
   72	
   20	
   Anticonvulsants	
  such	
  as	
  gabapentin	
  produce	
  optimal	
  pain	
  relief	
  after	
  a	
  single	
  dose	
   88.9	
  	
  26	
  	
   72	
  	
   32	
  	
   The	
  best	
  approach	
  for	
  cultural	
  consideration	
  in	
  caring	
  for	
  patient’s	
  in	
  pain	
  	
   88.9	
  	
  27	
  	
   72	
  	
   17	
  	
   Giving	
  a	
  patient	
  sterile	
  water	
  by	
  injection	
  (placebo)	
  is	
  useful	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  pain	
  is	
  real	
   90.3	
  	
  28	
  	
   71	
  	
   38	
  	
   The	
  action	
  a	
  nurse	
  would	
  take	
  for	
  patient	
  in	
  lying	
  in	
  bed	
  quietly,	
  grimacing	
  and	
  rates	
  pain	
  as	
  8	
   91.6	
  	
  29	
  	
   72	
  	
   7	
  	
   Combining	
  analgesia	
  that	
  work	
  by	
  different	
  mechanism	
  may	
  results	
  in	
  pain	
  better	
  control	
  with	
  fewer	
  side	
  effects	
   93.1	
  	
  30	
  	
   72	
  	
   16	
  	
   After	
  initial	
  dose	
  of	
  opioid,	
  subsequent	
  doses	
  should	
  be	
  adjusted	
  	
   94.4	
  	
  31	
   71	
   22	
   Narcotic/opioids	
  addiction	
  characteristics	
   94.4	
  32	
  	
   72	
  	
   27	
  	
   When	
  should	
  analgesic	
  for	
  post-­‐operative	
  pain	
  by	
  initially	
  given	
   94.4	
  	
  33	
   70	
   31	
   The	
  most	
  accurate	
  judge	
  of	
  the	
  intensity	
  of	
  a	
  patients	
  pain	
   97.1	
  34	
   72	
   29	
   The	
  most	
  likely	
  reason	
  a	
  patient	
  with	
  pain	
  would	
  request	
  increased	
  doses	
  of	
  pain	
  medication	
   97.2	
  35	
   72	
   12	
   Elderly	
  patients	
  cannot	
  tolerate	
  opioids	
  for	
  pain	
  relief	
   97.2	
  36	
   72	
   15	
   A	
  patient’s	
  spiritual	
  belief	
  on	
  pain	
   97.2	
   	
   	
  	
   54	
   	
  	
  Rank	
   	
  N	
   	
  Question	
  Number	
   	
  Question	
   	
  N	
  Correct	
  (%)	
  	
  	
  37	
  	
   	
  71	
  	
   	
  13	
  	
   	
  Patients	
  should	
  be	
  encouraged	
  to	
  endure	
  as	
  much	
  pain	
  as	
  possible	
   	
  98.6	
  	
  38	
  	
   72	
  	
   10	
  	
   Opioids	
  should	
  not	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  patients	
  with	
  a	
  history	
  of	
  substance	
  abuse	
   98.6	
  	
   Note:	
  KASRP	
  =	
  Nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  survey	
  regarding	
  pain;	
  N	
  =	
  number	
  and	
  percentage	
  of	
  correct	
  answers.	
  	
  Items	
  1-­‐22,	
  true	
  or	
  false;	
  item	
  23-­‐36,	
  multiple	
  choice;	
  item	
  37-­‐38,	
  case	
  scenario.	
  	
  	
   4.3.1	
   Older	
  Adults	
  on	
  the	
  Medical	
  Unit	
  	
   	
   A	
  majority	
  of	
  nurses	
  (97.2%)	
  recognized	
  that	
  older	
  patients	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  tolerate	
  opioids	
  for	
  pain	
  relief.	
  Other	
  questions	
  related	
  to	
  older	
  adults	
  found	
  97.1%	
  of	
  nurses	
  recognized	
  that	
  patients	
  are	
  the	
  most	
  accurate	
  judge	
  of	
  their	
  own	
  pain	
  intensity	
  (Q	
  31),	
  and	
  97.2%	
  of	
  nurses	
  recognized	
  a	
  patient	
  with	
  pain	
  would	
  request	
  increased	
  doses	
  of	
  pain	
  medication	
  because	
  they	
  are	
  experiencing	
  increased	
  pain,	
  and	
  not	
  because	
  of	
  requesting	
  increased	
  attention,	
  anxiety,	
  or	
  depression	
  (Q	
  29).	
  There	
  were	
  71.8%	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  acknowledged	
  that	
  patients	
  may	
  sleep	
  in	
  spite	
  of	
  severe	
  pain	
  (Q	
  4)	
  and	
  76.4%	
  of	
  nurses	
  were	
  aware	
  that	
  vital	
  signs	
  are	
  not	
  always	
  reliable	
  indicators	
  of	
  the	
  intensity	
  of	
  a	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  (Q	
  1).	
  	
  	
   4.3.2	
   Pharmacology	
  The	
  least	
  correctly	
  answered	
  questions	
  were	
  related	
  to	
  pharmacology	
  and	
  their	
  side	
  effects.	
  For	
  example,	
  the	
  question	
  regarding	
  the	
  likelihood	
  of	
  a	
  patient	
  developing	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  in	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  new	
  comorbidity	
  was	
  the	
  worst	
   	
   	
  	
   55	
   answered	
  question	
  (Q	
  28),	
  at	
  only	
  11.8%	
  (n	
  =	
  8).	
  Just	
  under	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  sampled	
  (45.6%)	
  thought	
  the	
  rate	
  of	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  was	
  1-­‐10%,	
  however	
  the	
  correct	
  answer	
  was	
  that	
  the	
  chance	
  of	
  developing	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  is	
  less	
  than	
  1%.	
  Over	
  half	
  (54.2%)	
  of	
  nurses	
  felt	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  rarely	
  occurs	
  in	
  patients	
  who	
  have	
  been	
  receiving	
  stable	
  doses	
  of	
  opioids	
  over	
  a	
  period	
  of	
  months	
  (Q	
  6).	
  There	
  were	
  40.7%	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  were	
  unaware	
  that	
  morphine	
  does	
  not	
  have	
  a	
  ceiling	
  dose	
  (Q	
  11)	
  and	
  65.7%	
  of	
  nurses	
  did	
  not	
  know	
  the	
  equal	
  analgesia	
  conversion	
  of	
  oxycodone	
  and	
  acetaminophen	
  to	
  morphine	
  (Q	
  18).	
  There	
  were	
  62.5%	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  would	
  use	
  opioids	
  for	
  pain,	
  if	
  the	
  source	
  of	
  the	
  patients’	
  pain	
  were	
  unknown	
  (Q	
  19).	
  The	
  remaining	
  nurses	
  thought	
  using	
  opioids	
  would	
  mask	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
  correctly	
  diagnosis	
  the	
  cause	
  of	
  pain.	
  	
   4.3.3	
   Cancer	
  Related	
  Pain	
  There	
  were	
  five	
  questions	
  (Q	
  5,	
  Q	
  23,	
  Q25,	
  Q28,	
  Q30)	
  related	
  to	
  cancer-­‐associated	
  pain	
  that	
  were	
  poorly	
  answered.	
  Although	
  these	
  questions	
  were	
  specific	
  to	
  cancer	
  pain,	
  older	
  adults	
  are	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  have	
  co-­‐morbidities,	
  such	
  as	
  cancer,	
  than	
  younger	
  patients	
  (Moulin,	
  2008).	
  There	
  were	
  43.7%	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  thought	
  that	
  the	
  subcutaneous	
  route	
  was	
  the	
  recommended	
  route	
  of	
  administrating	
  opioids	
  for	
  patients	
  with	
  persistent	
  cancer	
  related	
  pain	
  (Q	
  23).	
  The	
  correct	
  answer	
  is	
  the	
  oral	
  route;	
  only	
  23.9%	
  of	
  nurses	
  answered	
  this	
  question	
  correctly.	
  There	
  were	
  38.9%	
  of	
  participants	
  who	
  thought	
  Aspirin	
  and	
  other	
  NSAIDs	
  were	
  effective	
  for	
  painful	
  bone	
  metastases	
  (Q	
  5)	
  and	
  62.3%	
  were	
  aware	
  of	
  medications	
  that	
  were	
  useful	
  in	
  the	
  treatment	
  of	
  cancer	
  pain	
  (Q	
  30).	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   56	
   	
   4.3.4	
   Addiction,	
  Withdrawal,	
  and	
  Substance	
  Abuse	
  	
  	
   There	
  were	
  inconsistencies	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  area	
  of	
  addiction,	
  withdrawal,	
  and	
  substance	
  abuse	
  gathered	
  from	
  the	
  study.	
  For	
  example,	
  just	
  34.7%	
  of	
  nurses	
  were	
  aware	
  sweating,	
  yawning,	
  diarrhea,	
  and	
  agitation	
  from	
  abrupt	
  discontinuation	
  of	
  opioids	
  were	
  side	
  effects,	
  whereas	
  a	
  larger	
  percentage	
  (54.2%)	
  incorrectly	
  thought	
  impaired	
  control	
  over	
  drug	
  use;	
  compulsive	
  use;	
  and	
  craving	
  were	
  also	
  characteristics	
  of	
  abrupt	
  discontinuation	
  of	
  an	
  opioid	
  (Q	
  36).	
  However,	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  top	
  correctly	
  answered	
  questions	
  were	
  also	
  related	
  to	
  opioid	
  addition.	
  There	
  were	
  94.4%	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  knew	
  the	
  signs	
  and	
  symptoms	
  of	
  opioid	
  addiction	
  (Q22)	
  and	
  98.6%	
  realized	
  opioids	
  could	
  be	
  safely	
  used	
  in	
  patients	
  with	
  a	
  history	
  with	
  substance	
  abuse	
  (Q10).	
  There	
  were	
  39.4%	
  of	
  nurses’	
  who	
  recognized	
  that	
  5-­‐15%	
  of	
  patients	
  who	
  develop	
  pain	
  already	
  have	
  an	
  alcohol	
  or	
  drug	
  abuse	
  problem	
  (Q	
  33).	
  There	
  were	
  23%	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  thought	
  the	
  rate	
  was	
  higher	
  at	
  25-­‐50%,	
  which	
  may	
  be	
  explained	
  by	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  the	
  hospital,	
  which	
  is	
  further	
  discussed	
  in	
  Chapter	
  Five.	
  	
   4.4	
   Research	
  Question	
  2:	
  After	
  reading	
  a	
  written	
  description	
  of	
   patients	
  in	
  pain,	
  what	
  are	
  the	
  nurses’	
  assessment,	
  documentation,	
   and	
  intervention	
  surrounding	
  a	
  patient	
  in	
  pain?	
  The	
  case	
  studies	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  explored	
  the	
  participant’s	
  assessment,	
  documentation,	
  and	
  intervention.	
  Patient	
  A	
  and	
  B	
  are	
  both	
  males	
  who	
  underwent	
  abdominal	
  surgery.	
  On	
  their	
  first	
  day	
  following	
  surgery,	
  both	
  patients	
  rate	
  their	
  pain	
   	
   	
  	
   57	
   as	
  8	
  out	
  of	
  10	
  and	
  vital	
  signs	
  are	
  identical	
  for	
  both	
  patients.	
  However,	
  Patient	
  A	
  is	
  joking	
  with	
  a	
  visitor	
  and	
  Patient	
  B	
  is	
  lying	
  in	
  bed	
  grimacing.	
  	
  Overall,	
  there	
  were	
  87.3%	
  (n	
  =	
  62)	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  would	
  document	
  Patient	
  A’s	
  pain	
  as	
  8,	
  while	
  11.3%	
  (n	
  =	
  8)	
  of	
  nurses	
  documented	
  his	
  pain	
  less	
  than	
  8	
  	
  (Table	
  3	
  -­‐	
  Q	
  37).	
  There	
  were	
  91.5%	
  (n	
  =	
  65)	
  of	
  nurses	
  who	
  documented	
  Patient	
  B’s	
  pain	
  as	
  an	
  8,	
  and	
  5.6%	
  (n	
  =	
  4)	
  rated	
  it	
  less	
  than	
  8	
  (Table	
  3	
  -­‐	
  Q	
  38).	
  	
  	
   Table	
  4	
   	
   Nursing	
  Assessment	
  of	
  Pain	
  for	
  Patient	
  A	
  and	
  Patient	
  B	
  Professional	
  Qualification	
  of	
  Nurse	
   Documentation	
   Patient	
  A	
  N	
  (%)	
   Patient	
  B	
  N	
  (%)	
  RN	
   8	
   47	
  (92.2)	
   48	
  (94.1)	
   LPN	
   8	
   15	
  (71.4)	
   17	
  (85)	
   	
  Although	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  nurses	
  would	
  document	
  both	
  patients’	
  pain	
  as	
  8,	
  nurses	
  still	
  had	
  a	
  tendency	
  to	
  rank	
  their	
  pain	
  lower	
  than	
  8.	
  However,	
  Patient	
  B,	
  the	
  grimacing	
  patient,	
  received	
  a	
  pain	
  assessment	
  of	
  8	
  more	
  frequently	
  than	
  patient	
  A,	
  the	
  smiling	
  patient.	
  In	
  addition,	
  LPNs	
  under	
  documented	
  the	
  pain	
  of	
  patients	
  more	
  frequently	
  than	
  RNs.	
  The	
  nurse’s	
  assessment	
  is	
  made	
  two	
  hours	
  after	
  both	
  patients	
  received	
  2mg	
  of	
  morphine.	
  Both	
  patients	
  are	
  still	
  complaining	
  of	
  pain	
  ranging	
  from	
  6	
  to	
  8	
  out	
  of	
  10,	
  and	
  identified	
  a	
  level	
  of	
  2	
  out	
  of	
  10	
  as	
  an	
  acceptable	
  level	
  of	
  pain.	
  Both	
  patients	
   	
   	
  	
   58	
   have	
  no	
  clinically	
  significant	
  respiratory	
  depression,	
  sedation,	
  or	
  other	
  untoward	
  side	
  effects.	
  The	
  physician’s	
  order	
  for	
  analgesia	
  is	
  “morphine	
  IV	
  1-­‐3mg	
  q1h	
  PRN	
  pain	
  relief.”	
  Below,	
  table	
  5	
  illustrates	
  the	
  nursing	
  intervention	
  for	
  patients	
  A	
  and	
  B.	
  	
   Table	
  5	
   	
   Nursing	
  Intervention	
  for	
  Patient	
  A	
  and	
  Patient	
  B	
  Professional	
  Qualification	
  of	
  Nurse	
   Action	
  Taken	
   Patient	
  A	
  N	
  (%)	
   Patient	
  B	
  N	
  (%)	
  RN	
   No	
  morphine	
   7	
  (13.7)	
   4	
  (7.8)	
  	
   1mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
   11	
  (21.6)	
   7	
  (13.7)	
  	
   2mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
   9	
  (17.6)	
   7	
  (13.7)	
  	
   3mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
   24	
  (47.1)	
   33	
  (64.7)	
  LPN	
   No	
  morphine	
   7	
  (33.3)	
   4	
  (22.2)	
  	
   1mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
   7	
  (33.3)	
   5	
  (27.8)	
  	
   2mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
   0	
  (0)	
   5	
  (27.8)	
  	
   3mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
   6	
  (28.6)	
   4	
  (22.2)	
  	
  Table	
  5	
  indicates	
  that	
  for	
  patient	
  B,	
  47.1%	
  of	
  RNs	
  would	
  administer	
  the	
  maximum	
  3mg	
  IV	
  morphine,	
  and	
  64.7%	
  of	
  RNs	
  would	
  administer	
  3mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
  for	
  patient	
  B.	
  A	
  third	
  of	
  LPNs	
  would	
  not	
  provide	
  medication	
  and	
  another	
  third	
  would	
  administer	
  1mg	
  IV	
  morphine	
  for	
  patient	
  A.	
  For	
  patient	
  B,	
  27.8%	
  of	
  LPNs	
  would	
  give	
  1mg	
  IV	
  morphine,	
  and	
  another	
  27.8%	
  of	
  LPNs	
  would	
  administer	
  2mg	
  IV	
  of	
   	
   	
  	
   59	
   morphine.	
  The	
  different	
  scope	
  of	
  practice	
  between	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs	
  will	
  be	
  further	
  discussed	
  in	
  the	
  next	
  chapter.	
  	
  	
   4.5	
   Research	
  Question	
  3:	
  What	
  are	
  the	
  factors	
  influencing	
  nurses’	
   knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain?	
  This	
  research	
  question	
  used	
  the	
  demographic	
  profile	
  and	
  the	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  to	
  address	
  the	
  factors	
  that	
  may	
  influence	
  the	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
  that	
  affect	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
  	
   4.5.1	
   Gender	
  	
  There	
  were	
  far	
  fewer	
  males	
  (17.3%)	
  than	
  females	
  (82.7%)	
  in	
  the	
  sample	
  study.	
  An	
  independent	
  sample	
  t-­‐test	
  was	
  conducted	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  KASRP	
  scores	
  for	
  males	
  and	
  females.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  significant	
  difference	
  in	
  scores	
  for	
  males	
  (M	
  =	
  73.48;	
  SD	
  =	
  9.87)	
  and	
  females,	
  (M	
  =	
  68.06;	
  SD	
  =	
  11.80);	
  t	
  (73)	
  =	
  -­‐1.54,	
  p	
  =	
  .129	
  (two-­‐tailed).	
  The	
  magnitude	
  of	
  the	
  differences	
  in	
  the	
  means	
  (mean	
  difference	
  =	
  -­‐5.41,	
  95%	
  CI:	
  -­‐12.44	
  to	
  1.61)	
  was	
  moderate	
  (η2	
  =	
  0.03).	
  	
   4.5.2	
   Age	
  Distribution	
  The	
  findings	
  revealed	
  nurses	
  aged	
  50-­‐59	
  years	
  (n	
  =	
  3)	
  scored	
  the	
  highest	
  with	
  71.92%,	
  followed	
  by	
  the	
  40-­‐49	
  year	
  age	
  group	
  (n	
  =	
  14)	
  at	
  69.36%.	
  The	
  30-­‐39	
  year	
  age	
  group	
  (n=	
  24)	
  scored	
  68.19%,	
  and	
  finally,	
  the	
  20-­‐29	
  year	
  age	
  group	
  (n=	
  34)	
  scored	
  67.26%.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   60	
   A	
  one-­‐way	
  between	
  groups	
  analysis	
  of	
  variance	
  (ANOVA)	
  was	
  conducted	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  impact	
  of	
  age	
  on	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitude	
  level	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management,	
  as	
  measured	
  by	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  Participants	
  were	
  divided	
  into	
  four	
  groups	
  according	
  to	
  their	
  age	
  (Group	
  1:	
  20-­‐29	
  years;	
  Group	
  2:	
  30-­‐39	
  years:	
  Group	
  3:	
  40-­‐49	
  years;	
  Group	
  4:	
  50-­‐59	
  years).	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  statistically	
  significant	
  difference	
  at	
  the	
   p	
  <	
  0.05	
  level	
  in	
  the	
  KASRP	
  score	
  for	
  the	
  four	
  age	
  groups:	
  F	
  (3,	
  68)	
  =	
  0.143,	
  p	
  =	
  0.943.	
  The	
  effect	
  size	
  was	
  small	
  (η2	
  =	
  0.01)	
  and	
  was	
  calculated	
  using	
  eta	
  squared.	
  	
   4.5.3	
   Professional	
  Qualification	
  	
   An	
  independent	
  sample	
  t-­‐test	
  was	
  conducted	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  KASRP	
  scores	
  for	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs.	
  The	
  knowledge	
  levels	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  RNs	
  were	
  higher	
  than	
  LPNs.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  statistically	
  significant	
  difference	
  in	
  scores	
  for	
  RNs	
  (M	
  =	
  72.50),	
   SD	
  =	
  10.33)	
  and	
  LPNs,	
  (M	
  =	
  60.65,	
  SD	
  =	
  10.34);	
  t	
  (37.29)	
  =	
  4.42,	
  p	
  =	
  .00	
  (two-­‐tailed).	
  The	
  magnitude	
  of	
  the	
  differences	
  in	
  the	
  means	
  (mean	
  difference	
  =	
  11.85,	
  95%	
  CI:	
  6.42	
  to	
  17.28)	
  was	
  very	
  large	
  (η2=	
  0.23).	
  	
   4.5.4	
   Educational	
  Level	
  	
   An	
  ANOVA	
  was	
  conducted	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  impact	
  of	
  education	
  on	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitude	
  scores	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management,	
  as	
  measured	
  by	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  Nurses	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  record	
  their	
  highest	
  level	
  of	
  education	
  (diploma,	
  bachelor’s	
  degree,	
  master’s	
  degree,	
  and	
  doctorate).	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  statistically	
  significant	
  difference	
  at	
  the	
  p	
  <	
  0.05	
  level	
  in	
  KASRP	
  scores	
  for	
  the	
  four	
  educational	
  levels:	
  F	
  (2,	
  69)	
  =	
  7.71,	
  p	
  =	
  0.001.	
  The	
  actual	
  differences	
  in	
  mean	
  scores	
  between	
  the	
  groups	
  were	
  quite	
  large.	
   	
   	
  	
   61	
   The	
  effect	
  size,	
  calculated	
  using	
  eta	
  squared,	
  was	
  0.18.	
  Post-­‐hoc	
  comparisons	
  using	
  the	
  Tukey	
  HSD	
  test	
  indicated	
  that	
  the	
  mean	
  score	
  for	
  diploma	
  prepared	
  nurses	
  (M	
  =	
  61.40,	
  SD	
  =	
  11.08)	
  was	
  significantly	
  different	
  for	
  the	
  bachelors	
  prepared	
  nurses	
  (M	
  =	
  72.07,	
  SD	
  =	
  10.56).	
  Nurses	
  with	
  doctorates	
  did	
  not	
  differ	
  significantly	
  from	
  either	
  the	
  diploma	
  or	
  bachelor	
  prepared	
  nurses.	
  No	
  masters’	
  degree	
  prepared	
  nurses	
  participated	
  in	
  the	
  study.	
  This	
  will	
  be	
  further	
  discussed	
  in	
  the	
  next	
  chapter.	
  	
   	
   4.5.5	
   Years	
  of	
  Professional	
  Nursing	
  Experience	
  	
   	
   The	
  relationship	
  between	
  years	
  of	
  professional	
  experience	
  and	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  was	
  investigated	
  using	
  Pearson	
  correlation	
  coefficient.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  weak	
  positive	
  correlation	
  between	
  the	
  two	
  variable,	
  r	
  =	
  0	
  .08,	
  n	
  =	
  71,	
  p	
  <	
  0.50,	
  suggesting	
  a	
  weak	
  relationship	
  between	
  years	
  of	
  professional	
  experience	
  and	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP.	
  More	
  than	
  half	
  (54.1%)	
  of	
  all	
  the	
  participants	
  had	
  less	
  than	
  3	
  years	
  of	
  experience.	
  	
   	
   4.5.6	
   Pain	
  Education	
  	
   Of	
  all	
  the	
  nurses,	
  the	
  group	
  that	
  did	
  not	
  attend	
  a	
  pain	
  course	
  (n	
  =	
  24;	
  M	
  =	
  68.31)	
  scored	
  similar	
  averages	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  questionnaire	
  to	
  the	
  group	
  that	
  did	
  attend	
  a	
  pain	
  course	
  (n	
  =	
  48;	
  M	
  =	
  69.41).	
  About	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  (n	
  =	
  38)	
  “always”	
  worked	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
  pain,	
  and	
  this	
  group	
  had	
  an	
  average	
  KASRP	
  score	
  of	
  69.67%.	
  Nurses	
  who	
  worked	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
  pain	
  “often”	
  (n	
  =	
  30)	
  had	
  an	
  average	
  score	
  of	
  67.28%,	
  five	
  nurses	
  who	
  stated	
  they	
  “occasionally”	
  worked	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
   	
   	
  	
   62	
   pain	
  had	
  an	
  average	
  score	
  of	
  62.63%.	
  One	
  nurse	
  who	
  “never”	
  worked	
  with	
  patients	
  in	
  pain	
  scored	
  84.2%.	
  	
   An	
  independent	
  sample	
  t-­‐test	
  was	
  conducted	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  KASRP	
  score	
  for	
  attendance	
  at	
  any	
  pain	
  education.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  significant	
  difference	
  for	
  nurses’	
  who	
  attended	
  pain	
  education	
  (M	
  =	
  69.41,	
  SD	
  =	
  11.86)	
  and	
  nurses’	
  who	
  did	
  not	
  attended	
  pain	
  education	
  (M	
  =	
  68.31,	
  SD	
  =	
  11.28);	
  t	
  (70)	
  =	
  -­‐0.376,	
  p	
  =	
  0.71	
  (two-­‐tailed).	
  The	
  magnitude	
  of	
  the	
  differences	
  in	
  the	
  means	
  (mean	
  difference	
  =	
  -­‐1.09,	
  95%	
  CI:	
  -­‐6.92	
  to	
  4.33)	
  was	
  very	
  small	
  (η2	
  =	
  0.002).	
  	
  	
  	
   4.5.7	
   Frequency	
  of	
  Caring	
  for	
  Patients	
  in	
  Pain	
  	
   This	
  factor	
  explored	
  whether	
  nurses	
  caring	
  for	
  patients	
  in	
  pain	
  frequently	
  would	
  make	
  an	
  impact	
  on	
  their	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain.	
  An	
  ANOVA	
  test	
  was	
  conducted	
  on	
  all	
  the	
  nurses	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  impact	
  that	
  the	
  frequency	
  of	
  treating	
  patients	
  in	
  pain,	
  during	
  a	
  typical	
  workweek,	
  would	
  have	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  score.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  statistically	
  significant	
  difference	
  at	
  the	
  p	
  <	
  0.05	
  level	
  in	
  the	
  KASRP	
  scores	
  for	
  the	
  group	
  (never,	
  occasional,	
  often,	
  and	
  always):	
  F	
  (3,	
  67)	
  =	
  .914,	
  p	
  	
  =	
  0.44.	
  The	
  effect	
  size	
  was	
  moderate	
  (η2	
  =	
  0.04).	
  	
   4.6	
   Research	
  Question	
  4:	
  What	
  are	
  the	
  preconceived	
  notions	
   regarding	
  a	
  patient’s	
  conditions/diagnosis	
  and	
  age	
  that	
  influence	
   the	
  nurses’	
  decision	
  making	
  regarding	
  the	
  management	
  of	
  pain?	
   	
   	
  	
   63	
   	
  	
   This	
  question	
  was	
  best	
  addressed	
  using	
  the	
  CDMPQ	
  tool	
  (Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2003).	
  Table	
  6	
  presents	
  the	
  percentage	
  of	
  nurses	
  scoring	
  from	
  1	
  -­‐	
  5	
  on	
  the	
  CDMPQ	
  on	
  11	
  various	
  patients	
  diagnosis	
  and	
  conditions.	
  	
  	
   Table	
  6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Clinical	
  Decision	
  Making	
  Pain	
  Questionnaire	
  -­‐	
  Nurses	
  Distribution	
  of	
  Their	
  Time	
  and	
  Energy	
  	
   Managing	
  a	
  Patient’s	
  Pain	
  	
  Participants	
  	
   1(%)	
   2(%)	
   3(%)	
   4(%)	
   5(%)	
   Mean	
   SD	
   Range	
  Diabetes	
   2.9	
   8.6	
   17.1	
   18.8	
   52.9	
   4.09	
   1.15	
   1-­‐5	
  Suicide	
  attempt	
   4.3	
   7.1	
   17.1	
   12.9	
   58.6	
   4.14	
   1.19	
   1-­‐5	
  Renal	
  patients	
   0	
   5.7	
   20	
   21.4	
   52.9	
   4.21	
   0.96	
   2-­‐5	
  Substance	
  abuse	
   0	
   5.7	
   18.6	
   21.4	
   54.3	
   4.24	
   0.95	
   2-­‐5	
  Older	
  adults	
   2.9	
   2.9	
   12.9	
   24.3	
   57.1	
   4.30	
   0.99	
   1-­‐5	
  Laparoscopic	
  surgery	
   0	
   2.9	
   18.6	
   18.6	
   60	
   4.36	
   0.89	
   2-­‐5	
  AIDS	
   0	
   7.1	
   14.3	
   10	
   68.6	
   4.40	
   0.98	
   2-­‐5	
  Chronic	
  pain	
   0	
   4.3	
   11.4	
   17.1	
   67.1	
   4.47	
   0.86	
   2-­‐5	
  General	
  surgery	
   2.9	
   2.9	
   1.4	
   12.9	
   80	
   4.64	
   0.89	
   1-­‐5	
  Cancer	
   2.9	
   0	
   4.3	
   7.1	
   85.7	
   4.73	
   0.80	
   1-­‐5	
  Multiple	
  trauma	
   4.4	
   0	
   1.3	
   5.7	
   88.6	
   4.74	
   0.80	
   1-­‐5	
   Note:	
  1	
  =	
  minimal	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  expended	
  on	
  pain	
  management;	
  5	
  =	
  maximum	
  time	
  	
  and	
  energy	
  expended	
  on	
  pain	
  management	
  	
  SD	
  =	
  standard	
  deviation	
  N	
  =	
  70,	
  except	
  Diabetes	
  N	
  =	
  69	
  	
   	
   The	
  patients	
  who	
  received	
  the	
  least	
  amount	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  were	
  patients	
  with	
  diabetes	
  (M	
  =	
  4.09);	
  renal	
  disease	
  (M	
  =	
  4.21);	
  attempted	
  suicide	
  (M	
  =	
  4.14),	
  or	
  those	
  who	
  abused	
  substances	
  (M	
  =	
  4.24).	
  The	
  patients	
  who	
  received	
  moderate	
  time	
   	
   	
  	
   64	
   and	
  energy	
  were	
  patients	
  who	
  had	
  laparoscopic	
  surgery	
  (M	
  =	
  4.36)	
  and	
  AIDS	
  (M	
  =	
  4.40).	
  The	
  patient’s	
  who	
  received	
  the	
  greatest	
  amount	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  were	
  patients	
  with	
  multiple	
  trauma	
  (M	
  =	
  4.74);	
  cancer	
  (M	
  =	
  4.73);	
  general	
  surgery	
  (M	
  =	
  4.64),	
  and	
  chronic	
  pain	
  (M	
  =	
  4.47).	
  	
  Chart	
  1	
  illustrates	
  the	
  percentage	
  of	
  patients	
  who	
  would	
  expend	
  the	
  maximum	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  on	
  a	
  patient’s	
  pain.	
   Chart	
  1	
   Maximum	
  Time	
  and	
  Energy	
  Expended	
  on	
  Patient’s	
  Pain	
  	
  (5	
  on	
  a	
  1-­‐5	
  scale).	
   	
  Patients	
  with	
  multiple	
  trauma	
  were	
  viewed	
  mostly	
  positively,	
  as	
  88.8%	
  of	
  nurses	
  would	
  spend	
  the	
  maximum	
  amount	
  of	
  their	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  managing	
  the	
  patients’	
  pain,	
  followed	
  closely	
  by	
  cancer	
  patients	
  (85.7%),	
  and	
  general	
  surgery	
  patients	
  (80.0%).	
  However,	
  patients	
  typically	
  seen	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  unit,	
  diabetic	
  (52.2%),	
  renal	
  (52.9%),	
  substance	
  abuse	
  (54.9%),	
  older	
  adults	
  (57.1%),	
  and	
  attempted	
  suicides	
  (58.6%)	
  were	
  viewed	
  less	
  positively.	
  	
  	
  	
   52.2	
   52.9	
   54.3	
   57.1	
   58.6	
   60	
   67.1	
   68.6	
   80	
   85.7	
   88.6	
   	
   	
  	
   65	
   4.7	
   Conclusion	
   	
   The	
  data	
  analysis	
  presented	
  in	
  the	
  results	
  chapter	
  found	
  the	
  participants	
  with	
  bachelor’s	
  degrees	
  and	
  RNs	
  presented	
  a	
  greater	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  a	
  positive	
  attitude	
  about	
  pain.	
  However,	
  there	
  were	
  no	
  statistically	
  significant	
  differences	
  in	
  age,	
  gender,	
  and	
  years	
  of	
  professional	
  experience.	
  Additionally,	
  nurses’	
  participation	
  in	
  pain	
  education	
  and	
  the	
  frequency	
  with	
  which	
  they	
  cared	
  for	
  pain	
  patients	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  a	
  significant	
  impact	
  on	
  the	
  study’s	
  results.	
  	
  The	
  case	
  studies	
  revealed	
  that	
  nurses	
  underestimated	
  patients’	
  pain	
  and	
  nurses	
  have	
  insufficient	
  knowledge	
  surrounding	
  pharmacology,	
  cancer	
  related	
  pain,	
  addictions,	
  withdrawal,	
  and	
  substance	
  abuse.	
  	
  	
   Data	
  analysis	
  from	
  the	
  CDMPQ	
  revealed	
  that	
  medical	
  nurses	
  would	
  spend	
  the	
  most	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  on	
  patients’	
  experiencing	
  multiple	
  trauma,	
  pain	
  associated	
  with	
  cancer,	
  and	
  patients	
  who	
  have	
  had	
  general	
  surgery.	
  Nurses	
  would	
  spend	
  the	
  least	
  amount	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  on	
  patients	
  with	
  pain	
  associated	
  with	
  diabetes,	
  attempted	
  suicide,	
  renal,	
  and	
  older	
  patients.	
  	
   4.8	
   Summary	
  The	
  results	
  section	
  provided	
  the	
  statistical	
  analysis	
  used	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  mean	
  difference	
  between	
  scores	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  and	
  the	
  factors	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  that	
  impacted	
  their	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitude	
  level.	
  The	
  study	
  also	
  presented	
  a	
  demographic	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  and	
  the	
  response	
  rate	
  of	
  the	
  study.	
  Finally,	
  the	
  data	
  analysis	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  nurses	
  have	
  preconceived	
  notions	
  that	
  result	
  in	
  their	
   	
   	
  	
   66	
   spending	
  less	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  on	
  patients’	
  with	
  chronic	
  medical	
  conditions	
  and	
  older	
  adults;	
  and	
  this	
  will	
  be	
  discussed	
  in	
  the	
  next	
  chapter.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   67	
   Chapter	
  5	
   Discussion	
   The	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  was	
  to	
  explore	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  surrounding	
  pain,	
  with	
  a	
  focus	
  on	
  older	
  adults	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  unit.	
  The	
  results	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  will	
  be	
  discussed	
  within	
  the	
  context	
  of	
  the	
  relevant	
  literature	
  .	
  The	
  limitations,	
  strengths	
  of	
  the	
  study,	
  and	
  implications	
  for	
  nursing	
  practice	
  will	
  also	
  be	
  considered.	
  This	
  chapter	
  will	
  enhance	
  our	
  understanding	
  of	
  strategies	
  to	
  improve	
  medical	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  better	
  pain	
  management	
  practices	
  and	
  make	
  recommendation	
  for	
  future	
  research.	
  	
   	
   5.1	
   Demographics	
  of	
  Participants	
  	
  In	
  2009,	
  the	
  average	
  age	
  of	
  RNs	
  in	
  Canada	
  was	
  45.2	
  (CIHI,	
  2009)	
  and	
  the	
  average	
  age	
  of	
  LPNs	
  was	
  44.4	
  years	
  (CIHI,	
  2005).	
  The	
  largest	
  cohort	
  of	
  nurses	
  	
  (15.4%)	
  was	
  between	
  50-­‐54	
  years	
  of	
  age.	
  Specific	
  to	
  the	
  medical/surgical	
  units	
  in	
  Canada,	
  the	
  average	
  age	
  was	
  slightly	
  younger	
  at	
  41.1	
  years	
  of	
  age	
  (CIHI,	
  2009).	
  In	
  this	
  sample	
  population,	
  77.3%	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  were	
  39	
  years	
  old	
  or	
  younger,	
  reflecting	
  a	
  relatively	
  young	
  group	
  of	
  nurses,	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  national	
  average.	
  Generally	
  new	
  nursing	
  graduates	
  start	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  or	
  surgical	
  wards,	
  often	
  because	
  patients	
  are	
  less	
  acute,	
  whereas	
  high	
  acuity	
  units,	
  such	
  as	
  intensive	
  care	
  units	
  (ICU)	
  and	
  cardiac	
  care	
  units,	
  have	
  traditionally	
  been	
  designated	
  for	
  more	
  experienced	
  and	
  seasoned	
  nurses.	
   	
   	
  	
   68	
   In	
  2009,	
  men	
  represented	
  6.2%	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  RNs	
  in	
  Canada	
  (CNA,	
  2009).	
  Men	
  made	
  up	
  a	
  greater	
  percentage	
  (17.2%)	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  nurses	
  sampled,	
  possibly	
  due	
  to	
  many	
  new	
  graduates	
  starting	
  on	
  the	
  medical/surgical	
  unit.	
  	
  The	
  highest	
  level	
  of	
  education	
  reported	
  by	
  RNs	
  in	
  Canada	
  employed	
  in	
  nursing	
  was	
  a	
  diploma	
  (60.3%),	
  followed	
  by	
  a	
  bachelor	
  (36.7%),	
  a	
  master’s	
  degree	
  (3%),	
  and	
  then	
  a	
  doctorate	
  degree	
  (0.2%)	
  (CNA,	
  2009).	
  The	
  RNs	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  presented	
  higher	
  educational	
  preparation	
  than	
  the	
  national	
  average,	
  as	
  88.9%	
  (n	
  =	
  48)	
  had	
  a	
  bachelor’s	
  degree,	
  while	
  9.3%	
  (n	
  =	
  5)	
  had	
  a	
  diploma,	
  and	
  one	
  had	
  a	
  doctorate.	
  The	
  increase	
  in	
  bachelors	
  prepared	
  RNs	
  may	
  be	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  educational	
  requirement	
  for	
  entry	
  to	
  practice	
  as	
  a	
  RN	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (BC).	
  Since	
  2006,	
  B.C.	
  required	
  all	
  RNs	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  bachelor’s	
  degree	
  for	
  nursing	
  entry	
  to	
  practice	
  (CNA,	
  2012).	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  76.2%	
  (n	
  =	
  16)	
  of	
  LPNs	
  had	
  diplomas,	
  19%	
  (n	
  =	
  4)	
  had	
  a	
  bachelor’s	
  degree,	
  and	
  one	
  person	
  had	
  a	
  doctorate.	
  The	
  minimum	
  requirement	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  LPN	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  certificate	
  in	
  practical	
  nursing	
  (CLPNBC,	
  2012).	
  	
   5.2	
   Registered	
  Nurses	
  and	
  Bachelor’s	
  Education	
   	
   Research	
  has	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  bachelors	
  educated	
  RNs	
  have	
  been	
  associated	
  with	
  positive	
  patient	
  outcomes	
  and	
  improved	
  patient	
  safety	
  (CNA,	
  2012).	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  RNs	
  and	
  bachelors	
  prepared	
  nurses	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  have	
  statistically	
  significant	
  higher	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
  on	
  the	
  KASRP	
  than	
  LPNs	
  and	
  diploma	
  prepared	
  nurses.	
  One	
  study	
  (Aiken,	
  Clarke,	
  Cheung	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002)	
  found	
  staffing	
  in	
  hospitals	
  with	
  a	
  10%	
  increase	
  in	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  bachelors	
  prepared	
  RNs	
  were	
  associated	
  with	
  a	
  5%	
  decrease	
  in	
  patients	
  dying.	
  Other	
  findings	
  (Brunier	
   	
   	
  	
   69	
   et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Buckner,	
  2008;	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  also	
  support	
  that	
  bachelors	
  prepared	
  nurses	
  have	
  higher	
  knowledge	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  The	
  bachelors	
  prepared	
  nurse	
  is	
  important	
  for	
  nursing	
  because	
  the	
  competence	
  and	
  skill	
  to	
  critically	
  assess	
  and	
  manage	
  complex	
  diseases	
  are	
  taught	
  in	
  their	
  programs	
  (CNA,	
  2012).	
  	
  The	
  participants	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  were	
  younger	
  than	
  the	
  general	
  nursing	
  population	
  and	
  the	
  greater	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  score	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  reflection	
  of	
  the	
  different	
  educational	
  content.	
  In	
  previous	
  studies	
  (Wilson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al,.	
  2011),	
  younger	
  nurses	
  with	
  fewer	
  years	
  of	
  experience	
  had	
  positive	
  pain	
  scores.	
  Nurses	
  who	
  attended	
  educational	
  sessions	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  an	
  impact	
  on	
  pain	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  as	
  found	
  in	
  Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2008).	
  In	
  contrast,	
  Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1995)	
  found	
  attendance	
  at	
  pain	
  in-­‐service	
  training	
  resulted	
  in	
  improvements	
  in	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  management.	
  Educational	
  efforts	
  have	
  been	
  beneficial	
  and	
  should	
  continue,	
  however	
  more	
  analysis	
  is	
  needed	
  on	
  what	
  and	
  how	
  the	
  educational	
  content	
  is	
  delivered.	
  	
  Solely	
  attending	
  an	
  educational	
  session	
  on	
  pain	
  management	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  enough	
  to	
  impact	
  the	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes.	
  	
  	
   5.2.1	
   LPN	
  Scope	
  of	
  Practice	
  	
  There	
  are	
  distinct	
  differences	
  in	
  the	
  role	
  and	
  responsibilities	
  of	
  LPNs	
  across	
  Canada	
  that	
  is	
  dependent	
  upon	
  their	
  scope	
  of	
  practice	
  (as	
  defined	
  by	
  the	
  provincial	
  authority),	
  foundational	
  education	
  (as	
  defined	
  by	
  their	
  licensing	
  body),	
  organizational	
  policies	
  (as	
  defined	
  by	
  their	
  employer),	
  and	
  individual	
  competencies.	
  The	
  administration	
  of	
  IV	
  medications	
  does	
  not	
  fall	
  within	
  the	
  core	
  competency	
  of	
   	
   	
  	
   70	
   LPNs	
  in	
  B.C.	
  (CLPNBC,	
  2009),	
  and	
  LPNs	
  cannot	
  administer	
  medication	
  via	
  the	
  IV	
  route	
  at	
  this	
  hospital	
  site	
  (Providence	
  Health	
  Care,	
  2011).	
  	
  Furthermore	
  at	
  the	
  study	
  site,	
  more	
  acute	
  patients	
  with	
  IV	
  medications	
  are	
  usually	
  under	
  the	
  care	
  of	
  RNs.	
  This	
  may	
  explain	
  why	
  many	
  LPNs	
  scored	
  worse	
  on	
  the	
  questionnaire,	
  were	
  hesitant	
  to	
  give	
  the	
  higher	
  range	
  of	
  pain	
  medication,	
  and	
  lacked	
  the	
  experience	
  to	
  administer	
  the	
  appropriate	
  pain	
  medication.	
  	
  	
  	
   5.3	
   Medical	
  Nurses’	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
   Management	
  in	
  Older	
  Adults	
  The	
  mean	
  score	
  (69.04%)	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  revealed	
  moderate	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  Previous	
  studies	
  using	
  the	
  KASRP	
  used	
  to	
  measure	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  found	
  scores	
  ranging	
  from	
  41%	
  to	
  79%	
  (Brunier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Innis,	
  Bikaunieks,	
  Petryshen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Tapp	
  &	
  Kropp,	
  2005;	
  Wilson,	
  2007;	
  Liu	
  et	
  el.,	
  2008;	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  As	
  advised	
  by	
  McCaffrey	
  and	
  Ferrell	
  (1997),	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  true	
  passing	
  score,	
  rather	
  is	
  it	
  better	
  to	
  look	
  at	
  the	
  questions	
  individually	
  or	
  as	
  categories.	
  The	
  areas	
  of	
  concern	
  gathered	
  from	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  were	
  related	
  to:	
  	
  I. Underestimation	
  of	
  pain	
  II. Pharmacology	
  III. Cancer	
  related	
  pain	
  IV. Addiction,	
  withdrawal,	
  and	
  substance	
  abuse	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   71	
   5.3.1	
   Underestimation	
  of	
  Pain	
   	
   In	
  this	
  study,	
  it	
  was	
  very	
  encouraging	
  to	
  find	
  the	
  assessment	
  of	
  a	
  patient’s	
  self-­‐report	
  of	
  pain	
  intensity	
  was	
  accurately	
  documented	
  by	
  approximately	
  93%	
  of	
  RNs	
  and	
  78%	
  of	
  LPNs.	
  Evidence	
  to	
  support	
  the	
  finding	
  is	
  found	
  in	
  Shaer	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2011),	
  where	
  the	
  nurses	
  recognized	
  the	
  basic	
  principal	
  of	
  pain	
  assessment	
  and	
  also	
  recognized	
  that	
  the	
  patient	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  accurate	
  judge	
  of	
  pain	
  intensity.	
  In	
  contrast,	
  previous	
  researchers	
  	
  (Solomon,	
  2001,	
  Puntillo,	
  Neighbour,	
  O’Neil,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003;	
  Idvall,	
  Berg,	
  Unosson,	
  Brudin,	
  2005;	
  Prkachin,	
  Solomon,	
  &	
  Ross,	
  2007)	
  have	
  found	
  nurses	
  and	
  other	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  continue	
  not	
  to	
  accept	
  patient’s	
  self-­‐pain	
  reports.	
  	
  At	
  the	
  study	
  site,	
  a	
  24-­‐hour	
  patient	
  care	
  flow	
  sheet	
  was	
  used	
  for	
  nursing	
  documentation	
  and	
  required	
  the	
  nurses	
  to	
  record	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  intensity	
  score	
  from	
  0-­‐10	
  and	
  also	
  the	
  patient’s	
  comfort	
  level	
  from	
  0-­‐10.	
  The	
  flow	
  sheets	
  had	
  been	
  discussed	
  at	
  length	
  during	
  nursing	
  orientation	
  and	
  nurses	
  were	
  made	
  to	
  utilize	
  them	
  correctly,	
  which	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  reflection	
  of	
  the	
  reasonably	
  accurate	
  documentation.	
  	
  As	
  we	
  have	
  seen,	
  while	
  the	
  nurses’	
  pain	
  ratings	
  were	
  accurate,	
  the	
  intervention	
  and	
  re-­‐assessment	
  of	
  pain	
  was	
  problematic,	
  as	
  has	
  been	
  found	
  by	
  other	
  researchers	
  (Bucknall,	
  Manias,	
  &	
  Botti,	
  2007).	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  despite	
  the	
  high	
  pain	
  intensity,	
  less	
  than	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  would	
  give	
  the	
  higher	
  range	
  of	
  prescribed	
  opioids	
  to	
  treat	
  the	
  pain.	
  Many	
  nurses	
  gave	
  opioids	
  in	
  dosages	
  that	
  would	
  cause	
  the	
  pain	
  to	
  continue	
  or	
  worsen.	
  This	
  reflects	
  research	
  carried	
  out	
  by	
  Hornbury	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2005);	
  Askay,	
  Bombardier	
  &	
  Patterson,	
  (2009)	
  and	
  Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2010).	
  Also,	
  in	
  a	
  study	
  by	
  Watt-­‐Watson	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2004)	
  analyzing	
  analgesic	
  given	
  post-­‐operatively	
   	
   	
  	
   72	
   following	
  coronary	
  artery	
  bypass	
  surgery	
  (CABG)	
  surgery,	
  the	
  researchers	
  found	
  only	
  33%	
  of	
  the	
  prescribed	
  pain	
  medication	
  was	
  given	
  to	
  patients.	
  As	
  Pasero	
  and	
  	
  McCaffrey	
  (2003)	
  concluded,	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  pain	
  documentation	
  does	
  not	
  necessarily	
  guarantee	
  pain	
  relief.	
  	
  Findings	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  learned	
  nurses	
  would	
  give	
  more	
  analgesia	
  for	
  the	
  patient	
  who	
  displayed	
  overt	
  signs	
  of	
  pain.	
  Results	
  are	
  consistent	
  with	
  those	
  of	
  McCaffrey	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1991)	
  and	
  Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2010).	
  According	
  to	
  Horbury	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2005),	
  nursing	
  decisions	
  on	
  pain	
  control	
  were	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  influenced	
  by	
  patients’	
  behaviors,	
  rather	
  than	
  on	
  the	
  self-­‐report	
  of	
  pain.	
  Nurses	
  may	
  be	
  aware	
  the	
  patient	
  is	
  in	
  pain,	
  however	
  they	
  may	
  lack	
  the	
  knowledge	
  and	
  communication	
  to	
  manage	
  their	
  pain.	
  This	
  may	
  be	
  explained	
  by	
  a	
  study	
  from	
  Bostrom	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2004)	
  of	
  the	
  patients’	
  perception	
  of	
  pain	
  management.	
  Those	
  patients	
  believed,	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  communication	
  with	
  their	
  health	
  care	
  provider,	
  that	
  the	
  underestimation	
  of	
  their	
  pain	
  came	
  from	
  not	
  being	
  believed	
  rather	
  than	
  other	
  factors.	
  Furthermore,	
  nurses	
  are	
  influenced	
  by	
  behavioural	
  displays	
  of	
  pain	
  more	
  so	
  than	
  verbal	
  reports.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   5.3.2	
  	
  	
  	
  Poor	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pharmacology	
  	
  Poor	
  pharmacology	
  knowledge	
  among	
  nurses	
  has	
  existed	
  for	
  decades	
  (McCaffery	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  1999;	
  Watt-­‐Watson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Jones,	
  Fink,	
  Pepper,	
  Hutt,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Tapp	
  &	
  Kropp,	
  2005;	
  Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Elcigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Lewthwaite,	
  2011).	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  the	
  questions	
  that	
  were	
  most	
  often	
  incorrectly	
  answered	
  were	
  related	
  to	
  pharmacology,	
  specifically	
  questions	
  related	
  to	
  opioids.	
  An	
  opioid	
  commonly	
  prescribed	
  to	
  medical	
  patients	
  is	
  morphine,	
  however	
  many	
   	
   	
  	
   73	
   nurses	
  were	
  unaware	
  of	
  the	
  duration,	
  peak	
  effect,	
  ceiling	
  effect,	
  and	
  the	
  amount	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  safely	
  given.	
  Erkes	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2001)	
  found	
  that	
  medical	
  nurses	
  had	
  knowledge	
  deficits	
  about	
  morphine	
  compared	
  to	
  ICU	
  nurses,	
  where	
  opioids	
  are	
  used	
  more	
  regularly.	
  Nurses	
  were	
  uncomfortable	
  with	
  administrating	
  opioids,	
  and	
  avoided	
  it	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  (Bernabei	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998;	
  Gregory	
  &	
  Haigh,	
  2007)	
  because	
  nurses’	
  formed	
  negative	
  opinions	
  about	
  opioids,	
  such	
  as	
  addiction,	
  or	
  risk	
  of	
  overdose	
  (McCaffrey	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  Along	
  with	
  poor	
  knowledge,	
  the	
  attitudes	
  of	
  nurses	
  seem	
  to	
  determine	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  pharmacology	
  interventions,	
  resulting	
  in	
  inconsistent	
  and	
  unreliable	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
  	
  In	
  particular,	
  LPNs	
  were	
  less	
  likely	
  to	
  believe	
  the	
  patients’	
  pain	
  reports,	
  under-­‐document	
  pain,	
  and	
  were	
  more	
  hesitant	
  to	
  administer	
  opioids	
  than	
  RNs.	
  LPNs	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  score	
  significantly	
  lower	
  in	
  knowledge	
  of	
  pharmacology	
  pain	
  management	
  scores	
  than	
  RNs	
  as	
  found	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  and	
  also	
  by	
  Coyne,	
  Reinert,	
  Cater,	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1999).	
  Once	
  again,	
  this	
  may	
  be	
  attributed	
  to	
  lack	
  of	
  experience	
  and	
  their	
  scope	
  of	
  practice.	
  Nurses	
  continue	
  to	
  have	
  the	
  misconception	
  that	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  from	
  opioids	
  makes	
  it	
  too	
  dangerous	
  to	
  use	
  in	
  patients	
  (Hornbury,	
  Henderson,	
  &	
  Bromley,	
  2005;	
  Elcigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  Only	
  11.8%	
  of	
  nurses	
  correctly	
  answered	
  the	
  chance	
  of	
  getting	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  from	
  opioids	
  was	
  less	
  than	
  1%.	
  Nurses	
  are	
  taught	
  early	
  in	
  their	
  education	
  the	
  respiratory	
  depressant	
  effects	
  of	
  opioids	
  and	
  feel	
  it	
  is	
  inappropriate	
  to	
  give	
  opioids	
  to	
  older	
  patients	
  (Kaasalainen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  As	
  the	
  medical	
  unit	
  consistently	
  has	
  a	
  greater	
  portion	
  of	
  older	
  adults,	
  the	
  nurses	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  reluctant	
  to	
  use	
  opioids	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  for	
  fear	
  of	
  confusion,	
   	
   	
  	
   74	
   delirium	
  (Jovey,	
  1998),	
  or	
  risk	
  of	
  falls	
  (Leveille,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002).	
  There	
  is	
  less	
  nursing	
  knowledge	
  about	
  appropriate	
  opioid	
  use	
  for	
  older	
  adults	
  (Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Elcigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011),	
  which	
  may	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  fear	
  of	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  	
  	
   5.3.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Cancer	
  Associated	
  Pain	
  Although	
  cancer	
  can	
  occur	
  at	
  any	
  age,	
  the	
  occurrence	
  of	
  cancer	
  tends	
  to	
  increase	
  as	
  we	
  grow	
  older.	
  The	
  results	
  revealed	
  that	
  a	
  lack	
  of	
  knowledge	
  surrounding	
  cancer	
  related	
  pain	
  still	
  persists	
  among	
  nurses	
  as	
  has	
  been	
  found	
  by	
  other	
  researchers	
  (McCaffrey,	
  1995;	
  Bernadri,	
  Catania,	
  Tridello,	
  2007;	
  Yildirim,	
  Cicek,	
  &	
  Uyar,	
  2008).	
  It	
  was	
  discouraging	
  to	
  find	
  that	
  many	
  nurses	
  were	
  unaware	
  that	
  the	
  oral	
  route	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  for	
  severe	
  pain	
  and	
  this	
  has	
  not	
  changed	
  since	
  McCaffrey’s	
  research	
  in	
  1995	
  even	
  though	
  best	
  practice	
  guidelines	
  recommend	
  the	
  oral	
  route	
  for	
  chronic	
  and	
  acute	
  pain	
  (RNAO,	
  2002).	
  However,	
  similar	
  to	
  Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2003),	
  it	
  was	
  promising	
  to	
  find	
  that	
  nurses	
  would	
  spend	
  a	
  significant	
  amount	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  managing	
  cancer	
  related	
  pain.	
  Cancer	
  has	
  generated	
  tremendous	
  awareness	
  and	
  support	
  globally	
  from	
  research,	
  cancer	
  care	
  organizations,	
  and	
  dedicated	
  palliative	
  care	
  units.	
  These	
  may	
  be	
  the	
  reasons	
  nurses	
  expend	
  the	
  maximum	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  when	
  managing	
  cancer	
  related	
  pain.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   75	
   5.3.4	
   Addiction,	
  Withdrawal,	
  and	
  Substance	
  Abuse	
  	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  nurses	
  assumed	
  a	
  higher	
  percentage	
  of	
  patients	
  with	
  pain	
  would	
  also	
  have	
  an	
  alcohol	
  or	
  substance	
  abuse	
  problem.	
  Previous	
  research	
  found	
  that	
  nurses	
  were	
  reluctant	
  to	
  give	
  opioids	
  for	
  fear	
  of	
  addiction	
  (Elcigil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  and	
  were	
  confused	
  between	
  the	
  definition	
  of	
  dependence,	
  addiction,	
  and	
  withdrawal	
  (Ferrell,	
  McCaffrey;	
  Rhiner,	
  1992;	
  McCaffrey	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  1995;	
  Jones	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  These	
  findings	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  reflection	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  patients	
  at	
  the	
  study	
  site	
  that	
  serves	
  nearby	
  Vancouver	
  Downtown	
  Eastside,	
  which	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  impoverished	
  urban	
  location	
  in	
  Canada,	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  the	
  focus	
  of	
  heavy	
  illicit	
  drug	
  use	
  since	
  the	
  1970s	
  (Wood,	
  Tyndall,	
  Spittal	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  Among	
  injection	
  drug	
  users,	
  HIV/AIDS	
  and	
  drug	
  overdose	
  have	
  been	
  common	
  (Wood	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  In	
  the	
  study	
  site,	
  15%	
  of	
  admissions	
  were	
  related	
  to	
  injection	
  drug	
  use	
  (Wood,	
  Kerr,	
  Spittal	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003)	
  and	
  many	
  patients	
  are	
  admitted	
  for	
  drug	
  and	
  addictions	
  treatment.	
  	
  Staff	
  knowledge	
  deficit,	
  attitudes,	
  and	
  bias	
  can	
  influence	
  the	
  assessment	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  care.	
  Substance	
  abuse	
  patients	
  would	
  receive	
  only	
  54.3%	
  of	
  the	
  nurses’	
  maximum	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  managing	
  their	
  pain.	
  	
  These	
  patients	
  may	
  be	
  under	
  medicated	
  for	
  pain	
  due	
  to	
  health	
  care	
  providers’	
  fear	
  of	
  addiction,	
  fear	
  of	
  drug	
  overdose,	
  misbelieving	
  their	
  pain,	
  and	
  lack	
  of	
  knowledge	
  about	
  how	
  to	
  manage	
  pain	
  in	
  this	
  population	
  (Ferrell	
  et	
  al.,	
  1992;	
  Askay	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  The	
  inadequate	
  attention	
  substance	
  abuse	
  patients	
  received	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  reflection	
  of	
  the	
  inconsistent	
  knowledge	
  and	
  pre-­‐conceived	
  notions	
  held	
  by	
  nurses	
  (Askay	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  Furthermore,	
  substance	
  abuse	
  among	
  older	
  adults	
  may	
  be	
  deemed	
  difficult	
  to	
  treat	
  by	
  health	
  care	
  professionals,	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  an	
  “invisible”	
  epidemic	
  (Widlitz	
  &	
  Marin	
   	
   	
  	
   76	
   2002).	
  It	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  recognized	
  as	
  we	
  commonly	
  think	
  of	
  drug	
  abuse	
  as	
  an	
  issue	
  with	
  younger	
  individuals.	
  Managing	
  their	
  pain	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  complex,	
  but	
  overlooking	
  older	
  adults	
  has	
  implications	
  for	
  their	
  health	
  and	
  their	
  trust	
  in	
  the	
  health	
  care	
  system.	
  More	
  knowledge	
  surrounding	
  the	
  interaction	
  between	
  addiction,	
  tolerance,	
  and	
  pain	
  management	
  is	
  needed	
  to	
  effectively	
  treat	
  this	
  patient	
  population,	
  especially	
  given	
  the	
  high	
  admission	
  rate	
  of	
  substance	
  users.	
  	
  	
   5.4	
   Perceived	
  Notions	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  	
   5.4.1	
   Older	
  Adults	
  It	
  was	
  disappointing	
  to	
  find	
  nurses	
  had	
  poor	
  understanding	
  of	
  older	
  adults’	
  pain	
  and	
  they	
  were	
  not	
  seen	
  as	
  high	
  a	
  priority	
  as	
  other	
  patients.	
  This	
  concurs	
  with	
  other	
  research	
  (Whealan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Stevens,	
  Katz	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Jovey,	
  2008;	
  Wang	
  &	
  Tsai,	
  2010),	
  and	
  is	
  concerning	
  as	
  older	
  adults	
  are	
  likely	
  to	
  have	
  multiple	
  medical	
  conditions	
  associated	
  with	
  pain	
  (Miller,	
  1996;	
  Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003;	
  Watt-­‐Watson,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008;	
  Moulin,	
  2008).	
  Medical	
  patients	
  account	
  for	
  a	
  large	
  portion	
  of	
  hospitalized	
  older	
  patients	
  (Dix	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Sawyer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010),	
  however	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  are	
  too	
  focused	
  on	
  the	
  diagnosis	
  and	
  disease	
  process	
  (Liu	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  Misconceptions	
  and	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  and	
  aging	
  have	
  contributed	
  to	
  how	
  nurses	
  and	
  physicians	
  assess	
  and	
  manage	
  pain	
  (Herr	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Kaasalainen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Coker,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Chapman,	
  2010).	
  Older	
  adults	
  were	
  only	
  given	
  57.1%	
  of	
  the	
  nurses’	
  maximum	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  managing	
  their	
  pain.	
  Furthermore,	
  there	
   	
   	
  	
   77	
   are	
  factors	
  that	
  may	
  complicate	
  the	
  assessment	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  older	
  adult	
  that	
  include:	
  cognitive	
  impairment,	
  language	
  barriers,	
  and	
  sensory	
  problems	
  (Coker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Health	
  care	
  providers	
  may	
  view	
  pain	
  as	
  a	
  normal	
  part	
  of	
  aging	
  and	
  believe	
  that	
  older	
  patients	
  experience	
  less	
  pain	
  because	
  they	
  have	
  decreased	
  pain	
  sensitivity	
  (Helme	
  &	
  Gibson,	
  2011;	
  IASP,	
  2011).	
  Other	
  myths	
  about	
  pain	
  include	
  the	
  belief	
  that	
  patients	
  with	
  dementia	
  may	
  not	
  feel	
  pain,	
  and	
  if	
  they	
  do	
  not	
  report	
  pain	
  then	
  they	
  do	
  not	
  feel	
  pain	
  (Kaasalainen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
   	
   5.4.2	
   Chronic	
  Conditions	
  versus	
  Acute	
  Conditions	
  	
  Nurses	
  have	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  attribute	
  less	
  pain	
  to	
  patients	
  suffering	
  from	
  chronic	
  conditions	
  than	
  to	
  those	
  suffering	
  from	
  acute	
  conditions	
  (Taylor,	
  et	
  al.,	
  1984).	
  More	
  than	
  80%	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  have	
  pre-­‐existing	
  chronic	
  medical	
  conditions	
  such	
  as	
  arthritis	
  and	
  diabetes	
  that	
  contribute	
  to	
  their	
  different	
  sources	
  and	
  types	
  of	
  pain	
  (Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  pain	
  associated	
  with	
  diabetes	
  and	
  renal	
  disease,	
  conditions	
  often	
  found	
  in	
  aging	
  adults,	
  was	
  viewed	
  the	
  most	
  negatively.	
  HIV/AIDS	
  patients	
  were	
  given	
  moderate	
  attention,	
  while	
  those	
  whose	
  pain	
  was	
  caused	
  by	
  multiple	
  trauma	
  or	
  surgery	
  was	
  viewed	
  the	
  most	
  positively.	
  	
  Chronic	
  pain	
  has	
  been	
  associated	
  with	
  a	
  lower	
  quality	
  of	
  life,	
  compared	
  to	
  other	
  diseases	
  (Schopflocher,	
  Jovey	
  et	
  al.	
  2010).	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  reason	
  that	
  one	
  can	
  assume	
  that	
  chronic	
  pain	
  is	
  less	
  severe	
  than	
  acute	
  pain,	
  however	
  nursing	
  attitudes	
  on	
  psychological	
  symptoms	
  related	
  to	
  chronic	
  conditions	
  exist	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1984).	
  Unfortunately,	
  the	
  negativity	
  surrounding	
  chronic	
  conditions	
  has	
  prevented	
  patients	
  from	
  receiving	
  the	
  appropriate	
  pain	
  treatment.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   78	
   Similar	
  to	
  this	
  study,	
  Davidson	
  (2003)	
  found	
  the	
  pain	
  felt	
  by	
  hemodialysis	
  patients	
  were	
  not	
  being	
  effectively	
  managed	
  and	
  they	
  were	
  more	
  prone	
  to	
  pain	
  than	
  the	
  general	
  population.	
  Their	
  pain	
  was	
  mostly	
  musculoskeletal	
  in	
  nature,	
  but	
  also	
  psychological,	
  involving	
  end	
  of	
  life	
  issues	
  that	
  can	
  cause	
  anxiety	
  (Davidson,	
  2003).	
  As	
  Kumar	
  &	
  Allcock	
  (2008)	
  found,	
  the	
  psychosocial	
  issues	
  may	
  play	
  a	
  factor	
  in	
  the	
  influence	
  and	
  expression	
  of	
  an	
  older	
  adult’s	
  pain.	
  Renal	
  disease	
  is	
  a	
  major	
  medical	
  issue	
  and	
  takes	
  a	
  toll	
  on	
  relationships,	
  work,	
  family	
  and	
  friends,	
  and	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
  engage	
  in	
  social	
  activities.	
  A	
  literature	
  review	
  by	
  Williams	
  &	
  Manias	
  (2007)	
  found	
  little	
  information	
  to	
  guide	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  on	
  renal	
  disease,	
  and	
  no	
  study	
  examined	
  pain	
  control	
  from	
  the	
  health	
  care	
  professionals’	
  perspective,	
  which	
  may	
  explain	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  given	
  to	
  renal	
  patients	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  In	
  another	
  example,	
  diabetic	
  neuropathy	
  is	
  a	
  common	
  complication	
  of	
  diabetes	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  difficult	
  to	
  treat,	
  which	
  may	
  discourage	
  health	
  care	
  providers	
  (Huizinga	
  &	
  Peltier,	
  2007).	
  As	
  patients	
  with	
  neuropathic	
  pain	
  rarely	
  get	
  complete	
  pain	
  relief,	
  both	
  health	
  care	
  providers	
  and	
  patients	
  feel	
  frustration	
  (Larme	
  &	
  Pugh,	
  1998).	
  The	
  pain	
  is	
  often	
  chronic	
  and	
  leaves	
  patients	
  and	
  providers	
  with	
  the	
  inability	
  to	
  achieve	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  control	
  over	
  the	
  disease	
  (Larme	
  &	
  Pugh,	
  1998).	
  	
  Another	
  chronic	
  condition	
  growing	
  rapidly	
  is	
  older	
  adults	
  living	
  with	
  HIV/AIDS.	
  Advanced	
  medicine	
  and	
  treatment	
  has	
  kept	
  people	
  affected	
  with	
  HIV/AIDS	
  living	
  longer,	
  with	
  50%	
  of	
  all	
  HIV/AIDS	
  people	
  aged	
  50	
  or	
  older	
  (Effros,	
  Fletcher,	
  Gebo,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008)	
  and	
  older	
  adults	
  comprising	
  of	
  15%	
  of	
  all	
  new	
  infections	
  in	
  the	
  USA	
  (CDC,	
  2010).	
  Pain	
  is	
  common	
  in	
  HIV/AIDS	
  patients	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  severely	
  undertreated,	
  which	
  is	
  attributed	
  to	
  health	
  care	
  providers	
  underestimation	
  of	
   	
   	
  	
   79	
   patient’s	
  pain	
  and	
  lack	
  of	
  knowledge	
  on	
  proper	
  analgesia	
  (Larue,	
  Fontain,	
  Colleau,	
  1997).	
  As	
  discussed	
  previously,	
  nurses	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  had	
  tremendous	
  exposure	
  to	
  patients	
  with	
  HIV/AIDS	
  given	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  patients.	
  Compared	
  to	
  other	
  studies	
  (Rintamaki,	
  Scott,	
  Kosenko,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Zukoski	
  &	
  Thorburn,	
  2009),	
  HIV/AIDS	
  positive	
  patients	
  were	
  viewed	
  negatively,	
  however	
  the	
  nurses	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  seemed	
  to	
  give	
  better	
  attention	
  and	
  energy	
  caring	
  for	
  this	
  population.	
  The	
  hospital	
  site	
  has	
  been	
  dedicated	
  to	
  caring	
  for	
  the	
  HIV/AIDS	
  population	
  through	
  research,	
  education,	
  and	
  treatment;	
  this	
  was	
  reflected	
  in	
  the	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  nurses	
  would	
  spend	
  managing	
  their	
  pain.	
  	
  	
   5.4.3	
   Psychological	
  Symptoms	
  Associated	
  with	
  Chronic	
  Pain	
  Conditions	
  Pain	
  associated	
  with	
  psychological	
  symptoms	
  is	
  viewed	
  as	
  less	
  intense	
  or	
  real	
  than	
  pain	
  having	
  a	
  known	
  origin	
  (Burgess,	
  1980;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1984).	
  This	
  is	
  damaging	
  for	
  chronic	
  pain	
  sufferers,	
  as	
  a	
  considerable	
  measure	
  of	
  patients	
  presenting	
  with	
  chronic	
  pain	
  have	
  a	
  history	
  of	
  psychiatric	
  co-­‐morbidities,	
  such	
  as	
  depression,	
  anxiety,	
  and	
  thoughts	
  of	
  suicide	
  (Smith,	
  Aronson,	
  &	
  Sokol,	
  2011).	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  patients	
  who	
  were	
  seen	
  as	
  exacerbating	
  their	
  condition,	
  for	
  example,	
  through	
  substance	
  abuse	
  or	
  attempted	
  suicide;	
  were	
  less	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  treated	
  for	
  pain	
  versus	
  patients	
  who	
  were	
  not	
  contributing	
  to	
  their	
  pain.	
  The	
  presence	
  of	
  depression	
  in	
  a	
  patient	
  had	
  a	
  significant	
  effect	
  on	
  the	
  pain	
  intervention	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1984).	
  Nurses	
  viewed	
  suicide	
  attempts	
  negatively,	
  as	
  it	
  would	
  appear	
  that	
  the	
  responsibility	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  for	
  their	
  condition	
  affected	
  the	
  nurses’	
  treatment	
  of	
  their	
  pain	
  (Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  A	
  study	
  by	
  Botega,	
  Reginato,	
  Volk	
  da	
  Silva	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2005)	
  discovered	
   	
   	
  	
   80	
   nurses’	
  difficulty	
  in	
  providing	
  care	
  for	
  patients	
  who	
  wanted	
  to	
  die.	
  The	
  study	
  by	
  Brockopp	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2003)	
  revealed	
  many	
  nurses	
  thought	
  a	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  through	
  attempted	
  suicide	
  would	
  prevent	
  suicide	
  re-­‐attempt.	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  (1984)	
  found	
  that	
  depressed	
  headache	
  patients	
  would	
  receive	
  less	
  pain	
  intervention	
  than	
  non-­‐depressed	
  patients.	
  It	
  was	
  thought	
  that	
  nurses	
  perceived	
  the	
  pain	
  intervention	
  to	
  be	
  less	
  effective	
  and	
  inappropriate	
  in	
  patients	
  with	
  psychological	
  symptoms	
  than	
  pathological	
  symptoms	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1984).	
  	
  As	
  Cohen-­‐Mansfield	
  &	
  Marx	
  (1993)	
  found,	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  depression	
  may	
  be	
  enhanced	
  in	
  the	
  older	
  adults	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  multiple	
  chronic	
  pain	
  comorbidities	
  and	
  sometimes	
  the	
  symptoms	
  of	
  depression	
  and	
  chronic	
  pain	
  may	
  overlap	
  or	
  co-­‐exist.	
  	
  A	
  self-­‐rated	
  report	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  revealed	
  that	
  those	
  with	
  chronic	
  pain	
  consider	
  their	
  health	
  poorer	
  than	
  patients	
  without	
  chronic	
  pain	
  (Reyes-­‐Gibby,	
  Aday	
  &	
  Cleeland,	
  2002).	
  	
  	
   5.5	
   Implications	
  for	
  Nursing	
   5.5.1	
   Nursing	
  Practice	
  	
  Nurses	
  play	
  an	
  important	
  role	
  in	
  the	
  prevention	
  and	
  treatment	
  of	
  pain.	
  Nursing	
  assessments	
  on	
  patient	
  pain	
  intensity	
  were	
  mostly	
  accurately	
  documented;	
  however	
  concerns	
  were	
  discovered	
  on	
  the	
  nurses’	
  interventions.	
  As	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  re-­‐assessment,	
  nurses	
  can	
  ensure	
  pain	
  level	
  is	
  not	
  greater	
  than	
  the	
  patient’s	
  comfort	
  level.	
  	
  The	
  24-­‐hour	
  patient	
  care	
  flow	
  sheet	
  is	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  documentation	
  used	
  for	
  pain	
  assessment	
  by	
  nurses	
  at	
  the	
  hospital	
  however,	
  emphasis	
  should	
  be	
  made	
  on	
   	
   	
  	
   81	
   utilizing	
  the	
  comfort	
  ratings.	
  The	
  comfort-­‐function	
  goal	
  is	
  a	
  way	
  to	
  establish	
  accountability	
  for	
  the	
  nurse	
  (Pasero	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2004)	
  and	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  positive	
  through	
  the	
  regular	
  assessment	
  of	
  pain	
  intensity	
  ratings	
  and	
  comfort	
  goals	
  (Shugarman,	
  Goebel,	
  Lanto,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  When	
  routinely	
  asked	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  comfort-­‐functional	
  goals,	
  the	
  patient	
  and	
  nurse	
  can	
  work	
  on	
  a	
  common	
  goal	
  to	
  decrease	
  the	
  pain	
  to	
  a	
  level	
  that	
  is	
  acceptable	
  to	
  the	
  patient.	
  Nurses	
  documenting	
  both	
  the	
  pain	
  intensity	
  and	
  the	
  comfort	
  level	
  can	
  establish	
  the	
  evaluation	
  of	
  pain	
  treatments.	
  Thus	
  nurses’	
  can	
  provide	
  pain	
  medication	
  that	
  is	
  appropriate,	
  consistent,	
  and	
  prevent	
  bias	
  against	
  chronic	
  conditions.	
  Establishing	
  accountability	
  for	
  pain	
  management	
  and	
  creating	
  regular	
  functional	
  comfort	
  goals,	
  will	
  decrease	
  personal	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  from	
  health	
  care	
  providers	
  (Pasero	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  2004).	
  	
  	
   5.5.2	
   Nursing	
  Education	
  	
   	
   Education	
  is	
  one	
  central	
  aspect	
  to	
  strengthening	
  pain	
  knowledge,	
  however	
  education	
  may	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  tailored	
  and	
  appropriate	
  to	
  meet	
  the	
  nurses	
  educational	
  needs.	
  	
  Nurses	
  have	
  expressed	
  an	
  interest	
  in	
  learning	
  more	
  about	
  pain	
  management,	
  however	
  limited	
  time	
  and	
  busy	
  days	
  shifts	
  remained	
  an	
  issue	
  as	
  most	
  in-­‐services	
  are	
  offered	
  during	
  the	
  day	
  (J.	
  Santucci,	
  personal	
  communications).	
  Educators	
  could	
  provide	
  educational	
  courses	
  during	
  night,	
  evening,	
  or	
  weekend	
  shifts,	
  when	
  it	
  tends	
  to	
  be	
  less	
  busy.	
  Brief	
  focused	
  educational	
  sessions	
  might	
  be	
  helpful	
  when	
  there	
  are	
  time	
  pressures.	
  Other	
  approaches	
  could	
  include	
  using	
  clinical	
  pain	
  champions	
  (Idell,	
  Grant	
  &	
  Kirk,	
  2007).	
  As	
  suggested	
  by	
  Russell	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2010)	
  elected	
  pain	
  champions	
   	
   	
  	
   82	
   responsibility	
  would	
  include	
  discussing	
  the	
  interventions	
  and	
  outcomes	
  that	
  happened	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  shift.	
  Nursing	
  educators	
  need	
  to	
  provide	
  education	
  specifically	
  on	
  pharmacology.	
  As	
  the	
  sample	
  unit	
  was	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  medicine	
  unit,	
  more	
  emphasis	
  must	
  be	
  given	
  to	
  older	
  adults	
  and	
  the	
  management	
  of	
  pain	
  related	
  to	
  their	
  chronic	
  conditions.	
  Another	
  educational	
  strategy	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  discussion	
  regarding	
  older	
  adults	
  and	
  the	
  pain	
  requirements	
  needed	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  and	
  the	
  persistent	
  underlying	
  concerns	
  about	
  opioids.	
  	
  	
  Many	
  hospitals	
  have	
  utilized	
  the	
  mix	
  staffing	
  of	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  unit,	
  however	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  roles	
  and	
  current	
  scope	
  of	
  practice	
  of	
  LPNs	
  has	
  to	
  evolve	
  with	
  the	
  changing	
  population.	
  Stronger	
  results	
  were	
  found	
  in	
  bachelors	
  educated	
  nurses,	
  which	
  as	
  suggested	
  by	
  Lewthwaite	
  et	
  al.,	
  (2011),	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  the	
  course	
  content	
  and	
  more	
  emphasis	
  on	
  evidence	
  based	
  research	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  LPN	
  curriculum.	
  Education	
  may	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  tailored	
  more	
  appropriately	
  to	
  LPNs.	
  A	
  key	
  area	
  is	
  supporting	
  LPNs,	
  and	
  perhaps	
  more	
  case	
  studies	
  and	
  clinical	
  discussions	
  should	
  be	
  used	
  as	
  an	
  alternative	
  teaching	
  method.	
  	
  Many	
  large	
  hospitals	
  have	
  been	
  providing	
  education	
  on	
  IV	
  maintenance	
  and	
  IV	
  administration,	
  and	
  believe	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  add	
  the	
  IV	
  initiation	
  in	
  the	
  basic	
  LPN	
  education	
  (CLPNA,	
  2008).	
  A	
  collaborative	
  practice	
  model	
  involving	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs	
  will	
  help	
  to	
  utilize	
  and	
  support	
  LPNs’	
  full	
  scope	
  of	
  practice.	
  	
  Finally,	
  the	
  culture	
  change	
  also	
  needs	
  to	
  occur	
  from	
  within	
  the	
  educational	
  institutions.	
  Educators,	
  nurses,	
  and	
  interdisciplinary	
  colleagues	
  such	
  as	
  pharmacist	
  and	
  physicians	
  can	
  work	
  to	
  emphasize	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  pain	
  relief	
  and	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   83	
   5.5.3	
   Administration	
  Finally,	
  support	
  is	
  needed	
  from	
  hospitals	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  culture	
  change	
  that	
  treats	
  pain	
  as	
  a	
  priority.	
  By	
  viewing	
  pain	
  as	
  the	
  fifth	
  vital	
  sign	
  and	
  monitoring	
  it	
  as	
  frequently	
  as	
  the	
  other	
  vital	
  signs,	
  relieving	
  pain	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  fundamental	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  health	
  care	
  professional’s	
  dedication	
  to	
  treating	
  pain.	
  Nursing	
  and	
  key	
  interdisciplinary	
  team	
  players	
  are	
  needed	
  to	
  help	
  reform	
  and	
  advocate	
  effective	
  pain	
  management.	
  Nurses	
  have	
  the	
  responsibility	
  to	
  support	
  and	
  work	
  with	
  other	
  health	
  care	
  professionals	
  for	
  organizational	
  change	
  in	
  effective	
  pain	
  management	
  (RNAO,	
  2007).	
  	
  	
   5.6	
   Limitations	
  of	
  the	
  Study	
  	
  	
   There	
  were	
  several	
  limitations	
  to	
  the	
  study	
  that	
  may	
  have	
  influenced	
  the	
  results.	
  First,	
  this	
  was	
  an	
  exploratory,	
  non-­‐experimental,	
  descriptive	
  study.	
  Data	
  were	
  gathered	
  through	
  convenience	
  sample	
  at	
  one	
  hospital	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  limiting	
  the	
  findings	
  to	
  a	
  similar	
  population.	
  Second,	
  LPNs	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  study,	
  however	
  administering	
  medications	
  is	
  a	
  relatively	
  new	
  role	
  for	
  LPNs,	
  and	
  they	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  as	
  comfortable	
  administering	
  medications	
  or	
  have	
  the	
  same	
  level	
  of	
  clinical	
  judgment	
  as	
  RNs.	
  Third,	
  even	
  though	
  the	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  given	
  with	
  envelopes	
  for	
  participants	
  to	
  put	
  their	
  completed	
  questionnaires	
  in	
  to	
  maintain	
  privacy,	
  they	
  could	
  have	
  completed	
  the	
  questions	
  together,	
  discussed	
  the	
  questions,	
  or	
  found	
  other	
  sources	
  for	
  the	
  answers.	
  Fourth,	
  the	
  questions	
  in	
  the	
  survey	
  were	
  all	
  closed-­‐ended,	
  limiting	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  information	
  that	
  could	
  be	
  obtained.	
  There	
  were	
  other	
  factors	
  such	
  as	
  culture	
  or	
  individual	
  experiences	
  that	
  may	
  have	
  influenced	
  the	
   	
   	
  	
   84	
   nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  on	
  pain	
  management	
  that	
  were	
  not	
  explored.	
  Finally,	
  the	
  study	
  was	
  limited	
  to	
  theoretical	
  questions,	
  the	
  case	
  study	
  focused	
  on	
  younger	
  patients,	
  and	
  not	
  on	
  older	
  adults	
  the	
  actual	
  clinical	
  practice	
  of	
  the	
  nurses	
  was	
  not	
  examined.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   5.7	
   Strengths	
  of	
  the	
  Study	
   	
   One	
  of	
  the	
  strengths	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  was	
  the	
  sample,	
  which	
  was	
  representative	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  nurses	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  thus	
  making	
  the	
  study	
  generalizable	
  to	
  similar	
  populations	
  of	
  nurses	
  working	
  in	
  comparable	
  acute	
  care	
  hospitals.	
  Furthermore,	
  by	
  participating	
  in	
  the	
  questionnaire,	
  nurses	
  may	
  have	
  increased	
  their	
  knowledge	
  of	
  pain	
  and	
  enhanced	
  their	
  awareness	
  of	
  their	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain.	
  Most	
  importantly,	
  this	
  study	
  adds	
  to	
  the	
  body	
  of	
  literature	
  surrounding	
  medical	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  surrounding	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  	
  	
   5.8	
   Recommendation	
  for	
  Future	
  Research	
   	
   	
  An	
  area	
  of	
  future	
  study	
  could	
  explore	
  the	
  cultural	
  or	
  personal	
  experiences	
  that	
  impact	
  nurses’	
  decisions	
  on	
  pain	
  management.	
  As	
  this	
  study	
  found,	
  documentation	
  does	
  not	
  necessarily	
  guarantee	
  pain	
  treatment.	
  The	
  nursing	
  documentation	
  can	
  be	
  audited	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  pain	
  intensity	
  ratings	
  and	
  comfort	
  goals	
  are	
  completed.	
  These	
  can	
  be	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitude	
  of	
  the	
  management	
  of	
  pain	
  and	
  also	
  the	
  patients’	
  satisfaction	
  with	
  their	
  pain	
  management.	
  Furthermore,	
  educational	
  approaches	
  should	
  target	
  attitudes	
  and	
  beliefs	
  regarding	
  pain.	
  Lastly,	
  a	
  qualitative	
  study	
  can	
  concentrate	
  on	
  the	
  factors	
  that	
   	
   	
  	
   85	
   contribute	
  to	
  nurses’	
  pre-­‐conceived	
  notions	
  for	
  certain	
  groups	
  of	
  people	
  and	
  how	
  that	
  affects	
  their	
  knowledge	
  and	
  personal	
  attitudes.	
  	
  	
   5.9	
   Summary	
  Challenges	
  continue	
  to	
  remain	
  evident	
  in	
  the	
  area	
  of	
  pain	
  management	
  and	
  persist	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  most	
  common	
  complaints	
  of	
  older	
  adults.	
  The	
  major	
  findings	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  found	
  insufficient	
  knowledge	
  levels	
  and	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  management.	
  Nurses	
  are	
  major	
  contributors	
  to	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  care	
  and	
  health	
  outcomes	
  of	
  patients;	
  their	
  knowledge,	
  attitudes	
  and	
  bias	
  are	
  important	
  in	
  shaping	
  their	
  view	
  of	
  pain	
  to	
  create	
  the	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management	
  care	
  for	
  older	
  patients.	
  Development	
  in	
  the	
  areas	
  of	
  pharmacology,	
  pain	
  intervention,	
  and	
  misconceptions	
  towards	
  pain	
  are	
  needed	
  to	
  increase	
  knowledge	
  and	
  create	
  more	
  positive	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  pain	
  management.	
  A	
  focus	
  on	
  changing	
  the	
  culture	
  of	
  care,	
  and	
  towards	
  evolving	
  the	
  nursing	
  practice	
  to	
  one	
  of	
  more	
  accountability	
  for	
  pain	
  management,	
  will	
  enhance	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain,	
  and	
  most	
  importantly	
  will	
  reduce	
  patient	
  pain	
  and	
  improve	
  quality	
  of	
  care.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   86	
   References	
   AGS	
  Panel.	
  (2002).	
  The	
  management	
  of	
  persistent	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  persons.	
  Journal	
  	
   American	
  Geriatric	
  Society,	
  6,	
  205-­‐240.	
   	
  Askay,	
  S.,	
  Bombrdier,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Patterson,	
  D.	
  (2009).	
  Effect	
  of	
  acute	
  and	
  chronic	
  	
  	
  alcohol	
  abuse	
  on	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  a	
  trauma	
  center.	
  Expert	
  Review	
  of	
  	
   Neurotherapeutics,	
  9(2),	
  271-­‐277.	
  Aiken,	
  L.,	
  Clarke,	
  S.,	
  Cheung,	
  R.,	
  Sloane,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Silber,	
  J.	
  (2003).	
  Educational	
  levels	
  of	
  	
  hospital	
  nurses	
  and	
  surgical	
  patient	
  mortality.	
  American	
  Medical	
  Association,	
  	
   290(12),	
  1617-­‐1623.	
  Al-­‐Shaer,	
  D.,	
  Hill,	
  P.	
  D.,	
  &	
  Anderson,	
  M.	
  A.	
  (2011).	
  Nurses'	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  	
  regarding	
  pain	
  assessment	
  and	
  intervention.	
  Medical	
  Surgical	
  Nursing:	
   Official	
  Journal	
  of	
  the	
  Academy	
  of	
  Medical-­‐Surgical	
  Nurses,	
  20(1),	
  7-­‐11.	
  Apfelbaum,	
  J.,	
  Chen,	
  C.,	
  Mehta,	
  S	
  &	
  Gan,	
  T.	
  (2003).	
  Postoperative	
  pain	
  experience:	
  	
  results	
  from	
  a	
  national	
  survey	
  suggest	
  postoperative	
  pain	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  undermanaged.	
  International	
  Anesthesia	
  Research	
  Society,	
  97,	
  534-­‐540.	
  	
  Arnstein,	
  P.,	
  Caudill,	
  M.,	
  Mandle,	
  CL.,	
  Norris,	
  A.,	
  Beasley,	
  R.	
  (1999).	
  Self-­‐efficacy	
  as	
  	
  a	
  mediator	
  of	
  the	
  relationship	
  between	
  pain	
  intensity,	
  disability	
  and	
  depression	
  in	
  chronic	
  pain	
  patients.	
  Pain,	
  80(3),	
  483-­‐491.	
  Badger,	
  F	
  &	
  Werrett,	
  J.	
  (2005).	
  Room	
  for	
  improvement?	
  Reporting	
  response	
  	
  rates	
  and	
  recruitment	
  in	
  nursing	
  research	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  decade.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Advanced	
  Nursing,	
  51(5),	
  502–510.	
  	
  Bell,	
  L	
  &	
  Duffy,	
  A.	
  (2009).	
  Pain	
  assessment	
  and	
  management	
  in	
  surgical	
  nursing:	
  a	
  	
  literature	
  review.	
  British	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing,	
  18(3),	
  153-­‐156.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   87	
   Bernabei,	
  R.,	
  Gambassi,	
  G.,	
  Lapane,	
  K.,	
  Landi,	
  F.,Gatsonis,	
  C,	
  Dunlop,	
  R.,Lipsitz,	
  L,	
  	
  Steel,	
  K.,	
  &	
  Mor,	
  V.	
  (1998).	
  Management	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  elderly	
  patients	
  with	
  cancer.	
   SAGE	
  Study	
  Group,	
  279(23),	
  1877-­‐1822.	
  Bernadri,	
  M.,	
  Catania,	
  G.,	
  &	
  Tridello,	
  G.	
  (2007).	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  about	
  	
  cancer	
  pain	
  management:	
  A	
  national	
  survey	
  of	
  Italian	
  hospice	
  nurses.	
  Cancer	
   Nursing,	
  30(2),	
  20-­‐26.	
  Blyth,	
  F.,	
  March,	
  LM.,	
  Brnabic,	
  AJ.,	
  Jorm,	
  LR.,	
  Williamson,	
  M.,	
  Cousins,	
  MJ.	
  (2001).	
  	
  	
   Chronic	
  pain	
  in	
  Australia:	
  A	
  prevalence	
  study.	
  Pain,	
  89(2-­‐3),	
  127-­‐34.	
  Bostrom,	
  B.,	
  Lundberg,	
  D	
  &	
  Fridlund,	
  B.	
  (2004).	
  Cancer	
  related	
  pain	
  in	
  palliative	
  	
  care:	
  patient’s	
  perceptions	
  of	
  pain	
  management.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Advanced	
  Nursing,	
   45,	
  410-­‐419.	
  	
  Bucknall,	
  T.,	
  Manias,	
  E.,	
  &	
  Botti,	
  M.	
  (2007).	
  Nurses'	
  reassessment	
  of	
  postoperative	
  	
  pain	
  after	
  analgesic	
  administration.	
  Clinical	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pain,	
  23(1),	
  1-­‐7.	
  Brattberg,	
  P	
  &	
  Thorslund	
  M.	
  (1996).	
  The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  pain	
  among	
  the	
  oldest	
  in	
  	
  Sweden,	
  Pain,	
  67,	
  29-­‐34.	
  Botega,	
  N.,	
  Reginato,	
  D.,	
  Volk	
  da	
  Silva,	
  S.,	
  Filinto	
  da	
  Silva	
  Cais,	
  C.,	
  Rapeli,	
  C.,	
  Mauro,	
  M.,	
  	
  Cecconi,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Steganello,	
  S.,	
  (2005).	
  Nursing	
  personnel	
  attitudes	
  towards	
  suicide:	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  a	
  measure	
  scale.	
  Revista	
  Brasileira	
  de	
  Psiquiatria,	
   24(4),	
  515-­‐318.	
  Brown,	
  S.,	
  Bowman,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Eason,	
  F.	
  (1999).	
  Assessment	
  of	
  nurses'	
  attitudes	
  and	
  	
  knowledge	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  The	
  Journal	
  of	
  Continuing	
  Education	
   in	
  Nursing,	
  30(3),	
  132-­‐139.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   88	
   Brunier,	
  G.,	
  Carson,	
  M.	
  G.,	
  &	
  Harrison,	
  D.	
  E.	
  (1995).	
  What	
  do	
  nurses	
  know	
  and	
  believe	
  	
  about	
  patients	
  with	
  pain?	
  Results	
  of	
  a	
  hospital	
  survey.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pain	
  and	
   Symptom	
  Management,	
  10(6),	
  436-­‐445.	
  Brockopp,	
  D.,	
  Ryan,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Warden,	
  S.	
  (2003).	
  Nurses’	
  willingness	
  to	
  manage	
  the	
  pain	
  	
  of	
  specific	
  groups	
  of	
  patients.	
  British	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing,	
  12(7),	
  409-­‐415.	
  Brown,	
  ST.	
  (2000).	
  Outcomes	
  analysis	
  of	
  a	
  pain	
  management	
  project	
  for	
  two	
  rural	
  	
  hospitals.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing	
  Care	
  Quality,	
  14,	
  28-­‐34.	
  	
  Buckner,	
  M.	
  (2008).	
  Nurses'	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
   	
   Clinical	
  Nurse	
  Specialist,	
  22(2),	
  98-­‐99.	
  Canadian	
  Nurses	
  Association.	
  (2009).	
  2009	
  Workforce	
  Profile	
  of	
  Registered	
  Nurses	
  	
   in	
  Canada.	
  Ottawa.	
  	
  Canadian	
  Nurses	
  Association.	
  (2008).	
  Code	
  of	
  Ethics	
  for	
  Registered	
  Nurses.	
  Ottawa.	
  Canadian	
  Nurses	
  Association.	
  (2012).	
  Nursing	
  in	
  Canada.	
  Ottawa.	
  Canadian	
  Nurses	
  Association.	
  (2011).	
  Standards	
  and	
  Best	
  Practices.	
  Ottawa.	
  	
  Canadian	
  Institute	
  for	
  Health	
  Information	
  (CIHI).	
  (2005).	
  Workforce	
  Trends	
  of	
  	
   Licensed	
  Practical	
  Nurses	
  in	
  Canada.	
  	
  Ottawa.	
  	
  Celik,	
  S.S.,	
  Kapucu,	
  S.,	
  Tuna,	
  Z.	
  &	
  Akkus,	
  Y.	
  (2010).	
  Views	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  nursing	
  	
  students	
  towards	
  ageing	
  and	
  older	
  patients.	
  Australian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Advanced	
   Nursing,	
  24	
  (4),	
  24-­‐30.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   89	
   Centers	
  for	
  Disease	
  Control	
  and	
  Prevention	
  [CDC].	
  (2008).	
  Diagnoses	
  of	
  HIV	
  	
   infection	
  and	
  AIDS	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  and	
  dependent	
  areas,	
  2010.	
  Retrieved	
  November	
  16,	
  2012	
  from	
  http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2010report/index.htm.	
  Chapman,	
  S.	
  (2010).	
  Managing	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  older	
  person.	
  Nursing	
  Standard,	
  25(11),	
  	
  35-­‐	
  39.	
  Cheatle,	
  M.	
  D.	
  (2011).	
  Depression,	
  chronic	
  pain,	
  and	
  suicide	
  by	
  overdose:	
  On	
  the	
  	
  edge.	
  Pain	
  Medicine,	
  12(2),	
  43-­‐48.	
  	
  Cohen-­‐Mansfield	
  J	
  &	
  Lipson	
  S.	
  (2002).	
  Pain	
  in	
  cognitively	
  impaired	
  nursing	
  home	
  	
  residents:	
  how	
  well	
  are	
  physicians	
  diagnosing	
  it?	
  Journal	
  of	
  the	
  American	
   Geriatrics	
  Society,	
  50(6),	
  1039-­‐44.	
  Cohen-­‐Mansfield,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Marx,	
  M.	
  S.	
  (1993).	
  Pain	
  and	
  depression	
  in	
  the	
  nursing	
  home:	
  Corroborating	
  results.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Gerontology,	
  48(2),	
  96-­‐97.	
  Coker,	
  E.,	
  Papaioannou,	
  A.,	
  Turpie,	
  I.,	
  Dolovich,	
  L.,	
  Kaasalainen,	
  S.,	
  Taniguchi,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Burns,	
  S.	
  (2008).	
  Pain	
  management	
  practices	
  with	
  older	
  adults	
  on	
  acute	
  medical	
  units.	
  Perspectives	
  Gerontological	
  Nursing	
  Association	
  of	
  Canada,	
   32(1),	
  5-­‐12.	
  Coker,	
  E.,	
  Papaioannou,	
  A.,	
  Kaasalainen,	
  S.,	
  Dolovich,	
  L.,	
  Turpie,	
  I.,	
  &	
  	
  Taniguchi,	
  A.	
  (2010).	
  Nurses'	
  perceived	
  barriers	
  to	
  optimal	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  on	
  acute	
  medical	
  units.	
  Applied	
  Nursing	
  Research,	
  23(3),	
  139-­‐146.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   90	
   College	
  of	
  Licensed	
  Practical	
  Nurses	
  of	
  Alberta.	
  CLPNA	
  (2008).	
  Practice	
  Memo.	
  	
   Change	
  in	
  Scope	
  of	
  Practice	
  –	
  intravenous	
  initiation.	
  Edmonton.	
  Obtained	
  online	
  on	
  September	
  30,	
  2012	
  from	
  http://www.clpna.com/Portals/0/Files/doc_V-­‐3_IV_Initiation.pdf.	
  	
  College	
  of	
  Licensed	
  Practical	
  Nurses	
  of	
  BC.	
  CLPNBC	
  (2009).	
  Basic	
  competencies	
  for	
  	
  Licensed	
  Practical	
  Nurses’	
  Professional	
  Practice.	
  Burnaby.	
  College	
  of	
  Practical	
  Nursing	
  BC	
  (CLPNBC).	
  (2012).	
  CLPNBC	
  Recognized	
  PN	
  Programs.	
  	
  Burnaby.	
  Coyne,	
  M.,	
  Reinert,	
  B.,	
  Cater.,	
  K.,	
  Dubusson,	
  W.,	
  Smith,	
  J.,	
  Parker,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Chatham,	
  C.	
  	
  (1999).	
  Nurses'	
  knowledge	
  of	
  pain	
  assessment,	
  pharmacologic	
  and	
  nonpharmacologic	
  interventions.	
  Clinical	
  Nursing	
  Research,	
  8,	
  153-­‐165.	
  	
  Davidson,	
  S.	
  (2003).	
  Pain	
  in	
  hemodialysis	
  patients:	
  prevalence,	
  cause,	
  severity,	
  and	
  	
  	
   management.	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Kidney	
  Diseases,	
  42(6),	
  1239-­‐1247.	
  Deandrea,	
  S.,	
  Montanari,	
  M.,	
  Moja,	
  L.	
  &	
  Apolone,	
  G.	
  (2008).	
  Prevalence	
  of	
  	
  under	
  treatment	
  in	
  cancer	
  pain.	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  published	
  literature.	
  Annals	
  of	
   Oncology,	
  19(12),	
  1985-­‐1991.	
  	
  Desbiens	
  NA,	
  Mueller-­‐Rizner	
  N,	
  Connors	
  AF	
  Jr,	
  Hamel,	
  MB	
  &	
  Wenger,	
  NS.	
  (1997).	
  	
  Pain	
  in	
  the	
  oldest-­‐old	
  during	
  hospitalization	
  and	
  up	
  to	
  one	
  year	
  later.	
  Journal	
   American	
  Geriatric	
  Society,	
  45,	
  1167-­‐1172.	
  Dix,	
  P.,	
  Sandhar,	
  B.,	
  Murdoch,	
  J.,	
  &	
  MacIntrye,	
  P.	
  (2004).	
  Pain	
  on	
  medical	
  wards	
  in	
  a	
  	
  district	
  general	
  hospital.	
  British	
  Journal	
  of	
  Anesthesia,	
  92	
  (2),	
  235-­‐237.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   91	
   Drayer,	
  R.A.,	
  Henderson,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Reidenberg,	
  M.	
  (1999).	
  Barriers	
  to	
  better	
  pain	
  	
  management	
  control	
  in	
  hospitalized	
  patients.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pain	
  and	
  Symptom	
   Management,	
  17,	
  434-­‐440.	
  Edwards,	
  P.,	
  Roberts,	
  I.,	
  Clarke,	
  M.,	
  DiGuiseppi,	
  C.,	
  Pratap,	
  S.,	
  Wentz,	
  R.,	
  &	
  Kwan,	
  I.	
  	
  (2002).	
  Increasing	
  response	
  rates	
  to	
  postal	
  questionnaires:	
  systematic	
  review.	
  British	
  Medical	
  Journal,	
  324,	
  1-­‐9.	
  	
  Effros,	
  R.,	
  Fletcher,	
  C.,	
  Gebo,	
  K.,	
  Courtney,	
  V.,	
  Halter,	
  J.,	
  Hazzard,	
  W.,	
  &	
  High,	
  K.	
  (2008).	
  	
  Aging	
  and	
  infectious	
  diseases:	
  Workshop	
  on	
  HIV	
  infection	
  and	
  aging	
  –	
  What	
  is	
  known	
  and	
  future	
  research	
  directions.	
  Clinical	
  Infectious	
  Disease,	
  47,	
  542–553.	
  	
  Elcigil,	
  A.,	
  Maltepe,	
  H.,	
  Esrefgil,	
  G.,	
  &	
  Mutafoglu,	
  K.	
  (2011).	
  Nurses'	
  	
  perceived	
  barriers	
  to	
  assessment	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  a	
  university	
  hospital.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pediatric	
  Hematology/Oncology,	
  33(1),	
  S33-­‐8.	
  Ersek,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Poe,	
  C.	
  (2004).	
  Pain.	
  In	
  S.	
  Lewis,	
  M.	
  Heitkemper,	
  Dirksen,	
  S.	
  R.,	
  Medical-­‐	
  Surgical	
  Nursing-­‐-­‐-­‐assessment	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  clinical	
  problems,	
  St.	
  Louis:	
  Mosby.	
  	
  Ferrell,	
  B.R.,	
  McGuire,	
  D.B.,	
  &	
  Donovan,	
  M.I.	
  (1993).	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  beliefs	
  regarding	
  	
  pain	
  in	
  a	
  sample	
  of	
  nursing	
  faculty.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Professional	
  Nursing,	
  9(2),	
  79-­‐88.	
  Ford,	
  R.,	
  &	
  Bammer,	
  G.	
  (2009).	
  A	
  research	
  routine	
  to	
  assess	
  bias	
  introduced	
  by	
  low	
  	
  response	
  rates	
  in	
  postal	
  surveys.	
  Nurse	
  Researcher,	
  17(1).	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   92	
   Franco,	
  Sprung	
  &	
  Trentman,	
  (2005).	
  The	
  impact	
  of	
  the	
  joint	
  commission	
  	
  for	
  accreditation	
  of	
  healthcare	
  organizations	
  pain	
  initiative	
  on	
  perioperative	
  opiate	
  consumption	
  and	
  recovery	
  room	
  length	
  of	
  stay.	
  Anesthesia	
  and	
   Analgesia,	
  100(1),	
  162-­‐168.	
  	
  Gibbs,	
  G.	
  (1995).	
  Nurses	
  in	
  private	
  nursing	
  homes:	
  A	
  study	
  of	
  their	
  knowledge	
  and	
  	
  attitudes	
  to	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  palliative	
  care.	
  Palliative	
  Medicine,	
  9,	
  245-­‐253.	
  Gloth,	
  F.M.,	
  2001.	
  Pain	
  management	
  in	
  older	
  adults:	
  prevention	
  and	
  treatment.	
  	
   Journal	
  of	
  American	
  Geriatric	
  Society	
  49,	
  188–199.	
  Gureje,	
  O.,	
  Von	
  Korff,	
  M.,	
  Simon,	
  G.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Gater,	
  R.	
  (1998).	
  Persistent	
  pain	
  and	
  well-­‐	
  being:	
  A	
  world	
  health	
  organization	
  study	
  in	
  primary	
  care.	
  JAMA:	
  The	
  Journal	
   of	
  the	
  American	
  Medical	
  Association,	
  280(2),	
  147-­‐151.	
  Gregory,	
  J	
  &	
  Haigh,	
  C.	
  (2008).	
  Multi-­‐disciplinary	
  interpretations	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  	
  patients	
  on	
  medical	
  units.	
  Nurse	
  Education	
  in	
  Practice,	
  8,	
  249–257.	
  Helfand,	
  M	
  &	
  Freeman,	
  M	
  (2009).	
  Assessment	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  acute	
  	
  pain	
  in	
  adult	
  medical	
  inpatients:	
  a	
  systematic	
  review.	
  Pain	
  Medicine,	
  10(7),	
  1183-­‐1199.	
  Helme	
  RD,	
  Gibson	
  SJ.	
  (2001).	
  The	
  epidemiology	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  elderly	
  people.	
  Clinical	
  	
   Geriatric	
  Medicine,	
  17,	
  417–431.	
  Herr,	
  K	
  &	
  Garland,	
  L.	
  (2001).	
  Assessment	
  and	
  measurement	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  adults.	
  	
   Clinical	
  Geriatric	
  Medicine,	
  17(3),	
  457-­‐476.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   93	
   Herr,	
  K.,	
  Titler,	
  M.	
  Schilling,	
  M,	
  Marsh,	
  L,	
  Xie,	
  X.,	
  Ardery,	
  G.,	
  Clarke,	
  W.,	
  &	
  Everett,	
  L.	
  	
  (2004).	
  Evidence-­‐based	
  assessment	
  of	
  acute	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  adults	
  current	
  nursing	
  practices	
  and	
  perceived	
  barriers.	
  Clinical	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pain,	
  20(5),	
  331-­‐340.	
  Hoffman,	
  D.,	
  &	
  Tarzian,	
  A.	
  (2001).	
  The	
  girl	
  who	
  cried	
  pain:	
  a	
  bias	
  against	
  women	
  in	
  	
  the	
  treatment	
  of	
  pain.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Law	
  Medical	
  Ethics,	
  29,	
  13-­‐27.	
  	
  Holder,	
  E.,	
  &	
  Fedorowicz,	
  A.	
  (2011).	
  Nurses'	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  	
  management	
  in	
  hospitalized	
  adults.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Continuing	
  Education	
  in	
   Nursing,	
  42(6),	
  251-­‐257.	
  	
  Horbury,	
  C.,	
  Henderson,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Bromley,	
  B.	
  (2005).	
  Influences	
  of	
  patient	
  behavior	
  on	
  	
  clinical	
  nurses'	
  pain	
  assessment:	
  Implications	
  for	
  continuing	
  education.	
  The	
   Journal	
  of	
  Continuing	
  Educational	
  in	
  Nursing,	
  36(1),	
  18-­‐24.	
  Horgas,	
  A	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  S.	
  (2008).	
  Nursing	
  standard	
  of	
  practice	
  protocol:	
  pain	
  management	
  	
   in	
  older	
  adults.	
  Obtained	
  from	
  http://consultgerirn.org/topics/pain/want_to_know_more#item_3.	
  Huang,	
  N.,	
  Cunningham,	
  F.,	
  Laurito,	
  C.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Chen,	
  C.	
  (2001).	
  Can	
  we	
  do	
  	
  better	
  with	
  postoperative	
  pain	
  management?	
  The	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
   Surgery,	
  182(5),	
  440-­‐448.	
  Huizinga,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Peltier,	
  A.	
  (2007).	
  Painful	
  diabetic	
  neuropathy:	
  A	
  management-­‐	
  centered	
  review.	
  Clinical	
  Diabetes,	
  25(1),	
  6-­‐15.	
  Idell,	
  C.,	
  Grant,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Kirk,	
  C.	
  (2007).	
  Alignment	
  of	
  pain	
  reassessment	
  practices	
  and	
  	
  national	
  comprehensive	
  cancer	
  network	
  guidelines.	
  Oncology	
  Nursing	
  Forum,	
   34(3),	
  661-­‐671.	
   	
   	
  	
   94	
   Idvall,	
  E.,	
  Berg,	
  K.,	
  Unosson,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Bruidin,	
  L.	
  (2005).	
  Differences	
  between	
  nurse	
  and	
  	
  patient	
  assessments	
  on	
  postoperative	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  two	
  hospitals.	
   Journal	
  of	
  Evaluation	
  in	
  Clinical	
  Practice,	
  11(5),	
  444-­‐451.	
  Innis,	
  J.,	
  Bikaunieks,	
  N.,	
  Petryshen,	
  P.,	
  Zellermyer,	
  V.,	
  &	
  Ciccarelli,	
  L.	
  (2004).	
  Patient	
  	
  satisfaction	
  and	
  pain	
  management:	
  An	
  educational	
  approach.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Nursing	
  Care	
  Quality,	
  19(4),	
  322-­‐327.	
  Inouye,	
  S.	
  (2006).	
  Delirium	
  in	
  older	
  persons.	
  The	
  New	
  England	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medicine,	
  	
  354,	
  1157-­‐	
  1165.	
  	
  International	
  Association	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  pain	
  (IASP).	
  (2011).	
  IASP	
  Taxonomy.	
  	
  Obtained	
  from	
  pain.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Pain_Defi...isplay.cfm&ContentID=1728#Pain.	
  Joint	
  Commission	
  on	
  Accreditation	
  of	
  Healthcare	
  Organizations.	
  (2000).	
  	
  Comprehensive	
  accreditation	
  manual	
  for	
  long-­‐term	
  care.	
  Oakbrook,	
  IL:	
  Joint	
  Commission	
  on	
  the	
  Accreditation	
  of	
  Healthcare	
  Organizations.	
  (1999).	
  Facts	
  	
  about	
  pain	
  management.	
  Retrieved	
  on	
  August	
  18,	
  2012	
  from	
  http://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/Pain_Management.pdf.	
  	
  Jones,	
  K.,	
  Fink,	
  R.,	
  Pepper,	
  G.,	
  Hutt,	
  E.,	
  Vojir,	
  C.,	
  Scott,	
  J.,	
  Clark,	
  L.,	
  &	
  Mellis,	
  K.	
  (2004).	
  I	
  Improving	
  nursing	
  home	
  staff	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  about	
  pain.	
  The	
   Gerontological	
  Society	
  of	
  America,	
  44(4),	
  469–478.	
  Jovey,	
  R.	
  (2008).	
  Barriers	
  to	
  optimum	
  pain	
  management.	
  Managing	
  pain:	
  The	
  	
   Canadian	
  healthcare	
  professional’s	
  reference.	
  The	
  Canadian	
  Pain	
  Society.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   95	
   Kaasalainen,	
  S.,	
  &	
  Crook,	
  J.	
  (2004).	
  An	
  exploration	
  of	
  seniors'	
  ability	
  to	
  report	
  pain.	
  	
   Clinical	
  Nursing	
  Research,	
  13(3),	
  199-­‐215.	
  	
  Kaasalainen,	
  E.,	
  Coker,	
  E.,	
  Dolovich,	
  D.,	
  Papaioannou,	
  A.,	
  Hadjistavropoulos,	
  T.,	
  Emili,	
  	
  A.,	
  &	
  Ploeg,	
  J.	
  (2007).	
  Pain	
  management	
  decision	
  making	
  among	
  long-­‐term	
  care	
  physicians	
  and	
  nurses.	
  Western	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing	
  Research,	
  29	
  (5),	
  561-­‐580.	
  	
  Kroenke,	
  K	
  &	
  Price,	
  RK.	
  (1993).	
  Symptoms	
  in	
  the	
  community.	
  Prevalence,	
  	
  classification,	
  and	
  psychiatric	
  comorbidity.	
  Archieves	
  of	
  Internal	
  Medicine,	
   153(21),	
  2474-­‐2480.	
  	
  Krulewitch,	
  H.,	
  London,	
  M.,	
  Skakel,	
  V.,	
  Lundstedt,	
  G.,	
  Thomason,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Burmmel-­‐	
  Smith,	
  K.	
  (2002).	
  Assessment	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  cognitively	
  impaired	
  older	
  adults:	
  A	
  	
  comparison	
  of	
  pain	
  assessment	
  tools	
  and	
  their	
  use	
  by	
  nonprofessional	
  caregivers.	
  Journal	
  of	
  American	
  Geriatrics	
  Society,	
  48(12),1607-­‐1611.	
  Kumar,	
  A	
  &	
  Allcock,	
  N.	
  (2008).	
  Pain	
  in	
  older	
  people.	
  Reflections	
  and	
  experiences	
  	
  from	
  an	
  older	
  persons	
  perspective:	
  Helped	
  the	
  age.	
  British	
  Pain	
  Society.	
  Obtained	
  from	
  	
  http://www.britishpainsociety.org/book_pain_in_older_age_ID7826.pdf.	
  	
  	
  Larue,	
  F.,	
  Fontaine,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Colleau,	
  S.	
  (1997).	
  Underestimation	
  and	
  undertreatment	
  of	
  	
  pain	
  in	
  HIV	
  disease:	
  Multicentre	
  study.	
  (1997).	
  British	
  Medical	
  Journal,	
  314,	
  23.	
  Larme,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Pugh,	
  J.	
  (1998).	
  Attitudes	
  of	
  primary	
  care	
  providers	
  toward	
  diabetes	
  –	
  	
  barriers	
  to	
  guideline	
  implementation.	
  Diabetes	
  Care,	
  21(9),	
  1391-­‐1396.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   96	
   Leveille,	
  S.,	
  Bean,	
  J.,	
  Bandeen-­‐Roche,	
  C.,	
  Jones,	
  R.,	
  Hochberg,	
  M	
  &	
  Guralnik,	
  J.	
  (2002).	
  	
  Musculoskeletal	
  pain	
  and	
  risk	
  for	
  falls	
  in	
  older	
  disabled	
  women	
  living	
  in	
  the	
  community.	
  American	
  Geriatrics	
  Society,	
  50(4),	
  671-­‐678.	
  	
  Lewthwaite,	
  B.	
  J.,	
  Jabusch,	
  K.	
  M.,	
  Wheeler,	
  B.	
  J.,	
  Schnell-­‐Hoehn,	
  K.	
  N.,	
  Mills,	
  J.,	
  Estrella-­‐	
  Holder,	
  &	
  Fedorowicz,	
  A.	
  (2011).	
  Nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  hospitalized	
  adults.	
  The	
  Journal	
  of	
  Continuing	
  Education	
   in	
  Nursing,	
  42(6),	
  251-­‐258.	
  Liu,	
  L.,	
  So,	
  W.,	
  &	
  Fong,	
  D.	
  (2008).	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  	
  management	
  among	
  nurses	
  in	
  Hong	
  Kong	
  medical	
  units.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Clinical	
   Nursing,	
  17,	
  2014-­‐2021.	
  Lynch,	
  EP.,	
  Lazor,	
  MA.,	
  Gellis.,	
  JE	
  (1998).	
  The	
  impact	
  of	
  post	
  operative	
  paon	
  on	
  the	
  developpent	
  of	
  post	
  operative	
  delirium.	
  Anesthesia	
  Analogue,	
  86,	
  781-­‐785.	
  	
  Lynch,	
  M.,	
  Schopflocher,	
  D.,	
  Taenzer	
  P	
  &	
  Sinclair	
  C.	
  (2009).	
  Research	
  funding	
  for	
  pain	
  in	
  Canada.	
  Pain	
  Resident	
  Management,	
  14,	
  113-­‐115.	
  Macpherson,	
  C.	
  (2009).	
  Undertreating	
  pain	
  violates	
  ethical	
  principles.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Medical	
  Ethics,	
  35,	
  603-­‐606.	
  Magni,	
  G.,	
  Marchetti,	
  M.,	
  Moreschi,	
  C.,	
  Merskey,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Luchini,	
  SR.	
  (1993).	
  Chronic	
  	
  musculoskeletal	
  pain	
  and	
  depressive	
  symptoms	
  in	
  the	
  National	
  Health	
  and	
  Nutrition	
  Examination.	
  I.	
  Epidemiologic	
  follow-­‐up	
  study.	
  Pain,	
  53(2),163-­‐168.	
  Matthews,	
  E.,	
  &	
  Malcolm,	
  C.	
  (2007).	
  Nurses'	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  in	
  pain	
  	
  management	
  practice.	
  British	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing,	
  16(3),	
  174-­‐179.	
  Mayberry,	
  R.,	
  Mili,	
  F.,	
  &	
  Ofili,	
  E.	
  (2000).	
  Racial	
  and	
  ethnic	
  differences	
  in	
  access	
  to	
  	
  medical	
  care.	
  Medical	
  Care	
  Research	
  and	
  Review,	
  57,	
  108-­‐145.	
   	
   	
  	
   97	
   McCaffery,	
  M	
  &	
  Pasero,	
  C.	
  (1999).	
  Pain:	
  clinical	
  manual.	
  St.	
  Louis:	
  Mosby.	
  	
  McCaffrey,	
  M.,	
  Rolling	
  F.,	
  Pasero.,	
  C.	
  (2000).	
  Nurse’s	
  personal	
  opinions	
  about	
  	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  and	
  their	
  effect	
  on	
  recorded	
  assessments	
  and	
  titration	
  of	
  	
  opioid	
  doses.	
  Pain	
  Management	
  Nursing,	
  1,	
  79-­‐87.	
  	
  McCaffery,	
  M.	
  (1991).	
  How	
  would	
  you	
  respond	
  to	
  these	
  patients	
  in	
  pain?	
  Nursing,	
  	
   21(6),	
  34-­‐37.	
  	
  McCaffery	
  M.	
  (1968).	
  Nursing	
  practice	
  theories	
  related	
  to	
  cognition,	
  bodily	
  pain,	
  and	
  	
   man-­‐environment	
  interactions.	
  Los	
  Angeles.	
  McCaffery,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  B.	
  R.	
  (1995).	
  Nurses'	
  knowledge	
  about	
  cancer	
  pain:	
  A	
  survey	
  of	
  five	
  countries.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pain	
  and	
  Symptom	
  Management,	
  10(5),	
  356-­‐369.	
  McCaffery,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Ferrell,	
  B.	
  R.	
  (1997).	
  Nurses'	
  knowledge	
  of	
  pain	
  assessment	
  and	
  management:	
  How	
  much	
  progress	
  have	
  we	
  made?	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pain	
  and	
   Symptom	
  Management,	
  14(3),	
  175-­‐188.	
  McCleary,	
  L.,	
  Ellis,	
  J.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Rowley,	
  B.	
  (2004).	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  the	
  pain	
  resource	
  nurse	
  	
  role:	
  A	
  resource	
  for	
  improving	
  pediatric	
  pain	
  management.	
  Pain	
  Management	
   Nursing,	
  5(1),	
  29-­‐36.	
  McColl,	
  E.,	
  Jacoby,	
  A.,	
  Thomas,	
  L.,	
  Soutter,	
  J.,	
  Bamford,	
  C.,	
  Steen,	
  N.,	
  Thomas,	
  R.,	
  Harvey,	
  E.,	
  Garratt,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Bond,	
  J.	
  (2001).	
  Design	
  and	
  use	
  of	
  questionnaires:	
  a	
  review	
  	
  of	
  best	
  practice	
  applicable	
  to	
  surveys	
  of	
  health	
  service	
  staff	
  and	
  patients.	
   Health	
  Technology	
  Assessment,	
  5(31),	
  1-­‐256.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   98	
   McInnes,	
  C.,	
  Druyts,	
  E.,	
  Harvard,	
  S.,	
  Gilbert,	
  M.,	
  Tyndall,	
  M.,	
  Lia,	
  V.,	
  Wood,	
  E.,	
  	
  Montaner,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Hogg,	
  R.	
  (2009).	
  HIV/AIDS	
  in	
  Vancouver,	
  British	
  Columbia:	
  A	
  growing	
  epidemic.	
  Harm	
  Reduction	
  Journal,	
  6(5),	
  1-­‐5.	
  McMaster	
  University.	
  (2011).	
  Pain	
  Management.	
  Department	
  of	
  anesthesia.	
  	
  Obtained	
  from	
  http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/anesthesia/pain_management.html.	
  Melzack,	
  R.	
  (1996).	
  Gate	
  control	
  theory:	
  on	
  the	
  evolution	
  of	
  pain	
  concepts.	
  Pain	
  	
   Forum,	
  5(1),	
  128–138.	
  Melotti,	
  R.	
  M.,	
  Samolsky-­‐Dekel,	
  B.	
  G.,	
  Ricchi,	
  E.,	
  Chiari,	
  P.,	
  Di	
  Giacinto,	
  I.,	
  	
  Carosi,	
  F.,	
  &	
  Di	
  Nino,	
  G.	
  (2005).	
  Pain	
  prevalence	
  and	
  predictors	
  among	
  inpatients	
  in	
  a	
  major	
  Italian	
  teaching	
  hospital.	
  A	
  baseline	
  survey	
  towards	
  a	
  pain	
  free	
  hospital.	
  European	
  Journal	
  of	
  Pain,	
  9(5),	
  485-­‐495.	
  Miaskowski,	
  C.,	
  Crews,	
  J.,	
  Ready,	
  LB.,	
  Paul,	
  SM.,	
  &	
  Ginsberg,	
  B.	
  (1999).	
  Anesthesia-­‐	
  based	
  pain	
  services	
  improve	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  postoperative	
  pain	
  management.	
   Pain,	
  80,	
  23-­‐29.	
  	
  Miller,	
  W.	
  (1996).	
  Chronic	
  Pain.	
  Health	
  Reports,	
  Statistics	
  Canada,	
  7(4),	
  82-­‐003.	
  	
  Retrieved	
  from	
  http://www.statcan.gc.ca/studies-­‐etudes/82-­‐003/archive/1996/5018989-­‐eng.pdf.	
  Moulin,	
  D.	
  E.,	
  Clark,	
  A.	
  J.,	
  Speechley,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Morley-­‐Forster,	
  P.	
  K.	
  (2002).	
  Chronic	
  pain	
  	
  in	
  Canada-­‐-­‐prevalence,	
  treatment,	
  impact	
  and	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesia.	
  Pain	
   Research	
  &	
  Management:	
  The	
  Journal	
  of	
  the	
  Canadian	
  Pain,	
  7(4),	
  179-­‐184.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   99	
   Morrison,	
  R.	
  S.,	
  Magaziner,	
  J.,	
  Gilbert,	
  M.,	
  Koval,	
  K.	
  J.,	
  McLaughlin,	
  M.	
  A.,	
  Orosz,	
  G.,	
  &	
  Siu,	
  A.	
  L.	
  (2003).	
  Relationship	
  between	
  pain	
  and	
  opioid	
  analgesics	
  on	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  delirium	
  following	
  hip	
  fracture.	
  The	
  Journals	
  of	
  Gerontology,	
   58(1),	
  76-­‐81.	
  Murphy,	
  C.	
  (1993).	
  Increasing	
  the	
  response	
  rates	
  of	
  reluctant	
  professionals	
  to	
  mail	
  surveys.	
  Applied	
  Nursing	
  Research,	
  6(3),	
  137-­‐141.	
  	
  	
  Musclow,	
  S.	
  L.,	
  Sawhney,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Watt-­‐Watson,	
  J.	
  (2002).	
  The	
  emerging	
  role	
  of	
  advanced	
  nursing	
  practice	
  in	
  acute	
  pain	
  management	
  throughout	
  Canada.	
   Clinical	
  Nurse	
  Specialist,	
  16(2),	
  63-­‐67.	
  Pasero,	
  C	
  &	
  McCaffrey,	
  M.	
  (1997).	
  Pain	
  ratings:	
  The	
  fifth	
  vital	
  sign.	
  American	
  	
   Journal	
  of	
  Nursing,	
  97(2),	
  15.	
  	
  Peter,	
  E.,	
  &	
  Watt-­‐Watson,	
  J.	
  (2002).	
  Unrelieved	
  pain:	
  an	
  ethical	
  and	
  epistemological	
  	
  analysis	
  of	
  distrust	
  in	
  patients.	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing	
  Research,	
  34(2),	
  65.	
  	
  Phillips,	
  C.	
  J.	
  &	
  Schopflocher,	
  D.	
  (2008).	
  The	
  Economics	
  of	
  Chronic	
  Pain.	
  Health	
  	
  Policy	
  Perspectives	
  on	
  Chronic	
  Pain.	
  UK,	
  Wiley	
  Press.	
  Picker	
  Institute	
  Europe.	
  (2007).	
  A	
  Hidden	
  problem:	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  people.	
  Obtained	
  	
  from	
  http://www.pickereurope.org/Filestore/PIE_reports/project_reports/paincarehomes_final.pdf.	
  	
  Prkachin,	
  K.,	
  Solomon,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Ross,	
  J.	
  (2007).	
  Underestimation	
  of	
  pain	
  by	
  health-­‐care	
  	
  providers:	
  Towards	
  a	
  model	
  of	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  inferring	
  pain	
  in	
  others.	
   Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing	
  Research,	
  39(2),	
  88-­‐106.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   100	
   Puls-­‐McColl,	
  P.,	
  Holden,	
  J.,	
  Buschmann,	
  M.	
  (2001).	
  Pain	
  management:	
  as	
  assessment	
  	
  of	
  surgical	
  nurse’s	
  knowledge.	
  Medical	
  Surgical	
  Nursing,	
  10(4),	
  185-­‐191.	
  Puntillo,	
  K.,	
  Neighbor, M.,	
  O'Neil	
  N.,	
  &	
  Nixon	
  R.	
  (2003).	
  Accuracy	
  of	
  emergency	
  	
  nurses	
  in	
  assessment	
  of	
  patients'	
  pain.	
  Pain	
  Management	
  Nursing,	
  4(4),	
  171-­‐175.	
  	
  Registered	
  Nurses	
  Association	
  of	
  Ontario	
  (RNAO).	
  (2002a).	
  Assessment	
  and	
  	
   management	
  of	
  pain.	
  Toronto,	
  ON:	
  Registered	
  Nurses	
  Association	
  of	
  Ontario.	
  Registered	
  Nurses	
  Association	
  of	
  Ontario	
  (RNAO).	
  (2007).	
  Assessment	
  and	
  	
   Management	
  of	
  Pain	
  in	
  the	
  Elderly.	
  Toronto,	
  ON:	
  Registered	
  Nurses	
  Association	
  of	
  Ontario.	
  Reyes-­‐Gibby,	
  C,	
  Aday,	
  L.,	
  Cleeland,	
  C.	
  (2002).	
  Impact	
  of	
  pain	
  on	
  self-­‐rated	
  health	
  in	
  	
  the	
  community-­‐dwelling	
  older	
  adults.	
  Pain,	
  95,	
  75-­‐82.	
  	
  Richard,	
  J	
  &	
  Hubbert,	
  A.	
  (2007).	
  Experiences	
  of	
  expert	
  nurses	
  in	
  caring	
  for	
  patients	
  	
  with	
  postoperative	
  pain.	
  Pain	
  Management	
  Nursing,	
  8(3),	
  122-­‐129.	
  Ross,	
  M	
  &	
  Crook,	
  J.	
  (1998).	
  Elderly	
  recipients	
  of	
  home	
  nursing	
  services:	
  pain,	
  	
  disability	
  and	
  functional	
  competence.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Advanced	
  Nursing,	
  27,	
  1117-­‐26.	
  Royal	
  College	
  of	
  Anesthetics.	
  (2010).	
  Acute	
  pain	
  service.	
  Guidance	
  on	
  the	
  provision	
  of	
  	
  anesthesia	
  services	
  for	
  Acute	
  Pain	
  Management.	
  Chapter	
  6.	
  Obtained	
  from	
  http://www.rcoa.ac.uk/docs/gpas-­‐acutepain.pdf.	
  Russell,	
  T.,	
  Madsen,	
  R.,	
  Flesner,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Rantz,	
  M.	
  (2010).	
  Pain	
  management	
  in	
  nursing	
  	
  homes.	
  What	
  do	
  quality	
  measure	
  scores	
  tell	
  us?	
  Journal	
  of	
  Gerontological	
   Nursing.	
  36(12),	
  49-­‐56.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   101	
   Sawyer,	
  J.,	
  Haslam,	
  L.,	
  Daines,	
  P.,	
  &	
  Stilos,	
  K	
  (2010).	
  Pain	
  Prevalence	
  Study	
  in	
  a	
  Large	
  	
  Canadian	
  Teaching	
  Hospital.	
  Round	
  2:	
  Lessons	
  Learned?	
  Pain	
  Management	
   Nursing,	
  11(1),	
  45-­‐55.	
  	
  Schneider,	
  J.	
  (2011).	
  Addiction	
  and	
  Chronic	
  Pain.	
  National	
  Pain	
  Foundation.	
  	
  	
   Obtained	
  from	
  	
  http://www.nationalpainfoundation.org/articles/134/addiction-­‐and-­‐chronic-­‐pain.	
  	
  Schopflocher,	
  D.,	
  R.	
  Jovey,	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010).	
  The	
  burden	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  Canada,	
  results	
  of	
  a	
  	
  nanos	
  survey.	
  Pain	
  Resident	
  Manage:	
  In	
  Press.	
  Smith,	
  H.,	
  Aronson,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Sokol,	
  N.	
  (2011).	
  Evaluation	
  of	
  Chronic	
  Pain	
  in	
  Adults.	
  Up	
  to	
  	
  date.	
  	
  Smith,	
  B.,	
  Elliott,	
  AM.,	
  Chambers,	
  WA.,	
  Smith,	
  C.,	
  Hannaford,	
  P	
  &	
  Penny,	
  K.	
  (2001).	
  	
  The	
  impact	
  of	
  chronic	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  community.	
  Family	
  Practice,	
  18(3),	
  292-­‐	
  299.	
  Söderhamn,	
  O.,	
  Lindencrona,	
  C.,	
  Gustavsson,	
  S.	
  (2001).	
  Attitudes	
  toward	
  older	
  	
  	
   people	
  among	
  nursing	
  students	
  and	
  registered	
  nurses	
  in	
  Sweden.	
  Nurse	
   	
   Education	
  Today,	
  21,	
  225-­‐229.	
  	
  Solomon,	
  P.	
  2001.	
  Congruence	
  between	
  health	
  professionals'	
  and	
  patients'	
  pain	
  	
  	
   ratings:	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  literature.	
  Scandinavian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Caring	
  Sciences,	
  15,	
  	
   174-­‐180.	
  Stephenson,	
  N.	
  L.	
  (1994).	
  A	
  comparison	
  of	
  nurse	
  and	
  patient:	
  Perceptions	
  of	
  	
  postsurgical	
  pain.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Intravenous	
  Nursing:	
  The	
  Official	
  Publication	
  of	
  	
   the	
  Intravenous	
  Nurses	
  Society,	
  17(5),	
  235-­‐239.	
   	
   	
  	
   102	
   Statistics	
  Canada.	
  (2006).	
  Office	
  of	
  Nursing	
  Policy.	
  Nursing	
  Issues:	
  General	
  Statistics.	
  	
  Obtained	
  from	
  http://www.hc-­‐sc.gc.ca/hcs-­‐sss/alt_formats/hpb-­‐dgps/pdf/nurs-­‐infirm/2006-­‐stat-­‐eng.pdf.	
  Statistics	
  Canada.	
  (2008).	
  Chronic	
  pain	
  in	
  Canadian	
  seniors.	
  Obtained	
  from	
  	
  http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-­‐quotidien/080221/dq080221b-­‐eng.htm.	
  Stoller,	
  E.	
  P.,	
  Forster,	
  L.	
  E.,	
  &	
  Portugal,	
  S.	
  (1993).	
  Self-­‐care	
  responses	
  to	
  	
  symptoms	
  by	
  older	
  people.	
  A	
  health	
  diary	
  study	
  of	
  illness	
  behavior.	
  Medical	
   Care,	
  31(1),	
  24-­‐42.	
  Shugarman,	
  L.,	
  Goebel,	
  Lanto,	
  A.,	
  Asch,	
  S.,	
  Sherbourne,	
  C.,	
  Lee,	
  M.,	
  Rubenstein,	
  L.,	
  	
  Wen,	
  L.,	
  Meredith,	
  L.,	
  Lorenz.	
  (2010).	
  Nursing	
  staff,	
  patient,	
  and	
  environmental	
  factors	
  associated	
  with	
  accurate	
  pain	
  assessment.	
  Journal	
  of	
   Pain	
  Symptom	
  Management,	
  40(5),	
  723-­‐733.	
  Tang,	
  N.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Crane,	
  C.	
  (2006).	
  Suicidality	
  in	
  chronic	
  pain:	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  	
  prevalence,	
  risk	
  factors	
  and	
  psychological	
  links.	
  Psychological	
  Medicine,	
   36(5),	
  575-­‐586.	
  Tapp,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Kropp,	
  D.	
  E.	
  (2005).	
  Evaluating	
  pain	
  management	
  delivered	
  by	
  direct	
  care	
  	
  	
   nurses.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Nursing	
  Care	
  Quality,	
  20(2),167-­‐173.	
  Taverner,	
  T.	
  (2005).	
  The	
  evidence	
  on	
  perceptions	
  of	
  pain	
  in	
  older	
  people.	
  Nursing	
  	
   Times,	
  101(36),	
  36.	
  	
  Taylor,	
  A.,	
  Skelton,	
  J.,	
  &	
  Butcher,	
  J.	
  (1984).	
  	
  Duration	
  of	
  pain	
  condition	
  and	
  physical	
  	
  pathology	
  as	
  determinants	
  of	
  nurses’	
  assessments	
  of	
  patients	
  in	
  pain.	
  Nursing	
   Research,	
  4-­‐8.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   103	
   University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  (2005).	
  Guidance	
  Notes	
  for	
  the	
  Application	
  for	
  	
   Behavioural	
  Ethical	
  Review.	
  UBC	
  Behavioural	
  Research	
  Ethics	
  Board.	
  Van	
  Niekerk,	
  LM	
  &	
  Martin,	
  F.	
  (2003).	
  The	
  impact	
  of	
  the	
  nurse-­‐physician	
  relationship	
  	
  on	
  barriers	
  encountered	
  by	
  nurses	
  during	
  pain	
  management.	
  Pain	
   management	
  nurses,	
  4,	
  3-­‐10.	
  	
  Watt-­‐Watson,	
  J.,	
  McGillion,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Hunter,	
  J.	
  Choiniere,	
  M.,	
  Clark,	
  AJ.,	
  Dewar,	
  	
  A.,	
  Johnston,	
  C.,	
  Lynch,	
  M.,	
  Morley-­‐Forster,	
  .P,	
  Moulin,	
  D.,	
  Thie	
  ,N.,	
  von	
  Baeyer,	
  CL.,	
  &	
  Webber,	
  K.	
  (2009).	
  A	
  Survey	
  of	
  pain	
  curricula	
  in	
  prelicensure	
  health	
  science	
  faculties	
  in	
  Canadian	
  universities.	
  Pain	
  Research	
  and	
  Management,	
   14(6),	
  439-­‐444.	
  Watt-­‐Watson,	
  J.,	
  Stevens,	
  B.,	
  Katz,	
  J.,	
  Costello,	
  J.,	
  Reid,	
  G.	
  J.,	
  &	
  David,	
  T.	
  	
  (2004).	
  Impact	
  of	
  preoperative	
  education	
  on	
  pain	
  outcomes	
  after	
  coronary	
  artery	
  bypass	
  graft	
  surgery.	
  Pain,	
  109(1-­‐2),	
  73-­‐85.	
  Wang,	
  H	
  &	
  Tsai,	
  Y.	
  (2010).	
  Nurse’s	
  knowledge	
  and	
  barriers	
  regarding	
  pain	
  	
  management	
  in	
  intensive	
  care	
  units.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Clinical	
  Nursing,	
  19,	
  3188-­‐3196.	
  Whelan,	
  C.,	
  Jin,	
  L.,	
  &	
  Meltzer,	
  D.	
  (2004).	
  Pain	
  and	
  Satisfaction	
  With	
  Pain	
  Control	
  in	
  	
  Hospitalized	
  Medical	
  Patients:	
  No	
  Such	
  Thing	
  as	
  Low	
  Risk.	
  American	
  Medical	
   Association,	
  164,	
  175-­‐180.	
  	
  Williams,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Manias,	
  E.	
  (2007).	
  A	
  structured	
  literature	
  review	
  of	
  pain	
  	
  assessment	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  patients	
  with	
  chronic	
  kidney	
  disease.	
  Journal	
   of	
  Clinical	
  Nursing,	
  17,	
  69-­‐81.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   104	
   Wilson,	
  B.	
  (2007).	
  Nursing	
  knowledge	
  of	
  pain.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Clinical	
  Nursing,	
  16,	
  1012-­‐	
  1020.	
  	
  Wood,	
  E.,	
  Kerr,	
  T.,	
  Spittal,	
  P.,	
  Tyndall,	
  M.,	
  O’Shaughnessy,	
  &	
  M.,	
  Schechter,	
  M.	
  (2003).	
  	
  The	
  health	
  care	
  and	
  fiscal	
  costs	
  of	
  illicit	
  drug	
  use	
  epidemic:	
  The	
  impact	
  of	
  	
  conventional	
  drug	
  control	
  strategies.	
  BC	
  Medical	
  Journal,	
  45(3),	
  128-­‐134.	
  	
  Wood,	
  E.,	
  Tyndall,	
  M.,	
  Spittal.,	
  Li,	
  K.,	
  Kerr,	
  T.,	
  Hogg,	
  R.,	
  Montaner,	
  J.,	
  O’Shaughnessy,	
  M	
  	
  &	
  Schechter,	
  M.	
  (2001).	
  Unsafe	
  injection	
  practices	
  in	
  a	
  cohort	
  of	
  injection	
  drug	
  users	
  in	
  Vancouver:	
  Could	
  safer	
  injecting	
  rooms	
  help?	
  Canadian	
  Medical	
   Association,	
  165(4),	
  405-­‐410.	
  	
  Yates,	
  P.,	
  Dewar,	
  A.,	
  &	
  Fentiman,	
  B.	
  (1995).	
  Pain:	
  the	
  views	
  of	
  elderly	
  people	
  living	
  in	
  	
  long-­‐term	
  residential	
  care	
  settings.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Advanced	
  Nursing,	
  21(1),	
  667-­‐674.	
  	
  Yildirim,	
  Y.,	
  Cicek,	
  F.,	
  &	
  Uyar,	
  M.	
  (2008).	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  Turkish	
  	
  oncology	
  nurses	
  about	
  cancer	
  pain	
  management.	
  Pain	
  Management	
  Nursing,	
  	
   9(1),	
  17-­‐25.	
  	
  Wildlitz,	
  M	
  &	
  Martin,	
  D.	
  (2002).	
  Substance	
  abuse	
  in	
  older	
  adults:	
  An	
  Overview.	
  	
   Geriatrics,	
  57(12),	
  29-­‐34.	
  	
  Wood,	
  E.,	
  Kerr,	
  T.,	
  Spittal,	
  P.,	
  Tyndall,	
  M.,	
  O’Shaughnessy,	
  M.,	
  &	
  Schechter,	
  M.	
  (2003).	
  	
  The	
  health	
  care	
  and	
  fiscal	
  costs	
  of	
  the	
  illicit	
  drug	
  use	
  epidemic:	
  The	
  impact	
  of	
  conventional	
  drug	
  control	
  strategies.	
  BC	
  Medical	
  Journal,	
  45(3),	
  128-­‐134.	
  	
  Zimmerman,	
  D	
  &	
  Stewart,	
  J.	
  (1993).	
  Postoperative	
  pain	
  management	
  and	
  acute	
  Pain	
  	
  Service	
  activity	
  in	
  Canada.	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Anesthesia,	
  40(6),	
  568-­‐575.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   105	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   APPENDICES	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   106	
   	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Appendix	
  A	
  Invitation	
  Letter	
  To	
  Participants	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   107	
   	
   Invitation	
  Letter	
  Nurses’	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  Management	
  in	
  the	
  Medical	
  Unit	
  Dear	
  Participant,	
   	
   Why	
  is	
  this	
  research	
  being	
  done?	
  	
   This	
  research	
  focuses	
  on	
  Nurses’	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  Management	
  in	
  the	
  Medical	
  Unit.	
  This	
  research	
  is	
  part	
  of	
  a	
  requirement	
  for	
  a	
  Masters	
  of	
  Science	
  in	
  Nursing	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  and	
  is	
  being	
  conducted	
  by	
  Michelle	
  Wong,	
  a	
  practicing	
  registered	
  nurse.	
  	
  	
   Why	
  have	
  you	
  been	
  asked?	
  	
   You	
  are	
  invited	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  because	
  you	
  are	
  a	
  nurse	
  who	
  is	
  able	
  to	
  assess	
  and	
  effectively	
  manage	
  patients’	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  unit.	
  Your	
  experience	
  and	
  opinions	
  are	
  very	
  important	
  and	
  are	
  needed	
  to	
  give	
  an	
  accurate	
  picture	
  of	
  the	
  current	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  of	
  pain	
  management	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  unit.	
  	
  	
   What	
  happens	
  if	
  you	
  decide	
  to	
  take	
  part	
  in	
  this	
  study?	
   • You	
  will	
  be	
  asked	
  to	
  complete	
  an	
  anonymous	
  questionnaire	
  about	
  your	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  a	
  brief	
  demographic	
  questionnaire.	
   • The	
  questionnaire	
  will	
  take	
  you	
  approximately	
  15	
  minutes	
  to	
  complete.	
  	
   What	
  happens	
  if	
  you	
  do	
  not	
  want	
  to	
  take	
  part	
  in	
  the	
  study?	
   • There	
  will	
  be	
  no	
  impact	
  on	
  you	
  if	
  you	
  do	
  not	
  want	
  to	
  take	
  part	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
   • The	
  study	
  is	
  entirely	
  voluntary	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  your	
  choice	
  whether	
  or	
  not	
  you	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  participate.	
  	
   What	
  are	
  the	
  benefits	
  of	
  participating?	
   • There	
  may	
  or	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  direct	
  benefits	
  to	
  you	
  for	
  participating	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  It	
  is	
  hoped	
  that	
  the	
  study	
  will	
  be	
  valuable	
  to	
  you	
  by	
  increasing	
  your	
  awareness	
  of	
  your	
  knowledge	
  level	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
   • You	
  will	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  view	
  answers	
  to	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  by	
  going	
  to	
  a	
  website	
  provided	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  document.	
  	
   • You	
  will	
  be	
  provided	
  with	
  resources	
  to	
  Pain	
  BC,	
  Canadian	
  Pain	
  Coalition,	
  and	
  the	
  contacts	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  on	
  the	
  research	
  committee	
  for	
  further	
  information	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   108	
   	
  	
  	
   What	
  will	
  happen	
  to	
  the	
  information	
  gained?	
   • All	
  information	
  will	
  be	
  stored	
  securely,	
  on	
  a	
  computer	
  with	
  password	
  protection,	
  by	
  the	
  researcher;	
  only	
  the	
  research	
  team	
  will	
  have	
  access	
  to	
  the	
  data.	
   • A	
  report	
  will	
  be	
  produced	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  this	
  research	
  and	
  a	
  summary	
  of	
  this	
  will	
  be	
  made	
  available	
  to	
  you,	
  if	
  you	
  wish.	
  	
   What	
  will	
  the	
  study	
  cost	
  me?	
   • There	
  are	
  no	
  direct	
  costs	
  to	
  you	
  for	
  participating	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  You	
  will	
  not	
  be	
  paid	
  for	
  your	
  participation.	
  We	
  have	
  included	
  chocolate	
  as	
  a	
  token	
  of	
  our	
  appreciation	
  for	
  your	
  time	
  and	
  consideration	
  in	
  participating	
  in	
  our	
  study,	
  however,	
  you	
  are	
  not	
  obliged	
  to	
  do	
  so.	
  	
   What	
  if	
  I	
  have	
  complaints	
  or	
  concerns	
  about	
  the	
  study?	
   • If	
  you	
  have	
  any	
  concerns	
  about	
  your	
  rights	
  as	
  a	
  research	
  subject	
  and/or	
  your	
  experiences	
  while	
  participating	
  in	
  this	
  study,	
  you	
  may	
  contact	
  the	
  Research	
  Subject	
  Information	
  Line	
  in	
  the	
  UBC	
  Office	
  of	
  Research	
  Services	
  at	
  604-­‐822-­‐8598,	
  or	
  if	
  long	
  distance	
  e-­‐mail	
  RSIL@ors.ubc.ca,	
  or	
  call	
  toll	
  free	
  1-­‐877-­‐822-­‐8598.	
   • You	
  may	
  also	
  contact	
  St.	
  Paul’s	
  Hospital	
  Ethics	
  Board	
  by	
  calling	
  604-­‐806-­‐8851.	
  	
  	
   Consent:	
   • Taking	
  part	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  is	
  entirely	
  up	
  to	
  you.	
  You	
  have	
  the	
  right	
  to	
  refuse	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
   • If	
  you	
  decide	
  to	
  take	
  part,	
  you	
  may	
  choose	
  to	
  pull	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  at	
  any	
  time	
  without	
  giving	
  a	
  reason	
  and	
  without	
  any	
  negative	
  impact	
  on	
  your	
  employment.	
   • The	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  will	
  be	
  reported	
  in	
  a	
  graduate	
  thesis	
  and	
  may	
  also	
  be	
  published	
  in	
  journal	
  articles.	
  	
   • If	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  is	
  completed	
  it	
  will	
  be	
  assumed	
  that	
  consent	
  has	
   been	
  given.	
  	
   	
   If	
  you	
  have	
  any	
  further	
  questions	
  please	
  contact	
  Michelle	
  or	
  anyone	
  on	
  the	
   research	
  team.	
  	
   	
   Thank	
  you!	
  Your	
  participation	
  is	
  greatly	
  appreciated	
  in	
  improving	
  pain	
   management.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   109	
   	
   	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Appendix	
  B	
  Demographic	
  Profile	
  (DP)	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   110	
   Demographic	
  Profile	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Please	
  check	
  one	
  response	
  	
   	
   1.	
  Age	
  	
   ☐	
  20	
  –	
  29	
  years	
  old	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  ☐	
  30	
  –	
  39	
  years	
  old	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ☐	
  40	
  –	
  49	
  years	
  old	
   	
  	
   ☐	
  50	
  –	
  59	
  years	
  old	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ☐	
  60	
  years	
  old	
  or	
  greater	
  	
  	
   2.	
  Gender	
  	
  	
   ☐	
  Female	
   ☐	
  Male	
  	
  	
  	
   3.	
  Type	
  of	
  Nurse	
  	
   ☐	
  Registered	
  nurse	
  (RN)	
   ☐	
  Licensed	
  practical	
  nurse	
  (LPN)	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   4.	
  Highest	
  level	
  of	
  education	
  	
  	
   ☐	
  Diploma	
   ☐	
  Bachelor’s	
  degree	
   	
  	
  	
  ☐	
  Master’s	
  degree	
   	
  	
  ☐	
  Doctorate	
  	
  	
  	
   5.	
  Year(s)	
  of	
  professional	
  experience	
  as	
  a	
  nurse:	
  	
   	
  ________Year(s)	
  	
  	
  	
   6.	
  Have	
  you	
  attended	
  any	
  conferences,	
  in-­‐hospital	
  training,	
  workshops,	
  or	
   courses	
  in	
  pain	
  management	
  since	
  graduating	
  as	
  a	
  nurse?	
  	
  	
   ☐	
  No	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   ☐	
  Yes	
   	
   	
   	
   7.	
  During	
  a	
  typical	
  week	
  at	
  work,	
  how	
  often	
  do	
  you	
  care	
  for	
  patients	
  in	
  pain?	
  	
   ☐	
  Never	
   	
   	
   	
   ☐	
  Occasionally	
  (1-­‐2	
  patients)	
  	
  	
   ☐	
  Often	
  (greater	
  than	
  2	
  patients)	
   ☐	
  Always	
  	
  (greater	
  than	
  3	
  patients)	
   	
   	
  	
   111	
   	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  Appendix	
  C	
  Nurses	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  Management	
  (KASRP)	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   112	
   Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
   Regarding	
  Pain	
  	
   True	
  or	
  False	
  –	
  Circle	
  the	
  correct	
  answer	
  	
  	
  	
   T	
   F	
   1.	
  Vital	
  signs	
  are	
  always	
  reliable	
  indicators	
  of	
  the	
  intensity	
  of	
  a	
  patient’s	
  pain.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   2.	
  Patients	
  who	
  can	
  be	
  distracted	
  from	
  pain	
  usually	
  do	
  not	
  have	
  severe	
  pain.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   4.	
  Patients	
  may	
  sleep	
  in	
  spite	
  of	
  severe	
  pain.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   5.	
  Aspirin	
  and	
  other	
  nonsteroidal	
  anti-­‐inflammatory	
  agents	
  are	
  NOT	
  effective	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  analgesics	
  for	
  painful	
  bone	
  metastases.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   6.	
  Respiratory	
  depression	
  rarely	
  occurs	
  in	
  patients	
  who	
  have	
  been	
  receiving	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  stable	
  doses	
  of	
  opioids	
  over	
  a	
  period	
  of	
  months.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   7.	
  Combining	
  analgesics	
  that	
  work	
  by	
  different	
  mechanisms	
  (e.g.,	
  combining	
  an	
  	
  opioid	
  with	
  an	
  NSAID)	
  may	
  result	
  in	
  better	
  pain	
  control	
  with	
  fewer	
  side	
  effects	
  than	
  using	
  a	
  single	
  analgesic	
  agent.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   8.	
  The	
  usual	
  duration	
  of	
  analgesia	
  of	
  1-­‐2	
  mg	
  morphine	
  IV	
  is	
  4-­‐5	
  hours.	
  	
   	
   T	
   F	
   9.	
  Research	
  shows	
  that	
  promethazine	
  (Phenergan)	
  and	
  hydroxyzine	
  (Atarax)	
  are	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  reliable	
  potentiators	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesics.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   10.	
  Opioids	
  should	
  not	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  patients	
  with	
  a	
  history	
  of	
  substance	
  abuse.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   11.	
  Morphine	
  has	
  a	
  dose	
  ceiling	
  (i.e.,	
  a	
  dose	
  above	
  which	
  no	
  greater	
  pain	
  relief	
  can	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  be	
  obtained).	
  	
   T	
   F	
   12.	
  Elderly	
  patients	
  cannot	
  tolerate	
  opioids	
  for	
  pain	
  relief.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   13.	
  Patients	
  should	
  be	
  encouraged	
  to	
  endure	
  as	
  much	
  pain	
  as	
  possible	
  before	
  using	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  an	
  opioid.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   15.	
  A	
  patient’s	
  spiritual	
  beliefs	
  may	
  lead	
  them	
  to	
  think	
  pain	
  and	
  suffering	
  are	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  necessary.	
  	
   	
   T	
   F	
   16.	
  After	
  an	
  initial	
  dose	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesic	
  is	
  given,	
  subsequent	
  doses	
  should	
  be	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  adjusted	
  in	
  accordance	
  with	
  the	
  individual	
  patient’s	
  response.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   17.	
  Giving	
  patients	
  sterile	
  water	
  by	
  injection	
  (placebo)	
  is	
  a	
  useful	
  test	
  to	
  determine	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  if	
  the	
  pain	
  is	
  real.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   18.	
  Oxycodone	
  5	
  mg	
  +	
  acetaminophen	
  325	
  mg	
  PO	
  is	
  approximately	
  equal	
  to	
  10	
  mg	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  of	
  morphine	
  PO.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   113	
   T	
   F	
   19.	
  If	
  the	
  source	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  is	
  unknown,	
  opioids	
  should	
  not	
  be	
  used	
  during	
  the	
  pain	
  evaluation	
  period,	
  as	
  this	
  could	
  mask	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
  correctly	
  diagnose	
  the	
  cause	
  of	
  pain.	
   	
   T	
   F	
   20.	
  Anticonvulsant	
  drugs	
  such	
  as	
  gabapentin	
  (Neurontin)	
  produce	
  optimal	
  pain	
  	
  	
  relief	
  after	
  a	
  single	
  dose.	
  	
   T	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   F	
   21.	
  Benzodiazepines	
  are	
  not	
  effective	
  pain	
  relievers	
  unless	
  the	
  pain	
  is	
  due	
  to	
  muscle	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  spasms.	
  	
   T	
   F	
   22.	
  Narcotic/opioid	
  addiction	
  is	
  defined	
  as	
  a	
  chronic	
  neurobiologic	
  disease,	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  characterized	
  by	
  behaviors	
  that	
  include	
  one	
  or	
  more	
  of	
  the	
  following:	
  impaired	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  control	
  over	
  drug	
  use,	
  compulsive	
  use,	
  continued	
  use	
  despite	
  harm,	
  and	
  craving.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   114	
   Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  	
  Multiple	
  Choice	
  –	
  Circle	
  the	
  correct	
  answer	
  	
  	
  23.	
   The	
  recommended	
  route	
  of	
  administration	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesics	
  for	
  patients	
  with	
  persistent	
  cancer-­‐related	
  pain	
  is	
  _____	
  :	
  	
   a.	
  intravenous.	
  	
   b.	
  intramuscular.	
  	
   c.	
  subcutaneous.	
  	
   d.	
  oral.	
  	
   e.	
  rectal.	
  	
  24.	
   The	
  recommended	
  route	
  administration	
  of	
  opioid	
  analgesics	
  for	
  patients	
  with	
  brief,	
  severe	
  pain	
  of	
  sudden	
  onset	
  such	
  as	
  trauma	
  or	
  postoperative	
  pain	
  is	
  _____	
  :	
  	
   a.	
  intravenous.	
  	
   b.	
  intramuscular.	
  	
  	
   c.	
  subcutaneous.	
  	
  	
   d.	
  oral.	
  	
  	
   e.	
  rectal.	
  	
  25.	
   Which	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  analgesic	
  medications	
  is	
  considered	
  the	
  drug	
  of	
  choice	
  for	
  the	
  treatment	
  of	
  prolonged	
  moderate	
  to	
  severe	
  pain	
  for	
  cancer	
  patients?	
  	
   a.	
  codeine.	
  	
  	
   b.	
  morphine.	
  	
  	
   c.	
  meperidine.	
  	
  	
   d.	
  tramadol.	
  	
  26.	
   Which	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  IV	
  doses	
  of	
  morphine	
  administered	
  over	
  a	
  4	
  hour	
  period	
  would	
  be	
  equivalent	
  to	
  30	
  mg	
  of	
  oral	
  morphine	
  given	
  q	
  4	
  hours?	
  	
   a.	
  Morphine	
  5	
  mg	
  IV.	
  	
  	
   b.	
  Morphine	
  10	
  mg	
  IV.	
  	
   c.	
  Morphine	
  30	
  mg	
  IV.	
  	
  	
   d.	
  Morphine	
  60	
  mg	
  IV.	
  	
  27.	
   Analgesics	
  for	
  post-­‐operative	
  pain	
  should	
  initially	
  be	
  given	
  _____:	
  	
   a.	
  around	
  the	
  clock	
  on	
  a	
  fixed	
  schedule.	
  	
   b.	
  only	
  when	
  the	
  patient	
  asks	
  for	
  the	
  medication.	
  	
  	
   c.	
  only	
  when	
  the	
  nurse	
  determines	
  that	
  the	
  patient	
  has	
  moderate	
  or	
  greater	
  discomfort.	
  	
  28.	
   A	
  patient	
  with	
  persistent	
  cancer	
  pain	
  has	
  been	
  receiving	
  daily	
  opioid	
  analgesics	
  for	
  2	
  months.	
  Yesterday	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  receiving	
  morphine	
  200	
  mg/hour	
  intravenously.	
  Today	
  he	
  has	
  been	
  receiving	
  250	
  mg/hour	
  intravenously.	
  The	
  likelihood	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  developing	
  clinically	
  significant	
  respiratory	
  depression	
  in	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  new	
  comorbidity	
  is	
  _______:	
  	
   a.	
  less	
  than	
  1%.	
  	
  	
   b.	
  1-­‐10%.	
  	
  	
   c.	
  11-­‐20%.	
  	
  	
   d.	
  21-­‐40%.	
  	
   e.	
  >	
  41%.	
   	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   115	
   	
  29.	
   The	
  most	
  likely	
  reason	
  a	
  patient	
  with	
  pain	
  would	
  request	
  increased	
  doses	
  of	
  pain	
  medication	
  is	
  ________:	
  	
   a.	
  The	
  patient	
  is	
  experiencing	
  increased	
  pain.	
  	
   b.	
  The	
  patient	
  is	
  experiencing	
  increased	
  anxiety	
  or	
  depression.	
  	
  	
   c.	
  The	
  patient	
  is	
  requesting	
  more	
  staff	
  attention.	
  	
  	
   d.	
  The	
  patient’s	
  requests	
  are	
  related	
  to	
  addiction.	
  	
  30.	
   Which	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  is	
  useful	
  for	
  treatment	
  of	
  cancer	
  pain?	
  	
  	
   a.	
  Ibuprofen	
  (Motrin).	
  	
   b.	
  Hydromorphone	
  (Dilaudid).	
  	
  	
   c.	
  Gabapentin	
  (Neurontin).	
  	
   d.	
  All	
  of	
  the	
  above.	
  	
  31.	
   The	
  most	
  accurate	
  judge	
  of	
  the	
  intensity	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  pain	
  is:	
  	
   a.	
  the	
  treating	
  physician.	
  	
   b.	
  the	
  patient’s	
  primary	
  nurse.	
  	
   c.	
  the	
  patient.	
  	
   d.	
  the	
  pharmacist.	
  	
   e.	
  the	
  patient’s	
  spouse	
  or	
  family.	
  	
  32.	
   Which	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  describes	
  the	
  best	
  approach	
  for	
  cultural	
  considerations	
  in	
  caring	
  for	
  patients	
  in	
  pain:	
  	
  	
   a.	
  There	
  are	
  no	
  longer	
  cultural	
  influences	
  in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  diversity	
  of	
  the	
  population.	
  	
  	
   b.	
  Cultural	
  influences	
  can	
  be	
  determined	
  by	
  an	
  individual’s	
  ethnicity	
  (e.g.,	
  Asians	
  are	
  stoic,	
  Italians	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  are	
  expressive,	
  etc).	
  	
   c.	
  Patients	
  should	
  be	
  individually	
  assessed	
  to	
  determine	
  cultural	
  influences.	
  d.	
  Cultural	
  influences	
  can	
  be	
  determined	
  by	
  an	
  individual’s	
  socioeconomic	
  status	
  (e.g.,	
  blue	
  collar	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  workers	
  report	
  more	
  pain	
  than	
  white	
  collar	
  workers).	
  	
  33.	
   How	
  likely	
  is	
  it	
  that	
  patients	
  who	
  develop	
  pain	
  already	
  have	
  an	
  alcohol	
  and/or	
  drug	
  abuse	
  problem?	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   a.	
  <	
  1%	
   	
   b.	
  5	
  –	
  15%	
   	
   c.	
  25	
  -­‐	
  50%	
   	
   d.	
  75	
  -­‐	
  100%	
  	
  34.	
   The	
  time	
  to	
  peak	
  effect	
  for	
  morphine	
  given	
  IV	
  is	
  _____:	
  	
  	
   a.	
  15	
  min.	
   	
   b.	
  45	
  min.	
  	
   	
   c.	
  1	
  hour	
  	
   	
   d.	
  2	
  hours	
  	
  35.	
   The	
  time	
  to	
  peak	
  effect	
  for	
  morphine	
  given	
  orally	
  is	
  _____:	
  	
   	
  	
   a.	
  5	
  min.	
   	
   b.	
  30	
  min.	
  	
   	
   c.	
  1	
  –	
  2	
  hours	
  	
   d.	
  3	
  hours	
  	
  36.	
   Following	
  abrupt	
  discontinuation	
  of	
  an	
  opioid,	
  physical	
  dependence	
  is	
  manifested	
  by	
  the	
  following	
  _____	
  :	
  	
   a.	
  sweating,	
  yawning,	
  diarrhea	
  and	
  agitation	
  with	
  patients	
  when	
  the	
  opioid	
  is	
  abruptly	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  discontinued.	
  	
   b.	
  Impaired	
  control	
  over	
  drug	
  use,	
  compulsive	
  use,	
  and	
  craving.	
  	
   c.	
  The	
  need	
  for	
  higher	
  doses	
  to	
  achieve	
  the	
  same	
  effect.	
  	
   d.	
  a	
  and	
  b.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   116	
   Case	
  Studies	
   Two	
  patient	
  case	
  studies	
  are	
  presented.	
  For	
  each	
  patient	
  you	
  are	
  asked	
  to	
  make	
   decisions	
  about	
  pain	
  and	
  medication.	
   Directions:	
  Please	
  select	
  one	
  answer	
  for	
  each	
  question . 	
  	
  	
  37	
   Patient	
  A:	
  Andrew	
  is	
  25	
  years	
  old	
  and	
  this	
  is	
  his	
  first	
  day	
  following	
  abdominal	
  surgery.	
  As	
  you	
  enter	
  his	
  room,	
  he	
  smiles	
  at	
  you	
  and	
  continues	
  talking	
  and	
  joking	
  with	
  his	
  visitor.	
  Your	
  assessment	
  reveals	
  the	
  following	
  information:	
  BP	
  =	
  120/80;	
  HR	
  =	
  80;	
  R	
  =	
  18;	
  on	
  a	
  scale	
  of	
  0	
  to	
  10	
  (0	
  =	
  no	
  pain/discomfort,	
  10	
  =	
  worst	
  pain/discomfort)	
  he	
  rates	
  his	
  pain	
  as	
  8.	
  	
  A.	
   On	
  the	
  patient’s	
  record	
  you	
  must	
  mark	
  his	
  pain	
  on	
  the	
  scale	
  below.	
  	
  	
   Circle	
  the	
  number	
  that	
  represents	
  your	
  assessment	
  of	
  Andrew’s	
  pain . 	
  	
  0	
  	
   1	
  	
   2	
  	
   3	
   	
  4	
  	
   5	
  	
   6	
  	
   7	
   	
  8	
  	
   9	
  	
   10	
  	
  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐	
  No	
  pain/discomfort	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Worst	
  Pain/discomfort	
  	
  B.	
  Your	
  assessment,	
  above,	
  is	
  made	
  two	
  hours	
  after	
  he	
  received	
  morphine	
  2	
  mg	
  IV.	
  Half	
  hourly	
  pain	
  ratings	
  following	
  the	
  injection	
  ranged	
  from	
  6	
  to	
  8	
  and	
  he	
  had	
  no	
  clinically	
  significant	
  respiratory	
  depression,	
  sedation,	
  or	
  other	
  untoward	
  side	
  effects.	
  He	
  has	
  identified	
  2/10	
  as	
  an	
  acceptable	
  level	
  of	
  pain	
  relief.	
  His	
  physician’s	
  order	
  for	
  analgesia	
  is	
  “morphine	
  IV	
  1-­‐3	
  mg	
  q1h	
  PRN	
  pain	
  relief.”	
  	
  	
   Check	
  the	
  action	
  you	
  will	
  take	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
  1.	
  Administer	
  no	
  morphine	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
  	
  2.	
  Administer	
  morphine	
  1	
  mg	
  IV	
  now.	
  	
  3.	
  Administer	
  morphine	
  2	
  mg	
  IV	
  now.	
  	
  4.	
  Administer	
  morphine	
  3	
  mg	
  IV	
  now.	
  	
  	
  38.	
   Patient	
  B:	
  Robert	
  is	
  25	
  years	
  old	
  and	
  this	
  is	
  his	
  first	
  day	
  following	
  abdominal	
  surgery.	
  As	
  you	
  enter	
  his	
  room,	
  he	
  is	
  lying	
  quietly	
  in	
  bed	
  and	
  grimaces	
  as	
  he	
  turns	
  in	
  bed.	
  Your	
  assessment	
  reveals	
  the	
  following	
  information:	
  BP	
  =	
  120/80;	
  HR	
  =	
  80;	
  R	
  =	
  18;	
  on	
  a	
  scale	
  of	
  0	
  to	
  10	
  (0	
  =	
  no	
  pain/discomfort,	
  10	
  =	
  worst	
  pain/discomfort)	
  he	
  rates	
  his	
  pain	
  as	
  8.	
  A.	
   On	
  the	
  patient’s	
  record	
  you	
  must	
  mark	
  his	
  pain	
  on	
  the	
  scale	
  below.	
  	
  	
   Circle	
  the	
  number	
  that	
  represents	
  your	
  assessment	
  of	
  Andrew’s	
  pain . 	
  	
  0	
  	
   1	
  	
   2	
  	
   3	
   	
  4	
  	
   5	
  	
   6	
  	
   7	
   	
  8	
  	
   9	
  	
   10	
  	
  -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐	
  No	
  pain/discomfort	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Worst	
  Pain/discomfort	
  	
  Your	
  assessment,	
  above,	
  is	
  made	
  two	
  hours	
  after	
  he	
  received	
  morphine	
  2	
  mg	
  IV.	
  Half	
  hourly	
  pain	
  ratings	
  following	
  the	
  injection	
  ranged	
  from	
  6	
  to	
  8	
  and	
  he	
  had	
  no	
  clinically	
  significant	
  respiratory	
  depression,	
  sedation,	
  or	
  other	
  untoward	
  side	
  effects.	
  He	
  has	
  identified	
  2/10	
  as	
  an	
  acceptable	
  level	
  of	
  pain	
  relief.	
  His	
  physician’s	
  order	
  for	
  analgesia	
  is	
  “morphine	
  IV	
  1-­‐3	
  mg	
  q1h	
  PRN	
  pain	
  relief.”	
  	
  	
   Check	
  the	
  action	
  you	
  will	
  take	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
  1.	
  Administer	
  no	
  morphine	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
  	
  2.	
  Administer	
  morphine	
  1	
  mg	
  IV	
  now.	
  	
  3.	
  Administer	
  morphine	
  2	
  mg	
  IV	
  now.	
  	
  4.	
  Administer	
  morphine	
  3	
  mg	
  IV	
  now.	
   	
   	
  	
   117	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Appendix	
  D	
  The	
  Clinical	
  Decision-­‐Making	
  Questionnaire	
  in	
  Pain	
  Management	
  (CDMPQ)	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   118	
   The	
  Clinical	
  Decision-­‐Making	
  Questionnaire	
  in	
  Pain	
  Management	
  (CDMPQ)	
   	
  Given	
  that	
  all	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  have	
  the	
  same	
  degree	
  of	
  pain	
  using	
  the	
  following	
  scale	
  (1–5)	
  rate	
  the	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  you	
  would	
  choose	
  to	
  spend	
  managing	
  the	
  pain	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  patients	
  (1=little	
  time	
  and	
  energy,	
  5=maximum	
  time	
  and	
  energy).	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   Patients	
  condition	
   	
   1	
   2	
   3	
   4	
   5	
  Cancer	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Substance	
  abuse	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  AIDS	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Multiple	
  trauma	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Suicide	
  attempt	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Elderly	
  patients	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Renal	
  patients	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Diabetes	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  General	
  surgery	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Chronic	
  pain	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Laparoscopic	
  surgery	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   119	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Appendix	
  E	
  Additional	
  Resources	
  About	
  Pain	
  Management	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   120	
   Additional	
  Resources	
  about	
  Pain	
   Management	
  	
   	
  Answers	
  to	
  this	
  questionnaire	
  will	
  be	
  posted	
  in	
  the	
  nursing	
  conference	
  room	
  in	
  about	
  one	
  month.	
  We	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  you	
  for	
  your	
  time	
  and	
  effort	
  in	
  participating	
  in	
  this	
  research	
  study.	
  	
  	
  Please	
  feel	
  free	
  to	
  contact	
  the	
  study	
  team	
  or	
  visit	
  the	
  websites	
  below	
  for	
  more	
  information.	
  	
  	
  	
   Pain	
  BC	
  	
  http://www.painbc.ca	
  	
  	
   Canadian	
  Pain	
  Society	
  http://www.canadianpainsociety.ca/en/	
  	
  	
   Canadian	
  Pain	
  Coalition	
  	
  http://prc.canadianpaincoalition.ca/en/	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   121	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Appendix	
  F	
  Letter	
  of	
  Initial	
  Contact	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   122	
   	
   Letter	
  of	
  Introduction	
  to	
  the	
  Nursing	
  Operations	
   Leader	
  	
  Medicine	
  Operations	
  Leader	
  St.	
  Paul’s	
  Hospital	
   	
  Vancouver,	
  BC	
  	
  Dear	
  Shannon,	
  	
  	
   My	
  name	
  is	
  Michelle	
  Wong.	
  I	
  am	
  a	
  registered	
  nurse	
  working	
  in	
  the	
  area	
  of	
  Chronic	
  Pain.	
  I	
  am	
  currently	
  completing	
  my	
  Masters	
  of	
  Science	
  in	
  Nursing	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  As	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  graduate	
  thesis,	
  I	
  am	
  interested	
  in	
  conducting	
  a	
  study	
  on	
  Nurses’	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
   Management	
  in	
  the	
  Medical	
  Unit.	
   	
   Why	
  this	
  study	
  is	
  important?	
   	
   One	
  in	
  five	
  adults	
  suffer	
  from	
  chronic	
  pain	
  (Moulin,	
  Clark,	
  Speechley,	
  et	
  al.,	
  2002)	
  and	
  fifty	
  percent	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  have	
  reported	
  experiencing	
  chronic	
  pain	
  (Helme	
  &	
  Gibson,	
  2001).	
  Pain	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  distressing	
  symptoms	
  for	
  both	
  patients	
  and	
  caregivers	
  (Gloth,	
  2001)	
  however	
  patients	
  continue	
  to	
  suffer	
  from	
  poorly	
  managed	
  pain	
  (Herr,	
  Titler,	
  Schilling	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Horgas	
  &	
  Yoon,	
  2008).	
  	
  Nurses	
  spend	
  the	
  most	
  time	
  with	
  patients	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  health	
  care	
  team	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  a	
  major	
  contributor	
  to	
  adequate	
  pain	
  control.	
  With	
  increased	
  knowledge	
  and	
  education	
  towards	
  pain	
  management,	
  nurses	
  can	
  be	
  an	
  advocate	
  and	
  the	
  cornerstone	
  for	
  pain	
  management.	
  Given	
  their	
  important	
  role,	
  it	
  is	
  central	
  to	
  understand	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  on	
  the	
  medical	
  unit.	
  The	
  medical	
  unit	
  is	
  a	
  desirable	
  site	
  for	
  this	
  research	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  high	
  percentage	
  of	
  older	
  adults	
  who	
  are	
  admitted	
  in	
  this	
  unit.	
  	
  	
   What	
  this	
  study	
  involves?	
  	
  The	
  research	
  will	
  include	
  a	
  census	
  of	
  all	
  RNs	
  and	
  LPNs	
  who	
  work	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  unit	
  at	
  St.	
  Paul’s.	
  Each	
  nurse	
  will	
  complete	
  a	
  paper	
  questionnaire	
  that	
  will	
  take	
  about	
  15	
  minutes	
  to	
  complete.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   123	
   	
   	
  The	
  questionnaire	
  includes:	
  i)	
  Demographic	
  profile	
  (age,	
  professional	
  experience,	
  pain	
  background,	
  level	
  of	
  education);	
  	
  ii)	
  Knowledge	
  and	
  Attitudes	
  Survey	
  Regarding	
  Pain	
  (KASRP),	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  nurses	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  regarding	
  pain	
  management	
  and	
  lastly;	
  	
  iii)	
  Clinical	
  Decision-­‐Making	
  Questionnaire	
  in	
  Pain	
  (CDMPQ),	
  to	
  capture	
  a	
  clinicians	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  they	
  would	
  spend	
  managing	
  pain	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  patients	
  conditions.	
  	
  If	
  feasible,	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  extend	
  an	
  invitation	
  to	
  all	
  medical	
  nurses	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  display	
  posters	
  on	
  the	
  nursing	
  unit	
  bulletin	
  boards	
  that	
  remind	
  nurses	
  about	
  this	
  study.	
  I	
  would	
  also	
  like	
  to	
  make	
  visits	
  to	
  the	
  medical	
  units	
  during	
  morning	
  rounds	
  to	
  describe	
  the	
  study	
  briefly	
  and	
  encourage	
  participation	
  in	
  this	
  research	
  study.	
  	
  	
  	
  No	
  names	
  or	
  identifying	
  information	
  will	
  be	
  asked	
  of	
  nurses	
  on	
  the	
  questionnaire.	
  All	
  data	
  will	
  be	
  kept	
  secured	
  in	
  a	
  locked	
  filing	
  cabinet	
  and	
  information	
  put	
  into	
  the	
  computer	
  will	
  be	
  password	
  protected,	
  encrypted	
  and	
  only	
  those	
  on	
  the	
  research	
  committee	
  will	
  have	
  access	
  to.	
  Results	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  may	
  be	
  published	
  in	
  a	
  nursing	
  research	
  journal	
  and	
  the	
  study	
  findings	
  will	
  provide	
  you	
  with	
  a	
  more	
  complete	
  picture	
  of	
  nurses’	
  knowledge	
  and	
  attitudes	
  in	
  the	
  medical	
  unit	
  and	
  possible	
  areas	
  where	
  pain	
  education	
  is	
  appropriate.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Sincerely,	
  	
  	
  Michelle	
  Wong,	
  RN,	
  MSN	
  student	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   124	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Appendix	
  G	
  Advertisement	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   125	
   	
  	
   	
   What do you know about PAIN? Medical RNs and LPNs, we need your help! Will take less than 15 minutes Please pick up your questionnaire at the nursing station! Version 2: May 2, 2012 This is a UBC study Co-Investigator: Michelle Wong, RN  Nurses’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Pain Management in the Medical Unit Chocolate is included for your time and consideration in this study Contact Information Primary Investigator: Tarnia Taverner, RN, PhD, UBC Associate Professor !

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0073486/manifest

Comment

Related Items