Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Playing the market : contemporary Christian music and the theory of religious economy Carrick, Jamie 2012-12-31

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
ubc_2013_spring_carrick_jamie.pdf [ 555.59kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0073408.json
JSON-LD: 1.0073408+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0073408.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0073408+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0073408+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0073408+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0073408 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0073408.txt
Citation
1.0073408.ris

Full Text

	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   PLAYING	
  THE	
  MARKET:	
   CONTEMPORARY	
  CHRISTIAN	
  MUSIC	
  &	
  	
   THE	
  THEORY	
  OF	
  RELIGIOUS	
  ECONOMY	
   	
    	
    by	
   	
   Jamie	
  Carrick	
    B.A.,	
  The	
  University	
  of	
  Calgary,	
  2007	
   	
   	
   	
   A	
  THESIS	
  SUBMITTED	
  IN	
  PARTIAL	
  FULFILLMENT	
  OF	
   THE	
  REQUIREMENTS	
  FOR	
  THE	
  DEGREE	
  OF	
   	
   	
   MASTER	
  OF	
  ARTS	
   	
   in	
   	
   The	
  Faculty	
  of	
  Graduate	
  Studies	
   	
   (Religious	
  Studies)	
   	
   	
   THE	
  UNIVERSITY	
  OF	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
   (Vancouver)	
   	
   	
   October	
  2012	
   	
   	
   ©	
  Jamie	
  Carrick,	
  2012	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    Abstract	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  (CCM)	
  is	
  a	
  fascinating	
  and	
  understudied	
  part	
   of	
  the	
  religious	
  vitality	
  of	
  modern	
  American	
  religion.	
  In	
  this	
  dissertation	
  the	
  theory	
   of	
  religious	
  economy	
  is	
  proposed	
  as	
  a	
  valuable	
  and	
  highly	
  serviceable	
   methodological	
  approach	
  for	
  the	
  scholarly	
  study	
  of	
  CCM.	
  The	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
   economy,	
  or	
  the	
  marketplace	
  approach,	
  incorporates	
  economic	
  concepts	
  and	
   terminology	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  better	
  explain	
  American	
  religion	
  in	
  its	
  distinctly	
  American	
   context.	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  I	
  propose	
  three	
  ways	
  in	
  which	
  this	
  method	
  can	
  be	
  applied.	
   Firstly,	
  I	
  propose	
  that	
  CCM	
  artists	
  can	
  be	
  identified	
  as	
  religious	
  firms	
  operating	
  on	
   the	
  “supply-­‐side”	
  of	
  the	
  religio-­‐economic	
  dynamic;	
  it	
  is	
  their	
  music,	
  specifically	
  the	
   diverse	
  brands	
  of	
  Christianity	
  espoused	
  there	
  within,	
  that	
  can	
  allow	
  CCM	
  artists	
  to	
   be	
  interpreted	
  in	
  such	
  a	
  way.	
  Secondly,	
  the	
  diversity	
  within	
  the	
  public	
  religious	
   expressions	
  of	
  CCM	
  artists	
  can	
  be	
  recognized	
  as	
  being	
  comparable	
  to	
  religious	
   pluralism	
  in	
  a	
  free	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion.	
  Finally,	
  it	
  is	
  suggested	
  that	
  the	
   relationship	
  between	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  is	
  determined,	
  primarily,	
  by	
  the	
  competitive	
   reality	
  of	
  a	
  free	
  market	
  religious	
  economy.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    ii	
    Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   Abstract	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  ii	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
  	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  iii	
   List	
  of	
  Figures	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  iv	
   Acknowledgements	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  v	
   1	
    Introduction	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  1	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.1	
  Introduction	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  1	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.2	
  Religion	
  &	
  Popular	
  Culture	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  3	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.3	
  What	
  is	
  ‘Christian	
  Music?’	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  5	
    2	
    The	
  Theory	
  of	
  Religious	
  Economy	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  12	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.1	
  The	
  New	
  Paradigm	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  12	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.2	
  Rational	
  Choice	
  Theory	
  	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  16	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  2.3	
  Religious	
  Economies	
  &	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .18	
    3	
    The	
  History	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  21	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3.1	
  The	
  Birth	
  &	
  Rise	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  Genre	
  (1960	
  –	
  1989)	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  21	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3.2	
  The	
  “Parallel	
  Universe”	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  Genre	
  (1990	
  –	
  1999)	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  30	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3.3	
  “Artists-­‐who-­‐are-­‐Christian?”	
  or	
  “Christian	
  artists?”	
  (2000	
  –	
  2012)	
  	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  34	
    4	
    Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  &	
  the	
  Marketplace	
  Approach	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  	
  41	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  4.1	
  CCM	
  Artists	
  as	
  Religious	
  Innovators	
  	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  41	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  4.2	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  Evangelicalism,	
  &	
  the	
  Rise	
  of	
  Supply-­‐Side	
  Firms	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  44	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  4.3	
  Competition	
  in	
  the	
  Open	
  Marketplace	
  of	
  Religion	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  48	
    5	
    Conclusion	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  55	
    Bibliography	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  58	
    	
   	
   	
    iii	
    List	
  of	
  Figures	
   Figure	
  4.3.1	
  	
  Competitive	
  religious	
  economies	
  and	
  religious	
  participation	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  	
  51	
   Figure	
  4.3.2	
  	
  Monopoly	
  structures	
  and	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  genre	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  .	
  54	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    iv	
    Acknowledgements	
  	
   I	
  want	
  to	
  express	
  my	
  sincere	
  gratitude	
  to	
  Dr.	
  Cousland	
  for	
  his	
  valuable	
  insight	
   and	
  patience	
  in	
  supervising	
  the	
  writing	
  of	
  this	
  dissertation.	
  I	
  would	
  also	
  like	
   to	
  thank	
  the	
  faculty	
  and	
  my	
  colleagues	
  within	
  the	
  Classical,	
  Near	
  Eastern,	
  and	
   Religious	
  Studies	
  department	
  at	
  UBC.	
  Lastly,	
  I	
  must	
  express	
  a	
  heartfelt	
   appreciation	
  for	
  my	
  family,	
  especially	
  my	
  wife	
  Danielle.	
  Your	
  unwavering	
   support	
  was	
  instrumental	
  in	
  the	
  completion	
  of	
  this	
  project.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    v	
    1	
  Introduction	
  	
   1.1	
  Introduction	
   The	
  rise	
  of	
  the	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  genre	
  (CCM)	
  is	
  a	
  recent	
  American	
   cultural	
  phenomenon	
  that	
  has	
  birthed	
  a	
  billion-­‐dollar	
  industry	
  devoted	
  to	
  the	
  recording,	
   producing,	
  and	
  selling	
  of	
  CCM.1	
  Since	
  its	
  inception	
  in	
  the	
  1970s,	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry	
  has	
   spawned	
  Christian	
  music	
  stores,	
  Christian	
  music	
  award	
  shows	
  (the	
  ‘Dove	
  Awards’),	
   Christian	
  music	
  magazines,	
  and	
  Christian	
  music-­‐video	
  television	
  channels.	
  Today,	
   “Christian	
  rock	
  stars	
  and	
  music	
  celebrities	
  have	
  replaced	
  television	
  evangelists	
  as	
  the	
   primary	
  media	
  connection	
  between	
  pop	
  culture	
  and	
  pop	
  religion.”2	
  The	
  CCM	
  industry	
   today,	
  far	
  removed	
  from	
  its	
  humble	
  roots	
  within	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  of	
  the	
  1960s,	
  serves	
   to	
  supply	
  a	
  demand	
  by	
  a	
  subculture	
  of	
  American	
  evangelical	
  Christians	
  of	
  a	
  particular	
   product.	
  	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music,	
  its	
  industry,	
  its	
  genre	
  and	
  its	
  artists,	
  has	
  become	
  a	
   controversial	
  subject	
  of	
  theological	
  debate	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States.	
  At	
  the	
  heart	
  of	
  this	
   discussion	
  are	
  questions	
  concerning	
  the	
  legitimacy	
  of	
  a	
  genre	
  of	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  as	
  a	
   whole.	
  The	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association	
  (GMA)	
  for	
  example,	
  the	
  self-­‐described	
  “face	
  and	
  voice	
   for	
  the	
  Christian/Gospel	
  music	
  community,”3	
  neatly	
  divides	
  the	
  music	
  industry	
  into	
  its	
   “Christian”	
  and	
  “secular”	
  components,	
  however,	
  such	
  divisions	
  have	
  frequently	
  been	
   criticized	
  as	
  being	
  inadequate	
  or	
  as	
  hopelessly	
  problematic.	
  Throughout	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  the	
   phenomenon,	
  the	
  great	
  diversity	
  of	
  opinions	
  concerning	
  appropriate	
  lyrics,	
  musical	
  style,	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   1	
  Mark	
  Allan	
  Powell,	
  “Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music:	
  A	
  New	
  Research	
  Area	
  in	
  American	
   2	
  Ibid.	
   3	
  “GMA	
  Mission,”	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association,	
  accessed	
  April	
  20,	
  2012,	
   http://www.gospelmusic.org/gmainfo/aboutus.aspx.	
   	
    1	
    and	
  artistic	
  intent	
  for	
  legitimate	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  has	
  led	
  to	
  confusion	
  and	
  conflict	
  among	
   CCM	
  artists,	
  record	
  labels,	
  and	
  fans	
  alike.	
  Over	
  the	
  past	
  40	
  years,	
  many	
  Christian	
  artists	
   have	
  distanced	
  themselves	
  from	
  the	
  CCM	
  label	
  (U2,	
  Creed,	
  and	
  Bruce	
  Cockburn	
  to	
  name	
  a	
   small	
  few)	
  dismissing	
  any	
  parameters	
  as	
  being	
  unreasonably	
  limiting	
  for	
  their	
  art,	
  opting	
   instead	
  to	
  express	
  their	
  beliefs	
  in	
  whatsoever	
  manner	
  they	
  choose.	
  The	
  roots	
  of	
  such	
   disagreements	
  are	
  undoubtedly	
  theological,	
  Jay	
  R.	
  Howard	
  and	
  John	
  M.	
  Streck	
  explain,	
   “defining	
  Christian	
  music	
  becomes	
  an	
  effort	
  in	
  defining	
  Christianity…	
  this,	
  then,	
  leads	
  to	
   debates	
  over	
  the	
  difference	
  between	
  so-­‐called	
  ‘artists	
  who	
  are	
  Christian’	
  and	
  ‘Christian	
   artists’	
  and	
  a	
  morass	
  of	
  competing	
  doctrines,	
  religious	
  views,	
  and	
  religious	
  prejudices.”4	
  	
   In	
  recent	
  years,	
  CCM	
  has	
  become	
  as	
  an	
  extremely	
  popular	
  subject	
  of	
  discussion	
  by	
   journalists,	
  bloggers,	
  and,	
  although	
  to	
  a	
  much	
  lesser	
  extent,	
  researchers	
  in	
  the	
  area	
  of	
   religion	
  and	
  popular	
  culture.	
  Regardless	
  of	
  the	
  considerable	
  attention	
  that	
  CCM	
  has	
   attracted,	
  today	
  very	
  few	
  serious	
  academic	
  analyses	
  of	
  CCM	
  exist.	
  This	
  study	
  seeks	
  to	
   contribute	
  to	
  the	
  scholarly	
  discussion	
  of	
  this	
  modern	
  religious	
  phenomenon	
  by	
  proposing	
  a	
   novel	
  sociological	
  method	
  for	
  its	
  consideration,	
  namely	
  that	
  of	
  religious	
  economy.	
  The	
   theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
  is	
  a	
  recent	
  sociological	
  study	
  of	
  religion	
  fashioned	
  by	
   contemporary	
  social	
  scientists	
  and	
  historians	
  for	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  better	
  understanding	
   American	
  religious	
  trends	
  in	
  their	
  distinctly	
  American	
  context.	
  These	
  scholars	
  have	
  shifted	
   towards	
  a	
  new	
  paradigm	
  within	
  the	
  field,	
  proposing	
  that	
  all	
  religious	
  dynamics	
  in	
  a	
  society	
   can	
  be	
  understood	
  in	
  a	
  way	
  comparable	
  to	
  other	
  forms	
  of	
  consumer	
  behavior.	
  Here	
  it	
  is	
   suggested	
  that,	
  “religion,	
  much	
  like	
  commercial	
  entertainment,	
  depends	
  on	
  innovative	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   4	
  Jay	
  R.	
  Howard	
  &	
  John	
  M.	
  Streck,	
  Apostles	
  of	
  Rock	
  (Lexington:	
  University	
  of	
  Kentucky	
  Press,	
   1999),	
  9.	
   	
    2	
    leadership	
  to	
  exercise	
  mass	
  appeal,”5	
  Scholars	
  who	
  have	
  adopted	
  the	
  marketplace	
   approach	
  recognize	
  that,	
  as	
  in	
  commercial	
  economies,	
  individuals	
  and	
  groups	
  respond	
  to	
   costs	
  and	
  benefits,	
  religious	
  or	
  otherwise,	
  in	
  a	
  predictable	
  way.	
  	
   Grounded	
  within	
  the	
  proposal	
  that	
  a	
  true	
  open	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion	
  is	
  accessible	
   to	
  all	
  would-­‐be	
  religious	
  innovators	
  who	
  may	
  seek	
  to	
  operate	
  within	
  that	
  market,	
  CCM	
   artists	
  will	
  be	
  interpreted	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  as	
  “suppliers”	
  of	
  a	
  religious	
  “product;”	
  a	
  product	
   that	
  exists	
  beyond	
  the	
  physical	
  album	
  sales.	
  The	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
  provides	
  a	
   practical	
  explanation	
  for	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  religious	
  plurality	
  in	
  the	
  American	
  open	
   marketplace	
  of	
  religion	
  (perhaps	
  more	
  appropriately	
  recognized	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  as	
  Christian	
   plurality),	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  a	
  practical	
  means	
  of	
  interpreting	
  the	
  complex	
  relationship	
  between	
   religious	
  “suppliers”	
  in	
  a	
  competitive	
  marketplace.	
  It	
  is	
  the	
  goal	
  of	
  this	
  project	
  to	
  present	
   the	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
  as	
  a	
  valuable	
  methodological	
  lens	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  of	
   contemporary	
  Christian	
  music;	
  to	
  introduce	
  the	
  model	
  as	
  a	
  useful	
  method	
  to	
  help	
  make	
   coherent	
  the	
  modern,	
  perplexing,	
  and	
  under-­‐studied	
  religious	
  phenomenon	
  that	
  is	
   contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States.	
   	
    1.2	
  Religion	
  and	
  Popular	
  Culture	
   	
    The	
  subject	
  of	
  religion	
  and	
  popular	
  culture	
  has	
  received	
  a	
  great	
  deal	
  of	
  attention	
  in	
    the	
  past	
  decade	
  by	
  scholars	
  of	
  religion.	
  Scholars	
  are	
  increasingly	
  recognizing	
  value	
  in	
  the	
   wealth	
  of	
  the	
  new	
  primary	
  source	
  material	
  created	
  daily;	
  material	
  that	
  provides	
  direct	
   access	
  to	
  the	
  pulse	
  of	
  a	
  given	
  society	
  and	
  to	
  the	
  religious	
  climate	
  of	
  a	
  given	
  day.	
  Scholars	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   5	
  Shayne	
  Lee	
  and	
  Phillip	
  Luke	
  Sinitiere,	
  Holy	
  Mavericks:	
  Evangelical	
  Innovators	
  and	
  the	
   Spiritual	
  Marketplace	
  (New	
  York:	
  New	
  York	
  University	
  Press,	
  2009),	
  159.	
   	
    3	
    have	
  also	
  discovered	
  a	
  delighted	
  audience,	
  excited	
  by	
  the	
  growing	
  consideration	
  given	
  to	
   many	
  facets	
  of	
  popular	
  culture	
  in	
  which	
  they	
  are	
  well	
  versed.	
  At	
  the	
  moment,	
  academia	
  is	
   said	
  to	
  be	
  “in	
  the	
  throes	
  of	
  a	
  full-­‐scale	
  infatuation	
  with	
  popular	
  culture.”6	
  Finally	
  gone,	
  it	
   seems,	
  are	
  the	
  days	
  when	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  religion	
  in	
  popular	
  culture	
  was	
  dismissed	
  as	
   insignificant.	
  For	
  many	
  scholars	
  of	
  religion,	
  the	
  spotlight	
  has	
  shifted	
  from	
  an	
  emphasis	
  on	
   notable	
  religious	
  figures	
  and	
  movements	
  of	
  centuries	
  past	
  to	
  an	
  attempt	
  at	
  understanding	
   the	
  contemporary	
  religious	
  lives	
  of	
  contemporary	
  religious	
  people.	
   	
    Naturally,	
  the	
  scholarly	
  interest	
  in	
  the	
  CCM	
  as	
  a	
  modern	
  religious	
  phenomenon	
  only	
    truly	
  emerged	
  following	
  the	
  industry’s	
  incredible	
  boom	
  of	
  the	
  1990s.	
  Today	
  scholars	
  from	
  a	
   variety	
  of	
  differing	
  backgrounds	
  have	
  tackled	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  CCM.	
  Writers	
  such	
  as	
  Heather	
   Hendershot,	
  Terry	
  Mattingly,	
  Jay	
  R.	
  Howard,	
  Don	
  Cusic,	
  Randall	
  Balmer,	
  John	
  M.	
  Streck,	
   David	
  W.	
  Stowe	
  and	
  Mark	
  Allan	
  Powell	
  have	
  all	
  produced	
  works	
  on	
  CCM	
  in	
  recent	
  years,	
   and	
  with	
  such	
  notable	
  industry	
  insiders	
  as	
  Mark	
  Joseph,	
  Charlie	
  Peacock,	
  and	
  John	
  J.	
   Thompson	
  also	
  publishing	
  on	
  the	
  subject,	
  the	
  beginnings	
  of	
  a	
  rich	
  discussion	
  of	
  the	
   phenomenon	
  has	
  materialized.	
   	
  	
    In	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  popular	
  culture,	
  however,	
  the	
  subject	
  can	
  be	
  a	
  moving	
  target;	
    published	
  works	
  on	
  religion	
  and	
  popular	
  culture	
  quickly	
  become	
  outdated.	
  Eric	
  Michael	
   Mazur	
  and	
  Kate	
  McCarthy	
  explain,	
  “both	
  the	
  field	
  of	
  popular	
  culture	
  studies	
  and	
  the	
   material	
  it	
  examines…	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  growing	
  at	
  a	
  pace	
  that	
  outstrips	
  the	
  analytical	
  categories	
   and	
  methods	
  available.”7	
  This	
  is	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  the	
  curse	
  and	
  the	
  advantage	
  of	
  the	
  study	
   of	
  popular	
  culture.	
  News	
  articles	
  about	
  Christian	
  music	
  artists	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  in	
  virtually	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   6	
  Mazur,	
  Eric	
  Michael	
  &	
  Kate	
  McCarthy,	
  God	
  in	
  the	
  Details:	
  American	
  Religion	
  in	
  Popular	
   Culture	
  (New	
  York:	
  Routledge,	
  2011),	
  2.	
   7	
  Mazur	
  &	
  McCarthy,	
  God	
  in	
  the	
  Details,	
  2.	
   	
    4	
    every	
  popular	
  music	
  magazine	
  on	
  the	
  stands	
  today,	
  and,	
  through	
  the	
  internet,	
  many	
   Christian	
  artists	
  frequently	
  ‘weblog’	
  on	
  their	
  websites	
  about	
  their	
  music,	
  their	
  lives,	
  and	
   their	
  faith.	
  This	
  wealth	
  of	
  material	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  paint	
  a	
  fairly	
  detailed	
  and	
  accurate	
  image	
   of	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  CCM	
  today,	
  although	
  it	
  can	
  take	
  a	
  great	
  deal	
  of	
  ingenuity	
  to	
  craft	
  a	
  suitable	
   approach	
  for	
  its	
  analysis.	
   Ultimately,	
  American	
  Christianity	
  has	
  evolved	
  over	
  the	
  past	
  40	
  years,	
  and	
  CCM	
  may	
   be	
  an	
  important	
  measure	
  of	
  its	
  transformation	
  and	
  of	
  its	
  trajectory.	
  Thompson	
  writes,	
   “Most	
  mainstream	
  evangelical	
  churches	
  now	
  use	
  music	
  in	
  their	
  Sunday	
  services	
  that	
  would	
   have	
  been	
  unacceptable	
  30	
  years	
  ago.	
  Even	
  the	
  most	
  conservative	
  worship	
  music	
  these	
   days	
  is	
  more	
  aggressive	
  than	
  the	
  most	
  progressive	
  church	
  music	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  1960s.”8	
   Powell,	
  in	
  his	
  2004	
  article	
  “Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music:	
  A	
  New	
  Research	
  Area	
  in	
   American	
  Religious	
  Studies,”	
  asks,	
  “What	
  does	
  the	
  very	
  existence	
  of	
  this	
  genre,	
  not	
  to	
   mention	
  its	
  success,	
  tell	
  us	
  about	
  the	
  American	
  religious	
  experience?	
  What	
  does	
  it	
  tell	
  us	
   about	
  the	
  integration	
  and	
  segregation	
  of	
  religion	
  and	
  culture?”9	
  As	
  scholarly	
  consideration	
   of	
  the	
  CCM	
  phenomenon	
  grows,	
  and	
  as	
  analytical	
  methods	
  evolve,	
  these	
  questions	
  can	
  be	
   answered.	
   	
    1.3	
  What	
  is	
  ‘Christian	
  Music?’	
   	
    It	
  is	
  logical	
  to	
  begin	
  this	
  study	
  by	
  confronting	
  the	
  most	
  obvious	
  of	
  pertinent	
    questions;	
  what	
  is	
  ‘Christian	
  music?’	
  This	
  question	
  is	
  of	
  course	
  not	
  as	
  simple,	
  nor	
  as	
   innocent,	
  as	
  it	
  may	
  appear.	
  It	
  is	
  thus	
  valuable	
  to	
  begin	
  this	
  study	
  with	
  a	
  discussion	
  of	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   8	
  John	
  J.	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves:	
  The	
  Story	
  of	
  Christian	
  Rock	
  &	
  Roll	
  (Toronto:	
  ECW	
   Press,	
  2000),	
  37.	
   9	
  Powell,	
  “Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music,”	
  130	
  .	
   	
    5	
    common	
  competing	
  understandings	
  of	
  ‘Christian	
  music,’	
  it	
  is	
  here	
  that	
  many	
  of	
  the	
  conflicts	
   within	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  CCM	
  can	
  be	
  found.	
  In	
  surveying	
  past	
  attempts	
  at	
  establishing	
  an	
   operational	
  definition	
  of	
  ‘Christian	
  music,’	
  it	
  is	
  evident	
  that	
  a	
  majority	
  are	
  encumbered	
  by	
   theological	
  baggage	
  owing	
  to	
  the	
  particular	
  tradition	
  from	
  which	
  that	
  definition	
  emerged.	
   While	
  there	
  are	
  many	
  commonalities	
  among	
  American	
  evangelicals,	
  evangelicalism	
  is	
  by	
  no	
   means	
  monolithic.	
  Jay	
  Howard	
  writes,	
  “Among	
  evangelicals	
  music	
  is	
  believed	
  to	
  facilitate	
  a	
   more	
  authentic	
  and	
  active	
  religious	
  experience.	
  Thus,	
  debates	
  over	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  Christian	
   music	
  and	
  its	
  appropriate	
  manifestations…	
  are	
  to	
  a	
  large	
  degree	
  debates	
  about	
  the	
  nature	
   of	
  Christianity	
  and	
  the	
  Christian	
  experience.”10	
  The	
  exercise	
  of	
  defining	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
   bends	
  towards	
  defining	
  Christianity	
  itself;	
  debates	
  concerning	
  appropriate	
  ‘Christian	
   music’	
  often	
  concern	
  questions	
  of	
  orthodoxy.	
   In	
  his	
  book	
  Pop	
  Goes	
  Religion,	
  Terry	
  Mattingly	
  presents	
  a	
  list	
  of	
  what	
  he	
  identifies	
  as	
   six	
  popular	
  understandings	
  of	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  that	
  exist	
  in	
  America	
  today.	
  They	
  read:	
   1)	
  Christian	
  music	
  consists	
  of	
  hymns.	
   2)	
  If	
  music	
  can	
  be	
  played	
  or	
  sung	
  in	
  worship	
  services,	
  then	
  it’s	
  ‘Christian.’	
   3)	
  “Christian	
  music”	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  in	
  all	
  genres	
  of	
  music,	
  except	
  rock.	
  Anything	
  with	
  a	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  strong	
  backbeat	
  is	
  off-­‐limits.	
   4)	
  All	
  forms	
  of	
  music	
  are	
  accessible,	
  even	
  heavy-­‐metal,	
  rock,	
  or	
  rap,	
  as	
  long	
  as	
  the	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  songs	
  contain	
  clear	
  evangelistic	
  messages.	
   5)	
  ‘Christian	
  songs’	
  must	
  contain	
  some	
  clear	
  ‘God-­‐talk.’	
  Many	
  Contemporary	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Christian	
  Music	
  industry	
  pros	
  call	
  this	
  the	
  ‘Jesus-­‐per-­‐minutes’	
  rule.	
   6)	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  is	
  music	
  made	
  by	
  artists	
  who	
  are	
  publicly	
  identified	
  as	
  believers,	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  and	
  their	
  art	
  –	
  to	
  one	
  degree	
  or	
  another	
  –	
  reflects	
  this	
  Christian	
  worldview.11	
   	
   Although	
  these	
  six	
  definitions	
  are	
  hopelessly	
  incongruent,	
  two	
  common	
  themes	
  can	
  be	
   identified:	
  1)	
  Christian	
  music	
  is	
  performed	
  and/or	
  composed	
  by	
  Christians;	
  and	
  2)	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   10	
  Howard	
  &	
  Streck,	
  Apostles	
  of	
  Rock,	
  6.	
   11	
  Terry	
  Mattingly,	
  Pop	
  Goes	
  Religion	
  (Nashville:	
  W	
  Publishing	
  Group,	
  2005),	
  3.	
   	
    6	
    ‘Christian	
  music’	
  can	
  be	
  identified	
  by	
  its	
  lyrical	
  content.	
  Although	
  these	
  two	
  basic	
  premises	
   do	
  appear	
  straight-­‐forward	
  enough,	
  they	
  are	
  commonly	
  at	
  the	
  core	
  of	
  CCM	
  debates.	
   Firstly,	
  to	
  identify	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  by	
  its	
  lyrical	
  content	
  alone	
  is	
  problematic.	
  The	
   most	
  obvious	
  dilemma	
  here	
  is	
  that	
  it	
  necessarily	
  excludes	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  instrumental	
   ‘Christian	
  music.’	
  It	
  also	
  raises	
  several	
  concerns	
  about	
  what	
  may	
  be	
  identified	
  as	
   appropriate	
  lyrical	
  content.	
  If	
  a	
  Christian	
  songwriter	
  were	
  to	
  compose	
  a	
  song	
  about	
   marriage	
  or	
  a	
  subject	
  that	
  is	
  not	
  explicitly	
  referencing	
  Jesus	
  for	
  example,	
  should	
  the	
  song	
   still	
  be	
  classified	
  as	
  ‘Christian?’	
  This	
  was	
  a	
  question	
  that	
  the	
  band	
  Sixpence	
  None	
  the	
  Richer	
   struggled	
  with	
  in	
  1999	
  after	
  the	
  success	
  of	
  their	
  hit	
  song	
  “Kiss	
  Me.”	
  Although	
  the	
  members	
   of	
  the	
  band	
  professed	
  to	
  be	
  devout	
  Christians	
  and	
  had	
  previously	
  been	
  lauded	
  by	
  the	
   Gospel	
  Music	
  Association,	
  the	
  GMA	
  did	
  not	
  find	
  the	
  subject	
  of	
  the	
  song,	
  a	
  woman	
  desiring	
  to	
   kiss	
  her	
  husband,	
  particularly	
  Christian.12	
  Regardless	
  of	
  the	
  song’s	
  enormous	
  success,	
  it	
   was	
  ineligible	
  for	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  Dove	
  Awards	
  given	
  out	
  by	
  the	
  GMA.	
  Leigh	
  Nash,	
  the	
  lead	
  singer	
   and	
  songwriter	
  of	
  the	
  group,	
  disapproved	
  of	
  her	
  song’s	
  exclusion	
  from	
  the	
  award	
   ceremony.	
  She	
  argued:	
  “We	
  don’t	
  experience	
  faith	
  as	
  a	
  compartmentalized,	
  religious	
  aspect	
   of	
  life…	
  I	
  don’t	
  feel	
  like	
  I’m	
  more	
  of	
  a	
  Christian	
  when	
  I’m	
  saying	
  my	
  prayers	
  than	
  when	
  I’m	
   kissing	
  my	
  husband.”13	
  The	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association’s	
  definition	
  of	
  Christian	
  music	
  reads,	
   Christian	
  music	
  is	
  music	
  in	
  any	
  style	
  whose	
  lyric	
  is	
  based	
  upon	
  historically	
  orthodox	
   Christian	
  truth	
  contained	
  in	
  or	
  derived	
  from	
  the	
  Holy	
  Bible;	
  and/or	
  an	
  expression	
  of	
   worship	
  of	
  God	
  or	
  praise	
  for	
  his	
  works;	
  and/or	
  testimony	
  of	
  relationship	
  with	
  God	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   12	
  Randall	
  Balmer	
  writes,	
  “’Kiss	
  Me’	
  had	
  roughly	
  as	
  much	
  spiritual	
  content	
  as	
  a	
  steel-­‐belted	
   radial	
  tire,	
  but	
  because	
  the	
  group	
  had	
  enjoyed	
  initial	
  success	
  in	
  the	
  Christian	
  market	
  it	
   begged	
  the	
  question	
  of	
  whether	
  or	
  not	
  the	
  song	
  was	
  ‘Christian’	
  music.”	
  Randall	
  Balmer,	
   Mine	
  Eyes	
  Have	
  Seen	
  the	
  Glory	
  (New	
  York:	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  1989),	
  306.	
   13	
  Powell,	
  “Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music,”	
  134.	
   	
    7	
    through	
  Christ;	
  and/or	
  obviously	
  prompted	
  and	
  informed	
  by	
  a	
  Christian	
   worldview.14	
   	
   As	
  experienced	
  by	
  Nash,	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  can	
  be	
  a	
  subtle,	
  and	
  restrictive,	
  category.	
   Defining	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  as	
  songs	
  with	
  lyrics	
  containing	
  “historically	
  orthodox	
   truths”	
  can	
  also	
  be	
  problematic.	
  Songs	
  such	
  as	
  Cake’s	
  “Sheep	
  go	
  to	
  Heaven,”	
  Depeche	
   Mode’s	
  “Personal	
  Jesus,”	
  and	
  The	
  Meat	
  Puppets’	
  “Lake	
  of	
  Fire”	
  can	
  all	
  meet	
  the	
  Gospel	
   Music	
  Association’s	
  lyrical	
  standards,	
  and	
  yet	
  none	
  are	
  commonly	
  thought	
  to	
  exist	
  within	
   the	
  genre	
  of	
  ‘Christian	
  music.’	
  Perhaps	
  the	
  heavy-­‐metal	
  group	
  ‘The	
  Sin	
  Destroyers,’	
  a	
  band	
   that	
  masquerade	
  as	
  Christian,	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  obvious	
  example	
  of	
  this	
  ambiguity.	
  They	
  are	
  self-­‐ described	
  as	
  “the	
  world’s	
  Christianiest	
  rock	
  band”,	
  and	
  were	
  voted	
  the	
  “Best	
  Band	
  Jesus	
   Would	
  Do”	
  in	
  2005	
  by	
  the	
  Village	
  Voice.15	
  Although	
  The	
  Sin	
  Destroyers	
  are	
  sarcastically	
   making	
  the	
  statement	
  that	
  Christianity	
  and	
  rock	
  music	
  should	
  not	
  mix,	
  the	
  lyrical	
  content	
  of	
   their	
  songs	
  could	
  perfectly	
  fit	
  within	
  the	
  GMA’s	
  lyrical	
  standards.	
  	
   There	
  is	
  a	
  much	
  more	
  obvious	
  dilemma	
  in	
  defining	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  as	
  music	
   written	
  by	
  a	
  Christian,	
  namely,	
  who	
  decides	
  who	
  is	
  a	
  ‘genuine’	
  Christian?	
  Is	
  there	
  thus	
  one	
   correct	
  way	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  Christian?	
  The	
  proverbial	
  ‘litmus	
  test’	
  for	
  listeners	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
   authenticity	
  of	
  Christian	
  artists	
  seems	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  close	
  evaluation	
  of	
  these	
  artists’	
  public	
  lives;	
   often	
  the	
  Christian	
  audience	
  assumes	
  that	
  the	
  lifestyles	
  of	
  the	
  band’s	
  members	
  must	
  be,	
  or	
   should	
  be,	
  saintly	
  and	
  holy.	
  Here,	
  these	
  artists’	
  personal	
  lives	
  are	
  often	
  held	
  up	
  to	
  the	
   impossible	
  standard	
  of	
  perfection.16	
  If	
  a	
  Christian	
  artist	
  sins	
  in	
  the	
  public	
  eye,	
  they	
  are	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   14	
  “Policy	
  &	
  Procedures	
  Manual,”	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association,	
  accessed	
  April	
  24,	
  2012,	
   http://www.gospelmusic.org/dovevoting/procedures.html.	
   15	
  Kate	
  Lanahan,	
  “Meet	
  the	
  World’s	
  Christianest	
  Rock	
  Band”	
  The	
  Bosh,	
  January	
  12,	
  2006,	
  	
   accessed	
  December	
  1,	
  2011,	
  http://thebosh.com/archives/2006/01/meet_	
   the_worlds_christianest_rock_band.php.	
   16	
  Mark	
  Joseph,	
  Faith	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
  Roll	
  (London:	
  MPG	
  Books,	
  2003),	
  45.	
   	
    8	
    judged	
  accordingly	
  by	
  their	
  Christian	
  fans.	
  This	
  understanding	
  of	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  can	
  be	
   unfortunate	
  for	
  both	
  the	
  listener,	
  who	
  may	
  feel	
  deceived	
  when	
  their	
  initial	
  expectations	
  of	
   the	
  artist	
  are	
  shattered,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  artist,	
  who	
  faces	
  the	
  threat	
  of	
  a	
  boycott	
  of	
  their	
  music	
   by	
  the	
  CCM	
  audience.	
  When	
  a	
  sex-­‐tape	
  of	
  Creed	
  front	
  man	
  Scott	
  Stapp	
  was	
  discovered	
  on	
   the	
  Internet	
  in	
  February	
  2006	
  for	
  example,	
  it	
  left	
  one	
  reporter	
  asking;	
  “will	
  Christian	
  fans	
   forgive?”17	
  Similarly,	
  when	
  CCM	
  artist	
  Michael	
  English	
  admitted	
  to	
  an	
  extramarital	
  affair,	
  he	
   was	
  pressured	
  by	
  his	
  fans	
  to	
  return	
  his	
  Dove	
  Award	
  to	
  the	
  GMA.	
  This	
  does	
  not	
  appear	
  to	
  be	
   a	
  fair	
  assessment	
  by	
  the	
  audience	
  in	
  that,	
  at	
  the	
  ground	
  level,	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  evangelicals	
  in	
   the	
  United	
  States	
  accept	
  the	
  possibility	
  that	
  a	
  Christian	
  will	
  sin	
  after	
  their	
  initial	
  conversion	
   experience.	
   The	
  ‘crossover	
  artist’	
  was	
  a	
  curious	
  phenomenon	
  that	
  emerged	
  in	
  the	
  1990s.	
   ‘Crossover’	
  artists	
  are	
  ‘Christian	
  artists’	
  who	
  left	
  the	
  CCM	
  market	
  for	
  the	
  mainstream	
   market,	
  often	
  to	
  seek	
  a	
  broader	
  audience.	
  Perhaps	
  the	
  most	
  famous	
  example	
  of	
  this	
   phenomenon	
  was	
  the	
  mainstream	
  success	
  of	
  CCM	
  darling	
  Amy	
  Grant	
  during	
  the	
  early	
   nineties.	
  Amy	
  Grant	
  outraged	
  many	
  of	
  her	
  fans	
  by	
  ‘going	
  secular’	
  with	
  the	
  commercial	
  hit	
   “Baby	
  Baby.”	
  Greg	
  Hamm,	
  president	
  of	
  ForeFront	
  records,	
  understands	
  the	
  dilemma	
  of	
   ‘selling	
  out’	
  to	
  the	
  mainstream	
  market.	
  He	
  confesses:	
  “It’s	
  a	
  real	
  tension	
  –	
  if	
  you	
  crossover,	
   is	
  it	
  Christian	
  anymore?	
  …	
  The	
  motto	
  we	
  tell	
  our	
  artists	
  to	
  live	
  by	
  is:	
  Don’t	
  cross	
  over	
  unless	
   you	
  plan	
  to	
  take	
  the	
  cross	
  over.”18	
  Underlying	
  criticism	
  of	
  the	
  ‘crossover’	
  artist	
  is	
  the	
   assumption	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  only	
  one	
  appropriate	
  way	
  for	
  Christian	
  artists	
  to	
  act.	
  Hendershot	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   17	
  Joanna	
  Molloy	
  &	
  George	
  Rush,	
  “Sex	
  video	
  with	
  Kid	
  Rock	
  will	
  test	
  faithful	
  Stapp	
  fans,”	
  	
   New	
  York	
  Daily	
  News,	
  February	
  17,	
  2006,	
  accessed	
  April	
  20,	
  2012,	
   http://articles.nydailynews.com/2006-­‐02-­‐17/gossip/18336748_1_creed-­‐singer-­‐scott-­‐ stapp-­‐kid-­‐rock-­‐tape.	
   18	
  Daniel	
  Fierman	
  and	
  Gillian	
  Flynn,	
  “The	
  Greatest	
  Story	
  Ever	
  Sold,”	
  Entertainment	
  Weekly,	
   December	
  3,	
  1999,	
  59.	
   	
    9	
    explains,	
  “The	
  problem	
  with	
  accusing	
  Christian	
  artists	
  of	
  selling	
  out	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  accusation	
   assumes	
  all	
  Christians	
  operate	
  from	
  an	
  identical	
  spiritual	
  position	
  and	
  that	
  they	
  all	
  have	
  –	
   or	
  should	
  have	
  –	
  the	
  same	
  goals.”19	
  	
   Jars	
  of	
  Clay	
  is	
  another	
  band	
  that	
  was	
  frequently	
  criticized	
  for	
  ‘crossing	
  over.’	
  In	
  a	
   1998	
  interview,	
  guitarist	
  Steve	
  Mason	
  explained,	
   It	
  can	
  start	
  to	
  get	
  to	
  you	
  when	
  people	
  ask	
  over	
  and	
  over	
  again	
  ‘Are	
  you	
  going	
   secular?’	
  Well,	
  what	
  do	
  you	
  define	
  as	
  secular?	
  Do	
  we	
  want	
  to	
  reach	
  un-­‐churched	
   people?	
  Of	
  course…	
  but	
  the	
  greater	
  our	
  reach	
  becomes,	
  the	
  more	
  suspect	
  our	
  faith	
   and	
  commitment	
  in	
  the	
  eyes	
  of	
  some	
  people.	
  It’s	
  like	
  ‘you’re	
  in	
  or	
  you’re	
  out.’	
   There’s	
  got	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  third	
  rail	
  where	
  music	
  can	
  just	
  be	
  music.	
  And	
  in	
  the	
  end	
  there’s	
   really	
  nothing	
  we	
  can	
  do	
  but	
  be	
  who	
  we	
  are.20	
   	
   The	
  fact	
  that	
  Jars	
  of	
  Clay	
  was	
  named	
  Playboy	
  magazine’s	
  band	
  of	
  the	
  month	
  in	
  1996	
  for	
   example,	
  likely	
  made	
  some	
  Christian	
  fans	
  uneasy;	
  to	
  the	
  band,	
  however,	
  it	
  was	
  undoubtedly	
   a	
  sign	
  of	
  success.	
   	
    The	
  definition	
  of	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  employed	
  in	
  this	
  study	
    will	
  be	
  extremely	
  inclusive.	
  Powell,	
  in	
  his	
  2002	
  Encyclopedia	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
   Music,	
  writes	
  that	
  genre	
  is	
  always	
  audience-­‐driven	
  and	
  based	
  upon	
  perception,	
  not	
  intent.	
   With	
  this	
  audience-­‐driven	
  notion	
  of	
  genre	
  in	
  mind,	
  Powell	
  states,	
  “Contemporary	
  Christian	
   music	
  is	
  music	
  that	
  appeals	
  to	
  self-­‐identified	
  fans	
  of	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  on	
   account	
  of	
  a	
  perceived	
  connection	
  to	
  what	
  they	
  regard	
  as	
  Christianity.”21	
  Thus,	
  if	
  a	
  song	
  is	
   understood	
  to	
  be	
  ‘Christian’	
  by	
  self-­‐identified	
  fans	
  of	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
   genre,	
  it	
  can	
  be	
  understood	
  in	
  such	
  a	
  way,	
  even	
  despite	
  an	
  artist’s	
  disapproval.	
  It	
  is	
  with	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   19	
  Heather	
  Hendershot,	
  Shaking	
  the	
  World	
  for	
  Jesus	
  (Chicago:	
  The	
  University	
  of	
  Chicago	
   Press,	
  2004),	
  33.	
   20	
  Balmer,	
  Mine	
  Eyes,	
  306.	
   21	
  Mark	
  Allan	
  Powell,	
  Encyclopedia	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  (Peabody:	
  Hendrickson	
   Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002),	
  13.	
   	
    10	
    this	
  very	
  broad	
  conception	
  in	
  mind	
  that	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  will	
  be	
  approached	
   in	
  the	
  following	
  chapters.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    11	
    2	
  The	
  Theory	
  of	
  Religious	
  Economy	
   2.1	
  The	
  New	
  Paradigm	
   To	
  begin	
  this	
  study,	
  it	
  is	
  necessary	
  to	
  make	
  clear	
  exactly	
  what	
  the	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
   economy	
  entails,	
  and	
  to	
  present	
  a	
  case	
  for	
  its	
  value	
  as	
  a	
  method	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  religion	
   and	
  popular	
  culture.	
  Although	
  this	
  study	
  will	
  inevitably	
  make	
  mention	
  of	
  the	
  financial	
   success	
  of	
  individual	
  CCM	
  artists	
  as	
  evidence	
  of	
  their	
  popularity,	
  influence	
  and	
   marketability,	
  it	
  must	
  be	
  stated	
  that	
  religious	
  economic	
  theory	
  is	
  not	
  primarily	
  focused	
   upon	
  matters	
  of	
  money	
  or	
  financial	
  rewards,	
  rather,	
  this	
  sociological	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
   activity	
  incorporates	
  the	
  language	
  of	
  economics	
  to	
  help	
  explain	
  the	
  religious	
  dynamics	
  of	
  a	
   given	
  society.	
  Rodney	
  Stark	
  explains	
  that,	
  “Religious	
  economies	
  are	
  like	
  commercial	
   economies	
  in	
  that	
  they	
  consist	
  of	
  a	
  market	
  of	
  current	
  and	
  potential	
  customers,	
  a	
  set	
  of	
   religious	
  firms	
  seeking	
  to	
  serve	
  that	
  market,	
  and	
  the	
  religious	
  ‘product	
  lines’	
  offered	
  by	
  the	
   various	
  firms.”22	
  In	
  contemporary	
  American	
  Christianity,	
  the	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
   interprets	
  “churches	
  as	
  firms,	
  pastors	
  as	
  marketers	
  and	
  producers,	
  and	
  church	
  members	
  or	
   attendees	
  as	
  consumers	
  whose	
  tastes	
  and	
  preferences	
  shape	
  the	
  goods	
  and	
  services	
   ministries	
  and	
  firms	
  offer.”23	
  With	
  the	
  marketplace	
  approach,	
  all	
  religious	
  activity	
  in	
  a	
   given	
  society	
  can	
  be	
  interpreted	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  its	
  “supply”	
  and	
  “demand.”	
  Although	
  the	
   conceptualization	
  of	
  economic	
  reward	
  is	
  understandably	
  different	
  than	
  in	
  conventional	
   economic	
  theories,	
  the	
  marketplace	
  approach	
  proposes	
  that	
  religious	
  institutions,	
  groups,	
   and	
  individuals	
  do	
  function	
  in	
  a	
  comparable	
  way	
  to	
  consumers	
  and	
  producers	
  in	
  a	
  secular	
   economy.	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   22	
  Rodney	
  Stark,	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Christianity	
  (Princeton:	
  Princeton	
  University	
  Press,	
  1996),	
  194.	
   23	
  Lee	
  &	
  Sinitiere,	
  Holy	
  Mavericks,	
  160.	
   	
    12	
    	
    In	
  1993,	
  R.	
  Stephen	
  Warner	
  remarked	
  in	
  an	
  article	
  published	
  in	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
    Sociology	
  that	
  a	
  handful	
  of	
  sociologists	
  of	
  religion	
  had	
  taken	
  significant	
  steps	
  in	
  a	
  new	
   direction	
  for	
  the	
  future	
  of	
  the	
  discipline.24	
  These	
  scholars,	
  noted	
  Warner,	
  were	
  working	
   towards	
  the	
  modernization	
  of	
  the	
  discipline	
  by	
  formulating	
  new	
  theoretical	
  approaches	
   inspired	
  primarily	
  by	
  religious	
  history	
  in	
  North	
  America.	
  This	
  new	
  paradigm	
  “stems	
  not	
   from	
  the	
  old	
  one	
  which	
  was	
  developed	
  to	
  account	
  for	
  the	
  European	
  experience,	
  but	
  from	
  an	
   entirely	
  independent	
  vision	
  inspired	
  by	
  American	
  history.”	
  These	
  scholars	
  were	
  not	
   necessarily	
  unified	
  by	
  an	
  individual	
  theory,	
  but	
  rather	
  by	
  their	
  radical	
  shift	
  in	
  approach.25	
   Warner	
  explains:	
   The	
  older	
  paradigm	
  –	
  identified	
  here	
  with	
  the	
  early	
  work	
  of	
  Peter	
  Berger	
  (1969,	
   1970)	
  –	
  is	
  still	
  cited	
  by	
  a	
  great	
  many	
  researchers	
  in	
  the	
  field	
  and	
  remains	
  useful	
  for	
   understanding	
  aspects	
  of	
  the	
  phenomenology	
  of	
  religious	
  life.	
  However,	
  those	
  who	
   use	
  the	
  older	
  paradigm	
  to	
  interpret	
  American	
  religious	
  organization	
  –	
   congregations,	
  denominations,	
  special	
  purpose	
  groups,	
  and	
  more	
  –	
  face	
  increasing	
   interpretive	
  difficulties	
  and	
  decreasing	
  rhetorical	
  confidence.	
  The	
  newer	
  paradigm	
  –	
   consciously	
  under	
  development	
  by	
  only	
  a	
  handful	
  of	
  independent	
  investigators	
  –	
   stands	
  a	
  better	
  chance	
  of	
  providing	
  intellectual	
  coherence	
  to	
  the	
  field.26	
   	
   As	
  scholars	
  of	
  religious	
  history	
  began	
  to	
  give	
  as	
  much	
  of	
  their	
  attention	
  to	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  new	
   religions	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  to	
  the	
  decline	
  of	
  the	
  old,	
  new	
  analytical	
  approaches	
  were	
  demanded.	
  	
   Scholars	
  of	
  this	
  new	
  paradigm	
  contend	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  established	
   religious	
  institutions	
  that	
  allowed	
  for	
  American	
  religion	
  to	
  develop	
  so	
  differently	
  than	
   could	
  have	
  been	
  possible	
  in	
  a	
  European	
  context.	
  Due	
  to	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  what	
  may	
  be	
  interpreted	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   24	
  Stephen	
  R.	
  Warner,	
  “Work	
  in	
  Progress	
  Toward	
  a	
  New	
  Paradigm	
  for	
  the	
  Sociological	
   Study	
  of	
  Religion	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States,”	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Sociology	
  98.5	
  (1993),	
  1044-­‐ 1093.	
   25	
  According	
  to	
  Warner,	
  “A	
  paradigm	
  is…	
  a	
  way	
  of	
  seeing	
  the	
  world,	
  a	
  representation,	
   picture,	
  or	
  narrative	
  of	
  the	
  fundamental	
  properties	
  of	
  reality.”	
  Stephen	
  Warner,	
  “More	
   Progress	
  on	
  the	
  New	
  Paradigm”	
  in	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
  Religious	
   Markets	
  and	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  ed.	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen.	
  (New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
  Littlefield	
   Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002),	
  2.	
   26	
  Warner,	
  “Work	
  in	
  Progress,”	
  1045.	
   	
    13	
    as	
  “monopoly”	
  religious	
  institutions	
  in	
  the	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion	
  (namely	
  the	
  Roman	
   Catholic	
  Church	
  and	
  the	
  Church	
  of	
  England),	
  in	
  the	
  new	
  American	
  open	
  marketplace	
  of	
   religion,	
  individuals	
  are	
  no	
  longer	
  commanded	
  nor	
  controlled,	
  but	
  rather	
  persuaded.	
  The	
   free	
  market	
  reality	
  of	
  this	
  new	
  religious	
  marketplace	
  allowed	
  for	
  a	
  striking	
  amount	
  of	
   religious	
  pluralism	
  in	
  American	
  society,	
  as	
  the	
  open	
  market	
  was	
  of	
  course	
  much	
  more	
   accommodating	
  to	
  new	
  firms	
  than	
  could	
  have	
  been	
  possible	
  in	
  a	
  European	
  context.	
  Warner	
   writes,	
  “The	
  remarkable	
  growth	
  of	
  religion	
  in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  –	
  including	
  the	
  many	
   accomplishments	
  that	
  old-­‐as	
  well	
  as	
  new-­‐	
  paradigm	
  thinkers	
  credit	
  it	
  with	
  –	
  began	
  when	
   religion	
  was	
  disestablished.”27	
  In	
  short,	
  disestablishment	
  of	
  the	
  ‘regulated’	
  European	
   religious	
  marketplace	
  allowed	
  for	
  new	
  market	
  conditions	
  to	
  accommodate	
  new	
  realities.	
   In	
  the	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy,	
  competition	
  can	
  be	
  identified	
  as	
  the	
  true	
  driving	
   force	
  of	
  American	
  religious	
  pluralism.	
  In	
  the	
  open	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion	
  anyone	
  can	
  open	
   a	
  church	
  or	
  start	
  a	
  religion,	
  and,	
  to	
  that	
  effect,	
  they	
  must	
  compete	
  against	
  each	
  other	
  for	
   attention.	
  Churches	
  or	
  religious	
  leaders	
  who	
  fail	
  to	
  offer	
  a	
  relevant,	
  attractive	
  religious	
   “product”	
  are	
  destined	
  to	
  fall	
  behind	
  those	
  better	
  suited	
  to	
  adapt	
  to	
  market	
  demand.	
  Stark	
   and	
  Finke	
  explain:	
  	
   Other	
  things	
  being	
  equal,	
  the	
  harder	
  a	
  religious	
  group	
  works	
  to	
  achieve	
  success,	
  the	
   more	
  successful	
  it	
  will	
  be.	
  Second,	
  people	
  will	
  only	
  work	
  as	
  hard	
  as	
  they	
  must	
  to	
   achieve	
  their	
  goals.	
  Thus,	
  competition	
  creates	
  and	
  rewards	
  eager	
  and	
  efficient	
   religious	
  firms	
  as	
  they,	
  collectively,	
  sustain	
  high	
  levels	
  of	
  public	
  religious	
   commitment.28	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   27	
  Stephen	
  Warner,	
  “More	
  Progress	
  on	
  the	
  New	
  Paradigm,”	
  4.	
   28	
  Finke	
  and	
  Stark	
  continue:	
  “These	
  points	
  seem	
  so	
  self-­‐evident	
  that	
  only	
  trained	
  social	
   scientists	
  could	
  doubt	
  them.”	
  Roger	
  Finke	
  &	
  Rodney	
  Stark,	
  “Beyond	
  Church	
  and	
  Sect:	
   Dynamics	
  and	
  Stability	
  in	
  Religious	
  Economics,”	
  in	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
   on	
  Religious	
  Markets	
  and	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  ed.	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen.	
  (New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
   Littlefield	
  Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002),	
  54.	
   	
    14	
    The	
  new	
  paradigm,	
  “envisions	
  the	
  possibility	
  and	
  potential	
  within	
  a	
  religiously	
  pluralistic	
   environment…	
  a	
  context	
  where	
  firms	
  must	
  be	
  responsive	
  to	
  and	
  flexible	
  with	
  consumer	
   demands.”29	
  An	
  open	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion	
  allows	
  room	
  for	
  a	
  true	
  diversity	
  of	
  religious	
   supply.	
   While	
  the	
  early	
  stages	
  of	
  American	
  religious	
  history	
  have	
  been	
  examined	
  in	
  this	
   way,	
  the	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
  has	
  also	
  recently	
  been	
  employed	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  of	
   contemporary	
  American	
  religious	
  dynamics.30	
  Wade	
  Clark	
  Roof,	
  in	
  his	
  book	
  Spiritual	
   Marketplace:	
  Baby	
  Boomers	
  and	
  the	
  Remaking	
  of	
  American	
  Religion,	
  interprets	
  recent	
   ecclesiastical	
  trends	
  in	
  American	
  religion	
  as	
  the	
  result	
  of	
  shrewd	
  religious	
  suppliers.	
  Roof	
   writes:	
   As	
  the	
  social	
  demographics	
  of	
  religious	
  constituencies	
  change	
  over	
  time,	
  religious	
   and	
  spiritual	
  leaders	
  are	
  in	
  positions	
  to	
  envision	
  beliefs	
  and	
  practices	
  appropriate	
  to	
   changing	
  circumstances.	
  In	
  recent	
  times	
  especially,	
  religious	
  messages	
  and	
  practices	
   have	
  come	
  to	
  be	
  frequently	
  re-­‐stylized,	
  made	
  to	
  fit	
  a	
  targeted	
  social	
  clientele,	
  often	
   on	
  the	
  basis	
  of	
  market	
  analysis,	
  and	
  carefully	
  monitored	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
   programmatic	
  emphases	
  should	
  be	
  adjusted	
  to	
  meet	
  particular	
  needs.31	
   	
   Shayne	
  Lee	
  and	
  Phillip	
  Luke	
  Sinitiere	
  utilize	
  the	
  market	
  approach	
  to	
  examine	
  prominent	
   contemporary	
  religious	
  figures	
  in	
  the	
  America	
  in	
  their	
  2009	
  book	
  Holy	
  Mavericks:	
   Evangelical	
  Innovators	
  and	
  the	
  Spiritual	
  Marketplace.	
  Here	
  they	
  describe	
  five	
  influential	
   Evangelical	
  leaders	
  (Brian	
  McLaren,	
  Rick	
  Warren,	
  Joel	
  Osteen,	
  T.D.	
  Jakes,	
  and	
  Paula	
  White)	
   as	
  gifted	
  spiritual	
  brokers.	
  Lee	
  and	
  Sinitiere	
  write:	
   …Religious	
  suppliers	
  thrive	
  in	
  a	
  competitive	
  spiritual	
  marketplace	
  because	
  they	
  are	
   quick,	
  decisive,	
  and	
  flexible	
  in	
  reaching	
  to	
  changing	
  conditions,	
  savvy	
  at	
  packaging	
   and	
  marketing	
  their	
  ministries,	
  and	
  resourceful	
  at	
  offering	
  spiritual	
  rewards	
  that	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   29	
  Lee	
  and	
  Sinitiere,	
  Holy	
  Mavericks,	
  163.	
   30	
  Roger	
  Finke	
  &	
  Rodney	
  Stark,	
  The	
  Churching	
  of	
  America	
  1776-­‐1990:	
  Winners	
  and	
  Losers	
  in	
   our	
  Religious	
  Economy	
  (Toronto:	
  Rutgers	
  University	
  Press:	
  1993).	
   31	
  Wade	
  Clark	
  Roof,	
  Spiritual	
  Marketplace:	
  Baby	
  Boomers	
  and	
  the	
  Remaking	
  of	
  American	
  	
   Religion	
  (Princeton:	
  Princeton	
  University	
  Press,	
  2001),	
  78.	
   	
    15	
    resonate	
  with	
  the	
  existential	
  needs	
  of	
  the	
  public.	
  Religious	
  suppliers	
  carve	
  out	
  a	
   niche	
  in	
  the	
  spiritual	
  marketplace	
  and	
  distinguish	
  their	
  ministries	
  by	
  offering	
  an	
   array	
  of	
  spiritual	
  goods	
  and	
  services	
  that	
  match	
  the	
  tastes	
  and	
  desires	
  of	
  religious	
   consumers.32	
   	
   Successful	
  religious	
  suppliers	
  recalibrate	
  their	
  message	
  to	
  fit	
  the	
  market	
  profiles	
  of	
  target	
   buyers,	
  and,	
  as	
  Lee	
  and	
  Sinitiere	
  demonstrate,	
  individuals,	
  and	
  not	
  only	
  religious	
   institutions,	
  can	
  be	
  interpreted	
  as	
  being	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  in	
  the	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion.	
   	
    In	
  their	
  book	
  The	
  Marketplace	
  of	
  Christianity,	
  Robert	
  B.	
  Ekelund	
  Jr.,	
  Robert	
  F.	
  Hebert	
    and	
  Robert	
  D.	
  Tollison	
  also	
  tout	
  the	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  economic	
  analysis	
  in	
  the	
  history	
  of	
   Christianity.	
  They	
  write,	
  “Because	
  religion	
  is	
  a	
  set	
  of	
  organized	
  beliefs,	
  and	
  a	
  church	
  is	
  an	
   organized	
  body	
  of	
  worshipers,	
  it	
  is	
  natural	
  to	
  use	
  economics-­‐	
  a	
  science	
  that	
  explains	
  the	
   behavior	
  of	
  individuals	
  in	
  organizations	
  –	
  to	
  understand	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  organized	
   religion.”33	
  Ekelund,	
  Hebert	
  and	
  Tollison	
  also	
  suggest	
  that	
  economic	
  models	
  can	
  serve	
  in	
   predicting	
  future	
  religious	
  trends.	
  They	
  continue,	
  “In	
  religious	
  activity,	
  as	
  in	
  commercial	
   activity,	
  people	
  respond	
  to	
  costs	
  and	
  benefits	
  in	
  a	
  predictable	
  way,	
  and	
  therefore	
  their	
   actions	
  are	
  amenable	
  to	
  economic	
  analysis.”34	
   	
    2.2	
  Rational	
  Choice	
  Theory	
   	
    The	
  question	
  must	
  be	
  asked:	
  how	
  it	
  is	
  that	
  religion	
  can	
  be	
  said	
  to	
  function	
  as	
  a	
    desired	
  commodity	
  in	
  a	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion?	
  Although	
  identifying	
  the	
  many	
  particular	
   demands	
  of	
  individual	
  religious	
  ‘consumers’	
  would	
  be	
  a	
  near-­‐impossible	
  task,	
  it	
  is	
  equally	
   helpful	
  to	
  identify	
  the	
  means	
  by	
  which	
  these	
  individual	
  religious	
  consumers	
  ‘consume.’	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   32	
  Lee	
  and	
  Sinitiere,	
  Holy	
  Mavericks,	
  3.	
   33	
  Robert	
  B.	
  Ekelund	
  Jr.,	
  Robert	
  F.	
  Hebert	
  and	
  Robert	
  D.	
  Tollison,	
  The	
  Marketplace	
  of	
   Christianity	
  (Cambridge:	
  MIT	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  viii.	
   34	
  Ekelund,	
  Hebert	
  and	
  Tollison,	
  The	
  Marketplace	
  of	
  Christianity,	
  2.	
   	
    16	
    Rational	
  choice	
  theory,	
  a	
  theory	
  adapted	
  from	
  conventional	
  economic	
  theories,	
  is	
  at	
  the	
   core	
  of	
  religious	
  economics,	
  and	
  the	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
  functions,	
  largely,	
  as	
  an	
   application	
  of	
  rational	
  choice	
  theory	
  at	
  the	
  societal	
  level.	
  	
   In	
  the	
  1980s,	
  a	
  handful	
  of	
  sociologists,	
  led	
  by	
  Rodney	
  Stark,	
  William	
  Sims	
   Bainbridge,	
  Roger	
  Finke,	
  and	
  Lawrence	
  Iannaccone,	
  began	
  to	
  formulate	
  a	
  theory	
  of	
  religion	
   based	
  upon	
  the	
  proposal	
  that	
  religious	
  choice	
  was	
  ultimately	
  a	
  rational	
  one.	
  This	
  was	
  a	
   proposition	
  that	
  stood	
  in	
  direct	
  opposition	
  to	
  established	
  theories	
  of	
  secularization.	
  Today	
   rational	
  choice	
  theory	
  is	
  recognized	
  as	
  “the	
  most	
  systematic	
  recent	
  attempt	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
   general	
  theory	
  of	
  religion.”35	
  The	
  theory	
  served	
  to	
  provide	
  an	
  answer	
  as	
  to	
  why	
  global	
   religion	
  was	
  not	
  in	
  fact	
  diminishing,	
  as	
  traditional	
  secularization	
  theorists	
  maintained,	
  but	
   rather	
  expanding	
  in	
  many	
  environments.	
   Rational	
  choice	
  theory	
  rejected	
  the	
  notion	
  that	
  religion	
  is	
  essentially	
  a	
  phenomenon	
   bred	
  of	
  an	
  irrational	
  mind.	
  Warner	
  explains	
  that	
  “the	
  overlapping	
  companies	
  of	
  rational	
   choice	
  theorists	
  and	
  new	
  paradigm	
  analysts	
  of	
  religion	
  have	
  in	
  common	
  a	
  bias	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  a	
   mistake	
  to	
  assume	
  that	
  religious	
  people	
  are,	
  to	
  put	
  it	
  bluntly,	
  benighted.”36	
  Stark	
  and	
  his	
   contemporaries	
  instead	
  interpreted	
  religion	
  as	
  a	
  choice	
  made	
  for	
  practical	
  and	
  identifiable	
   reasons.	
  As	
  a	
  comprehensive	
  theory,	
  Stark	
  and	
  Bainbridge	
  assert	
  that	
  religion,	
  in	
  the	
   plainest	
  of	
  terms,	
  can	
  be	
  understood	
  as,	
  “the	
  attempt	
  to	
  secure	
  desired	
  rewards	
  in	
  the	
   absence	
  of	
  alternative	
  means.”37	
  Because	
  religious	
  beliefs	
  and	
  practices	
  provide	
  the	
   individual	
  with	
  anticipated	
  rewards,	
  a	
  religious	
  choice	
  is	
  one	
  that	
  can	
  thus	
  be	
  identified	
  as	
   a	
  considered	
  action.	
  A	
  rational	
  choice,	
  according	
  to	
  Stark,	
  “involves	
  weighing	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   35	
  Malcolm	
  Hamilton,	
  The	
  Sociology	
  of	
  Religion	
  (New	
  York:	
  Routledge,	
  2001),	
  215.	
   36	
  Warner,	
  “More	
  Progress	
  on	
  the	
  New	
  Paradigm,”	
  6.	
   37	
  Hamilton,	
  Sociology,	
  216.	
   	
    17	
    anticipated	
  costs	
  and	
  benefits	
  of	
  actions	
  and	
  then	
  seeking	
  to	
  act	
  so	
  as	
  to	
  maximize	
  net	
   benefits.”38	
  Thus,	
  as	
  in	
  conventional	
  economic	
  theories,	
  the	
  underlying	
  assumption	
  for	
   advocates	
  of	
  rational	
  choice	
  theory	
  is	
  that	
  human	
  beings	
  do	
  in	
  fact	
  endeavor	
  to	
  make	
   rational	
  choices	
  when	
  attempting	
  to	
  satisfy	
  their	
  desires	
  and	
  demands.	
   	
    The	
  rewards	
  sought	
  by	
  ‘demanders’	
  of	
  religion	
  can	
  indeed	
  be	
  broad;	
  religious	
    reward	
  in	
  religious	
  economies	
  can	
  include,	
  “very	
  specific	
  and	
  limited	
  things	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
   most	
  general	
  things	
  such	
  as	
  solutions	
  to	
  questions	
  of	
  ultimate	
  meaning	
  and	
  even	
  unreal	
  or	
   non-­‐existent	
  things,	
  conditions	
  or	
  states.”39	
  Regardless,	
  rational	
  choice	
  theory,	
  coupled	
   with	
  the	
  basics	
  of	
  exchange	
  theory	
  (the	
  proposal	
  that	
  most	
  human	
  interaction	
  can	
  be	
   understood	
  as	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  exchange),	
  allows	
  for	
  a	
  practical	
  and	
  comprehensive	
  framework	
   for	
  the	
  examination	
  of	
  how	
  religion,	
  as	
  a	
  ‘product,’	
  operates	
  in	
  the	
  religious	
  marketplace,	
   and	
  it	
  is	
  upon	
  these	
  proposals	
  that	
  this	
  study	
  will	
  make	
  its	
  case.40	
   	
    2.3	
  Religious	
  Economies	
  and	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
   The	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
  provides	
  the	
  concepts,	
  the	
  terminology,	
  and	
  the	
   methodological	
  scaffolding	
  to	
  make	
  coherent	
  the	
  modern	
  religious	
  phenomenon	
  that	
  is	
   CCM	
  in	
  America.	
  The	
  subsequent	
  chapter	
  will	
  recount	
  a	
  brief	
  history	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  genre,	
   beginning	
  with	
  its	
  inception,	
  and	
  tracing	
  its	
  course	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  present	
  day.	
  Here	
  notable	
   disagreements	
  and	
  significant	
  evolutions	
  within	
  the	
  genre	
  will	
  be	
  highlighted.	
  Chapter	
  4	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   38	
  Stark,	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Christianity,	
  169.	
   39	
  Hamilton,	
  Sociology,	
  216.	
   40	
  Social	
  Exchange	
  Theory	
  is	
  a	
  sociological	
  perspective	
  that	
  explains	
  human	
  interactions	
  as	
   reducible	
  to	
  negotiated	
  exchanges;	
  “the	
  longitudinal	
  exchange	
  relation	
  between	
  two	
   specific	
  actors	
  is	
  the	
  central	
  concept	
  around	
  which	
  theory	
  is	
  organized.”	
  Richard	
  M.	
   Emerson,	
  “Toward	
  a	
  Theory	
  of	
  Value	
  in	
  Exchange	
  Theory,”	
  in	
  Social	
  Exchange	
  Theory,	
  ed.	
   Karen	
  S.	
  Cook.	
  (Newbury	
  Park:	
  Sage	
  Publications,	
  1987),	
  12.	
   	
    18	
    will	
  identify	
  the	
  phenomenon	
  and	
  its	
  artists,	
  audience,	
  and	
  industry	
  as	
  existing	
  within	
  a	
   religious	
  marketplace;	
  a	
  marketplace	
  subject	
  to	
  economic	
  analysis.	
  Many	
  of	
  the	
  events	
  in	
   the	
  history	
  of	
  the	
  genre	
  will	
  be	
  revisited	
  in	
  this	
  light.	
  A	
  case	
  will	
  be	
  made	
  that	
  the	
  diversity	
   of	
  Christian	
  religious	
  expression	
  apparent	
  in	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  CCM	
  can	
  indeed	
  be	
  recognized	
   as	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  religious	
  pluralism	
  in	
  the	
  American	
  religious	
  marketplace.	
  Secondly,	
  CCM	
   artists	
  will	
  be	
  identified	
  as	
  functioning	
  as	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  in	
  the	
  religious	
  economy.	
   Lastly,	
  competition	
  and	
  the	
  competitive	
  reality	
  of	
  an	
  open	
  religious	
  marketplace	
  will	
  be	
   identified	
  as	
  the	
  true	
  driving	
  force	
  behind	
  many	
  of	
  the	
  significant	
  disagreements	
  in	
  the	
   history	
  of	
  the	
  genre	
  that	
  were	
  identified	
  in	
  Chapter	
  3.	
  	
   As	
  discussed	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  chapter,	
  the	
  CCM	
  phenomenon	
  represents	
  a	
  valuable	
  new	
   avenue	
  for	
  American	
  Religious	
  Studies,	
  and	
  I	
  believe	
  that	
  approaching	
  this	
  subject	
  by	
   employing	
  the	
  novel	
  sociological	
  method	
  of	
  religio-­‐economic	
  analysis	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  worthwhile	
   endeavor,	
  both	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  CCM	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  for	
  the	
  advancement	
  of	
   the	
  theory	
  itself.	
  In	
  the	
  concluding	
  chapter	
  of	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
   Religious	
  Markets	
  and	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  sociologist	
  Ted	
  Jelen	
  calls	
  for	
  the	
  marketplace	
   approach	
  to	
  be	
  broadened	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  more	
  easily	
  incorporate	
  diverse	
  forms	
  of	
  social	
   activity,	
  religious	
  or	
  otherwise,	
  lest	
  the	
  theory	
  fall	
  short	
  of	
  its	
  rich	
  potential.	
  He	
  writes,	
   To	
  put	
  the	
  matter	
  as	
  bluntly	
  as	
  I	
  can,	
  if	
  the	
  market	
  model	
  of	
  religious	
  economies	
  is	
   simply	
  a	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  participation,	
  it	
  is	
  ultimately	
  stagnant,	
  and	
  perhaps	
   destined	
  for	
  intellectual	
  obsolescence.	
  However,	
  if	
  the	
  program	
  can	
  successfully	
  be	
   expanded	
  to	
  include	
  other	
  social	
  phenomena,	
  the	
  prospects	
  for	
  economic	
   approaches	
  to	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  religion	
  appear	
  to	
  be	
  much	
  more	
  promising.41	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   41	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen,	
  “Reflections	
  on	
  the	
  ‘New	
  Paradigm’:	
  Unfinished	
  Business	
  and	
  an	
  Agenda	
  for	
   Research,”	
  in	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
  Religious	
  Markets	
  and	
  Religious	
   Pluralism,	
  ed.	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen.	
  (New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
  Littlefield	
  Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002),	
  188.	
   	
    19	
    Expanding	
  this	
  program	
  to	
  include	
  the	
  modern	
  intersection	
  of	
  pop-­‐culture	
  and	
  religion	
  in	
   21st	
  century	
  American	
  society	
  is	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  study.	
   	
   	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    20	
    3	
  The	
  History	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
   3.1	
  The	
  Birth	
  and	
  Rise	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  Genre	
  (1960	
  –	
  1989)	
  	
   	
    Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  emerged	
  during	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  in	
  the	
  1960s	
    both	
  as	
  a	
  popular	
  form	
  of	
  personal	
  religious	
  expression	
  and	
  as	
  a	
  tool	
  for	
  street	
  evangelism.	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music,	
  in	
  its	
  infancy,	
  was	
  fundamentally	
  counter-­‐cultural;	
  its	
   appropriation	
  of	
  the	
  “secular”	
  genres	
  of	
  folk	
  and	
  rock	
  was	
  very	
  much	
  in	
  tune	
  with	
  the	
  Jesus	
   Movement’s	
  personality	
  as	
  a	
  “counterculture	
  of	
  mainstream	
  Christianity.”42	
  After	
  all,	
  the	
   musical	
  genres	
  of	
  rock	
  and	
  folk	
  were	
  often	
  understood	
  to	
  be	
  guilty,	
  at	
  least	
  by	
  association,	
   of	
  promoting	
  drug	
  use	
  and	
  free	
  love,	
  particularly	
  during	
  the	
  1960s	
  and	
  early	
  1970s	
  when	
   “rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll	
  was	
  still	
  relatively	
  new	
  and	
  possessed	
  of	
  its	
  in-­‐your-­‐face	
  freshness.”43	
  The	
   music	
  of	
  the	
  early	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  consisted	
  of	
  deeply	
  personal	
  and	
  affective	
  songs,	
  not	
   unlike	
  the	
  emotional,	
  introspective	
  mainstream	
  singer-­‐songwriters	
  that	
  gained	
  fame	
   during	
  this	
  time.44	
  This	
  music	
  was	
  recognized	
  early	
  on	
  by	
  observers	
  as	
  being	
  essential	
  to	
   the	
  movement’s	
  growth	
  and	
  popularity;	
  as	
  early	
  as	
  1973,	
  Robert	
  Ellwood	
  commented,	
  “It	
  is	
   largely	
  music	
  that	
  has	
  made	
  the	
  movement	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  popular	
  culture…	
  The	
  ability	
  of	
  Jesus	
   rock	
  and	
  gospel	
  melodies	
  to	
  generate	
  rich,	
  powerful	
  feelings	
  in	
  a	
  mood	
  and	
  emotion-­‐ oriented	
  age	
  has	
  brought	
  and	
  held	
  the	
  movement	
  together.”45	
   	
    However,	
  unlike	
  the	
  commercially	
  successful	
  rock	
  and	
  folk	
  bands	
  from	
  which	
  Jesus	
    Movement	
  borrowed,	
  the	
  earliest	
  Christian	
  artists	
  found	
  themselves	
  ignored	
  by	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   42	
  Don	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light	
  (Milwaukee:	
  Hal	
  Leonard,	
  2002),	
  279.	
   43	
  David	
  W.	
  Stowe,	
  No	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil	
  (Chapel	
  Hill:	
  University	
  of	
  North	
  Carolina	
   Press,	
  2011),	
  2.	
   44	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light,	
  280.	
   45	
  Robert	
  S.	
  Ellwood,	
  One	
  Way:	
  The	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  and	
  Its	
  Meaning	
  (Englewood	
  Cliffs:	
   Prentice-­‐Hall,	
  1973),	
  63.	
   	
    21	
    mainstream	
  music	
  industry.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  overt	
  and	
  unapologetic	
  Christian	
  lyrical	
  content	
  of	
   the	
  songs	
  that	
  caused	
  the	
  mainstream	
  labels	
  to	
  distance	
  themselves	
  from	
  this	
  Jesus	
  music	
   deemed	
  simply	
  unprofitable.46	
  However,	
  this	
  rejection	
  by	
  the	
  mainstream	
  music	
  industry	
   was	
  not	
  overly	
  discouraging	
  for	
  many	
  early	
  CCM	
  artists.	
  Don	
  Cusic	
  explains	
  that	
  within	
  the	
   Jesus	
  Movement,	
  like	
  the	
  greater	
  American	
  countercultural	
  movement	
  of	
  the	
  time,	
  “there	
   was	
  also	
  a	
  strong	
  anti-­‐establishment	
  and	
  anti-­‐business	
  bias,	
  especially	
  in	
  the	
  music	
   industry,	
  where	
  large	
  corporations	
  were	
  seen	
  as	
  the	
  enemy	
  of	
  ‘pure’	
  music.”47	
  John	
  J.	
   Thompson	
  suggests	
  that	
  the	
  earliest	
  years	
  of	
  this	
  new	
  ‘Jesus	
  music’	
  actually	
  served	
  to	
   produce	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  genuine,	
  heartfelt	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  that	
  has	
  ever	
   been	
  written;	
  these	
  early	
  Christian	
  artists	
  understood	
  that	
  their	
  unabashed	
  religious	
  lyrics	
   unavoidably	
  precluded	
  them	
  from	
  any	
  fame	
  or	
  wealth.	
  Thompson	
  writes:	
   The	
  unsophisticated	
  Christian	
  artists	
  of	
  the	
  1960s	
  and	
  1970s	
  believed	
  that	
  they	
  had	
   no	
  choice	
  but	
  to	
  communicate	
  the	
  message	
  of	
  Christ	
  in	
  the	
  language	
  that	
  was	
  most	
   natural	
  to	
  them.	
  The	
  early	
  artists	
  had	
  a	
  passion	
  for	
  what	
  they	
  were	
  doing	
  that	
  is	
   unrivaled	
  to	
  this	
  day.	
  Knowing	
  that	
  they	
  were	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  chastised	
  by	
  the	
  church,	
   and	
  certain	
  to	
  be	
  ignored	
  by	
  the	
  mainstream	
  music	
  business,	
  these	
  young	
  musicians	
   went	
  underground,	
  and	
  their	
  ‘ministries’	
  were	
  as	
  spontaneous	
  as	
  their	
  music,	
  often	
   with	
  little	
  or	
  no	
  superstructure	
  around	
  them.48	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   46	
  Although	
  it	
  is	
  undeniable	
  that	
  the	
  two	
  musicals	
  Jesus	
  Christ	
  Superstar	
  and	
  Godspell	
  were	
   both	
  financially	
  successful	
  and	
  critically	
  acclaimed	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  1970s,	
  and	
  both	
  considering	
   Christian	
  subject	
  material,	
  the	
  underlying	
  themes	
  were	
  not	
  overly	
  evangelistic.	
  Neither	
  film	
   depicts	
  a	
  resurrection	
  scene,	
  for	
  example.	
  In	
  Jesus	
  Christ	
  Superstar,	
  Judas	
  was	
  in	
  many	
  ways	
   the	
  protagonist	
  of	
  the	
  film,	
  and	
  Ted	
  Neely,	
  who	
  depicted	
  Jesus,	
  describes	
  his	
  character	
  as,	
   “…	
  a	
  theologian	
  and	
  a	
  thinker,	
  not	
  a	
  God.	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  man	
  who	
  got	
  beyond	
  himself	
  and	
  went	
   too	
  far.”	
  Neely	
  quoted	
  in	
  Ellis	
  Nassour	
  and	
  Richard	
  Broderick,	
  Rock	
  Opera:	
  The	
  Creation	
  of	
   Jesus	
  Christ	
  Superstar,	
  from	
  Record	
  Album	
  to	
  Broadway	
  Show	
  and	
  Motion	
  Picture	
  (New	
  York:	
   Hawthorn	
  Books,	
  1973),	
  240.	
   47	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light,	
  279.	
   48	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  38. 	
    22	
    Evangelism	
  was	
  often	
  the	
  driving	
  motivation	
  for	
  these	
  artists;	
  the	
  early	
  songwriters	
   performed	
  free	
  concerts	
  in	
  parks	
  and	
  street	
  corners,	
  playing	
  for	
  any	
  audience	
  that	
  would	
   listen,	
  either	
  selling	
  their	
  albums	
  or	
  handing	
  them	
  out	
  free	
  of	
  charge.	
  	
   	
    Larry	
  Norman	
  is	
  perhaps	
  the	
  most	
  recognizable	
  figure	
  of	
  the	
  early	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
    songwriters.	
  Norman	
  is	
  often	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  “Father	
  of	
  Christian	
  Rock;”	
  his	
  influence	
   is	
  credited	
  today	
  by	
  such	
  artists	
  and	
  bands	
  as	
  U2,	
  John	
  Mellencamp,	
  and	
  the	
  Violent	
   Femmes.49	
  Norman	
  so	
  personified	
  the	
  spirit	
  of	
  the	
  1960s	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  in	
  fact	
   for	
  him	
  that	
  the	
  term	
  “Jesus	
  Freak”	
  was	
  first	
  coined.50	
  His	
  1972	
  manifesto	
  “Why	
  Should	
  the	
   Devil	
  have	
  all	
  the	
  Good	
  Music?”	
  became	
  a	
  Christian	
  rock	
  anthem	
  for	
  the	
  self-­‐identified	
   “Jesus	
  Freaks”	
  across	
  the	
  continent.	
  He	
  sang:	
   They	
  say	
  to	
  cut	
  my	
  hair	
  /	
  they're	
  driving	
  me	
  insane	
  /	
  I	
  grew	
  it	
  out	
  long	
  to	
  make	
   room	
  for	
  my	
  brain	
  /	
  But	
  sometimes	
  people	
  don't	
  understand,	
  What's	
  a	
  good	
  boy	
   doing	
  in	
  a	
  Rock	
  n'	
  Roll	
  band	
  /	
  There's	
  nothing	
  wrong	
  with	
  playing	
  the	
  blues	
  licks,	
  If	
   you've	
  got	
  a	
  reason,	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  hear	
  it	
  /	
  Why	
  should	
  the	
  Devil	
  have	
  all	
  the	
  good	
   music?	
  I've	
  been	
  filled,	
  I	
  feel	
  okay	
  /	
  Jesus	
  is	
  the	
  rock	
  and	
  He	
  rolled	
  my	
  blues	
  away51	
   	
   Norman	
  quickly	
  found	
  his	
  lyrics	
  and	
  his	
  forceful	
  evangelical	
  style	
  under	
  attack	
  by	
  both	
   mainstream	
  evangelical	
  churches	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  his	
  peers	
  in	
  the	
  broader	
  American	
  music	
  scene;	
   his	
  song	
  is	
  written	
  as	
  a	
  response	
  to	
  those	
  Christians	
  who	
  rejected	
  “Jesus	
  rock”	
  for	
   theological	
  reasons	
  that	
  he	
  deemed	
  simply	
  indefensible.	
  Norman	
  became	
  “marginalized	
  in	
   both	
  the	
  realm	
  of	
  rock	
  music,	
  where	
  he	
  was	
  considered	
  too	
  religious,	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  burgeoning	
   Christian	
  music	
  industry,	
  where	
  his	
  music	
  was	
  believed	
  to	
  be	
  too	
  aggressive.”52	
   Nevertheless,	
  his	
  influence	
  on	
  his	
  contemporaries	
  can	
  not	
  be	
  underestimated;	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   49	
  Mark	
  Allan	
  Powell,	
  Encyclopedia,	
  633.	
   50	
  Ibid.	
   51	
  Larry	
  Norman,	
  Only	
  Visiting	
  this	
  Planet,	
  Verve,	
  1972.	
   52	
  Howard	
  &	
  Streck,	
  Apostles	
  of	
  Rock,	
  31.	
   	
    23	
    contemporary	
  Christian	
  music,	
  as	
  it	
  exists	
  today,	
  is	
  in	
  many	
  ways	
  a	
  genre	
  of	
  Norman’s	
   creation.	
   	
    Like	
  Norman,	
  many	
  early	
  Christian	
  rock	
  bands	
  found	
  themselves	
  under	
  siege	
  by	
    their	
  Christian	
  brethren.	
  Bands	
  such	
  as	
  The	
  Seventy	
  Sevens,	
  Crouch,	
  The	
  Resurrection	
   Band,	
  and	
  the	
  All	
  Saved	
  Freak	
  Band	
  faced	
  a	
  two-­‐front	
  war;	
  the	
  earliest	
  Christian	
  artists	
   were	
  scorned	
  by	
  the	
  two	
  worlds	
  they	
  sought	
  to	
  bridge.	
  Thompson	
  explains,	
  “Christian	
  rock	
   was	
  an	
  infant	
  in	
  those	
  days.	
  One	
  of	
  its	
  parents,	
  pop	
  culture,	
  decided	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  irrelevant	
   and	
  old-­‐fogeyish	
  and	
  kicked	
  it	
  to	
  the	
  curb.	
  The	
  other	
  parent,	
  the	
  church,	
  saw	
  too	
  much	
  of	
   ‘the	
  world’	
  in	
  it	
  and	
  was	
  frightened	
  by	
  it.”53	
  	
   This	
  all	
  began	
  to	
  change,	
  however,	
  in	
  June,	
  1972.	
  The	
  Jesus	
  Music	
  Festival	
  in	
  Dallas,	
   1972,	
  on	
  the	
  last	
  day	
  of	
  Explo	
  ‘72,	
  marked	
  the	
  most	
  visible	
  event	
  of	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  in	
   America,	
  and,	
  ultimately,	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  its	
  end.54	
  The	
  International	
  Student	
  Conference	
   on	
  Evangelicalism	
  (the	
  event’s	
  official	
  title)	
  was	
  a	
  five-­‐day	
  event	
  organized	
  by	
  Campus	
   Crusade	
  for	
  Christ’s	
  founder	
  Bill	
  Bright	
  and	
  geared	
  towards	
  high	
  school	
  and	
  college	
   students.	
  On	
  this	
  day,	
  over	
  250,000	
  people	
  came	
  out	
  to	
  Woodall	
  Rogers	
  Parkway	
  to	
  take	
   part	
  in	
  what	
  has	
  become	
  known	
  as	
  “Godstock.”	
  Here,	
  participants	
  took	
  in	
  a	
  sermon	
  from	
   Billy	
  Graham	
  and	
  performances	
  by	
  such	
  bands	
  as	
  Children	
  of	
  the	
  Day,	
  Love	
  Song,	
  the	
   Maranatha	
  Band,	
  Crouch	
  and	
  the	
  Disciples,	
  Kris	
  Kristofferson,	
  Johnny	
  Cash,	
  and	
  Larry	
   Norman.	
  The	
  event	
  comprised	
  daytime	
  seminars	
  with	
  the	
  express	
  purpose	
  of	
  instructing	
   youth	
  “how	
  to	
  witness	
  effectively	
  for	
  Christ.”55	
  The	
  event’s	
  true	
  legacy,	
  however,	
  has	
   proven	
  to	
  be	
  its	
  musical	
  finale;	
  the	
  once-­‐shunned	
  music	
  of	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  was	
  given	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   53	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  28.	
   54	
  Ibid. 55	
  Stowe,	
  No	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil,	
  62.	
   	
    24	
    center-­‐stage	
  and	
  was	
  ultimately	
  embraced	
  by	
  mainstream	
  American	
  Christianity.	
  Larry	
   Eskridge	
  credits	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  Billy	
  Graham	
  as	
  a	
  key	
  reason	
  for	
  the	
  mainstream	
   acceptance	
  of	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  music;	
  he	
  writes,	
  “The	
  fact	
  that	
  America's	
  leading	
   evangelist	
  could	
  tolerate	
  the	
  movement's	
  hippie	
  eccentricities	
  undoubtedly	
  eased	
  its	
   acceptance	
  in	
  many	
  evangelical	
  quarters.”56	
  After	
  Explo	
  ’72,	
  “churches	
  started	
  to	
  accept	
  the	
   milder	
  Jesus	
  music,	
  soon	
  to	
  be	
  referred	
  to	
  as	
  ‘Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music,’	
  though	
  the	
   rockier	
  stuff	
  was	
  still	
  suspect.”57	
  In	
  the	
  following	
  years,	
  Gospel	
  music	
  distributors	
  began	
  to	
   make	
  the	
  music	
  more	
  accessible,	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  1970s	
  an	
  industry	
  began	
  to	
  emerge	
  with	
   the	
  goal	
  of	
  supporting	
  and	
  promoting	
  the	
  genre.	
   	
    By	
  1976,	
  a	
  fledgling	
  infrastructure	
  had	
  emerged	
  to	
  foster	
  the	
  growth	
  of	
    contemporary	
  Christian	
  music.	
  The	
  Christian	
  Booksellers	
  Association,	
  a	
  trade	
  organization	
   networking	
  Christian	
  bookstores	
  across	
  America,	
  had	
  expanded	
  dramatically	
  during	
  the	
   early	
  1970s.	
  The	
  association	
  had	
  begun	
  in	
  1950	
  with	
  approximately	
  25	
  stores,	
  and,	
  “in	
   1976	
  they	
  represented	
  2,800	
  members,	
  who	
  generated	
  $500	
  million	
  in	
  sales,	
  up	
  from	
  $100	
   million	
  in	
  1971.”58	
  Christian	
  bookstores	
  provided	
  a	
  means	
  for	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
   artists,	
  labels,	
  and	
  marketers	
  to	
  effectively	
  promote	
  their	
  music	
  to	
  evangelicals	
  without	
  the	
   assistance	
  of	
  the	
  mainstream	
  music	
  industry.	
  The	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association,	
  the	
  trade	
   organization	
  for	
  Gospel	
  music	
  in	
  America,	
  became	
  well	
  established	
  and	
  their	
  ‘Dove	
  Awards’	
   became	
  a	
  serviceable	
  means	
  of	
  bringing	
  nation-­‐wide	
  “recognition	
  and	
  attention	
  to	
   Christian	
  music.”59	
  These	
  awards	
  also	
  served	
  as	
  a	
  framing	
  mechanism	
  for	
  the	
  genre;	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   56	
  Larry	
  Eskridge,	
  "One	
  Way:	
  Billy	
  Graham,	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Generation,	
  and	
  the	
  Idea	
  of	
  an	
   Evanglical	
  Youth	
  Culture,"	
  Church	
  History	
  67.1	
  (1998):	
  85.	
   57	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  36.	
   58	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light,	
  282.	
   59	
  Ibid.	
   	
    25	
    Dove	
  Awards	
  created	
  a	
  means	
  of	
  identifying,	
  promoting,	
  and	
  encouraging	
  consumption	
  of	
   the	
  most	
  popular	
  and	
  profitable	
  CCM	
  artists.	
  In	
  1977,	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  time,	
  a	
  gospel	
  recording	
   on	
  a	
  Christian	
  label	
  had	
  been	
  certified	
  ‘Gold’	
  (500,000	
  units	
  sold),	
  a	
  feat	
  accomplished	
  by	
   the	
  Bill	
  Gaither	
  Trio’s	
  record	
  Alleluia,	
  A	
  Praise	
  Gathering	
  for	
  Believers.	
  In	
  1978,	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  magazine	
  was	
  first	
  published.	
  By	
  the	
  early	
  1980s,	
  Christian	
   bookstores	
  had	
  moved	
  from	
  retail	
  stores	
  into	
  shopping	
  malls.	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
   music	
  had	
  quietly	
  become	
  a	
  fixture	
  of	
  the	
  evangelical	
  America	
  subculture.	
   	
    Although	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  primary	
  reasons	
  for	
  the	
  initial	
  rise	
  of	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
    music	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  1970s	
  was	
  the	
  movement’s	
  unity,	
  the	
  Christianity	
  advocated	
  by	
  its	
  artists	
   was	
  hardly	
  monolithic.	
  The	
  legitimacy	
  of	
  the	
  Dove	
  Awards,	
  for	
  example,	
  became	
  a	
  target	
  for	
   theological	
  debate	
  by	
  CCM	
  artists.	
  The	
  primary	
  objection	
  by	
  critics	
  of	
  the	
  event	
  was	
  that	
  “all	
   rewards	
  should	
  be	
  ‘heavenly’	
  and	
  that,	
  somehow,	
  giving	
  awards	
  to	
  Christians,	
  from	
   Christians,	
  for	
  Christian	
  endeavors,	
  was	
  ‘ungodly.’”60	
  In	
  1981,	
  an	
  editorial	
  was	
  published	
  in	
   CCM	
  magazine	
  questioning	
  the	
  integrity	
  of	
  the	
  awards,	
  voicing	
  popular	
  concerns	
  by	
  a	
   growing	
  number	
  of	
  Christian	
  artists	
  who	
  had	
  begun	
  to	
  take	
  offense	
  at	
  the	
  entire	
  event.61	
   Keith	
  Green,	
  after	
  his	
  rise	
  to	
  stardom,	
  became	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  outspoken	
  artists	
  against	
  the	
   industry	
  and	
  the	
  “business	
  side”	
  of	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music.	
  After	
  his	
  initial	
   conversion	
  during	
  a	
  traumatic	
  LSD	
  experiment	
  at	
  age	
  19,	
  and	
  before	
  his	
  untimely	
  death	
  in	
  a	
   plane	
  crash	
  in	
  1982,	
  Green	
  strived	
  to	
  make	
  his	
  records	
  free	
  and	
  accessible	
  to	
  all,	
  reasoning	
   that,	
  “if	
  the	
  gospel	
  –	
  and	
  salvation	
  –	
  was	
  free,	
  you	
  cannot	
  charge	
  money	
  for	
  an	
  album.”62	
   Although	
  many	
  in	
  the	
  industry	
  branded	
  him	
  a	
  radical,	
  his	
  passing	
  “had	
  an	
  effect	
  on	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   60	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light,	
  333.	
   61	
  Karen	
  Marie	
  Platt,	
  “The	
  Doves:	
  What	
  Kind	
  of	
  Strange	
  Birds	
  They	
  Are.”	
  CCM,	
  April,	
  1981. 62	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light,	
  292.	
   	
    26	
    contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  subculture	
  analogous	
  to	
  that	
  which	
  the	
  murder	
  of	
  John	
   Lennon	
  had	
  on	
  the	
  mainstream	
  rock	
  and	
  roll	
  culture	
  two	
  years	
  later.”63	
  His	
  integrity	
  and	
   his	
  ambition	
  for	
  what	
  he	
  deemed	
  “theologically-­‐sound”	
  lyrics	
  had	
  a	
  significant	
  influence	
  on	
   his	
  peers;	
  today	
  he	
  has	
  attained	
  a	
  near	
  iconic	
  status	
  among	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
   artists.64	
   	
    By	
  the	
  1980s,	
  the	
  youth	
  of	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  had	
  matured	
  and	
  began	
  to	
  emerge	
  in	
    leadership	
  positions	
  in	
  churches	
  across	
  America.	
  These	
  head	
  pastors,	
  or	
  youth	
  pastors,	
   were	
  much	
  more	
  comfortable	
  with	
  Christian	
  forms	
  of	
  mainstream	
  musical	
  genres;	
  they	
   knew	
  full	
  well	
  the	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  popular	
  music	
  as	
  a	
  tool	
  for	
  mass	
  evangelism.	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  concerts	
  now	
  often	
  took	
  place	
  in	
  church	
  basements	
  as	
  youth	
   outreach,	
  albeit	
  often	
  with	
  “a	
  softer	
  sound	
  to	
  accommodate	
  conservative	
  churches.”65	
  In	
  the	
   1980s,	
  Christian	
  artists	
  once	
  again	
  borrowed	
  from	
  popular	
  mainstream	
  musical	
  trends,	
  and	
   Christian	
  heavy	
  metal,	
  in	
  the	
  style	
  of	
  such	
  bands	
  as	
  Petra,	
  Barren	
  Cross,	
  Bloodgod,	
  Saint,	
   Leviticus,	
  and	
  Messiah	
  Prophet,	
  was	
  born.66	
  Stryper’s	
  anthem	
  “To	
  Hell	
  with	
  the	
  Devil”	
   became	
  a	
  hit;	
  its	
  album	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  name	
  went	
  platinum.	
  Like	
  the	
  first	
  contemporary	
   Christian	
  artists,	
  evangelism	
  was	
  the	
  driving	
  motivation	
  of	
  these	
  bands.	
  On	
  stage,	
  Stryper	
   became	
  as	
  well	
  known	
  for	
  throwing	
  copies	
  of	
  the	
  New	
  Testament	
  into	
  the	
  crowd	
  as	
  they	
   did	
  for	
  their	
  yellow	
  and	
  black	
  fatigue	
  and	
  “demonic-­‐sounding	
  vocals.”67	
  Despite	
  the	
  fact	
   that	
  many	
  Christian	
  music	
  bookstores	
  were	
  hesitant	
  to	
  stock	
  these	
  Christian	
  heavy	
  metal	
   albums	
  because	
  of	
  their	
  often-­‐disturbing	
  cover	
  art,	
  Christian	
  heavy	
  metal	
  thrived	
  in	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   63	
  Powell,	
  Encyclopedia,	
  382.	
   64	
  Ibid.	
   65	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  89.	
   66	
  Ibid.,	
  226.	
   67	
  Deena	
  Weinstein,	
  Heavy	
  Metal:	
  The	
  Music	
  and	
  its	
  Culture	
  (New	
  York:	
  Da	
  Capo	
  Press,	
   1991),	
  54.	
   	
    27	
    independent	
  scene	
  in	
  the	
  1980s;	
  its	
  music	
  and	
  its	
  message	
  had	
  struck	
  a	
  chord	
  within	
  a	
   subset	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  evangelical	
  subculture.68	
   As	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  grew,	
  critics	
  of	
  the	
  genre	
  became	
  more	
  outspoken.	
   Several	
  prominent	
  evangelical	
  pastors	
  and	
  televangelists	
  condemned	
  contemporary	
   Christian	
  music	
  as	
  being	
  overly	
  “worldly,”	
  and	
  thus	
  spiritually	
  unsafe.	
  Televangelists	
  Bob	
   Larson	
  and	
  Jimmy	
  Swaggart	
  became	
  two	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  outspoken	
  critics	
  of	
  contemporary	
   Christian	
  music	
  in	
  the	
  1980s;	
  Swaggart	
  attacked	
  the	
  music	
  of	
  Petra,	
  Steve	
  Taylor,	
  and	
  Larry	
   Norman,	
  calling	
  rock	
  music	
  “the	
  new	
  pornography.”	
  In	
  1987,	
  Swaggart	
  wrote	
  Religious	
   Rock	
  n'	
  Roll:	
  A	
  Wolf	
  in	
  Sheep's	
  Clothing	
  as	
  a	
  treatise	
  against	
  the	
  hazards	
  of	
  the	
  genre.69	
  The	
   fundamentalist	
  preacher	
  Bill	
  Gothard	
  even	
  went	
  as	
  far	
  as	
  to	
  preach	
  that,	
  “the	
  syncopated	
   4/4	
  beat	
  of	
  rock	
  and	
  roll	
  collided	
  with	
  the	
  natural	
  rhythm	
  of	
  the	
  human	
  heart”	
  and	
  that	
  it	
   could	
  make	
  listeners	
  physically	
  unwell.70	
  Michael	
  Haynes	
  penned	
  The	
  God	
  of	
  Rock:	
  A	
   Christian	
  Perspective	
  on	
  Rock	
  Music	
  with	
  the	
  express	
  goal	
  of	
  “[educating]	
  Christian	
  parents	
   and	
  teens	
  to	
  the	
  spiritual,	
  mental,	
  and	
  physical	
  dangers	
  of	
  being	
  distracted	
  from	
  the	
   Lordship	
  of	
  Christ	
  by	
  the	
  addicting	
  power	
  of	
  rock	
  music.”	
  The	
  book	
  became	
  a	
  Christian	
  best	
   seller	
  in	
  1983.71	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   68	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light,	
  327.	
  	
   69	
  Jimmy	
  Swaggart,	
  Religious	
  Rock	
  n'	
  Roll:	
  A	
  Wolf	
  in	
  Sheep's	
  Clothing	
  (Baton	
  Rouge:	
  Jimmy	
   Swaggert	
  Ministries,	
  1987).	
   70	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  30. 71	
  	
  Haynes	
  writes,	
  “Continue	
  asking,	
  ‘do	
  I	
  enjoy	
  the	
  evil	
  and	
  sensuality	
  that	
  my	
  music	
   stimulates?’	
  If	
  you	
  do,	
  this	
  could	
  be	
  the	
  manifestation	
  of	
  more	
  serious	
  problems	
  that	
  Rock	
   music	
  is	
  only	
  bringing	
  to	
  the	
  surface.	
  Maybe	
  there	
  is	
  excitement	
  at	
  the	
  thought	
  of	
  torture	
  or	
   sadism.	
  Maybe	
  you	
  have	
  frequent	
  thoughts	
  of	
  abnormal	
  sexual	
  activities.	
  Listen,	
  if	
  music	
   excites	
  these	
  types	
  of	
  feelings,	
  do	
  not	
  listen	
  anymore!	
  Cut	
  it	
  off!	
  You	
  are	
  headed	
  for	
  some	
   serious	
  trouble	
  if	
  you	
  do	
  not.”	
  Michael	
  K.	
  Haynes,	
  The	
  God	
  of	
  Rock:	
  A	
  Christian	
  Perspective	
  of	
   Rock	
  Music	
  (Lindale:	
  Priority,	
  1982),	
  209.	
   	
    28	
    It	
  was	
  also	
  during	
  the	
  1980s	
  that	
  Christian	
  music	
  artists	
  began	
  to	
  turn	
  against	
  each	
   other	
  in	
  a	
  real	
  way;	
  theologically	
  differences	
  among	
  artist,	
  divergent	
  artistic	
  imperatives,	
   and	
  even	
  appropriate	
  musical	
  style	
  became	
  the	
  subjects	
  of	
  intense	
  public	
  debate.	
  Artists	
   also	
  began	
  to	
  publically	
  criticize	
  the	
  industry	
  for	
  promoting	
  artistic	
  competition	
  between	
   Christians	
  and,	
  in	
  doing	
  so,	
  hindering	
  their	
  individual	
  ministries.	
  In	
  1986	
  an	
  open	
  letter,	
   signed	
  by	
  sixty-­‐six	
  Christian	
  artists,	
  was	
  published	
  in	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
   magazine.	
  It	
  read:	
   For	
  years	
  we	
  have	
  all	
  realized	
  the	
  incredible	
  growth	
  of	
  Christian	
  music	
  –	
  so	
   much	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  often	
  labeled	
  ‘the	
  industry.’	
  We	
  who	
  feel	
  called	
  as	
  ministers	
  of	
  the	
   gospel	
  of	
  Jesus	
  Christ	
  feel	
  that	
  this	
  label	
  is	
  reflecting	
  an	
  unfortunate	
  trend	
  in	
   Christian	
  music	
  brought	
  on	
  in	
  part	
  by	
  the	
  proliferation	
  of	
  airplay	
  and	
  sales	
  charts	
   and	
  album	
  reviews…	
   Scripture	
  exhorts	
  us	
  not	
  to	
  compare	
  ourselves	
  with	
  one	
  another	
  nor	
  to	
   compete	
  with	
  one	
  another.	
  We	
  feel	
  that	
  polls	
  such	
  as	
  these	
  create	
  an	
  unhealthy	
   atmosphere	
  of	
  rivalry	
  between	
  ministries.	
  Even	
  though	
  we	
  strive	
  to	
  be	
  men	
  and	
   women	
  of	
  God,	
  in	
  our	
  humanity	
  we	
  often	
  fall	
  prey	
  to	
  the	
  pride	
  or	
  envy	
  which	
  polls	
   such	
  as	
  this	
  create.	
  We	
  can	
  hardly	
  imagine	
  the	
  apostles	
  and	
  prophets	
  being	
   categorized	
  in	
  such	
  a	
  way…	
   The	
  whole	
  area	
  of	
  reviewing	
  albums	
  and	
  ripping	
  apart	
  one	
  another’s	
   offerings	
  unto	
  the	
  Lord	
  is	
  disgraceful.	
  If	
  you	
  don’t	
  like	
  an	
  album	
  we	
  simply	
  ask	
  that	
   you	
  not	
  review	
  it.	
  It	
  is	
  not	
  right	
  or	
  righteous	
  that	
  an	
  offering	
  which	
  has	
  taken	
  a	
  year	
   or	
  more	
  of	
  our	
  lives	
  and	
  an	
  outpouring	
  of	
  our	
  hearts	
  and	
  labor	
  should	
  be	
  torn	
  down	
   by	
  the	
  subjective	
  opinion	
  of	
  one	
  Christian	
  brother.	
  It	
  hurts	
  and	
  discourages	
  us,	
  and	
  it	
   damages	
  the	
  potential	
  ministry	
  opportunities	
  of	
  our	
  albums.72	
  	
   	
   The	
  editor’s	
  response	
  to	
  this	
  letter	
  was	
  defensive,	
  asking,	
  “…	
  Is	
  every	
  Christian	
  who	
  writes	
   and	
  performs	
  music	
  automatically	
  involved	
  in	
  ‘music	
  ministry?’”	
  Although	
  some	
  may	
  seek	
   to	
  evangelize,	
  argued	
  the	
  editor,	
  others	
  may	
  provide	
  alternative	
  entertainment	
  or	
  to	
   produce	
  art.	
  According	
  to	
  the	
  editors	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music,	
  Christian	
  music	
   must	
  “come	
  to	
  grips	
  with	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  not	
  every	
  artist	
  who	
  is	
  a	
  Christian	
  operates	
  under	
  the	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   72	
  Howard	
  &	
  Streck,	
  Apostles	
  of	
  Rock,	
  41.	
   	
    29	
    same	
  artistic	
  imperative.”73	
  In	
  an	
  article	
  published	
  in	
  2008,	
  the	
  founder	
  of	
  the	
  magazine	
   John	
  Styll	
  commented	
  that	
  these	
  types	
  of	
  debates	
  had	
  been	
  extremely	
  common	
  in	
  the	
   thirty-­‐four	
  year	
  history	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  magazine;	
  concerns	
  over	
   “entertainment	
  vs.	
  industry,”	
  “God	
  vs.	
  Mammon,”	
  and	
  “Spirit	
  and	
  the	
  flesh,”	
  abound.74	
  	
   	
    3.2	
  The	
  “Parallel	
  Universe”	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  (1990-­‐ 1999)	
   	
    It	
  was	
  during	
  the	
  1990s	
  that	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  industry	
  truly	
  made	
    its	
  presence	
  known	
  in	
  the	
  broader	
  American	
  music	
  scene.	
  By	
  1998,	
  the	
  contemporary	
   Christian	
  music	
  industry	
  had	
  become	
  a	
  billion-­‐dollar	
  industry;	
  CCM	
  accounted	
  for	
  6%	
  of	
   overall	
  music	
  sales	
  in	
  America,	
  outselling	
  jazz	
  and	
  classical	
  sales	
  combined.75	
  As	
  testament	
   to	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  genre	
  within	
  Christian	
  music	
  as	
  a	
  whole,	
  it	
  is	
  worth	
  noting	
  that	
  by	
   1991	
  the	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association	
  no	
  longer	
  even	
  televised	
  the	
  black	
  Gospel	
  category	
  of	
   the	
  Dove	
  Awards.	
  CCM	
  Industry	
  insider	
  Terry	
  Hemmings	
  explains	
  that,	
  “The	
  Christian	
   music	
  market	
  changed	
  from	
  an	
  entrepreneurial	
  environment	
  to	
  a	
  corporate	
  environment…	
   [It]	
  substantially	
  and	
  rapidly	
  changed	
  –	
  it	
  didn’t	
  really	
  evolve.	
  It	
  happened	
  almost	
   overnight”76	
  With	
  the	
  expansive	
  growth	
  of	
  the	
  industry	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  clear	
  and	
  dramatic	
   transformation	
  in	
  the	
  underlying	
  theological	
  impetuses	
  of	
  its	
  artists,	
  producers,	
  and	
   marketers,	
  or	
  so	
  it	
  would	
  appear;	
  during	
  the	
  1990s,	
  the	
  evangelistic	
  motivations	
  of	
  the	
   contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  artists	
  of	
  years	
  past	
  were	
  all	
  but	
  replaced	
  by	
  a	
  much	
  more	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   73	
  Ibid.	
   74	
  John	
  Styll,	
  "From	
  There	
  to	
  Here…,"	
  CCM,	
  April	
  1,	
  2008,	
  accessed	
  March	
  1,	
  2012,	
   http://www.ccmmagazine.com/article/from-­‐there-­‐to-­‐here.	
  	
   75	
  Hemmings	
  quoted	
  in	
  Hendershot,	
  Shaking	
  the	
  World	
  for	
  Jesus,	
  56.	
   76	
  Deborah	
  Evans	
  Price,	
  “Shake-­‐Ups	
  Hit	
  Christian	
  Labels,”	
  Billboard,	
  March	
  7,	
  1999.	
   	
    30	
    internal	
  focus	
  within	
  the	
  evangelical	
  subculture.	
  Christian	
  music	
  as	
  alternative	
   entertainment	
  emerged	
  at	
  the	
  forefront	
  of	
  this	
  new	
  CCM,	
  and,	
  “to	
  many	
  who	
  had	
  helped	
   create	
  the	
  Christian	
  rock	
  of	
  the	
  seventies,	
  it	
  had	
  lost	
  its	
  soul.”77	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
   artists	
  were	
  now	
  primarily	
  performing	
  for	
  Christian	
  audiences	
  alone.	
  	
   By	
  the	
  early	
  1990s,	
  the	
  industry	
  had	
  emerged	
  as	
  a	
  true	
  “parallel	
  universe”	
  of	
  the	
   general	
  music	
  market;	
  CCM	
  now	
  offered	
  “wholesome”	
  Christian	
  alternatives	
  to	
  most	
   mainstream	
  genres.	
  Heather	
  Hendershot	
  has	
  observed	
  that	
  within	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
   music,	
  “Rap	
  is	
  dissociated	
  from	
  black	
  culture	
  and	
  becomes	
  a	
  style	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  to	
   promote	
  any	
  message.	
  Reggae	
  promotes	
  drug-­‐free	
  submission	
  to	
  authority.	
  Rock-­‐and-­‐Roll	
   does	
  not	
  resist	
  norms	
  but	
  rather	
  secular	
  culture’s	
  pressure	
  to	
  have	
  premarital	
  sex.	
  Even	
  a	
   sexy	
  pop	
  song	
  can	
  become	
  a	
  chastity	
  song.”78	
  CCM	
  became	
  a	
  tool	
  for	
  substituting	
   mainstream	
  popular	
  culture,	
  to	
  the	
  best	
  of	
  its	
  ability,	
  with	
  an	
  alternate	
  form	
  for	
  the	
   evangelical	
  subculture.	
  W.	
  D.	
  Romanowski	
  argues	
  that:	
   CCM	
  has	
  placed	
  religious	
  music	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  non-­‐ecclesiastical	
  contexts	
  as	
  those	
  of	
   secular	
  popular	
  culture	
  –	
  background	
  music	
  during	
  conversation,	
  dance	
  music,	
  or	
   the	
  live-­‐performance	
  spectacle	
  of	
  a	
  rock	
  concert	
  –	
  as	
  opposed	
  to	
  worship,	
  and	
  has	
   furthered	
  a	
  certain	
  commodification	
  of	
  religious	
  faith	
  symbols.79	
   	
   In	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  of	
  the	
  early	
  1990s,	
  it	
  can	
  be	
  argued	
  that	
  little	
   evangelizing	
  was	
  in	
  fact	
  taking	
  place.80	
  Eric	
  Gormly	
  argues	
  that	
  CCM,	
  as	
  a	
  genre,	
  “provides	
  a	
   musical	
  medium	
  for	
  religious	
  expression	
  that	
  allows	
  its	
  adherents	
  to	
  feel	
  they	
  are	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   77	
  Stowe,	
  No	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil,	
  9.	
   78	
  Hendershot,	
  Shaking	
  the	
  World	
  for	
  Jesus,	
  28.	
   79	
  W.	
  D.	
  Romanowski,	
  "Evangelicals	
  and	
  Popular	
  Music:	
  The	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
   Industry,"	
  in	
  Religion	
  and	
  Popular	
  Culture	
  in	
  America,	
  ed.	
  B.D.	
  Forbes	
  &	
  J.J.	
  Mahan	
   (Berkeley:	
  University	
  of	
  California	
  Press,	
  2000),	
  105.	
   80	
  Mark	
  Joseph	
  suggests,	
  “To	
  make	
  narrow,	
  sectarian	
  appeals	
  to	
  fellow	
  believers	
  based	
  on	
   their	
  faith	
  was	
  easier	
  and	
  required	
  less	
  imagination	
  and	
  effort.”	
  Joseph,	
  Faith	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
   Roll,	
  222.	
   	
    31	
    participating	
  in	
  the	
  broader,	
  secular	
  culture	
  although	
  maintaining	
  the	
  integrity	
  of	
  their	
   religious	
  faith.”81	
  This	
  evolution	
  within	
  the	
  genre	
  allowed	
  many	
  evangelicals	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
   retreat	
  from	
  mainstream	
  society,	
  “to	
  live	
  in	
  a	
  world	
  within	
  a	
  world,	
  one	
  that	
  would	
  protect	
   them	
  from	
  ever	
  brushing	
  up	
  against	
  non-­‐Christians.”82	
  	
   DC	
  Talk	
  was	
  undeniably	
  the	
  most	
  successful	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  band	
  to	
   emerge	
  during	
  this	
  period.	
  The	
  three	
  members	
  of	
  DC	
  Talk	
  (short	
  for	
  “Decent	
  Christian	
   Talk”)	
  met	
  at	
  Jerry	
  Falwell’s	
  Liberty	
  University	
  in	
  1987,	
  and	
  over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  the	
  next	
   decade	
  would	
  be	
  rewarded	
  with	
  one	
  gold	
  record,	
  three	
  platinum	
  records,	
  three	
  Grammy	
   awards,	
  and	
  countless	
  Doves.83	
  The	
  band	
  found	
  immediate	
  success;	
  within	
  two	
  years	
  of	
   their	
  founding	
  they	
  had	
  become	
  the	
  most	
  successful	
  CCM	
  band	
  in	
  the	
  world,	
  and	
  within	
   three	
  years	
  they	
  became	
  the	
  most	
  successful	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  group	
  of	
  all	
  time.84	
   Although	
  DC	
  Talk	
  initially	
  began	
  as	
  a	
  rap	
  group	
  (during	
  the	
  years	
  when	
  the	
  Beastie	
  Boys	
   and	
  Run	
  DMC	
  enjoyed	
  success),	
  they	
  later	
  abandoned	
  that	
  genre	
  for	
  grunge	
  (during	
  the	
   popularity	
  of	
  Nirvana	
  and	
  Soundgarden),	
  in	
  an	
  attempt	
  to	
  remain	
  relevant.	
  	
  Powell	
  suggests	
   that	
  DC	
  Talk’s	
  introduction	
  of	
  rap	
  music	
  to	
  the	
  evangelical	
  subculture	
  granted	
  the	
  group	
   their	
  initial	
  success	
  despite	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  that	
  album;	
  “The	
  group’s	
  first	
  album	
  wasn’t	
  very	
   good	
  and	
  it	
  still	
  became	
  the	
  best	
  selling	
  Christian	
  debut	
  record	
  of	
  all	
  time.”85	
  DC	
  Talk,	
  as	
   musical	
  chameleons,	
  reinvented	
  and	
  revived	
  the	
  genre	
  at	
  the	
  turn	
  of	
  the	
  decade,	
  as	
  the	
  CCM	
   industry	
  became	
  “increasingly	
  sophisticated	
  and	
  market-­‐oriented.”86	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   81	
  Eric	
  Gormly,	
  "Evangelizing	
  Through	
  Appropriation:	
  Toward	
  a	
  Cultural	
  Theory	
  on	
  the	
   Growth	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music,"	
  Journal	
  of	
  Media	
  and	
  Religion	
  2.4	
  (2003):	
  262.	
   82	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  172.	
   83	
  Powell,	
  Encyclopedia,	
  239.	
   84	
  Ibid.	
   85	
  Ibid.,	
  240.	
   86	
  Stowe,	
  No	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil,	
  8.	
   	
    32	
    The	
  band	
  Audio	
  Adrenaline	
  can	
  also	
  be	
  identified	
  as	
  an	
  example	
  of	
  this	
  trend.	
   Formed	
  in	
  1992	
  at	
  Kentucky	
  Christian	
  College,	
  Audio	
  Adrenaline	
  was	
  quickly	
  signed	
  to	
  DC	
   Talk’s	
  label	
  in	
  Nashville	
  after	
  Forefront	
  Records	
  president,	
  Dan	
  Brock,	
  listened	
  to	
  their	
   demo.	
  This	
  group	
  also	
  gained	
  success	
  by	
  tailoring	
  their	
  sound	
  to	
  mainstream	
  trends,	
  “Just	
   as	
  the	
  alternative	
  moment	
  was	
  taking	
  off,	
  Forefront	
  was	
  grooming	
  Audio	
  Adrenaline	
  to	
  fit	
   the	
  bill.”87	
  Over	
  the	
  next	
  decade,	
  Audio	
  Adrenaline	
  would	
  win	
  two	
  Grammy	
  and	
  four	
  Doves	
   awards	
  before	
  breaking	
  up	
  in	
  2006.	
  The	
  group	
  had	
  a	
  significant	
  influence	
  on	
  the	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  industry,	
  and	
  the	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  band	
  describe	
  their	
   ministry	
  as,	
  "focused	
  primarily	
  on	
  communicating	
  within	
  the	
  Christian	
  subculture	
  rather	
   than	
  (primarily)	
  on	
  converting	
  outsiders.”88	
  	
   It	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  1990s	
  that	
  the	
  phenomenon	
  of	
  the	
  “crossover”	
  artist	
  first	
  came	
  into	
  the	
   spotlight.	
  As	
  discussed	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  chapter	
  of	
  this	
  study,	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  primary	
  criticisms	
  of	
   “crossover”	
  artists	
  was	
  ultimately	
  their	
  decision	
  to	
  cater	
  to	
  markets	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
   evangelical	
  subculture	
  (Jars	
  of	
  Clay,	
  Michael	
  W.	
  Smith	
  and	
  Amy	
  Grant	
  are	
  likely	
  the	
  most	
   famous	
  examples).	
  The	
  assumptions	
  upon	
  which	
  this	
  charge	
  is	
  grounded	
  are	
  clearly	
   indicative	
  of	
  an	
  inward	
  shift	
  in	
  world	
  of	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music.	
  The	
  irony	
  of	
  such	
  a	
   transformation	
  within	
  the	
  genre	
  was	
  apparent	
  to	
  many;	
  David	
  W.	
  Stowe	
  explains:	
  	
   Music	
  that	
  had	
  been	
  created	
  to	
  break	
  down	
  boundaries	
  between	
  Christians	
  and	
  non-­‐ Christians,	
  to	
  offer	
  new	
  sonic	
  wineskins	
  for	
  the	
  teaching	
  of	
  a	
  new	
  counterculture	
   Jesus	
  that	
  would	
  allow	
  his	
  message	
  to	
  reach	
  thirsty	
  nonbelievers,	
  ended	
  up	
   hermetically	
  sealed	
  in	
  its	
  own	
  new	
  niche,	
  the	
  parallel	
  universe	
  of	
  Christian	
  popular	
   culture.89	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   87	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  216.	
   88	
  Powell,	
  Encyclopedia,	
  57.	
   89	
  Stowe,	
  No	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil,	
  9.	
   	
    33	
    Evangelism	
  took	
  a	
  back	
  seat	
  to	
  Christian	
  entertainment	
  as	
  the	
  1990s	
  gave	
  rise	
  to	
  what	
  may	
   be,	
  “the	
  most	
  extensive	
  attempt	
  (yet)	
  to	
  merge	
  religious	
  music	
  with	
  the	
  commercial	
  and	
   industrial	
  apparatus	
  of	
  the	
  entertainment	
  industry.”90	
   	
    3.3	
  “Artists-­‐who-­‐are-­‐Christian,”	
  or	
  “Christian	
  Artists?”	
  (1997-­‐2012)	
   	
   	
    At	
  the	
  turn	
  of	
  the	
  millennium,	
  many	
  Christian	
  artists	
  began	
  to	
  leave	
  the	
    contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  industry	
  in	
  search	
  of	
  a	
  broader	
  audience.	
  By	
  the	
  early	
  2000s,	
   the	
  phenomenon	
  of	
  the	
  “crossover”	
  artist	
  was	
  quickly	
  becoming	
  obsolete;	
  many	
  Christian	
   artists	
  had	
  chosen	
  to	
  circumvent	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry	
  and	
  sign	
  record	
  contracts	
  with	
  the	
   larger	
  mainstream	
  music	
  labels.	
  One	
  of	
  the	
  reasons	
  for	
  this	
  revolution	
  was	
  a	
  fear	
  of	
  the	
   negative	
  stigma	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  label	
  “Christian	
  music;”	
  artists	
  had	
  become	
  aware	
  that	
   “the	
  surest	
  way	
  to	
  not	
  be	
  heard	
  by	
  the	
  mainstream	
  music	
  culture	
  was	
  to	
  allow	
  themselves	
   to	
  be	
  branded	
  ‘Christian	
  rock.’”91	
  A	
  second,	
  more	
  profound,	
  motive	
  for	
  this	
  change,	
  and	
  one	
   that	
  would	
  become	
  clear	
  in	
  the	
  years	
  to	
  come,	
  was	
  that	
  many	
  of	
  these	
  Christian	
  artists	
   sought	
  to	
  express	
  their	
  Christianity	
  in	
  ways	
  that	
  would	
  certainly	
  have	
  been	
  unwelcome	
   within	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  industry.	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music,	
  as	
  a	
   genre,	
  was	
  in	
  collapse.	
  Mark	
  Joseph	
  writes,	
  “So	
  much	
  for	
  the	
  explosive	
  growth	
  in	
  Christian	
   music:	
  the	
  truth	
  was	
  that	
  Christian	
  music	
  wasn’t	
  growing,	
  but	
  the	
  idea	
  of	
  Christians	
  playing	
   music	
  was	
  growing	
  exponentially.”92	
  	
   	
    Mainstream	
  record	
  companies	
  had	
  taken	
  notice	
  of	
  the	
  surprising	
  success	
  of	
    contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  industry	
  in	
  the	
  mid	
  1990s,	
  and	
  corporations	
  such	
  as	
  EMI	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   90	
  Romanowski,	
  "Evangelicals	
  and	
  Popular	
  Music,"	
  105.	
   91	
  Joseph,	
  Faith,	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
  Roll,	
  19.	
   92	
  Ibid.,	
  22.	
   	
    34	
    and	
  Sony	
  began	
  to	
  purchase	
  independent	
  Christian	
  labels	
  at	
  an	
  alarming	
  pace.	
  The	
   hesitation	
  that	
  many	
  mainstream	
  record	
  labels	
  had	
  held	
  for	
  the	
  promotion	
  of	
  overtly	
   Christian	
  artists	
  was	
  rejected	
  in	
  the	
  pursuit	
  of	
  profit.93	
  Meanwhile,	
  “Christian	
  bands”	
  such	
   as	
  Creed,	
  Lifehouse,	
  P.O.D.,	
  Collective	
  Soul,	
  Sixpence	
  None	
  the	
  Richer,	
  Switchfoot,	
  and	
   Blindside	
  chose	
  to	
  sign	
  record	
  deals	
  with	
  major	
  labels,	
  often	
  rejecting	
  comparable	
  offers	
  by	
   Christian	
  music	
  labels.94	
  Some	
  of	
  these	
  artists	
  sought	
  to	
  evangelize	
  in	
  the	
  spotlight	
  of	
  the	
   “secular”	
  music	
  world,	
  and	
  some	
  “didn’t	
  think	
  that	
  their	
  music	
  was	
  the	
  place	
  to	
  give	
  voice	
   to	
  their	
  beliefs.”95	
  Others	
  simply	
  pursued	
  what	
  they	
  regarded	
  as	
  their	
  best	
  chance	
  at	
  a	
   career	
  in	
  music.	
  	
   P.O.D.	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  popular	
  “Christian	
  bands”	
  to	
  emerge	
  during	
  this	
  time,	
   and	
  a	
  band	
  that	
  had	
  a	
  definite	
  distaste	
  for	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  industry	
  and	
   genre	
  as	
  a	
  whole.	
  A	
  “hard-­‐rapcore”	
  group	
  from	
  Southern	
  California,	
  the	
  group	
  began	
  their	
   careers	
  on	
  a	
  Christian	
  label	
  (Tooth	
  and	
  Nail	
  Records),	
  yet	
  only	
  found	
  success,	
  in	
  either	
   market,	
  once	
  Atlantic	
  Records	
  signed	
  them.	
  P.O.D.	
  (short	
  for	
  Payable	
  On	
  Death)	
  reject	
  the	
   classification	
  of	
  Christian	
  music	
  entirely;	
  following	
  their	
  mainstream	
  success	
  the	
  band	
  was	
   given	
  a	
  Dove	
  Awards	
  by	
  the	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association	
  but	
  the	
  group	
  refused	
  to	
  attend	
  the	
   ceremony.	
  Sonny	
  Sandoval,	
  lead	
  singer	
  of	
  the	
  band,	
  considers	
  the	
  genre	
  restricting	
  and,	
   ultimately,	
  empty:	
   We’ve	
  been	
  together	
  for	
  ten	
  years	
  and	
  we	
  just	
  want	
  to	
  play	
  music…	
  now	
  with	
  all	
  the	
   mainstream	
  and	
  everything,	
  we’re	
  just	
  a	
  rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll	
  band	
  out	
  there.	
  I	
  guess	
  we’re	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   93	
  Mark	
  Joseph	
  explains,	
  “This	
  movement	
  of	
  artists	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  Christian	
  music	
  world	
  and	
   onto	
  the	
  rosters	
  of	
  mainstream	
  record	
  labels	
  presented	
  a	
  clear	
  problem	
  for	
  the	
  CCM	
   industry.	
  After	
  all,	
  it	
  had	
  built	
  a	
  business	
  on	
  disgruntled	
  artists	
  who	
  weren’t	
  being	
  given	
  a	
   fair	
  shake	
  at	
  mainstream	
  labels,	
  which	
  were	
  accused	
  of	
  trying	
  to	
  get	
  them	
  to	
  tone	
  down	
   their	
  faith-­‐based	
  lyrics	
  or	
  ignoring	
  them	
  altogether.”	
  Ibid.,	
  20.	
   94	
  Ibid.,	
  19.	
   95	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  239.	
   	
    35	
    just	
  against	
  the	
  norm,	
  not	
  as	
  music	
  but	
  the	
  lyrical	
  content.	
  It’s	
  always	
  been	
  our	
   heart’s	
  desire	
  to	
  encourage	
  people	
  with	
  our	
  music	
  and	
  with	
  our	
  walk	
  of	
  life.	
  It	
  does	
   get	
  frustrating	
  at	
  times,	
  but	
  no	
  matter	
  what	
  you	
  do	
  they’re	
  going	
  to	
  label	
  you.96	
   	
   P.O.D.	
  are	
  but	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  “refugee”	
  bands	
  that	
  fled	
  from	
  an	
  industry	
  and	
  a	
  culture	
  that	
   “failed	
  to	
  share	
  the	
  artistic	
  dreams	
  of	
  cultural	
  penetration	
  of	
  the	
  artists	
  in	
  their	
  camp.”97	
   The	
  group	
  is	
  not	
  motivated	
  primarily	
  by	
  evangelism;	
  Traa,	
  the	
  bass	
  player	
  of	
  the	
  group,	
   explains,	
  “Yes,	
  we	
  have	
  a	
  personal	
  relationship	
  with	
  God,	
  but	
  we’re	
  not	
  trying	
  to	
  convert	
   anyone	
  to	
  live	
  like	
  us.	
  We’re	
  just	
  a	
  rock	
  band.”98	
  P.O.D.	
  strived	
  to	
  exist	
  in	
  a	
  space	
  between	
   the	
  world	
  of	
  extreme	
  rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll	
  excess	
  and	
  the	
  isolationism	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry,	
  and	
  to	
   express	
  their	
  Christianity,	
  as	
  they	
  understood	
  it,	
  however	
  they	
  so	
  desired.	
  Their	
  ultimate	
   success	
  among	
  both	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  and	
  mainstream	
  American	
   audiences	
  may	
  suggest	
  that	
  their	
  mission	
  was	
  well	
  received.	
   	
    In	
  1999,	
  Charlie	
  Peacock,	
  a	
  prolific	
  artist	
  and	
  producer	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  contemporary	
    Christian	
  music	
  since	
  the	
  early	
  1980s,	
  authored	
  At	
  the	
  Crossroads:	
  An	
  Insider’s	
  look	
  at	
  the	
   Past,	
  Present,	
  and	
  Future	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music.	
  The	
  book	
  was	
  effectively	
  a	
   theological	
  treatise	
  rebuking	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry	
  and	
  its	
  culture	
  that	
  he	
  felt	
  “[bred]	
  apathy	
   and	
  complacency,”	
  and	
  held	
  “the	
  most	
  narrow	
  consensus	
  as	
  to	
  what	
  Christian	
  music	
  is.”99	
   Peacock	
  pled:	
  	
  	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  is	
  at	
  a	
  crossroads	
  and	
  the	
  stakes	
  are	
  enormous.	
  In	
   one	
  direction	
  there’s	
  conformity	
  to	
  an	
  artificial,	
  market-­‐driven	
  definition	
  of	
  what	
   many	
  of	
  us	
  have	
  come	
  to	
  believe	
  CCM	
  should	
  be.	
  In	
  the	
  other,	
  the	
  subject	
  matter	
  and	
   instrumental	
  style	
  of	
  Christian	
  music	
  is	
  allowed	
  –	
  is	
  encouraged	
  –	
  to	
  range	
  over	
  the	
   entire	
  length	
  and	
  breadth	
  of	
  human	
  emotion	
  and	
  experience.	
  Here	
  and	
  now	
  I	
  ask	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   96	
  Stated	
  in	
  an	
  interview	
  by	
  Keith	
  Ryan	
  Cartwright,	
  quoted	
  in	
  Joseph,	
  Faith,	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
   Roll,	
  39.	
   97	
  Joseph,	
  Faith,	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
  Roll,	
  36.	
   98	
  As	
  quoted	
  in	
  Joseph,	
  Faith,	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
  Roll,	
  36.	
   99	
  Charlie	
  Peacock,	
  At	
  the	
  Crossroads:	
  An	
  Insider’s	
  Look	
  at	
  the	
  Past,	
  Present,	
  and	
  Future	
  of	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  (Nashville:	
  Broadman	
  &	
  Holman	
  Publishers,	
  1999),	
  7.	
   	
    36	
    you	
  to	
  consider	
  the	
  second	
  path,	
  a	
  new	
  model	
  of	
  Christian	
  music	
  that	
  embraces	
  the	
   whole	
  kingdom	
  –	
  a	
  path	
  that	
  is	
  absolutely	
  faithful	
  to	
  the	
  other	
  Christian	
  mission	
  as	
   well	
  as	
  the	
  mission	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  church	
  with	
  good	
  and	
  truthful	
  music.	
  This	
  model	
   of	
  music	
  is	
  not	
  defined	
  by	
  instrumentation	
  or	
  specific	
  lyrical	
  buzzwords,	
  but	
  by	
  the	
   fact	
  that	
  it	
  grows	
  from	
  and	
  points	
  toward	
  a	
  life	
  in	
  Jesus	
  Christ	
  as	
  subjects	
  in	
  his	
   kingdom.100	
   	
   Peacock	
  and	
  critics	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry	
  in	
  the	
  late	
  1990s	
  rejected	
  the	
  limitations,	
  either	
   explicit	
  or	
  implied,	
  upon	
  Christian	
  expression	
  in	
  the	
  business	
  as	
  inappropriate	
  and,	
  in	
  their	
   eyes,	
  un-­‐Christian.	
   	
    	
  In	
  truth,	
  it	
  is	
  undeniable	
  that	
  a	
  true	
  diversity	
  of	
  religious	
  expression,	
  Christian	
  or	
    otherwise,	
  has	
  existed	
  in	
  American	
  popular	
  music,	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  genre	
  of	
  CCM,	
  for	
  nearly	
  a	
   century.	
  Steve	
  Turner	
  argues	
  that,	
  “Even	
  avowedly	
  secular	
  rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll	
  often	
  has	
  at	
  its	
  heart	
   a	
  quest	
  for	
  transcendence	
  that	
  uses	
  a	
  language	
  of	
  religion.”101	
  Christians	
  have	
  of	
  course	
   been	
  performing	
  in	
  the	
  public	
  sphere	
  by	
  means	
  of	
  popular	
  music	
  for	
  decades,	
  some	
  artists	
   more	
  overtly	
  than	
  others.	
  U2,	
  for	
  example,	
  has	
  been	
  perhaps	
  the	
  most	
  successful	
  band	
  of	
   the	
  past	
  three	
  decades	
  to	
  have	
  overt	
  Christian	
  lyrics	
  and	
  Christian	
  band	
  members	
  (all	
   members	
  except	
  bassist	
  Adam	
  Clayton	
  identify	
  themselves	
  as	
  Christians).	
  Bono,	
  U2’s	
   enigmatic	
  front	
  man,	
  has	
  become	
  the	
  veritable	
  personification	
  of	
  the	
  complex	
  modern	
   intersect	
  of	
  religion	
  and	
  popular	
  culture	
  in	
  modern	
  times.	
  Clive	
  Marsh	
  &	
  Vaughan	
  S.	
   Roberts	
  suggest	
  that	
  U2’s	
  public	
  musing	
  on	
  Christianity	
  and	
  religion	
  have	
  resonated	
   strongly	
  with	
  an	
  audience	
  fascinated	
  by	
  the	
  means	
  of	
  its	
  consideration.	
  They	
  write:	
  	
   The	
  evidence	
  of	
  the	
  way	
  U2	
  fans	
  use	
  the	
  band’s	
  music	
  clearly	
  suggests	
  that	
  such	
  use	
   of	
  music	
  creates	
  at	
  the	
  very	
  least	
  a	
  virtual	
  community	
  of	
  enquirers	
  in	
  which	
   religious	
  exploration	
  is	
  explicit,	
  acceptable,	
  and	
  sometimes	
  religion-­‐specific,	
  while	
   not	
  necessarily	
  functioning	
  normatively	
  for	
  those	
  participating	
  in	
  the	
  conversation.	
   Public	
  discussion	
  not	
  simply	
  of	
  religion,	
  but	
  of	
  the	
  subject	
  matter	
  which	
  religions	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   100 	
  Peacock,	
  At	
  the	
  Crossroads,	
  202.	
   101 	
  Steve	
  Turner,	
  Hungry	
  for	
  Heaven:	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
  Roll	
  &	
  the	
  Search	
  for	
  Redemption	
  (Downer’s	
   Grove:	
  Intervarsity	
  Press,	
  1995),	
  12.	
   	
    37	
    address,	
  is	
  thus	
  brought	
  to	
  a	
  new	
  place,	
  a	
  context	
  where	
  the	
  affective,	
  aesthetic,	
   cognitive,	
  and	
  ethical	
  meet,	
  beyond	
  the	
  immediate	
  reach	
  of	
  religious	
  orthodoxies	
   and	
  channels	
  of	
  religious	
  authority.102	
   	
   Bob	
  Dylan	
  can	
  also	
  easily	
  be	
  brought	
  into	
  this	
  discussion;	
  after	
  his	
  conversion	
  to	
   Christianity	
  in	
  the	
  1970s	
  (perhaps	
  by	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  his	
  close	
  friend	
  Keith	
  Green),	
  for	
  a	
   time	
  Dylan’s	
  lyrics	
  became	
  obviously	
  influenced	
  by	
  his	
  spirituality,	
  particularly	
  in	
  his	
  1979	
   album	
  Slow	
  Train	
  Coming.	
  It	
  is	
  interesting	
  to	
  note	
  that	
  although	
  Dylan	
  has	
  been	
  placed	
  on	
   the	
  cover	
  of	
  CCM	
  magazine	
  several	
  times	
  throughout	
  the	
  magazine’s	
  history,	
  he	
  has	
  never	
   once	
  agreed	
  to	
  an	
  interview	
  with	
  the	
  publication.	
  	
   	
    Shock-­‐rocker	
  and	
  self-­‐proclaimed	
  “Prince	
  of	
  Darkness”	
  Alice	
  Cooper	
  may	
  serve	
  as	
    the	
  perfect	
  example	
  of	
  an	
  evangelical	
  Christian	
  operating	
  in	
  an	
  unexpected	
  fashion	
  in	
  the	
   mainstream	
  music	
  scene.	
  Since	
  the	
  1960s,	
  Alice	
  Cooper	
  has	
  characterized	
  the	
  hedonistic	
   rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll	
  lifestyle;	
  his	
  music	
  and	
  macabre	
  stage	
  performances	
  laid	
  the	
  groundwork	
  for	
   the	
  heavy	
  metal	
  genre	
  of	
  the	
  next	
  40	
  years.	
  In	
  his	
  performances	
  Cooper	
  performed	
  gory	
   theatrics	
  –	
  he	
  would	
  often	
  act	
  out	
  his	
  own	
  execution,	
  pretend	
  to	
  murder	
  band	
  members,	
   and	
  dismember	
  baby	
  dolls	
  –	
  and	
  his	
  unsettling,	
  explicit	
  lyrics	
  made	
  him	
  to	
  become	
  a	
   polarizing	
  figure	
  in	
  American	
  popular	
  culture.	
  For	
  much	
  of	
  his	
  career,	
  Cooper	
  claims	
  he	
  was	
   “the	
  most	
  functional	
  alcoholic	
  ever.”103	
  Cooper	
  credits	
  his	
  Christian	
  faith	
  for	
  keeping	
  him	
   alive	
  during	
  the	
  wild	
  1970s	
  when	
  the	
  rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll	
  lifestyle	
  famously	
  took	
  the	
  lives	
  of	
  his	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   102 	
  Clive	
  Marsh	
  &	
  Vaughan	
  S.	
  Roberts,	
  “Soundtracks	
  of	
  Acrobatic	
  Selves:	
  Fan	
  Site	
  Religion	
  in	
   the	
  Reception	
  and	
  Use	
  of	
  the	
  Music	
  of	
  U2,”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Religion	
  26.3	
  (2011):	
   428.	
   103 	
  Lonn	
  Friend,	
  “Exclusive	
  Interview!	
  Alice	
  Cooper:	
  Prince	
  of	
  Darkness/Lord	
  of	
  Light”	
   KNAC.com,	
  October	
  27,	
  2001,	
  accessed	
  March	
  2,	
  2012,	
  http://www.alicecooperechive.com/	
   articles/print_article.php?mag=knac&art=011019.	
   	
    38	
    friends	
  Jimi	
  Hendrix,	
  Jim	
  Morrison,	
  Janis	
  Joplin,	
  and	
  Keith	
  Moon.104	
  During	
  an	
  interview	
   with	
  online	
  rock	
  magazine	
  KNAC.com	
  in	
  2001,	
  Cooper	
  justified	
  his	
  evangelical	
  beliefs	
  and	
   his	
  lifestyle:	
   	
  I	
  think	
  that	
  people	
  fill	
  their	
  lives	
  with	
  other	
  things,	
  whether	
  that	
  be	
  drugs,	
  or	
  cars…	
   whatever.	
  I’ve	
  filled	
  my	
  life	
  with	
  a	
  sincere,	
  divine	
  love	
  of	
  rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll.	
  I	
  will	
  never	
   back	
  down	
  in	
  my	
  rock	
  ‘n’	
  roll	
  attitude	
  because	
  I	
  think	
  rock	
  is	
  great!	
  I’m	
  the	
  first	
  one	
   to	
  turn	
  it	
  up.	
  I’m	
  the	
  first	
  one	
  to	
  rock	
  as	
  loud	
  as	
  I	
  can,	
  but	
  when	
  it	
  comes	
  to	
  what	
  I	
   believe,	
  I’m	
  the	
  first	
  one	
  to	
  defend	
  it	
  too.	
  It	
  has	
  also	
  gotten	
  me	
  in	
  trouble	
  with	
  the	
   staunch	
  Christians	
  who	
  believe	
  that	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  Christian	
  you	
  have	
  to	
  be	
  on	
  your	
   knees	
  24	
  hours	
  a	
  day	
  in	
  a	
  closet	
  somewhere.	
  Hey,	
  maybe	
  some	
  people	
  can	
  live	
  like	
   that,	
  but	
  I	
  don’t	
  think	
  that’s	
  the	
  way	
  God	
  expected	
  us	
  to	
  live.	
  When	
  Christ	
  came	
  back,	
   He	
  hung	
  out	
  with	
  the	
  whores,	
  the	
  drunks,	
  and	
  miscreants	
  because	
  they	
  were	
  people	
   that	
  needed	
  him.105	
   	
   Alice	
  Cooper	
  has	
  been	
  sober	
  for	
  almost	
  two	
  decade	
  now;	
  his	
  dark	
  stage	
  persona	
  has	
   become	
  a	
  fictional	
  character	
  that	
  he	
  plays	
  on	
  stage,	
  one	
  that	
  he	
  has	
  learned	
  to	
  disconnect	
   from	
  his	
  everyday	
  life.	
  Cooper	
  interprets	
  his	
  Christian	
  faith	
  to	
  be	
  perfectly	
  congruent	
  with	
   his	
  gruesome	
  theatrics	
  and	
  his	
  vulgar	
  songs.	
  	
   	
    In	
  2008,	
  within	
  the	
  pages	
  of	
  the	
  final	
  print	
  version	
  of	
  CCM	
  magazine,	
  Peacock	
  again	
    offered	
  his	
  thoughts	
  on	
  the	
  state	
  of	
  the	
  industry,	
  warning	
  of	
  its	
  inevitable,	
  	
  and	
  looming,	
   demise.	
  He	
  chastised	
  the	
  industry	
  for	
  continuing	
  to	
  follow	
  a	
  self-­‐destructive	
  pattern,	
   namely,	
  “an	
  increasingly	
  unsuccessful	
  business	
  model	
  run	
  by	
  people	
  trapped	
  in	
  a	
  system	
   intent	
  on	
  slow,	
  incremental	
  change	
  in	
  the	
  face	
  of	
  monumental	
  cultural	
  shifts.”106	
  Peacock	
   predicted	
  that	
  in	
  the	
  near	
  future,	
  “All	
  significant	
  Christian	
  music,	
  apart	
  from	
  worship	
  music,	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   104 	
  Alice	
  Cooper	
  contends,	
  “Faith	
  kept	
  me	
  alive,	
  and	
  being	
  alive,	
  after	
  what	
  I’ve	
  seen	
  and	
   done,	
  makes	
  me	
  a	
  very	
  unique	
  creature	
  in	
  the	
  rock	
  ’n’	
  roll	
  business.”	
  Ibid.	
   105 	
  Ibid.	
   106 	
  Charlie	
  Peacock,	
  “Charlie	
  Peacock	
  Predicts	
  the	
  Future	
  of	
  Christian	
  Music,”	
  CCM	
   Magazine,	
  April	
  1,	
  2008,	
  accessed	
  Febuary	
  10,	
  2011,	
  http://www.ccmmagazine.com/article	
   /charlie-­‐peacock-­‐predicts-­‐the-­‐future-­‐of-­‐christian-­‐music.	
   	
    39	
    will	
  be	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  mainstream	
  (with	
  no	
  connection	
  to	
  the	
  Christian	
  music	
  industry).”107	
   For	
  Peacock,	
  the	
  primary	
  reason	
  for	
  the	
  demise	
  of	
  the	
  industry	
  is	
  not	
  growing	
  internet	
   music	
  piracy,	
  but	
  the	
  unwillingness	
  of	
  the	
  genre’s	
  artists	
  and	
  executives	
  to	
  effectively	
   communicate	
  with	
  the	
  modern	
  world.108	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music,	
  as	
  a	
  genre	
  and	
  an	
   industry,	
  will	
  continue	
  to	
  make	
  itself	
  irrelevant	
  in	
  21st	
  century	
  America,	
  and,	
  “all	
  the	
   companies	
  will	
  continue	
  to	
  downsize	
  and,	
  ultimately,	
  there	
  may	
  be	
  only	
  one	
  major	
   company	
  left	
  to	
  steward	
  the	
  music	
  of	
  the	
  ‘ccm’	
  era.”109	
  	
   John	
  Styll,	
  as	
  the	
  CEO	
  of	
  the	
  Gospel	
  Music	
  Association,	
  also	
  spoke	
  out	
  in	
  2008	
  on	
  the	
   troubles	
  that	
  faced	
  the	
  industry.	
  Styll	
  preached	
  that	
  the	
  financially	
  turbulent	
  time	
  that	
  the	
   industry	
  currently	
  faces	
  could	
  indeed	
  be	
  overcome.	
  In	
  an	
  interview	
  with	
  Beliefnet.com,	
  Styll	
   explained:	
  “Well,	
  some	
  in	
  our	
  community,	
  who	
  are	
  faced	
  with	
  tightening	
  budgets,	
  may	
  be	
   inclined	
  to	
  back	
  off	
  from	
  their	
  involvement	
  with	
  GMA…	
  but	
  the	
  truth	
  is,	
  it	
  is	
  more	
   important	
  than	
  ever	
  for	
  us	
  to	
  come	
  together	
  as	
  a	
  community	
  to	
  find	
  the	
  solutions	
  to	
  the	
   challenges	
  that	
  we	
  collectively	
  and	
  individually	
  face.”110	
  He	
  continued,	
  “The	
  real	
   opportunity	
  in	
  this	
  very	
  difficult	
  season	
  is	
  for	
  gospel	
  music	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  hope	
  and	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   107 	
  Ibid.	
   108 	
  Shawn	
  David	
  Young	
  writes,	
  “The	
  result	
  of	
  a	
  collapsing	
  corporate	
  music	
  industry	
  has	
   only	
  exacerbated	
  an	
  already	
  ticklish	
  situation	
  within	
  popular	
  Christian	
  music…	
  As	
  [CCM]	
   groups	
  signed	
  to	
  subsidiary	
  labels	
  reach	
  mainstream	
  success,	
  the	
  very	
  category	
  of	
  CCM	
  as	
  a	
   valuable	
  niche	
  genre	
  is	
  reexamined…”	
  Shawn	
  David	
  Young,	
  “The	
  Future	
  of	
  Contemporary	
   Christian	
  Music,”	
  Patheos.com,	
  August	
  13,	
  2010,	
  accessed	
  September	
  19,	
  2012,	
   http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-­‐Resources/Future-­‐of-­‐Contemporary-­‐ Christian-­‐Music.html.	
   109 	
  Peacock	
  continues,	
  “Ironically,	
  Larry	
  Norman,	
  Bob	
  Dylan	
  and	
  U2	
  will	
  be	
  remembered	
  as	
   the	
  best	
  of	
  Christian	
  music	
  created	
  during	
  the	
  ‘ccm’	
  era.”	
  Ibid.	
   110 	
  Joanne	
  Brokaw,	
  “3	
  Things	
  You	
  Need	
  to	
  Know	
  About	
  the	
  Christian	
  Music	
  Industry	
  and	
  the	
   Economy,”	
  Beliefnetblog,	
  October	
  3,	
  2008,	
  accessed	
  September	
  19,	
  2012,	
   http://blog.beliefnet.com/gospelsoundcheck	
  /2008/10/3-­‐things-­‐you-­‐need-­‐to-­‐know-­‐ abou.html.	
   	
    40	
    inspiration	
  our	
  culture	
  so	
  desperately	
  needs.”111	
  Less	
  than	
  one	
  year	
  after	
  that	
  interview,	
   however,	
  Styll	
  resigned	
  from	
  his	
  post	
  and	
  the	
  GMA’s	
  full	
  time	
  staff	
  was	
  reduced	
  by	
  more	
   than	
  50%.112	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   111 	
  Brokaw,	
  “3	
  Things.”	
   112 	
  Skates,	
  Sarah,	
  “John	
  Styll	
  Exits	
  GMA,”	
  Musicrow.com,	
  September	
  2,	
  2009,	
  accessed	
   October	
  1,	
  2012,	
  http://www.musicrow.com/2009/09/john-­‐styll-­‐exits-­‐gma.	
   	
    41	
    4	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music	
  and	
  the	
  Marketplace	
  Approach	
  	
   4.1	
  CCM	
  Artists	
  as	
  Religious	
  Innovators	
  in	
  the	
  Spiritual	
  Marketplace	
   As	
  observed	
  in	
  the	
  previous	
  chapter,	
  many	
  of	
  the	
  disputes	
  and	
  the	
  disagreements	
   throughout	
  the	
  short	
  history	
  of	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music,	
  whether	
  concerning	
  musical	
   style,	
  lyrics,	
  or	
  artistic	
  intent,	
  can	
  very	
  often	
  be	
  recognized	
  as	
  stemming	
  from	
  a	
  diversity	
  of	
   theological	
  presuppositions	
  among	
  its	
  artists	
  and	
  its	
  fans.	
  One	
  way	
  in	
  which	
  the	
  theory	
  of	
   religious	
  economy	
  can	
  aid	
  in	
  interpreting	
  this	
  reality	
  is	
  by	
  analyzing	
  the	
  dynamics	
  of	
   religious	
  pluralism	
  in	
  a	
  disestablished,	
  competitive	
  religious	
  environment.	
  By	
  identifying	
   the	
  diverse	
  public	
  religious	
  expressions	
  of	
  Christian	
  artists	
  as	
  comparable	
  to	
  religious	
   pluralism	
  in	
  a	
  free	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion,	
  the	
  birth,	
  the	
  evolution,	
  and,	
  conceivably,	
  the	
   trajectory	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  phenomenon	
  can	
  be	
  considered	
  in	
  an	
  original	
  way.	
   Economic	
  principles	
  dictate	
  that	
  in	
  a	
  free	
  marketplace,	
  uninhibited	
  by	
  monopolistic	
   structures,	
  an	
  array	
  of	
  firms	
  can	
  exist	
  alongside	
  each	
  other	
  as	
  they	
  compete	
  for	
  a	
  share	
  of	
   the	
  market.	
  Rodney	
  Stark	
  and	
  Roger	
  Finke	
  suggest	
  that	
  in	
  religious	
  economies,	
  “other	
   things	
  being	
  equal,	
  the	
  inherent	
  diversity	
  of	
  demand	
  requires	
  a	
  diversity	
  in	
  supply.”113 	
  In	
  a	
   truly	
  open	
  market	
  of	
  religion,	
  the	
  marketplace	
  approach	
  suggests	
  that	
  a	
  demand	
  may	
  be	
   satisfied	
  by	
  any	
  number	
  of	
  firms	
  who	
  seek	
  to	
  participate	
  within	
  that	
  market.	
  Stephen	
  R.	
   Warner	
  asserts	
  that	
  in	
  a	
  disestablished	
  religious	
  environment	
  “barriers	
  to	
  entry”	
  are	
  low	
   for	
  would-­‐be	
  “religious	
  innovators,”	
  and	
  thus,	
  “the	
  religious	
  field	
  is	
  open	
  to	
  anyone.”114	
  He	
   continues,	
  “The	
  only	
  thing	
  [religious	
  innovators]	
  cannot	
  count	
  on	
  is	
  people	
  being	
  required	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   113 	
  Stark	
  and	
  Finke,	
  “Beyond	
  Church	
  and	
  Sect,”	
  32.	
   114 	
  Warner,	
  “More	
  Progress,”	
  5.	
   	
    42	
    to	
  pay	
  attention	
  to	
  them.	
  But	
  the	
  message	
  is	
  theirs	
  to	
  spread.”115	
  In	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
   music	
  it	
  is	
  the	
  artists	
  themselves	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  identified	
  as	
  religious	
  firms	
  operating	
  on	
  the	
   “supply-­‐side”	
  of	
  this	
  religio-­‐economic	
  dynamic;	
  it	
  is	
  their	
  music,	
  specifically	
  the	
  diverse	
   brands	
  of	
  Christianity	
  espoused	
  there	
  within,	
  that	
  can	
  allow	
  CCM	
  artists	
  to	
  be	
  interpreted	
   as	
  such.	
   It	
  is	
  undeniable,	
  however,	
  that	
  many	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  artists	
  would	
   reject	
  the	
  label	
  of	
  “religious	
  innovator,”	
  or	
  as	
  being	
  a	
  “supplier”	
  of	
  a	
  religious	
  “product,”	
   beyond	
  their	
  music.	
  The	
  lack	
  of	
  such	
  an	
  intent,	
  they	
  might	
  say,	
  must	
  necessarily	
  preclude	
   them	
  from	
  such	
  a	
  conversation.	
  If	
  true,	
  the	
  theory’s	
  value	
  to	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  CCM	
  would	
  be	
   greatly	
  diminished,	
  as	
  the	
  existence	
  of	
  ‘inadvertent	
  salespersons’	
  operating	
  in	
  the	
  American	
   religious	
  marketplace,	
  one	
  in	
  which	
  they	
  had	
  not	
  sought	
  to	
  operate,	
  might	
  be	
  overly	
   problematic.	
  However,	
  as	
  discussed	
  in	
  the	
  introductory	
  chapter,	
  genres	
  are	
  always	
   audience-­‐driven	
  and	
  “based	
  unapologetically	
  upon	
  perception,	
  not	
  content	
  or	
  intent.”116	
  As	
   such,	
  regardless	
  of	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  artists	
  such	
  as	
  P.O.D.,	
  Creed,	
  and	
  U2	
  reject	
  the	
  “Christian”	
   label	
  for	
  their	
  art,	
  if	
  their	
  music	
  is	
  interpreted	
  as	
  “Christian”	
  by	
  their	
  fans,	
  it	
  can	
  be	
   considered	
  as	
  such.	
  And	
  so,	
  curious	
  as	
  it	
  may	
  seem,	
  it	
  is	
  not	
  unreasonable	
  to	
  interpret	
   Christian	
  rock	
  bands	
  as	
  supply-­‐side	
  religious	
  innovators	
  in	
  a	
  religious	
  economy,	
  even	
   despite	
  their	
  wishes,	
  if	
  they	
  are	
  interpreted	
  in	
  such	
  a	
  way	
  by	
  their	
  fans.	
   	
    Powell,	
  in	
  his	
  foreword	
  to	
  the	
  Encyclopedia	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music,	
    explains	
  that	
  he	
  has	
  written	
  his	
  volume	
  as	
  first	
  and	
  foremost	
  a	
  work	
  of	
  church	
  history.117	
   According	
  to	
  Powell,	
  the	
  artists	
  described	
  in	
  the	
  encyclopedia’s	
  pages,	
  their	
  lyrics,	
  their	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   115 	
  Ibid.,	
  9.	
   116 	
  Powell,	
  Encyclopedia,	
  13.	
   117 	
  Ibid.,	
  7.	
   	
    43	
    medium,	
  and	
  their	
  reception,	
  play	
  a	
  significant	
  role	
  in	
  the	
  ongoing	
  history	
  of	
  American	
   Christianity.118	
  Powell	
  writes:	
  	
   I	
  regard	
  the	
  persons	
  in	
  this	
  book	
  as	
  amateur	
  theologians	
  whose	
  perspectives	
  and	
   insights	
  on	
  life	
  and	
  faith	
  are	
  every	
  bit	
  as	
  valid	
  as	
  those	
  of	
  any	
  Harvard	
  professor	
  or	
   Rhodes	
  scholar.	
  These	
  are	
  real	
  people,	
  attempting	
  to	
  articulate	
  their	
  experiences	
  in	
   the	
  church	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  world,	
  often	
  with	
  a	
  vulnerability	
  that	
  scholars	
  are	
  trained	
  to	
   conceal.	
  They	
  offer	
  no	
  feigned	
  neutrality,	
  no	
  illusion	
  of	
  dispassionate	
  inquiry.	
  And	
  it	
   does	
  not	
  bother	
  me	
  that	
  these	
  poets	
  lack	
  the	
  proper	
  nuances	
  of	
  reflection	
  or	
   expression	
  taught	
  within	
  the	
  guild.	
  Jesus	
  was	
  a	
  carpenter,	
  and	
  Peter,	
  a	
  fisherman.	
   Only	
  Paul	
  was	
  a	
  scholar,	
  and	
  he	
  is	
  generally	
  the	
  most	
  boring	
  of	
  the	
  three.119	
   	
   Powell	
  also	
  chooses	
  to	
  include	
  several	
  bands	
  in	
  his	
  Encyclopedia	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
   Music	
  that	
  have	
  outright	
  rejected	
  the	
  label	
  “Christian”	
  for	
  their	
  music;	
  U2	
  and	
  Collective	
   Soul,	
  as	
  two	
  examples,	
  are	
  found	
  in	
  its	
  pages.	
  	
   As	
  “amateur	
  theologians”	
  then,	
  operating	
  in	
  a	
  free	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion	
  with	
  a	
   low	
  “barrier	
  to	
  entry,”	
  it	
  is	
  not	
  difficult	
  to	
  bring	
  the	
  earliest	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
   musicians	
  into	
  the	
  discussion.	
  For	
  those	
  musically	
  “unsophisticated”	
  “Jesus	
  Freaks”	
  of	
  the	
   1960s	
  and	
  1970s,	
  their	
  passion	
  to	
  spread	
  the	
  word	
  and	
  the	
  unpretentious	
  means	
  of	
  their	
   delivery	
  lend	
  themselves	
  well	
  to	
  such	
  an	
  interpretation.120	
  On	
  street	
  corners,	
  campuses,	
   and	
  communes	
  these	
  artists	
  “[offered]	
  the	
  radical	
  message	
  of	
  Jesus	
  in	
  a	
  language	
  that	
  the	
   hippies	
  easily	
  understood.”121	
  These	
  artists	
  served	
  to	
  supply	
  a	
  demand	
  by	
  the	
  youth	
  of	
  an	
   era	
  for	
  a	
  more	
  relevant	
  and	
  relatable	
  brand	
  of	
  Christianity,	
  and,	
  as	
  history	
  as	
  shown,	
  they	
   did	
  have	
  success.	
  The	
  movement	
  and	
  its	
  music,	
  grew,	
  evolved,	
  and	
  were	
  ultimately	
   accepted,	
  in	
  some	
  form,	
  by	
  mainstream	
  evangelicals	
  after	
  it	
  was	
  legitimated	
  at	
  Explo	
  ’72.	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   118 	
  Powell	
  writes,	
  “They’re	
  all	
  here:	
  the	
  saints,	
  the	
  pilgrims,	
  the	
  pious,	
  the	
  outcasts,	
  the	
   hypocrites,	
  the	
  prophets,	
  the	
  heretics,	
  and	
  the	
  martyrs;	
  they’re	
  all	
  here	
  in	
  their	
  earthly	
  and	
   spiritual	
  glory.”	
  Ibid.,	
  1.	
   119 	
  Ibid.,	
  8.	
   120 	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  38.	
   121 	
  Ibid.,	
  29.	
   	
    44	
    As	
  the	
  “barriers	
  to	
  entry”	
  for	
  such	
  “religious	
  innovators”	
  are	
  said	
  to	
  be	
  low	
  in	
  an	
   open	
  marketplace,	
  it	
  is	
  worth	
  mentioning	
  Robert	
  Wuthnow’s	
  comments	
  on	
  the	
   “democratization	
  of	
  art”	
  and	
  its	
  influence	
  on	
  religion	
  in	
  contemporary	
  American	
  popular	
   culture.	
  In	
  his	
  book	
  All	
  in	
  Sync:	
  How	
  Music	
  and	
  Art	
  are	
  Revitalizing	
  American	
  Religion,	
   Wuthnow	
  writes:	
   The	
  introspective	
  nature	
  of	
  the	
  artist	
  is	
  in	
  some	
  ways	
  similar	
  to	
  that	
  of	
  the	
  person	
   who	
  meditates	
  and	
  prays.	
  In	
  theory,	
  at	
  least,	
  the	
  arts	
  are	
  concerned	
  with	
  deep	
   questions	
  about	
  human	
  existence…	
  It	
  is	
  also	
  worth	
  noting	
  that	
  institutional	
   arrangements	
  are	
  creating	
  opportunities	
  for	
  religion	
  to	
  capitalize	
  on	
  whatever	
   interests	
  in	
  spirituality	
  the	
  arts	
  may	
  enforce.	
  Both	
  the	
  democratization	
  of	
  art	
  and	
  the	
   erosion	
  of	
  rigid	
  boundaries	
  between	
  sacred	
  and	
  secular	
  space	
  have	
  played	
  a	
  part.	
   Through	
  the	
  mass	
  media,	
  and	
  through	
  deliberate	
  efforts	
  by	
  art	
  organizations	
  to	
   expand	
  their	
  audiences,	
  the	
  arts	
  are	
  more	
  readily	
  available	
  to	
  a	
  large	
  majority	
  of	
  the	
   public	
  that	
  ever	
  before.122	
   	
   The	
  modern	
  accessibility	
  of	
  art	
  forms	
  and	
  their	
  effectiveness	
  in	
  communicating	
  religious	
   themes	
  and	
  messages	
  to	
  popular	
  culture	
  serves	
  well	
  to	
  strengthen	
  the	
  proposal	
  that	
  early	
   CCM	
  artists	
  could	
  operate	
  as	
  religious	
  innovators	
  in	
  a	
  religious	
  economy.	
   	
    4.2	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  Evangelicalism,	
  and	
  Rise	
  of	
  Supply-­‐Side	
  Firms	
   	
    Rodney	
  Stark	
  and	
  Roger	
  Finke	
  construe	
  religious	
  pluralism	
  in	
  their	
  model	
  of	
    religious	
  economy	
  as	
  existing	
  on	
  the	
  supply-­‐side	
  of	
  a	
  religious	
  economy.	
  Finke	
  and	
  Stark	
   write,	
  “Pluralistic	
  refers	
  to	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  firms	
  active	
  in	
  the	
  economy;	
  the	
  more	
  firms	
   having	
  a	
  significant	
  market-­‐share,	
  the	
  greater	
  the	
  degree	
  of	
  pluralism.”123	
  Understanding	
   contemporary	
  Christian	
  artists	
  as	
  firms	
  and	
  suppliers	
  of	
  religion,	
  it	
  is	
  reasonable	
  to	
  suggest	
   that	
  a	
  Christian	
  diversity	
  among	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  artists	
  may	
  thus	
  constitute	
  a	
  form	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   122 	
  Robert	
  Wuthnow,	
  All	
  in	
  Sync:	
  How	
  Music	
  and	
  Art	
  are	
  Revitalizing	
  American	
  Religion	
  	
   (Los	
  Angeles:	
  University	
  of	
  California	
  Press,	
  2003),	
  18.	
   123 	
  Stark	
  and	
  Finke,	
  “Beyond	
  Church	
  and	
  Sect,”	
  37.	
   	
    45	
    of	
  religious	
  pluralism	
  in	
  the	
  religious	
  marketplace.	
  The	
  relationship	
  between	
  these	
  firms,	
   which	
  will	
  be	
  discussed	
  later	
  in	
  this	
  chapter,	
  is	
  determined,	
  primarily,	
  by	
  the	
  competitive	
   reality	
  of	
  the	
  free	
  market	
  religious	
  economy.	
  Before	
  identifying	
  exactly	
  what	
  “religious	
   competition”	
  suggests,	
  it	
  is	
  first	
  valuable	
  to	
  consider	
  religious	
  individualism	
  in	
  the	
  United	
   States,	
  the	
  diversity	
  of	
  American	
  evangelicalism,	
  and	
  most	
  importantly,	
  the	
  manner	
  in	
   which	
  new	
  religious	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  emerge	
  into	
  a	
  religious	
  economy.	
   	
    Just	
  as	
  religious	
  supply	
  in	
  an	
  open	
  religious	
  marketplace	
  can	
  be	
  diverse,	
  so	
  too	
  can	
    be	
  the	
  religious	
  demand.	
  Like	
  other	
  forms	
  of	
  consumer	
  behavior	
  in	
  an	
  open	
  marketplace,	
  if	
   a	
  demand	
  is	
  not	
  met	
  by	
  an	
  appropriate	
  supply,	
  new	
  firms	
  can	
  rise	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  attempt	
  to	
   satisfy	
  that	
  demand.	
  In	
  applying	
  the	
  marketplace	
  approach	
  to	
  significant	
  events	
  within	
   Christian	
  history,	
  Ekelund,	
  Hebert	
  and	
  Tollison	
  suggest	
  that,	
  “Some	
  Christians	
  reject	
   institutionalized	
  religion	
  because	
  they	
  do	
  not	
  find	
  a	
  church	
  that	
  matches	
  their	
  beliefs,	
  or	
   satisfies	
  their	
  wants.	
  These	
  Christians	
  may	
  become	
  both	
  suppliers	
  and	
  demanders	
  of	
   religion	
  –	
  Christian	
  or	
  otherwise.”124	
  It	
  is	
  in	
  this	
  way	
  that	
  new	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  are	
  born	
  in	
   the	
  religious	
  economy.	
  They	
  continue,	
  “Given	
  the	
  wide	
  latitude	
  concerning	
  biblical	
   interpretation	
  that	
  is	
  characteristic	
  of	
  Protestantism,	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  fundamental	
  reason	
  why	
   Christianity	
  cannot	
  be	
  tailored	
  to	
  individual	
  tastes,	
  within	
  limits.”125	
  In	
  a	
  wholly	
   disestablished	
  free	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion,	
  as	
  is	
  the	
  contemporary	
  American	
  religious	
   environment,	
  the	
  transformation	
  from	
  demander	
  to	
  supplier	
  of	
  religion	
  is	
  sure	
  to	
  happen	
   with	
  more	
  regularity;	
  Finke	
  and	
  Stark	
  contend	
  that,	
  “The	
  degree	
  that	
  a	
  religious	
  economy	
  is	
   unregulated,	
  it	
  will	
  tend	
  to	
  be	
  very	
  pluralistic.”126	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   124 	
  Ekelund,	
  Hebert,	
  and	
  Tollison,	
  The	
  Marketplace	
  of	
  Christianity,	
  8.	
   125 	
  Ibid.,	
  8.	
   126 	
  Stark	
  and	
  Finke,	
  “Beyond	
  Church	
  and	
  Sect,”	
  36.	
   	
    46	
    It	
  is	
  not	
  difficult	
  to	
  identify	
  artists	
  in	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  CCM	
  who	
  identify	
  themselves	
  as	
   having	
  been	
  driven	
  into	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  a	
  religious	
  supplier	
  of	
  a	
  religious	
  product	
  they	
  had	
   deemed,	
  in	
  one	
  manner	
  or	
  another,	
  deficient.	
  Keith	
  Green’s	
  refusal	
  to	
  withhold	
  his	
  albums	
   from	
  those	
  who	
  could	
  not	
  afford	
  to	
  pay,	
  for	
  example,	
  was	
  something	
  he	
  considered	
   essential	
  to	
  all	
  “musical	
  ministry.”	
  This	
  was	
  an	
  unusual	
  policy	
  during	
  the	
  early	
  years	
  of	
  the	
   industry,	
  and	
  many	
  in	
  the	
  business	
  branded	
  him	
  a	
  “kook”	
  for	
  this	
  attitude.127	
  Green	
  was	
   fixated	
  upon	
  what	
  he	
  believed	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  correct	
  means	
  of	
  operating	
  for	
  a	
  Christian	
  artist,	
   and	
  he	
  was	
  not	
  shy	
  in	
  his	
  rebuke	
  of	
  his	
  musical	
  peers.	
  Green	
  preached,	
  “The	
  only	
  music	
   ministers	
  to	
  whom	
  the	
  Lord	
  will	
  say,	
  ‘Well	
  done,	
  thou	
  good	
  and	
  faithful	
  servant,’	
  are	
  the	
   ones	
  whose	
  lives	
  prove	
  what	
  their	
  lyrics	
  are	
  saying,	
  and	
  the	
  ones	
  to	
  whom	
  music	
  is	
  the	
   least	
  important	
  part	
  of	
  their	
  life	
  –	
  glorifying	
  the	
  only	
  worthy	
  One	
  has	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  most	
   important!”128	
   P.O.D.	
  are	
  another	
  example	
  of	
  this	
  trend.	
  During	
  the	
  band’s	
  early	
  years,	
  their	
   members,	
  although	
  unsigned	
  and	
  broke,	
  refused	
  advances	
  by	
  Christian	
  record	
  labels	
  over	
   what	
  were	
  effectively	
  theological	
  objections.	
  Joseph	
  writes,	
  “Their	
  mission	
  was	
  to	
  take	
  their	
   music	
  and	
  their	
  message	
  to	
  the	
  world	
  and	
  that	
  was	
  unlikely	
  to	
  happen	
  through	
  the	
  efforts	
   of	
  a	
  CCM	
  label	
  that	
  didn’t	
  share	
  their	
  cultural	
  mission.”129	
  After	
  the	
  band	
  signed	
  a	
  deal	
  with	
   Atlantic	
  several	
  years	
  later,	
  the	
  band	
  toured	
  with	
  such	
  hard	
  rock	
  “mainstream”	
  acts	
  as	
  Korn	
   and	
  Sevendust.	
  The	
  band	
  also	
  performed	
  at	
  Ozzy	
  Osborne’s	
  Ozzfest	
  in	
  2002,	
  and	
  regardless	
   of	
  such	
  an	
  unexpected	
  environment	
  for	
  a	
  band	
  with	
  a	
  clearly	
  positive,	
  Christian	
  message,	
   P.O.D.	
  was	
  received	
  positively	
  and	
  they	
  were	
  invited	
  to	
  return.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   127 	
  Cusic,	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light,	
  292.	
   128 	
  Ibid.	
   129 	
  Joseph,	
  Faith,	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ’n’	
  Roll,	
  34.	
   	
    47	
    	
    In	
  truth,	
  contemporary	
  American	
  evangelicalism	
  today,	
  in	
  all	
  of	
  its	
  diverse	
    manifestations,	
  is	
  very	
  much	
  a	
  product	
  of	
  religious	
  “demanders”	
  becoming	
  religious	
   “suppliers”	
  in	
  the	
  religious	
  marketplace.	
  American	
  Evangelicals	
  can	
  be	
  an	
  extremely	
   diverse	
  lot;	
  historian	
  Mark	
  A.	
  Noll	
  contends	
  that	
  evangelicalism,	
  in	
  its	
  earliest	
  years,	
  could	
   be	
  characterized	
  generally	
  as,	
  “a	
  movement	
  away	
  from	
  formal,	
  outward,	
  and	
  established	
   religion	
  to	
  personal,	
  inward,	
  and	
  heartfelt	
  religion.”130	
  This	
  emphasis	
  on	
  individuality	
  and	
   experience	
  remains	
  a	
  common	
  thread	
  for	
  evangelicals	
  today.	
  Evangelicalism,	
  as	
  both	
  a	
   designation	
  and	
  a	
  subculture,	
  has	
  proven	
  not	
  to	
  be	
  stagnant,	
  but	
  rather	
  able	
  to	
  continually	
   evolve	
  and	
  adapt	
  in	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  remain	
  relevant	
  in	
  the	
  disestablished	
  religious	
  marketplace	
   of	
  its	
  American	
  environment.	
  Joel	
  Carpenter	
  suggests	
  that:	
  	
   Rather	
  than	
  viewing	
  evangelicalism	
  as	
  a	
  throwback,	
  as	
  a	
  religion	
  of	
  consolidation	
  of	
   those	
  who	
  cannot	
  accept	
  the	
  dominant	
  humanist,	
  modernist,	
  liberal,	
  and	
  secular	
   thrust	
  of	
  mainstream	
  society,	
  perhaps	
  it	
  is	
  more	
  accurate	
  to	
  see	
  evangelicalism	
  as	
  a	
   religious	
  persuasion	
  that	
  has	
  repeatedly	
  adapted	
  to	
  the	
  changing	
  tone	
  and	
  rhythms	
   of	
  modernity.131	
   	
   Over	
  the	
  last	
  two	
  hundred	
  years,	
  a	
  host	
  of	
  religious	
  innovators	
  on	
  the	
  supply-­‐side	
  of	
   evangelical	
  Christianity	
  have	
  endeavored	
  to	
  promote	
  a	
  more	
  fashionable	
  and	
  relevant	
   brand	
  of	
  evangelical	
  Christianity	
  -­‐	
  George	
  Whitfield,	
  John	
  Wesley	
  and	
  Billy	
  Graham,	
  to	
   name	
  a	
  small	
  few	
  -­‐	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  the	
  unregulated	
  religious	
  marketplace	
  in	
  which	
  they	
  operated	
   that	
  made	
  such	
  developments	
  possible.	
  Religious	
  innovators	
  “compete	
  in	
  the	
  marketplace	
   of	
  ideas	
  and	
  draw	
  market	
  share	
  from	
  suppliers	
  who	
  fail	
  to	
  change	
  with	
  the	
  times.”132	
   Hendershot	
  writes,	
  “If	
  today’s	
  thriving	
  Christian	
  cultural	
  products	
  industry	
  illustrates	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   130 	
  Mark	
  A.	
  Noll,	
  The	
  Old	
  Religion	
  in	
  the	
  New	
  World:	
  The	
  History	
  of	
  North	
  American	
   Christianity	
  (Grand	
  Rapids:	
  William	
  B.	
  Eerdmans	
  Publishing	
  Company:	
  2002),	
  51.	
   131 	
  Joel	
  Carpenter,	
  Revive	
  Us	
  Again:	
  The	
  Reawakening	
  of	
  American	
  Fundamentalism	
  (New	
   York,	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
  234.	
   132 	
  Lee	
  and	
  Sinitiere,	
  Holy	
  Mavericks,	
  176.	
   	
    48	
    anything,	
  it	
  is	
  that	
  evangelicals	
  continue	
  to	
  spread	
  their	
  messages	
  using	
  the	
  ‘newest	
  thing,’	
   be	
  it	
  film,	
  video,	
  or	
  the	
  web.”133	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music,	
  the	
  genre	
  itself	
  and	
  the	
   diversity	
  of	
  the	
  artists	
  that	
  comprise	
  it,	
  is	
  undoubtedly	
  an	
  example	
  of	
  this	
  trend.	
  	
   Evangelicalism,	
  in	
  its	
  disestablished	
  American	
  religious	
  environment,	
  is	
  effectively	
  a	
   breeding	
  ground	
  for	
  supply-­‐side	
  religious	
  firms.	
  Warner	
  writes,	
  “Americans	
  choose	
   whether	
  and	
  where	
  to	
  be	
  committed	
  to	
  a	
  religious	
  community;	
  this	
  has	
  been	
  implicit	
  all	
   along	
  and	
  especially	
  overt	
  in	
  the	
  early-­‐nineteenth	
  century	
  second	
  great	
  awakening	
  as	
  well	
   as	
  today.	
  Whatever	
  we	
  may	
  think	
  of	
  it,	
  religious	
  individualism	
  is	
  traditionally	
  American.”134	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  is,	
  in	
  many	
  ways,	
  intimately	
  linked	
  to	
  American	
   evangelicalism.	
  Many	
  of	
  its	
  artists	
  identify	
  themselves	
  as	
  evangelicals,	
  and	
  the	
  evangelical	
   subculture	
  has	
  time	
  and	
  again	
  proven	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  largest	
  audience	
  of	
  the	
  genre.	
  The	
  powerful	
   influence	
  of	
  competition	
  in	
  the	
  religious	
  marketplace	
  is	
  central	
  to	
  understanding	
  the	
   religious	
  dynamics	
  of	
  the	
  market,	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  to	
  this	
  question	
  we	
  now	
  turn.	
  	
   	
    4.3	
  Competition	
  in	
  the	
  Open	
  Marketplace	
  of	
  Religion	
   	
    In	
  the	
  same	
  way	
  that	
  competition	
  is	
  said	
  to	
  motivate	
  free	
  market	
  economies	
  in	
    conventional	
  economic	
  theories,	
  competition	
  is	
  critical	
  in	
  explaining	
  the	
  dynamics	
  of	
  a	
   religious	
  economy.	
  Although	
  competition	
  in	
  an	
  open	
  religious	
  marketplace	
  can	
  certainly	
   imply	
  a	
  deliberate	
  and	
  methodical	
  rivalry	
  between	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms,	
  it	
  can	
  also	
  function	
  in	
   a	
  much	
  more	
  discreet	
  manner.	
  Hamberg	
  and	
  Pettersson	
  explain:	
   As	
  we	
  understand	
  it,	
  the	
  characterization	
  of	
  a	
  religious	
  market	
  as	
  competitive	
  need	
   not	
  necessarily	
  mean	
  that	
  the	
  firms	
  on	
  the	
  market	
  consciously	
  compete	
  with	
  other	
   firms	
  for	
  market	
  shares.	
  They	
  may	
  do	
  so,	
  but	
  a	
  pluralistic	
  religious	
  market	
  may	
  have	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   133 	
  Hendershot,	
  Shaking	
  the	
  World	
  for	
  Jesus,	
  6.	
   134 	
  Warner,	
  “More	
  Progress,”	
  7.	
   	
    49	
    the	
  characteristics	
  of	
  a	
  competitive	
  market,	
  even	
  if	
  the	
  ‘producers’	
  should	
  not	
  see	
   themselves	
  as	
  competing	
  for	
  ‘customers.’	
  …	
  Even	
  if	
  the	
  producers	
  in	
  a	
  competitive	
   market	
  should	
  not	
  consciously	
  compete	
  with	
  each	
  other,	
  inefficiency	
  will	
  be	
   punished	
  and	
  efficiency	
  rewarded,	
  as	
  inefficient	
  producers	
  will	
  lose	
  market	
  shares	
   or	
  be	
  forced	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  market,	
  while	
  efficient	
  producers	
  will	
  gain	
  market	
  shares…	
   Even	
  if	
  the	
  producers	
  in	
  a	
  pluralistic	
  religious	
  market	
  should	
  not	
  see	
  themselves	
  as	
   competing	
  with	
  other	
  producers,	
  the	
  market	
  may	
  still	
  function	
  as	
  a	
  competitive	
   market.135 	
   	
   In	
  a	
  disestablished	
  religious	
  economy,	
  a	
  competitive	
  marketplace	
  is	
  an	
  inevitable	
  reality.	
   	
    Market	
  principles	
  dictate	
  that	
  a	
  multiplicity	
  of	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  (religious	
    pluralism)	
  within	
  a	
  free-­‐market	
  economy	
  will	
  also	
  breed	
  competition.	
  Stark	
  and	
  Finke	
   argue	
  that,	
  “Religious	
  pluralism	
  (the	
  presence	
  of	
  multiple	
  suppliers)	
  is	
  important	
  only	
   insofar	
  as	
  it	
  increases	
  choices	
  and	
  competition,	
  offering	
  consumers	
  a	
  wider	
  range	
  of	
   religious	
  rewards	
  and	
  forcing	
  suppliers	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  responsive	
  and	
  efficient.”136	
   Competition	
  thus	
  promotes	
  change	
  in	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  as	
  suppliers	
  attempt	
  to	
   accommodate	
  new	
  realities.	
  Hamberg	
  and	
  Petterson	
  explain:	
  “Such	
  market	
  adaptation	
  can	
   be	
  expected	
  to	
  result	
  in	
  a	
  rich	
  and	
  diversified	
  supply	
  of	
  religious	
  ‘goods’	
  and	
  thus	
  to	
   increase	
  the	
  likelihood	
  that	
  consumers	
  can	
  find	
  religious	
  goods	
  well	
  adapted	
  to	
  their	
   individual	
  tastes.”137 	
  The	
  end	
  result	
  of	
  this	
  process	
  is	
  a	
  true	
  diversity	
  of	
  religious	
  supply	
   satisfying	
  a	
  full	
  spectrum	
  of	
  religious	
  demand.	
   	
    Competition	
  in	
  a	
  disestablished	
  religious	
  economy	
  can	
  also	
  contribute	
  to	
  an	
  increase	
    in	
  religious	
  consumption	
  in	
  a	
  given	
  society.	
  Here,	
  “…	
  religious	
  pluralism	
  and	
  competition	
   will	
  ensure	
  the	
  quality	
  and	
  diversity	
  of	
  religious	
  supply	
  and	
  lead	
  to	
  high	
  levels	
  of	
  religious	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   135 	
  Eva	
  M.	
  Hamberg	
  &	
  Thorleif	
  Pettersson,	
  “Religious	
  Markets:	
  Supply,	
  Demand,	
  and	
   Rational	
  Choices,”	
  in	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
  Religious	
  Markets	
  and	
   Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  ed.	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen.	
  (New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
  Littlefield	
  Publishers	
  Inc.,	
   2002),	
  97.	
   136 	
  Finke	
  &	
  Stark,	
  “Beyond	
  Church	
  &	
  Sect,”	
  136.	
   137 	
  Hamberg	
  &	
  Pettersson,	
  “Religious	
  Markets,”	
  97.	
   	
    50	
    participation.”138	
  The	
  greater	
  the	
  diversity	
  of	
  religious	
  products	
  within	
  a	
  market,	
  the	
  more	
   religious	
  products	
  will	
  be	
  consumed.	
  The	
  competitive	
  reality	
  of	
  the	
  market	
  also	
  motivates	
   some	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  to	
  aggressively	
  compete	
  against	
  other	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms,	
  here	
   pluralism	
  increases	
  religious	
  participation	
  because,	
  “it	
  expands	
  the	
  set	
  of	
  options	
  for	
   religious	
  consumers	
  and	
  causes	
  denominations	
  to	
  compete	
  more	
  vigorously	
  for	
   members.”139	
  	
   Figure	
  4.3.1	
  	
  Competitive	
  religious	
  economies	
  and	
  religious	
  participation.	
    	
   	
    Religious	
  pluralism	
  in	
  a	
  disestablished	
  religious	
  economy	
  promoting	
  competition,	
    the	
  end	
  results	
  of	
  which	
  being	
  a	
  general	
  increase	
  in	
  religious	
  consumption,	
  can	
  be	
  seen	
   during	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  genre.	
  In	
  a	
  much	
  less	
  obvious	
  way,	
  the	
  proposal	
  may	
  also	
   provide	
  one	
  hypothesis	
  as	
  to	
  why	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry	
  declined	
  at	
  the	
  turn	
  of	
  the	
  millennium,	
   once	
  it	
  had	
  been	
  made	
  obsolete	
  by	
  the	
  emergence	
  of	
  Christian	
  artists	
  within	
  the	
   ‘mainstream’	
  music	
  industry.	
  As	
  the	
  CCM	
  genre	
  exploded,	
  the	
  debate	
  over	
  what	
  ‘Christian	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   138 	
  Ibid.,	
  98.	
   139 	
  James	
  D	
  Montgomery,	
  “A	
  Formalization	
  and	
  Test	
  of	
  the	
  Religious	
  Economies	
  Model,”	
   American	
  Sociological	
  Review	
  68:5	
  (2003),	
  782.	
   	
    51	
    music’	
  exactly	
  entailed	
  was	
  given	
  a	
  much	
  larger	
  stage	
  and	
  a	
  much	
  broader	
  audience.	
  The	
   Gospel	
  Music	
  Association’s	
  initial	
  strict	
  definition	
  of	
  CCM	
  and	
  their	
  disagreement	
  with	
   Sixpence	
  None	
  the	
  Richer	
  in	
  1999,	
  for	
  example,	
  may	
  be	
  indicative	
  of	
  the	
  industry’s	
  supply-­‐ side	
  firms	
  struggling	
  with	
  the	
  emerging	
  Christian	
  heterogeneity	
  among	
  Christian	
  artists.	
   Howard	
  suggests	
  that	
  the	
  battle	
  to	
  define	
  CCM	
  was	
  an	
  inevitable	
  result	
  of	
  the	
  genre’s	
   popularity;	
  he	
  writes:	
  	
  	
   Perhaps	
  not	
  surprisingly,	
  as	
  these	
  divergent	
  rationales	
  came	
  to	
  be	
  articulated	
  and	
   refined,	
  the	
  various	
  artists,	
  producers,	
  distributors,	
  critics,	
  and	
  audiences	
  that	
   subscribed	
  to	
  a	
  particular	
  school	
  of	
  thought	
  frequently	
  dismissed	
  or	
  criticized	
  those	
   operating	
  in	
  accordance	
  with	
  the	
  assumptions	
  of	
  another	
  rationale.	
  Each	
  group	
   began	
  to	
  argue	
  that	
  they	
  themselves	
  were	
  producing	
  true	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
   music	
  and	
  that	
  the	
  others	
  were	
  falling	
  short	
  of	
  the	
  goal.140	
   	
   The	
  religious	
  consumption	
  bred	
  by	
  the	
  huge	
  growth	
  of	
  the	
  industry	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  1990s	
  gave	
   rise	
  to	
  religious	
  demanders	
  who	
  later	
  became	
  religious	
  suppliers;	
  market	
  principle	
  dictate	
   that	
  the	
  more	
  active	
  firms	
  in	
  the	
  economy	
  there	
  are,	
  the	
  greater	
  the	
  diversity	
  among	
  those	
   firms.	
   Ultimately,	
  in	
  the	
  1990s,	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry,	
  and	
  the	
  GMA,	
  can	
  also	
  be	
  interpreted	
  as	
   operating	
  in	
  a	
  comparable	
  way	
  to	
  monopoly	
  structures	
  in	
  secular	
  economies.	
  As	
  the	
   popularity	
  of	
  the	
  genre	
  grew	
  in	
  the	
  early	
  1990s,	
  the	
  industry	
  sought	
  to	
  define	
  and	
  promote	
   the	
  product	
  they	
  offered.	
  As	
  the	
  criteria	
  for	
  CCM,	
  as	
  a	
  product,	
  became	
  increasingly	
  well	
   defined,	
  many	
  Christian	
  artists	
  found	
  themselves	
  on	
  the	
  outside	
  looking	
  in.	
  Both	
  suppliers	
   and	
  demanders	
  of	
  CCM	
  were	
  thus	
  forced	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
   genre	
  and	
  industry,	
  and,	
  with	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  mainstream	
  record	
  companies	
  that	
  had	
   recognized	
  the	
  profit	
  to	
  be	
  made	
  by	
  selling	
  religious	
  music,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  by	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
   online	
  music	
  distribution,	
  the	
  CCM	
  industry	
  lost	
  ground.	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   140 	
  Howard	
  &	
  Streck,	
  Apostles	
  of	
  Rock,	
  40.	
   	
    52	
    	
    Stark	
  and	
  Finke	
  contend	
  that	
  successful	
  monopolistic	
  structures	
  within	
  religious	
    economies	
  will	
  ultimately	
  decrease	
  the	
  diversity	
  of	
  religious	
  expression	
  in	
  that	
  religious	
   economy.	
  They	
  write:	
  	
  	
   To	
  the	
  degree	
  that	
  a	
  religious	
  firm	
  achieves	
  a	
  monopoly,	
  it	
  will	
  seek	
  to	
  exert	
  its	
   influence	
  over	
  institutions	
  and	
  thus	
  the	
  society	
  will	
  become	
  sacralized.	
  Sacralization	
   means	
  that	
  there	
  will	
  be	
  little	
  differentiation	
  between	
  religious	
  and	
  secular	
   institutions	
  and	
  that	
  the	
  primary	
  symbols,	
  rhetoric,	
  and	
  ritual.141	
   	
   This	
  phenomenon	
  is	
  very	
  much	
  in	
  line	
  with	
  the	
  critique	
  that	
  was	
  leveled	
  against	
  the	
   industry	
  by	
  Charlie	
  Peacock,	
  both	
  in	
  1999	
  and	
  in	
  2008.	
  To	
  Peacock,	
  it	
  was	
  the	
  narrow	
   consensus	
  of	
  “Christian	
  music”	
  that	
  was	
  advocated	
  by	
  the	
  industry	
  that	
  was	
  creating	
  their	
   product	
  to	
  become	
  increasingly	
  irrelevant	
  in	
  modern	
  times.	
   Writing	
  in	
  the	
  year	
  2000,	
  Thompson	
  had	
  a	
  similar	
  reading	
  of	
  the	
  changes	
  he	
  was	
   witnessing	
  before	
  his	
  very	
  eyes.	
  Excited	
  by	
  the	
  growing	
  plurality	
  of	
  religious	
  expression	
   among	
  Christian	
  artists,	
  he	
  wrote:	
  “Until	
  the	
  past	
  few	
  years,	
  the	
  top-­‐selling	
  Christian	
  music	
   has	
  been	
  the	
  least	
  aggressive,	
  adventurous,	
  or	
  challenging.”142	
  Thompson	
  suggested	
  that	
  it	
   was	
  in	
  fact	
  digital	
  distribution	
  that	
  allowed	
  Christian	
  artists	
  to	
  skirt	
  the	
  industry	
  and	
  its	
   various	
  parameters.	
  Thompson	
  explained:	
  “With	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  the	
  internet,	
  fans	
  can	
  now	
   connect	
  directly	
  with	
  the	
  artists	
  who	
  move	
  them.	
  No	
  longer	
  must	
  they	
  rely	
  on	
  the	
   gatekeepers	
  within	
  the	
  church	
  or	
  the	
  entertainment	
  industry.”143	
  He	
  continued:	
  “With	
  the	
   explosion	
  of	
  the	
  Internet,	
  digital	
  delivery	
  of	
  music,	
  and	
  greatly	
  reduced	
  costs	
  of	
   manufacturing,	
  many	
  believe	
  that	
  the	
  future	
  of	
  Christian	
  rock	
  is	
  brightest	
  where	
  the	
  sun	
  of	
   the	
  industry’s	
  attention	
  doesn’t	
  shine.”144	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   141 	
  Stark	
  and	
  Finke,	
  “Beyond	
  Church	
  &	
  Sect,”	
  37.	
   142 	
  Thompson,	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves,	
  243.	
   143 	
  Ibid.	
   144 	
  Ibid.,	
  243.	
   	
    53	
    Figure	
  4.3.2	
  Monopoly	
  structures	
  and	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  genre.	
   	
    	
   Ultimately,	
  the	
  religious	
  demand	
  of	
  the	
  CCM	
  audience	
  evolved.	
  The	
  shrinking	
  of	
  an	
   industry	
  that	
  provided	
  CCM	
  as	
  Christian	
  culture-­‐replacement,	
  and	
  the	
  popularity	
  of	
   Christian	
  artists	
  in	
  the	
  mainstream,	
  suggest	
  that	
  religious	
  demand	
  had	
  shifted	
  away	
  from	
   isolationist	
  and	
  towards	
  a	
  brand	
  of	
  Christianity	
  that	
  was	
  less	
  suspicious	
  of	
  mainstream	
   American	
  popular	
  culture.	
  Joseph	
  writes:	
  	
  	
   Ironically	
  enough,	
  while	
  the	
  very	
  notion	
  of	
  ‘Christian	
  music’	
  was	
  in	
  retreat,	
  people	
  of	
   faith	
  were	
  streaming	
  out	
  of	
  their	
  subcultures	
  and	
  making	
  strong	
  statements	
  of	
  faith	
   in	
  the	
  center	
  of	
  the	
  music	
  culture.	
  And	
  they	
  appeared	
  to	
  be	
  continuing	
  to	
  do	
  so	
  with	
   or	
  without	
  the	
  help	
  from	
  their	
  brothers	
  and	
  sisters	
  on	
  the	
  business	
  side	
  of	
  the	
   existing	
  paradigm	
  of	
  Christian	
  music.145	
   	
   Those	
  CCM	
  artists	
  who	
  offered	
  Christian	
  entertainment,	
  DC	
  Talk	
  and	
  Audio	
  Adrenaline	
  for	
   example,	
  had	
  become	
  irrelevant.	
   	
    Karen	
  Ward’s	
  story	
  provides	
  an	
  example	
  of	
  such	
  a	
  shift	
  at	
  the	
  turn	
  of	
  the	
    millennium.	
  Originally	
  of	
  the	
  Lutheran	
  church,	
  Ward	
  left	
  that	
  denomination	
  to	
  begin	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   145 	
  Joseph,	
  Faith,	
  God	
  &	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
  Roll,	
  25.	
   	
    54	
    Church	
  of	
  the	
  Apostles	
  in	
  Seattle.	
  Her	
  new	
  congregation	
  combines	
  Lutheran	
  liturgical	
   services	
  with	
  the	
  contemporary	
  arts.	
  Ward	
  writes:	
   We	
  are	
  ancient	
  and	
  future.	
  We	
  Bach	
  and	
  rock.	
  We	
  chant	
  and	
  spin.	
  We	
  emo	
  and	
  alt.	
   We	
  write	
  our	
  own	
  church	
  music	
  and	
  incorporate	
  mainstream	
  music	
  as	
  well	
  –	
   everything	
  from	
  Rachel’s	
  to	
  U2,	
  Bjork	
  to	
  Moby,	
  Dave	
  Matthews	
  to	
  Coldplay.	
  We	
  have	
   no	
  need	
  to	
  “Christianize”	
  music.	
  God	
  is	
  sovereign,	
  and	
  the	
  whole	
  world	
  is	
  God’s,	
  so	
   any	
  music	
  that	
  is	
  good	
  already	
  belongs	
  to	
  God.146	
   	
   Here	
  the	
  genre	
  of	
  CCM,	
  and	
  questions	
  about	
  appropriate	
  lyrical	
  content,	
  musical	
  style,	
  and	
   artistic	
  intent,	
  are	
  evidently	
  non-­‐issues.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   146 	
  Karen	
  Ward,	
  “The	
  New	
  Church:	
  Artistic,	
  Monastic,	
  and	
  Commute-­‐Free,”	
  in	
  The	
  Relevant	
   Church:	
  A	
  New	
  Vision	
  for	
  Communities	
  of	
  Faith,	
  ed.	
  Jennifer	
  Ashley.	
  (Orlando:	
  Relevant	
   Books,	
  2005),	
  82.	
   	
    55	
    5	
  Conclusion	
   	
    As	
  proposed	
  in	
  this	
  study,	
  the	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy	
  is	
  a	
  valuable	
  and	
  highly	
    effective	
  methodological	
  approach	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  the	
  modern	
  religious	
  phenomenon	
  of	
   contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States.	
  The	
  theory	
  of	
  religious	
  economy,	
  as	
  a	
   method,	
  was	
  initially	
  fashioned	
  for	
  the	
  better	
  understanding	
  of	
  American	
  religious	
  trends	
   in	
  their	
  distinctly	
  American	
  religious	
  environment,	
  and	
  by	
  borrowing	
  language	
  and	
  models	
   from	
  economic	
  theory,	
  interpreting	
  American	
  society	
  as	
  free-­‐marketplace	
  of	
  religion	
  driven	
   by	
  competition	
  and	
  the	
  economic	
  forces	
  of	
  supply	
  and	
  demand,	
  the	
  understudied	
  and	
   splintered	
  history	
  of	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  can	
  be	
  approached	
  in	
  an	
  original	
  way.	
   Here,	
  theological	
  diversity	
  among	
  Christian	
  artists	
  is	
  recognized	
  as	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  religious	
   pluralism	
  and	
  CCM	
  artists	
  are	
  identified	
  as	
  comparable	
  to	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  in	
  religious	
   economy.	
  Recognizing	
  the	
  competitive	
  reality	
  of	
  the	
  open	
  marketplace	
  of	
  religion,	
  the	
  many	
   arguments	
  and	
  disagreements,	
  and	
  successes	
  and	
  failures,	
  in	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  CCM	
  are	
  better	
   investigated.	
   This	
  study	
  has	
  focused	
  upon	
  the	
  supply-­‐side	
  of	
  this	
  religious	
  economy	
  – contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  artists	
  –	
  and	
  presented	
  ways	
  in	
  which	
  their	
  relations	
  with	
   each	
  other,	
  and	
  with	
  their	
  industry,	
  can	
  be	
  interpreted	
  using	
  economic	
  models.	
  The	
  other	
   side	
  to	
  this	
  story,	
  one	
  that	
  must	
  be	
  considered	
  in	
  future	
  analyses	
  of	
  the	
  splintered	
  world	
  of	
   CCM,	
  is	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  the	
  consumer,	
  or	
  religious	
  demander,	
  in	
  this	
  religious	
  economy.	
  How	
   does	
  a	
  culture	
  affect	
  its	
  artists?	
  To	
  what	
  effect	
  does	
  the	
  religious	
  supply	
  encourage	
  or	
   facilitate	
  change	
  in	
  the	
  demand	
  of	
  a	
  given	
  religious	
  marketplace?	
  Or	
  posed	
  more	
  simply,	
   why	
  does	
  the	
  demand	
  change?	
  Although	
  the	
  emergence	
  of	
  new	
  supply-­‐side	
  CCM	
  firms	
  may	
   have	
  been	
  a	
  cause	
  of	
  the	
  evolution	
  within	
  religious	
  demand	
  over	
  the	
  past	
  40	
  years,	
  the	
   	
    56	
    change	
  within	
  popular	
  CCM	
  supply-­‐side	
  firms	
  is,	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time,	
  undoubtedly	
  a	
  sign	
  of	
   that	
  evolution	
  in	
  demand.	
  	
   In	
  his	
  book	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil:	
  Christian	
  Pop	
  Music	
  &	
  the	
  Transformation	
  of	
   American	
  Evangelism,	
  Stowe	
  confronts	
  the	
  question	
  as	
  to	
  whether	
  popular	
  music	
   influences,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  mirrors,	
  its	
  culture.	
  He	
  writes,	
  “But	
  does	
  music	
  do	
  more	
  than	
  reflect;	
   does	
  it	
  actually	
  alter	
  the	
  contours	
  of	
  history	
  by	
  working	
  on	
  people’s	
  conceptions	
  of	
   themselves,	
  their	
  communities,	
  and	
  their	
  nation?	
  The	
  answer	
  is	
  yes	
  –	
  of	
  course	
  it	
  does.”147	
   Stowe	
  argues	
  in	
  his	
  study	
  that	
  by	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  1970s,	
  Christian	
  music	
  had	
  in	
  fact	
  been	
   influenced	
  more	
  by	
  right-­‐wing	
  politics	
  than	
  the	
  other	
  way	
  around.	
  He	
  proposes	
  that,	
  “The	
   relocation	
  of	
  the	
  fledgling	
  CCM	
  industry	
  from	
  California	
  to	
  rural	
  Texas,	
  and,	
  more	
   importantly,	
  Nashville	
  was	
  part	
  of	
  this	
  larger	
  trend.”148	
  With	
  the	
  marketplace	
  approach	
  in	
   mind,	
  it	
  is	
  in	
  this	
  direction	
  that	
  future	
  scholarly	
  studies	
  of	
  CCM	
  should	
  venture.	
   Investigating	
  the	
  influencing	
  cultural	
  forces	
  at	
  a	
  given	
  time	
  can	
  provide	
  a	
  window	
  into	
  the	
   causes	
  of	
  a	
  shift	
  in	
  the	
  demand.	
  Identifying	
  the	
  forces	
  behind	
  a	
  change	
  in	
  market	
  demand	
   can	
  help	
  to	
  elucidate	
  trends	
  in	
  both	
  the	
  past	
  and	
  the	
  trajectory	
  of	
  a	
  market’s	
  supply.	
  	
   Ultimately,	
  the	
  history	
  of	
  the	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  phenomenon	
  is	
  still	
   unfolding,	
  and	
  if	
  critics	
  such	
  as	
  Charlie	
  Peacock	
  are	
  indeed	
  correct,	
  the	
  industry’s	
  best	
  days	
   are	
  now	
  certainly	
  behind	
  them.	
  It	
  need	
  not	
  be	
  argued	
  that	
  CCM	
  is	
  a	
  worthwhile	
  avenue	
  for	
   increased	
  scholarly	
  attention;	
  CCM	
  is	
  a	
  fascinating	
  and	
  understudied	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  religious	
   vitality	
  of	
  contemporary	
  American	
  religion.	
  It	
  is	
  the	
  goal	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  to	
  promote	
  the	
  theory	
   of	
  religious	
  economy	
  as	
  a	
  valuable	
  method	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  the	
  modern	
  religious	
   phenomenon	
  that	
  is	
  contemporary	
  Christian	
  music	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States.	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   147 	
  Stowe,	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil,	
  3.	
   148 	
  Ibid.,	
  246.	
   	
    57	
    Bibliography	
    	
   Balmer,	
  Randall.	
  Mine	
  Eyes	
  Have	
  Seen	
  the	
  Glory.	
  New	
  York:	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  	
   1989.	
   	
   Broderick,	
  Richard,	
  &	
  Ellis	
  Nassour.	
  Rock	
  Opera:	
  The	
  Creation	
  of	
  Jesus	
  Christ	
  Superstar,	
  from	
  	
   Record	
  Album	
  to	
  Broadway	
  Show	
  and	
  Motion	
  Picture.	
  New	
  York:	
  Hawthorn	
  Books,	
   1973.	
   	
   Brokaw,	
  Joanne.	
  “3	
  Things	
  You	
  Need	
  to	
  Know	
  about	
  the	
  Christian	
  Music	
  Industry	
  and	
  the	
  	
   Economy.”	
  Beliefnetblog.	
  October	
  3,	
  2008.	
  Accessed	
  September	
  19,	
  2012.	
   http://blog.beliefnet.com/gospelsoundcheck	
  /2008/10/3-­‐things-­‐you-­‐need-­‐to-­‐ know-­‐abou.html	
   	
   Carpenter,	
  Joel.	
  Revive	
  Us	
  Again:	
  The	
  Reawakening	
  of	
  American	
  Fundamentalism.	
  	
   New	
  York,	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997.	
   	
   Cusic,	
  Don.	
  The	
  Sound	
  of	
  Light:	
  A	
  History	
  of	
  Gospel	
  and	
  Christian	
  Music.	
  Milwaukee:	
  	
   Hal	
  Leonard,	
  2002.	
   	
   Ekelund,	
  Robert	
  B.	
  Jr.,	
  Robert	
  F.	
  Hebert	
  and	
  Robert	
  D.	
  Tollison.	
  The	
  Marketplace	
  of	
  	
   Christianity.	
  Cambridge:	
  MIT	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   Ellwood,	
  Robert	
  S.	
  One	
  Way:	
  The	
  Jesus	
  Movement	
  and	
  Its	
  Meaning.	
  Englewood	
  Cliffs:	
  	
   Prentice-­‐Hall,	
  1973.	
   	
   Emerson,	
  Richard	
  M.	
  “Toward	
  a	
  Theory	
  of	
  Value	
  in	
  Exchange	
  Theory.”	
  In	
  Social	
  Exchange	
  	
   Theory,	
  edited	
  by	
  Karen	
  S.	
  Cook,	
  11-­‐46.	
  Newbury	
  Park:	
  Sage	
  Publications,	
  1987.	
   	
   Eskridge,	
  Larry.	
  "One	
  Way:	
  Billy	
  Graham,	
  the	
  Jesus	
  Generation,	
  and	
  the	
  Idea	
  of	
  an	
  	
   Evangelical	
  Youth	
  Culture,"	
  Church	
  History	
  67.1	
  (March	
  1998):	
  83–106.	
   	
   Fierman,	
  Daniel,	
  and	
  Gillian	
  Flynn.	
  “The	
  Greatest	
  Story	
  Ever	
  Sold.”	
  Entertainment	
  Weekly,	
  	
   December	
  3,	
  1999.	
   	
   Finke,	
  Roger,	
  and	
  Rodney	
  Stark.	
  “Beyond	
  Church	
  and	
  Sect:	
  Dynamics	
  and	
  Stability	
  in	
  	
   Religious	
  Economics.”	
  In	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
  Religious	
   Markets	
  and	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  edited	
  by	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen,	
  31-­‐62.	
  New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
   Littlefield	
  Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002.	
   	
   Finke,	
  Roger,	
  and	
  Rodney	
  Stark.	
  The	
  Churching	
  of	
  America	
  1776-­‐1990:	
  Winners	
  and	
  Losers	
  	
   in	
  our	
  Religious	
  Economy.	
  Toronto:	
  Rutgers	
  University	
  Press:	
  1993.	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    58	
    Friend,	
  Lonn.	
  “Exclusive	
  Interview!	
  Alice	
  Cooper:	
  Prince	
  of	
  Darkness/Lord	
  of	
  Light”	
  	
   KNAC.com.	
  October	
  27,	
  2001.	
  Accessed	
  March	
  2,	
  2012.	
   http://www.alicecooperechive.com/articles/print_article.php?mag=knac&art=	
   011019.	
   	
   Gormly,	
  Eric.	
  "Evangelizing	
  Through	
  Appropriation:	
  Toward	
  a	
  Cultural	
  Theory	
  on	
  	
   the	
  Growth	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Media	
  and	
  Religion	
  2.4	
   (2003):	
  251-­‐265.	
   	
   Gospel	
  Music	
  Association.	
  “GMA	
  Mission.”	
  Accessed	
  April	
  20,	
  2012.	
  	
   http://www.gospelmusic.org/gmainfo/aboutus.aspx.	
   	
   Gospel	
  Music	
  Association.	
  “Policy	
  &	
  Procedures	
  Manual.”	
  Accessed	
  April	
  24,	
  2012.	
  	
   http://www.gospelmusic.org/dovevoting/procedures.html.	
   	
   Hamberg,	
  Eva	
  M.	
  &	
  Thorleif	
  Pettersson,	
  “Religious	
  Markets:	
  Supply,	
  Demand,	
  and	
  	
   Rational	
  Choices.”	
  In	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
  Religious	
  Markets	
   and	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  edited	
  by	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen,	
  91-­‐114.	
  New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
   Littlefield	
  Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002.	
   	
   Hamilton,	
  Malcolm.	
  The	
  Sociology	
  of	
  Religion.	
  New	
  York:	
  Routledge,	
  2001.	
   	
   Haynes,	
  Michael	
  K.	
  The	
  God	
  of	
  Rock:	
  A	
  Christian	
  Perspective	
  of	
  Rock	
  Music.	
  Lindale:	
  	
   Priority,	
  1982.	
   	
   Hendershot,	
  Heather.	
  Shaking	
  the	
  World	
  for	
  Jesus.	
  Chicago:	
  Chicago	
  University	
  Press,	
  	
   2004.	
   	
   Howard,	
  Jay	
  R.	
  &	
  John	
  M.	
  Streck.	
  Apostles	
  of	
  Rock:	
  The	
  Splintered	
  World	
  of	
  	
   Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music.	
  Lexington:	
  The	
  University	
  Press	
  of	
  Kentucky,	
  1999.	
   	
   Jelen,	
  Ted	
  G.	
  “Reflections	
  on	
  the	
  ‘New	
  Paradigm’:	
  Unfinished	
  Business	
  and	
  an	
  Agenda	
  for	
  	
   Research.”	
  In	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
  Religious	
  Markets	
  and	
   Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  ed.	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen,	
  187-­‐203.	
  New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
  Littlefield	
   Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002.	
   	
   Joseph,	
  Mark.	
  Faith,	
  God	
  &	
  Rock’n’Roll.	
  London:	
  Sanctuary	
  Publishing,	
  2003.	
   	
   Lanahan,	
  Kate.	
  “Meet	
  the	
  World’s	
  Christianest	
  Rock	
  Band.”	
  The	
  Bosh,	
  January	
  12,	
  2006.	
  	
   Accessed	
  December	
  1,	
  2006.	
  http://thebosh.com/archives/2006/01/meet_	
  	
   the_worlds_christianest_rock_band.php	
   	
   Lee,	
  Shayne,	
  and	
  Phillip	
  Luke	
  Sinistere.	
  Holy	
  Mavericks:	
  Evangelical	
  Innovators	
  and	
  	
   the	
  Spiritual	
  Marketplace.	
  New	
  York:	
  New	
  York	
  University	
  Press,	
  2009.	
   	
   	
   	
    59	
    Marsh,	
  Clive	
  &	
  Vaughan	
  S.	
  Roberts.	
  “Soundtracks	
  of	
  Acrobatic	
  Selves:	
  Fan-­‐	
   Site	
  Religion	
  in	
  the	
  Reception	
  and	
  Use	
  of	
  the	
  Music	
  of	
  U2.”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Contemporary	
   Religion	
  26.3	
  (2011):	
  419-­‐432.	
   	
   Mattingly,	
  Terry.	
  Pop	
  Goes	
  Religion.	
  Nashville:	
  W	
  Publishing	
  Group,	
  2005.	
   	
   Mazur,	
  Eric	
  Michael	
  &	
  Kate	
  McCarthy.	
  God	
  in	
  the	
  Details:	
  American	
  Religion	
  in	
  	
   Popular	
  Culture.	
  New	
  York:	
  Routledge,	
  2011.	
   	
   McDannell,	
  Colleen.	
  Material	
  Christianity.	
  New	
  Haven:	
  Yale	
  University	
  Press,	
  1995.	
   	
   Molloy,	
  Joanna,	
  George	
  Rush.	
  “Sex	
  video	
  with	
  Kid	
  Rock	
  will	
  test	
  faithful	
  Stapp	
  fans.”	
  	
   New	
  York	
  Daily	
  News,	
  February	
  17,	
  2006.	
  Accessed	
  April	
  20,	
  2012.	
   http://articles.nydailynews.com/2006-­‐02-­‐17/gossip/18336748_1_creed-­‐singer-­‐ scott-­‐stapp-­‐kid-­‐rock-­‐tape.	
   	
   Montgomery,	
  James	
  D.	
  “A	
  Formalization	
  and	
  Test	
  of	
  the	
  Religious	
  Economies	
  Model.”	
  	
   American	
  Sociological	
  Review	
  68:5	
  (2003):	
  782-­‐809.	
   	
   Noll,	
  Mark	
  A.	
  The	
  Old	
  Religion	
  in	
  the	
  New	
  World:	
  The	
  History	
  of	
  North	
  American	
  	
   Christianity.	
  Grand	
  Rapids:	
  William	
  B.	
  Eerdmans	
  Publishing	
  Company:	
  2002.	
   	
   Normal,	
  Larry.	
  “Why	
  Should	
  the	
  Devil	
  Have	
  All	
  the	
  Good	
  Music.”	
  Only	
  Visiting	
  this	
  	
   Planet.	
  1972,	
  Verve.	
   	
   Peacock,	
  Charlie.	
  At	
  The	
  Crossroads:	
  An	
  Insider’s	
  Look	
  at	
  the	
  Past,	
  Present,	
  and	
  Future	
  	
   of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music.	
  Nashville:	
  Broadman	
  &	
  Holman	
  Publishers,	
  1999.	
  	
   	
   Peacock,	
  Charlie.	
  “Charlie	
  Peacock	
  Predicts	
  the	
  Future	
  of	
  Christian	
  Music.”	
  CCM	
  Magazine,	
  	
   April	
  1,	
  2008.	
  Accessed	
  Febuary	
  10,	
  2011.	
  http://www.ccmmagazine.com/article	
   /charlie-­‐peacock-­‐predicts-­‐the-­‐future-­‐of-­‐christian-­‐music.	
  	
   	
   Platt,	
  Karen	
  Marie.	
  “The	
  Doves:	
  What	
  Kind	
  of	
  Strange	
  Birds	
  They	
  Are.”	
  CCM,	
  April,	
  1981.	
   	
   Powell,	
  Mark	
  Allen.	
  “The	
  Business	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music.”	
  Christian	
  	
   Century	
  119.26	
  (2006):	
  20-­‐26.	
   	
   Powell,	
  Mark	
  Allen.	
  “Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music:	
  A	
  New	
  Research	
  Area	
  in	
  	
   American	
  Religious	
  Studies.”	
  American	
  Theological	
  Association	
  Summary	
  of	
   Proceedings	
  58.1	
  (2004):	
  129-­‐141.	
   	
   Powell,	
  Mark	
  Allan.	
  Encyclopedia	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music.	
  Peabody:	
  	
   Hendrickson	
  Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002.	
   	
   Price,	
  Deborah	
  Evans.	
  “Shake-­‐Ups	
  Hit	
  Christian	
  Labels.”	
  Billboard,	
  March	
  7,	
  1999.	
   	
   	
    60	
    Romanowski,	
  W.	
  D.	
  "Evangelicals	
  and	
  Popular	
  Music:	
  The	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  	
   Music	
  Industry."	
  In	
  Religion	
  and	
  Popular	
  Culture	
  in	
  America,	
  edited	
  by	
  B.D.	
  Forbes	
  &	
   J.J.	
  Mahan,	
  103-­‐124.	
  Berkeley:	
  University	
  of	
  California	
  Press,	
  2000.	
   	
   Roof,	
  Wade	
  Clark.	
  Spiritual	
  Marketplace:	
  Baby	
  Boomers	
  and	
  the	
  Remaking	
  of	
  	
   American	
  Religion.	
  Princeton:	
  Princeton	
  University	
  Press,	
  2001.	
   	
   Sarah,	
  Skates.	
  “John	
  Styll	
  Exits	
  GMA.”	
  Musicrow.com.	
  September	
  2,	
  2009.	
  Accessed	
  October	
  	
   1,	
  2012.	
  http://www.musicrow.com/2009/09/john-­‐styll-­‐exits-­‐gma.	
   	
   Stark,	
  Rodney.	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Christianity.	
  Princeton:	
  Princeton	
  University	
  Press,	
  1996.	
   	
   Stowe,	
  David	
  W.	
  No	
  Sympathy	
  for	
  the	
  Devil.	
  Chapel	
  Hill:	
  University	
  of	
  North	
  Carolina	
  	
   Press,	
  2011.	
   	
   Styll,	
  John.	
  "From	
  There	
  to	
  Here…"	
  CCM,	
  April	
  1,	
  2008.	
  Accessed	
  March	
  1,	
  2012.	
   http://www.ccmmagazine.com/article/from-­‐there-­‐to-­‐here.	
   	
   Swaggert,	
  Jimmy.	
  Religious	
  Rock	
  n'	
  Roll:	
  A	
  Wolf	
  in	
  Sheep's	
  Clothing.	
  Baton	
  Rouge:	
  	
   Jimmy	
  Swaggert	
  Ministries,	
  1987.	
   	
   Thompson,	
  John	
  J.	
  Raised	
  By	
  Wolves:	
  The	
  Story	
  of	
  Christian	
  Rock	
  &	
  Roll.	
  Toronto:	
  	
   ECW	
  Press,	
  2000.	
   	
   Turner,	
  Steve.	
  Hungry	
  for	
  Heaven:	
  Rock	
  ‘n’	
  Roll	
  and	
  the	
  Search	
  for	
  Redemption.	
  	
   Downers	
  Grove:	
  Intervarsity	
  Press,	
  1995.	
   	
   Ward,	
  Karen.	
  “The	
  New	
  Church:	
  Artistic,	
  Monastic,	
  and	
  Commute-­‐Free.”	
  In	
  The	
  Relevant	
  	
   Church:	
  A	
  New	
  Vision	
  for	
  Communities	
  of	
  Faith,	
  edited	
  by	
  Jennifer	
  Ashley,	
  79-­‐88.	
   Orlando:	
  Relevant	
  Books,	
  2005.	
   	
   Warner,	
  Stephen	
  R.	
  “More	
  Progress	
  on	
  the	
  New	
  Paradigm.”	
  In	
  Sacred	
  Markets,	
  Sacred	
  	
   Canopies:	
  Essays	
  on	
  Religious	
  Markets	
  and	
  Religious	
  Pluralism,	
  edited	
  by	
  Ted	
  G.	
  Jelen,	
   1-­‐29.	
  New	
  York:	
  Rowman	
  &	
  Littlefield	
  Publishers	
  Inc.,	
  2002.	
   	
   Warner,	
  Stephen	
  R.	
  “Work	
  in	
  Progress	
  Toward	
  a	
  New	
  Paradigm	
  for	
  the	
  Sociological	
  	
   Study	
  of	
  Religion	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States,”	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Sociology	
  98.5	
  	
   (1993):	
  1044-­‐1093.	
   	
   Weinstein,	
  Deena.	
  Heavy	
  Metal:	
  The	
  Music	
  and	
  its	
  Culture.	
  New	
  York:	
  Da	
  Capo	
  Press,	
  1991.	
   	
   Wuthnow,	
  Robert.	
  All	
  in	
  Sync:	
  How	
  Music	
  and	
  Art	
  are	
  Revitalizing	
  American	
  Religion.	
  	
   Los	
  Angeles:	
  University	
  of	
  California	
  Press,	
  2003.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    61	
    Young,	
  David	
  Shawn.	
  “The	
  Future	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  Christian	
  Music.”	
  Patheos.com,	
  August	
  	
   13,	
  2010.	
  Accessed	
  September	
  19,	
  2012.	
  	
   http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-­‐Resources/Future-­‐of-­‐ Contemporary-­‐Christian-­‐Music.html.	
    	
    62	
    

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
United States 39 3
Chile 9 0
Philippines 8 1
Canada 8 0
China 8 1
Germany 5 60
Poland 3 0
Russia 2 0
Brazil 2 2
Australia 1 0
Japan 1 0
France 1 0
City Views Downloads
Unknown 28 61
Washington 16 0
Valdivia 8 0
Shenzhen 6 1
Ashburn 5 0
Lewes 2 0
Saint Petersburg 2 0
Los Angeles 2 0
Berkeley 2 0
Mishawaka 2 0
São Paulo 2 2
Beijing 2 0
Vancouver 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}
Download Stats

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0073408/manifest

Comment

Related Items