Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

The epidemiology of Huntington disease in British Columbia 2012

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubc_2012_fall_fisher_emily.pdf
ubc_2012_fall_fisher_emily.pdf
ubc_2012_fall_fisher_emily.pdf [ 4.2MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0073226.json
JSON-LD: 1.0073226+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0073226.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0073226+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0073226+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0073226+rdf-ntriples.txt
Citation
1.0073226.ris

Full Text

	
  	
   	
  	
   THE	
  EPIDEMIOLOGY	
  OF	
  HUNTINGTON	
  DISEASE	
  IN	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
  	
  	
  	
   by	
  	
  	
  Emily	
  Rachel	
  Fisher	
  	
  	
  BSc,	
  The	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  2012	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   08	
  Fall	
   THESIS	
  SUBMITTED	
  IN	
  PARTIAL	
  FUFILLMENT	
  OF	
  THE	
  REQUIREMENTS	
  FOR	
  THE	
  DEGREE	
  OF	
  	
  MASTER	
  OF	
  SCIENCE	
  	
  in	
  	
  The	
  Faculty	
  of	
  Graduate	
  Studies	
  	
  (Medical	
  Genetics)	
  	
  	
  THE	
  UNIVERSITY	
  OF	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
  (Vancouver)	
  	
  	
  September	
  2012	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ©	
  Emily	
  Rachel	
  Fisher,	
  2012	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   ii	
   Abstract	
  	
   Introduction:	
  Global	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  for	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  (HD)	
  vary	
  widely,	
  and	
  those	
  cited	
  for	
  Canada	
  are	
  outdated	
  and	
  not	
  specific	
  to	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (BC).	
  	
  The	
  most	
  recent	
  incidence	
  calculation	
  was	
  performed	
  in	
  BC	
  and	
  includes	
  diagnoses	
  only	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  year	
  1999.	
  	
  Reports	
  on	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  in	
  Canada	
  are	
  based	
  on	
  theories	
  and	
  estimates	
  that	
  do	
  not	
  pertain	
  to	
  any	
  particular	
  population.	
  	
  Despite	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  an	
  extensive	
  laboratory	
  and	
  clinical	
  research	
  hub	
  in	
  this	
  province,	
  a	
  comprehensive	
  epidemiological	
  study	
  of	
  the	
  prevalence,	
  incidence	
  and	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  has	
  never	
  been	
  assessed.	
  	
  As	
  such,	
  the	
  specific	
  objectives	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  were	
  to:	
  1)	
  Calculate	
  the	
  minimum	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  on	
  April	
  1,	
  2012;	
  2)	
  Calculate	
  the	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  from	
  January	
  1,	
  2001-­‐	
  December	
  31,	
  2011;	
  and	
  3)	
  Calculate	
  the	
  minimum	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  on	
  April	
  1,	
  2012.	
  	
   Methods:	
  A	
  comprehensive	
  province-­‐wide	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  patient	
  population	
  and	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  was	
  conducted	
  using	
  multiple	
  sources	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  including:	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  records,	
  hospital	
  and	
  physician	
  records,	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  reports,	
  the	
  HD	
  research	
  lab	
  at	
  the	
  Centre	
  for	
  Molecular	
  Medicine	
  and	
  Therapeutics	
  (CMMT),	
  nursing	
  homes,	
  The	
  Huntington	
  Society	
  of	
  Canada	
  and	
  HD	
  community	
  members.	
  	
   Results:	
  The	
  minimum	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  was	
  estimated	
  at	
  12.5	
  -­‐	
  14.9/100,000	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  11.5-­‐16.0)	
  (1/8,697	
  –	
  1/6,250),	
  the	
  incidence,	
  7.2	
  per	
  million/year	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  6.5-­‐7.9),	
  and	
  the	
  minimum	
  population	
  at	
  risk:	
  1/1,064	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  1/1,941	
  -­‐	
  1/2,107).	
   Conclusions:	
  The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  is	
  nearly	
  twice	
  as	
  high	
  as	
  suggested	
  by	
  a	
  previous	
  Canadian	
  report.	
  	
  This	
  study	
  comprised	
  the	
  most	
  thorough	
  HD	
  patient	
  ascertainment	
  study	
  since	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  direct	
  mutation	
  testing	
  and	
  may	
  set	
  a	
  precedent	
  for	
  future	
  prevalence	
  studies.	
  	
  Incidence	
  has	
  remained	
  the	
  same	
  since	
  1999	
  and	
  BC	
  is	
  only	
  the	
  fourth	
  region	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  direct	
  estimate	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD.	
   	
   iii	
   Preface	
  Study	
  methods	
  were	
  approved	
  by	
  the	
  Children's	
  and	
  Women's	
  Research	
  Ethics	
  Board	
  (H10-­‐00943).	
  The	
  Cure	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Initiative	
  (CHDI)	
  provided	
  funding	
  for	
  this	
  project	
  (CHDI,	
  2012).	
   	
   	
   	
   iv	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   Abstract	
  .......................................................................................................................................	
  ii	
   Preface	
  .......................................................................................................................................	
  iii	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
  ....................................................................................................................	
  iv	
   List	
  of	
  Tables	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  vi	
   List	
  of	
  Figures	
  .........................................................................................................................	
  vii	
   Acknowledgements	
  ................................................................................................................	
  ix	
   Introduction	
  ..............................................................................................................................	
  1	
   Background	
  ........................................................................................................................................	
  1	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  ........................................................................................................................................	
  1	
  Epidemiology	
  of	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  .....................................................................................................	
  2	
   Rationale	
  .....................................................................................................................................	
  8	
   Specific	
  objectives	
  ................................................................................................................	
  11	
   Methodology	
  ...........................................................................................................................	
  12	
   Epidemiology:	
  definitions	
  ............................................................................................................	
  12	
   Population	
  under	
  review:	
  British	
  Columbia	
  .........................................................................	
  13	
   Defining	
  an	
  affected	
  patient:	
  Age	
  at	
  onset	
  ..............................................................................	
  13	
   Sources	
  of	
  Ascertainment	
  ............................................................................................................	
  15	
   Methods	
  of	
  Ascertainment	
  ..........................................................................................................	
  16	
   Maximizing	
  accuracy	
  of	
  prevalence	
  numbers:	
  certainty	
  measures	
  and	
  overlap	
  risk	
   scores	
  ..................................................................................................................................................	
  21	
  Certainty	
  measures	
  .....................................................................................................................................	
  21	
  Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  &	
  Prevalence	
  ranges	
  ..........................................................................................	
  22	
   Performing	
  calculations	
  ...............................................................................................................	
  27	
  Minimum	
  prevalence	
  ranges	
  ...................................................................................................................	
  27	
  Mortality	
  estimates	
  .....................................................................................................................................	
  29	
  Prevalence	
  by	
  ethnicity	
  .............................................................................................................................	
  29	
  Incidence	
  ..........................................................................................................................................................	
  31	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  ................................................................................................................................	
  32	
   Results	
  ......................................................................................................................................	
  37	
   Patient	
  ascertainment	
  results	
  ....................................................................................................	
  37	
  Prevalence	
  –	
  individuals	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  .......................................................................................	
  42	
   Minimum	
  prevalence	
  ranges	
  ......................................................................................................	
  43	
   The	
  ethnic	
  composition	
  of	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  patient	
  population	
  .....................................................	
  44	
  Geographic	
  distribution	
  of	
  patients	
  .....................................................................................................	
  45	
   Minimum	
  Incidence	
  .......................................................................................................................	
  47	
   Minimum	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  .......................................................................................................	
  50	
  Predictive	
  testing	
  .........................................................................................................................................	
  54	
   Discussion	
  ...............................................................................................................................	
  56	
   Prevalence	
  .........................................................................................................................................	
  56	
   Incidence	
  ...........................................................................................................................................	
  67	
   Population	
  at	
  risk	
  ...........................................................................................................................	
  71	
   	
   v	
   Predictive	
  testing	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  74	
   Direct	
  and	
  immediate	
  implications	
  ................................................................................	
  77	
   Conclusion	
  ...............................................................................................................................	
  79	
   Future	
  direction	
  ..............................................................................................................................	
  80	
   Bibliography	
  ...........................................................................................................................	
  83	
   Appendix	
  1a	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  91	
   Appendix	
  1b	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  94	
   Appendix	
  2	
  ..............................................................................................................................	
  97	
   Appendix	
  3	
  ..............................................................................................................................	
  99	
   Appendix	
  4	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  100	
   Appendix	
  5	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  101	
   Appendix	
  6	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  102	
   Appendix	
  7	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  106	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   vi	
   List	
  of	
  Tables	
  	
  	
  TABLE	
  1.	
  ESTIMATES	
  OF	
  HD	
  PREVALENCE,	
  INCIDENCE	
  AND	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK	
  THAT	
  TOOK	
  PLACE	
  AFTER	
  THE	
  ADVENT	
  OF	
  THE	
  DIRECT	
  MUTATION	
  TEST	
  (POST	
  1993)	
  ..................................................................................................	
  3	
  TABLE	
  2.	
  FIELDS	
  FROM	
  THE	
  HD	
  ACCESS	
  DATABASE	
  PERTAINING	
  TO	
  THE	
  CALCULATIONS	
  OF	
  PREVALENCE,	
  INCIDENCE	
  AND	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK	
  ...................................................................................................................................................	
  17	
  TABLE	
  3.	
  NUMBERS	
  AND	
  PROPORTION	
  OF	
  HD	
  PATIENTS	
  DIAGNOSED	
  WITH	
  AND	
  WITHOUT	
  A	
  GENETIC	
  TEST	
  .................	
  38	
  TABLE	
  4.	
  SUMMARY	
  OF	
  PATIENTS	
  ASCERTAINED	
  FROM	
  PHYSICIAN	
  QUESTIONNAIRES	
  .........................................................	
  39	
  TABLE	
  5.	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  PATIENTS	
  ASCERTAINED	
  FROM	
  EACH	
  SOURCE	
  UNDER	
  EACH	
  CERTAINTY	
  MEASURE	
  OR	
  OVERLAP	
  RISK	
  SCORE	
  IS	
  SHOWN	
  BELOW.	
  EACH	
  OF	
  THE	
  UPPER,	
  MID	
  AND	
  LOWER	
  PREVALENCE	
  RANGE	
  CALCULATIONS	
  IS	
  BROKEN	
  DOWN	
  ......................................................................................................................................	
  42	
  TABLE	
  6.	
  	
  BREAKDOWN	
  OF	
  THE	
  INCIDENCE	
  CALCULATION	
  SHOWING	
  THE	
  POPULATION	
  OF	
  BC,	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  CASES	
  INCLUDED	
  FROM	
  EACH	
  SOURCE,	
  THE	
  TOTAL	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  INCIDENT	
  CASES	
  AND	
  THE	
  DIAGNOSTIC	
  TEST	
  (DT)-­‐POSITIVE	
  RATE	
  FOR	
  EACH	
  YEAR	
  BETWEEN	
  2000-­‐2011	
  ...............................................................................................	
  48	
  TABLE	
  7.	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  PATIENTS	
  RECORDED	
  AT	
  DEATH	
  UNDER	
  ICD	
  CODE	
  333.0	
  AND	
  333.4	
  BETWEEN	
  2000	
  AND	
  2009	
  ......................................................................................................................................................................................	
  49	
  TABLE	
  8.	
  	
  BREAKDOWN	
  OF	
  THE	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK	
  BASED	
  ON	
  A	
  PRIORI	
  RISK	
  CATEGORIES	
  ............................................	
  50	
  TABLE	
  9.	
  	
  BREAK	
  DOWN	
  OF	
  THE	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK	
  BASED	
  ON	
  RISK	
  CATEGORIES	
  AFTER	
  ACCOUNTING	
  FOR	
  GENETIC	
  TEST	
  RESULTS	
  ........................................................................................................................................................................	
  53	
  TABLE	
  10.	
  THE	
  UPTAKE	
  OF	
  PREDICTIVE	
  TESTING	
  IN	
  BC	
  (2000-­‐2012)	
  USING	
  TWO	
  SEPARATE	
  METHODS	
  FOR	
  ESTIMATING	
  THE	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  50%	
  RISK	
  AND	
  TWO	
  SEPARATE	
  EQUATIONS	
  FOR	
  CALCULATING	
  UPTAKE	
  .......	
  55	
  TABLE	
  11.	
  COMPARISON	
  OF	
  ASCERTAINMENT	
  SOURCES	
  EMPLOYED	
  IN	
  STUDIES	
  PERFORMED	
  AFTER	
  THE	
  ADVENT	
  OF	
  THE	
  DIRECT	
  MUTATION	
  TEST	
  ......................................................................................................................................................	
  61	
  TABLE	
  12.	
  COMPARING	
  THE	
  UPTAKE	
  OF	
  PREDICTIVE	
  TESTING	
  IN	
  BC	
  OVER	
  TWO	
  STUDY	
  PERIODS.	
  THREE	
  SEPARATE	
  METHODS	
  OF	
  CALCULATING	
  THE	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK	
  ARE	
  APPLIED	
  WHILE	
  TWO	
  SEPARATE	
  METHODS	
  OF	
  CALCULATING	
  THE	
  UPTAKE	
  ARE	
  APPLIED.	
  ........................................................................................................................	
  76	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   vii	
   List	
  of	
  Figures	
  	
  FIGURE	
  1.	
  GLOBAL	
  PREVALENCE	
  AVERAGES	
  (#/100,000)	
  BY	
  REGION.	
  	
  THE	
  AMERICAS:	
  4.2,	
  EUROPE:	
  5.8,	
  AFRICA:	
  2.8,	
  ASIA:	
  0.62	
  AND	
  AUSTRALIA	
  &	
  NEW	
  ZEALAND:	
  6.8	
  ................................................................................................	
  4	
  FIGURE	
  2.	
  THE	
  AVERAGE	
  OF	
  ALL	
  REPORTS	
  ON	
  HD	
  PREVALENCE	
  FOR	
  EACH	
  REGION.	
  BAR	
  COLOURS	
  REPRESENT	
  THE	
  DIAGNOSTIC	
  TECHNIQUES	
  AVAILABLE	
  DURING	
  THE	
  STUDY	
  PERIOD	
  ................................................................................	
  5	
  FIGURE	
  3.	
  COMPARISON	
  OF	
  HD	
  PREVALENCE	
  AVERAGES	
  BETWEEN	
  POPULATIONS	
  OF	
  ASIAN,	
  AFRICAN	
  AND	
  EUROPEAN	
  DESCENT	
  ...................................................................................................................................................................................	
  5	
  FIGURE	
  4.	
  CHRONOLOGY	
  OF	
  ASCERTAINMENT	
  SOURCES	
  ...........................................................................................................	
  20	
  FIGURE	
  5.	
  STEPS	
  TAKEN	
  TO	
  MINIMIZE	
  OVERLAP	
  RISK	
  SCORES	
  (O.R.S.)	
  FOR	
  PATIENTS	
  ASCERTAINED	
  FROM	
  PHYSICIAN	
  QUESTIONNAIRES,	
  FAMILY	
  SURVEYS	
  AND	
  NURSING	
  HOMES	
  BY	
  ENSURING	
  THEY	
  DO	
  NOT	
  OVERLAP	
  WITH	
  PATIENTS	
  ASCERTAINED	
  FROM	
  CLINIC	
  PEDIGREES	
  ............................................................................................................................	
  26	
  FIGURE	
  6.	
  GRAPHICAL	
  REPRESENTATION	
  OF	
  THE	
  SPECIFIC	
  OVERLAP	
  RISK	
  SCORES	
  AND	
  CERTAINTY	
  MEASURES	
  THAT	
  MAKE	
  UP	
  THE	
  UPPER,	
  MID	
  AND	
  LOWER	
  PREVALENCE	
  RANGES	
  ......................................................................................	
  27	
  FIGURE	
  7.	
  EQUATION	
  FOR	
  THE	
  CALCULATION	
  OF	
  UPPER	
  (RED),	
  MID	
  (LIGHT	
  RED)	
  AND	
  LOWER	
  (LIGHT	
  PINK)	
  PREVALENCE	
  ESTIMATES	
  .....................................................................................................................................................	
  28	
  FIGURE	
  8.	
  EQUATION	
  FOR	
  THE	
  CALCULATION	
  OF	
  INCIDENCE	
  (PER	
  MILLION/YEAR).	
  THIS	
  EQUATION	
  WAS	
  APPLIED	
  SEPARATELY	
  FOR	
  EACH	
  YEAR	
  REVIEWED	
  (2000-­‐2011)	
  ..............................................................................................	
  31	
  FIGURE	
  9.	
  A	
  PRIORI	
  RISK	
  CATEGORIES	
  AND	
  RISK	
  CATEGORIES	
  AFTER	
  ACCOUNTING	
  FOR	
  GENETIC	
  TEST	
  RESULTS	
  ............	
  32	
  FIGURE	
  10.	
  EQUATION	
  FOR	
  THE	
  CALCULATION	
  OF	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK.	
  	
  THIS	
  EQUATION	
  WAS	
  APPLIED	
  TO	
  EACH	
  RISK	
  CATEGORY	
  SEPARATELY	
  .......................................................................................................................................................	
  33	
  FIGURE	
  11.	
  	
  THE	
  EQUATION	
  FOR	
  CALCULATING	
  UPTAKE	
  AS	
  PROPOSED	
  BY	
  TASSICKER	
  ET	
  AL.	
  (2009)	
  ............................	
  34	
  FIGURE	
  12.	
  A	
  DEPICTION	
  OF	
  THE	
  THEORY	
  PROPOSED	
  BY	
  TASSICKER	
  ET	
  AL.	
  IN	
  SUPPORT	
  OF	
  THE	
  PROPOSED	
  EQUATION	
  FOR	
  CALCULATING	
  UPTAKE	
  OF	
  PREDICTIVE	
  TESTING.	
  DOTTED	
  VERTICAL	
  LINES	
  ENCLOSE	
  THE	
  EXAMPLE	
  STUDY	
  PERIOD.	
  AN	
  INDIVIDUAL	
  AFFECTED	
  BY	
  HD	
  (HD1)	
  IS	
  REPLACED	
  IN	
  THE	
  PATIENT	
  POPULATION	
  BY	
  A	
  NEWLY	
  AFFECTED	
  INDIVIDUAL	
  (HD2),	
  THEREBY	
  MAINTAINING	
  THE	
  PREVALENCE	
  OVER	
  TIME.	
  THE	
  NEWLY	
  AFFECTED	
  INDIVIDUAL	
  NOW	
  REPRESENTS	
  ADDITIONAL	
  MEMBERS	
  OF	
  THE	
  50%	
  RISK	
  POPULATION.	
  THEORETICALLY,	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  THESE	
  ADDITIONAL	
  INDIVIDUALS	
  IS	
  EQUAL	
  TO	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  50%	
  RISK	
  INDIVIDUALS	
  REPRESENTED	
  BY	
  THE	
  PREVIOUSLY	
  DECEASED.	
  ...............................................................................................................	
  35	
  FIGURE	
  13.	
  VENN	
  DIAGRAMS	
  SHOWING	
  THE	
  PATIENT	
  NUMBER	
  BREAKDOWN	
  FOR	
  THE	
  A.	
  LOWER,	
  B.	
  MID	
  AND	
  C.	
  UPPER	
  PREVALENCE	
  RANGE	
  .............................................................................................................................................................	
  43	
  FIGURE	
  14.	
  HD	
  PATIENTS	
  IN	
  BC	
  SEPARATED	
  BY	
  ETHNICITY.	
  THE	
  PIE	
  CHART	
  SHOWS	
  RELATIVE	
  PROPORTIONS	
  OF	
  EACH	
  ETHNIC	
  GROUP	
  IN	
  BC’S	
  PATIENT	
  POPULATION.	
  BREAKDOWN	
  OF	
  THE	
  ‘OTHER’	
  CATEGORY	
  SHOWS	
  THE	
  PROPORTION	
  OF	
  BC’S	
  HD	
  POPULATION	
  FROM	
  EACH	
  LISTED	
  ETHNIC	
  GROUP.	
  ETHNIC-­‐SPECIFIC	
  PREVALENCE	
  ESTIMATES	
  ARE	
  SHOWN	
  IN	
  COLUMN	
  4	
  OF	
  THE	
  TABLE.	
  ...................................................................................................	
  44	
  FIGURE	
  15.	
  PREVALENCE	
  OF	
  HD	
  SEPARATED	
  BY	
  “RURAL”	
  AND	
  “URBAN”	
  BC	
  .....................................................................	
  45	
  FIGURE	
  16.	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  PATIENTS	
  LIVING	
  IN	
  EACH	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIAN	
  HEALTH	
  REGION	
  BASED	
  ON	
  LOWER	
  AND	
  UPPER	
  PREVALENCE	
  RANGE.	
  THE	
  COLOUR	
  KEY	
  SHOWS	
  THE	
  PREVALENCE	
  (/100,000)	
  FOR	
  EACH	
  RESPECTIVE	
  REGION.	
  ..................................................................................................................................................................................	
  46	
  FIGURE	
  17.	
  ESTIMATES	
  OF	
  INCIDENCE	
  (/MILLION/YEAR)	
  FROM	
  2000-­‐2011.	
  ERROR	
  BARS	
  REPRESENT	
  95%	
  CONFIDENCE	
  INTERVALS	
  .....................................................................................................................................................	
  47	
  FIGURE	
  18.	
  THE	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK	
  FOR	
  HD	
  SEPARATED	
  BY	
  “RURAL”	
  AND	
  “URBAN”	
  BC	
  .............................................	
  51	
  FIGURE	
  19.	
  THE	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  RISK	
  FOR	
  HD	
  IN	
  EACH	
  PROVINCIAL	
  HEALTH	
  REGION	
  ......................................................	
  52	
  FIGURE	
  20.	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  PREDICTIVE	
  TESTS	
  PROVIDED	
  IN	
  BC	
  BETWEEN	
  1987	
  AND	
  APRIL	
  2012.	
  THE	
  BOTTOM	
  SECTION	
  OF	
  EACH	
  BAR	
  SHOWS	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  LINKAGE	
  TESTS	
  AND	
  THE	
  TOP	
  PORTION	
  SHOWS	
  THE	
  NUMBER	
  OF	
  DIRECT	
  MUTATION	
  TESTS	
  ....................................................................................................................................................	
  54	
  FIGURE	
  21.	
  PREVALENCE	
  ESTIMATE	
  FOR	
  EACH	
  REGION	
  SHOWN	
  OVER	
  TIME	
  INCLUDING	
  UPDATED	
  BC	
  AVERAGE	
  ...........	
  57	
  FIGURE	
  22.	
  CANADIAN	
  ESTIMATES	
  OF	
  HD	
  PREVALENCE	
  OVER	
  TIME.	
  ERROR	
  BARS	
  REPRESENT	
  95%	
  CONFIDENCE	
  INTERVALS.	
  ........................................................................................................................................................................................	
  57	
  FIGURE	
  23.	
  LIFE	
  EXPECTANCY	
  IN	
  CANADA	
  AND	
  WORLDWIDE	
  (1960-­‐2011).	
  .....................................................................	
  60	
  FIGURE	
  24A.	
  ESTIMATES	
  OF	
  HD	
  INCIDENCE	
  IN	
  BC	
  SINCE	
  1987	
  USING	
  CLINICAL	
  AND	
  GENETIC	
  DIAGNOSTIC	
  CRITERIA.	
  ERROR	
  BARS	
  REPRESENT	
  95%	
  CONFIDENCE	
  INTERVALS	
  ..............................................................................................	
  68	
  FIGURE	
  24B.	
  	
  ESTIMATES	
  OF	
  HD	
  INCIDENCE	
  IN	
  BC	
  SINCE	
  1993	
  USING	
  GENETIC	
  DIAGNOSTIC	
  CRITERIA	
  ONLY.	
  ERROR	
  BARS	
  REPRESENT	
  95%	
  CONFIDENCE	
  INTERVALS	
  ...........................................................................................................	
  69	
   	
   viii	
   FIGURE	
  25.	
  GLOBAL	
  ESTIMATES	
  OF	
  INCIDENCE	
  OVER	
  TIME	
  AND	
  GEOGRAPHIC	
  REGION.	
  	
  FOR	
  COMPARATIVE	
  PURPOSES,	
  STUDIES	
  AFTER	
  1993	
  INCLUDE	
  ONLY	
  DIAGNOSES	
  CONFIRMED	
  BY	
  GENETIC	
  TEST	
  .....................................................	
  69	
  FIGURE	
  26.	
  THE	
  RATIO	
  OF	
  POPULATION	
  AT	
  50%	
  RISK	
  TO	
  THE	
  PREVALENCE	
  OF	
  HD	
  IN	
  4	
  DIFFERENT	
  POPULATIONS	
  ...	
  73	
  FIGURE	
  27.	
  STEPS	
  TO	
  BE	
  TAKEN	
  TO	
  CONVERT	
  THE	
  HD	
  RESEARCH	
  DATABASE	
  INTO	
  A	
  REGISTER	
  FOR	
  HD	
  IN	
  BC	
  ............	
  82	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   ix	
   Acknowledgements	
  	
  	
   First,	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  acknowledge	
  my	
  thesis	
  supervisor,	
  Dr.	
  Michael	
  Hayden,	
  for	
  providing	
  me	
  with	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  reach	
  my	
  potential.	
  	
  Only	
  accepting	
  excellence	
  and	
  nothing	
  less	
  is	
  Dr.	
  Hayden’s	
  way	
  and	
  I	
  know	
  that	
  his	
  influence	
  will	
  change	
  the	
  way	
  that	
  I	
  analyze	
  and	
  attempt	
  to	
  solve	
  problems	
  for	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  also	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  my	
  supervisory	
  committee,	
  Susan	
  Creighton	
  and	
  Jan	
  Friedman	
  for	
  taking	
  the	
  time	
  out	
  of	
  their	
  extraordinarily	
  busy	
  schedules	
  to	
  show	
  me	
  the	
  ropes	
  and	
  critique	
  my	
  research.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  mention	
  Alice	
  Hawkins,	
  who	
  has	
  gone	
  above	
  and	
  beyond	
  in	
  ensuring	
  my	
  experience	
  in	
  graduate	
  school	
  has	
  been	
  successful.	
  	
  She	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  mentor	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  Thank	
  you	
  as	
  well	
  to	
  Jennifer	
  Collins,	
  who	
  provided	
  major	
  assistance	
  in	
  setting	
  up	
  the	
  HD	
  database	
  for	
  this	
  project	
  and	
  to	
  Alicia	
  Semaka,	
  for	
  allowing	
  me	
  to	
  work	
  with	
  her	
  as	
  a	
  summer	
  student	
  and	
  for	
  supporting	
  my	
  decision	
  to	
  join	
  the	
  lab	
  as	
  a	
  graduate	
  student.	
  	
  Thank	
  you	
  to	
  the	
  whole	
  HD	
  research	
  lab	
  for	
  providing	
  their	
  expertise	
  and	
  insight	
  whenever	
  asked	
  and	
  for	
  being	
  unconditionally	
  helpful.	
  	
  Finally,	
  thank	
  you	
  to	
  my	
  family,	
  mom,	
  and	
  dad,	
  Ben,	
  Gillian,	
  Sara,	
  Andrew	
  and	
  David.	
  	
  You	
  all	
  inspire	
  me	
  and	
  have	
  been	
  role	
  models	
  for	
  me	
  since	
  day	
  one.	
  	
  I	
  do	
  not	
  know	
  where	
  I	
  would	
  be	
  without	
  you.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   Introduction	
   Background	
   Huntington	
  Disease	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  (HD)	
  is	
  a	
  neurodegenerative	
  disorder	
  characterized	
  by	
  autosomal	
  dominant	
  inheritance.	
  	
  Symptoms	
  include	
  psychiatric	
  disturbances,	
  cognitive	
  decline	
  and	
  neurological	
  abnormalities	
  such	
  as	
  chorea,	
  dystonia	
  and	
  rigidity	
  (Tabrizi	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
  Onset	
  can	
  occur	
  at	
  any	
  time	
  of	
  life	
  but	
  most	
  commonly	
  arises	
  in	
  the	
  mid	
  40’s	
  (Kirkwood,	
  et	
  al.	
  2001).	
  	
  George	
  Huntington	
  described	
  HD	
  in	
  the	
  1872	
  and	
  observed	
  the	
  autosomal	
  dominant	
  inheritance	
  pattern	
  (Huntington	
  G,	
  1972).	
  	
  In	
  1987,	
  the	
  linkage	
  test	
  for	
  HD	
  became	
  available.	
  	
  In	
  this	
  test,	
  restriction	
  fragment	
  length	
  polymorphisms	
  (RFLPs)	
  were	
  analyzed	
  in	
  multiple	
  family	
  members	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  obtain	
  results	
  for	
  one	
  individual.	
  	
  Certain	
  RFLPs	
  segregated	
  only	
  with	
  affected	
  family	
  members.	
  	
  Inferences	
  could	
  thus	
  be	
  made	
  on	
  whether	
  the	
  individual	
  in	
  question	
  carried	
  the	
  mutation	
  responsible	
  for	
  HD	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  gene	
  discovery	
  (Gusella	
  1987).	
  	
  Linkage	
  analysis	
  was	
  mainly	
  used	
  for	
  pre-­‐symptomatic	
  (predictive)	
  testing,	
  but	
  in	
  some	
  cases,	
  aided	
  in	
  confirmation	
  of	
  diagnoses	
  (S.	
  Creighton,	
  personal	
  communication,	
  2012).	
  	
  British	
  Columbia	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  to	
  offer	
  predictive	
  testing	
  for	
  HD	
  using	
  the	
  linkage	
  technique	
  (Fox	
  et	
  al.	
  1989).	
  	
  In	
  1993,	
  the	
  specific	
  mutation	
  responsible	
  for	
  HD	
  was	
  identified	
  and	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  became	
  available.	
  This	
  test	
  was	
  used	
  for	
  both	
  predictive	
  and	
  diagnostic	
  purposes.	
  	
  	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  results	
  are	
  more	
  accurate	
  than	
  linkage	
  test	
  results	
  and	
  contrary	
  to	
  linkage	
  –	
  requiring	
  the	
  analysis	
  of	
  multiple	
  family	
  members	
  –	
  individuals	
  undergoing	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  do	
  so	
  independently.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  found	
  that	
  an	
  individual	
  with	
  36	
  or	
  more	
  CAG	
  repeats	
  in	
  the	
  HTT	
  gene	
  (4p16.3)	
  will	
  likely	
  become	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  in	
  her	
  lifetime	
  (MacMillan	
  et	
  al.	
  1993).	
  	
  Clinical	
  data	
  have	
  led	
  to	
  the	
  classification	
  of	
  CAG	
  sizes	
  into	
  four	
  specific	
  ranges:	
  fewer	
  than	
  27	
  repeats	
  result	
  in	
  a	
  normal	
  phenotype;	
  intermediate	
  alleles	
  (IAs)	
  comprise	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  27–2	
  repeats	
  –	
  IAs	
  are	
  below	
  the	
  affected	
  CAG	
  repeat	
  range,	
  but	
  are	
  thought	
  to	
  carry	
  a	
  risk	
  of	
  expansion	
  into	
  the	
  disease	
  range	
  within	
  one	
  generation;	
  36–39	
  repeats	
  are	
   	
   2	
   considered	
  abnormal	
  but	
  are	
  associated	
  with	
  reduced	
  penetrance	
  (RP)	
  -­‐	
  age	
  of	
  onset	
  for	
  RP	
  allele-­‐bearing	
  individuals	
  may	
  be	
  either	
  very	
  late	
  or	
  may	
  not	
  occur	
  at	
  all	
  (Quarrell	
  et	
  al.	
  2007);	
  forty	
  CAG	
  repeats	
  or	
  greater	
  -­‐	
  lifespan	
  permitting	
  –	
  invariably	
  give	
  rise	
  to	
  HD.	
  	
  Evidence	
  suggests	
  that	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  symptom	
  onset	
  for	
  HD	
  is	
  inversely	
  correlated	
  to	
  the	
  individual’s	
  specific	
  CAG	
  repeat	
  length;	
  an	
  individual	
  with	
  a	
  CAG	
  repeat	
  length	
  in	
  the	
  lower	
  range	
  is	
  likely	
  to	
  develop	
  HD	
  symptoms	
  later	
  in	
  life	
  and	
  vice	
  versa	
  (Langbehn,	
  et	
  al.	
  2004).	
  	
   Epidemiology	
  of	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
   Prevalence	
  is	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  a	
  population	
  affected	
  with	
  disease	
  during	
  a	
  defined	
  period	
  of	
  time	
  (Rothman	
  2002).	
  	
  Prevalence	
  has	
  been	
  the	
  central	
  focus	
  of	
  epidemiological	
  assessments	
  on	
  HD	
  to	
  date	
  (Table	
  1,	
  Appendix	
  1a,b).	
  	
  Incidence	
  is	
  the	
  rate	
  of	
  new	
  diagnoses	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  studied	
  less	
  than	
  prevalence.	
  	
  The	
   population	
  at	
  risk	
  is	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  a	
  population	
  that	
  is	
  living	
  during	
  a	
  defined	
  period	
  of	
  time	
  who	
  are	
  likely	
  to	
  become	
  affected	
  with	
  disease	
  in	
  the	
  future	
  (Rothman	
  2002).	
  	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  has	
  been	
  given	
  little	
  attention	
  (Table	
  1).	
  	
  The	
  majority	
  of	
  studies	
  on	
  prevalence	
  took	
  place	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  linkage	
  or	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  for	
  HD	
  (Appendix	
  1a),	
  and	
  all	
  prevalence	
  studies	
  in	
  Canada	
  were	
  performed	
  before	
  either	
  type	
  of	
  testing	
  was	
  available	
  (Barbeau	
  et	
  al.	
  1964,	
  Shokeir,	
  1975).	
  	
  Global	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  range	
  from	
  0.01/100,000	
  (1/10	
  million)	
  in	
  South	
  Africa	
  (Hayden	
  et	
  al.	
  1980),	
  to	
  46.2/100,000	
  (1/2,000)	
  on	
  the	
  Island	
  of	
  Mauritius	
  (Hayden	
  et	
  al.	
  1981).	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  an	
  extraordinarily	
  high	
  prevalence	
  of	
  699.2/100,000	
  (1/143)	
  was	
  reported	
  for	
  the	
  Lake	
  Maracaibo	
  region	
  of	
  Venezuela.	
  	
  This	
  abnormally	
  high	
  prevalence	
  in	
  Venezuela	
  along	
  with	
  those	
  from	
  Mauritius	
  and	
  from	
  the	
  Genoa	
  region	
  of	
  Italy	
  (Appendix	
  1)	
  have	
  all	
  been	
  attributed	
  to	
  extreme	
  founder	
  effects	
  or	
  insufficient	
  sample	
  population	
  sizes	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.	
  1986,	
  Roccatagliata	
  et	
  al.	
  1983).	
  	
  The	
  average	
  global	
  prevalence	
  including	
  Lake	
  Maracaibo	
  is	
  11.2/100,000	
  (1/8,929),	
  while	
  that	
  excluding	
  this	
  region	
  is	
  5.1/100,000	
  (1/19,608)	
  (Appendix	
  1).	
  	
  The	
  global	
  prevalence	
  while	
  excluding	
  all	
  three	
  of	
  these	
  disproportionately	
  large	
  estimates	
  is	
  4.5/100,000	
  (1/22,000).	
  	
  When	
   	
   3	
   considering	
  only	
  studies	
  performed	
  after	
  the	
  availability	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test,	
  the	
  global	
  average	
  is	
  again	
  5.1/100,000	
  (1/19,608)	
  (Table	
  1).	
   Table	
  1.	
  Estimates	
  of	
  HD	
  prevalence,	
  incidence	
  and	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  that	
  took	
  place	
   after	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  (post	
  1993)	
   Region	
   Study	
  year	
   Prevalence	
  (#/100,000)	
  (1/X)	
   Incidence	
  (#/million/year)	
   Pop.	
  At	
  50%	
  risk	
  (#/100,000)	
   References	
  Switzerland	
  &	
  Austria	
   1993-­‐1997	
   10.0**	
   	
   -­‐	
   (Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999)	
  Germany	
   1993-­‐1997	
   10.0**	
   -­‐	
   30.0*	
   (Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999)	
  British	
  Columbia	
   1993-­‐2000	
   -­‐	
   6.9	
   42.0*	
   (Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  2001,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003)	
  Australia	
   1999	
   8.0	
   -­‐	
   33.9	
   (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009)	
  Malta	
   1994	
   11.8	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (Gassivaro	
  Gallo	
  et	
  al	
  1999)	
  Spain	
   1994-­‐2002	
   -­‐	
   4.7	
   -­‐	
   (Ramos-­‐Arroyo	
  et	
  al.	
  2004)	
   Greece	
   1995-­‐2008	
   2.5-­‐5.4	
   3.3	
   -­‐	
   (Panas	
  et	
  al.	
  2011)	
  Australia	
  -­‐	
  New	
  South	
  Wales	
   1996	
   6.3	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (McCusker	
  et	
  al.	
  2000)	
  Japan	
   1997	
   0.7	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (Adachi	
  &	
  Nakashima	
  1999)	
  Northern	
  Ireland	
   2001	
   10.6	
   -­‐	
   44.9	
   (Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2010)	
  The	
  Netherlands	
   2002	
   6.5	
   -­‐	
   32.5	
   (Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000)	
  Croatia	
   2002	
   1.0	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (Hecimovic	
  et	
  al.	
  2002)	
  Slovenia	
   2006	
   5.2	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (Peterlin	
  et	
  al	
  2008)	
  Venezuela	
   2007	
   0.5	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (Paradisi	
  et	
  al	
  2008)	
  Taiwan	
   2007	
   0.4	
   1.0	
   -­‐	
   Chen	
  and	
  Lai	
  2010	
  Mexico	
   2008	
   4.0	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (Alonso	
  et	
  al	
  2009)	
  UK	
   2008	
   5.9-­‐6.5	
   6.1	
   37.5*	
   (Sackley	
  et	
  al	
  2011)	
  England	
  &	
  Wales	
   2010	
   12.4	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   (Rawlins	
  2010)	
   Global	
  average	
   	
   5.1	
   5.7	
   34.0	
   	
  *	
  Indirect	
  assessments	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  calculated	
  from	
  estimates	
  of	
  prevalence	
  **	
  Published	
  estimates	
  not	
  based	
  on	
  exact,	
  but	
  approximate	
  patient	
  and	
  general	
  population	
  numbers	
  	
  The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  appears	
  to	
  vary	
  widely	
  across	
  ethnic	
  populations	
  and	
  geographic	
  regions	
  (Figure	
  1,	
  Figure	
  2,	
  &	
  Figure	
  3	
  and	
  appendix	
  1a).	
  	
  A	
  long-­‐standing	
  question	
  is	
  whether	
  these	
  observed	
  fluctuations	
  are	
  due	
  primarily	
  to	
  variation	
  in	
  ascertainment	
  precision	
  or	
  due	
  to	
  true	
  differences	
  in	
  prevalence	
   	
   4	
   (Myrianthopoulos	
  1966).	
  	
  Evidence	
  suggests	
  that	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  in	
  populations	
  of	
  Asian	
  and	
  African	
  descent	
  is	
  significantly	
  lower	
  than	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  in	
  populations	
  of	
  European	
  descent	
  (Figure	
  3)	
  and	
  thus	
  HD	
  is	
  thought	
  to	
  have	
  arisen	
  in	
  Northern	
  Europe	
  (Warby	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
  The	
  mean	
  prevalence	
  for	
  all	
  studies	
  performed	
  in	
  populations	
  of	
  European	
  descent	
  is	
  5.8/100,000	
  (1/17,241)	
  and	
  for	
  populations	
  of	
  Asian	
  descent	
  it	
  is	
  0.62/100,000	
  (1/161,290)	
  (Figure	
  3).	
  	
  The	
  mean	
  prevalence	
  of	
  all	
  studies	
  performed	
  in	
  populations	
  of	
  African	
  descent	
  is	
  2.8/100,000	
  (1/35,714);	
  this	
  is	
  lower	
  than	
  the	
  European	
  average	
  (Figure	
  3).	
  	
  However,	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  from	
  African	
  populations	
  range	
  widely,	
  from	
  0.01-­‐7.0/100,000	
  and	
  all	
  reports	
  from	
  this	
  region	
  are	
  outdated	
  (Appendix	
  1).	
  	
  Further	
  work	
  is	
  thus	
  required	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  gain	
  a	
  greater	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  true	
  prevalence	
  in	
  these	
  populations.	
  	
  Only	
  two	
  prevalence	
  studies	
  have	
  ever	
  taken	
  place	
  in	
  Canada.	
  	
  The	
  first,	
  conducted	
  in	
  Quebec	
  in	
  1964,	
  found	
  a	
  prevalence	
  of	
  3.4/100,000	
  (1/29,412)	
  (Barbeau	
  et	
  al.	
  1964)	
  and	
  the	
  second,	
  conducted	
  in	
  Saskatchewan	
  and	
  Manitoba	
  in	
  1975,	
  estimated	
  a	
  prevalence	
  of	
  8.4/100,000	
  (1/11,905)	
  (Shokeir	
  1975).	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   4.2$ 5.8$ 2.8$ 0.62$ 6.8$ Figure	
  1.	
  Global	
  prevalence	
  averages	
  (#/100,000)	
  by	
  region.	
  The	
  Americas:	
  4.2,	
   Europe:	
  5.8,	
  Africa:	
  2.8,	
  Asia:	
  0.62	
  and	
  Australia	
  &	
  New	
  Zealand:	
  6.8	
  	
   Appendix	
  1	
  provides	
  a	
  full	
  list	
  of	
  individual	
  studies	
  and	
  their	
  corresponding	
  references	
   	
   1993-­‐2012:	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  available 	
   <1993:	
  Prior	
  to	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test 	
   5	
   Prevale nce	
  (/1 00,000 )	
   Prevale nce	
  (/1 00,000 )	
   Figure	
  3.	
  Comparison	
  of	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  averages	
  between	
  populations	
  of	
  Asian,	
  African	
  and	
   European	
  descent.	
   Figure	
  2.	
  The	
  average	
  of	
  all	
  reports	
  on	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  for	
  each	
  region.	
  Bar	
  colours	
   represent	
  the	
  diagnostic	
  techniques	
  available	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
   5.8	
  4.8	
  2.7	
  0.0	
  1.6	
   8.4	
   1.3	
  7.0	
  4.5	
  0.2	
   10.0	
  5.6	
  5.0	
  0.5	
  4.9	
  0.8	
   21.0	
   1.7	
  4.3	
  0.4	
  5.0	
  6.4	
  5.4	
   11.8	
  5.7	
   10.0	
  0.7	
   10.0	
  8.0	
  1.0	
  5.2	
  0.4	
  4.0	
  4.0	
  0.5	
   9.3	
   0	
  5	
   10	
  15	
   20	
  25	
   Norwa y	
   Poland 	
  (Prusz kow)	
   Iceland 	
   Guam	
  ( Chamo rros)	
   Belgium 	
  	
   Canada 	
  (Manit oba	
  &	
   South	
  A frica	
   Tanzan ia	
  (Mou nt	
   Yugosl avia	
  (R ijeka	
   Nigeria 	
  (Ibada n)	
   UK	
  (Sc otland, 	
   Swede n	
   France 	
  (North -­‐West) 	
   Finland 	
   UK	
  (En gland,	
   Zimbab we	
   Egypt	
   India	
  ( Pakista n,	
   USA	
   China	
  ( Hong	
  K ong)	
   Italy	
  (A osta)	
   UK	
  (Ire land,	
   Spain	
  ( Valenc ia)	
   Malta	
   New	
  Ze aland	
   Austria 	
   Germa ny	
   Japan	
  ( San-­‐in) 	
   Switze rland	
   Austra lia	
   Croatia 	
   Sloven ia	
   Taiwan 	
   Greece 	
   Mexico 	
   Venezu ela	
   UK	
   0.4	
   0.1	
   0.4	
   1.7	
   0.7	
   0.4	
   1.50	
   0.01	
   6.4	
   7.0	
   1.0	
   0.8	
   6.8	
   5.3	
   4.2	
   0	
  1	
   2	
  3	
   4	
  5	
   6	
  7	
   8	
   Asian	
  descent	
   0.62	
   African	
  descent	
  	
  2.8	
  	
   European	
  descent	
  5.8	
  Ethnic	
  origin:	
  Mean	
  prevalence:	
  (/100,000)	
  	
   1993-­‐2012:	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  available 	
   <1993:	
  Prior	
  to	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test 	
   1993-­‐2012:	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  available 	
   <1993:	
  Prior	
  to	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test 1930	
   2010	
   	
   6	
   The	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD	
  ranges	
  globally	
  from	
  1.0	
  per	
  million/year	
  in	
  Taiwan	
  (Chen	
  and	
  Lai,	
  2010)	
  to	
  6.9	
  per	
  million/year	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  2001).	
  	
  To	
  our	
  knowledge,	
  only	
  seven	
  assessments	
  of	
  incidence	
  have	
  taken	
  place	
  worldwide,	
  two	
  of	
  which	
  were	
  performed	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  (Appendix	
  1b).	
  	
  The	
  availability	
  of	
  the	
  genetic	
  test,	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  improving	
  diagnostic	
  accuracy,	
  has	
  simplified	
  the	
  ascertainment	
  of	
  new	
  HD	
  cases.	
  	
  The	
  average	
  global	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD,	
  when	
  accounting	
  only	
  for	
  those	
  studies	
  that	
  took	
  place	
  after	
  1993,	
  is	
  5.7	
  per	
  million/year	
  (Table	
  1).	
  	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  has	
  received	
  little	
  attention	
  (Table	
  1).	
  	
  With	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  three	
  studies,	
  estimates	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  have	
  been	
  calculated	
  only	
  from	
  estimates	
  of	
  prevalence.	
  	
  These	
  exceptional	
  studies	
  include	
  one	
  from	
  the	
  Netherlands,	
  one	
  from	
  Victoria,	
  Australia,	
  and	
  one	
  from	
  Northern	
  Ireland,	
  all	
  of	
  which	
  utilized	
  electronic	
  registries	
  to	
  calculate	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  directly	
  (Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009,	
  Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2011)1,	
  2,	
  3.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  remaining	
  studies,	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  has	
  been	
  calculated	
  by	
  multiplying	
  the	
  prevalence	
  by	
  three	
  or	
  by	
  five	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  specific	
  study	
  in	
  question	
  (Taylor	
  1994,	
  Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999,	
  Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Harper	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Goizet	
  et	
  al.	
  2002,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  Multiplying	
  the	
  prevalence	
  by	
  five	
  was	
  provoked	
  by	
  Conneally’s	
  theory	
  (Conneally,	
  1984).	
  	
  This	
  theory	
  suggested	
  that	
  each	
  individual	
  has	
  on	
  average	
  five	
  first-­‐degree	
  relatives;	
  thus	
  for	
  every	
  individual	
  affected	
  with	
  HD,	
  there	
  are	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  five	
  individuals	
  at	
  50%	
  risk.	
  	
  Only	
  one	
  study	
  has	
  estimated	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  by	
  calculating	
  the	
  affected	
  population	
  by	
  three	
  and	
  did	
  not	
  provide	
  an	
  explanation	
  as	
  to	
  why	
  this	
  number	
  was	
  chosen	
  (Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999).	
  	
  A	
  full	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  25%	
  risk	
  has	
  yet	
  to	
  be	
  studied	
  in	
  a	
  population.	
  There	
  have	
  been	
  several	
  accounts	
  worldwide	
  of	
  the	
  estimated	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  Caucasian	
  populations	
  (Taylor	
  1994,	
  Lacconne	
  et	
  al.	
  1999,	
  Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Harper	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Goizet	
  et	
  al.	
  2002,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1	
  The	
  Leiden	
  roster	
  is	
  a	
  database	
  containing	
  information	
  on	
  every	
  individual	
  who	
  attended	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  eight	
  clinical	
  genetic	
  departments	
  in	
  the	
  Netherlands	
  for	
  HD	
  testing	
  and	
  counseling	
  (Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000).	
  2	
  The	
  Victoria	
  registry	
  is	
  a	
  database	
  of	
  individuals	
  affected	
  with	
  and	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD.	
  This	
  registry	
  began	
  in	
  1950	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  up	
  kept	
  ever	
  since	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  3	
  The	
  Northern	
  Ireland	
  HD	
  register	
  is	
  a	
  database	
  of	
  individuals	
  affected	
  with	
  and	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD.	
  This	
  register	
  began	
  in	
  1976	
  and	
  only	
  contains	
  data	
  up	
  to	
  2005	
  due	
  to	
  software	
  incompatibility	
  issues	
  involving	
  the	
  hospital	
  database	
  system	
  (Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2010).	
   	
   7	
   2003,	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009,	
  Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2010,	
  Bernhardt	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
  Uptake	
  is	
  defined	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  who	
  have	
  undergone	
  predictive	
  testing	
  as	
  a	
  proportion	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  estimated	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  in	
  the	
  population	
  and	
  is	
  expressed	
  as	
  a	
  percentage	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
  Reports	
  of	
  uptake	
  range	
  from	
  3%	
  in	
  Germany,	
  Switzerland	
  and	
  Austria	
  (Lacconne	
  et	
  al.	
  1999),	
  to	
  25%	
  in	
  the	
  Netherlands	
  (Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000).	
  	
  An	
  uptake	
  of	
  21%	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  British	
  Columbia	
  for	
  the	
  years	
  1987-­‐2000	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  As	
  stated	
  above,	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk,	
  with	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  few	
  studies,	
  has	
  been	
  estimated	
  from	
  the	
  assumed	
  prevalence	
  lending	
  a	
  high	
  possibility	
  for	
  inaccuracy	
  in	
  calculating	
  the	
  uptake.	
  	
  In	
  2009,	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  proposed	
  that	
  all	
  previous	
  accounts	
  of	
  uptake	
  were	
  likely	
  overestimated.	
  	
  This	
  report	
  suggested	
  that	
  every	
  previous	
  calculation	
  failed	
  to	
  take	
  into	
  account	
  the	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  During	
  the	
  study	
  period,	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  may	
  change,	
  thereby	
  altering	
  uptake	
  results.	
  	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  suggested	
  a	
  formula	
  that	
  would	
  account	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  period	
  and	
  showed	
  that	
  by	
  using	
  this	
  formula,	
  when	
  compared	
  to	
  conventional	
  methods,	
  the	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  Victoria	
  Australia	
  had	
  decreased	
  by	
  nearly	
  half.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   8	
   Rationale	
  	
   1.	
  Updated	
  and	
  accurate	
  epidemiological	
  assessments	
  for	
  HD	
  are	
  required:	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  acquire	
  accurate	
  epidemiological	
  assessments	
  for	
  HD.	
  Firstly,	
  these	
  assessments	
  allow	
  for	
  the	
  appropriate	
  planning	
  of	
  services	
  and	
  allocation	
  of	
  resources	
  for	
  those	
  populations	
  in	
  need.	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  accurate	
  assessments	
  allow	
  for	
  meaningful	
  comparisons	
  of	
  HD	
  epidemiology	
  to	
  be	
  performed	
  across	
  populations	
  and	
  over	
  time.	
  	
  With	
  a	
  clearer	
  understanding	
  of	
  true	
  differences	
  in	
  HD	
  epidemiology	
  amid	
  discrete	
  populations,	
  efforts	
  towards	
  studying	
  genetic	
  factors	
  that	
  underlie	
  these	
  differences	
  can	
  be	
  more	
  efficiently	
  designed	
  (Warby	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
   Prevalence:	
  The	
  majority	
  of	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  assessments	
  were	
  performed	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  direct	
  mutation	
  testing	
  for	
  HD	
  (Appendix	
  1a).	
  	
  These	
  assessments	
  are	
  outdated	
  and	
  cannot	
  be	
  meaningfully	
  compared	
  to	
  modern	
  studies	
  as	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  diagnostic	
  methods	
  has	
  since	
  improved.	
  	
  However,	
  when	
  comparing	
  studies	
  performed	
  post-­‐1993,	
  after	
  the	
  direct	
  test	
  became	
  available,	
  it	
  is	
  apparent	
  that	
  even	
  these	
  estimates	
  vary	
  widely	
  (Table	
  1,	
  Figure	
  2).	
  	
  It	
  is	
  uncertain	
  as	
  to	
  whether	
  the	
  bulk	
  of	
  this	
  variation	
  is	
  due	
  primarily	
  to	
  differences	
  in	
  ascertainment	
  precision	
  or	
  to	
  true	
  differences	
  in	
  prevalence	
  across	
  populations.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  minimize	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  under-­‐ascertainment,	
  as	
  many	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  as	
  possible	
  should	
  be	
  used.	
  	
  An	
  extensive	
  search	
  for	
  secondary	
  cases	
  (i.e.	
  affected	
  patients	
  found	
  via	
  family	
  survey	
  as	
  opposed	
  to	
  chart	
  review)	
  is	
  also	
  essential	
  (Harper,	
  1992,	
  Levy	
  and	
  Fenigold,	
  2000).	
  	
  The	
  majority	
  of	
  the	
  post-­‐1993	
  assessments	
  of	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  used	
  less	
  than	
  three	
  ascertainment	
  sources,	
  with	
  three	
  being	
  the	
  maximum	
  number	
  of	
  sources	
  used	
  (Peterlin	
  2009).	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  the	
  most	
  recent	
  study	
  took	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  Kingdom	
  (UK)	
  in	
  2010,	
  and,	
  although	
  estimating	
  a	
  prevalence	
  of	
  12.4/100,000	
  (1/8,065),	
  nearly	
  double	
  what	
  a	
  previous	
  UK	
  assessment	
  found	
  (Sackley	
  et	
  al.	
  2011),	
  this	
  study	
  used	
  only	
  one	
  ascertainment	
  source	
  and	
  requires	
  revision	
  to	
  achieve	
  more	
  accurate	
  results	
  (Rawlins	
  2010).	
  	
  A	
  thorough	
  multi-­‐source	
  ascertainment	
  study	
  is	
  required	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  obtain	
  an	
  updated	
  and	
  accurate	
  estimate	
  of	
  prevalence	
  that	
  is	
  capable	
  of	
  setting	
  a	
  precedent	
   	
   9	
   for	
  future	
  studies	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  compared	
  with	
  confidence	
  to	
  findings	
  from	
  other	
  regions.	
  	
   Incidence:	
  The	
  most	
  recent	
  incidence	
  calculation	
  for	
  HD	
  was	
  conducted	
  in	
  the	
  UK	
  in	
  2008	
  (Sackley,	
  et	
  al.	
  2011).	
  	
  Only	
  seven	
  estimates	
  of	
  incidence	
  have	
  been	
  performed	
  to	
  date,	
  two	
  of	
  which	
  took	
  place	
  before	
  genetic	
  testing	
  became	
  available	
  (Appendix	
  1b).	
  	
  One	
  of	
  these	
  incidence	
  studies	
  is	
  from	
  BC	
  and	
  included	
  diagnoses	
  from	
  1993-­‐1999;	
  all	
  diagnoses	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  were	
  confirmed	
  with	
  diagnostic	
  testing	
  (Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  2001).	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  maintain	
  accuracy	
  in	
  incidence	
  estimates	
  and	
  to	
  observe	
  variation	
  in	
  incidence	
  over	
  time,	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  that	
  these	
  numbers	
  are	
  updated.	
  	
  With	
  12	
  additional	
  years	
  of	
  available	
  clinical	
  and	
  genetic	
  data	
  for	
  HD,	
  incidence	
  can	
  be	
  updated	
  in	
  BC	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
   Population	
  at	
  risk:	
  Worldwide	
  reports	
  on	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  are	
  largely	
  based	
  on	
  theories	
  and	
  estimates	
  that	
  do	
  not	
  pertain	
  to	
  any	
  specific	
  population	
  and	
  have	
  been	
  calculated	
  from	
  estimates	
  of	
  prevalence	
  (Table	
  1).	
  	
  Patients	
  with	
  familial	
  diseases	
  such	
  as	
  HD	
  are	
  often	
  asked	
  to	
  provide	
  information	
  regarding	
  their	
  family	
  structure	
  as	
  a	
  component	
  of	
  their	
  clinical	
  records.	
  	
  These	
  pedigrees,	
  which	
  are	
  necessary	
  for	
  estimating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk,	
  are	
  readily	
  available	
  from	
  Vancouver’s	
  HD	
  clinic.	
  	
  Knowledge	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  and	
  geographic	
  distribution	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  is	
  essential	
  in	
  care	
  and	
  service	
  planning	
  for	
  the	
  HD	
  community.	
  	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  should	
  be	
  studied	
  empirically	
  from	
  family	
  pedigrees	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  comparison	
  to	
  those	
  estimates	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  predicted	
  prevalence	
  and	
  the	
  average	
  number	
  of	
  first-­‐degree	
  relatives	
  in	
  a	
  population.	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  first-­‐degree	
  relatives	
  varies	
  significantly	
  between	
  populations	
  (CIA	
  World	
  Factbook	
  2012),	
  and	
  recent	
  evidence	
  suggests	
  that	
  multiplying	
  the	
  prevalence	
  by	
  a	
  factor	
  of	
  4.2	
  –	
  as	
  opposed	
  to	
  the	
  previous	
  notion	
  of	
  5	
  –	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  accurate.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  update	
  the	
  calculation	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  uptake.	
  	
  Firstly,	
  the	
  equation	
  for	
  calculating	
  uptake	
  has	
  changed	
  since	
  BC’s	
  latest	
  estimate	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003),	
  and	
  second,	
  empirical	
  evidence	
  regarding	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  will	
  become	
  available	
  from	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  the	
  calculation	
  of	
  uptake	
  can	
  be	
  compared	
  in	
  two	
  ways	
  in	
  BC:	
  from	
  empirical	
  data,	
  and	
  from	
  theoretical	
  data.	
  	
   	
   10	
   2.	
  British	
  Columbia	
  is	
  an	
  appropriate	
  model	
  for	
  this	
  study:	
  	
   There	
  is	
  ample	
  opportunity	
  for	
  complete	
  ascertainment	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  One	
  lab	
  is	
  responsible	
  for	
  performing	
  all	
  HD	
  genetic	
  tests	
  for	
  the	
  entire	
  province	
  and	
  one	
  clinic	
  serves	
  as	
  an	
  HD	
  care	
  hub	
  for	
  BC.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  thus	
  likely	
  that	
  every	
  clinical	
  and	
  genetic	
  diagnosis	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  can	
  be	
  ascertained.	
  	
  Further,	
  in	
  2000,	
  it	
  was	
  shown	
  that	
  BC	
  had	
  provided	
  a	
  larger	
  number	
  of	
  total	
  genetic	
  tests	
  (predictive	
  and	
  diagnostic)	
  for	
  HD,	
  proportional	
  to	
  its	
  population	
  size,	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  province	
  in	
  Canada,	
  however,	
  Quebec	
  and	
  Alberta	
  were	
  not	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  analysis	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  Having	
  been	
  the	
  first	
  province	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  predictive	
  test,	
  BC’s	
  population	
  may	
  have	
  a	
  greater	
  awareness	
  of	
  the	
  test	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  other	
  provinces.	
  	
  This	
  further	
  emphasizes	
  the	
  high	
  potential	
  for	
  full	
  ascertainment	
  in	
  BC.	
  Further,	
  as	
  BC	
  is	
  a	
  global	
  hub	
  for	
  HD	
  research	
  and	
  care	
  and	
  as	
  there	
  are	
  many	
  opportunities	
  for	
  patients	
  and	
  families	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  clinical	
  trials	
  and	
  other	
  types	
  of	
  HD	
  research,	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  community	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  seek	
  medical	
  attention	
  in	
  this	
  province	
  than	
  in	
  regions	
  offering	
  no	
  such	
  services	
  or	
  opportunities;	
  BC	
  has	
  a	
  specialized	
  HD	
  medical	
  clinic	
  equipped	
  with	
  genetic	
  counsellors,	
  social	
  workers,	
  neurologists,	
  psychiatrists,	
  geneticists	
  and	
  an	
  extensive	
  research	
  team,	
  all	
  with	
  experience	
  in	
  HD-­‐specific	
  challenges.	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  suggested	
  that	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  epidemiological	
  calculations	
  may	
  be	
  improved	
  with	
  a	
  population	
  consisting	
  of	
  500,000	
  to	
  5,000,000	
  people.	
  	
  Populations	
  smaller	
  than	
  this	
  are	
  thought	
  to	
  be	
  vulnerable	
  to	
  skewing	
  due	
  to	
  large	
  families	
  and	
  populations	
  larger	
  than	
  this,	
  vulnerable	
  to	
  incomplete	
  ascertainment	
  (Harper,	
  1992,	
  Levy	
  and	
  Feingold,	
  2000).	
  	
  BC’s	
  population	
  is	
  within	
  these	
  suggested	
  limits	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Statistics,	
  2012).	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   11	
   Specific	
  objectives	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  appropriately	
  characterize	
  the	
  epidemiology	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC,	
  this	
  study	
  posed	
  three	
  main	
  objectives:	
  	
   1. Calculate	
  minimum	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  The	
  first	
  objective	
  was	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  number	
  and	
  approximate	
  geographical	
  location	
  of	
  symptomatic	
  HD	
  patients	
  living	
  in	
  BC	
  on	
  April	
  1,	
  2012.	
  	
  	
   2. Calculate	
  minimum	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  The	
  second	
  objective	
  was	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  new	
  HD	
  cases	
  diagnosed	
  each	
  year	
  between	
  January	
  1,	
  2001,	
  and	
  December	
  31,	
  2011,	
  and	
  the	
  positive	
  diagnostic	
  test-­‐rate	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  between	
  2000	
  and	
  2012.	
  	
   3. Calculate	
  the	
  minimum	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  The	
  third	
  objective	
  was	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  people	
  living	
  in	
  BC	
  on	
  April	
  1,	
  2012	
  who	
  were	
  likely	
  to	
  develop	
  HD	
  in	
  the	
  future.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  two	
  levels	
  of	
  risk	
  category,	
  a	
  priori	
  risk	
  (i.e.	
  25%	
  or	
  50%)	
  and	
  risk	
  categories	
  after	
  accounting	
  for	
  genetic	
  test	
  results.	
  	
  This	
  objective	
  also	
  included	
  an	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  and	
  uptake	
  of	
  the	
  predictive	
  testing	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  between	
  April	
  1,	
  2000,	
  and	
  April	
  1,	
  2012.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   12	
   Methodology	
   Epidemiology:	
  definitions	
  Epidemiology	
  is	
  defined	
  as	
  the	
  branch	
  of	
  medicine	
  that	
  deals	
  with	
  the	
  incidence,	
  distribution,	
  and	
  possible	
  control	
  of	
  diseases	
  and	
  other	
  factors	
  relating	
  to	
  health	
  in	
  a	
  population	
  (J.	
  Simpson	
  1989).	
  	
  Prevalence,	
  incidence	
  and	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  are	
  epidemiological	
  assessments	
  commonly	
  studied	
  for	
  disease.	
  	
  Prevalence	
  is	
  a	
  calculation	
  of	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  people	
  affected	
  with	
  disease	
  in	
  a	
  defined	
  population	
  at	
  a	
  point	
  in	
  time	
  or	
  over	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  time	
  (Rothman	
  2002);	
  prevalence	
  is	
  often	
  expressed	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  affected	
  individuals	
  per	
  100,000	
  in	
  a	
  population	
  or	
  1	
  over	
  X	
  number	
  of	
  people	
  where	
  X	
  indicates	
  the	
  average	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  that	
  must	
  be	
  observed	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  detect	
  one	
  affected	
  case.	
  	
  Incidence	
  is	
  a	
  calculation	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  people	
  who	
  are	
  newly	
  affected	
  with	
  a	
  disease	
  over	
  time,	
  the	
  rate	
  of	
  new	
  diagnoses	
  (Rothman	
  2002);	
  incidence	
  is	
  often	
  expressed	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  newly	
  affected	
  patients	
  (incident	
  cases)	
  per	
  million	
  individuals	
  per	
  year.	
  	
  The	
   population	
  at	
  risk	
  refers	
  to	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  a	
  defined	
  population	
  at	
  a	
  specific	
  point	
  in,	
  or	
  range	
  of,	
  time	
  that	
  is	
  likely	
  to	
  become	
  affected	
  with	
  disease	
  (Rothman	
  2002).	
  	
  Similar	
  to	
  prevalence,	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  is	
  often	
  expressed	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  at-­‐risk	
  individuals	
  per	
  100,000	
  in	
  a	
  population	
  or	
  1	
  over	
  X	
  number	
  of	
  people.	
  	
  The	
  risk	
  of	
  acquiring	
  a	
  disease	
  depends	
  on	
  the	
  genetics,	
  transmission	
  patterns	
  and	
  other	
  external	
  factors	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  specific	
  disease	
  at	
  hand.	
  	
  For	
  HD,	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  has	
  been	
  calculated	
  largely	
  from	
  the	
  prevalence	
  (Taylor	
  1994,	
  Harper	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Goizet	
  et	
  al.	
  2002,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  In	
  doing	
  so,	
  the	
  ratios	
  of	
  1:3,	
  1:5	
  and	
  more	
  recently	
  1:4.2	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009)	
  –	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  affected:	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  –	
  have	
  largely	
  been	
  used.	
  	
  An	
  explanation	
  of	
  the	
  1:5	
  ratio	
  is	
  as	
  follows.	
  	
  In	
  theory,	
  ½	
  of	
  those	
  at	
  risk	
  will	
  carry	
  the	
  CAG	
  expansion.	
  	
  A	
  third	
  of	
  this	
  ½	
  will	
  be	
  affected	
  at	
  any	
  given	
  time,	
  leaving	
  two	
  thirds	
  at	
  risk.	
  	
  However,	
  none	
  of	
  the	
  other	
  ½	
  at	
  risk	
  (who	
  do	
  not	
  carry	
  the	
  mutation)	
  will	
  be	
  affected,	
  leaving	
  all	
  of	
  this	
  remaining	
  ½	
  at	
  risk.	
  	
  This	
  results	
  in	
  a	
  ratio	
  of	
  	
  (1/3):(2/3	
  +	
  1	
  =	
  5/3)	
  (Conneally	
  1984).	
  	
  An	
  explanation	
  was	
  not	
  provided	
  for	
  use	
  of	
  the	
  1:3	
  ratio	
  (Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999).	
  	
  The	
  4.2	
  ratio	
  has	
  been	
  observed	
  by	
  two	
  separate	
  populations	
  via	
  empirical	
   	
   13	
   data	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009,	
  Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2011)	
  and	
  thus	
  may	
  provide	
  a	
  more	
  accurate	
  measurement.	
  	
  	
   Population	
  under	
  review:	
  British	
  Columbia	
  The	
  defined	
  population	
  in	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  ascertainment	
  took	
  place	
  is	
  the	
  province	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada	
  (BC).	
  	
  The	
  population	
  of	
  BC	
  for	
  2012	
  as	
  projected	
  by	
  BC	
  Statistics	
  is	
  4,609,659	
  (Statistics	
  BC,	
  2012).	
  	
  The	
  last	
  census	
  took	
  place	
  in	
  2011,	
  and	
  the	
  actual	
  (non-­‐projected)	
  census	
  population	
  is	
  not	
  yet	
  available.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  distribution	
  of	
  patients	
  and	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD,	
  the	
  province	
  was	
  divided	
  in	
  two	
  ways.	
  	
  First,	
  BC	
  was	
  divided	
  into	
  “Rural”	
  and	
  ‘Urban’	
  regions.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  this	
  study,	
  cities	
  that	
  are	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  away	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car	
  were	
  designated	
  to	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  category.	
  	
  Cities	
  two	
  hours	
  or	
  less	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car,	
  were	
  designated	
  to	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  category.	
  	
  This	
  definition	
  renders	
  some	
  “Urban”	
  centers	
  –	
  such	
  as	
  Victoria	
  –	
  as	
  being	
  “Rural”	
  areas.	
  	
  	
  Although	
  this	
  may	
  seem	
  counterintuitive,	
  these	
  specific	
  categorizations	
  were	
  chosen	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  mirror	
  the	
  convenience	
  in	
  accessing	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  in	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  Individuals	
  requiring	
  specialized	
  HD	
  care	
  or	
  wishing	
  to	
  take	
  part	
  in	
  HD	
  research	
  are	
  required	
  to	
  commute	
  to	
  Vancouver	
  to	
  do	
  so.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  by	
  car	
  from	
  these	
  opportunities	
  renders	
  these	
  seemingly	
  larger	
  “Urban”	
  centers	
  as	
  being	
  “Rural”	
  for	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  particular	
  study.	
  	
  The	
  second	
  categorization	
  involved	
  dividing	
  the	
  BC	
  into	
  its	
  constitutive	
  provincial	
  health	
  regions.	
  	
  Provincial	
  health	
  regions	
  are	
  legislated	
  administrative	
  areas	
  defined	
  by	
  the	
  provincial	
  ministries	
  of	
  health.	
  	
  These	
  regions	
  represent	
  geographic	
  areas	
  of	
  responsibility	
  for	
  hospital	
  boards	
  or	
  regional	
  health	
  authorities.	
  	
  BC	
  is	
  made	
  up	
  of	
  five	
  health	
  regions:	
  the	
  Northern	
  region,	
  comrising	
  7%	
  of	
  BC’s	
  total	
  population;	
  Interior	
  health,	
  comprising	
  17%;	
  Fraser,	
  36%;	
  Vancouver	
  Coastal,	
  23%	
  and	
  Vancouver	
  Island,	
  17%	
  (Statistics	
  Canada	
  2007,	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Statistics	
  2010).	
  	
  	
   Defining	
  an	
  affected	
  patient:	
  Age	
  at	
  onset	
  Calculating	
  the	
  prevalence	
  and	
  incidence	
  involves	
  counting	
  patients	
  who	
  experience	
  onset	
  of	
  HD	
  symptoms	
  at	
  a	
  particular	
  point	
  in	
  time.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  it	
  is	
   	
   14	
   imperative	
  to	
  define	
  what	
  particular	
  factors	
  render	
  a	
  case	
  of	
  onset.	
  	
  Before	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  direct	
  mutation	
  testing,	
  the	
  diagnosis	
  of	
  HD	
  could	
  only	
  be	
  made	
  when	
  characteristic	
  neurological	
  signs	
  and	
  symptoms	
  and	
  a	
  positive	
  family	
  history	
  of	
  HD	
  were	
  present.	
  	
  Psychiatric	
  and	
  cognitive	
  symptoms	
  were	
  often	
  too	
  general	
  to	
  entail	
  a	
  definitive	
  diagnosis	
  on	
  their	
  own	
  (F.	
  O.	
  Walker	
  2007).	
  	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  the	
  availability	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test,	
  cases	
  of	
  onset	
  have	
  been	
  defined	
  in	
  two	
  ways	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  Affected	
  patients	
  are	
  either	
  considered	
  “symptomatic	
  HD	
  positive”,	
  or	
  “clinically	
  diagnosed”.	
  	
   	
   Symptomatic	
  HD	
  positive:	
  A	
  patient	
  is	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  “symptomatic	
  HD	
  positive”	
  if	
  they	
  have	
  received	
  a	
  positive	
  result	
  from	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  	
  (HTT	
  CAG	
  size	
  ≥36)	
  and	
  there	
  is	
  evidence,	
  from	
  physician	
  notes,	
  a	
  family	
  member,	
  an	
  HD	
  community	
  member	
  or	
  caregiver,	
  that	
  this	
  patient	
  has	
  begun	
  to	
  exhibit	
  neurological	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD.	
  	
  If	
  no	
  information	
  is	
  available	
  regarding	
  onset	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  disease	
  symptoms,	
  and	
  the	
  patient	
  has	
  undergone	
  a	
  Unified	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Rating	
  Scale	
  (UHDRS)4	
  assessment,	
  the	
  date	
  on	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  first	
  received	
  a	
  UHDRS	
  diagnostic	
  confidence	
  score	
  of	
  ≥2	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  define	
  the	
  date	
  of	
  onset.	
  	
  	
  The	
  UHDRS	
  diagnostic	
  confidence	
  score	
  is	
  a	
  value	
  ranging	
  from	
  0-­‐4;	
  zero	
  means	
  that	
  no	
  symptoms	
  are	
  present	
  and	
  4	
  means	
  that	
  severe	
  symptoms	
  are	
  present.	
  	
  The	
  diagnostic	
  confidence	
  score	
  is	
  an	
  average	
  score	
  taken	
  from	
  30	
  specific	
  motor	
  tests	
  (Huntington	
  Study	
  Group	
  1996).	
  	
  Although	
  a	
  motor	
  score	
  of	
  4	
  is	
  used	
  in	
  detecting	
  onset	
  for	
  studies	
  that	
  closely	
  track	
  the	
  progression	
  of	
  specific	
  disease	
  symptoms	
  (Orth	
  and	
  Schwenke,	
  2011),	
  a	
  minimum	
  motor	
  score	
  of	
  2	
  was	
  applied	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  as	
  this	
  score	
  has	
  shown	
  to	
  be	
  sufficient	
  in	
  detecting	
  noticeable	
  motor	
  symptoms	
  in	
  clinical	
  practice	
  (M.	
  Hayden,	
  personal	
  correspondence,	
  2011).	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  4	
  The	
  Unified	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Rating	
  Scale	
  (UHDRS)	
  is	
  a	
  research	
  tool	
  that	
  was	
  developed	
  in	
  1996	
  by	
  the	
  Huntington	
  Study	
  Group	
  	
  (HSG)	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  uniform	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  clinical	
  features	
  and	
  course	
  of	
  HD.	
  The	
  UHDRS	
  has	
  undergone	
  extensive	
  reliability	
  and	
  validity	
  testing	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  major	
  outcome	
  measure	
  by	
  the	
  HSG	
  in	
  controlled	
  clinical	
  trials.	
  	
  The	
  components	
  of	
  the	
  UHDRS	
  are	
  Motor	
  Assessment,	
  cognitive	
  Assessment,	
  behavioral	
  Assessment,	
  independence	
  Scale,	
  functional	
  assessment	
  and	
  Total	
  Functional	
  Capacity	
  (Huntington	
  Study	
  Group	
  1996).	
  	
  	
   	
   15	
   Clinically	
  diagnosed:	
  A	
  patient	
  is	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  clinically	
  diagnosed	
  if	
  it	
  is	
  clear	
  that	
  this	
  patient	
  has	
  a	
  positive	
  family	
  history	
  of	
  HD	
  and	
  there	
  is	
  evidence	
  (from	
  physician	
  notes,	
  a	
  family	
  member,	
  an	
  HD	
  community	
  member	
  or	
  caregiver)	
  that	
  this	
  patient	
  is	
  exhibiting	
  neurological	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD.	
  	
  These	
  patients	
  have	
  not	
  undergone	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  or	
  their	
  results	
  are	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  review.	
  	
  Like	
  the	
  “symptomatic	
  HD	
  positive”	
  patient,	
  if	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  information	
  available	
  regarding	
  onset	
  of	
  the	
  patient’s	
  disease	
  symptoms,	
  and	
  the	
  patient	
  has	
  undergone	
  a	
  United	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Rating	
  Scale	
  (UHDRS)	
  assessment,	
  the	
  date	
  on	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  first	
  received	
  a	
  UHDRS	
  diagnostic	
  confidence	
  score	
  of	
  ≥2	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  define	
  the	
  date	
  of	
  onset.	
   Sources	
  of	
  Ascertainment	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  obtain	
  a	
  comprehensive	
  ascertainment	
  of	
  HD	
  cases	
  in	
  BC,	
  multiple	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  were	
  used:	
  1) The	
  HD	
  clinic	
  at	
  UBC	
  Hospital	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  BC.	
  	
  The	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  has	
  served	
  patients	
  and	
  families	
  affected	
  with	
  or	
  affected	
  by	
  HD	
  since	
  1983.	
  Multidisciplinary	
  teams	
  including	
  geneticists,	
  neurologists,	
  psychiatrists,	
  a	
  social	
  worker,	
  and	
  a	
  genetic	
  counsellor	
  work	
  together	
  at	
  the	
  clinic	
  (Centre	
  for	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  2011).	
  	
  The	
  HD	
  clinic	
  is	
  a	
  major	
  hub	
  for	
  clinical	
  research	
  and	
  medical	
  care;	
  HD	
  patients	
  and	
  families	
  from	
  across	
  the	
  province	
  and	
  from	
  out	
  of	
  province	
  attend	
  this	
  clinic.	
  	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  symptom	
  management,	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  offers	
  predictive	
  and	
  diagnostic	
  testing	
  and	
  counselling	
  for	
  HD	
  and	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  predictive	
  test	
  in	
  1987	
  (Fox	
  et	
  al.	
  1989).	
  	
  2) The	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  department	
  at	
  Victoria	
  General	
  Hospital	
   (VGH).	
  	
  This	
  department	
  houses	
  specialized	
  professionals	
  who	
  serve	
  the	
  HD	
  community	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia’s	
  Islands.	
  	
  VGH	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  offers	
  genetic	
  counselling	
  and	
  predictive	
  and	
  diagnostic	
  testing	
  for	
  HD	
  but	
  is	
  not	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  clinical	
  research	
  as	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic.	
  	
  3) The	
  research	
  laboratory	
  at	
  the	
  Centre	
  for	
  Molecular	
  Medicine	
  and	
   Therapeutics	
  (CMMT).	
  Dr.	
  Michael	
  Hayden’s	
  HD	
  research	
  lab	
  at	
  the	
   	
   16	
   CMMT	
  was	
  the	
  sole	
  facility	
  in	
  BC	
  responsible	
  for	
  performing	
  linkage	
  analysis	
  (1987-­‐1993)	
  and	
  direct	
  mutation	
  testing	
  (1993-­‐2001)	
  for	
  HD	
  until	
  2001.	
  	
  4) The	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  laboratory	
  at	
  Children	
  and	
  Women’s	
  Hospital	
  in	
   Vancouver	
  (C&W).	
  	
  This	
  lab	
  has	
  been	
  and	
  continues	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  sole	
  facility	
  in	
  BC	
  responsible	
  for	
  performing	
  predictive	
  and	
  diagnostic	
  testing	
  for	
  HD	
  since	
  2002.	
  	
  5) Medical	
  records	
  from	
  BC	
  General	
  Practitioners,	
  Neurologists	
  and	
  all	
  additional	
  physicians	
  in	
  BC	
  who	
  have	
  sent	
  DNA	
  to	
  the	
  Diagnostic	
  lab.	
  	
  6) The	
  Huntington	
  Society	
  of	
  Canada	
  (HSC)	
  and	
  HD	
  genetic	
  counsellors.	
  	
  The	
  BC	
  resource	
  director	
  for	
  the	
  HSC	
  and	
  HD	
  genetic	
  counsellors	
  were	
  in	
  frequent	
  contact	
  with	
  the	
  primary	
  researcher	
  for	
  the	
  duration	
  of	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  These	
  individuals	
  work	
  directly	
  with	
  HD	
  patients	
  and	
  families	
  in	
  BC	
  and	
  are	
  most	
  familiar	
  with	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  community.	
  	
  7) Communication	
  with	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  Family	
  community.	
  These	
  individuals	
  are	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  familiar	
  with	
  other	
  members	
  of	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  community	
  who	
  may	
  be	
  affected	
  or	
  at	
  risk	
  and	
  have	
  not	
  yet	
  come	
  to	
  our	
  attention.	
  8) Nursing	
  homes	
  in	
  BC.	
  Please	
  see	
  appendix	
  3	
  for	
  a	
  full	
  list	
  of	
  the	
  nursing	
  homes	
  contacted	
  for	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  9) Death	
  records.	
  	
  Statistics	
  Canada	
  maintains	
  a	
  database	
  for	
  all	
  causes	
  of	
  death	
  categorized	
  by	
  International	
  Classification	
  of	
  Disease	
  (ICD)	
  code.	
  	
  Diseases	
  of	
  the	
  basal	
  ganglia	
  are	
  classified	
  under	
  ICD	
  code	
  333.0,	
  and	
  HD	
  has	
  its	
  own	
  sub	
  category	
  under	
  ICD	
  code	
  333.4	
  (Vital	
  Statistics	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  2009).	
  	
   Methods	
  of	
  Ascertainment	
  The	
  first	
  step	
  in	
  ascertaining	
  patients	
  was	
  to	
  perform	
  a	
  detailed	
  chart	
  review	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  the	
  VGH	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  department.	
  	
  A	
  custom	
  electronic	
  database	
  was	
  built	
  on	
  a	
  Microsoft	
  Access	
  platform	
  and	
  pertinent	
  information	
  was	
  extracted	
  from	
  patients’	
  medical	
  charts	
  and	
  entered	
  into	
  the	
  database.	
  	
  Information	
  extracted	
  that	
  was	
  most	
  relevant	
  to	
  calculating	
  prevalence,	
  incidence	
  and	
   	
   17	
   population	
  at	
  risk,	
  included:	
  province	
  of	
  residence,	
  presence	
  or	
  absence	
  of	
  a	
  family	
  history,	
  whether	
  the	
  patient	
  is	
  living	
  or	
  deceased,	
  date	
  of	
  death,	
  age	
  and	
  year	
  of	
  neurological	
  symptom	
  onset,	
  date	
  of	
  UHDRS	
  motor	
  score	
  assessment,	
  upper	
  CAG	
  size,	
  HD	
  and	
  risk	
  status,	
  and	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  family	
  members	
  affected	
  and	
  at	
  risk	
  who	
  were	
  not	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  clinic	
  (Table	
  2).	
  	
  Appendix	
  2	
  contains	
  a	
  complete	
  list	
  and	
  description	
  of	
  each	
  field	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  HD	
  database.	
  	
  	
   Table	
  2.	
  Fields	
  from	
  the	
  HD	
  Access	
  database	
  pertaining	
  to	
  the	
  calculations	
  of	
   prevalence,	
  incidence	
  and	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
   Field	
  Name	
   Field	
  Description	
  Province	
  of	
  residence	
   	
  Family	
  History	
  of	
  HD?	
   • Yes	
  • No	
  • Unknown	
  Deceased?	
   Yes	
  or	
  No	
  If	
  yes,	
  date	
  of	
  death	
   Motor	
  age/year	
  of	
  onset	
   The	
  age/year	
  at	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  first	
  noted	
  to	
  have	
  experienced	
  neurological	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD	
   • Chorea/dystonia	
   • Rigidity	
   • Difficulty	
  with	
  balance	
  Difficulty	
  breathing/swallowing	
  UHDRS?	
   Has	
  the	
  patient	
  undergone	
  a	
  UHDRS	
  assessment?	
  United	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  Rating	
  Scale:	
  Developed	
  by	
  the	
  Huntington	
  Study	
  Group	
  in	
  1996i	
  -­‐	
  Assessment	
  of	
  HD	
  clinical	
  features	
  to	
  track	
  disease	
  progression	
  on	
  a	
  standardized	
  scale	
  Upper	
  CAG	
  size	
   Dictates	
  HD	
  test	
  results	
  CAG	
  ≥	
  36	
  is	
  a	
  positive	
  test	
  result	
   HD	
  Status	
   • Symptomatic	
  HD	
  +	
  • Clinical	
  Dx	
  • UNKNOWN	
   • Unaffected	
  (spouse/other)	
   • At	
  Risk	
   At	
  risk	
  (AR)	
  Status	
   • 50%	
  AR	
   • 25%	
  AR	
   • Unknown	
  AR	
   • Affected	
   • Pre	
  Manifest	
  (100%	
  AR)	
  Family	
  risk	
  totals	
   • Total	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  in	
  this	
  family	
  at	
  each	
  risk	
  category	
  • BC	
  residents	
  only	
  Total	
  affected	
  –	
  Not	
  yet	
  in	
  database	
   • Total	
  number	
  of	
  affected	
  living	
  individuals	
  in	
  this	
  family	
  • Not	
  a	
  clinic	
  patient	
  • BC	
  residents	
  only	
  	
   The	
  second	
  method	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  was	
  to	
  obtain	
  results	
  from	
  every	
  diagnostic	
  and	
  predictive	
  genetic	
  test	
  that	
  has	
  ever	
  been	
  performed	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  HD	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  results	
  have	
  been	
  available	
  in	
  BC	
  since	
  1993	
  and	
  as	
  a	
  result,	
  nearly	
  20	
  years	
  worth	
  of	
  test	
  results	
  were	
  available.	
  	
  A	
  single	
  lab	
  is	
  responsible	
  for	
  performing	
  all	
  of	
  these	
  tests	
  for	
  the	
  entire	
  province.	
  	
  Genetic	
  test	
  reports	
  from	
  the	
  CMMT	
  HD	
  laboratory	
  and	
  the	
  DNA	
  Diagnostic	
  Laboratory	
  at	
  Children	
  and	
  Women’s	
  Hospital	
  in	
   	
   18	
   Vancouver	
  (C&W)	
  were	
  reviewed.	
  	
  All	
  HD	
  Genetic	
  tests	
  performed	
  between	
  1987-­‐2001	
  were	
  available	
  from	
  a	
  database	
  at	
  the	
  CMMT	
  HD	
  research	
  lab	
  and	
  those	
  performed	
  between	
  2002-­‐2012	
  were	
  available	
  from	
  the	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  at	
  C&W.	
  The	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  provided	
  hard	
  copy	
  test	
  reports,	
  excluding	
  patient	
  personal	
  information	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  maintain	
  privacy.	
  	
  All	
  tests	
  were	
  separated	
  by	
  Predictive	
  or	
  Diagnostic	
  test	
  and	
  each	
  type	
  of	
  test	
  was	
  separated	
  by	
  year.	
  	
  Throughout	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  process,	
  the	
  BC	
  resource	
  director	
  of	
  the	
  Huntington	
  Society	
  of	
  Canada	
  (HSC)	
  provided	
  guidance	
  in	
  confirming	
  and	
  updating	
  information	
  in	
  the	
  database.	
  	
  Patients	
  and	
  family	
  members	
  who	
  were	
  known	
  to	
  be	
  deceased	
  but	
  were	
  not	
  recorded	
  as	
  such	
  in	
  their	
  clinic	
  file	
  were	
  updated,	
  city	
  of	
  residence	
  was	
  updated	
  for	
  patients	
  and	
  family	
  members	
  who	
  had	
  moved	
  locations	
  and	
  family	
  pedigrees	
  were	
  analyzed	
  and	
  updated.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  obtain	
  greater	
  coverage	
  of	
  the	
  province	
  and	
  receive	
  information	
  from	
  physician	
  records	
  outside	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH,	
  short	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  sent	
  to	
  the	
  following	
  physicians:	
  1)	
  every	
  neurologist	
  practicing	
  in	
  BC,	
  2)	
  every	
  BC	
  physician	
  who	
  has	
  ever	
  sent	
  DNA	
  to	
  the	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  or	
  the	
  CMMT	
  research	
  lab	
  for	
  an	
  HD	
  genetic	
  test,	
  and	
  3)	
  every	
  GP	
  in	
  BC	
  that	
  serves	
  an	
  area	
  that	
  is	
  not	
  covered	
  by	
  either	
  1)	
  or	
  2).	
  	
  Physicians	
  were	
  asked	
  if	
  they	
  currently	
  care	
  for	
  any	
  patients	
  affected	
  with	
  neurological	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD	
  and	
  if	
  so	
  how	
  many.	
  	
  They	
  were	
  also	
  asked	
  to	
  list	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  who	
  have	
  undergone	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  and	
  those	
  who	
  have	
  not.	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  they	
  were	
  asked	
  if	
  any	
  of	
  their	
  patients	
  had	
  additional	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  Most	
  importantly,	
  physicians	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  mention	
  whether	
  their	
  reported	
  patients	
  had	
  ever	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics.	
  	
  Patients	
  who	
  had	
  been	
  referred	
  had	
  already	
  been	
  ascertained	
  via	
  chart	
  review	
  and	
  were	
  not	
  counted	
  again.	
  	
  A	
  complete	
  list	
  of	
  the	
  questions	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  physician	
  questionnaires	
  is	
  listed	
  in	
  Appendix	
  4.	
  	
  To	
  encourage	
  responses,	
  physicians	
  who	
  replied	
  to	
  the	
  questionnaire	
  were	
  entered	
  in	
  a	
  draw	
  to	
  win	
  an	
  iPad2.	
  	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  physician	
  questionnaires,	
  surveys	
  were	
  distributed	
  to	
  families	
  in	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  community.	
  	
  In	
  2011,	
  the	
  HSC	
  conducted	
  a	
  ‘Family	
  Day’	
  at	
  the	
  CMMT	
  attended	
  by	
  over	
  100	
  individuals.	
  	
  An	
  introductory	
  presentation	
  and	
  information	
   	
   19	
   booth	
  describing	
  the	
  present	
  study	
  was	
  set	
  up.	
  	
  Surveys	
  were	
  made	
  available	
  for	
  those	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  community	
  who	
  were	
  interested	
  in	
  participating.	
  	
  Surveys	
  asked	
  participants	
  to	
  list	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  living	
  HD	
  patients	
  to	
  their	
  knowledge,	
  who	
  currently	
  exhibit	
  neurological	
  symptoms,	
  in	
  which	
  city,	
  who	
  these	
  patients’	
  GP	
  and/or	
  neurologist	
  is	
  and/or	
  whether	
  they	
  are	
  known	
  to	
  have	
  visited	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics	
  (Appendix	
  4).	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  cover	
  the	
  province	
  further	
  and	
  ascertain	
  elderly	
  HD	
  patients	
  who	
  may	
  not	
  have	
  been	
  ascertained	
  from	
  UBC	
  or	
  VGH,	
  long-­‐term	
  nursing	
  homes	
  in	
  BC	
  were	
  contacted.	
  	
  Care	
  managers	
  at	
  these	
  homes	
  were	
  visited,	
  emailed	
  or	
  phoned	
  and	
  asked	
  if	
  they	
  had	
  any	
  HD	
  residents	
  with	
  the	
  diagnosis	
  of	
  HD	
  living	
  in	
  their	
  home	
  and	
  if	
  so,	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  residents.	
  	
  If	
  possible	
  they	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  name	
  of	
  the	
  resident’s	
  referring	
  doctor	
  and/or	
  if	
  the	
  resident	
  had	
  ever	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics.	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  49	
  nursing	
  homes	
  were	
  contacted	
  (Appendix	
  3).	
  	
  Nursing	
  homes	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  were	
  not	
  contacted	
  as	
  Evergreen	
  hamlets	
  in	
  Surrey	
  is	
  advertised	
  as	
  specializing	
  in	
  HD	
  long-­‐term	
  care	
  (Evergreen	
  Hamlets,	
  2011)	
  and	
  HD	
  patients	
  in	
  the	
  Vancouver	
  area	
  requiring	
  living	
  assistance	
  are	
  referred	
  to	
  this	
  home	
  (V.	
  Jojin,	
  personal	
  communication,	
  2011).	
  	
  Nursing	
  homes	
  in	
  Victoria	
  were	
  not	
  contacted	
  either.	
  	
  We	
  found	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  additional	
  (non-­‐clinic)	
  affected	
  patients	
  on	
  family	
  pedigrees	
  from	
  Victoria	
  (Appendix	
  6).	
  	
  These	
  pedigrees	
  did	
  not	
  include	
  personal	
  information	
  regarding	
  these	
  patients.	
  	
  Questions	
  could	
  thus	
  not	
  be	
  formulated	
  for	
  nursing	
  home	
  staff	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  ensure	
  their	
  potential	
  HD	
  residents	
  were	
  not	
  already	
  counted.	
  	
  The	
  International	
  Classification	
  of	
  Disease	
  (ICD)	
  code	
  number	
  333.0,	
  covers	
  systemic	
  atrophies	
  primarily	
  affecting	
  the	
  central	
  nervous	
  system.	
  	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  has	
  its	
  own	
  sub-­‐category	
  of	
  this	
  code,	
  under	
  the	
  number	
  333.4	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Vital	
  Statistics,	
  2009).	
  	
  When	
  death	
  occurs,	
  a	
  corresponding	
  ICD	
  code	
  is	
  recorded	
  for	
  each	
  individual	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  account	
  for	
  the	
  cause	
  of	
  death.	
  	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  publishes	
  annual	
  reports	
  describing	
  the	
  causes	
  of	
  death	
  each	
  year	
  under	
  each	
  particular	
  code.	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  Statistics	
  Canada	
  maintains	
  a	
  database	
  for	
  annual	
  deaths	
  under	
  each	
  larger	
  ICD	
  code	
  category	
  i.e.	
  code	
  333.0	
  is	
  available	
  from	
  Stats	
  Can	
  but	
  code	
  333.4	
  is	
  not.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  acquire	
  the	
  number	
  of	
   	
   20	
   Figure	
  4.	
  Chronology	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
   individuals	
  recorded	
  under	
  ICD	
  code	
  333.4	
  each	
  year,	
  BC	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  annual	
  reports	
  were	
  reviewed.	
  	
  Annual	
  reports	
  from	
  2000-­‐2009	
  are	
  currently	
  available.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   Chart review (1) UBC HD clinic & (2) VGH medical genetics Review of HD genetic tests (4) CMMT research lab, (5) C&W DNA diagnostic lab BC physician records (6) Questionnaires to neurologists, GPs and DNA diagnostic lab referring doctors HSC (3) BC resource director HD family community in BC (7) Surveys to volunteer participants BC nursing home review (8) Personal visits, email and telephone communication ICD code analysis (9) BC Vital Statistics annual reports reviewed 	
   21	
   Maximizing	
  accuracy	
  of	
  prevalence	
  numbers:	
  certainty	
  measures	
  and	
  overlap	
   risk	
  scores	
  	
  	
   Certainty	
  measures	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  maximize	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  our	
  prevalence	
  estimate,	
  a	
  certainty	
  scale	
  was	
  applied	
  to	
  all	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  clinic	
  pedigrees.	
  	
  Patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  pedigrees	
  are	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
  of	
  clinic	
  patients	
  who	
  have	
  never	
  themselves	
  been	
  seen	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics	
  but	
  are	
  recorded	
  to	
  be	
  living	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  rare	
  that	
  information	
  regarding	
  these	
  patients’	
  city	
  of	
  residence,	
  full	
  name,	
  birthdate	
  or	
  age	
  of	
  symptom	
  onset	
  is	
  included	
  on	
  their	
  pedigree,	
  but	
  where	
  these	
  pieces	
  of	
  information	
  were	
  provided,	
  they	
  were	
  used	
  in	
  an	
  attempt	
  to	
  ensure	
  these	
  individuals	
  do	
  not	
  overlap	
  with	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  physician	
  and	
  family	
  surveys	
  or	
  nursing	
  homes.	
  	
  Certainty	
  measures	
  were	
  assigned	
  based	
  on	
  certainty	
  scores.	
  	
  Two	
  factors	
  contributed	
  to	
  the	
  resulting	
  certainty	
  score:	
  1)	
  the	
  likelihood	
  that	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question	
  is	
  still	
  alive	
  and	
  2)	
  the	
  likelihood	
  that	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question	
  is	
  affected	
  with	
  HD:	
  	
   Certainty	
  scores:	
  1) The	
  likelihood	
  the	
  patient	
  is	
  still	
  alive:	
   Score	
  of	
  0:	
  the	
  pedigree,	
  from	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  ascertained,	
  was	
  updated	
  ≥20	
  years	
  ago	
  (before,	
  or	
  in,	
  1992)	
   Score	
  of	
  1:	
  the	
  pedigree,	
  from	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  ascertained,	
  was	
  updated	
  between	
  10	
  and	
  20	
  years	
  ago	
  (1993-­‐2001)	
   Score	
  of	
  2:	
  the	
  pedigree,	
  from	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  ascertained,	
  was	
  updated	
  ≤10	
  years	
  ago	
  (before,	
  or	
  in,	
  2002)	
  2) The	
  likelihood	
  the	
  patient	
  is	
  affected	
  with	
  HD:	
   Score	
  of	
  0:	
  no	
  genetic	
  test	
  information	
  or	
  clinical	
  information	
  was	
  available	
  regarding	
  the	
  family	
  member(s)	
  (seen	
  in	
  the	
  clinic)	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question	
   Score	
  of	
  1:	
  	
  family	
  member(s)	
  (seen	
  in	
  the	
  clinic)	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question	
  were	
  clinically	
  diagnosed	
  with	
  HD	
  and/or	
  have	
  been	
  referred	
  for	
  predictive	
  testing	
   	
   22	
   Score	
  of	
  2:	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  family	
  member	
  (seen	
  in	
  the	
  clinic)	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question	
  has	
  tested	
  gene	
  positive	
  for	
  HD.	
  	
   Defining	
  certainty	
  measures:	
   “Low”:	
  A	
  total	
  score	
  of	
  0-­‐1,	
  from	
  the	
  sum	
  of	
  1)	
  and	
  2)	
  above	
  	
   “Medium”:	
  A	
  total	
  score	
  of	
  2,	
  from	
  the	
  sum	
  of	
  1)	
  and	
  2)	
  above	
  	
   “High”:	
  A	
  total	
  score	
  of	
  ≥3,	
  from	
  the	
  sum	
  of	
  1)	
  and	
  2)	
  above	
  	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  &	
  Prevalence	
  ranges	
   Overlap	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  this	
  study,	
  is	
  defined	
  as	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  ascertaining	
  the	
  same	
  patient	
  from	
  more	
  than	
  one	
  source.	
  	
  Patient	
  medical	
  information	
  is	
  confidential	
  and	
  as	
  such,	
  the	
  identity	
  of	
  patients	
  from	
  all	
  ascertainment	
  sources,	
  with	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics,	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  review	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  The	
  inability	
  to	
  directly	
  crosscheck	
  patients	
  between	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  causes	
  limitations	
  to	
  the	
  feasibility	
  of	
  the	
  data	
  (Levy	
  and	
  Feingold,	
  2000).	
  	
  Cases	
  of	
  overlap	
  would	
  cause	
  the	
  same	
  prevalent	
  case	
  to	
  be	
  counted	
  more	
  than	
  once,	
  resulting	
  in	
  an	
  overestimate	
  of	
  minimum	
  prevalence.	
  	
  Assuming	
  overlap	
  when	
  it	
  does	
  not	
  exist	
  would	
  result	
  in	
  failure	
  to	
  count	
  a	
  prevalent	
  case	
  and	
  therefore	
  lead	
  to	
  an	
  underestimate	
  of	
  minimum	
  prevalence.	
  	
  To	
  maximize	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  our	
  prevalence	
  estimate,	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  prevalence	
  values	
  was	
  calculated	
  –	
  lower,	
  mid	
  and	
  upper	
  prevalence.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  quantify	
  the	
  chances	
  of	
  overlap,	
  overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  (ORS)	
  were	
  assigned	
  to	
  each	
  patient	
  ascertained	
  from	
  those	
  sources	
  for	
  which	
  patient	
  information	
  was	
  withheld	
  -­‐	
  	
  nursing	
  homes,	
  	
  physician	
  questionnaires,	
  and	
  	
  family	
  surveys.	
  	
  Each	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  was	
  initially	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2,	
  the	
  highest	
  risk	
  of	
  overlap.	
  	
  Further	
  work,	
  described	
  in	
  detail	
  below,	
  was	
  required	
  to	
  lower	
  this	
  score.	
  	
  In	
  surveys,	
  physicians	
  and	
  family	
  members	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  record	
  whether	
  their	
  patients	
  had	
  or	
   	
   23	
   had	
  not	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics.	
  	
  Patients	
  who	
  had	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  one	
  of	
  these	
  locations	
  were	
  automatically	
  removed	
  from	
  all	
  prevalence	
  estimates,	
  as	
  it	
  is	
  likely	
  that	
  these	
  patients	
  have	
  already	
  been	
  ascertained	
  from	
  the	
  chart	
  review.	
  	
  These	
  patients	
  are	
  not	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  overlap	
  risk	
  analysis,	
  as	
  it	
  is	
  likely	
  that	
  these	
  patients	
  are	
  indeed	
  cases	
  of	
  overlap.	
  	
  Patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  surveys	
  that	
  had	
  never	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics	
  run	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  having	
  already	
  been	
  counted	
  from	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  nursing	
  homes	
  and	
  from	
  clinic	
  pedigrees.	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  privacy	
  concerns,	
  it	
  was	
  not	
  possible	
  to	
  obtain	
  patients’	
  personal	
  information	
  from	
  nursing	
  homes	
  or	
  physician	
  and	
  family	
  survey	
  responders.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  additional	
  steps	
  were	
  required	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  minimize	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  overlap	
  for	
  each	
  prevalent	
  case	
  (Figure	
  5).	
  	
  	
  Defining	
  risk	
  scores	
  	
   0:	
  An	
  overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  (ORS)	
  of	
  zero	
  suggests	
  there	
  is	
  an	
  extremely	
  low	
  chance	
  that	
  this	
  is	
  a	
  case	
  of	
  overlap	
  i.e.	
  there	
  is	
  an	
  extremely	
  low	
  chance	
  that	
  this	
  patient	
  has	
  already	
  been	
  ascertained	
  from	
  another	
  source.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  become	
  assigned	
  to	
  a	
  score	
  of	
  0,	
  secondary	
  information	
  regarding	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question	
  must	
  be	
  obtained.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  the	
  physician	
  or	
  nursing	
  home	
  that	
  reported	
  the	
  patient	
  has	
  been	
  re-­‐contacted	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  asked	
  to	
  provide	
  specific	
  information	
  regarding	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question.	
  The	
  information	
  requested	
  depended	
  on	
  that	
  available	
  from	
  the	
  patient’s	
  family	
  pedigree.	
  	
  Examples	
  include,	
  number	
  and	
  gender	
  of	
  siblings	
  and/or	
  number	
  and	
  gender	
  of	
  children	
  and	
  first	
  and	
  last	
  name	
  initials	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  or	
  a	
  family	
  member.	
  	
  If	
  the	
  information	
  provided	
  by	
  the	
  physician	
  or	
  nursing	
  home	
  did	
  not	
  match	
  with	
  our	
  pedigree	
  information,	
  it	
  is	
  as	
  certain	
  as	
  possible	
  that	
  this	
  patient	
  has	
  not	
  yet	
  been	
  accounted	
  for	
  and	
  will	
  be	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  0,	
  and	
  be	
  included	
  in	
  all	
  three	
  of	
  the	
  upper,	
  mid	
  and	
  lower	
  prevalence	
  range	
  calculations.	
  	
  	
   1:	
  An	
  ORS	
  of	
  1	
  means	
  there	
  is	
  evidence	
  to	
  suggest	
  that	
  this	
  patient	
  has	
  not	
  been	
  ascertained	
  from	
  both	
  sources,	
  but	
  obtaining	
  secondary	
  evidence	
  was	
  not	
  possible.	
  	
  For	
  example:	
  there	
  are	
  no	
  clinic	
  patients	
  or	
  known	
  family	
  members	
  living	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  city	
  as	
  the	
  physician	
  who	
  provided	
  the	
  original	
  survey	
  response,	
  but	
  the	
   	
   24	
   physician	
  could	
  not	
  provide	
  any	
  secondary	
  information.	
  	
  Patients	
  with	
  an	
  overlap	
  score	
  of	
  1	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  upper	
  and	
  mid	
  range	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  but	
  were	
  left	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  lower.	
  	
  	
   2:	
  An	
  overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  of	
  2	
  suggests	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  not	
  possible	
  for	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  steps	
  required	
  to	
  minimize	
  ORS	
  to	
  be	
  taken,	
  as	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  information	
  necessary	
  to	
  complete	
  steps	
  1	
  and	
  2	
  (see	
  steps	
  to	
  minimize	
  ORS	
  below).	
  	
  The	
  patients	
  in	
  question,	
  however,	
  were	
  not	
  definite	
  cases	
  of	
  overlap,	
  as	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  information	
  available	
  to	
  suggest	
  this	
  patient	
  had	
  definitely	
  been	
  ascertained	
  via	
  chart	
  review.	
  	
  Patients	
  with	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  range	
  only.	
  	
   Specific	
  steps	
  to	
  minimize	
  ORS:	
  Step	
  1:	
  	
  Check	
  if	
  the	
  responding	
  physician	
  has	
  reported	
  patients	
  from	
  a	
  city	
  where	
  affected	
  patients	
  found	
  on	
  a	
  family	
  pedigree	
  (non-­‐clinic	
  patients)	
  or	
  their	
  family	
  members	
  were	
  recorded	
  to	
  reside.	
  	
  Please	
  note:	
  it	
  is	
  rare	
  that	
  information	
  regarding	
  the	
  city	
  of	
  residence	
  is	
  included	
  on	
  the	
  pedigree;	
  often	
  only	
  the	
  province	
  or	
  country	
  is	
  included.	
  	
  If	
  the	
  city	
  was	
  not	
  available,	
  the	
  city	
  of	
  the	
  closest	
  possible	
  relative	
  was	
  recorded.	
  	
  If	
  the	
  there	
  was	
  in	
  fact	
  a	
  common	
  city	
  between	
  a	
  pedigree	
  and	
  survey	
  response,	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  siblings,	
  number	
  of	
  children	
  and	
  initials	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  (if	
  available)	
  were	
  recorded.	
  	
  Physicians	
  from	
  these	
  overlapping	
  cities	
  were	
  re-­‐contacted	
  and	
  asked,	
  if	
  possible,	
  to	
  provide	
  these	
  same	
  pieces	
  of	
  information.	
  If	
  the	
  information	
  provided	
  by	
  the	
  physician	
  were	
  to	
  match	
  our	
  information,	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  removed	
  from	
  all	
  prevalence	
  estimates.	
  It	
  is	
  known	
  with	
  near	
  complete	
  certainty	
  that	
  these	
  patients	
  have	
  already	
  been	
  counted.	
  	
  If	
  answers	
  did	
  not	
  match	
  our	
  information,	
  the	
  patients	
  were	
  bumped	
  up	
  to	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  0.	
  	
  If	
  this	
  information	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  to	
  the	
  physician	
  or	
  the	
  physician	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  re-­‐contact,	
  the	
  patients	
  remained	
  with	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2	
  and	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  upper	
  range	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  only	
  (figure	
  5).	
  	
  Step	
  2:	
  Check	
  if	
  the	
  physician	
  who	
  provided	
  the	
  survey	
  response	
  serves	
  any	
  clinic	
  patients	
  from	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  that	
  are	
  recorded	
  to	
  have	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
   	
   25	
   who	
  were	
  ascertained	
  from	
  their	
  pedigree.	
  	
  If	
  cases	
  like	
  this	
  were	
  to	
  be	
  found,	
  information	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  siblings,	
  number	
  of	
  children	
  and	
  initials	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  (if	
  available)	
  were	
  recorded.	
  These	
  physicians	
  were	
  re-­‐contacted	
  and	
  asked,	
  if	
  possible,	
  to	
  provide	
  this	
  same	
  information.	
  	
  If	
  the	
  information	
  provided	
  by	
  the	
  physician	
  were	
  to	
  match	
  our	
  information,	
  the	
  patients	
  were	
  taken	
  out	
  of	
  all	
  prevalence	
  estimates.	
  It	
  is	
  known	
  with	
  near	
  complete	
  certainty	
  that	
  these	
  patients	
  have	
  already	
  been	
  counted.	
  	
  If	
  their	
  information	
  did	
  not	
  match	
  ours,	
  the	
  patients	
  were	
  to	
  be	
  bumped	
  up	
  to	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  1	
  (not	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  0,	
  as	
  the	
  city	
  of	
  residence	
  of	
  a	
  family	
  member	
  does	
  not	
  necessarily	
  indicate	
  the	
  city	
  of	
  resident	
  of	
  the	
  patient).	
  	
  If	
  this	
  information	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  to	
  the	
  physician	
  or	
  the	
  physician	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  re-­‐contact,	
  the	
  patients	
  remained	
  with	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2	
  and	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  range	
  calculation	
  only	
  (figure	
  5).	
  	
  	
   	
   26	
   Figure	
  5.	
  Steps	
  taken	
  to	
  minimize	
  overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  (O.R.S.)	
  for	
  patients	
  ascertained	
   from	
  physician	
  questionnaires,	
  family	
  surveys	
  and	
  nursing	
  homes	
  by	
  ensuring	
  they	
   do	
  not	
  overlap	
  with	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  clinic	
  pedigrees	
   	
  	
   	
   27	
   Performing	
  calculations	
   Minimum	
  prevalence	
  ranges	
  The	
  minimum	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  was	
  divided	
  into	
  a	
  lower,	
  mid	
  and	
  upper	
  range.	
  	
  The	
  lower	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  included	
  only	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  survey	
  responses	
  with	
  overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  of	
  0	
  and	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  clinic	
  pedigrees	
  with	
  “high”	
  certainty	
  measures.	
  	
  The	
  mid	
  prevalence	
  range	
  included	
  overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  of	
  0	
  and	
  1	
  and	
  “high”	
  and	
  “medium”	
  certainty.	
  	
  The	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  range	
  included	
  overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  of	
  0,	
  1	
  and	
  2	
  and	
  “high”,	
  “medium”	
  and	
  “low”	
  certainty	
  measures	
  (Figure	
  6).	
  	
   Figure	
  6.	
  Graphical	
  representation	
  of	
  the	
  specific	
  overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  and	
  certainty	
   measures	
  that	
  make	
  up	
  the	
  upper,	
  mid	
  and	
  lower	
  prevalence	
  ranges	
   	
  	
   OVERLAP RISK SCORES C ER TA IN TY M EA SU R ES 0  1   2 Low - Medium - High - Patients(included(in(upper%prevalence(range( Patients(included(in(mid(prevalence(range( Patients(included(in(lower%prevalence(range( Certainty(score(total(of( 0-1% Certainty(score(total(of( 2% Certainty(score(total(of( ≥3% Patients(for(whom(information(could(not(support(or(rule(out(overlap( Information(suggested(this(patient(was(unique(but(secondary(sources(could(not(con;irm(this( Secondary(information(con;irmed(patient(had(not(already(been(counted(( 	
   28	
   Figure	
  7.	
  Equation	
  for	
  the	
  calculation	
  of	
  upper	
  (red),	
  mid	
  (light	
  red)	
  and	
  lower	
  (light	
   pink)	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
   The	
  prevalence	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  each	
  range.	
  	
  All	
  prevalence	
  ranges	
  included	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  chart	
  review.	
  	
  The	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  range	
  also	
  included	
  patients	
  with	
  “high”,	
  “medium”	
  and	
  “low”	
  certainty	
  measures	
  and	
  patients	
  with	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  0,	
  1	
  and	
  2.	
  	
  The	
  only	
  patients	
  subtracted	
  from	
  the	
  high	
  prevalence	
  range	
  were	
  those	
  who	
  were	
  known	
  with	
  full	
  certainty	
  to	
  be	
  cases	
  of	
  overlap	
  (i.e.	
  patients	
  reported	
  by	
  physicians,	
  family	
  surveys	
  or	
  nursing	
  homes	
  to	
  be	
  already	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH).	
  	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  these	
  definite	
  cases	
  of	
  overlap,	
  patients	
  with	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2	
  and	
  a	
  “low”	
  certainty	
  measure	
  were	
  also	
  subtracted	
  to	
  arrive	
  at	
  the	
  mid	
  prevalence	
  range.	
  	
  The	
  lower	
  prevalence	
  range	
  was	
  the	
  mid	
  range	
  minus	
  patients	
  with	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  1	
  and	
  those	
  with	
  a	
  “medium”	
  certainty	
  score.	
  	
  The	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  for	
  each	
  range	
  was	
  then	
  divided	
  by	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  BC	
  in	
  2012:	
  4,609,659	
  (Figure	
  7).	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   29	
   Mortality	
  estimates	
  	
   Specific	
  parameters	
  were	
  applied	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  account	
  for	
  potentially	
  missed	
  mortalities	
  in	
  the	
  patient	
  population.	
  	
  If	
  a	
  patient’s	
  year	
  of	
  symptom	
  onset	
  subtracted	
  from	
  the	
  prevalence	
  year	
  (2012)	
  was	
  greater	
  than	
  or	
  equal	
  to	
  19	
  and	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  information	
  to	
  suggest	
  the	
  patient	
  or	
  their	
  family	
  member	
  (whose	
  chart	
  included	
  the	
  pedigree	
  on	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question	
  is	
  drawn)	
  had	
  been	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  clinic	
  in	
  ≤5	
  years,	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  suspected	
  to	
  be	
  deceased,	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  the	
  lower	
  and	
  mid	
  prevalence	
  estimates.	
  	
  These	
  patients	
  were	
  maintained	
  in	
  the	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  as	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  documentation	
  available	
  to	
  ensure	
  their	
  death.	
  	
  Nineteen	
  years	
  was	
  chosen	
  as	
  this	
  is	
  shown	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  approximate	
  average	
  disease	
  duration	
  for	
  HD	
  (Roos	
  et	
  al.	
  1993,	
  Foroud	
  et	
  al.	
  1999).	
  	
   Prevalence	
  by	
  ethnicity	
  British	
  Columbia	
  is	
  an	
  ethnically	
  heterogeneous	
  population.	
  	
  While	
  BC	
  is	
  predominantly	
  Caucasian,	
  approximately	
  25%	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  is	
  of	
  visible	
  minority.	
  	
  Visible	
  minorities	
  include,	
  South	
  Asian	
  (7%),	
  Chinese	
  (10%),	
  Black	
  (0.7%),	
  Filipino	
  (2%),	
  Latin	
  American	
  (0.7%)	
  and	
  Southeast	
  Asian	
  (1%)	
  (Statistics	
  Canada,	
  2006).	
  	
  The	
  classification	
  of	
  ethnic	
  groups	
  by	
  the	
  European	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  network	
  (EHDN)	
  registry5	
  is	
  slightly	
  different	
  than	
  those	
  presented	
  above	
  by	
  Statistics	
  Canada.	
  	
  Categories	
  by	
  Statistics	
  Canada	
  can	
  however	
  be	
  grouped	
  accordingly	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  fit	
  with	
  and	
  be	
  compared	
  to	
  those	
  from	
  the	
  EHDN	
  registry.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  present	
  review,	
  EHDN	
  registry	
  ethnic	
  classification	
  was	
  followed.	
  	
  These	
  included:	
  Caucasian,	
  African-­‐North,	
  American-­‐Latin,	
  Asian-­‐East,	
  Asian-­‐West,	
  Mixed	
  and	
  Other	
  (EHDN,	
  2010).	
  	
  Information	
  regarding	
  a	
  patient’s	
  ethnicity	
  and	
  country	
  of	
  origin	
  were	
  collected	
  wherever	
  possible	
  during	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  process	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  (Appendix	
  2).	
  	
  Ethnicity	
  was	
  also	
  requested	
  from	
  nursing	
  home	
  responders	
  but	
  was	
  not	
  requested	
  in	
  physician	
  questionnaires	
  or	
  family	
  surveys	
  (questions	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5	
  The	
  European	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  network	
  (EHDN)	
  registry	
  is	
  a	
  multi-­‐center	
  collaboration	
  aiming	
  to	
  obtain	
  clinical	
  and	
  genetic	
  information	
  on	
  a	
  large	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  interested	
  in	
  taking	
  part	
  in	
  various	
  HD-­‐associated	
  studies.	
  The	
  registry	
  maintains	
  information	
  on	
  HD	
  patients	
  in	
  Europe	
  and	
  is	
  the	
  largest	
  database	
  for	
  HD	
  patient	
  information	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  (EHDN,	
  2010).	
   	
   30	
   regarding	
  ethnicity	
  of	
  patients	
  were	
  excluded	
  from	
  these	
  surveys	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  minimize	
  complexity	
  and	
  in	
  turn	
  maximize	
  response	
  rate).	
  	
  The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  was	
  estimated	
  within	
  each	
  ethnic	
  group	
  by	
  adding	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  each	
  ethnic	
  group	
  to	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  the	
  ‘unknown’	
  ethnic	
  group	
  expected	
  to	
  be	
  composed	
  of	
  the	
  group	
  in	
  question	
  based	
  on	
  empirical	
  ascertainment	
  numbers;	
  this	
  total	
  was	
  then	
  divided	
  by	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  the	
  specific	
  group	
  in	
  question	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  approximately	
  938,488	
  East	
  Asian,	
  647,123	
  West	
  Asian,	
  31,108	
  Latin	
  American,	
  30,410	
  North	
  African	
  and	
  219,604	
  Canadian	
  Aboriginal	
  individuals	
  estimated	
  to	
  be	
  living	
  in	
  BC	
  in	
  2012	
  (Statistics	
  Canada,	
  2012).	
  	
  These	
  populations	
  were	
  used	
  as	
  the	
  denominators	
  in	
  estimating	
  the	
  ethnic-­‐specific	
  prevalence	
  figures	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   31	
   	
   Figure	
  8.	
  Equation	
  for	
  the	
  calculation	
  of	
  incidence	
  (per	
  million/year).	
  This	
  equation	
   was	
  applied	
  separately	
  for	
  each	
  year	
  reviewed	
  (2000-­‐2011)	
   Incidence	
  	
   The	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  was	
  calculated	
  by	
  summing	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  who	
  had	
  either	
  received	
  a	
  positive	
  diagnostic	
  test	
  result	
  and/or	
  had	
  experienced	
  onset	
  of	
  neurological	
  HD	
  symptoms	
  each	
  year	
  between	
  January	
  1,	
  2000	
  and	
  December	
  31,	
  2011.	
  	
  This	
  number	
  was	
  divided	
  by	
  the	
  average	
  population	
  of	
  BC	
  for	
  each	
  respective	
  year	
  (BC	
  Stats,	
  2012)	
  (Figure	
  8).	
  	
  This	
  calculation	
  was	
  applied	
  to	
  each	
  year	
  separately.	
  	
  Patients	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  incidence	
  calculation	
  who	
  lacked	
  diagnostic	
  test	
  results	
  were	
  either	
  1)	
  those	
  who	
  had	
  received	
  a	
  positive	
  predictive	
  test	
  result	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  but	
  experienced	
  symptom	
  onset	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period,	
  2)	
  those	
  patients	
  who	
  had	
  never	
  undergone	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  and	
  were	
  diagnosed	
  clinically,	
  or	
  3)	
  patients	
  whose	
  test	
  results	
  were	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  review.	
  	
  Additionally,	
  the	
  positive	
  diagnostic	
  test-­‐rate	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003),	
  was	
  measured	
  from	
  2000-­‐2011.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   	
   32	
   The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  was	
  divided	
  into	
  two	
  separate	
  analyses.	
  	
  	
  The	
  first	
  involved	
  the	
  calculation	
  of	
  the	
  a	
  priori	
  risks.	
  	
  A	
  priori	
  risk	
  refers	
  to	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  disease	
  associated	
  with	
  an	
  individual	
  at	
  birth	
  since,	
  in	
  actuality,	
  an	
  individual’s	
  specific	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  decreases	
  with	
  age	
  (Harper	
  1992).	
  	
  A	
  priori	
  risk	
  measurements	
  are	
  useful	
  in	
  categorizing	
  risks	
  into	
  two	
  distinct	
  groups:	
  50%,	
  meaning	
  the	
  individual	
  has	
  a	
  first	
  degree	
  relative	
  who	
  is	
  affected	
  with	
  or	
  has	
  tested	
  positive	
  for	
  HD	
  and	
  25%,	
  meaning	
  the	
  individual	
  has	
  a	
  second	
  degree	
  relative	
  who	
  is	
  affected	
  with	
  or	
  has	
  tested	
  positive	
  for	
  HD	
  (figure	
  9a).	
  	
  The	
  second	
  analysis	
  involved	
  risk	
  categories	
  after	
  accounting	
  for	
  those	
  genetic	
  test	
  results	
  available	
  for	
  review:	
  pre-­‐manifest,	
  meaning	
  the	
  individual	
  tested	
  positive	
  for	
  HD	
  and	
  is	
  likely	
  to	
  develop	
  the	
  disease	
  in	
  the	
  future;	
  and	
  Negative,	
  meaning	
  the	
  individual	
  has	
  received	
  a	
  negative	
  genetic	
  test	
  result	
  and	
  will	
  not	
  develop	
  the	
  disease	
  in	
  the	
  future.	
  	
  Individuals	
  who	
  have	
  not	
  undergone	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  will	
  remain	
  in	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  a	
  priori	
  risk	
  categories	
  (Figure	
  9b).	
  	
   	
   Figure	
  9.	
  A	
  priori	
  risk	
  categories	
  and	
  risk	
  categories	
  after	
  accounting	
  for	
  genetic	
  test	
   results	
   	
   	
   	
   33	
   Figure	
  10.	
  Equation	
  for	
  the	
  calculation	
  of	
  population	
  at	
  risk.	
  This	
  equation	
  was	
  applied	
  to	
  each	
   risk	
  category	
  separately	
   	
   Each	
  risk	
  category	
  was	
  calculated	
  using	
  the	
  same	
  equation	
  (Figure	
  10).	
  	
  The	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  clinic	
  patients	
  at	
  risk	
  who	
  were	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  clinic	
  for	
  predictive	
  testing	
  and	
  counselling	
  was	
  summed	
  with	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  clinic	
  patients’	
  family	
  members	
  who	
  were	
  ascertained	
  from	
  family	
  pedigrees.	
  This	
  total	
  was	
  divided	
  by	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  BC	
  in	
  2012,	
  4,609,659.	
  	
  	
   In	
  order	
  to	
  determine	
  the	
  geographic	
  distribution	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC,	
  their	
  city	
  and	
  BC	
  health	
  region6	
  of	
  residence	
  was	
  recorded.	
  	
  The	
  health	
  region	
  of	
  residence	
  was	
  however	
  inferred	
  for	
  a	
  large	
  portion	
  of	
  this	
  group.	
  	
  Locations	
  were	
  unknown	
  for	
  those	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  who	
  were	
  ascertained	
  from	
  patient	
  pedigrees.	
  	
  These	
  additional	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  were	
  distributed	
  amongst	
  BC	
  health	
  regions	
  in	
  proportion	
  to	
  the	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  living	
  in	
  each	
  region7.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  6	
  Health	
  regions	
  are	
  legislated	
  administrative	
  areas	
  defined	
  by	
  provincial	
  ministries	
  of	
  health.	
  These	
  administrative	
  areas	
  represent	
  geographic	
  areas	
  of	
  responsibility	
  for	
  hospital	
  boards	
  or	
  regional	
  health	
  authorities.	
  British	
  Columbia	
  is	
  made	
  up	
  of	
  five	
  health	
  regions:	
  Northern,	
  Interior,	
  Fraser,	
  Vancouver	
  Coastal	
  and	
  Vancouver	
  Island	
  (Statistics	
  Canada	
  2007,	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Statistics	
  2010).	
  7	
  Approximate	
  percentage	
  of	
  British	
  Columbians	
  residing	
  in	
  each	
  health	
  region:	
  Fraser:	
  36%,	
  Interior:	
  17%,	
  Northern:	
  7%,	
  Vancouver	
  Coastal:	
  23%	
  and	
  Vancouver	
  Island:	
  17%	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Statistics,	
  2010).	
   	
   34	
   Predictive	
  testing	
  British	
  Columbia	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  to	
  offer	
  the	
  predictive	
  test	
  for	
  HD	
  (Fox	
  et	
  al.	
  1989).	
  	
  	
  The	
  linkage	
  test	
  has	
  been	
  available	
  since	
  1987	
  and	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test,	
  since	
  1993	
  (Gusella	
  et	
  al.	
  1987,	
  MacMillan	
  et	
  al.	
  1993).	
  	
  Predictive	
  testing	
  is	
  generally	
  offered	
  to	
  those	
  at	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  majority	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
  The	
  age	
  of	
  majority	
  in	
  BC	
  is	
  19	
  (Statistics	
  Canada,	
  2012),	
  but	
  eligibility	
  for	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  BC	
  begins	
  at	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  18	
  (MacLeod	
  et	
  al.	
  unpublished	
  report).	
  Uptake	
  has	
  generally	
  been	
  defined	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  who	
  have	
  undergone	
  predictive	
  testing	
  as	
  a	
  proportion	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  estimated	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  in	
  the	
  population	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
  However,	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  account	
  for	
  the	
  study	
  period,	
  and	
  in	
  turn,	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  changing	
  during	
  this	
  period,	
  a	
  revised	
  equation	
  was	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  study	
  to	
  calculate	
  uptake	
  (Figure	
  11).	
  	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  11.	
  	
  The	
  equation	
  for	
  calculating	
  uptake	
  as	
  proposed	
  by	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  (2009)	
   	
  	
  This	
  equation	
  corrects	
  for	
  the	
  previously	
  static	
  denominator	
  that	
  has	
  been	
  used	
  to	
  represent	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  in	
  a	
  population.	
  	
  The	
  revised	
  denominator	
  consists	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  eligible	
  for	
  predictive	
  testing	
  but	
  only	
  during	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  This	
  includes	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  50%	
  risk	
  individuals	
  who	
  were	
  at	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  majority	
  on	
  the	
  day	
  the	
  study	
  began	
  (denoted	
  as	
  ‘P’),	
  plus	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  50%	
  risk	
  individuals	
  who	
  became	
  eligible	
  over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  the	
  study.	
  	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  estimate	
  this	
  number	
  of	
  additional	
  individuals	
  added	
  to	
  ‘P’,	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  propose	
  multiplying	
  ‘P’	
  by	
  the	
  study	
  period	
  and	
  dividing	
  this	
  number	
  by	
  the	
  average	
  disease	
  duration	
  -­‐	
  18.8	
  years	
  (Roos	
  et	
  al.	
  1993,	
  Foroud	
  et	
  al.	
  1999)	
  (Figure	
  11).	
  	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  reason	
  that	
  an	
  individual	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  at	
  the	
  start	
  of	
   	
   35	
   the	
  study	
  and	
  who	
  dies	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period,	
  will	
  be	
  replaced	
  by	
  a	
  previously	
  50%	
  risk	
  individual	
  who	
  has	
  since	
  become	
  symptomatic.	
  	
  This	
  newly	
  affected	
  individual	
  will	
  in	
  turn	
  represent	
  a	
  new	
  group	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  that	
  is	
  proportional	
  to	
  the	
  group	
  that	
  was	
  previously	
  represented	
  by	
  the	
  recently	
  deceased	
  HD	
  patient	
  (Figure12).	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  12.	
  A	
  depiction	
  of	
  the	
  theory	
  proposed	
  by	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  in	
  support	
  of	
  the	
   proposed	
  equation	
  for	
  calculating	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing.	
  Dotted	
  vertical	
  lines	
   enclose	
  the	
  example	
  study	
  period.	
  An	
  individual	
  affected	
  by	
  HD	
  (HD1)	
  is	
  replaced	
  in	
  the	
  patient	
  population	
  by	
  a	
  newly	
  affected	
  individual	
  (HD2),	
  thereby	
  maintaining	
  the	
  prevalence	
  over	
  time.	
  The	
  newly	
  affected	
  individual	
  now	
  represents	
  additional	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  50%	
  risk	
  population.	
  Theoretically,	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  these	
  additional	
  individuals	
  is	
  equal	
  to	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  50%	
  risk	
  individuals	
  represented	
  by	
  the	
  previously	
  deceased.	
  	
   	
  	
   Uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  BC	
  was	
  determined	
  using	
  two	
  methods;	
  the	
  above	
  methods	
  and	
  the	
  methods	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  previous	
  review	
  of	
  uptake	
  in	
  BC	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  Both	
  methods	
  were	
  applied	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  allow	
  for	
  comparisons	
  in	
  BC	
  over	
  time.	
  	
  Uptake	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  the	
  time	
  period	
  of	
  April	
  1,	
  2000	
  to	
  April	
  1,	
  2012.	
  	
  This	
  time	
  period	
  was	
  chosen	
  as	
  the	
  previous	
  study	
  of	
  uptake	
  in	
  BC	
  reviewed	
  the	
  period	
  from	
  January	
  1,	
  1987	
  to	
  April	
  1,	
  2000.	
  	
  Not	
  every	
  predictive	
  test	
  report	
  was	
  available	
  from	
  the	
  CMMT	
  research	
  lab,	
  the	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  or	
  the	
  chart	
  review,	
  but	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  tests	
  and	
  the	
  year	
  each	
  test	
   2000 2012 HD1 AR AR AR AR AR 18.8 years HD HD2 AR AR AR AR AR 12 years AR AR AR AR AR HD Individual affected with HD Individual at 50% risk for HD 	
   36	
   was	
  performed	
  were	
  available.	
  	
  For	
  this	
  reason,	
  geographic	
  distribution	
  of	
  test	
  participants	
  and	
  regional-­‐uptake	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  determined.	
  	
  	
   Statistical	
  analyses	
  	
   Differences	
  in	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  between	
  populations	
  were	
  analyzed	
  using	
  chi	
  square	
  analyses.	
  	
  Standard	
  error	
  and	
  95%	
  confidence	
  intervals	
  for	
  prevalence,	
  incidence	
  and	
  at-­‐risk	
  popuation	
  estimates	
  were	
  calculated	
  on	
  the	
  assumption	
  of	
  Poisson	
  distribution	
  (Massey	
  University,	
  2012).	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   37	
   Results	
   Patient	
  ascertainment	
  results	
   Clinic	
  chart	
  review:	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  1,914	
  charts	
  comprising	
  more	
  than	
  775	
  families	
  were	
  reviewed	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  Victoria	
  General	
  Hospital’s	
  (VGH)	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  department.	
  	
  These	
  charts	
  belong	
  to	
  anyone	
  who	
  has	
  ever	
  been	
  seen	
  in	
  one	
  of	
  these	
  clinics,	
  including	
  patients	
  affected	
  with	
  or	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  and	
  individuals	
  related	
  to	
  or	
  connected	
  with	
  a	
  person	
  affected	
  by	
  HD.	
  	
  Of	
  the	
  approximately	
  775	
  family	
  files	
  present	
  in	
  these	
  clinics,	
  696	
  (90%)	
  of	
  these	
  files	
  included	
  extensive	
  family	
  pedigrees	
  available	
  for	
  review.	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  410	
  HD	
  patients	
  from	
  UBC	
  and	
  99	
  from	
  VGH	
  were	
  suggested	
  to	
  be	
  alive,	
  living	
  in	
  BC	
  and	
  affected	
  with	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD	
  on	
  the	
  prevalence	
  day,	
  April	
  1,	
  2012.	
  An	
  additional	
  127	
  HD	
  patients	
  were	
  found	
  on	
  clinic	
  pedigrees	
  and	
  were	
  also	
  suggested	
  to	
  be	
  alive,	
  living	
  and	
  affected	
  with	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD	
  on	
  prevalence	
  day.	
  	
  Of	
  these	
  127	
  potentially	
  additional	
  patients,	
  98	
  were	
  assigned	
  a	
  “high”	
  certainty	
  measure,	
  18	
  were	
  assigned	
  a	
  “medium”	
  certainty	
  measure	
  and	
  11	
  were	
  assigned	
  a	
  “low”	
  certainty	
  measure	
  (Table	
  5,	
  Appendix	
  5).	
  	
  Thirteen	
  of	
  the	
  98	
  (13%)	
  patients	
  assigned	
  a	
  “high”	
  certainty	
  measure,	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  having	
  been	
  updated	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  10	
  years,	
  included	
  information	
  regarding	
  their	
  city	
  of	
  residence	
  on	
  their	
  pedigree.	
  	
  Ten	
  of	
  these	
  13	
  patients	
  were	
  recorded	
  to	
  be	
  living	
  in	
  cities	
  different	
  to	
  those	
  cities	
  from	
  where	
  nursing	
  homes	
  reported	
  patients	
  and	
  different	
  to	
  those	
  cities	
  from	
  where	
  physicians	
  and	
  families	
  provided	
  survey	
  responses.	
  	
  	
  Appendix	
  5	
  shows	
  the	
  breakdown	
  of	
  certainty	
  measure	
  assignments.	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  452	
  (89%)	
  affected	
  patients,	
  360	
  ascertained	
  from	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  92	
  from	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics,	
  had	
  been	
  confirmed	
  as	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  via	
  a	
  positive	
  genetic	
  test.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  57	
  (50	
  from	
  UBC	
  and	
  7	
  from	
  Victoria)	
  were	
  clinically	
  diagnosed	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  positive	
  family	
  history	
  and	
  clinical	
  presentation	
  of	
  the	
  disease	
  (Table	
  3).	
   	
   38	
   Table	
  3.	
  Numbers	
  and	
  proportion	
  of	
  HD	
  patients	
  diagnosed	
  with	
  and	
  without	
  a	
   genetic	
  test	
   	
   Physician	
  questionnaires:	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  722	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  sent	
  to	
  physicians	
  in	
  BC;	
  this	
  included	
  510	
  General	
  Practitioners	
  (GPs),	
  132	
  neurologists	
  and	
  80	
  additional	
  physicians	
  who	
  had	
  sent	
  blood	
  to	
  the	
  HD	
  research	
  lab	
  at	
  the	
  CMMT	
  or	
  the	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  at	
  C&W	
  for	
  predictive	
  or	
  diagnostic	
  testing.	
  	
  Responses	
  were	
  received	
  from	
  174	
  GPs	
  (34%),	
  42	
  neurologists	
  (32%)	
  and	
  27	
  diagnostic	
  lab-­‐referring	
  physicians	
  (34%).	
  	
  The	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  responses	
  was	
  243,	
  resulting	
  in	
  an	
  overall	
  response	
  rate	
  of	
  34%	
  (Table	
  4).	
  	
  Patients	
  were	
  reported	
  from	
  19	
  GPs	
  (46	
  patients),	
  23	
  neurologists	
  (54	
  patients)	
  and	
  11	
  diagnostic	
  lab-­‐referring	
  doctors	
  (13	
  patients).	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  113	
  patients	
  and	
  an	
  additional	
  48	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
  were	
  ascertained	
  from	
  these	
  questionnaires	
  (Table	
  3).	
  	
  Of	
  the	
  113	
  patients,	
  32	
  had	
  not	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics	
  and	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  (ORS)	
  analysis.	
  	
  Of	
  the	
  48	
  total	
  HD	
  affected	
  family	
  members,	
  36	
  belonged	
  to	
  families	
  of	
  referred	
  patients	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  thus	
  highly	
  likely	
  that	
  these	
  individuals	
  had	
  already	
  been	
  ascertained	
  via	
  clinic	
  pedigrees.	
  	
  These	
  patients	
  were	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  definite	
  cases	
  of	
  overlap	
  and	
  were	
  not	
  counted.	
  The	
  remaining	
  12	
  HD	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  ORS	
  analysis.	
  	
  	
   From	
  physician	
  questionnaires,	
  a	
  total	
  of	
  81	
  patients	
  and	
  36	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
  (117	
  patients	
  total)	
  were	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  cases	
  of	
  definite	
  overlap,	
  as	
  physicians	
  had	
  responded	
  stating	
  these	
  patients	
  had	
  already	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  UBC	
  or	
  VGH	
  and	
  have	
  thus	
  already	
  been	
  accounted	
  for	
  via	
  chart	
  review.	
  	
  Forty-­‐four	
  of	
  the	
  reported	
  patients	
  (including	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
  of	
  patients)	
  were	
  not	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  and	
  were	
  therefore	
  assigned	
  ORS	
  scores.	
  	
  Nineteen	
  patients	
   Ascertainment	
  source	
   Number	
  of	
  affected	
   patients	
  with	
  the	
   genetic	
  test	
   Number	
  of	
  affected	
   patients	
  without	
  the	
   genetic	
  test	
   Percentage	
  of	
  patients	
   with	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
   452	
   57	
   89%	
  Physician	
  questionnaires	
   15	
   17	
   47%	
  Total	
   469	
   74	
   86%	
   	
   39	
   were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2;	
  4	
  reported	
  by	
  GPs	
  and	
  15,	
  by	
  neurologists.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  25	
  patients	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  1.	
  	
  The	
  justifications	
  for	
  these	
  ORS	
  assignments	
  are	
  described	
  in	
  detail	
  in	
  Appendix	
  6.	
  	
  No	
  patients	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  0;	
  physicians	
  were	
  either	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  re-­‐contact	
  or	
  the	
  information	
  required	
  to	
  rule	
  out	
  overlap	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  to	
  them	
  (Appendix	
  6).	
  	
  Of	
  the	
  32	
  additional	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  physician	
  surveys,	
  15	
  (47%)	
  were	
  recorded	
  to	
  have	
  undergone	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  and	
  thus	
  be	
  genetically	
  confirmed	
  to	
  have	
  HD	
  and	
  17	
  were	
  diagnosed	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  positive	
  family	
  history	
  and	
  clinical	
  presentation	
  (Table	
  4).	
  	
  	
   	
   Table	
  4.	
  Summary	
  of	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  physician	
  questionnaires	
   	
   Total	
  sent	
   Number	
  Responded	
   Total	
  Response	
  Rate	
   Number	
  of	
  patients	
   Number	
  of	
  BC	
  resident	
  family	
  members	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
   Number	
  of	
  patients	
  not	
  referred	
  to	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  Victoria	
   Number	
  of	
  affected	
  family	
  members	
  of	
  non-­‐referred	
  patients	
  GPs	
   510	
   174	
   34%	
   46	
   17	
   16	
   5	
  Neurologists	
   132	
   42	
   32%	
   54	
   16	
   15	
   6	
  DNA	
  Diagnostic	
  lab	
  referring	
  doctors	
   80	
   27	
   34%	
   13	
   15	
   1	
   1	
  Total	
   722	
   243	
   34%	
   113	
   48	
   32	
   12	
   	
   	
   HD	
  research	
  lab	
  and	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  assessment:	
  	
  Test	
  results	
  were	
  available	
  for	
  929	
  patients;	
  295	
  were	
  diagnostic	
  and	
  634	
  were	
  predictive	
  tests.	
  Of	
  the	
  predictive	
  tests,	
  107	
  of	
  the	
  positive	
  results	
  belonged	
  to	
  patients	
  who	
  became	
  symptomatic	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  	
   Family	
  Surveys:	
  	
  	
   A	
  total	
  of	
  30	
  surveys	
  were	
  distributed	
  to	
  interested	
  participants	
  at	
  the	
  2011	
  HDC	
  family	
  information	
  day.	
  	
  Six	
  surveys	
  (20%)	
  were	
  returned,	
  and	
  reported	
  a	
  total	
  of	
  36	
  HD	
  patients.	
  	
  Only	
  1	
  of	
  the	
  6	
  survey	
  responders	
  (reporting	
  1	
  patient)	
  stated	
   	
   40	
   that	
  this	
  patient	
  had	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH.	
  The	
  remaining	
  5	
  responders	
  did	
  not	
  provide	
  this	
  information;	
  the	
  35	
  reported	
  patients	
  associated	
  with	
  these	
  responses	
  underwent	
  overlap	
  risk	
  analysis.	
  	
  Twenty-­‐nine	
  of	
  these	
  35	
  patients	
  were	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  cases	
  of	
  definite	
  overlap,	
  as	
  they	
  were	
  reported	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  large	
  metropolitan	
  centers	
  and	
  were	
  thus	
  very	
  likely	
  to	
  have	
  been	
  ascertained	
  via	
  chart	
  review	
  or	
  physician	
  survey.	
  	
  Three	
  patients	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2.	
  	
  Two	
  of	
  them	
  reside	
  in	
  Princeton,	
  a	
  city	
  from	
  where	
  no	
  physician	
  survey	
  responses	
  were	
  received	
  and	
  from	
  where	
  no	
  HD	
  clinic	
  families	
  with	
  affected	
  members	
  found	
  on	
  their	
  pedigrees	
  are	
  recorded	
  to	
  live	
  and	
  one	
  resided	
  in	
  Tsawwassen,	
  a	
  city	
  where	
  only	
  one	
  patient	
  had	
  been	
  ascertained	
  via	
  chart	
  review.	
  	
  Three	
  patients	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  1,	
  as	
  all	
  three	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  were	
  also	
  reported	
  to	
  be	
  living	
  in	
  Tsawwassen	
  (Table	
  4,	
  Appendix	
  6).	
  	
  	
   Nursing	
  home	
  assessment:	
  	
   	
   Of	
  the	
  49	
  nursing	
  homes	
  contacted,	
  32	
  homes	
  (65%)	
  were	
  available	
  for	
  contact	
  and	
  provided	
  the	
  requested	
  information.	
  	
  Four	
  homes	
  (8%)	
  reported	
  HD	
  patient	
  residents	
  living	
  in	
  their	
  location:	
  1	
  in	
  Penticton,	
  2	
  in	
  Westbank,	
  1	
  in	
  Powell	
  River	
  and	
  14	
  in	
  Surrey	
  (Appendix	
  6).	
  	
  All	
  14	
  patients	
  from	
  Surrey	
  and	
  the	
  patient	
  from	
  Powell	
  River	
  had	
  already	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  HD	
  medical	
  clinic	
  and	
  were	
  removed	
  from	
  the	
  ORS	
  analysis.	
  	
  The	
  patients	
  from	
  Penticton	
  and	
  Westbank	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2,	
  as	
  the	
  nursing	
  staff	
  was	
  unable	
  to	
  answer	
  the	
  necessary	
  questions	
  required	
  to	
  minimize	
  overlap	
  (Appendix	
  6).	
   	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  totals:	
   	
   For	
  affected	
  individuals	
  ascertained	
  from	
  clinic	
  pedigrees,	
  resident	
  cities	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  formulate	
  questions.	
  	
  Questions	
  maintained	
  the	
  privacy	
  of	
  these	
  non-­‐clinic	
  patients	
  and	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  follow-­‐up	
  with	
  physician	
  questionnaire,	
  family	
  survey	
  and	
  nursing	
  home	
  responders	
  in	
  the	
  best	
  possible	
  attempt	
  to	
  rule	
  out	
  overlap.	
  	
  Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  for	
  each	
  patient	
  ascertained	
  from	
  physician	
  questionnaires,	
  family	
  surveys	
  and	
  nursing	
  homes	
  are	
  listed	
  in	
  column	
  8	
  of	
  Appendix	
  6	
  and	
  each	
  particular	
  case	
  of	
  ORS	
  analysis	
  is	
  described	
  in	
  the	
  footnotes	
   	
   41	
   labeled	
  in	
  column	
  9.	
  	
  No	
  patients	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  0	
  (patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  were	
  not	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  ORS	
  analysis).	
  	
  All	
  follow-­‐up	
  questions	
  either	
  confirmed	
  the	
  existence	
  of	
  overlap	
  or	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  answered	
  (Appendix	
  6).	
  Twenty-­‐eight	
  patients	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  1.	
  	
  Three	
  were	
  ascertained	
  from	
  family	
  survey	
  responses	
  and	
  25	
  from	
  physician	
  questionnaires.	
  Twenty-­‐five	
  patients	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2.	
  	
  Three	
  from	
  long-­‐term	
  care	
  homes,	
  3	
  from	
  family	
  surveys	
  and	
  19	
  from	
  physician	
  questionnaires.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Mortality	
  estimates:	
  	
   A	
  total	
  of	
  30	
  patients	
  were	
  presumed	
  to	
  be	
  deceased	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  the	
  mid	
  and	
  lower	
  prevalence	
  estimates.	
  	
  The	
  difference	
  between	
  the	
  prevalence	
  year	
  (2012)	
  and	
  the	
  year,	
  on	
  which	
  the	
  patients’	
  neurological	
  HD	
  symptoms	
  began,	
  was	
  ≥19	
  for	
  these	
  30	
  patients.	
  	
  Additionally,	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  information	
  in	
  these	
  patients’	
  charts	
  nor	
  in	
  the	
  charts	
  of	
  their	
  family	
  member(s)	
  to	
  suggest	
  these	
  patients	
  are	
  still	
  living.	
  	
  	
   Prevalence	
  calculations	
  The	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  included	
  all	
  certainty	
  measures	
  and	
  all	
  ORS’s.	
  	
  When	
  added	
  to	
  those	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  (509),	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  included	
  was	
  689,	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  prevalence	
  of	
  14.9/100,000	
  (1/6,711)	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  13.8-­‐16.0).	
  	
  The	
  mid	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  included	
  “high”	
  and	
  “medium”	
  certainty	
  measures	
  and	
  ORS’s	
  of	
  0	
  and	
  1	
  and	
  excluded	
  patients	
  presumed	
  to	
  be	
  deceased	
  (30	
  patients).	
  	
  The	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  included	
  was	
  thus	
  623,	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  of	
  13.5/100,000	
  (1/7,407)	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  12.4-­‐14.6).	
  	
  The	
  lower	
  estimate	
  included	
  only	
  “high”	
  certainty	
  measures	
  and	
  ORS’s	
  of	
  0	
  and	
  also	
  excluded	
  patients	
  presumed	
  to	
  be	
  deceased	
  (30),	
  totaling	
  577	
  patients,	
  and	
  thus	
  a	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  of	
  12.5/100,000	
  (1/8,000)	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  11.5-­‐13.5)	
  (Table	
  5,	
  Figure	
  13).	
  	
  The	
  minimum	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  for	
  BC	
  for	
  April	
  1,	
  2012	
  thus	
  ranges	
  from	
  12.5-­‐14.9/100,000	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  11.5-­‐16.0;	
  1/8,696-­‐1/6,250)	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   42	
   Prevalence	
  –	
  individuals	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  	
   Table	
  5.	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  each	
  source	
  under	
  each	
  certainty	
   measure	
  or	
  overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  is	
  shown	
  below.	
  Each	
  of	
  the	
  upper,	
  mid	
  and	
  lower	
   prevalence	
  range	
  calculations	
  is	
  broken	
  down	
  Ascertainment	
  source	
   Certainty	
  measure	
   Definite	
  Overlap	
   Total	
  Low	
   Medium	
   High	
  HD	
  clinic	
  pedigrees	
   11	
   18	
   98	
   	
   127	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
   27	
   	
   383	
   	
   410	
  Victoria	
  General	
  Hospital	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
   3	
   	
   96	
   	
   99	
  Long	
  term	
  care	
  home	
  assessment	
   3	
   	
   	
   15	
   18	
  Family	
  surveys	
   3	
   3	
   	
   30	
   36	
  Physician	
  questionnaires	
   19	
   25	
   	
   117	
   161	
  	
   2	
   1	
   0	
   	
   	
  Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  	
  	
  	
   Prevalence	
  range	
   Upper	
   Mid	
   Lower	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
  included	
   0+1+2	
   0+1	
   0	
  Certainty	
  measures	
  included	
   High	
  +	
  Medium	
  +	
  Low	
   High	
  +	
  Medium	
   High	
  Total	
  patients	
   689	
   623	
   577	
   Minimum	
  prevalence	
  (/100,000)	
   14.9	
   13.5	
   12.5	
  Prevalence	
  (1/X)	
   1/6,711	
   1/7,407	
   1/8,000	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   43	
   Minimum	
  prevalence	
  ranges	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   a.	
   b.	
   c.	
   Figure	
  13.	
  Venn	
  diagrams	
  showing	
  the	
  patient	
  number	
  breakdown	
  for	
  the:	
  a.	
  lower,	
  b.	
   mid	
  and	
  c.	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  range	
   =	
  577	
   =	
  623	
   =	
  689	
   162$52$127$ 348$ Clinic$charts$509$Surveys$+$$nursing$homes$215$Clinic$pedigrees$127$ 162$ 28$ 24$92$ 317$ Clinic$charts$479$ Clinic$pedigrees$116$ Clinic&charts&479& Clinic&pedigrees&98& 162&53&45& 317& 	
   44	
   The	
  ethnic	
  composition	
  of	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  patient	
  population	
  The	
  chart	
  review	
  revealed	
  490	
  patients	
  to	
  be	
  Caucasian,	
  one	
  to	
  be	
  African-­‐North,	
  one	
  American-­‐Latin,	
  six	
  Asian-­‐East,	
  16	
  Asian-­‐West	
  and	
  one	
  Canadian	
  Aboriginal	
  (the	
  Canadian	
  Aboriginal	
  belongs	
  in	
  the	
  EHDN	
  ‘Other’	
  category).	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  approximately	
  113	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  were	
  of	
  unknown	
  ethnicity.	
  	
  The	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  used	
  in	
  this	
  analysis	
  comprises	
  the	
  average	
  of	
  the	
  three	
  prevalence	
  estimates.	
  	
  After	
  extrapolating	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  patients	
  in	
  each	
  ethnic	
  group	
  from	
  the	
  empirical	
  data	
  to	
  include	
  patients	
  from	
  the	
  ‘Unknown’	
  category,	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  Caucasian	
  patients	
  became	
  597,	
  total	
  North	
  African,	
  1;	
  Latin	
  American,	
  1;	
  Canadian	
  Aboriginal,	
  1;	
  East	
  Asian,	
  7	
  and	
  West	
  Asian,	
  20.	
  	
  Appendix	
  7	
  lists	
  the	
  countries	
  of	
  origin	
  and	
  numbers	
  of	
  patients	
  from	
  each	
  country	
  associated	
  with	
  each	
  EHDN	
  ethnic	
  category.	
  	
  Figure	
  14	
  shows	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  the	
  patient	
  population	
  from	
  each	
  ethnic	
  group	
  and	
  the	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  for	
  each	
  group	
  with	
  respect	
  to	
  BC’s	
  population	
  of	
  the	
  specific	
  group	
  in	
  question.	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  14.	
  HD	
  patients	
  in	
  BC	
  separated	
  by	
  ethnicity.	
  The	
  pie	
  chart	
  shows	
  relative	
   proportions	
  of	
  each	
  ethnic	
  group	
  in	
  BC’s	
  patient	
  population.	
  Breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  ‘Other’	
   category	
  shows	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  population	
  from	
  each	
  listed	
  ethnic	
  group.	
   Ethnic-­‐specific	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  are	
  shown	
  in	
  column	
  4	
  of	
  the	
  table.	
   	
  	
   	
   490$(78%)$ 25$(~4%)$ 113$(18%)$ Caucasian$ Other$ Unknown$ Origin&(ethnicity)& & #&of& pa3ents& & & Percent&of& pa3ent& popula3on& & Ethnic9 specific& prevalence& (#/100,000)$ $ Ethnic9 specific& prevalence& (1/X)$ $ Caucasian&(countries$ listed$in$Appendix$7)& 597$ 95%$ 17.2& 1/5,815$ Tanzania& (AfricanINorth)$ 1$ 0.2%$ 4.14& 1/24,155$ Mexico$$ (AmericanILaNn)$ 1$ 0.2%$ 4.05& 1/24,691$ Philippines,&Hong& Kong&(AsianIEast)$ 7$ 1.2%$ 0.78& 1/128,205$ Pakistan,& Afghanistan,&India,& Iran,&Iraq&(AsianI West)$ 20$ 3.0%$ 3.01& 1/33,222$ Aboriginal9Canada&& (Other)$ 1$ 0.2%$ 0.57& 1/175,439$ Number of patients in BC (% of total) 	
   45	
   Geographic	
  distribution	
  of	
  patients	
  Patients	
  were	
  ascertained	
  from	
  96	
  cities	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  Appendix	
  6	
  shows	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  each	
  source	
  and	
  from	
  each	
  city.	
  	
  A	
  range	
  of	
  231-­‐245	
  (48%)	
  HD	
  patients	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  “Rural”	
  BC	
  –	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car.	
  	
  This	
  range	
  reflects	
  the	
  lower	
  and	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  respectively.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  average	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  for	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  22.1/100,000	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  19.3-­‐24.9;	
  1/5,181-­‐1/4,016).	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  248-­‐264	
  (52%)	
  patients	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  “Urban”	
  BC	
  –	
  within	
  two	
  hours	
  by	
  car	
  from	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  The	
  average	
  prevalence	
  for	
  this	
  region	
  was	
  estimated	
  at	
  7.2/100,000	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  6.4-­‐8.1;	
  15,625-­‐1/12,346),	
  whereas	
  the	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  was	
  9.3/100,000.	
  	
  The	
  prevalence	
  is	
  significantly	
  lower	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region	
  that	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  (P<0.0001,	
  t=10.2)	
  (Figure	
  15).	
  	
  The	
  ratio	
  of	
  “Urban”:	
  “Rural”	
  prevalence	
  is	
  1:3.1.	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  15.	
  Prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  separated	
  by	
  “Rural”	
  and	
  “Urban”	
  BC	
   	
   Rural=	
  more	
  than	
  2	
  hours	
  away	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car;	
  	
   Urban=	
  within	
  two	
  hours	
  by	
  car	
  from	
  Vancouver	
   Rural Urban Vancouver Victoria Prince George 231-245 patients (48%) ~22.1/100,000 264-248 patients (52%) ~7.2/100,000 	
   46	
   Figure	
  16	
  shows	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  living	
  in	
  each	
  provincial	
  health	
  region.	
  	
  The	
  lower	
  range	
  includes	
  patients	
  with	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  0	
  and	
  a	
  high	
  certainty	
  measure	
  and	
  the	
  upper	
  range	
  includes	
  all	
  patients	
  (ORS	
  of	
  0,	
  1	
  and	
  2	
  and	
  high,	
  medium	
  and	
  low	
  certainty	
  measures).	
  	
  The	
  regional	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  range	
  from	
  8.9/100,000	
  (1/11,236),	
  in	
  the	
  Fraser	
  health	
  authority,	
  to	
  20.4/100,000	
  (1/4,902)	
  in	
  the	
  Vancouver	
  Island	
  Health	
  Authority	
  however	
  the	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  in	
  all	
  health	
  regions	
  do	
  not	
  differ	
  significantly	
  from	
  one	
  another	
  (ANOVA,	
  F=1.83,	
  P=0.26)	
  (Figure	
  16).	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  16.	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  living	
  in	
  each	
  British	
  Columbian	
  health	
  region	
   based	
  on	
  lower	
  and	
  upper	
  prevalence	
  range.	
  The	
  colour	
  key	
  shows	
  the	
  prevalence	
   (/100,000)	
  for	
  each	
  respective	
  region.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   32 – 47 patients 84 – 124 patients 148 – 199 patients 125 – 162 patients 115 – 140 patients 10.3 – 15.1         Northern health 11.1 – 13.5         Vancouver Coastal health 10.9 – 16.1         Interior health 15.7 –  20.4        Vancouver Island health 8.9 – 12.0          Fraser health Regional Prevalence (#/100,000) Health region 	
   47	
   Minimum	
  Incidence	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  350	
  incident	
  cases	
  were	
  counted	
  between	
  2000-­‐2011.	
  	
  Of	
  these,	
  235	
  (67%)	
  were	
  positive	
  diagnostic	
  test	
  recipients,	
  85	
  (24%)	
  were	
  positive	
  predictive	
  test	
  recipients	
  who	
  had	
  experienced	
  symptom	
  onset	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period,	
  and	
  30	
  (9%)	
  were	
  patients	
  who	
  had	
  not	
  undergone	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  or	
  for	
  whom	
  results	
  were	
  not	
  available	
  but	
  who	
  had	
  experienced	
  symptom	
  onset	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period	
  (Table	
  6).	
  	
  The	
  yearly	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD	
  between	
  2000-­‐2011	
  ranged	
  from	
  3.7	
  per	
  million/	
  year	
  in	
  2011	
  to	
  9.1	
  per	
  million/year	
  in	
  2005.	
  	
  The	
  average	
  incidence	
  was	
  7.2	
  per	
  million/year	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  6.5-­‐7.9)	
  over	
  the	
  twelve-­‐year	
  period	
  (Figure	
  17,	
  Table	
  6).	
  	
  The	
  diagnostic	
  test-­‐positive	
  rate	
  ranged	
  from	
  1.6-­‐4.8	
  per	
  million/year	
  with	
  an	
  average	
  of	
  3.3	
  per	
  million/year	
  over	
  the	
  ten-­‐year	
  period	
  (Table	
  6).	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   6.9	
   6.9	
   8.8	
   8.5	
   8.4	
   9.1	
   5.2	
   8.6	
   7.8	
   7.2	
   5.5	
   3.7	
   0	
   2	
   4	
   6	
   8	
   10	
   12	
   14	
   2000	
   2001	
   2002	
   2003	
   2004	
   2005	
   2006	
   2007	
   2008	
   2009	
   2010	
   2011	
   Inciden ce	
  (/m illion/y ear)	
   	
   Figure	
  17.	
  Estimates	
  of	
  incidence	
  (/million/year)	
  from	
  2000-­‐2011.	
  Error	
   bars	
  represent	
  95%	
  confidence	
  intervals	
   	
   48	
   Table	
  6.	
  	
  Breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  incidence	
  calculation	
  showing	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  BC,	
  the	
   number	
  of	
  cases	
  included	
  from	
  each	
  source,	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  incident	
  cases	
  and	
   the	
  diagnostic	
  test	
  (DT)-­‐positive	
  rate	
  for	
  each	
  year	
  between	
  2000-­‐2011	
   Year	
   Pop.	
  of	
  BC	
  	
   #	
  of	
  (+)	
  DT	
  	
   #	
  of	
  (+)	
  PT	
  and	
  symptom	
  onset	
  (2000-­‐2011)	
   #	
  with	
  symptom	
  onset	
  –	
  test	
  unavailable	
   Total	
  #	
  incident	
  cases	
   Incidence	
  (/million/yr.)	
  (95%	
  CI)	
   DT	
  positive	
  rate	
  (/million/yr.)	
  (95%	
  CI)	
  2000	
   4039200	
   19	
   7	
   2	
   28	
   6.9	
  (4.4-­‐9.5)	
   3.7	
  (2.0-­‐5.4)	
  2001	
   4,076,264	
   16	
   8	
   4	
   28	
   6.9	
  (4.3-­‐9.4)	
   2.2	
  (1.1-­‐3.2)	
  2002	
   4,098,178	
   24	
   8	
   4	
   36	
   8.8	
  (5.9-­‐11.7)	
   4.4	
  (2.6-­‐6.2)	
  2003	
   4,122,396	
   31	
   3	
   1	
   35	
   8.5	
  (5.7-­‐11.3)	
   3.4	
  (2.2-­‐4.6)	
  2004	
   4,155,170	
   23	
   11	
   1	
   35	
   8.4	
  (5.6-­‐11.2)	
   4.6	
  (2.7-­‐6.5)	
  2005	
   4,196,788	
   28	
   9	
   1	
   38	
   9.1	
  (6.2-­‐11.9)	
   4.8	
  (3.0-­‐6.6)	
  2006	
   4,243,580	
   16	
   4	
   2	
   22	
   5.2	
  (3.0-­‐7.4)	
   2.4	
  (1.2-­‐3.6)	
  2007	
   4,309,632	
   21	
   10	
   6	
   37	
   8.6	
  (5.8-­‐11.4)	
   3.9	
  (2.2-­‐5.6)	
  2008	
   4,383,860	
   25	
   8	
   1	
   34	
   7.8	
  (5.2-­‐10.4)	
   2.7	
  (1.6-­‐3.8)	
  2009	
   4,460,292	
   15	
   12	
   5	
   32	
   7.2	
  (4.7-­‐9.7)	
   1.6	
  (0.79-­‐2.4)	
  2010	
   4,530,960	
   17	
   5	
   3	
   25	
   5.5	
  (3.4-­‐7.7)	
   2.0	
  (1.0-­‐3.0)	
  2011	
   4,472,600	
   7	
   1	
   9	
   17	
   3.7	
  (1.2-­‐5.5)	
   1.1	
  (0.29-­‐1.9)	
  Total	
   	
   235	
   85	
   30	
   350	
     Mean	
   4,257,410	
   20	
   7	
   3	
   32	
   7.2	
  (6.5-­‐7.9)	
   3.1	
  (1.7-­‐4.5)	
  %	
   	
   67%	
   24%	
   9%	
   	
   	
    	
  	
   ICD	
  codes	
  and	
  mortality	
  rates:	
   	
   BC	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  only	
  began	
  to	
  record	
  the	
  annual	
  breakdown	
  for	
  ICD	
  code	
  333.4	
  (Huntington’s	
  disease)	
  in	
  the	
  year	
  2000.	
  	
  Prior	
  to	
  2000,	
  annual	
  reports	
  only	
  considered	
  larger	
  categories,	
  and	
  HD	
  was	
  grouped	
  in	
  with	
  ICD	
  code	
  333.0.	
  	
  Annual	
  reports	
  were	
  only	
  available	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  year	
  2009	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  Agency	
  2000-­‐2009).	
  	
  The	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  recorded	
  at	
  death	
  under	
  ICD	
  code	
  333.4	
  between	
  2000-­‐2009	
  is	
  124	
  and	
  the	
  highest	
  number	
  recorded	
  in	
  a	
  single	
  year	
  occurred	
  in	
  2004	
  and	
  reported	
  19	
  individuals	
  with	
  HD	
  as	
  their	
  cause	
  of	
  death	
  (Table	
  7).	
  	
  The	
  average	
  mortality	
  rate	
  for	
  HD	
  when	
  taking	
  only	
  ICD	
  codes	
  into	
  account	
  is	
  2.9	
  per	
  million/year	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  1.3-­‐4.5)	
  between	
  2000-­‐2009	
  with	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  1.5-­‐4.6	
  per	
  million/year	
  (Table	
  7).	
  	
  	
   	
   49	
   Table	
  7.	
  Number	
  of	
  patients	
  recorded	
  at	
  death	
  under	
  ICD	
  code	
  333.0	
  and	
  333.4	
   between	
  2000	
  and	
  2009	
   Year	
   Number	
  ICD	
  333.0	
  recorded	
   Mortality	
  rate	
  for	
   CNS	
  atrophies	
   (/million/yr)	
   (95%	
  CI)	
   Number	
  ICD	
  333.4	
   recorded	
   Mortality	
  rate	
   for	
  HD	
   (/million/yr)	
   (95%	
  CI)	
  2000	
   Not	
  available	
   Not	
  available	
   10	
   2.5	
  (1.0-­‐4.1)	
  2001	
   Not	
  available	
   Not	
  available	
   12	
   2.9	
  (1.3-­‐4.5)	
  2002	
   Not	
  available	
   Not	
  available	
   7	
   1.7	
  (0.4-­‐3.0)	
  2003	
   Not	
  available	
   Not	
  available	
   6	
   1.5	
  (0.3-­‐2.7)	
  2004	
   111.3	
   24.3	
  (23.0-­‐28.8)	
   19	
   4.6	
  (2.5-­‐6.7)	
  2005	
   116.8	
   25.6	
  (23.7-­‐30.2)	
   14	
   3.3	
  (1.6-­‐5.0)	
  2006	
   133.3	
   24.8	
  (21.5-­‐29.0)	
   15	
   3.5	
  (1.7-­‐5.3)	
  	
  (	
  2007	
   122.6	
   26.8	
  (22.1-­‐31.5)	
   10	
   2.3	
  (0.9-­‐3.7)	
  2008	
   126.2	
   27.6	
  (22.8-­‐32.4)	
   16	
   3.6	
  (1.8-­‐5.4)	
  2009	
   Not	
  available	
   Not	
  available	
   15	
   3.4	
  (1.7-­‐5.1)	
   Total	
   610.2	
   	
   124	
   	
   Average	
   122.0	
   25.8	
   12.4	
   2.9	
  (1.3-­‐4.5)	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   50	
   Minimum	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
   A-­‐priori	
  risk	
  categories:	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  2,252	
  patients	
  in	
  BC	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  for	
  HD,	
  signifying	
  that	
  approximately	
  49.2/100,000	
  (1/2,047)	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  are	
  at	
  50%	
  risk.	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  2,045	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  25%	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  and	
  therefore	
  approximately	
  44.7/100,000	
  (1/2,254)	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  are	
  at	
  25%	
  risk.	
  Taken	
  together,	
  a	
  total	
  of	
  4,297	
  individuals	
  in	
  BC	
  (94.0/100,000	
  or	
  1/1,073)	
  are	
  at	
  either	
  25	
  or	
  50%	
  risk	
  for	
  HD.	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  920	
  (21%)	
  of	
  these	
  individuals	
  possessed	
  clinic	
  files	
  and	
  the	
  remaining	
  3,377	
  (79%)	
  were	
  discovered	
  on	
  family	
  pedigrees	
  but	
  did	
  not	
  themselves	
  possess	
  clinic	
  files	
  (Table	
  8).	
  	
   	
   Table	
  8.	
  	
  Breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  priori	
  risk	
  categories	
   Risk	
  Category	
   Seen	
  at	
  Clinic	
   Discovered	
  on	
  pedigrees	
   Total	
   Proportion	
  of	
   population	
   (/100,000)	
   Proportion	
  of	
   population	
   (1/X)	
   50%	
   787	
   1465	
   2,252	
   49.2	
   1/2,047	
   25%	
   133	
   1912	
   2,045	
   44.7	
   1/2,254	
   	
   920	
   3377	
   4,297	
   94.0	
   1/1,073	
  	
  	
   Of	
  the	
  920	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  ascertained	
  from	
  the	
  chart	
  review,	
  the	
  city	
  of	
  residence	
  was	
  known	
  for	
  859	
  of	
  them,	
  762	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  and	
  97	
  at	
  25%	
  risk.	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  315	
  of	
  those	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  “Rural”	
  BC	
  –	
  in	
  cities	
  that	
  are	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  by	
  car	
  from	
  Vancouver;	
  45	
  of	
  those	
  at	
  25%	
  risk	
  were	
  also	
  found	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  447	
  of	
  those	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  “Urban”	
  BC	
  –	
  within	
  two	
  hours	
  by	
  car	
  from	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  52	
  at	
  25%	
  risk	
  were	
  also	
  found	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region.	
  	
  Using	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  “Rural”	
  BC,	
  1,075,589	
  (23%	
  of	
  the	
  total	
  population)	
  (British	
  Columbia	
  Statistics,	
  2012),	
  the	
  remaining	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  –	
  3,438	
  –	
  was	
  assigned	
  a	
  “Rural”	
  or	
  “Urban”	
  designation.	
  	
  Twenty-­‐three	
  percent	
  of	
  these	
  individuals	
  were	
  assigned	
  to	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  and	
  77%,	
  to	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region.	
  	
  In	
  total,	
  approximately	
  1/536	
  appear	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region,	
  whereas	
  1/1,123	
  appear	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  risk	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region	
  (Figure	
  18).	
   	
   51	
   Figure	
  18.	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  separated	
  by	
  “Rural”	
  and	
  “Urban”	
  BC	
   Rural=	
  more	
  than	
  2	
  hours	
  away	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car;	
  	
   Urban=	
  within	
  two	
  hours	
  by	
  car	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  	
   Of	
  the	
  920	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  who	
  were	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  clinic,	
  the	
  charts	
  belonging	
  to	
  859	
  of	
  these	
  individuals	
  included	
  information	
  regarding	
  their	
  provincial	
  health	
  region	
  of	
  residence.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  3,438	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  were	
  distributed	
  among	
  health	
  regions	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  the	
  general	
  population	
  living	
  in	
  each	
  region	
  (the	
  859	
  individuals	
  with	
  known	
  addresses	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  dispersed	
  in	
  this	
  manner).	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  58	
  (7%)	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  reside	
  in	
  the	
  Northern	
  health	
  region,	
  236	
  (27%),	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  Coastal	
  health;	
  157	
  (18%),	
  in	
  the	
  Interior;	
  128	
  (15%)	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  Island	
  health	
  and	
  281	
  (33%)	
  in	
  the	
  Fraser	
  health	
  region	
  (Figure	
  19).	
  	
  	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  roughly	
  1/1,074	
  in	
  the	
  Northern	
  health	
  region;	
  1/1,029	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  Coastal	
   Rural (23% population) Urban (77% population) Vancouver Victoria Prince George Risk% Empirical% %Total% Theore3cal% Total% 50%$ 315% 41%% 342$ 657$ 25%$ 45% 46%% 448$ 493$ 2,005$ Total$at$risk:$~1/536$ Risk% Empirical% %Total% Theore3cal% Total% 50%$ 447% 59%% 1,147$ 1,594$ 25%$ 52% 54%% 1,500$ 1,552$ 3,146$ Total$at$risk:$~1/1,123$ 	
   52	
   health;	
  1/1,054	
  in	
  the	
  Interior;	
  1/1,106	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  Island	
  health	
  and	
  1/1,094	
  in	
  the	
  Fraser	
  health	
  region	
  (Figure	
  19).	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  19.	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  each	
  provincial	
  health	
  region	
   	
   	
   Risk	
  categories	
  after	
  accounting	
  for	
  genetic	
  test	
  results:	
  When	
  taking	
  into	
  account	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  results	
  available	
  from	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  along	
  with	
  the	
  CMMT	
  research	
  lab	
  and	
  the	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab,	
  a	
  negative/decreased	
  risk	
  and	
  a	
  Pre-­‐manifest	
  risk	
  category	
  are	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  analysis.	
  	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  344	
  individuals	
  make	
  up	
  the	
  negative/decreased	
  risk	
  category	
  and	
  326	
  make	
  up	
  the	
  pre-­‐manifest	
  category.	
  	
  Of	
  these	
  326	
  individuals	
  with	
  positive	
  predictive	
  test	
  results,	
  36	
  of	
  them	
  were	
  discovered	
  on	
  pedigrees	
  and	
  did	
  not	
  themselves	
  possess	
  clinic	
  files.	
  	
  These	
  individuals	
  were	
  likely	
  tested	
  in	
  another	
  province	
  or	
  country	
  but	
  currently	
  reside	
  in	
                  Regional population at risk 58 (7%) 157 (18%) 281 (33%) 236 (27%) 128 (15%) 50%$ $ 25%$ $ $ Total$ $ Popula.on$$ at$risk$ (1/X)& Health$region$ $ Empirical$ Theore.cal$ Empirical$ Theore.cal$ 52& 101& 6& 133& 292& 1,074& Northern$ 210& 338& 26& 442& 1016& 1,029& Vancouver$Coastal$ 139& 251& 18& 328& 736& 1,054& Interior$ 109& 258& 19& 338& 724& 1,106& Vancouver$Island$ 253& 541& 28& 707& 1,529& 1,094& Fraser$ $$Total$ 2,252$ 2,045$ 4,297$ 1,073$ 	
   53	
   BC.	
  	
  Approximately	
  1/14,141	
  individuals	
  in	
  BC	
  are	
  thus	
  highly	
  likely	
  to	
  develop	
  HD	
  in	
  the	
  future	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  confirmation	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  mutation.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  3,627	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  have	
  not	
  undergone	
  the	
  genetic	
  test;	
  2,045	
  remain	
  with	
  a	
  25%	
  a-­‐	
   priori	
  risk	
  and	
  1,582	
  with	
  an	
  a	
  priori	
  risk	
  of	
  50%	
  (Table	
  9).	
   	
   Table	
  9.	
  	
  Break	
  down	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  based	
  on	
  risk	
  categories	
  after	
   accounting	
  for	
  genetic	
  test	
  results	
   	
   Seen	
  at	
   Clinic	
   Discovered	
  on	
   pedigrees	
   Total	
   Proportion	
  of	
   population	
   (/100,000)	
   Proportion	
  of	
   population	
   (1/X)	
   Tested	
   	
   0%	
  (Direct	
  mutation)	
   293	
   0	
   344	
   8.6	
   1/11,574	
   Negative	
  (Linkage	
  analysis)	
   51	
   0	
   100%	
   255	
   36	
   326	
   7.1	
   1/14,027	
  Positive	
  (Linkage	
  analysis)	
   35	
   0	
   Untested	
   	
   25%	
   95	
   1950	
   2,045	
   43.9	
   1/2,278	
   50%	
   323	
   1259	
   1,582	
   38.3	
   1/2,611	
   Total	
   	
   	
   4297	
   94	
   1/1,073	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   54	
   Predictive	
  testing	
  A	
  total	
  of	
  634	
  British	
  Columbians	
  have	
  participated	
  in	
  the	
  predictive	
  testing	
  program	
  in	
  BC	
  since	
  1987;	
  290	
  (46%)	
  of	
  which	
  revealed	
  positive	
  and	
  344	
  (54%)	
  of	
  which	
  revealed	
  negative	
  results.	
  	
  Of	
  these	
  634	
  total	
  tests,	
  86	
  (14%)	
  were	
  performed	
  via	
  linkage	
  analysis	
  and	
  548	
  (86%)	
  via	
  direct	
  mutation	
  testing	
  (Figure	
  20).	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  20.	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  predictive	
  tests	
  provided	
  in	
  BC	
  between	
  1987	
  and	
  April	
   2012.	
  The	
  bottom	
  section	
  of	
  each	
  bar	
  shows	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  linkage	
  tests	
  and	
  the	
  top	
   portion	
  shows	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  direct	
  mutation	
  tests	
   	
  	
   Uptake:	
  The	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  the	
  12-­‐year	
  period	
  between	
  April	
  1,	
  2000	
  and	
  April	
  1,	
  2012	
  using	
  two	
  separate	
  methods	
  of	
  estimating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  and	
  two	
  separate	
  methods	
  of	
  calculating	
  the	
  uptake.	
  	
  Using	
  the	
  empirical	
  data	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  to	
  estimate	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk,	
  the	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  was	
  calculated	
  at	
  21%	
  and	
  13%,	
  using	
  the	
  original	
  formula	
  and	
  then	
  the	
  Tassicker	
  formula	
  respectively	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003,	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
  	
  The	
  second	
  method	
  of	
  estimating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  was	
  to	
  use	
  theoretical	
  data	
  -­‐	
  multiply	
  the	
  prevalence	
  (13.9/100,000	
  –	
  an	
  average	
  of	
  all	
  three	
  ranges	
  calculated	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  study)	
  by	
  4.2.	
  Using	
  this	
  method,	
  the	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  was	
  calculated	
  to	
  be	
  18%	
  and	
  11%	
  with	
  respect	
  to	
  the	
  original	
  formula	
  and	
  the	
  formula	
  revised	
  by	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  (Table	
  10).	
  	
   35	
   51	
   86	
   255	
   293	
   548	
   0	
  100	
   200	
  300	
   400	
  500	
   600	
  700	
   Positive	
  predictive	
  tests	
   Negative	
  predictive	
  tests	
   Total	
  predictive	
  tests	
  Linkage	
  analysis	
   Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
   344 290 634 Numbe r	
   	
  (of	
  pre dictive 	
  tests	
  p erform ed)	
   	
   	
   55	
   Table	
  10.	
  The	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  BC	
  (2000-­‐2012)	
  using	
  two	
  separate	
   methods	
  for	
  estimating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  and	
  two	
  separate	
  equations	
  for	
   calculating	
  uptake	
   	
   #	
  of	
  individuals	
   at	
  50%	
  risk	
  in	
   the	
  population	
   Minus	
   population	
  <18	
   years	
   D	
   Uptake	
  	
  (0riginal)	
  D/P	
   Uptake	
  	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.)	
  D/(P+P*t/18.8)	
   	
  Empirical	
  	
   (ascertained	
  from	
  BC)	
   2,252	
   1,351	
   280	
   21%	
   13%	
   Theoretical	
  	
   (prevalence	
  x4.2)	
   2,536	
   1,522	
   280	
   18%	
   11%	
   	
   D=	
  number	
  of	
  predictive	
  tests	
  performed;	
  P=	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  in	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  who	
  are	
  eligible	
  for	
  predictive	
  testing	
  (age	
  18	
  or	
  above);	
  t=number	
  of	
  years	
  in	
  the	
  study	
  period;	
  18.8=	
  average	
  duration	
  of	
  disease	
  (HD	
  symptoms)	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
   	
   	
   	
   56	
   Discussion	
   Prevalence	
  	
  The	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  presented	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  for	
  the	
  province	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  ranges	
  from	
  12.5-­‐14.9/100,000	
  (1/8,000-­‐	
  1/6,711)	
  (mean=13.6/100,000	
  (1/7,353),	
  95%CI:	
  11.9-­‐16.0	
  (1/8,403-­‐1/6,250).	
  	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  highest	
  reported	
  prevalence	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  since	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  in	
  1993	
  (Figure	
  21).	
  	
  When	
  comparing	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  from	
  studies	
  performed	
  after	
  1993,	
  only	
  three	
  studies	
  presented	
  comparable	
  findings	
  to	
  those	
  from	
  BC:	
  Malta,	
  Northern	
  Ireland	
  and	
  the	
  UK	
  (Figure	
  21).	
  	
  The	
  prevalence	
  estimated	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  study	
  is	
  significantly	
  higher	
  than	
  both	
  previous	
  estimates	
  from	
  Canada	
  (χ2=207.3,	
  p<0.001,	
  df=2)	
  (Figure22).	
  	
  It	
  is	
  also	
  higher	
  than	
  those	
  estimates	
  from	
  Northern	
  Ireland	
  	
  (10.6/100,000,	
  95%	
  CI:	
  9.1-­‐12.1,	
  χ2=9.1,	
  p<0.01,	
  df=1)	
  and	
  the	
  UK	
  (12.4/100,000,	
  95%CI:	
  12.1-­‐12.7,	
  χ2=5.46,	
  p<0.05,	
  df=1)	
  (Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2010,	
  Rawlins,	
  2010),	
  but	
  is	
  not	
  significantly	
  higher	
  than	
  the	
  estimate	
  from	
  Malta	
  (11.8,	
  95%CI:	
  8.3-­‐15.3,	
  χ2=0.95,	
  p>0.05,	
  df=1)	
  (Gassivaro	
  Gallo	
  et	
  al.	
  1994).	
  	
  The	
  island	
  of	
  Malta	
  has	
  a	
  relatively	
  small	
  population	
  size	
  and	
  has	
  attributed	
  its	
  abnormally	
  high	
  prevalence	
  to	
  a	
  founder	
  effect	
  associated	
  with	
  Maritime	
  traffic	
  (Gassivaro	
  Gallo,	
  1994).	
  	
  Ascertainment	
  efforts	
  for	
  the	
  Irish	
  study	
  were	
  limited	
  to	
  a	
  hospital	
  registry	
  (Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2010).	
  	
  The	
  UK	
  prevalence	
  was	
  estimated	
  from	
  only	
  a	
  single	
  ascertainment	
  source,	
  consisting	
  of	
  an	
  HD	
  Association	
  clientele	
  count.	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  extensive	
  ascertainment	
  efforts	
  and	
  no	
  conformation	
  or	
  follow-­‐up	
  of	
  cases,	
  this	
  study	
  requires	
  repetition	
  with	
  improved	
  methodology	
  to	
  achieve	
  more	
  accurate	
  results	
  (Rawlins	
  2010).	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   57	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   Figure	
  21.	
  Prevalence	
  estimate	
  for	
  each	
  region	
  shown	
  over	
  time	
  including	
   updated	
  BC	
  average	
   Prevale nce	
  (/1 00,000 )	
   5.8	
  4.8	
  2.7	
   0	
   1.6	
   8.4	
   1.3	
   7	
   4.5	
   0.2	
   10	
   5.6	
   5	
   0.5	
   4.9	
   0.8	
  1.7	
   4.3	
   0.4	
   5	
   6.4	
  5.4	
   11.8	
   0.7	
   8	
  10.6	
   1	
   5.2	
   0.42	
   3.95	
  4	
   0.5	
   8	
   12.4	
  13.6	
   0	
  2	
   4	
  6	
   8	
  10	
   12	
  14	
   16	
   Norwa y	
   Poland 	
  (Prusz kow)	
   Iceland 	
   Guam	
  ( Chamo rros)	
   Belgium 	
  	
   Canada 	
  (Manit oba	
  &	
   South	
  A frica	
   Tanzan ia	
  (Mou nt	
   Yugosl avia	
  (R ijeka	
  d istrict) 	
   Nigeria 	
  (Ibada n)	
   UK	
  (Sc otland, 	
  Gramp ian,	
   Swede n	
   France 	
  (North -­‐West) 	
   Finland 	
   UK	
  (En gland,	
   Cornw all)	
   Zimbab we	
  (Ma nicalan d	
   India	
  ( Pakista n,	
  Punj ab	
  and 	
   USA	
   China	
  ( Hong	
  K ong)	
   Italy	
  (A osta)	
   UK	
  (Ire land,	
  N orthern )	
   Spain	
  ( Valenc ia)	
   Malta	
   Japan	
  ( San-­‐in) 	
   Austra lia	
   N.	
  Irela nd	
   Croatia 	
   Sloven ia	
   Taiwan 	
   Greece 	
   Mexico 	
   Venezu ela	
   UK	
   UK	
   BC	
  1930	
   2012	
   	
   1993-­‐2010	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  available	
  	
   <1993:	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
   Figure	
  22.	
  Canadian	
  estimates	
  of	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  over	
  time.	
  Error	
  bars	
   represent	
  95%	
  confidence	
  intervals	
   3.4	
   8.4	
   13.6	
   0	
  2	
   4	
  6	
   8	
  10	
   12	
  14	
   16	
   1963	
   1975	
   2012	
  Quebec	
   Canadian	
  Prairies	
   BC	
   Prevale nce	
  (/1 00,000 )	
   	
   1993-­‐2010	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  available 	
   <1993:	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test 	
   58	
   An	
  important	
  question	
  to	
  ponder	
  is	
  whether	
  the	
  increase	
  in	
  prevalence	
  reported	
  here	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  both	
  global	
  and	
  Canadian	
  studies	
  performed	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  (Figure	
  21	
  &	
  22),	
  is	
  due	
  to	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  the	
  true	
  prevalence	
  or	
  simply	
  an	
  improvement	
  in	
  ascertainment	
  methodology.	
  	
  Factors	
  that	
  may	
  contribute	
  to	
  a	
  true	
  increase	
  in	
  the	
  prevalence	
  are:	
  1)	
  the	
  aging	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  and	
  2)	
  the	
  introduction	
  of	
  new	
  HD	
  mutations.	
  	
  	
  The	
  proportion	
  of	
  the	
  world	
  population	
  over	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  65	
  has	
  increased	
  by	
  10%	
  and	
  the	
  Canadian	
  population	
  aged	
  45-­‐64	
  has	
  increased	
  by	
  10%	
  since	
  the	
  1980’s	
  (StatisticsCanada	
  2008);	
  these	
  cohorts	
  have	
  likely	
  increased	
  further	
  since	
  the	
  1960’s	
  and	
  1970’s	
  when	
  the	
  bulk	
  of	
  worldwide	
  studies	
  and	
  the	
  most	
  recent	
  Canadian	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  studies	
  were	
  performed.	
  	
  The	
  global	
  life	
  expectancy	
  has	
  increased	
  by	
  16	
  years	
  and	
  by	
  10	
  years	
  in	
  Canada	
  alone	
  since	
  the	
  1960’s	
  (Figure	
  23).	
  	
  Taken	
  together,	
  an	
  aging	
  population	
  and	
  the	
  tendency	
  of	
  HD	
  to	
  manifest	
  in	
  mid-­‐life,	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  individuals	
  who	
  are	
  experiencing	
  HD	
  symptoms	
  at	
  any	
  given	
  time	
  may	
  have	
  increased.	
  	
  With	
  an	
  increasing	
  life	
  expectancy	
  –	
  a	
  population	
  that	
  is	
  living	
  longer	
  –	
  there	
  is	
  an	
  elevated	
  possibility	
  for	
  late	
  onset	
  HD	
  to	
  manifest	
  before	
  death.	
  	
  Both	
  of	
  these	
  factors	
  may	
  contribute	
  to	
  a	
  true	
  increase	
  in	
  the	
  prevalence.	
  	
  New	
  mutations	
  for	
  HD	
  have	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  arise	
  at	
  a	
  rate	
  of	
  approximately	
  10%	
  in	
  the	
  population	
  of	
  HD	
  patients	
  (Falush	
  et	
  al.	
  2000).	
  	
  New	
  mutations	
  introduced	
  into	
  the	
  population	
  have	
  the	
  potential	
  to	
  further	
  increase	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD.	
  	
  Factors	
  that	
  may	
  contribute	
  to	
  a	
  perceived	
  rather	
  than	
  true	
  increase	
  in	
  prevalence	
  are	
  the	
  improved	
  potential	
  for,	
  and	
  rigor	
  in,	
  obtaining	
  complete	
  ascertainment	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  those	
  conducted	
  in	
  the	
  past.	
  	
  There	
  is	
  ample	
  potential	
  for	
  complete	
  ascertainment	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  A	
  single	
  lab	
  is	
  responsible	
  for	
  performing	
  all	
  genetic	
  tests	
  for	
  HD	
  for	
  the	
  entire	
  province	
  and	
  specialized	
  professionals	
  at	
  only	
  two	
  facilities	
  -­‐	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  -­‐	
  provide	
  HD-­‐specific	
  care	
  to	
  patients	
  and	
  families	
  from	
  all	
  around	
  the	
  province	
  associated	
  with	
  this	
  disease.	
  	
  In	
  2000,	
  it	
  was	
  shown	
  that	
  BC	
  had	
  provided	
  a	
  larger	
  number	
  of	
  total	
  genetic	
  tests	
  (predictive	
  and	
  diagnostic)	
  for	
  HD,	
  proportional	
  to	
  its	
  population	
  size,	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  province	
  in	
  Canada.	
  	
  However,	
  Quebec	
  and	
  Alberta	
  were	
  not	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  analysis	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  Having	
  been	
  the	
  first	
  province	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  predictive	
  test,	
  BC’s	
  population	
  may	
  have	
  a	
  greater	
  awareness	
  of	
  the	
   	
   59	
   test	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  other	
  provinces,	
  further	
  emphasizing	
  the	
  high	
  potential	
  for	
  full	
  ascertainment	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  when	
  compared	
  to	
  previous	
  assessments,	
  a	
  greater	
  number	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  and	
  a	
  greater	
  variation	
  in	
  ascertainment	
  methods	
  were	
  applied	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  Multiple	
  methods	
  of	
  communication	
  and	
  nine	
  sources	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  were	
  utilized	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  analysis	
  whereas	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  sources	
  employed	
  in	
  all	
  other	
  worldwide	
  studies	
  conducted	
  after	
  1993	
  ranged	
  only	
  from	
  one	
  to	
  three	
  	
  (Table	
  11).	
  	
  Ten	
  of	
  the	
  14	
  studies	
  compared	
  in	
  Table	
  11	
  obtained	
  results	
  from	
  genetic	
  testing	
  centers	
  alone	
  with	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  2	
  of	
  these	
  studies,	
  which	
  used	
  both	
  testing	
  centers	
  and	
  clinic	
  and/or	
  hospital	
  records.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  studies	
  either	
  used	
  hospital	
  and/or	
  clinic	
  records	
  alone	
  or	
  other	
  methods	
  (Table	
  11).	
  	
  Only	
  two	
  and	
  five	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  were	
  employed	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  recent	
  Canadian	
  studies	
  (Barbeau	
  et	
  al.	
  1964,	
  Shokeir	
  1975).	
  	
  Although	
  the	
  aging	
  population	
  and	
  new	
  mutations	
  have	
  the	
  potential	
  to	
  contribute	
  to	
  an	
  elevated	
  prevalence,	
  these	
  factors	
  are	
  likely	
  not	
  weighted	
  enough	
  to	
  produce	
  the	
  magnitude	
  of	
  increase	
  observed	
  here.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  likely	
  that	
  this	
  observed	
  increase	
  is	
  primarily	
  due	
  to	
  improved	
  ascertainment	
  methods	
  and	
  represents	
  a	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  true	
  prevalence	
  of	
  the	
  disease	
  in	
  this	
  population.	
  It	
  is	
  possible	
  that	
  the	
  prevalence	
  observed	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  is	
  the	
  closest	
  estimate	
  to	
  the	
  true	
  prevalence	
  performed	
  to	
  date.	
  	
  An	
  issue	
  worth	
  questioning	
  however,	
  is	
  whether	
  there	
  is	
  reason	
  to	
  believe	
  that	
  British	
  Columbia	
  represents	
  an	
  overestimate	
  of	
  prevalence;	
  whether	
  the	
  extensive	
  research	
  and	
  care	
  facilities	
  in	
  this	
  province	
  act	
  as	
  a	
  motivating	
  force,	
  pulling	
  more	
  families	
  to	
  migrate	
  to	
  BC.	
  	
  From	
  the	
  extensive	
  province-­‐wide	
  review	
  that	
  took	
  place	
  during	
  the	
  present	
  study,	
  patients’	
  full	
  history	
  was	
  observed	
  for	
  the	
  509	
  chart-­‐reviewed	
  patients.	
  	
  None	
  of	
  the	
  histories	
  reviewed	
  suggested	
  migration	
  of	
  HD	
  families	
  to	
  BC	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  acquiring	
  enhanced	
  care	
  or	
  of	
  seeking	
  opportunities	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  research.	
  	
  It	
  can	
  thus	
  be	
  assumed	
  at	
  this	
  time	
  that	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  presented	
  here	
  is	
  not	
  overestimated	
  due	
  to	
  an	
  abnormally	
  large	
  patient	
  presence	
  in	
  this	
  province.	
  	
  Further	
  work	
  involving	
  a	
  province-­‐wide	
  survey	
  of	
  BC’s	
  HD	
  community	
  including	
  questions	
  related	
  to	
  family	
  migration	
  patterns	
  would	
  be	
  required	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  gain	
  a	
  clearer	
  understanding	
  of	
  this	
  notion.	
  	
   	
   60	
   Figure	
  23.	
  Life	
  expectancy	
  in	
  Canada	
  and	
  worldwide	
  (1960-­‐2011).	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   52.65	
   62.95	
   67.23	
   69.41	
   69.41	
   71.4	
   73.5	
   76.7	
   78.9	
   81.4	
   0	
  10	
   20	
  30	
   40	
  50	
   60	
  70	
   80	
  90	
   1960	
   2011	
  	
  	
   Life	
  expectancy	
  in	
  Canada Life	
  expectancy	
  worldwide Age	
  (ye ars)	
   	
   61	
   Table	
  11.	
  Comparison	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  employed	
  in	
  studies	
  performed	
  after	
   the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
   Study	
  region	
   and	
  year	
   Prevalence	
  (/100,000)	
   Genetic	
  testing	
  Centre	
   HD	
  clinic	
  records	
   Hosp.	
  records	
   GP	
  &	
  Neurol.	
  records	
   HD	
  services	
   ICD	
  codes	
   Nursing	
  homes	
   HD	
  families	
   Pedigree	
  analysis	
  British	
  Columbia	
  2012	
   12.5-­‐14.9	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
  The	
  UK	
  2010	
   12.4	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  The	
  UK	
  2008	
   6.2	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Mexico	
  2008	
   4	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Taiwan	
  2007	
   0.4	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
  Venezuela	
  2007	
   0.5	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Slovenia	
  2006	
   5.2	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Greece	
  2002	
   4	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Croatia	
  2002	
   1	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  N.	
  Ireland	
   10.6	
   √ 	
   	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Japan	
  1997	
   0.7	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Australia	
  1996	
   6.3	
   	
   √ 	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  New	
  Zealand	
  1996	
   5.7	
   	
   	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Germany	
  1995	
   10	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Switzerland	
  1995	
   10	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Malta	
  1994	
   11.8	
   √ 	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
   	
   Ethnic-­‐specific	
  prevalence:	
  it	
  is	
  interesting	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  ethnic	
  minorities	
  in	
  BC	
  to	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  these	
  groups	
  as	
  estimated	
  in	
  their	
  countries	
  of	
  origin.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  calculate	
  the	
  ethnic-­‐specific	
  prevalence,	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  from	
  each	
  ethnic	
  group	
  living	
  in	
  BC	
  was	
  used	
  as	
  the	
  denominator	
  for	
  these	
  calculations.	
  Roughly	
  20%	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia’s	
  population	
  is	
  made	
  up	
  of	
  nationalities	
  fitting	
  into	
  the	
  East-­‐Asian	
  EHDN	
  ethnic	
  category	
  (EHDN	
  2010,	
  Statistics	
   	
   62	
   Canada	
  2012).	
  	
  The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  the	
  East	
  Asian	
  population	
  of	
  BC	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  0.64/100,000	
  (1/156,250).	
  	
  As	
  expected,	
  this	
  is	
  much	
  smaller	
  than	
  the	
  prevalence	
  in	
  Caucasians	
  and	
  is	
  similar	
  to,	
  although	
  larger	
  than,	
  the	
  prevalence	
  estimated	
  from	
  studies	
  in	
  this	
  region	
  (0.42/100,000	
  (1/238,095),	
  Appendix	
  1b).	
  	
  	
  The	
  West-­‐Asian	
  category	
  showed	
  a	
  prevalence	
  of	
  3.0/100,000	
  (1/33,000);	
  this	
  is	
  higher	
  than	
  the	
  prevalence	
  estimated	
  in	
  this	
  region,	
  of	
  1.7/100,000	
  (1/58,824)	
  (Appendix	
  1b).	
  	
  The	
  Latin-­‐American	
  population	
  showed	
  a	
  prevalence	
  of	
  4.1/100,000	
  (1/24,390),	
  also	
  higher	
  than	
  that	
  estimated	
  in	
  this	
  region;	
  2.3/100,000	
  (1/43,478)	
  (Appendix	
  1b).	
  	
  The	
  North	
  African	
  prevalence	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  4.2/100,000	
  (1/23,810),	
  also	
  higher	
  than	
  the	
  average	
  estimate	
  from	
  this	
  region	
  of	
  3.6/100,000	
  (1/28,000)	
  (Appendix	
  1b).	
  	
  The	
  only	
  minority	
  without	
  a	
  previous	
  estimate	
  for	
  comparison	
  was	
  the	
  Canadian-­‐Aboriginal	
  group	
  in	
  which	
  a	
  prevalence	
  of	
  0.60/100,000	
  (1/167,000)	
  was	
  estimated.	
  	
  The	
  higher	
  prevalence	
  estimates	
  of	
  these	
  ethnic	
  groups	
  in	
  BC	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  those	
  estimates	
  from	
  their	
  region	
  of	
  origin	
  may	
  reflect	
  cultural	
  differences	
  in	
  adherence	
  to	
  health	
  care.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  it	
  is	
  less	
  common	
  to	
  make	
  public	
  a	
  familial	
  degenerative	
  disease	
  in	
  other	
  cultures	
  than	
  it	
  is	
  here	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  Further	
  work	
  is	
  required	
  to	
  gain	
  a	
  better	
  understanding	
  of	
  these	
  differences.	
  	
   Regional	
  prevalence:	
  when	
  observing	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  “Rural”	
  BC	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  “Urban”	
  BC,	
  it	
  is	
  apparent	
  that	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  prevalence	
  is	
  approximately	
  3	
  times	
  higher.	
  	
  This	
  may	
  either	
  be	
  a	
  reflection	
  of	
  under-­‐ascertainment	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  or	
  it	
  may	
  be	
  an	
  indication	
  that	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  does	
  in	
  fact	
  have	
  a	
  higher	
  prevalence.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  maintain	
  legal	
  and	
  ethical	
  obligations,	
  personal	
  information	
  of	
  patients	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  this	
  study	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  two	
  clinics	
  from	
  which	
  special	
  consent	
  was	
  granted	
  (UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH).	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  other	
  BC	
  physician	
  records	
  were	
  only	
  crosschecked	
  and	
  distinguished	
  via	
  city	
  of	
  residence.	
  	
  Contacting	
  physicians	
  from	
  large	
  metropolitan	
  centers	
  (i.e.	
  Vancouver)	
  was	
  not	
  feasible	
  as	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  distinguish	
  patients	
  from	
  one	
  another.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  a	
  GP,	
  a	
  physician	
  and	
  a	
  psychiatrist	
  may	
  report	
  the	
  same	
  patient	
  and	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  avoid	
  overlap	
  and	
  double	
  counting.	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  this	
  shortfall,	
  only	
  neurologists	
  from	
  these	
  large	
  metropolitan	
  centers	
  were	
  contacted;	
  GPs	
  and	
  other	
  specialists	
  were	
  not.	
  	
  This	
   	
   63	
   may	
  have	
  led	
  to	
  under	
  ascertainment	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region.	
  	
  It	
  is,	
  however,	
  expected	
  that	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  HD	
  patients	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region	
  would	
  have	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic.	
  	
  Thus,	
  if	
  under-­‐ascertainment	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region	
  is	
  a	
  factor,	
  it	
  is	
  unlikely	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  extreme	
  enough	
  to	
  cause	
  the	
  abrupt	
  difference	
  in	
  prevalence	
  between	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  and	
  “Rural”	
  regions	
  observed	
  here.	
  	
  If	
  the	
  higher	
  “Rural”	
  prevalence	
  does	
  in	
  fact	
  reflect	
  a	
  true	
  difference	
  in	
  prevalence	
  between	
  the	
  two	
  regions,	
  there	
  are	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  potential	
  contributory	
  factors.	
  	
  First,	
  it	
  may	
  be	
  that	
  families	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  afford	
  living	
  within	
  2	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  These	
  families	
  may	
  have	
  too	
  large	
  a	
  financial	
  burden	
  associated	
  with	
  caring	
  for	
  those	
  affected	
  and	
  at	
  risk	
  in	
  their	
  family,	
  that	
  “Rural”	
  regions	
  might	
  be	
  the	
  only	
  option	
  that	
  is	
  financially	
  feasible.	
  	
  Another	
  factor	
  may	
  be	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  lifestyle	
  involved	
  with	
  “Rural”	
  living.	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  more	
  personal	
  space	
  and	
  less	
  crowd-­‐density	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  suitable	
  for	
  families	
  with	
  HD	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  urban	
  living.	
  	
  Individuals	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  may	
  also	
  feel	
  more	
  comfortable	
  living	
  in	
  a	
  rural	
  environment	
  as	
  the	
  social	
  stigma	
  associated	
  with	
  HD	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  emphasized	
  in	
  urban	
  regions	
  with	
  higher	
  crowd	
  density	
  than	
  in	
  rural	
  regions.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  explore	
  these	
  factors	
  further,	
  the	
  “Urban”/”Rural”	
  analysis	
  was	
  replicated	
  for	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  Island	
  only.	
  	
  Victoria	
  was	
  designated	
  “Urban”	
  whereas	
  every	
  other	
  island	
  region	
  was	
  designated	
  “Rural”.	
  	
  This	
  analysis	
  revealed	
  that	
  approximately	
  half	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  Island’s	
  patients	
  reside	
  in	
  Victoria.	
  	
  Since	
  Victoria	
  constitutes	
  only	
  ~12%	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  Island’s	
  population,	
  this	
  led	
  to	
  an	
  abrupt	
  difference	
  in	
  prevalence;	
  82.5/100,000	
  (1/1,212)	
  for	
  “Urban”	
  Vancouver	
  Island	
  and	
  9.1/100,000	
  (1/11,000)	
  for	
  “Rural”	
  Vancouver	
  Island.	
  	
  This	
  information	
  suggests	
  the	
  preference	
  for	
  rural	
  living	
  is	
  likely	
  not	
  a	
  factor	
  contributing	
  to	
  the	
  extreme	
  difference	
  in	
  “Urban”	
  and	
  “Rural”	
  prevalence	
  reported	
  for	
  BC	
  as	
  a	
  whole.	
  	
  The	
  cost	
  of	
  living	
  in	
  Victoria	
  is	
  significantly	
  lower	
  than	
  the	
  cost	
  of	
  living	
  in	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  the	
  high	
  cost	
  of	
  living	
  within	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  is	
  a	
  dominant	
  factor	
  leading	
  to	
  the	
  relatively	
  low	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  in	
  this	
  area.	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  this	
  abrupt	
  difference	
  may	
  be	
  related	
  in	
  part	
  to	
  the	
  specific	
  definitions	
  of	
  “Urban”	
  and	
  “Rural”	
  applied	
  to	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  Cities	
  designated	
  to	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  category	
  were	
  all	
  cities	
  in	
  BC	
  that	
  are	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  away	
  from	
   	
   64	
   Vancouver	
  by	
  car,	
  thus	
  including	
  cities	
  with	
  larger	
  populations,	
  such	
  as	
  Victoria,	
  that	
  are	
  generally	
  defined	
  as	
  “Urban”.	
  	
  Findings	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  suggest	
  the	
  vast	
  majority	
  of	
  HD	
  patients	
  are	
  living	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  This	
  may	
  suggest	
  that	
  participation	
  in	
  HD	
  research	
  studies	
  conducted	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  clinic	
  is	
  only	
  accessible	
  to	
  a	
  small	
  fraction	
  of	
  the	
  province’s	
  patient	
  population.	
  	
  However,	
  it	
  is	
  also	
  possible	
  that	
  this	
  suggests	
  an	
  under-­‐ascertainment	
  of	
  patients	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region,	
  as	
  it	
  is	
  expected	
  that	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  and	
  “Rural”	
  proportions	
  should	
  be	
  equal.	
  	
  When	
  the	
  analysis	
  was	
  repeated	
  by	
  placing	
  Victoria	
  in	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  prevalence	
  continued	
  to	
  be	
  nearly	
  3-­‐times	
  higher	
  although	
  the	
  difference	
  was	
  less	
  extreme.	
  	
  Despite	
  the	
  extensive	
  efforts	
  put	
  forth	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  to	
  thoroughly	
  search	
  for	
  patients	
  and	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD,	
  there	
  are	
  caveats	
  associated	
  with	
  each	
  ascertainment	
  method.	
   UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics	
  chart	
  review:	
  	
  The	
  chart	
  review	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  allowed	
  for	
  a	
  thorough	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  medical	
  records	
  belonging	
  to	
  509	
  (~80%)	
  patients.	
  	
  However,	
  death	
  records	
  for	
  these	
  patients	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  obtained	
  to	
  ensure	
  every	
  patient	
  was	
  still	
  living	
  on	
  prevalence	
  day.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  obtain	
  death	
  records,	
  patients’	
  personal	
  health	
  number	
  (PHN)	
  was	
  required	
  for	
  Population	
  Data	
  BC	
  (Population	
  Data	
  BC,	
  2012).	
  	
  The	
  specific	
  type	
  of	
  consent	
  form	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics	
  did	
  not	
  cover	
  the	
  present	
  criteria	
  that	
  are	
  required	
  by	
  Population	
  Data	
  BC	
  to	
  obtain	
  patient’s	
  death	
  records.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  obtain	
  these	
  records,	
  the	
  patient	
  must	
  have	
  signed	
  consent	
  during	
  their	
  lifetime	
  that	
  states	
  their	
  PHN	
  number	
  may	
  be	
  shared	
  for	
  these	
  purposes.	
  	
  The	
  likelihood	
  of	
  linking	
  this	
  database	
  with	
  death	
  records	
  would	
  improve	
  if	
  this	
  database	
  were	
  to	
  be	
  converted	
  from	
  a	
  research	
  database	
  in	
  to	
  a	
  type	
  of	
  disease	
  registry.	
  	
  Further	
  work	
  is	
  required	
  to	
  set	
  this	
  up.	
  	
  Patients	
  who	
  had	
  not	
  been	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  for	
  an	
  extended	
  period	
  of	
  time	
  or	
  who	
  were	
  likely	
  deceased	
  by	
  prevalence	
  day	
  based	
  on	
  their	
  age	
  at	
  onset	
  of	
  HD	
  symptoms,	
  were	
  removed	
  from	
  the	
  patient	
  count.	
  	
  Maximum	
  disease	
  duration	
  of	
  19	
  years	
  was	
  applied	
  to	
  this	
  analysis	
  and	
  although	
  this	
  is	
  an	
  average	
  (Foroud	
  et	
  al.	
  1999,	
  Roos	
  et	
  al.	
  1993),	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  information	
  regarding	
  each	
  patient’s	
  true	
  disease	
  duration	
  limits	
  data	
  feasibility.	
  	
  Further,	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  symptom	
  onset	
  for	
  20	
  (~3%)	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
   	
   65	
   the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  were	
  provided	
  by	
  patient	
  family	
  members.	
  	
  This	
  information	
  was	
  recorded	
  in	
  the	
  physician	
  notes	
  and	
  was	
  initially	
  retrieved	
  from	
  physician	
  interviews	
  with	
  patients’	
  family	
  members.	
  	
  This	
  introduces	
  the	
  possibility	
  in	
  a	
  bias	
  towards	
  either	
  earlier	
  onset,	
  due	
  to	
  hyper-­‐vigilance,	
  or	
  later	
  onset	
  as	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  denial.	
  	
  	
   Patients	
  and	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  ascertained	
  from	
  clinic	
  pedigrees:	
  	
  Clinic	
  pedigrees	
  are	
  updated	
  as	
  often	
  as	
  possible.	
  The	
  limitation	
  of	
  this	
  data	
  is	
  based	
  on	
  how	
  frequently	
  the	
  proband	
  visits	
  the	
  clinic	
  and	
  how	
  recent	
  their	
  last	
  clinic	
  visit	
  was.	
  	
  Although	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  via	
  this	
  method	
  were	
  assigned	
  certainty	
  measures	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  year	
  their	
  pedigree	
  was	
  last	
  updated,	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  patients	
  and	
  family	
  members	
  migrating	
  in	
  and	
  out	
  of	
  province	
  is	
  always	
  apparent.	
  	
  Unfortunately	
  patients	
  and	
  family	
  members	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  contacted	
  for	
  this	
  study,	
  as	
  this	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  approved	
  by	
  the	
  ethics	
  board	
  without	
  prior	
  consent	
  from	
  each	
  individual	
  who	
  we	
  wished	
  to	
  contact.	
  	
  	
  	
   Patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  BC	
  physician	
  questionnaires:	
  	
  Physician	
  questionnaires	
  were	
  distributed	
  in	
  June	
  2011	
  and	
  all	
  responses	
  were	
  received	
  by	
  September	
  2011.	
  	
  Patients	
  that	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  ORS	
  analysis	
  with	
  potential	
  for	
  inclusion	
  in	
  the	
  final	
  patient	
  count	
  were	
  those	
  who	
  physicians	
  had	
  ensured	
  had	
  never	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  possible,	
  however,	
  that	
  these	
  patients	
  may	
  have	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  one	
  of	
  these	
  clinics	
  between	
  September	
  2011	
  and	
  April	
  2012.	
  	
  Despite	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  all	
  possible	
  steps	
  were	
  taken	
  in	
  an	
  attempt	
  to	
  recognize	
  potential	
  cases	
  of	
  overlap	
  in	
  scenarios	
  such	
  as	
  this,	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  inaccuracy	
  remains.	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  in	
  certain	
  cases,	
  patients	
  reported	
  from	
  physician	
  questionnaires	
  that	
  were	
  from	
  unique	
  cities	
  (cities	
  where	
  no	
  clinic	
  patients	
  were	
  recorded	
  to	
  reside),	
  were	
  reported	
  to	
  have	
  been	
  previously	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VHG	
  medical	
  genetics.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  these	
  patients	
  were	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  definite	
  cases	
  of	
  overlap	
  and	
  were	
  not	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  ORS	
  analysis	
  nor	
  were	
  they	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  patient	
  count	
  (i.e.	
  Appendix	
  6,	
  row	
  1).	
  However,	
  it	
  remains	
  uncertain	
  as	
  to	
  where	
  these	
  patients	
  reside.	
  	
  As	
  the	
  city	
  of	
  residence	
  was	
  used	
  in	
  many	
  cases	
  to	
  minimize	
  overlap,	
  failure	
  to	
  identify	
  where	
  certain	
  patients	
  reside	
  has	
  the	
  potential	
  to	
  be	
  problematic	
  in	
  analyzing	
  overlap	
  in	
  other	
  cities	
  where	
   	
   66	
   these	
  “missing”	
  patients	
  may	
  in	
  actuality,	
  reside.	
  	
  Further,	
  physician	
  surveys	
  were	
  only	
  sent	
  to	
  GPs	
  in	
  areas	
  that	
  were	
  not	
  already	
  served	
  by	
  a	
  neurologist	
  or	
  a	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab-­‐referring	
  doctor.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  therefore	
  assumed	
  that	
  more	
  than	
  one	
  physician	
  would	
  not	
  report	
  the	
  same	
  patient.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  possible	
  however,	
  that	
  patients	
  have	
  migrated	
  to	
  different	
  areas	
  and/or	
  have	
  seen	
  more	
  than	
  one	
  responding	
  physician	
  and	
  were	
  counted	
  more	
  than	
  once.	
  	
  Lastly,	
  66%	
  of	
  physicians	
  did	
  not	
  respond	
  to	
  the	
  survey.	
  	
  HD	
  patients	
  may	
  have	
  been	
  missed	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  physician	
  responses.	
  	
  	
   Patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  family	
  surveys:	
  The	
  only	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  this	
  source	
  who	
  were	
  added	
  to	
  the	
  final	
  patient	
  count	
  came	
  from	
  surveys	
  whose	
  responders	
  had	
  knowledge	
  of	
  the	
  patients’	
  physicians	
  and/or	
  whether	
  they	
  were	
  referred	
  to	
  UBC	
  or	
  VGH.	
  	
  Only	
  2	
  responders	
  provided	
  this	
  information.	
  	
  Patients	
  included	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  based	
  on	
  their,	
  or	
  their	
  family’s,	
  city	
  of	
  residence.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  possible	
  that	
  some	
  patients	
  moved	
  to	
  a	
  different	
  city	
  causing	
  the	
  ORS	
  to	
  lack	
  accuracy.	
  	
  	
   Long-­‐term	
  care	
  homes:	
  	
  In	
  some	
  instances,	
  nursing	
  home	
  staff	
  was	
  unaware	
  of	
  the	
  information	
  required	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  minimize	
  overlap.	
  	
  All	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  under	
  these	
  circumstances	
  were	
  assigned	
  an	
  ORS	
  of	
  2.	
  	
  	
   It	
  is	
  possible	
  that,	
  although	
  multiple	
  sources	
  were	
  utilized	
  in	
  this	
  study,	
  we	
  have	
  not	
  achieved	
  full	
  ascertainment	
  of	
  HD	
  patients	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  If	
  full	
  ascertainment	
  were	
  achieved,	
  no	
  difference	
  between	
  “Urban”	
  and	
  “Rural”	
  prevalence	
  would	
  be	
  expected,	
  as	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  evidence	
  to	
  suggest	
  that	
  HD	
  patients	
  prefer	
  to	
  live	
  in	
  one	
  region	
  in	
  particular.	
  	
  Further,	
  if	
  full	
  ascertainment	
  were	
  achieved,	
  we	
  would	
  expect	
  to	
  see	
  more	
  overlap	
  of	
  the	
  final	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  (Figure	
  13),	
  as	
  many	
  HD	
  patient	
  are	
  likely	
  cared	
  for	
  by	
  a	
  number	
  services	
  at	
  once	
  (for	
  example,	
  a	
  neurologist,	
  a	
  GP,	
  a	
  specialized	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  nursing	
  home).	
  	
  This	
  suggests	
  that	
  the	
  prevalence	
  reported	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  may	
  be	
  an	
  underestimate.	
  	
  Achieving	
  full	
  ascertainment	
  would	
  require	
  the	
  surveying	
  of	
  the	
  remaining	
  BC	
  physician	
  population	
  and	
  re-­‐surveying	
  of	
  those	
  physicians	
  (66%)	
  who	
  did	
  not	
  provide	
  responses	
  for	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  It	
  would	
  also	
  require	
  ethical	
  approval	
  for	
  the	
  collection	
  of	
  patient	
  information	
  from	
  all	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  study	
  (this	
  was	
  limited	
  to	
  two	
  sources	
  –	
   	
   67	
   UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  –	
  for	
  this	
  study).	
  	
  If	
  such	
  approval	
  were	
  obtained,	
  the	
  remaining	
  nursing	
  homes,	
  hospitals	
  and	
  family	
  members	
  could	
  be	
  contacted	
  with	
  more	
  direct	
  questions	
  about	
  their	
  patients	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  avoid	
  overlap.	
  	
  	
   Incidence	
  An	
  incidence	
  of	
  7.2	
  per	
  million/year	
  was	
  reported	
  in	
  this	
  study;	
  this	
  appears	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  slight	
  increase	
  from	
  that	
  reported	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  recent	
  BC	
  study	
  (Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  2001).	
  	
  It	
  is	
  important,	
  however,	
  to	
  note	
  that	
  Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  counted	
  incident	
  cases	
  only	
  if	
  they	
  had	
  been	
  confirmed	
  by	
  a	
  genetic	
  test.	
  	
  Figure	
  24a	
  shows	
  the	
  yearly	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  since	
  1987	
  with	
  the	
  methods	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  study;	
  incident	
  cases	
  include	
  those	
  diagnosed	
  via	
  clinical	
  symptoms	
  and	
  a	
  positive	
  family	
  history	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  those	
  diagnosed	
  with	
  a	
  genetic	
  test.	
  	
  When	
  comparing	
  the	
  incidence	
  using	
  this	
  method,	
  it	
  becomes	
  apparent	
  that	
  the	
  incidence	
  increased	
  from	
  the	
  first	
  period	
  (1987-­‐1992)	
  to	
  the	
  second	
  period	
  (1993-­‐1999),	
  but	
  then	
  decreased	
  slightly	
  from	
  the	
  second	
  period	
  to	
  the	
  third	
  period	
  (2000-­‐2011)	
  –	
  the	
  present	
  study	
  period	
  (Figure	
  24a).	
  	
  Figure	
  24b	
  shows	
  the	
  yearly	
  incidence	
  since	
  1993	
  for	
  only	
  those	
  cases	
  with	
  confirmation	
  of	
  diagnosis	
  via	
  genetic	
  test.	
  	
  When	
  comparing	
  incidence	
  with	
  this	
  method,	
  again	
  we	
  see	
  a	
  slight	
  decrease	
  in	
  the	
  average	
  incidence	
  from	
  the	
  first	
  time	
  period	
  (1993-­‐1999)	
  to	
  the	
  second	
  (2000-­‐2011)	
  –	
  the	
  present	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  In	
  general,	
  the	
  incidence	
  has	
  remained	
  fairly	
  constant	
  over	
  time.	
  	
  Incidence	
  for	
  the	
  year	
  2011	
  seems	
  very	
  low	
  and	
  when	
  removed,	
  recovers	
  the	
  same	
  incidence	
  as	
  the	
  prior	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  Incidence	
  may	
  be	
  underestimated	
  for	
  the	
  year	
  2011.	
  	
  The	
  timing	
  involved	
  in	
  having	
  test	
  reports	
  sent	
  from	
  the	
  DNA	
  diagnostic	
  lab	
  to	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  then	
  scanned	
  into	
  the	
  electronic	
  medical	
  records	
  for	
  review	
  is	
  reliant	
  upon	
  scheduling	
  of	
  a	
  patient’s	
  post-­‐testing	
  follow	
  up	
  visit	
  to	
  the	
  clinic.	
  	
  For	
  this	
  reason,	
  the	
  complete	
  list	
  of	
  tests	
  from	
  2011	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  available	
  at	
  this	
  time,	
  leading	
  to	
  an	
  underestimate	
  of	
  incidence.	
  Similar	
  to	
  the	
  prevalence,	
  the	
  incidence	
  of	
  HD	
  also	
  appears	
  to	
  fluctuate	
  across	
  geographic	
  and	
  temporal	
  studies	
  (Figure	
  25).	
  	
  The	
  two	
  incidence	
  studies,	
  from	
  Italy	
  and	
  the	
  USA,	
  were	
  performed	
  before	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  became	
  available	
  and	
  both	
  report	
  a	
  lower	
  incidence	
  than	
  those	
  studies	
  performed	
  after.	
  	
   	
   68	
   This	
  may	
  reflect	
  the	
  ability	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  to	
  diagnose	
  atypical	
  clinical	
  cases	
  that	
  may	
  have	
  been	
  missed	
  before.	
   	
   Figure	
  24a.	
  Estimates	
  of	
  HD	
  incidence	
  in	
  BC	
  since	
  1987	
  using	
  clinical	
  and	
  genetic	
   diagnostic	
  criteria.	
  Error	
  bars	
  represent	
  95%	
  confidence	
  intervals	
   	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   3.9	
   7.4	
  6.9	
  4.9	
  3.9	
   6.9	
  5.9	
   9.0	
  7.9	
  9.3	
  6.8	
   8.0	
  7.5	
  6.9	
  6.9	
  8.8	
   8.5	
  8.4	
  9.1	
  5.2	
   8.6	
  7.8	
   7.2	
  5.5	
  3.7	
   0	
  2	
   4	
  6	
   8	
  10	
   12	
  14	
   1987	
   1988	
   1989	
   1990	
   1991	
   1992	
   1993	
   1994	
   1995	
   1996	
   1997	
   1998	
   1999	
   2000	
   2001	
   2002	
   2003	
   2004	
   2005	
   2006	
   2007	
   2008	
   2009	
   2010	
   2011	
   Inciden ce	
  (/m illion/y ear)	
   	
   Mean:	
  7.8	
  	
   Mean:	
  7.2	
  Current	
  report	
  	
   1993-­‐2010	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  available 	
   <1993:	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test Mean:	
  5.7	
  	
   	
   69	
   Figure	
  24b.	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  HD	
  incidence	
  in	
  BC	
  since	
  1993	
  using	
  genetic	
  diagnostic	
   criteria	
  only.	
  Error	
  bars	
  represent	
  95%	
  confidence	
  intervals	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Figure	
  25.	
  Global	
  estimates	
  of	
  incidence	
  over	
  time	
  and	
  geographic	
  region.	
  	
  For	
   comparative	
  purposes,	
  studies	
  after	
  1993	
  include	
  only	
  diagnoses	
  confirmed	
  by	
   genetic	
  test	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   5.9	
   8.4	
   7.4	
   7.5	
   5.8	
   7.8	
   6.0	
   6.9	
   6.1	
   7.8	
   8.5	
   8.2	
   8.8	
   4.7	
   7.2	
   7.5	
   6.1	
   4.9	
   1.7	
   0	
  2	
   4	
  6	
   8	
  10	
   12	
  14	
   1993	
  1994	
  1995	
  1996	
  1997	
  1998	
  1999	
  2000	
  2001	
  2002	
  2003	
  2004	
  2005	
  2006	
  2007	
  2008	
  2009	
  2010	
  2011	
   Inciden ce	
  (/m illion/y ear)	
   	
   Mean:	
  6.9	
  (Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  2001)	
  	
   Mean:	
  6.5	
  Current	
  report	
   3.0	
   4.0	
   6.9	
   4.7	
   1.0	
   4.4	
   6.1	
   6.9	
   0	
  1	
  2	
   3	
  4	
  5	
   6	
  7	
  8	
   1987	
   1989	
   2000	
   2002	
   2007	
   2008	
   2008	
   2011	
  Italy	
   USA	
   Canada	
  -­‐	
  BC	
   Spain	
   Taiwan	
   Greece	
   UK	
   Canada	
  -­‐	
  BC	
   Inciden ce	
  (/m illion/y ear)	
   	
   	
   1993-­‐2010	
  Direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  available 	
   <1993:	
  prior	
  to	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test 	
   70	
   Sources	
  of	
  error:	
  caveats	
  in	
  the	
  incidence	
  assessment	
  are	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  onset	
  information	
  that	
  is	
  recorded	
  in	
  patients’	
  clinical	
  files.	
  	
  Some	
  patients	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  incidence	
  calculation	
  because	
  they	
  had	
  a	
  positive	
  predictive	
  test	
  and	
  were	
  recorded	
  to	
  have	
  become	
  symptomatic	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  Other	
  patients	
  were	
  included	
  who	
  had	
  never	
  undergone	
  the	
  genetic	
  test	
  (or	
  their	
  test	
  results	
  were	
  not	
  available)	
  but	
  who	
  were	
  also	
  recorded	
  to	
  have	
  become	
  symptomatic	
  during	
  the	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  Year	
  and/or	
  age	
  of	
  symptom	
  onset	
  was	
  obtained	
  from	
  physician	
  notes	
  during	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  and	
  was,	
  at	
  times,	
  expressed	
  as	
  a	
  time	
  frame	
  of	
  several	
  years	
  rather	
  than	
  a	
  specific	
  date.	
  	
  Under	
  such	
  circumstances,	
  the	
  median	
  year	
  was	
  recorded.	
  	
  For	
  this	
  reason,	
  the	
  breakdown	
  of	
  annual	
  incidence	
  may	
  lack	
  accuracy.	
  	
  Additionally,	
  it	
  is	
  apparent	
  that	
  the	
  incidence	
  may	
  me	
  underestimated.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  be	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  incidence	
  calculation,	
  the	
  date	
  of	
  onset	
  information	
  (or	
  date	
  of	
  positive	
  diagnostic	
  test)	
  must	
  be	
  available.	
  	
  As	
  the	
  date	
  of	
  onset	
  information	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  174	
  of	
  the	
  patients	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  (patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  sources	
  outside	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH),	
  it	
  is	
  possible	
  that	
  at	
  least	
  a	
  portion	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  experienced	
  first	
  onset	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  12	
  years.	
  	
  This	
  would	
  result	
  in	
  the	
  inclusion	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  to	
  the	
  incidence	
  estimate.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  if	
  only	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  174	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  clinics	
  experienced	
  first	
  onset	
  in	
  the	
  last	
  12	
  years,	
  the	
  incidence	
  from	
  2000-­‐2011	
  increases	
  from	
  7.2	
  to	
  8.9	
  per	
  million/year.	
  	
  If	
  two-­‐thirds	
  of	
  the	
  174	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  clinics	
  experienced	
  onset	
  in	
  the	
  last	
  12	
  years,	
  the	
  incidence	
  then	
  becomes	
  9.4	
  per	
  million/year.	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  the	
  privacy	
  of	
  the	
  clinical	
  information	
  belonging	
  to	
  patients	
  outside	
  of	
  UBC	
  and	
  VGH,	
  this	
  date	
  of	
  onset	
  information	
  is	
  not	
  attainable	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
  	
  	
   ICD	
  codes	
  and	
  mortality	
  rate:	
  the	
  number	
  recorded	
  deaths	
  caused	
  by	
  HD	
  	
  (ICD	
  code	
  333.4)	
  are	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  Although	
  this	
  information	
  does	
  provide	
  a	
  rough	
  estimate	
  of	
  the	
  HD-­‐specific	
  mortality	
  rate,	
  there	
  are	
  many	
  caveats	
  associated	
  with	
  this	
  assessment.	
  	
  Firstly,	
  although	
  the	
  lives	
  of	
  HD	
  patients	
  are	
  shortened	
  as	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  the	
  disease,	
  the	
  direct	
  cause	
  of	
  death	
  is	
  often	
  associated	
  with	
  some	
  other	
  ailment	
  such	
  as	
  pneumonia	
  (Heemskerk	
  and	
  Roos,	
  2010).	
  	
  These	
  ailments	
  may	
  be	
   	
   71	
   recorded	
  instead	
  of	
  HD,	
  resulting	
  in	
  an	
  underestimate	
  of	
  the	
  HD-­‐specific	
  mortality	
  rate.	
   Population	
  at	
  risk	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  note	
  that	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  calculated	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  only	
  includes	
  the	
  a	
  priori	
  risks	
  and	
  the	
  risks	
  after	
  accounting	
  for	
  genetic	
  test	
  results.	
  	
  These	
  classifications	
  are	
  useful	
  as	
  they	
  allow	
  for	
  four	
  distinct	
  risk	
  categories;	
  0%	
  (negative	
  predictive	
  test),	
  25%,	
  50%	
  and	
  100%	
  (positive	
  predictive	
  test).	
  	
  These	
  classifications	
  do	
  however	
  lack	
  accuracy,	
  as	
  an	
  individual’s	
  specific	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  is	
  dependent	
  on	
  his	
  age	
  (Harper	
  and	
  Newcombe,	
  1992).	
  	
  In	
  other	
  words,	
  in	
  many	
  cases,	
  an	
  individual’s	
  risk	
  for	
  developing	
  the	
  disease	
  decreases	
  for	
  every	
  additional	
  year	
  that	
  the	
  individual	
  is	
  alive	
  and	
  symptom	
  free.	
  	
  Clinical	
  and	
  demographic	
  information	
  was	
  only	
  available	
  for	
  a	
  small	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  ascertained	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  the	
  age-­‐specific	
  risk	
  estimates	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  acquired.	
  Three	
  assessments	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  provide	
  comparisons	
  for	
  the	
  findings	
  obtained	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  study.	
  	
  One	
  study	
  was	
  conducted	
  in	
  the	
  Netherlands	
  (Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000)	
  one	
  in	
  Victoria,	
  Australia	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009)	
  and	
  the	
  last,	
  in	
  Northern	
  Ireland	
  (Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2011).	
  	
  All	
  other	
  assessments	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk,	
  to	
  our	
  knowledge,	
  have	
  been	
  calculated	
  from	
  estimates	
  of	
  prevalence	
  (Taylor	
  1994,	
  Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999,	
  Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Harper	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Goizet	
  et	
  al.	
  2002,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  The	
  Dutch,	
  Australian	
  and	
  Irish	
  studies	
  along	
  with	
  the	
  present	
  study	
  from	
  BC,	
  have	
  all	
  calculated	
  the	
  prevalence	
  and	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  directly	
  from	
  the	
  specific	
  population	
  at	
  hand.	
  	
  When	
  comparing	
  the	
  prevalence	
  in	
  proportion	
  to	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  between	
  these	
  studies,	
  it	
  is	
  apparent	
  that	
  the	
  Dutch	
  study	
  has	
  the	
  largest	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  relative	
  to	
  prevalence,	
  with	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  being	
  five	
  times	
  the	
  estimated	
  prevalence	
  (Figure	
  21).	
  	
  The	
  Australian	
  and	
  Irish	
  studies	
  follow	
  with	
  a	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  that	
  is	
  4.2	
  times	
  the	
  prevalence	
  (Figure	
  26).	
  	
  The	
  present	
  study	
  from	
  BC	
  appears	
  to	
  have	
  the	
  lowest	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  relative	
  to	
  prevalence	
  –	
  only	
  3.6	
  times	
  the	
  prevalence	
  (Figure	
  26).	
  	
  The	
  relative	
   	
   72	
   population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  from	
  the	
  Dutch	
  study	
  is	
  keeping	
  with	
  Conneally’s	
  theory	
  of	
  1:5	
  affected:	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  ratio	
  (Conneally,	
  1984).	
  	
  The	
  Australian	
  and	
  Irish	
  studies	
  are	
  lower	
  than	
  would	
  be	
  expected	
  by	
  this	
  theory	
  but	
  are	
  equal	
  to	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  may	
  represent	
  a	
  more	
  appropriate	
  ratio,	
  than	
  the	
  commonly	
  used	
  1:5,	
  for	
  future	
  reviews.	
  	
  The	
  relative	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  in	
  BC	
  is	
  the	
  lowest	
  of	
  the	
  four.	
  	
  This	
  seemingly	
  low	
  BC	
  estimate	
  may	
  be	
  due	
  to	
  one	
  of	
  two	
  potential	
  factors:	
  an	
  overestimate	
  of	
  prevalence	
  or	
  an	
  underestimate	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk.	
  	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  a	
  high	
  degree	
  of	
  rigor	
  was	
  applied	
  to	
  the	
  ascertainment	
  of	
  affected	
  patients	
  that	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  prevalence	
  estimate.	
  	
  Multiple	
  methods	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  including	
  follow-­‐up	
  on	
  secondary	
  cases	
  were	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  ascertainment	
  process.	
  	
  All	
  patients	
  who	
  were	
  included	
  had	
  been	
  diagnosed	
  by	
  a	
  physician	
  and	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  were	
  confirmed	
  by	
  a	
  genetic	
  test	
  (Table	
  2).	
  	
  Conversely,	
  fewer	
  avenues	
  were	
  available	
  in	
  the	
  ascertainment	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk.	
  	
  Individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  were	
  either	
  active	
  patients	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  who	
  were	
  referred	
  for	
  predictive	
  testing	
  and/or	
  counselling	
  or	
  they	
  were	
  individuals	
  included	
  on	
  the	
  pedigrees	
  of	
  active	
  clinic	
  patients.	
  	
  The	
  clinic	
  counselling	
  team	
  and	
  the	
  HSC	
  resource	
  director	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  provide	
  some	
  information	
  for	
  the	
  updating	
  of	
  family	
  pedigrees.	
  	
  However,	
  no	
  further	
  steps	
  could	
  be	
  taken	
  to	
  follow	
  up	
  with	
  families	
  for	
  further	
  update.	
  	
  Approximately	
  3,500	
  (65%)	
  of	
  those	
  at	
  risk	
  individuals	
  that	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  final	
  estimate	
  were	
  ascertained	
  from	
  family	
  pedigrees	
  and	
  were	
  not	
  active	
  clinic	
  patients.	
  	
  Unlike	
  those	
  affected	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  from	
  pedigrees,	
  these	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  were	
  not	
  assigned	
  certainty	
  measures.	
  	
  Assigning	
  certainty	
  measures	
  to	
  at	
  risk	
  individuals	
  would	
  not	
  improve	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  the	
  data,	
  as	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  concern	
  for	
  overlap;	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  were	
  only	
  ascertained	
  from	
  one	
  source	
  –	
  the	
  chart	
  review.	
  	
  A	
  substantial	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  pedigrees	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  at-­‐risk	
  calculation	
  may	
  be	
  outdated	
  and	
  may	
  not	
  include	
  the	
  children	
  that	
  were	
  born	
  since	
  the	
  proband’s	
  most	
  recent	
  clinic	
  visit.	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  approximately	
  10%	
  of	
  the	
  family	
  files	
  at	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  did	
  not	
  include	
  pedigrees	
  or	
  lists	
  of	
  family	
  members.	
  	
  This	
  may	
  be	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  independence	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test;	
  test	
  participants	
  are	
  no	
  longer	
  reliant	
  upon	
  the	
  medical	
  history	
  of	
  their	
  family	
  members	
  as	
  they	
  were	
  during	
  linkage	
  analysis.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  first	
  or	
  second-­‐degree	
  family	
   	
   73	
   members	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  lacking	
  pedigrees	
  who	
  live	
  in	
  BC	
  would	
  have	
  been	
  missed,	
  contributing	
  further	
  to	
  an	
  underestimate	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
  appears	
  to	
  be	
  approximately	
  double	
  in	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region.	
  	
  Similar	
  to	
  the	
  distribution	
  of	
  the	
  affected	
  patient	
  population,	
  this	
  difference	
  may	
  either	
  be	
  a	
  reflection	
  of	
  under-­‐ascertainment	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  or	
  it	
  may	
  be	
  an	
  indication	
  that	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  region	
  does	
  in	
  fact	
  have	
  a	
  larger	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD.	
  	
  	
  It	
  is	
  unlikely	
  that	
  this	
  difference	
  is	
  the	
  result	
  of	
  an	
  under	
  ascertainment	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region.	
  	
  At	
  risk	
  individuals	
  were	
  not	
  ascertained	
  from	
  sources	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  and	
  as	
  pedigrees	
  were	
  only	
  available	
  from	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic,	
  the	
  ascertainment	
  of	
  at	
  risk	
  individuals	
  in	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  region	
  is	
  likely	
  more	
  thorough	
  than	
  that	
  from	
  other	
  BC	
  regions.	
  When	
  the	
  “Urban”	
  and	
  “Rural”	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  analysis	
  was	
  reproduced	
  for	
  Vancouver	
  Island	
  (Victoria	
  designated	
  as	
  “Urban”	
  and	
  any	
  other	
  Island	
  region,	
  “Rural”),	
  results	
  similar	
  to	
  those	
  regarding	
  prevalence	
  were	
  revealed.	
  	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  (50	
  and	
  25%)	
  risk	
  in	
  Victoria	
  (using	
  empirical	
  data	
  only)	
  was	
  89.0/100,000	
  (1/1,123)	
  and	
  that	
  outside	
  Victoria	
  was	
  8.5/100,000	
  (1/12,000).	
  	
  The	
  tendency	
  for	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  to	
  live	
  outside	
  of	
  Vancouver	
  by	
   0	
   10	
   20	
   30	
   40	
   50	
   60	
   1999	
   2000	
   2001	
   2012	
  Australia	
  -­‐	
  Victoria	
   The	
  Netherlands	
   Northern	
  Ireland	
   Canada	
  -­‐	
  BC	
   Popula tion	
  (/ 100,00 0)	
   	
  	
  Population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  (/100,000)	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Prevalence	
  (/100,000)	
   Figure	
  26.	
  The	
  ratio	
  of	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  to	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  4	
  different	
   populations	
   4.2x	
  5x	
  	
   3.5x	
  	
   4.2	
  	
  54.2 3.6	
  	
  	
  	
  1	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1	
   	
   74	
   over	
  two	
  hours	
  may	
  be	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  financial	
  pressure	
  associated	
  with	
  being	
  part	
  of	
  an	
  HD	
  family	
  and	
  thus	
  the	
  inability	
  to	
  afford	
  living	
  in	
  this	
  financially	
  pressing	
  Greater	
  Vancouver	
  region.	
  	
  The	
  difference	
  may,	
  in	
  part,	
  be	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  “Rural”,	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  this	
  study,	
  was	
  defined	
  as	
  any	
  location	
  in	
  BC	
  that	
  is	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car.	
  	
  Therefore	
  populous	
  “Urban”	
  centers,	
  such	
  as	
  Victoria,	
  are	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  “Rural”	
  category,	
  adding	
  a	
  relatively	
  large	
  number	
  to	
  the	
  pool	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk.	
  	
  Despite	
  this	
  definition,	
  it	
  is	
  apparent	
  that	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  in	
  this	
  province	
  are	
  living	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver,	
  and	
  in	
  turn,	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  wishing	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  predictive	
  testing	
  are	
  required	
  to	
  travel	
  long	
  distances	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  do	
  so.	
  	
  This	
  information	
  supports	
  the	
  requirement	
  in	
  this	
  province,	
  for	
  more	
  equitable	
  access	
  to	
  predictive	
  testing.	
  	
  A	
  telehealth8	
  program	
  in	
  BC	
  is	
  currently	
  in	
  its	
  development	
  phase	
  (Alice	
  Hawkins,	
  unpublished).	
  	
  This	
  program	
  aims	
  to	
  provide	
  access	
  to	
  predictive	
  testing	
  for	
  this	
  large	
  proportion	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  that	
  is	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  Vancouver	
  “Urban”	
  region.	
  The	
  geographic	
  distribution	
  of	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  among	
  BC	
  health	
  regions	
  seems	
  to	
  show	
  an	
  even	
  dispersion	
  in	
  proportion	
  to	
  the	
  population	
  living	
  in	
  each	
  region.	
  	
  Although	
  this	
  suggests	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  specific	
  regional	
  ‘HD	
  hotspot’	
  in	
  BC,	
  surveying	
  those	
  at	
  risk	
  ascertained	
  from	
  pedigrees	
  (n=3,377)	
  and	
  those	
  for	
  whom	
  an	
  address	
  was	
  not	
  available	
  (n=61),	
  is	
  required	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  gain	
  a	
  more	
  accurate	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  true	
  distribution.	
  	
  Despite	
  this	
  uncertainty,	
  this	
  study	
  provides	
  the	
  first	
  ever	
  estimate	
  of	
  the	
  distribution	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  This	
  assessment	
  may	
  aid	
  in	
  region-­‐specific	
  care	
  planning	
  and	
  resource	
  allocation	
  for	
  those	
  in	
  need	
  of	
  HD	
  services.	
  	
   Predictive	
  testing	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  the	
  634	
  individuals	
  who	
  have	
  undergone	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  BC,	
  36	
  individuals	
  were	
  found	
  to	
  have	
  received	
  a	
  positive	
  predictive	
  test	
  result	
  from	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  8	
  Telehealth	
  uses	
  videoconferencing	
  and	
  supporting	
  technologies	
  to	
  put	
  patients	
  in	
  touch	
  with	
  health	
  professionals	
  across	
  distances.	
  It	
  is	
  especially	
  useful	
  in	
  remote	
  areas	
  where	
  patients	
  have	
  to	
  travel	
  long	
  distances	
  to	
  meet	
  health	
  professionals	
  (Ministry	
  of	
  Health	
  2012).	
   	
   75	
   outside	
  of	
  BC;	
  this	
  information	
  was	
  available	
  from	
  family	
  pedigrees.	
  	
  The	
  existence	
  of	
  these	
  additional	
  36	
  tests	
  raises	
  the	
  possibility	
  that	
  there	
  are	
  other	
  unknown	
  individuals	
  who	
  had	
  predictive	
  testing	
  but	
  did	
  not	
  reveal	
  their	
  results	
  to	
  their	
  families.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  thus	
  likely	
  that	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  predictive	
  tests	
  ascertained	
  in	
  BC	
  during	
  this	
  study	
  reflects	
  an	
  underestimate	
  of	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  living	
  in	
  BC	
  who	
  have	
  received	
  predictive	
  test	
  results.	
  	
  A	
  different	
  equation	
  for	
  calculating	
  the	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  was	
  used	
  in	
  the	
  present	
  study	
  than	
  was	
  applied	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  recent	
  account	
  of	
  uptake	
  in	
  BC	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  conduct	
  a	
  meaningful	
  comparison	
  of	
  these	
  two	
  studies	
  and	
  in	
  turn	
  understand	
  trends	
  in	
  uptake	
  over	
  time	
  in	
  this	
  province,	
  uptake	
  was	
  re-­‐calculated	
  for	
  each	
  study	
  period	
  using	
  both	
  the	
  original	
  equation	
  and	
  the	
  revised	
  equation.	
  	
  Additionally,	
  three	
  methods	
  of	
  calculating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  were	
  applied	
  to	
  both	
  equations	
  (Table	
  12).	
  	
  It	
  appears	
  that	
  the	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  has	
  declined	
  in	
  BC	
  since	
  2000.	
  	
  Using	
  all	
  methods	
  of	
  calculating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  and	
  both	
  equations	
  for	
  uptake,	
  all	
  2000-­‐2012	
  values	
  remain	
  lower	
  than	
  those	
  from	
  1987-­‐2000.	
  	
  This	
  decline	
  in	
  uptake	
  may	
  be	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  greater	
  enthusiasm	
  surrounding	
  predictive	
  testing	
  during	
  its	
  beginning	
  stages	
  and	
  potentially	
  higher	
  hopes	
  of	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  a	
  treatment	
  during	
  these	
  first	
  ten	
  years	
  of	
  predictive	
  test	
  availability.	
  	
  From	
  Table	
  12,	
  it	
  can	
  be	
  noted	
  that	
  the	
  uptake	
  results	
  differ	
  considerably	
  between	
  equations.	
  	
  This	
  supports	
  the	
  notion	
  that	
  a	
  standard	
  method	
  must	
  be	
  adopted	
  when	
  considering	
  the	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  a	
  population.	
  	
  Without	
  a	
  standardized	
  method,	
  uptake	
  cannot	
  be	
  meaningfully	
  compared	
  between	
  populations	
  and	
  over	
  time.	
  	
  Secondly,	
  the	
  uptake	
  results	
  differ	
  considerably	
  when	
  different	
  methods	
  are	
  used	
  to	
  estimate	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk.	
  	
  As	
  most	
  studies	
  incorporate	
  an	
  estimate	
  of	
  the	
  50%	
  risk	
  population	
  by	
  multiplying	
  the	
  prevalence	
  by	
  4.2	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009,	
  Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2011)	
  or	
  by	
  5	
  (Conneally	
  1984,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003),	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  that	
  an	
  accurate	
  estimate	
  of	
  prevalence	
  is	
  available.	
  	
  Underestimates	
  of	
  prevalence	
  render	
  overestimates	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  uptake.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  therefore	
  important	
  that	
  populations	
  wishing	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  predictive	
  testing	
  uptake	
  using	
  theoretical	
   	
   76	
   methods	
  of	
  estimating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  first	
  ensure	
  that	
  a	
  thorough	
  patient	
  ascertainment	
  study	
  has	
  been	
  conducted	
  in	
  their	
  population.	
  	
   Table	
  12.	
  Comparing	
  the	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  BC	
  over	
  two	
  study	
  periods.	
   Three	
  separate	
  methods	
  of	
  calculating	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  are	
  applied	
  while	
  two	
   separate	
  methods	
  of	
  calculating	
  the	
  uptake	
  are	
  applied.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   UPTAKE	
   Study	
  period	
   Pop.	
  At	
  50%	
  risk	
   P	
   D	
   Method	
  1	
   D/P	
   Method	
  2	
   D/P+(P*t/18.8)	
  	
   Method	
  1:	
  Theoretical	
  	
  (prevalence	
  of	
  8.4/100,000)	
   1987-­‐2000	
   1268	
   672	
   354	
   53%	
   32%	
   2000-­‐2012	
   1626	
   976	
   280	
   29%	
   18%	
   	
   Method	
  2:	
  Theoretical	
  	
  (prevalence	
  of	
  13.9/100,000)	
   1987-­‐2000	
   1980	
   1049.4	
   354	
   34%	
   20%	
   2000-­‐2012	
   2536	
   1522	
   280	
   18%	
   11%	
   	
   Method	
  3:	
  Empirical	
  data	
   1987-­‐2000	
   1758	
   932	
   354	
   38%	
   23%	
   2000-­‐2012	
   2252	
   1351	
   280	
   21%	
   13%	
   D=	
  number	
  of	
  predictive	
  tests	
  performed;	
  P=	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  in	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  for	
  HD	
  who	
  are	
  eligible	
  for	
  predictive	
  testing	
  (age	
  18	
  or	
  above);	
  t=number	
  of	
  years	
  in	
  the	
  study	
  period;	
  18.8=	
  average	
  duration	
  of	
  disease	
  (HD	
  symptoms)	
  (Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009).	
   	
   	
   	
   77	
   Direct	
  and	
  immediate	
  implications	
  This	
  study	
  comprises	
  the	
  first	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  epidemiology	
  of	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  (HD)	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (BC).	
  	
  Generation	
  of	
  HD	
  services	
  in	
  BC	
  has	
  occurred,	
  thus	
  far,	
  without	
  data	
  regarding	
  the	
  prevalence,	
  incidence,	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  and	
  geographical	
  distribution	
  of	
  HD	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  Without	
  these	
  figures,	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  difficult	
  to	
  produce	
  a	
  compelling	
  argument	
  to	
  justify	
  the	
  allocation	
  of	
  public	
  resources	
  to	
  aid	
  in	
  supporting	
  these	
  services.	
  	
  Moreover,	
  epidemiological	
  estimates	
  extrapolated	
  from	
  other	
  regions	
  have	
  provided	
  underestimates	
  (Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003).	
  	
  This	
  study	
  provides	
  the	
  baseline	
  numbers	
  that	
  are	
  essential	
  for	
  an	
  accurate	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  true	
  service	
  and	
  care	
  requirements	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  this	
  province.	
  	
  	
  Through	
  our	
  physician	
  surveys,	
  we	
  have	
  identified	
  specific	
  regions	
  in	
  this	
  province	
  where	
  patients	
  are	
  numerous.	
  	
  Information	
  obtained	
  regarding	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  cared	
  for	
  by	
  each	
  responding	
  physician	
  represents	
  minimum	
  numbers	
  that	
  may	
  be	
  useful	
  for	
  targeting	
  new	
  programs.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  one	
  general	
  practitioner	
  from	
  Port	
  Alice	
  indicated	
  that	
  he	
  cares	
  for	
  ten	
  HD	
  patients,	
  none	
  of	
  who	
  have	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH.	
  	
  No	
  neurologist	
  works	
  in	
  or	
  near	
  to	
  Port	
  Alice,	
  indicating	
  this	
  GP	
  may	
  be	
  the	
  sole	
  care	
  provider	
  for	
  these	
  patients.	
  	
  This	
  GP	
  may	
  be	
  suitable	
  as	
  a	
  key	
  player	
  in	
  a	
  potential	
  pilot	
  project	
  to	
  act	
  as	
  a	
  “remote	
  representative”	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  As	
  resources	
  are	
  scarce	
  and	
  public	
  funding	
  involvement	
  absent	
  in	
  in	
  this	
  province,	
  recognizing	
  professionals	
  who	
  are	
  already	
  involved	
  with	
  the	
  disease	
  as	
  remote	
  representatives,	
  may	
  be	
  an	
  appropriate	
  first	
  step	
  towards	
  strengthening	
  the	
  HD	
  resource	
  infrastructure	
  in	
  this	
  province.	
  	
  Further,	
  with	
  a	
  population	
  of	
  only	
  821	
  (BC	
  Stats,	
  2011),	
  up	
  to	
  1/82	
  people	
  in	
  Port	
  Alice	
  may	
  suffer	
  from	
  HD	
  –	
  this	
  is	
  clearly	
  the	
  highest	
  HD	
  frequency	
  observed	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  If	
  we	
  extrapolate	
  from	
  the	
  epidemiological	
  estimates	
  obtained	
  for	
  BC,	
  this	
  study	
  suggests	
  that	
  countrywide,	
  there	
  may	
  be	
  up	
  to	
  4,700	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  4,586-­‐4,862)	
  patients	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  and	
  17,000	
  individuals	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  presently	
  living	
  in	
  Canada,	
  and	
  approximately	
  250	
  new	
  cases	
  may	
  be	
  diagnosed	
  this	
  year.	
  	
  Further,	
  this	
  study	
  implies	
  that	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States,	
  there	
  may	
  up	
  to	
  42,000	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  42,225-­‐42,945)	
   	
   78	
   individuals	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  and	
  153,000	
  individuals	
  at	
  50%	
  risk	
  presently	
  living	
  in	
  the	
  States,	
  and	
  approximately	
  2,252	
  new	
  cases	
  may	
  be	
  diagnosed	
  this	
  year.	
  	
  	
   It	
  is	
  clear	
  from	
  this	
  study	
  that	
  HD	
  has	
  a	
  higher	
  frequency	
  than	
  previously	
  recognized.	
  	
  This	
  has	
  implications	
  not	
  only	
  for	
  service	
  delivery,	
  but	
  also	
  for	
  drug	
  development.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  share	
  these	
  findings	
  with	
  the	
  pharmaceutical	
  industry,	
  as	
  investment	
  in	
  therapeutic	
  development	
  for	
  HD,	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  providing	
  benefit	
  to	
  the	
  patients,	
  will	
  provide	
  benefit	
  to	
  companies.	
  	
  The	
  argument	
  that	
  HD	
  is	
  infrequent	
  is	
  laid	
  to	
  rest.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   79	
   Conclusion	
  	
   This	
  study	
  comprised	
  the	
  most	
  modern	
  and	
  comprehensive	
  assessment	
  of	
  HD	
  epidemiology	
  to	
  date.	
  	
  A	
  minimum	
  prevalence	
  ranging	
  from	
  12.5-­‐14.9/100,000	
  (1/8,000-­‐1/6,711)	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  11.5-­‐16.0	
  [1/8,696-­‐1/6,250])	
  was	
  estimated	
  for	
  the	
  general	
  population	
  and	
  approximately	
  17.20/100,000	
  (1/5,814)	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  17.19-­‐17.20)	
  for	
  Caucasians.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  highest	
  prevalence	
  estimate	
  to	
  be	
  reported	
  since	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test	
  in	
  1993	
  and	
  is	
  more	
  than	
  twice	
  as	
  high	
  as	
  that	
  reported	
  by	
  the	
  most	
  recent	
  Canadian	
  assessment	
  (Shokeir,	
  1975).	
  	
  The	
  incidence	
  observed	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  was	
  between	
  6.9-­‐7.2	
  per	
  million/year	
  (95%	
  CI:	
  4.4-­‐7.9)	
  between	
  the	
  years	
  2000	
  and	
  2011	
  and	
  is	
  very	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  incidence	
  estimated	
  in	
  BC	
  for	
  1996-­‐1999	
  –	
  6.9	
  per	
  million/year	
  (Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  2001).	
  	
  The	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  was	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  94.0/100,000	
  or	
  1/1,073.	
  	
  This	
  study	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  to	
  estimate	
  both	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  50%	
  a	
  priori	
  risk	
  and	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  25%	
  a	
  priori	
  risk	
  and	
  was	
  only	
  the	
  fourth	
  study	
  to	
  calculate	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  empirically	
  from	
  the	
  specific	
  community	
  at	
  hand	
  (Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000,	
  Tassicker	
  et	
  al.	
  2009,	
  Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2011).	
  	
  This	
  study	
  utilized	
  a	
  significantly	
  greater	
  number	
  of	
  ascertainment	
  sources	
  than	
  did	
  previous	
  reports	
  on	
  HD	
  epidemiology	
  and	
  thus	
  may	
  comprise	
  the	
  most	
  confident	
  results	
  to	
  date.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  also	
  the	
  first	
  study	
  to	
  provide	
  information	
  regarding	
  ethnicity	
  of	
  HD	
  patients.	
  	
  For	
  these	
  reasons,	
  this	
  study	
  may	
  set	
  a	
  precedent	
  for	
  future	
  work	
  and	
  may	
  be	
  compared	
  with	
  confidence	
  to	
  future	
  findings	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  gain	
  a	
  greater	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  true	
  epidemiology	
  of	
  HD	
  across	
  geographic	
  regions,	
  between	
  ethnicities	
  and	
  over	
  time.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   80	
   Future	
  direction	
  	
   When	
  ascertaining	
  symptomatic	
  patients,	
  only	
  minimum	
  prevalence	
  can	
  be	
  estimated	
  as	
  individuals	
  affected	
  with	
  HD	
  may	
  not	
  seek	
  medical	
  attention	
  or	
  the	
  study	
  group	
  may	
  fail	
  to	
  obtain	
  the	
  medical	
  records	
  for	
  every	
  patient.	
  	
  These	
  limitations	
  become	
  more	
  apparent	
  with	
  a	
  shorter	
  study	
  period.	
  	
  The	
  frequency	
  of	
  intermediate	
  allele	
  (IA),	
  reduced	
  penetrance	
  (RP)	
  and	
  full	
  penetrance	
  (FP)	
  alleles	
  in	
  the	
  general	
  population	
  should	
  be	
  assessed.	
  	
  This	
  information	
  is	
  important	
  for	
  an	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  true	
  prevalence,	
  the	
  true	
  heterozygousity	
  frequency	
  (Harper,	
  1991)	
  and	
  for	
  predicting	
  future	
  patterns	
  of	
  HD	
  prevalence	
  in	
  the	
  population.	
  	
  A	
  large	
  random	
  sample	
  population	
  would	
  be	
  required	
  for	
  this	
  analysis	
  such	
  as	
  blood	
  spot	
  cards9	
  from	
  local	
  hospitals	
  or	
  random	
  DNA	
  samples	
  from	
  unrelated	
  studies	
  of	
  the	
  general	
  population.	
  	
  	
  	
   Additionally,	
  an	
  investigation	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  mutation	
  frequency	
  in	
  residents	
  of	
  nursing	
  homes	
  would	
  provide	
  further	
  information	
  regarding	
  the	
  disease	
  prevalence.	
  	
  Dementia	
  is	
  widespread	
  in	
  Canada;	
  8%	
  of	
  those	
  over	
  65	
  and	
  35%	
  of	
  those	
  over	
  85	
  years	
  of	
  age	
  suffer	
  from	
  dementia	
  (Long	
  term	
  care	
  Canada	
  2011).	
  	
  This	
  prevalence	
  is	
  expected	
  to	
  increase	
  significantly	
  more	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  aging	
  of	
  the	
  baby	
  boom	
  cohort	
  (Statistics	
  Canada,	
  2011).	
  	
  Although	
  commonly	
  characterized	
  as	
  having	
  a	
  distinct	
  phenotype	
  (Walker,	
  2007),	
  symptoms	
  can	
  vary	
  quite	
  dramatically	
  between	
  cases	
  of	
  HD	
  (personal	
  correspondence).	
  	
  Very	
  late	
  onset	
  HD	
  may	
  exist	
  in	
  the	
  form	
  of	
  a	
  dementia-­‐like	
  phenotype	
  without	
  chorea,	
  leading	
  to	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  missed	
  cases.	
  	
  An	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  mutation	
  frequency	
  in	
  the	
  elderly	
  population	
  would	
  allow	
  for	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  detect	
  potential	
  dementia-­‐like	
  cases	
  of	
  HD.	
  	
  This	
  would	
  in	
  turn,	
  further	
  increase	
  the	
  estimated	
  prevalence.	
  	
  	
  	
  An	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  mean	
  CAG	
  size	
  of	
  control	
  chromosomes	
  across	
  populations	
  of	
  varying	
  prevalence	
  is	
  required.	
  	
  Warby	
  et	
  al.	
  (2011)	
  suggest	
  that	
  the	
  difference	
  in	
  prevalence	
  observed	
  between	
  ethnicities	
  is	
  attributable	
  in	
  part	
  to	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  9	
  Blood	
  spot	
  cards	
  are	
  cards	
  that	
  contain	
  small	
  blood	
  samples	
  for	
  every	
  newborn	
  baby	
  in	
  hospitals	
  as	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  newborn	
  screening	
  program.	
  Newborn	
  Screening	
  can	
  identify	
  babies	
  who	
  may	
  have	
  one	
  of	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  treatable	
  disorders.	
  	
  	
   	
   81	
   specific	
  haplotypes.	
  	
  Falush	
  (2009)	
  suggested	
  the	
  cross-­‐ethnic	
  differences	
  in	
  prevalence	
  observed	
  might	
  be	
  explained	
  by	
  the	
  variation	
  in	
  CAG	
  size	
  in	
  each	
  population’s	
  control	
  (non	
  CAG	
  expanded)	
  chromosome	
  pool.	
  	
  With	
  data	
  from	
  the	
  present	
  study,	
  BC	
  is	
  now	
  a	
  population	
  possessing	
  confident	
  prevalence	
  findings	
  and	
  haplotype	
  data	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  data	
  regarding	
  CAG	
  size	
  of	
  control	
  chromosomes.	
  	
  BC	
  is	
  therefore	
  a	
  well-­‐suited	
  population	
  in	
  which	
  to	
  conduct	
  in	
  an	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  above-­‐mentioned	
  hypotheses.	
  	
  Finally,	
  an	
  extensive	
  database	
  has	
  been	
  created	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  this	
  study,	
  containing	
  a	
  vast	
  array	
  of	
  clinical	
  and	
  demographic	
  information	
  for	
  individuals	
  in	
  BC	
  who	
  have	
  been	
  seen	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics.	
  	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  maximize	
  the	
  potential	
  of	
  this	
  database,	
  it	
  is	
  crucial	
  that	
  it	
  be	
  maintained	
  and	
  improved.	
  	
  The	
  long-­‐term	
  goal	
  is	
  to	
  convert	
  this	
  database	
  into	
  a	
  provincial	
  HD	
  register.	
  	
  A	
  number	
  of	
  steps	
  are	
  required	
  to	
  ensure	
  success	
  of	
  this	
  process	
  (Newton	
  and	
  Garner,	
  2002)	
  (Figure	
  27).	
  	
  1)	
  A	
  structured,	
  multidisciplinary	
  team	
  responsible	
  for	
  the	
  register	
  must	
  be	
  established.	
  	
  The	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  already	
  composes	
  the	
  framework	
  for	
  this	
  team;	
  a	
  multidisciplinary	
  team	
  with	
  specialty	
  in	
  HD	
  provides	
  care	
  to	
  patients	
  and	
  individuals	
  at	
  risk	
  in	
  the	
  clinic.	
  	
  The	
  addition	
  of	
  a	
  register	
  manager	
  would	
  largely	
  complete	
  this	
  team.	
  	
  2)	
  Long-­‐term,	
  stable	
  funding	
  must	
  be	
  pursued	
  and	
  3)	
  arrangements	
  must	
  be	
  made	
  regarding	
  access	
  to	
  the	
  data,	
  data	
  security,	
  accountability,	
  reporting	
  and	
  publicity.	
  	
  4)	
  It	
  might	
  be	
  necessary	
  (depending	
  on	
  the	
  privacy	
  laws	
  in	
  place	
  at	
  the	
  time)	
  to	
  modify	
  accordingly,	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VGH	
  medical	
  genetics	
  consent	
  forms	
  to	
  include	
  consent	
  for	
  participation	
  in	
  the	
  register	
  (this	
  will	
  depend	
  largely	
  on	
  the	
  decisions	
  made	
  in	
  number	
  3).	
  5)	
  Ethics	
  approval	
  must	
  be	
  obtained	
  for	
  development	
  of	
  the	
  register.	
  6)	
  Since	
  the	
  register	
  would	
  ideally	
  include	
  information	
  of	
  every	
  HD	
  patient	
  in	
  the	
  province,	
  ethical	
  approval	
  must	
  be	
  acquired	
  for	
  the	
  addition	
  of	
  clinical	
  and	
  demographic	
  information	
  to	
  the	
  register	
  from	
  patients	
  who	
  were	
  ascertained	
  for	
  this	
  project	
  from	
  sources	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic	
  and	
  VHG	
  (nursing	
  homes,	
  neurologist	
  and	
  GP	
  records,	
  family	
  surveys).	
  	
  For	
  register	
  data	
  to	
  be	
  updated,	
  it	
  may	
  be	
  beneficial	
  to	
  link	
  the	
  register	
  with	
  the	
  electronic	
  medical	
  records	
  (EMR)	
  at	
  the	
  HD	
  clinic.	
  	
  This	
  would	
  allow	
  for	
  the	
  potential	
  of	
  new	
  patient	
  information	
  to	
  be	
  automatically	
  added	
  to	
  the	
   	
   82	
   database.	
  	
  As	
  only	
  specific	
  information	
  will	
  be	
  required	
  for	
  transfer	
  from	
  EMR	
  to	
  the	
  register,	
  specialized	
  programming	
  software	
  may	
  be	
  required	
  for	
  this	
  step.	
  	
  The	
  alternative	
  to	
  this	
  would	
  involve	
  an	
  individual	
  responsible	
  for	
  data-­‐upkeep.	
  	
  8)	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  ensure	
  every	
  individual	
  is	
  living	
  and	
  in	
  turn	
  the	
  register	
  is	
  constantly	
  up	
  to	
  date,	
  the	
  register	
  should	
  be	
  linked	
  to	
  death	
  records.	
  	
  An	
  application	
  to	
  British	
  Population	
  Data	
  BC	
  must	
  be	
  made	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  request	
  linkage	
  to	
  death	
  records	
  (Population	
  Data	
  BC	
  2012).	
  	
  9)	
  Finally,	
  as	
  the	
  database	
  has	
  been	
  designed	
  to	
  mirror	
  fields	
  collected	
  for	
  the	
  European	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  network	
  (EHDN)	
  registry,	
  the	
  BC	
  register	
  may	
  be	
  well	
  suited	
  for	
  collaborating	
  with	
  this	
  registry	
  for	
  the	
  potential	
  to	
  begin	
  an	
  international	
  register	
  for	
  Huntington	
  Disease.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   Figure	
  27.	
  Steps	
  to	
  be	
  taken	
  to	
  convert	
  the	
  HD	
  research	
  database	
  into	
  a	
  register	
  for	
  HD	
  in	
  BC	
   	
   83	
   Bibliography	
  	
  	
   Adachi	
  Y,	
  Nakashima	
  K.	
  "Population	
  genetic	
  study	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease-­‐prevalence	
  and	
  founder's	
  effect	
  in	
  the	
  San-­‐in	
  area,	
  western	
  Japan."	
  Nihon	
  Rinsho	
  4	
  (1999):	
  100-­‐104.	
  	
   Al-­‐Jader,	
  LN,	
  PS	
  Harper,	
  M	
  Krawczak,	
  and	
  SR	
  Palmer.	
  "The	
  frequency	
  of	
  inherited	
  disorders	
  database:	
  prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington	
  disease.	
  ."	
  Community	
  Genetics,	
  2001:	
  148-­‐157.	
  	
   Almqvist	
  EW,	
  Elterman	
  DS,	
  MacLeod	
  PM,	
  Hayden	
  MR.	
  "High	
  incidence	
  rate	
  and	
  absent	
  family	
  histories	
  in	
  one	
  quarter	
  of	
  patients	
  newly	
  diagnosed	
  with	
  Huntington	
  disease	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  ."	
   Clinical	
  Genetics,	
  2001:	
  198-­‐205.	
  	
  	
   Alonso	
  ,	
  ME,	
  et	
  al.	
  "Clinical	
  and	
  genetic	
  characteristics	
  of	
  Mexican	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  patients.	
  ."	
  Movement	
  Disorders,	
  2009:	
  2012-­‐2015.	
  	
   Avila-­‐Giron.	
  1973.	
  Medical	
  and	
  Social	
  Aspects	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  the	
  state	
  of	
  Zulia,	
  Venezuela.	
  Advances	
  in	
  Neurology	
  1:	
  261–6.	
  	
  	
   Barbeau,	
  A,	
  C	
  Coiteux,	
  JG	
  Trudeau,	
  and	
  Fullum	
  G.	
  "Le	
  Choree	
  de	
  Huntington	
  Chez	
  le	
  Canadiens	
  Francais:	
  Etude	
  Preliminaire."	
  L'Union	
  Medicale	
  du	
  Canada,	
  1964:	
  1178-­‐1182.	
  	
  Barbeau,	
  Andre,	
  Carl	
  Coiteux,	
  Jean-­‐Guy	
  Trudeau,	
  and	
  Gabrielle	
  Fullum.	
  "La	
  Choree	
  de	
  Huntington	
  chez	
  le	
  Canadiens	
  Francais	
  Etude	
  Preliminaire."	
  L'Union	
  Medicale	
  du	
  Canada,	
  1964:	
  1178-­‐1182.	
  	
   BC,	
  Stats.	
  Population	
  Projections.	
  01	
  2012.	
  http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/StatisticsBySubject/Demography/PopulationProjections.aspx	
  (accessed	
  03	
  27,	
  2012).	
  	
   Bernhardt	
  C,	
  Anne-­‐Marie	
  Schwan,	
  Peter	
  Kraus,	
  Joerg	
  Thomas	
  Epplen	
  and	
  Erdmute	
  Kunstmann.	
  "Decreasing	
  uptake	
  of	
  predictive	
  testing	
  for	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  in	
  a	
  German	
  centre:	
  12	
  years’	
  experience	
  (1993–2004)	
  ."	
  European	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
  Genetics	
  17	
  (2009):	
  295–300.	
  	
  Bickford,	
  JA,	
  and	
  RM	
  Ellison.	
  "The	
  high	
  incidence	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  the	
  Duchy	
  of	
  Cornwall.	
  ."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Mental	
  Science,	
  1953:	
  291-­‐294.	
  	
  Bolt,	
  JM.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  the	
  West	
  of	
  Scotland.	
  ."	
  The	
  British	
  Journal	
  of	
  Psychiatry,	
  1970:	
  259-­‐270.	
  	
  Brewis,	
  M,	
  DC	
  Poskanzer,	
  C	
  Rolland,	
  and	
  H	
  Miller.	
  "Neurological	
  disease	
  in	
  an	
  English	
  city.	
  ."	
   Acta	
  Neurologica	
  Scandinavica,	
  1966:	
  1-­‐89.	
  	
   British	
  Columbia	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  Agency.	
  Selected	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  and	
  Health	
  Status	
  Indicators	
  .	
  Statistics	
  report,	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  Agency,	
  2000-­‐2009.	
  Brothers,	
  CR.	
  "Huntington's	
  Chorea	
  in	
  Victoria	
  and	
  Tasmania."	
  J	
  Neurol	
  Sci,	
  1964:	
  405-­‐20.	
  	
   	
  Chen	
  C,	
  Y	
  Lai.	
  "Nationwide	
  Population-­‐Based	
  Epidemiologic	
  Study	
  of	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  in	
  Taiwan."	
  Neuroepidemiology,	
  2010:	
  250–254.	
  	
   	
  Cameron,	
  D,	
  and	
  GA	
  Venters.	
  "Some	
  problems	
  in	
  Huntington's	
  Chorea."	
  Scottish	
  Medical	
   Journal,	
  1967:	
  152–156.	
  	
   Caro,	
  AJ.	
  "The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  an	
  area	
  of	
  East	
  Anglia."	
  The	
  Journal	
  of	
  the	
   Royal	
  College	
  of	
  General	
  Practitioners,	
  1977:	
  41-­‐45.	
   	
   84	
   Centre	
  for	
  Huntington	
  Disease.	
  2011.	
  http://www.cmmt.ubc.ca/outreach/hd-­‐clinic	
  (accessed	
  02	
  02,	
  2011).	
  	
   Chang	
  CM,	
  Yu	
  YL,	
  Fong	
  KY,	
  Wong	
  MT,	
  Chan	
  YW,	
  Ng	
  TH,	
  Leung	
  CM,	
  Chan	
  V.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Hong	
  Kong	
  Chinese:	
  epidemiology	
  and	
  clinical	
  picture."	
  Clin	
  Exp	
  Neurol.,	
  1994:	
  43-­‐51.	
  	
   CHDI.	
  Cure	
  Huntington's	
  Disease	
  Initiative	
  Foundation.	
  http://www.highqfoundation.org/	
  (accessed	
  03	
  01,	
  2012).	
  	
   Chen	
  KM,	
  Brody	
  JA,	
  Kurland	
  LT.	
  "Patterns	
  of	
  neurologic	
  diseases	
  on	
  guam."	
  Arch	
  Neurol	
  6	
  (1968):	
  573-­‐8.	
  	
  	
   CIA	
  World	
  Factbook.	
  Total	
  fertility	
  rate.	
  2012.	
  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-­‐world-­‐factbook/rankorder/2127rank.html	
  (accessed	
  04	
  3,	
  2012).	
  	
   Conneally,	
  M.	
  "Huntington	
  Disease:	
  Genetics	
  and	
  Epidemiology."	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
   Genetics,	
  1984:	
  506-­‐526.	
  	
   Creighton	
  S,	
  Almqvist	
  EW,	
  MacGregor	
  D,	
  Fernandez	
  B,	
  Hogg	
  H,	
  Beis	
  J,	
  Welch	
  JP,	
  Riddell	
  C,	
  Lokkesmoe	
  R,	
  Khalifa	
  M,	
  MacKenzie	
  J,	
  Sajoo	
  A,	
  Farrell	
  S,	
  Robert	
  F,	
  Shugar	
  A,	
  Summers	
  A,	
  Meschino	
  W,	
  Allingham-­‐Hawkins	
  D,	
  Chiu	
  T,	
  Hunter	
  A,	
  Allanson	
  J,	
  Hare	
  H,	
  Schween	
  J,	
  Collins	
  L,	
  Sanders	
  S,	
  Greenberg	
  C,	
  Cardwell	
  S,	
  Lemire	
  E,	
  MacLeod	
  P,	
  Hayden	
  MR.	
  "Predictive,	
  pre-­‐natal	
  and	
  diagnostic	
  genetic	
  testing	
  for	
  Huntington's	
  disease:	
  the	
  experience	
  in	
  Canada	
  from	
  1987	
  to	
  2000."	
  Clinical	
   Genetics,	
  2003:	
  462–475.	
  	
   	
  	
   European	
  Huntington's	
  Disease	
  Network.	
  About	
  EHDN	
  REGISTRY.	
  2010.	
  http://www.euro-­‐hd.net/html/registry/about/description	
  (accessed	
  04	
  30,	
  2012).	
  Evergreen	
  Hamlets	
  at	
  Fleetwood.	
  Evergreen	
  Cottages.	
  2011.	
  http://www.evergreen-­‐cottages.com/	
  (accessed	
  2012).	
  	
   Falush	
  D,	
  Almqvist	
  EW,	
  Brinkmann	
  RR,	
  Iwasa	
  Y,	
  and	
  Hayden	
  MR.	
  "Measurement	
  of	
  Mutational	
  Flow	
  Implies	
  Both	
  a	
  High	
  New-­‐Mutation	
  Rate	
  for	
  	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  and	
  Substantial	
  Underascertainment	
  of	
  Late-­‐Onset	
  Cases."	
  Am.	
  J.	
  Hum.	
  Genet.,	
  2000:	
  373-­‐385.	
  	
   Falush,	
  Daniel.	
  "Haplotype	
  Background,	
  Repeat	
  Length	
  Evolution,	
  and	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  ."	
  The	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
  Genetics	
  85	
  (2009):	
  939-­‐942.	
  	
   Farrer	
  LA,	
  R	
  H	
  Myers,	
  L	
  A	
  Cupples,	
  and	
  P	
  M	
  Conneally.	
  "Considerations	
  in	
  using	
  linkage	
  analysis	
  as	
  a	
  presymptomatic	
  test	
  for	
  Huntington's	
  disease."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medical	
  Genetics,	
  1987:	
  577–588.	
  	
   Folstein,	
  Susan	
  E.	
  Huntington's	
  disease:	
  a	
  disorder	
  of	
  families.	
  Baltimore:	
  Johns	
  Hopkins	
  University	
  Press,	
  1989.	
  	
   Folstein,	
  Susan,	
  Gary	
  Chase,	
  Wendy	
  Wahl,	
  Anne	
  McDonnell,	
  and	
  Marshal	
  Folstein.	
  "Huntington	
  Disease	
  in	
  Maryland:	
  Clinical	
  Aspects	
  of	
  Racial	
  Variation	
  ."	
  1987:	
  168-­‐179.	
  	
   Foroud	
  T,	
  Gray	
  J,	
  Ivashina	
  J.	
  "Differences	
  in	
  duration	
  of	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  based	
  on	
  age	
  at	
  onset."	
  J	
  Neurol	
  Neurosurg	
  Psychiatry	
  66	
  (1999):	
  52–56.	
  	
   Fox	
  S,	
  Bloch	
  M,	
  Fahy	
  M,	
  Hayden	
  MR.	
  "Predictive	
  testing	
  for	
  Huntington	
  disease:	
  I.	
  Description	
  of	
  a	
  pilot	
  project	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia."	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  32	
  (1989):	
  211-­‐216.	
  	
   	
   85	
   Frontali	
  M,	
  Malaspina	
  P,	
  Rossi	
  C,	
  Jacopini	
  AG,	
  Vivona	
  G,	
  Pergola	
  MS,	
  Palena	
  A,	
  Novelletto	
  A.	
  "Epidemiological	
  and	
  linkage	
  studies	
  on	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Italy.	
  ."	
  Human	
  Genetics,	
  1990:	
  165-­‐170.	
  	
   García	
  Ruiz	
  PJ,	
  Gómez-­‐Tortosa	
  E,	
  del	
  Barrio	
  A,	
  Benítez	
  J,	
  Morales	
  B,	
  Vela	
  L,	
  Castro	
  A,	
  Requena	
  I.	
  "Senile	
  chorea:	
  a	
  multicenter	
  prospective	
  study."	
  Acta	
  Neurol	
  Scand	
  3	
  (1997):	
  180-­‐183.	
  	
   Garner,	
  John	
  Newton	
  and	
  Sarah.	
  Disease	
  Registers	
  in	
  England.	
  Department	
  of	
  Health	
  Policy	
  Research	
  Programme,	
  University	
  of	
  Oxford	
  ,	
  Oxford:	
  Institute	
  of	
  Health	
  Sciences,	
  2002.	
  	
   Gassivaro	
  Gallo,	
  Buhagiar,	
  Cuschieri	
  and	
  Viviani.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea	
  (HD)	
  in	
  Malta:	
  Epidemiology	
  and	
  origins."	
  International	
  Journal	
  of	
  Anthropology	
  14,	
  no.	
  2-­‐3	
  (1999):	
  577-­‐589.	
  	
   Goizet	
  C,	
  Lesca	
  G,	
  Dürr	
  A,	
  and	
  French	
  Group	
  for	
  Presymptomatic	
  Testing	
  in	
  Neurogenetic	
  Disorders.	
  "Presymptomatic	
  testing	
  in	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  and	
  autosomal	
  dominant	
  cerebellar	
  ataxias."	
  Neurology	
  59	
  (2002):	
  1330-­‐6.	
  	
   	
  	
   Govoni	
  V,	
  Pavoni	
  M,	
  Granieri	
  E,	
  Carreras	
  M,	
  Malagù	
  S,	
  Gandini	
  E,	
  Del	
  Senno	
  L.	
  "Huntington	
  chorea	
  in	
  the	
  province	
  of	
  Ferrara	
  from	
  1971	
  to	
  1987.	
  Descriptive	
  study."	
  Riv	
  Neurol	
  6	
  (1988):	
  235-­‐240.	
  	
  	
   Gudmundsson,	
  KR.	
  "Prevalence	
  and	
  occurrence	
  of	
  some	
  rare	
  neurological	
  diseases	
  in	
  Iceland."	
  Acta	
  Neurol	
  Scand	
  1	
  (1969):	
  114-­‐118.	
  	
   Gusella,	
  James.	
  Test	
  for	
  Huntington's	
  disease.	
  patent,	
  The	
  General	
  Hospital	
  Corporation,	
  Boston:	
  United	
  States	
  Patent,	
  1987.	
  	
   Handley	
  OJ,	
  Marleen	
  van	
  Walsem,	
  Peter	
  Juni,	
  Anne-­‐Catherine	
  Bachoud-­‐Levi,	
  Anna	
  Rita	
  Bentivoglio,	
  Raphael	
  M.	
  Bonelli,	
  Jean-­‐Marc	
  Burgunder,	
  Joaquim	
  Ferreira,	
  Arvid	
  Heiberg,	
  Jørgen	
  Nielsen,	
  Markku	
  Päivärinta,	
  Sven	
  Pålhagen,	
  María	
  Ramos-­‐Arroyo,	
  Raymund	
  A.	
  C.	
  Roos,	
  Sarah	
  	
  ,	
  Tereza	
  Uhrova,	
  Wim	
  Vandenberghe,	
  Christine	
  Verellen-­‐Dumoulin,	
  Jacek	
  Zaremba,	
  Bernhard	
  G.	
  Landwehrmeyer	
  and	
  the	
  Registry	
  investigators	
  of	
  the	
  European	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Network.	
  "Study	
  Protocol	
  of	
  Registry	
  –	
  version	
  2.0	
  –	
  European	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Network	
  (EHDN)	
  ."	
  Hygeia	
   Public	
  Health,	
  2011:	
  115-­‐182.	
  	
  Harper	
  PS,	
  Lim	
  C,	
  Craufurd	
  D.	
  "Ten	
  years	
  of	
  presymptomatic	
  testing	
  for	
  Huntington’s	
  disease:	
  the	
  experience	
  of	
  the	
  UK	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Prediction	
  Consortium.	
  ."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medical	
   Genetics,	
  2000:	
  567–571.	
  	
   Harper,	
  Peter	
  &	
  Newcombe,	
  Robert.	
  "Age	
  at	
  onset	
  and	
  life	
  table	
  risks	
  in	
  genetic	
  counselling	
  for	
  Huntington's	
  disease."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  29	
  (1992):	
  239-­‐242.	
  	
  Harper,	
  PS.	
  Huntington's	
  Disease.	
  Cardiff:	
  W.B.	
  Saunders	
  Company,	
  1996.	
  	
   Harper,	
  PS.	
  "The	
  epidemiology	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease."	
  89(1992):	
  365-­‐376.	
  	
   Hayden	
  MR,	
  Beighton	
  P.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  the	
  Cape	
  coloured	
  community	
  of	
  South	
  Africa."	
  S	
  Afr	
  Med	
  J	
  22	
  (1977):	
  886-­‐888.	
  	
   Hayden	
  MR,	
  Berkowicz	
  AL,	
  Beighton	
  PH,	
  Yiptong	
  C.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea	
  on	
  the	
  island	
  of	
  Mauritius."	
  South	
  African	
  Medical	
  Journal	
  26	
  (1981):	
  1001-­‐2.	
  	
   Hayden,	
  MacGregor	
  JM,	
  Beighton	
  PH.	
  "The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  South	
  Africa."	
  S	
  Afr	
  Med	
  J	
  5	
  (1980):	
  193-­‐196.	
  	
   	
   86	
   Hećimović	
  ,	
  S,	
  et	
  al.	
  "Genetic	
  background	
  of	
  Huntington	
  disease	
  in	
  Croatia:	
  Molecular	
  analysis	
  of	
  CAG,	
  CCG,	
  and	
  Delta2642	
  (E2642del)	
  polymorphisms.	
  ."	
  Human	
  Mutation,	
  2002:	
  233.	
  	
   Heemskerk	
  AW,	
  R	
  A	
  C	
  Roos.	
  "E04	
  Causes	
  of	
  death	
  in	
  Huntington's	
  disease."	
  J	
  Neurol	
   Neurosurg	
  Psychiatry	
  81	
  (2010):	
  A22.	
  	
   Heathfield,	
  KW.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea.	
  Investigation	
  into	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  this	
  disease	
  in	
  the	
  area	
  covered	
  by	
  the	
  North	
  East	
  Metropolitan	
  Regional	
  Hospital	
  Board.	
  ."	
  Brain:	
  A	
  Journal	
  of	
   Neurology,	
  1967:	
  203-­‐232.	
  	
   Huntington's	
  Disease	
  Collaborative	
  Research	
  Group.	
  "A	
  Novel	
  Gene	
  Containing	
  a	
  Trinucleotide	
  Repeat	
  That	
  Is	
  Expanded	
  and	
  Unstable	
  on	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Chromosomes	
  ."	
  Cell,	
  1993:	
  971-­‐983.	
  	
  	
   Huntington	
  G.	
  "On	
  Chorea".	
  Medical	
  and	
  Surgical	
  reported	
  of	
  Philadelphia.,	
  26(15):	
  317-­‐321.	
  	
   Huntington	
  Study	
  Group.	
  "Unified	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Rating	
  Scale:	
  Reliability	
  and	
  Consistency	
  ."	
  Movement	
  Disorders	
  11,	
  no.	
  2	
  (1996):	
  136-­‐142.	
  	
   Husquinet,	
  H.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease:	
  social	
  problem;	
  eugenic	
  problem."	
  Arch	
  Belg	
  Med	
  Soc.,	
  1972:	
  65-­‐74.	
  InternationalEnergyAgency.	
  Key	
  World	
  Energy	
  Statistics.	
  Paris:	
  IEA,	
  2011.	
  	
   Kandil	
  MR,	
  Tohamy	
  SA,	
  Fattah	
  MA,	
  Ahmed	
  HN,	
  Farwiez	
  HM.	
  "Prevalence	
  of	
  chorea,	
  dystonia	
  and	
  athetosis	
  in	
  Assiut,	
  Egypt:	
  a	
  clinical	
  and	
  epidemiological	
  study."	
  Neuroepidemiology	
  5	
  (1994):	
  202-­‐210.	
  	
   Kirilenko	
  NB,	
  Fedotov	
  VP,	
  Baryshnikova	
  NV,	
  Dadali	
  EL,	
  Poliakov	
  AV.	
  "Nozological	
  spectrum	
  of	
  hereditary	
  diseases	
  of	
  the	
  nervous	
  system	
  in	
  the	
  cities	
  of	
  Volgograd	
  and	
  Volzhsky."	
  Genetika	
  9	
  (2004):	
  1262-­‐7.	
  	
   Kirkwood,	
  Sandra,	
  Jessica	
  Su,	
  Michael	
  Conneally,	
  and	
  Tatiana	
  Foroud.	
  "Progression	
  of	
  Symptoms	
  in	
  the	
  Early	
  and	
  Middle	
  Stages	
  of	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  ."	
  Arch	
  Neurol,	
  2001:	
  273-­‐278.	
  	
   Kokmen	
  E,	
  Ozekmekçi	
  FS,	
  Beard	
  CM,	
  O'Brien	
  PC,	
  Kurland	
  LT.	
  "Incidence	
  and	
  Prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  Disease	
  in	
  Olmsted	
  County,	
  Minnesota	
  (1950	
  Through	
  1989)."	
  Arch	
  Neurol,	
  1994:	
  696-­‐698.	
  	
  	
   Laccone	
  F,	
  Engel	
  U,	
  Holinski-­‐Feder	
  E,	
  Weigell-­‐Weber	
  M,	
  Marczinek	
  K,	
  Nolte	
  D,	
  Morris-­‐Rosendahl	
  DJ,	
  Zühlke	
  C,	
  Fuchs	
  K,	
  Weirich-­‐Schwaiger	
  H,	
  Schlüter	
  G,	
  von	
  Beust	
  G,	
  Vieira-­‐Saecker	
  AM,	
  Weber	
  BH,	
  Riess	
  O.	
  "DNA	
  analysis	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease:	
  five	
  years	
  of	
  experience	
  in	
  Germany,	
  Austria,	
  and	
  Switzerland."	
  Neurology	
  4	
  (1999):	
  801-­‐806.	
  	
  	
   Langbehn,	
  DR,	
  RR	
  Brinkman,	
  D	
  Falush,	
  JS	
  Paulsen,	
  and	
  MR	
  Hayden.	
  "A	
  new	
  model	
  for	
  prediction	
  of	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  onset	
  and	
  penetrance	
  for	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  based	
  on	
  CAG	
  length	
  ."	
  Clinical	
   Genetics,	
  2004:	
  267–277.	
  	
   Levy,	
  Micheline	
  and	
  Fenigold,	
  Josue.	
  "Estimating	
  prevalence	
  in	
  single-­‐gene	
  kidney	
  diseases	
  progressing	
  to	
  renal	
  failure."	
  Kidney	
  International	
  58	
  (2000):	
  925–943.	
  	
   Long	
  term	
  care	
  Canada.	
  Nursing	
  home	
  living	
  -­‐	
  know	
  the	
  facts.	
  2011.	
  http://www.longtermcarecanada.com/long_term_care_resources/care_years_pg_9.html	
  (accessed	
  2012).	
  	
   	
   	
   87	
   Maat-­‐Kievit	
  A,	
  Vegter-­‐van	
  der	
  Vlis	
  M,	
  Zoeteweij	
  M,	
  Losekoot	
  M,	
  van	
  Haeringen	
  A,	
  Roos	
  R.	
  "is	
  M,	
  Zoeteweij	
  M,	
  Losekoot	
  M,	
  van	
  Haeringen	
  A,	
  Roos	
  R:	
  Paradox	
  of	
  a	
  better	
  test	
  for	
  Huntington’s	
  disease."	
  J	
  Neurol	
  Neurosurg	
  Psychiatry,	
  2000:	
  579–583.	
  	
  	
   Macdonald	
  M,	
  Christine	
  M.	
  Ambrose,	
  Mabel	
  P.	
  Duyao,	
  Richard	
  H.	
  Myers,	
  Carol	
  Lin,	
  Lakshmi	
  Srinidhi,	
  Glenn	
  Barnes,	
  Sherry	
  A.	
  Taylor,	
  Marianne	
  James,	
  Nicolet	
  Groat,	
  Heather	
  MacFarlane,	
  Barbara	
  Jenkins,	
  Mary	
  Anne	
  Anderson,	
  Nancy	
  S.	
  Wexler	
  and	
  James	
  F.	
  Gusella.	
  “A	
  Novel	
  Gene	
  Containing	
  a	
  Trinucleotide	
  Repeat	
  That	
  Is	
  Expanded	
  and	
  Unstable	
  on	
  Huntington’s	
  Disease	
  Chromosomes”.	
  Cell.	
  1993.	
  72:971-­‐983	
  MacLeod	
  R,	
  Tibben	
  A,	
  Frontali	
  M,	
  Evers	
  Kiebooms	
  G	
  Jones	
  A,	
  Martinez	
  A,	
  and	
  writing	
  committee	
  and	
  working	
  group	
  ‘Genetic	
  testing	
  and	
  Counselling’	
  of	
  the	
  EHDN.	
  RECOMMENDATIONS	
   FOR	
  THE	
  MOLECULAR	
  GENETICS	
  PREDICTIVE	
  TEST	
  IN	
  HUNTINGTON	
  DISEASE	
  .	
  Guidelines,	
  Writing	
  committee:	
  Martin	
  Delatycki,	
  Mark	
  Guttman,	
  Michael	
  Hayden,	
  Ann	
  Jones,	
  Rhona	
  MacLeod,	
  Asunción	
  Martínez	
  Descales,	
  	
  	
  	
   MacMillan	
  JC,	
  Snell	
  RG,	
  Tyler	
  A,	
  Houlihan	
  GD,	
  Fenton	
  SRN,	
  Cheadle	
  JP,	
  Lazarou	
  LP,	
  Shaw	
  JD	
  and	
  Harper	
  PS.	
  "Molecular	
  analysis	
  and	
  clinical	
  correlations	
  of	
  the	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  mutation".	
   The	
  Lancet,	
  1993.	
  342(8877)954-­‐958.	
  	
  	
   MacMillan,	
  JC,	
  and	
  PS	
  Harper.	
  "Single-­‐gene	
  neurological	
  disorders	
  in	
  South	
  Wales:	
  an	
  epidemiological	
  study".	
  Annals	
  of	
  Neurology,	
  1991:	
  411-­‐414.	
  	
   Massey	
  University.	
  Estimate	
  prevalence:	
  confidence	
  interval.	
  2011.	
  http://www.promesa.co.nz/Help/EP_est_simple_random_sample.htm	
  (accessed	
  20	
  05,	
  2012)	
  	
   McCusker	
  EA,	
  Casse	
  RF,	
  Graham	
  SJ,	
  Williams	
  DB,	
  Lazarus	
  R.	
  "Prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington	
  disease	
  in	
  New	
  South	
  Wales	
  in	
  1996."	
  Med	
  J	
  Aust	
  4	
  (2000):	
  187-­‐190.	
  Medical	
  News.	
  Rising	
  prevalence	
  of	
  dementia	
  will	
  cripple	
  Canadian	
  families,	
  the	
  health	
  care	
  system	
  and	
   economy.	
  Jan	
  4,	
  2010.	
  http://www.news-­‐medical.net/news/20100104/Rising-­‐prevalence-­‐of-­‐dementia-­‐will-­‐cripple-­‐Canadian-­‐families-­‐the-­‐health-­‐care-­‐system-­‐and-­‐economy.aspx	
  (accessed	
  April	
  29,	
  2012).	
  	
   Ministry	
  of	
  Health.	
  eHealth	
  -­‐	
  Faster,	
  safer,	
  better	
  healthcare.	
  2012.	
  http://www.health.gov.bc.ca/ehealth/telehealth.html	
  (accessed	
  05	
  08,	
  2012).	
  Morrison.	
  "Morrison	
  PJ,	
  Harding-­‐Lester	
  S,	
  Bradley	
  A."	
  Clinical	
  Genetics	
  80	
  (2011):	
  281–286.	
  	
   Morrison,	
  PJ,	
  and	
  NC	
  Nevin.	
  "Huntington	
  disease	
  in	
  County	
  Donegal:	
  epidemiological	
  trends	
  over	
  four	
  decades."	
  The	
  Ulster	
  Medical	
  Journal,	
  1993:	
  141-­‐144.	
  	
   Morrison,	
  PJ,	
  WP	
  Johnston,	
  and	
  NC	
  Nevin.	
  "The	
  epidemiology	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Northern	
  Ireland.	
  ."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medical	
  Genetics,	
  1995:	
  524-­‐530.	
  	
  	
   Morrison,	
  PJ,	
  Harding-­‐Lester	
  S,	
  Bradley	
  A.	
  "Uptake	
  of	
  Huntington	
  disease	
  predictive	
  testing	
  in	
  a	
  complete	
  population."	
  Clinical	
  Genetics,	
  2010:	
  281-­‐286.	
  	
   Myrianthopoulos.	
  "Huntington's	
  Chorea."	
  J	
  Med	
  Genet,	
  1966:	
  298-­‐314.	
  	
   Nance,	
  M,	
  Fiona	
  Richards,	
  Raymund	
  Roos,	
  Aad	
  Tibben,	
  Louise	
  Vetter,	
  2012.	
  	
   Oliver,	
  JE.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  Northamptonshire.	
  ."	
  The	
  British	
  Journal	
  of	
  Psychiatry,	
  1970:	
  241-­‐253.	
  	
   	
   88	
   	
   Orth	
  M,	
  Schwenke	
  C.	
  "Age-­‐at-­‐onset	
  in	
  Huntington	
  disease."	
  PLoS	
  Currents	
  Huntington	
   Disease,	
  2011:	
  doi:	
  10.1371.	
  	
  	
   Panas	
  M,	
  Karadima	
  G,	
  Vassos	
  E,	
  Kalfakis	
  N,	
  Kladi	
  A,	
  Christodoulou	
  K,	
  Vassilopoulos	
  D.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Greece:	
  the	
  experience	
  of	
  14	
  years.	
  ."	
  Clinical	
  Genetics,	
  2011:	
  586-­‐590.	
  	
   Paradisi,	
  I,	
  A	
  Hernández,	
  and	
  S	
  Arias.	
  "Huntington	
  disease	
  mutation	
  in	
  Venezuela:	
  age	
  of	
  onset,	
  haplotype	
  analyses	
  and	
  geographic	
  aggregation.	
  ."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
  Genetics,	
  2008:	
  127-­‐135.	
  	
   Peterlin,	
  Kobal	
  J,	
  Teran	
  N,	
  Flisar	
  D,	
  Lovrecić	
  L.	
  "Epidemiology	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Slovenia."	
  Acta	
  Neurol	
  Scand	
  6	
  (2009):	
  371-­‐375.	
  	
   Petit,	
  H,	
  and	
  JL	
  Salomez.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease.	
  Contribution	
  of	
  clinical	
  and	
  epidemiological	
  data	
  to	
  genetic	
  counseling."	
  Journal	
  de	
  Genetique	
  Humaine,	
  1985:	
  91-­‐102.	
  	
   Population	
  Data	
  BC.	
  DATA	
  SET:	
  BC	
  VITAL	
  STATISTICS	
  DEATHS.	
  2012.	
  http://www.popdata.bc.ca/data/internal/demographic/vsdeaths	
  (accessed	
  05	
  05,	
  2012).	
  	
   Pridmore	
  SA.	
  "The	
  prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Tasmania."	
  Med	
  J	
  Aust	
  3	
  (1990):	
  133-­‐134.	
  	
   Quarrell	
  O,	
  Alan	
  Rigby,	
  L	
  Barron,	
  Y	
  Crow,	
  A	
  Dalton,	
  N	
  Dennis,	
  A	
  E	
  Fryer,	
  F	
  Heydon,	
  E	
  Kinning,	
  A	
  Lashwood,	
  M	
  Losekoot,	
  L	
  Margerison,	
  S	
  McDonnell,	
  P	
  J	
  Morrison,	
  A	
  Norman,	
  M	
  Peterson,	
  F	
  L	
  Raymond,	
  S	
  Simpson,	
  E	
  Thompson,	
  J	
  Warner.	
  "Reduced	
  penetrance	
  alleles	
  for	
  Huntington’s	
  disease:	
  a	
  multi-­‐centre	
  direct	
  observational	
  study."	
  Journal	
  of	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  44,	
  no.	
  3	
  (2007):	
  e68.	
  	
   Quarrell	
  ,	
  OW,	
  A	
  Tyler,	
  MP	
  Jones,	
  M	
  Nordin,	
  and	
  PS	
  Harper.	
  "Population	
  studies	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Wales."	
  Clinical	
  Genetics,	
  1988:	
  189-­‐195.	
  	
   	
  Ramos-­‐Arroyo	
  MA,	
  Moreno	
  S,	
  Valiente	
  A.	
  "Incidence	
  and	
  mutation	
  rates	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Spain:	
  experience	
  of	
  9	
  years	
  of	
  direct	
  genetic	
  testing."	
  J	
  Neurol	
  Neurosurg	
  Psychiatry	
  3	
  (2005):	
  337-­‐342.	
  	
   Rawlins,	
  M.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  closet?"	
  The	
  Lancet	
  Neurology,	
  2010:	
  1372-­‐1373.	
  	
   Reed,	
  Edward,	
  and	
  Joseph	
  Chandler.	
  "Huntington's	
  Chorea	
  in	
  Michigan:	
  Demography	
  and	
  Genetics."	
  1958:	
  201-­‐225.	
  Roccatagliata	
  G,	
  De	
  Marchi	
  C,	
  Maffini	
  M,	
  Albano	
  C.	
  "Epidemiological	
  aspects	
  of	
  Huntington	
  chorea	
  in	
  the	
  Genoa	
  region	
  from	
  1930	
  to	
  1977."	
  Rivista	
  di	
  patologia	
  nervosa	
  e	
  mentale	
  4	
  (1983):	
  171-­‐7.	
  	
   Rothman,	
  Kenneth	
  J.	
  Epidemiology:	
  an	
  introduction.	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  2002.	
  	
  	
   Sackley,	
  C,	
  et	
  al.	
  "Huntington's	
  Disease:	
  Current	
  Epidemiological	
  and	
  Pharmacological	
  Management	
  in	
  UK	
  Primary	
  Care."	
  Neuroepidemiology,	
  2011:	
  216-­‐221.	
  	
   Sandra	
  Close	
  Kirkwood,	
  Jessica	
  L.	
  Su,	
  P.	
  Michael	
  Conneally,	
  Tatiana	
  Foroud.	
  "Progression	
  of	
  Symptoms	
  in	
  the	
  Early	
  and	
  Middle	
  Stages	
  of	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  ."	
  Arch	
  Neurol	
  58	
  (2001):	
  273-­‐278.	
  	
   Scrimgeour	
  EM,	
  Pfumojena	
  JW.	
  "Huntington	
  disease	
  in	
  black	
  Zimbabwean	
  families	
  living	
  near	
  the	
  Mozambique	
  border."	
  Am	
  J	
  Med	
  Genet	
  6	
  (1992):	
  762-­‐766.	
  	
   Shiwach	
  RS,	
  Lindenbaum	
  RH.	
  "Prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  among	
  UK	
  immigrants	
  from	
  the	
  Indian	
  subcontinent."	
  Br	
  J	
  Psychiatry,	
  1990:	
  598-­‐599.	
  	
   	
   89	
   Shiwach,	
  RS.	
  "Prevalence	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  the	
  Oxford	
  region.	
  ."	
  The	
  British	
  Journal	
   of	
  Psychiatry,	
  1994:	
  414-­‐415.	
  	
   Shokeir,	
  MHK.	
  "Investigations	
  on	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  in	
  the	
  Canadian	
  Prairies	
  1.	
  Prevalence	
  ."	
  Clinical	
  Genetics,	
  1975:	
  345-­‐348.	
  	
  	
   Simpson,	
  John.	
  Oxford	
  English	
  Dictionary.	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  1989.	
  	
   Simpson,	
  SA,	
  and	
  AW	
  Johnston.	
  "The	
  prevalence	
  and	
  patterns	
  of	
  care	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  Grampian.	
  ."	
  The	
  British	
  Journal	
  of	
  Psychiatry,	
  1989:	
  799-­‐804.	
  	
   StatisticsCanada.	
  Death	
  by	
  cause	
  .	
  2008.	
  http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/84-­‐208-­‐x/2011001/tbl-­‐eng.htm	
  (accessed	
  Feb	
  29,	
  2012).	
  	
   Stats,	
  BC.	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Population	
  Projections	
  2009	
  to	
  2036.	
  BC	
  Stats,	
  2009.	
  	
  	
   Tabrizi	
  SJ,	
  Douglas	
  R	
  Langbehn,	
  Blair	
  R	
  Leavitt,	
  Raymund	
  AC	
  Roos,	
  Alexandra	
  Durr,	
  David	
  Craufurd,	
  Christopher	
  Kennard,	
  Stephen	
  L	
  Hicks,	
  Nick	
  C	
  Fox,	
  Rachael	
  I	
  Scahill,	
  Beth	
  Borowsky,	
  Allan	
  J	
  Tobin,	
  H	
  Diana	
  Rosas,	
  Hans	
  Johnson,	
  Ralf	
  Reilmann,	
  Bernhard	
  Landwehrmeyer,	
  Julie	
  C	
  Stout,	
  the	
  TRACK-­‐HD	
  investigators.	
  “Biological	
  and	
  clinicalmanifestations	
  of	
  Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  the	
  longitudinal	
  TRACK-­‐HD	
  study:	
  cross-­‐sectional	
  analysis	
  of	
  baseline	
  data”.	
  The	
  Lancet	
  Neurology.	
  2009.	
  8(9):	
  791-­‐801	
  	
   Tassicker	
  RJ,	
  Betty	
  Teltscher,	
  M	
  Kaye	
  Trembath,	
  Veronica	
  Collins,	
  Leslie	
  J	
  Sheffield,	
  Edmond	
  Chiu,	
  Lyle	
  Gurrin6	
  and	
  Martin	
  B	
  Delatycki.	
  "Problems	
  assessing	
  uptake	
  of	
  Huntington	
  disease	
  predictive	
  testing	
  and	
  a	
  proposed	
  solution."	
  European	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
  Genetics,	
  2009:	
  66–70.	
  	
  Taylor,	
  SD.	
  "Demand	
  for	
  predictive	
  genetic	
  testing	
  for	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  in	
  Australia."	
   Medical	
  Journal	
  of	
  Australia,	
  1994:	
  354	
  –	
  355.	
  	
  	
   TheHuntington’sDiseaseCollaborativeResearchGroup.	
  "A	
  novel	
  gene	
  containing	
  a	
  trinucleotide	
  repeat	
  that	
  is	
  expanded	
  and	
  unstable	
  on	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  chromo-­‐	
  somes."	
  Cell	
  72	
  (1993):	
  971–983.	
  	
   TheProvinceofBritishColumbia.	
  Vital	
  Statistics	
  Agency	
  BC.	
  2011.	
  http://www.vs.gov.bc.ca/.	
  	
   Therapeutics,	
  Centre	
  for	
  Molecular	
  Medicine	
  and.	
  Centre	
  for	
  Huntington	
  Disease.	
  2011.	
  http://www.cmmt.ubc.ca/outreach/hd-­‐clinic	
  (accessed	
  02	
  02,	
  2011).	
  	
   Walker,	
  DA,	
  PS	
  Harper,	
  CE	
  Wells,	
  A	
  Tyler,	
  K	
  Davies,	
  and	
  RG	
  Newcombe.	
  "Huntington's	
  Chorea	
  in	
  South	
  Wales.	
  A	
  genetic	
  and	
  epidemiological	
  study."	
  Clinical	
  Genetics,	
  1981:	
  213-­‐221.	
  	
   Walker,	
  Francis	
  O.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease."	
  The	
  Lancet	
  369	
  (2007):	
  218-­‐228.	
  Wallace,	
  D.	
  C.	
  and	
  Parker,	
  N.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  Queensland:The	
  most	
  recent	
  story	
  ."	
  Advances	
  in	
   Neurology	
  1	
  (1973):	
  223-­‐236.	
  	
  Warby	
  SC,	
  Henk	
  Visscher,	
  Jennifer	
  A	
  Collins,	
  Crystal	
  N	
  Doty,	
  Catherine	
  Carter,	
  Stefanie	
  L	
  Butland,	
  Anna	
  R	
  Hayden,	
  Ichiro	
  Kanazawa,	
  Colin	
  J	
  Ross	
  and	
  Michael	
  R	
  Hayden.	
  "HTT	
  haplotypes	
  contribute	
  to	
  differences	
  in	
  Huntington	
  disease	
  prevalence	
  between	
  Europe	
  and	
  East	
  Asia	
  ."	
   European	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
  Genetics	
  ,	
  2011:	
  561–566.	
  	
   Warby	
  SC,	
  Alexandre	
  Montpetit,	
  Anna	
  R.	
  Hayden,	
  Jeffrey	
  B.	
  Carroll,	
  Stefanie	
  L.	
  Butland,	
  Henk	
  Visscher,	
  Jennifer	
  A.	
  Collins,	
  Alicia	
  Semaka,	
  Thomas	
  J.	
  Hudson,	
  and	
  Michael	
  R.	
  Hayden.	
  "CAG	
  Expansion	
  in	
  the	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  Gene	
  Is	
  Associated	
  with	
  a	
  Specific	
  and	
  Targetable	
  Predisposing	
  Haplogroup	
  ."	
  The	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
  Genetics	
  84	
  (2009):	
  351–366.	
   	
   90	
   	
   WorldBank.	
  Population	
  ages	
  65	
  and	
  above	
  (%	
  of	
  total).	
  03	
  27,	
  2012.	
  http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.POP.65UP.TO.ZS.	
  	
   Wright,	
  HH,	
  CN	
  Still,	
  and	
  RK	
  Abramson.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  black	
  kindreds	
  in	
  South	
  Carolina.	
  ."	
  Arch	
  Neurol,	
  1981:	
  412-­‐114.	
  	
   Ødegård,	
  Letten	
  Saugstad	
  and	
  Ørnulv.	
  "Huntington's	
  chorea	
  in	
  Norway."	
  Psychological	
   Medicine	
  16	
  (1986):	
  39-­‐48.	
  	
   Young	
  A,	
  Ira	
  Shoulson,	
  John	
  B.	
  Penney,	
  Simon	
  Starosta-­‐Rubinstein,	
  Fidela	
  Gomez,	
  RN,	
  Helen	
  Travers,,	
  Maria	
  A.	
  Ramos-­‐Arroyo,,	
  S.	
  Robert	
  Snodgrass,	
  Ernesto	
  Bonilla,	
  Humberto	
  Moreno,	
  and	
  Nancy	
  S.	
  Wexler.	
  "Huntington's	
  disease	
  in	
  Venezuela	
  Neurologic	
  features	
  and	
  functional	
  decline."	
   Neurology	
  36,	
  no.	
  2	
  (1986):	
  224.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   91	
   Appendix	
  1a	
  	
   Worldwide	
  reports	
  on	
  the	
  prevalence	
  of	
  HD	
  from	
  1940-­‐2010	
  	
   POPULATION	
   DATE	
  OF	
  SURVEY	
   PREVALENCE	
   (#/100,000)	
   REFERENCE	
  Australia	
  (New	
  South	
  Wales)	
   1996	
   6.3	
   	
  (McCusker	
  et	
  al	
  2000)	
  Australia	
  (Queensland)	
   1976	
   5.8	
   (Wallace	
  &	
  Parker	
  1979)	
  Australia	
  (Queensland)	
   1969	
   6.3	
   (Wallace	
  &	
  Parker	
  1973)	
  Australia	
  (Tasmania)	
   1990	
   12.1	
   (Pridmore	
  1990)	
  Australia	
  (Victoria)	
   1963	
   4.6	
   (Brothers	
  1964)	
  Austria	
   1993-­‐1997	
   10	
   (Laccone	
  et	
  al	
  1999)	
  Belgium	
  	
   1970	
   1.6	
   (Husquinet	
  1973)	
  Canada	
  (Quebec)	
   1963	
   3.4	
   (Barbeau	
  et	
  al.	
  1964)	
  Canada	
  (Manitoba	
  &	
  Saskatchewan)	
   1975	
   8.4	
   (Shokeir	
  1975)	
  China	
  (Hong	
  Kong)	
   1984-­‐1991	
   0.4	
   (Leung	
  et	
  al	
  1992)	
  China	
  (Hong	
  Kong)	
   1984-­‐1991	
   0.4	
   (Chang	
  et	
  al	
  1994)	
  Croatia	
   2002	
   1	
   (Hecimovic	
  et	
  al	
  2002)	
  Egypt	
  (Assiut)	
   1988-­‐1990	
   21	
   (Kandil	
  et	
  al	
  1994)	
  Finland	
   1986	
   0.5	
   (Palo	
  et	
  al	
  1987)	
  France	
  (North-­‐West)	
   	
   5	
   (Petit	
  &	
  Salomez	
  1985)	
  Germany	
  (Kassel)	
   1950	
   2.6	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Germany	
  (Rhineland)	
   1933	
   3.2	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Germany	
  (West,	
  without	
  Berlin	
  &	
  Saarland)	
   1950	
   2.2	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Germany	
  (West,	
  without	
  Berlin	
  &	
  Saarland)	
   1939	
   2.2	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Germany	
   1993-­‐1997	
   10	
   (Laccone	
  et	
  al	
  1999)	
  Greece	
   2004	
   3.95	
   (Panas	
  et	
  al.	
  2011)	
  Guam	
  (Chamorros)	
   1967	
   0	
   (Chen	
  et	
  al	
  1968)	
  Iceland	
   1963	
   2.7	
   (Gudmundsson	
  1969)	
  India	
  (Pakistan,	
  Punjab	
  and	
  Gujerat)	
   1990	
   1.7	
   (Shiwach	
  &	
  Lindenbaum	
  1990)	
  Italy	
  (Aosta)	
   1982-­‐1991	
   5	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Italy	
  (Emilia	
  &	
  Parma)	
   1980	
   4.8	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Italy	
  (Ferrara	
  province)	
   1987	
   1.9	
   (Govoni	
  et	
  al	
  1988)	
  Italy	
  (Florence)	
   1970-­‐1979	
   4.1	
   (Groppi	
  et	
  al	
  1986)	
  Italy	
  (Frogiuone)	
   1981	
   2.6	
   (Frontali	
  et	
  al	
  1990)	
  Italy	
  (Genoa	
  Region)	
   1930-­‐1977	
   28	
   (Roccatagliata	
  et	
  al	
  1979)	
  Italy	
  (Genoa-­‐Savona)	
   1973	
   4.5	
   (Roccatagliata	
  &	
  Albano	
  1976)	
  Italy	
  (Latima)	
   1981	
   3	
   (Frontali	
  et	
  al	
  1990)	
  Italy	
  (Lazio)	
   1981	
   2.6	
   (Frontali	
  et	
  al	
  1990)	
  Italy	
  (Puglia)	
   1980	
   2.9	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Italy	
  (Rieti)	
   1981	
   5.6	
   (Frontali	
  et	
  al	
  1990)	
  Italy	
  (Rome)	
   1981	
   2.5	
   (Frontali	
  et	
  al	
  1990)	
  Italy	
  (Tuscany)	
   1978	
   2.3	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Italy	
  (Viterbo)	
   1981	
   1.5	
   (Frontali	
  et	
  al	
  1990)	
  Japan	
  (Aichi)	
   1959	
   0.4	
   (Kishimoto	
  et	
  al	
  1957)	
  Japan	
  (Ibaraki)	
   1982	
   0.1	
   (Kanazawa	
  et	
  al	
  1990)	
  Japan	
  (San-­‐in)	
   1993	
   0.7	
   (Nakashima	
  et	
  al	
  1996)	
  Japan	
  (San-­‐in)	
   1997	
   0.7	
   (Adachi	
  &	
  Nakashima	
  1999)	
  Malta	
   1994	
   11.8	
   (Gassivaro	
  Gallo	
  et	
  al	
  1999)	
  Malta	
   	
   7.8	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Mauritius	
  (European	
  descent)	
   1977	
   46.2	
   (Hayden	
  et	
  al	
  1981)	
  Mexico	
   2008	
   4	
   (Alonso	
  et	
  al	
  2009)	
   	
   92	
   New	
  Zealand	
   1996	
   5.7	
   (Harper	
  1996)	
  Nigeria	
  (Ibadan)	
   1984	
   0.2	
   (Aiyesimoju	
  et	
  al	
  1984)	
  Norway	
   1930	
   6.9	
   (Saugstad	
  &	
  Odegård	
  1986)	
  Norway	
   1940	
   6.7	
   (Saugstad	
  &	
  Odegård	
  1986)	
  Norway	
   1950	
   5.8	
   (Saugstad	
  &	
  Odegård	
  1986)	
  Poland	
  (Pruszkow)	
   1960	
   4.8	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Russia	
  (6	
  populations	
  in	
  Central	
  Asia)	
   	
   1.3	
   (Kirilenko	
  et	
  al	
  2004)	
  Russia	
  (Volgograd	
  and	
  Volzhsky)	
   	
   0.6	
   (Kirilenko	
  et	
  al	
  2004)	
  Russia	
  (Vladimir	
  Oblast)	
   	
   1.9	
   (Kirilenko	
  et	
  al	
  2004)	
  Slovenia	
   2006	
   5.2	
   (Peterlin	
  et	
  al	
  2008)	
  South	
  Africa	
   1979	
   0.6	
   (Hayden	
  et	
  al	
  1982)	
  South	
  Africa	
   1979	
   0.01	
   (Hayden	
  et	
  al	
  1980)	
  South	
  Africa	
  (Cape	
  Coloured,	
  mixed	
  race)	
   1976	
   3.5	
   (Hayden	
  &	
  Beighton	
  1977)	
  South	
  Africa	
  (Mixed	
  race)	
   1979	
   0.9	
   (Hayden	
  &	
  Beighton	
  1977)	
  South	
  Africa	
  (White	
  and	
  Coloured	
  population)	
   1979	
   2.2	
   (Hayden	
  et	
  al	
  1980)	
  South	
  Africa	
  (Whites	
  Afrikaans)	
   1979	
   0.4	
   (Hayden	
  &	
  Beighton	
  1977)	
  Spain	
  (Salamanca)	
   	
   8.4	
   (Ruiz	
  et	
  al	
  1985)	
  Spain	
  (Cadiz	
  province)	
   1968	
   1.3	
   (Calcedo	
  Ordóez	
  1970)	
  Spain	
  (Valencia)	
   1987-­‐1992	
   5.4	
   (Burguera	
  et	
  al	
  1997)	
  Sweden	
   1965	
   4.7	
   (Mattsson	
  1974)	
  Sweden	
   1985	
   5.6	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  Switzerland	
   1993-­‐1997	
   10	
   (Laccone	
  et	
  al	
  1999)	
  Taiwan	
   2007	
   0.42	
   (Chen	
  et	
  al.	
  2010)	
  Tanzania	
  (Mount	
  Kilimanjaro,	
  Bantu)	
   1980	
   7	
   (Scrimgeour	
  1981)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Carlisle)	
   1961	
   2.8	
   (Brewis	
  et	
  al	
  1966)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Cornwall)	
   1950	
   5.6	
   (Bickford	
  &	
  Ellison	
  1953)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Cornwall)	
   1987	
   4.9	
   (Harper	
  1996)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Devon)	
   1987	
   4.6	
   (Harper	
  1996)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  East	
  Anglia)	
   1971	
   9.19	
   (Caro	
  1977)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Essex)	
   1965	
   2.5	
   (Heathfield	
  1967)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Leeds)	
   1966	
   4.2	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Northamptonshire)	
   1967-­‐1968	
   6.3	
   (Oliver	
  1970)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Northamptonshire)	
   1960	
   7.2	
   (Reid	
  1960)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Northamptonshire)	
   1954-­‐1955	
   6.5	
   (Pleydell	
  1955)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Oxford	
  region)	
   1985	
   5.7	
   (Shiwach	
  1994)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Somerset)	
   1965	
   5.5	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  UK	
  (England,	
  Wessex)	
   1987	
   3.7	
   (Harper	
  1996)	
  UK	
  (Indian	
  subcontinent	
  immigrants)	
   1990	
   1.7	
   (Shiwach	
  &	
  Lindenbaum	
  1990)	
  UK	
  (Ireland,	
  Northern)	
   1991	
   6.4	
   (Morrison	
  et	
  al	
  1995)	
  UK	
  (Ireland,	
  Northern,	
  County	
  Donegal)	
   1991	
   1.6	
   (Morrison	
  &	
  Nevin	
  1993)	
  UK	
  (Scotland,	
  Grampian,	
  north-­‐east	
  )	
   1984	
   10	
   (Simpson	
  &	
  Johnston	
  1989)	
  UK	
  (Scotland,	
  South-­‐East)	
   1967	
   7.2	
   (Cameron	
  &	
  Venters	
  1967)	
  UK	
  (Scotland,	
  West)	
   1960	
   5.2	
   (Bolt	
  1970)	
  UK	
  (Wales,	
  North)	
   1981	
   5.5	
   (Quarrell	
  et	
  al	
  1988)	
  UK	
  (Wales,	
  South	
  &	
  Glamorgan)	
   1988	
   8.4	
   (MacMillan	
  &	
  Harper	
  1991)	
  UK	
  (Wales)	
   1994	
   6.2	
   (James	
  et	
  al	
  1994)	
  UK	
  (Wales,	
  South)	
   1981	
   8.9	
   (Quarrell	
  et	
  al	
  1988)	
  UK	
  (Wales,	
  South)	
   1971	
   7.6	
   (Walker	
  et	
  al	
  1981)	
  UK	
  (Wales,	
  South)	
   1971	
   7.6	
   (Harper	
  et	
  al	
  1979)	
  UK	
   2008	
   6.25	
   (Sackley	
  et	
  al	
  2011)	
  UK	
   2010	
   12.4	
   (Rawlins,	
  2010)	
   	
   93	
   USA	
  &	
  Australia	
  (Whites)	
   	
   5	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  USA	
  (African	
  Americans)	
   1940	
   1.5	
   (Reed	
  &	
  Chandler	
  1958)	
  USA	
  (Maryland)	
   1980	
   5.2	
   (Folstein	
  et	
  al	
  1987)	
  USA	
  (Maryland,	
  African	
  Americans)	
   1980	
   6.4	
   (Folstein	
  et	
  al	
  1987)	
  USA	
  (Michigan)	
   1940	
   4.1	
   (Reed	
  &	
  Chandler	
  1958)	
  USA	
  (Minnesota)	
   1955	
   5.4	
   (Pearson	
  et	
  al	
  1955)	
  USA	
  (Minnesota,	
  Olmsted	
  county)	
   1990	
   2	
   (Kokmen	
  et	
  al	
  1994)	
  USA	
  (Minnesota,	
  Olmsted	
  county)	
   1960	
   6	
   (Kokmen	
  et	
  al	
  1994)	
  USA	
  (Minnesota,	
  Rochester)	
   1955	
   6.7	
   (Kurland	
  1958)	
  USA	
  (New	
  York)	
   1973	
   3.5	
   (Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al	
  2001)	
  USA	
  (South	
  Carolina)	
   1980	
   1	
   (Wright	
  et	
  al	
  1981)	
  USA	
  (South	
  Carolina,	
  White)	
   1980	
   4.8	
   (Wright	
  et	
  al	
  1981)	
  Venezuela	
   	
   0.5	
   (Paradisi	
  et	
  al	
  2008)	
  Venezuela	
  (Lake	
  Maracaibo)	
   1973	
   699.2	
   (Avila-­‐Giron	
  1973)	
  Yugoslavia	
  (Rijeka	
  district)	
   1981	
   4.5	
   (Sepci	
  et	
  al	
  1989)	
  Zimbabwe	
  (Manicaland	
  region,	
  Shona)	
   1988-­‐1989	
   0.8	
   (Scrimgeour	
  &	
  Pfumojena	
  1992)	
   Global	
  Average	
  (including	
  Lake	
  Maracaibo)	
   1930-­‐2010	
   11.4	
   	
   Global	
  Average	
  (excluding	
  Lake	
  Maracaibo)	
   1930-­‐2010	
   5.1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   94	
   Appendix	
  1b	
   	
   	
   Worldwide	
  reports	
  on	
  HD	
  prevalence,	
  incidence	
  and	
  population	
  at	
  risk	
  by	
  region	
   REGION	
   YEAR	
  OF	
  REPORT	
   PREVALENCE	
  (#/100,000)	
   INCIDENCE	
  (#/million/year)	
   POP	
  AT-­‐RISK	
  (#/100,000)	
   REFERENCE	
   The	
  Americas	
  Canada	
   	
  Quebec	
   1963	
   3.4	
   -­‐	
   	
   Barbeau	
  et	
  al.	
  1964	
  Prairies	
  (Saskatchewan	
  &	
  Manitoba 	
  1975	
   	
  8.4	
   	
  -­‐	
   	
   Shokeir	
  1975	
  British	
  Columbia	
   1993-­‐2000	
   -­‐	
   6.9	
   42.0	
   Almqvist	
  et	
  al.	
  2001,	
  Creighton	
  et	
  al.	
  2003	
  Regional	
  average	
   	
   5.9	
   6.9	
   42.0	
   	
  United	
  States	
   	
  Michigan	
   1940	
   1.5	
  4.1	
   -­‐	
   	
   Reed	
  and	
  Chandler,	
  1958	
  Maryland	
   1980	
   6.4	
  5.2	
   -­‐	
   	
   Folstein	
  et	
  al.	
  1987	
  Minnesota	
  	
   1950-­‐1989	
   2.0	
   2.0-­‐4.0	
   	
   Folstein	
  et	
  al.	
  1987	
  South	
  Carolina	
   1980	
   1.0	
  4.8	
   -­‐	
   	
   Wright	
  et	
  al.	
  1980	
  New	
  York	
  	
   1973	
   3.5	
   -­‐	
   	
   Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al.	
  2001	
  Regional	
  average	
   	
   3.6	
   3.0	
   	
   	
  Mexico	
   	
  Mexico	
   2008	
   4.0	
   -­‐	
   	
   Alonso	
  et	
  al.	
  2009	
  Venezuela	
  	
  Venezuela	
   2007	
   0.5	
   -­‐	
   	
   Paradisi	
  et	
  al.	
  2008	
  Lake	
  Maracaibo	
   1973	
   699	
   -­‐	
   	
   Avila-­‐Giron,	
  1973	
   Europe	
  The	
  United	
  Kingdom	
  Carlisle	
  	
   1961	
   2.8	
   -­‐	
   	
   Brewis	
  et	
  al.	
  1966	
  Cornwall	
   1950	
  1987	
   5.6	
  4.9	
   -­‐	
   	
   Bickford	
  and	
  Ellison,	
  1953,	
  Harper	
  1996	
  Devon	
   1987	
   4.6	
   -­‐	
   	
   Harper	
  1996	
  East	
  Anglia	
   1971	
   9.2	
   -­‐	
   	
   Caro	
  1977	
  Essex	
   1965	
   2.5	
   -­‐	
   	
   Heathfield,	
  1967	
  Leeds	
   1966	
   4.2	
   -­‐	
   	
   Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al.	
  2001	
  Northamptonshire	
   1967-­‐1968	
   6.3	
   -­‐	
   	
   Oliver	
  1970	
  Oxford	
   1985	
   5.7	
   -­‐	
   	
   Shiwach	
  1994	
  Wessex	
   1987	
   3.7	
   -­‐	
   	
   Harper	
  1996	
  Somerset	
  	
   1965	
   5.5	
   -­‐	
   	
   Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al.	
  2001	
  Northern	
  Ireland	
   1991	
   6.4	
   -­‐	
   	
   Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  1995	
  County	
  Donegal	
  -­‐	
   1991	
   1.6	
   -­‐	
   	
   Morrison	
  and	
  Nevin	
  1993	
   	
   95	
   Ireland	
  Northern	
  Ireland	
   2001	
   10.6	
   -­‐	
   44.9	
   Morrison	
  et	
  al.	
  2010	
  Grampian	
   1984	
   10.0	
   -­‐	
   	
   Simpson	
  and	
  Johnston,	
  1989	
  South	
  East	
  Scotland	
   1967 7.2	
   -­‐	
   	
   Cameron	
  and	
  Venters,	
  1967	
  West	
  Scotland	
   1960	
   5.2	
   -­‐	
   	
   Bolt,	
  1970	
  Northern	
  Wales	
   1981	
   5.5	
   -­‐	
   	
   Quarell	
  et	
  al.	
  1988	
  South	
  &	
  Glamorgan	
   1988	
   1994	
   8.4	
  6.2	
   -­‐	
   	
   Macmillan	
  and	
  Harper,	
  1991,	
  James	
  et	
  al.	
  1994	
  South	
  Wales	
   1981	
   8.9	
   -­‐	
   	
   Quarell	
  et	
  al.	
  1988	
  South	
  Wales	
   1971	
   7.6	
   -­‐	
   	
   Walker	
  et	
  al.	
  1981	
  UK	
   2008	
   5.9-­‐6.5	
   4.4-­‐7.8	
   37.5	
   Sackley	
  et	
  al.	
  2011	
  England	
  &	
  Wales	
   2010	
   12.4	
   -­‐	
   	
   Rawlins	
  2010	
  Regional	
  average	
   	
   6.3	
   6.1	
   41.2	
   	
  Non-­‐UK	
  countries	
   	
  Belgium	
   1970	
   1.6	
   	
   	
   Husquinet,	
  1973	
  Croatia	
   2002	
   1.0	
   	
   	
   Hecimovic	
  et	
  al.	
  2002	
  France	
   1985	
   5.0	
   	
   25.0	
   Petit	
  and	
  Salmonez,	
  1985,	
  Goizet	
  et	
  al.	
  2002	
  Germany	
   1993-­‐1997	
   10.0	
   	
   30.0	
   Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999	
  Greece	
   1995-­‐2008	
   2.5-­‐5.4	
   2.2-­‐4.4	
   	
   Panas	
  et	
  al.	
  2011	
  Italy	
   1981	
   5.6	
   	
   	
   Frontali	
  et	
  al.	
  1990	
  Italy	
  (Ferrara)	
   1871-­‐1987	
   0.36-­‐3.1	
   2.0 	
   Giovani	
  et	
  al.	
  1988	
  Malta 1994	
   11.8	
   	
   	
   Gasivaro-­‐Gallo	
  1990	
  Netherlands	
   2002	
   6.5	
   	
   32.5	
   Maat-­‐Kievit	
  et	
  al.	
  2000	
  Norway	
   1950	
   5.8	
   	
   	
   Saugstad	
  and	
  Odegard	
  1986	
  Poland	
   1960	
   4.8	
   	
   	
   Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al.	
  2001	
  Russia	
   2004	
   1.9	
   	
   	
   Kirilenko	
  et	
  al.	
  2004	
  Slovenia	
   2006	
   5.2	
   	
   	
   Peterlin	
  et	
  al.	
  2008	
  Spain	
   1985	
   8.4	
   	
   	
   Ruiz	
  et	
  al.	
  1985	
  Spain	
   1994-­‐2002	
   	
   4.7	
   	
   Ramos-­‐Arroyo	
  et	
  al.	
  2004	
  Sweden	
   1985	
   5.6	
   	
   	
   Al-­‐Jader	
  et	
  al.	
  2001	
  Switzerland	
   1993-­‐1997	
   10.0	
   	
   	
   Laccone	
  et	
  al.	
  1999	
  Iceland	
   1963	
   2.7	
   	
   	
   Gudmundsson	
  1969	
  Regional	
  average	
   	
   5.4	
   3.4	
   29.2	
   	
   Africa	
  Egypt	
   1988-­‐1990	
   21.0 -­‐	
   	
   Kandil	
  et	
  al.	
  1994	
  Zimbabwe	
   1988-­‐1989	
   0.8 -­‐	
   	
   Scrimgeour	
  and	
  Pfumojena	
  1992	
  Tanzania	
   1980	
   7.0	
   -­‐	
   	
   Scrimgeour	
  1981	
   	
   96	
   Rows	
  highlighted	
  in	
  pink	
  comprise	
  studies	
  performed	
  after	
  the	
  advent	
  of	
  the	
  direct	
  mutation	
  test.	
  Numbers	
  in	
  light	
  grey	
  were	
  not	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  regional	
  average	
  due	
  to	
  methodological	
  inaccuracies.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   South	
  Africa	
   1979	
   2.2	
  0.9	
  0.4	
  0.01	
   	
  -­‐	
   	
   Hayden	
  and	
  Beighton	
  1977,	
  Hayden	
  et	
  al.	
  1980	
  Regional	
  average	
   	
   1.7	
   	
   	
   	
   Asia	
  Taiwan	
   2007	
   0.42	
   1.0	
   	
   Chen	
  and	
  Lai	
  2007	
  China	
  (Hong	
  Kong)	
   1984-­‐1991	
   0.4	
  0.4	
   -­‐	
   	
   Leung	
  et	
  al.	
  1992	
  India	
   1990	
   1.7	
   -­‐	
   	
   Shiwach	
  and	
  Lindenbaum	
  1992	
  Japan	
   1997	
   0.7	
  0.7	
   -­‐	
   	
   Adachi	
  and	
  Nakashima	
  1999	
  Guam	
  (Chamorros)	
   1967	
   0.0	
   -­‐	
   	
   Chen	
  et	
  al.	
  1968	
  Regional	
  average	
   	
   0.5	
   1.0	
   Not	
  calculated	
   	
   Australia	
  &	
  New	
  Zealand	
  Australia	
   1994	
   	
   	
   27.5	
   Taylor	
  1994	
  New	
  South	
  Wales	
   1996	
   6.3	
   -­‐	
   	
   McCusker	
  et	
  al.	
  2000	
  Queensland	
   1976	
   5.8	
   -­‐	
   	
   Wallace	
  and	
  Parker	
  1979	
  Tasmania	
   1990	
   12.1	
   -­‐	
   	
   Pridmore	
  1990	
  Victoria	
   1963	
   4.6	
   -­‐	
   	
   Brothers	
  1964	
  New	
  Zealand	
   1996	
   5.7	
   -­‐	
   	
   Harper	
  1996	
  Regional	
  average	
   	
   6.8	
   Not	
  calculated	
   27.5	
   	
   	
   97	
   Appendix	
  2	
   A	
  list	
  of	
  each	
  field	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  HD	
  database	
  and	
  a	
  description	
  of	
  each	
  	
   Field	
  Name	
   Field	
  Description	
   HD	
  Clinic	
  Data	
  Table	
  Personal	
  Information	
  Unique	
  ID	
  #	
   A	
  number	
  unique	
  to	
  each	
  individual	
  entered	
  in	
  the	
  database	
  Gender	
   	
  Origin	
   Country	
  of	
  origin	
  Ethnicity	
   Field	
  options	
  following	
  the	
  EHDN	
  guidelines10	
  Date	
  of	
  Birth	
   	
  Date	
  of	
  Death	
   	
  Cause	
  of	
  Death	
   What	
  was	
  the	
  direct	
  physiological	
  cause	
  of	
  death	
  Deceased?	
   Yes	
  or	
  No	
  Demographic	
  Information	
  BC	
  Health	
  Authority	
  Region	
  of	
  residency	
   • Vancouver	
  Coastal	
  • Fraser	
   • Vancouver	
  Island	
   • Northern	
   • Interior	
  City,	
  Province	
  and	
  Postal	
  Code	
  of	
  residence	
   	
  “Urban”	
  or	
  “Rural”	
  residence	
   Rural=	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car	
  Urban=	
  within	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  Vancouver	
  by	
  car	
  Referring	
  physician	
   Name	
  of	
  the	
  physician	
  who	
  referred	
  the	
  patient	
  to	
  VGH	
  Medical	
  genetics	
  or	
  Vancouver’s	
  Centre	
  for	
  HD	
  Referring	
  physician	
  city	
   City	
  of	
  referring	
  physician’s	
  practice	
  Initial	
  Clinic	
  Location	
  Information	
  HD	
  Clinic	
   Reason	
  for	
  initial	
  clinic	
  visit:	
   • HD	
  Medical	
  clinic	
   • Referred	
  for	
  PT	
   • PT	
  +	
  HD	
  Medical	
  Clinic	
   • Other	
  PT/DT?	
   If	
  the	
  patient	
  has	
  undergone	
  an	
  HD	
  test,	
  was	
  it	
  a	
  predictive	
  test	
  or	
  a	
  diagnostic	
  test?	
  Family	
  History	
  of	
  HD?	
   • Yes	
   • No	
   • Unknown	
  Genetic	
  Test	
  Information	
  Date	
  of	
  genetic	
  test	
  report	
   From	
  the	
  DNA	
  Diagnostic	
  lab	
  	
  Results	
  reported	
  to	
  patient?	
   • Yes	
  • No	
   • Unknown	
  Upper	
  CAG	
  size	
   Dictates	
  HD	
  test	
  results	
  CAG	
  ≥	
  36	
  is	
  a	
  positive	
  test	
  result	
  Disease	
  Status	
  Information	
  Risk	
  Status	
   • 50%	
  AR	
   • 25%	
  AR	
   • Unknown	
  AR	
   • Affected	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  10	
  The	
  European	
  Huntington’s	
  disease	
  network	
  (EHDN)	
  registry	
  is	
  a	
  multi-­‐center	
  collaboration	
  aiming	
  to	
  obtain	
  clinical	
  and	
  genetic	
  information	
  on	
  a	
  large	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  interested	
  in	
  taking	
  part	
  in	
  various	
  HD-­‐associated	
  studies.	
  The	
  registry	
  maintains	
  information	
  on	
  HD	
  patients	
  in	
  Europe	
  and	
  is	
  the	
  largest	
  database	
  for	
  HD	
  patient	
  information	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  (EHDN,	
  2010).	
   	
   98	
   • Pre	
  Manifest	
  (100%	
  AR)	
  HD	
  Status	
   • Symptomatic	
  HD	
  +	
   • Clinical	
  Dx	
   • UNKNOWN	
   • Unaffected	
  (spouse/other)	
   • At	
  Risk	
  Disease	
  Onset	
  Information	
  Motor	
  age/year	
  of	
  onset	
   The	
  age/year	
  at	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  first	
  noted	
  to	
  have	
  experienced	
  neurological	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD	
   • Chorea/dystonia	
   • Rigidity	
   • Difficulty	
  with	
  balance	
   • Difficulty	
  breathing/swallowing	
  Age	
  at	
  Diagnosis	
   The	
  age/year	
  at	
  which	
  the	
  patient	
  was	
  diagnosed	
  by	
  a	
  physician	
  as	
  having	
  HD	
  Age	
  at	
  onset	
  source	
   • Family	
  provided	
  information	
   • Referral	
  letter	
   • MD	
  notes	
  UHDRS?	
   Has	
  the	
  patient	
  undergone	
  a	
  UHDRS	
  assessment?	
  United	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  Rating	
  Scale:	
  Developed	
  by	
  the	
  Huntington	
  Study	
  Group	
  in	
  1996ii	
  -­‐	
  Assessment	
  of	
  HD	
  clinical	
  features	
  to	
  track	
  disease	
  progression	
  on	
  a	
  standardized	
  scale	
  First	
  UHDRS	
  Item	
  17	
  >	
  2	
   • Item	
  17	
  =	
  diagnostic	
  confidence	
  score	
  • Sum	
  of	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  neurological	
  symptom	
  assessments	
   • 0=no	
  symptoms	
   • 4=severe	
  symptoms	
  UHDRS	
  Motor	
  Score	
   This	
  particular	
  patient’s	
  diagnostic	
  confidence	
  score	
  (0-­‐4)	
  Most	
  recent	
  UHDRS	
   Date	
  of	
  most	
  recent	
  UHDRS	
  patient’s	
  assessment	
  	
  Additional	
  Information	
  Comments	
  regarding	
  HD	
   • Any	
  additional	
  information	
  regarding	
  the	
  patient’s	
  HD	
  status/	
  diagnosis	
  • For	
  example	
  if	
  no	
  genetic	
  test	
  info	
  available	
  but	
  chart	
  mentions	
  patient	
  was	
  tested	
  in	
  another	
  province/country	
  	
  Additional	
  comments	
   • Additional	
  comments	
  	
   • For	
  example	
  patient	
  is	
  a	
  phenocopy	
   • Any	
  information	
  of	
  interest	
  that	
  does	
  not	
  fit	
  into	
  a	
  database	
  field	
   Family	
  Risk	
  Table	
  Clinic	
  pedigree	
  number	
   • HD	
  clinic	
  family	
  number	
  	
  • Members	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  family	
  share	
  this	
  common	
  number	
  Family	
  risk	
  totals	
   • Total	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  in	
  this	
  family	
  at	
  each	
  risk	
  category	
   • BC	
  residents	
  only	
  Total	
  affected	
  –	
  Not	
  yet	
  in	
  database	
   • Total	
  number	
  of	
  affected	
  living	
  individuals	
  in	
  this	
  family	
  • Not	
  a	
  clinic	
  patient	
   • BC	
  residents	
  only	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   99	
   Appendix	
  3	
  	
   List	
  of	
  each	
  long-­‐term	
  care	
  home	
  contacted	
  in	
  BC	
  	
   	
   Nursing	
  home	
   City	
  1	
   Cormorant	
  Island	
  Health	
  Centre	
   Alert	
  Bay	
  2	
   Lakes	
  District	
  Hospital	
  and	
  Health	
  Centre	
   Burns	
  Lake	
  3	
   Sunshine	
  Lodge	
   Campbell	
  River	
  4	
   McKim	
  Cottage	
   Castlegar	
  5	
   Talarico	
  Place	
   Castlegar	
  6	
   Burquitlam	
  Lions	
  Care	
  Centre	
   Chemainus	
  7	
   Dr.	
  F.W.	
  Greene	
  Memorial	
  Home	
   Cranbrook	
  8	
   Hillcrest	
  Extended	
  Care	
  Unit	
   Creston	
  9	
   Swan	
  Valley	
  Lodge	
   Creston	
  	
  10	
   Fort	
  Nelson	
  Health	
  Unit	
   Fort	
  Nelson	
  11	
   North	
  Peace	
  Care	
  Centre	
   Fort	
  St.	
  John	
  12	
   North	
  Peace	
  Care	
  Centre	
   Fort	
  St.	
  John	
  13	
   Hardy	
  View	
  Lodge	
  Intermediate	
  Care	
   Grand	
  Forks	
  14	
   Sunshine	
  Manor	
  Extended	
  Care	
  Unit	
   Grand	
  Forks	
  15	
   Granisle	
  Community	
  Health	
  Centre	
   Granisle	
  16	
   Hudson's	
  Hope	
  Health	
  Centre	
   Hudson’s	
  Hope	
  17	
   Cottonwoods	
  Extended	
  Care	
  Centre	
   Kelowna	
  18	
   David	
  Lloyd-­‐Jones	
  Home	
   Kelowna	
  19	
   Lake	
  Country	
  Manor	
  -­‐Pleasant	
  Meadows	
  Lodge	
   Lake	
  Country	
  20	
   Mackenzie	
  and	
  District	
  Hospital	
  and	
  Health	
  Centre	
   Mackenzie	
  21	
   McBride	
  and	
  District	
  Hospital	
   McBride	
  	
  22	
   Pleasant	
  View	
  Care	
  Home	
   Mission	
  	
  23	
   Mountain	
  Lakes	
   Nelson	
  24	
   Country	
  Squire	
  Retirement	
  Villa	
   Osoyoos	
  25	
   Arrowsmith	
  Lodge	
   Parksville	
  	
  26	
   Penticton	
  ECU	
   Penticton	
  27	
   Tsawaayuus	
  (Rainbow	
  Gardens)	
   Port	
  Alberni	
  28	
   Westhaven	
   Port	
  Alberni	
  29	
   Peace	
  River	
  Haven	
   Pouce	
  Coupe	
  30	
   Pouce	
  Coupe	
  Care	
  Home	
   Pouce	
  Coupe	
  31	
   Evergreen	
  Extended	
  Care	
   Powell	
  River	
  32	
   Olive	
  Devaud	
  Residence	
   Powell	
  River	
  33	
   Acropolis	
  Manor	
   Prince	
  Rupert	
  34	
   Prince	
  Rupert	
  Community	
  Health	
   Prince	
  Rupert	
  35	
   Ridgewood	
  Lodge	
   Princeton	
  36	
   Eagle	
  Park	
  Health	
  Care	
  Facility	
   Qualicum	
  Beach	
  37	
   The	
  Gardens	
  at	
  Qualicum	
  Beach	
   Qualicum	
  Beach	
  38	
   Moberly	
  Park	
  Manor	
   Revelstoke	
  39	
   Hilltop	
  House	
   Squamish	
  40	
   Kelly	
  Care	
  Centre	
   Summerland	
  41	
   Evergreen	
  Hamlets	
  	
   Surrey	
  42	
   Rosewood	
   Trail	
  43	
   Harbour	
  House	
   Trail	
  	
  44	
   Tumbler	
  Ridge	
  Community	
  Health	
  Centre	
   Tumbler	
  Ridge	
  45	
   Gateby	
  Intermediate	
  Care	
  Facility	
   Vernon	
  46	
   Noric	
  House	
   Vernon	
  47	
   Heritage	
  Square	
   Vernon	
  48	
   Brookhaven	
  Extended	
  Care	
  Centre	
   Westbank	
  49	
   Westside	
  Care	
  Centre	
   Westbank	
   	
   100	
   Appendix	
  4	
  	
   Physician	
  survey	
  content	
  	
   Question	
   number	
   Question	
   1a	
   Do	
  you	
  currently	
  care	
  for	
  any	
  patients	
  who	
  are	
  affected	
  with	
  the	
  clinical	
  symptoms	
  of	
  Huntington	
  Disease?	
  Y/N	
  	
   1b	
   If	
  yes,	
  how	
  many	
  HD	
  patients	
  in	
  total	
  are	
  under	
  your	
  care	
  or	
  supervision?	
  	
   1c	
   How	
  many	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  have	
  been	
  genetically	
  confirmed	
  to	
  carry	
  the	
  HD	
  mutation	
  (≥36	
  CAG	
  repeats	
  in	
  the	
  HTT	
  gene)?	
  	
   1d	
   How	
  many	
  have	
  been	
  diagnosed	
  with	
  HD	
  solely	
  via	
  clinical	
  presentation	
  and	
  family	
  history	
  (without	
  a	
  genetic	
  test)?	
  	
   2a	
   To	
  the	
  best	
  of	
  your	
  knowledge,	
  do	
  any	
  of	
  these	
  patients	
  have	
  living	
  family	
  members	
  residing	
  in	
  BC	
  who	
  are	
  currently	
  affected	
  with	
  the	
  clinical	
  symptoms	
  of	
  HD?	
  	
   2b	
   If	
  yes,	
  to	
  the	
  best	
  of	
  your	
  knowledge,	
  how	
  many	
  affected	
  relatives?	
  	
   3	
   If	
  any	
  of	
  your	
  HD	
  patients	
  and	
  or/their	
  family	
  members	
  live	
  out	
  of	
  province,	
  please	
  provide	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  both	
  in	
  BC	
  and	
  out	
  of	
  province	
  	
   4a	
   In	
  order	
  to	
  avoid	
  double	
  counting	
  the	
  patients	
  ascertained	
  for	
  this	
  study,	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  know	
  whether	
  your	
  patients	
  have	
  also	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  Medical	
  Clinic	
  at	
  UBC	
  Hospital	
  or	
  the	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  department	
  at	
  Victoria	
  General	
  Hospital	
  	
   4b	
   To	
  the	
  best	
  of	
  your	
  knowledge,	
  please	
  provide	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  patients	
  who	
  have	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  Huntington	
  Disease	
  medical	
  clinic	
  or	
  Victoria	
  General	
  Hospital	
  Medical	
  Genetics	
  and	
  those	
  who	
  have	
  not.	
  	
  	
   Family	
  survey	
  content	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   101	
   Appendix	
  5	
  	
   The	
  breakdown	
  of	
  certainty	
  measures	
  showing	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  pedigrees	
  last	
  updated	
   on	
  each	
  particular	
  year	
  and	
  the	
  corresponding	
  certainty	
  measure	
  	
   Year	
  pedigree	
  last	
   updated	
   Number	
  of	
  patients	
  ascertained	
   from	
  pedigrees	
  Unknown	
   18	
  1995	
   1	
  1996	
   2	
  1997	
   2	
  1998	
   3	
  1999	
   5	
  2000	
   4	
  2001	
   4	
  2002	
   3	
  2003	
   15	
  2004	
   7	
  2005	
   5	
  2006	
   3	
  2007	
   8	
  2008	
   6	
  2009	
   3	
  2010	
   8	
  2011	
   26	
  2012	
   2	
  	
   127	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   102	
   Appendix	
  6	
   City	
   Chart	
  review	
  (UBC/VGH)	
   Family	
  Pedigree/	
  patient	
  file	
   Physician	
  responses	
  (patients)	
   Physician	
  responses	
  (Family	
  members	
  with	
  HD)	
   Family	
  Surveys	
   Long-­‐term	
  care	
  homes	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  justification	
   100	
  Mile	
  House	
   	
   	
   2	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Abbotsford	
   16	
   7	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Aiyansh	
   	
   	
   4	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Aldergrove	
   2	
   	
  	
   1	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Agassiz	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Armstrong	
   5	
   	
  	
   2	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1,	
  1	
   A	
  Ashcroft	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Bella	
  Coola	
   	
   	
   4	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Berriere	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Blind	
  Bay	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Burnaby	
   18	
   4	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Burns	
  Lake	
   1	
   4	
   2	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   	
  Campbell	
  River	
   5	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Castlegar	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Chase	
   1	
   	
  	
   1	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Chemainus	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Chilliwack	
   11	
   1,	
  4	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Christina	
  Lake	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Clearwater	
   	
   	
   2	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Cobble	
  Hill	
   1	
   	
  	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Comox	
   2	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Coquitlam	
   4	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Courtenay	
   3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Cranbrook	
   	
  	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Crawford	
  Bay	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Creston	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Cumberland	
   1	
   	
  	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Dease	
  Lake	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Delta	
   5	
   3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Dawson	
  Creek	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Duncan	
   4	
   2	
   	
  1	
   1	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2,	
  2	
  	
   	
  Elkford	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Enderby	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Fort	
  St.	
  James	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Fort	
  St.	
  John	
   3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Ferni	
   2	
   1	
   4	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2,	
  2,	
  2,	
  1,	
  1,	
  1	
   B	
  Fort	
  Nelson	
   	
  	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Fraser	
  Lake	
   1	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2	
   C	
  Fruitvale	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Gabriola	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Garabaldi	
  Highlands	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Gibsons	
   1	
   	
  	
   6	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Goldon	
   	
   	
   8	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Gold	
  River	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Hazleton	
   	
   	
   2	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Hope	
   2	
   1	
   6	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Houston	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Invermere	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1	
   D	
  Kaleden	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Kamloops	
   13	
   1	
   3	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2,	
  2,	
  2,	
  2,	
  2	
   E	
  Kaslo	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Kelowna	
   16	
   8	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Keremeos	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Kimberley	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   7	
   1	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1,	
  1,	
  1	
   F	
  Kitamat	
   	
  	
   1	
   1	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   103	
   City	
   Chart	
  review	
  (UBC/VGH)	
   Family	
  Pedigree/	
  patient	
  file	
   Physician	
  responses	
  (patients)	
   Physician	
  responses	
  (Family	
  members	
  with	
  HD)	
   Family	
  Surveys	
   Long-­‐term	
  care	
  homes	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  justification	
   Koksilah	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1,	
  1	
   G	
  Lac	
  la	
  Hache	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Ladysmith	
   3	
   	
  	
   6	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Lake	
  Cowichan	
   1	
   	
  	
   2	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Langford	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Langley	
   8	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Lantzville	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Lazo	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Lillooet	
   	
   	
   2	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Logan	
  lake	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Lumby	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Lytton	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Mackenzie	
   2	
   4	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Madeira	
  Park	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Malahat	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Maple	
  Ridge	
   8	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Mara	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Masons	
  Landing	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Masset	
   	
   	
   2	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Mayne	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  McBride	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Meritt	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Mill	
  Bay	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Mission	
   6	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Nakusp	
   	
   	
   2	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Nanaimo	
   13	
   2	
   5	
   	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2,	
  2,	
  2,	
  2,	
  2	
   H	
  Nanoose	
  Bay	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Naramata	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Nelson	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  New	
  Denver	
   	
  	
   1	
   4	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  New	
  Westminster	
   8	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  North	
  Vancouver	
   15	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Parksville	
   2	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Pemberton	
   	
   	
   3	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Pender	
  Island	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Penticton	
   8	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1	
   2	
   I	
  Port	
  Alberni	
   5	
   3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Port	
  Alice	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2	
   10	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1	
  (x10)	
   J	
  Port	
  Coquitlam	
   9	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Port	
  Hardy	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Port	
  Moody	
   4	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Powell	
  River	
   5	
   4	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   1	
   1,	
  1,	
  2	
   K	
  Prince	
  George	
   14	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Prince	
  Rupert	
   1	
   1	
   	
  2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Princeton	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2	
   	
  	
   2,	
  2	
   L	
  Pritchard	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Quadra	
  Island	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Qualicum	
  Beach	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Quathiaski	
  Cove	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Queen	
  Charlotte	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Quesnel	
   3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Richmond	
   10	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Rossland	
   	
   	
   6	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Salmon	
  Arm	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Saltspring	
  Island	
   3	
   4	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Sayward	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Sechelt	
   	
   	
   8	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Shawnigan	
  Lake	
   2	
   6	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   104	
   	
  Note:	
  	
  Cells	
  shaded	
  in	
  grey	
  contain	
  numbers	
  of	
  patients	
  who	
  are	
  cases	
  of	
  definite	
  overlap	
  and	
  have	
  not	
  been	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  ORS	
  assessment	
  or	
  the	
  prevalence	
  estimates.	
  Numbers	
  coloured	
  orange	
  in	
  column	
  2	
  are	
  those	
  11	
  out	
  of	
  127	
  non-­‐clinic	
  patients	
  found	
  on	
  family	
  pedigrees	
  whose	
  pedigree	
  included	
  city	
  of	
  residence	
  information	
  for	
  the	
  patient	
  in	
  question.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  remaining	
  116	
  patients,	
  first-­‐degree	
  family	
  members’	
  resident	
  cities	
  were	
  recorded.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  justifications:	
  	
   A. None	
  of	
  our	
  families	
  in	
  this	
  Armstrong	
  have	
  an	
  affected	
  family	
  member	
  ascertained	
  from	
  pedigree	
  B. Three	
  were	
  given	
  an	
  overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  of	
  1	
  because	
  there	
  are	
  only	
  3	
  total	
  Ferni	
  patients	
  from	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  and	
  3	
  were	
  given	
  an	
  overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  of	
  2	
  because	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  information	
  in	
  the	
  file	
  to	
  confirm	
  with	
  the	
  physician	
  (non-­‐clinic	
  patient	
  was	
  ascertained	
  from	
  referral	
  letter)	
  C. Physician	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  reached	
  to	
  answer	
  pertinent	
  questions	
  D. No	
  patients	
  from	
  other	
  sources	
  are	
  recorded	
  to	
  live	
  in	
  Invermere	
  E. Multiple	
  families	
  with	
  non-­‐clinic	
  patient	
  affected	
  members	
  on	
  their	
  pedigree	
  live	
  in	
  Kamloops.	
  There	
  is	
  far	
  too	
  long	
  a	
  list	
  to	
  re-­‐contact	
  physicians	
  with	
  questions.	
  F. Patients	
  from	
  Kimberley	
  were	
  not	
  ascertained	
  from	
  any	
  other	
  sources	
  G. Patients	
  from	
  Koksilah	
  were	
  not	
  ascertained	
  from	
  any	
  other	
  sources	
  H. Physician	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  access	
  to	
  the	
  information	
  required	
  to	
  minimize	
  overlap	
  I. Nursing	
  home	
  staff	
  were	
  not	
  able	
  to	
  provide	
  information	
  on	
  whether	
  this	
  patient	
  has	
  been	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  HD	
  clinic	
  or	
  VGH	
  nor	
  did	
  they	
  have	
  information	
  regarding	
  the	
  patient’s	
  family	
  members	
   City	
   Chart	
  review	
  (UBC/VGH)	
   Family	
  Pedigree/	
  patient	
  file	
   Physician	
  responses	
  (patients)	
   Physician	
  responses	
  (Family	
  members	
  with	
  HD)	
   Family	
  Surveys	
   Long-­‐term	
  care	
  homes	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  scores	
   Overlap	
  risk	
  score	
  justification	
   Slocan	
  Park	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Smithers	
   	
   	
   5	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Sooke	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Southbank	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Sparwood	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Squamish	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Stewart	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Summerland	
   3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Surrey	
   42	
   11	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   14	
   2,	
  2	
   M	
  Terrace	
   4	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Trail	
   3	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Tsawwassen	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   4	
   	
  	
   1,	
  1,	
  1,	
  2	
   N	
  Ucluelet	
   	
   	
   2	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Unknown	
  	
   8	
   4	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Valemount	
   	
   	
   1	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Vancouver	
   76	
   15,	
  1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Vanderhoof	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   1	
   O	
  Vernon	
   7	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Victoria	
   67	
   10,	
  3	
   1	
   2	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2,	
  2,	
  2	
   P	
  Watson	
  Lake	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  West	
  Vancouver	
   6	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Westbank	
   3	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2	
   2,	
  2	
   Q	
  Whistler	
   	
   	
   8	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Whiterock	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  Williams	
  Lake	
   5	
   1	
   6	
   1	
   1	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   2,2	
   R	
  Winfield	
   1	
   	
  	
   4	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   105	
   J. These	
  patients	
  have	
  no	
  known	
  family	
  members	
  and	
  no	
  patients	
  or	
  families	
  ascertained	
  from	
  other	
  sources	
  live	
  in	
  Port	
  Alice	
  K. No	
  families	
  from	
  the	
  chart	
  review	
  have	
  non-­‐clinic	
  patient	
  affected	
  members	
  in	
  Powell	
  River.	
  L. Cannot	
  re-­‐contact	
  family	
  survey	
  responders	
  M. Multiple	
  families	
  with	
  affected	
  non-­‐clinic	
  patient	
  family	
  members	
  live	
  in	
  Surrey	
  N. The	
  one	
  clinic	
  family	
  from	
  Tsawwassen	
  does	
  not	
  have	
  affected	
  non-­‐clinic	
  patient	
  family	
  member,	
  and	
  only	
  has	
  1	
  patient	
  from	
  Tsawwassen	
  is	
  recorded	
  as	
  affected.	
  Family	
  survey	
  responders	
  cannot	
  be	
  re-­‐contacted	
  O. Only	
  family	
  in	
  Vanderhoof	
  has	
  no	
  affected	
  not	
  in	
  database	
  members	
  and	
  saw	
  a	
  different	
  doctor.	
  P. Multiple	
  families	
  with	
  non-­‐clinic	
  patient	
  affected	
  members	
  on	
  their	
  pedigree	
  live	
  in	
  Victoria.	
  There	
  is	
  far	
  too	
  long	
  a	
  list	
  to	
  re-­‐contact	
  physicians	
  with	
  questions.	
  Q. Nursing	
  home	
  staff	
  were	
  not	
  able	
  to	
  provide	
  the	
  pertinent	
  information	
  to	
  minimize	
  overlap	
  R. Physicians	
  were	
  not	
  available	
  to	
  answer	
  the	
  pertinent	
  questions	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   106	
   Appendix	
  7	
  	
  	
   Ethnicity	
   Country	
  of	
  orgin	
   Number	
  of	
  patients	
   Caucasian	
   Acadian/Cajun	
   3	
  	
   Austria	
   4	
  	
   Belgium	
   1	
  	
   Great	
  Britain	
   154	
  	
   Hungary	
   1	
  	
   Iceland	
   1	
  	
   Ireland	
   30	
  	
   Canada	
   11	
  	
   Denmark	
   5	
  	
   Poland	
   5	
  	
   Norway	
   13	
  	
   The	
  Netherlands	
   16	
  	
   Latvia	
   1	
  	
   Italy	
   5	
  	
   Israel	
   1	
  	
   Germany	
   26	
  	
   France	
   6	
  	
   Finland	
   1	
  	
   Russia	
   17	
  	
   South	
  Africa	
   2	
  	
   Sweden	
   11	
  	
   Ukraine	
   8	
  	
   Slovania	
   2	
  	
   Unknown	
   166	
   African-­‐North	
   Tanzania	
   1	
   American-­‐Latin	
   Mexico	
   1	
   Asian-­‐East	
   Philippines	
  	
   2	
  	
   Hong	
  Kong	
   1	
  	
   Unknown	
   1	
   Asian-­‐West	
   Pakistan	
   3	
  	
   Afghanistan	
  	
   1	
  	
   India	
   8	
  	
   Iran	
   1	
  	
   Iraq	
   1	
  	
   Unknown	
   2	
   Other	
   Ontario	
  Aboriginal	
   1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
Canada 10 1
United States 3 0
India 2 0
Spain 2 0
Peru 1 0
China 1 29
City Views Downloads
Unknown 4 5
Madrid 2 0
Vancouver 2 0
New Westminster 2 0
San Francisco 1 0
Beijing 1 0
Redmond 1 0
Mayne 1 0
Toronto 1 1
Maple Ridge 1 0
Lima 1 0
Mississauga 1 0
Ashburn 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}

Share

Share to:

Comment

Related Items