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Workshopping A Little Creation : a scenographic approach to theatre for young audiences, oral tradition… Vanessa, Imeson Lynne 2012

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   Workshopping	
  a	
  Little	
  Creation:	
   A	
  Scenographic	
  Approach	
  to	
  Theatre	
  for	
  Young	
  Audiences,	
  Oral	
  Tradition	
  and	
  the	
   Concrete	
  Indian	
   	
   by	
   	
  	
   Vanessa	
  Lynne	
  Imeson	
   	
   BA	
  Honours	
  University	
  of	
  Windsor	
  2010	
  	
   	
   A	
  THESIS	
  SUBMITTED	
  IN	
  PARTIAL	
  FULFILLMENT	
  OF	
  THE	
  REQUIREMENTS	
  FOR	
  THE	
   DEGREE	
  OF	
   	
   MASTER	
  OF	
  FINE	
  ARTS	
   	
   in	
   	
   The	
  Faculty	
  of	
  Graduate	
  Studies	
  	
   (Theatre)	
   	
   THE	
  UNIVERSITY	
  OF	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
  	
   (Vancouver)	
   	
   August	
  2012	
  	
   	
   ©	
  Vanessa	
  Lynne	
  Imeson,	
  2012	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    Abstract	
  	
  	
   	
   This	
  thesis	
  describes	
  the	
  production	
  of	
  A	
  Little	
  Creation,	
  a	
  play	
  that	
  I	
  wrote	
  and	
   developed,	
  which	
  took	
  place	
  on	
  the	
  Frederic	
  Wood	
  stage	
  during	
  November	
  2011.	
  The	
   intent	
  was	
  to	
  workshop	
  my	
  original	
  script	
  as	
  a	
  dramatic	
  piece	
  and	
  explore	
  its	
  theatrical	
   and	
  visual	
  elements.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  initially	
  planned	
  for	
  the	
  black	
  box	
  space	
  of	
  the	
  Dorothy	
   Somerset	
  Studio	
  on	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Campus,	
  but	
  was	
  shifted	
  to	
  the	
   Frederic	
  Wood	
  Theatre	
  main	
  stage.	
  	
  This	
  shift	
  to	
  a	
  much	
  larger	
  venue	
  meant	
  an	
  increase	
   in	
  production	
  scale	
  and	
  technical	
  possibilities;	
  the	
  production	
  literally	
  grew	
  to	
  fit	
  the	
   space.	
  	
  The	
  workshop	
  production	
  ran	
  for	
  three	
  evening	
  performances	
  and	
  one	
  matinee	
   during	
  the	
  week	
  of	
  November	
  24th	
  until	
  the	
  26th,	
  2011.	
  	
  Advisors	
  for	
  the	
  project	
  were	
   Professor	
  Alison	
  Green,	
  Professor	
  Dory	
  Nason,	
  Professor	
  Ron	
  Fedoruk	
  and	
  Melody	
   Anderson.	
  	
  	
   The	
  workshop	
  consisted	
  of	
  a	
  staged	
  realization	
  of	
  my	
  script	
  in	
  progress	
  of	
  the	
   same	
  title	
  where	
  I	
  functioned	
  as	
  playwright,	
  puppet	
  designer	
  and	
  developer,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
   costume	
  and	
  set	
  designer.	
  	
  In	
  collaboration	
  with	
  Director	
  Patrick	
  New,	
  UBC	
  MFA	
   candidate	
  in	
  Direction,	
  Stage	
  Manager	
  Ashley	
  Noyes,	
  Designers	
  Gua	
  Khee	
  Chong	
   (Sound),	
  Emily	
  Hartig	
  (Lighting),	
  Jon	
  Tsang	
  (Lighting	
  Supervisor),	
  Brady	
  Villadsen	
   (Projections)	
  Carolyn	
  Rapanos	
  (Graffiti	
  and	
  Head	
  painter),	
  and	
  Actors	
  Nyla	
  Carpentier,	
   Alex	
  Carr,	
  Meaghan	
  Chenosky,	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto,	
  David	
  Kaye,	
  Ashley	
  McAllister	
  and	
  Lisa	
   Smith,	
  the	
  workshop	
  was	
  intended	
  to	
  explore	
  my	
  creative	
  process	
  as	
  an	
  Indigenous	
   person	
  and	
  artist	
  alike,	
  and	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  theatrical	
  piece	
  that	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  design	
  rather	
   than	
  design	
  a	
  director’s	
  vision;	
  which	
  is	
  often	
  the	
  case.	
  	
  This	
  thesis	
  is	
  a	
  description	
  of	
   	
    ii	
    that	
  workshop	
  process	
  concluding	
  in	
  an	
  evaluation	
  of	
  the	
  workshop	
  and	
  its	
  effect	
  on	
  my	
   creative	
  process.	
   	
   	
    	
    iii	
    Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   	
   Abstract ........................................................................................................................................ii	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents ........................................................................................................................ iv	
   List	
  of	
  Illustrations ........................................................................................................................v	
   Acknowledgments...................................................................................................................... vii	
   Dedication ................................................................................................................................. viii	
   Chapter	
  1	
  	
  Introduction................................................................................................................1	
   1.1.	
  Project	
  Origin	
  Research	
  and	
  Inspiration ....................................................................2	
   1.2.	
  The	
  Writing	
  Process...................................................................................................7	
   Chapter	
  2	
  	
  Artistic	
  Collaboration................................................................................................12	
   2.1.	
  Workshop	
  Process ...................................................................................................15	
   Chapter	
  3	
  	
  Development ............................................................................................................21	
   3.1.	
  Puppet	
  Conception	
  and	
  Creation ............................................................................23	
   3.2.	
  Costume	
  and	
  Cultural	
  Hybridity ..............................................................................32	
   3.3.	
  Scenographic	
  Utility:	
  Tradition	
  and	
  Modernity .......................................................38	
   Chapter	
  4	
  	
  Production	
  Report ....................................................................................................41	
   Chapter	
  5	
  	
  Conclusion ................................................................................................................44	
   Bibliography ...............................................................................................................................74	
   Appendix	
  	
  	
  Script ........................................................................................................................77	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    iv	
    List	
  of	
  Illustrations	
   	
   1	
  –	
  shows	
  Matt	
  Reznek’s	
  poster	
  design .....................................................................................48	
   2	
  –	
  shows	
  Carolyn	
  Rapanos’	
  graffiti	
  rough	
  sketch......................................................................49	
   3	
  –	
  shows	
  the	
  complete	
  graffiti	
  platform...................................................................................49	
   4	
  –	
  shows	
  singular	
  armatures	
  before	
  assembly .........................................................................50	
   5	
  –	
  shows	
  a	
  rough	
  sketch	
  of	
  the	
  concept	
  for	
  the	
  Raven	
  puppet................................................51	
   6	
  –	
  shows	
  a	
  paint	
  4x6	
  inch	
  Raven	
  maquette..............................................................................51	
   7	
  –	
  shows	
  a	
  Gran-­‐Gran	
  maquette ..............................................................................................52	
   8	
  –	
  shows	
  finished	
  Gran-­‐Gran	
  puppet........................................................................................52	
   9	
  –	
  shows	
  close-­‐up	
  Gran-­‐Gran’s	
  face	
  unpainted........................................................................52	
   10	
  –	
  shows	
  Tear’s	
  simple	
  bobbing	
  head	
  mechanism .................................................................53	
   11	
  –	
  shows	
  Tear	
  puppet .............................................................................................................53	
   12	
  –	
  shows	
  Coyote	
  rough	
  sketch................................................................................................54	
   13	
  –	
  shows	
  Coyote	
  maquette.....................................................................................................54	
   14	
  –	
  shows	
  Coyote	
  in	
  standing	
  position.....................................................................................55	
   15	
  –	
  shows	
  Coyote	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  David	
  Kaye........................................................56	
   16	
  –	
  shows	
  Raven	
  head	
  detail....................................................................................................56	
   17	
  –	
  shows	
  Raven	
  wing	
  detail ....................................................................................................57	
   18	
  –	
  shows	
  Raven	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  Nyla	
  Carpentier..................................................57	
   19	
  –	
  shows	
  Otter	
  concept	
  rough	
  sketch.....................................................................................58	
   20	
  –	
  shows	
  Otter	
  puppet	
  profile ................................................................................................58	
   21	
  –	
  shows	
  Otter	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto ..................................................58	
   22	
  –	
  shows	
  rough	
  concept	
  sketch	
  of	
  Turtle ...............................................................................59	
   23	
  –	
  shows	
  Turtle	
  maquette ......................................................................................................59	
   24	
  –	
  shows	
  Turtle	
  profile............................................................................................................59	
   25	
  –	
  shows	
  Turtle	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  Alex	
  Carr.............................................................60	
   26	
  –	
  shows	
  rough	
  sketch	
  concept	
  for	
  Sun	
  and	
  Moon ................................................................60	
   27	
  –	
  shows	
  Sun	
  projection .........................................................................................................61	
   28	
  –	
  shows	
  Moon	
  projection......................................................................................................61	
   29	
  –	
  shows	
  Twin	
  Creations	
  sock	
  puppets...................................................................................61	
    	
    v	
    30	
  –	
  shows	
  Twin	
  Creations	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actors	
  David	
  Kaye,	
  Alex	
  Carr,	
  Laura	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Fukumoto	
  and	
  Nyla	
  Carpentier ......................................................................................62	
   31	
  –	
  shows	
  Weesageechak	
  hand	
  puppet ...................................................................................63	
   32	
  –	
  shows	
  Hunter’s	
  daughter	
  hand	
  puppet..............................................................................63	
   33	
  –	
  shows	
  puppet	
  box	
  rehearsal	
  with	
  actors	
  Alex	
  Carr	
  and	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto ..........................63	
   34	
  –	
  shows	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Narrator’s	
  costume...................................64	
   35	
  –	
  shows	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Gran-­‐Gran’s	
  costume................................65	
   36	
  –	
  shows	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Terra/Tear’s	
  costume ...............................66	
   37	
  –	
  shows	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Coyote’s	
  costume .....................................67	
   38	
  –	
  shows	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Raven’s	
  costume.......................................68	
   39	
  –	
  shows	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Otter’s	
  costume ........................................69	
   40	
  –	
  shows	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Turtle’s	
  costume .......................................70	
   41	
  –	
  shows	
  final	
  set ....................................................................................................................71	
   42	
  –	
  shows	
  Narrator	
  talking	
  about	
  her	
  childhood	
  memory .......................................................71	
   43	
  –	
  shows	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  in	
  action .........................................................................................72	
   44	
  –	
  shows	
  actors	
  Alex	
  Carr,	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto	
  and	
  David	
  Kaye	
  lifting	
  the	
  Puppet	
  theatre........73	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    vi	
    Acknowledgments	
  	
   	
   With	
  the	
  greatest	
  thanks	
  to	
  my	
  director	
  Patrick	
  New,	
  the	
  cast,	
  crew,	
  faculty	
  and	
  staff	
   whose	
  voluntary	
  efforts	
  made	
  this	
  undertaking	
  bearable	
  and	
  possible.	
  This	
  workshop	
   grew	
  to	
  fit	
  your	
  love	
  and	
  devotion.	
  We	
  created	
  a	
  monster.	
   	
   Extra	
  special	
  thanks	
  to	
  my	
  stage	
  manager	
  Ashley	
  Noyes	
  for	
  being	
  my	
  rock	
  and	
  the	
   greatest	
  of	
  friends.	
   	
   To	
  Steffi	
  Lai,	
  Megan	
  Kennedy,	
  Jui	
  Kang,	
  Megan	
  Gilron	
  and	
  all	
  those	
  who	
  helped	
  me	
   create	
  the	
  puppets;	
  I	
  owe	
  you	
  my	
  deepest	
  appreciation.	
   	
   To	
  Lynn,	
  Jean,	
  Keith,	
  Jim	
  and	
  Jay	
  thank	
  you	
  for	
  the	
  support	
  and	
  creativity	
  you	
  gave	
  every	
   step	
  of	
  the	
  way;	
  the	
  department	
  is	
  lucky	
  to	
  have	
  you	
  all.	
   	
   To	
  Dory	
  Nason,	
  Melody	
  Anderson	
  and	
  Ron	
  Fedoruk	
  your	
  insight	
  and	
  advisement	
  was	
   invaluable	
  during	
  the	
  creation	
  of	
  this	
  project.	
   	
   It	
  was	
  a	
  pleasure	
  to	
  be	
  in	
  the	
  company	
  of	
  Martha	
  Herrera-­‐Lasso,	
  Jon	
  Tsang,	
  Brian	
   Cochrane,	
  Chris	
  Robson,	
  Patrick	
  New,	
  Seth	
  Soulstein,	
  Amanda	
  Konkin,	
  Alex	
  Carr	
  and	
   Catriona	
  Leger.	
   	
   Finally,	
  infinite	
  thanks	
  to	
  Alison	
  Green,	
  who	
  helped	
  me	
  see	
  the	
  impossible	
  as	
  a	
  stepping	
   stone.	
   	
    	
    vii	
    Dedication	
   	
   For	
  my	
  partner	
  Matt	
  who	
  pushed	
  me	
  to	
  discover	
  my	
  passion	
  and	
  then	
  proceeded	
  to	
   help	
  me	
  realize	
  it.	
  	
   	
    	
    viii	
    	
   Chapter	
  1	
   	
   	
   Introduction	
   	
   “When	
  I	
  sit	
  alone	
  in	
  a	
  theatre	
  and	
  gaze	
  into	
  the	
  dark	
  space	
  of	
  its	
  empty	
  stage,	
  I’m	
  frequently	
   seized	
  by	
  fear	
  that	
  this	
  time	
  I	
  won’t	
  manage	
  to	
  penetrate	
  it,	
  and	
  I	
  always	
  hope	
  fear	
  will	
  never	
  desert	
  me.	
   Without	
  an	
  unending	
  search	
  for	
  the	
  key	
  to	
  the	
  secret	
  of	
  creativity,	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  creation.	
  It’s	
  necessary	
   always	
  to	
  begin	
  again.	
  And	
  that	
  is	
  beautiful.”	
   ~Joseph	
  Svoboda	
    	
   I	
  always	
  want	
  to	
  try	
  something	
  new.	
  	
  It’s	
  that	
  fear	
  of	
  the	
  unknown	
  and	
  that	
  fear	
   of	
  failure	
  that	
  drives	
  my	
  creative	
  instinct…you	
  can’t	
  be	
  wrong	
  if	
  no	
  one	
  has	
  done	
  it	
   before,	
  right?	
  	
  	
  So	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  approach	
  my	
  Thesis	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  fashion,	
  chaos	
  seems	
  to	
   be	
  my	
  comfort	
  zone	
  and	
  if	
  you	
  never	
  know	
  what’s	
  going	
  to	
  happen	
  you	
  are	
  prepared	
  for	
   anything…	
  	
   As	
  a	
  mixed	
  blood	
  Métis	
  woman	
  I	
  feel	
  my	
  history	
  is	
  pivotal	
  in	
  the	
  ways	
  in	
  which	
  I	
   see	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  Our	
  chaotic	
  individual	
  stories,	
  histories	
  and	
  mythologies	
  affect	
  the	
  ways	
   in	
  which	
  we	
  interpret	
  our	
  surroundings	
  and	
  interact	
  within	
  contemporary	
  society.	
   There’s	
  this	
  unstable	
  interlocking	
  web	
  that	
  dictates	
  who	
  we	
  are	
  and	
  what	
  we	
  will	
   become	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  self-­‐created	
  persona	
  we	
  embody	
  and	
  act	
  out	
  within	
  these	
  systems.	
  	
   These	
  interconnections	
  between	
  self-­‐perceived	
  identity	
  and	
  our	
  environment	
  are	
  crucial	
   in	
  understanding	
  the	
  ways	
  in	
  which	
  we	
  are	
  evolving	
  culturally.	
  	
  Contemporary	
  Canadian	
   society	
  holds	
  on	
  so	
  tightly	
  to	
  static	
  ideas	
  of	
  the	
  past	
  and	
  ridged	
  stereotypic	
   representation	
  of	
  aboriginal	
  peoples	
  that	
  authenticity	
  of	
  the	
  self	
  is	
  constantly	
  being	
   questioned.	
  	
  With	
  this	
  project	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  devise	
  a	
  new	
  social	
  artistic	
  identity	
  through	
  my	
    	
    1	
    	
   work	
  that	
  approached	
  these	
  ideas	
  of	
  authenticity	
  and	
  identity	
  by	
  reinterpreting	
  them	
  in	
   a	
  personal	
  and	
  urban-­‐centric	
  aesthetic.	
  	
  Thus	
  creating	
  a	
  singular	
  moment	
  in	
  parallel	
  with	
   the	
  traditional	
  stories	
  and	
  characterizing	
  what	
  Ojibwa	
  photographer	
  Nadya	
  Kwandibens	
   refers	
  to	
  as	
  the	
  “concrete	
  Indian”	
  as	
  a	
  temporal	
  identity.	
  	
  This	
  production	
  while	
  visually	
   displaying	
  oral	
  traditions	
  and	
  Indigenous	
  stock	
  characters	
  examines	
  the	
  essence	
  of	
  the	
   contemporary	
  life	
  of	
  indigenous	
  youth	
  and	
  particularly	
  mixed	
  blood	
  culture	
  in	
  an	
  urban	
   setting.	
  	
   I’m	
  not	
  trying	
  to	
  speak	
  for	
  any	
  one	
  culture	
  or	
  the	
  Aboriginal	
  community	
  at	
  large	
   in	
  the	
  reinvention	
  of	
  these	
  stories.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  mixed	
  blood	
  urban	
  individual	
  my	
  grasp	
  on	
  my	
   heritage	
  is	
  just	
  that,	
  a	
  grasp,	
  and	
  my	
  stories	
  were	
  given	
  to	
  me	
  just	
  as	
  they	
  were	
  given	
  to	
   those	
  that	
  told	
  them.	
  	
  I’m	
  just	
  trying	
  to	
  remember.	
   	
   	
   1.1 Project	
  Origin	
  Research	
  and	
  Inspiration	
   	
   	
   “it’s	
  our	
  tradition	
  to	
  recall	
  our	
  history	
  or	
  obtain	
  our	
  history	
  in	
  an	
  oral	
  manner.	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  for	
  our	
   children	
  and	
  others	
  to	
  benefit	
  through	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  continuing	
  to	
  recall	
  and	
  make	
  history”	
   ~Ojibwa	
  Shaman	
  and	
  Artist	
  Norval	
  Morrisseau	
    	
   My	
  inspiration	
  was	
  simple;	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  tell	
  a	
  story	
  that	
  brought	
  together	
  the	
   various	
  versions	
  of	
  the	
  creation	
  myth	
  from	
  across	
  Canada	
  because	
  hearing	
  and	
  being	
  a	
   part	
  of	
  other	
  First	
  Nations	
  stories	
  was	
  such	
  an	
  important	
  experience	
  when	
  I	
  was	
  growing	
   up.	
  In	
  order	
  for	
  my	
  thesis	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  pan-­‐Canadian	
  feel	
  I	
  focused	
  on	
  the	
  most	
  popular	
   stories	
  from	
  the	
  Northwest	
  coast	
  (Haida),	
  the	
  Prairies	
  (Cree)	
  and	
  Eastern	
  Canada	
  (Six	
    	
    2	
    	
   Nations	
  and	
  Inuit).	
  	
  Each	
  region	
  has	
  very	
  specific	
  stock	
  animal	
  characters	
  and	
  trickster	
   beings	
  that	
  act	
  as	
  teachers	
  within	
  the	
  oral	
  tradition	
  to	
  explain	
  each	
  Nation’s	
  origin,	
   history	
  and	
  theology.	
  	
  	
  The	
  Northwest	
  coast	
  seems	
  to	
  favour	
  the	
  tale	
  of	
  Raven	
  tricking	
   the	
  Hunter’s	
  daughter	
  into	
  letting	
  him	
  into	
  the	
  Hunter’s	
  cabin	
  to	
  steal	
  the	
  sun	
  and	
  moon	
   and	
  bring	
  light	
  to	
  a	
  world	
  previously	
  blanketed	
  in	
  darkness.	
  	
  The	
  original	
  Cree	
  creation	
   story	
  tells	
  of	
  the	
  world	
  parent	
  giving	
  birth	
  to	
  six	
  brothers	
  (the	
  number	
  of	
  brothers	
   changes	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  story’s	
  origin)	
  and	
  the	
  fifth	
  was	
  the	
  trickster	
  Weesageechak	
   who	
  created	
  man	
  out	
  of	
  clay.	
  	
  However	
  Coyote	
  is	
  a	
  more	
  notorious	
  Trickster	
  figure	
  with	
   more	
  lascivious	
  behavior	
  so	
  I	
  chose	
  to	
  focus	
  on	
  him	
  as	
  a	
  character.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  Northeast	
  the	
   Inuit	
  favour	
  Raven	
  in	
  stories	
  similar	
  to	
  those	
  of	
  the	
  Northwest	
  coastal	
  Nations.	
  	
  The	
   Great	
  Lakes	
  area	
  tells	
  the	
  story	
  of	
  the	
  Earth	
  Diver	
  (traditionally	
  a	
  muskrat)	
  who	
  swims	
  to	
   the	
  bottom	
  of	
  the	
  ocean	
  to	
  retrieve	
  land	
  for	
  the	
  fallen	
  Skywoman,	
  thus	
  creating	
  Turtle	
   Island	
  where	
  we	
  stand	
  today.	
   Within	
  each	
  story	
  these	
  characters	
  often	
  cause	
  mischief	
  and	
  ultimately	
  bring	
   about	
  the	
  creation	
  of	
  the	
  world	
  or	
  other	
  miracles	
  by	
  accident,	
  therefore	
  relating	
  a	
   Nation’s	
  heritage	
  and	
  imparting	
  lessons	
  of	
  morality	
  and	
  life	
  skills	
  through	
  entertaining	
   stories.	
  	
  	
  It	
  is	
  also	
  interesting	
  to	
  note	
  that	
  each	
  Nation	
  tells	
  the	
  same	
  story	
  with	
  minor	
   differences.	
  	
  Sometimes	
  Raven	
  flies	
  in	
  and	
  out	
  with	
  the	
  box	
  containing	
  the	
  moon,	
   sometimes	
  he	
  shrinks	
  down	
  and	
  hides	
  inside	
  the	
  daughter’s	
  womb	
  until	
  she	
  gives	
  birth	
   to	
  the	
  moon	
  and	
  in	
  an	
  Inuit	
  story	
  Raven	
  actually	
  steals	
  the	
  daughter	
  and	
  the	
  moon	
  saves	
   her	
  by	
  creating	
  tides	
  and	
  capsizing	
  Ravens	
  boat.	
  	
  Each	
  story	
  has	
  the	
  basic	
  elements	
  that	
   need	
  to	
  be	
  conveyed,	
  but	
  each	
  Nation	
  makes	
  the	
  stories	
  their	
  own.	
  	
  This	
  idea	
  of	
  owning	
    	
    3	
    	
   and	
  creating	
  your	
  own	
  history	
  is	
  what	
  gave	
  me	
  the	
  motivation	
  to	
  write	
  this	
  story.	
  	
  I	
   wanted	
  to	
  do	
  something	
  that	
  was	
  intrinsically	
  mine,	
  something	
  that	
  I	
  could	
  explore	
  and	
   share,	
  where	
  it	
  was	
  safe	
  to	
  grow	
  and	
  make	
  mistakes.	
  	
  So	
  the	
  basic	
  idea	
  was	
  to	
  present	
  a	
   bricolage	
  creation	
  story	
  through	
  amalgamating	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  First	
  Nations	
  legends	
  that	
   were	
  all	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  life	
  growing	
  up,	
  with	
  a	
  scenario	
  from	
  my	
  childhood;	
  a	
  kind	
  of	
   autobiographic	
  fiction.	
  	
  I	
  made	
  the	
  distinction	
  between	
  the	
  stories	
  that	
  were	
  from	
  my	
   family	
  and	
  those	
  that	
  I	
  heard	
  told	
  by	
  visitors	
  from	
  other	
  Nations	
  at	
  powwows	
  and	
   gatherings	
  my	
  mother	
  brought	
  us	
  to.	
  	
  But	
  growing	
  up,	
  the	
  origins	
  didn’t	
  seem	
  to	
  matter	
   and	
  as	
  one	
  story	
  began	
  to	
  bleed	
  into	
  the	
  next,	
  my	
  over	
  active	
  imagination	
  made	
  it	
   harder	
  and	
  harder	
  to	
  distinguish	
  the	
  difference	
  between	
  what	
  the	
  story	
  was	
  saying	
  and	
   what	
  I	
  was	
  taking	
  away	
  from	
  it.	
  	
  With	
  this	
  project	
  I	
  hoped	
  to	
  move	
  the	
  familiar	
  oral	
   tradition	
  form	
  into	
  a	
  contemporary	
  medium	
  like	
  theatre	
  where	
  we	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  engage	
   the	
  multimodal	
  literacies	
  of	
  the	
  live	
  event	
  to	
  interpret	
  and	
  create	
  a	
  dramatic	
  identity.	
  	
  	
   By	
  multimodal	
  I	
  mean	
  that	
  I	
  hoped	
  to	
  engage	
  multiple	
  levels	
  of	
  understanding	
  so	
   that	
  every	
  aspect	
  from	
  music,	
  movement,	
  and	
  visual	
  aesthetic	
  to	
  the	
  actual	
  hearing	
  of	
   the	
  words	
  are	
  all	
  signifiers	
  in	
  a	
  larger	
  story.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  very	
  adamant	
  on	
  keeping	
  a	
  strong	
   narrative	
  voice	
  because	
  the	
  oral	
  nature	
  of	
  the	
  stories	
  is	
  such	
  a	
  powerful	
  tool	
  to	
   understanding	
  them.	
  	
  I	
  wanted	
  the	
  audience	
  to	
  see	
  what	
  I	
  see	
  when	
  I	
  hear	
  the	
  stories	
   but	
  I	
  also	
  wanted	
  them	
  to	
  have	
  enough	
  freedom	
  to	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  imagine	
  what	
  they	
  are	
   hearing	
  in	
  conjunction	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  other	
  sensory	
  stimulus.	
  	
  For	
  this	
  reason	
  I	
  chose	
  to	
   develop	
  the	
  piece	
  for	
  young	
  audiences.	
  	
  It	
  just	
  seemed	
  the	
  most	
  pliable	
  form	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
   audience	
  acceptance.	
  	
  When	
  entering	
  a	
  space	
  meant	
  for	
  children	
  I	
  find	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  more	
    	
    4	
    	
   able	
  to	
  trust	
  what	
  we	
  are	
  experiencing	
  because	
  the	
  environment	
  encourages	
  curiosity.	
  	
   Spectacle	
  is	
  intertwined	
  with	
  knowledge	
  acquisition	
  so	
  that	
  one	
  is	
  indistinguishable	
   from	
  the	
  other.	
  	
  Every	
  element	
  tells	
  the	
  story	
  and	
  yet	
  the	
  story	
  is	
  incomplete	
  if	
  one	
  is	
   missing.	
   The	
  theatre	
  for	
  young	
  audiences’	
  format	
  seemed	
  to	
  lend	
  itself	
  so	
  brilliantly	
  to	
   the	
  pivotal	
  character	
  of	
  the	
  Trickster	
  figure	
  since	
  he/she	
  is	
  the	
  subject	
  through	
  which	
   lessons	
  are	
  learned	
  within	
  indigenous	
  storytelling	
  around	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  A	
  figure	
  that	
  is	
   neither	
  man	
  nor	
  woman	
  but	
  can	
  be	
  both,	
  neither	
  human	
  nor	
  animal	
  but	
  sometimes	
   appears	
  as	
  one	
  or	
  the	
  other	
  or	
  a	
  combination	
  of	
  the	
  two,	
  he/she	
  is	
  neither	
  completely	
   flesh	
  nor	
  ephemeral	
  spirit	
  and	
  yet	
  still	
  remains	
  very	
  real.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  this	
  liminal	
  space	
  where	
   the	
  Trickster	
  exists	
  to	
  cause	
  mischief	
  and	
  teach	
  lessons	
  that	
  relates	
  so	
  well	
  to	
  theatre	
  for	
   young	
  audiences,	
  and	
  that	
  can	
  also	
  be	
  enjoyed	
  by	
  any	
  age.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  the	
  ambiguity	
  of	
  place	
   and	
  the	
  characters	
  that	
  make	
  the	
  stories	
  so	
  intriguing	
  and	
  surreal	
  but	
  still	
  familiar.	
  	
  I	
   have	
  always	
  been	
  fascinated	
  with	
  Julie	
  Taymor	
  and	
  Jim	
  Henson	
  and	
  I	
  knew	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
   interpret	
  the	
  creation	
  myths	
  through	
  puppetry	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  effect	
  these	
  artists	
  and	
   their	
  medium	
  had	
  on	
  my	
  childhood.	
  	
  Their	
  work	
  opened	
  my	
  eyes	
  to	
  what	
  can	
  be	
  created	
   and	
  expressed	
  by	
  inanimate	
  objects	
  that	
  cannot	
  be	
  conveyed	
  the	
  same	
  way	
  with	
  just	
  a	
   living,	
  breathing	
  body.	
  	
  The	
  creation	
  of	
  these	
  creatures,	
  which	
  are	
  grotesque	
  yet	
   beautiful,	
  abrasive	
  and	
  empathetic,	
  would	
  be	
  the	
  best	
  way	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  tell	
  the	
  story.	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  art	
  of	
  object	
  performance	
  is	
  also	
  closely	
  linked	
  to	
  the	
  ritualism	
  of	
  storytelling	
   and	
  acts	
  as	
  a	
  large	
  part	
  of	
  Indigenous	
  knowledge	
  sharing.	
  	
  	
  Object	
  performance	
   generally	
  refers	
  to	
  a	
  “performance	
  style	
  that	
  contains	
  the	
  animation	
  of	
  utilitarian,	
  or	
   	
    5	
    	
   pre-­‐existing	
  ‘found’	
  objects	
  rather	
  than	
  those	
  constructed	
  for	
  theatrical	
  effect,	
  such	
  as	
   the	
  puppet”	
  (Allen).	
  	
  This	
  kind	
  of	
  performance	
  is	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  decorated	
  objects	
   such	
  as	
  feather	
  fans	
  and	
  talking	
  sticks	
  by	
  indigenous	
  peoples	
  from	
  coast	
  to	
  coast,	
  and	
   the	
  wampum	
  belts	
  of	
  the	
  Six	
  Nations	
  used	
  to	
  retain	
  and	
  perform	
  stories	
  and	
  oral	
   histories.	
  	
  From	
  the	
  basic	
  object	
  the	
  performance	
  has	
  evolved	
  into	
  a	
  more	
  ritualistic	
   pageantry	
  from	
  the	
  theatrical	
  transformation	
  masks	
  of	
  the	
  Northwest	
  coast	
  Kwakiutl,	
   used	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  spirit	
  world	
  during	
  dance	
  ceremonies,	
  to	
  Iroquois	
  corn	
  husk	
  mask	
  or	
   false	
  face	
  mask	
  used	
  to	
  scare	
  away	
  evil	
  spirits	
  that	
  foreshowed	
  disease.	
  	
  These	
  objects	
   preserve	
  and	
  recount	
  the	
  stories	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  that	
  made	
  them	
  and	
  brought	
  them	
  to	
  life	
   and	
  are	
  animated	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  fashion	
  as	
  the	
  puppets	
  I	
  have	
  created	
  to	
  convey	
  the	
   stories	
  of	
  my	
  family,	
  heritage	
  and	
  community.	
  	
  	
  They	
  also	
  reflect	
  the	
  shifts	
  in	
  the	
  stories	
   that	
  occur	
  through	
  time	
  with	
  each	
  new	
  orator.	
  	
   With	
  this	
  project	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  address	
  the	
  historical	
  misrepresentations	
  of	
  Canada’s	
   indigenous	
  peoples	
  and	
  myths	
  by	
  retelling	
  traditional	
  stories	
  in	
  an	
  urban	
  setting.	
  	
  	
  The	
   question	
  of	
  whether	
  the	
  myth	
  creates	
  us	
  or	
  we	
  create	
  the	
  myth	
  is	
  always	
  at	
  the	
   forefront	
  of	
  my	
  mind.	
  	
  So	
  by	
  questioning	
  the	
  relationship	
  of	
  the	
  storyteller	
  to	
  the	
  story	
   I’m	
  trying	
  to	
  decipher	
  if	
  they	
  are	
  truly	
  distinct	
  and	
  if	
  one	
  can	
  survive	
  without	
  the	
  other.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    6	
    	
   1.2	
  The	
  Writing	
  Process	
   	
   	
   As	
  storyteller	
  we	
  are	
  “connecting	
  speaker	
  and	
  listener	
  in	
  communal	
  experience	
  and	
  uniting	
  past	
  and	
   present	
  in	
  memory.”	
   	
  ~Renate	
  Eigenbrod	
    	
   I	
  had	
  originally	
  written	
  “A	
  Little	
  Creation”	
  as	
  a	
  short	
  story	
  mashing	
  up	
  a	
  few	
   different	
  myths	
  I	
  heard	
  as	
  a	
  child	
  because	
  I	
  loved	
  the	
  characters	
  of	
  Coyote	
  and	
  Raven	
   and	
  felt	
  they	
  belonged	
  in	
  the	
  story	
  of	
  my	
  creation.	
  	
  These	
  characters	
  have	
  made	
  such	
  an	
   impact	
  on	
  my	
  life	
  that	
  it	
  seemed	
  only	
  natural	
  that	
  their	
  stories	
  could	
  be	
  shifted	
  into	
  my	
   childhood	
  account.	
  	
  In	
  2009,	
  the	
  story	
  was	
  selected	
  for	
  an	
  Alistair	
  MacLeod	
  award	
  for	
   creative	
  writing	
  and	
  that’s	
  when	
  I	
  thought	
  it	
  needed	
  to	
  evolve	
  and	
  become	
  something	
   bigger.	
  	
  I	
  turned	
  it	
  into	
  a	
  short	
  crude	
  play	
  and	
  applied	
  to	
  UBC	
  with	
  the	
  intention	
  of	
  doing	
   a	
  small	
  workshop	
  production	
  in	
  a	
  black	
  box	
  space.	
  	
  	
   	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  take	
  very	
  generalized	
  stereotypic	
  characters,	
  such	
  as	
  Raven	
  and	
   Coyote,	
  along	
  with	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  more	
  popular	
  stories	
  within	
  the	
  Aboriginal	
  community	
   and	
  center	
  them	
  to	
  pivot	
  around	
  my	
  childhood	
  experience	
  of	
  visiting	
  my	
  grandparents	
   and	
  hearing	
  the	
  stories	
  as	
  a	
  central	
  access	
  to	
  a	
  larger	
  world.	
  	
  The	
  interlacing	
  of	
   autobiographical	
  events	
  with	
  the	
  reinterpretations	
  of	
  the	
  creation	
  stories	
  was	
  an	
   attempt	
  to	
  bridge	
  a	
  gap	
  between	
  popular	
  culture	
  and	
  the	
  bi-­‐coastal	
  stories	
  that	
  were	
   familiar	
  to	
  me	
  growing	
  up.	
  	
  	
  	
   I	
  am	
  more	
  interested	
  in	
  the	
  beasts	
  that	
  creep	
  in	
  and	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  frame	
  and	
   permeate	
  the	
  worlds	
  of	
  Jim	
  Henson	
  and	
  Julie	
  Taymor	
  than	
  I	
  am	
  with	
  realism.	
  	
  That’s	
    	
    7	
    	
   where	
  I	
  felt	
  the	
  connection,	
  to	
  the	
  creature,	
  the	
  other,	
  and	
  that’s	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  reasons	
  I	
   wanted	
  to	
  use	
  puppetry	
  in	
  this	
  show.	
  	
  These	
  semi-­‐grotesque	
  puppets	
  distort	
  our	
   perception	
  of	
  reality.	
  	
  	
  For	
  example	
  we	
  know	
  the	
  character	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  is	
  human	
  and	
   Coyote	
  is	
  a	
  canine	
  but	
  we	
  can’t	
  precisely	
  associate	
  them	
  with	
  living	
  bodies;	
  we	
  are	
   better	
  able	
  to	
  identify	
  with	
  them	
  because	
  they	
  are	
  ambiguous.	
  	
  Theatre	
  practitioner	
   Tina	
  Bicat	
  explains	
  in	
  her	
  book	
  Puppets	
  and	
  Performing	
  Objects:	
  	
   “A	
  puppet	
  is	
  by	
  nature	
  impassive.	
  It	
  contains	
  the	
  possibility	
  to	
  display	
  all	
  sorts	
  of	
   emotion	
  but	
  can’t	
  do	
  it	
  alone.	
  It	
  needs	
  us	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  live.	
  	
  Its	
  very	
  impassivity	
  pushes	
  us	
   towards	
  questions	
  and	
  truths	
  which	
  engross	
  philosophers	
  and	
  children.	
  Its	
  bloodless,	
   blameless	
  body	
  allows	
  us	
  the	
  freedom	
  to	
  laugh	
  or	
  cry	
  at	
  it	
  and	
  with	
  it.	
  Its	
  life	
  does	
  not	
  exist	
   without	
  the	
  one	
  who	
  animates	
  it	
  and	
  the	
  one	
  who	
  watches	
  it”	
  (Bicat	
  15).	
  	
  	
    This	
  idea	
  of	
  the	
  inexistence,	
  of	
  that	
  spark	
  that	
  can’t	
  happen	
  without	
  the	
   connection	
  between	
  the	
  animator,	
  the	
  puppet	
  and	
  the	
  witness	
  was	
  a	
  crucial	
  part	
  in	
  the	
   writing	
  process.	
  	
  As	
  the	
  actors	
  moved	
  and	
  interacted	
  with	
  the	
  puppets	
  we	
  became	
  very	
   aware	
  of	
  how	
  the	
  story	
  needed	
  to	
  progress,	
  where	
  it	
  needed	
  to	
  expand	
  and	
  where	
  the	
   dialogue	
  and	
  movement	
  needed	
  to	
  deviate	
  and	
  come	
  back	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  tell	
  the	
  story.	
   It	
  was	
  clear	
  from	
  the	
  initial	
  script	
  that	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  development	
  needed	
  to	
  take	
  place;	
   stronger	
  characters	
  had	
  to	
  be	
  formed	
  and	
  dialogue	
  seemed	
  inevitable.	
  	
  My	
  original	
   intention	
  was	
  to	
  hold	
  true	
  to	
  the	
  oral	
  tradition,	
  with	
  a	
  strong	
  narrator	
  telling	
  the	
  story	
   which	
  was	
  being	
  acted	
  out.	
  	
  Simplicity	
  was	
  a	
  goal	
  that	
  I	
  let	
  slip	
  away	
  from	
  me	
  as	
  the	
   workshop	
  continued	
  to	
  grow	
  and	
  as	
  I	
  listened	
  to	
  my	
  director	
  Patrick	
  New	
  who	
  helped	
   me	
  develop	
  it.	
  	
  When	
  it	
  was	
  decided	
  to	
  move	
  the	
  production	
  to	
  the	
  Frederic	
  Wood	
    	
    8	
    	
   Theatre	
  from	
  the	
  smaller	
  Dorothy	
  Somerset	
  Studio	
  I	
  was	
  persuaded	
  to	
  adapt	
  the	
  script	
   to	
  include	
  many	
  more	
  production	
  elements	
  than	
  originally	
  planned.	
  	
   My	
  idea	
  for	
  this	
  play	
  is	
  that	
  it	
  takes	
  place	
  in	
  a	
  dual	
  reality,	
  two	
  worlds,	
  one	
  that	
  is	
   happening,	
  where	
  the	
  narrator	
  is	
  remembering	
  and	
  telling	
  us	
  the	
  story	
  of	
  our	
  creation	
   that	
  her	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  told	
  her	
  and	
  another	
  that	
  is	
  being	
  created	
  as	
  the	
  story	
  unravels.	
  	
   Both	
  are	
  realities	
  on	
  different	
  planes	
  side	
  by	
  side	
  or	
  overlapping,	
  like	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  the	
   living	
  and	
  that	
  of	
  the	
  spirits.	
  	
  Eventually	
  they	
  begin	
  to	
  inform	
  each	
  other,	
  molding	
  and	
   changing	
  the	
  stories	
  as	
  the	
  play	
  progresses.	
  	
  The	
  key	
  animal	
  characters	
  of	
  the	
  creation	
   stories	
  from	
  across	
  Canada,	
  Coyote,	
  Raven,	
  Otter	
  are	
  thrust	
  together	
  in	
  a	
  communal	
   story	
  that	
  belongs	
  to	
  no	
  one	
  culture	
  in	
  particular.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  brought	
  into	
  existence	
  in	
   both	
  animal	
  (puppet)	
  and	
  human	
  form,	
  just	
  as	
  the	
  trickster	
  can	
  walk	
  in	
  both	
  guises.	
  	
  The	
   worlds	
  remain	
  separate	
  -­‐	
  that	
  of	
  the	
  storyteller	
  and	
  that	
  of	
  the	
  story	
  -­‐	
  until	
  the	
  character	
   of	
  Terra/Tear	
  gets	
  curious	
  and	
  breeches	
  the	
  mythic	
  world.	
  	
  She	
  is	
  a	
  symbol	
  of	
  the	
   connection	
  we	
  share	
  with	
  both	
  worlds.	
  	
  She	
  is	
  able	
  to	
  function	
  and	
  affect	
  change	
  in	
   either	
  and	
  she	
  is	
  meant	
  to	
  show	
  us	
  how	
  we	
  have	
  control	
  over	
  our	
  own	
  story.	
   The	
  script	
  had	
  to	
  change	
  to	
  fit	
  the	
  broadening	
  scope	
  of	
  the	
  production.	
  	
  I	
  added	
   the	
  introduction	
  segment	
  at	
  the	
  beginning	
  to	
  give	
  credit	
  to	
  the	
  Nations	
  and	
  original	
   versions	
  of	
  the	
  stories	
  from	
  which	
  I	
  drew.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  afraid	
  of	
  infringing	
  on	
  the	
  intellectual	
   properties	
  of	
  the	
  individual	
  Nations	
  and	
  wasn’t	
  sure	
  how	
  to	
  go	
  about	
  asking	
  permission	
   for	
  popular	
  stories	
  that	
  are	
  shared	
  by	
  many	
  Nations.	
  	
  By	
  giving	
  them	
  credit	
  in	
  the	
  script	
  I	
   felt	
  it	
  acted	
  much	
  like	
  citing	
  a	
  quote.	
  	
  The	
  additional	
  material	
  allowed	
  us	
  to	
  introduce	
   the	
  audience	
  to	
  the	
  characters	
  and	
  their	
  places	
  of	
  origin.	
  	
  It	
  also	
  allowed	
  us	
  to	
  play	
  with	
   	
    9	
    	
   scale	
  and	
  echo,	
  both	
  auditory	
  and	
  visual,	
  and	
  gave	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  actors	
  beefier	
  roles.	
  	
  The	
   smaller	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  set	
  up	
  a	
  familiar	
  precedent	
  of	
  what	
  a	
  puppet	
  show	
  should	
  be,	
   reminding	
  us	
  of	
  more	
  traditional	
  Punch	
  and	
  Judy	
  style	
  show.	
  	
  	
  It	
  also	
  allowed	
  for	
   constant	
  interaction	
  between	
  actors,	
  puppets	
  and	
  audience,	
  which	
  was	
  something	
  I	
   didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  lose	
  sight	
  of.	
  	
  The	
  story	
  is	
  after	
  all	
  being	
  told	
  to	
  us	
  and	
  we	
  are	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  it,	
   so	
  having	
  everyone	
  know	
  the	
  source	
  material	
  made	
  the	
  reinterpretation	
  easier	
  to	
   understand.	
  	
  	
   Each	
  puppet	
  in	
  the	
  main	
  production	
  conjured	
  familiar	
  images	
  from	
  the	
  animals’	
   region	
  of	
  origin.	
  	
  Bill	
  Reid’s	
  Raven	
  of	
  the	
  Pacific	
  North	
  West	
  steals	
  the	
  sun	
  from	
  the	
   Great	
  Hunter’s	
  Daughter.	
  	
  The	
  Iroquois	
  story	
  of	
  Sky	
  Woman	
  falling	
  on	
  Turtles	
  back	
  and	
   Otter	
  bringing	
  dirt	
  to	
  create	
  Turtle	
  Island	
  originates	
  in	
  Ontario,	
  and	
  the	
  tale	
  of	
  Coyote	
   creating	
  man	
  out	
  of	
  clay	
  from	
  the	
  Prairies.	
  	
  The	
  Narrator	
  is	
  the	
  only	
  character	
  without	
  a	
   puppet	
  counterpart	
  because	
  she	
  is	
  the	
  point	
  of	
  origin;	
  the	
  story	
  is	
  what	
  she	
  is	
   remembering,	
  recounting	
  and	
  interacting	
  with.	
  	
  She	
  is	
  reliving	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  telling	
  the	
   story	
  to	
  a	
  younger	
  version	
  of	
  herself	
  (Terra/Tear)	
  and	
  the	
  story	
  keeps	
  changing	
  because	
   she	
  cannot	
  remember	
  what	
  she	
  heard	
  and	
  what	
  she	
  imagined.	
  	
  This	
  leads	
  to	
  a	
  constant	
   questioning	
  of	
  the	
  authenticity	
  of	
  the	
  myth	
  because	
  she	
  forgets	
  that	
  she	
  is	
  the	
  one	
  who	
   is	
  creating	
  it.	
  I	
  had	
  originally	
  wanted	
  her	
  to	
  voice	
  both	
  her	
  opinion	
  and	
  Gran-­‐gran’s,	
  but	
   my	
  Director	
  felt	
  it	
  was	
  too	
  much	
  for	
  the	
  actor	
  and	
  so	
  the	
  role	
  was	
  divided	
  and	
  another	
   actor	
  voiced	
  the	
  puppet	
  of	
  Gran-­‐gran.	
  	
  	
   I	
  felt	
  that	
  Terra/Tear	
  should	
  be	
  silent;	
  being	
  a	
  memory	
  and	
  having	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
   be	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  both	
  worlds	
  I	
  thought	
  that	
  her	
  language	
  had	
  evolved	
  beyond	
  speech	
  into	
   	
    10	
    	
   movement,	
  meaning	
  that	
  her	
  body	
  and	
  movement	
  would	
  tell	
  her	
  story	
  and	
  connect	
  the	
   two	
  worlds.	
  	
  But	
  the	
  Director	
  thought	
  that	
  the	
  audience	
  couldn’t	
  understand	
  these	
   concepts	
  and	
  at	
  the	
  time	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  figure	
  out	
  how	
  to	
  make	
  them	
  clear.	
  	
  So	
  I	
  gave	
  her	
   some	
  lines	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  audience	
  would	
  not	
  think	
  she	
  was	
  just	
  mute.	
  	
  	
    	
    11	
    	
   Chapter	
  2	
   	
   	
   Artistic	
  Collaboration	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
    	
   “Through	
  sacred	
  forces	
  barely	
  understood,	
  we	
  collectively	
  create”	
  	
   ~Lewis	
  Mehl-­‐Madrona	
  	
    	
   I	
  originally	
  approached	
  Ron	
  Fedoruk	
  in	
  my	
  first	
  year	
  with	
  a	
  proposal	
  to	
  do	
  a	
  short	
   play,	
  with	
  small	
  puppets	
  in	
  a	
  small	
  venue	
  like	
  the	
  Dorothy	
  Somerset	
  Theatre	
  where	
  I	
   would	
  design	
  and	
  build	
  all	
  the	
  elements	
  -­‐	
  costume,	
  sound,	
  set,	
  lights,	
  puppets,	
   everything.	
  	
  Ron	
  suggested	
  moving	
  the	
  project	
  to	
  the	
  main	
  stage	
  since	
  it	
  was	
  available	
   during	
  the	
  slot	
  I	
  was	
  to	
  run	
  my	
  production.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  rather	
  excited	
  at	
  first	
  and	
  then	
  the	
   reality	
  of	
  the	
  sheer	
  size	
  of	
  the	
  space	
  set	
  in.	
  	
  Everything	
  needed	
  to	
  grow	
  to	
  fit	
  it,	
  in	
  my	
   mind,	
  even	
  though	
  my	
  Advisor	
  Alison	
  Green	
  and	
  Ron	
  gave	
  suggestions	
  of	
  how	
  to	
  keep	
  it	
   contained,	
  creating	
  a	
  smaller	
  set	
  and	
  having	
  the	
  audience	
  on	
  stage,	
  going	
  back	
  to	
  my	
   original	
  plan	
  to	
  do	
  everything	
  with	
  puppets	
  and	
  keep	
  it	
  low	
  tech.	
  	
  I	
  failed	
  miserably.	
  	
  	
   The	
  puppets	
  became	
  four	
  feet	
  tall	
  on	
  average,	
  the	
  set	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  redesigned	
  because	
   my	
  original	
  design	
  of	
  a	
  large	
  paper	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  was	
  no	
  longer	
  feasible	
  financially	
  and	
   there	
  wasn’t	
  enough	
  shop	
  time	
  to	
  build	
  it	
  to	
  accommodate	
  the	
  size	
  of	
  the	
  puppets	
   anyway.	
  There	
  were	
  so	
  many	
  amazing	
  ideas	
  being	
  thrown	
  out	
  by	
  so	
  many	
  talented	
   people	
  I	
  just	
  wanted	
  to	
  use	
  them	
  all,	
  but	
  I	
  quickly	
  found	
  that	
  to	
  be	
  impossible	
  so	
  I	
  held	
   on	
  to	
  what	
  I	
  could	
  and	
  ran	
  with	
  it.	
    	
    12	
    	
   This	
  little	
  idea	
  had	
  blossomed	
  so	
  fast	
  and	
  with	
  the	
  space	
  came	
  certain	
   expectations.	
  	
  The	
  workshop	
  now	
  had	
  a	
  main	
  stage	
  presence	
  and	
  was	
  listed	
  in	
  the	
   Theatre	
  at	
  UBC	
  brochure	
  under	
  special	
  events.	
  	
  The	
  director	
  thought	
  we	
  might	
  as	
  well	
   get	
  it	
  as	
  close	
  to	
  a	
  product	
  as	
  possible	
  and	
  I	
  agreed	
  with	
  him	
  at	
  the	
  time.	
  	
  We	
  now	
  had	
  a	
   fixed	
  opening	
  date	
  for	
  a	
  somewhat	
  realized	
  production	
  of	
  an	
  evolving	
  script	
  that	
  now	
   had	
  to	
  quadruple	
  in	
  size	
  to	
  fill	
  the	
  Frederic	
  Wood	
  Theatre.	
  	
  A	
  possible	
  touring	
  	
   production	
  was	
  now	
  the	
  end	
  game	
  being	
  considered.	
  	
  My	
  experiment	
  had	
  morphed	
   from	
  me	
  trying	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  process	
  and	
  an	
  artistic	
  identity	
  to	
  facilitating	
  as	
  best	
  I	
  could	
   the	
  director’s	
  needs,	
  which	
  is	
  exactly	
  what	
  I	
  didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  do	
  and	
  what	
  I	
  started	
  this	
   project	
  to	
  get	
  away	
  from.	
  	
  But	
  projects	
  always	
  change	
  and	
  the	
  more	
  people	
  who	
   became	
  involved	
  the	
  more	
  changes	
  happed.	
   Patrick	
  lined	
  up	
  Matt	
  Reznek	
  to	
  do	
  our	
  poster	
  design	
  which	
  was	
  exactly	
  what	
  I	
   asked	
  for	
  and	
  some	
  of	
  my	
  concept	
  images	
  where	
  used	
  as	
  source	
  material	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  1).	
  	
  	
  I	
   sought	
  out	
  Brady	
  Viladsen	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  projection	
  design,	
  since	
  I	
  had	
  this	
  idea	
  for	
  a	
   sketchy	
  animation	
  of	
  the	
  tear	
  falling	
  to	
  earth.	
  	
  But	
  that	
  one	
  scene	
  got	
  away	
  from	
  me	
  and	
   Brady,	
  I	
  feel,	
  as	
  more	
  and	
  more	
  projections	
  were	
  being	
  added.	
  	
  The	
  Sun	
  and	
  Moon	
   puppets	
  were	
  abandoned	
  for	
  animated	
  versions	
  of	
  my	
  sketches	
  and	
  cheeky	
  intro	
   animations	
  where	
  created	
  for	
  the	
  entrances	
  of	
  the	
  large	
  Raven	
  and	
  Coyote	
  and	
  the	
   cataclysm	
  of	
  the	
  earth	
  being	
  created.	
  	
  The	
  animations	
  where	
  very	
  clever	
  and	
  Brady	
  did	
   exactly	
  what	
  I	
  wanted	
  using	
  a	
  vector	
  style	
  Jon	
  Tsang	
  had	
  showed	
  us.	
  	
  But	
  there	
  was	
  just	
   something	
  off.	
  	
  The	
  animations	
  seemed	
  to	
  steal	
  some	
  scenes	
  and	
  get	
  lost	
  altogether	
   during	
  others.	
  	
  They	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  working	
  against	
  the	
  puppets	
  rather	
  than	
  with	
  them	
    	
    13	
    	
   some	
  of	
  the	
  time.	
  	
  The	
  animations	
  will	
  never	
  have	
  a	
  life	
  outside	
  our	
  UBC	
  production	
  due	
   to	
  budget	
  and	
  facility	
  requirements,	
  so	
  the	
  experience	
  of	
  coordinating	
  with	
  an	
  animator	
   was	
  invaluable.	
  	
   I	
  was	
  assigned	
  lighting	
  designer	
  Emily	
  Hartig	
  and	
  sound	
  designer	
  Gua	
  Khee	
   Chong.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  anticipated	
  doing	
  these	
  elements	
  myself	
  and	
  with	
  new	
  collaborators	
  came	
   new	
  ideas.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  hard	
  time	
  relinquishing	
  control	
  of	
  these	
  elements	
  considering	
  I	
  had	
   made	
  extensive	
  and	
  specific	
  lighting	
  and	
  sound	
  cues	
  in	
  the	
  script.	
  	
  Emily’s	
  lighting,	
   supervised	
  by	
  Jon	
  Tsang,	
  came	
  into	
  realization	
  during	
  tech.	
  	
  Of	
  course	
  the	
  ideas	
  she	
   talked	
  about	
  in	
  production	
  meetings	
  were	
  hard	
  to	
  visualize	
  until	
  all	
  the	
  pieces	
  began	
  to	
   be	
  put	
  into	
  place.	
  	
  The	
  overall	
  lighting	
  was	
  a	
  bit	
  dark	
  for	
  my	
  taste	
  but	
  I	
  felt	
  it	
  delineated	
   the	
  worlds	
  nicely	
  and	
  brought	
  the	
  separated	
  spaces	
  into	
  focus	
  as	
  a	
  whole.	
  	
   With	
  my	
  undertaking	
  escalated	
  by	
  the	
  size	
  of	
  the	
  space	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  able	
  to	
  be	
  as	
   hands	
  on	
  and	
  meticulous	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  elements	
  as	
  I	
  had	
  planned,	
  so	
  my	
  workload	
   consisted	
  of	
  the	
  design	
  of	
  the	
  costumes	
  and	
  set	
  and	
  the	
  design	
  and	
  construction	
  of	
  the	
   puppets.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  not	
  enough	
  money	
  in	
  the	
  budget	
  for	
  a	
  scenic	
  painter,	
  but	
  thankfully	
   I	
  had	
  a	
  very	
  talented	
  ASM,	
  Carolyn	
  Rapanos	
  who	
  took	
  on	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  head	
  painter,	
  with	
   me	
  as	
  her	
  assistant.	
  	
  She	
  also	
  designed	
  the	
  set’s	
  graffiti	
  panel	
  based	
  on	
  my	
  artwork	
  and	
   local	
  Vancouver	
  graffiti	
  artists’	
  styles	
  that	
  I	
  photographed	
  and	
  sent	
  to	
  her	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  2	
   and	
  3).	
  	
  Her	
  integration	
  of	
  this	
  stylized	
  pseudo	
  indigenous	
  landscape	
  (Haida	
  inspired	
   images	
  of	
  trees,	
  clouds)	
  added	
  to	
  that	
  multimodal	
  aesthetic	
  I	
  was	
  trying	
  for.	
  	
  I	
  wanted	
   the	
  set	
  to	
  look	
  as	
  if	
  Coyote	
  had	
  created	
  it,	
  much	
  like	
  creating	
  the	
  world,	
  but	
  in	
  an	
  urban	
   context.	
  So	
  I	
  had	
  Carolyn	
  tag	
  the	
  set	
  as	
  Coyote,	
  his	
  name	
  sprawled	
  over	
  the	
  lower	
   	
    14	
    	
   corner,	
  with	
  his	
  grinning	
  smile	
  and	
  a	
  cartoon	
  dead	
  Raven	
  with	
  X’s	
  over	
  the	
  eyes.	
  	
   Collaborating	
  with	
  Carolyn	
  was	
  the	
  best	
  experience	
  I	
  had	
  on	
  this	
  show	
  working	
  so	
   closely	
  with	
  another	
  artist.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  so	
  vibrant	
  and	
  full	
  of	
  ideas	
  and	
  understood	
  the	
   script	
  and	
  what	
  I	
  was	
  trying	
  to	
  say.	
   	
   	
   2.1	
  Workshop	
  Process	
   	
   	
   “You	
  are	
  the	
  gadget.	
  You	
  are	
  the	
  one	
  who’s	
  going	
  to	
  pick	
  up	
  all	
  these	
  colours	
  and	
  explain	
  how	
  this	
  works”	
  	
   ~Ojibwa	
  Shaman	
  and	
  Artist	
  Norval	
  Morrisseau	
   	
    	
    The	
  workshop	
  of	
  my	
  script	
  consisted	
  of	
  two	
  major	
  sections:	
  the	
  puppet	
    construction,	
  which	
  I	
  started	
  in	
  August	
  2011,	
  and	
  the	
  performance	
  portion	
  that	
  began	
   with	
  casting	
  in	
  October	
  and	
  rehearsal	
  beginning	
  November	
  2nd.	
  	
  The	
  puppet	
   construction	
  workshops,	
  headed	
  by	
  my	
  partner	
  Matt	
  Marentette	
  and	
  myself,	
  took	
  place	
   in	
  the	
  trap	
  room	
  of	
  the	
  Fredric	
  Wood	
  theatre,	
  and	
  focused	
  on	
  the	
  production	
  of	
  the	
   larger	
  animal	
  characters	
  of	
  Raven,	
  Coyote,	
  Otter	
  and	
  Turtle	
  and	
  of	
  the	
  Sun	
  and	
  Moon	
  all	
   approximately	
  three	
  to	
  five	
  feet	
  in	
  length	
  and/or	
  diameter.	
  	
  The	
  puppets	
  were	
  skeletal	
   constructions	
  of	
  papier-­‐mâché	
  over	
  a	
  tinfoil	
  base,	
  a	
  technique	
  introduced	
  to	
  me	
  by	
   mask-­‐maker	
  Melody	
  Anderson.	
  	
  This	
  process	
  consisted	
  of	
  four	
  days	
  of	
  piece	
  building,	
   where	
  groups	
  varying	
  from	
  six	
  to	
  fourteen	
  volunteers	
  on	
  various	
  days	
  set	
  about	
  the	
   daunting	
  task	
  of	
  building	
  scaled-­‐up	
  deconstructed	
  armatures	
  based	
  on	
  my	
  rough	
   sketches	
  and	
  maquettes	
  that	
  were	
  to	
  be	
  assembled	
  at	
  a	
  later	
  date	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  4,	
  5	
  and	
  6).	
  	
   The	
  fragments	
  were	
  then	
  papier-­‐mâchéd	
  separately	
  over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  a	
  few	
  weeks	
  to	
   	
    15	
    	
   build	
  up	
  enough	
  layers	
  for	
  the	
  needed	
  durability.	
  	
  These	
  smaller	
  workshops	
  consisted	
   most	
  regularly	
  of	
  Steffi	
  Lai,	
  Meghan	
  Kennedy	
  and	
  myself	
  with	
  occasional	
  extra	
  hands	
   when	
  we	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  recruit	
  people	
  as	
  they	
  walked	
  by.	
  	
  It	
  took	
  an	
  average	
  of	
  nine	
   hours	
  for	
  the	
  three	
  of	
  us	
  cover	
  all	
  the	
  pieces	
  in	
  one	
  layer,	
  with	
  a	
  minimum	
  of	
  six	
  layers	
   required	
  to	
  stabilized	
  the	
  skeletal	
  structures.	
  	
  Aside	
  from	
  the	
  main	
  workshop	
  I	
  built	
   Gran-­‐gran	
  and	
  Tear	
  along	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  hand	
  puppets	
  at	
  home	
  after	
  hours.	
  	
  	
   The	
  final	
  assembly	
  of	
  the	
  individual	
  pieces	
  overlapped	
  with	
  the	
  next	
  phase	
  in	
  the	
   workshop.	
  	
  	
  At	
  this	
  point	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  shift	
  my	
  attention	
  to	
  casting,	
  finding	
  a	
  choreographer	
   and	
  acquiring	
  permission	
  from	
  the	
  DJ	
  group	
  A	
  Tribe	
  Called	
  Red	
  to	
  use	
  their	
  tracks	
  in	
  the	
   show.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  choreography	
  I	
  contacted	
  a	
  local	
  Vancouver	
  company	
  Raven	
  Sprit	
  Dance	
   Society.	
  	
  Nyla	
  Carpentier,	
  cast	
  as	
  my	
  Raven	
  stepped	
  up	
  to	
  do	
  the	
  dance	
  sequence	
  and	
   with	
  twenty-­‐five	
  years	
  of	
  pow	
  wow	
  training	
  we	
  were	
  so	
  glad	
  to	
  have	
  her.	
   The	
  production	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  urban	
  and	
  fresh	
  and	
  I	
  wanted	
  the	
  actors	
  to	
  be	
  able	
   to	
  move,	
  since	
  I	
  envisioned	
  the	
  cataclysm	
  of	
  the	
  earth	
  being	
  created	
  by	
  dance.	
  	
  The	
   music	
  for	
  this	
  sequence	
  was	
  A	
  Tribe	
  Called	
  Red’s	
  “Electric	
  Pow	
  wow”	
  which	
  infuses	
  dub	
   step	
  with	
  traditional	
  pow	
  wow	
  drums	
  and	
  singing.	
  	
  I	
  reached	
  out	
  to	
  all	
  my	
  Aboriginal	
   contacts	
  to	
  put	
  out	
  the	
  casting	
  call:	
  Margo	
  Kane	
  at	
  Full	
  circle,	
  a	
  notice	
  in	
  the	
  UBC	
  First	
   Nation’s	
  House	
  of	
  Learning	
  Talking	
  Stick	
  newsletter,	
  an	
  ad	
  in	
  Red	
  Wire	
  magazine,	
  and	
   my	
  advisor	
  Dory	
  Nason	
  distributed	
  a	
  notice	
  by	
  email	
  through	
  the	
  First	
  Nation’s	
  Studies	
   department.	
  	
  However	
  on	
  the	
  day	
  of	
  the	
  audition	
  we	
  only	
  had	
  four	
  first	
  nations	
  actors	
   answer	
  the	
  call.	
  	
  Out	
  of	
  the	
  four	
  we	
  cast	
  three	
  Nyla	
  Carpentier	
  as	
  Raven,	
  Lisa	
  Smith	
  as	
   Gran-­‐gran	
  and	
  Denalene	
  Manitoye	
  as	
  Tear	
  who	
  was	
  later	
  replaced	
  by	
  Ashley	
  McAllister.	
  	
   	
    16	
    	
   After	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  casting	
  we	
  proceed	
  to	
  general	
  auditions,	
  casting	
  two	
  recent	
  UBC	
   BFA	
  graduates	
  Meaghan	
  Chenosky	
  as	
  the	
  Narrator,	
  and	
  David	
  Kaye	
  as	
  Coyote,	
  and	
  BFA	
   Theatre	
  Production	
  student	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto	
  was	
  cast	
  as	
  Otter	
  and	
  hand	
  puppeteer	
  and	
   finally	
  my	
  fellow	
  MFA	
  in	
  Theatre	
  Design	
  candidate	
  Alex	
  Carr	
  who	
  took	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  Turtle	
   and	
  hand	
  puppeteer.	
  	
   The	
  casting	
  process	
  was	
  very	
  interesting	
  considering	
  as	
  a	
  designer	
  I	
  do	
  not	
   normally	
  have	
  a	
  say	
  in	
  who	
  is	
  cast,	
  but	
  since	
  it	
  was	
  my	
  project	
  Patrick	
  was	
  very	
  keen	
  to	
   allow	
  me	
  to	
  help	
  him	
  make	
  the	
  decisions.	
  	
  It	
  came	
  down	
  to	
  a	
  sort	
  of	
  bartering	
  of	
  one	
   actor	
  for	
  others	
  so	
  that	
  I	
  received	
  the	
  aboriginal	
  representation	
  I	
  required,	
  while	
  Patrick	
   was	
  more	
  concerned	
  with	
  the	
  level	
  of	
  talent.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  very	
  tricky	
  negotiating	
  what	
  was	
   best	
  for	
  the	
  play	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  variety	
  of	
  factors.	
  	
  One	
  of	
  my	
  main	
  concerns	
  was	
  that	
  I	
   didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  misrepresent	
  anyone	
  so	
  the	
  larger	
  variety	
  of	
  races	
  involved	
  gave	
  the	
  cast	
   a	
  diversity	
  that	
  is	
  present	
  in	
  the	
  script	
  but	
  which	
  also	
  meant	
  we	
  were	
  working	
  with	
   mostly	
  untrained	
  actors.	
  	
  But	
  I	
  think	
  that	
  rawness	
  gave	
  the	
  show	
  something	
  visceral.	
  	
   What	
  the	
  show	
  needed	
  was	
  puppeteers	
  but	
  no	
  one	
  in	
  the	
  cast	
  had	
  any	
  experience	
  with	
   puppets	
  so	
  the	
  whole	
  experience	
  would	
  be	
  new	
  and	
  educational.	
  	
  	
   The	
  actors	
  were	
  cast	
  based	
  on	
  their	
  training	
  level	
  and	
  physical	
  abilities.	
  	
  I	
  was	
   looking	
  for	
  a	
  bit	
  of	
  the	
  character	
  in	
  the	
  actor	
  -­‐	
  Otter’s	
  shyness,	
  Coyotes	
  confidence,	
  the	
   Narrator’s	
  awkwardness	
  -­‐	
  and	
  I	
  think	
  all	
  the	
  actors	
  really	
  came	
  to	
  embody	
  their	
   character	
  in	
  a	
  physical	
  manner	
  which	
  is	
  integral	
  for	
  children’s	
  theatre.	
  	
  The	
  audience	
   needed	
  to	
  know	
  they	
  were	
  looking	
  at	
  Coyote	
  even	
  when	
  David	
  didn’t	
  have	
  the	
  puppet.	
  	
   After	
  the	
  first	
  week	
  and	
  a	
  half	
  of	
  table	
  work	
  in	
  the	
  rehearsal	
  hall	
  we	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  move	
   	
    17	
    	
   onto	
  the	
  stage.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  lucky	
  to	
  have	
  puppeteer	
  Brenden	
  Boyd	
  be	
  there	
  for	
  the	
  first	
   time	
  the	
  actors	
  interacted	
  with	
  the	
  puppets.	
  	
  He	
  went	
  over	
  the	
  basic	
  maneuvers	
  for	
  the	
   variety	
  of	
  puppets	
  giving	
  tips	
  on	
  the	
  ways	
  to	
  convey	
  emotion	
  and	
  have	
  the	
  puppet	
  look	
   as	
  though	
  it	
  is	
  speaking	
  without	
  having	
  a	
  moving	
  mouthpiece.	
  	
  The	
  main	
  rule	
  was	
  to	
   establish	
  breath	
  and	
  how,	
  even	
  if	
  it	
  is	
  unnatural,	
  the	
  semblance	
  of	
  breath	
  equals	
  life.	
  	
   This	
  idea	
  of	
  breath	
  links	
  back	
  to	
  that	
  idea	
  of	
  multimodal	
  performance	
  I	
  was	
  discussing	
   earlier.	
  	
  Tina	
  Bicat	
  describes	
  this	
  as	
  “the	
  energy	
  that	
  travels	
  from	
  the	
  animator	
  to	
  object	
   [investing]	
  the	
  puppet	
  with	
  the	
  combined	
  power	
  of	
  these	
  two,	
  plus	
  that	
  of	
  the	
   audience’s	
  imagination”	
  (Bicat	
  15).	
  	
  	
   The	
  actors	
  were	
  freshly	
  discovering	
  the	
  limits	
  and	
  abilities	
  of	
  the	
  puppet	
  and	
   themselves	
  as	
  an	
  animator.	
  	
  Since	
  they	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  a	
  hand	
  in	
  building	
  the	
  puppets	
  they	
   had	
  no	
  idea	
  how	
  I	
  intended	
  them	
  to	
  move.	
  	
  So	
  this	
  initial	
  workshop	
  seemed	
  the	
  most	
   vital	
  because	
  this	
  was	
  where	
  we	
  were	
  going	
  to	
  discover	
  the	
  articulation	
  that	
  would	
  be	
   used	
  and	
  expanded	
  upon	
  throughout	
  the	
  show.	
  	
  I	
  worked	
  with	
  Brenden	
  during	
  the	
   workshop	
  showing	
  the	
  cast	
  what	
  I	
  felt	
  the	
  main	
  points	
  of	
  articulation	
  were	
  and	
  then	
   Brenden	
  would	
  develop	
  these	
  simple	
  mechanics	
  into	
  lively	
  movements.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  very	
   lucky	
  to	
  have	
  the	
  main	
  platform	
  and	
  bench	
  set	
  up	
  for	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  the	
  rehearsals	
  in	
   the	
  space.	
  	
  This	
  basically	
  got	
  rid	
  of	
  that	
  awkward	
  time	
  between	
  blocking	
  on	
  a	
  flat	
  space	
   and	
  seeing	
  if	
  it	
  would	
  work	
  with	
  the	
  set.	
  The	
  space	
  began	
  to	
  inform	
  the	
  action	
  triggering	
   funny	
  sight	
  gags	
  like	
  Coyote	
  urinating	
  his	
  name	
  on	
  the	
  wall	
  and	
  Otter	
  swimming	
  in	
  front	
   of	
  the	
  cutout	
  waves	
  to	
  distract	
  from	
  them	
  being	
  reversed	
  when	
  the	
  water	
  turns	
  to	
  land.	
  	
   All	
  the	
  discoveries	
  occurred	
  with	
  the	
  set,	
  puppet	
  and	
  animator	
  in	
  their	
  environment,	
  so	
    	
    18	
    	
   the	
  choices	
  became	
  clearer	
  and	
  experiments	
  with	
  movement	
  and	
  negotiating	
  the	
  levels	
   were	
  quick	
  and	
  painless.	
  	
  	
  	
   Because	
  of	
  the	
  short	
  rehearsal	
  period	
  the	
  actors	
  unfortunately	
  had	
  very	
  little	
   time	
  to	
  become	
  really	
  comfortable	
  with	
  their	
  puppet.	
  	
  The	
  compacted	
  schedule,	
  I	
  feel,	
   affected	
  everything	
  and	
  tech	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  catch-­‐all	
  for	
  all	
  the	
  neglected	
  elements.	
  	
   It	
  seemed	
  that	
  the	
  puppeteering	
  style	
  was	
  more	
  presentational	
  then	
  engaging,	
  with	
  the	
   exception	
  of	
  David	
  Kaye	
  who	
  took	
  very	
  well	
  to	
  transferring	
  focus	
  to	
  the	
  object	
  and	
   manipulating	
  it	
  with	
  feeling	
  and	
  humor.	
  	
  	
  	
   This	
  schedule	
  was	
  very	
  different	
  from	
  the	
  one	
  Ron	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  discussed	
  earlier	
  on	
   in	
  the	
  year.	
  	
  We	
  initially	
  intended	
  to	
  have	
  the	
  puppets	
  constructed	
  to	
  a	
  functional	
  state	
   where	
  we	
  could	
  bring	
  in	
  the	
  actors	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  weeks	
  to	
  work	
  the	
  bugs	
  out,	
  after	
  which	
  I	
   would	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  go	
  back,	
  reassess	
  and	
  rebuild	
  as	
  needed,	
  and	
  then	
  we	
  could	
  start	
  the	
   main	
  rehearsals	
  with	
  finished	
  fully	
  functional	
  puppets.	
  	
  This	
  layout	
  was	
  designed	
  so	
  that	
   the	
  actors	
  and	
  myself	
  could	
  explore	
  and	
  develop	
  the	
  story	
  out	
  of	
  what	
  we	
  discovered	
  in	
   rehearsal,	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  process	
  would	
  be	
  more	
  organic,	
  more	
  collectively	
  created,	
  rather	
   than	
  the	
  normal	
  format	
  of	
  rehearsing	
  a	
  finished	
  script	
  with	
  a	
  particular	
  goal	
  in	
  mind.	
  	
  	
   Patrick’s	
  schedule,	
  however,	
  would	
  not	
  allow	
  for	
  this	
  type	
  of	
  process	
  to	
  unfold.	
  	
  Our	
   development	
  time	
  was	
  compressed	
  and	
  the	
  rushed	
  timeline	
  was	
  stressful.	
  	
  Schedules	
   were	
  being	
  prepared	
  the	
  night	
  before	
  for	
  next	
  day’s	
  call	
  and	
  since	
  I	
  was	
  still	
  building	
  and	
   painting	
  and	
  attending	
  classes	
  there	
  was	
  not	
  time	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  integrate	
  into	
  the	
  rehearsals	
   because	
  I	
  only	
  became	
  aware	
  of	
  them	
  very	
  late	
  the	
  night	
  before.	
  	
  I	
  thought	
  I	
  was	
  going	
   to	
  have	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  work	
  with	
  the	
  actors	
  and	
  the	
  puppets	
  throughout	
  the	
   	
    19	
    	
   workshop	
  and	
  adjust	
  the	
  play	
  to	
  what	
  was	
  being	
  discovered.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  very	
  much	
  cut	
  off	
   from	
  this	
  process	
  as	
  Patrick	
  worked	
  individually	
  with	
  the	
  actors	
  in	
  the	
  beginning,	
   focusing	
  on	
  delivery	
  and	
  acting	
  technique,	
  which	
  was	
  important	
  since	
  the	
  cast	
  consisted	
   of	
  mostly	
  amateur	
  actors,	
  but	
  it	
  felt	
  like	
  the	
  movement	
  and	
  the	
  actual	
  integrating	
  of	
  the	
   puppets	
  was	
  an	
  afterthought.	
  	
   But	
  maybe	
  that’s	
  what	
  a	
  workshop	
  is	
  like.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  my	
  first	
  production	
  on	
  which	
   I	
  have	
  participated	
  in	
  so	
  many	
  aspects.	
  	
  And	
  every	
  show	
  has	
  its	
  kinks.	
  	
  But	
  I	
  think	
  the	
   workshop	
  was	
  beneficial	
  in	
  the	
  sense	
  that	
  I	
  now	
  know	
  what	
  to	
  expect.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  did	
  what	
  I	
   could	
  in	
  the	
  time	
  frame	
  that	
  was	
  available	
  and	
  despite	
  all	
  the	
  flaws	
  I	
  saw	
  the	
  audience	
   really	
  enjoyed	
  it.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    20	
    	
   Chapter	
  3	
   	
   	
   Development	
  	
   	
   	
   “We	
  begin	
  with	
  the	
  idea	
  that	
  everyone	
  needs	
  a	
  creations	
  story,	
  just	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  cultures	
  need	
  stories	
  about	
   their	
  origins.”	
  	
   ~Lewis	
  Mehl-­‐Madrona	
  	
    	
   The	
  story	
  itself	
  really	
  influenced	
  my	
  designs.	
  	
  The	
  idea	
  of	
  a	
  bricolaged	
  world,	
   where	
  characters,	
  timelines,	
  and	
  traditions	
  are	
  all	
  mashed	
  up	
  and	
  confused,	
  seemed	
  to	
   be	
  my	
  central	
  focus.	
  	
  Within	
  theater	
  for	
  young	
  audiences,	
  design	
  functions	
  both	
   narratively	
  and	
  graphically.	
  	
  When	
  breaking	
  design	
  down	
  in	
  this	
  fashion	
  it	
  is	
  easy	
  to	
  see	
   the	
  multimodal	
  effects	
  each	
  element	
  can	
  have,	
  how	
  each	
  piece	
  is	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  puzzle.	
  	
   I	
  initially	
  began	
  the	
  design	
  process	
  in	
  April	
  of	
  2011,	
  sketching	
  out	
  some	
  rough	
   ideas	
  of	
  what	
  type	
  of	
  puppet	
  each	
  character	
  needed	
  to	
  be,	
  how	
  their	
  corresponding	
   human	
  animator	
  should	
  look	
  and	
  what	
  the	
  world	
  these	
  creatures	
  inhabited	
  needed	
  to	
   look	
  like.	
  	
  I	
  tossed	
  around	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  ideas,	
  toying	
  with	
  models	
  of	
  paper	
  puppet	
  theatres,	
   trying	
  to	
  envision	
  Muppet-­‐like	
  Tricksters,	
  but	
  unsure	
  how	
  to	
  build	
  foam	
  creatures	
  within	
   my	
  budget.	
  	
  So	
  I	
  started	
  with	
  the	
  basics:	
  the	
  costumes	
  needed	
  to	
  reflect	
  urban	
   indigenous	
  peoples,	
  the	
  set	
  needed	
  levels	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  creatures	
  could	
  traverse	
  the	
   iceberg	
  and	
  the	
  puppets	
  needed	
  to	
  articulate	
  a	
  certain	
  motion.	
  	
  Raven	
  needed	
  to	
  fly,	
   Otter	
  needed	
  to	
  swim,	
  Coyote	
  to	
  run	
  and	
  so	
  forth.	
  	
  	
    	
    21	
    	
   To	
  help	
  me	
  figure	
  out	
  the	
  mechanics	
  of	
  the	
  puppets	
  Ron	
  put	
  me	
  in	
  touch	
  with	
   acclaimed	
  mask	
  maker	
  and	
  puppet	
  builder	
  Melody	
  Anderson,	
  who	
  gave	
  me	
  a	
  tutorial	
  in	
   basic	
  papier-­‐mâché	
  techniques.	
  	
  Melody	
  explain	
  to	
  me	
  how	
  she	
  solved	
  articulation	
   challenges	
  with	
  flapping	
  birds	
  wings	
  and	
  moving	
  eyes	
  for	
  some	
  of	
  her	
  productions	
  but	
   unfortunately	
  those	
  techniques	
  wouldn’t	
  work	
  with	
  the	
  scale	
  and	
  materials	
  I	
  would	
  later	
   use.	
  	
  The	
  most	
  valuable	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  time	
  with	
  Melody	
  was	
  when	
  she	
  showed	
  me	
  some	
  of	
   her	
  trade	
  secrets	
  including	
  a	
  technique	
  for	
  creating	
  horns	
  and	
  appendages	
  with	
  tinfoil.	
  	
   This	
  small	
  trick	
  sparked	
  something	
  in	
  my	
  brain	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  determined	
  to	
  build	
  all	
  the	
   puppets	
  completely	
  out	
  of	
  papier-­‐mâché	
  and	
  tinfoil.	
  	
  This	
  combination	
  provided	
   durability	
  and	
  flexibility	
  when	
  building,	
  because	
  pieces	
  could	
  be	
  reshaped	
  and	
  patched	
   up	
  without	
  visible	
  scaring,	
  and	
  the	
  light	
  weight	
  was	
  necessary	
  for	
  such	
  large	
  scale	
   puppets	
  that	
  were	
  to	
  be	
  manipulated	
  by	
  only	
  one	
  person.	
   After	
  my	
  workshop	
  with	
  Melody	
  attended	
  the	
  Prague	
  Quadrennial,	
  a	
  two-­‐week	
   Scenography	
  conference	
  in	
  the	
  Czech	
  Republic,	
  where	
  I	
  witnessed	
  some	
  amazing	
  puppet	
   productions	
  and	
  participated	
  in	
  puppet	
  workshops	
  focusing	
  on	
  animation	
  and	
   synchronized	
  movement.	
  	
  I	
  also	
  became	
  interested	
  in	
  the	
  topic	
  of	
  sustainability	
  in	
   costumes,	
  reusing	
  and	
  repurposing.	
  	
  With	
  all	
  these	
  new	
  ideas	
  and	
  methods	
  bouncing	
   around	
  in	
  my	
  head	
  I	
  returned	
  to	
  Vancouver	
  and	
  started	
  my	
  research	
  on	
  the	
  stylization	
  of	
   the	
  Trickster	
  and	
  his/her	
  world	
  and	
  just	
  how	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  present	
  it.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    22	
    	
   3.1	
  Puppet	
  Conception	
  and	
  Creation	
   	
   	
   “We	
  have	
  that	
  decision	
  to	
  make,	
  to	
  create	
  something.	
  It	
  could	
  be	
  grotesque	
  and	
  ugly,	
  but	
  it	
  is	
  monstrously	
   beautiful,	
  so	
  it	
  inspires	
  people.”	
   	
  ~Julie	
  Taymor	
    	
   	
    I	
  began	
  researching	
  Indigenous	
  artists	
  across	
  Canada	
  and	
  my	
  biggest	
  influences	
    came	
  from	
  Haida	
  carver	
  Bill	
  Reid	
  and	
  Ojibwa	
  shaman	
  and	
  painter	
  Norval	
  Morrisseau.	
  	
   Their	
  work	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  the	
  root	
  of	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  aboriginal	
  artistic	
  movements	
  with	
  many	
   other	
  artists	
  mimicking	
  their	
  style	
  to	
  articulate	
  their	
  own	
  artistic	
  expression.	
  	
  I	
  scanned	
   books,	
  Google,	
  examined	
  the	
  resources	
  at	
  the	
  Museum	
  of	
  Anthropology,	
  the	
  Stanly	
  Park	
   Totem	
  poles,	
  walked	
  about	
  town	
  taking	
  note	
  of	
  the	
  local	
  graffiti	
  and	
  even	
  sorted	
   through	
  jewelry,	
  souvenirs	
  and	
  greeting	
  cards	
  by	
  local	
  artists	
  on	
  Granville	
  island	
  and	
   around	
  Vancouver.	
  	
  	
  The	
  one	
  thing	
  that	
  seemed	
  to	
  stand	
  out	
  the	
  most	
  to	
  me	
  was	
  this	
   idea	
  of	
  compartmentalization	
  within	
  a	
  figure.	
  	
  The	
  subject	
  always	
  seems	
  to	
  be	
  sectioned	
   off	
  and	
  divided.	
  	
  	
  And	
  this	
  isn’t	
  just	
  the	
  case	
  in	
  Canadian	
  Indigenous	
  artwork.	
  	
  This	
  sort	
  of	
   linear	
  compartmental	
  style	
  can	
  be	
  seen	
  in	
  Indigenous	
  art	
  around	
  the	
  world	
  from	
  Inca	
   stone	
  work	
  in	
  Mexico,	
  Kalahari	
  bushmen	
  linocuts	
  in	
  Africa,	
  Maori	
  bone	
  carving	
  in	
  New	
   Zealand	
  and	
  tiki	
  carvings	
  in	
  Hawaii.	
  	
   Doris	
  Shadbolt	
  describes	
  Bill	
  Reid’s	
  work	
  as	
  having	
  these	
  “qualities	
  of	
   containment,	
  confinement,	
  enclosure,	
  stability,	
  which	
  in	
  turn	
  embrace	
  particular	
   characteristics	
  such	
  as	
  symmetry,	
  frontality,	
  a	
  preoccupation	
  with	
  surface	
  rather	
  than	
   depth”	
  (Shadbolt	
  76).	
  	
  She	
  adds:	
    	
    23	
    	
   “We	
  find	
  little	
  watchful	
  humanoid	
  faces	
  inserted	
  in	
  animal	
  ears	
  or	
  eyes,	
  or	
  in	
  joints,	
   perhaps	
  with	
  hands	
  pushing	
  through	
  as	
  a	
  creature	
  is	
  about	
  to	
  climb	
  out	
  -­‐	
  and	
  sometimes	
   they	
  have	
  climbed	
  out.	
  In	
  their	
  way	
  they	
  speak	
  to	
  us	
  of	
  a	
  man-­‐animal	
  relationship	
  that	
  today	
   could	
  only	
  exist	
  in	
  our	
  dreams	
  or	
  in	
  a	
  lingering	
  primordial	
  memory”	
  (Shadbolt	
  80).	
  	
  	
    These	
  ideas	
  of	
  frontality,	
  symmetry	
  and	
  containment	
  started	
  to	
  inform	
  some	
  of	
   my	
  sketches	
  and	
  then	
  simplicity	
  came	
  back	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  How	
  was	
  I	
  going	
  to	
  create	
  these	
   complex	
  line	
  drawings	
  into	
  three-­‐dimensional	
  figures?	
  	
  Then	
  it	
  occurred	
  to	
  me	
  to	
  take	
   the	
  flat,	
  two	
  dimensional	
  sketch,	
  mirror	
  it,	
  and	
  connect	
  it	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  to	
  create	
  a	
   skeletal	
  creature	
  that	
  maintained	
  the	
  essence	
  of	
  the	
  cultures	
  it	
  came	
  from	
  while	
   maintaining	
  a	
  solid	
  design	
  concept.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  like	
  things	
  to	
  be	
  pretty,	
  I’d	
  rather	
  they	
  be	
   interesting.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  like	
  designs	
  should	
  encompass	
  fear	
  and	
  curiosity;	
  that	
  way	
  we	
  are	
   never	
  bored.	
   With	
  this	
  basic	
  idea	
  I	
  set	
  about	
  designing	
  each	
  character	
  individually	
  while	
  trying	
   to	
  maintain	
  a	
  set	
  of	
  rules:	
  unique	
  articulation,	
  a	
  compartmentalized	
  design	
  aesthetic,	
   and	
  a	
  sort	
  of	
  grotesque	
  quality.	
  	
  The	
  month	
  before	
  the	
  puppet	
  construction	
  workshop	
   began	
  Matt	
  and	
  I	
  set	
  about	
  trying	
  to	
  translate	
  these	
  pencil	
  sketches	
  into	
  three-­‐ dimensional	
  moveable	
  objects.	
  	
  While	
  I	
  tinkered	
  around	
  with	
  a	
  miniature	
  Gran-­‐gran	
   Matt	
  rationalized	
  Coyote’s	
  articulation	
  from	
  the	
  actions	
  I	
  described,	
  and	
  we	
  then	
   proceeded	
  to	
  replicate	
  this	
  process	
  of	
  building	
  the	
  maquettes	
  together	
  while	
  then	
  trying	
   to	
  figure	
  out	
  the	
  ways	
  in	
  which	
  they	
  could	
  be	
  easily	
  manipulated	
  for	
  each	
  distinct	
  action.	
  	
   All	
  the	
  larger	
  scale	
  puppets	
  were	
  developed	
  from	
  tape	
  and	
  tinfoil	
  maquettes	
  and	
  were	
   constructed	
  of	
  tinfoil,	
  wood	
  dowels,	
  tape,	
  wire	
  and	
  papier-­‐mâché	
  and	
  assembled	
  with	
   leather	
  joints,	
  hot	
  glue,	
  wood	
  screws,	
  springs	
  and	
  bolts.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  originally	
  intended	
  to	
    	
    24	
    	
   paint	
  the	
  larger	
  animal	
  puppets	
  but	
  after	
  they	
  were	
  constructed	
  Alison	
  pointed	
  out	
  the	
   unity	
  that	
  was	
  created	
  with	
  the	
  raw	
  brown	
  paper	
  finish	
  so	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  leave	
  them.	
  	
  I’m	
   glad	
  I	
  did	
  because	
  they	
  gave	
  the	
  illusion	
  of	
  being	
  carved	
  of	
  wood	
  and	
  surprised	
  the	
   audience	
  when	
  they	
  found	
  out	
  they	
  were	
  only	
  paper.	
   	
   	
   Individual	
  Puppet	
  Development	
   	
    	
    	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran	
   	
    Originally	
  I	
  wanted	
  the	
  Narrator	
  to	
  voice	
  both	
  her	
  and	
  Gran-­‐gran’s	
    opinions	
  and	
  when	
  I	
  revisit	
  the	
  script	
  I	
  will	
  stick	
  with	
  that	
  decision.	
  	
  So	
  with	
  this	
  initial	
   blocking	
  it	
  made	
  sense	
  for	
  the	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  puppet	
  to	
  sit	
  on	
  the	
  Narrator’s	
  lap	
  with	
  the	
   Narrator	
  working	
  her	
  head	
  and	
  one	
  hand.	
  	
  The	
  design	
  was	
  quite	
  simple,	
  and	
  consisted	
  of	
   four	
  separate	
  pieces,	
  the	
  body	
  with	
  rigid	
  comically	
  short	
  legs,	
  two	
  hands	
  and	
  a	
  head	
  that	
   were	
  all	
  connected	
  with	
  leather	
  strips	
  by	
  hot	
  glue	
  and	
  screws.	
  	
  A	
  handle	
  was	
  inserted	
   into	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  her	
  head	
  and	
  the	
  loose	
  neck	
  allowed	
  for	
  extreme	
  mobility	
  and	
  a	
  rod	
   operated	
  the	
  left	
  hand	
  while	
  the	
  other	
  hand	
  was	
  pinned	
  to	
  her	
  clothing	
  so	
  that	
  it	
   appeared	
  to	
  be	
  resting	
  in	
  her	
  lap.	
  	
  I	
  made	
  the	
  body	
  by	
  bunching	
  up	
  large	
  sheets	
  of	
   newsprint	
  that	
  was	
  then	
  covered	
  and	
  shaped	
  by	
  tinfoil.	
  	
  At	
  the	
  end	
  the	
  body	
  resembled	
   a	
  large	
  turkey	
  wrapped	
  in	
  foil	
  and	
  was	
  quite	
  amusing.	
  	
  The	
  head	
  consisted	
  of	
  a	
  large	
   Styrofoam	
  ball	
  that	
  was	
  also	
  covered	
  in	
  tinfoil	
  to	
  shape.	
  	
  I	
  constructed	
  the	
  face	
  using	
  a	
   combination	
  of	
  molded	
  tinfoil	
  for	
  the	
  features	
  and	
  then	
  built	
  up	
  and	
  wrinkled	
  the	
    	
    25	
    	
   papier-­‐mâché	
  to	
  show	
  age	
  and	
  laugh	
  lines.	
  	
  The	
  face	
  was	
  a	
  completely	
  organic	
  process.	
  	
   I	
  thought	
  of	
  the	
  fright	
  factor	
  of	
  the	
  falseface	
  masks	
  and	
  human	
  face	
  masks	
  seen	
  in	
  Haida	
   and	
  Mohawk	
  ceremonies	
  and	
  how	
  they	
  were	
  often	
  carved	
  with	
  grotesque	
  features	
  to	
   honour	
  a	
  past	
  ancestor	
  and	
  ward	
  of	
  any	
  evil	
  spirits.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  experimented	
  with	
  her	
   features	
  and	
  used	
  some	
  research	
  of	
  the	
  anatomy	
  of	
  elderly	
  women’s	
  faces	
  to	
  guide	
  me.	
  	
   She	
  also	
  needed	
  an	
  expression	
  that	
  could	
  be	
  neutral	
  and	
  yet	
  display	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  feelings.	
  	
   I	
  tried	
  to	
  bring	
  my	
  own	
  Grandma’s	
  round	
  sweet	
  demeanor	
  into	
  the	
  puppet’s	
  physicality,	
   which	
  is	
  why	
  she	
  is	
  so	
  squat	
  and	
  loveable	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  7,	
  8	
  and	
  9).	
   	
   Tear	
   	
    The	
  Tear	
  puppet	
  may	
  have	
  needed	
  two	
  incarnations,	
  one	
  to	
  fall	
  from	
  the	
  sun	
  and	
    the	
  other	
  to	
  be	
  worn	
  by	
  the	
  actor.	
  	
  Since	
  we	
  animated	
  the	
  scene	
  where	
  the	
  tear	
  falls	
   from	
  the	
  sun	
  and	
  transforms	
  into	
  the	
  girl	
  I	
  just	
  had	
  to	
  build	
  the	
  body	
  puppet.	
  	
  My	
  idea	
   came	
  from	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  puppets	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  recently	
  seen	
  at	
  the	
  Prague	
  Quadrennial	
  that	
   were	
  strapped	
  to	
  the	
  waist	
  with	
  one	
  hand,	
  the	
  head	
  being	
  manipulated	
  by	
  the	
  artists.	
  	
   But	
  I	
  needed	
  Tear	
  to	
  dance	
  so	
  I	
  simply	
  expanded	
  on	
  that	
  idea	
  to	
  include	
  elastic	
   attachments	
  to	
  the	
  wrists	
  and	
  feet.	
  	
  The	
  puppet	
  was	
  made	
  with	
  legs	
  and	
  arms	
  to	
  the	
   scale	
  of	
  the	
  actor	
  but	
  with	
  a	
  smaller	
  body,	
  which	
  gave	
  it	
  an	
  awkward	
  gangly	
  look.	
  	
  The	
   limbs	
  were	
  tinfoil	
  and	
  papier-­‐mâché	
  held	
  together	
  with	
  hair	
  elastics	
  as	
  joints	
  threaded	
   through	
  a	
  leather	
  thong	
  that	
  was	
  hot	
  glued	
  and	
  screwed.	
  	
  This	
  allowed	
  the	
  limbs	
  to	
   bounce	
  and	
  stretch	
  with	
  the	
  dancer.	
  	
  The	
  body	
  and	
  head	
  were	
  tricky	
  because	
  I	
  still	
   wanted	
  the	
  artist	
  to	
  have	
  the	
  option	
  to	
  move	
  the	
  head	
  if	
  needed.	
  	
  I	
  used	
  an	
  orange	
  juice	
   	
    26	
    	
   container	
  with	
  a	
  slender	
  neck	
  for	
  the	
  body	
  and	
  then	
  put	
  the	
  head	
  on	
  a	
  cardboard	
  tube	
   with	
  a	
  weighted	
  Styrofoam	
  ball	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  and	
  put	
  that	
  into	
  the	
  juice	
  container.	
  	
  The	
   result	
  kind	
  of	
  resembled	
  a	
  ball	
  joint	
  but	
  the	
  length	
  of	
  the	
  tube	
  restricted	
  the	
  movement	
   to	
  bobbing	
  up	
  and	
  down	
  and	
  spinning	
  around.	
  	
  This	
  way	
  the	
  puppets	
  head	
  would	
  move	
   as	
  she	
  was	
  dancing	
  and	
  thus	
  give	
  her	
  a	
  spark	
  of	
  life	
  without	
  having	
  to	
  directly	
  animate	
   the	
  head.	
  	
  Her	
  hair	
  was	
  made	
  of	
  strands	
  of	
  wool	
  yarn	
  that	
  I	
  pulled	
  apart	
  to	
  give	
  it	
  a	
  more	
   realistic	
  look	
  and	
  her	
  costume	
  coordinated	
  with	
  the	
  actors	
  (See	
  Illus.	
  10	
  and	
  11)	
   	
   Coyote	
   	
    I	
  wanted	
  Coyote	
  to	
  have	
  flexibility.	
  	
  His	
  character	
  is	
  always	
  shape-­‐shifting	
  to	
    better	
  express	
  his	
  mischievousness	
  so	
  I	
  wanted	
  his	
  articulation	
  to	
  be	
  transformable	
  from	
   the	
  four-­‐legged	
  canine	
  maneuvers	
  to	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
  stand	
  and	
  walk	
  upright	
  as	
  a	
  man.	
  	
  So	
   his	
  structure	
  resembles	
  that	
  of	
  a	
  stringless	
  marionette.	
  	
  The	
  arms	
  and	
  legs	
  are	
  attached	
   to	
  the	
  body	
  by	
  a	
  post	
  with	
  a	
  stopper	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  limbs	
  can	
  freely	
  rotate.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
   joints	
  and	
  neck	
  are	
  attached	
  at	
  specific	
  angles	
  by	
  leather	
  strips,	
  hot	
  glue	
  and	
  screws,	
   which	
  lets	
  Coyote	
  land	
  on	
  his	
  paws	
  with	
  the	
  elbow	
  and	
  knee	
  rigged	
  to	
  face	
  the	
  right	
   direction.	
  	
  The	
  puppet	
  is	
  manipulated	
  by	
  handles	
  in	
  its	
  back	
  and	
  head	
  which	
  allows	
  the	
   artist	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  motions	
  with	
  simple	
  tilts	
  and	
  jiggles,	
  tilting	
  the	
  chest	
  to	
  suggest	
   breathing,	
  tilting	
  the	
  chest	
  down	
  and	
  hind	
  quarters	
  up	
  to	
  suggest	
  a	
  playful	
  stance	
  or	
   reverse	
  to	
  a	
  sitting	
  position	
  and	
  nods	
  of	
  the	
  head	
  to	
  suggest	
  panting.	
  	
  This	
  puppet	
   seemed	
  the	
  most	
  successful	
  with	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  movement	
  possibilities	
  that	
  were	
   enhanced	
  by	
  David	
  Kaye’s	
  fluid	
  agility.	
  	
  An	
  issue	
  that	
  we	
  encountered	
  was	
  that	
  David’s	
   	
    27	
    	
   hands	
  were	
  sweating	
  profusely	
  and	
  weakening	
  the	
  papier-­‐mâché	
  structure	
  so	
  I	
  had	
  to	
   go	
  back	
  and	
  reinforce	
  the	
  areas	
  and	
  cover	
  them	
  in	
  leather	
  to	
  contend	
  with	
  the	
  moisture.	
  	
   Matt	
  took	
  lead	
  build	
  on	
  Coyote,	
  developing	
  the	
  maquette	
  from	
  my	
  rendering	
  and	
   figuring	
  out	
  the	
  simplest	
  way	
  to	
  articulate	
  what	
  I	
  needed.	
  	
  He	
  also	
  began	
  the	
  larger	
  scale	
   puppet,	
  which	
  I	
  assisted	
  with	
  and	
  then	
  eventually	
  took	
  over	
  and	
  finished	
  when	
  he	
   returned	
  to	
  school.	
  	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  have	
  an	
  example	
  to	
  show	
  the	
  scale	
  and	
  the	
  idea	
  we	
   were	
  looking	
  for	
  to	
  the	
  workshop	
  group	
  and	
  it	
  made	
  sense	
  to	
  get	
  the	
  most	
  complicated	
   puppet	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  way	
  first	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  12,	
  13,	
  14	
  and	
  15).	
   	
   Raven	
   	
    Raven’s	
  stylization	
  was	
  more	
  identifiably	
  Haida	
  inspired.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  that	
  since	
  Raven	
    was	
  a	
  predominantly	
  Northwest	
  Coast	
  figure	
  that	
  he/she	
  should	
  embody	
  this	
  side	
  of	
  the	
   country	
  a	
  little	
  more	
  while	
  the	
  others	
  remained	
  ambiguous	
  and	
  “tribal”	
  for	
  lack	
  of	
  a	
   better	
  word.	
  	
  This	
  puppet	
  was	
  harder	
  to	
  conceive	
  than	
  it	
  was	
  to	
  build.	
  	
  He/she	
  needed	
   to	
  fly	
  and	
  I	
  originally	
  thought	
  that	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  manipulated	
  by	
  two	
  artists,	
  one	
  animating	
   the	
  body	
  and	
  left	
  wing	
  and	
  the	
  other	
  the	
  head	
  and	
  the	
  right	
  wing.	
  	
  But	
  with	
  the	
  singular	
   casting	
  I	
  now	
  had	
  to	
  develop	
  a	
  way	
  for	
  one	
  person	
  to	
  maneuver	
  a	
  puppet	
  built	
  for	
  two.	
  	
   Luckily	
  I	
  had	
  the	
  great	
  fortune	
  to	
  collaborate	
  with	
  Lynn	
  Burton.	
  	
  We	
  bounced	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
   options	
  around	
  and	
  settled	
  on	
  a	
  drummers	
  backpack	
  harness	
  that	
  would	
  perch	
  Raven	
   above	
  the	
  actors	
  head	
  at	
  an	
  angle	
  allowing	
  for	
  wings	
  to	
  be	
  manipulated	
  by	
  rods	
  as	
  I	
  had	
   previously	
  intended.	
  	
  I	
  attached	
  the	
  head	
  with	
  springs	
  so	
  that	
  it	
  could	
  be	
  controlled	
  by	
   the	
  actor.	
  	
  After	
  I	
  assembled	
  the	
  puppet	
  Lynn	
  took	
  over	
  rigging	
  it	
  to	
  the	
  backpack	
  and	
   	
    28	
    	
   adjusting	
  the	
  rods	
  for	
  easy	
  manipulation.	
  	
  We	
  then	
  covered	
  the	
  structure	
  in	
  black	
  tape	
   and	
  glued	
  feathers	
  and	
  buttons	
  to	
  it	
  as	
  an	
  added	
  Raven	
  touch.	
  	
  Nyla	
  took	
  to	
  the	
   contraption	
  really	
  well	
  and	
  had	
  no	
  issue	
  with	
  the	
  setup	
  and	
  handling.	
  	
  However,	
  I	
  think	
   more	
  work	
  was	
  needed	
  to	
  rehearse	
  the	
  manipulation	
  of	
  the	
  puppet	
  as	
  I	
  felt	
  that	
  the	
   performer	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  in	
  focus	
  and	
  I	
  somehow	
  lost	
  the	
  gigantic	
  bird	
  above	
  her	
   head	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  16,	
  17	
  and	
  18).	
   	
   Otter	
   	
    I	
  gave	
  Otter	
  the	
  task	
  of	
  swimming	
  to	
  the	
  ocean	
  floor	
  and	
  retrieving	
  earth	
  rather	
    than	
  Muskrat	
  from	
  the	
  original	
  story.	
  	
  Otters	
  are	
  cuter	
  and	
  more	
  playful	
  and	
  really	
   unrecognized	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  Aboriginal	
  storytelling	
  so	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  give	
  her/him	
  a	
   chance	
  to	
  shine.	
  	
  The	
  original	
  swimming	
  articulation	
  was	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  Otter’s	
  habit	
  of	
   winding	
  its	
  body	
  from	
  side	
  to	
  side	
  to	
  jet	
  though	
  currents.	
  	
  But	
  the	
  side-­‐to-­‐side	
  motion	
   was	
  too	
  awkward	
  for	
  such	
  a	
  large	
  puppet.	
  	
  I	
  twisted	
  the	
  body	
  barrel	
  so	
  that	
  the	
   articulation	
  undulated	
  like	
  a	
  Chinese	
  fish	
  ornament.	
  	
  The	
  body	
  is	
  segmented	
  into	
  five	
   drum-­‐like	
  shapes	
  that	
  fit	
  into	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  The	
  main	
  problem	
  I	
  had	
  with	
  the	
  otter	
  was	
   the	
  head,	
  which	
  looks	
  like	
  a	
  bear	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  The	
  problem	
  came	
  in	
  the	
  transfer	
  of	
  the	
  flat	
   profile	
  image	
  into	
  three	
  dimensions.	
  	
  The	
  other	
  animals	
  mainly	
  have	
  profile	
  type	
  heads	
   with	
  eyes	
  shifted	
  to	
  the	
  sides,	
  but	
  the	
  otter’s	
  features	
  are	
  all	
  central	
  which	
  was	
  a	
   problem	
  I	
  didn’t	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  fix	
  or	
  have	
  the	
  time	
  to	
  do	
  so	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  19,	
  20	
  and	
  21).	
   	
    	
    29	
    	
   Turtle	
   	
    The	
  Turtle’s	
  design	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  my	
  favorites	
  because	
  it	
  was	
  just	
  so	
  simple.	
  	
  I	
  had	
    one	
  concern	
  and	
  that	
  was	
  to	
  have	
  thirteen	
  scales	
  on	
  his/her	
  back	
  to	
  echo	
  the	
  months	
  of	
   the	
  Ojibwa	
  calendar.	
  	
  This	
  puppet	
  was	
  the	
  most	
  basic;	
  originally	
  I	
  only	
  anticipated	
  it	
   would	
  be	
  wheeled	
  on	
  and	
  voiced	
  by	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  other	
  actors	
  and	
  Tear	
  would	
  sit	
  on	
  it.	
  	
   With	
  Patrick	
  casting	
  an	
  actor	
  for	
  every	
  part	
  the	
  Turtle’s	
  role	
  became	
  more	
  prominent.	
  	
   Unfortunately	
  the	
  construction	
  was	
  so	
  basic	
  it	
  didn’t	
  allow	
  for	
  much	
  articulation.	
  	
  The	
   feet	
  dangled	
  so	
  they	
  swayed	
  when	
  the	
  puppet	
  was	
  moved	
  but	
  the	
  head	
  could	
  only	
   move	
  from	
  side	
  to	
  side	
  rather	
  than	
  retracting,	
  as	
  Alex	
  suggested	
  during	
  rehearsal.	
  	
  At	
   that	
  point	
  there	
  was	
  not	
  enough	
  time	
  to	
  alter	
  the	
  structure	
  but	
  it	
  is	
  an	
  idea	
  I’m	
  toying	
   with	
  for	
  the	
  remount	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  22,	
  23,	
  24	
  and	
  25).	
   	
   Sun	
  and	
  Moon	
   	
    I	
  originally	
  thought	
  that	
  these	
  puppets	
  would	
  be	
  mounted	
  on	
  rods	
  that	
  would	
    rotate	
  showing	
  night	
  and	
  day.	
  	
  I	
  wanted	
  Sun’s	
  eyes	
  to	
  move	
  and	
  look	
  around	
  and	
   Melody	
  gave	
  me	
  some	
  great	
  ideas	
  on	
  how	
  to	
  accomplish	
  this	
  with	
  rods	
  through	
  the	
   eyeballs	
  and	
  a	
  wire	
  pulley	
  system	
  like	
  bike	
  brakes	
  to	
  shift	
  them.	
  	
  But	
  with	
  the	
   animations	
  claiming	
  more	
  and	
  more	
  scenes	
  the	
  puppets	
  were	
  abandoned	
  to	
  lobby	
   decorations	
  while	
  a	
  bouncy	
  projected	
  version	
  replaced	
  them	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  26,	
  27,	
  28).	
   	
   	
    	
    30	
    	
   Twin	
  Creations	
  	
   	
    The	
  twins	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  molded	
  from	
  clay	
  as	
  one	
  body	
  and	
  then	
  split	
  into	
  two	
  to	
    form	
  the	
  brothers	
  of	
  light	
  and	
  dark.	
  	
  I	
  came	
  up	
  with	
  all	
  these	
  ideas	
  of	
  puppets	
  splitting	
   apart	
  and	
  being	
  snapped	
  back	
  together,	
  with	
  magnets	
  or	
  smaller	
  spring-­‐loaded	
  halves	
   hidden	
  inside	
  the	
  bodies.	
  	
  But	
  that	
  just	
  seemed	
  too	
  complicated,	
  so	
  I	
  came	
  up	
  with	
  a	
   design	
  for	
  some	
  sock	
  dolls	
  with	
  Mohawk	
  face	
  paint	
  and	
  half	
  shaved	
  heads	
  that	
  could	
  be	
   attached	
  to	
  rods.	
  	
  I	
  brought	
  the	
  rendering	
  to	
  Lynn	
  and	
  she	
  constructed	
  them	
  to	
  be	
   almost	
  identical	
  to	
  the	
  drawing	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  29	
  and	
  30).	
   	
   Hand	
  puppets	
   	
    The	
  hand	
  puppets	
  were	
  created	
  to	
  give	
  credit	
  to	
  the	
  original	
  stories	
  and	
  to	
  play	
    with	
  the	
  idea	
  of	
  scale	
  and	
  the	
  traditional	
  ideas	
  of	
  a	
  booth	
  style	
  puppet	
  show.	
  	
  The	
  into	
   Punch	
  and	
  Judy	
  style	
  show	
  was	
  quite	
  a	
  success.	
  	
  Its	
  campy	
  self-­‐debasing	
  nature	
  and	
  the	
   genre	
  of	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  in	
  general	
  allowed	
  for	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  styles.	
  	
  I	
  used	
  two	
  Punch	
  and	
   Judy	
  type	
  glove	
  puppets	
  for	
  the	
  hunter’s	
  daughter	
  and	
  Weesageechak	
  the	
  crane.	
  	
  Since	
   these	
  characters	
  were	
  not	
  in	
  the	
  larger	
  story	
  I	
  wanted	
  them	
  to	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  stand	
  out	
  and	
   be	
  remembered	
  as	
  distinct	
  puppets.	
  	
  The	
  bodies	
  were	
  made	
  of	
  fabric	
  and	
  their	
  heads	
   were	
  paper	
  clay	
  that	
  ended	
  up	
  being	
  quite	
  heavy.	
  	
  The	
  hunter’s	
  daughter	
  had	
  the	
  same	
   hair	
  as	
  Tear	
  and	
  her	
  dress	
  was	
  covered	
  in	
  a	
  crocheted	
  lace	
  with	
  pearls	
  to	
  simulate	
  the	
   Northwest	
  Coast	
  style	
  of	
  cedar	
  bark	
  dresses	
  and	
  abalone	
  shell	
  buttons.	
  	
  The	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
    	
    31	
    	
   puppets	
  consisted	
  of	
  silhouette	
  stick	
  puppets	
  for	
  comic	
  effect	
  intermixed	
  with	
  the	
   maquettes	
  that	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  develop	
  their	
  larger	
  counterparts	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  31,	
  32	
  and	
  33).	
   	
   	
   3.2	
  Costume	
  and	
  Cultural	
  Hybridity	
   	
   	
   "We	
  look	
  at	
  the	
  world	
  from	
  the	
  outsider's	
  point	
  of	
  view,	
  from	
  the	
  monster's	
  point	
  of	
  view."	
  	
   ~Julie	
  Taymor	
    	
   	
    When	
  I	
  started	
  thinking	
  about	
  the	
  costumes	
  and	
  how	
  they	
  would	
  integrate	
  with	
    the	
  other	
  elements	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  hard	
  time	
  deciding	
  whether	
  I	
  wanted	
  the	
  puppeteers	
  to	
  be	
   seen	
  as	
  noticeable	
  distinct	
  entities	
  or	
  if	
  I	
  wanted	
  them	
  to	
  be	
  in	
  neutral	
  uniform	
  so	
  that	
   they	
  would	
  blend	
  into	
  the	
  background	
  and	
  the	
  audience	
  could	
  focus	
  solely	
  on	
  the	
   puppets.	
  	
  I	
  opted	
  for	
  suggestive	
  character-­‐driven	
  costumes	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  audience	
  would	
   know	
  which	
  actor	
  was	
  which	
  animal	
  when	
  they	
  were	
  not	
  holding	
  the	
  puppet.	
  I	
  again	
   chose	
  to	
  do	
  a	
  mash-­‐up,	
  intermixing	
  character	
  elements,	
  like	
  animal	
  colouring	
  and	
   characteristics,	
  with	
  Indigenous	
  regalia	
  and	
  contemporary	
  fashion.	
  	
  	
   I	
  looked	
  at	
  19th	
  century	
  portraits	
  depicting	
  Indigenous	
  peoples	
  in	
  fashions	
  of	
  the	
   time	
  with	
  cultural	
  accents,	
  like	
  shirtsleeves	
  with	
  a	
  hair	
  pipe	
  breastplate	
  and	
  matching	
   headdress.	
  	
  Many	
  of	
  these	
  photographs	
  were	
  staged,	
  which	
  triggered	
  questions	
  of	
   identity,	
  authenticity	
  and	
  nostalgia,	
  especially	
  when	
  considering	
  how	
  the	
  modern	
   indigenous	
  identity	
  is	
  affected	
  by	
  memory	
  and	
  historic	
  representations	
  of	
  the	
  past.	
  	
  So	
  I	
   began	
  to	
  wonder	
  if,	
  although	
  such	
  a	
  diverse	
  people,	
  we	
  can	
  be	
  visually	
  identifiable	
    	
    32	
    	
   beyond	
  the	
  historic	
  costume	
  created	
  by	
  the	
  tales	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  spun	
  since	
  our	
  story	
   has	
  been	
  written	
  down.	
  	
  Or	
  are	
  we	
  destined	
  to	
  walk	
  in	
  the	
  constructed	
  shadow	
  of	
   pictorial	
  history?	
  	
  How	
  do	
  we	
  challenge	
  this	
  cultural	
  depiction	
  of	
  teepees	
  and	
  feathers	
   when	
  contemporary	
  fashion	
  conglomerates	
  like	
  Urban	
  Outfitters,	
  H&M	
  and	
  Forever	
  21	
   appropriate	
  these	
  static	
  stereotypic	
  images	
  as	
  the	
  newest	
  trend	
  in	
  popular	
  culture	
   (Houston	
  Brown).	
  	
  With	
  these	
  issues	
  in	
  mind	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  design	
  costumes	
  that	
  I	
  think	
  the	
   characters	
  would	
  wear	
  today,	
  mashing	
  up	
  elements	
  from	
  each	
  character’s	
  indigenous	
   culture	
  of	
  origin	
  with	
  contemporary	
  hipster	
  style.	
  	
  I	
  also	
  used	
  temporary	
  tattoos	
  of	
  each	
   animal	
  on	
  the	
  actors	
  to	
  further	
  their	
  connection	
  to	
  the	
  puppet.	
  	
  Unfortunately	
  to	
   acquire	
  the	
  styles	
  I	
  wanted	
  and	
  still	
  stay	
  in	
  my	
  budget	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  purchase	
  items	
  from	
   Urban	
  Outfitters,	
  H&M	
  and	
  Forever	
  21,	
  thus	
  supporting	
  the	
  cultural	
  appropriation	
  I	
  was	
   questioning.	
  	
  This	
  felt	
  hypocritical	
  but	
  my	
  budget	
  restriction	
  outweighed	
  my	
  principles.	
  	
  	
   	
   Individual	
  Costume	
  Development	
   	
   Narrator	
   	
    The	
  Narrator	
  was	
  the	
  easiest	
  costume	
  to	
  conceive	
  since	
  she	
  is	
  closest	
  to	
  my	
  own	
    age	
  demographic	
  and	
  social	
  standing.	
  	
  Even	
  though	
  she	
  recounts	
  stories	
  and	
  memories	
   from	
  my	
  childhood,	
  I	
  don’t	
  directly	
  identify	
  with	
  her	
  stylistically.	
  	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  give	
  her	
  a	
   trendy	
  everywoman	
  quality	
  that	
  was	
  current	
  and	
  easy	
  to	
  relate	
  to.	
  	
  I	
  really	
  took	
   inspiration	
  from	
  what	
  was	
  around	
  me	
  and	
  styled	
  her	
  on	
  what	
  young	
  women	
  were	
    	
    33	
    	
   wearing	
  last	
  summer.	
  	
  She	
  wore	
  a	
  loose	
  sheer	
  blouse	
  with	
  a	
  feather	
  motif,	
  dark	
  denim	
   skinny	
  jeans	
  and	
  gladiator	
  sandals	
  that	
  were	
  embossed	
  with	
  a	
  golden	
  Aztec-­‐like	
   ornamentation.	
  	
  Her	
  hair	
  was	
  worn	
  in	
  a	
  French	
  braid	
  along	
  one	
  side	
  of	
  her	
  head.	
  	
  I	
  found	
   the	
  amazing	
  image	
  by	
  American	
  photographer	
  Edward	
  Curtis	
  of	
  a	
  Tsawatenok	
  girl	
  with	
   large	
  shell	
  earrings	
  that	
  I	
  loved,	
  and	
  used	
  that	
  inspiration	
  creating	
  earrings	
  out	
  of	
  local	
   abalone	
  shells.	
  	
  I	
  also	
  wanted	
  to	
  link	
  the	
  Narrator,	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  and	
  Terra/Tear	
  visually.	
  	
  	
   The	
  idea	
  of	
  the	
  story	
  being	
  passed	
  down	
  and	
  changing	
  as	
  it	
  shifts	
  from	
  one	
  teller	
  to	
  the	
   next	
  brought	
  to	
  mind	
  the	
  tradition	
  of	
  the	
  wampum	
  belt	
  which	
  signifies	
  specific	
  events	
   through	
  a	
  pattern	
  in	
  the	
  beading.	
  	
  But	
  it	
  is	
  the	
  storyteller	
  that	
  brings	
  the	
  event	
  to	
  life	
  in	
   the	
  form	
  of	
  oral	
  history	
  and	
  although	
  the	
  facts	
  remain	
  the	
  same	
  each	
  orator	
  has	
  a	
   distinct	
  style	
  of	
  storytelling.	
  	
  With	
  that	
  in	
  mind	
  I	
  gave	
  the	
  two	
  younger	
  women	
  identical	
   belts	
  of	
  hairpipe	
  bead	
  and	
  leather	
  thong	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  however	
  wore	
  a	
  necklace	
   constructed	
  in	
  a	
  similar	
  fashion	
  because	
  I	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  enough	
  beads	
  to	
  encircle	
  her	
   abdomen	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  34).	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran	
   	
    Gran-­‐gran’s	
  hair	
  and	
  costume	
  was	
  to	
  coordinate	
  with	
  the	
  puppet	
  and	
  I	
  tossed	
    around	
  the	
  stereotypical	
  ideas	
  of	
  what	
  old	
  Aboriginal	
  grandmothers	
  look	
  like,	
  the	
  long	
   flowered	
  dress,	
  the	
  shawl,	
  the	
  braids,	
  beads	
  and	
  ribbons.	
  	
  The	
  image	
  of	
  the	
  Kokum	
  from	
   APTN’s	
  animated	
  series	
  Wapos	
  Bay	
  kept	
  seeping	
  into	
  to	
  my	
  thoughts	
  but	
  then	
  I	
  realized	
   that	
  if	
  this	
  is	
  my	
  story	
  then	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  should	
  dress	
  like	
  my	
  own	
  grandmother,	
  so	
  she	
   needed	
  a	
  sweatsuit,	
  sneakers	
  and	
  a	
  pixie	
  cut.	
  	
  I	
  found	
  matching	
  wigs	
  that	
  fit	
  the	
  actor	
   	
    34	
    	
   and	
  I	
  adjusted	
  one	
  for	
  the	
  puppet.	
  	
  All	
  of	
  the	
  human	
  women	
  were	
  accented	
  in	
  shades	
  of	
   purple	
  as	
  that	
  was	
  my	
  favorite	
  colour	
  as	
  a	
  child	
  and	
  it	
  always	
  permeates	
  my	
  memories.	
  	
   Gran-­‐gran	
  had	
  a	
  purple	
  top	
  under	
  her	
  grey	
  sweatsuit	
  with	
  purple	
  stitching	
  that	
   coordinated	
  with	
  the	
  puppet’s	
  purple	
  sweatshirt	
  and	
  they	
  both	
  wore	
  green	
  sneakers.	
  	
  I	
   assembled	
  the	
  fat	
  pad	
  onto	
  a	
  bodysuit	
  out	
  of	
  bits	
  of	
  carved	
  foam	
  I	
  found	
  in	
  stock	
  and	
   wardrobe	
  head	
  Jean	
  Driscoll-­‐Bell	
  attached	
  and	
  covered	
  the	
  form	
  I	
  had	
  pinned	
  together.	
  	
   I	
  overlaid	
  the	
  design	
  for	
  the	
  old	
  age	
  makeup	
  on	
  a	
  picture	
  of	
  Lisa’s	
  face	
  that	
  the	
  crew	
   applied	
  every	
  night	
  to	
  help	
  give	
  her	
  round	
  face	
  some	
  depth	
  of	
  the	
  character.	
  	
  Gran-­‐gran	
   needed	
  to	
  be	
  saucy	
  and	
  vibrant	
  as	
  she	
  embodies	
  the	
  characteristic	
  of	
  three	
  of	
  my	
   grandmothers	
  and	
  I	
  think	
  in	
  a	
  campy	
  sort	
  of	
  way	
  we	
  accomplished	
  that	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  35).	
   	
   Tear	
   	
    Tear	
  was	
  the	
  embodiment	
  of	
  my	
  younger	
  self	
  and	
  I	
  styled	
  her	
  after	
  the	
  childhood	
    vision	
  I	
  have	
  of	
  me	
  with	
  tousled	
  half-­‐braided	
  hair	
  and	
  a	
  jumper.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  lucky	
  that	
  Ashley	
   fit	
  into	
  the	
  costume	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  already	
  purchased	
  for	
  Denalene	
  and	
  she	
  was	
  able	
  to	
   move	
  freely	
  in	
  it.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  time	
  I	
  designed	
  a	
  costume	
  for	
  a	
  dancer	
  and	
  didn’t	
   realize	
  the	
  most	
  important	
  thing	
  were	
  the	
  shoes.	
  	
  After	
  the	
  third	
  week	
  of	
  rehearsal	
  it	
   was	
  clear	
  with	
  Ashley’s	
  foot	
  swelling	
  up	
  that	
  we	
  needed	
  actual	
  dancing	
  moccasins.	
  	
  I	
  had	
   originally	
  considered	
  styling	
  this	
  character	
  in	
  the	
  Métis	
  ribbon	
  dresses	
  that	
  I	
  remember	
   from	
  my	
  youth	
  but	
  they	
  just	
  seemed	
  impractical	
  and	
  didn’t	
  meet	
  the	
  hipster	
  concept	
  I	
   was	
  going	
  for.	
  	
  The	
  jumper	
  was	
  great	
  for	
  mobility	
  and	
  the	
  youthful	
  appearance	
  and	
  I	
  was	
   able	
  to	
  find	
  one	
  in	
  a	
  floral	
  pattern	
  that	
  echoed	
  my	
  research.	
  	
  During	
  the	
  dance	
  scene	
  I	
   	
    35	
    	
   wanted	
  to	
  bring	
  in	
  some	
  traditional	
  elements	
  so	
  I	
  fastened	
  two	
  layers	
  of	
  jingles	
  to	
  a	
  belt	
   that	
  could	
  be	
  added	
  in	
  a	
  quick	
  change	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  36).	
   	
   Coyote	
   	
    With	
  Coyote	
  I	
  played	
  with	
  a	
  brown	
  and	
  tan	
  colour	
  palette	
  to	
  emulate	
  the	
  animal.	
  	
    I	
  designed	
  a	
  leather	
  vest	
  with	
  fringe	
  inspired	
  by	
  Plains	
  leather	
  crafts	
  and	
  dress,	
  which	
   was	
  built	
  by	
  Jean.	
  	
  The	
  hipster	
  vibe	
  seemed	
  to	
  really	
  suite	
  Coyote	
  with	
  the	
  baggy	
  toque,	
   cuffed	
  pant	
  and	
  high	
  top	
  sneakers.	
  	
  With	
  his	
  mischievous	
  macho	
  nature	
  I	
  put	
  his	
  tattoo	
   on	
  his	
  bicep	
  to	
  affirm	
  that	
  tough	
  guy	
  persona.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  originally	
  planned	
  a	
  tank	
  top	
   because	
  of	
  the	
  demographic	
  of	
  the	
  show	
  but	
  Patrick	
  wanted	
  him	
  shirtless	
  under	
  the	
  vest	
   so	
  that	
  is	
  how	
  he	
  appeared	
  on	
  stage	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  37).	
   	
   Raven	
   	
    With	
  Raven	
  I	
  chose	
  to	
  use	
  a	
  black	
  and	
  navy	
  palette,	
  to	
  give	
  the	
  hint	
  of	
  the	
    feathers	
  when	
  they	
  are	
  under	
  sunlight	
  and	
  have	
  that	
  beautiful	
  blue	
  glint.	
  	
  I	
  originally	
   though	
  Raven	
  would	
  be	
  a	
  man	
  and	
  since	
  the	
  designs	
  were	
  done	
  before	
  the	
  casting	
   she/he	
  is	
  depicted	
  as	
  one.	
  	
  But	
  the	
  costume	
  is	
  quite	
  unisex	
  with	
  the	
  addition	
  of	
  an	
   undershirt.	
  	
  So	
  I	
  didn’t	
  feel	
  the	
  need	
  to	
  re-­‐render	
  when	
  Nyla	
  was	
  cast	
  because	
  the	
   costume	
  actually	
  suited	
  her	
  Goth	
  aesthetic	
  really	
  well	
  with	
  the	
  black	
  skinny	
  jeans	
  and	
   combat	
  boots.	
  	
  The	
  tattoo	
  was	
  painted	
  across	
  the	
  chest	
  with	
  the	
  raven’s	
  head	
  going	
  up	
   Nyla’s	
  neck	
  and	
  the	
  wings	
  spread	
  out	
  over	
  her	
  shoulders.	
  	
  To	
  achieve	
  a	
  bird	
  like	
  quality	
    	
    36	
    	
   to	
  the	
  costume	
  we	
  deconstructed	
  a	
  tail-­‐coat,	
  removing	
  the	
  sleeves	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  tail-­‐vest,	
   and	
  adorned	
  the	
  edges	
  of	
  the	
  garment	
  with	
  buttons	
  as	
  a	
  nod	
  to	
  the	
  Northwest	
  Coastal	
   button	
  blankets.	
  	
  I	
  adorned	
  the	
  neck	
  of	
  the	
  tank	
  top	
  with	
  a	
  string	
  of	
  small	
  black	
  feathers	
   to	
  add	
  to	
  the	
  animalistic	
  nature	
  and	
  completed	
  the	
  look	
  with	
  a	
  stereotypic	
  feather	
  and	
   bead-­‐festooned	
  top	
  hat.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  couldn’t	
  help	
  myself;	
  that	
  look	
  is	
  just	
  so	
  stereotypical	
   when	
  thinking	
  of	
  post-­‐contact	
  fashion	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  38).	
   	
   Otter	
   	
  	
    The	
  inspiration	
  for	
  Otter	
  came	
  from	
  one	
  of	
  photographer	
  Nadya	
  Kwandibens’	
    Concrete	
  Indian	
  portraits	
  of	
  a	
  girl	
  in	
  mukluks	
  texting	
  on	
  her	
  phone	
  outside	
  a	
  Starbucks.	
  	
  I	
   loved	
  the	
  idea	
  of	
  pairing	
  the	
  big	
  furry	
  boots	
  with	
  pants	
  and	
  a	
  raglan	
  off-­‐the-­‐shoulder	
   jersey	
  top.	
  	
  In	
  keeping	
  with	
  the	
  Otter’s	
  playful	
  animalistic	
  theme	
  we	
  put	
  Laura’s	
  hair	
  in	
   pigtail	
  buns	
  to	
  resemble	
  ears	
  with	
  a	
  big	
  furry	
  bow	
  on	
  one	
  side.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  also	
   accessorized	
  with	
  chunky	
  wood	
  and	
  bone	
  bangles	
  and	
  a	
  seed	
  bead	
  fringe	
  necklace	
  that	
   bounced	
  and	
  made	
  noise	
  as	
  she	
  danced.	
  	
  Her	
  tattoo	
  was	
  placed	
  on	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  her	
  right	
   shoulder,	
  which	
  was	
  visible	
  above	
  the	
  scooping	
  neckline	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  39).	
   	
   Turtle	
   Turtle	
  was	
  originally	
  designed	
  as	
  a	
  girl	
  with	
  fringed	
  shorts	
  and	
  feathers	
  in	
  her	
   hair	
  but	
  that	
  design	
  wasn’t	
  as	
  unisex	
  as	
  Raven	
  and	
  I	
  re-­‐rendered	
  after	
  casting	
  Alex.	
  	
  I	
   gave	
  him	
  a	
  muted	
  olive	
  and	
  gray	
  palette	
  with	
  a	
  stripped	
  shirt	
  to	
  echo	
  the	
  pattern	
  of	
  a	
    	
    37	
    	
   turtles	
  underside.	
  	
  Alex	
  experimented	
  with	
  old	
  age	
  makeup	
  to	
  help	
  give	
  depth	
  to	
  the	
   character	
  echoing	
  this	
  old-­‐as-­‐time	
  idea	
  in	
  his	
  movement	
  and	
  voice	
  pattern,	
  both	
  of	
   which	
  were	
  painfully	
  slow	
  and	
  quite	
  comical.	
  	
  To	
  my	
  surprise	
  he	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  the	
   audience’s	
  favorite	
  characters.	
  	
  We	
  rolled	
  up	
  his	
  pants	
  and	
  put	
  the	
  tattoo	
  on	
  his	
  leg	
   since	
  we	
  were	
  running	
  out	
  of	
  exposed	
  body	
  parts	
  and	
  I	
  didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  repeat	
  tattoo	
   location	
  amongst	
  the	
  actors.	
  	
  With	
  this	
  character	
  literally	
  becoming	
  Turtle	
  Island	
  (earth),	
   where	
  we	
  all	
  live,	
  I	
  was	
  inspired	
  by	
  the	
  Métis	
  sash	
  for	
  the	
  accessory	
  because	
  it	
   symbolizes	
  the	
  unity	
  of	
  cultures.	
  	
  Traditionally	
  the	
  sash	
  was	
  woven	
  of	
  wool	
  about	
  three	
   meters	
  long	
  and	
  tied	
  around	
  the	
  waist,	
  but	
  it	
  was	
  occasionally	
  worn	
  as	
  a	
  scarf	
  so	
  that	
  is	
   how	
  I	
  chose	
  to	
  use	
  it	
  since	
  scarves	
  are	
  a	
  popular	
  trend.	
  	
  	
  Wool	
  would	
  be	
  too	
  hot	
  and	
   three	
  meters	
  would	
  impede	
  the	
  actor’s	
  mobility	
  so	
  I	
  simply	
  found	
  a	
  light	
  weight	
  scarf	
  in	
   my	
  colour	
  palette	
  with	
  the	
  familiar	
  stripe	
  pattern	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  40).	
   	
   	
   3.3	
  Scenograpic	
  Unity:	
  Tradition	
  and	
  Modernity	
   	
   	
   “I	
  try	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  well-­‐made	
  object;	
  that	
  is	
  all	
  that	
  anyone	
  can	
  do”	
  	
   ~Bill	
  Reid	
    	
   	
    With	
  the	
  costume	
  and	
  puppets	
  adhering	
  to	
  this	
  fusion	
  of	
  traditional	
  and	
    contemporary	
  urban	
  Indigenous	
  ideals	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  tie	
  all	
  the	
  elements	
  together	
  with	
  the	
   set	
  and	
  basic	
  atmosphere	
  of	
  the	
  show.	
  	
  Originally	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  build	
  a	
  giant	
  paper	
  puppet	
   theatre	
  complete	
  with	
  moving	
  waves	
  and	
  tongue	
  and	
  groove	
  sliding	
  scenery	
  on	
  the	
    	
    38	
    	
   stage,	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  small	
  puppet	
  booth	
  sat	
  in	
  the	
  larger	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  which,	
  in	
  turn,	
  sat	
   in	
  the	
  theatre	
  itself.	
  	
  The	
  idea	
  was	
  to	
  play	
  with	
  the	
  space	
  and	
  scale	
  of	
  the	
  theatre	
  by	
   echoing	
  to	
  make	
  the	
  audience	
  aware	
  of	
  the	
  space	
  and	
  how	
  it	
  signifies	
  the	
  presentation	
   of	
  a	
  story	
  through	
  multiple	
  layers	
  of	
  framing.	
  	
  This	
  concept	
  would	
  then	
  be	
  echoed	
  in	
  the	
   script	
  by	
  the	
  story	
  being	
  changed	
  and	
  framed	
  different	
  ways	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  teller.	
  	
  But	
   my	
  budget	
  wouldn’t	
  allow	
  for	
  that	
  so	
  the	
  idea	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  simplified.	
  	
  	
   	
    Again	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  go	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  basics.	
  	
  So	
  what	
  did	
  we	
  need?	
  	
  I	
  knew	
  I	
  wanted	
    the	
  show	
  to	
  be	
  contemporary	
  and	
  urban,	
  a	
  hybridized	
  world	
  of	
  myth	
  and	
  everyday	
  but	
   what	
  did	
  that	
  look	
  like?	
  	
  Images	
  of	
  concrete	
  and	
  graffiti	
  blurred	
  with	
  a	
  naturalistic	
   landscape.	
  	
  But	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  fill	
  this	
  space	
  with	
  little	
  effort	
  and	
  less	
  money.	
  	
  I	
  tossed	
   around	
  a	
  few	
  ideas	
  with	
  Patrick,	
  reducing	
  my	
  original	
  idea	
  to	
  a	
  platform	
  covered	
  in	
   Carolyn’s	
  graffiti	
  design	
  with	
  two	
  internally	
  illuminated	
  columns	
  on	
  either	
  side	
  of	
  the	
   stage.	
  	
  Stage	
  right	
  signified	
  the	
  puppet	
  world,	
  the	
  space	
  of	
  myth,	
  and	
  stage	
  left	
  with	
  a	
   porch	
  and	
  swing	
  and	
  a	
  small	
  TV	
  set	
  signified	
  the	
  real	
  world.	
  	
  Alison	
  suggested	
  I	
  change	
   the	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  into	
  a	
  television	
  set,	
  because	
  of	
  its	
  significance	
  in	
  stereotypic	
   reservation	
  life.	
  	
  I	
  really	
  liked	
  this	
  idea	
  and	
  then	
  tried	
  to	
  surround	
  the	
  platform	
  with	
  a	
   large	
  ply	
  board	
  cutout	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  television	
  façade	
  as	
  the	
  small	
  puppet	
  theatre.	
  	
  This	
   tied	
  into	
  the	
  small	
  TV	
  set	
  on	
  the	
  porch	
  which	
  I	
  was	
  using	
  as	
  a	
  speaker	
  to	
  broadcast	
   sound	
  bites	
  of	
  past	
  Indigenous	
  representations	
  in	
  popular	
  culture.	
  	
  The	
  recordings	
   included	
  a	
  song	
  from	
  Peter	
  Pan	
  “What	
  Made	
  the	
  Red	
  Man	
  Red,”	
  the	
  Lakota	
  pain	
  reliever	
   ad	
  and	
  a	
  news	
  report	
  of	
  the	
  recent	
  shooting	
  of	
  Native	
  American	
  woodcarver	
  John	
  T.	
    	
    39	
    	
   Williams	
  in	
  Seattle.	
  	
  The	
  sounds	
  were	
  a	
  way	
  to	
  acknowledge	
  the	
  past	
  and	
  show	
  that	
  we	
   are	
  moving	
  forward	
  and	
  creating	
  our	
  own	
  stories	
  (see	
  Illus.	
  41	
  and	
  42).	
   	
    This	
  was	
  my	
  first	
  large-­‐scale	
  set	
  design	
  that	
  was	
  being	
  constructed	
  by	
  someone	
    else	
  I	
  was	
  lucky	
  to	
  have	
  Keith	
  Smith	
  as	
  my	
  Technical	
  Director	
  and	
  Head	
  Carpenter.	
  	
  His	
   optimism	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  never-­‐ending.	
  	
  Everything	
  I	
  threw	
  at	
  him	
  with	
  my	
  poorly	
  drafted	
   and	
  haphazard	
  design	
  was	
  met	
  with	
  “we	
  can	
  do	
  that.”	
  	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  completely	
  trust	
   him	
  to	
  do	
  what	
  was	
  best	
  for	
  the	
  production	
  and	
  he	
  helped	
  guide	
  me	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  how	
   things	
  should	
  be	
  built,	
  talking	
  through	
  every	
  aspect	
  of	
  each	
  design	
  for	
  better	
   understanding	
  on	
  both	
  our	
  parts.	
  	
  He	
  physically	
  walked	
  me	
  through	
  ideas	
  regarding	
  the	
   small	
  puppet	
  booth	
  so	
  that	
  two	
  people	
  could	
  sit	
  comfortably	
  inside	
  and	
  facilitate	
  the	
   necessary	
  actions	
  of	
  performing	
  and	
  moving	
  the	
  theatre	
  off	
  stage	
  while	
  inside	
  (see	
  Illus.	
   43	
  and	
  44).	
  	
  This	
  kind	
  of	
  tactile	
  discussion	
  was	
  extremely	
  helpful	
  to	
  me;	
  it	
  gave	
  me	
  a	
   spatial	
  sensibility	
  to	
  the	
  measurements	
  I	
  was	
  adhering	
  to	
  in	
  my	
  model.	
  	
  He	
  creatively	
   solved	
  puppet	
  storage	
  problems	
  and	
  ensured	
  safety	
  for	
  everyone	
  involved.	
  	
  His	
   presence	
  and	
  expertise	
  was	
  invaluable.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    40	
    	
   Chapter	
  4	
   	
   	
   Production	
  Report	
   	
   	
   "Puppets	
  always	
  have	
  to	
  try	
  to	
  be	
  alive…that	
  desperation	
  to	
  live,	
  it’s	
  basically	
  a	
  dead	
  object,	
  it	
  only	
  lives	
   because	
  you	
  make	
  it.	
  	
  An	
  actor	
  struggles	
  to	
  die	
  onstage,	
  but	
  a	
  puppet	
  has	
  to	
  struggle	
  to	
  live.	
  And	
  in	
  a	
  way	
   that’s	
  a	
  metaphor	
  for	
  life.”	
  	
   ~	
  Adrian	
  Kohler	
    	
    	
    	
    The	
  production	
  was	
  more	
  successful,	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  audience	
  reception,	
  than	
  I	
    anticipated.	
  	
  With	
  such	
  minimal	
  advertising	
  and	
  being	
  the	
  first	
  theatre	
  production	
  for	
   young	
  audiences	
  to	
  be	
  produced	
  at	
  UBC	
  I	
  didn’t	
  know	
  what	
  to	
  expect.	
  	
  Word	
  of	
  mouth	
   seemed	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  very	
  powerful	
  tool	
  because	
  every	
  night	
  the	
  audience	
  grew.	
  	
  We	
  roped	
   off	
  the	
  seating	
  so	
  that	
  people	
  could	
  only	
  sit	
  in	
  the	
  center	
  isle,	
  thus	
  making	
  sure	
  every	
   person	
  in	
  the	
  house	
  could	
  see	
  into	
  the	
  smaller	
  puppet	
  theatre,	
  but	
  that	
  proved	
   problematic	
  as	
  more	
  people	
  were	
  arriving	
  and	
  we	
  had	
  to	
  move	
  the	
  ropes	
  out	
  further	
   and	
  further.	
  	
  	
   The	
  audience	
  was	
  extremely	
  receptive	
  and	
  chatty.	
  	
  David	
  Kaye	
  would	
  enter	
  from	
   the	
  lobby	
  and	
  bring	
  the	
  audience	
  into	
  the	
  story	
  by	
  interacting	
  with	
  them	
  during	
  the	
   small	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  intro.	
  	
  The	
  audience	
  was	
  engaged	
  and	
  responded	
  to	
  his	
  questions	
   every	
  night	
  with	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  the	
  matinee	
  that	
  had	
  an	
  abundance	
  of	
  children	
  under	
   five	
  attending	
  and	
  all	
  sitting	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  three	
  rows.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  a	
  little	
  off-­‐putting	
  to	
  the	
   actors	
  since	
  that	
  age	
  group	
  is	
  not	
  familiar	
  with	
  theatrical	
  traditions.	
  	
  The	
  matinee	
  got	
  off	
   slowly	
  and	
  but	
  picked	
  up	
  again	
  once	
  the	
  music	
  started.	
  	
  The	
  three	
  evening	
  performances	
    	
    41	
    	
   were	
  very	
  energetic	
  and	
  fun	
  and	
  the	
  audience	
  laughed	
  all	
  the	
  way	
  through	
  every	
  night	
   so	
  I	
  feel	
  I	
  was	
  successful	
  in	
  pleasing	
  the	
  audience.	
  	
  	
   After	
  each	
  show	
  we	
  held	
  a	
  short	
  talkback	
  where	
  the	
  audience	
  could	
  come	
  up	
  and	
   talk	
  to	
  the	
  actors	
  and	
  interact	
  with	
  the	
  puppets.	
  	
  This	
  seemed	
  to	
  really	
  be	
  the	
  highlight	
   of	
  the	
  show	
  because	
  we	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  talk	
  to	
  the	
  audience	
  and	
  get	
  feedback	
  in	
  an	
   informal	
  setting.	
  	
  The	
  Musqueam	
  band	
  brought	
  several	
  youth	
  groups	
  out	
  and	
  we	
  were	
   constantly	
  being	
  thanked	
  by	
  the	
  children	
  and	
  their	
  parents	
  for	
  telling	
  a	
  story	
  that	
  they	
   could	
  relate	
  to.	
  	
  One	
  little	
  girl	
  of	
  about	
  three	
  loved	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  so	
  much	
  that	
  her	
  mom	
   brought	
  her	
  and	
  her	
  sister	
  to	
  every	
  production.	
  	
  Every	
  night	
  she	
  would	
  sit	
  on	
  the	
  porch	
   swing	
  with	
  Lisa	
  and	
  hug	
  and	
  kiss	
  the	
  puppet	
  until	
  her	
  mom	
  told	
  her	
  it	
  was	
  Gran-­‐gran’s	
   bedtime.	
  	
  Seeing	
  the	
  young	
  people	
  ranging	
  from	
  small	
  children	
  to	
  teenagers,	
  to	
  the	
   parents	
  and	
  my	
  peers	
  all	
  getting	
  something	
  relevant	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  story	
  was	
  the	
  most	
   fulfilling	
  part.	
  	
   During	
  the	
  run	
  I	
  was	
  also	
  fortunate	
  enough	
  to	
  go	
  and	
  speak	
  to	
  two	
  sections	
  of	
   Jerry	
  Wasserman’s	
  Theatre	
  120	
  class	
  about	
  the	
  process	
  and	
  give	
  a	
  demonstration	
  of	
   how	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  smaller	
  puppets	
  functioned.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  a	
  different	
  but	
  still	
  valuable	
   audience	
  response	
  since	
  they	
  were	
  required	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  show	
  for	
  their	
  class.	
  	
  After	
  the	
   demonstration	
  there	
  were	
  very	
  mixed	
  responses;	
  some	
  loved	
  the	
  freedom	
  of	
  genre	
  and	
   actually	
  said	
  they	
  were	
  reconsidering	
  their	
  previous	
  intentions	
  of	
  becoming	
  actors	
  to	
   explore	
  design	
  and	
  creation.	
  	
  Others	
  didn’t	
  feel	
  Theatre	
  for	
  Young	
  Audiences	
  belonged	
   in	
  the	
  university	
  repertoire	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  lower	
  form	
  of	
  theater	
  that	
  they	
  couldn’t	
  see	
  any	
   relevance	
  in	
  studying	
  even	
  if	
  they	
  may	
  have	
  enjoyed	
  it.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  interesting	
  to	
  compare	
   	
    42	
    	
   the	
  responses	
  of	
  those	
  who	
  were	
  enthusiastic	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  production	
  and	
  came	
  on	
  their	
   own	
  accord	
  to	
  those	
  who	
  were	
  required	
  to	
  attend.	
   So	
  despite	
  some	
  minimal	
  negative	
  feedback	
  I	
  actually	
  felt	
  like	
  this	
  story	
  affected	
   some	
  of	
  these	
  people.	
  	
  That	
  is	
  what	
  we	
  are	
  trying	
  to	
  accomplish	
  with	
  theatre.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  like	
   we	
  are	
  always	
  searching	
  for	
  the	
  moment,	
  for	
  connection	
  that	
  moves	
  us.	
  	
  I	
  tried	
  for	
  a	
   pan-­‐Indigenous	
  Canadian	
  feel	
  to	
  the	
  story	
  and	
  ended	
  up	
  with	
  what	
  many	
  people	
  felt	
   was	
  universal.	
  	
  Many	
  Chinese	
  and	
  Japanese	
  patrons	
  expressed	
  the	
  thrill	
  of	
  connection	
   they	
  felt	
  when	
  watching	
  the	
  play,	
  because	
  they	
  were	
  seeing	
  many	
  of	
  their	
  own	
   traditional	
  tales	
  told	
  through	
  different	
  bodies.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  just	
  so	
  amazing	
  to	
  me	
  to	
  see	
  all	
   these	
  people	
  from	
  different	
  cultures	
  relating	
  to	
  the	
  story.	
  	
  It	
  shows	
  that	
  we	
  really	
  are	
   not	
  that	
  different	
  when	
  we	
  come	
  back	
  to	
  this	
  idea	
  of	
  community	
  and	
  the	
  need	
  to	
   connect	
  with	
  one’s	
  past	
  and	
  personal	
  heritage.	
   I	
  couldn’t	
  have	
  asked	
  for	
  a	
  better	
  response	
  from	
  the	
  audience.	
  	
  This	
  experience	
   has	
  given	
  me	
  the	
  confidence	
  to	
  keep	
  creating	
  and	
  pushing	
  and	
  breaking	
  down	
  cultural	
   boundaries	
  in	
  order	
  for	
  a	
  new	
  story	
  to	
  be	
  told.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    43	
    	
   Chapter	
  5	
   	
   	
   Conclusion	
   	
   	
   “I	
  really	
  do	
  believe	
  that	
  if	
  you	
  don't	
  challenge	
  yourself	
  and	
  risk	
  failing,	
  that	
  it's	
  not	
  interesting.”	
   	
  ~Julie	
  Taymor	
    	
   	
    With	
  this	
  being	
  my	
  first	
  attempt	
  at	
  creating	
  theatre	
  I	
  really	
  tried	
  to	
  tell	
  a	
  story	
    that	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  experience.	
  	
  This	
  workshop	
  really	
  helped	
  me	
  understand	
  how	
  to	
  put	
   those	
  ideas	
  together	
  in	
  a	
  way	
  that	
  everyone	
  can	
  understand,	
  and	
  it	
  reminded	
  me	
  to	
   stick	
  to	
  simplicity.	
  	
  One	
  of	
  my	
  biggest	
  struggles	
  during	
  this	
  process	
  was	
  trying	
  to	
  sift	
   through	
  all	
  the	
  advice	
  that	
  was	
  being	
  offered	
  and	
  judiciously	
  decide	
  what	
  would	
  work	
   and	
  what	
  wouldn’t.	
  	
  I	
  think	
  I	
  failed	
  to	
  stand	
  up	
  for	
  my	
  vision	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  the	
  time.	
  	
  Being	
   bombarded	
  with	
  great	
  ideas	
  from	
  many	
  great	
  theatre	
  practitioners	
  clouded	
  my	
   judgment	
  and	
  I	
  allowed	
  myself	
  to	
  be	
  talked	
  into	
  ideas	
  that	
  didn’t	
  necessarily	
  fit	
  with	
  the	
   production	
  just	
  because	
  we	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  do	
  them.	
  One	
  example	
  of	
  this	
  was	
  the	
   projections.	
  	
  I	
  now	
  believe	
  the	
  changes	
  we	
  made	
  were	
  a	
  disservice	
  to	
  the	
  story	
  and	
   production	
  even	
  if	
  it	
  was	
  viewed	
  as	
  successful	
  because	
  it	
  cannot	
  exist	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
   Frederic	
  Wood	
  facility.	
  	
  This	
  version	
  of	
  the	
  show	
  has	
  no	
  life	
  after	
  this	
  production	
   because	
  it	
  is	
  unrealistic	
  in	
  terms	
  budget	
  and	
  portability.	
  	
  It	
  cannot	
  tour	
  in	
  its	
  current	
   state.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  too	
  many	
  actors	
  and	
  the	
  technical	
  needs	
  cannot	
  be	
  meet	
  by	
  the	
  types	
   of	
  road	
  venues	
  which	
  support	
  small	
  touring	
  shows.	
  	
  Also	
  no	
  Theatre	
  for	
  Young	
   Audiences	
  company	
  can	
  view	
  this	
  show	
  with	
  potential	
  for	
  remount	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  cost	
    	
    44	
    	
   of	
  the	
  animation	
  and	
  projection	
  equipment,	
  and	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  trained	
  staff	
  to	
  operate	
  such	
   a	
  specialize	
  program.	
  	
   With	
  all	
  the	
  constant	
  changes	
  to	
  my	
  story	
  I	
  also	
  feel	
  I	
  lost	
  myself	
  in	
  the	
  process.	
  	
   Its	
  only	
  now	
  in	
  hindsight	
  that	
  I	
  see	
  how	
  confused	
  I	
  was	
  and	
  how	
  that	
  confusion	
  was	
   reflected	
  in	
  the	
  script	
  and	
  the	
  production.	
  	
  Having	
  never	
  written	
  a	
  script	
  or	
  created	
  a	
   play	
  before	
  I	
  believe	
  I	
  allowed	
  myself	
  to	
  lose	
  track	
  of	
  what	
  I	
  was	
  trying	
  to	
  do.	
  	
  I	
  still	
  don’t	
   know	
  who	
  has	
  the	
  final	
  say	
  in	
  design	
  choices;	
  it	
  seems	
  to	
  always	
  be	
  the	
  director.	
  	
  I’m	
  still	
   discovering	
  how	
  to	
  maneuver	
  in	
  a	
  design	
  that	
  I	
  think	
  is	
  mine	
  but	
  is	
  dictated	
  by	
  an	
   outside	
  party.	
  	
  The	
  director	
  of	
  this	
  project,	
  Patrick	
  New,	
  is	
  a	
  very	
  experienced	
  director	
   with	
  an	
  effective	
  and	
  established	
  method	
  and	
  with	
  such	
  an	
  organic	
  project	
  the	
  necessity	
   for	
  experimentation	
  was	
  overlooked	
  and	
  the	
  workshop	
  was	
  tackled	
  as	
  if	
  it	
  were	
  a	
   regular	
  production.	
  	
  We	
  would	
  meet	
  after	
  rehearsals	
  to	
  discuss	
  what	
  I	
  was	
  trying	
  to	
  say	
   and	
  he	
  helped	
  me	
  flesh	
  out	
  the	
  parts	
  that	
  were	
  confusing	
  him,	
  which	
  I	
  think	
  made	
  it	
   more	
  accessible	
  to	
  audiences	
  who	
  are	
  not	
  familiar	
  with	
  the	
  stories	
  and	
  the	
  culture.	
  	
   However,	
  I	
  think	
  that	
  being	
  so	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  project,	
  knowing	
  all	
  the	
  stories	
  and	
  what	
  I	
   thought	
  I	
  was	
  saying	
  made	
  it	
  difficult	
  to	
  hear	
  outside	
  suggestions,	
  I	
  thought	
  it	
  was	
  clear	
   and	
  I	
  was	
  easily	
  offended	
  in	
  the	
  beginning.	
  	
  I	
  struggled	
  with	
  these	
  constant	
  requests	
  to	
   change	
  the	
  script	
  to	
  accommodate	
  the	
  blocking	
  and	
  actor’s	
  talent	
  level	
  and	
  felt	
  as	
  if	
  the	
   project	
  was	
  being	
  taken	
  over	
  by	
  this	
  alien	
  entity	
  that	
  didn’t	
  understand	
  what	
  I	
  was	
   trying	
  to	
  say	
  or	
  do	
  with	
  this	
  story.	
  	
  	
  But	
  I	
  didn’t	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  counter	
  this	
  power	
  struggle	
   and	
  where	
  my	
  own	
  voice	
  fit	
  into	
  the	
  decision-­‐making	
  process.	
  	
  	
  	
    	
    45	
    	
   As	
  a	
  designer	
  I	
  know	
  that	
  my	
  task	
  is	
  to	
  aid	
  the	
  director	
  in	
  bringing	
  his/her	
  vision	
   to	
  life,	
  so	
  as	
  the	
  playwright/designer	
  I	
  was	
  unsure	
  of	
  where	
  my	
  opinion	
  outweighed	
  the	
   director.	
  	
  I	
  think	
  the	
  solution	
  is	
  to	
  direct	
  or	
  co-­‐direct	
  with	
  a	
  more	
  like-­‐minded	
  individual,	
   one	
  who	
  has	
  knowledge	
  and	
  experience	
  with	
  stories	
  like	
  mine	
  and	
  a	
  desire	
  to	
   collaborate	
  rather	
  than	
  dictate.	
  	
  Each	
  type	
  of	
  director	
  has	
  a	
  place	
  but	
  when	
  creating	
   theatre	
  that	
  is	
  so	
  close	
  to	
  my	
  heart	
  I	
  think	
  I	
  need	
  to	
  assemble	
  a	
  collective	
  of	
  people	
  who	
   have	
  a	
  similar	
  way	
  of	
  thinking	
  to	
  mine.	
  	
  When	
  I	
  started	
  this	
  project	
  my	
  lighting	
  design	
   supervisor	
  Jon	
  Tsang	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  a	
  designer	
  is	
  only	
  as	
  good	
  as	
  the	
  people	
  they	
  surround	
   themselves	
  with,	
  and	
  he	
  was	
  absolutely	
  right.	
  	
  My	
  crew	
  was	
  not	
  only	
  talented	
  but	
   inspiring	
  and	
  they	
  pushed	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  finished	
  product	
  that	
  might	
  not	
  have	
  been	
  what	
  I	
   started	
  out	
  trying	
  to	
  obtain	
  but	
  I	
  still	
  think	
  this	
  rendition	
  of	
  the	
  production	
  has	
  merit	
  and	
   was	
  a	
  success.	
   I	
  really	
  think	
  this	
  workshop	
  was	
  successful	
  despite	
  the	
  drawbacks	
  of	
  a	
   complicated	
  and	
  expensive	
  production.	
  	
  The	
  workshop	
  showed	
  me	
  what	
  was	
  possible.	
  	
   It	
  developed	
  in	
  a	
  trial	
  and	
  error	
  sort	
  of	
  way;	
  with	
  each	
  elusive	
  and	
  perplexing	
  step	
  I	
   eventually	
  attained	
  some	
  clarity	
  and	
  I	
  now	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  approach	
  my	
  reworking	
  of	
  the	
   script	
  for	
  its	
  next	
  workshop.	
  	
  With	
  this	
  being	
  an	
  entirely	
  new	
  process	
  to	
  me	
  I	
  wasn’t	
   confident	
  enough	
  to	
  make	
  informed	
  decisions,	
  but	
  seeing	
  what	
  worked	
  and	
  what	
  didn’t,	
   I	
  now	
  feel	
  more	
  secure	
  in	
  what	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  say	
  and	
  how	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  say	
  it.	
  	
  The	
  script	
  is	
   currently	
  in	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  being	
  rewritten	
  in	
  a	
  way	
  that	
  brings	
  it	
  back	
  to	
  simplicity,	
  back	
   to	
  my	
  original	
  intentions.	
  	
  I’m	
  focusing	
  on	
  the	
  design	
  component	
  being	
  a	
  character	
  all	
  its	
    	
    46	
    	
   own	
  so	
  that	
  all	
  the	
  elements	
  are	
  truly	
  in	
  sync.	
  	
  Every	
  element	
  must	
  feel	
  like	
  it	
  belongs	
   there	
  rather	
  than	
  the	
  contrived	
  atmosphere	
  that	
  was	
  created	
  in	
  such	
  a	
  rush.	
  	
   I	
  learned	
  so	
  much	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  myself	
  as	
  an	
  artist	
  and	
  my	
  capabilities	
  and	
   limitations	
  as	
  a	
  theatre	
  creator	
  and	
  I	
  now	
  know	
  I	
  will	
  never	
  live	
  in	
  that	
  world	
  of	
   achievable	
  expectations.	
  	
  I	
  already	
  have	
  my	
  next	
  play	
  in	
  mind,	
  a	
  spin-­‐off	
  of	
  this	
  story	
   focusing	
  on	
  the	
  relationship	
  of	
  Terra	
  with	
  her	
  papa	
  interlaced	
  with	
  Inuit	
  myths	
  of	
  water	
   creatures.	
  	
  I	
  think	
  I	
  will	
  continue	
  with	
  this	
  idea	
  of	
  autobiography	
  mashed-­‐up	
  with	
  myth	
   and	
  create	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  short	
  plays	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  produced	
  individually	
  or	
  as	
  a	
  collection.	
   I’m	
  truly	
  thankful	
  for	
  this	
  opportunity	
  to	
  create	
  freely	
  and	
  I	
  think	
  this	
  experience	
   has	
  not	
  only	
  changed	
  the	
  way	
  I	
  design	
  and	
  create	
  theatre	
  but	
  it	
  has	
  shown	
  me	
  the	
   endless	
  possibilities.	
  	
  It	
  has	
  changed	
  my	
  entire	
  outlook	
  on	
  what	
  I	
  wanted	
  as	
  a	
  career.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    47	
    	
   Illustrations	
   	
    	
   Illustration	
  1	
  –	
  Matt	
  Reznek’s	
  poster	
  design.	
    	
    48	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  2	
  –Carolyn	
  Rapanos’	
  graffiti	
  rough	
  sketch	
   	
    	
   Illustration	
  3	
  –the	
  complete	
  graffiti	
  platform	
    	
    49	
    	
    Illustration	
  4	
  –	
  singular	
  armatures	
  before	
  assembly	
    	
    	
    	
    50	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  5	
  –	
  a	
  rough	
  sketch	
  of	
  the	
  concept	
  for	
  the	
  Raven	
  puppet	
    	
   Illustration	
  6	
  –	
  a	
  painted	
  4X6	
  inch	
  Raven	
  maquette	
   	
    51	
    	
    	
   Clockwise	
   Illustration	
  7	
  –	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  maquette	
   Illustration	
  8	
  –	
  finished	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  puppet	
   Illustration	
  9	
  –	
  close	
  up	
  of	
  Gran-­‐gran’s	
  face,	
  unpainted	
    	
    52	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  10	
  –	
  Tear’s	
  simple	
  bobbing	
  head	
  mechanism	
   	
    Illustration	
  11	
  –Tear	
  puppet	
    	
    	
    53	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  12	
  –	
  Coyote	
  rough	
  sketch	
    	
   Illustration	
  13	
  –	
  Coyote	
  maquette	
    	
    54	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  14	
  –	
  Coyote	
  in	
  standing	
  position	
    	
    55	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  15	
  –	
  shows	
  Coyote	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  David	
  Kaye	
    	
   Illustration	
  16	
  –	
  Raven	
  head	
  detail	
    	
    56	
    	
    Illustration	
  17	
  –	
  Raven	
  wing	
  detail	
   	
    Illustration	
  18	
  –	
  Raven	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  Nyla	
  Carpentier	
    	
    	
    	
    57	
    	
    Illustration	
  19	
  –	
  Otter	
  concept	
  rough	
  sketch	
   Illustration	
  20	
  –	
  Otter	
  puppet	
  profile	
   	
    Illustration	
  21	
  –	
  Otter	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto	
    	
    	
    	
    58	
    	
    Illustration	
  22	
  –	
  rough	
  concept	
  sketch	
  of	
  Turtle	
   Illustration	
  23	
  –	
  Turtle	
  maquette	
    Illustration	
  24	
  –	
  Turtle	
  profile	
    	
    	
    	
    59	
    	
    Illustration	
  25	
  –	
  Turtle	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actor	
  Alex	
  Carr	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Illustration	
  26	
  –	
  rough	
  sketch	
  concept	
  for	
  Sun	
  and	
  Moon	
   	
   	
    	
    60	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  27	
  –	
  Sun	
  projection	
   Illustration	
  28	
  –	
  Moon	
  projection	
   	
    	
   Illustration	
  29	
  –	
  Twin	
  Creations	
  sock	
  puppets	
   	
   	
    	
    61	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  30	
  	
  –	
  Twin	
  Creations	
  in	
  performance	
  with	
  actors	
  David	
  Kaye,	
  Alex	
  Carr,	
  Laura	
   Fukumoto	
  and	
  Nyla	
  Carpentier	
   	
    62	
    	
    Illustration	
  31	
  	
  –	
  Weesageechak	
  hand	
  puppet	
   	
    	
    Illustration	
  32	
  –	
  Hunter’s	
  daughter	
  hand	
  puppet	
   Illustration	
  33	
  –	
  puppet	
  box	
  rehearsal	
  with	
  Alex	
  Carr	
  and	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto	
   	
    	
    63	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  34	
  –	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Narrator	
  costume,	
  Actor	
   Meaghan	
  Chenosky	
  	
    	
    64	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  35	
  –	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Gran-­‐gran’s	
  costume,	
  actor	
  Lisa	
   Smith	
    	
    65	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  36	
  –	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Terra/Tear’s	
  costume,	
  actor	
   Ashley	
  McAllister	
    	
    66	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  37	
  –	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Coyote’s	
  costume,	
  actor	
  David	
   Kaye	
    	
    67	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  38	
  –	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Raven’s	
  costume,	
  actor	
  Nyla	
   Carpentier	
    	
    68	
    	
    	
   Illustration	
  39	
  –	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Otter’s	
  costume,	
  actor	
  Laura	
   Fukumoto	
    	
    69	
    	
   	
    	
   Illustration	
  40	
  –	
  rendering,	
  research	
  and	
  final	
  design	
  of	
  Turtle’s	
  costume,	
  actor	
  Alex	
  Carr	
   	
    70	
    	
    Illustration	
  41	
  –	
  final	
  set	
   	
    Illustration	
  42	
  –Narrator	
  talking	
  about	
  her	
  childhood	
  memory,	
  actor’s	
  Meaghan	
   Chenosky,	
  Ashley	
  McAllister,	
  Lisa	
  Smith	
    	
    	
    	
    71	
    	
    Illustration	
  43	
  –	
  shows	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  in	
  action	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    72	
    	
    Illustration	
  44	
  –	
  actors	
  Alex	
  Carr,	
  Laura	
  Fukumoto	
  and	
  David	
  Kaye	
  lifting	
  the	
  puppet	
   theatre	
   	
    	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    73	
    	
   Bibliography	
  	
   	
   	
   Allen,	
  Rich.	
  “What	
  is	
  Object	
  Theatre.”	
  Object	
  Theatre,	
  Objects,	
  Performance,	
  Material	
   Culture.	
  11	
  Jun.	
  2012.	
  Web.	
  23	
  Jun.	
  2012	
   Ballinger,	
  Franchot.	
  Living	
  Sideways:	
  Tricksters	
  in	
  American	
  Indian	
  Oral	
  Traditions.	
   Norman:	
  University	
  of	
  Oklahoma	
  Press,	
  2004.	
  Print.	
   Barbeau,	
  Marius,	
  and	
  David	
  Hancock.	
  Art	
  of	
  the	
  Totem:	
  Totem	
  Poles	
  of	
  the	
  Northwest	
   Coastal	
  Indians.	
  Surrey,	
  B.C:	
  Hancock	
  House,	
  2006.	
  Print.	
   Bell,	
  John.	
  Puppets,	
  Masks,	
  and	
  Performing	
  Objects.	
  Cambridge,	
  Mass:	
  MIT	
  Press,	
  2001.	
   Print.	
   Bell,	
  John.	
  “Puppets	
  and	
  the	
  Performance	
  of	
  Race”.	
  Puppetry	
  International	
  30	
  (2011):25-­‐ 27.	
  Print.	
   Bicat,	
  Tina.	
  Puppets	
  and	
  Performing	
  Objects:	
  A	
  Practical	
  Guide.	
  Wilshire,	
  UK:	
  The	
   Crowood	
  Press	
  Ltd,	
  2006.	
  Print.	
   Böhmer,	
  Gunter.	
  Puppen	
  Theatre.	
  Germany:	
  Bruckmann	
  Munchen,	
  1969.	
  Print.	
   Bruchac,	
  Joseph,	
  and	
  Michael	
  J.	
  Caduto.	
  The	
  Native	
  Stories	
  from	
  Keepers	
  of	
  the	
  Earth.	
   Saskatoon:	
  Fifth	
  House,	
  1991.	
  Print.	
   Currell,	
  David.	
  Puppets	
  and	
  Puppet	
  Theatre.	
  Wilshire,	
  UK:	
  The	
  Crowood	
  Press	
  Ltd,	
  2011.	
   Print.	
   Eigenbrod,	
  Renate,	
  and	
  Renée	
  Hulan.	
  Aboriginal	
  Oral	
  Traditions:	
  Theory,	
  Practice,	
  Ethics.	
    	
    74	
    	
   Black	
  Point,	
  N.S:	
  Fernwood	
  Pub,	
  2008.	
  Print.	
   Fettig,	
  Hansjürgen.	
  Hand-­‐und	
  Stabpuppen.	
  Germany:	
  Stuttgart-­‐Botnang,	
  1970.	
  Print.	
   Goldberg,	
  Moses.	
  Children's	
  Theatre:	
  A	
  Philosophy	
  and	
  a	
  Method.	
  Englewood	
  Cliffs,	
  N.J:	
   Prentice-­‐Hall,	
  1974.	
  Print.	
   Kohler,	
  Adrian	
  and	
  Basil	
  Jones.	
  “Handspring	
  Puppet	
  Co.:	
  The	
  genius	
  puppetry	
  behind	
   War	
  Horse.”	
  TEDtalks.	
  Mar.	
  2011.	
  Web.	
  12	
  Apr.	
  2012.	
  	
   Houston	
  Brown,	
  Sasha.	
  “An	
  Open	
  Letter	
  to	
  Urban	
  Outfitters	
  on	
  Columbus	
  Day.”	
  Indian	
   Country.	
  10	
  Oct.	
  2011.	
  Web.	
  15	
  Oct.	
  2011.	
   Humbert,	
  Raymond.	
  Puppets	
  and	
  Marionettes.	
  London:	
  Magnet,	
  1988.	
  Print.	
   Helbig,	
  Jack.	
  Rehearsing	
  with	
  Gods:	
  Photographs	
  and	
  Essays	
  on	
  the	
  Bread	
  and	
  Puppet	
   Theatre.	
  100	
  Vol.	
  ,	
  2004.	
  Print.	
   “Josef	
  Svoboda-­‐The	
  Scenographer.”	
  Theatre	
  Design.	
  Wordpress.	
  16	
  May.	
  2011.	
  Web.	
  10	
   Apr.2012.	
   Kwandibens,	
  Nadya.	
  “Concrete	
  Indian”.	
  RedWorks	
  Studio.	
  12	
  Apr.	
  2012.	
  Web.	
  30	
  Mar.	
   2012.	
  	
   Keel,	
  Paul.	
  Hand	
  Puppets.	
  Germany,	
  Hatje	
  Cantz	
  Verlag:	
  2006.	
  Print	
   King,	
  J.	
  C.	
  H.	
  Portrait	
  Masks	
  from	
  the	
  Northwest	
  Coast	
  of	
  America.	
  London:	
  Thames	
  and	
   Hudson,	
  1979.	
  Print.	
   Lawrence,	
  Bonita.	
  "Real"	
  Indians	
  and	
  Others	
  Mixed-­‐Blood	
  Urban	
  Native	
  Peoples	
  and	
   Indigenous	
  Nationhood	
  .	
  Lincoln:	
  University	
  of	
  Nebraska	
  Press,	
  2004.	
  Print.	
    	
    75	
    	
   Mehl-­‐Madrona,	
  Lewis.	
  Coyote	
  Wisdom:	
  The	
  Power	
  of	
  Story	
  in	
  Healing.	
  Rochester,	
  Vt:	
   Bear	
  and	
  Co,	
  2005.	
  Print.	
   Morrisseau,	
  Norval,	
  and	
  Donald	
  Robinson.	
  Norval	
  Morrisseau:	
  Travels	
  to	
  the	
  House	
  of	
   Invention.	
  Toronto:	
  Key	
  Porter	
  Books,	
  1997.	
  Print.	
   Mourning	
  Dove,	
  and	
  Heister	
  Dean	
  Guie.	
  Coyote	
  Stories.	
  Lincoln:	
  University	
  of	
  Nebraska	
   Press,	
  1990.	
  Print.	
   Paterek,	
  Josephine.	
  Encyclopedia	
  of	
  American	
  Indian	
  Costume	
  .	
  Denver,	
  Colo.:	
  ABC-­‐CLIO,	
   1994.	
  Print.	
   Shadbolt,	
  Doris,	
  and	
  Bill	
  Reid.	
  Bill	
  Reid.	
  Vancouver:	
  Douglas	
  and	
  McIntyre,	
  1986.	
  Print.	
   Stewart,	
  Hilary.	
  Looking	
  at	
  Indian	
  Art	
  of	
  the	
  Northwest	
  Coast.	
  Vancouver,	
  B.C:	
  Douglas	
   and	
  McIntyre,	
  1979.	
  Print.	
   Taymor,	
  Julie.	
  Playing	
  with	
  Fire	
  3	
  ed.	
  New	
  York,	
  NY:	
  Abrams,	
  2007.	
  Print.	
   Vastokas,	
  Joan	
  M.,	
  and	
  Robarts	
  Centre	
  for	
  Canadian	
  Studies.	
  Beyond	
  the	
  Artifact:	
  Native	
   Art	
  as	
  Performance.	
  North	
  York,	
  Ontario:	
  Robarts	
  Centre	
  for	
  Canadian	
  Studies,	
   York	
  University,	
  1992.	
  Print.	
   Wyatt,	
  Gary.	
  Spirit	
  Faces:	
  Contemporary	
  Native	
  American	
  Masks	
  from	
  the	
  Northwest.	
   San	
  Francisco:	
  Chronicle	
  Books,	
  1995.	
  Print.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    76	
    	
   APPENDIX	
   	
   	
   Script	
   	
   A	
  Little	
  Creation	
  	
   	
   	
   Written	
  by	
  Vanessa	
  Imeson	
   Developed	
  for	
  the	
  Stage	
  by	
  Vanessa	
  Imeson	
  and	
  Patrick	
  New	
   	
   	
   Author’s	
  Note:	
   	
   A	
  Little	
  Creation	
  is	
  an	
  amalgamation	
  of	
  several	
  Canadian	
  First	
  Nation	
  Creation	
   stories	
  and	
  characters	
  blended	
  together	
  to	
  reflect	
  the	
  traditions	
  of	
  the	
  past	
  with	
  the	
   bricolage	
  of	
  the	
  modern	
  lives	
  of	
  the	
  concrete	
  Indians	
  today.	
  	
  The	
  play	
  is	
  a	
  combination	
   of	
  oral	
  tradition	
  and	
  theatrical	
  realization.	
  	
  	
  The	
  characters	
  are	
  visually	
  left	
  up	
  for	
   interpretation	
  but	
  should	
  retain	
  and	
  essence	
  of	
  their	
  cultures	
  of	
  origin	
  (Haida,	
  Cree,	
   Ojibwa,	
  Iroquois)	
  while	
  allowing	
  the	
  hybridity	
  of	
  traditional	
  and	
  contemporary	
  culture	
  to	
   inform	
  the	
  design.	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   List	
  of	
  Characters:	
   	
   Narrator……...…Adult	
  Terra	
  retelling	
  the	
  creation	
  story	
  with	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  puppet	
  to	
  her	
   younger	
  self.	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran……....Terra	
  in	
  the	
  golden	
  years,	
  she	
  tends	
  to	
  exaggerate	
  and	
  spin	
  yarns	
  at	
  a	
   whim.	
  Puppet	
  and	
  human	
  form.	
    	
    77	
    	
   	
   Terra/Tear….......Enters	
  as	
  younger	
  puppet	
  version	
  of	
  Narrator	
  listening	
  to	
  the	
  tale	
  and	
   then	
  takes	
  on	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  Tear	
  in	
  the	
  retelling	
  both	
  in	
  puppet	
  and	
   human	
  form.	
  Terra/Tear	
  is	
  manipulated	
  by	
  the	
  same	
  actor	
  throughout,	
   preferably	
  one	
  with	
  dance	
  training.	
  Puppet	
  and	
  human	
  form.	
   	
   Sun……………..Personification	
  of	
  the	
  Sun	
  the	
  giver	
  of	
  life.	
  Very	
  jovial.	
  Puppet.	
  Voice	
  over.	
   	
   Moon…………..Personification	
  of	
  the	
  Moon.	
  Very	
  blue,	
  dreamy	
  and	
  melancholic.	
  Puppet.	
   	
   Raven…………One	
  incarnation	
  of	
  the	
  Trickster	
  spirit.	
  Very	
  meticulous	
  and	
  tedious.	
  	
  He	
  is	
   ruled	
  by	
  routine	
  and	
  ethereal	
  laws	
  of	
  probability.	
  Puppet	
  and	
  human	
   form.	
  	
   	
   Coyote…………..Another	
  incarnation	
  of	
  the	
  Trickster	
  spirit.	
  Very	
  selfish	
  and	
  arrogant.	
  	
   Content	
  with	
  the	
  world	
  revolving	
  around	
  him.	
  Puppet	
  and	
  human	
   form.	
   	
   Turtle…………....The	
  basis	
  of	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  Early	
  belief	
  was	
  that	
  the	
  earth	
  was	
  carried	
  about	
   the	
  heavens	
  on	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  a	
  giant	
  turtle.	
  Grandmother	
  type	
   character.	
  Puppet.	
   	
   Otter……………..The	
  overachiever.	
  she	
  is	
  smarter	
  than	
  the	
  rest	
  because	
  she	
  relies	
  on	
  her	
   passive	
  observation	
  to	
  deduce	
  truths	
  about	
  the	
  world.	
  Puppet	
  and	
   human.	
   	
   	
   Suggested	
  Actor	
  Breakdown	
   	
   ARTIST	
    	
    CHARACTER	
    78	
    	
   #1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  AGE	
  20-­‐35	
    Narrator	
    #2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  AGE	
  9-­‐15	
    Terra/Tear	
    #3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  AGE	
  65-­‐85	
    Gran-­‐gran	
    #4	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  AGE	
  any	
    Raven	
    #5	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  AGE	
  any	
    Coyote	
    #6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  AGE	
  any	
    Introduction	
  Hand	
  puppets,	
  Otter,	
  Tear’s	
  creation	
  I	
    #7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  AGE	
  any	
    Introduction	
  Hand	
  puppets,	
  Turtle,	
  Tear’s	
  creation	
  II	
    	
   Setting:	
   	
   The	
  stage	
  is	
  occupied	
  by	
  three	
  distinct	
  spaces;	
  the	
  back	
  porch	
  stoop	
  of	
  the	
   contemporary	
  world	
  where	
  the	
  play	
  is	
  currently	
  being	
  told,	
  the	
  puppet	
  world	
  where	
  the	
   story	
  being	
  told	
  plays	
  out	
  with	
  puppets	
  and	
  the	
  apron	
  where	
  the	
  real	
  world	
  mixes	
  with	
   the	
  mythic	
  and	
  characters	
  take	
  on	
  human	
  form.	
  	
  There	
  is	
  also	
  a	
  Punch	
  and	
  Judy	
  style	
   hand	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  in	
  the	
  shape	
  of	
  a	
  cheesy	
  old	
  television	
  set	
  at	
  the	
  beginning.	
   	
   	
   A	
  PLAY	
  IN	
  ONE	
  ACT	
  	
   	
   Hand	
  Puppet	
  Theatre	
  preset	
  center	
  of	
  the	
  apron	
  with	
  puppeteer	
  #6	
  and	
  #7	
  inside.	
   	
   Top	
  of	
  show	
  music:	
  a	
  mash	
  up	
  of	
  “Native	
  Puppy	
  Love”	
  and	
  “Electric	
  Pop	
  Wow	
  Mini	
  Mix”	
   A	
  Tribe	
  Called	
  Red	
   	
   Coyote	
  enters	
  from	
  front	
  of	
  house	
  whistling.	
  He	
  notices	
  the	
  audience	
  and	
  the	
  set	
  and	
   takes	
  it	
  all	
  in	
  with	
  grand	
  gesture,	
  Coyote	
  is	
  a	
  cad	
  and	
  overdramatizes	
  but	
  not	
  to	
  the	
   point	
  of	
  melodrama.	
  	
  The	
  music	
  fades	
  as	
  he	
  moves	
  about	
  the	
  house	
  and	
  speaks	
  to	
  the	
   audience.	
  	
   	
    	
    79	
    	
   Coyote:	
   (whispers)	
  Hey…	
  (looks	
  around)	
  Hey…what	
  are	
  you	
  doing	
  here?	
  (points	
  to	
   someone	
  in	
  the	
  audience)	
  	
  Yeah…you…what’s	
  going	
  on?	
  Why	
  are	
  you	
  all	
  here?	
  (tries	
  to	
   illicit	
  	
  answers	
  from	
  the	
  audience	
  then	
  adlibs	
  from	
  their	
  answers)	
  What	
  story?	
  (rustle	
   inside	
  small	
  puppet	
  theatre,	
  coyote	
  starts	
  to	
  fumble	
  with	
  oversized	
  remote)	
  	
  Oh…	
  is	
  it	
  the	
   Cree	
  story	
  where	
  Weesageechak	
  molds	
  the	
  brothers	
  of	
  light	
  and	
  dark	
  out	
  of	
  clay	
  and	
   they	
  race	
  around	
  the	
  world	
  creating	
  day	
  and	
  night?	
  Like	
  this…	
   	
   Coyote	
  points	
  to	
  the	
  hand	
  puppet	
  theatre,	
  clicks	
  the	
  remote,	
  colours	
  change	
  in	
  the	
  tv	
  and	
   sock	
  puppets	
  with	
  animal	
  characteristics	
  pop	
  up.	
   	
   Puppeteer#6:	
   umphhh….uggggrh…ahhhhha…making	
  brothers	
  is	
  harder	
  than	
  it	
  looks.	
  	
   	
   Sock	
  Weesageechak	
  tries	
  to	
  roll	
  little	
  people	
  stick	
  puppets	
  who	
  run	
  away	
  from	
  him.	
  	
   	
   Coyote:	
  	
   No,	
  no	
  that’s	
  not	
  right	
  is	
  it,	
  (Coyote	
  flipping	
  channels,	
  colours	
  change)	
   well	
  is	
  it	
  the	
  Haida	
  story	
  of	
  Raven	
  where	
  he	
  tricks	
  the	
  hunters	
  daughter	
  into	
  letting	
  him	
   into	
  to	
  the	
  hunters	
  cabin	
  so	
  that	
  Raven	
  could	
  free	
  the	
  sun	
  and	
  moon	
  and	
  bring	
  light	
  to	
   all	
  the	
  earth?	
  (Flipping)	
  Here	
  it	
  is…	
   	
   Coyote	
  points	
  to	
  the	
  hand	
  puppet	
  theater	
  where	
  a	
  new	
  story	
  starts.	
  Cabin	
  hung	
  with	
   Velcro	
  sun	
  and	
  moon	
  inside,	
  stick	
  puppet	
  Raven	
  flies	
  about	
  the	
  cabin	
  and	
  watches	
  the	
   sock	
  puppet	
  hunter’s	
  daughter	
  who	
  has	
  stereotypic	
  long	
  wool	
  hair.	
  	
   	
   Puppeteer#6:	
  	
  (as	
  hunters	
  daughter)	
  Bye	
  dad…uh	
  have	
  a	
  good	
  hunting	
  trip.	
  (looks	
  about,	
   tossing	
  her	
  hair)	
  don’t	
  worry	
  I’ll	
  be	
  fine	
  here	
  alone…no…no…I	
  won’t	
  let	
  anyone	
   in…(unenthused)	
  especially	
  my	
  good	
  for	
  nothing	
  boyfriend…ok	
  dad…locking	
  the	
   door…BYEEE…(harsh	
  whisper)	
  Bobby…	
  he	
  said	
  he	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  be	
  here.	
  (shrugs	
   shoulders	
  and	
  goes	
  in	
  cabin)	
  	
  Eh.	
  	
  	
   	
   Puppeteer#7:	
   (as	
  Raven,	
  looks	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  and	
  speaks	
  to	
  the	
  audience)…	
   oh…ok	
  so	
  your	
  probably	
  wondering	
  what	
  my	
  plan	
  is…ok	
  I’m	
  going	
  to	
  knock	
  on	
  the	
   door…(looks	
  around)	
  she’s	
  gonna	
  open	
  the	
  door…and	
  then	
  I	
  will	
  just	
  fly	
  in	
  grab	
  that	
  Sun	
   and	
  Moon	
  and	
  then	
  just	
  fly	
  back	
  out…foolproof!	
  (knocks	
  on	
  cabin	
  again	
  and	
  hides)	
   Knock,	
  knock,	
  knock.	
    	
    80	
    	
   	
   Puppeteer#6:	
  	
  (as	
  hunters	
  daughter,	
  mimes	
  opening	
  door	
  )	
  Bobby…(looks	
  around)	
   huh…well…ooh…umm…ok.	
   	
  	
   (Raven	
  rushes	
  the	
  hunters	
  daughter	
  and	
  gets	
  inside	
  the	
  cabin)	
   	
   Puppeteer#7:	
   (as	
  Raven,	
  grabs	
  Velcro	
  sun	
  and	
  moon)	
  Give	
  me	
  that	
  Sun.	
   	
   Puppeteer#6:	
  	
  (as	
  hunters	
  daughter,	
  screams	
  and	
  blocks	
  the	
  exit,	
  they	
  skirmish)	
  ahhhh,	
   ahhhhhhh,	
  ahhhhaahh.	
  	
  Nope…no…no	
  way	
  you	
  are	
  getting	
  out	
  of	
  here…awww	
  my	
  dad	
   is	
  gonna	
  kill	
  me.	
   Puppeteer#7:	
   (as	
  Raven,	
  panics)	
  Crap,	
  crap,	
  crap.	
  Ahh	
  the	
  chimney	
  (flies	
  out	
  the	
   chimney	
  coughing)	
  man	
  I’m	
  never	
  gonna	
  get	
  this	
  soot	
  out.	
   	
   Puppeteer#6:	
  	
  (as	
  hunters	
  daughter,	
  watching	
  raven	
  fly	
  away)	
  hun…I	
  always	
  wondered	
   why	
  ravens	
  were	
  black.	
   Coyote:	
  	
   Wait	
  you	
  can’t	
  be	
  here	
  to	
  see	
  Raven…	
  I	
  just	
  got	
  a	
  text	
  from	
  him	
  (pulls	
  out	
   cell)	
  and	
  he	
  has	
  a	
  pow	
  wow	
  this	
  weekend,	
  besides	
  (looks	
  around	
  and	
  flaps	
  arms	
  like	
   wings)	
  there	
  really	
  isn’t	
  enough	
  space	
  for	
  him	
  (aside)	
  or	
  his	
  ego,	
  to	
  fly	
  around	
  in	
  there.	
  	
   Oh,	
  are	
  you	
  here	
  to	
  see	
  that	
  same	
  old	
  Iroquois	
  story	
  of	
  Skywoman	
  falling	
  down	
  to	
  earth	
   when	
  it	
  was	
  nothing	
  but	
  a	
  puddle.	
  	
  	
   	
   Coyote	
  points	
  the	
  remote	
  at	
  the	
  hand	
  puppet	
  theatre	
  and	
  flips	
  channels,	
  the	
  colour	
   changes.	
  	
  The	
  Skywoman	
  stick	
  puppet	
  falls	
  down	
  from	
  the	
  top	
  of	
  the	
  puppet	
  theater	
   accompanied	
  by	
  raindrop	
  sound.	
   	
   Coyote:	
   (sarcastic)	
  I	
  know,	
  I	
  know	
  Muskrat	
  brings	
  her	
  dirt	
  and	
  she	
  puts	
  it	
  around	
   turtle’s	
  shell	
  and	
  creates	
  turtle’s	
  island	
  and	
  we	
  all	
  live	
  happily	
  ever	
  after…	
  kind	
  of	
  like	
   this.	
  	
   	
   Coyote	
  points	
  to	
  hand	
  puppet	
  theatre.	
  Stick	
  puppet	
  turtle	
  is	
  plunked	
  on	
  edge	
  of	
  puppet	
   theatre.	
   	
    81	
    	
   	
   Puppeteer#7:	
  	
  	
  (as	
  sock	
  skywoman)	
  Help…help…I’m	
  drowning.	
   	
   Puppeteer#6:	
  	
  (as	
  sock	
  muskrat)	
  Here…here	
  you	
  go	
  lets	
  just	
  put	
  this	
  on	
  turtles	
  shell.	
  	
   	
   Puppeteer#7:	
  	
  	
  (as	
  sock	
  skywoman)	
  Thanks!	
   	
   Coyote:	
  	
   (sits	
  on	
  stage	
  facing	
  the	
  audience,	
  looks	
  about	
  and	
  in	
  a	
  hushed	
  voice)	
  You	
   know,	
  I	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  one	
  to	
  convince	
  some	
  ducks	
  to	
  get	
  some	
  dirt	
  so	
  that	
  I	
  could	
  create	
   this	
  place.	
  	
   	
   Coyote	
  flips	
  channel	
  over	
  his	
  shoulder	
  and	
  mouths	
  the	
  words	
  along	
  with	
  the	
  puppeteer.	
   	
   Puppeteer#7:	
  	
  (sock	
  coyote)	
  Hey	
  you	
  ducks	
  (paper	
  ducks	
  on	
  a	
  stick)	
  go	
  get	
  me	
  some	
  dirt.	
   	
   Coyote:	
  	
   But	
  you	
  know	
  re-­‐writes.	
  Awww	
  no,	
  you’re	
  not	
  here	
  to	
  listen	
  to	
  that	
  Terra	
   girl	
  are	
  you?	
  (to	
  puppet	
  theatre)	
  that’s	
  it	
  pack	
  it	
  up	
  (artist	
  #6	
  stands	
  up	
  and	
  walks	
  with	
   theatre	
  off	
  stage,	
  while	
  still	
  inside)	
  Oh	
  that	
  Terra	
  girl	
  is	
  just	
  all	
  mixed	
  up,	
  too	
  many	
   stories,	
  too	
  many	
  blood	
  lines,	
  things	
  just	
  seem	
  to	
  blur	
  together	
  over	
  time	
  and	
  shift	
  and	
   change	
  so	
  you	
  never	
  know	
  what	
  you’re	
  gonna	
  get.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  infinite	
  possibilities	
  and	
   with	
  time	
  the	
  stories	
  change	
  ever	
  so	
  slightly	
  and	
  begin	
  to	
  reflect	
  the	
  storyteller	
  more	
   and	
  more.	
  	
  They	
  jumble	
  and	
  mix	
  and	
  get	
  confused	
  and	
  that	
  is	
  where	
  we	
  begin.	
  	
  	
   	
   Blackout	
   	
   “What	
  made	
  the	
  red	
  man	
  red”	
  Disney’s	
  Peter	
  pan.	
  	
  Lights	
  fade	
  up	
  with	
  Narrator	
  sitting	
   on	
  swing,	
  Terra	
  puppet	
  with	
  artist	
  #2	
  laying	
  at	
  the	
  bottom.	
  Coyote	
  hands	
  remote	
  to	
  tear	
   and	
  runs	
  off	
  stage.	
  	
  Terra	
  flips	
  the	
  channels	
  and	
  we	
  hear	
  various	
  sounds	
  and	
  ads	
   (anything	
  with	
  an	
  indigenous	
  element:	
  Lakota	
  commercial,	
  woodcarver	
  shooting	
  etc.)	
   Peter	
  pan	
  comes	
  back	
  on	
  with	
  fading	
  volume	
  as	
  the	
  Narrator	
  speaks	
  in	
  a	
  clear	
  storyteller	
   voice	
  (except	
  for	
  when	
  she	
  regresses)	
  and	
  moves	
  about	
  the	
  stage	
  through	
  her	
   monologue.	
    	
    82	
    	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
   (to	
  audience)	
  Oh	
  Hello!	
  Oh	
  there	
  are	
  so	
  many	
  people.	
  What’s	
  your	
  name?	
   (adlibs	
  from	
  response)	
  well	
  you	
  know	
  (persons	
  name),	
  and	
  everybody	
  for	
  that	
  matter,	
   when	
  I	
  was	
  a	
  little	
  girl,	
  my	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  sat	
  with	
  me	
  beneath	
  the	
  Amur	
  Maples	
  that	
  lined	
   the	
  cusp	
  of	
  the	
  creek	
  and	
  told	
  me	
  the	
  stories	
  of	
  our	
  creation.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  sit	
  by	
  her	
  feet	
   sucking	
  the	
  nectar	
  outta	
  clover	
  letting	
  her	
  words	
  intertwine	
  with	
  the	
  daydreams	
  in	
  my	
   head.	
  	
  I	
  can’t	
  wait	
  to	
  tell	
  these	
  stories	
  to	
  my	
  own	
  gran	
  kids.	
  	
  I	
  remember	
  them	
  like	
   yesterday’s	
  picnic	
  lunch,	
  turkey	
  on	
  whole	
  wheat	
  with	
  potato	
  salad	
  on	
  the	
  side	
  and	
  a	
  tall	
   glass	
  of	
  fresh	
  squeezed	
  lemonade…mmm…(aside)	
  or	
  was	
  it	
  ham	
  on	
  rye,	
  potato	
  chips	
   and	
  coke…	
  (laughing	
  embarrassed)	
  um	
  never	
  mind,	
  I	
  remember	
  well	
  enough	
  to	
  know	
  I	
   had	
  lunch	
  anyway.	
  	
  That’s	
  the	
  thing	
  with	
  memories,	
  you	
  know,	
  they	
  just	
  get	
  all	
  jumbled	
   up	
  with	
  thoughts	
  and	
  stories	
  and	
  ideas	
  and	
  sitcom	
  plots,	
  that	
  you	
  just	
  can’t	
  distinguish	
   what	
  you	
  think	
  you	
  remember	
  and	
  what	
  you	
  think	
  you	
  created	
  from	
  the	
  truth….or	
   fiction	
  for	
  that	
  matter	
  (looks	
  off	
  dreamily)	
  Oh…umm…what	
  was	
  I	
  saying	
  (retraces)	
   uhh…memories…coke…stories…Amur	
  maples.	
  	
  Oh	
  yeah…ok	
  (back	
  to	
  storyteller	
  voice)	
  so	
   those	
  summer	
  days	
  at	
  my	
  gran-­‐parents	
  were	
  what	
  I	
  looked	
  forward	
  to	
  every	
  June,	
   running	
  on	
  grass	
  with	
  no	
  broken	
  concrete	
  sticking	
  out	
  and	
  tripping	
  you	
  out	
  of	
  nowhere,	
   well	
  except	
  that	
  patch	
  by	
  the	
  pouch	
  that	
  my	
  gran-­‐gran	
  poured	
  herself,	
  oh	
  and	
  playing	
  in	
   running	
  water	
  that	
  wasn’t	
  attached	
  to	
  a	
  faucet.	
  	
  Well	
  we	
  still	
  did	
  that,	
  my	
  papa	
  would	
   set	
  up	
  the	
  sprinkler	
  in	
  the	
  back	
  yard	
  and	
  my	
  sister	
  and	
  I	
  would	
  run	
  around	
  in	
  matching	
   swim	
  gear	
  and	
  goofy	
  snorkels.	
  	
  And	
  then	
  we	
  would	
  lay	
  around	
  in	
  the	
  sun	
  and	
  my	
  Gran-­‐ gran	
  would	
  talk,	
  and	
  talk,	
  and	
  talk…	
   	
   Artist	
  #3	
  and	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  puppet	
  waddle	
  out	
  and	
  sit	
  next	
  to	
  the	
  Narrator.	
  	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    (interrupting)	
  Terra!	
  	
    	
   	
  Terra	
  puppet	
  and	
  artist	
  #2	
  shift	
  at	
  the	
  sound	
  of	
  their	
  name	
  and	
  move	
  clumsily	
  closer	
  as	
   Narrator	
  continues.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   She’d	
  say,	
  snapping	
  her	
  fingers,	
  she	
  always	
  did	
  that	
  when	
  she	
  was	
  trying	
   to	
  get	
  my	
  attention.	
  	
  	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran	
  begins	
  to	
  tell	
  the	
  creation	
  story	
  to	
  the	
  audience	
  and	
  the	
  younger	
  versions	
  of	
   herself	
  who	
  still	
  look	
  bored,	
  music	
  comes	
  up.	
  	
   	
   	
    83	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   Terra,	
  now	
  listen!	
  Turn	
  that	
  darn	
  thing	
  off.	
  	
  (tear	
  turns	
  off	
  T.V.)	
  I’m	
  going	
   to	
  tell	
  you	
  the	
  LEGEND	
  OF	
  OUR	
  CREATION	
  (epic	
  voice	
  with	
  cosmic	
  sounds.	
  	
  They	
  look	
  in	
   opposite	
  directions	
  to	
  see	
  where	
  it	
  came	
  from)	
  Long,	
  long	
  ago,	
  before	
  the	
  Sun	
  caught	
  the	
   Moon	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  time,	
  the	
  whole	
  world	
  was	
  covered	
  with	
  water	
  and	
  ice.	
  	
   	
   Lights	
  slowly	
  come	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  puppet	
  world	
  but	
  drop	
  abruptly	
  with	
  Tear’s	
  question.	
   Narrator	
  settles	
  down	
  beside	
  tear.	
   	
   Tear:	
   	
    Why?	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    What	
  do	
  you	
  mean	
  why?	
  That’s	
  just	
  the	
  way	
  it	
  is.	
    	
   Tear:	
   	
   But	
  if	
  there	
  was	
  nothing	
  but	
  water	
  and	
  ice	
  how	
  do	
  we	
  know	
  the	
  story	
   even	
  took	
  place.	
  	
  I	
  mean,	
  who	
  was	
  there	
  to	
  pass	
  the	
  story	
  down?	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    (unsure)	
  Well	
  Coyote	
  was	
  there.	
  	
    	
   Tear:	
   	
    	
  (unconvinced)	
  Coyote?	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    Yes.	
  I	
  just	
  talked	
  to	
  him	
  last	
  week	
  and	
  he	
  confirmed	
  it.	
    	
   Narrator:	
    (sarcastic,	
  moves	
  to	
  sit	
  with	
  Gran-­‐gran)	
  He	
  confirmed	
  it?	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    Yes.	
    	
   Narrator:	
    Yes?	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    	
    (epic	
  voice)	
  YES!	
  	
    84	
    	
   	
   Narrator:	
    ok,	
  ok	
  I’m	
  just	
  trying	
  to	
  get	
  the	
  story	
  straight.	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    oh…well	
  don’t	
  you	
  worry	
  bum,	
  	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran	
  freezes	
  while	
  narrator	
  regresses.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   (to	
  the	
  audience)	
  Her	
  and	
  my	
  papa	
  always	
  called	
  us	
  that…well	
  bum	
  or	
  jo…	
   my	
  sister	
  and	
  I	
  never	
  knew	
  which	
  one	
  of	
  us	
  was	
  which…sometimes	
  I	
  was	
  bum	
  and	
  then	
  I	
   was	
  jo.	
  	
  Sometimes	
  even	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  sentence,	
  I	
  used	
  to	
  think	
  it	
  was	
  because	
  they	
  could	
   never	
  remember	
  our	
  names.	
  	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran	
  interrupts.	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   OH…well	
  don’t	
  you	
  worry	
  bum,	
  there	
  are	
  no	
  discrepancies	
  here.	
  If	
  your	
   old	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  knows	
  a	
  thing	
  or	
  two	
  it’s	
  how	
  to	
  tell	
  a	
  story.	
  	
  Now	
  where	
  were	
  we?	
   	
   Narrator:	
   	
  (rushed	
  and	
  unenthused)	
  Long,	
  long	
  ago,	
  before	
  the	
  Sun	
  caught	
  the	
   Moon	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  time…	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   Oh	
  yes…	
  Long,	
  long	
  ago,	
  before	
  the	
  Sun	
  caught	
  the	
  Moon	
  for	
  the	
  first	
   time	
  the	
  whole	
  world	
  was	
  covered	
  with	
  water	
  and	
  ice.	
  	
  	
   	
   Lights	
  fade	
  up	
  on	
  puppet	
  world	
  and	
  dim	
  slightly	
  on	
  the	
  stoop.	
  	
  Narrator	
  takes	
  over	
  telling	
   the	
  story.	
  	
  	
  Spinning	
  stars	
  swirl	
  on	
  the	
  back	
  scrim.	
   	
   Narrator:	
    (sense	
  of	
  wonderment)	
  In	
  the	
  beginning…there	
  were	
  stars.	
    	
    	
    85	
    	
   Lights	
  slowly	
  come	
  up,	
  Sun	
  and	
  Moon	
  rotating	
  about	
  each	
  other	
  in	
  the	
  puppet	
  world.	
  	
  	
  As	
   they	
  spin	
  about,	
  the	
  light	
  changes	
  from	
  night	
  to	
  day	
  and	
  back	
  again.	
  	
  	
  After	
  at	
  least	
  3	
   steady	
  rotations	
  the	
  sun	
  stops	
  at	
  10	
  o’clock	
  and	
  the	
  moon	
  at	
  4.	
  	
  	
   	
   Narrator:	
   There	
  was	
  also	
  a	
  Sun,	
  to	
  bring	
  light	
  to	
  the	
  day…and	
  a	
  Moon,	
  to	
  cast	
  the	
   shadows	
  of	
  night.	
   	
   The	
  sun	
  and	
  moon	
  speak	
  to	
  each	
  other	
  only	
  in	
  passing.	
   	
   Sun:	
   	
    Good	
  morning.	
    	
   Moon:	
  	
    Good	
  Night.	
    	
   Sun:	
   	
    Good	
  Night.	
    	
   Moon:	
  	
    Good	
  morning.	
    	
   Sun:	
   	
    Good	
  morning.	
    	
   Moon:	
  	
    Good	
  Night.	
    	
   Narrator:	
   Now	
  that	
  Sun,	
  she	
  was	
  a	
  happy	
  one	
  but	
  she	
  was	
  bored.	
  	
  (aside)	
  Routine	
   just	
  got	
  the	
  best	
  of	
  her.	
  	
  What	
  she	
  wanted	
  was	
  somebody	
  to	
  have	
  fun	
  with…to	
  hang	
   out…or	
  at	
  least	
  someone	
  she	
  could…	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    	
  (buts	
  in)	
  Text.	
  	
    	
   Narrator:	
   Right,	
  Text	
  when	
  she	
  saw	
  something	
  funny	
  or	
  had	
  to	
  wait	
  in	
  line	
  or	
   wanted	
  to	
  get	
  some…	
  (looking	
  for	
  the	
  word)	
  some…	
  	
   	
    86	
    	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    (buts	
  in)	
  Sushi.	
    	
   Narrator:	
   Sushi?	
    Right,	
  right	
  sushi	
  and	
  so	
  she	
  shouted	
  at	
  that	
  Moon…(confused)	
  wait	
    	
   Blackout	
  on	
  puppet	
  world,	
  lights	
  come	
  up	
  on	
  stoop	
  where	
  narrator	
  questions	
  Gran-­‐gran.	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    (matter	
  of	
  factly)	
  Well	
  what	
  else	
  would	
  they	
  eat?	
    	
   Narrator:	
    Well…(searching)	
  well	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  but	
  where	
  would	
  they	
  get	
  sushi?	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    …mmmmm…yam	
  tempura	
  rolls…	
    	
   Narrator:	
    (snapping	
  her	
  fingers)	
  Gran-­‐gran	
  focus!	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
  	
   oh	
  well	
  (nonchalantly)	
  the	
  world	
  was	
  covered	
  by	
  water	
  and	
  ice	
  so	
  Coyote	
   set	
  up	
  shop…the	
  economy	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  market	
  for	
  something	
  new	
  and	
  fresh	
  since	
  all	
  the	
   previous	
  business	
  had	
  been	
  washed	
  up.	
   	
   Narrator:	
    Coyote.	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
  	
    um	
  yeah…	
  “Su-­‐Shi	
  Coyote”	
  used	
  to	
  be	
  up	
  on	
  Manitoba	
  st.	
  near	
  4th.	
    	
   Narrator:	
   What?	
  Oh	
  never	
  mind…where	
  was	
  I…ah…oh	
  right,	
  That	
  Sun,	
  she	
  was	
  just	
   so	
  lonely	
  and	
  blue	
  in	
  fact	
  that	
  she	
  shouted	
  at	
  that	
  Moon.	
  	
   	
   Lights	
  up	
  on	
  puppet	
  world	
  as	
  the	
  slightly	
  fade	
  on	
  stoop.	
    	
    87	
    	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
    Hey	
  there	
  blue	
  eyes…	
    	
  	
   Sun:	
   	
   Hey	
  there	
  blue	
  eyes,	
  let’s	
  go	
  out	
  sometime!	
  	
  Let’s	
  go	
  swimmin’!	
  	
  Let’s	
   have	
  some	
  fun!	
   	
   Narrator:	
   Oh,	
  but	
  that	
  Moon,	
  she	
  was	
  always	
  so	
  blue	
  and	
  more	
  content	
  to	
  sit	
  on	
   her	
  own	
  and	
  gaze	
  at	
  them	
  stars.	
  	
  That	
  Moon	
  was	
  so	
  fond	
  of	
  them	
  stars,	
  with	
  their	
   twinkling	
  smiles	
  gleaming	
  as	
  they	
  danced	
  and	
  twirled	
  in	
  that	
  inky	
  blanket	
  above	
  the	
   world,	
  that	
  she	
  barely	
  noticed	
  Sun	
  jumping	
  and	
  carrying	
  on.	
  	
  So	
  that	
  Sun,	
  crazy	
  as	
  she	
   was,	
  decided	
  to	
  find	
  someone	
  to	
  go	
  out	
  with.	
  	
  Someone	
  who	
  would	
  go	
  swimming	
  and	
   have	
  some	
  fun.	
   	
   	
  Sun	
  moves	
  to	
  High	
  noon	
  position.	
  	
  Colour	
  in	
  the	
  puppet	
  world	
  intensifies	
  hot	
  yellow	
   orange.	
  	
  Moon	
  is	
  hidden	
  at	
  the	
  bottom	
  of	
  the	
  rotation.	
  	
  Transitioning	
  projections	
  imply	
   Sun’s	
  search	
  from	
  the	
  stars	
  to	
  the	
  earth	
  as	
  she	
  scans	
  the	
  sky	
  with	
  her	
  eyes	
  and	
  then	
   focuses	
  her	
  attention	
  to	
  the	
  world	
  below	
  with	
  a	
  tilt	
  of	
  the	
  orb.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  She	
  searched	
  high	
  and	
  low	
  and	
  low	
  and	
  high,	
  but	
  nobody	
  wanted	
  to	
  play.	
  	
   She	
  searched	
  the	
  heavens	
  peering	
  behind	
  the	
  twinkling	
  stars,	
  Nobody	
  wanted	
  to	
  go	
  out!	
  	
   She	
  hopped	
  from	
  cloud	
  to	
  cloud	
  hunting	
  for	
  someone…anyone	
  to	
  go	
  swimming	
  or	
  go	
  to	
   the…the…	
  	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    Movies.	
    	
   Narrator:	
    Right	
  movies,	
  	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   	
  She	
  heard	
  the	
  new	
  movie	
  (name	
  a	
  current	
  film)	
  was	
  out	
  and	
  she	
  really	
   wanted	
  to	
  see	
  it!	
  	
   	
    	
    88	
    	
   Narrator:	
   But	
  nobody	
  wanted	
  to	
  do	
  anything.	
  	
  They	
  were	
  all	
  just	
  too	
  busy	
  they	
  said.	
  	
   Then	
  Sun	
  saw	
  Raven	
  flying	
  in	
  circles	
  above	
  a	
  big	
  iceberg,	
  and	
  she	
  yelled	
  and	
  hollered	
  and	
   hollered	
  and	
  yelled...	
   	
   Sun	
  yells	
  and	
  makes	
  a	
  commotion,	
  Narrator	
  reacts	
  to	
  the	
  racket	
  in	
  gesture	
  but	
   continues,	
  Raven	
  flight	
  music	
  comes	
  up.	
  	
  Raven	
  enters;	
  the	
  tip	
  of	
  the	
  iceberg	
  is	
  projected	
   with	
  some	
  clouds	
  on	
  the	
  scrim	
  from	
  behind	
  with	
  Raven	
  flying	
  above	
  it,	
  sun	
  remains	
  at	
   high	
  noon	
  looking	
  down.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  But	
  that	
  Raven	
  couldn’t	
  slow	
  down.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  just	
  so	
  busy	
  soaring	
  above	
  that	
   iceberg…dipping	
  and	
  gliding…gliding	
  and	
  dipping.	
  Her	
  wings	
  spread	
  wide	
  and	
  her	
  head	
   bobbing	
  about	
  surveying	
  all	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  Sun	
  could	
  see	
  that	
  Raven’s	
  reflection	
   shimmering	
  in	
  the	
  water	
  below	
  as	
  she	
  soared	
  in	
  that	
  circler	
  formation.	
  	
  Round	
  and	
   round	
  the	
  peak…	
  stretching	
  and	
  flapping…flapping	
  and	
  stretching…	
  her	
  Alular	
  quills	
   glinting	
  in	
  Sun’s	
  light.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  grinding	
  her	
  teeth	
  so	
  hard	
  her	
  occiput	
  ruffled	
  and	
  stood	
   on	
  end.	
  And…	
   	
   Music	
  stops,	
  Raven	
  freezes,	
  lights	
  up	
  on	
  stoop.	
   	
   Narrator:	
    (to	
  Gran-­‐gran)	
  um…what’s	
  an	
  occiput	
  again…	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   It’s	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  the	
  crown…where	
  the	
  feathers	
  puff	
  up	
  (puts	
  puppets	
   hand	
  at	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  its	
  head	
  to	
  show	
  position	
  of	
  feathers)	
  now	
  keep	
  going	
  …keep	
  going.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   Oh	
  right…	
  but	
  all	
  that	
  flying	
  was	
  keeping	
  that	
  Raven	
  far	
  to	
  busy	
  so	
  she	
   screeched	
  up	
  to	
  sun.	
  	
  	
  I’ve	
  got	
  people	
  to	
  see…	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Raven:	
  (OCD)	
  I’ve	
  got	
  people	
  to	
  see	
  and	
  places	
  to	
  go,	
  places	
  to	
  go	
  and	
  people	
  to	
  see.	
   	
   Narrator:	
    	
    Says	
  that	
  Raven.	
    89	
    	
   	
   Raven:	
  Now	
  I	
  didn’t	
  put	
  you	
  up	
  there	
  to	
  shine	
  over	
  the	
  world	
  and	
  then	
  to	
  annoy	
   everyone	
  with	
  all…all	
  that	
  ruckus.	
  	
  (talking	
  to	
  him	
  self)	
  squawking	
  and	
  mocking	
  and	
   talking	
  and	
  gawking.	
  Sun…	
  I’m	
  sorry	
  but,	
  I	
  am	
  very	
  busy,	
  I	
  simply	
  don’t	
  have	
  time	
  to	
  go	
   out!	
  	
  Very	
  busy.	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  time	
  to	
  go	
  swimming,	
  I’m	
  very	
  busy,	
  very	
  very	
  busy	
  and	
  I	
   certainly	
  don’t	
  have	
  any	
  time	
  to	
  have	
  fun!	
  Now	
  quit	
  talking	
  to	
  me	
  or	
  I’m	
  going	
  to	
  drop	
   this	
  stone	
  from	
  my	
  beak	
  and	
  who	
  knows	
  what	
  will	
  happen.	
  (talking	
  to	
  him	
  self)	
  whole	
   world	
  is	
  going	
  spring	
  up	
  outta	
  that	
  ice	
  and	
  men	
  are	
  going	
  start	
  climbing	
  outta	
  clam	
  shells	
   and	
  then	
  who’s	
  going	
  be	
  responsible…me	
  that’s	
  who…me…oh	
  well	
  how	
  am	
  I	
  supposed	
   to	
  explain	
  that…huh…how…awww	
  I	
  never	
  should	
  have	
  left	
  the	
  spirit	
  world…	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
   the	
  time	
  or	
  the	
  patience	
  for	
  this.	
  	
   	
   Raven	
  flies	
  off	
  stage	
  left.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   	
  	
  Time!	
  	
  What	
  a	
  funny	
  concept	
  Sun	
  thought	
  and	
  she	
  kept	
  looking,	
  looking	
   for	
  someone,	
  maybe	
  for	
  someone	
  with	
  time.	
  	
  	
   	
   Projection	
  of	
  the	
  iceberg	
  moves	
  up	
  exposing	
  a	
  second	
  tier	
  where	
  Coyote	
  is	
  trying	
  to	
   suntan.	
  Coyote’s	
  music	
  comes	
  up.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Then	
  Sun	
  saw	
  that	
  Coyote	
  scampering	
  down,	
  way	
  down	
  below	
  on	
  the	
   iceberg	
  and	
  everybody	
  knows	
  that	
  Coyote	
  has	
  nothing	
  but	
  time.	
  	
  	
   	
   Coyote	
  hops	
  out	
  without	
  puppet	
  and	
  stops	
  music	
  to	
  converse	
  with	
  Narrator.	
   	
   Coyote:	
  	
    You	
  know	
  I	
  resent	
  that!	
    	
   Narrator:	
   (annoyed	
  that	
  she	
  was	
  interrupted)	
  So	
  that	
  Coyote,	
  you	
  know	
  he’s	
  king	
  of	
   the	
  roost	
  so	
  he	
  goes	
  gallivanting	
  about	
  this	
  iceberg.	
  	
   	
   Coyote:	
  	
    	
    I	
  don’t	
  gallivant!	
    90	
    	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
   (more	
  annoyed)	
  well	
  you	
  do	
  now!	
  (in	
  disbelief	
  to	
  Gran-­‐gran)	
  Who’s	
  story	
   is	
  this	
  anyway!	
  So	
  that	
  Coyote…he	
  goes	
  gallivanting	
  and	
  scampering,	
  sniffing	
  and	
   roaming,	
  marking	
  his	
  territory	
  all	
  over	
  the	
  place…	
   	
   	
  Coyote:	
  	
    (spells	
  out	
  name)	
  COYOTE.	
    	
   Narrator:	
  	
   (covering	
  her	
  eyes)	
  ugggh	
  this	
  is	
  a	
  kids	
  show.	
  	
  Until	
  he	
  found	
  the	
  perfect	
   spot	
  to	
  lie	
  down.	
  	
  Well	
  that	
  Sun	
  she	
  yelled	
  and	
  hollered	
  and	
  hollered	
  and	
  yelled,	
  (Sun	
   makes	
  commotion	
  and	
  Narrator	
  reacts)	
  but	
  that	
  Coyote	
  just	
  rolled	
  over.	
  	
  And	
  with	
  a	
   great	
  big	
  yawn	
  (Coyote	
  stretches	
  and	
  yawns)	
  he	
  sighs.	
  	
  	
   	
   Narrator:	
    I	
  got	
  stuff	
  to	
  do!	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Coyote:	
   I	
  got	
  stuff	
  to	
  do!	
  (puppeteer	
  removes	
  sunglasses	
  from	
  puppet	
  coyote’s	
   face	
  and	
  puts	
  them	
  on)	
   	
   Narrator:	
    says	
  that	
  Coyote	
    	
   Coyote:	
   I’ve	
  got	
  to	
  float	
  on	
  this	
  iceberg	
  all	
  day	
  or	
  else	
  I	
  won’t	
  get	
  that	
  perfect	
  tan	
   all	
  them	
  Movie	
  Stars	
  are	
  ranting	
  about,	
  besides	
  Sun,	
  if	
  you	
  come	
  down	
  here	
  who	
  will	
  be	
   up	
  there	
  to	
  give	
  me	
  my	
  prefect	
  tan?	
   	
   Narrator:	
   So	
  that	
  Sun,	
  she	
  thinks	
  about	
  this	
  and	
  it	
  make	
  sense,	
  it’s	
  a	
  pretty	
  clever	
   concept	
  if	
  ya	
  think	
  about	
  it.	
  	
  (narrator	
  breaks	
  from	
  storytelling	
  voice)	
  Wait…	
  this	
  makes	
   no	
  sense.	
   	
   Blackout	
  on	
  puppet	
  world.	
  	
  Lights	
  come	
  up	
  on	
  stoop.	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    Of	
  course	
  it	
  does.	
    	
   	
    91	
    	
   Narrator:	
   (frantic)	
  Movie	
  stars,	
  (the	
  current	
  film),	
  texting?	
  These	
  things	
  didn’t	
  exist	
   at	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  the	
  world.	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    Who	
  said	
  anything	
  about	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  the	
  world?	
    	
   Narrator:	
   (in	
  disbelief)	
  You!…you	
  did	
  remember?	
  	
  We	
  were	
  sitting	
  right	
  here	
  and	
   you	
  were	
  like	
  “Terra,	
  now	
  listen!	
  I’m	
  going	
  to	
  tell	
  you	
  the	
  (epic	
  voice)	
  LEGEND	
  OF	
  OUR	
   CREATION”	
  (both	
  look	
  in	
  opposite	
  directions	
  to	
  see	
  where	
  it	
  came	
  from,	
  Terra	
  sits	
  up	
   more	
  attentively	
  at	
  the	
  bottom	
  of	
  the	
  stoop).	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   (absentmindedly)	
  oh…But,	
  this	
  isn’t	
  the	
  story	
  of	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  the	
   world.	
  Who	
  could	
  know	
  that,	
  (chuckles)	
  if	
  it	
  was	
  the	
  beginning	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  no	
  one	
   who	
  knew	
  because	
  no	
  one	
  had	
  come	
  before	
  and	
  they	
  wouldn’t	
  have	
  had	
  a	
  concept	
  of	
   time	
  or	
  anything?	
  	
  Heh…time,	
  what	
  a	
  funny	
  thing.	
  	
  Except	
  the	
  creator	
  maybe,	
  but	
  I	
  think	
   you’ll	
  find	
  the	
  blueprints	
  got	
  all	
  messed	
  up,	
  so	
  she’s	
  not	
  so	
  keen	
  on	
  talkin'	
  about	
  that.	
  	
   No…this	
  here	
  is	
  our	
  story,	
  but	
  not	
  ours	
  alone	
  either.	
  	
  And	
  its	
  not	
  the	
  only	
  one	
  there	
  is,	
  its	
   kinda	
  shared,	
  the	
  characters	
  change	
  but	
  the	
  plot	
  basically	
  stays	
  the	
  same,	
  kinda	
  like	
   them	
  smut	
  books,	
  ooo	
  I	
  love	
  Danielle	
  Steele.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   Um…ok	
  (look	
  of	
  disgust	
  that	
  her	
  gran-­‐gran	
  reads	
  smut	
  books),	
  But	
  it’s	
  not	
   like	
  the	
  last	
  time	
  I	
  heard	
  it…the	
  texting	
  and	
  the	
  moooviiii….	
  (snoring,	
  gran-­‐gran	
  has	
  her	
   head	
  down	
  and	
  is	
  asleep)	
  awww	
  forget	
  it.	
   	
   Lights	
  up	
  on	
  puppet	
  world	
  diming	
  on	
  stoop.	
  	
  Sun	
  is	
  alone	
  on	
  stage	
  and	
  the	
  scrim	
  is	
  a	
   sorrowful	
  blue	
  that	
  gets	
  deeper.	
  	
  The	
  scene	
  is	
  in	
  tableaux	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  seconds	
  before	
   resuming.	
  	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   But	
  that	
  Sun,	
  she	
  started	
  to	
  get	
  sad,	
  downright	
  blue	
  in	
  fact,	
  and	
  she	
   started	
  to	
  cry.	
  	
  	
   	
   Lights	
  dim,	
  Sun	
  cries	
  a	
  lone	
  tear,	
  which	
  is	
  projected	
  and	
  as	
  it	
  falls	
  Sun	
  disappears	
  out	
  the	
   top	
  of	
  the	
  frame.	
  	
  The	
  Tear	
  transforms,	
  falling	
  through	
  the	
  sky,	
  bouncing	
  down	
  the	
   iceberg	
  and	
  eventually	
  meeting	
  at	
  the	
  platform	
  where	
  artist	
  #2	
  and	
  Terra/Tear	
  puppet	
    	
    92	
    	
   continue	
  the	
  tumbling	
  motion	
  down	
  on	
  to	
  lowest	
  platform	
  looking	
  dazed	
  and	
  confused,	
   it	
  should	
  be	
  craggy	
  and	
  raw.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   That	
  tear	
  Sun	
  cried	
  fell	
  quickly	
  at	
  first,	
  and	
  then	
  began	
  to	
  change.	
  	
  It	
   twisted	
  and	
  warped,	
  first	
  creating	
  a	
  hand	
  that	
  reached	
  up	
  for	
  the	
  stars.	
  	
  Then	
  a	
  foot,	
  no	
   two	
  feet,	
  with	
  black	
  soles	
  searching	
  for	
  earth.	
  	
  That	
  tear	
  warped	
  and	
  twisted	
  and	
   twisted	
  and	
  warped	
  to	
  create	
  the	
  form	
  of	
  a	
  woman.	
  	
  Now	
  Sun	
  didn’t	
  want	
  that	
  creature	
   to	
  fall	
  to	
  the	
  world	
  so	
  far	
  below,	
  she	
  wanted	
  to	
  keep	
  her	
  so	
  they	
  could	
  go	
  out.	
  	
  So	
  they	
   could	
  go	
  swimming.	
  	
  So	
  that	
  they	
  could	
  have	
  some	
  fun.	
  	
  But	
  that	
  creature	
  was	
  falling	
  too	
   fast	
  for	
  Sun	
  to	
  catch	
  her.	
  	
  	
   	
   Blackout.	
  	
  Lights	
  up	
  on	
  stoop.	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   Now,	
  Terra	
  you	
  pay	
  attention	
  and	
  take	
  that	
  clover	
  outta	
  your	
  mouth,	
  it’s	
   just	
  starting	
  to	
  get	
  good.	
  Go	
  on…go	
  on!	
   	
   Lights	
  up	
  on	
  puppet	
  world	
  in	
  tableaux,	
  sun	
  peaking	
  in	
  from	
  the	
  upper	
  corner	
  stage	
  left.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   Well	
  that	
  Tear	
  she	
  continued	
  to	
  fall	
  through	
  the	
  sky,	
  twisting	
  and	
  turning,	
   turning	
  and	
  twisting,	
  reaching	
  out	
  for	
  something…something	
  to	
  grab	
  on	
  to…something	
   to	
  slow	
  her	
  down…something	
  to	
  break	
  her	
  fall.	
  	
  And	
  then	
  she	
  landed	
  on	
  that	
  iceberg	
  and	
   tumbled	
  down	
  to	
  the	
  world	
  below.	
  	
  	
  Where	
  there	
  was	
  nothing	
  but	
  water	
  and	
  ice	
  and	
  a	
   very	
  large	
  turtle.	
  	
  Well	
  that	
  Sun	
  she	
  called	
  and	
  shouted,	
  and	
  shouted	
  and	
  called.	
   	
   Sun	
  makes	
  commotion	
  and	
  Narrator	
  reacts.	
  	
  Turtle	
  music.	
   	
   Narrator:	
    Until	
  Turtle	
  weakly	
  shouted	
  back.	
  	
  What	
  are	
  you	
  yelling	
  about	
  …	
  	
  	
  	
    	
   Turtle:	
  What	
  are	
  you	
  yelling	
  about	
  Sun?	
  	
  It’s	
  too	
  early	
  to	
  go	
  out!	
  	
  It’s	
  too	
  early	
  to	
  go	
   swimming!	
  	
  And	
  it	
  is	
  entirely	
  too	
  early	
  to	
  have	
  any	
  sort	
  of	
  fun,	
  of	
  any	
  kind!	
   	
    	
    93	
    	
   Terra	
  as	
  Tear	
  tumbles	
  down	
  onto	
  Turtle.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   	
  Well	
  just	
  then,	
  as	
  Turtle	
  went	
  to	
  stretch,	
  that	
  creature	
  she	
  landed	
  square	
   on	
  old	
  Turtle’s	
  back.	
  	
  Well	
  that	
  Turtle	
  he	
  doesn’t	
  want	
  just	
  any	
  old	
  creature	
  just	
  hanging	
   out	
  on	
  his	
  back,	
  so	
  he	
  called	
  to	
  Otter	
  to	
  get	
  this	
  creature	
  some	
  land	
  from	
  the	
  bottom	
  of	
   the	
  ocean	
  and	
  some	
  of	
  those	
  stones	
  that	
  Raven	
  keeps	
  dropping,	
  so	
  that	
  tear	
  can	
  get	
  off	
   his	
  backside.	
  	
  But	
  that	
  Otter	
  didn’t	
  hear	
  that	
  Turtle	
  at	
  first,	
  she	
  was	
  so	
  caught	
  up	
  in	
  the	
   curl	
  of	
  the	
  waves,	
  splashing	
  and	
  paddling,	
  paddling	
  and	
  splashing,	
  until	
  all	
  of	
  a	
  sudden	
   she	
  crashed	
  right	
  into	
  that	
  Turtle	
  nearly	
  knocking	
  that	
  Tear	
  clean	
  off.	
   Otter	
  music	
  accompanies	
  her	
  swimming.	
  	
   	
   Narrator:	
   	
  Otter,	
  being	
  an	
  over	
  achiever,	
  apologized	
  profusely	
  and	
  then	
  dove	
  deep	
   to	
  the	
  bottom	
  of	
  the	
  ocean…	
   	
   Blackout.	
  	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    ahhhhh…she’s	
  gonna	
  drown!	
    	
   Lights	
  come	
  up	
  on	
  stoop	
  and	
  puppet	
  world.	
  	
  Narrator	
  and	
  Otter	
  both	
  stare	
  at	
  Gran-­‐gran.	
   Tear	
  begins	
  to	
  dance	
  slowly.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   And	
  returned	
  with	
  some	
  mud.	
  	
  (Otter	
  holds	
  up	
  paw	
  with	
  mud	
  mimicking	
   narration)	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    (relieved)	
  oh	
  good.	
    	
   Narrator:	
   What	
  do	
  you	
  mean	
  (mimicking)	
  “oh	
  good”	
  you	
  know	
  she	
  doesn’t…you	
   know	
  this	
  story…it’s	
  your	
  story!	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   so	
  exciting.	
  	
   	
    oh	
  right…I	
  know	
  bum…but,	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  lights	
  and	
  dramatic	
  music…it’s	
  just	
    94	
    	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran	
  tilts	
  her	
  head	
  to	
  the	
  side	
  and	
  falls	
  asleep	
  again,	
  snoring	
   	
   Narrator:	
    (in	
  disbelief)	
  Really?	
  	
  Your	
  just	
  gonna…okay	
  well…	
    	
   The	
  Cataclysm.	
  The	
  stage	
  becomes	
  a	
  furry	
  of	
  motion	
  with	
  tear	
  at	
  the	
  center,	
  crashing	
   thunder	
  and	
  lightning,	
  trees	
  come	
  crashing	
  in,	
  leaf	
  gobos	
  swirl	
  across	
  the	
  stage.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
  As	
  that	
  Otter	
  swam	
  he	
  kept	
  bringing	
  up	
  more	
  and	
  more	
  dirt	
  and	
  rocks	
  and	
   tiny	
  crusty	
  sea	
  creature	
  that	
  were	
  too	
  slow	
  to	
  get	
  away.	
  	
  As	
  she	
  made	
  trip	
  after	
  trip	
  the	
   mud	
  got	
  longer	
  and	
  wider	
  and	
  thicker	
  and	
  stronger.	
  	
  It	
  started	
  to	
  hill	
  and	
  furrow.	
  	
  It	
   started	
  to	
  grow	
  trees!	
  	
  It	
  grew	
  Amur	
  Maples	
  and	
  clovers!	
  	
  The	
  ocean	
  sprung	
  up	
  in	
  the	
   middle	
  and	
  streamed	
  down	
  the	
  hills	
  and	
  over	
  the	
  cliffs.	
  	
  The	
  land	
  began	
  to	
  speak	
  and	
   listen	
  and	
  move.	
  	
  (Terra/Tear	
  begins	
  to	
  dance	
  faster	
  as	
  the	
  music	
  gets	
  louder	
  and	
   increases	
  tempo)	
  The	
  trees	
  beckoned	
  that	
  Tear	
  closer	
  and	
  twisted	
  her	
  about,	
  tangling	
   her	
  hair	
  and	
  dizzying	
  her	
  head.	
  	
  Shadows	
  closed	
  in,	
  and	
  that	
  Sun,	
  well	
  she	
  just	
  lost	
  sight	
   of	
  that	
  Tear	
  in	
  the	
  darkness	
  of	
  the	
  growing	
  world.	
   	
   Dance	
  sequence.	
  The	
  techno	
  pow	
  wow	
  music	
  intermingls	
  with	
  wind,	
  thunder	
  and	
  lighting	
   progressively	
  getting	
  louder.	
  	
  Tear	
  gets	
  violently	
  twisted	
  about	
  by	
  the	
  environment.	
  	
  The	
   other	
  characters	
  and/or	
  large	
  branches	
  fly	
  in	
  and	
  force	
  her	
  down	
  stage	
  until	
  she	
  is	
   deconstructed,	
  the	
  puppet	
  is	
  tossed	
  off	
  and	
  her	
  real	
  life	
  counter	
  part	
  rolls	
  over	
  the	
  edge	
   on	
  to	
  the	
  main	
  stage	
  apron	
  where	
  she	
  continues	
  to	
  dance	
  and	
  be	
  tossed	
  about	
  by	
   branches.	
  	
  The	
  waves	
  are	
  shifted	
  and	
  turned	
  to	
  reveal	
  grass,	
  turtle	
  is	
  removed,	
  land	
  rises,	
   the	
  iceberg	
  dissolves	
  into	
  a	
  waterfall.	
   	
   	
  Blackout.	
  	
   	
   Narrator:	
    (thrilled)	
  What	
  was	
  that!?	
    	
   Lights	
  come	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  stoop.	
   	
    	
    95	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    (suddenly	
  waking	
  up,	
  confused)	
  What?	
  …What?	
    	
   Narrator:	
    That!	
  …	
  That…cosmic	
  collision	
  of	
  fury.	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   (indifferent	
  and	
  dozing	
  back	
  off	
  to	
  sleep)	
  oh	
  that…(yawing	
  and	
  waving	
  it	
   off	
  and	
  then	
  propping	
  her	
  head)	
  you	
  know…big	
  bang…genesis…chinoodin	
  (big	
  wind	
  in	
   Ojibway)…	
  création	
  (French	
  pronunciation).	
   	
   	
  Lights	
  come	
  up	
  on	
  depressed	
  Sun	
  and	
  moon	
  rotating	
  about	
  each	
  other	
  in	
  a	
  small	
  circle	
   with	
  faded	
  circling	
  of	
  stars	
  seen	
  at	
  the	
  beginning	
  to	
  show	
  the	
  progression	
  of	
  time,	
   human	
  Tear	
  is	
  hiding	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  the	
  puppet	
  world.	
   	
   Narrator:	
    Amazing…	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
  	
    right…right…now	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  story.	
    	
   Narrator:	
   oh…ok…Well	
  that	
  Sun,	
  she	
  was	
  right	
  lonely	
  now,	
  just	
  the	
  deepest	
  shade	
   of	
  blue	
  in	
  fact,	
  and	
  she	
  searched	
  high	
  and	
  low	
  for	
  that	
  Tear.	
  	
  She	
  called	
  to	
  that	
  Moon.	
  	
   	
   Narrator:	
    Hey	
  there	
  blue	
  eyes…	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Sun:	
   	
   Hey	
  there	
  blue	
  eyes	
  have	
  you	
  seen	
  that	
  Tear?	
  	
  We	
  were	
  gonna	
  go	
  out,	
  we	
   were	
  gonna	
  go	
  swimming	
  and	
  we	
  most	
  certainly	
  were	
  gonna	
  have	
  some	
  fun,	
  no	
  matter	
   what	
  ol’	
  Turtle	
  says!	
   	
   Lights	
  glitter	
  and	
  swirl	
  with	
  deep	
  blues	
  and	
  purples	
  at	
  center	
  stage.	
   	
   Narrator:	
   	
  But	
  that	
  Moon	
  she	
  just	
  sat	
  quietly	
  and	
  she	
  watched	
  the	
  world	
  as	
  it	
   moved	
  and	
  changed.	
  	
  The	
  glistening	
  sea	
  of	
  ice	
  and	
  water	
  that	
  once	
  reflected	
  them	
  stars	
   was	
  now	
  dark	
  and	
  deep	
  and	
  shadowy.	
  	
  That	
  Moon	
  had	
  never	
  seen	
  anything	
  like	
  it.	
  	
  And	
    	
    96	
    	
   that	
  Sun,	
  well	
  she	
  was	
  so	
  sad,	
  she	
  yelled	
  and	
  hollered	
  and	
  hollered	
  and	
  yelled,	
  but	
  there	
   was	
  no	
  sign	
  of	
  that	
  Tear.	
  	
  And	
  so	
  she	
  searched,	
  and	
  searched,	
  and	
  searched,	
  but	
  found	
   only	
  darkness.	
   	
   Blackout.	
  	
  Dim	
  expanding	
  spot	
  on	
  Tear	
  discovering	
  the	
  world	
  anew	
  from	
  stage	
  right.	
   Moving	
  tree	
  gobos	
  in	
  eerie	
  green.	
  One	
  by	
  one	
  Raven,	
  Coyote	
  and	
  Otter	
  leave	
  their	
   puppet	
  counter	
  parts	
  in	
  the	
  puppet	
  world	
  while	
  live	
  actors	
  come	
  into	
  the	
  real	
  world.	
  	
  As	
   each	
  creature	
  enters	
  they	
  begin	
  to	
  check	
  out	
  the	
  new	
  world	
  and	
  then	
  stop,	
  Raven	
  and	
   Coyote	
  circle	
  each	
  other	
  staring	
  each	
  other	
  down.	
   	
   Raven:	
  humph….oh	
  its	
  you!	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  hearing	
  some	
  wild	
  stories	
  about	
  you!	
   	
   Coyote:	
    Is	
  that	
  so…well	
  I	
  haven’t	
  heard	
  anything	
  about	
  you.	
    	
   Otter:	
   	
   Look!	
    Really…you	
  two	
  are	
  going	
  to	
  do	
  that	
  now?	
  (pointing	
  at	
  a	
  frightened	
  tear)	
    	
  	
   One	
  after	
  another	
  they	
  echo	
  each	
  other	
  freezing	
  and	
  stare	
  at	
  tear.	
  	
   	
   Blackout	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
  	
   related.	
    Ooo…ha…ha…I	
  saw	
  an	
  otter	
  in	
  the	
  harbour	
  last	
  week,	
  I	
  wonder	
  if	
  they’re	
    	
   Narrator:	
   else.	
    Well…I’m	
  sure	
  they	
  are.	
  	
  So	
  is	
  that…did	
  you…did	
  you	
  have	
  something	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
  	
    What…oh	
  no	
  why?	
    	
    	
    97	
    	
   Narrator:	
   Ooooh	
  shiny…You	
  know	
  what	
  no	
  reason…so…	
  they	
  are	
  all	
  looking	
  at	
  each	
   other…and…right…right…So	
  that	
  Tear	
  was	
  just	
  so	
  frightened.	
  	
  She	
  looked	
  for	
  that	
  Sun	
   but	
  the	
  shadows	
  twisted	
  and	
  jerked,	
  choking	
  out	
  the	
  light.	
  	
  She	
  didn’t	
  know	
  anybody	
  on	
   that	
  Turtle	
  Island	
  and	
  all	
  them	
  creatures,	
  well,	
  they	
  just	
  stared	
  at	
  that	
  Tear.	
  	
  She	
  was	
   kinda	
  funny	
  lookin’	
  to	
  them	
  ya	
  see,	
  with	
  her	
  little	
  square	
  box	
  feet,	
  kinda	
  like	
  yours	
   (directed	
  to	
  the	
  audience)	
  with	
  the	
  little	
  nubby	
  toes,	
  and	
  her	
  straight	
  dark	
  hair.	
  	
  She	
  was	
   strange	
  but	
  beautiful	
  and	
  them	
  creatures	
  didn’t	
  know	
  what	
  to	
  think.	
  	
  So	
  that	
  Raven	
  she	
   pipes	
  up.	
  	
   	
   Raven,	
  Coyote	
  and	
  Otter	
  begin	
  to	
  rhythmically	
  surround	
  Tear,	
  investigating	
  and	
  poking	
   at	
  her.	
   	
   Raven:	
  Well…	
  that	
  Tear	
  there,	
  her	
  hair	
  is	
  shimmerin’	
  black	
  and	
  knotty	
  and	
  twisted	
  like	
  a	
   nest,	
  so	
  she	
  must	
  be	
  a	
  raven,	
  just	
  a	
  funny	
  looking	
  raven.	
   	
   Coyote:	
    No,	
  no,	
  no	
    	
   Narrator:	
    	
  Says	
  that	
  Coyote	
  	
    	
   As	
  Coyote	
  examines	
  tear.	
   	
   Coyote:	
   Look	
  …	
  at	
  her	
  skin	
  it’s	
  all	
  shimmerin’	
  and	
  silky	
  and	
  bronze,	
  she	
  can’t	
  be	
  a	
   raven,	
  she	
  looks	
  too	
  good,	
  she	
  must	
  be	
  a	
  coyote!	
  Just	
  an	
  odd,	
  yet	
  oddly	
  attractive,	
   coyote!	
   	
   Narrator:	
   	
  But	
  Otter	
  wasn’t	
  convinced.	
  	
  (examining	
  Tear)	
  she	
  looked	
  at	
  her	
  feet	
  and	
   her	
  face	
  and	
  her	
  hands	
  and	
  her	
  legs.	
  	
  That	
  Tear	
  was	
  like	
  nothin’	
  that	
  Otter	
  had	
  ever	
  seen	
   before	
  and	
  Otter	
  could	
  tell	
  Tear	
  was	
  a	
  little	
  worried	
  that	
  she	
  didn’t	
  quite	
  fit	
  in.	
  	
  Tear	
  was	
   all	
  alone	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  ,	
  but	
  she	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  give	
  it	
  her	
  best	
  shot.	
   	
   Raven,	
  Coyote	
  and	
  Otter	
  scare	
  Tear	
  around	
  the	
  edge	
  of	
  the	
  puppet	
  world	
  proscenium	
   where	
  they	
  revert	
  back	
  to	
  their	
  puppet	
  identities	
  and	
  try	
  to	
  figure	
  out	
  what	
  Tear	
  is	
   through	
  skill.	
  	
  The	
  puppets	
  enact	
  the	
  following	
  character	
  music	
  accompaniment.	
   	
    98	
    	
   	
   Narrator:	
   	
  So	
  that	
  Tear	
  she	
  tried	
  to	
  fly	
  with	
  Raven,	
  but	
  she	
  just	
  couldn’t	
  get	
  her	
  feet	
   off	
  the	
  ground.	
  	
  (pause	
  for	
  action	
  completion)	
  Then	
  she	
  tried	
  to	
  run	
  with	
  Coyote,	
  but	
   that	
  Coyote	
  was	
  just	
  too	
  fast,	
  and	
  Tear’s	
  little	
  box	
  feet	
  just	
  couldn’t	
  keep	
  up.	
  (pause	
  for	
   action	
  completion)	
  So	
  that	
  Otter	
  she	
  took	
  her	
  swimmin’,	
  she	
  didn’t	
  think	
  that	
  Tear	
   looked	
  like	
  an	
  otter	
  but	
  if	
  she	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  raven	
  and	
  she	
  sure	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  coyote	
  then	
  what	
   could	
  she	
  be?	
  	
  Oh	
  well,	
  that	
  Tear	
  she	
  loved	
  the	
  water,	
  but	
  Otter	
  swam	
  so	
  deep,	
  she	
   couldn’t	
  hold	
  her	
  breath	
  and	
  she	
  swam	
  back	
  to	
  shore	
  and	
  sat	
  on	
  the	
  beach.	
  (pause	
  for	
   action	
  completion).	
   	
   Lights	
  dim	
  and	
  fade	
  blue,	
  narrow	
  focus	
  on	
  Tear	
  stage	
  right.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
    Now	
  that	
  Tear	
  was	
  lonely,	
  downright	
  blue	
  in	
  fact,	
  and	
  she	
  began	
  to	
  cry.	
  	
    	
   Tear	
  mimics	
  narration.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
   Now	
  those	
  tears	
  fell	
  to	
  the	
  ground	
  and	
  they	
  mixed	
  with	
  the	
  sand	
  and	
  the	
   clay,	
  they	
  mixed	
  with	
  the	
  dust	
  and	
  the	
  earth,	
  and	
  that	
  Tear	
  began	
  to	
  mold	
  some	
  little	
   box	
  feet	
  just	
  like	
  hers.	
  	
  She	
  molded	
  some	
  hands	
  and	
  a	
  face	
  and	
  some	
  long	
  dark	
  hair.	
   (Tear	
  pulls	
  stick	
  puppets	
  from	
  behind	
  a	
  rock	
  near	
  the	
  puppet	
  world	
  proscenium)	
  	
  That	
   Tear	
  she	
  found	
  some	
  raven	
  feathers	
  and	
  tucked	
  them	
  behind	
  that	
  little	
  creature’s	
  ear.	
  	
   And	
  she	
  put	
  her	
  strange	
  but	
  beautiful	
  little	
  creation	
  on	
  a	
  rock	
  to	
  dry.	
  	
  	
   	
   Lights	
  fade	
  up	
  to	
  hot	
  orange	
  yellow,	
  Sun	
  at	
  high	
  noon.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
   Well	
  that	
  Sun,	
  she’d	
  been	
  searching	
  all	
  this	
  time	
  you	
  know,	
  and	
  she	
  saw	
   that	
  Tear	
  on	
  that	
  beach.	
  	
  She	
  hollered	
  and	
  yelled	
  and	
  yelled	
  and	
  hollered	
  until	
  that	
  tear	
   looked	
  up.	
  	
  Now	
  that	
  Sun	
  she	
  was	
  just	
  so	
  happy.	
  	
  She	
  had	
  finally	
  found	
  that	
  someone,	
   someone	
  with	
  time,	
  time	
  to	
  go	
  out,	
  time	
  to	
  go	
  swimmin’,	
  and	
  most	
  importantly	
  of	
  all,	
   time	
  to	
  have	
  fun!	
  	
  Tear	
  smiled	
  and	
  her	
  teeth	
  sparkled	
  like	
  the	
  stars.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  so	
  happy	
   to	
  be	
  back	
  with	
  that	
  Sun	
  that	
  she	
  didn’t	
  notice	
  that	
  Coyote	
  whispering	
  something	
  in	
  that	
   strange	
  but	
  beautiful	
  little	
  creature’s	
  ear.	
  	
  That	
  Tear	
  she	
  didn’t	
  notice	
  the	
  little	
  creature	
   begin	
  to	
  crack	
  and	
  grow	
  and	
  shutter	
  and	
  change.	
  	
  (Artist	
  #6	
  and	
  #7	
  lift	
  stick	
  puppet	
  over	
   their	
  heads	
  in	
  circular	
  motion,	
  splitting	
  the	
  puppet	
  in	
  two	
  at	
  the	
  top	
  and	
  exchanging	
  the	
    	
    99	
    	
   stick	
  puppet	
  for	
  mutated	
  rod	
  sock	
  puppet	
  versions	
  at	
  bottom)	
  Tear	
  didn’t	
  notice	
  that	
   little	
  creature	
  begin	
  to	
  move	
  or	
  take	
  its	
  first	
  steps	
  and	
  split	
  in	
  two.	
  	
  	
   	
   Sun	
  starts	
  a	
  commotion	
  and	
  yells	
  at	
  Tear	
   	
   Sun:	
    Hey…	
  (makes	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  commotions)	
    	
   The	
  little	
  puppet	
  creatures	
  jump	
  and	
  play	
  all	
  over	
  the	
  land	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
   Well	
  that	
  Sun,	
  she	
  saw	
  what	
  was	
  going	
  on,	
  and	
  she	
  yelled	
  and	
  hollered	
   and	
  hollered	
  yelled	
  until	
  Tear	
  turned	
  around	
  to	
  see	
  them	
  strange	
  but	
  beautiful	
  little	
   creatures	
  tumble	
  in	
  the	
  furrows	
  of	
  the	
  earth	
  and	
  play	
  in	
  the	
  streams.	
  	
   	
   The	
  little	
  puppet	
  creatures	
  dance	
  and	
  partake	
  in	
  lewd	
  actions.	
   	
   Sun:	
   Hey…	
  isn’t	
  someone	
  going	
  to	
  do	
  something.	
  	
  They’re	
  running	
  amuck…	
  Grab	
  that	
   little	
  guy	
  he’s	
  peeing	
  in	
  the	
  pool.	
   	
   Raven	
  enters	
  stage	
  left	
  and	
  lures	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  twins	
  while	
  Coyote	
  enters	
  from	
  stage	
  right	
   distracting	
  the	
  other.	
  	
  Tear	
  jumps	
  up	
  and	
  tries	
  get	
  the	
  twins	
  but	
  she	
  is	
  too	
  short	
  to	
  reach	
   the	
  one	
  raven	
  has,	
  so	
  she	
  engages	
  in	
  a	
  tug	
  of	
  war	
  over	
  the	
  other	
  with	
  Coyote	
  and	
  loses	
   following	
  them	
  off	
  stage.	
  	
  She	
  then	
  makes	
  her	
  way	
  over	
  to	
  the	
  stoop	
  and	
  sits	
  attentively	
   playing	
  with	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  twins	
  like	
  a	
  doll.	
   	
   Blackout.	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    chuckles…	
    	
   	
  Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
   (looks	
  at	
  Gran-­‐gran)	
  Really…amuck?	
    	
    100	
    	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    chuckles…Hooo	
  Ah	
  ha…	
  do	
  you	
  get	
  it?	
    	
   Narrator:	
  	
  	
  	
   (sarcastic)	
  yeah…	
  I	
  get	
  it	
  a	
  MUCK…they’re	
  made	
  of	
   mud…hhhaahha…funny.	
  So	
  anyway	
  (tilting	
  her	
  head	
  and	
  looking	
  disturbed	
  as	
  tear	
  hold	
   up	
  the	
  twin	
  by	
  one	
  leg)	
  those	
  little	
  creatures	
  is	
  where	
  we	
  come	
  from	
  and	
  that’s	
  why	
  you	
   have	
  little	
  box	
  feet	
  just	
  like	
  me.	
  	
  (shows	
  audience	
  her	
  feet	
  wiggling	
  her	
  toes)	
  And	
  that	
   Sun	
  she	
  was	
  so	
  happy	
  to	
  find	
  her	
  Tear	
  and	
  the	
  new	
  world	
  that	
  was	
  created	
  for	
  her,	
  that	
   she	
  stayed	
  with	
  us	
  all	
  this	
  time.	
  	
  So	
  we	
  can	
  have	
  that	
  perfect	
  tan	
  Coyote	
  was	
  talking	
   about,	
  even	
  though	
  we	
  moved	
  far	
  from	
  that	
  creek	
  and	
  covered	
  the	
  earth	
  in	
  concrete	
   and	
  shopping	
  malls.	
  	
   	
   Tear:	
  	
  So	
  what	
  happened	
  to	
  that	
  Otter?	
  Or	
  that	
  Raven?	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   (dozy)	
  Well	
  they	
  are	
  all	
  really	
  one	
  in	
  the	
  same…and	
  then	
  again	
  not	
  really	
   either….its	
  tricky.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
    What	
  does	
  that	
  even	
  mean?	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   (startled)	
  What?	
  	
  Oh…	
  um…	
  well	
  I	
  think	
  you’ll	
  find	
  that	
  all	
  of	
  them	
  critters	
   mean	
  different	
  things	
  to	
  different	
  people…they	
  are	
  who	
  you	
  need	
  them	
  to	
  be	
  and	
  then	
   they	
  aren’t	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time,	
  its	
  complicated.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
    Complicated.	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   Yes…but	
  Raven	
  dances	
  all	
  along	
  the	
  west	
  coast…(whispers	
  and	
  looks	
   around)	
  I	
  even	
  heard	
  he	
  was	
  gonna	
  be	
  on	
  “Dancing	
  With	
  the	
  Stars”	
  this	
  season,	
   eeeeeeeeee…can	
  you	
  imagine?	
  	
  (laughs)	
  Hun	
  hun	
  hun,	
  and	
  I	
  just	
  saw	
  Otter	
  last	
  week	
  at	
   Kits	
  pool.	
   	
   Narrator:	
  	
    	
    Dancing	
  With	
  the	
  Star…Kits	
  pool?	
    101	
    	
   	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
   Yeah,	
  for	
  my	
  [current	
  day]	
  scuba	
  class	
  (pulls	
  out	
  a	
  snorkel	
  mask)	
  which	
   reminds	
  me	
  can	
  we	
  hurry	
  this	
  thing	
  up…I’m	
  gonna	
  be	
  late.	
   	
   Tear:	
  	
   	
    But	
  what	
  about	
  that	
  Coyote?	
    	
   Gran-­‐gran:	
    Well	
  I’m	
  sure	
  he’s	
  up	
  to	
  all	
  kinds	
  of	
  mischief	
  …but	
  I	
  heard…	
    	
   Coyote	
  pops	
  up	
  from	
  behind	
  the	
  stoop	
  in	
  modern	
  fashionable	
  clothes	
  and	
  interrupts	
   Gran-­‐gran	
   	
   Coyote:	
  	
   But	
  that	
  is	
  a	
  story	
  for	
  another	
  time,	
  *when	
  you	
  actually	
  pay	
  for	
  your	
   ticket.	
  (*line	
  can	
  be	
  adjusted	
  to	
  the	
  production)	
   	
   Blackout.	
  “Native	
  Puppy	
  love”	
  by	
  A	
  Tribe	
  Called	
  Red	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    102	
    

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