Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Failure behaviour of bedrock and overburden landslides of the Peace River Valley near Fort St. John,… Van Esch, Kristen Johanna Brearley 2012

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2012_fall_vanesch_kristen.pdf [ 43.56MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0072987.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0072987-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0072987-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0072987-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0072987-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0072987-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0072987-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0072987-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0072987.ris

Full Text

FAILURE BEHAVIOUR OF BEDROCK AND OVERBURDEN LANDSLIDES OF THE PEACE RIVER  VALLEY NEAR FORT ST. JOHN, BRITISH COLUMBIA    by    KRISTEN JOHANNA BREARLEY VAN ESCH    B.Sc.Eng., Queen’s University, 2009          A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    MASTER OF APPLIED SCIENCE    in    The Faculty of Graduate Studies      (Geological Engineering)            THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)      August, 2012      © Kristen Johanna Brearley Van Esch, 2012               Abstract  A reach of Peace River between Fort St. John and Hudson’s Hope flows in a steep‐ sided  valley  cut  by  meltwater  and  Holocene  river  flow  through  Cretaceous  shale  and  sandstone covered by clay‐rich glaciolacustrine deposits. Numerous landslides occur on the  banks, initiating in both the bedrock and overburden. Following a recently completed local  landslide  inventory  and  the  completion  of  an  airborne  LiDAR  survey,  five  landslides  have  been examined in detail: the Attachie Slide, the Moberly River Slide, the Halfway River Slide,  the Cache Creek Slide and the Tea Creek Slide. Analysis of the five case studies suggests that  most  slope  movements  can  be  attributed  to  one  of  four  dominant  landslide  failure  mechanisms: compound rock slides, compound overburden slides, shallow rapid flow slides,  and earth flows.   Compound slides in bedrock and overburden are morphologically similar. Most have  the character of compound slides, exploiting weak horizontal clay layers found at multiple  levels  in  both  materials.  Typically,  a  sliding  surface  develops  along  a  bedding  plane  pre‐ sheared to residual friction and connects to a steep main scarp cross cutting the layers of  rock  and  soil.  Frequently  this  mechanism  then repeats  successively  at multiple  levels.  The  Cache  Creek  Slide  and  Tea  Creek  Slide  are  examples  of  compound  slides  in  bedrock.  The  Moberly River Slide and the Attachie Slide are examples of compound slides in overburden.  The toes of the slide deposits often assume the character of earth flow tongues which are  intermittently removed by river erosion. Shallow rapid flow slides, such as the Halfway River  Slide,  are  also  common  in  the  normally  consolidated  glaciolacustrine  silts  and  clays  of  Glacial Lake Peace that overlie the study area.             ii        Table of Contents    Abstract ......................................................................................................................................ii  Table of Contents ...................................................................................................................... iii  List of Tables ............................................................................................................................ vii  List of Figures .......................................................................................................................... viii  Acknowledgements ................................................................................................................... xi     1.0  Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1  1.1  Statement of Purpose ................................................................................................ 4    2.0  Regional Setting ............................................................................................................. 5  2.1  Physiography .............................................................................................................. 5  2.2  Climate ....................................................................................................................... 6  2.3  Local and Regional Infrastructure .............................................................................. 6    3.0  Landslide Classification .................................................................................................. 8  3.1  Mass Movements in Shale ......................................................................................... 8  3.1.1  Falls ..................................................................................................................... 8  3.1.2  Topples ................................................................................................................ 9  3.1.3  Rotational Slides ............................................................................................... 10  3.1.4  Translational Slides ........................................................................................... 11  3.1.5  Compound Slides .............................................................................................. 12  3.2  Mass Movement in Glaciolacustrine Sediments ...................................................... 12  3.2.1  Rotational Slides ............................................................................................... 13  3.2.2  Translational slides ........................................................................................... 13  3.2.3  Compound Slides .............................................................................................. 15  3.2.4  Flows ................................................................................................................. 15    4.0  Geology of the Peace River Area ................................................................................. 17  4.1  Bedrock Geology ...................................................................................................... 17  4.1.1  Bedrock Units .................................................................................................... 17  4.1.2  Regional Tectonics ............................................................................................ 23  4.2  Bedrock and Discontinuity Shear Strength Properties ............................................ 24  4.2.1  Discontinuity Shear Strength of the Shaftesbury Shale .................................... 24  4.2.2  Intact Rock Properties of the Shaftesbury Shale .............................................. 28  4.2.3  Comparison with Other Prairie Shales .............................................................. 28  4.2.4  Geotechnical Properties of the Dunvegan Sandstone ...................................... 28  4.3  Quaternary Geology ................................................................................................. 29  4.3.1  Quaternary Stratigraphy and Glacial History .................................................... 29  4.3.2  Overburden Deposits ........................................................................................ 35  4.4  Quaternary Sequence Material Properties .............................................................. 41  4.4.1  Soil Classification ............................................................................................... 41  iii       4.4.2  Shear Strength Properties ................................................................................. 44  4.5  Groundwater ............................................................................................................ 46    5.0  Local and Regional Landslide Investigations ................................................................ 48  5.1  Existing Data ............................................................................................................. 48  5.2  Slides in Quaternary Deposits .................................................................................. 49  5.3  Slides in Bedrock ...................................................................................................... 50    6.0  Methodology ................................................................................................................ 51  6.1  Field Work ................................................................................................................ 51  6.2  Slide Characterization .............................................................................................. 51    7.0  The Attachie Slide ........................................................................................................ 55  7.1  Introduction .............................................................................................................. 55  7.3  Detailed Stratigraphy ............................................................................................... 58  7.4  Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology ............................................................... 60  7.4.1  Slope Geometry ................................................................................................ 60  7.4.2  Detailed Slide Description ................................................................................. 68  7.5  Groundwater Conditions .......................................................................................... 74  7.6  Slide Volume Estimation .......................................................................................... 75  7.7  Slope Movement Monitoring ................................................................................... 78  7.8  Failure Analysis ......................................................................................................... 81  7.8.1  2D Limit Equilibrium Analysis ............................................................................ 81  7.8.2  3D Limit Equilibrium Analysis ............................................................................ 87  7.8.3  DAN‐W Analysis ................................................................................................ 90  7.9  Failure Mechanism ................................................................................................... 92  7.9.1  Supporting Factual Evidence ............................................................................. 92  7.9.2  Existing Hypotheses .......................................................................................... 94  7.9.3  Proposed Sequence of Events .......................................................................... 96    8.0  The Moberly River Slide ............................................................................................. 101  8.1  Introduction ............................................................................................................ 101  8.2  Detailed Stratigraphy ............................................................................................. 103  8.3  Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology ............................................................. 104  8.3.1  Basic Slope Geometry ..................................................................................... 104  8.3.2  Detailed Slope Description.............................................................................. 111  8.4  Groundwater Conditions ........................................................................................ 112  8.5  Slide Volume Estimation ........................................................................................ 113  8.6  Slope Movement Monitoring ................................................................................. 114  8.7  Failure Mechanism ................................................................................................. 115  8.7.1  Existing Hypotheses ........................................................................................ 115  8.7.2  Proposed Failure Mechanism ......................................................................... 116  8.7.3  Contemporary Slope Movement .................................................................... 120    iv       9.0  The Halfway River Slide .............................................................................................. 121  9.1  Introduction ............................................................................................................ 121  9.2  Detailed Stratigraphy ............................................................................................. 123  9.3  Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology ............................................................. 124  9.4  Groundwater Conditions ........................................................................................ 129  9.5  Slide Volume ........................................................................................................... 129  9.6  Failure Mechanism ................................................................................................. 131  9.6.1  Supporting Factual Evidence ........................................................................... 132  9.6.2  Existing Hypotheses ........................................................................................ 135  9.6.3  Discussion........................................................................................................ 136    10.0  The Cache Creek Slide ................................................................................................ 146  10.1  Introduction ............................................................................................................ 146  10.2  Detailed Stratigraphy ............................................................................................. 149  10.3  Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology ............................................................. 152  10.3.1  Slide Geometry ............................................................................................... 152  10.3.2  Detailed Bedrock Topography ........................................................................ 156  10.3.3  Distribution of Slide Debris ............................................................................. 158  10.4  Groundwater Conditions ........................................................................................ 160  10.5  Slide Volume Estimation ........................................................................................ 161  10.6  Slope Movement Monitoring ................................................................................. 163  10.7  Failure Mechanism ................................................................................................. 164  10.7.1  Existing Hypotheses ........................................................................................ 164  10.7.2  Discussion of Bedrock Failures ........................................................................ 166  10.7.3  Failure Mechanisms at the Cache Creek Slide ................................................ 169  10.7.4  Contemporary Slope Movement .................................................................... 170    11.0  The Tea Creek Slide .................................................................................................... 173  11.1  Introduction ............................................................................................................ 173  11.2  Detailed Stratigraphy ............................................................................................. 175  11.2.1  Major Stratigraphic Units ................................................................................ 175  11.2.2  Bedding Planes and Marker Units................................................................... 176  11.3  Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology ............................................................. 180  11.4  Groundwater Conditions ........................................................................................ 188  11.5  Slide Volume Estimation ........................................................................................ 189  11.6  Slope Movement Monitoring ................................................................................. 190  11.7  Failure Mechanism ................................................................................................. 191  11.7.1  Existing Hypotheses ........................................................................................ 191  11.7.2  Discussion of Bedrock Failure Mechanisms .................................................... 191  11.7.3  Proposed Bedrock Failure Mechanism at the Tea Creek Slide ....................... 195  11.7.4  Contemporary Slope Movement at the Tea Creek Slide ................................ 197    12.0  Conclusions ................................................................................................................ 200  12.1  Suggestions for Further Work ................................................................................ 203  v       References ............................................................................................................................ 205    Appendix A     Climate Data .................................................................................................. 214  Appendix B     Soil Classification and Testing Results ........................................................... 219  Appendix C     Selected Drillhole Logs ................................................................................... 225  Appendix D     Piezometer Data ............................................................................................ 311  Appendix E     Inclinometer Data .......................................................................................... 319  Appendix F     Slope Stability Modeling Results .................................................................... 334   vi        List of Tables    Table 4.1     Principal rock types found in project area. ......................................................... 20  Table 4.2     Shear strength properties of key bedding planes in shale bedrock. ................... 27  Table 4.3     Bulk material properties for the Shaftesbury Shale ............................................ 28  Table 4.4     Principal overburden units found in the project area (modified from BGC,  2012a). .................................................................................................................................... 35  Table 4.5     Summary of classification test results. Average value is given with range of  values provided in brackets []. ................................................................................................ 42  Table 4.6     Summary of secondary shear strength data for glaciolacustrine deposits based  on both triaxial and direct shear data. ................................................................................... 46  Table 6.1     Definition of landslide features shown in Figure 6.1 (IAEG, 1990). .................... 51  Table 7.1     Attachie landslide dimensions (based on IAEG 1990). ........................................ 68  Table 7.2     Volume calculations for the Attachie Slide. ........................................................ 78  Table 7.3     Material parameters used in stability modeling. ................................................ 83  Table 7.4     Results of the 2D limit equilibrium back analysis at the Attachie Slide. Factor of  safety values closest to one marked in grey. .......................................................................... 86  Table 7.5     Results of the 3D limit equilibrium back analysis of the Attachie Slide. Factor of  safety values closest to one marked in grey. .......................................................................... 89  Table 8.1     Landslide dimensions of the Moberly River Slide (based on IAEG, 1990). ....... 105  Table 8.2     Moberly River Slide volume calculations. ......................................................... 114  Table 8.3     Material parameters used in stability modeling. .............................................. 117  Table 9.1     Halfway River Slide dimensions (based on IAEG, 1990). ................................... 125  Table 9.2     Volume Estimates for the Halfway River Slide. ................................................. 130  Table 10.1     Cache Creek Slide dimensions (based on IAEG, 1990). ................................... 156  Table 10.2     Volume calculations for the Tea Creek Slide. .................................................. 162  Table 11.1     Tea Creek Slide dimensions (based on IAEG, 1990) ........................................ 187  Table 11.2     Volume calculations for the Tea Creek Slide. .................................................. 190  Table 11.3     Shear strength parameters used for Tea Creek Slide stability analysis. ......... 194         vii        List of Figures    Figure 1.1     Site location map. LiDAR image courtesy of BC Hydro (2007). Slide locations,  towns and major tributaries marked. ....................................................................................... 3  Figure 4.1     Bedrock geology of the Peace River Area (based on B.C Ministry of Energy and  Mines Digital Geology Map of B.C, 2005) ............................................................................... 18  Figure 4.2     Stratigraphic correlation of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in the Peace River  valley. Formations exposed in the study area highlighted. Figure based on Stott (1982). .... 19  Figure 4.3     Conceptual diagram of events determining the characteristics of slope failures  in argillaceous bedrock of the Canadian Western Interior (Mollard, 1977, © Geological  Society of America). ................................................................................................................ 26  Figure 4.4     Evolution of the Peace River valley downstream of Halfway River ................... 32  Figure 4.5     Evolution of the Peace River valley upstream of Halfway River (based on  Hartman and Clague, 2008). ................................................................................................... 33  Figure 4.6     Surficial geology of the Peace River area (Hickins and Fournier, 2011) ............ 34  Figure 4.7     Plasticity chart for overburden materials. ......................................................... 43  Figure 6.1     Definition of landslide dimensions. The lower portion is a plan view of a typical  landslide in which the dashed lines represents the trace of the rupture surface on the  original ground surface, in the upper section, hatching indicates undisturbed ground and  stippling indicates disturbed material (IAEG, 1990). Numbers refer to Table 6.1. ................ 52  Figure 6.2     Measurement of fahrböschung and travel angle. ............................................. 53  Figure 7.1     Aerial photograph of the Attachie Slide, pre‐failure, in 1970 (BC7279‐70). ...... 56  Figure 7.2     Aerial photograph of the Attachie Slide 40 hours post‐failure (Aerial  Photograph BC5529‐75). ......................................................................................................... 57  Figure 7.3     Schematic showing major geological features of the Attachie Slide and the  location of investigative boreholes and interpretive cross sections superimposed on the  LiDAR survey data. .................................................................................................................. 62  Figure 7.4     Attachie Slide section 1, through the downstream intact slope. See Figure 7.3  for location. ............................................................................................................................. 63  Figure 7.5     Attachie Slide section 2. See Figure 7.3 for location. ......................................... 64  Figure 7.6     Attachie Slide section 3: through the centre of the main slide body. Section  shows post‐failure conditions. See Figure 7.3 for location. ................................................... 65  Figure 7.7     Attachie Slide section 4. See Figure 7.3 for location. ......................................... 66  Figure 7.8     Attachie Slide section 5: through the upstream intact slope. See Figure 7.3 for  location. .................................................................................................................................. 67  Figure 7.9     A horst and graben structure near El. 595 m. .................................................... 69  Figure 7.10     Sheared surface in a clay layer recovered from a test pit (TP11‐1) near the  downstream flank of the Attachie Slide (El. 502 m) (Photo courtesy of BGC, 2012b). .......... 71  Figure 7.11     Glaciolacustrine silt and clay exposed in a test pit (TP11‐1) near the  downstream flank of the Attachie Slide (El. 502 m) (Photo courtesy of BGC, 2012b). .......... 71  Figure 7.12     Photograph showing the suspected toe of the rupture surface (Fletcher,  2000). ...................................................................................................................................... 73  Figure 7.13     Definition of areas used in volume calculation ................................................ 76  viii       Figure 7.14     Sections 1b through 5b, through the accumulation zone. Section locations  shown in Figure 7.3. ................................................................................................................ 77  Figure 7.15     Drawing showing extensometer and monument movement .......................... 80  Figure 7.16     Section through the centre of the Attachie Slide, pre‐failure. Post‐failure  topography and stratigraphy shown as dotted lines. Approximate failure surface shown in  red. High and low piezometric surfaces shown in blue. ......................................................... 82  Figure 7.17     SLOPE/W back analysis input for the mapped failure surface at the Attachie  Slide with an assumed low piezometric surface. .................................................................... 84  Figure 7.18     Slope/W back analysis input for the mapped failure surface at the Attachie  Slide with an assumed high piezometric surface. ................................................................... 85  Figure 7.19     An isometric view of the Attachie Slide, looking downstream. ....................... 87  Figure 7.20     A compound failure surface at the Attachie Slide created using CLARA. ........ 88  Figure 7.21     An example longitudinal profile used for CLARA analysis ................................ 88  Figure 7.22     DAN‐W Voellmy modeling results with a friction coefficient of 0.08 and a  turbulence coefficient of 2000. .............................................................................................. 91  Figure 7.23     Monthly rainfall, Fort St. John B.C., 1971‐1973 (Environment Canada, 2012). 93  Figure 7.24     Monthly snowfall, Fort St. John B.C., 1971‐1973 (Environment Canada, 2012). ................................................................................................................................................. 94  Figure 8.1     Photograph of the Moberly River Slide (BC Hydro, 2007) overlain on an aerial  photograph of the area (BC86047‐031, 1986). The Moberly River Slide is outlined. .......... 102  Figure 8.2     LiDAR image of the Moberly River Slide showing major geological features and  the location of interpretive cross sections. .......................................................................... 106  Figure 8.3      Section 1 through the Moberly River Slide. .................................................... 107  Figure 8.4      Section 2 through the Moberly River Slide. .................................................... 108  Figure 8.5      Section 3 through the Moberly River Slide. .................................................... 109  Figure 8.6      Section 4 through the Moberly River Slide. .................................................... 110  Figure 8.7      Definition of cross‐sectional areas used in volume calculation. ..................... 113  Figure 8.8     Example of SLOPE/W input where the piezometric surface lies at the failure  plane. The resulting FOS = 1.03. ........................................................................................... 117  Figure 8.9     The competition between river erosion and slope movement which shapes  valley slope morphology. ...................................................................................................... 119  Figure 9.1     Aerial photograph of the Halfway River Slide post‐failure in 1996 (15BCB96020‐ 18), overlain with post‐slide photographs and a pre‐slide aerial photograph taken in 1963  (BC5067‐78). Slide location marked on pre‐slide and post‐slide air photos. ....................... 122  Figure 9.2     Cross section through the Halfway River Slide, post‐failure. All contacts are  assumed. Cross section location marked on Figure 9.3. ...................................................... 127  Figure 9.3     LiDAR image of the Halfway River Slide showing major geological features... 128  Figure 9.4     Definition of cross‐sectional areas used in volume calculations. .................... 130  Figure 9.5     Monthly rainfall records for Fort St.John, 1989 (Environment Canada, 2012). ............................................................................................................................................... 133  Figure 9.6     Daily rainfall records for Fort St.John, 1989 (Environment Canada, 2012). .... 134  Figure 9.7     Plasticity chart for all known samples of glaciolacustrine Lake Peace material. ............................................................................................................................................... 139  Figure 9.8     Schematic of a multiple retrogressive failure. ................................................. 142  ix       Figure 9.9     Schematic of a spread (based on Locat et al., 2011). ...................................... 145  Figure 10.1     2007 aerial photograph of the Cache Creek Slide (BC Hydro, 2007) overlain on  a 1997 aerial photograph (30BCC97159‐288). The upstream and downstream areas of the  slide are outlined. ................................................................................................................. 148  Figure 10.2     Photograph of a displaced block of Dunvegan Sandstone (Photo courtesy of  McKane, 2004). ..................................................................................................................... 150  Figure 10.3     LiDAR image of the Cache Creek Slide. Major geological features, and cross  section location marked. ...................................................................................................... 154  Figure 10.4     Cross section through the Cache Creek Slide. See Figure 10.3 for location. . 155  Figure 10.5     Photograph of the main scarp of the Cache Creek Slide. Dunvegan Sandstone  is visible at the face. The slope is near vertical (Photo courtesy of McKane, 2004). ........... 157  Figure 10.6     Photograph of Dunvegan shale at the main scarp, standing in a vertical face.  Vertical relaxation joints visible. (Photograph courtesy of McKane, 2004). ........................ 157  Figure 10.7     Photograph of a pond at the base of the upper debris scarp, on the mid‐slope  shale terrace. Looking west. (Photo courtesy of McKane, 2004). ........................................ 160  Figure 10.8     Definition of cross sectional areas used in volume calculation. .................... 162  Figure 10.9     Geological map of the Upper Peace River region showing the regional contact  between the Dunvegan and Fort St John Formations. Bedrock slides associated with the  trace of this contact marked (Map data from the B.C Ministry of Energy and Mines Digital  Geology Map of B.C, 2005; landslide data from Thurber (1981b). ...................................... 167  Figure 10.10     Development of a  sandstone block topple (Photo courtesy of McKane,  2004). .................................................................................................................................... 171  Figure 10.11     Small, recent, rotational failure in debris. ................................................... 172  Figure 11.1     Photograph of the Tea Creek Slide (BC Hydro, 2007) overlain on an aerial  photograph of the area (BC7836‐243, 1978). The Tea Creek Slide is outlined. ................... 174  Figure 11.2     Photograph of the white clay layer (BP 8) above a marl layer. ..................... 177  Figure 11.3     Stratigraphic correlation of marker units from the Cache Creek Slide to the  Tea Creek Slide based on mapping conducted by BC Hydro (1981a).  A point indicates a  mapped location. Topography based on LiDAR data. Stratigraphy based on drillhole data (BC  Hydro, 1981a) and stratigraphic sections (Hartman, 2005). All contacts are approximate. 179  Figure 11.4     LiDAR image of the Tea Creek Slide showing major geological features and the  location of interpretive cross section. Major and minor scarps and active earth flows are  outlined. ................................................................................................................................ 181  Figure 11.5     Tea Creek Slide Section 1, through the upstream slope adjacent to the main  slide body. See Figure 11.4 for location. ............................................................................... 182  Figure 11.6     Tea Creek Slide Section 2. See Figure 11.4 for location. ................................ 183  Figure 11.7     Tea Creek Slide Section 3. See Figure 11.4 for location. ................................ 184  Figure 11.8     Tea Creek Slide Section 4. See Figure 11.4 for location. ................................ 185  Figure 11.9     Tea Creek Slide Section 5. See Figure 11.4 for location. ................................ 186  Figure 11.10     Definition of cross‐sectional areas used in volume calculation. .................. 189  Figure 11.11     An example of SLOPE/W input for the Tea Creek Slide. .............................. 194  Figure 11.12     Schematic of the development of a compound failure along a horizontal  weak bedding plane in shale (modified from SoeMoe et al., 2009)..................................... 197        x        Acknowledgements    I would like to thank my thesis supervisors, Dr. Oldrich Hungr and Dr. Erik Eberhardt for  their time, guidance and technical advice. Thank you for introducing me to such an  interesting project! I would also like to thank my honourary thesis supervisor, Dr. Scott  McDougall for the endless advice, guidance and encouragement.    I would also like the thank Andrew Watson of BC Hydro for providing access to data and  reports which formed the basis of this thesis.    I also appreciate the help of Martin Devonald, Pete Quinn, Nathan Swanson, Garrett Miller,  Lara Fletcher and Shane Magnusson for reviewing chapters and providing excellent  feedback.  xi        1.0 Introduction   The  Peace  River  area  of  northeastern  British  Columbia  is  an  important  agricultural  area,  oil  and  gas  production  area,  and  the  site  of  two  hydroelectric  dams.  A  reach  of  the  Peace River between Hudson’s Hope and Fort St. John is currently being studied as part of  the  BC  Hydro  Site  C  Clean  Energy  Project,  a  proposed  third  dam  and  hydroelectric  generating  station  on  the  river.  This  thesis  summarizes  a  research  project  focused  on  identifying,  describing  and  classifying  the  dominant  landslide  failure  mechanisms  acting  along  this  reach  of  the  Peace  River.  To  this  end,  five  landslide  case  studies  including  the  Attachie Slide, the Moberly River Slide, the Halfway River Slide, the Cache Creek Slide and  the Tea Creek Slide are described and discussed (Figure 1.1).  Post‐glacial downcutting of the modern Peace River during the Late Pleistocene and  Holocene  formed  steep  slopes  in  Cretaceous  bedrock  and  Quaternary  fluvial,  glacial  and  interglacial deposits. The bedrock topography and the occurrence of Quaternary soils in the  area  are  controlled  by  the  presence  of  ancient  Pleistocene  valleys  infilled  by  glacial  drift,  which  have  been  re‐excavated  by  the  modern  valley.  Landslides  most  commonly  occur  within  the  Cretaceous  Shaftesbury  Formation,  a  horizontally  bedded  marine  shale,  and  within  glaciolacustrine  deposits  of  laminated  silt  and  clay.  Failures  in  bedrock  and  overburden are morphologically and mechanically similar and slides often exploit multiple  rupture surfaces in both materials.   Landslides  in  Cretaceous  bedrock  commonly  involve  compound  sliding  along  horizontal  or  sub‐horizontal  bedding  planes  within  the  Shaftesbury  Shale.  Discontinuity  shear  strength  in  the  valley  walls  is  heavily  influenced  by  valley  rebound  processes  which  form  pre‐sheared  bedding  planes,  cross‐cutting  shears  and  relaxation  joints  (Cornish  and  Moore, 1985). The Cache Creek Slide and the Tea Creek Slide are the two largest and most  well documented bedrock slides in the Peace River valley.    1       Similar  to  bedrock  slides,  landslides  in  fine  grained  glaciolacustrine  sediments  commonly  exploit  pre‐sheared  horizontal  or  sub‐horizontal  bedding  planes.  These  landslides  can  be  large  and  catastrophic,  but  more  commonly  glaciolacustrine  slides  are  slow. Two failure mechanisms are associated with overburden deposits: clay flow slides, as  illustrated by the Halfway River Slide, and compound glaciolacustrine slides as illustrated by  the Attachie and Moberly River Slides.   Landslide investigations along the reach of the Peace River between Hudson’s Hope  and the B.C./Alberta border have been reported by Thurber (1973, 1978, 1981a, 1981b and  1982),  the  B.C  Department  of  Highways  (BCDOH,  1973),  Mathews  (1978a),  BC  Hydro  (1981a,  1981b),  Evans  et  al.  (1996),  Fletcher  (2000)  Fletcher  et  al.  (2002),  Severin  (2004),  McKane  (2004)  and  Geertsema  (2006).  Additional  landslide  investigations  have  been  conducted along tributaries of the Peace River, and east of the B.C./Alberta border.   2        Bear Flat    Figure 1.1     Site location map. Slide locations, towns and major tributaries marked. (LiDAR image courtesy of BC Hydro, 2007, Copyright © Airborne Imaging, 2007, by permission)  3        1.1 Statement of Purpose  The  Peace River  area was  intensively  studied during  the  original  site  investigations  for  the  Site  C  dam  in  the  1970s  and  1980s.  After  a  lengthy  hiatus,  new  and  intensive  site  investigations re‐commenced in 2009. These investigations have produced a large quantity  of new information in the form of drilling, laboratory testing and remote sensing data. Of  special  importance  is  the  new  LiDAR  (Light  Detection  and  Ranging)  coverage  of  the  area,  which  considerably  improves  data  on  the  detailed  topography  of  geomorphological  features, including landslides. The availability of new data allows for a comprehensive study  of the landslides in the Peace River valley.  The objectives of this thesis are:  1. To summarize all existing data related to landslides in the Peace River valley  2. To provide improved case histories of five typical landslides  3. To identify and characterize the failure mechanisms of these landslides  4. To show how these failure mechanisms are reflected in modern valley slope  morphology   Landslide case studies have been chosen to be representative of the typical modes  of failure that affect valley slopes of the Peace River area. The selected case studies are also  among the best documented slides in the area.   An  understanding  of  slide  failure  mechanisms  may  be  useful  for  predicting  the  future  behaviour  of  slopes  that  may  become  destabilized  by  human  activity,  such  as  the  creation of a dam reservoir.           4        2.0 Regional Setting  2.1 Physiography   The  Peace  River  is  located  in  northeastern  British  Columbia,  east  of  the  Rocky  Mountain  foothills.  The  area  is  characterized  by  forested  and  rolling  uplands  cut  by  deep  river  valleys  which  include  the  Peace  River  valley,  as  well  as  those  formed  by  tributaries  such  as  the  Halfway  River,  Moberly  River  and  Pine  River.  The  valleys  and  uplands  are  connected by benches which slope less than 2° towards the east (Mathews, 1978a).   The  Peace River  valley  is  broad  and  flat‐floored,  occupying  a  trench  approximately  3.5  km  wide  and  200  m  deep.  The  river  varies  from  500  m  to  1  km  wide.  Wide  fluvial  terraces are common between the floodplain and the broader valley walls, and are typically  elevated less than 50 m above river level. Where the river has downcut through bedrock,  the  valley  walls  rise  sharply  at  angles  exceeding  35°;  however,  where  colluvium  has  accumulated,  the  valley  walls  can  dip  as  low  as  10°.  The  upper  limit  of  the  valley  slope  is  sharply defined and is often notched by drainage gullies and scalloped by landslide scarps.  The  Peace  River  area  is  underlain  by  subhorizontal  and  largely  tectonically  intact  Upper and Lower Cretaceous bedrock, primarily shales and sandstones. The present post‐ glacial Peace River valley generally follows the path of an interglacial river valley now infilled  with a succession of interglacial and early Wisconsinan river and lake deposits up to 400 m  thick.  The  interglacial  valley  was  excavated  to  a  depth  of  approximately  30  m  above  the  base of the current river valley. Where the present valley cuts through the ancient valley,  the Peace River erodes the underlying bedrock to a depth greater than that of the ancient  river.  The  rapid  re‐excavation  of  the  valley  during  the  Late  Pleistocene  and  Holocene  periods allowed steep slopes to form in the overburden layers, as well as in the Cretaceous  bedrock (Mathews, 1978a).   The  Peace  River  and  its  tributaries  dominate  the  drainage  system  of  the  area.  Between  Hudson’s  Hope  and  Fort  St.  John,  the  Peace  River  flows  west  to  east  with  an   5       average  gradient  of  0.0006.  The  flow  of  the  Peace  River  through  the  study  area  is  largely  controlled by the WAC Bennett dam and the Peace Canyon dam.    2.2 Climate  The  climate  of  the  study  area  is  classified  as  Continental  Boreal.  The  subdued  topography allows cold Arctic air to flow into the area resulting in warm summers and cold  winters,  with  a  mean  annual  temperature  of  2  °C  (Environment  Canada,  2012).  Annual  precipitation  is  approximately  465  mm,  with  maximum  rainfall  occurring  in  June  and  July,  unlike most of British Columbia which experiences higher precipitation in the winter months  (Lu et al., 1998). Summer precipitation also includes frequent intense thunderstorms. There  is a net moisture deficiency due to evaporation, and the area is classified as dry and sub‐ humid (Drinkwater et al., 1969). Monthly and annual precipitation information is included in  Appendix A. The westerly winds combined with the barrier effect of the Rocky Mountains  suggest that the area may lie in a rain shadow.   The region is also located within the Boreal White and Black Spruce biogeoclimate  zone  (B.C.  Ministry  of  Forests,  1988).  The  south  facing  slopes  are  often  dominated  by  grasses and small trees, whereas the north facing slopes are more often densely vegetated  with large trees.   2.3 Local and Regional Infrastructure  The  most  significant  local  industries  in  the  Fort  St.  John  region  are  agriculture,  oil,  natural  gas  and  forestry  (City  of  Fort  St.John,  2009).  In  particular,  much  of  the  area  surrounding the Peace River valley is used for agriculture.   Two major highways are found near the study area. B.C. Provincial Highway 96, also  known as the Alaska Highway, runs from the southeast through Fort St. John and continues  to the northwest towards the Yukon. This highway only crosses the Peace River once, but is  the most commonly used local highway. B.C. Provincial Highway 29 runs from Charlie Lake  to the town of Hudson’s Hope.   6       Two major dams are also located on the Peace River upstream of the study area. The  W.A.C. Bennett dam, completed in 1967, is located approximately 20 km west of Hudson’s  Hope,  and  the  Peace  Canyon  dam,  completed  in  1980,  is  located  approximately  6  km  southwest of Hudson’s Hope (BC Hydro, 2012).       7        3.0 Landslide Classification  Variable  geological  conditions  along  the  Peace  River  valley  allow  for  a  variety  of  slope  movements  to  occur.  Mass  movements  are  most  commonly  initiated  in  either  Cretaceous  shale  or  glaciolacustrine  sediments.  The  classification  of  mass  movement  presented here is based on the system proposed by Hutchinson (1988), which characterizes  landslides based on the morphology of slope movements. The systems proposed by Varnes  (1978)  and  Cruden  and  Varnes  (1996)  are  also  referenced.  These  systems  are  the  most  common  landslide  classification  schemes.  The  classification  has  been  further  divided  into  two  subsections  in  this  discussion:  mass  movements  in  shale  and  mass  movements  in  glaciolacustrine materials.   3.1 Mass Movements in Shale  Engineering slopes in shale presents a unique challenge and there is a large body of  literature on the stability characteristics of shale. The shales of western North America have  been  well  investigated  (Mollard,  1977;  Thomson  and  Morgenstern,  1978;  Locker,  1969;  Scott  and  Brooker,  1968;  Sauer  et  al.,  1990;  Cruden,  1996).  The  following  five  types  of  movement have been identified as particularly important in shale: (1) Falls, (2) Topples, (3)  Rotational  slides,  (4)  Translational  slides,  and  (5)  Compound  slides.  A  description  of  each  type of mass movement is provided.   3.1.1 Falls  A rock fall refers to any type of movement where a mass is detached from a steep  slope and descends through the air by free falling, leaping or rolling depending on the angle  of  the  slope.  There  is  little  to  no  shear  displacement  along  the  failure  surface  (Varnes,  1996). These movements are extremely rapid, and there may be no movement prior to the  detachment  of  the  rock  mass.  Hutchinson  (1988)  further  classified  falls  as  (1)  primary,  where  the  fall  involves  the  fresh  detachment  of  material  from  the  parent  mass,  and  (2)   8       secondary, where the material is already physically detached from the parent mass and is  merely resting on it. Primary falls are generally initiated by the growth of tension cracks.   As shales do not generally support large vertical rock masses, shale falls are usually  considered insignificant due to the small volumes involved. Shale slopes are usually shallow,  allowing debris to accumulate as a colluvial apron which breaks down quickly to form clay.  The  presence  of  a  clay  talus  cone  may  absorb  the  falling  shale  fragments  limiting  their  runout (Severin, 2004).   It  is  also  important  to  note  the  presence  of  massive  vertical  sandstone  scarps  present in the Cache Creek area. The Dunvegan Sandstone, which overlies the Shaftesbury  Shale, may be prone to rock falls where vertical or near vertical jointing occurs.  3.1.2 Topples  Toppling is defined as a failure where the vector of the applied forces projected from  a  block’s  centroid  falls  through  or  outside  a  pivot  point  in  the  base  of  the  affected  block  (Hutchinson, 1988). Topples are most common in rock with near vertical discontinuities and  the most common type of rock topple involves blocks bound by pre‐existing discontinuities.  Toppling  is  generally  initiated  by  deterioration  of  the  base  of  the  block,  either  due  to  erosion  or  shear  failure.  Topples  can  also  form  in  intact  rock,  exploiting  near‐vertical  exfoliation  joints.  For  example,  undercutting  of  a  relatively  intact  material  may  cause  tension  failure  at  the  rear  of  the  mass  (Hutchinson,  1988).  A  second  form  of  toppling,  flexural toppling, involves bending and forward rotation of thinly‐jointed, weak rock masses  (Goodman and Bray, 1974).  Toppling  in  shales  with  horizontal  bedding  most  commonly  exploits  vertical  joints  created by diagenesis, shrinkage and stress relief. Similar to rock falls, there is also potential  for rock topples to occur in the competent Dunvegan Sandstone cap rock which overlies the  shale near Cache Creek. Toppling failures can also occur in the bedrock slopes upstream of  Hudson’s Hope.    9       3.1.3 Rotational Slides  Rotational slides are one of the most common types of slope failures. In a rotational  slide,  failure  occurs  through  shearing  along  a  well‐defined  curved  slip  surface  that  is  generally  not  strongly  related  to  the  structure  of  the  rock  mass.  As  the  failure  surface  is  concave upwards, there is a degree of backward rotation to the mass which is accompanied  by sinking at the rear, forming a scarp, and heaving at the toe (Hutchinson, 1988). Overall  movement is rotational about an axis parallel to the slope, however the shape of the failure  surface may also be influenced by faults, bedding and other pre‐existing discontinuities.   Often,  an  initial  rotational  slump  will  form  a  near  vertical  scarp  which  is  prone  to  further movement. Rotational failures may also create terraces and cause pooling of water  which  can  further  contribute  to  instability.  The  successive  creation  of  steep  scarps  and  trapped water can contribute to a self‐perpetuating area of instability which will continue to  fail until a sufficiently low gradient is attained (Varnes, 1978).   Rotational  slides  occur  most  frequently  in  homogeneous  materials.  In  the  argillaceous sediments of Western Canada, simple rotational failures are not common due  to the presence of weak horizontal or subhorizontal bedding planes.   Hutchinson (1988) identified three main types of rotational failure: single, successive  and  multiple  slides.  Single  rotational  slides  are  characterized  by  a  single  concave  upward  slip  surface  upon  which  a  mass  is  moving  as  a  coherent  unit.  These  types  of  slides  are  typically  associated  with  over‐consolidated  clay.  Successive  rotational  slips  consist  of  a  succession  of  shallow  rotational  failures  arranged  along  the  length  of  the  slope.  These  failures are often of considerable lateral extent and usually form a series of steps along a  slope.  Multiple  rotational  slides  are  generally  large  scale  and  are  formed  by  the  retrogression  of  a  single  deep‐seated  rotational  slip  forming  two  or  more  slipped  blocks  each with a concave slip surface. Multiple rotational slides usually form where the strata are  subhorizontal and are overlain by a layer of competent cap rock.    10       3.1.4 Translational Slides  Translational  slides  are  a  common  type  of  mass  movement  in  shale.  According  to  Varnes  (1978),  the  mass  moves  along  a  planar  shear  surface  running  parallel  to  bedding  with little or no rotary movement or backward tilting. The movement of a translational slide  is  usually  controlled  by  structurally  based  surfaces  of  weakness  such  as  faults,  joints,  or  bedding planes. These structures create a zone of low shear strength between layers which  allows  sliding  to  occur.  Hutchinson  (1988)  notes  that  translational  slides  are  usually  associated with failure surfaces which strike parallel to the ground surface contours and dip  downslope  more  gently  than  the  ground  slope.  This  allows  the  failure  plane  to  daylight.  Translational failure is less likely to occur if the failure surface dips steeper than the ground  surface.    It  is  important  to  distinguish  a  rotational  slide  from  a  translational  slide,  as  in  a  rotational slide, equilibrium is often restored to the slope through the transition of active  driving  blocks  into  passive  resisting  blocks.  However,  in  the  case  of  a  translational  slide,  sliding may occur indefinitely as long as the sliding surface is sufficiently inclined and shear  resistance  remains  lower  than  the  driving  force.  A  translational  slide  in  which  the  failed  mass  stays  intact  is  called  a  block  slide.  If  the  failed  mass  breaks  into  multiple  units,  it  is  called a broken or disrupted slide (Varnes, 1978). In many cases, as the slide progresses an  intact block will disintegrate into smaller units, especially as the velocity and water content  of the slide increase. In this case, the slide may turn into a flow.  In  additional  to  the  block  and  disrupted  classifications  discussed  by  Varnes  (1978),  Hutchinson (1988) classifies translational slides as either planar (block), stepped, or wedge  depending on the characteristics of the failure surface.   Within the study area, translational failures can occur in Upper Cretaceous marine  shales, but rarely, because the bedding planes are usually not sufficiently inclined to cause  block  instability.  Failures  can  occur  along  the  bentonite‐rich  layers  found  between  beds  which create areas of low shear strength. Planar, subhorizontal failure surfaces can also be  11       created  through  the  process  of  isostatic  rebound,  or  as  a  result  of  the  release  of  tectonic  stresses.  3.1.5 Compound Slides  Compound  slides  are  intermediate  between  rotational  and  translational  slides.  According  to  Hutchinson  (1988),  this  type  of  slide  is  characterized  by  non‐circular  slip  surfaces consisting of a combination of a steep curved or planar surface near the rear of the  failure,  and  a  flatter  surface  near  the  toe.  Compared  to  a  fully  rotational  or  translational  slide,  in  which  initial  movement  can  occur  without  any  distortion  of  the  moving  mass,  compound slides are held in place by their slip surface geometry and can only move when  the  sliding  mass  itself  becomes  kinematically  active  due  to  the  development  of  internal  displacement  and  shear  surfaces.  Compound  slides  usually  reflect  the  presence  of  weak  surfaces or heterogeneity within a slope.   Hutchinson  (1988)  divides  compound  slides  into  two  categories:  compound  slides,  released  by  internal  shearing  towards  the  rear  of  the  mass;  and  progressive  compound  slides.  In  the  first  case,  the  principal  failure  surface  consists  of  a  steeply  inclined  shear  surface located near the rear of the mass. The rear block drops down along this surface to  form a graben, and the middle part of the slide then moves forward as a translational slide.  In the case of a progressive compound slide, the steep proximal part of the rupture surface  may have characteristics similar to a rotational slide, accompanied by translational failure of  the distal mass. In either case, the sliding body is divided into a distinct active block and a  passive (resisting) block.   In the study area, compound slides are common in the Shaftesbury Shale.    3.2 Mass Movement in Glaciolacustrine Sediments  Landslides  in  silts  and  clays  have  been  thoroughly  investigated,  and  multiple  classification  schemes  have  been  published  (Terzaghi  and  Peck,  1948;  Varnes,  1978;  Hutchinson  1988;  Cruden  and  Varnes,  1996).  Due  to  the  widespread  extent  of  12       glaciolacustrine  sediments  in  the  Peace  River  valley,  these  failures  require  significant  attention and analysis. Five types of mass movement have been selected for discussion; 1)  Rotational slides, 2) Translational slides 3) Compound slides, 4) Flows and 5) Complex slides.  A description of each failure type is provided.  3.2.1 Rotational Slides  According  to  Hutchinson  (1988),  rotational  slides  occur  predominantly  in  slopes  consisting  of  thick  and  relatively  homogeneous  layers  of  fine  grained  sediments  such  as  clay.  Rotational  failures  in  overburden  are  similar  to  rotational  failures  in  shale  in  that  movement imparts a degree of rotation to the failed mass, accompanied by sinking at the  rear and  heaving  at  the  toe.  Rotational  failures  typically  have  a  well‐defined  cylindrical  or  listric  slip  surface.  Failure  can  occur  under  drained  or  undrained  conditions.  Terzaghi  and  Peck (1948) note that rotational slides may occur in varved silt and clay deposits if the pore  water pressure is minimal.   If the failed mass moves sufficiently far from the back scarp, a new failure may be  initiated  at  the  crest.  Through  this  mechanism,  a  single  rotational  slide  may  initiate  a  multiple  rotational  slide.  According  to  Hutchinson  (1988),  multiple  rotational  landslides  in  overburden  materials  are  usually  large  scale  and  are  most  common  where  the  strata  are  subhorizontal  and  consist  of  thick  layers  of  stiff,  fissured  clay  overlain  and  underlain  by  a  strong  till  or  other  strong  material.  Where  there  is  no  overlying  strong  cap,  the  material  continually  erodes  and  the  materials  are  less  likely  to  develop  high  stress  and  undergo  deep‐seated rotational failure.   3.2.2 Translational slides  Translational  slides  are  very  common  in  overburden  materials  such  as  glaciolacustrine  clay.  Hutchinson  (1988)  identifies  five  major  types  of  translational  failure:  sheet slides, slab slides, debris slides, active layer slides and sudden spreading failures.    13       Sheet  slides  are  slides  of  relatively  dry,  cohesionless  material  standing  at  approximately  their  angle  of  repose.  These  slides  are  generally  slow.  Sheet  slides  often  occur due to toe erosion or over steepening of sandy materials. Slab slides, or flake slides,  consist of translational slides of coherent but unlithified soils failing along an inclined weak  layer  or  discontinuity.  Debris  slides  are  a  common  type  of  translational  movement  in  loosened surficial or colluvial veneers. This type of slide usually occurs very rapidly on slopes  between  25°  and  45°  and  is  usually  triggered  by  intense  rainfall  or  an  earthquake.  The  likelihood of a debris slide is significantly affected by the presence of vegetation on a slope.  In the study area, colluvial veneers often produce debris slides.   Active  layer  slides  occur  in  permafrost  slopes  when  a  thin  veneer  of  soil  and  vegetation  detaches  from  an  underlying  layer  and  displaces  over  a  planar  surface,  usually  the  permafrost  table.  According  to  Hutchinson  (1988),  these  types  of  failures  are  usually  long  and  ribbon  like.  Permafrost  is  absent  from  the  study  area  at  present,  but  some  loosened  surficial  veneers  in  the  area  may  have  originated  under  periglacial  conditions  in  the Early Holocene.  Sudden spreading failures are of particular importance in the Peace River valley, as  they often occur in varved clays under high pore water pressure (Terzaghi and Peck, 1948).  This type of failure is characterized by gentle slopes, broad fronts, rapid movement and a  succession  of  graben  and  horst  structures  produced  by  the  slipping  mass.  The  dominant  mode  of  movement  is  lateral  extension  resulting  in  shear  or  tensile  fractures  where  the  behavior  of  the  failure  is  determined  by  the  resistance  along  the  basal  slip  surface.  According  to  Varnes  (1978),  this  type  of  movement  contains  elements  of  rotation,  translation  and  flow,  and  can  therefore  also  be  considered  a  complex  failure.  Sudden  spreading  failures  are  common  only  in  extra‐sensitive  "quick"  clays  or  materials  prone  to  liquefaction. The Lake Peace deposits appear to have liquefiable zones capable of producing  sudden spreading failures, multiple‐retrogressive slides and clay flows.   14       3.2.3 Compound Slides  Compound slides in glaciolacustrine materials are very common, and exhibit many of  the same characteristics seen in shale compound slides, namely a steep, planar or curved  back  scarp  and  a  planar  basal  sliding  surface.  In  contrast  to  translational  and  rotational  failures, compound failures require internal deformation, and are therefore dependent on  the internal strength of the soil mass. The internal strength of glaciolacustrine materials is  dependent on clay content and plasticity. Compound slides can be very rapid or very slow  depending on the degree of brittleness of the material.   3.2.4 Flows  According to Varnes (1978), flows are characterized by the fluidizing effect of water  on a mass.  Slip surfaces are usually not visible in a flow slide, and the boundary between  failed  material  and  intact  material  can  occur  as  either  a  sharp  surface  of  differential  movement  or  a  zone  of  distributed  shear  movements.  Flows  are  primarily  distinguished  from slides by water content and movement character. Flow‐like failures are often caused  by heavy precipitation or snow thaw and often occur on steep slopes where vegetation is  minimal.  Once  movement  has  begun,  a  stream  of  water  containing  soil  particles  has  momentum disproportionate to its size, and causes continual erosion which adds material  to  the  moving  mass.  Flows  often  follow  existing  topographical  routes  and  are  often  very  dense,  consisting  of  approximately  60  to  70%  solids.  Flows  often  continue  for  kilometers  before stopping in a terminal valley of lower gradient (Varnes, 1978).   Hungr et al. (2001) proposed detailed definitions for landslides of the flow type. This  classification  system  is  based  on  material  type,  water  content  and  velocity.  The  classification  system  includes  a  dry  sand  flow,  which  is  a  flow‐like  movement  loose,  dry,  granular material without any excess pore pressure, a sand flow slide, which is a rapid flow  of granular material involving excess pore pressures or liquefaction, a clay flow slide, which  is  a  very  rapid  flow  of  liquefied  sensitive  clay,  an  earth  flow,  which  is  a  rapid  to  slow  to  intermittent  flow‐like  movement  of  plastic  clayey  earth,  a  debris  flow,  which  is  a  rapid  to  15       extremely  rapid  flow  of  saturated  non‐plastic  debris  in  a  steep  channel,  and  a  mud  flow,  which is a very rapid to extremely rapid flow of saturated plastic debris in a channel with a  very high water content relative to the source material.   Flow  slides  commonly  occur  within  the  glaciolacustrine  Lake  Peace  deposits,  and  earth flows often form in slide debris. The Attachie Slide of 1973 was a special and rather  unique example of a flow slide that does not have many analogies in the existing literature  (see Section 7.0).     16        4.0 Geology of the Peace River Area  The  geology  of  the  Peace  River  valley  between  Hudson’s  Hope  and  Fort  St.  John  consists  of  Cretaceous  bedrock  overlain  by  a  Quaternary  sequence  of  fluvial,  glacial  and  interglacial  deposits  up  to  400  m  thick.  Investigations  have  been  conducted  by  Mathews  (1978), Stott (1982), Cornish and Moore (1985), Hartman (2005) and Hartman and Clague  (2008). Investigations associated with the proposed Site C dam have also been completed  by  Thurber  Consulting  Ltd.  (Thurber,  1978)  and  BC  Hydro  (1981).  More  recently,  detailed  surface  mapping  and  drilling  were  completed  by  BGC  Engineering  Inc.  (BGC,  2012b)  on  behalf of BC Hydro.   4.1 Bedrock Geology   4.1.1 Bedrock Units  The  Peace  River  study  area  is  underlain  by  gently  northeast‐dipping  Upper  and  Lower  Cretaceous sedimentary rocks which include conglomerates, sandstones and marine shales  of  the  Bullhead  Group,  shales  and  sandstones  of  the  Fort  St.  John  Group  and  sandstones  and conglomerates of the Dunvegan Formation (Stott, 1982). A simplified bedrock geology  map is shown in Figure 4.1. A stratigraphic correlation of the rocks within the project area is  presented in Figure 4.2. The principal bedrock units are summarized in Table 4.1, followed  by  a  brief  description  of  each  unit.  Unit  descriptions  are  based  on  data  provided  by  BGC  (2012a).   17             Figure 4.1     Bedrock geology of the Peace River Area (B.C Ministry of Energy and Mines Digital Geology Map  of B.C, 2005, Copyright © Province of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission of the  province of British Columbia. www. ipp.gov.bc.ca)      18       Peace River - Plains Downstream of Farrell Cr  Dunvegan Formation  Dunvegan Formation  Upper Cretaceous  Peace River - Foothills Upstream of Farrell Cr  Fish Scales  Cruiser Formation  Fish Scales  Hulcross Formation Gates Formation  Cadomin Formation  Bullhead Group  Bullhead Group  Moosebar Formation  Gething Formation  Peace R FM  Boulder Creek FM  Spirit River  Fm.   Hasler Formation  Fort St. John Group  Fort St. John Group  Lower Cretaceous  Shaftesbury Formation Goodrich Formation  Paddy Mbr. Cadotte Mbr.  Harmom Member  Notikewin Mbr. Falher Member Wilrich Member Bluesky Formation  Gething Formation Cadomin Formation     Figure 4.2     Stratigraphic correlation of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in the Peace River valley. Formations  exposed in the study area highlighted. Figure based on Stott (1982).    19       Table 4.1     Principal rock types found in project area.   Geological Unit  (youngest to oldest)   Engineering Description   Dunvegan Formation   Sandstone, fine grained, beige to grey, widely spaced joints, strong  rock.   Shaftesbury Formation   Shale (Upper Cretaceous) and silty shale (Lower Cretaceous) dark  grey, very to extremely closely fractured, moderately strong to  extremely weak rock.   Sandstone, fine grained, interbedded with shale and silty shale,  Boulder Creek Formation  laminated, beige to dark grey, moderately jointed, medium strong  rock.  Hulcross Formation   Silty shale, some siltstone beds, dark grey, very to extremely closely  fractured, weak rock.   Gates Formation   Sandstone, fine grained, laminated, some cross bedding, well sorted  grading upwards to poorly sorted, beige to grey, massive to thin‐ bedded, strong rock. Multiple thick coal seams.   Moosebar Formation   Shale grading upward to siltstone, dark grey, very to extremely closely  fractured, weak to medium strong rock.   4.1.1.1 Dunvegan Formation  Dunvegan Formation sandstone is exposed along the north bank of the Peace River  near Cache Creek, where it stands in a near vertical scarp near the top of the valley wall.  The Formation consists of Upper Cretaceous interbedded marine and non‐marine siltstones  and  sandstones.  Shale  layers  increase  in  abundance  towards  the  base  of  the  unit  where  there is a gradational contact with the underlying Shaftesbury Shale.  4.1.1.2 Shaftesbury Formation  Shales,  silty  shales  and  siltstones  belonging  to  the  Shaftesbury  Formation  are  intermittently exposed low on the valley slopes between Farrell Creek and Tea Creek. The  Shaftesbury  Formation  grades  upward  from  Lower  Cretaceous  silty  shale  to  Upper  Cretaceous  shale,  and  then  into  the  interbedded  marine  and  non‐marine  siltstones  and  sandstones  of the Upper Cretaceous Dunvegan Formation. The ‘fish scales marker unit’, a  zone of condensed bioclastic accumulation, marks the contact between Upper Cretaceous  and  Lower  Cretaceous  deposits  (Leckie  et  al.,  1991).  These  marine  shales  and  silty  shales  20       contain abundant fossiliferous concretion zones, bentonitic layers and distinct marker beds  that are best documented at the proposed Site C dam site (Cornish and Moore, 1985).  Between  Farrell  Creek  and  Halfway  River,  the  Shaftesbury  Formation  is  generally  composed of competent siltstone and silty shale, and forms steep bluffs. There is evidence  of  block  topple  failures  in  this  reach.  Downstream  past  Halfway  River  and  higher  in  the  stratigraphic  sequence,  the  rock  becomes  less  competent.  At  Bear  Flat,  the  increasing  abundance  of  weak  shale  layers  results  in  gently  sloping  bedrock  slopes,  although  large  bedrock  failures  are  still  absent.  The  largest  regional  bedrock  failure  is  located  farther  downstream on the north bank at Cache Creek. Another prominent shale failure is located  on  the  north  bank  near  Tea  Creek.  Downstream  of  this  point,  bedrock  instability  is  conspicuous,  particularly  on  the  eroding  north  bank  near  Tea  Creek.  In  this  reach,  the  Shaftesbury Formation comprises weak shale which weathers rapidly.  4.1.1.3 Boulder Creek Formation  The  Boulder  Creek  Formation  is  exposed  in  the  slopes  opposite  Hudson’s  Hope  (Stott,  1982).  This  Formation  comprises  fine  grained  sandstone  interbedded  with  grey  to  weathered brownish grey shale and silty shale with abundant ripples and bedding planes. It  conformably overlies Hulcross shale. The upper contact with Shaftesbury Shale is marked by  a band of chert pebbles (Stott 1982).  4.1.1.4 Hulcross Formation  Silty shale and siltstone of the Hulcross Formation is well exposed in a gully on the  north bank of the Peace River near Hudson’s Hope where it overlies the Gates Formation.  Hulcross Formation siltstone may be exposed on the south bank downstream of Hudson’s  Hope,  however  this  may  also  be  siltstone  of  the  lower  Shaftesbury  Formation.  Hulcross  Formation siltstone and silty shale forms steep subvertical slopes. This unit grades upwards  into interbedded sandstone of the Boulder Creek Formation. The lower contact with Gates  sandstone is abrupt.    21       4.1.1.5 Gates Formation  Gates Formation sandstone is exposed along the Peace River upstream of Hudson’s  Hope, where it caps Moosebar shale, and downstream between Lynx Creek and Hudson’s  Hope.  This  unit  comprises  massive  to  thickly  bedded,  nearly  flat,  well  sorted  marine  sandstone  layers  with  lesser  interbeds  of  conglomerate,  coal,  and  shale  near  the  upper  contact. It commonly forms overhanging bluffs. The lower contact with Moosebar shale is  conformable and gradational, with the first thick continuous bed of sandstone marking the  base of the Gates Formation (Stott 1982).  4.1.1.6 Moosebar Formation  The Moosebar Formation is exposed along the banks of the Peace River from Peace  Canyon  Dam  downstream  to  Hudson’s  Hope.  This  Formation  is  comprised  of  interbedded  dark grey shale and siltstone with rusty weathering and sideritic concretions. Shale horizons  are commonly friable and highly fractured. Moosebar shale and siltstone commonly forms  steep,  subvertical  bluffs.  This  unit  is  conformably  overlain  by,  and  grades  into  Gates  Formation sandstone.   22        4.1.2 Regional Tectonics  The  project  site  is  located  east  of  the  southern  Canadian  Cordillera,  a  region  of  relatively low seismic activity. The rate of seismic activity drops inland from the coast, and  increases to the east in the region of the Rocky Mountain trench and western Alberta, and  to  the  south  near  the  Canada/United  States  border  (Klohn  Crippen  Berger  Ltd.  and  SNC  Lavalin, 2009). Four notable seismic events have been recorded in the southern Cordillera:    Magnitude 6.0 on 4 February 1918 near McNaughton Lake about 460 km southeast  from Fort St. John;     Magnitude 5.0 on 14 May 1978 near McNaughton Lake and about 420 km southeast  from Fort St. John;     Magnitude  5.4  on  21  March  1986  near  Prince  George  about  230  km  from  Fort  St.  John and,     Magnitude 5.7 on 14 April 2001 near Dawson Creek, British Columbia, about 70 km  from Fort St. John.  Most of the seismic activity is due to natural seismicity, however seismic activity has   been  attributed  to  hydrocarbon  extraction  including  high  pressure  water  injection  (KCBL  and SNC, 2009).   Past regional tectonic activity has had little effect on the rocks of the study area. The  most easterly major thrust structures related to development of the Rocky Mountains occur  immediately  downstream  of  Peace  Canyon  and  consist  of  a  series  of  broad  northeast  trending  folds  and  low  angle  thrusts  found  near  Hudson’s  Hope.  Several  shallow  dipping  thrust features with small displacements are also found between Hudson’s Hope and Bear  Flat (Irish, 1958).   23        4.2 Bedrock and Discontinuity Shear Strength Properties  This discussion of rock mass and discontinuity shear strength parameters is limited  to  the  bedrock  units  which  directly  underlie  the  overburden  deposits  at  the  five  landslide  sites  and  most  of  the  study  area,  namely  the  Shaftesbury  Shale  and  the  Dunvegan  Sandstone.    4.2.1 Discontinuity Shear Strength of the Shaftesbury Shale  The  geotechnical  properties  of  the  Shaftesbury  Shale  have  been  investigated  by  Thurber (1978), BC Hydro (1981a, 1982 and 1984), Cornish and Moore (1985), Sargent and  Cornish (1985), Imrie (1991), Bidwell (1999), McKane (2004) and Severin (2004). Rock mass  strength is controlled by discontinuities which are primarily influenced by three processes:  (1) Deposition (2) Valley Rebound and (3) Weathering.   4.2.1.1 Deposition  The  Shaftesbury  Shales  are  marine  shales  which  were  deposited  horizontally,  creating  horizontal  bedding  planes.  The  shale  contains  multiple  high  plasticity  bentonitic  layers which are particularly prone to shearing. Mineralogically, the Shaftesbury clay shale  predominantly consists of kaolinite, illite and smectite, whereas select bentonitic ash layers  contain a higher proportion of smectite (Bidwell, 1999).   4.2.1.2 Valley Rebound  Valley rebound is the process of horizontal and vertical stress relief caused by glacial  unloading  and  valley  downcutting.  In  the  Peace  River  valley,  this  process  formed  bedding  plane fractures, cross cutting shear zones and steep vertical relaxation joints (Imrie, 1991).  As  rock  strength  varies  throughout  the  valley,  there  is  a  corresponding  variation  in  structural features. In more competent rock, there is a tendency towards upwards arching  and  vertical  jointing,  whereas  shear  zones  dominate  in  weaker  rock.  The  valley  rebound  process is illustrated in Figure 4.3.   24       Horizontal  bedding  plane  fractures  generally  consist  of  discontinuous  hairline  partings, however some fractures situated beneath the valley floor are up to 1 cm thick and  infilled  with  alluvium  or  clay  materials  derived  from  the  rock  adjacent  to  the  fracture  (Cornish  and  Moore,  1985).  Three  bedding  planes  have  been  identified  as  particularly  relevant to slope instability. They are termed bedding plane (BP) 8, BP 25 and BP 28. Imrie  (1991) noted that these bedding planes appear to be continuous throughout the valley. The  weakest bedding plane, BP 8, is infilled with clay consisting of 63% illite/smectite (Bidwell,  1999). Cornish and Moore (1985) identified a further 27 bedding planes which appear to be  continuous throughout the region, but which do not likely govern the strength of the shale.  The bedding plane data presented by Cornish and Moore (1985) is shown in Table 4.2, along  with corresponding strength estimates from BC Hydro (1984).  Site  investigations  also  indicated  the  presence  of  valley  rebound  induced  cross  cutting  shear  surfaces,  most  of  which  dip  15°  to  30°  towards  the  south.  The  shears  are  characterized  by  at  least  0.2  m  of  vertical  offset  and  5  cm  of  gouge.  The  major  shears  consist of over 3 m of gouge with inclusions of intact rock (Cornish and Moore, 1985). The  shears are associated with thrust movement. Cornish and Moore also noted that shearing  appears to be more intense on the south bank than the north bank.      25          Figure 4.3     Conceptual diagram of events determining the characteristics of slope failures in argillaceous  bedrock of the Canadian Western Interior (Mollard, 1977, Copyright © Geological Society of America, 1977,  by permission).     A = Ardkenneth Sand Member in the Bearpaw Formation  B = bentonitic, marine, argillaceous strata of the Bearpaw Formation with bentonite seams (darker  lines).  D = Drift, mostly till, containing blocks of ice‐thrust shale in the lower part; shear planes of ice‐ thrusting in the upper part.  F = Direction of regional groundwater flow  H = hard shale zone  I = Ice (+/‐ 1200 m thick)  M = Medium shale zone  R = River alluvium, mostly fine to medium sand  S = Soft shale zone containing closely spaced joints, numerous slickensides and deformed bentonite  seams.   T = Tension cracks in stiff glacial overburden on the upland near the top of the valley wall.   U = Uplift of the valley floor, producing a gently anticlinal structure and upwarping of beds in the  valley sides (exaggerated)  V = Valley in bedrock partly infilled with stratified sand and gravel  W = Weathering and erosion.    26       Lastly, open relaxation joints strike parallel to the river and dip steeply towards the  river.  The  joints  occur  to  a  depth  of  approximately  30  m  and  are  partially  infilled  with  broken rock and clay (Imrie, 1991).    Table 4.2     Shear strength properties of key bedding planes in shale bedrock.      Bedding Plane    Bedding Plane    Bedding Plane    8   25   28   Peak and Residual Shear Strength (Cornish and Moore, 1985)  ɸp (degrees)   10.8‐13.3   10‐13   14.6   ɸr (degrees)   8.3‐9.2   7‐9.5   7.7‐8.5   10   13.5   Residual Shear Strength (BC Hydro, 1984)  ɸp (degrees)   10.5   Atterberg Limits and Hydrometer Results (Cornish and Moore, 1985)  Water Content (%)   17   13   10   Plastic Limit (%)   25   24   22   Liquid Limit (%)   86   52   47   % Clay   59   52   43   Kaolinite (%)   20   9   9   Illite (%)   2   10   9   Illite/Smectite (%)   63   44   39   Clay Mineralogy   4.2.1.3 Weathering  Finally,  the  Shaftesbury  Shale  is  also  prone  to  weathering,  including  slaking,  decomposition  and  swelling  due  to  its  mineralogy,  level  of  induration  and  poor  consolidation  (Cornish  and  Moore,  1985).  According  to  Bidwell  (1999),  erosion  of  the  overburden and exposure to water causes the shales to weather to over consolidated clay.  Weathering  of  the  shales  likely  occurred  during  downcutting  of  earlier  paleovalleys  in  addition to contemporary weathering along the banks of the modern Peace River. Multiple  sliding  events,  such  as  the  Peace  River  Bridge  collapse  and  the  Edgerton  slide  have  been  attributed to weathering of the shales (APEGBC, [date unknown]; Cruden et al., 1995).   27       4.2.2 Intact Rock Properties of the Shaftesbury Shale  In addition to testing carried out on individual bedding planes, Thurber (1978) and  BC  Hydro  (1981a,  1982  and  1984)  conducted  tests  to  determine  the  bulk  strength  properties of the shale. These data are presented in Table 4.3.   Table 4.3     Bulk material properties for the Shaftesbury Shale   Unit Weight   Cohesion   ɸp   ɸr   (kN/m3)   (kPa)   (degrees)   (degrees)   20.5   69.41   15‐21   13‐18   BC Hydro (1981a)   ‐   51.41   20,30,452   10,13,162   BC Hydro (1982)   ‐   ‐   45,501   ‐   BC Hydro (1984)   ‐   50.31   35,451   ‐   Source   Thurber (1978)   :   Notes 1  Values parallel to bedding and perpendicular to bedding  2  Estimates used to reflect variable conditions such as orientation, location and weathering.    4.2.3 Comparison with Other Prairie Shales  Sargent and Cornish (1985) compared the Shaftesbury Shale to other prairie shales  and determined that the Shaftesbury Shale exhibits favorable characteristics compared to  many  other  prairie  shales.  In  particular,  according  to  Sargent  and  Cornish  (1985),  the  Shaftesbury Shale has a lower plasticity index, a lower liquid limit and a higher compressive  strength compared to similar clay shales of the Bear Paw and Pierre Formations.  4.2.4 Geotechnical Properties of the Dunvegan Sandstone  The  Upper  Cretaceous  Dunvegan  Formation  consists  of  fluvial  and  deltaic  sandstones  and  conglomerates  interbedded  with  shale  (Stott,  1982).  The  unit  is  more  competent than the underlying Shaftesbury Shale, and acts as a cap rock.  Saint  Simon,  Solymar  and  Thompson  (1979)  described  stress  relief  jointing  and  horizontal bedding joints in the sandstone, indicating that the valley rebound mechanisms  that dominate the stress response of the shale also control the overlying sandstone.  28        4.3 Quaternary Geology  4.3.1 Quaternary Stratigraphy and Glacial History  The Quaternary geology is dominated by the influence of at least three Laurentide  glacial  advances  from  the  east  and  at  least  one  Cordilleran  glacial  advance  from  the  west  (Hartman  and  Clague,  2008).  The  glaciations  were  separated  by  interglaciations  during  which three relict fluvial drainage systems formed, each of which graded to a different base  level. In most areas, the modern Peace River follows the path of the youngest paleovalley,  exposing the Pleistocene sediments which infilled the relict valley. However, between Tea  Creek  and  Moberly  River,  the  modern  river  diverged  from  the  path  of  the  youngest  paleovalley and incised through Cretaceous bedrock.   A  schematic  of  the  interpreted  valley  evolution  processes  downstream  of  Halfway  River, based on Hartman and Clague (2008), is presented in Figure 4.4. A schematic of the  interpreted valley evolution processes upstream of Halfway River is presented in Figure 4.5.  A map of the surficial geology is included in Figure 4.6.  The  oldest  relict  fluvial  drainage  is  represented  by  a  broad,  gravel‐covered  fluvial  planation surface. These deposits have only been encountered locally on the uplands and  most of the material has been removed through erosion. The age of the planation gravels is  unknown (Hartman and Clague, 2008).   The second relict paleovalley, termed the Upper Paleovalley, formed in the Lower to  Middle Pleistocene (2 588 000 – 126 000 BP1) and is represented by a gravel‐covered fluvial  erosion surface located approximately 225 m above the present Peace River (Hartman and  Clague, 2008). The Upper Paleovalley has been identified on the north and south banks of  the  Peace  River  between  Tea  Creek  and  the  B.C.‐Alberta  border.  This  paleovalley  was  almost  four  times  as  wide  as  the  modern  valley.  The  Upper  Paleovalley  fluvial  gravels  are  overlain  by  advance‐phase  glaciolacustrine  sediments.  Dropstones  and  diamicton  pods     1   BP refers to years ‘Before Present’ where ‘Present’ is defined as 1950   29       increase in abundance towards the top of the unit, suggesting the approach of a Laurentide  advance from the east (Hartman and Clague, 2008).  Both Mathews (1978), Hartman (2005) and Hartman and Clague (2008) suggest that  downcutting and infilling of the Upper Paleovalley was followed by a Laurentide advance in  the early Wisconsinan (80 000 ‐ 65 000 BP). However, diamicton attributed to this event has  only been encountered at one site. Stronger evidence indicates that a Cordilleran advance  occurred in the early‐middle Wisconsinan (80 000 – 23 000 BP), depositing a thick unit of till  encountered in drillholes near Farrell Creek, and may have extended as far east as Halfway  River  (Hartman,  2005).  Hartman  and  Clague  (2008)  suggest  that  the  Cordilleran  advance  also carved multiple deep bedrock basins east of Portage Mountain. There is evidence of at  least  one  basin  in  the  Peace  River  valley  between  Hudson’s  Hope  and  Farrell  Creek.  The  basin  was  infilled  with  glaciolacustrine  and  glaciofluvial  deposits  as  the  Cordilleran  ice  retreated.   However, it is also possible that the deep basin was not formed during a Cordilleran  advance, but instead reflects the presence of a deep preglacial valley that formed in the late  Tertiary  (Geological  Survey  of  Canada,  1970).  During  the  Pliocene,  a  mature  dendritic  drainage  system  existed  on  the  Interior  Plains,  consisting  of  preglacial  valleys  6  to  16  km  wide with gently sloping slides. The major elements of the modern drainage system reflect  the trend of the old valleys, but there are many divergences (Geological Survey of Canada,  1970). A preglacial river valley has not been identified in the study area, but the valleys are  often completely obscured by drift and may be difficult to identify.  The  early  glacial  advances  were  followed  by  the  downcutting  of  the  third  relict  drainage  system,  termed  the  Lower  Paleovalley,  by  approximately  27  400  BP.  The  Lower  Paleovalley primarily eroded through the deposits of the Upper Paleovalley and was two to  four times as wide as the modern valley (Hartman and Clague, 2008). Fluvial gravels cover  the  floor  of  the  Lower  Paleovalley  and  have  sharp  contacts  with  both  the  bedrock  below  and the younger fine grained sediments above.  30       The  Lower  Paleovalley  gravels  are  overlain  by  up  to  100  m  of  glaciolacustrine  sediments.  These  materials  were  deposited  in  Glacial  Lake  Mathews,  which  formed  as  Laurentide  ice  advanced  from  the  east  (22  020  –  27  400  BP),  blocking  drainage.  Varves,  cross  bedding  and  ripple  marks  indicate  the  materials  were  deposited  in  a  deep  water  environment. Coarser sediments found near the margins of Glacial Lake Mathews indicate  proximity  to  a  glacial  front  (Hartman  and  Clague,  2008).  Fluvial  gravel  within  the  Lake  Mathews  materials  also  suggests  that  a  minor  lake  regression  was  followed  by  renewed  glaciolacustrine deposition shortly after impoundment (Hartman and Clague, 2008).  There  is  a  sharp  contact  between  the  Glacial  Lake  Mathews  deposits  and  an  overlying  till  unit  deposited  during  the  last  Laurentide  advance  (13  970  BP  –  15  180  BP).  Glacial  grooves  show  the  progress  of  the  Laurentide  Ice  Sheet  from  the  east.  Simultaneously,  Cordilleran  ice  may  have  advanced  from  the  west.  Mathews  (1978)  suggests that the two ice sheets met in the area between Bear Flat and Attachie, but as no  terminal moraine was located, the extent of this glaciation is uncertain. The Laurentide till is  clay‐rich,  homogeneous  and  shows  a  gradation  of  drop  stones  near  the  top  as  the  overriding glacier retreated (Hartman and Clague, 2008).   As the Laurentide ice retreated to the east, the water level of Glacial Lake Mathews  dropped  and  smaller  ice‐dammed  lakes,  including  Glacial  Lake  Peace,  were  formed.  The  thickness of the Lake Peace deposits shows greater isostatic rebound to the west, indicating  that this region had been ice‐free for a longer period (Hartman and Clague, 2008).   Once the ice had fully retreated, the small ice‐dammed lakes were able to drain. This  drainage process created the modern Peace River valley, which downcut rapidly during the  Upper Pleistocene (13 970 – 10 500 BP) depositing fluvial gravel and forming steep slopes in  the  overburden  and  Cretaceous  bedrock  (Hartman  and  Clague,  2008).  The  uppermost  stratigraphic  unit  in  the  valley  consists  of  landslide  deposits  in  the  form  of  bedrock  colluvium and overburden colluvium.   31               Figure 4.4     Evolution of the Peace River valley downstream of Halfway River (based on Hartman and Clague, 2008).   32        Figure 4.5     Evolution of the Peace River valley upstream of  Halfway River (based on Hartman and Clague, 2008).     33               Figure 4.6     Surficial geology of the Peace River area (Hickins and Fournier, 2011, Copyright © GeoScience BC, 2011, by permission)  34        4.3.2 Overburden Deposits  The  overburden  geology  has  been  described  by Mathews  (1978a),  Hartman  (2005)  and  Hartman  and  Clague  (2008).  The  engineering  properties  for  the  principal  overburden  units encountered within the study area are summarized in Table 4.4. A brief description of  each unit follows. Unit descriptions are based on data provided by BGC (2012a).  Table 4.4     Principal overburden units found in the project area (modified from BGC, 2012a).   Geological Unit  (generally youngest to oldest)   Engineering Description   Fill   Sand (SW) and gravel, trace to some silt, very  dense, gravel is rounded, light grey.   Tufa   Limestone, light brown to beige with some orange  and brown staining, matrix of fine grained calcium  carbonate precipitate with up to 30% voids  containing some sand and gravel, medium strong  rock.    Overburden Colluvium   Silt (ML‐MH), sandy, trace to some gravel and  clay, soft to very stiff, grey to beige, homogeneous  to stratified.   Bedrock Colluvium   Sand and fine gravel, (SW‐GW), platy shale  particles, trace to some silt and clay, soft to very  stiff, dark grey, homogeneous to stratified.    Holocene Fluvial Deposits   Sand (SW) and gravel, trace to some silt, dense,  rounded, light grey, stratified.   Glacial Lake Peace Deposits   Silt (ML), some fine sand interbedded with sandy  silt and trace silty clay, non‐plastic to low plastic,  trace plastic clay laminations, very stiff to hard,  grey to beige, laminated to stratified with  occasional climbing and draped ripples.    Laurentide Till   Silt (ML), gravelly (coarse), some sand, non‐plastic  to low plastic, hard, dry, massive.   Glacial Lake Mathews Deposits   Silt (ML), some fine sand interbedded with sandy  silt and trace silty clay, non‐plastic to low plastic,  trace plastic clay laminations, very stiff to hard,  grey, laminated to stratified with occasional  climbing and draped ripples.   35       Geological Unit  (generally youngest to oldest)   Engineering Description   Lower Paleovalley Fluvial Deposits   Gravel (GW), coarse to cobble sized, interbedded  with sand, trace clay, well graded, very dense,  rounded, grey, homogeneous to stratified, weak  to strong cementation.   Cordilleran Basin Glaciolacustrine Deposits   Silt (ML), fine sandy, non‐plastic to low plastic,  stiff to very stiff, greyish brown, laminated.   Cordilleran Basin Glaciofluvial Deposits   Gravel (GW), some cobbles, well graded, loose,  rounded to subrounded, grey, homogeneous, no  cementation.   Cordilleran Basin Diamicton    Gravel (GP), coarse, some angular sandstone and  shale boulders, some sand, gap graded, very  dense, up to boulders, gravel is rounded, boulders  are angular, grey, homogeneous, weak  cementation.   Cordilleran Till   Silt (ML) and sand and gravel, trace boulders,  angular to rounded, non‐plastic, hard,  homogeneous.   Upper Paleovalley Glaciolacustrine Deposits   SILT (ML‐MH), clayey, sandy, grey, laminated, stiff  to hard, high to low plasticity, calcareous and  micaceous with some black carbonaceous layers.    Upper Paleovalley Fluvial Deposits   Gravel (GP) with silty clay layers, some silty sand,  gap graded, pebbles to cobbles, quartzite,  sandstone and igneous composition, well  rounded, partly rusted.    4.3.2.1 Fill  Fill is present at some locations near the surface and typically comprises very dense,  well  graded  sands,  gravels  and  cobbles.  The  fill  encountered  in  the  study  area  is  typically  associated with access roads and highways.  4.3.2.2 Tufa  At  several  locations  along  the  riverbank  where  springs  emerge,  tufa  overlies  the  bank  materials,  most  notably  along  the  north  bank  at  Hudson’s  Hope.  Tufa  is  a  calcium  carbonate ‘bedrock‐like’ limestone deposit that precipitates from solution out of cold water  emerging  from  the  springs.  The  tufa  is  described  as  light  brown  to  beige  with  a  matrix  of  36       fine grained calcium carbonate and up to 30% voids containing some sand and gravel. The  deposit is generally medium strong and moderately to highly weathered.  4.3.2.3 Overburden Colluvium  Overburden  slide  debris  is  variable  in  nature,  reflecting  the  source  material.  The  surface expression is generally hummocky and can present as either a thin surficial veneer,  or a thick lobe of material at the base of a large landslide. Most overburden landslide debris  is  silty  with  some  sand  and  trace  to  some  gravel.  Debris  from  the  1973  Attachie  Slide  is  preserved  in  the  floodplain  at  the  foot  of  the  slide.  The  debris  encompasses  an  area  of  approximately  950  000  m2  with  an  average  thickness  of  8.5  m.  At  the  Attachie  Slide,  the  debris consists of angular, boulder‐sized blocks of silty clay and till surrounded by a matrix  of sand, silt and clay (Evans et al., 1996).  4.3.2.4 Bedrock Colluvium  Bedrock  slide  debris  is  generally  derived  from  Shaftesbury  Shale,  and  consists  of  angular fine gravel sized fragments of shale in a clay matrix. However, when failure occurs  in  a  weak  material,  such  as  shale,  overlain  by  stronger  material,  such  as  sandstone,  large  intact  blocks  are  often  entrained  and  carried  down‐slope  in  a  highly  disturbed  matrix  formed  from  the  weak  material.  At  the  Cache  Creek  Slide,  the  debris  consists  of  angular  boulders of sandstone in a fine grained matrix.  4.3.2.5 Holocene Fluvial Deposits  Holocene sand and gravel fluvial deposits cap terraces and floodplains. These consist  of  cross‐bedded  sands  and  gravels  with  trace  to  some  silt.  The  gravels  are  generally  well  graded and comprise rounded to sub‐rounded pebbles and cobbles of non‐local rock types  ranging up to 8 cm in diameter. Oversized boulders (< 1 m in diameter) are rare, accounting  for  less  than  10%  of  all  materials.  Sand  lenses  and  beds  range  in  thickness  from  a  few  centimetres  to  approximately  a  metre  and  are  generally  fine  to  medium  grained,  moderately well sorted, and occasionally cross‐bedded. The Holocene fluvial deposits have   37       an average thickness of 17 m (Hartman and Clague, 2008). Overbank fines that are up to 2  m thick, but generally less than 1 m thick, commonly cap the fluvial sand and gravel.   4.3.2.6 Glacial Lake Peace Deposits  Sediments deposited in Glacial Lake Peace form a surficial veneer which overlies the  Peace River region. The Lake Peace deposit is the uppermost glaciolacustrine unit and has  an average thickness of 10 m (Hartman and Clague, 2008). This unit consists of interbedded  fine sand, silt, and clay with trace isolated gravel clasts.  4.3.2.7 Laurentide Till  A regional till layer was deposited by Laurentide ice during the last glaciation. Within  the limits of Glacial Lake Mathews, it overlies advance phase glaciolacustrine sediments on  an erosional contact, and is conformably overlain by Glacial Lake Peace sediments. Outside  of  these  limits,  the  till  typically  overlies  bedrock.  The  Laurentide  till  comprises  homogeneous,  matrix  supported  gravelly  silt  and  clay,  is  typically  very  stiff  to  hard  and  stands in vertical faces where dry. Colour varies from olive grey to light olive grey. Gravel is  commonly rounded, suggesting erosion from fluvial sediments (Hartman 2005). Granite and  gneiss  clasts  derived  from  the  Canadian  Shield  are  common.  The  Laurentide  till  has  an  average thickness of 12 m (Hartman and Clague, 2008).  4.3.2.8 Glacial Lake Mathews Deposits  Glacial  Lake  Mathews  sediments  form  a  part  of  the  Lower  Paleovalley  valley  fill  sequence underlying the gently sloping benches on either side of the Peace River. The Lake  Mathews glaciolacustrine sediments are overlain by Laurentide till. The deposits comprise  laminated  fine  sand  and  silt  with  some  clayey  beds  concentrated  near  the  base  of  the  sequence.  There  are  also  occasional  layers  of  fine  to  coarse  gravel.  The  Lake  Mathews  deposits have an average thickness of 18 m, and a maximum thickness of 100 m (Hartman  and  Clague,  2008).  Much  of  the  instability  observed  along  the  banks  of  the  Peace  River  within the project area is associated with this unit.    38       4.3.2.9 Lower Paleovalley Fluvial Deposits  Paleovalley  sand  and  gravel  lies  at  the  base  of  the  Lower  Paleovalley  fill  sequence  where it typically overlies bedrock. Where a deep Cordilleran basin is present, the gravels  overlie  older  glaciolacustrine  and  glaciofluvial  deposits.  The  base  of  the  gravel  is  an  erosional  contact.  The  upper  contact  is  conformable  where  overlain  by  Glacial  Lake  Mathews  sediments,  and  unconformable  where  overlain  by  till.  It  comprises  pebble  to  cobble sized grains, with some sand beds and trace fine layers. This unit is homogeneous to  stratified  and  commonly  rusty,  weathered  and  partially  cemented.  The  Lower  Paleovalley  fluvial  deposits  have  an  average  thickness  of  13  m,  and  a  maximum  thickness  of  67  m  (Hartman and Clague, 2008).  4.3.2.10 Cordilleran Basin Glaciolacustrine Deposits  Cordilleran  Basin  glaciolacustrine  deposits  are  exposed  in  the  slopes  between  Hudson’s Hope and Lynx Creek, and in the slopes between Farrell Creek and BC Hydro River  Kilometer 53. This unit overlies either boulder diamicton or Cordilleran till and underlies the  Lower  Paleovalley  deposits.  The  glaciolacustrine  sediments  comprise  a  stiff  to  very  stiff,  greyish brown, fine to medium sand or sandy laminated silt. Drillhole data indicates this unit  has an average thickness of 15 m and a maximum thickness of 22 m (BGC 2012b).  4.3.2.11 Cordilleran Basin Glaciofluvial Deposits  The  Cordilleran  Basin  glaciofluvial  deposits  consist  of  homogeneous,  well  graded,  coarse, rounded silty gravel with some cobbles. This unit may have been deposited near a  lake  margin  within  a  fluvial  delta.  Drillhole  data  indicate  the  Cordilleran  glaciofluvial  deposits  have  an  average  thickness  of  24  m  (BGC,  2012b).  There  is  a  gradational  contact  with the overlying Cordilleran glaciolacustrine deposits. Near Farrell Creek and Lynx Creek,  the deposits are underlain by Cordilleran diamicton and near Hudson’s Hope the deposits  are underlain by siltstone.    39       4.3.2.12 Cordilleran Basin Diamicton  A  homogeneous,  matrix‐supported  boulder  diamicton  is  exposed  in  the  steep  riverbank  slopes  opposite  Lynx  Creek.  The  deposit  is  approximately  20  m  thick  and  comprises  a  matrix  of  homogeneous  silty  sandy  pebble  gravel  with  some  subangular  to  angular boulders of shale and sandstone up to 2 m in diameter. The boulder diamicton may  have been deposited as a debris flood, debris flow or a subaqueous debris flow (Hartman  and Clague, 2008), possibly associated with a glacial lake outburst flood.  4.3.2.13 Cordilleran Till  Cordilleran till is exposed on the lower Halfway River where it is underlain by sand  and  gravel  of  unknown  stratigraphic  association.  Cordilleran  till  was  also  encountered  in  drillholes  near  Lynx  Creek  and  Farrell  Creek.  The  till  comprises  30%  subrounded  gravel,  trace angular boulders up to 3 m in diameter and a matrix of sand and silt. The Cordilleran  till  has  an  average  thickness  of  40  m,  and  a  maximum  thickness  of  60  m  (Hartman  and  Clague, 2008). At Halfway River, the till is overlain by Glacial Lake Mathews deposits, and at  Farrell Creek the till is overlain by older glaciolacustrine and glaciofluvial deposits. The high  gravel content (~30%) and silty sand matrix distinguish Cordilleran till from Laurentide till,  which  has  ~10%  gravel,  a  clayey  matrix  and  is  olive  grey  in  colour  (Hartman,  2005).  The  Cordilleran till at Farrell Creek was likely deposited in a Cordilleran basin, whereas the till at  Halfway River was likely deposited regionally.   4.3.2.14 Upper Paleovalley Glaciolacustrine Deposits  The Upper Paleovalley glaciolacustrine deposits are exposed along the north bank of  the Peace River near Tea Creek, and along the Moberly River. This glaciolacustrine unit of  interbedded sand, silt and clay has an average thickness of 33 m and a maximum thickness  of  66  m  (Hartman  and  Clague,  2008).  Laminations,  ripples,  and  cross  bedding  indicate  deposition from suspension and flow in a lake. Dropstones and diamicton pods increase in  abundance  towards  the  top  of  the  unit,  indicating  the  approach  of  a  Laurentide  advance  (Hartman and Clague, 2008).   40       4.3.2.15 Upper Paleovalley Fluvial Deposits  The  Upper  Paleovalley  fluvial  sand  and  gravel  underlies  the  Upper  Paleovalley  glaciolacustrine  deposits  and  overlies  Cretaceous  bedrock.  The  upper  contact  is  conformable  where  overlain  by  the  Upper  Paleovalley  glaciolacustrine  deposits,  and  the  unit  has  an  average  thickness  of  8  m  (Hartman  and  Clague,  2008).  The  deposit  comprises  rounded pebble to cobble sized gravel with silty clay layers, and may have been deposited  by  a  braided  stream.  Clasts  primarily  consist  of  Cordilleran  lithologies  such  as  quartzite,  chert, sandstone and igneous rocks (Hartman and Clague, 2008).    4.4 Quaternary Sequence Material Properties  4.4.1 Soil Classification  Soil  classification  tests  have  been  completed  by  BC  Hydro  (1980,  1981a)  Fletcher  (2000), Severin (2004), and BGC Engineering Inc. (2012b). Samples were collected both from  drillholes and from test pits. Tests included grain size analysis, Atterberg limits and natural  moisture  content.  The  data  from  these  analyses  has  been  subdivided  for  each  major  stratigraphic unit based on the sample depth and interpretation of drillhole logs. These data  are  presented  in  Table  4.5.  A  corresponding  plasticity  chart  is  shown  in  Figure  4.7.  A  complete listing of all soil classification data is included in Appendix B.   41       Table 4.5     Summary of classification test results. Average value is given with range of values provided in  brackets [].       Property   Moisture  Content  (%)  Liquid  Limit (%)  Plastic  Limit (%)  Liquidity  Index  Clay  Content  (%)  Silt  Content  (%)  Sand  Content  (%)  Gravel  Content  (%)   Laurentide Till  n=4   16  [1.‐24]   Glacial  Lake  Peace  n=4  22  [11‐30]   39  [24‐49]  18  [13‐22]  ‐0.3  [‐1.5 to  0.8]  32  [23‐48]     Colluvium  n=111   Cordilleran Basin  Glaciolacustrine  n=24   21 [11‐35]   Glacial Lake  Mathews  n=155  26 [0.6‐38]   49  [28‐66]  22.3  [18‐26]    ‐    46  [15‐64]   34 [21‐44]  17 [13‐22]  0.1 [‐0.3‐0.6]   43 [18‐84]  23 [13‐31]  0 [‐2 to 0.6]   25 [17‐40]  17 [13‐25]   31 [19‐37]   61  [46‐74]   51  [36‐85]   46.3 [25‐63]   8  [1‐19]   4  [0‐13]   0.2  [0.2‐0.2]     ‐     ‐    ‐     16 [11‐27]   Paleovalley Fluvial  Gravel  n=6  11.7 [5‐20]   35 [0‐75]   ‐    27 [2‐61]   34 [30‐38]  17.5 [17‐18]    ‐    17 [6‐38]   57 [8‐97]   56 [36‐77]   14 [6‐34]   13 [0‐90]   17 [0‐61]   32 [19‐62]   3 [0‐64]   ‐    ‐       1   n = number of samples  42        Figure 4.7     Plasticity chart for overburden materials.     43        Colluvium samples are classified as inorganic low plasticity clay (Figure 4.7), however  grain  size  analysis  shows  that  most  samples  are  actually  clayey  silt,  with  an  average  clay  content of 31%. This trend applies to most of the materials sampled. With the exception of  the Lake Mathews deposits which varied from low plasticity silt to high plasticity clay, most  samples  were  classified  as  a  low  plasticity  clay,  but  were  found  to  contain  significant  proportions  of  silt.  The  Lake  Mathews  materials  show  a  wide  variation  in  material  properties which likely reflect changing depositional conditions. The liquidity index indicates  that most materials are lightly over consolidated.   Calcite  and  gypsum  crystals  were  observed  in  some  samples,  indicating  that  some  cementation is possible. Fletcher (2000) noted that a solution of 10% HCl applied to a block  sample of clayey silt reacted by fizzing and bubbling.   Fletcher  (2000)  also  conducted  X‐ray  diffraction  on  the  materials  adjacent  to  the  presumed  sliding  surface  at  the  Attachie  Slide.  The  results  indicate  that  this  material  consists primarily of 85 % illite and 15% kaolinite with some glacially ground rock flour of  quartz and feldspar. Vermiculite and smectite were also identified in trace amounts.   4.4.2 Shear Strength Properties  Direct  shear  and  triaxial  shear  strength  testing  has  been  conducted  by  Thurber  (1982)  and  BGC  Engineering  (2012b).  In  1982,  direct  shear  tests  were  conducted  on  24  samples;  18  recovered  from  drillhole  DH63‐2  at  Attachie,  and  six  from  a  nearby  test  pit.  Thurber  also  conducted  nine  consolidated  undrained  (CU)  triaxial  tests  on  three  samples  recovered from drillhole DH63‐5 at Attachie, and six from drillholes 84‐4 and 84‐5 located in  Hudson’s Hope. Detailed laboratory testing data are included in Appendix B.   In 2012, Golder Associates (on behalf of BGC) conducted direct shear tests on four  bulk  samples  recovered  from  a  test  pit  adjacent  to  the  Attachie  Slide.  Direction‐reversal  tests  were  conducted  parallel  to  bedding  and  along  shear  planes  to  determine  peak  and   44       residual  effective  shear  strength  parameters.  Residual  tests  were  also  conducted  on  sheared samples. These data are summarized in Appendix B.  Additionally, in 2012, 11 consolidated, undrained triaxial tests were performed using  semi‐intact samples recovered from multiple drillholes. These data are included in Appendix  B.   The  shear  strength  testing  data  can  be  used  to  estimate  the  shear  strength  parameters of the glaciolacustrine Lake Mathews unit, the Cordilleran basin glaciolacustrine  unit,  and  colluvium.  There  is  no  shear  strength  testing  data  available  for  the  Lake  Peace  deposits, the Laurentide till, or the basal gravels.    All direct shear tests (28 in total) were conducted on samples recovered from the  Lake Mathews unit. These tests indicated that the peak friction angle varies from 14.3° to  27.5° with an average of 22.8°. The residual friction angle varies from 8.2° to 25.5° with an  average  of  18.9°.  It  should  be  noted  that  the  samples  showing  particularly  low  estimates  were described as belonging to a “weak black clay” unit, and may not be representative of  the Lake Mathews material as a bulk unit. Estimates of cohesion varied widely from 0 to 150  kPa.   48 triaxial tests have been completed on samples of colluvium (n = 3), Lake Mathews  deposits (n = 6) and Cordilleran basin glaciolacustrine deposits (n = 38). The friction angle  and  cohesion  of  the  colluvium  were  estimated  to  be  29°  and  12.5  kPa  respectively.  The  friction angle of the Lake Mathews samples varied from 31° to 32° with an average value of  31.7°.  Cohesion  was  estimated  to  be  0  kPa.  The  friction  angle  of  the  Cordilleran  basin  glaciolacustrine samples varied from 29° to 38° with an average of 33.6°. Cohesion varied  from 0 to 100 kPa.  The variation in friction angles between the direct shear and triaxial data is likely a  result of the testing method. In a direct shear test, the strength is measured along a defined  plane such as a bedding plane. In a triaxial test, the samples fails along a plane which cross  45       cuts the intact horizontal or near horizontal bedding planes, resulting in a higher strength  estimate.  With  respect  to  slope  stability  analysis,  the  results  of  the  direct  shear  testing  provides  estimates  for  the  strength  along  the  horizontal  sliding  surface,  and  the  triaxial  testing provides estimated for the strength along the back scarp.   Although  shear  strength  testing  is  limited  to  the  testing  programs  conducted  by  Thurber (1982) and BGC Engineering (2012b), multiple other studies (Thurber, 1978, 1982,  BC Hydro, 1982) have estimated the bulk shear strength properties of the glaciolacustrine  materials  (there  is  generally  no  distinction  made  between  the  Lake  Mathews,  Lake  Peace  and  Cordilleran  basin  glaciolacustrine  deposits).  These  data  are  summarized  in  Table  4.6.  These analyses are considered secondary sources, as the data is based on the results of the  1982 Thurber testing program.   Table 4.6     Summary of secondary shear strength data for glaciolacustrine deposits based on both triaxial  and direct shear data.       Unit   Cohesion   Cohesion   Phi (Peak)   Phi (Residual)   Reference   Weight   (Peak)   (Residual)   (Degrees)   (Degrees)   (kN/m3)   (kPa)   (kPa)   Thurber, 1978   ‐   0‐124   0‐14   18‐27   11‐27   Thurber, 1982   19‐22   50   ‐   20   15.2   BC Hydro, 1982   ‐   0‐19.6   ‐   35‐36   ‐   Finally, Morgenstern (1992) notes that there are several limitations associated with  laboratory testing of clays: notably moisture sensitivity, fissuring and disturbance. He also  notes that insitu shear surfaces are often very different from those created in the lab, often  resulting in misleadingly high residual shear strength values.    4.5 Groundwater   Sladen and Dyke (2004) conducted a two dimensional groundwater flow simulation  to model the approximate groundwater conditions in the banks adjacent to the Peace River.  This model also estimated the average annual pore pressure variation. Using precipitation  46       data collected at the Fort St. John airport by Environment Canada, Sladen and Dyke suggest  there is a steep downward hydraulic gradient beneath the uplands extending away from the  Peace River. They also suggest that the basal gravels may act as a drainage layer. A steep  hydraulic  gradient  is  also  present  in  the  Dunvegan  Formation.  The  interbedded  character  and multiple local springs within the Shaftesbury Shale indicate that perched water tables  are  likely  present.  Sladen  and  Dyke  also  note  that  infiltration  can  result  in  pore  pressure  increases  at  multiple  levels  depending  on  the  sequence  of  perched  water  at  a  particular  site.         47        5.0 Local and Regional Landslide Investigations  5.1 Existing Data  In  total,  more  than  61  industry  reports,  61  published  papers  and  seven  master’s  theses have been published on topics related to landslides in the Peace River valley. Initial  investigations were triggered by the 1957 Peace River bridge collapse, with the first report  published  in  1958.  There  was  little  geological  information  available  until  1963,  when  Mathews produced “Quaternary Stratigraphy of the Peace River area.” However, this report  was only available within the Department of Mines. Early work focused on the 1957 bridge  collapse, with some research on landslides of the Meikle River and the Beatton River.   The Attachie slide occurred in 1973, followed by the Peace River Hill slide in 1974.  Multiple  reports  were produced  on  the  slides  by  both  engineering  firms  and  independent  researchers. In 1974, research further accelerated as the area was identified as the site of a  potential reservoir. In 1978, Mathew’s paper summarizing the Quaternary stratigraphy was  published,  along  with  Thurber  Associates  “Shoreline  Stability  Assessment”  report.  As  the  most  comprehensive  and  detailed  slope  stability  report  to  date,  this  report  influenced  future  investigations  and  is  referenced  in  nearly  all  proceeding  slope  stability  reports.  In  1981 BC Hydro published a follow up report summarizing the results of the extensive 1978‐ 1980 field investigation.   In 1982, The Geological Survey of Canada published a paper by Stott which provided  the  first  comprehensive  description  of  bedrock  geology  in  the  area.  This  was  followed  by  multiple  papers  by  Cornish  further  characterizing  the  Shaftesbury  Shale.  In  1990,  Cruden  published “Landslides of the Peace River valley”, the first of many papers Cruden wrote on  the topic. Since 1990, most publications have consisted of landslide case studies with a few  notable  exceptions:  Bidwell’s  1999  thesis  on  the  engineering  geology  of  the  region,  Severin’s  2004  landslide  inventory,  Dyke  and  Sladen’s  2005  work  on  groundwater,  Hartman’s  2005  master’s  thesis  and  Hartman  and  Clague’s  2008  publication  on  the  Quaternary stratigraphy of the valley.   48        5.2 Slides in Quaternary Deposits  Multiple  regional  investigations  and  landslide  case  studies  have  been  published  documenting  landslides  in  the  Quaternary  glaciolacustrine  sediments  of  British  Columbia  and  Alberta.  Geertsema  (2006)  compiled  an  overview  of  38  large  catastrophic  landslides  which  occurred  in  British  Columbia  between  1973  and  2002.  Six  case  studies  involved  failures  in  glaciolacustrine  sediments:  the  1973  Attachie  slide,  the  1979  Inklin  River  slide,  the 1980 Sharktooth slide, the 1989 Halfway River slide, the 1990 Quintette Mine slide and  the 1997 Flatrock slide.  Nasmith  (1964)  described  a  retrogressive  rotational  slide  along  the  Meikle  River  Valley  in  northwestern  Alberta.  The  rupture  surface  was  located  within  glaciolacustrine  sediments overlain by a clay‐rich till. Cruden et al. (1993) described the 1990 Saddle River  slide located north of Rycroft, Alberta. The slide was described as translational with a deep  seated  rupture  surface  in  glaciolacustrine  clay  overlain  by  till.  Cruden  et  al.  (1997)  also  described  the  1939  Montagneuse  River  slide,  the  largest  historic  rapid  landslide  in  the  Interior Plains of Canada. The slide involved two independent blocks: a lower block which  translated  intact  along  a  deep  rupture  surface  in  glaciolacustrine  material,  and  an  upper  block  which  fragmented  during  failure.  The  authors  noted  that  the  rupture  surface  coincided  with  the  Shaftesbury  buried  preglacial  channel,  and  stated  that  these  deposits  were  particularly  prone  to  landslides.  Lu  et  al.  (1998)  described  the  1990  Hines  Creek  landslide,  where  five  large  blocks  slid  along  a  rupture  surface  in  preglacial  lacustrine  sediments. Miller and Cruden (2002) described the 1990 Eureka River slide, a translational  slide which also occurred in preglacial lacustrine sediments. The landslide produced a dam  over  20  m  high,  which  diverted  the  river  around  the  landslide  entirely.  Lastly,  Kim  et  al.  (2009)  described  the  2007  Fox  Creek  slide,  another  translational  block  slide  in  glaciolacustrine sediments.   Additional work has been completed by Severin (2004), who completed a landslide  inventory of the Peace, Pine and Beatton Rivers based on air photos and field investigation.  Severin  classified  most  overburden  slides  as  multi‐level  failures  which  exploited  multiple  49       weak surfaces within the glaciolacustrine deposits. Froese (2007) completed an additional  landslide inventory near the town of Peace River.    5.3 Slides in Bedrock  Many case studies have also been published describing landslides in the Cretaceous  shales  of  the  Interior  Plains.  Thomson  and  Haley  (1975)  described  the  Little  Smoky  Landslide, a slow moving slide in Upper Cretaceous clay shale overlain with till. Dewar and  Cruden (1998) described a large landslide along the Mackay River Valley which slid along a  weak, sheared clay layer of the lower Cretaceous Clearwater Formation. Krahn and Weimar  (1984)  described  the  Western  Irrigation  District  (W.I.D.)  landslide,  a  multi‐block  rock  slide  with  a  rupture  surface  along  a  thin  weak  clay  seam  in  the  mudstone  bedrock  of  the  Paskapoo  Formation.  Martin  et  al.  (1998)  described  the  Grierson  Hill  landslide  along  the  North  Saskatchewan  River,  a  large  translational  slide  along  a  horizontal  bentonite  layer  within the Upper Cretaceous Edmonton Formation.   Gerath and Hungr (1983) documented multiple slides in the Liard River basin, where  shale is overlain by a thick cap of sandstone. Thomson (1971) and Cruden (2002) described  the Lesueur slide, another translational slide along a bentonite‐rich layer within Cretaceous  shale. SoeMoe (2009) also described three large translational rock slides in weak rock near  Edmonton.   Geertsema’s  (2006)  inventory  of  large  catastrophic  slides  included  four  cases  involving  sedimentary  rocks.  These  included  the  1979  Muskwa  slide,  the  2001  Muskwa‐ Chisca slide, the 1988 Tetsa slide rock avalanche and the 1996 Chisca rock avalanche. The  latter two slides involved dip slope failures. The landslide inventory completed by Severin  (2004) also included multiple rock slides.    50        6.0 Methodology  6.1 Field Work  Detailed surficial mapping was carried out at the Attachie Slide during the summer  of  2011  as  part  of  this  thesis  investigation.  Mapped  features  included  surficial  materials,  deformation  features  such  as  horsts  and  grabens,  tree  orientation  and  disturbed  vegetation,  seepage,  scarps  and  tension  cracks.  GPS  coordinates  were  taken  for  each  feature and later mapped using Global Mapper map display software.    6.2 Slide Characterization  The  stratigraphy  of  each  slide  was  described  based  on  drillhole  data  (BC  Hydro,  1981a;  BGC  2012b),  surficial  mapping  data  (Hartman,  2005)  and  field  investigations.  Secondly, slide geometry was described using the system of landslide dimensions provided  by the 1990 International Association of Engineering Geologists (IAEG). These definitions are  summarized in Table 6.1. Each dimension is illustrated in Figure 6.1.   Table 6.1     Definition of landslide features shown in Figure 6.1 (based on IAEG, 1990).   Number   Dimension   Reference   1   Width of displaced mass   W D   2   Width of rupture surface   WR   3   Total Length   L   4   Length of displaced mass   L D   5   Length of rupture surface   LR   6   Depth of displaced mass   D D   7   Depth of rupture surface   DR      51          Figure 6.1     Definition of landslide dimensions. The lower portion is a plan view of a typical landslide in  which the dashed lines represents the trace of the rupture surface on the original ground surface, in the  upper section, hatching indicates undisturbed ground and stippling indicates disturbed material (IAEG 1990,  Copyright© Springer and The Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment, 1990, with kind  permission from Springer Science and Business Media). Numbers refer to Table 6.1.   The fahrböschung and travel angle of each slide were also determined (Figure 6.2).  The fahrböschung angle refers to the angle of the line connecting the highest point of the  landslide  back  scarp  to  the  distal  margin  of  the  displaced  mass  (Heim,  1932).  The  travel  angle refers to the angle of the line connecting the centre of mass of the displaced material  pre‐failure  to  the  centre  of  mass  of  the  displaced  material  post‐failure.  These  angles  are  used to estimate the relative mobility of a slide.    52          Figure 6.2     Measurement of fahrböschung and travel angle.   Lastly, the geomorphology of each slide was described in detail using the system of  landslide features provided by the IAEG (1990) and modified by Cruden and Varnes (1996).  Airborne LiDAR data was extensively used to describe the geomorphology of the slides. The  LiDAR was also used to  determine slide volumes and characterize the distribution  of slide  debris.   LiDAR,  or  Light  Detection  and  Ranging  consists  of  a  laser  rangefinder,  in  this  case  operating from an aerial platform such as a helicopter, plane or satellite (Giglierano, 2007).  The location and elevation of the platform is precisely determined using an airborne GPS. To  conduct  a  survey,  the  rangefinder  takes  multiple  measurements  of  the  distance  between  the ground and the air craft; the elevation of the ground surface can then be calculated by  subtracting the distance from the height of the aircraft. Gyroscopes and accelerometers are  used  to  account  for  the  tilt  and  pitch  of  the  aircraft.  LiDAR  systems  record  multiple  measurements  every  second,  and  can  quickly  create  a  dense  grid  of  elevation  data.  Generally  LiDAR  systems  record  multiple  “returns”  from  a  single  pulse  in  order  to  differentiate  between  the  ground  surface,  and  any  overlying  material  such  as  trees  or  power lines (Giglierano, 2007). The first return will reflect off the top of an object, like a tree  top, the second might reflect off a lower object such as a branch, and hopefully the last will  reflect off the ground surface. LiDAR surveys are most commonly completed in the winter  when there is less vegetation cover. During a survey, the field of view of the scanner can be   53       altered.  An  individual  swath  is  usually  approximately  1  km  wide.  Each  swath  overlaps  the  adjacent  swaths  from  15  to  30%  to  ensure  there  are  no  gaps  in  the  data.  Once  data  collection  is  complete,  classification  algorithms  are  used  to  create  the  required  surface  (Giglierano, 2007).   54        7.0 The Attachie Slide  7.1 Introduction  The Attachie Slide was one of the largest landslides involving Pleistocene deposits in  British  Columbia  in  the  20th  century.  The  slide  is  located  on  the  south  bank  of  the  Peace  River  opposite  the  Halfway  River  approximately  40  km  west  of  Fort  St.  John  at  UTM  coordinates N 6229666 E 595950 (Figure 1.1). The slide occurred on May 26, 1973 between  23:45  and  23:55  when  farmers  reported  hearing  loud  noises  “like  thunder”  and  hearing  rushing water (Evans et al., 1996). With an estimated volume of 14.7 million m3, debris from  the  slide  traveled  a  distance  of  924  m  from  the  toe  of  the  slope  and  dammed  the  Peace  River  for  approximately  12  hours  (The  Province,  1973).  The  slide  also  generated  a  displacement  wave  that  broke  trees  up  to  21  m  above  river  level  on  the  opposite  bank  (Evans  et  al.,  1996).  Aerial  photographs  of  the  slide  both  pre‐failure  (1970)  and  40  hours  post failure are shown in Figure 7.1 and Figure 7.2 respectively.   As one of the largest, most rapid modern landslides in the region, the Attachie Slide  has  been  extensively  investigated.  Investigations  and  analyses  were  reported  by  Thurber  Engineering Ltd. (1973, 1978, 1981c, 1982), the BC Department of Highways (BCDOH, 1973),  BC  Hydro  (1981a)  and  BGC  Engineering  Inc.  (2012b).  Between  1977  and  1980,  BC  Hydro  completed  eight  drillholes  at  the  Attachie  Slide,  and  installed  piezometers,  inclinometers,  extensometers and survey monuments. More recent studies have been completed by Evans  et  al.  (1996),  Fletcher  (2000)  and  Fletcher  et  al.  (2002).  Periodic  instrumentation  updates  were  reported  by  BC  Hydro  in  1985,  1990,  1993,  1995  and  1996,  and  by  Klohn  Crippen  Berger Ltd. and SNC Lavalin Inc. in 2008. In 2011, BGC completed two drillholes at the site,  and  KCB  and  SNCL  completed  a  test  pit.  The  following  discussion  describes  the  geological  conditions  at  the  site,  the  landslide  geometry  and  geomorphology,  slide  volume,  groundwater conditions, slope movement, and the slide failure mechanism.      55        North   Halfway River  Highway 29  Slide Area Pre‐Failure in 1970    Figure 7.1     Aerial photograph of the Attachie Slide, pre‐failure, in 1970 (Airphoto BC7279‐70, 1970,  Copyright © Province of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission of the Province of  British Columbia. www.ipp.gov.bc.ca)  56        North   Approximate limits of  the Attachie Slide, 40  hours post Failure  500 m  0 m  1000 m  (Approximate Scale)    Figure 7.2     Aerial photograph of the Attachie Slide 40 hours post‐failure (Airphoto BC5529‐75, 1973,  Copyright © Province of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission of the Province of  British Columbia. www.ipp.gov.bc.ca)                57        7.3 Detailed Stratigraphy  The  stratigraphy  at  the  Attachie  Slide  is  consistent  with  the  regional  stratigraphy  proposed  by  Mathews  (1978a),  Hartman  (2005)  and  Hartman  and  Clague  (2008)  and  summarized in Section 4.3. Ten drillholes completed by BC Hydro (1981a) and BGC (2012b),  and a test pit (BGC, 2012b) provide the basis for describing the detailed stratigraphy of the  site. Landslide terminology is based on Cruden and Varnes (1996).   BC  Hydro  (1981a)  completed  five  drillholes  in  the  failed  (upstream)  area;  drillhole  63‐4 was drilled above the crest of the slide in intact material, drillholes 63‐8, 63‐5 and 63‐6  on the main body of the slide, and drillhole 63‐1 in the toe. BC Hydro (1981a) completed an  additional three drillholes in the intact downstream area; drillholes 63‐2 and 63‐7 located  mid‐slope and drillhole 63‐3 in the crown (BC Hydro, 1981a). The drillhole log for DH63‐3 is  included  in  Appendix  C.  BGC  (2012b)  completed  two  additional  drillholes,  DH11‐29  and  DH11‐32 in the downstream slide area. Drillhole locations are marked on Figure 7.3. A test  pit,  TP11‐1,  was  also  completed  in  2011  (BGC,  2012b).  The  test  pit  was  located  near  the  downstream flank of the slide near a historical exposure of the failure plane.  The  site  stratigraphy  consists  of  Shaftesbury  Shale  to  El.  475  overlain  by  15  m  of  lower  paleovalley  glaciofluvial  deposits,  120  m  of  glaciolacustrine  Lake  Mathews  deposits,  25 m of Laurentide till and 0 to 27 m of glaciolacustrine Lake Peace deposits.   The Shaftesbury Shale was encountered in three drillholes, and has an approximate  maximum  elevation  of  475  m  at  the  river  bank.  This  elevation  corresponds  with  outcrops  mapped  on  the  opposite  bank.  The  shale  is  sub‐horizontally  bedded,  dipping  towards  the  river  at  angles  between  0°  and  15°.  The  Shaftesbury  Shale is  black  and  silty  with  siltstone  laminae throughout.   The shale is overlain by a sequence of Pleistocene sediments up to 150 m thick. The  lowermost  unit  consists  of  fluvial  or  glaciofluvial,  coarse  grained,  well  graded  gravel  with  some clayey sand and cobbles. The gravel and cobble fragments are similar in provenance  58       to those deposited by the present Peace River, and primarily consist of quartzite, sandstone  and granite. The basal gravels at the Attachie Slide also have a distinct silty matrix not seen  at  other  study  locations.  The  gravel  unit  has  an  average  thickness  of  15  m  with  an  uppermost elevation of 492 m to 499 m at the river bank. The unit then thins out away from  the river and is not encountered in drillholes located 600 m back from the river.   The  basal  gravels  are  overlain  by  a  complex  sequence  of  laminated  clay  and  silt  interbedded with sand lenses. This unit has a maximum thickness of 120 m and corresponds  with  the  Glacial  Lake  Mathews  unit  described  by  Hartman  and  Clague  (2008).  The  glaciolacustrine  deposits  are  laminated  on  a  scale  of  1  mm  to  3  cm  and  are  dark  grey,  micaceous  and  stiff  with  low  to  high  plasticity.  The  plasticity  is  highly  dependent  on  the  ratio of clay to silt, which varies between laminations. This unit contains approximately 34%  low to high plasticity clay, 55% low to high plasticity silt and 11% sand. Varves, black organic  laminations,  chert  fragments  and  trace  charcoal  fragments  are  also  found  throughout  the  unit. A block of wood measuring approximately 1440 cm3 was encountered at El. 556 m in  drillhole  DH11‐29.  The  wood  was  age  dated  to  27  660  +/‐  150  BP  (BGC,  2012b).  This  age  corresponds to the middle Wisconsinan, and agrees with the expected age range indicated  by Hartman and Clague (2008). Calcareous zones were also noted between El. 492 m and El.  512 m. Highly plastic clay layers 2 mm to 1 cm thick were noted at El. 557 m and El. 531 m.   Laminations  are  generally  horizontal,  however  evidence  of  sliding  is  indicated  by  back tilting and disturbed bedding. According to Evans et al. (1996), the back tilting occurs  in  conjunction  with  complex  normal  faulting  that  offsets  laminations  by  up  to  25  cm.  Additionally, many disturbed clay laminations show slickensided surfaces in the down slope  direction. Disturbed bedding was noted in drillhole 63‐3 with intact bedding below El. 591  m, and distorted bedding above. Local shearing and brecciation was also encountered at El.  508 m, El. 500 m, El. 561 m and El. 502 m. The sheared and brecciated zones are most often  encountered immediately above the basal gravel unit. These deformations are likely a result  of both valley rebound and pre and post glacial slope movements (Evans et al., 1996).   59       The Glacial Lake Mathews deposits are overlain by a unit of Late Wisconsinan glacial  till. The till is an unstratified, non‐plastic to low plastic sand silt and clay mixture containing  some  well‐rounded  gravel  and  cobbles.  This  unit  is  compact  and  often  exhibits  vertical  jointing that enables steep slopes to form where the till is exposed. The till has an average  thickness of 25 m.  The  Late  Wisconsinan  till  is  overlain  by  glaciolacustrine  clay,  corresponding  to  the  Glacial  Lake  Peace  deposits  described  by  Mathews  (1978a).  This  unit  was  regionally  deposited on an irregular till surface and is highly variable in thickness, ranging from 0 to 27  m (Evans et al., 1996). The low to medium plasticity Lake Peace deposits consist of varved  or  laminated  silty  clay  to  clay  with  trace  rounded  gravel.  The  sequence  of  Pleistocene  deposits is often locally overlain by colluvium on slopes, with a maximum thickness of 30 m.  Debris is described in detail in Section 7.4.   7.4 Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology  7.4.1 Slope Geometry  Aerial Photograph BC 5529‐075, LiDAR imagery (BC Hydro, 1997), drillhole logs (BC  Hydro,  1981a;  BGC,  2012b)  and  surficial  mapping  provide  the  basis  for  describing  the  geometry and geomorphology of the Attachie Slide.   A LiDAR image of the slide is shown in Figure 7.3. Geological features including major  and  minor  scarps,  earth  flow  fronts  and  tension  cracks  are  overlain  on  this  figure.  The  location  of  interpretive  cross  sections  is  also  included.  Five  cross  sections  were  created  using the LiDAR, drillhole, surficial mapping and piezometer data (Figures 7.4 to 7.8). Three  sections are located within the main body of the slide, and two are located in the adjacent  intact slopes. Five additional sections (designated Sections 1b through 5b) extend through  the  toe  of  the  slope  and  across  the  river;  these  sections  were  used  to  characterize  the  distribution of the debris (Figure 7.14).   60        The  Attachie  Slide  consists  of  two  connected  source  zones  and  a  lower  accumulation zone. From the crest of the main scarp at El. 650 m, the slope descends at an  average angle of 15° to the toe of the rupture surface at El. 500 m. The toe of the rupture  surface daylights near the crest of a steep, 70 m high cut bank slope adjacent to the Peace  River.  Debris  is  deposited  both  in  the  upper  depletion  zone  and  the  lower  accumulation  zone that extends across the Peace River. As indicated by a loss of vegetation on the north  bank, the debris traveled across the Peace River and up the opposite bank to approximately  El. 460 m creating a travel path 1.0 km long. With a maximum debris extent of 1607 m from  the  slope  crest,  and  a  vertical  elevation  difference  of  210  m,  the  Attachie  Slide  has  a  fahrböschung  of  8.6°.  The  travel  angle,  connecting  the  original  and  post‐slide  centres  of  gravity, is approximately 8.8°.   The  flanks  of  the  slide  are  somewhat  undefined  due  to  instability  in  both  the  upstream and downstream slopes. The eastern flank is identified by a continuous side scarp,  however the western flank shows only discontinuous side scarps. Later aerial photographs  show  that  the  eastern  flank  failed  in  a  separate  event  post‐1973.  The  slide  is  relatively  uniform in width. The depletion zone has an average width of 650 m, and the accumulation  zone has an average width of 910 m. A summary of the major landslide dimensions is shown  in Table 7.1. These dimensions are based on the 1990 IAEG system discussed in Section 6.2.    61        1 2 3 4 5    Figure 7.3     Schematic showing major geological features of the Attachie Slide and the location of investigative boreholes and interpretive cross sections  superimposed on the LiDAR survey data. (LiDAR image courtesy of BC Hydro, 2007, Copyright © Airborne Imaging, 2007, adapted by permission)  62        Section 1                                         Figure 7.4     Attachie Slide section 1, through the downstream intact  slope. See Figure 7.3 for location.    63        Section 2         Figure 7.5     Attachie Slide section 2. See Figure 7.3 for location.                             64        Section 3     Figure 7.6     Attachie Slide section 3: through the centre of the main  slide body. Section shows post‐failure conditions. See Figure 7.3 for  location.                           65        Section 4                                  Figure 7.7     Attachie Slide section 4. See Figure 7.3 for location.           66        Section 5                           Figure 7.8    Attachie Slide section 5: through the upstream intact  slope. See Figure 7.3 for location.  67       Table 7.1     Attachie landslide dimensions (based on IAEG 1990).   Number    Average Dimension   Value (m)   1   Width of displaced mass (WD)   910   2   Width of rupture surface (WR)   650   3   Total Length (L)   1600   4   Length of displaced mass (LD)   1580   5   Length of rupture surface (LR)   590   6   Depth of displaced mass (DD)   140   7   Depth of rupture surface (DR)   35   7.4.2 Detailed Slide Description      The  LiDAR  imagery  reveals  a  prominent  tension  crack  located  approximately  50  m  behind  the  crest  of  the  slope,  and  the  crown  of  the  slide  (Figure  7.3).  The  tension  crack  is  near  vertical, and is accompanied with a downward vertical displacement of approximately 5 m.  Aerial  photographs  indicate  this  tension  crack  formed  post‐1973.  The  main  scarp  of  the  1973  slide  is  defined  by  an  800  m  long  continuous  scarp  that  is  near  vertical  and  approximately  25  m  high.  Aerial  photographs  taken  48  hours  after  the  slide  show  a  20  m  wide  horst  with  mature  trees  located  at  the  base  of  the  main  scarp.  Down‐slope  of  this  treed section, materials are more highly disturbed, however the material did not completely  disaggregate and horst and graben structures and back tilted blocks are visible (Figure 7.9).  Some  zones  near  the  flanks  remained  relatively  intact,  with  shallow  (1‐5  m  deep)  minor  scarps and intact vegetation.    68        Horst Graben    Figure 7.9     A horst and graben structure near El. 595 m.   The upper portion of the slope is truncated down‐slope by a mid‐slope scarp from El.  580 m to El. 550 m that extends well beyond the flanks of the 1973 slide event. There is no  evidence of the scarp near the centre of the main body, however it is likely overlain by slide  debris. Thurber (1981c) and Fletcher (2000) indicated that undisturbed stratified layers are  visible on the face of the scarp, suggesting the material is intact. This scarp separates the  upper and lower source areas.   A  comparison  of  pre‐failure  and  post‐failure  aerial  photographs  suggests  that  the  majority  of  material  depletion  in  the  1973  slide  occurred  below  the  mid‐slope  scarp.  The  material in this area is highly disturbed with a few intact blocks of till scattered throughout  a  matrix  of  disturbed  sand,  silt  and  clay.  The  matrix  material  appears  flow‐like,  forming  lobate debris aprons. No structure is visible in this material. The centre portion of the slide,  approximately  430  m  wide,  is  the  most  highly  disturbed.  As  in  the  upper  depletion  zone,  69       material near the flanks did not disaggregate as completely. Also, there is a flat‐lying area  located  at  the  toe  above  the  river  bank  containing  mature  trees.  This  zone  measures  approximately 420 m by 35 m. Fletcher (2000) indicates that the treed area is underlain by  20‐30 m of debris and has been displaced 10 m vertically. It is not possible to determine the  original location of this displaced raft of trees.  Slide debris travelled over the river bank and across the Peace River to the opposite  bank. Beyond the slope, the debris encompasses an area of 950 000 m2 and has an average  thickness of 8.5 m. The debris has very smooth topography and rounded, flow‐like features.  The majority of debris consists of till and varved clay derived from the Glacial Lake Mathews  deposits.  Large  blocks  of  material  are  visible  in  the  debris,  both  in  the  river  and  on  the  slope.  Evans  et  al.  (1996)  noted  that  these  blocks  comprise  both  till  and  varved  glaciolacustrine materials showing heavily sheared fabric. Thurber (1981c), conducting field  investigations  eight  years  after  the  event,  also  noted  that  the  debris  along  the  riverbank  consists  of  angular,  boulder‐sized  silty‐clay  blocks  surrounded  by  a  smooth  matrix.  The  relative proportion of block to matrix does not vary with distance from the slope.   Test  pit  TP11‐1,  completed  in  2011,  exposed  1‐3  m  of  gravelly  silt  colluvium  overlying at least 1.5 m of disturbed glaciolacustrine sandy silt and clay of the Glacial Lake  Mathews  deposits.  The  silty,  high  plasticity  clay  was  highly  sheared  with  undulating,  low  persistence  shears  and  planar  high  persistence  shears  throughout.  Both  shears  dip  approximately 35° from the side scarp towards the slide body. Three samples of dark grey  sheared clay were recovered from the test pit (Figure 7.10 and Figure 7.11).    70          Figure 7.10     Sheared surface in a clay layer recovered from a test pit (TP11‐1) near the downstream flank  of the Attachie Slide (El. 502 m) (Photo courtesy of BGC, 2012b, Copyright © BC Hydro, 2011, by  permission).       Figure 7.11     Glaciolacustrine silt and clay exposed in a test pit (TP11‐1) near the downstream flank of the  Attachie Slide (El. 502 m) (Photo courtesy of BGC, 2012b, Copyright © BC Hydro, 2011, by permission).   71         Additionally, two large earthflows originating near the toe of the rupture surface of  the  main  slide,  overlie  the  main  debris  deposits.  The  earth  flows  are  visible  in  aerial  photographs taken 48 hours after the main slide event.   Drillhole  data  indicate  evidence  of  shearing  at  multiple  elevations.  Drillhole  63‐3,  located  near  the  crest  of  the  slide,  shows  disturbed  bedding  above  El.  590  m  and  intact  material below. Additionally, drillhole 63‐5, located near the mid‐slope scarp at El. 611 m,  contains tilted bedding to a depth of 35 m, and a shear zone at 55 m depth. Drillhole 63‐8,  located in the crown, shows evidence of slickensided surfaces and tilted, offset laminations  at 60 m depth. However, these shear zones may have formed pre‐failure and may not be  directly related to the 1973 event.  According to field observations made by Fletcher (2000), the failure surface daylights  between  El.  496  m  and  El.  500  m  as  a  well‐defined  slickensided  plane  located  in  a  plastic  clay  layer  within  the  Lake  Mathews  deposits,  approximately  30‐45  cm  above  the  basal  gravel unit (Figure 7.12). Mathews (1978a) describes this as a common location for sliding in  the  Peace  River  area.  Fletcher  described  this  unit  as  a  beige,  sheared  marl  approximately  0.5 to 1 cm thick. The material was classified as low plasticity (PI = 13) with a clay content of  46%. X‐Ray diffraction indicated that the clay primarily consists of illite and kaolinite, with  some  glacially  ground  materials  (quartz  and  feldspar).  Vermiculite  and  smectite  are  also  present in trace amounts. Samples of sheared glaciolacustrine material were also recovered  from  TP11‐1,  located  near  the  suspected  failure  surface.  The  material  was  described  as  a  very stiff, dark grey high plasticity clay (PI = 28) with slickensides.   It is uncertain if either the marl or the clay formed part of a continuous basal shear  surface,  however  these  samples  provide  evidence  that  movement  occurred  at  multiple  levels near the base of the Glacial Lake Mathews deposits.    72        Debris  Intact Material?     Figure 7.12     Photograph showing the suspected toe of the rupture surface (Copyright © Fletcher, 2000,  adapted by permission).   As  noted  above,  the  flanks  of  the  slide  are  difficult  to  define,  primarily  due  to  ongoing  movement.  In  particular,  evidence  of  more  recent  (post‐1973)  sliding  is  visible  along the eastern side scarp, near the toe of the slope. In this area, a treed block measuring  100 m by 30 m has been vertically displaced 10 m.   The  1973  Attachie  Slide  debris  created  a  dam  that  blocked  the  Peace  River  for  approximately  12  hours  (The  Province,  1973).  According  to  Thurber  (1973),  the  silt  line  formed  by  upstream  pondage  reached  7  m  above  normal  river  level.  Evans  et  al.  (1996)  further estimated that at least 32.4 million m3 of water was impounded by the debris. The  dam  was  likely  breached  gradually  with  no  catastrophic  release  of  water  downstream  (Thurber,  1973).  Post‐slide  aerial  photographs  (Figure  7.2)  show  that  a  well‐developed  channel approximately 150 m wide, had formed by the time the photograph was taken, 40  hours after the slide.    73        7.5 Groundwater Conditions  The  groundwater  regime  at  the  Attachie  Slide  is  very  complex,  as  the  underlying  bedded Quaternary deposits have highly variable permeabilities. The stratigraphy suggests  that  seepage  horizons  and  perched  water  tables  are  likely  within  the  glaciolacustrine  deposits. The underlying basal gravel layer is the most permeable, however, both Evans et  al. (1996) and Fletcher (2000) suggest that the gravels are not well connected to either the  overlying Lake Mathews deposits or the recharge area beyond the slope crest.   12  standpipe  piezometers  and  two  pneumatic  piezometers  were  installed  in  six  of  the drillholes at the Attachie Slide between 1977 and 1980 (Thurber, 1982). All piezometers  initially  responded  to  changes  in  water  levels.  During  monitoring,  11  piezometers  were  essentially dry, and three piezometers yielded positive readings (BC Hydro, 1981a; Fletcher,  2000).  The  multiple  dry  piezometers  indicate  that  the  groundwater  table  is  low,  and  the  positive water level readings likely indicate the presence of perched water tables within the  Lake  Mathews  deposits.  One  piezometer  indicates  a  perched  water  table  within  the  slide  debris  (Thurber,  1982).  Monitoring  was  discontinued  in  1982.  An  inspection  conducted  in  1989  showed  that  all  of  the  piezometers  were  either  dry  or  destroyed  (KCB  and  SNCL,  2008). Detailed piezometer data is included in Appendix D.  However,  although  piezometers  reflect  the  general  groundwater  regime  at  a  site,  they  may  not  reflect  the  groundwater  conditions  preceding  a  landslide.  For  example,  Thurber (1982) commented:  “Immediately following the slide which occurred May, 1973, water was observed to  be abundant in the slide area including springs in the basal gravel beneath the slide.  Much of the disturbed silts were in a saturated state such that it was difficult to walk  upon them.”   74       At  the  Peace  River  Hill  Slide  near  Taylor,  piezometers  recorded  a  rapid  increase  in  water  pressure  in  the  basal  gravel  unit  just  before  the  piezometer  was  sheared  off  by  ground movement (Maber and Stewart, 1976).   7.6 Slide Volume Estimation  The  BCDOH  (1973)  estimated  a  slide  volume  of  20  million  m3,  Thurber  (1973)  estimated  8  ‐  11.5  million  m3,  Thurber  (1978)  estimated  11.4  ‐  17  million  m3,  Thurber  (1981c) estimated 11 ‐ 17 million m3 and BC Hydro (1981a) estimated 14 million m3. Evans  et al. (1996), estimated the overall slide volume to be 12.4 million m3, with 6.0 million m3  remaining  on  the  slope  and  6.4  million  m3  deposited  in  the  river.  Fletcher  (2000)  and  Fletcher et al. (2002) also cited these volumes. As LiDAR data and additional drillhole data  are now available, a more rigorous volume estimation can be performed.   First, the pre‐slide topography was recreated using a topographic map surveyed in  1967. This surface was compared with the profiles of the upstream and downstream slopes  (sections 1 and 5) to better define the pre‐slide ground surface. Pre‐slide aerial photographs  were  also  referenced.  The  pre‐slide  topography  was  then  overlain  on  sections  2,  3  and  4.  Secondly,  five  additional  cross  sections  were  created  extending  past  the  toe  of  the  slope  and across the Peace River. These sections are shown in Figure 7.14. The location of these  sections is shown on Figure 7.3. For each slope cross section (sections 2, 3 and 4) a digital  planimeter  was  used  to  measure  the  cross‐sectional  areas  of  the  debris  deposited  on  the  upper and lower slopes and that of the depleted mass (Figure 7.13). Debris cross sections  2b, 3b and 4b were used to measure the cross‐sectional area of the debris deposited in the  river.  The  presence  of  the  river  channel  itself  was  discounted,  as  the  1973  slide  fully  dammed the river. The basal river elevation was estimated to be 430 m. For sections 1b and  5b,  the  area  of  the  fluvial  gravel  bars  was  measured  and  the  average cross‐sectional  area  was calculated to be 1505 m2. This area was then subtracted from the cross‐sectional area  of  the  debris  deposited  in  the  river.  Each  area  was  then  multiplied  by  a  suitable  width  to  determine  the  volume  associated  with  each  cross  section.  These  data  are  shown  in  Table  7.2.   75          Figure 7.13     Definition of areas used in volume calculation  76        Section 1b   Section 2b   Section 3b   Section 4b   Section 5b                                  Figure 7.14     Sections 1b through 5b, through the accumulation zone. Section locations shown in Figure 7.3.  77        Table 7.2     Volume calculations for the Attachie Slide.   Section  Width  Slide  Body  (m)  2  3  4             200  200  200             Width Deposit  (m)   Volume of  Debris   in River  (m3)   Volume of   Depleted  Mass  (m3)   330  330  330    Sub Total  With 23% Bulking   Total (m3)   2,633,400  3,019,500  2,494,800    8,147,700  ‐    14,753,144   1,846,000  2,484,000  2,368,000    6,698,000  8,225,144       Volume of  Debris   on Upper  Slope  (m3)  516,000  292,000  258,000    1,066,000  ‐       Volume of  Debris   on Lower  Slope  (m3)  1,624,000  2,078,000  1,760,000    5,462,000  ‐       The bulking factor was determined by comparing the volume of the depleted mass to  the  volume  of  debris  in  the  river.  No  bulking  factor  was  applied  to  the  volumes  of  debris  remaining on the slope, as the measured cross‐sectional areas correspond to failed masses  and  already  account  for  bulking.  Finally,  the  total  area  was  calculated  by  summing  the  volume of the depleted mass, the volume of the debris deposited on the upper slope, and  the volume of the debris deposited on the lower slope (the volume of debris deposited in  the river could also be used in place of the depleted mass, both calculations would yield the  same result). The final volume was calculated to be approximately 14.7 million m3, which is  larger than the original estimate of 12.6 million m3 (Evans et al., 1996), but in line with the  BC Hydro (1981a) estimate. Of this volume, approximately 1.1 million m3 was deposited on  the upper slope, 5.4 million m3 on the lower slope, and 8.2 million m3 was deposited in the  river.    7.7 Slope Movement Monitoring  Areas both upstream and downstream of the 1973 slide may have the potential for  catastrophic failures similar to the Attachie Slide. For this reason, two inclinometers were  installed  in  1978  by  BC  Hydro.  The  inclinometers  were  installed  in  Drillhole  63‐4,  in  the  crown  of  the  slide,  and  in  Drillhole  63‐7,  located  mid‐slope  and  downstream  of  the  1973  slide area. Detailed inclinometer data is included in Appendix E. It is important to note that  78       neither  inclinometer  was  installed  in  bedrock,  and  therefore  movement  is  difficult  to  interpret.  Monitoring was discontinued in 1984, then recommenced in 1989. Movement up to  1995 was reported in BC Hydro report MEP185 (1996). Inclinometer 63‐4 showed no sign of  movement  up  to  1995,  however  a  survey  of  the  collar  location  indicated  a  possible  displacement  of  1.61  m  north,  suggesting  deep  seated  sliding  below  the  depth  of  the  inclinometer  (KCB  and  SNCL,  2008).  However,  the  observed  movement  may  also  be  the  result of survey error. Inclinometer 63‐7 showed evidence of movement in three zones (BC  Hydro, 1996; KCB and SNCL, 2008):    Possible  movement  occurring  at  a  rate  of  0.4  mm/year  in  the  upper  5  m.  Movement  was  erratic  but  appears  to  be  slowing.  19  mm  of  movement  in  total since installation     Possible movement at a rate of 1.8 mm/year within a silty clay layer at 25 m  depth. Movement stopped in 1989.      Confirmed movement of 156 mm/year at 72 m depth corresponding with a  well‐defined shear zone encountered during coring. Inclinometer sheared off  in  1980.  A  survey  of  the  collar  location  indicates  possible  displacement  of  1.74 m north.    Additionally,  six  extensometers  were  installed  across  a  major  tension  crack  and  monitored  between  1980  and  1984  (Figure  7.15).  Data  indicated  displacements  of  approximately  8  cm/month  (BC  Hydro,  1981a).  Survey  monuments  monitored  between  1980 and 1984 indicate two general modes of displacement were occurring: downhill creep  at  a  rate  of  10‐30  mm/year,  and  substantial,  localized  movement  on  the  order  of  400  mm/month.  There  is  apparently  no  correlation  between  seasonality  and  either  creep  or  larger movement.       79           Figure 7.15     Drawing showing extensometer and monument movement   (Fletcher, 2000, Copyright © BC Hydro, 1981)       80        7.8 Failure Analysis     The Attachie Slide most likely experienced two successive modes of failure: an initial   slow progressive movement that occurred under drained conditions over many years, and a  rapid  flow  slide  that  occurred  under  undrained  conditions.  Consequently,  failure  analysis  can be divided into two main subsections: 2D and 3D limit equilibrium analyses that study  the slow progressive failure, and a dynamic 2D runout analysis that studies the behavior of  the rapid flow slide.    7.8.1 2D Limit Equilibrium Analysis     A two dimensional limit equilibrium back analysis was performed in order to better   understand  slide  behavior.  Three  key  variables  were  investigated:  piezometric  conditions,  the strength of the horizontal failure surface and the strength of the Lake Mathews deposits  in  which  the  back  scarp  formed.  All  analyses  were  conducted  using  a  cross  section  that  traverses  the  centreline  of  the  main  slide  body;  this  corresponds  with  section  3  shown  in  Figure 7.6. The pre‐slide topography was estimated using contours from a large scale 1967  topographic  map,  the  map  itself  was  likely  derived  using  photogrammetry.  The  pre‐slide  stratigraphy  was  approximated  using  both  drillholes  located  near  the  section  line,  and  drillholes located adjacent to the slide in the intact material. The pre‐slide section used for  back analysis is shown in Figure 7.16.                 81                             Section 3, Pre‐Failure                                                                                                                                                                                    Figure 7.16    Section through the centre of the Attachie Slide, pre‐ failure. Post‐failure topography and stratigraphy shown as dotted  lines. Approximate failure surface shown in red. High and low  piezometric surfaces shown in blue.   82       The 2D limit equilibrium back analysis was performed using the GEO‐SLOPE program  SLOPE/W (Geostudio 2007, Version 7.17). In all cases, the Morgenstern‐Price solution was  used.  The  post‐slide  topography  and  drillhole  data  were  used  to  approximate  a  fully‐ specified failure surface. This surface is shown on Figure 7.16. Two piezometric conditions  were  analyzed,  a  high  and  low  piezometric  surface.  In  the  case  of  the  low  piezometric  surface, the water table lies below the presumed failure surface, and in the case of the high  piezometric surface, the water table lies above the presumed failure surface. Negative pore  water  pressures  were  not  included  in  the  analysis.  Both  the  high  and  low  piezometric  surfaces are shown on Figure 7.16.   The  material  properties  adopted  for  each  unit  are  summarized  in  Table  7.3.  These  properties  are  based  on  the  results  of  shear  strength  testing  and  values  used  in  previous  stability analyses (Thurber, 1978, 1982; BC Hydro 1981a, 1982). As no shear strength data  was available for the Glaciolacustrine Lake Peace, Laurentide Till, Lower Paleovalley Fluvial  Gravel  and  Colluvium  units,  shear  strength  properties  were  estimated  based  on  known  values  for  similar  material  types.  The  ‘pre‐sheared’  layer  lies  at  the  base  of  the  Lake  Mathews unit, and is used to simulate sliding along a weak horizontal layer.   Table 7.3     Material parameters used in stability modeling.   Unit   Unit Weight  (kN/m3)  Lake Peace  19  Till (Laurentide)  23  Lake Mathews  19  Gravel (SG)  20  Lake Mathews – Pre‐sheared  19  Silty Shale  25  Colluvium  16   C  (kPa)  0  20  0‐20  0  0  250  0   Phi   (degrees)  20  35  15‐35  38  9‐15  45  30   Direct shear testing data of a sheared back clay sample recovered from the test pit  at the Attachie Slide (BGC, 2012b), and tested parallel to varves indicated a friction angle of  9°, which is an unusually low value. Direct shear testing of a sheared clay sample recovered  from  a  nearby  exposure  and  tested  parallel  to  varves  yielded  a  peak  strength  of  22°  83       (Thurber, 1978). Shear strength perpendicular to varves was 28°. Thurber (1978) also noted  that a clay layer at the base of the glaciolacustrine sequence near Taylor, B.C. had a residual  shear  strength  of  11.5°  (Maber  and  Stewart,  1976).  Nine  degrees  is  considered  a  low  estimate  of  residual  shear  strength  for  the  Lake  Mathews  deposits,  and  therefore  friction  angles of 12° and 15° were also considered.   The  Lake  Mathews  material  consists  of  interbedded  sand,  silt  and  clay,  and  it  is  difficult  to  estimate  the  bulk  strength  of  this  material.  In  this  analysis,  the  cohesion  was  varied from 0 to 20 kPa in increments of 5 kPa, and the friction angle was varied from 15° to  35° in increments of 5°. The results of the 2D stability back analyses are shown in Table 7.4.  The results with a factor of safety (FOS) nearest one have been highlighted. Figure 7.17 and  Figure  7.18  are  examples  of  SLOPE/W  input  for  the  low  piezometric  surface  and  high  piezometric surface respectively.      Figure 7.17     SLOPE/W back analysis input for the mapped failure surface at the Attachie Slide with an  assumed low piezometric surface.      84          Figure 7.18     Slope/W back analysis input for the mapped failure surface at the Attachie Slide with an  assumed high piezometric surface.        85        Table 7.4     Results of the 2D limit equilibrium back analysis at the Attachie Slide. Factor of safety values closest to one marked in grey.    Pre‐sheared Layer  Phi = 9   Low Water Table  Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 12   Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 15   Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 9   High Water Table  Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 12   Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 15     Lake Mathews    C   Phi   Min FOS   Min FOS   Min FOS   Min FOS   Min FOS   Min FOS   0   15   0.79   0.95   1.11   0.70   0.84   0.98   0   20   0.87   1.03   1.20   0.78   0.92   1.06   0   25   0.96   1.13   1.28   0.85   0.99   1.14   0   30   1.05   1.21   1.38   0.92   1.08   1.23   0   35   1.12   1.31   1.48   1.08   1.17   1.31   5   15   0.80   0.96   1.12   0.71   0.85   0.98   5   20   0.88   1.04   1.20   0.78   0.92   1.06   5   25   0.96   1.13   1.29   0.86   1.00   1.15   5   30   1.05   1.22   1.38   0.93   1.09   1.23   5   35   1.12   1.31   1.48   1.07   1.17   1.32   10   15   0.80   0.96   1.12   0.71   0.86   0.99   10   20   0.88   1.05   1.21   0.79   0.93   1.07   10   25   0.97   1.14   1.30   0.86   1.00   1.16   10   30   1.06   1.23   1.39   0.93   1.09   1.24   10   35   1.12   1.33   1.49   1.07   1.18   1.32   15   15   0.81   0.97   1.13   0.72   0.86   1.00   15   20   0.89   1.05   1.22   0.79   0.93   1.07   15   25   0.98   1.14   1.30   0.87   1.02   1.16   15   30   1.06   1.23   1.40   0.93   1.10   1.24   15   35   1.12   1.33   1.50   1.08   1.19   1.33   20   15   0.81   0.98   1.14   0.73   0.87   1.00   20   20   0.89   1.06   1.22   0.80   0.94   1.08   20   25   0.98   1.15   1.31   0.87   1.02   1.17   20  20   30  35   1.07  1.09   1.24  1.34  1.40  1.50  0.93  1.08   1.10  1.19  1.25  1.33  86       7.8.2 3D Limit Equilibrium Analysis     In  addition  to  the  2D  limit  equilibrium  back  analysis  performed  using   SLOPE/W, a 3D limit equilibrium analysis was performed using CLARA. Seven cross sections  were used to develop the 3D model. In addition to the five sections included in Section 7.4,  two additional sections were used to define the lateral limits of the slide. Figure 7.19 shows  an isometric view of the Attachie Slide, looking downstream.    Figure 7.19     An isometric view of the Attachie Slide, looking downstream.      The  material  parameters  used  for  the  2D  back  analysis  were  also  used  for  the  3D  back  analysis.  Similarly,  the  same  range  of  shear  strength  values  was  assessed.  The  silty  shale  unit  and  the  gravel  unit  were  modeled  as  stronger  surfaces  that  forced  the  failure  surface  to  slide  along  a  horizontal  plane  at  the  base  of  the  Lake  Mathews  unit  to  match  87       post‐slide observations of the location of the failure surface. A single ellipsoid was used to  define the back scarp. The results of the CLARA analysis are shown in Table 7.5. The Bishop  Simplified  solution  was  used  in  all  cases  with  a  mesh  measuring  300  elements  by  300  elements. The Bishop Simplified method is not as rigorous as the Morgensern‐Price method,  as  it  does  not  satisfy  all  equilibrium  conditions  by  assuming  that  the  shear  component  of  the  interslice  force  is  zero.  An  example  of  the  3D  compound  failure  surface created  using  CLARA is shown in Figure 7.20. An example longitudinal profile for the high water table case  is shown in Figure 7.21.      Figure 7.20     A compound failure surface at the Attachie Slide created using CLARA.     Figure 7.21     An example longitudinal profile used for CLARA analysis  88        Table 7.5     Results of the 3D limit equilibrium back analysis of the Attachie Slide. Factor of safety values closest to one marked in grey.   Lake Mathews    C  Phi  0  15  0  20  0  25  0  30  0  35  5  15  5  20  5  25  5  30  5  35  10  15  10  20  10  25  10  30  10  35  15  15  15  20  15  25  15  30  15  35  20  15  20  20  20  25  20  30  20  35     Pre‐sheared Layer  Phi = 9  Min FOS  0.95  1.01  1.09  1.17  1.27  0.96  1.02  1.10  1.17  1.27  0.97  1.03  1.10  1.18  1.28  0.97  1.04  1.11  1.19  1.29  0.98  1.05  1.12  1.20  1.29   Low Water Table  Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 12  Min FOS  1.21  1.28  1.35  1.43  1.51  1.21  1.29  1.36  1.43  1.52  1.22  1.29  1.36  1.44  1.53  1.23  1.30  1.37  1.45  1.53  1.24  1.31  1.38  1.46  1.54   Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 15  Min FOS  1.46  1.54  1.62  1.69  1.78  1.47  1.55  1.62  1.70  1.79  1.48  1.56  1.63  1.71  1.79  1.49  1.56  1.64  1.72  1.80  1.50  1.57  1.65  1.72  1.81    Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 9  Min FOS  0.69  0.75  0.80  0.90  ‐  0.70  0.76  0.83  0.93  ‐  0.71  0.76  0.83  0.93  ‐  0.71  0.77  0.84  0.94  ‐  0.72  0.78  0.85  0.94  ‐   High Water Table   Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 12  Min FOS  0.88  0.93  0.99  1.06  1.16  0.88  0.94  1.00  1.07  1.17  0.89  0.95  1.00  1.08  1.17  0.90  0.95  1.01  1.08  1.18  0.90  0.96  1.02  1.09  1.19    Pre‐sheared Layer Phi = 15  Min FOS  1.06  1.12  1.18  1.24  1.32  1.07  1.13  1.18  1.25  1.33  1.08  1.13  1.19  1.26  1.33  1.08  1.14  1.20  1.26  1.34  1.09  1.15  1.21  1.27  1.35   89        7.8.3 DAN‐W Analysis  In  addition  to  limit  equilibrium  analysis,  DAN‐W  was  used  to  conduct  a  dynamic  runout  analysis. DAN‐W is based on the theory of runout analysis developed by Hungr (1995). The  objective of the dynamic analysis was to estimate the landslide debris velocity and better  understand the flow‐like characteristics that resulted in the extreme runout of the Attachie  Slide debris.  The pre‐failure slope profile and failure surface were created using LiDAR data and pre‐slide  topographic  data.  The  geometry  was  then  confirmed  by  comparing  the  DAN‐W  estimated  slide  volume  with  the  actual  estimated  slide  volume.  50  elements  were  used  with  a  time  step of 0.05 and a soil/debris unit weight of 19 kN/m3.      A frictional model was first used to back‐calculate a suitable friction angle along the   failure  surface.  Multiple  friction  angles  were  tested  and  the  model  runout  distance  was  compared with the actual runout distance to determine the best estimate. A friction angle  of  7.5°  produced  the  best  correlation,  with  a  runout  distance  within  7  m  of  the  observed  runout.  The  maximum  velocity  in  this  scenario  was  54  m/s,  at  the  toe  of  the  cut  bank.  However,  frictional  modeling  is  known  to  produce  unrealistically  high  velocity  values  (Hungr, 1995). In addition to the frictional rheological model, the Voellmy (1955) rheological  model was also used. The Voellmy model uses both friction and turbulence to give a better  approximation of debris movement than the frictional model, which only considers friction  (Hungr, 1995).     A bulk friction angle of 7.5° was the used as the starting point for modeling using the   Voellmy model. This friction angle corresponds to a friction coefficient of 0.13 (the tangent  of  7.5°).  The  turbulence  coefficient  was  then  increased  until  the  model  runout  distance  approximated  the  actual  runout  distance.  The  friction  angle  was  then  decreased  and  the  process  was  repeated  for  friction  coefficients  from  0.12  to  0.01.  The  results  of  these  analyses are presented in Appendix F. A friction coefficient of 0.08 (corresponding to a bulk  friction angle of 4.6°) with a turbulence coefficient of 2000 m/s2 was found to produce the  90       most  realistic  correlation.  In  this  case,  approximately  half  of  the  debris  remains  on  the  slope, and half is deposited in the river, as was observed at the Attachie Slide (Figure 7.22).  In  this  scenario,  the  peak  velocity  was  44  m/s  at  the  base  of  the  river  cut  bank.  The  maximum velocity is always found at this same location where the debris drops over a steep  scarp and into the river, and this velocity controls the overall peak slide velocity. However,  an  assessment  of  the  average  velocity  indicates  an  estimated  overall  velocity  of  30  m/s,  which is considered a more realistic value.      Figure 7.22     DAN‐W Voellmy modeling results with a friction coefficient of 0.08 and a turbulence  coefficient of 2000.      91        7.9 Failure Mechanism  Stratigraphy,  slide  geometry  and  geomorphology,  slope  movement  history,  piezometric  conditions  and  material  strengths  all  contribute  towards  an  improved  understanding of the slide failure mechanism. This discussion is divided into three parts: a  summary  of  the  supporting  factual  evidence  associated  with  the  actual  sliding  event,  a  survey  of  existing  failure  mechanism  hypotheses  and  finally  a  discussion  of  the  proposed  sequence of events.  7.9.1 Supporting Factual Evidence     There is evidence that the slopes at the Attachie Slide experienced movement prior   to  1973.  Aerial  photographs  taken  in  1970  show  a  series  of  prominent  tension  cracks,  grabens  and  pressure  ridges  distributed  throughout  the  slope  from  the  toe  to  the  crown.  The 1970 photographs also show a prominent scarp that is coincident with the 1973 main  scarp. This indicates that significant movement occurred in the upper slope prior to 1973.  Aerial photographs indicate this scarp existed prior to 1945 in some form, with as much as  20  m  of  vertical  displacement  pre‐1973.  Downstream  of  the  Attachie  Slide,  tilted  trees  indicate slow, ongoing movement. Inclinometers installed in this downstream section (after  the  1973  failure)  also  indicate  slow,  deep  seated  sliding  along  narrow  zones.  Lastly,  the  Alaska  Highway  News  (1973),  reported  that  a  farmer  saw  “dirt  sliding  into  the  river”  two  weeks before the 1973 slide.      The  slide  occurred  on  May  26,  1973  between  23:45  and  23:55  when  farmers   reported hearing loud noises “like thunder” and hearing rushing water (Evans et al., 1996).  The  displacement  wave  snapped  trees  21  m  above  river  level  (Thurber,  1973),  and  the  debris  had  significant  momentum  to  cross  the  Peace  River  and  reach  the  opposite  bank.  Debris  consists  of  angular,  boulder‐sized  blocks  of  till  projecting  from  a  smooth  surface  exhibiting  flow‐like  features  (Thurber,  1982).  Evans  et  al.  notes  that  the  flow  material  truncates  the  slide  blocks,  suggesting  the  flow failure  occurred within the  debris.  Fletcher  (2000) notes that the upper portion of the slide did not completely disaggregate, and that   92       this area contains multiple back tilted blocks of till. The sliding surface is located within the  overburden deposits, as there is no evidence of shale in the slide debris.      There is no clear trigger. There were no strong earthquakes prior to the slide event   (Thurber,  1973),  and  no  unusually  high  precipitation  in  the  days  preceding  the  slide  (Environment  Canada,  2012).  In  fact,  precipitation  in  May  1973  recorded  at  Fort  St.  John  was below normal (Figure 7.23). However, 1972 was the second wettest year on record, and  snowfall in the winter of 1972 and 1973 was well above normal (Figure 7.24). There was no  man‐made  activity  nearby,  and  the  river  level,  controlled  by  the  WAC  Bennett  Dam,  remained constant.    Monthly Rainfall, Fort St. John, 1971 to 1973. 180 160 1971  140 Total Rainfall (mm)  1972 120  1973 Mean  100 80 60 40 20 0 Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sept  Oct  Nov  Dec  Month    Figure 7.23     Monthly rainfall, Fort St. John B.C., 1971‐1973 (Environment Canada, 2012).      93        Monthly Snowfall, Fort St. John, 1971 to 1973. 70 1971  Total Snowfall (cm)  60  1972 1973  50  Mean 40 30 20 10 0 Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sept  Oct  Nov  Dec  Month    Figure 7.24     Monthly snowfall, Fort St. John B.C., 1971‐1973 (Environment Canada, 2012).   7.9.2 Existing Hypotheses  The  Attachie  Slide  has  been  intensively  studied,  but  the  underlying  failure  mechanism is still poorly understood. The failure mechanism has been discussed by Thurber  (1973,  1978,  1981c,  1982)  BC  Hydro  (1981a),  Evans  et  al.  (1996),  Fletcher  (2000)  and  Fletcher et al. (2002). Thurber (1973) first hypothesized that the slope may have been failing  progressively for many years along brittle, highly plastic clay layers. Thurber also suggested  that the slide may have been triggered by excess pore water pressure due to snowmelt, and  noted that the snowfall in the two winters prior to the slide was higher than normal. Lastly,  Thurber  suggests  that  rainfall  on  the  day  of  the  slide  may  have  infiltrated  cracks  and  fissures, triggering failure.   Thurber  (1978)  classified  the  Attachie  Slide  as  a  rapid,  combination  translational  slide/flow  that  failed  progressively  upward  from  the  toe  and  was  initiated  by  excess  pore  water  pressures  in  the  basal  gravel  layer.  Building  on  the  1973  Thurber  report,  the  1978  report  also  suggested  that  clay  shrinkage  in  the  upper  slope  may  have  allowed  water  to  94       penetrate the slope. It was estimated that the slide had a velocity of 10 m/s at the toe of  the rupture surface (above the steep bank) and 30 m/s to 35 m/s at the toe of the steep  bank. It is not clear in the report how these velocity estimates were obtained.   BC  Hydro  (1981a)  noted  that  intense  rainfall  was  recorded  the  evening  before  the  failure, and suggests that the rainfall, in addition to melting of an unusually high snow pack  triggered  failure.  The  1981a  report  also  notes  that  prior  to  failure  the  slope  was  marked  with numerous scarps. Back analysis estimated a slide velocity of 30 m/s.   Thurber  (1981c),  characterized  the  Attachie  Slide  as  a  rapid  earth  flow,  and  noted  that  both  the  material  in  the  river  and  on  the  lower  slope  exhibit  the  same  degree  of  disturbance,  suggesting  significant  disintegration  of  the  debris  prior  to  descent  over  the  steep bluff.   Furthermore, in a 1982 paper on the feasibility of stabilizing the slope downstream  of  the  Attachie  Slide,  Thurber  (1982)  noted  that  overburden  materials  in  the  Peace  River  region may experience a rapid surge in pore water pressure originating in the basal gravels.  This increase in pore water pressures may be high enough to reduce the shear strength of  interbedded,  non‐plastic  silts  and  cause  static  liquefaction.  The  pressure  increase  may  be  further influenced by deep seated movement that impedes drainage. However, liquefaction  of  a  dense,  over  consolidated  silt  and  clay  mixture  is  unlikely.  Alternatively,  Thurber  hypothesized that the rapid movement exhibited at the Attachie Slide may be a secondary  result of slow movement that breaks the soil mass into blocks separated by fissures. When  the  fissures  fill  up  from  surface  runoff,  the  material  between  the  blocks  may  liquefy,  inducing a rapid landslide. Thurber (1982) and Evans et al. (1996) also suggests that the flow  slide  may  have  been  triggered  by  the  blockage  of  seepage  paths  during  the  initial  failure  process.  Evans  et  al.  (1996),  was  the  first  to  describe  the  failure  in  terms  of  two  phases  of  movement:  an  initial  slow  deformation  followed  by  a  violent  catastrophic  flow  slide.  Mobility may have been further enhanced by the drop to the river. However, Evans et al.  95       also  notes  that  the  flow  slide  component  is  unexpected,  and  that  there  is  no  source  of  brittleness in the source materials.      Fletcher (2000), and Fletcher et al. (2002) contributed to the understanding of the   flow slide component, proposing three alternatives to explain the rapid behavior:  (1) Failure is controlled by the strength of the rupture surface, which exhibits  undrained, brittle characteristics,   (2)  The materials exhibit ‘macroscopic brittleness’ that forms as the materials  develop open joints and tension cracks that are then infilled with softened,  liquefiable materials and water.   (3) Failure is controlled by the cross‐bedding strength of the Lake Mathews deposit,  while the rupture surface itself assumes a factor of safety less than 1.0. At some  point, the peak strength of the Lake Mathews deposit is overcome and failure  occurs.   Fletcher  et  al.  (2002)  also  considered  an  alternative  hypothesis  where‐by  an  initial  failure of the upper source zone deposited debris on the lower slope, causing liquefaction  by  undrained  loading  (Hutchinson  and  Bhandari,  1971).  However,  the  upper  source  zone  has  a  relatively  small  volume,  and  considerable  activity  was  reported  at  the  toe  prior  to  failure suggesting that initial failure of the upper source zone is unlikely (Evans et al., 1996).  7.9.3 Proposed Sequence of Events     Taking  into  account  the  local  stratigraphy,  topography,  slide  geometry  and   geomorphology,  LiDAR,  aerial  photographs,  surficial  mapping  data,  drillhole  data,  slope  movement  history,  piezometric  data,  material  properties,  climate  and  seismic  data,  local  observations and existing failure mechanism hypotheses, the following possible sequence of  events is proposed.   At the Attachie Slide, there were two general phases of movement, slow long term  slope deformation, and an extremely rapid landslide. Each phase occurred under different  96       strength and groundwater conditions. The slope stability back analyses suggest five possible  scenarios that would have allowed movement to occur in either case (Table 7.4 and Table  7.5);  (1) High  pore  water  pressures,  a  basal  surface  at  residual  strength  and  intact  Lake  Mathews deposits.  (2) High pore water pressures, a moderate strength rupture surface and moderate  strength Lake Mathews deposits.   (3) High  pore  water  pressures,  a  high  strength  basal  surface  and  residual  strength  Lake Mathews deposits.  (4) Low  pore  water  pressures,  a  basal  surface  at  residual  strength  and  moderate  strength Lake Mathews deposits.   (5)  Low  pore  water  pressures,  a  moderate  strength  basal  surface  and  residual  strength Lake Mathews deposits.   The  1973  slide  was  likely  preceded  by  years  of  slow  sliding  along  one  or  multiple  weak clay layers within the Lake Mathews unit. This sliding caused extension of the material  upslope,  creating  tension  cracks,  grabens  and  pressure  ridges.  A  bulge  may  have  formed  down‐slope,  as  in  the  case  of  the  downstream  intact  slope.  The  main  scarp  formed  pre‐ 1973. Piezometric data suggests that under normal conditions the slope is well drained by  the  basal  gravel  unit.  Therefore  Scenarios  (4)  and  (5)  present  the  most  likely  options  for  slow long term sliding. However, it is also possible that slow sliding occurred incrementally  as  a  product  of  short  term  pore  water  pressure  increases.  Ongoing  movement  may  have  blocked  drainage  paths,  allowing  local  movement  to  occur  that  then  allowed  the  pore  pressures  to  dissipate.  However,  there  is  no  evidence  to  indicate  these  piezometric  conditions are possible. Observations of slow movement between 1980 and 1984 were not  coincident with any recorded spikes in pore water pressure. Additionally, laboratory shear  strength  testing  indicates  the  presence  of  weak  clay  layers  in  materials  sampled  from  the  intact,  downstream  area.  This  suggests  that  pre‐sheared,  residual  strength  layers  either  precede  or  develop  during  the  slow  sliding  stage,  and  likely  formed  pre‐1973.  Stability  97       analyses  also  suggest  that  under  these  conditions,  the  Lake  Mathews  materials  remained  moderately intact.  It is unclear why the slope failed rapidly on May 26, 1973, and no clear trigger can be  identified. Thurber (1973) notes that no earthquake tremors were recorded the day of the  event, and there was no human activity on or near the slope. Assuming that one or multiple  low  strength  shear  surfaces  did  develop  during  slope  deformation,  failure  could  have  occurred  under  the  conditions  of  Scenario  (1)  or  Scenario  (4).  Although  it  is  possible  that  ongoing movement decreased the shear strength of the Lake Mathews unit to near residual  values,  there  is  stronger  evidence  suggesting  that  excess  pore  water  pressures  were  the  primary cause of the 1973 slide (Scenario 1). As there was no unusually high rainfall in the  days preceding the failure, the source of the excess water is unclear. However, according to  Thurber  (1973),  the  formation  of  tension  cracks  during  the  initial  slow  sliding  phase  may  have  allowed  excess  water  (snowmelt)  to  penetrate  deep  into  the  basal  gravels.  As  the  snow melted and infiltrated during the winter and spring of 1973, the pore water pressures  may have gradually increased until reaching a critical point at which the shear strength of a  weak,  pre‐sheared  layer  was  sufficiently  reduced  for  failure  to  occur.  Mathews  (1963)  notes:  “The underlying gravel is generally well drained and uplift pressures seem not to play  a  significant  part  in  initiating  sliding.  However,  fissuring  of  the  overlying  beds  following initial movement at depth may permit ingress of snowmelt and rainwater  and thus contribute to additional and perhaps much larger‐scale movements.”  Alternatively, it is possible that excess snowmelt did not play a significant role, but  that  ongoing  slow  movement  blocked  a  critical  drainage  path  that  caused  pore  water  pressures to increase rapidly. As Thurber (1973) reported seeing water “gushing” from the  face  post‐failure,  this  scenario  may  be  the  most  likely  option.  It  has  also  been  suggested  that  clay  shrinkage  and  tension  cracking  may  have  allowed  water  to  penetrate  the  slope,  however soil testing shows that the majority of clays within the Lake Mathews unit are not  98       sensitive  to  shrinking  or  swelling  (Fletcher,  2000).  With  high  pore  water  pressures  within  the  Lake  Mathews  material,  the  failure  may  have  exploited  one  or  multiple  pre‐sheared  surfaces.   Although  excess  pore  water  pressures  are  the  most  likely  cause  of  the  1973  slide,  decreasing  shear  strength  cannot  be  discounted.  As  pore  water  pressure  increased  and  movement began, the shear strength of the back scarp and basal surface would have rapidly  decreased to residual values, accelerating failure.   Finally,  the  rapid  catastrophic  behavior  of  the  slide  suggests  that  the  materials  involved were brittle. However, laboratory testing shows that the Lake Mathews materials,  that constitute a large proportion of the slope, are only moderately brittle (Fletcher, 2000).   It  is  possible  that  brittle  failure  can  occur  when  the  internal  strength  of  the  slide  mass  is  high  relative  to  the  strength  of  the  basal  failure  surface  (Hutchinson,  1988).  This  mechanism was first applied to the Attachie slide by Fletcher (2000). In particular, whereas  tension cracks develop parallel to the slope, side scarps generally remain intact until failure  occurs.  Rapid  failure  of  the  side  scarps  may  provide  a  sufficient  drop  in  shear  strength  to  induce brittle behaviour. Laboratory testing shows that samples of Lake Mathews deposits  contain approximately 57% silt (Section 4.4.1). Fletcher (2000) also noted that a prominent  12 m thick unit of low plasticity silt was observed in a side scarp of intact material along the  downstream flank. Additionally, Fletcher noted cementation in samples of glaciolacustrine  material. Both the presence of silt and cementation could contribute to slide brittleness.   An  alternative  concept  proposed  by  Thurber  (1981c)  and  termed  ‘macroscopic  brittleness’  by  Fletcher  (2000)  provides  another  reasonable  alternative  to  explain  brittleness. This theory proposes that slow ongoing movement in the slope creates a series  of joints and tension cracks within the interbedded sand, silt and clay of the Lake Mathews  deposits,  and  within  the  Laurentide  till.  The  cracks  are  then  infilled  with  loose,  remolded  material  sloughed  from  adjacent  blocks.  Water  may  also  infill  the  cracks.  This  process  results  in  a  series  of  low  shear  strength  planes  that  separate  blocks  of  intact  material.  As  99       failure  occurs,  the  material  within  the  cracks  liquefies,  allowing  the  blocks  of  material  to  flow within the low shear strength matrix. The character of the deposits, which consists of  blocks  within  a  smooth,  flow‐like  surface,  supports  this  hypothesis.  A  similar  failure  mechanism was described by Terzaghi (1950):  “The slide at Swir is an example of a process leading to a mechanical mixture of slide  material with water. Before the slide occurred, the glacial till overlying the Devonian  clay was firm and stable, and its porosity hardly exceeding 25 percent. The expansion  of  the  underlying  clay  broke  the  glacial  till  into  larger  fragments.  It  caused  disintegration  and  collapse  of  the  fragments;  and  the  mixture  of  water  and  till  fragments flowed into the cut. During this process, the porosity of the till must have  been  increased  from  25  to  at  least  40  percent.  Otherwise,  the  slide  material  could  not possibly have flowed like molasses.”  Lastly,  the  dynamic  DAN‐W  analyses  suggest  that  the  velocity  of  the  slide  is  controlled by the steep, 40 m drop from the point at which the failure surface daylights to  the  river  bottom.  This  drop  may  have  allowed  the  flow‐like  materials  to  assume  the  momentum necessary to reach the opposite bank.   In  summary,  the  Attachie  Slide  exhibited  two  phases  of  movement,  slow  deformation over a period of many years and a rapid compound slide along a pre‐sheared  layer near the base of the Lake Mathews deposit. Slope deformation likely contributed to  the development of the low strength basal shear surface. Failure was most likely triggered  by  excess  pore  water  pressures  that  may  be  attributed  to  snowmelt,  rainfall,  infiltration  through tension cracks or blocked drainage paths. The lower source mass likely failed first,  followed  by  retrogression  up  the  slope.  The  rapid,  flow‐like  behaviour  suggests  a  brittle  failure mechanism was also involved.      100        8.0 The Moberly River Slide  8.1 Introduction  The  Moberly  River  Slide  is  located  on  the  west  bank  of  the  Moberly  River  at  UTM  coordinates  N  6229966  E  627243,  approximately  1  km  from  the  confluence  of  the  Peace  and Moberly Rivers (Figure 1.1). In this area the Moberly River has eroded through deposits  of the upper paleovalley and the underlying Shaftesbury Shale. Numerous landslides can be  seen  along  the  west  bank  of  the  river  in  air  photos  and  LiDAR  (Figure  8.1).  The  Moberly  River Slide, the largest slide on the Moberly River, has an estimated volume of 12.4 million  m3.  The  Moberly  River  Slide  has  been  investigated  by  Thurber  (1978)  and  BC  Hydro  (1981)  as  part  of  the  proposed  Site  C  dam  project.  In  1980,  BC  Hydro  completed  three  drillholes at the site and installed two inclinometers. Ongoing instrumentation monitoring  has been completed by BC Hydro in 1985, 1990, 1993, 1995 and 1996, and by Klohn Crippen  Berger  Ltd.  and  SNC  Lavalin  in  2008.  The  following  discussion  describes  the  geological  conditions  at  the  site,  the  landslide  geometry  and  geomorphology,  slide  volume,  groundwater conditions, slope movement and the slide failure mechanism.    101            Figure 8.1     Photograph of the Moberly River Slide overlain on an aerial photograph of the area. The  Moberly River Slide is outlined. (Airphoto BC86047‐031, 1986, Copyright © Province of British Columbia. All  rights reserved. Reprinted with permission of the Province of British Columbia. www.ipp.gov.bc.ca)              102        8.2 Detailed Stratigraphy  Three  drillholes  were  completed  at  the  Moberly  River  Slide  by  BC  Hydro  (1980):  DHMR‐1, DHMR‐2 and DHMR‐3. Drillhole locations are marked on Figure 8.2. Drillhole MR‐1  is located at El. 494 m, near the toe of the slope. Drillhole MR‐2 is located near the centre of  the slide on a mid‐level terrace at El. 577 m, and drillhole MR‐3 is located in the crown at El.  643  m.  The  stratigraphy  generally  follows  the  succession  described  by  Mathews  (1978a),  Hartman  (2005)  and  Hartman  and  Clague  (2008)  and  summarized  in  Section  4.3.  The  drillhole log for DHMR‐3 is included in Appendix C.   The site stratigraphy consists of Shaftesbury Shale to El. 558 m overlain by 15 m of  upper paleovalley fluvial gravel, 34 m of upper paleovalley glaciolacustrine deposits, 10 m of  Laurentide till and 35 m of glaciolacustrine Lake Peace deposits.   The  Shaftesbury  Shale  is  a  competent,  medium  hard  shale  to  silty  shale  with  thin  silty laminations. Joints are described as horizontal and generally tight and planar with no  infilling. A clay seam was encountered at El. 539 m and described as soft, light‐coloured and  soapy. This seam may correspond with the upper marl marker unit encountered at the Tea  Creek Slide and described in Section 11.2.2. A similar clay seam was also encountered at El.  552  m,  however  this  seam  cannot  be  correlated  with  any  regional  marker  unit.  Softening  and limonite infilling along joints and bedding planes indicates that the shale is more highly  weathered near the surface.   The  upper  paleovalley  fluvial  gravel  is  unstratified  and  consists  of  well‐rounded,  partly rusted pebble to cobble sized fragments in a silty clay matrix.   Between  El.  573  m  and  El.  597  m,  the  glaciolacustrine  deposits  of  the  upper  paleovalley consist of interbedded sand and silt with clay laminations. These materials are  grey,  moist,  and  stiff  to  hard.  Plasticity  varies  from  high  to  low  depending  on  the  local  prevalence of clay layers. At El. 581 m there is a 3 cm wide shear zone associated with a clay  layer.  Between  El.  588  m  and  El.  597  m,  the  glaciolacustrine  deposits  consist  of  clay  and  103       clayey  silt  which  fines  upward  and  is  described  as  micaceous,  dark  grey,  moist  and  hard.  This  unit  is  sheared  and  brecciated  throughout.  Where  laminations  have  remained  intact,  they are tilted down dip.   The  Laurentide  till  consists  of  extremely  hard,  unstratified  sand  and  clay.  Lastly,  glaciolacustrine  Lake  Peace  deposits  consist  of  interbedded  sand  silt  and  clay  which  is  described  as  grey‐brown,  moist,  hard  and  non‐plastic  to  highly  plastic.  Horizontal  laminations are present throughout  most of the unit, with  a sheared and brecciated zone  between El. 635 m and El. 637 m. This shear zone includes slickensides, clay infilling along  bedding planes and gypsum crystals on some bedding surfaces. The uppermost unit is slide  debris, which is described in detail in section 8.3.  Four  interpretive  cross  sections  through  the  Moberly  River  Slide  are  included  in  Figures 8.3 to 8.6. Cross section locations are marked on Figure 8.2.     8.3 Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology  8.3.1 Basic Slope Geometry  LiDAR imagery, aerial photographs and drillhole logs provide the basis for describing  the geometry and geomorphology of the Moberly River Slide, which has not been previously  described.  The  Moberly  River  Slide  consists  of  an  upper  source  zone  followed  by  a  prominent mid‐slope scarp and a lower depositional zone. Although the primary slide was a  large overburden failure, additional failures in surficial material, debris and bedrock overlie  and abut the Moberly River Slide.  The slope crest, located at El. 630 m descends in a series of scarps and terraces to  river level at El. 420 m. The actual extent of the debris is unknown as river erosion has likely  removed  a  significant  volume.  Assuming  a  maximum  debris  extent  of  1020  m  (from  the  crest of the back scarp to the opposite river bank), and a vertical elevation difference of 220  m,  the  Moberly  River  Slide  has  a  fahrböschung  of  12°.  The  travel  angle,  connecting  the  original  and  post‐slide  centres  of  gravity  is  approximately  11.5°.  Both  the  southern  and  104       northern  flanks  are  relatively  poorly  defined  due  to  ongoing  slope  movement.  Notwithstanding, the slide is relatively uniform in width with an average width of 1220 m.   A summary of major landslide dimensions is shown in Table 8.1. These dimensions  are based on the IAEG system discussed in Section 6.2.   Table 8.1     Landslide dimensions of the Moberly River Slide (based on IAEG, 1990).   Number    Average Dimension  Value (m)  1   Width of displaced mass (WD)  1240  2   Width of rupture surface (WR)  1120  3   Total Length (L)  1020  4   Length of displaced mass (LD)  930  5   Length of rupture surface (LR)  550  6   Depth of displaced mass (DD)  300  7   Depth of rupture surface (DR)  23  105           Figure 8.2     LiDAR image of the Moberly River Slide showing major geological features and the location of interpretive cross sections. (LiDAR image  courtesy of BC Hydro, 2007, Copyright © Airborne Imaging, 2007, adapted by permission)     106        Section 1      Figure 8.3      Section 1 through the Moberly River Slide.  See Figure 8.2 for location.                           107        Section 2      Figure 8.4      Section 2 through the Moberly River Slide.  See Figure 8.2 for location.                        108        Section 3      Figure 8.5     Section 3 through the Moberly River Slide.  See Figure 8.2 for location.                          Section 4  109           Figure 8.6      Section 4 through the Moberly River Slide.  See Figure 8.2 for location.                     110       8.3.2 Detailed Slope Description  The  Moberly  River  slide  consists  of  a  steep  back  scarp  in  overburden,  an  upper  terrace  which  is  overlain  by  debris,  a  mid‐slope  scarp  in  shale,  and  a  lower  depositional  zone.   The  upper  limit  of  the  Moberly  River  Slide  is  defined  by  a  continuous  back  scarp  1710  m  long.  The  scarp  is  eroded  by  multiple  deep  gullies  and  small  terraces  which  likely  formed after the primary slide. The terraces and gullies are well vegetated. The formation of  drainage  channels  behind  the  back  scarp  has  also  contributed  to  slumping  and  erosion  of  the back scarp which descends 60 m at an angle of 42° to a mid‐level terrace. This terrace  has  an  area  of  approximately  206  000  m2.  The  majority  of  material  depletion  occurred  above this terrace, which is overlain by debris 23 m thick. The debris consists of grey‐brown,  moderately  plastic,  stiff  to  hard  sand  silt,  clay  and  gravel.  Multiple  minor  scarps  have  formed  in  the  debris  which  generally  appears  angular  and  unweathered.  Failures  of  the  back  scarp  have  also  deposited  small  lobate  debris  aprons  at  the  foot  of  the  scarp  which  overlie  existing  older  debris.  At  present,  the  terrace  is  well  vegetated.  Drillhole  MR‐2,  located on the upper terrace, suggests that the failure surface is located near El. 555 m at  the base of the upper paleovalley glaciolacustrine deposits.  The terrace slopes at an angle of 8° towards a mid‐slope scarp located 230 m from  the base of the back scarp. The mid‐slope scarp descends 80 m at an angle of 40° to El. 453  m  and  extends  well  beyond  the  limits  of  the  Moberly  River  Slide  event.  Shale  bedrock  is  exposed  at  the  face.  Lobate  debris  fans  originating  in  either  the  debris  deposited  on  the  upper terrace or the shale scarp itself have deposited multiple large debris fans at the base  of the scarp. At present, the debris fans are vegetated but most of the slope remains clear  of vegetation.    Downslope  of the mid‐slope scarp lies a large lower terrace in shale. An area near  the centre of the slide remains clear of debris, however the terrace is primarily overlain by  overburden  and  shale  slide  debris  from  both  ancient  and  more  modern  events.  Angular,  111       fresh  minor  scarps  and  terraced  steps  at  the  toe  of  the  slide  suggest  ongoing  movement.  The morphology of the debris seen in the LiDAR data reflects the underlying bedrock steps.  Drillhole MR‐1 suggests sliding in the uppermost 10 m of the shale. The deposit is abruptly  truncated  at  El.  421  m,  where  fluvial  action  has  eroded  the  toe  of  the  debris  to  create  a  smooth, flat‐lying floodplain. The river currently meanders away from the toe of the slope,  and it is possible that slide debris forced the river to change course and migrate away from  the toe of the slope.   Multiple contemporary slides have occurred at the Moberly River Slide, mostly in the  form  of  small  debris  flows  and  a  large  earth  flow  in  the  deposit.  However,  there  are  two  notable large slides which abut the main slide body (Figure 8.2). The slide near the southern  flank of the Moberly River Slide has an estimated volume of 155 000 m3, and the slide near  the  northern  flank  has  an  estimated  volume  of  99  000  m3.  The  southern  slide,  may  have  occurred  within  intact  quaternary  deposits,  or  within  slide  debris  deposited  during  a  previous  event.  Slide  debris  from  this  event  overlies  the  mid‐slope  scarp  and  forms  a  fan  which overlies the modern fluvial terrace. The Moberly River is actively eroding the deposit.  The slide at the northern flank has a distinctive, well defined round crater. Debris overlies  the mid‐slope scarp, and it is unclear if the rupture surface is located near the base of the  overburden, or near the top of the shale. A debris fan was deposited on the lower terrace  and is actively failing.   8.4 Groundwater Conditions  No piezometers have been installed in the Moberly River Slide and the groundwater  conditions  are  unknown.  Observations  at  other  sites  suggest  that  the  water  table  is  most  commonly  located  above  the  shale,  within  the  fluvial  gravel.  Stability  back  analysis  of  the  initial compound slide shows that the pore water pressure at the time of failure was likely  at, or above the basal shear surface.    112        8.5 Slide Volume Estimation  BC Hydro (1981) estimated that the Moberly River Slide had an approximate volume  of 10 to 12 million m3. As LiDAR data and additional drillhole data are now available, a more  rigorous volume estimation can be performed.  First,  the  location  of  the  pre‐slide  ground  surface  was  estimated  for  Sections  1  through  4  (see  Figure  8.3  through  8.6).  This  surface  was  created  by  extrapolating  the  elevation  and  slope  angle  of  the  intact  material  at  the  crown,  and  the  lower  intact  shale  scarp. This pre‐slide surface is similar to the surface proposed by BC Hydro (1981). For each  section, a digital planimeter was used to measure the cross‐sectional areas of the depleted  mass, the debris deposited on the upper slope and the debris deposited on the lower slope.  These areas are defined in Figure 8.7. The cross‐sectional areas of the depleted mass and  upper  debris  were  then  multiplied  by  one  quarter  of  the  average  width  of  the  main  slide  body, and the cross‐sectional area of the lower debris was multiplied by one quarter of the  average width of the deposit. This data is included in Table 8.2.     Figure 8.7      Definition of cross‐sectional areas used in volume calculation.    113       Table 8.2     Moberly River Slide volume calculations.   Section   Width Slide  Body  (m)   Width Deposit  (m)   Volume of   Depleted  Mass  (m3)   Volume of  Upper  Debris   (m3)   Volume of   Lower Debris   (m3)   1   280   310   4,054,400   834,260   2,185,500   2   280   310   3,833,200   649,600   514,600   3   280   310   2,494,660   168,000   815,300   4   280   310   2,307,200   865,200   548,700               Sub Total     8,635,060     1,682,800     1,878,600         With 23% Bulking  10,707,474   ‐   ‐         Total (m3)   12,390,274         The volume of the depleted mass was increased using a bulking factor of 23%. This  factor was determined through a back analysis of  slide volumes at the Attachie slide. The  total  volume  was  calculated  by  summing  the  volumes  of  the  depleted  mass  (bulked),  and  the  volume  of  the  upper  debris.  The  total  volume  of  the  Moberly  River  Slide  was  approximately 12.4 million m3, with 1.7 million m3 of debris deposited on the upper slope,  1.9  million  m3  of  debris  deposited  below  the  mid‐slope  scarp,  and  8.8  million  m3  unaccounted for. This material was likely deposited in the river and has since been removed  through  erosion.  Additionally,  it  is  important  to  note  that  movement  is  ongoing,  and  multiple modern slides have occurred within the slide debris and shale bedrock. The debris  from these slides overlies the ancient slide debris, and it is difficult to distinguish between  individual slide deposits.    8.6 Slope Movement Monitoring  In 1980 BC Hydro installed inclinometers in drillholes MR‐2 and MR‐3. Inclinometer  MR‐2 indicated movement near surface and near the base of the slide debris. Downslope  movement was detected between 0 m and 1.8 m depth at a rate of 2.8 mm/year from 1980  to 1995, decreasing to less than 0.1 mm/year after 1995 (KCB and SNCL, 2008). Downslope  114       movement was also detected between 18.9 and 20.1 m depth, with a total movement of 17  mm at a rate of 0.9 mm/year between 1980 and 2008. These movements can be attributed  to  ongoing  failures  of  the  debris  likely  caused  by  material  softening  through  weathering.  Loading  of  the  debris  by  failures  upslope  may  also  cause  surges  of  movement  through  undrained loading (Hutchinson and Bhandari, 1971).   Inclinometer MR‐3 was installed to El. 519 m, however after installation in 1980 the  inclinometer  became  blocked  at  El.  575  m.    Inclinometer  MR‐3  indicated  movement  near  surface and at 5.5 m depth. A total movement of 3.5 mm was recorded between 0 m and  2.4  m  depth  between  1980  and  2008,  at  a  rate  of  less  than  0.1  mm/year.  A  total  displacement of 3 mm was recorded at 5.5 m depth between 1980 and 1993, after which no  movement was detected. These movements may reflect ongoing retrogression of the steep  head scarp where it is not buttressed by slide debris.   A  survey  of  collar  elevations  suggested  that  inclinometers  MR‐2  and  MR‐3  have  experienced  12.3  and  12.5  m  of  horizontal  displacement  since  installation,  however,  KCB  and  SNCL  (2008)  attribute  this  difference  to  survey  error.  The  measured  vertical  displacements of 0.29 m and 0.18 m are considered realistic. Detailed inclinometer data is  included in Appendix E.   8.7 Failure Mechanism  Stratigraphy,  slide  geometry  and  geomorphology,  slope  movement  history,  piezometric  conditions  and  material  strengths  all  contribute  towards  an  understanding  of  the slide failure mechanism. This discussion is divided into three parts: a survey of existing  failure  mechanism  hypotheses,  a  discussion  of  the  proposed  failure  mechanism  and  a  discussion of contemporary slope movements at the site.  8.7.1 Existing Hypotheses  Very little analysis of the Moberly River Slide has been completed. BC Hydro (1981)  suggested that sliding occurred along a surface just above the basal gravel layer. BC Hydro  115       (1981) also proposed that the morphology of the deposit indicates that the slide was rapid,  noting  that  very  little  debris  was  left  on  the  slide  plane  and  only  thin  deposits  of  debris  remain  at  the  base  of  the  slide.  The  maximum  slide  velocity  was estimated  to  be  20  m/s.  However, BC Hydro then goes on to note that the majority of the debris was likely removed  through river erosion.  8.7.2 Proposed Failure Mechanism  The Moberly River Slide was most likely a large compound slide with a basal shear  surface located near the base of the upper paleovalley glaciolacustrine deposits, just above  the  upper  paleovalley  fluvial  deposits.  Slide  morphology  suggests  that  the  present  slope  geometry may be the result of several large compound slides with a common basal shear  surface.  Most  slides  may  have  occurred  during  valley  downcutting.  The  slide  deposit  has  formed a large earth flow complex which surges and flows intermittently.   The  Moberly  River  Slide  is  similar  to  the  Attachie  slide  in  that  both  are  large  compound slides with basal sliding surfaces near the base of a glaciolacustrine unit, above a  unit  of  paleovalley  gravel.  However,  there  are  also  many  differences  between  the  two  slides.  The  Attachie  Slide  occurred  within  the  glaciolacustrine  deposits  of  Glacial  Lake  Mathews,  a  stratigraphic  unit  which  has  been  well  characterized,  whereas  the  Moberly  River  Slide  occurred  within  the  upper  paleovalley  glaciolacustrine  deposits.  The  Moberly  River Slide is an ancient slide and the slide velocity is unknown. Lastly, the conditions at the  time of failure, such as river location and level, precipitation, groundwater conditions and  seismicity  make  it  difficult  to  understand  pre‐slide  conditions  and  identify  a  triggering  mechanism.   A  simple  back  analysis  was  conducted  to  investigate  piezometric  conditions  at  the  time  of  failure.  A  2D  limit  equilibrium  analysis  was  completed  using  the  commercial  software SLOPE/W (Geostudio 2007, Version 7.17). The Morgenstern‐Price solution method  was used.  The cross section used for stability analyses corresponds with Section 1  (Figure  8.3).  The  post‐slide  topography  and  post‐slide  drillhole  data  were  used  to  approximate  a  116       fully‐specified  failure  surface.  As  there  is  no  laboratory  data  available  for  materials  at  the  Moberly Slide, material properties were estimated using data from the Attachie Slide (Table  8.3). These data are based on shear strength testing data and back analysis (Thurber, 1978,  1982; BC Hydro 1981a, 1982).  The ‘pre‐sheared’ layer lies at the base of the glaciolacustrine  deposits  and  is  used  to  simulate  sliding  along  a  weak  horizontal  plane.  Initially,  the  piezometric  surface  was  located  2  m  below  the  failure  plane  within  the  gravel  unit.  The  surface was then raised in 2 m increments until a Factor of Safety (FOS) of 1.0 was attained.   Table 8.3     Material parameters used in stability modeling.   Unit   Unit  Weight   (kN/m3)  19  23  19  20  19  25   Lake Peace  Till (Laurentide)  Upper Paleovalley Glaciolacustrine Glaciolacustrine‐Pre‐sheared  Basal Shear Surface  Shale   C  (kPa)   Phi   (degrees)   0  20  0  0  0  250   20  35  20  38  12  45   An example of the SLOPE/W input is shown in Figure 8.8.    650  LAKE PEACE GLACIOLACUSTRINE TILL  600  Elevation  550  UPPER PALEOVALLEY GLACIOLCAUSTRINE . GRAVEL  500  450  SHALE  400  350 0.0  0.2  0.4  0.6  0.8  1.0  Distance (x 1000)     Figure 8.8     Example of SLOPE/W input where the piezometric surface lies at the failure plane. The resulting  FOS = 1.03.     Back  analysis  shows  that  a  rise  in  piezometric  pressure  could  have  triggered  the  Moberly River Slide. When the water table lies at or below the failure plane, the slide has a  117       FOS of 1.03. When the water table lies 2 m above the failure plane, the slide has a FOS of  0.96. Therefore, assuming a pre‐sheared weak failure surface is present, a small change in  groundwater  conditions  due  to  high  rainfall  or  snowmelt  may  have  been  capable  of  initiating  failure.  The  presence  of  a  pre‐sheared  plane  is  considered  a  reasonable  assumption,  as  drillhole  data  shows  that  long  term  slope  deformation  is  common  in  the  overburden deposits of the Peace River valley. Slope deformation may have also allowed for  infiltration and weathering, furthering weakening shear surface.   The  geometry  of  the  slide  suggests  that  multiple  slides  exploited  a  failure  surface  near  El.  555  m.  These  slides  may  have  occurred  at  different  times,  or  may  have  occurred  within the same time period, such as during a period of valley downcutting. The basic slide  morphology observed at the Moberly River Slide is very similar to the morphology of other  slides  throughout  the  valley,  both  in  bedrock  and  overburden.  Often,  sliding  occurs  at  multiple  levels  leaving  prominent  intact  benches  of  material  which  give  the  slopes  a  ‘stepped’ character. Severin (2004) noted that multi‐level slides were common. The Cache  Creek Slide (Section 10.0) and the Tea Creek Slide (Section 11.0) both have prominent mid‐ slope benches of relatively intact material.   The characteristic stepped slope morphology in the Peace River valley is the result of  a  competition  between  slope  movements  and  river  erosion.  Initially,  river  downcutting  forms  steep  slopes  in  both  bedrock  and  overburden  which  then  fail  along  weak  bedding  planes due to oversteepening. The debris that results from this slide often forms an earth  flow tongue that moves the river away from the toe of the slope where it begins to downcut  a new channel. As the river base level changes, this process can repeat, creating a series of  benches as the path of the river is pushed farther from the slope. This process is illustrated  in Figure 8.9, and may explain the unique slope morphology observed at the Moberly Slide  and throughout the valley.        118               Figure 8.9     The competition between river erosion and slope movement which shapes valley slope  morphology.       119       8.7.3 Contemporary Slope Movement  Field  investigations,  drillhole  data,  LiDAR  data  and  air  photos  indicate  that  the  Moberly  River  Slide  area  is  very  active.  There  are  multiple  non‐vegetated  slopes  at  the  flanks,  back  scarp,  mid‐slope  and  near  the  toe,  indicating  areas  of  recent  movement.  As  described in Section 8.3, two large contemporary slides overlie the southern and northern  flanks of the main slide body.   There are also multiple small, recent debris flows originating  in  the  debris  deposited  on  the  upper  terrace.  These  movements  are  reflected  in  the  inclinometer  data  (Section  8.6).  The  debris  deposited  by  earlier  and  more  modern  sliding  events has also formed a large earth flow complex at the foot of the slide. The earth flow  may surge and flow intermittently and different areas show different levels of activity. The  younger,  upstream  debris  flow  tongue  appears  to  be  more  active  than  the  older  downstream  debris  flow  tongue.  The  earth  flow  deposit  is  intermittently  eroded  by  the  river.   LiDAR data also suggests that there may be compound shale bedrock sliding below  the mid‐slope scarp, near the toe of the slide. In this area, river erosion has created multiple  bedrock benches which may be capable of sliding along pre‐sheared bedding planes which  formed due to valley rebound. Similar shale block slides were observed near river level at  the Cache Creek Slide and the Tea Creek Slide, although these translational block slides are  often covered by debris. Drillhole MR‐1, located just downslope of the mid‐slope bedrock  scarp,  encountered  bedrock  slide  debris  from  El.  452  m  to  El.  433  m.  The  material  was  described as highly weathered, disturbed silty shale with extensive limonite staining along  bedding planes. The degree of weathering decreased with depth. Zones of silty sand were  interbedded with the shale and a zone of breccia was encountered at the base of the shale  slide  debris.  The  underlying  intact  shale  contained  many  clay  seams,  but  there  was  no  evidence of shearing along these seams.          120        9.0  The Halfway River Slide  9.1 Introduction  The  Halfway  River  Slide  is  located  on  the  south  bank  of  the  Halfway  River,  15  km  upstream from the Peace River confluence at UTM coordinates N 6231656 E 586722 (Figure  1.1).  The  slide  occurred  at  15:00  on  August  20,  1989,  creating  a  3.6  million  m3  flow  slide  which  dammed  the  Halfway  River  for  six  hours,  during  which  time  the  river  was  diverted  north across a vegetated floodplain on the north bank (Bobrowsky and Smith, 1992). As a  shallow, rapid flow slide within the Lake Peace deposits, the Halfway River slide illustrates a  failure  mechanism  that  has  not  been  well  documented  in  the  Peace  River  valley.  Modern  LiDAR data (BC Hydro, 2007) shows that this type and scale of failure, involving the top layer  in the Quaternary sequence, is common throughout the valley and therefore merits further  investigation.   This  discussion  uses  surficial  mapping  data  (Bobrowsky  and  Smith,  1992;  Hartman,  2005)  aerial  photographs,  LiDAR  imagery  and  soil  testing  data  to  describe  the  local  stratigraphy, the geometry and geomorphology of the slide and the failure mechanism. Pre‐ slide and post‐slide air photographs and post‐slide photos are shown in Figure 9.1.   121           Figure 9.1     Aerial photograph of the Halfway River Slide post‐failure in 1996, overlain with post‐slide  photographs and a pre‐slide aerial photograph taken in 1963. Slide location marked on pre‐slide and post‐ slide air photos. (Airphotos 15BCB96020‐18, 1996, and BC5067‐78, 1963, Copyright © Province of British  Columbia. All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission of the Province of British Columbia.  www.ipp.gov.bc.ca; Photographs Copyright© BC Hydro, 1989, by permission)                122        9.2 Detailed Stratigraphy  Unlike the Attachie, Cache Creek, Moberly River and Tea Creek Slides, no drillholes  have  been  completed  at  the  site  of  the  Halfway  River  Slide.  However,  Hartman  (2005)  conducted  surface  investigations  in  the  area  and  three  nearby  stratigraphic  columns  provide  a  basis  for  understanding  the  local  geology.  Stratigraphic  section  SS‐77  is  located  approximately 3.5 km north of the landslide site, section SS‐78 is located 4.5 km north east  of  the  site,  and  section  SS‐79  is  located  5.3  km  north  east  of  the  site.  The  general  stratigraphic sequence correlates with that described by Mathews (1978a), Hartman (2005)  and  Hartman  and  Clague  (2008)  and  summarized  in  Section  4.3.  Figure  9.2  depicts  the  approximate post‐slide stratigraphy of the Halfway River Slide. The cross section location is  marked on Figure 9.3.   The  basic  stratigraphic  sequence  consists  of  shale  bedrock  overlain  by  fluvial  deposits, Cordilleran diamicton, glaciolacustrine Lake Mathews deposits, Laurentide till and  glaciolacustrine Lake Peace deposits. Bedrock depth at the Halfway River Slide is uncertain  because of the existence of a pre‐glacial valley, backfilled by drift. Bedrock was encountered  at El. 618 m at section SS‐77, El. 497 m at SS‐78 and El. 451 m at SS‐79. Field investigations  suggest  that  bedrock  rises  rapidly  northwards  (Hartman,  2005).  An  analysis  of  outcrops  visible  in  air  photos  and  LiDAR  suggests  that  bedrock  is  located  near  El.  475  m  at  the  Halfway River Slide site.   At  SS‐78  and  SS‐79,  shale  is  overlain  by  weakly  stratified  sandy  gravel  and  gravely  sand  with  some  silt  and  rounded  clasts.  This  material  is  likely  fluvial  in  origin  and  is  approximately  19  m  thick.  The  sandy  gravel  is  overlain  by  massive,  clast  supported  diamicton consisting of 30% rounded to angular clasts with a maximum diameter of 3 m and  a sandy silty matrix. At SS‐77, the diamicton directly overlies the bedrock, stands in vertical  faces and is vertically jointed. Hartman (2005) interprets this material as Cordilleran till. This  unit  is  approximately  20  m  thick.  At  SS‐78  the  diamicton  is  overlain  by  interbedded  silty  sand,  silty  clay  and  clayey  silt  corresponding  with  the  glaciolacustrine  Lake  Mathews  deposits. This unit has an approximate thickness of 40 m. At SS‐77 the diamicton is overlain  123       by  fluvial  deposits.  At  SS‐78,  the  Lake  Mathews  deposits  are  overlain  by  a  massive  matrix  supported  diamicton  with  approximately  25%  clasts.  According  to  Hartman  (2005)  this  till  unit  is  less  dense  than  the  underlying  till  unit,  suggesting  less  compaction  may  have  occurred.  This  unit  is  inferred  to  correspond  with  the  Laurentide  till  unit.  LiDAR  data  suggests the till is approximately 18 m thick. At the Attachie Slide (10 km from the Halfway  River Slide) the till is described as a grey‐brown, stiff, moderately plastic sand silt and clay  mixture with trace cobbles  Although  the  surficial  deposits  were  not  described  in  the  stratigraphic  sections,  additional evidence indicates that Lake Peace deposits overlie the Laurentide till, as follows:  Firstly, according to Mathews (1978a) the slide area is located within the regional extent of  Lake  Peace  deposits.  Additionally,  sampling  of  test  pits  and  drillholes  conducted  by  the  Ministry  of  Transportation  and  Highways  (MOTH,  1980‐1995)  indicates  the  presence  of  clayey,  varved  glaciolacustrine  deposits  at  the  surface  in  areas  with  similar  landslide  features.  Lastly,  an  examination  of  slope  inclinations  in  the  LiDAR  data  suggest  that  the  Laurentide  till  is  overlain  by  a  weaker  material  which  is  most  likely  glaciolacustrine.  The  Glacial Lake Peace deposits are approximately 35 m thick.   9.3 Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology  The Halfway River Slide consists of an upper source zone followed by a steep scarp  and a lower depositional zone (Figure 9.2). The slope crest, located at El. 652 m descends to  a gently sloping plateau truncated by a steep scarp at El. 613 m. From the base of this mid‐ slope  scarp  at  El.  556  m,  material  is  deposited  downslope  to  El.  465  m,  river  level.  As  indicated  by  post‐slide  photos  and  disturbed  vegetation,  the  debris  traveled  across  the  Halfway River and up the opposite bank to approximately El. 470 m.   With  a  maximum  debris  extent  of  1210  m  from  the  slope  crest  and  a  vertical  elevation difference of 180 m, the Halfway River Slide has a fahrböschung of 8.5°. The travel  angle, connecting the original and post‐slide centres of gravity is 7.8°. As the slide occurred  relatively recently (1989), the flanks of the slide are well defined by the presence of debris  124       and  a  lack  of  vegetation.  Based  on  oblique  photos  taken  post‐slide,  the  slide  covered  the  entire runout distance in one rapid displacement. At the main scarp, the slide has a width of  190 m. The slide then widens to a maximum width of 340 m within the source zone. Below  the mid‐slope scarp debris is channeled into a narrow zone 100 m wide. Figure 9.3 shows a  LiDAR image of the slide, including major geological features and cross section location. A  summary of major landslide dimensions is included in Table 9.1.  Table 9.1     Halfway River Slide dimensions (based on IAEG, 1990).    Number    Average Dimension   Value (m)   1   Width of displaced mass (WD)   310   2   Width of rupture surface (WR)   310   3   Total Length (L)   1210   4   Length of displaced mass (LD)   1210   5   Length of rupture surface (LR)   600   6   Depth of displaced mass (DD)   14   7   Depth of rupture surface (DR)   38   The crown  of the Halfway River Slide, as seen on the LiDAR image, is defined by a  continuous main scarp with a semi‐circular plan, characteristic of many Lake Peace failures  near this location and elsewhere. The scarp outline is irregular, which suggests retrogressive  character but could also be a result of the local micro‐topography. The main scarp descends  19 m at an angle of approximately 18° to a gently sloping plateau covered by debris, with an  area of 102 200 m2. The majority of material depletion during the 1989 slide occurred in this  zone.  The  plateau  surface  is  hummocky  and  contains  small  scale  lobate  debris  aprons  formed by the deposition of slide debris within the upper source zone. Downed trees cover  the  area.  Photos  taken  post‐slide  show  some  intact  vegetated  zones  near  the  main  scarp  (which could be remnants of retrogression slices). The debris becomes progressively more  disturbed  and  flow‐like  downslope.  The  surface  of  the  debris  slopes  at  an  angle  of  5°  towards a minor mid‐slope scarp located 365 m from the main scarp, likely made up of the  Laurentide till unit. This scarp descends 57 m at an angle of approximately 45°. This scarp is  125       continuous and smoothly‐contoured and extends well beyond the margins of the 1989 slide  event,  indicating  that  its  shape  pre‐dates  the  1989  event  and  has  likely  been  formed  by  erosion processes. The mid‐slope scarp is intersected in a few locations by deep gullies and  terraced secondary scarps. Vegetation was preserved along two ridges bordering the flow  path of the 1989 landslide.    126        Post‐Slide Stratigraphy             Figure 9.2     Cross section through the Halfway River Slide,  post‐failure. All contacts are assumed. Cross section  location marked on Figure 9.3.                                  127               Figure 9.3     LiDAR image of the Halfway River Slide showing major geological features (Figure truncated by LiDAR extent to the west). Older landslide scars  are clearly visible. (LiDAR image courtesy of BC Hydro, 2007, Copyright © Airborne Imaging, 2007, adapted by permission)   128        The  slopes  below  the  mid‐slope  scarp  have  smooth  topography  and  lobate  debris  aprons.  There  are  two  minor  secondary  scarps  within  this  zone.  Multiple  deep  drainage  gullies are also visible. Approximately 192 m from the base of the mid slope scarp the debris  path narrows into a channel 105 m wide. The debris was likely forced into the channel due  to the presence of older slide debris deposited by adjacent slides. Near the river, the debris  forms  a  series  of  terraced  steps  suggesting  the  material  is  being  actively  eroded.  The  morphology of the lower part of the slope suggests a complex pre‐slide topography formed  of intact layers, local slope failures and old landslide debris accumulations, which has been  over‐ridden by the 1989 flow slide and is now being eroded by surface drainage. The debris  path  continues  to  the  opposite  side  of  the  valley,  but  is  interrupted  by  the  river  channel,  which re‐established itself after breaching of the landslide dam on the day of the slide.   9.4 Groundwater Conditions  As there are no piezometers at the Halfway River site, the groundwater conditions  are  uncertain.  Bobrowsky  and  Smith  (1992)  note  that  water  was  visible  draining  from  the  upper  terraces  after  the  1989  failure,  suggesting  high  pore  water  pressures  may  have  existed within the Lake Peace deposits pre‐slide. The visible water may also be a result of  surface  water  accumulating  in  the  landslide  crater  or  a  result  of  drainage  of  excess  water  from the liquefied soil mass.      9.5 Slide Volume   Bobrowsky  and  Smith  (1992)  estimated  the  overall  slide  volume  to  be  1.88  million  m3. As LiDAR data are now available, a more rigorous volume estimation can be performed.  Unlike the Attachie Slide, in which the majority of debris remains at the foot of the slide, the  debris deposited by the Halfway River Slide has largely been removed through erosion by  the Halfway River itself. First, the cross‐sectional areas of the upper debris, mid‐level debris,  lower debris, and depleted mass were determined using a digital planimeter. A schematic  depicting these areas is shown in Figure 9.4. The cross‐sectional areas were then multiplied   129       by  the  width  of  the  deposit.  For  the  case  of  the  upper  debris  and  depleted  mass,  the  average width of the main slide body was used. These data are included in Table 9.2.   The estimate of the depletion volume is based on the assumptions that the pre‐slide  topography  of  the  majority  of  the  source  zone  was  a  part  of  the  surrounding  horizontal  plateau  and  that  the  rupture  surface  of  the  landslide  lies  above  the  horizontal  contact  between  the  Lake  Peace  unit  and  the  underlying  till.  Both  of  these  assumptions  are  well‐ supported  by  the  LiDAR  image  and  by  the  comparison  of  pre‐slide  and  post‐slide  aerial  photographs  (Figure  9.1).  The  estimate  also  produces  a  balance  between  depleted  and  accumulated volumes, as shown in Table 9.2.     Figure 9.4     Definition of cross‐sectional areas used in volume calculations.  Table 9.2     Volume Estimates for the Halfway River Slide.      Width   (m)   Depleted Mass  Upper Debris  Mid‐Slope Debris  Lower Debris       300  300  250  130       Cross‐Sectional  Area   (m2)  6,460  4,170  1,720  4,190       Volume   (m3)   Bulked Volume   (m3)   1,938,000  1,251,000  430,000  545,000    Total (m3)   2,383,740  ‐  ‐  ‐    3,634,740   The  volume  of  the  depleted  mass  was  increased  using  a  bulking  factor  of  23%.  This  factor was determined through a back analysis of slide volumes at the Attachie Slide, and is  considered  a  reasonable  estimate  for  glaciolacustrine  deposits.  The  total  volume  was  130       calculated by summing the volumes of the depleted mass (bulked), and the volume of the  upper debris. The total volume of material moved by the Halfway River Slide was calculated  to be 3.6 million m3, of which 1.3 million m3 was deposited on the upper slope, 430 000 m3  was deposited mid‐slope, 545 000 m3 was deposited on the lower slope, and 1.4 million m3  was deposited in the river and beyond. The volume of material deposited in the river was  estimated  by  subtracting  the  volume  of  the  mid‐slope  debris  and  the  lower  slope  debris  from the volume of the depleted mass.   The total volume is considerably larger than the volume estimated by Bobrowsky and  Smith (1992) of 1.88 million m3. As there is no drillhole data available, the location of the  sliding  surface  was  assumed  to  lie  at  the  base  of  the  Lake  Peace  unit,  just  above  the  Laurentide  till.  This  assumption  is  well‐supported  by  the  constant  form  of  the  mid‐slope  scarp,  as  described  above,  and  the  low  angle  of  the  deposits  filling  the  landslide  scar.  Possible sources of error include the assumed bulking factor and the extent of pre‐existing  instability near the pre‐slide valley crest. Consequently, the value of 3.6 million m3 should  be considered an upper bound.   9.6 Failure Mechanism  This thesis proposes that the Halfway River Slide was a retrogressive flow slide which  occurred within the normally consolidated glaciolacustrine Lake Peace deposits due to the  presence  of  a  liquefiable  material.  The  slide  may  have  been  triggered  by  sloughing,  undercutting,  an  increase  in  pore  water  pressures  or  a  combination  of  these  events.  This  failure mechanism discussion is divided into three parts: a summary of the factual evidence  associated with the slide, a survey of existing failure mechanism hypotheses specific to the  slide,  and  a  discussion  of  the  proposed  failure  mechanism  including  the  location  of  the  failure  surface,  soil  sensitivity,  failure  mechanisms  in  liquefiable  materials  and  finally  flow  slides and spreads.   131       9.6.1 Supporting Factual Evidence  There is evidence of local slope movement prior to the 1989 slide. The craters and  deposits of similar ancient slides are visible both upstream and downstream of the Halfway  River Slide (see Figure 9.1 and Figure 9.3). These slides are particularly evident in the LiDAR  data. In fact, these shallow slides are so widespread throughout the Peace River valley and  its tributary valleys that it is difficult to find a slope with similar stratigraphy which has not  experienced a shallow flow slide. Jointing and cracking is visible within the slide debris, and  at the top of the upper terrace. There is no evidence of tension cracks in the crown of the  slide.   The  Halfway  River  Slide  occurred  at  approximately  15:00  on  August  20,  1989.  According to Bobrowsky and Smith (1992), the event was witnessed by local residents. In a  1996 report, BC Hydro reported that the slide occurred in July of 1989. The slide resulted in  a flow of approximately 3.6 million m3, and dammed the river for approximately six hours.  The first photographs of the slide were taken on August 21st by members of the Ministry of  Transportation and Highways. BC Hydro (1996) noted that the character of the deposit and  the longitudinal extent of the slide indicated the event was very rapid and flow‐like.  The slide trigger is unknown. Climate data for Fort St. John (Appendix A) indicate the  average total monthly precipitation for August is 56.9 mm. The total precipitation in August  1989 was 65 mm, suggesting that the month was only slightly wetter than normal (Figure  9.5).  Daily  rainfall  records  (Figure  9.6)  also  show  there  was  no  precipitation  in  the  three  days  preceding  the  Halfway  River  slide.  In  fact,  the  largest  yearly  rainfall  event  (27  mm)  occurred on August 22, two days after the slide. The maximum daily rainfall event recorded  in  August  was  58.4  mm,  in  1972  (Appendix  A).  However,  precipitation  is  measured  at  the  Fort  St.  John  airport,  approximately  50  km  from  the  Halfway  River  Slide.  Weather  in  the  Peace  River  valley  is  highly  variable,  and  it  is  possible  that  the  site  experienced  different  rainfall than what was recorded in Fort St. John.    132       Furthermore,  there  was  no  significant  seismic  activity  prior  to  the  slide  (Natural  Resources Canada, 2012) and no man‐made activity was performed nearby (Bobrowsky and  Smith, 1992).      Figure 9.5     Monthly rainfall records for Fort St.John, 1989 (Environment Canada, 2012).   133             August 20th    August  Figure 9.6     Daily rainfall records for Fort St.John, 1989 (Environment Canada, 2012).     134        9.6.2 Existing Hypotheses  Slide  failure  mechanisms  have  been  proposed  by  Bobrowsky  and  Smith  (1992),  BC  Hydro  (1996)  and  Geertsema  et  al.  (2006).  Bobrowsky  and  Smith  suggested  that  the  Halfway River Slide had a similar failure mechanism to the Attachie Slide, including a long  history of jointing and cracking within the glaciolacustrine deposits, followed by long‐term  ponding  within  the  existing  tension  cracks  with  infiltration  and  saturation.  The  authors  suggested that this process may have continued until a critical point was reached where the  effective internal shear strength was sufficiently reduced and failure occurred. Bobrowsky  and  Smith  (1992)  noted  that  the  rainfall  records  did  not  support  a  precipitation  induced  slide,  and  suggested  that  long  term  pore  water  pressure  increases  may  play  a  role.  In  describing  the  failure,  Bobrowsky  and  Smith  (1992)  proposed  that  the  failure  surface  was  located  within  the  Wisconsinian  glacial  diamicton  overlying  the  Shaftesbury  Shale.  Bobrowsky and Smith (1992) also noted that the distressed sediments may have undergone  a quick disintegration followed by flow.   The Attachie Slide analogy is contradicted by several facts. Firstly, the Attachie Slide  occurred in pre‐glacial, overconsolidated deposits, while the Lake Peace Clay has not been  loaded by ice. Also, the flow‐like nature of the Attachie Slide appears to be unique in the  region, while the Lake Peace flow slides are ubiquitous. Thirdly, the source of the Attachie  Slide originated in previously‐disturbed material, while the Halfway River landslide moved a  large quantity of a previously intact stratum.  Geertsema  (2006)  included  the  Halfway  River  Slide  as  a  case  study  in  a  paper  describing  recent  catastrophic  slides  in  British  Columbia.  The  paper  reported  that  the  Halfway River Slide had two failure surfaces, an upper one in till, and a lower one in ‘lake  sediment’.  As  discussed  above,  our  observations  found  no  evidence  of  a  failure  in  till.  On  the contrary, the till layer represents a resistant horizon in the morphology of the slope.   135       Lastly, BC Hydro (1996), classified the Halfway River Slide as a large rapid earth flow  which occurred in an area previously weakened by sliding and slumping activity. The trigger  was  attributed  to  rainfall,  and  it  was  noted  that  “three  significant  rainstorms  (>  10  mm)”  had occurred in early July (BC Hydro dated the slide to July, 1989). Groundwater response in  clay  is  delayed  and  the  critical  piezometric  pressure  may  well  have  developed  over  a  number of months after precipitation. On the other hand, absence of strong precipitation  immediately preceding the failure contradicts the importance of extensive deformation and  cracking, as such features could be destabilized by rain.  9.6.3 Discussion  9.6.3.1 Location of the Failure Surface  Although  Bobrowsky  and  Smith  (1992)  and  Geertsema  (2006)  suggested  that  the  failure  surface  was  located  in  till,  this  is  unlikely.  A  landslide  inventory  of  the  Peace  River  valley  did  not  identify  till  as  a  locus  for  sliding  (Severin,  2004).  An  analysis  of  LiDAR  data  shows that  the till slopes throughout the valley can maintain very steep faces (> 45°) and  there is no evidence of sliding. Till slopes in the area do occasionally fail through toppling.  Surface  mapping  conducted  by  BGC  Engineering  Inc.  (2012b)  noted  that  similar  slides  appeared to be contained within the glaciolacustrine material, not the till.   Considering the recent advancements in local geological knowledge (Hartman, 2005;  Hartman  and  Clague,  2008)  and  the  available  LiDAR  data,  the  basal  sliding  surfaces  suggested  by  Bobrowsky  and  Smith  (1992)  and  Geertsema  (2006)  can  be  discounted.  As  discussed  in  Section  9.3,  it  is  therefore  assumed  that  the  slide  occurred  within  the  Lake  Peace glaciolacustrine deposits.   9.6.3.2 Soil Sensitivity  The  morphology  and  behaviour  of  the  flow  slide  suggest  that  a  sensitive  clay  or  a  liquefiable  granular  soil  was  involved.  In  particular,  the  shallow,  near  horizontal  sliding   136       surface, large areal extent and extreme mobility are characteristic of sensitive clay slides or  liquefaction slides.  The term ‘sensitivity’ indicates the effect of remoulding on the consistency of a clay  (Terzaghi et al., 1963). The degree of sensitivity is expressed by the ratio of the undisturbed  unconfined compressive strength (UCS) to the remoulded UCS at the same water content.  High  degrees  of  sensitivity  are  usually  attributed  to:  (1)  local  mineral  sources  and  depositional  conditions  which  allow  the  clay  to  form  an  open  fabric,  and  (2)  geochemical  factors which reduce the remoulded shear strength (Lefebvre, 1996).   However, although the slide morphology is characteristic of a flow slide, there is no  laboratory  evidence  to  indicate  that  the  Lake  Peace  deposits  contain  sensitive  clays.  Furthermore,  the  Lake  Peace  deposits  are  glaciolacustrine,  whereas  sensitive  clays  most  commonly  occur  within  marine  deposits.  However,  Quigley  (1980),  reports  that  sensitive  clays do not have to be marine in origin, and that many non‐marine Canadian glacial clays  are known to exhibit moderate sensitivity.   Four  samples,  presumed  to  be  samples  of  Lake  Peace  deposits  (based  on  sample  elevation and LiDAR data), were recovered from drillhole 53‐2. This drillhole was completed  in 1980 by BC Hydro, and is located at the slopes opposite Bear Flat (24 km from the site of  the Halfway River Slide). These samples are the only BC Hydro drillhole samples which have  been  tested  and  can  be  attributed  to  the  Lake  Peace  unit.  The  Lake  Peace  unit  was  also  encountered in drillhole 63‐3 at the Attachie Slide, and drillhole MR‐3 at the Moberly Slide,  however, although samples of Lake Peace material were obtained from these drillholes, no  laboratory testing was conducted on the samples.   The Lake Peace material was described as a very stiff, dark grey silty clay with traces  of sand and gravel, interbedded with occasional silt varves. Mathews (1978a) described the  Lake  Peace  unit  as  a  “clay  with  distinct  silty  layers”.  The  material  was  classified  as  high  plasticity  clay  (CH)  to  low  plasticity  clay  (CL)  with  an  average  clay  content  of  46%,  a  silt  content of 51%, and a sand content of 4%. Lefebvre (1996) notes that sensitive clays often  137       have a high silt fraction (30‐70 %). The plastic limit varied from 18 to 26%, the liquid limit  varied  from  28  to  66%,  and  the  plasticity  index  varied  from  8  to  40%.  The  liquidity  index  varied from 0 to 0.44.   Additionally, 122 samples were recovered from drillholes and test pits completed by  the Ministry of Transportation and Highways (MOTH, 1980‐1995). The MOTH samples were  chosen based on sample location and elevation, the documented stratigraphic sequence at  each  site  and  LiDAR  data.  However,  the  MOTH  data  did  not  include  any  geological  interpretation  and  it  is  possible  that  samples  were  misidentified  and  may  consist  of  Lake  Mathews glaciolacustrine material. All samples were recovered between 10 and 18 km from  the site of the Halfway River Slide.   The plasticity index and liquid limit of each sample were plotted on a plasticity chart  (Figure 9.7). Most samples were identified as low plasticity clay (CL) or high plasticity clay  (CH), with few samples of high plasticity silt (MH) and low plasticity silt (ML). Two clusters of  data are visible: a dominant cluster with plasticity index above the A line (clay) and a second  cluster  with  a  plasticity  index  on  or  just  below  the  A  line  (silt).  The  second  cluster  may  represent samples influenced by silt varves.    138          Figure 9.7     Plasticity chart for all known samples of glaciolacustrine Lake Peace material.   Sensitivity  is  most  commonly  measured  using  intact  and  remoulded  UCS  values.  Sensitivity can also be estimated using shear vane tests, laboratory vane tests or fall cone  tests  (Lefebvre,  1996).  However,  none  of  these  tests  have  been  conducted  on  samples  of  Lake Peace material. Carson (1977) also notes that the undrained shear strength can be a  good indicator of soil sensitivity. Morgenstern and Houston (1969) proposed a relationship  between  liquidity  index  and  sensitivity,  suggesting  that  the  liquidity  index  must  be  above  1.0 in order for a clay to flow. The liquidity index for the Lake Peace samples varies from ‐ 0.31  to  1.0,  with  an  average  value  of  0.2.  According  to  this  methodology,  the  Lake  Peace  deposits do not consist of sensitive clay.   It  is  difficult  to  reconcile  the  laboratory  testing  data  with  the  observed  slide  morphology. However, there are relatively few samples which are known to belong to the  Lake  Peace  deposit.  Additionally,  the  majority  of  the  Lake  Peace  samples  were  recovered  139       from  test  pits  and  shallow  drillholes  and  may  not  reflect  the  material  properties  at  the  depth  of  the  failure  surface.  At  Halfway  River,  the  failure  surface  is  inferred  to  be  approximately 30 m below ground.   It is also possible that there is no sensitive clay present. However, for the debris to  break  apart  and  flow,  a  liquefiable  material  must  be  present.  Odenstad  (1951)  notes  that  grain size has no relation to sensitivity. Glaciolacustrine sediments often consist of varved  silt,  deposited  in  the  summer,  and  clay,  deposited  in  the  winter  (Quigley,  1980).  It  is  possible  that  the  Halfway  River  Slide  involved  a  liquefiable  silt,  as  opposed  to  a  sensitive  (liquefiable) clay. For a silt to be liquefiable the material must be normally consolidated, low  plasticity  and  contractant  with  a  natural  water  content  above  the  liquid  limit.  Unfortunately, there is very little data available with which to characterize the silts, as the  MOTH (1980‐1995) generally only completed Atterberg limit testing on clay samples.   The  geotechnical  literature  contains  many  examples  of  flow  slides  developed  in  extra‐sensitive ("quick") clays and liquefiable, loose saturated sands. In comparison, there is  not  much  information  available  on  spontaneous  or  earthquake  liquefaction  of  silts.  However, it should be noted that some classic landslide cases that are included under the  "sensitive  clay"  label  are,  in  fact,  in  silts  (e.g.  Toulnoustonck  Slide,  Conlon  1966).  Also,  extremely mobile flow slides are widespread in loess and in the glaciolacustrine silts of the  South Thompson and Okanagan valleys (Eshragian et al., 2007). Loose natural and saturated  silts  are  very  difficult  to  sample,  hence,  the  liquefaction  process  has  not  been  extensively  studied in laboratory tests.  9.6.3.3 Possible Failure Mechanisms  According to Locat et al. (2011), four main types of slides are common in liquefiable  materials: single rotational slides, multiple retrogressive slides (also known as flow slides),  translational progressive slides, and spreads. A single rotational slide can be discounted as a  potential  failure  mechanism,  as  these  slide  are  generally  slow  and  have  a  distinct  morphology.  The  Halfway  River  slide  was  most  likely  a  rapid  slide  as  shown  by  the  long  140       runout  distance,  covered  in  a  single  episode  and  lasting  for  a  short  period  of  time.  Translational  progressive  slides,  as  described  by  Locat,  can  also  be  discounted.  A  translational progressive slide is characterized by a zone of subsidence at the head of the  slide,  and  an  extensive  compressive  heave  zone  near  the  toe.  The  development  of  the  rupture surface initiates near the head of the slope, and progresses downward. These slides  are  most  commonly  triggered  by  human  activities  occurring  upslope.  In  the  Peace  River  area, there is no evidence to suggest the Lake Peace failures are translational progressive  slides;  most  commonly  Lake  Peace  failures  are  triggered  at  the  toe  of  the  slope  and  the  rupture surface propagates upward. Therefore the Halfway River Slide is most likely either a  flow slide or a spread. Both flow slides and spreads are common amongst eastern Canadian  clays, with approximately 42% of large landslides in sensitive clays identified as spreads, and  the  remaining  58%  consisting  of  flows  and  other  retrogressive  slides  (Fortin  et  al.,  2008).  However, spreads exhibit a characteristic deposit morphology of horsts and grabens. Thus,  by  elimination,  then  Halfway  River  Slide  can  be  classified  as  a  multiple‐retrogressive  flow  slide.  9.6.3.4 Multiple Retrogressive (Flow Slide) Failures  According to Locat et al. (2011), a multiple retrogressive failure can only occur when  three  conditions  are  met:  (1)  an  initial  slide  has  occurred,  (2)  the  potential  energy  is  high  enough to effectively remould the material, and (3) the remoulded material is liquid enough  to flow. Sliding most often begins with failure at the toe. In the case of the Halfway River  Slide,  a  small  rotational  failure  may  have  triggered  the  slide.  Alternatively,  erosion  oversteepening  of  the  Laurentide  till  may  have  caused  undercutting.  Thus,  a  small  initial  slide may have exposed a steep scarp primed for failure of another retrogressive slice. Even  in  retrogressive  slides,  however,  the  strength  of  any  given  slice  can  be  reduced  by  the  process of progressive failure, which operates efficiently in strain‐softening materials.   141       According to Skempton (1964):  “If for any reason a clay is forced to pass the peak at some particular point within its  mass, the strength at that point will decrease. This action will throw additional stress  on to the clay at some other point, causing the peak to be passed at that point also.  In this way, a progressive failure can be initiated and, in the limit, the strength along  the entire length of a slip surface will fall to the residual value.”  This process explains how a local failure, with a factor of safety less than one, can  occur  in  a  slope  consisting  of  strain  softening  material  even  if  the  overall  slope  is  stable  (Locat et al. 2011).  In a sensitive clay slide, the initial triggering mass movement induces a substantial  decrease in shear resistance, causing the remoulded clay to behave as a liquid and flow out  from  the  slope.  This  decreases  the  horizontal  lateral  earth  pressures  on  the  new  slope,  creating  a  second  unstable  scarp.  A  second  slide  can  then  occur,  as  the  remoulded  clay  flows outward, generating another unstable scarp. The process continues until a final stable  scarp is formed (Locat et al, 2011). This process is illustrated schematically in Figure 9.8.      Figure 9.8     Schematic of a multiple retrogressive failure. (based on Locat et al., 2011).   Flow slides are characterized by an empty crater with a bottleneck shape (Bjerrum,  1955; Lefebvre, 1996; Locat et al., 2011). Usually minimal debris remains in the crater due  142       to the extreme mobility of the materials. Although the location of the failure surface of the  Halfway  River  Slide  is  unknown,  the  distribution  of  debris  in  the  crater  is  similar  to  the  distribution  of  debris  depicted  in  Figure  9.8.  Figure  9.1  and  Figure  9.3  also  show  that  the  material nearest the main scarp appears to be more intact than the material farther from  the scarp, supporting the hypothesis of a retrogressive failure originating near the toe.   Finally, in order for retrogression to occur, the material must be liquefiable enough  that  the  debris  from  the  original  slide  will  flow,  and  not  remain  to  buttress  the  slope.  Various parameters are used to assess the potential for retrogression. For example, there is  the  general  relationship  between  liquidity  index  and  sensitivity  stated  in  Section  9.6.3.2.  Tavenas  (1983)  also  suggested  that  there  is  a  linear  relationship  between  the  liquid  limit  and the remoulding energy necessary to induce movement, where a liquid limit less than 40  indicates  potential  for  retrogression,  and  a  liquid  limit  greater  than  40  indicates  reduced  likelihood of retrogression. In the case of the Halfway River Slide, the average liquid limit of  the  Lake  Peace  deposits  is  51%  suggesting  the  materials  are  not  prone  to  retrogression.  However, as the Lake Peace unit comprises two distinct materials, silt and clay, the average  liquid limit may only reflect the liquid limit of the clay and not the overall soil mass. The clay  interbeds  were  preferentially  sampled  and  there  is  little  soil  testing  information  available  with  which  to  characterize  the  silts.  Therefore,  it  is  possible  that  the  overall  layered  soil  mass does satisfy the criterion set by Tavenas (1983).    Lastly,  Cruden  and  Varnes  (1996)  suggest  that  the  liquidity  index  is  also  a  good  indicator of susceptibility to retrogression, indicating that clays at sites where retrogression  occurs generally have liquidity indices exceeding 1.5. The average liquidity index of the Lake  Peace samples is 0.17. However, these criteria were developed for sensitive clays and may  not suitably characterize the behaviour of a liquefiable silt.    143       9.6.3.5 Spreads  Spreads  in  liquefiable  deposits  often  occur  along  river  banks  and  result  from  the  extension and dislocation of a soil mass, above a liquefiable layer, which forms horsts and  grabens that subside into the underlying remoulded material (Locat et al., 2011).   As with multiple retrogressive slides, spreads are usually triggered by erosion at the  toe. However, the nature of the critical disturbance is highly unpredictable. Disturbance at  the  toe  generates  additional  shear  stresses  and  may  decrease  the  horizontal  force  sufficiently  to  trigger  instability.  As  movement  begins,  at  some  depth  the  solid  material  becomes  a  semi‐fluid  to  fluid  like  mass  and  begins  flowing  outward.  Once  initiated,  the  failure  surface  propagates  sub‐horizontally.  Locat  et  al  (2011),  suggests  that  the  failure  surface  does  not  form  continuously  over  the  full  extent  of  the  slide,  but  forms  incrementally.   As the instability propagates into the slope, the lateral earth pressure is reduced. If  this force becomes less than the active resistance during propagation, a graben may form  near  the  toe.  The  formation  of  a  graben  further  decreases  the  lateral  forces  on  the  remaining material, allowing a sequence of horsts and grabens to form. These blocks, with  their  base  at  the  failure  surface,  can  slide  apart  without  any  appreciable  deformation,  leading to the complete dislocation of the soil mass (Locat et al., 2011). Retrogression stops  when the subsidence of a graben is not sufficient to leave an unstable scarp. The process of  spreading, as described by Locat et al. (2011), is illustrated in Figure 9.9.    144        Figure 9.9     Schematic of a spread (based on Locat et al., 2011).      Both  flow  slides,  and  spreads  can  occur  within  liquefiable  deposits.  During  a  spreading  failure,  the  soil  mass  dislocates  into  a  series  of  horsts  and  grabens,  whereas  during  a  flow  slide  the  soil  structure  is  completely  destroyed.  In  order  for  horsts  and  grabens  to  form,  a  cohesive  element,  such  as  a  desiccated  crust,  must  be  present.  In  the  case  of  the  Halfway  River  Slide,  there  is  no  evidence  of  a  desiccated  crust.  Also,  the  significant material depletion in the source zone, and the lack of apparent horst and graben  blocks within the debris suggest that a flow slide is the most likely failure mechanism. Unlike  the  Attachie  Slide  where  the  flow‐like  behaviour  is  attributed  to  ‘macroscopic  brittleness’  where  remoulded  liquefiable  material  separated  blocks  of  cohesive  soil,  there  is  no  evidence  for  cohesive  blocks  at  the  Halfway  River  slide  and  the  flow  is  attributed  to  liquefaction of the insitu materials.       145        10.0 The Cache Creek Slide  10.1 Introduction  The Cache Creek Slide is located on the north bank of the Peace River, approximately  25 km west of Fort St. John at UTM coordinates N 6238090 E 611922 (Figure 1.1). The shale  and sandstone slide is the largest known slide in the Peace River valley, with an estimated  volume  of  108  million  m3.  The  age  of  the  slide  is  unknown,  however  anecdotal  evidence  suggests  that  a  major  movement  of  the  slide  may  have  occurred  in  the  late  1700s  (BC  Hydro,  1981a).  Reports from  locals also  suggest  that  substantial  movement  of  debris  may  have  occurred  in  the  early  1900s  (Thurber,  1978).  Thurber  also  noted  the  presence  of  multiple sharply defined grabens, in the debris mid‐slope, containing trees all less than 50  years old. Radiocarbon dating of a wood sample recovered from a drillhole downstream of  the main slide (DH51‐11) suggested an age range of 1790‐1950 (BC Hydro, 1981b). The slide  is defined by a prominent main scarp approximately 1500 m long and 120 m high, which is  clearly visible in aerial photographs (Figure 10.1) and LiDAR data.   The  Cache  Creek  Slide  has  been  investigated  by  Thurber  Consultants  Ltd.  (1978,  1981a,  1981b),  BC  Hydro  (1981a,  1981b)  and  McKane  (2004).  In  1977,  six  drillholes  were  completed  by  BC  Hydro.  Five  standpipe  piezometers  and  two  inclinometers  were  also  installed. In 1980 an additional five drillholes were completed and a further three standpipe  piezometers, four pneumatic piezometers and three inclinometers were installed. Ongoing  instrumentation  monitoring  has  been  completed  by  BC  Hydro  in  1985,  1990,  1993,  1995  and 1996, and by Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd. and SNC Lavalin in 2008.   The following discussion describes the geological conditions at the site, the landslide  geometry and geomorphology, slide volume, groundwater conditions, slope movement and  the slide failure mechanism. The Cache Creek Slide area consists of two distinct failures: a  large,  more  recent  upstream  slide,  and  an  older,  smaller  downstream  slide  (Figure  10.1).  Discussion  is  primarily  focused  on  the  more  recent,  large,  upstream  slide,  although  site   146       investigation work has also been completed on the downstream slide, which likely exploited  a similar failure mechanism to the adjacent upstream slide.    147            Figure 10.1     2007 aerial photograph of the Cache Creek Slide (Copyright © BC Hydro, 2007, by permission)  overlain on a 1997 aerial photograph. The upstream and downstream areas of the slide are outlined.  (Airphoto BCC97159‐288, 2007, Copyright © Province of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Reprinted  with permission of the Province of British Columbia. www.ipp.gov.bc.ca)   148        10.2 Detailed Stratigraphy  Eight drillholes are located on the main (upstream) slide mass, four near the toe and  four  mid‐slope.  An  additional  three  drillholes  are  located  on  the  downstream  slide  mass.  Drillhole  logs,  in  addition  to  stratigraphic  descriptions  provided  by  Hartman  (2005)  and  McKane  (2004),  provide  a  basis  for  describing  the  local  geology.  Drillhole  locations  are  marked on Figure 10.3. The drillhole log for DH51‐10 is included in Appendix C.  The  stratigraphy  at  the  Cache  Creek  Slide  is  unique  from  that  observed  at  the  Attachie  Slide,  Halfway  River  Slide  and  Moberly  Slide,  as  the  site  is  located  along  a  reach  where  the  Peace  River  has  eroded  through  the  Cretaceous  shale  and  sandstone  bedrock,  unaffected  by  either  of  the  two  paleovalleys  that  occur  in  the  area  (Section  4.3).  This  process  created  steep  and  high  rock  slopes  which  have  been  actively  failing  since  valley  down cutting approximately 10 000 years ago.   The  Cache  Creek  Slide  is  underlain  by  the  Shaftesbury  Shale  with  a  maximum  elevation of 664 m at the slope crest. All 11 drillholes intersect the shale, which is silty, dark  grey, moderately hard and horizontally bedded (BC Hydro, 1981a). At the Cache Creek Slide,  thick (> 10 m) layers of pyritic shale, siltstone and shale are interbedded. The shale contains  numerous clay seams and ash layers throughout, with a coal lamination at El. 643 m. Pyritic  nodules and stringers are also common, as well as calcareous layers ranging from marl to  limestone. Joints are generally planar, vertical or near vertical and smooth with occasional  crushed rock infill. Low angled, down‐dip slickensided surfaces were noted at El. 610 m and  El. 534 m. Major discontinuities that are commonly present in shale throughout the valley,  such as bedding plane shears, cross cutting shears and relaxation joints, are presumed to be  also  present  at  the  Cache  Creek  Slide.  A  full  description  of  the  Shaftesbury  Shale  and  its  discontinuities is included in Section 4.0.   The upper marl marker unit was encountered at El. 580 m, a white clay marker unit  (BP  8)  at  El.  467  m  and  a  blue‐grey  marker  unit  at  El.  448  m.  A  2  cm  thick  pebble   149       conglomerate  layer  was  encountered  at  El.  656  m.  These  marker  units  can  be  correlated  with  marker  units  encountered  at  the  Tea  Creek  Slide  and  the  Moberly  Slide,  and  are  described in detail in Section 11.2.2. The position and attitude of the marker units can be  used to identify intact rock strata.   The  shale  is  overlain  by  Dunvegan  Sandstone  approximately  180  m  thick.  No  drillholes intersected the Dunvegan Sandstone, which outcrops along the main slide scarp.  Stott  (1982)  describes  the  Dunvegan  Formation  as  a  massive,  Upper  Cretaceous  fluvial/deltaic  sandstone  or  conglomerate  interbedded  with  shale.  Thurber  (1981a)  notes  that  the  exposed  sandstone  appears  to  have  a  few  massive  beds  but  is  generally  thinly  bedded,  blocky  and  weak.  The  sandstone  is  less  prone  to  weathering  than  the  underlying  marine shale. A photo of a displaced block of Dunvegan Sandstone is shown in Figure 10.2.  Bedding and cross bedding suggesting marine or lacustrine origin are clearly visible.      Figure 10.2     Photograph of a displaced block of Dunvegan Sandstone (Copyright © McKane, 2004, by  permission).   On the plateau above the valley slope, the sandstone is overlain by a discontinuous  layer of unconsolidated glacial till approximately 15 m thick.    150       A schematic cross section through the centre of the Cache Creek Slide is included in  Figure 10.4. The section location is marked on Figure 10.3.   151        10.3 Landslide Geometry and Geomorphology   Air  photos,  LiDAR  imagery,  drillhole  logs  and  observations  from  site  visits  provide  the  basis  for  describing  the  geometry  and  geomorphology  of  the  Cache  Creek  Slide.  This  slide was previously described by Thurber (1978) on behalf of BC Hydro, but only a limited  description of site geomorphology was included. The slide was further described by McKane  (2004). The availability of LiDAR data allows for a new and more detailed interpretation of  slide geometry and geomorphology.   10.3.1 Slide Geometry  The  Cache  Creek  Slide  is  a  bedrock  landslide  with  a  prominent  main  scarp  and  multiple significant secondary scarps. The main scarp has a maximum elevation of 860 m at  the crest. The slope then descends in a series of scarps and terraces to the river at El. 420  m.  Slide  debris  covers  the  slope  from  the  base  of  the  main  scarp  to  the  river,  where  it  is  being  actively  eroded.  The  actual  distal  extent  of  the  debris  is  unknown.  Some  reports  indicate that the slide debris did not reach the opposite bank, however, conflicting reports  suggest that debris did reach the opposite bank. Assuming that the slide debris ends at the  river bank, the slide has a fahrböschung of 15.1°. The travel angle, related to the centre of  mass,  was  not  calculated  as  the  centre  of  mass  of  the  debris  cannot  be  accurately  determined.   The western flank of the slide is well defined by a prominent side scarp. There is an  older,  shallower  slide  which  abuts  the  western  flank  of  the  Cache  Creek  Slide;  smooth  topographic  features  suggest  this  slide  is  much  older  than  the  Cache  Creek  Slide.  Debris  from the Cache Creek Slide appears to have deflected around the debris deposited by this  slide and the boundary between older and younger slide debris is clearly visible in the LiDAR  data.  The  eastern  flank  is  much  less  well  defined.  The  Cache  Creek  Slide  deposit  has  an  average  width  of  1170  m  at  its  narrowest  point  mid‐slope.  The  deposit  then  widens  to  a  maximum width of 1660 m at the river bank.    152       A summary of major landslide dimensions is shown in Table 10.1. These dimensions  are based on the IAEG system discussed in Section 6.2.    153              Figure 10.3     LiDAR image of the Cache Creek Slide. Major geological features, and cross section location marked. (LiDAR image courtesy of BC Hydro, 2007,  Copyright © Airborne Imaging, 2007, adapted by permission)  154        Cross Section through the Cache Creek Slide          Figure 10.4     Cross section through the Cache Creek Slide. See Figure 10.3 for location.                      155        Table 10.1     Cache Creek Slide dimensions (based on IAEG, 1990).   Number    Average Dimension   Value (m)   1   Width of displaced mass (WD)   1120   2   Width of rupture surface (WR)   1490   3   Total Length (L)   1760   4   Length of displaced mass (LD)   1540   5   Length of rupture surface (LR)   730   6   Depth of displaced mass (DD)   1‐140   7   Depth of rupture surface (DR)   81   10.3.2 Detailed Bedrock Topography  At the Cache Creek Slide, the bedrock topography consists of a main scarp, an upper  terrace, a mid‐slope scarp and a lower terrace. The main scarp has a convex profile due to  differential  erosion  of  the  bedrock.  At  the  centre,  the  scarp  is  approximately  160  m  high,  whereas  at  the  flanks  the  scarp  is  approximately  120  m  high,  reflecting  a  local  rise  in  the  bedrock  topography.  This  bedrock  rise  can  be  seen  in  the  LiDAR.  The  slope  angle  of  the  main  scarp  varies  from  45°  to  near  vertical  and  appears  to  be  particularly  steep  near  the  base. Sandstone of the Dunvegan Formation is exposed at the face, and a thin veneer of till  is  visible  at  the  crest.  The  crown  area  consists  of  flat  lying  pasture  with  few  trees.  No  tension  cracks  are  visible  in  the  crown.  The  height  and  angle  of  the  scarp  are  likely  controlled by the properties of the sandstone which varies from massive to thinly bedded  (Figure  10.5  and  Figure  10.6).  Clearly  defined  bedding  planes  are  visible  in  both  the  air  photos  and  LiDAR  data,  and  the  sandstone  appears  to  be  laterally  homogeneous.  Gullies  drain  water  from  the  crest  over  the  scarp  face,  and  although  no  water  is  visibly  seeping  from  the  slope  face,  vegetated  zones  near  the  top  of  the  scarp  suggest  some  water  is  present.    156           Figure 10.5     Photograph of the main scarp of the Cache Creek Slide. Dunvegan Sandstone is visible at the  face. The slope is near vertical (Copyright © McKane, 2004, by permission).     Figure 10.6     Photograph of Dunvegan shale at the main scarp, standing in a vertical face. Vertical  relaxation joints visible. (Copyright © McKane, 2004, by permission).   157       The back scarp descends from El. 860 m to El. 610 m where it intersects a mid‐slope  terrace. This terrace has an area of 733 540 m2 and an average gradient of 2°. Drillhole 51‐9  indicates that this terrace is formed in intact shale. The top of the terrace may be coincident  with  the  failure  surface.  Circular  tension  cracks  are  visible  at  the  downslope  edge  of  the  terrace indicating ongoing retrogressive failures. Small ponds are also visible at the centre  of the slide near the downslope edge. With a width of 570 m, and a length of 150 m, this  terrace forms the crown of an intact bedrock promontory at the centre of the slide mass.  This  feature  may  be  a  remnant  of  older  adjacent  bedrock  failures  upstream  and  downstream,  or  it  may  have  been  created  during  valley  downcutting.  A  similar  feature  is  visible at the Tea Creek Slide (Section 11.3).  Immediately downslope of the bedrock terrace is a prominent mid‐slope shale scarp  which is approximately 100 m high and has gradient of 35°. Multiple drainage gullies have  formed  at  the  face  of  the  scarp,  draining  water  from  the  overlying  ponds.  Aerial  photographs  show  a  marked  lack  of  vegetation  on  the  slope  face,  and  small  sloughs  and  earth flows deposits are also visible. This scarp appears to be one of the most active areas  of the slide. The scarp descends from El. 610 m to El. 510 m where it is covered by debris.  10.3.3 Distribution of Slide Debris  Slide  debris  is  deposited  in  two  areas:  on  the  mid‐slope  shale  terrace  at  El.  610  m  and from the base of the mid‐slope shale scarp at El. 510 m down to river level at El. 420 m  (Figure 10.4). The shale terrace is overlain with debris consisting of a well‐graded mixture of  sand,  silt  and  clay  containing  sandstone  boulders  up  to  5  m  in  diameter  (McKane,  2004).  Near the back scarp the debris is approximately 90 m thick and at the crest of the mid‐slope  shale scarp, 500 m from the back scarp, the debris is approxima