Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Investigating the divergence of reproductive ecotypes in Kokanee salmon 2012

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubc_2012_fall_frazer_karen.pdf
ubc_2012_fall_frazer_karen.pdf [ 4.76MB ]
ubc_2012_fall_frazer_karen.pdf
Metadata
JSON: 1.0072941.json
JSON-LD: 1.0072941+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0072941.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0072941+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0072941+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0072941+rdf-ntriples.txt
Citation
1.0072941.ris

Full Text

	
  INVESTIGATING	
  THE	
  DIVERGENCE	
  OF	
  REPRODUCTIVE	
  ECOTYPES	
  IN	
  KOKANEE	
  SALMON	
  	
   	
   by	
   Karen	
  Kiyomi	
  Frazer	
   B.Sc.,	
  Dalhousie	
  University,	
  2009	
   	
   A	
  THESIS	
  SUBMITTED	
  IN	
  PARTIAL	
  FULFILLMENT	
  OF	
  	
  THE	
  REQUIREMENTS	
  FOR	
  THE	
  DEGREE	
  OF	
   MASTER	
  OF	
  SCIENCE	
   in	
   The	
  College	
  of	
  Graduate	
  Studies	
   (Biology)	
   	
   THE	
  UNIVERSITY	
  OF	
  BRITISH	
  COLUMBIA	
  	
  (Okanagan)	
   June	
  2012	
   	
   ©	
  Karen	
  Kiyomi	
  Frazer,	
  2012	
   	
  	
  	
   ii	
   ABSTRACT	
   Investigating	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  in	
  driving	
  adaptive	
  diversification	
  has	
  become	
  a	
  central	
  theme	
  in	
  evolutionary	
  ecology	
  as	
  advancements	
  in	
  genome	
  typing	
  technologies	
  provide	
  new	
  approaches	
  for	
  identifying	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  phenotypic	
  diversity	
  in	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms.	
  	
  I	
  used	
  population-­‐based	
  genome	
  scans	
  to	
  investigate	
  the	
  recent	
  divergence	
  of	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  kokanee	
  salmon	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka).	
  	
  These	
  ecotypes	
  co-­‐exist	
  in	
  many	
  post-­‐glacial	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  their	
  range,	
  and	
  exhibit	
  distinct	
  reproductive	
  behaviors,	
  spawning	
  habitat	
  preference,	
  and	
  life	
  history	
  traits.	
  	
  Several	
  algorithms	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  test	
  for	
  statistical	
  outliers	
  across	
  five	
  replicate	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  of	
  kokanee	
  salmon.	
  	
  Among	
  50	
  expressed	
  sequence	
  tag	
  (EST)-­‐linked	
  and	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  loci,	
  signatures	
  of	
  directional	
  selection	
  were	
  observed	
  at	
  15	
  loci,	
  including	
  four	
  loci	
  that	
  exhibited	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  across	
  two	
  or	
  more	
  lakes.	
  	
  The	
  inconsistency	
  of	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  suggests	
  that	
  either	
  several	
  different	
  genes	
  or	
  genetic	
  pathways	
  underlie	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  or	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  methods	
  are	
  prone	
  to	
  Type	
  II	
  error	
  when	
  selection	
  is	
  weak.	
  	
  Nonetheless,	
  population	
  structure	
  and	
  differentiation	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  is	
  distinct	
  from	
  that	
  of	
  neutral	
  loci,	
  which	
  infers	
  that	
  outliers	
  may	
  be	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  Annotations	
  of	
  EST-­‐linked	
  outliers	
  suggest	
  that	
  energy	
  metabolism	
  and	
  pathogen	
  resistance	
  may	
  be	
  involved	
  in	
  initiating	
  and	
  maintaining	
  barriers	
  to	
  gene	
  flow	
  between	
  these	
  two	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes.	
   Within	
  a	
  kokanee	
  fisheries	
  management	
  context,	
  markers	
  associated	
  with	
  adaptive	
  genetic	
  variation	
  would	
  be	
  very	
  useful	
  since	
  neutral	
  microsatellite	
  markers	
  cannot	
  distinguish	
  these	
  recently	
  diverged	
  ecotypes	
  (<10,000	
  years).	
  	
  Currently,	
  the	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  cannot	
  be	
  determined	
  using	
  conventional	
  methods	
  and	
  ecotypes	
  cannot	
  be	
  determined	
  for	
  angled	
  fish	
  to	
  estimate	
  ecotype-­‐specific	
  harvest	
  rates.	
  	
  Here,	
  I	
  assess	
  the	
  accuracy	
  and	
  power	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  in	
  distinguishing	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  using	
  mixed	
  stock	
  analyses	
  and	
  individual	
  assignment	
  tests.	
  	
  In	
  general,	
  outlier	
  loci	
  outperform	
  neutral	
  loci	
  and	
  simulations	
  suggest	
  that	
  management-­‐relevant	
  levels	
  of	
  accuracy	
  (>90%)	
  may	
  be	
  achieved	
  with	
  sufficient	
  baseline	
  sampling	
  and	
  ecotype	
  differentiation.	
  	
  Thus,	
  genome	
  scans	
  can	
  be	
  useful	
  in	
  identifying	
  informative	
  markers	
  for	
  recently	
  diverged	
  stocks.	
   	
  	
  	
   iii	
   PREFACE	
   Multiple	
  individuals	
  have	
  contributed	
  to	
  Chapter	
  2	
  and	
  3	
  of	
  this	
  thesis.	
  	
  Manuscript	
  versions	
  of	
  these	
  two	
  chapters	
  will	
  be	
  co-­‐authored	
  when	
  submitted	
  for	
  publication.	
  	
  My	
  contribution	
  to	
  the	
  identification	
  and	
  design	
  of	
  this	
  research	
  is	
  shared	
  with	
  my	
  co-­‐authors.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  taken	
  lead	
  responsibility	
  for	
  performing	
  the	
  research,	
  data	
  collection,	
  data	
  analysis,	
  and	
  manuscript	
  preparation.	
   Some	
  data	
  from	
  Chapter	
  2	
  was	
  included	
  in	
  a	
  research	
  article	
  published	
  in	
  Evolutionary	
  Applications:	
  	
   -­‐	
  Russello,	
  MA,	
  Kirk,	
  S,	
  Frazer,	
  KK,	
  and	
  Askey,	
  P	
  (2012)	
  Detection	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  and	
  their	
  utility	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  for	
  fisheries	
  management.	
  Evolutionary	
  Applications	
  5:39-­‐52.	
   I	
  collected	
  a	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  data	
  and	
  provided	
  comments	
  on	
  the	
  manuscript.	
  	
  Michael	
  Russello	
  and	
  Stephanie	
  Kirk	
  designed	
  the	
  study,	
  collected	
  data,	
  analyzed	
  the	
  data	
  and	
  wrote	
  the	
  manuscript.	
  	
  Paul	
  Askey	
  facilitated	
  sample	
  collection	
  and	
  also	
  provided	
  comments	
  on	
  the	
  manuscript.	
   The	
  data	
  presented	
  in	
  this	
  thesis	
  were	
  collected	
  from	
  fish	
  sampled	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  animal	
  care	
  protocol	
  of	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Research	
  Ethics	
  Board	
  (#	
  A07-­‐0088	
  and	
  #	
  A11-­‐0127)	
  and	
  a	
  fish	
  collection	
  permit	
  (#	
  SM10-­‐66091)	
  issued	
  by	
  the	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment	
  of	
  the	
  Province	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia.	
   	
  	
  	
   iv	
   TABLE	
  OF	
  CONTENTS	
   ABSTRACT ........................................................................................................................................................... ii	
   PREFACE..............................................................................................................................................................iii	
   TABLE	
  OF	
  CONTENTS...................................................................................................................................... iv	
   LIST	
  OF	
  TABLES ...............................................................................................................................................vii	
   LIST	
  OF	
  FIGURES............................................................................................................................................... ix	
   ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ................................................................................................................................... x	
   DEDICATION ...................................................................................................................................................... xi	
   CHAPTER	
  1.0	
  	
  GENERAL	
  INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 1	
  1.1	
  	
  The	
  study	
  of	
  adaptation.........................................................................................................................................1	
  1.1.1	
  	
  Natural	
  selection	
  vs	
  neutral	
  evolution:	
  a	
  classical	
  debate................................................ 1	
  1.1.2	
  	
  Testing	
  for	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  selection	
  in	
  initiating	
  population	
  divergence........................... 3	
  1.2	
  	
  Population	
  genomics ..............................................................................................................................................3	
  1.3	
  Post-­‐glacial	
  fishes	
  for	
  studying	
  evolutionary	
  processes ..........................................................................5	
  1.3.1	
  	
  Recent	
  glacial	
  history	
  of	
  North	
  America	
  and	
  its	
  consequences...................................... 5	
  1.3.2	
  	
  Studying	
  evolution	
  in	
  salmonids.................................................................................................. 6	
  1.3.3	
  	
  Common	
  patterns	
  of	
  phenotypic	
  divergence ......................................................................... 7	
  1.4	
  	
  Study	
  system:	
  kokanee	
  salmon..........................................................................................................................8	
  1.4.1	
  	
  The	
  origin	
  of	
  non-­‐anadromous	
  Oncorhynchus	
  nerkids ...................................................... 8	
  1.4.2	
  	
  Current	
  distribution .......................................................................................................................... 9	
  1.4.3	
  	
  	
  Two	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  kokanee	
  salmon .................................................................. 9	
  1.4.3.1	
  	
  Morphology,	
  life	
  history	
  and	
  behavioural	
  differences ....................................9	
  1.4.3.2	
  	
  Genetic	
  differentiation	
  of	
  ecotypes.......................................................................11	
  1.4.3.3	
  	
  Habitat	
  differences ......................................................................................................12	
  1.4.3.4	
  	
  Population	
  declines	
  and	
  recovery	
  objectives...................................................13	
  1.5	
  	
  A	
  genetics-­‐based	
  approach	
  for	
  managing	
  recently	
  diverged	
  stocks...............................................14	
  1.6	
  	
  Thesis	
  objectives ...................................................................................................................................................15	
   CHAPTER	
  2.0	
  	
  INVESTIGATING	
  THE	
  GENETIC	
  BASIS	
  OF	
  ECOTYPE	
  DIVERGENCE	
  IN	
   KOKANEE	
  SALMON	
  ACROSS	
  MULTIPLE	
  LAKES .......................................................................16	
  2.1	
  	
  Background..............................................................................................................................................................16	
   	
  	
  	
   v	
   2.2	
  	
  Methods.....................................................................................................................................................................20	
  2.2.1	
  	
  Study	
  sites........................................................................................................................................... 20	
  2.2.2	
  	
  Site	
  selection	
  &	
  sample	
  collection ............................................................................................ 22	
  2.2.3	
  	
  Data	
  collection................................................................................................................................... 23	
  2.2.4	
  	
  Data	
  quality	
  and	
  definition	
  of	
  genetic	
  units ......................................................................... 24	
  2.2.5	
  	
  Outlier	
  locus	
  detection	
  and	
  annotation.................................................................................. 25	
  2.2.6	
  	
  Population	
  genetic	
  analyses........................................................................................................ 28	
  2.3	
  	
  Results........................................................................................................................................................................30	
  2.3.1	
  	
  Data	
  quality ........................................................................................................................................ 30	
  2.3.2	
  	
  Outlier	
  locus	
  detection	
  and	
  dataset	
  definition.................................................................... 33	
  2.3.3	
  	
  Neutral	
  and	
  adaptive	
  population	
  divergence...................................................................... 35	
  2.3.4	
  	
  Putative	
  functional	
  annotations	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci ................................................................... 39	
  2.4	
  	
  Discussion.................................................................................................................................................................41	
  2.4.1	
  	
  Evidence	
  of	
  parallel	
  patterns...................................................................................................... 43	
  2.4.2	
  	
  Outlier	
  locus	
  detection .................................................................................................................. 44	
  2.4.3	
  	
  Testing	
  for	
  a	
  unique	
  signal	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci.............................................................................. 45	
  2.4.4	
  	
  Traits	
  putatively	
  under	
  selection.............................................................................................. 46	
  2.5	
  	
  Summary...................................................................................................................................................................48	
   CHAPTER	
  3.0	
  	
  A	
  GENOME-­SCAN	
  APPROACH	
  FOR	
  IDENTIFYING	
  INFORMATIVE	
  MARKERS	
   FOR	
  LANDSCAPE-­LEVEL	
  FRESHWATER	
  FISHERIES ...............................................................49	
  3.1	
  	
  Background..............................................................................................................................................................49	
  3.2	
  	
  Methods.....................................................................................................................................................................52	
  3.2.1	
  	
  Data	
  collection	
  &	
  dataset	
  definition ........................................................................................ 52	
  3.2.2	
  	
  Individual	
  assignment	
  tests ........................................................................................................ 53	
  3.2.3	
  	
  Mixed	
  composition	
  analyses....................................................................................................... 53	
  3.3	
  	
  Results........................................................................................................................................................................54	
  3.3.1	
  	
  Individual	
  Assignment	
  Tests ...................................................................................................... 54	
  3.3.2	
  	
  Mixed	
  Stock	
  Analyses..................................................................................................................... 55	
  3.3.3	
  	
  100%	
  Simulations	
  using	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’............................................................................. 57	
  3.4	
  	
  Discussion.................................................................................................................................................................58	
  3.4.1.	
  	
  Power	
  and	
  accuracy	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  in	
  IA	
  and	
  MC	
  analyses ........................................... 59	
   	
  	
  	
   vi	
   3.4.2	
  	
  Bias	
  in	
  estimates	
  of	
  ecotype	
  proportions.............................................................................. 61	
  3.5	
  	
  Summary...................................................................................................................................................................62	
   CHAPTER	
  4.0	
  	
  GENERAL	
  CONCLUSIONS ...................................................................................................63	
  4.1	
  	
  Research	
  findings	
  and	
  significance ...............................................................................................................63	
  4.2	
  	
  Limitations	
  of	
  this	
  study ....................................................................................................................................66	
  4.3	
  	
  Future	
  work.............................................................................................................................................................67	
   REFERENCES .....................................................................................................................................................70	
   APPENDICES......................................................................................................................................................88	
  Appendix	
  A:	
  	
  Supplementary	
  Material	
  for	
  Chapter	
  2.....................................................................................88	
  Appendix	
  B:	
  	
  Supplementary	
  Material	
  for	
  Chapter	
  3.....................................................................................96	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   vii	
   LIST	
  OF	
  TABLES	
  	
   Table	
  1.1	
  	
  Physical	
  attributes	
  of	
  the	
  spawning	
  habitat	
  and	
  morphological,	
  life	
  history,	
  and	
  behavioural	
  attributes	
  of	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  British	
  Columbian	
  Lakes ..................................... 10	
   Table	
  2.1	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  population	
  genetic	
  parameters	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype	
  within	
  each	
  lake	
  using	
  all	
  50	
  loci .......................................................................................................................................................................... 33	
   Table	
  2.2	
  	
  Loci	
  detected	
  as	
  outliers	
  in	
  four	
  different	
  algorithms	
  (BAYESCAN/LOSITAN/DETSEL/lnRH)	
  are	
  identified	
  in	
  each	
  of	
  five	
  British	
  Columbian	
  Lakes........................................................................... 34	
   Table	
  2.3	
  	
  A	
  summary	
  of	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  loci	
  detected	
  as	
  statistical	
  outliers	
  by	
  each	
  of	
  four	
  algorithms,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  false	
  positive	
  detections	
  and	
  false	
  negative	
  detections	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  sensitivity	
  of	
  each	
  algorithm ........................................................................... 35	
   Table	
  2.4	
  	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  occurring	
  among	
  lakes	
  and	
  within	
  lakes	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  as	
  assessed	
  by	
  a	
  hierarchical	
  analysis	
  of	
  molecular	
  variance	
  (AMOVA)	
  at	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  all	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’............................................................................... 37	
   Table	
  2.5	
  	
  The	
  proportion	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  occurring	
  among	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  from	
  five	
  lakes	
  as	
  assessed	
  by	
  pair-­‐wise	
  FST	
  using	
  4	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  lake-­‐specific	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  lake,	
  and	
  15	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’........................................................................................................................................................ 38	
   Table	
  2.6	
  	
  A	
  description	
  of	
  the	
  gene	
  annotations	
  for	
  each	
  of	
  the	
  15	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  exhibiting	
  ‘true	
  outlier’	
  behaviour.................................................................................................................. 41	
   Table	
  A.1	
  	
  The	
  physical	
  and	
  biological	
  attributes	
  of	
  each	
  British	
  Columbian	
  Lake	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  study............................................................................................................................................................................. 88	
   Table	
  A.2	
  	
  Details	
  of	
  kokanee	
  tissue	
  sample	
  collection	
   .............................................................................................. 88	
   	
  	
  	
   viii	
   Table	
  A.3	
  	
  A	
  descriptive	
  summary	
  of	
  50	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  (42	
  EST-­‐linked	
  and	
  8	
  anonymous)	
  used	
  in	
  this	
  study.................................................................................................................................................... 89	
   Table	
  A.4	
  	
  Pair-­‐wise	
  FST	
  comparisons	
  among	
  sampling	
  sites	
  in	
  Duncan,	
  Kootenay,	
  Okanagan,	
  Tchesinkut	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lake,	
  using	
  eight	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  markers............................. 90	
   Table	
  A.5	
  	
  Pair-­‐wise	
  population	
  FST	
  values	
  for	
  all	
  lake-­‐ecotype	
  comparisons	
  using	
  the	
  15	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  and	
  the	
  4	
  ‘repeat-­‐outlier’	
  loci .................................................................................................................. 91	
   Table	
  A.6	
  	
  A	
  summary	
  of	
  the	
  sample	
  size,	
  allelic	
  richness,	
  observed	
  and	
  expected	
  heterozygosity,	
  and	
  fixation	
  index	
  for	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  from	
  five	
  British	
  Columbian	
  lakes	
  at	
  all	
  50	
  loci............................................................................................................................ 92	
   Table	
  B.1	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  from	
  mixed-­‐composition	
  analyses	
  conducted	
  in	
   ONCOR.	
  True	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  were	
  pre-­‐defined	
  ratios	
  and	
  the	
  residual	
  represents	
  the	
  difference	
  between	
  the	
  true	
  proportion	
  and	
  the	
  simulated	
  proportions	
  using	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outlier’	
  dataset ........................................................................................................................................ 96	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   ix	
   LIST	
  OF	
  FIGURES	
   Figure	
  1.1	
  	
  Photographs	
  of	
  a	
  deceased	
  female	
  and	
  male	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  found	
  along	
  the	
  shore	
  of	
  Sandners	
  Creek,	
  tributary	
  to	
  Christina	
  Lake,	
  BC............................................................. 11	
   Figure	
  2.1	
  	
  The	
  location	
  of	
  the	
  six	
  lakes	
  sampled	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada................................................ 21	
   Figure	
  2.2	
  	
  STRUCTURE	
  plots	
  depict	
  all	
  23	
  sampled	
  stocks	
  as	
  2	
  and	
  5	
  discrete	
  genetic	
  clusters	
  (K),	
  based	
  on	
  ∆K	
  estimates.......................................................................................................................................... 32	
   Figure	
  2.3	
  	
  A	
  discriminate	
  analysis	
  of	
  principal	
  components	
  (DAPC)	
  plot	
  depicting	
  the	
  relationships	
  among	
  individuals	
  from	
  each	
  ecotype	
  group	
  in	
  each	
  lake	
  based	
  on	
  genetic	
  similarity.	
  	
  Similarity	
  is	
  estimated	
  from	
  polymorphism	
  frequency	
  data	
  at	
  15	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  and	
  displayed	
  on	
  the	
  first	
  two	
  principal	
  components	
  (x-­‐	
  and	
  y-­‐axes) .................................. 36	
   Figure	
  2.4	
  	
  STUCTURE	
  plots	
  based	
  on	
  neutral	
  loci	
  and	
  lake-­‐specific	
  outliers	
  loci	
   ............................................. 39	
   Figure	
  3.1	
  	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  genotypes	
  accurately	
  assigned	
  to	
  the	
  ecotype	
  of	
  origin	
  as	
  assessed	
  in	
  individual	
  assignment	
  tests	
  using	
  the	
  realistic	
  fishery	
  simulation	
  approach	
  implemented	
  in	
  ONCOR.	
  	
  Mean	
  accuracy	
  is	
  shown	
  for	
  each	
  lake	
  and	
  all	
  five	
  datasets............ 55	
   Figure	
  3.2	
  	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  estimated	
  by	
  ONCOR	
  for	
  six	
  mixture	
  scenarios	
  with	
  pre-­‐defined	
  mixtures	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners.	
  	
  Estimates	
  for	
  all	
  scenarios	
  were	
  calculated	
  using	
  each	
  of	
  the	
  five	
  datasets.................................................................................................... 57	
   Figure	
  3.3	
  	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
  increasing	
  the	
  baseline	
  sample	
  size	
  for	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outlier’	
  dataset	
  on	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  mixed	
  stock	
  estimates	
  in	
  100%	
  simulations	
  implemented	
  in	
  ONCOR................... 58	
   	
  	
  	
   x	
   ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS	
   This	
  thesis	
  was	
  completed	
  under	
  the	
  supervision	
  of	
  Dr	
  Michael	
  Russello.	
  	
  I	
  thank	
  him	
  for	
  his	
  advice	
  and	
  guidance	
  over	
  the	
  last	
  two	
  and	
  a	
  half	
  years.	
  	
  For	
  their	
  contribution	
  on	
  previous	
  drafts	
  of	
  this	
  thesis,	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  my	
  other	
  committee	
  members,	
  Bob	
  Lalonde	
  and	
  Paul	
  Askey.	
  	
  I	
  thank	
  fellow	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  Conservation	
  Genomics	
  Laboratory,	
  Philippe	
  Henry	
  and	
  Matt	
  Lemay,	
  for	
  sharing	
  their	
  knowledge	
  of	
  population	
  genetics,	
  genomics	
  and	
  statistics.	
  	
  For	
  her	
  contributions	
  in	
  initiating	
  this	
  work,	
  I	
  thank	
  Stephanie	
  Kirk.	
  	
   I	
  thank	
  the	
  many	
  fishery	
  biologists	
  with	
  the	
  BC	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment	
  and	
  private	
  consultant	
  agencies	
  for	
  their	
  assistance	
  in	
  identifying	
  and	
  evaluating	
  lakes	
  for	
  inclusion	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  For	
  their	
  volunteered	
  assistance	
  in	
  acquiring	
  tissue	
  samples,	
  I	
  thank	
  the	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  Stewardship	
  Society,	
  Joe	
  DeGisi	
  (MOE),	
  Paul	
  Askey	
  (MOE),	
  Andy	
  Morris	
  (MOE),	
  Brian	
  Jantz	
  (MOE),	
  Matt	
  Lemay	
  (UBCO),	
  Dan	
  Rissling	
  (UBCO)	
  and	
  Matthew	
  Abbott.	
  	
  I	
  thank	
  Eric	
  Taylor	
  at	
  UBC	
  for	
  also	
  providing	
  samples	
  for	
  this	
  project.	
  	
  For	
  their	
  assistance	
  in	
  generating	
  genetic	
  data,	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  Christine	
  Braun,	
  Stephanie	
  Kirk,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  Mahsa	
  and	
  Michaela	
  at	
  Fragment	
  Analysis	
  and	
  DNA	
  Sequencing	
  Services	
  (FADSS).	
  	
  For	
  general	
  assistance	
  in	
  the	
  lab,	
  I	
  thank	
  Matt	
  Lemay,	
  Philippe	
  Henry,	
  Carolina	
  Mino	
  and	
  Yoamel	
  Milián-­‐García.	
  	
   This	
  research	
  was	
  funded	
  by	
  a	
  the	
  Canadian	
  Foundation	
  for	
  Innovation,	
  the	
  Habitat	
  Conservation	
  Trust	
  Fund	
  and	
  a	
  National	
  Science	
  and	
  Engineering	
  Research	
  Council	
  (NSERC)	
  discovery	
  grant	
  (#	
  341711-­‐07)	
  awarded	
  to	
  Michael	
  Russello.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  also	
  supported	
  in	
  part	
  by	
  University	
  of	
  BC	
  Graduate	
  Fellowships,	
  an	
  NSERC	
  Canada	
  Graduate	
  Scholarship	
  and	
  a	
  Pacific	
  Century	
  Scholarship.	
   Finally,	
  I	
  would	
  also	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  my	
  family	
  for	
  their	
  endless	
  support.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   xi	
   DEDICATION	
   To my parents. 	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   1	
   CHAPTER	
  1.0	
  	
  GENERAL	
  INTRODUCTION	
   1.1	
  	
  The	
  study	
  of	
  adaptation	
   1.1.1	
  	
  Natural	
  selection	
  vs	
  neutral	
  evolution:	
  a	
  classical	
  debate	
  	
   Understanding	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  in	
  generating	
  and	
  maintaining	
  biological	
  diversity	
  has	
  been	
  of	
  central	
  interest	
  to	
  evolutionary	
  biologists	
  since	
  Darwin’s	
  seminal	
  work	
  in	
  1859	
  (Darwin,	
  1859).	
  	
  According	
  to	
  his	
  theory	
  of	
  natural	
  selection,	
  if	
  traits	
  are	
  polymorphic	
  and	
  there	
  is	
  competition	
  for	
  resources,	
  individuals	
  will	
  experience	
  differential	
  survival.	
  	
  Groups	
  will	
  become	
  more	
  optimally	
  suited	
  to	
  their	
  niche	
  as	
  small,	
  continually	
  arising	
  variations	
  accumulate	
  due	
  to	
  selection,	
  causing	
  a	
  gradual	
  shift	
  in	
  traits.	
  	
  Eventually,	
  these	
  adaptive	
  differences	
  can	
  lead	
  to	
  speciation.	
  	
  Numerous	
  examples	
  of	
  artificial	
  selection	
  (e.g.	
  breeding	
  livestock),	
  specialized	
  morphological	
  traits	
  correlated	
  with	
  resources	
  use	
  (e.g.	
  mockingbirds	
  and	
  Darwin’s	
  finches	
  in	
  the	
  Galapagos	
  Islands;	
  Schluter,	
  2000)	
  and	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  of	
  phenotypic	
  traits	
  in	
  similar,	
  but	
  isolated,	
  environments	
  (Schluter	
  and	
  Conte,	
  2009)	
  supported	
  the	
  adaptationist	
  view,	
  thus	
  it	
  became	
  widely	
  accepted.	
  	
  	
   In	
  the	
  1930’s	
  and	
  1940’s,	
  the	
  significance	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  came	
  into	
  question.	
  	
  Based	
  on	
  principles	
  of	
  Mendelian	
  inheritance,	
  mathematical	
  models	
  of	
  evolutionary	
  processes	
  revealed	
  that	
  species	
  are	
  more	
  aptly	
  defined	
  as	
  reproductively	
  isolated	
  units	
  than	
  simply	
  groups	
  sharing	
  phenotypic	
  resemblance.	
  	
  Thus,	
  Mayr	
  proffered	
  the	
  Biological	
  Species	
  Concept	
  (1942),	
  which	
  describes	
  a	
  species	
  as	
  	
  a	
  groups	
  of	
  individuals	
  that	
  actually,	
  or	
  potentially,	
  interbreed	
  in	
  nature	
  to	
  produce	
  viable	
  offspring.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  speciation	
  should	
  be	
  focused	
  on	
  identifying	
  the	
  origin	
  and	
  nature	
  of	
  mechanisms	
  that	
  reinforce	
  reproductive	
  barriers	
  among	
  divergent	
  populations	
  (e.g.	
  positive	
  assortative	
  mating	
  caused	
  by	
  divergence	
  in	
  ecology,	
  behavior,	
  or	
  time	
  of	
  reproduction)	
  such	
  that	
  hybrids	
  exhibit	
  reduced	
  fitness	
  and,	
  eventually,	
  reduced	
  viability	
  and/or	
  sterility	
  (Coyne	
  and	
  Orr,	
  1998;	
  Dobzhansky,	
  1951;	
  Mayr,	
  1942).	
  	
  Classical	
  models	
  also	
  suggested	
  that	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  selective	
  deaths	
  (i.e.	
  genetic	
  load)	
  required	
  for	
  selection	
  to	
  initiate	
  species	
  divergence	
  in	
  the	
  face	
  of	
  genetic	
  recombination	
  and	
  ongoing	
  gene	
  flow	
  among	
  closely	
  related,	
  co-­‐existing	
  populations	
  (i.e.	
  sympatric	
   	
  	
  	
   2	
   speciation)	
  was	
  rarely	
  achievable	
  in	
  nature	
  (Haldane,	
  1949;	
  Kimura,	
  1995).	
  	
  Only	
  some	
  extrinsic,	
  physical	
  barrier	
  was	
  thought	
  to	
  be	
  capable	
  of	
  sundering	
  gene	
  flow	
  among	
  populations	
  (Felsenstein,	
  1981;	
  Johannesson,	
  2001;	
  Kondrashov,	
  1986;	
  Mayr,	
  1963).	
  	
  According	
  to	
  neutral	
  (Kimura,	
  1983),	
  or	
  nearly	
  neutral	
  (Ohta,	
  1973),	
  theory,	
  evolutionary	
  change	
  (i.e.	
  shifts	
  in	
  population	
  allele	
  frequencies)	
  occurs	
  over	
  long	
  periods	
  of	
  time	
  through	
  the	
  fixation	
  of	
  mutant	
  alleles	
  by	
  random	
  genetic	
  drift,	
  which	
  have	
  little	
  or	
  no	
  effect	
  on	
  the	
  individuals	
  fitness,	
  particularly	
  through	
  founder	
  events	
  and	
  population	
  bottlenecks.	
  	
  Thus,	
  neutral	
  evolution	
  in	
  allopatric	
  populations	
  became	
  widely	
  accepted	
  as	
  the	
  dominant	
  mode	
  of	
  speciation	
  in	
  nature	
  because	
  it	
  provided	
  the	
  most	
  parsimonious	
  explanation	
  for	
  observed	
  patterns	
  in	
  biological	
  diversity	
  at	
  the	
  time	
  (Coyne	
  and	
  Orr,	
  2004;	
  Provine,	
  1971).	
  	
  	
  However,	
  empirical	
  support	
  for	
  this	
  was	
  lacking.	
  	
  Several	
  isolating	
  mechanisms	
  can	
  arise	
  simultaneously	
  when	
  populations	
  diverge	
  in	
  allopatry,	
  which	
  makes	
  it	
  impossible	
  to	
  disentangle	
  the	
  roles	
  of	
  selection	
  and	
  neutral	
  evolution	
  in	
  initiating	
  and	
  maintaining	
  reproductive	
  barriers.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  little	
  progress	
  was	
  made	
  in	
  assessing	
  the	
  relative	
  merits	
  of	
  these	
  two	
  theories	
  because	
  evolutionary	
  biologists	
  were	
  faced	
  with	
  untestable	
  predictions	
  about	
  a	
  process	
  that	
  they	
  believed	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  witnessed	
  within	
  a	
  lifetime	
  (Hendry,	
  2009).	
  	
   More	
  recently,	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  assumptions	
  underlying	
  the	
  allopatric	
  paradigm	
  have	
  been	
  overturned.	
  	
  Empirical	
  and	
  theoretical	
  studies	
  demonstrate	
  that	
  evolution	
  can	
  occur	
  rapidly	
  (i.e.	
  on	
  ecological	
  time-­‐scales;	
  Reznick	
  and	
  Ghalambor,	
  2005)	
  and	
  in	
  large	
  populations	
  as	
  long	
  as	
  they	
  possess	
  ample	
  genetic	
  variation	
  and	
  selection	
  is	
  strong	
  (Hendry	
  and	
  Kinnison,	
  1999;	
  Kinnison	
  and	
  Hendry,	
  2001;	
  Reznick	
  and	
  Ghalambor,	
  2001;	
  Stockwell	
  and	
  Weeks,	
  1999).	
  	
  Also,	
  ‘divergence-­‐with-­‐gene-­‐flow’	
  (Rice	
  and	
  Hostert,	
  1993)	
  is	
  now	
  supported	
  by	
  strong	
  theoretical	
  models	
  (Dieckmann	
  and	
  Doebeli,	
  1999;	
  Kondrashov	
  and	
  Kondrashov,	
  1999)	
  and	
  empirical	
  studies	
  (Huber	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Jiggins,	
  2008;	
  Ogden	
  and	
  Thorpe,	
  2002;	
  Quesada	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Schliewen	
  et	
  al.,	
  1994).	
  	
  Together,	
  this	
  suggests	
  that	
  natural	
  selection	
  could	
  have	
  a	
  major	
  role	
  in	
  generating	
  reproductive	
  barriers,	
  which	
  has	
  renewed	
  interest	
  in	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  adaptive	
  speciation.	
   	
  	
  	
   3	
   1.1.2	
  	
  Testing	
  for	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  selection	
  in	
  initiating	
  population	
  divergence	
   Historically,	
  studies	
  focused	
  on	
  phenotypic	
  divergence	
  after	
  speciation	
  had	
  already	
  taken	
  place.	
  	
  Many	
  claimed	
  to	
  exemplify	
  environment-­‐driven	
  speciation	
  (termed	
  ecological	
  speciation),	
  but	
  rarely	
  provided	
  robust	
  evidence	
  (Hendry,	
  2009).	
  	
  Studies	
  demonstrated	
  strong	
  correlations	
  between	
  distinct	
  phenotypes	
  and	
  resource	
  use,	
  but	
  no	
  evidence	
  suggested	
  that	
  these	
  phenotypes	
  were	
  involved	
  in	
  generating	
  reproductive	
  isolation.	
  	
  The	
  assumption	
  that	
  extant	
  phenotypic	
  traits	
  are	
  adaptated	
  for	
  their	
  contemporary	
  purpose	
  is	
  often	
  incorrect	
  (Gould	
  and	
  Lewontin,	
  1979).	
  	
  Other	
  studies	
  demonstrated	
  the	
  inability	
  of	
  closely	
  related	
  yet	
  ecologically	
  distinct	
  species	
  to	
  interbreed,	
  but	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  evidence	
  that	
  adaptation	
  was	
  the	
  cause.	
  	
  Neutral	
  forces	
  (e.g.	
  founder	
  effects)	
  could	
  have	
  initiated	
  divergence	
  and	
  phenotypic	
  disparities	
  corresponding	
  to	
  resource	
  use	
  evolved	
  secondarily	
  (Via,	
  2009).	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  non-­‐adaptive	
  structures	
  can	
  arise	
  through	
  a	
  developmental	
  correlation	
  with	
  selected	
  features	
  (e.g.	
  pleiotropy,	
  material	
  compensation,	
  mechanically	
  forces	
  correlation	
  or	
  allometry;	
  Gould	
  and	
  Lewontin,	
  1979).	
  	
  To	
  provide	
  robust	
  inferences	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  in	
  driving	
  population	
  divergence,	
  and	
  potentially	
  speciation,	
  it	
  is	
  necessary	
  to	
  link	
  early	
  stages	
  of	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  with	
  divergent	
  phenotypic	
  traits	
  at	
  the	
  genetic	
  level	
  (Barrett	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2011).	
  	
  Only	
  with	
  recent	
  advancements	
  in	
  genome-­‐typing	
  technology	
  has	
  it	
  become	
  feasible	
  to	
  investigate	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  in	
  natural	
  populations	
  in	
  situ.	
  	
   1.2	
  	
  Population	
  genomics	
  	
   Population	
  genomics	
  employs	
  traditional	
  population	
  genetic	
  approaches,	
  but	
  uses	
  increasingly	
  efficient	
  and	
  cost-­‐effective	
  genotyping	
  technologies	
  to	
  achieve	
  genome-­‐wide	
  sampling	
  (i.e.	
  often	
  thousands	
  of	
  loci;	
  Luikart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  This	
  approach	
  explicitly	
  acknowledges	
  that	
  neutral	
  evolutionary	
  processes	
  (e.g.	
  genetic	
  drift,	
  gene	
  flow,	
  and	
  mutation)	
  influences	
  the	
  entire	
  genome	
  while	
  natural	
  selection	
  only	
  has	
  locus-­‐specific	
  effects.	
  	
  Using	
  a	
  genome	
  scan	
  approach,	
  neutrality	
  tests	
  are	
  used	
  to	
  screen	
  large	
  numbers	
  of	
  loci	
  and	
  identify	
  statistical	
  outliers	
  (i.e.	
  loci	
  that	
  do	
  not	
  conform	
  to	
  expectations	
  under	
  a	
  neutral	
  model	
  of	
  evolution)	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  truly	
  neutral	
  loci	
  can	
  be	
  segregated	
  from	
   	
  	
  	
   4	
   loci	
  putatively	
  under	
  selection	
  (i.e.	
  outlier	
  loci;	
  Antao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Black	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001;	
  Storz,	
  2005).	
  	
  Since	
  the	
  inclusion	
  of	
  loci	
  under	
  selection	
  would	
  bias	
  allele	
  frequency	
  distributions	
  in	
  neutral	
  datasets,	
  the	
  elimination	
  of	
  outliers	
  allows	
  for	
  more	
  accurate	
  estimates	
  of	
  population	
  demography	
  and	
  evolutionary	
  history	
  than	
  population	
  genetics	
  approaches	
  would	
  achieve	
  alone	
  (Luikart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003;	
  Nielsen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009a).	
  	
  Also,	
  further	
  investigation	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  could	
  provide	
  insights	
  into	
  the	
  ecological	
  mechanism	
  driving	
  adaptive	
  population	
  divergence	
  and	
  the	
  genetic	
  architecture	
  of	
  adaptations.	
  	
  This	
  bottom-­‐up	
  approach	
  for	
  detecting	
  adaptive	
  variation	
  provides	
  unprecedented	
  opportunities	
  to	
  empirically	
  test	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  at	
  the	
  genetic	
  level	
  in	
  natural	
  populations	
  of	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms.	
  	
  	
   The	
  genome-­‐scan	
  approach	
  is	
  commonly	
  equivalated	
  to	
  ‘looking	
  for	
  a	
  needle	
  in	
  a	
  haystack’,	
  because	
  a	
  very	
  small	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  genome	
  is	
  under	
  selection	
  (Campbell	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2004).	
  	
  Most	
  polymorphisms	
  occur	
  in	
  the	
  neutral	
  regions	
  of	
  the	
  genome,	
  therefore	
  studies	
  using	
  anonymous	
  markers	
  such	
  as	
  amplified	
  fragment	
  length	
  polymorphisms	
  (AFLPs)	
  and	
  microsatellites	
  tend	
  to	
  have	
  low	
  detection	
  rates	
  (2-­‐8%;	
  Bonin,	
  2008;	
  Bonin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Campbell	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2004;	
  Tice	
  and	
  Carlon,	
  2011;	
  Wilding	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  Alternatively,	
  single	
  nucleotide	
  polymorphisms	
  (SNPs)	
  recovered	
  from	
  the	
  transcriptome	
  or	
  microsatellite	
  markers	
  linked	
  to	
  expressed	
  sequence	
  tags	
  (ESTs)	
  can	
  target	
  the	
  functional	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  genome,	
  where	
  polymorphisms	
  are	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  maintained	
  by	
  selection	
  (Bonin,	
  2008;	
  Bouck	
  and	
  Vision,	
  2007),	
  to	
  achieve	
  higher	
  detection	
  rates	
  (13-­‐20%;	
  Namroud	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Oetjen	
  and	
  Reusch,	
  2007;	
  Shikano	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Vasemagi	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005).	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  convergent	
  evolution	
  in	
  closely	
  related	
  populations	
  may	
  arise	
  from	
  i)	
  the	
  exact	
  same	
  mutation,	
  ii)	
  a	
  different	
  mutation	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  gene,	
  or	
  iii)	
  mutations	
  in	
  different	
  genes	
  within	
  a	
  common	
  genetic	
  pathway.	
  	
  Since	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellites	
  are	
  neutral	
  markers	
  embedded	
  in	
  the	
  flanking	
  regions	
  of	
  a	
  gene	
  and	
  may	
  bear	
  the	
  signature	
  of	
  selection	
  due	
  to	
  ‘genetic	
  hitchhiking’	
  (Barton,	
  2000;	
  Maynard-­‐Smith	
  and	
  Haigh,	
  1974),	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  greater	
  likelihood	
  of	
  detecting	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  at	
  the	
  gene-­‐level	
  using	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  than	
  at	
  the	
  nucleotide-­‐level	
  using	
  SNPs	
  (Arendt	
  and	
  Reznick,	
  2008;	
  Vasemagi	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005).	
  	
  The	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  are	
  also	
  transferrable	
  among	
  closely	
  related	
  species,	
  and	
  EST	
  libraries	
  continue	
  to	
  grow	
  rapidly	
  due	
  to	
  tremendous	
  advances	
  in	
  next-­‐generation	
  sequencing	
  technologies	
   	
  	
  	
   5	
   (Bouck	
  and	
  Vision,	
  2007).	
  	
  The	
  use	
  of	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  is	
  expected	
  increase	
  because	
  they	
  provide	
  a	
  cost-­‐effective	
  approach	
  for	
  organisms	
  with	
  otherwise	
  limited	
  genetic	
  resources.	
  	
  	
   Detecting	
  robust	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  in	
  natural	
  populations	
  also	
  relies	
  upon	
  using	
  an	
  appropriate	
  study	
  system.	
  	
  Several	
  criteria	
  have	
  been	
  proposed	
  for	
  selecting	
  such	
  a	
  system;	
  i)	
  populations	
  must	
  be	
  closely	
  related	
  to	
  ensure	
  that	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  is	
  entirely	
  environment-­‐dependent;	
  ii)	
  divergence	
  must	
  be	
  recent	
  (<12,000	
  years	
  ago)	
  such	
  that	
  processes	
  underlying	
  phenotypic	
  divergence	
  and	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  are	
  still	
  actively	
  maintained	
  and	
  genetic	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  have	
  not	
  yet	
  deteriorated	
  via	
  genetic	
  recombination;	
  iii)	
  divergence	
  has	
  occurred	
  in	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  ongoing	
  gene	
  flow	
  (i.e.	
  in	
  sympatry)	
  such	
  that	
  the	
  genome	
  is	
  homogenized	
  except	
  at	
  adaptive	
  loci;	
  iv)	
  populations	
  must	
  have	
  a	
  known	
  phylogeographic	
  history	
  to	
  ensure	
  that	
  divergence	
  was	
  initiated	
  and	
  maintained	
  in	
  sympatry;	
  and	
  v)	
  ideally	
  multiple	
  replicate	
  systems	
  should	
  be	
  available	
  to	
  test	
  for	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  in	
  divergence,	
  because	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  divergence	
  can	
  provide	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  strongest	
  forms	
  of	
  evidence	
  for	
  adaptive	
  divergence	
  achievable	
  using	
  population	
  genomic	
  approaches	
  (Hendry,	
  2009).	
  	
  Generally,	
  post-­‐glacial	
  fishes	
  meet	
  these	
  criteria	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  recent	
  glacial	
  history	
  of	
  North	
  America	
  (Rambaut	
  and	
  Schluter,	
  1996),	
  and	
  so	
  far	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  strongest	
  evidence	
  for	
  adaptive	
  divergence	
  using	
  population	
  genomic	
  approaches	
  has	
  been	
  revealed	
  in	
  this	
  group	
  (Bernatchez	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Colosimo	
  et	
   al.,	
  2004).	
   1.3	
  Post-­glacial	
  fishes	
  for	
  studying	
  evolutionary	
  processes	
   1.3.1	
  	
  Recent	
  glacial	
  history	
  of	
  North	
  America	
  and	
  its	
  consequences	
  	
   A	
  series	
  of	
  glaciation	
  events	
  during	
  the	
  Pleistocene	
  epoch	
  altered	
  the	
  global	
  climate,	
  sea	
  level,	
  and	
  land	
  ice-­‐cover,	
  which	
  significantly	
  impacted	
  mammalian,	
  avian,	
  and	
  teleost	
  phylogeography	
  (Avise	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
  	
  During	
  the	
  Wisconsin	
  glaciation,	
  sheets	
  of	
  ice	
  extended	
  into	
  North	
  America,	
  Asia,	
  and	
  Europe.	
  	
  The	
  Cordilleran	
  and	
  Laurentide	
  ice	
  sheets	
  covered	
  Canada	
  and	
  northern	
  USA,	
  destroying	
  any	
  pre-­‐existing	
  freshwater	
  habitat	
  and	
  displacing	
  freshwater	
  and	
  anadromous	
  fishes	
  into	
  habitats	
  skirting	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
   6	
   glacial	
  fronts	
  (Pielou,	
  1991).	
  	
  Substantive	
  declines	
  in	
  abundance	
  caused	
  large	
  reductions	
  in	
  genetic	
  diversity	
  (Bernatchez	
  and	
  Wilson,	
  1998).	
  	
  During	
  the	
  last	
  glacial	
  retreat	
  (8,000-­‐15,000	
  years	
  ago),	
  meltwater	
  formed	
  small	
  proglacial	
  lakes	
  (i.e.	
  small	
  basins	
  of	
  water	
  contained	
  by	
  glaciers)	
  and	
  meltwater	
  created	
  outflows	
  that	
  served	
  as	
  temporary	
  corridors	
  and	
  allowed	
  access	
  to	
  dispersers	
  from	
  refugial	
  populations	
  in	
  the	
  Bering	
  and	
  Columbia	
  Refugia.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  several	
  fishes	
  had	
  colonized	
  post-­‐glacial	
  lakes	
  by	
  the	
  time	
  the	
  ice	
  had	
  withdrawn	
  and	
  the	
  water	
  level	
  dropped	
  to	
  current	
  levels.	
  	
   An	
  explosion	
  in	
  intraspecific	
  variation	
  followed	
  the	
  colonization	
  of	
  these	
  lakes	
  (Pielou,	
  1991).	
  	
  Habitats	
  were	
  resource-­‐rich	
  and	
  there	
  were	
  few	
  competitors	
  and	
  predators	
  because	
  opportunities	
  to	
  colonize	
  these	
  new	
  lakes	
  were	
  brief	
  (Rambaut	
  and	
  Schluter,	
  1996).	
  	
  This	
  presented	
  many	
  ecological	
  opportunities	
  	
  and	
  allowed	
  resource	
  polymorphism	
  to	
  arise	
  in	
  sympatry.	
  	
  Rapid	
  evolution	
  of	
  assortative	
  mating	
  based	
  on	
  niche	
  differentiation,	
  despite	
  a	
  history	
  of	
  gene	
  flow,	
  reinforces	
  associated	
  changes	
  in	
  morphology,	
  physiology,	
  and	
  behavior.	
  	
  This	
  drove	
  intraspecific	
  differentiation	
  of	
  post-­‐glacial	
  freshwater	
  fishes	
  in	
  the	
  northern	
  hemisphere	
  such	
  that	
  they	
  are	
  now	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  fastest	
  evolving	
  groups	
  of	
  taxa.	
   1.3.2	
  	
  Studying	
  evolution	
  in	
  salmonids	
  	
   Salmonids	
  are	
  ideal	
  candidates	
  for	
  studying	
  adaptation	
  and	
  species	
  divergence	
  because	
  most	
  extant	
  populations	
  of	
  Pacific	
  salmon	
  are	
  descendent	
  from	
  refugial	
  populations	
  (Hendry	
  and	
  Stearns,	
  2004).	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  they	
  appear	
  evolutionarily	
  young	
  and	
  appear	
  to	
  have	
  accumulated	
  a	
  remarkable	
  level	
  of	
  diversity	
  in	
  life	
  history	
  strategies	
  and	
  morphologies	
  in	
  a	
  short	
  time	
  (Cossins	
  and	
  Crawford,	
  2005).	
  	
  Their	
  rapid	
  divergence	
  is	
  facilitated	
  by	
  natal	
  homing	
  (Quinn,	
  2005).	
  	
  Through	
  chemical	
  imprinting	
  during	
  early	
  life	
  stages,	
  salmon	
  return	
  to	
  the	
  natal	
  spawning	
  grounds	
  to	
  reproduce.	
  	
  This	
  allows	
  for	
  some	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  among	
  geographically	
  proximate	
  populations	
  and	
  adaptation	
  to	
  local	
  conditions	
  to	
  produces	
  new	
  ecological	
  forms,	
  or	
  ecotypes	
  (Mayr,	
  1963).	
  	
  Adaptation	
  can	
  occur	
  rapidly	
  in	
  salmonids	
  because	
  they	
  possess	
  a	
  significant	
  amount	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  due	
  to	
  a	
  historical	
  tetraploidization	
  event	
  >25	
  million	
  years	
  ago	
  (Allendorf	
  and	
  Thorgaard,	
  1984)	
  and	
  phenotypic	
   	
  	
  	
   7	
   variation	
  due	
  to	
  phenotypic	
  plasticity	
  (Pfennig	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  Phenotypic	
  plasticity	
  (when	
  a	
  single	
  genotype	
  can	
  produce	
  multiple	
  phenotypes	
  in	
  response	
  to	
  variation	
  in	
  the	
  environment)	
  creates	
  opportunities	
  for	
  selection	
  to	
  act	
  upon	
  novel	
  phenotypes,	
  releases	
  cryptic	
  genetic	
  variation,	
  increases	
  the	
  chances	
  of	
  survival	
  for	
  advantageous	
  phenotypes	
  (Pfennig	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  Although	
  much	
  of	
  the	
  observed	
  phenotypic	
  variation	
  could	
  be	
  attributed	
  to	
  plasticity,	
  the	
  frequency	
  of	
  failed	
  transplant	
  experiments	
  suggests	
  that	
  salmon	
  are	
  especially	
  well	
  adapted	
  to	
  the	
  local	
  ecological	
  conditions	
  of	
  their	
  natal	
  environment	
  (Fraser	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Taylor,	
  1991).	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  Pacific	
  salmonids	
  are	
  excellent	
  candidates	
  for	
  genetic	
  studies	
  because	
  many	
  have	
  well-­‐described	
  population	
  structures,	
  substantial	
  and	
  rapidly	
  accumulating	
  genomic	
  resources,	
  and	
  an	
  abundance	
  of	
  archived	
  samples	
  have	
  been	
  collected	
  due	
  to	
  long-­‐term	
  monitoring	
  and	
  research	
  initiatives	
  by	
  commercial	
  and	
  recreational	
  fisheries	
  (Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008;	
  Wenne	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  	
   1.3.3	
  	
  Common	
  patterns	
  of	
  phenotypic	
  divergence	
   Among	
  post-­‐glacial	
  fishes,	
  certain	
  species	
  and	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  commonly	
  re-­‐occur	
  in	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  their	
  distribution.	
  	
  Much	
  of	
  the	
  variation	
  appears	
  to	
  be	
  driven	
  by	
  intra-­‐specific	
  competition	
  for	
  space	
  or	
  resources	
  (Schluter,	
  1996;	
  Schluter	
  and	
  McPhail,	
  1992)	
  and	
  has	
  resulted	
  in	
  niche	
  partitioning	
  associated	
  with	
  either	
  trophic	
  position	
  (Landry	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Ostberg	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Peichel	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001;	
  Saint-­‐Laurent	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003),	
  spawning	
  timing	
  (Creelman	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  McGlauflin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011),	
  habitat	
  preference	
  (Lecomte	
  and	
  Dodson,	
  2004),	
  or	
  anadromy	
  (Shikano	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Theriault	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Wood	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Divergence	
  in	
  trophism	
  generally	
  results	
  in	
  the	
  co-­‐existence	
  of	
  a	
  planktivore	
  that	
  feeds	
  on	
  pelagic	
  zooplankton	
  and	
  a	
  benthivore	
  that	
  feeds	
  on	
  benthic	
  invertebrates	
  or	
  larger	
  prey	
  from	
  littoral	
  zone	
  (Schluter,	
  1996).	
  	
  In	
  salmonids,	
  often	
  two	
  or	
  more	
  life	
  history	
  types	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  within	
  a	
  single	
  geographic	
  area.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  many	
  river	
  drainages	
  support	
  both	
  spring-­‐run	
  and	
  fall-­‐run	
  Chinook	
  salmon	
  (Bernier	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008),	
  early-­‐	
  and	
  late-­‐run	
  coho	
  salmon,	
  and	
  summer-­‐run	
  and	
  winter-­‐run	
  steelhead	
  (Waples	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  However,	
  few	
  studies	
  have	
  investigated	
  the	
  mechanisms	
  driving	
  divergence	
  in	
  reproductive	
  behaviour	
  and	
  habitat	
  preference,	
  which	
  accounts	
  for	
  a	
  considerable	
  amount	
  of	
  the	
  intra-­‐specific	
  diversity	
  in	
  salmonids	
  (Mehner	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
  These	
  phenotypes	
  are	
   	
  	
  	
   8	
   difficult	
  to	
  measure	
  compared	
  to	
  morphological	
  traits,	
  but	
  with	
  recent	
  advancements	
  facilitating	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms	
  in	
  natural	
  environments,	
  investigation	
  of	
  these	
  traits	
  will	
  likely	
  be	
  important	
  role	
  in	
  generalizing	
  our	
  knowledge	
  of	
  environmental	
  drivers	
  of	
  adaptive	
  population	
  divergence	
  and	
  speciation	
  (Bernatchez	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
   1.4	
  	
  Study	
  system:	
  kokanee	
  salmon	
   	
   1.4.1	
  	
  The	
  origin	
  of	
  non-­anadromous	
  Oncorhynchus	
  nerkids	
   Kokanee	
  salmon	
  are	
  a	
  polyphyletic	
  group	
  of	
  obligate	
  freshwater	
  populations	
  that	
  have	
  diverged	
  from	
  anadromous	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  multiple	
  times	
  since	
  the	
  last	
  glaciation	
  (McPhail	
  and	
  Lindsey,	
  1970;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996;	
  Wood	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Similar	
  to	
  juvenile	
  sockeye,	
  kokanee	
  inhabit	
  the	
  limnetic-­‐pelagic	
  zone	
  and	
  feed	
  primarily	
  on	
  crustacean	
  macro-­‐zooplankton	
  zooplankton	
  (Chipps	
  and	
  Bennett,	
  2000;	
  Clarke	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  Both	
  kokanee	
  and	
  sockeye	
  spawn	
  in	
  rivers,	
  streams	
  tributary	
  to	
  lakes,	
  or	
  shoreline	
  areas	
  (Quinn,	
  2005) often	
  associated	
  groundwater	
  seepage	
  (McPhail	
  and	
  Lindsey,	
  1970).	
  	
  However,	
  through	
  isolation,	
  the	
  non-­‐anadromous	
  kokanee	
  have	
  evolved	
  several	
  morphological,	
  reproductive,	
  and	
  genetic	
  differences	
  (Wood	
  and	
  Foote,	
  1996).	
  	
  Kokanee	
  exhibit	
  slower	
  growth	
  rates,	
  much	
  smaller	
  size,	
  earlier	
  age	
  at	
  maturity	
  (3-­‐4	
  years),	
  and	
  they	
  possess	
  significantly	
  more	
  gill	
  rakers	
  (Foote	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999).	
  	
  Sexual	
  dimorphism	
  and	
  secondary	
  sex	
  characteristics	
  (i.e.	
  humped	
  back,	
  bright	
  coloration,	
  hooked	
  jaw)	
  are	
  less	
  pronounced	
  in	
  kokanee	
  and	
  sexual	
  selection	
  for	
  red	
  breeding	
  coloration	
  has	
  led	
  to	
  a	
  divergence	
  in	
  the	
  regulation	
  of	
  carotenoid	
  sequestering	
  in	
  their	
  tissue	
  (Craig	
  and	
  Foote,	
  2001).	
  	
  Sockeye	
  are	
  now	
  genetically	
  distinct	
  from	
  their	
  lacustrine	
  counterpart,	
  as	
  assessed	
  by	
  mitochondrial,	
  minisatellite,	
  and	
  allozymes	
  frequencies	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996;	
  Wood	
  and	
  Foote,	
  1996).	
  	
  Gene	
  flow	
  is	
  estimated	
  at	
  0.1	
  -­‐	
  0.8%	
  in	
  those	
  tributaries	
  where	
  kokanee	
  and	
  anadromous	
  sockeye	
  spawning	
  grounds	
  overlap,	
  which	
  is	
  much	
  lower	
  than	
  that	
  of	
  different	
  tributaries	
  (Wood	
  and	
  Foote,	
  1996).	
  	
  Genetic	
  distinction	
  has	
  also	
  been	
  demonstrated	
  through	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  controlled	
  breeding	
  experiments	
  (Foote	
  et	
  al.,	
  1992;	
  Foote	
  et	
  al.,	
  1989;	
  Wood	
  and	
  Foote,	
  1990).	
  	
  However,	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  plurality	
  of	
  divergent	
  non-­‐anadromous	
  populations,	
  overall	
  ecological	
  similarity,	
  and	
  the	
  ability	
  of	
  non-­‐ 	
  	
  	
   9	
   anadromous	
  kokanee	
  to	
  revert	
  back	
  to	
  anadromy	
  (Godbout	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010),	
  they	
  are	
  not	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  distinct	
  species,	
  or	
  even	
  subspecies	
  (McPhail	
  and	
  Lindsey,	
  1970;	
  Taylor,	
  1999).	
   1.4.2	
  	
  Current	
  distribution	
   Kokanee	
  salmon	
  are	
  naturally	
  distributed	
  in	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  the	
  coastal	
  regions	
  of	
  North	
  America	
  and	
  northeastern	
  Asia	
  rimming	
  the	
  Pacific	
  Ocean	
  (McPhail	
  and	
  Lindsey,	
  1970).	
  	
  In	
  North	
  America,	
  kokanee	
  inhabit	
  lakes	
  between	
  the	
  Klamath	
  River,	
  California	
  and	
  Point	
  Hope,	
  Alaska,	
  and	
  in	
  Asia	
  between	
  northern	
  Hokkaido,	
  Japan	
  and	
  Anadyr	
  River,	
  Russia.	
  	
  Kokanee	
  have	
  also	
  been	
  introduced	
  throughout	
  central	
  and	
  southeastern	
  Canada	
  and	
  northwestern	
  USA	
  through	
  experimental	
  stocking	
  programs	
  (Crawford	
  and	
  Muir,	
  2008;	
  Crossman,	
  1991).	
  	
  In	
  lakes	
  still	
  accessible	
  from	
  the	
  Pacific	
  Ocean,	
  kokanee	
  and	
  anadromous	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  share	
  common	
  spawning	
  grounds.	
   1.4.3	
  	
  	
  Two	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  kokanee	
  salmon	
   In	
  many	
  post-­‐glacial	
  lakes,	
  two	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes	
  co-­‐exist:	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  and	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  	
  The	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  exhibit	
  the	
  ancestral	
  life	
  history	
  form	
  and	
  utilize	
  streambeds	
  for	
  spawning.	
  	
  The	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  use	
  the	
  shoreline	
  adjacent	
  to	
  streams	
  or	
  in	
  other	
  regions	
  of	
  the	
  lake,	
  sometimes	
  in	
  upwelling	
  zones,	
  and	
  exhibit	
  distinct	
  reproductive	
  behaviours.	
  	
  Outside	
  of	
  the	
  spawning	
  period,	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  are	
  ecologically	
  and	
  morphologically	
  indistinguishable	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  Winans	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  If	
  divergence	
  has	
  occurred	
  while	
  in	
  sympatry,	
  environment-­‐mediated	
  selection	
  pressures	
  are	
  likely	
  driving	
  local	
  adaptation.	
   1.4.3.1	
  	
  Morphology,	
  life	
  history	
  and	
  behavioural	
  differences	
   During	
  the	
  spawning	
  period,	
  shore	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  exhibit	
  distinct	
  reproductive	
  strategies	
  and	
  form	
  spatially	
  and	
  temporally	
  discrete	
  spawning	
  aggregations.	
  	
  Similar	
  to	
  sockeye,	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  (Figure	
  1.1)	
  engage	
  in	
  traditional	
  up-­‐stream	
  migrations	
  in	
  the	
  fall	
  where	
  a	
  female	
  will	
  excavate	
  a	
  redd	
  by	
  beating	
  her	
  tail	
  while	
  on	
  her	
  side	
  (Table	
  1.1).	
  	
  She	
  evaluates	
  secondary	
   	
  	
  	
   10	
   sex	
  characteristics	
  to	
  select	
  a	
  	
  fit	
  mate	
  and	
  they	
  spawn	
  in	
  unison.	
  	
  The	
  female	
  then	
  dislodges	
  upstream	
  gravel	
  which	
  covers	
  the	
  nest	
  to	
  prevent	
  scour	
  and	
  will	
  continue	
  to	
  defend	
  the	
  nest	
  until	
  fatal	
  exhaustion.	
  	
  Shore-­‐spawners	
  generally	
  form	
  spawning	
  aggregations	
  2	
  to	
  6	
  weeks	
  (and	
  up	
  to	
  2	
  months)	
  later	
  than	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  at	
  specific	
  areas	
  along	
  the	
  shoreline.	
  	
  They	
  tend	
  to	
  select	
  a	
  very	
  narrow	
  depth	
  range	
  within	
  the	
  water	
  column	
  (<	
  1m)	
  and	
  may	
  use	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  larger	
  substrates	
  (Shephard,	
  2000).	
  	
  They	
  do	
  not	
  form	
  mating	
  pairs	
  or	
  defend	
  their	
  nests.	
  	
  In	
  fact,	
  they	
  abandon	
  the	
  shoreline	
  habitat	
  during	
  the	
  day	
  in	
  several	
  lakes.	
  	
  In	
  some	
  lakes,	
  they	
  build	
  redds	
  at	
  greater	
  depths	
  near	
  stream	
  deltas	
  or	
  areas	
  with	
  groundwater	
  seepage	
  (Andrusak	
  and	
  Jantz,	
  2002),	
  but	
  many	
  only	
  clean	
  off	
  the	
  rocks	
  prior	
  to	
  egg	
  deposition.	
  	
  In	
  a	
  few	
  lakes,	
  body	
  size,	
  egg	
  size,	
  and	
  post-­‐hatching	
  growth	
  rate	
  are	
  slightly	
  lower	
  in	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  than	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  (e.g.	
  Okanagan	
  Lake;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
   Table	
  1.1	
  	
  Physical	
  attributes	
  of	
  the	
  spawning	
  habitat	
  and	
  morphological,	
  life	
  history,	
  and	
  behavioural	
  attributes	
  of	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  British	
  Columbian	
  Lakes.	
   	
  Category	
  	
   Phenotypic	
  trait	
   Stream-­‐spawners	
   Shore	
  spawners	
   Reference	
   Spawning	
  location	
   tributaries	
   shoreline	
  	
   (de	
  Zwart	
  et	
  al.,	
   2011;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
   1997)	
   Spawning	
  substrate	
   Rounded	
  gravel	
   <5cm	
  diameter	
   Large,	
  angular	
  rocks	
   >5cm	
  diameter	
   (Shephard,	
  2000)	
   Environment	
   Spawning	
  depth	
   Shallow	
  	
   Deeper	
  	
   (up	
  to	
  6	
  m)	
   (Andrusak	
  and	
   Andrusak,	
  2011;	
   Shephard,	
  2000)	
   Nuptial	
  coloration	
   Bright	
  red	
  body	
  and	
   green	
  head	
   Dark	
  red	
  body	
  and	
   green	
  head	
   (Dill,	
  1996)	
  Morphology	
   Secondary	
  sex	
   characteristics	
   pronounced	
   less	
  pronounced	
   (Dill,	
  1996)	
   Peak	
  spawning	
  time	
   Fall	
  (Sept	
  –	
  Nov)	
   2-­‐6	
  weeks	
  later	
  in	
  fall	
   (Shephard,	
  2000)	
  Life	
  history	
   Time	
  of	
  emergence	
   Spring	
  (Mar–Jun)	
   Spring	
  (Mar-­‐Jun)	
   (Shephard,	
  2000)	
   Mate	
  selection	
   Courting	
  behaviour	
   and	
  long-­‐term	
   pairing	
   No	
  obvious	
  pairing	
   (Dill,	
  1996)	
   Parental	
  care	
  	
   Female	
  builds	
  redds	
   and	
  defends	
  nest	
   No	
  nest	
  defense	
   (Dill,	
  1996)	
   Behaviour	
   Time	
  of	
  day	
  for	
   spawning	
   Day-­‐time	
   Night-­‐time	
  or	
  day-­‐ time	
   (Andrusak	
  and	
   Andrusak,	
  2011;	
  de	
   Zwart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
   	
  	
  	
   11	
   	
   Figure	
  1.1	
  	
  Photographs	
  of	
  a	
  deceased	
  (A)	
  female	
  and	
  (B)	
  male	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  found	
  along	
  the	
  shore	
  of	
  Sandners	
  Creek,	
  tributary	
  to	
  Christina	
  Lake,	
  BC.	
  	
  A	
  tissue	
  sample	
  has	
  been	
  taken	
  from	
  the	
  operculum	
  of	
  the	
  female	
  kokanee.	
   1.4.3.2	
  	
  Genetic	
  differentiation	
  of	
  ecotypes	
   Patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  in	
  natural	
  populations	
  are	
  shaped	
  by	
  gene	
  flow,	
  genetic	
  drift,	
  mutation	
  and	
  natural	
  selection.	
  	
  In	
  previous	
  studies	
  of	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  kokanee,	
  low	
  levels	
  of	
  neutral	
  genetic	
  differentiation	
  were	
  detected	
  in	
  the	
  frequency	
  of	
  mitochondrial	
  DNA	
  haplotypes	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997),	
  five	
  nuclear	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000),	
  and	
  74	
  allozyme	
  loci	
  (Winans	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  This	
  is	
  not	
  surprising	
  given	
  the	
  high	
  potential	
  for	
  gene	
  flow	
  among	
  stocks,	
  however	
  these	
  findings	
  suggest	
  that	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  are	
  not	
  a	
  single	
  panmictic	
  population.	
  	
  Reductions	
  in	
  gene	
  flow	
  may	
  be	
  the	
  result	
  of	
  local	
  adaptation	
  to	
  different	
  spawning	
  habitats.	
  	
  In	
  sockeye	
  salmon,	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  that	
  stray	
  onto	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  grounds	
  are	
  numerous	
  (39%)	
  but	
  appear	
  to	
  have	
  low	
  fitness	
  given	
  the	
  high	
  level	
  of	
  differentiation	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  (Hendry	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  To	
  investigate	
  the	
  locus-­‐specific	
  effects	
  of	
  selection,	
  Russello	
  et	
  al.	
  (2012)	
  conducted	
  a	
  genome-­‐wide	
  scan	
  of	
  243	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellites	
  for	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  and	
  used	
  neutrality	
  tests	
  to	
  identify	
  outlier	
  loci.	
  	
  The	
  eight	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  showing	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  had	
  a	
  93%	
  success	
  rate	
  in	
  assigning	
  individuals	
  back	
  to	
  their	
  source	
   A	
   B	
   	
  	
  	
   12	
   ecotypes	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  59%	
  success	
  rate	
  using	
  eight	
  putatively	
  neutral	
  markers.	
  	
  The	
  significant	
  difference	
  in	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  suggests	
  that	
  natural	
  selection	
  may	
  be	
  involved	
  in	
  ecotype	
  divergence,	
  but	
  since	
  the	
  study	
  was	
  limited	
  to	
  a	
  single	
  lake	
  these	
  outlier	
  loci	
  could	
  not	
  be	
  further	
  validated.	
  	
   1.4.3.3	
  	
  Habitat	
  differences	
   Salmon	
  populations	
  are	
  specifically	
  adapted	
  to	
  local	
  environmental	
  conditions,	
  which	
  appear	
  to	
  vary	
  between	
  stream	
  and	
  shore	
  habitats	
  substantially	
  (Dill,	
  1996;	
  Shephard,	
  2000).	
  	
  Habitats	
  differ	
  water	
  depth,	
  velocity,	
  temperature,	
  substrate,	
  and	
  dissolved	
  oxygen	
  content	
  and	
  therefore	
  may	
  differentially	
  impact	
  evolutionary	
  trade-­‐offs	
  in	
  life	
  history	
  and	
  physiological	
  traits	
  (Hendry	
  and	
  Stearns,	
  2004).	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  egg	
  size	
  is	
  a	
  heritable	
  trait	
  linked	
  to	
  egg	
  survival	
  (Hendry	
  and	
  Stearns,	
  2004)	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  positively	
  correlated	
  with	
  mean	
  geometric	
  size	
  of	
  spawning/incubating	
  gravel	
  for	
  Alaskan	
  sockeye	
  populations	
  (which	
  can	
  vary	
  30-­‐fold;	
  Quinn	
  et	
  al.,	
  1995;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  A	
  similar	
  trend	
  may	
  be	
  present	
  in	
  kokanee	
  since	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  often	
  use	
  larger	
  substrates	
  than	
  stream-­‐spawners.	
  	
  Also,	
  studies	
  suggest	
  that	
  timing	
  of	
  spawning	
  can	
  differ	
  systematically	
  between	
  habitat	
  types	
  due	
  to	
  temperature	
  differences.	
  	
  In	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  peaks	
  one	
  month	
  after	
  stream-­‐spawning,	
  but	
  they	
  acquire	
  the	
  same	
  number	
  of	
  Accumulated	
  Thermal	
  Units	
  (ATU)	
  and	
  hatch	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  Therefore,	
  spawning	
  time	
  is	
  probably	
  an	
  evolutionary	
  response	
  that	
  ensures	
  emergence	
  is	
  synchronized	
  with	
  spring	
  algal	
  blooms.	
  	
  Spawning	
  time	
  has	
  already	
  been	
  linked	
  to	
  the	
   CLOCK	
  gene	
  in	
  other	
  salmonids	
  (Leder	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  	
  Biotic	
  interactions	
  may	
  be	
  generating	
  distinct	
  selection	
  pressures,	
  including	
  predation,	
  pathogens,	
  and	
  intra-­‐specific	
  competition	
  for	
  mates	
  or	
  resources	
  (Andrusak	
  and	
  Jantz,	
  2002).	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  the	
  expression	
  of	
  secondary	
  sex	
  characteristics	
  (e.g.	
  breeding	
  coloration,	
  dorsal	
  hump,	
  teeth,	
  hooked	
  jaw)	
  and	
  reproductive	
  behaviours	
  (e.g.	
  mate	
  choice,	
  nest	
  defence,	
  parental	
  care)	
  are	
  maintained	
  by	
  sexual	
  selection,	
  but	
  environment-­‐mediated	
  selection	
  may	
  lead	
  to	
  the	
  loss	
  of	
  these	
  traits	
  altogether	
  due	
  to	
  a	
  trade-­‐off	
  between	
  attaining	
  high	
  quality	
  mates	
  and	
  high	
  energetic	
  costs	
  or	
  predation	
  pressure	
  (Craig	
  and	
  Foote,	
  2001).	
  	
  Evidence	
  for	
  adaptive	
  divergence	
  in	
  mate	
  recognition	
  traits	
  have	
  been	
  detected	
  in	
  three-­‐spine	
  stickleback	
  (Rundle	
   	
  	
  	
   13	
   et	
  al.,	
  2000)	
  and	
  cichlids	
  (Seehausen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Finally,	
  habitat	
  preference	
  is	
  also	
  thought	
  to	
  be	
  critical	
  for	
  matching	
  locally	
  adapted	
  phenotypes	
  within	
  heterogeneous	
  landscapes	
  (Davis	
  and	
  Stamps,	
  2004).	
  	
  These	
  are	
  just	
  a	
  few	
  examples	
  of	
  the	
  traits	
  potentially	
  under	
  selection	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  differences	
  in	
  selection	
  regimes	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  shore	
  and	
  stream	
  habitats.	
  	
  	
   1.4.3.4	
  	
  Population	
  declines	
  and	
  recovery	
  objectives	
  	
   Kokanee	
  are	
  considered	
  a	
  keystone	
  species	
  because	
  they	
  are	
  an	
  important	
  forage	
  fish	
  for	
  many	
  of	
  species	
  at	
  higher	
  trophic	
  levels,	
  including	
  piscivorous	
  trout	
  and	
  char	
  (Andrusak	
  and	
  Parkinson,	
  1984).	
  	
  Kokanee	
  are	
  also	
  a	
  popular	
  recreation	
  fish	
  in	
  Canada	
  and	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  (Shephard,	
  2000).	
  	
  Hence,	
  the	
  substantive	
  declines	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  observed	
  in	
  numerous	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  their	
  native	
  distribution	
  are	
  of	
  great	
  concern.	
  	
  In	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  BC	
  they	
  have	
  declined	
  by	
  99%	
  since	
  the	
  1960’s.	
  	
  Similar	
  trends	
  have	
  been	
  observed	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  Lake,	
  BC	
  (Anders	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007)	
  and	
  Kathleen	
  Lake,	
  Yukon	
  	
  (L.	
  Freese,	
  pers.	
  comm.).	
  	
  In	
  Seton	
  and	
  Anderson	
  Lakes,	
  BC,	
  kokanee	
  once	
  occurred	
  in	
  large	
  numbers,	
  but	
  are	
  now	
  described	
  as	
  “severely	
  depressed”	
  by	
  First	
  Nations	
  to	
  whom	
  they	
  are	
  culturally	
  significant	
  and	
  an	
  important	
  supplementary	
  component	
  of	
  their	
  diet	
  (Morris	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  Substantive	
  declines	
  have	
  been	
  observed	
  in	
  and	
  Pend	
  O’reille,	
  Idaho	
  (Paragamian	
  and	
  Bowles,	
  1995).	
  	
  In	
  Samammish	
  Lake,	
  Washington,	
  kokanee	
  are	
  currently	
  being	
  reviewed	
  for	
  listing	
  as	
  threatened	
  or	
  endangered	
  under	
  the	
  US	
  Endangered	
  Species	
  Act	
  (USFWS,	
  2008).	
   Generally,	
  declines	
  have	
  been	
  attributed	
  to	
  the	
  introduction	
  of	
  non-­‐native	
  species	
  that	
  compete	
  for	
  food	
  resources	
  (e.g.	
  opossum	
  shrimp,	
  Mysis	
  relicta)	
  or	
  predators	
  (e.g.	
  lake	
  trout,	
  Salvelinus	
  namaycush),	
  habitat	
  degradation	
  through	
  stream	
  channelization,	
  hydroelectric	
  dam	
  construction,	
  shoreline	
  development,	
  lake	
  draw-­‐down,	
  overfishing,	
  competition	
  with	
  increasing	
  sockeye	
  and	
  rainbow	
  trout	
  populations	
  (Sebastian	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003),	
  and	
  decreased	
  lake	
  productivity	
  due	
  to	
  anthropogenic	
  factors	
  that	
  decrease	
  nutrient	
  inputs	
  (e.g.	
  dams	
  and	
  logging).	
  	
  Also,	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  their	
  range	
  are	
  supplemented	
  with	
  eggs	
  from	
  foreign	
  kokanee	
  stocks	
  to	
  increase	
  recreation	
  opportunities	
  in	
  northwestern	
  USA	
  (Parametrix,	
  2003)	
  and	
  southern	
  British	
  Columbia	
  with	
  unknown	
  genetic	
  consequences.	
  	
  Several	
  of	
   	
  	
  	
   14	
   these	
  factors	
  specifically	
  impact	
  either	
  shore	
  or	
  stream	
  habitats,	
  therefore	
  independent	
  management	
  of	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  is	
  required	
  (Andrusak	
  and	
  Jantz,	
  2002).	
  	
  	
   1.5	
  	
  A	
  genetics-­based	
  approach	
  for	
  managing	
  recently	
  diverged	
  stocks	
   A	
  recent	
  study	
  estimated	
  that	
  ~30%	
  of	
  historical	
  salmon	
  populations	
  in	
  the	
  Pacific	
  Northwest	
  have	
  been	
  extirpated	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  200	
  years	
  and	
  50%	
  of	
  extant	
  populations	
  are	
  being	
  listed	
  as	
  threatened	
  or	
  endangered	
  under	
  the	
  USA’s	
  Endangered	
  Species	
  Act	
  (see	
  http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-­‐Salmon-­‐Listings/Index.cfm;	
  Gustafson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  Therefore,	
  fine-­‐scale	
  delineation	
  of	
  evolutionarily	
  and	
  ecologically	
  unique	
  populations	
  is	
  needed	
  to	
  conserve	
  the	
  diversity	
  of	
  remaining	
  stocks	
  for	
  the	
  future.	
  	
  A	
  major	
  obstacle	
  to	
  maintaining	
  sustainable	
  kokanee	
  fisheries	
  is	
  the	
  diversification	
  of	
  populations	
  into	
  sympatric	
  ecotypes,	
  which	
  often	
  leads	
  to	
  mixed	
  stock	
  fisheries.	
  	
  Managing	
  mixed	
  stock	
  kokanee	
  fisheries	
  is	
  a	
  challenge,	
  because	
  it	
  is	
  difficult	
  to	
  manage	
  harvest	
  levels	
  to	
  specific	
  stocks	
  with	
  varying	
  levels	
  of	
  stock	
  productivity	
  (and	
  sustainable	
  harvest).	
  	
  In	
  kokanee,	
  ecotypes	
  (or	
  further	
  divided	
  sub-­‐stocks)	
  are	
  visually	
  indistinguishable	
  at	
  time	
  of	
  harvest,	
  but	
  each	
  stock	
  will	
  sustain	
  different	
  levels	
  of	
  harvest	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  inherent	
  productivity	
  of	
  the	
  stock’s	
  spawning	
  habitat.	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  kokanee	
  enumeration	
  programs	
  rely	
  on	
  visual	
  counts	
  conducted	
  while	
  in	
  their	
  spawning	
  aggregations.	
  	
  The	
  dark	
  coloration,	
  seasonal	
  foul	
  weather	
  and	
  extreme	
  densities	
  of	
  aggregated	
  fish,	
  particularly	
  at	
  depths	
  up	
  to	
  ten	
  meters,	
  make	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  very	
  difficult	
  to	
  count	
  with	
  accuracy.	
  	
  Other	
  methods	
  include	
  hydroacoustics	
  and	
  trawl	
  surveys,	
  but	
  these	
  methods	
  only	
  measure	
  the	
  aggregate	
  abundance	
  of	
  all	
  ecotypes,	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  subject	
  to	
  several	
  biases.	
  	
  Stream-­‐spawners	
  can	
  potentially	
  be	
  accurately	
  censused	
  by	
  adding	
  fences	
  to	
  spawning	
  tributaries,	
  however,	
  when	
  the	
  stock	
  is	
  distributed	
  among	
  many	
  tributaries,	
  the	
  labour	
  and	
  costs	
  become	
  prohibitive	
  (P.	
  Askey,	
  pers.	
  comm.).	
  	
  Genetics-­‐based	
  approaches	
  for	
  monitoring	
  and	
  assessing	
  kokanee	
  stocks	
  are	
  now	
  being	
  sought	
  because	
  of	
  its	
  well-­‐demonstrated	
  success	
  in	
  other	
  species	
  (Beacham	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Beacham	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008).	
  	
  However	
  the	
  conventional	
  use	
  of	
  neutral	
  markers	
  is	
  not	
  effective	
  in	
  detecting	
  patterns	
  recently	
  diverged	
  ecotypes	
  because	
  neutral	
  differences	
  have	
  not	
  yet	
  accumulated.	
  	
  So	
  far,	
  few	
  have	
  attempted	
  to	
  test	
  the	
  power	
  of	
  putatively	
  adaptive	
  markers	
  (i.e.	
  markers	
  linked	
  to	
  traits	
  of	
  adaptive	
  significance)	
  for	
   	
  	
  	
   15	
   genetic	
  stock	
  identification	
  (GSI)	
  in	
  recently	
  diverged	
  ecotypes	
  (but	
  see	
  Ackerman	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Creelman	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
  Since	
  a	
  primary	
  goal	
  in	
  conservation	
  biology	
  is	
  to	
  preserve	
  maximum	
  genetic	
  diversity	
  (neutral	
  and	
  adaptive)	
  and	
  thereby	
  species’	
  capacity	
  to	
  endure	
  disturbance	
  and	
  continually	
  adapt	
  to	
  changing	
  fitness	
  landscapes	
  (Hilborn	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003),	
  the	
  integration	
  of	
  adaptive	
  markers	
  within	
  a	
  fisheries	
  management	
  plan	
  will	
  be	
  important	
  for	
  achieving	
  this	
  goal.	
  	
  	
   1.6	
  	
  Thesis	
  objectives	
   Kokanee	
  salmon	
  represent	
  an	
  ideal	
  system	
  for	
  investigating	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  relating	
  to	
  habitat-­‐use	
  and	
  for	
  evaluating	
  the	
  potential	
  for	
  outlier	
  loci	
  to	
  inform	
  fisheries	
  management.	
  	
  The	
  many	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  BC	
  that	
  contain	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  of	
  kokanee,	
  which	
  share	
  a	
  common	
  geological	
  history,	
  enable	
  a	
  replicated	
  experimental	
  approach	
  within	
  a	
  natural	
  setting.	
  	
  Using	
  the	
  analytical	
  tools	
  of	
  population	
  genomic	
  and	
  genetic	
  approaches,	
  Chapter	
  2	
  reconstructs	
  evolutionary	
  relationships	
  among	
  multiple	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  behaviour	
  evolved	
  independently	
  within	
  multiple	
  lakes	
  or	
  has	
  descended	
  from	
  a	
  single	
  source	
  population.	
  	
  I	
  also	
  test	
  outlier	
  loci	
  detected	
  from	
  genome-­‐scans	
  for	
  unique	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  differentiation	
  compared	
  to	
  neutral	
  loci	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  likelihood	
  that	
  natural	
  selection	
  is	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  divergence	
  of	
  these	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes	
  and	
  identify	
  the	
  expressed	
  genes	
  associated	
  with	
  each	
  outlier	
  marker.	
  	
  In	
  Chapter	
  3,	
  I	
  evaluate	
  outlier	
  loci	
  for	
  their	
  ability	
  to	
  consistently	
  distinguish	
  ecotypes	
  from	
  multiple	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  British	
  Columbia	
  and	
  evaluate	
  the	
  extent	
  to	
  which	
  a	
  genetics-­‐based	
  approach	
  that	
  utilizes	
  these	
  outlier	
  loci	
  may	
  improve	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  range-­‐wide	
  kokanee	
  stock	
  identification	
  and	
  management.	
   	
  	
  	
   16	
   CHAPTER	
  2.0	
  	
  INVESTIGATING	
  THE	
  GENETIC	
  BASIS	
  OF	
  ECOTYPE	
  DIVERGENCE	
  IN	
   KOKANEE	
  SALMON	
  ACROSS	
  MULTIPLE	
  LAKES	
   2.1	
  	
  Background	
  	
   The	
  relative	
  role	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  and	
  neutral	
  evolutionary	
  processes	
  in	
  generating	
  and	
  maintaining	
  biological	
  diversity	
  has	
  long	
  been	
  debated.	
  	
  Recently,	
  tools	
  to	
  test	
  for	
  environment-­‐genotype	
  relationships	
  have	
  become	
  available,	
  allowing	
  researchers	
  to	
  attain	
  more	
  robust	
  evidence	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  in	
  generating	
  reproductive	
  barriers	
  among	
  locally	
  adapted	
  populations	
  (Schluter,	
  2001).	
  	
  Salmonids	
  provide	
  ideal	
  systems	
  for	
  studying	
  evolution	
  driven	
  by	
  ecological	
  processes	
  because	
  they	
  exhibit	
  an	
  extensive	
  range	
  in	
  morphological,	
  physiological,	
  and	
  behavioral	
  traits	
  at	
  the	
  intra-­‐specific	
  level	
  that	
  have	
  arisen	
  over	
  a	
  short	
  period	
  of	
  time	
  (<10,000	
  years;	
  Hendry	
  and	
  Stearns,	
  2004).	
  	
  The	
  plurality	
  of	
  certain	
  phenotype-­‐environment	
  correlations	
  among	
  geographically	
  discrete	
  populations	
  and	
  their	
  rapid	
  evolution	
  and	
  persistence	
  in	
  sympatry	
  suggest	
  that	
  natural	
  selection	
  is	
  driving	
  population	
  divergence	
  rather	
  than	
  neutral	
  evolutionary	
  processes	
  (Schluter,	
  1996).	
  	
  Extensive	
  phenotypic	
  plasticity	
  in	
  salmonids	
  provides	
  the	
  variability	
  upon	
  which	
  selection	
  may	
  act	
  when	
  individuals	
  disperse	
  to	
  new	
  environments	
  in	
  response	
  to	
  high	
  competition	
  for	
  limited	
  resources	
  in	
  their	
  natal	
  environment	
  (Pfennig	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  While	
  plasticity	
  alone	
  could	
  explain	
  much	
  of	
  the	
  phenotypic	
  variation	
  in	
  salmonids,	
  many	
  failed	
  transplant	
  experiments	
  suggest	
  that	
  many	
  locally	
  adapted	
  populations	
  are	
  not	
  ecologically	
  exchangeable	
  (Fraser	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Miller	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  These	
  failures	
  underscore	
  the	
  need	
  to	
  identify	
  those	
  traits	
  that	
  have	
  significant	
  fitness	
  consequences	
  and	
  thereby	
  achieve	
  a	
  better	
  understanding	
  of	
  extrinsic	
  and	
  intrinsic	
  factors	
  that	
  promote	
  and	
  constrain	
  adaptation	
  (Schluter,	
  2001).	
  	
   In	
  kokanee	
  salmon,	
  stocks	
  utilizing	
  distinct	
  spawning	
  habitats	
  (e.g.	
  shorelines	
  and	
  streams)	
  within	
  the	
  same	
  lake	
  often	
  exhibit	
  different	
  reproductive	
  traits	
  (e.g.	
  mating	
  behavior,	
  secondary	
  sex	
  characteristics,	
  parental	
  care,	
  and	
  spawning	
  time;	
  see	
  Table	
  1.1),	
  yet	
  show	
  no	
  morphological	
  or	
  ecological	
  differences	
  prior	
  to	
  maturation	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Winans	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   17	
   In	
  general,	
  rather	
  than	
  exhibiting	
  the	
  ancestral	
  traits	
  of	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  sockeye,	
  the	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  form	
  large	
  spawning	
  aggregations	
  along	
  the	
  shoreline	
  a	
  couple	
  weeks	
  or	
  months	
  following	
  sympatric	
  stream-­‐spawners.	
  	
  They	
  do	
  not	
  exhibit	
  courting	
  behaviour,	
  mate	
  selection,	
  redd	
  excavation,	
  or	
  nest	
  defence	
  (de	
  Zwart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Dill,	
  1996;	
  Shephard,	
  2000).	
  	
  Shore	
  habitats	
  are	
  typically	
  deeper	
  (0.1-­‐10	
  meters),	
  warmer	
  (at	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  of	
  year),	
  low-­‐flow	
  environments	
  with	
  larger	
  rocky	
  substrates.	
  	
  The	
  specific	
  fitness-­‐related	
  traits	
  initially	
  involved	
  in	
  generating	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  among	
  these	
  two	
  ecotypes	
  are	
  unknown,	
  but	
  are	
  possibly	
  related	
  to	
  habitat	
  preference,	
  mating	
  behavior,	
  energy	
  metabolism,	
  and/or	
  life-­‐history	
  ecology	
  that	
  increase	
  reproductive	
  success	
  in	
  adult	
  spawners	
  and	
  survival	
  at	
  early	
  life	
  stages	
  (Lecomte	
  and	
  Dodson,	
  2004).	
  	
  	
   Ecological	
  diversification	
  via	
  habitat	
  partitioning	
  is	
  commonly	
  observed	
  in	
  post-­‐glacial	
  fishes	
  (Berner	
   et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Lecomte	
  and	
  Dodson,	
  2004;	
  Ostberg	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Rogers	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2006;	
  Saint-­‐Laurent	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003)	
  and	
  has	
  lead	
  to	
  speciation	
  in	
  more	
  deeply	
  divergent	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  lineages	
  of	
  marine	
  fish	
  including	
  smelt	
  and	
  silversides	
  (Martin	
  and	
  Swiderski,	
  2001).	
  	
  Presently,	
  it	
  is	
  unclear	
  if	
  there	
  is	
  truly	
  an	
  adaptive	
  basis	
  for	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  behaviour	
  in	
  kokanee	
  salmon	
  (and	
  sockeye	
  salmon)	
  or	
  if	
  it	
  is	
  simply	
  a	
  plastic	
  response	
  to	
  resource	
  availability.	
  	
  Sympatric	
  ecotypes	
  may	
  represent	
  two	
  ecologically	
  and	
  evolutionarily	
  distinct	
  populations	
  if	
  unique	
  phenotypes	
  exhibited	
  by	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  confer	
  a	
  strong	
  fitness	
  advantage	
  in	
  shoreline	
  habitats	
  such	
  that	
  gene	
  flow	
  is	
  reduced	
  at	
  genes	
  underlying	
  these	
  adaptations.	
  	
  Alternatively,	
  sympatric	
  ecotypes	
  may	
  represent	
  a	
  single	
  panmictic	
  population	
  if	
  individual	
  stocks	
  (and	
  ecotypes)	
  are	
  being	
  maintained	
  through	
  natal	
  homing,	
  but	
  remain	
  entirely	
  undifferentiated	
  due	
  to	
  straying	
  among	
  habitats.	
  	
  A	
  substantial	
  amount	
  of	
  the	
  intraspecific	
  diversity	
  in	
  salmonids	
  is	
  a	
  consequence	
  of	
  niche	
  partitioning	
  within	
  lakes,	
  and	
  the	
  relative	
  importance	
  of	
  evolutionary	
  versus	
  plastic	
  responses	
  to	
  distinct	
  spawning	
  habitats	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  teased	
  apart	
  (Hendry	
  and	
  Stearns,	
  2004).	
  	
  To	
  determine	
  if	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  are	
  uniquely	
  adapted	
  to	
  shoreline	
  habitats,	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  their	
  divergence	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  revealed.	
   Recent	
  advancements	
  in	
  genome-­‐typing	
  technologies	
  and	
  analytical	
  tools	
  allow	
  us	
  to	
  simultaneously	
  investigate	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  various	
  evolutionary	
  processes	
  at	
  the	
  genetic	
  level	
  in	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms	
   	
  	
  	
   18	
   while	
  in	
  their	
  natural	
  environment	
  (Nosil	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Storz,	
  2005).	
  	
  Population-­‐based	
  genome	
  scans	
  can	
  identify	
  gene	
  regions	
  of	
  adaptive	
  significance	
  by	
  screening	
  a	
  large	
  number	
  of	
  markers	
  distributed	
  throughout	
  the	
  genome	
  and	
  segregating	
  those	
  that	
  correspond	
  with	
  neutral	
  expectations	
  from	
  those	
  assessed	
  to	
  be	
  statistical	
  outliers	
  (Black	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001;	
  Luikart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003;	
  Nielsen,	
  2005;	
  Stinchcombe	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2008;	
  Storz,	
  2005).	
  	
  Only	
  the	
  locus-­‐specific	
  effects	
  of	
  selection	
  can	
  explain	
  such	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  diversity.	
  	
  This	
  ‘bottom-­‐up’	
  strategy	
  allows	
  us	
  to	
  assay	
  genetic	
  variability	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  with	
  no	
  a	
  priori	
  assumptions	
  about	
  the	
  specific	
  phenotypic	
  traits	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
   Several	
  types	
  of	
  markers	
  have	
  been	
  widely	
  used	
  in	
  genome	
  scan	
  studies	
  of	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms,	
  including	
  amplified	
  fragment	
  length	
  polymorphisms	
  (AFLP),	
  single	
  nucleotide	
  polymorphisms	
  (SNP),	
  and	
  microsatellites	
  (Luikart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  Amplified	
  fragment	
  length	
  polymorphisms	
  have	
  broad	
  genomic	
  coverage,	
  produce	
  many	
  markers	
  at	
  low	
  cost,	
  and	
  do	
  not	
  require	
  prior	
  sequence	
  information	
  (Bonin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007),	
  but	
  these	
  dominant	
  markers	
  contain	
  less	
  information	
  and	
  any	
  locus	
  exhibiting	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  will	
  be	
  anonymous.	
  	
  Single	
  nucleotide	
  polymorphisms	
  are	
  also	
  broadly	
  distribution	
  throughout	
  the	
  genome,	
  have	
  low	
  genotyping	
  error	
  rates,	
  and	
  better-­‐understood	
  mutation	
  models.	
  	
  However,	
  a	
  large	
  number	
  of	
  these	
  co-­‐dominant	
  loci	
  are	
  needed	
  (2-­‐6	
  times	
  as	
  many	
  as	
  polymorphic	
  loci),	
  which	
  makes	
  their	
  identification	
  and	
  application	
  expensive	
  and	
  laborious	
  in	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms	
  without	
  sufficient	
  genomic	
  resources	
  (Morin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  Alternatively,	
  microsatellites	
  are	
  highly	
  variable	
  and	
  the	
  primers	
  work	
  in	
  closely	
  related	
  species.	
  	
  Expressed	
  sequence-­‐tag	
  (EST)	
  libraries	
  are	
  available	
  for	
  many	
  species,	
  which	
  offers	
  a	
  much	
  more	
  cost-­‐effective	
  and	
  efficient	
  approach	
  for	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms	
  because	
  they	
  enable	
  users	
  to	
  target	
  the	
  functional	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  genome	
  (Bouck	
  and	
  Vision,	
  2007;	
  Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008;	
  Vasemagi	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005;	
  Wiehe	
   et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  	
   Expressed	
  sequence	
  tag-­‐linked	
  microsatellites	
  are	
  sequences	
  of	
  tandem	
  repeat	
  units	
  (Bouck	
  and	
  Vision,	
  2007).	
  	
  They	
  are	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  introns	
  flanking	
  expressed	
  genes	
  and	
  are	
  unlikely	
  to	
  be	
  broken	
  up	
  by	
  recombination	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  close	
  proximity	
  to	
  the	
  gene.	
  	
  The	
  spread	
  of	
  a	
  beneficial	
  mutation	
  through	
  a	
  population	
  reduces	
  variability	
  at	
  the	
  selected	
  gene	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  its	
  flanking	
  regions	
  through	
  hitch-­‐hiking	
   	
  	
  	
   19	
   effects	
  (Slatkin,	
  1995;	
  Smith	
  and	
  Haigh,	
  1974).	
  	
  Positive	
  selection	
  acting	
  on	
  the	
  gene	
  can	
  be	
  inferred	
  when	
  patterns	
  of	
  significantly	
  reduced	
  variability	
  are	
  detected	
  at	
  the	
  linked	
  microsatellite	
  marker.	
   This	
  approach	
  has	
  previously	
  been	
  applied	
  to	
  divergent	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  kokanee	
  from	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (Russello	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  Over	
  11,000	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  were	
  scanned	
  for	
  polymorphism,	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  panel	
  of	
  57	
  markers	
  (49	
  EST-­‐linked	
  and	
  8	
  anonymous).	
  	
  Using	
  three	
  different	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches,	
  eight	
  putative	
  outliers	
  were	
  identified	
  including	
  three	
  loci	
  that	
  were	
  detected	
  by	
  multiple	
  approaches.	
  	
  However,	
  this	
  study	
  was	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  single	
  lake,	
  which	
  precluded	
  validation	
  of	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  selection	
  in	
  driving	
  adaptive	
  divergence	
  in	
  this	
  system.	
   Since	
  outliers	
  can	
  be	
  difficult	
  to	
  distinguish	
  from	
  background	
  selection	
  or	
  neutral	
  variation	
  when	
  selection	
  is	
  weak,	
  several	
  methods	
  have	
  been	
  proposed	
  to	
  eliminate	
  false	
  positives	
  and	
  ensure	
  that	
  detected	
  outliers	
  are	
  robust.	
  	
  Environmental-­‐genotype	
  correlations	
  can	
  be	
  tested	
  when	
  environmental	
  data	
  is	
  available	
  (Bonin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Holderegger	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Joost	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Landry	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Wilding	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001),	
  but	
  this	
  approach	
  is	
  most	
  appropriate	
  when	
  populations	
  are	
  collected	
  along	
  an	
  environmental	
  gradient	
  and	
  agents	
  of	
  selection	
  are	
  known	
  a	
  priori.	
  	
  In	
  general,	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  multiple	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches	
  is	
  commonly	
  advocated	
  (Nunes	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  testing	
  for	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  in	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  across	
  multiple	
  independent	
  samples	
  (Colosimo	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Hohenlohe	
   et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Oetjen	
  and	
  Reusch,	
  2007;	
  Schlötterer,	
  2003).	
  	
  Local	
  adaptation	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  parsimonious	
  explanation	
  for	
  the	
  repeated	
  evolution	
  of	
  particular	
  phenotypes	
  in	
  geographically	
  discrete	
  populations	
  experiencing	
  similar	
  ecological	
  conditions	
  (Johannesson,	
  2001;	
  McKinnon	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  If	
  a	
  common	
  genetic	
  basis	
  (e.g.	
  same	
  genes)	
  can	
  be	
  identified	
  across	
  multiple	
  ecotype	
  pairs,	
  strong	
  evidence	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  can	
  be	
  inferred	
  since	
  the	
  probability	
  of	
  detecting	
  spurious	
  patterns	
  of	
  parallel	
  evolution	
  is	
  very	
  low	
  (Hendry,	
  2009;	
  Johannesson,	
  2001;	
  McKinnon	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
   Here,	
  I	
  test	
  for	
  evidence	
  of	
  directional	
  selection	
  driving	
  adaptive	
  divergence	
  in	
  sympatric	
  ecotypes	
  (shore	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners)	
  of	
  kokanee	
  salmon	
  in	
  five	
  British	
  Columbian	
  lakes.	
  	
  Four	
  conceptually	
  different	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches	
  are	
  used	
  to	
  evaluate	
  patterns	
  of	
  gene	
  diversity	
  and	
   	
  	
  	
   20	
   differentiation	
  at	
  57	
  EST-­‐linked	
  and	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  loci.	
  	
  Recovered	
  patterns	
  of	
  neutral	
  and	
  adaptive	
  genetic	
  variation	
  are	
  used	
  to	
  test	
  hypotheses	
  regarding	
  the	
  origin	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  behaviour	
  (e.g.	
  either	
  a	
  polyphyletic	
  group	
  arising	
  independently	
  in	
  each	
  lake	
  or	
  a	
  para-­‐	
  or	
  monophyletic	
  group	
  with	
  a	
  common	
  ancestor)	
  and	
  identify	
  candidate	
  genes	
  associated	
  with	
  local	
  adaptations	
  that	
  may	
  be	
  restricting	
  gene	
  flow	
  among	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee.	
  	
   2.2	
  	
  Methods	
   2.2.1	
  	
  Study	
  sites	
  	
   Six	
  lakes	
  containing	
  sympatric	
  populations	
  of	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  study:	
  Wood,	
  Okanagan,	
  Kootenay,	
  Duncan,	
  Christina,	
  and	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lakes	
  (Figure	
  2.1).	
  	
  The	
  lakes	
  vary	
  in	
  size	
  and	
  time	
  since	
  isolation.	
  	
  They	
  all	
  have	
  records	
  of	
  minimal	
  stocking,	
  little	
  or	
  no	
  overlap	
  with	
  wild	
  sockeye	
  populations,	
  and	
  are	
  distributed	
  across	
  the	
  Columbia	
  and	
  Fraser	
  River	
  drainage	
  systems.	
  	
  Wood	
  and	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  are	
  located	
  in	
  the	
  central	
  interior	
  of	
  BC.	
  	
  Kootenay,	
  Duncan,	
  and	
  Christina	
  Lakes	
  are	
  located	
  in	
  the	
  eastern	
  interior	
  of	
  BC.	
  	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  is	
  located	
  in	
  northern	
  BC	
  (Figure	
  2.1).	
  	
  Each	
  lake	
  is	
  characterized	
  by	
  deep,	
  cold,	
  clear	
  water	
  with	
  rocky	
  shores	
  and	
  low	
  productivity	
  (i.e.	
  oligotrophic	
  conditions),	
  except	
  for	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  (Table	
  A.1).	
  	
  Productivity	
  has	
  increased	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  due	
  to	
  longer	
  water	
  residence	
  time	
  and	
  increased	
  nutrient	
  loads	
  over	
  the	
  last	
  20	
  years.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  the	
  kokanee	
  grow	
  larger	
  than	
  usual	
  and	
  sustain	
  the	
  highest	
  angling	
  pressure	
  in	
  BC.	
  	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  is	
  the	
  first	
  of	
  five	
  valley	
  bottom	
  lakes	
  in	
  the	
  Okanagan	
  River	
  basin,	
  which	
  is	
  tributary	
  to	
  the	
  Columbia	
  River.	
  	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  is	
  the	
  third	
  lake	
  in	
  this	
  chain	
  and	
  separated	
  from	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  by	
  Kalamalka	
  Lake.	
  	
  These	
  three	
  lakes	
  contain	
  both	
  stream-­‐	
  and	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  ecotypes,	
  but	
  historical	
  gene	
  flow	
  was	
  probably	
  low	
  owing	
  to	
  the	
  marked	
  difference	
  in	
  nutrient	
  water	
  chemistry	
  of	
  Kalamalka	
  Lake.	
  	
  Starting	
  in	
  the	
  1920’s,	
  dam	
  construction	
  above	
  and	
  below	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  has	
  eliminated	
  the	
  upstream	
  migration	
  of	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  from	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  Okanagan	
  River	
  and	
  any	
  migration	
  of	
  kokanee	
  between	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  (Long,	
  2003).	
  	
  Despite	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  native	
  kokanee,	
  all	
  five	
  Okanagan	
  River	
  lakes	
  were	
  stocked	
  from	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  to	
  some	
  extent.	
   	
  	
  	
   21	
   Figure	
  2.1	
  	
  The	
  geographic	
  location	
  of	
  the	
  six	
  lakes	
  sampled	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada.	
  	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lakes	
  are	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  Okanagan	
  River	
  Chain,	
  Duncan	
  and	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  are	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  Kootenay	
  River	
  Chain,	
  and	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  feeds	
  into	
  the	
  Kettle	
  River,	
  all	
  of	
  which	
  are	
  tributary	
  to	
  the	
  Columbia	
  River	
  in	
  Washington	
  state,	
  USA.	
  	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  is	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  Fraser	
  River	
  Drainage	
  system,	
  which	
  feeds	
  into	
  the	
  Pacific	
  just	
  above	
  the	
  Canada-­‐USA	
  border.	
  	
  This	
  map	
  was	
  generated	
  by	
  Natural	
  Resources	
  Canada.	
   In	
  the	
  east,	
  Kootenay	
  is	
  the	
  largest	
  lake	
  and	
  consists	
  of	
  three	
  geochemically	
  distinct	
  arms	
  that	
  experience	
  very	
  limited	
  biotic	
  exchange	
  (Anders	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  Our	
  study	
  sites	
  are	
  concentrated	
  at	
  the	
  distal	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  West	
  Arm,	
  which	
  is	
  riverine	
  in	
  shape	
  and	
  flow.	
  	
  Since	
  North	
  Arm	
  kokanee	
  (especially	
  Meadow	
  Creek)	
  have	
  been	
  extensively	
  used	
  to	
  stock	
  other	
  lakes	
  in	
  BC,	
  I	
  included	
  two	
  sites	
  from	
  this	
  region	
  (Meadow	
  Creek	
  and	
  Lower	
  Duncan	
  River)	
  to	
  evaluate	
  its	
  influence	
  on	
  the	
  genetic	
  composition	
   	
  	
  	
   22	
   of	
  populations	
  in	
  recipient	
  lakes	
  (including	
  the	
  West	
  Arm,	
  Okanagan,	
  Wood,	
  and	
  Christina	
  Lakes).	
  	
  In	
  1967,	
  Duncan	
  Dam	
  was	
  constructed	
  just	
  upstream	
  of	
  the	
  North	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake,	
  which	
  created	
  a	
  small	
  reservoir	
  now	
  known	
  as	
  Duncan	
  Lake.	
  	
  Shore-­‐spawners	
  were	
  first	
  observed	
  in	
  this	
  area	
  following	
  the	
  construction	
  of	
  the	
  dam	
  and	
  shore	
  sites	
  are	
  found	
  in	
  close	
  proximity	
  to	
  tributaries.	
  	
  Both	
  Duncan	
  and	
  Kootenay	
  Lakes	
  are	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  Kootenay	
  River	
  chain	
  and	
  are	
  tributary	
  to	
  the	
  Columbia	
  River.	
  	
  Below	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  lies	
  Bonnington	
  Falls,	
  a	
  natural	
  feature	
  that	
  has	
  blocked	
  the	
  passage	
  of	
  sockeye	
  since	
  the	
  lake	
  was	
  formed.	
  	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  is	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  Kettle	
  River	
  system,	
  which	
  runs	
  adjacent	
  to	
  the	
  Kootenay	
  River	
  and	
  also	
  feed	
  into	
  the	
  Columbia	
  River.	
  	
  This	
  small	
  lake	
  is	
  very	
  deep,	
  but	
  warm,	
  and	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  exhibit	
  the	
  greatest	
  divergence	
  in	
  spawning	
  timing	
  (~3	
  months).	
  	
  Despite	
  low	
  fishing	
  pressure,	
  the	
  lake	
  was	
  stocked	
  from	
  the	
  North	
  and	
  West	
  Arms	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  in	
  the	
  1980’s.	
  	
  	
   In	
  northern	
  BC,	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  is	
  a	
  small	
  but	
  deep	
  lake	
  in	
  the	
  headwaters	
  of	
  the	
  Fraser	
  River	
  system.	
  	
  The	
  small	
  catchment	
  area	
  of	
  this	
  lake	
  causes	
  smaller	
  tributaries	
  (e.g.	
  Drew	
  creek)	
  to	
  be	
  prone	
  to	
  drought.	
  	
  The	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  site	
  encompasses	
  a	
  small	
  (0.5	
  km2)	
  island	
  in	
  the	
  center	
  of	
  the	
  lake,	
  which	
  can	
  be	
  subject	
  to	
  considerable	
  wave	
  action	
  due	
  to	
  wind.	
  	
  Beaver	
  dams	
  are	
  thought	
  to	
  make	
  this	
  lake	
  inaccessible	
  to	
  anadromous	
  sockeye	
  because	
  there	
  are	
  no	
  records	
  of	
  sockeye	
  ever	
  entering	
  this	
  lake	
  (J.	
  DeGisi,	
  pers.	
  comm.).	
  	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  has	
  no	
  record	
  of	
  stocking	
  from	
  foreign	
  lakes.	
   2.2.2	
  	
  Site	
  selection	
  &	
  sample	
  collection	
   Between	
  2007	
  and	
  2011,	
  tissue	
  samples	
  were	
  collected	
  from	
  16	
  to	
  48	
  mature	
  kokanee	
  (i.e.	
  exhibiting	
  bright	
  breeding	
  coloration)	
  from	
  each	
  sampling	
  site	
  during	
  the	
  peak	
  of	
  their	
  respective	
  spawning	
  period	
  (Table	
  A.2).	
  	
  Adipose	
  fins	
  were	
  taken	
  from	
  live	
  spawners	
  caught	
  with	
  dip	
  nets	
  in	
  Drew	
  Creek	
  of	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake.	
  	
  At	
  the	
  shore	
  sites	
  of	
  Christina,	
  Tchesinkut,	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lakes,	
  a	
  3-­‐4	
  cm	
  gillnet	
  was	
  set	
  parallel	
  to	
  the	
  shoreline	
  over	
  night	
  to	
  catch	
  kokanee	
  because	
  carcasses	
  rarely	
  wash	
  onshore	
  or	
  are	
  quickly	
  consumed	
  by	
  scavengers	
  at	
  these	
  sites.	
  	
  At	
  all	
  other	
  sampling	
  sites,	
  a	
  single	
  hole-­‐punch	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  collect	
  operculum	
  tissue	
  from	
  fresh	
  carcasses	
  found	
  along	
  the	
  banks	
  adjacent	
  to	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
   	
  	
  	
   23	
   stream-­‐spawning	
  aggregations.	
  	
  All	
  tissue	
  samples	
  were	
  preserved	
  in	
  2	
  ml	
  vials	
  containing	
  100%	
  ethanol	
  and	
  stored	
  at	
  -­‐20°C	
  for	
  subsequent	
  DNA	
  analysis.	
   Given	
  the	
  many	
  spawning	
  streams	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  only	
  the	
  primary	
  stream-­‐	
  and	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  stocks	
  were	
  sampled.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  West	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake,	
  the	
  two	
  streams	
  that	
  were	
  selected	
  had	
  the	
  greatest	
  potential	
  for	
  gene	
  flow	
  with	
  the	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  populations	
  size	
  and	
  proximity	
  to	
  the	
  shore	
  site.	
  	
  Inclusion	
  of	
  multiple	
  stocks	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  ecotype	
  in	
  most	
  lakes	
  should	
  lead	
  to	
  a	
  more	
  conservative	
  assessment	
  of	
  outlier	
  behavior	
  (i.e.	
  reduces	
  the	
  probability	
  of	
  Type	
  I	
  error).	
  	
  	
   2.2.3	
  	
  Data	
  collection	
   Genotypic	
  data	
  was	
  previously	
  collected	
  for	
  three	
  shore-­‐	
  (n=72)	
  and	
  four	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  stocks	
  (n=72)	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  in	
  2007	
  and	
  2010	
  (Table	
  A.2;	
  Russello	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  For	
  488	
  fish	
  sampled	
  Ffrom	
  the	
  other	
  five	
  lakes,	
  total	
  genomic	
  DNA	
  was	
  extracted	
  with	
  the	
  NucleoSpin	
  Tissue	
  kit	
  (Macherey	
  Nagel)	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  manufacturer’s	
  suggested	
  protocol	
  for	
  96-­‐well	
  plates.	
  	
  All	
  samples	
  were	
  polymerase	
  chain	
  reaction	
  (PCR)-­‐amplified	
  at	
  49	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  and	
  8	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  known	
  to	
  be	
  polymorphic	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  (Russello	
  et	
   al.,	
  2012),	
  except	
  for	
  kokanee	
  from	
  the	
  North	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake.	
  	
  Shore-­‐spawners	
  are	
  not	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  North	
  Arm	
  but	
  56	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  were	
  amplified	
  at	
  the	
  8	
  anonymous	
  loci	
  for	
  phylogeographic	
  analyses.	
  	
  	
   Each	
  PCR	
  contained	
  1.25	
  µl	
  of	
  10x	
  PCR	
  buffer,	
  1.25	
  µl	
  of	
  2	
  mM	
  dNTP	
  mix,	
  0.5	
  µl	
  of	
  1	
  mM	
  forward	
  primer,	
  0.5	
  µl	
  of	
  10	
  mM	
  M13	
  fluorescent	
  labeled	
  primer,	
  0.5	
  µl	
  of	
  10	
  mM	
  reverse	
  primer,	
  0.5	
  Units	
  of	
   Taq	
  polymerase	
  and	
  20	
  to	
  80	
  ng	
  of	
  DNA	
  template	
  for	
  a	
  total	
  reaction	
  volume	
  of	
  12.5	
  µl.	
  	
  To	
  allow	
  for	
  multiplex	
  genotyping,	
  all	
  forward	
  primers	
  were	
  modified	
  to	
  incorporate	
  the	
  M13	
  sequence	
  [5’-­‐TCCCAGTCACGA-­‐CGT	
  -­‐3’]	
  at	
  the	
  5’-­‐end	
  of	
  the	
  PCR	
  amplicon	
  (Schuelke,	
  2000)	
  so	
  that	
  the	
  M13	
  primer	
  that	
  was	
  	
  labeled	
  with	
  one	
  of	
  four	
  fluorescent	
  dyes:	
  6-­‐FAM	
  (Integrated	
  DNA	
  Technologies)	
  VIC,	
  NED,	
  or	
  PET	
  (Applied	
  Biosystems)	
  could	
  be	
  incorporated.	
  	
  PCR	
  products	
  for	
  four	
  markers,	
  one	
  with	
  each	
   	
  	
  	
   24	
   fluorescent	
  tag,	
  were	
  then	
  combined	
  on	
  a	
  single	
  panel	
  for	
  genotyping.	
  	
  Each	
  reverse	
  primer	
  was	
  modified	
  to	
  include	
  a	
  GTTT-­‐tail	
  for	
  improved	
  scoring	
  quality	
  (Brownstein	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  	
  All	
  reactions	
  use	
  KAPA	
  Taq	
  DNA	
  polymerase	
  (Kapa	
  Biosystems),	
  except	
  for	
  markers	
  EV170,	
  OMM5008,	
  OMM5067,	
  and	
  One14.	
  	
  AmpliTaq	
  Gold	
  DNA	
  polymerase	
  (Applied	
  Biosystems)	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  promote	
  amplification	
  of	
  these	
  markers.	
   Amplification	
  of	
  targeted	
  loci	
  was	
  achieved	
  using	
  a	
  touchdown	
  cycling	
  program	
  on	
  a	
  Veriti	
  thermal	
  cycler	
  (Applied	
  Biosystems).	
  	
  The	
  program	
  started	
  with	
  an	
  initial	
  denaturation	
  at	
  94	
  ˚C	
  for	
  2	
  minutes	
  (or	
  10	
  minutes	
  for	
  reactions	
  using	
  AmpliTaq	
  Gold),	
  followed	
  by	
  20	
  cycles	
  at	
  94	
  ˚C	
  for	
  30	
  seconds,	
  60	
  ˚C	
  for	
  30	
  seconds,	
  and	
  72	
  ˚C	
  for	
  30	
  seconds	
  with	
  the	
  annealing	
  temperature	
  decreasing	
  by	
  0.5	
  ˚C	
  per	
  cycle.	
  	
  The	
  annealing	
  temperature	
  is	
  held	
  at	
  50	
  ˚C	
  for	
  15	
  more	
  cycles	
  and	
  then	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  final	
  extension	
  at	
  72	
  ˚C	
  for	
  2	
  min.	
  	
  DNA	
  fragments	
  were	
  analyzed	
  on	
  an	
  Applied	
  Biosystems	
  3130XL	
  DNA	
  automated	
  sequencer	
  using	
  the	
  GS500	
  LIZ	
  size	
  standard	
  to	
  determine	
  fragment	
  length.	
  	
  Two	
  independent	
  investigators	
  manually	
  scored	
  all	
  alleles	
  in	
  GENEMAPPER	
  4.0	
  (Applied	
  Biosystems)	
  based	
  on	
  peak	
  topography	
  and	
  intensity.	
  	
  Universal	
  marker	
  bins	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  improve	
  the	
  consistency	
  of	
  allele	
  calls	
  across	
  the	
  entire	
  dataset.	
  	
  At	
  this	
  point,	
  the	
  raw	
  genotypic	
  data	
  generated	
  for	
  the	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  by	
  Russello	
  et	
  al.	
  (2012)	
  was	
  incorporated	
  with	
  the	
  newly	
  generated	
  data.	
   2.2.4	
  	
  Data	
  quality	
  and	
  definition	
  of	
  genetic	
  units	
   Loci	
  were	
  tested	
  for	
  null	
  alleles	
  using	
  MICROCHECKER	
  (Van	
  Oosterhout	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004),	
  deviations	
  from	
  Hardy-­‐Weinberg	
  Equilibrium	
  (HWE)	
  using	
  the	
  Markov	
  chain–Monte	
  Carlo	
  (MCMC)	
  approximation	
  of	
  Fisher’s	
  exact	
  test	
  (using	
  1,000	
  batches	
  with	
  1,000	
  iterations;	
  Guo	
  and	
  Thompson,	
  1992)	
  and	
  linkage	
  disequilibrium	
  (LD)	
  was	
  assessed	
  for	
  all	
  possible	
  marker	
  combinations	
  using	
  simulated	
  exact	
  tests	
  as	
  implemented	
  in	
  GENEPOP	
  3.3	
  (Raymond	
  and	
  Rousset,	
  1995).	
  	
  In	
  tests	
  of	
  LD	
  and	
  HWE,	
  statistical	
  significance	
  (α)	
  was	
  adjusted	
  for	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  simultaneous	
  tests	
  k	
  (α/k	
  for	
  α	
  =	
  0.05)	
  using	
  a	
  sequential	
  Bonferroni	
  procedure	
  (Rice,	
  1989)	
  to	
  reduce	
  Type	
  I	
  errors.	
  	
  Since	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  selection	
  can	
  generate	
  patterns	
  of	
  LD	
  and	
  violates	
  a	
  critical	
  assumption	
  of	
  HWE,	
  ecotype	
  groups	
  from	
  each	
  lake	
  were	
   	
  	
  	
   25	
   evaluated	
  separately	
  and	
  loci	
  were	
  only	
  removed	
  if	
  LD	
  or	
  Hardy-­‐Weinberg	
  disequilibrium	
  was	
  detected	
  for	
  both	
  ecotypes.	
   Descriptive	
  statistics	
  for	
  the	
  final	
  dataset	
  were	
  generated	
  in	
  GenAlEx	
  version	
  6.2	
  (Peakall	
  and	
  Smouse,	
  2006),	
  including	
  locus-­‐,	
  site-­‐	
  (Table	
  A.3),	
  and	
  ecotype-­‐specific	
  (Table	
  2.1)	
  mean	
  number	
  of	
  alleles	
  (NA),	
  sample	
  size	
  (N),	
  observed	
  heterozygosity	
  (Ho),	
  expected	
  heterozygosity	
  (He;	
  Nei,	
  1987),	
  and	
  the	
  percentage	
  of	
  polymorphic	
  loci	
  in	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
  In	
  lieu	
  of	
  markers	
  known	
  to	
  be	
  truly	
  neutral,	
  a	
  preliminary	
  assessment	
  of	
  population	
  structure	
  was	
  conducted	
  using	
  eight	
  anonymous,	
  highly	
  variable	
  microsatellite	
  markers	
  that	
  are	
  frequently	
  used	
  in	
  population	
  genetic	
  studies	
  of	
  Oncorhynchus	
  nerka	
  (Olsen	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996;	
  Scribner	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996;	
  Wright	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Given	
  the	
  extensive	
  stocking	
  history	
  of	
  kokanee	
  in	
  BC	
  and	
  unknown	
  strength	
  of	
  philopatry,	
  I	
  tested	
  the	
  correspondence	
  of	
  geographically	
  separated	
  stocks	
  and	
  ecotypes	
  as	
  discrete	
  genetic	
  units	
  by	
  calculating	
  pair-­‐wise	
  estimates	
  of	
  differentiation	
  (FST)	
  in	
  ARLEQUIN	
  3.5	
  (Excoffier	
  and	
  Lischer,	
  2010)	
  and	
  using	
  the	
  Bayesian	
  clustering	
  method	
  of	
  Pritchard	
  et	
  al.	
  (2000)	
  implemented	
  in	
  STRUCTURE	
  2.3.3	
  (see	
  population	
  genetics	
  section	
  for	
  details	
  of	
  the	
  analysis).	
  	
  	
   2.2.5	
  	
  Outlier	
  locus	
  detection	
  and	
  annotation	
  	
   A	
  number	
  of	
  different	
  statistical	
  approaches	
  are	
  available	
  for	
  outlier-­‐detection,	
  each	
  with	
  a	
  different	
  algorithm	
  and	
  associated	
  assumptions	
  regarding	
  gene	
  flow,	
  effective	
  population	
  size,	
  and	
  population	
  structure	
  (Storz,	
  2005;	
  Vasemagi	
  and	
  Primmer,	
  2005).	
  	
  I	
  tested	
  for	
  signatures	
  of	
  directional	
  selection	
  at	
  polymorphic	
  loci	
  based	
  on	
  patterns	
  of	
  heterozygosity	
  (lnRH;	
  Kauer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003),	
  FST	
  (DetSel;	
  Vitalis	
  et	
   al.,	
  2003),	
  and	
  both	
  FST	
  and	
  heterozygosity	
  (Lositan	
  Selection	
  Workbench;	
  Antao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  BayeScan;	
  Foll	
  and	
  Gaggiotti,	
  2008)	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype	
  pair,	
  separately.	
  	
  	
   In	
  general,	
  selection	
  on	
  a	
  linked	
  marker	
  should	
  appear	
  as	
  a	
  selective	
  sweep,	
  i.e.	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  homozygosity	
  at	
  the	
  selected	
  gene	
  and	
  its	
  flanking	
  regions	
  as	
  the	
  gene	
  sweeps	
  through	
  the	
  population	
  (Barton,	
  2000;	
  Kaplan	
  et	
  al.,	
  1989).	
  	
  This	
  process	
  is	
  inferred	
  by	
  a	
  heterozygosity	
  deficit.	
  	
  The	
  lnRH	
  test	
   	
  	
  	
   26	
   compares	
  genetic	
  diversity	
  among	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  by	
  calculating	
  the	
  ratio	
  of	
  expected	
  heterozygosity	
  for	
  each	
  locus	
  (Kauer	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  Monomorphic	
  loci	
  were	
  assumed	
  to	
  have	
  one	
  allele	
  that	
  differed	
  from	
  the	
  others	
  to	
  avoid	
  dividing	
  by	
  zero.	
  	
  The	
  lnRH	
  estimates	
  were	
  standardized	
  to	
  a	
  mean	
  of	
  0	
  and	
  a	
  standard	
  deviation	
  of	
  1,	
  so	
  that	
  90%,	
  95%	
  and	
  99%	
  of	
  the	
  loci	
  are	
  expected	
  to	
  have	
  values	
  of	
  ±	
  1.64,	
  	
  ±	
  1.96,	
  and	
  ±	
  2.58,	
  respectively.	
  	
  Loci	
  with	
  values	
  outside	
  these	
  boundaries	
  were	
  considered	
  significant	
  at	
  the	
  respective	
  level.	
   Under	
  a	
  pure	
  divergence	
  model	
  (i.e.	
  an	
  ancestral	
  population	
  splits	
  into	
  two	
  daughter	
  populations),	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  was	
  assessed	
  in	
  a	
  pair-­‐wise	
  fashion	
  based	
  on	
  population	
  specific	
  F-­‐statistics	
  using	
  the	
  probabilistic	
  approach	
  implemented	
  in	
  DETSEL	
  1.0	
  (Vitalis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  Coalescent	
  simulations	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  generate	
  a	
  joint	
  distribution	
  of	
  expected	
  FST	
  values	
  under	
  a	
  neutral	
  model	
  of	
  evolution	
  (i.e.	
  a	
  confidence	
  envelope)	
  against	
  which	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  was	
  evaluated.	
  	
  For	
  all	
  post-­‐glacial	
  ecotype	
  pairs,	
  null	
  distributions	
  were	
  generated	
  assuming	
  that	
  the	
  ancestral	
  population	
  had	
  a	
  constant	
  effective	
  population	
  size	
  (Ne)	
  of	
  500,	
  1000,	
  or	
  10,000,	
  prior	
  to	
  a	
  bottleneck	
  when	
  population	
  size	
  (No)	
  declined	
  to	
  500	
  individuals	
  for	
  a	
  duration	
  of	
  50,	
  100,	
  or	
  1000	
  non-­‐overlapping	
  generations	
  (To).	
  	
  The	
  mutation	
  rate	
  (μ)	
  was	
  assumed	
  to	
  be	
  0.0001	
  or	
  0.00001	
  and	
  time	
  since	
  the	
  population	
  split	
  (t)	
  was	
  assumed	
  to	
  be	
  100	
  generations.	
  	
  Since	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  was	
  formed	
  only	
  45	
  years	
  ago,	
  nuisance	
  parameters	
  were	
  adjusted	
  for	
  this	
  lake	
  (Ne	
  =	
  100,	
  500,	
  and	
  5000;	
  No=	
  50;	
  To	
  =5,	
  10,	
  or	
  20;	
  t	
  =	
  1).	
  	
  Outliers	
  were	
  determined	
  based	
  on	
  an	
  empirical	
  P-­‐value	
  for	
  each	
  locus	
  at	
  the	
  90%,	
  95%	
  and	
  99%	
  levels	
  using	
  two-­‐dimensional	
  arrays	
  of	
  50	
  ×	
  50	
  square	
  cells	
  (Vitalis	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  Loci	
  falling	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  confidence	
  envelope	
  were	
  identified	
  as	
  putatively	
  outliers.	
  	
   LOSITAN	
  and	
  BAYESCAN	
  both	
  implement	
  the	
  FDIST2	
  approach	
  of	
  Beaumont	
  and	
  Nichols	
  (1996),	
  which	
  simulates	
  the	
  expected	
  relationship	
  between	
  FST	
  and	
  He	
  under	
  a	
  neutral	
  model	
  of	
  evolution	
  against	
  which	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  can	
  be	
  assessed.	
  	
  The	
  approach	
  implemented	
  in	
  LOSITAN	
  SELECTION	
  WORKBENCH	
  (Antao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008)	
  assumes	
  an	
  island	
  model	
  of	
  migration	
  (i.e.	
  a	
  set	
  of	
  populations	
  with	
  constant	
  and	
  equal	
  subpopulation	
  sizes	
  that	
  are	
  connected	
  by	
  gene	
  flow),	
  and	
  uses	
  coalescent	
  simulations	
  to	
  generate	
  the	
  null	
  distribution	
  to	
  identify	
  loci	
  displaying	
  exceptionally	
  high	
  (or	
  low)	
  FST	
  values.	
  	
  An	
   	
  	
  	
   27	
   infinite	
  alleles	
  model	
  (e.g.	
  assuming	
  each	
  mutation	
  that	
  arises	
  is	
  unique)	
  was	
  used	
  because	
  the	
  dynamics	
  of	
  microsatellite	
  mutation	
  is	
  more	
  complex	
  than	
  is	
  reflected	
  by	
  the	
  step-­‐wise	
  mutation	
  model	
  (i.e.	
  it	
  assumes	
  slippage	
  during	
  replication	
  can	
  cause	
  single	
  repeat	
  unit	
  changes),	
  especially	
  when	
  differences	
  in	
  the	
  type	
  and	
  length	
  of	
  the	
  repeat	
  motifs	
  in	
  our	
  dataset	
  are	
  considered	
  (Ellegren,	
  2000).	
  	
  In	
  the	
  initial	
  50,000	
  simulations,	
  loci	
  outside	
  a	
  95%	
  confidence	
  interval	
  (CI)	
  were	
  removed	
  so	
  that	
  a	
  more	
  accurate,	
  mean	
  neutral	
  FST	
  could	
  be	
  calculated.	
  	
  In	
  a	
  second	
  set	
  of	
  50,000	
  simulations,	
  this	
  mean	
  neutral	
  FST	
  was	
  forced	
  to	
  calculate	
  the	
  probability	
  of	
  each	
  locus	
  being	
  under	
  selection	
  based	
  on	
  90%,	
  95%,	
  and	
  99%	
  CI.	
  	
  To	
  assess	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  population	
  substructure,	
  if	
  any,	
  the	
  same	
  algorithm	
  was	
  implemented	
  in	
  ARELQUIN	
  (Excoffier	
  and	
  Lischer,	
  2010),	
  but	
  a	
  hierarchical	
  island	
  model	
  of	
  migration	
  was	
  incorporated	
  such	
  that	
  stocks	
  within	
  ecotypes	
  could	
  exchange	
  migrants	
  at	
  a	
  higher	
  rate	
  than	
  among	
  ecotypes,	
  because	
  strays	
  may	
  prefer	
  their	
  native	
  type	
  of	
  spawning	
  habitat	
  (Gomez-­‐Uchida	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
  Results	
  from	
  these	
  two	
  methods	
  were	
  compared,	
  but	
  ultimately	
  the	
  results	
  from	
  ARLEQUIN	
  were	
  not	
  reported	
  owing	
  to	
  its	
  propensity	
  for	
  Type	
  I	
  errors	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  and	
  in	
  other	
  literature	
  (Narum	
  and	
  Hess,	
  2011).	
   The	
  FDIST2	
  approach	
  implemented	
  in	
  BAYESCAN	
  2.0	
  (Foll	
  and	
  Gaggiotti,	
  2008)	
  is	
  modified	
  to	
  use	
  Bayesian-­‐based	
  simulations.	
  	
  For	
  each	
  locus,	
  posterior	
  probabilities	
  are	
  estimated	
  for	
  two	
  alternative	
  models	
  (one	
  with	
  and	
  one	
  without	
  the	
  locus-­‐specific	
  effects	
  of	
  selection)	
  using	
  a	
  reversible	
  jump	
  MCMC	
  approach.	
  	
  The	
  Bayes	
  Factor	
  is	
  calculated	
  from	
  the	
  ratio	
  of	
  posterior	
  probabilities	
  for	
  these	
  two	
  models,	
  which	
  provides	
  the	
  scale	
  of	
  evidence.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  MCMC	
  algorithm,	
  20	
  pilot	
  runs	
  of	
  5000	
  iterations	
  were	
  conducted	
  followed	
  by	
  100,000	
  iterations	
  with	
  a	
  burn-­‐in	
  of	
  50,000.	
  	
  A	
  Bayes	
  Factor	
  threshold	
  of	
  >3	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  identify	
  outlier	
  loci.	
  	
  According	
  to	
  Jeffrey’s	
  scale	
  of	
  evidence,	
  posterior	
  probabilities	
  of	
  >0.76,	
  >0.91,	
  >0.97	
  are	
  interpreted	
  as	
  ‘substantial’,	
  ‘strong’,	
  and	
  ‘very	
  strong’	
  support	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  selection.	
  	
   Controlling	
  for	
  multiple	
  testing	
  to	
  reduce	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  false	
  positives	
  can	
  be	
  achieved	
  using	
  a	
  Bonferonni	
  correction	
  following	
  the	
  lnRH	
  test	
  and	
  analyses	
  in	
  DETSEL	
  (Schlötterer,	
  2003)	
  and	
  the	
  false	
  discovery	
  rate	
  (FDR)	
  is	
  often	
  applied	
  following	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  analyses	
  in	
  LOSITAN	
  and	
  BAYESCAN	
   	
  	
  	
   28	
   (Benjamini	
  and	
  Hochberg,	
  1995).	
  	
  The	
  FDR	
  is	
  defined	
  as	
  the	
  expected	
  proportion	
  of	
  false	
  positives.	
  	
  However,	
  it	
  was	
  difficult	
  to	
  predict	
  which	
  FDR	
  value	
  (e.g.	
  0.01,	
  0.05,	
  0.10)	
  was	
  a	
  suitable	
  threshold	
  for	
  minimizing	
  Type	
  I	
  error	
  without	
  increasing	
  Type	
  II	
  error	
  since	
  selection	
  is	
  weak	
  in	
  this	
  system	
  (Narum	
  and	
  Hess,	
  2011)	
  and	
  only	
  polymorphic	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  dataset.	
  	
  Instead,	
  I	
  used	
  the	
  repeated	
  detection	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  by	
  multiple	
  algorithms	
  as	
  evidence	
  for	
  robustness	
  (Bonin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Foll	
  and	
  Gaggiotti,	
  2008).	
  	
  Therefore,	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  results	
  from	
  all	
  four	
  approaches	
  at	
  90%,	
  95%	
  and	
  99%	
  CIs	
  were	
  compared	
  and	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  (as	
  referred	
  to	
  hereon)	
  were	
  identified	
  as	
  any	
  locus	
  exhibiting	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  in	
  at	
  least	
  two	
  of	
  the	
  four	
  approaches.	
  	
  Any	
  locus	
  exhibiting	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  in	
  only	
  one	
  approach	
  was	
  considered	
  a	
  false	
  positive	
  (‘false	
  outliers’).	
  	
  If	
  similar	
  selective	
  forces	
  are	
  driving	
  divergence	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  genes	
  in	
  all	
  five	
  closely	
  related	
  ecotype	
  pairs,	
  the	
  same	
  genes	
  regions	
  may	
  be	
  involved	
  in	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  in	
  all	
  five	
  lakes	
  (Campbell	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2004;	
  Colosimo	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  Therefore,	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  identified	
  in	
  two	
  or	
  more	
  lakes	
  were	
  identified	
  as	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’.	
  	
  ‘Repeat-­‐outliers’	
  represent	
  the	
  most	
  promising	
  candidates	
  to	
  be	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  Any	
  locus	
  not	
  detected	
  by	
  any	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approach	
  in	
  any	
  lake	
  was	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  truly	
  neutral	
  (referred	
  to	
  as	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  hereon).	
  	
   Sequence	
  similarity	
  searches	
  were	
  conducted	
  for	
  all	
  ‘true	
  outlier’	
  loci	
  within	
  the	
  consortium	
  for	
  Genomics	
  Research	
  on	
  All	
  Salmon	
  (cGRASP)	
  and	
  the	
  salmonidae	
  database	
  in	
  BLAST	
  to	
  identify	
  the	
  expressed	
  genes	
  linked	
  to	
  ‘true	
  outlier’	
  loci	
  (Salem	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  The	
  functional	
  annotations	
  of	
  each	
  locus	
  are	
  discussed	
  to	
  shed	
  light	
  on	
  some	
  possible	
  mechanisms	
  underlying	
  barriers	
  to	
  gene	
  flow	
  among	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes.	
   2.2.6	
  	
  Population	
  genetic	
  analyses	
   Since	
  loci	
  known	
  to	
  be	
  free	
  of	
  selection	
  can	
  provide	
  a	
  more	
  accurate	
  picture	
  of	
  neutral	
  population	
  structure,	
  I	
  assessed	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  the	
  origin	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  populations	
  by	
  constructing	
  a	
  discriminate	
  analysis	
  of	
  principal	
  components	
  plot	
  (DAPC)	
  using	
  only	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’.	
  	
  This	
  ordination	
  method	
  assumes	
  no	
  model	
  of	
  evolution	
  and	
  plots	
  individuals	
  using	
  linear	
  combinations	
  of	
  allelic	
  data	
   	
  	
  	
   29	
   (synthetic	
  variables)	
  that	
  maximize	
  differences	
  observed	
  among	
  pre-­‐defined	
  groups	
  while	
  minimizing	
  within-­‐group	
  variation	
  (Jombart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  I	
  plotted	
  all	
  individuals	
  using	
  the	
  first	
  two	
  principal	
  components	
  while	
  retaining	
  90%	
  of	
  the	
  variation.	
  	
  Lines	
  connect	
  members	
  of	
  each	
  ecotype	
  group	
  to	
  a	
  central	
  point	
  with	
  a	
  95%	
  confidence	
  envelope	
  around	
  each	
  ecotype	
  group.	
  	
  If	
  greater	
  overlap	
  is	
  exhibited	
  among	
  groups	
  from	
  the	
  same	
  lake	
  than	
  groups	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  ecotype,	
  these	
  populations	
  likely	
  have	
  polyphyletic	
  origins	
  and	
  ecotypes	
  likely	
  diverged	
  in	
  sympatry	
  within	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
   Most	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches	
  use	
  allele	
  frequency	
  distributions	
  to	
  evaluate	
  outlier	
  behaviour,	
  therefore	
  false	
  positives	
  can	
  result	
  when	
  heterozygosity	
  excess	
  is	
  generated	
  through	
  the	
  rapid	
  loss	
  of	
  alleles	
  characteristic	
  of	
  a	
  population	
  bottleneck	
  (Teshima	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Wiehe	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  Knowing	
  several	
  lakes	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  have	
  undergone	
  substantive	
  population	
  declines,	
  I	
  tested	
  for	
  recent	
  population	
  bottlenecks	
  using	
  the	
  one-­‐tailed	
  Wilcoxon	
  test	
  (Cornuet	
  and	
  Luikart,	
  1996)	
  and	
  mode-­‐shift	
  indicator	
  test	
  implemented	
  in	
  BOTTLENECK	
  (Piry	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999)	
  under	
  a	
  two-­‐phase	
  model	
  of	
  mutation	
  (80%	
  step-­‐wise	
  mutation	
  model;	
  Dirienzo	
  et	
  al.,	
  1994)	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  demographic	
  history	
  influenced	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  results.	
  	
  	
   Loci	
  truly	
  under	
  selection	
  are	
  expected	
  to	
  show	
  distinct	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  compared	
  to	
  neutral	
  loci	
  (Storz,	
  2005).	
  	
  Therefore,	
  to	
  further	
  validate	
  outlier	
  loci,	
  I	
  calculated	
  pair-­‐wise	
  estimates	
  of	
  population	
  differentiation	
  (Weir	
  and	
  Cockerham,	
  1984)	
  with	
  95%	
  CIs	
  at	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  ‘true	
  outliers’,	
  and	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype	
  pair	
  in	
  ARLEQUIN	
  3.5	
  (Excoffier	
  and	
  Lischer,	
  2010).	
  	
  The	
  overall	
  amount	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  occurring	
  at	
  the	
  ecotype	
  level	
  was	
  also	
  assessed	
  across	
  all	
  lakes	
  using	
  a	
  hierarchical	
  analysis	
  of	
  molecular	
  variance	
  (AMOVA;	
  Excoffier	
  et	
  al.,	
  1992)	
  as	
  implemented	
  in	
   ARLEQUIN	
  3.5	
  (Excoffier	
  and	
  Lischer,	
  2010).	
  	
  If	
  outliers	
  are	
  truly	
  linked	
  to	
  adaptive	
  gene	
  regions,	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  and	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  are	
  expected	
  to	
  show	
  greater	
  differentiation	
  at	
  the	
  ecotype	
  level	
  overall	
  and	
  among	
  each	
  ecotype	
  pair	
  compared	
  to	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’.	
  	
  If	
  ecotypes	
  have	
  diverged	
  by	
  a	
  common	
  genetic	
  mechanism	
  in	
  multiple	
  lakes,	
  ‘repeat	
  outlier’	
  will	
  show	
  greater	
  differentiation	
  at	
  the	
  ecotype	
  level	
  than	
  the	
  ‘true	
  outliers’.	
  	
  Alternatively,	
  if	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  has	
  a	
  unique	
  genetic	
  basis	
  in	
  each	
  lake,	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  will	
  have	
  much	
  higher	
  pair-­‐wise	
  FST	
  estimates	
  than	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
   30	
   ‘repeat-­‐outliers’.	
  	
  A	
  student	
  t-­‐test	
  is	
  used	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  had	
  significantly	
  higher	
  FST	
  estimates	
  across	
  all	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  (P<0.05).	
   Finally,	
  the	
  Bayesian	
  clustering	
  algorithm	
  implemented	
  in	
  STRUCTURE	
  2.3.3	
  (Pritchard	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000)	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  visualize	
  differences	
  in	
  the	
  level	
  of	
  admixture	
  between	
  ecotypes	
  using	
  the	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’.	
  	
  Assuming	
  an	
  admixture	
  model	
  and	
  correlated	
  allele	
  frequencies	
  between	
  clusters	
  (K),	
  I	
  used	
  a	
  burn-­‐in	
  period	
  of	
  500,000,	
  then	
  1,000,000	
  MCMC	
  replicates.	
  	
  Since	
  structuring	
  is	
  weak	
  in	
  these	
  lakes,	
  sampling	
  habitats	
  (stream	
  and	
  shore)	
  were	
  used	
  as	
  prior	
  information	
  to	
  assist	
  in	
  clustering	
  (Hubisz	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
  In	
  each	
  run,	
  samples	
  were	
  assigned	
  to	
  the	
  cluster	
  that	
  they	
  had	
  the	
  greatest	
  probability	
  of	
  originating	
  from.	
  	
  Then	
  the	
  ∆K	
  method	
  (Evanno	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005)	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  infer	
  the	
  most	
  likely	
  number	
  of	
  genetically	
  distinct	
  units	
  within	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  clusters	
  was	
  varied	
  from	
  1	
  to	
  7	
  with	
  5	
  iterations	
  per	
  value	
  of	
  K	
  to	
  confirm	
  the	
  consistency	
  of	
  log-­‐likelihood	
  probabilities.	
  	
  If	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  are	
  identified	
  as	
  two	
  genetically	
  discrete	
  clusters	
  (K=2)	
  by	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  but	
  not	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  (K=1),	
  this	
  will	
  further	
  suggest	
  that	
  gene	
  regions	
  linked	
  to	
  ‘outlier	
  loci’	
  are	
  truly	
  under	
  divergent	
  selection.	
   2.3	
  	
  Results	
   2.3.1	
  	
  Data	
  quality	
  	
   A	
  total	
  of	
  688	
  individuals	
  and	
  50	
  loci	
  were	
  retained	
  following	
  assessments	
  of	
  data	
  quality.	
  	
  Twelve	
  individuals	
  with	
  21.6-­‐68.4%	
  missing	
  data	
  were	
  removed	
  owing	
  to	
  poor	
  DNA	
  quality.	
  	
  Overall,	
  the	
  final	
  dataset	
  contained	
  1.4%	
  missing	
  data	
  and	
  less	
  than	
  2.9%	
  at	
  any	
  single	
  spawning	
  site.	
  	
  Loci	
  EV103,	
   EV626	
  and	
  One109	
  exhibited	
  false	
  alleles	
  in	
  both	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  from	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  and	
  the	
  latter	
  two	
  loci	
  also	
  deviated	
  from	
  HWE	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake.	
  	
  Three	
  pairs	
  of	
  loci	
  consistently	
  exhibited	
  patterns	
  of	
  LD	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  (OMM5099	
  &	
  Ots29,	
  Ca687	
  &	
  EV712,	
  and	
  Ca613	
  &	
   Ots14)	
  and	
  two	
  of	
  which	
  were	
  identified	
  in	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  (OMM5099	
  &	
  Ots29	
  and	
  Ca687	
  &	
  EV712).	
  	
  Loci	
  Ca613,	
  Ca687,	
  and	
  Ots29	
  were	
  removed	
  because	
  they	
  had	
  more	
  missing	
  data.	
  	
  Locus	
  Ssa85	
  was	
   	
  	
  	
   31	
   also	
  removed	
  because	
  primers	
  sequences	
  used	
  throughout	
  data	
  were	
  inconsistent.	
  	
  Consequently,	
  the	
  final	
  dataset	
  was	
  reduced	
  from	
  57	
  to	
  50	
  loci.	
   Based	
  on	
  eight	
  anonymous	
  loci,	
  two	
  discrete	
  genetic	
  units	
  corresponded	
  with	
  the	
  major	
  drainage	
  systems	
  represented	
  in	
  this	
  study	
  were	
  inferred	
  (K=2;	
  Figure	
  2.2).	
  	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  in	
  the	
  Fraser	
  River	
  system	
  made	
  up	
  one	
  cluster	
  and	
  the	
  other	
  five	
  lakes	
  from	
  the	
  central	
  and	
  eastern	
  interior	
  of	
  BC	
  that	
  are	
  tributary	
  to	
  the	
  Columbia	
  River	
  made	
  up	
  the	
  other	
  cluster.	
  	
  A	
  small	
  secondary	
  peak	
  inferred	
  five	
  clusters	
  (K=5)	
  corresponding	
  with:	
  i)	
  Tchesinkut	
  lake,	
  ii)	
  lakes	
  in	
  the	
  Okanagan	
  River	
  Chain	
  (Okanagan	
  and	
  Wood),	
  iii)	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  and	
  nearby	
  stocks	
  from	
  the	
  North	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay,	
  iv)	
  the	
  West	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  from	
  Christina	
  Lake,	
  and	
  v)	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  shore-­‐spawners.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  in	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  are	
  not	
  native	
  and	
  the	
  entire	
  lake	
  had	
  to	
  be	
  removed	
  from	
  all	
  subsequent	
  analyses.	
  	
  Assessments	
  of	
  demographic	
  history	
  showed	
  no	
  evidence	
  of	
  heterozygote	
  excess	
  and	
  a	
  normal	
  L-­‐shaped	
  distribution	
  of	
  alleles,	
  therefore	
  no	
  populations	
  were	
  removed	
  due	
  to	
  a	
  severe	
  bottleneck	
  despite	
  observations	
  of	
  population	
  declines	
  in	
  the	
  recent	
  past.	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  neutral	
  genetic	
  differentiation	
  among	
  stocks	
  within	
  each	
  ecotype	
  group	
  were	
  low	
  on	
  average	
  (FST	
  =	
  0.008)	
  ranging	
  from	
  -­‐0.003	
  to	
  0.021	
  (Table	
  A.4),	
  allowing	
  for	
  spawning	
  sites	
  with	
  the	
  same	
  habitat	
  type	
  to	
  be	
  pooled	
  and	
  thereby	
  increase	
  sample	
  sizes	
  without	
  generating	
  population	
  substructure.	
  	
   The	
  level	
  of	
  polymorphism	
  in	
  our	
  dataset	
  varied	
  across	
  lakes,	
  but	
  was	
  high	
  overall	
  (Table	
  2.1	
  and	
  A.3).	
  	
  It	
  ranged	
  from	
  80%	
  to	
  100%,	
  and	
  was	
  lower	
  in	
  lakes	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  Okanagan	
  River	
  Chain.	
  	
  Eight	
  monomorphic	
  loci	
  were	
  found	
  in	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  (EV291,	
  EV691,	
  OMM5032,	
  OMM5037,	
  OMM5099,	
   OMM5121,	
  One8,	
  Ots06),	
  three	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  (EV723,	
  EV911,	
  Ots06)	
  and	
  one	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  (Ots06).	
  	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  alleles	
  per	
  locus	
  ranged	
  from	
  1	
  to	
  23,	
  with	
  a	
  mean	
  of	
  5.35.	
  	
  Heterozygosity	
  ranged	
  from	
  0	
  to	
  0.93	
  across	
  loci	
  with	
  an	
  overall	
  mean	
  of	
  0.46.	
  	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  had	
  the	
  most	
  alleles	
  (mean	
  7.32)	
  and	
  gene	
  diversity	
  (mean	
  0.518).	
  	
  No	
  significant	
  trends	
  were	
  observed	
  among	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  in	
  NA	
  or	
  HE,	
  although	
  HE	
  was	
  slightly	
  higher	
  in	
  the	
  stream	
  ecotype	
  in	
  four	
  out	
  of	
  five	
  lakes.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   32	
   Figure	
  2.2	
  	
  STRUCTURE	
  plots	
  depict	
  23	
  sampled	
  stocks	
  as	
  (a)	
  2	
  and	
  possibly	
  (b)	
  5	
  discrete	
  genetic	
  clusters	
  (K),	
  based	
  on	
  (c)	
  estimates	
  of	
  ∆K	
  (Evanno	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005)	
  for	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  K	
  values	
  (1-­‐23).	
  	
  For	
  each	
  individual,	
  the	
  probability	
  of	
  membership	
  to	
  each	
  cluster	
  is	
  represented	
  by	
  the	
  color	
  composition	
  of	
  a	
  vertical	
  bar.	
  	
  Sampled	
  stocks	
  include	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  (1-­‐4):	
  1)	
  Griz	
  shore,	
  2)	
  Little	
  Glacier	
  shore,	
  3)	
  SOB	
  Creek	
  and	
  4)	
  Upper	
  Duncan	
  River;	
  West	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  (5-­‐7):	
  5)	
  Six	
  Mile	
  shore,	
  6)	
  Six	
  Mile	
  Creek,	
  7)	
  Harrop	
  Creek;	
  North	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  (8-­‐9):	
  8)	
  Lower	
  Duncan	
  River,	
  9)	
  Meadow	
  Spawning	
  Channel;	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  (10-­‐16):	
  ,	
  10)	
  Northeast	
  shore,	
  11)	
  Northwest	
  shore,	
  12)	
  Southeast	
  shore,	
  13)	
  Peachland	
  Creek,	
  14)	
  Penticton	
  Creek,	
  15)	
  Mission	
  Creek,	
  16)	
  Powers	
  Creek;	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  (17-­‐19):	
  17)	
  the	
  island	
  shore,	
  18)	
  Drew	
  Creek,	
  19)	
  Tchesinkut	
  Inlet	
  Creek;	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  (20-­‐21):	
  20)	
  the	
  shore,21)	
  Middle	
  Vernon	
  Creek;	
  and	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  (22-­‐23):	
  22)	
  the	
  shore,	
  23)	
  Sandners	
  Creek.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   33	
   Table	
  2.1	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  population	
  genetic	
  parameters	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype	
  within	
  each	
  lake	
  using	
  all	
  50	
  loci,	
  including:	
  sample	
  size	
  (N),	
  mean	
  number	
  of	
  alleles	
  per	
  locus	
  (NA),	
  range	
  in	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  alleles,	
  mean	
  expected	
  heterozygosity	
  (He),	
  mean	
  observed	
  heterozygosity	
  (Ho),	
  and	
  the	
  percentage	
  of	
  polymorphic	
  loci	
  (%poly).	
   Lake	
   	
   Ecotype	
   N	
   NA	
   NA	
  range	
   He	
  	
   Ho	
   %	
  poly	
  	
   Okanagan	
   Shore	
   72	
   7.451	
   2-­‐23	
   0.507	
   0.513	
   100%	
   	
   Stream	
   69	
   7.196	
   2-­‐23	
   0.516	
   0.507	
   100%	
   Wood	
   Shore	
   39	
   5.196	
   2-­‐19	
   0.505	
   0.525	
   100%	
   	
   Stream	
   38	
   5.137	
   1-­‐17	
   0.526	
   0.535	
   96%	
   Duncan	
   Shore	
   47	
   6.000	
   1-­‐21	
   0.515	
   0.527	
   90%	
   	
   Stream	
   50	
   6.280	
   1-­‐22	
   0.529	
   0.538	
   92%	
   Kootenay	
   Shore	
   27	
   4.320	
   1-­‐14	
   0.438	
   0.449	
   92%	
   	
   Stream	
   41	
   5.220	
   1-­‐17	
   0.467	
   0.474	
   98%	
   Tchesinkut	
   Shore	
   48	
   3.451	
   1-­‐13	
   0.326	
   0.337	
   80%	
   	
   Stream	
   94	
   3.843	
   1-­‐14	
   0.317	
   0.326	
   80%	
  	
   2.3.2	
  	
  Outlier	
  locus	
  detection	
  and	
  dataset	
  definition	
   Thirty	
  out	
  of	
  42	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  (71.4%)	
  and	
  three	
  of	
  out	
  eight	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  (37.5%)	
  were	
  identified	
  as	
  putative	
  outliers	
  by	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  approach	
  in	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  lake	
  (without	
  correcting	
  for	
  multiple	
  comparisons;	
  Table	
  2.2).	
  	
  Based	
  on	
  patterns	
  in	
  outlier	
  behaviour,	
  each	
  locus	
  is	
  classified	
  as	
  ‘neutral’,	
  a	
  ‘false	
  outlier’,	
  or	
  a	
  ‘true	
  outlier’.	
  	
  ‘Neutral	
  loci’	
  included	
  the	
  17	
  loci	
  that	
  were	
  polymorphic	
  in	
  all	
  lakes	
  but	
  exhibited	
  no	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  at	
  all.	
  	
  The	
  ‘false	
  outliers’	
  included	
  the	
  18	
  loci	
  that	
  were	
  only	
  detected	
  by	
  one	
  algorithm.	
  	
  The	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  included	
  15	
  loci	
  that	
  were	
  detected	
  by	
  two	
  or	
  more	
  algorithms	
  in	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  lake	
  (Table	
  2.2;	
  Table	
  A.3).	
  	
  From	
  the	
  ‘true	
  outliers’,	
  a	
  subset	
  of	
  four	
  loci	
  detected	
  in	
  multiple	
  lakes	
  were	
  defined	
  as	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  (EV358,	
  OMM5003,	
  OMM5067,	
   TAP2),	
  although	
  none	
  showed	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  across	
  all	
  five	
  ecotype	
  pairs.	
  	
  I	
  also	
  defined	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true-­‐outliers’	
  dataset	
  for	
  situations	
  when	
  only	
  the	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  for	
  each	
  respective	
  lake	
  (3	
  to	
  6	
  loci)	
  were	
  used	
  in	
  an	
  analysis	
  when	
  lakes	
  were	
  analyzed	
  independently.	
  	
  Although	
  33%	
  to	
  66%	
  of	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  were	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  for	
  each	
  lake,	
  this	
  dataset	
  allows	
  for	
  loci	
  with	
  inconsistent	
  but	
  strong	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  in	
  a	
  lake	
  to	
  be	
  included	
  (e.g.	
  OMM5125	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Ots06	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake)	
  while	
  excluding	
  the	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  that	
  are	
  monomorphic	
  in	
  that	
  lake	
  (e.g.	
   Ots06,	
  OMM5037,	
  OMM5121,	
  EV691).	
   	
  	
  	
   34	
   Table	
  2.2	
  	
  Loci	
  detected	
  as	
  outliers	
  in	
  four	
  different	
  algorithms	
  (BAYESCAN/LOSITAN/DETSEL/lnRH)	
  with	
  a	
  probability	
  of	
  	
  <0.010,	
  <0.05,	
  and	
  <0.01	
  are	
  identified	
  in	
  each	
  of	
  five	
  British	
  Columbian	
  Lakes.	
  	
  Loci	
  detected	
  by	
  only	
  one	
  approach	
  are	
  listed	
  as	
  false	
  outliers	
  (‘False’).	
  Loci	
  detected	
  by	
  at	
  least	
  two	
  approaches	
  in	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  lake	
  are	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  (Outlier),	
  and	
  those	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  that	
  are	
  detected	
  in	
  two	
  or	
  more	
  lakes	
  are	
  ‘repeat	
  outliers’	
  (R	
  Outlier).	
  Each	
  marker	
  is	
  identified	
  as	
  either	
  an	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellite	
  marker	
  (EST)	
  or	
  an	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  marker	
  (Anon).	
  	
   Marker	
   type	
   Locus	
   Okanagan	
   Wood	
   Duncan	
   Kootenay	
   Tchesinkut	
   Status	
   EST	
   TAP2	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   	
   	
   -­‐/**/*/-­‐	
   -­‐/*/**/-­‐	
   R	
  Outlier	
   EST	
   EV358	
   -­‐/**/*/**	
   -­‐/**/*/-­‐	
   -­‐/-­‐/**/**	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   R	
  Outlier	
   EST	
   OMM5003	
   	
   -­‐/**/*/-­‐	
   -­‐/*/**/-­‐	
   	
   */***/**/-­‐	
   R	
  Outlier	
   EST	
   OMM5067	
   	
   -­‐/**/**/**	
   -­‐/-­‐/**/-­‐	
   -­‐/**/*/**	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   R	
  Outlier	
   EST	
   OMM5125	
   ***/***/**/-­‐	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   Ots06	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/***	
   -­‐/***/**/***	
   MONO	
   MONO	
   MONO	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   EV862	
   -­‐/-­‐/**/-­‐	
   -­‐/*/*/-­‐	
   	
   	
   	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   EV170	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/**	
   	
   	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/*	
   	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   EV642	
   -­‐/**/**/-­‐	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   EV685	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/*	
   	
   -­‐/**/-­‐/-­‐	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/***	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   OMM5037	
   	
   -­‐/**/-­‐/**	
   	
   	
   MONO	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   EV691	
   	
   -­‐/**/-­‐/-­‐	
   -­‐/**/-­‐/*	
   	
   MONO	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   EV740	
   	
   	
   -­‐/***/-­‐/***	
   	
   	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   OMM5033	
   	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/**	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/*	
   	
   Outlier	
   	
  EST	
   OMM5121	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/**/*/-­‐	
   MONO	
   Outlier	
   EST	
   EV536	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   EV188	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   -­‐/**/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   OMM5124	
   	
   -­‐/**/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   Ca983	
   	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   EV291	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/*	
   	
   	
   MONO	
   False	
   EST	
   EV597	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   	
   	
   	
   False	
   Anon	
   One8	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/*/-­‐	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   MONO	
   False	
   EST	
   OMM5058	
   	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   EV475	
   	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/**/-­‐	
   	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   OMM5053	
   	
   */-­‐/-­‐/-­‐	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/*	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   OMM5032	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   MONO	
   False	
   EST	
   EV365	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/**/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   EV634	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   False	
   Anon	
   One108	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/*/-­‐/-­‐	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   EV220	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/**	
   	
   False	
   Anon	
   Ots14	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/*	
   	
   False	
   EST	
   EV484	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/*	
   False	
   EST	
   EV911	
   	
   	
   MONO	
   	
   -­‐/-­‐/-­‐/**	
   False	
   MONO	
  indicates	
  that	
  the	
  locus	
  is	
  monomorphic	
  in	
  that	
  lake	
  *	
  P<0.10,	
  **	
  P<0.05,	
  ***	
  P<0.01	
   Assessments	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  for	
  50	
  loci	
  in	
  each	
  of	
  five	
  lakes	
  (a	
  total	
  of	
  250	
  possible	
  detections)	
  yielded	
  positive	
  detection	
  rates	
  from	
  1.2%	
  to	
  13.0%	
  across	
  the	
  four	
  approaches	
  (Table	
  2.3).	
  	
  LOSITAN	
  and	
  DETSEL	
  had	
  the	
  highest	
  detection	
  rates	
  and	
  BAYESCAN	
  had	
  the	
  lowest.	
  	
  Type	
  I	
  error	
  rates	
  were	
  much	
  higher	
  than	
  Type	
  II	
  across	
  all	
  approaches	
  except	
  BAYESCAN.	
  	
  Three	
  loci	
  were	
  detected	
  by	
  all	
  three	
  of	
  the	
  other	
  approaches,	
  demonstrating	
  that	
  BAYESCAN	
  is	
  under-­‐sensitive	
  to	
  patterns	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   35	
   However,	
  all	
  other	
  approaches	
  exhibited	
  relatively	
  high	
  Type	
  I	
  error	
  rates	
  (33%	
  to	
  45%).	
  	
  LOSITAN,	
  DETSEL	
  and	
  lnRH	
  detected	
  the	
  most	
  loci	
  that	
  were	
  subsequently	
  identified	
  as	
  ‘false	
  outliers’	
  (13,	
  10,	
  and	
  9	
  respectively).	
  	
  DETSEL,	
  lnRH,	
  and	
  particularly	
  LOSITAN	
  demonstrated	
  over-­‐sensitivity	
  to	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  because	
  they	
  detected	
  loci	
  determined	
  to	
  be	
  ‘false	
  outliers’	
  (Table	
  2.3).	
  	
  Although,	
  there	
  were	
  four	
  instances	
  when	
  a	
  ‘repeat	
  outlier’	
  was	
  detected	
  by	
  only	
  one	
  approach	
  in	
  a	
  lake,	
  therefore	
  it	
  is	
  possible	
  some	
  of	
  these	
  ‘false	
  outliers’	
  are	
  actually	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and/or	
  some	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  are	
  consistent	
  across	
  more	
  lakes	
  than	
  I	
  indicate	
  here.	
  	
  Overall,	
  a	
  large	
  proportion	
  of	
  loci	
  identified	
  as	
  ‘false	
  outliers’	
  were	
  only	
  detected	
  in	
  either	
  Kootenay	
  (6	
  loci)	
  or	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  (4	
  loci),	
  which	
  showed	
  the	
  greatest	
  neutral	
  divergence	
  among	
  shore	
  and	
  stream	
  spawning	
  sites	
  at	
  the	
  eight	
  anonymous	
  loci	
  (FST=0.039	
  and	
  0.015,	
  respectively;	
  Table	
  A.4).	
  	
  When	
  the	
  18	
  loci	
  identified	
  as	
  ‘false	
  outliers’	
  are	
  discarded,	
  the	
  overall	
  detection	
  rate	
  of	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  is	
  30%	
  (15	
  out	
  of	
  50	
  loci).	
  	
  	
   Table	
  2.3	
  	
  A	
  summary	
  of	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  loci	
  detected	
  as	
  statistical	
  outliers	
  by	
  each	
  of	
  four	
  algorithms,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  false	
  positive	
  detections	
  and	
  false	
  negative	
  detections	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  sensitivity	
  of	
  each	
  algorithm.	
  	
  False	
  positives	
  are	
  the	
  loci	
  detected	
  by	
  the	
  present	
  algorithm	
  that	
  were	
  not	
  detected	
  in	
  any	
  other	
  lakes	
  by	
  any	
  other	
  algorithm.	
  	
  The	
  false	
  negatives	
  are	
  loci	
  not	
  detected	
  by	
  the	
  present	
  algorithm	
  when	
  all	
  three	
  other	
  algorithms	
  detected	
  it	
  as	
  an	
  outlier.	
  	
   Outlier-­‐detection	
   approach	
   No.	
  outliers	
  detected	
   (out	
  of	
  50)	
   False	
  positive	
   False	
  negative	
   BAYESCAN	
   3	
   0	
   3	
   LOSITAN	
   33	
   7	
   0	
   DETSEL	
   27	
   3	
   0	
   lnRH	
   20	
   5	
   2	
  	
   2.3.3	
  	
  Neutral	
  and	
  adaptive	
  population	
  divergence	
  	
   At	
  the	
  15	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’,	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  sampled	
  from	
  the	
  same	
  lake	
  appeared	
  more	
  genetically	
  similar	
  to	
  one	
  another	
  than	
  they	
  were	
  to	
  groups	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  ecotype	
  in	
  other	
  lakes	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  DAPC	
  analysis	
  (Figure	
  2.3).	
  	
  Lakes	
  from	
  the	
  same	
  geographical	
  region	
  were	
  clustered	
  together.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  considerable	
  overlap	
  among	
  groups	
  from	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lakes,	
  and	
  some	
  overlap	
  among	
  groups	
  from	
  Kootenay	
  and	
  Duncan	
  Lakes	
  as	
  well.	
  	
  Tchesinkut	
  showed	
  the	
  least	
  genetic	
  similarity	
  to	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  other	
  groups.	
  	
  Based	
  on	
  the	
  organization	
  of	
  groups,	
  the	
  first	
  principal	
   	
  	
  	
   36	
   component	
  appears	
  to	
  correspond	
  to	
  a	
  north-­‐south	
  axis,	
  which	
  captures	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  the	
  variation,	
  and	
  the	
  second	
  principal	
  component	
  corresponds	
  to	
  an	
  east-­‐west	
  axis.	
  	
   	
   	
   Figure	
  2.3	
  	
  A	
  discriminate	
  analysis	
  of	
  principal	
  components	
  (DAPC)	
  plot	
  depicting	
  the	
  relationships	
  among	
  individuals	
  from	
  each	
  ecotype	
  group	
  in	
  each	
  lake	
  based	
  on	
  genetic	
  similarity.	
  	
  Similarity	
  is	
  estimated	
  from	
  polymorphism	
  frequency	
  data	
  at	
  15	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  and	
  displayed	
  on	
  the	
  first	
  two	
  principal	
  components	
  (x-­‐	
  and	
  y-­‐axes).	
   In	
  a	
  global	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  hierarchical	
  organization	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation,	
  among-­‐ecotype	
  variation	
  putatively	
  due	
  to	
  selection	
  (outlier	
  loci)	
  generally	
  exceeded	
  the	
  variation	
  due	
  to	
  drift	
  (neutral	
  loci;	
  Table	
  2.4).	
  	
  Genetic	
  variation	
  occurring	
  among	
  ecotype	
  groups	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  four	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  all	
  15	
  ‘true	
  outliers’,	
  and	
  15	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  was	
  3.33%,	
  2.49%,	
  and	
  0.72%	
  respectively.	
  	
  Overall,	
  there	
  was	
  a	
   	
  	
  	
   37	
   significant	
  difference	
  in	
  patterns	
  of	
  variation	
  revealed	
  at	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  compared	
  to	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  (Chi-­‐squared	
  test,	
  P=0.002),	
  but	
  not	
  at	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  (Chi-­‐squared	
  test,	
   P=0.332).	
  	
   Table	
  2.4	
  	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  occurring	
  among	
  lakes	
  and	
  within	
  lakes	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  as	
  assessed	
  by	
  a	
  hierarchical	
  analysis	
  of	
  molecular	
  variance	
  (AMOVA)	
  at	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  all	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’.	
  	
  	
   Level	
   4	
  Repeat-­‐outliers	
  (%)	
   15	
  True	
  outliers	
  (%)	
   15	
  Neutral	
  loci	
  (%)	
   Among	
  lakes	
   12.71*	
   19.14*	
   14.98*	
   Among	
  ecotypes	
   3.33*	
   2.49*	
  	
   0.72*	
   Within	
  ecotypes	
   83.96	
   78.37	
   84.30	
  *	
  indicates	
  significance	
  of	
  P<0.05	
   Similarly,	
  genetic	
  differentiation	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  was	
  consistently	
  higher	
  using	
  outlier	
  loci	
  than	
  neutral	
  loci	
  in	
  pair-­‐wise	
  FST	
  comparisons	
  for	
  each	
  lake	
  (Table	
  2.5).	
  	
  The	
  mean	
  FST	
  for	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  were	
  0.044	
  (range	
  of	
  0.013	
  to	
  0.104),	
  0.074	
  (range	
  of	
  0.017	
  to	
  0.126),	
  and	
  0.009	
  (range	
  of	
  -­‐0.001	
  to	
  0.032),	
  respectively.	
  	
  A	
  significant	
  difference	
  between	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  and	
  lake-­‐specific	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  were	
  observed	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  and	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lakes,	
  and	
  particularly	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake.	
  	
  However,	
  only	
  marginal	
  levels	
  of	
  differentiation	
  were	
  found	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  by	
  any	
  dataset.	
  	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  ecotypes	
  were	
  highly	
  differentiated	
  using	
  both	
  outlier	
  datasets	
  (FST=0.126),	
  but	
  also	
  using	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  (FST=0.032).	
  	
  Overall,	
  the	
  level	
  of	
  ecotype	
  differentiation	
  revealed	
  at	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  was	
  significantly	
  greater	
  than	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  (paired	
  t-­‐test;	
  P=0.018),	
  suggesting	
  that	
  the	
  one	
  or	
  two	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  that	
  were	
  not	
  identified	
  in	
  any	
  other	
  lakes	
  can	
  substantially	
  increase	
  amount	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  that	
  reflects	
  ecotype	
  differences	
  within	
  individual	
  lakes.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   38	
   Table	
  2.5	
  	
  The	
  proportion	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  occurring	
  among	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  from	
  five	
  lakes	
  as	
  assessed	
  by	
  pair-­‐wise	
  FST	
  using	
  4	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  lake	
  (number	
  of	
  loci	
  indicated	
  in	
  parentheses),	
  and	
  15	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’.	
  	
  	
   Lake	
   4	
  Repeat-­‐outliers	
   Lake-­‐specific	
  	
   true	
  outliers	
  (nloci)	
   15	
  Neutral	
  loci	
   Duncan	
   0.013*	
   0.017*	
  (4)	
   -­‐0.001	
   Kootenay	
   0.044*	
   0.071*	
  (5)	
   0.008*	
   Okanagan	
   0.017*	
   0.081*	
  (3)	
   0.005*	
   Wood	
   0.104*	
   0.126*	
  (6)	
   0.032*	
   Tchesinkut	
   0.041*	
   0.074*	
  (3)	
   0.000	
  *	
  indicates	
  significance	
  of	
  P<0.05	
   Distinct	
  patterns	
  of	
  populations	
  structuring	
  were	
  revealed	
  by	
  STRUCTURE	
  plots	
  for	
  three	
  of	
  the	
  five	
  lakes	
  when	
  using	
  the	
  lake-­‐specific	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  compared	
  to	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  (Figure	
  2.4).	
  	
  Using	
  the	
  outliers,	
  two	
  clusters	
  (K=2)	
  corresponding	
  to	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  ecotypes	
  were	
  inferred	
  in	
  Okanagan,	
  Wood,	
  Tchesinkut,	
  and	
  Kootenay	
  Lakes.	
  	
  Using	
  the	
  neutral	
  loci,	
  two	
  clusters	
  were	
  only	
  inferred	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake.	
  	
  Complete	
  admixture	
  was	
  inferred	
  by	
  both	
  datasets	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  (K=1).	
  	
  Overall,	
  these	
  results	
  are	
  consistent	
  with	
  previous	
  analyses	
  in	
  demonstrating	
  differential	
  levels	
  of	
  genetic	
  differentiation	
  among	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  using	
  outliers	
  versus	
  neutral	
  loci	
  in	
  several	
  lakes.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   39	
   	
   Figure	
  2.4	
  	
  STUCTURE	
  plots	
  indicate	
  the	
  probability	
  of	
  membership	
  to	
  a	
  cluster	
  for	
  each	
  individuals	
  (vertical	
  bars)	
  when	
  K=2	
  is	
  forced.	
  	
  Green	
  represents	
  one	
  cluster	
  and	
  red	
  represents	
  the	
  second	
  cluster.	
  	
  Plots	
  were	
  constructed	
  using	
  the	
  neutral	
  loci	
  (n	
  loci=15;	
  right)	
  and	
  lake-­‐specific	
  outliers	
  (n	
  loci=3-­‐6;	
  left)	
  for	
  (a)	
  Duncan	
  Lake,	
  n	
  loci=4,	
  (b)	
  Kootenay	
  Lake,	
  n	
  loci=5,	
  (c)	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  n	
  loci=3,	
  (d)	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake,	
   n	
  loci=3,	
  and	
  (e)	
  Wood	
  Lake,	
  n	
  loci=6.	
   2.3.4	
  	
  Putative	
  functional	
  annotations	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  	
   Annotations	
  for	
  nine	
  of	
  fifteen	
  EST-­‐linked	
  outlier	
  loci	
  were	
  recovered	
  from	
  the	
  cGRASP	
  database	
  (Salmo	
  salar)	
  or	
  Genbank	
  via	
  BLAST	
  (using	
  ‘salmonidae’),	
  including	
  three	
  of	
  the	
  four	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  (Table	
  2.6).	
  	
  Locus	
  EV358	
  showed	
  high	
  coverage	
  and	
  strong	
  sequence	
  similarity	
  to	
  the	
  chemokine	
  receptor	
  type	
  4	
  (CXCR4)	
  protein-­‐coding	
  gene	
  in	
  Atlantic	
  salmon	
  (Salmo	
  salar;	
  Genbank	
  #	
  NP_001158765)	
  and	
  rainbow	
  trout	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  mykiss;	
  Genbank	
  #	
  CAA04493),	
  which	
  is	
  a	
  rhodopsin-­‐like	
  G	
  protein	
  receptor	
  involved	
  in	
  immunological	
  functioning.	
  	
  Locus	
  OMM5003	
  aligned	
  with	
  a	
  plasminogen	
  activator	
  inhibitor-­‐1	
  RNA-­‐binding	
  (PAIRB)	
  protein-­‐coding	
  gene	
  (Genbank	
  #	
   	
  	
  	
   40	
   BT044770)	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (cGRASP#gn1|UG|Ssa#S47626048).	
  	
  Its	
  function	
  is	
  unknown	
  in	
  salmonids.	
  	
  Locus	
  TAP2	
  exhibited	
  similarity	
  to	
  the	
  transport-­‐associated	
  protein-­‐coding	
  gene	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (Genbank	
  #	
  CAB05916).	
  	
  This	
  protein	
  is	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  ATP-­‐binding	
  cassette	
  (ABC)	
  transporter	
  transmembrane	
  region	
  superfamily,	
  which	
  hydrolyzes	
  ATP	
  to	
  export	
  substrates	
  (e.g.	
  noxious	
  substances	
  and	
  extracellular	
  toxins)	
  across	
  cellular	
  membranes.	
  	
  Locus	
  EV170	
  showed	
  similarity	
  to	
  a	
  malate	
  dehydrogenase	
  protein-­‐coding	
  gene	
  found	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (Genbank	
  #	
  ACN10417.1),	
  which	
  is	
  an	
  important	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  citric	
  acid	
  cycle	
  and	
  therefore	
  involved	
  in	
  energy	
  metabolism.	
  	
  Locus	
  EV642	
  exhibited	
  weak	
  similarity	
  to	
  a	
  transcription	
  elongation	
  factor	
  B	
  (ELOB)	
  polypeptide	
  2	
  protein-­‐coding	
  gene	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (cGRASP	
  #	
  gn1|UG|Ssa#S47726589).	
  	
  Locus	
  EV740	
  showed	
  similarity	
  to	
  a	
  secretory	
  carrier-­‐associated	
  membrane	
  protein	
  (SCAMP)-­‐coding	
  gene	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (Genbank	
  #	
  ACI66888.1)	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  a	
  3-­‐oxo-­‐5-­‐alpha-­‐steroid	
  4-­‐dehydrogenase	
  2	
  protein-­‐coding	
  gene	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (Genbank	
  #	
  ACM08278.1),	
  which	
  is	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  phospholipid	
  methyltransferase	
  (PEMT)	
  region.	
  	
  Locus	
  EV685	
  showed	
  similarity	
  to	
  a	
  procollagen-­‐proline,	
  2-­‐oxoglutarate	
  4-­‐dioxygenase,	
  alpha	
  1	
  polypeptide	
  precursor	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (Genbank	
  NP_001167096.1).	
  	
  Locus	
  EV691	
  was	
  similar	
  to	
  a	
  Ras-­‐related	
  protein	
  Rab-­‐14	
  coding	
  gene	
  found	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (Genbank	
  #	
  ACN58615.1.1),	
  which	
  is	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  P-­‐loop-­‐containing	
  nucleoside	
  triphosphate	
  hydrolase	
  (NTPase)	
  region.	
  	
  Locus	
  EV862	
  showed	
  some	
  similarity	
  to	
  an	
  LBH	
  protein-­‐coding	
  gene	
  in	
  Salmo	
  salar	
  (Genbank	
  #	
  ACI67592.1),	
  which	
  is	
  a	
  highly	
  conserved	
  transcription	
  activator	
  for	
  the	
  mitogen-­‐activated	
  protein	
  kinase-­‐signaling	
  pathway	
  in	
  the	
  heart.	
  	
  Annotations	
  were	
  not	
  found	
  for	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  OMM-­‐	
  markers	
  originally	
  described	
  in	
  rainbow	
  trout	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  mykiss)	
  by	
  Rexroad	
  et	
  al	
  (2005).	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   41	
   Table	
  2.6	
  	
  A	
  description	
  of	
  the	
  gene	
  annotations	
  for	
  each	
  of	
  the	
  15	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  exhibiting	
  ‘true	
  outlier’	
  behaviour.	
  	
  For	
  each	
  annotated	
  gene,	
  the	
  name,	
  function	
  of	
  the	
  protein,	
  location	
  of	
  expression	
  and	
  the	
  lake(s)	
  in	
  which	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  was	
  detected	
  are	
  given.	
  	
  	
  Locus	
   Gene	
  	
   Protein	
  function	
   Location	
  of	
  expression	
   Lake	
  	
   EV358	
  	
   chemokine	
  receptor	
  4	
  (CXCR4)	
  gene	
  	
   transmembrane	
  receptor	
   immune	
  system	
   DUN/WOO	
   OMM5003	
   1	
  RNA-­‐binding	
  protein	
  (PAIRB	
  or	
  PAI1)	
  gene	
  	
   receptor	
  	
   blood	
   DUN/TCH/WOO	
   TAP2	
   transporter	
  2	
  ATP-­‐binding	
  cassette	
   antigen	
  peptide	
  transporter	
  	
   immune	
  system	
  	
   KOO/TCH	
   OMM5067	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   WOO/KOO	
   EV170	
   Malate	
  dehydrogenase	
   enzyme	
  in	
  	
  citric	
  acid	
  cycle	
   mitochondria	
  	
   KOO	
   EV642	
   Transcription	
  elongation	
  factor	
  B	
  polypeptide	
  2	
  (ELOB)	
  gene	
   RNA	
  transcription	
  regulator	
  	
   n/a	
   OKA	
   EV685	
   procollagen-­‐proline,	
  2-­‐oxoglutarate	
  4-­‐dioxygenase	
  (proline	
  4-­‐hydroxylase),	
  alpha	
  polypeptide	
  2	
  (P4HA2)	
  gene	
   enzyme	
  	
   n/a	
   TCH	
   EV691	
   Ras-­‐related	
  protein	
  Rab-­‐14	
  	
   protein	
  transporter	
  	
   n/a	
   DUN	
   EV740	
   secretory	
  carrier-­‐associated	
  membrane	
  protein	
  	
   transporter	
  	
  	
   n/a	
   DUN	
   EV862	
   LBH	
  protein	
   transcription	
  regulator	
   heart	
   WOO	
   OMM5037	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   WOO	
   OMM5121	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   WOO	
   Ots06	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   WOO	
   OMM5125	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   OKA	
   OMM5033	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   -­‐	
   KOO	
  OKA-­‐	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  WOO-­‐	
  Wood	
  Lake,	
  DUN-­‐Duncan	
  Lake,	
  KOO-­‐	
  Kootenay	
  Lake,	
  TCH-­‐	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
   2.4	
  	
  Discussion	
   A	
  recent	
  surge	
  of	
  studies	
  are	
  attempting	
  to	
  uncover	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  phenotype-­‐environment	
  correlations	
  using	
  genome	
  scans,	
  particularly	
  in	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms,	
  in	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  better	
  understand	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  in	
  generating	
  biodiversity	
  (Campbell	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2004;	
  Namroud	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Loci	
  exhibiting	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  across	
  multiple	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  have	
  the	
  greatest	
  potential	
  to	
  be	
  under	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  and	
  involved	
  in	
  initiating	
  and	
  maintaining	
  barriers	
  to	
  gene	
  flow	
  in	
  divergent	
  ecotypes	
  (Hendry,	
  2009).	
  	
  Some	
  success	
  has	
  arisen	
  from	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  post-­‐glacial	
  fishes,	
  which	
  generally	
  meet	
  the	
  necessary	
  criteria	
  to	
  ensure	
  that	
   	
  	
  	
   42	
   statistical	
  outliers	
  truly	
  reflect	
  the	
  locus-­‐specific	
  effects	
  of	
  selection	
  rather	
  than	
  neutral	
  processes	
  (i.e.	
  divergence	
  of	
  ecotypes	
  among	
  closely	
  related	
  populations	
  with	
  a	
  well	
  understood	
  phylogeographic	
  history;	
  Hendry,	
  2009).	
  	
  In	
  global	
  assessments	
  of	
  population	
  structure	
  using	
  anonymous	
  loci,	
  patterns	
  of	
  variation	
  appear	
  to	
  reflect	
  the	
  known	
  colonization	
  and	
  phylogeographic	
  history	
  of	
  Oncorhynchus	
   nerka	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  	
  Clustering	
  analyses	
  with	
  (STRUCTURE	
  plots;	
  Figure	
  2.2)	
  and	
  without	
  an	
  inferred	
  model	
  of	
  evolution	
  (DAPC;	
  Figure	
  2.3),	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  population	
  differentiation	
  (pair-­‐wise	
  FST;	
  Table	
  2.5)	
  and	
  trends	
  in	
  polymorphism	
  (Table	
  2.1)	
  demonstrate	
  that	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  is	
  distinct	
  from	
  the	
  other	
  lakes.	
  	
  This	
  corresponds	
  with	
  studies	
  that	
  suggest	
  sockeye	
  from	
  the	
  Bering	
  Refugia	
  colonized	
  post-­‐glacial	
  lakes	
  in	
  northern	
  BC	
  and	
  Alaska	
  and	
  sockeye	
  from	
  the	
  Columbia	
  Refugia	
  colonized	
  southern	
  BC	
  and	
  northern	
  USA	
  (Avise	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  Foote	
  et	
  al.,	
  1989;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996).	
  	
  Lakes	
  sampled	
  in	
  the	
  north,	
  central	
  interior,	
  and	
  east	
  interior	
  suggest	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  limited	
  connectivity	
  among	
  populations	
  in	
  the	
  Kettle,	
  Kootenay,	
  Okanagan,	
  and	
  Fraser	
  River	
  systems	
  (i.e.	
  since	
  the	
  water	
  in	
  BC	
  reached	
  current	
  levels	
  ~	
  10,000	
  years	
  ago),	
  but	
  populations	
  have	
  a	
  more	
  recent	
  shared	
  lineage	
  within	
  these	
  river	
  systems.	
  	
  Strong	
  genetic	
  similarities	
  observed	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lakes	
  and	
  Duncan	
  and	
  Kootenay	
  Lakes	
  are	
  not	
  surprising	
  given	
  the	
  connectivity	
  between	
  them	
  prior	
  to	
  dam	
  construction.	
  	
  The	
  DAPC	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  sampled	
  from	
  the	
  same	
  lake	
  were	
  more	
  similar	
  to	
  each	
  other	
  than	
  groups	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  ecotype	
  from	
  other	
  lakes,	
  even	
  in	
  geographically	
  proximate	
  and	
  recently	
  connected	
  lakes	
  such	
  as	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lakes	
  (Figure	
  2.3).	
  	
  Overall,	
  results	
  suggest	
  that	
  kokanee	
  populations	
  are	
  closely	
  related,	
  divergence	
  was	
  likely	
  initiated	
  and	
  maintained	
  in	
  sympatry	
  (although	
  differentiation	
  is	
  still	
  quite	
  weak),	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  unlikely	
  that	
  dispersal	
  or	
  stocking	
  from	
  other	
  lakes	
  founded	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  stocks	
  in	
  this	
  study,	
  except	
  for	
  Christina	
  Lake.	
  	
  Christina	
  Lake	
  was	
  eliminated	
  because	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  were	
  genetically	
  much	
  more	
  similar	
  to	
  kokanee	
  from	
  West	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  (Figure	
  2.2b)	
  than	
  the	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  in	
  Christina	
  Lake,	
  suggesting	
  that	
  stocked	
  fish	
  founded	
  the	
  Sandners	
  Creek	
  stock.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  populations	
  appear	
  to	
  conform	
  to	
  all	
  the	
  criteria	
  initially	
  set	
  out	
  for	
  ensuring	
  that	
  neutral	
  evolutionary	
  processes	
  would	
  not	
  confound	
  signals	
  of	
  selection	
  detected	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   43	
   2.4.1	
  	
  Evidence	
  of	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  	
   No	
  locus	
  exhibited	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  in	
  all	
  five	
  ecotype	
  pairs,	
  but	
  four	
  loci	
  were	
  detected	
  in	
  three	
  or	
  four	
  ecotype	
  pairs.	
  	
  In	
  general,	
  the	
  strength	
  of	
  the	
  hitchhiking	
  effect	
  is	
  determined	
  by	
  the	
  strength	
  of	
  selection,	
  recombination	
  rate,	
  initial	
  frequency	
  of	
  the	
  advantageous	
  allele,	
  and	
  time	
  to	
  fixation	
  (Kaplan	
   et	
  al.,	
  1989;	
  Smith	
  and	
  Haigh,	
  1974;	
  Storz,	
  2005).	
  	
  Therefore,	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  congruency	
  across	
  all	
  pairs	
  may	
  reflect	
  a	
  lack	
  of	
  power	
  to	
  detect	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  (Stinchcombe	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2008;	
  Teshima	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006)	
  because	
  the	
  environment	
  (and	
  selection	
  pressure)	
  is	
  heterogeneously	
  distributed,	
  traits	
  under	
  selection	
  are	
  not	
  pleiotropic	
  (e.g.	
  morphological	
  traits	
  are	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  have	
  contrasting	
  fitness	
  consequences	
  in	
  alternative	
  environments	
  than	
  physiological	
  traits;	
  Liao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010),	
  or	
  linkage	
  between	
  the	
  neutral	
  marker	
  and	
  the	
  fitness-­‐relevant	
  mutation	
  may	
  be	
  broken	
  up	
  by	
  recombination	
  if	
  loci	
  are	
  not	
  tightly	
  associated	
  with	
  each	
  other	
  or	
  sufficient	
  time	
  has	
  passed	
  (Nielsen,	
  2005;	
  Stinchcombe	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2008).	
  	
  If	
  adaptive	
  traits	
  have	
  arisen	
  from	
  standing	
  variation	
  (i.e.	
  a	
  soft	
  sweep),	
  the	
  gene	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  favoured	
  trait	
  will	
  have	
  existed	
  in	
  the	
  population	
  at	
  a	
  low	
  frequency	
  for	
  some	
  time,	
  generating	
  polymorphism	
  at	
  the	
  linked	
  microsatellite	
  marker	
  through	
  neutral	
  processes	
  (i.e.	
  mutation	
  and	
  drift).	
  	
  	
  When	
  the	
  population	
  encountered	
  the	
  new	
  environment,	
  several	
  different	
  alleles	
  may	
  have	
  hitchhiked	
  as	
  the	
  selected	
  gene	
  moved	
  towards	
  fixation	
  (Barrett	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Hermisson	
  and	
  Pennings,	
  2005).	
  	
  A	
  simulation	
  study	
  by	
  Teshima	
  et	
  al.	
  (2006)	
  demonstrates	
  that	
  many	
  loci	
  under	
  selection	
  may	
  be	
  missed	
  by	
  genome	
  scans,	
  especially	
  if	
  the	
  locus	
  under	
  selection	
  was	
  previously	
  neutral.	
  	
  Signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  may	
  be	
  obscured	
  by	
  other	
  confounding	
  factors	
  including	
  inflated	
  differentiation	
  at	
  neutral	
  loci	
  due	
  to	
  random	
  chance,	
  sampling	
  bias	
  (i.e.	
  ascertainment	
  bias;	
  Thornton	
  and	
  Jensen,	
  2007),	
  the	
  inclusion	
  of	
  unidentified	
  strays	
  (Excoffier	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
  Biologically	
  significant	
  levels	
  of	
  differentiation	
  were	
  not	
  detected	
  among	
  spawning	
  sites	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  ecotypes,	
  therefore	
  straying	
  among	
  spawning	
  sites	
  must	
  maintain	
  gene	
  flow	
  despite	
  natal	
  homing.	
  	
  Alternatively,	
  there	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  biological	
  reason	
  for	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  in	
  outlier	
  behaviour.	
  	
  Many	
  other	
  empirical	
  studies	
  have	
  failed	
  to	
  detect	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  at	
  the	
  genetic	
  level	
  (Campbell	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2004;	
  DeFaveri	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Egan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Renaut	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Tice	
  and	
  Carlon,	
  2011)	
  and	
  different	
  mutations	
  have	
  been	
  identified	
  to	
  produce	
  the	
  same	
  phenotype	
  in	
  some	
  closely	
  related	
  populations	
   	
  	
  	
   44	
   (Hoekstra	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006)	
  bringing	
  into	
  question	
  how	
  often	
  parallel	
  mechanisms	
  underlie	
  observed	
  replicated	
  phenotype-­‐environment	
  correlations	
  in	
  natural	
  populations	
  (Arendt	
  and	
  Reznick,	
  2008;	
  Elmer	
  and	
  Meyer,	
  2011).	
   2.4.2	
  	
  Outlier	
  locus	
  detection	
   Several	
  challenges	
  are	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  statistical	
  detection	
  of	
  loci	
  that	
  exhibit	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection.	
  	
  Models	
  of	
  evolution	
  used	
  to	
  estimate	
  population	
  parameters	
  that	
  do	
  not	
  accurately	
  reflect	
  the	
  complex	
  demographic	
  history	
  of	
  natural	
  populations	
  (Akey	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004)	
  cause	
  all	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches	
  to	
  be	
  susceptible	
  to	
  high	
  Type	
  I	
  and	
  II	
  error	
  rates,	
  especially	
  when	
  selection	
  is	
  weak	
  (Excoffier	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Narum	
  and	
  Hess,	
  2011).	
  	
  Since	
  five	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  cannot	
  be	
  expected	
  to	
  fit	
  all	
  of	
  the	
  assumption	
  associated	
  with	
  any	
  one	
  algorithm,	
  I	
  chose	
  to	
  use	
  several	
  algorithms	
  to	
  avoid	
  making	
  spurious	
  conclusions	
  due	
  to	
  violated	
  assumptions	
  (Bonin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Egan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Luikart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003;	
  Vasemagi	
  and	
  Primmer,	
  2005;	
  Wilding	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  	
  All	
  four	
  algorithms	
  used	
  a	
  different	
  combination	
  of	
  i)	
  model	
  of	
  evolution	
  and	
  consideration	
  of	
  neutral	
  population	
  structure	
  (e.g.	
  pure	
  divergence	
  model,	
  island	
  model,	
  hierarchical	
  island	
  model,	
  no	
  model),	
  ii)	
  metric	
  for	
  assessing	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  (i.e.	
  He	
  to	
  detect	
  a	
  selective	
  sweep	
  or	
  FST	
  to	
  detect	
  excessive	
  population	
  differentiation),	
  iii)	
  approach	
  for	
  assessing	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  (i.e.	
  null	
  hypothesis	
  testing	
  or	
  comparing	
  alternative	
  models;	
  Foll	
  and	
  Gaggiotti,	
  2008),	
  and	
  iv)	
  assumptions	
  regarding	
  population	
  sizes	
  (i.e.	
  equal	
  or	
  constant;	
  Narum	
  and	
  Hess,	
  2011).	
  	
  The	
  importance	
  of	
  controlling	
  for	
  false	
  positives	
  by	
  using	
  the	
  most	
  stringent	
  criteria	
  (Egan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Wilding	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001)	
  and	
  correcting	
  for	
  multiple	
  testing	
  (Schlötterer,	
  2003;	
  Storz	
  and	
  Nachman,	
  2003)	
  have	
  been	
  underscored	
  in	
  several	
  studies.	
  However,	
  FDRs	
  and	
  Bonferroni	
  corrections	
  were	
  not	
  used	
  here	
  because	
  selection	
  is	
  likely	
  weak	
  in	
  this	
  system	
  and	
  choosing	
  a	
  threshold	
  that	
  would	
  reduce	
  Type	
  I	
  error	
  without	
  inflating	
  Type	
  II	
  error	
  is	
  difficult	
  to	
  determine,	
  especially	
  since	
  genome	
  scans	
  using	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  are	
  expected	
  to	
  have	
  higher	
  detection	
  rates	
  (13-­‐20%;	
  Namroud	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Shikano	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Vasemagi	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005)	
  than	
  those	
  using	
  SNPs	
  or	
  other	
  anonymous	
  markers	
  (2–10%;	
  Bonin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006;	
  Campbell	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2004;	
  Stinchcombe	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2008;	
  Wilding	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001)	
  that	
  are	
  found	
  most	
  frequently	
  in	
  non-­‐coding	
   	
  	
  	
   45	
   regions.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  that	
  the	
  requirement	
  for	
  detection	
  by	
  two	
  or	
  more	
  approaches	
  is	
  adequately	
  conservative	
  given	
  that	
  18	
  of	
  33	
  markers	
  were	
  eliminated	
  as	
  false	
  positives.	
  	
  Foll	
  and	
  Gaggiotti	
  (2008)	
  found	
  that	
  detection	
  of	
  loci	
  across	
  multiple	
  replicate	
  ecotype-­‐pairs	
  is	
  an	
  adequate	
  approach	
  for	
  reducing	
  Type	
  I	
  and	
  II	
  errors	
  when	
  data	
  on	
  L.	
  saxatilis	
  (Wilding	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001)	
  was	
  reanalyzed.	
  	
  Although	
  it	
  is	
  impossible	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  any	
  true	
  outliers	
  were	
  classified	
  as	
  ‘false	
  outliers’	
  (for	
  this	
  reason,	
  they	
  were	
  not	
  retained	
  in	
  the	
  ‘truly	
  neutral’	
  dataset)	
  or	
  if	
  false	
  positives	
  were	
  classified	
  as	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  at	
  this	
  point,	
  the	
  four	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  are	
  very	
  promising	
  candidates	
  for	
  loci	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
   Outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches	
  varied	
  in	
  their	
  sensitivity	
  to	
  outlier	
  behaviour.	
  	
  BAYESCAN	
  had	
  very	
  low	
  detection	
  rates	
  (1.2%)	
  and	
  exhibited	
  under-­‐sensitivity	
  to	
  true	
  outliers.	
  	
  While	
  BAYESCAN	
  is	
  generally	
  reported	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  most	
  stringent	
  approach,	
  it	
  is	
  also	
  commonly	
  described	
  as	
  the	
  most	
  robust	
  to	
  complex	
  demographic	
  scenarios,	
  which	
  is	
  somewhat	
  contradictory	
  to	
  our	
  findings.	
  	
  Under-­‐sensitivity	
  to	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  was	
  greatest	
  in	
  the	
  lnRH	
  approach,	
  probably	
  because	
  soft	
  sweeps	
  will	
  not	
  produce	
  differences	
  in	
  gene	
  diversity	
  (He)	
  as	
  they	
  will	
  population	
  differentiation	
  (Hohenlohe	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  The	
  detection	
  of	
  false	
  positives	
  was	
  much	
  more	
  common	
  than	
  false	
  negatives	
  for	
  three	
  of	
  the	
  four	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches.	
  	
  DETSEL,	
  LOSITAN	
  and	
  lnRH	
  exhibited	
  over-­‐sensitivity	
  to	
  outlier	
  behaviour,	
  mostly	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lakes.	
  	
  In	
  these	
  lakes,	
  complex	
  demographic	
  histories	
  may	
  be	
  influencing	
  outlier-­‐detection.	
  	
  High	
  detection	
  rates	
  are	
  frequently	
  reported	
  for	
  the	
  FDIST2	
  approach	
  implemented	
  in	
  LOSITAN.	
  (Narum	
  and	
  Hess,	
  2011).	
  	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  exhibited	
  the	
  lowest	
  neutral	
  differentiation	
  among	
  spawning	
  sites	
  and	
  only	
  two	
  false	
  positives	
  were	
  identified,	
  while	
  all	
  four	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  were	
  detected	
  by	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  approach	
  in	
  this	
  lake.	
  	
  This	
  supports	
  the	
  notion	
  that	
  despite	
  their	
  propensity	
  for	
  high	
  Type	
  I	
  error	
  rates,	
  a	
  genome	
  scan	
  approach	
  can	
  identify	
  loci	
  under	
  selection	
  when	
  replicate	
  lakes	
  are	
  used	
  to	
  identify	
  false	
  positives.	
  	
   2.4.3	
  	
  Testing	
  for	
  a	
  unique	
  signal	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  	
  	
   Tests	
  for	
  distinct	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  differentiation	
  and	
  structuring	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  at	
  outliers	
  compared	
  to	
  neutral	
  loci	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  further	
  validate	
  outliers	
  because	
  only	
  natural	
  selection	
  can	
   	
  	
  	
   46	
   generate	
  barriers	
  to	
  gene	
  flow	
  at	
  specific	
  loci	
  (outliers)	
  without	
  affecting	
  the	
  entire	
  genome	
  (neutral	
  loci).	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  differentiation	
  at	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  were	
  significantly	
  higher	
  that	
  those	
  estimated	
  at	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  across	
  all	
  lakes	
  and	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype	
  pair	
  (Tables	
  2.4	
  and	
  2.5),	
  which	
  further	
  supports	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  as	
  loci	
  truly	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  Although	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  chance	
  that	
  focusing	
  on	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  may	
  result	
  in	
  overlooking	
  loci	
  of	
  interest	
  (Stinchcombe	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2008).	
  	
  Even	
  if	
  the	
  same	
  selective	
  forces	
  are	
  favouring	
  the	
  same	
  phenotype	
  in	
  multiple	
  populations,	
  different	
  mutations	
  within	
  the	
  same	
  gene,	
  mutations	
  in	
  different	
  genes,	
  and	
  mutations	
  in	
  genes	
  belonging	
  to	
  different	
  pathways	
  could	
  produce	
  a	
  similar	
  phenotype	
  (Shikano	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  Variation	
  in	
  loci	
  identified	
  as	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  across	
  lakes	
  suggests	
  that	
  different	
  genes	
  may	
  underlie	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  in	
  different	
  lakes.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  some	
  loci	
  were	
  detected	
  as	
  strong	
  outliers	
  by	
  two	
  or	
  three	
  different	
  algorithms	
  in	
  only	
  a	
  single	
  lake	
  (i.e.	
  OMM5125	
  in	
  Okanagan,	
  and	
  Ots06	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake)	
  and	
  some	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  were	
  monomorphic	
  in	
  other	
  lakes.	
  	
  To	
  investigate	
  the	
  validity	
  of	
  these	
  outliers,	
  I	
  compared	
  patterns	
  of	
  variation	
  at	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’,	
  all	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’.	
  	
  The	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  exhibited	
  the	
  highest	
  levels	
  of	
  ecotype	
  differentiation,	
  which	
  suggests	
  that	
  different	
  genes	
  may	
  be	
  involved	
  in	
  ecotype	
  divergence.	
  	
  This	
  trend	
  could	
  also	
  be	
  produced	
  simply	
  by	
  ascertainment	
  bias	
  (Thornton	
  and	
  Jensen,	
  2007),	
  but	
  the	
  2.5-­‐fold	
  increase	
  in	
  FST	
  observed	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  likely	
  has	
  some	
  biological	
  significance.	
  	
  Still,	
  there	
  is	
  considerable	
  overlap	
  between	
  ‘repeat-­‐outlier’	
  and	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  (Table	
  2.2)	
  and	
  the	
  difference	
  in	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  discrete	
  genetic	
  units	
  inferred	
  by	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  suggests	
  that	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  at	
  outliers	
  are	
  distinct	
  from	
  that	
  of	
  neutral	
  loci	
  and	
  possibly	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  locus-­‐specific	
  effects	
  of	
  selection.	
  	
  Repeat-­‐outliers	
  represent	
  the	
  best	
  candidates	
  for	
  further	
  validation,	
  but	
  in	
  cases	
  of	
  high	
  congruence	
  among	
  detection	
  approaches,	
  some	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  are	
  certainly	
  worthy	
  of	
  further	
  investigation	
  as	
  well.	
  	
   2.4.4	
  	
  Traits	
  putatively	
  under	
  selection	
   Using	
  a	
  genome-­‐scan	
  approach	
  allowed	
  us	
  to	
  identifying	
  loci	
  putatively	
  under	
  selection	
  with	
  no	
  a	
  priori	
  knowledge	
  of	
  the	
  phenotypes	
  involved.	
  	
  While	
  additional	
  validation	
  is	
  necessary,	
  preliminary	
   	
  	
  	
   47	
   inferences	
  can	
  be	
  made	
  about	
  the	
  possible	
  traits	
  involved	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  function	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  closely	
  linked	
  genes.	
  	
  Since	
  outliers	
  are	
  closely	
  linked	
  to	
  genes	
  that	
  code	
  for	
  transporters	
  (TAP2,	
  EV691,	
   EV740),	
  receptors	
  (EV358,	
  OMM5003)	
  and	
  enzymes	
  (EV170,	
  EV685),	
  selection	
  is	
  most	
  likely	
  acting	
  on	
  physiological	
  traits	
  rather	
  than	
  morphological	
  traits	
  (which	
  are	
  generally	
  associated	
  with	
  transcriptional	
  regulators;	
  Liao	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  More	
  specifically,	
  the	
  annotations	
  recovered	
  for	
  nine	
  outliers	
  infer	
  that	
  the	
  divergence	
  of	
  stream-­‐	
  and	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  ecotypes	
  may	
  involve	
  differences	
  in	
  immune	
  responses	
  to	
  pathogens	
  and	
  energy	
  metabolism.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  locus	
  EV358	
  is	
  a	
  strong	
  candidate	
  and	
  linked	
  to	
  an	
  immunological	
  gene,	
  CXCR4.	
  	
  This	
  gene	
  has	
  shown	
  differential	
  expression	
  in	
  response	
  to	
  exposure	
  to	
  sea	
  lice	
  in	
  Atlantic	
  salmon	
  (Skugar	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008)	
  and	
  saprolegniasis	
  (a	
  fungal	
  infection	
  (Roberge	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  CXCR4	
  has	
  potent	
  chemotactic	
  activity	
  for	
  lymphocyctes	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  inhibit	
  haematopoietic	
  stem	
  cell	
  proliferation	
  (Nie	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  The	
  TAP2	
  transporter	
  protein	
  has	
  been	
  identified	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  immune	
  system	
  in	
  brown	
  trout	
  and	
  European	
  trout	
  (Salmo	
   trutta;	
  Abele	
  and	
  Tampe,	
  2006;	
  Jensen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008;	
  Keller	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
  Some	
  viruses	
  can	
  suppress	
  the	
  functioning	
  of	
  this	
  protein,	
  which	
  suggests	
  there	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  potential	
  for	
  strong	
  pathogen-­‐mediated	
  selection.	
  	
  Studies	
  of	
  Alaskan	
  sockeye	
  have	
  identified	
  variation	
  at	
  SNPs	
  in	
  the	
  major	
  histocompatibility	
  complex	
  (MHC)	
  that	
  are	
  linked	
  to	
  immune	
  function	
  and	
  disease	
  resistance	
  and	
  correlated	
  with	
  different	
  spawning	
  sites	
  (Creelman	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  and	
  habitat	
  types	
  (McGlauflin	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
  Locus	
   EV170	
  is	
  associated	
  with	
  an	
  enzyme	
  in	
  the	
  citric	
  acid	
  cycle,	
  and	
  is	
  therefore	
  crucially	
  involved	
  in	
  energy	
  metabolism	
  throughout	
  the	
  body.	
  	
  Selection	
  on	
  this	
  gene	
  may	
  reflect	
  the	
  reduced	
  metabolic	
  demands	
  of	
  shore	
  spawners,	
  since	
  the	
  migration	
  to	
  shore	
  sites	
  is	
  far	
  less	
  demanding	
  than	
  stream	
  sites.	
  	
  This	
  gene	
  may	
  relate	
  to	
  differences	
  in	
  size	
  observed	
  in	
  some	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  since	
  an	
  over-­‐expression	
  of	
  genes	
  with	
  key	
  roles	
  in	
  the	
  citric	
  acid	
  cycle	
  (including	
  malate	
  dehydrogenase)	
  have	
  been	
  implicated	
  in	
  the	
  divergence	
  of	
  dwarf	
  and	
  normal	
  lake	
  whitefish	
  (St-­‐Cyr	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  The	
  annotations	
  of	
  the	
  strongest	
  outliers	
  identified	
  here	
  offer	
  highly	
  plausible	
  mechanisms	
  driving	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  and	
  some	
  of	
  which	
  known	
  to	
  be	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  divergence	
  of	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  in	
  other	
  systems.	
  	
  This	
  further	
  supports	
  the	
  notion	
  that	
  genome	
  scans	
  can	
  successfully	
  link	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  to	
  gene	
  regions	
  under	
  selection	
  and	
  shed	
  new	
  light	
  on	
  the	
  possible	
  mechanisms	
  underlying	
  divergence.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   48	
   2.5	
  	
  Summary	
   Using	
  genome	
  scans	
  to	
  identify	
  genes	
  of	
  adaptive	
  significance	
  has	
  several	
  inherent	
  challenges,	
  yet	
  identifying	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  in	
  outlier	
  behavior	
  across	
  multiple	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  can	
  provide	
  the	
  most	
  robust	
  evidence	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  natural	
  selection	
  on	
  a	
  gene	
  (and	
  linked	
  regions).	
  	
  Loci	
  identified	
  here	
  as	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  represent	
  the	
  best	
  candidates	
  for	
  further	
  investigation	
  and	
  validation.	
  	
  Although,	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  were	
  not	
  detected	
  across	
  all	
  five	
  ecotype	
  pairs,	
  there	
  is	
  still	
  strong	
  evidence	
  for	
  ecotype	
  differentiation	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  in	
  multiple	
  lakes	
  based	
  on	
  AMOVA	
  and	
  STRUCTURE	
  results,	
  potentially	
  reflecting	
  the	
  locus-­‐specific	
  effects	
  of	
  selection.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  possible	
  that	
  differences	
  in	
  selection	
  pressure	
  or	
  standing	
  variation	
  may	
  be	
  obscuring	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  in	
  some	
  lakes	
  or	
  that	
  different	
  genes	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  pathways	
  are	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  divergence	
  of	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee,	
  which	
  is	
  not	
  unprecedented	
  in	
  the	
  literature	
  (Hoekstra,	
  2006).	
  	
  	
   These	
  outlier	
  loci	
  are	
  strong	
  candidates	
  for	
  selection	
  and	
  plausible	
  mechanisms	
  can	
  be	
  inferred	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  most	
  closely	
  linked	
  gene,	
  but	
  further	
  validation	
  is	
  necessary.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  only	
  the	
  first	
  step	
  towards	
  uncovering	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  in	
  kokanee	
  salmon.	
  	
  Ultimately,	
  this	
  work	
  may	
  identify	
  those	
  environmental	
  factors	
  that	
  drive	
  divergence	
  in	
  salmonids	
  utilizing	
  different	
  spawning	
  habitats	
  and	
  factors	
  that	
  promote	
  and	
  constrain	
  progress	
  towards	
  speciation	
  in	
  natural	
  populations.	
  	
  Such	
  insights	
  could	
  substantially	
  enhance	
  our	
  ability	
  to	
  identify	
  population	
  boundaries,	
  designate	
  management	
  units,	
  predict	
  future	
  evolutionary	
  trajectories	
  of	
  wild	
  stocks,	
  and	
  recover	
  populations	
  of	
  conservation	
  concern	
  (Fraser	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008).	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   49	
   CHAPTER	
  3.0	
  	
  A	
  GENOME-­SCAN	
  APPROACH	
  FOR	
  IDENTIFYING	
  INFORMATIVE	
   MARKERS	
  FOR	
  LANDSCAPE-­LEVEL	
  FRESHWATER	
  FISHERIES	
  	
   3.1	
  	
  Background	
   Population	
  genetics	
  provides	
  significant	
  insight	
  into	
  the	
  migrational	
  behaviour,	
  mating	
  systems,	
  demographics,	
  and	
  particularly	
  the	
  population	
  structure	
  of	
  fishes,	
  which	
  would	
  otherwise	
  be	
  very	
  difficult	
  to	
  assess	
  (Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008).	
  	
  Over	
  the	
  last	
  six	
  decades,	
  genetic	
  approaches	
  have	
  been	
  increasingly	
  used	
  for	
  genetic	
  stock	
  identification	
  (GSI)	
  in	
  commercial	
  fisheries	
  (Shaklee	
  et	
  al.,	
  1999)	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  informing	
  decisions	
  on	
  recovery	
  initiatives	
  (Allendorf	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010;	
  Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008;	
  Waples	
  and	
  Hendry,	
  2008).	
  	
  Presently,	
  the	
  delineation	
  of	
  management	
  and	
  conservation	
  units	
  heavily	
  relies	
  on	
  neutral	
  population	
  structure,	
  reflecting	
  historical	
  patterns	
  of	
  reproductive	
  isolation.	
  	
  Substantial	
  effort	
  has	
  been	
  dedicated	
  to	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  increasingly	
  accurate	
  and	
  more	
  powerful	
  markers	
  to	
  define	
  evolutionary	
  significant	
  units	
  on	
  increasingly	
  finer	
  spatial	
  and	
  temporal	
  scales	
  (Narum	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  However,	
  studies	
  suggest	
  that	
  neutral	
  markers	
  are	
  only	
  effective	
  for	
  resolving	
  population	
  boundaries	
  on	
  relatively	
  large	
  scales	
  (e.g.	
  100	
  km	
  in	
  Chinook	
  salmon;	
  Beacham	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  	
  At	
  smaller	
  scales,	
  niche	
  partitioning	
  and	
  local	
  adaptation	
  promote	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  among	
  proximate	
  populations	
  (Gomez-­‐Uchida	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011),	
  generating	
  much	
  of	
  the	
  intraspecific	
  diversity	
  (e.g.	
  life	
  history	
  forms)	
  that	
  has	
  arisen	
  since	
  the	
  last	
  glaciation	
  (Fraser	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2005).	
  	
  Many	
  failed	
  transplant	
  experiments	
  suggests	
  that	
  these	
  populations	
  are	
  uniquely	
  adapted	
  to	
  local	
  conditions	
  (Fraser	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011)	
  and	
  underscores	
  the	
  need	
  to	
  identify,	
  delineate,	
  and	
  preserve	
  locally	
  adapted	
  stocks	
  to	
  maintain	
  ecological	
  complexity	
  and	
  thereby	
  stock	
  productivity	
  and	
  stability	
  in	
  the	
  future	
  (Fraser	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Harmon	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
  Conventional	
  neutral	
  genetic	
  markers	
  cannot	
  distinguish	
  recently	
  diverged	
  ecotypes	
  because	
  selection	
  only	
  acts	
  on	
  fitness-­‐related	
  genes	
  and	
  neutral	
  differences	
  have	
  not	
  yet	
  accumulated	
  or	
  are	
  lost	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  homogenizing	
  effects	
  of	
  gene	
  flow.	
  	
  In	
  such	
  cases,	
  adaptive	
  genetic	
  markers,	
  i.e.	
  markers	
  directly	
  linked	
  to	
  polymorphisms	
  in	
  genes	
  under	
  selection,	
  are	
  needed	
  to	
  conduct	
  assessments	
  for	
  recently	
  diverged	
  stocks	
  and	
  inform	
  fishery	
  management	
  decisions.	
   	
  	
  	
   50	
   In	
  the	
  past,	
  crossbreeding	
  experiments	
  and	
  quantitative	
  trait	
  loci	
  (QTL)	
  studies	
  were	
  required	
  to	
  investigate	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  adaptive	
  traits.	
  	
  However,	
  these	
  approaches	
  can	
  be	
  prohibitively	
  expensive	
  and	
  time	
  consuming,	
  especially	
  for	
  species	
  with	
  longer	
  generation	
  times	
  (Storz,	
  2005).	
  	
  The	
  use	
  of	
  population-­‐based	
  genomic	
  scans	
  represents	
  a	
  faster	
  and	
  relatively	
  inexpensive	
  alternative	
  for	
  identifying	
  informative	
  loci	
  (i.e.	
  outlier	
  loci)	
  for	
  distinguishing	
  recently	
  evolved	
  ecotypes	
  with	
  no	
  knowledge	
  of	
  the	
  phenotypes	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  If	
  outliers	
  truly	
  reflect	
  adaptive	
  variation,	
  they	
  could	
  be	
  used	
  for	
  genetic	
  stock	
  identification	
  (GSI)-­‐based	
  individual	
  assignment	
  (IA)	
  and	
  mixed	
  composition	
  (MC)	
  analysis	
  in	
  conspecific	
  populations	
  exhibiting	
  the	
  same	
  patterns	
  of	
  phenotypic	
  divergence,	
  in	
  theory	
  (Andre	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Nielsen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009a).	
  	
  Few	
  have	
  investigated	
  the	
  utility	
  of	
  outliers	
  versus	
  truly	
  neutral	
  markers	
  within	
  a	
  management	
  context	
  (Ackerman	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Andre	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Freamo	
   et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Nielsen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009b;	
  Russello	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012;	
  VanDeHey	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009),	
  but	
  the	
  approach	
  seems	
  quite	
  promising	
  (Helyar	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
   Currently,	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  need	
  to	
  develop	
  adaptive	
  markers	
  in	
  kokanee	
  salmon,	
  Oncorhynchus	
  nerka.	
  	
  Kokanee	
  are	
  an	
  economically	
  and	
  ecologically	
  important	
  freshwater	
  fish	
  that	
  exhibit	
  two	
  distinct	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes:	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  (Shephard,	
  2000;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  These	
  ecotypes	
  exhibit	
  distinct	
  reproductive	
  behaviours	
  and	
  spawning	
  habitat	
  preferences	
  (see	
  Table	
  1.1),	
  but	
  are	
  ecologically	
  and	
  morphologically	
  indistinguishable	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  spawning	
  period.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  last	
  30	
  years,	
  lake-­‐wide	
  kokanee	
  populations	
  have	
  declined	
  in	
  abundance	
  by	
  more	
  than	
  90%	
  in	
  several	
  BC	
  and	
  northwestern	
  US	
  lakes	
  (Andrusak	
  and	
  Andrusak,	
  2011;	
  Paragamian	
  and	
  Bowles,	
  1995;	
  Shephard,	
  2000).	
  	
  Managers	
  have	
  been	
  urged	
  to	
  treat	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  as	
  discrete	
  management	
  units	
  based	
  on	
  their	
  geographical	
  and	
  temporal	
  discreteness,	
  modest	
  levels	
  of	
  neutral	
  genetic	
  variation,	
  and	
  possible	
  divergence	
  in	
  some	
  phenotypic	
  traits	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  Since	
  they	
  use	
  distinct	
  spawning	
  habitats,	
  ecotypes	
  are	
  also	
  differentially	
  vulnerable	
  to	
  various	
  anthropogenic	
  activities	
  (e.g.	
  lake	
  draw-­‐down,	
  shoreline	
  development).	
  	
  Obtaining	
  ecotype-­‐specific	
  estimates	
  of	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  will	
  be	
  critical	
  for	
  the	
  future	
  recovery	
  of	
  at-­‐risk	
  populations,	
  however	
  standard	
   	
  	
  	
   51	
   methods	
  do	
  not	
  allow	
  for	
  independent	
  estimates	
  of	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  or	
  harvest	
  rates	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype	
  when	
  they	
  occur	
  in	
  sympatry.	
   Visual	
  counts	
  of	
  kokanee	
  aggregations	
  during	
  the	
  peak	
  spawning	
  time	
  is	
  the	
  standard	
  approach	
  for	
  obtaining	
  instantaneous	
  abundance	
  estimates	
  for	
  individual	
  stocks.	
  	
  Absolute	
  abundance	
  can	
  be	
  accurately	
  determined	
  for	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  using	
  more	
  labour-­‐intensive	
  counting	
  methods	
  (e.g.	
  a	
  counting	
  fence)	
  or	
  applying	
  the	
  provincial	
  standard	
  expansion	
  factor	
  to	
  visual	
  counts	
  (x1.5),	
  which	
  takes	
  into	
  account	
  the	
  residence	
  time	
  of	
  fish	
  (by	
  movement	
  or	
  death)	
  and	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  fish	
  that	
  are	
  generally	
  visible	
  (Ashley	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
  	
  This	
  information	
  is	
  easy	
  to	
  obtain	
  in	
  streams	
  because	
  fish	
  are	
  in	
  a	
  closed	
  environment	
  and	
  they	
  tend	
  to	
  hold	
  their	
  position	
  in	
  the	
  stream	
  to	
  defend	
  their	
  nest.	
  	
  Visual	
  counts	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawner	
  abundance	
  have	
  simply	
  been	
  used	
  as	
  an	
  index	
  for	
  monitoring	
  long-­‐term	
  trends	
  because	
  the	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  cannot	
  be	
  calculated	
  (P.	
  Askey,	
  pers.	
  comm.).	
  	
  Expansion	
  factors	
  developed	
  for	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  are	
  not	
  suitable	
  because	
  their	
  residence	
  time	
  is	
  unknown,	
  and	
  visibility	
  is	
  much	
  lower	
  due	
  to	
  wave	
  action,	
  less	
  colouration,	
  and	
  depth	
  of	
  spawning	
  (Ashley	
  et	
  al.,	
  1998).	
  	
  Other	
  methods	
  for	
  estimating	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  (e.g.	
  mark-­‐recapture	
  or	
  counting	
  fences)	
  cannot	
  be	
  used	
  because	
  shorelines	
  are	
  open	
  areas	
  and	
  fish	
  are	
  free	
  to	
  come	
  and	
  go.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  genetic	
  markers	
  capable	
  of	
  accurately	
  distinguishing	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  are	
  needed	
  to	
  (i)	
  calculate	
  the	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  and	
  (ii)	
  identify	
  the	
  source	
  ecotype	
  of	
  fish	
  that	
  are	
  otherwise	
  indistinguishable	
  (e.g.	
  mixed	
  samples).	
  	
  The	
  relative	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  could	
  be	
  determined	
  from	
  mixed	
  samples	
  obtained	
  from	
  gillnet,	
  trawl	
  survey	
  and	
  then	
  the	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  of	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  estimate	
  that	
  for	
  shore-­‐spawners.	
  	
  Similarly,	
  the	
  ecotype-­‐specific	
  harvest	
  rates	
  could	
  be	
  calculated	
  from	
  estimates	
  of	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  and	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  angler-­‐caught	
  fish	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype.	
  	
  This	
  could	
  be	
  achieved	
  by	
  assigning	
  each	
  fish	
  sampled	
  in	
  an	
  angler	
  survey	
  to	
  an	
  ecotype	
  using	
  a	
  reference	
  sample.	
  	
  With	
  this	
  information,	
  fishery	
  managers	
  would	
  be	
  better	
  able	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
  ecotype-­‐specific	
  impacts	
  of	
  management	
  decisions	
  (e.g.	
  harvest	
  rate)	
  and	
  prioritize	
  conservation	
  efforts.	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   52	
   Here,	
  loci	
  identified	
  as	
  outliers	
  in	
  a	
  genome	
  scan	
  (see	
  Chapter	
  2)	
  are	
  assessed	
  for	
  their	
  ability	
  to	
  identify	
  the	
  ecotype	
  of	
  individuals	
  with	
  unknown	
  origins	
  and	
  estimate	
  the	
  relative	
  proportions	
  of	
  each	
  ecotype	
  in	
  mixed	
  samples	
  for	
  kokanee	
  from	
  five	
  British	
  Columbian	
  lakes.	
  	
  Specifically,	
  I	
  assessed	
  the	
  bias	
  and	
  accuracy	
  of	
  five	
  datasets	
  consisting	
  of	
  different	
  combinations	
  of	
  outlier	
  and	
  neutral	
  loci	
  in	
  MC	
  and	
  IA	
  tests.	
  	
  Since	
  sampling	
  is	
  often	
  limited	
  by	
  time	
  and	
  resources	
  (Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008),	
  the	
  minimum	
  sample	
  sizes	
  needed	
  to	
  achieve	
  management-­‐relevant	
  levels	
  of	
  accuracy	
  (>90%)	
  are	
  simulated	
  for	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
  Finally,	
  I	
  discuss	
  the	
  prospect	
  of	
  using	
  these	
  outlier	
  loci	
  in	
  other	
  lakes	
  distributed	
  throughout	
  BC	
  and	
  northwestern	
  USA.	
   3.2	
  	
  Methods	
   3.2.1	
  	
  Data	
  collection	
  &	
  dataset	
  definition	
   Baseline	
  information	
  for	
  this	
  study	
  was	
  comprised	
  of	
  genotypic	
  data	
  collected	
  at	
  42	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  and	
  8	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  for	
  525	
  individuals	
  across	
  five	
  lakes,	
  including	
  Okanagan,	
  Wood,	
  Kootenay,	
  Duncan,	
  and	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lakes	
  (see	
  Chapter	
  2	
  for	
  sampling	
  and	
  genotyping	
  details).	
  	
  Five	
  datasets	
  were	
  defined	
  based	
  on	
  marker	
  type	
  and	
  behaviour	
  in	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  analyses:	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  ‘true	
  outliers’,	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’,	
  ‘anonymous	
  loci’,	
  and	
  truly	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  (see	
  Chapter	
  2).	
  	
  The	
  ‘repeat	
  outlier’	
  dataset	
  consisted	
  of	
  loci	
  exhibiting	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  in	
  multiple	
  lakes	
  using	
  multiple	
  algorithms	
  (n	
  loci=4),	
  and	
  had	
  the	
  greatest	
  potential	
  to	
  be	
  informative	
  in	
  lakes	
  throughout	
  the	
  native	
  range	
  of	
  kokanee.	
  	
  The	
  ‘true	
  outlier’	
  dataset	
  consisted	
  of	
  all	
  loci	
  detected	
  by	
  two	
  or	
  more	
  algorithms	
  in	
  any	
  one	
  lake	
  (n	
  loci=15).	
  	
  This	
  dataset	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  added	
  benefit	
  of	
  incorporating	
  strong	
  outliers	
  that	
  were	
  only	
  detected	
  in	
  only	
  one	
  lake	
  and	
  evaluate	
  the	
  possibility	
  that	
  multiple	
  genes	
  are	
  involved	
  in	
  ecotype	
  divergence.	
  	
  For	
  a	
  similar	
  purpose,	
  I	
  included	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outlier’	
  dataset.	
  	
  This	
  dataset	
  consisted	
  of	
  five	
  different	
  sets	
  of	
  loci	
  corresponding	
  to	
  those	
  detected	
  by	
  at	
  least	
  two	
  algorithms	
  within	
  each	
  respective	
  lake	
  (Duncan	
  n	
  loci=4,	
  Kootenay	
  n	
  loci=5,	
  Okanagan	
  n	
  loci=3,	
  Wood	
  n	
  loci=6,	
  Tchesinkut	
  n	
  loci=3),	
  and	
  therefore	
  eliminated	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  uninformative	
  markers	
  in	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
  The	
  ‘anonymous	
  loci’	
  dataset	
  (n	
  loci=8)	
  contained	
  highly	
  variable	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  that	
  are	
   	
  	
  	
   53	
   commonly	
  used	
  in	
  genetic	
  studies	
  of	
  O.	
  nerka.	
  	
  Finally,	
  the	
  ‘neutral	
  dataset’	
  consisted	
  of	
  any	
  polymorphic	
  locus	
  that	
  showed	
  no	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  at	
  all	
  (n	
  loci=15).	
  	
  This	
  dataset	
  acted	
  as	
  a	
  baseline	
  for	
  comparison	
  when	
  evaluating	
  the	
  power	
  of	
  putatively	
  adaptive	
  markers	
  in	
  distinguishing	
  recently	
  evolved	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  ecotypes.	
   3.2.2	
  	
  Individual	
  assignment	
  tests	
  	
   The	
  ability	
  of	
  each	
  dataset	
  to	
  assign	
  individuals	
  to	
  the	
  most	
  likely	
  ecotype	
  of	
  origin	
  was	
  assessed	
  using	
  the	
  method	
  of	
  Rannala	
  and	
  Mountain	
  (1997)	
  implemented	
  in	
  the	
  GSI	
  program,	
  ONCOR	
  (Kalinowski	
  et	
   al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  First,	
  realistic	
  fishery	
  simulations	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  generate	
  multi-­‐locus	
  genotypes	
  (Anderson	
   et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Both	
  genotype	
  frequencies	
  and	
  mixture	
  proportions	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  calculate	
  the	
  ecotype	
  with	
  the	
  highest	
  probability	
  of	
  producing	
  the	
  given	
  genotype.	
  	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  individuals	
  correctly	
  assigned	
  was	
  calculated	
  for	
  each	
  ecotype	
  in	
  all	
  five	
  lakes.	
  	
  The	
  leave-­‐one-­‐out	
  individual	
  assignment	
  test	
  was	
  also	
  used	
  to	
  assess	
  how	
  well	
  individuals	
  from	
  the	
  baseline	
  were	
  assigned	
  back	
  to	
  their	
  ecotype	
  of	
  origin	
  (Kalinowski	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  	
   3.2.3	
  	
  Mixed	
  composition	
  analyses	
  	
   Mixed-­‐stock	
  proportions	
  were	
  estimated	
  using	
  the	
  conditional	
  maximum	
  likelihood-­‐based	
  approach	
  implemented	
  in	
  ONCOR	
  (Kalinowski	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  This	
  algorithm	
  avoids	
  overly	
  optimistic	
  assessments	
  of	
  power	
  by	
  simulating	
  genotypes	
  from	
  the	
  existing	
  baselines	
  to	
  create	
  mixture	
  samples	
  and	
  then	
  estimating	
  their	
  probability	
  of	
  occurrence	
  in	
  the	
  baseline	
  populations	
  (Anderson	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Two	
  series	
  of	
  simulation	
  analyses	
  were	
  conducted	
  to	
  evaluate	
  the	
  utility	
  of	
  our	
  baseline	
  datasets	
  in	
  MC	
  analysis.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  first	
  series,	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  were	
  skewed	
  to	
  test	
  for	
  any	
  systematically	
  bias	
  in	
  the	
  estimation	
  of	
  ecotype	
  contributions	
  in	
  a	
  mixed	
  sample.	
  	
  Using	
  the	
  realistic	
  fishery	
  simulation	
  method	
  in	
  ONCOR,	
  six	
  mixture	
  scenarios	
  were	
  defined	
  for	
  each	
  lake	
  (shore	
  :	
  stream):	
  90:10,	
  75:25,	
  50:50,	
  25:75,	
  10:	
  90	
  and	
  0:100.	
  	
  Mixture	
  samples	
  of	
  200	
  multi-­‐locus	
  genotypes	
  were	
  generated	
  by	
  drawing	
  fish	
  from	
  the	
  baseline	
  sample,	
  with	
  replacement,	
  to	
  achieve	
  the	
  specified	
  proportions	
  of	
  each	
  ecotype	
  (Anderson	
  and	
  Slatkin,	
  2007).	
  	
  I	
  ran	
  1000	
  simulations	
  and	
  five	
  replicates	
  per	
  scenario	
  with	
  the	
  reporting	
  groups	
   	
  	
  	
   54	
   defined	
  by	
  ecotype.	
  	
  The	
  proportion	
  of	
  shore	
  spawners	
  estimated	
  by	
  ONCOR	
  was	
  subtracted	
  by	
  the	
  actual	
  (pre-­‐defined)	
  proportion	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  to	
  calculate	
  the	
  residual	
  from	
  each	
  mixture	
  scenario	
  in	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
  A	
  positive	
  residual	
  indicated	
  an	
  overestimate	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  and	
  a	
  negative	
  residual	
  indicated	
  an	
  under-­‐estimate	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  relative	
  to	
  the	
  true	
  value.	
  	
  The	
  residuals	
  were	
  used	
  to	
  assess	
  any	
  bias	
  in	
  observed	
  estimates	
  and	
  determine	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  different	
  datasets	
  in	
  MC	
  analyses.	
  	
  The	
  absolute	
  sum	
  of	
  the	
  residuals	
  for	
  each	
  lake	
  were	
  compared	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  the	
  five	
  datasets.	
   In	
  the	
  second	
  series,	
  the	
  100%	
  simulation	
  method	
  of	
  Anderson	
  and	
  Slatkin	
  (2007)	
  was	
  used	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  baseline	
  sample	
  sizes	
  on	
  accuracy	
  of	
  MC	
  estimates	
  using	
  only	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outlier’	
  dataset.	
  	
  Baseline	
  samples	
  consisting	
  of	
  50,	
  100,	
  150,	
  200,	
  and	
  250	
  multi-­‐locus	
  genotypes	
  were	
  generated	
  by	
  drawing	
  alleles	
  from	
  reduced	
  variance	
  estimates	
  of	
  allele	
  frequencies	
  in	
  the	
  baseline	
  dataset	
  for	
  each	
  lake	
  (Kalinowski	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  Samples	
  were	
  generated	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  pre-­‐defined	
  composition	
  of	
  stream-­‐	
  and	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  (25:75)	
  to	
  better	
  reflect	
  realistic	
  proportions	
  and	
  minimize	
  bias	
  in	
  the	
  results	
  since	
  ONCOR	
  does	
  not	
  perform	
  as	
  well	
  when	
  proportions	
  are	
  skewed	
  (see	
  results).	
  	
  Again,	
  five	
  replicates	
  were	
  run	
  for	
  each	
  sample	
  size.	
  	
  Accuracy	
  was	
  plotted	
  against	
  baseline	
  sample	
  size	
  to	
  determine	
  the	
  minimum	
  number	
  of	
  samples	
  needed	
  to	
  attain	
  the	
  desired	
  threshold	
  of	
  90%	
  accuracy	
  for	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
  	
   3.3	
  	
  Results	
   3.3.1	
  	
  Individual	
  Assignment	
  Tests	
   Assignment	
  accuracy	
  varied	
  substantially	
  across	
  lakes	
  and	
  datasets	
  (29.4	
  %	
  to	
  95.9%;	
  Table	
  B.2)	
  when	
  using	
  the	
  realistic	
  fishery	
  simulation	
  approach	
  in	
  ONCOR.	
  	
  Stream-­‐spawners	
  were	
  assigned	
  to	
  the	
  correct	
  ecotype	
  more	
  often	
  than	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  by	
  1-­‐6%,	
  except	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  (shore	
  was	
  2%	
  higher;	
  Figure	
  3.1).	
  	
  Overall,	
  mean	
  IA	
  accuracy	
  across	
  all	
  five	
  lakes	
  was	
  71.2%	
  using	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  75.6%	
  using	
  all	
  15	
  ‘true	
  outliers’,	
  74.7%	
  using	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’,	
  69.2%	
  using	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
   55	
   ‘anonymous	
  loci’,	
  and	
  67.3%	
  using	
  the	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’.	
  	
  The	
  three	
  outlier	
  datasets	
  outperformed	
  the	
  anonymous	
  and	
  neutral	
  datasets,	
  but	
  none	
  achieved	
  >80%	
  assignment	
  accuracy,	
  aside	
  from	
  Wood	
  Lake.	
  	
  The	
  IA	
  accuracy	
  based	
  on	
  ‘anonymous’	
  and	
  ‘neutral’	
  datasets	
  produced	
  similar	
  results	
  overall,	
  although	
  the	
  ‘anonymous	
  loci’	
  were	
  5.4%	
  more	
  accurate	
  in	
  both	
  Duncan	
  and	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lakes.	
  	
  The	
  ‘repeat	
  outliers’	
  outperformed	
  better	
  than	
  the	
  ‘anonymous’	
  and	
  ‘neutral’	
  datasets	
  in	
  three	
  out	
  of	
  five	
  lakes,	
  and	
  was	
  best	
  out	
  of	
  all	
  five	
  datasets	
  in	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  (Figure	
  3.1).	
  	
  Using	
  the	
  leave-­‐one-­‐out	
  method	
  in	
  ONCOR,	
  estimates	
  of	
  IA	
  accuracy	
  were	
  very	
  similar,	
  but	
  on	
  average	
  they	
  were	
  1%	
  higher	
  for	
  all	
  datasets	
  (data	
  not	
  shown).	
  	
   	
   	
   Figure	
  3.1	
  	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  genotypes	
  accurately	
  assigned	
  to	
  the	
  ecotype	
  of	
  origin	
  as	
  assessed	
  in	
  individual	
  assignment	
  (IA)	
  tests	
  using	
  the	
  realistic	
  fishery	
  simulation	
  approach	
  implemented	
  in	
  ONCOR.	
  	
  Mean	
  accuracy	
  is	
  shown	
  for	
  each	
  lake,	
  using	
  each	
  of	
  five	
  different	
  datasets,	
  including	
  repeat	
  outliers	
  (n	
  loci=4),	
  true	
  outliers	
  (n	
  loci=15),	
  lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers	
  (Duncan	
  n	
  loci=4,	
  Kootenay	
  n	
  loci=5,	
  Okanagan	
  n	
  loci=3,	
  Wood	
  n	
  loci=6,	
  Tchesinkut	
  n	
  loci=3),	
  anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  (n	
  loci=8),	
  and	
  truly	
  neutral	
  loci	
  (n	
  loci=15).	
   3.3.2	
  	
  Mixed	
  Stock	
  Analyses	
   In	
  mixed-­‐stock	
  analyses,	
  the	
  estimated	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  differed	
  from	
  the	
  true	
  proportions	
  by	
  0.4%	
  to	
  51.6%	
  across	
  the	
  six	
  mixture	
  scenarios	
  and	
  five	
  lakes	
  (Figure	
  3.2).	
  	
  In	
  general,	
  all	
  estimates	
  were	
  most	
  accurate	
  when	
  the	
  true	
  proportions	
  of	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  were	
  equal	
  (50:50).	
  	
  Weakly	
   50	
   60	
   70	
   80	
   90	
   100	
   Dunacan	
   Kootenay	
   Okanagan	
   Wood	
   Tchesinkut	
   Percent	
  	
   accuracy	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   in	
  IA	
  	
   repeat-­‐outliers	
   all	
  true	
  outliers	
   lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers	
   anonymous	
  loci	
   truly	
  neutral	
  loci	
   	
   Dun 	
   	
  	
  	
   56	
   contributing	
  stocks	
  were	
  consistently	
  over-­‐estimated	
  when	
  the	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  were	
  highly	
  skewed.	
  	
  Estimates	
  were	
  also	
  slightly	
  more	
  accurate	
  when	
  the	
  proportions	
  were	
  skewed	
  in	
  favour	
  of	
  stream-­‐spawners,	
  except	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  0:100	
  mixture	
  scenario	
  (no	
  shore-­‐spawners),	
  zero	
  was	
  included	
  in	
  the	
  confidence	
  interval	
  (CI)	
  when	
  using	
  all	
  five	
  datasets	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake,	
  only	
  ‘lake-­‐specific’	
  and	
  ‘repeat-­‐outlier’	
  datasets	
  in	
  Tchesinkut,	
  and	
  only	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outliers’	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  and	
  Okanagan	
  Lakes.	
   Differences	
  in	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  outliers	
  compared	
  to	
  neutral	
  datasets	
  in	
  MC	
  analyses	
  were	
  most	
  evident	
  in	
  Okanagan,	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lakes,	
  and	
  Kootenay	
  Lakes.	
  	
  All	
  five	
  datasets	
  produced	
  similar	
  results	
  in	
  MC	
  analyses	
  conducted	
  for	
  Duncan	
  and	
  Wood	
  Lakes.	
  	
  All	
  estimates	
  were	
  within	
  3%	
  of	
  the	
  true	
  proportion	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake.	
  	
  The	
  15	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  performed	
  the	
  best,	
  only	
  deviating	
  by	
  a	
  mean	
  of	
  0.5%	
  across	
  the	
  six	
  scenarios.	
  	
  In	
  Duncan	
  Lake,	
  the	
  estimated	
  proportion	
  of	
  shore	
  spawners	
  differed	
  from	
  the	
  true	
  proportions	
  by	
  20.9%	
  on	
  average	
  and	
  never	
  deviated	
  from	
  50:50	
  by	
  more	
  than	
  15.3%	
  (range	
  of	
  30.6%).	
  	
  The	
  ‘neutral	
  dataset’	
  deviated	
  from	
  50:50	
  the	
  least	
  across	
  all	
  scenarios	
  (range	
  of	
  7.8%).	
  	
  The	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  deviated	
  the	
  most	
  (range	
  of	
  43.1%),	
  but	
  the	
  95%	
  CIs	
  did	
  not	
  include	
  the	
  true	
  proportions	
  for	
  five	
  of	
  the	
  six	
  scenarios	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake.	
  	
   Using	
  ‘repeat	
  outlier’	
  dataset,	
  mixed-­‐stock	
  estimates	
  deviated	
  from	
  true	
  proportions	
  by	
  9.2%	
  overall	
  (Table	
  B.1).	
  	
  Deviations	
  were	
  less	
  than	
  5%	
  in	
  19	
  out	
  of	
  30	
  scenarios	
  across	
  all	
  five	
  lakes.	
  	
  The	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outliers’	
  and	
  all	
  ‘true	
  outlier’	
  datasets	
  performed	
  slightly	
  better	
  than	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  with	
  mean	
  deviations	
  of	
  5.7%	
  and	
  8.9%	
  respectively.	
  	
  All	
  three	
  outlier	
  datasets	
  performed	
  significantly	
  better	
  than	
  the	
  ‘anonymous’	
  and	
  ‘neutral’	
  datasets	
  with	
  mean	
  deviations	
  of	
  13.9%	
  and	
  16.6%,	
  respectively.	
  	
  In	
  Kootenay	
  Lake,	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  performed	
  the	
  best,	
  deviating	
  from	
  true	
  proportions	
  by	
  a	
  mean	
  of	
  4.1%	
  and	
  9.5%,	
  respectively.	
  	
  Kootenay	
  was	
  the	
  only	
  lake	
  where	
  estimates	
  based	
  on	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  (14.8%)	
  deviated	
  more	
  than	
  that	
  of	
  the	
  ‘anonymous’	
  	
  (12.8%)	
  and	
  ‘neutral’	
  datasets	
  (13.3%).	
  	
  In	
  Tchesinkut	
  and	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  estimates	
  based	
  on	
  ‘neutral’	
  and	
  ‘anonymous	
  loci’	
  datasets	
  showed	
  little	
  deviation	
  from	
  50:50,	
  while	
  the	
  three	
  outlier	
  datasets	
  were	
  within	
  4.9%	
  and	
  6.5%,	
  of	
  the	
  true	
  proportions	
  across	
  all	
  six	
  scenarios	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  and	
   	
  	
  	
   57	
   Tchesinkut,	
  respectively.	
  	
  The	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outliers’	
  performed	
  the	
  best	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  three	
  outlier	
  datasets,	
  with	
  a	
  mean	
  deviation	
  of	
  2.9%	
  and	
  2.4%,	
  respectively.	
  	
   	
   Figure	
  3.2	
  	
  The	
  percentage	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  estimated	
  by	
  ONCOR	
  for	
  six	
  mixture	
  scenarios	
  with	
  pre-­‐defined	
  mixtures	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  (blue	
  bar).	
  	
  Estimates	
  for	
  all	
  scenarios	
  were	
  calculated	
  using	
  five	
  different	
  datasets,	
  including	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outliers’	
  (Duncan	
  n	
  loci=4,	
  Kootenay	
  n	
  loci=3,	
  Okanagan	
  n	
  loci=3,	
  Wood	
  n	
  loci=6,	
  Tchesinkut	
  n	
  loci=3),	
  ‘repeat	
  outliers’	
  only	
  (n	
  loci=4),	
  all	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  (n	
  loci=15),	
  truly	
  ‘neutral	
  loci’	
  (n	
  loci=15),	
  and	
  the	
  ‘anonymous	
  microsatellite	
  loci’	
  (n	
  loci=8).	
   3.3.3	
  	
  100%	
  Simulations	
  using	
  ‘repeat-­outliers’	
   Using	
  the	
  four	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  the	
  proportion	
  of	
  simulated	
  genotypes	
  correctly	
  assigned	
  to	
  the	
  ecotype	
  of	
  origin	
  increased	
  when	
  the	
  baseline	
  sample	
  size	
  was	
  increased	
  from	
  25	
  to	
  250	
  individuals	
  (Figure	
  3.3).	
  	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  samples	
  needed	
  to	
  obtain	
  90%	
  accuracy	
  was	
  <25	
  individuals	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake,	
  ~100	
  individuals	
  in	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lakes,	
  and	
  ~230	
  individuals	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  and	
  Okanagan	
  Lakes.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   58	
   Sufficient	
  accuracy	
  in	
  MC	
  analyses	
  (≥90%)	
  cannot	
  be	
  achieved	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  regardless	
  of	
  sample	
  size	
  (within	
  reasonable	
  limits).	
   	
   Figure	
  3.3	
  	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
  increasing	
  the	
  baseline	
  sample	
  size	
  for	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outlier’	
  dataset	
  on	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  mixed	
  stock	
  estimates	
  in	
  100%	
  simulations	
  implemented	
  in	
  ONCOR.	
  	
  The	
  mixture	
  proportions	
  were	
  pre-­‐defined	
  as	
  75%	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  25%	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  for	
  all	
  simulations.	
  	
   3.4	
  	
  Discussion	
   Substantial	
  intra-­‐specific	
  diversity	
  has	
  arisen	
  in	
  salmonids	
  since	
  the	
  last	
  glaciation,	
  presenting	
  a	
  challenge	
  to	
  fishery	
  managers.	
  	
  A	
  genetics-­‐based	
  approach	
  for	
  conducting	
  stock	
  assessments	
  based	
  on	
  contemporary	
  adaptations	
  to	
  local	
  environments	
  and	
  future	
  evolutionary	
  potential,	
  rather	
  than	
  historical	
  patterns	
  of	
  gene	
  flow	
  could	
  be	
  implemented	
  using	
  markers	
  linked	
  to	
  adaptive	
  genes.	
  	
  Previous	
  work	
  suggested	
  that	
  eight	
  outliers	
  detected	
  in	
  a	
  genome-­‐scan	
  may	
  be	
  the	
  best	
  class	
  of	
  markers	
  for	
  GSI	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  where	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  ecotypes	
  of	
  kokanee	
  co-­‐exist	
  (Russello	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  	
  After	
  applying	
  this	
  approach	
  to	
  multiple	
  lakes,	
  the	
  observed	
  level	
  of	
  accuracy	
  and	
  bias	
  in	
  IA	
  and	
  MC	
  analysis	
  suggests	
  that	
  this	
  is	
  a	
  promising	
  approach	
  for	
  identifying	
  informative	
   	
  	
  	
   59	
   genetic	
  markers	
  and	
  obtaining	
  accurate	
  estimates	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawner	
  abundance,	
  however	
  it	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  effective	
  in	
  all	
  lakes.	
  	
   3.4.1.	
  	
  Power	
  and	
  accuracy	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  in	
  IA	
  and	
  MC	
  analyses	
   Given	
  the	
  range	
  in	
  ecotype	
  differentiation	
  observed	
  across	
  our	
  five	
  lakes	
  (see	
  Chapter	
  2),	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  empirically	
  assess	
  the	
  power	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  to	
  distinguish	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  natural	
  scenarios	
  within	
  a	
  management	
  context.	
  	
  Ecotypes	
  were	
  very	
  weakly	
  differentiated	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake	
  kokanee,	
  moderately	
  differentiated	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  but	
  not	
  neutral	
  loci	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  kokanee,	
  weakly	
  differentiated	
  throughout	
  the	
  genome	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  kokanee,	
  and	
  strongly	
  differentiated	
  throughout	
  the	
  genome	
  in	
  Wood	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  (Table	
  A.4).	
  	
  Overall,	
  IA	
  tests	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  reproductive	
  ecotypes	
  were	
  more	
  genetically	
  discrete	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  compared	
  to	
  neutral	
  loci,	
  though	
  IA	
  success	
  for	
  four	
  out	
  of	
  five	
  lakes	
  was	
  still	
  relatively	
  low	
  (<80%;	
  Figure	
  3.1).	
  	
  Consistent	
  with	
  estimates	
  of	
  FST,	
  the	
  contrast	
  in	
  the	
  performance	
  of	
  outlier	
  and	
  neutral	
  loci	
  was	
  most	
  evident	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake	
  kokanee.	
  	
  In	
  both	
  cases,	
  the	
  outlier	
  datasets	
  produced	
  the	
  most	
  accurate	
  estimates	
  of	
  true	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  in	
  MC	
  analyses.	
  	
  Simulations	
  suggest	
  that	
  increasing	
  the	
  baseline	
  for	
  Okanagan	
  and	
  Kootenay	
  Lakes	
  to	
  ~230	
  individuals	
  could	
  boost	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  MC	
  analysis	
  estimates	
  to	
  a	
  management-­‐relevant	
  level	
  (≥90%;	
  Figure	
  3.3).	
  	
  Other	
  studies	
  of	
  Atlantic	
  salmon,	
  trout	
  and	
  herring	
  have	
  achieved	
  similar	
  levels	
  of	
  accuracy	
  in	
  MC	
  analyses	
  using	
  markers	
  that	
  exhibit	
  similarly	
  low	
  levels	
  of	
  differentiation,	
  FST	
  =0.008	
  (Bekkevold	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011;	
  Hansen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Koljonen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005).	
  	
  However,	
  in	
  more	
  recently	
  isolated	
  lakes	
  (45	
  years),	
  where	
  ecotypes	
  exhibit	
  very	
  little	
  differentiation	
  at	
  outlier	
  and	
  neutral	
  loci	
  (e.g.	
  FST	
  ≤0.001	
  in	
  Duncan	
  Lake),	
  signatures	
  of	
  divergence	
  appear	
  too	
  weak	
  to	
  achieve	
  adequate	
  levels	
  of	
  accuracy	
  for	
  MC	
  and	
  IA,	
  regardless	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  loci	
  or	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  used	
  (Figure	
  3.3).	
  	
   The	
  use	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  identified	
  in	
  genome	
  scans	
  renders	
  more	
  accurate	
  estimates	
  of	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  from	
  a	
  mixed	
  sample	
  than	
  highly	
  variable	
  neutral	
  loci.	
  	
  Outlier	
  loci	
  exhibited	
  superior	
  performance	
  in	
  IA	
  and	
  MC	
  with	
  fewer	
  loci	
  and	
  alleles,	
  compared	
  to	
  neutral	
  datasets.	
  	
  Generally,	
   	
  	
  	
   60	
   increasing	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  alleles	
  increases	
  the	
  power	
  to	
  resolve	
  population	
  differences	
  in	
  allele	
  frequencies	
  (Beacham	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  	
  Yet,	
  the	
  outlier	
  datasets	
  revealed	
  greater	
  ecotype	
  differentiation	
  with	
  fewer	
  alleles	
  (ranging	
  between	
  137	
  and	
  18	
  alleles	
  across	
  15	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  3	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outliers’	
  in	
  Tchesinkut	
  Lake)	
  than	
  anonymous	
  (146	
  alleles	
  across	
  8	
  markers)	
  and	
  neutral	
  datasets	
  (187	
  alleles	
  across	
  15	
  markers).	
  	
  It	
  is	
  difficult	
  to	
  determine	
  which	
  of	
  the	
  three	
  outlier	
  datasets	
  will	
  be	
  the	
  most	
  accurate	
  and	
  reliable	
  markers	
  for	
  distinguishing	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  lakes	
  beyond	
  those	
  included	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  Generally,	
  the	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  outliers’	
  yielded	
  slightly	
  more	
  accurate	
  estimates	
  of	
  mixed-­‐stock	
  sample	
  than	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’,	
  but	
  it	
  remains	
  unknown	
  whether	
  the	
  superior	
  IA	
  success	
  was	
  the	
  result	
  of	
  retaining	
  additional,	
  informative	
  markers	
  for	
  different	
  lakes	
  or	
  simply	
  high-­‐grading	
  bias	
  (Anderson,	
  2010).	
   High	
  grading	
  bias	
  can	
  be	
  generated	
  when	
  the	
  samples	
  used	
  to	
  select	
  potentially	
  informative	
  markers	
  (Chapter	
  2)	
  are	
  also	
  used	
  to	
  evaluate	
  their	
  performance	
  (Anderson,	
  2010).	
  	
  Although	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  distinguish	
  ecotypes	
  with	
  high	
  accuracy	
  here,	
  we	
  cannot	
  determine	
  that	
  differentiation	
  observed	
  at	
  these	
  markers	
  is	
  entirely	
  due	
  to	
  true	
  population	
  differences	
  in	
  allele	
  frequencies	
  and	
  not	
  stochastic	
  sampling	
  effects	
  to	
  some	
  extent	
  (Waples,	
  2010).	
  	
  Even	
  in	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  selection,	
  loci	
  throughout	
  the	
  genome	
  are	
  expected	
  to	
  exhibit	
  a	
  range	
  in	
  the	
  level	
  of	
  differentiation,	
  which	
  can	
  become	
  inflated	
  by	
  sampling	
  error,	
  especially	
  when	
  sample	
  sizes	
  are	
  small.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  and	
  ‘true	
  outlier’	
  datasets	
  may	
  be	
  producing	
  upwardly	
  biased	
  estimates,	
  although	
  this	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  concern	
  for	
  the	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  because	
  they	
  were	
  selected	
  based	
  on	
  strong	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  observed	
  in	
  multiple	
  independent	
  lakes.	
  	
  Although	
  using	
  a	
  low	
  number	
  of	
  polymorphic	
  loci	
  (n=57)	
  and	
  reasonable	
  sample	
  size	
  (n=27-­‐96)	
  reduces	
  the	
  potential	
  for	
  high-­‐grading	
  bias,	
  additional	
  independent	
  samples	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  analyzed	
  to	
  cross-­‐validate	
  the	
  power	
  of	
  these	
  markers	
  in	
  the	
  future	
  (e.g.	
  using	
  the	
  Simple	
  Training	
  and	
  Holdout	
  method;	
  Anderson,	
  2010).	
   In	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  estimates	
  of	
  individual	
  assignment	
  accuracy	
  using	
  outlier	
  loci	
  were	
  much	
  higher	
  in	
  a	
  previous	
  study	
  by	
  Russello	
  et	
  al	
  (2012)	
  than	
  is	
  reported	
  here.	
  	
  Self-­‐assignment	
  accuracy	
  estimated	
  from	
  the	
  leave-­‐one-­‐out	
  analysis	
  implemented	
  in	
  ONCOR	
  was	
  92.0%.	
  	
  	
  The	
  decreased	
  accuracy	
  reported	
   	
  	
  	
   61	
   here	
  for	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  may	
  be	
  explained	
  by	
  the	
  inclusion	
  of	
  false	
  outliers.	
  	
  They	
  used	
  all	
  eight	
  loci	
  that	
  showed	
  any	
  evidence	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  in	
  any	
  one	
  of	
  three	
  detection	
  approaches.	
  	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  only	
  79.8%	
  of	
  individuals	
  were	
  correctly	
  assigned	
  using	
  the	
  best	
  performing	
  outlier	
  dataset,	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’.	
  	
  I	
  used	
  nearly	
  the	
  same	
  sample	
  (i.e.	
  nine	
  individuals	
  were	
  retained	
  here	
  compared	
  to	
  the	
  previous	
  study),	
  and	
  the	
  same	
  three	
  loci	
  that	
  were	
  detected	
  by	
  multiple	
  methods	
  in	
  both	
  studies,	
  but	
  I	
  did	
  not	
  include	
  the	
  five	
  outliers	
  only	
  identified	
  only	
  by	
  DETSEL	
  in	
  the	
  Russello	
  et	
  al	
  (2012)	
  study.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  the	
  discrepancies	
  in	
  estimates	
  of	
  IA	
  accuracy	
  are	
  either	
  a	
  consequence	
  of	
  the	
  inclusion	
  of	
  false	
  outliers	
  by	
  the	
  previous	
  study	
  or	
  exclusion	
  of	
  weak	
  outlier	
  loci	
  in	
  this	
  study.	
  	
  In	
  either	
  case,	
  these	
  results	
  underscore	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  cross-­‐validation	
  when	
  evaluating	
  the	
  utility	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  for	
  GSI.	
  	
   3.4.2	
  	
  Bias	
  in	
  estimates	
  of	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
   	
   Simulations	
  using	
  different	
  ecotype	
  ratios	
  in	
  MC	
  analyses	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  bias	
  in	
  estimated	
  proportions	
  in	
  favor	
  of	
  one	
  ecotype	
  or	
  the	
  other.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  abundance	
  estimates	
  from	
  visual	
  counts	
  of	
  stream-­‐spawners	
  could	
  be	
  combined	
  with	
  MC	
  estimates	
  using	
  mixed	
  samples	
  from	
  a	
  trawl,	
  gillnet	
  or	
  creel	
  survey	
  to	
  determine	
  shore-­‐spawner	
  abundance.	
  	
  This	
  approach	
  could	
  be	
  used	
  each	
  year	
  or,	
  if	
  mixed	
  samples	
  are	
  unavailable,	
  an	
  expansion	
  coefficient	
  could	
  be	
  calculated	
  for	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  kokanee.	
  	
  Estimates	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawner	
  abundance	
  based	
  on	
  visual	
  counts	
  would	
  then	
  be	
  more	
  accurate	
  and	
  allow	
  for	
  early	
  detection	
  of	
  population	
  decline.	
  	
  However,	
  ONCOR	
  demonstrated	
  a	
  strong	
  bias	
  in	
  estimates	
  when	
  the	
  proportions	
  were	
  highly	
  skewed	
  (Figure	
  B.1)	
  such	
  that	
  estimated	
  proportions	
  tended	
  to	
  be	
  biased	
  towards	
  50:50	
  or	
  1/k	
  (where	
  k	
  is	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  stocks;	
  Bekkevold	
  et	
   al.,	
  2011;	
  Kalinowski	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  This	
  trend	
  was	
  most	
  pronounced	
  in	
  lakes	
  showing	
  the	
  lowest	
  levels	
  of	
  differentiation	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  (FST	
  <0.007),	
  e.g.	
  Duncan	
  and	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  kokanee.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  if	
  ecotypes	
  are	
  poorly	
  differentiated	
  and	
  their	
  ratio	
  in	
  the	
  lake	
  is	
  highly	
  skewed,	
  MC	
  analyses	
  may	
  not	
  alert	
  managers	
  to	
  nearly	
  depleted	
  levels	
  of	
  abundance.	
  	
  In	
  mixed	
  stock	
  fisheries,	
  all	
  stocks	
  are	
  subject	
  to	
  the	
  same	
  harvesting	
  process,	
  but	
  the	
  weaker	
  stock	
  is	
  typically	
  the	
  one	
  that	
  gets	
  overharvested	
  (P.	
  Askey,	
  pers.	
  comm.).	
  	
  These	
  results	
  suggest	
  that	
  biases	
  will	
  cause	
  managers	
  to	
  overestimate	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
   62	
   contribution	
  of	
  the	
  weak	
  stock	
  to	
  the	
  catch,	
  and	
  potentially	
  overestimate	
  its	
  abundance.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  a	
  bias	
  correction	
  factor	
  may	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  estimated	
  for	
  each	
  lake	
  to	
  obtain	
  more	
  accurate	
  abundance	
  estimates	
  in	
  these	
  scenarios.	
  	
  By	
  plotting	
  the	
  relationship	
  between	
  the	
  residuals	
  and	
  the	
  proportions	
  in	
  the	
  simulated	
  mixtures	
  and	
  inversing	
  the	
  equation	
  that	
  defines	
  the	
  line	
  of	
  best	
  fit,	
  this	
  bias	
  could	
  be	
  corrected	
  for	
  these	
  lakes.	
  	
  If	
  applying	
  this	
  method	
  to	
  a	
  new	
  lake,	
  the	
  FST	
  of	
  the	
  new	
  ecotype	
  pair	
  should	
  be	
  calculated	
  and	
  compared	
  to	
  those	
  described	
  here	
  to	
  determine	
  the	
  most	
  appropriate	
  correction.	
  	
  Using	
  this	
  correction	
  factor,	
  more	
  accurate	
  abundance	
  estimates	
  may	
  be	
  achieved	
  when	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  are	
  highly	
  skewed	
  (however,	
  this	
  is	
  not	
  recommended	
  when	
  differentiation	
  is	
  very	
  weak).	
   3.5	
  	
  Summary	
   In	
  conclusion,	
  outlier	
  loci	
  detected	
  by	
  genome	
  scans	
  are	
  a	
  promising	
  tool	
  for	
  GSI.	
  	
  In	
  most	
  post-­‐glacial	
  lakes,	
  a	
  management-­‐relevant	
  level	
  of	
  accuracy	
  (>90%)	
  in	
  MC	
  analysis	
  can	
  be	
  achieved	
  with	
  adequate	
  baseline	
  sampling	
  (e.g.	
  ~200	
  individuals).	
  	
  However,	
  this	
  genetics-­‐based	
  approach	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  reliable	
  when	
  applied	
  to	
  lakes	
  where	
  ecotype	
  proportions	
  are	
  highly	
  skewed	
  and/or	
  ecotypes	
  are	
  poorly	
  differentiated	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  (e.g.	
  Duncan	
  Lake).	
  	
  Still,	
  an	
  expansion	
  factor	
  can	
  be	
  calculated	
  for	
  shore	
  spawners	
  in	
  suitable	
  lakes,	
  which	
  will	
  allow	
  for	
  the	
  calculation	
  of	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  in	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  using	
  visual	
  counts	
  in	
  the	
  future.	
  	
  It	
  appears	
  that	
  these	
  markers	
  may	
  be	
  effective	
  in	
  other	
  lakes	
  where	
  sympatric	
  ecotypes	
  exist,	
  although	
  they	
  will	
  not	
  be	
  useful	
  for	
  detecting	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  in	
  lakes	
  where	
  their	
  existence	
  is	
  currently	
  unknown	
  if	
  those	
  stocks	
  are	
  poorly	
  differentiated.	
  	
  Once	
  mixed	
  samples	
  are	
  obtained	
  from	
  these	
  lakes,	
  an	
  expansion	
  factor	
  can	
  be	
  calculated	
  to	
  allow	
  fishery	
  managers	
  to	
  better	
  track	
  fluctuations	
  in	
  true	
  abundance	
  and	
  achieve	
  a	
  better	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  health	
  of	
  the	
  whole-­‐lake	
  population	
  in	
  each	
  lake.	
  	
  This	
  will	
  be	
  important	
  for	
  guiding	
  management	
  decisions	
  pertaining	
  to	
  habitat	
  quality	
  and	
  exploitation	
  as	
  managers	
  strive	
  to	
  recover	
  depleted	
  kokanee	
  populations	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
   63	
   CHAPTER	
  4.0	
  	
  GENERAL	
  CONCLUSIONS	
   4.1	
  	
  Research	
  findings	
  and	
  significance	
  	
   Few	
  studies	
  have	
  investigated	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  divergent	
  ecological	
  forms	
  using	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers	
  on	
  a	
  comparable	
  scale	
  to	
  this	
  work.	
  	
  Fewer	
  still	
  have	
  used	
  replicate	
  divergent	
  pairs	
  to	
  identify	
  genes	
  potentially	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  Results	
  presented	
  here	
  provide	
  strong	
  empirical	
  evidence	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  natural	
  selection.	
  	
  Greater	
  differentiation	
  at	
  outlier	
  loci	
  relative	
  to	
  neutral	
  and	
  anonymous	
  loci	
  suggests	
  that	
  there	
  are	
  locus-­‐specific	
  barriers	
  to	
  reproduction,	
  likely	
  due	
  to	
  fitness	
  consequences	
  associated	
  with	
  spawning	
  in	
  a	
  habitat	
  distinct	
  from	
  that	
  to	
  which	
  it	
  is	
  locally	
  adapted.	
  	
  Expressed	
  genes	
  linked	
  to	
  outlier	
  loci	
  suggest	
  possible	
  mechanisms	
  of	
  divergence.	
  	
  Patterns	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  also	
  suggest	
  that	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  behaviour	
  may	
  have	
  arisen	
  via	
  multiple	
  genetic	
  pathways	
  throughout	
  the	
  native	
  range	
  of	
  kokanee.	
  	
  Finally,	
  I	
  demonstrated	
  the	
  utility	
  of	
  population-­‐based	
  genome	
  scans	
  in	
  identifying	
  informative	
  loci	
  for	
  distinguishing	
  recently	
  diverged	
  ecotypes	
  with	
  considerable	
  accuracy.	
  	
  	
   While	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  genome	
  scans	
  has	
  been	
  widely	
  criticized	
  for	
  their	
  inability	
  to	
  link	
  anonymous	
  outlier	
  loci	
  with	
  the	
  functional	
  basis	
  of	
  adaptations	
  (e.g.	
  genes	
  and	
  genetic	
  pathways	
  responsible	
  for	
  adaptations),	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellites	
  allowed	
  me	
  to	
  identify	
  genes	
  linked	
  to	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  with	
  no	
  a	
  priori	
  knowledge	
  of	
  phenotypes	
  involved	
  in	
  Chapter	
  2.	
  	
  By	
  restricting	
  our	
  search	
  to	
  the	
  functional	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  genome	
  and	
  using	
  multiple	
  ecotype	
  pairs,	
  I	
  achieved	
  high	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  rates	
  and	
  produced	
  strong	
  evidence	
  for	
  selection	
  acting	
  on	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  (Bonin,	
  2008;	
  Namroud	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Based	
  on	
  the	
  annotations	
  of	
  nine	
  strong	
  candidate	
  loci,	
  including	
  four	
  that	
  showed	
  consistent	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  across	
  multiple	
  lakes,	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  make	
  preliminary	
  inferences	
  about	
  possible	
  ecological	
  mechanisms	
  driving	
  ecotype	
  divergence.	
  	
  Differences	
  in	
  pathogen	
  resistance	
  and	
  energy	
  metabolism	
  offer	
  plausible	
  advantages	
  in	
  alternative	
  spawning	
  environments.	
  	
  Two	
  genes	
  (CXCR4	
  and	
  TAP2)	
  have	
  already	
  been	
  linked	
  to	
  immunological	
  responses	
  to	
  infection	
  in	
  other	
  fish	
  species.	
  	
  With	
  a	
  better	
  understanding	
  of	
  those	
  environmental	
  characteristics	
  to	
  which	
  populations	
  are	
  locally	
  adapted	
  and	
  that	
  reinforce	
  reproductive	
  isolation,	
  we	
  will	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  better	
  predict	
  evolutionary	
   	
  	
  	
   64	
   responses	
  to	
  human	
  disturbances	
  (e.g.	
  climate	
  change,	
  biological	
  invasions,	
  artificial	
  propagation,	
  habitat	
  alteration,	
  and	
  harvesting;	
  Waples	
  and	
  Hendry,	
  2008),	
  which	
  will	
  significantly	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  success	
  of	
  management	
  and	
  recovery	
  programs	
  (Tucker	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
  	
   The	
  lack	
  of	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  detected	
  across	
  all	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  may	
  add	
  to	
  the	
  increasing	
  number	
  of	
  studies	
  that	
  suggest	
  parallelism	
  in	
  natural	
  populations	
  is	
  not	
  as	
  common	
  as	
  previously	
  thought	
  (Arendt	
  and	
  Reznick,	
  2008;	
  Elmer	
  and	
  Meyer,	
  2011;	
  Schluter	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  Despite	
  expectations	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  relatedness	
  of	
  kokanee	
  populations	
  and	
  the	
  speed	
  at	
  which	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  has	
  evolved	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997),	
  our	
  findings	
  suggest	
  that	
  ecotypes	
  may	
  have	
  arisen	
  via	
  distinct	
  evolutionary	
  pathways	
  in	
  some	
  traits	
  critical	
  to	
  their	
  fitness	
  in	
  the	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  environments.	
  	
  However,	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  congruency	
  may	
  also	
  be	
  a	
  limitation	
  of	
  the	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  approaches	
  employed	
  (i.e.	
  high	
  Type	
  II	
  error).	
  	
  The	
  detection	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  by	
  a	
  single	
  method	
  in	
  one	
  lake	
  for	
  loci	
  classified	
  as	
  a	
  repeat-­‐outlier	
  based	
  on	
  other	
  lakes	
  suggests	
  that	
  this	
  may	
  be	
  an	
  issue.	
  	
  Also,	
  the	
  power	
  of	
  current	
  approaches	
  to	
  reliably	
  detect	
  true	
  outliers	
  is	
  known	
  to	
  be	
  low	
  when	
  selection	
  is	
  weak.	
  	
  Like	
  many	
  before	
  me,	
  I	
  caution	
  researchers	
  to	
  thoroughly	
  validate	
  detected	
  outliers	
  and	
  recommend	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  multiple	
  divergent	
  pairs	
  whenever	
  possible	
  (Bonin,	
  2008;	
  Oetjen	
  and	
  Reusch,	
  2007;	
  Shikano	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
   If	
  convergence	
  in	
  recently	
  evolved	
  phenotypes	
  does	
  not	
  have	
  a	
  common	
  genetic	
  basis,	
  we	
  may	
  be	
  underestimating	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  biological	
  diversity	
  within	
  systems	
  consisting	
  of	
  multiple	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  (Taylor,	
  1999).	
  	
  This	
  may	
  have	
  significant	
  implications	
  for	
  designating	
  management	
  and	
  conservation	
  units.	
  	
  Presently,	
  distinct	
  ecological	
  forms	
  of	
  salmon	
  are	
  taxonomically	
  unrecognized	
  because	
  they	
  are	
  generally	
  considered	
  to	
  be	
  easily	
  replaceable	
  (i.e.	
  populations	
  are	
  often	
  founded	
  by	
  the	
  same	
  species	
  and	
  presumably	
  by	
  a	
  common	
  genetic	
  mechanism;	
  Colosimo	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004;	
  Shapiro	
  et	
  al.,	
  2004).	
  	
  Shore-­‐spawners	
  have	
  arisen	
  within	
  a	
  few	
  generations	
  in	
  some	
  lakes	
  where	
  they	
  have	
  been	
  stocked,	
  yet	
  there	
  are	
  many	
  lakes	
  where	
  one	
  ecotype	
  exists	
  without	
  the	
  other.	
  	
  Clearly,	
  there	
  are	
  constraints	
  to	
  the	
  conversion	
  of	
  stream-­‐	
  to	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  behaviour	
  and	
  visa	
  versa,	
  but	
  we	
  have	
  yet	
  to	
  determine	
  what	
  these	
  constraints	
  are.	
  	
  Kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  do	
  not	
  represent	
  distinct	
  biological	
  species	
  (Mayr,	
  1942),	
  but	
  evidence	
  for	
  adaptive	
  differentiation	
  presented	
  here,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  previous	
  findings	
  of	
  weak	
  neutral	
   	
  	
  	
   65	
   divergence	
  and	
  ecological	
  uniqueness	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000),	
  warrants	
  the	
  independent	
  monitoring	
  and	
  maintenance	
  of	
  both	
  ecotypes	
  if	
  managers	
  wish	
  to	
  preserve	
  the	
  productivity	
  and	
  future	
  stability	
  of	
  kokanee	
  populations	
  (Fraser	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  2001;	
  Fraser	
  et	
  al.,	
  2011).	
  	
  The	
  divergence	
  of	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  has	
  facilitated	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  a	
  broader	
  spectrum	
  of	
  habitats	
  within	
  each	
  lake,	
  which	
  could	
  act	
  to	
  buffer	
  against	
  whole-­‐lake	
  population	
  declines	
  if	
  some	
  spawning	
  habitats	
  are	
  more	
  susceptible	
  to	
  degradation	
  or	
  loss	
  compared	
  to	
  others	
  (Andrusak	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000;	
  Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
   One	
  of	
  the	
  overarching	
  goals	
  of	
  this	
  work	
  was	
  to	
  identify	
  adaptive	
  markers	
  to	
  facilitate	
  the	
  management	
  of	
  sympatric	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  populations	
  throughout	
  their	
  native	
  range	
  in	
  BC,	
  and	
  potentially	
  the	
  Pacific	
  Rim.	
  	
  In	
  Chapter	
  3,	
  I	
  selected	
  markers	
  based	
  on	
  patterns	
  of	
  outlier	
  behaviour	
  and	
  evaluated	
  their	
  accuracy	
  in	
  GSI	
  applications	
  (e.g.	
  individual	
  assignment	
  and	
  missed	
  stock	
  composition	
  tests).	
  	
  This	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  first	
  studies	
  to	
  demonstrate	
  that	
  outlier	
  loci	
  are	
  more	
  powerful	
  for	
  distinguishing	
  recently	
  diverged	
  ecotypes	
  than	
  the	
  highly	
  variable	
  microsatellite	
  markers	
  that	
  are	
  commonly	
  used	
  in	
  BC	
  and	
  northwestern	
  USA	
  for	
  O.	
  nerka	
  GSI.	
  	
  	
  While	
  neutral	
  microsatellite	
  markers	
  have	
  considerable	
  accuracy	
  and	
  precision	
  in	
  GSI	
  at	
  large	
  spatial	
  scales,	
  they	
  appear	
  to	
  be	
  much	
  less	
  effective	
  in	
  distinguishing	
  ecological	
  forms	
  on	
  small	
  spatial	
  and	
  temporal	
  scales.	
  	
  With	
  further	
  validation,	
  these	
  loci	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  promising	
  tool	
  for	
  conducting	
  stock	
  assessments	
  with	
  greater	
  accuracy	
  than	
  previously	
  achieved	
  using	
  traditional	
  fisheries	
  methods.	
  	
  These	
  results	
  should	
  encourage	
  other	
  investigators	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  utility	
  of	
  genome	
  scans	
  for	
  identifying	
  putatively	
  informative	
  markers	
  for	
  GSI	
  in	
  other	
  non-­‐model	
  organisms	
  of	
  conservation	
  concern	
  (Schwartz	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
  Genetic	
  resources	
  are	
  rapidly	
  accumulating	
  due	
  to	
  advancements	
  in	
  genomic	
  technologies	
  and	
  ESTs	
  are	
  easily	
  transferrable	
  between	
  closely	
  related	
  species	
  (Bonin,	
  2008;	
  Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008).	
  	
  This	
  approach	
  may	
  be	
  particularly	
  useful	
  for	
  identifying	
  informative	
  markers	
  in	
  other	
  recently	
  diverged	
  life	
  history	
  forms	
  of	
  salmon	
  (e.g.	
  run	
  timing,	
  age	
  at	
  maturity)	
  given	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  delineating	
  evolutionarily	
  significant	
  units	
  in	
  this	
  group.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   66	
   4.2	
  	
  Limitations	
  of	
  this	
  study	
   Some	
  aspects	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  design	
  and	
  evaluation	
  of	
  performance	
  limit	
  our	
  ability	
  to	
  exclude	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  Type	
  I	
  and	
  Type	
  II	
  errors	
  associated	
  with	
  outlier	
  locus	
  detection	
  in	
  influencing	
  our	
  interpretations	
  of	
  the	
  results.	
  	
  This	
  study	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  comprehensive	
  screening	
  of	
  all	
  genes	
  potentially	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  Coverage	
  was	
  limited	
  by	
  the	
  breadth	
  of	
  the	
  EST	
  libraries	
  and,	
  although	
  11,390	
  EST-­‐linked	
  microsatellite	
  loci	
  were	
  tested,	
  the	
  initial	
  screening	
  process	
  conducted	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  may	
  have	
  eliminated	
  truly	
  adaptive	
  loci	
  by	
  chance	
  or	
  due	
  to	
  weak	
  selection	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake.	
  	
  Coverage	
  within	
  the	
  functional	
  genome	
  is	
  also	
  contingent	
  on	
  the	
  size	
  of	
  the	
  linkage	
  groups	
  (Bonin,	
  2008).	
  	
  The	
  extent	
  of	
  LD	
  can	
  vary	
  between	
  markers	
  and	
  study	
  systems	
  depending	
  upon	
  population	
  history,	
  mating	
  system,	
  recombination	
  rate,	
  and	
  strength	
  of	
  selection	
  (Stinchcombe	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2008).	
  	
  Next-­‐generation	
  sequencing	
  of	
  the	
  transcriptome	
  for	
  SNP	
  discovery	
  would	
  provide	
  more	
  complete	
  coverage	
  of	
  the	
  functional	
  genome,	
  and	
  is	
  currently	
  underway.	
  	
  This	
  approach	
  is	
  becoming	
  increasingly	
  common	
  as	
  sequencing	
  costs	
  decline	
  and	
  more	
  analytical	
  tools	
  become	
  available	
  for	
  managing	
  massive	
  amounts	
  of	
  data,	
  but	
  screening	
  for	
  polymorphisms	
  consistent	
  with	
  phenotypic	
  variation	
  among	
  ecotypes	
  is	
  still	
  a	
  challenge.	
  	
  I	
  may	
  have	
  only	
  detected	
  a	
  few	
  of	
  the	
  genomic	
  regions	
  that	
  are	
  truly	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  spawning	
  timing	
  is	
  almost	
  certainly	
  under	
  divergent	
  selection,	
  in	
  at	
  least	
  some	
  lakes.	
  	
  A	
  previous	
  study	
  found	
  that	
  eggs	
  accumulate	
  the	
  same	
  number	
  of	
  thermal	
  units	
  or	
  emerge	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  despite	
  differences	
  in	
  spawning	
  timing	
  in	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  (Taylor	
  et	
  al.,	
  2000).	
  	
  This	
  suggests	
  that	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  have	
  evolved	
  to	
  spawn	
  later	
  in	
  the	
  year	
  to	
  compensate	
  for	
  differences	
  in	
  over-­‐winter	
  thermal	
  regimes.	
  	
  This	
  ensures	
  that	
  offspring	
  emerge	
  during	
  the	
  spring	
  blooms,	
  which	
  maximizes	
  their	
  chances	
  of	
  survival	
  (Quinn,	
  2005).	
  	
  Finally,	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  true	
  outliers	
  detected	
  here	
  and	
  prevalence	
  of	
  parallel	
  patterns	
  may	
  be	
  underestimated	
  here	
  because	
  outlier-­‐detection	
  algorithms	
  are	
  susceptible	
  to	
  Type	
  II	
  error.	
  	
  Although,	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  multiple	
  methods,	
  a	
  90%	
  CI	
  threshold,	
  and	
  no	
  multiple	
  comparison	
  correction	
  should	
  minimize	
  this,	
  other	
  genes	
  or	
  pathways	
  may	
  also	
  be	
  driving	
  ecotype	
  divergence	
  in	
  different	
  lakes.	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   67	
   On	
  the	
  other	
  hand,	
  I	
  cannot	
  conclude	
  that	
  loci	
  identified	
  as	
  ‘true	
  outliers’	
  are	
  truly	
  under	
  selection	
  without	
  further	
  investigation.	
  	
  Outlier	
  behaviour	
  in	
  multiple	
  lakes	
  provides	
  strong	
  correlative	
  evidence,	
  but	
  the	
  specific	
  mutations	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  identified	
  to	
  demonstrate	
  a	
  link	
  between	
  genotype	
  and	
  ecologically	
  driven	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  to	
  infer	
  a	
  mechanism	
  (Luikart	
  et	
  al.,	
  2003).	
  	
  When	
  using	
  EST-­‐linked	
  markers,	
  it	
  is	
  possible	
  that	
  selection	
  that	
  is	
  acting	
  on	
  a	
  distantly	
  linked	
  gene.	
  	
  Therefore,	
  drawing	
  conclusions	
  about	
  the	
  mechanism	
  of	
  selection	
  based	
  on	
  gene	
  annotations	
  could	
  be	
  inaccurate.	
  	
   The	
  most	
  significant	
  limitation	
  of	
  our	
  assessment	
  of	
  outliers	
  for	
  GSI	
  was	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  cross-­‐validation	
  using	
  independent	
  samples.	
  	
  Presently,	
  it	
  is	
  unclear	
  whether	
  the	
  superior	
  performance	
  of	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outliers’	
  is	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  true	
  population	
  differences	
  or	
  stochastic	
  sampling	
  effects.	
  	
  The	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  are	
  robust	
  to	
  sampling	
  effects,	
  but	
  estimates	
  of	
  IA	
  and	
  MC	
  accuracy	
  using	
  the	
  ‘lake-­‐specific	
  true	
  outlier’	
  datasets	
  may	
  be	
  upwardly	
  biased.	
  	
  The	
  utility	
  of	
  these	
  markers	
  for	
  province-­‐wide	
  management	
  of	
  kokanee	
  ecotypes	
  is	
  contingent	
  on	
  the	
  hypothesized	
  parallel	
  evolution	
  (i.e.	
  same	
  gene	
  involved)	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  behaviour.	
  	
  While	
  the	
  performance	
  of	
  ‘repeat-­‐outliers’	
  alone	
  suggest	
  a	
  common	
  underlying	
  genetic	
  mechanisms	
  may	
  be	
  involved,	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  unique	
  genetic	
  mechanisms	
  is	
  unknown.	
  	
  This	
  makes	
  it	
  is	
  difficult	
  to	
  predict	
  how	
  successful	
  these	
  markers	
  will	
  be	
  in	
  other	
  lakes.	
   4.3	
  	
  Future	
  work	
   To	
  address	
  the	
  limitations	
  identified	
  above,	
  future	
  work	
  should	
  be	
  directed	
  towards	
  i)	
  identifying	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  in	
  genes	
  known	
  to	
  be	
  linked	
  to	
  outlier	
  loci	
  at	
  the	
  nucleotide	
  level,	
  ii)	
  then	
  linking	
  genotype	
  and	
  fitness	
  with	
  the	
  phenotypic	
  trait	
  thought	
  to	
  be	
  under	
  selection,	
  and	
  iii)	
  cross-­‐validating	
  estimates	
  of	
  accuracy	
  for	
  outlier	
  loci	
  in	
  GSI.	
  	
  To	
  verify	
  that	
  outliers	
  are	
  truly	
  linked	
  to	
  genes	
  under	
  divergent	
  selection,	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  need	
  to	
  search	
  for	
  SNPs	
  that	
  reflect	
  patterns	
  of	
  divergence	
  observed	
  at	
  linked	
  microsatellite	
  loci.	
  	
  Individuals	
  from	
  all	
  five	
  ecotype	
  pairs	
  will	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  Sanger	
  sequenced	
  at	
  the	
  annotated	
  genes	
  for	
  all	
  15	
  true	
  outlier	
  loci.	
  	
  If	
  patterns	
  of	
  differentiation	
  are	
  consistent,	
  it	
  can	
  be	
  confirmed	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  link	
  between	
  genotypic	
  variation	
  at	
  the	
  candidate	
  gene	
  and	
  reproductive	
   	
  	
  	
   68	
   isolation,	
  which	
  implies	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  selection	
  and	
  local	
  adaptation.	
  	
  Identifying	
  genes	
  of	
  interest	
  for	
  outliers	
  without	
  annotations	
  (e.g.	
  OMM-­‐	
  markers;	
  Scribner	
  et	
  al.,	
  1996)	
  will	
  require	
  a	
  genetic	
  linkage	
  map.	
  	
  Presently,	
  the	
  whole	
  genome	
  is	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  any	
  Pacific	
  salmon	
  species	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  spp.),	
  but	
  linkage	
  maps	
  developed	
  for	
  male	
  and	
  female	
  Atlantic	
  salmon	
  (Salmo	
  salar)	
  provides	
  a	
  description	
  of	
  SNPs	
  and	
  microsatellites	
  throughout	
  the	
  genome	
  (Moen	
  et	
  al.,	
  2008).	
  	
  Since	
  Atlantic	
  and	
  Pacific	
  salmon	
  diverged	
  over	
  two	
  million	
  years	
  ago	
  (Quinn,	
  2005),	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  lower	
  chance	
  that	
  proximate	
  genes	
  or	
  linkage	
  group	
  could	
  be	
  determined	
  for	
  the	
  non-­‐annotated	
  loci	
  (Ng	
  et	
  al.,	
  2005;	
  Wenne	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  	
   To	
  validate	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  natural	
  selection,	
  a	
  causal	
  link	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  demonstrated	
  between	
  genotype,	
  phenotype	
  and	
  isolation.	
  	
  Further	
  work	
  will	
  be	
  required	
  to	
  confirm	
  the	
  genes	
  and	
  phenotypic	
  traits	
  under	
  selection.	
  	
  As	
  mentioned,	
  regions	
  of	
  LD	
  can	
  vary	
  widely	
  across	
  species	
  and	
  across	
  the	
  genome	
  (Via	
  and	
  West,	
  2008).	
  	
  It	
  is	
  difficult	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  selection	
  is	
  acting	
  directly	
  on	
  the	
  most	
  proximate	
  gene	
  (i.e.	
  the	
  annotated	
  gene)	
  rather	
  than	
  a	
  more	
  distant,	
  unknown	
  gene.	
  	
  The	
  most	
  effective	
  way	
  to	
  rule	
  out	
  pleiotropic	
  effects	
  and	
  validate	
  the	
  adaptive	
  importance	
  of	
  a	
  particular	
  gene	
  is	
  to	
  test	
  for	
  a	
  direct	
  relationship	
  in	
  an	
  experimental	
  study	
  of	
  selection	
  (Barrett	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  2011).	
  	
  Fitness	
  differences	
  between	
  genotypes	
  and	
  phenotypes	
  can	
  be	
  measured	
  in	
  response	
  to	
  treatments	
  that	
  impose	
  a	
  selective	
  force	
  within	
  a	
  controlled	
  environment.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  survival	
  and	
  changes	
  in	
  allele	
  frequencies	
  at	
  the	
  TAP2	
  gene	
  can	
  be	
  measured	
  when	
  experimental	
  populations	
  are	
  exposed	
  to	
  a	
  pathogen	
  commonly	
  found	
  in	
  streams.	
  	
  If	
  a	
  causal	
  link	
  between	
  genotype,	
  phenotype,	
  and	
  fitness	
  in	
  alternative	
  environments	
  can	
  be	
  demonstrated,	
  the	
  adaptive	
  process	
  driving	
  differentiation	
  of	
  shore-­‐	
  and	
  stream-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  can	
  be	
  directly	
  inferred.	
  	
   To	
  implement	
  a	
  genetics-­‐based	
  approach	
  for	
  ecotype-­‐specific	
  monitoring,	
  it	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  established	
  that	
  linked	
  microsatellite	
  markers	
  can	
  achieve	
  management-­‐relevant	
  levels	
  of	
  accuracy	
  (>90%)	
  in	
  GSI	
  where	
  the	
  two	
  ecotypes	
  co-­‐exist.	
  	
  Baseline	
  samples	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  expanded	
  to	
  verify	
  that	
  simulated	
  estimates	
  of	
  accuracy	
  in	
  Chapter	
  3	
  can	
  be	
  achieved.	
  	
  Also,	
  independent	
  mixture	
  samples	
  must	
  be	
  obtained	
  from	
  each	
  lake	
  (and	
  additional	
  lakes)	
  to	
  ensure	
  that	
  estimates	
  of	
  accuracy	
  for	
  MC	
  analyses	
  are	
   	
  	
  	
   69	
   not	
  subject	
  to	
  high-­‐grading	
  bias	
  (Anderson,	
  2010).	
  	
  If	
  our	
  findings	
  reflect	
  simulated	
  results	
  in	
  Chapter	
  3,	
  I	
  recommend	
  that	
  these	
  outliers	
  be	
  implemented	
  for	
  estimating	
  the	
  absolute	
  abundance	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  (with	
  bias	
  correction,	
  if	
  needed).	
  	
  However,	
  if	
  mixed	
  samples	
  are	
  collected	
  from	
  a	
  lake	
  where	
  ecotypes	
  are	
  well	
  differentiated,	
  an	
  expansion	
  factor	
  could	
  be	
  calculated	
  for	
  shore-­‐spawners	
  and	
  applied	
  to	
  lakes	
  province-­‐wide.	
   As	
  genetic	
  resources	
  grow	
  and	
  progress	
  is	
  made	
  towards	
  identifying	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  various	
  adaptive	
  traits,	
  managers	
  can	
  pursue	
  the	
  integration	
  of	
  adaptive	
  markers	
  for	
  GSI	
  of	
  commercially	
  exploited	
  species	
  to	
  achieve	
  better	
  resolution	
  of	
  population	
  boundaries	
  at	
  finer	
  spatial	
  scales	
  (Hauser	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  2008),	
  because	
  this	
  is	
  an	
  aspect	
  of	
  biological	
  diversity	
  that	
  is	
  currently	
  being	
  overlooked.	
  	
  These	
  outlier	
  loci	
  should	
  be	
  tested	
  in	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  populations	
  of	
  other	
  salmonids	
  and	
  I	
  encourage	
  researchers	
  to	
  use	
  a	
  similar	
  framework	
  to	
  uncover	
  the	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  other	
  important	
  life	
  history	
  traits.	
  	
  Achieving	
  a	
  better	
  understanding	
  of	
  ecological	
  attributes	
  that	
  confer	
  a	
  unique	
  fitness	
  advantage	
  in	
  local	
  environments	
  in	
  natural	
  populations	
  is	
  a	
  longstanding	
  goal	
  of	
  conservation	
  biology	
  and	
  new	
  insights	
  generated	
  by	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  population	
  genomic	
  approaches	
  will	
  certainly	
  contribute	
  to	
  more	
  effective	
  management	
  and	
  recovery	
  programs	
  in	
  the	
  future.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
   70	
   REFERENCES	
   Abele,	
  R,	
  and	
  Tampe,	
  R	
  (2006)	
  Modulation	
  of	
  the	
  antigen	
  transport	
  machinery	
  TAP	
  by	
  friends	
  and	
  enemies.	
   FEBS	
  Letters	
  580,	
  1156-­‐1163.	
   Ackerman,	
  MW,	
  Habicht,	
  C,	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  LW	
  (2011)	
  Single-­‐nucleotide	
  polymorphisms	
  (SNPs)	
  under	
  diversifying	
  selection	
  provide	
  increased	
  accuracy	
  and	
  precision	
  in	
  mixed-­‐stock	
  analyses	
  of	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  from	
  the	
  Copper	
  River,	
  Alaska.	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Fisheries	
  Society	
  140,	
  865-­‐881.	
   Akey,	
  JM,	
  Eberle,	
  MA,	
  Rieder,	
  MJ,	
  Carlson,	
  CS,	
  Shriver,	
  MD,	
  Nickerson,	
  DA,	
  and	
  Kruglyak,	
  L	
  (2004)	
  Population	
  history	
  and	
  natural	
  selection	
  shape	
  patterns	
  of	
  genetic	
  variation	
  in	
  132	
  genes.	
  PLoS	
  Biology	
  2,	
  1591-­‐1599.	
   Allendorf,	
  FW,	
  Hohenlohe,	
  PA,	
  and	
  Luikart,	
  G	
  (2010)	
  Genomics	
  and	
  the	
  future	
  of	
  conservation	
  genetics.	
   Nature	
  Reviews	
  Genetics	
  11,	
  697-­‐709.	
   Allendorf,	
  FW,	
  and	
  Thorgaard,	
  GH	
  (1984)	
  Tetraploidy	
  and	
  evolution	
  of	
  salmonid	
  fishes.	
  In:	
  Evolutionary	
   genetics	
  of	
  fishes	
  (ed.	
  Turner	
  BJ),	
  pp.	
  1-­‐53.	
   Anders,	
  P,	
  Faler,	
  J,	
  Powell,	
  M,	
  Andrusak,	
  H,	
  and	
  Holderman,	
  C	
  (2007)	
  Initial	
  Microsatellite	
  Analysis	
  of	
  Kokanee	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka)	
  Population	
  Structure	
  in	
  the	
  Kootenai/y	
  River	
  Basin,	
  Idaho,	
  Montana,	
  and	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Freshwater	
  Fisheries	
  Society	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  and	
  the	
  Kootenai	
  Tribe	
  of	
  Idaho.	
   Anderson,	
  EC	
  (2010)	
  Assessing	
  the	
  power	
  of	
  informative	
  subsets	
  of	
  loci	
  for	
  population	
  assignment:	
  standard	
  methods	
  are	
  upwardly	
  biased.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  Resources	
  10,	
  701-­‐710.	
   Anderson,	
  EC,	
  and	
  Slatkin,	
  M	
  (2007)	
  Estimation	
  of	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  individuals	
  founding	
  colonized	
  populations.	
  Evolution	
  61,	
  972-­‐983.	
   Anderson,	
  EC,	
  Waples,	
  RS,	
  and	
  Kalinowski,	
  ST	
  (2008)	
  An	
  improved	
  method	
  for	
  predicting	
  the	
  accuracy	
  of	
  genetic	
  stock	
  identification.	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  and	
  Aquatic	
  Sciences	
  65,	
  1475-­‐1486.	
   Andre,	
  C,	
  Larsson,	
  LC,	
  Laikre,	
  L,	
  Bekkevold,	
  D,	
  Brigham,	
  J,	
  Carvalho,	
  GR,	
  Dahlgren,	
  TG,	
  Hutchinson,	
  WF,	
  Mariani,	
  S,	
  Mudde,	
  K,	
  Ruzzante,	
  DE,	
  and	
  Ryman,	
  N	
  (2011)	
  Detecting	
  population	
  structure	
  in	
  a	
  high	
  gene-­‐flow	
  species,	
  Atlantic	
  herring	
  (Clupea	
  harengus):	
  Direct,	
  simultaneous	
  evaluation	
  of	
  neutral	
  vs	
  putatively	
  selected	
  loci.	
  Heredity	
  106,	
  270-­‐280.	
   Andrusak,	
  G,	
  and	
  Andrusak,	
  H	
  (2011)	
  Observations	
  and	
  analysis	
  of	
  shore	
  spawning	
  kokanee	
  (Oncorhynchus	
   nerka)	
  in	
  the	
  West	
  Arm	
  of	
  Kootenay	
  Lake	
  BC	
  Hydro,	
  Fortis	
  BC	
  and	
  Columbia	
  Power	
  Corporation,	
  Redfish	
  Consulting	
  Ltd.	
  Nelson,	
  BC.	
   	
  	
  	
   71	
   Andrusak,	
  G,	
  and	
  Parkinson,	
  EA	
  (1984)	
  Food	
  habits	
  of	
  Gerrard	
  stock	
  rainbow	
  trout	
  in	
  Kootenay	
  Lake,	
  British	
  Columbia.	
  In:	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Fisheries	
  Technical	
  Circular	
  No.	
  60,	
  B.C.	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment,	
  Fish	
  and	
  Wildlife	
  Branch.	
   Andrusak,	
  H,	
  and	
  Jantz,	
  B	
  (2002)	
  Development	
  of	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  shore	
  spawning	
  kokanee	
  for	
  the	
  2001	
  brood	
  year.	
  Okanagan	
  Nation	
  Fisheries	
  Commission,	
  British	
  Columbia.	
   Andrusak,	
  H,	
  Sebastian,	
  D,	
  McGregor,	
  I,	
  Matthews,	
  S,	
  Smith,	
  D,	
  Ashley,	
  K,	
  Pollard,	
  S,	
  Scholten,	
  G,	
  Stockner,	
  J,	
  Ward,	
  P,	
  Kirk,	
  R,	
  Lasenby,	
  D,	
  Webster,	
  J,	
  Whall,	
  J,	
  Wilson,	
  G,	
  and	
  Yassien,	
  H	
  (2000)	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  Action	
  Plan	
  Year	
  4	
  (1999)	
  Report.	
  Fisheries	
  Management	
  Branch,	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Agriculture,	
  Food	
  and	
  Fisheries,	
  Province	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia.	
   Antao,	
  T,	
  Lopes,	
  A,	
  Lopes,	
  RJ,	
  Beja-­‐Pereira,	
  A,	
  and	
  Luikart,	
  G	
  (2008)	
  LOSITAN:	
  A	
  workbench	
  to	
  detect	
  molecular	
  adaptation	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  F(st)-­‐outlier	
  method.	
  BMC	
  Bioinformatics	
  9,	
  323	
   Arendt,	
  J,	
  and	
  Reznick,	
  D	
  (2008)	
  Convergence	
  and	
  parallelism	
  reconsidered:	
  what	
  have	
  we	
  learned	
  about	
  the	
  genetics	
  of	
  adaptation?	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Evolution	
  23,	
  26-­‐32.	
   Ashley,	
  K,	
  Shepherd,	
  B,	
  Sebastian,	
  D,	
  Thompson,	
  L,	
  Vidmanic,	
  L,	
  Ward,	
  P,	
  Yassien,	
  HA,	
  McEachern,	
  L,	
  MNordin,	
  R,	
  Lasenby,	
  D,	
  Quirt,	
  J,	
  Whall,	
  JD,	
  Dill,	
  P,	
  Taylor,	
  EB,	
  Pollard,	
  S,	
  Wong,	
  C,	
  den	
  Dulk,	
  J,	
  and	
  Scholten,	
  G	
  (1998)	
  Okanagan	
  Lake	
  Action	
  Plan	
  Year	
  1	
  (1996-­‐1997)	
  and	
  Year	
  2	
  (1997-­‐1998)	
  Report.	
  In:	
  Fisheries	
  Project	
  Report	
  No.	
  RD	
  73.	
  Province	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Fisheries,	
  Fisheries	
  Management	
  Branch.	
   Avise,	
  JC,	
  Arnold,	
  J,	
  Ball,	
  RM,	
  Bermingham,	
  E,	
  Lamb,	
  T,	
  Neigel,	
  JE,	
  Reeb,	
  CA,	
  and	
  Saunders,	
  NC	
  (1987)	
  Intraspecific	
  Phylogeography	
  -­‐	
  The	
  mitochondrial	
  DNA	
  bridge	
  between	
  populations	
  genetics	
  and	
  systematics.	
  Annual	
  Review	
  of	
  Ecology	
  and	
  Systematics	
  18,	
  489-­‐522.	
   Avise,	
  JC,	
  Walker,	
  D,	
  and	
  Johns,	
  GC	
  (1998)	
  Speciation	
  durations	
  and	
  Pleistocene	
  effects	
  on	
  vertebrate	
  phylogeography.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  265,	
  1707-­‐1712.	
   Barrett,	
  RDH,	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  HE	
  (2011)	
  Molecular	
  spandrels:	
  tests	
  of	
  adaptation	
  at	
  the	
  genetic	
  level.	
  Nature	
   Reviews	
  Genetics	
  12,	
  767-­‐780.	
   Barrett,	
  RDH,	
  Paccard,	
  A,	
  Healy,	
  TM,	
  Bergek,	
  S,	
  Schulte,	
  PM,	
  Schluter,	
  D,	
  and	
  Rogers,	
  SM	
  (2011)	
  Rapid	
  evolution	
  of	
  cold	
  tolerance	
  in	
  stickleback.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  B-­Biological	
  Sciences	
  278,	
  233-­‐238.	
   Barton,	
  NH	
  (2000)	
  Genetic	
  hitchhiking.	
  Philosophical	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
   355,	
  1553-­‐1562.	
   Beacham,	
  TD,	
  Candy,	
  JR,	
  Jonsen,	
  KL,	
  Supernault,	
  J,	
  Wetklo,	
  M,	
  Deng,	
  L,	
  Miller,	
  KM,	
  Withler,	
  RE,	
  and	
  Varnavskaya,	
  N	
  (2006)	
  Estimation	
  of	
  stock	
  composition	
  and	
  individual	
  identification	
  of	
  Chinook	
  salmon	
  across	
  the	
  Pacific	
  Rim	
  by	
  use	
  of	
  microsatellite	
  variation.	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  American	
   Fisheries	
  Society	
  135,	
  861-­‐888.	
   	
  	
  	
   72	
   Beacham,	
  TD,	
  Wetklo,	
  M,	
  Wallace,	
  C,	
  Olsen,	
  JB,	
  Flannery,	
  BG,	
  Wenburg,	
  JK,	
  Templin,	
  WD,	
  Antonovich,	
  A,	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  LW	
  (2008)	
  The	
  application	
  of	
  Microsatellites	
  for	
  stock	
  identification	
  of	
  Yukon	
  River	
  Chinook	
  salmon.	
  North	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  Management	
  28,	
  283-­‐295.	
   Beaumont,	
  MA,	
  and	
  Nichols,	
  RA	
  (1996)	
  Evaluating	
  loci	
  for	
  use	
  in	
  the	
  genetic	
  analysis	
  of	
  population	
  structure.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  263,	
  1619-­‐1626.	
   Bekkevold,	
  D,	
  Clausen,	
  LAW,	
  Mariani,	
  S,	
  Andre,	
  C,	
  Hatfield,	
  EMC,	
  Torstensen,	
  E,	
  Ryman,	
  N,	
  Carvalho,	
  GR,	
  and	
  Ruzzante,	
  DE	
  (2011)	
  Genetic	
  mixed-­‐stock	
  analysis	
  of	
  Atlantic	
  herring	
  populations	
  in	
  a	
  mixed	
  feeding	
  area.	
  Marine	
  Ecology	
  Progress	
  Series	
  442,	
  187-­‐199.	
   Benjamini,	
  Y,	
  and	
  Hochberg,	
  Y	
  (1995)	
  Controlling	
  the	
  false	
  discovery	
  rate	
  -­‐	
  A	
  practical	
  and	
  powerful	
  approach	
  to	
  multiple	
  testing	
  Journal	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Statistical	
  Society	
  Series	
  B	
  57,	
  289-­‐300.	
   Bernatchez,	
  L,	
  Renaut,	
  S,	
  Whiteley,	
  AR,	
  Derome,	
  N,	
  Jeukens,	
  J,	
  Landry,	
  L,	
  Lu,	
  G,	
  Nolte,	
  AW,	
  Ostbye,	
  K,	
  Rogers,	
  SM,	
  and	
  St-­‐Cyr,	
  J	
  (2010)	
  On	
  the	
  origin	
  of	
  species:	
  insights	
  from	
  the	
  ecological	
  genomics	
  of	
  lake	
  whitefish.	
  Philosophical	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  B	
  365,	
  1783-­‐1800.	
   Bernatchez,	
  L,	
  and	
  Wilson,	
  CC	
  (1998)	
  Comparative	
  phylogeography	
  of	
  nearctic	
  and	
  palearctic	
  fishes.	
   Molecular	
  Ecology	
  7,	
  431-­‐452.	
   Berner,	
  D,	
  Roesti,	
  M,	
  Hendry,	
  AP,	
  and	
  Salzburger,	
  W	
  (2010)	
  Constraints	
  on	
  speciation	
  suggested	
  by	
  comparing	
  lake-­‐stream	
  stickleback	
  divergence	
  across	
  two	
  continents.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  19,	
  4963-­‐4978.	
   Bernier,	
  JC,	
  Birkeland,	
  SR,	
  Cipriano,	
  MJ,	
  McArthur,	
  AG,	
  and	
  Banks,	
  MA	
  (2008)	
  Differential	
  gene	
  expression	
  between	
  fall-­‐	
  and	
  spring-­‐run	
  Chinook	
  salmon	
  assessed	
  by	
  long	
  serial	
  analysis	
  of	
  gene	
  expression.	
   Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Fisheries	
  Society	
  137,	
  1378-­‐1388.	
   Black,	
  WC,	
  Baer,	
  CF,	
  Antolin,	
  MF,	
  and	
  DuTeau,	
  NM	
  (2001)	
  Population	
  genomics:	
  Genome-­‐wide	
  sampling	
  of	
  insect	
  populations.	
  Annual	
  Review	
  of	
  Entomology	
  46,	
  441-­‐469.	
   Bonin,	
  A	
  (2008)	
  Population	
  genomics:	
  A	
  new	
  generation	
  of	
  genome	
  scans	
  to	
  bridge	
  the	
  gap	
  with	
  functional	
  genomics.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  17,	
  3583-­‐3584.	
   Bonin,	
  A,	
  Ehrich,	
  D,	
  and	
  Manel,	
  S	
  (2007)	
  Statistical	
  analysis	
  of	
  amplified	
  fragment	
  length	
  polymorphism	
  data:	
  a	
  toolbox	
  for	
  molecular	
  ecologists	
  and	
  evolutionists.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  16,	
  3737-­‐3758.	
   Bonin,	
  A,	
  Taberlet,	
  P,	
  Miaud,	
  C,	
  and	
  Pompanon,	
  F	
  (2006)	
  Explorative	
  genome	
  scan	
  to	
  detect	
  candidate	
  loci	
  for	
  adaptation	
  along	
  a	
  gradient	
  of	
  altitude	
  in	
  the	
  common	
  frog	
  (Rana	
  temporaria).	
  Molecular	
  Biology	
   and	
  Evolution	
  23,	
  773-­‐783.	
   Bouck,	
  A,	
  and	
  Vision,	
  T	
  (2007)	
  The	
  molecular	
  ecologist's	
  guide	
  to	
  expressed	
  sequence	
  tags.	
  Molecular	
   Ecology	
  16,	
  907-­‐924.	
   	
  	
  	
   73	
   Brownstein,	
  MJ,	
  Carpten,	
  JD,	
  and	
  Smith,	
  JR	
  (1996)	
  Modulation	
  of	
  non-­‐templated	
  nucleotide	
  addition	
  by	
  Taq	
  DNA	
  polymerase:	
  Primer	
  modifications	
  that	
  facilitate	
  genotyping.	
  BioTechniques	
  20,	
  1004.	
   Campbell,	
  D,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2004)	
  Generic	
  scan	
  using	
  AFLP	
  markers	
  as	
  a	
  means	
  to	
  assess	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  directional	
  selection	
  in	
  the	
  divergence	
  of	
  sympatric	
  whitefish	
  ecotypes.	
  Molecular	
  Biology	
  and	
   Evolution	
  21,	
  945-­‐956.	
   Chipps,	
  SR,	
  and	
  Bennett,	
  DH	
  (2000)	
  Zooplanktivory	
  and	
  nutrient	
  regeneration	
  by	
  invertebrate	
  (Mysis	
   relicta)	
  and	
  vertebrate	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka)	
  planktivores:	
  Implications	
  for	
  trophic	
  interactions	
  in	
  oligotrophic	
  lakes.	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Fisheries	
  Society	
  129,	
  569-­‐583.	
   Clarke,	
  LR,	
  Letizia,	
  PS,	
  and	
  Bennett,	
  DH	
  (2004)	
  Autumn-­‐to-­‐spring	
  energetic	
  and	
  diet	
  changes	
  among	
  kokanee	
  from	
  North	
  Idaho	
  Lakes	
  with	
  and	
  without	
  Mysis	
  relicta.	
  North	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
   Management	
  24,	
  597-­‐608.	
   Colosimo,	
  PF,	
  Peichel,	
  CL,	
  Nereng,	
  K,	
  Blackman,	
  BK,	
  Shapiro,	
  MD,	
  Schluter,	
  D,	
  and	
  Kingsley,	
  DM	
  (2004)	
  The	
  genetic	
  architecture	
  of	
  parallel	
  armor	
  plate	
  reduction	
  in	
  threespine	
  sticklebacks.	
  PLoS	
  Biology	
  2,	
  635-­‐641.	
   Cornuet,	
  JM,	
  and	
  Luikart,	
  G	
  (1996)	
  Description	
  and	
  power	
  analysis	
  of	
  two	
  tests	
  for	
  detecting	
  recent	
  population	
  bottlenecks	
  from	
  allele	
  frequency	
  data.	
  Genetics	
  144,	
  2001-­‐2014.	
   Cossins,	
  AR,	
  and	
  Crawford,	
  DL	
  (2005)	
  Opinion	
  -­‐	
  Fish	
  as	
  models	
  for	
  environmental	
  genomics.	
  Nature	
  Reviews	
   Genetics	
  6,	
  324-­‐333.	
   Coyne,	
  JA,	
  and	
  Orr,	
  HA	
  (1998)	
  The	
  evolutionary	
  genetics	
  of	
  speciation.	
  Philosophical	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
   Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  353,	
  287-­‐305.	
   Coyne,	
  JA,	
  and	
  Orr,	
  HA	
  (2004)	
  Speciation	
  Sinauer	
  Associates,	
  Sunderland,	
  MA.	
   Craig,	
  JK,	
  and	
  Foote,	
  CJ	
  (2001)	
  Countergradient	
  variation	
  and	
  secondary	
  sexual	
  color:	
  Phenotypic	
  convergence	
  promotes	
  genetic	
  divergence	
  in	
  carotenoid	
  use	
  between	
  sympatric	
  anadromous	
  and	
  nonanadromous	
  morphs	
  of	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka).	
  Evolution	
  55,	
  380-­‐391.	
   Crawford,	
  SS,	
  and	
  Muir,	
  AM	
  (2008)	
  Global	
  introductions	
  of	
  salmon	
  and	
  trout	
  in	
  the	
  genus	
  Oncorhynchus:	
  1870-­‐2007.	
  Reviews	
  in	
  Fish	
  Biology	
  and	
  Fisheries	
  18,	
  313-­‐344.	
   Creelman,	
  EK,	
  Hauser,	
  L,	
  Simmons,	
  RK,	
  Templin,	
  WD,	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  LW	
  (2011)	
  Temporal	
  and	
  geographic	
  genetic	
  divergence:	
  Characterizing	
  Sockeye	
  salmon	
  populations	
  in	
  the	
  Chignik	
  Watershed,	
  Alaska,	
  using	
  single-­‐nucleotide	
  polymorphisms.	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Fisheries	
  Society	
  140,	
  749-­‐762.	
   Crossman,	
  EJ	
  (1991)	
  Introduction	
  fresh-­‐water	
  fishes	
  -­‐	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  North	
  American	
  perspective	
  with	
  emphasis	
  on	
  Canada.	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  and	
  Aquatic	
  Sciences	
  48,	
  46-­‐57.	
   	
  	
  	
   74	
   Darwin,	
  C	
  (1859)	
  On	
  the	
  origin	
  of	
  species	
  by	
  means	
  of	
  natural	
  selection,	
  or	
  the	
  preservation	
  of	
  favoured	
  races	
   in	
  the	
  struggle	
  for	
  life	
  (2nd	
  ed.)	
  John	
  Murray,	
  London.	
   Davis,	
  J,	
  and	
  Stamps,	
  J	
  (2004)	
  The	
  effect	
  of	
  natal	
  experience	
  on	
  habitat	
  preferences.	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
   Evolution	
  19,	
  411-­‐416.	
   de	
  Zwart,	
  I,	
  Andrusak,	
  G,	
  Thorley,	
  J,	
  Irvine,	
  R,	
  and	
  Masse,	
  S	
  (2011)	
  Duncan	
  Dam	
  Project	
  Water	
  Use	
  Plan:	
  Duncan	
  Reservoir	
  fish	
  habitat	
  use	
  monitoring	
  Year	
  3	
  (2010)	
  Data	
  Report,	
  Nelson,	
  BC.	
   DeFaveri,	
  J,	
  Shikano,	
  T,	
  Shimada,	
  Y,	
  Goto,	
  A,	
  and	
  Merila,	
  J	
  (2011)	
  Global	
  analysis	
  of	
  genes	
  involved	
  in	
  freshwater	
  adaptation	
  in	
  threespine	
  sticklebacks	
  (Gasterosteus	
  aculeatus).	
  Evolution	
  65,	
  1800-­‐1807.	
   Dieckmann,	
  U,	
  and	
  Doebeli,	
  M	
  (1999)	
  On	
  the	
  origin	
  of	
  species	
  by	
  sympatric	
  speciation.	
  Nature	
  400,	
  354-­‐357.	
   Dill,	
  PA	
  (1996)	
  A	
  study	
  of	
  shore-­‐spawning	
  kokanee	
  salmon	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka)	
  at	
  Bertram	
  Creek	
  Park	
  Okanagan	
  Lake,	
  B.C.,	
  1992-­‐1996.	
  ,	
  p.	
  23	
  pp.	
  B.C.	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Environment,	
  Penticton,	
  B.C.	
   Dirienzo,	
  A,	
  Peterson,	
  AC,	
  Garza,	
  JC,	
  Valdes,	
  AM,	
  Slatkin,	
  M,	
  and	
  Freimer,	
  NB	
  (1994)	
  Mutational	
  processes	
  of	
  simple-­‐sequence	
  repeat	
  loci	
  in	
  human	
  popualtions	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Academy	
  of	
  Sciences	
   of	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  of	
  America	
  91,	
  3166-­‐3170.	
   Dobzhansky,	
  T	
  (1951)	
  Genetics	
  and	
  the	
  Origin	
  of	
  Species	
  Columbia	
  University	
  Press,	
  London.	
   Egan,	
  SP,	
  Nosil,	
  P,	
  and	
  Funk,	
  DJ	
  (2008)	
  Selection	
  and	
  genomic	
  differentiation	
  during	
  ecological	
  speciation:	
  Isolating	
  the	
  contributions	
  of	
  host	
  association	
  via	
  a	
  comparative	
  genome	
  scan	
  of	
  Neochlamisus	
   bebbianae	
  leaf	
  beetles.	
  Evolution	
  62,	
  1162-­‐1181.	
   Ellegren,	
  H	
  (2000)	
  Heterogeneous	
  mutation	
  processes	
  in	
  human	
  microsatellite	
  DNA	
  sequences.	
  Nature	
   Genetics	
  24,	
  400-­‐402.	
   Elmer,	
  KR,	
  and	
  Meyer,	
  A	
  (2011)	
  Adaptation	
  in	
  the	
  age	
  of	
  ecological	
  genomics:	
  insights	
  from	
  parallelism	
  and	
  convergence.	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Evolution	
  26,	
  298-­‐306.	
   Evanno,	
  G,	
  Regnaut,	
  S,	
  and	
  Goudet,	
  J	
  (2005)	
  Detecting	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  clusters	
  of	
  individuals	
  using	
  the	
  software	
  STRUCTURE:	
  A	
  simulation	
  study.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  14,	
  2611-­‐2620.	
   Excoffier,	
  L,	
  Hofer,	
  T,	
  and	
  Foll,	
  M	
  (2009)	
  Detecting	
  loci	
  under	
  selection	
  in	
  a	
  hierarchically	
  structured	
  population.	
  Heredity	
  103,	
  285-­‐298.	
   Excoffier,	
  L,	
  and	
  Lischer,	
  HEL	
  (2010)	
  Arlequin	
  suite	
  ver	
  3.5:	
  a	
  new	
  series	
  of	
  programs	
  to	
  perform	
  population	
  genetics	
  analyses	
  under	
  Linux	
  and	
  Windows.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  Resources	
  10,	
  564-­‐567.	
   	
  	
  	
   75	
   Excoffier,	
  L,	
  Smouse,	
  PE,	
  and	
  Quattro,	
  JM	
  (1992)	
  Analysis	
  of	
  molecular	
  variance	
  inferred	
  from	
  metric	
  distances	
  among	
  DNA	
  haplotypes	
  -­‐	
  Application	
  to	
  human	
  mitochondrial	
  DNA	
  restriction	
  data	
   Genetics	
  131,	
  479-­‐491.	
   Felsenstein,	
  J	
  (1981)	
  Skepticism	
  towards	
  Santa	
  Rosalia,	
  or	
  why	
  are	
  there	
  so	
  few	
  kinds	
  of	
  animals?	
  Evolution	
   35,	
  124-­‐138.	
   Foll,	
  M,	
  and	
  Gaggiotti,	
  O	
  (2008)	
  A	
  genome-­‐scan	
  method	
  to	
  identify	
  selected	
  loci	
  appropriate	
  for	
  both	
  dominant	
  and	
  codominant	
  markers:	
  A	
  Bayesian	
  perspective.	
  Genetics	
  180,	
  977-­‐993.	
   Foote,	
  CJ,	
  Moore,	
  K,	
  Stenberg,	
  K,	
  Craig,	
  KJ,	
  Wenburg,	
  JK,	
  and	
  Wood,	
  CC	
  (1999)	
  Genetic	
  differentiation	
  in	
  gill	
  raker	
  number	
  and	
  length	
  in	
  sympatric	
  anadromous	
  and	
  nonanadromous	
  morphs	
  of	
  sockeye	
  salmon,	
  Oncorhynchus	
  nerka.	
  Environmental	
  Biology	
  of	
  Fishes	
  54,	
  263-­‐274.	
   Foote,	
  CJ,	
  Wood,	
  CC,	
  Clarke,	
  WC,	
  and	
  Blackburn,	
  J	
  (1992)	
  Circannunal	
  cycle	
  of	
  seawater	
  adaptability	
  in	
   Oncorhynchus	
  nerka	
  -­‐	
  Genetic	
  differences	
  between	
  sympatric	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  and	
  kokanee.	
   Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  and	
  Aquatic	
  Sciences	
  49,	
  99-­‐109.	
   Foote,	
  CJ,	
  Wood,	
  CC,	
  and	
  Withler,	
  RE	
  (1989)	
  Biochemical	
  genetic	
  comparison	
  of	
  anadromous	
  sockeye	
  and	
  kokanee,	
  the	
  anadromous	
  and	
  non-­‐anadromous	
  forms	
  of	
  Oncorhynchus	
  nerka.	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
   Fisheries	
  and	
  Aquatic	
  Sciences	
  46,	
  149-­‐158.	
   Fraser,	
  DJ,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2001)	
  Adaptive	
  evolutionary	
  conservation:	
  towards	
  a	
  unified	
  concept	
  for	
  defining	
  conservation	
  units.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  10,	
  2741-­‐2752.	
   Fraser,	
  DJ,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2005)	
  Allopatric	
  origins	
  of	
  sympatric	
  brook	
  charr	
  populations:	
  Colonization	
  history	
  and	
  admixture.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  14,	
  1497-­‐1509.	
   Fraser,	
  DJ,	
  Weir,	
  LK,	
  Bernatchez,	
  L,	
  Hansen,	
  MM,	
  and	
  Taylor,	
  EB	
  (2011)	
  Extent	
  and	
  scale	
  of	
  local	
  adaptation	
  in	
  salmonid	
  fishes:	
  Review	
  and	
  meta-­‐analysis.	
  Heredity	
  106,	
  404-­‐420.	
   Freamo,	
  H,	
  O'Reilly,	
  P,	
  Berg,	
  PR,	
  Lien,	
  S,	
  and	
  Boulding,	
  EG	
  (2011)	
  Outlier	
  SNPs	
  show	
  more	
  genetic	
  structure	
  between	
  two	
  Bay	
  of	
  Fundy	
  metapopulations	
  of	
  Atlantic	
  salmon	
  than	
  do	
  neutral	
  SNPs.	
  Molecular	
   Ecology	
  Resources	
  11,	
  254-­‐267.	
   Godbout,	
  L,	
  Wood,	
  CC,	
  Withler,	
  RE,	
  Latham,	
  S,	
  Nelson,	
  RJ,	
  Wetzel,	
  L,	
  Barnett-­‐Johnson,	
  R,	
  Grove,	
  MJ,	
  Schmitt,	
  AK,	
  and	
  McKeegan,	
  KD	
  (2010)	
  Sockeye	
  salmon	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka)	
  return	
  after	
  an	
  absence	
  of	
  nearly	
  90	
  years:	
  A	
  case	
  of	
  reversion	
  to	
  anadromy.	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  and	
  Aquatic	
  Sciences	
   68,	
  1590-­‐1602.	
   Gomez-­‐Uchida,	
  D,	
  Seeb,	
  JE,	
  Smith,	
  MJ,	
  Habicht,	
  C,	
  Quinn,	
  TP,	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  LW	
  (2011)	
  Single	
  nucleotide	
  polymorphisms	
  unravel	
  hierarchical	
  divergence	
  and	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  among	
  Alaskan	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka)	
  populations.	
  BMC	
  Evolutionary	
  Biology	
  11,	
  17.	
   	
  	
  	
   76	
   Gould,	
  SJ,	
  and	
  Lewontin,	
  RC	
  (1979)	
  Spandrels	
  of	
  San	
  Marco	
  and	
  the	
  Panglossian	
  Paradigm	
  -­‐	
  A	
  critique	
  of	
  the	
  adaptionist	
  program.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  205,	
  581-­‐598.	
   Guo,	
  SW,	
  and	
  Thompson,	
  EA	
  (1992)	
  A	
  Monte-­‐Carlo	
  method	
  for	
  combined	
  segregation	
  and	
  linkage	
  analysis.	
   American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Human	
  Genetics	
  51,	
  1111-­‐1126.	
   Gustafson,	
  RG,	
  Waples,	
  R,	
  Kalinowski,	
  ST,	
  and	
  Winans,	
  GA	
  (2001)	
  Evolution	
  of	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  ecotypes.	
   Science	
  291,	
  251-­‐251.	
   Haldane,	
  J	
  (1949)	
  The	
  cost	
  of	
  natural	
  selection.	
  Genetics	
  55,	
  511-­‐524.	
   Hansen,	
  MM,	
  Ruzzante,	
  DE,	
  Nielsen,	
  EE,	
  and	
  Mensberg,	
  KLD	
  (2000)	
  Microsatellite	
  and	
  mitochondrial	
  DNA	
  polymorphism	
  reveals	
  life-­‐history	
  dependent	
  interbreeding	
  between	
  hatchery	
  and	
  wild	
  brown	
  trout	
  (Salmo	
  trutta	
  L.).	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  9,	
  583-­‐594.	
   Harmon,	
  LJ,	
  Matthews,	
  B,	
  Des	
  Roches,	
  S,	
  Chase,	
  JM,	
  Shurin,	
  JB,	
  and	
  Schluter,	
  D	
  (2009)	
  Evolutionary	
  diversification	
  in	
  stickleback	
  affects	
  ecosystem	
  functioning.	
  Nature	
  458,	
  1167-­‐1170.	
   Hauser,	
  L,	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  JE	
  (2008)	
  Advances	
  in	
  molecular	
  technology	
  and	
  their	
  impact	
  on	
  fisheries	
  genetics.	
  Fish	
   and	
  Fisheries	
  9,	
  473-­‐486.	
   Helyar,	
  SJ,	
  Hemmer-­‐Hansen,	
  J,	
  Bekkevold,	
  D,	
  Taylor,	
  MI,	
  Ogden,	
  R,	
  Limborg,	
  MT,	
  Cariani,	
  A,	
  Maes,	
  GE,	
  Diopere,	
  E,	
  Carvalho,	
  GR,	
  and	
  Nielsen,	
  EE	
  (2011)	
  Application	
  of	
  SNPs	
  for	
  population	
  genetics	
  of	
  nonmodel	
  organisms:	
  New	
  opportunities	
  and	
  challenges.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  Resources	
  11,	
  123-­‐136.	
   Hendry,	
  AP	
  (2009)	
  Ecological	
  speciation!	
  Or	
  the	
  lack	
  thereof?	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  and	
  Aquatic	
   Sciences	
  66,	
  1383-­‐1398.	
   Hendry,	
  AP,	
  and	
  Kinnison,	
  MT	
  (1999)	
  The	
  pace	
  of	
  modern	
  life:	
  Measuring	
  rates	
  of	
  contemporary	
  microevolution.	
  Evolution	
  53,	
  1637-­‐1653.	
   Hendry,	
  AP,	
  and	
  Stearns,	
  SC	
  (2004)	
  Evolution	
  Illuminated:	
  Salmon	
  and	
  Their	
  Relatives	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  New	
  York.	
   Hendry,	
  AP,	
  Wenburg,	
  J,	
  Bentzen,	
  P,	
  Volk,	
  E,	
  and	
  Quinn,	
  TP	
  (2000)	
  Rapid	
  evolution	
  of	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  in	
  the	
  wild:	
  evidence	
  from	
  introduced	
  salmon.	
  Science	
  290,	
  516-­‐518.	
   Hermisson,	
  J,	
  and	
  Pennings,	
  P	
  (2005)	
  Soft	
  sweeps:	
  molecular	
  population	
  genetics	
  of	
  adaptation	
  from	
  standing	
  genetic	
  variation.	
  Genetics	
  162,	
  2335-­‐2352.	
   Hilborn,	
  R,	
  Quinn,	
  TP,	
  Schindler,	
  DE,	
  and	
  Rogers,	
  DE	
  (2003)	
  Biocomplexity	
  and	
  fisheries	
  sustainability.	
   Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Academy	
  of	
  Sciences	
  100,	
  6564-­‐6568.	
   	
  	
  	
   77	
   Hoekstra,	
  HE	
  (2006)	
  Genetics,	
  development	
  and	
  evolution	
  of	
  adaptive	
  pigmentation	
  in	
  vertebrates.	
  Heredity	
   97,	
  222-­‐234.	
   Hoekstra,	
  HE,	
  Hirschmann,	
  RJ,	
  Bundey,	
  RA,	
  Insel,	
  PA,	
  and	
  Crossland,	
  JP	
  (2006)	
  A	
  single	
  amino	
  acid	
  mutation	
  contributes	
  to	
  adaptive	
  beach	
  mouse	
  color	
  pattern.	
  Science	
  313,	
  101-­‐104.	
   Hohenlohe,	
  PA,	
  Bassham,	
  S,	
  Currey,	
  M,	
  and	
  Cresko,	
  WA	
  (2012)	
  Extensive	
  linkage	
  disequilibrium	
  and	
  parallel	
  adaptive	
  divergence	
  across	
  three-­‐spine	
  stickleback	
  genomes.	
  Philosophical	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
   Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  367,	
  395-­‐408.	
   Hohenlohe,	
  PA,	
  Bassham,	
  S,	
  Etter,	
  PD,	
  Stiffler,	
  N,	
  Johnson,	
  EA,	
  and	
  Cresko,	
  WA	
  (2010)	
  Population	
  genomics	
  of	
  parallel	
  adaptation	
  in	
  three-­‐spine	
  stickleback	
  using	
  sequenced	
  RAD	
  tags.	
  PLoS	
  Genetics	
  6.	
   Holderegger,	
  R,	
  Herrmann,	
  D,	
  Poncet,	
  B,	
  Gugerli,	
  F,	
  Thuiller,	
  W,	
  Taberlet,	
  P,	
  Gielly,	
  L,	
  Rioux,	
  D,	
  Brodbeck,	
  S,	
  Aubert,	
  S,	
  and	
  Manel,	
  S	
  (2008)	
  Land	
  ahead:	
  Using	
  genome	
  scans	
  to	
  identify	
  molecular	
  markers	
  of	
  adaptive	
  relevance.	
  Plant	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Diversity	
  1,	
  273-­‐283.	
   Huber,	
  SK,	
  De	
  Leon,	
  LF,	
  Hendry,	
  AP,	
  Bermingham,	
  E,	
  and	
  Podos,	
  J	
  (2007)	
  Reproductive	
  isolation	
  of	
  sympatric	
  morphs	
  in	
  a	
  population	
  of	
  Darwin's	
  finches.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  274,	
  1709-­‐1714.	
   Hubisz,	
  MJ,	
  Falush,	
  D,	
  Stephens,	
  M,	
  and	
  Pritchard,	
  JK	
  (2009)	
  Inferring	
  weak	
  population	
  structure	
  with	
  the	
  assistance	
  of	
  sample	
  group	
  information.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  Resources	
  9,	
  1322-­‐1332.	
   Jensen,	
  LF,	
  Hansen,	
  MM,	
  Pertoldi,	
  C,	
  Holdensgaard,	
  G,	
  Mensberg,	
  K-­‐LD,	
  and	
  Loeschcke,	
  V	
  (2008)	
  Local	
  adaptation	
  in	
  brown	
  trout	
  early	
  life-­‐history	
  traits:	
  Implications	
  for	
  climate	
  change	
  adaptability.	
   Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  275,	
  2859-­‐2868.	
   Jiggins,	
  CD	
  (2008)	
  Ecological	
  speciation	
  in	
  mimetic	
  butterflies.	
  Bioscience	
  58,	
  541-­‐548.	
   Johannesson,	
  K	
  (2001)	
  Parallel	
  speciation:	
  a	
  key	
  to	
  sympatric	
  divergence.	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Evolution	
  16,	
  148-­‐153.	
   Jombart,	
  T,	
  Devillard,	
  S,	
  and	
  Balloux,	
  F	
  (2010)	
  Discriminant	
  analysis	
  of	
  principal	
  components:	
  a	
  new	
  method	
  for	
  the	
  analysis	
  of	
  genetically	
  structured	
  populations.	
  BMC	
  Genetics	
  11.	
   Joost,	
  S,	
  Bonin,	
  A,	
  Bruford,	
  MW,	
  Despres,	
  L,	
  Conord,	
  C,	
  Erhardt,	
  G,	
  and	
  Taberlet,	
  P	
  (2007)	
  A	
  Spatial	
  Analysis	
  Method	
  (SAM)	
  to	
  detect	
  candidate	
  loci	
  for	
  selection:	
  Towards	
  a	
  landscape	
  genomics	
  approach	
  to	
  adaptation.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  16,	
  3955-­‐3969.	
   Kalinowski,	
  ST,	
  Manlove,	
  KR,	
  and	
  Taper,	
  ML	
  (2007)	
  ONCOR:	
  a	
  computer	
  program	
  for	
  genetic	
  stock	
  identification,	
  Department	
  of	
  Ecology,	
  Montana	
  State	
  University,	
  Bozeman,	
  MT.	
  Available	
  at	
  http://www.montana.edu/kalinowski/kalinowski_software.htm.	
   	
  	
  	
   78	
   Kaplan,	
  NL,	
  Hudson,	
  RR,	
  and	
  Langley,	
  CH	
  (1989)	
  The	
  hitchhiking	
  effect	
  revisited	
  Genetics	
  123,	
  887-­‐899.	
   Kauer,	
  MO,	
  Dieringer,	
  D,	
  and	
  Schlötterer,	
  C	
  (2003)	
  A	
  microsatellite	
  variability	
  screen	
  for	
  positive	
  selection	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  "Out	
  of	
  Africa"	
  habitat	
  expansion	
  of	
  Drosophila	
  melanogaster.	
  Genetics	
  165,	
  1137-­‐1148.	
   Keller,	
  I,	
  Taverna,	
  A,	
  and	
  Seehausen,	
  O	
  (2011)	
  Evidence	
  of	
  neutral	
  and	
  adaptive	
  genetic	
  divergence	
  between	
  European	
  trout	
  populations	
  sampled	
  along	
  altitudinal	
  gradients.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  20,	
  1888-­‐1904.	
   Kimura,	
  M	
  (1983)	
  The	
  neutral	
  theory	
  of	
  molecular	
  evolution	
  Cambridge	
  University	
  Press,	
  Cambridge.	
   Kimura,	
  M	
  (1995)	
  Limitations	
  of	
  Darwinian	
  Selection	
  in	
  a	
  finite	
  population.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  National	
   Academy	
  of	
  Sciences	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  of	
  America	
  92,	
  2343-­‐2344.	
   Kinnison,	
  MT,	
  and	
  Hendry,	
  AP	
  (2001)	
  The	
  pace	
  of	
  modern	
  life	
  II:	
  From	
  rates	
  of	
  contemporary	
  microevolution	
  to	
  pattern	
  and	
  process.	
  Genetica	
  112,	
  145-­‐164.	
   Koljonen,	
  ML,	
  Pella,	
  JJ,	
  and	
  Masuda,	
  M	
  (2005)	
  Classical	
  individual	
  assignments	
  versus	
  mixture	
  modeling	
  to	
  estimate	
  stock	
  proportions	
  in	
  Atlantic	
  salmon	
  (Salmo	
  salar)	
  catches	
  from	
  DNA	
  microsatellite	
  data.	
   Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  and	
  Aquatic	
  Sciences	
  62,	
  2143-­‐2158.	
   Kondrashov,	
  AS	
  (1986)	
  Multilocus	
  model	
  of	
  sympatric	
  speciation.	
  III.	
  Computer	
  simulations.	
  Theoretical	
   Population	
  Biology	
  29,	
  1-­‐15.	
   Kondrashov,	
  AS,	
  and	
  Kondrashov,	
  FA	
  (1999)	
  Interactions	
  among	
  quantitative	
  traits	
  in	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  sympatric	
  speciation.	
  Nature	
  400,	
  351-­‐354.	
   Landry,	
  L,	
  Vincent,	
  WF,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2007)	
  Parallel	
  evolution	
  of	
  lake	
  whitefish	
  dwarf	
  ecotypes	
  in	
  association	
  with	
  limnological	
  features	
  of	
  their	
  adaptive	
  landscape.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Evolutionary	
  Biology	
   20,	
  971-­‐984.	
   Lecomte,	
  F,	
  and	
  Dodson,	
  JJ	
  (2004)	
  Role	
  of	
  early	
  life-­‐history	
  constraints	
  and	
  resource	
  polymorphism	
  in	
  the	
  segregation	
  of	
  sympatric	
  populations	
  of	
  an	
  estuarine	
  fish.	
  Evolutionary	
  Ecology	
  Research	
  6,	
  631-­‐658.	
   Leder,	
  EH,	
  Danzmann,	
  RG,	
  and	
  Ferguson,	
  MM	
  (2006)	
  The	
  candidate	
  gene,	
  Clock,	
  localizes	
  to	
  a	
  strong	
  spawning	
  time	
  quantitative	
  trait	
  locus	
  region	
  in	
  rainbow	
  trout.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Heredity	
  97,	
  74-­‐80.	
   Liao,	
  B-­‐Y,	
  Weng,	
  M-­‐P,	
  and	
  Zhang,	
  J	
  (2010)	
  Contrasting	
  genetic	
  paths	
  to	
  morphological	
  and	
  physiological	
  evolution.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Academy	
  of	
  Sciences	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  of	
  America	
  107,	
  7353-­‐7358.	
   	
  	
  	
   79	
   Long,	
  K	
  (2003)	
  Okanagan	
  Region	
  Fish	
  Species	
  at	
  Risk	
  Status	
  Report,	
  p.	
  37.	
  Okanagan	
  Nation	
  Alliance,	
  Fisheries	
  Department,	
  Westbank,	
  BC.	
   Luikart,	
  G,	
  England,	
  PR,	
  Tallmon,	
  D,	
  Jordan,	
  S,	
  and	
  Taberlet,	
  P	
  (2003)	
  The	
  power	
  and	
  promise	
  of	
  population	
  genomics:	
  From	
  genotyping	
  to	
  genome	
  typing.	
  Nature	
  Reviews	
  Genetics	
  4,	
  981-­‐994.	
   Martin,	
  KLM,	
  and	
  Swiderski,	
  DL	
  (2001)	
  Beach	
  spawning	
  in	
  fishes:	
  phylogenetic	
  tests	
  of	
  hypotheses.	
   American	
  Zoologist	
  41,	
  526-­‐537.	
   Maynard-­‐Smith,	
  J,	
  and	
  Haigh,	
  J	
  (1974)	
  The	
  hitch-­‐hiking	
  effect	
  of	
  a	
  favourable	
  gene.	
  Genetic	
  Resources	
  23,	
  23-­‐35.	
   Mayr,	
  E	
  (1942)	
  Systematics	
  and	
  the	
  origin	
  of	
  species	
  from	
  the	
  viewpoint	
  of	
  a	
  zoologist	
  Harvard	
  University	
  Press.	
   Mayr,	
  E	
  (1963)	
  Animal	
  Species	
  and	
  Evolution	
  Belknap	
  Press,	
  Cambridge,	
  Massachusetts.	
   McGlauflin,	
  MT,	
  Schindler,	
  DE,	
  Seeb,	
  LW,	
  Smith,	
  CT,	
  Habicht,	
  C,	
  and	
  Seeb,	
  JE	
  (2011)	
  Spawning	
  habitat	
  and	
  geography	
  influence	
  population	
  structure	
  and	
  juvenile	
  migration	
  timing	
  of	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  in	
  the	
  Wood	
  River	
  Lakes,	
  Alaska.	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Fisheries	
  Society	
  140,	
  763-­‐782.	
   McKinnon,	
  JS,	
  Mori,	
  S,	
  Blackman,	
  BK,	
  David,	
  L,	
  Kingsley,	
  DM,	
  Jamieson,	
  L,	
  Chou,	
  J,	
  and	
  Schluter,	
  D	
  (2004)	
  Evidence	
  for	
  ecology's	
  role	
  in	
  speciation.	
  Nature	
  429,	
  294-­‐298.	
   McPhail,	
  JD,	
  and	
  Lindsey,	
  CC	
  (1970)	
  Freshwater	
  fishes	
  of	
  northwestern	
  Canada	
  and	
  Alaska	
  Fisheries	
  Research	
  Board	
  of	
  Canada.	
   Mehner,	
  T,	
  Freyhof,	
  J,	
  and	
  Reichard,	
  M	
  (2011)	
  Summary	
  and	
  perspective	
  on	
  evolutionary	
  ecology	
  of	
  fishes.	
   Evolutionary	
  Ecology	
  25,	
  547-­‐556.	
   Miller,	
  MR,	
  Brunelli,	
  JP,	
  Wheeler,	
  PA,	
  Liu,	
  S,	
  Rexroad,	
  CE,	
  III,	
  Palti,	
  Y,	
  Doe,	
  CQ,	
  and	
  Thorgaard,	
  GH	
  (2001)	
  A	
  conserved	
  haplotype	
  controls	
  parallel	
  adaptation	
  in	
  geographically	
  distant	
  salmonid	
  populations.	
   Molecular	
  Ecology	
  21,	
  237-­‐249.	
   Moen,	
  T,	
  Hayes,	
  B,	
  Baranski,	
  M,	
  Berg,	
  PR,	
  Kjoglum,	
  S,	
  Koop,	
  BF,	
  Davidson,	
  WS,	
  Omholt,	
  SW,	
  and	
  Lien,	
  S	
  (2008)	
  A	
  linkage	
  map	
  of	
  the	
  Atlantic	
  salmon	
  (Salmo	
  salar)	
  based	
  on	
  EST-­‐derived	
  SNP	
  markers.	
  BMC	
   Genomics	
  9.	
   Morin,	
  PA,	
  Luikart,	
  G,	
  Wayne,	
  RK,	
  and	
  the	
  SNP	
  Workshop	
  Group	
  (2004)	
  SNPs	
  in	
  ecology,	
  evolution	
  and	
  conservation.	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Evolution	
  19,	
  208-­‐216.	
   	
  	
  	
   80	
   Morris,	
  A,	
  Braumandl,	
  E,	
  Andrusak,	
  H,	
  and	
  Caverly,	
  A	
  (2003)	
  2002/2003	
  Seton	
  and	
  Anderson	
  Lakes	
  kokanee	
  assessment	
  -­‐	
  Feasibility	
  study	
  and	
  study	
  design	
  (ed.	
  British	
  Columbia	
  Conservation	
  Foundation	
  and	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Water	
  LaAP,	
  Kamloops,	
  BC.).	
   Namroud,	
  M-­‐C,	
  Beaulieu,	
  J,	
  Juge,	
  N,	
  Laroche,	
  J,	
  and	
  Bousquet,	
  J	
  (2008)	
  Scanning	
  the	
  genome	
  for	
  gene	
  single	
  nucleotide	
  polymorphisms	
  involved	
  in	
  adaptive	
  population	
  differentiation	
  in	
  white	
  spruce.	
   Molecular	
  Ecology	
  17,	
  3599-­‐3613.	
   Narum,	
  SR,	
  Banks,	
  M,	
  Beacham,	
  TD,	
  Bellinger,	
  MR,	
  Campbell,	
  MR,	
  Dekoning,	
  J,	
  Elz,	
  A,	
  Guthrie,	
  CM,	
  Kozfkay,	
  C,	
  Miller,	
  KM,	
  Moran,	
  P,	
  Phillips,	
  R,	
  Seeb,	
  LW,	
  Smith,	
  CT,	
  Warheit,	
  K,	
  Young,	
  SF,	
  and	
  Garza,	
  JC	
  (2008)	
  Differentiating	
  salmon	
  populations	
  at	
  broad	
  and	
  fine	
  geographical	
  scales	
  with	
  microsatellites	
  and	
  single	
  nucleotide	
  polymorphisms.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  17,	
  3464-­‐3477.	
   Narum,	
  SR,	
  and	
  Hess,	
  JE	
  (2011)	
  Comparison	
  of	
  F(ST)	
  outlier	
  tests	
  for	
  SNP	
  loci	
  under	
  selection.	
  Molecular	
   Ecology	
  Resources	
  11,	
  184-­‐194.	
   Nei,	
  M	
  (1987)	
  Molecular	
  evolutionary	
  genetics	
  Columbia	
  University	
  Press,	
  USA.	
   Ng,	
  SHS,	
  Artieri,	
  CG,	
  Bosdet,	
  IE,	
  Chiu,	
  R,	
  Danzmann,	
  RG,	
  Davidson,	
  WS,	
  Ferguson,	
  MM,	
  Fjell,	
  CD,	
  Hoyheim,	
  B,	
  Jones,	
  SJM,	
  de	
  Jong,	
  PJ,	
  Koop,	
  BF,	
  Krzywinski,	
  MI,	
  Lubieniecki,	
  K,	
  Marra,	
  MA,	
  Mitchell,	
  LA,	
  Mathewson,	
  C,	
  Osoegawa,	
  K,	
  Parisotto,	
  SE,	
  Phillips,	
  RB,	
  Rise,	
  ML,	
  von	
  Schalburg,	
  KR,	
  Schein,	
  JE,	
  Shin,	
  HS,	
  Siddiqui,	
  A,	
  Thorsen,	
  J,	
  Wye,	
  N,	
  Yang,	
  G,	
  and	
  Zhu,	
  BL	
  (2005)	
  A	
  physical	
  map	
  of	
  the	
  genome	
  of	
  Atlantic	
  salmon,	
  Salmo	
  salar.	
  Genomics	
  86,	
  396-­‐404.	
   Nie,	
  YC,	
  Han,	
  YC,	
  and	
  Zou,	
  YR	
  (2008)	
  CXCR4	
  is	
  required	
  for	
  the	
  quiescence	
  of	
  primitive	
  hematopoietic	
  cells.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Experimental	
  Medicine	
  205,	
  777-­‐783.	
   Nielsen,	
  EE,	
  Hemmer-­‐Hansen,	
  J,	
  Larsen,	
  PF,	
  and	
  Bekkevold,	
  D	
  (2009a)	
  Population	
  genomics	
  of	
  marine	
  fishes:	
  identifying	
  adaptive	
  variation	
  in	
  space	
  and	
  time.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  18,	
  3128-­‐3150.	
   Nielsen,	
  EE,	
  Hemmer-­‐Hansen,	
  J,	
  Poulsen,	
  NA,	
  Loeschcke,	
  V,	
  Moen,	
  T,	
  Johansen,	
  T,	
  Mittelholzer,	
  C,	
  Taranger,	
  G-­‐L,	
  Ogden,	
  R,	
  and	
  Carvalho,	
  GR	
  (2009b)	
  Genomic	
  signatures	
  of	
  local	
  directional	
  selection	
  in	
  a	
  high	
  gene	
  flow	
  marine	
  organism;	
  the	
  Atlantic	
  cod	
  (Gadus	
  morhua).	
  BMC	
  Evolutionary	
  Biology	
  9.	
   Nielsen,	
  R	
  (2005)	
  Molecular	
  signatures	
  of	
  natural	
  selection.	
  In:	
  Annual	
  Review	
  of	
  Genetics,	
  pp.	
  197-­‐218.	
   Nosil,	
  P,	
  Funk,	
  DJ,	
  and	
  Ortiz-­‐Barrientos,	
  D	
  (2009)	
  Divergent	
  selection	
  and	
  heterogeneous	
  genomic	
  divergence.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  18,	
  375-­‐402.	
   Nunes,	
  VL,	
  Beaumont,	
  MA,	
  Butlin,	
  RK,	
  and	
  Paulo,	
  OS	
  (2011)	
  Multiple	
  approaches	
  to	
  detect	
  outliers	
  in	
  a	
  genome	
  scan	
  for	
  selection	
  in	
  ocellated	
  lizards	
  (Lacerta	
  lepida)	
  along	
  an	
  environmental	
  gradient.	
   Molecular	
  Ecology	
  20,	
  193-­‐205.	
   	
  	
  	
   81	
   Oetjen,	
  K,	
  and	
  Reusch,	
  TBH	
  (2007)	
  Genome	
  scans	
  detect	
  consistent	
  divergent	
  selection	
  among	
  subtidal	
  vs.	
  intertidal	
  populations	
  of	
  the	
  marine	
  angiosperm	
  Zostera	
  marina.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  16,	
  5156-­‐5167.	
   Ogden,	
  R,	
  and	
  Thorpe,	
  RS	
  (2002)	
  Molecular	
  evidence	
  for	
  ecological	
  speciation	
  in	
  tropical	
  habitats.	
   Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Academy	
  of	
  Sciences	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  of	
  America	
  99,	
  13612-­‐13615.	
   Ohta,	
  T	
  (1973)	
  Slightly	
  deleterious	
  mutant	
  substitutions	
  in	
  evolution.	
  Nature	
  246,	
  96-­‐98.	
   Olsen,	
  JB,	
  Wenburg,	
  JK,	
  and	
  Bentzen,	
  P	
  (1996)	
  Semiautomated	
  multilocus	
  genotyping	
  of	
  Pacific	
  salmon	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  spp.)	
  using	
  microsatellites.	
  Molecular	
  Marine	
  Biology	
  and	
  Biotechnology	
  5,	
  259-­‐272.	
   Ostberg,	
  CO,	
  Pavlov,	
  SD,	
  and	
  Hauser,	
  L	
  (2009)	
  Evolutionary	
  relationships	
  among	
  sympatric	
  life	
  history	
  forms	
  of	
  Dolly	
  Varden	
  inhabiting	
  the	
  landlocked	
  Kronotsky	
  Lake,	
  Kamchatka,	
  and	
  a	
  neighboring	
  anadromous	
  population.	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Fisheries	
  Society	
  138,	
  1-­‐14.	
   Paragamian,	
  VL,	
  and	
  Bowles,	
  EC	
  (1995)	
  Factors	
  affecting	
  survival	
  of	
  kokanee	
  stocked	
  in	
  Lake	
  Pend	
  Orielle,	
  Idaho.	
  North	
  American	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
  Management	
  15,	
  208-­‐219.	
   Parametrix	
  (2003)	
  Lake	
  Whatcome	
  and	
  Bellingham	
  Hatcheries	
  production	
  replacement	
  feasibility	
  report.	
  Washington	
  Department	
  of	
  Fish	
  and	
  Wildlife,	
  Resident	
  Native	
  Fish	
  Program	
  and	
  Hatchery	
  Program,	
  Olympia,	
  WA.	
   Peakall,	
  R,	
  and	
  Smouse,	
  PE	
  (2006)	
  GENALEX	
  6:	
  genetic	
  analysis	
  in	
  Excel.	
  Population	
  genetic	
  software	
  for	
  teaching	
  and	
  research.	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  Notes	
  6,	
  288-­‐295.	
   Peichel,	
  CL,	
  Nereng,	
  KS,	
  Ohgi,	
  KA,	
  Cole,	
  BLE,	
  Colosimo,	
  PF,	
  Buerkle,	
  CA,	
  Schluter,	
  D,	
  and	
  Kingsley,	
  DM	
  (2001)	
  The	
  genetic	
  architecture	
  of	
  divergence	
  between	
  three-­‐spine	
  stickleback	
  species.	
  Nature	
  414,	
  901-­‐905.	
   Pfennig,	
  DW,	
  Wund,	
  MA,	
  Snell-­‐Rood,	
  EC,	
  Cruickshank,	
  T,	
  Schlichting,	
  CD,	
  and	
  Moczek,	
  AP	
  (2010)	
  Phenotypic	
  plasticity's	
  impacts	
  on	
  diversification	
  and	
  speciation.	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Evolution	
  25,	
  459-­‐467.	
   Pielou,	
  EC	
  (1991)	
  After	
  the	
  Ice	
  Age:	
  The	
  return	
  of	
  life	
  to	
  glaciated	
  North	
  America	
  The	
  University	
  of	
  Chicago	
  Press,	
  Chicago.	
   Piry,	
  S,	
  Luikart,	
  G,	
  and	
  Cornuet,	
  JM	
  (1999)	
  BOTTLENECK:	
  A	
  computer	
  program	
  for	
  detecting	
  recent	
  reductions	
  in	
  the	
  effective	
  population	
  size	
  using	
  allele	
  frequency	
  data.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Heredity	
  90,	
  502-­‐503.	
   Pritchard,	
  JK,	
  Stephens,	
  M,	
  and	
  Donnelly,	
  P	
  (2000)	
  Inference	
  of	
  population	
  structure	
  using	
  multilocus	
  genotype	
  data.	
  Genetics	
  155,	
  945-­‐959.	
   Provine,	
  WB	
  (1971)	
  The	
  origin	
  of	
  theoretical	
  populatiosn	
  genetics	
  Chigaco	
  University	
  Press,	
  Chicago.	
   	
  	
  	
   82	
   Quesada,	
  H,	
  Posada,	
  D,	
  Caballero,	
  A,	
  Moran,	
  P,	
  and	
  Rolan-­‐Alvarez,	
  E	
  (2007)	
  Phylogenetic	
  evidence	
  for	
  multiple	
  sympatric	
  ecological	
  diversification	
  in	
  a	
  marine	
  snail.	
  Evolution	
  61,	
  1600-­‐1612.	
   Quinn,	
  TP	
  (2005)	
  The	
  Behaviour	
  and	
  Ecology	
  of	
  Pacific	
  Salmon	
  and	
  Trout	
  University	
  of	
  Washington	
  Press,	
  Vancouver.	
   Quinn,	
  TP,	
  Hendry,	
  AP,	
  and	
  Wetzel,	
  LA	
  (1995)	
  The	
  influence	
  of	
  life	
  history	
  trade-­‐offs	
  and	
  the	
  size	
  of	
  incubation	
  gravels	
  on	
  egg	
  size	
  variation	
  in	
  sockeye	
  salmon	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  nerka).	
  Oikos	
  74,	
  425-­‐438.	
   Rambaut,	
  A,	
  and	
  Schluter,	
  D	
  (1996)	
  Ecological	
  speciation	
  in	
  postglacial	
  fishes	
  -­‐	
  Discussion.	
  Philosophical	
   Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  351,	
  814-­‐814.	
   Rannala,	
  B,	
  and	
  Mountain,	
  JL	
  (1997)	
  Detecting	
  immigration	
  by	
  using	
  multilocus	
  genotypes.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
   the	
  National	
  Academy	
  of	
  Sciences	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  of	
  America	
  94,	
  9197-­‐9201.	
   Raymond,	
  M,	
  and	
  Rousset,	
  F	
  (1995)	
  An	
  exact	
  test	
  for	
  population	
  differentiation.	
  Evolution	
  49,	
  1280-­‐1283.	
   Renaut,	
  S,	
  Nolte,	
  AW,	
  Rogers,	
  SM,	
  Derome,	
  N,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2011)	
  SNP	
  signatures	
  of	
  selection	
  on	
  standing	
  genetic	
  variation	
  and	
  their	
  association	
  with	
  adaptive	
  phenotypes	
  along	
  gradients	
  of	
  ecological	
  speciation	
  in	
  lake	
  whitefish	
  species	
  pairs	
  (Coregonus	
  spp.).	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  20,	
  545-­‐559.	
   Rexroad,	
  CE,	
  Rodriguez,	
  MF,	
  Coulibaly,	
  I,	
  Gharbi,	
  K,	
  Danzmann,	
  RG,	
  DeKoning,	
  J,	
  Phillips,	
  R,	
  and	
  Palti,	
  Y	
  (2005)	
  Comparative	
  mapping	
  of	
  expressed	
  sequence	
  tags	
  containing	
  microsatellites	
  in	
  rainbow	
  trout	
  (Oncorhynchus	
  mykiss).	
  BMC	
  Genomics	
  6,	
  54.	
   Reznick,	
  DN,	
  and	
  Ghalambor,	
  CK	
  (2001)	
  The	
  population	
  ecology	
  of	
  contemporary	
  adaptations:	
  what	
  empirical	
  studies	
  reveal	
  about	
  the	
  conditions	
  that	
  promote	
  adaptive	
  evolution.	
  Genetica	
  112,	
  183-­‐198.	
   Reznick,	
  DN,	
  and	
  Ghalambor,	
  CK	
  (2005)	
  Selection	
  in	
  nature:	
  experimental	
  manipulations	
  of	
  natural	
  populations.	
  Integrative	
  and	
  Comparative	
  Biology	
  45,	
  456-­‐462.	
   Rice,	
  WR	
  (1989)	
  Analyzing	
  tables	
  of	
  statistical	
  tests.	
  Evolution	
  43,	
  223-­‐225.	
   Rice,	
  WR,	
  and	
  Hostert,	
  EE	
  (1993)	
  Laboratory	
  experiments	
  on	
  speciation	
  -­‐	
  What	
  have	
  we	
  learned	
  in	
  40	
  years.	
   Evolution	
  47,	
  1637-­‐1653.	
   Roberge,	
  C,	
  Paez,	
  DJ,	
  Rossignol,	
  O,	
  Guderley,	
  H,	
  Dodson,	
  J,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2007)	
  Genome-­‐wide	
  survey	
  of	
  the	
  gene	
  expression	
  response	
  to	
  saprolegniasis	
  in	
  Atlantic	
  salmon.	
  Molecular	
  Immunology	
  44,	
  1374-­‐1383.	
   	
  	
  	
   83	
   Rogers,	
  SM,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2006)	
  The	
  genetic	
  basis	
  of	
  intrinsic	
  and	
  extrinsic	
  post-­‐zygotic	
  reproductive	
  isolation	
  jointly	
  promoting	
  speciation	
  in	
  the	
  lake	
  whitefish	
  species	
  complex	
  (Coregonus	
   clupeaformis).	
  Journal	
  of	
  Evolutionary	
  Biology	
  19,	
  1979-­‐1994.	
   Rundle,	
  HD,	
  Nagel,	
  L,	
  Boughman,	
  JW,	
  and	
  Schluter,	
  D	
  (2000)	
  Natural	
  selection	
  and	
  parallel	
  speciation	
  in	
  sympatric	
  sticklebacks.	
  Science	
  287,	
  306-­‐308.	
   Russello,	
  MA,	
  Kirk,	
  S,	
  Frazer,	
  KK,	
  and	
  Askey,	
  P	
  (2012)	
  Detection	
  of	
  outlier	
  loci	
  and	
  their	
  utility	
  for	
  fisheries	
  management	
  Evolutionary	
  Applications	
  5,	
  39-­‐52.	
   Saint-­‐Laurent,	
  R,	
  Legault,	
  M,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2003)	
  Divergent	
  selection	
  maintains	
  adaptive	
  differentiation	
  despite	
  high	
  gene	
  flow	
  between	
  sympatric	
  rainbow	
  smelt	
  ecotypes	
  (Osmerus	
  mordax	
  Mitchill).	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  12,	
  315-­‐330.	
   Salem,	
  M,	
  Rexroad,	
  CE,	
  III,	
  Wang,	
  J,	
  Thorgaard,	
  GH,	
  and	
  Yao,	
  J	
  (2010)	
  Characterization	
  of	
  the	
  rainbow	
  trout	
  transcriptome	
  using	
  Sanger	
  and	
  454-­‐pyrosequencing	
  approaches.	
  BMC	
  Genomics	
  11,	
  564-­‐574.	
   Schliewen,	
  UK,	
  Tautz,	
  D,	
  and	
  Paabo,	
  S	
  (1994)	
  Sympatric	
  speciation	
  suggested	
  by	
  monophyly	
  of	
  Crater	
  Lake	
  cichlids.	
  Nature	
  368,	
  629-­‐632.	
   Schlötterer,	
  C	
  (2003)	
  Hitchhiking	
  mapping	
  -­‐	
  functional	
  genomics	
  from	
  the	
  population	
  genetics	
  perspective.	
   Trends	
  in	
  Genetics	
  19,	
  32-­‐38.	
   Schluter,	
  D	
  (1996)	
  Ecological	
  speciation	
  in	
  postglacial	
  fishes.	
  Philosophical	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
   of	
  London	
  Series	
  B	
  351,	
  807-­‐814.	
   Schluter,	
  D	
  (2000)	
  The	
  Ecology	
  of	
  Adaptive	
  Radiation	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  Oxford.	
   Schluter,	
  D	
  (2001)	
  Ecology	
  and	
  the	
  origin	
  of	
  species.	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Evolution	
  16,	
  372-­‐380.	
   Schluter,	
  D,	
  Clifford,	
  EA,	
  Nemethy,	
  M,	
  and	
  McKinnon,	
  JS	
  (2004)	
  Parallel	
  evolution	
  and	
  inheritance	
  of	
  quantitative	
  traits.	
  American	
  Naturalist	
  163,	
  809-­‐822.	
   Schluter,	
  D,	
  and	
  Conte,	
  GL	
  (2009)	
  Genetics	
  and	
  ecological	
  speciation.	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Academy	
  of	
   Sciences	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  of	
  America	
  106,	
  9955-­‐9962.	
   Schluter,	
  D,	
  and	
  McPhail,	
  JD	
  (1992)	
  Ecological	
  character	
  displacement	
  and	
  speciation	
  in	
  sticklebacks.	
   American	
  Naturalist	
  140,	
  85-­‐108.	
   Schuelke,	
  M	
  (2000)	
  An	
  economic	
  method	
  for	
  the	
  fluorescent	
  labeling	
  of	
  PCR	
  fragments.	
  Nature	
   Biotechnology	
  18,	
  233-­‐234.	
   	
  	
  	
   84	
   Schwartz,	
  MK,	
  Luikart,	
  G,	
  and	
  Waples,	
  RS	
  (2007)	
  Genetic	
  monitoring	
  as	
  a	
  promising	
  tool	
  for	
  conservation	
  and	
  management.	
  Trends	
  in	
  Ecology	
  &	
  Evolution	
  22,	
  25-­‐33.	
   Scribner,	
  KT,	
  Gust,	
  JR,	
  and	
  Fields,	
  RL	
  (1996)	
  Isolation	
  and	
  characterization	
  of	
  novel	
  salmon	
  microsatellite	
  loci:	
  Cross-­‐species	
  amplification	
  and	
  population	
  genetic	
  applications.	
  Canadian	
  Journal	
  of	
  Fisheries	
   and	
  Aquatic	
  Sciences	
  53,	
  833-­‐841.	
   Sebastian,	
  DC,	
  Dolighan,	
  R,	
  Andrusak,	
  H,	
  Hume,	
  J,	
  Woodruff,	
  P,	
  and	
  Scholten,	
  G	
  (2003)	
  Summary	
  of	
  Quesnel	
  Lake	
  kokanee	
  and	
  rainbow	
  trout	
  biology	
  with	
  reference	
  to	
  sockeye	
  salmon.	
  In:	
  Stock	
  Management	
   Report	
  No.	
  17,	
  Province	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia.	
   Seehausen,	
  O,	
  Terai,	
  Y,	
  Magalhaes,	
  IS,	
  Carleton,	
  KL,	
  Mrosso,	
  HDJ,	
  Miyagi,	
  R,	
  van	
  der	
  Sluijs,	
  I,	
  Schneider,	
  MV,	
  Maan,	
  ME,	
  Tachida,	
  H,	
  Imai,	
  H,	
  and	
  Okada,	
  N	
  (2008)	
  Speciation	
  through	
  sensory	
  drive	
  in	
  cichlid	
  fish.	
   Nature	
  455,	
  620-­‐623.	
   Shaklee,	
  JB,	
  Beacham,	
  TD,	
  Seeb,	
  L,	
  and	
  White,	
  BA	
  (1999)	
  Managing	
  fisheries	
  using	
  genetic	
  data:	
  case	
  studies	
  from	
  four	
  species	
  of	
  Pacific	
  salmon.	
  Fisheries	
  Research	
  43,	
  45-­‐78.	
   Shapiro,	
  MD,	
  Marks,	
  ME,	
  Peichel,	
  CL,	
  Blackman,	
  BK,	
  Nereng,	
  KS,	
  Jonsson,	
  B,	
  Schluter,	
  D,	
  and	
  Kingsley,	
  DM	
  (2004)	
  Genetic	
  and	
  developmental	
  basis	
  of	
  evolutionary	
  pelvic	
  reduction	
  in	
  three-­‐spine	
  sticklebacks.	
  Nature	
  428,	
  717-­‐723.	
   Shephard,	
  BG	
  (2000)	
  A	
  case	
  history:	
  the	
  kokanee	
  stocks	
  of	
  Okanagan	
  Lake.	
  In:	
  Proceedings	
  of	
  a	
  conference	
  on	
   the	
  biology	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  species	
  and	
  habitats	
  at	
  risk	
  (ed.	
  Darling	
  LM),	
  pp.	
  609-­‐616,	
  Kamloops,	
  B.C.	
   Shikano,	
  T,	
  Ramadevi,	
  J,	
  and	
  Merila,	
  J	
  (2010)	
  Identification	
  of	
  local-­‐	
  and	
  habitat-­‐dependent	
  selection:	
  Scanning	
  functionally	
  important	
  genes	
  in	
  nine-­‐spined	
  sticklebacks	
  (Pungitius	
  pungitius).	
  Molecular	
   Biology	
  and	
  Evolution	
  27,	
  2775-­‐2789.	
   Skugar,	
  S,	
  Glover,	
  KA,	
  Nilsen,	
  F,	
  and	
  Krasnov,	
  A	
  (2008)	
  Local	
  and	
  systemic	
  gene	
  expression	
  responses	
  of	
  Atlantic	
  salmon	
  (Salmo	
  salar	
  L.)	
  to	
  infection	
  with	
  the	
  salmon	
  louse	
  (Lepeophtheirus	
  salmonis).	
  BMC	
   Genomics	
  9,	
  498-­‐516.	
   Slatkin,	
  M	
  (1995)	
  Hitchhiking	
  and	
  associative	
  overdominance	
  at	
  a	
  microsatellite	
  locus.	
  Molecular	
  Biology	
   and	
  Evolution	
  12,	
  473-­‐480.	
   Smith,	
  JM,	
  and	
  Haigh,	
  J	
  (1974)	
  Hitch-­‐hiking	
  effect	
  of	
  a	
  favourable	
  gene.	
  Genetical	
  Research	
  23,	
  23-­‐35.	
   St-­‐Cyr,	
  J,	
  Derome,	
  N,	
  and	
  Bernatchez,	
  L	
  (2008)	
  The	
  transcriptomics	
  of	
  life-­‐history	
  trade-­‐offs	
  in	
  whitefish	
  species	
  pairs	
  (Coregonus	
  sp.).	
  Molecular	
  Ecology	
  17,	
  1850-­‐1870.	
   Stinchcombe,	
  JR,	
  and	
  Hoekstra,	
  HE	
  (2008)	
  Combining	
  population	
  genomics	
  and	
  quantitative	
  genetics:	
  Finding	
  the	
  genes	
  underlying	
  ecologically	
  important	
  traits.	
  Heredity	
  100,	
  158-­‐170.	
   	
  	
  	
   85	
   Stockwell,	
  CA,	
  and	
  Weeks,	
  SC	
  (1999)	
  Translocations	
  and	
  rapid	
  evolutionary	
  responses	
  in	
  recently	
  established	
  populations	
  of	
  western	
  mosquitofish	
  (Gambusia	
  affinis).	
  Animal	
  Conservation	
  2,	
  103-­‐110.	
   Storz,	
  JF	
  (2005)	
  Using	
  genome	
  scans	
  of	
  DNA	
  polymorphism	
  to	
  infer	
  adaptive	
  population	
  divergence.	
   Molecular	
  Ecology	
  14,	
  671-­‐688.	
   Storz,	
  JF,	
  and	
  Nachman,	
  MW	
  (2003)	
  Natural	
  selection	
  on	
  protein	
  polymorphism	
  in	
  the	
  rodent	
  genus	
   Peromyscus:	
  evidence	
  from	
  interlocus	
  contrasts.	
  Evolution	
  57,	
  2628-­‐2635.	
   Taylor,	
  EB	
  (1991)	
  A	
  review	
  of	
  local	
  adaptation	
  in	
  Salmonidae,	
  with	
  particular	
  reference	
  to	
  Pacific	
  and	
  Atlantic	
  salmon.	
  Aquaculture	
  98,	
  185-­‐207.	
   Taylor,	
  EB	
  (1999)	
  Species	
  pairs	
  of	
  north