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Graphic narrative and existential philosophy : the scenic design for "The Trial of Judith K." Carr, Alexander Leo 2012

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GRAPHIC NARRATIVE AND EXISTENTIAL PHILOSOPHY: THE SCENIC DESIGN FOR “THE TRIAL OF JUDITH K.” by ALEXANDER LEO CARR B.A., The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 2007  A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF FINE ARTS in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Theatre)  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver)  April 2012  © Alexander Leo Carr, 2012  Abstract	
   	
   	
    “The	
  Trial	
  of	
  Judith	
  K.,”	
  by	
  Sally	
  Clark	
  was	
  held	
  in	
  the	
  Frederic	
  Wood	
  Theatre	
    at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  (UBC)	
  from	
  September	
  29th	
  through	
  October	
   8th,	
  2011	
  and	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  production	
  of	
  the	
  2011/2012	
  theatre	
  season.	
  The	
   production	
  team	
  was	
  as	
  follows:	
  Director,	
  Tom	
  Scholte;	
  Scenic	
  Designer,	
  myself,	
   Alexander	
  L.	
  Carr;	
  Lighting	
  Designer,	
  Mandi	
  Lau;	
  Costume	
  Designer,	
  Allison	
  Green;	
   Sound	
  Designer,	
  Emily	
  Griffiths;	
  and	
  Properties	
  Designer,	
  Lynn	
  Burton.	
  The	
   Technical	
  Director	
  for	
  this	
  production	
  was	
  James	
  Ferguson	
  and	
  the	
  Production	
   Manager	
  was	
  Jay	
  Henrickson.	
   	
   I	
  approached	
  the	
  design	
  inspired	
  by	
  the	
  philosophy	
  of	
  Jean	
  Paul	
  Sartre.	
  Other	
   major	
  influences	
  on	
  this	
  project	
  were	
  the	
  literary	
  art	
  form	
  the	
  graphic	
  narrative	
  and	
   cartoon	
  cell	
  animation.	
  A	
  major	
  focus	
  in	
  my	
  study	
  of	
  scenic	
  design	
  is	
  how	
  to	
   interpret	
  structural	
  and	
  thematic	
  concepts	
  of	
  the	
  graphic	
  narrative	
  and	
  cartoon	
   animation	
  in	
  three-­‐dimensional	
  space	
  for	
  use	
  on	
  the	
  stage.	
  Three	
  of	
  the	
  concepts	
  I	
   explored	
  in	
  this	
  design	
  were	
  “page	
  turning”	
  as	
  one	
  would	
  turn	
  the	
  pages	
  of	
  a	
  book,	
   “frames,”	
  or	
  the	
  pictorial	
  images	
  found	
  in	
  a	
  graphic	
  narrative,	
  and	
  “the	
  gutter,”	
  or	
   the	
  physical	
  and	
  psychological	
  space	
  between	
  frames	
  in	
  a	
  graphic	
  narrative.	
  Graphic	
   narrative	
  and	
  cartoon	
  animation	
  were	
  also	
  direct	
  influences	
  on	
  the	
  paint	
  scheme	
   chosen	
  for	
  the	
  set.	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    ii	
    Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   Abstract	
  ...........................................................................................................................................................	
  ii	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
  ......................................................................................................................................	
  iii	
   List	
  of	
  Tables	
  .................................................................................................................................................	
  v	
   List	
  of	
  Figures	
  .............................................................................................................................................	
  vi	
   List	
  of	
  Illustrations	
  ....................................................................................................................................	
  ix	
   Acknowledgements	
  ..................................................................................................................................	
  xi	
   	
   Dedication	
  ...................................................................................................................................................	
  xii	
   1  2  3  	
    Introduction	
  ...................................................................................................................................	
  1	
   1.1  The	
  Philosophical	
  Background	
  ................................................................................	
  1	
    1.2  The	
  Design	
  Rationale	
  ...................................................................................................	
  2	
    The	
  Design	
  Concept	
  ....................................................................................................................	
  6	
   2.1  Reading	
  and	
  Analyzing	
  the	
  Script	
  ..........................................................................	
  6	
    2.2  Structural	
  Analysis	
  .......................................................................................................	
  7	
    2.3  Initial	
  Design	
  Concept	
  .................................................................................................	
  9	
    2.4  Initial	
  Design	
  Revision	
  .............................................................................................	
  13	
    2.5  First	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director:	
  Pitching	
  the	
  Design	
  .................................	
  14	
    2.6  The	
  Director’s	
  Concept	
  &	
  the	
  Primary	
  Scenic	
  Metaphor	
  ..........................	
  16	
    The	
  Design	
  Process:	
  Part	
  1	
  ...................................................................................................	
  17	
   3.1  Developing	
  and	
  Revising	
  the	
  Design	
  ..................................................................	
  17	
    3.2  Second	
  Meeting	
  Preparation	
  .................................................................................	
  17	
    3.3  Second	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director	
  ......................................................................	
  23	
    3.4  Third	
  Meeting	
  	
  Preparation	
  ...................................................................................	
  23	
    3.5  Third	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director	
  ..........................................................................	
  31	
    3.6  Fourth	
  Meeting	
  Preparation	
  ..................................................................................	
  34	
    3.7  Fourth	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director	
  .......................................................................	
  37	
    iii	
    4  5  6  3.8  Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawings	
  .........................................................................	
  38	
    3.9  The	
  Design	
  to	
  Date	
  .....................................................................................................	
  45	
    3.10  Summer	
  Break	
  .............................................................................................................	
  46	
    The	
  Design	
  Process:	
  Part	
  2	
  ...................................................................................................	
  47	
   4.1  Final	
  Technical	
  Drawings	
  .......................................................................................	
  47	
    4.2  First	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
  ........................................................................................	
  60	
    4.3  Second	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
  ...................................................................................	
  62	
    4.4  Third	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
  ......................................................................................	
  98	
    4.5  Fourth	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
  ................................................................................	
  101	
    4.6  Fifth	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
  .....................................................................................	
  106	
    4.7  Tech	
  Weekend	
  ..........................................................................................................	
  106	
    4.8  Sixth	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
  ....................................................................................	
  106	
    Performance	
  Analysis	
  ..........................................................................................................	
  107	
   5.1  Time,	
  Place,	
  and	
  Budget	
  Constraints	
  ..............................................................	
  107	
    5.2  Meeting	
  the	
  Director’s	
  Concept	
  and	
  Staging	
  ...............................................	
  108	
    5.3  Meeting	
  the	
  Design	
  Rationale	
  and	
  Scenic	
  Metaphor	
  ................................	
  112	
    Conclusion	
  .................................................................................................................................	
  117	
    Bibliography	
  ...........................................................................................................................................	
  119	
   	
    	
    	
    iv	
    List	
  of	
  Tables	
   	
   Table	
  2.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Scenic	
  Locales	
  ......................................................................................................................	
  8	
   Table	
  2.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Primary	
  Furniture	
  Props	
  by	
  Locale	
  ............................................................................	
  8	
   Table	
  3.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Locale	
  Positions	
  per	
  Revolve	
  .....................................................................................	
  26	
   Table	
  3.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
  Breakdown	
  ...........................................................................................	
  27	
   Table	
  3.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Furniture	
  Props	
  List	
  .......................................................................................................	
  29  	
    v	
    List	
  of	
  Figures	
   	
   Figure	
  1.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  Finished	
  Set	
  ...............................................................................................................	
  2	
   Figure	
  1.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Costume	
  Contrast	
  .............................................................................................................	
  3	
   Figure	
  1.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door,	
  Door	
  Fly	
  ......................................................................................	
  4	
   Figure	
  1.4	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Existence	
  and	
  Nonexistence	
  ........................................................................................	
  4	
   Figure	
  1.5	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
  .....................................................................................................................	
  5	
   Figure	
  2.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  Sketch	
  1	
  ..............................................................................................	
  10	
   Figure	
  2.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  Sketch	
  2	
  ..............................................................................................	
  10	
   Figure	
  2.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  3D	
  Model	
  ............................................................................................	
  11	
   Figure	
  2.4	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Locale	
  Placement	
  .............................................................................................	
  12	
   Figure	
  2.5	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Platform	
  Shapes	
  and	
  Sizes.........................................................................................	
  12	
   Figure	
  2.6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Position	
  of	
  the	
  Set	
  ..............................................................................................	
  13	
   Figure	
  2.7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  Without	
  Screens	
  .............................................................................	
  14	
   Figure	
  2.8	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Page	
  Turning	
  ...................................................................................................................	
  15	
   Figure	
  2.9	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Frames	
  &	
  Gutters	
  ..........................................................................................................	
  15	
   Figure	
  2.10	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Page	
  Turning,	
  Frames,	
  and	
  Gutters	
  ....................................................................	
  16	
   Figure	
  3.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  7,	
  Plan	
  View	
  –	
  Enclosure	
  and	
  Door	
  Flies	
  ...................................	
  18	
   Figure	
  3.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  7,	
  Perspective	
  View	
  –	
  Enclosure	
  and	
  Door	
  Flies	
  ....................	
  18	
   Figure	
  3.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Thumbnail	
  Storyboard	
  ................................................................................................	
  19	
   Figure	
  3.4	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Act1:	
  Scene	
  1,	
  Plan	
  View	
  –	
  3D	
  Storyboard	
  .........................................................	
  20	
   Figure	
  3.5	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Act1:	
  Scene	
  1,	
  Perspective	
  View	
  –	
  3D	
  Storyboard	
  ..........................................	
  20	
   Figure	
  3.6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Wood	
  Frame	
  Roof	
  Treatment	
  Sketch	
  ...................................................................	
  21	
   Figure	
  3.7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ¼”	
  Scale	
  White	
  Model	
  .................................................................................................	
  22	
   Figure	
  3.8	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
  Outline	
  ..................................................................................................	
  22	
   Figure	
  3.9	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Hinged	
  Walls	
  and	
  ‘S’	
  Curved	
  Tracks	
  ......................................................................	
  24	
   Figure	
  3.10	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  3D	
  Model	
  ........................................................................................................................	
  25	
   Figure	
  3.11	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Stage	
  Plot	
  Outline	
  .......................................................................................................	
  26	
   Figure	
  3.12	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Revised	
  3D	
  Model,	
  Plan	
  View	
  ................................................................................	
  31	
   Figure	
  3.13	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Revised	
  3D	
  Model,	
  Perspective	
  View	
  .................................................................	
  32	
   Figure	
  3.14	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Treatment	
  ...........................................................................................................	
  35	
    	
    vi	
    Figure	
  3.15	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Wall	
  Treatment	
  1	
  ........................................................................................................	
  35	
   Figure	
  3.16	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Wall	
  Treatment	
  2	
  ........................................................................................................	
  35	
   Figure	
  3.17	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
  1	
  .......................................................................................................	
  36	
   Figure	
  3.18	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
  2	
  .......................................................................................................	
  36	
   Figure	
  3.19	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Option	
  1	
  ...............................................................................................................	
  37	
   Figure	
  3.20	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Option	
  2	
  ...............................................................................................................	
  38	
   Figure	
  3.21	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Chair	
  Options	
  ................................................................................................................	
  43	
   Figure	
  3.22	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Cabinet	
  Option	
  .............................................................................................................	
  43	
   Figure	
  3.23	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Podium	
  Option	
  .............................................................................................................	
  43	
   Figure	
  3.24	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Headboard	
  Option	
  ......................................................................................................	
  44	
   Figure	
  3.25	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Desk	
  Option	
  ...................................................................................................................	
  44	
   Figure	
  3.26	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Cathedral	
  Option	
  A	
  .....................................................................................................	
  45	
   Figure	
  3.27	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Cathedral	
  Option	
  B	
  .....................................................................................................	
  45	
   Figure	
  4.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Painted	
  Model	
  .................................................................................................................	
  48	
   Figure	
  4.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Painter’s	
  Elevations	
  ......................................................................................................	
  48	
   Figure	
  4.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1/2”	
  Scale	
  Deck	
  Rendering	
  .......................................................................................	
  61	
   Figure	
  4.4	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Updated	
  Painter’s	
  Elevations	
  ...................................................................................	
  62	
   Figure	
  4.5	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  1	
  .............................................................................................................	
  67	
   Figure	
  4.6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  2	
  .............................................................................................................	
  68	
   Figure	
  4.7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  3	
  .............................................................................................................	
  68	
   Figure	
  4.8	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Final	
  .....................................................................................................	
  69	
   Figure	
  4.9	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Updated	
  3D	
  Model	
  ........................................................................................................	
  69	
   Figure	
  4.10	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  1	
  Footprint	
  ..........................................................................................	
  99	
   Figure	
  4.11	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Centerline	
  Section	
  ......................................................................................................	
  99	
   Figure	
  4.12	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Wainscoting	
  Model	
  1	
  .............................................................................................	
  100	
   Figure	
  4.13	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Wainscoting	
  Model	
  2	
  .............................................................................................	
  100	
   Figure	
  4.14	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Finished	
  Model	
  with	
  Wainscoting	
  ....................................................................	
  102	
   Figure	
  5.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Judith	
  K.	
  in	
  Her	
  Office	
  ...............................................................................................	
  108	
   Figure	
  5.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
  ..................................................................................................	
  109	
   Figure	
  5.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
  by	
  Members	
  of	
  the	
  Court	
  ...........................................................	
  109	
   Figure	
  5.4	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Enclosure	
  ......................................................................................	
  110	
   	
    vii	
    Figure	
  5.5	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Judith	
  K.	
  and	
  Ted,	
  “the	
  Psychopath”	
  ...................................................................	
  111	
   Figure	
  5.6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  “The	
  Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door”	
  .......................................................................................	
  112	
   Figure	
  5.7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Frames	
  and	
  Gutters	
  ...................................................................................................	
  113	
   Figure	
  5.8	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Existence	
  within	
  the	
  Void	
  of	
  Nonexistence	
  .....................................................	
  114	
   Figure	
  5.9	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Composing	
  the	
  Box	
  Set	
  ............................................................................................	
  115	
   Figure	
  5.10	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Judith	
  K.	
  Just	
  Before	
  her	
  Reality	
  Crumbles	
  ...................................................	
  116	
   Figure	
  6.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  Nun	
  tells	
  “The	
  Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door”	
  ..........................................................	
  118	
    	
    viii	
    List	
  of	
  Illustrations	
   	
   Illustration	
  3.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawing:	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit	
  ........................	
  40	
   Illustration	
  3.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawing:	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit	
  .......................	
  41	
  	
   Illustration	
  3.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawing:	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit	
  ....................	
  42	
   Illustration	
  4.1	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
  ....................................................................................................	
  49	
   Illustration	
  4.2	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Revolve	
  Detail	
  1	
  ...................................................................................................	
  50	
   Illustration	
  4.3	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Revolve	
  Detail	
  2	
  ...................................................................................................	
  51	
   Illustration	
  4.4	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Elevation	
  .................................................................................................................	
  52	
   Illustration	
  4.5	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Detail	
  .............................................................................................................	
  53	
   Illustration	
  4.6	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Elevation	
  ..............................................................................................	
  54	
   Illustration	
  4.7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Plan	
  .........................................................................................................	
  55	
   Illustration	
  4.8	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Cabinets	
  Elevation	
  .................................................................................	
  56	
   Illustration	
  4.9	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Cabinets	
  Plan	
  ...........................................................................................	
  57	
   Illustration	
  4.10	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Gothic	
  Window	
  Detail	
  .....................................................................................	
  58	
   Illustration	
  4.11	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Revolve	
  Open	
  ....................................................................	
  59	
   Illustration	
  4.12	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  –	
  Initial	
  Design	
  ..................................................................	
  63	
   Illustration	
  4.13	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  –	
  Revision	
  ............................................................................	
  64	
   Illustration	
  4.14	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  -­‐	
  Revision,	
  ISO	
  1	
  ................................................................	
  65	
   Illustration	
  4.15	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  -­‐	
  Revision,	
  ISO	
  2	
  ................................................................	
  66	
   Illustration	
  4.16	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Full	
  Stage	
  Plan	
  ....................................................................................................	
  70	
   Illustration	
  4.17	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Map	
  ..............................................................................................................	
  71	
   Illustration	
  4.18	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
  .................................................................................................	
  72	
   Illustration	
  4.19	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Fly	
  Positions	
  ........................................................................................................	
  73	
   Illustration	
  4.20	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Masking	
  Plot	
  .......................................................................................................	
  74	
   Illustration	
  4.21	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Right	
  Side	
  View	
  ..................................................................................................	
  75	
   Illustration	
  4.22	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Revolve	
  .............................................................................	
  76	
   Illustration	
  4.23	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Revolve	
  ................................................................................	
  77	
   Illustration	
  4.24	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Revolve	
  .................................................................................	
  78	
   Illustration	
  4.25	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit	
  Assembly	
  ................................................................	
  79	
   Illustration	
  4.26	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit	
  Assembly	
  ...................................................................	
  80	
   	
    ix	
    Illustration	
  4.27	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit	
  Assembly	
  ...................................................................	
  81	
   Illustration	
  4.28	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  A	
  .........................................................	
  82	
   Illustration	
  4.29	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  B	
  .........................................................	
  83	
   Illustration	
  4.30	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  ..........................................................................	
  84	
   Illustration	
  4.31	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit,	
  Hinged	
  Walls	
  ..........................................................	
  85	
   Illustration	
  4.32	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  A	
  .............................................................	
  86	
   Illustration	
  4.33	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  B	
  .............................................................	
  87	
   Illustration	
  4.34	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  ....................................................................................................	
  88	
   Illustration	
  4.35	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Assembly	
  ...............................................................................	
  89	
   Illustration	
  4.36	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly,	
  Panel	
  Detail	
  .........................................................................	
  90	
   Illustration	
  4.37	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Flown	
  Door	
  Fly	
  ..................................................................................................	
  91	
   Illustration	
  4.38	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Detail	
  ...........................................................................................................	
  92	
   Illustration	
  4.39	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Air	
  Tank	
  Cabinets	
  ................................................................................	
  93	
   Illustration	
  4.40	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Air	
  Tank	
  Cabinets,	
  ISO	
  .......................................................................	
  94	
   Illustration	
  4.41	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Gothic	
  Windows	
  ................................................................................................	
  95	
   Illustration	
  4.42	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Molding	
  Detail	
  ....................................................................................................	
  96	
   Illustration	
  4.43	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Molding	
  ISO	
  .........................................................................................................	
  97	
   Illustration	
  4.44	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit	
  Wainscoting	
  ...........................................................	
  103	
   Illustration	
  4.45	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit	
  Wainscoting	
  .......................................................	
  104	
   Illustration	
  4.46	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit	
  Wainscoting	
  ..........................................................	
  105  	
    x	
    Acknowledgements	
   	
   	
    I	
  offer	
  my	
  humble	
  thanks	
  and	
  gratitude	
  to	
  the	
  UBC	
  Theatre	
  Department,	
  its	
    faculty,	
  and	
  staff	
  for	
  providing	
  me	
  with	
  the	
  opportunity	
  and	
  the	
  education	
  to	
  hone	
   my	
  craft.	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank,	
  first	
  and	
  foremost,	
  my	
  thesis	
  advisor,	
  Robert	
   Gardiner,	
  for	
  his	
  continued	
  support,	
  guidance,	
  and	
  assistance	
  throughout	
  this	
   project.	
   	
   I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  the	
  director,	
  Tom	
  Scholte,	
  for	
  his	
  enthusiasm	
  and	
  vision	
   and	
  for	
  keeping	
  the	
  train	
  on	
  its	
  rails	
  throughout	
  the	
  design	
  process.	
  I	
  owe	
  a	
  great	
   deal	
  to	
  Tom	
  for	
  his	
  contributions	
  in	
  every	
  aspect	
  of	
  this	
  design.	
  This	
  was	
  truly	
  a	
   collaborative	
  effort.	
   	
   	
    I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  Jim	
  Ferguson,	
  Technical	
  Director,	
  and	
  Lynn	
  Burton,	
    Properties	
  Supervisor,	
  for	
  their	
  patience	
  and	
  commitment	
  to	
  the	
  project,	
  without	
   whose	
  aid	
  this	
  project	
  would	
  not	
  have	
  succeeded	
  so	
  greatly.	
   	
   	
    I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  the	
  design	
  team:	
  Mandi	
  Lau,	
  Emily	
  Griffiths,	
  and	
  Allison	
    Green,	
  whose	
  contributions	
  created	
  a	
  unified,	
  collaborative	
  production.	
   	
   	
    Lastly,	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  the	
  Stage	
  Manager,	
  Jenny	
  Kim,	
  the	
  Assistant	
    Stage	
  Managers,	
  Kristen	
  Anthony,	
  Tanya	
  Mathivanan,	
  Carolyn	
  Rapanos,	
  and	
  Javier	
   Sotres,	
  and	
  the	
  crew	
  for	
  putting	
  everything	
  together,	
  keeping	
  everyone	
  together,	
   and	
  conducting	
  an	
  incredible	
  show.	
   	
   I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  add	
  a	
  special	
  thank	
  you	
  for	
  the	
  exceptional	
  contributions	
  of	
   Mr.	
  Michael	
  Bock	
  and	
  Ms.	
  Carolyn	
  Rapanos	
  for	
  their	
  time,	
  their	
  talent,	
  and	
  their	
   expertise	
  in	
  the	
  creation	
  of	
  the	
  crucifix	
  and	
  the	
  courtroom	
  audience,	
  respectively.	
   	
    	
    	
    xi	
    Dedication	
   	
   	
    To	
  my	
  parents	
  and	
  to	
  the	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  Soka	
  Gakkai	
  International,	
  I	
    humbly	
  thank	
  you	
  for	
  encouraging	
  me	
  to	
  pursue	
  my	
  dreams	
  and	
  to	
  make	
  them	
  a	
   concrete	
  reality.	
  Were	
  it	
  not	
  for	
  you,	
  I	
  would	
  not	
  be	
  here.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    xii	
    1	
  	
  	
  Introduction	
   1.1	
    The	
  Philosophical	
  Background	
    	
   	
    “The	
  Trial	
  of	
  Judith	
  K.,”	
  by	
  Sally	
  Clark,	
  was	
  published	
  by	
  Playwrights	
  Canada	
    Press	
  in	
  1985,	
  a	
  time	
  when	
  corporate	
  greed	
  and	
  the	
  growth	
  of	
  multinational	
   corporations,	
  aided	
  heavily	
  by	
  the	
  banking	
  industry,	
  was	
  at	
  its	
  peak	
  politically	
  and	
   economically.	
  The	
  author’s	
  choice	
  to	
  adapt	
  Franz	
  Kafka’s	
  novel,	
  “The	
  Trial”	
  in	
  the	
   midst	
  of	
  the	
  controversy	
  surrounding	
  economic	
  policies	
  based	
  on	
  greed	
  and	
   corruption,	
  a	
  play	
  in	
  which	
  the	
  protagonist	
  herself	
  is	
  a	
  corporate	
  banker	
  who	
  is	
   ultimately	
  executed	
  for	
  an	
  unknown	
  crime	
  –	
  of	
  which	
  she	
  constantly	
  professes	
  her	
   innocence	
  –	
  makes	
  a	
  dramatic,	
  if	
  not	
  definite,	
  political	
  statement	
  in	
  itself.	
   	
   	
    The	
  author’s	
  choice	
  to	
  use	
  a	
  novel	
  commonly	
  associated	
  with	
  existential	
    philosophy	
  as	
  her	
  framework	
  begs	
  the	
  reader	
  to	
  interpret	
  her	
  work	
  through	
  that	
   particular	
  lens.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  play,	
  Judith	
  K.	
  has	
  been	
  charged	
  with	
  an	
  unspecified	
  crime	
   and	
  must	
  present	
  herself	
  to	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
  where	
  she	
  will	
  be	
  interrogated.	
  The	
   interrogation	
  is	
  an	
  investigation	
  into	
  her	
  character.	
  	
  The	
  process	
  of	
  her	
  trial	
  itself	
   and	
  her	
  behavior	
  during	
  that	
  trial	
  is	
  the	
  evidence	
  that	
  is	
  used	
  to	
  either	
  free	
  or	
   condemn	
  her.	
  But,	
  as	
  the	
  story	
  progresses,	
  we	
  learn	
  that	
  her	
  fate	
  is	
  inevitable	
   because	
  she	
  is	
  already	
  guilty	
  of	
  the	
  unknown	
  crime.	
  The	
  inquiry	
  ultimately	
  ends	
  in	
   her	
  execution,	
  but	
  the	
  exact	
  nature	
  of	
  the	
  charge	
  against	
  her	
  is	
  not	
  revealed.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    1	
    1.2	
    The	
  Design	
  Rationale	
    	
   Figure	
  1.1	
  	
  	
  The	
  Finished	
  Set	
    	
   	
   A	
  major	
  focus	
  in	
  my	
  study	
  of	
  scenic	
  design	
  is	
  how	
  to	
  interpret	
  elements	
  of	
   graphic	
  narrative	
  and	
  cartoon	
  animation	
  in	
  three-­‐dimensional	
  space	
  for	
  use	
  on	
  the	
   stage.	
  Three	
  of	
  the	
  concepts	
  I	
  explored	
  in	
  this	
  scenic	
  design	
  were	
  “page	
  turning,”	
  as	
   one	
  turns	
  the	
  pages	
  of	
  a	
  book,	
  “frames,”	
  the	
  pictorial	
  images	
  in	
  a	
  graphic	
  narrative,	
   and	
  “the	
  gutter,”	
  the	
  physical	
  and	
  psychological	
  space	
  between	
  frames	
  in	
  a	
  graphic	
   narrative.	
   	
   These	
  elements	
  are	
  represented	
  in	
  the	
  design	
  by	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  three	
  localized	
   units,	
  or	
  “frames,”	
  separated	
  by	
  gangways	
  or	
  “gutters”	
  which	
  the	
  audience	
  must	
   read	
  psychologically,	
  composing	
  the	
  complete	
  locale	
  within	
  their	
  own	
  minds.	
  The	
   physical	
  act	
  of	
  rotating	
  each	
  unit	
  represents	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  page	
  turning	
  and	
  adds	
  a	
   temporal	
  quality	
  to	
  the	
  scene	
  shifts	
  as	
  each	
  unit	
  is	
  rotated	
  only	
  clockwise.	
    	
    2	
    Figure	
  1.2	
  	
  	
  Costume	
  Contrast	
    	
   	
   The	
  paint	
  scheme	
  and	
  color	
  palette	
  were	
  chosen	
  to	
  give	
  focus	
  to	
  the	
  actors	
   (dressed	
  in	
  brightly	
  colored	
  costumes)	
  and	
  to	
  push	
  the	
  set	
  into	
  the	
  background.	
  I	
   designed	
  the	
  paint	
  scheme	
  to	
  border	
  between	
  realism	
  and	
  cartoon,	
  reflecting	
  the	
   color	
  and	
  style	
  of	
  images	
  found	
  in	
  graphic	
  narrative	
  and	
  cartoon	
  animation.	
   	
   Another	
  foundation	
  for	
  the	
  scenic	
  imagery	
  was	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  story	
  “the	
   Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door,”	
  found	
  within	
  the	
  play.	
  The	
  large	
  door	
  suspended	
  above	
  the	
  set	
   served	
  to	
  represent	
  that	
  concept	
  or	
  theme.	
  	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    3	
    Figure	
  1.3	
  	
  	
  Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door,	
  Door	
  Fly	
    	
   	
   My	
  design	
  was	
  also	
  influenced	
  by	
  Jean	
  Paul	
  Sartre’s	
  essay	
  “Being	
  and	
   Nothingness.”	
  The	
  basis	
  of	
  that	
  essay	
  is	
  that	
  being	
  and	
  nothingness	
  are	
  mutually	
   inclusive	
  and	
  dependent.	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  capture	
  the	
  sense	
  that	
  everything	
  in	
  existence	
   took	
  place	
  within	
  the	
  set	
  on	
  stage	
  and	
  that	
  the	
  existence	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  and	
  of	
  the	
  set	
   was	
  suspended	
  in	
  a	
  void	
  of	
  nonexistence.	
  The	
  entire	
  upstage	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  stage	
  was	
   masked	
  with	
  blackout	
  curtains	
  to	
  aid	
  in	
  this	
  effect.	
  Because	
  the	
  revolves	
  were	
   separated	
  by	
  voids,	
  this	
  presented	
  the	
  added	
  illusion	
  that	
  nonexistence	
  was	
   breaking	
  into	
  and	
  invading	
  the	
  space.	
   	
   Figure	
  1.4	
  	
  	
  Existence	
  and	
  Nonexistence	
    	
   	
    4	
    Figure	
  1.5	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
    	
   	
   I	
  worked	
  very	
  closely	
  with	
  Director	
  Tom	
  Scholte	
  through	
  every	
  step	
  of	
  the	
   design	
  process.	
  In	
  the	
  final	
  analyses,	
  we	
  hoped	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  type	
  of	
  puzzle	
  box	
  or	
   labyrinth	
  in	
  which	
  Judith	
  K.	
  was	
  trapped	
  and	
  from	
  which	
  she	
  ultimately	
  could	
  not	
   escape;	
  an	
  environment	
  that	
  was	
  manipulated	
  around	
  her	
  by	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  court,	
   but	
  which	
  ultimately	
  remained	
  the	
  same	
  location;	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry.	
   	
   The	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  set,	
  although	
  not	
  intentionally	
  designed	
  to	
  do	
  so,	
  also	
   served	
  as	
  a	
  “box	
  set”	
  typically	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  filming	
  of	
  television	
  sit-­‐coms.	
  This	
  was	
  an	
   added	
  dimension	
  to	
  the	
  scenery	
  that	
  was	
  not	
  purposefully	
  engineered,	
  but	
  was	
  a	
   result	
  of	
  the	
  design	
  choices	
  described	
  above.	
    	
    5	
    2	
  	
  	
  The	
  Design	
  Concept	
   2.1	
    Reading	
  and	
  Analyzing	
  the	
  Script	
    	
    	
   “The	
  Trial	
  of	
  Judith	
  K.”	
  was	
  chosen	
  as	
  my	
  thesis	
  project	
  by	
  UBC	
  theatre	
    faculty	
  in	
  the	
  spring	
  of	
  2011.	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  knowledge	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  prior	
  to	
  receiving	
  the	
   script.	
  Developing	
  an	
  effective	
  scenic	
  design	
  for	
  a	
  play	
  I	
  had	
  not	
  previously	
  read	
  or	
   seen	
  promised	
  to	
  present	
  considerable	
  challenges	
  and	
  I	
  set	
  forth	
  to	
  meet	
  those	
   challenges	
  as	
  best	
  I	
  could.	
   	
   	
    The	
  first	
  step	
  in	
  the	
  design	
  process	
  was	
  to	
  perform	
  a	
  close	
  reading	
  of	
  the	
    script.	
  I	
  read	
  the	
  script	
  three	
  times,	
  analyzing	
  specific	
  aspects	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  with	
  each	
   reading.	
  I	
  obtained	
  the	
  script	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  spring	
  term,	
  April	
  2011.	
   	
   On	
  the	
  first	
  reading	
  I	
  familiarized	
  myself	
  with	
  the	
  play,	
  its	
  characters,	
  the	
   major	
  themes,	
  the	
  structure	
  and	
  the	
  style	
  of	
  the	
  play.	
  I	
  knew	
  beforehand	
  that	
  the	
   play	
  was	
  based	
  on	
  Franz	
  Kafka’s	
  novel,	
  “The	
  Trial,”	
  so	
  I	
  paid	
  particular	
  attention	
  to	
   the	
  existential	
  and	
  philosophical	
  concepts	
  within	
  the	
  play.	
   	
   On	
  the	
  second	
  reading,	
  I	
  analyzed	
  the	
  play	
  for	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  scenes,	
  the	
   number	
  of	
  locales,	
  the	
  furniture	
  props,	
  and	
  the	
  basic	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  scene	
  changes.	
   I	
  determined	
  which	
  locales	
  played	
  in	
  multiple	
  scenes,	
  which	
  scenes	
  had	
  an	
  interior	
   change	
  in	
  locale	
  –	
  for	
  example	
  from	
  exterior	
  to	
  interior	
  or	
  from	
  living	
  room	
  to	
   bedroom	
  –	
  and	
  created	
  a	
  list	
  of	
  the	
  major	
  furniture	
  props	
  used	
  in	
  each	
  scene.	
  I	
   drafted	
  a	
  scene-­‐by-­‐scene	
  breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  major	
  locals	
  and	
  the	
  major	
  furniture	
   props.	
   	
   On	
  the	
  third	
  reading	
  I	
  analyzed	
  the	
  major	
  themes	
  and	
  concepts	
  explored	
  in	
   the	
  play.	
  I	
  determined	
  to	
  use	
  the	
  philosophies	
  of	
  Jean	
  Paul	
  Sartre	
  as	
  the	
  premise	
  for	
   my	
  design	
  rationale.	
  I	
  wanted	
  the	
  scenic	
  design	
  to	
  reflect	
  the	
  existential	
  theories	
    	
    6	
    that	
  were	
  being	
  explored	
  in	
  the	
  play	
  and	
  to	
  use	
  the	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  design	
  to	
  convey	
   the	
  play’s	
  philosophical	
  queries	
  to	
  the	
  audience.	
   	
   2.2	
    Structural	
  Analysis	
    	
   	
    The	
  most	
  important	
  aspect	
  of	
  developing	
  a	
  functional	
  scenic	
  design	
  is	
  the	
    structural	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  to	
  determine	
  the	
  scenic	
  locales,	
  scene	
  shift	
  pattern,	
   and	
  furniture	
  props	
  used.	
  The	
  set	
  must	
  effectively	
  accommodate	
  all	
  of	
  the	
  physical	
   elements	
  necessary	
  for	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  to	
  occur,	
  no	
  matter	
  what	
  the	
  design	
   rationale	
  may	
  be.	
  I	
  listed	
  the	
  primary	
  scenic	
  locales	
  in	
  the	
  play	
  with	
  the	
  primary	
   furniture	
  props	
  used	
  in	
  each	
  scene	
  and	
  I	
  outlined	
  a	
  general	
  scene	
  change	
  pattern,	
   noting	
  any	
  complicated	
  or	
  problematic	
  scene	
  changes	
  or	
  furniture	
  props.	
   	
   	
    The	
  play	
  has	
  twenty-­‐one	
  scenes	
  in	
  two	
  acts:	
  eleven	
  scenes	
  in	
  act	
  one	
  and	
  ten	
    scenes	
  in	
  act	
  two.	
  There	
  are	
  eight	
  primary	
  scenic	
  locales:	
  Judith	
  K.’s	
  bedroom	
  and	
   house,	
  the	
  Bank	
  Office,	
  the	
  Bank	
  Corridor	
  and	
  Closet,	
  outside	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry,	
   inside	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry,	
  the	
  Law	
  Offices	
  of	
  Theadora	
  Moxie,	
  Pollock’s	
  Studio,	
  and	
   the	
  Cathedral.	
  I	
  noted	
  some	
  challenging	
  transitions:	
  the	
  transformation	
  of	
  Judith’s	
   bedroom	
  into	
  her	
  house,	
  the	
  hallway	
  and	
  closet	
  needed	
  for	
  the	
  “flogger”	
  scene,	
  and	
   the	
  transition	
  from	
  Theodora	
  Moxie’s	
  house	
  into	
  her	
  bedroom.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    7	
    Table	
  2.1	
  	
  	
  Scenic	
  Locales	
   Act	
  1	
    Act	
  2	
    Scene	
  1:	
  Judith’s	
  Bedroom	
    Scene	
  1:	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
    Scene	
  2:	
  Bank	
  Office	
    Scene	
  2:	
  Outside	
  the	
  Court	
    Scene	
  3:	
  Judith’s	
  House	
    Scene	
  3:	
  Bank	
  Office	
    Scene	
  4:	
  Judith’s	
  House	
    Scene	
  4:	
  Pollock’s	
  Studio	
    Scene	
  5:	
  Outside	
  the	
  Court	
    Scene	
  5:	
  Outside	
  the	
  Court	
    Scene	
  6:	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
    Scene	
  6:	
  Bank	
  Office	
    Scene	
  7:	
  Bank	
  Corridor	
    Scene	
  7:	
  Theadora’s	
  House	
    Scene	
  8:	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
    Scene	
  8:	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
    Scene	
  9:	
  Bank	
  Office	
    Scene	
  9:	
  Judith’s	
  Small	
  Office	
    Scene	
  10:	
  Theadora	
  Moxie’s	
  Office	
    Scene	
  10:	
  Cathedral	
    Scene	
  11:	
  Outside	
  Theadora’s	
  Office	
   	
   Table	
  2.2	
  	
  	
  Primary	
  Furniture	
  Props	
  by	
  Locale	
   Judith’s	
  Bedroom/House	
    Bank	
  Office	
    1.) Judith’s	
  Bed	
    1.) Judith’s	
  Office	
  Desk	
  with	
  drawer	
    2.) Nightstand	
    2.) Judith’s	
  Office	
  Chair	
    3.) Breakfast	
  Table	
    3.) Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  Desk	
    4.) Inspector’s	
  Chair	
    4.) Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  Chair	
    5.) Couch	
    5.) Cabinet/Table	
    Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
    	
    Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
    1.) Theadora’s	
  Bed	
    1.) Courtroom	
  Chairs	
    2.) Nightstand	
    2.) Judge’s	
  Podium	
    3.) 1	
  Chair	
    3.) Witness	
  Stand	
    4.) Table	
    4.) Signs	
    Pollock’s	
  Studio	
    Cathedral	
    1.) Pollock’s	
  Bed	
    1.) Dais/Altar	
    2.) 3	
  red	
  paintings	
    2.) Podium	
    	
   	
    8	
    2.3	
   	
    Initial	
  Design	
  Concept	
   My	
  primary	
  design	
  challenge	
  was	
  to	
  accommodate	
  twenty-­‐one	
  scenes	
    without	
  stopping	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  with	
  obtrusive	
  scene	
  changes.	
  To	
  address	
   this	
  concern,	
  I	
  developed	
  a	
  scenic	
  concept	
  that	
  utilized	
  three,	
  two-­‐sided	
  revolves	
   placed	
  across	
  the	
  stage.	
  The	
  two-­‐sided	
  revolves	
  would	
  allow	
  for	
  scene	
  changes	
  on	
   the	
  upstage	
  side	
  of	
  the	
  units	
  while	
  the	
  actors	
  performed	
  on	
  the	
  downstage	
  side	
  of	
   the	
  units,	
  with	
  virtually	
  no	
  stop	
  in	
  action.	
  	
   	
   One	
  aspect	
  in	
  my	
  study	
  of	
  scenic	
  design	
  is	
  how	
  to	
  interpret	
  structural	
  and	
   thematic	
  concepts	
  from	
  graphic	
  narrative	
  and	
  cartoon	
  animation	
  into	
  three-­‐ dimensional	
  space	
  for	
  use	
  on	
  the	
  stage.	
  In	
  this	
  design,	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
   concept	
  of	
  “the	
  gutter,”	
  found	
  in	
  graphic	
  narratives,	
  and	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  “layers”	
  in	
  cell	
   animation	
  typical	
  of	
  1970’s	
  and	
  1980’s	
  television	
  cartoons.	
  	
   	
   To	
  incorporate	
  the	
  concepts	
  of	
  “the	
  gutter”	
  and	
  “cartoon	
  cell	
  animation”	
  into	
   the	
  design,	
  I	
  designed	
  the	
  upper	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  walls	
  as	
  rear-­‐projection	
  screens	
  and	
   added	
  four	
  smaller	
  screens;	
  two	
  placed	
  at	
  either	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  stage	
  and	
  two	
  placed	
   between	
  the	
  revolves.	
  Each	
  unit	
  and	
  each	
  screen	
  would	
  represent	
  a	
  layer	
  of	
  cell	
   animation	
  and	
  the	
  gaps	
  or	
  spaces	
  between	
  each	
  unit	
  and	
  each	
  screen	
  would	
   represent	
  the	
  gutters.	
  Video	
  projections	
  would	
  display	
  images	
  indicative	
  of	
  setting	
   and	
  mood.	
  Rather	
  than	
  trying	
  to	
  create	
  eight	
  specific	
  locals	
  through	
  hard	
  scenery,	
   projections	
  would	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  differentiate	
  each	
  locale.	
  I	
  also	
  lowered	
  the	
  orchestra	
   pit	
  to	
  add	
  an	
  additional	
  locale,	
  to	
  add	
  another	
  layer,	
  and	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  feeling	
  of	
   intimacy	
  with	
  the	
  audience.	
   	
   This	
  initial	
  design	
  concept	
  had	
  not	
  yet	
  been	
  approved	
  by	
  the	
  director	
  or	
  by	
   my	
  thesis	
  advisor.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  face	
  the	
  possibility	
  that	
  projections	
  would	
  be	
  cut	
  from	
  the	
   show	
  and	
  that	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  to	
  find	
  ways	
  to	
  incorporate	
  concepts	
  of	
  graphic	
   narrative	
  and	
  cartoon	
  animation	
  into	
  the	
  design	
  of	
  the	
  hard	
  scenery	
  itself.	
   	
    	
    	
    9	
    	
    I	
  first	
  sketched	
  gesture	
  drawings	
  or	
  thumbnail	
  sketches	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  design	
    concept.	
   	
   Figure	
  2.1	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  Sketch	
  1	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  2.2	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  Sketch	
  2	
    	
    	
    10	
    I	
  created	
  a	
  crude	
  3D	
  Model	
  in	
  Vectorworks	
  to	
  explore	
  this	
  design	
  concept,	
  its	
   ability	
  to	
  accommodate	
  each	
  of	
  the	
  eight	
  primary	
  scenic	
  locales,	
  and	
  the	
  spacing	
   required	
  to	
  accommodate	
  the	
  four	
  projection	
  screens	
  and	
  the	
  projectors.	
   	
   Figure	
  2.3	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  3D	
  Model	
    	
   	
   I	
  drafted	
  a	
  rough	
  stage	
  plot	
  of	
  the	
  eight	
  locales,	
  placing	
  the	
  different	
  locales	
   on	
  specific	
  units.	
  I	
  placed	
  Judith	
  K.’s	
  bedroom	
  and	
  house,	
  the	
  bank	
  office,	
  the	
  court	
  of	
   inquiry,	
  and	
  Theadora	
  Moxie’s	
  bedroom	
  upstage	
  center.	
  I	
  placed	
  Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  desk	
   stage	
  right	
  and	
  Pollock’s	
  studio	
  stage	
  left.	
  I	
  placed	
  the	
  psychopath	
  scenes	
  in	
  the	
   orchestra	
  pit.	
  The	
  cathedral	
  scene	
  would	
  utilize	
  the	
  entire	
  stage.	
   	
   I	
  sketched	
  geometric	
  shapes	
  of	
  various	
  sizes	
  to	
  determine	
  the	
  size,	
  shape,	
  and	
   relative	
  position	
  of	
  the	
  three	
  revolves.	
  I	
  experimented	
  with	
  square,	
  rectangular	
   triangular,	
  and	
  diamond	
  shapes.	
  I	
  determined	
  that	
  a	
  hexagonal	
  shape	
  maximized	
  the	
   playable	
  space	
  on	
  each	
  revolve	
  while	
  maintaining	
  clear	
  passageways	
  between	
  the	
   revolves.	
  	
    	
    11	
    Figure	
  2.4	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Locale	
  Placement	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  2.5	
  	
  	
  Platform	
  Shapes	
  and	
  Sizes	
    	
   	
   	
    	
    12	
    I	
  moved	
  the	
  entire	
  set	
  downstage	
  to	
  clear	
  sight	
  lines	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  possible	
  and	
   to	
  place	
  a	
  projector	
  upstage	
  of	
  the	
  set.	
  I	
  adjusted	
  the	
  relative	
  position	
  of	
  each	
   revolve	
  in	
  relation	
  to	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  the	
  proscenium	
  arch	
  and	
  I	
  adjusted	
  the	
  angles	
   of	
  the	
  walls	
  to	
  maintain	
  clear	
  sightlines.	
  I	
  made	
  the	
  upstage	
  center	
  revolve	
  12’x16’	
   and	
  the	
  stage	
  right	
  and	
  stage	
  left	
  revolves	
  8’x8’	
  at	
  their	
  outside	
  dimensions	
  to	
   provide	
  enough	
  room	
  on	
  each	
  revolve	
  for	
  furniture	
  and	
  for	
  actor	
  blocking.	
  	
   	
   Figure	
  2.6	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Position	
  of	
  the	
  Set	
    	
   	
   2.4	
    Initial	
  Design	
  Revision	
   	
   When	
  experimenting	
  with	
  the	
  3D	
  model	
  in	
  Vectorworks,	
  I	
  found	
  that	
  I	
  could	
    not	
  effectively	
  accommodate	
  four	
  screens	
  and	
  three	
  revolves	
  within	
  the	
  36’	
  wide	
   proscenium	
  arch	
  of	
  the	
  Frederic	
  Wood	
  theatre	
  and	
  maintain	
  clear	
  sightlines	
  without	
   compromising	
  the	
  size	
  and	
  shape	
  of	
  the	
  revolves.	
  I	
  struck	
  the	
  four	
  screens	
  and	
   determined	
  to	
  discuss	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  projections	
  with	
  the	
  Director.	
    	
    13	
    Figure	
  2.7	
  	
  	
  Initial	
  Concept	
  Without	
  Screens	
    	
   	
   I	
  considered	
  two	
  other	
  design	
  options:	
  1.	
  A	
  two-­‐story,	
  three-­‐sided	
  unit	
  set	
   that	
  would	
  operate	
  mechanically.	
  	
  This	
  design	
  concept	
  was	
  not	
  seriously	
  considered	
   due	
  to	
  its	
  size	
  and	
  complexity	
  and	
  the	
  probability	
  that	
  it	
  would	
  not	
  fit	
  within	
  the	
   expected	
  budget.	
  2.	
  A	
  series	
  of	
  trucks	
  and	
  furniture	
  props	
  with	
  little	
  or	
  no	
  hard	
   scenery.	
  This	
  design	
  concept	
  was	
  seen	
  as	
  too	
  simple	
  for	
  a	
  main	
  stage	
  production.	
   	
   2.5	
    First	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director:	
  Pitching	
  the	
  Design	
    	
   I	
  met	
  with	
  the	
  Director,	
  Tom	
  Scholte,	
  to	
  pitch	
  the	
  three-­‐revolve	
  concept.	
  The	
   two-­‐story,	
  three-­‐sided	
  revolve	
  concept	
  was	
  dismissed	
  due	
  to	
  its	
  scale	
  and	
   complexity.	
  The	
  truck	
  and	
  furniture	
  prop	
  concept	
  was	
  dismissed	
  due	
  to	
  its	
   ineffectiveness	
  in	
  accommodating	
  the	
  Director’s	
  staging.	
  Projections	
  were	
  cut	
  from	
   the	
  three-­‐revolve	
  concept	
  by	
  the	
  Director	
  and	
  by	
  my	
  thesis	
  advisor,	
  Robert	
   Gardiner.	
  The	
  Director	
  and	
  I	
  continued	
  to	
  discuss	
  using	
  and	
  developing	
  the	
  three-­‐ revolve	
  concept	
  without	
  projections.	
   	
   	
    14	
    Figure	
  2.8	
  	
  	
  Page	
  Turning	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  2.9	
  	
  	
  Frames	
  &	
  Gutters	
    	
   	
    15	
    Figure	
  2.10	
  	
  	
  Page	
  Turning,	
  Frames,	
  and	
  Gutters	
    	
   	
   2.6	
    The	
  Director’s	
  Concept	
  &	
  the	
  Primary	
  Scenic	
  Metaphor	
    	
   The	
  Director’s	
  concept	
  coalesced	
  around	
  “The	
  Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door,”	
  which	
   takes	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  final	
  scene	
  of	
  the	
  play.	
  The	
  protagonist’s	
  inability	
  to	
  access	
  this	
   door	
  was	
  his	
  prominent	
  theme.	
  The	
  Director	
  concluded	
  that	
  he	
  wanted	
  the	
  set	
  to	
   represent	
  a	
  “maze”	
  or	
  “labyrinth”	
  which	
  Judith	
  K.	
  could	
  not	
  escape	
  from,	
  that	
  was	
   being	
  manipulated	
  around	
  her	
  by	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  court,	
  but	
  which	
  ultimately	
   remained	
  the	
  same	
  place,	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry.	
   	
   I	
  was	
  intrigued	
  by	
  the	
  idea	
  of	
  a	
  Chinese	
  puzzle	
  box	
  fused	
  with	
  existential	
   theory.	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  use	
  this	
  concept	
  as	
  my	
  primary	
  scenic	
  metaphor.	
  This	
  concept	
   later	
  coalesced	
  into	
  what	
  I	
  call,	
  “The	
  Existential	
  Cube,”	
  or	
  six	
  elements	
  of	
  our	
  self-­‐ identity	
  that	
  we	
  use	
  to	
  define	
  our	
  reality.	
  The	
  question	
  I	
  explored	
  throughout	
  the	
   design	
  process	
  was,	
  “If	
  one	
  of	
  these	
  six	
  elements,	
  primarily	
  that	
  of	
  faith,	
  were	
   removed	
  from	
  our	
  consciousness	
  and	
  our	
  being,	
  would	
  we	
  exist	
  at	
  all?” 	
    16	
    3	
  	
  	
  The	
  Design	
  Process:	
  Part	
  1	
   3.1	
    Developing	
  and	
  Revising	
  the	
  Design	
    	
   	
    I	
  met	
  with	
  the	
  Director	
  four	
  times	
  over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  six	
  weeks	
  to	
  develop	
    and	
  revise	
  the	
  design	
  before	
  the	
  school	
  closed	
  for	
  the	
  summer.	
  In	
  that	
  time,	
  we	
   concretized	
  all	
  of	
  the	
  major	
  scenic	
  elements.	
  When	
  the	
  school	
  reopened	
  in	
  the	
  fall,	
   the	
  Director	
  and	
  I	
  continued	
  to	
  make	
  minor	
  revisions	
  to	
  the	
  design	
  as	
  ideas	
  and	
   developments	
  arose	
  through	
  the	
  rehearsal	
  process.	
   	
   	
    The	
  design	
  process	
  I	
  employed	
  used	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  thumbnail	
  sketches,	
  painter’s	
    elevations,	
  physical	
  models,	
  3D	
  CAD	
  models,	
  and	
  CAD	
  technical	
  drawings.	
  Most	
  of	
   the	
  work	
  for	
  this	
  design	
  was	
  performed	
  using	
  3D	
  models	
  in	
  Vectorworks.	
   	
   The	
  goal	
  of	
  the	
  design	
  process	
  was	
  to	
  take	
  the	
  initial	
  design	
  concept	
  and	
   develop	
  it	
  to	
  meet	
  the	
  directing	
  concept	
  and	
  staging	
  requirements	
  of	
  the	
  Director	
   and	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  design	
  rationale	
  and	
  scenic	
  metaphor	
  of	
  the	
  scenic	
  designer.	
  I	
  feel	
   that	
  we	
  succeeded	
  in	
  meeting	
  that	
  goal.	
   	
   3.2	
    Second	
  Meeting	
  Preparation	
    	
   I	
  redesigned	
  the	
  set	
  adding	
  enclosures	
  to	
  the	
  stage	
  right	
  and	
  stage	
  left	
   revolves,	
  for	
  symmetry	
  and	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  way	
  to	
  either	
  open	
  up	
  or	
  confine	
  the	
  space.	
   I	
  felt	
  that	
  an	
  element	
  of	
  symmetry	
  was	
  necessary	
  to	
  balance	
  the	
  absurd	
  and	
  chaotic	
   actions	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  and	
  certain	
  scenes,	
  such	
  as	
  Pollock’s	
  studio	
  and	
  Judith	
  K.’s	
  new	
   office,	
  called	
  for	
  a	
  small,	
  confined	
  locale.	
    	
    17	
    I	
  hinged	
  two	
  of	
  the	
  outside	
  walls	
  in	
  the	
  stage	
  left	
  enclosure	
  so	
  that	
  it	
  could	
   open	
  up	
  for	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  7,	
  providing	
  greater	
  actor	
  visibility,	
  and	
  added	
  two	
  flown	
   door	
  flies	
  to	
  create	
  the	
  “corridor”	
  in	
  that	
  scene.	
  	
   	
   Figure	
  3.1	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  7,	
  Plan	
  View	
  –	
  Enclosure	
  and	
  Door	
  Flies	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  3.2	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  7,	
  Perspective	
  View	
  –	
  Enclosure	
  and	
  Door	
  Flies	
    	
    	
    18	
    I	
  then	
  storyboarded	
  the	
  entire	
  show	
  in	
  thumbnail	
  sketches	
  and	
  in	
   Vectorworks	
  to	
  determine	
  how	
  the	
  three	
  revolves	
  and	
  the	
  orchestra	
  pit	
  could	
   accommodate	
  all	
  twenty-­‐one	
  scenes	
  in	
  the	
  play.	
   	
   Figure	
  3.3	
  	
  	
  Thumbnail	
  Storyboard	
    	
   	
    	
    	
    19	
    Figure	
  3.4	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  1,	
  Plan	
  View	
  –	
  3D	
  Storyboard	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  3.5	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  1,	
  Perspective	
  View	
  –	
  3D	
  Storyboard	
    	
   	
   I	
  experimented	
  with	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  flown	
  roof	
  treatments	
  to	
  add	
  character	
  and	
   definition	
  to	
  each	
  locale.	
  These	
  ideas	
  were	
  discarded	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  limited	
  number	
  of	
   line	
  sets	
  that	
  would	
  be	
  available	
  for	
  flies.	
    	
    	
    20	
    I	
  considered	
  designing	
  an	
  elaborate	
  wood	
  frame	
  structure	
  for	
  the	
  roof	
   treatment,	
  but	
  I	
  could	
  not	
  rationalize	
  how	
  it	
  would	
  add	
  to	
  the	
  design	
  concept	
  or	
   scenic	
  metaphor,	
  nor	
  could	
  I	
  justify	
  the	
  added	
  cost	
  and	
  labor	
  for	
  something	
  that	
  was	
   stylized	
  and	
  decorative.	
  Lastly,	
  I	
  felt	
  that	
  the	
  added	
  weight	
  of	
  the	
  roof	
  structure	
   would	
  detract	
  from	
  the	
  stability	
  of	
  the	
  set.	
  	
   	
   I	
  decided	
  on	
  a	
  geometric	
  “scalloped”	
  roof	
  treatment	
  that	
  would	
  add	
  stability	
   to	
  the	
  walls	
  and	
  provide	
  an	
  added	
  labyrinthine	
  quality	
  to	
  the	
  set.	
   	
   I	
  built	
  a	
  ¼”	
  scale	
  white	
  model	
  of	
  the	
  revised	
  set	
  and	
  took	
  the	
  stage	
  plot	
   outline,	
  the	
  scene	
  change	
  outline,	
  and	
  furniture	
  props	
  list	
  to	
  my	
  next	
  meeting	
  with	
   the	
  Director.	
  	
   	
   Figure	
  3.6	
  	
  	
  Wood	
  Frame	
  Roof	
  Treatment	
  Sketch	
    	
   	
    	
    	
    21	
    Figure	
  3.7	
  	
  	
  ¼”	
  Scale	
  White	
  Model	
    	
   	
   I	
  also	
  created	
  a	
  scene	
  change	
  outline	
  with	
  all	
  furniture	
  props,	
  noting	
  which	
   props	
  could	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  multiple	
  scenes.	
  I	
  streamlined	
  the	
  scene	
  changes	
  to	
  make	
   them	
  as	
  quick	
  as	
  possible.	
   	
   Figure	
  3.8	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
  Outline	
    	
   	
    	
    	
    22	
    3.3	
    Second	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director	
   	
   The	
  Director	
  removed	
  the	
  stage	
  right	
  enclosure,	
  leaving	
  the	
  center	
  wall	
  in	
    place.	
  The	
  storyboard	
  and	
  scene	
  change	
  outline	
  worked	
  for	
  the	
  entire	
  show	
  with	
  a	
   few	
  minor	
  revisions.	
  The	
  scene	
  change	
  from	
  Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  7	
  to	
  Scene	
  8	
  proved	
   problematic.	
   	
   The	
  Director	
  did	
  not	
  like	
  the	
  roof	
  treatment	
  I	
  developed,	
  but	
  he	
  did	
  feel	
  that	
   there	
  was	
  a	
  large	
  void	
  above	
  the	
  set	
  and	
  asked	
  me	
  to	
  find	
  ways	
  to	
  fill	
  that	
  space.	
  He	
   suggested	
  adding	
  more	
  doors.	
  	
   	
   Robert	
  Gardiner	
  attended	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  meeting	
  and	
  felt	
  that	
  the	
  Director	
  and	
  I	
   had	
  a	
  functional	
  scenic	
  design.	
  He	
  recommended	
  making	
  the	
  stage	
  right	
  revolve	
   larger.	
  The	
  Director	
  asked	
  me	
  to	
  build	
  a	
  ½”	
  scale	
  whiteboard	
  model	
  for	
  our	
  next	
   meeting.	
   	
   	
   3.4	
    Third	
  Meeting	
  Preparation	
    	
   I	
  continued	
  to	
  experiment	
  with	
  adding	
  a	
  more	
  labyrinthine	
  and	
  maze-­‐like	
   quality	
  to	
  the	
  set.	
  I	
  experimented	
  with	
  adding	
  hinged	
  walls,	
  placing	
  the	
  walls	
  at	
   various	
  angles,	
  and	
  with	
  moving	
  the	
  revolves	
  along	
  an	
  ‘S’	
  curved	
  track.	
  All	
  of	
  these	
   ideas	
  made	
  the	
  set	
  cumbersome	
  and	
  I	
  feared	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  unmanageable	
  for	
  the	
   crew.	
  Furthermore,	
  I	
  did	
  not	
  feel	
  that	
  these	
  changes	
  added	
  significantly	
  to	
  the	
  set,	
   nor	
  did	
  I	
  feel	
  that	
  they	
  were	
  worth	
  the	
  added	
  time	
  and	
  expense.	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    23	
    Figure	
  3.9	
  	
  	
  Hinged	
  Walls	
  and	
  ‘S’	
  Curved	
  Tracks	
    	
   	
   Inspired	
  by	
  the	
  works	
  of	
  Samuel	
  Becket,	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  follow	
  a	
  minimalist	
   approach	
  and	
  stripped	
  the	
  set	
  of	
  everything	
  extraneous.	
  I	
  concluded	
  that	
  placing	
  the	
   revolves	
  at	
  different	
  angles,	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  scene,	
  would	
  add	
  enough	
  dimension	
   and	
  variation	
  to	
  the	
  set	
  without	
  increasing	
  the	
  cost	
  or	
  overcomplicating	
  the	
  scene	
   changes.	
  	
   	
   I	
  determined	
  the	
  final	
  angle	
  and	
  position	
  of	
  all	
  walls	
  and	
  the	
  shape	
  of	
  the	
   enclosure	
  to	
  maintain	
  clear	
  sightlines.	
  I	
  built	
  a	
  3D	
  model	
  of	
  the	
  set	
  in	
  Vectorworks	
   and	
  started	
  building	
  a	
  ½”	
  scale	
  whiteboard	
  model.	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    24	
    Figure	
  3.10	
  	
  	
  3D	
  Model	
    	
   	
   The	
  placement	
  of	
  each	
  locale	
  on	
  a	
  specific	
  side	
  of	
  a	
  revolve	
  became	
  crucial.	
   The	
  door	
  positions	
  on	
  the	
  downstage	
  side	
  of	
  the	
  revolves	
  had	
  to	
  remain	
  consistent	
   from	
  scene	
  to	
  scene,	
  requiring	
  that	
  each	
  revolve	
  turn	
  in	
  a	
  specific	
  sequence	
   throughout	
  the	
  play	
  to	
  allow	
  for	
  the	
  proper	
  scene	
  change	
  to	
  occur	
  on	
  the	
  upstage	
   side	
  while	
  maintaining	
  the	
  consistency	
  of	
  the	
  door	
  positions.	
   	
   I	
  created	
  a	
  final	
  stage	
  plot	
  outline,	
  scene	
  change	
  outline,	
  and	
  furniture	
  props	
   list.	
  I	
  minimized	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  revolve	
  turns	
  required	
  to	
  effectively	
  accommodate	
   all	
  of	
  the	
  scenic	
  locales	
  and	
  scene	
  changes.	
  I	
  struck	
  any	
  furniture	
  props	
  that	
  were	
   not	
  essential	
  and	
  determined	
  which	
  furniture	
  props	
  would	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  multiple	
   scenes.	
  I	
  placed	
  the	
  revolves	
  at	
  different	
  angles	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  scene.	
   	
    	
    	
    25	
    Table	
  3.1	
  	
  	
  Locale	
  Positions	
  per	
  Revolve	
   USC	
  Revolve	
  Side	
  A:	
   1.) Judith’s	
  Bedroom	
   2.) Judith’s	
  House	
   3.) The	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
   4.) Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   5.) Pollock’s	
  Studio	
   6.) The	
  Cathedral	
   	
   USC	
  Revolve	
  Side	
  B:	
   1.) The	
  Bank	
  Office	
   2.) The	
  Bank	
  Corridor	
  	
   DSL	
  Revolve	
  Side	
  A:	
   1.) Judith’s	
  Bedroom	
   2.) Judith’s	
  House	
   3.) The	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
   4.) Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   5.) The	
  Cathedral	
   Orchestra	
  Pit	
   1.) Judith	
  K.	
  &	
  Psychopath	
   	
    DSR	
  Revolve	
  Side	
  A:	
   1.) Judith’s	
  Bedroom	
   2.) Judith’s	
  House	
   3.) The	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
   4.) Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   5.) The	
  Cathedral	
  	
   DSR	
  Revolve	
  Side	
  B:	
   1.) Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  Desk	
   2.) Pollock’s	
  Studio	
   DSL	
  Revolve	
  Side	
  B:	
   1.) The	
  Bank	
  Corridor	
   2.) Pollock’s	
  studio	
   3.) Judith’s	
  small	
  office	
   	
   	
    Figure	
  3.11	
  	
  	
  Stage	
  Plot	
  Outline  	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    26	
    Table	
  3.2	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
  Breakdown	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  1	
  	
  	
  Judith’s	
  House	
   Preshow	
  Presets	
   1.) Set	
  to	
  Judith	
  K	
  House	
  Int.	
   • USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Bedroom:	
  Bed,	
  small	
   table	
   • DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Biff	
  &	
  Clem:	
  Table	
  &	
   chair	
   • DSR:	
  A	
  –	
  Inspector:	
  Chair	
   2.) Upstage	
  Set	
  to	
  Office	
   • USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Judith:	
  Desk	
  and	
   Chair,	
  Lamp,	
  Wastebasket	
   • DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang:	
  Desk	
  &	
   Chair	
   • DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  2	
  	
  	
  Bank	
  Office	
   1.) Spin	
  to	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang.	
  	
   2.) Spin	
  to	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure.	
   • Strike	
  DSL	
  Table	
  and	
  Chair	
   • Strike	
  DSR	
  Chair.	
   3.) Spin	
  to	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office.	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  3	
  	
  	
  Judith’s	
  House	
   1.) Spin	
  to	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Empty.	
   2.) Spin	
  to	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Bedroom.	
   3.) Spin	
  to	
  DSR	
  A	
  -­‐	
  Empty	
   • Strike	
  Office	
   • Strike	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  4	
  	
  	
  Apron	
  Special	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Empty	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Empty	
   3.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  B.	
  –	
  Empty	
   • Set	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Judge’s	
  Podium	
   • Set	
  DSR:	
  A	
  –	
  Witness	
  stand	
   • Set	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Psychopath	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  5	
  	
  	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   1.) No	
  Change:	
  Orch	
  Pit	
  	
   • Upstage	
  side	
  of	
  all	
  units	
  set	
  to	
  	
   Court	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  6	
  	
  	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Judge’s	
  Podium	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  A	
  –	
  Witness	
  Stand	
   3.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Psychopath	
   	
    Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  1	
  	
  	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   • USC:	
  A,	
  Preset	
  –	
  Bed,	
  Chair,	
   Night	
  Stand	
   • DSR:	
  A,	
  	
  Preset	
  –	
  Table	
   • DSL:	
  A,	
  Preset	
  –	
  Door	
   • USC:	
  B,	
  Preset	
  –	
  Office	
   • DSR	
  B,	
  Preset	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   • DSL	
  B,	
  Preset	
  –	
  Empty	
   	
    Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  2	
  	
  	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   1.) No	
  Change:	
  Orch	
  Pit	
   	
    Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  3	
  	
  	
  Bank	
  Office	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   3.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   • Strike	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Bedroom	
   • Set	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Pollock’s	
   • Set	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Voight	
   	
   Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  4	
  	
  	
  Pollock’s	
  Studio	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Pollock’s	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR	
  A	
  –	
  Empty	
   	
    Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  5	
  	
  	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   1.) No	
  Change:	
  Orch	
  Pit	
  	
   	
   	
   Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  6	
  	
  	
  Bank	
  Office	
   1.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   2.) Spin	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office	
   3.) Spin	
  DSL	
  A	
  –	
  Empty	
   27	
    Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  6	
  	
  	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
  (cont.)	
   • Set	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office	
   • Set	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  7	
  	
  	
  Office	
  Corridor	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   3.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   4.) Open	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   5.) Close	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   • Strike	
  USC:	
  A	
   • Strike	
  DSR:	
  A	
   • Strike	
  DSL:	
  A	
   • Set	
  DSR:	
  A–	
  Sign	
  A	
   • Set	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Sign	
  B	
   	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  8	
  	
  	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Empty	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  A	
  –	
  Sign	
   3.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Sign	
   • Set	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office	
   • Set	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   • Set	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  9	
  	
  	
  Bank	
  Office	
   1.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   • Strike	
  Sign	
   2.) Spin	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office	
   • Set	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
   Bedroom	
   3.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   • Set	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Sign	
  C	
    Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  10	
  	
  	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   1.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Sign	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  A	
  –	
  Table	
   3.) Spin	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
   Bedroom	
   Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  11	
  	
  	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   1.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Door	
   	
    	
    Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  6	
  	
  	
  Bank	
  Office	
  (cont.)	
   • Strike	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Pollock’s	
   • Set	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
   Bedroom	
   Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  7	
  	
  	
  Theadora’s	
  House	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
   Bedroom	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR	
  A	
  -­‐	
  Empty	
   	
    Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  8	
  	
  	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   1.) Spin	
  DSL	
  B	
  –	
  Enclosure	
   	
    Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  9	
  	
  	
  Bank	
  Office	
   1.) Spin	
  USC:	
  B	
  –	
  Office	
   2.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  B	
  –	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
   3.) Open	
  DSL:	
  B	
  –	
  Judith’s	
  New	
  Office	
   • Strike	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
   Bedroom	
   • Set	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Cathedral	
   Dais/Crucifix	
   • Set	
  DSR:	
  A	
  –	
  Cathedral	
   Window	
   • Set	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Cathedral	
   Window	
   	
   Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  10	
  	
  	
  Cathedral	
   4.) Spin	
  USC:	
  A	
  –	
  Cathedral	
  Dais	
   5.) Spin	
  DSR:	
  A	
  –	
  Cathedral	
  Window	
   6.) Spin	
  DSL:	
  A	
  –	
  Cathedral	
  Window	
   	
   	
   	
    28	
    Table	
  3.3	
  	
  	
  Furniture	
  Props	
  List	
   A1:S1	
  –	
  Judith’s	
  Bedroom	
   USC	
  Unit	
   6.) Judith’s	
  Bed	
   7.) Judith’s	
  Headboard	
   8.) Nightstand	
   9.) Blanket	
  and	
  Pillow	
   10.) Purse	
   DSL	
  Unit	
   1.) Breakfast	
  Table	
   2.) Chair	
   3.) Breakfast	
  Plate	
   4.) Coffee	
  Cup	
   5.) Newspaper	
   DSR	
  Unit	
   1.) Chair	
   2.) Clipboard	
  or	
  Briefcase	
   	
   A1:S2	
  –	
  Bank	
  Office	
   USC	
  Unit	
   6.) Judith’s	
  Office	
  Desk	
  with	
  drawer	
   7.) Judith’s	
  Office	
  Chair	
   8.) Waste	
  Basket	
   9.) Phone	
   10.) Cigarettes	
  and	
  Lighter	
   11.) Desk	
  Supplies	
   DSR-­‐B	
   1.) Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  Desk	
   2.) Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  Chair	
   DSR-­‐A	
   1.) Table/Cabinet	
   DSL	
   1.) Enclosure	
   	
   A1:S3	
  –	
  Judith’s	
  House	
   USC	
   1.) Bed	
   2.) Headboard	
   3.) Nightstand	
   4.) Blanket	
  and	
  Pillow	
   DSR	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  1.)	
  Table/Cabinet	
  	
   DSL	
   1.) Empty	
   	
   	
    A2:S1	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   USC	
   5.) Bed	
   6.) Headboard	
   7.) Nightstand	
   DSR	
   1.) Table/Cabinet	
   2.) Chair	
   DSL	
   1.) Table/Cabinet	
   	
    A2:S2	
  –	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   	
    A2:S3	
  –	
  Bank	
  Office	
   USC	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   3.) Waste	
  Basket	
   DSR	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   DSL	
   1.) Enclosure	
   	
   29	
    A1:S4	
  –	
  Apron	
  Special	
   	
   	
    A1:S5	
  –	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   1.) Mop	
  &	
  Bucket	
   A1:S6	
  –	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
   USC	
   1.) Judge’s	
  Podium	
   2.) Judge’s	
  Chair	
   DSR	
   1.) Witness	
  Stand	
   DSL	
   1.) Empty	
   	
   A1:S7	
  –	
  Office	
  Corridor	
   USC	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   3.) Wastebasket	
   DSR	
   1.) Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  Desk	
   2.) Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  Chair	
   DSL	
   1.) Enclosure	
   A1:S8	
  –	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
   	
   Empty	
   A1:S9	
  –	
  Bank	
  Office	
   USC	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   3.) Waste	
  Basket	
   DSR	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   DSL	
  –	
  Enclosure	
    	
    A2:S4	
  –	
  Pollock’s	
  Studio	
   USC	
   1.) Pollock’s	
  Bed	
  (same)	
   DSR	
   1.) Table/Cabinet	
   DSL	
   1.) Enclosure	
   	
   	
   1.) 	
   A2:S5	
  –	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   	
   A2:S6	
  –	
  Bank	
  Office	
   USC	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   3.) Waste	
  Basket	
   DSR	
   Table/Cabinet/Chair	
   A2:S7	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
  House	
   DSL	
   1.) Table/Cabinet/Chair	
   	
   USC	
   1.) Bed	
   2.) Headboard	
   DSR	
   1.) Table/Cabinet/Chair	
   DSL	
   1.) Table/Cabinet/Chair	
   A2:S8	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   	
   Same	
   	
   A2:S9	
  –	
  Bank	
  Office	
   USC	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   3.) Wastebasket	
   DSR	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   	
    30	
    A1:S9	
  –	
  Bank	
  Office	
  (cont.)	
   	
    A1:S10	
  –	
  Theadora’s	
  Bedroom	
   USC	
   1.) Theadora’s	
  Bed	
  (same)	
   2.) Theodora’s	
  Headboard	
   3.) Nightstand	
   DSR	
   1.) Table/Cabinet/Chair	
   DSL	
   1.) Sign	
   	
   A1:S11	
  –	
  Orchestra	
  Pit	
   Empty	
   	
   3.5	
    A2:S9	
  –	
  Bank	
  Office	
  (cont.)	
   DSL	
   1.) Enclosure	
  Open	
   1.) Desk	
   2.) Chair	
   	
   A2:S10	
  –	
  Cathedral	
   USC	
   3.) Dais	
   4.) Altar	
   	
   DSR	
   1.) Window	
   2.) Candelabra	
   DSL	
   1.) Window	
   Candelabra	
   	
   	
    Third	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director	
    	
   Figure	
  3.12	
  	
  	
  Revised	
  3D	
  Model,	
  Plan	
  View	
    	
   	
   	
    	
   31	
    Figure	
  3.13	
  	
  	
  Revised	
  3D	
  Model,	
  Perspective	
  View	
    	
   	
   I	
  presented	
  the	
  Vectorworks	
  model	
  for	
  our	
  discussion.	
  The	
  Director	
  came	
  to	
   the	
  meeting	
  with	
  many	
  new	
  ideas	
  and	
  minor	
  changes	
  to	
  his	
  staging.	
  He	
  added	
   additional	
  revolve	
  turns	
  to	
  Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  desk	
  stage	
  right.	
  He	
  adjusted	
  actor	
  positions	
   requiring	
  a	
  change	
  in	
  the	
  placement	
  of	
  certain	
  furniture	
  props.	
  He	
  wanted	
  to	
  use	
  the	
   stage	
  left	
  enclosure	
  for	
  both	
  the	
  flogger	
  scene	
  in	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  7	
  and	
  for	
  Judith	
  K.’s	
   small	
  office	
  scene	
  in	
  Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  9.	
  	
   	
   The	
  Director,	
  wanting	
  to	
  stay	
  true	
  to	
  Kafka’s	
  novel,	
  suggested	
  changing	
  the	
   color	
  palette	
  for	
  the	
  paint	
  scheme	
  from	
  blues	
  and	
  greys	
  to	
  browns.	
  He	
  showed	
  me	
  a	
   picture	
  of	
  a	
  wooden	
  “Labyrinth”	
  game	
  as	
  an	
  example	
  of	
  the	
  color	
  palette.	
  He	
  wanted	
   the	
  paint	
  scheme	
  to	
  reflect	
  old	
  world	
  European	
  courtrooms	
  and	
  he	
  wanted	
  the	
   bright,	
  1980’s	
  inspired	
  costumes	
  to	
  contrast	
  with	
  the	
  brown	
  background.	
  I	
   suggested	
  adding	
  a	
  labyrinthine	
  pattern	
  to	
  the	
  wainscoting.	
   	
    	
    	
    32	
    Because	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  many	
  doors	
  was	
  an	
  important	
  factor	
  in	
  the	
  Director’s	
   concept,	
  I	
  suggested	
  adding	
  three	
  static	
  door	
  flies,	
  built	
  in	
  cheated	
  perspective,	
  and	
   hung	
  from	
  the	
  bridge.	
  We	
  also	
  discussed	
  the	
  look	
  of	
  the	
  doors	
  on	
  the	
  set.	
  I	
  suggested	
   using	
  office	
  doors	
  with	
  windows	
  made	
  of	
  Plexiglas	
  and	
  using	
  either	
  flat	
  surfaced	
  or	
   raised	
  panel	
  doors.	
  	
   	
   The	
  Director	
  also	
  concluded	
  that	
  he	
  wanted	
  the	
  set	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  “maze”	
  or	
   “labyrinth”	
  in	
  which	
  Judith	
  K.	
  is	
  trapped	
  and	
  that	
  the	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
   Inquiry	
  were	
  manipulating	
  around	
  her,	
  but	
  which	
  ultimately	
  remained	
  the	
  same	
   place,	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry.	
  I	
  determined	
  to	
  make	
  the	
  final	
  look	
  of	
  the	
  show	
  match	
   this	
  concept.	
   	
   We	
  discussed	
  the	
  look	
  of	
  the	
  cathedral	
  scene,	
  the	
  final	
  scene	
  of	
  the	
  play.	
  The	
   Director	
  wanted	
  it	
  to	
  reflect	
  a	
  catholic	
  church.	
  I	
  suggested	
  an	
  altar	
  or	
  dais	
  with	
  a	
   candelabra	
  center	
  stage	
  and	
  gothic	
  windows	
  stage	
  right	
  and	
  stage	
  left.	
  He	
  agreed	
   with	
  the	
  gothic	
  windows,	
  but	
  needed	
  a	
  podium	
  stage	
  right	
  and	
  a	
  crucifix	
  upstage	
   center.	
  Since	
  the	
  theatre	
  had	
  no	
  crucifix	
  in	
  stock,	
  I	
  suggested	
  we	
  discuss	
  the	
   possibility	
  of	
  renting	
  a	
  crucifix	
  with	
  the	
  Properties	
  Supervisor.	
   	
   Because	
  I	
  felt	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  no	
  effective	
  way	
  of	
  hiding	
  the	
  crew	
  from	
  the	
   audience,	
  I	
  suggested	
  dressing	
  the	
  crew	
  in	
  costume	
  and	
  choreographing	
  the	
  scene	
   changes	
  into	
  the	
  show.	
  I	
  also	
  suggested	
  using	
  live	
  actors	
  for	
  the	
  courtroom	
  audience	
   in	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  6.	
  We	
  decided	
  that	
  the	
  entire	
  upstage	
  area	
  of	
  the	
  stage	
  would	
  be	
   blacked	
  out	
  with	
  legs	
  and	
  curtains	
  to	
  present	
  the	
  illusion	
  that	
  the	
  set	
  existed	
  within	
   a	
  void.	
  	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    33	
    3.6	
    Fourth	
  Meeting	
  Preparation	
    	
   I	
  worked	
  through	
  each	
  scene	
  and	
  each	
  scene	
  change	
  with	
  the	
  added	
  revolve	
   turns.	
  Fortunately,	
  the	
  added	
  turns	
  did	
  not	
  disrupt	
  the	
  sequence	
  of	
  turns	
  needed	
  to	
   maintain	
  continuity.	
   	
   I	
  finished	
  building	
  the	
  ½”	
  scale	
  white	
  model	
  and	
  created	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  paint	
   sketches	
  of	
  the	
  paint	
  treatment.	
  I	
  developed	
  a	
  paint	
  scheme	
  using	
  the	
  brown	
  color	
   palette.	
  I	
  used	
  the	
  labyrinth	
  game	
  and	
  visual	
  research	
  of	
  European	
  courtrooms	
  as	
   inspiration.	
  I	
  painted	
  the	
  model.	
  The	
  whiteboard	
  did	
  not	
  take	
  the	
  paint	
  well	
  (no	
   image	
  available).	
   	
   	
    I	
  designed	
  the	
  paint	
  scheme	
  to	
  border	
  between	
  realism	
  and	
  cartoon.	
  My	
    choice	
  of	
  colors	
  and	
  textures	
  was	
  determined	
  to	
  aid	
  in	
  this	
  effect.	
  It	
  proved	
  difficult	
   to	
  match	
  colors	
  to	
  the	
  labyrinth	
  game	
  that	
  the	
  director	
  showed	
  me,	
  but	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
   create	
  a	
  paint	
  scheme	
  with	
  a	
  good	
  degree	
  of	
  interest	
  and	
  contrast,	
  despite	
  the	
   monochromatic	
  color	
  palette.	
  My	
  focus	
  was	
  to	
  give	
  the	
  set	
  character	
  and	
  warmth,	
  to	
   reflect	
  the	
  look	
  of	
  a	
  European	
  courtroom	
  as	
  the	
  Director	
  wanted,	
  and	
  to	
  direct	
  focus	
   to	
  the	
  actors.	
  The	
  molding,	
  wainscoting,	
  and	
  chair	
  rail	
  would	
  serve	
  to	
  frame	
  the	
   walls.	
  The	
  doors	
  were	
  designed	
  to	
  look	
  as	
  if	
  they	
  were	
  on	
  fire.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    34	
    Figure	
  3.14	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Treatment	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  3.15	
  	
  	
  Wall	
  Treatment	
  1	
    	
   Figure	
  3.16	
  	
  	
  Wall	
  Treatment	
  2	
    	
   	
    	
    	
    35	
    Figure	
  3.17	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
  1	
    	
   Figure	
  3.18	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
  2	
    	
   	
    	
    	
    36	
    3.7	
    Fourth	
  Meeting	
  with	
  the	
  Director	
    	
   I	
  presented	
  the	
  Director	
  with	
  the	
  painted	
  model.	
  He	
  suggested	
  adding	
  wood	
   grain	
  or	
  paneling	
  to	
  the	
  upper	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  walls.	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  make	
  the	
  upper	
  walls	
   look	
  like	
  parchment,	
  rather	
  than	
  wood.	
  	
  The	
  door	
  casements	
  and	
  molding	
  would	
  be	
   umber,	
  but	
  the	
  chair	
  rail	
  would	
  be	
  a	
  violet	
  red	
  for	
  contrast.	
  The	
  wainscoting	
  would	
   be	
  a	
  honey	
  maple	
  brown,	
  as	
  would	
  the	
  revolve	
  platforms.	
  With	
  so	
  much	
  wood	
  detail	
   in	
  the	
  set	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  scumble	
  the	
  deck	
  for	
  contrast.	
  The	
  interior	
  of	
  the	
  downstage	
   left	
  enclosure	
  would	
  be	
  blue.	
   	
   The	
  Director	
  decided	
  he	
  wanted	
  one	
  large	
  door	
  fly	
  suspended	
  above	
  the	
  set	
   instead	
  of	
  three	
  smaller	
  doors	
  and	
  that	
  he	
  wanted	
  to	
  use	
  a	
  lighting	
  effect	
  on	
  the	
  door	
   for	
  the	
  final	
  scene.	
  I	
  showed	
  the	
  Director	
  CAD	
  drawings	
  of	
  door	
  options.	
  The	
   Director	
  and	
  I	
  made	
  final	
  decisions	
  for	
  the	
  design,	
  including	
  door	
  options,	
  door	
   positions,	
  and	
  deck	
  treatment.	
   	
   Figure	
  3.19	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Option	
  1	
    	
    	
    37	
    Figure	
  3.20	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Option	
  2	
    	
   	
   We	
  confirmed	
  that	
  the	
  design	
  would	
  work	
  for	
  each	
  scene	
  and	
  each	
  scene	
   change.	
  The	
  Director	
  suggested	
  a	
  solution	
  to	
  the	
  Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  7	
  to	
  Scene	
  8	
  transition	
   that	
  would	
  add	
  a	
  revolve	
  turn	
  and	
  we	
  determined	
  that	
  the	
  additional	
  revolve	
  turn	
   would	
  not	
  affect	
  the	
  revolve	
  sequence.	
   	
   3.8	
    Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawings	
   	
   I	
  created	
  preliminary	
  technical	
  drawings	
  of	
  the	
  scenic	
  units	
  and	
  met	
  with	
  the	
    Technical	
  Director	
  and	
  Production	
  Manager	
  to	
  do	
  an	
  initial	
  cost	
  estimate	
  and	
  to	
  get	
   approval	
  to	
  go	
  forward	
  with	
  the	
  design.	
  We	
  discussed	
  the	
  design	
  to	
  date	
  with	
  future	
   revisions	
  and	
  additions	
  including	
  the	
  static	
  door	
  fly,	
  the	
  wainscoting,	
  and	
  the	
   molding.	
  The	
  design	
  was	
  approved.	
  I	
  discussed	
  braking	
  options	
  for	
  the	
  revolves	
  with	
   the	
  Technical	
  Director	
  and	
  Production	
  Manager.	
  Hand	
  operated	
  plungers	
  or	
   pneumatic	
  brakes	
  were	
  suggested.	
  I	
  went	
  through	
  the	
  digital	
  props	
  catalogue	
  and	
   began	
  choosing	
  set	
  pieces	
  for	
  the	
  show	
  to	
  determine	
  the	
  finished	
  look	
  of	
  the	
  set.	
  The	
   	
    38	
    Properties	
  Lab	
  was	
  closed	
  for	
  the	
  summer,	
  so	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  shelve	
  my	
  choices	
  until	
  it	
   reopened	
  in	
  the	
  fall.	
   	
   When	
  the	
  school	
  closed	
  for	
  the	
  summer,	
  I	
  still	
  had	
  a	
  few	
  unanswered	
   questions	
  to	
  discuss	
  with	
  the	
  Technical	
  Director	
  and	
  the	
  Properties	
  Supervisor:	
  the	
   material	
  and	
  profiles	
  of	
  the	
  moldings	
  and	
  the	
  wainscoting,	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  pneumatic	
   brakes	
  for	
  the	
  revolves	
  with	
  accessible	
  cabinets	
  to	
  house	
  the	
  air	
  tanks,	
  the	
  final	
   position	
  and	
  angle	
  of	
  the	
  static	
  door	
  fly	
  and	
  its	
  rigging,	
  and	
  the	
  construction	
  of	
  the	
   doors	
  and	
  corridor	
  door	
  fly,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  what	
  furniture	
  props	
  and	
  wall	
  dressings	
   would	
  be	
  available	
  for	
  the	
  run	
  of	
  the	
  show.	
  I	
  found	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  at	
  an	
  impasse	
  until	
  I	
   could	
  meet	
  with	
  the	
  Technical	
  Director	
  and	
  Props	
  Supervisor	
  to	
  discuss	
  these	
   elements.	
  	
   	
   I	
  developed	
  as	
  many	
  solutions	
  to	
  these	
  problems	
  as	
  I	
  could	
  and	
  created	
   drawings	
  in	
  advance	
  of	
  the	
  shop	
  reopening	
  in	
  the	
  fall.	
  I	
  made	
  as	
  many	
  decisions	
  on	
   the	
  furniture	
  pieces	
  as	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  from	
  viewing	
  the	
  pictures	
  in	
  the	
  digital	
  props	
   catalogue.	
    	
    39	
    Illustration	
  3.1	
  	
  	
  Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawing:	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit	
    	
    	
   	
    40	
    Illustration	
  3.2	
  	
  	
  Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawing:	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit	
    	
   	
    41	
    Illustration	
  3.3	
  	
  	
  Preliminary	
  Technical	
  Drawing:	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit	
    	
    42	
    Figure	
  3.21	
  	
  	
  Chair	
  Options	
  	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  3.22	
  	
  	
  Cabinet	
  Option	
  	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  3.23	
  	
  	
  Podium	
  Option	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    43	
    Figure	
  3.24	
  	
  	
  Headboard	
  Option	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  3.25	
  	
  	
  Desk	
  Option	
    	
   	
    44	
    Figure	
  3.26	
  	
  	
  Cathedral	
  Option	
  A	
    	
    	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Figure	
  3.27	
  	
  	
  Cathedral	
  Option	
  B	
    	
    	
   3.9	
    The	
  Design	
  to	
  Date	
    	
   	
    The	
  physical	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  design	
  was	
  complete,	
  but	
  a	
  few	
  things	
  would	
    need	
  clarification	
  once	
  rehearsals	
  started.	
  Primarily,	
  the	
  dominant	
  side	
  and	
  door	
   position	
  of	
  the	
  downstage	
  right	
  revolve.	
  	
   	
   	
    In	
  support	
  of	
  my	
  design	
  rationale,	
  the	
  set	
  effectively	
  captured	
  the	
  graphic	
    narrative	
  elements	
  of	
  “page	
  turning,”	
  “frames,”	
  and	
  “the	
  gutter”	
  as	
  I	
  had	
  hoped.	
   Masking	
  the	
  upper	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  stage	
  and	
  isolating	
  the	
  set	
  within	
  a	
  void	
  worked	
  well	
   in	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  existential	
  philosophies	
  of	
  Jean	
  Paul	
  Sartre	
  that	
  I	
  wished	
  to	
  explore.	
   The	
  final	
  look	
  of	
  the	
  show	
  would	
  be	
  determined	
  by	
  the	
  paint	
  scheme,	
  the	
  furniture	
   props,	
  and	
  the	
  wall	
  dressings	
  chosen.	
  	
   	
    	
    	
    45	
    3.10	
   Summer	
  Break:	
   	
   I	
  worked	
  on	
  the	
  design	
  until	
  the	
  UBC	
  Theatre	
  Scene	
  Shop	
  closed	
  for	
  the	
   summer	
  in	
  the	
  last	
  week	
  of	
  May.	
  I	
  finished	
  revising	
  the	
  3D	
  model	
  adding	
  the	
  door	
  fly	
   and	
  molding.	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  use	
  pneumatic	
  brakes	
  for	
  the	
  revolves	
  and	
  designed	
   cabinets	
  that	
  would	
  house	
  the	
  brake	
  system’s	
  air	
  tanks.	
  	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    	
    46	
    4	
  	
  	
  The	
  Design	
  Process:	
  Part	
  2	
   4.1	
    Final	
  Technical	
  Drawings	
    	
   I	
  received	
  an	
  email	
  from	
  the	
  Production	
  Manager,	
  Jay	
  Henrickson,	
  on	
  August	
   1st,	
  2011	
  informing	
  me	
  that	
  final	
  technical	
  drawings	
  were	
  due	
  on	
  August	
  17th.	
  This	
   was	
  the	
  only	
  correspondence	
  I	
  received	
  for	
  deadlines	
  on	
  any	
  and	
  all	
  materials.	
  I	
  did	
   not	
  receive	
  correspondence,	
  nor	
  was	
  I	
  given	
  deadlines	
  for	
  the	
  finished	
  model	
  or	
  for	
   painter’s	
  elevations.	
   	
   	
    I	
  met	
  with	
  the	
  Production	
  Manager	
  at	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  August	
  to	
  test	
  the	
    pneumatic	
  brake	
  system.	
  The	
  brake	
  system	
  worked	
  well	
  and	
  I	
  incorporated	
  the	
   cabinets	
  needed	
  to	
  house	
  the	
  air	
  tanks	
  into	
  the	
  design.	
  I	
  relayed	
  this	
  information	
  to	
   the	
  Director.	
   	
   I	
  rebuilt	
  the	
  physical	
  model	
  in	
  ½”	
  scale.	
  I	
  included	
  basic	
  furniture	
  pieces,	
  the	
   flown	
  door	
  fly,	
  and	
  the	
  static	
  door	
  fly.	
  I	
  painted	
  the	
  model	
  with	
  the	
  determined	
  paint	
   scheme,	
  allowing	
  for	
  adjustments	
  by	
  the	
  scenic	
  artist.	
  Elements	
  missing	
  from	
  the	
   painted	
  model	
  were	
  finished	
  furniture	
  pieces,	
  the	
  wainscoting,	
  and	
  the	
  stairs	
  to	
  the	
   orchestra	
  pit.	
  I	
  created	
  basic	
  painter’s	
  elevations	
  and	
  determined	
  to	
  discuss	
  the	
   paint	
  scheme	
  with	
  the	
  scenic	
  artist	
  at	
  our	
  meeting.	
   	
   This	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  time	
  I	
  used	
  Vectorworks	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  3D	
  model	
  and	
  to	
   produce	
  technical	
  drawings.	
  Due	
  to	
  my	
  lack	
  of	
  experience	
  with	
  the	
  software,	
  I	
  was	
   not	
  able	
  to	
  produce	
  proper	
  three-­‐view	
  technical	
  drawings	
  before	
  the	
  deadline.	
  I	
   produced	
  the	
  best	
  drawings	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  at	
  the	
  time	
  and	
  submitted	
  them	
  to	
  the	
   scene	
  shop	
  on	
  August	
  18th.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    47	
    Figure	
  4.1	
  	
  	
  Painted	
  Model	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  4.2	
  	
  	
  Painter’s	
  Elevations	
    	
   	
    	
    48	
    Illustration	
  4.1	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
    	
   	
   	
    49	
    Illustration	
  4.2	
  	
  	
  Revolve	
  Detail	
  1	
    	
    	
    50	
    Illustration	
  4.3	
  	
  	
  Revolve	
  Detail	
  2	
    	
    	
    51	
    Illustration	
  4.4	
  	
  	
  Elevation	
    	
    	
    52	
    Illustration	
  4.5	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Detail	
    	
    	
    53	
    Illustration	
  4.6	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Elevation  	
    	
    54	
    Illustration	
  4.7	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Plan  	
    	
    55	
    Illustration	
  4.8	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Cabinets	
  Elevation  	
    	
    56	
    Illustration	
  4.9	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Cabinets	
  Plan	
    	
    	
    57	
    Illustration	
  4.10	
  	
  	
  Gothic	
  Window	
  Detail	
    	
    	
    58	
    Illustration	
  4.11	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Revolve	
  Open	
    	
    59	
    4.2	
    First	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
    	
   	
    I	
  presented	
  the	
  physical	
  model	
  at	
  the	
  first	
  production	
  meeting	
  on	
  August	
    16th,	
  2011.	
  We	
  removed	
  the	
  roof	
  treatment,	
  and	
  the	
  Production	
  Manager	
  suggested	
   that	
  I	
  add	
  a	
  small	
  return	
  to	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  each	
  wall	
  unit	
  instead.	
  The	
  three-­‐dimensional	
   design	
  of	
  the	
  static	
  door	
  fly	
  proved	
  problematic	
  for	
  positioning	
  and	
  establishing	
  an	
   effective	
  angle	
  for	
  sight	
  lines.	
  The	
  Director	
  suggested	
  I	
  make	
  the	
  door	
  two-­‐ dimensional.	
  The	
  Technical	
  Director	
  also	
  suggested	
  that	
  I	
  lower	
  the	
  hinged	
  walls	
  on	
   the	
  downstage	
  left	
  unit	
  to	
  deck	
  level	
  to	
  help	
  support	
  the	
  weight	
  of	
  the	
  walls	
  in	
  their	
   open	
  position.	
  I	
  met	
  with	
  the	
  Lighting	
  Designer	
  and	
  sent	
  her	
  drawings	
  of	
  the	
  floor	
   plan.	
  She	
  asked	
  for	
  a	
  centerline	
  section.	
   	
   	
    I	
  met	
  with	
  the	
  Technical	
  Director	
  on	
  Friday,	
  August	
  20th	
  to	
  discuss	
  the	
    remaining	
  details	
  needed	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  submit	
  the	
  lumber	
  order.	
  On	
  Saturday,	
  Robert	
   Gardiner	
  called	
  me	
  into	
  a	
  meeting	
  to	
  discuss	
  the	
  technical	
  drawings	
  I	
  had	
  submitted.	
   I	
  received	
  a	
  tutorial	
  on	
  proper	
  technical	
  drawing	
  format	
  and	
  on	
  how	
  to	
  use	
  the	
   Vectorworks	
  software	
  to	
  create	
  proper	
  three-­‐view	
  technical	
  drawings,	
  including	
   creating	
  drawings	
  of	
  “unwrapped	
  elevations.”	
   	
   	
    I	
  found	
  that	
  I	
  did	
  not	
  build	
  the	
  3D	
  CAD	
  model	
  properly	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  create	
    unwrapped	
  elevations	
  and	
  completely	
  rebuilt	
  the	
  model.	
  I	
  created	
  drawings	
  of	
  the	
   three	
  revolve	
  platforms,	
  with	
  the	
  revision	
  to	
  the	
  downstage	
  left	
  revolve	
  and	
   submitted	
  them	
  to	
  the	
  shop	
  on	
  Tuesday,	
  August	
  23rd	
  so	
  that	
  they	
  could	
  begin	
   building.	
   	
   	
    That	
  same	
  Tuesday,	
  I	
  met	
  with	
  Jay	
  Henrickson	
  to	
  discuss	
  the	
  deadline	
  for	
  the	
    paint	
  elevations	
  and	
  to	
  request	
  a	
  meeting	
  with	
  the	
  scenic	
  artist.	
  He	
  called	
  the	
  scenic	
   artist,	
  Lorraine	
  West,	
  immediately	
  and	
  scheduled	
  an	
  appointment	
  for	
  the	
  following	
   morning.	
  I	
  spent	
  the	
  remainder	
  of	
  the	
  evening	
  finishing	
  the	
  paint	
  elevations.	
  	
   	
    	
    	
    60	
    	
    I	
  met	
  with	
  the	
  scenic	
  artist	
  and	
  discussed	
  the	
  paint	
  scheme	
  referring	
  to	
  the	
    model	
  and	
  the	
  painter’s	
  elevations.	
  She	
  required	
  a	
  ½”	
  scale	
  rendering	
  of	
  the	
  deck	
   treatment,	
  including	
  a	
  detail	
  of	
  the	
  labyrinth	
  pattern	
  by	
  Friday	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  begin	
   painting	
  the	
  deck	
  on	
  Saturday.	
  She	
  also	
  needed	
  more	
  detail	
  on	
  the	
  interior	
  of	
  the	
   downstage	
  left	
  enclosure,	
  the	
  molding,	
  and	
  the	
  static	
  door	
  fly.	
  I	
  created	
  these	
   renderings	
  and	
  submitted	
  them	
  to	
  the	
  shop	
  on	
  Friday,	
  August	
  26th.	
  I	
  also	
  included	
  a	
   new	
  rendering	
  of	
  the	
  wall	
  treatment.	
  I	
  worked	
  with	
  the	
  scenic	
  artist	
  on	
  Saturday	
   and	
  Sunday	
  painting	
  the	
  deck.	
  We	
  changed	
  the	
  orientation	
  of	
  the	
  wood	
  grain	
  in	
  the	
   orchestra	
  pit	
  to	
  match	
  the	
  existing	
  wood.	
  The	
  deck	
  treatment	
  came	
  out	
  perfectly.	
   	
   Figure	
  4.3	
  	
  	
  ½”	
  Scale	
  Deck	
  Rendering	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    61	
    Figure	
  4.4	
  	
  	
  Updated	
  Painter’s	
  Elevations	
    	
   	
   4.3	
    Second	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
    	
   	
    I	
  presented	
  the	
  model	
  of	
  the	
  set	
  at	
  the	
  cast	
  meeting	
  on	
  August	
  23rd.	
  During	
    this	
  meeting,	
  I	
  was	
  struck	
  with	
  an	
  intense	
  inspiration	
  to	
  redesign	
  the	
  set.	
  On	
  August	
   27th	
  I	
  built	
  a	
  3D	
  CAD	
  model	
  of	
  the	
  redesigned	
  set	
  and	
  sent	
  it	
  to	
  my	
  thesis	
  advisor.	
  We	
   met	
  on	
  Monday	
  and	
  discussed	
  further	
  revisions	
  to	
  the	
  new	
  design.	
  I	
  revised	
  the	
  set	
   and	
  sent	
  drawings	
  to	
  the	
  Director	
  that	
  evening	
  to	
  see	
  if	
  he	
  would	
  agree	
  to	
  change	
   the	
  design.	
  The	
  Director	
  felt	
  that	
  the	
  redesigned	
  set	
  changed	
  the	
  show	
  too	
  much	
  to	
   consider	
  the	
  revision	
  in	
  the	
  time	
  available.	
   	
    62	
    Illustration	
  4.12	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  –	
  Initial	
  Design	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    63	
    Illustration	
  4.13	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  –	
  Revision	
  	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    64	
    Illustration	
  4.14	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  –	
  Revision,	
  ISO	
  1	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    65	
    Illustration	
  4.15	
  	
  	
  Redesigned	
  Set	
  –	
  Revision,	
  ISO	
  2	
    	
    66	
    On	
  Tuesday,	
  August	
  30th	
  I	
  returned	
  to	
  rebuilding	
  the	
  3D	
  CAD	
  model	
  of	
  the	
   original	
  design	
  and	
  producing	
  proper	
  three-­‐view	
  technical	
  drawings	
  for	
  the	
  shop.	
  I	
   decided	
  to	
  simplify	
  the	
  doors	
  to	
  save	
  time	
  and	
  expense.	
  I	
  created	
  a	
  complete	
  set	
  of	
   drawings	
  and	
  submitted	
  them	
  to	
  the	
  shop	
  on	
  September	
  1st.	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  able	
  to	
   include	
  the	
  wainscoting	
  in	
  this	
  set	
  of	
  drawings	
  due	
  to	
  time	
  constraints	
  and	
  planned	
   to	
  submit	
  updated	
  drawings	
  of	
  the	
  wainscoting	
  at	
  a	
  later	
  date.	
  I	
  had	
  two	
  options	
  for	
   the	
  design	
  of	
  the	
  wainscoting	
  and	
  needed	
  further	
  clarification	
  from	
  the	
  Director.	
   	
   The	
  Technical	
  Director	
  informed	
  me	
  that	
  the	
  stage	
  right	
  and	
  stage	
  left	
   revolves	
  passed	
  beyond	
  the	
  fire	
  curtain	
  when	
  they	
  were	
  in	
  their	
  angled	
  positions.	
   The	
  set	
  was	
  moved	
  upstage	
  16”	
  to	
  clear	
  the	
  fire	
  curtain.	
  This	
  was	
  a	
  fortuitous	
  move	
   as	
  it	
  placed	
  the	
  stage	
  left	
  revolve	
  in	
  a	
  position	
  the	
  lighting	
  designer	
  needed	
  to	
  hang	
  a	
   practical	
  for	
  the	
  closet	
  scenes	
  when	
  the	
  downstage	
  left	
  enclosure	
  was	
  opened	
  up.	
   The	
  large	
  static	
  door	
  fly	
  upstage	
  center	
  was	
  revised	
  several	
  times	
  before	
  a	
  final	
   solution	
  was	
  found.	
   	
   Figure	
  4.5	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  1	
    	
    	
    67	
    Figure	
  4.6	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  2	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  4.7	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  3	
    	
    	
    68	
    Figure	
  4.8	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Final	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  4.9	
  	
  	
  Updated	
  3D	
  Model	
    	
    69	
    Illustration	
  4.16	
  	
  	
  Full	
  Stage	
  Plan	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    70	
    Illustration	
  4.17	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Map	
    	
   	
    	
    	
    71	
    Illustration	
  4.18	
  	
  	
  Deck	
  Treatment	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    72	
    Illustration	
  4.19	
  	
  	
  Fly	
  Positions	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    73	
    Illustration	
  4.20	
  	
  	
  Masking	
  Plot	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    74	
    Illustration	
  4.21	
  	
  	
  Right	
  Side	
  View	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    75	
    Illustration	
  4.22	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Revolve	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    76	
    Illustration	
  4.23	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Revolve	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    77	
    Illustration	
  4.24	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Revolve	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    78	
    Illustration	
  4.25	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit	
  Assembly	
    	
    	
    79	
    Illustration	
  4.26	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit	
  Assembly	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    80	
    Illustration	
  4.27	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit	
  Assembly	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    81	
    Illustration	
  4.28	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  A	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    82	
    Illustration	
  4.29	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  B	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    83	
    Illustration	
  4.30	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    84	
    Illustration	
  4.31	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit,	
  Hinged	
  Walls	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    85	
    Illustration	
  4.32	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  A	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    86	
    Illustration	
  4.33	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit,	
  Walls	
  Side	
  B	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    87	
    Illustration	
  4.34	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    88	
    Illustration	
  4.35	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly	
  Assembly	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    89	
    Illustration	
  4.36	
  	
  	
  Static	
  Door	
  Fly,	
  Panel	
  Detail	
    	
    	
    	
    90	
    Illustration	
  4.37	
  	
  	
  Flown	
  Door	
  Fly	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    91	
    Illustration	
  4.38	
  	
  	
  Door	
  Detail	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    92	
    Illustration	
  4.39	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Air	
  Tank	
  Cabinets	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    93	
    Illustration	
  4.40	
  	
  	
  Brake	
  Air	
  Tank	
  Cabinets,	
  ISO	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    94	
    Illustration	
  4.41	
  	
  	
  Gothic	
  Windows	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    95	
    Illustration	
  4.42	
  	
  	
  Molding	
  Detail	
    	
    	
   	
   	
    96	
    Illustration	
  4.43	
  	
  	
  Molding	
  ISO	
    	
    	
    97	
    4.4	
    Third	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
    	
   This	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  time	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  meet	
  with	
  the	
  Properties	
  Supervisor,	
   Lynn	
  Burton,	
  to	
  discuss	
  and	
  to	
  choose	
  furniture	
  props.	
  I	
  emailed	
  my	
  list	
  of	
  furniture	
   props	
  to	
  the	
  Properties	
  Supervisor.	
  The	
  following	
  week,	
  the	
  Director,	
  the	
  Stage	
   Managers,	
  and	
  myself	
  met	
  with	
  the	
  Properties	
  Supervisor	
  to	
  choose	
  all	
  of	
  the	
   furniture	
  props,	
  hand	
  props,	
  and	
  bedding.	
  The	
  props	
  lab	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  suitable	
  desks	
   for	
  Ms.	
  Lang	
  or	
  for	
  Judith	
  K.’s	
  Office.	
  The	
  Properties	
  Supervisor	
  searched	
  online	
  and	
   purchased	
  a	
  desk	
  for	
  Judith	
  K.	
  and	
  rented	
  a	
  desk	
  for	
  Ms.	
  Lang.	
   	
   It	
  was	
  determined	
  during	
  rehearsals	
  that	
  the	
  door	
  position	
  and	
  the	
  dominant	
   side	
  of	
  the	
  downstage	
  right	
  revolve	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  changed.	
  I	
  updated	
  the	
  CAD	
  Model	
   and	
  sent	
  the	
  drawings	
  to	
  the	
  shop.	
  I	
  created	
  a	
  footprint	
  of	
  each	
  scene	
  and	
  sent	
  the	
   drawings	
  to	
  the	
  Stage	
  Manager	
  for	
  rehearsal.	
  I	
  also	
  sent	
  a	
  centerline	
  section	
  to	
  the	
   Lighting	
  Designer.	
  I	
  continued	
  to	
  revise	
  the	
  model	
  with	
  the	
  wainscoting	
  detail,	
   building	
  two	
  different	
  models.	
   	
   I	
  began	
  working	
  in	
  the	
  shop	
  to	
  build	
  the	
  scenic	
  elements	
  the	
  Technical	
   Director	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  time	
  to	
  work	
  on:	
  the	
  gothic	
  windows	
  and	
  a	
  two-­‐sided	
  sign	
  for	
   the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
  and	
  Theadora	
  Moxie’s	
  Law	
  Office.	
  The	
  Director	
  also	
  wanted	
  a	
   table	
  top	
  on	
  the	
  stage	
  right	
  air	
  tank	
  cabinet,	
  but	
  I	
  resisted	
  this	
  suggestion	
  not	
  feeling	
   that	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  large	
  enough	
  to	
  justify	
  the	
  addition.	
  Ultimately	
  this	
  was	
  cut.	
   	
   I	
  attended	
  many	
  of	
  the	
  paint	
  calls	
  with	
  the	
  scenic	
  artist	
  to	
  supervise	
  the	
   painting	
  of	
  the	
  set.	
  	
   	
   I	
  made	
  the	
  decision	
  to	
  use	
  brake	
  levers	
  with	
  exposed	
  red	
  handles	
  in	
  the	
  set,	
   choosing	
  not	
  to	
  hide	
  the	
  devices	
  from	
  the	
  audience.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    98	
    Figure	
  4.10	
  	
  	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  1	
  Footprint	
    	
   Figure	
  4.11	
  	
  	
  Centerline	
  Section	
    	
    	
    99	
    Figure	
  4.12	
  	
  	
  Wainscoting	
  Model	
  1  	
   	
   Figure	
  4.13	
  	
  	
  Wainscoting	
  Model	
  2	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    100	
    4.5	
    Fourth	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
    	
   	
    The	
  Director	
  decided	
  that	
  he	
  did	
  not	
  want	
  to	
  use	
  live	
  actors	
  for	
  the	
    courtroom	
  audience	
  in	
  Act	
  1:	
  Scene	
  6	
  and	
  asked	
  me	
  to	
  design	
  four	
  wood	
  cut-­‐outs	
  of	
   people	
  seated	
  in	
  chairs.	
  I	
  drew	
  sketches	
  of	
  the	
  cutouts,	
  built	
  and	
  painted	
  the	
   backgrounds.	
  I	
  wanted	
  the	
  images	
  to	
  resemble	
  courtroom	
  sketches,	
  but	
  in	
  a	
  more	
   cartoon-­‐like	
  and	
  animated	
  way.	
  The	
  images	
  on	
  the	
  cut-­‐outs	
  were	
  drawn	
  and	
  painted	
   by	
  a	
  student.	
  	
   	
   	
    I	
  approached	
  the	
  Director	
  about	
  the	
  crucifix	
  in	
  the	
  cathedral	
  scene,	
  because	
    props	
  did	
  not	
  have	
  a	
  crucifix	
  in	
  stock.	
  I	
  discussed	
  renting	
  a	
  crucifix,	
  and	
  the	
  props	
   supervisor	
  suggested	
  having	
  a	
  student	
  artist	
  carve	
  a	
  figure	
  of	
  Jesus	
  and	
  mounting	
  it	
   on	
  a	
  large	
  wooden	
  cross	
  that	
  they	
  did	
  have	
  in	
  stock.	
  I	
  agreed	
  and	
  the	
  student	
   completed	
  the	
  project.	
   	
   	
    I	
  also	
  discussed	
  wall	
  dressings	
  with	
  the	
  Properties	
  Supervisor.	
  She	
  showed	
    me	
  what	
  was	
  available	
  in	
  stock.	
  I	
  chose	
  two	
  matching	
  pairs	
  of	
  framed	
  prints	
  in	
  a	
   monochromatic,	
  sepia	
  tone	
  to	
  hang	
  symmetrically	
  in	
  the	
  set	
  and	
  one	
  additional	
   framed	
  print,	
  also	
  in	
  a	
  monochromatic,	
  sepia	
  tone,	
  to	
  hang	
  in	
  Ms.	
  Lang’s	
  office.	
   	
   	
    The	
  Director	
  and	
  I	
  decided	
  on	
  the	
  final	
  look	
  of	
  the	
  wainscoting.	
  The	
  Director	
    wanted	
  the	
  labyrinthine	
  pattern	
  we	
  had	
  discussed	
  earlier.	
  I	
  created	
  updated	
   drawings	
  of	
  the	
  unwrapped	
  elevations	
  with	
  the	
  wainscoting	
  and	
  sent	
  the	
  drawings	
   to	
  the	
  shop.	
   	
   	
    The	
  Lighting	
  Designer	
  needed	
  a	
  batten	
  position	
  upstage	
  requiring	
  the	
    removal	
  of	
  a	
  piece	
  of	
  masking	
  upstage	
  center.	
  The	
  upstage	
  right	
  and	
  upstage	
  left	
  legs	
   were	
  brought	
  further	
  on	
  stage	
  to	
  compensate	
  for	
  lost	
  furniture	
  storage	
  space.	
  The	
   removal	
  of	
  the	
  masking	
  added	
  greater	
  dimension	
  and	
  focus	
  to	
  the	
  static	
  door	
  fly.	
   	
    	
    101	
    Figure	
  4.14	
  	
  	
  Finished	
  Model	
  with	
  Wainscoting  	
   	
    	
    102	
    Illustration	
  4.44	
  	
  	
  Upstage	
  Center	
  Unit	
  Wainscoting  	
   	
   	
    103	
    Illustration	
  4.45	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Right	
  Unit	
  Wainscoting	
    	
   	
   	
    104	
    Illustration	
  4.46	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Unit	
  Wainscoting	
    	
    105	
    4.6	
    Fifth	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
    	
   	
    We	
  finalized	
  all	
  set	
  pieces,	
  furniture	
  props,	
  and	
  wall	
  dressings.	
  The	
  set	
  with	
    furniture	
  props	
  was	
  complete	
  for	
  cue	
  to	
  cue,	
  with	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  the	
  molding	
  and	
   wainscoting.	
  The	
  shop	
  ran	
  out	
  of	
  lumber	
  and	
  had	
  to	
  submit	
  a	
  second	
  lumber	
  order	
   for	
  the	
  molding	
  and	
  wainscoting.	
   	
   4.7	
    Tech	
  Weekend	
    	
   	
    I	
  coordinated	
  with	
  the	
  Assistant	
  Stage	
  Manager	
  and	
  the	
  crew	
  to	
  perform	
  all	
    scene	
  changes.	
  We	
  choreographed	
  the	
  scene	
  changes	
  for	
  the	
  entire	
  show	
  with	
  only	
  a	
   few	
  corrections.	
  The	
  angle	
  of	
  the	
  downstage	
  right	
  revolve	
  was	
  adjusted	
  so	
  that	
  the	
   fly	
  operator	
  could	
  see	
  the	
  stage	
  clearly.	
   	
   4.8	
    Sixth	
  Week	
  of	
  Production	
    	
   	
    This	
  was	
  the	
  final	
  week	
  of	
  production	
  before	
  opening.	
  The	
  shop	
  finished	
    installing	
  the	
  molding	
  and	
  the	
  wainscoting.	
  The	
  set	
  was	
  complete	
  for	
  preview	
  on	
   Wednesday,	
  September	
  28th,	
  2011.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    106	
    5	
  	
  	
  Performance	
  Analysis	
   5.1	
    Time,	
  Place,	
  and	
  Budget	
  Constraints	
    	
   	
    There	
  were	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  constraints	
  and	
  other	
  factors	
  that	
  added	
  to	
  the	
    difficulty	
  of	
  completing	
  this	
  set	
  design.	
  The	
  primary	
  obstacle	
  I	
  faced	
  was	
  not	
  having	
   access	
  to	
  the	
  scene	
  shop	
  and	
  properties	
  lab,	
  the	
  Technical	
  Director	
  and	
  the	
   Properties	
  Supervisor,	
  over	
  the	
  summer	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  finish	
  the	
  design	
  by	
  the	
  time	
   classes	
  resumed	
  in	
  the	
  fall.	
   	
   	
    This	
  was	
  a	
  major	
  hindrance	
  to	
  my	
  process	
  as	
  discussion	
  with	
  the	
  Technical	
    Director	
  and	
  the	
  Properties	
  Supervisor	
  are	
  crucial	
  in	
  my	
  process	
  to	
  solve	
  problems	
   and	
  to	
  answer	
  questions	
  I	
  have	
  about	
  the	
  design.	
  When	
  the	
  school	
  closed	
  for	
  the	
   summer,	
  I	
  felt	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  trying	
  to	
  create	
  in	
  a	
  vacuum	
  and	
  my	
  productivity	
  stalled.	
   Once	
  the	
  school	
  reopened	
  in	
  the	
  fall,	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  discuss	
  my	
  design	
  questions	
  with	
   the	
  Technical	
  Director	
  and	
  Properties	
  Supervisor	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  complete	
  the	
  design.	
   Unfortunately,	
  this	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  process	
  occurred	
  during	
  production	
  and	
  after	
  final	
   technical	
  drawings	
  were	
  due.	
  I	
  did,	
  however,	
  complete	
  all	
  aspects	
  of	
  the	
  design	
  once	
   I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  meet	
  with	
  them.	
   	
   	
    Placing	
  the	
  set	
  on	
  the	
  downstage	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  deck	
  limited	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  line	
    sets	
  that	
  would	
  be	
  available	
  for	
  both	
  scenery	
  and	
  lighting.	
  As	
  lighting	
  would	
  have	
   priority,	
  this	
  limited	
  my	
  ability	
  to	
  experiment	
  with	
  different	
  flown	
  treatments.	
   Fortunately,	
  flies	
  were	
  not	
  a	
  major	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  final	
  design	
  (there	
  was	
  only	
  one	
  static	
   door	
  fly	
  and	
  one	
  operating	
  door	
  fly)	
  and	
  this	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  problem.	
   	
   	
    The	
  budget	
  and	
  construction	
  crew	
  placed	
  considerable	
  limits	
  on	
  the	
  scope	
  of	
    the	
  design.	
  For	
  this	
  reason,	
  the	
  set	
  was	
  designed	
  in	
  the	
  simplest	
  manner	
  possible.	
   The	
  budget	
  for	
  this	
  show	
  was	
  $1500.00.	
  If	
  the	
  budget	
  had	
  been	
  $3000.00	
  and	
  if	
  we	
   had	
  three	
  or	
  four	
  carpenters,	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  designed	
  a	
  two-­‐story,	
  three-­‐sided	
  revolve	
   and,	
  hopefully,	
  explored	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  projections.	
    	
    107	
    5.2	
    Meeting	
  the	
  Director’s	
  Concept	
  and	
  Staging	
    	
    	
   Sally	
  Clark,	
  the	
  author	
  of	
  the	
  play,	
  attended	
  opening	
  night	
  and	
  commented	
    that	
  this	
  production	
  of	
  “The	
  Trial	
  of	
  Judith	
  K.”	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  that	
  she’d	
  thoroughly	
   enjoyed	
  from	
  beginning	
  to	
  end.	
  	
   	
   Figure	
  5.1	
  	
  	
  Judith	
  K.	
  in	
  her	
  Office  	
   	
   	
    The	
  set	
  succeeded	
  in	
  meeting	
  the	
  Director’s	
  staging	
  requirements	
  and	
  in	
    accommodating	
  the	
  twenty-­‐one	
  scenes	
  with	
  quick,	
  unobtrusive	
  scene	
  changes.	
  We	
   were	
  able	
  to	
  capture	
  the	
  Director’s	
  desire	
  to	
  make	
  the	
  set	
  an	
  environment	
  that	
  was	
   manipulated	
  around	
  the	
  protagonist	
  by	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  court,	
  but	
  which	
  ultimately	
   remained	
  the	
  same	
  place,	
  the	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry.	
  The	
  scene	
  changes	
  were	
  animated	
   with	
  music	
  and	
  light.	
    	
    108	
    Figure	
  5.2	
  	
  	
  The	
  Court	
  of	
  Inquiry	
    	
   	
   Figure	
  5.3	
  	
  	
  Scene	
  Change	
  by	
  Members	
  of	
  the	
  Court	
    	
   	
    109	
    	
    The	
  enclosure	
  on	
  the	
  downstage	
  left	
  revolve	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  accommodate	
  Act	
  1:	
    Scene	
  7	
  and	
  Act	
  2:	
  Scene	
  9	
  as	
  the	
  Director	
  wanted.	
  Opening	
  the	
  unit	
  up	
  with	
  two	
   hinged	
  walls	
  added	
  greatly	
  to	
  the	
  versatility	
  and	
  function	
  of	
  this	
  unit.	
  The	
  actors	
  had	
   ample	
  room	
  and	
  were	
  fully	
  visible	
  to	
  the	
  audience.	
   	
   Figure	
  5.4	
  	
  	
  Downstage	
  Left	
  Enclosure	
    	
   	
   	
    Placing	
  the	
  scenes	
  that	
  take	
  place	
  between	
  Judith	
  K.	
  and	
  Ted,	
  “the	
    Psychopath,”	
  in	
  the	
  orchestra	
  pit	
  created	
  an	
  additional	
  sense	
  of	
  intimacy	
  with	
  the	
   audience	
  by	
  bringing	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  into	
  the	
  house.	
  These	
  scenes	
  with	
  Judith	
   K.	
  and	
  Ted	
  are	
  the	
  only	
  semblance	
  of	
  love	
  and	
  romance	
  in	
  Judith	
  K.’s	
  life	
  within	
  the	
   play	
  and	
  by	
  bringing	
  these	
  scenes	
  into	
  the	
  house	
  we	
  created	
  another	
  level	
  of	
   connection	
  and	
  engagement	
  to	
  the	
  characters.	
  The	
  intimacy	
  also	
  added	
  to	
  the	
  tragic	
   consequences	
  of	
  the	
  climax	
  as	
  Judith	
  K.	
  reaches	
  out	
  to	
  Ted,	
  only	
  to	
  be	
  denied.	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    110	
    Figure	
  5.5	
  	
  	
  Judith	
  K.	
  and	
  Ted,	
  “the	
  Psychopath”	
    	
   	
    	
   The	
  large	
  static	
  door	
  fly	
  captured	
  the	
  Director’s	
  concept	
  derived	
  from	
  “The	
    Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door”	
  which	
  takes	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  final	
  scene.	
  The	
  lighting	
  effect	
  added	
  to	
   this	
  door	
  was	
  also	
  successful.	
  The	
  cheated	
  perspective	
  used	
  in	
  designing	
  this	
  door	
   was	
  successful	
  in	
  making	
  the	
  door	
  appear	
  three-­‐dimensional.	
   	
   	
    Suspending	
  this	
  door	
  far	
  upstage	
  and	
  above	
  the	
  set,	
  looming	
  in	
  the	
    background,	
  captured	
  the	
  idea	
  that	
  Judith	
  K.	
  could	
  not	
  gain	
  access	
  to	
  this	
  door	
   although	
  it	
  was	
  always	
  present	
  to	
  her.	
  She,	
  instead,	
  was	
  confined	
  to	
  using	
  the	
  doors	
   she	
  did	
  have	
  access	
  to,	
  the	
  doors	
  within	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  the	
  set.	
  This	
  was	
  a	
  major	
   theme	
  in	
  the	
  Director’s	
  concept	
  and	
  I	
  believe	
  we	
  succeeded	
  in	
  conveying	
  that	
  theme.	
   	
    111	
    Figure	
  5.6	
  	
  	
  “The	
  Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door”	
    	
   	
   The	
  set	
  did	
  not	
  fully	
  succeed	
  in	
  representing	
  a	
  maze-­‐like	
  or	
  labyrinthine	
   environment.	
  This	
  was	
  largely	
  due	
  to	
  my	
  choice	
  of	
  creating	
  a	
  minimalist	
  set	
  and	
   dismissing	
  the	
  idea	
  of	
  adding	
  hinged	
  walls	
  and	
  revolves	
  that	
  moved	
  along	
  tracks.	
  I	
   did,	
  however,	
  add	
  details	
  to	
  the	
  deck	
  and	
  to	
  the	
  wainscoting	
  to	
  represent	
  this	
  theme.	
  	
   	
   	
   5.3	
    Meeting	
  the	
  Design	
  Rationale	
  and	
  Scenic	
  Metaphor	
    	
   	
    The	
  set	
  succeeded	
  in	
  meeting	
  my	
  expectations,	
  my	
  design	
  rationale,	
  and	
  my	
    scenic	
  metaphor.	
  The	
  three	
  revolves	
  spaced	
  across	
  the	
  stage,	
  separated	
  by	
   gangways,	
  with	
  the	
  upstage	
  area	
  blacked	
  out	
  with	
  curtains,	
  served	
  to	
  represent	
  the	
   concepts	
  of	
  “page-­‐turning,”	
  “frames,”	
  and	
  “gutters”	
  as	
  found	
  in	
  a	
  graphic	
  narrative.	
  I	
   was	
  very	
  pleased	
  at	
  how	
  well	
  the	
  set	
  reflected	
  elements	
  of	
  graphic	
  narrative	
  in	
  its	
   design	
  and	
  structure.	
   	
   	
   	
    112	
    Figure	
  5.7	
  	
  	
  Frames	
  and	
  Gutters	
    	
   	
   The	
  paint	
  scheme	
  worked	
  exceptionally	
  well	
  in	
  providing	
  focus	
  to	
  the	
  actors.	
   The	
  unbleached	
  parchment	
  look	
  of	
  the	
  upper	
  walls	
  was	
  light	
  enough	
  to	
  contrast	
   sharply	
  with	
  the	
  costumes	
  yet	
  subdued	
  enough	
  not	
  to	
  overshadow	
  the	
  actors.	
  The	
   dark	
  wainscoting	
  on	
  the	
  lower	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  walls	
  provided	
  contrast,	
  definition,	
  and	
   character	
  to	
  the	
  walls.	
  The	
  paint	
  scheme	
  also	
  succeeded	
  in	
  bordering	
  between	
   realism	
  and	
  cartoon,	
  bringing	
  an	
  element	
  of	
  cartoon	
  animation	
  to	
  the	
  set.	
  	
   	
   Layering	
  the	
  set	
  with	
  the	
  orchestra	
  pit,	
  the	
  apron,	
  the	
  three	
  revolves,	
  and	
  the	
   static	
  door	
  fly	
  succeeded	
  in	
  creating	
  layers	
  of	
  foreground,	
  mid-­‐ground,	
  and	
   background	
  as	
  found	
  in	
  cartoon	
  cell	
  animation.	
   	
   Establishing	
  the	
  set	
  within	
  a	
  void	
  represented	
  the	
  philosophies	
  of	
  Jean-­‐Paul	
   Sartre	
  that	
  I	
  wished	
  to	
  convey.	
   	
   	
   	
    113	
    Figure	
  5.8	
  	
  	
  Existence	
  within	
  the	
  Void	
  of	
  Nonexistence	
    	
   	
   	
    The	
  gangways	
  or	
  gutters	
  successfully	
  divided	
  the	
  set	
  to	
  express	
  the	
    philosophical	
  concept	
  that	
  non-­‐existence	
  was	
  fracturing	
  and	
  dividing	
  reality.	
  The	
   question	
  I	
  wished	
  to	
  address	
  through	
  this	
  design,	
  was:	
  “If	
  a	
  primary	
  facet	
  of	
  our	
   understanding	
  of	
  reality	
  and	
  our	
  belief	
  in	
  an	
  integral	
  self	
  Identity	
  –	
  our	
  concept	
  of	
   faith	
  –	
  were	
  fractured	
  and	
  removed,	
  would	
  our	
  self-­‐identity	
  and	
  concept	
  of	
  reality	
   crumble,	
  and	
  the	
  belief	
  in	
  our	
  being	
  fail?	
  Would	
  we	
  question	
  our	
  very	
  existence?”	
   	
   	
    I	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  successful	
  the	
  set	
  was	
  in	
  conveying	
  this	
  question,	
  but	
  the	
    physical	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  set	
  successfully	
  captured	
  this	
  idea.	
  The	
  gangways	
  between	
   the	
  stage	
  right	
  and	
  upstage	
  center	
  revolve	
  and	
  between	
  the	
  stage	
  left	
  and	
  upstage	
   center	
  revolve	
  would	
  grow	
  larger	
  when	
  the	
  revolves	
  were	
  placed	
  at	
  certain	
  angles,	
   and	
  from	
  far	
  house	
  right	
  and	
  far	
  house	
  left,	
  these	
  gangways	
  appeared	
  even	
  larger.	
   The	
  void	
  left	
  in	
  these	
  spaces	
  did	
  successfully	
  represent	
  the	
  fracturing	
  reality	
  of	
  the	
   play	
  and	
  the	
  non-­‐existence	
  that	
  broke	
  into	
  it.	
   	
   	
    114	
    	
    From	
  a	
  design	
  perspective,	
  these	
  gaps	
  as	
  seen	
  from	
  far	
  house	
  right	
  and	
  far	
    house	
  left	
  were	
  larger	
  than	
  I	
  had	
  anticipated	
  and	
  I	
  felt	
  this	
  detracted	
  from	
  the	
   overall	
  composition	
  of	
  the	
  set.	
  But	
  the	
  Director	
  did	
  successfully	
  fill	
  these	
  voids	
  with	
   actors	
  at	
  certain	
  moments	
  in	
  the	
  show,	
  adding	
  another	
  element	
  to	
  the	
  philosophy	
  of	
   the	
  design,	
  as	
  these	
  characters	
  can	
  be	
  seen	
  as	
  ideas	
  coming	
  into	
  existence	
  from	
  the	
   void.	
   	
   	
    The	
  set	
  also	
  served	
  quite	
  successfully	
  as	
  a	
  “box	
  set”	
  typically	
  found	
  in	
    television	
  sit-­‐coms.	
  The	
  gangways	
  or	
  voids	
  between	
  the	
  revolves	
  acted	
  as	
  gutters	
   dividing	
  the	
  frames	
  which	
  the	
  audience	
  had	
  to	
  compose	
  psychologically	
  within	
  their	
   own	
  minds	
  to	
  form	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  the	
  locale.	
   	
   Figure	
  5.9	
  	
  	
  Composing	
  the	
  Box	
  Set	
    	
   	
   This	
  added	
  dimension	
  also	
  served	
  to	
  represent	
  my	
  scenic	
  metaphor	
  of	
  the	
   “Existential	
  Cube”	
  as	
  the	
  three	
  revolves	
  formed	
  three	
  sides	
  of	
  the	
  cube.	
  The	
  deck	
  and	
   the	
  static	
  door	
  fly	
  formed	
  two	
  more	
  and	
  the	
  fourth	
  wall	
  formed	
  the	
  sixth.	
  From	
  this	
   	
    115	
    perspective,	
  the	
  audience	
  is	
  viewing	
  the	
  play	
  from	
  the	
  missing	
  sixth	
  wall	
  of	
  the	
  cube	
   or	
  from	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  faith	
  and	
  viewing	
  the	
  actions	
  of	
  the	
  play	
  through	
  this	
  lens.	
   	
   	
    Overall,	
  I	
  believe	
  this	
  design	
  served	
  to	
  represent	
  the	
  major	
  themes	
  and	
    concepts	
  I	
  wished	
  to	
  explore	
  and	
  convey	
  to	
  the	
  audience.	
  An	
  element	
  I	
  would	
  add	
  to	
   this	
  design,	
  if	
  I	
  could,	
  would	
  be	
  the	
  crumbling	
  sense	
  of	
  reality	
  by	
  having	
  elements	
  of	
   the	
  structure	
  deteriorate	
  and	
  fall	
  away,	
  leaving	
  a	
  vast	
  emptiness	
  or	
  void	
  for	
  the	
  final	
   scene.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  also	
  varied	
  the	
  direction	
  of	
  the	
  revolve	
  turns	
  in	
  the	
  second	
  act	
   to	
  add	
  to	
  the	
  sense	
  of	
  Judith’s	
  crumbling	
  reality.	
   	
   If	
  I	
  were	
  to	
  redesign	
  this	
  set,	
  I	
  would	
  build	
  a	
  large	
  two-­‐story	
  cube	
  on	
  a	
   mechanical	
  revolve	
  and	
  project	
  onto	
  the	
  surfaces	
  of	
  the	
  cube.	
   	
   Figure	
  5.10	
  	
  	
  Judith	
  K.	
  Just	
  Before	
  her	
  Reality	
  Crumbles	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    116	
    6	
  	
  	
  Conclusion	
   	
   	
  “The	
  Trial	
  of	
  Judith	
  K.”	
  is	
  a	
  piece	
  of	
  theatre	
  with	
  serious	
  existential	
  themes.	
   The	
  Director	
  did	
  well	
  to	
  approach	
  this	
  play	
  from	
  its	
  more	
  comic	
  aspects,	
  heightening	
   the	
  absurd	
  and	
  humorous	
  elements	
  of	
  the	
  show	
  and	
  balancing	
  the	
  gravity	
  of	
  its	
   philosophical	
  underpinnings	
  and	
  gruesome	
  execution	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  play.	
   	
   Approaching	
  the	
  scenic	
  design	
  by	
  exploring	
  the	
  philosophical	
  themes	
  in	
  the	
   play	
  and	
  structuring	
  the	
  design	
  around	
  elements	
  of	
  graphic	
  narrative	
  and	
  cartoon	
   animation	
  worked	
  well	
  with	
  the	
  Director’s	
  approach	
  to	
  this	
  piece.	
   	
   Together	
  we	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  light,	
  fun	
  piece	
  of	
  theatre	
  that	
  the	
  audience	
   could	
  engage	
  with	
  and	
  be	
  entertained	
  by	
  while	
  still	
  conveying	
  the	
  major	
  themes	
  we	
   wished	
  to	
  express.	
   	
   The	
  Director	
  and	
  I	
  worked	
  well	
  together	
  on	
  this	
  show	
  and	
  together	
  I	
  believe	
   we	
  created	
  an	
  engaging	
  piece	
  of	
  theatre.	
   	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    117	
    Figure	
  6.1	
  	
  	
  The	
  Nun	
  tells	
  “The	
  Parable	
  of	
  the	
  Door”	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    	
    	
   	
    	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   	
    118	
    Bibliography	
   	
   Sartre,	
  Jean-­‐Paul.	
  Being	
  and	
  Nothingness:	
  a	
  Phenomenological	
  Essay	
  on	
  Ontology.	
   Trans.	
  Hazel	
  E.	
  Barnes.	
  New	
  York:	
  Washington	
  Square	
  Press.	
  1992.	
  Print.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    119	
    

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