UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Multivalent monoclonal antibodies as improved cancer therapies : proof-of-concept and mechanistic studies.. Popov, Jesse 2012-12-31

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
ubc_2012_spring_popov_jesse.pdf [ 4.86MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0072637.json
JSON-LD: 1.0072637+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0072637.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0072637+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0072637+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0072637+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0072637 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0072637.txt
Citation
1.0072637.ris

Full Text

MULTIVALENT MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AS IMPROVED CANCER THERAPIES:  PROOF‐OF‐CONCEPT AND MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING RITUXIMAB‐LIPID NANOPARTICLES  by    Jesse Popov    B.Sc., B.Mus., The University of Western Ontario, 2004      A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY    in    THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (Interdisciplinary Oncology)        THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)        March 2012          © Jesse Popov, 2012 • ii   Abstract  This  body  of  work  describes  a  novel  methodology  for  discovering  and  developing  new  cancer drugs based on  therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.   Such antibodies generally contain  two  sites where  they bind  to  their  target, but  interesting  improvements are often observed when  the  valence (number of target‐binding sites)  is  increased above two.   The methodology outlined  in this  dissertation  involves  using  liposomes  to  prepare  multivalent  antibody‐lipid  nanoparticle  formulations of different valence that can be utilized for preclinical drug development.    As  a proof‐of‐concept, we  applied  the methodology  to  rituximab,  a  therapeutic  antibody  used  to  treat  lymphomas and  leukemias.   For  the  same dose of  rituximab, multivalent  rituximab‐ lipid nanoparticles with valences up to ~250 showed significantly elevated anticancer activity from  enhanced complement‐dependent cytotoxicity, antibody‐dependent cell‐mediated cytotoxicity, and  direct  induction of apoptosis.   A valence‐dependent  improvement  in apoptosis  in  lymphoma cells  was  observed  up  to  levels  that  were  21‐fold  higher  than  those  observed  after  treatment  with  bivalent rituximab.  We subsequently employed the different valences of multivalent rituximab to investigate its  poorly  defined  direct  mechanism  of  action.    We  uncovered  a  novel  mechanism  consisting  of  upregulation and activation of CD120a which led to ensuing apoptosis.  Effector cells of the immune  system  were  capable  of  hypercrosslinking  rituximab  on  lymphoma  cells  and  reproducing  this  mechanism,  suggesting  that  it  contributes  to  the  in vivo  cytotoxicity of  regular bivalent  rituximab  therapy.  The methodology described  in  this dissertation  can  therefore  serve  to  identify antibodies  that are more active as multivalent  rather  than bivalent molecules, define  the optimal valence of  such antibodies, and elucidate the mechanism of action of the new multivalent drugs.  Furthermore,  we illustrate that this information applies to other types of constructs with similar valences, enabling  use  of  the  methodology  for  advancing  both  liposomal  and  non‐liposomal  multivalent  antibody  formulations to preclinical maturity.    Finally,  this work  suggests  that  every  therapeutic  antibody may  have  a  different  valence  where  it shows optimal therapeutic activity.   For example, antibodies directed against targets that  exert therapeutic effects upon clustering may show maximum activity at valences above two. This  methodology  can easily be applied  to other antibodies  in an effort  to develop  superior  therapies  against nearly any type of cancer.      • iii   Preface    A version of Chapter 2 has been published [Popov J, Kapanen AI, Turner C, Ng R, Tucker C,  Chiu G, Klasa R, Bally MB, Chikh G. Multivalent rituximab lipid nanoparticles as improved lymphoma  therapies: Indirect mechanisms of action and in vivo activity. Nanomedicine 2011 Nov;6(9):1575‐91].   I collaborated primarily with Dr. Ghania Chikh for collection of data  in this article, and  I wrote the  manuscript  based  on  a  preliminary  draft  by  Dr.  Chikh.    I  obtained  the  content  in  Chapters  3–6  independently; I planned and carried out all experiments, performed data analysis, prepared figures,  and wrote manuscripts for future publication.  A  separate  article  resulting  from  collaboration with  the  laboratory  of  Dr.  Ruth  Signorell  (Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia) was also published and referenced in this  dissertation  [Weiss A, Preston TC, Popov  J,  Li Q, Wu  S, Chou KC, Burt HM, Bally MB,  Signorell R.  Selective recognition of rituximab‐functionalized gold nanoparticles by lymphoma cells studied with  3D imaging. J Phys Chem C 2009 Oct 21;113(47):20252‐8].  All experiments involving the use of animals were completed in accordance with the current  guidelines of the Canadian Council of Animal Care.   The University of British Columbia Animal Care  Committee  reviewed  and  approved  certificate  numbers  A05‐1582  and  A06‐1537  for  the  animal  studies carried out in Chapter 2 (in vivo efficacy of rituximab and rituximab‐lipid nanoparticles, and  pharmacokinetics of rituximab‐lipid nanoparticles).      This document is written using United States English spelling.   • iv   Table of Contents    Abstract ......................................................................................................................................... ii  Preface .......................................................................................................................................... iii  Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... iv  List of Tables ................................................................................................................................ xii  List of Figures .............................................................................................................................. xiii  List of Abbreviations ..................................................................................................................... xv  Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................... xvii  Dedication ................................................................................................................................. xviii  1    Introduction: Developing novel therapies for treating cancer ................................................. 1    1.1    Overview ................................................................................................................................. 1    1.2    Liposomal formulations .......................................................................................................... 2        1.2.1    Liposomes in cancer treatment .................................................................................... 2        1.2.2    What are Ab‐LNPs? ....................................................................................................... 3    1.3    Therapeutic monoclonal Abs .................................................................................................. 6        1.3.1    Rituximab and CD20 ..................................................................................................... 8    1.4    The mechanisms of action of therapeutic monoclonal Abs ................................................... 9        1.4.1    Complement‐dependent cytotoxicity ........................................................................ 10        1.4.2    Ab‐dependent cell‐mediated cytotoxicity .................................................................. 10        1.4.3    Direct mechanisms of action of Rtx and other therapeutic Abs ................................ 12    1.5    Apoptosis as a target in cancer therapy ............................................................................... 14    1.6    Multivalent Abs as improved therapies ................................................................................ 15        1.6.1    Characteristics of multivalent Ab constructs and a definition of valence .................. 15        1.6.2    Examples of multivalent interactions in biology and their physical basis .................. 17 • v         1.6.3    Descriptions of multivalent Abs that exhibit superior efficacies ............................... 19    1.7    Multivalent Ab‐LNPs and the content of this dissertation ................................................... 20  2    Indirect mechanisms and in vivo activity of multivalent rituximab‐lipid nanoparticles ...........22    2.1    Synopsis ................................................................................................................................ 22    2.2    Background ........................................................................................................................... 22        2.2.1    Complement‐dependent cytotoxicity of Rtx .............................................................. 22        2.2.2    Ab‐dependent cell‐mediated cytotoxicity of Rtx ....................................................... 23        2.2.3    Does  the  creation  of  Rtx‐LNPs  affect  the  indirect  mechanisms  and  in  vivo  properties of Rtx? ....................................................................................................... 24    2.3     Materials and methods ......................................................................................................... 24        2.3.1    Reagents and cell lines ............................................................................................... 24        2.3.2    Preparation of multivalent Ab‐LNPs ........................................................................... 26        2.3.3    Measurement of cell‐surface protein expression levels ............................................ 28        2.3.4    In vivo xenograft models to assess Rtx efficacy ......................................................... 28        2.3.5    Quantification of Ab‐LNPs bound to cells .................................................................. 28        2.3.6    Annexin‐V/PI flow cytometry‐based apoptosis assay ................................................ 29        2.3.7    Assay for measuring levels of complement‐dependent cytotoxicity ......................... 30        2.3.8    Assay for the quantification of Ab‐dependent cell‐mediated cytotoxicity ................ 30        2.3.9    Quantification of activated natural killer cells ........................................................... 31        2.3.10   In vivo xenograft models for Rtx‐LNP efficacy studies ............................................... 31        2.3.11   In vivo studies on the pharmacokinetics of Rtx‐LNP .................................................. 32    2.4    Results ................................................................................................................................... 33        2.4.1    Characterization of Z138 and  JVM2 cell  lines: surface protein expression  levels  and in vivo response to Rtx treatment ....................................................................... 33        2.4.2    Rtx‐LNPs bind specifically to JVM2 and Z138 cells and induce apoptosis .................. 35 • vi         2.4.3    Multivalent Rtx‐LNPs elicit superior complement‐dependent cytotoxicity and Ab‐ dependent cell‐mediated cytotoxicity compared with Rtx ........................................ 38        2.4.4    Rtx‐LNP induces the activation of natural killer cells ................................................. 40        2.4.5    In vivo efficacy of multivalent Rtx‐LNP ....................................................................... 41        2.4.6    Pharmacokinetics of Rtx and Rtx‐LNP ........................................................................ 44    2.5     Discussion and conclusions ................................................................................................... 45        2.5.1    Discussion ................................................................................................................... 45        2.5.2    Conclusions ................................................................................................................. 48  3    Improved methodology for preparing multivalent antibody‐lipid nanoparticles ....................50    3.1    Synopsis ................................................................................................................................ 50    3.2     Background ........................................................................................................................... 50        3.2.1    The need to produce a new method for creating many valences of Ab‐LNPs ........... 50        3.2.2    How the new methodology overcomes previous limitations .................................... 51    3.3    Materials and methods ......................................................................................................... 52        3.3.1    Materials ..................................................................................................................... 52        3.3.2    Preparation of Neut‐micelles ..................................................................................... 53        3.3.3    Preparation of Neut‐LNP ............................................................................................ 53        3.3.4    CBQCA  assay  for  measuring  protein  concentration  in  solution  or  Ab‐LNP  suspension .................................................................................................................. 54        3.3.5    Ammonium ferrothiocyanate assay for measuring polyethylene glycol content in  LNPs ............................................................................................................................ 54        3.3.6    Ab biotinylation on a nickel immobilized metal affinity chromatography column .... 55        3.3.7    Ab biotinylation in solution ........................................................................................ 56        3.3.8    HABA/avidin assay for measuring the extent of Ab biotinylation .............................. 56        3.3.9     Coupling of Rtx‐biotin to Neut‐LNP to create Rtx‐LNP ............................................... 57 • vii     3.4    Results ................................................................................................................................... 57        3.4.1    Overview of the improved methodology for creating Ab‐LNPs of different valence  57        3.4.2    Preparation of Neut‐LNP and measurement of protein content ............................... 59        3.4.3    Direct measurement of levels of post‐inserted polyethylene glycol in Neut‐LNP ..... 61        3.4.4    Ab biotinylation on a nickel immobilized metal affinity chromatography support ... 62        3.4.5    Different  Ab‐LNP  valences  are  achieved  by  taking  advantage  of  the  slow  association dynamics between Ab‐biotin and Neut‐LNP ........................................... 65    3.5    Discussion and conclusions ................................................................................................... 67        3.5.1    Discussion ................................................................................................................... 67        3.5.2    Conclusions ................................................................................................................. 69  4    Unique biological properties of rituximab‐lipid nanoparticles ................................................71    4.1    Synopsis ................................................................................................................................ 71    4.2    Background ........................................................................................................................... 71        4.2.1    Properties of different types of multivalent anti‐CD20 Abs ....................................... 71        4.2.2    Hypotheses concerning the observed increases in apoptosis induced by Rtx‐LNP ... 73    4.3     Materials and methods ......................................................................................................... 74        4.3.1    Materials ..................................................................................................................... 74        4.3.2    Cell lines ...................................................................................................................... 74        4.3.3    Preparation of Rtx‐LNPs ............................................................................................. 75        4.3.4    Measurement of levels of bound Rtx and free CD20 after treatment with Rtx or  Rtx‐LNP ....................................................................................................................... 75        4.3.5    Confocal laser‐scanning fluorescence microscopy of treated cells ............................ 76        4.3.6     Measurement of total CD20 levels in treated cells .................................................... 76        4.3.7    Measurement of mitochondrial activity using AlamarBlue ....................................... 77        4.3.8    Annexin‐V/PI apoptosis assay using flow cytometry ................................................. 77 • viii     4.4     Results ................................................................................................................................... 78        4.4.1    Rtx‐LNPs exhibit unique binding properties to CD20+ target lymphoma cells ........... 78        4.4.2    Rtx‐enriched domains are found on cells treated with Rtx‐LNP but not on those  treated with bivalent Rtx ............................................................................................ 82        4.4.3    Expression of CD20 does not change substantially after treatment with Rtx‐LNP .... 83        4.4.4    Cytotoxicity of Rtx‐LNPs in two lymphoma cell lines ................................................. 85        4.4.5    Time dependence of apoptosis induced in lymphoma cells by Rtx‐LNP .................... 86        4.4.6    Levels of apoptosis in lymphoma cells depend on the valence of Rtx‐LNP ............... 89    4.5     Discussion and conclusions ................................................................................................... 90        4.5.1    Discussion ................................................................................................................... 90        4.5.2    Conclusions ................................................................................................................. 93  5    A novel direct mechanism of action of multivalent rituximab ................................................94    5.1    Synopsis ................................................................................................................................ 94    5.2    Background ........................................................................................................................... 94        5.2.1    Extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways ................................................................. 94        5.2.2    The  death‐inducing  signaling  complex  and  the  tumor  necrosis  factor  receptor  superfamily ................................................................................................................. 95        5.2.3    Death receptors .......................................................................................................... 96        5.2.4    Deciphering the direct mechanism of action of multivalent Rtx ............................... 97    5.3    Materials and methods ......................................................................................................... 98        5.3.1    Materials and cell lines ............................................................................................... 98        5.3.2    Preparation of Rtx‐LNPs ............................................................................................. 98        5.3.3    Assay for quantifying caspase‐8 levels in treated cells .............................................. 99        5.3.4    Profiling of caspases and inhibition of caspase‐8 ..................................................... 100        5.3.5    Measurement of levels of death receptors using flow cytometry ........................... 100 • ix         5.3.6    Annexin‐V/PI  apoptosis  assay  and  measurement  of  CD120a  levels  within  apoptotic subpopulations......................................................................................... 101        5.3.7    Confocal laser‐scanning fluorescence microscopy ................................................... 102        5.3.8    Preparation of Rtx‐MS .............................................................................................. 103    5.4    Results ................................................................................................................................. 103        5.4.1    Caspase dependence of Rtx‐LNP‐induced apoptosis ............................................... 103        5.4.2    Dependence of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member expression  on apoptosis induced by Rtx‐LNP ............................................................................. 106        5.4.3    CD120a is equally upregulated in viable and early apoptotic cells after treatment  with Rtx‐LNP ............................................................................................................. 109        5.4.4    Time course and valence dependence of CD120a upregulation .............................. 111        5.4.5    Colocalization of caspase‐8 and CD120a .................................................................. 113        5.4.6    CD120a  upregulation  and  direct  induction  of  apoptosis  result  from  Rtx  multivalency and not the liposomal component of Rtx‐LNP .................................... 115    5.5    Discussion and conclusions ................................................................................................. 118        5.5.1    Discussion ................................................................................................................. 118        5.5.2    Conclusions ............................................................................................................... 121  6    In vivo relevance of a CD120a‐dependent mechanism of action of rituximab ...................... 122    6.1    Synopsis .............................................................................................................................. 122    6.2    Background ......................................................................................................................... 122        6.2.1    The biology and function of CD120a ........................................................................ 122        6.2.2    Plasma membrane rafts ........................................................................................... 124        6.2.3    Studying plasma membrane rafts ............................................................................ 126            6.2.3.1    Detergent‐resistant membranes ...................................................................... 126            6.2.3.2  Manipulation of plasma membrane cholesterol content ................................. 127 • x         6.2.4    Can the direct mechanism of action of bivalent Rtx involve CD120a in vivo? ......... 128    6.3    Materials and methods ....................................................................................................... 129        6.3.1    Materials and cell lines ............................................................................................. 129        6.3.2    Preparation of Rtx‐LNP and Rtx‐MS ......................................................................... 130        6.3.3    Depletion and augmentation of plasma membrane cholesterol levels ................... 130        6.3.4    Use of  flow cytometry  to determine  levels of apoptosis or expression  levels of  cell‐surface proteins ................................................................................................. 131        6.3.5    Assay for quantifying the detergent resistance of plasma membrane‐associated  proteins .................................................................................................................... 131        6.3.6    Confocal laser‐scanning fluorescence microscopy ................................................... 132        6.3.7    Experiments  using  Ramos  cells  pretreated  with  Rtx  or  A568‐Rtx  followed  by  addition of 2oAb or 2oAb‐MS .................................................................................... 132        6.3.8    Coculture of treated Ramos cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.133    6.4     Results ................................................................................................................................. 135        6.4.1    Apoptosis induced by multivalent Rtx is cholesterol‐dependent ............................ 135        6.4.2    Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis using simvastatin sensitizes cells  to Rtx‐LNP‐ induced apoptosis .................................................................................................... 140        6.4.3    A model of Rtx hypercrosslinking that occurs in vivo after normal Rtx therapy ...... 142        6.4.4    CD120a  that  is  excluded  from  plasma  membrane  rafts  is  colocalized  with  hypercrosslinked Rtx‐enriched patches ................................................................... 145        6.4.5    Effector  cells  induce  elevated  apoptosis  and  CD120a  expression  only  in  lymphoma cells treated with Rtx .............................................................................. 149    6.5    Discussion and conclusions ................................................................................................. 151        6.5.1    Discussion ................................................................................................................. 151        6.5.2    Conclusions ............................................................................................................... 155 • xi   7    Discussion  and  conclusions:  Antibody‐lipid  nanoparticles  as  a  promising  tool  in  cancer  drug development ............................................................................................................... 156    7.1    Recapitulation ..................................................................................................................... 156    7.2    Discussion concerning Ab‐LNPs and other multivalent Ab constructs ............................... 157        7.2.1    Strengths and weaknesses of Ab‐LNPs as a tool for developing new drugs ............ 157        7.2.2    The use of whole Abs in Ab‐LNPs versus Ab fragments ........................................... 158        7.2.3    Relevance of the direct mechanism of action of therapeutic Abs studied in vitro  in the absence of hypercrosslinking ......................................................................... 160        7.2.4    The nature of the interaction between Ab‐LNPs and the surface of target cells .... 162    7.3    Discussion on the mechanism of action of Rtx ................................................................... 163        7.3.1    The issue of rapid clearance of multivalent Rtx remains unresolved ...................... 163        7.3.2    Local concentrations of CD20  in the plasma membrane, and not the number of  Rtx‐CD20  interactions, determine the  level of apoptosis  induced by multivalent  Rtx ............................................................................................................................. 165        7.3.3    The direct mechanism of action of Rtx may not exclusively  involve CD120a, but  also other death receptors and signaling molecules ................................................ 166        7.3.4    CD120a  expression  levels  or  mutation  status  as  predictive  markers  for  Rtx  response ................................................................................................................... 167        7.3.5    Statins in combination with Rtx therapy .................................................................. 169    7.4    Future work ........................................................................................................................ 171    7.5    Conclusions ......................................................................................................................... 172  References ................................................................................................................................. 174 • xii   List of Tables    Table 1.1    Pharmacokinetic variables and tumor localization of Trz‐LNP .......................................... 6  Table 1.2    Selected therapeutic monoclonal Abs approved or under development in oncology ..... 7  Table 3.1    Comparison  of  Ab  yields  between  current  and  previous  methods  of  Ab‐LNP  production ....................................................................................................................... 58  Table 3.2    PEG content of 0.5 mL fractions during purification of Neut‐SUV .................................. 62       • xiii   List of Figures    Figure 1.1  Ab‐LNPs exhibit enhanced therapeutic responses  in vitro compared to equal doses  of Ab .................................................................................................................................. 4  Figure 1.2    Trz‐LNP  exhibits  improved  in  vivo  efficacy  in  an  LCC6ErbB2  breast  cancer  model  compared to Trz................................................................................................................. 5  Figure 2.1    Phenotypic characterization of JVM2 and Z138 cell lines and in vivo response to Rtx  treatment ......................................................................................................................... 34  Figure 2.2    Binding of Rtx‐LNPs to target cells and direct induction of apoptosis ............................ 36    Figure 2.3    In vitro levels of Rtx‐mediated CDC and ADCC are augmented when Rtx is presented  to cells as multivalent Rtx‐LNP  ....................................................................................... 39  Figure 2.4    NK cell activation upon treatment of Z138 cells with different forms of Rtx  ................. 41  Figure 2.5    Efficacy study for Rtx‐LNP ................................................................................................ 43  Figure 2.6    Pharmacokinetics of Rtx‐LNP in two mouse models ....................................................... 45  Figure 3.1    Overview of the improved methodology for preparing multivalent Ab‐LNPs ................ 59  Figure 3.2    Control over Neut and PEG content during the preparation of Neut‐LNPs .................... 61  Figure 3.3    Ab biotinylation on a NIMAC column allows for easy purification, high recovery, and  precise degree of biotinylation  ....................................................................................... 64  Figure 3.4    Control over the valence of Rtx‐LNP when coupling Rtx‐biotin to Neut‐LNP ................. 66  Figure 4.1    Levels of bound Rtx and unbound CD20 show an inverse correlation when cells are  treated with bivalent Rtx but not with Rtx‐LNP .............................................................. 79  Figure 4.2    Representative  confocal  fluorescence  microscopy  images  of  Rtx  distribution  on  Ramos cells treated with Rtx or Rtx‐LNP ......................................................................... 83  Figure 4.3    Time course of plasma‐membrane CD20 expression in Ramos cells treated with Rtx  or Rtx‐LNP ........................................................................................................................ 85  Figure 4.4    Particularly  at  higher  doses,  Rtx‐LNPs  are  significantly  more  cytotoxic  than  equivalent doses of free Rtx ............................................................................................ 86  Figure 4.5    Rtx‐LNPs  directly  induce  apoptosis  in  lymphoma  cells  while  the  individual  precursors to Rtx‐LNP do not .......................................................................................... 88  Figure 4.6    A  valence‐dependent  increase  in  the  level  of  apoptosis  is  observed  in  Rtx‐LNP‐ treated lymphoma cells even though all cells are given equal doses of Rtx ................... 89 • xiv   Figure 5.1    Rtx‐LNP‐induced apoptosis is dependent on the activation of caspase‐8 .................... 104  Figure 5.2    CD120a expression is dramatically elevated in lymphoma cells after treatment with  Rtx‐LNP  ......................................................................................................................... 107  Figure 5.3    CD120a levels are elevated in the viable and apoptotic fractions of Rtx‐LNP‐treated  cells 8 h after treatment  ............................................................................................... 109  Figure 5.4    CD120a  expression  levels  in  the  plasma  membrane  are  highest  at  8  h  post‐ treatment and are valence‐dependent ......................................................................... 112  Figure 5.5    Two  slices  of  the  same  representative  non‐necrotic  Ramos  cells  24  h  after  treatment with different valences of Rtx‐LNP  .............................................................. 114  Figure 5.6    Apoptosis via upregulation of CD120a  is not an effect of the  liposomal component  of the formulation of Rtx‐LNP ....................................................................................... 117  Figure 6.1  The manipulation of plasma membrane Chol  content using MBCD or MBCD/Chol  significantly impacts the ability of multivalent Rtx to induce apoptosis ....................... 136  Figure 6.2    Cells  that  are  rescued  from  apoptosis  by  increasing  the  plasma membrane  Chol  content show elevated levels of raft‐associated CD120a ............................................. 139  Figure 6.3    Simvastatin decreases  the DR of CD120a and sensitizes cells  to apoptosis  induced  by Rtx‐LNP ...................................................................................................................... 141  Figure 6.4    A model for the hypercrosslinking of Rtx that occurs in vivo by FcγR‐bearing effector  cells ................................................................................................................................ 143  Figure 6.5    Membrane  raft‐associated  CD120a  is  excluded  from  regions  enriched  in  hypercrosslinked  Rtx/CD20,  and  non‐raft  CD120a  is  colocalized  with  hypercrosslinked Rtx/CD20 ........................................................................................... 146  Figure 6.6    Human  PBMCs  induce  significantly  higher  levels  of  apoptosis  and  plasma‐ membrane CD120a expression in lymphoma cells pretreated with Rtx compared to  non‐pretreated cells ...................................................................................................... 150         • xv   List of Abbreviations    2oAb  secondary antibody  [3H]CHE  [3H]cholesteryl hexadecyl ether  A###‐τ  Alexa Fluor ###‐labeled antibody against antigen τ        e.g. A647‐CD120a = Alexa Fluor 647 labeled anti‐CD120a antibody  Ab  antibody  ADCC  antibody‐dependent cell‐mediated cytotoxicity  AF  ammonium ferrothiocyanate  AFC   7‐amino‐4‐trifluoromethyl coumarin  BB  binding buffer  BCA  bicinchoninic acid  CBQCA  3‐(4‐carboxybenzoyl)quinoline‐2‐carboxaldehyde  CDC  complement‐dependent cytotoxicity  CFSE  carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester  Chol  cholesterol  CLL  chronic lymphocytic leukemia  CTX  cholera toxin B subunit  D649  DyLight 649  DISC  death‐inducing signaling complex  DLBCL   diffuse large B‐cell lymphoma  DMSO  dimethyl sulfoxide  DR  detergent resistance  DSPC  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphocholine  DSPE‐PEG  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphoethanolamine‐N‐[methoxy(polyethylene   glycol)‐2000]  DSPE‐PEG‐biotin  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphoethanolamine‐N‐[biotinyl(polyethylene glycol)‐  2000]  DSPE‐PEG‐Mal  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphoethanolamine‐N‐[maleimide(polyethylene   glycol)‐2000]  DTT  dithiothreitol  EB  elution buffer  EDTA  ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid  ELISA  enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay  FAM  carboxyfluorescein  FcγR  IgG Fc receptor  FcεRI   IgE Fc receptor I  FITC  fluorescein isothiocyanate  FL  follicular lymphoma  FLICA  fluorescent inhibitor of caspase  FMK  fluoromethyl ketone  FSC  forward scatter  HABA  4‐hydroxyazobenzene‐2‐carboxylic acid  HEPES  2‐[4‐(2‐hydroxyethyl)piperazin‐1‐yl]ethanesulfonic acid  HBS  HEPES buffered saline  HMG‐CoA   3‐hydroxy‐3‐methylglutaryl coenzyme A  IgE/IgG  immunoglobulin E/immunoglobulin G  IL  interleukin  IP  intraperitoneally • xvi   IV  intravenous/intravenously  LNP  lipid nanoparticle  Luc  luciferase  LV  lentivirus  Mal  maleimide  MCL  mantle cell lymphoma  MS  microsphere  Neut  NeutrAvidin  NHL  non‐Hodgkin’s lymphoma  NHS‐PEG‐biotin  N‐Hydroxysuccinimide ester‐dPEG4‐biotin  NIMAC  nickel immobilized metal affinity chromatography  NK  natural killer  NP  nanoparticle  PBMC  peripheral blood mononuclear cell  PBS  phosphate buffered saline  PE  phycoerythrin  PEG  polyethylene glycol  PI  propidium iodide  Prz  pertuzumab  QLS  quasi‐elastic light scattering    Rtx  rituximab  Rtx‐LNP(α)  rituximab‐lipid nanoparticle of valence α  ROI  region of interest  SB  stripping buffer  SC  subcutaneous/subcutaneously  SCID  severe combined immunodeficiency  SD  standard deviation  SPDP  N‐Succinimidyl 3‐(2‐pyridyldithio)propionate  SSC  side scatter  SUV  small unilamellar vesicle  TNFα  tumor necrosis factor α  TNFR  tumor necrosis factor receptor  TRAPS  TNFR‐associated periodic syndrome  Trz  trastuzumab  TX100  Triton X‐100  wrt  with respect to       • xvii   Acknowledgements    I would  like  to offer my gratitude  to my  supervisor, Dr. Marcel Bally,  for his  support and  guidance in my graduate studies, and for encouraging my growth as a scientist.  I would also like to  acknowledge  the other members of my  supervisory committee, Dr. Pieter Cullis and Dr.  I. Robert  Nabi for their scientific direction.    I would  like  to  give  special  thanks  to  the members  of  the  Department  of  Experimental  Therapeutics  at  the  British  Columbia  Cancer  Research  Centre,  both  the  laboratory  and  administrative groups, who provided assistance and encouragement with my work.  I would also like  to thank the Interdisciplinary Oncology Program (College for Interdisciplinary Studies), who provided  support as well as financial assistance in the form of travel awards.    I would also like to thank Dr. Gert Storm, my supervisor during a six‐month work term at the  Utrecht  Institute  for Pharmaceutical Sciences at Utrecht University, The Netherlands.   Some data  found  in Chapter 4 was obtained during  this  time,  including  confocal  laser‐scanning  fluorescence  microscopy  images  which  were  obtained  at  the  Center  for  Cellular  Imaging  in  the  Faculty  of  Veterinary Medicine, and I would like to thank Dr. Richard Wubboltz and Esther van ‘t Veld for help  and technical advice.    I would also like to acknowledge the generous financial support from the following sources:   Canadian Institutes of Health Research   Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research   British Columbia Innovation Council   Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council    Finally,  a  heartfelt  thank  you  to my  friends,  family,  and  partner  Sébastien  for  their  love,  encouragement, and enduring support.   • xviii     Dedication      To my father     • 1   1  Introduction: Developing novel therapies for treating cancer  1.1  Overview  The goal of the work presented in this dissertation is to create new drug technologies for the  treatment  of  cancer.    It  involves  a  novel  methodology  for  discovering  and  developing  new  treatments  based  on  therapeutic monoclonal  antibodies  (Abs),  a  class  of  drugs  that  hold  great  promise  in  cancer  treatment1,  2.    The methodology makes  use  of  a  drug  formulation  based  on  liposomes,  a  type of  lipid nanoparticle  (LNP)  that normally  serves  to  enhance  the delivery of  an  encapsulated chemotherapeutic drug to the site of disease and therefore increase its efficacy3.  One  common  way  to  further  improve  this  favorable  targeting  effect  is  by  attaching  tumor‐specific  proteins or peptides to the liposome surface4‐6.  We generated such Ab‐LNP constructs by attaching  several copies of the therapeutic Abs rituximab (Rtx) or trastuzumab (Trz) to the exterior surface of  the liposome, with the exception that the liposome interior was devoid of chemotherapy.  Strikingly,  these Ab‐LNPs exhibited much higher efficacy in vitro and in vivo than Ab or bare liposomes alone7.  Given  the  absence  of  encapsulated  drug,  the mechanism  by  which  Ab‐LNPs  exert  their  effects is distinct from the changes in drug pharmacokinetics and biodistribution normally attributed  to  liposomal formulations3, 8.   Because of this entirely abnormal behavior, the mechanism of action  of  these  promising Ab‐LNP  constructs was  completely  elusive,  but  the mechanism  of  action  is  a  critical element for further preclinical and clinical development of such drug technologies.  The work  presented  in  this  dissertation  began with  efforts  to  uncover  the  unique mechanism  of  action  of  these  constructs.    The  outcomes were  not  only  the  uncovering  of  a  novel mechanism  of  action  explaining  the  enhanced  efficacy  of  Rtx‐LNPs  and  Rtx  itself,  but  also  the  creation  of  a  novel  methodology  with  clear  potential  in  the  pharmaceutical  industry  for  discovering,  studying,  and  developing new cancer treatments based on therapeutic monoclonal Abs.   • 2   1.2  Liposomal formulations  1.2.1  Liposomes in cancer treatment  Liposomes are nanometer‐scale particles made up of one or more hydrophobic lipid bilayers  that  enclose  an  internal  aqueous  compartment.    There  are  currently  four  approved  liposomal  formulations for the treatment of cancer, and at  least 14  in Phase  I clinical trials or later stages of  development9.    In  cancer  treatment,  liposomes  are  traditionally  used  as  drug  delivery  vehicles,  where  a  chemotherapeutic  agent  is  encapsulated  within  the  liposome  and  the  drug‐liposome  complex accumulates at the tumor site8.  The main mechanism by which this occurs is the enhanced  permeability and retention effect, also referred to as passive targeting.  It results from the passage  of  liposomes  through  tumor  vasculature,  which  unlike  normal  vasculature,  is  permeable  to  liposomes  and  macromolecules.    Because  tumors  exhibit  poor  lymphatic  drainage,  liposomes  subsequently accumulate at the site of the tumor10.  Compared to administration of the same dose  of  free drug,  concentrations of drug at  the  tumor  site  can be 10‐fold or higher3.   Such enhanced  delivery to target cell populations at the site of disease, without an associated increase in toxicity, is  instrumental in achieving therapeutic improvement of the encapsulated drug8.  As a method to further refine the specificity of targeting, the attachment of target‐specific  proteins or peptides to the drug carrier surface has received considerable attention4‐6.   This results  in active targeting of the liposome and its contents to the tumor site.  The targeting protein is most  commonly a  tumor‐specific Ab, and such constructs are therefore termed  immunoliposomes.   Abs  are selected on the basis of their ability to bind to target molecules at the disease site; when these  Abs are coupled to  liposomes containing chemotherapy,  liposome targeting  is regularly enhanced6,  11,  12.    It  has  been  shown,  however,  that  the  chemical modification  of  the  protein  required  for  conjugation  to  liposomes  impairs  the  function of  the Ab13‐15.   With  the advent of monoclonal Abs  such  as  Rtx  and  Trz  (Section  1.3),  the  targeting  Ab  itself  can  exhibit  a  therapeutic  response  in • 3   addition to encapsulated drug (Section 1.3).   Surprisingly, previous work from our  laboratory using  “empty immunoliposomes” containing a therapeutic Ab (rather than simply a targeting Ab) indicated  that  coupling  the  Ab  to  the  liposome  actually  benefited  its  therapeutic  activity7.    These  special  constructs have been termed Ab‐LNPs.   1.2.2  What are Ab­LNPs?  Ab‐LNPs consist of many therapeutic Ab molecules tethered to the outer surface of a small  unilamellar vesicle (SUV), creating a construct with a diameter of approximately 130 nm.  An SUV is a  type of liposome that contains one lipid bilayer surrounding an aqueous interior, and in the current  application,  the bilayer  contains  a mixture of phospholipids,  cholesterol  (Chol),  and polyethylene  glycol  (PEG)  (see Section 2.3.2 and Chapter 3  for more detail)16, 17.   The PEG  serves  specifically  to  block the binding of plasma proteins to the Ab‐LNPs; in the absence of PEG, such binding results in  uptake by the reticuloendothelial system and results in significantly decreased circulation lifetime of  the formulation18, 19.        Ab‐LNPs employ liposomes strictly as scaffolds to bridge many Ab molecules together, which  is distinct from the traditional use of  liposomes, which actively or passively target an encapsulated  drug.    In  fact,  due  to  the  lack  of  encapsulated  drug,  the  advantages  normally  associated  with  liposomal  formulations  discussed  in  Section  1.2.1  (improvements  in  pharmacokinetics  and  biodistribution of an encapsulated drug) are not applicable to Ab‐LNPs3, 8.  In order to emphasize this  distinction  in  liposome  function and mechanism of  action,  the  term  “Ab‐LNP”  is employed rather  than other terms such as “liposomal antibody” or “empty immunoliposome.”    Previous  studies  from  our  laboratory made  use  of  Ab‐LNPs  prepared with  two  different  therapeutic Abs, Rtx and Trz7.  As shown in Figure 1.1, these studies demonstrated that even though  cells were given the same dose of Rtx or Trz, the Abs exhibited significantly higher activities against  different cancer cell lines when the Abs were attached to the liposome as Ab‐LNPs.  • 4       Figure 1.1  Ab‐LNPs exhibit enhanced therapeutic responses in vitro compared to equal doses of Ab†.  (A & B) Two different  lymphoma cell  lines  (Ramos and Z138) were treated  for 3 days with Rtx  (white columns), Rtx‐LNP  (gray columns), or Rtx and a crosslinking secondary Ab  (2oAb)  (black columns).    (C & D) Two different breast cancer cell  lines (LCC6ErbB2 and MCF7ErbB2) were treated for 5 days with Trz (white columns) or Trz‐LNP (gray columns) in the presence  of heregulin.    “Fraction affected” was  calculated by determining  the  fraction of  remaining viable  cells using  the 3‐(4,5‐ dimethylthiazol‐2‐yl)‐2,5‐diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and subtracting this value from 1.   Columns: mean of three  independent experiments; bars: standard error; *p < 0.05, #p < 0.05, compared with the free Ab treatment.    The  in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetics of Trz‐LNPs were also examined  to determine  if  these favorable effects were observed in vivo.  As shown in Figure 1.2, the in vivo efficacy of Trz‐LNP  was shown to be significantly higher  than that of Trz.   The pharmacokinetics of Trz‐LNP were also  studied and compared to those of Trz; as shown in Table 1.1, Trz‐LNP exhibited significantly elevated  Trz plasma  levels after 24 h  compared  to  free Trz, as well as enhanced  tumor  localization of Trz,  explaining the increased efficacy that was observed7.                                                               †Adapted and reprinted by permission from the American Association for Cancer Research: Chiu, G.N.C. et  al.,  Modulation  of  Cancer  Cell  Survival  Pathways  Using  Multivalent  Liposomal  Therapeutic  Antibody  Constructs, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, 2007, vol. 6(3), 844–55.   A                 Ramos                           B                   Z138    C                LCC6ErbB2                         D                 MCF7ErbB2  • 5        Figure 1.2  Trz‐LNP exhibits improved in vivo efficacy in an LCC6ErbB2 breast cancer model compared to Trz†.  (A) In vivo efficacy of Trz‐LNP in the LCC6ErbB2 breast cancer model.  Trz‐LNP was administered at 0.25 mg/kg (), 0.5 mg/kg  (), and 1 mg/kg () IV twice weekly for 5 weeks starting on day 18 after inoculation of tumor cells.  Ab‐LNP containing  an irrelevant Ab () was administered at 1 mg/kg according to the same dosing schedule, and saline () was used as the  vehicle control.  (B) Fold‐change in tumor volume after 5 weeks of various treatments (controls and Trz‐LNP) according to  the same dosing schedule.  Controls: a, saline; b, irrelevant Ab; c, Trz (1.0 mg/kg); d, irrelevant Ab‐LNP; e, bare liposomes.   *p < 0.05 compared with Trz.   Data represent means obtained  from using six mice  in each study group.   Bars: standard  error.        This was  the  first  report describing enhanced activity of drugs attached  to  the outside of  liposomes, where the liposomes serve a purely structural role.  These studies therefore established  that Ab‐LNPs exhibited novel  therapeutic activity  that could not be explained by passive or active  targeting of an encapsulated drug, so  the improvements  in Ab efficacy resulted  from an unknown  mechanism of action  that remained elusive.   The complications  in understanding  this mechanistic  puzzle  were  due,  wholly  or  in  part,  to  the  fact  that  the  mechanisms  of  the  therapeutic  Abs  themselves are not clearly delineated.      A B Controls         Trz‐LNP dose  (mg/kg) 0.2 5 0.5 0 1.0a b c d e• 6   Table 1.1  Pharmacokinetic variables and tumor localization of Trz‐LNP†.  Pharmacokinetic comparisona:    Trz  Trz‐LNP  Plasma levels at 24 h (μg/mL)  2.91 ± 0.13  27.7 ± 1.3  AUC0‐24 h (μg ∙ h ∙ mL−1)b  88.7  883  Total body clearance (mL ∙ h‐1)  4.04  0.386  Volume of distribution at steady state (mL)  277  29.7  MRTlast (h)  9.64  10.3  Tumor localizationa:    Control liposome  Trz‐LNP  % Injected dose/g tumor at 24 h 3.84 ± 2.4  13.9 ± 3.4      Abbreviations:  AUC0‐24 h: Area under the curve from time of dosing (t = 0 h) up to the last measured plasma concentration  (t = 24 h); MRTlast: Mean residence time, calculated using values up to the last measured plasma concentration (t = 24 h). a For plasma elimination studies, 12 animals were used for each study group, with four animals used for each time point of  blood collection (at 1, 4, and 24 h). For tumor localization study, four animals were used for each study group, and tumors  were harvested at 24 h.   b Noncompartmental analysis based on the  linear trapezoidal rule was done using the software WinNonlin version 1.5 to  estimate the values of various pharmacokinetic variables.    1.3  Therapeutic monoclonal Abs  Therapeutic monoclonal Abs are a class of drugs that hold great promise in cancer treatment  due to their ability to target and kill cancer cells while leaving healthy cells in the body unaffected.   This  concept  of  using  “magic  bullets”  to  treat  disease  was  proposed  as  early  as  1897  by  Paul  Ehrlich20.  It was not until 1975, however, that the development of therapeutic Abs as targeted drugs  became  possible  with  the  invention  of  hybridoma  technology,  allowing  for  the  production  of  monoclonal  Abs  of  predefined  antigen  specificity21.   Monoclonal  Abs  were  thought  to  be  ideal  candidates  for  administration  in  humans  because  of  their  specificity  to  a  single  epitope  on  their  corresponding antigen, but early therapeutic Abs were antigenic  in humans due  to their origins  in  mice, limiting their clinical potential22, 23.    Starting  in  the  early  1980s,  protein  engineering  techniques  allowed  for  replacement  of  mouse  regions  of  the  Ab molecules  with  corresponding  regions  of  human  origin,  reducing  the • 7   mouse‐specific  immunogenic  response when administered  in humans.   Chimeric Abs  refer  to Abs  with  antigen‐binding  regions  coded  by  genes  of mouse  origin  and  constant  regions  from  human  genes.  Humanized Abs refer to a genetically engineered mouse Ab where the protein sequence has  been modified  to  increase  the  similarity of  the Ab  to human Abs22, 23.    Subsequent  technological  advances have allowed fully human therapeutic Abs to also be produced24‐26.    The first monoclonal Ab to be approved for use  in oncology was Rtx  in 199727, 28, and over  the past decade, the market for therapeutic monoclonal Abs has grown exponentially29‐31.  Over 30  Abs  and  their  derivatives  have  been  approved  for  use  in  various  indications,  including  10  in  oncology, and there are hundreds in the late stages of preclinical and clinical development31.  Table  1.2 shows a selection of therapeutic monoclonal Abs that are currently approved for use in treating  cancer, or at late stages of clinical trials.      Table 1.2  Selected therapeutic monoclonal Abs approved or under development in oncology.    Generic name  Trade name  Target  Ab format  Cancer indication  Status  Refs.  Rituximab (Rtx)  Rituxan/Mabthera  CD20  Chimeric IgG1  NHL  Approved  27, 28  Trastuzumab (Trz)  Herceptin  ErbB2  Humanized IgG1  Breast  Approved  32, 33  Alemtuzumab  Campath/MabCampath CD52  Humanized IgG1  CLL  Approved  34  Cetuximab  Erbitux  EGFR  Chimeric IgG1  Colorectal  Approved  35  Bevacizumab  Avastin  VEGFA Humanized IgG1  Colorectal, breast, lung  Approved  36  Panitumumab  Vectibix  EGFR  Human IgG2  Colorectal  Approved  24  Ofatumumab  Arzerra  CD20  Human IgG1  CLL  Approved  25, 37  Pertuzumab (Prz)  Omnitarg  ErbB2  Humanized IgG1  Breast, ovarian  Phase III  38, 39  Veltuzumab  N/A   CD20  Humanized IgG1  NHL, CLL  Phase III  40, 41    Abbreviations:  CLL: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia; N/A: Not applicable; NHL: Non‐Hodgkin lymphoma.    Even though in humans there are five classes of immunoglobulin (IgM, IgD, IgG, IgA, and IgE)  as well as four  IgG subclasses  (IgG1,  IgG2,  IgG3, and  IgG4), by far most therapeutic Abs are of the  IgG1  subtype  (Table 1.2).   This  is because  IgG1 exhibits a  long half‐life  in blood  (~21 days) and  it  elicits more  favorable  indirect mechanisms of action  (see Sections 1.4.1 & 1.4.2) compared  to  the • 8   other  Ig  classes and  subclasses42.   Cancer patients  treated with  therapeutic Abs  typically need  to  receive weekly doses of  several hundred milligrams over  several months  to maintain an effective  serum concentration of over 10 μg/mL43.   The 150 kDa Y‐shaped structure of  IgGs can be divided  into two distinct functional units: the fragment of antigen binding (Fab; the v‐shaped upper part of  the molecule) and the constant fragment (Fc), which are connected at a site called the hinge region.   The Fab region contains two identical sites where the Ab (drug) binds its antigen (target), while the  Fc region interacts with specific effector cells of the immune system1.  The Fab and Fc regions each  are responsible for different mechanisms of action of therapeutic Abs, as described in Section 1.4.   1.3.1  Rituximab and CD20  Rtx  is  often  heralded  as  a  “blockbuster”  Ab  given  its widespread  success  in  significantly  improving  the  survival  statistics  for  B‐cell  non‐Hodgkin  lymphomas  (NHLs),  as  well  as  other  malignancies  such  as  chronic  lymphocytic  leukemia  (CLL)  and  autoimmune  disorders  such  as  rheumatoid arthritis31, 44.   As opposed to more recently developed Abs, which are often humanized  or  fully human molecules, Rtx  is a  chimeric Ab  containing a murine variable  region attached  to a  human IgG1 constant region.    The target of Rtx is CD20, a 33 to 37 kD membrane‐associated phosphoprotein that is highly  expressed on all normal and most malignant B  cells, but not other cells  in  the body, making  it an  attractive target for B cell‐based therapy.   CD20  is not detected on embryonic stem or pro‐B cells,  but is expressed on the surface of mature B cells; expression ceases upon differentiation into plasma  cells.   The protein spans the plasma membrane four times and there  is some evidence that  it may  function in calcium entry45, 46.  It has been shown to form tetramers which associate with the B cell  antigen receptor in unstimulated cells, and upon antigen binding, CD20 is released and it associates  transiently with phosphoproteins and calmodulin‐binding proteins, which regulate calcium entry47.  • 9   Most  anti‐CD20  therapeutic  Abs  do  not  internalize  upon  binding  to  CD2040.    Despite  its  proven  success as a target for Ab therapy, the precise function of CD20 is still elusive.   1.4  The mechanisms of action of therapeutic monoclonal Abs  In general,  the precise mechanisms of action of  therapeutic Abs are not completely clear,  and they vary from Ab to Ab.  The activity of a given therapeutic Ab is commonly viewed as resulting  from a combination of indirect and direct effects that occur after the Ab binds to  its target44.   The  indirect  and  direct  mechanisms  are  mediated  by  the  Fc  and  Fab  regions  of  the  Ab  molecule,  respectively.    The indirect mechanisms are related to the action of the immune system on target cells that  are  coated with  therapeutic  Ab.    They  involve  the  interaction  of  specific  cell‐surface  or  plasma  proteins with the Fc region of the therapeutic Ab molecule; since the Fc region is common to most  therapeutic Abs, it is not surprising that the indirect mechanisms are common to all therapeutic Abs.   Specifically,  the  two  indirect mechanisms are known as complement‐dependent cytotoxicity  (CDC;  Section 1.4.1)  and Ab‐dependent  cell‐mediated  cytotoxicity  (ADCC;  Section  1.4.2).    The  Fc  region  possesses  interaction  sites  for  ligands  which  can  induce  effector  functions,  including  three  structurally  homologous  cellular  IgG  Fc  receptor  types  (FcγRI,  FcγRII,  FcγRIII)  as well  as  the  C1q  component  of  the  complement48.    Even  though  every  therapeutic  Ab  elicits  CDC  and  ADCC,  the  relative contributions of the two mechanisms vary from one Ab to the next44, 49, 50.    As opposed to the Fc region‐mediated indirect mechanisms, the direct mechanism of action  of a  therapeutic Ab  results  from  the physical  interaction of  its  two  identical Fab  regions with  the  target on the cell surface48 (Section 1.4.3).  The direct mechanism is therefore Ab‐specific, and highly  variable  between  different  Abs;  for  example,  the  direct  mechanism  of  action  can  result  in  therapeutic effects such as growth inhibition, chemosensitization, or induction of apoptosis51.  • 10   1.4.1  Complement­dependent cytotoxicity  As part of the  innate  immune system, complement  is one of the main mechanisms of Ab‐ mediated immunity and is responsible for protecting the host from attack by intruding pathogens.  It  was first identified as a serum component that “complemented” Abs in order to kill bacteria, but we  now know today that it consists of more than 30 proteins found in the plasma and on the surfaces of  cells52,  53.    Activation  of  complement  occurs  after  distinct  events  that  trigger  different  protease  cascades known as  the classical, mannose‐binding  lectin, and alternative pathways.   For example,  the classical pathway is activated by the binding of the complement protein C1q to the Fc region of  the Ab on the surface of an invading pathogen or on a cancer cell coated with therapeutic Ab.  The  final result of all  three complement pathways  is  the assembly of a 5–10 nm diameter membrane‐ attack complex on the foreign cell, which causes cell death by disrupting the plasma membrane53, 54.   Complement  is  finely regulated so  that  it  is activated on  foreign Ab‐coated cells  (resulting  in their  elimination) but not on normal cells52.  For  the  induction  of  strong  CDC  activity  during  monoclonal  Ab  therapy,  relatively  high  expression of target antigen is required in order to attain sufficiently high Ab levels on the tumor‐cell  surface to initiate CDC.  It is also clear that higher amounts of bound C1q to the Fc region of the Ab  correlate with elevated levels of CDC43, 54.  Moreover, given the importance of CDC in the mechanism  of action of  therapeutic Abs,  several  strategies have been employed  to enhance CDC  in new Abs  under  development,  such  as  amino  acid  mutations  that  enhance  CDC  through  improved  C1q  binding55, 56.    Another  strategy  involves  shuffling  IgG1  and  IgG3  sequences within  a  heavy  chain  constant  region, since  IgG3 exhibits superior CDC compared  to  the other  IgG  isotypes, while  IgG1  exhibits  higher  ADCC,  the  other  principal  indirect mechanism  of  action57.    A  discussion  of  CDC  relating specifically to Rtx is provided in Section 2.2.1.   • 11   1.4.2  Ab­dependent cell­mediated cytotoxicity  ADCC  results  from  the  interaction  between  effector  cells  of  the  immune  system  and  a  foreign cell coated with Ab.  Effector cells contain IgG Fc receptors (FcγRs) that bind to the Fc region  of IgG molecules, and they consist of macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, granulocytes, and other  types  of  leukocytes43, 58.    FcγRs  can  be  classified  as  activating  or  inhibitory;  for  example,  FcγRIa,  FcγRIIa,  FcγRIIc and  FcγRIIIa, are activating  receptors,  while  FcγRIIb  is an  inhibitory  receptor.   NK  cells  and  granulocytes  contain  only  activating  FcγRs,  and  are  therefore  better  inducers  of  ADCC  compared to macrophages, which contain both activating and  inhibitory FcγRs54.   When activating  FcγRs  on  effector  cells  are  crosslinked  by  IgG  bound  to  its  target,  activation  of  the  effector  cell  occurs  and  results  in phagocytosis of  the  target  cell or  cell  lysis  through  the  release of  cytotoxic  granules by the effector cell43, 54, 58.  When studied in vitro, ADCC resulting from therapeutic Ab treatment can be achieved at Ab  concentrations below 10 ng/mL, which  is  several orders of magnitude  lower  than  the  required  in  vivo  serum  concentrations  mentioned  in  Section  1.3  (ref.  43).    This  discrepancy  results  from  competition between endogenous human serum  IgG and therapeutic Abs for binding to activating  FcγR on effector cells (such as FcγRIIIa on NK cells), which leads to the requirement of a significant  amount of drug, contributing to the very high costs associated with such therapies58.    Different Abs against the same target show variable  levels of ADCC, and the magnitude of  induced ADCC does not correlate with the density of the target on the cell surface, underscoring the  complexity of  this mechanism of action59.   Since  increased ADCC has been shown  to enhance  the  efficacy of therapeutic Abs, strategies for  improving ADCC activity occupy an  important role  in the  development of the next generation of therapeutic Abs58.   Some approaches  include modifications  of glycosylation of the Ab that result in enhanced ADCC58, 60, 61 as well as amino acid mutations that  result in enhanced binding to FcγRIIIa62‐64.    Properties relating to the ability of Rtx to induce ADCC  are described in further detail in Section 2.2.2.    • 12   1.4.3  Direct mechanisms of action of Rtx and other therapeutic Abs  Because  the  direct mechanism  of  a  therapeutic Ab  is  highly Ab‐specific,  it  depends  on  a  multitude of factors.  These include the molecular biology of the target, the nature of the interaction  between Ab and target, and the specific characteristics of the target cell, such as mutation status,  target  expression  levels,  and  expression of proteins  that  regulate  activation of  the  target51.    The  direct mechanisms of therapeutic Abs are therefore far less well‐defined and more variable than the  indirect ones, even when  looking at direct mechanisms of different Abs directed against the same  target.    One such example  is  two  therapeutic Abs used  in  the  treatment of breast cancer, Trz and  pertuzumab (Prz)32, 65.  Both of these Abs are directed against ErbB2 (also known as Her2 or EGFR2),  which  is overexpressed  in 15‐30% of  invasive breast  carcinomas,  and which  is predictive of poor  prognosis66.   The ErbB  family  includes  four  receptor  tyrosine kinases with a common extracellular  ligand‐binding  domain.   Upon  ligand  binding,  various  homodimers  and  heterodimers  are  formed  among  the  four  family members,  resulting  in  the activation of  intracellular pathways  that control  survival and cell cycle progression.   Dysregulation of  this kinase pathway,  resulting  in constitutive  activation, has been shown to regulate tumor growth in a variety of cancers67.    Trz  acts  by  binding  to  the  extracellular  juxtamembrane  domain  of  ErbB2.    This  causes  dimerization of ErbB2 and  subsequent  internalization and downmodulation of  the protein on  the  tumor  surface.    Downstream  signaling  from  ErbB2  overexpression  therefore  ceases,  resulting  disruption of cell‐cycle progression and inhibition of the growth of metastases68‐70.  Prz, on the other  hand, binds to an epitope on the extracellular domain of ErbB2 that sterically inhibits the ability of  ErbB2 to form ligand‐activated dimer complexes.  This does not result in downmodulation like with  Trz, but instead it causes inhibition of ErbB signaling by disrupting the vast array of different ligand‐ dependent receptor combinations that exist in the ErbB kinase pathway71. • 13   Because of  the differences  in direct mechanisms of action, Trz  requires overexpression of  ErbB2 on the cell surface in order to have therapeutic activity, and it shows low activity when ErbB2  is not overexpressed.   Prz, however,  is highly effective at  inhibiting  tumor growth when ErbB2  is  overexpressed or when ErbB2 expression is low71.  Moreover, the two Abs together have also been  shown  to  show  synergistic effects  against breast  cancer  cells  in  vitro72  and  against  in  vivo breast  cancer xenografts73, and  the  combination exhibited  favorable  response  rates  in patients who had  progressed following previous Trz therapy38.  The direct mechanism of action of Rtx involves a different mechanism: it is known to consist  of  induction of apoptosis  in  target cells.   Generally,  in  the absence of ADCC and CDC  in vitro, Rtx  exhibits low levels of cytotoxicity in neoplastic cells unless it is crosslinked with a reagent such as an  anti‐human‐IgG secondary Ab (2oAb).   This has been demonstrated with established cell  lines7, 74, 75  as well as primary cells76.  This direct effect is generally thought to result from clustering of CD20 in  the plasma membrane, and since  it has been shown to occur  in the absence of ADCC or CDC, the  direct mechanism also plays a role in the overall mechanism of action of Rtx.    It has been postulated that in vivo, such a direct mechanism may occur as a result of FcγR‐ mediated hypercrosslinking of Rtx by NK cells and other effector cells, since it is known that Rtx and  other therapeutic Abs mediate FcγR crosslinking in the induction of ADCC43, 54, 58.  Such direct effects  may be responsible for a substantial proportion of the cytotoxic effects of Rtx therapy, although this  has not been definitively shown77.  Moreover, a direct mechanistic link between Rtx crosslinking and  apoptosis has not been established, so it is not understood how crosslinking can result in apoptosis.   The crosslinking of therapeutic Abs is further discussed in Section 1.6.  Taken together, the complex nature of the mechanism of action of therapeutic Abs makes it  difficult  to define  features of  specific Abs  that, upon modulation, would  increase or decrease  the  efficacy of the Ab.  Several strategies for improving the activity of therapeutic Abs by increasing CDC • 14   or ADCC were mentioned above, and equivalent strategies can also be employed for enhancing the  Ab‐specific direct mechanisms of action.    In  the case of Abs  such as Rtx whose direct mechanism  consists of induction of apoptosis, methods to enhance levels of apoptosis would have clear benefit  in improving these drugs.    1.5  Apoptosis as a target in cancer therapy  Evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer78, and a large and promising focus in  cancer  research  involves  inducing apoptosis  specifically  in cancer cells but not  in normal cells79‐82.   Apoptosis  is  the  process  of  programmed  cell  death,  and  is  conserved  across  all metazoans;  it  is  necessary  under  normal  physiological  conditions  at  all  stages  of  life.    During  embryonic  development,  apoptosis  is  essential  for organogenesis  and  the  formation of multicellular  tissues,  where  it  ensures  the  proper  balance  of  each  differentiated  cell  lineage,  and  in  adult  organisms,  apoptosis maintains normal cellular homeostasis83.    In multicellular organisms, the total number of cells is a balance between new cells created  through  mitosis  and  cells  that  die  through  apoptosis80.    Different  studies  have  shown  that  disruptions  in  this  balance  due  to  altered  apoptotic  signaling  can  be  primary  pathogenic  events  resulting  in disease. Accelerated  cell death  is evident  in acute and chronic degenerative diseases,  immunodeficiency,  and  infertility,  while  insufficient  apoptosis  can manifest  as  autoimmunity  or  cancer80, 83.    Apoptosis  can  be  contrasted  to  necrosis,  which  is  traumatic  cell  death  following  acute  cellular  injury  such as  rupture of  the plasma membrane, and which may  lead  to an  inflammatory  response.  Apoptosis, on the other hand, is a controlled process that leads to characteristic changes  in biochemistry and morphology before death.  Morphological changes include condensation of the  chromatin and DNA  fragmentation,  reduction of  cell  volume,  cytoskeletal  rearrangement, plasma  membrane blebbing, and eventual  formation of  small vesicles known as apoptotic bodies.   These • 15   apoptotic bodies are rapidly phagocytosed by macrophages so the dead cell is removed without any  inflammatory response81.    One early biochemical change in apoptosis is the loss of plasma membrane lipid asymmetry.   This  results  in  the  exposure of  phosphatidylserine  in  the outer  leaflet of  the plasma membrane,  which under normal conditions is present almost exclusively in the inner leaflet84.  The appearance  of phosphatidylserine in the extracellular leaflet can be used to identify cells in early apoptosis using  fluorescently‐labeled conjugates of Annexin‐V, a protein that interacts strongly and specifically with  phosphatidylserine.  Using appropriate protocols, labeled Annexin‐V conjugates can be employed in  applications such as flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy85.    Apoptosis signaling most often results from activation of the caspases, a family of cysteine  proteases that also plays a role in inflammation.  To date, 12 human caspases have been discovered,  and each is activated by cleavage of its procaspase precursor.  Cleavage is often performed by other  activated caspases, resulting in different proteolytic cascades82, 86, 87.  When a cell receives a stimulus  to die,  caspase  signaling begins with  the  cleavage of one or more  specific  initiator  caspases;  this  early  event  corresponds  to  the  loss  of  plasma  membrane  asymmetry  and  appearance  of  phosphatidylserine  in  the  outer  leaflet  of  the  plasma  membrane84,  85.    Specific  molecular  mechanisms related to the direct induction of apoptosis by Rtx and Rtx‐LNP are discussed in greater  detail in Sections 5.2 and 6.2.    1.6  Multivalent Abs as improved therapies   1.6.1  Characteristics of multivalent Ab constructs and a definition of valence  As mentioned in Section 1.4.3, Rtx induces low levels of apoptosis in target cells unless it is  crosslinked with a 2oAb7, 74‐76.   The  importance of  this mechanism  in vivo was provided by studies  showing  that cross‐linked Rtx  induced apoptosis  in a dose‐ and  time‐dependent manner  in  freshly • 16   isolated clinical samples of B‐CLL cells, in the absence of ADCC and CDC76.  To make use of this effect  in vivo  is a challenge because clearly, administration of a 2oAb  is not feasible.     A different method  that has been shown  to  result  in  induction of apoptosis  is  the use of multivalent Rtx constructs75,        88‐90.  The  valence  of  a multivalent  ligand  is  defined  as  the  number  of  target‐binding  sites  it  contains.  For example, normal therapeutic Abs are bivalent molecules because they are IgGs (Table  1.2), which contain  two  identical sites where  they bind  to  their  target.   Multivalent Ab constructs  possess valences of three or higher, and consist of two or more Ab molecules and/or Fab fragments  bound together in a stable configuration.  In general, the valence of a multivalent Ab prepared using  whole  IgG will be equal  to  twice  the number of  IgG molecules per construct;  for example, an  IgG  dimer produced by chemically crosslinking two IgG molecules has a valence of four.  Rtx, as well as a  variety of other Abs, have been shown  in some cases to be more efficacious as multivalent rather  than bivalent constructs (see Section 1.6.3).    Multivalent Abs of  low valence  (<10) can be Ab or Ab‐like molecules produced by protein  engineering and/or recombination techniques89, 91, or can involve coupling Ab or fragments together  using crosslinking chemistry with or without molecular scaffolds92.  Higher valences can achieved by  coupling  Abs  to  nanostructures  consisting  of  different  types  of  polymers93,  dendrimers94,  95,  rotaxanes92, or gold nanoparticles96.  Regardless of the type of construct, multivalent Abs are able to  crosslink their target in the plasma membrane without the need for a crosslinking 2oAb.  When the  crosslinking  involves  more  than  two  proteins  being  bridged,  creating  an  extensive  network  of  crosslinked  target  due  to  the  numerous  binding  sites  on  the  multivalent  Ab,  the  term  “hypercrosslinking” is employed.    The  increased  efficacy  of many multivalent  Abs  is  related  to  the  fact  that  they  exhibit  different properties  compared  to  their bivalent  counterparts.   Conversion of Abs  into multivalent  formats  has  been  shown  to  result  in  increased  functional  affinity  toward  the  cell‐surface  target, • 17   decreased  dissociation  rates,  enhanced  biodistribution,  and  longer  in  vivo  half‐life97,  98.    These  characteristics provide  the basis  for mechanisms  of  enhancements  (or  inhibitions) of  therapeutic  activity that are fundamentally different in the multivalent case compared to the bivalent one99.    1.6.2  Examples of multivalent interactions in biology and their physical basis  Multivalent interactions are found throughout biology and are necessary for processes such  as adhesion of viruses or bacteria to the surface of cells, binding of transcription factors to multiple  sites on DNA, and Abs interacting with macrophages and other immune effector cells through their  Fc  regions99.    In  nature,  examples  of  biological molecules with  clustered  and  repeated  epitopes  include  biopolymers  such  as  polysaccharides,  proteoglycans,  filamentous  proteins,  and  DNA100.  Besides  Abs,  other  types  of  multivalent  ligands  include  carbohydrates,  peptides,  and  small  molecules, all of which demonstrate enhanced binding affinity to targeted tissue15.  A multivalent  interaction  consists,  in  theory, of  a  complex  created by  an  initial univalent  interaction  where  the  local  concentrations  of  the  remaining  free  binding  sites  on  both  species  become greatly enhanced due to their close proximity15.  Due to this increase in effective ligand and  target  concentrations,  there  is  a  significantly  higher  probability  that  subsequent  ligand‐target  interactions will result after the first univalent interaction.  This increased probability translates into  a higher avidity of the multivalent ligand.  Avidity refers to the association constant of a polyvalent  interaction,  as  opposed  to  affinity,  which  refers  to  the  association  constant  of  a  univalent  interaction; avidity is usually greater than the sum of constituent affinities for a multivalent ligand99,  100.  Kinetic  studies  have  shown  that  enhanced  avidity  results  from  decreases  in  the  rate  of  dissociation of the multivalent ligand from its target, rather than increases in the rate of association;  a greater number of univalent interactions must be broken99.  While some are being broken, others  continue to  form, resulting  in recapture of the  ligand before the  ligand‐target complex dissociates • 18   completely100.  From a molecular point of view, the avidity of a multivalent interaction results from  the  length  and  flexibility  of  the  linker(s),  the  strength  of  the  noncovalent  forces  involved,  the  number of binding elements, and the conformational freedom of the multivalent construct101.   On  top of an enormous diversity of constructs in terms of the materials employed, significant work has  also been described on the configuration, architecture, and spacing of the target‐binding sites102, 103.    The  effects  of  multivalency  can  result  in  many  biological  consequences;  for  example,  multivalent  ligands can be strong  inhibitors, particularly  if they bind to a receptor whose agonistic  ligand is monovalent; there is significant therapeutic interest in creating such multivalent ligands104.   Multivalent interactions can also serve to induce specific geometric shapes in the plasma membrane  such as clathrin‐coated pits99.   They may also play a role  in the grading of biological responses; for  example, macrophages cannot ingest a pathogen based on recognizing a single Ab Fc region with its  FcγRs,  but  more  Fc‐FcγR  associations  strengthen  the  interaction  between  pathogen  and  macrophage, increasing the likelihood that the pathogen will be cleared99.    Interactions between Fc  regions on antibody‐coated cells with FcγRs  in general constitute  multivalent interactions; FcγR crosslinking, a multivalent interaction, is required for the initiation of  ADCC  by  NK  cells  and  other  types  of  effector  cells  (Section  1.4.2).   Moreover,  initiation  of  the  classical  complement  cascade  requires  a multivalent  interaction;  C1q  is  a  hexavalent  ligand  and  requires binding to many Fc regions of Ab molecules on the surface of a pathogen or cancer cell in  order  for  CDC  to  result105, 106  (Section  1.4.1).    In  cell  signaling  processes,  there  are  innumerable  examples of multivalent ligands that cause receptor activation due to oligomerization.  Clustering of  the  receptor  results  in  signal amplification because many  receptors become  activated by a  single  ligand, which creates high local concentrations of activated receptor and which also causes exclusion  of negative modulators107, 108.   For example, tumor necrosis factor α  (TNF‐α), the  ligand to CD120a  (Tumor  necrosis  factor  receptor  1  (TNFR1)),  is  a  trivalent  ligand  that  is  capable  of  binding  and  crosslinking  three CD120a molecules;  receptor  clustering  is  required  for  the activation of CD120a • 19   and the subsequent initiation of diverse signaling processes ranging from proliferation to apoptosis  (see Section 6.2.1).    Taken together, these descriptions highlight that multivalent  interactions are ubiquitous  in  nature.  They also illustrate that even though a univalent and multivalent ligand may share the same  target‐binding site, they exhibit distinct physiochemical and biochemical properties that can result in  remarkably different biological responses.  1.6.3  Descriptions of multivalent Abs that exhibit superior efficacies  Although  all  therapeutic Abs differ  in  terms of  their direct mechanism of  action  (Section  1.4.3),  the  multimerization  of  many  bivalent  therapeutic  Abs  that  are  approved  or  under  development  has  been  shown  to  enhance  their  associated  biological  responses7, 74, 89, 109‐113.    For  example, using two different breast cancer cell  lines, one that responds to Trz and one that  is Trz‐ resistant,  it  was  shown  that  creating  multivalent  Trz  by  coupling  it  to  magnetic  microspheres  resulted in therapeutic effects in both cell lines including the Trz‐resistant one110.  Another example  illustrated that multivalent Trz constructs with valences up to four showed significantly higher levels  of growth  inhibition compared to Trz, and similarly constructed multivalent therapeutic anti‐death  receptor 5 (DR5) Abs showed equivalent levels of apoptosis to bivalent Ab at doses that were ~100‐ fold lower89.  Consistent with  the  requirement of crosslinking of Rtx  in order  to  induce apoptosis, many  many multivalent anti‐CD20 designs have been described,  including  tetravalent Rtx dimers88, Rtx‐ dextran polymers  (valence ~10) and nanoparticles  (NPs) prepared by coupling Rtx to Dynabeads75,  trivalent and tetravalent Rtx constructs obtained through protein engineering89, Rtx coupled to gold  nanoparticles96, anti‐CD20 multivalent branched copolymer‐Fab conjugates15, and hexavalent anti‐ CD20 created using  the Dock‐and‐Lock method90.    In general,  the multivalent constructs exhibited • 20   superior binding to target cells along with elevated responses  in vitro and  in vivo; these responses  are described in greater detail in Section 4.2.  One  type of multivalent Ab not  listed  above  is Ab‐LNPs.    In  fact, before  the experiments  described in Section 1.2.2 (ref. 7) were carried out, the use of a liposome as a nanoscale scaffold for  creating a multivalent therapeutic Ab had not been considered.  This may be surprising in light of the  interest  surrounding  immunoliposomes,  but  the  focus  of  such  work  had  always  been  to  target  encapsulated  chemotherapy;  the Abs employed  therefore possessed  targeting properties and not  necessarily  therapeutic activity  (Section 1.2).   Since  the work  in  this dissertation began, only one  report describing a  similar application of  liposomes has been published; Oliveira et al. describe a  situation where anti‐EGFR nanobodies coupled to empty liposomes resulted in enhanced anticancer  activity through downregulation of EGFR114.  The work presented herein shows that Ab‐LNPs provide  a  convenient,  useful,  and  promising  means  for  the  preclinical  discovery  and  development  of  liposomal and non‐liposomal therapeutic Abs.    1.7  Multivalent Ab­LNPs and the content of this dissertation    The work  in  this dissertation makes use of  the  therapeutic Ab Rtx  in order  to prove  the  concept that Ab‐LNPs are multivalent therapeutic Ab constructs with enhanced activity compared to  bivalent Ab.  It also sets the groundwork for developing improved multivalent drugs based on other  therapeutic Abs.   Section 1.2.2 illustrated that the direct mechanism of action of Rtx  (induction of  apoptosis) is enhanced when cells are treated with equal doses of Rtx‐LNP instead of Rtx.  Chapter 2  serves to examine how the coupling of Ab to Ab‐LNP affects the indirect mechanisms of action (CDC  and ADCC), since the improved direct mechanism should not occur at the cost of decreased indirect  mechanisms.    This  chapter  also  examines  the  in  vivo  efficacy  and  pharmacokinetics  of  Rtx‐LNP.   Next,  to  study  the  direct  mechanism  of  action  of  Rtx‐LNP,  it  was  necessary  to  prepare  many  different valences of Rtx‐LNP, but the available methods for coupling Abs to liposomes were found • 21   to  be  unsuitable.    Chapter  3  describes  a  superior methodology  that was  developed  for  creating  numerous  Ab‐LNP  constructs  of  different  valence  from  the  same  Ab.    This methodology  shows  significant improvements in terms of yield of coupled Ab, time required to produce many valences,  and reproducibility.      Chapter 4 makes use of the new methodology to prepare many different Rtx‐LNP valences in  order  to  examine  their  novel  physiochemical  and  biological  properties.    These  include  binding  characteristics as well as  improvements  in their therapeutic activity  in CD20+  lymphoma cells.   This  chapter establishes a  relationship between  the valence of a multivalent Rtx‐LNP construct and  its  ability  to  induce apoptosis.   The work  in Chapter 5 employs  the different  valences of Rtx‐LNP  to  uncover  a  novel  molecular  mechanism  of  action  of  Rtx‐LNP  that  explains  its  ability  to  induce  apoptosis.    This  is  extended  into  Chapter  6,  where  it  is  shown  that  conditions  involving  the  interaction of  immune effector cells with lymphoma cells coated with bivalent Rtx give rise to the  same mechanism,  suggesting  that  it  is  also  a mechanism  of  action  of  bivalent  Rtx  under  in  vivo  conditions.  This provides compelling evidence of a defined direct mechanism of action of Rtx, which  so far has not been described.    Overall,  this  proof‐of‐concept  serves  to  illustrate  that  the methodology  described  in  this  dissertation  would  be  invaluable  in  the  development  of multivalent  therapeutic  Abs.    Because  multivalent Abs show enhanced efficacies over bivalent ones,  it  is possible  that some “discarded”  Abs under development (due to  low activity as bivalent molecules) may actually show significantly  improved activity as multivalent Abs.  This methodology can therefore be employed in the context of  drug discovery to progress promising multivalent therapeutic Ab formulations to an advanced stage  of preclinical development.        • 22   2  Indirect  mechanisms  and  in  vivo  activity  of  multivalent  rituximab­lipid nanoparticles‡  2.1  Synopsis    Although creating multivalent Ab‐LNPs has been shown to enhance the direct mechanism of  action  (Section 1.2.2),  the effects on  the  indirect mechanisms of action are unclear.   The  indirect  mechanisms of therapeutic Abs consist of complement‐dependent cytotoxicity (CDC; Section 1.4.1)  and  antibody‐dependent  cell‐mediated  cytotoxicity  (ADCC;  Section 1.4.2).   This  chapter examines  how the  indirect mechanisms of Rtx are affected by creating Rtx‐LNPs, and  it also examines the  in  vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetics of Rtx‐LNP. 2.2  Background 2.2.1  Complement­dependent cytotoxicity of Rtx  Rtx activates the classical complement pathway by binding C1q115, leading to generation of  the membrane attack complex and ensuing tumor cell lysis116.  Rtx has been shown to induce CDC in  many different  lymphoma cell  lines  in vitro115, 117 and Rtx has been shown to be effective only  in a  mouse model expressing a  full complement system, while  its activity was ablated  in C1q‐deficient  mice118.    Infusion of Rtx  in CLL patients has also been shown  to deplete complement, and pre‐Rtx  complement  levels  do  not  return  until  several  weeks  after  completion  of  therapy119.    The  complement cascade leading to CDC is regulated by proteins on the lymphoma cell surface such as  CD55 and CD59.   Blocking CD55 and/or CD59 has been shown to  increase  levels of CDC  in NHL cell                                                               ‡ A  version  of  Chapter  2  has  been  published16.    Adapted  and  reprinted  by  permission  from  Future  Medicine Ltd. • 23   lines  and  primary  cells  treated  with  Rtx,  indicating  that  these  two  proteins  function  in  the  mechanism of action of Rtx as important regulators of CDC46, 120.  2.2.2  Ab­dependent cell­mediated cytotoxicity of Rtx  ADCC  is also an established contributor to the mechanism of action of Rtx and therapeutic  Abs  in  general.   On Ab‐coated  tumor  cells,  it occurs upon  binding of  the  Fc  region of  the Ab  to  activating Fc receptors  (FcR) such as FcRIIIa which are present on effector cells such as natural  killer  (NK)  cells,  granulocytes,  and macrophages.    Rtx  has  been  shown  to  induce  ADCC  in many  human lymphoma cell lines117 and ADCC was abolished in nude mice deficient in activating FcR yet  present in the wild‐type mice121, establishing a central role of ADCC in the therapeutic activity of Rtx.    The  importance  of  Rtx‐induced  ADCC  in  humans was  illustrated  in  studies  on  a  FcRIIIa  dimorphism  that  influences  the  binding  affinity  of  the  receptor  to  Rtx, where  enhanced  binding  corresponds  to  elevated  ADCC.    Patients  homozygous  for  the  high‐affinity  dimorphism  showed  enhanced clinical and molecular responses compared to the other patients122, 123.  In terms of ADCC‐ regulating molecules on the tumor cells themselves, expression levels of ligands to NKG2D, a NK cell  receptor,  influence  the  susceptibility of  the  tumor  cell  to Rtx‐induced ADCC124.   Other molecules  present on B cells which trigger NK cell activation include CD40125, CD80, and CD86126, but in general,  the molecular determinants of whether a tumor cell will elicit ADCC upon Rtx binding are not well  understood.  Moreover, the relative contributions of CDC and ADCC that occur after Rtx treatment,  as well as  the  relative contribution of  the direct mechanism  (Section 1.4.3), are unclear and have  been shown to depend on the origin of the target cell44, 49, 50.     • 24   2.2.3  Does  the creation of Rtx­LNPs affect  the  indirect mechanisms and  in vivo  properties of Rtx?  We examined how the known indirect mechanisms of action of Rtx are affected by creating  Rtx‐LNPs.   We  have  previously  shown  that  cells  treated with  Rtx‐LNP  exhibit  increased  levels  of  apoptosis compared  to  those  treated with equal doses of  free Rtx  (Section 1.2.2)7.   These studies  established  that Rtx‐LNP exhibits an  improved direct mechanism of action  compared  to Rtx.   The  objective of the current study was to establish whether levels of ADCC and CDC are preserved, since  under  in  vivo  conditions,  the  favorable  direct  effects  of  Rtx‐LNP  should  not  occur  at  the  cost  of  decreased indirect contributions to the efficacy.      To examine differences between Rtx and Rtx‐LNPs in terms of their indirect mechanisms of  action, we employed two mantle cell lymphoma cell lines, Z138 and JVM2, which exhibited different  in vivo sensitivities to Rtx along with variable expression levels of cell‐surface proteins that regulate  ADCC  and  CDC.    Rtx‐LNPs  were  prepared  which  showed  enhanced  binding  and  which  induced  apoptosis in both cell lines.  We demonstrate that multivalent Rtx‐LNPs exhibited increased levels of  CDC and ADCC compared to Rtx, alongside an increase in NK cell activation levels.  Finally, in order to  understand the manifestations of these mechanisms of action in vivo, we examined the efficacy and  pharmacokinetics of Rtx and Rtx‐LNP.  2.3   Materials and methods  2.3.1  Reagents and cell lines  The  following  lipids  were  obtained  from  Avanti  Polar  Lipids  (Alabaster  AL,  USA):  1,2‐ distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphocholine  (DSPC),  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphoethanolamine‐ N‐[methoxy(polyethylene  glycol)‐2000]  (DSPE‐PEG),  and  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐ phosphoethanolamine‐N‐[maleimide(polyethylene  glycol)‐2000]  (DSPE‐PEG‐Mal).    [3H]cholesteryl • 25   hexadecyl  ether  ([3H]CHE)  was  from  Perkin‐Elmer  Life  Sciences  (Woodbridge  ON,  Canada).   Cholesterol (Chol) was purchased from Sigma‐Aldrich (St. Louis MO, USA).   Pico‐Fluor 15 and Pico‐ Fluor 40 scintillation cocktails were bought from PerkinElmer BioSignal (Montreal QC, Canada).   N‐ Succinimidyl  3‐(2‐pyridyldithio)propionate  (SPDP)  and  dithiothreitol  (DTT)  were  obtained  from  Pierce/Thermo  Fisher  Scientific  (Rockford  IL,  USA).    Rituximab  (Rtx)  and  trastuzumab  (Trz) were  obtained  from  the BC Cancer Agency pharmacy  (Vancouver BC, Canada).   Matrigel was purchased  from  Collaborative  Biomedical  Products  Inc.  (Chicago  IL,  USA).    Carboxyfluorescein  diacetate  succinimidyl ester (CFSE) was obtained from Molecular Probes (Eugene OR, USA).  Anti‐human CD3‐ FITC,  CD56‐PE,  CD54‐APC,  and  FcγRIII/II  (CD16/32)  Abs  were  obtained  from  BD  Biosciences  (Mississauga ON, Canada).  Anti‐Rtx‐FITC Ab was purchased from Serotec (Oxford, UK).  Rabbit anti‐ human IgG Fc fragment was purchased from MP Biomedicals (Irvine CA, USA).  Lympholyte‐Mammal  was obtained from Cedarlane (Burlington ON, Canada).  Unless otherwise noted, all other reagents  were from Sigma‐Aldrich (St. Louis MO, USA).    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cell lines Z138 and JVM2 were generously provided by Dr. Zeev  Estrov  (University of Texas) and previously  characterized127.   Cells were maintained  in RPMI 1640  medium  (Stem  Cell  Technologies)  supplemented  with  2  mM  L‐glutamine,  10%  FBS,  and  1%  penicillin/streptomycin.   All cells were maintained at 37  °C  in a humidified atmosphere containing  5% CO2.   For  in  vivo  imaging  studies,  Z138  cells  were  transfected  to  express  luciferase  (Luc).  Constructs for the lentivirus (LV) vector containing the Luc genes were obtained from Dr. Alice Mui  (Jack Bell Research Centre, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver BC, Canada) who also assisted in  the transfection of the cell line.  Briefly, the Luc coding sequence was isolated from the pGL‐3 vector  (Promega, Madison, WI, USA) and cloned  into the  lentiviral vector FG9 behind the CMV – LTR and  UBiC promoters.  To generate Luc‐expressing lentivirus (LV‐Luc), this vector was cotransfected using  calcium  phosphate with  packaging  constructs  pRSVREV,  pMDLg/pRRE,  and  the  VSV‐G  expression • 26   plasmid  pHCMVG  into HEK‐293T  cells.    Five million  293T HEK  cells were  plated  on  poly‐L‐lysine‐ coated  tissue  culture plates  allowed  to  adhere  for  24  hours.    The  following  day,  10  µg of  the  transducing vector, 7.5 µg of the packaging vector, and 2.5 µg of the VSV envelope pMD.G were co‐ transfected  by  LipofectAMINE  2000  (Invitrogen,  Burlington  ON,  Canada),  according  to  the  manufacturer's  instructions.  After 24 h, fresh medium was applied to cells, and cells were cultured  for  another  24  h.    Conditioned medium was  then  collected  and cleared  of  debris  by  low  speed  centrifugation, filtered, and stored at ‐70 °C.  Supernatant was collected daily for 4 days, pooled and  ultracentrifuged.  The pellet was re‐suspended in 500 µL of medium, and aliquots were stored at ‐70  °C.  The Z138 cells were then infected with LV‐Luc (25 µL viral supernatant/mL medium).  Briefly, one  million cells were add to each well of a 12‐well plate in 500 µL of complete medium and these were  then cultured for 24 h.  Subsequently, LV‐vector or LV‐Luc constructs were added to the medium in  the presence of Polybrene (8 µg/mL medium).  After approximately 5 h of incubation, the cells were  washed with phosphate‐buffered  saline  (PBS, pH 7.4),  fresh  culture medium was added and  cells  were incubated for up to 6 days. To enrich for Luc‐positive cells, cells were sorted by FACS for GFP  expression (cells were cotransfected with LV‐GFP constructs). GFP‐positive cells were considered to  be positive for Luc and this was confirmed by culturing the sorted cells in low concentrations in the  wells of a 96‐well plate.   Luciferin was added to each well and plates were  imaged using  IVIS  (see  below)  to  confirm  Luc expression.   These Z138‐Luc  cells were expanded and used  for  the  in  vivo  studies described below.    2.3.2  Preparation of multivalent Ab­LNPs  Small  unilamellar  vesicles  composed  of  DSPC/Chol/DSPE‐PEG/DSPE‐PEG‐Mal  (mole  ratio  48:45:5:2) were prepared by the extrusion procedure128, 129.  A total of 200 µmol lipid were dissolved  in CHCl3  and  an  aliquot of  [3H]CHE  (0.009 µCi/µmol  liposomal  lipid) was  added.   A  lipid  film was  formed by drying  the solution  first with a stream of N2  then under vacuum  for 3 h.   The  film was • 27   hydrated in 2.0 mL HEPES‐buffered saline (HBS) at 65 oC for 1 h with stirring, then was subjected to  five freeze‐thaw cycles each consisting of five‐minute treatments in liquid N2 and a 65 oC water bath,  respectively.    The  suspension was  then  extruded  ten  times  through  two  stacked  polycarbonate  filters (100 nm and 80 nm pore size) using a Lipex extruder (Northern Lipids, Burnaby BC, Canada).   The resulting mean vesicle diameter was 95–110 nm as determined by quasielastic  light scattering  (QLS)  using  a Nicomp  submicron  particle  sizer  (model  370/270).    Liposomal  lipid  concentrations  were measured by liquid scintillation counting with a Packard scintillation counter (model 1900 TR)  using aliquots mixed with 5.0 mL Pico‐Fluor 15 scintillation fluid.    Rtx was coupled to  liposomes according to an established procedure130.   Briefly, 80 µL of a  12.5 mM solution of SPDP in ethanol were diluted with 920 µL HBS (25 mM HEPES, 150 mM NaCl, pH  7.4)  to give a  final concentration of 1.0 nmol/µL.   The Ab  (8 – 9 mg) was  reacted with a  five‐fold  molar  excess  of  SPDP  for  25 min  at  room  temperature,  and was  subsequently  eluted  by  gravity  through a Sephadex G‐50 column equilibrated with sodium acetate buffer (100 mM sodium acetate,  150 mM NaCl, pH 4.5).  Fractions containing the Ab were determined by diluting aliquots 50‐fold in  HBS and by measuring the absorbance at 280 nm.  Ab‐containing fractions were pooled and added  to  solid DTT  to  give  a  final  concentration  of  25 mM DTT.    This  solution was  incubated  at  room  temperature  for 25 min with  stirring.   The  thiolated Ab was  then  isolated using a Sephadex G‐50  column  equilibrated with HBS,  and was  immediately added  to  liposomes  (10 mM  final  liposomal  lipid concentration).   The mixture was incubated at room temperature for 18 h with gentle mixing.   At the end of the reaction, the mixture was eluted through a Sepharose CL‐4B column equilibrated  with HBS to separate the unreacted Ab from the Ab‐LNPs.   The diameter of the Ab‐LNPs was ~130  nm, as determined using QLS.  The amount of Ab conjugated to liposomes was determined using the  Pierce Micro bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay kit.  This quantitation was carried out according  to the manufacturer’s  instructions with 0.5% Triton X‐100 added to the reagent solution and using • 28   Ab solutions of known concentration as standards.  The number of Ab molecules per liposome was  calculated as described previously7 and was found to be between 38 and 47.    2.3.3  Measurement of cell­surface protein expression levels  A total of 1 × 106 Z138 or  JVM2 MCL cells  in    the exponential growth phase were washed  with cold PBS containing 1% FBS, then incubated at 4 oC  for 10 min with anti‐FcγRIII/II Ab followed  by 20 min with saturating amounts of FITC‐labeled anti‐human CD20, CD40, CD80, CD86, CD95 (Fas  receptor), CD54, CD55 or CD59 Abs.  Samples were then washed and analyzed on a FACSCalibur flow  cytometer  (Becton Dickinson,  San  Jose, CA)  collecting  10,000  events  for  each  sample.   Data was  analyzed  using  BD  CellQuest  software.    In  this  and  all  subsequent  experiments,  data  values  are  reported  as mean  ±  standard  deviation  (SD)  unless  indicated  otherwise.    In  all  cases,  two‐tailed  unpaired Student’s t‐tests were applied with a level of significance of 0.05.    2.3.4  In vivo xenograft models to assess Rtx efficacy  All in vivo studies were completed using protocols approved by the Animal Care Committee  at  the University of British Columbia,  and were  in  accordance with  the  current  guidelines of  the  Canadian Council of Animal Care.  To assess response to Rtx treatment, 5 × 106 Z138 or JVM2 cells in  the exponential growth phase were mixed with Matrigel to a final volume of 100 µL, then  injected  subcutaneously (SC) into the flank of male Rag‐2M mice.  Treatments with Rtx or control (PBS) were  initiated  when  tumors  were  palpable  (0.5  ×  0.5  ×  0.5  mm),  typically  25  to  28  days  after  cell  inoculation.   Groups of 6 mice were treated with Rtx (2.5 or 10 mg/kg) given  intraperitoneally (IP)  every 3 days  for a  total of 6  treatments  (Q3D × 6).   Tumor  size was measured using a calibrated  caliper every 2–3 days.   • 29   2.3.5  Quantification of Ab­LNPs bound to cells  Z138 or JVM2 cells (1 × 106) were  incubated for 4 h at 4 °C with Rtx, Rtx‐LNP or Trz‐LNP at  different doses as  indicated.   All treatments were done  in triplicate.   At the end of the  incubation  time, cells were washed with cold PBS containing 1% FBS and labeled with anti‐Rtx‐FITC for 30 min  at  4  °C,  then  analyzed  on  a  FACSCalibur  flow  cytometer  as  described  above  (10,000  events  per  sample).   A parallel study was performed to measure Ab‐LNP binding to cells through quantification of  [3H]CHE present in liposomes bound to cells.  After the incubation, cells were centrifuged at 300g for  5 min at 4 C, then washed three times with 1 mL of PBS to eliminate unbound Ab‐LNP.   Washed  cells were resuspended and solubilized with 1 mL of 0.9% Triton‐X 100 in PBS, and concentrations of  [3H]CHE were measured by liquid scintillation counting using Pico‐Fluor 40 scintillation cocktail and a  Canberra‐Packard Scintillation β counter (1900 TR Tri Carb).  2.3.6  Annexin­V/PI flow cytometry­based apoptosis assay  Cells were seeded  in 96‐well plates  (20,000 cells/well) and  treatments were added on  the  same day  the cells were seeded.   Control  treatments consisted of HBS and uncoupled  liposomes,  negative controls employed Trz  instead of Rtx, and positive controls  included campothecin‐treated  samples.   For analysis 72 h  later, samples were transferred to 1.5 mL Eppendorf tubes and spun at  7000 rpm for 15 s.   Supernatants were removed and pellets were washed with 500 µL cold Hanks’  balanced  salt  solution.    Samples  were  spun  again  at  7000  rpm  /  15  s  and  supernatants  were  removed.    Positive  control  samples  were  unstained,  stained  with  Annexin‐V‐FITC,  stained  with  propidium  iodide  (PI),  or  double‐stained with  both;  all  other  samples were  double‐stained.    For  Annexin‐V‐FITC  staining, pellets were  resuspended  in a mixture of 5 µL Annexin‐V‐FITC and 40 µL  Annexin‐V binding buffer and incubated at room temperature for 20 min.  For PI staining, 500 µL of a  cold 0.5 µg/mL solution of PI  in Hanks’ were added to the samples.   Analysis was performed on a • 30   Becton Dickinson FACSCalibur flow cytometer.  Compensation values were set with positive controls  and  quadrant  placement  in  a  plot  of  PI  fluorescence  intensity  (FL3)  versus  Annexin‐V‐FITC  fluorescence  intensity  (FL1)  in  each  case  was  decided  on  the  basis  of  data  obtained  with  the  negative  controls.   Early apoptotic  cells were defined as PI negative and Annexin‐V‐FITC positive,  necrotic cells were positive for both fluorophores, and viable cells were negative for both.  2.3.7  Assay for measuring levels of complement­dependent cytotoxicity  MCL target cells  (1 × 106 cells/mL) were  incubated with Rtx, Rtx‐LNP or controls  (including  HBS, uncoupled liposomes, and Trz‐NP) for 15 min at 37 °C, then a 25% volume of human serum (50  µL) was added and the sample was further incubated for 4 h.  Informed consent was obtained from  volunteers who provided the serum.  Cells were washed and stained with PI, then analyzed by flow  cytometry as described above.  Cell lysis due to CDC was expressed as a percentage according to the  following: %  cell  lysis = [1 − (fraction  of  viable  treated  cells  in  the  presence  of  human  serum)  /  (fraction of viable treated cells in the absence of human serum)] × 100%.  2.3.8  Assay for the quantification of Ab­dependent cell­mediated cytotoxicity  A fluorometric method described by Gomez‐Roman et al. was used131.  Briefly, 1 × 106 Z138  or JVM2 target cells were double‐stained with 2.5 µM PKH26 (a membrane dye) and 2.5 µM CFSE (a  viability dye).   Cells were  then  treated with  controls  (as  described  in  the CDC assay above) or 10  µg/mL of Rtx  (either as  free Rtx or Rtx‐LNP)  for 30 min.   Next,  cells were  incubated with mouse  splenocytes (at 5:1, 50:1, and 100:1 ratios of effector to target cells) previously stimulated overnight  with  25  ng/mL of  interleukin‐12  (IL‐12).   After  a  24 h  incubation,  cells were washed  in  cold  PBS  containing 1% FBS and resuspended in the same buffer before analysis by flow cytometry, acquiring  10,000 nongated events.   Flow  cytometry data was acquired by  setting FL1 as  the CFSE emission  channel and FL2 as the PKH26 emission channel. Percent cell kill was obtained by back‐gating on the • 31   PKH26bright population of targets and is reported as the percentage of membrane‐labeled target cells  having  lost the viability dye,  i.e. % CFSE– within PKH26bright.   Non‐stained and single‐stained targets  were included in every experiment to compensate for single‐stained CFSE and PKH26 emissions, and  double‐stained  targets  incubated with Ab without effectors were used  to define spontaneous cell  death  to  exposure  to  the media  and  Ab  alone.    The  percentage  of  cells  undergoing  ADCC was  quantified  as  follows: %  undergoing  ADCC = [1 − (fraction  of  viable  double‐stained  target  cells)  /  (fraction of double‐stained untreated control cells)] × 100%.   2.3.9  Quantification of activated natural killer cells  Fresh  peripheral  blood  mononuclear  cells  (PBMCs;  effector  cells)  were  obtained  from  volunteers who provided  informed consent.   PBMCs were treated with Lympholyte‐Mammal, then  incubated with Z138 target cells  in a 1:1 ratio, at a final concentration of 1 × 106 effector cells/mL  and 1 × 106 target cells/mL.  Cultures were treated with 10 µg/mL of Rtx either as: free Rtx, Rtx‐LNP,  a mixture of free Rtx and unconjugated liposomes, or Trz‐LNP (negative control).  Treated cells were  incubated  for  20  h  at  37  C  in  RPMI  1640  complete  medium  supplemented  with  50  µM‐ mercaptoethanol.  Several control samples containing effector cells only (without target cells) were  also included.  After incubation, cells were washed and labeled with anti‐human CD3‐FITC, CD56‐PE  and CD54‐APC Abs  for 30 min at 4  °C before analysis by  flow cytometry.   Natural killer  (NK) cells  were identified as the CD3–/CD56+ population, and the percentage of CD54bright cells was determined  within this population.  A total of 50,000 events were collected per sample.   2.3.10   In vivo xenograft models for Rtx­LNP efficacy studies  For  in  vivo  efficacy  studies,  female C.B‐17 mice with  severe  combined  immunodeficiency  (SCID) weighing 20‐25 g were  inoculated  intravenously (IV) with 5 × 106 Z138‐Luc cells (see Section  2.3.1).   On day 7 after cell inoculation, the presence of tumors was assessed using the  IVIS optical • 32   imaging  system  200  Series  (Xenogen)  prior  to  treatment.   At  10 min  before  imaging, mice were  injected  IP with 200 µl of 15 mg/mL  firefly D‐luciferin potassium salt, which emits photons  in  the  presence  of  oxygen,  adenosine  triphosphate,  and  Luc.    The  animals were  imaged  and  the  total  photon  counts  from  captured  images were  quantified  using  the  Living  Image  software  package  (version  2.50;  Xenogen).    A  photograph  was  first  obtained  in  the  imaging  chamber  under  dim  illumination,  then  a  luminescence  image was  acquired.    The overlay of  the pseudocolour  images  represents the spatial distribution of photon counts produced by active Luc, with red representing  the most  intense  (saturated)  luminescence and blue  representing  the  least  intense  luminescence.   Captured  images were then quantified using Living Image. Bioluminescent signals from the regions  of  interest  (ROI)  expressed  in  pseudocolour  are  presented  as  the  cumulative  photon  counts  collected within each ROI.  Uninfected animals were imaged to detect background signals.  Starting  on  day  7  after  Z138  cell  inoculation,  treatments  consisting  of  either  free  Rtx  or  Rtx‐LNP  were  administered Q3D × 6.  Tumor measurements with the IVIS optical imaging system were made twice  (early  in the study) or once per week.   Mice were monitored daily for extended time frames using  both qualitative and quantitative health status indicators.  When the health status of the animal was  considered poor based on a predefined  scale,  the animals were killed and  the  following day was  recorded as the time of death in order to generate Kaplan‐Meier survival curves.  2.3.11   In vivo studies on the pharmacokinetics of Rtx­LNP  For studies of liposome and Rtx clearance from the plasma, BALB/c mice (17‐19 g) and C.B‐ 17 SCID mice (19‐22 g) were injected IV with 5 mg/kg (in 200 µL) free Rtx or Rtx‐LNP.  At various time  points  post‐injection,  blood  was  collected  by  cardiac  puncture  and  placed  into  EDTA‐coated  microtainer tubes.  Plasma was isolated from blood samples by centrifugation at 1000g for 15 min.   Aliquots  of  the  plasma  were  used  to  determine  Rtx  levels  by  a  colorimetric  enzyme‐linked  immunosorbent assay (ELISA).  Briefly, a rabbit anti‐human IgG Fc fragment was used for coating and • 33   capturing  Rtx.    A  horseradish  peroxidase‐conjugated  rabbit  anti‐human whole  IgG was  used  for  detection,  with  orthophenylenediamine  added  as  substrate.    To  determine  the  levels  of  Rtx  in  plasma,  absorbance  at  405  nm  was measured  and  compared  to  values  from  a  standard  curve  constructed  from  known  amounts  of  Rtx.    For  liposomal  lipid  concentrations,  aliquots  of  plasma  were counted in 5 mL of Pico‐Fluor 40 scintillation fluid.  2.4  Results  2.4.1  Characterization of Z138  and  JVM2  cell  lines:  surface protein  expression  levels and in vivo response to Rtx treatment  Two  human MCL  cell  lines,  JVM2  and  Z138,  were  used  in  our  studies  on  the  indirect  mechanisms of action of Rtx and Rtx‐LNPs.  These cell lines were selected based on previous studies  that characterized several MCL cell lines in terms of their expression of the classic features of MCL,  namely  the  t(11;14)(q13;q32)  translocation and overexpression of cyclin D1127.   The Z138  line was  found to possess both traits of classic MCL, and while the JVM2 cells retained the translocation, they  expressed cyclin D2 and did not overexpress cyclin D1, therefore representing a variant form of the  disease132, 133.  Given  these phenotypic differences,  the  two  cell  lines were  further  characterized  in  terms of  select cell‐surface proteins  involved  in the direct and  indirect mechanisms of action of Rtx.   These  molecules consist of the target of Rtx, CD20, as well as a number of proteins known to regulate CDC  and ADCC.  Figure 2.1A shows that while CD20 expression is similar in both cell lines, the JVM2 line  expresses  significantly  higher  levels  of  tumor  necrosis  factor  receptor  (TNFR)  receptor  family  receptors  (CD95  and  CD40),  as  well  as  the  costimulatory molecules  CD80  and  CD86  which  are  necessary  for  T‐cell  activation  and  survival.    NK  cells  are  also  activated  by  CD40125,  CD80,  and  CD86126.  Levels of CD55 are elevated in Z138 cells, whereas CD59 expression is relatively the same in • 34   both  lines;  these  proteins  have  been  shown  to  inhibit  Rtx‐induced  CDC46,  120.    The  intercellular  adhesion molecule CD54 also shows similar expression in both cell lines.  Overall, the differences in  phenotype observed suggest  that  levels of ADCC and CDC may vary between  the  two cell  lines  in  response to treatment with Rtx and Rtx‐LNP46, 49.        Figure 2.1  Phenotypic characterization of JVM2 and Z138 cell lines and in vivo response to Rtx treatment.  (A)  Cell‐surface  marker  expression  on  JVM2  and  Z138  cells,  assessed  by  flow  cytometry.    *p  <  0.05.    MFI:  mean  fluorescence intensity.  (B & C) To assess in vivo responses to treatment with Rtx, 5 × 106 JVM2 (B) or Z138 (C) cells were  injected SC  into Rag‐2M mice.   Once  the  tumors  reached ~200 mm3, mice were  treated  twice weekly  for 3 weeks with  either 2.5 mg/kg () or 10 mg/kg () Rtx. Control mice () were injected with PBS.  Treatments are indicated by arrows.   Data correspond to the average metastasis from 6 mice for each time point ± SD and are representative of two separate  experiments.  0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 25 30 35 40 45 50 Tum or vol um e /  m m3 Days postinoculation JVM2B 0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 10 20 30 40 50 Tum or vo lum e /  m m3 Days postinoculation Z138C• 35     The responses to Rtx treatment of Rag‐2M mice inoculated subcutaneously (SC) with JVM2  and Z138 cells were also determined.   As shown  in Figure 2.1B, JVM2 tumors  in mice treated with  Rtx  exhibited  an  initial  growth  delay  (after  day  35  postinoculation),  but  eventually  the  tumors  progressed in a manner that was comparable to controls.  On day 45 after JVM2 cell inoculation, the  control animals possessed tumors that were approximately 600 mg in size.  The animals treated with  2.5 or 10 mg/kg Rtx exhibited  slightly  smaller  tumors, albeit  the differences were not  significant.   Figure 2.1C shows that mice bearing established Z138 tumors were sensitive to treatment with Rtx.   Control animals exhibited  tumors  that were approximately 500 mg  in  size 40 days after Z138 cell  inoculation, while the tumors in mice treated with Rtx (2.5 or 10 mg/kg) were 50% smaller then the  tumors measured  prior  to  initiation  of  treatment.    Based  on  these  data,  the  JVM2  tumors were  considered to be Rtx‐insensitive and the Z138 tumors were considered Rtx‐sensitive.  2.4.2  Rtx­LNPs bind specifically to JVM2 and Z138 cells and induce apoptosis  Multivalent  Rtx‐LNPs were  prepared  from  bivalent  Rtx  as  described  in  Section  2.3.2.    To  examine  the behavior of  these constructs when  tested against  the Z138 and  JVM2 cell  lines, cells  were  treated  with  Rtx  and  Rtx‐LNP  and  the  levels  of  bound  Rtx  were  determined  using  flow  cytometry.   The results, summarized  in Figure 2.2A & B,  indicate  that 4.9 and 3.2  times more Rtx  became bound to JVM2 and Z138 cells, respectively, when added as multivalent Rtx‐LNP compared  with free Rtx at a dose of 100 µg/mL.  Comparable increases in binding were also observed at lower  Rtx doses, and  these data agree with  the  general observation  that multivalent  constructs exhibit  increased functional affinity and decreased dissociation rates when bound to cell‐surface antigens97.   Surprisingly, even though both cell  lines had similar  levels of CD20 expression  (Figure 2.1A),  JVM2  cells had  the ability  to bind more Rtx and Rtx‐LNP.   At doses of 25 µg/mL and above,  the mean  fluorescence intensities for both Rtx and Rtx‐LNP in Figure 2.2A are between 1.8‐ and 2.5‐fold higher  than  those  of  Figure  2.2B  (p  <  0.05  for  all  equivalent  treatments).    Using  non‐exchangeable • 36   [3H]cholesteryl hexadecyl ether ([3H]CHE)  incorporated in the liposomes as an alternative means to  assess cell binding, the amount of bound lipid following addition of Rtx‐LNP was approximately two‐ fold greater for JVM2 cells compared to Z138 cells (p < 0.05; data not shown).  JVM2‐derived tumors  were less sensitive to Rtx treatment although they bound more Ab than Z138 cells, again suggesting  that the JVM2 cells are more resistant to Rtx therapy.        Figure 2.2  Binding of Rtx‐LNPs to target cells and direct induction of apoptosis.    (A & B) Rtx binding to JVM2 (A) and Z138 (B) MCL cells when incubated with Rtx‐LNP (), free Rtx (), or Trz‐LNP (×), as  assessed  by  flow  cytometry.    Error  bars  are within  the  size  of  the  data  points.    Data  are  the means  of  experiments  performed  in  triplicate.   MFI:  mean  fluorescence  intensity.  (C  &  D)  Fraction  of  viable  cells  remaining  after  in  vitro  0 100 200 300 400 0 25 50 75 100 MF I [Rtx]  /  μg/mL JVM2A 0 100 200 300 400 0 25 50 75 100 MF I [Rtx]  /  μg/mL Z138B• 37   treatment of JVM2 (C) or Z138 (D) cells with Rtx or Rtx‐LNP at 37 oC for 72 h, as assessed by flow cytometry after Annexin‐ V‐FITC and PI staining.  Double‐negatively stained cells were considered viable.  The different treatments are indicated in  the legend.  Data correspond to means of triplicates, and are representative of three separate experiments.     The in vitro responses to treatment of JVM2 and Z138 cells with Rtx and Rtx‐LNP were also  assessed.  Previous work has demonstrated that Rtx, on its own, has little therapeutic effect in vitro  unless a crosslinking Ab  is added7, 74‐76.   Using  the AlamarBlue assay, we have previously observed  that  both  crosslinked  Rtx  and multivalent  Rtx‐LNP  decrease  Z138  cell  proliferation  in  vitro  to  an  equivalent  extent7.    In  this  study,  flow  cytometry  was  used  to  measure  the  fraction  of  viable  (nonapoptotic)  JVM2 and Z138 cells  remaining after  treatment with  free Rtx, crosslinked Rtx, and  Rtx‐LNP. The results, summarized  in Figure 2.2C & D, suggest that when using Annexin‐V and PI to  identify nonviable  cells,  free Rtx was  the  least  effective of  the  treatments  (dark  gray  bars), with  minimum cell viabilities of 80% in JVM2 cells (at 1.5 µg/mL) and 69% in Z138 cells (0.15 µg/mL). The  percentages of viable cells were measured relative to untreated control cell populations in all cases.   Compared to free Rtx, the multivalent Rtx‐LNP (white bars) engenders significant therapeutic effects  on both JVM2 and Z138 cells.   At a treatment dose of 15 µg/mL of Rtx‐LNP, 42% and 62% of JVM2  and Z138 cells,  respectively, were considered non‐viable  (Figure 2.2C & D).   These  results  suggest  that  Z138  cells  are more  sensitive  to  Rtx‐LNP  than  JVM2  cells  in  vitro.    The  effects  on  the  cell  populations after Rtx treatment were equal in the absence or presence of bare uncoupled liposomes  (hatched  bars),  indicating  that  the  enhanced  effects  observed  for  Rtx‐LNP  result  from  Rtx  being  bound to the LNPs.   As an additional control, LNPs formulated with Trz (an anti‐ErbB2 therapeutic  monoclonal  Ab)  instead  of  Rtx  showed  minimal  activity  (light  gray  bars),  indicating  that  the  therapeutic effects are specific to Rtx.  The effects of Rtx‐LNPs were comparable (p > 0.05) to 2oAb‐ crosslinked Rtx (black bars) when the dose of Rtx used was 15 µg/mL.     • 38   2.4.3  Multivalent  Rtx­LNPs  elicit  superior  complement­dependent  cytotoxicity  and Ab­dependent cell­mediated cytotoxicity compared with Rtx  Taken together, the data summarized above  indicate that the multivalent Rtx‐LNPs exhibit  enhanced activity in vitro when compared to the effects achieved with equal doses of free Rtx, and  these data are consistent with previous results7.  The therapeutic activity of Rtx‐LNP shown in Figure  2.2 occurred as a result of direct effects on the cells, yet it is understood that the in vivo activity of  Rtx is largely dependent on indirect mechanisms of action involving CDC and ADCC115‐119, 121, 123.  Thus  it was  important  to  assess how  the CDC  and ADCC  responses  are  affected when  tumor  cells  are  treated with Rtx‐LNPs.  To measure levels of CDC, JVM2 and Z138 cells were given equivalent doses of Rtx and Rtx‐ LNP, then human serum was added and cell lysis was measured 4 h later using flow cytometry (see  Section 2.3.7).  These data have been summarized in Figure 2.3A & B.  Rtx‐LNP treatment resulted in  more significant cell  lysis  than Rtx  treatment  in both cell  lines, indicating  that Rtx‐LNP  is better at  inducing CDC than free Rtx.  When comparing results obtained in the two cell lines, CDC activity was  higher in JVM2 cells, where treatment with a 1 µg/mL dose of Rtx‐LNP induced a 3.4‐fold increase in  CDC activity (relative  to control), compared with a 2.0‐fold  increase  in Z138 cells.   This effect was  even more pronounced when the dose  increased to 10 µg/mL, where the values  increased to 5.3‐ fold (JVM2) and 3.9‐fold (Z138).   The  level of CDC observed following treatment with free Rtx was  comparable  to  controls, which  included  Trz‐LNP  as well  as  a mixture  of  free  Rtx  and  uncoupled  liposomes  (Rtx  +  lip)  (Figure  2.3A &  B).    The  level  of  cell  lysis  obtained  for  Rtx  plus  crosslinking  secondary Ab (2oAb) was identical to that obtained with Rtx alone (data not shown).   These results  suggest that indirect CDC‐based mechanisms of activity would be enhanced in vivo when using Rtx‐ LNP, even when compared to situations where Rtx crosslinking is achieved by an anti‐Rtx 2oAb.     • 39     Figure 2.3   In vitro  levels of Rtx‐mediated CDC and ADCC are augmented when Rtx  is presented to cells as multivalent  Rtx‐LNP.    (A & B)  For measuring  levels of CDC,  JVM2 or  Z138  cells were untreated  (U) or  treated with  Trz‐LNP, Rtx, Rtx  + bare  liposomes (Rtx + lip), or Rtx‐LNP.  All treatments consisted of 10 µg Ab except for Rtx‐LNP(lo), which consisted of 1 µg.  (C &  D) For ADCC experiments, JVM2 or Z138 target cells were  incubated for 30 min with 10 µg of Ab  in the form of free Rtx  (), Rtx + bare liposomes (?), Rtx + crosslinking 2oAb (), Trz‐LNP (◇), or Rtx‐LNP ().  Stimulated effector cells (mouse  splenocytes) were then added in excess of target cells at effector‐to‐target cell ratios of 5:1, 50:1, and 100:1. After a 24 h  incubation,  ADCC  was  measured  as  described  in  Section  2.3.8.    Data  represent  the  means  of  triplicates,  and  are  representative of three separate experiments.     To assess ADCC, a fluorometric method described by Gomez‐Roman et al. was used131.  Cells  were  first  dual‐labeled  with  PKH26,  a  membrane‐associating  lipid  dye,  and  carboxyfluorescein  diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), which stains viable cells.  Cells were then incubated with Rtx‐LNP  or other treatments for 30 min, followed by the addition of mouse splenocytes (effector cells).  After  24 h, the JVM2 and Z138 target cells that were lysed as a result of ADCC retained the PKH26 signal  but lost that of CFSE.  The percentage of lysed cells was therefore determined using flow cytometry • 40   as the fraction of CFSE‐negative cells within the PKH26bright population.  The results, shown in Figure  2.3C & D,  indicate  that  free Rtx  (filled  triangles) elicits an ADCC  response at  levels comparable  to  those observed when using secondary‐antibody crosslinked Rtx (filled diamonds) or a mixture of Rtx  and uncoupled  liposomes  (open  triangles).   The extent of ADCC  resulting  from Rtx‐LNP  treatment  (filled  squares) was  significantly enhanced  in both  cell  lines, but  it was particularly notable when  using Z138 cells, where at a 100‐fold excess of effector  cells, 81% of cells were undergoing ADCC  after treatment with Rtx‐LNP, compared to 26% for free Rtx (p < 0.05 at all target/effector cell ratios  tested).  Overall levels of ADCC were significantly lower in JVM2 cells, where at the same excess of  effector  cells,  Rtx‐LNP  treatment  resulted  in  an  ADCC  response  of  14%,  compared  to  5%  after  treatment with Rtx (p < 0.05 only at this target cell/effector cell ratio).  2.4.4  Rtx­LNP induces the activation of natural killer cells  In order to corroborate the results suggesting that Rtx‐LNP elicits a superior ADCC response  compared with free Rtx, the extent to which NK cells were activated after exposure to Rtx or Rtx‐ LNP was determined.   Bowles and Weiner demonstrated a correlation between ADCC activity after  treatment with  Rtx  and  CD54  upregulation  on  NK  cells134,  and  therefore  the  activation  state  of  human NK cells was quantified here in terms of their CD54 expression levels.  The NK cells used were  a  subpopulation within  a  sample  of  human  peripheral  blood mononuclear  cells  (PBMCs).    These  effector  cells were mixed with Z138  cells as  the  target  cells; only Z138  cells were used  since  the  ADCC response was most robust with these cells, as shown in Figure 2.3D.  Samples of effector cells  or combined effector and target cells were treated with Rtx, Rtx‐LNP, and controls (U or T‐NP).  The  results, shown in Figure 2.4, compare the activation state of the NK cells in terms of the fraction of  CD54bright  cells  contained within  the NK  cell population  (CD3–/CD56+).   Open bars  indicate  control  samples that contained only effector cells, while black bars correspond to samples containing both  effector  and  target  (Z138)  cells.    In  general,  a  greater  fraction  of  NK  cells  are  activated  in  the • 41   presence  of  Z138  target  cells,  as  illustrated  by  the  elevated  CD54  expression  levels  (black  bars  compared  to  the white  ones).   NK  cell  activation was  greatest when  the  target  Z138  cells were  treated with Rtx or Rtx‐LNP, with the highest  level of CD54 expression found after treatment with  Rtx‐LNP (rightmost black bar).   Among the samples containing both effector and target cells (black  bars), the only significant difference (p < 0.05) occurred between the untreated (34% activated) and  Rtx‐LNP treated (62%) samples.  This study confirms that the elevated levels of ADCC resulting from  Rtx‐LNP treatment are associated with enhanced NK cell activation.         Figure 2.4  NK cell activation upon treatment of Z138 cells with different forms of Rtx.    Human  PBMCs  (effector  cells) were  incubated  overnight with  or without  Z138  target  cells  that were  untreated  (U)  or  treated with Trz‐LNP, Rtx, or Rtx‐LNP.   Cells were then  labeled with anti‐human‐CD3, CD56 and CD54 Abs conjugated to  different  fluorophores.    Flow  cytometric  analysis  was  performed  and  NK  cells  were  identified  as  the  CD3–/CD56+  population.   Within  this population,  the percentage of CD54bright cells was determined, corresponding  to  the  fraction of  activated NK cells.  *p < 0.05.    2.4.5  In vivo efficacy of multivalent Rtx­LNP  The ability of Rtx‐LNP  to  induce ADCC and CDC  is enhanced compared  to  that of  free Rtx,  and when this is considered alongside the increased direct activity leading to cell death, one would • 42   expect that Rtx‐LNP would exhibit significantly improved therapeutic effects compared with free Rtx  when used in vivo.  We therefore completed in vivo efficacy studies on Rtx‐LNP in C.B‐17 SCID mice.   Although these mice lack functional B and T cells (similar to the Rag‐2M mice used to generate the  data in Figure 2.1), they have a well‐defined NK cell population and should therefore be capable of  eliciting ADCC  responses135.   The  Z138  cell  line was used  for  these  studies  since  it was  the most  responsive  to  Rtx  treatment,  and  a  systemic  tumor model was  employed, where  the  cells were  inoculated  IV.    This  model  is  considered  to  be more  aggressive  and  less  sensitive  to  treatment  compared to the SC model.    In  order  to  follow  disease  development  non‐invasively,  Z138  cells  were  transfected  to  express Luc, and tumor‐bearing mice  (as confirmed by bioluminescent  imaging) were treated with  HBS, Rtx, or Rtx‐LNP.  At specified time points after the start of treatment, the animals were imaged  and representative images are provided in Figure 2.5A.  Mice treated with Rtx and Rtx‐LNP exhibited  a significantly  lower  tumor burden compared  to control animals and  this was  readily apparent 14  days after  initiation of  treatment.   The  imaging data also highlighted  that  following  IV  injection of  Z138‐Luc  cells,  disease  development  was  throughout  the  body.    Notably,  there  was  significant  disease burden in the brain, which would partially explain why this model may be considered more  aggressive. As highlighted  in  the Rtx‐treated examples, disease development within  the brain was  unaffected by treatment with Rtx or Rtx‐LNP.  Tumor burden was quantified by measuring the total  number of emitted photons from each mouse, and the average photon counts determined for each  treatment are summarized in Figure 2.5B.  These data show that the tumor burden in mice treated  with  Rtx  and  Rtx‐LNP  are  not  significantly  different,  but  both  treatment  groups  exhibited  significantly lower tumor burden when compared with control (HBS‐treated) mice.     • 43     Figure 2.5  Efficacy study for Rtx‐LNP.   C.B‐17 SCID mice were injected with Z138‐Luc cells and were monitored for tumor growth with the IVIS 200 optical imaging  system.  A total of 10 days after visible tumor growth appeared, mice were treated twice per week for 3 weeks with either  HBS or 1 mg/kg of free Rtx or multivalent Rtx‐LNP (R‐NP). Tumors were scanned once or twice per week.   (A)  Images of  three out of five mice are presented.  Red and blue regions represent the highest and lowest luminescence, respectively.  (B) Assessment of tumor growth, as measured by the total amount of light emitted by Luc‐expressing tumor cells from the  entire body of control mice (), and mice treated with Rtx  () or Rtx‐LNP ().   (C) Kaplan‐Meier survival curve for the  mice in this study; symbols are the same as in (B).  Inset: Increase in lifespan with respect to control.  Data is representative  of two separate studies.     Kaplan‐Meier  survival  curves were also generated as described  in Section 2.3.10, and are  provided in Figure 2.5C.  They are consistent with the imaging data and indicate that treatment with  Rtx and Rtx‐LNP provided equivalent survival benefits.  The median survival time for the Rtx and Rtx‐ LNP  treated animals was 56 and 61 days,  respectively, while  the median  survival  time  for control  animals was 35 days.  These data were somewhat surprising given that the in vitro studies suggested  that the Rtx‐LNP would exhibit improved treatment effects when compared with Rtx.  In an effort to • 44   understand why these expectations were not realized, pharmacokinetic studies were completed to  compare  the Rtx  levels  in  the plasma compartment over  time  following  IV  injection of Rtx or Rtx‐ LNP.    2.4.6  Pharmacokinetics of Rtx and Rtx­LNP  Pharmacokinetic  studies were  completed  in  immunocompromised mice  (C.B‐17  SCID)  as  well as immunocompetent BALB/c mice, and the data obtained are summarized in Figure 2.6.  The  black symbols in Figure 2.6A (C.B‐17 SCID mice) and Figure 2.6C (BALB/c mice) represent the plasma  concentration of Rtx  in the different mouse strains, and  in general, the elimination rate of Rtx was  comparable in both strains.  The percentage of the initial Rtx dose remaining after 72 h was 27% for  C.B‐17  SCID  mice  and  24%  for  BALB/c  mice.    These  values  are  comparable  to  those  reported  elsewhere136  and  highlight  that  Rtx  is  slowly  eliminated  from  the  circulation  following  IV  administration in mice.  The open symbols in Figure 2.6A & C represent plasma concentrations of Rtx  following  IV  injection of Rtx‐LNP, and  it  is obvious  that  these values are considerably reduced.    In  both mouse strains,  the  injected dose was  reduced by as much as 80% within  the  first hour after  administration, and at 72 h postinjection, the remaining percentages of the  initial dose were 0.3%  (C.B‐17 SCID) and 2.8% (BALB/c).  The plasma concentration of liposomal lipids was also monitored after administration of Rtx‐ LNP.  As highlighted in Figure 2.6B & D, the time‐dependent LNP concentration curves mirror those  of Rtx for the same treatments; after 72 h, 0.7% of the initial dose remained in the C.B‐17 SCID mice,  while 0.5% remained in the BALB/c animals.  The observation that the plasma concentrations of Rtx  and LNPs decrease at approximately the same rate suggests that Rtx does not dissociate from LNPs  in  the  circulation  and  that  both  are  cleared  together.    Since  the  detected  levels  of  Rtx‐LNP  are  similar in both mouse strains, the data also indicate that Rtx‐LNP is not cleared via an immunogenic • 45   mechanism.  Nevertheless, the plasma levels of Rtx‐LNP are so low compared to free Rtx that its full  therapeutic potential, as illustrated in vitro in Figures 2‐4, is compromised in mice as a result.      Figure 2.6  Pharmacokinetics of Rtx‐LNP in two mouse models.   C.B‐17 SCID mice (A & B) and BALB/c mice (C & D) were injected IV with 5 mg/kg of Rtx in free form (black symbols) or in  Rtx‐LNP (open symbols).  At time points of 0.5, 4, 24 and 72 h after the injection, circulating Rtx (A & C) and lipid (B & D)  were  quantified  by  ELISA  and  liquid  scintillation  counting,  respectively.    Data  is  representative  of  two  separate  experiments.    2.5   Discussion and conclusions  2.5.1  Discussion  In  spite of  the  fact  that nearly all  therapeutic Abs are bivalent  IgG molecules,  it has been  demonstrated  in numerous cases  that equivalent doses of multivalent Abs have more  therapeutic • 46   potency.   A number of multivalent anti‐CD20 designs have been reported which exhibit enhanced  binding  to  target  cells15, 96  and/or elevated  levels of  cell  kill  in  vitro7, 75, 88‐90  and enhanced  in  vivo  efficacy75, 90.   The Rtx‐LNPs studied here represent  the only  liposomal  formulation of a multivalent  therapeutic IgG that has been described137.  These constructs have a valence of ~90, which is much  higher  than  the  other  types of  reported multivalent  constructs, whose  valences  generally do not  exceed 10.    The  favorable effects  related  to  the direct mechanism of action  following  treatment with  Rtx‐LNPs7 were confirmed in the experiments described above.  Figure 2.2 shows that the Z138 cell  line was substantially more sensitive to Rtx‐LNP‐induced apoptosis in spite of the fact that it bound  only half as much Rtx‐LNP,  indicating  that higher  levels of apoptosis do not  result  from more Rtx  being bound to the cells.  These results may be explained, in part, by the fact that the JVM2 line (and  not the Z138  line)  is Epstein‐Barr virus positive, and  latently  infected Epstein‐Barr virus‐positive B‐ cell  lymphomas are often protected from death‐receptor  induced apoptosis such as that triggered  by CD95 (Fas receptor)138.   This may  justify why the high  levels of CD95 observed  in the JVM2  line  (Figure 2.1) did not correlate with lower cell viability levels following treatment with crosslinked Rtx  or Rtx‐LNP (Figure 2.2C & D).    There has been a lack of studies on the indirect mechanisms of multivalent therapeutic Abs  (ADCC  and CDC),  even  though  the  indirect mechanisms  are  known  to be  essential  to  the  in  vivo  efficacy of Rtx118, 119, 121, 123 and this  information would be critical for developing such constructs for  clinical use.    In  the current study,  the  JVM2 cell  line was expected  to  induce higher  levels of CDC  than  the  Z138  line  since,  as  shown  in  Figure  2.1,  it  exhibited  lower  expression  of  CD55,  a  CDC  inhibitor46.    It  was  also  expected  that  the  JVM2  line  would  exhibit  enhanced  ADCC  since  its  expression levels of CD40, CD80, and CD86 were elevated, and these proteins activate NK cells125, 126.   As  expected,  the  JVM2  cell  line  induced  a  more  robust  CDC  response,  but  Z138  cells  were  substantially better at  inducing ADCC  (Figure 2.3).   This  illustrates  the poor understanding of how • 47   different  types of  lymphoma cells  induce ADCC  to various extents49.   Together with  the apoptosis  data from Figure 2.2C & D, however, the observations in Figure 2.3 support the results in Figure 2.1B  &  C, which  show  that  animals  bearing  established  Z138  tumors  are  Rtx‐sensitive whereas  those  bearing  JVM2  tumors  are  not.    This  is  of  particular  interest  since  these models may  provide  a  framework  for  the  future elucidation of molecular markers of Rtx  resistance or  response  in MCL,  which are currently poorly defined139, 140.  Figure  2.3  also  demonstrates  that  multivalent  Rtx‐LNP  elicits  superior  CDC  and  ADCC  responses compared with bivalent Rtx.    In  fact, bivalent Rtx did not  induce specific CDC activity  in  vitro.    A multivalent  interaction  consists,  in  theory,  of  a  complex  created  by  an  initial  univalent  interaction where the  local concentrations of the remaining  free binding sites on both species are  greatly enhanced15.  This may help explain the increased CDC and ADCC observed in Rtx‐LNP‐treated  cells.  The elevated CDC may result from the fact that C1q is itself a hexavalent ligand that requires  binding  to  several  IgG  Fc  regions  in order  to activate a CDC  response105, 106.   Multivalent Rtx‐LNP  provides significantly higher local concentrations of exposed Fc available to bind C1q after the initial  univalent Fc – C1q  interaction.   Similarly, ADCC requires binding of the Fc region of Rtx to FcγR on  effector cells such as NK cells.  Following the initial interaction between an Fc region on Rtx‐LNP and  a FcγR on a NK cell, the remaining Fc and FcγR are at significantly elevated local concentrations with  respect to one another.  This facilitates subsequent Fc – FcγR interactions leading to ADCC, and this  effect is absent with bivalent Rtx.  Despite  the  fact  that  Rtx‐LNPs  appear  to  be  therapeutically  superior  in  vitro,  we  unexpectedly found that Rtx and Rtx‐LNP exhibited equivalent activity when used to treat a systemic  Z138  tumor  model  (Figure  2.5).    This  could  be  explained  by  the  rapid  elimination  of  Rtx‐LNP  following  IV  injection  (Figure  2.6).    The  observed  removal  of  Rtx‐LNP  from  the  circulation  was  surprising  in  light  of  previous  studies  from  our  laboratory  on  Trz‐LNP  (Section  1.2.2),  which  is  identical  to  Rtx‐LNP  in  every way  except  for  the  Ab  employed.    These  studies  showed  that  the • 48   pharmacokinetics (plasma concentrations and area under the curve) and efficacy (decrease in tumor  volume)  of  Trz‐LNP  were  both  significantly  enhanced  with  respect  to  free  Trz  in  breast  tumor  xenograft mouse models7.  Thus, the rapid clearance of Rtx‐LNP does not appear to result from the  binding of plasma proteins such as albumin or lipoproteins to the LNPs, which would result in uptake  by the reticuloendothelial system18, 19.  This is expected since Rtx‐LNP contains PEG for this purpose,  and Trz did not interfere with PEG function in Trz‐LNP7.  As shown in Figure 2.6, the rapid elimination  of Rtx‐LNP  involved neither dissociation of Rtx  from  the  liposomes nor an  immunogenic  reaction,  but when compared with Trz‐LNP, the pharmacokinetic behavior of Rtx‐LNP appears to arise  from  the Ab used and not from the liposomal component of the formulation.  The issue of rapid clearance  is discussed further in Section 7.3.1.    2.5.2  Conclusions  The studies  in  this chapter demonstrate  that multivalency can be an effective strategy  for  improving  the efficacy of  therapeutic Abs.   The greatest barrier  to developing multivalent Abs  for  clinical use is their poorly understood mechanism of action, but we have shown that both the direct  and indirect modes of action of multivalent Rtx‐LNPs are significantly improved compared with Rtx.   This chapter focused on the enhanced indirect mechanisms (CDC and ADCC), and we further showed  that elevated ADCC occurred alongside higher levels of activated NK cells.  In spite of more favorable  direct  and  indirect  cytotoxicity,  we  found  that  the  in  vivo  efficacy  of  Rtx  and  Rtx‐LNP  were  equivalent, and pharmacokinetic  studies  revealed  that Rtx‐LNP was very  rapidly  cleared  from  the  circulation compared to Rtx.   This not only  indicates the need to create multivalent Rtx constructs  with more extended circulation lifetimes (using a different type of NP formulation and/or a different  anti‐CD20  Ab)  if  they  are  to  be  developed  for  clinical  use,  but  it  also  highlights  the  therapeutic  potency of Rtx‐LNP compared to Rtx.   • 49   Part of this potency results from the direct mechanism of action, which in the case of Rtx, is  undefined from a molecular point of view.  The next chapter describes an alternative, more versatile  methodology that we developed for producing Ab‐LNPs of differing valence for use in studies on the  direct mechanisms of action of therapeutic Abs51.  Applying this methodology to Rtx‐LNPs will add to  the current results on the indirect factors and will help to delineate the overall mechanism of action  of multivalent Rtx.  This understanding will further define cases where it might be more efficacious  to employ a multivalent Ab rather than a bivalent IgG in order to treat cancer.         • 50   3  Improved methodology for preparing multivalent antibody­lipid  nanoparticles  3.1  Synopsis  Previous methods of coupling Abs to liposomes were unsuitable for creating many different  valences of  (Ab‐LNPs).   An  improved methodology developed  for  this purpose  is described  in  this  chapter.    It  exhibits  significant  improvements  over  previous methods  in  terms  of  reproducibility,  length of time required to produce many valences, and yields of coupled Ab.    3.2   Background  3.2.1  The need to produce a new method for creating many valences of Ab­LNPs  An  updated  methodology  was  required  to  produce  many  different  valences  of  Ab‐LNP  because previous methods, which have been described  largely  in  light of  immunoliposomes, were  inadequate  in  terms  of  reproducibility,  time  required,  and  overall  yields  of  coupled  Ab.    These  problems stem from the method of chemical coupling, which normally involves thiolation of the Ab  followed  by  reaction with  maleimide  (Mal)‐containing  liposomes  or micelles3, 5, 141, 142.    Between  three and seven  thiol groups are required per Ab molecule7, 143, resulting  in a very heterogeneous  reaction product  that  varies  from preparation  to preparation.    Such heavy  chemical modification  may  also  pose  a  problem  particularly  for  therapeutic  Abs,  which  after  thiolation  have  shown  decreased binding to target144 and whose indirect mechanisms depend on a native Fc fragment44.    One common coupling strategy, described in Section 2.3.2, involves the preparation of small  unilamellar  vesicles  (SUVs)  containing  surface  Mal  moieties,  followed  by  the  addition  of  thiol‐ modified  Ab7,  144.    In  the  current  application,  where  smaller  amounts  of  several  different • 51   formulations are required, this method is impractical since a different SUV composition would need  to be prepared, by extrusion or other means, for every desired valence.    A more recent variation  is the coupling of Abs to DSPE‐PEG micelles using thiol‐maleimide  chemistry, followed by heating in the presence of SUVs, enabling the “post‐insertion” of the micellar  lipids and Ab  into  the preformed SUVs142, 145.     Although  this method may be useful  for preparing  immunoliposomes,  it  is unsuitable for preparing many precise valences of Ab‐LNPs because the Ab  undergoes  substantial  heterogeneous  chemical modification  as  described  above.    This  results  in  variable  valences  from  one  preparation  to  the  next  as  well  as  potentially  reduced  therapeutic  activity of the Ab.  Moreover, low yields of Ab in the final product are obtained (59%) compared to  the amount of Ab that was initially modified.  This is particularly a problem when using therapeutic  Abs  since  they  are  generally  available  in  limited  quantities,  especially  novel  drugs  under  development.  3.2.2  How the new methodology overcomes previous limitations  The  improved methodology described  in  this  chapter overcomes  the above  limitations by  drawing on desirable  features  from earlier methods,  including  the post‐insertion  technique142, 145,  while  replacing  thiol‐maleimide  chemistry  with  high‐affinity  biotin‐NeutrAvidin  (Neut)  interactions146, 147.  In doing so, a novel feature concerning the kinetics of biotin‐Neut interactions on  liposomes was discovered and incorporated in the methodology.  Specifically, it involves surprisingly  slow kinetics of association between biotinylated protein and Neut on the surface of PEG‐containing  liposomes, attributed  to a  steric blocking effect by PEG148.   Since Ab addition  is  slow  (coupled Ab  levels continued to increase over 72 h), to make a series of different valences, it was only necessary  to stop fractions of the same coupling reaction at different times.  To improve yields, a solid‐support  Ab  biotinylation  technique was  employed149  that  provides  high  recovery  (96%),  and  to  aid with  reproducibility,  relevant  analytical  assays were developed  for  the  characterization of preparation • 52   intermediates, including fluorescence‐based protein quantitation150 and an assay for PEG content in  liposomes151.  This chapter details this new methodology and the significant improvements it brings  to the preparation of multivalent Ab‐LNPs of different valence.    3.3  Materials and methods  3.3.1  Materials  The  following  lipids  were  obtained  from  Avanti  Polar  Lipids  (Alabaster  AL,  USA):  1,2‐ distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphocholine  (DSPC),  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐phosphoethanolamine‐ N‐[methoxy(polyethylene  glycol)‐2000]  (DSPE‐PEG),  and  1,2‐distearoyl‐sn‐glycero‐3‐ phosphoethanolamine‐N‐[biotinyl(polyethylene  glycol)‐2000]  (DSPE‐PEG‐biotin).    [3H]cholesteryl  hexadecyl ether ([3H]CHE) and Pico‐Fluor 15 scintillation fluid were from Perkin‐Elmer Life Sciences  (Woodbridge  ON,  Canada).    NeutrAvidin  (Neut)  and  immobilized  iminodiacetic  acid  gel  were  obtained from Pierce/Thermo Fisher Scientific (Rockford IL, USA).  Rituximab (Rtx) and trastuzumab  (Trz)  were  obtained  from  the  BC  Cancer  Agency  pharmacy  (Vancouver  BC,  Canada).    N‐ Hydroxysuccinimide ester‐dPEG4‐biotin  (NHS‐PEG‐biotin) was purchased  from TimTec  (Newark DE,  USA).   Disposable PD‐10 columns  (which contain Sephadex G‐25 medium) were obtained  from GE  Healthcare  Life  Sciences  (Piscataway  NJ,  USA).    4‐Hydroxyazobenzene‐2‐carboxylic  acid  (HABA)/avidin  reagent  was  purchased  from  Sigma‐Aldrich  (St.  Louis MO,  USA)  as  a  lyophilized  powder.   ATTO‐TAG 3‐(4‐carboxybenzoyl)quinoline‐2‐carboxaldehyde (CBQCA) was from  Invitrogen  (Burlington ON, Canada).   Unless noted otherwise, all other  reagents were obtained  from Sigma‐ Aldrich and were of the highest quality available.       • 53   3.3.2  Preparation of Neut­micelles  Separate micellar  suspensions of DSPE‐PEG and DSPE‐PEG‐biotin were prepared by gently  dissolving the lipids in HBS (25 mM HEPES, 150 mM NaCl, pH 7.4).  The two suspensions were then  mixed  in different mole  ratios of DSPE‐PEG  to DSPE‐PEG‐biotin corresponding  to different desired  Neut‐LNP formulations.   Separately, with vortexing, the micellar suspension was slowly added to a  threefold mole excess of Neut over DSPE‐PEG‐biotin.   Suspensions were vortexed  for 30 s  longer,  then incubated for 30 min at room temperature with stirring.  3.3.3  Preparation of Neut­LNP  Using  the  same  procedure  as  described  in  Section  2.3.2,  SUVs  composed  of  DSPC  and  cholesterol  (Chol)  in a mole ratio of 2:1 and  labeled with [3H]CHE  (0.009 µCi/µmol  liposomal  lipid)  were prepared by extrusion.    In all  cases when producing Neut‐LNPs,  the  total number of added  moles of DSPE‐PEG + DSPE‐PEG‐biotin (in Neut‐micelles) was 4 % of the number of moles of DSPC (in  SUV).  SUV and Neut‐micelles were heated separately in a 65 oC water bath for 10 min with stirring,  then were combined with vortexing and incubated for 60 min with stirring.  After being allowed to  return to room temperature (with stirring), Neut‐LNP preparations were purified on Sepharose CL‐ 4B  columns  pre‐equilibrated  with  HBS.    Lipid  concentrations  were  determined  with  liquid  scintillation counting, and Neut concentrations were determined using CBQCA (see below).    The  number  of Neut molecules  per  SUV was  calculated  by  dividing  the  number  of Neut  molecules per liter by the number of SUV per liter.  This latter quantity was calculated assuming that  each DSPC molecule occupies 0.815 nm2 of surface area in the bilayer of DSPC/Chol (mole ratio 2:1)  SUV144 and  that  the bilayer  thickness  in  these SUV  is 4.9 nm152.   For a 100‐nm diameter SUV,  this  corresponds to 6.98 × 104 DSPC molecules per SUV.  The number of SUV per liter was calculated by  dividing the number of DSPC molecules per liter by the number of DSPC molecules per SUV.     • 54   3.3.4  CBQCA  assay  for measuring protein  concentration  in  solution  or Ab­LNP  suspension    Solutions of borate  (100 mM Na2B4O7•10H2O, pH 9.3) and KCN (20 mM) were prepared  in  ultrapure water.   A KCN/borate solution was then prepared by mixing 25 volumes of borate and 1  volume of KCN.   A 96‐well plate  layout was prepared  for each assay, which  included separate Rtx  and Neut standards over appropriate concentration ranges, as well as triplicates of unknowns.   To  each sample‐containing well, 130 µL of KCN/borate were added,  followed by 10 µL of standard or  unknown sample.  Finally, a 40 mM stock solution of ATTO‐TAG CBQCA in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)  was diluted tenfold in borate, and 10 µL of the resulting solution were added to the wells.  The plate  was  covered  with  aluminum  foil  and  incubated  for  1  h  at  room  temperature  with  shaking.   Fluorescence  emission  intensities were  then measured  in  triplicate  at 550 nm with  an  excitation  wavelength  of  465  nm  using  a  BMG  Labtechnologies  Fluorstar  plate  reader.    Unknown  concentrations of Rtx and Neut were calculated from their respective standard curves.      3.3.5  Ammonium  ferrothiocyanate  assay  for  measuring  polyethylene  glycol  content in LNPs   Ammonium ferrothiocyanate (AF) was prepared by dissolving 30.4 g of NH4SCN and 27.0 g of  FeCl3•6H2O in ultrapure water to a final volume of 1.0 L.  Standard solutions of DSPE‐PEG (0 to 500  µM) and DSPC (0 to 4.5 mM) were prepared from DSPE‐PEG micelles and DSPC/Chol (2:1) SUV.   In  1.5 mL  Eppendorf  tubes,  500  µL  of  CHCl3 were  added,  followed  by  500  µL  of  AF  and  50  µL  of  standard or unknown solution (assayed in triplicate).  Tubes were closed and mixed vigorously on a  plate shaker for 30 min, then tubes were spun in a microcentrifuge at 13000 rpm for 2 min, and the  lower CHCl3 layers (495 µL) were pipetted into separate Eppendorf tubes.  The absorbances of these  CHCl3 solutions were measured at 530 nm.   The expected absorbances of the unknown samples  in  the  absence  of  DSPE‐PEG  were  calculated  based  on  their  known  DSPC  concentrations  from • 55   scintillation  counting,  and  excess  absorbances  at  530  nm  in  each  case  were  attributed  to  the  presence of PEG.  PEG concentrations of the unknowns were calculated from the excess absorbance  values.   3.3.6  Ab  biotinylation  on  a  nickel  immobilized metal  affinity  chromatography  column  Immobilized iminodiacetic acid gel was transferred into a 1.5 mL polypropylene column to a  final  gel  bed  volume  of  500  µL  then  rinsed with  5.0 mL  of  ultrapure water.    The  gel was  then  chelated with nickel by adding 5.0 mL of 50 mM ammonium nickel(II) sulfate and washed with an  additional 5.0 mL of water.  If not used immediately, the resultant nickel immobilized metal affinity  chromatography (NIMAC) columns were stored at 4 oC in 0.02 % sodium azide.  Otherwise, columns  were equilibrated with 5.0 mL binding buffer  (BB; 25 mM HEPES, 1 M NaCl, pH 7.4).   Separately,  500µL of 10 mg/mL Rtx were added to 1250 µL of 2x BB and 750 µL of ultrapure water.  For future  analysis, 100 µL of  this solution were set aside, and  the  remaining 2400 µL were  loaded onto  the  column by eluting the solution through the gel bed twice.   The column was then washed with 4 x  500 µL BB.   For biotinylation,  the desired mole excess of NHS‐PEG‐biotin with  respect  to Ab was  measured from a stock DMSO solution and was diluted to 1.0 mL in cold BB.  The concentration of  NHS‐PEG‐biotin was equilibrated across the column by adding 500 µL of the solution to the column,  allowing the eluent to drain into the NHS‐PEG‐biotin solution, vortexing briefly, then another 500 µL  aliquot was added to the column.  After five such aliquots, the entire 1.0 mL was added and allowed  to drain from the column by gravity for 45 min, with the column being refilled as necessary with the  drained solution.  Next, the column was washed with 5 x 500 µL BB to remove NHS‐PEG‐biotin.  Rtx  was either eluted with imidazole or ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA).  For imidazole elution,  the  column was  treated with  3  x  500  µL  elution  buffer  (EB;  25 mM HEPES,  1 M NaCl,  200 mM  imidazole, pH 7.4).  A final 500 µL aliquot of EB was passed through the column three times, and the • 56   four resulting fractions were pooled.  For elution with EDTA, the column was treated with 4 x 500 µL  stripping buffer  (SB; 25 mM HEPES, 1 M NaCl, 50 mM EDTA, pH 7.4)  and  all  four  fractions were  pooled.   The concentration of Rtx was measured using the CBQCA assay and the number of biotin  groups  per  Rtx molecule was  calculated  using  HABA