UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

On the degradation of porous stainless steel in low and intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell… Rose, Lars 2011

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2011_spring_rose_lars.pdf [ 11.36MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0071732.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0071732-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0071732-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0071732-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0071732-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0071732-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0071732-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0071732-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0071732.ris

Full Text

ON THE DEGRADATION OF POROUS STAINLESS STEEL   IN LOW AND INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL   SUPPORT MATERIALS    by    Lars Rose    M.Sc., Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, 2005    A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE  DEGREE OF    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY    in    The Faculty of Graduate Studies    (Materials Engineering)    THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)    April 2011    © Lars Rose, 2011         Abstract     Research  on  oxidation  kinetics  of  stainless  steel  traditionally  focuses  on  flat  sheet material. Little is known about the oxidation of steel within porous structures or  particles of different sizes. In cases where oxidation of porous materials is reported, the  data  are  seldom  related  to  the  actual  surface  area  of  the  material.  Instead,  the  mass  change is often reported as a percentage mass gain only. In some literature references,  the oxidation mass gain is assumed to increase with increasing porosity, often without  information of the surface area of the pores. If an area‐normalized oxidation mass gain  is  calculated,  it  is  often  normalized  to  the  outside  dimensions  of  the  investigated  specimens,  making  comparisons  between  different  microstructures  difficult.  In  this  work, oxidation of spherical stainless steel powders with different powder particle sizes  and  of  porous  sintered  stainless  steel  specimens  is  analyzed.  Oxidation  kinetics  are  correlated to the powder particle size and initial metal surface area of spherical stainless  steel powders, addressing this knowledge gap. For oxidation kinetics of spherical steel  powders, the dynamic change in metallic surface area over time is taken into account in  the model Msph developed in this work. Maximum oxidation mass gain of stainless steel  powder  based  on  composition  and  changes  in  phase  structure,  microstructure,  and  composition of oxides growing under the influence of prolonged exposure to solid oxide  fuel cell (SOFC) operating temperatures is analyzed.  The  oxidation  mass  gain  of  sintered  porous  stainless  steel  is  influenced  by  microstructure. The oxidation mass gain correlated to the entire surface area of the 3‐D  structure  of  the  sintered  porous  specimens  indicates  slightly  lower  oxidation  rate  kinetics  per  unit  surface  area  at  1073 K  than  published  kinetics  of  similar  materials  in  dense form.  Additionally, the chromium diffusion through four spinel coatings that have been  proposed  as  protective  coatings  for  stainless  steels  used  in  SOFCs  is  analyzed  in  this  work. Al‐Mg‐type spinels have the lowest Cr‐diffusion rate at the investigated conditions  and among the investigated materials.      ii        Preface    The  research  and  data  analysis  was  performed  by  Lars  Rose.  This  thesis  was  written  by  L.  Rose  with  revisions,  additions,  and  comments  by  Dr.  Tom  Troczynski,  University  of  British  Columbia  (UBC),  Dr.  O.  Kesler,  University  of  Toronto  (UofT),  Dr.  Yongsong  Xie,  National  Research  Council  Institute  for  Fuel  Cell  Innovation  (NRC  IFCI),  MSc.  David  Edwards  (NRC  IFCI),  Dr.  Heidrun  Spohr  (UBC),  Dr.  Daan  Maijer  (UBC),  Dr.  Matthias Militzer (UBC), Dr. Peter Barr (UBC), Dr. Elöd Gyenge (UBC), Dr. Radenka Maric  (University of Connecticut), and Dr. Eric Croiset (University of Waterloo).    Sections 1‐3: The sections were written entirely by the candidate, L. Rose (100%),  including  all  literature  research,  implications  for  the  research,  justification  of  project  proposal,  and  experimental  design.  The  section  includes  revisions  by  the  internal  and  external  thesis  examining  committee  and  suggestions  by  colleagues  during  the  annual  thesis progress review meetings.  Section 4: The section was written entirely by the candidate, L. Rose (100%). The  experiments  were  instigated,  designed,  and  executed  by  the  candidate.  Measurement  holders  for  Archimedes  measurements  and  oxidation  experiments  were  designed  and  machined  by  the  candidate.  Four  repeat  experiments  of  mercury  porosimetry  were  performed  by  Dr.  Tetyana  Sobolyeva,  Simon  Fraser  University  (SFU),  for  result  confirmation.  The  section  includes  revisions  by  the  internal  and  external  thesis  examining committees and suggestions by colleagues during the annual thesis progress  review meetings.  Section 5: The section was written entirely by the candidate, L. Rose (100%). The  experiments  were  designed  and  executed  by  the  candidate;  novel  gas  permeability  measurement  jigs  were  designed  and  machined  by  the  candidate.  The  fluid  dynamics  calculations  were  suggested  by  Dr.  Cyrille  Decès‐Petit,  NRC  IFCI.  The  section  includes  revisions by the internal and external thesis examining committees and suggestions by  colleagues during the annual thesis progress review meetings.  iii        Section 6: The section was written entirely by the candidate, L. Rose (100%). The  experiments  were  suggested  by  Prof.  Radenka  Maric,  University  of  Connecticut.  The  experiments  and  calculations  were  designed  and  executed  by  the  candidate.  The  experimental section includes revisions by Prof. R. Maric, University of Connecticut, and  the  internal  and  external  thesis  examining  committees.  The  mathematical  modelling  section was suggested by Prof. Matthias Militzer, UBC, and Prof. Daan Maijer, UBC, and  includes revisions suggested by the internal and external thesis examining committees.  Section 7: The section was written entirely by the candidate, L. Rose (100%). The  experiments  were  suggested  by  Dr.  Yongsong  Xie,  NRC  IFCI.  The  experiments  were  designed and executed by the candidate. Spray pyrolysis was performed together with  MSc Baisheng Yao, NRC IFCI. The section includes revisions by the internal and external  thesis  examining  committees,  with  additional  comments  by  various  colleagues  during  the regular thesis review meetings and the internal NRC IFCI project progress meetings.  Section 8: The section was written entirely by the candidate, L. Rose (100%).  Section 9: The section was written entirely by the candidate, L. Rose (100%).  Appendices:  The  appendices  were  written  entirely  by  the  candidate,  L.  Rose  (100%). The appendices include revisions by the internal and external thesis examining  committees.      A version of section 4 and section 5 was published in: Lars Rose, Olivera Kesler,  Cyrille Decès‐Petit, Tom Troczynski, Radenka Maric: Characterization of Porous Stainless  Steel  430  for  Low‐  and  Intermediate‐Temperature  Solid  Oxide  Fuel  Cell  (SOFC)  Substrates, International Journal of Green Energy 6 (2009) 638‐645. This manuscript was  written  and  the  research  carried  out  by  the  candidate,  L.  Rose  (100%),  with  revisions,  corrections, and suggestions by the co‐authors.      iv        Table of Contents    Abstract ................................................................................................................................ ii  Preface ................................................................................................................................ iii  Table of Contents ................................................................................................................. v  List of Tables ...................................................................................................................... vii  List of Figures ...................................................................................................................... ix  List of Symbols .................................................................................................................. xix  List of Abbreviations ...................................................................................................... xxvii  List of Compound Abbreviations .................................................................................... xxix  Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................... xxx  1.  Introduction ................................................................................................................. 1  1.1.  Advantages and disadvantages of fuel cells .................................................. 2  1.2.  Principle of fuel cell operation ...................................................................... 3  1.3.  The solid oxide fuel cell ................................................................................. 5  1.4.  SOFC materials ............................................................................................... 7  2.  Literature review........................................................................................................ 12  2.1.  Oxidation of porous stainless steel ............................................................. 12  2.1.1.  Metallic components in SOFCs: Interconnects and cell supports ..... 12  2.1.2.  Porous materials ................................................................................ 19  2.1.3.  Gas permeability measurements ....................................................... 23  2.1.4.  Summary  and  justification  for  the  presented  investigation  of  porous stainless steel oxidation ......................................................... 24  2.2.  Oxidation of spherical stainless steel microspheres ................................... 25  2.3.  Protective coatings for stainless steel materials in SOFCs .......................... 29  2.3.1.  Cr diffusion through spinels ‐ spinels containing Cr .......................... 30  2.3.2.  Spinels containing Mg and Al ............................................................. 31  2.3.3.  Other spinels ...................................................................................... 31  3.  Objectives .................................................................................................................. 35  4.  Influence of porosity, pore size distribution, and pore surface curvature on  stainless steel oxidation ........................................................................................ 37  4.1.  Material characterization ............................................................................ 37  4.2.  Porous metal foam characterization ........................................................... 39  4.2.1.  Surface profilometry .......................................................................... 39  4.2.2.  Porosity measurements ..................................................................... 45  4.2.3.  3‐D pore morphology ......................................................................... 49  4.3.  Oxidation behaviour of porous AISI 430 ..................................................... 57  4.4.  Calculation of growth rate constants from mass gain data ........................ 67  4.4.1.  Calculation  of  area  normalized  mass  change  from  image  analysis on polished cross sections .................................................... 67  4.4.2.  Oxidation growth rates ...................................................................... 75  4.5.  Conclusions – Oxidation of porous stainless steel ...................................... 85  5.  Gas permeability of oxidized porous AISI 430 specimens ......................................... 87  5.1.  Introduction ................................................................................................. 87  v        5.2.   Gas flow measurements .............................................................................. 88  5.2.1.  Permeability measurement, experimental set‐up ............................. 88  5.3.  Selection of gas for permeability testing and instrument settings ............. 91  5.4.  Results  and  discussion  of  gas  flow  through  oxidized  porous  AISI 430  specimens .................................................................................................... 94  5.5.  Conclusions ‐ Permeability of oxidized porous stainless steel .................. 102  6.  Oxidation of spherical surfaces and complete oxidation of stainless steel ............ 104  6.1.  Introduction ............................................................................................... 104  6.2.  Experimental procedure ............................................................................ 105  6.3.  Results and discussion of the mass gain experiments .............................. 108  6.4.  Model (Msph) describing the oxidation of spherical particles ................... 123  6.5.  Conclusions ‐ Oxidation of spherical steel particles .................................. 140  7.  Chromium diffusion in protective spinel coatings for intermediate  temperature solid oxide fuel cells ....................................................................... 144  7.1.  Introduction ............................................................................................... 144  7.2.  Experimental procedure ............................................................................ 144  7.3.  Results and discussion ............................................................................... 149  7.4.  Conclusions ‐ Cr diffusion in spinels .......................................................... 167  8.  Summary and conclusions of the work presented .................................................. 169  9.  Future work .............................................................................................................. 176  Bibliography .................................................................................................................... 178  Appendices ...................................................................................................................... 180  Appendix  A  Fe‐Cr phase diagram ........................................................................ 180  Appendix  B  Elemental analysis of the AISI 430 specimens ................................. 181  Appendix  C  Discussion of common porosity measurements .............................. 183  Appendix  D  Specimen holder for Archimedes measurement preparation ......... 187  Appendix  E  Specimen holder for oxidation experiments ................................... 188  Appendix  F  Confidence intervals of porous AISI 430 oxidation EA ..................... 189  Appendix  G  Oxidation rates of sintered porous AISI 430 .................................... 192  Appendix  H  Calculations of gas pressure, temperature and density .................. 194  Appendix  I  Friction and pressure loss in the gas permeability set‐up ............... 200  Appendix  J  Mechanical design of gas permeability jig V5 .................................. 210  Appendix  K  Influence of oxidation on permeability ............................................ 212  Appendix  L  Oxidation mass gain model based on elemental composition ........ 242  Appendix  M  Reproducibility and peak intensity of the XRD measurements ....... 254  Appendix  N  BET surface area of AISI 440C powder ............................................. 256  Appendix  O  Confidence intervals of the Msph oxidation activation energy ......... 259  Appendix  P  Literature reference value for diffusion coefficients in spinels ....... 261  Appendix  Q  Ternary phase diagrams of the spinel‐Cr systems investigated ...... 265  Appendix  R  Bibliography of appendices .............................................................. 269        vi        List of Tables    Table 1.1: Some of the materials typically used in SOFCs [24]. .......................................... 7  Table 1.2: Globally mined elemental production data [26]. ............................................... 8  Table 2.3: Typical composition of several proposed alloy materials for SOFCs (max.  values, in mass%) [57], [72], [74], [82], [83]. ................................................. 17  Table 4.1: Average bulk volume of the sintered AISI 430 discs (Vdisc). ............................. 38  Table 4.2: Heat treatment of sintered porous AISI 430 specimens. ................................. 58  Table 4.3: Time ranges with a constant slope in the area normalized mass gain as a  function of square root of time graphs used to calculate oxidation rate  constants of sintered porous AISI 430 specimens. If no microstructure  is indicated, the range applies to all microstructures not specifically  mentioned at that oxidation temperature. ................................................... 75  Table 4.4: Comparison between activation energies for different metals and alloys. .... 82  Table 4.5: Activation energies for porous AISI 430 oxidation calculated in this work. .... 83  Table 5.1: Lower limit of permeability at which an NRC‐IFCI test station may shut  down as a safety precaution due to an increase in pressure by  34.5 kPa. ......................................................................................................... 99  Table 6.1: Mass fractions of the sieved AISI 440C powders ........................................... 108  Table 6.2: Mean particle diameters and mass specific surface areas of sieved  powder fractions, calculated from the particle size distributions shown  in Figure 6.1. ................................................................................................. 110  Table 6.3: Phases found by XRD analysis of the oxidized metal powders. ..................... 112  Table 6.4: Density, molar mass and molar volume of Fe, Cr (m) and their oxides  (ox). .............................................................................................................. 124  Table 6.5:  Cr2O3 oxidation growth rate constants (ks,1, in h‐0.5m‐1) for different  AISI 440C sieved powder size fractions. ...................................................... 128  Table 6.6:  Fe2O3 oxidation growth rate constants (ks,2, in 103 h‐0.5m‐1) for different  AISI 440C sieved powder size fractions. ...................................................... 128  Table 6.7:  Cr2O3‐Fe2O3 oxidation rate switch time, in hours, for the different  sieved powder size fractions constants. ...................................................... 133  Table 6.8:  Parameters for the prediction of oxidation behavior of Cr2O3 on  spherical steel particles (ks,1) based on curve fitting results performed  in this work. .................................................................................................. 135  Table 6.9:  Parameters for the prediction of oxidation behavior of Fe2O3 on  spherical steel particles (ks,2) based on curve fitting results performed  in this work. .................................................................................................. 135  Table 6.10:  Parameters for the prediction of the time (in hours) until the surface  oxidation of stainless steel spheres changes from ks,1 to ks,2, depending  on oxidation temperature (large error). ...................................................... 135  Table 6.11:  Parameters for the prediction of the time (in hours) until the surface  oxidation of stainless steel spheres changes from ks,1 to ks,2, depending  on mean particle diameter Dmp. .................................................................. 135  Table 7.1: Spinel preparation by coprecipitation method. ............................................. 145  vii        Table 7.2:  Phases found in addition to spinel phases in the Cu‐Mn system,  depending on preparation method. Abbreviations used: CoPNa –  Coprecipitation with (Na) carbonates, CoPK – Coprecipitation with (K)  carbonates, EG – Ethylene glycol, EtOH – Ethanol, EtAcH – Ethoxy  acetylacetone, CIT – Citric acid organic complex method, MAL – Malic  acid organic complex method, CoPUr – Urea coprecipitation, PEC –  Pechini method. ........................................................................................... 151  Table 7.3:  Calculated electron interaction depth and width in solids. .......................... 153  Table 7.4: Measured CTE compared with literature values for CTE and electronic  conductivity. ................................................................................................. 155  Table 7.5: Activation energy EA of Cr cation diffusion in different spinels. .................... 163  Table 7.6: Recommended minimum thickness, in μm, of spinel coatings based on  Cr cation diffusion at 873‐1123 K. ............................................................... 167  Table B.1: Elemental compositions (at%) of the AISI 430 discs, as reported by the  manufacturer (Fe=balance). ........................................................................ 181  Table B.2: Elemental compositions (at%) of the AISI 430 discs, analyzed by  inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (5% measurement error,  Fe=balance). ................................................................................................. 182  Table C.1: Summary of various porosity measurement methods. *Cost unknown,  **Argonne National Lab (ANL) [369], ***PMI Analytical [370],  ****University of Calgary, Dept. Cell Biology.  ............................................ 184  Table G.1: Measured oxidation rates (k’’ and k’) calculated in this work  (section 4.4.2)............................................................................................... 192  Table G.2: Reference values for oxidation rates (k’’, k’) and for expected oxide  scale thicknesses after 40,000 h. Percentage values are given in mass%. .. 193  Table H.1: Density of moist air, ρgas, based on the dew point of the air stream. ........... 195  Table H.2: Calculations of molar composition and relative humidity of the analyzed  water/air gas mixture system. ..................................................................... 197  Table H.3: Sutherland constants, and applicability ranges for a number of gases. ....... 198  Table I.4: Average surface roughness of various tube materials.................................... 202  Table L.1: Assumptions made for oxidation model Mel₁ ................................................. 244  Table L.2: Assumptions made for oxidation model Mel₂. ................................................ 245  Table P.1: Diffusion coefficients in spinels, in cm2sec‐1. ................................................. 261  Table P.1, continued: Diffusion coefficients in spinels, in cm2sec‐1. ............................... 262  Table P.1, continued: Diffusion coefficients in spinels, in cm2sec‐1. ............................... 263  Table P.1, continued: Diffusion coefficients in spinels, in cm2sec‐1. ............................... 264        viii        List of Figures    Figure 1.1: Principle of operation of a single solid oxide fuel cell. ..................................... 4  Figure 1.2: Materials development in SOFCs. Temperatures reflect the targeted  temperatures in fuel cell development at TOFC/Risø [31]. FeCr: Ferritic  stainless steel. Reprinted from [31] with permission of Elsevier. ................... 9  Figure 2.3: Select chromium species over the surface of Cr2O3 at various  temperatures [48]. Reprinted from [48] with permission of Elsevier. .......... 13  Figure 2.4: Alloys of the Fe‐Cr‐Ni system considered as SOFC materials [38].  Reprinted with permission of ASM International®. All rights reserved. ........ 15  Figure 2.5: Mass change during heat treatment of different Crofer22 batches in  air [71]. Reproduced with permission of Dr. Quadakkers,  Forschungszentrum Jülich, and ThyssenKrupp VDM GmbH. ......................... 15  Figure 2.6: Comparison of mass gain between four SOFC candidate alloys exposed  to air at 1073 K for 500 h (H = Haynes) [72]. Reprinted from [72] with  permission of Elsevier. ................................................................................... 16  Figure 2.7: Oxidation mass gain of several SOFC candidate alloys in air at  1073 K [74]. Reprinted with permission of Dr. Quadakkers,  Forschungszentrum Jülich, and published under unported non‐ commercial Creative Commons License 3.0. ................................................. 18  Figure 2.8: Contact resistance of different SOFC candidate alloys oxidized in air at  1073 K [74]. Reprinted with permission of Dr. Quadakkers,  Forschungszentrum Jülich, and published under unported non‐ commercial Creative Commons License 3.0. ................................................. 18  Figure 2.9: Different grain structures of a Ti‐48Al‐2Cr alloy analyzed for their  oxidation behaviour in air at 1073 K by Haanappel et al. [120]. A: γ‐TiAl  grain structure, B: Duplex and lamellar structure, C: Lamellar grain  structure. No influence of these grain structures on oxidation was  observed. ........................................................................................................ 22  Figure 4.1: Ratio of molar fractions fCr/fFe of the different porous AISI 430  specimens analyzed in this work, compared before and after sintering. ..... 38  Figure 4.2: Surface roughness, Ra, of porous AISI 430 specimens with various  microstructures, indicated by media grade. .................................................. 40  Figure 4.3: Surface of an MG0.2 specimen recorded by stylus profilometry. .................. 41  Figure 4.4: SEM micrograph of the surface of an MG0.2 specimen. ................................ 41  Figure 4.5: Surface of an MG0.5 specimen recorded by stylus profilometry. .................. 41  Figure 4.6: SEM micrograph of the surface of an MG0.5 specimen. ................................ 41  Figure 4.7: Surface of an MG1 specimen recorded by stylus profilometry. ..................... 41  Figure 4.8: SEM micrograph of the surface of an MG1 specimen. ................................... 41  Figure 4.9: Surface of an MG2 specimen recorded by stylus profilometry. ..................... 42  Figure 4.10: SEM micrograph of the surface of an MG2 specimen. ................................. 42  Figure 4.11: Surface of an MG5 specimen recorded by stylus profilometry. ................... 42  Figure 4.12: SEM micrograph of the surface of an MG5 specimen. ................................. 42  Figure 4.13: Surface of an MG40 specimen recorded by stylus profilometry. ................. 42  ix        Figure 4.14: SEM micrograph of the surface of an MG40 specimen. ............................... 42  Figure 4.15: Surface of an MG100 specimen recorded by stylus profilometry. ............... 43  Figure 4.16: SEM micrograph of the surface of an MG100 specimen. ............................. 43  Figure 4.17: Polished cross sections of the various AISI 430 specimens: (A) MG0.2,  (B) MG0.5, (C) MG1, (D) MG2, (E) MG5, (F) MG40, and (G) MG100. ............ 44  Figure 4.18: XRD patterns of as‐received porous AISI 430 specimens, showing a  typical Fe‐Cr steel pattern (black dots), such as the pattern shown in  reference [255].  ............................................................................................. 46  Figure 4.19: Results of the different porosity analyses performed. ................................. 48  Figure 4.20: Pressure at maximum incremental mercury intrusion and pore size  diameter as a function of porosity of the analyzed AISI 430 specimens. ...... 50  Figure 4.21: Pore size diameter at maximum incremental mercury intrusion and  characteristic length (pore size diameter at point of inflection of  cumulative mercury intrusion as a function of pressure) shown as a  function of the AISI 430 porosity measured by the XRD/mass method.  Error in pore size diameter derives from multiple measurements of the  same specimen type; error in porosity is due to the experimental error  of the XRD/mass measurements. .................................................................. 52  Figure 4.22: Log differential intrusion of mercury as a function of pore size  diameter. Inset numbers indicate media grade. ........................................... 54  Figure 4.23: Cumulative specific pore surface area as a function of porosity. ................ 55  Figure 4.24: Relationship between tortuosity and porosity of the analyzed AISI 430  specimens, measured by mercury porosimetry. ........................................... 56  Figure 4.25: Relative mass gain of AISI 430 substrates at (A) 873 K, (B) 973 K, and  (C) 1073 K for different microstructures. ....................................................... 59  Figure 4.25, continued: Relative mass gain of AISI 430 substrates at (D) 920 K,  (E) 1020 K, and (F) 1125 K, for different microstructures. Inset in (F)  shows the changes in slope at short times, especially for MG0.2  specimens, as indicated by the arrow. .......................................................... 60  Figure 4.26: Surface microstructure of MG0.2 specimens after: (A) 100 h, (B) 500 h,  (C) 1000 h, and (D) 2000 h of oxidation at 920 K. Only few oxidation  products can be seen, even after long oxidation times. ................................ 62  Figure 4.27: Surface microstructure of MG0.2 specimens after: (A) 100 h, (B) 500 h,  (C) 1000 h, and (D) 2000 h of oxidation at 1020 K. Oxides close the  pores by platelet growth. ............................................................................... 63  Figure 4.28: Surface microstructure of MG0.2 specimens after: (A) 100 h, (B) 500 h,  (C) 1000 h, and (D) 2000 h of oxidation at 1125 K. Oxide growths close  the pores. ....................................................................................................... 63  Figure 4.29: Surface microstructure of MG40 specimens after: (A) 100 h, (B) 500 h,  (C) 1000 h, and (D) 2000 h of oxidation at 1125 K. After 2000 h, the  original microstructures of both metal substrate and Cr2O3 oxide layer  were grown over by a different (Fe2O3) metal oxide (D). .............................. 64  Figure 4.30: EDX elemental map of a cross section of AISI 430 MG0.2 specimens  after 1000 h at 1073 K. ................................................................................... 65  x        Figure 4.31: Grazing incidence XRD pattern of the surface of a MG100 specimen  oxidized for 1000 h at 1073 K. The recorded XRD pattern shown here  was compared with literature data: Open triangles: Fe‐Cr phase [255],  Circles: eskolaite phase [272].  ....................................................................... 65  Figure 4.32: Locked couple XRD pattern of the surface of a MG40 specimen  oxidized for 1500 h at 1125 K. The recorded XRD pattern shown here  was compared with literature data: Rectangles: Fe2O3 [273].  ..................... 66  Figure 4.33: Magnified image of a recorded cross section of a MG0.2 specimen. (A)  Optical image. (B) and (C) pores marked by image analysis, using  different grey scale settings. .......................................................................... 67  Figure 4.34: SV of as‐received, cleaned porous metal specimens as a function of  media grade, shown for 50x and 100x magnification. .................................. 69  Figure 4.35: Area (As) normalized oxidation mass change of porous AISI 430  specimens at (A) 873 K, (B) 973 K, and (C) 1073 K for different  microstructures. As was determined by image analysis. ............................... 71  Figure 4.35, continued: Area (As) normalized oxidation mass change of porous  AISI 430 specimens at (D) 920 K, (E) 1020 K, and (F) 1125 K, for  different microstructures. As was determined by image analysis. ................ 72  Figure 4.36: Area normalized oxidation mass change of porous AISI 430 specimens  at 1125 K, for different microstructures, magnifying the changes in  mass gain for the first 1500 h, which are barely visible in Figure 4.35 F. ...... 73  Figure 4.37: Cross section of an AISI430 MG1 specimen after 500 h at 973 K,  indicating the geometry assumed for the calculation of the oxide scale  thickness. ........................................................................................................ 76  Figure 4.38: Calculated values of k’’ at different temperatures (873 K – 1125 K), as  a function of media grade. ............................................................................. 77  Figure 4.39: Calculated values of k’' at different temperatures, as a function of  pore curvature as characterized by mercury porosimetry (Figure 4.21).  X‐axis error bars derive from the distribution of pore surface  curvatures observed in mercury porosimetry and y‐axis error bars  derive from the measurement errors of Sv, Vdisc, and Δmox (Eq. 4.18). ......... 79  Figure 4.40: Calculated oxide scale thickness after 40,000 hours at elevated  temperatures, using the oxide growth rates shown in Figure 4.39, as a  function of pore curvature. The dashed line indicates the pore size  radius (PSR) at maximum volumetric mercury intrusion. Oxides  growing thicker than this radius will close off the pores, and all  specimens and temperatures in the shaded area are consequently not  usable for 40,000 hours. ................................................................................ 80  Figure 4.41: Arrhenius‐type plot of oxidation rate k" for oxidized specimens. Error  bars are within the data markers. .................................................................. 81  Figure 4.42: Activation energy of oxidation of the various porous AISI 430  microstructures examined in this work. ........................................................ 83  Figure 5.1: Gas permeability set‐up with jig V1 as the specimen holder. ........................ 89  xi        Figure 5.2: Opened (horizontally cross sectioned) gas permeability jig V2&V3 with  porous AISI 430 disc shown on the right half. The largest o‐ring shown  on the left half provides the outer seal between measurement  chamber and the environment. ..................................................................... 89  Figure 5.3: Vertical cross section of a V5 gas permeability jig designed in this work.  The long vertical arrow indicates the gas flow direction; the x‐marks  indicate the position of the porous sintered specimens inserted in the  permeability jig. ............................................................................................. 90  Figure 5.4: Difference in gas flow rate of (A) air and (B) helium through various as‐ received porous AISI 430 specimens using measurement jig V3. ................. 92  Figure 5.5: Porosity divided by tortuosity and helium flow at 6.9 kPa as a function  of porosity. ..................................................................................................... 93  Figure 5.6: Air flow rate through as‐received porous AISI 430 specimens using the  measurement jig V5. ...................................................................................... 94  Figure 5.7: SEM micrograph of a cross section of a pore in a MG5 specimen, heat  treated for 10 h at 1273 K. The internal pathways for the reactant  gases can be seen to be partially blocked due to oxide growth. ................... 96  Figure 5.8: SEM micrograph of a cross section of multiple pores in a MG0.2  specimen, heat treated for 1000 h at 1073 K. The internal pathways for  the reactant gases can be seen to be blocked due to oxide growth. ............ 96  Figure 5.9: Gas permeability of porous AISI 430 specimens with varying  microstructure oxidized at (A) 873 K, (B) 973 K, and (C) 1073 K  (measured in jig V3). Inset italic numbers in (A) indicate the porous  specimen media grade. Dashed lines and dotted lines indicate  calculated maximum tolerable reduction in permeability for a 1 kW  stack for a high flow rate and low flow rate operation, respectively.  The dashed lines are shown only for the materials with the highest  porosity for which the measured permeability was reduced below the  tolerable limit. .............................................................................................. 100  Figure 5.9, continued: Gas permeability of porous AISI 430 specimens with varying  microstructure oxidized at (D) 920 K, (E) 1020 K, and (F) 1125 K,  (measured in jig V5). Dashed lines and dotted lines indicate calculated  maximum tolerable reduction in permeability for a 1 kW stack for a  high flow rate and low flow rate operation, respectively. The dashed  lines are shown only for the materials with the highest porosity for  which the measured permeability was reduced below the tolerable  limit. ............................................................................................................. 101  Figure 6.1: Particle size analysis (PSA) of AISI 440C powder size fractions by  dynamic laser light scattering. ..................................................................... 108  Figure 6.2: SEM micrograph of AISI 440C powders before oxidation. ........................... 109  Figure 6.3: XRD pattern of AISI 440C powders after 10 h at 1073 K. 5 sec/step high  resolution XRD scan of the 2θ region from 35.1° to 36.6°. Peaks  indicated based on these references:  Fe2O3: [273], Cr2O3: [307] ............... 111  xii        Figure 6.4: XRD pattern of AISI 440C powder, after 1000 h at 1073 K. The powder  appears to be completely oxidized. All peaks fit the Fe2O3 phase  described in reference [273]. ....................................................................... 111  Figure 6.5: Scherrer crystallite sizes of oxidized AISI 440C powder, heat treated at  different temperatures for 150 h each, after having been exposed to  1073 K for 1000 h (the initial crystallite size after the pre‐exposure is  indicated by the value at 1073 K). ............................................................... 113  Figure 6.6: Comparison of mass gain relative to unoxidized mass at 1073 K  between the different AISI 440C powder size fractions. ............................. 115  Figure 6.7: Comparison of relative mass gain of the different AISI 440C powder size  fractions at 920 K. ........................................................................................ 116  Figure 6.8: Comparison of relative mass gain of the different AISI 440C powder size  fractions at 1023 K. ...................................................................................... 117  Figure 6.9: Oxidation mass change of AISI 440C sheet at 1073 K as a reference  from published literature. Data reprinted from [174] with permission  of Elsevier. .................................................................................................... 118  Figure 6.10: SEM micrograph of unsieved AISI 440C powder after (A) 10 h at 873 K  and (B) 100 h at 873 K. Some oxide crystals (bright spots) can be seen  on the surface of the partic