Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Quantifying development : using T₂ relaxation to investigate myelination of the corpus callosum in preadolescents Whitaker, Kirstie Jane 2010

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2010_fall_whitaker_kirstie.pdf [ 1023.97kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0071378.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0071378-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0071378-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0071378-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0071378-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0071378-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0071378-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0071378-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0071378.ris

Full Text

Quantifying Development: Using T2 Relaxation to Investigate  Myelination of the Corpus Callosum in Preadolescents  by   Kirstie Jane Whitaker     A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of  Master of Science  in  The Faculty of Graduate Studies  (Physics)     The University of British Columbia  (Vancouver)     September 2010      ©Kirstie Whitaker, 2010        Abstract      This thesis describes a novel voxel‐based analysis of the transverse (T2) relaxation decay  curve  to  quantify  myelin  water fraction  (MWF).    Multi‐echo  T2  relaxation  decay  data  was  acquired for 5 preadolescent males (age range 9 – 12 years).  A novel signal to noise filter  appropriate for multi‐exponential T2 analysis was then applied to remove voxels which did  not  accurately  fit  the  modelled  curve.    The  remaining  voxels  were  designated  “highly  myelinated” if their MWF was greater than a certain critical value.  A range  of  signal  to   noise  filter  cut‐off  values and  highly myelinated  critical  values  were investigated.  This  thesis demonstrates, for the first time, a very strong and significant correlation (r = 0.990, p  = 0.001) between verbal intelligence quotient scores on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for  Children  –  Revised  and  myelination  in  the  corpus  callosum  of  developing  children.    This  relationship is supported by a growing number of studies showing a correlation between  white matter development and cognitive ability.    In  addition,  due  to  the  restricted  age  range  of  our  subjects,  this work is able  to  show  the  individual  variations  in  myelin  maturation rates.     ii     Table of Contents  Abstract ....................................................................................................................................................................................... ii  Table of Contents .................................................................................................................................................................... iii  List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................................................. v  1   2   3   Introduction, Background and Motivation .......................................................................................................... 1  1.1.1   Myelin: Structure and Function ............................................................................................................ 2   1.1.2   Myelin Imaging ............................................................................................................................................ 4   1.1.3   Quantitative T2 Relaxation ...................................................................................................................... 4   1.1.4   Alternative Techniques for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Myelin ............................ 6   1.1.5   Myelin Development ................................................................................................................................. 8   1.1.6   Specific Hypotheses ................................................................................................................................. 10   Physics of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging ............ 13  2.1.1   The NMR Signal: Precession of a non‐zero magnetic dipole in a magnetic field ............ 13   2.1.2   The Intrinsic Nuclear Spin and Magnetic Moment ..................................................................... 13   2.1.3   The Macroscopic Magnetic Moment ................................................................................................. 15   2.1.4   Equation of motion of M: Precession in a Magnetic Field ........................................................ 18   2.1.5   Relaxation of the NMR Signal: The Bloch Equation .................................................................... 20   2.1.6   Detection of the NMR Signal ................................................................................................................ 23   2.1.7   The rotating frame of reference ......................................................................................................... 23   2.1.8   RF Excitation ............................................................................................................................................... 24   2.1.9   Induction Signal Detection .................................................................................................................... 26   2.1.10   Spin Echo Experiments: T2 measurement ...................................................................................... 27   2.1.11   Spin Dephasing .......................................................................................................................................... 27   2.1.12   The CPMG Spin Echo Sequence: True T2 Measurement ........................................................... 28   2.1.13   Spatial Localisation .................................................................................................................................. 30   2.1.14   T2 relaxation analysis .............................................................................................................................. 34   2.1.15   NNLS Signal to Noise Ratio ................................................................................................................... 37   Method ............................................................................................................................................................................. 39  3.1.1   Specifically Imaging the Development of Myelin: A Novel Voxel Based Analysis .......... 39   3.1.2   Data Acquisition ........................................................................................................................................ 40   3.1.3   Subjects ......................................................................................................................................................... 40  iii      4   3.1.4   MR Acquisition ........................................................................................................................................... 40   3.1.5   Data Analysis .............................................................................................................................................. 41   3.1.6   Cognitive Measures .................................................................................................................................. 43   3.1.7   Statistical Analysis ................................................................................................................................... 43   Results .............................................................................................................................................................................. 44  4.1.1   Maps ............................................................................................................................................................... 44   4.1.2   SNRNNLS Filter .............................................................................................................................................. 45   4.1.3   Voxel Based Analysis ............................................................................................................................... 47   4.1.4   Non‐significant Correlations ................................................................................................................ 48   5   Discussion ....................................................................................................................................................................... 49   6   Conclusion and Future Directions ........................................................................................................................ 52   7   Bibliography ................................................................................................................................................................... 54      iv     List of Figures  Figure 1‐1 Conceptual illustration of myelin and nerve structure [1]. ............................................................. 3  Figure 1‐2: Typical T2 distribution of central nervous system tissue.  The three water environments  with distinct spin‐spin relaxation times are illustrated representing myelin water, intra and extra  cellular water and cerebrospinal fluid.  Inset is an electron micrograph of a myelinated axon in  cross section.  (Figure reproduced courtesy of Cornelia Laule.) ......................................................................... 5  Figure 2‐1: Spins in free space with random orientations (A) and in an external magnetic field (B) 15  Figure 2‐2: The Zeeman Effect.  The energy difference between the high energy (up) and low energy  (down) states increases with the external magnetic field strength [54]. ...................................................... 17  Figure 2‐3: Precession.  (A) The movement of the net magnetisation, M, around the applied  magnetic field is analogous to (B) a spinning top in an external gravitational field [55]. ...................... 19  Figure 2‐4: Time evolution of the magnetisation vector M.  (A) Mx, My and Mz as functions of time.   (B) The motion of M vector in 3D.  The M vector undergoes a Larmor precession as well as T1 and T2  relaxations to finish at the equilibrium state M0 [55]. ........................................................................................... 22  Figure 2‐5: The M vector precesses about the effective magnetic field in the rotating frame [55]. ... 25  Figure 2‐6: Induction signal detection [55]. ............................................................................................................... 27  Figure 2‐7: Spin dephasing due to magnetic field inhomogeneities in the transverse plane over time  [55].  Below is the time course of the NMR signal. .................................................................................................. 28  Figure 2‐8: Rotating frame spin phase diagram for a CMPG spin‐echo experiment.  At time τ the  second RF pulse rotates the spins 180° along the y’ axis.  At time 2τ the spins are rephased [55]. ... 29  Figure 2‐9: Induction signals as a train of spin echoes [55]. ............................................................................... 30  Figure 2‐10: A sinc shaped slice selection pulse represents a rectangular distribution of excited  frequencies [54]. .................................................................................................................................................................... 32  Figure 2‐11: Monoexponential T2 decay curve from water (solid line) and multiexponential decay  curve from CNS white matter (dots) [59].................................................................................................................... 35  Figure 4‐1 One subject’s (a) raw myelin water map, (b) SNRNNLS map, (c) filtered myelin water map  (created by excluding all voxels with SNRNNLS less than 100) and (d) myelin water map of the corpus  callosum superimposed on the first echo of the CMPG sequence.  Note that the colour bars  represent different values for the different types of maps; in (a), (c) and (d) the colour represents  the MWF and in (b) the colour represents the SNRNNLS.  Excluded voxels were given the value ‐0.01.  ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 44  Figure 4‐2 Myelin water maps of the corpus callosum superimposed on the first echo of the CPMG  sequence for all 5 subjects.  The colour bar represents the MWF of each voxel within the ROI  prescribing the corpus callosum.  This region is shown in clearer detail inset in the picture.  These  maps have all been filtered to exclude voxels with SNRNNLS less than 100 and are presented in their  unanimous ranking by three blinded judges ............................................................................................................. 45  Figure 4‐3 Pearson’s Product Moment correlation coefficient between voxel based myelin measures  and VIQ for SNRNNLS filter minimum values (90‐110).  The plot clearly shows a highly uniform and  robust correlation for significant correlations (r>0.847).  Noise began to affect the correlation  coefficients at SNRNNLS filter values above 100 and therefore a SNRNNLS filter minimum value of 100   v     was chosen to maximise the number of true highly myelinated voxels included in the analysis while  still removing voxels with low SNRNNLS which did not fit well to the data..................................................... 46  Figure 4‐4 Pearson’s Product Moment coefficient for correlations between filtered (voxels with  SNRNNLS < 100 excluded) myelin measures of various critical points.  As the voxels with low  coefficients are excluded from the analysis the correlations become stronger peaking at a maximum  correlation of 0.990 for a critical point of 0.12.  The correlation of average MWF with VIQ is shown  as a dotted line at r = 0.217. .............................................................................................................................................. 47  Figure 4‐5 Correlations between VIQ and filtered HMV0.12 which represents the number of voxels  with MWF > 0.12 and SNRNNLS > 100. ............................................................................................................................ 48         vi     Acknowledgments   Thanks must go, first and foremost, to my supervisors, Dr Alex Mackay and Dr Campbell Clark.   Both taught me more than I could have predicted and have irrevocably shaped my future for  the better.  Their influence only becomes stronger with time.  They supported me through an  academic adolescence, where I didn’t know what I wanted to do, or, if something did occur to  me, how to do it.  And more often than not I solved this with a ski trip or ten.  The completion  of  this  thesis  marks  a  transition in my  career,  and  I  hope  that  my  future work will do them  proud.    The  person  who  has  really  made  this  study  happen  is  Shannon  Kolind.    She  taught  me  everything  I  needed  to  know  in  the  field  of  MRI  data  analysis;  from  how  to  open  matlab  to  writing the code for these analyses, and everything in between.  Her contribution in writing up  this  work  for  publication  was  invaluable,  and  her  collection  of  rubber  duckies  will  always  make me smile.    The  data  for  this  work  was  actually  collected,  before  my  time,  by  Craig  Jones  and  Heike  Dumke, and I thank them for their hard work.  Of course there would be no thesis without the  subjects, children I never met but whose brains I stared at for months on end, and I’m grateful  for their participation in a loud and often scary brain scan.    Finally, there are those outside the lab: my money, my family and my friends.  I was funded at  UBC by a Commonwealth Scholarship, and I owe my wonderful three years in Canada to their  generosity.  Of course, I can never adequately express how well my family and friends looked  after  me.    They  welcomed  me  to  a  new  country,  joined  me  on  adventures  to  mountains  and  seashores,  lifted  me  up  and  supported  me  through  all  the  tough  times.    Those  vanilla  lattes  and long distance phone calls did more to raise my spirits than you can possibly know.    Thank you.     vii     1  Introduction, Background and Motivation   One  of  the  primary  goals  of  the  neurosciences  is  to  understand  the  biological  underpinnings  of  human  cognitive  and  emotional  development.    Following  Sherrington’s  lead,  the  proposed  models  from  the  last  century  of  work  have  primarily  concentrated  on  the  synapse.    Although  neuronal  development  and  communication  is  clearly  a  necessary  function for models of human development, work in the past decade has demonstrated that  it is insufficient to fully explain the phenomena.    This belief arises from the recognition that models of neuronal firing cannot fully explain  the  dramatic  and  sequential  acquisition  of  abilities  that  characterise  normal  human  development during the first two decades of life.  At birth, when the neonate is essentially  defenceless  and  completely  dependent  on  others  for  succour,  the  majority  of  neuronal  proliferation,  migration  and  specialisation  are  complete.    Subsequently,  more  complex  behaviours  develop  in  a  sequential  manner.    The  maturation  rates  within  this  pattern  of  development vary across individuals, while the pattern itself remains consistent within the  species.    From  a  logical  point  of  view,  a  suggested  biological  mechanism  to  complement  the  neuronal  model  for  explaining  mental  functions  and  development  should  fulfil  the  following criteria:  1. Provide a rationale for its impact on cell firing  2. Exhibit measurable changes in regions of the brain associated with specific abilities   1     3. These  changes  should  be  temporally  consistent  with  the  acquisition  of  specific  abilities  4. The rates of change should vary across individuals and hence reflect the variation in  behavioural observed across people of the same age.    Myelination of neuronal axons has been suggested by many as a mechanism that meets the  above criteria.  This chapter outlines the structure and function of myelin, how myelin can  be imaged using magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and the current base of knowledge  regarding its development.  With this information in mind, the criteria above are revisited  at the end of this chapter and specific hypotheses for this study are described.    1.1.1 Myelin: Structure and Function  Myelin is found in both the central and peripheral nervous systems of vertebrates.  It is a  lipid‐protein  lamellar  membranous  structure  which  surrounds  neuronal  axons.    In  the  central nervous system (CNS) it is responsible for white matter’s characteristic colour and  makes  up  approximately  50%  of  its  mass.    Grey  matter  does  contain  myelin  but  in  much  lower quantities.    Figure 1‐1 illustrates a myelinated axon.  The myelin bilayer comprises approximately 80%  lipid  and  20%  protein  and  approximately  40%  (by  weight)  of  the  space  between  the  bilayers is water.  The myelin of the CNS is produced by oligodendrocytes and the bilayers  illustrated are made up of oligodendrocyte cell membranes.      2       Figure 1­1 Conceptual illustration of myelin and nerve structure [1].     Unmyelinated  axons  transmit  action  potentials  using  continuous  conduction  mediated  by  sodium  channels  arranged  along  the  length  of  the  axon,  while  myelinated  axons  transmit  these electrical messages by saltatory conduction.  Saltatory conduction is characterised by  the  depolarisation  of  a  whole  section  between  two  successive  nodes  of  Ranvier,  which  mark  a  gap  in  the  myelin  sheath  and  the  location  of  the  voltage‐gated  sodium  channels.   Since the areas wrapped in the myelin sheath are electrically insulated the action potential  jumps from one node of Ranvier to the next and thus allows much faster conduction.  This  increased transmission speed of signals is necessary for complex functions, such as those  associated with motor, sensory and behavioural processes.    Recent  developments  in  molecular  and  systems  neuroscience  have  illustrated  the  critical  role which white matter plays in physiological mechanisms of brain maturation and neural  3     signalling [2‐6].   Therefore we can be confident that techniques which allow more precise  and  accurate  imaging  of  myelinated  fibres  will  allow  a  better  investigation  and  understanding of the white matter of the CNS.    1.1.2 Myelin Imaging  Five  techniques  are  currently  utilised  to  image  myelin.    Currently  it  is  not  possible,  at  a  clinically  relevant  level,  to  image  the  non‐aqueous  proteins  and  lipids  which  make  up  myelin not only due to the very fast signal decay time but also the difficulty (in fact, near  impossibility)  in  distinguishing  specific  myelin  molecules  from  the  other  non  aqueous  tissue surrounding them.    Therefore, to investigate myelin in vivo, an indirect measure of myelin is provided though  the imaging of the water in the CNS.  Four methods are summarised in this section and the  investigation  of  myelin  using  T2  relaxation,  the  technique  used  to  image  myelin  in  this  thesis, is described in detail.    1.1.3 Quantitative T2 Relaxation  As described in detail in the following chapter (section 2.5) T2 relaxation can be analysed to  consider  the  relative  number  of  protons  in  any  number  of  water  environments.    In  fact,  data  from  normal  CNS  tissue  resolves  remarkably  consistent  T2  distributions  which  illustrate  three  peaks  representing  three  water  environments.    An  example  is  shown  in  figure 1‐2.   4       Figure  1­2:  Typical  T2  distribution  of  central  nervous  system  tissue.    The  three  water  environments  with  distinct  spin­spin  relaxation  times  are  illustrated  representing  myelin  water, intra and extra cellular water and cerebrospinal fluid.  Inset is an electron micrograph of  a myelinated axon in cross section.  (Figure reproduced courtesy of Cornelia Laule.)      The  three  peaks  illustrated  in  figure  1‐2  have  been  assigned  to  cerebrospinal  fluid  CSF,  intra and extra cellular water, and water trapped between the myelin bilayers or “myelin  water” [7, 8].  The myelin water is the most constrained and therefore has the shortest T2  time, while the CSF represents the least inhibited environment and therefore demonstrates  a T2 time close to that of free water.    Histopathological  work  which  correlates  the  relative  amount  of  myelin  water  (myelin  water  fraction,  or  MWF)  to  tissue  stained  for  phospholipid  components  of  myelin  has  supported  the  hypothesis  that  T2  relaxation  can  provide  an  indirect  but  reliably  quantitative measure of myelin in CNS white matter [9‐14].  MR studies have detected the  short T2 component in myelinated trigeminal and optic nerves of the garfish, but not in the   5     same species’ unmyelinated olfactory nerve [15], lending credence to the specificity of the  short T2 component to myelin.    One drawbacks of the T2 relaxation technique is the very high signal to noise ratio required  to accurately compute the T2 distribution.  Another is the 30 minutes of scan time required  to amass the data from just one slice.  However, although this thesis does not consider new  approaches to data acquisition, work by Oh [16] and [17][17][17]Mädler and Kolind [18] is  drastically  reducing  the  acquisition  time  required  to  produce  three  dimensional  images  using this technique.    1.1.4 Alternative Techniques for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Myelin  Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  T1  and  T2 weighted imaging  has  been  used in  studies  of  myelin  development in neonates  and very young children.  This technique, which highlights areas with long relaxation times  (either  longitudinal  or  transverse  depending  on  the  pulse  sequence  utilised)  as  hyperintense,  is  solely  qualitative.    While  decreases  in  T1  and  T2  times  of  the  developing  brain have been significantly correlated with decreases in water content [19], which may  represent  an  increase  in  myelin,  the  assumption  that  myelination  is  the  only  process  changing  in  the  CNS  at  this  time  is  naïve  and  is  not  considered  a  viable  assessment  of  myelin content in children over 1 year of age.   6     MR Spectroscopy  MR  Spectroscopy  (MRS)  can  be  used  to  illustrate  the  concentration  of  certain  lipids  and  provides  indirect  information  about  myelin  concentration  [20].    Myelin  development  has  been imaged using proton MRS [21, 22].  Unfortunately the low signal to noise ratio of MRS  renders  it  insufficiently  sensitive  to  normal  myelin  development  in  older  children  and  adolescents.    However,  this  technique  is  quickly  advancing  and  may  prove  to  become  important in future research.  Diffusion Tensor Imaging  Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is an MRI technique which enables the measurement of the  restricted diffusion of water in tissue.  This is achieved by applying gradients in at least 6  directions  and  analysing  the  tensor  which  describes  the  three  dimensional  shape  of  the  diffusion for each voxel.  The mean diffusivity, <D>, and the fractional anisotropy (FA) can  be  calculated,  along  with  the  axial  and  radial  eigenvalues  (λ||  and  λ |   respectively)  of  the  tensor.    These  measures  can  be  used  to  track  white  matter  tracts  in  the  brain  (tractography)  and  has  been  shown  to  be  a  quantitative  measure  of  myelin  in  animal  models [23, 24].    This  method  is  the  most  utilised  to  image  myelin  development  and  the  vast  body  of  literature  which  investigates  myelin  development  in  children  and  young  adults  uses  DTI  (see  section  1.3).    We  should  not  find  it  difficult  to  believe  that  the  insulation  of  an  axon  which  myelin  provides  will  affect  the  anisotropy  of  water  diffusion;  however,  it  is  well  know that myelin is not necessary for this anisotropy to occur.  Work by Beaulieu et al [25]  has  shown  that  changes  in  DTI  measures  with  age  can  be  attributed  to  increases  in  fibre  7     diameter,  greater  cohesiveness  and  compactness  of  the  fibre  tracts,  reduced  extra‐axonal  spaces and a reduction in brain water, along with changes in myelin density.  This work is  supported by Schmithorst et al [26] and Suzuki et al [19].  It is, therefore, more appropriate  to  utilise  DTI  in  the  investigation  of  changes  in  myelination,  rather  than  an  absolute  measure  since  it  is  not  possible  to  resolve  single  axons  in  human  CNS  tissue  at  a  clinical  level and fibre tract orientation within the imaging voxel strongly affects the tensor.    Magnetisation Transfer  Magnetisation transfer imaging looks at the exchange of magnetisation between water and  non‐aqueous  tissue  [27].    A  magnetisation  transfer  ratio  (MTR)  is  usually  calculated  although other tissue parameters can be obtained, such as the fraction of protons on non  aqueous tissue [28, 29].    Many studies have shown MTR to be a very strong indicator of tissue damage.  However,  this  damage  may  not  specifically  be  a  change  in  myelination.    For  example  myelinic  and  inter‐axonal  nerve  components  have  been  shown  to  present  similar  steady‐state  MTR  characteristics [30].    1.1.5 Myelin Development  Yakovlev and Lecours reported from a post mortem study in 1967 that while most areas of  the brain myelinate in the first postnatal year certain regions, such as the corpus callosum,  reticular  formation  and  frontal  lobes,  continue  to  develop  the  myelin  sheath  into   8     adolescence  [31].    In  addition  the  forebrain  was  show  to  continue  to  myelinate  into  adulthood.    Further  histopathological  work  was  performed  by  Benes  et  al  [32]  which  supported  Yakovlev  and  Lecours’  findings  although  this  study  limited  its  investigations  solely to the hippocampus.    Even  though  histopathological  studies  would  be  considered  to  be  the  closest  to  a  “gold  standard” in the field of quantification of myelin, the paucity of post‐mortem brains within  this  critical  age  range  which  do  not  exhibit  disease  or  traumatic  injury  means  that  it  is  difficult  to  verify  findings  using  this  method.    We  are  required  to  utilise  a  non‐invasive  technique to continue the study of myelin development.  Since computerised tomography  scans deliver a dose of radiation to the region being imaged MR is the only completely non‐ invasive technique which allows the subjects to be investigated.    One may find in the literature a large number of MR studies which strongly illustrated the  myelin development in neonates, infants and children and in recent years there has been a  growing  number  which  illustrate  this  development  continuing,  in  certain  regions,  into  adolescence  and  adulthood  [33‐36].    Studies  which  investigate  the  trace  and  fractional  anisotropy of a diffusion tensor have also shown a relationship with age using a variety of  methods: voxel‐based morphometry [11, 26], region of interest analysis [37, 38] and most  recently,  tractography  [39].    Volumetric  studies  have  shown  an  increase  in  white  matter  volume accompanied by a decrease in grey matter volume with age [40‐43] and studies of  cortical thickness show a thinning of most regions throughout childhood and adolescence  implying an increase in myelination [44‐46].  9       These  studies  have  supported  the  age  related  changes  in  white  matter  structure,  specifically  supporting  a  continuation  of  myelination  into  adolescence  but  with  different  time  patterns  for  different  regions  of  the  brain.    A  growing  body  of  research  is  providing  evidence  that  myelin  development  is  correlated  with  cognitive  function,  be  that  general  intelligence [47], reading ability [48‐51] or visual spatial information processing [34].  The  goal  of  this  thesis  is  to  provide  evidence  to  support  this  hypothesis  by  correlating  the  subjects’ intelligence quotient (IQ) scores with the amount of myelin water in their corpus  callosum.  This relationship has never been previously shown with T2 relaxation.    The  studies  referenced  above  have  primarily  used  conventional  and  diffusion  tensor  imaging.  These methods are therefore subject to the limitations discussed in section 3.2,  that  is,  the  non‐specificity  to  myelin  which  is  inherent  in  the  DTI  technique.    This  thesis  introduces a novel analysis method to investigate the normal myelination of children aged  8  to  12  and  demonstrates,  for  the  first  time,  quantitative  T2  relaxation  in  children.    This  method is described in chapter 3.    1.1.6 Specific Hypotheses  With the information presented in this chapter in mind, we can return to the criteria listed  at the beginning of this chapter and now see how myelination of neuronal axons fulfils the  requirements as a biological model of development of mental functions.  First, myelination  of  the  axon  will  increase  the  intensity  and  frequency  of  cell  firing,  both  of  which  are  classically  associated  with  learning.  Second,  the  brain  myelinates  in  a  regional  and  10     sequential pattern and the majority of this myelination occurs during the first two decades  of  life.  Thirdly,  Yakovlev  and  Lecours  [31]  and  Benes  et  al  [32]  showed  from  their  histological  studies  that  structures  associated  with  specific  abilities  are  in  the  process  of  myelinating when these abilities are typically acquired.    Finally, the fourth of the criteria stated above requires that rates of maturation should vary  across  individuals.    As  discussed  earlier,  previous  studies  have  shown  a  correlation  with  age  [33‐36].    However,  these  studies  which  controlled  for  age  have  shown  that  cognitive  ability  alone  is  correlated  to  myelination.    Indeed,  age  is  simply  a  proxy  measure  of  maturity  and  should  not  be  a  perfect  definer  of  myelin  development.    For  this  study  children  were  chosen  from  a  very  narrow  age  range  in  order  to  remove,  as  much  as  possible,  the  relationship  between  myelin  density  and  age.    Therefore  we  were  able  to  investigate the relationship between cognitive ability without the overwhelming influence  of the confounding factor of age.     The Wechsler Intelligence Scale was developed based on the philosophy that intelligence is  “the global capacity to act purposefully, to think rationally, and to deal effectively with   [one's]  environment” [52].  In  this  study  we  use  the Wechsler  Intelligence Scale  for  Children    –    Revised    (WISC‐R)  as  our  measure  of  cognitive  ability.    The  test  comprises  a  battery  of  10  subtests  which  are  compiled  to  provide  verbal,  performance  and  full  intelligence quotients. These scores  are  age  corrected  but  do  not  account  for  any other   factor which may  affect  the child’s cognitive development.    It is generally recognised as  the most robust behavioural measure of overall cognitive ability.  11       The corpus callosum is a region which connects the two hemispheres of the brain and its  development  allows  faster  and  more  effective  communication  between  the  two  hemispheres.    Children’s  response  times,  which  are  improved  by  myelination  of  axons  in  the developing brain, have been shown to correlated with traditional IQ measures [53].  In  addition,  it  has  a  large  cross  sectional  area  and  is  highly  oriented  and  therefore  can  be  unambiguously identified in the sagittal plane.    The specific hypothesis of this thesis is that the MWF of the children’s corpus callosum will  be correlated with their IQ measures, and to a lesser extent, their age.  In this study a novel  voxel  based  analysis  method  is  introduced  and  it  is  hypothesised  that  this  analysis  will  yield  more  specific  results  than  the  region  of  interest  method  regarding  the  relationship  between  the  myelin  and  cognitive  measures.    This  study  aims  to  provide  evidence  for  an  age‐independent  measure  of  development,  namely  the  level  of  myelin  development  as  measured by quantitative T2 MRI.       12     2  Physics of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Principles of Magnetic  Resonance Imaging   2.1.1 The NMR Signal: Precession of a non‐zero magnetic dipole in a magnetic field  Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was first described in 1938 by Isidor Rabi and in 1952  Bloch  and  Purcell  were  awarded  the  Nobel  Prize  in  physics  for  their  work  refining  the  technique.  The first biological images were created in the 1970s, in the 1980s MRI became  clinically prevalent, and the following decade brought the introduction of functional MRI to  indentify  brain  activity.    Today  the  International  Society  for  Magnetic  Resonance  in  Medicine  has  over  5,000  members  and  presents  4,000  new  pieces  of  work  every  year  at  their annual meeting.    This section outlines the physics behind this outstanding, elegant and extremely influential  method  of  non‐invasive  biological  imaging.    It  assumes  an  upper  undergraduate  level  knowledge of quantum mechanics.    2.1.2 The Intrinsic Nuclear Spin and Magnetic Moment  An  atom  consists  of  protons,  neutrons  and  electrons.    The  protons  and  neutrons  are  situated  in  the  nucleus  of  the  atom  while  the  electrons  occupy  orbitals  outside  of  the  nucleus.  The energy levels which these fermions occupy are filled according to two rules:  one,  the  Pauli  Exclusion  Principle,  which  states  that  no  electron  can  occupy  the  same  energy state; and two, the Aufbau Principle, which dictates that each electron occupies the   13     lowest available energy state.  For NMR we are interested in the nucleons: the protons and  neutrons.    Three quantum numbers are used to characterise the state of a nucleon: the orbital angular  momentum, l, the spin angular momentum, s, and the total angular momentum, j. The total  angular momentum of the nucleus is the nuclear spin,  I, defined as the vector sum of the  angular momentum of each nucleon.  The most energetically stable state is achieved when  nucleons  are  paired  such  that  their  spin  and  orbital  angular  momenta  sum  to  zero.   Therefore when a nucleus has an even number of nucleons its nuclear spin is always zero.    The magnetic dipole moment, μ, of the nucleus is directly proportional to the nuclear spin,  I, with a constant of proportionality defined as the gyromagnetic ratio, γ.       μ=γI     Equation 2­1     If a nucleus has a non‐zero nuclear spin, which can only occur if there are either unpaired  protons or unpaired neutrons or both, a non‐zero net magnetic dipole moment will be  observed.  Nucleons with angular momentum and a non‐zero magnetic dipole moment are  said to posses the nuclear magnetic resonance property and are generally referred to as  “spins”.    In biological experiments carbon‐13, oxygen‐17, fluorine‐19, sodium‐23 and phosphorus‐ 31 all have the NMR property and are studied but it is hydrogen with its one proton  (nuclear spin = ½) which contributes most of the signal from biological tissue.  An average  14     human, weighing 150 lbs, has approximately 5 x 1027 hydrogen protons in water, fat and  organic molecules.  Unless the signal from hydrogen in water is suppressed (as in MR  spectroscopy) the signal from other non‐zero dipoles is negligible.  For simplicity, this  chapter will only consider the signal from hydrogen from here on.    In the absence of a strong magnetic field the spins will be randomly oriented, as shown in  figure  2‐1(A)  and  no  overall  magnetisation  will  be  discerned.    However,  when  a  strong  external magnetic field is present the non‐zero magnetic dipole moments will interact with  it and cause the spins to either align with or against the magnetic field.  These are the spin‐ up and spin‐down orientations and are shown in figure 2‐1(B).    A   B    Figure  2­1:  Spins  in  free  space  with  random  orientations  (A)  and  in  an  external magnetic field (B)    The  difference  between  the  number  of  spins  in  each  state  is  the  macroscopic  magnetic  moment, or net magnetisation, M.    2.1.3 The Macroscopic Magnetic Moment  The  energy  of  the  interaction  between  a  magnetic  dipole  moment,  μ,  and  an  external  magnetic field, B, is their dot product and is known as the Zeeman energy.     E = −μ⋅ B    Equation 2­2   15        The Hamiltonian operator for the system can be defined by combing equations 2‐1 and 2‐2:  H = − hγ B ⋅ I       Equation 2­3     If the direction of B is defined to be along the z‐axis, B = Bzˆ , then it is only the component  of  the  magnetic  dipole  moment  in  the  z  direction,  μz  which  is  non‐zero.    In  this  case  the  Hamiltonian operator reduces to   H = −hγ Bz I z       Equation 2­4     Using the Schrödinger equation the energy of the eigenstate, where  ms  is the projection of  the spin onto the z‐axis, is given by:  H ms = E ms    −hγ Bz I z ms = −hγ Bz ms ms     Equation 2­5   E = −hγ Bz ms    For hydrogen, or any nucleus whose nuclear spin is ±½, there are two possible values for  the energy, either E − = − hγ B  2  which corresponds to the spin‐up orientation ( s = + 1 2 ), or   the  slightly  higher E + = hγ B which  corresponds  to  the  spin‐down  orientation  ( s = − 1 2 ).   2 The  separation  of  the  nucleus’  ground  state  into  these  two  orientations  after  the  application  of  an  external  magnetic  field  is  called  Zeeman  splitting  and  is  illustrated  in  figure  2‐2.    The  difference  in  energy  between  the  two  states  is  ΔE = hγ B .    Note  the  dependence on the external magnetic field strength.  The higher the field the easier it is to  detect the net magnetisation.  16       Figure 2­2: The Zeeman Effect.  The energy difference between the high energy  (up) and low energy (down) states increases with the external magnetic field  strength [54].     Using  the  Boltzmann  distribution  (equation  2‐6)  to  calculate  the  probability  of  a  proton  occupying either of the two energy states (when a large number of protons are involved)  leads to the ratio of the number of protons in the spin‐up state (N‐) to the number in the  spin‐down state (N+) (equation 2‐7).   P ( E ) = Ce     −E  kT     Equation 2­6   C is a constant of the system, k is the Boltzmann constant and T is the temperature measured in Kelvin      R=  −  P ( E− )  − E−  hγ B ΔE N Ce kT kT kT = = = = e e    + + N P ( E + ) Ce− E kT  Equation 2­7     At  an average  room  temperature of  300K and  a  typical clinical  magnetic  field  strength  of  1.5T the ratio of the number of protons in the spin‐up state to those in the spin‐down state  is  approximately  1.00000163x10‐6  which  means  that  for  every  two  million  protons  there  will be three which has overcome thermal randomisation and has aligned themselves in the  direction of the applied magnetic field, settling in the spin‐up state rather than in the spin‐ down state.    17     We are now able to calculate the net magnetisation, or macroscopic magnetic moment, for  a particular temperature:  M0 = μ ( N − N −     +  ) = μ(N  ( R − 1) = μN = μN ( R + 1)  (e (e  −  ΔE  ΔE  +N kT  kT  +  (N ) N (  − −  − N+)  + N+ )  ) = μN tanh ( ΔE ) 2kT + 1) −1      Equation 2­8     This value M0 is called the thermal equilibrium value of the magnetisation.    2.1.4 Equation of motion of M: Precession in a Magnetic Field  In 1897 Joseph Larmor found that if an aligning force is applied to a spinning object it will  undergo precession.  Therefore, if a spinning object is tipped away from the aligning force it  will  precess  about  the  axis  of  the  force.    In  this  section  we  will  define  the  equation  of  motion of the net magnetisation as it moves in an external magnetic field.    As  illustrated  in  figure  2‐3,  the  motion  of  a  magnetic  moment  in  a  magnetic  field  is  analogous  to  movement  of  a  spinning  top,  with  the  magnetic  field  exerting  the  aligning  force instead of a gravitational field.     18     A   B    Figure 2­3: Precession.  (A) The movement of the net magnetisation, M, around  the  applied  magnetic  field  is  analogous  to  (B)  a  spinning  top  in  an  external  gravitational field [55].     Classical mechanics states that the rate of change of the total angular momentum, I, equals  the total torque, T, exerted on the system:     dI =T dt     Equation 2­9     For a system made up of many nuclei in a unit volume under a magnetic field, B, the total  torque is the cross product between the total magnetic moment, M, and the magnetic field,  as defined by the system’s electrodynamics:     T = M ×B   Equation 2­10     The  gyromagnetic  ratio  (introduced  in  equation  2‐1)  is  the  ratio  of  the  total  angular  momentum to the magnetic moment.  This definition holds for the macroscopic properties  of  the  system  and  therefore  equations  2‐9  and  2‐10  can  be  combined  to  provide  the  equation of motion of M:     dM =γM×B  dt  Equation 2­11   19       This relationship holds true whether the magnetic field is time dependent or not.    This  equation  of  motion  of  the  macroscopic  magnetisation  if  it  is  deviated  from  the  direction of the external magnetic field can either be derived using classical mechanics, as  shown here, or quantum mechanics and both investigations yield the same result, which is  that  the  magnetisation will  precess  around the  axis  of the  external magnetic  field.   There  are  situations  in  which  the  behaviour  of  the  hydrogen  nuclei  requires  a  quantum  mechanical approach, such as NMR spectroscopy, but these situations are outside the scope  of this thesis and hence I have not outlined the quantum mechanical proof here.    2.1.5 Relaxation of the NMR Signal: The Bloch Equation  The  equation  of  motion  derived  in  section  2.1.3  describes  the  motion  of  the  magnetic  moment under the assumption that there are no other interfering factors and implies that  the perturbed magnetisation vector would precess indefinitely about the axis of the applied  magnetic  field.    In  reality,  the  interactions  between  individual  nuclei  and  the  interactions  between each nucleus and its surroundings result in an exchange of energy which acts to  restore  the  thermal  equilibrium  magnetisation  (equation  2‐8).    The  return  of  the  macroscopic magnetic moment to thermal equilibrium is known as relaxation.    The  effect  of  the  interaction  of  the  spin  of  a  nucleus  with  its  surroundings  (spin‐lattice  interaction) is that the nucleus transfers energy to these surroundings and therefore loses  energy itself.  The spin‐spin interaction is the interaction of the spin of a nucleus with that  20     of another nucleus and the effect of this interaction is the dephasing of these spins, causing  a decrease in the net magnetisation.    In 1946 Bloch introduced a detailed phenomenological relationship which aimed to model  these energy exchanges, defining the equation of motion of M in terms of its components,  Mx, My and Mz, along three orthogonal axes with unit vectors xˆ ,  yˆ  and  zˆ  [56]:     M x xˆ + M y yˆ ( M z − M 0 ) zˆ dM   =γM×B− − dt T2 T1  Equation 2­12     The Bloch equation (equation 2‐12) uses simple exponential processes to model the spin‐ lattice and spin‐spin interactions.  The spin‐lattice interactions cause the net magnetisation  to relax along the direction of the magnetic field while the spin‐spin interactions cause the  relaxation  of  the  net  magnetisation  perpendicular  to  the  direction  of  the  magnetic  field.   The terms T1 and T2 are used to describe the spin‐lattice, or longitudinal, and spin‐spin, or  transverse, relaxation times respectively.    By  separating  the  Bloch  equation  into  its  components  along  each  axis  it  can  be  solved  to  give three general solutions:   M x ( t ) = ⎡⎣ M x ( 0 ) cos (ω0t ) + M y ( 0 ) sin (ω0t ) ⎤⎦ e    −t  M y ( t ) = ⎡⎣ − M x ( 0 ) sin (ω0t ) + M y ( 0 ) cos (ω0t ) ⎤⎦ e M z (t ) = M 0 + [M z − M 0 ] e  −t  T2 −t  T2     Equation 2­13   T1     21     Figure  2.4(a)  illustrates  the  time  development  of  each  of  these  three  components  and  figure  2.4(b)  allows  the  three‐dimensional  motion  of  the  magnetisation  vector  to  be  envisaged.       Figure 2­4: Time evolution of the magnetisation vector M.  (A) Mx, My and Mz as  functions of time.  (B) The motion of M vector in 3D.  The M vector undergoes a  Larmor precession as well as T1 and T2 relaxations to finish at the equilibrium  state M0 [55].      The longitudinal component of M is Mz since the magnetic field is defined as being aligned  along the z‐axis.  The transverse component can be defined as a single complex variable MT  and expressed as:   M T ≡ M x + iM y    M T (t ) = M T ( 0) e  −t  T2 iω0t     Equation 2­14   e    When the relaxation effects are negligible, for example during short time periods such as  RF excitation and signal detection (as addressed in section 2.2), equation 2‐15 will yield the   22     same  solution  as  the  solutions  to  the  Bloch  equation  when  the  relaxation  times  are  replaced with infinity.    2.1.6 Detection of the NMR Signal  2.1.7 The rotating frame of reference  The precession described in section 2.1.3 will be observed for any and every nucleus which  has a magnetic dipole moment and the frequency of the precession will be characteristic of  the element.  This frequency is commonly known as the Larmor frequency, in honour of the  Irish physicist whose work described the dynamics of precessing systems.    If  the  movement  of  the  magnetisation  vector  is  observed  from  a  stationary  frame  of  reference then its motion as it relaxes is very complicated.  However, if a rotating frame of  reference is utilised, and specifically one which is rotating at the Larmor frequency, we are  able to easily observe only the motion of the vector which is caused by the transverse and  longitudinal relaxation.    An effective magnetic field, Beff, is introduced, and defined as     Beff = B +  ω  γ     Equation 2­15     where  ω  is  the  frequency  of  the  rotating  frame.    This  allows  the  equation  of  motion  excluding the effects of relaxation as defined in equation 2.11, to be transformed from the  stationary frame (x, y, z) into the rotating frame (x’, y’, z’):  23        dM = M × ( γ B + ω ) = γ M × Beff   dt  Equation 2­16     If Beff is defined to equal zero then the motion of M, excluding effects of relaxation, in the  rotating frame, will also be zero.  Therefore the angular frequency of the rotating frame is  defined to be:     ω = −γ Bzˆ    Equation 2­17     2.1.8 RF Excitation  The  precession  described  thus  far  describes  the  motion  of  the  net  magnetisation  when  perturbed  from  its  equilibrium  position,  M0.    This  perturbation  is  achieved  by  applying  a  magnetic field pulse for a short time, orthogonally to the static magnetic field, B0.  Since it is  necessary to transform the pulse into the rotating frame of reference described in section  2.2.1, it must oscillate in the stationary frame of reference in order that the magnetisation  vector is pushed in the same direction at each rotation.    The frequency of the oscillations is the Larmor frequency, ω, for the element being studied.   This frequency is in the radio frequency (RF) range for conventional MRI and therefore this  pulse is commonly referred to as the RF pulse.  If this pulse does not oscillate at the Larmor  frequency it will not affect the magnetisation vector much since in the rotating frame it will  not appear to be a constant field.  A pulse of this nature is termed to be “off‐resonance” and  will take longer to tip the longitudinal magnetisation away from the axis of the B0 field due  to the inefficient trajectory caused by an incorrect pulse frequency.   24       The RF pulse is analogous to pushing a child on a swing.  The most efficient push is at the  top of her swing and has the same frequency as the child’s motion.  An off‐resonance pulse  is equivalent to pushing the child too soon, or too late.    While in the stationary frame of reference the applied magnetic field (B1) is oscillating at  the Larmor frequency, in the rotating frame of reference it is a constant field along an axis  perpendicular to the  zˆ  axis.  For this explanation this axis is set to be the  xˆ ′  axis.  Note that  the  zˆ   and  zˆ′   axes  are  the  same,  although  the  former  refers  to  the  axis  in  the  laboratory  frame, and the latter to the rotating frame, because the rotating frame revolves around the  axis of the B0 field.  This notation extends to the transverse axes.    The  only  magnetic  field  affecting  M  is  B1 xˆ ′   since  the  effective  magnetic  field  is  B1  in  this  frame  of  reference.    Therefore,  the  magnetisation  vector  will  now  rotate  around  this  magnetic  field  and will  be  perturbed  from  the  zˆ′   direction  to  trace  a  circle  orthogonal  to  the  xˆ ′  axis as shown in figure 2‐5.       Figure  2­5:  The  M  vector  precesses  about  the  effective  magnetic  field  in  the  rotating frame [55].   25       The angle though which M will turn (α) depends on how long the B1 field is applied for and  can  be  calculated,  α = γ B1τ .    Since  τ  is  small  (a  few  ms)  for  a  flip  angle  of  π  radians, it  is  reasonable to ignore the effects of relaxation during the application of the RF pulse.    2.1.9 Induction Signal Detection  According  to  Faraday’s  law,  a  charged  particle  moving  in  a  magnetic  field  will  induce  a  voltage  in  an  orthogonally  orientated  coil.    In  this  case  an  induction  coil  is  oriented  perpendicular to the  xˆ  axis and the magnitude of the induced voltage is     V=  1 dΦ   c dt  Equation 2­18     where  c  is  the  speed  of  light  and  Φ  is  the  total  magnetic  flux  in  the  coil  which  is  proportional to the component of the magnetisation along the  xˆ  axis.    As discussed in section 2.1.4 the transverse component of the magnetisation is modelled to  relax  back  to  M0,  exponentially.    The  coil  is  in  the  stationary  frame  of  reference  and  the  induced  voltage  will  therefore  oscillate  at  the  Larmor  frequency,  reflecting  the  angular  frequency  of  the  rotating  frame  of  reference.    Figure  2‐6  illustrates  this  oscillating  exponential  decay.    This  oscillating  voltage  creates  an  alternating  (at  the  Larmor  frequency) current which is detected by the electronics of the RF receiver and provides the  signal we use to create a magnetic resonance image.  Image reconstruction is described in  section 2.4.  26          Figure 2­6: Induction signal detection [55].     2.1.10 Spin Echo Experiments: T2 measurement  2.1.11 Spin Dephasing  In section 2.2.2 it was noted that if the RF pulse does not oscillate at the Larmor frequency  it  will  not  affect  the  magnetisation  vector  much  since  in  the  rotating  frame  the  effective  magnetic field generated by this pulse will not appear to be a constant field.  In a similar  manner any variations in the magnitude or direction of the main magnetic field, B0, across a  region  will  cause  the  nucleons  across  the  region  to  each  experience  slightly  different  magnetic fields and Beff will not be defined to be exactly zero.  As the spins precess they will  therefore move at different rates.    The  gradual  accumulation  of  spins  which  are  precessing  slower  or  faster  than  the  theoretical  Larmor  frequency  lead  to  a  macroscopic  magnetic  moment  of  zero,  since  the  transverse  components  of  each  of  the  individual  nucleon’s  magnetic  moments  eventually  return to their original random orientation within the x‐y plane (the spins are still tilting  27     towards the z axis as they undergo longitudinal relaxation).  Therefore, due to this process  of  spin  dephasing,  no  signal  is  detected.    Figure  2‐7  illustrates  the  dispersion  of  the  transverse components of the individual spins.       Figure  2­7:  Spin  dephasing  due  to  magnetic  field  inhomogeneities  in  the  transverse plane over time [55].  Below is the time course of the NMR signal.     The time taken for this signal to decay to 1/e is T2*.  It is not the transverse relaxation time  T2 but is related by taking into account the field inhomogeneities, ΔB:     1 1 = + γΔ B   * T2 T2  Equation 2­19     2.1.12 The CPMG Spin Echo Sequence: True T2 Measurement  Imagine  if  the  spin  dephasing  discussed  above  could  be  reversed.    This  would  allow  the  field inhomogeneities to be compensated for and the measurement of the true transverse  relaxation time.  The Carr, Purcell, Meiboom and Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence, developed in  1958, does exactly that [57].    28       Figure  2­8:  Rotating  frame  spin  phase  diagram  for  a  CMPG  spin­echo  experiment.  At time τ the second RF pulse rotates the spins 180° along the y’  axis.  At time 2τ the spins are rephased [55].     The spin phase diagram for the CMPG sequence is shown in Figure 2‐10.  Figures 2‐10(A)  and  2‐10(B)  illustrate  the  dephasing  of  the  spins  after  being  flipped  into  the  transverse  plane after a 90° x’ pulse.    At  time  τ,  another  RF  pulse  rotates  the  spins  180°  along  the  y’  axis  (figure  2‐8(C)).    The  individual magnetic moments continue to change according to their particular equation of  motion,  with  some  precessing  faster  than  the  rotating  frame  and  others  rotating  more  slowly, but now they are moving in the opposite direction (figure 2‐8(D)).  Therefore, after  time  2τ  (measured  from  the  original  RF  excitation  of  the  nuclei),  the  spins  are  rephased  back into alignment (figure 2‐8(E)).    These 180° pulses are called refocusing pulses and can be repeated at times 3τ, 5τ, 7τ etc to  allow spins to be rephrased over a long time period.  This leads to the accurate calculation  of the true T2 relaxation time since the dephasing effect of the interactions between nuclei  is not recoverable and will cumulate as illustrated below in figure 2‐9.     29     Equation  2‐20  relates  the  signal  after  n  refocusing  pulses,  S(2nτ),  to  the  original  signal  strength, S(0), and T2.   S ( 2nτ ) = S ( 0 ) e     −2 nτ T2     Equation 2­20        Figure 2­9: Induction signals as a train of spin echoes [55].     The  original  spin‐echo  sequence  created  by  Carr  and  Purcell  was  similar  to  the  CPMG  sequence and the only difference between them is that in the CP sequence the 180° pulse  was aligned along the x’ axis rather than the y’ axis [58].  In this sequence errors in the flip  angle initiated by the RF pulse would cumulate at each subsequent refocusing pulse.  The  CPMG sequence refocuses these errors at every second echo at the same time as refocusing  the spins themselves.    2.1.13 Spatial Localisation  Investigating the precession characteristics of each individual spin (i.e. their frequency and  phase)  when  a  known  spatial  dependence  is  introduced  to  the  applied  magnetic  field  allows an MR image to be created.  Three techniques are utilised to achieve the information   30     required to reconstruct the image in 3 dimensions: slice selection, frequency encoding and  phase encoding.    Although  in  the  following  explanation  the  x,  y  and  z  axes  are  used to  represent  the  three  orthogonal directions in which the data is encoded, it is important to remember that these  are not the only possible orientations.  One of the MRI technique’s greatest assets is the fact  that  these  axes  can  be  rotated  in  any  direction  allowing  images  to  be  acquired  in  any  oblique plane.    Slice Selection  A z dependence on the spin precession frequency can be introduced using a magnetic field  which changes linearly along the z axis.  The gradient of this field, i.e., its rate of change, is  Gz and alters the magnetic field in the z direction to:     B = ( B0 + zGz )    Equation 2­21     which in turn adjusts the spin precession frequency to:     ω ( z ) = γ ( B0 + zGz )    Equation 2­22     It  is  not  desirable  to  have  a  slice  which  is  too  thin  because  it  would  take  too  many  repetitions to image a volume in the body.  Therefore a range of frequencies are required.   The band width of the RF pulse, Δω is related to the thickness of the slice, d, by  d =  Δω .  γG    31     In  order  to  excite  a  rectangular  slice  the  RF  pulse  cannot  maintain  a  constant  amplitude  since  that  would  excite  a  sinc  shaped  slice.    However,  to  a  first  order  approximation  the  temporal  modulation  of  the  amplitude  is  related  to  its  frequency  spectrum  by  a  Fourier  transform.    To  achieve  a  rectangular  slice  in  the  time  domain,  a  sinc  shaped  RF  pulse  is  required, as shown in figure 2‐12.     Figure  2­10:  A  sinc  shaped  slice  selection  pulse  represents  a  rectangular  distribution of excited frequencies [54].     Slice  location  and  thickness  are  determined  by  three  factors:  the  centre  frequency  of  the  excitation  pulse  (ω),  the  bandwidth  of  the  excitation  field  (Δω)  and  the  strength  of  the  gradient field (Gz).   The centre frequency and the gradient field determine the slice location  and the bandwidth and the gradient field determine the slice thickness.  Theoretically we  could  simply  slide  the  centre  frequency  up  and  down  and  acquire  data  from  a  variety  of  slices.  However, due to off‐resonance excitation just beyond the edges of the slices, in most  scans the slices are acquired in an interleaved fashion: for example for an acquisition of ten  slices the sequence would acquire the first, third, fifth, seventh and ninth before going back  to  acquire  the  second,  fourth,  sixth,  eighth  and  tenth  slices  in  order  to  minimise  any  problems from overlapping slices.  32     Frequency Encoding  Following  slice  selection  a  second  gradient,  Gx,  may  be  applied  along  the  x  axis  so  that  different nuclei precess at different frequencies according to their position along the x axis.   This spatial dependence will be observed in the signal received by the induction coil.  If the  relaxation  effects  are  ignored  during  the  Gx  application,  which  is  reasonable  since  the  gradient is only applied for a short amount of time, the magnetisation can be modelled as  described  in  equation  2‐14  and  thus  the  complex  signal  received,  in  terms  of  the  spin  density distribution along the axis, P(x), can be written as:     C ( t ) = ∫ P ( x )eiγ xGxt dx    Equation 2­23     Using  a  substitution  of  k=γGxt  and  an  inverse  Fourier  transform,  the  x  coordinates  of  the  excited spins, P(x), can be recovered from the signal received:   S (k ) =    ∞  ∫ P ( x) e  ikx  dx  −∞  1 P ( x) = 2π  ∞  ∫ S (k )e    − ikx  Equation 2­24   dx  −∞    Phase Encoding  The  encoding  in  the  third  and  final  orthogonal  direction  is  generated  using  another  gradient, this time along the y axis.  In fact, it is necessary to apply a variety of gradients.  A  gradient  is  applied  for  a  short  amount  of  time  before  the  frequency  encoding  gradient,  changing the phase of the magnetisation vector.  Once the sequence has been repeated for a   33     range of gradients, both positive and negative, a vector encoding the phase of each voxel is  created:             Equation 2­25     A Fast Fourier Transform is then used to extract the y position of the voxel.    In  this  section  we  have  shown  how  slice  selection  and  frequency  and  phase  encoding  techniques are used to determine the magnetisation within each individual voxel and thus  create two‐dimensional maps of the scanned region.  There are many more ways to acquire  data.    For  example,  given  the  right  slice  prescription,  phase  encoding  can  readily  be  extended  to  three  directions,  replacing  the  slice  selection  pulse,  and  providing  increased  signal‐to‐noise ratio and superior spatial resolution.    2.1.14 T2 relaxation analysis  A  multi  echo  CPMG  sequence  can  reverse  the  signal  loss  due  to  the  dephasing  of  the  transverse magnetisation caused by inhomogeneities in different water environments and  allow the calculation of the true T2 of a sample as described in section 2.3.2.  The resulting  decay  curve  includes  the  contribution  from  protons  in  each  environment  and  therefore  encodes  information  concerning  the  number  and  relative  size  of each  environment.    This  section summarises the techniques required for this process.     34     It  is  conceptually  very  easy  to  understand  that  an  in  vivo  MR  image  would  represent  protons constrained within different water environments and therefore that the true T2 of  a  sample  would  follow  a  multi‐exponential  decay  pattern  as  those  protons  with  short  T2  ceased  their  contribution  to  the  decay  earlier  than  those  with  more  free  space  around  them.  Figure 2‐11 shows the difference between a mono‐exponential T2 decay (that of free  water) and a multi‐exponential decay from CNS tissue.  It is clear therefore that the model  used to approximate true T2 decay must be multi‐exponential, although we do not initially  know how many water reservoirs will contribute to it.       Figure  2­11:  Monoexponential  T2  decay  curve  from  water  (solid  line)  and  multiexponential  decay curve from CNS white matter (dots) [59].     The  general  integral  equation  describing  multi‐exponential  T2  relaxation  (equation  2‐26)  describes N data points, yi, measured at times ti.  S(T2) is the amplitude distribution of the  contributing exponentials as a function of their characteristic relaxation time.  b     y ( ti ) = yi = ∫ s (T2 )e  −  ti T2  dT2  i = 1, 2...N    Equation 2­26   a    35     Linear  techniques  overcome  the  necessary  shortcoming  of  nonlinear  techniques  in  that  they do not require any a priori assumptions as to the number of contributing exponentials.   Instead,  they  assume  a  large  number  of  T2j  times  and  solve  for  the  corresponding  amplitudes, allowing for the fact that some may be zero.  These techniques are guaranteed  to converge to the absolute minimum within the defined solution space.     The  utilisation  of  a  convergence  algorithm  to  compute  the  T2  times  requires  the  discretisation  of  s(T2)  in  equation  2‐26.    Equation  2‐27  illustrates  this  discretisation  through the assumption that the distribution is a sum of M delta functions with areas sj and  known relaxation times Tj.   (  M  s (T2 ) = ∑ s jδ T2 − T2 j     j =1  )   Equation 2­27     The general form of the linear system of equations is shown in equation 2‐28 and it is this  system we wish to solve.       N M  yi = ∑ Aij s j  i = 1, 2...N  j =1     Equation 2­28     The  chi  squared  statistic  (equation  2‐29)  represents the  misfit  of  the  acquired  data,  yi,  to  the value predicted by the constructed model, yip due to noise in the acquired data.  MN     χ2 = ∑ i =1  (y  p i  − yi )  σ i2  2     Equation 2­29      36     The  nonnegative  least  squares  (NNLS)  algorithm  approach  to  solving  equation  2‐28  involves  finding  the  set  of  sj  which  minimises  the  least  squares  misfit  (equation  2‐30)  which, when normalised to unit variance, also minimises the χ2 misfit.  N  M  i =1  j =1  2  ∑ ∑A s     ij  j  − yi     Equation 2­30     In reality it is unlikely that a biological sample of central nervous system tissue will exhibit  a distribution of T2 values which are perfectly described by the discrete solution offered by  the minimisation of equation 2‐30.  An adaptation which introduces additional constraints  regularising  the  solutions  can  be  used  and  is  illustrated  in  equation  2‐31.      Here  μ  is  the  trade‐off parameter and the H matrix contains the additional constraints on the data, such  as that of solution curvature.  The minimisation of equation 2‐31 leads to T2 distributions  which  more  accurately  reflect  the  physical  characteristics  of  biological  tissue  environments.      N  M  i =1  j =1  2  ∑ ∑A s ij  j  K  M  − yi + μ ∑ ∑ H kj s j  2     Equation 2­31   k =1 j =1    2.1.15 NNLS Signal to Noise Ratio     The  quality  of  any  image  increases  with  increased  signal  to  noise  ratio  (SNR)  due  to  the  reduced  influence  from  noise  in  the  image.    SNR  usually  compares  the  signal  from  the  protons within a volume to the background noise.  The parameter SNRNNLS is conceptually  analogous to SNR and provides a quantitative measure of “goodness of fit”.  37       SNRNNLS  compares  the  signal  density  with  the  χ2  misfit  described  in  equation  2‐30.    This  measure  illustrates  how  well  the  data  has  been  fitted  to  the  multi‐exponential  T2  distribution  modelled  using  the  NNLS  algorithm  described  above.    Small  values  of  the  χ2  misfit would represent a good fit to the data, while large values imply a poor model for the  data.  Therefore, as with SNR, a large value of SNRNNLS is desirable.           Equation 2­32     It  is  necessary  to  consider  the  signal  density  when  quantifying  “goodness  of  fit”  since  a  voxel  with  small  signal  density  will  produce  a  less  reliable  model  than  those  with  higher  signal due to the fewer available data points.    This is a novel measure which has not previously been utilised in T2 analysis.  One of the  aims  of  this  thesis  was  to  investigate  the  applications  of  this  measure  and  these  are  discussed in detail in later chapters.     38     3  Method   This  chapter  outlines  the  novel  voxel‐based  method  utilised  in  the  investigations  undertaken  along  with  details  of  MR  scan  acquisition  and  data  analysis.    The  hypotheses  tested are outlined in the final section of this chapter.    3.1.1 Specifically Imaging the Development of Myelin: A Novel Voxel Based Analysis  The average myelin water fraction, as described above, which takes the signal from a whole  ROI, has the benefit of high signal to noise (SNR).  However, it also homogenises the region,  meaning  that  an  area  with  low  myelin  development  may  present  with  the  same  average  MWF  as  an  area  with  advanced  myelin  development  containing  regions  of  water  with  longer T2.  Therefore, an analysis method which allows the areas within an ROI which have  high myelin content to be detected, even if they are surrounded by regions with low myelin  content, is required to further probe the ROI.    An  individual  voxel  has  the  benefit  of  having  identical  dimensions  for  all  subjects  and  all  scans.    In  our  technique  the  structure  of  interest  is  still  outlined  with  a  conventional  ROI  but it is the voxels which it prescribes that are considered for analysis.    The  voxels  are  then  classified  as  highly  myelinated  voxels  (HMVs)  if  their  MWF  above  a  certain critical value.  Since the voxels have much lower SNR than the overall ROI the actual  calculated  voxel  MWF  is  not  included  in  the  analysis  past  the  binary  consideration  of   39     whether  or  not  it  is  classified  as  an  HMV.    In  this  study,  the  first  to  use  this  technique,  a  variety of critical values are investigated.    A strong benefit to this voxel based investigation is that it allows for variations in the size  of the structure between subjects.  The average MWF by definition loses this information  and  presents  only  the  density  of  myelin  within  the  region.    The  voxel  based  analysis  proposed  in  this  thesis  does  not  simply  investigate  density  of  myelin  but  the  overall  quantity of myelin within the structure.    3.1.2 Data Acquisition  3.1.3 Subjects  Eight  normal  male  children  aged  between  9  and  12  years  were  chosen  for  this  study  (average  age:  131  months,  range:  114  –  144  months).    They  satisfied  the  recruitment  criteria  of  normal  school  progress  and  a  clear  medical  history  including  no  psychiatric  conditions.    3.1.4 MR Acquisition  MR images were acquired using a 1.5T GE scanner operating at the 5.7 software level in a  single  slice  acquisition  in  the  midsagittal  plane.    T2  relaxation  data  was  acquired  using  a  single  slice  modified  32‐echo  Carr‐Purcell‐Meiboom‐Gill  sequence  [7].    Crusher  gradients  were  included  to  eliminate  the  signal  from  tissue  outside  the  selected  slice  [60].    The   40     repetition time was 3 s, echo spacing = 10 ms, slice thickness = 5 mm, field of view = 22 cm  and a 256 x 128 matrix was created.  Each voxel measured 0.86mm x 0.86mm x 5mm.    Scans were examined by a trained radiologist for unacceptable artefacts.  Specifically, due  to  the  extended  data  acquisition  time  of  the  T2  relaxation  sequence,  scans  with  motion  artefact (3) were corrupted by motion artefact and were excluded from the analysis.    3.1.5 Data Analysis  The  32‐echo  decay  curves  were  decomposed  into  an  unspecified  number  of  exponential  components  using  a  regularised  non‐negative  least  squares  algorithm  [61].    The  myelin  water fraction was defined as the fraction of the T2 signal between 10 and 50ms relative to  the total T2 signal.  Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around the corpus callosum on  the first echo of the CPMG sequence, which has high in‐plane anatomic resolution.    The average MWF was calculated using the entire signal from the ROI and a myelin water  map, illustrating the MWF for each voxel within an ROI, was created by carrying out a NNLS  analysis of the signal from each individual voxel.    SNRNNLS Filter  Maps were created which illustrated the SNRNNLS for each voxel as defined by the ratio of  the TE = 0 amplitude of the fitted decay curve to the standard deviation of the residuals of  the fitted T2 decay curve.  These maps were used to extricate reliable myelin water fraction   41     results from T2 relaxation data. This operation was required since the sagittally acquired T2  data  was  noisy  in  some  regions  due  to  the  presence  of  CSF  flow  in  the  interhemispheric  fissure.    A  variety  of  potential  minimum  SNRNNLS  values  were  investigated  to  determine  the  sensitivity to the minimum SNRNNLS value of the outcome of the results.  Minimum SNRNNLS  values tested ranged from 90 to 110 in unit increments.  These  values were chosen from  visual  analysis  of  the  SNRNNLS  maps  by  an  observer  trained  in  brain  anatomy.    SNRNNLS  values  greater  than  110  yielded  myelin  maps  which  excluded  major  white  matter  tracts  and values lower than 90 included voxels in regions containing cerebrospinal fluid.    A filtered myelin water map was subsequently created which excluded voxels with SNRNNLS  less than the minimum value.  This is a novel approach to T2 analysis which has not been  employed previously.    Voxel Based Analysis  The  voxel  based  analysis  of  MWF  proposed  for  the  first  time  in  this  thesis  counts  the  number of voxels within the corpus callosum with a MWF greater than a critical MWF value  and designated these “highly myelinated voxels”.  15 different critical values evenly spaced  from 0.01 to 0.15 (HMV0.01 to HMW0.15) were investigated for both filtered and unfiltered  myelin maps.     42     3.1.6 Cognitive Measures  A trained investigator conducted the ten subtests of the WISC‐R and recorded the scores.   The  Verbal  IQ,  Performance  IQ  and  Full  IQ  were  calculated  from  the  age  corrected  and  population normalised subtest scores in the standard fashion.    3.1.7 Statistical Analysis  The  cognitive  scores  were  regressed  using  the  Pearson’s  Product  Moment  against  the  various  myelin  measures  and  significance  was  determined  using  a  two‐tailed  test  at  p  =  0.01  level.    In  addition  the  filtered  myelin  water  maps  were  ranked  by  eye  by  three  informed judges according to the amount of myelin within the corpus callosum.  The judges  were blinded to any subject details and were provided by a colour bar indicating the MWF  values represented by each colour.     43     4  Results   4.1.1 Maps  Figure 4‐1 is an example of one subject’s (a) raw myelin map, (b) SNRNNLS map, (c) a filtered  myelin map, which excludes all voxels with SNRNNLS less than 100 and (d) filtered myelin  map masked to solely illustrate the corpus callosum, superimposed on the first echo of the  T2 relaxation sequence.  The inset for (d) shows a close up of the corpus callosum.     Figure 4­1 One subject’s (a) raw myelin water map, (b) SNRNNLS map, (c) filtered myelin water  map (created by excluding all voxels with SNRNNLS less than 100) and (d) myelin water map of  the corpus callosum superimposed on the first echo of the CMPG sequence.  Note that the colour  bars  represent  different  values  for  the  different  types  of  maps;  in  (a),  (c)  and  (d)  the  colour  represents the MWF and in (b) the colour represents the SNRNNLS.  Excluded voxels were given  the value ­0.01.   44          Figure  4­2  Myelin  water  maps  of  the  corpus  callosum  superimposed  on  the  first  echo  of  the  CPMG sequence for all 5 subjects.  The colour bar represents the MWF of each voxel within the  ROI prescribing the corpus callosum.  This region is shown in clearer detail inset in the picture.   These  maps  have  all  been  filtered  to  exclude  voxels  with  SNRNNLS  less  than  100  and  are  presented in their unanimous ranking by three blinded judges     Figure  4‐2  presents  the  filtered  myelin  map,  masked  to  solely  illustrate  the  corpus  callosum,  superimposed  on  the  first  echo  of  the  T2  relaxation  sequence  for  each  subject.   The inset shows a close up of the corpus callosum.  The maps were ranked by eye, in order  of  least  to  most  myelinated.    This  ranking  was  unanimous  between  3  blinded  judges  and  perfectly correlated with the average MWF for each ROI.  The Spearman’s rank correlation  coefficient for this ranking with age was 0.825 but not statistically significant.    4.1.2 SNRNNLS Filter  Figure  4‐3  demonstrates  the  finding  that  within  the  range  of  minimum  SNRNNLS  values  investigated, a robust and nearly constant correlation between the voxel myelin measures  and verbal IQ (which were the only statistically significant correlations) was observed for  45     certain HMV critical values between minimum values of 90 and 100.  At minimum values  above 100 the correlations began to be more varied.  This outcome was probably due to the  exclusion of too many voxels, leading to results which are more likely to be influenced by  noise.  On this basis, a SNRNNLS minimum value of 100 was chosen to maximise the number  of true highly myelinated voxels while still removing those which did not sufficiently fit the  model.       Figure  4­3  Pearson’s  Product  Moment  correlation  coefficient  between  voxel  based  myelin  measures and VIQ for SNRNNLS filter minimum values (90­110).  The plot clearly shows a highly  uniform and robust correlation for significant correlations (r>0.847).  Noise began to affect the  correlation  coefficients  at  SNRNNLS  filter  values  above  100  and  therefore  a  SNRNNLS  filter  minimum  value  of  100  was  chosen  to  maximise  the  number  of  true  highly  myelinated  voxels  included in the analysis while still removing voxels with low SNRNNLS which did not fit well to the  data.      46     4.1.3 Voxel Based Analysis  Figure 4‐4 illustrates the different critical points for the voxel based myelin measures.  The  correlation increased as the HMV critical points were increased.  The correlations were not  significant  for  critical  points  higher  than  0.14  (p  <  0.01)  which  is  reasonable:  within  the  smallest ROI the number of voxels with MWF greater than 0.15 constituted only 12% of its  total size.  It is reasonable to expect that the paucity of voxels with adequate SNRNNLS and  very  high  MWF  will  prevent  significant  correlations  since  at  that  point  too  many  “highly  myelinated  voxels”  will  be  excluded  from  the  measure  and  the  results  will  more  closely  resemble noise.       Figure 4­4 Pearson’s Product Moment coefficient for correlations between filtered (voxels with  SNRNNLS  <  100  excluded)  myelin  measures  of  various  critical  points.    As  the  voxels  with  low  coefficients  are  excluded  from  the  analysis  the  correlations  become  stronger  peaking  at  a  maximum correlation of 0.990 for a critical point of 0.12.  The correlation of average MWF with  VIQ is shown as a dotted line at r = 0.217.       The highest correlation between any of the myelin water measures was found for filtered  HMV0.12 which represents the number of voxels with SNRNNLS above 100 and MWF greater  47     than  0.12.    These  highly  myelinated  voxels  represented  on  average  40%  of  the  total  ROI  (range:  29%  ‐  53%).    HMV0.12  correlated  almost  perfectly  with  verbal  IQ:  r  =  0.990,  p  =  0.001 (figure 4‐5).       Figure  4­5  Correlations  between  VIQ  and  filtered  HMV0.12  which  represents  the  number  of  voxels with MWF > 0.12 and SNRNNLS > 100.       4.1.4 Non‐significant Correlations  There  were  no  significant  correlations  between  any  of  the  myelin  water  measures  and  subject  age.    The  average  MWF  did  not  correlate  with  the  voxel  based  myelin  water  measures.  No myelin water measures correlated with performance or full IQ measures and  average  MWF  did  not  correlate  with  verbal  IQ.    In  addition  all  the  IQ  measures  were  independent of age (as designed in the WISC‐R test).   48     5  Discussion   The results of this study have provided evidence for a non‐invasive method of quantifying  development  in  preadolescent  children.    Where  the  average  MWF  is  unable  to  provide  a  significant correlation with cognitive measures of global intelligence this novel voxel‐based  method  illuminates  a  convincing  correlation  with  verbal  IQ.    Our  results  support  other  studies  which  have  also  shown  this  relationship  between  cognitive  ability  and  myelin  development [34, 47‐51].    That  the  correlation  with  this  global  IQ  measure  came  from  investigating  the  corpus  callosum  is  not  surprising.    This  structure  acts  to  communicate  between  the  two  hemispheres and therefore is entirely necessary for the completion of complex tasks, such  as those required in the verbal section of the WISC‐R.  The lack of significant correlations  between  performance  IQ  and  the  myelin  water  measures  may  be  explained  by  different  demands from the sub‐tests of this measure: these tasks may not rely on cross‐hemispheric  communication  as  heavily  as  those  recruiting  language  abilities  and  therefore  a  link  between the performance IQ score and the myelin measures would not been seen.  This in  turn  would  explain  the  lack  of  correlation  with  full  IQ  as  it  is  a  linear  sum  of  verbal  and  performance IQ scores.    It  is  worth  noting  that,  while  the  sample  size  is  very  small,  the  chosen  significance  was  conservative and the resulting probability is corrected for sample size.  Therefore we can  be  confident  in  our  results.    Clearly,  a  larger  sample  size  is  required  to  draw  firm  49     conclusions about the correlation between cognitive measures and level of myelination.  In  interpreting  the  results  one  should  not  suggest  that  there  is  an  almost  perfect  linear  correlation  between  VIQ  and  the  voxel  based  myelin  measures  over  a  larger  population,  rather  that  since  these  measures  are  able  to  describe  a  significant  correlation  in  a  very  small sample further investigations into this relationship can be confidently prepared.    The  SNRNNLS  filter  succeeded  in  removing  the  impossibly  high  myelin  water  fractions  represented  in  cerebrospinal  fluid  (CSF)  and  the  sinuses  in  sagittal  myelin  water  maps.   The CSF contains proton spins which may be moving quickly out of the excitation slice and  hence artefactually showed a short T2, and the sinuses comprise mostly air and therefore  also showed a short T2 due to magnetic susceptibility artefact.  Since neither fit the NNLS  model  of  multi‐exponential  decay  their  SNRNNLS  was  sufficiently  low  that  they  were  excluded from analysis when the filter was applied.  There are still some erroneously high  MWF values included on the filtered map, in the skull and neck for example.  These regions  are  affected  by  B0  and  B1  field  inhomogeneities.    However,  the  difference  between  the  filtered and unfiltered myelin water maps in figure 4‐1 is striking: the overall resolution of  the  image  is  vastly  increased  and  the  myelinated  white  matter  of  the  brain  can  be  easily  distinguished.    While  the  average  MWF  ROI  approach  previously  used  in  myelin  water  investigations  provides  better  signal  to  noise  ratios,  it  also  blinds  the  observer  to  some  potentially  important details of the structure under investigation.  For example, both the heterogeneity  within  the  ROI  and  the  size  of  the  ROI  are  not  reported  when  an  average  density  is  50     provided.  Our voxel‐based method can better illuminate the properties of admixtures and  regions of different sizes.  In addition, this approach can be used in techniques other than  MRI,  for  example,  in  the  investigation  of  binding  compounds  in  Positron  Emission  Tomography.    The  binary  system  of  simply  counting  the  number  of  voxels  with  MWF  greater  than  a  critical value allows the problem of low SNR within each individual voxel to be addressed.   While the critical value of 0.12 may seem arbitrary, the correlation between HMV0.12 and  VIQ demonstrates the highly plausible result that on average 40% of voxels within a highly  oriented  white  matter  structure,  such  as  the  corpus  callosum,  can  be  considered  to  be  highly myelinated.    That  the  average  MWF  did  not  correlate  significantly  with  any  of  the  HMV  measures  highlights the fact that we are obtaining different information from the two methods and  provides  support  that  the  voxel‐based  method  can  provide  more  information  than  the  average  MWF  alone.    This  measure  of  myelin  density  across  the  ROI  should  not  to  be  excluded from future analyses.  It correlated perfectly with the trained judges rankings of  myelin  development  (figure  4‐2).    The  two  analysis  techniques  together  support  and  complement each other.    By only selecting subjects from a narrow age range we were successful in eliminating age  as  a  significant  effect  in  our  results.    As  previous  work  has  shown,  age  is  an  important  factor in development but it is not able to account for individual variation alone.  51     6  Conclusion and Future Directions   The  specific  aims  of  this  study  were  to  find  a  technique  which  used  MRI  to  quantify  a  biologically relevant measure of cognitive development without the confounding factor of  age,  and  to  investigate  this  relationship  using  the  new  MR  method.    The  non‐invasive  quantitative  measure  of  myelin  using  T2  relaxation  which  has  been  demonstrated  in  this  thesis  allowed  the  relationship  between  cognitive  ability  and  myelin  development  to  be  investigated.  The SNRNNLS filter and voxel‐based analysis method have elucidated a strong  correlation  between  the  amount  of  myelin  within  the  corpus  callosum  and  verbal  IQ  and  the  narrow  age  range  of  our  subjects  has  allowed  correlations  to  be  reasonably  independent of age.      This study was the first to quantify myelin water in children.  The usual difficulty scanning  young  subjects  apply:  they  move.    Three  of  the  subjects  had  to  be  removed  from  the  analysis due to excess motion artefact and it is likely that all the scans had some corruption  from motion.  Training the subjects, for example in mock scanning machines which provide  feedback when they move, may help to preserve data in future studies.    In addition, this method suffers from the long acquisition time which limits the technique  to one slice.  Further work by Kolind and Mädler, presented in 2008 [62] and supporting  previous work [18] will not only allow 3D imaging, which permits much better delineation  of  regions  of  interest,  but  also  faster  imaging,  which  may  also  help  remove  movement  artefact.  This advance in pulse programming will allow other regions of white matter to be  52     investigated, such as the fronto‐parietal white matter which has been implicated in other  studies [63].  The application of this technique at MRI machines of 3T would be of interest,  since the greater signal to noise may illuminate even more subtle changes in white matter  maturation.    As  always,  longitudinal  studies  are  always  desirable  in  developmental  studies.    The  individual  differences  which  are  seen  in  this  study,  due  to  the  narrow  age  range,  may  continue  further  into  development.    Additional  measures  of  cognitive  function,  such  as  measures  of  working  memory  (for  example  the  WISC‐R  digit  span  subtest)  or  fluid  reasoning (using Raven’s Progressive Matrices) would further this work into the imaging of  the  development  of  specific  types  of  cognitive  ability.    A  comparison  of  diffusion  tensor  imaging and this quantitative T2 technique in identical subject populations will allow direct  comparison  of  the  results  described  in  this  thesis  with  work  already  existing  in  the  literature.    Finally,  as  previously  mentioned,  this  study  only  looked  at  a  small  sample  of  children.   Clearly  larger  groups  are  necessary  to  provide  data  which  can  be  extrapolated  to  the  general  population.    However,  with  even  with  the  small  group  size,  this  thesis  has  succeeded in presenting a novel, biologically relevant, non‐invasive method for imaging the  development  of  human  children  and  adolescents  as  they  continue  to  myelinate  critical  structures  for  those  cognitive  abilities  which  make  us  human.      Namely,  the  novel  voxel  based  approach  of  analysis  the  myelin  water  fraction  as  calculated  using  T2  relaxation.  53     7  Bibliography      1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.   8.   9.  10.  11.  12.   13.  14.  15.   Adleman,  N.E.,  et  al.,  A  Developmental  fMRI  Study  of  the  Stroop  Color­Word  Task.  NeuroImage, 2002. 16(1): p. 61.  Helmuth,  L.,  Neuroscience.  Glia  tell  neurons  to  build  synapses.  Science  (New  York,  N.Y.), 2001. 291(5504): p. 569.  Reed,  T.E.,  P.A.  Vernon,  and  A.M.  Johnson,  Sex  difference  in  brain  nerve  conduction  velocity in normal humans. Neuropsychologia, 2004. 42(12): p. 1709.  Tsuda,  M.,  K.  Inoue,  and  M.W.  Salter,  Neuropathic  pain  and  spinal  microglia:  a  big  problem from molecules in "small" glia. Trends in neurosciences, 2005. 28(2): p. 101.  Tsuda, M., et al., P2X4 receptors induced in spinal microglia gate tactile allodynia after  nerve injury. Nature, 2003. 424(6950): p. 778.  Ullian, E.M., et al., Control of synapse number by glia. Science (New York, N.Y.), 2001.  291(5504): p. 657.  MacKay,  A.,  et  al.,  In  vivo  visualization  of  myelin  water  in  brain  by  magnetic  resonance.  Magnetic  resonance  in  medicine  :  official  journal  of  the  Society  of  Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 1994.  31(6): p. 673.  Menon,  R.S.,  M.S.  Rusinko,  and  P.S.  Allen,  Proton  relaxation  studies  of  water  compartmentalization  in  a  model  neurological  system.  Magnetic  resonance  in  medicine : official journal of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society  of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 1992. 28(2): p. 264.  Laule,  C.,  et  al.,  Myelin  water  imaging  of  multiple  sclerosis  at  7  T:  Correlations  with  histopathology. NeuroImage, 2008.  Laule,  C.,  et  al.,  Myelin  water  imaging  in  multiple  sclerosis:  quantitative  correlations  with  histopathology.  Multiple  sclerosis  (Houndmills,  Basingstoke,  England),  2006.  12(6): p. 747.  Barnea‐Goraly,  N.,  et  al.,  White  matter  development  during  childhood  and  adolescence:  a  cross­sectional  diffusion  tensor  imaging  study.  Cerebral  cortex  (New  York, N.Y.: 1991), 2005. 15(12): p. 1848.  Stewart,  W.A.,  et  al.,  Spin­spin  relaxation  in  experimental  allergic  encephalomyelitis.  Analysis  of  CPMG  data  using  a  non­linear  least  squares  method  and  linear  inverse  theory. Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the Society of Magnetic  Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 1993. 29(6): p.  767.  Vasilescu,  V.,  et  al.,  Water  compartments  in  the  myelinated  nerve.  III.  Pulsed  NMR  results. Experientia, 1978. 34(11): p. 1443.  Webb, S., et al., Is multicomponent T2 a good measure of myelin content in peripheral  nerve? Magn Reson Med, 2003. 49(4): p. 638.  Beaulieu,  C.,  F.R.  Fenrich,  and  P.S.  Allen,  Multicomponent  water  proton  transverse  relaxation  and  T2­discriminated  water  diffusion  in  myelinated  and  nonmyelinated  nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging, 1998. 16(10): p. 1201.   54     16.  17.  18.  19.   20.  21.  22.   23.  24.  25.  26.  27.   28.  29.   Oh,  J.,  et  al.,  Measurement  of  in  vivo  multi­component  T2  relaxation  times  for  brain  tissue  using  multi­slice  T2  prep  at  1.5  and  3  T.  Magnetic  resonance  imaging,  2006.  24(1): p. 33.  Oh,  J.,  et  al.,  Measurement  of  in  vivo  multi­component  T2  relaxation  times  for  brain  tissue using multi­slice T2 prep at 1.5 and 3 T. Magn Reson Imaging., 2006. 24(1): p.  33‐43. Epub 2005 Dec 19.  Maedler,  B.  and  A.L.  MacKay,  In­vivo  3D  Multi­component  T2­Relaxation  Measurements  for  Quantitative  Myelin  Imaging  at  3T.  14th  Annual  Meeting  of  the  International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 2006.  Matsumae, M., et al., Distribution of intracellular and extracellular water molecules in  developing  rat's  midbrain:  comparison  with  fraction  of  multicomponent  T(2)  relaxation  time  and  morphological  findings  from  electron  microscopic  imaging.  Child's  nervous  system  :  ChNS  :  official  journal  of  the  International  Society  for  Pediatric Neurosurgery, 2003. 19(2): p. 91.  Kuker,  W.,  et  al.,  Modern  MRI  tools  for  the  characterization  of  acute  demyelinating  lesions: value of chemical shift and diffusion­weighted imaging. Neuroradiology, 2004.  46(6): p. 421.  Filippi,  C.G.,  et  al.,  Developmental  delay  in  children:  assessment  with  proton  MR  spectroscopy. AJNR.American journal of neuroradiology, 2002. 23(5): p. 882.  Kreis,  R.,  T.  Ernst,  and  B.D.  Ross,  Development  of  the  human  brain:  in  vivo  quantification  of  metabolite  and  water  content  with  proton  magnetic  resonance  spectroscopy.  Magnetic  resonance  in  medicine  :  official  journal  of  the  Society  of  Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 1993.  30(4): p. 424.  Song, S.K., et al., Diffusion tensor imaging detects and differentiates axon and myelin  degeneration in mouse optic nerve after retinal ischemia. NeuroImage, 2003. 20(3): p.  1714.  Song,  S.K.,  et  al.,  Dysmyelination  revealed  through  MRI  as  increased  radial  (but  unchanged axial) diffusion of water. NeuroImage, 2002. 17(3): p. 1429.  Beaulieu,  C.,  The  basis  of  anisotropic  water  diffusion  in  the  nervous  system  ­  a  technical review. NMR in biomedicine, 2002. 15(7‐8): p. 435.  Schmithorst, V.J., et al., Correlation of white matter diffusivity and anisotropy with age  during  childhood  and  adolescence:  a  cross­sectional  diffusion­tensor  MR  imaging  study. Radiology, 2002. 222(1): p. 212.  Wolff, S.D. and R.S. Balaban, Magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) and tissue water  proton  relaxation  in  vivo.  Magnetic  resonance  in  medicine  :  official  journal  of  the  Society  of  Magnetic  Resonance  in  Medicine  /  Society  of  Magnetic  Resonance  in  Medicine, 1989. 10(1): p. 135.  Ropele, S., et al., A comparison of magnetization transfer ratio, magnetization transfer  rate,  and  the  native  relaxation  time  of  water  protons  related  to  relapsing­remitting  multiple sclerosis. AJNR.American journal of neuroradiology, 2000. 21(10): p. 1885.  Sled,  J.G.,  et  al.,  Regional  variations  in  normal  brain  shown  by  quantitative  magnetization transfer imaging. Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of  the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in  Medicine, 2004. 51(2): p. 299.  55      30.  31.  32.  33.  34.  35.  36.  37.  38.  39.  40.  41.  42.  43.  44.  45.  46.  47.  48.  49.   Does,  M.D.,  et  al.,  Multi­component  T1  relaxation  and  magnetisation  transfer  in  peripheral nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging, 1998. 16(9): p. 1033.  Yakovlev, P.I. and A.R. Lecours, The myelogenetic cycles of regional maturation of the  brain. Regional development of the brain in early life, 1967: p. 3–70.  Benes,  F.M.,  et  al.,  Myelination  of  a  key  relay  zone  in  the  hippocampal  formation  occurs in the human brain during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Archives of  General Psychiatry, 1994. 51(6): p. 477.  Liston,  C.,  et  al.,  Frontostriatal  microstructure  modulates  efficient  recruitment  of  cognitive control. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y.: 1991), 2006. 16(4): p. 553.  Mabbott, D.J., et al., White matter growth as a mechanism of cognitive development in  children. NeuroImage, 2006. 33(3): p. 936.  Nagy, Z., H. Westerberg, and T. Klingberg, Maturation of White Matter is Associated  with  the  Development  of  Cognitive  Functions  during  Childhood.  Journal  of  cognitive  neuroscience, 2004. 16(7): p. 1227.  Olesen, P.J., et al., Combined analysis of DTI and fMRI data reveals a joint maturation  of  white  and  grey  matter  in  a  fronto­parietal  network.  Cognitive  Brain  Research,  2003. 18(1): p. 48.  Schneiderman,  J.S.,  et  al.,  Diffusion  Tensor  Anisotropy  in  Adolescents  and  Adults.  Neuropsychobiology, 2007. 55: p. 96.  Snook, L., et al., Diffusion tensor imaging of neurodevelopment in children and young  adults. NeuroImage, 2005. 26(4): p. 1164.  Kanaan,  R.A.,  et  al.,  Tract­specific  anisotropy  measurements  in  diffusion  tensor  imaging. Psychiatry research, 2006. 146(1): p. 73.  Giedd, J.N., et al., Brain development during childhood and adolescence: a longitudinal  MRI study. Nature neuroscience, 1999. 2: p. 861.  Jernigan,  T.L.  and  P.  Tallal,  Late  childhood  changes  in  brain  morphology  observable  with MRI. Developmental medicine and child neurology, 1990. 32(5): p. 379.  Jernigan,  T.L.,  et  al.,  Maturation  of  human  cerebrum  observed  in  vivo  during  adolescence. Brain : a journal of neurology, 1991. 114 ( Pt 5)(Pt 5): p. 2037.  Reiss,  A., et  al.,  Brain  development,  gender  and  IQ  in  children:  A  volumetric  imaging  study. Brain, 1996. 119(5): p. 1763.  Shaw,  P.,  et  al.,  Intellectual  ability  and  cortical  development  in  children  and  adolescents. Nature, 2006. 440(7084): p. 676.  Sowell,  E.R.,  et  al.,  Mapping  cortical  change  across  the  human  life  span.  Nature  neuroscience, 2003. 6(3): p. 309.  Sowell,  E.R.,  et  al.,  Longitudinal  mapping  of  cortical  thickness  and  brain  growth  in  normal children. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for  Neuroscience, 2004. 24(38): p. 8223.  Schmithorst, V.J., et al., Cognitive functions correlate with white matter architecture in  a  normal  pediatric  population:  a  diffusion  tensor  MRI  study.  Human  brain  mapping,  2005. 26(2): p. 139.  Beaulieu, C., et al., Imaging brain connectivity in children with diverse reading ability.  NeuroImage, 2005. 25(4): p. 1266.  Deutsch,  G.K.,  et  al.,  Children's  reading  performance  is  correlated  with  white  matter  structure  measured  by  diffusion  tensor  imaging.  Cortex;  a  journal  devoted  to  the  study of the nervous system and behavior, 2005. 41(3): p. 354.  56      50.  51.  52.  53.  54.  55.  56.  57.  58.  59.  60.  61.   62.  63.   Klingberg,  T.,  et  al.,  Microstructure  of  Temporo­Parietal  White  Matter  as  a  Basis  for  Reading Ability Evidence from Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neuron,  2000. 25(2): p. 493.  Niogi, S.N. and B.D. McCandliss, Left lateralized white matter microstructure accounts  for  individual  differences  in  reading  ability  and  disability.  Neuropsychologia,  2006.  44(11): p. 2178.  Kaplan,  R.M.  and  D.P.  Saccuzzo,  Psychological  Testing:  Principles,  Applications,  and  Issues. 1982: Thomson Brooks/Cole.  Kail,  R.,  Speed  of  Information  Processing  Developmental  Change  and  Links  to  Intelligence. 2000.  Huettel,  S.A.,  A.W.  Song,  and  G.  McCarthy,  Functional  magnetic  resonance  imaging.  2004: Sinauer Associates Sunderland Mass.  Xiang, Q., UBC Physics 542 Lecture Notes. 2004.  Bloch, F., Nuclear Induction. Physical Review, 1946. 70(7‐8): p. 460.  Meiboom,  S.  and  D.  Gill,  Modified  Spin†Echo  Method  for  Measuring  Nuclear  Relaxation Times. Review of Scientific Instruments, 1958. 29: p. 688.  Carr, H.Y. and E.M. Purcell, Effects of diffusion on free precession in NMR experiments.  Phys.Rev, 1954. 94: p. 630.  MacKay, A.L., UBC Physics 542 Lecture Notes.  Poon,  C.S.  and  R.M.  Henkelman,  Practical  T2  quantitation  for  clinical  applications.  Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI, 1992. 2(5): p. 541.  Whittall,  K.P.,  et  al.,  In  vivo  measurement  of  T2  distributions  and  water  contents  in  normal human brain. Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the Society  of  Magnetic  Resonance  in  Medicine  /  Society  of  Magnetic  Resonance  in  Medicine,  1997. 37(1): p. 34.  Kolind, S.H., B. Madler, and A.L. MacKay, Faster myelin imaging in vivo; validation of  3D  multi­echo  T2­relaxation  measurements.  Procedings  of  the  International  Society  for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 2008.  Klingberg,  T.,  H.  Forssberg,  and  H.  Westerberg,  Increased  Brain  Activity  in  Frontal  and  Parietal  Cortex  Underlies  the  Development  of  Visuospatial  Working  Memory  Capacity during Childhood. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 2002. 14(1): p. 1.        57     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0071378/manifest

Comment

Related Items