UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Assessing the environmental practices and impacts of intentional communities: an ecological footprint… Giratalla, Waleed 2010

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2010_fall_giratalla_waleed.pdf [ 2.73MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0071370.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0071370-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0071370-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0071370-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0071370-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0071370-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0071370-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0071370-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0071370.ris

Full Text

ASSESSING THE ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES AND IMPACTS OF INTENTIONAL  COMMUNITIES: AN ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT COMPARISON OF AN ECOVILLAGE  AND COHOUSING COMMUNITY IN SOUTHWESTERN BRITISH COLUMBIA    by  WALEED GIRATALLA  B.Sc., The University of Alberta, 2004      A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF    THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    MASTER OF SCIENCE in PLANNING  in  THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES        THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)    October 2010  © Waleed Giratalla, 2010                                ii    Abstract   The ecological footprint of the average Canadian is three times greater than the global per  capita  biocapacity  of  the  planet.    The  purpose  of  this  research  is  to  gain  insights  from  intentional  communities  on  how  to  reduce  household  ecological  footprints  in  Canada.   Intentional  community  is  an  inclusive  term  for  a  variety  of  community  types,  including  ecovillages  and  cohousing,  where  residents  have  come  together  to  achieve  a  common  purpose.   Studies show that intentional communities have per capita ecological footprints  that are less than those of conventional communities.  I corroborate these findings through  my  own  ecological  footprint  analyses  of  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage,  in  southwestern British Columbia.   These communities have per capita ecological  footprints  that  are  smaller  than  some  conventional  averages.    Overall,  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage also have comparatively similar per capita ecological footprints, suggesting that  residents  of  both  urban  and  rural  intentional  communities  may  demonstrate  similar  environmental behaviours.    Intentional community  living  is  currently confined  to small‐scale grassroots  initiatives so  even  the  aggregate  environmental  benefits  are  insignificant.    Municipalities  and  land  developers  can  help  to  advance  the  pro‐environmental  practices  of  intentional  communities by  increasing  incentives for this community model and adapting intentional  community practices to a conventional context.                            iii    Preface  This  research was  approved by  the University  of British Columbia Behavioural Research  Ethics Board (Certificate #H09‐01602).  A copy of the Certificate of Approval can be found  in Appendix A.                            iv    Table of Contents  Abstract ......................................................................................................................................................... ii  Preface ......................................................................................................................................................... iii  Table of Contents ......................................................................................................................................... iv  List of Tables ............................................................................................................................................... vii  List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................. viii  List of Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................... ix  Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................................... x    1.0 Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1  1.1  Problem and Context ................................................................................................................. 1  1.2  Research Purpose and Questions ........................................................................................... 2  1.3  Significance of Work .................................................................................................................. 2  1.4  Study Sites .................................................................................................................................. 3  1.4.1 OUR Ecovillage ............................................................................................................................. 3  1.4.2 Quayside Village ........................................................................................................................... 4  2.0  Sizing Up Intentional Communities .................................................................................... 9  2.1  Intentional Communities ............................................................................................................ 9  2.1.1 Definitions .................................................................................................................................... 9  2.1.2 Origins, Motivations and Philosophies ...................................................................................... 10  2.1.3 Challenges .................................................................................................................................. 11  2.2  Relevant Methods .................................................................................................................... 12  2.2.1 Ecological Footprint Analysis ..................................................................................................... 12  2.2.2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions .......................................................................................................... 14  2.2.3 Life Cycle Analysis ...................................................................................................................... 15  2.3  Environmental Impacts of Intentional Communities Worldwide ........................................ 15  2.3.1 Ecological Footprint ................................................................................................................... 15                            v    2.3.2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions .......................................................................................................... 21  2.4  Environmental Behavioural Change ...................................................................................... 23  2.5  Discussion of Previous Findings ............................................................................................ 26  3.0  Methods, Data Collection and Calculation Assumptions ........................................... 28  3.1  Methods ..................................................................................................................................... 28  3.2  Data Collection ......................................................................................................................... 29  3.2.1 Survey Questionnaires ............................................................................................................... 30  3.3  Calculation Assumptions ......................................................................................................... 31  4.0  Results and Discussion .......................................................................................................... 34  4.1  Socioeconomic Comparison ................................................................................................... 34  4.2  Preliminary Footprint Comparison ......................................................................................... 35  4.3  Energy Footprint ....................................................................................................................... 37  4.3.1 Comparison with City of North Vancouver Averages ................................................................ 41  4.4  Transportation Footprint .......................................................................................................... 43  4.4.1 Comparison with City of North Vancouver Averages ................................................................ 46  4.5  Consumption and Waste Footprint ........................................................................................ 47  4.6  Food Footprint ........................................................................................................................... 50  4.7  Built-up Land Footprint ............................................................................................................ 51  4.8  Aggregated Footprints ............................................................................................................. 51  4.8.1 Comparison with Global Footprint Network Quiz Results ......................................................... 52  4.9  Discussion of Results .............................................................................................................. 53  5.0  Conclusions and Recommendations ................................................................................. 55  5.1  Policy Recommendations........................................................................................................ 55  5.2  Future Research ....................................................................................................................... 58    Bibliography ......................................................................................................................................... 60                            vi    Appendix A: Ethics Approval Form ……………………………………………………………………………….………….………. 64  Appendix B: Final Survey ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………. 66  Appendix C: Waste Footprint Calculations …………………………………………………………………………………….…. 78                                      vii    List of Tables  Table 2.1: Variables of the Ecological Footprint Component Method ....................................................... 14  Table 2.2: Ecological Footprints of Various Intentional and Conventional Communities/Nations ............ 19  Table 3.1: Ecological Footprint Component Variables Included in Study ................................................... 29  Table 3.2: Summary of Survey Responses .................................................................................................. 31  Table 3.3: Conversion Factors ..................................................................................................................... 32  Table 4.1: Income Levels of Surveyed Households ..................................................................................... 34  Table 4.2: Global Footprint Network Ecological Footprint Quiz Results .................................................... 35  Table 4.3: Per Capita Energy Consumption, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Ecological Footprint by  Energy Source for Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage (2009)................................................................. 38  Table 4.4: Per Capita Energy Consumption, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Ecological Footprint by  Energy Source for Quayside Village and City of North Vancouver (2007) .................................................. 41  Table 4.5: Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Transportation Mode .......................................................... 43  Table 4.6: Per Capita On‐Road Transportation Fuel Consumption, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and  Ecological Footprint for Quayside Village and City of North Vancouver .................................................... 46  Table 4.7: Per Capita Consumption & Waste Ecological Footprint by Material Type ................................ 48  Table 4.8: Per Capita Ecological Footprint for Food Consumption ............................................................. 50                              viii    List of Figures  Figure 1.1: Context Map ............................................................................................................................... 6  Figure 1.2: OUR Ecovillage ............................................................................................................................ 7  Figure 1.3: Quayside Village .......................................................................................................................... 8  Figure 2.1: Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Community or Nation ........................................................ 20  Figure 2.2: Average per Capita Ecological Footprint by Category and Community Type ........................... 21  Figure 2.3: Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Four Finnish Ecovillages ............................................. 23  Figure 2.4: Environmental Behaviours Before and After Relocating to a Cohousing Community ............. 25  Figure 4.1: Average Per Capita Ecological Footprints from Global Footprint Network Quiz ...................... 36  Figure 4.2: Per Capita Energy Ecological Footprint by Energy Source ........................................................ 39  Figure 4.3: Average Monthly Temperatures at OUR Ecovillage and Quayside Village ............................... 40  Figure 4.4: Housing Types in North Vancouver........................................................................................... 42  Figure 4.5: Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Transportation Mode ........................................................ 44  Figure 4.6: Per Capita Consumption & Waste Ecological Footprint by Material Type ............................... 49  Figure 4.7: Average Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Category for Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage  .................................................................................................................................................................... 52                             ix    List of Abbreviations  BC    British Columbia  Bed Zed   Beddington Zero Energy Development   CDC    Cohousing Development Consulting  CEEI    Community Energy and Emissions Inventory  CMHC    Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation   CO2    Carbon Dioxide  CO2‐e    Carbon Dioxide Equivalent  CoNV    City of North Vancouver  DCC    Development Cost Charge  EF    Ecological Footprint  EFA    Ecological Footprint Analysis  ESRL    Earth System Research Laboratory   FCM    Federation of Canadian Municipalities  FSR    Floor Space Ratio  GEN    Global Ecovillage Network  GFN    Global Footprint Network  GHG    Greenhouse Gas   GJ    Gigajoule  gha    Global Hectares  ha     Hectares  IPCC    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  kg     Kilogram  km    Kilometre  kWh    Kilowatt‐hour  L    Liter  LCA    Life Cycle Analysis  OUR    One United Resource  sq.m    Square Metres  UK    United Kingdom  VKT    Vehicle‐Kilometre Travelled  WWF    World Wildlife Fund                           x    Acknowledgements  I  would  first  like  to  acknowledge  my  primary  Research  Supervisor,  Maged  Senbel,  who  supported  my  research  ideas  from  the  very  beginning.    Thank  you,  Maged,  for  your  guidance,  commitment  and  sincerity.    I  would  also  like  to  thank  my  second  Research  Supervisor, William Rees, for his encouragement and many insights.  I am indebted to members of OUR Ecovillage and Quayside Village for their willingness to  participate in this study and for the inspiration they provide.  I  am grateful  for  the  financial  support  of  the Natural  Sciences  and Engineering Research  Council of Canada (NSERC) and Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS).  Finally, I am deeply grateful for the love and support of my family and friends.                                        1    1.0 Introduction 1.1 Problem and Context The  ecological  footprint  of  the  average  Canadian  is  7.1  global  hectares  per  person  (gha/person), more  than three  times  the 2.1 gha/person biocapacity of  the planet  (WWF  2008).  In the face of the environmental stress imposed by rich countries like Canada, many  innovative lifestyle and housing models have emerged including intentional communities.   Intentional  community  is  an  “inclusive  term  for  ecovillages,  cohousing,  residential  land  trusts, urban housing cooperatives, and other projects where people strive together with a  common  vision  (Intentional  Communities  2009).”    The  residents  of  these  communities  have  consciously  or  ‘intentionally’  chosen  to  live  together  for  social,  economic  and/or  environmental reasons.   My research focuses on the environmental practices and impacts  of an ecovillage and a cohousing community in southwestern British Columbia (BC).    A  number  of  studies  show  that  intentional  communities  have  less  environmental  impact  per capita than conventional communities (Haraldsson et al. 2001, Tinsley & George 2006,  Moos et al. 2006).  However, there are no studies to verify whether this is true of Canadian  intentional communities.  There are over 100 intentional communities, either in existence  or forming, in Canada (Intentional Communities 2009).    Most  research  on  intentional  communities  has  focused  on  the  relative  environmental  impacts of ecovillages and their conventional counterparts.  There is limited research, both  in  quantity  and  scope,  which  compares  the  relative  environmental  impacts  of  different  types of  intentional  community,  including  cohousing.   There  is  also  limited  research  that                            2    draws from the experiences of intentional communities to inform conventional policy and  practice.  My research is intended to address these limitations in the literature.  1.2 Research Purpose and Questions The overall purpose of my research  is  to gain  insights  from a small sample of  intentional  communities  on  how  to  reduce  household  ecological  footprints  in  Canada.   My  research  questions are as follows:  1. How do  the  environmental  practices  and  impacts  of  an urban  intentional  community  differ from a rural intentional community, in southwestern BC?  2. How  do  the  environmental  practices  and  impacts  of  two  intentional  communities  in  southwestern BC differ from a conventional BC community?  3. What  policies  can  be  implemented  to  advance  the  pro‐environmental  practices  of  intentional communities in a conventional context?  I explore these questions, in part, by calculating the ecological footprint of two intentional  communities  in  British  Columbia:  Quayside  Village  and  One  United  Resource  (OUR)  Ecovillage.  Further information about these communities can be found in Section 1.4 while  information about research methods can be found in Section 3.      1.3 Significance of Work This study is unique and significant for the following reasons:  1. This  is  the  first ecological  footprint assessment of  intentional communities  in Canada.   This may also be  the  first  study  to compare  the ecological  footprints of an urban and  rural  intentional  community,  specifically  an  urban  cohousing  community  and  rural  ecovillage.                              3    2. This research  is based on  first‐hand knowledge of  living  in an  intentional community,  OUR Ecovillage, where the author resided for 1‐month in 2009.  3. This study recommends policy directions to advance the pro‐environmental practices of  intentional communities in a conventional context.   1.4 Study Sites This  section  provides  a  description  of  OUR  Ecovillage  and  Quayside  Village.    Figure  1.1  shows the locations of both communities while Figures 1.2 and 1.3 show, at a more detailed  level, OUR Ecovillage and Quayside Village, respectively.   1.4.1 OUR Ecovillage  OUR (One United Resource) Ecovillage,  founded  in 1998,  is a 10 ha  “sustainable  learning  community  and demonstration  site”  located  in  the Cowichan Valley on Vancouver  Island  (OUR  2010).    Under  a  unique  zoning  designation,  R‐4  Rural  Community  Residential,  the  ecovillage  features  a  multitude  of  integrated  land  uses  including  educational  and  office  facilities,  an  organic  farm  and  housing.    Furthermore,  one‐third  of  the  property  is  being  conserved  under  a  protective  covenant  (OUR  2008).    The  community’s  buildings  are  clustered at the southeast corner of the property (see Figure 1.2) in close proximity to the  farm and outdoor kitchen.    The number of community residents is continually evolving; however, as of February 2010,  there were 7  full‐time households  (defined as  living on‐site  for more  than 3  consecutive  months).    During  the  summer  season,  the  number  of  people  on‐site  increases  as  the  ecovillage  hosts  educational  internships  related  to  natural  building  and  sustainable  food  production.  The ecological footprint analysis focuses on the 7 full‐time households.  As of                            4    February 2010, there were 15 adults and 4 children (under 15 years old) residing in these  7 households.  The  community’s mission  is  “to  co‐create  accessible models  of  sustainable  living…onsite  and cooperatively within the wider world.  We provide a nurturing space to support social,  physical,  cultural,  spiritual  and  ecological  well‐being  for  ourselves,  the  land  and  our  broader  community  (OUR  2009).”    In  accordance  with  their  mission  statement,  OUR  Ecovillage  has  undertaken  a  variety  of  ecological  initiatives  and  projects  including  permaculture1  gardening  and  natural  building  construction,  involving  materials  such  as  cob and straw.  The ecovillage has completed two natural buildings with plans to build nine  more in the future.  The Climate Change Demonstration Building (Figure 1.2), the larger of  the two natural buildings, is approximately 150 sq.m.    1.4.2 Quayside Village  Quayside  Village,  completed  in  1998,  is  a  19‐unit  cohousing  community  in  North  Vancouver, BC.  As with most cohousing communities, Quayside features a common house  (240 sq.m) in addition to individual dwelling units.  The common house includes a kitchen  and dining area, a lounge, playroom, laundry facilities, craft area, guestroom, and an office  (Danziger  2004).    Quayside  also  features  a  60  sq.m  ground‐oriented  commercial  space,  currently occupied by a  convenience  store  (CDC 2010).   The dwelling units  range  in  size  and layout, from a bachelor to 3‐bedrooms, in both apartment and townhouse styles with  an  average  dwelling  size  of  80  sq.m  (Meltzer  2005,  Quayside  2010).    The  site  area  is                                                               1 Permaculture, coined by Bill Mollison and David Holmgren, is an approach to food production that mimics the  patterns and relationships found in nature.                            5    approximately 0.1 ha, resulting in an overall floor‐space‐ratio (FSR) of 1.8.  As of February  2010, there were 31 adults and 7 children (under 15 years old) residing at Quayside.  Quayside’s mission statement is “to have a community which is diverse in age, background  and  family  type  that  offers  a  safe,  friendly,  living  environment  which  is  affordable,  accessible  and  environmentally  conscious”  (Meltzer  2005).    In  accordance  with  their  mission statement, Quayside has incorporated many environmental initiatives including a  greywater recycling plant and an extensive solid waste recycling program.  The greywater  recycling plant, funded by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), was the  first  in  a  Canadian multi‐unit  complex.    The  greywater  plant  is maintained  by  Quayside  residents.  Residents also participate in an extensive recycling program that often results in  90‐95% diversion of solid waste from the landfill (Burke Personal Communication 2010).  Figure 1.1: CONTEXT MAP OUR Ecovillage Quayside Village Vancouver Island 1:1,000,000 Metro Vancouver 6 Figure 1.2: OUR Ecovillage Property Line Building Scale 1:3000 Aerial Photo of Site Climate Change Demonstration Building Fireplace inside Climate Change Demonstration Building Permaculture Garden 7 Figure 1.3: Quayside Village Building Scale 1:3000 Property Line Aerial Photo of Site Site Plan Main Entrance of Building Complex Common Kitchen 8                           9    2.0  Sizing Up Intentional Communities In  this  section,  I  review  the  literature.    Section  2.1  defines  intentional  communities  and  discusses  their  origins,  philosophies,  motivations  and  challenges.    Section  2.2  examines  environmental impact assessment methods and metrics that are relevant to this research.   Section 2.3 describes studies that have assessed the environmental impacts of intentional  communities.  Finally, Section 2.4 presents literature regarding the influence of intentional  communities on environmental behavioural change.  2.1 Intentional Communities 2.1.1 Definitions  Intentional  community  is  an  “inclusive  term  for  ecovillages,  cohousing,  residential  land  trusts, urban housing cooperatives, and other projects where people strive together with a  common  vision  (Intentional  Communities  2009).”    Below  are  definitions  of  an  ecovillage  and cohousing community.    Dawson  (2006)  describes  an  ecovillage  as  a  “settlement  in  which  human  activities  are  harmlessly integrated into the natural world in a way that is supportive of healthy human  development and that can be successfully continued into the indefinite future.”  According  to  Bang  (2005),  an  ecovillage  typically  has  fewer  than  500  members  and  includes  the  means to produce needs for life (food, water, shelter, leisure, commerce, etc.).  What sets an  ecovillage  apart  from  other  intentional  communities  is  its  explicit  emphasis  on  ecology  (Kasper 2008).    Cohousing emerged in the Netherlands, in the 1960s, through a desire to realize the social  advantages  of  communal  neighbourhoods  while  retaining  the  privacy  of  individual                            10    dwellings  (Hanson  1996).   McCamant  and Durrett  (1988)  identify  four  characteristics  of  cohousing:  1) Participatory process: residents organize and participate in the planning and design  of the housing development.  2) Intentional neighbourhood design: the physical design encourages a strong sense of  community.  3) Extensive  common  facilities:  common  areas  are  designed  for  daily  use  and  supplement private living areas.  This often includes a common house and kitchen.  4) Complete  resident management:  residents manage  the  site  and make  decisions  of  common concern at community meetings.  In  cohousing,  there  is  also  a  strong  focus  on  limiting  material  possessions  by  sharing  resources such as laundry facilities, play areas, vehicles and computers & electronics.  2.1.2 Origins, Motivations and Philosophies  Intentional communities have different origins around the world.    In America,  intentional  community  building  began  as  early  as  pioneer  settlement.    The  levels  of  activity  and  motivations  for  building  intentional  communities  have  changed  over  time;  however,  the  most recent increase in activity coincided with the paradigmatic shift of the 1960s (Kanter  1972).   Since that time, people have been commonly motivated by intentional community  living as a result of ecological concern and a desire for meaningful community.    The  ecovillage movement,  in  particular,  has  arisen  in  response  to  the  effects  of modern  living on the natural world (Kirby 2003).  Kasper (2008) describes the ecovillage model as  encompassing  a  new worldview  that  recognizes  human‐ecosystem  interdependence.    On                            11    the  other  hand,  the  cohousing  model  can  be  described  as  embracing  a  paradigm  that  recognizes  human‐human  interdependence.    Increasingly,  however,  ecologically‐oriented  cohousing  communities  are  becoming  the  norm  (Kirby  2003).    The  Global  Ecovillage  Network (GEN) was created  in 1995  to serve as an umbrella organization  for ecovillages  and  other  ecologically‐oriented  intentional  communities  from  around  the world  (Kasper  2008, GEN 2010).    2.1.3 Challenges  Intentional  communities,  including  ecovillage  and  cohousing  models,  are  faced  with  a  variety  of  challenges  to  forming  and  sustaining  their  settlements.    The  greatest  initial  challenge is often finding the land, money and people to realize a vision.  Commonly, groups  spend  years  searching  for  an  appropriate  location  to  build  a  community  (Kasper  2008).   Once  a  location  is  found,  there  are  often  legal  barriers  including  zoning  bylaws,  design  standards and codes.  Due to the array of challenges in forming an intentional community,  ninety  percent  of  groups  do  not  succeed  in  building  their  envisioned  communities  (Christian  2003).    Groups  who  succeed  in  building  their  communities  still  face  other  challenges  including  developing  viable  economies,  achieving  ethnic  and  socioeconomic  diversity and maintaining internal and external relationships.  The Findhorn Ecovillage, for  example,  faced  numerous  challenges  with  their  conservative  neighbours  during  the  community’s  initial years.   These tensions not only challenged the community’s existence  but also challenged the ideologies of its residents (Metcalf 2001).                            12    2.2 Relevant Methods This section examines relevant methods and metrics for environmental impact assessment  including ecological footprint analysis, carbon dioxide emissions and life cycle analysis.  2.2.1 Ecological Footprint Analysis  The ecological footprint (EF) of a specific population represents the “area of land and water  ecosystems  required on a  continuous basis  to produce  the  resources  that  the population  consumes, and to assimilate (some of) the wastes that the population produces, wherever  on Earth the relevant land/water may be located (Rees 2001).”  The EF aggregates some of  the major ecological demands of a population or economy into a single value corresponding  to  an  area  of  productive  land  and  water,  typically  expressed  in  hectares  (ha)  or  global  hectares (gha)2.  The footprint includes land area for the extraction of resources and land or  marine  area  required  for  sequestering  carbon  emissions  associated with  production  and  waste.    The  ecological  footprint  is  the  aggregate  of  different  land  categories,  typically  including:  energy  (sequestration),  arable  (crop),  grazing  (pasture),  degraded  (built‐up),  forest and productive marine areas.    There are  two main calculation methods  for ecological  footprint analysis:  compound and  component.   The compound method, a  ‘top down’ approach, often estimates consumption  based on large‐scale trade statistics (Simmons & Lewan 2001).   The compound method is  more established than the component method and is most applicable at the national scale  where the full range of consumption data is available (Kissinger & Haim 2008).                                                                 2 A global hectare is one hectare of biologically productive space with world average productivity                            13    The  component  method,  a  ‘bottom  up’  approach,  estimates  consumption  of  particular  activities at  the  local  level.     The component method  involves compilation of  the material  flows that support different activities using data specific to the region under consideration  (Chambers  et al.  2000,  Simmons  et al. 2000,  Kissinger & Haim 2008).    For  example,  the  footprint associated with electricity consumption in British Columbia would be based on an  estimate  of  GHG  emissions  associated  with  electricity  generation  by  the  local  utility  company, BC Hydro, plus the area occupied by dams and other physical infrastructure.  The  full  component method  includes  24  variables  as  presented  in  Table  2.1  (Simmons  et  al.  2000).  The component method most often uses solid waste as an indicator of the impacts  of both goods consumption and waste generation but the method could also rely on local  sales data (Barrett 2001, Barrett et al. 2002, Chambers et al. 2000, Kissinger & Haim 2008).    Like  other  indices,  ecological  footprint  analysis  cannot  measure  every  kind  of  impact.   Ecological impacts that are not readily associated with productive area or biocapacity are  not  accounted  for  by  EF  analysis  e.g.,  the  assimilation  or  neutralization  of  heavy metals,  radioactive substances and persistent materials (Holden 2004).                                    14    Table 2.1: Variables of the Ecological Footprint Component Method  Travel by Private Vehicles  Travel by Airplane Travel by Bus Travel by Train Road Haulage Rail Freight  Sea Freight Air Freight  Electricity ‐ domestic Natural Gas ‐ domestic Electricity ‐ other Gas ‐ other Household Waste (Landfill) Recycled Paper Recycled Metal Recycled Glass Recycled ‐ Other Compost Inert Waste Commercial Waste Food Food consumption Water consumption Forest products Built land Other Components Variable Transportation Energy Waste   2.2.2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions  There  is  a  high  level  of  certainty  in  the  scientific  community  concerning  the  realities  of  climate change and the role that humans are playing in this change.   Research shows that  CO2 levels in the atmosphere, which had remained relatively stable for 10,000 years, have  increased  by  38%  since  the  Industrial  Revolution  in  the  1800s  (ESRL  2010).    Human  activity is strongly correlated with this increase in CO2 levels and, consequently, a changing  climate  (Vitousek  et  al.  1997,  IPCC  2007).    In  light  of  this,  increasing  attention  is  being                            15    directed  towards  carbon  dioxide,  and  other  greenhouse  gas,  emissions.    For  example,  in  British  Columbia,  community‐level  GHG  inventories  were  produced  through  the  Community  Energy  and  Emissions  Inventory  (CEEI)  Program,  including  for  the  City  of  North Vancouver.   The reports allow comparisons  to be made between communities and  provide baseline values so that future GHG reductions can be monitored.  2.2.3 Life Cycle Analysis  Life  Cycle  Analysis  (LCA)  is  a  systematic  tool  used  to  assess  the  environmental  impacts  associated with a  specific product or  service during  its  life  cycle  from raw materials  and  manufacturing  through  distribution,  use,  and  ultimately  reuse  or  disposal  (Ciambrone  1997).   The strengths of LCA derive  from its roots  in  traditional engineering and process  analysis (Field & Ehrenfeld 1999).   A  full LCA requires extensive data collection, even for  one  product, which  is  often  time‐consuming  and  cost‐prohibitive.    Other  innovative  LCA  methods  are  emerging  including  economic  input‐output  life  cycle  assessment  (Hendrickson, Lave & Matthews 2006).  2.3 Environmental Impacts of Intentional Communities Worldwide Various  metrics  have  been  used  to  assess  the  environmental  impacts  of  intentional  communities.    This  section  considers  studies  that  have  used  the  ecological  footprint  and  carbon dioxide emissions.    2.3.1 Ecological Footprint   Several authors have used the ecological footprint to quantify the environmental impacts of  intentional  communities  (Haraldsson  2001,  Tinsley  &  George  2006,  Moos  et  al.  2006).   Haraldsson (2001) attempts to determine whether a 37‐unit Swedish ecovillage, Toarp, is                            16    less environmentally impactful than its conventional counterpart, Oxie.  The per capita EF  of each community was derived from random surveys that asked households to report on  their  monthly  consumption.    Ten  households  from  each  community  participated  in  the  study.    Survey  results  were  entered  into  a  calculation  matrix  to  derive  the  ecological  footprints.    In  addition,  Haraldsson  calculated  the  embodied  energy  of  constructing  one  representative  house  in  each  community.    The  embodied  energy  calculations  focused  on  ten main building materials.    The total ecological footprints for Toarp and Oxie are 2.8 and 3.7 ha/person, respectively.   In  other  words,  the  ecological  footprint  of  the  ecovillage  is  25%  lower  than  that  of  the  conventional neighbourhood.  Haraldsson indicates, however, that this is not a statistically  significant difference by using the Mann‐Whitney non‐parametric test.    Haraldsson  highlights  the  significance  of  housing  and  food, which  combined  account  for  approximately  75%  of  the  total  ecological  footprint  for  both  communities.    Housing  includes energy use for heating and electricity.  Tinsley & George (2006) also highlight the  significance of housing and food in their study of Findhorn’s ecological footprint.  Findhorn  is an ecovillage in Scotland that features eco‐houses, wind turbines and a biological sewage  treatment  plant  (Living  Machine®3).    Their  study  quantifies  the  ecological  footprint  of  Findhorn’s  residents  and  guests  to  determine  how  the  ecovillage  compares  with  other  communities including the Beddington Zero Energy Development (Bed Zed) in the UK.  Of  the 181 households at Findhorn, 48 participated in the study by completing the necessary                                                               3 The Living Machine uses plants and microorganisms to treat wastewater for onsite re‐use including irrigation and  toilet flushing.  The system is typically regarded as less environmentally impactful than conventional systems as it  requires less energy and chemicals.                            17    surveys.    Unlike  Haraldsson’s  2001  study,  building  materials  were  not  included  in  Findhorn’s  footprint  calculations.    However,  according  to  Haraldsson,  building materials  represent less than 5% of the communities’ ecological footprints.  The  total  ecological  footprint per person  at Findhorn  is  2.7 hectares.    This  is  lower  than  averages  in  the UK (5.4 ha), Scotland (5.4 ha), and Bed Zed (3.2 ha).   Findhorn residents  have  significantly  smaller  ecological  footprints  in  comparison  to  the  UK  and  Scotland  averages  for  home  &  energy,  food,  travel  and  consumables.    Furthermore,  Findhorn  residents  have  significantly  smaller  ecological  footprints  in  comparison  to  Bed  Zed with  respect to food consumption.  Findhorn’s low food footprint can be attributed mainly to its  vegetarian diet.   Haraldsson  and  Tinsley  &  George  both  highlight  intentional  communities  that  have  per  capita ecological  footprints  lower than that of their conventional counterparts.   They also  describe reasons for differences in ecological footprints such as dietary choices and energy  sources.    These  studies,  however,  do  not  attempt  to  discern  the  aspects  of  each  community’s  environmental  impact  that  are  attributable  to  design  decisions  rather  than  personal  behavioural  choices.    These  issues  are  explored  by  Moos  et  al.  (2006),  who  compare the EF of an existing intentional community, Ecovillage at Ithaca, with two other  unrealized designs for the same 71 ha site.  Ecovillage at Ithaca, located in New York State,  is  currently  comprised  of  60  dwellings  with  plans  to  expand  to  150  dwellings.    The  community  features  a  3.5  ha  organic  farm  and  22  ha  conservation  easement.    The  ecovillage  follows  Scandinavian  cohousing  principles  with  common  facilities  and  tightly  clustered homes arranged along pedestrian pathways.  The second subdivision design is a                            18    hypothetical 150‐unit new‐urbanist community called New Uxbridge.   The design  follows  principles outlined in the Charter of The New Urbanism and features a variety of housing  types,  narrow  streets  and  pedestrian  accessible  services  &  amenities.    The  third  subdivision  follows  an  earlier  design  for  this  site  that  was  never  realized.    A  previous  developer had proposed an estate style suburban neighbourhood, “Rose Hill”, featuring 50  townhouses  and  100  single‐family  homes  on  one‐acre  (0.4  ha)  lots.    Of  the  three  communities,  Ecovillage  at  Ithaca  demonstrated  the  lowest  per  capita  EF  of  4.25  ha  in  comparison to 6.88 and 7.53 ha at New Uxbridge and Rose Hill, respectively.  Moos et al. (2006) also compare that part of the EF attributable to physical infrastructure  with  the  part  of  the  EF  attributable  to  personal  consumption  choices.    Physical  infrastructure includes roads, buildings, parking, open space, paths and private yards while  personal consumption includes food, transportation and utility use.  Personal consumption  choices  are  shown  to  contribute  more  to  one’s  ecological  footprint  than  physical  infrastructure.   This suggests that behavioural patterns are possibly more important than  physical infrastructure from an ecological perspective.  However, this does not account for  behavioural  changes  that  are  influenced  by  physical  infrastructure  through  design.    For  example, utility consumption is a function of building design; water consumption is linked  to  landscape  design;  transportation  is  linked  to  pedestrian‐oriented  design.    Based  on  interview results, the authors suggest that “physical design may be a catalyst or facilitator  of  some  changes  in  consumption”.    These  design‐induced  behavioural  changes  are  not  studied in Moos’ analysis.                            19    The studies above suggest that intentional communities have lower environmental impacts  per  capita  than  conventional  communities.    Table  2.2  outlines  the  per  capita  ecological  footprints for the communities and nations discussed above.  The ecological footprints are  disaggregated  into  major  categories  of  housing  &  energy,  food,  transportation,  consumables  and  other.    The  category  ‘other’  includes  a  variety  of  elements  such  as  government  services  and  capital  investment.    It  is  important  to  note  that  EF  calculation  methods may vary from study to study; however, the overall methodological  frameworks  are consistent.   Table 2.2: Ecological Footprints of Various Intentional and Conventional  Communities/Nations  Housing & Energy Food Transportation Consumables Other Total Toarp, Sweden 1.15 0.93 0.42 0.15 0.13 2.78 Findhorn, Scotland 0.29 0.42 0.37 0.3 1.33 2.71 BedZed, UK 0.36 0.99 0.26 0.37 1.22 3.20 Ithaca, USA 1.58 1.38 1.30 0.00 0.00 4.25 Average 0.84 0.93 0.59 0.21 0.67 3.24 Oxie, Sweden 1.41 1.36 0.49 0.28 0.15 3.69 Scotland 1.33 1.06 0.99 0.67 1.31 5.36 United Kingdom 1.35 1.14 0.85 0.65 1.39 5.38 Rose Hill, USA 2.51 2.51 2.51 0.00 0.00 7.53 Average 1.65 1.52 1.21 0.40 0.71 5.49 Intentional Communities Conventional Communities / National Averages Community Ecological Footprint (ha/person)   The  ecological  footprint  for  intentional  communities  ranges  from  2.7  to  4.3  ha/person  while the footprint for conventional communities ranges from 3.7 to 7.5 ha/person.  Figure  2.1 shows the total per capita ecological footprint of each community or nation.                              20    Figure 2.1: Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Community or Nation  0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 Findhorn, Scotland Toarp, Sweden BedZed, UK Oxie, Sweden Ithaca, USA Scotland United Kingdom Rose Hill, USA Ec ol og ic al  F oo tp ri nt  P er  P er so n  (h a)   The Findhorn ecovillage has the lowest per capita ecological footprint while the 1‐acre lot  subdivision, Rose Hill, has the highest  footprint.   Figure 2.2 shows the average per capita  ecological footprint for both intentional and conventional communities based on category.   Housing & energy account  for  the  largest portion of  the conventional ecological  footprint  while food accounts for the largest portion of the intentional communities’ footprint.                            21    Figure 2.2: Average per Capita Ecological Footprint by Category and Community Type  0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 Housing & Energy Food Transportation Consumables Other Ec ol og ic al  F oo tp ri nt  P er  P er so n  (h a) Intentional Communities Conventional Communities /  National Averages      2.3.2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions  Carbon  dioxide  (CO2)  emissions  is  another  metric  used  to  measure  environmental  performance.  Harmaajarvi (2000) developed the EcoBalance Model in Finland as a tool to  estimate  the  life‐cycle  environmental  impacts  of  residential  development,  including  production of carbon dioxide emissions.  Model inputs include details of building materials  and  transportation networks while model  exports  include  total  energy  consumption  and  production  of  emissions.    Four  ecovillages  and  two  conventional  detached  home  developments were assessed using  the EcoBalance model.    Figure 2.3  shows  the average                            22    per capita 50‐year life‐cycle carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for the four ecovillages as well  as the conventional development average.   Harmaajarvi’s study shows that the average ecovillage produces more carbon dioxide per  capita  than  the  average  conventional  development.    Ecovillage  #4  produces  33%  more  carbon dioxide per capita than the average conventional development while Ecovillage #2  produces 13% less carbon dioxide per capita.    One factor that explains variations in carbon dioxide emissions is private automobile use,  which  is  largely dependent on neighbourhood  location.   The  four ecovillages are  remote,  thereby creating a reliance on private automobiles.   Harmaajarvi does not explicitly state  the distances travelled in private automobiles by each community; however, he does state  that certain communities are located in closer proximity to city centers.   Other important  factors that influence carbon dioxide emissions include consumption of heating energy and  electricity.   The environmental  impacts associated with  food  systems are not  included  in  Harmaajarvi’s study.                            23    Figure 2.3: Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Four Finnish Ecovillages  0 50 100 150 200 250 Ecovillage #1 Ecovillage #2 Ecovillage #3 Ecovillage #4 Ecovillage Average 50 ‐Y ea r C O 2  Em is si on s  Pe r C ap ita  ( to n) Conventional  Average = 182   2.4 Environmental Behavioural Change The  above  research  shows  how  intentional  communities  compare  to  conventional  communities  with  respect  to  environmental  impacts.    The  question  remains,  however,  whether members of intentional communities would have had similarly low environmental  impacts  if  they  continued  to  live  in  conventional  communities,  or  are  environmental  behavioural  changes  induced  by  living  in  an  intentional  community?    Meltzer  (2000a,  2000b)  addresses  this  question  in  his  research  on  cohousing  with  some  of  his  results  summarized in Bamford and Hindmarsh’s 2001 paper.                              24    Meltzer attempts to quantify the extent to which living in cohousing, in the USA, produces  pro‐environmental  behavioural  change  in  its  residents.    His  research  involved  surveying  346  households  in  18  different  cohousing  communities.    Meltzer  finds  that  the  average  cohousing resident moved from a larger dwelling unit to a smaller unit when transitioning  into  cohousing.    He  also  finds  a  reduction  in  consumables  due  to  an  increase  in  shared  amenities.    Figure 2.4 shows the reported improvements in pro‐environmental behaviour after moving  to cohousing based on four categories:  1) Driving Moderation – Car pooling, biking or walking instead of driving  2) Energy Conservation – Low energy fittings, switching lights off, turning heat down  3) Household Food Procurement – Purchasing food in bulk and local food production  4) Recycling  and  Composting  –  Separating  waste  streams  and  composting  organic  materials  Residents  ranked  their  behaviour  before  and  after moving  to  cohousing  on  a  scale  of  1  (never) to 5 (always).   A higher number coincides with greater environmentally‐sensitive  behaviour.    The  figure  shows  that  residents  tend  to  increase  their  pro‐environmental  behaviour  after  moving  into  cohousing  communities.    The  improvement  in  driving  moderation  is  likely  more  significant  considering  that  most  cohousing  communities  are  located away from city centers.  Using a composite indicator for four household behaviours  (water and energy conservation, waste and toxicity reduction), Meltzer also finds that pro‐ environmental behaviour increases with time spent in cohousing.                             25    Figure 2.4: Environmental Behaviours Before and After Relocating to a Cohousing  Community  0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 Driving Moderation Energy Conservation Household Food Procurement Recycling and Composting En vi ro nm en ta l B eh av io ur  (5  =  H ig he st  E nv ir on m en ta l S en si ti vi ty ) Categories (See Description Within Text) Mean Before Mean After   Residents of intentional communities, including cohousing, commonly choose to be part of  a  specific  community  in  order  to  behave  in  accordance  with  their  values.    Meltzer’s  research  suggests  that  living  in  an  intentional  community, with  others who have  similar  values, may contribute to personal behavioural change over time.                                26    2.5 Discussion of Previous Findings  The above permits a number of conclusions:  1. Many  intentional  communities,  including  ecovillages  and  cohousing  projects,  have  arisen from ecological concerns.  2. There are many methods or  indicators by which  to assess  the ecological  impacts of a  community  including  ecological  footprint  analysis,  carbon  dioxide  emissions  and  life  cycle analysis.    3. Intentional  communities  are  variably  effective  in  reducing  their  ecological  impacts  relative  to  conventional  communities.    Several  studies  indicate  that  intentional  communities  have  less  ecological  impact  per  capita  than  conventional  communities.   Harmaajarvi’s  2000  study  in  Finland,  however,  shows  contrary  results  where  the  average ecovillage emits more carbon dioxide per capita than the average conventional  development, pointing  to  the  important relationship between neighbourhood  location  and  transportation  impacts.    It  should  be  noted  that  Harmaajarvi’s  study  does  not  include  the  emissions  associated  with  food  systems,  which  could  have  altered  his  findings.   4. A community’s ecological  impact can be disaggregated into many categories  including  food,  housing  energy,  transportation,  built  infrastructure  and  consumables.    The  relative  ecological  impact  of  each  category  is  a  function  of  many  variables  including  design,  technology,  planning,  behavioural  choices  as  well  as  the  interrelationships  between  these variables.    In general,  food, housing energy and  transportation are  the  most ecologically impactful areas.                            27    5. Pro‐environmental behaviour may be influenced by living in an intentional community.   A  US  study  suggests  that  living  in  an  intentional  community,  with  others  who  have  similar values, may enhance environmental behavioural change.                             28    3.0 Methods, Data Collection and Calculation Assumptions 3.1 Methods Of the methods reviewed in Section 2, I chose to use ecological footprint analysis (EFA) in  this  study  over  other  methods  due  to  its  prevalence  in  the  literature  for  this  type  of  assessment,  its  comprehensiveness  in  the  face  of  data  constraints  and  the  fact  that  it  incorporates sequestration of carbon dioxide emissions.   Life cycle analysis has extensive  data requirements and has limited utility for this type of study as it is usually conducted on  one product or service at a time.  I used the component ecological footprint method due to its applicability at the community  scale.  Table 3.1 outlines the variables included in my study as well as each variable’s data  source(s).  I used a simplified version of the component method that encompasses 14 of 24  variables (Simmons et al. 2000).   Many variables are not applicable to the study sites and  are  therefore  disregarded.    This  includes  road  haulage,  rail  freight,  sea  freight  and  air  freight  as well  as  electricity produced by means other  than hydropower, which does not  apply  to  either  community.    Other  variables  are  not  included  in  my  study  because  of  challenges with  data  availability.    This  includes water  consumption,  forest  products,  and  inert  and  commercial  wastes.   Water  use  is  not metered  at  OUR  Ecovillage;  therefore,  I  decided  to  exclude  this  variable  in  the  EFA  especially  considering  that  the  footprint  associated with water consumption is typically low relative to other footprint components.   Some  forest  products  were  incorporated  in  the  EFA  as  part  of  separate  components  including  paper  use  and wood  consumed  for  heating.    Additional  forest  products would  require extensive monitoring periods and were therefore excluded from the EFA.  Similarly,                            29    inert and commercial wastes were excluded from the EFA because they are only generated  during intermittent renovations and would need to be monitored over extended periods of  time.      Table 3.1: Ecological Footprint Component Variables Included in Study  OUR Ecovillage Quayside Village Travel by Private Vehicles  Surveys Surveys Travel by Airplane Surveys Surveys Travel by Bus Surveys Surveys Travel by Train Surveys Surveys Road Haulage Not applicable Not applicable Rail Freight  Not applicable Not applicable Sea Freight Not applicable Not applicable Air Freight  Not applicable Not applicable Electricity ‐ domestic Utility Bills Utility Bills/Survey Natural Gas ‐ domestic Not applicable Utility Bills Electricity ‐ other Not applicable Not applicable Gas ‐ other (Wood) Community Estimate Not applicable Household Waste (Landfill) Community Monitoring Community Monitoring Recycled Paper Community Monitoring Community Monitoring Recycled Metal Community Monitoring Community Monitoring Recycled Glass Community Monitoring Community Monitoring Recycled ‐ Other (Plastic) Community Monitoring Community Monitoring Compost Not included Community Monitoring Inert Waste Not included Not included Commercial Waste Not included Not included Food Food consumption Surveys/Receipts Surveys/Receipts Water consumption Not included Not included Forest products Not included Not included Built land Site Drawings Site Drawings Consumption &  Waste Other Transportation Data Source(s) Components Variable Energy   3.2 Data Collection Data  were  derived  from  a  variety  of  sources  to  calculate  the  ecological  footprints  of  Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage.  As shown in Table 3.1, data necessary to calculate the  transportation  footprint  were  derived  from  survey  questionnaires.    Data  for  the  energy  component were primarily derived from utility bills.  Quayside Village provided utility bills                            30    from Terasen Gas and BC Hydro.  Terasen Gas bills account for all the natural gas consumed  by  the  community  while  BC  Hydro  bills  only  account  for  electricity  consumed  in  the  complex’s common spaces.  I therefore asked Quayside Village residents to report on their  household electricity consumption.   OUR Ecovillage provided BC Hydro bills  that account  for all the community’s electricity consumption.  The ecovillage is not serviced by Terasen  Gas.   Their primary heating source  is wood with some residents also  relying on propane  gas.    The  ecovillage  provided  an  estimate  of  their  wood  consumption  for  the  2009/10  winter season.    One  resident  from  each  community  participated  in  a  waste  monitoring  program  during  May  2010.    Various  waste  streams  were  monitored  including  garbage  destined  for  the  landfill, compost, and recycling of paper, metal, glass and plastic.  In  the  areas  of  housing‐related  energy  and  transportation,  the  ecological  footprint  of  Quayside  Village  was  compared  to  that  of  its  chosen  conventional  counterpart,  North  Vancouver.    Data  were  derived  from  the  City  of  North  Vancouver’s  2007  Community  Energy and Emissions Inventory (BC Ministry of Environment 2010).  3.2.1 Survey Questionnaires  I  administered  two  structured  quantitative  questionnaires  in  a  cross‐sectional  design:  a  preliminary and final survey.  The preliminary survey was intended to allow for a cursory  comparison of the study sites and to help inform how to conduct the final survey.  I invited  potential  participants  to  complete  a  10‐15 minute  internet  survey  during  February  and  March 2010.  In addition to residents of OUR Ecovillage and Quayside Village, I invited 305  households  from North Vancouver  to participate  in  the preliminary survey.   Due  to  their                            31    low  response  rate  (1.6%),  data  from North  Vancouver  residents  are  not  included  in my  results or discussion.  I distributed the final survey in hard copy format to residents of Quayside Village and OUR  Ecovillage during April and May 2010,  inviting potential participants to complete a 30‐60  minute  questionnaire  (Appendix  B).    In  conjunction  with  the  final  survey,  community  residents  collected  and  submitted  grocery  receipts  and  restaurant  bills  for  the month  of  May 2010.    Table 3.2 summarizes the number of responses for both the preliminary and final survey  questionnaires.   Since one person completed a questionnaire on behalf of all members of  his/her  household,  the  final  column of  Table  3.1  outlines  the  total  number  of  people  for  whom data were collected as part of the final survey.   Sixteen of the ecovillage’s nineteen  full‐time residents, and nineteen of Quayside Village’s thirty eight full‐time residents, were  represented by the data derived from the final survey.  Table 3.2: Summary of Survey Responses  Community  Total # of  Households  # of Respondents  # of People  Represented Prelim Survey  Final Survey  OUR Ecovillage  7  6  5  16  Quayside Village  19  12  11  19  Totals  26  18  16  35   3.3 Calculation Assumptions The ecological  footprint of each community  is determined by using conversion  factors  to  translate consumption categories into areas of land.  In some cases, as with transportation                            32    and energy, this first involves translating measured variables into a quantity of greenhouse  gas emissions, measured in kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalent4 (kg CO2‐e).   Then, an  additional conversion factor, 2.7 x 10‐4 gha/kg CO2‐e,  is used to translate greenhouse gas  emissions  into  global  hectares  of  forest  land  necessary  for  carbon  sequestration  (GFN  2009).    Waste  variables  are  translated  directly  into  a  land  area.    Table  3.3  outlines  conversion factors for variables related to transportation, energy and waste.    Table 3.3: Conversion Factors  Value Unit Emissions per liter of fuel consumed for small gasoline vehicles in BC 2.4 kg CO2‐e/L BC Ministry of Environment 2010 Emissions per liter of fuel consumed for small diesel vehicles in BC 2.7 kg CO2‐e/L BC Ministry of Environment 2010 Emissions per passenger‐kilometer for cars in Metro Vancouver 0.220 kg CO2‐e/passenger‐km Poudenx & Merida 2007 Travel by Airplane Emissions per passenger‐kilometer (incl. upper atmosphere effects) 0.176 kg CO2‐e/passenger‐km IPCC 2010 Emissions per passenger‐kilometer for a diesel bus in Metro Vancouver 0.070 kg CO2‐e/passenger‐km Poudenx & Merida 2007 Emissions per passenger‐kilometer for the SeaBus in Metro Vancouver 0.164 kg CO2‐e/passenger‐km Poudenx & Merida 2007 Travel by Train Emissions per passenger‐kilometer for the Skytrain in Metro Vancouver 0.002 kg CO2‐e/passenger‐km Poudenx & Merida 2007 Electricity Emissions per GJ of energy for BC Hydro electricity generation 6.9 kg CO2‐e/GJ BC Ministry of Environment 2010 Natural Gas Emissions per GJ of energy for Terasen natural gas production 51.0 kg CO2‐e/GJ BC Ministry of Environment 2010 Gas ‐ other (Wood) Emissions per kilogram of softwood 0.89 kg CO2‐e/kg Resurgence 2010 Ecological footprint per tonne of landfilled paper 3.4 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Ecological footprint per tonne of landfilled aluminum 13.6 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Ecological footprint per tonne of landfilled glass 1.05 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Ecological footprint per tonne of landfilled plastic 3.85 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Recycled Paper Ecological footprint per tonne of recycled paper 2.45 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Recycled Metal Ecological footprint per tonne of recycled aluminum cans 0.65 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Recycled Glass Ecological footprint per tonne of recycled glass 0.85 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Recycled Plastic Ecological footprint per tonne of recycled plastic 2.2 ha/tonne Chambers et al.  2000 Co ns um pt io n  &  W as te Household Waste  (Landfill) Travel by Bus Conversion Factor SourceDescriptionVariable Tr an sp or ta tio n Travel by Private  Vehicles  En er gy                                                                4 Since greenhouse gases have different global warming potentials, the total global warming potential is often  expressed in CO2 equivalents (CO2‐e) with 1 kg of CH4 being equivalent to 25 kg of CO2, and 1 kg of N2O equivalent  to 298 kg CO2 over a 100‐year time horizon (IPCC 2007).                            33    With respect to private vehicle use, residents of Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage were  asked to report on the type and age of their vehicles.  When this information was provided,  fuel  consumption was  estimated  using  the  vehicle’s  average  fuel  efficiency.    In  this  case,  GHGs  were  then  calculated  using  the  BC  Ministry  of  Environment  (2010)  conversion  factors  below  for  small  gasoline  or  diesel  vehicles.    When  vehicle  information  was  unavailable,  the Poudenx & Merida  (2007)  conversion  factor was used  to  translate VKTs  into GHG emissions.                                                      34    4.0  Results and Discussion Section 4.1 presents  socioeconomic  information  for OUR Ecovillage  and Quayside Village  while Section 4.2 considers  the results of an online  footprint quiz  that was conducted by  residents  of  both  communities.    Subsequently,  I  examine  ecological  footprints  for  both  intentional  communities estimated using a  simplified  component method.    Sections 4.3 –  4.7  each  consider  one  of  the  various  components  of  the  two  intentional  communities’  ecological footprints including housing energy, transportation, consumption & waste, food  and  built‐up  land.    Section  4.8  aggregates  the  ecological  footprint  components  for  an  overall  EF  comparison  of  the  two  communities.    Finally,  Section  4.9  presents  an  overall  discussion of my findings.  4.1 Socioeconomic Comparison Participants  reported  on  their  household  income  and  cost  of  living  in  the  survey  questionnaires.    For  the  purpose  of  this  study,  cost  of  living  only  includes  rent  and/or  mortgage payments for housing.  Table 4.1 summarizes the average annual income, income  tax,  cost  of  living  and  disposable  income  for  OUR  Ecovillage  and  Quayside  Village.    The  disposable  income  of  the  average  Quayside  household  is  30%  greater  than  the  average  household at OUR Ecovillage.  Table 4.1: Income Levels of Surveyed Households  OUR Ecovillage $43,250 $7,000 $8,400 $27,850 Quayside Village $61,900 $12,500 $13,400 $36,000 Income Tax Annual Average Per Household Pre‐Tax Income Cost of Living Disposable  Income                             35    4.2 Preliminary Footprint Comparison As  part  of  the  online  preliminary  survey,  participants  had  the  option  to  undertake  the  Global Footprint Network’s ecological footprint quiz (GFN 2010).  This quiz allows users to  compare  their  personal  ecological  footprints  to  national  and  global  averages.    I  used  the  quiz to understand how the ecological footprints of residents in both communities compare  to one another as well as how they compare to conventional averages.  Table  4.2  summarizes  the  average  and  range  of  ecological  footprints  for  respondents  in  both  communities.    Figure  4.1  illustrates  the  average  per  capita  ecological  footprint  for  each  community.    The minimum  ecological  footprint  that  can  be  obtained  from  the  GFN  quiz is 4.3 gha.  Approximately 2.6 gha of every user’s ecological footprint is attributable to  services, which is not a variable in the calculator.  Services encompass a variety of elements  including health care, legal, government and military services.  Table 4.2: Global Footprint Network Ecological Footprint Quiz Results  Minimum Maximum Average Quayside Village 5.7 7.1 6.4 5 OUR Ecovillage 4.8 8.8 6.5 6 Canadian Average 7.1 Community Per Capita Ecological Footprint (gha) Number of  Respondents    All  five  Quayside  residents who  completed  the  quiz  exhibited  ecological  footprints  at  or  below the Canadian average of 7.1 gha.  Moreover, Quayside Village exhibited a difference  of only 1.4 gha between the highest and lowest per capita footprints.                            36    In  contrast,  OUR  Ecovillage  exhibited  a  difference  of  4.0  gha  between  the  highest  and  lowest per capita  footprints.   Furthermore,  the ecovillage displayed both  the highest and  lowest individual footprints of all participants.    Figure 4.1: Average Per Capita Ecological Footprints from Global Footprint Network  Quiz   0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 Quayside Village OUR Ecovillage A ve ra ge  E co lo gi ca l F oo tp ri nt  P er  P er so n  fr om  O nl in e  Su rv ey  (g ha ) Canadian Avg. = 7.1 gha Quiz Min. = 4.3 gha   Despite the small sample sizes, the above results suggest that:  1. Residents  of  the  two  intentional  communities  have,  on  average,  lower  ecological  footprints than the average Canadian.   2. Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage have, on average, similar per capita ecological  footprints.                            37    These preliminary conclusions are explored  further  in  subsequent  sections by examining  the various components of each community’s ecological footprint, which I derived using a  simplified component method.  4.3 Energy Footprint The energy component of a community’s ecological  footprint  includes  its consumption of  electrical and heating energy.   Both communities are serviced by BC Hydro for electricity.   Quayside  Village’s  primary  heating  source  is  natural  gas  from  Terasen  Gas  while  OUR  Ecovillage’s primary heating source is wood from on‐site and off‐site sources.  The dwelling  units  at  Quayside  are  each  equipped with  a  natural  gas  fireplace  and  electric  baseboard  heaters for space heating.  Natural gas is also used to heat water at Quayside Village.  OUR  Ecovillage uses a mix of softwood for space heating and a combination of propane and solar  energy  for water heating.   The ecovillage has one outdoor  shower  that  is  connected  to a  solar collector, which is used by guests and interns in the summer months.  The ecovillage’s  Climate  Change  Demonstration  Building  is  equipped  with  electrically‐powered  hydronic  radiant floor heating5.   Table 4.3  summarizes  the per capita energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions and  ecological footprint associated with each energy source for 2009.  Figure 4.2 illustrates the  per  capita  energy  ecological  footprint  for  each  community.    The  ecological  footprint  for  both  communities  is  approximately  0.3  gha/person  with  the  footprint  predominately  associated with heating via natural gas or wood.                                                                 5 Hydronic radiant floor heating is an efficient method of heating, which uses hot water to disperse heat through a  system of plastic or metal tubes/pipes laid within the floor.                            38    Table 4.3: Per Capita Energy Consumption, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Ecological  Footprint by Energy Source for Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage (2009)  Quayside OUR Units Quayside OUR Quayside OUR BC Hydro 2336 3550 kWh 0.06 0.09 0.02 0.02 Terasen Gas 21 N/A GJ 1.05 0.00 0.29 0.00 Wood N/A 1000 kg 0.00 0.93 0.00 0.25 1.11 1.02 0.30 0.28Total Energy Source Consumption (2009) GHG Emissions (ton CO2‐e) Ecological Footprint (gha)   OUR Ecovillage consumed 50% more electricity per capita than Quayside Village in 2009.   It is presumed that this is, in part, due to the high number of guests and interns that use the  ecovillage’s  facilities  in  the  summer.    Both  communities  host  a  number  of  events  and  guests;  however,  OUR  Ecovillage  hosts  more  guests  than  Quayside  Village.    Due  to  the  challenge of  accurately  estimating  the number of  guests  in both  communities,  they were  not accounted for when calculating per capita consumption and impacts.  Instead, the total  electricity  consumption  of  each  community  was  divided  by  the  number  of  full‐time  residents.    Another  potential  reason  for  higher  electricity  consumption  at  OUR  Ecovillage  is  that  ecovillage  residents  work  on‐site  more  than  Quayside  residents,  resulting  in  electricity  consumption  throughout  the  day.    Electricity  is  also  consumed  by  the  ecovillage’s  groundwater well pump  that provides water  for  residents  and  the garden.   On  the other  hand, Quayside residents rely,  in part, on electricity for space heating.   This suggests that  further  investigation  is  necessary  to  understand  these  differences  in  electricity  consumption.                              39    Figure 4.2: Per Capita Energy Ecological Footprint by Energy Source  0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Electricity Natural Gas / Wood Total Ec ol og ic al  F oo tp ri nt  P er  P er so n  (g ha ) Quayside Village OUR Ecovillage   The  footprint  associated with Quayside’s  gas  consumption  is  approximately 15% greater  than  the  footprint associated with  the ecovillage’s wood consumption.   This difference  is  even more significant when one considers the additional energy consumed at Quayside for  space heating via electrical baseboard heaters as well as climatic differences.  As illustrated  in  Figure  4.3,  the  average  monthly  temperatures  at  OUR  Ecovillage  are  lower  than  at  Quayside  Village,  specifically  during  the  winter  months  when  space  heating  is  required  (Weather Network 2010).                              40    Figure 4.3: Average Monthly Temperatures at OUR Ecovillage and Quayside Village  0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec A ve ra ge  M on th ly  Te m pe ra tu re  (D eg re es  C el si us ) OUR Ecovillage (Duncan) Quayside Village (North Vancouver) As  with  electricity,  heating  energy  consumption  of  each  community  was  divided  by  the  number of full‐time residents.   However, the per capita calculations were not confounded  by  guests  since  space  heating  is  primarily  confined  to  winter  months  when  there  are  limited guests in both communities.   It is important to note that the energy ecological footprint only represents energy land, or  the  forest  area  necessary  to  sequester  GHG  emissions.    Built‐up  land would  represent  a  nominal  increase  in  the  footprint associated with both energy sources.   For example,  the  footprint  associated with  hydroelectricity  generation would  increase  if  one  included  the  land area and embodied energy of BC Hydro’s dams and other infrastructure.                                  41    4.3.1 Comparison with City of North Vancouver Averages  In 2007, the City of North Vancouver conducted an energy and greenhouse gas emissions  inventory.  According to this inventory, the City’s residential buildings consumed 561,396  GJ of electricity and 670,647 GJ of natural gas in 2007 (BC Ministry of Environment 2010).   Table 4.4  summarizes  the per capita energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions and  ecological  footprint  associated  with  both  energy  sources  in  2007  for  the  City  of  North  Vancouver and Quayside Village.     Table 4.4: Per Capita Energy Consumption, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Ecological  Footprint by Energy Source for Quayside Village and City of North Vancouver (2007)  Quayside N. Vancouver Quayside N. Vancouver Quayside N. Vancouver BC Hydro 9.2 12.4 0.06 0.09 0.02 0.02 Terasen Gas 20.3 14.8 1.03 0.76 0.28 0.21 Total 29.5 27.3 1.10 0.84 0.30 0.23 Energy Source 2007 Energy Consumption (GJ) GHG Emissions (ton CO2‐e) Ecological Footprint (gha)   In  2007,  Quayside  Village  consumed  approximately  25%  less  electricity,  and  40% more  natural gas, per person than the City of North Vancouver.  Overall, Quayside consumed 8%  more  housing‐related  energy  per  person  than  North  Vancouver.    Since  there  is  approximately  7  times  more  GHG  emissions  per  unit  energy  for  natural  gas  than  hydroelectricity  in  BC  (51  vs.  7  kg  CO2‐e/GJ),  the  overall  energy  footprint  per  capita  of  Quayside Village is 30% greater than North Vancouver.    There are many potential reasons for these differences in energy consumption patterns:  1. Heating Energy Sources:   Since many buildings  in  the City of North Vancouver are  heated via electrical energy,  it  is not  surprising  that  the average North Vancouver  resident  consumes  more  electricity  than  the  average  Quayside  resident.    Despite                            42    having electric baseboard heaters, discussions with Quayside residents indicate that  that most households rely primarily on natural gas fireplaces for space heating.  2. Building Typology:   Energy consumption is dependent on building typology, or the  design  and  construction  characteristics  of  dwellings.    Table 4.4  aggregates  energy  consumption  data  for  all  dwelling  types  in  both  communities.    The  majority  of  households  in  the  CoNV  and  at  Quayside  are  apartment  units;  however,  both  communities comprise other dwelling types.  Figure 4.4 illustrates the composition  of  North  Vancouver’s  building  stock.    Quayside  Village’s  unique  building  typology  includes  a  common  house  and  individual  dwellings  in  apartment  and  townhouse  styles.  Figure 4.4: Housing Types in North Vancouver  Single Detached House 16% Semi‐Detached  House 3% Row House 8% Apartment, Duplex 11% Apartment, 5 storeys  or higher 18% Apartment, under 5  storeys 44% Other 0%                             43    3. Building Design:   Quayside Village  is comprised of a 240 sq.m common house plus  19 individual dwelling units arranged along an outdoor single‐loaded corridor6.  In  addition to the common house creating heating demand, individual units experience  heat loss from high surface areas exposed to the outdoor elements.   Discussions with Quayside residents also highlighted  inefficiencies of  the common  house’s large fireplace.   The fireplace is described as being ornamental as opposed  to  functional.   A  large quantity of heat produced by the fireplace  is vented outside  instead of being directed into the common house.  This means that more natural gas  is required to heat the common house than is necessary.    4.4 Transportation Footprint The  transportation  component  of  a  community’s  ecological  footprint  includes  use  of  private  vehicles,  public  transportation  and  air  transportation.    Table  4.5  and  Figure  4.5  illustrate the per capita ecological footprint for transportation use at Quayside Village and  OUR Ecovillage.    Table 4.5: Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Transportation Mode  Private Vehicles Public Transport Air Transport Total Lowest Value Highest Value Quayside Village 0.34 0.00 0.60 0.94 0.02 1.87 OUR Ecovillage 0.39 0.00 0.28 0.67 0.17 1.88 Ecological Footprint (gha/person)   The total ecological  footprint associated with transportation at Quayside Village and OUR  Ecovillage  is  0.94  and  0.67  gha/person,  respectively.    The  majority  of  Quayside’s                                                               6 A single‐loaded corridor is a building arrangement where all the dwellings are along one side of the access  corridor.  The corridor can be outdoors or indoors.                            44    transportation ecological footprint is attributable to air travel while the largest component  of OUR Ecovillage’s transportation footprint is attributable to private vehicles.    The  per  capita  footprint  associated  with  private  automobile  use  at  the  ecovillage  is  approximately 15% greater  than at Quayside Village.   This corroborates my observations  that OUR Ecovillage residents rely heavily on private vehicles.  The ecovillage is located in a  rural setting.  Therefore, residents rely on private vehicles to access services and amenities.   Residents  often  travel  to  Victoria  or  Duncan,  which  are  45km  and  25km  from  the  ecovillage,  respectively.    Conversely,  Quayside  residents  are  located  in  a  dense,  urban  center where services and amenities are often within walking distance.      Figure 4.5: Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Transportation Mode  0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 Private Vehicles Public Transport Air Transport Total Ec ol og ic al  F oo tp ri nt  P er  P er so n  (g ha ) Quayside Village OUR Ecovillage                             45    The  per  capita  footprint  associated  with  air  travel  at  Quayside  is  approximately  200%  greater than at OUR Ecovillage.  This suggests that the average ecovillage resident may be  more  inclined  to  spend  leisure or holiday  time on‐site, possibly because  the ecovillage  is  host  to  many  events  and  guests.    However,  this  difference  in  air  travel  may  also  be  associated with differences  in disposable  income  levels,  as discussed  in  Section 4.1.   The  disposable  income  of  the  average  Quayside  household  is  30%  greater  than  the  average  ecovillage household.    Furthermore,  the average household at Quayside  reports  to  spend  approximately $2,600 per year on holidays while the average household at OUR Ecovillage  only reports to spend $1,000.  It is also possible that the average ecovillage resident may be  more  environmentally  conscious  than  the  average Quayside  resident with  respect  to  the  impacts of air travel and, therefore, chooses to limit his/her flights.  While  spending  time  at  OUR  Ecovillage  and  Quayside  Village,  I  observed  differences  in  residents’  commitment  levels  to  environmentally  superior  forms  of  transportation.    This  observation is supported by the range of  individual transportation footprints within each  community.   The per capita footprint ranges from 0.02 – 1.87 gha at Quayside Village and  0.17  –  1.88  gha  at  OUR  Ecovillage.    Members  of  two  households  in  Quayside  Village  demonstrate a transportation footprint of less than 0.15 gha/person.  In both cases, these  residents  have  not  travelled  by  air  over  the  course  of  the  past  year.    Moreover,  both  households do not own private vehicles and, instead, rely heavily on public transportation.   Alternatively, every household at OUR Ecovillage owns a private vehicle.  Quayside  Village  is  located  in  close  proximity  to  many  public  transportation  options  including the SeaBus and local bus system.  Many Quayside residents reported using public                            46    transportation  on  a  regular  basis.    Still,  the  overall  per  capita  footprint  associated  with  public  transportation  is  only  0.0004  gha.    Public  transportation  options  are  limited  for  residents  of  OUR  Ecovillage.    Consequently,  no  ecovillage  resident  reported  using  public  transportation.   That being said,  it  is common for residents to carpool or car‐share at the  ecovillage.    4.4.1 Comparison with City of North Vancouver Averages  As discussed above, the City of North Vancouver conducted an energy and greenhouse gas  emissions inventory in 2007.  According to this inventory, over 37 million liters of gasoline  and  approximately  900,000  liters  of  diesel were  consumed  by  passenger  vehicles  in  the  CoNV  (BC  Ministry  of  Environment  2010).    Table  4.6  summarizes  the  per  capita  fuel  consumption, greenhouse gas emissions and ecological footprint associated with both fuel  sources for the City of North Vancouver and Quayside Village.    Table 4.6: Per Capita On­Road Transportation Fuel Consumption, Greenhouse Gas  Emissions and Ecological Footprint for Quayside Village and City of North Vancouver  Quayside N. Vancouver Quayside N. Vancouver Quayside N. Vancouver Gasoline 476 827 1.13 1.97 0.31 0.54 Diesel 42 20 0.11 0.05 0.03 0.01 Total 518 846 1.25 2.02 0.34 0.55 Fuel Source Fuel Consumption (L) GHG Emissions (ton CO2‐e) Ecological Footprint (gha)   As  shown  in  Table  4.6,  the  average  North  Vancouver  resident  consumes  approximately  60% more  on‐road  transportation  fuel  than  the  average Quayside Village  resident.    This  translates into a 60% greater per capita transportation ecological footprint for the average  North Vancouver resident.                              47    It  is  important  to  note  that,  despite  using  the  same  conversion  factor  to  translate  fuel  consumption  into  GHG  emissions,  the  North  Vancouver  fuel  consumption  data  were  derived  using  a  different method  than  for Quayside Village.    Assuming  comparable  data,  there  are many  potential  reasons  for  the  differences  in  fuel  consumption  patterns.    One  possible factor is proximity to services and amenities.  Quayside Village may be located in  closer  proximity  to  services  and  amenities  than  the  average  North  Vancouver  resident,  leading to  less of a dependence on private automobiles.    It  is also possible, however,  that  the average Quayside resident is more environmentally conscious than the average North  Vancouver resident and, as a result, chooses to use alternatives to the private automobile.   This  level of environmental consciousness may be  linked to Quayside’s unique cohousing  model.  Meltzer (2000a, 2000b) shows that residents decrease their dependence on private  vehicles after moving into cohousing communities.  4.5 Consumption and Waste Footprint The  consumption & waste  component  of  a  community’s  ecological  footprint  includes  the  embodied energy of producing materials and the greenhouse gas emissions associated with  disposing and/or recycling those materials.   As is common with the component method, I  used solid waste generation as an indicator of the impacts of both goods consumption and  waste generation.  However, it is important to note that many waste streams, and therefore  consumption  categories,  are  not  accounted  for  in  these  calculations  including  compost,  electronic waste (e‐waste), construction & demolition waste, and wastes generated off‐site  but that are associated with each community’s consumption.                              48    During  the  month  of  May  2010,  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage  monitored  their  community’s waste generation including garbage destined for the landfill and recycling of  paper, glass, aluminum cans and plastic.   Table 4.7 and Figure 4.6 illustrate the per capita  ecological  footprint  of  consumption  &  waste  generation  at  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage.    As with  energy,  the  consumption  & waste  footprint  of  each  community was  divided  by  the  number  of  full‐time  residents;  however,  the  visitor  population  in  both  communities was minimal during the monitoring period.  A summary of calculations can be  found in Appendix C.  Table 4.7: Per Capita Consumption & Waste Ecological Footprint by Material Type  Quayside Village OUR Ecovillage Quayside Village OUR Ecovillage Paper 0.06 0.04 0.15 0.11 Glass 0.03 0.06 0.03 0.06 Aluminum Cans 0.00 0.01 0.00 0.00 Plastic 0.02 0.04 0.05 0.13 Total 0.11 0.14 0.23 0.30 Ecological Footprint (gha/person) Material Quantity (tonne/person/year)     The ecological footprint associated with consumption & waste at Quayside Village and OUR  Ecovillage  is  0.23  and  0.30  gha/person,  respectively.    This  includes  the waste  diversion  efforts of both communities (i.e. recycling and composting).   While spending time in both  communities,  I  observed  a  high  level  of  participation  in  recycling  and  composting.    Both  communities  compost  kitchen  waste  with  the  final  product  being  used  for  on‐site  gardening and landscaping.  OUR Ecovillage also uses cardboard as mulch in the garden.                            49    Figure 4.6: Per Capita Consumption & Waste Ecological Footprint by Material Type  0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Paper Glass Aluminum Cans Plastic Total Ec ol og ic al  F oo tp ri nt  P er  P er so n  (g ha ) Quayside Village OUR Ecovillage   Quayside Village has established an extensive  recycling program with  reported diversion  rates  of  90‐95%.    Based  on  the  solid waste monitoring  program  in May  2010,  Quayside  Village’s diversion rate was found to be 87% by weight and 89% by volume.  This exceeds  the  national  average  of  22%  by  approximately  four  times  (FCM  2009).    Quayside’s  ecological  footprint would  be  approximately  50%  greater without  any  of  their  recycling  efforts.         Quayside Village’s recycling program involves separating waste into 57 different streams.   Some of  these waste  streams are collected by  the City of North Vancouver; however,  the  majority  of  waste  streams  are  transported  off‐site  by  Quayside  residents  to  different                            50    recycling  companies.    One  member  of  the  community  has  championed  the  recycling  program with other community members also taking on leadership roles.    4.6 Food Footprint The  food  component  of  a  community’s  ecological  footprint  includes  the  agricultural  land  and  carbon  sink  required  to  grow,  process  and  transport  food  and  beverage  for  human  consumption and  to assimilate  the associated carbon emissions.   Table 4.8  illustrates  the  per  capita  ecological  footprint  for  food  consumption  at  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage.   The  footprint  values were derived by  inputting dietary  information  from  the  final surveys into the Global Footprint Network’s online quiz (GFN 2010).    Table 4.8: Per Capita Ecological Footprint for Food Consumption  Average Minimum Maximum Quayside Village 1.11 0.90 1.40 OUR Ecovillage 1.12 1.00 1.40 Ecological Footprint (gha/person)     The  average  per  capita  ecological  footprint  for  food  consumption  is  approximately  1.1  gha/person at both Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage.  Residents who consume limited  meat  and  dairy  achieve  the  lowest  food  footprints.    The  lowest  footprint,  0.9  gha,  is  achieved by a Quayside resident who does not eat beef, lamb or pork and only occasionally  eats poultry, fish and dairy.   Residents of OUR Ecovillage share common meals during most of the year.  The ecovillage  employs one, or more, of  its residents  to purchase and prepare meals  for  the community  and  its  guests.    During  summer months,  the  cook(s) will  often  prepare meals with  food                            51    grown in the community’s permaculture garden.  Most meals are vegetarian; however, the  ecovillage  also  raises  animals  for  meat  consumption  including  poultry,  lamb  and  pork.   Meat was only served once during my month spent at the ecovillage.  Residents  of  Quayside  Village  prepare  most  of  their  own  meals  at  the  household  level.   However,  the  community  shares  a meal  once  or  twice  a week  in  their  common  kitchen.   Most of the common meals are vegetarian.           4.7 Built-up Land Footprint Built‐up land is the physical land area appropriated for human settlement, which includes  buildings  and  paved  surfaces.    Built‐up  land  is  also  known  as  degraded  land  as  its  productive bio‐capacity has been  lost  to human development  (Greater  London Authority  2003).  The built‐up land at Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage is approximately 0.10 ha  and  0.15  ha,  respectively.    This  translates  into  a  per  capita  built‐up  land  footprint  at  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage  of  0.003  ha/person  and  0.008  ha/person,  respectively.   Using the equivalence factor7 of 2.39 for built‐up land, this translates into a  per  capita  built‐up  land  footprint  at  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage  of  0.006  gha/person and 0.019 gha/person, respectively (GFN 2009b).    4.8 Aggregated Footprints The total per capita ecological footprint for Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage is 2.59 and  2.39  gha/person,  respectively.    Figure  4.7  illustrates  the  average  per  capita  ecological  footprint for both communities based on category.                                                               7 Due to productivity differentials of different land types, equivalence factors are used to convert actual land areas  into their global hectare equivalents.                            52    Food  is  the  largest  component  of  both  communities’  ecological  footprints  followed  by  transportation, housing‐related energy, consumption & waste and built‐up land.      Figure 4.7: Average Per Capita Ecological Footprint by Category for Quayside Village  and OUR Ecovillage  0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 Food Air Travel Automobile Travel Waste Natural Gas / Wood Electricity Built‐up Land Ec ol og ic al  F oo tp ri nt  P er  P er so n  (g ha ) Quayside Village Cohousing OUR Ecovillage   4.8.1 Comparison with Global Footprint Network Quiz Results  According to the Global Footprint Network quiz results presented in Section 4.2, Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage  demonstrated  per  capita  ecological  footprints  of  6.4  and  6.5  gha/person, respectively.  However, using a simplified component method, I calculated per  capita  ecological  footprints  for  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage  of  2.59  and  2.39  gha/person,  respectively.    In  other  words,  there  is  a  difference  of  approximately  4  gha/person between each method.  There are two main reasons for this difference:                            53    1. The full component method includes 24 variables.   For the purpose of this study, I  completed a simplified version of the component method, which only includes 14 of  these variables.  See Section 3 for details.    2. The GFN online quiz assigns a constant value of 2.6 gha to services, which includes  health  care,  legal,  government  and  military  services.    These  services  are  not  included in the footprint I calculated using the simplified component method.  The per capita ecological footprints for Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage would be 5.2  and 5.0 gha/person, if I were to add 2.6 gha/person as a base value for all Canadians who  rely on consumption to maintain national services.  This addition would not only decrease  the difference in results obtained through the GFN quiz and component method, but would  also  decrease  the  percent  difference  between  the  per  capita  ecological  footprints  of  Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage.  4.9 Discussion of Results Despite  moderate  sample  sizes  and  response  rates8,  a  number  of  conclusions  may  be  derived from the results:  1. The  per  capita  housing‐related  energy  footprints  of  OUR  Ecovillage  and Quayside  Village are slightly higher than an average North Vancouver dwelling.  This suggests  that  the  two  intentional  communities do not possess  an environmental  advantage  over conventional communities in relation to household electrical or heating energy.                                                               8 The transportation and food elements of the EFA are based on survey results while the energy and waste  elements are based on data gathered at the community‐scale.  The transportation and food footprints are,  therefore, affected by response rates of the final survey.                            54    2. The overall  per  capita  transportation  footprint of Quayside Village  is  greater  than  OUR Ecovillage.  While the average Quayside resident relies less on private vehicles  than  the  average  ecovillage  resident,  they  use  more  air  transportation.    This  suggests  there may be a difference  in the transportation habits of rural and urban  intentional community residents, which may be explained by differences in on‐site  leisure  opportunities  and/or  access  to  services  and  amenities.    The  average  Quayside  resident  also  relies  less  on  private  vehicles  than  the  average  North  Vancouver  resident  suggesting  there  may  be  ecological  benefits  to  Quayside’s  location and/or community model.     3. Both Quayside Village and OUR Ecovillage have extensive solid waste management  programs.    Quayside  Village’s  program  is  particularly  noteworthy  as  it  diverts  approximately 90% of material  away  from  the  landfill.   Quayside Village and OUR  Ecovillage may  offer  insights  to  conventional  communities  with  respect  to  waste  management and resource recovery.   4. Food  is  the  largest  component  of  the  per  capita  ecological  footprint  at  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage.    Further  research  and  attention  is  required  to  understand the life‐cycle environmental impacts of both communities’ food systems  including year round monitoring or reporting of food consumption.  5. Overall,  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage  have  similar  per  capita  ecological  footprints.  This suggests that residents of urban and rural intentional communities  may demonstrate similar environmental behaviours.                             55    5.0 Conclusions and Recommendations Several  studies  show  that  intentional  communities  have  per  capita  ecological  footprints  that are less than those of conventional communities.  I corroborate these findings through  my  own  ecological  footprint  analyses  of  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage,  in  southwestern British Columbia.   These communities have per capita ecological  footprints  that  are  smaller  than  some  conventional  averages.    Overall,  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage  have  comparatively  similar  per  capita  ecological  footprints,  suggesting  that  residents  of  urban  and  rural  intentional  communities  may  demonstrate  similar  environmental behaviours.    5.1 Policy Recommendations  The  above  suggests  that  intentional  communities  may  offer  insights  on  how  to  reduce  household  ecological  footprints  in  Canada.    At  present,  however,  intentional  community  living is confined to small‐scale grassroots initiatives so even the aggregate environmental  benefits are  insignificant.   The  following policy recommendations may help to extend the  pro‐environmental practices of intentional communities to society at large:  1. Enhance  the  prevalence  of  intentional  communities,  especially  in  urban  settings.  This  can  first be  accomplished by  increasing  the number of  cohousing developments.   There  is  empirical  evidence  that  a  demand  exists  for  this  housing  model  in  British  Columbia (Hendrickson & Roseland 2010), which can be satisfied with the help of land  developers and municipalities.  Land developers can help potential residents by leading  the  design  process  and  facilitating  dialogue  regarding  appropriate  governance  and                            56    ownership models.   Municipalities  can help by working with groups  to establish  site‐ specific  zoning  and  overcome  other  regulatory  barriers.    For  example,  the  Cowichan  Valley Regional District worked with OUR Ecovillage  to  establish  a unique  integrated  land  use  zoning  designation,  R‐4 Rural  Community Residential.    Similarly,  the  City  of  Chilliwack  worked  with  Yarrow  Ecovillage  to  establish  an  ‘ecovillage’  zoning.   Municipalities  are  also  positioned  to  provide  financial  incentives  that  favor  communities  with  lower  ecological  footprints.    Municipalities  may  waive  or  reduce  Development  Cost  Charges  (DCCs)  to  projects  that  have  little  or  negligible  impact  on  utility  infrastructure,  as  may  be  the  case  with  ecologically‐oriented  intentional  communities.      There  is  also  the  potential  to  integrate  ecovillage‐type  developments  in  an  urban  setting.    According  to  the  Global  Ecovillage  Network,  there  are  nearly  50  self‐ proclaimed  urban  ecovillages  worldwide  (GEN  2009).    Municipalities  can  provide  a  variety  of  incentives  to  citizens  and  land  developers  to  promote  ecovillage  and  cohousing projects.  A major barrier to enhancing the prevalence of intentional communities is the stigma or  stereotypes  associated  with  this  type  of  development.    Municipalities  and  land  developers  can  assist  to  change  the  image  of  intentional  communities  through public  awareness‐building  campaigns.    Intentional  communities  can  be  profiled  using  local  examples  such  as  Quayside  Village  and  OUR  Ecovillage.    It may  also  be  necessary  to  rebrand  intentional  communities  to  appeal  to  a  broader  audience  with  specific  attention to current demographics and housing needs.                            57    2. Adapt  pro­environmental  practices  of  intentional  communities  to  a  conventional context  First,  pro‐environmental  practices  of  intentional  communities  can  be  adapted  to  a  conventional  context  through  physical  design.    Municipalities  can  establish  design  guidelines that encompass cohousing and/or ecovillage principles, including:      a. Decreased individual dwelling unit sizes in exchange for increased common  space  and  shared  amenities  (e.g.  common  kitchen,  guest  rooms,  laundry  facilities, play area, vehicles, computers & electronics, etc.).  Vehicle sharing,  in particular, may help to decrease the ecological impacts of transportation.  b. Community‐scale waste management and resource recovery  c. Community‐scale permaculture gardening and sustainable  food production.   It  is especially  important  to  focus efforts on  food since  it  represents such a  large portion of a community’s ecological footprint.   The  latter  two  design  elements  may  pose  particular  regulatory  challenges.    For  example,  regulators  may  uses  zoning  ordinances  to  prohibit  agricultural  uses  to  be  mixed with residential uses, especially if the agricultural uses are deemed unfavorable  due  to  their  unconventional  nature.    Similarly,  community‐scale  waste management  requires infrastructure, which must adhere to local codes and standards.  In both cases,  it  is  essential  to  first  educate  regulators  of  the  advantages  of  these  unconventional  techniques.    It  is  also  essential  to  align with  professionals  who  are  trained  in  these  alternative methods.                              58    The pro‐environmental practices of intentional communities can also be adapted to the  conventional  context  through  governance  models.    Conventional  strata  councils  can  establish rules and structures that encompass cohousing and/or ecovillage principles,  including consensus decision‐making and specific conflict resolution techniques.    5.2 Future Research  Future  research  is  required  to  corroborate  and  enhance  this  study’s  findings.    It  is  first  necessary  to  increase  the  overall  sample  size  by  studying  other  similar  communities.   Moreover, future research should monitor all energy and material flows for longer periods  of time (i.e. one year) to provide more confidence in the ecological footprint calculations.    As  shown  above,  food  is  a  significant  component  of  a  community’s  ecological  footprint;  however, it is also the area with the greatest uncertainty in this study.  Further research is  required  to  understand  the  life‐cycle  environmental  impacts  of  food  systems  including  agricultural production  techniques and dietary consumption choices.   This would help  to  refine the ecological footprint associated with community‐scale food systems.  Further  research  is  also  necessary  to  understand  the  social  elements  of  intentional  community living that result in, or support, pro‐environmental behavior.  This would help  to  refine  policy  recommendations  to  advance  pro‐environmental  practices  of  intentional  communities.  Finally, research is required to understand the steps necessary to enhance the prevalence  of  intentional  communities  as  well  as  adapt  pro‐environmental  practices  of  intentional  communities to a conventional context.                              59    Ongoing research is necessary in the quest to reduce the environmental burdens of human  settlements.  Ultimately, humans need to find ways to live within the regenerative capacity  of  the  planet  by  transcending  conventional  practice  and  realizing  truly  sustainable  development models.                               60    Bibliography  Bamford, G., & Hindmarsh, R. (2001). Bringing us home: Cohousing and the environmental  possibilities  of  reuniting  people  with  neighbourhoods.  Situating  the  Environment  at  the  University of Queensland, 36.   Bang, J.M. (2005). Ecovillages: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Communities. Gabriola  Island: New Society Publishers.  Barrett, J. (2001). Component ecological footprint: Developing sustainable scenarios.  Impact assessment and project appraisal, 19(2), 107–118.    Barrett, J., Vallack, H., Jones, A., & Haq, G. (2002). A material flow analysis and ecological  footprint of York. Stockholm: Environmental Institute.    BC Ministry of Environment. (2010). North Vancouver Community Energy and Emissions  Inventory 2007. http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/cas/mitigation/ceei/RegionalDistricts/Metro‐ Vancouver/ceei_2007_north_vancouver_city.pdf.  Accessed June 2010.  CDC ‐ Cohousing Development Consulting. (2010). http://www.cohousingconsulting.ca/  subpages/projects_quay.html. Accessed April 2010.  Chambers, N., Simmons, C., & Wackernagel, M. (2000). Sharing nature's interest: Ecological  footprints as an indicator of sustainability. London: Earthscan Publications Ltd.   Christian, D.L. (2003). Creating a Life Together: Practical Tools to Grow Ecovillages and  Intentional Communities. Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers.     Ciambrone, D.F. (1997). Environmental Life Cycle Analysis. New York: Lewis Publishers.    Danziger, S. (2004). Adaptable Design in Five Housing Projects in North Vancouver: Client  Use and Satisfaction, Masters Project, Simon Fraser University.  Dawson, J. (2006). Ecovillages: New Frontiers for Sustainability. Green Books Ltd.  ESRL – Earth System Research Laboratory. (2010). http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/  ccgg/trends/. Accessed July 2010.  FCM – Federation of Canadian Municipalities. (2009). Getting to 50% and Beyond: Waste  Diversion Success Stories from Canadian Municipalities. http://gmf.fcm.ca/files/  Capacity_Building_‐_Waste/WasteDiversion‐EN.pdf. Accessed June 2010.  Field, F.R., & Ehrenfeld, J.R. (1999). Life‐Cycle Analysis: The Role of Evaluation and Strategy.  In Measures of Environmental Performance and Ecosystem Condition, pp. 29‐41.  Washington, DC: National Academy Press.                            61    GEN – Global Ecovillage Network. (2009). http://gen.ecovillage.org/iservices/index.html.  Accessed June 2009.  GEN – Global Ecovillage Network. (2010). http://gen.ecovillage.org. Accessed August 2010.  GFN – Global Footprint Network. (2009a). National Footprint Accounts, 2009 Edition.  Available online at http://www.footprintnetwork.org.  GFN – Global Footprint Network. (2009b). Ecological Footprint Atlas 2009.  http://www.footprintnetwork.org/images/uploads/Ecological_Footprint_Atlas_2009.pdf.  Accessed August 2010.  GFN – Global Footprint Network. (2010). http://www.footprintnetwork.org/en/  index.php/GFN/page/calculators/. Accessed February 2010.  Greater London Authority. (2003). London’s Ecological Footprint. Commissioned by GLA  Economics.  Hanson, C. (1996). The Cohousing Handbook: Building a Place for Community. Hartley &  Marks Publishers.  Haraldsson, H. V., Ranhagen, U., & Sverdrup, H. (2001). Is eco‐living more sustainable than  conventional living? Comparing sustainability performances between two townships in  southern Sweden. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 44(5), 663‐679.   Harmaajärvi, I. (2000). EcoBalance model for assessing sustainability in residential areas  and relevant case studies in Finland. Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 20(3),  373‐380.   Hendrickson, D.J. & Roseland, M. (2010). Green Buildings, Green Consumption: Do “Green”  Residential Developments Reduce Post‐Occupancy Consumption Levels? The Centre for  Sustainable Community Development, Simon Fraser University.  Hendrickson, C.T., Lave, L.B. & Matthews, H.S. (2006). Environmental Life Cycle Assessment  of Goods and Services: An Input‐Output Approach. Washington: Resources for the Future.  Holden, E. (2004). Ecological footprints and sustainable urban form. Journal of Housing and  the Built Environment, 19(1), 91‐109.   Intentional Communities. (2009). http://www.ic.org/. Accessed June 2009.  IPCC. (2007). Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working  Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate  Change. Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.                              62    IPCC. (2010). http://www.grida.no/publications/other/ipcc_sr/?src=/climate/ipcc/  aviation/125.htm. Accessed March 2010.    Kanter, R.M. (1972). Commitment and community. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University  Press.    Kasper, D.V.S. (2008). Redefining Community in the Ecovillage. Human Ecology Review,  15(1), 12‐24.    Kirby, A. (2003). Redefining social and environmental relations at the ecovillage at Ithaca:  A case study. Journal of Environmental Psychology 23 (2003), 323‐332.    Kissinger, M., A. Haim. (2008). Urban hinterlands—the case of an Israeli town ecological  footprint. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 10 (2008), 391–405.    Lewan, L., Simmons, C. (2001). The use of Ecological Footprint and Biocapacity Analyses as  Sustainability Indicators for Subnational Geographical Areas: A Recommended Way  Forward. European Common Indicators Project EUROCITIES/Ambiente Italia 27th August  2001.  McCamant, K., & Durrett, C. (1988). Cohousing: A contemporary approach to housing  ourselves. Ten Speed Press.   Meltzer, G. (2000a). Cohousing: Towards Social and Environmental Sustainability, PhD  Thesis. The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.  Meltzer, G. (2000b). Cohousing: Verifying the Importance of Community in the Application  of Environmentalism. Journal of Architectural Planning and Research, 17(2), 110‐132.  Meltzer, G. (2005). Sustainable Community: Learning from the cohousing model. Trafford  Publishing.  Metcalf, B. (2001). Findhorn Foundation: Dealing with external criticism and attacks.  Chapter 20 in Contemporary Utopian Struggles: Communities between modernism and  postmodernism (eds. Poldervaart, S., Jansen, H., Kesler, B.). Amsterdam: Aksant Academic  Publishers.  Moos, M., Whitfield, J., Johnson, L. C., & Andrey, J. (2006). Does design matter? the ecological  footprint as a planning tool at the local level. Journal of Urban Design, 11(2), 195‐224.   North Vancouver. (2009). City of North Vancouver 2009 Community Profile Release 1 ‐  Data Inventory. http://www.cnv.org. Accessed June 2010.   OUR Ecovillage. (2008). Information Handbook and Visitor’s Guide.                            63    OUR Ecovillage. (2009). OUR Ecovillage Cooperative Business Plan.   OUR Ecovillage. (2010). http://ourecovillage.org/. Accessed April 2010.  Quayside Village. (2010). http://sites.google.com/site/quaysidevillage/home. Accessed  April 2010.  Rees, W. E. (2001). Ecological Footprint, Concept of. Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Simon  Levin, Editor‐in‐Chief), Vol 2, pp 229 –244. San Diego: Academic Press.  Resurgence (2010). http://www.resurgence.org/education/carbon‐calculator.html.   Accessed June 2010.  Simmons, C., Lewis, K., & Barrett, J. (2000). Two feet – two approaches: A component based  model of ecological footprinting. Ecological Economics, 32(3), 375–380.  Statistics Canada. (2006). http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/famil55a‐eng.htm. Accessed  June 2009.  Tinsley, S., & George, H. (2006). Ecological Footprint of the Findhorn Foundation and  Community. Sustainable Development Research Centre.  Tobin, M. (2004). Linking Ecological Accounting to Design Guidelines for Environmentally  Sustainable Developments, Masters Project. University of Oregon.  Vitousek, P., Mooney, H.A., Lubchenco, J., Melillo, J.M. (1997). Human Domination of Earth’s  Ecosystems. Science 277: 494‐499.  Weather Network (2010). http://www.theweathernetwork.com.  Accessed September  2010.  World Wildlife Fund (2008). Living Planet Report. http://www.panda.org/  about_our_earth/all_publications/living_planet_report/lpr_2008/. Accessed June 2009.                             64                    Appendix A  Ethics Approval Form     CERTIFICATE EXPIRY DATE:  July 23, 2010   The University of British Columbia Office of Research Services Behavioural Research Ethics Board Suite 102, 6190 Agronomy Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z3  CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL - MINIMAL RISK  PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: INSTITUTION / DEPARTMENT: UBC BREB NUMBER: Maged Senbel UBC/College for Interdisciplinary Studies/Community & Regional Planning H09-01602 INSTITUTION(S) WHERE RESEARCH WILL BE CARRIED OUT:  Institution Site N/A N/A Other locations where the research will be conducted: Questionnaires will be sent to community residents to complete in the privacy of their own homes. CO-INVESTIGATOR(S): Waleed Giratalla SPONSORING AGENCIES: N/A PROJECT TITLE: Comparative Study of the Ecological Impacts of Intentional and Mainstream Communities DOCUMENTS INCLUDED IN THIS APPROVAL: DATE APPROVED:   July 23, 2009  Document Name Version Date Protocol: Research Proposal 1 June 22, 2009 Advertisements: Flyer Advertisement 1 June 22, 2009 Questionnaire, Questionnaire Cover Letter, Tests: Questionnaire 2 June 28, 2009 Cover Letter 1 June 22, 2009 Letter of Initial Contact: Letter of Initial Contact 4 July 20, 2009  The application for ethical review and the document(s) listed above have been reviewed and the procedures were found to be acceptable on ethical grounds for research involving human subjects.   Approval is issued on behalf of the Behavioural Research Ethics Board and signed electronically by one of the following: Dr. M. Judith Lynam, Chair Dr. Ken Craig, Chair Dr. Jim Rupert, Associate Chair Dr. Laurie Ford, Associate Chair Dr. Anita Ho, Associate Chair Page 1 of 1 07/08/2010https://rise.ubc.ca/rise/Doc/0/7DV9RC9ITQ2418U207DPDHSU1A/fromString.html                           66            Appendix B  Final Survey                                                      67    Assessing Your Ecological Footprint   The ecological footprint is one way to assess our impact on the environment.  It is a measure of  the land area required to sustain a person’s consumption and absorb their wastes.  Instructions  This survey questionnaire is divided into five sections.  The questionnaire should take 30 – 60  minutes to complete.  Please only fill in one questionnaire per household and complete the  questionnaire on behalf of the other members of your home.  You must be 19 years or older to  participate.  Forms must be completed and returned by June 5, 2010.    In addition, we ask that you please collect and submit all food receipts for the month of May  in the envelope provided.  This includes all grocery receipts and restaurant bills.  Please include  the portion of the receipt that indicates the items you purchased.      Part I: General Information  1. What is your postal code? _______________  2. When did you move to your current home (month/year)? _______________  3. How many people live in your household? Household refers to the members of your home.  a. One  b. Two  c. Three  d. Four  e. Other – please indicate how many: _______       4. How many people in your household are under the age of 15?  a. Zero  b. One  c. Two  d. Three  e. Other – please indicate how many: _______                                 68    5. How would you describe your type of housing?  a. Apartment  b. Single‐family home  c. Other: _______________    6. What size is your home?  a. Studio or 1‐bedroom  b. 2‐bedroom  c. 3‐bedroom  d. Larger than 3‐bedroom    7. What is the approximate annual income of your household? Please report the combined  income of all the members of your household before income tax.  If possible, please report  your household’s income from 2009. _______________    8. How much does your household spend on housing per month (i.e. rent, mortgage)?  _______________    9. How much money does your household spend on holidays per year? _______________                              69    Part II: Energy Footprint  Your energy footprint may include consumption of electricity, natural gas, wood, propane or a  variety of other energy sources.  Please note that the information you provide in this section is  being combined with information collected at the community‐level (i.e. past utility bills) to  derive the energy footprint.  1. My home is heated by the following source(s):  a. Electricity  b. Natural Gas  c. Wood  d. Propane  e. Other: _______________   f. I don’t know    2. If you answered d. or e. to the above question, please report the amount (e.g. liters of  propane) your household uses in a typical year: _______________                            70    Part III: Transportation Footprint  1. I would like to give distances in:  a. Kilometers (Km)  b. Miles (Mi)  c. Other: _______________    2. How far do you and the members of your household travel by automobile in a typical  week? _______________    3. On average, how many people ride together in a vehicle?  a. One  b. Two  c. Three  d. Four  e. Other: _______________    4. How many vehicles has your household owned since moving to your current home?   Please include vehicles you currently own and no longer own.  a. None  b. One  c. Two  d. More than two – please indicate how many: _______________  e. I co‐own(ed) a car with a member of another household                                71    5. If you answered a. to the previous question, please proceed to question 6.  If not, please  complete the following table about your vehicles.    Make, Model  & Year  Date  Purchased  Mileage at  Purchase  Mileage at  Present (or  when sold)  Diesel,  Gasoline or  Other?  Example  1998 Ford  Escort      January, 2002  50,000 km  150,500 km  Gasoline  Vehicle #1                  Vehicle #2                  Vehicle #3                  Vehicle #4                                            72    6. Please fill in the following table about the flights you and the members of your household  have taken in the past year (May 1, 2009 – May 1, 2010).  Please use additional paper if  required and attach to end of questionnaire.  Draw a line diagonally across the page if the  members of your household have not taken any flights in the past year.  Date  From  To  Via (Optional)  Number of  People  One‐Way or  Round Trip?  December 21,  2008  Vancouver, BC  Cairo, Egypt Frankfurt,  Germany  2  Round‐Trip                                                                                             73    7. Please fill in the following table about you and your household’s travel by other modes of  motorized transportation in a typical week.  Please indicate an address in the ‘From’ and  ‘To’ columns OR indicate the approximate distance.  There are four lines available per  mode of transportation.  Please use additional paper if required.  Mode  Average # of  People in  Vehicle  Number of  Trips Per Week  From To Distance Taxi              Bus  N/A  Train  N/A  Other – Please  indicate:  __________                              74    Part IV: Food Footprint  Please remember to collect and submit all food receipts for your household for the month of  May.  This includes all grocery receipts and restaurant bills.  Please include the portion of the  receipt which indicates the items you purchased.    1. Approximately what percentage of your household’s food receipts and restaurant bills  from the month of May are you submitting? _______________ %     2. How often do you eat beef or lamb?  a. Never  b. Infrequently (once every few weeks)  c. Occasionally (once or twice a week)  d. Often (nearly every day)  e. Very often (nearly every meal)    3.  How often do you eat pork?  a. Never  b. Infrequently (once every few weeks)  c. Occasionally (once or twice a week)  d. Often (nearly every day)  e. Very often (nearly every meal)    4. How often do you eat poultry (e.g. chicken)?  a. Never  b. Infrequently (once every few weeks)  c. Occasionally (once or twice a week)  d. Often (nearly every day)  e. Very often (nearly every meal)                              75    5. How often do you eat fish?  a. Never  b. Infrequently (once every few weeks)  c. Occasionally (once or twice a week)  d. Often (nearly every day)  e. Very often (nearly every meal)    6. How often do you eat eggs, milk and dairy?  a. Never  b. Infrequently (once every few weeks)  c. Occasionally (once or twice a week)  d. Often (nearly every day)  e. Very often (nearly every meal)    7. How much of your diet is based on processed and packaged foods?  a. None (most of my food is fresh, unprocessed and unpackaged)  b. About one‐quarter (25%)  c. About half (50%)  d. About three‐quarters (75%)  e. Most of my food is processed and packaged                              76    Part V: Goods, Consumables & Waste Footprint  1. How much does your household spend on clothing, footwear and/or sporting goods in a  typical month?  a. Less than $50 (maybe some t‐shirts and socks)  b. Approximately $150 (maybe new pants and shirt)  c. Approximately $325 (maybe new pants, shoes and shirts)  d. More than $400    2. How much does your household spend on furnishings in a typical year?  a. $200 or less (maybe some bedding)  b. $500 (maybe a new lamp or table)  c. $2,500 (maybe a new couch or bedroom set)  d. $4,000 or more    3. How much does your household spend on appliances (e.g. fridge, stove, microwave,  blender) in a typical year?  a. $50 or less (we don’t typically buy appliances)  b. $200 (we only replace broken appliances)  c. $400 (we sometimes replace out‐of‐date appliances with newer models)  d. $1,000 or more    4. How much does your household spend on home entertainment, computer equipment and  other electronic gadgets in a typical year?  a. $200 or less (we rarely make such purchases)  b. $400 (maybe replacement of broken TV or computer equipment)  c. $900 (replace out‐of‐date models and occasionally buy new gadgets)  d. $2,000 or more                              77    5. How much of your household’s paper, cardboard, metal, glass and plastic waste do you  recycle?  a. None  b. Some (Less than 50%)  c. Half (50%)  d. Most (More than 50%)  e. All possible    You have completed the formal questionnaire.  Please provide any additional comments or  feedback here:  ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________  ______________________________________________________________________________  Thank you for your participation!  Please send your completed questionnaire and food  receipts/restaurant bills to:                                    78                Appendix C  Waste Footprint Calculations                      Footprint Calculations ‐ Waste Quayside Village Recycled Landfilled Recycled Landfilled TotalMaterial Quantity (tonne/year) Per Capita Ecological Footprint (ha)* Paper 0.050 0.008 0.12 0.03 0.15 Glass 0.025 0.008 0.02 0.01 0.03 Aluminum Cans 0.004 0.000 0.00 0.00 0.00 Plastic 0.008 0.008 0.02 0.03 0.05 Total 0.088 0.025 0.17 0.07 0.23 OUR Ecovillage Recycled Landfilled Recycled Landfilled Total P 0 009 0 027 0 02 0 09 0 11 Material Quantity (tonne/year) Per Capita Ecological Footprint (ha)* aper . . . . . Glass 0.034 0.027 0.03 0.03 0.06 Aluminum Cans 0.006 0.000 0.00 0.00 0.00 Plastic 0.010 0.027 0.02 0.10 0.13 Total 0.059 0.081 0.08 0.22 0.30 * Using average footprint conversions below. Footprint Conversions Low High Average Paper‐Landfilled 2.8 4 3.4 Paper‐Recycled 2 2.9 2.45 Glass‐Landfilled 1 1.1 1.05 Material Footprint (hectare years per tonne) Glass‐Recycled 0.8 0.9 0.85 Aluminum Cans‐Landfilled 9.4 17.8 13.6 Aluminum Cans‐Recycled 0.4 0.9 0.65 Plastic‐Landfilled 3.6 4.1 3.85 Plastic‐Recycled 1.1 3.3 2.2 (Source: Chambers et al . 2000.)

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0071370/manifest

Comment

Related Items