UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Morbidity and mortality related to tuberculosis (tb) in British Columbia (BC), Canada Moniruzzaman, Akm 2010

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2010_fall_moniruzzaman_akm.pdf [ 1.74MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0071046.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0071046-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0071046-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0071046-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0071046-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0071046-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0071046-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0071046-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0071046.ris

Full Text

MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY RELATED TO TUBERCULOSIS (TB) IN BRITISH COLUMBIA (BC),  CANADA      by    AKM MONIRUZZAMAN  MBBS, UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA, 1994  MBA, UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA, 1999  M.Sc., UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 2004        A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY  in  THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (Health Care and Epidemiology)      THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (VANCOUVER)      July 2010      © Akm Moniruzzaman, 2010  ii    ABSTRACT      BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of tuberculosis  (TB) related recurrence and mortality  is not  well characterized for British Columbia (BC) or Canada.  The objectives of this thesis were: 1) to  estimate  the  incidence  of  recurrence  of  TB  and  identify  predictors  associated  with  TB  recurrence; to  investigate the relative contribution of exogenous re‐infection as a mechanism  of  recurrence;  to  characterize  mortality  among  TB  patients  and  to  identify  potentially  modifiable risk factors for patients whose deaths were attributable to TB.      METHODS:  This  study  was  conducted  using  population‐based  data  maintained  by  the  centralized provincial TB service (TB Control Division at BC Center for Disease Control).   All TB  cases recorded with this Division from 1990 to 2006 were reviewed. TB patients who developed  recurrence  and who died during  the observation period were  identified. Cox  regression was  performed to identify risk factors associated with recurrence and mortality.     RESULTS: During the study period (1990 to 2006), over 5400 TB patients were registered with  the provincial TB control program. The  incidence of  recurrence was 370 per 100,000 person‐ years  (pys).  Several  factors  such  as  foreign‐birth,  incomplete  treatment,  poor‐compliance  to  treatment, place of  initial diagnosis, HIV and drug abuse were significantly associated with TB  recurrence. The  relative  contribution of  re‐infection was 8% and  the  incidence of  reinfection  was 19 per 100,000 PYs. There was an excess mortality among TB patients compared  to  the  general  BC  population.  1069  TB  patients  died  during  1990  to  2006  (29  per  1000  PYs).  The  cumulative mortality at  the  first 6 and 12 months were 8% and 10%  respectively.  Increasing  age,  Aboriginal  ethnicity,  miliary  TB,  HIV/AIDS,  alcoholism,  substance  abuse,  etc  was  significantly associated with all‐cause mortality in multivariable analyses. Among these deaths,  109  (109/5408=2%)  deaths were  primarily  caused  by  TB  and  another  177  (177/5408=3.3%)  deaths were partially contributed by TB (one of the causes of death). Miliary TB, far advanced  PTB and Aboriginal ethnicity were the strongest predictors of mortality related to TB.     CONCLUSIONS:  This  study  identified  several  important  risk  factors  in  a  population‐based  TB  cohort.  Effective  interventions  targeting  these  high‐risk  populations  are  urgently  required  in  order to prevent recurrence and mortality related to TB.            iii    TABLE OF CONTENTS    ABSTRACT .........................................................................................................................................ii  TABLE OF CONTENTS....................................................................................................................... iii  LIST OF TABLES ............................................................................................................................... vii  LIST OF FIGURES ............................................................................................................................... x  LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ................................................................................................................. xi  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .................................................................................................................. xii  DEDICATION .................................................................................................................................. xiii  CO‐AUTHORSHIP STATEMENT ...................................................................................................... xiv  CHAPTER 1: BACKGROUND, STUDY JUSTIFICATION, AND OBJECTIVES .......................................... 1  1.1 OVERVIEW OF THE DISSERTATION ....................................................................................... 2  1.2 BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................................... 2  1.2.1 Global Burden of Tuberculosis ....................................................................................... 2  1.2.2 Tuberculosis in Canada .................................................................................................. 3  1. 2.3 Recurrent TB ................................................................................................................. 4  1.2.4 Mechanism of Recurrence: Relapse vs. Reinfection ...................................................... 5  1.2.5: Tuberculosis Mortality .................................................................................................. 7  1.3 RATIONALE AND JUSTIFICATION ........................................................................................... 8  1.4 OBJECTIVES ........................................................................................................................... 9  1.5 HYPOTHESES ......................................................................................................................... 9  1.6 REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................ 11  CHAPTER 2: A POPULATION BASED STUDY OF RECURRENT TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITISH  COLUMBIA, CANADA ..................................................................................................................... 20  2.1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................. 21  2.2 METHODS ............................................................................................................................ 22  2.2.1 Setting and Source of Information .............................................................................. 22  2.2.2 Study Design ................................................................................................................ 23  2.2.3 Study Population and Relevant Definition ................................................................... 23  iv    2.2.4 Follow‐up Time ............................................................................................................ 24  2.2.5 Variables Description ................................................................................................... 25  2.2.6 Statistical Analysis ........................................................................................................ 35  2.3 RESULTS ............................................................................................................................... 36  2.3.1 Prevalence of Recurrence ............................................................................................ 36  2.3.2 Incidence of Recurrence .............................................................................................. 37  2.4 DISCUSSION ......................................................................................................................... 49  2.5 CONCLUSIONS ..................................................................................................................... 58  2.6 REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................ 60  CHAPTER 3: A POPULATION BASED STUDY OF TUBERCULOSIS RECURRENCE‐RELAPSE VERSUS  REINFECTION ................................................................................................................................. 67  3.1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................. 68  3.2 METHODS ............................................................................................................................ 69  3.2.1 Recurrent Cases ........................................................................................................... 72  3.2.2 Follow‐up Time ............................................................................................................ 72  3.2.3 Mycobacteriology ........................................................................................................ 72  3.2.4 Culture and DNA Extraction ......................................................................................... 73  3.2.5 DNA Fingerprinting ...................................................................................................... 73  3.2.6 Variables Description ................................................................................................... 74  3.2.7 Statistical Analysis ........................................................................................................ 74  3.3 RESULTS ............................................................................................................................... 75  3.3.1 Description of Study Cohort......................................................................................... 75  3.3.2 Recurrence ................................................................................................................... 77  3.3.3 Culture Positive Recurrent Cases ................................................................................. 79  3.3.4 Reinfection and Relapse .............................................................................................. 89  3.4 DISCUSSION ......................................................................................................................... 91  3.5 CONCLUSIONS ..................................................................................................................... 94  3.6 REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................ 95    v    CHAPTER 4: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW ON RISK FACTORS OF MORTALITY AMONG TB PATIENTS 101  4.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. 102  4.2 METHODS .......................................................................................................................... 103  4.2.1 Data Extraction and Calculation of Death Rate/Proportion ...................................... 104  4.3 RESULTS ............................................................................................................................. 105  4.3.1 Risk Factors for Mortality among TB Patients ........................................................... 113  4.4 DISCUSSION ....................................................................................................................... 123  4.5 CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................... 129  4.6 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................... 130  CHAPTER 5: AN ALL CAUSE MORTALITY STUDY AMONG PATIENTS WITH TUBERCULOSIS IN  BRITISH COLUMBIA ..................................................................................................................... 138  5.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. 139  5.2 METHODS .......................................................................................................................... 140  5.2.1 Variables Description ................................................................................................. 140  5.2.2 Statistical Analysis ...................................................................................................... 141  5.3 RESULTS ............................................................................................................................. 145  5.3.1 Description of Study Cohort and Mortality ............................................................... 145  5.3.2 Comparisons of Mortality between TB Cohort and General Population .................. 152  5.3.3 Follow‐up and Risk Factors for All‐cause Mortality among TB Patients .................... 153  5.4 DISCUSSION ....................................................................................................................... 162  5.5 CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................... 172  5.5 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................... 174  CHAPTER 6: A TB‐RELATED MORTALITY STUDY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA FROM 1990‐ 2006 ............................................................................................................................................ 182  6.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. 183  6.2 METHODS .......................................................................................................................... 184  6.2.1 Cause of Death ........................................................................................................... 185  6.2.2 Variables Description ................................................................................................. 187  6.2.3 Statistical Analysis ...................................................................................................... 188  vi    6.3 RESULTS ............................................................................................................................. 189  6.4 DISCUSSION ....................................................................................................................... 205  6.4.1 Older Age ................................................................................................................... 207  6.4.2 Failure of Diagnosis/Missed Diagnosis ...................................................................... 208  6.4.3 Miliary TB ................................................................................................................... 209  6.4.4 Aboriginal People ....................................................................................................... 210  6.4.5 Caucasian ................................................................................................................... 211  6.4.6 Far Advanced PTB and CNS/Meningeal TB ................................................................ 211  6.4.7 Drug Resistance.......................................................................................................... 212  6.4.8 HIV .............................................................................................................................. 212  6.4.9 Co‐morbidities ........................................................................................................... 213  6.5 CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................... 216  6.6 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................... 217  CHAPTER 7: SUMMARY, CONTRIBUTIONS, POLICY IMPLICATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS,  FUTURE RESERACH AND CONCLUSIONS ..................................................................................... 225  7.1 SUMMARY OF OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................... 226  7.2 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS ................................................................................................... 226  7.3 UNIQUE CONTRIBUTIONS TO RESEARCH .......................................................................... 229  7.4 LIMITATIONS ..................................................................................................................... 230  7.5 POLICY IMPLICATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TB CONTROL PROGRAM ........... 231  7.6 FUTURE RESEARCH ............................................................................................................ 237  7.7 CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................... 238  7.8 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................... 240  APPENDIX A ................................................................................................................................. 244  APPENDIX B: HUMAN ETHICS APPROVAL CERTIFICATE .............................................................. 260  vii    LIST OF TABLES    Table 2.1: Characteristics of study cohort (N=4464) .................................................................... 39  Table 2.2: Occurrence of incident recurrent cases (n=108) over the follow‐up period (interval  between treatment completion time and date of recurrence) .................................................... 40  Table 2.3: Occurrence of recurrence (incidence) among foreign‐born individuals (n=87) since  their arrival in Canada ................................................................................................................... 42  Table 2.4: Comparisons of socio‐demographic characteristics between TB patients who  developed a recurrence (n=108) and who did not (n=4356) ....................................................... 43  Table 2.5: Comparisons of treatment and related factors between TB patients who developed a  recurrence (n=108) and who did not (n=4356) ............................................................................ 44  Table 2.6: Comparisons of co‐morbidity and other clinical characteristics between TB patients  who developed a recurrence (n=108) and who did not (n=4356) ............................................... 45  Table 2.7: Multivariable cox regression analysis of risk factors for recurrence ........................... 47  Table 2.8: Incidence of recurrence across several risk factors among TB patients who  successfully completed treatment during the primary episode (n=3529) ................................... 48  Table 3.1: Socio‐demographic characteristics of study cohort .................................................... 76  Table 3.2: Treatment and other related characteristics of study cohort ..................................... 78  Table 3.3: Co‐morbidity and behavioral characteristics of TB patients in BC between 1995 and  2006 .............................................................................................................................................. 79  Table 3.4: Incidence of recurrence, relapse and reinfection ........................................................ 81  Table 3.5: Characteristics of 24 culture positive recurrent cases with available DNA fingerprint82  Table 3.6: Characteristics of 24 culture positive recurrent cases with paired isolates ................ 84  Table 3.7: Treatment (Rx) characteristics of 24 culture positive recurrent cases during their  initial episode ................................................................................................................................ 86  Table 3.8:  Characteristics of specimens from 24 culture positive recurrent cases during their  initial and recurrent episode ........................................................................................................ 88  Table 4.1:  Mortality among TB patients from selected studies (n=66) ..................................... 107  Table 4.2: Mortality according to the burden of TB disease (low, intermediate and high) ....... 108  viii    Table 4.3: Socio‐demographic risk factors for dying in patients with Tuberculosis (TB) ........... 115  Table 4.4: Co‐morbidities associated with mortality in patients with Tuberculosis (TB) ........... 117  Table 4.5: Health‐care delivery and treatment‐ related risk factors of mortality ...................... 119  Table 4.6: Risk factors associated with diagnosis and the type of disease ................................ 121  Table 5.1: Socio‐demographic characteristics of study cohort (n=5408) ................................... 146  Table 5.2: Comparisons of crude death rates (CDR) and age standardized mortality ratios  (ASMR) in British Columbia from 1990 to 2006 (TB cohort vs. general population) ................. 147  Table 5.3: Number of deaths among TB patients in BC over time (1990‐2006) by birth cohort 150  Table 5.4: Comparisons of socio‐demographic characteristics between TB patients who died  during follow up period (n=953) and who survived (n=4068) .................................................... 156  Table 5.5: Comparisons of diagnosis type and related factors between TB patients who died  during follow up period (n=953) and who survived (n=4068) .................................................... 157  Table 5.6: Comparisons of co‐morbidities between TB patients who died during follow up  period (n=953) and those who survived (n=4068) ..................................................................... 158  Table 5.7: Multivariable cox regression analysis for risk factors of mortality among TB patients ..................................................................................................................................................... 159  Table 5.8: Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis for risk factors of mortality  for patients who died during treatment (n=309) and who did not (n=4904) ............................ 161  Table 6.1: Socio‐demographic characteristics of study cohort (n=5408) ................................... 190  Table 6.2: Characteristics of TB patients who died during 1990 to 2006 in British Columbia  (N=1069) ..................................................................................................................................... 191  Table 6.3: Number of cause‐specific deaths by calendar year (1990 to 2006) .......................... 193  Table 6.4: Occurrence of TB‐related death during the treatment period .................................. 196  Table 6.5: Socio‐demographic and diagnosis‐related characteristics and prevalence of  associated illness across several types of death (n=1069) and survivors (n=4339) ................... 197  Table 6.6: Univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis for socio‐demographic risk factors  of TB‐related mortality ............................................................................................................... 200  Table 6.7: Univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis for diagnosis type and related risk  factors of TB‐related mortality ................................................................................................... 201  ix    Table 6.8: Univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis for co‐morbid risk factors of TB‐ related mortality ......................................................................................................................... 202  Table 6.9: Multivariable multinomial logistic regression analysis for risk factors of TB‐related  mortality among TB patients ...................................................................................................... 203  Table 6.10: Comparisons of socio‐demographic and clinical characteristics between TB patients  who were diagnosed postmortem (137) and who were diagnosed alive (n=5235) .................. 204  Table 6.11: Relationship between HIV and cause of death ........................................................ 205  Table A.1: Socio‐demographic and clinical characteristics of study cohort (n=5403) ................ 245  Table A.2: Comparisons of socio‐demographic characteristics between TB patients who had a  history of recurrence (n=490) and who had not (n=4913) ......................................................... 247  Table A.3: Comparisons of treatment and related behaviors between TB patients who had a  history of recurrence (n=490) and who had not (n=4913) ......................................................... 248  Table A.4: Comparisons of co‐morbidity and other clinical characteristics between TB patients  who developed a recurrence (n=108) and who did not (n=4356) ............................................. 249  Table A.5: Multivariable cox regression analysis to evaluate the effect of co‐morbid conditions  on TB recurrence ......................................................................................................................... 250  Table A.6:  Risk factors for recurrence among patients with more than 6 months of inactivity 251  Table A.7: Distribution of treatment incompletion and non‐compliance to treatment across  several risk factors ...................................................................................................................... 252  Table A.8: Lists of variables that were included in multivariable cox regression model for risk  factors of all‐cause mortality among TB patients ....................................................................... 253  Table A.9 Comparisons of co‐morbidity between TB patients who died during follow up period  (n=953) and who survived (n=4068) ........................................................................................... 256  Table A.10: Multivariable cox regression analysis for risk factors of mortality among TB patients ..................................................................................................................................................... 257  Table A.11: Comparisons of risk factors among canadian‐born non‐aboriginals, aboriginals, and  foreign‐born people (n=5191) .................................................................................................... 258  Table A.12: Univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis for co‐morbid risk factors of TB‐ related mortality ......................................................................................................................... 259  x    LIST OF FIGURES    Figure 2.1: Study population for incidence of recurrence (n=4464) ............................................ 26  Figure 2.2: Trend of recurrent (prevalent) cases from 1990 to 2006 in British Columbia, Canada ....................................................................................................................................................... 38  Figure 2.3: Trend of incident recurrent cases in British Columbia from 1990 to 2006 ................ 41  Figure 3.1: Study population ......................................................................................................... 71  Figure 3.2: MIRU‐VNTR results of 24 recurrent TB cases with paired isolated ............................ 90  Figure 4.1: Mortality among TB patients according to background incidence of disease ......... 111  Figure 4.2: Mortality among HIV positive and HIV negative TB patients by background incidence  of disease .................................................................................................................................... 112  Figure 5.1: Study population for all‐cause mortality among TB patients (n=5408) ................... 143  Figure 5.2: Trend of crude death rates for TB cohort in British Columbia from 1990 to 2006 .. 148  Figure 5.3: Trend of age standardized mortality ratios (ASMR) for TB cohort in British Columbia  from 1990 to 2006 ...................................................................................................................... 149  Figure 5.4: Trend of deaths among TB patients in British Columbia from 1990 to 2006 by birth  cohort .......................................................................................................................................... 151  Figure 5.5: Histogram of age at death for TB patients who died between 1990 and 2006  (n=1069) ...................................................................................................................................... 153  Figure 5.6: Survival curve among aboriginal (bottom line), canadian‐born non‐aboriginal and  foreign‐born (top line) TB patients ............................................................................................. 155  Figure 6.1: Study population for TB‐related mortality in British Columbia (n=5408) ................ 186  Figure 6.2: Trend of cause‐specific death percentage for TB cohort in British Columbia from  1990 to 2006 ............................................................................................................................... 194  Figure 6.3: TB‐related death rate (per 100, 000 BC population) in BC from 1990‐2006 ............ 195      xi    LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS    - AHR: Adjusted Hazard Ratio  - AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome  - AOR: Adjusted Odds Ratio  - BC: British Columbia.  - BCCDC: British Columbia Centre for Disease Control  - CB: Canadian‐born  - CI: Confidence Interval  - DTB: Division of TB Control of British Columbia  - EMB: Ethambutol  - EPTB: Extra‐pulmonary Tuberculosis  - FB: Foreign‐born  - HIV: Human Immunodeficiency Virus  - INH: Isoniazid  - MDR: Multi‐drug Resistance   - MIRU‐VNTR:  Mycobacterial  Interspersed  Repetitive  Unit‐Variable  Number  Tandem Repeats  - MTB: M. tuberculosis  - PTB: Pulmonary Tuberculosis  - RFLM: Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism  - PZA: Pyrazinamide  - RM: Rifampin  - SM: Streptomycin  - TB: Tuberculosis  - UHR: Unadjusted Hazard Ratio  - UOR: Unadjusted Odds Ratio   - WHO: World Health Organization    xii    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS        I offer sincere gratitude to my co‐supervisors, Dr. Arminee Kazanjian and Dr. J Mark  FitzGerald, who shared so generously of their time, knowledge and general enthusiasm for  research.  I also wish to thank my committee members Dr. Kevin Elwood and Dr. Hubert Wong  for their invaluable mentorship and support. They consistently provided me with sound advice,  great learning opportunities and support in all forms. They really made the completion of this  degree a great learning experience. I feel very privileged to have had such an amazing thesis  committee and will do my best to follow the example they have set.       I also offer sincere thanks to Ms. Fay Hutton and other staff at the Division of TB Control  in British Columbia, for their hard work in preparing and maintaining a comprehensive TB  database.  I would like to thank the staff at the Provincial TB laboratory for preparing specimens  for the molecular epidemiology study.  I would also like to thank Canadian Institutes of Health  Research (CIHR) and National Reference Mycobacterium Laboratory in Winnipeg for their  generous support. I would also like to thank the School of Population and Public Health for  providing a fantastic learning environment filled with opportunities. My special thanks to Drs.  Patricia Spittal and Chris Richardson for their continued support.        Special thanks to my wife, my family and my mother for their endless support  throughout my Ph. D.  I also extend my gratitude to my peers and colleagues: Margo Pearce,  Sheetal Patel, Elisa Lloyd‐Smith, Hasanat Alamgir, Margot Kuo and Darlene Taylor. xiii    DEDICATION      To the memory of my father: Md. Khalilur Rahman                                      xiv    CO­AUTHORSHIP STATEMENT    This statement describes the contributions of PhD candidate to the manuscripts  presented in this thesis.  The thesis was conceived, instrumented, written and disseminated by  PhD candidate.  The co‐authors of the manuscripts that were identified in this dissertation  made contributions only if it deemed appropriate with committee or collegial duties.  Dr.  Arminee Kazanjian and Dr. J. Mark FitzGerald were thesis co‐supervisors. Dr. Hubert Wong and  Dr. Kevin Elwood were other committee members.  Each of the co‐authors reviewed all the  manuscripts and provided feedback. However, the student was responsible for preparing the  drafts as well as revisions of all manuscripts as suggested by co‐authors.  1    CHAPTER 1: BACKGROUND, STUDY JUSTIFICATION, AND  OBJECTIVES  2    1.1 OVERVIEW OF THE DISSERTATION    The  PhD  dissertation  incorporates  a manuscript‐based  format  as  outlined  by  the  Faculty  of  Graduate Studies at the University of British Columbia. There are seven chapters in this thesis.  The  first  chapter  is  the  introductory  chapter, which discusses background,  study  justification  and the objectives of this thesis. Each chapter from two to six is representative of an individual  manuscript  resulted  from  thesis  related  research. The primary  focus of Chapter 2  is  the  risk  factors for recurrent tuberculosis (TB), whether Chapter 3  is an estimation of re‐infection and  relapse as a mechanism of recurrent TB. Chapter 4 is a systematic review of published literature  on TB‐related mortality. Chapter 4 and 5 discuss all‐cause mortality and cause‐specific mortality  among TB patients respectively. Chapter 7  is the concluding chapter that summarizes the key  findings from Chapters two to six, and outlines implications for future research and intervention  efforts.    1.2 BACKGROUND    1.2.1 Global Burden of Tuberculosis     In 1990, the World Health Organization (WHO) conducted a special study to estimate the global  burden  of  tuberculosis  (TB).  This  report  showed  that  approximately  one  third  of  the  global  population was  infected with Mycobacterium  tuberculosis  (MTB)  (1). Since  the publication of  the WHO  report,  the  epidemiology  of  TB  has  changed  in  response  to  a  number  of  factors  including the  increased prevalence of human  immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the emergence of  drug resistance disease and changes in TB management practices (2). Currently, there are more  new infections than ever, which translate a newly infected person with TB bacillus every second  (3). Fortunately, but not every case of  latent TB  infection progresses to active disease, only 5‐ 10% of all infected cases will develop active illness during their life time (3,4).     3    The most  recent  estimate  published  in  2009  predicted  a  total  of  9.4 million  new  TB  cases  globally in 2008 (5), a substantial increase of TB cases than that in last decades (6.6 million and  8.3 million  in 1990 and 2000 respectively) (6). The burden of this disease has been greatest  in  Southeast  Asia  and  sub‐Saharan  Africa  in  terms  of  both  the  absolute  number  of  cases  and  incidence.  For example, about 55% of these incident cases occurred in Asian countries and 31%  in African countries. According to geographical region, the sub‐Saharan countries have, overall,  the highest incidence of TB (350 per 100, 000), almost two‐times higher than that of Southeast  Asia region, which accounted for the highest number of new TB cases (3). Until 2005, the global  incidence of TB had been increasing by about 1.1% annually despite the increased global efforts  to control this disease (7). Since then, although the global incidence of TB has been falling, but  the annual rate of decline has been very slow (less than 1%).      1.2.2 Tuberculosis in Canada    According  to  Health  Canada,  approximately  1600  new  TB  cases  (e.g.,  1547  new  and  re‐ treatment cases in 2007) occur each year in Canada (8‐10). Although the overall TB incidence in  Canada has shown a decreasing trend during the last two decades, the burden of TB recurrence  did not decline proportionally. Alberta, British Columbia  (BC), Ontario  and Quebec‐  the  four  most populous provinces of Canada – are where approximately 85% of the total TB burden of  TB occurs  , with BC having  the highest  incidence  rate of TB  among  these provinces  (8,9).  In  2007, the TB incidence rate for BC was 6.3 per 100, 000 (national rate was 4.7) compared to a  rate of 5.1 (per 100, 000) in Ontario, 3.2 in Alberta and 3.0 in Quebec (8). There is also an over‐ representation  of  TB  among  Canadian‐born  aboriginals.  In  2007,  Canadian‐born  aboriginal  persons  accounted  for  20%  of  total  reported  cases,  while  Canadian‐born  non‐Aboriginal  persons only made up 11% of total cases despite making up a much higher proportion of the  population (8).       In Canada,  like many developed countries where a  large number of  immigrants are admitted  each year,  the majority of TB cases occur among  the  foreign‐born.  In Canada, approximately,  4    80%  of  immigrants  originate  from  a  country where  the  burden  of  TB  is  very  high  (9).  The  proportion of all TB cases occurring  in the foreign‐born has  increased significantly over time  ‐ from 18%  in 1970 to 66%  in 2007 (8,10).  In BC, 75% of all TB cases were among foreign‐born  people (although  immigrants accounted for only a quarter of total BC population according to  2006  census) and  the  incidence of TB among  foreign‐born people was 19.2 per 100,000  (1.6  among non‐Aboriginal Canadians) in 2004 (11).     To  address  the  large  number  of  cases  among  the  foreign‐born,  TB  control  programs  in  the  industrialized  nations  need  to  actively  support  the  development  and  implementation  of  TB  control  initiatives  in developing countries (12‐14). A recent article  indicates that  investment  in  immigrants’ countries of origin, where the  incidence of diseases  is particularly high, may be a  cost  effective means of  reducing  the  incidence of  TB  among  future  immigrants migrating  to  countries with a low burden of TB (14). The Canadian Lung Association has also recommended a  similar strategy.    1. 2.3 Recurrent TB    TB  recurrence  (the  term  retreatment  is  also  frequently  used  as  a  measure  of  recurrence  globally) is a second episode of TB that takes place after the first occurrence has been defined  as cured or inactive (15). In  low  incidence countries (e.g., Canada) attempting to eliminate TB,  prevention  of  recurrence  is  critical  for  control  strategies  because  it  helps  to  reduce  the  transmission  of  TB  by  decreasing  the  number  of  contagious  cases.  From  a  monitoring  perspective,  the  recurrence/retreatment  rate  is useful  for assessing  the quality of TB  control  programs due to  its potential association with treatment coverage and completion rates (16).  Several  factors such as age, male gender, Aboriginal ethnicity,  incomplete TB treatment, drug  resistant  status,  silicosis,  alcoholism, HIV  co‐infection,  and  extent  of  disease  (e.g.,  advanced  stage,  cavitations)  have  been  found  to  be  associated with  recurrence  (17‐26). However,  the  majority  of  studies,  focusing  on  recurrent  disease,  have  not  been  conducted  in  population‐  based cohorts but  rather  in an  institutional or clinical  setting, which  limits  the application of  5    study  findings  to  the  general  population. Moreover,  population  based  studies, which more  accurately reflect burden of illness, can be of great use to health policy makers at the national  and international level.  Additionally, information on TB recurrence from the Canadian setting is  limited. A  case‐control  study was  conducted  in  the  province  of Manitoba  during  the  1980s,  which was  limited by a  relatively  small number of cases,  study methodology and duration of  follow‐up  (23).  The  study  also  did  not  provide  an  estimate  of  incidence  of  recurrence.  The  estimation of incidence and identification of risk factors for recurrence using population based  data represents a potentially useful means of  improving TB control programs by targeting the  high‐risk population.      1.2.4 Mechanism of Recurrence: Relapse vs. Reinfection    Recurrence may be due to either endogenous reactivation (relapse) or exogenous re‐infection.  If both the recurrent episode and primary episode of TB are caused by the same strain of TB  bacillus, then it is considered to be a relapse. However, if a different strain is found for both the  initial  and  recurrent  episode,  re‐infection  is  considered  the  likely  mechanism.  Although  complex,  it  is  important  to  know  whether  the  recurrence  is  linked  to  ongoing  community  transmission (i.e., re‐infection) or has occurred because of  inadequate treatment of the  initial  episode (i.e., relapse). Re‐infection is thus an important indicator of community transmission. A  precise  estimate  of  the  extent  of  re‐infection  existing  in  specific  communities  is  vital when  attempting to prioritize control efforts (e.g., effective detection and management of contagious  cases) to decrease the number of cases with new infection and re‐infection.            It is noteworthy to mention that the relative contribution of reinfection to recurrence has direct  implications on  the development of  an  improved  vaccine  against  TB  (15,27).  If  the  infection  from  the  first  episode  does  not  provide  protective  immunity  against  a  new  strain  of  Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of new TB vaccines based on existing knowledge  of host defenses becomes more challenging (15,27,28). Moreover,  if re‐infection  is a frequent  cause  of  recurrence,  then  the  evaluation  of  TB  treatment  regimens  used  in  clinical  trials  6    becomes  problematic  because  it  can  be  difficult  to  determine  their  effectiveness  (i.e.,  successfully treated patients may unknowingly become reinfected during the study) (29). This  type  of  information  is  vital  to  the  development  of  efficient  and  effective  TB management  programs.    The relative contributions of relapse and reinfection as a cause of recurrence has been debated  for many decades,  since both  types of  recurrences  are not  clinically distinct  (15,27).  Studies  published  in  the  last  few  decades  described  relapse  exclusively  as  the  mechanism  for  recurrence  (29‐31). During  this period, TB  researchers were  limited  in  resources or access  to  techniques  that  could  differentiate  relapse  from  re‐infection.  However, with  the  advent  of  molecular epidemiology techniques, it is now possible to make quantitative assessment of the  contribution of reinfection to recurrence.     To date, few studies have been conducted to explicitly examine the contribution of reinfection  to  TB  recurrence.  The  relative  contribution of  re‐infection  varies widely  (0‐100%)  across  the  studies  that  have  been  conducted  (29,31‐44).  The majority  of  these  studies  have  not  been  population  based  and  reported  only  the  proportion  of  recurrence  due  to  reinfection  (no  incidence estimate of reinfection was available). A recent systematic review (15) on reinfection  raised concerns about the quality of many of the  included studies. The authors of this review  (15)  strongly  recommended  that  future  studies assessing  this question  should utilize a more  rigorous methodology to allow for an  improved understanding of the possible mechanisms of  recurrence.  Although  studies  have  been  conducted  in  several  countries  (mostly  in  the  developed world), no such  information  is available  in Canada. A study (43) on reinfection was  recently conducted across North America among patients participating in a clinical drug trial, no  specific estimates were provided for Canadian patients.  In addition because this was a clinical  trial, with very selective recruitment of patients, the study does not provide a true population  based estimate.     7    1.2.5: Tuberculosis Mortality    TB‐related  mortality  continues  to  pose  a  significant  public  health  problem  locally  and  internationally.   Globally,  TB  accounts  for  6%  of  all  deaths  and more  than  one  fourth  of  all  preventable  adult deaths  (45‐47). An  estimated  two million people die of  TB  each  year  (1.8  million deaths  in  2008  including  0.5 million HIV  co‐infected deaths) with  a  case  fatality  rate  (CFR) of up to 53% (overall global CFR  is 23%) %) (2,5,6).   The number of deaths caused by TB  bacillus was higher than that of any other  infectious agent  in the pre‐HIV era (1,48). Currently  TB is the second commonest infectious cause of death due to a single agent (HIV ranks first). In  the modern  era,  all  TB  related  deaths  are  potentially  preventable.  This  raises  an  important  question, why  do  so many  patients  diagnosed with  TB  die when  for  the majority  of  cases  effective  therapy  is  available.  It  is  commonly  acknowledged  that  further  epidemiological  research is required on the determinants of TB mortality.       Although  studies  conducted  in  this  area  have  identified  several  factors  (e.g.,  older  age, HIV  infection,  multi‐drug  resistance,  co‐morbid  conditions,  and  immune‐suppression  status)  as  being  associated  with  TB‐related  mortality  (46,49‐55),  the  epidemiological  risk  factors  for  mortality  in  TB  patients  requires  further  exploration.  In  addition,  there  is  a  scarcity  of  longitudinal,  population‐based  studies.  Most  studies  have  been  conducted  on  hospitalized  patients or in selected populations (46,50,51,56‐63)    Studies  based  on  narrowly  defined  populations  are  prone  to  have  limited  external  validity,  which often affects their application to the general population. Research focused on examining  the impact of preventable risk factors on TB related mortality in a general population setting is  clearly  required  to  address  these  gaps.  In  addition,  there  is  limited  Canadian  research  evaluating TB mortality (64‐66).  A study (64) evaluating TB‐related mortality was conducted in  BC  during  the  1980s  but  this  study  was  conducted  in  the  pre‐HIV  era.  Since  then,  the  epidemiology of TB has changed substantially both globally and in Canada. In addition, the prior  BC  study was  limited  by  in  terms  of  the  number  of  cases,  analytical  techniques,  and  study  8    duration.  Recently,  concern  regarding  TB  mortality  has  emerged  as  a  problem  in  many  industrialized countries of world (e.g., the USA) due to an increase in the number of TB related  deaths (56,67,68). This situation reinforces the need for an investigation of the risk factors for  TB related mortality in a Canadian setting.    1.3 RATIONALE AND JUSTIFICATION    Despite  to  increased  efforts  focusing  on  TB  control,  this  condition  continues  to  pose  a  significant public health problem throughout the world. Canada, a country with a low incidence  of TB aims to eliminate TB. Prevention of infection and re‐infection are important components  of this elimination strategy. There  is significant mortality among TB patients despite available  treatment strategies, which, at least for drug sensitive disease, is effective. Despite this there is  a  limited  body  of  research  on  TB  recurrence  and mortality  in  Canadian  setting.   Data  from  studies  conducted  in  other  countries might  not  be  relevant  to  Canada  due  to  fundamental  differences  in health care systems and population demographics.  In addition, there are only a  limited number of population‐based  studies. Studies based on  selective groups of  individuals  are prone to have limited external validity, which often affects their application to the general  population.     Moreover,  there  is  a  scarcity  of  systematic  reviews  on  TB‐related morality.  In  addition,  the  majority  of mortality  studies  among  TB  patients  evaluated  the  risk  of  dying  from  TB while  patients were on  treatment. Only a  limited number of  studies  investigated  specific causes of  death among TB patients and identified risk factors among TB patients whose deaths were truly  attributable  to  TB  (64,69,70).  These  studies  demonstrated  that  a  substantial  proportion  of  deaths while on  treatment were not directly  related  to TB  (the underlying cause),  rather  the  deaths  were  attributed  to  other  illness/causes.  Evaluating  the  performance  of  TB  control  program  based  deaths  during  treatment might  be misleading.  Interventions  based  on  such  findings  have  limited  applicability  in  preventing  deaths  from  other  causes.  Therefore,  it  is  widely acknowledged that more epidemiological research is required on the rates, patterns and  determinants of TB recurrence and mortality.  9    1.4 OBJECTIVES    This thesis explores the following objectives:    1. To  estimate  the  incidence  of  TB  recurrence  and  to  identify  socio‐demographic  and  clinical risk factors for recurrent TB in all TB patients in British Columbia  2. To  estimate  the  incidence  of  re‐infection  (exogenous  re‐infection)  and  relapse  (endogenous  reactivation)  as  the  cause  of  recurrence  using molecular  epidemiology  techniques (DNA finger printing) in patients with culture proven TB  3. Conduct  a  systematic  review  of  the  literature on  potential  risk  factors  for  TB‐related  mortality   4. To  characterize  the mortality  among  TB  patients,  to  investigate  the  trend  of  deaths  compared  to  general  population  of  BC  and  identify  the  risk  factors  associated with  mortality among TB patients  5. To  identify potentially modifiable or preventable risk factors for patients whose deaths  were attributable to TB in all TB patients in British Columbia    1.5 HYPOTHESES     Socio‐demographic  and  clinical  factors  including  foreign  birth,  drug‐resistance  status,  HIV  co‐infection,  non‐adherence  to  TB  treatment,  and  radiographic  evidence  of  cavitation will be positively associated with tuberculosis recurrence.   The relative contribution of re‐infection (exogenous reinfection) will be lower compared  to relapse (endogenous reactivation) among culture proven TB cases and occurrence of  re‐infection  (rate  of  reinfection)  parallels  the  overall  TB  incidence  in  the  general  population.   TB patients  experience excess mortality compared to the general population   Specific modifiable risk factors such as failure of diagnosis/missed diagnosis, alcoholism,  drug abuse and HIV co‐infection will be positively correlated with TB‐related mortality.     10    Findings from this thesis, described in the following chapters, will improve our understanding of  the epidemiology of TB recurrence and mortality and provide a basis for health policy makers  and service planners to implement effective interventions targeting high risk patients.        11    1.6 REFERENCES     (1) Kochi A. The global tuberculosis situation and the new control strategy of the World Health  Organization. Tubercle 1991 Mar;72(1):1‐6.   (2) Dye C, Scheele S, Dolin P, Pathania V, Raviglione MC. Consensus statement. Global burden of  tuberculosis: estimated incidence, prevalence, and mortality by country. WHO Global  Surveillance and Monitoring Project. JAMA 1999 Aug 18;282(7):677‐686.   (3) World Health Organization. Fact Sheets on Tuberculosis. 2009; Available at:  http://www.who.int/tb/publications/factsheets/en/index.html. Accessed April/02, 2010.   (4) World Health Organization. Global Tuberculosis Control 2009: Epidemiology Strategy  Financing. 2009; Available at:  http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/2009/pdf/full_report.pdf. Accessed  April/02, 2010.   (5) World Health Organization. Tuberculosis Facts 2009 Update. 2009; Available at:  http://www.who.int/tb/publications/2009/factsheet_tb_2009update_dec09.pdf. Accessed  April/02, 2010.   (6) Dolin PJ, Raviglione MC, Kochi A. Global tuberculosis incidence and mortality during 1990‐ 2000. Bull.World Health Organ. 1994;72(2):213‐220.   (7) Maher D, Raviglione M. Global epidemiology of tuberculosis. Clin.Chest Med. 2005 v;  Jun;26(2):167‐182.   (8) Public Health Agency of Canada. Tuberculosis in Canada 2007, Pre‐Release. 2007; Available  at: http://www.phac‐aspc.gc.ca/publicat/2008/tbcanpre07/pdf/tbpre2007‐eng.pdf. Accessed  March/31, 2010.   12    (9) Public Health Agency of Canada and Canadian Lung Association. Canadian Tuberculosis  Standards, 6th Edition. 2007; Available at: http://www.phac‐aspc.gc.ca/tbpc‐ latb/pubs/pdf/tbstand07_e.pdf. Accessed March/31, 2010.   (10) Health Canada & Public Health Agency of Canada. Tuberculosis in Canada 2000 &  Tuberculosis among the Foreign‐born in Canada. Canada Communicable Disease Report  2003;29(2):9.   (11) BC Center for Disease Control. TB Annual Report 2004. 2004; Available at:  http://www.bccdc.ca/NR/rdonlyres/F80BA3E8‐4E46‐4AFC‐9B05‐ CE3643C2947E/0/2004_TB_Annual.pdf. Accessed March/31, 2010.   (12) Maher D, Raviglione M. Global epidemiology of tuberculosis. Clin.Chest Med. 2005 v;  Jun;26(2):167‐182.   (13) Fanning A, Billo N, Tannenbaum T, Phypers M, Little C, Graham B, et al. Stop TB‐Halte a la  Tuberculose‐Canada: engaging industrialised nations in the challenge to meet global targets.  International Journal of Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2004 Jan;8(1):147‐150.   (14) Schwartzman K, Oxlade O, Barr RG, Grimard F, Acosta I, Baez J, et al. Domestic returns from  investment in the control of tuberculosis in other countries. N.Engl.J.Med. 2005 Sep  8;353(10):1008‐1020.   (15) Lambert ML, Hasker E, Van Deun A, Roberfroid D, Boelaert M, Van der Stuyft P. Recurrence  in tuberculosis: relapse or reinfection? The Lancet Infectious Diseases 2003 May;3(5):282‐287.   (16) Dobler CC, Crawford AB, Jelfs PJ, Gilbert GL, Marks GB. Recurrence of tuberculosis in a low‐ incidence setting. European Respiratory Journal 2009 Jan;33(1):160‐167.   (17) Chan‐Yeung M, Noertjojo K, Chan SL, Tam CM. Sex differences in tuberculosis in Hong  Kong. International Journal of Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2002 Jan;6(1):11‐18.   13    (18) Cox H, Kebede Y, Allamuratova S, Ismailov G, Davletmuratova Z, Byrnes G, et al.  Tuberculosis recurrence and mortality after successful treatment: impact of drug resistance.  PLoS Medicine / Public Library of Science 2006 Oct;3(10):e384.   (19) Mallory KF, Churchyard GJ, Kleinschmidt I, De Cock KM, Corbett EL. The impact of HIV  infection on recurrence of tuberculosis in South African gold miners. International Journal of  Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2000 May;4(5):455‐462.   (20) A controlled clinical comparison of 6 and 8 months of antituberculosis chemotherapy in the  treatment of patients with silicotuberculosis in Hong Kong. Hong Kong Chest  Service/tuberculosis Research Centre, Madras/British Medical Research Council.  Am.Rev.Respir.Dis. 1991 Feb;143(2):262‐267.   (21) Johnson JL, Okwera A, Nsubuga P, Nakibali JG, Whalen CC, Hom D, et al. Efficacy of an  unsupervised 8‐month rifampicin‐containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary  tuberculosis in HIV‐infected adults. Uganda‐Case Western Reserve University Research  Collaboration. International Journal of Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2000 Nov;4(11):1032‐1040.   (22) Cowie RL. Silicotuberculosis: long‐term outcome after short‐course chemotherapy.  Tubercle & Lung Disease 1995 Feb;76(1):39‐42.   (23) Johnson IL, Thomson M, Manfreda J, Hershfield ES. Risk factors for reactivation of  tuberculosis in Manitoba. CMAJ Canadian Medical Association Journal 1985 Dec  15;133(12):1221‐1224.   (24) Snider DE,Jr. Reactivation of tuberculosis in Oklahoma: 1970‐1973. Chest 1975 Jul;68(1):36‐ 40.   (25) Segarra F, Sherman DS. Relapses in pulmonary tuberculosis. Dis.Chest 1967 Jan;51(1):59‐ 63.   14    (26) Mitchison DA, Nunn AJ. Influence of initial drug resistance on the response to short‐course  chemotherapy of pulmonary tuberculosis. Am.Rev.Respir.Dis. 1986 Mar;133(3):423‐430.   (27) Fine PE, Small PM. Exogenous reinfection in tuberculosis. N.Engl.J.Med. 1999 Oct  14;341(16):1226‐1227.   (28) Repique CJ, Li A, Collins FM, Morris SL. DNA immunization in a mouse model of latent  tuberculosis: effect of DNA vaccination on reactivation of disease and on reinfection with a  secondary challenge. Infection & Immunity 2002 Jul;70(7):3318‐3323.   (29) van Rie A, Warren R, Richardson M, Victor TC, Gie RP, Enarson DA, et al. Exogenous  reinfection as a cause of recurrent tuberculosis after curative treatment. N.Engl.J.Med. 1999  Oct 14;341(16):1174‐1179.   (30) Chiang CY, Riley LW. Exogenous reinfection in tuberculosis. The Lancet Infectious Diseases  2005 Oct;5(10):629‐636.   (31) Garcia de Viedma D, Marin M, Hernangomez S, Diaz M, Ruiz Serrano MJ, Alcala L, et al.  Tuberculosis recurrences: reinfection plays a role in a population whose clinical/epidemiological  characteristics do not favor reinfection. Arch.Intern.Med. 2002 Sep 9;162(16):1873‐1879.   (32) Shen G, Xue Z, Shen X, Sun B, Gui X, Shen M, et al. The study recurrent tuberculosis and  exogenous reinfection, Shanghai, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2006 Nov;12(11):1776‐ 1778.   (33) Das S, Chan SL, Allen BW, Mitchison DA, Lowrie DB. Application of DNA fingerprinting with  IS986 to sequential mycobacterial isolates obtained from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in  Hong Kong before, during and after short‐course chemotherapy. Tubercle & Lung Disease 1993  Feb;74(1):47‐51.   (34) Das S, Paramasivan CN, Lowrie DB, Prabhakar R, Narayanan PR. IS6110 restriction fragment  length polymorphism typing of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients  15    with pulmonary tuberculosis in Madras, south India. Tubercle & Lung Disease 1995  Dec;76(6):550‐554.   (35) Godfrey‐Faussett P, Githui W, Batchelor B, Brindle R, Paul J, Hawken M, et al. Recurrence of  HIV‐related tuberculosis in an endemic area may be due to relapse or reinfection. Tubercle &  Lung Disease 1994 Jun;75(3):199‐202.   (36) el‐Sadr WM, Perlman DC, Matts JP, Nelson ET, Cohn DL, Salomon N, et al. Evaluation of an  intensive intermittent‐induction regimen and duration of short‐course treatment for human  immunodeficiency virus‐related pulmonary tuberculosis. Terry Beirn Community Programs for  Clinical Research on AIDS (CPCRA) and the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). Clinical Infectious  Diseases 1998 May;26(5):1148‐1158.   (37) Sahadevan R, Narayanan S, Paramasivan CN, Prabhakar R, Narayanan PR. Restriction  fragment length polymorphism typing of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from  patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Madras, India, by use of direct‐repeat probe.  J.Clin.Microbiol. 1995 Nov;33(11):3037‐3039.   (38) Vernon A, Burman W, Benator D, Khan A, Bozeman L. Acquired rifamycin monoresistance  in patients with HIV‐related tuberculosis treated with once‐weekly rifapentine and isoniazid.  Tuberculosis Trials Consortium. Lancet 1999 May 29;353(9167):1843‐1847.   (39) Lourenco MC, Grinsztejn B, Fandinho‐Montes FC, da Silva MG, Saad MH, Fonseca LS.  Genotypic patterns of multiple isolates of M. tuberculosis from tuberculous HIV patients.  Tropical Medicine & International Health 2000 Jul;5(7):488‐494.   (40) Caminero JA, Pena MJ, Campos‐Herrero MI, Rodriguez JC, Afonso O, Martin C, et al.  Exogenous reinfection with tuberculosis on a European island with a moderate incidence of  disease. American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine 2001 Mar;163(3 Pt 1):717‐ 720.   16    (41) Hawken M, Nunn P, Gathua S, Brindle R, Godfrey‐Faussett P, Githui W, et al. Increased  recurrence of tuberculosis in HIV‐1‐infected patients in Kenya. Lancet 1993 Aug  7;342(8867):332‐337.   (42) Heldal E, Docker H, Caugant DA, Tverdal A. Pulmonary tuberculosis in Norwegian patients.  The role of reactivation, re‐infection and primary infection assessed by previous mass screening  data and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. International Journal of  Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2000 Apr;4(4):300‐307.   (43) Jasmer RM, Bozeman L, Schwartzman K, Cave MD, Saukkonen JJ, Metchock B, et al.  Recurrent tuberculosis in the United States and Canada: relapse or reinfection?. American  Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine 2004 Dec 15;170(12):1360‐1366.   (44) Bandera A, Gori A, Catozzi L, Degli Esposti A, Marchetti G, Molteni C, et al. Molecular  epidemiology study of exogenous reinfection in an area with a low incidence of tuberculosis.  J.Clin.Microbiol. 2001 Jun;39(6):2213‐2218.   (45) Raviglione MC, Snider DE,Jr, Kochi A. Global epidemiology of tuberculosis. Morbidity and  mortality of a worldwide epidemic. JAMA 1995 Jan 18;273(3):220‐226.   (46) Abos‐Hernandez R, Olle‐Goig JE. Patients hospitalised in Bolivia with pulmonary  tuberculosis: risk factors for dying. International Journal of Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2002  Jun;6(6):470‐474.   (47) Olle‐Goig JE. Patients with tuberculosis in Bolivia: why do they die?. Pan American Journal  of Public Health 2000 Sep;8(3):151‐155.   (48) Kochi A. The global tuberculosis situation and the new control strategy of the World Health  Organization. 1991. Bull.World Health Organ. 2001;79(1):71‐75.   17    (49) Gustafson P, Gomes VF, Vieira CS, Samb B, Naucler A, Aaby P, et al. Clinical predictors for  death in HIV‐positive and HIV‐negative tuberculosis patients in Guinea‐Bissau. Infection 2007  Apr;35(2):69‐80.   (50) Connolly C, Davies GR, Wilkinson D. Impact of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic  on mortality among adults with tuberculosis in rural South Africa, 1991‐1995. International  Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 1998;2(11):919‐925.   (51) Rao VK, Iademarco EP, Fraser VJ, Kollef MH, Rao VK, Iademarco EP, et al. The impact of  comorbidity on mortality following in‐hospital diagnosis of tuberculosis. Chest 1998  Nov;114(5):1244‐52.   (52) Borgdorff MW, Veen J, Kalisvaart NA, Nagelkerke N. Mortality among tuberculosis patients  in the netherlands in the period 1993‐1995. European Respiratory Journal 1998 Apr;11(4):816‐ 820.   (53) Harries AD, Nyangulu DS, Kang'ombe C, Ndalama D, Glynn JR, Banda H, et al. Treatment  outcome of an unselected cohort of tuberculosis patients in relation to human  immunodeficiency virus serostatus in Zomba Hospital, Malawi. Transactions of the Royal  Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene 1998 May‐Jun;92(3):343‐347.   (54) Glynn JR, Warndorff DK, Fine PE, Munthali MM, Sichone W, Ponnighaus JM. Measurement  and determinants of tuberculosis outcome in Karonga District, Malawi. Bull.World Health  Organ. 1998;76(3):295‐305.   (55) van den Broek J, Mfinanga S, Moshiro C, O'Brien R, Mugomela A, Lefi M. Impact of human  immunodeficiency virus infection on the outcome of treatment and survival of tuberculosis  patients in Mwanza, Tanzania. International Journal of Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 1998  Jul;2(7):547‐552.   18    (56) Pablos‐Mendez A, Sterling TR, Frieden TR. The relationship between delayed or incomplete  treatment and all‐cause mortality in patients with tuberculosis. JAMA 1996 Oct  16;276(15):1223‐1228.   (57) Zahar JR, Azoulay E, Klement E, De Lassence A, Lucet JC, Regnier B, et al. Delayed treatment  contributes to mortality in ICU patients with severe active pulmonary tuberculosis and acute  respiratory failure. Intensive Care Med. 2001 Mar;27(3):513‐520.   (58) Mathur P, Sacks L, Auten G, Sall R, Levy C, Gordin F. Delayed diagnosis of pulmonary  tuberculosis in city hospitals. Arch.Intern.Med. 1994 Feb 14;154(3):306‐310.   (59) Katz I, Rosenthal T, Michaeli D. Undiagnosed tuberculosis in hospitalized patients. Chest  1985 Jun;87(6):770‐774.   (60) Sacks LV, Pendle S, Sacks LV, Pendle S. Factors related to in‐hospital deaths in patients with  tuberculosis. Archives of Internal Medicine 1998 Sep 28;158(17):1916‐22.   (61) Penner C, Roberts D, Kunimoto D, Manfreda J, Long R. Tuberculosis as a primary cause of  respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. American Journal of Respiratory & Critical  Care Medicine 1995 Mar;151(3 Pt 1):867‐872.   (62) Zafran N, Heldal E, Pavlovic S, Vuckovic D, Boe J, Zafran N, et al. Why do our patients die of  active tuberculosis in the era of effective therapy? Tubercle & Lung Disease 1994 Oct;75(5):329‐ 33.   (63) Greenaway C, Menzies D, Fanning A, Grewal R, Yuan L, FitzGerald JM. Delay in diagnosis  among hospitalized patients with active tuberculosis ‐ Predictors and outcomes. American  Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 2002 01 Apr;165(7):927‐933.   (64) Xie HJ, Enarson DA, Chao CW, Allen EA, Grzybowski S, Xie HJ, et al. Deaths in tuberculosis  patients in British Columbia, 1980‐1984. Tubercle & Lung Disease 1992 Apr;73(2):77‐82.   19    (65) Khan K, Campbell A, Wallington T, Gardam M. The impact of physician training and  experience on the survival of patients with active tuberculosis. CMAJ Canadian Medical  Association Journal 2006 September 26;175(7):749‐753.   (66) Enarson DA, Grzybowski S, Dorken E. Failure of diagnosis as a factor in tuberculosis  mortality. Can.Med.Assoc.J. 1978 Jun 24;118(12):1520‐1522.   (67) Kourbatova EV, K. LM,Jr, Romero J, Kraft C, del Rio C, Blumberg HM, et al. Risk factors for  mortality among patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis at an academic inner‐city hospital  in the US. European Journal of Epidemiology 2006;21(9):715‐21.   (68) de Meer G, van Geuns HA. Rising case fatality of bacteriologically proven pulmonary  tuberculosis in The Netherlands. Tubercle & Lung Disease 1992 Apr;73(2):83‐86.   (69) Bustamante‐Montes LP, Escobar‐Mesa A, Borja‐Aburto VH, Gomez‐Munoz A, Becerra‐ Posada F, Bustamante‐Montes LP, et al. Predictors of death from pulmonary tuberculosis: the  case of Veracruz, Mexico. International Journal of Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2000  Mar;4(3):208‐15.   (70) Walpola HC, Siskind V, Patel AM, Konstantinos A, Derhy P. Tuberculosis‐related deaths in  Queensland, Australia, 1989‐1998: characteristics and risk factors. International Journal of  Tuberculosis & Lung Disease 2003 Aug;7(8):742‐750.       20    CHAPTER 2: A POPULATION BASED STUDY OF RECURRENT  TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA1                                                                         1 ‐ “A version of this chapter will be submitted for publication. Moniruzzaman, A.  Kazanjian, A.  Wong, H.  Elwood,  R.K. and FitzGerald, J. M. (2010) Recurrence of Tuberculosis: a population‐based study.”   21    2.1. INTRODUCTION    Globally,  in terms of morbidity and mortality, tuberculosis (TB)  is one of the  leading  infectious  diseases, which caused the highest number of deaths by a single pathogenic agent  in the pre‐ HIV era  (1,2) and now  ranks second  to HIV.   Recurrent TB  remains a significant public health  problem  for  TB  control  programs  globally,  especially  in  resource‐poor  countries.  Recurrent  cases  have  higher  mortality  rates  (3‐6)  and  also  continue  to  transmit  infection  in  the  community. A recent South African study reported an elevated risk of new TB (another episode)  among  patients with  a  history  of  previous  TB  (7).  In  addition, management  and  treatment  becomes are more challenging in a patient with recurrent TB. Retreatment frequently involves  more expensive drugs and a  longer duration, and  thus provides an extra burden  to  resource  poor  countries.  In  low  incidence  countries  (e.g.  Canada),  attempting  to  eliminate  TB,  the  prevention  of  recurrence  is  critical  for  control  strategies  because  it  helps  to  reduce  the  transmission of  TB by decreasing  the number of  contagious  cases.  From  a quality  assurance  perspective,  the  recurrence  rate  is  useful  for  assessing  the  effectiveness  of  a  TB  control  program due to its potential association with treatment coverage and completion rates (8‐11) .  Recurrence  is  widely  used  as  an  outcome measure  in  studies  evaluating  either  efficacy  or  effectiveness of a TB treatment regimen (12‐17). An  improved understanding of recurrence  is  valuable for future development of treatment regimens.      Several factors such as age, male gender, Aboriginal ethnicity, incomplete TB treatment, drug  resistant status, silicosis, alcoholism, HIV co‐infection, and extent of disease (e.g., advanced  stage, cavitations) have been found to be associated with the recurrence of TB (10,13,18‐25).  However, wide discrepancies are observed across studies in terms of methodology and criteria  that are used to define reactivated cases (8,23,26‐28) and the majority of studies, evaluating  recurrence, have been conducted on specific populations in institutional or clinical settings,  which limit the application of study findings to the general population.  For example, findings  from clinical trials differ from population‐based studies as clinical trials usually follow rigid  selection criteria and a vigorous patient follow up and monitoring system. These criteria are not  being applicable in real‐life settings.    22    Additionally, few studies have investigated risk factors of recurrence in the presence of multiple  factors including demographic and clinical characteristics, individual prognostic factors and  treatment related behaviors (26). Information on TB recurrence from the Canadian setting is  also limited. To our knowledge, the study published by Johnson et al. in 1985 is the only  Canadian study and this study investigated the recurrence of TB in the province of Manitoba  (22). However, it was a case‐control study that included only 58 reactivated cases and did not  provide an estimate of incidence of recurrence.  The objectives of this study are to estimate the  incidence of, as well as the risk factors, for TB recurrence in the province of British Columbia  using population based data.     2.2 METHODS    2.2.1 Setting and Source of Information    This study was conducted  in British Columbia, with a population of approximately 3.4 million.  Like other parts of Canada, this province has many immigrants, mainly from Asian countries.      The provincial TB  service program  is administered by  the Division of TB Control  (DTB) at  the  British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC),  located  in Vancouver (the  largest city of  this province). This center acts as a referral centre for the prevention, control and treatment of  all TB‐related disease and infection occurring in BC.  Since TB is a notifiable disease, this division  is notified with regard to all new active cases of TB that are diagnosed in BC. In addition, the TB  medications are dispensed by  the Pharmacy division of BCCDC and myco‐bacteriology  for all  active cases is also coordinated from the provincial TB laboratory located at the BCCDC. These  centralized activities work as an additional safeguard and ensure that the DTB is informed of all  TB and TB‐related cases that occur in the province.     A centralized computer based system has been  in place  from  the 1960’s but  this system was  upgraded  and  integrated  into  a  more  comprehensive  database  since  1990.,  The  database  23    maintains  a  comprehensive  electronic  database with    records  for  all  subjects whose  care  is  managed through the TB control program. This database contains several types of information  including: socio‐demographic profile, medical  risk  factors,  treatment and  related  information,  mycobacteriology. Mycobacteriology related data  is generated  from  the BCCDC TB  laboratory  and  is entered  into  the TB  control by a  trained TB  clerk.    Socio‐demographic and  risk  factor  information is obtained from several sources. If TB patients are seen in person in the BCCDC TB  clinic, then an interview clerk usually collects this information and enters it into the TB control  database.  If the client is not seen in person (i.e. TB Control is consulted by private physicians or  the  patient  is  in  the  hospital),  then  usually  it  is  the  local  Public  Health Nurse who  collects  the socio‐demographic information for the patient in their area. A standardized data collection  form  is used  for  this purpose. The  information  is  then sent  (mailed,  faxed) to TB Control and  input by Medical Records Staff and Field Operations nursing personnel.       2.2.2 Study Design    A population‐based retrospective cohort design was used  for this study. This study used data  from 1990 to 2006.      2.2.3 Study Population and Relevant Definition    The study population included all TB cases recorded in the DTB case registry from 1990 to 2006.  According  to Health Canada, a  tuberculosis patient with “documented evidence or history of  previously  active  tuberculosis which  became  inactive”  (29)  is  defined  as  a  recurrent/relapse  case. A TB patient who did not have history of prior TB was termed as a new case.   In BC, the  same criteria set by Health Canada are being used to determine new and recurrent cases. It has  been recommended by Health Canada that all subjects who are diagnosed with TB  in Canada  need to be recorded under the headings new and relapsed cases. Prevalence and incidence of  recurrence  were  investigated  separately.  A  case  whose  recurrent  episode  was  determined  between 1990 and 2006 regardless of its primary episode was termed as a prevalent recurrent  24    case. However, a recurrent case whose both primary and 2nd episode occurred between 1990  and  2006 was  defined  as  an  incident  case.  Therefore,  the  number  of  eligible  cases  differed  across  these analyses.   For prevalence, all  recurrent cases  reported between  the observation  periods  were  included  in  the  analysis.  A  TB  patient  with  an  unknown  status  as  a  new  or  recurrent case was excluded from both the prevalence and incidence study.     However, a restricted sample was used to estimate  incidence of recurrence as well as factors  associated with  incidence of recurrence.  In the  incident study, recurrent cases whose primary  and  subsequent  episodes  of  TB  occurred  between  1990  and  2006 were  considered  for  this  study.  Any  case  having  a  history  of  a  primary  episode  before  1990 was  excluded  from  the  analysis.  In  addition, new  TB  cases diagnosed  in 2005  and 2006 were not  considered  in  the  incident  study  in order  to allow a minimum of  two years  follow up  time  (since  their primary  diagnosis date) for the development of recurrence. The period of inactivity (difference between  date  of  diagnosis  of  subsequent  episode  and  the  treatment  end  date  of  previous  episode)  differs across  studies  ranging  from 0  to 12 months  (8,23,27,28,30). The Canada TB  reporting  system recommends a 6 month period of inactivity to consider the case as a recurrent one.  The  primary  analysis  for  risk  factors  were  conducted  among  all  incident  recurrent  patients  regardless of period of inactivity (n=108). However, cases with less than 6 months of inactivity  were identified and an additional analysis was done among these recurrent patients (with more  than 6 months of inactivity).    2.2.4 Follow­up Time    Follow up time was estimated from the differences between time 1 and time 0.  Treatment end  date of  the primary episode was  time  zero  and  censoring date was  time 1. Recurrent  cases  were censored at  time of 1st recurrence  (time 1). Patients without recurrence were censored  (time 1) when death occurred, or  they  left  the province or  their  follow‐up ended  (Study end  date, 31st December, 2006).     25    2.2.5 Variables Description     2.2.5.1 Outcome (Dependent) Variable – Recurrence        The recurrence of TB  is our primary concern and therefore  it was considered as the outcome  variable.  For our prevalence  study, prevalence of  recurrence was  the outcome while  for our  incident study;  it was the  incidence of recurrence. New cases were the comparison group  for  both scenarios. In the previous section, both recurrent and new cases were defined.   26    Figure 2.1: Study population for incidence of recurrence (n=4464)       5433 TB cases registered with TB Division  between 1990 and 2006  1) TB patients with unknown  status (n=5)  2) Primary episode before  1990 (n=383)  3) Recurrent cases with  unknown primary episode  (n=24)  3) Recently (in 2005 and  2006) diagnosed new cases  (n=557)  Excluded (n=969)  Primary analysis: Cox regression  Outcome: Recurrence of TB (event=108)  Observation time: 29178 PYs  Incident cases with more than 6  months of inactivity (n=94)  Incident cases with less than 6  months of inactivity (n=14)  Eligible for follow up (n= 4464)     Follow up interval: time1 – time0  Time 0: Treatment end date of 1st episode  Time 1: Date of recurrence/Date of  Death/Lost to follow up/Study end date  27    2.2.5.2 Independent Variables              2.2.5.2.1 Socio‐demographic Variables    Age    In the database, the exact age was not available; rather it was calculated from the differences  between  date  of  diagnosis  and  date  of  birth.  For  patients  with multiple  episodes,  date  of  diagnosis  at primary  episode was used  to  calculate  age. Age  at diagnosis was  analyzed  as  a  continuous variable.      Biological Gender    The  data  on  gender  in  the  primary  database was  almost  complete  and was  coded  as male,  female and trans‐sexual. For cases with trans‐sexual status, current gender was used. The risk  for  females  of  recurrence  was  estimated  by  comparing  females  with  males  (reference  category).      Country of Origin/ Immigration Status    Under this variable, data for several categories (Canadian born, foreign‐born Canadian citizen,  landed immigrant, visitors, refugee, etc.) were included in the primary database. All categories  were  collapsed  into  three groups‐ Canadian born non‐Aboriginals, Canadian born Aboriginals  and  foreign‐born. The  foreign‐born group  includes  landed  immigrants,  foreign‐born Canadian  citizens,  foreign‐born  people  living  on  a  work  permit,  minister’s  permit,  or  as  a  refugee,  student,  visitor,  etc.    For  several  subjects,  immigration  status  was  missing  or  unknown.  Attempts were made to see if this information could be extracted from other variables such as  birth country, arrival year and Aboriginal community. Subjects with missing or unknown status  were  reassessed  for  their  immigration  status  according  to  these  variables  and  adjustments  were made accordingly.  28    Ethnicity     In  the  primary  database,  several  categories were  used  to  determine  ethnicity.  There were  substantial numbers of patients  in certain ethnic groups, but  few  in other groups.  In order to  optimize  the  number  of  variables  during  the  analysis,  these  categories were  collapsed  into  seven groups as follows:        Caucasians‐ used as reference category      Aboriginals ‐ includes both registered and non‐registered subjects, Inuit and Métis     Chinese   Southeast Asian‐  includes East  Indian, Punjabi, East Asian, South Asian, and Southeast  Asian,    Vietnamese   Filipino   Other, which includes the rest of the ethnicities     In the current study, Filipino and Vietnamese have been analyzed as a single group.     Birth Country Regions     As  there were  exhaustive  lists  of  countries  of  birth‐place  for  TB  subjects  in  the database,  it  would be difficult  to run  the analysis  for all countries.  In  light of  this, all  listed counties were  collapsed into several geographical regions according to WHO criteria. The birth country regions  are as follows:     Pan American Heath Region  (PAHO)  ‐  includes patients who were born  in countries  in  North America, South America and Central America. PAHO was used as  the  reference  category  29     African  Health  Region:  includes  mostly  sub‐Saharan  countries  (except  Sudan  and  Somalia) and other African countries (except Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia)         European Health Region ‐ includes all people born in Europe and Russia   Southeast  Asia  Region‐  includes  Bangladesh,  Bhutan,  DPR  Korea,  India,  Indonesia,  Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Timor‐Leste    Eastern  Mediterranean  Health  Region‐includes  Afghanistan,  Pakistan,  middle‐east  countries  and  few  African  countries  (  Egypt,  Libya,  Morocco,  Somalia,  Sudan,  and  Tunisia)       Western  Pacific  Health  Region‐  includes  Australia,  Cambodia,  China,  Fiji,  Hong  Kong,  Japan, South Korea, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Mongolia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea,  Philippines, Singapore, Vietnam      Few  cases  belonged  to  the  Eastern Mediterranean  and  European  regions.  Therefore,  both  regions were collapsed into a single group and were analyzed accordingly.    Place of Diagnosis of Primary Episode    Several  places were mentioned  as  the  place  of  diagnosis  for  the  primary  episode  in  the  TB  databases.  Therefore,  all  the  places  were  collapsed  into  three  groups‐  BC,  other  Canadian  provinces, and outside Canada. Since  there were  few cases  that belonged  to  the category  to  “Other  Canadian  Provinces”,  it  was  combined  with  the  group  Outside  of  Canada  and  was  analyzed  as  a  single  group  (Outside  of  BC  included  patients who were  diagnosed  in  other  Canadian provinces as well as  in overseas countries). Patients who were diagnosed  initially at  BC were used as the reference category.    Marital Status     There were  several categories enlisted  in  the primary database. We collapsed  the categories  into the two following groups‐  30       Single‐includes single, separated, divorced, and widowed   Family –includes common law groups and married groups      The category “family” was used as the reference group during analysis.     2.2.6.2.2 Diagnosis and Treatment Related Factors     Type of Diseases     Several types of diagnosis were enlisted  in the primary database under diseases type. All this  information was grouped into three broad categories as follows:     Pulmonary TB (PTB)‐ TB that involves primarily lungs and also includes pleural TB     Extra‐pulmonary  TB  (EPTB):  includes  TB  that  involves  extra‐pulmonary  sites  such  as  genitourinary organs, abdominal, meninges, bones or  joints,  lymph nodes etc. Patients  with disseminated/miliary TB were considered as EPTB.   Both: patients who had both pulmonary and extra‐pulmonary involvement             Cavitary Disease       This variable was derived from diagnosis type of diseases. Patients who had been diagnosed as  ‘Cavitations of Lung TB’ were classified as ‘yes’. A patient who did not have such a diagnosis was  coded as ‘no’ and was used as the reference category.             31    Duration of Treatment     Treatment duration was calculated from treatment end date and treatment start date. Patients  who did not receive any treatment due to post‐mortem diagnosis were assigned zero time and  were not accounted for in the analysis.     Completion of Treatment      This variable was derived from the variable “Reason Treatment Ended”.  Several categories for  Reason  Treatment  ended  were  enlisted  in  the  original  database  such  as:  completed  satisfactorily,  Incomplete,  Incomplete  due  to  death,  and  Incomplete  due  to  departure  from  province. All these groups were classified into three groups:       Completed  treatment/successful  completion  of  treatment2:  includes  patients  who  received at  least 6 months therapy and completed medically recommended treatment  within acceptable timeframe and acceptable completion rate.    Incomplete  treatment:  includes  patients who  could  not  complete  treatment  due  to  individual causes (such as clients’ decision not to continue treatment, non‐compliance,  drug  reaction).  In  addition,  patients  whose  treatment  status  had  been  coded  as  incomplete, due to loss to follow up, were included in this category.   Other: includes patients who could not complete treatment due to death or relocation  out of province or could not receive treatment due to post‐mortem diagnosis or other  reasons.      In  the  current  analyses,  the  effect  of  incomplete  treatment  was  assessed  compared  to  complete  treatment. A patient who was  included  in  the “other  treatment” category was not  accounted for in this analysis.                                                           2 ‐Successful completion of treatment mostly represents patients whose outcome was ‘cure’ (bacteriological) and  whose outcome was ‘treatment completed’.  32    Compliance with Treatment    Information on compliance with treatment was coded in the TB databases as a percentage such  as “less than 50%”, “50% to 80%”, and 100%.   Patients who had 80% compliance or  less were  classified as non‐compliant/poor compliant while patients who had more than 80% compliance  were classified as compliant.       Administration of Therapy    This  variable  was  originally  coded  in  the  database  as  ‘Self‐administered’,  ‘Supervised  once  daily’,  ‘Supervised  twice weekly’,  ‘DOT’ and  ‘Supervised  thrice weekly’. All  these groups were  categorized into two groups:      Self‐administered therapy: includes ‘Self‐administered’   Supervised therapy:  includes  ‘Supervised once daily’,  ‘Supervised  twice weekly’,  ‘DOT’  and ‘Supervised thrice weekly’    2.2.5.2.3 Mycobacteriology Results     TB Culture     When  a  TB  is  suspected  as  diagnosis,  smear  and  culture  tests  on  available  specimens  are  routinely  performed  in  order  to  confirm  the  TB  diagnosis.  Based  on  culture  results,  all  TB  patients were categorized  into  two groups‐ culture positive cases and culture negative cases.  Patients  whose  culture  reports  were  not  available  or  could  not  be  done  were  treated  as  unknown.  The  effect  of  positive  culture  on  recurrence  was  investigated  and  culture  negative/unknown cases were used as the reference group.          33    Drug Sensitivity      Once culture tests are available, drug susceptibility tests were also routinely conducted on all  positive cultures. In the BCCDC TB lab, susceptibility testing is performed for four first‐lines anti  TB  drugs:  rifampin  (RIF),  isoniazid  (INH),  ethambutol  (EM)  and  streptomycin  (SM).  If  the  subjects  are  resistant  to  isoniazid  (INH)  or  rifampin  (RM),  then  the  susceptibility  testing  for  pyrazinamide (PZA) is done. This based on the infrequent presence of PZA resistance. Since the  test  reports  for PZA  susceptibility were unavailable  for most of  the  cases,  the  results of PZA  were  not  considered  to  determine  the  status  of  susceptibility  (i.e.,  whether  it  should  be  considered as sensitive or resistant cases). Based on the susceptibility results, three subgroups  for resistance patterns and one group for sensitivity were created as follows:      Mono resistance: resistance to a single drug   Multidrug resistance (MDR): resistance to rifampin and isoniazid   Poly‐resistance: resistance to at least two drugs excluding MDR  cases   Sensitive: sensitive to all four drugs      The  laboratory  report  of  drug  susceptibility  was  originally  coded  as  sensitive,  resistant,  borderline  sensitive/resistant  cases.  In  addition  to  clearly  resistant  groups,  all  borderline  categories are also considered as resistant cases.  In  the current analysis,  the poly and mono‐ resistance groups were collapsed  into a single group and patients with sensitive  isolates were  used as the reference group.     2.2.5.2.4 Co‐morbid Conditions     Under  co‐morbid  conditions,  the  variables  that  were  analyzed  were  as  follows:  diabetes  mellitus, malnutrition, alcoholism, drugs or substance abuse, HIV status, malignancy and use of  immunosuppressive medications.    34    Overall, all these variables were classified as a dichotomous variable ‐yes or no. “Yes” indicates  presence of co‐morbidity or illness while “No” indicates the absence of that particular disease.  There was  an  additional  two  categories  (uncertain  and  not  asked)  in  the  primary  database,  which were  treated  as unknown observations. Patients without  a  valid  response  (missing or  unknown)  to  co‐morbid  conditions  and  patients  without  co‐morbidity  were  used  as  the  reference group.         The  term  “Alcoholism  Yes”  indicates  a  history  or  current  intake  of  an  excessive  amount  of  alcohol (subjective judgment), while “No” indicates the absence of such an intake of alcohol.   The variable “Substance abuse” was derived from drug abuse and methadone use and coded as  yes and no. Yes  includes both past and present use of either non‐injection or  injection drugs  (including methadone) while no means absence of such a habit.  In the primary database, the  information  on  HIV  and  AIDS  was  available  separately.  Both  variables  were  combined  and  classified  into a binary variable  ‐ yes vs. no. Yes means sero‐positivity  for HIV which  includes  AIDS defining illness. No means negative for HIV.     The  variable  “Malignancy” was  derived  from  four  variables  (lymphoma,  leukemia  and  other  malignancy,  chemotherapy  for  cancer)  that  were  available  in  the  current  database.  It  was  coded  into  yes  (presence  of  any malignancy)  and  no  (absence  of  such  a malignancy.  The  variable  “Chronic  Renal  Failure”  was  derived  from  two  variables  renal  failure  and  kidney  transplant,  which  was  later  coded  as  yes  or  no.  Immunosuppressive  medications  is  a  combination variable of  immune‐suppressive medications and  steroid  therapy.   Patients who  received  immunosuppressive or  steroid  therapy or are being  treated with  these medications  currently were  coded  as  yes. Patients who did not have  a history of  such medications were  classified as no.        35    2.2.6 Statistical Analysis    An  initial  descriptive  analysis  for  the  study  population  was  performed.  Comparisons  of  continuous variables among groups (such as new vs. recurrent cases) were done using student t  test and Wilcoxon rank sum test whenever appropriate. Categorical variables were compared  using  the  chi‐square  test and  fisher’s exact  test  (if one of  the expected  cell values were  less  than 5). For the prevalence study, logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify factors  associated with  TB  recurrence.  Since  the  primary  focus  of  this  study was  the  incidence  of  recurrence, a detailed description of the analysis for incident study was presented here.    For the incident study, incidence was estimated per person‐year of follow up and expressed in  terms of 100, 000 person‐years. Univariate and multivariable Cox regression were conducted to  identify predictors of  incidence of recurrence. Variables which were found significant (p value  ≤0.05) in Univariate analysis were considered for multi‐variable analysis. The effect of universal  confounders such as age and gender were adjusted for in the multivariable model regardless of  their statistical significance in bi‐variate analysis. Clinical relevance and evidence from literature  were also considered in choosing variables for the multiple regression analysis.     A  series  of multivariable model  (Model  1  to Model  4) were  conducted. Variables  that were  considered for multivariable modeling were as follows: age, gender,  immigration status, birth‐ country  regions,  place  of  diagnosis,  culture  status,  completion  of  treatment  successfully,  adherence  to  treatment,  drug  abuse,  alcoholism  and  HIV/AIDS.  The  effect  of  “incomplete  treatment” and “non‐adherence to treatment” was evaluated in a separate multivariable model  in  the presence of  similar  controlling variables.  Immigration  status and birth  country  regions  were  not  considered  together  in  model  building  process.  Model  1  and  Model  2  included  variable “immigration status” whether Model 3 and Model 4  included “birth country regions”  rather  than  immigration  status.    Similarly,  Model  1  and  Model  3  evaluated  the  effect  of  “Incomplete treatment” and Model 2 and Model 4 evaluated the effect of “non‐adherence to  treatment”. Otherwise, variables that were considered in these four multivariable models were  36    the same.  The strength and magnitude of the association between incidence of recurrence and  the  risk  factors  was  expressed  in  terms  of  a  hazard  ratio  with  95%  confidence  intervals.  Variables were considered significant  if the 95% confidence  interval did not contain one. Two  additional  analyses  were  conducted  for  this  study‐  one  among  patients  who  successfully  completed  their TB  treatment during  the primary episode and other analysis among patients  who were identified as recurrent TB cases using rigid criteria (more than 6 months of inactivity  since treatment end).      For socio‐demographic, diagnosis and treatment related factors, the categories “unknown/not  known”,  “not  asked”  and  “uncertain”  were  treated  as  missing.    However,  for  co‐morbid  conditions, unknown/missing were combined with “no” response and treated as the reference  group in the analysis. SPSS (Windows 17.0 version) and S‐plus (Windows 8.1 version) statistical  packages were used to run these analyses.     2.3 RESULTS    2.3.1 Prevalence of Recurrence    During  the  study period  (1990‐2006),  5433  cases of  TB were  registered with  the  TB Control  Division (DTB) at the British Columbia Center for Disease Control. Among them, thirty patients  were  not  considered  in  the  current  analysis  because  of  unknown  outcome  status  (new  or  recurrent) or they were diagnosed as new cases before 1990.  The characteristics of the study  cohort  (n=5403) are described  in Table  (Appendix A.1).   The mean age of the study cohort at  the time of diagnosis was 46 years while the median was 44 years with a range from 1 to 104  years.    There was  predominance  of males  (55%)  in  this  TB  cohort.  Foreign‐born  individuals  accounted for 67% of the total TB cases, while Aboriginal people and non‐aboriginal Canadian‐ born accounted for 13% and 16% respectively.      37    Out of 5403 cases, 490 patients had at least one recurrent episode. Overall the recurrence rate  was 9.1 % (95% CI: 8.3%, 9.9%). The prevalence was the highest in 1990 (12%) and the lowest in  1995  (6%).  Although  the  prevalence  of  recurrence was  decreasing  over  time,  using  the  chi‐ square test for trend, it did not reach statistical significance (p=0.39).  The trend of recurrence  from 1990 to 2006 is presented in Figure 2.1. Comparisons of socio‐demographic characteristics  and  treatment‐related  behaviors  between  prevalent  recurrent  cases  and  new  cases  were  presented in the Appendix A (Table A.2 and Table A.3).      2.3.2 Incidence of Recurrence    Out of 5433 registered cases, 4464 cases were eligible for this study.  In total, 969 TB patients  were  excluded  from  the  analysis.  The  reasons  for  exclusions were:  primary  episode  before  1990,  recent  diagnosis  as  a  new  case,  and  unknown  status  of  primary  episode.  A  detailed  description of the study cohort is presented in Figure 2.2.  During the study period, 108 (2.4%)  patients developed recurrent disease. The incidence was 370 cases per 100,000 person years. A  few patients had more  than one  recurrence but our analysis was  limited  to  the 1st  recurrent  diagnosis. According  to calendar year,  the most number of  incident cases was 14  (5%)  in  the  year of 2000  followed by 12  (4%) cases  in 2002.   The  trend of  the  incidence of  recurrence  is  shown in Figure 2.3. As expected no case was observed in 1990. The characteristic of the study  cohort is presented in Table 2.1.        38    Figure 2.2: Trend of recurrent (prevalent) cases from 1990 to 2006 in British Columbia,  Canada            The median age at the time of 1st diagnosis was 45 years with an  inter‐quarterlies range from  30‐66 years. This study cohort was over‐represented by  foreign‐born people who contributed  two‐third of total cases while Canadian‐born non‐aboriginal contributed only one sixth of total  cases. In terms of ethnicity, the largest group was Chinese (23%) followed by Caucasian (18%).  In addition, 566 (13%) patients were of Aboriginal ancestry.   39    Table 2.1: Characteristics of study cohort (N=4464)    Variables    N (%)  Case Status  New cases  Incident recurrent cases   4356 (98%)  108 (2%)  Cumulative Incidence   Overall   At first year   At 2nd year  At 5th year    Per 100, 000 PYs  370  854  1500  2400  Median follow up time (IQR)  All cases  Incident cases  New cases   Years 6.1 (2.1, 10.7)  2.1 (0.8, 4.5)  6.2 (2.2, 10.8)  Age at diagnosis (primary episode)     Mean (SD)  Median  (IQR)  Years 47.4 (21.8)  45 (30‐66)  Biological gender   Male   Female   2405 (54)  2059 (46)  Birth place  Canadian‐ born non‐Aboriginal  Canadian‐ born Aboriginal  Foreign‐born  Unknown   754 (17)  566 (13)  2943 (66)  201 (4)  Birth Country regions  PAHO   African Region  East. Mediterranean  European Region  Southeast Asia Region  Western Pacific Region  Unknown/missing  1403 (31)  81 (2)  101 (2)  225 (5)  639 (14)  1762 (40)  253 (6)  Ethnicity  Caucasian  Aboriginals  Chinese  South‐East Asian  Filipino  Vietnamese  Other  Unknown/Missing   803 (18)  566 (13)  1047 (23)  704 (16)  351 (8)  265 (6)  442 (10)  286 (6)  Place of Diagnosis (1st episode)  In BC  Inside of Canada, outside of BC  Outside of Canada  Unknown/Missing    3909 (88)  5 (<1)  162 (4)  388 (8)  40          Table 2.2: Occurrence of incident recurrent cases (n=108) over the follow‐up period (interval  between treatment completion time and date of recurrence)           Within 6  months  Between   6 ‐12  months    Between   12‐24  months  Between   24‐36  months  Between   36 ‐48  months  Between   48 ‐60  months  After 60  months  Number of cases   14  18 21 17 9 4  25   Percentage of total  incident cases   13%  17% 19% 16% 8% 4%  23% Cumulative Percentage  of total incident cases   13%  30% 49% 65% 73% 77%  100%     The median follow up for the entire cohort was 6.1 years and was 6.2 years for new cases. The  median time to recurrence after treatment completion was 2.1 (IQR: 0.8‐4.5) years. Table 2.2  presents the occurrence of recurrence during the follow‐up period.   About 30% of recurrence  cases occurred within 1 year and 60% within four years of treatment completion. Twenty‐five  (23%)  cases developed  recurrence even  after  the  five  years of  follow up. Table 2.3 presents  time of  recurrence  among  foreign‐born patients  since  their  arrival  in Canada. About  52% of  recurrence occurred within four years of arrival among overseas patients (Table 2.3).     Variables    N (%) Marital status  Single  Not single  Other   Unknown/Missing   1992 (22)  1321 (30)  221 (5)  1930 (43)  41    Figure 2.3: Trend of incident recurrent cases in British Columbia from 1990 to 2006            Table 2.4 presents unadjusted hazard ratios and the corresponding 95% confidence interval for  the  socio‐demographic  determinants  for  the  development  of  recurrence.  Compared  to  Canadian‐born non‐aboriginal,  foreign‐born people  (UHR: 2.52) were  three‐fold higher  risk  to  have recurrence. As expected, the risk of recurrence was 4 times higher among patients born in  African  countries,  twice  as  high  in  patients  from  Southeast Asia  and  also  from  the Western  Pacific  region  compared  to  patients  born  in  the  Pan‐American  region.  In  terms  of  ethnicity,  Chinese  (UHR:  2.84),  Filipino/Vietnamese  (UHR:  2.89)  and  Southeast  Asian  (UHR:  2.84)  had  significantly higher risk to have recurrence compared to Caucasian subjects. Aboriginal people  had an elevated risk of having recurrence (UHR=1.75, 293 per 100, 000 PYs) compared to non‐ Aboriginal Canadian, but  the 95% CI of  the corresponding HR contained one. Patients whose  42    primary  diagnosis  took  place  outside  of  BC  were  fifteen‐times  (UHR=14.82) more  likely  to  develop recurrence compared to patients who were diagnosed locally.          Table 2.3: Occurrence of recurrence (incidence) among foreign‐born individuals (n=87) since  their arrival in Canada         Primary Episode  Before  arrival  Same  year  1 year  Interval  2 year  Interval  3 year  Interval  4 year  interval  5 year  interval  After 5  years    Number of cases   30  12  5 4 0 3  1 32   %  of total incident  cases   35%  14%  6% 5% 0% 3%  1% 36% Cumulative % of  total incident cases   49%  55% 60% 60% 63%  64% 100% Recurrent Episode       Number of cases   ‐  11  14 9 5 6  3 39 %  of total incident  cases   ‐  13%  16% 10% 6% 7%  3% 45% Cumulative % of  total incident cases   ‐  13%  29% 39% 45% 52%  55% 100%         43    Table 2.4: Comparisons of socio‐demographic characteristics between TB patients who  developed a recurrence (n=108) and who did not (n=4356)      Variable  Number of  Incident  cases/Total  person years    Incidence   per 100, 000  person years   Unadjusted Hazard  Ratio (95% CI)  Incidence of recurrence  Overall (all cases)  Culture positive cases  Cases who completed treatment  successfully3   108/29178  63/21064  73/27174    370  299  269    Age at diagnosis (primary episode)    Mean (SD)  Years 43.3 (19.2)  Years 47.5 (21.9)    1.00 (0.99, 1.00)  Biological gender  Male  Female  53/14851  55/14328  357  384    Reference  1.08 (0.74, 1.58)  Birth place  Canadian born non‐Aboriginal  Canadian born Aboriginal  Foreign born  9/5197  12/4095  87/19363  173  293  449    Reference  1.75 (0.74, 4.14)  2.52 (1.27, 5.00)  Birth Country regions  PAHO   African Region  East. Mediterranean and Europe  Southeast Asia Region  Western Pacific Region  22/9797  5/533  2/2276  20/4013  59/11898  225  939  88  498  496    Reference  4.0 (1.51, 10.56)  0.39 (0.09, 1.65)  2.07 (1.13, 3.79)  2.13 (1.30, 3.47)  Ethnicity  Caucasian  Aboriginals   Chinese  South‐East Asian  Filipino/Vietnamese   Other Ethnicity  Unknown/missing   9/5468  12/4095  31/7102  23/4611  21/4232  8/2698  4/971  165  293  436  499  496  296  412    Reference  1.80 (0.76, 4.26)  2.54 (1.21, 5.34)  2.84 (1.31, 6.31)  2.89 (1.32, 8.82)  1.68 (0.65, 4.35)  ‐  Marital status  Single  Not single  16/8440  33/10836  190  305    Reference  0.65 (0.36, 1.17)  Place of initial diagnosis  In BC  Outside of Canada4  67/27402  41/1104  245  3715    Reference  14.82 (10.04, 21.87)                                                         3 ‐Recurrence among patients who completed initial treatment successfully was termed as relapse in several  studies  4 ‐Outside of Canada also included  patients who were diagnosed outside of BC, but within Canada (only few cases  belong to this category‐ outside of BC, but within Canada)   44    Table 2.5: Comparisons of treatment and related factors between TB patients who developed  a recurrence (n=108) and who did not (n=4356)      Variable  Number of  Incident  cases/Total  person years    Incidence  per  100, 000  person years    Unadjusted  Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)  Duration of Treatment   Mean (SD)  Median (IQR)  Years 0.67 (0.39)  0.65 (0.50, 0.83)  Years 0.68 (0.31)  0.67 (0.50, 0.81)    0.48 (0.22, 1.08)  Rx completion of primary episode  Completed successfully5   Incomplete  73/27174  24/1621  269  1480    Reference  5.62 (3.54, 8.92)  Rx compliance of  primary episode  Complaint    Non‐compliant    65/27487  18/1139  236  1581    Reference  6.53 (3.88, 11.01)  Major mode of Treatment at primary episode   Supervised   Self‐administered   18/5893  56/22265  305  252    Reference  0.78 (0.46, 1.33)  Culture results at primary episode  Negative/no/unknown   Positive   45/8114  63/21064  555  299    1.96 (1.36, 2.93)  Reference  Drug resistance status at primary episode  Sensitive   Mono/poly resistance   MDR  55/19104  7/1755  1/70  288  399  1420    Reference  1.40 (0.64, 3.08)  3.85 (0.53, 27.83)  Disease type of initial episode  Pulmonary   Extra‐pulmonary   Both  65/19203  37/8661  6/1315  338  427  456    Reference  1.29 (0.86, 1.93)  1.30 (0.56, 2.99)  Presence of Cavitations at initial episode  Yes  No      4/838  74/28213    477  262    1.26 (0.46, 3.47)  Reference                                                               5 ‐This represents relapse, which was also used as a global measure of recurrence   45    Table 2.6: Comparisons of co‐morbidity and other clinical characteristics between TB patients  who developed a recurrence (n=108) and who did not (n=4356)      Variable  Number of  Incident  cases/Total  person years    Incidence  per  100, 000  person years    Unadjusted Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)  Diabetes  Mellitus   Yes   No/unknown  5/1714  103/27464  292  375    0.75 (0.30, 1.83)  Reference  Malnutrition   Yes    No/unknown  2/239  106/28939  835  366    2.17 (0.54, 8.80)  Reference  Alcoholism   Yes  No/unknown  7/1390  101/27781  504  364    1.39 (0.64, 2.98)  Reference  Drug abuse  Yes  No/unknown  12/731  96/28434  1641  338    4.28 (2.35, 7.81)  Reference  Either HIV or AIDS  Yes  No/unknown  14/838  94/28285  1670  332    4.28 (2.47, 7.40)  Reference  Any Malignancy   Yes   No/unknown  2/378  106/28804  529  368    1.37 (0.34, 5.53)  Reference  Immunosuppressive medication  Yes  No/unknown  4/479  104/28699  835  362    2.10 (0.77, 5.71)  Reference  Chronic Renal failure  Yes  No/unknown  2/237  106/28941  845  366    2.24 (0.55, 9.08)  Reference      Table  2.5  presents  the  hazard  of  recurrence  from  Univariate  Cox  regression  model  for  treatment  and  related  factors.  The  factors  that  had  the  largest  effects  on  recurrence were  incomplete treatment (UHR: 5.62), and poor compliance to treatment (UHR: 6.53). TB patients  with  negative  or without  culture  (UHR=1.92) were  two‐fold more  likely  to  have  recurrence  compared to culture positive TB patients. However, the mean duration of treatment and major  mode of treatment was similar among new and recurrent cases.  In terms of diagnosis related  factors, no significantly elevated risk of recurrence was observed among patients with EPTB and  46    patients with Cavitations. The  impact of  co‐morbid  factors on  the  incidence of  recurrence  is  presented in Table 2.6. The relative hazard associated with drug abuse (UHR: 4.28) and positive  HIV status (UHR: 4.28) were significantly higher among recurrent cases.     The  multivariable  Cox  regression  showed  that  foreign‐born  individuals,  place  of  diagnosis,  incomplete  treatment,  poor‐compliance with  treatment,  drug  abuse  and  positive HIV  status  were consistently significant risk factors for recurrence (Table 2.7).  Variables that did not reach  statistical  significance  in multivariable models were  age,  gender,  being  culture  positive  and  alcoholism.  Table  2.8  presents  findings  from  the  analysis  was  restricted  to  patients  who  successfully  completed  their  treatment  during  1st  episode.  Variable  that  was  significant  in  univariate  Cox  regression  were  foreign‐birth,  born  in  African,  Southeast  Asia  and Western  Pacific regions, diagnosis of TB outside of BC, positive HIV status and substance abuse.     Since  information  about  co‐morbidities  was  limited  in  terms  of  missing  observations,  a  sensitivity  analysis was  conducted  among  patients with  valid  responses  to  the  presence  co‐ morbid conditions. Results of this analysis are presented  in the appendix (Table A.4 and Table  A.5). Additional Cox Regression analysis was conducted among a selective group of  recurrent  patients based on  stricter definition  criteria  (who had  a period of  inactivity over 6 months).  Results of this additional analysis are presented in the Appendix A (Table A.6). Comparisons of  treatment completion and poor‐compliance rates across several risk factors are also presented  in Appendix (Table A.7).    47    Table 2.7: Multivariable cox regression analysis of risk factors for recurrence       Variable  Model 1  Adjusted  Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)    Model 2  Adjusted  Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)    Model 3  Adjusted  Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)    Model 4  Adjusted  Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)    Age at primary episode  (per year)     1.00 (0.99, 1.01) 1.00 (0.99, 1.01) 1.00 (1.00, 1.01)  1.00 (0.99, 1.01) Biological gender  Male  Female   Reference  1.19 (0.79, 1.80)  Reference  1.34 (0.86, 2.08)    Reference  1.15 (0.76, 1.74)  Reference  1.26 (0.81, 1.97)  Birth place  CB6 non‐Aboriginal  Canadian‐born Aboriginal  Foreign‐ born  Reference  1.11 (0.46, 2.71)  2.62 (1.25, 5.46)  Reference  1.30 (0.54, 3.14)  2.63 (1.21, 5.72)    Birth Country regions  Pan‐American Health Region   African Region  East. Mediterranean/Europe  Southeast Asia Region  Western Pacific Region    Reference  2.57 (0.82, 8.07)  0.78 (0.17, 3.56)  3.20 (1.43, 7.16)  3.82 (1.92, 7.56)  Reference  3.85 (1.28, 11.59) 0.38 (0.05, 2.97)  2.73 (1.18, 6.33)  2.94 (1.45, 5.93)  Place of Diagnosis   Outside of Canada7   In BC    9.98 (5.97, 16.69) Reference  5.07 (2.62, 9.84)  Reference    9.24 (5.50, 15.52)  Reference  4.59 (2.33, 9.03)  Reference  Culture positivity   Positive   Negative/unknown  1.25 (0.76, 2.05)  Reference  1.35 (0.76, 2.40)  Reference    1.18 (0.72, 1.95)  Reference  1.29 (0.73, 2.32)  Reference  Rx completion of primary episode  Completed successfully  Incomplete  Reference  4.29 (2.60, 7.08)  ‐    Reference  4.64 (2.78, 7.68)  Rx compliance of primary episode  Compliant  Non‐complaint  ‐  Reference  3.98 (3.23, 7.10)    Reference  4.04 (2.24, 7.26)  Alcoholism  1.46 (0.62, 3.43) 1.58 (0.64, 3.96) 1.84 (0.77, 4.41)  1.76 (0.69, 4.44) Drug abuse  2.68 (1.06, 6.76) 2.50 (0.99, 6.29)8 3.06 (1.13, 8.25)  3.14 (1.18, 8.31) Either HIV or AIDS  3.61 (1.69, 7.71) 4.97 (2.28, 10.87) 4.16 (1.75, 9.87)  4.63 (1.99, 10.82)                                                           6 ‐CB: Canadian‐born  7 ‐ Outside of Canada also included  patients who were diagnosed outside of BC, but within Canada (only few cases  belong to this category‐ outside of BC, but within Canada)  8 P value was 0.052  48    Table 2.8: Incidence of recurrence across several risk factors among TB patients who  successfully completed treatment during the primary episode (n=3529)        Number of  Incident  cases/Total  person years  Incidence   per 100,  000  person  years    Unadjusted  Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)  Overall  73/27174  269    Age at diagnosis      1.00 (0.99, 1.01)          Male   36/13793  261  Reference  Female  37/13380  277  1.07 (0.68, 1.69)          Canadian‐born non‐Aboriginal  6/4737  127  Reference  Canadian‐born Aboriginal  6/3685  163  1.34 (0.43, 4.16)  Foreign‐born   61/18795  325  2.53 (1.09, 5.84)          Pan‐ American Health Region  12/8874  135  Reference  African Region  3/3502  597  4.22 (1.19, 14.97) Eastern Mediterranean and  European Region 1/12253  44  0.40 (0.04, 2.61)  Southeast Asia Region  12/123901  308  2.13 (0.96, 4.74)  Western Pacific Region  45/11583  389  2.78 (1.47, 5.25)          In BC diagnosis  50/25564  196  Reference  Diagnosis outside of Canada9  23/979  2348  11.98 (7.31, 19.64)         Positive culture   49/19765  248  0.70 (0.43, 1.15)  Negative/no/unknown culture   24/7409  324  Reference          PTB  42/18001  233  Reference  EPTB  29/7906  367  1.60 (1.00, 2.57)  PTB & EPTB  2/1267  158  0.55 (0.16, 2.67)                                                         9 ‐ Outside of Canada also included  patients who were diagnosed outside of BC, but within Canada (only few cases  belong to this category‐ outside of BC, but within Canada)    49      Number of  Incident  cases/Total  person years  Incidence   per 100,  000  person  years    Unadjusted  Hazard Ratio  (95% CI)          Cavitations yes  2/801  250  0.80 (0.19, 3.27)  Cavitations no  56/26306  213  Reference          Rx duration (per year)      1.53 (0.66, 3.55)          Compliant   59/27037  218  Reference  Non‐compliant   2/394  507  2.20 (0.54, 9.01)          Supervised  15/5470  274  Reference  Self‐administered  38/21295  178  0.62 (0.34, 1.13)          Diabetes mellitus   4/1640  244  0.88 (0.32, 2.40)          Malnutrition yes  1/201  498  1.75 (0.24, 12.57)         Alcoholism yes  4/1191  336  1.26 (0.46, 3.45)          HIV/AIDS positive  4/601  666  3.95 (1.96, 7.94)          Drug abuse yes  9/707  1273  3.42 (1.48, 7.89)          Malignancy yes  2/370  540  2.10 (0.52, 8.59)      2.4 DISCUSSION    Between 1990 and 2006, recurrent cases of active TB accounted for 9% of the total active TB  cases reported  in BC.  In comparison to national data reported by Health Canada (6% to 12%),  BC had a higher  relapse proportion  (%  total BC cases)  for most calendar years  (31). A higher  prevalence  of  recurrence  continues  to  pose  a  concern  to  Canadian  TB  control  programs  because it is a source of ongoing transmission of infection for new cases in the community.  50    This  is  the  first Canadian  study which estimated  the  annual  incidence of  TB  recurrence. The  crude incidence was 370 cases per 100,000 person‐years. The cumulative incidence at the first  year and 2nd year were 854 and 1500 per 100,000 pys respectively. This incidence is lower than  has  been  reported  in  other  comparable  studies.  For  example,  the  North  American  TB  trial  consortium  study  22  and  23  conducted by  Jasmer  and others  reported  a  recurrence  rate of  3800 per 100, 000 person‐years, which was ten times higher than our study (32). The incidence  of recurrence was 550 per 100,000 person‐years  in a Brazilian study (33). The incidence varies  widely  under  study  conditions  due  to  differences  in  background  prevalence  of  tuberculosis  (high vs. low burden countries), selected population (population based vs. institutional setting),  study design  (clinical  trial vs. observational studies) and criteria  to define  recurrence. Several  studies (9,15,19,34,35) reported recurrence of TB (which sometimes was termed as a relapse)  in  patients whose  treatment  outcome was  ‘cure’  and/or  ‘treatment  completed’.  Our  study  demonstrated  that  the  recurrence  rate was 269 per 100, 000 pys  in patients who completed  their  initial  treatments  successfully  (which  represents  patients  with  cure  and  treatment  completed).  A  recent  Australian  study  restricted  to  culture  positive  cases  reported  that  the  crude  annual  incidence  of  recurrence  was  71  per  100,  000  after  completion  of  successful  treatment  (8). Their rate was much  lower  (compared to current study) which shares a similar  profile with Canada in terms of TB incidence (In our study, the incidence among culture positive  patients who completed treatment successfully was 248 per 100,000 pys).     As expected,  the  incidence of  recurrence was much higher  in  subjects  from  countries with a  high  incidence  of  TB.  For  example,  a  recent  study  conducted  in  a  high‐burden  setting  (Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan)  reported  a  high  level  of  recurrence  (36%)  among  patients who  were treated in the framework of a DOTS program (19). A Vietnamese study reported a relapse  rate  of  9%  among  patients  whose  treatment  outcome  was  documented  as  ‘cure’  (34).  In  another study from Vietnam, the  investigators reported a 13 % relapse rate among defaulters  or  participants who  had  transferred  out  (36).  The  reported  recurrence  rate  after  treatment  completion  in  a  systematic  review  (37)  based  on  controlled  trials  (2290  per  100,000  at  first  51    year) and observational studies (7850 per 100,000 at first year) were much higher than  in the  current study.      A  recent population based  study conducted  in South Carolina  reported an overall  recurrence  rate  of  2.9%  over  a  period  of  33  years  (1970  to  2002),  but  did  not  provide  any  incidence  estimates (38). It must be noted, a wide discrepancy exists in setting criteria to define recurrent  cases  across  studies, which makes  comparisons  difficult. However,  this  American  study  (38)  used  a minimum  12 months  inactivity period  to define  recurrent  cases  as  recommended by  Center for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta.  One possible explanation of the low incidence in this  setting  might  be  related  to  quality  of  heath  delivery  through  a  centralized  system,  which  ensures uniform prescription of standard treatment regimens.     Our  study  showed  almost  a  quarter  of  recurrent  cases  occurred  five  years  after  treatment  completion.  The  time  to  recurrent  diagnoses