Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Migration and survival of juvenile spring Chinook salmon and sockeye salmon determined by a large-scale.. Rechisky, Erin Leanne 2010

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
ubc_2010_spring_rechisky_erin.pdf [ 3.27MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0069587.json
JSON-LD: 1.0069587+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0069587.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0069587+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0069587+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0069587+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0069587 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0069587.txt
Citation
1.0069587.ris

Full Text

    MIGRATION AND SURVIVAL OF JUVENILE SPRING CHINOOK AND  SOCKEYE SALMON DETERMINED BY A LARGE­SCALE TELEMETRY ARRAY       by      Erin Leanne Rechisky      B.Sc., The University of North Carolina at Wilmington, 1994  M.Sc., The University of Rhode Island, 2002        A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY    in    The Faculty of Graduate Studies  (Zoology)      THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)      April 2010              © Erin Leanne Rechisky, 2010 ii  Abstract  This thesis documents the use a large‐scale acoustic telemetry array to track hatchery‐ reared salmon smolts during their seaward migration, presents estimates of early marine  survival, and describes migration behaviour in the ocean of two species of Pacific salmon from  the Columbia and Fraser River basins.   In the Columbia River basin, it is hypothesized that seaward migrating Snake River spring  Chinook salmon suffer from “delayed mortality” due to passage through eight hydropower  dams or “differential delayed mortality” from transportation via barge around the dams.  I  tested these hypotheses by comparing survival of in‐river migrating smolts from the Snake  River basin to 1) a Yakima River population that migrated past only four dams and 2) a Snake  River group that was transported around all dams. Early marine survival estimates of non‐ transported Snake and Yakima smolts from the mouth of the Columbia River to Vancouver  Island (a 485 km, one month journey) was equal in both 2006 and 2008 (2007 estimates were  not available), which contradicts the delayed mortality theory.  Early marine survival for the  transported groups was slightly higher than for the in‐river migrants, again contradicting the  differential delayed mortality theory.  These measurements form the first direct experimental  test of key theories concerning juvenile fish survival in the coastal ocean.   Cultus Lake sockeye salmon are a genetically unique population from the Fraser River basin  and are now endangered due to the very low return of adults in recent years. Mean  survivorship of smolts (2004‐7) from release to the northern Strait of Georgia ranged from 10‐ 50%, while survivorship to the final sub‐array in Queen Charlotte Strait ranged from 7‐28%.  Cultus Lake smolts displayed four migratory behaviours: northward migration to enter the  Pacific Ocean via Queen Charlotte Strait; westward migration through the Strait of Juan de  Fuca; migration into Howe Sound before continued the migration north; and migration  upstream into Cultus Lake. These are the first direct observations of movement and survival for  Fraser River sockeye salmon smolts. The availability of early marine survival data fills key  knowledge gaps and as well as permitting direct testing of important salmon conservation  hypotheses and rapid scientific advance. iii  Table of Contents  Abstract ................................................................................................................................... ii  Table of Contents ................................................................................................................... iii  List of Tables........................................................................................................................... vii  List of Figures ..........................................................................................................................ix  Acknowledgements ................................................................................................................ xii  Dedication .............................................................................................................................. xv  Co‐authorship Statement ...................................................................................................... xvi  1  General Introduction .................................................................................................... 1  1.1  Conservation of depleted species ................................................................................... 1  1.2  Marine survival of juvenile salmonids ............................................................................ 2  1.3  Threatened salmon in the Pacific Northwest ................................................................. 4  1.4  Spring Chinook salmon, Snake River basin, USA ............................................................ 4  1.5  Cultus Lake sockeye salmon, Fraser River, Canada ........................................................ 6  1.6  Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking array (POST) ...................................................................... 8  1.7  Estimating survival from telemetry data ...................................................................... 10  1.8  Thesis objectives ........................................................................................................... 12  1.9  References .................................................................................................................... 14  2  Surgical Implantation of Acoustic Tags: Influence of Tag Loss and Tag‐induced  Mortality on Free‐ranging and Hatchery‐held Spring Chinook Salmon (O. tschawtscha)  Smolts ........................................................................................................................ 20  2.1  Introduction .................................................................................................................. 20  2.2  Methods ........................................................................................................................ 23  2.2.1  Study/release sites ........................................................................................ 23  2.2.2  Tags and tagging .......................................................................................... 24  2.2.3  Captive study ................................................................................................. 26  2.2.4  Field study ..................................................................................................... 28  2.2.5  Data analyses ................................................................................................ 29  2.3  Results ........................................................................................................................... 33  2.3.1  Tag effects‐ Captive studies .......................................................................... 33  2.3.2  Tag effects‐ Field studies ............................................................................... 37  2.4  Discussion ..................................................................................................................... 41  2.5  References .................................................................................................................... 67  3  Experimental Measurement of Hydrosystem‐induced Delayed Mortality in Juvenile  Columbia River Spring Chinook Salmon Using a Large‐scale Acoustic Array ................ 70  3.1  Introduction .................................................................................................................. 70  3.2  Methods ........................................................................................................................ 71 iv  3.2.1  Populations used in the study ....................................................................... 71  3.2.2  Tagging ......................................................................................................... 72  3.2.3  Array location ................................................................................................ 72  3.2.4  Survival analysis ............................................................................................ 73  3.2.5  Cross‐shelf distribution .................................................................................. 74  3.3  Results ........................................................................................................................... 74  3.3.1  Survival .......................................................................................................... 74  3.3.2  Coastal ocean distribution ............................................................................ 76  3.4  Discussion ..................................................................................................................... 76  3.4.1  Study limitations ........................................................................................... 76  3.4.2  Conclusions .................................................................................................... 76  3.5  References .................................................................................................................... 81  4  Comparative Early Ocean Survival and Migration Behaviour of Juvenile Spring Chinook  Salmon Migrating from Two Tributaries of the Columbia River .................................. 82  4.1  Introduction .................................................................................................................. 82  4.2  Methods ........................................................................................................................ 84  4.2.1  Populations studied ....................................................................................... 84  4.2.2  Tag and release sites ..................................................................................... 85  4.2.3  Tag specs and surgical protocol .................................................................... 86  4.2.4  Acoustic array location .................................................................................. 88  4.2.5  Survival estimate analyses ............................................................................ 89  4.2.6  Survival models and model selection ............................................................ 92  4.2.7  Survival ratios ................................................................................................ 93  4.2.8  Survival rate .................................................................................................. 94  4.2.9  Cross shelf distribution .................................................................................. 95  4.2.10  Travel time and migration rate ..................................................................... 96  4.3  Results ........................................................................................................................... 97  4.3.1  Model selection ............................................................................................. 97  4.3.2  Estimates of survival ..................................................................................... 98  4.3.3  Survival ratios .............................................................................................. 100  4.3.4  Survival rate ................................................................................................ 101  4.3.5  Detection probability, p ............................................................................... 101  4.3.6  Cross‐shelf distribution ................................................................................ 102  4.3.7  Travel time and migration rate ................................................................... 103  4.4  Discussion ................................................................................................................... 104  4.4.1  Model selection ........................................................................................... 104  4.4.2  Survival in the hydrosystem ........................................................................ 105  4.4.3  Survival in the estuary ................................................................................. 106  4.4.4  Early marine survival ................................................................................... 107  4.4.5  Delayed mortality of Snake River spring Chinook salmon .......................... 107  4.4.6  Assessing additional model assumptions.................................................... 108  4.4.7  Survival rate ................................................................................................ 109  4.4.8  Marine migration characteristics ................................................................ 110 v  4.4.9  Study limitations ......................................................................................... 111  4.4.10  Conclusions .................................................................................................. 111  4.5  References .................................................................................................................. 129  5  Early Marine Survival of Transported and In‐River Migrant Hatchery Snake River Spring  Chinook Salmon Smolts: Does Transportation Reduce Survival? .............................. 133  5.1  Introduction ................................................................................................................ 133  5.2  Methods ...................................................................................................................... 137  5.2.1  Smolt acquisition and tagging .................................................................... 137  5.2.2  Transportation of acoustic tagged smolts .................................................. 141  5.2.3  POST array elements and location .............................................................. 142  5.2.4  Data analysis ............................................................................................... 143  5.2.5  Travel time and rate of movement ............................................................. 149  5.3  Results ......................................................................................................................... 149  5.3.1  In‐river survivorship ..................................................................................... 149  5.3.2  Estuary and plume survival ......................................................................... 150  5.3.3  Coastal ocean survival ................................................................................. 150  5.3.4  Survivorship from release to Willapa Bay and Lippy Point ......................... 151  5.3.5  Post Bonneville survivorship to Willapa Bay and Lippy Point ..................... 151  5.3.6  Post‐release mortality ................................................................................. 152  5.3.7  Timing of ocean entry ................................................................................. 153  5.3.8  Distribution on the ocean lines ................................................................... 154  5.3.9  Travel time and rate of movement ............................................................. 154  5.4  Discussion ................................................................................................................... 155  5.5  References .................................................................................................................. 175  6  Freshwater and Marine Migration and Survival of Endangered Cultus Lake Sockeye  Salmon Smolts Using POST, A large‐scale Acoustic Telemetry Array ......................... 180  6.1  Introduction ................................................................................................................ 180  6.2  Methods ...................................................................................................................... 182  6.2.1  Study site ..................................................................................................... 182  6.2.2  Smolt release groups ................................................................................... 182  6.2.3  Tag characteristics ...................................................................................... 183  6.2.4  Surgical techniques ..................................................................................... 184  6.2.5  Hydrophone receiver deployments ............................................................. 184  6.2.6  Freshwater mobile tracking ........................................................................ 185  6.2.7  Data analysis ............................................................................................... 186  6.2.8  Survival rate estimation .............................................................................. 188  6.3  Results ......................................................................................................................... 190  6.3.1  Survival estimates ....................................................................................... 190  6.3.2  Migration behaviour ................................................................................... 192  6.4  Discussion ................................................................................................................... 195  6.4.1  Survival ........................................................................................................ 195  6.4.2  Migration highways .................................................................................... 197 vi  6.4.3  The POST Array............................................................................................ 198  6.5  References .................................................................................................................. 212  7  General Conclusions ................................................................................................. 216  7.1  Transmitters had little effect on migrating salmon smolts ........................................ 216  7.2  Marine survival co‐varied with predicted ocean conditions ...................................... 218  7.3  Delayed mortality hypotheses challenged with early marine survival data .............. 218  7.4  Early marine survival data promote hypothesis testing ............................................. 219  7.5  Tag size and other study limitations ........................................................................... 220  7.6  Future research ........................................................................................................... 222  7.7  Applications of early marine survival data ................................................................. 223  7.8  References .................................................................................................................. 224  Appendix A. Travel Time Tables ........................................................................................... 226  Appendix B. Migration Rate Tables ...................................................................................... 230  Appendix C. Distribution of Mortality Rates ........................................................................ 234  Appendix D. Additional Peer‐reviewed Thesis Related Publications .................................... 239  D.1 Published papers .............................................................................................................. 239  D.2 Papers in review ............................................................................................................... 239  D.3 Non‐peer‐reviewed book chapters submitted ................................................................. 239  Appendix E. Animal Care Certification ................................................................................. 240       vii  List of Tables  Table 2.1. Tagging summary for captive spring Chinook salmon smolts tagged with 9 mm  dummy acoustic transmitters (DATs) in 2006, and 7 mm DATs in 2008. ......................... 59  Table 2.2. Tagging summary for seaward migrating spring Chinook salmon smolts tagged with 9  mm acoustic transmitters in 2006 and 7 mm transmitters in 2008. ................................ 60  Table 2.3. Tag burden (%) of spring Chinook salmon smolts implanted with 9 mm and 7 mm  dummy acoustic transmitters (DAT) used in captive tag effects studies, and 9 mm and 7  mm live transmitters used to estimate in‐river (IR) survival estimates. .......................... 61  Table 2.4. Summary of statistical analyses used in the captive tag study. ................................... 62  Table 2.5. Model selection for fork length (FL) analyses using Akaike’s Information Criterion  (AIC). .................................................................................................................................. 66  Table 3.1. Mean survival for Snake River (Dworshak) and Yakima (CESRF) spring Chinook salmon  implanted with V9‐6L acoustic transmitters and PIT tags in 2006. .................................. 80  Table 4.1. Tagging summary for seaward migrating spring Chinook smolts tagged with 9mm (3.1  grams in air) acoustic transmitters in 2006 and 2007, and 7mm (1.6 grams in air)  transmitters in 2008........................................................................................................ 123  Table 4.2. Model selection for Columbia River spring Chinook salmon survival analyses using  Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC).. ............................................................................. 124  Table 4.3. Segment specific survival probabilities of Dworshak and Yakima yearling Chinook  salmon released from Kooskia National Fish Hatchery, Kooskia, ID, and Chandler Juvenile  Monitoring Facility, Prosser, WA, respectively. .............................................................. 125  Table 4.4. Survivorship from release of Dworshak and Yakima yearling Chinook salmon released  from Kooskia National Fish Hatchery, Kooskia, ID, and Chandler Juvenile Monitoring  Facility, Prosser, WA, respectively .................................................................................. 126  Table 4.5. Estimated Dworshak to Yakima spring Chinook salmon survival ratios. Survival ratios  are from Lake Wallula (LaW) to McGowan’s Channel (McG) 10 km below Bonneville Dam  (hydro), from McG to Astoria (Ast), McG to Willapa Bay (WiB), and McG to north  western Vancouver Island (LIP). ..................................................................................... 127  Table 4.6. Detection probability of Snake and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts on POST  sub‐arrays in the Columbia River basin .......................................................................... 128 viii  Table 5.1. Summary of Dworshak‐origin spring Chinook salmon tagging. In 2006‐07 smolts were  implanted with 9 mm acoustic transmitters; in 2008 smolts were implanted with 7 mm  transmitters. ................................................................................................................... 168  Table 5.2. Survivorship (SE) from release of in‐river (IR) and transported Dworshak spring  Chinook salmon smolts. .................................................................................................. 169  Table 5.3. Survivorship (SE) of in‐river (IR) and transported spring Chinook salmon smolts from  McGowan's Channel (below Bonneville Dam). ............................................................... 169  Table 5.4. Segment survival (SE) of in‐river (IR) and transported Dworshak spring Chinook  salmon smolts. ................................................................................................................ 170  Table 5.5. Transport to in‐river (T/I) and differential delayed mortality (D) ratios. ................... 171  Table 5.6. Mean Travel time from release to sub‐arrays (days, st. dev.). .................................. 172  Table 5.7. Segment specific travel times (days; st. dev.) of in‐river (IR) and transported (TR)  Dworshak spring Chinook salmon smolts. ...................................................................... 173  Table 5.8. Segment‐specific rate of movement (km/day; st. dev.) of in‐river (IR) and transported  (TR) Dworshak spring Chinook salmon smolts in 2006, 2007 and 2008. ....................... 174  Table 6.1. Summary of Cultus Lake sockeye salmon smolts tagged and released 1. ................. 208  Table 6.2. Model selection results for recaptures‐only survival probability estimates1. ........... 209  Table 6.3. Migratory behaviour categories for Cultus Lake sockeye salmon in 2004‐2007.  The  first number in each column is the number of fish detected ......................................... 210  Table 6.4. Residualization and initial downstream migration surveys of Cultus Lake and the  rivers that connect it to the Fraser River. ....................................................................... 211  Table A.1. Segment specific travel time of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts  (mean days (st. dev.)) ...................................................................................................... 226  Table A.2. Cumulative travel time of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts to  detection sites (mean days (st. dev.)). ............................................................................ 228  Table B.1. Segment specific rate of movement of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon  smolts (mean km/day (st. dev)) ...................................................................................... 230  Table B.2. Cumulative migration rate of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts to  detection sites (mean km/day (st. dev.)) ........................................................................ 232       ix  List of Figures  Figure 1.1. The estimated proportion of total integrated mortality accounted for by the juvenile  in‐river migration, ocean life stages and adult upstream migration for spring Chinook  from the Clearwater River (Columbia River Basin, USA), 1999 to 2003 with standard  error (SE). ............................................................................................................................ 2  Figure 1.2. Map of the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) array. Red bars and dots indicate  individual sub‐arrays. POST map courtesy of the POST Project 2009. ............................... 9  Figure 2.1. Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) acoustic array. ................................................... 49  Figure 2.2. Size distribution of Dworshak (red bars) and Yakima (blue bars) spring Chinook  salmon tagged with 9 mm and 7 mm dummy acoustic transmitters (2006 and 2008,  respectively), initial size of smolts that expelled tags (white bars), and initial size of fish  that died during the tag study (black bars). ...................................................................... 50  Figure 2.3. Tag retention and survival for Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon tagged  with 9 mm dummy acoustic transmitters (solid lines) and passive integrated transponder  tags (dashed lines) in 2006. .............................................................................................. 51  Figure 2.4. Tag retention and survival for Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon tagged  with 7 mm dummy acoustic transmitters (solid lines) and passive integrated transponder  tags (dashed lines) in 2008. .............................................................................................. 52  Figure 2.5. Post‐surgery healing. .................................................................................................. 53  Figure 2.6. Boxplots (median, quartiles, and 95% confidence interval) of fork length (FL) for  Dworshak (a) and Yakima (b) spring Chinook salmon tagged with 9 mm dummy acoustic  transmitters (DAT) and passive integrated transponder tags (Control) in 2006. ............. 54  Figure 2.7. Boxplots (median, quartiles, and 95% confidence interval) of fork length (FL) for  Dworshak (a) and Yakima (b) spring Chinook salmon tagged with 7 mm dummy acoustic  transmitters (DAT) and passive integrated transponder tags (Control) in 2008. ............. 54  Figure 2.8. Survivorship of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon in 2006 and 2008 ..... 55  Figure 2.9. Survival in 2006 by size class (fork length) of migrating Dworshak (red) and Yakima  (blue) spring Chinook salmon tagged with 9 mm acoustic transmitters.. ........................ 56  Figure 2.10. Survival in 2008 by size class (fork length) of migrating Dworshak (red) and Yakima  (blue) spring Chinook salmon tagged with 7 mm acoustic transmitters. ......................... 57 x  Figure 2.11. Proportion of tagged animals available for detection from the captive tag study (K;  black circles), estimated in river survival with 95% confidence intervals (red symbols),  and estimated IR survival corrected for tag effects (SK, larger, grey symbols) ................ 58  Figure 3.1. Map of the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) acoustic array and distribution of  spring Chinook smolts on the continental shelf.. ............................................................. 78  Figure 4.1. Map of the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) acoustic array ............................... 113  Figure 4.2. Survivorship of spring Chinook salmon smolts to Lippy Point on the northwestern  end of Vancouver Island. ................................................................................................ 114  Figure 4.3. Dworshak (red) and Yakima (blue) Spring Chinook salmon survival estimates in four  migration zones in 2006 and 2008. Numbers in parentheses above bars indicate mean  survival per day. .............................................................................................................. 115  Figure 4.4. Cross‐shelf distribution of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts off of  southern Washington at Willapa Bay in 2006, 2007, and 2008.. ................................... 116  Figure 4.5. Cross‐shelf distribution of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts at  Lippy Point on northwestern Vancouver Island in 2006 and 2008. ............................... 119  Figure 4.6. Migration rate vs. fork length (FL) of spring Chinook salmon smolts (Dworshak and  Yakima smolts combined ................................................................................................ 121  Figure 4.7. Segment specific travel time of Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts  in the Columbia River hydrosystem and Pacific Ocean in 2006, 2007 and 2008 ........... 122  Figure 5.1. Schematic of components used in transportation to in‐river survival ratios (T/I) and  post‐Bonneville differential delayed mortality ratios (D). .............................................. 160  Figure 5.2. Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) acoustic array. ................................................. 161  Figure 5.3. Survivorship of in‐river (IR) and transported (TR) Dworshak spring Chinook salmon  smolts from release in 2006, 2007 and 2008. ................................................................ 162  Figure 5.4. Conditional survivorship of in‐river and transported Dworshak spring Chinook  salmon smolts from McGowan’s Channel (10 km below Bonneville Dam) in 2006, 2007  and 2008. ........................................................................................................................ 163  Figure 5.5. Timing of ocean entry of two release groups of in‐river (IR) and transported (TR)  Dworshak spring Chinook salmon smolts in 2006, 2007 and 2008 ................................ 164  Figure 5.6. Cross‐shelf distribution of in‐river (IR) and transported (TR) Dworshak spring Chinook  salmon smolts off of southern Washington at Willapa Bay in 2006, 2007, and 2008. .. 165 xi  Figure 5.7. Cross‐shelf distribution of in‐river (IR) and transported (TR) Dworshak spring Chinook  salmon smolts at Lippy Point on northwestern Vancouver Island in 2006 and 2008 .... 166  Figure 5.8. Migration rate vs. FL of Dworshak spring Chinook salmon smolts in 2006 and 2008  (in‐river and transported smolts combined) .................................................................. 167  Figure 6.1.  The southern British Columbia components of the POST array. ............................. 200  Figure 6.2. Survivorship estimates from release to exit from the Strait of Georgia system for  different assumed detection probabilities on the final QCS and JDF lines .................... 201  Figure 6.3. Survivorship relative to cumulative distance migrated for acoustically tagged Cultus  Lake sockeye. .................................................................................................................. 202  Figure 6.4. Segment‐specific survival estimates for acoustically tagged Cultus Lake sockeye  salmon from release to the lower Fraser River, lower Fraser River to NSOG, and NSOG to  QCS, 2004‐07. .................................................................................................................. 203  Figure 6.5. Distribution of migrating acoustically tagged Cultus Lake sockeye salmon on the  Northern Strait of Georgia lines. ..................................................................................... 204  Figure 6.6. Distribution of migrating acoustically tagged Cultus Lake sockeye salmon on the  Queen Charlotte Strait line ............................................................................................. 205  Figure 6.7. Significance of a series of χ2 goodness of fit tests obtained by grouping fish detected  on neighbouring receivers .............................................................................................. 206  Figure 6.8.  Average travel rates for different sections of the migration route.  Vertical bars  represent 95% confidence intervals.  (2004: ; 2005: ; 2006: , 2007: ). ............ 207  Figure C.1. Bootstrapped distribution of mortality rates per km of travel of seaward migrating  Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts in 2006 (higher positive values  represent greater mortality). .......................................................................................... 234  Figure C.2. Bootstrapped distribution of mortality rates per km of travel of seaward migrating  Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts in 2007 (higher positive values  represent greater mortality). .......................................................................................... 235  Figure C.3. Bootstrapped distribution of mortality rates per km of travel of seaward migrating  Dworshak and Yakima spring Chinook salmon smolts in 2008 (higher positive values  represent greater mortality). .......................................................................................... 236  Figure C.4. Bootstrapped distribution of post‐release mortality rates per km of travel of  seaward migrating juvenile Dworshak spring Chinook salmon migrating in‐river (IR) or  transported (TR) in 2006‐8 (higher positive values represent greater mortality).......... 238 xii  Acknowledgements  This research was successful because of the assistance and cooperation of a number of  people here in British Columbia, and in Washington and Idaho. I thank my PhD advisor Carl  Walters (UBC Dept. of Zoology) and my advisory committee David Welch (Kintama Research  Corp.), Eric (Rick) Taylor (UBC Dept. of Zoology), Scott Hinch (UBC Dept. of Forest Sciences) and  Steve Martell (UBC Dept. of Zoology) for feedback on my thesis. David Welch developed the  Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) array and acted as my research supervisor. In the early days  of POST, each receiver was weighted down with many pounds of boom chain left over from the  logging industry, for which my back is not thankful; however it has been exciting to observe and  be involved in the development of the POST array.  Dale Webber from Vemco informed me of the POST project when it was at its infancy. I  think I thank Dale for encouraging me to relocate from the Bahamas to Canada.   Many people contributed to the success of the field work. A small group of us performed  surgery on over 3000 salmon smolts. Thanks to Melinda Jacobs and Adrian Ladouceur (Kintama  Research) for ordering surgical supplies, preparing surgical kits and performing surgeries. Phillip  Pawlik and Michael Pawlik assisted with surgeries and were always a pleasure to work with.  Thanks also to Andrea Osborn, DVM, for teaching me how to perform surgery on bananas and  salmon smolts. Initially I was heavily involved in deployment and recovery of acoustic receiver  sub‐arrays, however Paul Winchell from Kintama Research currently does most of the logistical  work, and Paul and Melinda Jacobs have logged much of the time at sea, and for that I am  thankful.   I thank Aswea Porter (Kintama Research), Mike Melnychuk (University of Washington) and  Carl Schwarz (Simon Fraser University) for their assistance with Program MARK. Steve Martell  introduced me to the programming language R, and I thank Rob Ehrens, Robyn Forrest,  Meaghan Darcy Bryan, Brett van Poorten, and anyone else within a stones throw away from my  desk for their assistance in wielding it.   Isabel Gaboury (formerly at Kintama Research) and Aswea Porter provided detection  databases, and Luciana Neaga (Kintama Research) provided animations of smolt migrations that xiii  were always a crowd pleaser at conferences. David Lind from Yakama Fisheries and Steve Smith  from NOAA kindly provided annual PIT tag survival estimates of Columbia River spring Chinook  salmon. Dave Marvin from the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission assisted me with the  Columbia Basin PIT Tag Information System. Dustene Cummings, Dave Ayers and Brian Stevens  from the University of Idaho assisted me with tag retention studies and tagging. John McKern  (Fish Passage Solutions) designed his own fish transportation truck and transported salmon  smolts via truck to the transportation barges. I thank him for his assistance and for his historical  recollection of research in the Columbia River basin. I also thank John and his lovely wife, Janey,  for their hospitality during my visits to Walla Walla, WA.   The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff at Dworshak and Kooskia National Fish Hatcheries in  Idaho, particularly Ray Jones, Adam Izbicki, Jerry Fogelman, and Kenny Simpson provided  logistical support and fish monitoring. The Yakama Fisheries staff at the Cle Elum  Supplementation and Research Facility, Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility, and Prosser  Hatchery in Washington, particularly Dave Fast, Mark Johnston, Michael Fiander, Joe Blodgett  assisted with logistical support and fish monitoring. Al Stobbart from the Department of  Fisheries and Oceans at the Inch Creek hatchery in BC supplied us with large sockeye salmon  smolts.   Funding for my graduate research stipend and for the development for the POST array was  provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, Natural Sciences and Research Council of  Canada, Kintama Research, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Canada Foundation for  Innovation, the Ocean Tracking Network, the Census of Marine Life, the Vancouver Aquarium,  Pacific Salmon Commission, Pacific Salmon Foundation, and Habitat & Conservation Trust Fund,  Province of BC.    I attended many conferences in Oregon, Washington, BC, and Alaska during my time as a  PhD student and travel expenses were primarily provided by Kintama Research. I managed to  escape the Pacific Northwest to attend a tagging and telemetry conference in New Zealand and  I thank my advisor Carl Walters, the Fisheries Centre (Pacific Fishery Biologist Award), the UBC  Faculty of Graduate Studies, and the organizers and sponsors of the meeting for funding for  travel.    xiv  A rite of passage to earning a doctoral degree includes successfully formatting and printing  your thesis in the midst of last minute editing and a looming deadline. I thank Mike Melnychuk  and Ian McCulloch for their assistance.  My friends and family have always been supportive and I thank them for their interest in  my research. My time off was well spent here in BC, primarily with Robyn Forrest and Chris  O’Grady, Meaghan Darcy Bryan and David Bryan, Mike Melnychuk and Valeria Vergera (and  Martina too!), Laura White and Clayton McIntosh. Thank you for commiserating over data  analyses and discussing thesis details but thank you most of all for the amazing outdoor  adventures, and for your friendship and support. I look forward to many more.    And finally, to my husband, Ian McCulloch, whom I met at the very beginning of this  journey, who never once asked when I was going to be finished with my thesis. Your patience is  limitless; your quiet encouragement is irreplaceable. Thank you for your understanding and  endless support.      xv  Dedication      In memory of my beloved Grandmother, Marion McGilvray You will be missed.      xvi  Co­authorship Statement  For the duration of my PhD program I worked with David Welch, who appears as second  author for Chapters 2‐5 (Columbia River spring Chinook salmon survival). Dr. Welch had  envisioned an experiment to test delayed mortality hypotheses of Snake River spring Chinook  salmon in the Columbia River basin using the POST array. For several years we worked to make  the experimental design successful. Specifically, for Chapters 2‐5, I identified the appropriate  spring Chinook salmon populations to be used in the analyses, I coordinated with state and  tribal fishery agencies in the U.S. on smolt transfer, holding and tagging logistics, I performed  the research, tagged salmon smolts, deployed and recovered some of telemetry equipment,  analyzed the data, and prepared the manuscripts.  Chapter 6 (survival and migration of Cultus Lake sockeye salmon) was truly a collaborative  effort involving Kintama Research staff, particularly Aswea Porter and David Welch, and my  previous lab‐mate Mike Melnychuk, who’s Ph.D. research at UBC focused on survival of Fraser  and Squamish river salmon smolts. For the duration of the study (2004‐7) I contributed to  design of the research program, fish tagging, equipment deployment and recovery, mobile  tracking in Cultus Lake and the Vedder and Fraser rivers, data analysis, and preparation of the  manuscript.       1  1 General Introduction  1.1 Conservation of depleted species  As the human population swells and the need for and exploitation of natural resources  continues to increase, our “ecological footprint” (Wackernagel and Rees 1996) continues to  expand. Human activities and development have altered much of the landscape, and have  encroached upon freshwater and marine environments as well. As a result, many species and  populations of plants and animals, both terrestrial and aquatic, have been severely negatively  impacted and are greatly depleted relative to historical levels. In Canada and the United States,  wildlife are protected by the federal government under the Species at Risk Act (SARA), or the  Endangered Species Act (ESA), respectively. Both of these acts are charged with identifying,  protecting, recovering, and managing endangered or threatened species. Population  monitoring is an integral part of developing recovery strategies and determining critical  habitats. These assessments provide the best available science to resource managers.     Pacific salmon are highly migratory and utilize freshwater rivers, streams and lakes to  spawn and rear, as well as estuarine and marine habitats to forage and mature before returning  to the their natal streams. The anadromous life history of Pacific salmonids makes them  particularly vulnerable because they rely on a wide spectrum of habitats for survival, and these  habitats, in most cases, have been significantly altered. Rivers and streams have been physically  disturbed by the development of roads, infrastructure, dams, and irrigation channels. These  physical changes alter water levels, water flow and may affect habitats upstream and  downstream of the disturbance (Mallik and Richardson 2009). They have been chemically  altered by point source and non point source pollution. Even the vast oceans have been  affected by human activity; increasing global demand for fossil fuels has lead to increased  atmospheric carbon dioxide and sea surface temperatures that could have major direct and  indirect effects on salmon populations of the Pacific Northwest (Ashley 2006).       2  1.2 Marine survival of juvenile salmonids   Substantial mortality occurs during the 2‐3 year marine life history stage of migratory  salmonids (Bradford 1995). The estimated proportion of total integrated mortality is  significantly higher in the ocean when compared to mortality during the juvenile outmigration  or the adult migration upstream for spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (also  called yearling or stream‐type) from the Columbia River basin (Buchanan et al. 2007, Figure  1.1). Much of this mortality occurs soon after ocean entry (Pearcy 1992), and a second phase of  juvenile mortality may occur several months later if smolts do not attain favourable size during  their first summer in the ocean (Beamish and Mahnken 2001). Mortality in the ocean is driven  largely by predation, while size at ocean entry (larger smolts generally have higher survival),  timing of ocean entry, and rearing history (wild fish tend to return at higher rates than hatchery  raised) are all factors that contribute to variation in juvenile mortality rates (Quinn et al. 2002).     Figure 1.1. The estimated proportion of total integrated mortality accounted for by the juvenile  in‐river migration, ocean life stages and adult upstream migration for spring Chinook from the  Clearwater River (Columbia River Basin, USA), 1999 to 2003 with standard error (SE). From  Buchannan et al. 2007.    Changes in ocean and atmospheric conditions also have profound effects on salmon  production in the Pacific basin. Long‐term data sets of ocean climate conditions, including sea  surface temperature, show fluctuations that occur on decadal or interdecadal timescales. These  fluctuations correlate with trends in Pacific salmon productivity (Mantua et al. 1997; Welch et  ocean (84.6%, SE=1.8%)  juvenile in‐river  migration (11.2%, SE=1.2%) adult upstream  migration (4.2%, SE=1.2%)3  al. 1998) as well as zooplankton species distribution and abundance (Mackas et al. 2007).  Interspecific competition for these food resources may be an important factor affecting salmon  populations (Ruggerone and Nielsen 2004), therefore resource availability influenced by ocean  climate likely determines early marine growth and success of salmon smolts after ocean entry.