UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Modeling neurodevelopmental disorders : expression of neuroligin adhesion molecules in vivo Hines, Rochelle M. 2009

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2009_fall_hines_rochelle.pdf [ 7.12MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0067253.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0067253-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0067253-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0067253-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0067253-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0067253-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0067253-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0067253-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0067253.ris

Full Text

MODELING NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS:  EXPRESSION OF NEUROLIGIN ADHESION MOLECULES IN VIVO    by  Rochelle M. Hines    B.Sc. Hons., University of Lethbridge, 2002    A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF   THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY    in  The Faculty of Graduate Studies  (Neuroscience)    The University of British Columbia  (Vancouver)    May, 2009    © Rochelle M. Hines, 2009    ii    ABSTRACT    At post synaptic sites, the neuroligin (NL) family of proteins is thought to play an important role  in synapse maturation, and  regulation of excitatory and  inhibitory synapses. Being selectively  enriched  at  either  excitatory  (NL1,3)  or  inhibitory  (NL2)  synapses, NL’s  have  been  shown  to  regulate  the  ratio  of  excitation  to  inhibition  (E/I  ratio),  a  process  critical  for  normal  brain  development.  In  addition,  NLs  have  been  linked  to  neurodevelopmental  disorders  through  genetic studies. To advance our understanding of synaptic regulation by NLs, and their potential  role  in  synaptic dysfunciton  in neurodevelopmental disorders, we have developed  strains of  transgenic mice which overexpress either HA  tagged‐NL1, or  ‐NL2 under  control of  the Thy1  promoter.   Detailed behavioural analysis of TgNL2 mice revealed anxiety, stereotyped jumping behaviour,  and  impairments  in  social  approach  and  reciprocal  social  interactions.  These  animals  also  displayed  fronto‐parietal  seizure activity as  shown by  chronic  in  vivo EEG  recording. Synapse  analysis  in TgNL2 frontal cortex revealed changes  in the number and morphology of synapses  compared to wildtype littermates. A small change in NL2 expression results in enlarged synaptic  contact size and vesicle reserve pool and an overall reduction  in the E/I ratio.  In addition, the  frequency  of miniature  inhibitory  synaptic  currents  was  also  found  to  be  increased  in  the  frontal cortex of TgNL2 mice.   Behavioural assessment of TgNL1 mice revealed deficits in memory acquisition and retrieval in  water maze  paradigms. Golgi  and  electron microscopy  analysis  revealed  changes  in  synapse  iii    morphology  indicative  of  increased  maturation  of  excitatory  synapses.  In  parallel,  electrophysiological examination indicated a shift in the E/I ratio towards increased excitation.  Further experiments revealed impairment in the induction of long term potentiation.  These data demonstrate that altered expression of members of the NL  family  in vivo  leads to  altered synapse number and morphology, which potentially underlies the profound behavioural  changes. We  also observed    a predominant effect of NL2 expression on  inhibitory  synapses,  with NL1 primarily  influencing excitatory  synapses,  supporting  the  idea  that NL’s may  act  to  regulate  the  E/I  ratio.  In  addition  this  data  may  provide  insight  into  the  pathology  and  symptoms of  neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism thought be be caused by synaptic  abnormalities.        iv    TABLE OF CONTENTS       ABSTRACT ...................................................................................................................... ii    TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................... iii    LIST OF TABLES ............................................................................................................. viii    LIST OF FIGURES ............................................................................................................. ix    ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................................ xii     ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ................................................................................................. xiv    DEDICATION ................................................................................................................. xvi    CO‐AUTHORSHIP STATEMENT ...................................................................................... xvii  1.  INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1  GENERAL INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................................. 1  BACKGROUND AND CURRENT KNOWLEDGE ....................................................................................................................... 5  1.1.  SYNAPTIC STRUCTURE ....................................................................................................................................... 5  1.2.  COMPARING EXCITATORY AND INHIBITORY SYNAPSES ............................................................................................. 7  1.3.  THE MOLECULAR COMPOSITION OF SYNAPSES ...................................................................................................... 8  Postsynaptic Components ................................................................................................................................ 11  1.3.1.  Glutamate Receptors ......................................................................................................................... 11  1.3.1.1.  AMPA Receptors ....................................................................................................................................... 12  1.3.1.2.  NMDA Receptors ...................................................................................................................................... 13  1.3.1.3.  Kainate Receptors ..................................................................................................................................... 14  1.3.1.4.  Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors ......................................................................................................... 14  1.3.2.  γ‐aminobutyric Acid and Glycine Receptors ....................................................................................... 15  1.3.2.2.  GABAB Receptors ...................................................................................................................................... 16  1.3.2.3.  Glycine Receptors ..................................................................................................................................... 17  1.3.3.  Scaffolding Proteins ........................................................................................................................... 17  1.3.3.1.  Membrane‐Associated Guanylate Kinases: PSD‐95 Family of Proteins .................................................... 18  1.3.3.2.  Other Scaffolding Proteins of Glutamatergic Synapses ............................................................................ 19  1.3.3.3.  Scaffolding Molecules of Inhibitory Synapses ........................................................................................... 21  1.3.4.  Signalling Molecules .......................................................................................................................... 21  Presynaptic Components .................................................................................................................................. 22  1.3.5.  SNARE Proteins and Vesicle Release Machinery ................................................................................ 22  1.3.6.  Scaffolding Proteins of the Active Zone ............................................................................................. 24  1.3.7.  Neurotransmitter Transporters .......................................................................................................... 27  Trans‐synaptic Components ............................................................................................................................. 28  1.3.8.  Synaptic Adhesion Molecules ............................................................................................................. 28  v    1.3.8.1.  The Neuroligin‐Neurexin Trans‐Synaptic Adhesion System ...................................................................... 29  1.3.8.2.  Other Trans‐Synaptic Adhesion Systems .................................................................................................. 33  1.4.  STEPS OF SYNAPSE FORMATION ........................................................................................................................ 38  1.4.1.  Contact Initiation ............................................................................................................................... 42  1.4.2.  Synaptic Protein Recruitment ............................................................................................................ 45  1.4.2.1.  Postsynaptic Recruitment ......................................................................................................................... 46  1.4.2.2.  Presynaptic Recruitment ........................................................................................................................... 49  1.4.3.  Maturation ......................................................................................................................................... 50  1.4.4.  Elimination ......................................................................................................................................... 52  1.5.  THE RATIO OF EXCITATION TO INHIBITION ........................................................................................................... 54  1.6.  NEUROLIGIN‐NEUREXIN AND THE RATIO OF EXCITATION TO INHIBITION .................................................................... 55  1.7.  THE CASE FOR AUTISM AS AN E/I RATIO DISORDER .............................................................................................. 58  1.8.  AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS ........................................................................................................................ 59  1.8.1.  Symptoms and diagnosis ................................................................................................................... 59  1.8.2.  Genetic Basis of Autism...................................................................................................................... 61  1.8.2.1.  Neuroligins and Related Proteins in Autism.............................................................................................. 62  1.8.3.  Neuropathology and Brain Systems and Circuits Implicated in Autism ............................................. 67  1.8.3.1.  Frontal Cortex ........................................................................................................................................... 70  1.8.3.2.  Amygdala .................................................................................................................................................. 71  1.8.3.3.  Cerebellum ................................................................................................................................................ 72  1.9.  ANIMAL MODELS OF AUTISM ........................................................................................................................... 73  1.10.  RATIONALE AND HYPOTHESES .......................................................................................................................... 75  1.11.  OBJECTIVES .................................................................................................................................................. 76  1.12.  SIGNIFICANCE................................................................................................................................................ 78  1.13.  BIBLIOGRAPHY .............................................................................................................................................. 79  2.  SYNAPTIC  IMBALANCE,  STEREOTYPIES, AND  IMPAIRED  SOCIAL  INTERACTIONS  IN MICE  WITH ALTERED NEUROLIGIN 2 EXPRESSION ....................................................................... 101  2.1.  INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................... 101  2.2.  MATERIALS AND METHODS ........................................................................................................................... 103  2.2.1.  Generation and Genotyping of Transgenic Mice ............................................................................. 103  2.2.2.  Behavioural Assessments ................................................................................................................. 109  2.2.3.  In Situ Hybridization ......................................................................................................................... 111  2.2.4.  Western Blotting .............................................................................................................................. 112  2.2.5.  Immunohistochemistry .................................................................................................................... 113  2.2.6.  Electron Microscopy ......................................................................................................................... 114  2.2.7.  Whole‐Cell Patch Clamp Recordings ................................................................................................ 115  2.2.8.  In Vivo EEG ....................................................................................................................................... 116  2.3.  RESULTS..................................................................................................................................................... 118  2.3.1.  Limb  Clasping  Reveals  a  Neurological  Phenotype  in  Mice  Expressing  Neuroligin  2  that  is  not  Observed in Mice Expressing Neuroligin 1 ..................................................................................................... 118  2.3.2.  Behavioural Test Battery Demonstrates a Consistent, Dose Dependent Phenotype in Mice Expressing  Neuroligin 2 not Observed in Mice Expressing Neuroligin 1 .......................................................................... 119  2.3.3.  Expressed  Neuroligin  2  is  Distributed  Throughout  the  Neuroaxis  in  Neuronal  Cells  and  is  Predominantly Localized to Inhibitory Synaptic Contacts .............................................................................. 124  2.3.4.  Enhancement of Markers of Presynaptic Terminals in Mice Expressing Neuroligin 2 ..................... 124  vi    2.3.5.  EM  Analysis  Reveals  Changes  in  Synapse  Morphology  and  an  Increase  in  Inhibitory  Contacts  in  Frontal Cortex of Mice Expressing Neuroligin 2 ............................................................................................. 129  2.3.6.  Altered Synaptic Transmission in Prefrontal Cortex of Mice Expressing Neuroligin 2 ..................... 132  2.3.7.  Altered Neuroligin 2 Expression Leads to Spontaneous Stereotypies and Anxiety Behaviour ......... 137  2.3.8.  Mice Expressing Neuroligin 2 Display Abnormalities in Social Behaviour ........................................ 143  2.3.9.  Chronic EEG Recording in Freely Moving Neuroligin 2 Transgenic Mice Reveals Bilateral Spike‐Wave  Discharges ...................................................................................................................................................... 147  2.4.  DISCUSSION ................................................................................................................................................ 147  2.5.  BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................................................ 155  3.  LEARNING  DEFICITS,  IMPAIRED  LTP  AND  ALTERED  SYNAPTIC  EXCITATION‐INHIBITION  RATIO IN MICE OVER‐EXPRESSING NEUROLIGIN 1 .............................................................. 160  3.1.  INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................... 160  3.2.  MATERIALS AND METHODS ........................................................................................................................... 161  3.2.1.  Generation and Maintenance of Transgenic Mice ........................................................................... 161  3.2.2.  Genotyping....................................................................................................................................... 162  3.2.3.  Behaviour ......................................................................................................................................... 163  3.2.4.  Lysate Preparation and Western Blotting ........................................................................................ 164  3.2.5.  Golgi Cox Impregnation and Spine Morphometry Measurements .................................................. 165  3.2.6.  Immunostaining ............................................................................................................................... 166  3.2.7.  Antibodies ........................................................................................................................................ 166  3.2.8.  Electron Microscopy ......................................................................................................................... 167  3.2.9.  Electrophysiology ............................................................................................................................. 168  3.3.  RESULTS..................................................................................................................................................... 171  3.3.1.  The  Neuroligin  1  Transgene  is  Expressed  Throughout  the  Brain  and  is  Localized  at  Excitatory  Synapses ......................................................................................................................................................... 171  3.3.2.  Mice  Expressing  Neuroligin  1  do  not  show  Abnormalities  in  Sensory,  Autonomic  or  Basic  Motor  Function 176  3.3.3.  Specific Learning Impairments are Observed in Mice Expressing Neuroligin 1 ................................ 178  3.3.4.  Mice Expressing Neuroligin 1 show Changes in the Expression Levels of Related Synaptic Proteins190  3.3.5.  Alterations in Spine and Synapse Morphology in Mice Expressing Neuroligin 1 ............................. 193  3.3.6.  Mice Expressing Neuroligin 1 show Synaptic Changes Suggestive of a Shift in the Ratio of Excitation  to Inhibition .................................................................................................................................................... 197  3.3.7.  Impairments  in  the  Induction  of  Long  Term  Potentiation  in  the Hippocampus  of Mice  Expressing  Neuroligin 1 .................................................................................................................................................... 200  3.3.8.  Increased Basal Excitation in the Hippocampus of Mice Expressing Neuroligin 1 ........................... 203  3.4.  DISCUSSION ................................................................................................................................................ 206  3.5.  BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................................................ 212  4.  CONCLUDING CHAPTER ............................................................................................... 217  4.1.  SUMMARY OF FINDINGS ................................................................................................................................ 217  4.2.  THE ROLE OF NEUROLIGINS IN SYNAPSE FORMATION .......................................................................................... 218  4.3.  THE ROLE OF NEUROLIGINS IN THE EXCITATORY TO INHIBITORY RATIO ................................................................... 219  4.3.1.  How Could Neuroligins Influence the Excitatory to Inhibitory Ratio? .............................................. 223  4.4.  SYNAPSE ABNORMALITIES IN AUTISM, AND THE ROLE OF NEUROLIGINS & RELATED SYNAPTIC PROTEINS ...................... 228  vii    4.5.  THE ROLE OF THE EXCITATORY TO INHIBITORY RATIO IN AUTISM & OTHER CNS DISORDERS ...................................... 234  4.6.  POSSIBLE THERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES FOR AUTISM .............................................................................................. 236  4.7.  LIMITATIONS OF THE PRESENT FINDINGS .......................................................................................................... 239  4.8.  FINAL CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE .......................................................................................................... 240  4.9.  BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................................................ 242  5.  APPENDIX A: GENERATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TRANSGENIC MOUSE STRAINS   251  5.1.  PREPARATION OF DNA FRAGMENTS FOR PRONUCLEAR INJECTION ........................................................................ 251  5.2.  GENOTYPING AND SCREENING FOUNDERS ........................................................................................................ 251  5.3.  CATALOGUE OF FOUNDERS GENERATED ........................................................................................................... 259  5.4.  PRELIMINARY BEHAVIOUR SCREEN .................................................................................................................. 263  5.5.  BEHAVIOUR SCREEN RATING SCALES ............................................................................................................... 268  5.6.  BIBLIOGRAPHY ............................................................................................................................................ 271  6.  APPENDIX B: OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS ........................................................................ 272  6.1.  PUBLISHED CONTRIBUTIONS .......................................................................................................................... 272  6.2.  CONTRIBUTIONS UNDER REVIEW ..................................................................................................................... 274  7.      APPENDIX C: ETHICS BOARD CERTIFICATES ................................................................ 276        viii    LIST OF TABLES    Table 1.1   Summary  of  the  genetic mutations  in  neuroligin‐neurexin  adhesion molecules  and related synaptic proteins implicated in populations with autism ................ 63    Table 2.1   Summary of the preliminary behavioural screen conducted on all strains ....... 119    Table 3.1   Summary  of  the  preliminary  screen  conducted  on  primary  neuroligin  1  and  neuroligin 2 transgenic strains .......................................................................... 177    Table 4.1   Proposed genetic mouse models relevant to autism ........................................ 258    Table 5.1   Sequences  of  primers  designed  to  detect  neuroligin  1  and  neuroligin  2  transgenes ........................................................................................................ 254    Table 5.2   Details of primer combinations used, the size of PCR product produced and their  intended and actual specificity ......................................................................... 254    Table 5.3   Offspring  generated  from  pronuclear  injection  of  neuroligin  1  HA  Thy1.2  or  neuroligin 2 HA Thy1.2 ...................................................................................... 259    Table 5.4   Summary table of founders used to develop independent strains ................... 262        ix    LIST OF FIGURES    Figure 1.1   Structural and molecular complexity of synaptic contacts ................................... 2     Figure 1.2.   Comparison of key structural and molecular differences between excitatory and  inhibitory synaptic contacts ................................................................................. 9    Figure 1.3.   Schematic and crystal structure of neuroligin and neurexin adhesion molecules     ............................................................................................................................. 30    Figure 1.4.   Neuroligins  and  neurexins  as  central  components  of  synaptic  structure  and  function ............................................................................................................... 36     Figure 1.5.   Key stages thought to be involved in the formation of synaptic contacts .........  40     Figure 1.6.   Control of  the  ratio of excitatory  to  inhibitory  synaptic  contacts by neuroligins  and related molecules ......................................................................................... 56     Figure 1.7.   Schematic structure of neuroligin and neurexin interaction at synaptic contacts     ............................................................................................................................. 65     Figure 1.8.   Brain  regions predicted  to be  involved  in  the behavioural expression of autism  spectrum disorders ............................................................................................. 68     Figure 2.1.   Mice expressing neuroligin 2 display a neurological phenotype related to  levels  of expression ..................................................................................................... 104    Figure 2.2.   Genotyping, antibody generation and basic characterization .......................... 107    Figure 2.3.   Observation  of  transient  kyphosis  and  reduction  in  body  weight  in  mice  expressing neuroligin 2 ..................................................................................... 122    Figure 2.4.   Neuroligin 2 transgene distribution and localization ........................................ 125    Figure 2.5.   Western blotting and  immunohistochemical assessment of  synaptic proteins  in  mice expressing neuroligin 2 ............................................................................. 127    Figure 2.6.   Synaptic abnormalities in mice expressing neuroligin 2 ................................... 130    Figure 2.7.   Light and electron microscopic analysis of neuron and synapse number ......... 133    Figure 2.8.   Increased  inhibitory  synaptic  transmission  in  pyramidal  neurons  of  prefrontal  cortex in mice expressing neuroligin 2 .............................................................. 135  x      Figure 2.9.   Neuroligin  2  expressing  mice  display  spontaneous  jumping  stereotypies  and  anxiety behaviour ............................................................................................. 138    Figure 2.10.   Anxiety‐like behaviour in mice expressing neuroligin 2 .................................... 141    Figure 2.11.   Deficits in social interactions in mice expressing neuroligin 2 .......................... 145    Figure 2.12.   Seizure  spiking  activity  as  observed  via  freely moving  EEG  recording  in mice  expressing neuroligin 2 ..................................................................................... 148    Figure 3.1.   Expression of the neuroligin 1 transgene ......................................................... 172    Figure 3.2.   Expression of neuroligin 1 in different brain regions ........................................ 174    Figure 3.3.   Impaired memory acquisition in the plus‐shaped water maze in mice expressing  neuroligin 1 ..................................................................................................... 180    Figure 3.4.   Impairment in memory acquisition of mice expressing neuroligin 1 ................ 182    Figure 3.5.   Similar  impairment  in memory  acquisition  in  the Morris water maze  in mice  expressing neuroligin 1 ..................................................................................... 185    Figure 3.6.   Working memory impairment and alterations in the search strategy of mice   expressing neuroligin 1 ..................................................................................... 188    Figure 3.7.   Alterations in the expression of synaptic proteins in mice expressing neuroligin 1      .......................................................................................................................... 191    Figure 3.8.   Changes  in  the  morphology  of  spines  and  synapses  in  mice  expressing    neuroligin 1 ...................................................................................................... 194    Figure 3.9.   Mice  expressing  neuroligin  1  show  increased  spine  and  synapse  number  suggestive of a shift in the ratio of excitation to inhibition .............................. 198    Figure 3.10.   Long‐term  potentiation  in  the  CA1  region  is  significantly  impaired  in  mice  expressing neuroligin 1 .................................................................................... 201    Figure 3.11.    Mice  expressing  neuroligin  1  show  an  increase  in  excitation  and  the  ratio  of  excitation to inhibition ..................................................................................... 204    Figure 4.1.   Homeostatic regulation of the excitation–inhibition balance in cortical networks     ......................................................................................................................... 221    xi    Figure 4.2.   Frequency distribution of synapse size in mice expressing neuroligin 1 compared  to controls ......................................................................................................... 226    Figure 4.3.   Modifications of neuronal networks that increase susceptibility to autism ..... 232         Figure 5.1.   Expression  of  neuroligin  1  HA  Thy1.2  and  neuroligin  2  HA  Thy1.2  in  cultured  hippocampal neurons ....................................................................................... 252     Figure 5.2.   Genotyping  of  mice  expressing  neuroligin  1  or  neuroligin  2  using  PCR  amplification from genomic DNA ...................................................................... 255     Figure 5.3.   Example of a typical agarose gel run to observe the PCR genotyping results from  mouse genomic DNA ........................................................................................ 257     Figure 5.4.   Comparison of the body size and weight observed in littermates from neuroligin  2 HA Thy1.2 pronuclear injection offspring ...................................................... 264     Figure 5.5.   Observation  of  hindlimb  clasping  in  founder  mice  expressing  neuroligin  2  ......................................................................................................................... 266      xii    ABBREVIATIONS    AMPA ‐ α‐amino‐3‐hydroxy‐5‐Methyl‐4‐isoxazole Propionic Acid  AKAP ‐ A‐Kinase‐Anchoring Protein  BDNF ‐ Brain‐Derived Neurotrophic Factor  CNS ‐ Central Nervous System  CNTNAP2 ‐ Contactin Associated Protein‐Like  DLG ‐ Discs Large  EAAT ‐ Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter  EEG ‐ Electroencephalography  E/I ‐ Excitatory/Inhibitory  EM ‐ Electron Microscopy  EMG ‐ Electromyography  EVH1 ‐ Enabled (Ena) / Vasodilator‐stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) Homology 1  GABA ‐ γ‐Aminobutyric Acid  GABARAP ‐ GABAA ‐Receptor‐Associated Protein  GAP ‐ GTPase Activating Protein  GK‐ Guanylate Kinase  GKAP ‐ Guanylate Kinase Associated Protein  GLR ‐ Glycine Receptor subunit  GluR ‐ Glutamate Receptor  GRIP ‐ Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein  HA ‐ Heamagglutinin  IEG ‐ Immediate Early Gene  IP3 ‐ Inositol Tri‐Phosphate  KA ‐ Kainic Acid receptor subunit  KO ‐ Knock‐Out  LNS ‐ Laminin, Neurexin, Sex‐hormone‐binding protein  LTD ‐ Long‐Term Depression  LTP ‐ Long‐Term Potentiation  MAGUK ‐ Membrane‐Associated Guanylate Kinase  mGluR ‐ metabotropic Glutamate Receptor  Munc ‐ Mammalian homologue of Uncoordinated (UNC)  NARP ‐ Neuronal Activity‐Regulated Pentraxin  NL ‐ Neuroligin  NMDAR ‐ N‐methyl‐D‐aspartic acid Receptor  NMJ ‐ Neuromuscular Junction  NP ‐ Neuronal Pentraxin  NR ‐ NMDA Receptor subunit  NRX – Neurexin  NSF ‐ N‐ethylamide Sensitive Factor  PBH ‐ Piccolo Bassoon Homology domain  PCR ‐ Polymerase Chain Reaction  xiii    PDZ ‐ PSD‐95, Dlg and ZO‐1  PICK ‐ Protein Interacting with C Kinase   PKA ‐ cAMP‐dependent protein kinase  PSD ‐ Postsynaptic Density  RIM ‐ Regulating synaptic Membrane Exocytosis  SALM ‐ Synaptic Adhesion‐Like Molecules  SAM ‐ Sterile α Motif  SAP ‐ Synapse‐Associated Protein  sER ‐ Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum  SH3 ‐ Src‐Homology‐3 domain  siRNA ‐ small interfering RNA  S‐SCAM ‐ Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule  SLC ‐ Solute Carrier  SNARE ‐ Soluble NSF Attachment Receptor  STV ‐ Synaptic Transport Vesicles  SYN ‐ Synaptophysin  SynCAM ‐ Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule  TARP ‐ Transmembrane AMPA Receptor-binding Protein  TgNL1 ‐ Transgenic mice expressing Neuroligin 1  TgNL2 ‐ Transgenic mice expressing Neuroligin 2  TM – Transmembrane  UNC ‐ Uncoordinated  VAMP ‐ Vesicle‐Associated Membrane Protein  VGAT ‐ Vesicular GABA Transporter  VGluT ‐ Vesicular Glutamate Transporter  Wt ‐ Wildtype        xiv    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS    It  is  a  great  pleasure  for  me  to  acknowledge  the  contributions  of  all  of  those  who  have  supported me during my graduate training.   I would especially like to acknowledge Dr. Alaa El‐Husseini, a most inspiring mentor and friend.  Alaa,  you  acted  as  a  guide  to  those  of  us  around  you with  your  passion,  commitment  and  enthusiasm for all that you did. No matter what the question, you were never too busy to help  us  trouble‐shoot  and  discuss  our  projects.  Far  beyond what  you  taught me  in  the  lab,  you  helped me come to know myself. Thank you Alaa for teaching me to be passionate about my  work without being  emotional.  I  am  sure  you will understand  if  I  am  emotional whenever  I  express how deeply I miss you. Your contagious smile, laughter and spirit will always exist in my  memory.  It  is  also  important  for me  to  acknowledge  Dr.  Yu  Tian Wang, who  graciously  acted  as my  supervisor during  the  completion of my PhD. Yu Tian,  I am  thankful  for  your  strong  support  balanced with freedom and independence. The freedom you provided was important for me to  realize my own capacity.   I  am  very  thankful  to  the  members  of  my  committee,  Dr.  Tony  Phillips  and  Dr.  Elizabeth  Simpson, who each brought unique expertise and insight to my work. I would also like to thank  the  faculty members  at  UBC  who  included me  in  collaborations  with  their  labs,  Dr.  Garry  Quamme, Dr. Brian MacVicar, Dr.  Lynn Raymond, and Dr. Michael Hayden,  thank you all  for  enriching my PhD experience.   xv    I must acknowledge the support and collegiality of the members of the El‐Husseini lab, who also  made themselves available for insightful discussion at any time, on just about any topic! It was  heart‐warming  to see strength emerge  from all of us  to support one another during  times of  adversity.  In addition  to  the members of El‐Husseini  lab,  I  received much support  from other  colleagues on the fourth and fifth floors, and  in the Brain Research Centre.  I would especially  like  to  acknowledge members  of  the Wang  lab  at  the  BRC who made me  feel  that  I was  a  welcome participant at lab meetings.  The  immense  support  that  I  received  from  my  family  and  the  Hines  family  must  also  be  mentioned. To my parents and brothers,  I wish  to  thank  you  for  the unconditional  love and  acceptance  that  you  have  always  provided. During  difficult  times,  your  faith  in me made  it  possible for me to restore faith in myself.         Finally,  I would  like  to  acknowledge my beloved husband, and best  friend, Dustin.  I want  to  thank you for your continual  love, spirit, and support, which are reflected  in everything that  I  do, and everything that I hope to become.      xvi    DEDICATION    For Dustin    Whether it has been in the lab, in the mountains, or in life,   you have been my constant companion, and often my guide,   in adventure and discovery.   xvii    CO­AUTHORSHIP STATEMENT    I was  involved  in the original conception and planning of all of the experiments  involved with  this thesis. For the generation of transgenic mice, I was involved in preparation and purification  of DNA  fragments  for pronuclear  injection, establishing a working PCR genotyping procedure,  and  screening  of  all  potential  founders. Once  founders were  identified,  I  set  up  the mating  pairs, established all of  the  strains, and characterized  the expression of  the  transgenes using  Western blotting and immunohistochemistry in each strain. I then subjected all of the strains to  the preliminary behavioural screen, and conducted all behavioural assessments on neuroligin 2  transgenic mice.  I conducted immunohistochemistry for HA and synaptic proteins in neuroligin  2 transgenic mice, and assisted with all of the immunohistochemistry on neuroligin 1 transgenic  mice. Also, I completed all electron microscopy tissue preparations and imaging for both strains  of mice. I was involved in analysis of the data and figure preparation for all of the experiments,  except water maze and electrophysiology, as listed below. The neuroligin 2 manuscript was co‐ authored by Dr. Alaa El‐Husseini and myself, while the neuroligin 1 manuscript was written by  Dr. Regina Dahlhaus and myself, with assistance from Dr. Brian Christie and Brennan Eadie.  Regina  Dahlhaus  assisted  with Western  blotting  for  neuroligin  2  transgenic  mice,  and  for  neuroligin 1 transgenic mice, she conducted Western blotting, golgi staining, and water maze  assessment. Longjun Wu and Hendrik Steenland conducted electrophysiological assessments of  neuroligin  2  transgenic  mice.  Brennan  Eadie  and  Timal  Kannangara  conducted  electrophysiological assessment of neuroligin 1 transgenic mice.  1    1. INTRODUCTION  General Introduction  One of  the distinctive  features of  the  central nervous  system  (CNS)  is  its  ability  to  transmit  signals  through specialized contacts called synapses. Estimates state  that  the human brain  is  composed  of  approximately  ten  billion  neurons,  each  with  the  capacity  to  participate  in  thousands of connections. This means that the nervous system  is required to assemble up to  1013  interconnections  based  on  the  genetic  programs  of  CNS  cells.  Further,  following  the  transcription and translation of proteins in the cell body, complex mechanisms exist to govern  the proper  trafficking  and  compartmentalization of  these proteins  to  pre  and post  synaptic  sites independently (Figure 1.1A,B). The formation of these contacts does not occur at random,  but instead is governed by precise and tightly regulated mechanisms that dictate the location,  number  and  type  of  synapses  formed  (Rao  et  al.,  1998;  Sanes  and  Lichtman,  2001;  Li  and  Sheng,  2003;  Kim  and  Sheng,  2004; Waites  et  al.,  2005).  This  concerted  effort  leads  to  the  formation of highly complex, yet highly reproducible synaptic networks.   Individual  synapses  are  composed  of  complex  and  highly  organized  arrays  of  interacting  proteins that facilitate synaptic transmission (Figure 1.1C). The  importance of tight regulation  of  synaptic  transmission  can  be  gleaned  from  the  number  of  CNS  disorders  arising  from  alterations  to  synapses  (Holmes  and  McCabe,  2001;  Zoghbi,  2003).  Excitatory  synaptic  transmission  is  driven  mainly  by  glutamatergic  synapses  whereas  inhibitory  synaptic  transmission  involves  γ‐aminobutyric  acid  (GABA)  and  glycine  signaling.  Excitatory  and  inhibitory  synapses  are  composed  of  largely  distinct  collections  of  scaffolding  and  signaling  molecules, whose recruitment is thought to be  governed  by distinct mechanisms  (Craig et al.,   2                                    Figure  1.1.  Structural  and  molecular  complexity  of  synaptic  contacts,  demonstrating  the  orchestration required for assembly and function of synaptic contacts. A. Synapse formation  requires  the  transcription  and  tranlation  of  appropritate  proteins  (1),  transport  of  these  proteins  to  sites  of  nascent  synaptic  contact  (2),  and  finally  mathcing,  assembly,  and  maturation  into  funciton  units  competent  for  signaling  (3).  B.  Electron  microscope  image  illustrating  the  basic  structure  of  synaptic  contacts.  The  presynaptic  compartment  contains  numerous  neurotransmitter  vesicles  visible  via  electron  microscopy.  The  postsynaptic  compartment  of  excitatry  synaptic  contacts  also  contains  a  postsynaptic  density  (PSD)  visualized  via  electron microscopy  as  a  fuzzy  thickeneing of  the  postsynaptic membrane.  C.  Assembly  of  molecules  in  the  PSD  of  excitatory  synaptic  contacts,  demonstrating  the  complexity  of molecular  interactions  that  support  synaptic  structure  and  signalling.    Figure  from Hines and El‐Husseini, Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptogenesis, page 68.      3            4    1994). Together, excitatory and inhibitory systems provide the framework for the transmission  of signals in the brain. This is conceptualized as a “balance” between the function of excitatory  and  inhibitory  synapses  (E/I  ratio),  and  is  established  during  development  and maintained  throughout  life  (Turrigiano and Nelson, 2004; Cline, 2005;  Levinson and El‐Husseini, 2005a).  Individual neurons are equipped with mechanisms for the approximation and maintenance of  their E/I ratio of synaptic input/output. Perturbations in the E/I ratio have been postulated to  underlie  a  number  of  nervous  system  disorders,  such  as  epilepsy, mental  retardation  and  autism (Rubenstein and Merzenich, 2003).  During the  last ten years of research, several  important discoveries have defined some of the  critical  processes  that  govern  the  development  and maturation  of  excitatory  and  inhibitory  synapses (Sanes and Lichtman, 1999; Friedman et al., 2000; Waites et al., 2005). A great deal of  work suggests that families of cell adhesion molecules are key players  in the orchestration of  numerous molecular and cellular events  involved  in  the maturation of diverse synapse  types  (Brose, 1999; Rao  et  al., 2000b; Dean  et  al., 2003; Missler, 2003; Washbourne  et  al., 2004;  Gerrow  and  El‐Husseini,  2006).  However,  despite  significant  progress,  several  important  questions remain. In particular, in vivo experiments will be important to clearly define the roles  of  different  families  of  proteins  thought  to  be  involved  in  different  aspects  of  synapse  development,  including  contact  initiation,  target  recognition,  synapse  maturation  and  plasticity.     5    Background and Current Knowledge  1.1.   Synaptic Structure  Synapses  are highly  specialized  junctions between  two  cells  that provide  the  structural  and  functional framework for the transmission of signals in the brain. Under normal conditions, the  number,  location,  and  type  of  synapses  formed  are  well  controlled  parameters,  and  consequently reliable circuits are formed. This fact suggests that precise cellular and molecular  mechanisms  exist  to  determine  the  connectivity  of  networks  in  the  CNS. Within  the  CNS,  several distinct classes or types of synapses exist, which are composed of distinct collections of  molecules. Despite these distinct molecular profiles, neurons are capable of properly recruiting  molecules and matching pre and post synaptic compartments (O'Brien et al., 1998; Friedman  et al., 2000; Aoki et al., 2001; Craig and Boudin, 2001; Ziv, 2001; Nimchinsky et al., 2002; Kim  and Sheng, 2004; Craig et al., 2006). The unparalleled complexity of  intercellular connections  that is seen in the CNS presents a requirement for high levels of both specificity and diversity in  molecular constituents. Research into the mechanisms regulating these complex processes will  lead to increased understanding of the formation of neural networks, and the function of the  brain as a whole. Further, since synapse abnormalities have been implicated in a wide variety  of disorders of the CNS, understanding the fundamental principles that govern the formation  and  maturation  of  synapses  will  contribute  to  our  understanding  of  CNS  dysfunction.  An  immense body of work  that has  accumulated  in  recent  years has begun  to unravel  the  key  players and processes involved in controlling the formation of synapses and the construction of  CNS networks.  6    In  terms of both  their  structure and  function,  synapses are asymmetric, which distinguishes  them from other types of intercellular junctions. The presynaptic side exists as an enlargement  of  the axon, and  is  filled with  specialized vesicles  containing neurotransmitter  (Figure 1.1C).  These specialized vesicles reside  in what are considered to be distinct populations of docked  and reserve pools. Docked vesicles sit  in the presynaptic active zone, a specialized section of  the  presynaptic membrane  studded with  complex matrices  of  SNARE  and  related  proteins  critical for the fusion of vesicles and the release of neurotransmitter. The active zone can be  roughly  visualized  in  an  electron  micrograph  as  a  subtle  thickening  of  the  presynaptic  membrane (Figure 1.1B). Reserve pool vesicles reside away from the presynaptic membrane,  and are considered to replace docked vesicles following release triggered by the arrival of an  action  potential.  The  voltage  change  of  an  action  potential  activates  voltage‐dependent  calcium channels and results  in an  influx of calcium  ions. Calcium  ions act as the trigger for a  biochemical  cascade  that  culminates with  SNARE  complex‐medicated  fusion of  vesicles with  the  presynaptic membrane  (Rosenmund  et  al.,  2003;  Stevens,  2003;  Schneggenburger  and  Neher, 2005). Neurotransmitter that is released spills into the space between the pre and post  synaptic  compartments,  called  the  synaptic  cleft,  and  diffuses  across  the  small  gap  to  the  membrane  of  the  postsynaptic  compartment.  Postsynaptic  compartments  are  specialized  regions of neuronal cell bodies, dendrites or axon  initial segments, and can also be found on  muscle cells or cells that form the tissue of a gland. The most common type of synapse in the  CNS  is  formed  between  a  presynaptic  axon  and  a  postsynaptic  dendrite.  Similar  to  the  presynaptic  membrane,  the  postsynaptic  membrane  is  also  studded  with  matrices  of  interacting  proteins;  however,  the  protein  complexes  are  specialized  for  the  binding  of  neurotransmitter, and the subsequent transmission of the signal. At excitatory synapses, this  7    network of interacting proteins is termed the postsynaptic density (PSD), and can be observed  in electron micrographs as an electron dense thickening of the postsynaptic membrane (Figure  1.1B).  Postsynaptic  protein  complexes  are  composed  of  neurotransmitter  receptors,  and  numerous  scaffolding,  cytoskeletal  and  signalling  proteins  (Figure  1.1C;  (Kennedy,  1997;  Kornau et al., 1997; Boeckers, 2006; Okabe, 2007).     1.2.   Comparing Excitatory and Inhibitory Synapses  Whether  a  synapse  is  excitatory  or  inhibitory  depends  on  what  types  of  ion  channel  conductance the neurotransmitters and receptors activate.  In general, synaptic receptors are  activated by  the binding of neurotransmitter molecules, and  respond by opening nearby  ion  channels in the postsynaptic membrane. This opening of ion channels causes ions to flow down  their  concentration  gradients,  and  result  in  changes  to  the  local membrane  potential.  The  resulting  change  in  voltage  is  called  a postsynaptic potential.  In  general,  if  the postsynaptic  potential is decreased or depolarizing, the result is excitation of the postsynaptic cell; whereas  if the potential is increased or hyperpolarizing, the result is inhibition of the postsynaptic cell.  Hyperpolarization or inhibition makes it more difficult for the postsynaptic cell to fire an action  potential, lowering the firing rate of the neuron. In contrast, depolarization or excitation makes  it  easier  for  the  postsynaptic  cell  to  fire  an  action  potential.  Depolarization  is  typically  mediated  by  the  influx  of  cations  such  as  sodium  and  calcium,  while  hyperpolarization  is  typically mediated by influx of chloride ions and/or efflux of potassium ions. It is important to  note that changes in the postsynaptic potential depend upon the initial concentrations of ions  both inside and outside the cell, and thus do not always conform to these typical conditions.    8    Excitatory and  inhibitory  synapses  can be distinguished both by  their  typical  structures, and  also  by  the  complement  of  proteins  that  they  contain  (Figure  1.2).  Two  distinct  types  of  synapses were originally  identified using electron microscopy and were distinguished on  the  basis of synaptic vesicle and PSD morphology (Uchizono, 1965). Asymmetric or type I synapses,  which are typically excitatory, were  identified by the presence of a post‐synaptic density and  round  synaptic  vesicles  within  the  presynaptic  terminal.  In  contrast,  symmetric  or  type  II  synapses,  which  are  typically  inhibitory,  were  identified  by  the  presence  of  both  oval  or  flattened, and round synaptic vesicles and the absence of a pronounced post‐synaptic density.  In  terms of  their molecular content, excitatory and  inhibitory synapses differ  in  terms of  the  neurotransmitter  they  contain,  the  presynaptic  machinery  for  transporting  or  packing  the  various neurotransmitters into vesicles, the adhesion systems that link pre and post, the types  of postsynaptic receptors they are composed of, and the specific scaffolding proteins that bind  to  and  support  the  receptors.  Despite  numerous  differences,  excitatory  and  inhibitory  synapses do share many common molecular components, such as the machinery required for  vesicle  fusion  and  neurotransmitter  release,  and  some  common  signalling  molecules.  The  major  categories of molecules  that make up both excitatory and  inhibitory  synapses will be  discussed in detail below.    1.3.   The Molecular Composition of Synapses  Synapses  are  composed  of  a  diverse  collection  of  proteins  that  interact  and  participate  in  concert for  the transmission of  signals in the CNS.  Numerous proteins have been identified at     9                  Figure 1.2. Comparison of key structural and molecular differences between excitatory and  inhibitory  synaptic  contacts. A. Excitatory  synaptic  contacts, also  referred  to as asymmetric  synapses, are characterized by a pronounced thickening of the postsynaptic membrane known  as  the  PSD,  and  typically  occur  onto  spines  that  protrude  from  the  dendrites  of  the  postsynaptic  neuron.  B.  In  terms  of  molecular  constituents,  excitatory  synapses  typically  contain  neurotransmitter  vesicles  packed  with  glutamate,  via  the  vesicular  glutamate  transporter  (VGluT),  and  receptors  that  are  activated  by  glutamate  release  from  the  presynaptic  terminal  (AMAPR  and NMDAR).  In  addition  to  these  key  signalling  components,  excitatory synapses also specifically contain  the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD‐95, and  are enriched with  the adhesion molecule NL1  (postsynaptic)  typically bound  to β‐Nrx  lacking  the  insert  at  splice  site  4  (S4;  presynaptic).  C.  Inhibitory  synaptic  contacts,  also  called  symmetric  synaptic  contacts  are  characterized  by  symmetry  in  the  thicknesses  of  pre  and  postsynaptic  membranes,  and  most  commonly  occur  on  the  dendritic  shaft.  D.  Inhibitory  synapses contain GABA packed neurotransmitter vesicles and the vesicular GABA transporter  (VGAT),  along with GABA  receptors  (may  also  contain  glycinergic  signalling  components).  In  addition,  inhibitory  synapses  are  characterized  by  the  presence  of  the  scaffolding molecule  gephyrin, and are enriched with NL2 (postsyanptic) adhesion molecules which typically bind α‐ Nrx and/or β‐Nrx with insertion at splice site 4 (S4; presynaptic).            10          11    synaptic  sites,  most  of  which  can  be  categorized  into  one  of  several  classes:  receptors,  scaffolding proteins,  signalling molecules, adhesion molecules, or vesicle  release/active  zone  machinery.  Insight  into  the molecular  complexity  of  synaptic  specializations  can  be  gleaned  from  the  fact  that  the presynaptic  compartment  alone  contains  greater  than  1000 proteins  (Olsen et al., 2006). An overview of the major families of proteins located at synapses provides  insight into the orchestration required to make and maintain functional synaptic connections.  These proteins act in concert, with each family of proteins contributing specialized features to  synapse formation and signalling.     Postsynaptic Components  1.3.1. Glutamate Receptors  Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. There are multiple classes of  glutamate receptors, which can be categorized as to whether they contain an ion channel pore  or not, or alternatively by  the  ligand  that binds  them with highest affinity  (Dingledine et al.,  1999).  In  the  broadest  categorization,  glutamate  receptors  are  classified  as  ionotropic,  containing a selective pore that  is opened upon  ligand binding, or as metabotropic, which do  not  contain an  ion  channel pore, but  instead activate  signal  transduction mechanisms often  involving G proteins. Ionotropic glutamate receptors can further be subdivided into α‐amino‐3‐ hydroxy‐5‐methyl‐4‐isoxazolepropionic  acid  receptor  (AMPA), N‐methyl D‐aspartate  (NMDA)  or kainaite subtypes.    12    1.3.1.1. AMPA Receptors  AMPA  receptors mediate  fast  synaptic  transmission  in  the  CNS.  The  name  for  this  class  of  receptors originates  from  its ability to be activated by the artificial glutamate analog, AMPA.  AMPA receptors are found in many parts of the brain and are the most abundant receptor type  in the nervous system. AMPA receptors are composed of four types of subunits, designated as  GluR1, GluR2, GluR3, and GluR4, which form tetramers of various subunit combinations. Most  AMPA  receptors are heterotetrameric, composed of a  symmetrical dimer of dimers  typically  consisting  of  GluR2  and  either  GluR1,  GluR3  or  GluR4  (Mayer,  2005).    Functional  AMPA  receptors exist in two basic forms: calcium‐impermeable and calcium‐permeable channels. The  ion permeability is dictated by the presence of the GluR2 subunit, which renders heteromeric  AMPA receptor complexes impermeable to calcium.  Each  subunit  is  composed  of  four  transmembrane  domains  as  predicted  by  the  amino  acid  sequence (Mayer, 2005). However, it was determined that the second transmembrane domain  does not fully emerge on the extracellular side, but folds back on itself within the membrane.  When  the  four  subunits  of  the  tetramer  are  assembled  together,  this  second  membrane  domain forms the  ion‐permeable pore of the receptor. Each AMPA receptor subunit has one  site to which an agonist can bind, creating a total of  four binding sites per receptor complex  (Mayer,  2005).  The  binding  site  is  believed  to  be  formed  by  the  N‐terminal  tail,  and  the  extracellular  loop between  transmembrane domains  three and  four  (Armstrong et al., 1998;  Dingledine et al., 1999; Mayer, 2005). When the agonist binds, the  loops move towards each  other, leading to opening of the pore. Occupation of two sites is required for channel opening,  and as more binding  sites are occupied  the  current  increases. Once open,  the  channel may  undergo  rapid  desensitization  by  a  change  in  the  angle  of  one  portion  of  the  binding  site,  13    closing the pore and stopping the current (Armstrong et al., 2006). AMPA receptor function is  modulated by alternative RNA splicing and editing, as well as phosphorylation at multiple sites.  Furthermore,  AMPA  receptor  subunits  diverge  most  in  the  sequences  of  their  C‐terminal  regions, dictating their  interactions with different synaptic scaffolding proteins. Differences  in  interacting proteins have been shown to dynamically regulate the targeting and trafficking of  AMPA receptor subunits at dendritic spines.     1.3.1.2. NMDA Receptors  NMDA‐type glutamate receptor number at the synapse is relatively static, in contrast to AMPA‐ type glutamate receptor cycling, which has been shown to be very dynamic and regulated by  synaptic  activity.  NMDA‐type  receptor  subunits  include  NR1,  NR2A‐D,  and  NR3.  Functional  NMDA  receptors  are  composed  of  a  heterodimer  of  NR1  and  NR2  subunits,  typically  two  obligatory NR1 subunits and two NR2 subunits A‐D depending on the brain region (Dingledine  et al., 1999; Stephenson, 2001, 2006). Ligand binding is mediated by the globular extracellular  domain  which  binds  the  co‐agonist  glycine  in  NR1  subunits,  while  NR2  subunits  bind  glutamate. The membrane domain,  consisting of  three  trans‐membrane  segments and a  re‐ entrant  loop, makes up  the channel pore, and  is  responsible  for  the receptor's conductance,  calcium permeability, and voltage‐dependent block by magnesium (Stephenson, 2001). Similar  to AMPA receptor subunits, each NMDA subunit has an extensive cytoplasmic domain that can  be modified by phosphorylaiton, and contains domains for interaction with a large number of  adaptor and scaffolding proteins.    14    1.3.1.3. Kainate Receptors  Kainate receptors are less well understood than AMPA and NMDA receptors. Kainate receptors  have  been  shown  to  be  involved  in  excitatory  neurotransmission  by  activating  postsynaptic  receptors,  and  in  inhibitory  neurotransmission  by  presynaptically modulating GABA  release.  There are five types of kainate receptor subunits, GluR5‐7, and KA1 and KA2, which combine to  form tetramers of various compositions (Dingledine et al., 1999; Huettner, 2003). GluR5‐7 can  form homomers and heteromers, however, KA1 and KA2 can only form functional receptors by  combining with one of  the GluR5‐7 subunits. Each subunit  is composed of an extracellular N‐ terminal  segment, which  forms part of  the neurotransmitter binding  site. Each  subunit  also  contains three membrane spanning regions, with one segment that does not fully cross, similar  to the closely related AMPA receptor subunits, which also determines the calcium permeability  of kainate  receptors. The  ion channel pore of kainate  receptors  is permeable  to sodium and  potassium  ions,  with  similar  conductance  to  that  of  AMPA  receptors  (Huettner,  2003).  However,  the  duration  of  pore  opening  is much  shorter  compared  to  AMPA  receptors.  In  addition to sodium and potassium, kainate receptors can be permeable to calcium, depending  upon  their  subunit  composition  and RNA editing. Unlike AMPA  receptors,  kainate  receptors  play only a minor role in signalling at synapses (Song and Huganir, 2002; Huettner, 2003).     1.3.1.4. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors  In  addition  to  producing  excitatory  and  inhibitory  postsynaptic  potentials, mGluRs  serve  to  modulate  the  function of other  receptors  (such as NMDA  receptors), changing  the synapse's  excitability.  The  metabotropic  glutamate  receptor  (mGluR)  family  currently  includes  eight  members, divided into three groups based on their sequence homology and enzyme specificity  15    (Ferraguti and Shigemoto, 2006). mGluR1 and mGluR5 (group I) activate a G‐protein coupled to  phospholipase C, which hydrolyzes phospholipids in the plasma membrane. Group I receptors  are  also  associated with  sodium  and potassium  channels. Activation of  group  I mGluRs  can  result in increased excitation or increased inhibition, and they can also act to inhibit glutamate  release and modulate voltage dependent calcium channels. mGluR2, 3, and 8 receptor (group II)  subunits  favour  activation  by  trans‐1‐aminocyclopentane‐1,3‐dicarboxylate,  whereas  1,2‐ amino‐4‐phosphonobutyrate  is the  ideal agonist of mGluR4, 6, and 7 receptor subunits (group  III).  Group  II  and  III  mGluRs  prevent  the  formation  of  cyclic  adenosine  monophosphate,  (cAMP), by activating a G protein  that  inhibits  the enzyme adenylyl  cyclise. These  classes of  receptors are involved in presynaptic inhibition, and reduce the activity of both excitatory and  inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in the cortex. Like other metabotropic receptors, mGluRs are  composed of seven  transmembrane domains. mGluRs have been shown  to modulate NMDA  receptor function (Ferraguti and Shigemoto, 2006), and are coupled closely to NMDA receptors  via scaffolding proteins (Tu et al., 1999).    1.3.2. γ­aminobutyric Acid and Glycine Receptors  The most common receptor families mediating inhibitory neurotransmission are those that are  activated  by  γ‐aminobutyric  acid  (GABA)  and  those  that  are  activated  by  glycine.  GABA  receptors are divided  into  three classes, GABAA and GABAС  receptors which are  ligand‐gated  ion channels, and GABAB receptors which are G protein‐coupled (Bormann, 2000). Both GABA  and glycine receptors share structural and functional features.    16    1.3.2.1. GABAA and GABAC Receptors  GABAA,C receptors are members of family of Cys‐loop  ligand‐gated  ion channels characterized  by a loop formed by a disulfide bond between two cysteine residues. This family is composed  of  five  subunits  arranged  around  a  central  chloride  permeable  pore.  There  are  numerous  subunit isoforms for the GABAA receptor, which determine the receptor’s properties, including  agonist  affinity,  chance  of  opening,  and  conductance.  There  are  six  types  of  α  subunits  (GABRA1‐6),  three  β's  (GABRB1‐3),  three  γ's  (GABRG1‐3),  a  δ  (GABRD),  an  ε  (GABRE),  a  π  (GABRP),  and  a  θ  (GABRQ;  (Bormann,  2000).  Although  the  subunits  arrange  in  various  conformations, the most common type in the brain is a pentamer of two α's, two β's, and a γ  (α2β2γ; (Bormann, 2000). The receptor binds two GABA molecules, at the interface between an  α and a β subunit. The GABAA channel opens quickly and thus contributes to the early part of  the inhibitory post‐synaptic potential (Couve et al., 2000).   GABAС receptors are exclusively composed of ρ subunits (GABRR1‐3) that are related to GABAA  receptor  subunits  (Bormann,  2000).  Some  view  the GABAС  receptor  as  a  variant within  the  GABAA family; however, GABAC receptors are insensitive to the typical allosteric modulators of  GABAA  receptors  including benzodiazepines and barbiturates.  In contrast  to  the  rapid GABAA  receptor, GABAC receptors are slow to initiate but sustained in duration.    1.3.2.2. GABAB Receptors  GABAB  receptors  are metabotropic  transmembrane  receptors  that  are  linked  to  potassium  channels via G‐proteins. Opening of potassium channels via signalling  from GABAB brings the  neuron  closer  to  the equilibrium potential of potassium, hyperpolarising  the neuron. GABAB  17    receptors  can  also  reduce  the  activity  of  adenylyl  cyclase  and  decrease  the  calcium  conductance.  GABAB  receptors  are  in  the  same  receptor  family  with  mGluRs,  and  share  common  structural  characteristics.  There  are  two  subtypes  of  the  receptor,  GABAB1  and  GABAB2, and these appear to assemble as heterodimers (Bormann, 2000; Couve et al., 2000).  GABAB receptors mediate a slow response to GABA binding.    1.3.2.3. Glycine Receptors  The glycine receptor is one of the most widely distributed inhibitory receptors in the CNS, and  can be activated by a range of simple amino acids including glycine, β‐alanine and taurine. Like  GABAA,C receptors, glycine receptors are also members of the Cys‐loop family of Ligand‐gated  ion channels (Kirsch, 2006). Receptors of this family are arranged as five subunits surrounding  a central pore, with each subunit composed of four transmembrane segments. There are four  known isoforms of the glycine receptor α subunit (GLRA1‐4), and one β subunit (GLRB; (Kuhse  et al., 1993; Kuhse et al., 1995; Kirsch, 2006). α subunits are essential for  ligand binding, and  typical receptors are composed of three α1 subunits and two β subunits, or  four α1 subunits  and one β subunit (Kuhse et al., 1993; Kuhse et al., 1995; Kirsch, 2006).    1.3.3. Scaffolding Proteins  Each  of  the  aforementioned  receptor  types  must  be  properly  accumulated  within  microdomains  of  the  dendritic membrane,  and  are  typically  found  accumulated  in  perfect  opposition to presynaptic release of neurotransmitter. These microdomains are thought to be  supported by accumulations of  scaffolding proteins  that provide an  infrastructure of protein  18    interactions connecting the postsynaptic membrane and receptors to signalling molecules and  the cytoskeleton. Scaffolding molecules are thought to stabilize both excitatory and inhibitory  receptors  by  acting  as  a  selective  trap  for  receptors moving  along  the membrane  (Nusser,  2000;  Craig  and  Boudin,  2001).  In  addition  to  their  role  in  diffusion  trapping  of  surface  receptors, scaffolding proteins have also been shown to undergo rapid exchange, leading to a  dynamic equilibrium of receptor–scaffold complexes.     1.3.3.1. Membrane‐Associated  Guanylate  Kinases:  PSD‐95  Family  of  Proteins  The  membrane‐associated  guanylate  kinase  (MAGUK)  family  of  proteins  is  of  central  importance  to protein scaffolding  in many cell  types  (Fanning and Anderson, 1999; Funke et  al.,  2005).  MAGUKs  are  defined  by  the  presence  of  a  domain  homologous  to  the  yeast  guanylate  kinase  (GK)  domain,  which  is  catalytically  inactive.  The  GK  domain  is  always  preceded  by  a  Src‐homology‐3  (SH3)  domain.  In  addition, MAGUKs  contain  PDZ  domains,  which are named  for  the original proteins  in which  the motifs were  identified  (PSD‐95, discs  large,  and  zona  occludens  1).  PDZ  domains  bind  the  carboxyl‐terminus  of  proteins  or  form  dimers  with  other  PDZ  domain  containing  proteins.  These  domains  are  often  arranged  in  tandem arrays or associated with other protein‐protein interaction domains to form a protein  scaffold (Fanning and Anderson, 1999). Protein multimerization may act to enhance clustering  of binding proteins into large assemblies confined to specific sites, such as the PSD.  PSD‐95  (postsynaptic  density  protein  of  95  kDa)  is  the  prototypical  PDZ  domain  containing  protein,  and  extensive  research  has  been  conducted  on  the  structure  and  function  of  this  19    family of proteins (Irie et al., 1997; Migaud et al., 1998; Topinka and Bredt, 1998; Craven et al.,  1999; El‐Husseini et al., 2000a; El‐Husseini A. E. et al., 2002). The PSD‐95 family is encoded by  four genes – PSD‐95 / synapse associated protein 90 (SAP90), postsynaptic density protein of  93  kDa  (PSD‐93)  /  chapsyn‐110,  synapse  associated  protein  102  (SAP102),  and  synapse  associated protein 97  (SAP97), which are characterized by 3 PDZ domains,  in addition  to  the  SH3 and GK domain characteristic of MAGUKs (Funke et al., 2005). PSD‐95 family proteins are  key players  in  regulating  synaptic organization because of  their  capacity  to  assemble highly  specific, yet dynamically adaptable protein complexes at synaptic sites.    1.3.3.2. Other Scaffolding Proteins of Glutamatergic Synapses  Several  other  scaffolding  proteins  have  been  identified  at  excitatory  synapse,  each with  a  unique  role  in  maintaining  organization  of  the  postsynaptic  density.  The  PDZ‐containing  glutamate receptor  interacting protein GRIP1/ABP binds to the carboxy‐terminal PDZ motif of  AMPA receptor subunits GluR2 and GluR3 (Dong et al., 1997; Srivastava et al., 1998; Osten et  al., 2000).  It  is  thought  that GRIP1/ABP may serve  to  link AMPA  receptors as cargoes  to  the  microtubule transport system via binding to liprin‐α1 (Wyszynski et al., 2002). In turn, liprin‐α1  interacts with a member of the kinesin superfamily KIF1, and GIT1, a GTPase‐activating protein  for  the ADP‐ribosylation  factor  family of small GTPases known  to  regulate protein  trafficking  and  the  actin  cytoskeleton.  Protein  interacting  with  C  kinase  (PICK1)  is  another  well  characterized  PDZ  domain‐containing  protein.  PICK1  interacts  with  the  C‐termini  of  AMPA  receptors,  and  is  found  to  be  specifically  colocalized  with  AMPA  receptors  at  excitatory  synapses  (Daw et al., 2000; Perez et al., 2001).  In addition to AMPA receptors, PICK has also  20    been shown to bind cell adhesion molecules including neuroligins (NLs) and nectins (Meyer et  al., 2004; Reymond et al., 2005), to be discussed below.  Despite the  identification of these proteins as modulators of AMPA receptor  localization and  function,  immunoprecipitation  and quantification of  the proteins bound  to AMPA  receptors  suggests  that  transmembrane  AMPA  receptor  regulatory  proteins  (TARPs)  are  the  major  binding partner for AMPA receptors (Fukata et al., 2005). TARPs are transmembrane proteins  with four membrane‐spanning domains that interact with the transmembrane region of AMPA  receptors  (Chen et al., 2000; Dakoji et al., 2003; Tomita et al., 2004). This  family of proteins  includes  stargazin,  γ‐3,  γ‐4,  and  γ‐8,  all  of which  influence  the  surface  expression  of AMPA  receptors in different brain regions, and have also been shown to bind MAGUKs to participate  in scaffolding of  receptors at glutamatergic synapses  (Chen et al., 2000; Schnell et al., 2002;  Dakoji et al., 2003; Tomita et al., 2004).  The  Shank  family  of  proteins  are  scaffolding  molecules  that  provide  a  link  to  the  actin  cytoskeleton  (Sala  et  al.,  2001;  Sala  et  al.,  2005).  Shank  proteins  are  composed  of multiple  ankyrin repeats, an SH3 domain, a PDZ domain, a long proline‐rich region and a sterile α motif  (SAM)  domain.  Homer  proteins  are  interacting  partners  of  Shank  that  act  as  multimeric  adaptors  (Tu  et  al.,  1999).    EVH1  (enabled  (Ena)  /  vasodilator‐stimulated  phosphoprotein  (VASP) Homology 1) domains in Homer interact with proline rich motifs in a variety of proteins.  Shank and Homer mediate multiple protein  interactions  in the PSD providing  important  links  between  NMDA  receptors  and  metabotropic  glutamate  receptors  at  the  synapse,  inositol  trisphosphate  receptors  (IP3Rs)  in  the  smooth  endoplasmic  reticulum  (sER)  and  the  actin  cytoskeleton via cortactin (Tu et al., 1999; Sala et al., 2001; Sala et al., 2005).   21      1.3.3.3. Scaffolding Molecules of Inhibitory Synapses  The  basic  organization  of  inhibitory  synapses  is  comparable  to  that  of  excitatory  synapses.  Glycine  receptors  and  many,  but  not  all,  types  of  GABA  receptors  are  accumulated  at  postsynaptic microdomains, where  they  are  stabilized  by  subsynaptic  scaffolding  complexes  (Moss and Smart, 2001). At  inhibitory  synapses, gephyrin  represents  the core protein of  the  postsynaptic  scaffolding  complex.  Gephyrin  is  composed  of  two  oligomerization  domains  (called  G  and  E)  connected  by  a  linker  region  (Meyer  et  al.,  1995;  Fritschy  et  al.,  2008).  Gephyrin  is  thought  to generate a  reversible postsynaptic  scaffold  for  the  immobilization of  glycine  receptors  and  individual  subtypes  of  GABAA  receptors  (Kneussel  and  Betz,  2000;  Kneussel et al., 2001). Crystal  structure generation of gephyrin oligomerization domains and  the  glycine  receptor  β  subunit  binding  sites  revealed  that  dimeric  gephyrin  interacts  with  glycine receptor β subunits (Meyer et al., 1995). This complex  is then thought to multimerize  and form a hexagonal lattice (Kneussel and Betz, 2000). In addition to gephyrin, GRIP1 has also  been  localized to  inhibitory synapses, and has also been shown to act as a protein scaffold  in  both pre and postsynaptic compartments  (Li et al., 2005).  In contrast to excitatory synapses,  somewhat less is known about the full complement of proteins involved in scaffolding of GABA  and glycine receptors, and corresponding signalling molecules.    1.3.4. Signalling Molecules  The term signal transduction is used in biology to refer to any process by which a cell converts  one kind of signal or stimulus into another. Signal transduction involves ordered sequences of  22    biochemical reactions carried out by enzymes, typically activated by second messengers, which  are  diffusible  signalling molecules  that  can  be  rapidly  generated  or  released  and  go  on  to  activate effector proteins.  With relevance to synaptic transmission, phosphorylaiton is a central enzyme signalling system  that  is  dynamically mediated  by  protein  kinases  and  phosphatases.  Phosphorylation  is  the  transfer  of  phosphate  groups  from  high‐energy  donor molecules,  such  as  ATP,  to  specific  residues  in  the  amino  acid  sequences  of  target  substrates. Many  proteins  contained within  synaptic compartments contain sites for dynamic regulation of their structure and function by  phosphorylation. Kinases and phosphatases are regulated by synaptic activity and have been  shown  to  regulate  numerous  synaptic  parameters  ranging  from  postsynaptic  receptor  trafficking  and  localization  (Roche  et  al.,  1994;  Strack  et  al.,  2000;  Oh  et  al.,  2006),  to  presynaptic  regulation  of  exocytosis  (Foster  et  al.,  1998;  Fletcher  et  al.,  1999;  Evans  and  Morgan, 2003; Snyder et al., 2006).       Presynaptic Components  1.3.5. SNARE Proteins and Vesicle Release Machinery   The major  group  of  proteins  involved  in  vesicle  fusion  and  neurotransmitter  release  is  the  soluble N‐ethylmaleimide‐sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) family of proteins. The  SNARE  family  includes more  than  60 members  found  in  yeast  and mammalian  cells,  and  is  involved  in  the  fusion of  cellular  vesicles with  various membranous  targets  such  as  the  cell  membrane,  lysosomes or porosomes  (Sorensen, 2005; Rizo  and Rosenmund, 2008).  SNAREs  are generally divided into two categories based on their location, including vesicle or v‐SNAREs  23    and  target  or  t‐SNAREs.  Although  SNAREs  vary  greatly  in  size  and  structure,  all  contain  a  SNARE‐motif  in  their  cytosolic  domains  (Rizo  and  Rosenmund,  2008).  SNARE‐motifs  are  capable  of  tight  assembly  into  helical  bundles,  incorporating  three  SNARE  proteins  called  SNARE complexes, which switch between trans and cis conformations. For example, syntaxin 1  and  SNAP‐25  resident  in  cell membrane,  and  synaptobrevin  (vesicle‐associated membrane  protein or VAMP) anchored  in the vesicular membrane  form a trans‐SNARE complex prior to  membrane fusion (Hu et al., 2002; Pobbati et al., 2006). During fusion, the membranes of the  vesicle  and  target merge,  converting  the  complex  into  a  cis‐SNARE  complex, with  all  three  SNARE  proteins  residing  in  the  same  resultant  membrane.  Assembly  into  trans‐SNARE  complexes brings opposing  lipid bilayers  in  close proximity, priming  them  for  fusion.  SNARE  complex assembly  is completed and neurotransmitter  is released following calcium entry  into  the presynaptic  terminal, which activates synaptotagmin,  thought  to be a calcium sensor. N‐ ethylmaleimide‐sensitive factor (NSF) is involved in the ATP‐dependent prefusion priming, and  postfusion unzipping of SNARE proteins (Sollner et al., 1993; Banerjee et al., 1996). Dissociated  SNARE  complex  components  can  then  be  reused  in  subsequent  vesicle‐membrane  fusion  events.  In addition to SNARE proteins, numerous other families of adaptor proteins are  involved with  vesicle  fusion  and  neurotransmitter  release.  One  such  family  are  the Munc13s,  which  are  mammalian homologs of the Caenorhabditis elegans UNC13 proteins (Li and Chin, 2003). The  Munc13  family  is  composed  of  four  members,  Munc13‐1‐4,  which  all  share  a  common  structure of  their c‐terminal domains. Munc13 proteins have been shown  to be essential  for  the  priming  of  synaptic  vesicles,  converting  them  to  a  fusion‐ready  state,  and  also  for  the  generation  of  the  readily  releasable  pool  of  synaptic  vesicles  (Betz  et  al.,  1998;  Betz  et  al.,  24    2001).  Specifically, Munc13s  are  thought  to  induce  the  conformational  change  of  syntaxin,  thereby promoting the formation of the SNARE complex. Components such as synaptotagmin,  complexin, Munc13,  and  the  scaffold RIM, have been shown  to participate  in  exocytosis  at  synapses specifically, and are thought to be required to meet the special needs of fast calcium‐ triggered neurotransmitter release (Li and Chin, 2003).   1.3.6. Scaffolding Proteins of the Active Zone  In addition  to release machinery, the rapid, high  fidelity  fusion of vesicles at synaptic sites  is  also  supported by  several  scaffolding proteins  in  the presynaptic active  zone. Ultrastructural  electron microscopy  studies  of  synapses  have  revealed  that  the  presynaptic  active  zone  is  closely and precisely aligned with the PSD, and that the plasma membrane on both sites of the  synaptic  cleft  appears  as  a  thickened  or  electron‐dense  structure,  illustrating  the  high  concentration of proteins in these regions (Dreyer et al., 1973; Schikorski and Stevens, 1997). A  variety of classes of proteins have been  identified  in association with  the presynaptic active  zone,  including  proteins  involved  in  vesicle  fusion  (SNAREs,  Munc13s;  discussed  above),  cytoskeletal  proteins,  scaffolding  proteins  (CASK,  Mint,  SAP97,  veils/MALS),  voltage  gated  calcium channels, and cell adhesion molecules  (Nrx, cadherins,  integrins, sidekicks; discussed  above). Since some of these protein groups have been discussed above, this section will focus  primarily on scaffolding proteins of the presynaptic active zone.  A  number  of  scaffolding  proteins  are  thought  to  be  involved  in  maintaining  the  neurotransmitter  release  site  structure  with  the  postsynaptic  reception  apparatus.  Piccolo  (presynaptic cytomatrix protein; (Cases‐Langhoff et al., 1996; Wang et al., 1999; Fenster et al.,  25    2000) and Bassoon (tom Dieck et al., 1998) are the best characterized molecular scaffolds that  have been shown to maintain presynaptic active zone structure, and are the largest active zone  proteins  identified  thus  far  (420  and  530  kDa  respectively).  Piccolo  and  Bassoon  share  ten  regions of sequence homology called Piccolo‐Bassoon homology domains (PBH). The first two  domains  contain  zinc‐finger motifs, while  PBH  domains  4,6,8  include  coiled‐coil  regions.  In  addition,  Piccolo  C‐terminus  has  a  PDZ  domain  and  two  C2  domains which  are  structurally  related to those of the RIMs, along with a proline rich domain at the N‐terminus. Bassoon has  been shown to play a structural role in the assembly and function of various types of synapses,  including those in the retina and hair cells (Khimich et al., 2005; tom Dieck et al., 2005). Piccolo  functions  to  integrate  multiple  signals  for  the  regulation  of  synaptic  vesicle  endo‐  and  exocytosis.  In particular, Piccolo has been shown to act as a calcium sensor with  low affinity,  which makes it a candidate to act during periods of high activity when calcium levels build‐up  (Gerber et al., 2001).   A  key  group  of  proteins  involved  in  the  presynaptic  active  zone  is  the  regulating  synaptic  membrane  exocytosis  (RIM)  family  of  proteins.  RIMs  are  members  of  the  RAS  gene  superfamily, and function as protein scaffolds that help regulate vesicle exocytosis. RIM1α and  RIM2α  are  composed  of  the  complete  set  of  domains:  an N‐terminal  zinc  finger  domain,  a  central  PDZ‐domain,  two  C‐terminal  C2‐domains  (C2A,B),  a  short  proline‐rich  SH3  domain‐ binding motif  (Wang et al., 2000; Wang and Sudhof, 2003). RIM2β  is  identical  to RIM2α but  lacks the N‐terminal sequence, while RIM2γ,3γ,4γ are smaller proteins that contain a unique N‐ terminal sequence  followed by the C2B domain  (Wang and Sudhof, 2003).   RIM proteins are  further diversified by alternative splicing (Wang and Sudhof, 2003). RIMs have been shown to  function  both  during  priming  and  calcium‐triggered  vesicle  fusion  (Calakos  et  al.,  2004). Of  26    particular interest, RIMs have been shown to have different actions at excitatory and inhibitory  synapses (Schoch et al., 2002).  RIM  binds  liprin‐α,  a  presynaptic  scaffold  that  consists  of  several  N‐terminal  coiled‐coil  domains,  and  three  C‐terminal  SAM  domains  (Schoch  et  al.,  2002).  Liprin‐α  binds  to  the  receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR and together have been shown to be essential for  proper  active  zone  formation  in  c.  elegans  and  drosophila  mutants  (Zhen  and  Jin,  1999;  Kaufmann  et  al.,  2002).  Liprin‐α  has  recently  been  shown  to  bind  to  a  complex  containing  CASK/Mint/MALS  (Olsen  et  al., 2005; Olsen  et  al., 2006). CASK  is  a member of  the MAGUK  family of PDZ proteins, composed of an N‐terminal calcium calmodulin kinase domain, two L27  domains, and a PDZ domain and a SH3/GK domain (Hata et al., 1996). The kinase domain has  been  shown  to bind Mint‐1, while  the L27 domains bind SAP97 and MALS. The PDZ domain  binds the c‐terminus of Nrx adhesion molecules, providing a link to the presynaptic membrane  (Hata et al., 1996). Essential roles for CASK in the function of the presynaptic terminal remain  uncertain, however studies done on the drosophila homolog (CAMGUK) mutant show defects  in  neurotransmitter  release  at  the  neuromuscular  junction  (Zordan  et  al.,  2005). Mints  are  composed  of  two  c‐terminal  PDZ  domains  that  bind  N‐type  calcium  channels,  and  a  phosphotyrosine binding domain (Maximov et al., 1999). The Mint family is composed of three  proteins  (Mint‐1‐3), wich bind different  interacting partners  via divergent N‐termini. One of  these divergent sequences enables binding of Mint‐1 to CASK, while another enables binding  of Mint‐1 and ‐2 to Munc18 (Okamoto and Sudhof, 1997; Borg et al., 1998; Butz et al., 1998).  MALS, or mammalian homolog of Lin‐7,  is a binding partner of CASK that contains a single N‐ terminal L27 domain, and a C‐terminal PDZ domain (Borg et al., 1998). Studies in mice lacking  all three MALS family members show a role for these proteins  in determining the size of the  27    releasable pool of vesicles, and further for replenishing this pool from reserve vesicles (Olsen  et  al.,  2005).  The  complex  of  CASK, Mint‐1, MALS  and  liprin‐α  is  hypothesised  to  link  the  presynaptic release machinery to the active zone, thereby regulating neurotransmitter release  (Olsen et al., 2006).    1.3.7. Neurotransmitter Transporters  Neurotransmitter transporters exist  in the membranes of neurons and glia to remove excess  amounts of the neurotransmitter from the synapse, or in the case of vesicular transporters, to  pack  neurotransmitter  into  vesicles  for  synaptic  release.  In  general,  neurotransmitter  transporters are membrane‐bound pumps that resemble ion channels.   There  are  two  major  types  of  neurotransmitter  transporters,  the  first  depends  on  an  electrochemical  gradient  of  sodium  ions,  and  exchange  glutamate  or  GABA  with  sodium,  potassium and hydroxyl ions. Sodium‐dependant glutamate transporters are commonly known  as excitatory amino acid  transporters  (EAATs1‐5, also known as SLC1A3,2,1,6,7  respectively).  Sodium‐dependant GABA transporters are referred to simply as GABA transporters (GATs1‐3).  Vesicular glutamate  transporters  (VGluTs1–3, also known as SLC17A7,6,8  respectively)  reside  in the presynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses, whereas the vesicular GABA transporter  (VGAT)  resides  in  the  presynaptic membranes  of  inhibitory  synapses  exclusively.  Vesicular  transporters  rely on a proton gradient created by  the hydrolysis of ATP  in order  to package  neurotransmitter  into  synaptic  vesicles  for  release  (Maycox et al., 1988; Broer et al., 2002).  Because  of  their  specificity  of  localization,  VGluTs  and  VGAT  are  commonly  used  to  label  presynaptic terminals of excitatory and inhibitory synapses respectively.   28      Trans­synaptic Components  1.3.8. Synaptic Adhesion Molecules  Adhesion molecules are essential for maintaining the  integrity of cell‐to‐cell  junctions, and as  such have been shown to have a role in promoting the stability of synapses by linking the pre  and  postsynaptic  membrane.  In  addition,  numerous  recent  developments  have  also  demonstrated a role for synaptic adhesion molecules in target recognition, differentiation, and  regulation of synaptic structure and function (Brose, 1999; Cantallops and Cline, 2000; Zhang  and Benson, 2000; Ferreira and Paganoni, 2002; Garner et al., 2002; Missler, 2003; Yamagata  et al., 2003; Washbourne et al., 2004; Dea