Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Responses of a high Arctic heath to long-term ambient and experimental warming Hudson, James Michael 2009

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2009_spring_hudson_james.pdf [ 1.69MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0067119.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0067119-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0067119-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0067119-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0067119-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0067119-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0067119-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0067119-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0067119.ris

Full Text

    RESPONSES OF A HIGH ARCTIC HEATH TO LONG‐TERM  AMBIENT AND EXPERIMENTAL WARMING      by    JAMES MICHAEL HUDSON    B.Sc., The University of Waterloo, 2006            A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    MASTER OF SCIENCE        in      THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES    (Geography)        THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA    (Vancouver)        April 2009      © James Michael Hudson, 2009      Abstract  The Canadian High Arctic has been warming for several decades and is predicted to undergo  substantially more warming over the next century. Increased temperatures are expected to  alter the composition, structure, and function of Arctic plant communities. To better  understand High Arctic tundra responses to climate warming, I conducted longitudinal and  experimental studies in a snowbed heath plant community at Alexandra Fiord, Nunavut (79 °N).  I collected data in 2007 and 2008 and used data previously collected (1981‐2006) by others for  this project. Responses to ambient warming were measured by using a point‐intercept method  in permanent plots (1995‐2007) and a biomass harvest comparison (1981 to 2008). To quantify  responses to experimental warming, I analyzed point‐intercept data (1996, 2000, and 2007) in  plots that were passively warmed by open‐top chambers (OTCs) beginning in 1992.  Experimental warming increased mean annual temperature by about 1 °C from 1992, while  ambient warming increased mean annual temperature by > 2.5 °C (model‐derived). Ambient  warming shifted the composition of the community: evergreen shrub and bryophyte cover  increased and lichen cover decreased, leading to an increase in total aboveground biomass over  time. Also, canopy height increased while species diversity did not change. The experiment did  not produce the same responses as ambient warming. Experimental warming did not strongly  affect cover, canopy height, or species diversity. Only one response was significant: lichen cover  was 4% lower in warmed plots than in controls. In the experimental plots, temporal changes in  cover were more frequent and of greater magnitude than changes due to passive warming. It  seems that ambient warming has strongly affected community composition and structure in  this High Arctic heath while the experimental treatments did not. These findings support the  view that only substantial climatic changes will alter these snowbed heath ecosystems. This  study provides the first plot‐based evidence for the recent pan‐Arctic increase in tundra  productivity detected by satellite‐based remote‐sensing and repeat‐photography studies. These  types of fine‐scale, ground‐level observations are critical tools for detecting and projecting  long‐term community‐level responses.       ii      Table of contents  Abstract ............................................................................................................................................ii  Table of contents ............................................................................................................................ iii  List of tables ..................................................................................................................................... v  List of figures ................................................................................................................................... vi  Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... viii  Co‐authorship statement ................................................................................................................ ix  Chapter 1: Introduction ........................................................................................................... 1  Overview and summary ........................................................................................................... 1  Literature review ...................................................................................................................... 2  Arctic: past and present .................................................................................................... 2  Arctic plants ...................................................................................................................... 3  Arctic plants and climate change ...................................................................................... 6  International Tundra Experiment ..................................................................................... 8  Alexandra Fiord ................................................................................................................. 9  Objectives ............................................................................................................................... 12  Citations ................................................................................................................................. 13  Chapter 2: Community responses to recent ambient warming .............................................. 23  Introduction  ......................................................................................................................... 23  Methods ................................................................................................................................. 25  Study site ........................................................................................................................ 25  Environmental data monitoring ..................................................................................... 25  Productivity and composition sampling ......................................................................... 26  Environmental data analyses .......................................................................................... 27  Productivity and composition analyses .......................................................................... 27   iii     Results .................................................................................................................................... 28  Environmental data ........................................................................................................ 28  Productivity and composition ......................................................................................... 30  Discussion ............................................................................................................................... 34  Citations ................................................................................................................................. 36  Chapter 3: Community responses to 15 years of experimental warming  ............................. 42  Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 42  Methods ................................................................................................................................. 44  Study site ........................................................................................................................ 44  Experimental design ....................................................................................................... 44  Environmental monitoring.............................................................................................. 45  Statistical analyses .......................................................................................................... 46  Results .................................................................................................................................... 47  Plant community ............................................................................................................. 47  Environmental monitoring.............................................................................................. 51  Discussion ............................................................................................................................... 52  Citations ................................................................................................................................. 56  Chapter 4: Summary and conclusions .................................................................................... 62  Study objective ....................................................................................................................... 62  Significant findings ................................................................................................................. 63  Future research ...................................................................................................................... 65  Weaknesses ............................................................................................................................ 66  Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 67  Citations ................................................................................................................................. 68       iv      List of tables  Table 1.1 ‐ Adaptive traits of vegetation to environmental factors. Information taken from  references in sections “Arctic plants” and “Arctic plants and climate change.” ............................ 5  Table 2.1 ‐ Trends in mean annual air temperature and precipitation for the period 1981‐2007,  for the three closest High Arctic Weather Stations to Alexandra Fiord, based on estimated  generalized least squares models. Year = x, 1981 = 0. Data from Alert for 2006‐2007 are not  currently available from Environment Canada. A significant result at α = 0.05 is marked with a *. ....................................................................................................................................................... 29  Table 2.2 ‐ Trends in climate and environmental factors at Alexandra Fiord, 1995‐2007, based  on estimated generalized least squares models. Year = x, and 1995 = 0. A significant result at α =  0.05 is marked with a *. ................................................................................................................ 29  Table 2.3 ‐ Effect of year on aboveground biomass, diversity, and canopy height for 18  permanent 1 m2 plots from 1995‐2007. The data were analyzed with estimated generalized  least squares models (continuous variable = Year, correlation structure = Continuous‐time  AutoRegressive of order 1 on Year|PlotID). Year = x, and 1995 = 0. For all models, d.f. = 1, 56,  except for canopy height which had d.f. = 1, 34. A significant result at α = 0.05 is marked with a  *..................................................................................................................................................... 32  Table 3.1 ‐ Effects of Warming (W), Year (Y) and their interaction (W*Y) on point cover,  diversity, and canopy height for 36 permanent 1 m2 plots in a heath at Alexandra Fiord. The  data were analyzed with estimated generalized least squares models (correlation structure=  CAR(1) on Year|PlotID). For all models, d.f.= 1, 82 for Warming, Year and Warming*Year, except  for canopy height which had d.f.= 1, 68. NS is Non‐significant (α = 0.05). .................................. 48  Table 3.2 ‐ Site characteristics for three plant communities that largely resisted warming.  Citations for Buxton: Grime et al. (2000, 2008); for Thingvellir: Jónsdóttir et al. (2005). ........... 55  v     List of figures  Figure 1.1 ‐ Location of Alexandra Fiord (*) on the east coast of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian  High Arctic. Map created using the Generic Mapping Tool at www.aquarius.ifm‐geomar.de  (accessed September 2008). ......................................................................................................... 10  Figure 2.1 ‐ Air temperature annual mean anomalies for the period 1960 to 2007 for the three  closest Canadian High Arctic Weather Stations to Alexandra Fiord. Anomalies were calculated  relative to each Station’s 1961–1990 average. Each smoothed curve follows a Station’s 10‐year  running mean. The annual mean anomalies (yellow columns) are the averaged anomaly for the  three Stations for a given year. ..................................................................................................... 28  Figure 2.2 ‐ Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of 18 permanent 1 m2 plots, 1995– 2007. Points represent individual plots and 95% confidence ellipses envelop each year.  Configuration (k = 2) produced with a Bray‐Curtis distance matrix. ............................................ 30  Figure 2.3 ‐ Aboveground biomass by functional type for the 18 permanent 1 m2 plots, in 1995,  2000 and 2007. Values were the mean number of living tissue pin hits per plot using the point‐ intercept method. Bryophytes and evergreen shrubs increased significantly over the period at α  = 0.05............................................................................................................................................. 31  Figure 2.4 ‐ Cover (A panels), aboveground biomass (B panels), and total standing crop (C  panels) harvested at peak season in 1981 compared to 2008 (mean ± SE). Panels on right (2’s)  have smaller scales than panels on left (1’s) because these types were much less abundant in  this community. Only means are reported for cover. A significant change at α = 0.05 is marked  with a *. ......................................................................................................................................... 33  Figure 3.1 ‐ Percent cover for the 36 permanent 1 m2 plots, arranged by plant functional types  from 1996‐2007. ........................................................................................................................... 47   vi     Figure 3.2 ‐ Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of 36 permanent 1 m2 plots from  1996–2007. Points represent individual plots and 95% confidence ellipses envelop each  treatment‐year. 1996 = squares and thick dotted lines, 2000 = circles and medium dotted lines,  2007 = triangles and thin dotted lines; OTCs = hollow points, Controls = solid points.  Configuration (k = 2) produced with a Bray‐Curtis distance matrix. ............................................ 49  Figure 3.3 ‐ Simpson’s Index (mean ± 95% CI) for the 36 permanent 1 m2 plots from 1996‐2007.  The other diversity metrics (Shannon‐Wiener Index, Species Richness, and Pielou’s Evenness),  which are not shown, were also not affected by warming. ......................................................... 50  Figure 3.4 ‐ Canopy height (mean ± 95% CI) for the 36 permanent 1 m2 plots, measured in 2000  and 2007. ...................................................................................................................................... 50        vii     Acknowledgements  Thank you to my advisor, Dr. Greg Henry, for your support, wisdom, inspiration, and friendship.  Thank you to my committee members, Dr. Valerie LeMay and Dr. Roy Turkington, for guidance  and editorial comments. I received the technical support of Dr. Catherine La Farge with  bryophyte identification and Trevor Goward with lichen identification. Thanks to all of the  members of the UBC Tundra Ecology Lab who contributed to this research over the years. I’d  particularly like to thank Jessica Baas, William Brown, Carolyn Churchland, Tammy Elliott, Sarah  Elmendorf, Rebecca Klady, Justin Lau Hoover, Adrian Leitch, Laura Machial, Pamela O, Sarah  Trefry, and Jennifer Wurz. Aya Murakami, Isla Myers‐Smith, Gerald Singh and the Tundra  Ecology Lab provided useful comments on earlier drafts of this thesis.   This research would not have been possible without the financial support of ArcticNet, the  Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies, Eureka! Canada, the Garfield Weston  Foundation, the Government of Canada International Polar Year Program, the Northern  Scientific Training Program, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, and the  University of British Columbia.   Thank you to the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, Nunavut Research Institute, and Nunavut  Department of Environment for permission to conduct this research. The Polar Continental  Shelf Project and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police provided decades of logistical support for  this project. I am greatly indebted to these organizations for giving me the privilege of visiting  one of the Arctic’s most spectacular places to conduct research, Alexandra Fiord.   Last, I’d like to thank my family and friends for their continued support, especially Sarah, Mom,  Dad, Brad, and Rebecca.         viii     Co­authorship statement  Chapters 2 and 3 were co‐authored with my thesis advisor, Dr. Greg Henry. Dr. Henry  performed the research (1981‐2006), designed the warming experiment (1992), and provided  editorial comments. James Hudson performed the research (2007‐2008), analyzed the data,  and prepared the manuscripts.      ix     Chapter 1: Introduction  Overview and summary  Tundra is the most common terrestrial biome of the far North. It is characterized by extremely  cold climates, short growing seasons, and low nutrient cycling. Tundra ecosystems have low  biotic diversity and a simple vegetation structure. They provide animals, birds, and both edible  and medicinal plants for Arctic residents; however, these ecosystems are rapidly changing.  Climate change impacts to tundra are affecting the a) resources of Arctic residents, b)  biodiversity, and c) regional and global biogeochemical cycling. Our ability to understand and  predict these effects will require substantial scientific effort and Northern participation.   Climate change impacts to Arctic tundra will largely depend on how vegetation responds to a  suite of altered environmental factors (e.g. temperature, growing season length, soil moisture,  nutrient availability). Perturbation experiments that manipulate these factors have been used  to forecast large‐scale responses to climate change (see Wookey 2008). Researchers have also  attempted palaeo‐environmental proxies, gradient studies, repeat‐photography, satellite‐based  imagery, and computer modeling in order to better forecast changes to tundra systems (see  Wookey 2008). Over the last 30 years, researchers have determined the small‐ and large‐scale  drivers of tundra ecosystems, quantitatively monitored plant growth, reproduction, and  phenology, compared responses to experiments across time and space, and developed  predictions for long‐term change (see Callaghan et al. 2005, Anisimov et al. 2007).   In this thesis, I examine the effects of warming on a High Arctic heath plant community. This  project consists of two years of academic study and almost 30 years of data. The work  represents one of the first long‐term vegetation‐climate change studies in the Canadian Arctic.  Plant community responses to both ambient and experimental warming were simultaneously  assessed in this project, which is rare. In this chapter, I present a review of the relevant  literature and describe the objectives for this study. Chapter 2 investigates plant community  responses to ambient warming, and Chapter 3 describes responses to experimental warming.  Chapter 4 is a summary of the key findings of this research.  1     Literature review  Arctic: past and present  The Arctic is the northernmost region of the world and is centred on the North Pole. Its  southern boundary may be demarcated by the timberline of the boreal forest (Walker et al.  2005), the Arctic Circle (66°33′ N), or the 10 °C July isotherm (Bliss and Matveyeva 1992).  Depending on the definition, the Arctic includes 7% (Walker et al. 2005) to 15% (Billings 1997)  of the world’s landmass. Tundra ecosystems cover about 55% of the region (Walker et al. 2005).  The Arctic consists of parts of Greenland (Denmark), Iceland, Canada, Russia, the USA, Norway,  Sweden, and Finland.    The Arctic is characterized as an extreme environment because of its low temperatures. The  region is primarily cryospheric as extreme physical factors control most ecosystem‐level  processes (Billings 1997). Winters are dark and cold, while summers are brief and cool. Many  areas remain under year‐round snow and ice cover, while other parts become snow‐free only  briefly. During this period, plant and animal life flourishes. However, the Arctic as we know it  has not existed for very long. The region and its biota have repeatedly migrated north and  south in response to oscillations in global climates (McBean et al. 2005). The Arctic’s southern  boundary has constantly fluctuated making climate change the primary driver of the region’s  biodiversity (Sala et al. 2000).   Arctic climates are constantly changing: they are dynamic and complex. Past climate changes  have been common, and most climate periods were unstable and short‐lived. During the  Quaternary Period (the last 1.6 My BP), the earth’s climate repeatedly oscillated between  interglacial and glacial cycles, with each cycle possessing a unique length and set of  characteristics (McBean et al. 2005). Arctic cycles were of greater intensity than the average  global cycles during these periods. Therefore, the region has been both much warmer and  cooler than it is today (McBean et al. 2005). Past Arctic climates exhibited significant variation,  and were prone to rapid, non‐linear changes (McBean et al. 2005). For example, long‐term  temperature increases averaged 2 °C per millennium during the last glacial‐interglacial   2     transition, but rapid temperature shifts of up to 10 °C per 50 years occurred about 14.5 ky BP  and again 11 ky BP (McBean et al. 2005). Past climate reconstructions have been complicated  by sparse instrumental monitoring, geographically‐limited paleoclimate data, and spatially  asynchronous changes, primarily due to historical effects (McBean et al. 2005). Consequently,  historical analogues and past climate cycles must be extrapolated with caution.   Presently, the Arctic region is warming. Over the past century, the Arctic’s mean annual  temperature increased by approximately 0.9 °C (McBean et al. 2005). Warming is occurring  faster in the Arctic than anywhere else in the world due to several factors, which are  collectively referred to as polar amplification. Over the next century, mean annual  temperatures are projected to rise by 3‐5 °C (McBean et al. 2005). Already, climate change has  affected the Arctic. Melting glaciers, reductions in the extent and thickness of sea ice, thawing  permafrost, and rising sea levels all provide strong evidence of recent warming in the Arctic  (ACIA 2004). The implications of Arctic warming are multi‐faceted, and are characterized by a  complex system of lags, responses, thresholds and feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000).   Arctic plants  The Arctic has low biotic diversity. For example, it contains 900 (0.4%) of the world’s vascular  plant species (Billings 1997). Biodiversity is limited almost exclusively by physical factors  (Chapin et al. 1993). Vascular plants have evolved an extensive number of elaborate strategies  in response to the selective pressures of these factors (Table 1.1). Common vegetation types  include vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens; ferns are represented but rare. Almost all  vascular plants are herbaceous perennials (forbs, graminoids and sedges) or prostrate shrubs.  Species are mostly generalists with many ecotypes and wide distributions and tolerances  (Matveyeva and Chernov 2000).   Plants are mostly long‐lived and often use both sexual and vegetative propagation (Molau  1993). Sexual reproduction primarily occurs in years with favourable conditions (Wookey et al.  1994, Wookey et al. 1995). There is a tendency towards increased self‐pollination, apomixis,  3     and vivipary, rather than cross‐pollination (Molau 1993). Vegetative propagation occurs  through the formation of bulbils, viviparous propagules, fragmentation of clones or formation  of daughter ramets from stolons or rhizomes  (Crawford 1997). Vegetative and reproductive  plasticity is surprisingly high, given the extremeness of tundra ecosystems (Crawford 1997,  Robinson et al. 1998). Tundra plants are short dispersers and establish seedlings sporadically  (Jonasson 1992).   Physical factors strongly limit Arctic tundra. These factors include low air and soil temperatures,  brief growing seasons, and the low availabilities of water, light, and nutrients. Low temperature  is the ultimate factor affecting plant communities in the Arctic (Matveyeva and Chernov 2000).  Temperature directly affects rates of photosynthesis, growth and nutrient absorption, and is  the primary determinant of Arctic vascular plant biomass (Rannie 1986, Larcher 2003, Bardgett  et al. 2007). Growing seasons are exceptionally brief; Arctic landscapes are covered with snow  for more than two‐thirds of the year. Growing season length affects plants by limiting growth,  and by changing both edaphic conditions and nutrient cycles through its effects on soil moisture  contents, active layer depth, and available solar radiation (Kane et al. 1992). Soil moisture  largely determines the nature of vegetation communities, along with snow cover distribution  and geological substratum on fine scales (Muc et al. 1989). Water availability depends on inputs  (e.g. precipitation, snow depth, and snow melt timing), outputs (e.g. evapotranspiration), and  other factors (e.g. depth of permafrost table, slope angle, vegetation type, and soil/bedrock  type). Light conditions for polar vegetation are unusual. During the winter, darkness is  continuous and lasts for months; during the summer, light is continuous but weak.  Photosynthetic rates are rarely light‐saturated and vegetation may be at risk of loss of  reproductive abilities or even death due to low light levels (Chapin et al. 1980). Arctic tundra is  nutrient‐limited because of low air and soil temperatures, extremes in moisture (either  exceptionally high or low soil moisture contents), low‐quality organic matter, strong  seasonality, and unfavourable micro‐climates (Robinson et al. 1998). Low temperatures directly  limit microbial biomass and activity, and indirectly limit active layer depth (Chapin 1983). In the    4     Table 1.1 ‐ Adaptive traits of vegetation to environmental factors. Information taken from references in sections  “Arctic plants” and “Arctic plants and climate change.”   Factor  Adaptation  Temperature  low temperature optimum for photosynthesis  relatively temperature‐insensitive process rates (e.g. photosynthesis,  respiration, and nutrient absorption)  comparable daily growth rates to temperate species  continued function at very low temperatures (e.g. growth at 0 °C)  high enzyme concentrations cause high rates of photosynthesis and  respiration, even at low temperatures  summer freezing tolerance  winter frost hardening  short stature  dark pigmentation  leaf and flower morphology (size, shape, colour, and arrangement)  pubescence  continued attachment of dead parts  Growing  perennial life‐history strategy  season length  overwintering (evergreen) leaves  pre‐formation of reproductive and vegetative buds  vegetative growth using rhizomes, stolons and bulbils  rapid early summer shoot growth     multiple cues for the onset of dormancy  Water   desiccation resistance during winter   Light   high chlorophyll concentrations  low chlorophyll a to b ratio  flower heliotropism   Nutrients   high uptake per unit root biomass  high root/shoot ratio  translocation of resources belowground in late summer      uptake of soluble organic nitrogen (e.g. amino acids)      5      future, vegetation may be directly affected by increased temperatures, or indirectly affected by  greater supplies of resources (Shaver et al. 2000).   Arctic plants and climate change  Researchers have developed several tools to examine vegetation responses to climate change,  including palaeo‐environmental studies, transect or gradient studies, repeat photography,  remotely‐sensed imagery, perturbation experiments, and long‐term monitoring, which are all  briefly discussed below. Multi‐proxy palaeo‐environmental approaches enable the effects of  past climate changes to be teased apart from other effects. These approaches improve our  understanding of the climate‐vegetation linkage, as well as past environmental variability, but  they cannot provide information on future environmental scenarios for which no past  analogues exist (Wookey 2008). Researchers have primarily used pollen diagrams, and tree and  shrub rings to assess past periods of climatic changes. Transect and gradient (space‐for‐time  substitutions) studies are potentially useful as well, but have several drawbacks. They provide  no information about site‐specific rates of change, are influenced by interspecific interactions  and dispersal, and do not incorporate the multi‐faceted nature of climate change (Wookey  2008). Repeat photography has been used to detect increasing shrub cover in Alaska (Sturm et  al. 2001, Stow et al. 2004, Tape et al. 2006). However, few historical photographs exist, few  areas are suitable for these studies, and most changes cannot be seen by landscape  photographs (Tape et al. 2006). Studies that use remotely‐sensed data have been very helpful  at detecting large‐scale vegetation responses. In northern high latitudes, increases have been  observed in photosynthetic activity (Myneni et al. 1997), normalized difference vegetation  index (Pouliot et al. 2009), growing season length (Stow et al. 2004), and primary production  (Kimball et al. 2006, Zhang et al. 2008). Remotely‐sensed studies can be hindered by  measurement errors, caused by instrumentation drift and atmospheric effects (Fung 1997), and  are subject to uncertainty in the interpretation of their results, partly because of the lack of  ground‐based data. For example, images may be interpreted as either changes in growing  season length or shrub cover expansion (Tape et al. 2006).   6     Field‐based perturbation experiments are an effective tool for examining plant responses to  climate change (Wookey 2008). Experiments have been conducted in low productivity  ecosystems in Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.  Researchers have manipulated air and soil temperatures, nutrient, light, and water  availabilities, UV‐B, and CO2. Unfortunately, all perturbation experiments have drawbacks. They  are often too short, too confounded by experimental artifacts, or too large (i.e. step changes  can be excessive) to be scaled‐up across a larger region or a biome. Nonetheless, they may  become the most important tool for predicting vegetation change. The most commonly‐used  manipulations are nutrient additions and passive warming. Nutrient additions attempt to  simulate the increased rate of nutrient cycling expected with climate change. Arctic ecosystems  are strongly nutrient limited, such that additions “always increase plant growth” (Berendse and  Jonasson 1992). Nutrient additions stimulate larger responses than other factors (van Wijk et al.  2004), and strongly affect ecosystem structure, composition, and function (Chapin et al. 1995,  Shaver et al. 2001, van Wijk et al. 2004). They are usually administered as single doses (one  dose per season) of organic NPK (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) fertilizer in solid form.  These doses may be toxic to some plants, cryptogams, and microbes (e.g. Henry et al. 1986).  Their utility has been questioned because they supply nutrients at levels that are much greater  than the expected increase in nutrient cycling and they circumvent microbial cycling (Robinson  et al. 1998, Hartley et al. 1999, Jonasson et al. 1999, van Wijk et al. 2004). Passive warming  experiments increase near‐surface air temperature. Researchers have used closed greenhouses  and open‐top chambers to warm tundra plants. Community‐level responses to passive warming  have been detected in many vegetation types, and across many sites (see Chapin et al. 1995,  Hobbie and Chapin 1998, Press et al. 1998, Robinson et al. 1998, Cornelissen et al. 2001, Graglia  et al. 2001, Richardson et al. 2002, Gough and Hobbie 2003, van Wijk et al. 2004, Hollister et al.  2005b, Jónsdóttir et al. 2005a, Wahren et al. 2005, Walker et al. 2006, Post and Pedersen  2008). Shifts depend on initial community conditions, climate, region, and secondary  environmental factors (Shaver et al. 2000; Walker et al. 2006). Responses are quick (Arft et al.  1999), but may be transient (Chapin et al. 1995). Passive warming experiments also have  several drawbacks: they fail to increase soil temperatures (Jónsdóttir et al. 2005b), cause  7     shelter effects, cause only minor increases in air temperature (Marion et al. 1997), and affect  moisture, gas composition, snow cover, light, and wind speed in unintended ways (Kennedy  1995a, b, Shen and Harte 2000). In spite of these difficulties, they remain the most effective  manipulation for simulating the climatic changes expected in the Arctic (Shen and Harte 2000,  Wookey 2008).   Observational studies of natural changes are becoming increasingly common. As warming in the  Arctic continues, many systems are undergoing significant temporal changes. Although all  studies to‐date were from northern Alaska (Chapin et al. 1995, Hollister et al. 2005a, Jorgenson  and Buchholtz 2005), the “Back to the Future” International Polar Year natural changes project  will produce a wealth of studies from across the biome over the coming years, as researchers  return to many of the International Biological Programme (1964‐1974) sites.   International Tundra Experiment  The International Tundra Experiment (ITEX) is a network of over 20 Arctic and alpine sites that  investigate tundra vegetation responses to climate change (Henry and Molau 1997). The  network was formed in 1990 in recognition of the sensitivity of Arctic tundra to climate change.  Small‐scale experiments and standardized protocols for design, measurement, and data  recording are used to monitor and predict large‐scale vegetation responses to climate change.  To simulate climate change, researchers passively warm vegetation with open‐top chambers  (OTCs, Marion et al. 1997). The OTCs are designed to mimic the near‐surface temperature  warming predicted by general circulation models for the Arctic region. Other manipulations in  ITEX include nutrient additions, growing season length manipulations, and supplemental carbon  dioxide. By replicating a common experiment across sites, ITEX examines the variability in  species and community responses across climatic and geographic gradients. The network has  examined responses to warming of plant phenology, growth, and reproduction (Henry and  Molau 1997, Arft et al. 1999), composition and abundance (Walker et al. 2006), and carbon flux  (Oberbauer et al. 2007).   8     Alexandra Fiord  All research for this project was conducted at the flagship ITEX research station: Alexandra  Fiord (78°53`N, 75°55`W, Figure 1.1). The site is located on the east‐central coast of Ellesmere  Island, the largest, and most northerly of the Queen Elizabeth Islands in the Canadian Arctic  Archipelago. Since 1979, considerable ecological research has been conducted at the site and in  the surrounding region. In their book, Svoboda and Freedman (1994) describe most of the  research at the site from 1979‐1994. Since then, significant attention has been paid to the ITEX  project. There are currently seven ongoing ITEX experiments at the site, all of which began in  1992 or 1995. Data from several of these experiments have been reported in the ITEX meta‐ analyses mentioned earlier.   The Alexandra Fiord lowland is an 8 km2 polar oasis. It has warmer, longer growing seasons and  more soil moisture than the surrounding polar semi‐desert landscapes. The site has a mean  summer air temperature of 5 °C and a mean annual air temperature of ‐20 °C. It receives about  1‐5 cm of precipitation during the growing season and about 10‐20 cm of precipitation annually  (G. Henry, unpublished data). During the growing season, the lowland receives meltwater from  snow and glaciers and thawing permafrost. This post‐glacial outwash plain is bounded by bare  upland plateaus, glacial tongues from the Prince of Wales ice cap, and the waters of Alexandra  Fiord. The lowland’s topography includes rivers, streams and creeks, granite rock outcrops,  raised beaches, sorted polygons, and frost boils. The site is gently sloping and has a northerly  aspect. (See Muc et al. (1989) for information about the area’s soils.)   Alexandra Fiord is rich in plant, insect, and animal life. A total of 96 species of vascular plants  are found at the site (Ball and Hill 1994). The site is well‐vegetated, and the lush vegetation  contrasts with the barrens of the surrounding region. Common vascular species include  Cassiope tetragona, Dryas integrifolia, Salix arctica, and Luzula arctica. Across the lowland,  there is considerable variability in the composition of the plant communities (Muc et al. 1989).  Moisture status largely determines the abundances of species within communities at the site  (Muc et al. 1989).   9        Figure 1.1 ‐ Location of Alexandra Fiord (*) on the east coast of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic.  Map created using the Generic Mapping Tool at www.aquarius.ifm‐geomar.de (accessed September 2008).         10     Mesic dwarf shrub communities cover over 50% of the lowland (Muc et al. 1989). These  communities are found on the outwash plain as well as on seepage slopes. In heath  communities, snowmelt occurs in early‐ to mid‐June, and soils remain damp throughout the  growing season, which lasts from June‐August. Soils are usually poorly developed Static  Cryosols (Muc et al. 1989). The surface organic layer is 0‐6 cm thick and the maximum depth of  thaw varies from 40‐70 cm (Nams and Freedman 1987a).   Many dwarf shrub communities at Alexandra Fiord are dominated by Cassiope tetragona and  Dryas integrifolia. Both are long‐lived evergreen chamaephytes (dwarf shrubs). C. tetragona,  Arctic white heather, is common throughout many Arctic and alpine regions, typically forming  loose mats or cushions. Stems produce four rows of alternating, resinous leaves, which remain  green for several years. Reproduction is usually sexual. Plants produce white bell‐shaped  flowers. D. integrifolia, commonly called white Dryas or Arctic aven, is cushion‐ or mat‐forming  and characteristic of mesic and xeric sites throughout the Arctic. Flowers are white and  heliotropic, and are mainly pollinated by flies.  Seeds are wind dispersed.   Arctic evergreen shrubs exhibit slow growth, low biomass turnover, and a relatively long life‐ span for established individuals (Nams and Freedman 1987b, Shaver and Kummerow 1992).  Previous studies suggest that these plants will likely show relatively conservative responses to  nutrient additions (Henry et al. 1986, Chapin and Shaver 1989), and warming (Molau 1997, Arft  et al. 1999, Walker et al. 2006). Arctic prostrate shrub communities, such as heaths dominated  by evergreen shrubs, will not be as opportunistic as others types of vegetation, and are likely to  decline due to climate change (Callaghan et al. 2005).   11     Objectives  The effects of climate change on tundra ecosystems are substantial. Across the biome,  individual plant distributions will shift, species associations will be altered, and trophic level  interactions will be modified. At the local scale, the phenology, growth, and reproduction of  species will be affected. These changes will translate into composition and abundance changes  and may ultimately alter ecosystem function. Establishing strong causal links between climate  and plant community changes is essential for increasing our ability to predict large‐scale  vegetation responses to the warming that is expected for the Arctic region. The objective of this  project was to assess community composition and abundance responses to warming. I tested  the hypothesis that temperature affects tundra plant communities by asking two questions:   A) has ambient warming affected this heath plant community? (Chapter 2)  B) has experimental warming affected this heath? (Chapter 3)    For each question, I examined three community‐level metrics: composition and abundance,  species diversity, and canopy height. I addressed question A by examining long‐term control  plots (1995‐2007) and comparing biomass harvests (1981 to 2008). Passive warming with open‐ top chambers (1992‐2007) was used to address question B. For this project, I combined data  that I collected in the summers of 2007 and 2008 with data that Dr. Greg Henry and his  assistants collected from 1992‐2006. There are several features of this project which make its  contribution to northern scholarship valuable. This project is the first to examine the effects of  warming in a Canadian heath plant community, and is the first to assess long‐term plant  community composition and abundance responses to passive warming using permanent plots.  It is also one of the first to combine responses to ambient and passive warming. This project  extended several earlier studies that were conducted in the same heath (Nams and Freedman  1987a, b, Johnstone 1995), and it followed up on Hill’s thesis (2006), which detected biomass  changes in a relatively productive wet sedge community at the site between the early 1980s  and 2005. This project was undertaken in a heath community at a polar oasis, a common  community type in a keystone ecosystem. Therefore, study results may be compared to other  experiments at the site, both Arctic and alpine heath communities, and tundra at other sites. 12     Citations  ACIA. 2004. Impacts of a Warming Arctic: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment. Cambridge  University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Anisimov, O. A., D. G. Vaughan, T. V. Callaghan, C. Furgal, H. Marchant, T. D. Prowse, H.  Vihjálmsson, and J. E. Walsh. 2007. Polar regions (Arctic and Antarctic). Pages 653‐685 in  M. L. Parry, O. F. Canziani, J. P. Palutikof, P. J. van der Linden, and C. E. Hanson, editors.  Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Contribution of Working  Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate  Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Arft, A. M., M. D. Walker, J. Gurevitch, J. M. Alatalo, M. S. Bret‐Harte, M. Dale, M. Diemer, F.  Gugerli, G. H. R. Henry, M. H. Jones, R. D. Hollister, I. S. Jónsdóttir, K. Laine, E. Lévesque,  G. M. Marion, U. Molau, P. Mølgaard, U. Nordenhäll, V. Raszhivin, C. H. Robinson, G.  Starr, A. Stenström, M. Stenström, O. Totland, P. L. Turner, L. J. Walker, P. J. Webber, J.  M. Welker, and P. A. Wookey. 1999. Responses of tundra plants to experimental  warming: Meta‐analysis of the International Tundra Experiment. Ecological Monographs  69:491‐511.   Ball, P. and N. Hill. 1994. Vascular plants at Alexandra Fiord. Pages 255‐256 in J. Svoboda and B.  Freedman, editors. Ecology of a Polar Oasis: Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island, Canada.  Captus University Publications, Toronto, Canada.   Bardgett, R. D., R. van der Wal, I. S. Jónsdóttir, H. Quirk, and S. Dutton. 2007. Temporal  variability in plant and soil nitrogen pools in a high‐Arctic ecosystem. Soil Biology &  Biochemistry 39:2129‐2137.   Berendse, F. and S. Jonasson. 1992. Nutrient use and nutrient cycling in northern ecosystems.  Pages 337‐356 in F. S. Chapin, III, R. L. Jefferies, J. F. Reynolds, G. R. Shaver, and J.  13     Svoboda, editors. Arctic Ecosystems in a Changing Climate. Academic Press, New York,  USA.   Billings, W. D. 1997. Arctic phytogeography: Plant diversity, floristic richness, migrations, and  acclimation to changing climates. Pages 25‐45 in R. M. M. Crawford, editor. Disturbance  and Recovery in Arctic Lands: an Ecological Perspective. Kluwer Academic Publishers,  The Netherlands.   Bliss, L. C. and N. V. Matveyeva. 1992. Circumpolar arctic vegetation. Pages 59–89 in F. S.  Chapin, III, R. L. Jefferies, J. F. Reynolds, G. R. Shaver, and J. Svoboda, editors. Arctic  Ecosystems in a Changing Climate. Academic Press, New York, USA.   Callaghan, T. V., L. O. Björn, F. S. Chapin, III, Y. Chernov, T. R. Christensen, B. Huntley, R. Ims,  and M. Johansson. 2005. Arctic tundra and polar desert ecosystems. Pages 243‐352 in C.  Symon, L. Arris, and B. Heal, editors. Arctic Climate Impact Assessment: Scientific  Report. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Chapin, F. S., III. 1983. Direct and indirect effects of temperature on Arctic plants. Polar Biology  2:47‐52.   Chapin, F. S., III, K. Autumn, and F. Pugnaire. 1993. Evolution of suites of traits in response to  environmental stress. American Naturalist 142:S78‐S92.   Chapin, F. S., III, P. C. Miller, W. D. Billings, and P. I. Coyne. 1980. Carbon and nutrient budgets  and their control in coastal tundra. Pages 458‐482 in J. Brown, P. C. Miller, L. L. Tieszen,  and F. L. Bunnell, editors. An arctic ecosystem: the coastal tundra at Barrow, Alaska.  Dowden Hutchinson & Ross Inc., Stroudsbourg, USA.   14     Chapin, F. S., III and G. R. Shaver. 1989. Differences in growth and nutrient use among arctic   plant growth forms. Functional Ecology 3:73‐80.   Chapin, F. S., III, G. R. Shaver, A. E. Giblin, K. J. Nadelhoffer, and J. A. Laundre. 1995. Responses  of Arctic tundra to experimental and observed changes in climate. Ecology 76:694‐711.   Cornelissen, J. H. C., T. V. Callaghan, J. M. Alatalo, A. Michelsen, E. Graglia, A. E. Hartley, D. S.  Hik, S. E. Hobbie, M. C. Press, C. H. Robinson, G. H. R. Henry, G. R. Shaver, G. K. Phoenix,  D. G. Jones, S. Jonasson, F. S. Chapin, III, U. Molau, C. Neill, J. A. Lee, J. M. Melillo, B.  Sveinbjörnsson, and R. Aerts. 2001. Global change and arctic ecosystems: is lichen  decline a function of increases in vascular plant biomass? Journal of Ecology 89:984‐994.   Crawford, R. M. M. 1997. Habitat fragility as an aid to long‐term survival in arctic vegetation.  Pages 113‐136 in S. J. Woodin and M. Marquiss, editors. Ecology of Arctic Environments.  Blackwell, Oxford, UK.   Fung, I. 1997. Climate change ‐ A greener north. Nature 386:659‐660.   Gough, L. and S. E. Hobbie. 2003. Responses of moist non‐acidic arctic tundra to altered  environment: productivity, biomass, and species richness. Oikos 103:204‐216.   Graglia, E., S. Jonasson, A. Michelsen, I. K. Schmidt, M. Havström, and L. Gustavsson. 2001.  Effects of environmental perturbations on abundance of subarctic plants after three,  seven and ten years of treatments. Ecography 24:5‐12.   Hartley, A. E., C. Neill, J. M. Melillo, R. Crabtree, and F. P. Bowles. 1999. Plant performance and  soil nitrogen mineralization in response to simulated climate change in subarctic dwarf  shrub heath. Oikos 86:331‐343.   15     Henry, G. H. R., B. Freedman, and J. Svoboda. 1986. Effects of fertilization on three tundra plant  communities of a polar desert oasis. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue Canadienne De  Botanique 64:2502‐2507.   Henry, G. H. R. and U. Molau. 1997. Tundra plants and climate change: the International Tundra  Experiment (ITEX). Global Change Biology 3:1‐9.   Hill, G. 2006. Responses of High Arctic sedge meadows to climate warming at Alexandra Fiord,  Ellesmere Island, since 1980. MSc thesis. University of British Columbia, Vancouver,  Canada.   Hobbie, S. E. and F. S. Chapin, III. 1998. Response of tundra plant biomass, aboveground  production, nitrogen, and CO2 flux to experimental warming. Ecology 79:1526‐1544.   Hollister, R. D., P. J. Webber, and C. Bay. 2005a. Plant response to temperature in Northern  Alaska: Implications for predicting vegetation change. Ecology 86:1562‐1570.   Hollister, R. D., P. J. Webber, and C. E. Tweedie. 2005b. The response of Alaskan arctic tundra to  experimental warming: differences between short‐ and long‐term responses. Global  Change Biology 11:525‐536.   Johnstone, J. 1995. Responses of Cassiope tetragona, a high arctic evergreen dwarf shrub, to  variations in growing season temperature and growing season length at Alexandra Fiord,  Ellesmere Island. MSc thesis. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.   Jonasson, S. 1992. Plant  responses to fertilization and species removal in tundra related to  community structure and clonality. Oikos 63:420‐429.   16     Jonasson, S., A. Michelsen, and I. K. Schmidt. 1999. Coupling of nutrient cycling and carbon  dynamics in the Arctic, integration of soil microbial and plant processes. Applied Soil  Ecology 11:135‐146.   Jónsdóttir, I. S., O. Khitun, and A. Stenström. 2005a. Biomass and nutrient responses of a clonal  tundra sedge to climate warming. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue Canadienne De  Botanique 83:1608‐1621.   Jónsdóttir, I. S., B. Magnússon, J. Gudmundsson, A. Elmarsdóttir, and H. Hjartarson. 2005b.  Variable sensitivity of plant communities in Iceland to experimental warming. Global  Change Biology 11:553‐563.   Jorgenson, J. and C. A. Buchholtz. 2005. Eighteen years of vegetation monitoring in the Arctic  National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Pages 62‐63 in Proceedings of the SEARCH Open  Science Meeting, 27‐30 October 2003. Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.,  Fairbanks, USA.   Kane, D. L., L. D. Hinzman, M. Woo, and K. R. Everett. 1992. Arctic hydrology and climate  change. Pages 35‐57 in F. S. Chapin, III, R. L. Jefferies, J. F. Reynolds, G. R. Shaver, and J.  Svoboda, editors. Arctic Ecosystems in a Changing Climate. Academic Press, New York,  USA.   Kennedy, A. D. 1995a. Simulated climate change: are passive greenhouses a valid microcosm for  testing the biological effects of environmental perturbations. Global Change Biology  1:29‐42.   Kennedy, A. D. 1995b. Temperature effects of passive greenhouse apparatus in high‐latitude  climate change experiments. Functional Ecology 9:340‐350.   17     Kimball, J. S., M. Zhao, A. D. Mcguire, F. A. Heinsch, J. Clein, M. P. Calef, W. M. Jolly, S. Kang, S.  E. Euskirchen, K. C. McDonald, and S. W. Running. 2006. Recent climate‐driven increases  in vegetation productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence for an acceleration of the  northern terrestrial carbon cycle. Earth Interactions 11:1‐23.   Larcher, W. 2003. Physiological Plant Ecology: Ecophysiology and Stress Physiology of  Functional Groups. Springer, New York, USA.   Marion, G. M., G. H. R. Henry, D. W. Freckman, J. Johnstone, G. Jones, M. H. Jones, E. Lévesque,  U. Molau, P. Mølgaard, A. N. Parsons, J. Svoboda, and R. A. Virginia. 1997. Open‐top  designs for manipulating field temperature in high‐latitude ecosystems. Global Change  Biology 3:20‐32.   Matveyeva, N. and Y. Chernov. 2000. Biodiversity of terrestrial ecosystems. Pages 233–273 in  M. Nuttall and T. V. Callaghan, editors. The Arctic: Environment, People, Policy.  Harwood Academic Publishers, Reading, UK.   McBean, G., G. Alekseev, D. Chen, E. Førland, J. Fyfe, P. Y. Groisman, R. King, H. Melling, R. Vose,  and P. H. Whitfield. 2005. Arctic climate: past and present. Pages 21–60  Arctic Climate  Impact Assessment: Scientific Report. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Molau, U. 1993. Relationships between flowering phenology and life‐history strategies in  tundra plants. Arctic and Alpine Research 25:391‐402.   Molau, U. 1997. Responses to natural climatic variation and experimental warming in two  tundra plant species with contrasting life forms: Cassiope tetragona and Ranunculus  nivalis. Global Change Biology 3:97‐107.   18     Muc, M., B. Freedman, and J. Svoboda. 1989. Vascular plant communities of a polar oasis at  Alexandra Fiord (79°N), Ellesmere Island, Canada. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue  Canadienne De Botanique 67:1126‐1136.   Myneni, R. B., C. D. Keeling, C. J. Tucker, G. Asrar, and R. R. Nemani. 1997. Increased plant  growth in the northern high latitudes from 1981 to 1991. Nature 386:698‐702.   Nams, M. L. N. and B. Freedman. 1987a. Ecology of heath communities dominated by Cassiope  tetragona at Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island, Canada. Holarctic Ecology 10:22‐32.   Nams, M. L. N. and B. Freedman. 1987b. Phenology and resource allocation in a high arctic  evergreen dwarf shrub, Cassiope tetragona. Holarctic Ecology 10:128‐136.   Oberbauer, S. F., C. E. Tweedie, J. M. Welker, J. T. Fahnestock, G. H. R. Henry, P. J. Webber, R. D.  Hollister, M. D. Walker, A. Kuchy, E. Elmore, and G. Starr. 2007. Tundra CO2 fluxes in  response to experimental warming across latitudinal and moisture gradients. Ecological  Monographs 77:221‐238.   Post, E. and C. Pedersen. 2008. Opposing plant community responses to warming with and  without herbivores. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United  States of America 105:12353‐12358.   Pouliot, D., R. Latifovic, and I. Olthof. 2009. Trends in vegetation NDVI from 1 km AVHRR data  over Canada for the period 1985‐2006. International Journal of Remote Sensing 30:149‐ 168.   Press, M. C., J. A. Potter, M. J. W. Burke, T. V. Callaghan, and J. A. Lee. 1998. Responses of a  subarctic dwarf shrub heath community to simulated environmental change. Journal of  Ecology 86:315‐327.  19     Rannie, W. F. 1986. Summer air temperature and number of vascular species in Arctic Canada.  Arctic 39:133‐137.   Richardson, S. J., M. C. Press, A. N. Parsons, and S. E. Hartley. 2002. How do nutrients and  warming impact on plant communities and their insect herbivores? A 9‐year study from  a sub‐Arctic heath. Journal of Ecology 90:544‐556.   Robinson, C. H., P. A. Wookey, J. A. Lee, T. V. Callaghan, and M. C. Press. 1998. Plant community  responses to simulated environmental change at a high arctic polar semi‐desert. Ecology  79:856‐866.   Sala, O. E., F. S. Chapin, III, J. J. Armesto, E. Berlow, J. Bloomfield, R. Dirzo, E. Huber‐Sanwald, L.  F. Huenneke, R. B. Jackson, A. Kinzig, R. Leemans, D. M. Lodge, H. A. Mooney, M.  Oesterheld, N. L. Poff, M. T. Sykes, B. H. Walker, M. Walker, and D. H. Wall. 2000.  Biodiversity ‐ Global biodiversity scenarios for the year 2100. Science 287:1770‐1774.   Shaver, G. R., S. M. Bret‐Harte, M. H. Jones, J. Johnstone, L. Gough, J. Laundre, and F. S. Chapin,  III. 2001. Species composition interacts with fertilizer to control long‐term change in  tundra productivity. Ecology 82:3163‐3181.   Shaver, G. R., J. Canadell, F. S. Chapin, III, J. Gurevitch, J. Harte, G. H. R. Henry, P. Ineson, S.  Jonasson, J. Melillo, L. Pitelka, and L. Rustad. 2000. Global warming and terrestrial  ecosystems: A conceptual framework for analysis. Bioscience 50:871‐882.   Shaver, G. R. and J. Kummerow. 1992. Phenology, resource allocation, and growth of arctic  vascular plants. Pages 193‐211 in F. S. Chapin, III, R. L. Jefferies, J. F. Reynolds, G. R.  Shaver, and J. Svoboda, editors. Arctic Ecosystems in a Changing Climate. Academic  Press, New York, USA.   20     Shen, K. P. and J. Harte. 2000. Ecosystem climate manipulations. Pages 353–369 in O. E. Sala, R.  B. Jackson, H. A. Mooney, and R. B. Howarth, editors. Methods in Ecosystem Science.  Springer, New York, USA.   Stow, D. A., A. Hope, D. McGuire, D. Verbyla, J. Gamon, F. Huemmrich, S. Houston, C. Racine, M.  Sturm, K. Tape, L. Hinzman, K. Yoshikawa, C. Tweedie, B. Noyle, C. Silapaswan, D.  Douglas, B. Griffith, G. Jia, H. Epstein, D. Walker, S. Daeschner, A. Petersen, L. M. Zhou,  and R. Myneni. 2004. Remote sensing of vegetation and land‐cover change in Arctic  Tundra Ecosystems. Remote Sensing of Environment 89:281‐308.   Sturm, M., C. Racine, and K. Tape. 2001. Climate change: Increasing shrub abundance in the  Arctic. Nature 411:546‐547.   Svoboda, J. and B. Freedman. 1994. Ecology of a Polar Oasis: Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island,  Canada. Captus University Publications, Toronto, Canada.   Tape, K., M. Sturm, and C. Racine. 2006. The evidence for shrub expansion in Northern Alaska  and the Pan‐Arctic. Global Change Biology 12:686‐702.   van Wijk, M. T., K. E. Clemmensen, G. R. Shaver, M. Williams, T. V. Callaghan, F. S. Chapin, III, J.  H. C. Cornelissen, L. Gough, S. E. Hobbie, S. Jonasson, J. A. Lee, A. Michelsen, M. C. Press,  S. J. Richardson, and H. Rueth. 2004. Long‐term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik  Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations and differences in  ecosystem and plant type responses to global change. Global Change Biology 10:105‐ 123.   Wahren, C. H. A., M. D. Walker, and M. S. Bret‐Harte. 2005. Vegetation responses in Alaskan  arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow manipulation  experiment. Global Change Biology 11:537‐552.  21     Walker, D. A., M. K. Raynolds, F. J. A. Daniels, E. Einarsson, A. Elvebakk, W. A. Gould, A. E.  Katenin, S. S. Kholod, C. J. Markon, E. S. Melnikov, N. G. Moskalenko, S. S. Talbot, B. A.  Yurtsev, and CAVM Team. 2005. The Circumpolar Arctic vegetation map. Journal of  Vegetation Science 16:267‐282.   Walker, M. D., C. H. Wahren, R. D. Hollister, G. H. R. Henry, L. E. Ahlquist, J. M. Alatalo, M. S.  Bret‐Harte, M. P. Calef, T. V. Callaghan, A. B. Carroll, H. E. Epstein, I. S. Jónsdóttir, J. A.  Klein, B. Magnusson, U. Molau, S. F. Oberbauer, S. P. Rewa, C. H. Robinson, G. R. Shaver,  K. N. Suding, C. C. Thompson, A. Tolvanen, O. Totland, P. L. Turner, C. E. Tweedie, P. J.  Webber, and P. A. Wookey. 2006. Plant community responses to experimental warming  across the tundra biome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United  States of America 103:1342‐1346.   Wookey, P. A. 2008. Experimental approaches to predicting the future of tundra plant  communities. Plant Ecology & Diversity 1:299‐307.   Wookey, P. A., C. H. Robinson, A. N. Parsons, J. M. Welker, M. C. Press, T. V. Callaghan, and J. A.  Lee. 1995. Environmental constraints on the growth, photosynthesis and reproductive  development of Dryas octopetala at a High Arctic Polar Semidesert, Svalbard. Oecologia  102:478‐489.   Wookey, P. A., J. M. Welker, A. N. Parsons, M. C. Press, T. V. Callaghan, and J. A. Lee. 1994.  Differential growth, allocation and photosynthetic responses of Polygonum viviparum to  simulated environmental change at a High Arctic Polar Semidesert. Oikos 70:131‐139.   Zhang, K., J. S. Kimball, E. H. Hogg, M. S. Zhao, W. C. Oechel, J. J. Cassano, and S. W. Running.  2008. Satellite‐based model detection of recent climate‐driven changes in northern  high‐latitude vegetation productivity. Journal of Geophysical Research‐Biogeosciences  113:G03033. 22     Chapter 2: Community responses to recent ambient warming 1  Introduction  Over the past forty years, the Arctic has warmed by 1.6 °C (McBean et al. 2005). Many Arctic  physical and ecological systems appear to have responded to this recent climate change. For  example, glaciers have receded, permafrost has thawed, and seasonal snow cover extent has  decreased (ACIA 2004). Specific tundra vegetation responses include an increase in woody  shrub cover (Sturm et al. 2001, Tape et al. 2006) and shifting plant community types (e.g. dry  tundra transitioned to wet tundra, Hinzman et al. 2005). These and other impacts have led the  Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  (IPCC) to predict that tundra ecosystems will be particularly threatened by climate change over  the next century (Callaghan et al. 2005, Anisimov et al. 2007).   High Arctic tundra is relatively unproductive. Temperatures are cold, growing seasons are brief,  and nutrient inputs are low (Svoboda and Henry 1987). Many tundra plant species have  conservative nutrient‐use strategies and are short‐statured, and may decline due to their  inferior competitive abilities (Callaghan et al. 2005). While other unproductive ecosystems such  as infertile grasslands appear to be resistant to climate change (e.g. Grime et al. 2008), High  Arctic tundra may not be. Warmer temperatures are expected to stimulate primary productivity  and alter other ecosystem functions (Chapin et al. 1997). Satellite data indicate that plant  growth has already increased across northern latitudes (e.g. Myneni et al. 1997, Zhou et al.  2001, Stow et al. 2004, Zhang et al. 2008). Similarly, repeat photography shows an increase in  tall shrub cover over the past 50 years in parts of northern Alaska (Tape et al. 2006).  Unfortunately, satellite‐based remote sensing studies can be hindered by measurement errors,  caused by instrumentation drift and atmospheric effects (Fung 1997), and are subject to  uncertainty in the interpretation of their results. For example, images may be interpreted as  either changes in growing season length or shrub cover expansion (Tape et al. 2006). As well,  repeat photography has limited potential because historical photographs are rare, transition  zones (e.g. tall shrub tundra to graminoid tundra) are spatially limited, and most composition                                                           1   A version of this chapter has been submitted for publication: Hudson, JMG, and Henry, GHR. Increased plant  biomass in a High Arctic heath from 1981‐2008.   23     changes have been below the photo detection limit (Tape et al. 2006). Hence, simple and  inexpensive long‐term permanent plot monitoring studies are needed to verify increased  tundra productivity. These studies provide fine‐scale composition and structure data that is not  currently available from the other approaches. Ground‐level studies from Alaska suggest that  total aboveground biomass has remained stable (Chapin et al. 1995, Jorgenson and Buchholtz  2005, Wahren et al. 2005). Nonetheless, detecting when and where changes in tundra  productivity do occur is critical because these changes may affect species diversity and trophic  level interactions, shift land cover types (e.g. tundra to forest), and most importantly, influence  global biogeochemical cycles (Anisimov et al. 2007). Here, I present a 27‐year observational  study of the productivity and composition of an unproductive High Arctic tundra plant  community. I find evidence for an increase in aboveground biomass and an altered community  composition.         24     Methods   Study site  The study was conducted in an 8 km2 coastal lowland adjacent to Alexandra Fiord (78°53' N,  75°55' W) on the east‐central coast of Ellesmere Island, Nunavut. The site is considered a polar  oasis because it has favorable conditions for its region, the Queen Elizabeth Islands. Very few  large herbivores are present. For a more detailed site description, see Svoboda and Freedman  (1994). The study was conducted in a well‐vegetated, relatively homogeneous heath  community dominated by several vascular plant species (Cassiope tetragona, Salix arctica, and  Dryas integrifolia) and bryophytes (Aulacomnium turgidum, Tomenthypnum nitens, and  Dicranum spp). The community was snow‐free (growing season) from early‐mid June until mid‐ late August.   Environmental data monitoring  From 1995‐2007, environmental data were measured in select plots. Air temperature (n = 2)  was measured 10 cm aboveground with shielded copper‐constantan thermocouples. Readings  were taken every five minutes, averaged hourly and output daily. During the winter, ultrasonic  distance sensors measured snow depth (n = 2) daily. In 1995, 2002, and 2007, soil water  content (n = 18) was measured three times, either at 5 cm (gravimetrically) or 12 cm  (volumetrically). Instrumented plots were connected to a data‐logging system. The volumetric  soil moisture probe (CD620 HydroSense), distance sensors (UDG01), and data‐logging system  (CR10 data logger, multiplexer and storage module) were purchased from Campbell Scientific  Canada Corporation (Edmonton, Canada). At the beginning of the summer field seasons, plots  were considered snow‐free (n = 18) when > 90% of their ground surface was visible. Growing  season length was the consecutive number of days with mean daily air temperatures > 0 °C. I,  along with others, used a graduated steel rod to measure maximum seasonal thaw depth (n =  18) near the end of the field seasons (e.g. mid August).   Monthly temperature and precipitation data from 1960‐2007 for the three closest Canadian  High Arctic Weather Stations at Alert, Eureka, and Resolute Bay were obtained from the   25     Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment Canada (www.climate.weatheroffice.ec.gc.ca,  accessed 1 May 2008).   Productivity and composition sampling  In 1995, 18 permanent 1 m2 plots were randomly located in a ca. 1 ha area. The plots were  established to quantify long‐term cover changes at one of the open‐top chamber warming  experiments established at Alexandra Fiord as part of the International Tundra Experiment  (ITEX, Henry and Molau 1997). Aboveground composition and abundance were estimated non‐ destructively at peak season (mid‐late July) in 1995, 2000, and 2007 using the ITEX point‐ intercept method (Molau and Mølgaard 1996). There is a strong correlation between the point‐ intercept method and biomass from harvests (Jonasson 1988, Shaver et al. 2001). For each plot,  I, along with others, recorded the identity, tissue type (e.g. vegetative, reproductive), and state  (living or dead) of all layers (from the top of canopy to the ground level or bryophyte surface) at  100 evenly‐spaced points in a 1 m x 1 m quadrat. In almost all cases, vegetation was recorded  to the species level. Litter was considered dead unattached plant material. Canopy height was  recorded at peak season for 25 points per plot in 2000 and 2007.   In 2008, I repeated the 1981 peak season vascular plant harvests of Nams and Freedman  (1987). Specifically, I visually estimated percent cover, and measured aboveground biomass  (ABM) and total standing crop (TSC) of vascular plants in ten 25 cm x 25 cm plots grid‐spaced  every 10 m in the heath, according to Nams and Freedman (1987). Vascular plants were clipped  at the ground level or bryophyte surface. Samples were sorted into living and dead tissue and  to species or genus. Samples were field dried at 40 °C and subsequently dried at 70 °C for 72 h  prior to weighing. I recorded ABM as total mass of living tissue, and TSC as the weight of all  living and dead tissue. Plots were harvested on 21 July 1981 and on 20 July 2008.         26     Environmental data analyses  I tested for trends in annual temperature and precipitation using estimated generalized least  squares (EGLS) models with year as the continuous variable using the nlme package (3.1‐86,  Pinheiro et al. 2007) in R version 2.5.1 (R Development Core Team 2007). I used a Continuous  AutoRegressive order of 1 (CAR(1)) correlation structure for years within plots, since the  remeasurement period was irregular (p. 229, Pinheiro and Bates 2000). I also tested the  permanent plots for trends (1995‐2007) in annual air temperature, soil water content, spring  snow‐free dates, and snow depth with EGLS models.   Productivity and composition analyses  I used the 1995, 2000, and 2007 live point‐intercept pin hit data (= ABM) to test for temporal  changes in community composition using ordinations and permutational multivariate analysis  of variance (PERMANOVA, Anderson 2001). The PERMANOVA used the “adonis” procedure in  the vegan package (1.13‐2, Oksanen et al. 2008). Ordinations were plotted with Nonmetric  Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS, Kruskal 1964) using the default settings of vegan’s  “metaMDS” procedure. I used the untransformed ABM data to produce a 2‐dimensional  ordination. Pin hits of live biomass were grouped into six plant functional types (evergreen  shrubs, deciduous shrubs, graminoids, forbs, lichens, and bryophytes) by summing the annual  abundance of all species in each category in each plot. I then used the point‐intercept data to  test for changes in ABM, diversity, and canopy height with EGLS and CAR(1)) as described  above. I followed Dorrepaal’s (2007) hierarchical approach (broadest, broad, intermediate, and  narrow) for classifying vegetation: e.g. 1) all vegetation, 2) vascular/non‐vascular, 3) woody  vascular/non‐woody vascular, and 4) plant functional types. To measure diversity, I derived  Shannon‐Wiener and Simpson plot diversity scores from the point‐intercept data.   The 1981 and 2008 peak season vascular plant harvest data were grouped into five categories:  1) Cassiope tetragona, 2) Dryas integrifolia, 3) deciduous shrubs, 4) forbs, and 5) graminoids.  For each category, I tested for changes in ABM and TSC between 1981 and 2008 using t‐tests.  Cover data from these harvests were not statistically analyzed since only means were reported  in Nams and Freedman (1987).     27      Results   Environmental data  The north‐eastern region of the Canadian High Arctic warmed significantly between 1960 and  2007 (Figure 2.1). From 1981 to 2007, mean annual air temperature increased at two of the  region’s three meteorological stations, while mean annual precipitation did not change at any  of the three sites (Table 2.1). Since 1995, I detected two trends in climate‐related variables at  the site (Table 2.2): air temperature increased and the growing season lengthened (season end  shifted from mid to late August). Spring snow‐free dates, mean winter snow depth, and  maximum winter snow depth did not change.     Figure 2.1 ‐ Air temperature annual mean anomalies for the period 1960 to 2007 for the three closest Canadian  High Arctic Weather Stations to Alexandra Fiord. Anomalies were calculated relative to each Station’s 1961– 1990 average. Each smoothed curve follows a Station’s 10‐year running mean. The annual mean anomalies  (yellow columns) are the averaged anomaly for the three Stations for a given year.         28     Table 2.1 ‐ Trends in mean annual air temperature and precipitation for the period 1981‐2007, for the three  closest High Arctic Weather Stations to Alexandra Fiord, based on estimated generalized least squares models.  Year = x, 1981 = 0. Data from Alert for 2006‐2007 are not currently available from Environment Canada. A  significant result at α = 0.05 is marked with a *.   Variable  Temperature  Temperature  Temperature    Precipitation  Precipitation  Precipitation   Location  Alert  Eureka  Resolute    Alert  Eureka  Resolute   Equation  y = ‐ 17.95 + 0.03x  y = ‐ 208.14 + 0.10x  y = ‐ 16.83 + 0.07x    y = + 142.45 + 0.23x  y = + 77.68 + 0.09x  y = + 161.66 ‐ 0.21x   d. f.  1, 22  1, 25  1, 25    1, 22  1, 25  1, 25   F‐value  1.32  11.80  7.78    0.05  0.03  0.02   p‐value  0.26  < 0.01*  < 0.01*    0.83  0.87  0.88      Table 2.2 ‐ Trends in climate and environmental factors at Alexandra Fiord, 1995‐2007, based on estimated  generalized least squares models. Year = x, and 1995 = 0. A significant result at α = 0.05 is marked with a *.   Period  1995‐2006  1995‐2006  1995‐2007  1995‐2007  1995‐2007                    Measurement  Mean annual temp.  Growing season length  Maximum snow depth  Mean snow depth  Spring snow‐free date   Equation  y = ‐ 14.27 + 0.26x  y = + 73.07 + 1.47x  y = + 427.83 ‐ 11.50x  y = + 185.70 + 0.75x  y = + 169.13 ‐ 0.03x                d. f.  1, 10  1, 10  1, 7  1, 7  1, 11   F‐value  11.00  8.11  1.23  0.04  0.02   p‐value  < 0.01*  0.02*  0.30    0.84    0.89     Environmental parameters at the site responded differently over time. Maximum seasonal  thaw depth increased. The active layer measured 57.0 cm in 1981 (Nams and Freedman 1987),  54.9 ± 1.6 cm (mean ± 95% CI) in 1995, and 71.5 ± 3.0 cm in 2007. Soil water content was not  different over 1995, 2002, and 2007 (EGLS, F1, 29 = 0.08, P = 0.78).         29     Productivity and composition  Community composition shifted in the permanent plots between 1995 and 2007 (PERMANOVA,  F1, 52 = 11.81, R2 = 0.19, P < 0.01). The plots shifted towards bryophytes and away from lichens  over the period (Figure 2.2, NMDS, stress = 17.22, k = 2, non‐metric fit R2 = 0.97, linear fit R2 =  0.86).     Figure 2.2 ‐ Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of 18 permanent 1 m2 plots, 1995–2007. Points  represent individual plots and 95% confidence ellipses envelop each year. Configuration (k = 2) produced with a  Bray‐Curtis distance matrix.        30     The heath community became more productive from 1995‐2007 based on repeated  measurements of the permanent plots (Figure 2.3). The ABM of live vegetation, vascular plants,  non‐vascular plants, and woody plants increased, while non‐woody vascular plant ABM did not  change (Table 2.3). Evergreen shrub ABM increased by 60% and bryophyte ABM increased by  74%. Deciduous shrub, lichen, graminoid, and forb APP did not change. Diversity, measured  with Shannon‐Wiener and Simpson’s indices, also did not change. Mean canopy height, which  was only measured in 2000 and 2007, doubled from 17.2 cm to 34.2 cm.     Figure 2.3 ‐ Aboveground biomass by functional type for the 18 permanent 1 m2 plots, in 1995, 2000 and 2007.  Values were the mean number of living tissue pin hits per plot using the point‐intercept method. Bryophytes  and evergreen shrubs increased significantly over the period at α = 0.05.      31     Table 2.3 ‐ Effect of year on aboveground biomass, diversity, and canopy height for 18 permanent 1 m2 plots  from 1995‐2007. The data were analyzed with estimated generalized least squares models (continuous variable  = Year, correlation structure = Continuous‐time AutoRegressive of order 1 on Year|PlotID). Year = x, and 1995 =  0. For all models, d.f. = 1, 56, except for canopy height which had d.f. = 1, 34. A significant result at α = 0.05 is  marked with a *.     Variable  Composition    Live vegetation    Vascular         Woody         Non‐woody    Non‐vascular    Evergreen shrubs    Deciduous shrubs    Graminoids    Forbs    Lichens    Bryophytes    Litter      Diversity    Shannon‐Wiener    Simpson's      Height     Canopy height   Equation    y = 80.15 + 3.33x  y = 43.61 + 1.53x  y = 35.15 + 1.50x  y = 7.87 + 0.16x  y = 37.64 + 1.77x  y = 28.15 + 1.39x  y = 6.86 + 0.11x  y = 5.39 + 0.04x  y = 2.50 + 0.01x  y = 10.90 + 0.11x  y = 26.71 + 1.66x  y = 51.13 – 0.96x      y = 2.16 – 0.01x  y = 0.83 + 0.00x      y = 5.05 + 2.43x   F‐value    64.67  18.38  18.68  0.16  33.16  25.21  0.65  0.12  0.05  0.44  54.03  3.11      0.37  0.04      26.16   p‐value    < 0.01*  < 0.01*  < 0.01*  0.69  < 0.01*  < 0.01*  0.42  0.73  0.82  0.51  < 0.01*  0.08      0.55  0.85      < 0.01*     The community was more productive in 2008 than in 1981 based on peak season vascular plant  harvests (Figure 2.4). Aboveground biomass increased from 33.49 ± 10.97 g m‐2 to 86.91 ± 16.37  g m‐2 (mean ± 95% CI). Moreover, ABM increased for the two most abundant species, the  evergreen shrubs Cassiope tetragona (two‐sample t‐test, t18 = ‐3.82, P < 0.01) and Dryas  integrifolia (t‐test, t18 = ‐2.30, P = 0.046). Total standing crop increased (though not  significantly) from 347.88 ± 81.30 g m‐2 to 489.28 ± 100.44 g m‐2 (mean ± 95% CI). Total vascular  plant cover was 65‐75% of the ground surface. Most plant functional types had little or no  change in mean percent cover. Based on visual estimates, the cover of evergreen shrubs  declined by 1.6%, deciduous shrubs increased by 0.1%, forbs declined by 0.2% and graminoid  cover changed the most, decreasing from 4.9% to 2.3%.  32        Figure 2.4 ‐ Cover (A panels), aboveground biomass (B panels), and total standing crop (C panels) harvested at  peak season in 1981 compared to 2008 (mean ± SE). Panels on right (2’s) have smaller scales than panels on left  (1’s) because these types were much less abundant in this community. Only means are reported for cover. A  significant change at α = 0.05 is marked with a *.        33      Discussion  In this report, I describe the first long‐term plot‐based observational study in the Arctic to  detect an increase in total aboveground biomass. The findings of significant changes in  productivity and composition suggest that this tundra community has responded to recent  climate warming. The results contrast with several northern Alaskan long‐term plot studies,  which did not detect productivity changes (Shaver et al. 2001, Jorgenson and Buchholtz 2005,  Wahren et al. 2005), even though northern Alaska and Canada have experienced similar  warming over the period (Comiso 2006). Jorgenson and Buchholtz (2005) did not observe  compositional changes after 18 years (1984‐2002) in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, while  three Alaskan studies documented community‐specific cover changes after 5‐15 years (Shaver  et al. 2001, Hollister et al. 2005, Wahren et al. 2005). This study was the first to detect an  increase in bryophyte abundance.   The composition results are similar to several experimental warming studies in other Arctic  heath communities. After 5‐8 years of warming, evergreen shrub cover typically increased,  bryophyte cover typically decreased, and the cover responses of forbs, graminoids, lichens and  deciduous shrubs were variable (Hollister et al. 2005, Jónsdóttir et al. 2005, Wahren et al.  2005). In a recent meta‐analysis of 17 ITEX experiments, cover responses showed significant  differences among sites partitioned by either region or moisture regime (Walker et al. 2006).  Van Wijk et al. (2004) reviewed the greenhouse warming experiments at two major northern  research stations: Toolik Lake, USA, and Abisko, Sweden. At all five sites, 9‐13 years of warming  did not significantly alter total ABM. In this study, increasing evergreen shrub and bryophyte  ABM over time boosted community productivity. These plant functional types were able to  increase without compensatory decreases in other groups because the cover was open and well  below 100% at the site. On the other hand, ABM has not changed in the denser, closed plant  communities of the Low Arctic mentioned above because of compensatory changes. Total ABM  has remained stable in these communities because of contrasting responses of individual  species and plant functional types (van Wijk et al. 2004). Hence, it appears that warming may  affect open plant communities differently than closed communities.   34     I believe that regional climate change is the most likely driver of the changes observed in these  plots over the last 27 years. The lowland has been de‐glaciated for at least 8,000 years (England  et al. 2000). Herbivores, parasites and disease outbreaks, active layer detachment slides, and  fires are rare at the site. Hence, changes in vegetation are unlikely to be due to succession after  disturbance. Together, the results from the two components of this study provide strong  evidence for temporal changes in productivity. Production and biomass have low inter‐annual  variability in tundra ecosystems (Chapin and Shaver 1985, Henry et al. 1990, Molau 1997), and  changes in community composition are gradual and normally maintained at a constant rate for  many years (Graglia et al. 2001). Also, all sample years (1981, 1995, 2000, and 2007) and years  preceding sampling (1980, 1994, 1999, and 2006) had typical climate patterns (G. Henry & J.  Hudson, unpublished data).   The mechanisms for the observed increased productivity are unclear. However, it is likely that  warming directly increased plant growth and reproduction and indirectly increased resource  supply (Shaver et al. 2001). Increased temperatures also lengthened the growing season,  increased soil temperature, deepened the active layer, and consequently may have influenced  nutrient uptake in this plant community.   Satellite‐based remote sensing models, such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)  derived green trends (e.g. Myneni et al. 1997, Zhou et al. 2001, Stow et al. 2004, Verbyla 2008),  and global vegetation and ecosystem process simulations of the terrestrial carbon cycle (e.g.  Kimball et al. 2006, Zhang et al. 2008), indicate increasing trends in vegetation photosynthetic  activity and net primary production in the Arctic over the past several decades. For example,  from 1982‐2000, a 1.8 °C increase accompanied an 18% increase in vegetation productivity in  Alaska and northwest Canada (Kimball et al. 2006). This study has provided ground‐based  observations of this increased productivity. Although many heath species are predicted to  become endangered because of their inferior competitive abilities (Callaghan et al. 2005), the  results indicated that heath plant communities may persist in a warmer future.      35     Citations  ACIA. 2004. Impacts of a Warming Arctic: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment. Cambridge  University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Anderson, M. J. 2001. A new method for non‐parametric multivariate analysis of variance.  Austral Ecology 26:32‐46.   Anisimov, O. A., D. G. Vaughan, T. V. Callaghan, C. Furgal, H. Marchant, T. D. Prowse, H.  Vihjálmsson, and J. E. Walsh. 2007. Polar regions (Arctic and Antarctic). Pages 653‐685 in  M. L. Parry, O. F. Canziani, J. P. Palutikof, P. J. van der Linden, and C. E. Hanson, editors.  Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Contribution of Working  Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate  Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Callaghan, T. V., L. O. Björn, F. S. Chapin, III, Y. Chernov, T. R. Christensen, B. Huntley, R. Ims,  and M. Johansson. 2005. Arctic tundra and polar desert ecosystems. Pages 243‐352 in C.  Symon, L. Arris, and B. Heal, editors. Arctic Climate Impact Assessment: Scientific  Report. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Chapin, F. S., III, S. E. Hobbie, and G. R. Shaver. 1997. Impacts of global change on composition  of arctic communities: implications for ecosystem functioning. Pages 221‐228 in W. C.  Oechel, T. V. Callaghan, T. Gilmanov, J. I. Holten, B. Maxwell, U. Molau, and B.  Sveinbjörnsson, editors. Global Change and Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems. Springer,  Heidelberg, Germany.   Chapin, F. S., III and G. R. Shaver. 1985. Individualistic growth response of tundra plant species  to environmental manipulations in the field. Ecology 66:564‐576.   36     Chapin, F. S., III, G. R. Shaver, A. E. Giblin, K. J. Nadelhoffer, and J. A. Laundre. 1995. Responses  of Arctic tundra to experimental and observed changes in climate. Ecology 76:694‐711.   Comiso, J. C. 2006. Arctic warming signals from satellite observations. Weather 61:70–76.   Dorrepaal, E. 2007. Are plant growth‐form‐based classifications useful in predicting northern  ecosystem carbon cycling feedbacks to climate change? Journal of Ecology 95:1167‐ 1180.   England, J., I. R. Smith, and D. J. A. Evans. 2000. The last glaciation of east‐central Ellesmere  Island, Nunavut: ice dynamics, deglacial chronology, and sea level change. Canadian  Journal of Earth Sciences 37:1355‐1371.   Fung, I. 1997. Climate change ‐ A greener north. Nature 386:659‐660.   Graglia, E., S. Jonasson, A. Michelsen, I. K. Schmidt, M. Havström, and L. Gustavsson. 2001.  Effects of environmental perturbations on abundance of subarctic plants after three,  seven and ten years of treatments. Ecography 24:5‐12.   Grime, J. P., J. D. Fridley, A. P. Askew, K. Thompson, J. G. Hodgson, and C. R. Bennett. 2008.  Long‐term resistance to simulated climate change in an infertile grassland. Proceedings  of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105:10028‐10032.   Henry, G. H. R. and U. Molau. 1997. Tundra plants and climate change: the International Tundra  Experiment (ITEX). Global Change Biology 3:1‐9.   Henry, G. H. R., J. Svoboda, and B. Freedman. 1990. Standing crop and net production of sedge  meadows of an ungrazed polar desert oasis. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue  Canadienne De Botanique 68:2660‐2667.  37     Hinzman, L. D., N. D. Bettez, W. R. Bolton, F. S. Chapin, III, M. B. Dyurgerov, C. L. Fastie, B.  Griffith, R. D. Hollister, A. Hope, H. P. Huntington, A. M. Jensen, G. J. Jia, T. Jorgenson, D.  L. Kane, D. R. Klein, G. Kofinas, A. H. Lynch, A. H. Lloyd, A. D. McGuire, F. E. Nelson, W. C.  Oechel, T. E. Osterkamp, C. H. Racine, V. E. Romanovsky, R. S. Stone, D. A. Stow, M.  Sturm, C. E. Tweedie, G. L. Vourlitis, M. D. Walker, D. A. Walker, P. J. Webber, J. M.  Welker, K. Winker, and K. Yoshikawa. 2005. Evidence and implications of recent climate  change in northern Alaska and other arctic regions. Climatic Change 72:251‐298.   Hollister, R. D., P. J. Webber, and C. E. Tweedie. 2005. The response of Alaskan arctic tundra to  experimental warming: differences between short‐ and long‐term responses. Global  Change Biology 11:525‐536.   Jonasson, S. 1988. Evaluation of the point intercept method for the estimation of plant  biomass. Oikos 52:101‐106.   Jónsdóttir, I. S., B. Magnússon, J. Gudmundsson, A. Elmarsdóttir, and H. Hjartarson. 2005.  Variable sensitivity of plant communities in Iceland to experimental warming. Global  Change Biology 11:553‐563.   Jorgenson, J. and C. A. Buchholtz. 2005. Eighteen years of vegetation monitoring in the Arctic  National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Pages 62‐63 in Proceedings of the SEARCH Open  Science Meeting, 27‐30 October 2003. Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.,  Fairbanks, USA.   Kimball, J. S., M. Zhao, A. D. Mcguire, F. A. Heinsch, J. Clein, M. P. Calef, W. M. Jolly, S. Kang, S.  E. Euskirchen, K. C. McDonald, and S. W. Running. 2006. Recent climate‐driven increases  in vegetation productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence for an acceleration of the  northern terrestrial carbon cycle. Earth Interactions 11:1‐23.   38     Kruskal, J. B. 1964. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling: A numerical method. Psychometrika  29:115‐129.   McBean, G., G. Alekseev, D. Chen, E. Førland, J. Fyfe, P. Y. Groisman, R. King, H. Melling, R. Vose,  and P. H. Whitfield. 2005. Arctic climate: past and present. Pages 21–60  Arctic Climate  Impact Assessment: Scientific Report. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Molau, U. 1997. Responses to natural climatic variation and experimental warming in two  tundra plant species with contrasting life forms: Cassiope tetragona and Ranunculus  nivalis. Global Change Biology 3:97‐107.   Molau, U. and P. Mølgaard. 1996. International Tundra Experiment (ITEX) Manual. Danish Polar  Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.   Myneni, R. B., C. D. Keeling, C. J. Tucker, G. Asrar, and R. R. Nemani. 1997. Increased plant  growth in the northern high latitudes from 1981 to 1991. Nature 386:698‐702.   Nams, M. L. N. and B. Freedman. 1987. Ecology of heath communities dominated by Cassiope  tetragona at Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island, Canada. Holarctic Ecology 10:22‐32.   Oksanen, J., R. Kindt, P. Legendre, B. O'Hara, G. L. Simpson, M. H. H. Stevens, and H. Wagner.  2008. vegan: Community Ecology Package. R package version 1.13‐2.   Pinheiro, J. and D. Bates. 2000. Mixed‐Effects Models in S and S‐PLUS. Springer, New York, USA.   Pinheiro, J., D. Bates, S. DebRoy, D. Sarkar, and the R Core team. 2007. nlme: Linear and  Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models. R package version 3.1‐86.   39     R Development Core Team. 2007. R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R  Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria.   Shaver, G. R., S. M. Bret‐Harte, M. H. Jones, J. Johnstone, L. Gough, J. Laundre, and F. S. Chapin,  III. 2001. Species composition interacts with fertilizer to control long‐term change in  tundra productivity. Ecology 82:3163‐3181.   Stow, D. A., A. Hope, D. McGuire, D. Verbyla, J. Gamon, F. Huemmrich, S. Houston, C. Racine, M.  Sturm, K. Tape, L. Hinzman, K. Yoshikawa, C. Tweedie, B. Noyle, C. Silapaswan, D.  Douglas, B. Griffith, G. Jia, H. Epstein, D. Walker, S. Daeschner, A. Petersen, L. M. Zhou,  and R. Myneni. 2004. Remote sensing of vegetation and land‐cover change in Arctic  Tundra Ecosystems. Remote Sensing of Environment 89:281‐308.   Sturm, M., C. Racine, and K. Tape. 2001. Climate change: Increasing shrub abundance in the  Arctic. Nature 411:546‐547.   Svoboda, J. and B. Freedman. 1994. Ecology of a Polar Oasis: Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island,  Canada. Captus University Publications, Toronto, Canada.   Svoboda, J. and G. H. R. Henry. 1987. Succession in marginal Arctic environments. Arctic and  Alpine Research 19:373‐384.   Tape, K., M. Sturm, and C. Racine. 2006. The evidence for shrub expansion in Northern Alaska  and the Pan‐Arctic. Global Change Biology 12:686‐702.   van Wijk, M. T., K. E. Clemmensen, G. R. Shaver, M. Williams, T. V. Callaghan, F. S. Chapin, III, J.  H. C. Cornelissen, L. Gough, S. E. Hobbie, S. Jonasson, J. A. Lee, A. Michelsen, M. C. Press,  S. J. Richardson, and H. Rueth. 2004. Long‐term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik  Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations and differences in  40     ecosystem and plant type responses to global change. Global Change Biology 10:105‐ 123.   Verbyla, D. 2008. The greening and browning of Alaska based on 1982‐2003 satellite data.  Global Ecology and Biogeography 17:547‐555.   Wahren, C. H. A., M. D. Walker, and M. S. Bret‐Harte. 2005. Vegetation responses in Alaskan  arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow manipulation  experiment. Global Change Biology 11:537‐552.   Walker, M. D., C. H. Wahren, R. D. Hollister, G. H. R. Henry, L. E. Ahlquist, J. M. Alatalo, M. S.  Bret‐Harte, M. P. Calef, T. V. Callaghan, A. B. Carroll, H. E. Epstein, I. S. Jónsdóttir, J. A.  Klein, B. Magnusson, U. Molau, S. F. Oberbauer, S. P. Rewa, C. H. Robinson, G. R. Shaver,  K. N. Suding, C. C. Thompson, A. Tolvanen, O. Totland, P. L. Turner, C. E. Tweedie, P. J.  Webber, and P. A. Wookey. 2006. Plant community responses to experimental warming  across the tundra biome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United  States of America 103:1342‐1346.   Zhang, K., J. S. Kimball, E. H. Hogg, M. S. Zhao, W. C. Oechel, J. J. Cassano, and S. W. Running.  2008. Satellite‐based model detection of recent climate‐driven changes in northern  high‐latitude vegetation productivity. Journal of Geophysical Research‐Biogeosciences  113:G03033.   Zhou, L. M., C. J. Tucker, R. K. Kaufmann, D. Slayback, N. V. Shabanov, and R. B. Myneni. 2001.  Variations in northern vegetation activity inferred from satellite data of vegetation index  during 1981 to 1999. Journal of Geophysical Research‐Atmospheres 106:20069‐20083.   41     Chapter 3: Community responses to 15 years of experimental warming 2  Introduction   General circulation models predict that during the 21st century, anthropogenic climate forcing  will lead to significant warming and may even induce changes to the global climate system that  cause rapid and sometimes drastic changes to vegetation (IPCC 2007). Although many  ecosystems will be sensitive to these impacts (Callaghan et al. 2005), some may not be. For  example, several plant communities have exhibited strong resistance to simulated climate  change manipulations (Jónsdóttir et al. 2005, Grime et al. 2008), where resistance is defined as  the ability of a community to maintain its composition and structure in the face of  environmental change. Identifying which vegetation types are most sensitive to climate change  will be critical to predicting large‐scale ecosystem responses in the coming decades.   Passive warming experiments are an important tool for understanding and predicting the  effects of climate change on low productivity ecosystems, especially tundra (Wookey 2008).  The International Tundra Experiment (ITEX, Henry and Molau 1997) is a network of more than  20 Arctic and alpine tundra sites where standardized, plot‐level passive‐warming experiments  are conducted using open‐top chambers (OTCs). The OTCs are small, inexpensive, easy‐to‐ maintain, and do not require electrical power. The ITEX network has used four multi‐site  syntheses to examine the effects of experimental warming on plant traits (Henry and Molau  1997, Arft et al. 1999), community composition and abundance (Walker et al. 2006), and  carbon flux (Oberbauer et al. 2007). Using meta‐analysis across 17 experiments, Walker et al.  (2006) showed that passive warming alters species composition and abundance, increases  canopy height and the cover of deciduous shrubs and graminoids, and decreases cryptogam  cover and species diversity. Site‐specific cover responses to warming have also been detected  in dry, moist, and wet tundra ecosystems (e.g. Chapin et al. 1995, Graglia et al. 2001, Hollister  et al. 2005, Jónsdóttir et al. 2005, Wahren et al. 2005). Although cover responses to warming  have been substantial in these studies, they have not been unidirectional. Therefore,  vegetation responses to climate change are expected to be community type‐ and region‐                                                         2   A version of this chapter has been submitted for publication: Hudson, JMG, and Henry, GHR. High Arctic plant  community resists 15 years of experimental warming.    42     specific, and dependent upon initial and changing vegetation and climatic conditions (Shaver et  al. 2000, Hollister et al. 2005, Walker et al. 2006). Despite the importance of these local factors,  we expect that the magnitude and severity of large‐scale cover shifts will be driven by  communities’ responses to the changing thermal, nutrient, and competitive regimes created by  elevated temperatures.   Our understanding of how tundra plant communities will be affected by climate change  currently remains limited because of several factors, including insufficiently long experimental  studies. The durations of most field studies are determined by standard research funding  cycles, but meaningful responses often take much longer to document because these  ecosystems respond slowly to perturbation. Almost all studies are discontinued after less than  five years (Walker et al. 2006), even though changes in community composition may take more  than a decade to detect (Epstein et al. 2004, Rinnan et al. 2007). Also, short‐term experiments  (< 5 years) are poor predictors of long‐term effects (Chapin et al. 1995, Hollister et al. 2005).   Climate change experiments allow us to simulate future climatic and environmental conditions,  examine subsequent vegetation responses, and determine how these responses will affect  ecosystem properties and other trophic levels (see Callaghan et al. 2005). These experiments  are critical considering climate change is the most important exogenous driver of Arctic  terrestrial ecosystem biodiversity (Sala et al. 2000). Our ability to accurately forecast vegetation  responses to climate change will require a great many studies across a range of plant  communities and regions, due to the spatially heterogeneous nature of both tundra and climate  change. Here, I describe the results from the first long‐term passive warming experiment in the  Canadian Arctic. In this chapter, I test the hypothesis that temperature affects community‐level  variables by examining point cover, species diversity, and canopy height in a High Arctic heath  subjected to 15 years of passive warming.         43     Methods   Study site  The study was conducted on an 8 km2 coastal plain (sandur) at Alexandra Fiord (78°53'N,  75°55'W), Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada that is described in detail by Svoboda & Freedman  (1994). The coastal lowland is bound by bare upland plateaus, glacial tongues, and the waters  of Alexandra Fiord. It receives an influx of meltwater from snow and thawing permafrost from  the surrounding uplands. The site also receives 0‐60 mm of rain during the June‐August growing  season (G. Henry, unpublished data). It is a well‐vegetated polar oasis and its relatively lush  vegetation contrasts with the lack of vegetation in the polar deserts of the surrounding region  and the majority of the Queen Elizabeth Islands.    The study community is a snowbed heath dominated by several shrub species (Cassiope  tetragona, Dryas integrifolia, and Salix arctica) and bryophytes (Aulacomnium turgidum,  Tomenthypnum nitens, and Dicranum spp). Vascular plants cover between 65 and 75% of the  ground surface (Chapter 2). Hummocks and hollows are well‐vegetated and rocks of varying  sizes are common. The organic layer is 0‐6 cm deep and soils are poorly developed Static  Cryosols (Muc et al. 1989). Maximum depth of seasonal thaw is 50‐70 cm (Johnstone 1995,  Chapter 2). Snowmelt occurs in early to mid June and the growing season is 60‐90 days long  (Chapter 2). Soils remain moist throughout the snow‐free season.    Experimental design  In 1992, 28 permanent 1 m2 plots were selected based on the presence of several target  species for long‐term phenology, growth, and reproduction monitoring. In 1995, eight more  plots were added. Half of these 36 plots were passively warmed, while the other half were left  as control plots. Starting in 1995, the experiment was adjusted such that equal numbers of  plots also received additional or reduced spring snow. However, I elected to exclude this  manipulation from my analyses because it failed to significantly affect spring snow‐free dates  and had no discernible effect on any other variable (G. Henry & J. Hudson, unpublished data).   44     Open‐top chambers passively warmed the treatment plots for 12‐15 years. OTCs are inclined  hexagonal cones, 1.5 m diameter at the top and 0.5 m tall. They are constructed of 1.0 mm  thick fibreglass (Sun‐Lite HP Solar Components Corp., Manchester, New Hampshire, USA;  Marion et al. 1997). The material has high solar transmittance in the visible wavelengths (>  85%) and low transmittance in the infrared wavelengths (< 5%). The chambers allow  transmittance of solar radiation, decrease wind speeds, and trap convective heat (Marion et al.  1997). Chambers were left in place year‐round. Side effects such as altered light, moisture, and  gas exchange were minimized, nevertheless, the OTCs failed to simulate some aspects of  climate change (Kennedy 1995a, b, Marion et al. 1997, Shen and Harte 2000). The ITEX OTC  approach has been validated at the plot‐level (Hollister and Webber 2000) and remains the  preferred method of passive warming for Arctic and alpine ecosystems (Shen and Harte 2000,  Wookey 2008).   In 1996, 2000, and 2007, community composition and abundance were measured using the  standard ITEX point‐intercept method (Molau and Mølgaard 1996). At each point, the identity  (either species or genus name), state (alive or dead), and tissue type (vegetative or  reproductive) of all layers was recorded. Only point‐intercept pin hits that touched living plants  were included in the analyses, except for litter cover, which was defined as all dead plant  material that was unattached to living tissue. Afterwards, vegetation was grouped into six plant  functional types: bryophytes, lichens, deciduous shrubs, evergreen shrubs, forbs, and  graminoids. In 2000 and 2007, canopy height was also measured at 25 points per plot using the  point‐intercept method. I calculated four diversity metrics: the Shannon‐Wiener index,  Simpson’s index, species richness, and Pielou’s evenness using the raw point‐intercept data.  Because this is a long‐term experiment, all plant sampling was non‐destructive.   Environmental monitoring  Environmental variables were measured in 6 to 36 plots. Temperature was measured 10 cm  above the ground using HOBO thermistors (Onset Computer Corporation, Pocasset,  Massachusetts, USA) and copper‐constantan thermocouples attached to a data logging   45     system. Each spring, plots were visually inspected daily for snow‐free dates (> 90% of ground  surface visible). In 1995, 2002, and 2007, soil water content was measured three times during  the growing season either gravimetrically (‐5 cm) or with a Hydrosense probe (‐12 cm, Campbell  Scientific Canada Corporation, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada). At the end of the 2007 field season  (early August), I measured maximum depth of thaw.    Statistical analyses  I used the point cover data to test for changes in community composition. To visualize changes  through time and in response to warming, I plotted a 2‐dimensional Nonmetric  Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS, Kruskal 1964) ordination using the default settings of the  “metaMDS” procedure in vegan (1.13‐2, Oksanen et al. 2008) in R version 2.5.1 (R Development  Core Team 2007). To quantitatively test for plot‐level changes, Bray‐Curtis dissimilarity  measures were used. Community‐composition scores for each plot in each year were calculated  based on its Bray‐Curtis distance from the average point cover of the control plots in 1996. I  then ran an estimated generalized least squares (EGLS) model on these dissimilarities. Predictor  variables were Warming, Year, and Warming*Year. I used a Continuous AutoRegressive order of  1 (CAR(1)) correlation structure for years within plots, because the re‐measurement period was  irregular (p. 229, Pinheiro and Bates 2000). I also tested for changes in the cover of plant  functional types, diversity, canopy height, soil water content, and spring snow‐free dates using  the same EGLS model structure. Variables that did not meet the assumptions of normality and  homogeneity of variance were transformed (graminoid cover was square root transformed).  For all EGLS models, I used the nlme package (3.1‐86, Pinheiro et al. 2007) in R.   Because vegetation was measured infrequently throughout the period, I wanted to verify that  the sampling could detect long‐term trends and not just inter‐annual variability. To test for  inter‐annual variation in point cover, nine 1 m2 plots were re‐sampled using the point‐intercept  method at peak season in 1995 and 1996. I tested for differences in point cover for each of the  six plant functional types with EGLS models as described above.      46     Results   Plant community  On the whole, after 12‐15 years, this heath plant community was not affected by passive  warming (Figure 3.1). No effects were seen in Bray‐Curtis community composition scores (Table  3.1) or the ordination (Figure 3.2, NMDS, stress = 13.0, k = 2, non‐metric fit R2 = 0.98, linear fit  R2 = 0.93). Passive warming did cause a 4% decrease in lichen cover (Table 3.1). Temporal  changes were more common, but still minor. From 1996‐2007, bryophytes increased by 6.1%  and forbs decreased by 2.8%. Diversity and height were not affected by warming (Table 3.1,  Figures 3.3 and 3.4). In the plot re‐sampling test, I did not detect inter‐annual variability in  cover for any of the functional types between 1995 and 1996 (all six P > 0.05).     Figure 3.1 ‐ Percent cover for the 36 permanent 1 m2 plots, arranged by plant functional types from 1996‐2007.  47     Table 3.1 ‐ Effects of Warming (W), Year (Y) and their interaction (W*Y) on point cover, diversity, and canopy  height for 36 permanent 1 m2 plots in a heath at Alexandra Fiord. The data were analyzed with estimated  generalized least squares models (correlation structure= CAR(1) on Year|PlotID). For all models, d.f.= 1, 82 for  Warming, Year and Warming*Year, except for canopy height which had d.f.= 1, 68. NS is Non‐significant (α =  0.05).         Point cover    Bryophytes    Deciduous shrubs    Evergreen shrubs    Forbs    Graminoids    Lichens    Litter      Diversity    Shannon‐Wiener    Simpson's    Species richness    Pielou's evenness      Height    Canopy height      Dissimilarity     Bray‐Curtis       Warming (W)    NS  NS  NS  NS  NS  0.003  NS      NS  NS  NS  NS      NS      NS   Year (Y)    <.001  NS  NS  <.001  0.021  NS  <.001      NS  NS  NS  NS      NS      NS   W*Y    NS  NS  NS  NS  NS  NS  NS      NS  NS  NS  NS      NS      NS      48       Figure 3.2 ‐ Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination of 36 permanent 1 m2 plots from 1996–2007. Points  represent individual plots and 95% confidence ellipses envelop each treatment‐year. 1996 = squares and thick  dotted lines, 2000 = circles and medium dotted lines, 2007 = triangles and thin dotted lines; OTCs = hollow  points, Controls = solid points. Configuration (k = 2) produced with a Bray‐Curtis distance matrix.         49       Figure 3.3 ‐ Simpson’s Index (mean ± 95% CI) for the 36 permanent 1 m2 plots from 1996‐2007. The other  diversity metrics (Shannon‐Wiener Index, Species Richness, and Pielou’s Evenness), which are not shown, were  also not affected by warming.        Figure 3.4 ‐ Canopy height (mean ± 95% CI) for the 36 permanent 1 m2 plots, measured in 2000 and 2007.              50     Environmental monitoring  The long‐term mean annual air temperature in the plots was about –15 °C and the mean July  temperature was about 7 °C. During the growing season, the OTCs increased daily mean  temperature by 1.0 °C ± 0.1 (95% CI) and maximum temperature by 2.4 °C ± 0.2. The OTCs did  not alter spring melt‐out dates (EGLS, F1, 392 = 1.4, P = 0.23), soil water content (EGLS, F1, 86 =      0.01, P = 0.91), or maximum thaw depth in 2007 (t‐test, t1, 34 = 2.03, P = 0.15).   51     Discussion  This High Arctic heath community largely resisted 15 years of passive warming. Given that many  Arctic and alpine ecosystems respond strongly and rapidly to passive warming (Walker et al.  2006), the findings are somewhat surprising. However, the results are supported by studies that  have documented resistance in a sub‐Arctic moss heath (Jónsdóttir et al. 2005), and a  temperate grassland (Grime et al. 2008). Although passive warming altered the traits of several  dominant plant species in the study community (Johnstone 1995, G. Henry & J. Hudson,  unpublished data), these changes did not translate into significant shifts in community  composition, even after 15 years. There are at least three possible reasons for this lack of  community‐level response.   First, tundra ecosystems are usually slow to react to perturbations. For example, a sub‐Arctic  heath needed more than ten years of warming to change its belowground community  composition (Rinnan et al. 2007), and aboveground communities may take as many as two  decades to change (Epstein et al. 2004). In contrast, the most comprehensive meta‐analysis of  passive warming studies to date showed that only 3 to 6 years of experimental warming were  required to detect altered plant functional type abundances across 17 Arctic and alpine  communities (Walker et al. 2006).   Second, environmental factors other than temperature may have limited the ability of the  vegetation to respond to warming; however, I am unable to identify a limiting factor. Low‐dose  nutrient additions and watering had no effect on the standing crop of this community (Henry et  al. 1986). Other factors, such as light, UV‐B, and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations  affect vegetation, but are generally not limiting (Callaghan et al. 2005). It is possible that a  combination of these factors restrained this system, but I could not test for this in the design.   Third, the vegetation of this community possesses several characteristics that may promote  resistance. High Arctic heaths are dominated by long‐lived, stress‐tolerant species (Grime 1979)  with relatively inflexible growth strategies and slow decomposition rates (Chapin et al. 1993).  52     At the site, vegetative growth of several dominant plant species was not affected by low‐dose  nutrient additions (Henry et al. 1986), short‐term passive warming, or growing season length  manipulations (Johnstone 1995); however, high rates of nutrient addition strongly decreased  total vascular plant production (Henry et al. 1986). As well, a 1981‐2008 longitudinal study in  the same heath detected increases in community productivity during a period when the mean  annual temperature increased by > 2.5 °C, which was much greater than the passive warming  reported here (Chapter 2). Hence, this heath community appears resistant to minor  perturbations and sensitive to more substantial ones.   I have identified and attempted to address three of the study’s limitations. First, because the  earliest measurements were taken 1‐4 years after the treatments were initiated, I do not have  pre‐manipulation data. As a result, I examined the Warming*Year interaction, and the main  factors: Warming and Year. Second, vegetation was infrequently measured; however, studies  that used the point‐intercept method to monitor vegetation more frequently than in this study  show slow, gradual changes and little inter‐annual variability (Graglia et al. 2001, Wahren et al.  2005, Grime et al. 2008). As well, the repeated year (1995‐1996) sampling in this study  detected no abundance changes. Third, all simulated climate change experiments have artifacts  and are not perfect substitutes for ambient climate change (e.g. Kennedy 1995a, 1995b, Marion  et al. 1997, Shen and Harte 2000, Wookey 2008). For example, passive warming did not affect  active layer depth, date of spring melt‐out, or soil water content in the study. All three variables  are predicted to be affected by climate change (Chapin et al. 1997). Nevertheless, the ITEX  approach has been highly effective at causing and detecting community‐level changes (e.g.  Graglia et al. 2001, Hollister et al. 2005, Jónsdóttir et al. 2005, Wahren et al. 2005, Walker et al.  2006). For these reasons, I have high confidence in the findings of limited plant compositional  changes.   Although this heath community exhibited overall resistance to passive warming, there was a  decrease in lichen cover. Lichens also declined across the six High Arctic communities in the  recent meta‐analysis of ITEX studies (Walker et al. 2006). As in this study, a change in lichen  53     cover was the only significant shift detected in these other High Arctic experiments. The  consequences of tundra‐wide lichen decreases may be important, because some lichens are  nitrogen fixers, some are an important source of winter forage for herbivores such as caribou  and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), and some influence soil temperatures, water regimes, and  biogeochemical cycling (Longton 1997).   The resistance observed in this study is unusual because changes in community composition  and abundance have been detected in many passive warming experiments in other heaths  (Graglia et al. 2001, Hollister et al. 2005, Wahren et al. 2005, Walker et al. 2006). This leads us  to ask the question: why are some plant communities highly resistant to climate change (e.g.  this study, Jónsdóttir et al. 2005, Grime et al. 2008), while so many others are not? Grime et al.  (2000) proposed four non‐mutually exclusive site‐characteristic hypotheses: species richness,  previous exposure to climatic extremes, successional status, and functional composition.  Species diversities at the sites were variable, which suggests that species‐poor communities are  not more sensitive to perturbation (Table 3.2). At the site, several sensitive communities have  lower species richness scores than the heath community (G. Henry, unpublished data). Previous  exposure to climate extremes does not necessarily promote resistance either because  environmental conditions were more favourable at a resistant community than a sensitive one  in Iceland (Jónsdóttir et al. 2005). The effect of successional status is unclear. Both Buxton and  Alexandra Fiord are late‐successional communities, while the moss heath at Thingvellir, Iceland,  may be considered either a pioneer or a climax community (Bjarnason 1991). Last, the  communities have similar functional compositions, because they are relatively unproductive  and are dominated by stress‐tolerant, long‐lived species capable of withstanding strong inter‐ annual environmental variation. They also have conservative nutrient‐use strategies that are  associated with relatively slow growth rates, long tissue lifespans, and high root: shoot ratios.  However, these characteristics do not differentiate these communities from many of the  communities that have been sensitive to perturbation experiments. It is clear that further study  is needed to identify the exact mechanisms responsible because so few plant communities may  be able to resist the collective effects of global change.  54     Table 3.2 ‐ Site characteristics for three plant communities that largely resisted warming. Citations for Buxton:  Grime et al. (2000, 2008); for Thingvellir: Jónsdóttir et al. (2005).   Location   Annual  Annual  Vegetation  Altitude  Species  Latitude temperature  precipitation  richness  type  (m)  (°C)  (mm)   Buxton,  England   calcareous  53° 20'  grassland   370   8   1300   60   Thingvellir,  Iceland   moss  heath   64° 17'   120   4   1200   12   Alexandra  Fiord,  Canada   snowbed  heath   78° 53'   15   ‐15   <100   46      Like most plant communities, many microbial communities are highly sensitive to warming. In a  recent review, Allison & Martiny (2008) reported that only 2 of 11 belowground communities  resisted temperature increases. They examined composition responses to four perturbations:  temperature, CO2 enrichment, fertilization, and enrichment with C substrates, and found that  87 of 110 communities were sensitive to these perturbations. Although by no means  exhaustive, the review covered a range of taxonomic groups, habitats, methods, and durations.  The low number of highly resistant communities prevented the authors from identifying any  general trends. In both above‐ and below‐ground communities, resistance to warming appears  relatively rare and difficult to explain.   The High Arctic heath community I monitored was largely resistant to 15 years of 1 °C warming.  Although these results must be extrapolated with some caution because this experiment had  limited spatial coverage, this was the first long‐term passive warming study conducted in the  Canadian Arctic. There are six other long‐term experiments currently being maintained at  Alexandra Fiord, and many others at Arctic and alpine ITEX sites across the biome. The planned  syntheses of these studies will provide significant insight into the future of tundra. My findings  suggest that not all communities will be sensitive to minor temperature increases, and that  ecosystem‐level responses may only be observed after environmental thresholds are crossed. 55     Citations  Allison, S. D. and J. B. H. Martiny. 2008. Resistance, resilience, and redundancy in microbial  communities. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of  America 105:11512‐11519.   Arft, A. M., M. D. Walker, J. Gurevitch, J. M. Alatalo, M. S. Bret‐Harte, M. Dale, M. Diemer, F.  Gugerli, G. H. R. Henry, M. H. Jones, R. D. Hollister, I. S. Jónsdóttir, K. Laine, E. Lévesque,  G. M. Marion, U. Molau, P. Mølgaard, U. Nordenhäll, V. Raszhivin, C. H. Robinson, G.  Starr, A. Stenström, M. Stenström, O. Totland, P. L. Turner, L. J. Walker, P. J. Webber, J.  M. Welker, and P. A. Wookey. 1999. Responses of tundra plants to experimental  warming: Meta‐analysis of the International Tundra Experiment. Ecological Monographs  69:491‐511.   Bjarnason, A. H. 1991. Vegetation on lava fields in the Hekla Area, Iceland. Acta  Phytogeographica Suecica 77:3‐105.   Callaghan, T. V., L. O. Björn, F. S. Chapin, III, Y. Chernov, T. R. Christensen, B. Huntley, R. Ims,  and M. Johansson. 2005. Arctic tundra and polar desert ecosystems. Pages 243‐352 in C.  Symon, L. Arris, and B. Heal, editors. Arctic Climate Impact Assessment: Scientific  Report. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Chapin, F. S., III, K. Autumn, and F. Pugnaire. 1993. Evolution of suites of traits in response to  environmental stress. American Naturalist 142:S78‐S92.   Chapin, F. S., III, J. P. McFadden, and S. E. Hobbie. 1997. The role of arctic vegetation in  ecosystem and global processes. Pages 97‐112 in S. J. Woodin and M. Marquiss, editors.  Ecology of Arctic Environments. Blackwell, Oxford, UK.   56     Chapin, F. S., III, G. R. Shaver, A. E. Giblin, K. J. Nadelhoffer, and J. A. Laundre. 1995. Responses  of Arctic tundra to experimental and observed changes in climate. Ecology 76:694‐711.   Epstein, H. E., M. P. Calef, M. D. Walker, F. S. Chapin, III, and A. M. Starfield. 2004. Detecting  changes in arctic tundra plant communities in response to warming over decadal time  scales. Global Change Biology 10:1325‐1334.   Graglia, E., S. Jonasson, A. Michelsen, I. K. Schmidt, M. Havström, and L. Gustavsson. 2001.  Effects of environmental perturbations on abundance of subarctic plants after three,  seven and ten years of treatments. Ecography 24:5‐12.   Grime, J. P. 1979. Plant Strategies and Vegetation Processes. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK.   Grime, J. P., V. K. Brown, K. Thompson, G. J. Masters, S. H. Hillier, I. P. Clarke, A. P. Askew, D.  Corker, and J. P. Kielty. 2000. The response of two contrasting limestone grasslands to  simulated climate change. Science 289:762‐765.   Grime, J. P., J. D. Fridley, A. P. Askew, K. Thompson, J. G. Hodgson, and C. R. Bennett. 2008.  Long‐term resistance to simulated climate change in an infertile grassland. Proceedings  of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105:10028‐10032.   Henry, G. H. R., B. Freedman, and J. Svoboda. 1986. Effects of fertilization on three tundra plant  communities of a polar desert oasis. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue Canadienne De  Botanique 64:2502‐2507.   Henry, G. H. R. and U. Molau. 1997. Tundra plants and climate change: the International Tundra  Experiment (ITEX). Global Change Biology 3:1‐9.   57     Hollister, R. D. and P. J. Webber. 2000. Biotic validation of small open‐top chambers in a tundra  ecosystem. Global Change Biology 6:835‐842.   Hollister, R. D., P. J. Webber, and C. E. Tweedie. 2005. The response of Alaskan arctic tundra to  experimental warming: differences between short‐ and long‐term responses. Global  Change Biology 11:525‐536.   IPCC. 2007. Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report. Contribution of Working Groups I, II and III  to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.  IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland.   Johnstone, J. 1995. Responses of Cassiope tetragona, a high arctic evergreen dwarf shrub, to  variations in growing season temperature and growing season length at Alexandra Fiord,  Ellesmere Island. MSc thesis. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.   Jónsdóttir, I. S., B. Magnússon, J. Gudmundsson, A. Elmarsdóttir, and H. Hjartarson. 2005.  Variable sensitivity of plant communities in Iceland to experimental warming. Global  Change Biology 11:553‐563.   Kennedy, A. D. 1995a. Simulated climate change: are passive greenhouses a valid microcosm for  testing the biological effects of environmental perturbations. Global Change Biology  1:29‐42.   Kennedy, A. D. 1995b. Temperature effects of passive greenhouse apparatus in high‐latitude  climate change experiments. Functional Ecology 9:340‐350.   Kruskal, J. B. 1964. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling: A numerical method. Psychometrika  29:115‐129.   58     Longton, R. E. 1997. The role of bryophytes and lichens in polar ecosystems. Pages 69‐96 in S. J.  Woodin and M. Marquiss, editors. Ecology of Arctic Environments. Blackwell, Oxford,  UK.   Marion, G. M., G. H. R. Henry, D. W. Freckman, J. Johnstone, G. Jones, M. H. Jones, E. Lévesque,  U. Molau, P. Mølgaard, A. N. Parsons, J. Svoboda, and R. A. Virginia. 1997. Open‐top  designs for manipulating field temperature in high‐latitude ecosystems. Global Change  Biology 3:20‐32.   Molau, U. and P. Mølgaard. 1996. International Tundra Experiment (ITEX) Manual. Danish Polar  Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.   Muc, M., B. Freedman, and J. Svoboda. 1989. Vascular plant communities of a polar oasis at  Alexandra Fiord (79°N), Ellesmere Island, Canada. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue  Canadienne De Botanique 67:1126‐1136.   Oberbauer, S. F., C. E. Tweedie, J. M. Welker, J. T. Fahnestock, G. H. R. Henry, P. J. Webber, R. D.  Hollister, M. D. Walker, A. Kuchy, E. Elmore, and G. Starr. 2007. Tundra CO2 fluxes in  response to experimental warming across latitudinal and moisture gradients. Ecological  Monographs 77:221‐238.   Oksanen, J., R. Kindt, P. Legendre, B. O'Hara, G. L. Simpson, M. H. H. Stevens, and H. Wagner.  2008. vegan: Community Ecology Package. R package version 1.13‐2.   Pinheiro, J. and D. Bates. 2000. Mixed‐Effects Models in S and S‐PLUS. Springer, New York, USA.   Pinheiro, J., D. Bates, S. DebRoy, D. Sarkar, and the R Core team. 2007. nlme: Linear and  Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models. R package version 3.1‐86.   59     R Development Core Team. 2007. R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R  Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria.   Rinnan, R., A. Michelsen, E. Baath, and S. Jonasson. 2007. Fifteen years of climate change  manipulations alter soil microbial communities in a subarctic heath ecosystem. Global  Change Biology 13:28‐39.   Sala, O. E., F. S. Chapin, III, J. J. Armesto, E. Berlow, J. Bloomfield, R. Dirzo, E. Huber‐Sanwald, L.  F. Huenneke, R. B. Jackson, A. Kinzig, R. Leemans, D. M. Lodge, H. A. Mooney, M.  Oesterheld, N. L. Poff, M. T. Sykes, B. H. Walker, M. Walker, and D. H. Wall. 2000.  Biodiversity ‐ Global biodiversity scenarios for the year 2100. Science 287:1770‐1774.   Shaver, G. R., J. Canadell, F. S. Chapin, III, J. Gurevitch, J. Harte, G. H. R. Henry, P. Ineson, S.  Jonasson, J. Melillo, L. Pitelka, and L. Rustad. 2000. Global warming and terrestrial  ecosystems: A conceptual framework for analysis. Bioscience 50:871‐882.   Shen, K. P. and J. Harte. 2000. Ecosystem climate manipulations. Pages 353–369 in O. E. Sala, R.  B. Jackson, H. A. Mooney, and R. B. Howarth, editors. Methods in Ecosystem Science.  Springer, New York, USA.   Svoboda, J. and B. Freedman. 1994. Ecology of a Polar Oasis: Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island,  Canada. Captus University Publications, Toronto, Canada.   Wahren, C. H. A., M. D. Walker, and M. S. Bret‐Harte. 2005. Vegetation responses in Alaskan  arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow manipulation  experiment. Global Change Biology 11:537‐552.   Walker, M. D., C. H. Wahren, R. D. Hollister, G. H. R. Henry, L. E. Ahlquist, J. M. Alatalo, M. S.  Bret‐Harte, M. P. Calef, T. V. Callaghan, A. B. Carroll, H. E. Epstein, I. S. Jónsdóttir, J. A.  60     Klein, B. Magnusson, U. Molau, S. F. Oberbauer, S. P. Rewa, C. H. Robinson, G. R. Shaver,  K. N. Suding, C. C. Thompson, A. Tolvanen, O. Totland, P. L. Turner, C. E. Tweedie, P. J.  Webber, and P. A. Wookey. 2006. Plant community responses to experimental warming  across the tundra biome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United  States of America 103:1342‐1346.   Wookey, P. A. 2008. Experimental approaches to predicting the future of tundra plant  communities. Plant Ecology & Diversity 1:299‐307.         61     Chapter 4: Summary and conclusions  Study objective  Vegetation in the Arctic is expected to respond strongly to climate change (Callaghan et al.  2005), and so the primary objective of this study was to test this hypothesis at the community  level in a High Arctic heath at Alexandra Fiord. To investigate aboveground plant community  responses to ambient warming (Chapter 2), I analyzed data that I collected in 2007 and 2008  and that Dr. Greg Henry collected from 1981‐2006. I conducted an observational study using  the longitudinal data from control plots (1995‐2007) and biomass harvests (1981 to 2008). Over  the past 30‐50 years, the Canadian High Arctic has warmed, and from 1995‐2007, near‐surface  mean annual air temperature increased by several degrees at the site. I also did an experiment  using passive warming with open‐top chambers (Chapter 3). In both Chapter 2 and 3, I  examined community composition and abundance, species diversity, and canopy height to  ambient and simulated warming. Other important environmental variables, such as soil water  contents and maximum depth of seasonal thaw were measured. Few researchers have used  their control plots from experiments to compare plant community responses to both ambient  and experimental warming (Chapin et al. 1995, Hollister et al. 2005, Wahren et al. 2005). To the  best of my knowledge, this thesis represents the first study to compare and contrast  independent longitudinal data with a perturbation experiment.   62     Significant findings  The longitudinal data analysis (Chapter 2) was the first study in Arctic heath tundra to detect  increased productivity and composition changes due to ambient warming. Three studies from  northern Alaska had stable aboveground production in control plots over 8‐18 years (Shaver et  al. 2001, Jorgenson and Buchholtz 2005, Wahren et al. 2005). My findings support the greening  of the Arctic detected by repeat‐photography (Sturm et al. 2001, Stow et al. 2004, Tape et al.  2006), satellite‐based imagery studies (Myneni et al. 1997, Nemani et al. 2003, Kimball et al.  2006, Zhang et al. 2008, Pouliot et al. 2009), and a biomass harvest comparison (early 1980s to  2005) at Alexandra Fiord (Hill 2006). Total productivity increased due to greater abundances of  bryophytes and evergreen shrubs. This result was unexpected given that both warming and  nutrient addition studies generally suggest that bryophytes (e.g. Molau and Alatalo 1998,  Graglia et al. 2001, van Wijk et al. 2004, Callaghan et al. 2005) and evergreen shrubs (e.g. Molau  1997, van Wijk et al. 2004, Callaghan et al. 2005) will decrease due to their inferior competitive  abilities in a milder, drier Arctic. Canopy height and maximum depth of thaw increased, while  species diversity and soil water content did not change. Climate change is generally expected to  alter environmental factors (Chapin et al. 1997), decrease species diversity (Hollister et al. 2005,  Walker et al. 2006), and increase canopy height (Hollister et al. 2005, Wahren et al. 2005,  Walker et al. 2006). This is the second study at Alexandra Fiord to detect a long‐term increase in  total biomass. A relatively productive wet sedge community increased in productivity and  biomass over the past several decades (Hill 2006). Together, the results from these studies  suggest that both productive and unproductive plant communities at Alexandra Fiord are  responding to recent warming. My findings also confirm that tundra community responses are  variable across space and time. Vegetation responses are expected to be complex because of  initial conditions, lags, responses, thresholds, and feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000). I  demonstrated that responses to gradual ambient warming in the snowbed heath tundra are  slow and additive. Changes in composition and abundance will likely affect the structure,  function, and ecosystem services of this community.   The plant community was resistant to passive warming using open‐top chambers (Chapter 3).  Community composition and abundance, species diversity, canopy height, maximum depth of  63     thaw, and soil water content were largely unaffected by passive warming. Only lichen cover  decreased, as it did at other High Arctic ITEX sites in the recent community composition  synthesis (Walker et al. 2006), likely due to increased competition by vascular plant species  (Cornelissen et al. 2001). The results of the passive warming experiment were rather surprising  given the major changes detected by Walker et al. (2006), as well as plant trait studies in this  heath (Johnstone 1995, J. Hudson & G. Henry, unpublished data). Although tundra sites have  generally been very sensitive to passive warming (Walker et al. 2006), resistance to climate  change experiments was found in a sub‐Arctic moss heath (Jónsdóttir et al. 2005), and a  temperate grassland (Grime et al. 2008). All three of these communities are relatively  unproductive, but future studies may shed light on the mechanisms that determine which  communities resist temperature perturbation and which do not.   In this study, there were different responses to passive and ambient warming, but this may be  attributed to the magnitudes of the temperature increases. Since 1992, the community has not  been affected by long‐term 1 °C passive warming; however, the community did not resist > 2.5  °C ambient warming. This warming caused substantial community‐level changes, and suggests  that this system has a threshold for responses to changes in climate. There is strong inter‐ annual fluctuation in Arctic climates, and inter‐annual variability was larger than temperature  increases within the OTCs, as seen elsewhere (Hollister et al. 2005, Wahren et al. 2005). The  effects of large temperature increases are expected to strongly impact Arctic vegetation and its  ecosystem functions (Callaghan et al. 2005).   Previous work suggests that the dominant vascular plants in heath communities would benefit  slightly from climate change (Havström et al. 1993, Wookey et al. 1993, Rayback and Henry  2006), but would still be outcompeted by more responsive plants (Molau 1997, van Wijk et al.  2004, Callaghan et al. 2005, Walker et al. 2006). Bryophytes are expected to decrease (e.g.  Chapin and Shaver 1996, van Wijk et al. 2004, Walker et al. 2006). The findings suggest that  heath communities may not only persist, they may benefit, because their dominant vegetation  types, evergreen shrubs and bryophytes, are more productive when temperature rises.  64     Future research  This study exhaustively examined aboveground plant community responses to long‐term  warming in a High Arctic heath. There are at least two directions for future research:  belowground responses to warming and spatially extrapolating the results from this study.   First, future research should examine the other components of this plant community. Below the  ground surface, nutrient availabilities (using ion exchange membranes), and soil microbial  diversity, composition, and abundance should be examined. The interaction between plants  and microbes to changes in temperature is multi‐faceted (Jonasson et al. 1999). Also, the  effects of warming on greenhouse gas fluxes should be explored. Altered plant and microbial  communities will likely affect the carbon flux of this heath. Substantial research has already  been conducted to investigate the belowground responses to warming in other plant  communities at the site (Deslippe et al. 2005, Fujimura et al. 2008, Walker et al. 2008), but not  in this heath community.  A deeper understanding of both aboveground and belowground parts  of this community is needed to predict future changes.   Second, this study’s results should be scaled‐up to the landscape‐level. Comparisons with other  experiments at the site, other heaths, and other plant communities will enable researchers to  explore site, vegetation type, and regional effects. As well, measurements of plot‐level optical  indices, such as NDVI, should be attempted. The intensive plot‐level monitoring at the site may  be used for ground‐truthing landscape‐level studies. Cautious, effective spatial extrapolation of  this study’s results will require additional research over the coming years.            65     Weaknesses  When I began this project in 2007, I identified three primary challenges in my thesis proposal.  These challenges, as well as my attempts to address them, are described below.   1) I used a substantially large previously‐collected dataset in this study. Potential sources of  error include plot degradation, human and instrument error, and changing methods over time.  Over the study period, the areas within and around plots have become trampled. Wooden  walkways are costly, and would likely disturb the landscape just as much as trampling. During  the project, this challenge was addressed through standardized training, sampling, and  recording methods from the ITEX manual to minimize common field mistakes. As well, data  were checked for accuracy prior to analyses.   2) Vegetation was monitored infrequently from 1981‐2008, but production and biomass have  low inter‐annual variability in tundra ecosystems (Chapin and Shaver 1985, Henry et al. 1990,  Molau 1997), and changes in community composition are gradual and normally maintained at a  constant rate for many years (Graglia et al. 2001). Also, all sample years (1981, 1995, 2000, and  2007) and years preceding sampling (1980, 1994, 1999, and 2006) had typical climate patterns  (G. Henry & J. Hudson, unpublished data).   3) Bryophytes and lichens were not identified to species, and there was a different sampling  convention for each year. Although expert bryologists and lichenologists identified the voucher  specimens, field identification was very difficult. This necessitated the lumping of vegetation  into plant functional groups for most analyses.   Continued financial and logistical support for research in this plant community can partially  remedy all of the aforementioned challenges, and subsequently expand the wealth of  information already gained in previous studies (e.g. Nams and Freedman 1987a, b, Muc et al.  1989, Johnstone 1995).      66     Conclusions  This study provides insight into the effects of temperature on the vegetation of a High Arctic  heath. The project developed a relationship between temperature increase and community‐ level change. It also increased our ability to forecast vegetation change over the next century.  Not all landscape‐level vegetation changes will be driven by climate change, but many plant  communities, even some of the most unproductive ones, are already being affected by  warming.   67     Citations  Callaghan, T. V., L. O. Björn, F. S. Chapin, III, Y. Chernov, T. R. Christensen, B. Huntley, R. Ims,  and M. Johansson. 2005. Arctic tundra and polar desert ecosystems. Pages 243‐352 in C.  Symon, L. Arris, and B. Heal, editors. Arctic Climate Impact Assessment: Scientific  Report. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.   Chapin, F. S., III, J. P. McFadden, and S. E. Hobbie. 1997. The role of arctic vegetation in  ecosystem and global processes. Pages 97‐112 in S. J. Woodin and M. Marquiss, editors.  Ecology of Arctic Environments. Blackwell, Oxford, UK.   Chapin, F. S., III and G. R. Shaver. 1985. Individualistic growth response of tundra plant species  to environmental manipulations in the field. Ecology 66:564‐576.   Chapin, F. S., III and G. R. Shaver. 1996. Physiological and growth responses of arctic plants to a  field experiment simulating climatic change. Ecology 77:822‐840.   Chapin, F. S., III, G. R. Shaver, A. E. Giblin, K. J. Nadelhoffer, and J. A. Laundre. 1995. Responses  of Arctic tundra to experimental and observed changes in climate. Ecology 76:694‐711.   Cornelissen, J. H. C., T. V. Callaghan, J. M. Alatalo, A. Michelsen, E. Graglia, A. E. Hartley, D. S.  Hik, S. E. Hobbie, M. C. Press, C. H. Robinson, G. H. R. Henry, G. R. Shaver, G. K. Phoenix,  D. G. Jones, S. Jonasson, F. S. Chapin, III, U. Molau, C. Neill, J. A. Lee, J. M. Melillo, B.  Sveinbjörnsson, and R. Aerts. 2001. Global change and arctic ecosystems: is lichen  decline a function of increases in vascular plant biomass? Journal of Ecology 89:984‐994.   Deslippe, J. R., K. N. Egger, and G. H. R. Henry. 2005. Impacts of warming and fertilization on  nitrogen‐fixing microbial communities in the Canadian High Arctic. Fems Microbiology  Ecology 53:41‐50.   68     Fujimura, K. E., K. N. Egger, and G. H. R. Henry. 2008. The effect of experimental warming on  the root‐associated fungal community of Salix arctica. ISME Journal 2:105‐114.   Graglia, E., S. Jonasson, A. Michelsen, I. K. Schmidt, M. Havström, and L. Gustavsson. 2001.  Effects of environmental perturbations on abundance of subarctic plants after three,  seven and ten years of treatments. Ecography 24:5‐12.   Grime, J. P., J. D. Fridley, A. P. Askew, K. Thompson, J. G. Hodgson, and C. R. Bennett. 2008.  Long‐term resistance to simulated climate change in an infertile grassland. Proceedings  of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105:10028‐10032.   Havström, M., T. V. Callaghan, and S. Jonasson. 1993. Differential growth responses of Cassiope  tetragona, an Arctic dwarf shrub, to environmental perturbations among three  contrasting high‐ and sub‐Arctic sites. Oikos 66:389‐402.   Henry, G. H. R., J. Svoboda, and B. Freedman. 1990. Standing crop and net production of sedge  meadows of an ungrazed polar desert oasis. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue  Canadienne De Botanique 68:2660‐2667.   Hill, G. 2006. Responses of High Arctic sedge meadows to climate warming at Alexandra Fiord,  Ellesmere Island, since 1980. MSc thesis. University of British Columbia, Vancouver,  Canada.   Hollister, R. D., P. J. Webber, and C. E. Tweedie. 2005. The response of Alaskan arctic tundra to  experimental warming: differences between short‐ and long‐term responses. Global  Change Biology 11:525‐536.   69     Johnstone, J. 1995. Responses of Cassiope tetragona, a high arctic evergreen dwarf shrub, to  variations in growing season temperature and growing season length at Alexandra Fiord,  Ellesmere Island. MSc thesis. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.   Jonasson, S., A. Michelsen, I. K. Schmidt, and E. V. Nielsen. 1999. Responses in microbes and  plants to changed temperature, nutrient, and light regimes in the arctic. Ecology  80:1828‐1843.   Jónsdóttir, I. S., B. Magnússon, J. Gudmundsson, A. Elmarsdóttir, and H. Hjartarson. 2005.  Variable sensitivity of plant communities in Iceland to experimental warming. Global  Change Biology 11:553‐563.   Jorgenson, J. and C. A. Buchholtz. 2005. Eighteen years of vegetation monitoring in the Arctic  National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Pages 62‐63 in Proceedings of the SEARCH Open  Science Meeting, 27‐30 October 2003. Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.,  Fairbanks, USA.   Kimball, J. S., M. Zhao, A. D. Mcguire, F. A. Heinsch, J. Clein, M. P. Calef, W. M. Jolly, S. Kang, S.  E. Euskirchen, K. C. McDonald, and S. W. Running. 2006. Recent climate‐driven increases  in vegetation productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence for an acceleration of the  northern terrestrial carbon cycle. Earth Interactions 11:1‐23.   Molau, U. 1997. Responses to natural climatic variation and experimental warming in two  tundra plant species with contrasting life forms: Cassiope tetragona and Ranunculus  nivalis. Global Change Biology 3:97‐107.   Molau, U. and J. M. Alatalo. 1998. Responses of subarctic‐alpine plant communities to  simulated environmental change: Biodiversity of bryophytes, lichens, and vascular  plants. Ambio 27:322‐329.  70     Muc, M., B. Freedman, and J. Svoboda. 1989. Vascular plant communities of a polar oasis at  Alexandra Fiord (79°N), Ellesmere Island, Canada. Canadian Journal of Botany‐Revue  Canadienne De Botanique 67:1126‐1136.   Myneni, R. B., C. D. Keeling, C. J. Tucker, G. Asrar, and R. R. Nemani. 1997. Increased plant  growth in the northern high latitudes from 1981 to 1991. Nature 386:698‐702.   Nams, M. L. N. and B. Freedman. 1987a. Ecology of heath communities dominated by Cassiope  tetragona at Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island, Canada. Holarctic Ecology 10:22‐32.   Nams, M. L. N. and B. Freedman. 1987b. Phenology and resource allocation in a high arctic  evergreen dwarf shrub, Cassiope tetragona. Holarctic Ecology 10:128‐136.   Nemani, R. R., C. D. Keeling, H. Hashimoto, W. M. Jolly, S. C. Piper, C. J. Tucker, R. B. Myneni,  and S. W. Running. 2003. Climate‐driven increases in global terrestrial net primary  production from 1982 to 1999. Science 300:1560‐1563.   Pouliot, D., R. Latifovic, and I. Olthof. 2009. Trends in vegetation NDVI from 1 km AVHRR data  over Canada for the period 1985‐2006. International Journal of Remote Sensing 30:149‐ 168.   Rayback, S. A. and G. H. R. Henry. 2006. Reconstruction of summer temperature for a Canadian  High Arctic site from retrospective analysis of the dwarf shrub, Cassiope tetragona.  Arctic Antarctic and Alpine Research 38:228‐238.   Shaver, G. R., S. M. Bret‐Harte, M. H. Jones, J. Johnstone, L. Gough, J. Laundre, and F. S. Chapin,  III. 2001. Species composition interacts with fertilizer to control long‐term change in  tundra productivity. Ecology 82:3163‐3181.   71     Shaver, G. R., J. Canadell, F. S. Chapin, III, J. Gurevitch, J. Harte, G. H. R. Henry, P. Ineson, S.  Jonasson, J. Melillo, L. Pitelka, and L. Rustad. 2000. Global warming and terrestrial  ecosystems: A conceptual framework for analysis. Bioscience 50:871‐882.   Stow, D. A., A. Hope, D. McGuire, D. Verbyla, J. Gamon, F. Huemmrich, S. Houston, C. Racine, M.  Sturm, K. Tape, L. Hinzman, K. Yoshikawa, C. Tweedie, B. Noyle, C. Silapaswan, D.  Douglas, B. Griffith, G. Jia, H. Epstein, D. Walker, S. Daeschner, A. Petersen, L. M. Zhou,  and R. Myneni. 2004. Remote sensing of vegetation and land‐cover change in Arctic  Tundra Ecosystems. Remote Sensing of Environment 89:281‐308.   Sturm, M., C. Racine, and K. Tape. 2001. Climate change: Increasing shrub abundance in the  Arctic. Nature 411:546‐547.   Tape, K., M. Sturm, and C. Racine. 2006. The evidence for shrub expansion in Northern Alaska  and the Pan‐Arctic. Global Change Biology 12:686‐702.   van Wijk, M. T., K. E. Clemmensen, G. R. Shaver, M. Williams, T. V. Callaghan, F. S. Chapin, III, J.  H. C. Cornelissen, L. Gough, S. E. Hobbie, S. Jonasson, J. A. Lee, A. Michelsen, M. C. Press,  S. J. Richardson, and H. Rueth. 2004. Long‐term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik  Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations and differences in  ecosystem and plant type responses to global change. Global Change Biology 10:105‐ 123.   Wahren, C. H. A., M. D. Walker, and M. S. Bret‐Harte. 2005. Vegetation responses in Alaskan  arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow manipulation  experiment. Global Change Biology 11:537‐552.   72     Walker, J. K. M., K. N. Egger, and G. H. R. Henry. 2008. Long‐term experimental warming alters  nitrogen‐cycling communities but site factors remain the primary drivers of community  structure in high arctic tundra soils. The ISME Journal 2:982‐995.   Walker, M. D., C. H. Wahren, R. D. Hollister, G. H. R. Henry, L. E. Ahlquist, J. M. Alatalo, M. S.  Bret‐Harte, M. P. Calef, T. V. Callaghan, A. B. Carroll, H. E. Epstein, I. S. Jónsdóttir, J. A.  Klein, B. Magnusson, U. Molau, S. F. Oberbauer, S. P. Rewa, C. H. Robinson, G. R. Shaver,  K. N. Suding, C. C. Thompson, A. Tolvanen, O. Totland, P. L. Turner, C. E. Tweedie, P. J.  Webber, and P. A. Wookey. 2006. Plant community responses to experimental warming  across the tundra biome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United  States of America 103:1342‐1346.   Wookey, P. A., A. N. Parsons, J. M. Welker, J. A. Potter, T. V. Callaghan, J. A. Lee, and M. C.  Press. 1993. Comparative responses of phenology and reproductive development to  simulated environmental change in sub‐arctic and high arctic plants. Oikos 67:490‐502.   Zhang, K., J. S. Kimball, E. H. Hogg, M. S. Zhao, W. C. Oechel, J. J. Cassano, and S. W. Running.  2008. Satellite‐based model detection of recent climate‐driven changes in northern  high‐latitude vegetation productivity. Journal of Geophysical Research‐Biogeosciences  113:G03033.       73     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0067119/manifest

Comment

Related Items