Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Plasma concentrations of nelfinavir and viral suppression in HIV-1 infected pregnant women Chaworth-Musters, Tessa 2008

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2008_fall_chaworth_musters_tessa.pdf [ 6MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0066455.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0066455-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0066455-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0066455-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0066455-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0066455-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0066455-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0066455-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0066455.ris

Full Text

PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS OF NELFINAVIR AND VIRAL SUPPRESSION IN   HIV‐1 INFECTED PREGNANT WOMEN      by      TESSA CHAWORTH‐MUSTERS    B.Sc. (H.), McGill University, 2006            A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    MASTER OF SCIENCE      in      THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES    (Reproductive and Developmental Sciences)              THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA    (Vancouver)          June 2008          © Tessa Chaworth‐Musters, 2008    ABSTRACT     BACKGROUND: Highly active antiretroviral therapy(HAART) is used in pregnancy to suppress  viral load(pVL) before delivery, reducing risk of vertical HIV‐transmission. Nelfinavir(NFV)  containing HAART has been highly used in pregnancy, but dosages may be inadequate due to the  physiologic changes that occur. Given concerns regarding optimal viral suppression in pregnancy,  drug toxicity and resistance development, NFV levels need to be evaluated in this population to  guide dosing recommendations.    METHODS: As part of a prospective cohort study maternal blood was collected at 18‐28wks, 32‐ 37wks and at delivery. Times of last medication dose and blood sampling were recorded and  drug levels were measured using HPLC MS‐MS.  NFV concentration‐ratios(NFV‐CRs) were  calculated by dividing individual levels by a time‐adjusted population value.  Plasma NFV  concentrations and NFV‐CRs were compared across gestational age and correlated to variables of  interest. Rate and maintenance of viral suppression were analyzed in relation to NFV  concentrations and CRs.  Statistical tests included ANOVA, χ2, linear regression, and Kaplan Meier  estimates.      RESULTS: 113 samples were collected from 32 subjects. Samples were eliminated if not in steady  state (n=20); 93 samples from 32 subjects were analyzed. Mean NFV‐CR at 18‐28wks (1.1±0.73)  and 32‐37wks (0.86±0.73) were not significantly different but were both significantly higher by  ANOVA (p=0.049) than the mean NFV‐CR at delivery (0.44±0.50).  CRs were highly variable. Of 49  antepartum samples, 49%(24) had a CR<0.90 (clinically relevant threshold). Four women  reached a pVL <50 copies/mL by 34wks but had a detectable pVL at delivery. One woman never  reached an undetectable pVL in pregnancy. Minimum and mean NFV‐CRs in these 5 women were   ii       not significantly different than those who achieved and maintained virologic suppression.  Vertical HIV transmission rate was 0%.     CONCLUSIONS: There were no HIV transmissions but 16% (5/32) of women were inadequately  suppressed at delivery, which is of concern. Factors associated with inadequate suppression and  NFV‐CRs need to be explored in conjunction with patient/physician reported adherence and viral  resistance profiles. Extreme variability in CRs may limit the potential usefulness of random timed  drug levels in all pregnant women.    iii       TABLE OF CONTENTS    ABSTRACT........................................................................................................................................... ii  TABLE OF CONTENTS ..................................................................................................................... iv  LIST OF TABLES................................................................................................................................ vi  LIST OF FIGURES .............................................................................................................................vii  LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................................................... viii  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.................................................................................................................. ix  INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................. 1  BIOLOGY of HIV INFECTION .......................................................................................................................................1  EPIDEMIOLOGY of HIV ..................................................................................................................................................2  VERTICAL TRANSMISSION of HIV ............................................................................................................................4  MANAGEMENT of HIV INFECTED PREGNANCIES in HIGH RESOURCE SETTINGS.............................7  SAFETY of ANTIRETROVIRALS in PREGNANCY..............................................................................................10  PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES in PREGNANCY & DRUG DISPOSITION ......................................................14  THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING of ANTIRETROVIRALS.....................................................................17  MEASURES and TARGET THRESHOLDS for ANTIRETROVIRAL TDM ...................................................19  PREGNANCY and ANTIRETROVIRAL PHARMACOKINETICS.....................................................................24  JUSTIFICATION / RATIONALE ................................................................................................................................28  HYPOTHESIS ...................................................................................................................................................................29  OBJECTIVES .....................................................................................................................................................................29  METHODS ..........................................................................................................................................30  STUDY DESIGN ...............................................................................................................................................................30  STUDY SETTING and POPULATION ......................................................................................................................30  SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATION...................................................................................................................................31  STUDY VISITS and SAMPLE COLLECTION .........................................................................................................32  DATA COLLECTION ......................................................................................................................................................33  VARIABLE IDENTIFICATION and SELECTION .................................................................................................34  REPORTING on ADHERENCE...................................................................................................................................34  DETERMING DRUG PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS ..........................................................................................35  PLASMA CONCENTRATION RATIOS.....................................................................................................................36  DEFINITION of REMAINING VARIABLES ...........................................................................................................37  ANALYSIS PLAN.............................................................................................................................................................41  ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS ....................................................................................................................................42  RESULTS.............................................................................................................................................43  SUBJECT and SAMPLE INCLUSION........................................................................................................................43  SAMPLE CHARACTERISTICS ....................................................................................................................................44  BASIC DEMOGRAPHICS ..............................................................................................................................................45  HIV RELATED DESCRIPTORS ..................................................................................................................................47  ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY in PREGNANCY .................................................................................................49  NELFINAVIR RAW PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS ............................................................................................50  NELFINAVIR PLASMA CONCENTRATION RATIOS.........................................................................................52  REPORT ON CO‐VARIATES .......................................................................................................................................56  CORRELATIONS of COVARIATES and NFV CONCENTRATIONS...............................................................57  DESCRIPTION of LOPINAVIR/RITONAVIR CONCENTRATIONS IN PREGNANCY.............................58  iv       TIME to UNDETECTABLE VIRAL LOAD and NFV CRs...................................................................................60  LACK of VIRAL SUPPRESSION at DELIVERY .....................................................................................................64   DISCUSSION ......................................................................................................................................68  NELFINAVIR CONCENTRATIONS in PREGNANCY..........................................................................................68  VARIABILITY OF NELFVINAVIR CONCENTRATIONS....................................................................................69  METABOLISM and PROTEIN BINDING of NELFINAVIR...............................................................................70  VIRAL SUPPRESSION...................................................................................................................................................72  USE of RANDOMED TIMED DRUG LEVELS IN PREGNANCY ......................................................................74  LIMITATIONS..................................................................................................................................................................75  FUTURE DIRECTIONS .................................................................................................................................................76  REFERENCES.....................................................................................................................................78  APPENDIX 1 : ACTG SELF‐REPORTING ADHERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE .............................................89  APPENDIX 2 : HEIRARCHY for REPORTING HIV EXPOSURE CATEOGRY ............................................90  APPENDIX 3 : CONCOMITANT MEDICATIONS of INTEREST.....................................................................93  APPENDIX 4 : UBC RESEARCH ETHICS BOARD CERTIFICATES OF APPROVAL ...............................95   v       LIST OF TABLES   TABLE 1.  US FDA PREGNANCY CLASS OF ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUGS (36) ................................................................ 11  TABLE 2.  SUBJECT EXCLUSION....................................................................................................................................................... 43  TABLE 3.  SAMPLE EXCLUSION ....................................................................................................................................................... 44  TABLE 4.  SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION BY TIME POINT .............................................................................................................. 44  TABLE 5.  MATERNAL GENERAL DEMOGRAPHICS, N=40................................................................................................... 46  TABLE 6. HIV CHARACTERISTICS, N=40 ..................................................................................................................................... 48  TABLE 7. NELFINAVIR RAW PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS................................................................................................. 50  TABLE 8.  NELFINAVIR PLASMA CONCENTRATION RATIOS............................................................................................. 52  TABLE 9.  CO‐VARIANTS ACROSS PREGNANCY ....................................................................................................................... 56  TABLE 10. UNIVARIATE ANALYSIS, CO‐VARIATES AND NFV CONCENTRATIONS .................................................. 57  TABLE 11.  LOPINAVIR PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS (ΜG/ML)....................................................................................... 58  TABLE 12.  PROPORTIONAL HAZARDS, TIME TO UNDETECTABLE PVL (N=24) ..................................................... 64  TABLE 13.  CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATED WITH LACK OF VIRAL SUPPRESSION AT DELIVERY ............... 65  TABLE 14. VIRAL RESISTANCE AND ADHERENCE FOR PATIENTS WITH DETECTABLE VIRAL LOAD AT  DELIVERY....................................................................................................................................................................................... 67   vi       LIST OF FIGURES     FIGURE 1.  PHARMACOKINETIC MEASURES FOR THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING ....................................... 20  FIGURE 2.  ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY REGIMENS PRESCRIBED IN PREGNANCY .............................................. 49  FIGURE 3. NELFINAVIR PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS........................................................................................................... 51  FIGURE 4. NELFINAVIR CONCENTRATIONS RATIOS ............................................................................................................ 53  FIGURE 5. COMPARISON OF TWO ANTEPARTUM CONCENTRATION RATIOS IN RELATED SAMPLES ......... 54  FIGURE 6.  CHANGE IN SUBJECTS’ CONCENTRATION RATIO ACROSS GESTATIONAL AGE ................................ 55  FIGURE 7.  MEDIAN LPV & RTV PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS IN PREGNANCY ......................................................... 59  FIGURE 8.  RATE OF VIRAL SUPPRESSION BY FIRST ANTEPARTUM NFV CR............................................................ 61  FIGURE 9.  RATE OF VIRAL SUPPRESSION BY MEAN OF ANTEPARTUM NFV CRS .................................................. 62  FIGURE 10. LACK OF VIRAL SUPPRESSION AT DELIVERY.................................................................................................. 66  FIGURE 11. NELFINAVIR AND M8 METABOLISM BY LIVER ENZYMES......................................................................... 70   vii       LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS  ACTG:  AIDS:  ANOVA:  ART:  AUC:  AZT:  BID:  CD4:  Cmax:  Cmin:  CPARG:  CR:  CWHCBC:  CYP:  EI:  GA:  H:  HAART:  HIV:  HPLC:  HR:  IC:  IDU:  II:  IQ:  IQR:  LPV/r:  MEC:  MS‐MS:  NFV:  NNRTI:  NRTI:  NVP:  OTC:  PACTG:  PCR:  PLAT:  PK:  PK‐PD:  PI:  TDM:  UNAIDS:  US FDA:  Wks:  3TC:  95%CI:     AIDS Clinical Trial Group  Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome  Analysis of variance  Antiretroviral therapy  Area under concentration‐time curve  Zidovudine  Twice daily  T helper  Peak plasma concentration  Minimum plasma concentration  Canadian Pediatric AIDS Research Group  Concentration Ratio  Children’s and Women’s Health Centre of British Columbia  Cytochrome P‐450  Entry Inhibitor  Gestational age  Hours  Highly active antiretroviral therapy  Human immunodeficiency virus type 1  High Performance Liquid Chromatography  Hazard ratio  Inhibitory Concentration  Intravenous drug use  Integrase Inhibitor  Inhibitory Quotient  Interquartile Range  Lopinavir boosted with ritonavir (Kaletra)  Minimum Effective Concentration  Tandem Mass Spectrometry  Nelfinavir (Viracept)  Non‐Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor  Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor  Nevirapine  Oak Tree Clinic  Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group  Polymerase Chain Reaction  Pregnancy limited antiretroviral therapy  Pharmacokinetic  pharmacokinetic‐pharmacodynamic   Protease inhibitor  Therapeutic drug monitoring  The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS  United States Food and Drug Administration    Weeks  Lamuvidine  95% confidence interval   viii            ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS      I would like to give considerable thanks to all of the staff at the Oak Tree Clinic for the support  they have given to this project.   I am grateful for their patience and enthusiasm. I would  particularly like to thank Evelyn Maan for her insight, humor, unfaltering encouragement and  wisdom.  I owe her a debt of gratitude.  I would also like to expressly thank my supervisor, Dr.  Deborah Money, not only for her time and extensive mentorship, but also for the firm foundation  on which to build my future.     My thanks extend to the team studying HAART associated mitochondrial toxicity in pregnancy for  the use of the study samples and collected data. This project could also not have been completed  without the support of the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS for the analyses of antiretroviral  drug concentration.    I would like to thank my thesis committee, Drs. Helene Cote, Mary Ensome, Richard Harrigan and  Peter Leung for their interest, expertise and contribution to this thesis.  Their input has been  invaluable in both its preparation and completion.     Finally I would like to thank the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research for trainee  funding support through a Junior Graduate Studentship.   Further funding for the study was  awarded to Dr. Money from the Canadian Association for AIDS Research (CANFAR) and the  Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR).     ix       INTRODUCTION     BIOLOGY OF HIV INFECTION    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an RNA retrovirus that targets the human body’s  immune system.  Infection occurs through the transfer of bodily fluids, with the major routes of  transmission being unprotected sexual intercourse, percutaneous exposure to contaminated  needles, and transmission from an infected mother to her baby at birth or through breast milk.   Initial infection results in high levels of viral replication in the bloodstream (>106 virons/mL) and  in 80‐90% of patients, a seroconversion illness (1).      Acute infection is followed by a period of clinical latency: a strong defence by the body’s immune  system reduces the amount of circulating virus and infection is established in the cells of the  lymphoid system, specifically in T helper (CD4) cells, macrophages and dendritic cells.  During  cellular infection, viral RNA is converted into DNA using the virus’ own reverse transcriptase,  which permits the virus’ genetic information to be integrated into the cell’s DNA using the virally  encoded enzyme, integrase.  HIV can either then become latent in the cell, with the infected cell  continuing to function, or become active, with cell death and the liberation of newly replicated  virons into the bloodstream.     Over the course of the clinical latent period, the body’s immune system deteriorates.  The CD4  count depletes through three main mechanisms: CD4 cell death by apoptosis (programmed cell  death), by direct viral killing, and by killing by CD8 cytotoxic lymphocytes.  Patients transition to  symptomatic HIV infection and finally to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).  The  body is then prone to a wide range of opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis, Pneumocystis  pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, Cryptococcal meningitis, etc. and  malignant cancers including Kaposi's sarcoma, cervical cancer and high grade B‐cell lymphomas.   1       EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HIV    At the end of 2007, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) reported that an  estimated 33 million people worldwide were living with HIV (2).  More than two million AIDS  related deaths and 2.5 million new infections occur annually, the majority in Sub‐Saharan and  North Africa, the Middle East, and South and South East Asia (2). Those newly HIV infected  represent diverse ethnicities and nationalities, and include over 50% women and just under half  a million children under the age of 15 (2). Equal gender distribution of disease has meant an  increase in AIDS‐related illness and death in women, while mother to child transmission (vertical  transmission) causes the vast majority (>90%) of childhood HIV infections (2).    Initial HIV seropositivity rates among women in the developed world were low; however, over  the past decade there has been a consistent rise in incidence and prevalence among women of  reproductive age. In 2006, 9,500 of the 58,000 Canadians diagnosed with HIV were women (3).    This reflected a 15% increase in new diagnoses among women from the previous year.   Heterosexual contact (61.1%) and injection drug use (30.7%) were named as the primary  acquisition risk factors in this population (3).  Women also accounted for 45% of positive test  results in people between the ages of 15‐29 (3).      In British Columbia specifically, the total number of women diagnosed with HIV in the province  reached 1,758 in 2006, as 72 women were newly diagnosed (4). Of the 72 new infections, 28%  were Caucasian, 36% First Nations/Metis, 9.7% Black, and 13% Asian/South Asian (4).  Heterosexual contact (39%), intravenous drug use (IDU) (25%), and sex trade work in  combination with IDU (26%) were noted as the major risk categories (4).     2       As women represent an increasing proportion of the HIV infected population, both provincially  and nationally, there is significant concern about perinatal HIV infection.  A study to examine the  fertility intentions of HIV infected women living in British Columbia between November 2003  and December 2004 found that of the 230 women who completed the survey, 79% were of  reproductive age, and 26% indicated an intention to have children (5).  Additionally, a significant  number of women are diagnosed with HIV in the antenatal period (5).     All of the Canadian provinces have now incorporated HIV testing as part of recommended  prenatal blood work, and from October 2003 to October 2005, 83% of pregnant women in British  Columbia were tested.  HIV seroprevalence among this population was found to be 9.0 cases per  10,000 pregnant women (6) compared to 3.0 cases per 10,000 in Alberta (2000), 2.3 in Ontario  (2003) and 5.5 in Quebec (1990) (3).  By the end of 2005, 2,206 Canadian children had been  exposed to HIV in utero since the start of the epidemic in the early 1980s, and 496 were  perinatally infected (3), the majority prior to routine treatment with ART in pregnancy.      Fortunately, these recent elevated rates of adult infection and HIV infected pregnancies have not  translated into increased neonatal infections in high‐resource settings. ART and comprehensive  antenatal care has dramatically reduced vertical transmission rates in Canada, from 30% (in  1995) to less than one percent in 2005 (3).   The Canadian Pediatric AIDS Research Group  (CPARG) reported that of the 195 known infants born to HIV infected mothers in 2007, one was  infected (7).          3           VERTICAL TRANSMISSION OF HIV    Three  different  routes  or  different  timings  of  vertical  transmission  have  been  identified:  antepartum/  pregnancy,  intrapartum/delivery  and  postpartum/breastfeeding.  Kourtis  et  al.  developed  a  hypothetical  model  to  describe  the  temporal  distribution  of  transmission,  and  suggested  that  the  majority  of  infections  occur  during  late  pregnancy  at  the  onset  of  placental  separation,  between  36wks  gestational  age  (GA)  and  start  of  labour  (8).    The  delay  of  viral  detection  in  infants’  bloodstream  by  PCR  (polymerase  chain  reaction)  until  after  7  days  of  age  alternatively  suggests  that  the  vast  majority  (50‐80%)  of  infections  occur  in  the  intrapartum  period (9;10).    Several studies of women in both developed and developing nations have showed inconsistencies  as to whether untreated HIV affects pregnancy outcomes.  A study of HIV infected and uninfected  intravenous drug users in Italy found no statistical difference in obstetrical outcomes, although  the control group demonstrated unusually high rates of adverse events including pre term birth,  low birth weight, and poor infant health in the 5 minutes after birth (APGAR score) (11) .   Increased rates of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and low birth weight were seen  among untreated HIV infected women in Rwanda when compared to a control population (12).   In both studies, advanced HIV disease was associated with increased adverse outcomes.      The effect of pregnancy on maternal HIV progression has also been explored. In a large cohort  study, the relative risk of progression from HIV infection to an AIDS diagnosis associated with  pregnancy was 0.7 (95% confidence interval (95%CI) 0.4‐1.2) (13).  Two other studies in North  America and Europe found no alternation in the course of disease (14;15).  A more recent study  of pregnant and non‐pregnant women receiving ART, found that pregnancy was associated with a  4       lower risk of disease progression when conducting both a large cohort analyses (Cox  proportional hazard ratio (HR) 0.4 – 95%CI 0.20‐0.79; p=0.009) and matched‐pair analyses (Cox  HR 0.44 – 95%CI 0.19‐1.00; p=0.05) (16).    Despite exposure to maternal HIV, most infants are not infected.  Numerous studies have  investigated factors associated with differing transmission rates.   Advanced HIV disease, namely  low CD4 counts or an AIDS diagnosis, was initially associated with increased perinatal infection  (17).  Five years later, two landmark studies in the New England Journal of Medicine identified  high plasma HIV viral load to be an independent predictive factor for transmission.  Garcia et al.  reported that vertical transmission rates in 64 women with viral loads >100,000 copies/mL was  63.3%, compared with 0% in 57 women with viral loads of <1,000 copies/mL (18).  Similarly,  Mofenson et al. found that for each log increment of HIV viral load at delivery, the adjusted odds  ratio for transmission increased by 3.4 (95% CI 1.7‐6.8, p 0.001) (19).      Levels of plasma viral load have shown to be a predictor for the presence of HIV‐RNA in cervical  and vaginal secretions (20), also identified as a risk factor for transmission.  Transmission was  26.3% among Thai women with detectable virus by cervicovaginal lavage, compared to 7.9% in  women with no detectable virus (21).  Similarly, the presence of cervical and vaginal HIV‐RNA in  Kenyan patients was shown to be a risk factor for transmission, statistically independent of  plasma viral load (22).        Beyond maternal HIV parameters, different modes of delivery have been investigated in relation  to perinatal infection rates.  A meta‐analysis of 8,533 women from 15 study groups found a 50%  reduction in transmission when infants were delivered by caesarean section prior to the onset of  labour (23): 8.2% of infants delivered by caesarean section were infected, as compared to 16.7%  of those delivered vaginally.  This protective effect, however, was shown to lessen when the  5       patient was treated with zidovudine (AZT), and even more so in women treated effectively with  combination ART (23).  Increased transmission rates have also been noted with increased length  of time between rupture of membranes and delivery, instrumental or operative vaginal  deliveries, and the use of obstetrical devices such as scalp electrodes (24).      Breastfeeding is also a known risk factor for pediatric infection.   In a study of 4,085 breastfed  children, 42% of infections were determined as being late‐postnatal, and attributed to HIV  acquisition through breast milk (25). This risk factor is largely minimized in high resource  settings with ready access to infant formula, but remains of significant issue in developing  countries where formula is prohibitively expensive and is associated with widespread stigma.   This problem is further compounded by irregular access to clean drinking water and mixed infant  feeding practices (giving other foods or liquids as well as breast milk) which has been associated  with increased rates of infant HIV infection and death (26).    Finally, the role of ART in reducing vertical transmission is paramount. In 1994 the New England  Journal of Medicine published the landmark results of the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group  (PACTG) 076 Study, which introduced the use of AZT to prevent perinatal HIV infection (27). The  PACTG 076 regimen included a three part monotherapy series: pregnant women were initiated  on AZT from 14‐34 wks GA, received intravenous AZT during labour, and infants received up to  six wks of AZT prophylaxis after birth.  The trial was halted after an interim analysis; AZT was  shown to reduce transmission by 66%, from 25.5% in the placebo arm, to 8.3% in the AZT arm.  Since this seminal paper was published, monotherapy has been replaced by combinations of  three or more unique drugs, known collectively as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).   When antenatal HAART was combined with IV AZT in the intrapartum period, as well as neonatal  prophylaxis and infant formula, published vertical transmission rates ranged from 1.2‐1.7%  (28;29).  6       MANAGEMENT OF HIV INFECTED PREGNANCIES IN HIGH RESOURCE SETTINGS    Between 1996‐2000 HAART became the standard of care for adult therapy.  By minimizing viral  replication and permitting immune reconstitution, treatment dramatically decreases time to  symptomatic HIV, AIDS and death (30;31).  In non‐pregnant adults, HAART is initiated for two  main reasons: symtompatic HIV infection (including a clinical diganosis of AIDS), or  asymptomatic HIV disease with a low CD4 cell count. The CD4 cell count cut off at which to  initiate treatment remains controversial; current Therapeutic Guidelines published by the BC  Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS details that patients with a CD4 <200 x106 cells/L should  commence treatment, while patients with a CD4 >200 x106 cells/L but <350 x106 cells/L should  be closely evaluated, taking into consideration clinical and laboratory parameters (including CD4  cell fraction and pVL) as well as the patient’s preference (32).   First line therapies in this  population take advantage of newer fixed dose combinations of drugs because of the low bill  burden and the associated facilitation of adherence.  Common combinations include two  nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) partnered with either a protease inhibitor  (PI) or non‐nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (32).    Consistent with the standard of care for adults, HAART is used in HIV infected pregnant women  to treat both underlying maternal disease (33) and to prevent perinatal infection (34).  In 2003,  the Canadian HIV Trials Network Working Group on Vertical HIV Transmission published the  Canadian consensus guidelines for the management of pregnancy, labour and delivery and for  postpartum care of HIV infected pregnant women and their offspring (35).  The guidelines  recommend ART in pregnancy to ensure maximal viral suppression while maintaining a woman’s  long‐term treatment options.  Efforts are made to avoid potentially toxic medications, especially  since it is suspected that pregnancy increases the risk of toxic effects due to nucleoside  analogues, such as lactic acidosis.   7         Similar recommendations made by the United States Public Health Service Task Force are revised  bi‐yearly to accommodate new therapies or investigational results (36).  Based largely on the  three part (antepartum, intrapartum and neonatal) PACTG 076 regimen (27), the  recommendations suggest that AZT should be included as a component of antenatal HAART  whenever possible.  AZT is known to readily cross the placenta, and the fetus may have inhibitory  levels of therapy present during the birthing process (37).     If not required for maternal health, HAART used in pregnancy primarily to prevent vertical  transmission has recently been termed Pregnancy Limited Antiretroviral Therapy (PLAT) and is  distinct from HAART used for adult therapy for two main reasons.  To avoid exposing the fetus to  ART during major organogenesis and also to minimize toxicities, PLAT is often initiated following  a detailed ultrasound at 18‐19 wks of GA.  Treatment is discontinued immediately following  delivery (at approximately 40 wks GA), and so mother and fetus experience a relatively brief  period of drug exposure, as compared to patients who may be on HAART for many years.      The combinations of unique drugs used in pregnancy are also generally different from the first  line of drugs recommended for non‐pregnant adults.  Much uncertainty remains about the safety  of newer HAART regimens in pregnancy, and obstetricians often choose to prescribe older  regimens, with which they have had more clinically experience (38), with the longest experience  in pregnancy.  The most common combination of therapy prescribed for pregnant women in  British Columbia during the study period was a PI such as nelfinavir (NFV) or lopinavir boosted  with ritonavir (LPV/r), with a backbone of two NRTIs, most often AZT and lamuvidine (3TC).   Recently, availability of NFV was affected by evidence of a contaminant in the production of the  drug that temporarily ceased usage in all populations.  Prescribed dosages in pregnancy are the   8       same as for all non‐pregnant adults of both sexes, which were previously determined by  pharmaceutical licensure trials in largely male populations.     Of note, the HAART regimen of those women who are already on antiretroviral medications at  conception, for their own health, is reviewed to make sure it is as “pregnancy‐friendly” as  possible.    Standard clinical care of an HIV infected pregnant woman also includes monitoring of CD4 and  HIV viral load, and other HIV and pregnancy associated lab evaluations every 4‐6 wks throughout  the pregnancy. Prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocystis carinii (PCP)  and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is offered to women who are significantly  immunocompromised with CD4 counts of <200x106 cells/L.  Screening for other sexually  transmitted infections and for cervical cytologic abnormalities (Papanikolaou test) is also  recommended.     If there are no other obstetrical indications, a vaginal delivery is offered to women whose viral  load is <50 copies/mL at the onset of labour.  Alternatively, if either obstetrical indication exists  or the viral load is not fully suppressed, a caesarean section is offered, and then completed at  approximately 38‐39 wks GA.  Oral HAART medications are continued throughout labour, and IV  AZT is initiated either at the onset of regular contractions, at the time of ruptured membranes, or  2 hours (h) prior to a planned caesarean section.  Additionally, a single oral dose of nevirapine  (NVP) is administered intrapartum to women without adequate antenatal therapy.     Neonates are started on oral AZT prophylaxis within 6‐12 hour of birth and continue for up to 6  wks if the drug is well tolerated.  In addition, a single dose of NVP is given to an infant of a mother  who did not receive adequate antenatal prophylaxis.  Breastfeeding is contraindicated.  Infants  9       are tested regularly for the presence of HIV DNA by PCR; three consecutive negative PCRs before  six months of age is generally considered confirmation of the absence of HIV infection.  Maternal  antibodies, however, can be detected in the newborn up to 2 years of age.            SAFETY OF ANTIRETROVIRALS IN PREGNANCY  The decreased rate of vertical HIV transmission to less than one percent (3) through the use of  HAART, has shifted the emphasis of concern to the possible toxicity, teratogenicity and general  safety of these agents in pregnancy.   Data originating from a few publications describing  prospective and retrospective HIV infected ART exposed pregnancy cohorts have identified some  associated outcomes; however, the macro‐level initiative of the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry  has also been valuable in providing “an early signal of any major teratogenic effect associated  with a prenatal exposure,” that might have been missed in individual cohort studies due to low  levels of incidence. The Registry depends on the voluntary efforts of physicians to collect and  evaluate outcomes associated with non‐experimental pregnancy exposures to antiretroviral  products and collects information from all over North America and Europe (39).    Another description of a drug’s safety profile in pregnancy comes from the United States Food  and Drug Administration (US FDA).  Antiretrovirals available for use in the United States are  designated a specific class, depending on what is known from animal toxicity data, case reports,  or registry data (Table 1); this classification may guide recommendations for administration to  pregnant women.    10         Table 1.  US FDA Pregnancy Class of Antiretroviral Drugs (36)  Class  A   Description  Adequate and well‐controlled studies have failed to demonstrate  a risk to the fetus in the first trimester of pregnancy (and there is  no evidence of risk in later trimesters).  Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to  the fetus and there are no adequate and well‐controlled studies  in pregnant women OR Animal studies which have shown an  adverse effect, but adequate and well‐controlled studies in  pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in  any trimester.   ART  none          NRTI  Didanosine (ddI)    Emtricitabine  (FTC)    Tenofovir (TDF)  NNRTI  Nevirapine (NVP)  PI  Atazanavir (ATZ)  B    Darunavir     Nelfinavir (NFV)    Ritonavir (RTV)    Saquinavir (SQV)  EI*  Enfuvirtide     Maravaroc   Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the  NRTI  Abacavir (ABC)  fetus and there are no adequate and well‐controlled studies in    Lamuvidine (3TC)  humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in    Staduvine (d4T)  pregnant women despite potential risks.    Zalcitabine (ddC)    Zidovudine (AZT)  C  NNRTI  Delavirdine  PI  Amprenavir     Fosamprenavir     Indinavir  (IDV)    Lopinavir (LPV)  II#  Raltegravir   There is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse  NNRTI  Efavirenz (EFV)  reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or    D  studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the  drug in pregnant women despite potential risks.  Studies in animals or humans have demonstrated fetal  none    abnormalities and/or there is positive evidence of human fetal  X  risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or  marketing experience, and the risks involved in use of the drug in  pregnant women clearly outweigh potential benefits.  *EI: Entry Inhibitors including Fusion Inhibitors and CCR5 inhibitors   #II: Integrase Inhibitors      One drug, efavirenz (EFV), has been strongly associated with central nervous system  malformations in newborns when administered to pregnant cynomolgus monkeys  (40) and case  reports have identified human malformations (including neural tube defects) as a result of 1st  trimester in utero exposure (41;42).  The drug thus has an US FDA classification of D and is  contraindicated for use in the first trimester of pregnancy (36).      11       All other ART medications fall into either US FDA classification B or C (36), indicating that  possibility of risk associated with use during the first (and second or third) trimester of  pregnancy has not been eliminated.   Of note, NVP is now indicated for use in pregnant women  with CD4 counts below 250x106 cells/L, as it was shown to have associations with high  incidences of hepatoxicity and Stevens Johnson syndrome in women whose CD4 was greater than  250x106 cells/L (43).  Maternal mortality due to these toxicities resulted in an FDA warning, but  NVP remains labelled as a US FDA class B drug (36).     Beyond the US FDA classifications, data about various cellular toxicities related to antiretroviral  exposure originates almost singularly from non‐pregnant adults; this depth of research is  generally not available for pregnant women of for exposed infants.   Of note, in the effort to  prevent HIV transmission, fetuses are being exposed in utero for up to 40 wks to HIV therapies  that generally are known to readily cross the placenta (44). Varying HAART‐associated toxicities  during pregnancy have been described:    i.  HYPERTENSION – several studies, including Bucceri et al. 2002, have shown an elevated rate   of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) in HAART treated HIV infected pregnancies  (45‐47).  Previously, data demonstrated a higher rate of PIH only in HAART treated  women vs. HIV infected untreated women, but rates were similar to HIV negative controls  (48). Most recently, a study from Barcelona noted increased rates of HAART related pre‐ eclampsia when compared to the general population of pregnant women (49).    ii.  DIABETES – the stated risk of gestational diabetes in HIV infected HAART treated   pregnancies is 20‐25% (50;51).  By comparison, the rate of gestational diabetes for the  general pregnant population in British Columbia is 6.7% (52).     12       iii.  PRE TERM DELIVERY – Given that pre‐term infants have higher rates of complications and   poorer neonatal outcomes the lowest proportion of pre term deliveries is desirable.  Published data, although varied, has associated HAART with inappropriate rates of  pre  term delivery. A small Swiss cohort study originally showed that therapy was associated  with a 33% risk of pre term delivery (53), while the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group  found a rate of 66% (54).  A more recent publication linked only PI containing regimens  with pre term delivery (55), supported by another cohort that associated NFV only to pre  term delivery (56). Alternatively, an American meta‐analysis reported that no association  was found between HAART and pre term delivery (57).     iv.  LOW BIRTH WEIGHT – low birth weight in ART exposed infants has been seen throughout   the literature (53‐55).  While several studies have associated PIs with very low birth  weight, authors have also consistently stated their belief that it is the severity of HIV  infection in the PI treated women that is responsible for this outcome.  A large (645  women) multicentre study recently reported that HAART is associated with low birth  weight when compared to mono or dual therapy (56).    v.  HEPATOTOXICITY – recent studies have reported a significant rate of abnormal   transaminases while using saquinavir/ritonavir during pregnancy.   A total of 31% of  subjects in an Irish cohort had abnormal lab results, ranging from grade one to three,  within two to four wks of initiating treatment, and necessitating regimen changes in a  fraction of the group (58).     vi.  MITOCHONDRIAL TOXICITY – NRTIs are known to inhibit mitochondrial DNA polymerase   gamma, which may result in mitochondrial DNA/RNA depletion and possible  mitochondrial dysfunction (59;60)  and clinical conditions such as myopathy, neuropathy,  13       hyperlatatemia or fatty liver (37).  Case reports suggest that these toxic effects are more  pronounced in pregnant women (61) and may also affect exposed infants.       These outcomes are of significant concern in HAART treated pregnancies, but the role of other  risk factors should also be considered.  Smoking and injection drug use are known to be  confounders of pregnancy outcomes including low birth weight and HIV clinical status might also  impact rates of complications or differing responses with HAART during pregnancy.         PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PREGNANCY & DRUG DISPOSITION        Outside the context of HIV, the use of many medications during pregnancy has long necessitated  consideration of the general safety and toxicity of drugs for both mother and fetus.  These  potential toxicities are directly related to drug exposure, causing maternal drug levels as well as  transplacental transfer to become relevant.  In general, drug concentrations in pregnant women  are not known; clinical thresholds have traditionally been determined in non‐pregnant adult  populations, but it is evident that the physiological changes associated with pregnancy may alter  the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of drugs.  These changes can result in both lower levels  (necessitating higher, or more frequent dosing) and higher levels (requiring decreased dosing),  and become especially pronounced from the end of the second trimester onwards.   The  alterations in the body’s physiology that can result in changes in drug concentration can be  categorized in four areas: absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion.     ABSORPTION:  A wide range of changes can alter the body’s uptake of orally dosed drugs.   Vomiting   and nausea that accompany the first trimester may simply lower gastrointestinal absorption,  while heightened cardiac output may increase absorption from the stomach and small intestine  14       due to increased blood flow (62). Progesterone is known to relax smooth muscles, resulting in  reduced gastrointestinal motility and increased emptying time.  Pregnant women also have a 40  percent decrease in gastric acid secretion (when compared to non‐pregnant women), and  increased mucus secretion, causing the ionization, and absorption of weak acids and bases to be  altered through changes in pH and buffering capacity (63), also decreasing absorption.  Although  no antiretroviral drugs are inhaled, the increased pulmonary blood flow associated with  pregnancy favours the absorption of drugs taken by inhalation.     DISTRIBUTION:  The increase in plasma volume by 50 percent, and total water content of the body   by 8 litres, causes the peak serum concentration (Cmax) of many drugs to decrease in pregnancy  (63). The rate of distribution, however, is generally increased (62) due to higher cardiac output  and increased blood flow.   There are also increased stores of body fat (64).  Protein binding  during pregnancy is also affected by the large change in plasma volume. As plasma volumes  rapidly increase, the production of maternal serum albumin and other plasma proteins cannot  keep pace, and the proportion of circulating proteins decreases.   This often reduces a drug’s  binding affinity, and results in higher serum concentrations of the drug’s unbound or free  fraction.  The free concentration is the pharmacologically active form and is also available for  biotransformation and elimination (64).     METABOLISM: Hepatic metabolism is variably affected during pregnancy.  Progesterone is thought   to induce a higher rate of metabolism in the liver by stimulating hepatic microsomal enzyme  activity such as cytochrome P‐450 (CYP) 3A4 and CYP2D6.  Alternatively, it acts through  competitive inhibition of microsomal oxidases to hinder the elimination of other drugs through  the down‐regulation of CYP1A2.   Estrogen may also affect hepatic drug metabolism through its  cholestatic properties (63).      15       EXCRETION: Renal excretion of certain drugs is augmented due to higher renal plasma (increased   by 25‐50% (64)) and glomerular filtration rate (increases progressively by up to 50% through  pregnancy) in the kidneys (62).   Drug elimination also occurs through respiration and the  increased pulmonary function during gestation makes this route more important (62).     PK data on pregnant women is necessary to understand altered drug disposition, and to  determine if a drug’s potential toxicities increase due to these changes.   It is unknown whether  the magnitude of these changes warrants a change in dosing for many commonly used drugs, as  they may have a negating effect on each other.  Previous studies have shown that pregnant  women with epilepsy experience an increased frequency of seizures thought to be associated  with subtherapeutic drug levels (64); similarly, pregnant women on an antidepressants require  increased doses to maintain adequate serum drug concentrations (64).     A review by Little (62) looked at a number of studies and found that information on PK in  pregnancy is challenging to interpret because explicit quantitative dosing or scheduling  recommendations are not given and there is often conflicting data on the same therapies. Little  also highlights the implications of these studies by showing that the reported peak plasma  concentration, steady state, and drug half life all decreased in pregnancy, while both the reported  volume of distribution and drug clearance increased, in more than 30 percent of the  investigations reviewed.    The physiologic changes of pregnancy and their impact on drug disposition are of great concern  in the context of HIV as the negative implications of varied antiretroviral PKs in non‐pregnant  adult populations has been well described in the literature.       16       THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING OF ANTIRETROVIRALS    Adequate plasma levels of ART are required to effectively suppress the virus and permit immune  reconstitution (65).  Those individuals with drug levels that fall below certain parameters when  measuring peak plasma concentration (Cmax), minimum plasma concentration (Cmin), area  under concentration‐time curve (AUC) etc., have increased risk for treatment failure (incomplete  viral suppression) and for developing drug resistance (66;67).  Previous studies, using early  antiretroviral drugs, showed that up to 50% of patients failed to reach viral suppression on  various therapies (68),  and of those that did suppress, between 10‐50%  rebounded within one  year of follow‐up (69;70). Increased knowledge of drug interactions and resistance, as well as  newer, highly potent drugs have improved those outcomes.  Drug concentrations that exceed  recommended levels may also be associated with increased toxicity and incidence of adverse  events (71;72).  The role of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of ART is therefore to assess  whether measured plasma concentrations fall within an optimum therapeutic window (73).      While the cause of treatment failure is generally multifactorial and may include viral resistance to  therapy, adherence, food (absorption), liver function, GI abnormalities, toxicities, and  concomitant medications, the information garnered through TDM ultimately allows an initial  insight into a patient’s interaction with the drugs and how individualization of treatment through  dose adjustments or change of therapy could be approached (74).      Given the increasing complexity of HAART regimens (there are currently 25 US FDAA approved  drugs in 5 classes and many new drugs in development), it is important to consider the utility of  TDM for different drugs. NRTIs are often used in combination to act as a therapy’s backbone.  The  active moiety of this class is a triphosphate anabolite that causes the termination of DNA  elongation through the absence of the 3’‐hydroxyl group. These drugs require intracellular  17       phosphorylation to become substrates for the reverse transcriptase, and the intracellular levels  of two NRTIs, AZT and 3TC, have shown only a weak correlation to nucleoside plasma  concentrations (75;76). The extensive procedure required to measure intracellular triphosphate  levels makes its use, and TDM of NRTIs in general, impractical in the clinical setting (77).        The NNRTIs also target the HIV‐1 reverse transcriptase by binding close to the enzyme’s catalytic  active site and inhibiting reverse transcription. NNRTIs generally have prolonged half‐lives,  sufficient maintenance of steady state concentrations, and very little PK variability.   The  consistency and PK robustness of these drugs have previously lowered the need for TDM.    The third, widely used, class of ART is the PIs.  PIs prevent the cleavage of nascent viral proteins  for viron assembly, and lead to the production of non‐infectious viral particles.  Generally, better  and more durable clinical outcomes are seen when most PIs are boosted with a low dose of a  second PI, ritonavir, and one pharmaceutical formulation combines both drugs in a single pill. As  Van Heeswijk describes, PIs satisfy the four requirements for TDM (78):    1. There is a relatively simple method to measure PI plasma levels.  2. A strong correlation between PI plasma concentrations and virologic response has been  described.   3. There is large intra and inter patient variability of PI plasma concentrations, despite  standard dosing and regimens.  4. The short‐term direct clinical effect of PIs is difficult to assess given the slow progression  of HIV.          18       The clinical utility of TDM for PIs, however, is highly dependant on choosing an appropriate PK  parameter and establishing a target drug level for patient populations.  Altering drug levels  predictably with changes in dosing, and achieving an appropriate virologic response is also  necessary.        MEASURES AND TARGET THRESHOLDS FOR ANTIRETROVIRAL TDM    Published studies of antiretroviral PKs in the clinical setting have generally utilized four  measures: AUC, Cmax, Cmin, and concentration ratio (CR) (Figure 1).  Each measure and its  associated target threshold has been correlated to clinical outcomes in specific patient  populations (virologic suppression, development of resistance, etc.) with varying results, but it  remains unclear how drug concentrations should be interpreted and at what time they should be  measured (78).  The four options and supporting body of literature are explored below.    19                  Figure 1.  Pharmacokinetic Measures for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring  Area under the time‐concentration curve is found by plotting the concentrations of serial blood  samples versus the time in minutes after dosing and then calculating the area that falls below the  trend line.   Cmax represents the concentration drawn at the time of the dosing interval where  the most amount of drug is thought to be present in the plasma. Similarly, Cmin is drawn when  the least amount of drug is present.  A concentration ratio is found by dividing the patient’s  concentration by the concentration found at the exact same time on a constructed population  curve.         20       Area Under the Curve (AUC) is determined from a full PK profile, with serial blood sampling over  a dosing interval (approximately a 12h period for twice daily (BID) regimens).  The plasma  concentration at each time point is then plotted, connected via a curve, and the area under the  curve calculated.  An AUC value represents the total amount of drug in the bloodstream after a  specific dose, and is a useful measure to look at drug‐drug and drug‐food interactions and how a  patient generally handles a medication.  From the AUC, other parameters can also be calculated  including clearance, half‐life and volume of distribution. The literature relating AUC values to  virologic response to therapy is sparse; an investigation of monotherapy saquinavir established  which AUC gave maximal viral suppression, (79) and one further study did show a statistically  significant correlation between AUCs of NVP and IDV and rate of HIV RNA decline (80).     AUC, Cmax and Cmin are often closely correlated, but evidence from the study of other  antimicrobial agents show a distinction between these parameters in terms of pharmacokinetic‐ pharmacodynamic relationships (PK‐PD) (78).  Cmax is the highest concentration of drug in the  plasma after a dose, and is thought to occur at a specific time after dosing for each drug.   It is  most often correlated to rates of adverse events: the Cmax from patients experiencing side effects  on ritonavir were found to be significantly higher than those of control patients not experiencing  side effects (81).  Similarly, high levels of EFV have been linked to development of insomnia (82),  and increased levels of IDV associated with increased urological complaints (71).  As for AUC,  published literature has failed to widely demonstrate a relationship between Cmax and virologic  response.     Alternatively, the Cmin, or trough concentration, represents the point over a dosing interval with  the lowest plasma concentration of a drug, and therefore the point at which the plasma  concentration may be insufficient to prevent viral replication.  It is widely accepted in the   21       literature that in order to prevent virologic failure, a patient’s Cmin should always be greater  than a clinically relevant threshold.    Defining the necessary clinically relevant threshold, however, is difficult, as the potency of each  antiretroviral drug has traditionally been established in vitro.  Inhibitory Concentrations (IC), or  IC95 and IC50 values, are the in vitro concentrations needed to inhibit 95% and 50% of wild‐type  viral replication respectively.  Many antiretrovirals, however, bind to plasma proteins leaving  only the free concentration to inhibit viral replication.  To adjust for protein binding, novel IC95  and IC50 values have been measured in the presence of 50% human sera.   These values, named  minimum effective concentration (MEC) remain only approximations of in vivo ICs and there are  irregularities among reported values.  The simplest in vivo translation (and threshold for TDM) is  that the Cmin should be higher than the designated IC (83) or MEC (84) values.     Cmins have also been directly correlated to virologic response, and were found to be more  predictive than either AUC or Cmax.  In a study of 156 HIV‐1 infected NFV treated patients,  Pellegrin et al. found that Cmin was associated with virologic success, but AUC was similar  between success or failure (85).  Similar results were found with both indinavir (86) and  atazanavir (87‐89).    The Inhibitory Quotient (IQ) is an alternate adaptation of Cmin for TDM that corrects for viral  resistance (90).  The IQ can be calculated several different ways using the patient’s Cmin value  over a resistance measure related to specific viral isolates (IQ=Cmin/Resistance Measure).   Resistance measures originate from the individual’s genotype or phenotype resistance report or  from a calculated normalized population value and might include the total number of minor and  major PI mutations or the fold change (degree of difference in sensitivity between wild‐type virus  and the patient’s virus) (90). However, there has been a lack of standardization in the  22       calculation of IQ (90), and the potential variability of IQ between patients could be as large as  100% (84).  The majority of publications demonstrate a statistical correlation between IQ and  virologic response, especially in treatment experienced patients (88;91;92).     The final measure, the CR, uses a “time matched population value” to determine if drug plasma  concentrations are adequate. HIV‐1 infected, control patients, completed full twelve hour PK  profiles the medians were used to construct a standardized population PK curve.  Random  samples from a larger population were collected, and the time from ingestion of dose to blood  draw recorded.  The concentrations of these samples (patient values) were then divided by the  value taken from the point on the population curve that matched the time after drug  administration (time adjusted population value) (see Figure 1).  This ratio was named the CR and  an original publication documented that NFV and SQV CRs were statistically correlated with  more rapid viral decay, and were independent of baseline CD4 values (93).    The considerable discrepancies among assays used for TDM, as well as the marked inter‐ and  intra‐patient variablity  (upwards of 65%) of selected parameters, make it difficult to determine  which parameters (AUC, Cmax, Cmin, or CR) are best correlated to clinical outcomes (78).  A  single target threshold value also assumes that the susceptibility of all viral isolates is similar, and  does not adjust for drug resistance (with the exception of the IQ). Moreover, the logistical  difficulties associated with AUC, Cmin (especially with NFV, where trough values often do not  accurately reflect the dosing Cmin (94) or Cmax (difficult to measure in reality because it is  impossible to predict when it is reached in a particular patient on any given day (95)) make their  widespread use difficult.  These issues are not unique to ART, and persist in sectors where TDM  has been employed for many years (78).    23       PREGNANCY AND ANTIRETROVIRAL PHARMACOKINETICS        The  possibility  of  altered  ART  PKs  becomes  particularly  relevant  in  the  context  of  pregnancy,  especially given the accompanying physiologic changes.  Inadequate levels of ART may result in  slow  and  incomplete  viral  suppression,  increasing  the  risk  of  vertical  transmission  and  development  of  viral  resistance.  Alternatively,  excess  drug  concentrations  may  result  in  increased toxicities to both mother and infant.     Exploring  ART  PKs  in  this  population  is  a  relatively  new  field;  there  are  only  a  few  published  studies and abstracts, with only one considering the PK‐PD effects.  Emphasis in the literature has  been placed on investigating the drugs that are most widely used in pregnancy, such as AZT, NVP,  NFV  and  LPV/r.  Current  knowledge  about  each  of  these  drugs’  disposition  in  pregnancy  is  explored below.    AZT  AZT  is  perhaps  the  antiretroviral  drug  used  most  in  pregnancy  and  best  described  in  the  literature,  as  it  has  been  extensively  used  in  clinical  settings.    Two  different  groups  specifically  studied  AZT  PK  in  pregnancy  with  conflicting  results,  as  one  study  reported  that  AZT  PK  in  pregnancy  was  no  different  from  non  pregnant  adults  (96),  while  the  other  found  a  significant  decrease  of  33  percent  for  the  AUC,  when  samples  taken  during  pregnancy  were  compared  against  those  from  post  partum  (97).      Despite  unresolved  discrepancies,  the  recommended  dosing of AZT for pregnant women remains the same as for non‐pregnant adults.    3TC   The pharmacokinetics of 3TC were studied in the context of a short course of monotherapy, or in  combination with AZT.   Ten women were enrolled in each arm.   Plasma concentrations of 3TC  24       drawn at 38 wks were statistically similar in study both arms (mono versus dual therapy), and  were also statistically similar to concentrations drawn at one week post partum (98).  Prescribed  dosing of 3TC for pregnant women is standard adult dosing.     NEVIRAPINE    NVP was used widely in pregnancy because of its fast absorption and prolonged elimination;  however, it was associated with numerous cases of life threatening toxicities Stevens‐Johnson  Disease (rash and liver toxicity) (43), and is now indicated only for individuals with CD4 counts  of less than 250x106 cells/L that require potent NNRTIs.      A study of 18 pregnant women showed steady state NVP concentrations similar to the general  adult population (99) while recently published investigations in 26 women showed that  antepartum levels were similar to those postpartum (100).  Both these studies suggest that NVP  PKs are not significantly altered by pregnancy.  Alternatively, a study of 45 pregnant women and  152 non‐pregnant women receiving NVP found that pregnancy has a moderate but significant  lowering effect on plasma concentrations (101).    NELFINAVIR   NFV  has  been  widely  used  in  pregnancy  as  it  is  well  tolerated  with  little  side  effects,  and  has  a  favorable  safety  and  efficacy  profile.    Standard  dosing  is  1250  mg  NFV  BID.    Of  note,  50%  of  circulating NFV is metabolized into the active metabolite hydroxy‐tert‐butylamide (M8).     Two  case  studies  documenting  TDM  of  NFV  in  pregnancy  presented  women  with  consistently  sub‐optimal  plasma  concentrations,  who  initially  had  good  viral  suppression,  but  ultimately  developed  virologic  breakthrough.    In  one  case,  the  woman’s  NFV  dose  was  incrementally  increased,  and  the  virus  became  undetectable  for  the  remainder  of  the  pregnancy,  through  to  25       delivery (102).  Despite dosing interventions, the other case maintained detectable viremia until  delivery;  mutations  associated  with  all  three  drugs  used  for  therapy  were  noted  shortly  after  delivery (103).    There  have  been  several  studies  documenting  12h  PK  profiles  of  NFV  in  pregnant  women.  An  early  study  found  that  14/17  women  met  an  AUC  target  of  >15mg/h/mL  antepartum,  while  10/11  women  met  the  target  6  wks  post  partum.    Post  partum  AUCs  were  higher  than  antepartum  AUCs  (104).    Conversely,  another  study  with  9  women  (14  visits)  during  the  third  trimester found that diminished NFV AUC was not evident, and that plasma values were widely  variable  (105).    When  samples  drawn  from  the  same  woman  ante‐  and  postpartum  were  compared, there was no consistency in the magnitude or sign of the measured differences (106).     Nellen et al. (107) showed that pregnant women generally have NFV CRs that are lower than non‐ pregnant women, and often also fall below the established clinically relevant threshold of 0.9 (see  methods section).  As NFV plasma concentrations have previously been shown to be independent  of  sex,  age  and  body  weight  (94)  the  authors  suggest  that  this  threshold  is  also  relevant  for  pregnancy. In  samples taken from 21 patients during the third trimester, the mean CR was found  to  be  0.84  ±  0.51,  the  median  0.88  (0.38‐1.13),  and  the  percent  of  the  population  with  CR  <0.9,  52.4%  (107).    CR’s  from  pregnant  patients  were  on  average  34%  lower  than  those  of  non‐ pregnant women after adjusting for HIV‐RNA load, CD4 count and HCV infection (107).  Of note,  all but one of the women with a CR <0.9 had an undetectable viral load at delivery, and none of  the infants were HIV infected.      A more recent study also documented reduced NFV exposure in the third trimester. Eight of 11  women who completed a 12h PK profile had subtherapeutic trough concentrations, and the Cmin  value was statistically lower than in non‐pregnant adults (108).  Abstracts presented at the 14th  26       Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in 2007, however, presented conflicting  results:  Read  et  al.  (109)  showed  decreased  exposure  to  NFV  in  the  third  trimester  when  compared  to  6‐12  wks  post  partum,  while  Aweeka  et  al.’s  (110)  findings  did  not  support  this  trend.     To  further  investigate  NFV  PKs  in  pregnancy  and  identify  patient  characteristics  that  influence  NFV (and M8) concentrations Hirt et al. developed an integrated PK model (111). Sixty nine non  pregnant women (129 samples), 60 pregnant women (87 samples), and 42 women (43 samples)  at  the  time  of  delivery  were  included  in  the  population  study.  Data  was  not  included  from  patients when repeated low compliance was suspected or if time since dosing exceeded 15h for  the  BID  regimen  (or  11h  for  TID).    The  model  showed  that  mean  plasma  clearance,  apparent  plasma  clearance  and  NFV/M8  ratios  were  consistent  with  previously  published  data  from  studies in pregnant women, but that the percentage of women with NFV plasma concentrations  above  1mg/mL  was  not  significantly  different  between  pregnant  and  non‐pregnant  women  (111).  The exception was day of delivery.  The authors concluded that NFV dosage should not be  changed in pregnancy, but might be doubled on the day of delivery (111).     LOPINAVIR   The boosted lopinavir concentrations of a cohort of 101 pregnant women were compared against  those of matched non‐pregnant controls, and found to be statistically lower.   The data from this  study also suggested that inadequate viral suppression by delivery was directly related to a low  lopinavir  Cmin  (112).    A  second  study  compared  samples  taken  at  thirty‐six  wks  GA  and  those  taken  at  6  wks  post  partum.  The  trend  showed  that  mean  antepartum  drug  levels  were  lower  than those from post partum, although this difference did not reach significance (110).       27          JUSTIFICATION / RATIONALE    The physiological changes in pregnancy may result in considerable alterations in ART  disposition, and published data on PK of ART in pregnancy remains inconsistent. Despite this,  clinicians are already prescribing increased doses to pregnant women, which may pose  unnecessary risk to the fetus.  Before considering a clinical trial of dose adjustments in  pregnancy, the significant limitations of the literature must be addressed. Variation of plasma  concentrations across GA has not been explored, a concentration–response (rate and  maintenance of viral suppression) relationship has not been developed, and there has been no  formal consideration of adherence.       It is also important to note that while early clinical trials showed a benefit of TDM (113;114), two  recent randomized studies found no overall difference in the clinical outcomes of the TDM vs  standard clinical care groups in non pregnant adults  (115;116).  Median trough concentrations  increased significantly more in the TDM arms, but there was no difference in the time to virologic  failure or in the proportions of patients achieving an undetectable viral load (115;116).         The complexities of using ART in pregnancy will only increase in years to come.  HIV infected  women are living longer, healthier lives, and in the process are being exposed to long periods of  therapy as well as potential multiple, short‐courses during pregnancies.  These exposures  increase the risk of resistance development, and may necessitate novel combinations of drugs in  future pregnancies to fully suppress the virus. A greater understanding of the disposition of these  agents in pregnancy will ultimately permit a balance between effective therapy to protect long  term maternal treatment options, while minimize the risk of perinatal infection and potential  toxicities to mother and fetus.    28         The impact of this greater understanding will extend beyond Canada to the developing world, as  every year 2.5 million HIV infected women deliver infants worldwide. Currently less than five  percent of these women receive some form of antiretroviral treatment (2); however, with  increased international initiatives and commitment from the United Nations General Assembly,  ART rollouts continue to escalate towards universal use.          HYPOTHESIS    The plasma concentrations of NFV vary across GA and show correlation to optimal viral  suppression in HIV‐1 infected pregnant women.       OBJECTIVES    To investigate the utility of random timed monitoring of PIs in pregnancy by:      1. evaluating plasma concentrations of NFV and LPV/r in HIV‐1 infected pregnant women    2. exploring correlations between plasma concentrations and maternal characteristics    3. determining if plasma NFV concentrations in pregnancy affect the rate and maintenance  of viral suppression in pregnancy  29          METHODS     STUDY DESIGN     This research paper examines the plasma concentrations of PIs in HIV‐1 infected pregnant  women accessing care from the Oak Tree Clinic (OTC) between December 2004 and September  2006.   Samples were collected as part of a prospective cohort study evaluating the mitochondrial  toxicity of HAART in pregnancy.      Random timed blood samples were chosen for collection because they best reflect the realistic  sampling in a population of diverse pregnant women with multiple social issues, including  demanding family responsibilities to partners and children.  Given these considerations, and the  already considerably frequent schedule of visits for care of HIV in pregnancy, it would be  impracticable to add separate or very specifically timed visits for PK studies in the standard  clinical care.       STUDY SETTING AND POPULATION    Patients were recruited for this study at OTC the Women and Family HIV Centre at the Children’s  and Women’s Health Centre of British Columbia (CWHCBC).  OTC is the tertiary referral  outpatient centre for all HIV infected children and pregnant women in the province, and also  provides care to HIV infected women, as well as their children and partners (117).     Established in 1994, the Oak Tree program utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach and  includes clinical team members in varying disciplines: adult and paediatric infectious disease  30       specialists, obstetrical and gynaecological infectious disease specialists, a nurse practitioner and  clinical nurse specialist, pharmacists, dieticians, social workers and outreach staff.     Currently, more than 500 adults (over 80% women) and 150 exposed and infected children  access care through OTC.  The clinic also manages approximately 30 HIV infected pregnancies  each year; either directly through clinic visits in Vancouver or in partnership with care providers  in more remote regions of the province.     The patients at OTC are diverse.  Patients include new Canadians from endemic regions such as  refugees from Africa and immigrants from South Asia, as well individuals actively using  substances of addiction, and those with no discernable HIV acquisition risk factors apart from  being sexually active.  Local women in correctional institutions who are infected also receive care  at the clinic.   Persons of aboriginal descent are over represented in the patient population, when  compared to provincial statistics.        SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATION    The major evaluation for this thesis is the comparison of plasma concentrations at different GAs  in pregnancy and their affect on rate and maintenance of viral suppression.  To establish a  medium effect size (0.25) difference in two groups, using an α error of 0.05 and a power of 0.80,  the total sample size needed is 128, with 64 subjects/samples per arm. G*Power 3 was used for  the calculation, set to F tests: Fixed effects, omnibus, one‐way.        31       STUDY VISITS AND SAMPLE COLLECTION    Patients were introduced to the study during a visit to OTC for obstetrical care, and were then  enrolled and consented by research staff.   In the months leading up to delivery, several study  visits were conducted for each subject, the vast majority concurrent to a regular clinic visit.     The first study visit for women not on therapy at conception aimed to capture baseline data for  the mitochondrial toxicity portion of the study, and when possible occurred prior to HAART  initiation.  The blood test results and data collected at this visit are not pertinent to this thesis,  and were not included.     Antenatal maternal blood samples for analysis of plasma drug  concentration were therefore collected twice with routine clinical blood work: once in late  second trimester / very early third trimester (between 18‐28 wks GA) and then again during mid  third trimester (between 32‐37 wks GA).     Maternal venous delivery samples were collected peripartum, and cord blood samples were  collected immediately following delivery.   Postpartum samples were collected with regular  clinical blood work.  All venous samples were drawn by phlebotomists at the accessioning lab at  Children’s & Women’s Health Centre of British Columbia using a butterfly catheter.     During study visits, each subject had an extensive conversation with OTC pharmacists to discuss  side effects associated with their HAART regimen, as well as any challenges they had encountered  in taking their medications.  As for all patients at the clinic, pillboxes and medication timers were  offered to study subjects to aid with their adherence.       An extended amount of time was also spent with the research staff, who established a positive  and trustful rapport with all the women.   During this time, subjects were asked to self describe  32       some demographic data, detail any missed antiretroviral doses or side effects they experienced,  as well as report the time of their last medication dose.  This last data variable was of particular  value to the study, and subjects were closely questioned as to whether the time of last dose had  actually been 10‐15 minutes earlier or later than reported.   All specimens included in the  analysis were associated with dosing times for which the subject was certain.        DATA COLLECTION    Data for this study was collected by patient self‐report during study visits and then verified and  supplemented using prospective chart review by research staff.   Two sets of charts were used to  complete the data set: standard maternal and infant hospital charts from CWHCBC and the  maternal and infant charts maintained independently at OTC.     OTC charts provide comprehensive information on a patient’s medical history and HIV status, as  updates by clinic physicians are documented after each medical assessment.  These updates  capture patient demographics, current and past clinical interventions, alcohol and drug use,  physical examination results, social circumstances etc.  During pregnancy this information is re‐ captured and updated in great detail on the British Columbia Reproductive Care Program  standard antenatal records, Part 1 & 2.  Further insight on patients’ well being is found in the  reports from the other OTC clinical services, reflecting the multidisciplinary team approach of the  clinic.  Copies of lab reports, specialized consults and letters from community service  organisations are also included.  OTC charts were thus the source for the majority of study data.   Delivery and in‐patient data (time of medication dosing, concomitant medications or medical  conditions etc), however, were collected for all patients from main hospital charts.    33       Demographic and clinical data was recorded on study‐specific data collection forms.  The data  was then inputted into the Smartlist To Go version 2.002, a data management program, on a  Palm® handheld device, and then synched into a Microsoft Access™ database.       VARIABLE IDENTIFICATION AND SELECTION    Variables included in the overall study database were established through a comprehensive  review of the relevant medical literature and discussion between the team of experienced  clinicians and scientists involved in the study.   Since the variables selected were relevant to the  clinical and molecular outcomes of the HAART toxicity component of the study, they were further  refined for the purpose of this thesis.   Factors that have previously been demonstrated to impact  upon the plasma concentrations of adults and rate and maintenance of viral suppression were  identified.      Considering the small sample size, the relatively low event rate, and the large number of selected  variables, the possibility of missing relationships between variables (Type II errors / false  negatives) exists.   The data analysis therefore attempted to consider only those questions or  trends that were theory based.        REPORTING ON ADHERENCE    Patient self‐reporting of adherence at each visit was completed using an AIDS Clinical Trial Group  (ACTG) Adherence questionnaire.   This questionnaire gathers information on multiple aspects of  adherence including doses missed in the last few days, doses missed in the last four months, how   34       regularly doses were taken on schedule during the day and how often doses were taken following  particular instructions, such as with or without food (Appendix 1).    An adherence index was calculated using the formula from a cross‐protocol analysis of the  questionnaire by Reynolds et al. (118).   This index optimizes the variation between subject  reports, and is normed to give a range of adherence between 0 and 100.   This tool was found to  be strongly associated with pVL outcomes, and compare well with estimates based on medication  event monitoring system data (118).       DETERMING DRUG PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS    The plasma concentrations of PIs and NNRTIs were simultaneously assayed by a validated and  sensitive method using high‐pressure liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass  spectrometry (HPLC MS‐MS) (119;120) by technicians at the BC Centre for Excellence in  HIV/AIDS.  Reverse‐phase HPLC was completed using the Zorbax XDB‐C18 column from Agilent  Technologies and MS‐MS by the API‐2000 system from Applied Biosystems.    Acetonitrile was used to precipitate out proteins from the plasma, and the sample was  centrifuged. An aliquot was then injected into the HPLC column with ammonium acetate for the  online extraction.   The second mobile phase used was methanol, which eluted the desired drugs.   The analytes were then analyzed by MS‐MS.    Reserpine (Sigma‐Aldrich) was used as the internal standard.   The quality control standard curve  accuracy for NFV ranged from 86.0‐111%, for LPV it was 90.8‐102%, and for RTV it was 95.2‐  35       113%.  The lower limit of quantification for NFV was 56ng/mL, for LPV was 98 ng/mL, and RTV  102 ng/mL.     The clinically relevant threshold for the random timed NFV plasma concentrations was set at 0.8  ug/L.  This is lower than the NFV Cmin efficacy threshold of >1.0 ug/L found by Pellegrin et al.  (85) for non‐pregnant adults in the VIRAPHAR study.   It is consistent with established guidelines  and published research on improved virologic response in paediatric patients (121), and is more  discriminating than the value used for associating un‐timed random samples to virologic failure  (120) or that found by Duval et al. in a study of 68 NFV treated patients (122).       PLASMA CONCENTRATION RATIOS    NFV CRs were found using a protocol first published by Burger et al. (66;114) and then further  developed by Baede‐van Dijk et al. (94).   The published PK population curve was constructed using blood samples taken between 0‐12h  following morning dosing. The median plasma concentrations from 30 min time groups were  used for the fitting procedure, as well as additional knowledge about previously constructed  plasma concentration‐time curves (94).  The curve was derived from 618 samples obtained from  355 patients taking NFV at 1250 mg BID.   The patients were 80% male, an average age of 38  (range 18‐74) years old, and had an average weight of 74 (range 37‐119) kg.     For each sample collected in this study, the ratio of the plasma NFV concentration determined by  HPLC MS‐MS, to the point on population curve matching the time since last dose, was calculated.   This represented the NFV CR.   36         The clinically relevant threshold was set at a CR of 0.9, as initially established through a receiver  operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using samples from 48 patients (66).   It was  further verified in more extensive studies, and predicts virologic failure with a sensitivity of 64%  and a specificity of 74% (p=0.014) (66;94;114).  This threshold has been previously used for NFV  CRs in pregnancy, allowing comparisons to published data (107).       DEFINITION OF REMAINING VARIABLES     Maternal demographic and clinical data was abstracted from a combination of OTC and BC  Women’s Hospital Charts or self‐described by the patient.     Maternal HIV Serostatus. All HIV blood testing in the province is completed by the BC Centre for  Disease Control (BCCDC) and includes an enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and a  Western Blot test. Confirmation of maternal HIV serostatus was obtained, and copy of positive  tests results were placed in the patient’s clinic chart.     Ethnicity was self‐described by each woman.   Categories were those used by Health Canada for  positive HIV test results and AIDS reporting.  “Aboriginal” includes all women of First Nation,  Metis and Inuit descent. “Black” describes all African, Caribbean, and African‐Canadian women in  the study.  “Asian” women include those from Asia (Japan, Korea, Thailand, Philippines etc.), as  well as from South and West Asia (India, Pakistan etc.) (123).    Maternal Age (years) at the time of delivery was calculated from the recorded maternal date of  birth.   37         HIV Exposure Category. Probable mode of HIV acquisition was self‐reported by each woman.   Exposure categories include IDU, unprotected heterosexual intercourse, iatrogenically by  infected blood products or needles , perinatal transmission and unknown. If more than one  exposure category was reported, a woman was assigned to a single exposure category according  to a slightly modified version of Health Canada’s established hierarchy of HIV‐related risk factors.    This approach is used for the national reporting of each positive HIV test or AIDS case report,  where a case is classified by the highest category of the hierarchy (Appendix 2) (123).     Pre­Pregnancy Weight. A patient’s most recent weight (kg) prior to conception was abstracted  from clinic charts.  If data was unavailable from the chart, the patient self‐reported this value.    History of Exposure to ART. Detailed information on previous exposure to ART was abstracted  from physician reported histories and pharmacy order sheets from the BC Centre for Excellence  in HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program (provides all ART to patients in BC).   Names of all specific  medications, regimens/combinations and length of exposure were recorded.    Gestational Age of events (GA). The estimated date of delivery (EDD) for each patient was  abstracted from the BC Women’s Hospital Ultrasound report closest to delivery.  GA (wks) for  each event was then calculated with the formula: GA=40‐(EDD‐date of event)/7.    Current Weight in Pregnancy. Patients’ weight (kg) was measured at each study visit and  closest to delivery, and recorded in the clinic chart and on study data collection forms.    Current Use of Substances of Addiction.  Use of substances of addiction (y/n) was self‐ described by each woman.  Time periods of use were categorized as i) use ever (prior to  38       pregnancy),  ii) use in pregnancy prior to 1st study visit , iii) use between study visits.  Substances  of addiction included tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines.    Concomitant Medications of Interest. All concomitant medications, including vitamins, taken  by a patient during pregnancy were recorded on study data collection forms.  Medications of  interest, known to have drug‐drug interactions with NFV, were then identified through the  Thompson MICROMEDEX database (Apendix 3).  Patients were categorized as having taken any  of these medications or not.     Plasma HIV­1 RNA levels, pVL (copies/mL) were determined using the Roche Amplicor Monitor  assay (versions 1.5; Roche Diagnostics) via the UltraSensitive preparation, at the UBC Virology  Lab.   The assay’s quantification limit was ≤50 copies/mL.    Steady state. Samples were determined to be in steady state from the patient‐reported  questionnaire on adherence, representing the point at which drug absorption is approximately  the same as drug elimination, which is theoretically established after 5‐6 half‐lives of most  medications.   The drug terminal half‐life of NFV is 2.5‐5h, and is 5‐6h for LPV/r.   In practical  terms, a sample was considered to be in steady state if, at the time of blood draw, there had been  no missed doses in the previous three days and if the regimen had been initiated more than two  wks prior.    Viral Resistance Profile.   Viral resistance phenotypes for some patients were determined  through the identification of mutations (base variation in target amino acid sequences) encoded  in the viral genetic information.   The mutations were correlated to a change in effectiveness of  drug potency, permitting the development of a phenotypic profile for each antiretroviral agent.   Profiles were completed at the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS.   39       Alanine Aminotransferase, ALT (Normal Reference Range 10‐55 U/L).  No patients had clinical  manifestation due advanced Hepatitis B or C disease, and, as such ALT was used as a marker of  active liver inflammation in the context of chronic Hepatitis B or C infection.  Results were  available from the hospital lab departments at CWHCBC.    Absolute CD4 Count, (Normal Reference Range 300‐1400 x106 cells/L) was used as a measure of  immune status. Results were available from the hospital lab departments at CWHCBC and were  determined by flow cytometry.    Hepatitis Serology.  All testing for Hepatitis is conducted at the BCCDC and includes testing for  active Hepatitis C  virus (by PCR) or Hepatitis B virus (by detection of surface antigen) infections,  as well as previous natural exposure (HCV antibody, HBV core antibody).  Confirmation of  maternal serostatus was obtained, and copy of positive tests results were placed in the patient’s  clinic chart.     Infant Birth Weight was available from the Provincial Labour and Delivery Summary or the  Provincial Neonatal Record Part 1.    Infant HIV Serostatus.  Infant infection was determined by PCR detection of HIV‐RNA.  Two  positive results on different occasions indicated a HIV infection in the infant.  Alternatively, two  negative PCRs taken on different occasions at more than 1 month of age is indicative that the  infant is not HIV infected.  A final negative PCR and a negative ELISA/Western Blot at 18 months  of age, confirms an absence of infection and demonstrates the loss of maternal antibodies.        40       ANALYSIS PLAN    Data analysis was conducted using Microsoft Excel™ and SPSS® statistical software.     Objective 1:       •  compare plasma concentrations and CRs from 18‐28 wks to those from 32‐ 37 wks and time of delivery       A one‐way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures was used to test for a  difference in the means of the three groups.  Differences in the medians were tested using the  Mann Whitney U Test, and comparison of related samples was done using the Wilcoxon signed‐ rank test.   Pearson Chi square tests were used to compare the number of subjects at each time  point that had a plasma concentration or CR above the clinically relevant threshold.       Objective 2:       •  identify associations between variables of interest and plasma  concentrations at each time point       Univariate and multivariate linear regression models were used to investigate if variables of  interest were associated with differing plasma levels.   Both raw plasma concentrations and CRs  were used as the dependent variable.       Objective 3:       •  evaluate association of plasma NFV concentrations and CRs to rate of viral  suppression   •  investigate the relationship between time to undetectable plasma viral  load and possible co‐variants   •  compare variables of patients who did not achieve or maintain  suppression to those who were fully suppressed through to delivery       To evaluate the association of plasma NFV concentrations and CRs to rate of viral suppression,  stratified survival curves with Kaplan Meier estimate, were used.  The number of days to pVL <50  41       copies/mL was the dependent variable, and the subjects were stratified by whether their mean  antepartum concentrations and first antepartum concentration after HAART initiation were  above or below the clinically relevant threshold.      To investigate the relationship between time to undetectable plasma viral load and possible co‐ variants, Cox proportional hazard models were used.  Again, using days to pVL <50 copies/mL as  the dependent variable.    Finally, the analysis to compare patients who did not achieve or maintain suppression to those  whose virus was fully suppressed through to delivery included the Student’s t‐test and Mann‐ Whitney U test to compare respectively, the means and medians of continuous data, and the  Pearson Chi square test was used to compare the number of subjects that had a plasma  concentration or CR above the established clinically relevant threshold.      ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS    This study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Board (#C04‐0540), Faculty of Medicine,  University of British Columbia (Appendix 4), and the Clinical Research Review Committee  (#CW04‐0212), CWHCBC, in Vancouver, Canada.      42       RESULTS  SUBJECT AND SAMPLE INCLUSION  Of the 52 women who enrolled in the study from Dec 2004 to September 2007, 40 subjects were  included in the final analysis and 12 subjects did not meet the inclusion criteria (Table 2).  We  restricted our analysis to HIV‐infected women who were treated with a NFV or LPV based  regimen and from whom at least one sample was collected in steady state, prior to delivery.     Table 2.  Subject Exclusion   # of  Subjects    4      1      4      1      2      12     Reason for Exclusion  Medication or PI other than NFV or LPV/r    Spontaneous abortion at 20 wks  No samples obtained in steady state  Patient not initiated on ART prior to delivery  Patients received majority of care outside OTC, insufficient samples  TOTAL     Samples were excluded from analysis if they were considered not to be in steady state or if the  blood collection occurred >14h after the last medication dose. One hundred and forty six samples  were collected and 126 (1‐6 samples per subject) samples were included in the final analysis  (Table 3).          43       Table 3.  Sample Exclusion  # of  Samples   Reason for Exclusion               9  11  20   Not in steady state from patient reported questionnaire  Blood draw >14h after last medication dose  TOTAL        SAMPLE CHARACTERISTICS  Eighty‐nine of the 126 (70.6%) total samples collected were of NFV. Forty nine antepartum NFV  samples were collected; 23 were drawn between 18‐28 wks and 26 were drawn between 32‐37  wks GA (Table 4).       The 27 delivery samples were drawn peripartum; 48.1% (13) were drawn prior to delivery, 9/13  within 24h. Of the 14 samples drawn after delivery, 13 were drawn within 24h.     Only 15 antepartum LPV/r samples were drawn; the sample size was too small for a complete  analysis, but allowed for some description.  Similarly, since no venous blood was drawn at the  exact same time that the cord samples were taken, no ratio of cord level : plasma level can be  calculated.   No analysis was completed using the cord samples.     Table 4.  Sample Distribution by Time Point             NFV  LPV/r  ALL        18‐28  wks   32‐37  wks     Delivery     Cord   Post Partum   Total   23   26   20   15   5   89   7   8   7   8   6   37   30   34   27   23   11   126   44         BASIC DEMOGRAPHICS    The subjects’ demographics show a diverse study population (Table 5).   Women self‐described  their ethnicity as Aboriginal (30.0%), Caucasian (30.0%), Black (25.0%) or Asian (15.0%) and  were born in Canada (62.5%), Africa (25.0%) or Asia (12.5%).   Women of visible minority or  aboriginal identity were over‐represented in the study population, compared to the provincial  population.    Twelve (30.0%) subjects had completed some college or university education and an additional  six (15.0%) had graduated from high school or received their General Educational Diploma.  Of  those remaining, 4 (10.0%) completed some grade school only, and 16 (40.0%) completed some  high school.      Half of the subjects were receiving social assistance at the time of the study; 7 (17.5%) were  employed in any way, and 13 (32.5) were unemployed and not receiving assistance.  Just over  half (52.5%) had an annual household income of <$15000.       The majority of study subjects reported a history of use of drugs of dependency at one point in  their lives.  When questioned about use of drugs of dependency in the current pregnancy, 16  (40%) admitted to using alcohol, and 16 (40%) to using illicit drugs.  Half of the patients (50%)  admitted to smoking in pregnancy, compared to 10.0% of pregnant women in BC (52).    Subjects were a mean age of 29.4 years of age at the time of delivery, and ranged from 16.7‐40.4  years, which was slightly lower than the provincial average for age at delivery of 30.4 years.   The  mean maternal weight pre‐pregnancy was 67.4 kg, and ranged from 45‐101 kg.    45       One quarter of the study subjects had ever been infected with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV  antibody positive), and ten percent had an active infection in pregnancy (HCV PCR positive).  Two  subjects (5.0%) were actively infected with the Hepatitis B Virus (HepB surface antigen positive).     Table 5.  Maternal General Demographics, n=40     MATERNAL RACE  Aboriginal  Caucasian  Black  Asian  COUNTRY OF ORIGIN  Canada   Africa   Asia             #  (%)  Mean (Range)      12  (30.0)  12  (30.0)  10  (25.0)  6  (15.0)    25  (62.5)  10  (25.0)  5  (12.5)   Population  Reference    4.8 % ¥  70 % ¥  0.7 % ¥  20 % ¥           MATERNAL EDUCATION  (highest level completed)  Grade school  Some high school  High school grad/GED  Any college/university  Unknown   4  16  6  12  2     (10.0)  (40.0)  (15.0)  (30.0)  (5.0)                MATERNAL EMPLOYMENT STATUS  Employed in any way  Not employed  Social Assistance  ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME  > $15000  USE OF SUBSTANCES OF ADDICTION  Illicit Drugs (EVER)  Alcohol in Pregnancy  Smoking in Pregnancy  Illicit Drugs in Pregnanc   7  (17.5)  13  (32.5)  20  (50.0)     19  (47.5)    23   (57.5)  16  (40.0)  20  (50.0)  16  (40.0)                    AGE   PRE‐PREGNANCY WEIGHT  CO‐INFECTIONS (CURRENT)  HCV antibody +ve   HCV RNA PCR +                HBV surface antigen +ve           29.4  (16.7‐40.4)  67.4  (45.0‐101.0)     10  (25.0)  4  (10.0)  2  (5.0)   10.7%  ‡    30.4 yrs ‡      66.8 per 100,000 population ∫  0.9 per 100,000 population ∫   Reference Population Definition:  ‡ Pregnant Women in British Columbia, 2006/2007 (52)  ∫ Reported cases in British Columbia, 2006 (124)  ¥ British Columbia Population, 2006 (125)   46       HIV RELATED DESCRIPTORS    Twenty‐five (62.5%) woman described their HIV exposure category as heterosexual contact, nine  (22.5%) as having most likely contracted HIV through IDU, and 6 (15.0%) iatrogenically through  infected needles or blood products (Table 6).      Twenty‐one (52.5%) subjects had exposure to ART prior to the current pregnancy, and 19  (47.5%) were ART naïve.  Seven women had previously been exposed to NFV, similarly, 7 women  had previously been exposed to LPV/r.  Seven women were on therapy at the time of conception;  for the remaining 33, the median GA at HAART initiation in pregnancy was 22.4 wks (IQR 19.6‐ 24.9 wks).    Baseline labs describe the status of the subject’s HIV infection.  The median CD4 nadir was 300 x  106 cells/L (IQR 170‐445 x 106 cells/L). The first CD4 count drawn in pregnancy for each subject  was determined and the median count was found: 365 x106 cells/L (IQR 278‐560 x106 cells/L).    The baseline median viral load was similarly established, and found to 3.58 log10 copies/mL (IQR  of 2.62‐4.22 log10 copies/mL).    Adherence was self‐described by each subject at each study visit.  The mean adherence was  94.8% with the highest adherence reported as 100%, and the lowest as 72.9%.     There were no cases of HIV vertical transmission.   47       Table 6. HIV Characteristics, n=40  # (%) Median (IQR) MODE OF HIV ACQUISITION Heterosexual contact IDU Blood products/Percutaneous  25 9 6  (62.5) (22.5) (15.0)  ART HISTORY Experienced Naïve  21 19  (52.5) (47.5)  7 7  (17.5) (17.5)  Previous exposure to NFV Previous exposure to LPV/r On therapy at conception or GA at HAART initiation LABORATORY CD4 Nadir (x10^6 cells/L) Baseline CD4 Baseline VL (log10 copies/mL)  ADHERENCE Mean (Range)  VERTICAL TRANSMISSION, no. (%)  7 (17.5) 22.39 (19.64-24.86)  300 (170-445) 365 (278-560) 3.58 (2.62-4.22)  94.8% (72.9-100%)  0 (0)  48       ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN PREGNANCY    All 40 women included in this analysis received ART during pregnancy; 29 (72.5%) received a  NFV based regimen, 9 (22.5%) received a LPV/r based regimen, and 2 (5.0%) were initiated on  NFV and then switched to LPV/r over the course of pregnancy (Figure 2).     The most common pair of NRTIs used for the regimen backbone was AZT and 3TC, known as  Combivir® when formulated together.  Three other NRTIs were prescribed in pregnancy: DDI,  D4T, and ABC, each used in combination with AZT and/or 3TC (Figure 2).       FIGURE 2.  Antiretroviral Therapy Regimens Prescribed in Pregnancy    The HAART combination of three to five unique drugs received by each subject in the study is  described.  The PI is captured first, followed by the NRTI backbone, and finally by the number of  subjects on that combination.   49            NELFINAVIR RAW PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS    The mean NFV concentrations at 18‐28 wks and 32‐37 wks were 2.64 and 2.05 μg/mL (p=0.138),  respectively; the median concentrations were 2.88 and 1.18 μg/mL (p=0.113), respectively.  Six  (26.1%) of 23 pregnant women had a concentration of <0.8μg/mL at 18‐28 wks, compared with  11 (42.3%) of 26 at 32‐37 wks.   Delivery samples had a mean of 1.42 μg/mL, a median of  1.21μg/mL, and 40.0% of samples were below the threshold (Table 7, Figure 3).     Table 7. Nelfinavir Raw Plasma Concentrations      NFV mean, μg/mL   (±SD)       NFV median, μg/mL  (IQR)      <0.8μg/mL, no.   (%) of samples     18‐28wks  (n=23)   32‐37wks  (n=26)   P #      Delivery   (n=20)     2.64 (±1.93)   2.05 (±1.87)   2.88   (0.79‐4.25)   1.18   (0.62‐3.56)   6   (26.1%)   11   (42.3%)   .138   1.42 (±1.13)      1.21    .113  (0.58‐1.93)     .235   8  (40.0%)     NOTE. IQR, interquartile range. SD, standard deviation.   # Student’s t test (mean), Mann‐Whitney U test (median) for continuous data, and χ2 test for  categorical data.     A one‐way repeated measures ANOVA found that samples drawn between 18‐28 wks and 32‐37  to be significantly higher than at delivery (p=.048).       50                FIGURE 3. Nelfinavir Plasma Concentrations  The concentration from each sample is plotted by time since last medication dose.  Clinically  relevant thresholds for raw concentrations and concentration ratios are indicated by dotted lines.    51          NELFINAVIR PLASMA CONCENTRATION RATIOS    The mean NFV CRs at 18‐28 wks and 32‐37 wks were 1.09 and 0.86, (p=0.133), respectively; the  median CRs were 1.05 and 0.70 (p=0.102), respectively.  Ten (43.1%) of 23 pregnant women had  a CR of <0.9 at 18‐28 wks, compared with 14 (53.8%) of 26 at 32‐37 wks.   Delivery samples had  a mean of 0.44, a median of 0.27, and 85.7% of samples were less than the clinically relevant  threshold (0.9) (Table 8, Figures 3,4).     Table 8.  Nelfinavir Plasma Concentration Ratios      NFV mean CR,   (±SD)      NFV median CR,  (IQR)      <0.9, no.   (%) of samples     18‐28wks  (n=23)   32‐37wks  (n=26)   P #      Delivery (n=20)    1.09 (± 0.73)  0.86 (±0.73)  1.05 (0.39-1.64)  0.70 (0.21-1.37)  10 (43.5%)  14 (53.8%)  0.44 (±0.50)  .133    .102    .471  0.27   (0.09‐0.62) 18   (85.7%)    NOTE. IQR, interquartile range. SD, standard deviation.   # Student’s t test (mean), Mann‐Whitney U test (median) for continuous data, and χ2 test for  categorical data.     A one‐way repeated measures ANOVA found that samples drawn between 18‐28 wks and 32‐37  wks had significantly higher CRs than at delivery (p=.049).   A Wilcoxon signed‐rank test was also  completed to compare the CRs of related samples.  Nineteen subjects had samples from both  antepartum time points and were included in the test (Figure 5).   The Wilcoxon signed ranked  statistic W was found to be ‐32, indicating that 32‐37 wk CRs were smaller than at 18‐28 wks, but  was not found to be statistically significant (p=0.26).  Fourteen subjects had two antepartum  samples and a delivery sample (n=14); Figure 6 shows the related samples.  52            Figure 4. Nelfinavir Concentrations Ratios  Concentration Ratios were plotted across GA.  Dotted lines show mean value for each group.    53                                                                                                   Figure 5. Comparison of Two Antepartum Concentration Ratios in Related Samples  Coloured lines represent the change in antepartum CRs for each patient.   The subjects were split  into two groups based on whether CRs increased (upper graph) or decreased (lower graph)  across pregnancy.  54            Figure 6.  Change in Subjects’ Concentration Ratio Across Gestational Age   55       REPORT ON CO­VARIATES     Variables that could affect NFV plasma concentrations were investigated to determine if they  changed over the course of pregnancy.  Time from last medication dose to blood draw was a  mean of 305, 272 and 341 minutes at 18‐28 wks, 32‐37 wks and at the time of delivery,  respectively.     Subjects’ weight, as expected, showed an increasing trend over the course of pregnancy.    Between 18‐28 wks, subjects had a mean weight of 73.0 kg, which reached 81.7 kg by the time of  delivery.     The lab test used as a marker for liver inflammation, alanine aminotransferase, showed little to  no change in mean over the second and third trimesters.       Table 9.  Co‐Variants Across Pregnancy      Time from last  medication dose to  blood draw (mins)  Mean (95% CI)      Weight (kg)  Mean (95% CI)      Alanine Amino‐ transferase (U/L)  Median (range)     18‐28wks  (n=23)   32‐37wks  (n=26)   Delivery   (n=20)   305 (224‐386)   272 (208‐336)   341 (254‐428)   73.0 (63.8‐82.2)   79.9 (74.0‐85.8)   81.7 (74.1‐89.3)   13 (<3‐214)   16 (<3‐101)   13 (<3‐58)     NOTE. 95% CI, 95% Confidence Interval.        56       CORRELATIONS OF COVARIATES AND NFV CONCENTRATIONS    Univariate linear regression models were completed to determine if any demographic or  pregnancy related factors might predict or impact on raw NFV plasma concentrations (Table 10).   The statistical correlations found, however, were inconsistent across GA, and Mulitvariate linear  regression models found no significant predictors of raw NFV concentrations or NFV‐CRs.      Table 10. Univariate Analysis, Co‐Variates and NFV Concentrations     18‐28 wks    Regression  P  co‐efficient       Factor   0.120   .290   ‐0.231   .144   ‐0.162   .230   0.207   .172   ‐0.147   .252   ‐0.181   .205   0.262   .113   ‐0.136   .274   ‐0.332   .060   ‐0.094   .336        Pre‐pregnancy  weight (kg)  Previous exposure  to NFV  6  Baseline CD4 (x10   cells/L)  Drugs of addiction  in pregnancy  Concomitant  medications (CYP)   .007   ‐0.145   .245   0.323   .006   ‐0.090   .331   ‐0.331   .049   ‐0.400   .021   0.359   .035   ‐0.360   .035   0.087   .342   ‐0.255   .105                                   Time since dose  (min)   0.477           ALT (U/L)   P           Current weight (kg)   Regression  co‐efficient           Adherence (%)      32‐37 wks        Age (years)                    57       DESCRIPTION OF LOPINAVIR/RITONAVIR CONCENTRATIONS IN PREGNANCY    Plasma concentrations of LPV/r were highly variable in pregnancy, and both mean and median  lopinavir and ritonavir levels appeared to be higher post partum (Table 8, Figure 7).       Mean lopinavir levels were above the clinical threshold for Cmin (3.00 μg/mL) at all three  antepartum time points (18‐21, 23‐27 and 31‐36 wks) and at delivery.   The IQR at each time  point also show that at least 75% of all samples were above this threshold.     Table 11.  Lopinavir Plasma Concentrations (μg/mL)    18‐21wks  n=5     23‐27wks  n=7   31‐36wks  n=8   delivery  n=7   post partum  n=6          5.90  (4.48‐7.32)   5.42  (4.43‐6.41)   6.56  (4.89‐8.22)   6.83  (2.91‐10.7)   9.41  (5.42‐13.4)          5.84  (5.05‐7.26)   5.74  (4.95‐6.04)   6.40  (4.88‐7.65)   5.13  (3.76‐7.10)   11.00  (7.65‐13.0)          0.28  (0.19‐0.37)   0.27  (0.20‐0.32)   0.46  (0.12‐0.79)   0.43  (0.18‐0.67)   1.08  (0.12‐2.03)          0.26  (0.24‐0.32)   0.29  (0.25‐0.31)   0.28  (0.22‐0.47)   0.24  (0.21‐0.58)   0.70  (0.26‐1.41)       mean LPV  (95% CI)      median LPV  (IQR)      mean RTV  (95% CI)      median RTV  (IQR)       NOTE. 95% CI, 95% Confidence Interval, IQR, interquartile range.    58       Figure 7.  Median LPV & RTV Plasma Concentrations in Pregnancy  Plasma concentrations were plotted at five different time points, including post partum. Medians are plotted with 25th and 75th percentile markers (IQR).    59       TIME TO UNDETECTABLE VIRAL LOAD AND NFV CRS    Twenty‐eight (96.5%) of the 29 patients treated with only NFV had an undetectable viral load at  one point during pregnancy. Twenty‐four of these subjects were not on therapy at conception  and had detectable viral loads prior to treatment initiation. One patient was considered an “elite  suppressor” as no virus was detected using standard assays while the patient was not receiving  any ART, and therefore, was not included in this analysis.  This woman was still treated with  HAART in pregnancy to prevent vertical transmission as a precaution.      The mean number of days to undetectable viral load in the twenty‐four patients who suppressed  in pregnancy was 61 (range 16‐126), and was reached in all subjects prior to 34 wks GA.  The  median number of virological measurements per woman was 5 (range 3‐8) with a similar  interval between successive tests (mean of 26 days).     Figure 8 displays estimated proportions of women achieving undetectable viral loads, beginning  at the time of initiation of therapy, stratified by whether the first antepartum NFV CR drawn was  above or below the clinically relevant threshold of 0.9.  Twelve subjects were classified into the  sub‐therapeutic group (NFV‐CR <0.9) and twelve were considered therapeutic (NFV‐CR >0.9).   Twenty five percent of the subtherapeutic group and 30.8% of the therapeutic group were  undetectable 30 days after HAART initiation, 50.0% of the sub‐therapeutic group and 53.9% of  the therapeutic group by 60 days, and 75.0% of the sub‐therapeutic group and 77.0% of the  therapeutic achieved an undetectable viral load by 80 days, indicating a similar response by  initial NFV exposure.     Figure 9 displays an additional survival curve; the mean of each subject’s antepartum NFV CRs  was found and used to stratify the group based again on the clinically relevant threshold of 0.9.    60            Figure 8.  Rate of Viral Suppression by First Antepartum NFV CR   Survival curves for the time from initiation of HAART to achievement of an undetectable viral  load, by first antepartum NFV CR.   61                  Figure 9.  Rate of Viral Suppression by Mean of Antepartum NFV CRs   Survival curves for the time from initiation of HAART to achievement of an undetectable viral  load, by mean of antepartum NFV CRs.   62       Nine subjects (36.5%) had an antepartum NFV‐CR mean below 0.9, and the remaining 15 had a  NFV‐CR mean above 0.9.  This stratification showed a differing response between subject groups.   Three subjects (33.3%) of the subtherapeutic group and 20.0% of the therapeutic group were  undetectable 30 days after HAART initiation, 66.7% of the sub‐therapeutic group and 33.3% of  the therapeutic group by 60 days, and 88.9% of the sub‐therapeutic group and 46.7% of the  therapeutic achieved an undetectable viral load by 80 days.   The relationship between several co‐variates and days to undetectable viral load following  HAART initiation was considered (Table 11).  Baseline CD4 (HR: 1.001, p=0.416) and patient‐ reported adherence (HR: 0.977, p=0.465) were found not to have a significant effect, while low  baseline pVL was associated with a significant decrease in the number of days to reach an  undetectable pVL (HR: 0.524. p=0.026).      The effects of mean antepartum raw NFV concentration (RH: 0.810, p=0.229) and NFV CRs (RH:  0.497, p=0.137) were not associated  with a change in time to viral suppression.    63       Table 12.  Proportional Hazards, Time to Undetectable pVL (n=24)   Independent variable    Adherence (%)      6  Baseline CD4 (x10  cells/L)      Baseline logged pVL       Mean antepartum raw NFV  concentration (μg/mL)      Mean antepartum NFV CR       Univariate anlaysis  hazard ratio (95% CI)     P   0.977 (0.917‐1.041)   .465   1.001 (0.999‐1.003)   .416   0.524 (0.296‐0.925)   .026   0.810 (0.575‐1.142)   .229   0.497 (0.197‐1.250)   .137        LACK OF VIRAL SUPPRESSION AT DELIVERY    The median GA at delivery was 38.6 wks (range 31‐41), and 24 (82.8%) of 29 NFV only treated  women had undetectable viral loads.  Five subjects had HIV viral loads which were not  completely suppressed.  Four women reached a pVL <50 copies/mL (log10pVL <1.70) by 34 wks,  but broke through and had a detectable pVL at delivery. One woman never suppressed  completely (Figure 10).     The characteristics of both groups (suppressed vs. unsuppressed at delivery) were compared  (Table 12).   The median baseline CD4 was significantly higher in the suppressed group 490 x 106  cells/L (IQR 310‐740) compared to the unsuppressed group 340 x 106 cells/L (IQR 250‐360),  p=0.026.  Patient reported adherence (p=0.325) and illicit drug use (p=0. 498) were statistically  similar.  When considering raw plasma concentrations of NFV drawn at 32‐37 wks GA, there was  64       no statistical significant difference between the means, medians and percent below the clinically  relevant threshold of the two groups, and the results were highly variable.  The means of the NFV  levels of the five subjects who were unsuppressed and the 24 who remained suppressed, were,  2.06 μg /mL (SD: 0.08‐4.06) and 1.95 μg /mL (SD: 0.54‐3.36), respectively,p=0.448; the medians  were 2.21 ug/mL (1.14‐2.83) and 0.81 μg /mL (0.62‐3.57), respectively, p=0.488; the percent of  samples below 0.8 μg/mL were,  20.0% and 47.6%, respectively, p=0.279.      Table 13.  Characteristics Associated with Lack of Viral Suppression at Delivery     breakthrough/lack of  suppression  n=5   suppressed viral load  through to delivery  n=24   P#   340   (250‐360)   490   (310‐740)   .026   93.02%   (±5.38)   89.27%   (±7.9%)   .325   2   (40%)   6   (28.6%)   .498   2.07   (±1.99)   1.95   (±1.41)    .448   2.21   (1.14‐2.83)   0.81   (0.62‐3.57)   .488    1   (20%)   10   (47.6%)   .279     6   baseline CD4 (x10   cells/L)  median (IQR)      adherence %  mean (±SD)      Illicit drug use, no.   (%)      mean NFV at 32‐37wks  (±SD)       median NFV at 32‐ 37wks (IQR)       <0.8μg/mL,   no. (%) of samples       NOTE. IQR, interquartile range. SD, standard deviation.   # Student’s t test (mean), Mann‐Whitney U test (median) for continuous data, and χ2 test for  categorical data.     65          Figure 10. Lack of Viral Suppression at Delivery  The log of plasma viral loads (pVL) were plotted across gestational age for the five subjects who  did not achieve or maintain viral suppression (pVL<50 copies/ml, log10 pVL<1.70) during  pregnancy, prior to delivery.          66       Further insight on the five patients who had a detectable viral load at delivery was gained by  considering the viral resistance profiles close to the time of delivery (Table 14).   Three of the five  patients showed considerable resistance to 3TC, and two showed some resistance to NFV.  The  profiles of two subjects showed pan‐susceptible viruses.        Table 14. Viral Resistance and Adherence for Patients with Detectable Viral Load at Delivery   case   105   108   122   123   125   Regimen   Relevant Resistance Analysis   Adherence in Pregnancy   COM/NFV   35 wks GA  AZT: maximal response  3TC: minimal response  NFV: reduced response   patient report: 94.7%   COM/NFV   34 wks GA  AZT: maximal response  3TC: minimal response  NFV: reduced response   patient report: 96.9%   COM/NFV   37wks GA  AZT: maximal response  3TC: minimal response  NFV: maximal response   COM/NFV   36wks GA  AZT: maximal response  3TC: maximal response  NFV: maximal response   COM/NFV   day of delivery  AZT: maximal response  3TC: maximal response  NFV: maximal response        patient report: 83.9%   patient report: 92.6%     patient report: 96.9%          67          DISCUSSION       NELFINAVIR CONCENTRATIONS IN PREGNANCY    NFV plasma concentrations and NFV‐CRs were found to be statistically higher antepartum  compared to day of delivery.  Although concentrations were statistically similar at 18‐28 wks and  32‐37 wks, mean and medians demonstrated a trend towards decreased drug exposure as  gestation increased. An increase in sample size may be able to characterize differences more  definitively.  A large portion of subjects also had concentrations that fell below the therapeutic  threshold.   The percentage of samples considered sub‐therapeutic showed trends of increasing  across pregnancy.  Pregnant women between 18‐28 wks had similar NFV‐CRs (1.09 ± 0.73) to  those published from forty‐eight non‐pregnant adult women (1.19 ± 0.67) and the reference  population (107).  The NFV‐CRs at 32‐37 wks (0.86 ± 0.73) were also consistent with previously  reported values of twenty‐one women (0.84 ± 0.51) tested during the third trimester (107).  The  percentage of patients with samples below the clinically relevant threshold at the same time  point (53.8%) was also similar to that of the published pregnant population (52.4%).      The majority of women in the study had no detectable virus at the time of delivery and there  were no cases of vertical transmission, suggesting that drug levels of NFV from current dosing  may be sufficient for viral suppression for the purposes of prevention of vertical transmission.      The development of viral resistance due to low drug exposure should be further explored.          68       VARIABILITY OF NELFVINAVIR CONCENTRATIONS    Concentrations of NFV were also found to be highly variable antepartum and at time of delivery.   Inconsistent adherence, decreased bioavailability due to not taking the drug with food, and  inaccurate recall of time of last dose are potential factors explaining the variability.  Vrijens et al.  suggest “patients’ variable exposure to drugs, created by their diversely erratic execution of  protocol‐specified dosing regimens, is generally the single largest source of variance in drug  responses,”(126).  While a dose may be kept constant, the wide range of concentrations is  achieved by varying the dosing interval.  Indeed, by monitoring electronically the times of dosing,  forty percent of the apparent inter‐patient variability seen when assuming the samples were  drawn at trough, was explained (126).    Using univariate and multivariate linear regressions co‐variants of NFV concentrations and NFV  CRs were explored.  Chronic liver disease with Hepatitis B or C Viruses is known to cause a  decrease in hepatic clearance increasing plasma levels; however, univariate linear analysis using  the liver enzyme ALT as a marker for liver inflammation found no statistical correlation.   Body  weight, both prior to conception and during pregnancy was also not predictive of plasma  concentrations or CRs, consistent with published literature suggesting CRs are independent of  sex, age, body weight, (93).  Use of concomitant medications that have drug‐drug interactions  with NFV did not show any significant effect.     Variation in plasma concentrations might also arise from differing placental response between  individuals to the drug.  Placental transfer of PIs is known to be quite low, and there is little  accumulation in the amniotic fluid (127).  The variation in size and weight of placentas suggest  that drug may accumulate in the organ and contribute to variability in plasma levels.     69       METABOLISM AND PROTEIN BINDING OF NELFINAVIR    NFV is metabolized into M8 by the liver enzyme CYP2C19, and both drugs are metabolized by  liver enzyme CYP3A4 (Figure 11).  The drugs behave similarly in vitro, however there is little data  about the contribution of M8 to virologic response.        Figure 11. Nelfinavir and M8 Metabolism by Liver Enzymes  Fifty percent of circulating NFV is metabolized by liver enzyme CYP 2C19 into the active  metabolite hydroxy‐tert‐butylamide (M8).  Both drugs are metabolized by liver enzyme CYP 3A4.       Previously published papers have suggested that an alteration of the regulation of these two  enzymes in pregnancy may account for the decreased plasma levels of NFV compared to non‐ pregnant adult populations. CYP 34A is thought to be upregulated in pregnancy (107) and  data  has shown that decreased IDV AUCs were correlated to increases in secretion of 6β‐OHF, an in  vivo marker for CYP 3A4 (128).  The trend towards lower drug concentrations late in pregnancy  compared to the second trimester might be explained by the increase CYP 3A4 activity as  gestation increases.     70       The regulation of CYP 219 in pregnancy is less clear.  It is well established that the M8:NFV ratio  is constant at 0.29 in non‐pregnant adults (94), but M8 : NFV ratios were found to be lower in  pregnant women (111).  M8 concentrations were also found to be 70% lower during pregnancy  compared to post partum (129), suggesting either an induction of CYP 3A4 or an inhibition of  CYP 2C19, or both. While it is possible that the decreased M8:NFV ratio is consistent with  reduction of CYP2C19 activity during pregnancy(109), population PK from Hirt et al. did not  support change in CYP 2C19 metabolism (111).    Plasma protein concentrations are reduced during the third trimester.  NFV is highly (99%)  protein bound, and this absence of available serum proteins may mean that the drug’s free  fraction (ratio of unbound to bound drug) will increase.   As the free fraction increases, more  unbound drug (pharmacologically active form) is available for hepatic metabolism.  While the  actual free concentration of drug is not altered do to this increased clearance, changes in protein  binding could affect the half‐life of NFV, as bound drug is constantly released to maintain the new  equilibrium of the increased free fraction.      Protein binding of lopinavir has been investigated in pregnancy (110). Alpha‐1‐acid glycoprotein  (AAG) was found to strongly correlate to the extent of lopinavir binding (when albumin was not)  and an increase in the free fraction of the drug was found (110).   An animal model of PI  metabolism showed similar results (130).  Pregnant and non‐pregnant mice were treated either  orally or intravenously with NFV, and the mean NFV unbound oral plasma clearance of pregnant  mice was found to be approximately five‐fold that of non‐pregnant mice. The terminal half‐life of  NFV was not significantly different (p>0.05) however, and changes in drug clearance and AUC  were strongly correlated to changes in CYP 3A metabolism and not to the increase in NFV free  fraction (130).  The decrease in plasma protein concentrations over pregnancy may still   71       contribute to the low NFV levels seen between 32‐37 wks GA and should be further explored in  humans.     Finally, changes in drug protein binding may also account for some of the inter‐patient variability  that was seen in this study.   A previous investigation found that plasma protein concentration  differs between healthy volunteers and HIV infected patients, and this change (up to four time the  AAG’s) is related to the stage of HIV disease (131).       VIRAL SUPPRESSION     Effective use of HAART in pregnancy is used to suppress HIV RNA load below detectable limits  for both maternal health and the prevention of vertical transmission. Twenty‐nine women  received NFV based HAART in pregnancy, 24 women of which initiated therapy antenatally and  reached an undetectable pVL in a mean of 61 days.  Four of these women, however, broke  through later in pregnancy and were detectable at delivery; an additional subject did not achieve  suppression during gestation.  While there were no HIV transmissions, 17.2% (5/29) of women  were inadequately suppressed at delivery, which is of concern.    Plasma concentrations have been widely correlated retrospectively to the rate and maintenance  of viral suppression in non‐pregnant adults; however, no papers known to us have attempted to  demonstrate a PK‐PD relationship in pregnancy.       No difference was found in the days to undetectable viral load if a patient’s first antepartum  plasma concentration was above or below the clinically relevant threshold. When patients were  stratified by the mean of their antepartum concentrations, data showed suggested that patients  with mean antepartum plasma NFV concentrations and CRs below the known therapeutic  72       thresholds appeared to achieve an undetectable pVL more quickly.   This trend is inconsistent  with data published in non‐pregnant adults should be considered with caution as the sample  distribution into the two stratifications was uneven and there was a small sample size. Further  research is required to establish a concentration response relationship in pregnancy.      The inability to establish a concentration‐response relationship might have been partially  affected by what is called the white‐coat syndrome.  Patients may have been adherent to therapy  in the days immediately prior to the collection of the blood sample (resulting in a therapeutic  drug level), but were non‐compliant between clinical visits causing suppression to be slow or non  existent (95).  It is possible that the complex social dynamics of these women (recent immigrants  with large families, active use of drugs of dependency etc) may have exacerbated this affect.  It is  also important to consider that all twelve patients with a plasma concentration mean below the  clinically relevant threshold achieved and maintained a undetectable viral load; a distinct  threshold may need to be established for different time points in pregnancy.     Patients who did not have optimal viral suppression in the third trimester had poor immune  function compared to those who maintained suppression.  Mean and median NFV concentrations  at 32‐37wks did not differ statistically between those with optimal viral suppression and those  that did not, suggesting that other factors may play a significant role in this population.  When the  viral resistance and patient‐reported profiles of these five women were considered, mutations  against the NRTI 3TC was found in the virus of three women, with further mutations against NFV  in two.   The association of viral suppression and resistance in pregnancy requires further study.         73       USE OF RANDOMED TIMED DRUG LEVELS IN PREGNANCY     Some clinicians are recommending increased dosing of PIs during later pregnancy(36), despite a  lack of information and the generally held belief that drug doses at the lower end of the  therapeutic range should be prescribed to minimize fetal risk, as toxicities increase with  increased dosing.  The use of random timed drug levels for TDM could ultimately provide  personalized therapy to pregnant women by providing the information necessary to make timely  and appropriate dose adjustments similar to what is being explored in non‐pregnant adult  populations (78).     TDM of ART in pregnancy, however, requires more investigations before it can be of significant  clinical benefit.   While this study has attempted to define the necessary concentration‐effect  relationship (132), the virologic response to differing levels of NFV remains unclear, especially  when compounded by intermittent adherence or viral isolates with resistance mutations.  This  study has also suggests marked intrapatient variability; changing dosing based on a single plasma  concentration may result in inappropriate interventions.    Future clinical use of TDM in pregnancy will also require significant knowledge of previous  treatments and concomitant medications, as well as expert interpretation of levels to give full  benefit, all within the short time frame of the second half of pregnancy, following HAART  initiation (133).        74       LIMITATIONS    SAMPLE SIZE  This study did not reach sufficient enrolment to power comparisons between the antepartum  time points or the Kaplan Meier stratifications.  It is possible that stronger correlations might be  made with a larger study population.     ADHERENCE  The accuracy of patient reported adherence is limited, especially due to the physician‐patient  power dynamic.   It is generally believed that pregnant women are highly adherent to therapy  because they desire preventing their infant from becoming infected; it is possible, however, that  the emphasis placed on the benefits of treatment in pregnancy may bias subjects towards  reporting excellent adherence.     While our adherence questionnaire also attempted to capture aspects of adherence besides count  of dosages taken, it is likely that it did not capture to a great enough extent, the other components  that are important to clinical outcomes.       VIRAL RESISTANCE PROFILES  Relevant resistance profiles were not available on the majority of subjects enrolled in the study,  and so the number and type of baseline PI and NRTI mutations were not included in the analysis.   As drug potency lessens in the presence of these mutations, related clinical outcomes deteriorate,  affecting the study outcomes.        75       NRTI BACKBONE  The contribution of the NTRI backbone to virologic response is not easily studied due to the  intracellular nature of the active moieties of these drugs.   While they may affect suppression, it is  unlikely that they will be measurable in the clinical setting.     USE OF CONCENTRATION RATIOS  Random timed blood samples are advantageous in studying pregnant women because they  require no specific time for blood draw; however, there are several disadvantages to using CRs  for analysis.  Reference curves are required for every drug, and even perhaps for each regimen,  and populations used to construct the curve should reflect the average patient population to  which the curve is applied.   CRs also assume that ratios are constant over the course of the  dosing interval (95).       FUTURE DIRECTIONS    Future investigations should focus on determining what TDM measure is best suited to  establishing a concentration‐response relationship in pregnancy, as Cmin or an IQ value may be  more appropriate than random timed samples.   Similarly, it will be important to further  understand how drug levels change over the course of pregnancy to inform clinicians how  measures at different gestational time points relate to clinical outcomes.       Drug levels and incidence of adverse outcomes should also be examined to establish upper‐limit  thresholds to prevent unnecessary toxicity to mother and fetus. Finally, long‐term maternal  clinical outcomes associated with plasma concentrations should be investigated, primarily the  acquisition of PI resistance mutations due to sub therapeutic levels at the end of pregnancy.   76         Further in the future, clinical trials might determine if dose adjustments can increase plasma  concentrations and increase the rate of viral suppression and breakthroughs, while remaining  safe in pregnancy.     To date, the major success of HAART in pregnancy has been preventing vertical transmission.   While these results are truly remarkable, there is growing evidence of the harms caused by  intermittent therapy.   If these women are receiving imperfect treatment, the long‐term health  outcomes could be devastating.  Low drug levels may permit the generation of viral sub‐ populations with significant resistance.   Alternatively, high drug levels may be associated with  toxicities the scientific community is just beginning to explore, including exacerbated  osteoporosis, more radical lipid distribution and altered fetal development.   These factors may  also be compounded over the course of multiple pregnancies.        The information garnered from this study suggests that further PK studies of PIs in pregnancy  may be necessary to ensure that their use as the core of safe and effective drug regimens applied  to prevent vertical transmission are associated with minimal risk of perinatal infection and  positive long‐term maternal outcomes .              77       REFERENCES    (1)   Moss AR, Bacchetti P. Natural history of HIV infection. AIDS 1989 February;3(2):55‐61.    (2)   UNAIDS/WHO. UNAIDS/WHO AIDS Epidemic Update December 2007. UNAIDS/WHO  2007;    (3)   Public Health Agency of Canada. AIDS Epi Updates 2007. Public Health Agency of Canada  2007;    (4)   British Columbia Centre for Disease Control STI/HIV Prevention and Control. HIV/AIDS  Annual Update Report 2006. British Columbia Centre for Disease Control STI/HIV  Prevention and Control 2006;Available from: URL:  http://www.bccdc.org/content.php?item=5    (5)   Ogilvie GS, Palepu A, Remple VP, Maan E, Heath K, MacDonald G et al. Fertility intentions  of women of reproductive age living with HIV in British Columbia, Canada. AIDS 2007  January;21 Suppl 1:S83‐S88.    (6)   Ogilvie GS, Krajden M, Patrick DM, Money DM, Taylor D, Remple VP et al. Antenatal  Seroprevelance of HIV in British Columbia. 2006; 2006.    (7)   Alimenti A, Forbes JC, Samson LM, Ayers D, Singer J, Money DM et al. Perinatal HIV  Transmission and Demographics in Canada, 1990 to 2005: data from the Canadian  Perinatal HIV Surveillance Project (CPHSP). 2008; 2008.    (8)   Kourtis AP, Lee FK, Abrams EJ, Jamieson DJ, Bulterys M. Mother‐to‐child transmission of  HIV‐1: timing and implications for prevention. Lancet Infect Dis 2006  November;6(11):726‐32.    (9)   Dunn DT, Brandt CD, Krivine A, Cassol SA, Roques P, Borkowsky W et al. The sensitivity of  HIV‐1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in the neonatal period and the relative  contributions of intra‐uterine and intra‐partum transmission. AIDS 1995  September;9(9):F7‐11.    (10)   Newell ML. Mechanisms and timing of mother‐to‐child transmission of HIV‐1. AIDS 1998  May 28;12(8):831‐7.    (11)   Bucceri A, Luchini L, Rancilio L, Grossi E, Ferraris G, Rossi G et al. Pregnancy outcome  among HIV positive and negative intravenous drug users. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod  Biol 1997 April;72(2):169‐74.    (12)   Leroy V, Ladner J, Nyiraziraje M, De CA, Bazubagira A, Van de PP et al. Effect of HIV‐1  infection on pregnancy outcome in women in Kigali, Rwanda, 1992‐1994. Pregnancy and  HIV Study Group. AIDS 1998 April 16;12(6):643‐50.    (13)   Saada M, Le CJ, Berrebi A, Bongain A, Delfraissy JF, Mayaux MJ et al. Pregnancy and  progression to AIDS: results of the French prospective cohorts. SEROGEST and SEROCO  Study Groups. AIDS 2000 October 20;14(15):2355‐60.   78         (14)   Burns DN, Landesman S, Minkoff H, Wright DJ, Waters D, Mitchell RM et al. The influence  of pregnancy on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: antepartum and  postpartum changes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load. Am J Obstet  Gynecol 1998 February;178(2):355‐9.    (15)   Weisser M, Rudin C, Battegay M, Pfluger D, Kully C, Egger M. Does pregnancy influence the  course of HIV infection? Evidence from two large Swiss cohort studies. J Acquir Immune  Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol 1998 April 15;17(5):404‐10.    (16)   Tai JH, Udoji MA, Barkanic G, Byrne DW, Rebeiro PF, Byram BR et al. Pregnancy and HIV  disease progression during the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. J Infect Dis  2007 October 1;196(7):1044‐52.    (17)   Thomas PA, Weedon J, Krasinski K, Abrams E, Shaffer N, Matheson P et al. Maternal  predictors of perinatal human immunodeficiency virus transmission. The New York City  Perinatal HIV Transmission Collaborative Study Group. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1994  June;13(6):489‐95.    (18)   Garcia PM, Kalish LA, Pitt J, Minkoff H, Quinn TC, Burchett SK et al. Maternal levels of  plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA and the risk of perinatal transmission.  Women and Infants Transmission Study Group. N Engl J Med 1999 August 5;341(6):394‐ 402.    (19)   Mofenson LM, Lambert JS, Stiehm ER, Bethel J, Meyer WA, III, Whitehouse J et al. Risk  factors for perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in women  treated with zidovudine. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study 185 Team. N Engl J  Med 1999 August 5;341(6):385‐93.    (20)   Cu‐Uvin S, Snyder B, Harwell JI, Hogan J, Chibwesha C, Hanley D et al. Association between  paired plasma and cervicovaginal lavage fluid HIV‐1 RNA levels during 36 months. J  Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2006 August 15;42(5):584‐7.    (21)   Chuachoowong R, Shaffer N, VanCott TC, Chaisilwattana P, Siriwasin W, Waranawat N et  al. Lack of association between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody in  cervicovaginal lavage fluid and plasma and perinatal transmission, in Thailand. J Infect  Dis 2000 June;181(6):1957‐63.    (22)   John GC, Nduati RW, Mbori‐Ngacha DA, Richardson BA, Panteleeff D, Mwatha A et al.  Correlates of mother‐to‐child human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV‐1)  transmission: association with maternal plasma HIV‐1 RNA load, genital HIV‐1 DNA  shedding, and breast infections. J Infect Dis 2001 January 15;183(2):206‐12.    (23)   The mode of delivery and the risk of vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency  virus type 1‐‐a meta‐analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies. The International  Perinatal HIV Group. N Engl J Med 1999 April 1;340(13):977‐87.    (24)   Duration of ruptured membranes and vertical transmission of HIV‐1: a meta‐analysis  from 15 prospective cohort studies. AIDS 2001 February 16;15(3):357‐68.    (25)   John‐Stewart G, Mbori‐Ngacha D, Ekpini R, Janoff EN, Nkengasong J, Read JS et al. Breast‐ feeding and Transmission of HIV‐1. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2004 February  1;35(2):196‐202.  79         (26)   Thior I, Lockman S, Smeaton LM, Shapiro RL, Wester C, Heymann SJ et al. Breastfeeding  plus infant zidovudine prophylaxis for 6 months vs formula feeding plus infant  zidovudine for 1 month to reduce mother‐to‐child HIV transmission in Botswana: a  randomized trial: the Mashi Study. JAMA 2006 August 16;296(7):794‐805.    (27)   Connor EM, Sperling RS, Gelber R, Kiselev P, Scott G, O'Sullivan MJ et al. Reduction of  maternal‐infant transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 with zidovudine  treatment. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 076 Study Group. N Engl J Med  1994 November 3;331(18):1173‐80.    (28)   Cooper ER, Charurat M, Mofenson L, Hanson IC, Pitt J, Diaz C et al. Combination  antiretroviral strategies for the treatment of pregnant HIV‐1‐infected women and  prevention of perinatal HIV‐1 transmission. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2002 April  15;29(5):484‐94.    (29)   HIV‐infected pregnant women and vertical transmission in Europe since 1986. European  collaborative study. AIDS 2001 April 13;15(6):761‐70.    (30)   Palella FJ, Jr., Delaney KM, Moorman AC, Loveless MO, Fuhrer J, Satten GA et al. Declining  morbidity and mortality among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus  infection. HIV Outpatient Study Investigators. N Engl J Med 1998 March 26;338(13):853‐ 60.    (31)   Mocroft A, Ledergerber B, Katlama C, Kirk O, Reiss P, d'Arminio MA et al. Decline in the  AIDS and death rates in the EuroSIDA study: an observational study. Lancet 2003 July  5;362(9377):22‐9.    (32)   BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Therapeutic Guidelines. Antiretroviral therapy for  HIV‐1 infected adults. BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS 2006;Available from: URL:  http://www.cfenet.ubc.ca/content.php?id=12    (33)   Elective caesarean‐section versus vaginal delivery in prevention of vertical HIV‐1  transmission: a randomised clinical trial. The European Mode of Delivery Collaboration.  Lancet 1999 March 27;353(9158):1035‐9.    (34)   CDC. 2002 Guidelines for treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. MMWR 2002;47  (RR06) 2002;    (35)   Burdge DR, Money DM, Forbes JC, Walmsley SL, Smaill FM, Boucher M et al. Canadian  consensus guidelines for the management of pregnancy, labour and delivery and for  postpartum care in HIV‐positive pregnant women and their offspring (summary of 2002  guidelines). CMAJ 2003 June 24;168(13):1671‐4.    (36)   AIDSinfo. Public Health Service Task Force Recommendations for Use of Antiretroviral  Drugs in Pregnant HIV‐1‐Infected Women for Maternal Health and Interventions to  Reduce Perinatal HIV‐1 Transmission in the United States ‐ October 12, 2006. AIDSinfo  2002;Available from: URL:  http://www.aidsinfo.nih.gov/Guidelines/GuidelineDetail.aspx?MenuItem=Guidelines&Se arch=Off&GuidelineID=9    (37)   Watts DH. Management of human immunodeficiency virus infection in pregnancy. N Engl  J Med 2002 June 13;346(24):1879‐91.  80         (38)   Rakhmanina NY, van den Anker JN, Soldin SJ. Safety and pharmacokinetics of  antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy. Ther Drug Monit 2004 April;26(2):110‐5.    (39)    Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry 2008;Available from: URL:  http://www.apregistry.com/    (40)   Nightingale SL. From the Food and Drug Administration. JAMA 1998 November  4;280(17):1472.    (41)   De SM, Carducci B, De SL, Cavaliere AF, Straface G. Periconceptional exposure to efavirenz  and neural tube defects. Arch Intern Med 2002 February 11;162(3):355.    (42)   Fundaro C, Genovese O, Rendeli C, Tamburrini E, Salvaggio E. Myelomeningocele in a child  with intrauterine exposure to efavirenz. AIDS 2002 January 25;16(2):299‐300.    (43)   Hitti J, Frenkel LM, Stek AM, Nachman SA, Baker D, Gonzalez‐Garcia A et al. Maternal  toxicity with continuous nevirapine in pregnancy: results from PACTG 1022. J Acquir  Immune Defic Syndr 2004 July 1;36(3):772‐6.    (44)   Marzolini C, Rudin C, Decosterd LA, Telenti A, Schreyer A, Biollaz J et al. Transplacental  passage of protease inhibitors at delivery. AIDS 2002 April 12;16(6):889‐93.    (45)   Bucceri AM, Somigliana E, Matrone R, Ferraris G, Rossi G, Grossi E et al. Combination  antiretroviral therapy in 100 HIV‐1‐infected pregnant women. Hum Reprod 2002  February;17(2):436‐41.    (46)   Mattar R, Amed AM, Lindsey PC, Sass N, Daher S. Preeclampsia and HIV infection. Eur J  Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2004 December 1;117(2):240‐1.    (47)   Mawson AR. Effects of antiretroviral therapy on occurrence of pre‐eclampsia. Lancet  2003 January 25;361(9354):347‐8.    (48)   Wimalasundera RC, Larbalestier N, Smith JH, de RA, McG Thom SA, Hughes AD et al. Pre‐ eclampsia, antiretroviral therapy, and immune reconstitution. Lancet 2002 October  12;360(9340):1152‐4.    (49)   Suy A, Martinez E, Coll O, Lonca M, Palacio M, de LE et al. Increased risk of pre‐eclampsia  and fetal death in HIV‐infected pregnant women receiving highly active antiretroviral  therapy. AIDS 2006 January 2;20(1):59‐66.    (50)   Kourtis AP, Bansil P, McPheeters M, Meikle SF, Posner SF, Jamieson DJ. Hospitalizations of  pregnant HIV‐infected women in the USA prior to and during the era of HAART, 1994‐ 2003. AIDS 2006 September 11;20(14):1823‐31.    (51)   McGowan JP, Crane M, Wiznia AA, Blum S. Combination antiretroviral therapy in human  immunodeficiency virus‐infected pregnant women. Obstet Gynecol 1999 November;94(5  Pt 1):641‐6.    (52)   British Columbia Perinatal Health Program Annual Report.  2007.     (53)   Lorenzi P, Spicher VM, Laubereau B, Hirschel B, Kind C, Rudin C et al. Antiretroviral  therapies in pregnancy: maternal, fetal and neonatal effects. Swiss HIV Cohort Study, the  81       Swiss Collaborative HIV and Pregnancy Study, and the Swiss Neonatal HIV Study. AIDS  1998 December 24;12(18):F241‐F247.    (54)   Lambert JS, Watts DH, Mofenson L, Stiehm ER, Harris DR, Bethel J et al. Risk factors for  preterm birth, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth retardation in infants born to  HIV‐infected pregnant women receiving zidovudine. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group  185 Team. AIDS 2000 July 7;14(10):1389‐99.    (55)   Cotter AM, Garcia AG, Duthely ML, Luke B, O'Sullivan MJ. Is antiretroviral therapy during  pregnancy associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight, or  stillbirth? J Infect Dis 2006 May 1;193(9):1195‐201.    (56)   Joao E, Calver G, Menezes J, Cunha C, Cruz M, Martins E et al. Virologic Control and Infant  Outcomes among Pregnant Women Exposed to Different ART Regimens during  Pregnancy. 2007.    (57)   Tuomala RE, Shapiro DE, Mofenson LM, Bryson Y, Culnane M, Hughes MD et al.  Antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy and the risk of an adverse outcome. N Engl J Med  2002 June 13;346(24):1863‐70.    (58)   Hanlon M, O'Dea S, Mulcahy F. Maternal Hepatotoxicity with Boosted Saquinivir as Part of  Combination ART in Pregnancy. 2007.    (59)   Cote HC. Possible ways nucleoside analogues can affect mitochondrial DNA content and  gene expression during HIV therapy. Antivir Ther 2005;10 Suppl 2:M3‐11.    (60)   Brinkman K, Kakuda TN. Mitochondrial toxicity of nucleoside analogue reverse  transcriptase inhibitors: a looming obstacle for long‐term antiretroviral therapy? Curr  Opin Infect Dis 2000 February;13(1):5‐11.    (61)   Ibdah JA, Yang Z, Bennett MJ. Liver disease in pregnancy and fetal fatty acid oxidation  defects. Mol Genet Metab 2000 September;71(1‐2):182‐9.    (62)   Little BB. Pharmacokinetics during pregnancy: evidence‐based maternal dose  formulation. Obstet Gynecol 1999 May;93(5 Pt 2):858‐68.    (63)   Loebstein R, Koren G. Clinical relevance of therapeutic drug monitoring during pregnancy.  Ther Drug Monit 2002 February;24(1):15‐22.    (64)   Mirochnick M, Capparelli E. Pharmacokinetics of antiretrovirals in pregnant women. Clin  Pharmacokinet 2004;43(15):1071‐87.    (65)   Hammer SM, Squires KE, Hughes MD, Grimes JM, Demeter LM, Currier JS et al. A  controlled trial of two nucleoside analogues plus indinavir in persons with human  immunodeficiency virus infection and CD4 cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or less.  AIDS Clinical Trials Group 320 Study Team. N Engl J Med 1997 September  11;337(11):725‐33.    (66)   Burger DM, Hugen PW, Aarnoutse RE, Hoetelmans RM, Jambroes M, Nieuwkerk PT et al.  Treatment failure of nelfinavir‐containing triple therapy can largely be explained by low  nelfinavir plasma concentrations. Ther Drug Monit 2003 February;25(1):73‐80.  82         (67)   Moyle GJ, Back D. Principles and practice of HIV‐protease inhibitor  pharmacoenhancement. HIV Med 2001 April;2(2):105‐13.    (68)   Back DJ, Khoo SH, Gibbons SE, Merry C. The role of therapeutic drug monitoring in  treatment of HIV infection. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2001;52 Suppl 1:89S‐96S.    (69)   Ledergerber B, Egger M, Opravil M, Telenti A, Hirschel B, Battegay M et al. Clinical  progression and virological failure on highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV‐1  patients: a prospective cohort study. Swiss HIV Cohort Study. Lancet 1999 March  13;353(9156):863‐8.    (70)   Staszewski S, Miller V, Sabin C, Carlebach A, Berger AM, Weidmann E et al. Virological  response to protease inhibitor therapy in an HIV clinic cohort. AIDS 1999 February  25;13(3):367‐73.    (71)   Dieleman JP, Gyssens IC, van der Ende ME, de MS, Burger DM. Urological complaints in  relation to indinavir plasma concentrations in HIV‐infected patients. AIDS 1999 March  11;13(4):473‐8.    (72)   Merry C, Barry M, Gibbons S, Mulcahy F, Back D. Improved tolerability of ritonavir derived  from pharmacokinetic principles. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1996 December;42(6):787.    (73)   Justesen US. Therapeutic drug monitoring and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)  antiretroviral therapy. Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 2006 January;98(1):20‐31.    (74)   Justesen US. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and therpeutic drug monitoring  (TDM) of antiretroviral therapy. Clin Pharmacol 2004 June;65 (4):34‐38.    (75)   Barry MG, Khoo SH, Veal GJ, Hoggard PG, Gibbons SE, Wilkins EG et al. The effect of  zidovudine dose on the formation of intracellular phosphorylated metabolites. AIDS 1996  October;10(12):1361‐7.    (76)   Moore KH, Barrett JE, Shaw S, Pakes GE, Churchus R, Kapoor A et al. The  pharmacokinetics of lamivudine phosphorylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells  from patients infected with HIV‐1. AIDS 1999 November 12;13(16):2239‐50.    (77)   Fletcher CV, Kawle SP, Kakuda TN, Anderson PL, Weller D, Bushman LR et al. Zidovudine  triphosphate and lamivudine triphosphate concentration‐response relationships in HIV‐ infected persons. AIDS 2000 September 29;14(14):2137‐44.    (78)   Van Heeswijk RP. Critical issues in therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs.  Ther Drug Monit 2002 June;24(3):323‐31.    (79)   Gieschke R, Fotteler B, Buss N, Steimer JL. Relationships between exposure to saquinavir  monotherapy and antiviral response in HIV‐positive patients. Clin Pharmacokinet 1999  July;37(1):75‐86.    (80)   Murphy RL, Sommadossi JP, Lamson M, Hall DB, Myers M, Dusek A. Antiviral effect and  pharmacokinetic interaction between nevirapine and indinavir in persons infected with  human immunodeficiency virus type 1. J Infect Dis 1999 May;179(5):1116‐23.   83         (81)   Gatti G, Di BA, Casazza R, De PC, Bassetti M, Cruciani M et al. The relationship between  ritonavir plasma levels and side‐effects: implications for therapeutic drug monitoring.  AIDS 1999 October 22;13(15):2083‐9.    (82)   Nunez M, Gonzalez de RD, Gallego L, Jimenez‐Nacher I, Gonzalez‐Lahoz J, Soriano V.  Higher efavirenz plasma levels correlate with development of insomnia. J Acquir Immune  Defic Syndr 2001 December 1;28(4):399‐400.    (83)   Condra JH, Petropoulos CJ, Ziermann R, Schleif WA, Shivaprakash M, Emini EA. Drug  resistance and predicted virologic responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1  protease inhibitor therapy. J Infect Dis 2000 September;182(3):758‐65.    (84)   Montaner J, Hill A, Acosta E. Practical implications for the interpretation of minimum  plasma concentration/inhibitory concentration ratios. Lancet 2001 May  5;357(9266):1438‐40.    (85)   Pellegrin I, Breilh D, Montestruc F, Garrigue I, Caumont A, Merel P et al. Virological  response to nelfinavir‐containing regimens: analysis of individual pharmacokinetic (PK)  parameters and drug resistance mutations. 2001; 2001.    (86)   Hsu A, Zolopa A, Shulman N, Havlir D, Gallant J, Race E et al. Final analysis of ritonavir  (RTV) intensification in indinavir (IDV) recipients with detectable HIV RNA levels. 2001;  2001.    (87)   Pellegrin I, Breilh D, Ragnaud JM, Boucher S, Neau D, Fleury H et al. Virological responses  to atazanavir‐ritonavir‐based regimens: resistance‐substitutions score and  pharmacokinetic parameters (Reyaphar study). Antivir Ther 2006;11(4):421‐9.    (88)   Shulman N, Zolopa A, Havlir D, Hsu A, Renz C, Boller S et al. Virtual inhibitory quotient  predicts response to ritonavir boosting of indinavir‐based therapy in human  immunodeficiency virus‐infected patients with ongoing viremia. Antimicrob Agents  Chemother 2002 December;46(12):3907‐16.    (89)   Drusano GL, Bilello JA, Preston SL, O'Mara E, Kaul S, Schnittman S et al. Hollow‐fiber unit  evaluation of a new human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor, BMS‐ 232632, for determination of the linked pharmacodynamic variable. J Infect Dis 2001  April 1;183(7):1126‐9.    (90)   Winston A, Patel N, Back D, Khoo S, Bulbeck S, Mandalia S et al. Different methods to  calculate the inhibitory quotient of boosted single protease inhibitors and their  association with virological response. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2006 April  15;41(5):675‐6.    (91)   Solas C, Colson P, Ravaux I, Poizot‐Martin I, Moreau J, Lacarelle B et al. The Genotypic  Inhibitory Quotient: A Predictive Factor of Atazanavir Response in HIV‐1‐Infected  Treatment‐Experienced Patients. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2008 January 11.    (92)   Barrail‐Tran A, Morand‐Joubert L, Poizat G, Raguin G, Le TC, Clavel F et al. Predictive  values of the human immunodeficiency virus phenotype and genotype and of amprenavir  and lopinavir inhibitory quotients in heavily pretreated patients on a ritonavir‐boosted  dual‐protease‐inhibitor regimen. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2008 May;52(5):1642‐6.  84         (93)   Hoetelmans RM, Reijers MH, Weverling GJ, ten Kate RW, Wit FW, Mulder JW et al. The  effect of plasma drug concentrations on HIV‐1 clearance rate during quadruple drug  therapy. AIDS 1998 July 30;12(11):F111‐F115.    (94)   Baede‐van Dijk PA, Hugen PW, Verweij‐van Wissen CP, Koopmans PP, Burger DM, Hekster  YA. Analysis of variation in plasma concentrations of nelfinavir and its active metabolite  M8 in HIV‐positive patients. AIDS 2001 May 25;15(8):991‐8.    (95)   Kappelhoff BS, Crommentuyn KM, de Maat MM, Mulder JW, Huitema AD, Beijnen JH.  Practical guidelines to interpret plasma concentrations of antiretroviral drugs. Clin  Pharmacokinet 2004;43(13):845‐53.    (96)   O'Sullivan MJ, Boyer PJ, Scott GB, Parks WP, Weller S, Blum MR et al. The  pharmacokinetics and safety of zidovudine in the third trimester of pregnancy for women  infected with human immunodeficiency virus and their infants: phase I acquired  immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials group study (protocol 082). Zidovudine  Collaborative Working Group. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993 May;168(5):1510‐6.    (97)   Watts DH, Brown ZA, Tartaglione T, Burchett SK, Opheim K, Coombs R et al.  Pharmacokinetic disposition of zidovudine during pregnancy. J Infect Dis 1991  February;163(2):226‐32.    (98)   Fletcher CV, Kawle SP, Kakuda TN, Anderson PL, Weller D, Bushman LR et al. Zidovudine  triphosphate and lamivudine triphosphate concentration‐response relationships in HIV‐ infected persons. AIDS 2000 September 29;14(14):2137‐44.    (99)   Mirochnick M, Siminski S, Fenton T, Lugo M, Sullivan JL. Nevirapine pharmacokinetics in  pregnant women and in their infants after in utero exposure. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2001  August;20(8):803‐5.   (100)   Capparelli EV, Aweeka F, Hitti J, Stek A, Hu C, Burchett SK et al. Chronic administration of  nevirapine during pregnancy: impact of pregnancy on pharmacokinetics. HIV Med 2008  April;9(4):214‐20.   (101)   Nellen JF, Damming M, Godfried MH, Boer K, van der Ende ME, Burger DM et al. Steady‐ state nevirapine plasma concentrations are influenced by pregnancy. HIV Med 2008  April;9(4):234‐8.   (102)   Burger DM, Grintjes KJ, Lotgering FK, Koopmans PP. Therapeutic drug monitoring of  nelfinavir in pregnancy: a case report. Ther Drug Monit 2004 October;26(5):576‐8.   (103)   Angel JB, Khaliq Y, Monpetit ML, Cameron DW, Gallicano K. An argument for routine  therapeutic drug monitoring of HIV‐1 protease inhibitors during pregnancy. AIDS 2001  February 16;15(3):417‐9.   (104)   Bryson Y, Stek A, Mirochnick M, Mofenson L, Connor J, Watts H et al. Pharmacokinetics,  ANtiviral Activity, and Safety of Nelfinvair (NFV) with ZDV/3TC in Pregnant HIV‐Infected  Women and Their Infants: PACTG 353 Cohort 2. Seattle, Washington. 2002.   (105)   Kosel BW, Beckerman KP, Hayashi S, Homma M, Aweeka FT. Pharmacokinetics of  nelfinavir and indinavir in HIV‐1‐infected pregnant women. AIDS 2003 May  23;17(8):1195‐9.  85        (106)   Kosel BW, Beckerman KP, Hayashi S, Homma M, Aweeka FT. Pharmacokinetics of  nelfinavir and indinavir in HIV‐1‐infected pregnant women. AIDS 2003 May  23;17(8):1195‐9.   (107)   Nellen JF, Schillevoort I, Wit FW, Bergshoeff AS, Godfried MH, Boer K et al. Nelfinavir  plasma concentrations are low during pregnancy. Clin Infect Dis 2004 September  1;39(5):736‐40.   (108)   Van Heeswijk RP, Khaliq Y, Gallicano KD, Bourbeau M, Seguin I, Phillips EJ et al. The  pharmacokinetics of nelfinavir and M8 during pregnancy and post partum. Clin  Pharmacol Ther 2004 December;76(6):588‐97.   (109)   Read JS, Best B, Stek A, Hu C, Capparelli E, Holland D et al. Nelfinavir Pharmacokinetics  (625‐mg Tablets) during the Third Trimester of Pregnancy and Post‐partum. 2007; 2007.   (110)   Aweeka F, Tierney C, Stek A, Sun X, Cohn S, Coombs R et al. ACTG 5153s: Pharmacokinetic  Exposure and Virological Response in HIV‐1‐infected Pregnant Women Treated with PI.  2007.   (111)   Hirt D, Urien S, Jullien V, Firtion G, Chappuy H, Rey E et al. Pharmacokinetic modelling of  the placental transfer of nelfinavir and its M8 metabolite: a population study using 75  maternal‐cord plasma samples. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2007 November;64(5):634‐44.   (112)   Peytavin G, Cassard B, de Truchis P, Winter C, Visseaux B, Damond F et al. Reduced  Lopinavir Exposure during Pregnancy: A Case Control Study. 2007.   (113)   Fletcher CV, Anderson PL, Kakuda TN, Schacker TW, Henry K, Gross CR et al.  Concentration‐controlled compared with conventional antiretroviral therapy for HIV  infection. AIDS 2002 March 8;16(4):551‐60.   (114)   Burger D, Hugen P, Reiss P, Gyssens I, Schneider M, Kroon F et al. Therapeutic drug  monitoring of nelfinavir and indinavir in treatment‐naive HIV‐1‐infected individuals.  AIDS 2003 May 23;17(8):1157‐65.   (115)   Best BM, Goicoechea M, Witt MD, Miller L, Daar ES, Diamond C et al. A randomized  controlled trial of therapeutic drug monitoring in treatment‐naive and ‐experienced HIV‐ 1‐infected patients. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2007 December 1;46(4):433‐42.   (116)   Demeter LM, Jiang H, Mukherjee L, and others. A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled,  Open‐label Trial Evaluating the Effect of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Protease  Inhibitor Dose Escalation on Viral Load Responses in Antiretroviral‐experienced, HIV‐ infected Patients with a Normalized Inhibitory Quotient. 2008.   (117)   Kent H. Family‐friendly HIV and AIDS care the goal at Vancouver's Oak Tree Clinic. CMAJ  1996 May 1;154(9):1407‐9.   (118)   Reynolds NR, Sun J, Nagaraja HN, Gifford AL, Wu AW, Chesney MA. Optimizing  measurement of self‐reported adherence with the ACTG Adherence Questionnaire: a  cross‐protocol analysis. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2007 December 1;46(4):402‐9.   86        (119)   Volosov A, Alexander C, Ting L, Soldin SJ. Simple rapid method for quantification of  antiretrovirals by liquid chromatography‐tandem mass‐spectrometry. Clin Biochem 2002  March;35(2):99‐103.   (120)   Alexander CS, Asselin JJ, Ting LS, Montaner JS, Hogg RS, Yip B et al. Antiretroviral  concentrations in untimed plasma samples predict therapy outcome in a population with  advanced disease. J Infect Dis 2003 August 15;188(4):541‐8.   (121)   Burger DM, Bergshoeff AS, De GR, Gibb D, Walker S, Treluyer JM et al. Maintaining the  nelfinavir trough concentration above 0.8 mg/L improves virologic response in HIV‐1‐ infected children. J Pediatr 2004 September;145(3):403‐5.   (122)   Duval X, Peytavin G, Albert I, Benoliel S, Ecobichon JL, Brun‐Vezinet F et al. Determination  of indinavir and nelfinavir trough plasma concentration efficacy thresholds according to  virological response in HIV‐infected patients. HIV Med 2004 July;5(4):307‐13.   (123)   Public Health Agency of Canada. A Guide to HIV/AIDS Epidemiological and Surveillance  Terms. Public Health Agency of Canada 2006;Available from: URL: http://www.phac‐ aspc.gc.ca/publicat/haest‐tesvs/e_e.html   (124)   2006 Epidemiology Report ‐ British Columbia Annual Summary of Reportable Diseases.  British Columbia Centre for Disease Control 2006;Available from: URL:  http://www.bccdc.org/content.php?item=33   (125)   2006 Canadian Census: Data products. Statistics Canada 2006;Available from: URL:  http://www.census2006.ca/english/census06/data/highlights/ethnic/pages/Page.cfm?L ang=E&Geo=CMA&Code=59&Table=1&Data=Dist&StartRec=1&Sort=2&Display=Page&C SDFilter=5000   (126)   Vrijens B, Gross R, Urquhart J. The odds that clinically unrecognized poor or partial  adherence confuses population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses. Basic Clin  Pharmacol Toxicol 2005 March;96(3):225‐7.   (127)   Chappuy H, Treluyer JM, Rey E, Dimet J, Fouche M, Firtion G et al. Maternal‐fetal transfer  and amniotic fluid accumulation of protease inhibitors in pregnant women who are  infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2004  August;191(2):558‐62.   (128)   Kosel BW, Beckerman KP, Hayashi S, Homma M, Aweeka FT. Pharmacokinetics of  nelfinavir and indinavir in HIV‐1‐infected pregnant women. AIDS 2003 May  23;17(8):1195‐9.   (129)   Bryson Y, Stek A, Mirochnick M, Mofenson L, Connor J, Watts H et al. Pharmacokinetics,  ANtiviral Activity, and Safety of Nelfinvair (NFV) with ZDV/3TC in Pregnant HIV‐Infected  Women and Their Infants: PACTG 353 Cohort 2. Seattle, Washington. 2002.   (130)   Mathias AA, Maggio‐Price L, Lai Y, Gupta A, Unadkat JD. Changes in pharmacokinetics of  anti‐HIV protease inhibitors during pregnancy: the role of CYP3A and P‐glycoprotein. J  Pharmacol Exp Ther 2006 March;316(3):1202‐9.   87        (131)   Barry M, Gibbons S, Back D, Mulcahy F. Protease inhibitors in patients with HIV disease.  Clinically important pharmacokinetic considerations. Clin Pharmacokinet 1997  March;32(3):194‐209.   (132)   Ensom MH, Davis GA, Cropp CD, Ensom RJ. Clinical pharmacokinetics in the 21st century.  Does the evidence support definitive outcomes? Clin Pharmacokinet 1998  April;34(4):265‐79.   (133)   Droste JA, Koopmans PP, Hekster YA, Burger DM. TDM: therapeutic drug measuring or  therapeutic drug monitoring? Ther Drug Monit 2005 August;27(4):412‐6.               88       APPENDIX 1 : ACTG SELF­REPORTING ADHERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE    A. When was the last time the subject missed any medications?         Within the past week – go to question B  1‐2 weeks ago  – go to C  2‐4 weeks ago – go to C  1‐3 months ago – go to C  >3 months ago – go to C  Never – go to C        B. If the subject had missed dose(s) within the past week, determine how many doses were  missed:    Yesterday  2 days ago  3 days ago  4 days ago  Other_____________       C. How closely did the subject follow the specific schedule?    All the time  Most of the time  About half of the time  Some of the time  Never       D. Did the subject follow special dosing instructions? (eg. take with food, take on empty stomach)    No  Yes – skip to question F       E. What were the main reasons for non‐adherence?    Forgot  away from home  finds schedule difficult  too busy  ran out of pills  felt sick  avoid side effects  other_________________       89       APPENDIX 2 : HEIRARCHY FOR REPORTING HIV EXPOSURE CATEOGRY    For the purposes of national HIV surveillance reporting, the Public Health Agency of Canada  (PHAC) requires that only one exposure category is assigned to each reported positive HIV test  result or AIDS diagnosis.   As a person may report several risk factors, a hierarchy was  established to determine the activities or situations that are considered to have the highest risk  of HIV transmission.  A positive test result or AIDS diagnosis would be assigned the reported risk  factor that appears highest on the list below.     •  MSM: Men who report having had sex with men; this includes men who report either  homosexual or bisexual contact (i.e. some will also report having had sex with women as  well). It is important to note here that this exposure category refers to sexual behaviour  and not a person's self‐identified sexual identity.   •  MSM/IDU: Men who have had sex with men and have injected drugs.   •  IDU: People who inject drugs, also called injecting drug users. The acronym IDU is also  often applied to the behaviour of injecting drug use, or what is also commonly referred to  as injection drug use.   •  Blood/Blood Products:   o  Recipient of Blood: Received transfusion of whole blood or blood components, such  as packed red cells, plasma, platelets or cryoprecipitate.   o  Recipient of Clotting Factor: Received pooled concentrates of clotting factor VIII or  IX for treatment of hemophilia/coagulation disorder.   •  Heterosexual Contact/Endemic:  o  Origin from a Pattern II Country: People who were born in a country in which  the predominant means of HIV transmission is heterosexual contact;  90       o  Sexual Contact with a Person at Risk: People who report heterosexual contact  with a person who is either HIV‐infected or who is at increased risk for HIV  infection. A person at increased risk for HIV infection would be considered in this  case to include someone who is an injecting drug user, a bisexual man, a person  born in a country in which the predominant means of HIV transmission is  heterosexual contact, a person with hemophilia/ coagulation disorder, or a person  with suspected HIV infection or AIDS.   •  NIR­HET: If heterosexual contact is the only risk factor reported and nothing is known  about the HIV‐related risk factor(s) associated with the partner, the case would be  classified as No Identified Risk‐Heterosexual (NIR‐HET).   •  Occupational Exposure: Exposure to HIV‐contaminated blood or body fluids, or  concentrated virus in an occupational setting.   •  Other: Used to classify a person whose mode of HIV transmission is known but who  cannot be classified into any of the major exposure categories listed.   •  NIR (No Identified Risk): Where the history of exposure to HIV through any of the other  categories is unknown, or there is no reported history. This exposure category may  include:   o  people who are currently being followed up by their local health department;   o  people whose exposure history is incomplete because they have died;   o  people whose exposure history is incomplete because they declined to be  interviewed or were lost to follow‐up; and   o •  people who cannot identify any mode of transmission.   Exposure Category Not Reported: In certain provinces, it is not possible to report  information regarding exposure category. In these situations, people are classified as  Exposure Category Not Reported. This category is used only for positive HIV test reports.  91       •  Perinatal Transmission: The transmission of HIV from an HIV‐infected mother to her  child either   o  during pregnancy,   o  during labour,   o  at birth, or   o  after birth through breastfeeding.   92       APPENDIX 3 : CONCOMITANT MEDICATIONS OF INTEREST    Drugs identified as having drug‐drug interactions with nelfinavir by Thompson MICROMEDEX  database are listed below.       •  ALFUZOSIN      •  INDINAVIR      •  AMBRISENTAN      •  IXABEPILONE      •  AMIODARONE      •  LAMIVUDINE/ZIDOVUDINE      •  AMLODIPINE BESYLATE /ATORVASTATIN   •  LAPATINIB      CALCIUM      •  LOPINAVIR/RITONAVIR      •  AMPRENAVIR      •  LOVASTATIN      •  APREPITANT      •  LOVASTATIN/NIACIN      •  ASPIRIN/PRAVASTATIN SODIUM      •  MARAVIROC      •  ASTEMIZOLE      •  METHADONE    •  ATORVASTATIN      •  METHYLERGONOVINE      •  AZITHROMYCIN      •  MIDAZOLAM      •  CARBAMAZEPINE      •  NIFEDIPINE      •  CASPOFUNGIN      •  NILOTINIB      •  CERIVASTATIN      •  NORETHINDRONE      •  CISAPRIDE      •  PARICALCITOL      •  CYCLOSPORINE      •  PHENOBARBITAL      •  DARIFENACIN      •  PHENYTOIN      •  DASATINIB      •  PIMOZIDE      •  DELAVIRDINE      •  PRAVASTATIN      •  DIDANOSINE      •  QUINIDINE      •  DIHYDROERGOTAMINE      •  RANOLAZINE      •  DIHYDROERGOTAMINE/HEPARIN     •  RIFABUTIN      •  ELETRIPTAN      •  RIFAMPIN      93       •  EPLERENONE      •  RIFAPENTINE      •  ERGOLOID MESYLATES      •  RITONAVIR      •  ERGONOVINE      •  ROSUVASTATIN      •  ERGOTAMINE      •  SALMETEROL      •  ERLOTINIB      •  SAQUINAVIR      •  ESZOPICLONE      •  SILDENAFIL      •  ETONOGESTREL      •  SIMVASTATIN      •  ETRAVIRINE      •  SIMVASTATIN/NIACIN      •  EZETIMIBE/SIMVASTATIN      •  SOLIFENACIN      •  FELODIPINE      •  SUNITINIB      •  FENTANYL      •  TACROLIMUS      •  FENTANYL/DROPERIDOL      •  TADALAFIL      •  FLUTICASONE      •  TEMSIROLIMUS      •  FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE   •  TERFENADINE      /SALMETEROL XINAFOATE      •  TRAZODONE      •  FOSAMPRENAVIR      •  TRIAZOLAM      •  FOSAPREPITANT      •  VARDENAFIL      •  FOSPHENYTOIN      •  VORICONAZOLE                94       APPENDIX 4 :  UBC RESEARCH ETHICS BOARD CERTIFICATES OF APPROVAL   The original full board approval from the UBC Clinical Research Ethics Board and all amendment  approvals for significant changes or additions are included.    95         96              97           98           99       

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0066455/manifest

Comment

Related Items