Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Large smooth cylindrical elements located in a rectangular channel : upstream hydraulic conditions and… Turcotte, Benoit 2008

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2008_fall_turcotte_benoit.pdf [ 3.6MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0063090.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0063090-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0063090-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0063090-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0063090-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0063090-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0063090-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0063090-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0063090.ris

Full Text

     LARGE SMOOTH CYLINDRICAL ELEMENTS LOCATED IN A RECTANGULAR CHANNEL:  UPSTREAM HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS AND DRAG FORCE EVALUATION      by    BENOIT TURCOTTE  B.ING. École Polytechnique de Montréal, Québec, 2004    A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    MASTER OF APPLIED SCIENCE    in    THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (Civil Engineering)          THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)  October 2008  © Benoit Turcotte, 2008  ii    Abstract    Classical approaches  to evaluate  the stability of  large woody debris  (LWD)  introduced  in streams  for  habitat  restoration or  flood management purposes are usually based on  inappropriate assumptions  and hydraulic equations. Results suggest that the physics of small cylindrical elements located in large  channels cannot be  transferred  to  the case of a  large  roughness elements placed  in  small channels.  The  introduction of LWD  in a small channel can generate a significant modification of  the upstream  hydraulic conditions. This modification has direct implications on the stability of the LWD.   Experiments were performed in a controlled environment: a small stream section was represented by  a  low  roughness  rectangular  flume and LWD were modeled with smooth PVC cylinders. Direct  force  measurements were performed with a  load  cell and  results were used  to  identify an equation  that  evaluates  the  drag  force  acting  on  a  large  cylindrical  element  place  in  a  rectangular  channel.  This  equation  does  not  depend  on  a  drag  coefficient.  Water  depths  were  also  measured  during  the  experiments  and  results were  used  to  develop  an  approach  that  evaluates  the  upstream  hydraulic  impacts of a large cylinder introduced in a rectangular channel. The effect of the variation of the unit  discharge  (discharge per unit of width),  cylinder  size,  cylinder  elevation  from  the  channel bed,  and  downstream hydraulic conditions, could be related to the upstream hydraulic conditions with relative  success. Dimensionless parameters were developed to increase the versatility of the approach.   The application of this approach to field cases  is expected to require adjustments, mainly because of  the  roughness of natural environments differs  from  the  smoothness of  the  controlled environment  described in this work.  iii    Table of Contents    Abstract ...................................................................................................................................................... ii  Table of Contents ...................................................................................................................................... iii  List of Tables.............................................................................................................................................. vi  List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................vii  Nomenclature ............................................................................................................................................xi  Acknowledgements..................................................................................................................................xiii  1.0  Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 1  1.1  Project’s Objectives.................................................................................................................... 2  1.2  Thesis Outline............................................................................................................................. 3  2.0  Literature Review ........................................................................................................................... 4  2.1  Evaluation of the Drag Force (Fd) ............................................................................................... 4  2.1.1  Evaluation of the Drag Coefficient (Cd) .............................................................................. 4  2.1.2  Back‐Calculated Drag Coefficients (Cd)............................................................................... 7  2.1.3  Definition of the Upstream Velocity (V)............................................................................. 7  2.1.4  Effect of the Blockage Ratio (BR) ....................................................................................... 8  2.1.5  Effect of the Cylinder Elevation from the Channel Bed (wsg) ........................................... 10  2.1.6  Conclusion on the Drag Force Evaluation ........................................................................ 11  2.2  Evaluation of the Lift Force (Fl) ................................................................................................ 13  2.3  Evaluation of Upstream Hydraulic Conditions ......................................................................... 13  2.3.1  Weir Flow ......................................................................................................................... 14  2.3.2  Orifice Flow ...................................................................................................................... 16  2.3.3  Weir and Orifice Flows ..................................................................................................... 18  2.3.4  Conclusion on the Evaluation of the Upstream Hydraulic Conditions............................. 19  iv    3.0  Experiments ................................................................................................................................. 20  3.1  Experimental Material.............................................................................................................. 20  3.1.1  Flume Description ............................................................................................................ 21  3.1.2  Test Cylinders ................................................................................................................... 21  3.1.3  Water Depth Measurements ........................................................................................... 22  3.1.4  Force Measurement Apparatus ....................................................................................... 22  3.1.5  Flow Meter ....................................................................................................................... 23  3.1.6  Experimental Setup .......................................................................................................... 24  3.2  Experimental Set 1 ................................................................................................................... 27  4.0  Results .......................................................................................................................................... 30  4.1  Streamwise Forces ................................................................................................................... 31  4.1.1  Signal Distribution ............................................................................................................ 32  4.1.2  Comparing Calculated Drag Forces to Measured Streamwise Forces ............................. 34  4.2  Hydraulic Data Set.................................................................................................................... 36  4.2.1  Curve Types ...................................................................................................................... 36  4.2.2  Influence of Known Parameters....................................................................................... 40  5.0  Result Analysis.............................................................................................................................. 45  5.1  Legend Convention .................................................................................................................. 45  5.2  Curve 1‐2‐3 Model ................................................................................................................... 45  5.3  Curve 1‐2‐5 Models .................................................................................................................. 51  5.4  Separation between Curve 2 and Curve 5 ............................................................................... 57  6.0  Comparison of Results ................................................................................................................. 60  6.1  Upstream Water Depth Evaluation.......................................................................................... 60  6.2  Drag Force Evaluation .............................................................................................................. 61  6.2.1  Drag Force Equation......................................................................................................... 62  v    6.2.2  Drag Force Equation and Blockage Ratio ......................................................................... 64  6.2.3  Momentum Equation....................................................................................................... 65  7.0  Applications and Limitations........................................................................................................ 67  7.1  Synthesis of the Approach ....................................................................................................... 67  7.2  Example of the Approach......................................................................................................... 69  7.3  Limitations of the Approach..................................................................................................... 72  8.0  Conclusions .................................................................................................................................. 74  References................................................................................................................................................ 76  Appendix A  Load Cell Calibration ........................................................................................................ 78  A1  Streamwise Force Signal Calibration (Fx).................................................................................. 78  A2  Moment Signal Calibration (Mz)............................................................................................... 80  A3  Vertical Force Signal Calibration (Fy) ........................................................................................ 81  Appendix B   Downstream Water Depth Correction............................................................................. 83  Appendix C  Vertical Forces.................................................................................................................. 86  C1  Comparing Measured Lift Forces (Flm) to Theoretical Lift Forces (Fl)....................................... 86  C 2  Buoyancy forces (Fb)................................................................................................................. 89  C 3   Conclusion on the Lift Force Analysis....................................................................................... 89  Appendix D  Calibration of the α1 Coefficient ...................................................................................... 93  Appendix E  Conception of Figure 5.12 ................................................................................................ 95    vi    List of Tables    Table 3.1.  15 experiments performed for each cylinder size (marked with an “X”) ........................  28    Table 3.2.  Measured and recorded parameters for each experimental run .....................................28    Table 6.1.  List  of  experiments  from  Experimental  Set  1  rejected  from  the  drag  force  comparison analysis ..........................................................................................................62    Table 7.1.  Input parameters of Data Set A and Data Set B................................................................69    vii    List of Figures    Figure 2.1.  Drag  Coefficient  (Cd)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  Reynolds  number  (Re)  for  infinite cylinders ..................................................................................................................5    Figure 2.2.   Two‐dimensional  representations of  (a)  towing  tank or wind  tunnel experiments  and of (b) a large cylinder located in a small rectangular channel .....................................6    Figure 2.3.   Two‐dimensional representation of a large cylinder located on the channel bed...........14    Figure 2.4.    Two‐dimensional representation of a large cylinder acting as a sluice gate .................. 16    Figure 3.1.  Scheme of the flume and experimental setup..................................................................20    Figure 3.2.    Experimental  flume  in  the  hydraulics  laboratory  of  the  Department  of  Civil  Engineering at University of British Columbia ..................................................................21    Figure 3.3.  PVC cylinders used for the experiments ...........................................................................22    Figure 3.4.  Load cell used for the experiments...................................................................................23    Figure 3.5.  Flow meter and sensors installed on the flume recirculation pipe ..................................24    Figure 3.6.  Platform, load cell, and profiled vertical rods...................................................................25    Figure 3.7.  Experimental setup fixed to the flume .............................................................................26    Figure 3.8.  Vernier and Point Gauge at the downstream end of the flume .......................................27    Figure 4.1.   Scheme of different hydraulic states as the downstream water level decreases: (a)  low  turbulence  (b) contraction  (c)  submerged hydraulic  jump  (d) hydraulic  jump  separating  from  cylinder  (e)  hydraulic  jump  separated  from  cylinder  (f)  supercritical conditions. For experiments where  the cylinder  is  located at higher  elevations (wsg):  (g) vortex formation upstream of cylinder and (h) cylinder acting  as a sluice gate ..................................................................................................................31  viii    Figure 4.2.  Distribution of the streamwise force signals (Fx) for six distinct experimental runs ........33    Figure 4.3.   Drag  force  (Fd)  calculated  using  equation  (2.4)  and measured  streamwise  force  (FFx) expressed as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) for experiment   D4wsg010Q10 ...................................................................................................................34    Figure 4.4.   Drag  force  (Fd)  calculated  using  equation  (2.4)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  measured streamwise force (FFx) for 611 experimental runs ...........................................35    Figure 4.5.   Drag force (Fd) expressed as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) for  experiment  D4wsg010Q10,  and  two‐dimensional  schemes  and  photos  representing the hydraulic conditions for each of the 3 curves .......................................37    Figure 4.6.   Drag force (Fd) expressed as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) for  experiment  D4wsg076Q10,  and  two‐dimensional  schemes  and  photos  representing the hydraulic conditions for each of the 4 curves .......................................39    Figure 4.7.   Upstream water depth expressed as a  function of  the downstream water depth  for  both  experiments  D4wsg010Q10  and  D4wsg076Q10  (Note  that  Curve  4  is  considered a being part of Curve 5.) .................................................................................40    Figure 4.8.   Example  of  the  influence  of  the  cylinder  size  (D)  on  the  relation  between  the  upstream water depth (Yup) and the downstream water depth (Ydwn) .............................41    Figure 4.9.   Example of the  influence of the cylinder elevation  (wsg) on the relation between  the upstream water depth (Yup) and the downstream water depth (Ydwn).......................42    Figure 4.10.  Example  of  the  influence  of  the  discharge  (Q)  on  the  relation  between  the  upstream water depth  (Yup) and  the downstream water depth  (Ydwn). The critical  depths (Yc) are identified for each discharge ....................................................................43    Figure 5.1.   Upstream water  depth  (Yup)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn)  for  48  experimental  results  following  a  Curve  1‐2‐3 model.  Critical  water depths (Yc) and 1:1 line are presented as well........................................................46  ix    Figure 5.2.   Upstream water  depth  (Yup)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn)  for  15  experiments  during which  the  cylinder was  located  on  the  flume bed. Critical water depths (Yc) and 1:1 line are presented as well .........................47  Figure 5.3.   Upstream water  depth  (Yup)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn)  for  15  experiments  during which  the  cylinder was  located  on  the  flume bed using compound parameter (5.1). 1:1 line is also presented ..........................48  Figure 5.4.   Upstream water  depth  (Yup)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn)  for  48  Experimental  results  following  a  Curve  1‐2‐3  model  with  compound parameter (5.1) on both axes. 1:1 line is also presented. The spread in  the results is generated by the different cylinder elevation (wsg) values .........................49  Figure 5.5.    Upstream water  depth  (Yup)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn)  for  48  experimental  results  following  a  Curve  1‐2‐3  model  with  compound parameter (5.2) on both axes. 1:1 line is also presented ...............................51  Figure 5.6.    Reference Graph for Curve 1‐2‐3 models with compound parameter (5.2) on both  axes....................................................................................................................................52  Figure 5.7.  Upstream water  depth  (Yup)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn)  for  23  experimental  results  following  a  Curve  1‐2‐5  model  with  compound parameter (5.1) on both axes. 1:1 line is also presented ...............................53  Figure 5.8.   Back‐calculated sluice gate coefficients (Csg) for 25 experimental results following  a  Curve  5  model  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream  Froude  Number  (Frdwn).................................................................................................................................54  Figure 5.9.  Results  from  Experimental  Set  1  and  Experimental  Set  2 where  the  sluice  gate  coefficient  (Csg)  is  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  downstream  Froude  number  (Frdwn).................................................................................................................................55  Figure 5.10  Reference Graph for cylinders acting as sluice gates (Curve 5) ........................................56  Figure 5.11.   Threshold between Curve 1‐2‐3 models and possible Curve 1‐2‐5 models .....................58  Figure 5.12.   Theoretical thresholds for vortex formation upstream of a cylinder ...............................59  x    Figure 6.1.  Calculated  upstream  water  depths  from  Experimental  Set  1  expressed  as  a  function of the measured upstream water depths. The 1:1 line is also presented..........61  Figure 6.2   Calculated drag  force  (Fd) using equation  (6.1) and a drag  coefficient  (Cd) of 1.0  expressed as a function of the measured streamwise force (FFx) using the load cell .......63  Figure 6.3.   Calculated drag force (Fd) using equation (6.1) and a drag coefficient (Cd) based on  equation (6.3) corrected for blockage ratios (BR) using equation (2.9) expressed as  a function of the measured streamwise force (FFx) using the load cell.............................65  Figure 6.4.   Calculated  drag  force  (Fd)  using  the momentum  equations  (2.4)  expressed  as  a  function of the measured streamwise force (FFx) measured with the load cell................66  Figure 7.1.  Diagram  of  the  approach  developed  in  this  research  project  to  calculate  the  upstream water depth  (Yup) and  the drag  force  (Fd)  acting on a  large  cylindrical  element .............................................................................................................................68  Figure 7.2.  Downstream rating curves from Data Set A and Data Set B.............................................70  Figure 7.3.  Measured and calculated upstream rating curves from Data Set A and Data Set B ........71  Figure 7.4.  Calculated  upstream  water  depth  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  measured  upstream water depth for Data Set A and Data Set B ......................................................71  xi    Nomenclature    Aup    Upstream cross‐section area (m 2)  α1    Coefficient defined in equation (5.3)  α2    Coefficient defined in equation (5.4)  B    Channel or flume width (m)  BR    Blockage ratio  Cd    Drag coefficient  Cd BR    Drag coefficient considering the blockage ratio  Cl    Lift coefficient  Csg    Sluice gate coefficient  Cw, Cw*    Weir coefficient  d1,d2,d3    Parameters used in equation (D1), Appendix D, to calibrate equation (5.3)  D    Cylinder diameter (inches, m)  e1, e2    Parameters used in equation (E1), Appendix E   E    Energy (m) defined with equation (2.12)  Ecyl    Energy at the cylinder section (m)  Eup    Energy upstream of the cylinder (m)  Fb    Buoyancy force (N)  Fbm    Measured buoyancy force (N)  Fd    Drag Force (N)  FFx    Streamwise force based on Fx signal (N)  FFy    Vertical force based on Fy signal (N)  Fl    (Dynamic) Lift force (N)  Flm    Measured (dynamic) lift force (N)  FMz    Streamwise force based on Mz signal (N)  Fr    Froude number  Frdwn    Downstream Froude number  Fx    Streamwise signal (Volts)  Fxini    Initial streamwise signal (Volts), Appendix A  Fy    Vertical signal (Volts)  Fyini    Initial vertical signal (Volts), Appendix A  xii    g    Gravity constant (m/s2)  h    Distance between load cell and streamwise force application point (mm), Appendix A  hgate    Weir gate elevation (cm)   l    Cylinder length (m)  M    Momentum (m3), defined with equation (2.5)  Mdwn    Downstream momentum (m 3)  Mup    Upstream momentum (m 3)  MMz    Moment (Nm)  Mz    Moment signal (Volts)  Mzini    Initial moment signal (Volts), Appendix A  ν    Fluid kinematic viscosity (m2/s)  q    Unit discharge (m2/s)  qsg    Orifice flow unit discharge (m 2/s)  qw    Weir unit discharge (m 2/s)  Q    Discharge (L/s, m3/s)  Re    Reynolds number  ρ    Density of fluid (kg/m3)  ρcyl    Density of PVC cylinders (kg/m3)  ρlog    Hypothetical log density (kg/m3), Appendix C  ρw    Density of water (kg/m3)  V    Flow velocity (m/s)  Vcyl    Flow velocity at the cylinder section (m/s)  Vdwn    Downstream flow velocity (m/s)  Vup    Upstream flow velocity (m/s)  Y, Y1, Y2    Water depth (m)  Yc    Critical water depth  Ycyl    Water depth at the cylinder section (m)  Ydwn    Downstream water depth (cm, m)  Ydwn’    Water depth at the vena contracta or contraction (m)  Yup    Upstream water depth (m)  Yw    Weir flow depth (m)  wsg    Cylinder elevation from the channel bed (mm, m)  xiii    Acknowledgements    The  past  24  months  in  Vancouver  have  greatly  contributed  to  my  personal  and  professional  development. This experience was enriched by the presence of professors, technicians, students, and  close individuals who shared their knowledge, resources, and time with me.  I  would  like  to  address  special  thanks  to  my  supervisor,  Dr.  Robert  G.  Millar,  for  funding  and  for  proposing  a  challenging  and motivating  research  project. Dr. Millar  also  gave me  the  possibility  to  develop my own ideas and offered guidance and assistance when needed. The diversity of his interests  added to the richness of my experience at UBC.   I  would  like  to  express  gratitude  to  Dr.  Marwan  Hassan  from  the  department  of  Geography  for  constant  support  and  for  giving  me  opportunities  to  participate  in  research  projects  in  Geomorphology. I believe that my engineering background was significantly improved by his presence.  I owe Dr. Hassan my understanding of watershed processes and evolution.  I  would  also  like  to  thank  Dr.  Violeta  Martin  for  her  devotion  to  students,  including  myself.  Her  contribution made a great difference in all aspects of my laboratory experiments.   I would  like to thank Scott Jackson for electronic resources and computer assistance as well as Doug  Hudniuk, Bill Leung, and Harald Schrempp who were able to convert an experimental setup design into  a flawless final product.  I want to highlight the important contribution of Stephen Rennick, who helped producing additional  experimental data sets. The meticulousness of his work is reflected in my analysis results.  Finally, I am grateful for presence and understanding of my fiancée Rima. Her constant support and  language skills were essential to my success throughout my Master’s degree. 1    1.0 Introduction     Forest management  practice  in  riparian  zones  and  direct  large woody  debris  (LWD)  removal  from  streams have proven to generate negative effects on aquatic habitats (D’Aoust and Millar, 2000), and  have also been linked to increased peak floods by decreasing the in‐stream travel time (Gippel 1995).  The importance of LWD in streams is now recognized and channel restoration projects including LWD  reintroduction have been widely  investigated. However,  the  reported high  failure  rate of  artificially  introduced  roughness  elements  (D’Aoust  and  Millar,  2000;  Shields  et  al.,  2004)  suggests  that  our  understanding of the hydraulics of LWD is not developed enough to create solid guidelines for stream  restoration projects. Therefore, taking a step backwards seems necessary.   Classic  drag  force  experiments  (Lindsey,  1938)  were  performed  using  cylinders  (or  other  shaped  elements)  that were  small  compared  to  the  channel  cross‐section  (Gippel et al., 1992). As a  result,  these elements exerted negligible effects on upstream flow conditions. Conversely, LWD are often of  significant  size  relatively  to  streams cross‐sections and  their effects on  the  local  flow conditions are  usually important. Consequently, direct application of the classical approach to evaluate the drag force  on  LWD  in  streams  presents  2  fundamental  limitations:  (1)  The  flow  velocity  upstream  and  downstream of large cylinders in small channels can be substantially different and (2) the “text book”  values  of  drag  coefficients  can  underestimate  the  true  drag  coefficient  of  LDW  by  an  order  of  magnitude. D’Aoust and Millar (2000) adopted a drag coefficient of 0.3 for LWD elements introduced  in streams while Manners et al. (2007) obtained back‐calculated drag coefficient values as high as 9.0  for natural log jams.   Several studies have analyzed the drag  force acting on modeled cylindrical LWD  (Gippel et al., 1992;  Shields  and Gippel,  1995; Gippel  et  al.,  1996; Baudrick  and Grant,  2000; D’Aoust  and Millar,  2000;  Wallerstein  et  al.,  2001;  Wallerstein  et  al.,  2002;  Hygelund  and  Manga,  2003;  Alonso  2004).  The  dynamic  lift force acting on cylindrical roughness elements has also been  investigated (Alonso 2004).  Inconsistencies were noticed regarding the choice of water velocities and drag coefficients considered  for drag  force evaluations. Moreover, several  factors affecting  the drag  force, such as  the cylindrical  element elevation from the channel bed and the blockage ratio, have not been tested for the range of  conditions that is representative of LWD in streams. Consequently, one objective of this research was  to identify an adequate formulation using appropriate parameters to evaluate the drag force and the  lift force acting on cylindrical roughness element of significant size.  2    The main  challenge  about  LWD  reintroduction  practice  however  comes  from  the  initially  unknown  hydraulic conditions created by the LWD. Ironically, these hydraulic conditions are required to evaluate  the forces acting on the LWD in order to design proper anchoring systems. An approach that predicts  the  variation  in  hydraulic  conditions  induced  by  the  introduction  of  a  large  cylindrical  roughness  element would be valuable for three reasons. (1) From a habitat restoration perspective, a given LWD  size and position could be related to a desired water level and velocity. (2) From a flood management  angle, a given LWD size and position could be related to a stored water volume and to an overbank  flooding  return  period.  (3)  The  predicted  hydraulic  conditions  would  facilitate  a  LWD  stability  investigation  (Baudrick  and  Grant,  2000;  D’Aoust  and Millar,  2000)  for  a  proper  anchoring  system  design, which would limit the eventuality of premature entrainment during flooding events.   Flume experiments were performed  in the hydraulics  laboratory at the University of British Columbia  in 2008. LWD were modeled as cylinders (Gippel et al., 1992; Shields and Gippel, 1995; Gippel et al.,  1996;  Baudrick  and  Grant,  2000;  Wallerstein  et  al.,  2001;  Wallerstein  et  al.,  2002;  Hygelund  and  Manga, 2003). A number of parameters (cylinder size, cylinder vertical position, discharge, initial water  depth) that affect the stability of a roughness element were considered. Dimensionless relations were  developed as a function of the channel width to express the variation  in hydraulic conditions created  by the introduction of a cylindrical roughness element of significant size in a channel.   The motivation behind this study was to create guidelines for river restoration projects  including the  introduction of LWD, but it remains focused on the physics of smooth cylindrical elements introduced  in rectangular channels.   1.1  Project’s Objectives    The first objective of this work was to develop a methodology to evaluate the drag force acting on a  large cylinder located in a channel. This approach only considers the channel hydraulic conditions and  differs from the conventional method that refers to a drag coefficient. A complementary investigation  was performed to identify an accurate equation to evaluate the dynamic lift force acting on cylindrical  elements. These two dynamic forces represent the main uncertainties involved in the estimate of the  cylindrical element stability.    3    The second objective of this work was to develop an approach that evaluates the hydraulic effect of a  large  cylindrical  element.  This  approach  assumed  that  apart  from  local  disturbance  of  the  velocity  profile,  large  cylinders  can  only  have  an  influence  in  the  upstream  direction  (Gippel  et  al.,  1996).  Therefore, the downstream hydraulic conditions were assumed to be independent of the cylinder size  and position, even when the Froude number was less than 1.  The approach proposed  in this work was developed to determine the upstream hydraulic conditions  and the dynamic  forces acting on a cylindrical roughness element  for a range of channel discharges,  channel widths, element diameters, element vertical positions  from  the  channel bed,  together with  downstream  hydraulic  conditions.  It  would  only  be  applicable  for  rectangular  or  wide  channels.  Cylindrical  elements would have  to be of  constant  diameter,  to be  the  same  length  as  the  stream  width, and to be placed perpendicularly to the flow direction (referred as a Yaw angle of 0° by Alonso,  2004) and parallel to or directly on the channel bed.   1.2  Thesis Outline    The structure of this thesis is as follows. Chapter 2.0 presents a literature review of the methods used  to evaluate the drag force and lift force affecting cylindrical elements exposed to flowing water. It also  introduces  hydraulic  equations  that  could  be  used  to  evaluate  the  hydraulic  conditions  created  upstream of a roughness element of significant size. Flume experiments are described in Chapter 3.0.   Experimental  results and drag  force analysis are explained  in Chapter 4.0. Chapter 5.0 presents  the  development  of  the  upstream  hydraulic  conditions  predictive  approach.  Chapter  6.0  compares  the  results  from  the adopted drag  force evaluation equation  to  the classical evaluation approach, which  depends  on  a  drag  coefficient.  Chapter  7.0  synthesizes  the  approach  developed  in  this  research  project,  an  example  of  data  processing  is  given,  and  limits  to  adapt  the  approach  to  field  cases  including  stream  restoration  projects  are  presented.  Finally,  a  summary  of  the  findings  is  listed  in  Chapter 8.0.  4    2.0  Literature Review    The stability of a large cylindrical roughness element depends on two dynamic forces: the drag force Fd  and  the  lift  force  Fl.  Both  forces  depend  on  hydraulic  conditions  that  are  unknown  before  the  roughness element  is  introduced  in the channel. This chapter presents background to the drag force  and  lift  force  evaluation methods.  It  also  introduces  equations  that  could  possibly  be used  for  the  prediction of the hydraulic conditions generated upstream of a large cylindrical element introduced in  a channel.  2.1  Evaluation of the Drag Force (Fd)    The generally accepted equation to describe the drag force Fd acting on a cylindrical is  2 2DlVCF dd ρ=                     (2.1)  Here, Cd represents an empirical drag coefficient, ρ is the density of the fluid, D is the diameter of the  cylinder,  l  is  the  length of  the  cylinder,  and V  is  a  flow  velocity.  Two of  these  terms  appear  to be  recurrently difficult to define in literature: the drag coefficient Cd and the flow velocity V.   2.1.1  Evaluation of the Drag Coefficient (Cd)    The  drag  coefficient  of  a  cylinder  affected  by  an  incident  flow  is  often  presented  in  a  graph  as  a  function of the Reynolds number Re.   ν DVRe =                       (2.2)  Here ν  is  the kinematic viscosity of  the  fluid. Figure 2.1 presents an example of  this graph, which  is  usually presented in hydraulic handbooks. For Re values between 10 3 and 105, the corresponding drag  coefficient values are typically 0.9 to 1.2 for smooth infinite cylinders.   5    1.E‐01 1.E+00 1.E+01 1.E+02 1.E‐01 1.E+00 1.E+01 1.E+02 1.E+03 1.E+04 1.E+05 1.E+06 C d Re Relation for infinite cylinders       The results presented in Figure 2.1 are generally based on experiments performed in towing tanks or  wind tunnels (Lindsey, 1938; Zahm et al., 1972). The cylinders tested are usually small and the flow can  be  considered  of  infinite  extent  (Gippel  et  al.,  1992)  or  infinitely  large  (Hygelund  and   Manga,  2003).  This  means  that  the  boundary  effects  are  negligible  and  that  the  cylinder  has  no  measurable  influence  on  the  upstream  flow  conditions.  Therefore,  the  velocity  upstream  of  the  cylinder  is  comparable  to  the  velocity  at  the  cylinder  cross‐section  or  downstream  of  the  cylinder.  Figure 2.2a presents a two‐dimensional scheme of a towing tank or a wind tunnel experiment.    The drag coefficient evaluation based on Figure 2.1 could only be used to calculate the drag force Fd  acting on LWD in a stream if the LWD would not have a measurable effect on the upstream hydraulic  conditions.  In reality, LWD  in small channels usually generate significant back‐water effects (referred  as afflux by Ranga Raju et al., 1983). In this case, the flow velocity upstream of the cylinder is different  from the velocity at the cylinder cross‐section or downstream of the cylinder. Figure 2.2b presents a  two‐dimensional scheme of a large cylinder placed in a small rectangular channel.   Figure 2.1. Drag Coefficient  (Cd) expressed as a  function of  the Reynolds number  (Re)  for  infinite  cylinders  6    DY1 Y2 (a)   D Yup Ydwn Yw wsg (b)       The difference between  LWD hydraulics  in  streams  (Large D) and  the  classic drag  force experiment  (small D) presented  in Figure 2.2 was  recognized by Gippel et al. 1992 who proposed an alternative  empirical approach to evaluate the drag coefficient of a cylindrical object based only on its geometry:    062.0 81.0 ⎟⎠ ⎞⎜⎝ ⎛= D lCd                     (2.3)   Equation (2.3)  is only valid when  l/D < 21 and when the flow  is perpendicular to the cylinder.  In this  case, drag coefficient values of 0.8 to 1.0 are obtained for l/D ratios ranging from 1 to 21.   Figure 2.2. Two‐dimensional representations of  (a) towing tank or wind tunnel experiments and of  (b) a large cylinder located in a small rectangular channel  7    2.1.2  Back­Calculated Drag Coefficients (Cd)    An alternative method to evaluate the drag coefficient is to back‐calculate it using equation (2.1) if the  drag  force  is known. Hygelund and Manga  (2003) used a  torque wrench  to measure  the drag  force  acting  on  a  cylinder.  Wallerstein  et  al.  (2001)  measured  the  drag  force  on  cylinders  using  a  dynamometer.  Gippel  et  al.  (1996)  and  Manners  et  al.  (2007)  used  the  momentum  approach  to  estimate  the drag  force acting on  cylinders and  log  jams,  respectively  (e.g. Finnemore and Franzini,  2002).  ( )dwnupd MMgF −= ρ                   (2.4)  Here, g is the gravity constant and Mup and Mdwn are the momentum upstream and downstream of the  roughness element respectively. The momentum is defined by the following equation:  2 22 BY gY BqM +=                     (2.5)  Here,  B  is  the  channel  width,  Y  is  the  water  depth,  and  q  is  the  unit  discharge  defined  as  (for  rectangular or wide channel sections only)  B Qq =                        (2.6)  where Q is the total discharge.   The reliability of these techniques to measure the drag force is questionable since the back‐calculated  drag coefficient  is purely empirical and values significantly vary from a study to another. One reason  that partly explains  this variation  is  that  the back‐calculation of  the drag coefficient still depends on  one undefined parameter in equation (2.1): the flow velocity V.   2.1.3  Definition of the Upstream Velocity (V)    Because  a  cylindrical  roughness  element  of  significant  size  creates  a  back‐water  effect,  the  flow  velocity  upstream  of  the  element  (Vup)  differs  from  the  flow  velocity  at  the  element  (Vcyl)  or  downstream  of  the  element  (Vdwn).  This  can  be  straightforwardly  appreciated  in  Figure  2.2b.  For  a  given drag coefficient Cd, flow conditions, and object geometry (D and l), these three velocities used in  equation (2.1) could provide drag force values that are considerably different.   8    D’Aoust  and Millar  (2000)  and Alonso  (2004) did not  specify  the  streamwise  location of  the  reach‐ averaged velocity V to consider  in equation (2.1). Manners et al. (2007) suggested that V  is the flow  velocity “independent of the object” (log jam in their case). This would indicate that the flow velocity  has to be measured upstream of the back‐water region. Wallerstein et al. (2001) and Wallerstein et al.  (2002) proposed that V is the “approach velocity” but did not confirm if this velocity was measured in  the  back‐water  region  or  further  upstream  where  the  influence  of  the  roughness  element  fades.  Gippel  et  al.  (1996)  proposed  that  V would  be  the  “mean  velocity  at  the  section  upstream  of  the  object”.  A similar description was given by Hygelund and Manga (2003) who proposed that V would be  the depth‐averaged velocity of the water as it “approaches” the roughness element (as opposed to the  local velocity, which is the velocity at the element cross‐section).  The depth‐averaged velocity in the back‐water region Vup can be approximated using this equation for  rectangular sections:  upupup up Y q BY Q A QV ===                   (2.7)  Here Aup is the upstream section area. For the purpose of this research, it was assumed that Aup, B, and  Yup should be  taken  in  the back‐water region, upstream of  the  flow contraction zone created by  the  object. This seems to be the best definition of an upstream section and thus the most suitable to use in  equation (2.1) and equation (2.4).   When the roughness element has a significant size (D and  l) compared to the upstream cross‐section  Aup,  this  element  “feels”  a  velocity  that  is  consequently  higher  than  the  approach  velocity  Vup.  Therefore,  this  additional  concern  cannot be  ignored when one  calculates  the drag  force  acting on  large roughness elements (Gippel et al., 1992).   2.1.4  Effect of the Blockage Ratio (BR)    The blockage ratio was proposed as an alternative to correct the drag coefficient obtained from towing  tank or wind tunnel based‐experiments. The blockage ratio BR of a cylinder in a rectangular channel is  evaluated as follow:  upup BY Dl A DlBR ==                     (2.8)  9    If  the  upstream  depth‐averaged  velocity  obtained  from  equation  (2.7)  was  to  be  considered  in  equation  (2.1),  the  drag  coefficient  Cd  could  be  corrected  for  significant  blockage  ratios  using  this  empirical equation proposed by Shields and Gippel (1995):  ( ) 06.21997.0 −−= BRCC dBRd                    (2.9)  This equation was calibrated from 50 flume experiments for BR values ranging from 0.03 to 0.30 and  an approach Froude number of 0.35.   Gippel  (1995)  had  suggested  that  the  effect  of  the  blockage  on  the  drag  coefficient  should  be  considered in stream channels. Shields et al. (2004) referred to equation (2.9) to obtain corrected drag  coefficient Cd BR values of 0.7 to 0.9 for their LWDs structures but did not mention any blockage ratio  value. Curran and Wohl (2002) also used equation (2.9) even if their blockage ratios ranged from 0.3 to  0.8 and that their Froude numbers could be “locally quite high”. They obtained Cd BR values as high as  25.   Hygelund and Manga (2003) collected drag force data from field experiments (Froude number Fr<0.2)  using PVC  cylinders with blockage  ratios  ranging  from 0.1  to 0.7 and  compared  their  results with a  modified but similar version of equation (2.9).   ( ) 21 −−= BRCC dBRd                      (2.10)  Their Cd BR values ranged from 1.0 to 3.3. They observed that as blockage increased, drag increases but  that for blockage ratios greater than about 0.3, the drag (coefficient) Cd BR becomes independent of the  blockage  (ratio)  and  seemed  to  stabilize  at  a  value  of  Cd BR  ~2.1.  This  contradicts  the  assumption  previously made by Curran and Wohl (2002). Wilcox et al. (2006) also considered equation (2.10) for  their flume experiments on resistance partitioning. Equation (2.10) can easily be demonstrated (refer  to Figure 2.2b) using continuity:  cylcylupup YVYV =   ( )DYVYV upcylupup −=   ⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛ −= up cylup Y DVV 1         10    When l=B (cylinder length equals to the channel width), using equation (2.8)  ( )BRVV cylup −= 1   ( )222 1 BRVV upup −=   ( ) 2 2 1 − − −=⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛ BR V V up cyl   This proposes that equation (2.9) and equation (2.10) are simply adjusting Cd to account for the higher  velocity at the cylinder section. However, this demonstration, also presented by Hygelund and Manga  (2003), does not  take  the  flow  contraction  into account  (in  reality, Yup  is greater  than Ycyl + D). The  amplitude of the flow contraction at the cylinder cross‐section can be calculated using the energy (E)  equation:  DEE cylup +=                     (2.11)  where   g VYE 2 2 +=                       (2.12)  One could show that:  ( )21 BR V V upcyl −>                      (2.13)  This means that the larger the cylinder, the more significant the flow contraction. Therefore, the drag  force estimation error using equation (2.1) and equation (2.10) should be greater for large cylinders.   2.1.5  Effect of the Cylinder Elevation from the Channel Bed (wsg)    Gippel et al.  (1992), Gippel et al.  (1996), Wallerstein et al.  (2002), Hygelund and Manga  (2003), and  Alonso (2004) considered the  influence of the cylinder elevation (wsg) from the channel bed (refer to  Figure 2.2b) on the drag coefficient.   Gippel et al. (1996) observed that when the cylinder was located close to the bed (wsg ~ 0), a zone of  near‐zero velocity developed upstream of the cylinder, causing the apparent drag coefficient Cd BR to be  high. They also reported that this zone dissipated and Cd BR decreased as the model (i.e., the cylinder)  was elevated from the channel bed. This disagrees with Figure 3 in Alonso (2004) that clearly shows a  lower drag coefficient value when the cylinder is close to the channel bed (wsg/D ~ 0).   11    Gippel et al.  (1996) also mentioned that the drag coefficient (Cd BR) remained relatively constant with  relative height  (wsg/Yup)  for  larger  flow depths  (when D << Yup). This  tends  to agree with Figure 3 by  Alonso  (2004) but contradicts an observation made by Hygelund and Manga  (2003) who stated  that  this constancy would be valid for large cylindrical elements (D > 30% Yup). Both observations by Gippel  et al. (1996) and Hygelund and Manga (2003) were based on data sets of limited sizes.  Gippel et al. (1992) and Gippel et al. (1996) additionally observed that as the cylindrical element was  raised close to the water surface, Cd BR dropped sharply. This is in contradiction with Wallerstein et al.  (2002) who stated that the occurrence of stationary surface waves caused the drag coefficient (Cd) to  increase considerably when a roughness element was positioned near the free surface.   The  vertical  position  of  the  cylindrical  element  in  the  water  column  is  presented  by  different  parameters in literature. Gippel et al. (1996) expressed the relative depth with the ratio wsg/Ydwn (Ydwn  being  the downstream water depth). Wallerstein et al.  (2002)  suggested a  submergence parameter  defined  as  Yw+D/2, which  is  the  radius  of  the  cylinder  added  to  the weir  flow  above  the  cylinder.  Hygelund and Manga (2003) proposed the depth ratio Yw/(Yw+wsg). Most of these expressions have no  physical meaning in open channel hydraulics.   As a result, it can be concluded that the interaction between the object submergence (or its elevation  from the channel bed) and the drag force is still vague in literature.   2.1.6  Conclusion on the Drag Force Evaluation    It seems that previous authors have performed a limited number of experiments on a restricted range  of  parameters  and  are  thus  not  able  to  conclude  on  a  global  understanding  of  the  effects  of  the  blockage  ratio  (Gippel  et  al.,  1992;  Shields  and Gippel,  1995; Hygelund  and Manga,  2003)  and  log  submergence or cylinder elevation (Gippel et al., 1992; Gippel et al., 1996; Hygelund and Manga, 2003;  and Wallerstein et al., 2002; Alonso, 2004) on  the drag coefficient. Even  in controlled environments  such  as  rectangular  flumes with  smooth  boundaries,  the  conceptual  drag  coefficient  has  not  been  related  to  other  parameters with  great  confidence.  For  example,  equation  (2.3)  from Gippel  et  al.  (1992) is only based on 5 data points. Also, equation (2.9) from Shields and Gippel (1995) only presents  an R2 value of 0.81. This  scatter could be explained by  the  interference with  factors  influencing  the  drag coefficient ratio that were not taken into account.  12    Curran and Wohl (2002)  justified the adoption of equation (2.9) for their field experiments based on  the  fact  that  the  flume  study  on which  it  is  built  is  the  closest  available  simulation  of  their  study.  Shields  et  al.  (2004)  adopted  Cd BR  values  of  0.7  and  0.9  to  design  the  anchoring  of  their  hydraulic  structures. They  confess  that, during  the  second  year  following  construction, 31% of  the  structures  failed during high flows, probably due to  inadequate anchoring. The drag coefficient (Cd) assumed by  D’Aoust and Millar (2000) to evaluate the stability of artificially‐introduced single logs was 0.3 and no  blockage ratio was considered in the drag force calculation. Baudrick and Grant (2000) adopted a drag  coefficient of 1.0  for  their  flume  experiments on modeled  LWD  entrainment.  They mentioned  that  pieces in the larger diameter class generally moved at depths less than their predicted value. Manners  et al. (2007) attempted to adapt the drag coefficient approach to natural log jams. They obtained back‐ calculated  drag  coefficient  values  reaching  9.0,  one  order  of  magnitude  greater  than  the  values  adopted by Shields et al. (2004), D’Aoust and Millar (2000), and Baudrick and Grant (2000).  Even the meaning of the drag coefficient  is confusing  in  literature. Wallerstein et al. (2002) proposed  that Cd is a function of the roughness, element geometry, submergence, element Froude number, and  element Reynolds number. This is comparable to what was proposed by Alonso (2004). Manners et al.  (2007) mentioned that Cd has no physical meaning on its own, while Curran and Wohl (2002) propose  that objects  in flow have an  inherent drag coefficient. Equation (2.3) by Gippel et al. (1992) precedes  this idea. The drag force equation (2.1) is found to be problematic for the following reasons:  • No convincing equation exists to define the drag coefficient and values found in literature vary by  more than one order of magnitude.  • This approach does not seem to be compatible with LWD in small streams because of the  importance of the back‐water effect and flow contraction.  • The influence of factors such as the cylinder elevation from the channel bed on the drag force is  unclear.  An  alternative  approach  to  the  drag  force  equation  (2.1)  is  the  momentum  equation  (2.4).  This  equation does not  include any ambiguous coefficient. However, the momentum equation  is referred  with  limited popularity  in  literature, possibly because  it  is  less versatile and because  it depends on a  hydraulic parameter that is often neglected: the downstream water depth (ydwn), which represents the  condition undisturbed by the cylinder. In the perspective of a river restoration project, Ydwn is initially  known. The effectiveness of the momentum equation will be explored in Chapter 4.0.  13    2.2  Evaluation of the Lift Force (Fl)    The dynamic lift force (Fl) applied on a cylindrical element exposed to flowing water has received little  attention in literature compared to the drag force (Fd). Baudrick and Grant (2000), D’Aoust and Millar  (2000) and Shields et al. (2004) did not consider the dynamic lift force acting on their LWD structures  for stability calculation, assuming that this force would be negligible compared to the static buoyancy  force (Fb).  The dynamic lift force applied on a cylindrical roughness element can be evaluated using this generally  accepted equation:  2 2 up ll DlV CF ρ=                     (2.14)  The  upstream  water  velocity  (Vup)  was  defined  in  Subsection  2.1.3.  The  lift  coefficient  (Cl)  can  be  estimated with the following empirical equation, calibrated for well‐submerged smooth cylinders over  a flat bed, mentioned by Alonso (2004):   ⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛ −= D w l sg eC 4 5.0                     (2.15)  Equation  (2.14) presents  the  same  inconvenience as  the drag  force equation  (2.1):  It depends on a  coefficient that is difficult to define. Moreover, for significant cylindrical object sizes, the blockage ratio  BR defined in equation (2.8) does not seem to have been adapted to equation (2.14).   No  alternative  equation was  found  to  evaluate  the dynamic  lift  force  acting on  a  cylindrical object  exposed to flowing water.   2.3  Evaluation of Upstream Hydraulic Conditions     In  the perspective of a stream restoration project  including LWD  introduction,  the anchoring system  that  supports  the  dynamic  and  static  forces must  be  designed  before  the  log  is  introduced  in  the  stream.  However,  the  hydraulic  conditions  created  upstream  of  the  log  are  initially  unknown  and  equation  (2.1),  equation  (2.4),  and  equation  (2.14)  cannot  be  used.  If  fact,  the  upstream  hydraulic  conditions represent the only unknown on the right hand side of the momentum equation (2.4). This  section presents a review of open channel flow equations that could be used to evaluate the hydraulic  conditions created upstream of a cylinder introduced in a rectangular channel.   14    A procedure to approach the hydraulics of a cylinder disposed horizontally at a given distance from the  channel bed (wsg) would be to consider two interdependent unit discharges (refer to Figure 2.2b): the  weir  flow unit discharge  (qw) above  the element and  the orifice  flow unit discharge  (qsg) under  the  element.   sgw qqq +=                       (2.16)  In this case, q is a known parameter while qw and qsg are not defined.  2.3.1  Weir Flow    When the gap between the channel bottom and the cylinder (wsg) is negligible (Figure 2.3), one could  assume  that  the  total unit discharge q can be evaluated using a weir  flow equation.  If  the approach  velocity  (Vup)  is neglected,  the weir  flow  equation  is  expressed  as  follow  (based on  Finnemore  and  Franzini, 2002):  ( ) 23* 2 3 2 DYgCq upww −=                   (2.17)  where Cw * is a weir coefficient. Other parameters have been defined previously.    D Yup Ydwn Yw           Figure 2.3. Two‐dimensional representation of a large cylinder located on the channel bed  15    In order to obtain a negligible upstream velocity in the back‐water region, the blockage ratio defined in  equation  (2.8)  would  have  to  be  significant  and  the  drag  force  acting  on  the  element  could  be  estimated using hydrostatic force equations. This assumption cannot be made for the entire range of  hydraulic conditions and  log sizes  involved  in a stream restoration project. Equation  (2.17) takes  the  following form when the upstream energy defined in equation (2.12) is considered:  ( ) 23* 2 3 2 DEgCq upww −=                   (2.18)  In order to evaluate the upstream water depth (Yup) for a given discharge (qw) and cylinder size (D), one  has  to  solve  a  complex  equation  that  includes  the undefined weir  coefficient  (Cw*). A  collection of  empirical  formulas  characterizing  Cw*for  different weir  crest  shapes  are  available  in  literature  and  often depend on upstream hydraulic conditions as well. Indeed, a large proportion of the effort made  in research to understand the hydraulics of weir gates have been made in the perspective to calculate  a discharge for given upstream hydraulic conditions, and not the opposite.    The closest weir crest commonly present in literature that approaches the shape of a cylindrical weir is  the overflow spillway crest. Finnemore and Franzini (2002) presented a graph (Figure 11.33) where the  weir coefficient (Cw) was defined by:  gCC ww 23 2*=                     (2.19)  In equation (2.19), Cw would take a minimum value of 1.7 for low flows and a maximum value of 2.3 for  high flows and significant spillway height. These  limits could fluctuate  if one considers the difference  between a properly‐designed overflow spillway and a cylindrical element acting as a weir.   To add to the complexity of the problem, equation (2.17) and equation (2.18) are only valid when the  downstream  water  depth  (Ydwn)  does  not  affect  the  upstream  water  depth  (Yup).  This  assumption  cannot be made for a range of conditions considered in the present project. It is unclear in literature if  the  influence of the downstream hydraulic conditions can be corrected with the weir coefficient only  or  if  a  modification  of  equation  (2.17)  or  equation  (2.18)  is  required.  The  evaluation  of  Yup  using  common weir flow equations for given q, D, and Ydwn does not appear to find any simple solution.   16    2.3.2  Orifice Flow    When the cylinder is not fully submerged, water is confined under the cylinder, which acts as a sluice  gate (Figure 2.4). The closest sluice gate shape commonly presented  in  literature that compares to a  cylinder is the radial gate. Based on Bernoulli (or the energy) equation, Shahrokhnia and Javan (2006)  proposed this sluice gate (or orifice) flow equation for radial gates and rectangular channels:  ( )'2 dwnupsgsgsg YYgwCq −=                  (2.20)   In equation (2.20), Csg  is the sluice gate coefficient and Ydwn’  is the downstream water depth taken at  the vena contracta or minimum  jet  thickness  (Clemmens et al., 2003),  just downstream of  the gate.  This parameter depends on the sluice gate height and shape and is thus initially unknown. Shahrokhnia  and  Javan  (2006) mentioned  that, under  free‐flow  conditions,  the downstream hydraulic  conditions  cannot affect the upstream water depth or passing discharge (qsg) and can therefore be ignored. In this  case, equation (2.20) simplifies into:  ( )upsgsgsg YgwCq 2=                   (2.21)  Shahrokhnia and Javan (2006) calibrated equation (2.20) and (2.21) based on flume experiments with  radial gates. They obtained Csg values of 0.89 and 0.57  for both submerged and  free‐flow conditions  respectively.   D Yup Ydwn wsg Ydwn’     Figure 2.4. Two‐dimensional representation of a large cylinder acting as a sluice gate  17    Swamee  (1992) presented a  simple approach  to  calibrate vertical  sluice gate  coefficients. However,  both free flow and submerged flow conditions where expressed with equation (2.21). The influence of  the  downstream  water  depth  for  submerged  flow  conditions  was  included  in  the  equation  that  calculates  the  discharge  coefficient.  This  corresponds  to  what  was  suggested  by  Finnermore  and  Franzini (2002): Csg can absorb the effects of the upstream velocity and downstream water depth.  Clemmens et al.  (2003) developed  the more complex Energy‐Momentum  (E‐M) method  to calibrate  radial gate discharges under both free‐flow and submerged flow conditions. They commented that the  transition between free‐flow and submerged flow could be well captured but still needed refinement.  Tony  and  Wahl  (2005)  used  a  large  data  set  to  improve  the  precision  of  the  empirical  relations  developed by Clemmens et al. (2003).   The  approach  proposed  by  Swamee  (1992)  and  Clemmens  et  al.  (2003) was  based  on  an  iterative  method that  is not convenient for the purpose of the present study. Here, qsg  is known while Yup and  Csg (which depends on Yup and Ydwn) have to be defined.   Shahrokhnia  and  Javan  (2006)  unsurprisingly  stated  that  the  accurate  estimation  of  the  discharge  coefficient is the main problem in evaluating the discharge for all kinds of sluice gates. They proposed  that Csg is affected by viscosity, velocity, turbulence, velocity distribution, and the shape of the gate. A  similar statement was proposed by Ferro (2000).  In this study, the viscosity of water, and shape and  roughness  of  the  gate  (cylinders)  was  assumed  to  be  constant.  Turbulence  is  probably  the  most  difficult parameter to put  into equation. Sheridan et al. (1997) performed flume experiments of flow  past a cylinder close to a free surface focusing on the velocity distribution, vorticity distributions and  turbulence of the flow. Based on visual records, they observed a link between Froude numbers and the  cylinder elevation (wsg), velocity distribution, and vorticity distribution. Considering these results, it can  be assumed that the flow velocity, velocity distribution and turbulence past a cylinder can be related  to  the  downstream  Froude  number  and  cylinder  elevation.  This  hypothesis  is  expressed  by  the  following function:  ( )sgdwnsg wFrfC ,=                     (2.22)  Here, the downstream Froude number Frdwn is defined as:  ( ) 5.1dwndwn Yg qFr =                     (2.23)  18    One  striking  conclusion  about  orifice  flow  research  is  that  the  terms  “free  flow  conditions”  and  “submerged flow conditions” are not defined precisely in literature, nor expressed as a function of the  downstream Froude number. One could assume that when the sluice gate opening is smaller than the  critical water depth (Yc, a property of the unit discharge)  33.02 ⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛= g qYc                       (2.24)  free‐flow  conditions  will  occur  if  the  downstream  Froude  number  is  lesser  than  1  (supercritical  conditions)  and  submerged  flow  conditions  will  be  observed  if  the  hydraulic  jump  reaches  the  downstream  side of  the gate  (subcritical conditions). This hypothesis  is comparable  to a description  made by Clemmens et al. (2003) who proposed that submergence occurs when the rising downstream  water depth starts to affect the upstream water depth. However, for high gate elevations (wsg>Yc), this  hypothesis is ambiguous.   The importance of the critical water depth in the understanding of orifice flows is only known to have  been  mentioned  by  Ferro  (2000)  and  Shahrokhnia  and  Javan  (2006).  Both  studies  were  based  on  dimensional  analysis  and  captured  the  importance  and  versatility  the  critical  water  depth.  The  dimensionless parameter Yc/wsg proposed by Ferro (2000) and Shahrokhnia and Javan (2006) and the  hypothesis expressed  in equation (2.22)  inspired a series of analyses that will be described  in Section  5.3.  2.3.3  Weir and Orifice Flows    When  a  cylinder  lies  in mid‐flow  (refer  to  Figure  2.2b),  both weir  and  orifice  flow  unit  discharges  (equation (2.16)) have to be considered (qw and qsg respectively). Because both orifice and weir flows  have a direct effect on the upstream water depth, the problem becomes complex.   To our knowledge, Ferro (2000) is the only study based on hydraulic equations that attempted to solve  this problem. A dimensional approach was adopted and empirical equations were calibrated to solve  the problem. However,  the downstream water depth was not  considered  and  the  influence of  the  downstream  hydraulic  conditions was  not mentioned.  Therefore,  the  equations  proposed  by  Ferro  (2000) are not compatible with subcritical  flows observed  in natural settings and were consequently  not considered in the present work.   19    2.3.4  Conclusion on the Evaluation of the Upstream Hydraulic Conditions     As  for  the  drag  force  estimation  using  equation  (2.1),  it  does  not  seem  possible  to  evaluate  the  hydraulic  conditions  created  upstream  of  a  cylinder  without  having  to  deal  with  ambiguous  coefficients. To our knowledge, a cylindrical element acting as a weir and a sluice gate has not yet been  considered in literature.   As previously mentioned, most of  the  research done on weirs  and  sluice  gates  try  to  evaluate  the  discharge with known upstream hydraulic conditions while the objective of this project  is to evaluate  the upstream hydraulic conditions knowing the total discharge and downstream hydraulic conditions.  As a result, equations proposed in literature can only be considered in this work to a certain extent.   As stated in Section 1.1, the second objective of this project was to develop a method that evaluates  the upstream hydraulic conditions based on the following hypothesis: for a given combination of unit  discharge (q), cylindrical element diameter (D), sluice gate opening (wsg), and downstream water depth  (Ydwn),  there  is  only  one  possible  upstream  water  depth  (Yup).  This  assumption  would  be  valid  for  rectangular  or  wide  channels  where  the  channel  width  (B)  is  equal  to  the  cylinder  length  (l),  for  constant element skin roughness, and for cylindrical elements disposed parallel to the channel bed and  perpendicular to the flow direction. This method is developed in Chapter 5.0.  20    3.0  Experiments    A series of flume experiments were performed in the hydraulics laboratory of the Department of Civil  Engineering at University of British Columbia with the objective to determine the drag and  lift forces  acting on a range of “large” cylinders  located at different elevations from the channel bed. The term  “large” refers to significant blockage ratios. The hydraulic conditions upstream and downstream of the  cylinders were  also  taken  into  account.  This  chapter  presents  a  complete  description  of  the  flume  experiments.   3.1  Experimental Material    Figure 3.1 presents a scheme of the experimental setup. Each component of the setup is described in  the following subsections.           Figure 3.1. Scheme of the flume and experimental setup 21    3.1.1  Flume Description    The  Plexiglas  flume  (Figure  3.2) used  for  the  experiments was  6.232m  long  (X or  streamwise  axis),  0.476m high (Y axis), and 0.152m wide (Z axis). The pump had a capacity of 0.020m3/s. The discharge  was  controlled by a butterfly valve. A  small  reservoir and  series of  flow  conditioners  located at  the  head of the flume (X=0.000m) ensured an  initially uniform velocity distribution over the width of the  channel. An adjustable  thin plate weir gate  located at  the downstream end of  the  flume made  the  control of the water depth possible. The slope of the flume was set to 0% for all the experiments.   3.1.2  Test Cylinders    Low  roughness  solid  Polyvinyl Chloride  (PVC)  cylinders were used  for  the  experiments  (Shields  and  Gippel, 1995; Gippel et al., 1996; Hygelund and Manga, 2003). Their density (ρcyl) was 1 409 kg/m3. It  was assumed that the hydraulics of PVC cylinders and LWD would be governed by the same dominant  factors. Baudrick and Grant (2000) mentioned that cylinders represent a reasonable model for logs in  streams. Five different cylinder sizes (Figure 3.3) where chosen: from 2 to 6 inches in diameter with a 1  inch  increment. The  length (l) of each cylinder was precisely adjusted to fit the width of the flume B  (0.152 m).     Figure 3.2. Experimental flume in the hydraulics laboratory of the Department  of Civil Engineering at University of British Columbia  22        3.1.3  Water Depth Measurements    Water depths were measured upstream  (Yup) and downstream  (Ydwn) of  the  cylinder  location  in  the  flume  using  rulers  (0.300m  long,  0.001m  increments)  fixed  to  the  transparent  flume walls. Depths  were measured  relative  to  the horizontal  flume bed. Other  rulers were used  to measure  the water  level at the contraction in the cylinder region as well as the cylinder elevation (wsg) and the weir flow  depth (Yw) on top of the cylinder.  3.1.4  Force Measurement Apparatus    One objective of  this  research was  to  investigate  the applicability of  the momentum equation  (2.4).  ( )dwnupd MMgF −= ρ     The right hand side of the equation depends on experimentally measured hydraulic parameters (Y and  q) while the  left hand side of the equation was measured  independently. Gippel et al. (1996) used a  dynamometer to measure the drag force applied on cylinders. Wallerstein et al. (2001) and Wallerstein  et al. (2002) used an electronic balance to evaluate the drag force while Hygelund and Manga (2003)  used a torque wrench for the same purpose. For this research project, a load cell (model MC3A from  AMTI, Figure 3.4) was used. The load cell presented 6 degrees of freedom, but only three components  Figure 3.3. PVC cylinders used for the experiments 23    of  interest were  considered:  the  streamwise  force  FFx,  the  vertical  force  FFy,  and  the moment MMz  (which is equivalent to FFx multiplied by a distance h).  Output from the load cell was expressed as a voltage. A number of calibration tests (Appendix A) using  weights were performed to convert the voltage signals into force and moment units. It was found that  the voltage and the applied load were linearly proportional.   Gippel  et  al.  (1996)  commented  that  vibration  of  the  force‐measuring  apparatus  made  accurate  measurement  difficult  during  their  experiments.  Similarly,  Alonso  (2004)  suggested  that  vortex  shedding due  to  flow separation  from cylinders may  lead  to  severe  flow‐induced body vibration. To  limit  the errors  related  to  this phenomenon,  the  load cell was connected  to a computer and signals  were  recorded every  second  (1 Hz). The duration of each  test varied  from 15  sec  to 329  sec with a  typical test being performed for 90 sec. (Subsection 4.1.1).  3.1.5  Flow Meter    The  discharge  was  measured  using  a  GE  Panametrics  AT  868  flow  meter  that  was  fixed  to  the  recirculation pipe of the flume (Figure 3.5). The precision of this discharge‐measuring device was set to  0.001 L/s (10‐6 m3/s) but its true accuracy was not fully tested.         Figure 3.4. Load cell used for the experiments 24        3.1.6  Experimental Setup    In  order  to  measure  the  force  acting  on  the  cylinders  with  minimum  interference  with  hydraulic  conditions,  the  load  cell was  fixed  to  an aluminum platform  (Figure 3.6)  that was  fixed  to  the  rails  along the top of the flume. The upper part of the load cell was connected to the test cylinder with two  vertical  rods, acting as  two arms holding  the cylinder  in  the water. The  rods were adjustable  in  the  vertical direction  (Y axis). Therefore,  it was possible  to adjust  the elevation of  the  cylinder  for each  experiment in order to vary the distance between the cylinder and the flume bed (wsg).   The  vertical  rods  were  machined  to  present  a  more  streamlined  profile  in  order  to  minimize  the  residual drag. Their maximum thickness (Z axis) after machining was 0.002 m (originally 0.005m) and  their width was 0.025m in the streamwise direction (X axis). The rods presented a lateral blockage of  about 3% of the flume width for weir flows.   Figure 3.5. Flow meter and sensors installed on the flume recirculation pipe 25        The experimental setup is presented in Figure 3.7. The platform was located at 3.800m from the flume  head (X = 3.800m), where the velocity profile appeared to be stable. The ruler measuring the upstream  water elevation was  located 1.100m upstream of  the  aluminum platform  location  (X=2.700m).  This  conforms to the upstream location definition mentioned in Subsection 2.1.3. The ruler measuring the  downstream  water  depth  was  located  1.200m  downstream  of  the  aluminum  platform  location  (X=5.000)  in order  to avoid  the hydraulic  instabilities produced at  the cylinder  location as well as  to  avoid the effect of the flow acceleration as it approaches the downstream weir gate (X=6.230m).   Important water surface fluctuations were expected  in the downstream part of the flume, especially  when  hydraulic  jumps  would  form  downstream  of  the  cylinder.  This  could  eventually  produce  unacceptable  estimation  errors  of  Ydwn  using  a  conventional  ruler  described  in  Subsection  3.1.3.  Therefore, it was decided to use a Point Gauge fixed to a Vernier (Figure 3.8) with a precision of 10‐4m  to measure the downstream gate elevation (hgate).  It was assumed that for given measured hgate and q,  there is only one possible Ydwn. Point Gauge measurements would represent a reference that would be  used  to confirm or adjust  suspicious Ydwn values. Results of  this analysis are exposed  in Appendix B.  Point Gauge measurements  could not be used  to  confirm or adjust  supercritical downstream water  depth values (Equation (2.17) is only valid for subcritical upstream water depths).       Figure 3.6. Platform, load cell, and profiled vertical rods 26        Finally,  in order  to minimize  cylinder‐wall  interference, which  could  significantly affect  the  load  cell  force and moment measurements, grease was used to  lubricate the ends of each cylinder as well as  the profiled rod sides adjacent to  the  flume walls. Occasionally, when small cylinders  (diameter of 2  and  3  inches) were  tested,  interference with  the wall was  evident  in  the  load  cell  signal.  In  these  circumstances, light tapping of the flume wall at the cylinder location would usually release the friction  between the cylinder and the walls.    Figure 3.7. Experimental setup fixed to the flume 27        3.2  Experimental Set 1    One objective of  the experiments was  to  investigate  the  influence of  the unit discharge  (q), cylinder  size  (D),  cylinder elevation  (wsg), and downstream water depth  (Ydwn) on  the upstream water depth  (Yup). This would be completed under a wide  range of hydraulic conditions  including blockage  ratios  (BR) and Froude numbers (Fr).   A series of experiments were planned to  investigate one of the four variables q, D, wsg, and Ydwn at a  time, while holding the other three variables constant. Fifteen experiments for each cylinder (diameter  of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 inches) were proposed (Table 3.1). Three flume discharges (Q) were chosen (5, 10,  and 15L/s) and 6 different cylinder elevations from the channel bed (wsg) were selected (0, 10, 30, 48,  76, and 100 mm). The last 3 elevations correspond to the critical water depth (Yc from equation (2.24))  related to the 3 discharges (48mm, 76mm, and 100mm for 5L/s, 10L/s, and 15L/s respectively). Finally,  each  of  the  15  experiments  presented  in  Table  3.1  would  include  up  to  11  distinct  downstream  hydraulic  conditions,  from a water depth Ydwn of about 0.3m  to a maximum downstream weir gate  opening (hgate=0.0m). As a result, a maximum of 825 hydraulic states (or runs) distributed over a total  Figure  3.8.  Vernier  and  Point  Gauge  at  the  downstream end of the flume  28    of  75  experiments  were  initially  planned  for  the  Experimental  Set  1.  The  measured  or  recorded  parameters for each hydraulic state are presented in Table 3.2.   For experiments when the cylinder was resting on the flume bed (wsg = 0), the load cell measurements  were not collected because of the interference between the flume bed and the cylinder. In these cases  (15  experiments),  the  drag  and  lift  forces  had  to  be  estimated  using  theoretical  equations  and  measured hydraulic parameters.    Q = 5L/s  Q= 10L/s  Q= 15L/s  wsg = 0    mm  X  X  X  wsg = 10  mm  X  X  X  wsg= 30   mm  X  X  X  wsg= 48   mm  X  X  X  wsg= 76   mm    X  X  wsg= 100 mm      X      Cylinder size  D  Distance from the channel bed  wsg  Discharge  Q  Downstream gate height  hgate  Downstream water level  Ydwn  Water depth at the contraction  Ydwn’  Water depth on top of cylinder (weir flow)  Yw  Upstream water depth  Yup  Streamwise force signal  Fx  Streamwise moment signal  Mz  Vertical force signal  Fy        Table 3.1. 15 experiments performed for each cylinder size  (marked with an “X”)  Table  3.2.  Measured  and  recorded  parameters  for  each  experimental run 29    Since monitored discharge values were not constant over time, a tolerance range was defined for each  discharge. If a monitored value fell outside of this ±2% range, the discharge was adjusted immediately  with  the  valve.  These  corrections  were  mostly  required  at  5L/s  and  15L/s  while  the  discharge  measurements appear to be stable at 10L/s.   In order  to  simplify  the  experiment  labeling,  a  notation  that  identifies  each of  the  75  experiments  using the constant parameters D, wsg, and Q was adopted. For instance, the experiment for which the  cylinder diameter (D) was 3 inches, the cylinder elevation from the channel bed (wsg) was 10 mm, and  the flume discharge (Q) was 10 L/s, was labeled D3wsg010Q10.     30    4.0  Results    Experimental Set 1 was completed between  January and March 2008. This  includes 75 experiments  and 763 different hydraulic states. Subcritical downstream Froude numbers (Frdwn) ranged from 0.080  (D6wsg000Q05)  to  0.859  (D2wsg076Q10),  supercritical  downstream  Froude  numbers  ranged  from  1.383  (D2wsg048Q15)  to  3.171  (D6wsg000Q05),  and  the  blockage  ratio  (BR)  varied  between  0.20  (D2wsg010Q05) and 0.83 (D6wsg030Q05).   All experiments were  initiated at  relatively  low Froude numbers  (i.e.,  large water depth). Therefore,  the water surface at the cylinders initially showed little disturbance (Figure 4.1a). As the downstream  weir  gate was  lowered,  a  flow  contraction  appeared  downstream  of  the  cylinders  and  turbulence  made downstream water depth measurements more difficult  (Figure  4.1b). When  the downstream  water depth Ydwn  reached a given  level,  this  contraction  (or  trough) would  collapse  into a hydraulic  jump  that  stands  flat  downstream  of  the  cylinder  location,  and  local  turbulence  would  drastically  decline  (Figure  4.1c).  As  the  downstream  Froude  number  was  set  to  higher  values,  turbulence  intensified progressively (Figure 4.1d) and in most of the 75 experiments, the hydraulic jump separated  from the cylinders (Figure 4.1e) and was finally flushed out of the flume (Figure 4.1f). These qualitative  observations for each of the 763 hydraulic states are part of Experimental Set 1.   At high cylinder elevation (wsg) and low downstream water depths (ydwn), instabilities were observed at  the surface of  the water  just upstream of  the cylinders and vortex pairs would  form when  the weir  flow became shallow (Figure 4.1g). It was also observed that the appearance of these vortices would  correspond to a sharp decline in the streamwise force signal (Fx) and a noticeable drop of the upstream  water depth (Yup). The vortex pairs would fade as the downstream water depth was set to a lower level  and they would disappear when the difference between the upstream and downstream water depth  became small (Figure 4.1h). At this point, the cylinder would no longer be submerged and it would act  as a sluice gate.  31    (a) (c) (b) (e) (d) (g) (f) (h)Vortex       4.1  Streamwise Forces    One objective of this research was to compare the streamwise force measured with the load cell to the  drag  force  calculated  using  hydraulic  conditions  and  equation  (2.4).  Two  independent  signals were  initially considered to measure the horizontal hydraulic forces: the streamwise force signal (Fx) and the  moment signal  (Mz). These  two signals were converted  into streamwise  forces  (refer  to Appendix A)  that turned out to be virtually identical for the majority of cases. However, the load cell was limited to  measure moment values  (MMz)  less than about 9Nm  (corresponding to  forces ranging  from 16.9N to  18.4N, depending on D and wsg). Since streamwise forces (FFx) as high as 29N were measured,  it was  decided to work primarily with the streamwise force signal.   Figure 4.1. Scheme of different hydraulic states as the downstream water level decreases: (a) low turbulence  (b) contraction (c) submerged hydraulic jump (d) hydraulic jump separating from cylinder (e) hydraulic jump  separated from cylinder  (f) supercritical conditions. For experiments where the cylinder  is  located at higher  elevations (wsg): (g) vortex formation upstream of cylinder and (h) cylinder acting as a sluice gate.  32    4.1.1  Signal Distribution    A total of 610 series of streamwise force data were recorded. This corresponds to the 60 experiments  for which the load cell was in use, i.e, when wsg was greater than 0. Measurements were recorded at a  frequency of 1 Hz, for durations ranging from 15 seconds to 329 seconds, with an average duration of  95 seconds.   Series  that  presented  a  standard  deviation  smaller  than  0.2N  were  80  seconds  long  on  average.  Conversely, data  sets with a  standard deviation greater  than 0.5N were about 170  seconds  long on  average.  These  high  standard  deviation  values were  observed  for  12  different  experiments, mostly  with  the  4  and  6  inch  diameter  cylinders.  For  5  of  these  experiments,  significant  vibrations  were  observed during  testing  (D2wsg100Q15, D4wsg030Q10, D4wsg030Q15, D4wsg48Q15, D6wsg30Q10).  This  phenomenon  was  also  reported  by  Gippel  et  al.  (1996)  and  Alonso  (2004).  Instabilities  as  a  consequence  of  vortex  formation  were  noted  in  another  3  experiments  (D6wsg030Q15,  D6wsg048Q15, D6wsg100Q15), while during 4 of the 12 experiments (D4wsg076Q15, D6wsg048Q10,  D6wsg076Q10, D6wsg076Q15), no irregularities were observed.   The distribution of  the  signal  records  (126  in  total)  forming  these 12 experiments was examined  in  detail.  Since a normal distribution would usually be associated  to  representative data  set  sizes,  the  distribution shape of each record was investigated. Figure 4.2 presents 6 different distribution shapes,  each divided into 9 intervals from the minimum to the maximum recorded values.  Figure 4.2a and Figure 4.2d present relatively symmetric normal distributions and are thus associated  to  data  sets  of  representative  sizes.  Figure  4.2e  presents  an  apparently  normal  but  asymmetric  distribution. This data set was also considered to be of representative size. Figure 4.2c and Figure 4.2f  present symmetric distributions that are the inverse of a normal distribution. This could be explained  by the cylinders vibration tempo being in harmony with the signal recording rate (1Hz). Finally, Figure  4.2b presents a distribution that  is neither normal nor symmetrical. However, this distribution shape  could also be related to the signal recording rate.   It was concluded that the signal distribution shape was a poor detector of anomalous load cell records.  Consequently,  the  610  average  signal  values  were  considered  to  be  representative  of  the  actual  streamwise forces.   33      0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 [2 .5 80 ‐2 .6 14 [ [2 .6 14 ‐2 .6 31 [ [2 .6 31 ‐2 .6 48 [ [2 .6 48 ‐2 .6 65 [ [2 .6 65 ‐2 .6 82 [ [2 .6 82 ‐2 .6 99 [ [2 .6 99 ‐2 .7 16 [ [2 .7 16 ‐2 .7 33 [ [2 .7 33 ‐2 .7 50 ] N um be r o f m ea su re m en ts D2wsg100Q15 ; Ydwn = 0.127m 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 [2 .3 50 ‐2 .6 92 [ [2 .6 92 ‐2 .8 63 [ [2 .8 63 ‐3 .0 34 [ [3 .0 34 ‐3 .2 05 [ [3 .2 05 ‐3 .3 76 [ [3 .3 76 ‐3 .5 47 [ [3 .5 47 ‐3 .7 18 [ [3 .7 18 ‐3 .8 89 [ [3 .8 89 ‐4 .0 60 ] D4wsg030Q10 ; Ydwn = 0.047m 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 [1 .3 7‐ 2. 11 [ [2 .1 1‐ 2. 48 [ [2 .4 8‐ 2. 85 [ [2 .8 5‐ 3. 22 [ [3 .2 2‐ 3. 59 [ [3 .5 9‐ 3. 96 [ [3 .9 6‐ 4. 33 [ [4 .3 3‐ 4. 70 [ [4 .7 0‐ 5. 07 ]N um be r o f m ea su re m en ts D4wsg030Q15 ; Ydwn = 0.066m 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 [2 .0 90 ‐2 .4 96 [ [2 .4 96 ‐2 .6 99 [ [2 .6 99 ‐2 .9 02 [ [2 .9 02 ‐3 .1 05 [ [3 .1 05 ‐3 .3 08 [ [3 .3 08 ‐3 .5 11 [ [3 .5 11 ‐3 .7 14 [ [3 .7 14 ‐3 .9 17 [ [3 .9 17 ‐4 .1 20 ] D4wsg048Q15 ; Ydwn = 0.140m 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 [2 .6 80 ‐2 .7 24 [ [2 .7 24 ‐2 .7 46 [ [2 .7 46 ‐2 .7 68 [ [2 .7 68 ‐2 .7 90 [ [2 .7 90 ‐2 .8 12 [ [2 .8 12 ‐2 .8 34 [ [2 .8 34 ‐2 .8 56 [ [2 .8 56 ‐2 .8 78 [ [2 .8 78 ‐2 .9 00 ] N um be r o f m ea su re m en ts Fx Signal (Volt) D4wsg076Q15 ; Ydwn = 0.139m 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 [1 .7 30 ‐2 .8 66 [ [2 .8 66 ‐3 .4 34 [ [3 .4 34 ‐4 .0 02 [ [4 .0 02 ‐4 .5 70 [ [4 .5 70 ‐5 .1 38 [ [5 .1 38 ‐5 .7 06 [ [5 .7 06 ‐6 .2 74 [ [6 .2 74 ‐6 .8 42 [ [6 .8 42 ‐7 .4 10 ] Fx Signal (Volt) D6wsg030Q10 ; Ydwn = 0.045m (a) (c) (b) (d) (e) (f)     Figure 4.2. Distribution of the streamwise force signals (Fx) for six distinct experimental runs  34    4.1.2  Comparing Calculated Drag Forces to Measured Streamwise Forces    The  average  value  of  each  streamwise  force  data  set  (FFx)  was  compared  to  the  drag  force  (Fd)  calculated using  the momentum equation  (2.4). Figure 4.3 presents  the measured  streamwise  force  (FFx) and the calculated drag force (Fd) results for experiment D4wsg010Q10 expressed as a function of  the downstream water depth (Ydwn). The 610 data points from 60 experiments are presented in Figure  4.4. Results show  that measured streamwise  forces acting on cylinders  (FFx) are slightly smaller  than  drag forces (Fd) calculated using equation (2.4). It was expected that the indirectly calculated values of  Fd based on the momentum equation would represent a conservative upper bound on the values of FFx  measured  by  the  load  cell.  The  disparity  between  FFx  and  Fd  in  Figure  4.4  can  be  explained  by  (or  related to):  • The momentum correction factor β (Finnermore and Franzini, 2002) that was assumed to be  equal to 1.0 in equation (2.4). This correction factor is usually greater than 1.0 because of the  effect of the boundary (or side wall) drag and non‐uniform velocity distribution.   • Hydraulic obstruction of the two profiled rods (interference with the force measurements)  • The unknown precision of the flow meter   • The load cell calibration, which is based on a data set of limited size (Appendix A).   0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 F d an d  F F x (N ) Ydwn (m) Calculated drag force using equation (2.4) Streamwise force measured by load cell    Figure 4.3. Drag force (Fd) calculated using equation (2.4) and measured streamwise force (FFx)  expressed as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) for experiment D4wsg010Q10  35    y = 1.0101x + 0.7269 R² = 0.9934 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 F d (N )  FFx (N) Linear Regression 1:1 line     The mean absolute error  in Figure 4.4  is 0.80N. This error could not be related to the cylinder size or  cylinder elevation. However, there  is a clear  influence of the discharge on the difference between Fd  and FFx in Figure 4.4. For discharges of 5L/s, 10L/s and 15L/s, the average absolute difference between  Fd and FFx is respectively 0.38N, 0.76N, and 1.16N.  The first objective of this research (Section 1.1) was to  indentify an equation that evaluates the drag  force applied on a large cylinder. Results show small disparity between measured (FFx) and calculated  drag  forces  (Fd) using  the momentum  equation  (2.4). Because  of  this  consistency,  equation  (2.4)  is  considered to be conservative as well as reliable. As a result, the drag force can be estimated without  having to define the enigmatic drag coefficient (Subsection 2.1.6) required in equation (2.1).   In  the  context of  this project,  the upstream water depth  and  the drag  force  are  initially unknown.  Consequently, equation (2.4) cannot be solved at this point. The second section of this chapter has for  objective  to  identify patterns between known hydraulic parameters  (D, wsg, Q, B, and Ydwn) and  the  unknown upstream water depth (Yup).   Figure  4.4.  Drag  force  (Fd)  calculated  using  equation  (2.4)  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  measured streamwise force (FFx) for 610 experimental runs  36    4.2  Hydraulic Data Set    The  hydraulic  measurements  from  all  75  experiments  from  Experimental  Set  1  (including  the  15  experiments where the cylinder was resting on the channel bed and for which direct streamwise force  measurements  were  not  performed)  were  used  to  investigate  the  interaction  between  known  hydraulic  parameters  and  the  upstream  water  depth.  This  section  presents  general  trends  and  tendencies that were identified within the data.  4.2.1  Curve Types    Drag  force data  from  the 75 experiments were  initially presented as a  function of  the downstream  water depth  (Ydwn). Figure 4.5 presents  the drag  force  results  for experiments D4wsg010Q10. These  results were divided  into 3 distinct curves. Starting from high downstream water depths and moving  toward high Froude numbers (from right to left on the X axis), the 3 curves are described as follows:  • Curve  1:  For  a  Ydwn  value  higher  than  0.195m,  the  relation  between  Fd  and  the  Ydwn  follows  an  upward  curve  (Figure  4.5).  In  this  case,  the  water  surface  in  the  cylinder  region  presented  a  contraction  of  increasing  amplitude  as  Ydwn  was  lowered.  Hydraulic  conditions  in  the  cylinder  regions were subcritical. This is referred to as the Subcritical Curve.   • Curve 2: When Ydwn was lower than 0.195m, the contraction in the cylinder region collapsed into a  submerged hydraulic  jump and  the  relation between Fd and Ydwn  followed a straight upward  line.  The  hydraulic  conditions  in  the  cylinder  region  were  critical  but  they  remained  subcritical  downstream of the cylinder.  This curve is called the Submerged Hydraulic Jump Curve.    • Curve 3: When the Ydwn was lower than 0.115m, the hydraulic jump separated from the cylinder and  was eventually flushed out of the flume. This was observed to be independent of Fd., which means  that Ydwn could not longer affect Fd (and Yup). This has a straightforward explanation when one finds  that the moment (equation (2.5)) at Ydwn=0.115m and Ydwn=0.046m is equivalent when q is equal to  0.066  m2/s.  This  horizontal  line  is  referred  to  as  the  Supercritical  Curve.  During  experiment  D4wsg010Q10, Ydwn could not physically  take a value between 0.115m and 0.046m. This explains  the dashed line defining Curve 3. Note that the blue lines in Figure 4.5 represent the critical water  depth (equal to 0.076m from 10L/s).   Experiment D4wsg010Q10 is said to follow a Curve 1‐2‐3 model. Forty eight out of the 75 experiments  from Experimental Set 1 followed an analogous model.  37    0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 F d (N ) Ydwn (m) Critical depth Yc D4wsg010Q10 Curve 1Curve 3 Curve 2       Figure 4.5. Drag force (Fd) expressed as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) for experiment  D4wsg010Q10,  and  two‐dimensional  schemes  and  photos  representing  the  hydraulic  conditions  for  each of the 3 curves  38    In  Figure  4.6,  the  results  from  experiment  D4wsg076Q10  present  a  different  aspect.  The  trend  of  experiment D4wsg076Q10 was divided into 4 distinct curves that are described as follows (from right  to left on the X axis in Figure 4.6):  • Curve  1:  The  Subcritical  Curve  follows  a  similar  trend  that  the  one  defined  previously  for  experiment D4wsg010Q10 when Ydwn>0.197m.  • Curve 2: When Ydwn ranged from 0.172m to 0.197m, a submerged hydraulic jump was also observed  on the downstream side of the cylinder.   • Curve  4:  When  Ydwn=  0.161m,  a  pair  of  vortex  was  observed  upstream  of  the  cylinder  and  Fd  dropped sharply. The upstream water depth also dropped but the cylinder was still submerged (i.e.  a weir flow was still observed on top of the cylinder). This is called the Vortex Curve.   • Curve 5: When Ydwn<0.161m,  the cylinder was no  longer submerged and Fd continued  to drop as  Ydwn decreased. As a result, the cylinder acted as a sluice gate. This is referred to as the Sluice Gate  Curve. Note that this curve was usually difficult to distinguish from the Vortex Curve. Therefore, the  Vortex Curve will be considered as a transition between Curve 2 and Curve 5.  Experiment  D4wsg076Q10  is  labeled  to  follow  a  Curve  1‐2‐5  model.  Twenty  three  out  of  the  75  experiments from Experimental Set 1 followed a similar model.  The five curves previously defined are less distinct in Figure 4.7 when Yup is expressed as a function of  Ydwn  for  both  experiments  D4wsg010Q10  and  D4wsg076Q10.  Curve  1,  which  was  described  as  an  upward  curve on Figure 4.5 and Figure 4.6,  could be approximated as a  straight  line  that  is almost  parallel to the 1:1 line for both experiments. Curve 2, which was a straight line in Figure 4.5, presents  an  arc  that  separates  from  the  1:1  line  as  Ydwn  decreases  (right  to  left  in  Figure  4.7).  Curve  3  for  experiment D4wsg010Q10 shows the same horizontal trend for low values of Ydwn as in Figure 4.5. The  Sluice Gate Curve of experiment D4wsg076Q10 sharply separates from the Submerged Hydraulic Jump  Curve and tends to shift toward the 1:1  line as Ydwn decreases. The blue  lines  in Figure 4.7 represent  the critical water depth for both experiments (0.076m). The upstream water depth never reached the  supercritical regime throughout all the tests (i.e. no data was observed under the horizontal blue line  in Figure 4.7, independently of the parameters tested).  When cylinders were located close to the channel bed, Curve 5 could not be obtained. Inversely, when  the cylinder elevation (wsg) was high and the discharge (Q) was low, vortex pairs were often observed  and cylinders usually acted as sluice gates once the downstream water depth was low.   39    0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 F d (N ) Ydwn (m) Critical depth Yc D4wsg076Q10 Curve 1Curve 5 Curve 2Curve 4         Figure 4.6. Drag force (Fd) expressed as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) for experiment  D4wsg076Q10, and two‐dimensional schemes and photos representing the hydraulic conditions for each  of the 4 curves   40      0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Y u p (m ) Ydwn (m) Critical depth Yc D4wsg010Q10 D4wsg076Q10 1:1 line Curve 1  Curve 3  Curve 2  Curve 5        4.2.2  Influence of Known Parameters    This subsection presents partial results  illustrating  the effects of the main parameters D, wsg, Q, and  Ydwn on Yup. Figure 4.8 presents an example of the  influence of the cylinder size (D) using the results  from experiments D2wsg048Q10, D3wsg048Q10, D4wsg048Q10, D5wsg048Q10, and D6wsg048Q10.  All 5 experiments thus present a constant cylinder elevation (wsg) and discharge (Q).   Results from experiments using small cylinders D2 and D3 (2 and 3 inch diameter respectively) follow a  Curve  1‐2‐3 model  (showing  a  transition  from  the  1:1  line  to  a  horizontal  line  as  Ydwn  decreases).  Conversely,  the  results  from experiments with  the  largest cylinders D5 and D6  follow a Curve 1‐2‐5  model (showing a drop that tends to get closer to the 1:1 line as Ydwn decreases). The experiment with  cylinder D4  is one of the rare examples (4 experiments out of 75  in total) during which a vortex pair  was observed and where the cylinder was always submerged, independently of the downstream water  depth. In this case, the results follow a Curve 1‐2‐4 model.  Figure 4.7. Upstream water depth expressed as a function of the downstream water depth for both  experiments D4wsg010Q10  and D4wsg076Q10  (Note  that  Curve  4  is  considered  a  being  part  of  Curve 5.)  41    0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Y u p (m ) Ydwn (m) Yc D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 1:1     All  5  experiments  presented  in  Figure  4.8  have  the  interesting  aspect  of  reaching  a  downstream  Froude number greater than 1 when Ydwn is low. This was not always the case for Curve 1‐2‐5 models.  Results from experiment D4wsg076Q10 presented in Figure 4.7 supports this observation.   Figure 4.9 presents an example of the effect of the cylinder elevation (wsg) variation on the upstream  water  depth  using  the  results  from  experiments  D4wsg000Q10,  D4wsg010Q10,  D4wsg030Q10,  D4wsg048Q10,  and D4wsg076Q10. All  5  experiments  thus  present  a  constant  cylinder  size  (D)  and  discharge (Q).   Figure  4.9  shows  that  experiments with  cylinder  elevation  equal  or  smaller  than  30mm  follow  the  Curve 1‐2‐3 model  (constantly  separating  from  the 1:1  line as Ydwn decreases) while  the experiment  with  a  cylinder  elevation  of  76mm  clearly  follows  a  Curve  1‐2‐5  model  (net  separation  from  the  Submerged Hydraulic Jump Curve and shift toward the 1:1 line).   Figure 4.8. Example of the influence of the cylinder size (D) on the relation between the upstream water  depth (Yup) and the downstream water depth (Ydwn)  42    0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Y u p (m ) Ydwn (m) Yc wsg000 wsg010 wsg030 wsg048 wsg076 1:1     In  Figure  4.9,  all  Subcritical  Curves  (Ydwn  >  0.20m)  are  superposed  and  the  effect  of  the  cylinder  elevation becomes visible within the Submerged Hydraulic Jump Curve. A cautious investigation of the  downstream  water  depth  corresponding  to  the  separation  point  of  all  the  experimental  results  presented  in  Figure  4.9  reveals  that  Ydwn  roughly  coincides with  the  cylinder  size  (D)  added  to  the  critical water depth (Yc).  This value is equal to 0.178m in Figure 4.9. The importance of the parameter  (D+Yc) will be investigated in detail in Chapter 5.0.  Figure 4.9 proposes that, the higher the cylinder position, the  lower the upstream water depth for a  given downstream water depth. This is in contradiction with observations by Wallerstein et al. (2002)  about an increase of the drag force for low submergence (i.e. higher cylinder elevation) due to surface  waves. Small waves were observed travelling upstream prior to vortex  initiation  in  low submergence  experiments but  it was assumed that they were due to complex velocity distribution or oscillation of  the hydraulic jump downstream of the cylinder. No measurable effect on the drag force was related to  these waves.  Figure 4.9. Example of the influence of the cylinder elevation (wsg) on the relation between the upstream  water depth (Yup) and the downstream water depth (Ydwn)  43    The effect of the cylinder elevation on the upstream water depth can be explained with the following  hypothesis:  once  critical  hydraulic  conditions  are  reached  at  the  cylinder  section,  an  orifice  flow  is  more efficient  than a weir  flow of equivalent height  for  the  same downstream water depth. This  is  supported by a comparison of equations (2.17) and (2.21) using coefficients suggested in literature.    Finally, Figure 4.10 presents an example of the effect of the discharge (Q) variation on the upstream  water depth using results from experiments D4wsg010Q05, D4wsg010Q10, D4wsg010Q15. All 3 series  in Figure 4.10 thus present a constant cylinder size (D) and cylinder elevation (wsg).  The experimental results presented in Figure 4.10 follow a Curve 1‐2‐3 model. Moreover, all 3 curves  present similar but shifted trends. The vertical and horizontal lines in Figure 4.10 represent the critical  water depth related to each discharge (Yc=0.048m, 0.076m, and 0.100m for Q=5L/s, 10L/s, and 15L/s  respectively). It appears that the distance between the critical water depth lines is comparable to the  vertical  and  horizontal  shift of  the  three  series.  Therefore,  Yc would  represent  a potential  valuable  parameter to develop a relation between Ydwn and Yup that would be applicable for any discharge.    0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Y u p (m ) Ydwn (m) Yc (5 L/s) Yc (10 L/s) Yc (15 L/s) Q05 Q10 Q15 1:1     Figure 4.10. Example of the  influence of the discharge (Q) on the relation between the upstream  water depth (Yup) and the downstream water depth (Ydwn). The critical depths (Yc) are identified for  each discharge.  44    The next chapter of this work presents the development phases of a dimensionless approach that will  be  used  to  evaluate  the  upstream  hydraulic  conditions  with  any  given  value  of  cylinder  size  (D),  cylinder  elevation  from  the  channel  bed  (wsg),  discharge  (Q),  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn),  and  channel width (B).  Analysis of the vertical forces (including lift force and buoyancy) is presented in Appendix C.        45    5.0  Result Analysis    5.1  Legend Convention    In  order  to  facilitate  the  comprehension  of  the  figures  included  in  the  present  chapter,  a  legend  structure  was  defined  to  differentiate  each  of  the  75  experiments  from  Experimental  Set  1.  The  cylinder size (D) follows a color code:    The cylinder elevation from the channel bed (wsg) can be identified with different markers.    Finally, the discharge (Q) can be differentiated with the marker size and line thickness.    5.2  Curve 1­2­3 Model    Of  the 75  flume experiments  from Experimental Set 1, 48 experiments  follow a Curve 1‐2‐3 model,  which was described in Chapter 4.0 as a relation between the upstream water depth and downstream  water depth when cylinders are submerged independently of the downstream water depth. These 48  experimental results are presented  in Figure 5.1. The 3 blue vertical and horizontal lines in Figure 5.1  represent the critical water depth (Yc) for each discharge. The 1:1 (Yup=Ydwn) line is also presented.  46    0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Y u p  (m ) Ydwn (m)           Figure 5.1. Upstream water depth  (Yup) expressed as a  function of  the downstream water depth  (Ydwn) for 48 experimental results following a Curve 1‐2‐3 model. Critical water depths (Yc) and 1:1  line are presented as well.  47    The  objective  of  this  section  is  to  develop  a  unifying  formulation  that  would  collapse  all  48  experimental  results  into one dimensionless model. This  is  achieved by developing  a dimensionless  parameter using known parameters, leaving the upstream water depth as the only unknown.  As  a  first  step,  experiments  during which  the  cylinder was  located  on  the  flume  bed  (wsg  =  0)  are  initially considered. These 15 experiments are presented  in Figure 5.2. The different series represent  different  values  of  D  and  Q.  The  list  of  possible  parameters  that  can  be  used  to  develop  a  dimensionless compound parameter  includes the unit discharge (q), critical water depth (Yc), cylinder  size  (D),  gravity  constant  (g),  and  kinematic  viscosity  (ν).  A  formal  dimensional  analysis  was  not  required since the solution was straightforwardly developed, based on the parameter (D+Yc) previously  identified in Subsection 4.2.2. The dimensionless water depth takes the following form:  ( )cYD Y +                       (5.1)  Here, Y is the water depth either upstream or downstream of the cylinder.  0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Y u p  (m ) Ydwn (m) D2wsg000Q05 D2wsg000Q10 D2wsg000Q15 D3wsg000Q05 D3wsg000Q10 D3wsg000Q15 D4wsg000Q05 D4wsg000Q10 D4wsg000Q15 D5wsg000Q05 D5wsg000Q10 D5wsg000Q15 D6wsg000Q05 D6wsg000Q10 D6wsg000Q15     Figure 5.2. Upstream water depth  (Yup) expressed as a  function of the downstream water depth  (Ydwn) for 15 experiments during which the cylinder was  located on the flume bed. Critical water  depths (Yc) and 1:1 line are presented as well.  48    Figure 5.3 presents the collapsed results with dimensionless compound parameter (5.1) on each axis.  Results  from  experiment  D2wsg000Q15  are  the  only  ones  that  separate  from  the  general  trend.  Interestingly,  water  depth  measurements  were  labeled  as  being  highly  unstable  and  difficult  to  perform  during  experiments  D2wsg000Q15  and  D3wsg000Q15.  No  difficulties  or  anomalies  were  detected  during  all  13  other  experiments  presented  in  Figure  5.2  and  Figure  5.3.  The  average  dimensionless upstream water depth for shallow downstream water depths in Figure 5.3 is 1.08. If one  considers  the  energy  equation  (2.11)  to  evaluate  Yup  when  the  flow  conditions  are  critical  at  the  cylinder  section and assuming no energy  losses,  the  resulting dimensionless upstream water depths  range from 1.11 to 1.24.   One  remarkable  aspect  of  Figure  5.3  is  that  no  coefficient was  required  to  obtain  such  a  compact  collapse.  It  clearly presents  the 3 different  curves described  in  Subsection 4.2.1. Curve 1  is  roughly  linear for values above about 1.40 on the X axis. Curve 2 tends to separate from the 1:1 line for values  ranging between 0.75  to 1.40 on  the X axis and presents a smooth  transition  to Curve 3. For values  smaller than 0.75, Curve 3 is essentially horizontal.   0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 Y u p  / (D  +  Y c) Ydwn / (D + Yc) D2wsg000Q05 D2wsg000Q10 D2wsg000Q15 D3wsg000Q05 D3wsg000Q10 D3wsg000Q15 D4wsg000Q05 D4wsg000Q10 D4wsg000Q15 D5wsg000Q05 D5wsg000Q10 D5wsg000Q15 D6wsg000Q05 D6wsg000Q10 D6wsg000Q15     Figure 5.3. Upstream water depth  (Yup) expressed as a  function of the downstream water depth  (Ydwn) for 15 experiments during which the cylinder was located on the flume bed using compound  parameter (5.1). 1:1 line is also presented. 49    The third investigated parameter, the cylinder elevation from the channel bed (wsg), was subsequently  aggregated to the analysis. If one applies compound parameter (5.1) on all 48 experiments presented  in Figure 5.1, the result is evidently less compact than what was presented in Figure 5.3. The residual  influence of wsg is visible in Figure 5.4. The effect of the cylinder elevation could be considered with a  second dimensionless compound parameter that takes the following form:  ( )sgc wYD Y 21αα−+                     (5.2)    In Figure 4.9,  it was observed  that  the effect of wsg on Yup was only noticeable when Ydwn<(D+Yc). A  similar observation can be made in Figure 5.4 when Ydwn/(D+Yc)<1. Moreover, the greatest separation  between the experimental results presented  in Figure 5.4  is visible  in the shallow downstream water  depth region. Therefore, it was decided that the coefficient α1 in parameter (5.2) would be calibrated  using the shallowest downstream water depth of each experiment.  0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 Y u p  /  (D  +  Y c  ) Ydwn / (D + Yc)      Figure 5.4. Upstream water depth (Yup) expressed as a function of the downstream water depth  (Ydwn) for 48 experimental results following a Curve 1‐2‐3 model with compound parameter (5.1)  on both axes. 1:1  line  is also presented. The spread  in  the  results  is generated by  the different  cylinder elevation (wsg) values.  50    In Figure 5.3, the minimum and maximum (excluding experiment D2wsg000Q15) values on the Y axis  for  the  shallowest  downstream  water  depth  are  1.071  (D5wsg000Q15)  and  1.105  (D2wsg000Q10)  respectively. These two values were set as  limits to calibrate coefficient α1. Details of this calibration  based on 30 experiments out of 33 (48 experiments  in total minus 15 experiments where wsg was 0)  are presented in Appendix D. Experiments D2wsg010Q05, D5wsg010Q15, and D5wsg030Q15 were not  considered in the calibration process for reasons listed in Table 6.1. The best‐fit resulting equation is:  3.06.0 8.0 1 −⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛= cY Dα                     (5.3)  Note that α1 cannot be negative and has to be set to 0 when the ratio D/Yc is smaller than 0.42.   The second coefficient α2  in compound parameter (5.2) was then related to the applicability of α1. It  takes a value of 0 when Ydwn/(Yc+D) < 1 and takes a value of 1 when curve 3 is reached. The transition  between both curve sections is assumed to be linear.  >  1.00     =>   α2 = 0.00  If  ( )c dwn YD Y +        [0.75 , 1.00]   =>  α2 =  ( )⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛ +− c dwn YD Y 100.4     (5.4)  < 0.75    =>  α2 = 1.00  The  results  using  compound  parameter  (5.2),  equation  (5.3),  and  equation  (5.4)  are  presented  in  Figure 5.5. The collapse in Figure 5.5 is visually more compact than what was presented in Figure 5.4.  From these results, a reference graph was developed (Figure 5.6). This graph should be valid for Curve  1‐2‐3 models independently of the unit discharge (q), cylinder size (D), cylinder vertical position (wsg),  and  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn).  To my  knowledge,  Figure  5.6  has  no  precedent  in  literature.  Indications  propose  that  considering  small  cylindrical  elements  in  Figure  5.6  could  slightly  underestimate the upstream water depth.  51    0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 Y u p  /  (D  +  Y c  ‐α 1α 2 w sg  ) Ydwn / (D + Yc ‐ α1α2wsg)        5.3  Curve 1­2­5 Models    The 23 experimental results following a Curve 1‐2‐5 model are presented in Figure 5.7 in terms of the  dimensionless depth parameter (5.1). When Ydwn/(D+Yc) > 1.0, all experimental results collapsed in the  same trend that was observed  in Figure 5.4 for Curve 1‐2‐3 models. However,  it was not possible to  collapse these curves for values smaller than 1.0 on the x axis using compound parameter (5.2). Since  Curve 5 refers to the Sluice Gate Curve  in Subsection 4.2.1, the unifying method to describe Curve 5  was elaborated using the sluice gate equation (2.21). When qsg = q, equation (2.21) becomes  upsgsg gYwCq 2=                     (5.5)  where Csg is a sluice gate coefficient.  Figure 5.5. Upstream water depth  (Yup) expressed as a  function of  the downstream water depth  (Ydwn) for 48 experimental results following a Curve 1‐2‐3 model with compound parameter (5.2) on  both axes. 1:1 line is also presented.  52    0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 Y u p /  (Y c+ D ‐α 1 α 2w sg ) Ydwn / (Yc+D‐α1α2wsg)     Taking  into account  the critical depth equation  (2.24) and  following a similar approach  to what was  proposed by Ferro (2000) and Shahrokhnia and Javan (2006), equation (5.5) takes this form:   2 1 5.0 sgup c c sg CY Y Y w ⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛=                   (5.6)  The  left  hand  side  of  equation  (5.6)  presents  a  particularly  interesting  dimensionless  parameter  (wsg/Yc).   On the right hand side, the upstream water depth Yup and the sluice gate coefficient Csg are  initially unknown. It was proposed  in Subsection 2.3.2 with equation (2.22) that Csg would depend on  both downstream hydraulic conditions and cylinder elevation. Equation (5.6) was rearranged into  2 1 5.0 ⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛= up c sg c sg Y Y w YC                   (5.7)  and the data set presented in Figure 5.7 was used to generate Figure 5.8. Two additional experimental  results, presented  in a distinct  legend  in Figure 5.8, were  included to complete the overall picture of  this analysis: D4wsg065Q10 and D5wsg065Q10.  Figure 5.6.  Reference Graph for Curve 1‐2‐3 models with compound parameter (5.2) on both axes 53    0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 Y u p  /  (D  +  Y c  )  Ydwn / (D + Yc)          The highest back‐calculated  (cylindrical)  sluice gate  coefficient  in Figure 5.8  is 0.86  (D6wsg030Q05),  which  is  considerably  higher  than  the maximum  value  of  0.6  proposed  by  Finnemore  and  Franzini  (2002) for conventional sluice gates. Since Figure 5.8 only  includes 115 data points, a  limited number  of conclusions were initially made.     Figure 5.7. Upstream water depth (Yup) expressed as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn)  for 23 experimental  results  following a Curve 1‐2‐5 model with  compound parameter  (5.1) on both  axes. 1:1 line is also presented.  54    0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50 C s g Frdwn D4wsg065Q10 D5wsg065Q10 wsg/Yc= 1.00 wsg/Yc = 0.63 wsg/Yc = 0.77 wsg/Yc = 0.86     The first evident observation in Figure 5.8 is that 4 groupings defined by different wsg/Yc ratios can be  distinguished.  The  grouping  identified  as wsg/Yc  =  0.63  is  formed  by  6  experiments  and  presents  a  certain  scatter. The grouping  identified as wsg/Yc = 0.77  is only  formed by 3 experiments and  is  less  distinct. Finally,  the groupings  identified as wsg/Yc = 0.86 and wsg/Yc = 1.00 are  formed by 2 and 14  experiments respectively and are fairly consistent.   The  second  observation  in  Figure  5.8  is  the  central  effect  of  the  downstream  hydraulic  conditions  (Froude number) on the sluice gate coefficient.    The hypothesis stated in equation (2.22) was modified for cylinders acting as sluice gates:  ⎟⎠ ⎞⎜⎝ ⎛= c sg dwnsg Y wFrfC ,                   (5.8)   An additional set of 25 experiments (Experimental Set 2)  including a total 175 data point distributed  over 9 wsg/Yc  ratios was performed  in  July 2008  to  improve  the precision of  Figure 5.8.  Sluice gate  coefficients were back‐calculated using equation (5.7) and values as high as 1.00 were obtained.     Figure 5.8. Back‐calculated sluice gate coefficients (Csg) for 25 experimental results following a Curve 5  model expressed as a function of the downstream Froude Number (Frdwn)  55    A  family of  curves  categorized  by different wsg/Yc  ratios  (from  0.4  to  1.2 with  0.1  increments) was  manually interpolated within the results from both Experimental Set 1 and Experimental Set 2 (total of  290 data points). Results are presented in Figure 5.9.   Consistent experimental results with low wsg/Yc ratios (lower than 0.6) were difficult to obtain, even in  the  controlled  experimental  environment  described  in  Chapter  3.0.  Supercritical  conditions  were  seldom obtained downstream of the cylinders for data series with wsg/Yc ratios smaller than 0.80. It is  well  approved  in  the  literature  that  supercritical  downstream  hydraulic  conditions  cannot  affect  upstream hydraulic  conditions. Therefore,  the  supercritical extension of each manually  interpolated  curve, was assumed to be horizontal when the downstream Froude number (Frdwn) was greater than 1  (then, Yup would be independent of Frdwn). For wsg/Yc ratios greater than 0.8, the supercritical extension  was not presented but our hypothesis is that this extension should be horizontal as well.   Figure 5.9 was used  to  create  the  reference  graph  (Figure 5.10)  for  cylinders  acting  as  sluice  gates  (Curve 5). To my knowledge, Figure 5.10 has no precedent in the literature. It was not obtained from a  meticulous physical analysis, but it appears compatible with the orifice flow theory.  0.25 0.35 0.45 0.55 0.65 0.75 0.85 0.95 1.05 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50 2.75 C s g Frdwn Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 0.40 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 0.50 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 0.60 Exp Set 1: wsg/Yc = 0.63 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 0.70 Exp Set 1: wsg/Yc = 0.77 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 0.80 Exp Set 1: wsg/Yc = 0.86 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 0.90 Exp Set 1: wsg/Yc = 1.00 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 1.00 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 1.10 Exp Set 2: wsg/Yc = 1.20 wsg/Yc = 1.20 wsg/Yc = 0.70 wsg/Yc = 0.80 wsg/Yc = 0.90 wsg/Yc = 1.00 wsg/Yc = 1.10 wsg/Yc = 0.40 wsg/Yc = 0.50 wsg/Yc = 0.60     Figure 5.9. Results from Experimental Set 1 and Experimental Set 2 where the sluice gate coefficient  (Csg) is expressed as a function of the downstream Froude numbers (Frdwn).  56    Sluice Gate Curves (Curve 5) can be reconstructed  if one considers Figure 5.10 (input data: Frdwn, wsg,  and Yc) and the upstream hydraulic conditions are obtained using a transformation of equation (5.5):  2 3 22 1 sg c sg up w Y C Y =                      (5.9)   For a given cylinder size (D), cylinder elevation (wsg), discharge (Q), channel width (B), and downstream  water depth (Ydwn), it is not initially possible to confirm whether the cylinder will be submerged or not  (i.e., it is not initially possible to determine if this given case falls on a Curve 2, 3, or 5). The next section  will answer this question: Which reference graph (Figure 5.6 or Figure 5.10) should be used in order to  estimate  the  upstream  water  depth  for  given  downstream  hydraulic  conditions,  cylinder  size  and  cylinder vertical position?  0.25 0.35 0.45 0.55 0.65 0.75 0.85 0.95 1.05 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 C s g Frdwn wsg/Yc = 1.2 wsg/Yc = 1.1 wsg/Yc = 1.0 wsg/Yc = 0.9 wsg/Yc = 0.8 wsg/Yc = 0.7 wsg/Yc = 0.6 wsg/Yc = 0.5 wsg/Yc = 0.4          Figure 5.10. Reference Graph for cylinders acting as sluice gates (Curve 5) 57    5.4  Separation between Curve 2 and Curve 5    When  the  weir  flow  over  the  cylinder  became  shallow,  vortices  were  observed  upstream  of  the  cylinders. This corresponds to the beginning of Curve 4, which  is considered as a transition between  Curve 2 and Curve 5.  The first evidence that the cylinder would not be submerged for a given set of parameters is when the  upstream water depth evaluated using Figure 5.6 would have a smaller value than the cylinder size (D)  added to the cylinder elevation (wsg).   ( )sgup wDY +<                     (5.10)  In this case, it is recommended to refer to Figure 5.10 to evaluate the upstream water depth. However,  because of the complexity of the transition between Curve 2 and Curve 5, the condition proposed  in  (5.10) was not considered adequate to justify to use of Figure 5.6 or Figure 5.10.   The  cylinder  submergence  at  the  lowest  downstream  gate  elevation  (highest  downstream  Froude  number) for all 75 experiments from Experimental Set 1 was used to develop an exclusive assessment.  The most critical hydraulic state of each experiment was classified as: Cylinder surbmerged (Curve 3,  48 experiments), Vortex (Curve 4, 4 experiments), or Cylinder exposed (Curve 5, 23 experiments). An  additional set of experiments (Experimental Set 3) providing 85 additional data points was completed  in  June  2008.  These  experiments were performed with  a  fully opened weir  gate  at  the  end of  the  flume. Figure 5.11 presents all 160 data points.   The Envelope curve in Figure 5.11 represents a limit that is physically impossible to intersect. No data  point was obtained in the proximity of this envelope since the smallest cylinder tested had a diameter  of 2 inches. The Threshold curve represents a limit between submerged and possibly exposed cylinders  when the hydraulic conditions downstream of the cylinder approach the critical state. This means that,  independently of  the downstream water depth Ydwn, a point  located  in  the white markers  region  in  Figure 5.11 automatically represents a Curve 1‐2‐3 model and Figure 5.6 should be used to evaluate  the upstream water depth. If a point  is  located  in the black markers region, a Curve 4 or a Curve 5  is  possible  but  not  certain.  This will  depend  on  the  downstream  hydraulic  conditions. Note  that  the  highest extremity of the Threshold in Figure 5.11 still requires additional investigation.    58    0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 1.60 1.80 Y c  /  (w sg +D ) (wsg /Yc )2 Envelope Experimental Set 1: Submerged Experimental Set 1: Vortex Experimental Set 1: Exposed Experimental Set 3: Submerged Experimental Set 3: Vortex Experimental Set 3: Exposed Threshold Curve 1‐2‐3 model, Use Figure 5.6 Possible Curve 1‐2‐5 model     The last analysis of this research project concerns the initiation of the vortex. The objective was to find  a  maximum  upstream  water  depth  under  which  the  use  of  Figure  5.6  becomes  inaccurate.  As  a  complement to Figure 5.11, when a given set of parameters falls in the black markers region, this new  condition would confirm if Figure 5.10 should be used to evaluate the upstream water depth.  It was  attempted  to  investigate  the  separation  between  Curves  2  and  5  (refer  to  Figure  4.7) with  Experimental Set 1  including 23 experiments following a Curve 1‐2‐5 model.   Since the water depths  corresponding  to  vortex  initiation  were  not  specifically  recorded  in  this  data  set,  another  set  of  experiments  (Experimental  Set  4)  was  prepared  in  July  2008.  A  total  of  37  experiments  were  performed  in  the  same  flume  as  described  in  Section  3.1.  The  highest  upstream  water  depth  corresponding to the first vortex appearance was recorded for each experiment. This upstream water  depth was then related to other parameters: the cylinder size (D), the cylinder elevation (wsg), and the  critical water depth (Yc). A dimensionless correlation between these parameters was not obtained, the  critical water depth being expressed in metric units in the legend of Figure 5.12. Details of this analysis  are presented in Appendix E.   Figure 5.11.  Threshold between Curve 1‐2‐3 models and possible Curve 1‐2‐5 models   59    0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 ( Y up  ‐ D  )  /  Y c wsg / Yc Yc = 0.050 m Yc = 0.075 m Yc = 0.100 m No Vortex, Refer  to  Figure 5.6 to evaluate Yup Possible Vortex, Refer  to  Figure 5.10 to evaluate Yup       In Figure 5.12, a given set of parameters falling under  its corresponding Yc curve would be related to  vortices formation and Figure 5.10 would be recommended to evaluate Yup, even if condition (5.10) is  not respected. Inversely, a given set of data located above its corresponding curve suggests that Figure  5.6 should be used to evaluate the upstream water depth.   Because  critical  water  depths  between  0.050  m  and  0.100  m  were  not  extensively  tested  in  Experimental Set 4, Figure 5.12 presents some limitations. An additional problem in Figure 5.12 comes  from the upstream water depth on the Y axis, which initially needs to be estimated with Figure 5.6.    Additional  roughness  could  significantly  affect  the  upstream  water  depth  corresponding  to  vortex  formation. Moreover, the happening of vortices on  the upstream side of a water  intake depends on  complex parameters  that were not  tested and an exhaustive  investigation on the physics of vortices  was not performed. Therefore, Figure 5.12 will not be considered  in  the approach developed  in  this  research project (Refer to Section 7.1). Additional efforts should be made to improve the precision and  versatility of Figure 5.12.  Figure  5.12.  Theoretical  thresholds  for  vortex  formation  upstream  of  cylinders  expressed  as  a  function of the critical water depth (Yc)  60    6.0  Comparison of Results    The approach developed  in Chapter 5.0 can be used to evaluate the water depth upstream (Yup) of a  cylindrical element of length (l) equal to the rectangular channel width (B) for given element size (D),  element elevation from the channel bed (wsg), and discharge (Q). This approach is tested in Section 6.1  and then in Section 7.2 using independent verification data. Once the upstream water depth is known,  various  methods  can  be  used  to  evaluate  the  drag  force  applied  on  the  cylindrical  element.  One  common  method  is  to  refer  to  the  drag  force  equation  (2.1),  which  requires  an  empirical  drag  coefficient  (Cd).  The  second  method,  investigated  in  Section  4.1,  is  based  on  to  the  momentum  equation  (2.4),  which  considers  the  difference  in  water  depths  upstream  and  downstream  of  the  element, and does not require a drag coefficient. Both approaches are compared in Section 6.2.  6.1  Upstream Water Depth Evaluation    Figure 5.6 and Figure 5.10 were used  to calculate  the upstream water depths  for  the 763 hydraulic  states  included  in  Experimental  Set  1.  These  values  are  presented  as  a  function  of  the  measured  upstream water depth in Figure 6.1. Note that data points located on a Curve 1, 2, or 3 (white markers  in  Figure 6.1) were generally evaluated using  Figure 5.6 and data points  located on a Curve 4 or 5  (black markers in Figure 6.1) were mostly evaluated using Figure 5.10. The different curve identities (1  to 5) were initially unknown and their identification is part of the approach developed here.   Unsurprisingly, the results in Figure 6.1 follow the 1:1 line quite accurately (Figure 5.6 was developed  using the same data from Experimental Set 1, and Experimental Set 2 used to develop Figure 5.10 was  developed  using  similar  experimental  conditions). Data  from  Curves  1,  2, or  3  present  an  absolute  average error of 0.002 m and a maximum error of 0.019 m  (experiment D6wsg048Q10). Data  from  Curves  4  and  5  present  an  absolute  average  error  of  0.006  m  and  a  maximum  error  of  0.038  m  (experiment D6wsg048Q15). In general, the agreement is considered satisfactory.     61    0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Ca lc ul at ed  Y up (m ) Measured Yup (m) Curve 1‐2‐3 (Figure 5.6) Curve 4‐5 (Figure 5.10) 1:1 line     Figure 5.12 was not used to differentiate Curve 2 from Curve 4 data in the results presented in Figure  6.1.  Instead,  the  vortex  initiation  was  simply  ignored.  The  lowest  upstream  water  depth  value  calculated from Figure 5.10 or Figure 5.6 would respectively dictate if a Curve 1‐2‐3 or a Curve 5 should  be  assumed.  This  identification  technique  was  unsuccessful  15  times  for  the  763  hydraulic  states  presented in Figure 6.1.   6.2  Drag Force Evaluation    The calculated upstream water depths obtained  in Section 6.1 were  then used  to evaluate  the drag  force  on  the  cylinders.  Twenty‐two  experiments  (out  of  75) were  partially  or  entirely  rejected  for  reasons listed in Table 6.1.      Figure 6.1. Calculated upstream water depths from Experimental Set 1 expressed as a function of the measured upstream water depths 62    Reason for rejection:  Experiments entirely or partially rejected  (hydraulic states rejected):  Cylinder vibration during experiments  D2wsg100Q15  D4wsg030Q10 (9‐10)  D4wsg030Q15 (8‐11)  D4wsg048Q15 (8‐9)  D6wsg030Q10 (8‐10)  Unstable water depths during  experiments  D2wsg000Q15   D3wsg000Q15   D6wsg030Q05  Discharge variation over the 2% limit  due to pump or valve instabilities  D5wsg010Q15   D5wsg030Q15  D5wsg048Q15  D5wsg076Q15  D5wsg100Q15  Two apparent stable water depths for  given Q, D, and wsg  D3wsg030Q10 (10)  D4wsg030Q05  D6wsg030Q15 (10)  D6wsg048Q15   D6wsg100Q15  Wall interference (friction) with cylinder  D2wsg010Q05   D2wsg048Q10   D2wsg010Q15  D3wsg010Q10 (6‐8)      Three  different  methods  were  compared  to  evaluate  the  drag  force  applied  on  cylinders.  These  methods all consider the upstream water depth obtained in Section 6.1 and the calculated drag force  (Fd) is compared to the streamwise force (FFx) measured by the load cell (Section 4.1). The load cell was  not operating when cylinders were  located on channel bed. Therefore 15 experimental  results  (153  data points) are excluded from this analysis. The rejected experimental results listed in Table 6.1 (150  data points) are presented with a distinct marker color.  6.2.1  Drag Force Equation    The  first method considered to evaluate the drag  force Fd  is based on the drag  force equation  (2.1),  which is commonly accepted in literature. Equation (2.1) can be rewritten for cylinders of length equal  to the channel width (l=B):  2 2 up dd DBV CF ρ=                     (6.1)  Table 6.1. List of experiments from Experimental Set 1 rejected from the drag force comparison 63    The upstream Reynolds numbers calculated for the 763 hydraulic states of Experimental Set 1 ranged  from  6.54  X  103  to  1.12  X  105.  Values  of  the  drag  coefficient  (Cd)  were  set  equal  to  1.0,  which  corresponds to Reynolds numbers between 103 to 105 (Refer to Figure 2.1). The upstream velocity was  considered  to be  the depth‐averaged velocity obtained using  the  following equation  (from equation  (2.7), Subsection 2.1.3):  up up BY QV =                       (6.2)  Figure 6.2 presents  the results of 460 data points  identified by black markers and 150 rejected data  points  identified by  light blue markers. Equation (6.1) seriously underestimates the streamwise force  applied on large cylinders when the drag coefficient is equal to 1.0.     0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 F d (N ) FFx (N) Non‐rejected data from Experimental Set 1 Rejected data from Experimental Set 1 1:1 line       Figure 6.2. Calculated drag force (Fd) using equation (6.1) and a drag coefficient (Cd) of 1.0 expressed  as a function of the measured streamwise force (FFx) using the load cell  64    6.2.2  Drag Force Equation and Blockage Ratio    The assumption of a drag coefficient equal to 1.0 for all experiments appears simplistic. In Subsection  2.1.1, an alternate empirical equation  (2.3)  (Gippel et al., 1992) was proposed  to evaluate  the drag  coefficient Cd  for cylinders characterized by a geometry  respecting  the condition  l/D < 21. Here,  l  is  equal to B and equation (2.3) can be rewritten as:  062.0 81.0 ⎟⎠ ⎞⎜⎝ ⎛= D BCd                     (6.3)   The  drag  coefficient  (Cd)  values  obtained  from  equation  (6.3)  using  data  from  Experimental  Set  1  ranges  from  0.81  to  0.87,  which  is  smaller  than  the  value  of  1.0  proposed  in  Subsection  6.2.1.  However,  it has been  recommended  that  the blockage  ratio  (BR)  should be  considered  in  the drag  force calculation for cylinders of significant size compared to the channel section (Gippel et al., 1992;  Gippel,  1995;  Shields  and Gippel,  1995; Hygelund  and Manga,  2003).  The  blockage was  defined  in  equation  (2.8)  and  represents  an  attempt  to  account  for  the  higher water  velocity  at  the  cylinder  section when there is significant blockage of the channel section. When the cylinder length (l) is equal  to the stream width (B), equation (2.8) takes this form:  upY DBR =                       (6.4)  The  drag  coefficient  (Cd)  can  be  corrected  for  cylinders  of  significant  blockage  ratios  (Cd BR)  using  equation (2.9).   ( ) 06.21997.0 −−= BRCC dBRd   This equation was developed using data from 50 experiments (Shields and Gippel, 1995).  Values of the corrected drag coefficient for blockage ratios (Cd BR) obtained from equation (2.9) present  an average of 4.02 and a maximum value of 25.94 (Experiment D6wsg030Q05). This maximum value is  comparable to the maximum drag coefficient mentioned by Curran and Wohl (2002).   Figure 6.3 displays  the  results of  the  same data presented  in  Figure 6.2, but  it  considers a  cylinder  geometry‐based drag  coefficient  (equation  (6.3)), which  is  corrected  for blockage  ratios  (Cd BR) using  equation (2.9).   65    y = 0.4137x R² = 0.0881 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 F d (N ) FFx (N) Non‐rejected data from Experimental Set 1 Rejected data from Experimental Set 1 1:1 line       The data  in Figure 6.3 presents a  significant  scatter and does not  follow  this 1:1  line.  It  seems  that  equation (2.9) used in equation (6.1) does not represent a suitable approach to evaluate the drag force  acting on  cylinders of  significant  sizes.  The  automatic  linear  interpolation  (dashed  line  interpolated  within the non‐rejected data only) presents a poor correlation factor. This could partially be explained  by the fact that equation (2.9) was developed using results from experiments that are different from  the experiments described in Chapter 3.0.   6.2.3  Momentum Equation    The  second  method  proposed  is  to  evaluate  the  drag  force  using  the  momentum  equation  (2.4).  ( )dwnupd MMgF −= ρ   The calculated upstream water depths  from Section 6.1 were used on 460 non‐rejected data points  and 150  rejected data points  from Experimental Set 1  to evaluate  the drag  force  (Fd) with equation  (2.4). Results are presented in Figure 6.4.  Figure  6.3.  Calculated  drag  force  (Fd)  using  equation  (6.1)  and  a  drag  coefficient  (Cd)  based  on  equation (6.3) corrected for blockage ratios (BR) using equation (2.9) expressed as a function of the  measured streamwise force (FFx) using the load cell  66    y = 0.9847x + 0.8253 R² = 0.9652 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 F d (N ) FFx (N) Non‐rejected data from Experimental Set 1 Rejected data from Experimental Set 1 1:1 line       The  agreement  between  the  drag  force  obtained  from  equation  (2.4)  and  the  streamwise  force  measured by the load cell in Figure 6.4 is satisfactory. The mean absolute error for non‐rejected data is  0.998 N. The best fit linear trend (dashed line interpolated within the non‐rejected data only) presents  a  coefficient  of  determination  R2  =  0.965.  This  trend  is  almost  parallel  to  the  1:1  line.  Clearly,  the  results  show  that  for  large  cylinders  located  in a  small  channel,  the momentum equation approach  yields for superior drag force estimates.  Figure 6.4. Calculated drag force (Fd) using the momentum equations (2.4) expressed as a function of  the measured streamwise force (FFx) measured with the load cell  67    7.0  Applications and Limitations    This chapter presents a synthesis of  the method developed  in Chapter 5.0  to evaluate  the hydraulic  conditions upstream of a  large cylindrical element  in a  rectangular channel. The  second part of  this  chapter presents  an example of  input  and output data.  Finally,  the  limitations of  the  approach  are  listed in Section 7.3.   7.1  Synthesis of the Approach    The  synthesis of  the approach developed  in  this work  is applicable  to  large  cylinder  (large  refers  to  elements that create a measurable upstream backwater region) of  length  (l) equal  to the width of a  rectangular channel  (B), aligned perpendicular  to  the  flow direction and parallel  to  the channel bed.  One  representative  case  would  be  a  stream  segment  identified  for  a  stream  restoration  project  including reintroduction of LWD. Generally, the known parameters would include:   • The channel width (B) and cylinder length (l)  • The LWD diameter (D)   • The LWD elevation from the channel bed (wsg)  • The  downstream water  depth  (Ydwn)  corresponding  to  a  design  discharge  (Q),  or  a  rating  curve  relating the water depth (Ydwn) to the total channel discharge (Q). In the case of a log introduction  into a  stream,  this  rating  curve would be  taken at  the  stream  cross‐section  located  immediately  downstream of the log introduction location.  The outcomes would be an estimate of the upstream water depth  (Yup) or an upstream rating curve  and a corresponding drag force (Fd) acting on the LWD. The maximum drag force corresponding to a  given discharge would be appropriate for a stability analysis of the LWD.  Figure 7.1 presents a diagram that synthesizes the approach developed in this work.  If  this  approach  is  considered  for  stream  restoration  project  including  more  than  one  log  reintroduction  location, the approach should be applied from the downstream‐most  log  introduction  location moving upstream, especially if the back‐water region created by a log is expected to reach the  downstream side of the next upstream log introduction location.   68    Figure  7.1. Diagram  of  the  approach  developed  in  this  research  project  to  calculate  the  upstream  water depth (Yup) and the drag force (Fd) acting on a large cylindrical element  Above  Threshold Input data: Q, B (l), D, wsg, and Ydwn  wsg = 0 wsg > 0  Figure 5.11 Under  threshold Figure 5.10  Figure 5.6 Obtain: Yup   Calculate:   (Yc + D)  Calculate:   (wsg/Yc) 2  Yc/(wsg+D)  Calculate:  α1  Eq (5.3) α2  Eq (5.4)   (Yc+ D – αβwsg)  Calculate:  Frdwn Eq (2.23)  Calculate:  ( )DY Y c dwn +   ( )DY Y c dwn + >1   ( )DY Y c dwn + <1   Calculate:  q   Eq (2.6)  Yc  Eq (2.24)  Calculate:  α1  Eq (5.3) α2  Eq (5.4)   (Yc+ D – αβwsg)  Calculate:  Yup Eq (5.9)  Figure 5.6 Obtain: Yup   Calculate:  Fd Eq (2.4)  If Yup< (D+wsg) :  Reject Yup  Choose  minimum  Yup value  69    Note that the X axis on Figure 5.6 presents a maximum value of 2.00. Any data point located above this  value is not considered in this research and is not likely to represent a critical case for LWD stability.   Also note that when a calculated upstream water depth is smaller than the downstream water depth  (using Figure 5.10), which could be the case at  low flows and high cylinder elevations, the upstream  water depth  should be  assumed  equal  to  the  downstream water depth. Again,  this  is not  likely  to  represent a critical case for LWD stability.  7.2  Example of the Approach    Two  additional  data  sets  (A  and  B)  were  obtained  from  flume  experiments  using  the  same  PVC  cylinders. While  the data was  collected using  the  same experimental  setup  (Chapter 3.0),  it had no  implication in the development of the approach presented in this work. The input data is presented in  Table 7.1 and the downstream rating curves are displayed in Figure 7.2. Note that the rating curve of  Data  Set  A  presents  a  drop  for  an  increasing  discharge.  This  represents  a  shift  from  subcritical  to  supercritical regime.  In each case, the drag force acting on the cylinders was not measured with the  load cell.        Table 7.1 Input parameters of Data Set A and Data Set B 70    0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.000 0.004 0.008 0.012 0.016 0.020 0.024 Y d w n (m ) Q (m3/s) Data Set A Data Set B     The data from Table 7.1 and rating curves from Figure 7.2 were converted into upstream rating curves  using  the approach presented  in  the diagram of Figure 7.1. The  results were  then  compared  to  the  measured upstream rating curves. This comparison is presented in Figure 7.3.   The reconstructed upstream rating curve from Data Set A was based on both Figure 5.6 and Figure 5.9.  The maximum error between the measured and reconstructed curves is 0.011m. This evaluation error  occurred at the transition between subcritical to supercritical conditions. This point visually falls above  the  rating  curve  trend.  The  reconstruction  of  the  upstream  rating  curve  from Data  Set B was only  based  on  Figure  5.6  and  shows  a maximum  error  of  0.002m.  Figure  7.4  present  the  reconstructed  (calculated) upstream water depths expressed as a function of the measured upstream water depths.  The average absolute error is 0.002m.  The good agreement is not totally surprising given that the data was obtained from flume experiments  performed under similar conditions than the ones  from which the present approach was developed.  The approach developed  in this work should be tested with field data before further conclusions can  be made about its applicability to stream restoration projects including log introduction.  Figure 7.2. Downstream rating curves data from Data Set A and Data Set B 71    0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.000 0.004 0.008 0.012 0.016 0.020 0.024 Y u p (m ) Q (m3/s) Data Set A Data Set B Calculated Data Set A Calculated Data Set B     0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 C al cu la te d Y u p (m ) Measured Yup (m)   Figure 7.3. Measured and calculated upstream rating curves from Data Set A and Data Set B Figure 7.4. Calculated upstream water depth  expressed  as  a  function of  the measured upstream  water depth for Data Set A and Data Set B 72    7.3  Limitations of the Approach    In  a physical open  channel  flow  context,  the  approach developed  in  this work presents  reasonable  limitations. The most  important constraint  is related  to  the one‐dimensional  formulation scheme on  which  it  is  based:  The  channel  considered  should  be  rectangular  or  wide  enough  so  that  the  rectangular  approximation  could  be made.  Then,  the  cylindrical  roughness  element  should  have  a  constant  diameter,  obstruct  the  full  width  of  the  channel,  and  be  disposed  parallel  to  the  water  surface or  to  the  channel bed.  Finally,  the  flow  should be evenly distributed over  the width of  the  channel and its direction should be perpendicular to the cylindrical element.   The approach still presents a number of uncertainties  that should be explored. Any upstream water  depth  evaluation  based  on  coefficients  α1  and  α2  should  be  considered with  skepticism.  Empirical  equation  (5.3) was calibrated with a data  set of  limited  range  (See appendix D) and  the  linearity of  coefficient α2 in equation (5.4) is questionable. However, when the cylindrical element elevation wsg is  negligible, the trend in Figure 5.6 and parameter (5.1) appear reliable.   The influence of the flume side walls on the velocity distribution was not explored and the momentum  correction factor β in the momentum equation (Finnemore and Franzini, 2002) is assumed to be equal  to 1.0. For  this  reason,  the momentum equation  (2.4)  is expected  to slightly over‐estimate  the drag  force acting on large cylinders.  The application of this approach to field cases is expected to require a number of adjustments and the  context on which  it  is calibrated  should always be kept  in mind. Natural channels generally present  rough beds  and banks. Moreover,  LWD used  for  stream  restoration projects  are  rougher  than  PVC  cylinders and their section is rarely perfectly cylindrical. The natural rough features present in streams  create a  flow resistance that  interacts with  the additional resistance created by a LWD  introduction.  This interaction is complex (Wilcox et al., 2006) and is expected to have an effect on the trends of the  reference graphs presented in Figure 5.6, Figure 5.10, and Figure 5.11.         73    In  the  long  term,  the  local  modification  of  an  artificially‐made  roughness  element  will  generate  a  response of the local stream morphology. Deposition of sediment (bedload) should be expected in the  back‐water  region and  local  scour under  the  log and directly downstream of  the  log  should also be  anticipated. The drag force generated by a given discharge acting on the log may decrease with time,  due to erosion of the channel boundaries (Wallerstein et al., 2001). However, the log could also act as  a  trap  for  smaller mobile debris  (Gippel  et  al., 1992; D’Aoust  and Millar 2000).  This would  tend  to  increase the load supported by the designed anchors. Therefore, a conservative anchor design should  consider the long term possibility of partial to total orifice flow congestion.     74    8.0  Conclusions    An approach  that evaluates  the water depth upstream of a  large cylindrical  roughness element  in a  rectangular channel was developed  in this work. The drag force affecting this cylindrical element can  be estimated using the momentum equation with relative confidence. However, a formulation scheme  that  calculates  the  dynamic  lift  force  applied  on  the  cylindrical  element  still  needs  to  be  found  (Appendix C). Therefore, the analysis of the stability of a cylindrical roughness element introduced in a  channel is not yet complete.   Experimental results support the initial hypothesis based on Gippel et al. (1996) on which this project  was developed: apart from local disturbance of the velocity profile, roughness elements only have an  influence  in  the upstream direction. This assumption however  is only valid  in non‐erodible channels  (Wallerstein et al., 2001).  Additional efforts should confirm that Figure 5.6, Figure 5.10, and Figure 5.11 can be used in a natural  setting  context.  The  influence  of  parameters  that  were  not  considered  in  this  work  should  be  investigated. The cylindrical element skin roughness and the channel boundaries roughness appear to  be the most critical parameters that could interfere with the applicability of the approach developed in  this work to stream restoration projects.  In other words, the applicability of the approach developed  for smooth cylindrical elements should be tested and adapted for prototype logs and LWD.   In a theoretical context, the following observations were made:  • A large cylinder can be defined by:  cY YD −> 2   When this condition is respected, the cylinder creates a significant increase of the upstream water  level.  In  this  case,  the  momentum  equation  (2.4)  is  suitable  to  calculate  the  drag  force  (Fd).  Otherwise, the cylinder  is too small to have a measurable  influence  in the upstream direction and  the drag force equation (2.1) could present better approximations of the drag force.  • The meaning of  the blockage  ratio BR  is  limited. The  influence of  the blockage  ratio on  the drag  force depends on upstream and the downstream hydraulic conditions. The hydraulic  impacts of a  roughness element cannot be related to  its geometric size or to  its blockage ratio only. Therefore,  the geometric definition of a LWD should consider the hydraulic context in which it is located.   75    • The  drag  force  equation  (2.1)  appears  unsuitable  for  large  cylinders.  Theoretical  values  of  drag  coefficients have proven to greatly underestimate the drag force applied on a cylindrical element of  significant size (Figure 6.2). Considering the blockage ratio in the drag coefficient calculation could  still lead to errors approaching one order of magnitude (Figure 6.3). Back‐calculated drag coefficient  values  from  a  given  study  should  not  be  applied  in  a  different  context.  In  literature,  the  drag  coefficient was only related to a  limited range of hydraulic parameters and  its physical meaning  is  still uncertain.   • The momentum equation  (2.4) was  validated with  load  cell measurements  in a one‐dimensional  context.  This  equation  proved  to  be  reliable  to  evaluate  the  drag  force  applied  on  a  cylindrical  roughness element.   • The influence of the cylindrical roughness element vertical position is independent of the drag force  if  the downstream water depth  is greater  than  the element diameter added  to  the critical water  depth  (i.e.,  if  Ydwn/(Yc+D)>1).  This  is  only  valid  if  the  element  is  submerged.  This  has  not  been  mentioned previously in literature and it partially contradicts observations from Gippel et al. (1996),  Wallerstein et al. (2002), Hygelund and Manga (2003), and Alonso (2004).  • The dimensionless ratio of the sluice gate opening divided by the critical water depth (i.e., wsg/Yc) is  a key parameter in the orifice flow theory. It has been fitted in this research to a large data set and  its  meaning  was  relevant  (Figure  5.9).  A  comparable  observation  can  be  made  about  the  downstream Froude number Frdwn.  • To our knowledge, Figure 5.6, Figure 5.10, and Figure 5.11 have no precedents  in  literature. Their  applicability to other contexts has not been tested yet.   76    References    Alonso, C. V. (2004), ‘‘Transport mechanics of stream‐borne logs’’, Riparian vegetation and fluvial  geomorphology: Hydraulic, hydrologic, and geotechnical interactions, S. J. Bennett and A. Simon, eds.,  American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C.    Braudrick, C.A., Grant, G.E. (2000), “When do logs move in rivers?”,  Water Resources Research, 36(2),  571–583.    Clemmens, A. J., Strelkoff, T. S., and Replogle, J. A. (2003), “Calibration of submerged radial gates”,  Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 129(9), 680–687.    Curran, J.H., Wohl, E.E. (2003), “Large woody debris and flow resistance in step‐pool channels, Cascade  Range, Washington”, Geomorphology, 51, 141– 157.    D’Aoust, S., Millar, R.G. (2000), “Stability of Ballasted Woody Debris Habitat Structures”, Journal of  Hydraulic Engineering, 126, 810‐817.    Ferro, V. (2000), “Simultaneous flow over and under a gate”, Journal of Irrigation and Drainage  Engineering , 126(3), 190–193.    Finnemore, E.J., Franzini, J.B. (2002), “Fluid Mechanics with engineering Applications”, McGraw Hill,  New York.    Gippel, C. J., O’Neill, I. C., and Finlayson, B. L. (1992), “The hydraulic basis of snag management”,  Center for Environmental Applied Hydrology, Department of Civil and Agricultural Engineering, and  Department of Geography, University of Melbourne: Australia.    Gippel, C.J., O’Neill, I. C., Finlayson, B. L., and Schnatz, I. (1996), “Hydraulic guidelines for the re‐ introduction and management of large woody debris in lowland rivers”, Regulated Rivers: Research  and Management, 12, 223‐236.    Gippel, C. J. (1995), “Environmental hydraulics of large woody debris in streams and rivers”, Journal of  Environmental Engineering, 121, 388–395.    Hygelund, B., Manga, M. (2003), “Field measurements of drag coefficients for model large woody  debris”, Geomorphology, 51, 175–185.    Manners, R.B., Doyle, M.W., and Small, M.J. (2007), “The structure and hydraulics of natural woody  debris jams”, Water Resources Research, 43(6), W06432, doi:10.1029/2006WR004910.    Lindsey, W.F. (1938), “Drag of cylinders of simple shapes”, NACA Report 619, 169‐176.    Ranga Raju, K. G., Rana, O. P. S., Asawa, G. L., and Pillai, A. S. N.  (1983), “Rational assessment of  blockage effect in channel flow past smooth circular cylinders”, Journal of Hydraulic Research, 21, 289– 302.  77      Shahrokhnia, M.A., Javan, M. (2006), “Dimensionless Stage–Discharge Relationship in Radial Gates”,  Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 132(2), 180‐184.    Sheridan, J., Lin, J.‐C., Rockwell, D. (1997), “Flow past a cylinder close to a free surface”, Journal of  Fluid Mechanics, 330, 1‐30.    Shields, F. D., Jr., Gippel, C. J. (1995), “Prediction of effects of woody debris removal on flow  resistance”, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 121(4), 341–354.    Shields, F.D., Morin, N., and Cooper, C.M. (2004), “Large woody debris structures for sand‐bed  channel”, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 130, 208‐217.    Swamee, P.K. (1992), “Sluice‐gate discharge equations”, Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering,  118(1), 56‐60.    Tony, L., Wahl, P.E. (2005), “Refined Energy Correction for Calibration of Submerged Radial Gates”,  Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 131(6), 457‐466.    Wallerstein, N., Alonso, C., Bennett, S., and Thorne C. (2001), “Distorted froude‐scaled flume analysis  of large woody debris”, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 26, 1265‐1283.    Wallerstein, N., Alonso, C., Bennett, S., and Thorne C. (2002), “Surface Wave Forces Acting on  Submerged Logs”, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 128(3), 349‐353.    Wilcox, A.C., Nelson, J.M., and Wohl, E.E. (2006), “Flow resistance dynamics in step‐pool channels: 2.  Partitioning  between grain, spill, and woody debris resistance”, Water Resource Research, 42,  W05419, doi:10.1029/2005WR004278.    Zahm, A.F., Smith, R.H., and Hill, G.C. (1972), “Point drag and total drag of navy struts No. 1 Modified”,  NACA Report 137, 125‐139.  78    Appendix A  Load Cell Calibration    Calibration of the load cell was completed with a set of weights, a low friction pulley (Figure A1), and a  rope. The three signals (Fx, Mz, and Fy) were calibrated independently.    A1  Streamwise Force Signal Calibration (Fx)    The streamwise force signal (Fx) was calibrated with different combinations of weights, from 0.00Kg to  1.20Kg. The forces were applied at different vertical locations from the load cell (h). It was found that h  had  a  slight  but  non‐negligible  effect  on  the  streamwise  force  signal  (Fx).  Results  of  the  tests  are  presented in Figure A2. A linear trend was interpolated within each of the 7 data series. The slopes of  the trends were then expressed as a function of h. Results are presented in Figure A3.   From Figure A3, the calibration equation that transforms the streamwise signal (Fx) expressed in volts  into a streamwise force (FFx) expressed in N is:  ( ) ( )54234.000014.0 +− −= h FFgF xinixFx                   ( ) ( )h FFgF xinixFx − −= 3874 7143                   (A1)  Here, g is the gravity constant (m/s2), Fxini is the initial streamwise signal with no force applied (Volts),  and  h  is  the  distance  between  the  load  cell  center  and  the  vertical  point  of  streamwise  force  application (mm). Note that the data presented in Figure A3 presents a certain scatter.  Figure A1. Weights and pulley used for the calibration  79    y = 0.5198x + 2.5194 y = 0.5441x + 2.5189 y = 0.5423x + 2.5198 y = 0.5677x + 2.5232 y = 0.5732x + 2.5206 y = 0.5952x + 2.5223 y = 0.6160x + 2.5246 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 F x (v ol t) Weight (Kg) h = ‐93 mm h = ‐43 mm h = ‐28 mm h = 137 mm h = 265 mm h = 407 mm h = 541 mm     y = ‐0.00014x + 0.54234 R² = 0.96899 0.50 0.52 0.54 0.56 0.58 0.60 0.62 0.64 ‐600 ‐500 ‐400 ‐300 ‐200 ‐100 0 100 200 Eq ua tio n  sl op e  (V ol t  /  Kg ) h (mm)   Figure A2. Streamwise force signal (Fx) expressed as a function of the weight applied at different vertical locations (h)  Figure A3.  Slopes  of  linear  trends  presented  in Figure A2  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  vertical  location of the streamwise force application point (h)  80    A2  Moment Signal Calibration (Mz)     The moment  signal  (Mz) was  calibrated with  the  same method described  for  the  streamwise  force  signal  (Fx).  The  effect  of  the  distance  between  the  load  cell  and  the  vertical  streamwise  force  application point was expected to be more significant. Figure A4 shows the test results. The slopes of  the trends from Figure A4 were expressed as a function of h in Figure A5.  From Figure A5, the calibration equation that transforms the streamwise signal (Mz ) expressed in Volts  into a streamwise force (FMz ) expressed in N is:  ( ) ( )09415.001296.0 − −= h MMgF zinizMz   ( ) 26.7 16.77 − −= h MM gF zinizMz                   (A2)  Here, Mzini  is  the  initial momentum  signal with no  force  applied  (Volts).  The precision of  the  linear  trend in Figure A5 presents a fine correlation compared to the trend presented in Figure A3. However,  the linear trend was expected to meet with the origin of the graph (0,0), which is not the case.  y = 1.1055x + 0.1629 y = 0.2199x + 0.3005 y = 0.1342x + 0.2670 y = ‐1.8895x + 0.1472 y = ‐3.5291x + 0.1228 y = ‐5.3220x + 0.1083 y = ‐7.0397x + 0.0801 ‐10.00 ‐8.00 ‐6.00 ‐4.00 ‐2.00 0.00 2.00 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 M z (v ol t) Weight (Kg) h = ‐93 mm h = ‐43 mm h = ‐28 mm h = 137 mm h = 265 mm h = 407 mm h = 541 mm   Figure A4. Momentum signal (Mz) expressed as a function of the weight applied at different vertical  locations (h)  81    y = 0.01296x ‐ 0.09415 R² = 0.99992 ‐8.00 ‐7.00 ‐6.00 ‐5.00 ‐4.00 ‐3.00 ‐2.00 ‐1.00 0.00 1.00 2.00 ‐600 ‐500 ‐400 ‐300 ‐200 ‐100 0 100 200 Eq ua tio n  sl op e  (V ol t  /  Kg ) h (mm)     A3  Vertical Force Signal Calibration (Fy)     The vertical signal  (Fy) was calibrated by adding weights directly on the  load cell. Three distinct tests  were performed. The first test was achieved with no cylinder fixed to the experimental setup (refer to  Figure 3.1 and Figure 3.7). The second and third tests were respectively performed with the 3 inch and  5  inch cylinders fixed to the experimental setup. Results of the calibration tests for the vertical signal  (Fy) are presented in Figure A6.   The 3 linear interpolations in Figure A6 were used to generate the calibration formula for the vertical  force  (FFy).  The  importance of  each  slope would depend on  the  size of  its  respective data  set.  The  average slope obtained was 0.1408 Volt/Kg and the calibration equation is:  ( ) 1408.0 yiniy Fy FF gF −=   ( )yiniyFy FFgF −= 102.7                   (A3)  Here, Fyini is the initial vertical signal with no force applied (Volts).   Figure  A5.  Slopes  of  linear  trends  presented  in  Figure  A4  expressed  as  a  function  of  the  vertical  location of the streamwise force application point (h)  82    y = 0.145x + 6.111 y = 0.140x + 6.398 y = 0.142x + 6.651 6.00 6.10 6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70 6.80 6.90 7.00 7.10 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 F y (v ol t) Weight (Kg) No Cylinder 3 inches Cylinder 5 inches Cylinder   Figure A6. Vertical force signal (Fy) expressed as a function of the weight for 3 different initial weights 83    Appendix B   Downstream Water Depth Correction    The downstream water depth  (Ydwn) was measured with a transparent ruler.  In order to validate the  precision  of  the  measurements  from  Experimental  Set  1,  measured  water  depths  for  the  three  discharges (5L/s, 10L/s, and 15L/s) were plotted as a function of the downstream weir gate elevation  (hgate). The gate elevation was measured with a Point Gauge  fixed  to a Vernier  (See Figure 3.8). This  measure is considered reliable.   Figure B1, B2, and B3 present the data for 5L/s, 10L/s, and 15L/s respectively. The supercritical water  depths are represented by distinct markers and are not expected to follow the subcritical trend. The  data was compared with the theoretical weir flow equation (2.14), which was modified for the purpose  of this analysis:  ( ) 23* 2 3 2 gatedwnw hYgCq −=                   (B1)  The weir coefficient (Cw *) was estimated with this empirical equation presented by Finnemore and  Franzini (2002) for thin plate weirs:  ( ) ( )gate gatedwngatedwnw h hY hY C −+−+= 08.01000 1605.0*             (B2)  From equation (B1) and equation (B2), the downstream water depth was back‐calculated and results  are presented by a black line in Figures B1, B2, and B3. The weir flow equation was not expected to fit  the data but served as a reference to detect any anomalies  in the subcritical water depths measured  with rulers.   The conclusion from Figures B1, B2, and B3 was that the downstream water depth measurements of  the  subcritical hydraulic  states of Experimental Set 1 were consistent. Therefore, none of  them was  corrected  or  rejected.  The  reliability  of  the  supercritical  water  depth  measurements  could  not  be  confirmed.   84    0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 Y d w n (c m ) hgate (cm) Subcritical water depths Supercritical water depths Theoritical Weir gate equation Critical water depth     0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 Y d w n (c m ) hgate (cm) Subcritical water depths Supercritical water depths Theoritical weir flow equation Critical water depth     Figure B1. Downstream water depth (Ydwn) expressed as a function of the downstream gate elevation  (hgate) for a discharge (Q) of 5L/s  Figure B2. Downstream water depth (Ydwn) expressed as a function of the downstream gate elevation  (hgate) for a discharge (Q) of 10L/s  85    0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 Y d w n (c m ) hgate (cm) Subcritical water depths Supercritical water depths Theoritical weir flow equation Critical water depth     Figure B3. Downstream water depth (Ydwn) expressed as a function of the downstream gate elevation  (hgate) for a discharge (Q) of 15L/s  86    Appendix C  Vertical Forces    The  dynamic  lift  force  represents  an  additional  hydraulic  component  affecting  the  stability  of  roughness elements. It was mentioned in Subsection 3.1.4 and Section 3.3 that the vertical force (FFy)  acting on cylinders was measured by the load cell. This section presents the results, which are part of  the Experimental Set 1.  C1  Comparing Measured Lift Forces (Flm) to Theoretical Lift Forces (Fl)    The total vertical force measured by the load cell (FFy) is the sum of the buoyancy force (Fbm) and the  lift force (Flm).   bmlmFy FFF +=                     (C1)  The  buoyancy  force  acting  on  the  cylinder  (D’Aoust  and Millar  2000)  or  submerged weight  of  the  cylinder (Alonso 2004) is defined by:  ( )wcylb BgDF ρρπ −⎟⎠⎞⎜⎝⎛= 2 2                   (C2)  Here, D is the cylinder diameter, g is the gravity constant, ρcyl is the density of the cyinders, and ρw is  the density of water. The density of the PVC cylinders  is ρcyl = 1409 Kg/m3. The density of water was  assumed  to be  ρw = 1000 Kg/m3. When  the  cylinder was  completely  submerged, equation  (C2) was  used in equation (C1). However, when the cylinder was not fully submerged (when it acted as a sluice  gate), equation  (C2) had  to be  converted  to  calculate  the partially  submerged  cylinder weight. This  parameter was obtained using the upstream water depth and the cylinder was separated in two parts  of  different  relative  densities.  The  downstream  water  depth  was  not  taken  into  account  for  the  submerged  density  calculation,  even  when  supercritical  downstream  hydraulic  conditions  were  observed.  Before each of the 60 experiments for which the  load cell was used, the vertical force signal (Fy) was  recorded with no water in the flume as well as when the cylinder was fully submerged in steady water.  These  two  signals were used  to back‐calculate  the buoyancy  force measured by  the  load  cell  (Fbm).  These 60 values were compared to the theoretical buoyancy force calculated with equation (C2). The  results are presented in Figure C1.   87      0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 F b (N ) Fbm (N) D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 +/‐10%     Two  lines were  plotted  in  Figure  C1  to  illustrate  a  10%  departure  from  the  1:1  line.  The  average  absolute  difference  between  Fb  and  Fbm  was  0.41  N  and  the  maximum  difference  was  1.24  N  (Experiment D4wsg030Q15). The difference between  the  total averages was only 0.12 N. This value  compares  with  the  submerged  weight  of  the  aluminum  rods  that  was  not  considered  in  the  calculation. However, the wide range of values obtained for each cylinder size suggests that the initial  load  cell vertical  force measurements were not as accurate as  the  streamwise  force measurements  described in Section 4.1.   Equation  (2.14) was  adapted  to  this  case  study by  replacing  the  cylinder  length  l with  the  channel  width B.   2 2 up w ll DBVCF ρ=                     (C3)      Figure C1. Buoyancy force (Fb) calculated with equation (B2) expressed as a function of the buoyancy  force measured by the load cell (Fbm)  88    Equation  (C3)  and  equation  (2.15)  were  used  to  calculate  the  theoretical  lift  force  (Fl)  that  was  compared  to  the measured  lift  force  (Flm) obtained  from equation  (C1) and equation  (C2)  (Here,  the  theoretical buoyancy was considered in equation (C1) instead of the measured buoyancy presented in  Figure  (C1)). The  results are plotted  in Figure C2. One can  straightforwardly conclude  that empirical  equation (C3) and equation (2.15) do not agree with the  lift force measured by the  load cell (Flm) for  two  reasons:  the order of magnitude differs  significantly  and  a majority of  Flm  values  are negative.   Note  that  the  lift  force  values  are  of  same  order  of magnitude  as  the measured  drag  forces  (FFx)  presented in Figure 4.4.  0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 ‐40.0 ‐35.0 ‐30.0 ‐25.0 ‐20.0 ‐15.0 ‐10.0 ‐5.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 F l (N ) Flm (N) 1:1 line     Figure C2. Theoretical  lift  force  (Fl) calculated with equation  (C3) and equation  (2.15) expressed as a  function of the net lift force (Flm) (equation (C1) and equation (C2)) measured by the load cell 89    C 2  Buoyancy forces (Fb)      In  the  perspective  of  a  river  restoration  project,  the  610  measured  lift  force  (Flm)  values  from  Experimental Set 1 were compared to the buoyancy forces (Fb) of hypothetically lighter cylinders. The  original cylinder density (ρcyl) of 1409 kg/m3 was replaced by two commonly considered  log densities  (ρlog): one light density of 500 Kg/m3 and an average log density of 800 kg/m3. The buoyancy force (Fb)  was then calculated using equation (C2). Results are presented in Figure C3. The data points located on  the  left hand side of the  ‐1:1  line characterize cases where the  log would be stable,  i.e. the resulting  force calculated using equation (C1) would be directed downward. Reversely, the markers located on  the right hand side of the ‐1:1 line present a net upward force. As the density of the log increases, the  number of unstable cases decreases.   The hypothetical buoyancy force (Fb) and the measured lift force (Flm) roughly show a similar order of  magnitude. If the measured lift force values from Experimental Set 1 could be confirmed, the results of  this work would have an  impact on  the LWD  structure  stability approach presented by D’Aoust and  Millar (2000) and Baudrick and Grant (2000). Indeed, their approach did not consider the dynamic lift  force applied on LWD structures.  However, the present study does not propose any reliable equation  to evaluate the lift force.   C 3   Conclusion on the Lift Force Analysis    Some  interesting  trends were observed  in  the  lift  force data.  Figure C4  shows  the  influence of  the  discharge  on  the  measured  lift  force  as  a  function  of  the  downstream  water  depth  for  constant  cylinder  size and elevation. Results are difficult  to  justify using know hydraulic equations. Figure C5  presents  the effect of  the cylinder  size on  the measured  lift  force as a  function of  the downstream  water depth  for constant discharge and cylinder elevation. Even  if the curves presented  in Figure C5  are  irregular, a general  tendency  for negative  lift  force  can be observed as  the  cylinder  size  varies.  However, the influence of the cylinder size does not find a simple solution in Figure C6, which presents  a distinct set of data with constant discharge and cylinder position.      90    0.0 3.0 6.0 9.0 12.0 15.0 ‐45.0 ‐30.0 ‐15.0 0.0 15.0 F b (N )   Flm (N) Light density Hight density ‐1:1 line Stable region Unstable region       ‐12.0 ‐10.0 ‐8.0 ‐6.0 ‐4.0 ‐2.0 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 F l m (N ) Ydwn (m) D6wsg010Q05 D6wsg010Q10 D6wsg010Q15   Figure C4. Example of the influence of the discharge (Q) on the measured lift force (Flm) expressed  as a function of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) for the 6 inch cylinder  Figure C3. Hypothetical buoyancy force (Fb) calculated with equation (C2) expressed as a function  of the measured dynamic lift force (Flm) calculated from equation (C1) and equation (C2)  91    ‐12.0 ‐10.0 ‐8.0 ‐6.0 ‐4.0 ‐2.0 0.0 2.0 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 F l m (N ) Ydwn (m) D2wsg010Q05 D3wsg010Q05 D4wsg010Q05 D5wsg010Q05 D6wsg010Q05       ‐20.0 ‐15.0 ‐10.0 ‐5.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 F l m (N ) Ydwn (m) D2wsg030Q15 D3wsg030Q15 D4wsg030Q15 D5wsg030Q15 D6wsg030Q15     Figure C6. Influence of the cylinder size (D) on the measured lift force (Fl) expressed as a function  of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) when the discharge (Q) is 15L/s  Figure C5. Influence of the cylinder size (D) on the measured lift force (Fl) expressed as a function  of the downstream water depth (Ydwn) when the discharge (Q) is 5L/s  92    The analysis of the lift force data could not be conducted any further. Results from Figure C2 were not  satisfying and no alternative equation could be  found  to calculate  theoretical  lift  force values. Since  the measured  lift  forces were often negative,  it was assumed  that  the vertical  forces acting on  the  cylinders  would  have  a  limited  effect  on  their  stability  in  the  range  of  parameters  tested  here.  Additional experiments would be required to confirm or reject this hypothesis.   93    Appendix D  Calibration of the α1 Coefficient    The  equation  that  estimates  the  correction  coefficient  α1  was  calibrated  by  considering  the  last  (supercritical) hydraulic state of the 30 (out of 48) experiments that followed a Curve 1‐2‐3 model. The  15  experiment  during which  the  cylinder  elevation was  nil were  not  considered  in  the  calibration  process. Three experiments were rejected for uncertainties related to discharges (D5wsg010Q15 and  D5wsg030Q15) or to other problems affecting the water depth (D2wsg10Q05). The last hydraulic state  of  two  experiments  (D3wsg030Q10  and  D6wsg30Q15)  was  rejected  because  of  water  depth  instabilities. However, data from these experiments was considered in this analysis.    In Figure 5.3, values of Yup/(D+Yc‐α1wsg) (set equal to Yup/(D+Yc)) range from  1.071 to 1.105. Maximum  and minimum values of  α1 were back‐calculated  for each experiment. The maximum and minimum  resulting values  for  the 30 experiments are presented as a  function of  their  respective D/Yc  ratio  in  Figure D1.    ‐0.50 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 α 1 D/Yc Maximum value Minimum value Equation (D2) Polynomial interpolation  for maximum α1 values Polynomial interpolation  for minimum α1 values     Figure D1. Maximum and minimum values of the correction coefficient α1 expressed as a function  of the cylinder size (D) divided by the critical water depth (Yc)  94    Second  order  polynomial  functions  (black  and  red  curves  for  maximum  and  minimum  α1  values  respectively)  were  automatically  interpolated  in  Figure  D1.  Then,  a  power  function  that  takes  the  following form was considered:  311 2 d Y Dd d c −⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛=α                     (D1)   The parameters d1, d2, and d3 were manually adjusted until equation (D1) would be located between a  majority of maximum and minimum α1 values. The resulting equation was:  3.06.0 8.0 1 −⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛= cY Dα                     (D2)    Equation  (D2)  is  presented  on  Figure D1  as  a  blue  line. Only  2  red markers  are  located  above  the  equation trend and only three black markers are positioned slightly under the equation trend.  It  is  expected  that  equation  (D2) might  not  be  compatible with  data  sets  obtained  from  different  experimental  conditions. The  influence of  the  cylinder elevation when Ydwn <  (D+Yc)  is  complex and  does not seem to be independent of the cylinder size (D) and the unit discharge (q).               95    Appendix E  Conception of Figure 5.12    Experimental Set 4 was performed to complete the investigation related to the transition from Curve 2  to Curve 5. The maximum upstream water depth corresponding to vortex formation was measured for  37  experiments.  Four  different  cylinder  sizes were  tested  (3,  4,  5,  and  6  inches),  up  to  4  different  discharges were tested for each cylinder, and up to 3 different cylinder elevations were tested for each  discharge. Each experiment included two independent evaluations of this water level. The 37 averaged  results are presented in Figure E1.   It was observed in Figure E1 that the data was organized as a function of the critical water depth (Yc),  even if each axis included this parameter. Figure E2 presents the same results with a power equation  interpolated within the data. The form of the equation is:  ( ) 2 1 e c sg c up Y w e Y DY ⎟⎟⎠ ⎞ ⎜⎜⎝ ⎛=−                   (E1)  0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 (Y up ‐D )  /  Y c wsg/Yc Yc = 0.086 Yc = 0.076 Yc = 0.066 Yc = 0.054 Yc = 0.041 Yc = 0.034     Figure  E1.  Results  from  Experimental  Set  4:  Dimensionless  upstream  water  depth  (Yup)  corresponding  to vortex  formation  for given values of  cylinder  size  (D),  cylinder elevation  (wsg),  and critical water depth (Yc)  96    In Figure E2, apart  from  the  three data points defined by Yc = 0.034m, all  interpolations are visually  parallel to each other. Three automatically  interpolated power equations are presented by extended  dashed lines (Yc = 0.054m, Yc = 0.076m and Yc = 0.095m) and their respective equation is presented in  Figure E2. These equations were slightly modified and associated to Yc values of 0.050m, 0.075m, and  0.100m respectively. These modifications were performed manually. The e1 and e2 values of equation  (E1) presented in Figure 5.12 are defined in table E1.  Note that vortex  formation upstream of a sluice gate or a water  intake has not been  investigated  in  this research project. Trends  in Figure 5.12 should be extrapolated cautiously and more experiments  should be performed in order to confirm the tendencies presented in this figure. Roughness and water  velocity  distribution  are  expected  to  have  non‐negligible  effects  on  the  trends  presented  in  Figure  5.12.     e1 in equation (E1)  e2 in equation (E1)  Yc = 0.050 m  1.260  0.630  Yc = 0.075 m  1.225  0.670  Yc = 0.100 m  1.190  0.735      Table E1. Values of parameters e1 and e2 for each value of the critical water  depth (Yc ) in equation E1  97    y = 1.189x0.7362 y = 1.2153x0.6784 y = 1.2591x0.6339 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 (Y up ‐D )  /  Y c wsg/Yc Yc = 0.086 Yc = 0.076 Yc = 0.066 Yc = 0.054 Yc = 0.041 Yc = 0.034  Figure  E2.  Results  from  Figure  E1  with  power  equation  interpolation  within  each  data  set  corresponding to a distinct critical water depth (Yc) 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.24.1-0063090/manifest

Comment

Related Items