Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

The genesis of ‘giant’ copper-zinc-gold-silver volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits at Tambogrande,… Winter, Lawrence Stephen 2008

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2008_fall_winter_lawrence.pdf [ 9.53MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0052903.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0052903-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0052903-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0052903-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0052903-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0052903-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0052903-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0052903-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0052903.ris

Full Text

  THE GENESIS OF ‘GIANT’ COPPER‐ZINC‐GOLD‐SILVER VOLCANOGENIC MASSIVE SULPHIDE  DEPOSITS AT TAMBOGRANDE, PERÚ:  AGE, TECTONIC SETTING, PALEOMORPHOLOGY, LITHOGEOCHEMISTRY AND RADIOGENIC  ISOTOPES      by    LAWRENCE STEPHEN WINTER    B.Sc. (Hons.), Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1997  M.Sc., Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2000            A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY      in      THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES    (Geological Science)                    THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)    APRIL 2008      © Lawrence Stephen Winter, 2008      Abstract    The ‘giant’ Tambogrande volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits within the  Cretaceous Lancones basin of northwestern Perú are some of the largest Cu‐Zn‐Au‐Ag‐bearing  massive sulphide deposits known.  Limited research has been done on these deposits, hence  the ore forming setting in which they developed and the key criteria that permitted such  anomalous accumulation of base‐metal sulphides are not understood.   Based on field relationships in the host volcanic rocks and U‐Pb geochronology, the  deposits formed during the early stages of arc development in the latest Early Cretaceous and  were related to an extensional and arc‐rift phase (~105‐100 Ma, phase 1).  During this time,  bimodal, primitive basalt‐dominant volcanic rocks were erupted in a relatively deep marginal  basin.   Phase 1 rhyolite is tholeiitic, M‐type, and considered to have formed from relatively  high temperature, small batch magmas.  The high heat flow and extensional setting extant  during the initial stages of arc development were essential components for forming a VMS  hydrothermal system.  The subsequent phase 2 (~99‐91 Ma) volcanic sequence comprises more  evolved mafic rocks and similar, but more depleted, felsic rocks erupted in a relatively shallow  marine setting.  Phase 2 is interpreted to represent late‐stage arc volcanism during a waning  extensional regime and marked the transition to contractional tectonism.    The Tambogrande deposits are particularly unusual amongst the ‘giant’ class of VMS  deposits in that deposition largely occurred as seafloor mound‐type and not by replacement of  existing strata.  Paleomorphology of the local depositional setting was defined by seafloor  depressions controlled by syn‐volcanic faults and rhyolitic volcanism.  The depressions were the  main controls on distribution and geometry of the deposits and, due to inherently confined  hydrothermal venting, enhanced the efficiency of sulphide deposition.  Geochemical and radiogenic isotope data indicate that the rhyolites in the VMS deposits  were high temperature partial melts of the juvenile arc crust that had inherited the isotopic  signatures of continental crust.  Moreover, Pb isotope data suggest the metal budget was  sourced almost wholly from mafic volcanic strata.  Therefore, unlike the implications of many  conventional models, the felsic volcanic rocks at Tambogrande are interpreted to have only  played a passive role in VMS formation.   ii     Table of Contents  Abstract ......................................................................................................................................................................... ii  Table of Contents ......................................................................................................................................................... iii  List of Tables ................................................................................................................................................................. vi  List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................................... vii  Acknowledgements ..................................................................................................................................................... xii  Dedication .................................................................................................................................................................. xiii  Co‐Authorship Statement ........................................................................................................................................... xiv   Chapter 1.  Giant Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposits, Tambogrande, NW Perú  1.1   Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 1  1.2  Background and Approach ................................................................................................ 2  1.3  History ............................................................................................................................... 4  1.4  VMS Deposit Classification and Genetic Models .............................................................. 5  1.5  Controls on ‘Giant’ VMS systems ...................................................................................... 7  1.6  Thesis Objectives............................................................................................................... 9  1.7  Methodology ................................................................................................................... 10  1.7.1  1.7.2  1.7.3  1.7.4  1.7.5   Core Logging .................................................................................................................................... 10  Regional Mapping ............................................................................................................................ 10  Geochronology ................................................................................................................................ 11  Lithogeochemistry ........................................................................................................................... 11  Isotope Chemistry ............................................................................................................................ 12   1.8  Presentation .................................................................................................................... 12  1.9  References ...................................................................................................................... 22  Chapter 2.  Volcanic Stratigraphy and Geochronology of the Cretaceous Lancones Basin,  Northwestern Perú  2.1  Overview ......................................................................................................................... 27  2.2  Introduction .................................................................................................................... 28  2.3  Tectonic Setting .............................................................................................................. 30  2.4  Regional Geology ............................................................................................................ 31  2.5  Volcanic Stratigraphy ...................................................................................................... 32  2.5.1  2.5.2  2.5.3  2.5.4   Cerro San Lorenzo Formation .......................................................................................................... 35  Cerro El Ereo Formation .................................................................................................................. 37  La Bocana Formation ....................................................................................................................... 38  Lancones Formation ........................................................................................................................ 39   2.6  Structural Geology .......................................................................................................... 39  2.7  Plutonic Rocks ................................................................................................................. 41  2.8  U‐Pb Geochronologic Data ............................................................................................. 42  2.8.1  2.8.2   Volcanic Rocks of the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation ....................................................................... 43  Volcanic Rocks of the Lancones Formation ..................................................................................... 44   2.9  Discussion........................................................................................................................ 47  2.9.1  2.9.2  2.9.3  2.9.4   Depositional Evolution of the Lancones Basin ................................................................................. 47  Timing and Duration of the Volcanic Arc ......................................................................................... 49  Age of Massive Sulphide Deposits ................................................................................................... 50  Comparison of the Lancones Basin to the Western Peruvian Trough ............................................. 51   iii     2.9.5  2.9.6   Tectonic Implications ....................................................................................................................... 52  Inheritance in Zircons and Implications for Basement Rocks .......................................................... 53   2.10  Conclusions ..................................................................................................................... 54  2.11  References ...................................................................................................................... 78  Chapter 3.  A Reconstructed Cretaceous Depositional Setting for Giant VMS Deposits at  Tambogrande, NW Perú  3.1  Manuscript Status ........................................................................................................... 83  3.2  Abstract ........................................................................................................................... 83  Chapter 4.  Volcanic Rock Geochemistry and the Geodynamic Setting of VMS Deposits at  Tambogrande, Perú   4.1  Overview ......................................................................................................................... 85  4.2  Introduction .................................................................................................................... 87  4.3  Tectonic Setting .............................................................................................................. 89  4.4  Regional Geology and Volcanic Stratigraphy .................................................................. 91  4.4.1  4.4.2  4.4.3  4.4.4   Cerro San Lorenzo Formation .......................................................................................................... 93  Cerro El Ereo Formation .................................................................................................................. 94  La Bocana Formation ....................................................................................................................... 95  Lancones Formation ........................................................................................................................ 95   4.5  Lithogeochemistry .......................................................................................................... 95  4.5.1  4.5.2  4.5.3   Sampling Procedures and Analytical Methods ................................................................................ 95  Alteration and Element Mobility ..................................................................................................... 96  Geochemical Results ........................................................................................................................ 97  4.5.3.1  4.5.3.2  4.5.3.3  4.5.3.4   Cerro San Lorenzo Formation .............................................................................................................. 97  Cerro El Ereo Formation ....................................................................................................................... 99  La Bocana Formation ........................................................................................................................... 99  Chemostratigraphy of the VMS‐Host sequence ................................................................................. 101   4.6  Discussion...................................................................................................................... 102  4.6.1  4.6.2  4.6.3   Petrochemical Variations in Mafic Volcanic Rocks of the Lancones Basin .................................... 102  Felsic Volcanic Rock Petrochemistry and Association with VMS ................................................... 104  Implications for the Tectonic Setting ............................................................................................. 108   4.7  Summary ....................................................................................................................... 110  4.8  References .................................................................................................................... 135  Chapter 5.  Pb‐Sr‐Nd Isotope Systematics of Cretaceous Arc Volcanic Rocks in the Lancones  Basin near Tambogrande, Perú – Implications for VMS Deposit Formation  5.1  Overview ....................................................................................................................... 142  5.2  Introduction .................................................................................................................. 144  5.3  Regional Geology and Tectonic Setting ........................................................................ 145  5.4  Volcanic Stratigraphy of the Lancones Basin ................................................................ 148  5.5  Andean Isotopic Framework ......................................................................................... 150  5.6  Pb, Sm‐Nd and Rb‐Sr Isotope Geochemistry ................................................................ 152  5.7  Analytical Methods ....................................................................................................... 153  5.7.1  5.7.2   Pb Isotope Analysis, Mineral Separates ......................................................................................... 153  Pb, Rb‐Sr, Sm‐Nd Isotope Analysis, Whole Rock Samples ............................................................. 154   5.8  Results ........................................................................................................................... 155  5.8.1  5.8.2   Volcanic Rocks ............................................................................................................................... 155  Massive Sulphide Deposits ............................................................................................................ 158   5.9  Discussion...................................................................................................................... 159  iv     5.9.1  5.9.2   Volcanic Rock Petrogenesis ........................................................................................................... 159  Possible Linkages Between Petrogenesis of the Felsic Volcanic Suite and VMS Formation .......... 163   5.10  Summary and Conclusions ............................................................................................ 166  5.11  References .................................................................................................................... 187  Chapter 6.  Summary, Discussion and Unresolved Questions  6.1  Summary and Main Conclusions ................................................................................... 192  6.2  Discussion and Ideas ..................................................................................................... 198  6.2.1  6.2.2   Timing and Tectonic Setting .......................................................................................................... 198  Where’s the Intrusion? .................................................................................................................. 199   6.3  Outstanding Issues and Directions for Future Research .............................................. 200  6.3.1  6.3.2  6.3.3   At Tambogrande and in the Lancones Basin ................................................................................. 200  In the Western Peruvian Trough ................................................................................................... 201  Globally .......................................................................................................................................... 203   6.4  References .................................................................................................................... 205   A.1  A.2  A.3  A.4   Appendix A.  U‐Pb Zircon Sample Preparation, Analysis and Additional Data  Methodology ................................................................................................................. 210  Additional U‐Pb Zircon Geochronologic Data ............................................................... 217  Results ........................................................................................................................... 217  References .................................................................................................................... 225   Appendix B.  Ar‐Ar Geochronologic Data  B.1  Methodology ................................................................................................................. 226  B.2  Results ........................................................................................................................... 227  B.3  References .................................................................................................................... 236  Appendix C.  Lithogeochemistry  C.1  Analytical Methods, Precision, and Accuracy ............................................................... 237  C.2  References .................................................................................................................... 260       v     List of Tables    Table 1.1.  Individual deposit data from number drill holes, tonnage and grade (Manhattan Minerals, 2002). ........ 21  Table 2.1.  Summary of location and description data for samples analyzed in this study for U‐Pb zircon dating. .... 58  Table 4.1 (Following page).  Average lithogeochemical values and 2 σ errors for volcanic rocks of the Lancones  basin, based on volcanic rock type and formation.  Complete data are listed in Appendix C. ........................ 128  Table 4.2.  Summary of average selected trace element ratios for volcanic rocks of the Lancones basin based on  volcanic rock type and formation. ................................................................................................................... 133  Table 5.1.  Sample location data, approximate age and rock descriptions.  All samples are from diamond drill core  except for LW002.  Coordinates are in map projection WGS 84, UTM Zone 17 Southern Hemisphere. ........ 184  Table 5.2.  Pb, Nd and Sr isotope data from volcanic rocks associated with VMS deposits at Tambogrande.  ‘Initial’  isotope values are calculated to 100 Ma. ........................................................................................................ 185  Table 5.3.  Pb isotope compositions of Tambogrande ore deposits and post‐mineralization intrusive phases in the  Lancones basin. ................................................................................................................................................ 186  Table A1.  U‐Pb zircon analytical data obtained using ID‐TIMS method. .................................................................. 211  Table A2.  U‐Pb zircon analytical data obtained using the SHRIMP‐RG method. ...................................................... 212  Table A3. Description of additional rock samples for U‐Pb zircon analysis (not included in the Chapters). ............. 218  Table A4.  U‐Pb zircon data from SHRIMP‐RG analysis. ............................................................................................ 219  Table B1.  40Ar‐39Ar rock sample description and location data.  Eastings and northings are UTM Zone 17, Southern  Hemisphere (WGS84). ..................................................................................................................................... 228  Table B2.  40Ar‐39Ar age data for plutonic and volcanic rock samples from the Lancones basin.  Neutron flux  monitors: 24.36 Ma MAC‐83 biotite (Sandeman et al. 1999); 28.02 Ma FCs (Renne et al., 1998).  Isotope  production ratios: (40Ar/39Ar)K=0.0302, (37Ar/39Ar)Ca=1416.4306, (36Ar/39Ar)Ca=0.3952,  Ca/K=1.83(37ArCa/39ArK). ................................................................................................................................. 229  Table C1.  Whole rock geochemical analyses.  Major oxides are from Bondar‐Clegg Laboratories.  Trace elements  are from Memorial University.  Abbreviations: CSLF = Cerro San Lorenzo Formation; CEEF = Cerro El Ereo  Formation; LBF = La Bocana Formation.  D = dacite; A = andesite; B = basalt; R = rhyolite; RD = rhyolite dyke  (post mineralization); bx = breccia. .................................................................................................................. 239  Table C2.  Whole rock geochemical analyses.  Major oxides are from Bondar‐Clegg Laboratories.  Trace elements  are from Memorial University. ........................................................................................................................ 246  Table C3.  Memorial University analyses of in‐house standards run with samples from this study. ........................ 256  Table C4.  ALS Chemex analyses of MDRU standards run with samples from this study. ......................................... 257   vi     List of Figures      Figure 1.1.  Location maps and simplified geology for the study area.  The locations of VMS deposits (TG1, TG3, and  B5) in the Tambogrande area are also shown and field area of this study outlined.  Geology modified after  Jaillard et al. (1999) and Tegart et al. (2000). .................................................................................................... 15  Figure 1.2.  Schematic model for the formation of VMS deposits (from Franklin et al., 2005). .................................. 16  Figure 1.3.  Schematic section and model of a typical volcanogenic massive sulphide deposit from modern mid‐ ocean ridge settings; after Herzig and Hannington (1995). ............................................................................... 17  Figure 1.4.  Histogram of ages for global bimodal‐mafic type VMS deposits (n=327); data from Franklin et al. (2005).  ........................................................................................................................................................................... 18  Figure 1.5.   Metals versus size of the deposit (tonnes) for global VMS deposits of the bimodal‐mafic class (n=326;  data from Franklin et al., 2005).  Tambogrande deposits are labeled.  KC = Kidd Creek deposit.  A. Copper and  B. Zinc ................................................................................................................................................................. 19  Figure 1.6.  Gold grade (grams/tonne) versus size of the deposit (tonnes) for global VMS deposits of the bimodal‐ mafic class (n=326; data from Franklin et al., 2005).  Tambogrande deposits are labeled.  KC = Kidd Creek  deposit. .............................................................................................................................................................. 20  Figure 2.1.  Morphostructural units of the Peruvian Andes (modified after Benavides‐Cáceres, 1999).  Cretaceous  marginal basins ‐ Lancones (LB), Huarmey (HB) and Cañete (CB) basins ‐ are superimposed.  Also shown are  the locations of VMS deposits and prospects (circles) (data from Steinmüller et al., 2000). ............................ 56  Figure 2.2.  A. Location map for the Tambogrande project; B. regional map showing major tectonostratigraphic  units of coastal northwestern Perú.  The locations of VMS deposits (TG1, TG3, and B5) in the Tambogrande  area are also shown and field area of this study outlined.  Modified after Jaillard et al. (1999) and Tegart et al.  (2000). ................................................................................................................................................................ 57  Figure 2.3 (on the following page).  Schematic paleogeographic model of the development of Perú‐Ecuador  segment of the western margin of South America (SA) from the Jurassic to present using data from Mourier  et al. (1988), Mitouard et al. (1990), Litherland et al. (1994), Aspden et al. (1995),  Noble et al. (1997), Arculus  et al. (1999), Benavides‐Cáceres (1999), Jaillard et al. (2000), Bosch et al. (2002), and Polliand et al. (2005).  A.  Jurassic to earliest Early Cretaceous: ~SE‐directed convergence of the proto‐Farallon‐Caribbean ocean plate  with continental SA; subduction occurs along the Ecuadorian segment, whereas the Peruvian NNW‐trending  margin is a sinistral transform; Amotape terrane is a micro‐continent approaching SA; B) change in  convergence direction from SE to ~NE; accretion of the Amotape terrane, notably along the Peruvian  segment; dextral faulting of Amotape terrane and clockwise rotation of blocks; ocean‐continental plate  boundary ‘jumps’ toward the west; during this period the NW‐trending Peruvian margin becomes a  subduction zone whereas the Ecuadorian NE‐trending margin becomes a dextral transform.  C) trench ‘roll‐ back’ occurring along Peruvian margin and extension in overriding SA plate; the Lancones basin and Western  Peruvian Trough open up along a margin parallel rift and result in the deposition of Cretaceous sedimentary  and arc volcanic rocks; continued dextral displacement of Amotape terrane; D) termination of marginal  rifting, accretion of ocean plateau ‘Pallatanga’ terrane in Ecuador, and deformation of Andean terranes;  formation of Macuchi island arc near margin to be accreted to Ecuadorian segment by Early Oligocene; E)  modern day tectonostratigraphic model; compressive tectonic regime; E‐directed convergence. .................. 60  Figure 2.4.  Regional geologic map for the portion of the Lancones basin reviewed in this study; modified from  Reyes and Caldas (1987) and from mapping during this study.  The location of samples for U‐Pb zircon  geochronologic studies are shown and labeled by sample name.  Lines A‐A’ and B‐B’ show the trace of  sections in figures 2.5 a‐b. ................................................................................................................................. 62  Figure 2.5.  A.  Regional geological cross section A‐A’ through the southern region of the map area.  Looking  northeast.  TG1 and TG3 massive sulphide deposits projected from the south.  B.  Regional geological cross  section B‐B’ through the northern region of the map area.  Looking northeast.  Legend as per figure 2.4.  See  map in Figure 2.4 for trace of sections. ............................................................................................................. 63  Figure 2.6.  Schematic stratigraphic column of the eastern portion of the Lancones basin.  Inset section shows the  Tambogrande area in more detail. .................................................................................................................... 64  Figure 2.7 (following page).  Field and drill core photographs of mafic rocks from the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation:   A. Feldspar porphyritic and amygdaloidal basalt.  B. Drillcore from the B5 area, aphyric basalt with  autobrecciated margin and close up of breccia C. Illustrates the highly vesicular, scoria‐like clasts; note the  small fragments of bubble‐wall shards. D. Section through basaltic pillow lavas at Rio Quiroz; pillows are up  to 1 m wide; individual pillow flows are up to 10’s of metres thick.  E. Basaltic pillow lavas displaying well   vii     developed concentric flow foliations; this specimen is partly broken along radial fractures.  F. Pillow basalt  unit (P) overlain by mass flow (MF) deposit of basaltic pillow lava and autobreccia clasts.  A mafic dyke (Dk)  cuts both units and would have probably supplied lava to another cycle of pillow lavas and breccias.  G.  Medium to thick bedded basaltic volcaniclastic deposits ranging from sand‐ to boulder‐size; note the reverse  sorting of the thicker (~1m) basal unit (see arrow) possibly indicative of a massive flow.  H. In‐situ autoclastic  (hyaloclastic) breccia.  Note the jigsaw‐fit textures of the clasts.  Breccia are gradational into massive lavas.   Drill core,  B5.  I. In‐situ autoclastic breccias from drillcore, TG3.  Bulbous‐shaped clast with diffuse margins in  a dark green chlorite matrix; margins of clasts display fine (sub mm) chloritic amygdules.  This breccia grades  into massive lava. ............................................................................................................................................... 65  Figure 2.8.  Drill core photographs of intermediate and felsic rocks from the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation:  A.  Massive feldspar porphyritic rhyolite.  Scale units are mm.  TG1 area.  B.  Flow‐banded rhyolite autobreccia;  these breccias typically grade into lavas.  Textures partly masked by quartz and sericite alteration.  TG3 area.  C.  Rhyolitic, unsorted, clast‐supported, volcaniclastic rock with pebble‐size clasts and massive sulphide  fragments (near the TG3 deposit).  D. Green‐grey, feldspar porphyritic dacite with large flow‐foliated  chlorite‐quartz ‘pipe’ amygdules.  Hanging wall to TG3 deposit. ...................................................................... 67  Figure 2.9.  Field photographs of mafic rocks from the Cerro El Ereo Formation:  A. Typical porphyritic textures of  the Cerro El Ereo Formation porphyritic basalt.  Sample contains ~20% feldspar phenocrysts to >1 cm in an  aphanitic matrix.  Non‐amygdaloidal.  Subvolcanic or thick flow facies.  B. Bleached‐looking, boulder size,  subround clasts (C) of basalt feldspar porphyry in a fine matrix of dark grey feldspar porphyritic material (M).   Clasts show in‐situ breccia textures (jigsaw‐fit) attributed to progressive fragmentation of blocks during  transport.  C. Unsorted, non‐stratified basaltic cobble‐ to pebble‐sized lithic and feldspar crystal‐bearing  volcaniclastic rock.  The sample contains an equal proportion of aphyric to weakly feldspar porphyritic (W)  clasts and coarse feldspar (C) porphyry clasts.  Amygdaloidal clasts (A) are present but are generally not  common.  Clast margins often are not easily discernible.  D. Thin‐ to thick‐bedded feldspar crystal to ash‐ sized tuff; reworked facies at top of formation. ................................................................................................ 68  Figure 2.10.  Field photographs of mafic rocks from the La Bocana Formation:  A. Moderately west‐dipping, thick  massive basaltic‐andesite flows.  Felsic stocks and dykes cut perpendicular to bedding.  B.  Basaltic andesite  dykes with strongly flow foliation defined by flattened and large vesicules (silica amygdules up to 30 cm).  C.  Polylithic, basaltic‐andesite dominated, mass flow deposit.  Not the fractures and in‐situ fragmentation of  the clasts due to mass transport (see arrows).  D. Cracked and brecciated outer crust of basaltic andesite lava  flow and interstitial hyaloclastite resulting from quenching of exposed lava.  E. Mafic lobes (M) injected into  felsic quartz‐crystal tuffs (T).  Tuffs show ‘soft‐sediment’ deformation textures and mafic flows show  columnar jointing indicating tuffs were non‐welded/non‐lithified during deposition of mafic flows.  F.  Lithic  and quartz‐feldspar crystal rhyolitic tuff.  Colouration of the domains are a result of secondary  recrystallization to quartzo‐feldspathic (light) and chloritic (+clay) assemblages due to devitrification of glass  component. ........................................................................................................................................................ 69  Figure 2.10 (continued).  G. Rhyolitic quartz crystal‐rich and lithic tuff.   H. Coarse, boulder breccia with chaotic,  unsorted, subround (pillow?) clasts.  Talus breccia.  I. Medium bedded, well sorted and locally cross bedded  (arrow), pebble‐ to sand‐sized, mafic‐dominated volcaniclastic rocks. ............................................................. 70  Figure 2.11.  A. thin bedded arenaceous sequence from the Lancones Formation; massive unit at top of outcrop is a  diorite sill. B. thin bedded limestones and limey‐arenites. ............................................................................... 71  Figure 2.12.  Schematic stratigraphic column of the eastern portion of the Lancones basin.  Legend as per Figure  2.6.  Inset section shows the Tambogrande VMS section in more detail.  Age data from this study are shown  in their relative stratigraphic positions.  Ages of plutonic rocks provided herein (Appendices A, B). ............... 72  Figure 2.13. (following page)  238U/206Pb versus 207Pb/206Pb Tera‐Wasserburg plots (Tera and Wasserburg, 1972) for  various volcanic rock samples from the Cerro San Lorenzo and La Bocana Formations.  Error ellipses are 2σ.   Dashed lines indicate data points omitted versus solid lines/grey ellipses for data included in the age  calculation.  Inset figures show box plots for all sample points for 207Pb‐corrected 206Pb*/238U data with error  bars at 2σ.  Open boxes are omitted whereas solid boxes were included in the age calculation.  Ages given  are 206Pb/238U with 2σ uncertainties. ................................................................................................................. 73  Figure 2.14.   207Pb/235U versus  206Pb/238U U‐Pb concordia plots for various volcanic rock samples from the Cerro  San Lorenzo and La Bocana Formations. ........................................................................................................... 75  Figure 2.15.  Schematic stratigraphy and U‐Pb zircon ages that constrain the volcanic formations in the Lancones  basin. .................................................................................................................................................................. 76   viii     Figure 2.16.  Comparison of schematic volcanic stratigraphy of the Lancones Basin and Western Peruvian Trough  (modified from Myers, 1974; Offler et al., 1980; Cobbing et al., 1981) with emphasis on age correlation.   Legend as per Figure 2.6. ................................................................................................................................... 77  Figure 4.1.  Morphostructural units of the Peruvian Andes (modified after Benavides‐Cáceres, 1999).  Cretaceous  marginal basins ‐ Lancones (LB), Huarmey (HB) and Cañete (CB) basins ‐  are superimposed.  Also shown are  the locations of VMS deposits and prospects (circles) (data from Steinmüller et al., 2000). .......................... 111  Figure 4.2.  A. Location map for the Tambogrande project; B. regional map showing major tectonostratigraphic  units of coastal northwestern Perú.  The locations of VMS deposits (TG1, TG3, and B5) in the Tambogrande  area are also shown and field area of this study outlined (see Fig. 4.3 for a detailed map).  Modified after  Jaillard et al. (1999), Tegart et al. (2000). ........................................................................................................ 112  Figure 4.3 – Location map and simplified cross sections along the Peruvian continental margin based on gravity  modeling and seismic data from Couch et al. (1981) and Jones (1981). ......................................................... 113  Figure 4.4 (following page).  Regional geologic map for the Tambogrande area of the Lancones basin reviewed in  this study.  The location of VMS deposits TG1, TG3, and B5, as well as geochemical sampling locations are  shown.  Map projection is WGS 84, Zone 17S.  Map is from this study. ......................................................... 114  Figure 4.5.  Schematic stratigraphic column of the volcanic arc sequence of the Lancones basin.  Inset section is a  more detailed schematic section of the VMS‐bearing sequence at Tambogrande. ........................................ 116  Figure 4.6.  A.  Silica vs. total alkalies classification scheme of Le Bas et al. (1986).  B.  Nb/Y versus Zr/TiO2 plot of  Winchester and Floyd (1977).  C.  AFM plot (Irvine and Baragar, 1971). ......................................................... 117  Figure 4.7.  Bivariate plots of basalt from the Cerro San Lorenzo, Cerro El Ereo and La Bocana formations.  A. SiO2  versus MgO, B. Ni versus MgO, C.  Cr versus MgO, and D.  V versus MgO.    The vertical dashed line at 5.5 w%  MgO emphasizes the division in the data. ....................................................................................................... 118  Figure 4.8.  Basalt discrimination diagrams.  A.  Th‐Zr‐Nb plot (Wood, 1980).  B.  Zr‐Nb‐Y plot (Meschede, 1986); all  samples illustrate relatively low Nb but variable Th, Zr, and Y values and are defined as arc basalt.  C.  Zr‐Ti‐Y  plot (Pearce and Cann, 1973).  D.  Ti‐V plot (Shervais, 1982). ......................................................................... 119  Figure 4.9.  Primitive mantle‐ normalized extended trace element diagrams for mafic intermediate rocks from the  various formations.  A.  Cerro San Lorenzo Formation basalt.  B.  Cerro San Lorenzo Formation basaltic‐ andesite.   C.  Cerro El Ereo Formation basalt.  D.  Cerro El Ereo Formation basaltic‐andesite.  D.  La Bocana  Formation basalt.  E.  La Bocana Formation basaltic‐andesite.   Element order and normalizing values follow  Sun and McDonough (1989). ........................................................................................................................... 120  Figure 4.10.  Chondrite‐normalized (using values from Sun and McDonough, 1989) HFSE values for basalt from the  Cerro San Lorenzo, Cerro El Ereo, and La Bocana formations.  A.  Yb versus La/Yb.  B.  Y versus Zr/Y. ........... 121  Figure 4.11.  Felsic volcanic discrimination diagrams.  A.  Ga/Al versus Zr after Whalen et al. (1987).  B.  Y versus Nb  (Pearce et al., 1984).  All samples plot within the I‐ to M‐type field. .............................................................. 122  Figure 4.12.  Primitive mantle‐normalized extended trace element diagrams show broadly similar patterns for felsic  volcanic rocks of the Lancones basin.  A.  Cerro San Lorenzo Formation.   B.  La Bocana Formation.  Inset  diagrams are rare earth elements only and are normalized to chondrite values.  Element order and  normalizing values follow Sun and McDonough (1989). ................................................................................. 123  Figure 4.13 (following page).  Multi‐element bivariate plots for basalt, dacite, and rhyolite in the vicinity of VMS  deposits at Tambogrande.  A. Zr/TiO2 vs. Nb/Y (Winchester and Floyd, 1977).  B. Na2O+K2O vs. SiO2 (Le Bas et  al., 1986).  C. Fe2O3+MgO vs. SiO2.  D. TiO2 vs. Zr.  E.  P2O5 vs. Zr.  F. V vs. Zr/TiO2.  G. Hf vs. Nb.  H. Zr/Y vs. Y.  I.  La/Yb vs Yb (chondrite‐normalized values using Sun and McDonough (1989)).  J.  Th vs. Zr. ......................... 123  Figure 4.14.  Ta/Yb versus Th/Yb plot after Pearce (1983).  Only Cerro San Lorenzo Formation and El Ereo  Formation basalt shown due to data limits for La Bocana Formation.   D = depleted mantle.  E = enriched  mantle. ............................................................................................................................................................. 125  Figure 4.15.  Schematic two‐stage tectonic model for arc magmatism in the Lancones basin.  The model proposes a  shift from phase 1, extensional tectonics with a steeply dipping subduction zone to phase 2, waning  extension and shallower subduction. Depletion of the mantle‐wedge explains the relatively HFSE‐ and REE‐ depleted mafic volcanic rocks in the phase 2.  The thickened crust due to waning extension forces more  fractionation of mafic intrusions.  The partial melting of the arc crust causes phase 2 felsic volcanic rocks to  yield lower HFSE contents. ............................................................................................................................... 126  Figure 4. 16.  Felsic volcanic rock discrimination diagrams (after Lesher et al., 1986; Barrie et al., 1993; Lentz, 1998;  Hart et al., 2004).  A.  (La/Yb)N versus YbN (Chondrite‐normalized using values from Sun and McDonough  (1989)).  B.  Zr/Y versus Y. ................................................................................................................................ 127   ix     Figure 5.1.   Morphostructural units of the Peruvian Andes (modified after Benavides‐Cáceres, 1999).  Cretaceous  marginal basins ‐ Lancones (LB), Huarmey (HB) and Cañete (CB) basins ‐  are superimposed.  Also shown are  the locations of VMS deposits and prospects (circles) (data from Steinmüller et al., 2000). .......................... 169  Figure 5.2.  A.  Location map for the Tambogrande project B. Regional map showing major tectonostratigraphic  units of coastal northwestern Perú.  The locations of VMS deposits (TG1, TG3, and B5) in the Tambogrande  area are also shown and field area of this study outlined (see Fig. 5.3 for a detailed map).  Modified after  Jaillard et al. (1999), Tegart et al. (2000). ........................................................................................................ 170  Figure 5.3.  Location map and simplified cross sections along the Peruvian continental margin based on gravity  modeling and seismic data from Couch et al. (1981) and Jones (1981). ......................................................... 171  Figure 5.4 (next page).   Regional geologic map for the Tambogrande area of the Lancones Basin.  The location of  VMS deposits TG1, TG3, and B5,  where the bulk of the isotope samples were collected are shown  Other  individual samples from the region are labeled.  Map projection is WGS 84 (World Geodetic System), UTM  Zone 17 Southern Hemisphere. ....................................................................................................................... 172  Figure 5.5.  Schematic stratigraphic column of the volcanic arc sequence of the Lancones basin.  Inset section  shows a more detailed schematic section of the VMS‐bearing sequence at Tambogrande. .......................... 174  Figure 5.6.  Map depicting Pb isotope provinces of the Andes (modified after Macfarlane et al., 1990; Tosdal et al,  1999).  The location of Tambogrande and other VMS deposits within the Cretaceous marginal basins of Perú  are shown. ....................................................................................................................................................... 175  Figure 5.7.  Thorogenic (A) and Uranogenic (B) Pb isotope diagrams for data from the Lancones basin and fields for  Pb isotope provinces of the Andes (after Macfarlane et al., 1990).  All data points are from this study.   Symbols for rocks and sulphide samples and fields for Pb provinces are given in inset boxes in B.  S & K =  Stacey and Kramers (1975) growth curve. ....................................................................................................... 176  Figure 5.8.  Schematic east‐west cross section through the Lancones basin showing the main tectonic units and the  spatial distribution of units sampled for isotopic analysis (including this study and data available from the  literature; see references in the text). ............................................................................................................. 177  Figure 5.9.  Thorogenic (A) and Uranogenic (B) Pb isotope diagrams for data from the Lancones Basin and fields for  Pb isotope signatures of various tectonic units of the northern Andes or Perú and Ecuador.  Data for  ’Cretaceous platform sedimentary rocks’ and ‘continental crust (Olmos Complex)’ from the central Andes,  Perú, after Macfarlane et al. (1990) and Macfarlane (1999).  Data for ‘Jurassic‐Cretaceous metasedimentary  rocks’ and ‘Jurassic‐Cretaceous MORB’, from Ecuador, after Bosch et al. (2002).  Data for ‘Coastal Batholith’  from Mukasa (1986) and this study.  Data for ‘East Pacific MORB’, East Pacific Rise, from Sun (1980).  All data  points are from this study.  Symbols for rocks and sulphide samples and fields for Pb provinces are given in  inset boxes in B. ............................................................................................................................................... 178  Figure 5.10.  Rb‐Sr isotope plots for volcanic rocks of the Lancones Basin.  A. Sr versus 87Sr/86Srί.  B. 87Sr/86Sr versus  87 Rb/86Sr.  The line shown is defined by the felsic volcanic rocks only (n=6) and yields an errorchron of ~65  Ma. ................................................................................................................................................................... 179  Figure 5.11 ‐ 143Nd/144Nd versus 87Sr/86Sr for volcanic rocks of the Lancones basin.  A.  Compared to fields for  regional geologic units. B.  Enlargement of data shown in A.  Fields are given in the legend in A and symbols  for both plots are shown in B.  Data sources as per Fig. 5.9. ........................................................................... 180  Figure 5.12.  Geochemical discrimination diagrams for volcanic rocks from the Lancones Basin.  A. εNd versus Th/Yb.   B.  206Pb/204Pb versus Th/Yb. ............................................................................................................................ 181  Figure 5.13.  Uranogenic Pb isotope diagram showing isotope compositions for mafic and felsic volcanic rocks at  Tambogrande, as well as ore mineral isotope compositions.  Volcanic rock data is conceptually time‐adjusted  to 100 Ma based on Stacey and Kramers (1975) crustal growth curve with µ=9.85.  Mixing lines are shown  and labeled. ..................................................................................................................................................... 182  Figure 5.14 ‐ Conceptual magmatic‐hydrothermal model relating petrogenesis of bimodal mafic‐felsic volcanic  rocks at Tambogrande to hydrothermal system that formed VMS deposits (adopted from the petrogenetic  model of Hart et al. (2004) for FII‐FIII felsic volcanic rocks).  Depth of magma chamber is suggested by  geochemical data which indicate partial melting or fractionation with amphibole ± pyroxene and plagioclase  at shallow crustal depths.  Isotope data support partial melting models as felsic volcanic rocks are  substantially different isotopically as compared to basalts, and, yield more heterogeneous isotopic results.   Hydrothermal leaching of metals, which is limited by the depth of fracture permeability, did not penetrate   206 204 crustal rocks that were responsible for the unique isotope values (high Pb/ Pb) in the VMS‐associated  felsic rocks. ....................................................................................................................................................... 183  Figure A1.  SEM Cathodoluminesence images of zircons showing location of spot analyses for SHRIMP‐RG data. . 216   x     Figure A2.  Regional geologic map of northwestern Perú showing the location of U‐Pb zircon geochronology  samples. ........................................................................................................................................................... 222  Figure A3.  Box plot for all sample points for sample LW‐30 illustrating 207Pb‐corrected 206Pb*/238U data with error  bars at 2σ.  Open boxes are omitted whereas solid boxes were included in the age calculation.  Ages given  are 206Pb/238U with 2σ uncertainties. ............................................................................................................... 223  Figure A4.  Box plot for all sample points for sample LW‐31 illustrating 207Pb‐corrected 206Pb*/238U data with error  bars at 2σ.  Open boxes are omitted whereas solid boxes were included in the age calculation.  Ages given  are 206Pb/238U with 2σ uncertainties. ............................................................................................................... 223  Figure A5.  Box plot for all sample points for sample 3763 illustrating 207Pb‐corrected 206Pb*/238U data with error  bars at 2σ.  Open boxes are omitted whereas solid boxes were included in the age calculation (and are noted  by those encircled with the dashed line).  Ages given are 206Pb/238U with 2σ uncertainties. .......................... 224  Figure A6.  Box plot for all sample points for sample 1601 illustrating 207Pb‐corrected 206Pb*/238U data with error  bars at 2σ.  No age was determined for this sample, though the circled data points represent possible  igneous age of the sample.  Ages given are 206Pb/238U with 2σ uncertainties. ................................................ 224  Figure B1 ‐ Geology map of study area showing the location of Ar‐Ar samples.  Map projection is UTM Zone 17,  Southern Hemisphere (WGS84). ...................................................................................................................... 232  Figure B2 – Step‐heating cumulative percent of 39Ar released vs. age plot for sample LW‐06 (granodiorite). ........ 233  Figure B3 ‐ Step‐heating cumulative percent of 39Ar released vs. age plot for sample LW‐07 (rhyolitic volcaniclastic)  ......................................................................................................................................................................... 233  Figure B4 – Step‐heating cumulative percent of 39Ar released vs. age plot for sample LW‐36 (diorite). .................. 234  Figure B5 ‐ Step‐heating cumulative percent of 39Ar released vs. age plot for sample LW‐88 (hornblende porphyritic  dyke). ............................................................................................................................................................... 234  Figure B6 ‐ Step‐heating cumulative percent of 39Ar released vs. age plot for sample LW‐85 (hornblende granite).  ......................................................................................................................................................................... 235  Figure B7 ‐ Step‐heating cumulative percent of 39Ar released vs. age plot for sample LW‐61 (hornblende‐plagioclase  porphyritic dyke). ............................................................................................................................................. 235  Figure C8. (following page).  Primitive mantle‐normalized trace element diagrams for repeat analyses of in‐house  and internal reference material conducted during this study.  A.  ICP‐MS data (Memorial Univ.) for standards  MRG‐1 and BR‐688 compared to the detection limit.  B.  Average analyses for the reference materials from  this study in (A) compared to given values from previous analysis by Memorial Univ. of the material. C.  ICP‐ AES data (ALS Chemex) for MDRU reference samples BAS‐1 and P‐1 as compared to the detection limit for  the technique.  D.  Average values for the reference materials from this study from in (C) compared to data  from Piercey (2001). ........................................................................................................................................ 258   xi     Acknowledgements  This project began at the Roundup conference in Vancouver in January, 1999, when Steve Piercey  introduced me to Jim Mortensen.  I thank both of them for getting me started on this journey.  Dick Tosdal  agreed to take me on a year later, though I doubt he thought it might be 2008 before the final product by his  first doctoral student would be delivered!  I certainly didn’t think it would take 8 years.  However, Dick has  shown incredible patience and tolerance for which I am very grateful.  Without your constant support and  encouragement this project would not have been completed.   Few people have worked on and studied VMS systems as much as Jim Franklin.  I recall as an undergrad  reading many papers on VMS deposits by J.M. Franklin.  I thank Jim for sharing his knowledge and for working  with us on this project, for many great stories, and for providing excellent advice on both academic and a few  not‐so‐academic issues.  Peter Tegart, who spearheaded Manhattan Minerals, initiated this project and deserves much credit for  the recognition of the economic potential of Tambogrande district.  Peter was instrumental in getting the  company to fund this project funded and also provide logistical support.  I thank him for giving me the  opportunity to work at Tambo.    Additional financial support for this project came from a NSERC Collaborative Research and Develop  grant, a Hugh E. Mckinstry Grant (Society of Economic Geologists Foundation), the Egil H. Lorntzsen and  Thomas and Marguerite MacKay Memorial scholarships, UBC.    The Manhattan Minerals exploration and development team in Peru made working there an  unforgettable experience while contributing significantly to the ideas that have become part of this thesis.  I  am particularly grateful to Andy Carstensen, Cristian Soux, Gord Allen, and Brian Thurston, Kosta and Sefika  Lesnikov, and Arturo Cordova for many great discussions of these deposits, as well as for great memories of  working/living in Peru.  Allan San Martin also helped out significantly with data management.  Miguel  Jimenez provided excellent field assistance.  EOS and MDRU.  The geochronology and isotope work for this thesis was supported immensely by many  folks at UBC who graciously provided their time and attention to turning my rocks into data, including Janet  Gabites (Pb isotopes) Rich Friedman (U‐Pb), Tom Ullrich (Ar).   Thanks to Dominique Weis for running Pb‐Sr‐ Nd work.  Jim Mortensen kindly allowed me to destroy several of the ceramic grinding plates and worked  hard to help squeeze some dates out these rocks.  Claire Chamberlain skillfully ran the SHRIMP work.  Karie  Smith and Arne Toma are thanked for keeping my admin and technical life in order.  Steve Piercey and Derek Wilton provided excellent informal reviews of this thesis and their support is  most appreciated.  Kelly Russell, Malcolm Scoble, and Jan Peter (GSC) served on the examination committee  and provided helpful and constructive criticism.  Many of my fellow grad students at UBC are thanked for the good discussions and excellent distractions.    Thanks especially to Diego (and Diana) Charchaflie, Kathy Dilworth, Scott Heffernan, Steve Israel, Nancy  MacDonald, Piercey, Steve Quane, and Dave Smithson.  Simon Haynes made living on 16th Ave. a most  memorable time in my (our) lives.  Geoff Bradshaw was a great friend and officemate whom I shall forever  remember.  Peace.  A big thanks to Altius for allowing me the time and space to get this done, and especially the staff who  pulled extra weight for me.  A heartfelt thanks to Ken Hickey and Frankie Goodwin for all your help and for being there for us when I  (we) really needed a hand.  My family has always been extremely supportive of what I have decided to do in life and I am indebted to  my parents and sister for their encouragement and love.    Nobody has been more supportive or understanding during this undertaking than my wife, Angie.  Thank  you for your incredible patience, constant support and reassurances when I was least optimistic that this  would be completed.  You are simply amazing.  You, Dylan, and Teagan were my inspiration to finish this  venture.  Thanks for your love.    Vancouver  27 Jan 08.      xii     Dedication               To my Parents  xiii     Co‐Authorship Statement    This dissertation comprises the sum of the author’s research and has applications to both  mineral deposits exploration and academic studies.  It comprises a collection of papers that  were written for the purpose of publication in economic geology journals and in many cases  benefited from the collaboration with various industry and university geologists.  There are  many geologists who worked in the employment of the supporting mining company during the  exploration and development program and who contributed indirectly to the development of  this thesis.  Notwithstanding the significant contribution of these workers, and except in  circumstances where such acknowledgement is provided, the ideas presented herein are  entirely those of the author.  Unless otherwise indicated, all maps, sections, level plans, 3D  perspectives, and all other plots and figures were constructed by the author using data  generated by the author.  The co‐authors helped refine the concepts of this paper and contributed editorially.     xiv     Chapter 1.  Giant Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposits, Tambogrande, NW Perú    1.1    Introduction   Giant ore deposits represent a small number of examples within any particular deposit  type, though they commonly contain a major portion of the metal budget within the deposit  type (Singer, 1995).  Explorationists seek giant ore deposits because of the robust economic  value and the stability and longevity of mining that such large tonnage deposits provide.   Studies that attempt to understand the key criteria in the genesis of various giant ore deposit  types (e.g., Clark, 1993, 1995; Goodfellow and Zierenberg, 1999; Gibson et al., 2000;  Hedenquist et al., 2000) typically conclude that such deposits exist because all formational  processes operated under optimal conditions and/or that special ore‐forming circumstances  were required.   Despite years of searching for the key criteria other than direct detection  methods, there are limited tools available to assist the explorer in designing effective  exploration programs for giant deposit types.  Nonetheless, it is clear that a better  understanding of the geological processes and conditions essential to the formation of giant  deposits will be required to improve exploration methodologies.  The Tambogrande volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits of northwestern Perú  (Fig. 1.1) constitute a remarkable VMS district due to the presence of multiple abnormally large  tonnage Cu‐Zn‐Au‐Ag‐bearing massive sulphide deposits.  In contrast, most VMS camps contain  log‐normally distributed deposit sizes (e.g., 1 large, 2‐3 middle sizes, and 5‐6 small deposits;  Sangster, 1972; Franklin et al., 2005), such as at Noranda (Gibson and Watkinson, 1990) or Flin  Flon (Syme and Bailes, 1993).  The presence of more than one giant massive sulphide within a  single cluster is unusual and few regions are known to exhibit this feature (e.g., Urals;   Chapter 1         Page 1   Herrington et al., 2005).  The three deposits in the Tambogrande district define an unusual  resource of massive sulphide mineralization.    There is only an indirect understanding of the geological attributes of a district that  enabled the formation of giant deposits, and even fewer constraints on the geological  processes which permit the generation of multiple giant deposits.  As many of these deposits  have not been developed to the mining stage, little research has been done to elucidate  understanding of the potential world‐class district at Tambogrande.  Therefore, the theme of  this thesis is to evaluate the tectonic, volcanic, and depositional controls on the formation of  the series of giant VMS deposits at Tambogrande.  Despite the fact VMS deposits are a  relatively well understood hydrothermal metal deposit‐type, a better comprehension of the  geology of well‐preserved examples at Tambogrande will assist in refining VMS deposit models  and aid in the understanding of the genesis of the largest hydrothermal ore deposits.    1.2   Background and Approach   Continental margin arc sequences are known from Ecuador in the north to Tierra del  Fuego in southernmost Chile and Argentina (Dalziel, 1981; Atherton et al., 1983; Vergara et al.,  1995; Jaillard et al., 1996; Hanson and Wilson, 1991) and represent vestiges of a Mesozoic arc‐ related rift system (i.e., intra‐arc or back‐arc) that developed at the leading edge of western  continental South America.  A variety of ore deposit types occur throughout the rift sequences,  including Chilean manto, skarn, Fe‐oxide Cu‐Au, porphyry Cu‐Au, and VMS deposits, though few  VMS deposits other than those at Tambogrande are economically significant.  The tectonic and  magmatic processes that formed the Lancones basin, the northernmost of the Mesozoic arc‐rift  sequences, underpin the processes that enabled the formation of these unusually large  deposits.  Understanding the igneous‐volcanic and tectonic evolution of the Lancones basin   Chapter 1         Page 2   thus provides a basis for understanding the unique genetic attributes that enabled the  formation of the Tambogrande deposits.   The study area in northwestern Perú is situated within an enigmatic position along the  Andes orogen known as the Huancabamba deflection (Mourier et al., 1988; Mitouard et al.,  1990).  This major oroclinal bend marks an abrupt transition from the north‐northwest trending  Peruvian Andes to the north‐northeast trending Ecuadorian Andes.  Though the tectonic history  of the orocline is not well understood.  The Ecuadorian and Peruvian segments also record  somewhat different accretionary and magmatic histories (Jaillard et al., 1999, 2000; Benavides‐ Cáceres, 1999) adding to the significance of this transitional zone.  A better understanding of  the development of the Lancones basin is integral to the development of tectonic models of the  Huancabamba deflection and Mesozoic Andean orogenesis.    To summarize, this thesis adds to the theoretical and applied knowledge base on giant  VMS deposits and to the genesis of VMS deposits by documenting the regional  tectonomagmatic setting and also the detailed local volcanological, structural and stratigraphic  controls on VMS formation at Tambogrande.  The pristine state of preservation of the deposits,  well constrained volcanic stratigraphic sections, and good understanding of the tectonic history  of the region provide excellent controls to establish the geologic framework.  Furthermore, this  study contributes to improved genetic models for such giant ore deposits as well as more  efficient exploration methodologies.  In addition, better documentation of the Tambogrande  deposits and tectonomagmatic history of the Lancones basin fills a significant void in the  geological knowledgebase of one of the world’s major metallogenic belts, as well as one of the  more poorly understood parts of the Andes.   Chapter 1         Page 3   1.3     History   Iron oxide occurrences were documented at Tambogrande nearly 100 years ago (Boletin   de la Sociedad Geologica del Perú, 1904, in Tegart et al., 2000).  But it was not until the mid‐ 1970’s that interest was spurred again in the area by the joint venture of French state‐owned  Bureau de Recherches, Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM) and the Instituto Geologico Minero y  Metalurgico (INGEMMET) which found that the iron oxide (gossan) yielded anomalous base  metal and silver values (Injoque et al., 1979).  Susequent drilling of a self‐potential geophysical  target in 1978 led to the discovery of massive sulphide mineralization at the TG1 deposit.   Based on 21 diamond drill holes, the BRGM reported an inferred resource of 42.3 million  tonnes grading 2.04% Cu, 1.45% Zn, 0.35% Pb and 38.4 g/t Ag (BRGM, 1981, in Tegart et al.,  2000).    Manhattan Minerals Corp. of Vancouver, Canada, became involved in the project in  May, 1999.  Re‐assaying of selected drill core suggested potential for the overlying oxide zone  at TG1 to contain significant precious metals.  A gravity survey, followed by additional drilling,  resulted in an increased resource at TG1 as well as the discovery of two other massive sulphide  deposits, TG3 and B5 (Table 2), approximately 0.5 and 12 km south of TG1, respectively (Tegart  et al., 2000).  An updated resource was defined for the TG1 sulphide deposit, and new  resources for the TG1 oxide and TG3 sulphide deposits, were reported in 2002 (Table 1).   However, due to socio‐political issues at the local and regional level, which ultimately led to the  destruction of the company’s camp in early 2001, Manhattan lost title to the project in 2004.   The Tambogrande deposits remain undeveloped and there is presently no known active  exploration in the area.   Chapter 1         Page 4   Detailed reports related to VMS deposits in northwestern Perú provide excellent  documentation of the massive sulphide deposits but are limited in scope and have not  evaluated the broader regional geologic setting (Tegart et al. 2000; Injoque et al., 1979).      1.4   VMS Deposit Classification and Genetic Models   Volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits (Franklin et al., 1981; Lydon, 1984, 1988;  Ohmoto, 1996; Barrie and Hannington, 1999), also commonly termed ‘volcanic‐hosted massive  sulphide’ deposits (VHMS, Large, 1992), are ‘strata‐bound accumulations of sulphide minerals  that precipitated at or near the sea floor in spatial, temporal, and genetic association with  contemporaneous volcanism’ (Franklin et al., 2005).  The broadly accepted genetic model,  based mostly on empirical observations from ancient land‐based and modern seafloor systems,  considers VMS deposits to be the products of district‐scale hydrothermal convection resulting  from anomalous thermal input into the shallow crust (Fig. 1.2; Franklin et al., 2005).    Down‐drawn seawater is the primary component of the hydrothermal fluid and heat‐ induced fluid‐rock reactions facilitate the transfer of metals and sulphur from the substrate into  the convecting hydrothermal system (Franklin et al., 2005).  Reduced seawater sulphate may  constitute a minor sulphur component in VMS sulphides.  Chloride complexing is considered  responsible for most metal transport with precipitation triggered by cooling.  To a much lesser  amount bi‐sulphide complexes are thought to also play a role as transporting agent, especially  for Au, with oxidation causing metal precipitation (Hannington et al., 1995).  Mixing of a metal‐ bearing hydrothermal fluid with cool (± oxidized) seawater at or near the seafloor is the primary  method for sulphide deposition (Franklin et al., 2005).  Some VMS models invoke high‐level  intrusive phases as heat sources and include magmatic‐derived fluid as an additional metals  source (Galley, 1993; Franklin et al., 1981).  VMS deposits are broadly syngenetic with the host   Chapter 1         Page 5   rock assemblages, which vary from volcanic‐ to sediment‐dominated (Barrie and Hannington,  1999).  Extensional basins are integral to nearly all VMS settings for two main reasons: (i) the  heat transfer into the upper crust due to the intrusion and advection of magma into attenuated  and extended crust; and (ii) the development of normal faults which channel hydrothermal  fluids and focus the deposition of sulphide minerals.    The geometries of VMS deposits vary significantly, but many occur as mounds on the  seafloor, such as at the TAG hydrothermal mound (Fig. 1.3)(Herzig and Hannington, 1995).  In  the rock record, deposits may be bulbous to tabular lenses of massive sulphide, i.e., 60‐100%  sulphide minerals (Lydon 1984), underlain by discordant zones of veined (‘stringer’ or  ‘stockwork’) and disseminated mineralization.  The discordant sulphide zones represent the  paleo channel‐ways, usually synvolcanic faults, which facilitated metalliferous fluid transfer to  the seafloor environment to form the VMS deposit.    VMS deposits are known to occur from the Archean to modern times with notable spikes  in the number of deposits in the Late Archean and Early Proterozoic (Fig. 1.4).  VMS deposits  are more evenly distributed throughout the Phanerozoic when compared to the Precambrian  with the notable abundance of deposits in the early Paleozoic (Fig. 1.4).  The Tambogrande  deposits occur during a period of increased, but not prolific, VMS formation.  Classification of  massive sulphide deposits is most effective using the lithostratigraphy of the host assemblage  (Barrie and Hannington, 1999; Franklin et al., 2005).  Bimodal‐mafic deposits, which exemplify  those at Tambogrande, are characterized by volcanic‐dominated stratigraphic sequences  consisting largely of basalt and >3‐25% felsic volcanic rocks.  Other examples of large VMS  deposits from this class occur in the Archean, including the Noranda camp (Gibson and  Watkinson, 1990) and Kidd Creek (Hannington and Barrie, 1999), the Proterozoic, such as Flin   Chapter 1         Page 6   Flon (Syme and Bailes, 1993) and the Phanerozoic, such as the Urals deposits of Sibai and Gai  (Herrington et al., 2005).  In Latin America, significantly large bimodal‐mafic‐type Jurassic‐ Cretaceous VMS deposits occur at Cerro Lindo in central‐western Perú (Ly Zevallos, 2000) and  at San Nicolas, central Mexico (Johnson et al., 2000; Danielson, 2000).    Giant VMS Deposits    The Tambogrande VMS district hosts three known deposits located near and to the  south of the village of Tambogrande in the Piura district of northwestern Perú (Fig. 1.1).  The  Tambogrande deposits, with a collective tonnage of approximately 300 Mt, are within the  upper 3% of all bimodal‐mafic type VMS deposits in terms of size and contained metal (Fig. 1.5;  database from Franklin et al., 2005).  The term ‘giant’ is applied to deposits with greater than  50 Mt of massive sulphide ore, whereas supergiants are often ascribed to deposits containing  more than >100 Mt (Barrie and Hannington, 1999).  The Tambogrande deposits are the largest  of the Mesozoic massive sulphide deposits in Perú and represent the most significant group of  VMS deposits of continental South America.    Grade and tonnage estimates for the deposits are listed in Table 1.  No resource estimate  is available for B5, but the deposit had drillhole intersections of up to 280 m of massive  sulphide at similar grades to TG1 and TG3 (Tegart et al., 2000).  The TG1 deposit also has an  associated supergene oxide zone (Table 1).    1.5   Controls on ‘Giant’ VMS systems   Giant deposits vary in morphology, host rocks, mineralogy and metal content and such  size may require either special processes or an ideal combination of processes in their  formation.  Two main factors must be considered for the formation of VMS deposits: (A) the  nature/source of the hydrothermal fluids and (B) the depositional seafloor environment.  With   Chapter 1         Page 7   respect to the hydrothermal fluids, several variables could account for the delivery of a  significant amount of metal to the seafloor environment.  The possibilities include (i) a long‐ lived hydrothermal system allowing for the protracted delivery of metalliferous hydrothermal  fluid to the site of deposition.  For instance, based on heat and fluid‐flow modeling, Barrie et al.  (1999) proposed that the supergiant Kidd Creek ore body (~200 Mt) could have formed in  650,000 years, whereas modern ocean ridge massive sulphide deposits (~1 Mt) are estimated  to have formed in less than 100,000 years (Rona, 1988).  (ii) Discharge rates at hydrothermal  vents are also important and depend on a number of variables, namely the rate of heat loss  (heat flux) and the amount of fluid available.  Heat and fluid fluxes are largely dependent on the  distance to the heat source (in a convection model) or the size of the intrusion (magmatic‐ hydrothermal and convection models).  Ultimately, permeability is the main control on the fluid  flux and this is likely to be controlled by both the style and degree of structural deformation as  well as primary lithological features.  (iii) Finally, metal concentrations in the hydrothermal  fluids may be of critical importance.  In a magmatic model, the metal concentration depends on  the composition of the intrusion, metal partitioning into a volatile phase, and source of ligands  to transport metals.  In a convection system fluid‐rock reactions are of key importance, wherein  the amount of rock available for leaching (size of the system), metal contents of the source  rocks, and the effectiveness the fluids to scavenge metals must be considered.  The depositional site for sulphides at or below the seafloor must also be conducive to  efficient sulphide precipitation and preservation.  Only a relatively small portion (<1–5%) of  metals emitted from modern seafloor hydrothermal vents are actually precipitated (Converse  et al., 1984; Feely et al., 1994).  The remainder are vented into the ocean column and  dispersed.  Sub‐seafloor sulphide precipitation as replacement of relatively permeable strata is   Chapter 1         Page 8   a common feature to VMS mineralization (Doyle and Allen, 2003) and has been recognized at  the Horne (Kerr and Gibson, 1993) and Kidd Creek deposits (Hannington et al., 1999).  Ambient  oceanic environmental conditions are especially important in some VMS settings.  Eastoe and  Gustin (1996) suggest an association of Phanerozoic VMS deposits with black shale, and hence  oceanic anoxia, due to the efficiency of sulphide precipitation and preservation in anoxic  seawater environments.  Saez et al. (1999) argue that many giant to supergiant VMS deposits in  the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Portugal, Spain) are associated with black shale horizons formed in a  euxinic environment and hence bacterial reduction occurred.  Similarly, the supergiant  Brunswick No. 12 deposit is considered to have been deposited within the deeper segments of  a continental back‐arc rift basin where bottom waters were anoxic and reducing conditions  ideal for VMS formation (Goodfellow and Peter, 1996).  In the absence of anoxia, models  involving siliceous ‘caps’ as protective barriers to oxidative waters have been proposed, such as  Aljustrel deposit of the IPB (Barriga and Fyfe, 1988), as well as some modern seafloor deposits  where silica‐producing bacteria have also been observed (Humphris et al., 1995).    1.6   Thesis Objectives   Giant massive sulphide deposits at Tambogrande are an enigma in that few VMS  districts contain such large deposits and rarely is there more than one giant deposit within a  single camp.  The Tambogrande VMS deposits and Lancones basin of northwestern Perú  represent an opportunity to evaluate the conditions which permit the generation of giant VMS  deposits.  A main goal of this research is to place VMS deposits at Tambogrande within the  regional geological context and to explain the accompanying tectonomagmatic scenario  responsible for the development of the Lancones basin.  Key to achieving these goals are (i) the  development of a stratigraphic model for the volcanic sequences and (ii) an evaluation of the   Chapter 1         Page 9   igneous petrological associations with the massive sulphide deposits.  The latter will assist in  understanding possible igneous controls on ore formation in VMS systems.  In addition, due to  the pristine preservation state of the VMS deposits and the excellent three dimensional  geological database developed from diamond drill core logging, the thesis also aims to develop  a better understanding of the local paleomorphological, volcanic and structural controls.   Documenting the local and regional geological attributes of the Tambogrande VMS setting help  establish the depositional environments and tectonic controls for giant massive sulphide  deposits of this type, and establish a geologic framework for comparisons with similar VMS  settings.    1.7   Methodology   1.7.1  Core Logging    A total of 441 diamond drill holes and more than 80,000 m of core, mostly from  Manhattan Minerals work at TG1, TG3, and B5, and several targets outside of the known  deposits, were available for study during 2000.  In 2002, additional drill core was also made  available by BHP Billiton and Compañía de Minas Buenaventura from drill projects north of  Tambogrande.  The author had the opportunity to log and sample approximately half of the drill  core from Manhattan’s work on the deposits and all available core from the region.  1.7.2  Regional Mapping    Mapping at a scale of 1:100,000 was conducted during February to April, 2002, mostly  north of Tambogrande (Fig. 1.1).  Outcrop is generally poor in the vicinity of the deposits but  improves to the north.  Access to the east was limited by poor road conditions in rugged  mountainous terrain, and was discouraged in several regions within the field area due to  unstable political conditions.  The area had previously been mapped at 1:100,000 by Reyes and  Caldas (1987) as part of a large regional project.   Chapter 1         Page 10   1.7.3  Geochronology    U‐Pb age determinations of volcanic and intrusive rocks from the study area provide the  first known radiometric ages for the region.  Approximately 40 samples of felsic volcanic rocks  from drill core and outcrops were processed with about 25% of the samples yielding sufficient  zircons for U‐Pb isotope analysis.  Samples were analyzed at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and  Geochemical Research (PCIGR) at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, using  Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS).  Additional samples were analyzed at Stanford  University using Sensitive High Resolution Ion MicroProbe ‐ Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP‐RG).   Several intrusive phases were also dated by step‐heated Ar‐Ar using the noble gas mass  spectrometer (NGMS) technique at PCIGR.  Details of the methodology, precision and accuracy  are available in Appendices A & B and at  http://www.eos.ubc.ca/research/pcigr/Instrumentation.htm and  http://shrimprg.stanford.edu/.     1.7.4  Lithogeochemistry    Samples were collected from drill core and outcrop for whole rock major, trace and rare  earth element (REE) analysis.  Limited lithogeochemical studies were reported from the region  (Tegart et al., 2000).  Analyses were carried out at ALS Chemex Laboratories, Vancouver,  Canada and the Department of Earth Sciences at Memorial University, St. John’s, Canada, using  a combination of inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry (ICP‐MS) and inductively  coupled plasma ‐ atomic emission spectrometry (ICP‐AES).  Details of the methodology,  precision and accuracy are available in Appendix C and at  http://www.alschemex.com/learnmore/learnmore‐techinfo‐multielement‐wholerock.htm and  http://www.mun.ca/earthsciences/ICPMS/Solution_ICP‐MS.php.     Chapter 1         Page 11   1.7.5  Isotope Chemistry    Pb, Sm‐Nd and Rb‐Sr isotope geochemical data were utilized as tracers of relative  mantle and continental crust contributions to the volcanic rocks.  Pb isotope analyses of ore  samples were also carried out for VMS deposits in order to ascertain the source of the Pb (and  by inference other metals).  All analyses were carried out at the PCIGR.  Details of the  methodology are available at http://www.eos.ubc.ca/research/pcigr/Instrumentation.htm.   1.8     Presentation   This study is presented as a series of research manuscripts for the purpose of   publication in refereed professional journals pertaining to economic geology.  As such, some  repetition of material is inevitable.    Chapter 2 ‐ Volcanic stratigraphy and geochronology of the Cretaceous Lancones basin,  northwestern Perú – is a review of the regional geology of the Lancones basin with emphasis of  the volcanic successions and is based on geology interpreted from mapping and diamond drill  core logging.  The chapter provides a report of U‐Pb zircon ages for felsic volcanic rocks  throughout the volcanic arc sequence of the Lancones Basin, as well as U‐Pb zircon ages for  some intrusive phases within the sequence.  These are the first reported radiometric ages for  the rocks of this region and will assist in (ii) developing the stratigraphic models and  understanding the overall geological evolution of this region, such as the timing of volcanism  and duration of the volcanic arc sequence, and (ii) constraining the timing of formation of VMS  deposits.  Pinpointing the precise time interval of ore formation is critical to establish temporal  links with broader tectonic and magmatic events.  Moreover, this chapter makes a significant  contribution to the overall understanding of the tectonomagmatic framework and Mesozoic  evolution of the northern Andes of Perú by documenting an area that has not been studied in   detail.   Chapter 1         Page 12   Chapter 3 – A reconstructed Cretaceous depositional setting for giant volcanogenic  massive sulfide deposits at Tambogrande, northwestern Perú – illustrates the architecture of  the depositional setting and VMS deposits and provides a detailed analysis of the immediate  VMS‐hosting volcanic succession as well as reconstructed paleo‐sea‐floor models.  This chapter  utilizes geologic plans, sections and three‐dimensional perspectives to recreate the submarine  structural and volcanic setting of the TG1 and TG3 deposits and emphasize the important role  of the local submarine volcanic environment in the location and morphology and possibly the  size of the VMS deposits.  Tambogrande represents a rare occurrence of well preserved, giant  VMS deposits and may serve as a physical model for similar deposits in deformed terrains.  Chapter 4 ‐ Volcanic rock geochemistry and the tectonomagmatic setting of VMS  deposits at Tambogrande, Perú ‐ this chapter evaluates the volcano‐stratigraphic lithochemical  variations throughout the Lancones basin and demonstrates generally ‘oceanic’ arc‐like  geochemical signatures that vary from tholeiitic to weakly calc‐alkaline.  The ocean‐like  affinities reaffirm the tectonic setting as a volcanic arc developed on very thin crust at the  leading edge of continental South America.  The data also invoke partial melting of the crust as  the source for felsic volcanic rocks in the VMS environment, consistent with a high heat flow  regime and favourable for VMS formation.  Chapter 5 – Pb‐Sr‐Nd isotope systematics of Cretaceous arc volcanic rocks in the  Lancones Basin near Tambogrande, Perú – Implications for VMS deposit models – this chapter is  a tracer isotope study of the volcanic rocks hosting VMS deposits at Tambogrande and supports  the conclusions of Chapter 4 regarding the tectonic setting and petrochemical evolution of the  volcanic rocks in the Lancones basin.  Specifically, the data support a mantle‐wedge source for  basalts but indicate continental crust was a factor in the generation of the felsic volcanic rocks.     Chapter 1         Page 13   The data also permit tests of models relating igneous petrochemistry to VMS deposits and  suggests felsic volcanic rocks do not contribute to metals in the formation of the VMS deposits,  but are related to the same thermal anomaly which enabled VMS formation.    Chapter 6 – Summary, Discussion and Unresolved Questions ‐  A summary of the major  findings of this study with some discussions and elaboration on the on key ideas.  The key  contributions of this research project include the following: (i) a comprehensive baseline  documentation of an economically significant VMS district; (ii) a better understanding of the  Cretaceous geology of the northwest Perú Andean segment and of VMS metallogenesis within  the marginal basins of Perú; (iii) the reconstruction of the paleo‐depositional environment for  massive sulphide mineralization at Tambogrande provides a unique perspective as many VMS  deposits are more deformed and more difficult to reconstruct; (4) a synopsis of a continental‐ margin VMS setting with strong constraints on the relationship to global plate tectonics; and (5)  more constrained models for VMS genesis in terms of the relationship to associated felsic  volcanic rocks, metal sources and hydrothermal systems.  The chapter also proposed topics for  future work.   Chapter 1         Page 14          Figure 1.1.  Location maps and simplified geology for the study area.  The locations of VMS  deposits (TG1, TG3, and B5) in the Tambogrande area are also shown and field area of this  study outlined.  Geology modified after Jaillard et al. (1999) and Tegart et al. (2000).   Chapter 1         Page 15          Figure 1.2.  Schematic model for the formation of VMS deposits (from Franklin et al., 2005).     Chapter 1         Page 16            Figure 1.3.  Schematic section and model of a typical volcanogenic massive sulphide deposit  from modern mid‐ocean ridge settings; after Herzig and Hannington (1995).   Chapter 1         Page 17              Figure 1.4.  Histogram of ages for global bimodal‐mafic type VMS deposits (n=327); data from  Franklin et al. (2005).   Chapter 1         Page 18     Figure 1.5.   Metals versus size of the deposit (tonnes) for global VMS deposits of the bimodal‐ mafic class (n=326; data from Franklin et al., 2005).  Tambogrande deposits are labeled.  KC =  Kidd Creek deposit.  A. Copper and B. Zinc        Chapter 1         Page 19       Figure 1.6.  Gold grade (grams/tonne) versus size of the deposit (tonnes) for global VMS  deposits of the bimodal‐mafic class (n=326; data from Franklin et al., 2005).  Tambogrande  deposits are labeled.  KC = Kidd Creek deposit.   Chapter 1         Page 20   Table 1.1.  Individual deposit data from number drill holes, tonnage and grade (Manhattan  Minerals, 2002).      Deposit # Drill Category1 Metric Cu % Zn % Au g/t Ag g/t holes Tonnes Indicated2 56,156,000 1.6 1 0.5 26 2 Inferred 3,295,000 1.5 0.8 0.4 18 TG1 3 357 sulphide Probable 49,200,000 1.6 1 0.4 18 ore All 108,651,000 1.6 1.0 0.5 22 categories  357  Indicated4 Inferred4 Probable5 All categories  7,964,000 725,000 8,056,000 16,745,000  -------  -------  3.6 3.4 3.5 3.5  62 62 67 64  TG3 sulphide ore  53  Inferred6  82,000,000  1  1.4  0.8  25  B5 sulphide ore  14  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  TG1 oxide ore  1   The reserves and resources are calculated in accordance with National Instrument 43‐101 ‐ Standards of  Disclosure For Mineral Projects.  Mineral Reserves presented here are as at December 31, 2000, based on pre‐ feasibility Studies.  Mineral Resources for TG‐1 have been reviewed and updated (March 2002).  All  calculations are based on the following metal prices:  Cu US$ 0.90/lb, Zn US$ 0.55/lb, Au US$ 300/lb, Ag US$  5.00/lb.  2  resource with 0.75% Cu equivalent cutoff (Cu equiv. = Cu% + 0.61 Zn%) for sulphide ore and 1 g/t Au cutoff  for oxide ore.  3  reserves are calculated on variable NSR cut‐offs and incorporate 200,000 tonnes of external dilution and 400,000  tonnes of internal dike dilution, both taken at 0 grade.  4  resource is calculated based on a cut‐off grade of 1.0 g/t gold. High values have been cut to 20 g/t Au and 150  g/t Ag in the lower grade Oxide zone (main body) and 50 g/t Au and 2000 g/t Ag in the higher‐grade Transition  zone (contact zone with sulphide).  5  reserves are calculated on a Net Smelter Return (NSR) cut‐off of US$8.53 and incorporate 95,000 tonnes of  external dilution taken at zero grade.  6  resource with cutoff at 0.5% Cu equivalent.  Note: lead assays were not reported in resource estimates but for approximation purposes yield ~0.11% Pb at  TG1, based on the author’s calculations in this study for more than 8600 ore grade samples (i.e., 0.75% Cu  equivalent).      Chapter 1         Page 21   1.9   References    Atherton, M.P., Pitcher, W.S., and Warden, V.  1983.  The Mesozoic marginal basin of central  Peru, Nature, 305: 303‐306.     Barrie, C.T. and Hannington, M.D.  1999.  Classification of volcanic‐associated massive sulphide  deposits based on host‐rock composition.  In Volcanic‐associated massive sulphide deposits:  processes and examples in modern and ancient settings.  Edited by C.T. Barrie and M.D.  Hannington.  Reviews in Economic Geology, 8: 1‐11.    Barrie, C.T., Cathles, L.M., Erendi, A. 1999. Finite element heat and fluid‐flow computer  simulations of a deep ultramafic sill model for the giant Kidd Creek volcanic‐associated  massive sulphide deposit, Abitibi Subprovince, Canada.  In The Giant Kidd Creek  Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposit, Western Abitibi Subprovince.  Edited by M.D.  Hannington and C.T. Barrie.  Economic Geology Monograph 10, pp. 529‐540.    Barriga, F.J.A.S. and Fyfe, W.S.  1988.  Giant pyritic base‐metal deposits: the example of Feitais  (Aljustrel, Portugal).  Chemical Geology, 69: 331‐343.    Benavides‐Caceres, V.  1999.  Orogenic evolution of the Peruvian Andes; the Andean Cycle;  geology and ore deposits of the central Andes, Special Publication ‐ Society of Economic  Geologists, 7: 61‐107.     Clark, A.H.  1993.  Are outsize porphyry copper deposits either anatomically or environmentally  distinctive?; giant ore deposits.  In Giant Deposits.  Edited by Whiting, B.H., Hodgson, C.J.,  and Mason, R.  Society of Economic Geologists, Special Publication 2, pp. 213‐284.    Clark, A.H.  1995.  Proceeding of the Second Giant Ore Deposits Workshop, Giant Ore Deposits‐ II; Controls on the scale of orogenic magmatic‐hydrothermal mineralization: Department  of Geological Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, 753 p.      Converse, D.R., Holland, H.D., and Edmond, J.M.  1984.  Flow rates in the axial hot springs of the  East Pacific Rise (21oN): implications for the heat budget and the formation of massive  sulphide deposits.  Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 69: 159‐175.    Dalziel, I.W.D., Vine, F.J. and Smith, A.G. 1981. Back‐arc extension in the southern Andes; a  review and critical reappraisal; extensional tectonics associated with convergent plate  boundaries, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series A:  Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 300: 319‐335.     Danielson, T., J.  2000.  Age, paleotectonic setting, and common Pb isotope signature of the San  Nicolás volcanogenic massive sulphide deposit, southeastern Zacatecas state, central  Mexico.  Unpublished M.Sc. thesis, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.,  Canada, 120 p.     Chapter 1         Page 22   Doyle, M. G., and Allen, R. L.  2003.  Subseafloor replacement in volcanic‐hosted massive sulfide  deposits. Ore Geology Reviews, 23: 183‐222.    Eastoe, C.J. and Gustin, M.M. 1996. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits and anoxia in the  Phanerozoic oceans, Ore Geology Reviews, 10: 179‐197.    Feely, R.A., Massoth, G.J., Trefry, J.H., Baker, E.T., Paulson, A.J., and Lebon, G.T.  1994.   Composition and sedimentation of hydrothermal plume particles from the North Cleft  segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge.  Journal of Geophysical Research, 99: 4985‐5006.    Franklin, J.M., Sangster, D.M., and Lydon, J.W.  1981.  Volcanic‐associated massive sulfide  deposits. In Economic geology; Seventy‐fifth Anniversary Volume; 1905‐1980. Edited by  B.J. Skinner. Economic Geology Publishing Co., pp. 485‐627.    Franklin, J.M., Gibson, H.L., Jonasson, I.R., and Galley, A.G.  2005.  Volcanogenic massive sulfide  deposits. In Economic Geology; one hundredth anniversary volume, 1905‐2005.  Edited by  J.W. Hedenquist, J.F.H. Thompson, R.J. Goldfarb and J.P. Richards.  Society of Economic  Geologists, pp. 523‐560.    Galley, A.G.  1993.  Semi‐conformable alteration zones in volcanogenic massive sulphide  districts.  Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 48: 175‐200.    Gibson, H.L. and Watkinson, D.H. 1990. Volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits of the Noranda  cauldron and shield volcano, Quebec; Special Volume ‐ Canadian Institute of Mining and  Metallurgy, 43: 119‐132.     Gibson, H.L., Kerr, D.J., and Cattalani, S. 2000. The Horne Mine; geology, history, influence on  genetic models, and a comparison to the Kidd Creek Mine, Exploration and Mining  Geology, 9: 91‐111.     Goodfellow, W.D. and Zierenberg, R.A. 1999. Genesis of massive sulfide deposits at sediment‐ covered spreading centers, Reviews in Economic Geology, 8: 297‐324.     Goodfellow, W.D. and Peter, J.M.  1996.  Sulphur isotope composition of the Brunswick No. 12  massive sulphide deposit, Bathurst Mining Camp, New Brunswick: implications for  ambient environment, sulphur source, and ore genesis.  Canadian Journal of Earth  Sciences, 33: 231‐251.    Hannington, M.D. and Barrie, C.T.  1999.  The Giant Kidd Creek Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide  Deposit, Western Abitibi Subprovince, Canada.  Economic Geology, Monograph 10, 672 p.    Hannington, M.D., Jonasson, I.R., Herzig, P.M., and Peterson, S.  1995.  Physical and chemical  processes of seafloor mineralization at mid‐ocean ridges.  American Geophysical Union  Monograph 91, pp. 115‐157.     Chapter 1         Page 23   Hannington, M.D., Bleeker, W., Kjarsgaard, I.  1999.  Sulfide mineralogy, geochemistry and ore  genesis of the Kidd Creek deposit: part I.  North, central, and south orebodies.   In The  Giant Kidd Creek Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposit, Western Abitibi Subprovince.   Edited by M.D. Hannington and C.T. Barrie.  Economic Geology Monograph 10, pp.163‐ 224.    Hanson, R.E., Wilson, T.J., Harmon, R.S. and Rapela, C.W. 1991. Submarine rhyolitic volcanism in  a Jurassic proto‐marginal basin; southern Andes, Chile and Argentina; Andean magmatism  and its tectonic setting, Special Paper ‐ Geological Society of America, 265: 13‐27.     Hedenquist, J.W., Arribas R, A., and Gonzalez‐Urien, E. 2000. Exploration for epithermal gold  deposits; Gold in 2000, Reviews in Economic Geology, 13: 245‐277.     Herrington, R., Maslennikov, V., Zaykov, V., Seravkin, I., Kosarev, A., Buschmann, B., Orgeval, J.,  Holland, N., Tesalina, S., Nimis, P., and Armstrong, R. 2005. Classification of VMS deposits;  lessons from the Uralides; Ore Geology Reviews, 27: 203‐237.     Herzig, P.M. and Hannington, M.D. 1995. Polymetallic massive sulfides at the modern seafloor,  a review; Ore Geology Reviews, 10: 95‐115.     Humphris, S.E., Zierenberg, R.A., Mullineaux, L.S., and Thomson, R.E.  1995.  Seafloor  Hydrothermal Systems: Physical, Chemical, Biological, and Geological Interactions.   Geophysical Monograph 91, American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C., 466 p.    Injoque, J. Miranda, C., Duninn‐Borkowski, E.  1979.  Estudio de la genesis del yacimiento de  Tambo Grande y sus implicancias.  Boletin de la Sociedad del Peru, 64: 73‐99.    Jaillard, É, Laubacher, G., Bengston, P., Dhondt, A., and Bulot, L.  1999.  Stratigraphy and  evolution of the Cretaceous forearc “Celica‐Lancones basin” of Southwestern Ecuador.   Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 12: 51‐68.    Jaillard, E., Herail, G., Monfret, T., Diaz‐Martinez, E., Baby, P., Lavenu, A. and Dumont, J.F.  2000.   Tectonic evolution of the Andes of Ecuador, Perú, Bolivia and northernmost Chile; tectonic  evolution of South America.  In Tectonic evolution of South America, 31st International  Geological Congress, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  Edited by U.G. Cordani, E.J. Milani, A. Thomaz  Filho and D.A. Campos, pp. 481–559.    Jaillard, E., Ordonez, M., Berrones, G., Bengtson, P., Bonhomme, M., Jimenez, N., and  Zambrano, I. 1996. Sedimentary and tectonic evolution of the arc zone of southwestern  Ecuador during Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary times; Andean geodynamics.  Journal of  South American Earth Sciences, 9: 131‐140.     Johnson, B.J., Montante‐Martinez, J.A., Cenela‐Barboza, M., and Danielson, T.J.  2000.  Geology  of the San Nicolás deposit, Zacatecas.  In VMS Deposits of Latin America.  Edited by R.  Sherlock and M.A.V. Logan.  Geological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division,  Special Paper No.2., pp. 71‐85.   Chapter 1         Page 24     Kerr, D. and Gibson, H.L.  1993.  A comparison of the Horne volcanogenic massive sulphide  deposit and intracauldron deposits of the Mine sequence, Noranda, Quebec.  Economic  Geology, 88: 1419‐1442.    Large, R.R.  1992.  Australian volcanic‐hosted massive sulfide deposits: Features, styles, and  genetic models.  Economic Geology, 87: 471–510.    Lydon, J.W. 1984. Volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits, part 1: A descriptive model.   Geoscience Canada, 15: 195‐202.     Lydon, J.W. 1988. Volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits, part 2: genetic models. Geoscience  Canada, 15: 43‐65.     Ly Zevallos, P.  2000.  Cerro Lindo Project.  In VMS Deposits of Latin America.  Edited by R.  Sherlock and M.A.V. Logan. Geological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division,  Special Paper No.2., pp. 407‐422.    Manhattan Minerals Corporation.  2002.  Annual Report      Mitouard, P., Kissel, C., and Laj, C. 1990. Post‐Oligocene rotations in southern Ecuador and  northern Peru and the formation of the Huancabamba deflection in the Andean cordillera,  Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 98: 329‐339.     Mourier, T., Laj, C., Mégard, F., Roperch, P., Mitouard, P., and Farfan Medrano, A. 1988. An  accreted continental terrane in northwestern Peru, Earth and Planetary Science Letters,  88: 182‐192.     Ohmoto, H. 1996. Formation of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits; the Kuroko perspective;  Ore Geology Reviews, 10: 135‐177.     Reyes, L.R. and Caldas, J.Y.  1987.  Geologia de los Cuadranglos de las Playas, La Tina, Las Lomas,  Ayabaca, San Antonio.  Instituto Geologico Minero y Metalurgio, Bul. 49., 83 p.    Rona, P. 1988. Hydrothermal mineralization at ocean ridges; Canadian Mineralogist, 26: 431‐ 465.     Sáez, R., Pascual, E., Toscano, M. and Almodóvar, G.R.  1999.  The Iberian type of volcano‐ sedimentary massive sulphide deposits.  Mineralium Deposita, 34: 549‐570.    Sangster, D.F.  1972.  Precambrian massive sulphide deposits in Canada: a review.  Geological  Survey of Canada, Paper 72‐22.    Singer, D.A.  1995.  World class base and precious metal deposits; a quantitative analysis,  Economic Geology and the Bulletin of the Society of Economic Geologists, 90: 88‐104.     Chapter 1         Page 25   Syme, E.C., and Bailes, A.H., 1993. Stratigraphic and tectonic setting of Early Proterozoic  volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits, Flin Flon, Manitoba:  Economic Geology, 88: 566‐ 589.     Tegart, P., Allen, G., Carstensen, A.  2000.  Regional setting, stratigraphy, alteration and  mineralization of the Tambo Grande VMS district, Piura Department, Northern Perú.  In  VMS Deposits of Latin America.  Edited by R. Sherlock and M.A.V. Logan. Geological  Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division, Special Paper No.2. pp. 375‐405.    Vergara, M., Levi, B., Nyström, J.O., Cancino, A.  1995.  Jurassic and Early Cretaceous island arc  volcanism, extension, and subsidence in the Coast Range of central Chile.  Geological  Society of America Bulletin, 107: 1427‐1440.   Chapter 1         Page 26   Chapter 2.  Volcanic Stratigraphy and Geochronology of the Cretaceous Lancones Basin,  Northwestern Perú  1     2.1   Overview   A ~10 km‐thick sequence of Cretaceous basaltic to rhyolitic volcanic rocks forms the arc  component of the Lancones Basin in northwestern Perú and underlies part of the  Huancabamba deflection.   The marine volcanic successions show markedly different  compositional features and depositional facies and suggest two main formational  environments, consistent with a maturing arc and shallowing marine basin.  The earliest  volcanism accompanying rifting, referred to as phase 1, was dominated by basaltic pillow lava  and breccias with lesser aphyric to feldspar‐quartz porphyritic felsic volcanic rocks.  These  volcanic successions filled the lowest exposed portion of the basin and were accompanied by  volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits, which are inferred to have formed in a relatively  deep marine setting.  U‐Pb zircon dating of felsic volcanic rocks associated with VMS deposits at  Tambogrande indicate ages from 104.8 ±1.3 to 100.2 ±0.5 Ma for the phase 1 volcanic  sequence.  The timing of onset of rift‐related volcanism is not well constrained, but is therefore  of middle Albian age or older.  Phase 2 volcanism is composed of latest Albian to Turonian  successions of relatively more felsic‐rich volcaniclastic rocks and yields U‐Pb zircon ages of  99.3±0.3 to 91.1 ±1.0 Ma.  Successions of phase 2 volcanism are intercalated and overlain by  siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentary sequences prevalent in the western forearc section of  the basin.  Phase 2 volcanism is followed by granitoid plutonism of the Coastal Batholith  beginning in the Late Cretaceous.                                                               1  A version of this chapter will be submitted for publication. Winter, L.S., Tosdal, R., and Mortensen, J. Volcanic Stratigraphy and Geochronology of the Cretaceous Lancones Basin, Northwestern Perú.  Chapter 2                   Page 27   The genesis of the Cretaceous Lancones Basin and other equivalent rift‐related basins in  western South America, including the Western Peruvian Trough, is related tectonically to the  break‐up of Gondwana.  Phase 1 volcanism in the Lancones Basin in Albian times coincided with  the initial rift stage, prior to active oceanic spreading, between South America and Africa.   During this time the relatively stationary western margin of continental South America was  undergoing extension and rifting due to a westwards (oceanwards) retreating arc, resembling a  Mariana arc type setting.  The Mochica orogeny marks the termination of rifting, subsidence  and related volcanism along the western margin of South America.  This orogenic event also  broadly coincides with the onset of spreading of the South Atlantic and westward drift of the  South American continent.  Subsequent phase 2 volcanism was more continental arc‐like under  an Andean‐type arc scenario.    2.2   Introduction   The Lancones Basin of northwestern Perú (also known as the Celica‐Lancones Basin; Jaillard  et al., 1999), represents a Cretaceous marine volcanic and sedimentary succession with large  tonnage deposits of base‐ and precious‐metal‐bearing massive sulphides around Tambogrande  (Tegart et al., 2000; Chapter 3).  The basin overlaps both the Western Cordillera and the Para‐ Andean Depression of northwestern Perú and southwestern Ecuador (Fig. 2.1) and represents  the northernmost of a series of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous continental margin, arc‐related  rift basins extending along the South American western margin through Perú (Huarmey and  Cañete Basins or Western Peruvian Trough; Myers, 1974; Cobbing et al., 1981; Atherton et al.,  1983), Chile (Coast Range; Vergara et al., 1995), and Argentina (Rocas Verdes; Dalziel, 1981;  Hanson and Wilson, 1991).  In comparison to the other segments of the marginal rift system,   Chapter 2                   Page 28   the Lancones basin is well preserved and includes the arc and forearc components as well as  accreted allochthonous crustal blocks (i.e., the Amotape terrain; Fig. 2.2).    In this chapter the geology of the Lancones Basin, with emphasis on the volcanic  successions and the eastern portion of the basin, are reviewed based on recent mapping and  examination of diamond drill core.  This documentation represents a detailed account of the  volcanic successions of the Lancones basin and places the Tambogrande volcanogenic massive  sulphide (VMS) deposits in a stratigraphic context.  These VMS deposits represent the largest of  the massive sulphide deposits in Perú and represent the most significant group of VMS deposits  in South America, each with a gross tonnage of massive sulphide of ~100 Mt.  Furthermore,  they are within the upper 3% of all VMS deposits of their type globally with respect to size  (Franklin et al., 2005).  In addition, the first U‐Pb zircon ages for the volcanic rocks from the  Lancones marginal basin of northwestern coastal Perú are presented herein.    In this paper  (i) a chronostratigraphic framework for the volcanic successions of the  Lancones basin is provided; (ii) the field criteria are used to recognize the various sequences  and redefine formations; (iii) the volcanic depositional setting including the VMS environs and  the evolution of the setting through time are presented; (iv) a comparison of the volcanic  stratigraphy of the Lancones basin with other Cretaceous sequences in Perú and elsewhere is  provided; and (v) an explanation of how the Mesozoic volcanic arc is related to the  tectonomagmatic evolution of South America is provided.  Because northwestern Perú lies in a  major oroclinal bend, the Huancabamba deflection, additional constraints on the tectonic  development of this region improves upon understanding of the tectonomagmatic history the  Andes.     Chapter 2                   Page 29   2.3   Tectonic Setting   The tectonic evolution of the Jurassic to Tertiary South American western margin was  largely a function of terrain accretion and variable plate convergence directions and rates (Soler  and Bonhomme, 1990).  The latter was influenced by the late stages of Gondwana breakup in  the Early Cretaceous.  These events which triggered subduction along the western margin of  the continent mark the oldest phase of the Andean Cycle (Benavides‐Cáceres, 1999).   Throughout the Jurassic, a southeast‐directed subduction system was responsible for  continental arc volcanism along the Ecuadorian segment (Litherland et al., 1994), whereas a  sinistral transform system dominated the Peruvian segment (Fig. 2.3A; Jaillard et al., 2000).  A  shift towards northeast‐directed convergence occurred in the Early Cretaceous.  This is  indicated by the termination of the arc along the Ecuadorian segment.    The Amotape terrane is a microcontinental block of Paleozoic or older metasedimentary  rocks and Triassic metaplutonic rocks based on U‐Pb zircon ages (Noble et al., 1997; Appendix  B).  Within the Amotape Terrane in southern Ecuador, high pressure metamorphosed oceanic  rocks yield cooling ages of ~132‐110 Ma (Arculus et al., 1999; Bosch et al., 2002) that record  accretion to continental South America during the Neocomian.  The allochthonous Amotape  terrane was transported northward and accreted in the Early Cretaceous with northeast‐ trending dextral faults developed during clockwise rotation (Mourier et al., 1988; Fig. 2.3B).   The accretion is temporally linked to, and likely triggered, the westward relocation of the plate  boundary which manifested as a new subduction zone along the north‐northwest‐trending  Peruvian segment.  Under this Mariana‐type arc system, steep subduction and slab roll‐back  caused extension and attenuation in the overriding continental plate and resulted in rifting and  the formation of the Lancones Basin, followed by the deposition of marine sequences and the   Chapter 2                   Page 30   eruption of large volumes of mafic‐dominated arc volcanic rocks (Fig. 2.3C; Benavides‐Cáceres,  1999).  A clockwise rotation may have been related to the opening of the Lancones Basin in  Albian times (Winter et al., 2002).  Gravity modeling of crustal structure along the Peruvian  continental margin indicates that a dense arch‐like structure of 3.0 g/cm3 underlies the  volcanic‐dominated portion of the Western Peruvian Trough and possibly represents the  intrusion of basic material into the continental crust (Jones, 1981).   In late Albian times the geodynamical cycle shifted towards Andean‐type subduction and  marked the first Andean compressive tectonism, i.e., Mochica Phase (Mégard, 1984) and  subsequent continental arc volcanism and plutonism (Coastal Batholith).  An increasing  convergence rate through the Albian (Soler and Bonhomme, 1990), temporally linked to the  opening of the South Atlantic, may have been responsible for this transition in subduction zone  setting.  A series of post‐rift collisional events along the Northern Andes in Ecuador shortened  the Lancones basin and contributed an additional component of clockwise rotation (Mitouard  et al., 1990).  The accretion of the Pallatanga Terrane in the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene (Fig.  2.3D) and the Macuchi Island Arc in the late Eocene to early Oligocene (Huges and Pilatasig,  2002; Spikings et al., 2005) led to the current terrain configuration (Fig. 2.3E).  This compressive  tectonic regime continues to the present day.    2.4   Regional Geology   The Lancones Basin is situated at a major oroclinal bend in the Andes, the Huancabamba  deflection, which separates the north‐northwest‐trending Peruvian Andes from the northeast‐ trending Ecuadorian Andes (Mitouard et al., 1990; Fig. 2.2).  The basin is limited to the east‐ southeast and southwest to north by continental crustal blocks that represent the Jurassic to  Early Cretaceous pre‐rift Andean margin and were topographical highs during deposition in   Chapter 2                   Page 31   Mesozoic times (Cobbing et al., 1981).  To the southeast, the Paleozoic(?) Olmos Massif is a  probable reactivated margin of the Amazonian craton (Macfarlane, 1999).  This poorly defined  terrain consists of pre‐Ordovician greenschist facies pelitic to psammitic rocks overlain by  platform carbonate rocks of Triassic to Early Jurassic age, considered equivalent to the Marañon  Geanticline farther southeast in the Perú (Cobbing et al., 1981; Reyes and Caldas, 1987;  Mourier et al., 1988; Litherland et al., 1994).  Bordering the Lancones basin to the southwest,  west and north, are Paleozoic or older meta‐sedimentary rocks and Triassic granitic rocks of the  Amotape Range (Mourier et al., 1988; Aspden et al., 1995; Noble et al., 1997; Appendix B).    Volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Cretaceous Lancones basin can be subdivided into an  eastern volcanic arc and western forearc.  The rocks are exposed over 135 kilometres in strike  and ~150 kilometres width through northwestern Perú and southwestern Ecuador.   The basin  extends beneath Tertiary cover in the southwest for up to an additional 50 kilometres (Fig. 2.2).   An eastern volcanic arc sequence up to 80 km wide consists of mafic to felsic volcanic and  volcaniclastic rocks.  These uppermost of the volcanic successions grade into sedimentary rocks  which dominate the western forearc portion of the Lancones Basin (Jaillard et al., 1999).  The  forearc turbiditic subbasin was filled with the 3 km thick Copa Sombrero Group that interfingers  at the base of the group but, for the most part, overlap and buried the volcanic arc sequence  (Chávez and Nuñez del Prado, 1991; Morris and Aleman, 1975; Jaillard et al., 1996, 1999).  Late  Cretaceous‐Tertiary marine sequences as well as Pleistocene and recent sediments  unconformably cover all older rocks.  2.5   Volcanic Stratigraphy   The stratigraphic units that define the volcanic arc sequence of the Lancones Basin include a  wide spectrum of compositions and volcanic rock types ranging from effusive lava flows to   Chapter 2                   Page 32   pyroclastic rocks, from mafic to felsic volcanic rocks with less abundant intermediate  compositions, and with variable proportions of intercalated sedimentary rocks.  In general, the  sequence evolved from lava flow facies to volcaniclastic‐rich to sedimentary successions.  The  sequence also appears to evolve from deep to shallow marine, and with possibly subaerial  volcanic rocks deposited in the uppermost sections.    Four main formations (modified from Reyes and Caldas, 1987) define the volcanic arc  sequence of the Lancones Basin (Figs. 4, 5).  The Cerro San Lorenzo Formation is introduced in  this study as a new formation with the type locality located south of the San Lorenzo reservoir.   This formation represents a significant component of, but is considered distinctive from, the  former Cerro El Ereo Formation of Reyes and Caldas (1987) within which it was previously  included.  The Cerro El Ereo Formation has been retained, named for the topographically Ereo  Hill which is comprised wholly of this sequence.  Cerro El Ereo is defined by a distinctive  porphyritic mafic lava flow sequence that differs from the pillow basalt sequence of the Cerro  San Lorenzo Formation in terms of composition and depositional facies.  In addition, the La  Bocana and Lancones Formations have been revised to define the La Bocana Formation as a  volcanic‐volcaniclastic sequence, whereas the overlying and thicker calcareous‐siliciclastic  sedimentary dominated successions are assigned solely to the Lancones Formation.   Furthermore, estimates from this study suggest a significantly greater total thickness (~ 8 to 10  km; Fig. 2.6) for the volcanic arc sequence as compared to previous estimates of ~2 km (Reyes  and Caldas, 1987).  In Ecuador the volcanic and volcaniclastic sequence has not been studied in  detail and is described as a 2 to 3 km‐thick package of dominantly mafic pillow lavas and related  volcaniclastic rocks (Jaillard et al., 1996).  Fossils have been reported only from the La Bocana  Formation and stratigraphically higher successions (Reyes and Caldas, 1987).     Chapter 2                   Page 33   The volcanic arc sequence of the Lancones Basin is subdivided into two main tectono‐ volcanic phases based on depositional facies, composition and chronology.  The Cerro San  Lorenzo Formation represents phase 1 and the Cerro El Ereo, La Bocana and Lancones  Formations compose phase 2.  Phase 1, a mafic‐dominated sequence characterized by lava  flows and associated breccia, minor aphyric felsic lava, and general absence of siliciclastic  sedimentary rocks is interpreted to represent a deep water environment.  The basal contact has  not been seen in outcrop or drill core but siliciclastic rocks of the San Pedro Group present to  the east are interpreted as the earliest of the Cretaceous sequences within the basin (Reyes and  Caldas, 1987).  Geochronological data presented herein limit phase 1 volcanic rocks to the late  Albian.  The phase 1 volcanic sequence is of economic interest as it hosts all known VMS  deposits in the Lancones basin.    The phase 2 volcanic cycle is defined as an 8 km‐thick sequence of mafic to felsic volcanic  and volcaniclastic rocks with subordinate sedimentary rocks that represent a more shallow  water setting.  The upper part of the phase 2 volcanic cycle, the Lancones Formation, is  dominated by volcaniclastic rocks and intercalated with sedimentary and notably calcareous  rocks that mark a transition to forearc turbidite of the Copa Sombrero Group.  Rocks within  phase 2 are late Albian to Turonian(?) based on geochronological data presented in this  chapter.   Metamorphic grades range from zeolite to lower greenschist facies, with the higher  metamorphic grade mineral assemblages due to the thermal metamorphism around younger  plutonic rocks.  Diagenesis and seafloor metasomatism,due to seawater‐rock interaction,  resulted in a wide range of low‐temperature replacement and open‐space‐filling minerals  within basaltic rocks, including analcite, albite (after plagioclase), amphibole (uralitized   Chapter 2                   Page 34   clinopyroxene), carbonate minerals, chlorite, epidote, hematite, palagonite (after groundmass  glass), prehnite, pumpellyite, sericite or various clays (sausseritized feldspar), and zeolites.   Hydrothermal alteration is confined to discordant zones of the footwall rocks immediately  below massive sulphide deposits and includes variable replacement of the rocks with Fe‐ chlorite, sericite and quartz in addition to stringer and disseminated sulphide mineralization  (Tegart et al., 2000).  None of the rocks in this study show the effects of significant ductile strain  and primary textures are generally well preserved.  2.5.1  Cerro San Lorenzo Formation  The lowermost of the volcanic sequences, the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation (Fig. 2.6), is  characterized by bimodal volcanic rocks dominated by pillow basalt.  The depositional  environment is considered to have been relatively deep marine, based on the absence of the  pyroclastic rocks and with sedimentary rocks limited to thin units of laminated black mudstone.   Felsic volcanic rocks represent approximately 10% or less of the total volume of the formation.   Drill holes in the south of the basin near the vicinity of the massive sulphide deposits tested to a  maximum depth of ~800 m and did not intersect a basal contact of the Cerro San Lorenzo  Formation.  Simplified geological sections, interpreted from data generated through field  mapping as well as drill core (Fig. 2.5), suggest a possible thickness of up to 2,500 m.    Basalt is variably feldspar‐ (0‐20%) and augite‐ (0‐5%) porphyritic or microporphyritic, and is  typically vesicular with 2‐10%, 1‐5 mm amygdules (Fig. 2.7A).  Near the B5 deposit (Fig. 2.1),  basalt is locally scoria‐like and includes breccia with mm‐scale clasts dominated by bubble wall  shards (Fig. 2.7B, C).  Massive to pillowed flows are the most common lithofacies and form  monotonous nondescript intervals up to several hundred metres thick.  Pillows are typically 0.5‐ 1.0 m in diameter (Fig. 2.7D), commonly with radial fractures and ‘onion‐skin’‐type concentric  flow foliations (Fig. 2.7E).  Individual pillow lava flow units are decametres thick and associated   Chapter 2                   Page 35   with a variety of breccia types (Fig. 2.7F).  Pillow fragment breccia is derived from the collapse  of pillow mounds that vary from proximal talus breccia to distal facies showing evidence of  mass transport, e.g., reverse sorting (Fig. 2.7G).  Basaltic autoclastic breccia within the Cerro  San Lorenzo Formation includes hyaloclastite and autobreccia.  Hyaloclastite has angular and  cuspate, mostly pebble‐size breccia clasts with distinct clast outlines and often jigsaw‐fit  textures due to quench fragmentation in seawater (Fig. 2.7H).  Autobreccia, formed due to  viscosity variations within a cooling and flowing lava, display amoeboid‐shaped clasts with  abundant, fine (< 1 mm) amygdules (Fig. 2.7I).  Autobreccia clasts are typically maroon colour  due to hematization and have diffuse clast margins that grade into a darker, chloritic matrix.   Volcanic rocks of the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation host all known VMS deposits and  prospects (TG1, TG3, and B5).  Though outcrop is poor to non‐existent in the vicinity of the  deposits, an extensive drill core library was available for study.  Construction of a rhyolite‐dacite  volcanic complex intimately associated with the VMS deposits is documented by Winter et al.  (2004).  The extent of the felsic complex is not completely delimited, but at TG1 and TG3 it is a  minimum of 2 km in diameter and with a composite thickness of up to at least 300 m.    Felsic volcanic rocks represented by massive (Fig. 2.8A) to flow banded lavas, domes or  dykes of dacitic to rhyolitic composition and are associated with a variety of volcaniclastic rocks.   Breccia is common and varies from units of in‐situ autoclastic breccia (Fig. 2.8B) to transported  deposits (Fig. 2.8C).  Lava flow‐dome complexes are dominated by buff to light grey, aphyric to  weakly feldspar porphyritic, rarely amygdaloidal, but locally spherulitic and perlitic dacite‐ rhyolite.  Textures indicate the felsic volcanic rocks are mostly lavas and dykes with associated  in‐situ breccias and proximal re‐sedimented volcaniclastic units.  Quartz porphyritic lavas are  not recognized near the VMS deposits and are generally uncommon throughout the Cerro San   Chapter 2                   Page 36   Lorenzo Formation.  However, quartz‐plagioclase porphyritic rhyolite forms late dykes or stocks  within the volcanic complex at TG1 and elsewhere in the formation.  Dacitic lava flows and  breccias are conspicuous in the immediate hanging wall of the TG1 and TG3 deposits.  The  dacite is characterized by distinctive pale grey‐green, aphyric to feldspar porphyritic textures,  and is commonly amygdule‐rich (Fig. 2.8D).    Sedimentary rocks in the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation are limited to thin‐bedded to  laminated, black, carbonaceous mudstones in less than 1 m‐thick units.  Although  volumetrically minor, these pelagic sedimentary rocks are ubiquitous throughout this  formation.  No other sedimentary rock types are known to occur in the Cerro San Lorenzo  Formation.   2.5.2  Cerro El Ereo Formation  Though the lower contact with the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation is not exposed, the upper  contact with the La Bocana Formation is conformable and relatively sharp.  This sequence has a  rather limited geographic distribution in the western‐central part of the area and does not  extend north of the Las Lomas pluton (Fig. 2.4).  This study restricts the rocks included therein  to those of similar character that outcrop on the western side of the study area (Figs. 4, 5).  The  Cerro El Ereo Formation has an approximate thickness of up to 2,000m.  An entirely mafic volcanic sequence, the Cerro El Ereo Formation, is defined by distinctive  and monotonous coarse ‘crowded’ feldspar porphyritic volcanic and breccia and minor  coherent lava.  Subhedral feldspar phenocrysts to glomerocrysts range from 1 mm to >10 mm,  averaging 4‐5 mm (Fig. 2.9A).  Amygdaloidal lava flows are generally not common, though  amygdaloidal clasts are locally present in breccia.  Volcaniclastic rocks in this formation are  typically non‐stratified, matrix‐supported subangular to subround boulder breccia (Fig. 2.9B) or  cobble‐ to pebble‐sized lithic and feldspar crystal tuff (Fig. 2.9C).  Minor, thin bedded feldspar   Chapter 2                   Page 37   (and rare pyroxene) crystal and ash tuff, possibly as re‐worked material, occur near the upper  contact of the formation (Fig. 2.9D).  The sequence is also distinctive in the complete absence  of felsic volcanic and sedimentary rocks.  No pillow lava or autoclastic breccia similar to those  common in the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation are known in the El Ereo Formation.  The  dominance of poorly vesicular, matrix‐supported, non‐stratified breccia, with distinctive  porphyritic juvenile and variably abraded clasts, and the limited geographic extent of the unit,  suggests the formation may be the result of a diatreme‐like process.  2.5.3  La Bocana Formation  The La Bocana Formation marks a return to bimodal volcanism of basaltic‐andesite and  rhyolitic rocks, albeit with a greater abundance of volcaniclastic rocks.  The presence of  pyroclastic deposits, including crystal‐rich tuff, may indicate a shift to a relatively more shallow  water depositional setting.  Reyes and Caldas (1987) report an upper Albian age for this  sequence based on fossil evidence.  The La Bocana Formation has an estimated thickness of  3500 m with conformable upper and lower contacts.  Mafic rocks in this unit include highly vesicular, thick flows and dykes (Fig. 2.10A) with well  developed flow foliations (Fig. 2.10B).  Flows are observed to grade into autoclastic deposits of  unsorted coarse breccia (Fig. 2.10C).  ‘Breadcrust’ texture is illustrated by chilled and fractured  margins of lava flows with interstitial hyaloclastic breccia (Fig. 2.10D).  Pillow lava is present in  only a few localities.  However, polygonal jointed mafic lava flow lobes, apophyses and dykes  into volcaniclastic deposits or felsic crystal tuffs (Fig. 2.10E) are common.  Felsic rocks range from coherent facies of quartz‐ and/or feldspar‐ porphyritic lava (lava  flows, domes, dykes) to crystal‐, lithic‐, and pumice‐bearing tuffs (Figs. 2.10F, G).  The La Bocana  Formation is the only sequence in the Lancones Basin to include felsic tuffaceous rocks  indicative of pyroclastic eruptions.  Another enigmatic feature of the felsic volcanic rocks is that   Chapter 2                   Page 38   granitic xenoliths are present in several flows and were derived either from older crustal  basement or from related igneous plutonic roots carried in penecontemporaneous eruptions.    Volcaniclastic rocks make up a significant proportion of this unit, and range from chaotic,  matrix‐supported, boulder‐size breccia (Fig. 2.10H) to well sorted, pebble‐size breccia and  decimeters‐thick cross‐bedded volcanic sandstone (Fig. 2.10I).  The boulder breccia occurs as  either talus deposits related to fault scarps or mass flows.  The well‐sorted, coarse clastic rocks  suggest a high energy shallow marine to fluvial environment.  Basaltic‐andesite generally  dominates the clast composition, though felsic volcanic clasts are common.  Locally, calcareous  sedimentary clasts are abundant and occur as blocks up to boulder size.  Mafic and felsic  volcanic rocks are intercalated with the volcaniclastic units and suggest volcanism was also  active in a shallow marine setting.  2.5.4  Lancones Formation  The Lancones Formation consisting of a basal sequences of polylithic, basaltic‐andesite‐rich,  volcaniclastic units represent deposition in a relatively shallow marine environment.  These  thick‐bedded and variably stratified breccias are intercalated with siliciclastic and calcareous  sedimentary units, including limestones, calcareous sandstones, siltstone and greywacke (Fig.  2.11A, B).  Sedimentary rocks become more abundant towards the top of the unit.  Reyes and  Caldas (1987) report fossils in the age range of late Albian and Early Cenomanian.  These rocks  are considered to be gradational into the forearc sedimentary sequences of the Copa Sombrero  Group senso lato in the western Lancones Basin (Fig. 2.4, 11).  2.6   Structural Geology   The Lancones basin is situated at a major oroclinal bend along the Andean chain known as  Huancabamba deflection (Mégard, 1987), where the Andes trend changes from the north‐ northwest in northern Perú to north‐northeast in Ecuador (Fig. 2.2).  Several clockwise rotations   Chapter 2                   Page 39   are documented north of the Huancabamba deflection, including ~25‐30° and ~25° in  Cretaceous‐Tertiary and Tertiary times, respectively (Mourier et al., 1988; Mitouard et al.,  1990).  The kinematics of the deformation are poorly understood but suggest the opening of  the Lancones basin may have been an integral part of the Huancabamba deflection.  Part of the  rotation of the Amotape block was suggested by Mourier et al. (1988) to have happened in‐situ  and related to accretion.  Under the model presented (Fig. 2.3C), the opening of the Lancones  basin at the northernmost segment of the Andean rift system had a significant component of  dextral shear and associated clockwise rotation.  Subsequent accretionary tectonism north of  the Huancabamba deflection account for the additional rotations. (Fig. 2.3 D‐E).  Under this  scenario, the Albian rift segment at the Lancones basin may not have differed substantially  from that of the WPT with respect to an original NNW‐trending geometry.  Several deformation events are recognized in northwestern Perú in Late Cretaceous and  Tertiary times (Jaillard et al., 1999), including a mid‐ to late‐Albian tectonic phase correlated  with the Mochica orogeny defined in the central‐northern Andes (Mégard, 1984).  This  deformation is manifested mostly as broad open folds in the eastern Lancones basin, in general  with northeast‐southwest striking, ‘Andean‐normal’, fold axes (Figs. 4, 5).  A series of WNW‐ trending topographic lineaments are identifiable from the satellite data, but do not appear to  have resulted in any mapable displacement (Fig. 2.4).  These linears may be representative of  the same fracture system that controlled the emplacement of the plutonic rocks.    Data derived from oil exploration within the basin (Fig. 2.1) provides additional constraints  on the Mesozoic structural history of the area.  Alencastre (1980) reported a number of faults,  interpreted from petroleum borehole and geophysical data to be as normal or block and  transcurrent faults.  Seismically imaged faults in the Tertiary as well as Cretaceous strata strike   Chapter 2                   Page 40   east‐northeast to northeast.  Tegart et al. (2000) suggested northeast‐trending subsurface  Paleozoic faults imaged to the southwest under cover of the Sechura Basin (Alencastre, 1980)  can be projected to the Lancones Basin and inferred these to be primary graben‐bounding  faults controlling the location of Cretaceous volcanic rocks and VMS deposits.    2.7   Plutonic Rocks   As with the segment of the Coastal batholith within Western Peruvian Trough, the batholith  in northwestern Perú has been emplaced within the marginal volcanic arc succession of the  Lancones basin (Fig. 2.1).  Limited plutonism has occurred in the Copa Sombrero Group to the  west.   Although much of the Tambogrande district has been intruded by various phases of the  Coastal batholith, more voluminous plutonism is known to the east of the map area (Fig. 2.4).   The Las Lomas complex, a 15 km‐wide zoned gabbroic to granitic intrusion in the center of the  map area, yields U‐Pb and Ar‐Ar ages that suggest the time of emplacement for these rocks was  47‐88 Ma (Chapter 6).  No outcropping intrusive phases have been identified as syn‐volcanic in  origin.    As the granitoid suites occur within the northeast trending Lancones basin, the Coastal  batholith of northwestern Perú differs in trend from the northwest‐trending central Peruvian  batholith (Fig. 2.4).  Locally, the linear contacts of the granitoid suites (e.g., Las Lomas Complex)  also mimic the northeast trend.  The northeast ‘Andean’ trend in this region is thus  characteristic of both the Coastal batholith and the host volcanic arc suites.  However, as the  Las Lomas complex has been rotated ~25° clockwise (Mitouard et al., 1990), the original  orientation may have been closer to north‐trending.   Chapter 2                   Page 41   2.8   U‐Pb Geochronologic Data   Sample preparation and analytical procedures for U‐Pb geochronology are described in  Appendix A.  Two U‐Pb techniques were utilized because of the subtle inherited zircon cores to  many of the zircon populations.  Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) and Sensitive  High Resolution Ion Microprobe ‐ Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP‐RG) analytical data are presented  in Tables A1‐A2.  Rock sample and zircon descriptions are provided in Table A3 and shown on  the map (Fig. 2.5).  A total of thirteen U‐Pb zircon analyses are discussed in detail below.   Summarized results are also plotted on schematic regional‐ and mine‐scale stratigraphic  sections (Fig. 2.12).  All errors for these ages are presented as 2 sigma unless otherwise  specified.    Felsic and intermediate volcanic rocks sampled from the project area are generally aphyric  or weakly porphyritic and were typically found to yield low quantities of zircon concentrates.  In  addition, some samples analyzed by TIMS produced an older age due to an inherited  Proterozoic component.  Therefore, a combination of TIMS and SHRIMP‐RG analysis was  selected due to the variability of zircon contents as well as to characterize igneous  crystallization and inherited components.  Amongst the samples processed, with two  exceptions, only quartz porphyritic varieties of felsic volcanic rocks contain zircon.  Nine rock  samples of dacitic to rhyolitic volcanic rocks from the eastern Lancones basin were dated by U‐ Pb zircon methods, including three samples from the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation and six  samples from the La Bocana Formation.  An additional four samples from the La Bocana  Formation displayed strong inheritance and did not yield igneous ages.  U‐Pb zircon ages are  presented from four TIMS and six SHRIMP‐RG analyses.  An additional ~twenty‐five samples  were processed but did not yield zircons.   Chapter 2                   Page 42   2.8.1  Volcanic Rocks of the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation  Sample TG1‐136 (rhyolitic volcaniclastic) represents the immediate hanging wall strata to  the TG1 massive sulphide deposit.  This and all other samples yielded zircons that were mostly  clear, colorless, stubby to elongate, euhedral prisms.  The sample produced a small yield of <74  µm zircons that appear entirely magmatic.  Twelve grains were analyzed by SHRIMP‐RG of  which three data points cluster at slightly lower ages and one slightly higher than the main  population and these were omitted from the age calculation.  The weighted mean 206Pb/238U  age of eight analyses is 104.8 ± 1.3 Ma with MSWD of 1.8 (Fig. 2.13A).  Sample LW‐016 (quartz porphyritic rhyolite dyke) was also dated by SHRIMP‐RG analysis.   All crystals appear to be devoid of xenocrysts and display well developed oscillatory to lamellar  zoning under cathodoluminescence (CL; Appendix A).  Excluding two samples that have slightly  higher 206Pb/238U ages than the main population, ten analyses of both cores and rims yield a  single population with a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 103.2 ± 1.0 with MSWD of 1.3 (Fig.  2.13B).    Sample TG1‐111 (quartz‐feldspar porphyritic rhyolite dyke cutting the TG1 massive sulphide  deposit) yielded five zircon fractions.  Fractions A and E yield overlapping concordant analyses  (Fig. 2.14A) with a total range of 206Pb/238U ages of 100.2 ± 0.5 Ma, which is interpreted to be  the best estimate for the crystallization age of the sample.  Fraction B is also concordant but  yields a slightly younger 206Pb/238U age, and has possibly suffered minor post‐crystallization Pb‐ loss.  Fractions C and D yield discordant analyses with older 207Pb/206Pb ages, indicating the  presence of minor older inherited zircon components in some of the grains, presumably as  “cryptic” cores that could not be distinguished visually.   Chapter 2                   Page 43   2.8.2  Volcanic Rocks of the Lancones Formation  A moderate amount of zircons produced from sample LW‐086 (a single clast from a rhyolite  boulder breccia) was dated using TIMS.  Six fractions were analyzed (Fig. 2.14B).  Fractions B  and C yield overlapping concordant analyses with a total range of 206Pb/238U ages of 99.3 ± 0.3  Ma, which is interpreted to be the best estimate for the crystallization age of the sample.   Fractions E and F have suffered minor post‐crystallization Pb‐loss, and fractions A and D gave  discordant analyses with older 207Pb/206Pb ages, indicating the presence of minor older  inherited zircon components in these fractions.  Sample LW‐013 is a quartz porphyritic rhyolite dyke within the upper Cerro San Lorenzo  Formation near the contact with the La Bocana Formation.  A small quantity of zircons was  recovered.  CL images indicate that a few crystals have small xenocrystic cores, though most  display simple oscillatory zoning (Appendix A).  SHRIMP‐RG analyses of twelve crystals yield no  systematic measurable difference in ages between cores and rims of the wholly magmatic  crystals but show some scatter between 206Pb/238U ages of 96.6 and 104.6 Ma.  Three analyses  with slightly higher 206Pb/238U ages than the main population were rejected and are likely  xenocrystic.  As there is no geologic reason to reject any of the remaining zircon U‐Pb ages, a  weighted average 206Pb/238U age of 99.8 ± 1.6 with MSWD of 3.2 is calculated (Fig. 2.13C).  The  high MSWD reflects the scatter of the data.  Most of the zircons from sample LW‐078 (quartz‐feldspar porphyritic clast in polylithic  breccia) have CL patterns that suggest entirely magmatic phases with oscillatory to lamellar  zoning in igneous cores, though several grains have inherited zircon cores (Appendix A).  Twelve  crystals were analyzed by SHRIMP‐RG.  Sample point 1 yielded a slightly younger age (95.4 Ma)  than the main trend, possible due to Pb‐loss though it was an analysis of a zircon crystal core,   Chapter 2                   Page 44   and was omitted from the age calculation.  Eleven data points provide a 206Pb/238U age of 98.9 ±  0.7 Ma with MSWD of 1.1 (Fig. 2.13D).    Four zircon fractions from sample LW‐010 (dacite feldspar porphyry) were analyzed by TIMS  and all yielded concordant analyses (Fig. 2.14C).  Fractions A, C and D yield overlapping error  ellipses with a total range of 206Pb/238U ages of 97.0 ± 0.5 Ma, which is interpreted to be the  best estimate for the crystallization age of the sample.  Fraction E yields a slightly younger  206  Pb/238U age, indicating that this fraction suffered minor post‐crystallization Pb‐loss.  Sample LW‐077 (dacite flow and autobreccia) contained abundant zircons and was analyzed   by TIMS with six fractions all giving concordant analyses (Fig. 2.14D).  The analyses scatter along  Concordia, however, likely due to variable effects of post‐crystallization Pb‐loss that were not  completely eliminated by strong air abrasion.  Assuming that no older inherited zircon cores are  present in any of the grains, a minimum crystallization age for the sample is given by the oldest  206  Pb/238U age (for fraction B) at 95.0 ± 0.5 Ma.  Most zircons from sample LW‐043 (rhyolite quartz‐feldspar porphyritic flow) in CL imagery   display inherited cores represented by dark, resorbed zones with oscillatory zoned overgrowths  (Appendix A).  The sample was dated using SHRIMP‐RG with nearly all data points selected from  crystal rims.  Two of 12 data points yield substantially younger ages (due to possible significant  Pb‐loss?) and one additional data point with slightly older 206Pb/238U age (95.2 Ma), due to  distinctly different and high U contents (1586 ppm), were rejected.  The weighted mean  206  Pb/238U age for nine data points is 91.1 ± 1.0 with a MSWD of 3.7 (Fig. 2.13E).     A number of additional samples display strong Proterozoic inheritance and a meaningful   igneous age could not be calculated.  Sample LW‐051 (quartz‐lithic rhyolite tuff) yielded a  sufficient amount of zircon for three fractions which were analyzed by TIMS (Fig. 2.14E).    Chapter 2                   Page 45   Fractions A and B consisted of elongate prismatic grains, whereas C and D were stubby prisms.   Fraction B is slightly discordant near ~70 Ma on the concordia curve; however fractions A and C  are moderately to strongly discordant, indicating that at least these two fractions contained a  significant component of older inherited zircon cores.  Two‐point discordia lines through  fraction B and each of the two more discordant analyses yield calculated upper intercept ages  of 1.16 Ga and 1.51 Ga, suggesting a mainly Mesoproterozoic average for the inherited zircon  component.  The 206Pb/238U age of fraction B is surprisingly young (73.5 Ma), however,  indicating either that this sample has a considerably younger crystallization age than all of the  other dated samples, or that this fraction experienced much stronger post‐crystallization Pb‐ loss than was evident from the systematics of any of the other samples.  A crystallization age  for this sample cannot be assigned on the basis of the available analytical data.  Sample LW‐066 (quartz porphyritic rhyolite breccia) yielded a small quantity of zircon  analyzed by SHRIMP‐RG.  Most samples show strong Pb‐loss and unrealistically young  206  Pb/238U ages whereas older ages were measured ranging to 1898 Ma.  Two data points yield   206  Pb/238U ages of 99.4 and 99.8 Ma are in agreement with the range of ages determined for   other volcanic rocks in this area (97.0 to 99.3 Ma).    Zircons from samples LW‐026 (quartz‐feldspar porphyritic rhyolite dyke) and LW‐033  (quartz‐feldspar porphyritic rhyolite breccia) also yield dominantly older and inherited  206  Pb/238U ages ranging up to ~2540 Ma.  Single zircons from each of LW‐026 and LW‐033 yield   206  Pb/238U ages of 90.1 and 90.9 Ma, respectively.  These ages are in agreement with ca. 91 Ma   rhyolite (LW‐043) sampled in this part of the Lancones Formation.   Chapter 2                   Page 46   2.9   Discussion   2.9.1  Depositional Evolution of the Lancones Basin  The ~10 km thick stratigraphic package that defines the volcanic arc sequence of the  Lancones Basin represents a large bimodal volcanic eruptive event in mid‐Cretaceous times  within a marginal basin that presently is 150 km wide.  The stratigraphy suggests a progressively  shallowing basin and evolving depositional environment through mid‐Cretaceous times.   Although the continental crust at the Pacific margin would have been significantly thinner than  the present day western Andes, the amount of crustal attenuation and subsidence was  substantial.  An ensialic rift event related to a ‘Mariana‐type’ supra‐subduction zone is  envisaged to account for the volcanism.  The total inferred thickness of the Lancones basin  successions implies a syn‐subsidence depositional environment.  Rifting, crustal subsidence,  volcanism and sedimentation were synchronous.    The Cerro San Lorenzo Formation is interpreted as a relatively deep water facies based on  the absence of pyroclastic rocks and presence of pelagic sedimentary rocks.  Although not  unequivocal evidence of paleowater depth, a volcanic succession comprised entirely of massive  to pillowed lava flows and associated autoclastic deposits may be interpreted as a result of  deep water suppression of erupting lavas resulting in effusive‐only eruptions (Cas, 1992; Batiza  and White, 2000; White et al., 2003).  A deep water environment is also consistent with the  inferred depositional setting and deposit style (i.e., metal budget, alteration) of VMS deposits at  Tambogrande (Tegart et al., 2000; Winter et al., 2004).  The Cerro San Lorenzo Formation lacks abundant siliclastic or distal volcaniclastic deposits  despite the inferred deep water setting in a narrow rifted continental basin.  With continental  topographic highs inferred at both margins, a greater proportion of sedimentary rocks might be  expected in a deep basin, or at least close to the margins of the basin.  Indeed, the San Pedro   Chapter 2                   Page 47   Group, interpreted as Albian in its upper parts, has been mapped along the eastern portions of  the Lancones Basin (Reyes and Caldas, 1987) and may be the slope facies of the eastern margin  of the basin in the early‐syn rift phase.  The Copa Sombrero Group forearc sedimentary  sequence temporally overlaps with the entire volcanic arc succession along the western margin.   Clearly sedimentation was active during the volcanic episodes.  Therefore, it is possible that the  Cerro San Lorenzo Formation represents an ocean ridge‐type structure, analogous to back‐arc  volcanic ridge edifices in modern settings.  For comparison, the Manus Basin continental back‐ arc rift hosts an active 700 m‐high bimodal volcanic ridge flanked by siliciclastic rocks (Taylor et  al., 1995).  If the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation had been built as a topographically high volcanic  edifice, the interstratification of volcanic/volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks may be limited to  the flanks of the volcanic ridge.    All known VMS deposits and prospects are associated with the Cerro San Lorenzo  Formation, the lowermost of the volcanic sequences of the Lancones Basin.  The Cerro San  Lorenzo Formation represents the initial magmatic pulse, or phase 1 volcanic event, of the rift  sequence and appears to have been deposited in a relatively deep water environment during a  period of maximum subsidence.  During phase 2 volcanism, successions become progressively  more volcaniclastic‐ and sediment‐rich and appear to have been deposited in relatively shallow  water as late‐rift, basin‐fill sequences.  Therefore, the association of VMS deposits with the  Cerro San Lorenzo Formation may be linked to the establishment of large‐scale hydrothermal  systems in the early‐rift tectonic stages, during the most likely period of high magma input,  maximum heat flow and high permeability due to rift‐related extensional and transcurrent  faulting.  The phase 2 volcanic sequences have less potential for the discovery of VMS deposits  and are not known to host any VMS‐type mineral occurrences.   Chapter 2                   Page 48   2.9.2  Timing and Duration of the Volcanic Arc  U‐Pb TIMS and SHRIMP‐RG zircon ages presented in this paper permit an estimation of the  timing and duration of the arc volcanism in the Lancones Basin (Fig. 2.12).  Volcanism  commenced at a minimum of ca. 105 Ma (Albian) and continued to at least ca. 91 Ma  (Turonian) suggesting a minimum volcanic arc lifespan of ~14 Ma.  The upper age limit of the  volcanic succession is further constrained with U‐Pb zircon ages of 78‐88 Ma for granitic rocks  of the Coastal batholith that intruded into Lancones basin.  In the Ecuadorian segment of the  Lancones basin, granodiorite at the Los Linderos porphyry Cu‐Mo‐Au prospect (Chiaradia et al.,  2004) cuts basaltic rocks and is dated at 88.4 ± 1.0 Ma (Appendix B).  Compared to the youngest  Lancones basin volcanic rocks dated in this study (91.1 ± 1.0 Ma), there is a minimal temporal  transition from arc volcanism to arc plutonism.  Likewise, a temporal overlap from volcanism to  plutonism is recognized within Coastal Batholith the Western Peruvian Trough (Soler and  Bonhomme, 1990).  The duration of volcanic phases is also well constrained based on the data reported herein  (Fig. 2.12).  Phase 1 ranges from an oldest age of 104.8 ± 1.3 Ma (Sample LW‐16) to a minimum  of 100.2 ± 0.5 Ma (sample TG1‐111) indicating a minimum lifespan of ~4‐6 Ma.  Phase 2, limited  to dates from the La Bocana Formation, ranges from a maximum age of 99.8 ± 1.6 Ma (sample  LW‐086) to a lowermost age of 91.1 ± 1.0 Ma (LW‐043) and suggests a minimum duration for  volcanism of 7‐10 Ma.    No volcanic rocks from the El Ereo Formation were suitable for dating methods employed in  this study, however, the approximate age range can be deduced from the given ages of the  overlying La Bocana Formation and underlying Cerro San Lorenzo Formation (Fig. 2.15).   Volcanic rocks of the El Ereo Formation must be younger than 100.2 Ma.  However, the  minimum age requires some consideration of the stratigraphy and spatial distribution of the   Chapter 2                   Page 49   various formations.  Firstly, the oldest rocks in the La Bocana Formation occur in the northern  part of the map area and are dated at 99.3 ± 0.3 Ma.  These values suggest a potential 0‐3 Ma  interval for eruptions of the El Ereo Formation lavas.  However, the contact between the Cerro  San Lorenzo Formation and La Bocana Formation is uncertain and the El Ereo Formation is not  present in the north part of the map area (Figs. 2.5, 2.14).  Conversely, south of the Las Lomas  complex, the La Bocana Formation is known to be conformable above the El Ereo Formation.   Age constraints in this part of the La Bocana Formation are much younger (91.1 ± 1.0 Ma)  indicating a time interval than spans at least ~8‐11 Ma for duration of the Cerro San Lorenzo  and La Bocana formations.  Under this scenario in the southern Lancones Basin, the El Ereo  Formation would have potentially been deposited contemporaneously with the deposition of  the lower part of the La Bocana Formation to the north.  Due to the monotonous basaltic  volcanism and paucity of sedimentary rocks in the El Ereo Formation, a ‘single’ large volcanic  event is postulated that may not have required a significant time interval.  This is consistent  with a possible diatreme scenario and a maar‐like eruption.    2.9.3  Age of Massive Sulphide Deposits  Winter et al. (2004) provide a detailed reconstruction for the TG1 and TG3 VMS deposits  whereby equivalent time‐stratigraphic horizons can be correlated between each of the TG1 and  TG3 deposits.  Therefore, the relative timing of massive sulphide formation for these deposits is  considered practically identical.  The B5 VMS deposit ~10 km to the south could not be  represented on a continuous section with TG1 and TG3 but is hosted in similar volcanic strata.   Moreover, lead isotopic signatures (Chapter 5) are identical for all three deposits and suggest a  genetic, and possible temporal, relationship.  The minimum age of massive sulphide formation at TG1 is well constrained by several U‐Pb  zircon dates.  The immediate hanging wall felsic volcaniclastic rocks have been dated at 104.4 ±   Chapter 2                   Page 50   1.9 Ma (sample TG1‐136).  The sample is a sand‐ to pebble‐size, moderately‐well sorted, dacitic  volcaniclastic unit that, based on the volcanic reconstructions of the depositional environment  (Chap. 3), represents a distal facies of a seafloor rhyolite flow dome complex.  The rhyolite  eruption was most likely synchronous with or slightly post‐dates massive sulphide formation.   Additional age constraints on the deposits are thus provided by a rhyolite dyke that intrudes  the TG1 deposit.  This felsic unit represents a post‐mineralization phase and provides a  minimum age limit of 100.2 ± 0.5 Ma for formation of the TG1 and TG3 deposits.  Footwall rocks  to the VMS deposits did not yield zircons or other minerals suitable for U‐Pb zircon dating, and  therefore the maximum age for the massive sulphide system could not be determined.      2.9.4  Comparison of the Lancones Basin to the Western Peruvian Trough  Geochronologic and stratigraphic data presented herein verify the broadly  contemporaneous evolution of the volcanic successions of the Lancones basin and Western  Peruvian Trough.  Stratigraphically, the Casma group that filled the Western Peruvian Trough  has a total thickness of up to 9 km and is dominated by mafic with lesser felsic volcanic rocks  (Myers, 1974; Cobbing et al., 1981; Offler et al., 1980; Soler and Bonhomme, 1990), comparable  to the 8‐10 km of mafic‐dominated bimodal strata of the Lancones Basin (Fig. 2.16).  Volcanism  recorded by the Casma Group was largely terminated during the late Albian‐Early Cenomanian  indicating a short‐lived but vigorous volcanic event.    The Mochica phase, which represents the first contractional orogeny in the central Peruvian  Andes (Mégard, 1984), affected the Casma Group at the Albian‐Cenomanian boundary.  This  effectively represents the termination of the rift‐stage marine volcanism.  Volcanic rocks post‐ dating the Mochica phase were interpreted to be as the products of shallow marine to subaerial  volcanism (Webb in Cobbing et al., 1981) and these eruptions overlapped the initial phases of  the Coastal Batholith (Soler and Bonhomme, 1990).  A marine transgression and the deposition   Chapter 2                   Page 51   of shelf carbonates in the Western Peruvian Trough are recorded during Cenomanian to  Turonian times (Jaillard and Soler, 1996).  Although deformation related to the Mochica  orogeny is not well documented in the volcanic rocks of the Lancones Basin, the timing of the  contractional episode coincides with the transition from the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation to La  Bocana Formation.  Moreover, the facies change from deep(?) water, pillow lava‐dominated  volcanic rocks of the Cerro San Lorenzo Formation to mixed pyroclastic, siliciclastic and  carbonate rocks, representing dominantly shallow water environments, of the La Bocana  Formation and younger sequences suggests a major geodynamic change, the timing of which is  similar to that described for the upper Casma Group.  The stratigraphic thickness, relative age,  volcanic facies and inferred depositional environment of the Western Peruvian Trough is  remarkably similar to the Lancones Basin and suggests that both basins evolved along nearly  identical pathways.  2.9.5  Tectonic Implications  The fundamental processes required to generate a marginal rift basin related to subduction  along a continental margin are considered to be fairly well understood with the prerequisites  being a subducting and ‘sinking’ ocean slab and a trench line that migrates oceanwards at a  greater rate than the overriding plate, termed slab ‘rollback’ (Hamilton, 1995).  Benavides‐ Cáceres (1999) suggests the Lancones basin marginal rift resembled a ‘Mariana‐type’ arc (Karig  et al., 1978) which forms when the overriding plate, either oceanic or continental, is attenuated  and rifted due to tensional stresses associated with a steeply dipping slab, rollback and arc  migration.  The stratigraphic and geochronologic data in this study help to reconcile the  tectonic regime related to the formation of the Lancones basin and, by inference, the Western  Peruvian Trough.     Chapter 2                   Page 52   The formation of the Western Peruvian Trough is temporally linked with a major global  tectonic event, the final break‐up of Gondwana, which culminated in the opening of the South  Atlantic Ocean in the Early Cretaceous (Scotese, 1991).  More specifically, the Albian represents  the time of final separation of South America from Africa and opening of the equatorial South  Atlantic ca. 105 Ma (Sibuet et al., 1984; Scotese, 1991).  The lack of significant westward motion  of the South America plate