UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Beyond the confines of the ore deposit : mapping low temperature hydrothermal alteration above, within,.. Ahmed, Ayesha Doris 2010

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
ubc_2010_fall_ahmed_ayesha.pdf [ 8.83MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0052809.json
JSON-LD: 1.0052809+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0052809.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0052809+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0052809+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0052809+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0052809 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0052809.txt
Citation
1.0052809.ris

Full Text

    Beyond the Confines of the Ore Deposit: Mapping Low Temperature  Hydrothermal Alteration Above, Within, and Beneath Carlin‐type Gold  Deposits    by    Ayesha Doris Ahmed  B.Sc., The University of British Columbia, 2008    A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE   REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF     MASTER OF SCIENCE    in  The Faculty of Graduate Studies  (Geological Sciences)      THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  (Vancouver)  October 2010  ©Ayesha Doris Ahmed 2010   ii    ABSTRACT    Multiple  analytical  techniques were  employed  to  investigate  distal  patterns  in  low  temperature  hydrothermal fluid flow into and out of Carlin‐type gold deposits in two study areas: the Leeville deposit  and  the Shoshone  range  including  the Pipeline, Gold Acres and Elder Creek deposits. Previous studies  indicate that gold  is hosted  in  lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks overlain by thick sequences of similarly  aged  siliciclastic  rocks.  Patterns  in  δ18O  depletion  (<20‰VSMOW),  and  Au,  As,  Sb,  Hg,  Tl,  and  Te  concentrations  in  lower Paleozoic carbonate  rock  identified  three disconnected  lateral  fluid pathways  into the Pipeline deposit: a main conduit providing gold‐bearing fluid to the main ore body, the Abyss  fault  located  ~300m  below  the main  ore  zone,  and  the  RMT  located  underneath  the  Abyss  fault.  Following gold precipitation in the Pipeline deposit, gold‐depleted fluids were likely exhausted laterally,  at  least  initially,  along  the  same  structures  as  those  that  allowed  fluid  to  enter  the  deposit.  Upon  intersecting  the RMT  fault,  fluid either exploited  the  fault  to  reach  surface, or  transgressed overlying  siliciclastic  rocks  via  small  scale  faults  and  fractures.  δ18O  and  δD  values  of  H2O  in  equilibrium  clay  minerals,  and  the  concentration  and  crystallinity  of  illite  outlined  multiple  zones  of  hydrothermal  alteration in surface rocks from both the Shoshone Range and Leeville study areas, however no genetic  link  was  established  to  Carlin‐type  gold  mineralization  at  depth.  Similarities  in  trace  element  geochemistry,  ore  assemblage,  and  alteration  assemblages  however,  suggest  that  the  Elder  Creek  deposit may represent low temperature (200°C) gold mineralization resulting from the exhaust of Carlin‐ type ore forming fluid. The region above the surface projection of the Leeville deposit exhibits multiple  zones  of  hydrothermal  fluid  upflow  resulting  in  pervasive  illitization  of  surface  siliciclastic  rocks.  The  Pipeline/  Gold  Acres  also  contain  abundant  crystalline  illite.  The  presence  of  highly  crystalline  illite  highlights  zones  of  focused  fluid  upflow,  typically  along  faults  and  other  secondary  permeability  structures such as breccias.                          iii    PREFACE      Dr. K.H. Hickey identified and designed the research program. The research, sampling, and data  accumulation were performed by A. Ahmed in consultation with K.H. Hickey, S.L. and Barker. Chapters 3  and  4  of  the  thesis  are  intended  for  publication  in  a  scientific  journal  under  the  same  title  as  each  chapter respectively. A. Ahmed will be first author, K.A. Hickey will be second author, and S.L. Barker will  be third author. Appendix A of this thesis is currently in press in the Geological Society of Nevada 2010  symposium proceedings, due to be published in November, 2010.                         iv    TABLE OF CONTENTS   ABSTRACT ...................................................................................................................................................... ii  PREFACE ........................................................................................................................................................ iii  TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................................................... iv  LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................................... viii  LIST OF FIGURES ............................................................................................................................................. i  LIST OF TERMS/ ABBREVIATIONS ................................................................................................................. iii  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ................................................................................................................................ iv  DEDICATION .................................................................................................................................................. v  CHAPTER 1 – PROJECT OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................... 1  1.1 RATIONALE FOR STUDY ...................................................................................................................... 1  1.2 OVERVIEW OF CARLIN TYPE GOLD SYSTEMS ..................................................................................... 2  1.2.1 Carlin‐type gold deposits ............................................................................................................. 2  1.2.2 Tectonic framework .................................................................................................................... 4  1.3 THESIS OBJECTIVE ............................................................................................................................... 7  1.4 THESIS ORGANIZATION....................................................................................................................... 7  1.5 SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................................... 9  1.5 REFERENCES...................................................................................................................................... 10  CHAPTER 2‐ CLAY MINERALS AND LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESSES ........................................................ 14  2.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................ 14  2.2 CLAY EQUILIBRIA............................................................................................................................... 14  2.3 ILLITE THERMOMETRY ...................................................................................................................... 17  2.4 ILLITE POLYTYPISM ........................................................................................................................... 18  2.5 ILLITE CRYSTALLINITY ........................................................................................................................ 18  2.6 CLAY TEXTURES AND CLAY MORPHOLOGY ...................................................................................... 20  2.7 CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ILLITE ................................................................................................. 20  2.8 SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................ 24  2.9 REFERENCES...................................................................................................................................... 25  CHAPTER 3 – BEYOND THE CONFINES OF THE ORE BODY: SURFACE MAPPING OF LOW TEMPERATURE  HYDROTHERMAL FLUID ABOVE MAJOR ORE BODIES USING CLAY ALTERATION ....................................... 28  3.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................ 28 v    3.2 GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF CARLIN‐GOLD DEPOSITS ......................................................................... 32  3.3 CHARACTERISTICS OF CARLIN GOLD DEPOSITS ................................................................................ 36  3.3.1 Clay alteration in Carlin‐type systems ....................................................................................... 37  3.4 THERMAL SIGNATURE OF HYDROTHERMAL FLUID FLOW ............................................................... 37  3.5 ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES ................................................................................................................ 42  3.5.1 Near and Short Wave Infrared Analysis (Terraspec©) .............................................................. 42  3.5.2 X‐ray diffraction ......................................................................................................................... 43  3.5.3 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) ........................................................................................ 44  3.5.4 Electron Microprobe Analysis ................................................................................................... 44  3.5.5 Stable Isotope Analysis .............................................................................................................. 45  3.6 SAMPLES ........................................................................................................................................... 45  3.7 RESULTS ............................................................................................................................................ 46  3.7.1 Morphology and textural relationships of clays ........................................................................ 46  3.7.2 Spatial distribution of clays ‐Leeville ......................................................................................... 50  3.7.3 Distribution of clays ‐ Shoshone Range Field Area .................................................................... 56  3.7.4  Comparing the use of XRD vs. Terraspec in the identification of clay minerals ....................... 60  3.7.5. Calculated temperature of illite formation .............................................................................. 63  3.7.6. Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope data .............................................................................. 64  3.8 INTERPRETATIONS/ DISCUSSION ...................................................................................................... 68  3.8.1 Clay mineral zonation patterns around hydrothermal fluid conduits ....................................... 68  3.8.2 Illite crystallinity halos ............................................................................................................... 70  3.8.3 Crystal morphology ................................................................................................................... 71  3.8.4 The Origin of Clay Minerals ....................................................................................................... 71  3.8.5 Challenges in using the K + ?? ??? thermometer ................................................................ 72  3.8.6 Clay morphology, crystallinity , and composition as a function of reaction progress .............. 73  3.9 IMPLICATIONS .................................................................................................................................. 75  3.9.1 The ability of analytical tools to identify alteration related to Carlin‐Au mineralization.......... 75  3.9.2 Hydrothermal flow on a regional scale ..................................................................................... 77  3.9.3 The pathway of exhausted fluids in Carlin‐type systems .......................................................... 78  3.10 CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................................ 78  3.11 REFERENCES ................................................................................................................................... 80  CHAPTER 4 – SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE ABYSS: LATERAL FLUID FLOW UNDERNEATH AND INTO CARLIN‐ TYPE GOLD DEPOSITS ................................................................................................................................. 89 vi    4.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................ 89  4.2 GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF THE PIPELINE DEPOSIT ............................................................................ 90  4.2.1 Carlin‐type Au‐Mineralization ................................................................................................... 92  4.2.2 Previous isotope studies of the Pipeline Deposit ...................................................................... 93  4.3 FAULT RELATED FLUID FLOW IN CARLIN SYSTEMS AND THE ABYSS FAULT ..................................... 93  4.4 METHODS and ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES ........................................................................................ 97  4.4.1 Background 18O, 13C, Au and trace element values for marine carbonate rocks .................. 99  4.5 RESULTS .......................................................................................................................................... 101  4.5.1 18O and 13C values of rocks .................................................................................................. 101  4.5.2 18O and 13C values of veins ................................................................................................... 110  4.5.3 Gold and trace element concentrations near the Abyss fault ................................................ 114  4.6 DISCUSSION .................................................................................................................................... 117  4.6.1 Origin of the 18O depletion in veins ....................................................................................... 120  4.7 IMPLICATIONS ................................................................................................................................ 122  4.8 CONCLUSION .................................................................................................................................. 124  4.9 REFERENCES.................................................................................................................................... 125  CHAPTER 5 –CONCLUSIONS...................................................................................................................... 130  5.1 FLUID FLOW INTO CARLIN‐TYPE GOLD DEPOSITS .......................................................................... 130  5.2 FLUID PATHWAYS OUT OF CARLIN‐TYPE GOLD DEPOSITS ............................................................. 130  5.3 ESTABLISHING VECTORS TOWARD CARLIN‐TYPE ORE ................................................................... 133  5.4 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK .................................................................................... 133  5.5 REFERENCES.................................................................................................................................... 135  APPENDIX A: THE ELDER CREEK DEPOSIT: An Upper Plate Expression of an Auriferous Carlin‐type  hydrothermal system ............................................................................................................................... 136  INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................... 136  REGIONAL GEOLOGICAL SETTING......................................................................................................... 136  GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF THE ELDER CREEK MINE .......................................................................... 140  Clay mineralogy ................................................................................................................................ 144  Lithogeochemistry ............................................................................................................................ 147  METHODOLOGY .................................................................................................................................... 147  RESULTS ................................................................................................................................................ 149  Clay mineralogy ................................................................................................................................ 149  Lithogeochemistry ............................................................................................................................ 155 vii    INTERPRETATIONS ................................................................................................................................ 157  Physiochemical nature of fluid ......................................................................................................... 157  Fluid flow pathways .......................................................................................................................... 157  DISCUSSION .......................................................................................................................................... 161  Deposit classification ........................................................................................................................ 163  CONCLUSIONS ...................................................................................................................................... 164  REFERENCES ......................................................................................................................................... 165  APPENDIX B– APATITE FISSION TRACK THERMOCHRONOLOGY DATA .................................................... 168  APPENDIX C – SAMPLE INFORMATION .................................................................................................... 173  APPENDIX D – X‐RAY DIFFRACTION PATTERNS ........................................................................................ 181  APPENDIX E – MICROPROBE DATA ........................................................................................................... 187  APPENDIX F ‐  ISOTOPIC VARIATION BETWEEN LITHOLOGICAL FORMATIONS ........................................ 197       viii    LIST OF TABLES    Table 2.1  Calibration chart for FWHM values………………………………………………………………………………  19  Table 2.2  Regression line equations and correlation factors for K+[Fe‐Mg] thermometer………….  22  Table 3.1  XRD data for the Leeville study area…………………………………………………………………………….  53  Table 3.2  Calibrated FWHM values for the Leeville study area…………………………………………………….  55  Table 3.3  XRD data for the Shoshone Range study area………………………………………………………………  57  Table 3.4  Calibrated FWHM values for the Shoshone Range study area………………………………………  59  Table 3.5  XRD vs. Terraspec accuracy………………………………………………………………………………………….  61  Table 3.6  Averaged illite formation temperatures……………………………………………………………………….  64  Table 3.7  Stable isotope data………………………………………………………………………………………………………  65  Table 4.1  Trace element geochemistry analytical procedures and detection limits……………………..  99  Table 4.2  Stable isotope data and geochemistry for background samples from Lone Mtn………….  100  Table 4.3  δ18O, δ13C, and trace element geochemistry data…………………………………………………………  102    Table A1  Geochemical data comparison between Elder Creek and Carlin‐type deposit……………..  162  Table B1  Thermochronology data of the Northern Carlin trend………………………………………………….  168  Table B2  Thermochronology data of the Shoshone Range………………………………………………………….  170  Table C1  Sample information……………………………………………………………………………………………………..  173  Table E1  Illite microprobe compositional data……………………………………………………………………………  187 LIST OF FIGURES        Fig. 1.1  Location of Carlin‐type gold deposits in the western United States………………………………..  3  Fig. 1.2  Major deformation events affecting the western margin of North America……………………  5  Fig. 2.1  Clay stability phase diagrams…………………………………………………………………………………..........  15  Fig. 2.2  End member morphologies of illite………………………………………………………………………………….  21  Fig. 2.3  The derivation of the K +[Fe‐Mg] thermometer………………………………………………………………  23  Fig. 3.1  The distal extent and degree of alteration around ore deposits………………………………………  29  Fig. 3.2  Regional geology map of north‐eastern Nevada……………………………………………………………..  32  Fig. 3.3  Geological map and cross section of the Leeville study area……………………………………………  33  Fig. 3.4  Simplified tectono‐stratigraphic column of the RMT system…………………………………………..  34  Fig. 3.5  Potential fluid evolution pathways………………………………………………………………………………….  38  Fig. 3.6  Apatite fission track ages across the Northern Carlin trend…………………………………………….  40  Fig. 3.7  Apatite fission track ages across the Shoshone Range…………………………………………………….  41  Fig. 3.8  Sample types…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  47  Fig. 3.9  Sample location map from the Leeville study area…………………………………………………………..  48  Fig. 3.10  Scanning electron microphotographs showing the morphology of clay minerals…………….  49  Fig. 3.11  Scanning electron microphotographs showing mineral‐mineral relationships…………........  51  Fig. 3.12  XRD, Terraspec, FWHM, and microprobe data from across the Leeville area……………………  52  Fig. 3.13  XRD, Terraspec, and FWHM data from across the Shoshone Range .……………………………….  58  Fig. 3.14  Causes for discrepancies between XRD and Terraspec data…………………………………………….  62  Fig. 3.15  Graph of average potassium content of illite and average oxide totals……………………........  66  Fig. 3.16  Stable isotope data from this study along with data from other Carlin‐type deposits……..  67  Fig. 3.17  Zones of hydrothermal alteration identified in the Leeville study area…………………………….  69  Fig. 3.18  Trends in illite compositional data from previous studies………………………………………………..  74  Fig. 4.1  Regional map of northeastern Nevada with inset of the Pipeline deposit………………………..  91  Fig. 4.2  Cross section A‐A1 through the Abyss fault………………………………………………………………………. 95  Fig. 4.3  Photographs of core above, at and below the Abyss fault………………………………………………..  96  Fig. 4.4  Drill hole and cross‐section location map…………………………………………………………………………  98  Fig. 4.5  δ18O and δ13C data…………………………………………………………………….…………………………………….  109  Fig. 4.6  Cross sections through the Pipeline deposit show δ18O depletion zones………………………..  111  Fig. 4.7  δ18O values relative to the Abyss fault…………………………………………………………………………….  112 ii    Fig. 4.8  δ13C values relative to the Abyss fault……………………………………………………………………………..  113  Fig. 4.9  Trace element geochemistry concentrations relative to the Abyss fault…………………………  115  Fig. 4.10  Potential fluid pathways into the Pipeline ore deposit…………………………………………………..  121  Fig. A1  Regional Geology map of northeastern Nevada…………………………………………………………….  138  Fig. A2  Simplified stratigraphic column of lower Palaeozoic rocks……………………………………………..  139  Fig. A3  Geology of the Elder Creek deposit………………………………………………………………………………..  141  Fig. A4  Photograph of sample 456……………………………………………………………………………………………..  142  Fig. A5  Field photographs of strongly argillized zones……………………………………………………………….  143  Fig. A6  Fluid evolution pathways……………………………………………………………………………………………….  145  Fig. A7  Phyllosilicate phase diagrams…………………………………………………………………………………………  146  Fig. A8  Sample location map……………………………………………………………………………………………………..  148  Fig. A9  Two XRD standards……………………………………………………………………………………………………….  150  Fig. A10  X‐ray diffraction patterns……………………………………………………………………………………………..  152  Fig. A11  Hydrothermal illite textures………………………………………………………………………………………….  153  Fig. A12  Illite crystallinity vs. peak position graph………………………………………………………………………  154  Fig. A13  Gold ordered trace element diagrams…………………………………………………………………………..  156  Fig. A14  Geochemical halos………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  158  Fig. A15  Stability field clay phase diagram…………………………………………………………………………………..  160  Fig. F1  Stable isotope value variation with lithology…………………………………………………………………  197       iii    LIST OF TERMS/ ABBREVIATIONS    ax: activity  CIS: crystallinity index standard (a standardized Kubler Index)  FWHM: Full width at half the maximum value (at given 2Θ location of an x‐ray diffraction pattern)  I‐S: illite‐smectite interlayered clay  Lower plate: Lower Paleozoic shelf and slop carbonate rocks that form the footwall to the Roberts  Mountains Thrust fault and are the typically hosts for the Carlin‐type gold mineralization  PASW: Predictive Analytics Software (an IBM product)  PIMA: Portable Infrared Mineral Analyzer  RC: Reverse circulation (drill hole)  RMT : Roberts  Mountains Thrust Fault  VPDB: Versus Peedee Belminite (international standard for carbon isotopes)  VSMOW: Versus Standard Mean Ocean Water (international standard for oxygen isotopes)  Upper Plate: Lower Paleozoic shallow marine and basinal siliciclastic sediments that form the  hangingwall to the Roberts Mountains Thrust fault, and can form thick sequences of cover on top of  Carlin‐type gold systems.  δ = ratio of the heavy isotope (13C or 18O) vs. the light isotope (12C or 16O)  ‰ : per mil (stable isotope measurement relative to an international standard)           iv    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS    This  MSc.  thesis  is  part  of  a  larger  project  coordinated  by  Dr.  Kenneth  Hickey,  associate  professor,  University  of  British  Columbia,  Mineral  Deposit  Research  Unit  entitled  ‘Thermal  and  geochemical  footprints  of  low‐temperature  sedimentary  rock‐hosted  hydrothermal  Au‐systems:  Identifying  far‐field vectors toward ore’. My sincere  thanks to those companies and organizations that  provided financial support for this project: Barrick Gold Corporation, Newmont Mining Corporation, and  Teck Limited with matching  funds provided by a Collaborative Research and Development grant  from  the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. A special thanks to Kevin Creel, Bob Leonardson,  Nancy Richter, and  Joe Becker  for providing  support at  the Cortez mine. Thank you  to  the  Society of  Economic Geologists for providing financial support through scholarships and conference funding.  My sincere thanks to Dr. Kenneth Hickey for his continuing support and mentorship. I will fondly  remember  luring Ken  into  the office  for  some quality  thesis  review  time with  the help of  a  either  a  chocolate bar or biscuit, or both. As busy as he may have been, he always made the time to meet and  provide constructive criticism; a truly brilliant man. I thank my committee members Dr. Greg Dipple, Dr.  Dominique Weis,  and Dr.  Shaun Barker  for  their  interest  and  guidance.  I  appreciated  their  feedback  during committee meetings and their commitment to keeping my work within the scope of a Master’s  project. I am especially grateful for the constant support of Dr. Barker who will be happy never to have  to edit anything else I write.  I could not have completed any SEM, XRD, or microprobe work without the  help of Mati Raudsepp, Edith Czech, Jenny Lai, and Elisabetta Pani. For my work with  isotopes, I thank  Janet Gabites for sample preparation and data reduction.  I  am  indebted  to my  fellow  lab‐mates Moira Cruickshanks, Will  Lepore,  and  Jeremy Vaughan  who provided countless hours of discussion, both thesis related and otherwise. Thanks to good friends  Jean Francois Blanchette Guertin, Jaime Poblete, Santiago Vaca, Bram Van Straaten, Esther Bordet, and  Tatiana Alva for much needed evening distractions. To Bram and the rest of the ‘orphanage’, thank you  for welcoming me into my second home. A shout out to my best friends Devon and Christa for providing  a link to a world unrelated to geology. Last and far from least, I will be forever indebted to Shawn Hood  whose patience and support was and is never ending.   And of course to my family. To both my parents for giving me a desire to never stop learning and  for  inspiring me  to pursue higher education. To my mama  for always understanding  that  in  times of  despair,  it  is  comforting  to  hear  that  you’re  right,  even  when  you’re  not,  and  for  feeling  and  experiencing my troubles as much or more than I did. To my Abbu for always providing the extra push,  motivation and  support  to keep me on  the  right  track. And  to my  special Xantha, who ever  since we  were young has been a role model for her sense of adventure, and her lack of fear for new experiences  and new challenges.      v    DEDICATION                To Mutti, Abbi,  and Gogo (+/- Snooks) To Shawny 1    CHAPTER 1 – PROJECT OVERVIEW    1.1 RATIONALE FOR STUDY   Exploration  for  new  economic  mineral  resources  in  mature  mineral  terranes  has  become  increasingly  difficult  and  deposits  currently  exposed  at  surface  have  either  been  discovered  or  categorized as  sub‐economic  (Kelley et al., 2006). Recent  research has highlighted  the  importance of  discovering new exploration methods and improving on existing exploration methods that look beyond  the obvious limits of mineralization to the distal expression of mineralizing systems (Adams and Putnam,  1992; Arehart and Donelick, 2006; Kelley et al., 2006). This  task  is  complicated  in  the  context of  low  temperature  hydrothermal  systems  (<300C)  where  conventional  alteration  or  mineral  mapping  is  difficult to employ. Low temperature systems such as active geothermal systems (Simmons and Browne,  2000; Yang et al., 2001), and Carlin‐type gold deposits  (Cline et al., 2005) have a  tendency  to exhibit  more  subtle  alteration  halos  around  ore  deposits  than  their  high  temperature  counterparts  such  as  porphyry deposits (Rose, 1970). This is primarily a function of differences in both thermal and chemical  gradients between mineralizing fluid and host rock (Reed, 1982, 1997). Low temperature hydrothermal  systems intruding the shallow crust tend to lack large thermal and chemical gradients between hot rock  (~50C at 2km given a geothermal gradient of 25C/km) and low temperature (~200C) rock or surface  water buffered  fluid. Furthermore,  the alteration minerals produced  from  low  temperature  fluid‐rock  interactions  are  generally  fine  grained phyllosilicate minerals which  are difficult  to both  identify  and  analyze, and may not represent equilibrium assemblages (Essene and Peacor, 1995).  Identifying subtle  expressions of hydrothermal alteration around  low  temperature mineral deposits may provide  robust  vectors toward mineralization at depth. These expressions provide insights into to the nature and extent  of alteration in low temperature systems that help to further existing models for mineralizing processes.  This MSc.  thesis  is  part  of  a  larger  project  coordinated  by Dr.  Kenneth Hickey, University  of  British  Columbia,  Earth  and  Ocean  Sciences  Department,  Mineral  Deposit  Research  Unit  entitled  ‘Thermal  and  geochemical  footprints  of  low‐temperature  sedimentary  rock‐hosted  hydrothermal  Au‐ systems: Identifying far‐field vectors toward ore’. The project is sponsored by Barrick Gold Corporation,  Newmont  Mining  Corporation,  and  Teck  Limited  with  matching  funds  provided  by  a  Collaborative  Research  and  Development  grant  from  the  Natural  Sciences  and  Engineering  Research  Council.  The  project  combines  a  well‐constrained  geological  understanding  of  the  paleogeographic,  tectonic  and  magmatic environment of gold deposition using a range of thermochronometers, and lithogeochemical, 2    isotopic and mineralogical tracers to delineate the location and scale of low temperature hydrothermal  fluid circulation that resulted in Carlin‐type gold deposition, as well as identifying where these deposits   are manifested under cover.     1.2 OVERVIEW OF CARLIN TYPE GOLD SYSTEMS    1.2.1 Carlin‐type gold deposits  The world‐class Carlin‐type gold deposits of northeastern Nevada provide 9% of the world’s gold  production (Cline et al., 2005; Price et al., 2008). The majority of deposits occur along three structural  lineaments shown  in Figure 1.1:  the Carlin  trend,  the Battle Mountain Eureka  trend, and  the Getchell  trend. The majority of gold is ‘invisible’, hosted within arsenian‐rich pyrite, although the oxidized portion  of deposits can contain  free gold  (Barker et al., 2009; Bettles, 2002). Gold  is disseminated and occurs  predominantly within  lower  Paleozoic  silty  carbonate  shelf  and  slope  rocks  (Cline  et  al.,  2005). Gold  precipitated via sulfidation where a low temperature, slightly acidic fluid reacted with ferrous‐carbonate  host  rocks  (Cline  and Hofstra,  2000;  Lubben,  2004). Many  Carlin‐type  deposits  are  covered  by  thick  sequences of Paleozoic outer shelf and basin siliciclastic rocks which are largely devoid of mineralization  (Cline et al., 2005).    The namesake  for Carlin‐type gold deposits,  the  ‘Carlin deposit’  is  located along  the Northern  Carlin trend, north‐eastern Nevada. Subsequent to the discovery of the Carlin gold depoist in the 1960’s,  a number of other deposits of similar style were discovered in the area (Cline and Hofstra, 2000). Since  this type of deposit had not been documented anywhere else, a new classification of hydrothermal ore‐ deposits was created and termed  ‘Carlin‐type’. Carlin‐type gold deposits are typically restricted to  the  shallow crust (1‐4km below surface). The source of fluid and metals is strongly debated. Fluid inclusion  and mineral thermometry data  indicate that mineralizing  fluid  forming Carlin deposits  in northeastern  Nevada  was:  low  temperature  (180‐240C),  slightly  acidic  (pH  ~4),  low‐salinity  (~2–3  wt%  NaCl  equivalent), aqueous fluids that contained CO2 (<4 mol %), and CH4 (<0.4 mol %), and sufficient H2S (10– 1–10–2 m) to transport Au and other bisulfide‐complexed metals (Cline and Hofstra, 2000; Lubben, 2004).  No  fluid  inclusion,  mineralogical,  or  textural  evidence  exists  to  indicate  fluid  boiling  or  immiscibility.  Alteration associated with Carlin‐type mineralization is subtle and includes: pre‐ore      3            Fig.1.1.  (Modified  from Hofstra  et  al.,  1999) Dots  show  locations  of  Carlin‐type  gold  deposits  in  the  western United States. Deposits occur principally along three structural lineaments: the Battle Mountain  – Eureka trend, the Carlin trend, and the Getchell trend. The alignment of Carlin‐type deposits reflects  major  basement  fault  fabrics  which  were  established  during  Neoproterozoic  rifting  (Roberts,  1966;  Tosdal et al., 2000).   4    decalcification,  argillization,  sulfidation  and  local  silicification.  Clay minerals  observed  in  the  argillic  alteration assemblage  include  illite, dickite, and kaolinite (Ilchik, 1990; Clode et al., 1997; Folger et al.,  1998;  Hofstra  et  al.,  1999;  Cline  and  Hofstra,  2000;  Cail  and  Cline,  2001).  Thermochronology  based  estimates  of  bedrock  exhumation  suggest  that  the  Carlin‐type  Au‐deposits  likely  formed  over  a  paleodepth range of <1‐4 km (Cline et al., 2005).   DH2O values measured on hypogene kaolinite,  illite and  fluid  inclusions  from a wide‐range of  Carlin deposits  suggest evidence of meteoric water with very  low DH2O values of <  ‐110 ‰  (Hofstra,  1999). Geochemical data  and mineral  stability  also  suggest  a highly exchanged meteoric  source  fluid  (Ilchik and Barton, 1997). Stable isotope data from fluid inclusions and clay minerals of the the Getchell,  Twin  Creeks,  and  Deep  Star  deposits,  however,  indicate  the  additional  presence  of  deeply  sourced  metamorphic or magmatic  fluid  (Hofstra  et  al.,  1999; Heitt  et  al.,  2003; Cline  et  al.,  2005). A  spatial  association  between  some  Carlin‐type  deposits  and  Eocene  intrusive  centers  has  also  led  to  the  interpretation that Carlin‐type deposits are distal portions of magmatic hydrothermal systems (Radtke  et al., 1980; Arehart et al., 1993).  Gold  is  typically  hosted  within  Siluro‐Devonian miogeoclinal  carbonate  rocks  that  form  the  footwall to the Roberts Mountains Thrust  (RMT)  (the “lower plate”). The structurally overlying “upper  plate” is dominated by Ordovician‐Mississippian siliciclastic eugeoclinal rocks (Roberts, 1966). The upper  plate is not known to host any major Carlin‐type Au deposits although mineralization does occur locally  immediately  above  the  RMT  in  several  of  the  lower  plate‐hosted  deposits.  The  lack  of  Carlin‐type  deposits  in  the upper plate  is  thought  to  reflect  the  less  reactive nature of  the  siliciclastic  rocks  that  dominate the Roberts Mountains allochthon (Cline et al., 2005).    1.2.2 Tectonic framework    Figure 1.2 presents a timeline of deformation events leading to the formation of Carlin‐type gold  deposits  in Nevada. The western margin of continental North America  records a history of prolonged  episodic rifting and basin subsidence from the Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic as the proto‐Pacific oceanic  basin opened  following  the  breakup  of Rodinia  to  form  the paleo‐continent  Laurentia  (Powell  et  al.,  1993; Wingate and Giddings, 2000; Lund, 2008). Geochronologic data indicate the presence of two main  rifting events beginning in the Cryogenian and accelerated in the Ediacaran to Cambrian (Stewart,    5              Fig. 1.2. (Modified from Hofstra et al., 1999) Timeline showing the major deformation events affecting  the western margin of continental North America. PC = pre‐Cambrian C= Cambrian O = Ordovician D=  Devonian M = Mississippian  IP = Pensylvannian P = Permian Tr = Triassic J= Jurassic K= Cretaceous T =  Tertiary. 6    1972; Thompson et al., 1987; Ross, 1991; Colpron et al., 2002). The earlier rifting event corresponds to  the  deposition  of  coarse,  partly  glaciogenic  diamictite  and mafic  volcanic  rocks  of  the Windermere  Supergroup on  top of  an  intercontinental  rift margin  in British Columbia  (Ross,  1991; Colpron  et  al.,  2002).  Later  rifting  in  the  Neoproterozoic  is  interpreted  to  indicate  continental  breakup  and  establishment  of  a  passive  margin  along  the  western  margin  of  Laurentia  (Colpron  et  al.,  2002).  Neoproterozoic and Early Cambrian clastic rocks across central Nevada are dominated by quartzite with  interstratified argillite and phyllite, and were deposited  in a westward‐thickening  sedimentary wedge  over  structurally complex,  thinned Paleoproterozoic  to Neoproterozoic crystalline basement  (Poole et  al., 1992). During the Early‐ Middle Devonian, basins formed in the shelf and outer shelf regions of the  passive margin, probably as a result of reactivation of Neoproterozoic rift structures  in the underlying  crystalline basement (Stewart, 1972; Morrow and Sandberg, 2008). Following Neoproterozoic rifting and  initial  sedimentation,  miogeoclinal  and  eugeoclinal  sequence  sediments  were  deposited  on  top  of  Cambrian  clastic  rocks,  along  the western margin of  continental North America  (Burchfiel  and Davis,  1972).  Interbedded carbonate and shale, and silty carbonate were deposited along the shelf and slope,  with  basinal  and  shallow marine  siliciclastic  sediments  deposited  further west  (Burchfiel  and  Davis,  1972; Morrow and Sandberg, 2008).  Subsequent to deposition, the Paleozoic passive margin sequence was subject to multiple episodes  of  contractional  deformation  occurring  from middle Mississppian  to  Early  Permian  (Cashman  et  al.,  2008). During the Late Devonian – Early Mississippian Antler orogeny,  lower Paleozoic basin and slope  rocks (locally termed ‘upper plate’) were thrust eastward over coeval shelf‐margin and outer‐shelf rocks  (lower plate) forming the RMT system (Johnson and Pendergast, 1981; Poole et al., 1992). Lower plate  carbonate  rocks are  the  typical host  for gold mineralization  in Carlin‐type gold deposits. Upper plate  rocks  were  eventually  overlain  by Mississippian  to  Permian  shelf  deposits;  the  ‘overlap  sequence’  described by Roberts et al., (1958). The Late Mississippian to Middle Pennsylvanian Humboldt orogeny  resulted in uplift and later subsidence of the overlap sequences. Rocks of the Golconda allochthon were  thrust eastward over upper plate and overlap sequence rocks during the Late Permian and Early Triassic  Sonoma orogeny (Miller, 1984). Starting in the Late Triassic and continuing through to the Tertiary, the  western margin of North America became the site of semi‐continuous east‐directed subduction (Speed  et al., 1988) leading to the development of the Cordilleran orogenic belt. Further west, subduction was  marked by episodes of thin‐skinned contractional deformation with accompanying extensional faulting  and magmatism.  7    Two periods of extension affected Northeastern Nevada during the Cenozoic. Extension commenced  in the  late Paleogene with the onset of regional magmatism (Wernicke et al., 1987; Christiansen et al.,  1992; Sonder and Jones, 1999). The spatial and temporal overlap of Carlin‐type deposits with the onset  of Cenozoic volcanism and extension suggests a fundamental link between these phenomena (Hofstra et  al., 1999; Cline et al., 2005). Rb/Sr dating of the syn‐ore mineral galkhaite indicates a mineralization age  of 38‐40 Myr (Tretbar et al., 2000; Arehart et al., 2003; Cline et al., 2005). Subsequent to Carlin‐type gold  deposition, heterogeneous extension of  the Great Basin, accompanied by magmatism  continued  into  the Oligocene and ended with the mid Miocene development of the Basin and Range province and the  Northern Nevada Rift;  a  series  of  north‐northwest‐striking mafic  dikes  and  high  angle  normal  faults,  basaltic  volcanic  flow  units  related  to  the  dikes  and  epithermal,  volcanic‐hosted  mineral  deposits  (Wernicke et al., 1987; Zoback et al., 1994).    1.3 THESIS OBJECTIVE   The goal of this thesis is to investigate and answer two scientific questions: Question 1: Can we  identify fluid flow patterns into and out of low temperature hydrothermal systems by means of thermal  and/ or chemical alteration halos, and if so how is fluid flow manifested in host rocks? Question 2: What  set of  tools and analytical  techniques may provide vectors  toward  regions of hydrothermal  flow most  likely to have precipitated economic grades of mineralization? These two questions are answered with  two  complimentary  studies:  (i)  by  identifying  a  thermal  or  chemical  alteration  halo  in  upper  plate  siliciclastic  rocks  resulting  from  interaction  with  exhausted  Carlin‐type  hydrothermal  fluid  (ii)  by  investigating alteration within and above a major fault underlying a giant Carlin‐type deposit to identify  large scale  fluid  flow pathways. The  results contained  in  this  thesis  further  the understanding of  fluid  rock  interaction  in  Carlin‐type  environments  and  provide  information  on  the  practical  application  of  tools and analytical techniques related to identifying low temperature hydrothermal alteration.     1.4 THESIS ORGANIZATION  This thesis is arranged in four chapters. Chapter 1 introduced the concepts outlined in this study  by presenting  a  literature  review of Carlin‐type  gold  systems,  and  the  alteration  associated with  low  temperature hydrothermal  systems. Chapter 2 provides background  information on  low  temperature  clay  thermometers. Chapters  3  and  4  are written  as  stand‐alone manuscripts  to be  submitted  to  an  international  scientific  journal  for  publication,  and  adhere  to  the  formatting  protocol  of  Economic  Geology. 8    Chapter 3 presents a study that tested for the presence of clay alteration phases above regions  of  known  mineralization.  A  regional  study  of  the  Shoshone  Range  and  a  deposit  scale  study  of  the  Leeville  deposit  (both  in  northeastern Nevada)  investigated  the  relationship  between  argillization  at  surface  in  upper  plate  siliciclastic  rocks,  and  argillization  typically  associated  with  Carlin‐type  Au  mineralization at depth. The  identification of a hydrothermal clay mineral assemblage at  surface may  provide  insight  into  the  way  in  which  fluid  was  exhausted  following  mineralization  of  Carlin‐type  deposits.  Identifying zones of surface exhaust provides a direct  link  to ore deposits at depth. Detailed  results  of  this  study  include  clay  mineral  zonation  patterns,  illite  formation  temperatures,  illite  crystallinity,  textural and morphological analyses of clays, and O and H stable  isotope analyses of clay  minerals.  Results  from  this  chapter  indicate  that  extensive  zones  of  hydrothermal  clay  alteration  at  surface  are  spatially  associated  to  Carlin‐type  gold  deposits  at  depth.  The  chapter  concludes with  a  critical analysis of  the  results achieved using  two different analytical  techniques, x‐ray diffraction and  near and short wave spectroscopy, to identify clay minerals.   Chapter 4 of this  thesis extends  the work of Arehart and Donelick  (2006) and Rye  (1995) who  studied  the  stable  isotopic  depletion  signature  above  and  within  the  giant  Pipeline  gold  deposit,  northeastern Nevada. This chapter focuses on defining and identifying fluid pathways leading into Carli‐ type gold systems by studying the Abyss fault; a  large thrust structure that separates gold mineralized  lower  plate  on  top  of  largely  unmineralized  upper  plate  below  the  Pipeline  deposit.  Results  are  presented from a C and O stable isotope study on carbonate rocks within the hangingwall of the fault to  determine whether the Abyss fault acted as a fluid conduit, or whether  it played a passive role during  mineralization of the giant deposit. Those results indicate that ore‐forming fluid flow did occur along the  Abyss  fault  however  the  fault was  not  the main  conduit  for  fluid  forming  the  Pipeline  gold  deposit.  Furthermore, fluid pathways within the Pipeline deposit were dominantly lateral, not vertical.  A  case  study  is  presented  in  Appendix  A  of  this  thesis  of  the  Elder  Creek  deposit;  a  small,  sediment hosted disseminated gold deposit in the upper plate siliciclastic rocks of the Shoshone Range.  Information is used from chapters 2, 3, and 4 to discuss the potential for Carlin‐type gold mineralization  in  allochthonous  siliciclastic  rocks  (upper  plate).  Characteristics  of  the  Elder  Creek  deposit  are  considered  relative  to  known  characteristics  of  Carlin‐type  gold  deposits  including  trace‐element  geochemistry, clay alteration, temperature, and ore mineral assemblages.  The study of the Elder Creek  deposit  has  been  accepted  by  the  Geological  Society  of  Nevada  for  publication  in  the  2010  GSN  Symposium proceedings.  9    Although chapters 3 and 4 focus on different aspects of the same scientific questions outlined in  section  1.3,  each  chapter  has  been  prepared  as  a  stand‐alone  paper  resulting  in  some  inevitable  repetition and overlap between the chapters.    1.5 SUMMARY    Exploration for low temperature hydrothermal ore systems can be hindered by a lack of visible  alteration.  Carlin‐type  deposits  are  examples  of  low  temperature  hydrothermal  systems  exhibiting  subtle alteration associated with mineralization. In this thesis, we discuss the presence of both a thermal  and chemical alteration below, within, above and outboard from  large  low temperature hydrothermal  systems by  studying  variations  in  low  temperature  clay mineral  assemblages  in  siliciclastic  rocks  and  oxygen  and  carbon  isotope  depletion  in  carbonate  rocks.  In  addition,  we  investigate  the  role  of  largescale faults in the process of mineralization to place constraints on pathways for ore forming fluids.           10    1.5 REFERENCES      Adams, S.S., and Putnam, B.R.,  III, 1992, Application of mineral deposit models  in exploration: a case  study of sediment‐hosted gold deposits, Great Basin, Western United States: Geological Society,  London, Special Publications, v. 63, p. 1‐23.    Arehart, G., and Donelick, R., 2006, Thermal and isotopic profiling of the Pipeline hydrothermal system:  Application to exploration for Carlin‐type gold deposits: Journal of Geochemical exploration, v.  91, p. 27‐40.    Arehart, G., Chakurian, A., Tretbar, D., Christensen, J., McInnes, B., and Donelick, R., 2003, Evaluation of  radioisotope  dating  of  Carlin‐type  deposits  in  the  Great  Basin, western  North  America,  and  implications for deposit genesis: Economic Geology, v. 98, p. 235‐248.    Arehart, G., Eldridge, C., Chryssoulis, S., and Kesler,  S., 1993,  Ion microprobe determination of  sulfur  isotope  variations  in  iron  sulfides  from  the  Post/Betze  sediment‐hosted  disseminated  gold  deposit, Nevada, USA: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 57, p. 1505‐1519.    Barker,  S., Hickey,  K.,  Cline,  J.,  Dipple, G.,  Kilburn, M.,  Vaughan,  J.,  and  Longo, A.,  2009, Uncloaking  Invisible Gold: Use of NanoSIMS to Evaluate Gold, Trace Elements, and Sulfur Isotopes in Pyrite  from Carlin‐Type Gold Deposits: Economic Geology, v. 104, p. 897‐904.   Bettles, K. 2002, Exploration and geology, 1962–2002 at the Goldstrike property, Carlin Trend, Nevada:  Economic Geology Special Publication 9, p. 275–298.    Burchfiel,  B.,  and  Davis,  G.,  1972,  Structural  framework  and  evolution  of  the  southern  part  of  the  Cordilleran orogen, western United States: American Journal of Science, v. 272, p. 97‐118.    Cail, T., and Cline,  J., 2001, Alteration associated with gold deposition at  the Getchell Carlin‐type gold  deposit, north‐central Nevada: Economic Geology, v. 96, p. 1343‐1359.    Cashman, P., Trexler, J., Snyder, W., Davydov, V., and Taylor, W., 2008, Late Paleozoic deformation in  central and southern Nevada: GSA Field Guides, v. 11, p. 21‐43.    Christiansen, R., Yeats, R., Graham, S., Niem, W., Niem, A., and Snavely, P., 1992, Post‐Laramide geology  of the US Cordilleran region: The Cordilleran Orogen: Conterminous US G‐3, Geological Society  of America, Boulder, Colorado, p. 261–406.    Cline, J., and Hofstra, A., 2000, Ore‐fluid evolution at the Getchell Carlin‐type gold deposit, Nevada, USA:  European Journal of Mineralogy, v. 12, p. 195‐212.    Cline, J., Hofstra, A., Muntean, J., Tosdal, R., and Hickey, K., 2005, Carlin‐type gold deposits  in Nevada:  Critical  geologic  characteristics  and  viable  models:  Economic  Geology,  100th  Anniversary  Volume, p. 451‐484.    Clode,  C., Grusing,  S., Heitt, D.,  and  Johnston,  I.,  1997,  The  relationship  of  structure,  alteration,  and  stratigraphy  to  formation  of  the  Deep  Star  gold  deposit:  Eureka  County, Nevada:  Society  of  Economic Geologists Guidebook Series, v. 28, p. 239–256. 11     Colpron, M.,  Logan,  J.,  and Mortensen,  J.,  2002, U‐Pb  zircon  age  constraint  for  late Neoproterozoic  rifting  and  initiation  of  the  lower  Paleozoic  passive margin  of  western  Laurentia:  Canadian  Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 39, p. 133‐143.    Essene,  E.,  and  Peacor,  D.,  1995,  Clay  mineral  thermometry‐a  critical  perspective:  Clays  and  Clay  Minerals, v. 43, p. 540‐553.    Folger, H., Hofstra, A., Eberl, D., and Snee, L., 1998, Importance of clay characterization to interpretation  of  40  Ar/39  Ar  dates  of  illite  from  Carlin‐type  gold  deposits:  Insights  from  Jerritt  Canyon:  Contributions  to  the Gold Metallogeny of Northern Nevada,  ed.  Tosdal, RM, USGS Open  File  Rept, p. 98–338.    Heitt, D., Dunbar, W., Thompson, T., and Jackson, R., 2003, Geology and geochemistry of the Deep Star  gold deposit: Carlin trend, Nevada: Economic Geology, v. 98, p. 1107‐1135.    Hofstra, A.,  Snee,  L., Rye, R.,  Folger, H., Phinisey,  J.,  Loranger, R., Dahl, A., Naeser, C.,  Stein, H.,  and  Lewchuk, M., 1999, Age constraints on Jerritt Canyon and other carlin‐type gold deposits in the  Western  United  States;  relationship  to  mid‐Tertiary  extension  and  magmatism:  Economic  Geology, v. 94, p. 769‐802.    Ilchik, R., and Barton, M., 1997, An amagmatic origin of Carlin‐type gold deposits: Economic Geology, v.  92, p. 269‐288.    Ilchik, R., 1990, Geology and geochemistry of the Vantage gold deposits: Alligator Ridge‐Bald Mountain  mining district, Nevada: Economic Geology, v. 85, p. 50–75.    Kelley, D., Kelley, K., Coker, W., Caughlin, B., and Doherty, M., 2006, Beyond the obvious  limits of ore  deposits:  the  use  of  mineralogical,  geochemical,  and  biological  features  for  the  remote  detection of mineralization: Economic Geology, v. 101, p. 729‐752.    Johnson,  J.,  and  Pendergast, A.,  1981,  Timing  and mode  of  emplacement  of  the  Roberts Mountains  allochthon: Antler orogeny: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 92, p. 648‐658.    Lubben, J., 2004, Quartz as clues to paragenesis and fluid properties at the Betze‐Post deposit, northern  Carlin trend, Nevada: Unpublished M.Sc. thesis, Las Vegas, University of Nevada, p. 155.    Lund,  K.,  2008,  Geometry  of  the  Neoproterozoic  and  Paleozoic  rift  margin  of  western  Laurentia:  Implications for mineral deposit settings: Geosphere, v. 4, p. 429‐444.    Miller,  E.,  Holdsworth,  B., Whiteford,  W.,  and  Rodgers,  D.,  1984,  Stratigraphy  and  structure  of  the  Schoonover sequence, northeastern Nevada:  Implications for Paleozoic plate‐margin tectonics:  Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, v. 95, p. 1063‐1076.    Poole, F., Stewart, J., Palmer, A., Sandberg, C., Madrid, C., Ross Jr, R., Hintze, L., Miller, M., and Wrucke,  C., 1992, Latest Precambrian to latest Devonian time; development of a continental margin: The  Cordilleran Orogen: Conterminous US, p. 9–54.   12    Powell, C., Li, Z., McElhinny, M., Meert, J., and Park, J., 1993, Paleomagnetic constraints on timing of the  Neoproterozoic breakup of Rodinia and the Cambrian formation of Gondwana: Geology, v. 21, p.  889‐892.    Price, J.G. et al., 2008, The Nevada Minerals Industry 2007: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Special  Publication MI‐2007.    Reed, M., 1982, Calculation of multicomponent chemical equilibria and  reaction processes  in  systems  involving minerals, gases and an aqueous phase: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 46, p.  513‐528.  —,  1997,  Hydrothermal  alteration  and  its  relationship  to  ore  fluid  composition:  Geochemistry  of  hydrothermal ore deposits, p. 303–365.    Roberts, R., 1966, Metallogenic provinces and mineral belts in Nevada: Nevada Bureau of Mines, Rept, v.  13, p. 47‐72.    Roberts, R., Hotz, P., Gilluly,  J., and Ferguson, H., 1958, Paleozoic  rocks of north‐central Nevada: Am:  Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull, v. 42, p. 2813‐2857.    Rose,  A.,  1970,  Zonal  relations  of  wallrock  alteration  and  sulfide  distribution  at  porphyry  copper  deposits: Economic Geology, v. 65, p. 920‐936.    Ross, G., 1991, Tectonic setting of the Windermere Supergroup revisited: Geology, v. 19, p. 1125‐1128.    Rye,  R.,  1995, A model  for  the  formation  of  carbonate‐hosted  disseminated  gold  deposits  based  on  geologic,  fluid  inclusion,  geochemical,  and  stable  isotope  studies  of  the  Carlin  and  Cortez  deposits, Nevada: Nevada: US Geological Survey Bulletin, v. 1646, p. 35–42.    Simmons,  S.,  and  Browne,  P.,  2000,  Hydrothermal minerals  and  precious metals  in  the  Broadlands‐ Ohaaki  geothermal  system:  Implications  for  understanding  low‐sulfidation  epithermal  environments: Economic Geology, v. 95, p. 971‐999.   Sonder, L., and  Jones, C., 1999, Western United States extension: How the west was widened: Annual  Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, v. 27, p. 417‐462.    Speed,  R.,  Elison, M.W.,  and Heck,  F.R.,  1988,  Phanerozoic  tectonic  evolution  of  the Great  Basin,  in  Ernst., W.G., ed., Metamorphism and crustal evolution of the western United States, Volume 7:  New Jersey, Prentice Hall.    Stewart, J., 1972,  Initial deposits  in the Cordilleran geosyncline: Evidence of a  late Precambrian (< 850  my) continental separation: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 83, p. 1345‐1360.   Thompson,  B., Mercier,  E.,  and  Roots,  C.,  1987,  Extension  and  its  influence  on  Canadian  Cordilleran  passive‐margin evolution: Geological Society London Special Publications, v. 28, p. 409‐417.    Tretbar, D., Arehart, G., and Christensen, J., 2000, Dating gold deposition  in a Carlin‐type gold deposit  using Rb/Sr methods on the mineral galkhaite: Geology, v. 28, p. 947‐950.    Warr, L., 1996, Standardized clay mineral crystallinity data from the very low‐grade metamorphic facies  rocks of southern New Zealand: European Journal of Mineralogy, v. 8, p. 115‐127. 13      Wernicke, B., England, P., Sonder, L., and Christiansen, R., 1987, Tectonomagmatic evolution of Cenozoic  extension  in  the North American Cordillera: Geological Society London Special Publications, v.  28, p. 203‐221.    Wingate, M.,  and  Giddings,  J.,  2000,  Age  and  palaeomagnetism  of  the Mundine Well  dyke  swarm,  Western Australia: implications  for an Australia‐Laurentia connection at 755 Ma: Precambrian  Research, v. 100, p. 335‐357.    Yang, K., Browne, P., Huntington, J., and Walshe, J., 2001, Characterising the hydrothermal alteration of  the  Broadlands‐Ohaaki  geothermal  system,  New  Zealand,  using  short‐wave  infrared  spectroscopy: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, v. 106, p. 53‐65.    Zoback, M., McKee, E., Blakely, R., and Thompson, G., 1994, The northern Nevada rift: Regional tectono‐ magmatic relations and middle Miocene stress direction: Geological Society of America Bulletin,  v. 106, p. 371‐382.      14    CHAPTER 2‐ CLAY MINERALS AND LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESSES      2.1 INTRODUCTION  The purpose of this chapter is to provide background on clay minerals, and their use as indicators of  hydrothermal alteration based on different characteristics. The techniques described in this chapter are  applied  to  the  surface exploration  for Carlin‐type gold  systems  in Chapter 3. As will be  shown  in  this  chapter, clay mineral zonation patterns observed around hydrothermal systems can reflect gradients in  temperature,  fluid  composition  (e.g.,  acidity),  and  reaction  progress.  Clay mineral  assemblages  have  been used as proxies for temperature and fluid composition based on observations that show that clay  minerals  predictably  and  repeatedly  undergo  the  same  sequence  of  transformations with  increasing  grade of diagenesis, metamorphism,  and  changes  in  temperature  and  fluid  composition  (Essene  and  Peacor,  1995;  Simmons  and  Browne,  2000).  Observations  relating  changes  in  clay  minerals  to  temperature  are based on both  empirical  calibrations as observed  from natural  clay‐bearing  systems  (Rose, 1970; Simmons and Browne, 2000; Battaglia, 2004) and experimental observations (Whitney and  Northrop, 1988; Yates and Rosenberg, 1997; Bauer et al., 2000).     2.2 CLAY EQUILIBRIA  Figure 2.1 illustrates the different temperatures and fluid compositions at which illite, kaolinite, and  smectite are stable resolved from solution equilibration experiments conducted from 100‐250C (Yates  and Rosenberg, 1997). As temperature  increases, water in the interlayer site of smectite is replaced by  potassium.  The  loss  of  interstitial  water  causes  the  crystal  structure  of  smectite  to  become  more  ordered  resulting  in  the  reaction  smectite   illite‐smectite  interlayered clay  (I‐S)   illite  muscovite  (Lanson  and  Champion,  1991;  Lanson  et  al.,  1998). Well  ordered  end‐member  illite  and muscovite  contain  no  expandable  phases  (H2O,  H3O+)  (Yates  and  Rosenberg,  1997).  At  200‐250°C  pure,  end‐ member  illite,  lacking any expandable phases  (no H2O  in  the  interlayers) appears at  low aH4SiO4 values  and smectite disappears. The smectite field, which occurs at higher aH4SiO4 values than illite is replaced by  I‐S. Above 200C, and at high aK+/aH+ ratios K‐feldspar and illite are stable relative to kaolinite.   The equilibrium experiments of Yates and Rosenburg (1997), and modeling by others (Varadachari,  2006) highlight the wide ranges in temperature and fluid composition at which certain clay minerals are  15      Fig.  2.1.  (after  Yates  and  Rosenberg,  1997):  Isothermal,  isobaric  phase  diagrams  derived  from  solution  equilibration experiments by Yates and Rosenberg  (1997) showing  the stability  fields of  illite,  illite‐smectite and  smectite  in  the  simple  system K2O‐Al2O3‐SiO2‐H2O  at 100C, 150C, 200C  and 250C. Natural muscovite/  illite,  kaolinite, and quartz or amorphous silica samples were equilibrated  in a 2M KCL/HCl solution. Phase boundaries  are  indicated by  solid  lines. The Carlin‐fluid  field  (highlighted  in yellow)  is based on data  from previous  studies  which indicate that mineralizing fluid: (i)  is 180‐240C (ii) precipitates quartz, but not amorphous silica as part of  the  decarbonitization,  argillization,  silicification  and  sulfidation  alteration  sequence(Cline  and  Hofstra,  2000;  Hofstra  and  Cline,  2000;  Lubben,  2004)  (iii)  does  not  typically  precipitate  k‐spar/  adularia.  Adularia  has  been  identified  only  at  the  Twin  Creeks  deposit, Nevada  (Simon  et  al.,  1999;  Stenger  et  al.,  1998). As  temperature  increases, expandable phases  in  the  illite‐smectite  interlayered  clay  structure decrease and  the overall product  tends more  toward  illite. At 200°C pure, end‐member  illite appears with no expandable phases;  smectite  is no  longer  stable.  The  smectite  field  is  replaced  by  illite‐smectite  interlayered  clay.  In  the  range  of  temperatures  associated with ore deposition in Carlin deposits, smectite is not stable, but illite, illite‐smectite interlayered clay,  and  kaolinite are  stable depending on  fluid  composition. These equilibrium experiments  indicate  that  illite and  kaolinite can  form  in a hydrothermal environment within accepted  ranges  for both  fluid  temperature and  silica  content. 16    stable,  and  subsequently  the  different  environments  in  which  they  form.  Smectite  is  generally  not  present  in  rocks at  temperatures above 160‐200C  (Reyes, 1990; Essene and Peacor, 1995; Yates and  Rosenburg, 1995). Kaolinite can occur in low temperature supergene/ diagenetic environments, but also  in  higher  temperature  hydrothermal  environments  in  equilibrium  with  illite  (Yates  and  Rosenberg,  1997).  Illite  can  form  from  smectite  in  the  following  prograde  temperature  reaction  during  early  diagenesis or from hydrothermal alteration (Iuoup et al., 1988):  smectite + K+  illite + H2O (eqn. 2.2.1)  In  hydrothermal  systems,  illite  can  form  via  the  retrograde  alteration  of  muscovite  (Yates  and  Rosenberg, 1997):  muscovite + H+ + silica  illite + K+ + H20 (eqn. 2.2.2)    Illite can form directly from K‐feldspar under diagenetic conditions (2.2.3a) (Moore and Reynolds, 1997)  from the  initial weathering of  igneous rocks (2.2.3b) (Meunier, 1977), and  in the presence of an acidic  fluid, either surface derived or hydrothermal (2.2.3c) (Faure, 1998) as follows:    K‐feldspar + smectite  illite + chlorite + quartz (eqn. 2.2.3a)    K‐feldspar  (illite) + smectite + kaolinite (eqn. 2.2.3b)         K‐feldspar + H2O + H+   illite + K+ + amorphous silica (eqn. 2.2.3c)      Equations  2.2.1  and  2.2.2  are  favoured  for  the  formation  of  illite  in  sedimentary  rocks  due  to  the  abundance  of  sedimentary  smectite  and muscovite  in  primary  sedimentary  rock  types.  In  equation  2.3.3b, weathering processes cause K‐feldspar to decay initially to illite, but due to the metastability of  illite with respect to a low temperature weathering environment, illite quickly reacts to form smectite +  kaolinite  (Meunier,  1977).  Smectite  forms  from  the  low  temperature  (near  surface)  alteration  of  aluminosilicate minerals or from shallow diagenesis in sedimentary basin environments.   Inherent problems are associated with studying clay mineral assemblages outside of the laboratory:  (i) equilibrium of  low  temperature  clay mineral assemblages may be kinetically  inhibited  (Essene and  Peacor,  1995).  There  is  a  risk  that  low  temperature  systems  never  reach  equilibrium  given  that  equilibrium is typically attained at elevated temperatures (Essene and Peacor, 1995). Many researchers 17    assume that the reproducibility of a reaction, such as the smectite  illite reaction, signifies equilibrium  conditions.  Essene  and  Peacor  (1995)  suggest  that  reproducibility  does  not  necessarily  represent  equilibrium  and  that many  reactions  in nature  can be  reproducible without  representing  equilibrium  including: the maturation of hydrocarbons during diagenesis, or the precipitation of magnesian calcite or  aragonite  from  seawater.  Changes  in  clay minerals  including  grain  size  and  composition, may  be  a  function of kinetic factors such as time and fluid‐rock ratio, not temperature; (ii) certain aluminosilicate  poor  lithologies  are  not  favourable  to  argillization  i.e.  quartzite,  chert,  limestone  etc.  Siliciclastic  sediments with low aluminosilicate content may exhibit little to no argillic alteration, specifically no illite  alteration unless K+ is added to the system; (iii) relationships between minerals are difficult to determine  due  to  the  fine  grained  nature  of  clay minerals.  Determining  pre‐existing minerals  from which  clay  minerals  grew  is  made  difficult  due  to  a  lack  of  discerning  characteristics  between  some  low  temperature  clays  such  as  illite  and muscovite;  and  (iv)  the  origin  of  clay minerals  as  products  of  hypogene, supergene, or diagenetic processes  is often difficult to determine due to the wide range of  temperatures at which most clays are stable.      2.3 ILLITE THERMOMETRY  Despite the uncertainty regarding equilibrium clay processes, a number of techniques are available  to estimate formation temperatures of clay minerals. Clay thermometry techniques provide consistent  information on the relationship between crystallinity, morphology, chemical composition, and formation  temperature. As a result, these techniques serve as tools for determining temperature of formation, for  differentiating  between  generations  of  argillization  and  for  distinguishing  between  supergene  and  hypogene  clay  development. Many  techniques  involved  in  the  characterization  of  clay minerals  are  laborious and  time  consuming  (clay  separation of different  clay  size  fraction, TEM, SEM, microprobe)  and have not found use  in the realm of mineral exploration. The advent of rapid analysis tools such as  PIMA  (portable  infrared mineral analyzer) or Terraspec©  to  identify clay assemblages  in  the  field, has  seen  the  revival  of  clay  thermometry  in  the  context  of  exploration.  One  goal  of  this  paper  is  to  determine whether tools such as the PIMA or Terraspec can provide the accuracy necessary to identify  potential  ore  target  zones  based  on  clay mineral  assemblages.  This  is  accomplished  by  comparing  Terraspec data to data collected by x‐ray diffraction.   18    2.4 ILLITE POLYTYPISM    There  are  three  main  illite  polytypes:  1Md,  1M,  and  2M1  (Meunier  and  Velde,  2004).  The  transition from the 1Md to 1M to 2M1 polytype is generally thought to represent a progressive increase  in  temperature, pressure,  reaction  time, and/or  fluid‐rock  ratio  (Baronnet, 1980;  Lonker et al., 1990;  Srondon et al., 2001). Low temperature or early stage diagenetic illite was typically thought to occur as  the 1Md polytype while 2M1  illite represented higher temperature hydrothermal environments or  late‐ stage  diagenesis.  Continued  study  of  the  transition  between  polytypes  suggests  that  the  thermal  stability fields of each polytype are poorly defined and that growth mechanisms and kinetics of polytypic  transformations  play  a  key  role  in  polytype  determination  (Baronnet,  1980).  Furthermore,  illite  polytypes  have  been  observed  coexisting  in  the  same  environment.  In  the  Broadlands  Ohaaki  geothermal system, 1M and 2M illite co‐exist on the nanometer scale (Lonker et al., 1990). Owing to the  poorly constrained nature of illite polytypism and the questionable relevance of distinguishing between  them, polytypes were not identified in this study.     2.5 ILLITE CRYSTALLINITY  As  temperature  increases  and  the  crystal  structure  of  illite  becomes  more  ordered,  the  crystallite or grain particle size of illite increases (Kubler, 1967; Ji and Browne, 2000). The crystallinity of  illite can be measured from x‐ray diffraction patterns by measuring the full width at half the maximum  (FWHM) value of the 10Å (001) illite peak measured in 2. Low FWHM values have been correlated to  poorly crystallized illite formed at low temperatures, while high FWHM values correspond to crystalline  illite formed at higher temperatures (Kubler, 1967; Warr, 1996). The Kubler index uses measured FWHM  crystallinity values to infer temperature in diagenetic and low grade metamorphic environments (Kubler,  1967). According to the Kubler Index, the diagenesis/ anchizone boundary corresponds to temperature  values of ~200C  (Frey et al., 1987) and  to an FWHM value of 0.42 2, and  the anchizone/epizone  boundary corresponds to a temperature of ~300C and to an FWHM value of 0.25 2. Kubler (1967)  selected these limits on the basis of certain mineralogical changes. The lower anchizone limit coincides  with  the  upper‐grade  limit  of  the  existence  of  liquid  hydrocarbons,  the  dickite  to  pyrophyllite  transformation, and finally the loss of interlayer water and the conversion of I‐S to pure illite. The upper  anchizone  limit  is  associated with  the  appearance  of  greenschist  facies minerals  such  as  chlorotoid  (Kubler, 1967; Kubler and Jaboyedoff, 2000).   19     Since  its  initial  development,  the  Kubler  index  has  been  standardized  to  ensure  precision  between measurements made on different diffractometers. The  crystallinity  illite standard  (CIS) scale,  used  in  this  study,  provides  standards  used  to  calibrate  individual  diffractometers  and  correct  for  differences  that  exist  between  different machines,  and  different  clay  separation  techniques  (Warr,  1996).   The crystallinity results of this study were calibrated to the standardized scale (the crystallinity  index  standard, CIS) of Warr  (1996) by measuring  the  same  six  sets of pelitic  rock powder  standards  used by Warr (1996). Once calibrated  to  the set of standards,  the Kubler  index can be applied  to  the  standardized  experimental  FWHM  values.  Table  2.1  shows  the  FWHM  values  of  six  clay‐separated  standards (Warr, 1996) which were used to calibrate the CIS scale for this study. Each standard sample  contained illite with a different FWHM value, as determined by Warr (1996).   Table 2.1. Calibration chart showing FWHM values for six standards (Warr, 1996)  vs. measured FWHM values  calculated in this study for the same standards     FWHM values FWHM Values  Standard  Sample ID  (Warr, 1996) (2)  (This study)  (2)  SW‐1 0.63 0.28 SW‐2 0.47 0.27 SW‐3 0.46 0.23 SW4‐4 0.38 0.22 SW5 0.36 0.15 SW6‐1 0.25 0.12   A linear regression was calculated using IBM’s statistical software package Predictive Analytics Software  (PASW) v.18.0, between the FWHM values measured on the x‐ray diffractometer used for this study and  the  values  determined  by  Warr  (1996)  (Eqn.  2.2.4).  All  statistical  calculations  in  this  study  were  performed using PASW v. 18.0. The regression was then applied to all FWHM values for samples used in  this study.    ? = 1.794? + 0.041  R = 0.89    Where ?= FWHM value measured in this study  ? = standard value from Warr (1996)  Eqn. 2.2.4 20    2.6 CLAY TEXTURES AND CLAY MORPHOLOGY  Previous  studies  indicate  that  two end‐member morphologies of  illite exist  (Figure 2.2); each  representing a different environment of  formation  (Hancock and Taylor, 1978; Peaver, 1999; Meunier  and Velde, 2004; Schleicher et al., 2006). Hexagonal illite is the stable crystal shape of illite and has been  empirically observed  to  form under hydrothermal  conditions  (Inoue  et  al.,  1988).  “Hairy  illite”  is  the  metastable crystal shape and is typically observed in the pore‐space of sedimentary rocks likely resulting  from unconstrained growth  in  large pore‐spaces during diagenetic processes (Peaver, 1999; Schleicher  et  al.,  2006).  Meunier  and  Velde  (2004)  attribute  changes  in  morphology  to  temperature.  As  temperature  increases,  the  crystal  shape  of  illite  changes  from  elongated  one‐dimensional  'hairy'  crystals to more rigid hexagonal laths which increase in width progressively. Bauer et al. (2000) attribute  the change between morphologies to reaction progress whereby  initial stages of growth result  in hairy  illite and late stages of growth exhibit hexagonal illite.   However, departures from these end‐member morphologies have also been observed. Hancock  and  Taylor  (1978)  identified  sheeted  stacks  of  illite,  typical  of  hexagonal  illite  but  lacking  sharp  boundaries. They concluded this was a classic replacement texture. As temperature increased along with  depth, a higher temperature mineral  (illite) pseudomorphed a pre‐existing  lower temperature mineral  (kaolinite) no longer stable at those temperatures (Hancock and Taylor, 1978). Hancock (1978) describes  four different variations of the hexagonal morphology representing progressive stages of diagenesis and  therefore  increasing  temperature:  (i)  tangential  rims  where  large  flakes  appear  to  be  formed  by  a  coalescence of much  smaller bladed  crystals  (ii)  radial  rims where  illite  flakes  protrude  radially  from  grain margins, typically as overgrowths of tangential rims  (iii)  illite mesh‐work where  interlocking  illite  crystals extend far out into porespace (iv) dense homogenous illite whereby illite occurs as large, thick,  randomly oriented flakes which are often curves and may result from recrystallization of detrital  illite.  Studies  show  that  absolute  temperature  cannot  be  determined  using  illite morphology  but  relative  temperatures can be established using variations in both texture and morphology.    2.7 CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ILLITE  Modern  geothermal  environments  that  are  currently  precipitating  phyllosilicate  minerals  (Broadlands Ohaaki,  Salton  Sea,  Los Azufres, and Coso) provide  robust empirical observations on  the  positive relationship between temperature and clay mineralogy (Simmons and Browne, 2000; Battaglia,    21        Fig. 2.2. (Modified from Bauer et al., 2000) SEM photographs of synthesis products of micas. A. After 30 days the  first lath‐shaped “hairy” illite crystals can be observed B. After 210 days the XRD pattern indicates only lath‐shaped  mica‐illite C. After 28 months perfect hexagonal mica‐illite crystals can be observed. They are all approximately the  same size.     22    2004).  Changes  in  the  chemical  composition  of  illite  have  been  shown  to  correlate with  changes  in  temperature (Cathelineau, 1988; Battaglia, 2004). As temperature increases, and the crystal structure of  illite becomes more ordered,  larger  cations  like Fe and Mg are  removed  from  the  interlayer  site and  replaced by available K  (Battaglia, 2004). Therefore, high  temperature  illite  is more potassic  than  low  temperature  illite  as  observed  in  a  compilation  of  data  from  the  Los  Azufres,  Salton  Sea,  and  Coso  geothermal  fields  by  Cathelineau  (1988).  However,  numerous  problems  exist  with  the  data  of  Cathelineau (1988) and are outlined by Battaglia (2004): (i) the relationship between K and temperature  is consistent within one geothermal  field but absolute  temperatures vary between geothermal  fields,  and (ii) the linear regression lines for data from each geothermal field are not parallel. The data for Coso  and Los Azufres geothermal fields are convergent at a K value near 1 (measured  in cations), while the  regression  line  for  Salton  Sea  does  not  converge.  The  lack  of  convergence  of  Salton  Sea  data  is  attributed to a lack of elemental Ca in the illite samples analyzed. Hence, [K] alone is not an accurate or  consistent  proxy  for  temperature.  Based  on  this  previous  work  completed  by  Cathelineau  (1988),  Battaglia (2004) developed a cation‐interdependent formula ?+|?? ? ??| which appears to be a more  robust indicator of temperature.  Figure 2.3 shows data from five geothermal fields around the world which exhibit a linear trend  between  increases  in  cation  content  (?+|?? ? ??|)  and  increases  in  surrounding  temperature.  Regression  lines are shown  in Table 2.2. The best  fit  linear regression  line through  illite compositional  data acquired by Battaglia  (2004)  for all  five geothermal  fields  yields a  correlation  factor of R = 0.84  between temperature and ?+|?? ? ??| giving equation (2.2.5):  ? = 267.95? + 31.46  Where  ? = ?+|?? ? ??|    Table 2.2. Regression line equations and correlation factors (R) corresponding to data graphed in Figure 6.  Regression Line Equation Average  Error (%) *  R  Broadlands Ohaaki  ? = 113.19? + 182.59 5.71 0.72  Coso  ? = 196.47? + 64.00 10.96 0.97  Salton Sea  ? = 247.68? + 56.36 4.04 0.96  Los Azufres  ? = 337.93? ‐ 36.57 7.96 0.79  Aluto Langano  ? = 328.85? ‐ 1.17 6.73 0.84  *= Measure of average difference between calculated temperatures based on the regression  line from all data, and measured temperatures  from geothermal well.  (Eqn.  2.2.5) 23                  Fig. 2.3. Graph plotting microprobe composition data ?+|?? ???|  (measured as cations)  from  five geothermal  fields against measured temperatures of those samples presented in Battaglia (2004). Linear regression lines were  calculated  using  PASW.  A  regression  line  including  data  from  all  five  geothermal  fields  is  superimposed  on  individual data groups.      24    An average error of 7% on the final temperature value was calculated based on the difference between  temperature values calculated using  the  regression  line equation, and  temperature measured directly  from the geothermal well.    2.8 SUMMARY    Variations  in  the  texture,  morphology,  crystallinity,  and  composition  of  clay  minerals  with  temperature  can  provide  information  on  the  temperature  at  which  the minerals  formed.  There  is,  however, the possibility that variations in the characteristics of low temperature clay minerals are not in  fact solely a function of temperature but instead represent reaction progress (Essene and Peacor, 1995).  Temperature  is  important  in  order  to  constrain  the  origin  of  clay  minerals  as  either  products  of  hydrothermal alteration or otherwise.  In  the  following chapter,  the analytical  techniques described  in  this  chapter  are  applied  to  clay minerals  in  sedimentary  rocks  that occur  stratigraphically  above  and  outboard of Carlin‐type gold systems to determine whether clay alteration at surface is related to Carlin‐ type gold mineralization at depth.        25    2.9 REFERENCES  Baronnet, A., 1980, Polytypism  in micas: a survey with emphasis on the crystal growth aspect: Current  topics in materials science, v. 5, p. 447‐548.    Battaglia, S., 2004, Variations in the chemical composition of illite from five geothermal fields: a possible  geothermometer: Clay Minerals, v. 39, p. 501‐510.    Bauer, A., Velde, B.,  and Gaupp, R., 2000, Experimental  constraints on  illite  crystal morphology: Clay  Minerals, v. 35, p. 587‐597.    Cathelineau, M., 1988, Cation  site occupancy  in  chlorites  and  illites  as  function of  temperature: Clay  Minerals, v. 23, p. 471‐485.    Cline, J., and Hofstra, A., 2000, Ore‐fluid evolution at the Getchell Carlin‐type gold deposit, Nevada, USA:  European Journal of Mineralogy, v. 12, p. 195‐212.    Essene,  E.,  and  Peacor,  D.,  1995,  Clay  mineral  thermometry‐a  critical  perspective:  Clays  and  Clay  Minerals, v. 43, p. 540‐553.    Faure, G.,  1998,  Principles  and  applications  of  geochemistry:  a  comprehensive  textbook  for  geology  students: Upper Saddle Riber, New Jersey, Prentice Hall, 600 p.    Frey,  M.,  1987,  Very  low‐grade  metamorphism  of  clastic  sedimentary  rocks:  Low  temperature  metamorphism, p. 9–58.    Hancock,  N.,  1978,  Possible  causes  of  Rotliegend  sandstone  diagenesis  in  northern West  Germany:  Journal of the Geological Society, v. 135, p. 35‐40.    Hancock, N., and Taylor, A., 1978, Clay mineral diagenesis and oil migration in the Middle Jurassic Brent  Sand Formation: Journal of the Geological Society of London, v. 135, p. 69–72.    Hofstra, A., and Cline,  J., 2000, Characteristics and models  for Carlin‐type gold deposits, Chapter 5:  in  Hagemann, S. G. and Brown, PE, eds., Gold in 2000: Reviews in Economic Geology, v. 13, p. 163‐ 220.    Iuoup, A.,  1988, Mechanism of  illite  formation during  smectite‐to‐illite  conversion  in  a hydrothermal  system: American Mineralogist, v. 73, p. 1325‐1334.    Ji,  J.,  and  Browne,  P.,  2000,  Relationship  between  illite  crystallinity  and  temperature  in  active  geothermal systems of New Zealand: Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 48, p. 139‐144.    Kubler, B.,  1967,  La  cristallinite  de  l'illite  et  les  zones  tout‐a‐fait  superieures  du metamorphisme.,  in  Schaer, J.P., ed., Colloque sur les etages tectoniques: Baconniere, Neuchatel, p. 105‐122.    Kübler, B., and  Jaboyedoff, M., 2000,  Illite  crystallinity: CONCISE REVIEW PAPER: Comptes Rendus de  l'Académie des Sciences‐Series IIA‐Earth and Planetary Science, v. 331, p. 75‐89    Lanson,  B.,  and  Champion, D.,  1991,  The  I/S‐to‐illite  reaction  in  the  late  stage  diagenesis:  American  Journal of Science, v. 291, p. 473‐506. 26      Lanson, B., Velde, B.,  and Meunier, A.,  1998,  Late‐stage diagenesis of  illitic  clay minerals  as  seen by  decomposition of X‐ray diffraction patterns: Contrasted behaviors of  sedimentary basins with  different burial histories: Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 46, p. 69‐78.    Lonker,  S.,  FitzGerald,  J.,  Hedenquist,  J.,  and  Walshe,  J.,  1990,  Mineral‐fluid  interactions  in  the  Broadlands‐Ohaaki  geothermal  system, New  Zealand: American  Journal of  Science,  v.  290, p.  995‐1068.    Lubben, J., 2004, Quartz as clues to paragenesis and fluid properties at the Betze‐Post deposit, northern  Carlin trend, Nevada: Unpublished M.Sc. thesis, Las Vegas, Universitty of Nevada, p. 155.    Meunier, A., 1977, Les mechanismes de l'alteration des granites et le role des microsystemes:  tude des  arenes du massif granatique de Parthenay (Deux‐Se vres): PhD. Thesis, 248 p.    Meunier, A., and Velde, B., 2004, Illite: origins, evolution, and metamorphism: Poitier, France, Springer  Verlag, 286 p.    Moore,  D.,  and  Reynolds  Jr,  R.,  1997,  X‐ray  diffraction  and  the  identification  and  analysis  of  clay  minerals, 378 p, Oxford University Press, New York.    Peaver, D., 1999, Illite and hydrocarbon exploration: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,  v. 96, p. 3440‐3446.    Reyes, A., 1990, Petrology of Philippine geothermal systems and the application of alteration mineralogy  to their assessment: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, v. 43, p. 279‐309.    Rose,  A.,  1970,  Zonal  relations  of  wallrock  alteration  and  sulfide  distribution  at  porphyry  copper  deposits: Economic Geology, v. 65, p. 920‐936.    Schleicher,  A.,  Warr,  L.,  Kober,  B.,  Laverret,  E.,  and  Clauer,  N.,  2006,  Episodic  mineralization  of  hydrothermal  illite  in  the  Soultz‐sous‐Forêts  granite  (Upper  Rhine  Graben,  France):  Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, v. 152, p. 349‐364.    Simon, G.,  Kesler,  S.,  and  Chryssoulis,  S.,  1999, Geochemistry  and  textures  of  gold‐bearing  arsenian  pyrite,  Twin  Creeks,  Nevada;  implications  for  deposition  of  gold  in  Carlin‐type  deposits:  Economic Geology, v. 94, p. 405‐422.    Simmons,  S.,  and  Browne,  P.,  2000,  Hydrothermal minerals  and  precious metals  in  the  Broadlands‐ Ohaaki  geothermal  system:  Implications  for  understanding  low‐sulfidation  epithermal  environments: Economic Geology, v. 95, p. 971‐999.    Srodon, J., Drits, V., McCarty, D., Hsieh, J., and Eberl, D., 2001, Quantitative X‐ray diffraction analysis of  clay‐bearing rocks from random preparations: Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 49, p. 514‐528.    Stenger, D., Kesler, S., Peltonen, D., and Tapper, C., 1998, Deposition of gold in carlin‐type deposits; the  role of sulfidation and decarbonation at Twin Creeks, Nevada: Economic Geology, v. 93, p. 201‐ 215.    Varadachari, C., 2006, Fuzzy phase diagrams of clay minerals: Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 54, p. 616‐625. 27      Warr, L., 1996, Standardized clay mineral crystallinity data from the very low‐grade metamorphic facies  rocks of southern New Zealand: European Journal of Mineralogy, v. 8, p. 115‐127.    Whitney,  G.,  and  Northrop,  H.,  1988,  Experimental  investigation  of  smectite‐to‐illite  reaction‐‐dual  reaction mechanisms and oxygen‐isotope systematics: American Mineralogist, v. 73, p. 77‐90.    Yates, D., and Rosenberg, P., 1997, Formation and  stability of endmember  illite:  II. Solid equilibration  experiments at 100  to 250 C and Pv,  soln: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 61, p. 3135‐ 3144.             28    CHAPTER 3 – BEYOND THE CONFINES OF THE ORE BODY: SURFACE MAPPING OF  LOW TEMPERATURE HYDROTHERMAL FLUID ABOVE MAJOR ORE BODIES USING  CLAY ALTERATION    3.1 INTRODUCTION   The  passage  of  hydrothermal  fluid  through  the  Earth’s  crust  is  invariably  accompanied  by  mineral  alteration  (Giggenbach,  1981,  1984;  Reed,  1997).  The  degree  to which mineral  assemblages  change  is  a  function  of  multiple  factors:  temperature,  pressure,  time,  fluid  chemistry,  initial  rock  composition  and  fluid‐rock  ratio  (Reed, 1997). Alteration associated with mineral  deposits commonly  extends outboard from the ore body providing robust vectors toward the core of those deposits (Figure  3.1).  In alteration halos around  low temperature hydrothermal systems, gradients  in temperature and  chemical  composition  between  mineralizing  hydrothermal  fluid  and  host  rock  can  be  small.  With  increasing distance from the core of the hydrothermal system, thermal and chemical gradients between  hydrothermal fluid and country rock decrease until a point where no gradient exists between fluid and  rock. The distal expression of  low  temperature hydrothermal  systems may be dominated by mineral  assemblages also  resulting  from near  surface processes  including weathering,  shallow diagenesis, and  other overprinting hydrothermal events. Tools that identify subtle variations between low temperature  minerals which in turn help distinguish between different generations of minerals are required to assess  the extent of hydrothermal alteration, and to use that alteration to vector  in toward mineralization at  depth (Adams and Putnam, 1992; Kelley et al., 2006). However, the use of low temperature minerals to  investigate  geological  problems  has  been  criticized  due  to  the  inability  of  most  low  temperature  assemblages to reach equilibrium causing nanoscale variations in composition (Essene and Peacor, 1995,  1996).  Under  disequilibrium  conditions,  properties  such  as  crystallinity,  crystal  morphology,  or  composition might represent reaction progress rather than spatial variation in temperature (Essene and  Peacor, 1995).    Clay minerals  form  a  large  component  of  low  temperature  alteration  assemblages  and  have  been  documented  in  different  settings  including:  geothermal  systems  (Simmons  and  Browne,  2000;  Yang et  al., 2001),  epithermal  deposits  (White  and Hedenquist, 1995),  the distal extents of porphyry  deposits  (Rose, 1970; Tosdal, 2009;  Sillitoe, 2010), and diagenetic environments  (Meunier and Velde,  2004). Geothermal systems provide current information on low temperature systematics including clay 29      Fig. 3.1. The distal extent and degree of alteration around ore deposits is a direct function of thermal and chemical  gradients  between  country  rock  and  hydrothermal  fluid.  A.  Black  dashed  lines  represent  steady  state  thermal  contours  resulting  in mineral  alteration.  Porphyry  type  settings  exhibit  large  thermal  and  chemical  gradients.  Initially,  hot  (>700C)  magma  intrudes  cold  (<200C)  country  rock.    Hot  magmatic  fluid  alters  country  rock  immediately around the magma body via conduction. Convection cells of circulating pore fluid are generated at the  sides of  the  intrusion. Heat  is carried  from  the  intrusion by advection as  fluid  travels  through  fractures  forming  networks of veins. As magmatic fluid travels upward and decreases in temperature, acids dissociate and the fluid  becomes acidic. The lower temperature acidic fluid interacts with country rock to produce argillic alteration. As the  pluton  cools,  cold,  near‐neutral  surface meteoric water  is  drawn  into  the  core  of  the  system  resulting  in  the  hydrolysis of minerals and propyltic alteration which may overprint other stages of alteration. Visible alteration in  a porphyry system can extend kilometers away from mineralization, with distal alteration assemblages containing  minerals  significantly  different  to  unaltered  host  rock  assemblages  i.e.  sericite  ±  illite  ±  kaolinite    B.  In  low  temperature systems such as the Carlin‐type Au systems, there may be  little temperature gradient between the  incoming fluid (200C) and the shallow crust (~75C), resulting in the subtle mineral alteration assemblage illite ±  dickite ±  kaolinite  at  the  core of  the  system.  Fluid  flow  is  focused  along permeable pathways whereby heat  is  carried  primarily  by  advection.  Chemical  gradients  in  low  temperature  systems may  be  large,  as  shown  here  whereby acidic fluid causes the decarbonatization of permeable carbonate horizons. Visible alteration however is  often subtle and may extend as little as a few metres away from mineralized fluid pathways. Distal to the core of  the  hydothermal  system,  there may  be  no  difference  between  the  hydrothermal mineral  assemblage  and  the  unaltered host rock mineral assemblage (Modified from Sillitoe, 2010; Tosdal et al., 2009; Reed, 1997). 30    mineral  reaction  kinetics  and  timescales  of  fluid  flow.  Clay  minerals  have  been  used  to  map  out  networks of fluid flow pathways in geothermal systems by identifying zonation patterns of clay minerals  around upwelling regions of hydrothermal fluid (Simmons and Browne, 2000). Illite, a high temperature  clay mineral, occurs within and proximal  to  fluid  conduits. Smectite, a  low  temperature  clay mineral,  occurs most distal  to  fluid pathways with  illite‐smectite  interlayered clay  (I‐S) between  (Simmons and  Browne, 2000). Clay mineral mapping can also be used to determine relative proximity to mineralization  (Figure  3.1)  (Rose,  1970;  Seedorf  et  al.,  2005;  Sillitoe,  2010).  In  the  idealized  alteration model  of  a  porphyry deposit  (Rose, 1970, Tosdal et al., 2009),  the phyllic assemblage consisting of quartz‐sericite  (muscovite)‐pyrite occurs most proximal  to  the magmatic heat  source where  temperature  is highest.  Argillic  alteration  assemblages  consisting  of  illite  ±  kaolinite  indicate  progressive  acidification  of  the  fluid, decreasing temperature with distance from the core of the system, and possibly  interaction with  surface derived waters (Tosdal et al., 2009).   Another method to trace fluid flow  is by the advection of heat. Because heat  is transported by an  infiltrating  fluid at a  rate greater  than all but  the most  incompatible of geochemical  tracers,  transient  heating  associated with  hydrothermal  flow  is  quite  likely  to  be  one  of  the most  distally  developed  expressions of a hydrothermal mineral deposit  (Bickle and McKenzie, 1987). Because heat  is not only  transported by the fluid itself, but also diffuses rapidly outward from fluid flow pathways, the volume of  rock  affected  by  the  thermal  energy  of  a  hydrothermal  system will  be  significantly  larger  than  that  recorded by mineralogical alteration and  isotopic resetting. The  thermal  footprint of  low  temperature  systems can be identified using low temperature thermochronology including apatite fission tracks and  U‐Th/He  in apatite and zircon  (Chakurian et al., 2003; Cline et al., 2005; McInnes et al., 2005; Arehart  and Donelick, 2006; Kelley et al., 2006; Hickey et al., unpublished data).   The  Carlin  deposits  of  northern Nevada  are  one  of  the world’s major  sources  of  gold  (Teal  and  Jackson, 2002; Price et al., 2007). Carlin‐type gold deposits are an example of  low  temperature  (180‐ 240C) hydrothermal systems that exhibit subtle alteration associated with mineralization, making them  a difficult target  for exploration.  In this study, we  investigate  the ability of  low temperature analytical  methods  to  identify  hydrothermal  alteration  manifested  distal  to  the  core  of  Carlin‐type  gold  mineralization by characterizing clay mineral assemblages with respect to paleo‐formation temperature,  chemistry,  crystallinity  and  morphology.  We  also  provide  insight  into  a  combination  of  analytical  techniques that exhibit the highest potential to deliver reliable and robust exploration vectors for  low  temperature hydrothermal ore deposits in the subsurface.    31      Fig. 3.2. Regional geology map of northeastern Nevada showing location of significant Carlin‐type mineral deposits  including those discussed in this paper.     32    Apatite  fission  track  thermochronology  data  spanning  across  northeastern  Nevada  highlighted  potential  regions of hydrothermal  flow  around existing Carlin‐type deposits. Based on AFT data,  two  study  areas  (Figure  3.2),  were  chosen with  the  intent  of  (i)  identifying  zones  of  hydrothermal  clay  alteration  using  currently  available  clay  thermometers  and  (ii)  establishing  whether  hydrothermal  alteration at surface exhibited a genetic  link to Carlin‐type ore deposits at depth. The Leeville deposit,  (Figure 3.3) is located along the northern Carlin trend, south of the Tuscarora Mountains and is hosted in  lower plate  rocks  immediately beneath  the RMT with a  few hundred metres of upper plate  material  preserved above. In this field area, upper plate material was sampled above mineralization to determine  whether Carlin‐deposit forming fluid had exhausted through the upper plate to surface. The second field  area chosen for this study was the Shoshone Range, host to a number of Carlin‐type gold deposits that  form the Battle Mountain Eureka mineral belt. The giant Pipeline deposit,  located at the southeastern  end of the Shoshone Range was a starting point for sample collection  in an area of known Carlin‐style  mineralization in lower plate carbonate rocks. From the Pipeline deposit, a northwest trending transect  was sampled to determine the aerial extent of alteration  in upper plate rocks outboard from a site of  known mineralization.    3.2 GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF CARLIN‐GOLD DEPOSITS  During  the  period  from  Cambrian  ‐  Devonian,  passive margin miogeoclinal  and  eugeoclinal  sequences were deposited along  the  rifted margin of western North America  (Morrow and Sandberg,  2008).    Multiple  episodes  of  compression  from  Devonian  to  Cretaceous  led  to  eastward  directed  thrusting of miogeoclinal rocks on top of eugeoclinal rocks.  In northeastern Nevada, there  is one main  thrust  sheet,  the  Roberts Mountain  allochthon  (locally  termed  ‘upper  plate’) which  has  the  Roberts  Mountain Thrust  (RMT)  fault at  the base. Footwall rocks  (‘lower plate’) consist of shelf and slope silty  carbonate  rocks and are  the main host  for Carlin‐type gold mineralization. The upper plate  lacks any  major Carlin‐type Au deposits although mineralization does occur locally immediately above the RMT in  several of the lower plate‐hosted deposits.   A  tectono‐stratigraphic  column  of  lower  Paleozoic  rocks  is  presented  in  Figure  3.4.  In most  areas, thick sequences of upper plate siliciclastic rocks cover lower plate carbonate rocks, however post‐ Antler orogeny tectonism and erosion have exposed geologic windows into the lower plate as exhibited  at  Goat  Peak  (north‐western  Shoshone  Range),  and  at  the  Pipeline  deposit  locality  (south‐western  Shoshone Range)  (Kelson  et  al.,  2008).  Structurally, both  the upper  and  lower plates  are  imbricately  thrusted with tight, upright to westward‐inclined folds caused by the eastward transport of material  33          Fig. 3.3. A. Geological map of the Leeville deposit study area. The Roberts Mountain Thrust fault separates Lower  Paleozoic  upper  plate  siliciclastic  rocks  to  the North  from  Lower  Paleozoic  lower  plate  carbonate  rocks  in  the  South. B. Cross  section A –A1  through  the  Leeville deposit  shows  the presence of at  least 250m of upper  plate  siliciclastic rock cover above the main ore zones of the Leeville deposit.  A. B. 34          Fig. 3.4. (modified from Bettels et al., 2002 in Emsbo et al., 2003) Simplified tectono‐stratigraphic column showing  lower Paleozoic  rocks of  the RMT system. Variation  in  formation names between  the Battle Mountain – Eureka  trend (left) and Carlin trend (right) are shown. During the Mississippian Antler Orogeny, lower Paleozoic siliciclastic  sediments  (upper  plate) were  thrust  eastward  overtop  of  lower  Paleozoic  carbonate  sediments  (lower  plate).  Carlin‐type gold deposits are typically hosted in lower plate rocks. 35      during  orogenic  events  dating  from  the  Devonian  to  late  Cretaceous  (Noble  and  Finney,  1999).  Subsequent deformation includes broad open folding accompanied by oblique‐slip faulting, Mesozoic to  Cenozoic  low angle faulting, and high angle normal faulting associated with Basin and Range extension  (Winterer, 1968; Cluer et al., 1997).  The  lower  plate  of  the  RMT  can  be  subdivided  into  four main  units  (Emsbo  et  al.,  2003).  The  Devonian  Horse  Canyon  Formation/Rodeo  Creek  Formation  is  a  calcareous  siltstone, mudstone  and  chert with  local occurrences of sandstone and mudstone. The Devonian Wenban Formation/ Popovich  Formation  is  composed  of  laminated  calcareous  to  dolomitic  siltstones, micritic  limestone,  and  thick  bioclasitc debris flows.   The Silurian Roberts Mountain Formation  is dominated by  laminated dolomitic  and  calcareous,  and  calcareous  mudstone  and  calcareous  siltstone.  The  Ordovician  Hanson  Creek  Formation  is a sandy dolomite. The overlying upper plate comprises dominantly siliciclastic units with  the  rare occurrence of  thin carbonate  lenses. The Ordovician Valmi/ Vinini Formation  is composed of  several  thousand meters of chert, quartz arenite,  argillite,  slate, and greenstone  (Roberts, 1951). The  Silurian Elder Formation  is a set of  interbedded shale, siltstone, chert, and  feldspathic and calcareous  sandstone. The Devonian Slaven Formation  is a mixture of highly contorted and broken, black, nodular  chert with some carbonaceous shale partings.   Paleozoic  rocks are  intruded by Mesozoic and Cenozoic  intrusive  rocks  (Ressel and Henry, 2006).  Igneous  rocks  of  the  Shoshone  Range  include  Eocene‐Pliocene  intermediate  to  felsic  intrusions with  basalt, andesite and rhyolite flows and tuffs. Eocene intrusions were emplaced along a west‐northwest  trend and have been  identified both proximal and distal  to economic gold mineralization  (Gilluly and  Gates, 1965; Stager, 1977; Kelson et al., 2005). The Gold Acres stock is a Cretaceous quartz monzonitic  pluton  located  at  the  southeastern  edge  of  the  Shoshone  Range  proximal  to  the  Pipeline  deposit  (Mortensen et al., 2000). A  thorough compilation of data on  the igneous  rocks of  the  Carlin  trend by  Arehart et al. (2004) and Ressel and Henry (2006) suggest three periods of magmatism in the Northern  Carlin trend: Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Eocene. Jurassic intrusions consist of the Goldstrike laccolith and  related sills and mostly northwest‐striking  lamprophyre and rhyolite dikes ~158 Ma (Ressel and Henry,  2006).    The Vivian  sill  exposed  at  surface  and  the  Little Boulder Basin  stock  located  at  depth  in  the  Leeville area have been  interpreted as south‐eastern extensions of the Goldstrike  laccolith (Ressel and  Henry, 2006). Cretaceous magmatism  is  characterized by one occurrence  ~4km  south of  the  Leeville  deposit.  Concordant  Pb/U  ages  of  two  zircon  fractions  demonstrate  intrusion  at  112.4  +/‐  0.6 Ma  (Mortensen et al., 2000).  36      3.3 CHARACTERISTICS OF CARLIN GOLD DEPOSITS  Carlin gold deposits are  restricted  to a  small geographic area  in northeastern Nevada. The Carlin,  Battle  Mountain‐Eureka,  and  Getchell  Trends  describe  three  regional  lineaments  along  which  the  majority  of  Carlin‐deposits  are  focused,  including  those  described  in  this  study  (Figure  3.2).  The  alignment  of  Carlin‐type  deposits  is  thought  to  reflect  major  crustal  faults  established  during  Neoproterozoic rifting (Roberts, 1966; Tosdal et al., 2000). Lower plate Paleozoic carbonate shelf rocks  are  the  favourable  hosts  for  Carlin  gold mineralization  (e.g.,  Cortez Hills,  Pipeline,  Carlin,  Goldstrike,  Leeville,  and  Jerritt  Canyon).  This  has  been  attributed  to  the  reactivity  of  carbonate  sediments with  acidic gold‐bearing fluid resulting in mass loss and increased permeability, providing robust pathways for  Au‐bearing  fluid  (Cline  et  al.,  2005).  Conversely,  upper  plate  rocks  are  largely  devoid  of  gold  mineralization likely due to a lack of reactivity with these same gold bearing fluids.  Upper plate rocks of  the RMT are however host  to base and precious metal deposits  including Miocene Au‐Ag epithermal  deposits,  Eocene  porphyry  deposits,  and  a  limited  number  of  Carlin‐type  gold  deposits  i.e.  Alligator  Ridge  (Nutt  and Hofstra,  2003),  Emigrant  (Newmont Mining  Company,  unpublished  data),  and Mike  (Norby and Orobona, 2002). The Elder Creek deposit, considered  in  this study,  is a small gold deposit  located  in  the Central Shoshone Range. Gold  is hosted predominantly  in quartzite clast breccia of  the  Valmi  Formation  and  also within pyrite‐rich  argillite  and  shale of  the  Elder  Formation  (Ahmed et  al.,  2010).   Fluid  inclusion  and mineral  thermometry  data  indicate  that mineralizing  fluid  forming  Carlin  deposits  in  north‐eastern  Nevada  were:  low  temperature  (180‐240C),  slightly  acidic  (pH  ~4),  low‐ salinity (~2–3 wt% NaCl equivalent) aqueous fluids that contained CO2 (<4 mol %) and CH4 (<0.4 mol %),  and sufficient H2S  (10–1–10–2 mol/kg)  to  transport Au and other bisulfide‐complexed metals  (Cline and  Hofstra, 2000; Hofstra and Cline, 2000;  Lubben, 2004).  Stable  isotope analyses have provided  insight  into the source of mineralizing fluid in Carlin‐type deposit settings. DH2O values measured on ore‐stage  kaolinite and fluid  inclusions from a wide‐range of Carlin deposits suggest evidence of meteoric water  with very low DH2O values of < ‐110‰ (Hofstra et al., 1999). Similar data from the Getchell, Twin Creeks,  and Deep Star deposits  indicate  the additional presence of deeply sourced metamorphic or magmatic  fluid  (Hofstra, 1999; Heitt et al., 2003; Cline et al., 2005). Clay samples from Carlin‐deposits appear to  form along a mixing line between Eocene‐age meteoric water and magmatic or metamorphic fluid.  37    3.3.1 Clay alteration in Carlin‐type systems  The following characteristics are known of alteration in Carlin‐type settings: (i) quartz is precipitated  as part of  the  silicification  alteration  sequence, but not  amorphous  silica  (Bakkan  and Einaudi, 1986;  Cline and Hofstra, 2000; Cline, 2001; Ye et al., 2003), and (ii) K‐feldspar has not been observed in Carlin  type systems except for the presence of adularia at the Twin Creeks deposit (Stenger et al., 1998; Simon  et  al.,  1999).  According  to  clay  equilibria  (Figure  2.1),  constraints  on  temperature  (180‐240C),  fluid  chemistry  (pH~4),  and  observed mineralogy  indicate  that  smectite  is  not  stable,  but  illite,  I‐S,  and  kaolinite are  stable depending on  variations  in  fluid  chemistry.  Illite and  kaolinite  can  form  from  the  same hydrothermal event within a confined range of fluid temperature and silica content. For kaolinite  and illite to form from the same fluid, without forming K‐feldspar, log aK+/aH+ values are estimated to be  in the range of 2.0‐5.0 (Yates and Rosenberg, 1997).   Similar to patterns observed in geothermal systems, clay zonation has been observed in lower plate  carbonate rocks around ore shoots of the Getchell deposit, a Carlin‐type gold deposit  located  in North  Central  Nevada  (Cail  and  Cline,  2001).  Illite was  shown  to  occur  in  higher  volume % with  ore,  and  proximal  to  ore  whereas  smectite  occurred  distal  to  ore.  Both  1M  and  2M1  polytypes  have  been  observed spatially associated with mineralization  in Carlin type environments (Carlin, Kuehn and Rose,  1992; Betze‐Post, Arehart et al., 1993b; Deep Star, Heitt et al., 2003).  The  absence  of major  Carlin‐type  gold  deposits  in  the  upper  plate  suggests  that  ore  fluids  responsible  for mineralization  of  the  lower  plate must  have  followed  one  of  three  fluid  evolution  pathways shown in Figure 3.5. Either exhausted fluid did not transgress the upper plate and all fluid was  exhausted  laterally along  the RMT, or exhausted  fluid  transgressed  the upper plate and  reacted with  siliciclastic  rocks  forming  an alteration halo above  lower plate gold mineralization. Upper plate  rocks  contain  little  to  no  carbonate,  precluding  the  potential  for  observing  decalcification.  Silicification  of  upper plate rocks would be a challenge to identify given the high silica content of upper plate lithologies.   The stage of alteration with the most potential to be observed in upper plate rocks is argillization: illite ±  dickite ± kaolinite due to the presence of pre‐existing aluminosilicate minerals in some lower Paleozoic  sedimentary lithologies.      3.4 THERMAL SIGNATURE OF HYDROTHERMAL FLUID FLOW    AFT has conventionally been applied to a number of geological problems (Gallaghar et al., 1998):  (i) resolving the thermal history of sedimentary basins; (ii) investigating the provenance of rocks; (iii)  38        Fig. 3.5. The absence of major gold deposits  in  the  upper  plate  suggests  that  ore  fluids  responsible  for mineralization of  lower plate  carbonate  rocks must  have  followed  one  of  three  fluid  evolution  pathways: A.  following  gold mineralization  of  the  lower  plate,  fluid  was  dominantly  rock  buffered  but  still  contained  a  small  amount  of  gold.  Fluid  flowed  upward  to  the  RMT,  exploiting  pre‐ existing  fault  and  fracture  networks,  precipitating  gold  along  the  fluid  flow‐path.  Fluid was exhausted  laterally along  the RMT  to  surface.    The  upper  plate  was  largely  impermeable  to  exhausted  ore  fluids  and  behaved  as  an  aquitard.  This  scenario  supports  observed  mineralization  of  rocks  along  the  RMT.  In  the  scenario  described,  upper plate siliciclastic rocks would exhibit no  signs of alteration due to a lack of interaction  with  the  exhausted  Carlin‐fluid  B.  mineralizing  fluid  was  dominantly  rock  buffered  but  still  contained  a  small amount  of  gold.  Fluid  flowed  upward  through  a  network  of  small‐scale  fractures  becoming  increasingly  rock‐buffered  along  the  flow  path.  Upon  reaching  the  RMT  the  fluid  precipitated  a  small  amount  of  gold.  Fluid  was  exhausted  laterally  along  the  RMT  and  also  through  faults  and  fractures  in  upper  plate  siliciclastic  rocks.  The  upper  plate  exhibits  no  signs  of  Carlin‐type  alteration  because  the  fluid  was  completely  rock  buffered  by  the  time  it  encountered  the  upper  plate  C.  largely  unbuffered  mineralizing  fluid  was  partially  exhausted  laterally  along  the  RMT  and  the  remainder  transgressed  upper  plate  siliciclastic  rocks.  Sustained  fluid‐rock  interaction  between  siliciclastic  upper  plate  rocks  and  partially  rock  buffered  Carlin‐type  fluid  produced  a  thermal  and  chemical  signature  in  upper  plate rocks.  A.  B.  C. 39    studying the deformation history of orogenic belts, and (iv)  interpreting the conductive heating history  around magmatic intrusions. Recent studies show that fission track analysis can also be used to identify  regional  and deposit  scale patterns of hydrothermal  fluid  flow  (Chakurian  et  al., 2003; Hickey, 2003;  McInnes et al., 2005; Arehart and Donelick, 2006; Hickey et al., 2010). The maximum 180‐240C ore‐ stage  fluids  responsible  for  Carlin‐type  mineralization  have  the  capacity  to  reset  the  AFT  thermochronometer system on timescales of 104‐106 years (Hickey et al., 2010). Mapping the extent of  thermal  resetting  may  assist  in  delineating  the  far‐field  extent  of  Carlin  hydrothermal  systems  at  distances beyond any wall rock type alteration.   Chakurian et al. (2003), Hickey (2003), and Cline et al. (2005) have used AFT data to examine the  regional thermal history of the northern Carlin Trend.  Results from thermochronological studies of the  Northern  Carlin  trend  (Figure  3.6)  indicate  that  areas  of  Carlin‐type  mineralization  are  spatially  coincident with pooled AFT ages ranging from 50‐25 Ma. All thermochronological data used in this study  is included in Appendix B. Areas of young AFT ages lie within large scale regions of Cretaceous or older  AFT  ages  reflecting  the pre‐mineralization  regional  cooling history. The  thermal effects of  the Carlin‐ hydrothermal system were superimposed on the older regional pattern. Young apatite fission track ages  correspond  to  episodes  of  transient  reheating.  Advective  heating  by  circulating  hydrothermal  fluids  appears  to be  the primary  cause of  thermal  resetting,  shown by  the heterogeneous nature of  fission  track ages in the region. This is evidenced by the lack of major reheating in unaltered portions of large  Jurassic  stocks  (i.e.,  Goldstrike,  and  Vivian  stocks),  and  total  thermal  resetting  of  highly  altered,  mineralized material in the same stocks. A strongly argillized, mineralized dyke from within the Leeville  deposit is partially reset to 44.5 ± 3.0 Ma.     New apatite  fission  track data of samples  from  the Shoshone Range are presented along with  published  data  from  Arehart  and  Donelick  (2006)  in  Appendix  B.  Figure  3.7  shows  a  map  of  the  Shoshone Range on which  results  from a geophysical magnetics survey has been superimposed along  with pooled apatite fission track ages. The central part of Shoshone range exhibits a mixed population of  ages ranging from 20.3‐77.4 Ma. A single sample from the western margin of the range exhibits an older  age  of  108.2 Ma.  The  older  age may  represent  the western margin  of  hydrothermal  resetting.  The  southeastern Shoshone Range exhibits dominantly Eocene ages, likely related to the same hydrothermal  event responsible for gold mineralization of the Pipeline deposit (Arehart and Donelick, 2006). Younger  ages within  the  Pipeline  pit  and  on  the margins  of  the  deposit  are  likely  a  result  of  late Miocene  extension and uplift. The northwest  Shoshone Range exhibits  dominantly young Miocene ages which  can be explained two ways: (i) The magnetic high observed in the northwestern Shoshone Range in  40        Fig. 3.6. Compilation of apatite fission track ages across the Northern Carlin Trend (Chakurian et al., 2003; Cline et  al., 2005; Hickey et al., 2010). A zone of pervasive annealing preserves evidence  for an episode of rapid cooling  from > 100C at ~40 Ma., with  localized annealing of  fission  tracks as  late as ~20 Ma. The  zone of annealing  is  broadly parallel to the Carlin trend and becomes more heterogeneously distributed and  less pervasive farther to  the northwest,  toward  the Post‐Betze‐Screamer and Meikle deposits  (Hickey et al., 2003b). Dyke  samples  from  within the Leeville deposit are totally reset to 44.6 and 49.5 Ma. The Vivian stock is reset to 88.4 Ma, an age that  likely represents exhumation (Hickey et al., 2003).   41          Fig. 3.7. Compilation of apatite fission track pooled ages across the Shoshone Range plotted on a reduced to pole  magnetics map with a DBM  (database management) overlay. The  image was provided by Placer Dome  Inc. The  northwestern Shoshone Range  is dominated by younger ages  representative of either Miocene magmatism and  related  Au‐Ag mineralization,  or  extensive  exhumation  during  the Miocene.  The  southeastern  portion  of  the  Shoshone  Range,  the  location  of  the  Pipeline  and  Gold  Acres  deposits  is  reset  to  ages  between  36‐47Ma,  coincident  to  Eocene  Carlin‐type  gold mineralization.  The  rest  of  the  Shoshone  range  exhibits  ages  of mixed  populations. A group of  older AFT ages (108.2, 77.4, and 55.1 Ma) occur at the far western margin of the Shoshone  Range.     42    Figure 3.7  is a  large buried  intrusion of Miocene age. Conductive heating and hydrothermal  fluid  flow  associated  with  the  intrusion  thermally  reset  fission  track  ages  in  that  region.  Dissipation  of  heat  outboard from the intrusion resulted in a mixed population of ages in the central Shoshone Range, or (ii)  The Miocene was a period of major uplift and exhumation of the northwestern Shoshone Range. A study  of  the  regional  topography  of  the  area  shows  a  N‐S  trending  fault  along  the  length  of  the  central  Shoshone  Range  which  may  have  caused  significant  uplift  of  the  upthrown  block,  resulting  in  a  ‘younging’ of AFT ages across  the  fault  from SE  to NW  . Caetano Tuff, dated at 32.3 Ma (Naeser and  Mckee,  1970),  has  been  identified  at  the  eastern  and western margins  of  the  Shoshone  Range  and  suggests that Miocene exhumation would have to have been restricted to only the northwestern region  of the Shoshone Range.    3.5 ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES  A number of techniques were employed to measure the variation in clay type, illite crystallinity,  illite morphology, and  illite composition across  the  Leeville and Shoshone Range areas. Two  different  methods  were  applied  to  identify  clay minerals:  the  Terraspec  analytical  spectral  device  and  x‐ray  diffraction.  These  two  methods  were  chosen  to  compare  the  accuracy  of  rapid  analysis  mineral  identification  tools  such  as  the  Terraspec©  and  PIMA©  to  the more  conventional  and  standardized  technique of x‐ray diffraction. A review of the techniques used in this study is presented in Chapter 2.    3.5.1 Near and Short Wave Infrared Analysis (Terraspec©)  The Terraspec analytical spectral device (ASD) uses near and shortwave  infrared technology to  measure the vibrational energy between bonds in a mineral. The Terraspec and similar tools such as the  PIMA have been used as a rapid analysis technique to indentify alteration mineralogy in a variety of ore  deposit settings (Uranium deposits: Zhang et al., 2001; Pb‐Zn‐Ag deposit: Sun et al., 2001, Geothermal  systems: Yang et al., 2001).  In  this  study,  ~2.5cm3  blocks  of  each  sample were  analyzed  using  the  Terraspec©  analytical  spectral  device. Multiple  readings were  taken  of  each  sample  and  the  nature  of  the material  being  analyzed  (fracture, matrix, vein)  recorded. Smear mounted samples of whole  rock and clay separated  fractions were analyzed with the Terraspec©, however this type of sample preparation yielded nearly  aspectral  results,  the  reasons  for  which  are  unknown.  The  reflectance  spectra  collected  using  the 43    Terraspec were  interpreted both manually and with  the aid of  the  interpretive  software The Spectral  Geologist© (Merry et al., 1999).    3.5.2 X‐ray diffraction  Clay  minerals  were  identified  using  x‐ray  diffraction  in  both  whole  rock  samples  and  clay  separates. Clay separation was performed on whole rock samples, according to the methods outlined by  Moore and Reynolds (1997) to obtain the <2 m fraction, the accepted maximum particle size for clay  minerals  based  on  a  spherical  volume  diameter  (Johns  et  al.,  1954).  50‐100g  of  sample  was  disaggregated in a Blendtec© blender with 200ml of distilled water for a period of time between 0.5‐1  minute. Higher silica content required longer periods of disaggregation. Following initial disaggregation,  the solution was probed with a 500 watt ultrasonic probe for a time between 2 minutes and 10 minutes  depending on silica content. The fines from this solution were then decanted into 50ml test tubes. The  test tubes were placed in a centrifuge at 2000rpm for 2 minutes. The test tubes were removed and the  fines  decanted,  probed  by  the  ultrasonic  device  and  distributed  into  new  test  tubes.  The  solute  remaining at  the bottom of  the  test  tube was  categorized as  the  coarse  fraction  (>25). The  second  round  of  centrifugation  lasted  for  5  minutes.  The  solute  remaining  from  this  run  was  termed  the  moderate  fraction  (5‐25).  Following  separation  of  the moderate  fraction,  the  fines were  decanted,  probed, and centrifuged  for 1‐2 hrs or until  the water  remaining  ran clear. The  remaining  solute was  termed the fine fraction (<2‐5). If after 2 hrs the remaining water was still cloudy, the solution was left  to  settle  by  gravity.  The  solute  remaining  following  settling was  termed  the  ultra  fine  fraction  and  contained an average grain  size of 1. Grain  sizes were determined by  scanning electron microprobe  imaging of powdered clay‐separated grain mounts using the ruler application.   Air‐dried smear mounts were prepared for each fraction of all clay separated samples. 1‐2 grams  of clay‐separated material was mixed with ethanol by mortar and pestle. The resulting paste was placed  onto  a  glass  slide  according  to  the  methods  of Moore  and  Reynolds  (1997).  Smear  mounts  were  analyzed  by  a  Bruker  D500  and  Bruker  D8  diffractometer  for  angles  between  0  and  80°  2  for  18  minutes. Following  initial XRD analyses, samples were saturated with glycol to determine the presence  of smectite. Samples were placed in a petri dish with a small amount of glycol and set in an oven set at  60°C  for 5hrs. The  resulting diffraction patterns were  then analyzed using  the  interpretation software  EVA©. The  location and FWHM of the 001 smectite,  illite, and kaolinite peaks were measured.  I‐S was  distinguished  from discrete  illite  and  smectite phases by  characteristic differences  in  their  respective  diffraction  patterns.  I‐S was  present  if  one  or more  of  the  following  criteria were met:  a  significant 44    decrease  in  the  FWHM  value  of  illite  following  glycolation  due  to  a  loss  of  interstitial water  during  heating,  joint  001  illite  and  smectite  diffraction  peaks  with  no  separation  between  peaks,  and/or  asymmetry of the 001 illite and smectite peaks (Meunier and Velde, 2004).  X‐ray diffraction peak  intensity has been directly correlated  to abundance and  is a method by  which  to estimate  relative quantities of minerals  (Alexander and Klug, 1948; Pierce and Siegel, 1969;  Ouhadi and Yong, 2003). Relative abundances of illite, smectite, and kaolinite were calculated using the  area measured underneath  the 001 diffraction peak of each mineral  in  the  <2 µm  clay  fraction.  The  amount of I‐S was not calculated due to presence of overlapping peaks between IS, illite, and smectite.  Calculation of relative peak areas for the quantification of minerals has been used by many researchers  however  this method has been shown  to underestimate certain minerals while overestimating others  (Ouhadi  and  Yong,  2003). We  do  not  suggest  that  these  values  are  perfectly  accurate,  but  provide  information on relative abundances of minerals. In a subset of samples, relative abundances calculated  using peak areas were compared to modal abundances estimated by thin sections and were determined  to  be  in  agreement.  In  the majority  of  samples  analyzed  in  this  study,  one mineral  occurs  in much  greater  abundance  than  other minerals  in  the  same  sample.  Accordingly,  any  error  associated with  quantitative  calculation  using  peak  areas  is  unlikely  to  affect  the  category  into  which  each  clay  assemblage is placed.     3.5.3 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)   Scanning electron microscopy  (SEM) was used  to  characterize  the morphology of  illite  in  this  study. Additionally, SEM was used  to  identify  the existence of paragenetic  relationships between clay  minerals.  Polished  thin  sections  were  analyzed  using  backscattered  electron  imaging  and  smear  mounted  samples,  and  randomly  oriented  powder mounts were  analyzed  using  secondary  electron  imaging. A 15kv 10 beam was used. Energy dispersive spectra (EDS) and chemical element maps were  analyzed to determine the bulk chemical composition of minerals.    3.5.4 Electron Microprobe Analysis  Mineral analyses of illite were obtained by wavelength dispersive x‐ray analysis on a Cameca SX‐ 50 Scanning Electron Microprobe with 4 vertical wavelength‐dispersion x‐ray spectrometers and a fully‐ integrated  SAMx  energy‐dispersion  X‐ray  spectrometer.  The  following  parameters  were  used:  an  accelerating voltage of 15kV, a beam current of 10nA, and a beam diameter of 10. 20‐50 points were 45    probed  from  each  sample  depending  on  the  abundance  of  illite.  Two  types  of  illite  textures  were  probed:  tight  knit  aggregates  of  illite  and  long  euhedral  laths  of  illite.  Tight  knit  aggregates  of  illite  consisted  of  dozens  of  grains  of  illite woven  together  into  10‐100  µm wide masses.  Multiple  probe  points were collected from within each aggregate and from the same grains. Only one type of texture  occurred  in each sample. Some  illite could not be probed because the aggregates were too small (less  than  the  spot  size of  the beam), or  the  texture of  the  illite  surface was  too  rough  and would  cause  inconsistencies  in the compositional results.  Illite compositions were carefully checked for evidence of  any contamination from grains of other minerals inadvertently included in the broad microprobe beam.  Initial  statistical analyses were conducted on all data points. Specific points were  later  rejected  if  the  data did not satisfy the following criteria: 85.0% < oxide total < 100% determined by a lack of interlayer  H2O in pure end‐member illite and oxide totals used in other studies (Gaudette et al., 1966; Hunziker et  al., 1986), and K:Al:Si:Mg:Na:Ca similar to the structural formulae outlined by Gaudette et al. (1966) and  Meunier and Velde (2004) where K‐values are ~0.8 (cations).      3.5.5 Stable Isotope Analysis  Nine  samples  (~20mg  each  )  of  clay  separated  (<2) material were  analyzed  at  the Queen’s  Facility for Isotope Research at  Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario for oxygen and hydrogen stable  isotope  analysis using GasBench  II, EA,  and TC/EA  technology  and  a DELTAplusXP  Stable  Isotope Ratio  Mass Spectrometer. The purpose of these analyses was to help constrain the origin of clay minerals  in  this study. Along with chemical composition, the oxygen isotope signature of clay minerals can provide  information on the origin of water from which the clay formed. Fractionation factors calculated for the  distribution of 18O/16O and D/H between kaolinite‐water, illite‐water, and smectite‐water are a function  of source  fluid  temperature;  the effects of pressure are  less  than analytical uncertainty  (Taylor, 1974;  Gilg  and  Sheppard,  1996;  Hoefs,  2009).  Fractionation  decreases  as  temperature  increases  (Gilg  and  Sheppard, 1996; Taylor, 1974). As  such,  supergene clay minerals can be distinguished  from hypogene  clay minerals by observing a relative enrichment or depletion in 18O and D.       3.6 SAMPLES  The samples collected in this study are largely restricted to siliciclastic sedimentary rocks of the  lower Paleozoic Roberts Mountain Allochthon (upper plate). A small subset of samples was taken from  lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks (lower plate) in and around the Pipeline and Gold Acres pits, and Goat 46    window. The rationale for sample collection in this study was to identify variation in clay species over a  broad spatial extent while sampling a diverse  range  in primary  rock  types both proximal and distal  to  hydrothermal  centres.  Over  450  samples  were  collected  for  Terraspec  analysis  and  a  subset  of  73  samples was selected for x‐ray diffraction analysis. Not all samples collected for Terraspec analysis could  be analyzed using x‐ray diffraction due to difficulty in processing quartz‐rich samples for clay separation.  As  such,  sample density  is  low  in  the area between  the Pipeline deposit and  the Elder Creek deposit  owing to the  low clay content and the presence of abundant quartzite and chert. Samples represent a  broad  range  of  primary  rock  types with  varying  percentages  of  total  clay  content  (Figure  3.8).    Clay  minerals occur  in the pore‐space and matrix of sedimentary rocks (S), as thin (<20cm) clay seams (CS)  occurring parallel to sedimentary bedding, as alteration products of feldspar and muscovite in intrusive  rocks (I), as matrix material in breccia (BX), as a thin veneer along fault surfaces and in fault gouge (FG).  Brackets denote the abbreviation used in subsequent tables. Samples collected with low percentages of  total  clay  were  mostly  confined  to  aluminosilicate  poor,  quartzose  sedimentary  rocks  including  quartzite, chert, and mudstone. Samples were not taken directly above the Leeville property owing to  the  presence  of mine  infrastructure;  however  two  samples  were  collected  from mineralized  dykes  within the Leeville deposit. A list of all samples collected providing location, and lithology is included in  Appendix C. A map of samples locations from the Leeville deposit is shown in Figure 3.9.    3.7 RESULTS  3.7.1 Morphology and textural relationships of clays  Scanning electron microphotographs of the clay minerals in this study are shown in Figure 3.10.  In  all  samples  imaged  of  both  sedimentary  and  non‐sedimentary  protolith,  illite,  illite‐smectite  and  smectite  form  stacks  of  ‘pseudo‐hexagonal’  shaped  crystals.  The  terms  ‘hexagonal’  and  ‘hairy’ were  defined in section 2.2. The term ‘pseudo’ is employed here to denote a lack of definite hexagonal grain  boundaries (Schleicher et al., 2006; Hancock, 1978; Hancock and Taylor, 1978). Crystal boundaries are 47        Fig.  3.8.  Samples  were  collected  from  zones  of  strong  argillization  and  from  phyllosilicate‐bearing  rocks  representing a wide  range of  lithologies. A. Strong kaolinite and  illite altered dyke at  the  southeast end of  the  Leeville property B. Magnified photograph of the same argillized intrusion from A. Illite and smectite are replacing  k‐feldspar phenocrysts and  intrusive matrix material C. Argillized fault gouge  (white,  left) adjacent  to a strongly  illite  and  smectite  altered  dyke  (right)  with  relatively  unaltered  chert  immediately  adjacent  to  the  dyke  D.  Mudstone clast breccia (top) with  illite matrix from the North end of the Leeville property.  Illite occurs as a thin  veneer  coating  the  bottom  of  intact mudstone  beds  (bottom)  E.  Illite‐bearing  siltstone  from  the  Elder  Creek  deposit,  Shoshone  Range  F. Quartzite  clast  breccia with  illite  and  quartz matrix  from  the  Elder  Creek  deposit,  Shoshone Range.   48              Fig. 3.9. Sample location map for the Leeville study area. 49      Fig. 3.10. Scanning electron microscope images showing the morphology of clay minerals. A‐B. Randomly oriented  powder grain mounts of the <2µ size fraction of illite. A. The crystal shape of illite is pseudo‐hexagonal with rough  crystal edges. All  the  illite   analyzed  in  this  study  is of  the  same morphology. B.  Illite crystals are not  randomly  oriented but occur as stacks of pseudo‐hexagonal illite grains. C‐F Back scatter images C.  Illite  occurs as tightly knit  aggregates of  illite booklets. D. The  tightness of each aggregate appears  to be  related  to  the amount of  space  available for growth of the illite crystals. On the left side of the photograph, illite crystals are not as tightly spaced  as on the right hand side. E. Muscovite occurs as long euhedral laths with one good cleavage. F. Kaolinite occurs in  a similar texture to  illite,  in tightly knit aggregates of crystals. The morphology of kaolinite crystals could not be  resolved from SEM imaging.   50    ragged  and  uneven  similar  to  the  pseudomorphing  replacement  texture  described  by  Hancock  and  Taylor (1978) and possibly akin to the dissolved edges observed between end‐member growth stages by  Bauer et al. (2000). Needle‐shaped or ‘hairy’ illite were not observed in any of the samples in this study.  The pseudo‐hexagonal shape of  illite may represent the middle stage of a reaction from ‘hairy  illite’ to  hexagonal illite (Bauer et al., 2000) or single stage illite formation at temperatures on the higher end of  illite stability (Meunier and Velde, 2004).   In  both  sedimentary  and  igneous  rocks, muscovite  occurred  as  elongate  euhedral  laths with  visible unidirectional cleavage. Muscovite was differentiated from illite and smectite by shape and size.  Furthermore, muscovite, often partially replaced by illite, exhibited higher potassium contents in energy  dispersive  spectra  (EDS)  than  illite  and  smectite.    For  the  purposes  of  this  study, muscovitic  illite  is  defined as very crystalline  illite replacing euhedral muscovite  laths visible  in thin section and SEM. The  term ‘Illite’ is restricted to samples containing tightly knit aggregates of illite. The fine grained nature of  kaolinite  inhibited  the  imaging  of  its  crystal  shape.    Illite,  smectite  and  kaolinite  occur  in  spatially  distinct,  tightly  knit  fibrous  aggregates  set  between  quartz,  feldspar,  and muscovite  crystals  in  both  igneous and  sedimentary  rocks. Aggregates of  illite, smectite, and kaolinite were  similar  to  the dense  homogeneous texture observed by Hancock (1978) indicative of the latest stage of growth formation in  the context of diagenesis.  Paragenetic relationships between illite and kaolinite were difficult to determine based on SEM  imaging  (Figure  3.11).  X‐ray  element mapping  of  potassium  helped  to  distinguish  between  illite  and  kaolinite in samples containing both minerals. Illite can occur without kaolinite. Kaolinite can also occur  without  illite.  Illite  and  kaolinite  are  observed  texturally  intergrown  as  fine  grained  aggregates,  and  occur simultaneously replacing laths of euhedral muscovite. The spatial occurrence of illite and kaolinite  together  does  not  necessarily  indicate  the  synchronous  growth  of  the  two  minerals.  Synchronous  growth of illite and kaolinite is however, indicative of specific temperatures and fluid chemistry (Figure  2.1).     3.7.2 Spatial distribution of clays ‐Leeville  X‐ray diffraction pattern data for samples from the Leeville area are outlined in Table 3.1, which  includes  calculated  relative  abundances  of  illite,  kaolinite,  and  smectite  in  the  <2  µm  clay  fraction.  Estimates of total undifferentiated clay content in each sample are given in Appendix C. Figure 3.12a    51        Fig.  3.11.  Scanning  electron  microscope  (SEM)  back‐scatter  images  with  x‐ray  element  maps  for  potassium  overlain, illustrating the complex textural relationship between illite and kaolinite. The timing of growth for these  minerals could not be determined by SEM  imaging.  Illite, muscovite and k‐feldspar are highlighted  in blue, while  kaolinite  (potassium  deficient  aluminosilicate)  and  quartz  are  grey.    A.  Intergrown  kaolinite  and  illite  partially  replacing muscovite  lath  in strongly argillized  intrusive rock. Illite also occurs as fine grained aggregates between  quartz  grains.  B.  Fine  grained  aggregates  of  kaolinite  between  long  euhedral  laths  of muscovite  in  an  arkosic  sandstone. Energy dispersive spectrometry data  indicate a  low potassium content of muscovite  in this sample as  compared to other muscovite samples indicating the potential of a partial replacement by illite C. Intergrown fine  grained  aggregates of  kaolinite  and  illite  in  the  same  lithology  as B.  Illite  appears  to be  the dominant mineral  replacing a broken euhedral lath of muscovite.  D. Illite and kaolinite are intergrown as fine grained aggregates in a  strongly  fractured and oxidized quartzite  sample. E. Arkosic  sandstone  sample  containing kaolinite  feldspar and  muscovite, and lacking illite. F. Patchily hematized clay fault gouge containing quartz and kaolinite, lacking illite.     52        Fig. 3.12. Maps  showing  the distribution of A.  clay minerals  identified by XRD diffraction data B. Clay minerals  identified  by  Terraspec  data  C.  Contoured  Full  Width  Half  the  Maximum  values  (2),  D.  Illite  formation  temperatures calculated from electron microprobe data.   53    Table 3.1. XRD data from the <2 µm clay fraction and whole rock samples from the Leeville field area. n=39  Sample  Rock  I      ■  K  S    I‐S  +   Illite  Peak  (2  Illite   Peak*  (2  Illite   FWHM  (2)  Illite FWHM  *(2)  ΔFWHM  Illite  (2)  Smectite  Peak  (2  Smectite  Peak*  (2  Smectite      FWHM  (2)  Smectite        FWHM*  (2)  Kaolinite             Peak  (2  Kaolinite         Peak*  (2  % I  %K  % S  Type  ▲ ◊  472  I  ■ ▲ 10.109  9.968  0.667  0.603  0.064  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.146  7.149  57.6  42.4  0.0  473  I  ■ ▲  10.003  9.924  0.228  0.245  0.017  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.109  7.104  12.4  87.6  0.0  477a  FG  ■ ▲ ◊    10.107  9.975  0.568  0.497  0.071  19.658  18.856  0.978  0.648  7.164  7.169  1.5  92.4  6.1  478  I  ■ ▲ ◊  10.189  9.987  0.584  0.514  0.07  14.98  16.788  1.324  0.913  7.16  7.165  9.8  31.8  58.4  484  I  ■ ▲ 10.091  9.971  0.498  0.51  ‐0.012  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.154  7.147  81.1  18.9  0.0  486a×  S  ■       10.039    0.494  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  100  0.0  0.0  487  CS  ■ ▲ 10.012  9.989  0.502  0.48  0.022  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.202  7.209  41.2  58.8  0.0  492  BX  ■ ▲ ◊  10.005  9.995  0.266  0.265  0.001  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.157  7.167  98.1  0.9  1.0  495  S  ■ ▲     10.04  9.998  0.455  0.452  0.003  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.142  7.145  74.2  25.8  0.0  496  S  ■ ▲ ◊  9.986  9.972  0.344  0.352  ‐0.008  14.783  16.982  1.322  0.861  7.166  7.164  3.1  32.4  64.5  498×  I  ■  ▲      9.968  9.934  0.247  0.255  ‐0.008  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.140  7.117  21.2  78.8  0.0  499  I  ■ ▲ ◊  +  9.999  10.01  0.398  0.338  0.06  14.299  16.625  1.128  1.101  7.167  7.155  4.3  25.1  70.6  502  BX  ■ 9.923  9.919  0.214  0.217  ‐0.07  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  100.0  0.0  0.0  506  S  ■ 9.97  0.951  0.247  0.213  0.034  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  100.0  0.0  0.0  507  CS  ■       10.079  9.944  0.574  0.445  0.129  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  100.0  0.0  0.0  508  I  ■ ◊  +  10.045  10.013  0.322  0.324  ‐0.002  16.521  16.023  1.077  1.824  ‐  ‐  10.1  63.9  26.0  509¥  I    ▲ ◊    ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  14.225  16.334  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  5.6  28.4  66.0  510a  FG  ■ ▲ ◊    10.062  10.013  0.389  0.352  0.037  14.376  16.521  1.041  1.089  7.165  7.172  62.6  7.2  30.2  510c  CS  ■ ▲ ◊  10.093  10.047  0.394  0.365  0.029  14.792  17.142  2.517  1.151  7.176  56.3  9.9  33.8  511c  FG  ■ ◊  9.888  9.935  0.143  0.231  ‐0.108  15.007  16.785  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  9.4  0.0  90.6  513b  FG  ■ ▲     10.042  9.989  0.406  0.403  0.003  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.157  7.156  92.6  7.5  0.0  513c  FG  ■ ▲ 10.06  10.026  0.38  0.359  0.021  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.211  7.156  77.5  22.5  0.0  516b  CS  ■ ▲ ◊  10  9.98  0.283  0.271  0.012  12.486  16.625  1.063  1.479  7.172  7.159  17.0  52.0  31.0  516d  FG  ■ ▲ ◊    9.989  9.999  0.238  0.235  0.003  12.427  16.729  1.107  1.348  7.169  7.169  2.2  6.6  91.2  519  S  ■ ▲ ◊  10.113  10.003  0.426  0.458  ‐0.032  14.454  16.842  1.123  0.59  7.159  7.168  1.5  48.9  49.6  521a  BX  ■ ◊  10.037  10.01  0.303  0.293  0.01  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  99.1  0.9  523  I  ▲ ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  13.888  16.749  1.144  0.448  7.152  7.158  0.0  0.6  99.4  524  FG  ■ ▲ ◊  +  10.023  9.909  0.246  0.355  ‐0.109  14.245  16.521  0.976  1.464  7.169  7.116  18.0  14.4  67.6  525a‐1  FG  ■ 10.079  10.007  0.437  0.421  0.016  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  100.0  0.0  0.0  525a‐2  FG  ■ ▲ 10.064  9.996  0.419  0.421  ‐0.002  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  7.152  7.155  88.8  11.2  0.0  525b  FG  ■ 10.056  9.994  0.405  0.392  0.013  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  100.0  0.0  0.0  526a  I  ◊  +  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  14.684  16.637  0.731  0.5  ‐  ‐  0.0  0.2  99.8  526b  I  ▲ ◊  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  14.895  16.685  0.994  0.819  7.21  ‐  0.0  0.1  99.9  527  FG  ■ ▲ ◊  10.037  9.927  0.616  0.578  0.038  14.613  16.625  1.774  1.345  7.171  7.142  29.9  30.7  39.4  528a  CS  ■ ▲ ◊  +  10.075  9.916  1.231  0.788  0.443  15.384  17.052  1.439  1.158  7.176  7.176  83.6  4.9  11.5  528c  S  ■ ▲ ◊  +  10.113  9.998  1.121  0.999  0.122  16.521  17.162  1.91  1.577  7.194  0.724  27.1  36.5  36.5  528d  I  ■ ◊  10.087  9.945  0.549  0.532  0.017  14.694  16.625  1.001  0.898  ‐  ‐  83.0  0.0  17.0  UL‐18  I  ■ ▲ ◊  10.056  10.022  0.143  0.153  ‐0.01  14.228  16.893  0.159  0.329  7.165  7.149  5.4  89.4  5.2  UL‐19  I  ■ ▲ ◊  +  10.005  10.002  0.167  0.154  0.013  14.144  16.811  0.193  0.474  7.133  7.133  8.5  49.6  42.0  I = illite, I‐S=illite‐smectite, S=smectite, K=kaolinite × = whole rock XRD analysis   * = glycolated ¥ = contains chlorite, no FWHM values calculated for smectite   Rock type: I = intrusive, S= sedimentary, CS= clay seam, FG = fault gouge, BX = breccia    54    shows  the  distribution  of  clay minerals  identified  from  x‐ray  diffraction  patterns  of  the  fine  fraction  (<2m)  across  the map  area. Most  samples  contained  all  three  of  the  dominant  clay  types:  illite,  kaolinite, and smectite  in varying amounts. No obvious correlation became evident between  lithology  and  associated  clay mineralogy  although  smectite  does  appear most  abundant  in  altered  intrusive  samples, including those from in and around the Vivian sill: 499, 509, 523, 526, and 527. Dyke samples  UL‐18  and  UL‐19  from  within  the  Leeville  underground  deposit  containing  elevated  gold  values  (0.094ppm and 0.005ppm  respectively)  contained abundant kaolinite with  smectite and  illite. Sample  UL‐19  contains  significantly more  smectite and  I‐S, and  less gold  than  sample UL‐18.  Illite dominated  samples were present within close proximity  to  the surface projection of  the Leeville deposit. Sample  525,  on  the  edge  of  the  projected  deposit  only  comprised  illite.  Samples  510  and  513  contained  abundant  illite with  lesser amounts of kaolinite, and  smectite. Sample 528 contained more  illite  than  smectite.   Figure  3.12b  shows  the  distribution  of  clay  minerals  identified  from  Terraspec  reflectance  spectra of whole  rock  samples. Smectite dominates  the northwestern part of  the Leeville  study area.  Some  illite  occurs  above  the  surface  projection  of  the  Leeville  deposit.  The most  prominent  trend  outlined by Terraspec data  is a SW‐NE  trending  region of kaolinite dominated samples starting at  the  Leeville deposit. This trend in kaolinite correlates to the illite trend observed in the same samples using  x‐ray diffraction. Many samples returned aspectral data characterized by a reflectance spectrum with no  identifiable absorption peaks. Comparison of results from the Terraspec data and the XRD indicate that  the majority of samples analyzed by the Terraspec produced reflectance spectra indicative of a different  clay assemblage than that returned by XRD. Terraspec data returned numerous false positives when  in  fact illite occurs only in discrete areas. Inconsistency between XRD and Terraspec data are discussed in  detail below.  FWHM values of illite in samples from the Leeville area, calibrated to the CIS scale are shown in  Table 3.2. Results  indicate that FWHM values are dominantly above the accepted value of 0.422 for  the boundary between diagenesis and  low grade anchizonal metamorphism. This boundary  coincides  with a temperature of ~200C (Kisch, 1990) which is within the temperature range measured from fluid  inclusions paragenetically related to Carlin‐type Au‐mineralization (Hofstra and Cline, 2000; Cline et al.,  2005). Two samples within close proximity to the surface projection of the Leeville deposit show lower  FWHM  values  indicative of  increased  crystallinity  and higher  temperature  than  surrounding  samples.  Contouring of FWHM values across the Leeville deposit, shown in Figure 3.12c, an extensive zone of high  crystallinity illite; above and outboard of the surface projection of the Leeville deposit. Contoured  55    Table. 3.2. FWHM values of illite from clay separated samples collected from the vicinity of the Leeville deposit  calibrated to the CIS‐scale. Samples lacking illite are not included in this table.   Sample  Rock  Experimental  Calibrated  Inferred  ID  Type  FWHM Value  FWHM Value  T (°C)*  (2)  (2)  472  I  0.67  1.24  Diagenetic  477a  I  0.57  1.06  Diagenetic  478  FG  0.58  1.08  Diagenetic  484  I  0.5  0.94  Diagenetic  486  S  0.49  0.92  Diagenetic  487  CS  0.5  0.94  Diagenetic  492  BX  0.27  0.53  Diagenetic  495  S  0.46  0.87  Diagenetic  496  S  0.34  0.65  Diagenetic  499  I  0.4  0.76  Diagenetic  502  BX  0.21  0.42  Diagenetic ‐ Anchizonal  506  S  0.25  0.49  Diagenetic  507  CS  0.57  1.06  Diagenetic  508  I  0.32  0.62  Diagenetic  510a  FG  0.39  0.74  Diagenetic  510c  CS  0.39  0.74  Diagenetic  511c  FG  0.14  0.29  Epizonal  513b  FG  0.41  0.78  Diagenetic  513c  FG  0.38  0.72  Diagenetic  516b  CS  0.28  0.54  Diagenetic ‐ Anchizonal  516d  FG  0.24  0.47  Diagenetic ‐ Anchizonal  519  S  0.43  0.81  Diagenetic  521a  BX  0.3  0.58  Diagenetic ‐ Anchizonal  524  FG  0.25  0.49  Diagenetic ‐ Anchizonal  525a‐1  FG  0.44  0.83  Diagenetic  525a‐2  FG  0.42  0.79  Diagenetic  525b  FG  0.41  0.78  Diagenetic  527  FG  0.62  1.15  Diagenetic  528a  CS  1.23  2.25  Diagenetic  528c  S  1.12  2.05  Diagenetic  528d  I  0.55  1.03  Diagenetic  UL‐18  I  0.14  0.29  Epizonal  UL‐19  I  0.15  0.31  Epizonal  n=33      Rock type: I = intrusive, S= sedimentary, CS= clay seam, FG = fault gouge, BX = breccia56    FWHM values increase away from the Leeville deposit, with small zones of crystalline illite proximal to  faults and other permeable pathways.    3.7.3 Distribution of clays ‐ Shoshone Range Field Area  XRD pattern data  for  samples  from  the  Shoshone Range  field  area  are outlined  in  Table 3.3,  Appendix D. The distribution of  clays  identified using XRD  is  shown  in Figure 3.13a. Abundant quartz  content and lack of aluminosilicate minerals in this area restricted the samples analyzed by XRD. There  are two main sites of argillization along this transect, both of which are known occurrences of gold; the  giant Carlin Au Pipeline deposit and the Elder Creek gold deposit. Samples from the Pipeline and Gold  Acres deposits contained  illite and some sedimentary muscovite. At  the Elder Creek deposit,  illite was  identified  in the matrix of gold‐hosting quartzite clast breccia,  in strongly altered siltstone, and  in dyke  material. To the north of the Elder Creek deposit, unaltered siltstone contained no  illite, only smectite  and  kaolinite.  Unaltered  siltstone  and  argillite  from  west  of  the  Pipeline  deposit  contained  illite‐ smectite, smectite and kaolinite. The assemblage contained by samples 134 and 123 appears to be the  background clay content of most upper plate rocks.   Calibrated FWHM values from the Shoshone Range study area are presented in Table 3.4, Figure  3.13b and indicate a range of metamorphic grades. Samples from the Gold Acres deposit exhibited the  lowest FWHM values indicative of the highest crystallinity  illite. Within the Elder Creek deposit FWHM  values  vary  between  0.45‐0.94 2.  Illite  occurring within  the main  zone  of mineralization  at  Elder  Creek is less crystalline than illite from the Pipeline and Gold Acres deposits. Just outside the main zone  of  mineralization,  one  sample  contains  poorly  crystalline  illite  with  an  FWHM  value  of  1.12  2however,  ~1km  northwest  of  the  main  zone  of  mineralization,  sample  230  (quartzite  clast  breccias) exhibits highly crystalline illite with an FWHM value of 0.45 2.  Over 300 sa