Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Investigations of water and tracer movement in covered and uncovered unsaturated waste rock Marcoline, Joseph R. 2008

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
24-ubc_2008_fall_marcoline_joseph.pdf [ 17.12MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 24-1.0052633.json
JSON-LD: 24-1.0052633-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 24-1.0052633-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 24-1.0052633-rdf.json
Turtle: 24-1.0052633-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 24-1.0052633-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 24-1.0052633-source.json
Full Text
24-1.0052633-fulltext.txt
Citation
24-1.0052633.ris

Full Text

INVESTIGATIONS OF WATER AND TRACER MOVEMENT IN COVERED AND  UNCOVERED UNSATURATED WASTE ROCK by JOSEPH R. MARCOLINE B.A., Hamilton College, 1994 M.Sc., New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 1997 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF  DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Geological Sciences) UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver) July 2008 ©Joseph R. Marcoline, 2008 ABSTRACT A better understanding of the hydrogeology of mine waste rock and cover  systems is essential for the quantification, prediction and reduction of metals loading  to the receiving environment.  A series of experiments were conducted on an  instrumented intermediate­scale waste rock pile at the Cluff Lake Mine in  Saskatchewan to investigate the changes in flow and solute transport within coarse  waste rock under three different surface conditions.  Following these studies, the  waste rock pile was deconstructed, structures were mapped, and samples were  collected for physical characterization and pore water extraction.  The internal  structure of the waste rock pile was more important than the texture and topography  under the free­dumped and ripped/leveled surface, while the surface condition was  found to be the dominant control on spatial and temporal variability of outflow from  the waste rock with the covered surface.  Data from a deuterium tracer test,  lysimeter outflow, and from TDR probes were used to derive estimates of the  maximum and an average pore water velocity through the uncovered and the  covered waste rock.  An average pore water velocity through the matrix materials of  the uncovered waste rock was approximately 1.5 m/yr and maximum preferential  flow velocities were as high as 5 m/day.  The post­cover pressure wave velocity of  0.1 to 1 m/day is inferred from outflow and TDR data, and average pore water  velocities (0.39 m/y and 0.73 m/y) are calculated by the water flux and tracer  ii methods, respectively.  The distribution of the tracers in pore water and the internal  structure were mapped during a detailed deconstruction of the waste rock pile and  attempts were made to link the data to the spatial and temporal patterns of lysimeter  outflow.  The pore water chloride concentrations and the deuterium values did not  provide conclusive data necessary to link the spatial and temporal patterns observed  in the lysimeter hydrographs to internal structure; however, it provided insight into  the internal flow mechanisms and water residence times. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract...........................................................................................................................................i Table of Contents...........................................................................................................................ii List of Tables..............................................................................................................................viii List of Figures...............................................................................................................................ix Acknowledgments......................................................................................................................xiii CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................1 1.1.  RESEARCH OBJECTIVES..........................................................................................................2 1.2.  WASTE ROCK HYDROGEOLOGY..........................................................................................4 1.2.1.  Cluff Lake Mine..........................................................................................................................4 1.2.2.  Climate........................................................................................................................................5 1.2.3.  Geology and the DJ­X Waste Rock...........................................................................................5 1.2.4.  Experimental Design...................................................................................................................7 1.3.  RESEARCH METHODS..............................................................................................................7 1.4.  PREVIOUS RESULTS AND BACKGROUND.........................................................................8 1.4.1.  CPE ­ Previous Results...............................................................................................................8 1.4.2.  Water Content and Matric Suction ..........................................................................................10 1.4.3.  Potential and Actual Evaporation.............................................................................................13 1.4.  STRUCTURE OF DISSERTATION..........................................................................................15 1.5.  REFERENCES............................................................................................................................17 CHAPTER 2: WATER BALANCE OF THE CONSTRUCTED WASTE ROCK PILE:  PRE AND POST­COVER......................................................................................................25 2.1.  INTRODUCTION...........................................................................................................25 2.2.  BACKGROUND AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN...............................................................27 2.2.1.  Field Location and Climate......................................................................................................27 2.2.2.  Experimental Design.................................................................................................................27 2.2.3.  Compacted Waste Rock Cover on CPE...................................................................................28 iv 2.3.  METHODS..................................................................................................................................29 2.3.1.  Precipitation (P)........................................................................................................................30 2.3.2.  Net Percolation (NP).................................................................................................................31 2.3.3.  Surface Runoff (RS )................................................................................................................32 2.3.4.  Change in Storage ( S)Δ ............................................................................................................33 2.3.5.  Evaporation (E).........................................................................................................................33 2.3.5.1  Evaporative Flux Modeling....................................................................................................34 2.3.5.2.  Evaporative Flux Modeling Using SoilCover.......................................................................36 2.3.5.3.  Base Case Simulations...........................................................................................................37 2.3.5.4.  Initial Conditions...................................................................................................................39 2.4.  DETERMINATION OF PHYSICAL PARAMETERS.............................................................41 2.4.1.  Hydraulic Conductivity............................................................................................................41 2.4.2.  Water Content and Matric Suction...........................................................................................42 2.5.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION.................................................................................................44 2.5.1.  Measured and Calculated Water Balance.................................................................................44 2.5.2.  Physical Parameters..................................................................................................................48 2.5.3.  Numerical Modeling.................................................................................................................49 2.5.4.  Comparison of Model Results to Observational Data..............................................................51 2.5.4.1.  Uncovered CPE.....................................................................................................................52 2.5.4.2.  Covered CPE..........................................................................................................................54 2.5.5.  Sensitivity Analysis..................................................................................................................55 2.6.  CONCLUSIONS.........................................................................................................................57 2.7.  REFERENCES............................................................................................................................60 CHAPTER 3:  THE EFFECT OF SURFACE CONDITION ON INTERNAL WATER  FLOW IN WASTE ROCK.....................................................................................................82 3.1.  INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................82 3.2.  OBJECTIVES..............................................................................................................................83 3.3.  METHODS..................................................................................................................................84 3.3.1.  Experimental Design.................................................................................................................85 3.3.2.  Cover Construction...................................................................................................................87 3.4.  DATA..........................................................................................................................................91 3.4.1.  Individual Lysimeter Responses...............................................................................................92 v 3.5.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION.................................................................................................93 3.5.1.  Spatial Variability in Rate and Total Magnitude of Infiltration...............................................94 3.5.2.  Infiltration Rate.......................................................................................................................103 3.5.3.  Variability of Outflow............................................................................................................110 3.6.  CONCLUSIONS.......................................................................................................................110 3.7.  REFERENCES..........................................................................................................................113 CHAPTER 4:  WATER MIGRATION IN COVERED WASTE ROCK: A DEUTERIUM  TRACER STUDY..................................................................................................................137 4.3.  BACKGROUND.......................................................................................................................140 4.3.1.  Preferential Flow in Unsaturated Media................................................................................140 4.3.2.  Chemical Tracers Used in Waste Rock Studies.....................................................................142 4.3.3.  Stable Isotopes as Tracers in Unsaturated Media...................................................................143 4.4.  METHODS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN......................................................................145 4.4.1.  Constructed Waste Rock Pile Experiment.............................................................................145 4.4.2.  Lower Permeability Surface Layer.........................................................................................146 4.4.3.  Tracer Application..................................................................................................................148 4.4.4.  Monitoring..............................................................................................................................148 4.4.5.  Deconstruction and Sampling of the Waste Rock Pile..........................................................149 4.4.6.  Data Collection and Sample Processing.................................................................................150 4.5.  ISOTOPIC BASELINE.............................................................................................................151 4.6.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION...............................................................................................153 4.6.1.  Basal Outflow and Tracer Recovery......................................................................................153 4.6.2.  Internal Water Flow................................................................................................................155 4.6.3.  Deuterium Distribution of Pore Water...................................................................................156 4.6.4.  Condensation and Convection................................................................................................161 4.6.5.  Water Travel Times................................................................................................................164 4.6.5.1.  Water Velocities Estimated from Tracer Data....................................................................164 4.6.5.2.  Water Velocities Estimated from Wetting Front Data........................................................168 4.6.5.3.  Water Velocities Estimated from Flux Data.......................................................................171 4.7.  SUMMARY...............................................................................................................................172 4.8.  CONCLUSIONS.......................................................................................................................174 4.9.  REFERENCES..........................................................................................................................176 vi CHAPTER 5:  DECONSTRUCTION OF THE EXPERIMENTAL WASTE ROCK PILE .................................................................................................................................................199 5.1.  INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................................................199 5.1.1.  Objective.................................................................................................................................201 5.2.  BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY............................................................................203 5.2.1.  Deconstruction........................................................................................................................203 5.2.2.  Sampling.................................................................................................................................206 5.2.3.  Pore Water Extractions ­ Deuterium and Chloride................................................................207 5.2.4.  Dye Staining...........................................................................................................................209 5.3.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION...............................................................................................211 5.3.1.  Flow and Waste Rock Structure.............................................................................................211 5.3.2.  Dye Staining on the CPE........................................................................................................218 5.3.3  Particle Size Analysis..............................................................................................................221 5.3.4.  Tracer Distributions................................................................................................................223 5.3.5.  Chloride Mass Balance...........................................................................................................229 5.4.  CONCLUSIONS.......................................................................................................................234 5.5.  REFERENCES..........................................................................................................................236 CHAPTER 6:  SUMMARY OF DISSERTATION.............................................................260 6.1.  SUMMARY OF CHAPTER 2: WATER BALANCE OF THE CONSTRUCTED WASTE  ROCK PILE.......................................................................................................................................261 6.2.  SUMMARY OF CHAPTER 3:  THE EFFECT OF SURFACE CONDITION ON INTERNAL  WATER FLOW IN WASTE ROCK................................................................................................262 6.3.  SUMMARY OF CHAPTER 4: WATER MIGRATION IN COVERED WASTE ROCK: A  DEUTERIUM TRACER STUDY ...................................................................................................263 6.4.  SUMMARY OF CHAPTER 5: DECONSTRUCTION OF THE EXPERIMENTAL WASTE  ROCK PILE ......................................................................................................................................264 6.5  IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE..........................................................................................265 APPENDIXES:......................................................................................................................269 APPENDIX A: SOILCOVER INPUT FILES..................................................................................269 APPENDIX B: PHOTO DOCUMENTATION...............................................................................283 APPENDIX C:  TRACER RESULTS..............................................................................................296 vii LIST OF TABLES Table 2.1.  Monthly precipitation values measured on the top of the waste rock pile for the period  between January 2000 and May of 2004.  Yearly totals are based on April 01 to March 31 for each  of the four years.  Snowfall is excluded..............................................................................................69 Table 2.2.  Summary of measured water balance components.  The annual measurements are  reported as water years between April 01 and March 31 of the following year.  All percentages are  reported as percent of precipitation for the same time period.............................................................70 Table 2.3.  Comparison of field measurements with SoilCover results.  Results from two  simulations are presented for both of the two run years.  FC refers to the field SWCC and LC to the  laboratory derived SWCC both shown in Figure 2.1.  The annual measurements are reported from  April 01 to March 31 for each of the four years.  All percentages are reported as percent of  precipitation..........................................................................................................................................71 Table 3.1.  Summary of the six isolated rainfall events on the top of the constructed waste rock pile. ............................................................................................................................................................119 Table 4.1.  Summary of water travel time estimates for both pre­ and post­cover periods..............187 viii LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1.1.  Map of Saskatchewan with the location of the Cluff Lake Mine and the constructed  waste rock pile experiment..................................................................................................................21 Figure 1.2.  Photograph of the CPE on top of the DJN waste rock pile. Photograph taken in the  summer of 2003...................................................................................................................................22 Figure 1.3.  Schematic view of the top of the waste rock pile............................................................23 Figure 1.4.  Cross­section of the constructed waste rock pile and a detail of the basal lysimeter  design...................................................................................................................................................24 Figure 2.1.  Schematic view of the top of the waste rock pile............................................................72 Figure 2.2.  Cross­section of the constructed waste rock pile and a detail of the basal lysimeter  design...................................................................................................................................................73 Figure 2.3.  Hydrograph measured as combined outflow from the 16 lysimeters at the base of the  CPE between January of 2000 and May of 2004................................................................................74 Figure 2.4.  Soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) for the waste rock and cover material...........75 Figure 2.5.  Hydraulic conductivity curves for the waste rock and cover material............................76 Figure 2.6.  Annual precipitation and lysimeter outflow for the four years of the experiment..........77 Figure 2.7.  Annual cumulative precipitation and lysimeter outflow between January 2000 and  January 2004.  The accumulated rainfall excludes snowfall...............................................................78 Figure 2.8.  Cumulative precipitation, outflow and runoff for the year following the construction of  the compacted cover............................................................................................................................79 Figure 2.9.  The volumetric water content as measured by TDR probes at 8 different depths within  the waste rock pile between May 01, 2003 and June 25, 2003...........................................................80 Figure 2.10.  Sensitivity of net percolation to key parameters on the predicted net­percolation for  the uncovered and covered waste rock scenarios................................................................................81 Figure 3.1. Schematic plan view and cross section of the constructed waste rock pile...................120 Figure 3.2.  Topography of the free­dumped surface as surveyed in the Fall of 2001.....................121 Figure 3.3.  a) Photograph of the 3.5 year­old free­dumped top surface looking northwest.  b)  Photograph looking north­northeast at the ripped and leveled waste rock surface.  c) Photograph  looking north at the surface following construction of the compacted waste rock layer.................122 Figure 3.4.  Particle size distribution curves from the waste rock cover material before compaction. ............................................................................................................................................................123 ix Figure 3.5.a.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the free­dumped surface.............124 Figure 3.5.b.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the free­dumped surface.............125 Figure 3.6.a.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the ripped and leveled surface.  The  hydrographs are in liters per day for 3 days following a 25 mm natural rainfall event on July 01,  2002....................................................................................................................................................126 Figure 3.6.b.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the ripped and leveled surface... .127 Figure 3.7.a.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the covered surface.  The  hydrographs are in liters per day for 35 days following a 49 mm artificial rainfall event on May 13,  2003....................................................................................................................................................128 Figure 3.7.b.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the covered surface.....................129 Figure 3.8.  Two outflow hydrographs for each of the 11 lysimeters following two natural low  intensity rainfall events......................................................................................................................130 Figure 3.9.  Two outflow hydrographs for each of the 11 lysimeters following two artificial high  intensity events...................................................................................................................................131 Figure 3.10.  Two outflow hydrograph sets following an artificial and a natural rainfall event on the  covered surface for each of the 11 lysimeters following an artificial high intensity events with fairly  constant precipitation rates................................................................................................................132 Figure 3.11.  Soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) for the waste rock and cover material.......133 Figure 3.12.  Hydraulic conductivity curves for the waste rock and cover material........................134 Figure 3.13.  The volumetric water content as measured by TDR probes at 8 different depths within  the waste rock pile between May 01, 2003 and June 25, 2003.........................................................135 Figure 3.14.  Cumulative outflow from each of the 16 lysimeters in percent relative to precipitation  for  the period between April 2001 and April 2002 on the uncovered waste rock in blue and the  period between April 2003 and April 2004 on the covered waste rock in red.................................136 Figure 4.1.  A local water line on a  D versus  18O plot showing potential isotopic evolution ofδ δ   pore water and water vapor resulting from equilibrium fractionation..............................................188 Figure 4.2.  The global meteoric water line (GMWL) published by Craig (1961) is shown with the  dashed line..........................................................................................................................................189 Figure 4.3.  Schematic view of the top of the CPE.  Instrument profile and trench locations within  the lysimeter grid are shown..............................................................................................................190 Figure 4.4.  Photograph of a vertical trench face at the base of the experimental waste rock pile.   ............................................................................................................................................................191 x Figure 4.5.  Plot of the global meteoric water line (SMOW) (Craig, 1961), the Cluff Lake  background pore water line (CPWL) and an estimated fractionation line defined by pore water  samples...............................................................................................................................................192 Figure 4.6.  The vertical spatial distribution of 174 pore water  D values in the waste rock pile..δ 193 Figure 4.7.  Plot of  18O values relative to depth in the waste rock pile..δ .......................................194 Figure 4.8.  Plot showing the 49 mm rainfall event on the May 13, 2003 on the right Y­axis and the  lysimeter outflow in liters per day from the 16 combined lysimeters for the period between May 01,  2003 and June 18, 2003.....................................................................................................................195 Figure 4.9.a) TDR data from probes located in profiles A, B and C at two depths within the pile for  a period of 45 days following the May 13, 2003 tracer application. b) TDR data from different  depths during the tracer test...............................................................................................................196 Figure 4.10.  Temperature profiles for 7 depths within the waste rock pile.....................................197 Figure 4.11.  The volumetric water content as measured by TDR probes at 8 different depths within  the waste rock pile between May 01, 2003 and June 25, 2003.........................................................198 Figure 5.1.  Photographs of the CPE. A) Side view. B) Top covered surface of the waste rock pile. ............................................................................................................................................................244 Figure 5.2.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the free­dumped surface................245 Figure 5.3.  Schematic view of the top of the waste rock pile..........................................................246 Figure 5.4.  Photograph of the dye­stained area................................................................................247 Figure 5.5.  An intermediate size, matrix­supported boulder located approximately 0.5 m below the  base of the cover................................................................................................................................248 Figure 5.6.  An intermediate size boulder and gravel­supported by fine­grained matrix material  located approximately 0.5 m below the base of the cover................................................................249 Figure 5.7 a) Photograph of 1.2 m boulder located above lysimeters 1, 2 and the southwestern  corner of lysimeter 6.  b) Coarse rubble zone in lysimeter 10..........................................................250 Figure 5.8.  Photograph of trench face cut through the dye­stained area.........................................251 Figure 5.9.  Photograph of trench face cut through the dye­stained area.........................................252 Figure 5.10.  The solid (red) curves show the range of 24 particle size distribution curves from  samples collected during the deconstruction of the CPE in 2004.....................................................253 Figure 5.11.  Particle size distribution curves for eight samples from within the CPE....................254 Figure 5.12.  Volumetric water content as measured by TDR probes for a 60­hour period in 2003. ............................................................................................................................................................255 xi Figure 5.13.  Concentration in mg/L chloride, and deuterium values plotted with depth in the waste  rock pile..............................................................................................................................................256 Figure 5.14.  Plot of the  D value and the Cl concentration of 160 pore water samples within theδ   waste rock pile at the time of deconstruction....................................................................................257 Figure 5.15.   D values and the Cl concentrations of pore water samples with depth in the wasteδ   rock pile at the time of deconstruction..............................................................................................258 Figure 5.16.  Plot of the chloride tracer remaining in the waste rock pile on the Y­axis and time on  the X­axis...........................................................................................................................................259 xii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I acknowledge the generous support and funding from Areva Resources, the Cameco  Corporation and grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of  Canada (NSERC). I owe a great deal of thanks to numerous people who provided support, assistance and  friendship throughout the duration of this project.  I am especially thankful to Craig Nichol  for his generous time and assistance throughout the early phases of the research.  I am  thankful for the support and field assistance provided by the staff at the Cluff Lake Mine  Site.  The laborious deconstruction could not have been completed without the hard work of  both Craig Thompson and Karin Wagner.  Doreen Hacker provided months of laboratory  work with exceptional QA/QC practices.  I am grateful to Frank Marcoline who without any  compensation developed a commercial grade software package for this research project.  The software effectively and efficiently managed the huge quantity of site data with data  parsing, instrument calibration, error detection and data management routines.  I am  thankful for the many discussions with Fernando Junqueira, Justin Stockwell, Mike O'Kane  and Matthew Neuner.  The numerous editorial reviews and endless support provided by  Malisa Niemeyer are greatly appreciated and will be remembered, thank you.   I would like to express my sincere gratitude to Leslie Smith, Roger Beckie and Ward  Wilson who each provided unparalleled support, encouragement and guidance from the first  to the last day of this project.  It has been an honor and a privilege to have worked under the  guidance of each of you.  Thank you. xiii CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Products from the hard­rock mining industry are essential for the maintenance of  the modern global society and are a major part of the worldwide economic  foundation.  While mining is essential to maintain our modern society, it is  estimated that mining and mining­related activities are the leading sources of metal  releases to the environment (USEPA, 1999).  From exploration through post­closure  phase of hard­rock mining, the potential exists for negative environmental impacts  to both surface water and ground water.  The Mine Waste Technology Program  reports that the United States (US) hard­rock mining industry (excluding coal)  released 3.5 billion pounds of toxic pollution in 1998, greater than half of all  pollution released that year in the US (USEPA, 1999).  Acid mine drainage, which  includes acidic water and elevated metal concentrations is considered by the USEPA  to be the primary 'toxic pollutant' contributed by hard­rock mines. Waste rock piles, stockpiles and leach ore piles comprise only a subset of the  many facilities found within the mining industry.  Waste rock piles, stockpiles and  leach ore piles occupy a footprint greater than 90,000 hectares in the US alone and  are a significant source of the reported metal release.  While the US is used as an  example, metal release is a global problem with significant volumes of waste rock  existing in other countries such as Australia, Canada, Chile, and Mexico to name a  few. To minimize future effects from mining and to ensure the sustainability of the  1 industry, additional knowledge of the systematics causing metal releases is required.  Such information is used for prediction, planning and design of closure and  mitigation strategies. This thesis describes work conducted as part of the University of British  Columbia (UBC) waste rock research program designed to provide data to better  understand water flow and solute transport processes occurring within unsaturated  waste rock piles.  Specifically, this research focuses on the link between infiltration  into a waste rock pile, the surface condition, its internal structure, and the spatial  and temporal distribution of flow at the base of the pile. 1.1.  RESEARCH OBJECTIVES It is believed that a better understanding of the hydrogeology of waste rock piles  is essential for quantification, prediction and prevention of acid rock drainage and  metal loadings to the environment (Smith et al, 1995).  For example, variable  surface infiltration rates and material heterogeneities are believed to result in the  preferential flow of water; and cyclical and seasonal evaporation of the pore water  in the upper portions of the waste rock piles are believed to result in the consequent  precipitation of metal­rich salts, and subsequent dissolution of salts by precipitation  after extended dry periods.  The flow of water and transport of metals through  unsaturated waste rock is complicated by the heterogeneous material properties,  dynamic climatic stresses and the configuration of the piles and/or covers.  To  improve our understanding, an intermediate­scale constructed waste rock pile  2 experiment (CPE) was constructed and monitored for five years at a mine site in  northern Saskatchewan.  The CPE was used to investigate the flow of water and the  transport of solutes through heterogeneous waste rock.  The objectives of the  experiments examined in this thesis are: • To develop a comprehensive liquid and vapor flux balance for an uncovered  waste rock pile and compare it to the water balance for the same pile after  placement of a compacted surface cover. • To investigate the relationship between the volume and timing of basal  outflow relative to the surface texture and topography of the waste rock pile. • To characterize the degree of spatial variability of infiltration into the  covered waste rock and to estimate the magnitude and rate of flow within the  covered waste rock. • To identify the physical properties most important for understanding how  water flows through coarse waste rock and to determine the mechanisms  controlling the flow of water in covered waste rock. • To characterize the in­situ waste rock structure and the distribution of tracers  in pore water at the time of pile deconstruction. • To understand the relationship between the structure of the pile, the in­situ  tracer concentrations and the hydrographs observed in the basal lysimeters. • To identify practices that might improve existing closure practices for waste  rock and/or stockpiles. 3 Often predictions of the quantity and duration of metal leaching from waste rock  are performed with little data about the hydrologic processes occurring within waste  rock.  The general hypothesis examined in this thesis is that the reliable prediction  of mass loading from a waste rock pile demands a detailed understanding and  characterization of the fluid flow and solute transport pathways, even in the case  where a low­infiltration cover has been placed on the waste rock pile. 1.2.  WASTE ROCK HYDROGEOLOGY The mine waste rock hydrogeology project consisted of faculty and student  researchers from UBC and the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) and was funded  jointly by AREVA Resources Canada (formally Cogema Resources), Cameco  Corporation and Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada  (NSERC).  This research completes the flow and transport portion of the project  conducted on an experimental waste rock pile at the Cluff Lake Mine.  This section  introduces the site and experimental design of the research experiment as a  background for the following chapters. 1.2.1.  Cluff Lake Mine Cluff Lake is owned by AREVA Resources Canada.  The mine operated  between 1980 and 2002, producing approximately 30,000 metric tons of uranium.  Cluff Lake is located in northern Saskatchewan, approximately 15 km from the  Alberta border (Figure 1.1). 4 1.2.2.  Climate Cluff Lake is located in a semi­arid climate, in the northwestern Saskatchewan  boreal forest region.  Temperature, rainfall, snow depth, wind velocity and  evaporation have been recorded since the start of mining at Cluff Lake.  Average  daily temperature during the summer months ranges from 14.0 oC to 17.0 oC and the  range of average monthly temperatures in the winters months is ­17.5 oC to ­20.3 oC.  AREVA estimates that the average frost­free period is approximately 90 days per  year.  Precipitation amounts for the region are highest during the summer months,  typically during the months of June through to September.  The greatest amount of  snowfall usually occurs between January and April.  Average annual precipitation  from 1981 to 1998 was 459 mm and the average yearly pan evaporation measured at  Cluff Lake is 704.5 mm (Cluff Lake Project, 2001). 1.2.3.  Geology and the DJ­X Waste Rock Cluff Lake is situated on the southern side of the Carswell Structure within the  Athabascan basin.  The Carswell Structure consists of three concentric rings of  dolomite, sandstone and Precambrian gneiss, from the outer ring to the center  respectively.  The structure is surrounded by the younger, undisturbed Athabasca  Formation (Harper, 1982).  The structure is thought to be the result of a meteorite  impact. Airborne exploration began in 1958.  Open pit mining at Cluff Lake began in  1980 and was followed by underground mining until May of 2002.  Three waste  5 rock piles were constructed, the Claude pile, D­Pit pile, and the DJN pile.  The  Claude waste rock pile was constructed between 1982 and 1989 and contains  approximately 7.23 million tonnes of waste rock from the Claude pit.  The pile is  approximately 30 meters high and covers an area of 26.4 hectares.  The D­Pit waste  rock pile is small (2.3 ha) and contains less than 150,000 m3.  The DJN pile was  constructed between 1989 and 1991.  The pile is 16 meters high and covers an area  of 15.3 hectares and contains approximately 1.62 million tonnes of waste rock.  The  DJN pile was constructed by end­dumping and contained well developed traffic  surfaces between the lifts of dumped material.  The D­JX waste rock was excavated  from the D­JX open pit between 1994 and 1997 and placed in the DJN open pit.  A  small portion of the D­JX waste rock was used to construct the CPE.  The D­JX  material consisted of brecciated Precambrian gneiss, hosting both a uraninite­ selenide­sulfide assemblage, containing molybdenite, and a uraninite­dravite­lead­ copper­zinc sulphide assemblage (Baudemont et al, 1996).  The highest grade  uraninite sulphides were removed during mining.  Other minerals present in the  waste include epidote, coffinite (the main uranium­bearing mineral), magnesium  chlorites, illite, and rare fluorite and dravite.  The D­JX material has a total sulphur  content of  0.2 to 0.5% and contains iron, copper, lead, zinc, uranium, aluminum  and molybdenum as the major metals.  Even though the site is located in a semi­ arid, cool climate and the total sulfur content is low, low pH and metals are  observed in the drainage from the CPE. 6 1.2.4.  Experimental Design An intermediate­scale waste rock pile was constructed and fully instrumented at  the Cluff Lake Mine (Nichol, Smith and Beckie, 2000).  The CPE was built in 1998  and was 32 m by 32 m­wide, with an 8 meter by 8 meter­wide by 5 meter­high  central core (Figure 1.2).  The waste rock pile was composed of run­of­mine waste  rock, randomly dumped on a contiguous grid of 16 lysimeters, each 2 m by 2 m  (Figure 1.3).  The details of the lysimeter construction are outlined in Figure 1.4 and  described by Nichol (2003).  The outer walls of the lysimeter grid extended to the  top surface of the CPE.  Outflow from each lysimeter was piped to an instrument  hut where the volume and rate were measured and recorded continuously.  In  addition, water samples were collected manually from nine soil water solution  samplers, and nine tensiometers buried in the waste rock.  The waste rock pile was  instrumented with automatic temperature, soil moisture (TDR) and matrix suction  sensors (tensiometer and thermal dissipation sensors).  Detailed results from the  three years of experiments on the uncovered CPE are described in Nichol (2003),  Smith and Beckie (2003), and Nichol et al, (2000, 2003, and 2005) and are reviewed  below. 1.3.  RESEARCH METHODS The studies described above produced significant results regarding water flow  processes occurring in an uncovered, coarse unsaturated waste rock.  The research  not only advanced the understanding of flow mechanisms in waste rock, but also  7 identified areas where further research was needed and provided insight into how to  obtain needed data using existing instrumentation. To meet the specific objectives of this dissertation, data were obtained during  and following both natural and artificial rainfall events on the uncovered and the  covered CPE.  Methods included the application of an isotopic tracer, construction  of a surface cover, and a detailed deconstruction of the CPE.  Data included field  observations of the waste rock structure and characteristics, measurements of  lysimeter outflow, internal water content and temperature, climatic variables and  tracer concentrations of pore water. 1.4.  PREVIOUS RESULTS AND BACKGROUND This section contains a summary of the previous results from experiments  conducted with the CPE and background information about measuring soil water  characteristic curves and estimating actual and potential evaporation from coarse  waste rock.  The information provided serves as general background to support the  following four chapters. 1.4.1.  CPE ­ Previous Results The construction of the CPE was completed in September of 1998.  The initial  wetting­up of the waste rock required greater than a year, and the CPE first reached  a state of dynamic equilibrium in late fall of 1999.  Nichol (2003) analyzed  lysimeter outflow between the summer of 1999 and the summer of 2001 following  both natural and artificial rainfall events on the CPE.  The average yearly net­ 8 percolation, into the uncovered CPE, measured as direct outflow relative to  cumulative rainfall, varied from 55 to 59 percent.  Hydrographs from the 16 basal  lysimeters show that at a 2 m by 2 m scale, surface infiltration on the uncovered  waste rock pile led to a large range of wetting front arrival times (Nichol et al, 2000,  2002, Nichol, 2003).  The outflow response observed from each individual lysimeter  was consistent in form from rainfall event to event.  Furthermore, the magnitude of  the spatial variability in flow was observed to increase with an increase in intensity  of precipitation.  Each individual wetting front arrival was believed to represent at  least one spatially distinct flow path.  The high variability in magnitude of flow  observed in the hydrographs was proposed to be a result of the the irregular surface  topography of the CPE and to a lesser degree related to internal structure of the  waste rock (Nichol, 2003). A chloride tracer was applied to the surface of the pile during an artificial  rainfall event in the fall of 1999 and high frequency samples of the outflow were  collected during rainfall events for tracer analysis.  From the tracer data, Nichol  (2003) was able to confirm that the outflow hydrographs represent a contribution of  water from multiple flow paths.  The chloride breakthrough curves and the  hydrographs allowed for insights into the relationship between distinct flow paths,  chemistry, and residence time.  Nichol concluded that between 5 and 9 percent of  the outflow during larger rainfall events was event water, and approximately 91 to  95 percent was pre­event water.  In addition, he estimated a mean water residence  9 time of 3.0 to 3.9 years for the 5­meter high pile at the average annual rainfall rate. Wagner (2005) conducted a comprehensive study of the minerals that contribute  to the weathering processes in the CPE.  Wagner identified the primary minerals  responsible for the cations measured in the outflow water as chlorite and muscovite,  and determined that kaolinite, smectite and amphibole were secondary suppliers.  Secondary minerals observed during the deconstruction of the CPE were gypsum,  jarosite, ferryhydrite, goethite, annabergite and hydrated aluminum and magnesium  sulfates.  Based on data from 2001 to 2002, Wagner observed an initial, rapid and  short­lived spike in the solute concentrations (up to 10,000 mg/L sulfate) following  large natural and artificial rainfall events.  Following the spike in solute  concentrations, a general inverse relationship between outflow concentrations and  rate of outflow was observed.  The negative correlation between outflow and  concentrations became apparent with the lowest concentrations during elevated flow  rates and increasing concentrations as the flow rate gradually decreased to pre­ rainfall levels.  Wagner estimated sulfur release rates between 0.1 and 19 mg SO4/ (kg*week), yielding an approximate total of 150 kg of sulfur released from the CPE  between 2000 and 2003. 1.4.2.  Water Content and Matric Suction  The soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) is a relationship between the  saturation of a porous material and matric suction.  The shape of the curve is a  function of the pore size distribution.  Based on a SWCC, the relationship between  10 either the water content or matric suction and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity  for a particular soil can be estimated using the  Brooks and Corey (1964), the van  Genuchten (1980) or the Fredlund et al (1994a) methods. The SWCC can be measured from laboratory tests on small samples, estimated  numerically using a model such as SoilVision (SoilVision Systems, 1997) or the  MK model (Aubertin et al, 2003), or measured directly from in­situ matric suction  and water content data over time.  There are challenges associated with each  method, and the best method often depends on material properties, as well as the  moisture conditions. The SWCC's of coarse waste rock determined in the laboratory are rarely  representative of field conditions because of the small representative sample volume  and because the testing process disrupts the waste rock structure.  The disruption  occurs during the sampling, sieving and packing of the waste rock into the testing  apparatus.  For situations where in­situ measurements cannot be made, laboratory  SWCC's can be useful for understanding general waste rock properties of the finer  grained size fraction, and are a necessary check on numerically predicted SWCC's.  Laboratory SWCC's are also important in dual­continuum approaches, where the  matrix and the coarse fraction are treated distinctly. Field SWCC's can be obtained for materials where a wide range of water content  and matric suction values are collected along an uninterrupted wetting or drying  cycle.  Near­surface soils are better candidates for the measurement of field curves  11 where evaporation can result in high matric suctions that correspond to water  contents below the value at residual saturation.  In contrast, waste rock located  below the effect of evaporation will have a smaller range of matric suction values  making the measurement of a complete curve difficult. Few examples of field based SWCC's exist from both in­situ instrumentation  and from direct measurements of water content and matric suction from waste rock  samples.  Stockwell (2002), Stockwell et al (2006) and Nichol et al (2002) were  unable to obtain meaningful field SWCC's from coincident field measurements of  moisture content and matric suction.  The majority of their field data plot within the  portion of the SWCC most affected by hysteresis and they were unable to  conclusively determine if the waste rock was wetting or drying at the time of  measurement.  In the laboratory, samples are subjected to uninterrupted periods of  drying, starting from saturation and periods of wetting starting from a dry state.  During the wetting and drying cycles, the matric suction and water content  properties are measured and a wetting and a drying curve is determined.  In the  field, the waste rock is subjected to natural rainfall making it difficult to determine  if the waste rock is on a wetting curve, drying curve or on a scanning curve.  Since  the matric suction/water content relationship in the field is typically along a  scanning curve with a small range in suction, the end members of the field SWCC  (ie. residual saturation and near­ saturated portions of the SWCC) are not  represented. 12 Shurniak (2003) has shown that reliable field derived SWCC's can be produced  from a matric suction sensor and a TDR probe in the same location in near­surface  waste rock and cover systems.  Unlike the CPE, the material studied by Shurniak  was fine grained and experienced uninterrupted cycles of wetting and drying.  Fine  grained material located at the soil/atmosphere interface can experience matric  suctions far in excess of those produced in a standard Tempe Cell apparatus.  As a  result, a larger range in suction, including the end members, was represented. The CPE was in an extended state of drain down since cover placement and was  still draining at the time of deconstruction.  The field conditions at the time of  deconstruction, and the matric suction measurement techniques allowed for  sampling of a larger range of the matric suction/water content relationship of the in­ situ waste rock.  The technique is discussed in Chapter 2. 1.4.3.  Potential and Actual Evaporation Evaporation from a waste rock surface is difficult to directly measure and is an  important parameter of concern.  Instrumentation to directly measure the surface  energy flux were not available on the waste rock pile and the actual and potential  evaporation were both estimated using the modified Penman approach, and  calculated as a residual based on the water balance equation (1) in Chapter 2.  The  potential evaporation (PE) of water from a free­water surface requires a continuous  supply of energy for the latent heat of vaporization and requires that a vapor  pressure gradient exists away from the surface.  For evaporation to proceed, a  13 continuous supply of water must be available at the evaporating surface.  In waste  rock, the water supply is controlled by the moisture content and the particle size  characteristics of the waste rock.  Under saturated conditions, the evaporation rate  from a soil should be nearly equal to the evaporation rate from a free­water surface  (Holmes, 1961, Wilson et al, 1997).  As the degree of saturation decreases, the  evaporation rate becomes transport limited and is more dependent on the ability of  the soil to deliver water to the evaporation surface.  As the soil dries, the actual  evaporation rate significantly decreases compared to the potential evaporation rate. Potential evaporation is typically measured using evaporation pans or calculated  from meteorological data using the Penman equation (Penman, 1948).  The direct  measurement of AE from a soil surface is difficult.  Methods used to measure or  estimate the AE are the energy balance method (Bowen 1926), the eddy covariance  method (Baldocchi et al, 1988, Carey et al, 2005) and the modified Penman  equation (Wilson, 1990 and 1994).  Wilson (1994) modified the Penman (1948)  equation for PE to estimate AE from a soil.  The modified equation replaces the  term describing the vapor pressure of the water at the surface by a term that  describes the vapor pressure of the water held in capillarity within the soil.  The  modified Penman approach to calculate the vapor pressure is embedded in the  numerical evaporative flux model used in this research.  Model inputs for the  calculation of the soil water vapor pressure include soil parameters derived from the  SWCC and meteorological parameters such as temperature and relative humidity of  14 the air. 1.4.  STRUCTURE OF DISSERTATION This dissertation consists of an introductory chapter (1), four independent  research papers in Chapters 2 through 5, and one summary chapter (6). Chapter 2 presents a pre­cover and post­cover water balance for the CPE and a  discussion of the major water balance components.  Chapter 2 also includes a  discussion of techniques for characterization of the physical properties of coarse  waste rock that are essential for evaporative flux modeling.  The use of a model  based on Richards' equation for simulating flux in and out of covered waste rock is  discussed. Chapter 3 presents the results of experiments that investigate the spatial and  temporal distribution of outflow as measured in the basal lysimeters in response to  rainfall events following two successive surface modifications.  Surface  modifications include the ripping and leveling of the surface followed by the  installation of a compacted waste rock cover surface.  Chapter 3 also presents  observational data that links the waste rock heterogeneity and variable infiltration to  the character and rate of water flow within covered waste rock. Chapter 4 provides a discussion of a stable isotope tracer study conducted on the  covered surface of the waste rock pile in the final year of the field study.  The  isotopic tracer is used to investigate the flow patterns within the covered waste rock,  and to constrain estimates of the residence time of water in the covered waste rock  15 pile. Chapter 5 presents the results and a discussion of multiple investigations  conducted during and following the deconstruction of the waste rock pile.  The  investigations attempt to link data obtained during deconstruction to earlier  experimental results including the relationship between waste rock structure and  lysimeter outflow, a dye tracer and a chloride tracer experiment. Chapter 6 provides an overall summary and conclusions for the thesis and  suggestions for future studies. 16 1.5.  REFERENCES Aubertin, M., Mbonimpa, M., Chapuis, R.P.,  2003. A model to predict the water  retention curve from basic geotechnical properties. Canadian  Geotechnical Journal. v.40. pp. 1104­1122. Baldocchi, D.D., Hicks, B.B. and Meyers, T.P.,  1988. Measuring biosphere­ atmosphere exchanges of biologically related gases with  micrometeorological methods. Ecology. v. 69. n. 5. pp. 1331­1340. Baudemont, D. and Fedorowich, J.,  1996. Structural control of uranium  mineralization at the Dominique Peter deposit, Saskatchewan, Canada.  Economic Geology. v. 91. pp. 855­874. Bowen, G.J. and Wilkinson, B,  2002. Spatial distribution of D18O in meteoric  precipitation. Geology. v. 30. no. 4. pp. 315­318. Carey, S.K., Barbour, S.L. and Hendry, M.J.,  2005. Evaporation from a waste­rock  surface, Key Lake, Saskatchewan, Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v.  42. pp. 1189­1199. Cluff Lake Project,  2001. Comprehensive Study Report and Appendices,  Submitted to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission on January 19,  2001. v. 1­2. Harper, C.T.,  1982. Geology of the Carswell structure, central part. Saskatchewan  Geological Survey, Report 214. 6 p. Holmes, R. M.,  1961. Estimation of soil moisture content using evaporation data.  17 In: Evaporation, Proceedings of Hydrological Symposium 2, Toronto.  Queen's Printer, Ottawa. pp. 184­196. Marcoline, J.R., Smith, L, Beckie, R.D.,  2006, Water Migration in Covered Waste  Rock, Investigations Using. Deuterium as a Tracer.  Proceedings of the  7th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage, R.I. Barnhisel  (ed.). The American Society of Mining and Reclamation, pp.  1142­1156. Nichol, C.F.,  2003. Transient flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous  media: Field experiments in mine waste rock. Ph.D. dissertation,  University of British Columbia, Canada. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2000. Hydrogeologic behavior of  unsaturated mine waste rock: An experimental study. In Proceedings of  the 5th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage. Society for  Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration Inc. pp. 215­224. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2002. Evaluation of uncoated and coated  time domain reflectometry probes for high electrical conductivity  systems. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Journal. v. 66. pp. 1454­1465. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2003. Water flow in uncovered waste rock ­  A multi­year large lysimeter study.  Sixth International Conference  Acid Rock Drainage. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2005. Field scale experiments of  18 unsaturated flow and solute transport in a heterogeneous porous  medium. Water Resources Research. v. 41. Penman, H.L.,  1948. Natural evapotranspiration from open water, bare soil, and  grass. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A. v. 193.  pp. 120­145. Shurniak, R.E.,  2003, Predictive modeling of moisture movement within soil cover  systems for saline/sodic overburden piles, MS Thesis, University of  Saskatchewan, Canada. pp. 1­129. Smith, L., Lopez, D., Beckie, R.D., Morin, K., Dawson, R. and Price, W.,  1995.  Hydrogeology of waste rock dumps. Report prepared for CANMET  and BC Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources. pp.  1­130. Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2003. Hydrological and geochemical transport processes  in mine waste rock, Ch 3 in Environmental Aspects of Mine Wastes,  Mineral. Assoc. Canada, Short Course Series. v. 31. pp. 51­72. SoilVision Systems Ltd.,  1997. User’s guide for a knowledge­based database  program for estimating soil properties of unsaturated soils for use in  geotechnical engineering. SoilVision Systems Ltd., Saskatchewan,  Canada. Stockwell, J.E.,  2002. Investigation of hydrological and geochemical properties and  spatial relationships of an unsaturated waste rock pile, Key Lake,  19 Saskatchewan, Masters Thesis, University of British Columbia. U.S. EPA,  1999. Mine waste technology program, 1999 annual report. Prepared for  the U.S. EPA and the U.S. DOE.  Inter agency agreement management  committee: IAG ID NO. DW89938513­01­0. Wagner, K.,  2005. Geochemical characterization of mine waste rock, Cluff Lake,  Saskatchewan. Masters Thesis, University of British Columbia. Wilson, G.W.,  1990. Soil Evaporative Fluxes for Geotechnical Engineering  Problems. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon,  Saskatchewan, Canada. Wilson, G.W., Fredlund, D.G. and Barbour, S.L.,  1994. Coupled soil­atmosphere  modeling for soil evaporation. Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v. 31.  no.2. pp. 151­161. 20 Figure 1.1.  Map of Saskatchewan with the location of the Cluff Lake Mine and the  constructed waste rock pile experiment. 21 Cluff  Lake Wollaston Athabasca Lake Athabasca Basin Saskatoon Prince Albert La Ronge Regina Southend N Figure 1.2.  Photograph of the CPE on top of the DJN waste rock pile. Photograph  taken in the summer of 2003. 22 Figure 1.3.  Schematic view of the top of the waste rock pile.  The grid of sixteen  lysimeters is shown in relation to the overlying waste rock.  The origin of the grid is on the  lower left (south west) side of lysimeter 1.  The lysimeter grid is to scale and is  superimposed on topographic contours of the constructed waste rock pile.  The three  instrument profiles are labeled with an X, and contour intervals are 30 cm. 23 RUMENT Figure 1.4.  Cross­section of the constructed waste rock pile and a detail of the basal  lysimeter design. 24 CHAPTER 2: WATER BALANCE OF THE CONSTRUCTED WASTE  ROCK PILE: PRE AND POST­COVER.  2.1.  INTRODUCTION Water is the principal medium by which contaminants are transported from  sources in mine waste rock to the receiving environment, and a low permeability  cover can be expected to reduce net infiltration and delay metal loadings.  As a  result, the need to quantify the water balance components for covered and  uncovered waste rock stockpiles is common at both operational and closed mines.  Water balance components such as net percolation or basal outflow are important  input parameters for surface and groundwater modeling (Lopez et al, 1997, Swanson  et al, 1998, USEPA, 1999, Kempton and Atkins, 2000).  The infiltration, storage  and runoff components are important for determining slope and erosional stability  of waste rock (Torres et al, 1998, Nicolau, 2003) and for carrying out geochemical  modeling (Alpers and Nordstrom, 1999, Bain et al, 2001, Frostad et al, 2005).  The  relative proportions of runoff, infiltration and evaporation are critical for evaluating  cover performance (Khire et al, 1997, O'Kane et al, 2000, Durham, 2002, Noel and  Rykaart, 2003), and for evaluating vegetative success (Grigg et al, 2003).  Water  balance components are also important for estimating when waste rock is no longer    A version of this chapter will be submitted for publication.  Marcoline, J.R., Water balance of the  constructed waste rock pile: pre and post­cover.   25 accumulating water following initial material placement, and has reached a state of  dynamic equilibrium. Direct measurement of the water balance components in waste rock is often  difficult, even with abundant in­situ instrumentation and monitoring devices.  Waste  rock piles may be hectares in size and consist of highly heterogeneous material with  significant variations in particle size and composition.  Often data are collected from  a few locations across these large piles, and each measurement may only be  representative of the material within a few centimeters to a meter of the instrument.  The research presented in this paper is from a controlled, intermediate­scale  experimental waste rock pile from which detailed hydrologic and climatological  data were collected.  The research attempts to quantify the water balance of an  experimental waste rock pile and examine how the alteration of the surface  condition, by the placement of a low permeability cover, affects the water balance. The primary objective of this research was to establish the water balance for an  unsaturated waste rock pile over the time period from 2000 to 2004.  The four years  include a three year period when the pile was uncovered, and a one year period after  a compacted cover was placed on the pile.  Of particular interest is the change in  water balance components following the placement of a lower permeability cover  that resembled a traffic, or haul surface. 26 2.2.  BACKGROUND AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 2.2.1.  Field Location and Climate Cluff Lake Mine is a hard­rock uranium mine located in northern Saskatchewan,  approximately 15 km from the Alberta border.  The mine site is located in a semi­ arid climate, in the northwestern boreal forest region.  The average annual  temperature at Cluff Lake is ­0.3 °C, with three frost­free months per year.  Average  daily temperatures are above freezing for approximately 5 months (May to  October).  The average site rainfall, excluding snow, for the 18 year period between  1981 and 1998 was 310 mm, with a minimum of 231 mm in 1986 and a maximum  of 433 mm in 1996 (Cogema Resources, 2001).  Monthly precipitation data for the  top surface of the waste rock pile are summarized in Table 2.1.  Based on the daily  Class “A” Evaporation Pan data and rainfall from 1981 to 1998 (Cogema  Resources, 2001), potential evaporation at Cluff Lake is approximately twice the  precipitation, with an average potential evaporation of 704 mm per year. 2.2.2.  Experimental Design The constructed waste rock pile experiment (CPE) was located on top of the D­ JX waste rock pile.  The CPE was built in 1998 and was 32 m by 32 m­wide, with  an 8 m by 8 m­wide by 5 m­high central core (Nichol, Smith and Beckie, 2000).  The waste rock pile was composed of run­of­mine waste rock, dumped on a  contiguous grid of 16 lysimeters, each 2 m by 2 m (Figure 2.1).  Details of the  lysimeter construction are outlined in Figure 2.2.  The outer walls of the lysimeter  27 grid extended to the top surface of the CPE.  The volume and rate of lysimeter  outflow, internal moisture content, temperature, and climatic conditions were  measured and recorded continuously.  Moisture content was measured by time  domain reflectrometry (TDR) by a total of 21 probes placed in 3 vertical profiles  and later by 4 additional probes placed in the compacted cover (described below).  The pre­covered waste rock pile experiment at Cluff Lake is described in detail by  Nichol et al (2000), Nichol (2003), Marcoline et al (2003 and 2006) and Nichol et al  (2005); therefore, this paper only provides a summary of the previous work and  focuses on the cover experiment. 2.2.3.  Compacted Waste Rock Cover on CPE In September of 2002, a compacted layer was constructed with D­JX waste rock  located from within the CPE but outside of the lysimeter grid.  Four additional  Zegelin­type TDR probes (Zegelin, 1989) with a high resistance coating on the  center rod (Nichol et al, 2003) and two temperature probes were installed on the  surface just prior to placing the compacted cover.  Minus 0.1 m screened waste rock  was used for the compacted cover.  Moisture was added to approximate the optimal  water content of 7% as determined by laboratory Standard Proctor testing (ASTM,  1991a), and the surface was compacted with a jumping­jack compactor delivering  approximately 3100 pounds/blow over a 0.34 m by 0.36 m pad.  The compacted  layer was constructed with an overall slope of 1% towards the north edge of the  waste rock pile to allow for surface runoff during higher intensity storms.  The cover  28 had a runoff collection drain on the north side, described below.  The final surface  resembled a mine traffic surface, had a depth of compaction of approximately 0.15  m and an average density of 2280 kg/m3. 2.3.  METHODS The water balance is determined for the CPE based on data from the four year  period between 2000 and 2004.  The water balance for the CPE consists of four  measured quantities and one calculated quantity.  The direct measurements are the  water falling on the pile from precipitation (P), the net­percolation (NP) which is  equivalent to the water leaving the pile through lysimeter outflow, change in storage  ( S), and surface runoff (RΔ S ).  Evaporation (E) is the calculated quantity.  Measurements of P and NP were collected and recorded for the duration of the  experiment.  RS was not observed prior to cover placement and was only collected  and recorded for the post cover period.  Change in storage ( S) was evaluated usingΔ   records of moisture content and outflow.  Direct measurements of evaporation for  the CPE do not exist and a water balance approach was used to develop an estimate  of the evaporation across the top surface of the pile.  Evaporation was estimated  using the following equation: (1)  E = P ­ RS ­ NP ­  SΔ A coupled unsaturated flow and evaporative flux model was used as a check on  29 the estimated evaporative component of the water balance for the covered pile. The water balance data from 2000 to 2004 are presented on an annual basis from  April 1st to March 31st.  The use of annual estimates simplifies the water balance  calculation since the annual net change in internal storage was approximately zero  (discussed below).  The 1st of April was identified as the beginning of the annual  cycle based on the observations that the surface of the waste rock pile thawed  between mid­April to early May, and that the lowest outflow volumes were recorded  in early April of each year as shown in Figure 2.3.  Figure 2.3 shows the hydrograph  measured as combined outflow from the 16 lysimeters at the base of the CPE  between January of 2000 and May of 2004.  The methodology used to acquire data  for each component of the water balance is presented below. 2.3.1.  Precipitation (P) Precipitation measured on the CPE consisted of both natural and artificial  rainfall events.  Natural rainfall was measured by two independent, continuously  logging, tipping bucket rain gauges located directly on the top of the waste rock  pile.  The rainfall record is complete without data gaps.  An Environment Canada  tipping bucket rain gauge located one kilometer northeast, a manual rain gauge  located four kilometers south at the mill site, and a tipping bucket gauge located  approximately five kilometers south­southeast at the tailings facility were used as a  quality check on the data.  Data from the Environment Canada rain gauge and the  manual gauge at the mill site were plus or minus 10% of the natural rainfall  30 component recorded in two tipping bucket rain gauges on the top surface of the  CPE, however, the rain gauge at the tailings facility recorded a significantly lower  amount of precipitation.  The quantity and uniformity of artificial rainfall on the  CPE was measured using 32 cups placed on the surface of the waste rock pile, two  centered above each of the 16 lysimeters.  The uniformity of each of the combined  sets of 16 cups was greater than 95 using the Christensen Uniformity Coefficient  (Christensen, 1942).  The coefficient of uniformity approaches 100 as the rainfall  approaches complete uniformity (Nichol, 2003).  As a result of the even rainfall  coverage, the average value from the rainfall cups was used and rainfall was  assumed to be evenly distributed across the surface. 2.3.2.  Net Percolation (NP) The 64 m2 area of the central core of the waste rock pile was located on top of  16 lysimeters, each four square meters in area.  Net­percolation was measured as  direct outflow from the waste rock pile using 16 tipping bucket rainfall gauges  plumbed to the basal lysimeters.  The time of each tip for each lysimeter was  recorded.  Calibrations specific to each tipping bucket were used to convert the tip  time difference arrays into precise flow rates.  Cumulative volumes from each basal  lysimeter were then calculated from the calibrated flow rate data and the tip time  arrays. The term net­percolation is synonymous to net­infiltration and is used to make a  clear distinction between net­infiltration and surface infiltration.  Net­percolation  31 refers to water that infiltrates into the waste rock pile to a depth beyond which  evaporative effects are significant and reports to the base of the CPE.  Surface  infiltration includes water that percolates into the waste rock and is later removed by  evaporation. 2.3.3.  Surface Runoff (RS ) Runoff from the surface of the CPE only occurred after placement of the  compacted waste rock cover in the fall of 2002.  Prior to cover construction, the  perimeter of the waste rock pile was isolated from the surrounding waste rock by the  lysimeter perimeter walls, which extended several centimeters above the surface.  The design prevented overland flow from entering the 8 m by 8 m surface of the  CPE.  Localized ponding on the surface of the CPE was observed once during the  highest intensity artificial rainfall event.  Even during this high intensity event  overland flow was not observed.  All water that was applied to the surface of the  pile prior to covering either infiltrated into the waste rock or was removed by  evaporation.   During the placement of the compacted waste rock cover, a runoff gutter was  embedded into the surface along the base of the lowest side of the cover.  Following  placement of the lower permeability cover, runoff occurred in response to large  rainfall events.  Water collected in the runoff drain was stored in four 200 l drums  and measured using two independent tipping bucket rainfall gauges at the base of  the pile. 32 2.3.4.  Change in Storage ( S)Δ The water content of the pile increases rapidly during a few rainfall events, and  the duration of drain down of the water content is typically on a seasonal scale.  The  seasonal drain down to a pre­spring water content occurs over a period of  approximately 3 months (Figure 2.3).  To account for the seasonal pattern of water  content within the CPE, the change in storage is defined on a yearly basis.  The net­ annual percent change in storage was computed based on the difference in the  volumetric water content in the CPE in March of each year.  The change in the  volume of water in storage within the CPE was estimated using water content data  measured by 21 TDR probes located and along three vertical profiles at depths of  0.15 m, 0.2 m, 0.3 m, 0.4 m, 0.7 m, 1.2 m, 1.95 m, 3.2 m, and 4.7 m within the  waste rock pile and five TDR probes from locations within the cover.  Unlike the  lysimeters, which sample all water leaving the base of the CPE, the TDR probes  provide only limited point data from within the heterogeneous waste rock which  must be scaled up to provide estimates of whole­pile water storage.  The estimate of  the whole­pile water storage was based on the sum of the volume of water  calculated to be the cover (0 m to 0.3 m), in the upper half of the waste rock pile  (0.3 m to 2.5 m) and in the lower half of the waste rock pile (2.5 m to 5 m). 2.3.5.  Evaporation (E) Direct measurements of evaporation from the surface of the CPE do not exist.  As a result, annual evaporation was calculated as a residual based on equation (1)  33 and therefore includes the cumulative errors associated with each of the other four  components of measured water balance.  While the cumulative errors are not  quantified, the most likely sources of error are associated with the change in storage  and the net­percolation terms.  Transpiration is not included since vegetation was  not established on the surface of the CPE during the four year period.  Estimated  AE, simulated AE and simulated PE rates are compared to Bowen ratio energy  balance data collected from the Cluff Lake Mine site in 1996 (Ayres, 1998) and to  PE data measured at the mill site. 2.3.5.1  Evaporative Flux Modeling To assess the reasonableness of the evaporation rate calculated from the  measured water balance components, evaporation rates were also calculated using  an unsaturated flow model containing an evaporative flux module. There are many possible models that can be used to estimate evaporation.  The  HELP model (U.S Army Corps of Engineers, 1994) is one of the most widely used  models for water balance evaluations because of its ease of use and minimal data  requirements; however, this model is not based on Richards equation and has been  shown to provide poor estimates of water balance components (Benson and Pliska  1996, Albright et al, 2002).  Increasingly, one and two­dimensional variably­ saturated porous media models based on Richards equation such as UNSAT­H  (Fayer and Jones 1990), SoilCover (SoilCover, 1997) or VadoseW (Geo­Slope,  2004) are applied for water balance studies in waste rock.  These models are  34 physically based, readily available, but do not account for non­Darcy flow such as  macropore flow.  HYDRUS­2D (Simunek et al, 1996) accounts for preferential  flow, but does not take into account heat transfer or vapour flow in evaluating  evaporative fluxes at the soil surface. While several models are available that incorporate evaporative flux modeling,  SoilCover Version 4.1 (SoilCover, 1997) was deemed most appropriate for the  evaluation of fluxes from the covered waste rock.  SoilCover is a transient, one­ dimensional finite element, heat and mass transfer model for saturated and  unsaturated soils.  The unique feature of SoilCover is that it describes moisture flow  using the Richards equation and vapor flow using Fick's law, and the water and  vapour flow processes are coupled using both heat flow and the modified Penman  equation (Wilson, 1990 and Wilson et al, 1994).  As a result, SoilCover enables the  accurate prediction of actual evaporation and is commonly used (Kowalewski, 1999,  Rykaart et al, 2001, Wels, 2001).  The model describes heat, water and vapor flow  within the soils based on meteorological conditions and soil properties. SoilCover uses a Richards equation approach to model variably saturated water  flow.  Therefore, SoilCover may not provide a valid physical representation of flow  within the uncovered CPE where a significant macropore flow component was  observed (Nichol, 2003, Marcoline et al, 2003, Nichol et al, 2005).  If the flow  through the lower permeability cover results in water bypassing the coarser regions  through which the macropore flow occurred, and the physical parameters measured  35 in the field and laboratory are measured from the finer portions of the waste rock,  then it is likely that a capillary­based, porous media model can be used to evaluate  the water balance components of the pile following cover placement. For the measured waste rock properties, and the imposed climate and thermal  boundary conditions, SoilCover is used to predict surface flux and basal flux  conditions.  The flux conditions predicted from the CPE include actual evaporation,  potential evaporation, surface runoff and net­percolation.  SoilCover input files  include daily meteorological data for two years and solver settings (Appendix A). 2.3.5.2.  Evaporative Flux Modeling Using SoilCover SoilCover modeling proceeded in the following steps: 1) Two base case scenarios were developed: one using a soil water  characteristic curve (SWCC) and porosity value developed in the laboratory, the  other a SWCC and porosity value developed from field measurements in the CPE.  2) Each base case model was run for the April 2002 to April 2003 water year  (uncovered) and the April 2003 to April 2004 water year (covered). 3) The initial condition was established by completing a transient simulation  with no recharge representative of the final month of the winter drain­down.  The  moisture content was adjusted at the top boundary, basal boundary, and at one  internal boundary to match the in­situ water content profiles measured from TDR  probes in the field and the basal lysimeter outflow, representing a quasi­steady state.  The initial condition determined was in an equilibrium state and water entering or  36 leaving storage during each water year can be attributed solely to the imposed  change in the upper boundary condition. 4) A small amount of water was artificially introduced into the model in the  days prior to large rainfall events to promote numerical convergence of the  algorithm. 5) A sensitivity analysis of the model calculations to hydraulic conductivity and  porosity was conducted for each of the base case simulations.  The sensitivity of the  model calculations to the thickness of the cover layer was evaluated for the covered  simulations.  To ensure the model was conserving mass, the total volume of water  entering the CPE as rainfall and the total volume leaving the pile through outflow  and evaporation were compared to see if they balanced daily and yearly for each  model run. 2.3.5.3.  Base Case Simulations Two base case simulations of liquid and vapor flux through the CPE were  conducted.  One simulation used a SWCC measured in the laboratory by Dr. Lee  Barbour at the University of Saskatchewan, while the other simulation used a  SWCC measured in the field.  The SWCC's are discussed in detail below.  Simulations of the uncovered CPE were conducted for the 2002 water year (April  2002 through April 2003), and data from the 2003 water year (April 2003 through  April 2004) were used for the covered simulations. SoilCover uses a layer system to define the model profile, with boundary  37 condition values assigned at the top and the bottom of each layer.  The lower  boundary condition was specified as a transient temperature, constant matric  potential boundary (0 kPa).  Basal flux was evaluated at an observation point  located 5 m below the surface.  Basal temperature was specified by daily  temperatures measured at the base of the CPE.  The upper boundary condition was a  transient flux boundary, specified by measured daily precipitation, minimum and  maximum air temperature, minimum and maximum relative humidity, solar  radiation and average wind speed. The uncovered waste rock profile was modeled as a system of two material  layers.  The entire profile was discretized into 98 nodes across the profile.  SoilCover has a maximum limit of 100 nodes.  Nodal spacing decreased near the  material layer boundaries.  The grid was auto­generated within the model based on a  specified minimum and maximum size for each material layer.  The first layer was 0  m to 4.85 m deep and the second material layer was 4.85 m to 6.0 m in depth.  The  node spacing ranged from 0.1 cm at the waste rock surface and outflow boundary to  a maximum of 10.0 cm within profile.  While the material properties for the two  layers were identical, the addition of the bottom layer allowed for a finer  discretization resulting in a better fit to initial moisture conditions during model  calibration.  The 1 m depth added to the lower boundary was arbitrary and did not  influence the results. The covered waste rock was modeled as a three­layer system that included a  38 0.40 m thick surface layer above the two waste rock layers described above.  The  three layer models had a total of 98 nodes across the profile with node spacing  ranging from 0.5 cm to 1 cm in the cover and lowest layer and from 2 cm to 12.5 cm  within the middle waste rock layer.  The grids for both the covered and uncovered  models were similar, however, the additional surface layer with a fine discretization  resulted in a slightly lower discretization throughout the waste rock layer and near  the outflow boundary in the covered model. 2.3.5.4.  Initial Conditions Initial water content and matric suction values at each boundary layer strongly  affect the model results.  If the specified initial moisture conditions were too low the  model added water to storage and the annual net­percolation estimates were lower  than observed.  If the initial moisture conditions were higher than actual, the  predicted net­percolation was significantly higher than observed because of a rapid  release of water from storage. Transient simulations were conducted to better constrain the initial antecedent  moisture profile for the base case scenarios where TDR data were not available.  SoilCover requires that either a water content or matric suction value is specified at  the boundary of each layer.  The initial "guesses" of the moisture conditions were  based on TDR probes located at depths closest to the layer boundary depths.  Volumetric water content from April 2002 were obtained from TDR probes located  at 0.2 m, 3.0 m, and 4.5 m beneath the waste rock surface, and for April 2003 from  39 TDR probes located at 0.15 m, 0.4 m, and 4.70 m beneath the cover surface.  These  water content values were converted to matric suctions using the appropriate SWCC  and the data used as initial conditions in the transient simulations for the uncovered  and covered scenarios, respectively.  Initial matric suction values specified at each  layer boundary were then adjusted by trial­and­error until the model outflow  matched the observed field data.  The final moisture versus depth profiles predicted  at the end of the simulations were compared to the initial TDR data points, and the  matric suction profiles were used as the initial profiles in each of the base case  simulations.  The procedures were similar to those used by Swanson et al (2003)  and ensured that water was not being accumulated or depleted, except in response to  the boundary condition changes specified as part of the transient base case  simulations. The simulations used to determine initial conditions used measured weather  conditions and laboratory determined hydraulic conductivity as input parameters.  The initial value of porosity corresponded to the volumetric water content on the  SWCC at 0 kPa for each base case.  The sensitivity to the soil property input  parameters (porosity and hydraulic conductivity) and the sensitivity to the cover  thickness were evaluated using the base case simulations as described below. 40 2.4.  DETERMINATION OF PHYSICAL PARAMETERS The physical properties of the waste rock within the CPE and of the compacted  cover were used in the model for the determination of a comprehensive water  balance.  The methodology for the determination of hydraulic conductivity, water  content, matric suction, and the SWCC is described below. 2.4.1.  Hydraulic Conductivity Saturated hydraulic conductivity of both the waste rock and the compacted  surface cover were estimated using double ring infiltration tests (modified ASTM  Standard D3385) in the field.  Leakage from the outer ring of the infiltrometer was  observed during infiltration measurements on the covered CPE and results were not  reliable. In addition to field testing, hydraulic conductivity was obtained from laboratory  constant head tests (ASTM D 2434­68).  The waste rock was sampled, shipped to  the laboratory and sieved into a 0.15 m permeameter.  In­situ density measurements  of the non­compacted waste rock were not available at that time of hydraulic  conductivity testing.  Four sieved waste rock samples were packed to an  approximate density of 1800 kg/m3, higher than the 1100 kg/m3 to 1750 kg/m3  range measured one year later on the CPE.   Two laboratory hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on compacted waste  rock material.  The permeameters were packed with minus 0.1 m waste rock and  compacted to approximately 2100 kg/m3, resulting in a similar particle size and  41 density as measured in the field. 2.4.2.  Water Content and Matric Suction The soil water characteristic curve can either be measured from laboratory tests  on small samples, estimated empirically using a model such as that developed by  van Genuchten (1980), Fredlund and Xing (1994), Fredlund and Wilson (1997),  Aubertin et al (2003), or measured directly from in­situ matric suction and water  content data collected over time.  There are challenges associated with each method,  and the best method often depends on material properties, as well as moisture  conditions. A single composite field soil water characteristic curve from the waste rock pile  was determined using data obtained at the time of deconstruction.  Matric suction  values derived from the filter paper method were combined with volumetric water  content data of waste rock from the same location.  Guan (1996) discussed flaws in  earlier filter paper methodologies and summarizes the evolution of the filter paper  method since the early 1960's.  Schleicher & Schuell No. 589­WH filter paper was  used to calculate matric suction following ASTM procedure D5298­92 using the  matric suction equation derived by Fredlund and Xing (1994) and the procedures  recommended by Guan (1996) and Leong et al (2002). Samples of waste rock were collected during deconstruction from different  locations along a 5 m deep profile, including dry waste rock near the surface and  nearly saturated waste rock immediately above the basal lysimeters.  Each of the 35  42 samples were carefully placed in a 500 mL glass jar with minimal disruption of the  waste rock.  Three pieces of filter paper were placed in contact with the waste rock  and the jars sealed with minimal head space.  The jars were left in a controlled  temperature box at 18°C and allowed to come to equilibrium for one week.  Theoretically, after equilibrium was achieved, the matric suction of the paper and of  the waste rock were equal.  The water content of the filter paper was determined and  converted to suction values using the calibration matric suction versus water content  curve derived in the laboratory for the Schleicher & Schuell No. 589­WH filter  paper.  The combined measurement pairs of matric suction and volumetric water  content from each sample were used to estimate the composite field SWCC (Figure  2.4).  The composite SWCC is representative of the finer grained portions of the  waste rock that fit within the 500 mL jars.  Plotting a single SWCC based on a set of  different samples assumes that all of the material sampled was homogeneous.  While the assumption may be poor, the curve yields an approximation of the matric  suction/volumetric water content relationship similar to that of other waste rock  materials published in the literature (Cogema Resources, 2001, Wels et al, 2001,  Kabwe et al, 2005). A distinct drying laboratory SWCC was measured at the University of  Saskatchewan by Dr. Lee Barbour from a minus 0.1 m size fraction of D­JX waste  rock.  The sample tested was a composite of 60, five liter samples collected during  the construction of the CPE in 1998 (Nichol, 2003). 43 A SWCC for the cover material was determined numerically based on the  Fredlund & Xing (1994) equation using the program SoilVision (SoilVision  Systems Ltd., 1997).  SoilVision inputs included particle size distribution data  averaged from the eight samples collected from the cover during the deconstruction,  and three volume­mass properties (in­situ field density, specific gravity, and  porosity). The hydraulic conductivity curves that correspond to each of the field SWCC,  the laboratory SWCC, and the cover SWCC were generated using the Fredlund et al  (1994a) equation, which allows for the estimation of the permeability function from  the SWCC without knowledge of the residual saturation.  Other methods such as  Brooks and Corey (1964) and van Genuchten (1980) are available, but require  measuring the permeability at various suction levels, or require knowledge of the  residual saturation. 2.5.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 2.5.1.  Measured and Calculated Water Balance The outflow record from the CPE for May to December of 1999 was reported by  Nichol (2003), and Nichol et al (2005).  Data from the 1999 water year were  excluded from this water balance analysis because the CPE did not reach a dynamic  equilibrium until October of 1999.  The continuous outflow record for the CPE from  April 2000 to April 2004 is plotted in liters per day, and shows the seasonal  variation in outflow (Figure 2.3).  The measured water balance components for the  44 period between January of 2000 and May of 2004 are shown as cumulative plots in  Figure 2.6.  The cumulative precipitation pattern for each of the four years is similar  in both form and magnitude.  The precipitation was recorded on the waste rock pile  between May and October of each year and does not include the equivalent water  from snowfall.  Large drifts of snow were observed around the base of the  constructed pile and surrounding the instrument hut, however, little to no snow was  observed on the top surface.  The top surface of the experimental pile was nearly the  highest point on the mine site and experienced frequent high winds off Cluff Lake  that removed any snow that accumulated on top of the pile.  Between November and  April of each year, surface infiltration was negligible and the depth of freezing  progressively increased to greater than one meter. The cumulative outflow curve (Figure 2.6) shows a response that is delayed yet  similar in shape to the cumulative precipitation plot.  A significant reduction of  outflow, as well as the first appearance of surface runoff, is evident in the  cumulative outflow curve in 2003 to 2004 following the placement of the  compacted waste rock cover.  Each year during the winter months, basal outflow  continued and the volumetric water content would drop to its lowest annual value,  typically observed in March and April.  For the three years prior to cover placement,  the annual cumulative outflow plots (Figure 2.7) show a lower magnitude response  to the first few spring rainfall events and higher magnitude response to similar size  events later in the year.  The lower magnitude responses in the spring are associated  45 with the re­wetting of the waste rock following winter drain down. A summary of the annual water balance components is provided in Table 2.2.  To account for the slow transit times of water within the CPE, water balance  calculations were made on a yearly basis.  For water years 2000, 2001, and 2002,  44%, 51% and 55% of rainfall was measured as lysimeter outflow.  Annual water  balance estimates assume that the net change in storage within the pile was zero.  The assumption of a zero change in storage is based on similar internal volumetric  water content data, and on a stable outflow rate of less than one liter per day (~2.7  x10­10 m/s) observed in the early spring of each year (Figure 2.3).  This suggests at  least for the uncovered CPE, that dynamic equilibrium was achieved.  Outflow rates  decreased following the onset of freezing air temperatures and asymptotically  approached a near­steady outflow by March of each year.  Calculating evaporation  as a residual in the water balance, 56%, 49% and 45% of precipitation was removed  by evaporation from the waste rock pile for 2000, 2001 and 2002 years,  respectively. The differences in the annual evaporation are related to different weather  patterns, the different number of large magnitude rainfall events in each of the three  years, and to a lesser degree, related to an evolving surface texture of the waste rock  pile.  The physical characteristics or the textural differences of the near­surface  waste rock will influence both the upward transport of water to the surface and the  amount of actual evaporation. 46 Fast flow of water to the basal lysimeters and/or to depths below the influence of  evaporative forces was observed following larger rainfall events.  Fast flow of water  results in an event­based net­percolation rate that is greater than the annual average,  and an AE that is lower than the annual average AE.  Consistent with the  observations of Ayres (1998), it appears that the evaporation in the uncovered pile  was transport limited, based on the smaller AE/PE ratio in the dry periods between  rainfall events.  A simple explanation is that the lower magnitude or more frequent  rainfall events result in higher near­surface water contents and a more continuous  supply of water available at the evaporating surface.  The effects of the transport  limited system are also observed in the numerical modeling. The cumulative water balance plots for the water year 2003 are shown in Figure  2.8.  Following construction of the compacted cover, the lysimeter outflow was  reduced to less than 10% of precipitation, runoff increased from zero to  approximately 30% of precipitation, and at least 60% of the precipitation was  removed by evaporation (Table 2.2).  A higher percentage of precipitation was lost  to evaporation than in the two previous years and may be attributed to a higher  water holding capacity of the cover material and the underlying compacted coarse  waste rock.  The water content in the cover remained between 18 and 20% between  summer rainfall events as shown by TDR probes in the cover (Figure 2.9),  approximately 10% higher than the water content of the pre­cover waste rock  between rainfall events.  The higher percentage of evaporation may also be  47 attributed to the reduction in macropore and fast preferential flow following the  construction of the compacted cover.  Reduction of the amount of preferential flow  would result in additional water held closer to the evaporation surface and allow for  a higher annual evaporation. To further constrain the evaporation estimates, and to better understand the  water balance components, the SoilCover model was used for the 2002 pre­cover  year and the 2003 post­cover year. 2.5.2.  Physical Parameters The SWCC describes the relationship between the water content and matric  suction, which can be related to the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for a  particular soil.  Figure 2.4 shows three SWCC's: one derived from the matric suction  and volumetric water content measurements (SWCC (field curve)), one based on a  laboratory curve derived from a Tempe cell test (SWCC (laboratory curve)), and  one estimated SWCC for the compacted waste rock cover.  Both the field and the  laboratory SWCC's were obtained from the minus 0.1 m portions of the waste rock  and are more representative of the matrix material than the bulk waste rock.  With  the lower infiltration conditions observed following cover placement, water flow is  likely to occur exclusively within the matrix material. The hydraulic conductivity curves (HCC) derived from the field SWCC, the  laboratory SWCC and the cover SWCC are shown in Figure 2.5.  The relative  position and slopes of the three curves show that at saturated conditions, the waste  48 rock has a two­order of magnitude greater hydraulic conductivity than the  compacted cover, and a much greater capacity to conduct water.  With increasing  matric suction, the difference between the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the  waste rock and that of the cover decreased to within one­order of magnitude.  Both  the processes of sieving the waste rock to a minus 0.04 m size fraction and  compacting during the construction of the cover did not increase the fines portion  enough to allow the cover to act as a capillary break over the waste rock.  Based on  the estimated HCC's, the cover material will at no given value of matric suction  have a greater capacity to conduct water than the non­compacted waste rock.  For  most values of matric suction, the field curve corresponds to a slightly lower  hydraulic conductivity than the laboratory curve.  The difference between the curves  is in part a result of two different SWCC sample collection and preparation  methods. 2.5.3.  Numerical Modeling Obtaining model convergence was a challenge when modeling unsaturated flow  within the CPE.  While convergence was obtained for the simulations using  measured values of saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity, convergence was  not obtained for the largest and smallest values attempted during the sensitivity  analysis.  The most important factors affecting convergence were the steep SWCC  functions, the contrast in the material properties of the waste rock and cover layers,  and the rapid changes in water content with time.  For example, as a result of the  49 steep SWCC's, a large rainfall event following a dry period would result in non­ convergence.  To improve convergence, the near­surface nodal spacing was reduced  to minimum possible values permitted by the code, and a high number of iterations  were allowed. The non­linear relationship between hydraulic conductivity and matric suction  requires an iterative process to solve the equations for hydraulic head.  With a steep  SWCC, the degree of non­linearity increases and a small change in matric suction  can result in a several­order of magnitude change in hydraulic conductivity (Figure  2.5).  This highly non­linear relationship and a steep SWCC can result in the  solution failing to converge.  While the SWCC measured in the field and the SWCC  determined in the laboratory both exhibit a steep slope, obtaining convergence was  easier for the scenarios that used the laboratory SWCC to describe the waste rock  because of a slightly lower slope and a characteristic curve more similar to the cover  SWCC.  Convergence was difficult to obtain when simulating large rainfall events,  unless rainfall occurred in the previous few days.  To promote convergence, the total  volume of rain from large rainfall events were spread out over a few days.  While  this distribution of rainfall allowed the model to converge, it also artificially  contributed to an elevated predicted AE and a reduced predicted net­percolation.  The SoilCover model applies daily precipitation over a 24 hr period using a  sinusoidal function, so that the near­surface waste rock had a high degree of  saturation for a large portion of the days in which rainfall occurred.  For the days  50 with rainfall, SoilCover predicts a daily AE that is very close to the PE and an  AE/PE ratio close to one.  Yearly average AE/PE ratios of 0.38 and 0.27 were  calculated for the 2002 and 2003 model run years using the predicted daily AE and  PE for all rainless, non­freezing days.  The AE/PE ratios for days where rainfall was  artificially added to aid model convergence were calculated to be 0.70 and 0.66.  A  correction factor was determined by assuming that the AE/PE ratio for the days in  which rainfall was artificially added should have been similar to the AE/PE ratio of  a dry day.  The predicted PE from the days with added rainfall was divided by the  dry AE/PE ratio and the result was used as an estimate for AE for each of the days  with artificially added rainfall.  The amount of water that was determined to be  over­predicted as evaporation was added to the predicted total surface infiltration for  the day of the large rainfall, as if the rainfall was not distributed between days.  The  results of the base case simulations and the corrected evaporation and infiltration  values are presented in Table 2.3 and discussed below. 2.5.4.  Comparison of Model Results to Observational Data Net­percolation and runoff values predicted using SoilCover were compared to  measured rates from the CPE.  All SoilCover results are presented in mm and as a  percent of annual rainfall (Table 2.2).  The comparison is used to evaluate how well  the model reproduces the observed data, to provide confidence in the calculated  value of evaporation for which no direct measurements exist, and to provide  information about how to best characterize coarse waste rock using a SWCC. 51 2.5.4.1.  Uncovered CPE A suitable match to the observed outflow data was not obtained for either of the  uncovered base case simulations.  The SoilCover model under­predicted outflow  and over­predicted AE from the uncovered waste rock.  The adjusted SoilCover net­ percolation predictions for the uncovered waste rock were 96 mm using the field  curve and 115 mm using the laboratory curve, which are lower than the measured  167 mm by 30% and 19%, respectively.  The predicted AE values were 219 mm  using the field curve and 201 mm using the laboratory curve, which are higher than  the calculated AE by 24% and 19%, respectively.  SoilCover predicted that the  majority of the losses to evaporation occurred from within the top meter of the  waste rock pile. Distinctive wetting fronts in the form of outflow spikes were observed to  migrate the entire 5 m of the CPE following large rainfall events.  Based on tracer  test data, Nichol (2003) identified the fast flow spikes as macropore flow of event  water through the entire 5 m of the CPE.  As stated earlier, SoilCover cannot  mechanistically account for this component of flow.  In the simulations using the  field SWCC, sharp wetting fronts were observed to a depth of approximately 2 m in  response to the large surface infiltration events, and were not discernible at the base  of the model unless porosity was adjusted to lower than realistic values (<15%).  The reduction in porosity reduces the capacity of the waste rock to store water in the  upper portion of the pile where it can be readily drawn out by evaporation and  52 allows for deeper penetration of infiltration during single events.  The results for  net­percolation using the laboratory­derived SWCC are closer to measured values;  however, the porosity that corresponds to the laboratory curve (22%) is lower than  the field curve (30%), and lower than the waste rock porosity (30­35%).  The 8%  difference in porosity only accounts for 4 mm of the 19 mm difference between the  laboratory curve and the field curve results (Table 2.3).  The remainder of the  difference is likely a result of the steeper hydraulic conductivity function that relates  to the laboratory derived curve. A better fit to the observed pre­cover net percolation could have been obtained  by using a trial­and­error, or parameter optimization approach to adjust the SWCC  (Adu­Wusu et al, 2007).  The goal was not to develop a calibrated model of the  uncovered CPE for future predictions, rather to determine how well the model  predicted net percolation using the SWCC measured in the field and the SWCC  determined in the laboratory.  The difference between the simulation results and the  observations for the uncovered models are related to the estimated amount of non­ capillary preferential (macropore) flow occurring in the uncovered CPE, and gives  credibility to the simulations for the covered CPE where macropore flow was less  significant. The differences between the simulations and observations for the uncovered  models are likely related to macropore flow.  The process of macropore flow deep  into the pile was observed in the field (Nichol et al, 2005), and resulted in the  53 transport of water to a depth where evaporative effects were minimized.  SoilCover  does not account for this mechanism, and it is likely that macropore flow could  account for the 20 to 30% difference in net­percolation.  While Nichol (2003)  concluded that macropore flow only accounts for up to 5 to 9% of an observed  outflow response from a single large rainfall event, he estimated that 30 to 40% of  the flow within the CPE traveled through preferential pathways even if it was not  observed at the base of the CPE during the event.  Based on the model results it  appears that the majority of the evaporative flux occurred within the top 1.5 m of the  CPE.  It is possible that non­capillary preferential flow of water to a depth of greater  than 1.5 m could account for the discrepancy between model results and  observations. The results suggest that the exclusion of macropore and non­capillary processes  will result in an under­prediction of net­percolation, and an over­prediction of AE  when modeling coarse, uncovered waste rock with steep SWCC's.  Without a  mechanism that accounts for macropore flow of water in the pile, the model may  tend to over­predict AE. 2.5.4.2.  Covered CPE The net­percolation values predicted by SoilCover using both the field curve and  the laboratory curve are approximately 20% greater than measured outflow from the  covered waste rock.  The predicted values of runoff are 4% less than measured  values and the predicted values of AE are 3% greater than the estimate derived from  54 the water balance (Table 2.3).  Given the heterogeneity in the waste rock hydrologic  properties such as the water­holding capacity, all predicted values are thought to be  within the expected range.  The SWCC's used were appropriate for the covered  models and presumably provided good estimates for the capillary component in the  uncovered case. 2.5.5.  Sensitivity Analysis The sensitivity analysis was conducted by varying the saturated hydraulic  conductivity (K(sat)) and porosity of the waste rock and the cover material.  The  average saturated hydraulic conductivity of the matrix component of the waste rock  as measured in the laboratory was 5 x 10­5 m/s and in the cover was 5 x 10­7 m/s.  Figure 2.10 shows the results of the sensitivity analysis for both the uncovered and  the covered base case simulations using the laboratory SWCC.  K(sat) was varied one  order of magnitude greater and one order of magnitude lower.  The porosity of the  waste rock was varied at 5% intervals between 15 and 35%, and the cover porosity  was varied between 20 and 35%.  Porosity values of 20 to 35% are plausible for the  waste rock and cover material, and are consistent with both SWCC's.  The analysis  shows that the calculated net­percolation is sensitive to both the porosity and the  K(sat) for the uncovered model simulations, and only sensitive to the K(sat) of the  cover material in the covered model simulations. In addition to changing soil properties, the effect of changing the thickness of  the cover layer on the model net­percolation was evaluated.  The net­percolation for  55 the covered base case simulations was relatively insensitive to the range of  evaluated cover thickness, and decreasing the cover thickness from 0.4 m to 0.1 m  increased the net­percolation by only 3 mm/year.  The sensitivity analysis shows  that increasing the thickness of the compacted surface layer does not significantly  reduce the net­percolation. The sensitivity analysis shows that increasing the hydraulic conductivity of the  cover material increases the net­percolation.  The increase in net­percolation was  equal to the decrease in predicted AE, and not related to a decrease in predicted  runoff value until the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was less than that of the  underlying waste rock.  The model indicates the partitioning between net­ percolation, runoff, and evaporation was largely controlled by the sharp contrast in  material properties at the lower boundary of the cover layer and the upper boundary  of the waste rock layer.  Decreasing K(sat) within the one­order of magnitude range  resulted in a minimal increase in predicted runoff.  The increase in runoff was  minimal because the majority of rainfall occurred during low intensity events.  Changing the thickness of the compacted cover layer resulted in less than a 3%  difference in the predicted annual net­percolation.  As a result of the compaction  methods used during cover construction, the transition between the waste rock and  the compacted cover in the field was gradational.  Refining the model to make the  interface between the cover and waste rock more gradual would likely further  improve the model results, and result in fewer numerical instabilities.  However,  56 since the interface did not act as a capillary barrier in the field or in the base case  model simulations, and since data to better define the interface in the simulation  were not available, a distinct boundary between the cover and waste rock was used.  The characteristics of the waste rock below the cover had a smaller effect on the  predicted net­percolation than in the uncovered model simulations.  In contrast, the  characteristics of the cover, especially the saturated hydraulic conductivity, had a  large effect on the output from the covered model simulations. The SoilCover model is based on capillary flow, while water flow within the  uncovered waste rock occurred by several mechanisms, including both capillary  porous media flow and non­capillary flow.  The difference between predicted and  observed water balance components are observed to be larger in the uncovered  waste rock model simulations than in the covered simulations and this is attributed  to a greater amount of macropore and non­capillary flow.  Because non­capillary  preferential flow is reduced in the covered pile, the differences between the values  predicted using SoilCover and values observed in the field are significantly smaller  for the covered model simulations. 2.6.  CONCLUSIONS A detailed water balance for the experimental waste rock pile was determined  from four years of hydrologic data measured in the field.  A variably saturated,  evaporative flux model was employed to assess calculated evaporation rates for the  CPE and to gain insight into parameters that affect net infiltration and evaporation.  57 The appropriateness of a Richards based model for modeling flows through a  covered heterogeneous waste rock pile was also evaluated.  The water balance and  the modeling provides data necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of water flow  through waste rock and the relationship between flow mechanisms and surface  conditions.  Ultimately, a careful determination of the water balance is critical for  understanding the factors controlling mass loading at the base of waste rock  stockpiles.  The specific conclusions from this analysis include: • For years 2000, 2001 and 2002 when the CPE was uncovered, 44%, 51%  and 55% of rainfall was measured as lysimeter outflow at the base of the  waste rock pile.  Following the placement of a compacted cover that  resembled a traffic or haul surface, lysimeter outflow was reduced to less  than 10% of rainfall and evaporation increased by 10%. • As expected, the non­capillary preferential flow (non­Darcian) that has been  observed in the CPE could not be simulated using a Darcian flow model.  The model simulations for the uncovered pile over­predicted actual  evaporation and under­predicted net­percolation as a result of the inability of  the model to account for fast non­capillary flow that was observed in the  field. • The differences between the model predictions for the covered pile and field  observations were shown to lie within the expected range (given the  uncertainties in potential evaporation, and those associated with the  58 heterogeneous characteristics of the waste rock).  The capillary­based  SoilCover model was able to accurately predict water balance components  based on observed field data from a highly heterogeneous, covered waste  rock pile. 59 2.7.  REFERENCES Adu­Wusu, C., Yanful, E.K., Lanteigne, L., O’Kane, M.,  2007.  Prediction of the  water balance of two soil cover systems. Geotech Geol Eng. v. 25. pp.  215­237. Albright, W.H.,. Gee, G.W., Wilson, G.V., Fayer, M.J.,  2002. Alternative Cover  Assessment Project, Phase I Report. Desert Research Institute Report  No. 41183. Alpers, C.N. and Nordstrom, D.K.,  1999. Geochemical modeling of water­rock  interactions in mining environments, in Plumlee, G.S. and Logsdon,  M.J. (eds.), The Environmental. Geochemistry of Mineral Deposits.  Part A. Processes, Methods, and Health Issues. Society of Economic  Geologists, Littleton, Colorado, Reviews in Economic Geology. v. 6A.  Chapter 14. pp. 289­323. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 1991.  Test method for  laboratory compaction characteristics of soil using standard effort  (12,400 ft­lbf/ft3 (600 kN­m/m3)) (D698­91). Annual Book of ASTM  Standards. v. 04.08. Aubertin, M., Mbonimpa, M., Chapuis, R.P.,  2003. A model to predict the water  retention curve from basic geotechnical properties. Canadian Geotech. J.  v.40. pp. 1104­1122. Ayres, B.K.,  1998. Field monitoring of soil­atmosphere fluxes through uranium  60 mill tailings and natural surface soils at Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan,  M.Sc. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan,  Canada. Bain, J.G., Mayer, K.U., Molson, J.W., Blowes, D., Frind, E.O., Kahnt R. and Jenk,  U., 2001. Modelling the closure­related geochemical evolution of  groundwater at a former uranium mine, Journal of Contaminant  Hydrology. v. 52. pp. 109­135. Baldocchi, D.D., Hicks, B.B. and Meyers, T.P.,  1988. Measuring biosphere­ atmosphere exchanges of biologically related gases with  micrometeorological methods. Ecology, v. 69. pp. 1331­1340. Bowen, I.S.,  1926. The ratio of heat losses by conduction and by evaporation from  any water surface, Physics Review, vol. 27, pp. 779­787. Brooks, R.H. and Corey, A.T.,  1964. Hydraulic properties of porous media.  Colorado State University (Fort Collins), Hydrology Paper No. 3. Carey, S.K., Barbour, S.L. and Hendry, M.J.,  2005. Evaporation from a waste­rock  surface, Key Lake, Saskatchewan, Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v.  42. pp. 1189­1199. Christiansen, J.E.,  Irrigation by sprinkling, University of California Agricultural  Experimental Station Bulletin, 670., 1942. Cogema Resources,  2001. Cluff Lake Project Comprehensive Study Report for  decommissioning. January 15, 2001. 61 Durham, A.,  2002. Design and optimization of a waste rock cover system for arid  environments,  MSC. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan, 258 p. Fayer, M.J. and Jones, T.L.,  1990. UNSAT­H version 2.0: Unsaturated soil water  and heat flow model. PNL­6779, Pacific Northwest Laboratory,  Richland, Washington. Fredlund, D.G. and Xing, A.,  1994. Equations for the soil­water characteristic  curve, Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v 31. pp. 521­532. Fredlund, D.G., Xing, A. and Huang, S.  1994. Predicting the permeability function  for unsaturated soils using the soil­water characteristic curve, Canadian  Geotechnical Journal. v 31. pp. 533­546. Fredlund, M., Fredlund, D.G., Wilson, G.W.,  1997. Prediction of the soil­water  characteristic curve from grain–size distribution and volume­mass  properties. In: Proc 3rd Brazilian Symp on Unsaturated Soils, Rio de  Janerio. Frostad, S., Klein. B. and Lawrence, R.W.,  2005. Determining the weathering  characteristics of a waste dump with field tests, International Journal of  Surface Mining, Reclamation and Environment. pp. 132­143. Geo­Slope International Ltd.  2004. VADOSE/W on­line help version 1.18. Grigg, A.H., Sheridan, G.J., Pearce, A.B. and Mulligan, D.R.,  2003. The effect of  organic mulches on crusting, infiltration and salinity in the revegetation  of a saline­sodic coal mine spoil from central Queensland, Australia.  62 Paper presented at the 2003 National Meeting of the American Society  of Mining and Reclamation and the 9th Billings Land Reclamation  Symposium, Billings, Montana. 3­6 June 2003. pp. 292­310. Guan, Y.,  1996. The measurement of soil suction. Ph.D. Thesis, University of  Saskatchewan, 353 p. Holmes, R.M.,  1961. Estimation of soil moisture content using evaporation data.  In: Evaporation, Proceedings of Hydrological Symposium 2, Toronto.  Queen's Printer, Ottawa. pp. 184­196. Kabwe, L.K., Wilson, G.W. and Hendry, M.J.,  2005. Effects of rainfall events on  waste­rock surface­water conditions and CO2 fluxes across the surfaces  of two waste­rock piles. Journal of Environmental Engineering and  Science Review. v. 4. pp. 469­480. Kempton, H. and Atkins, D.,  2000. Delayed environmental impacts from mining in  semi­arid climate, in Proceedings from the 5th International Conference  on Acid Rock Drainage ICARD 2000, Society for Mining Metallurgy  and Exploration, Inc. Proceedings Fifth International Conference on  Acid Rock Drainage. pp. 1299­1308. Khire, M., Benson, C.H. and Bosscher, P.J.,  1997. Water balance modeling of  earthen final covers.  Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental  Engineering. pp. 744­757. Kowalewski, P.E.,  1999. Design and evaluation of engineered soil covers for  63 infiltration control in heap leach closure. Closure, remediation and  management of precious metals heap leach facilities. Edited by Dororthy  Kosich and Glenn Miller. pp. 21­29. Leong, E.C., He, L., Rahardjo, H.,  2002. Factors affecting the filter paper method  for total and matric suction measurements Geotechnical Testing Journal,  ASTM 25. pp. 321­332. Lopez, D.L., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  1997. Modeling water flow in waste rock  piles using kinematic wave theory, in 4th International Conference on  Acid Rock Drainage. pp. 497­513. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2000. Hydrogeologic behavior of  unsaturated mine waste rock: An experimental study. In Proceedings of  the 5th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage, Denver,  Colorado, 21­24 May. Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration  Inc. (SME),. pp. 215­224. Nichol, C.F.,  2003. Transient flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous  media: Field experiments in mine waste rock. Ph.D. dissertation,  University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2005. Field scale experiments of  unsaturated flow and solute transport in a heterogeneous porous  medium, Water Resources Research. v. 41. Nicolau, J.M.,  2003. Trends in relief design and construction in opencast mining  64 reclamation. Land Degradation & Development. v. 14. no. 2. pp.  215­226. Noel, M.N., Rykaart, E.M.,  2003. Comparative study of surface flux boundary  models to design soil covers for mine waste facilities. Sixth  International Conference Acid Rock Drainage. pp. 703­710. O’Kane, M.A., Porterfield, D., Weir, A. and Watkins, L.,  2000. Cover system  performance in semi arid climate on horizontal and sloped waste rock  surfaces, in 5th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage. pp.  1309­1317. Penman, H.L.,  1948. Natural evapotranspiration from open water, bare soil, and  grass. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A. v. 193. pp.  120­145. Rykaart, M., Fredlund, M.D. and Stianson, J.,  2001. Solving tailings impoundment  water balance problems with 3­D seepage software. Geotech. News. v.  12. pp. 50­54. Simunek, J., M. Sejna and van Genuchten, M.Th.,  1996. HYDRUS­2D: Simulating  water flow and solute transport in two­dimensional variably saturated  media. International Groundwater Modeling Center, Colorado School of  Mines, Golden, CO. Shurniak, R.E.,  2003, Predictive modeling of moisture movement within soil cover  systems for saline/sodic overburden piles, MS Thesis, University of  65 Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. pp. 1­129. SoilCover,  1997. The design of soilcover systems. SoilCover Version 4.0 User  Manual. Unsaturated Soils Group, Department of Civil Engineering,  University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. SoilVision Systems Ltd.,  1997. User’s guide for a knowledge­based database  program for estimating soil properties of unsaturated soils for use in  geotechnical engineering. SoilVision Systems Ltd., Saskatoon,  Saskatchewan, Canada. Stockwell, J.E.,  2002. Investigation of hydrological and geochemical properties and  spatial relationships of an unsaturated waste rock pile, Key Lake,  Saskatchewan, Masters Thesis, University of British Columbia. Swanson, D.A., Kempton, J.H., Travers, C. and Atkins, D.A.,  1998. Predicting  long­term seepage from waste­rock facilities in dry climates, Society for  Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Inc. pp. 98­135. Swanson, D.A., Barbour, S.L., Wilson, G.W., O'Kane, M.,  2003. Soil­atmosphere  modelling of an engineered soil cover for acid generating mine waste in  a humid, alpine climate, Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v. 40. pp.  276­292. Torres, R., W.E. Dietrich, D.R.,  1998. Montgomery, S. P. Anderson, K. Loague,  Unsaturated zone processes and the hydrologic response of a steep,  unchanneled catchment, Water Resources Research. v. 34. no.8. p. 1865. 66 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,  1994. The Hydrological Evaluation of Landfill  Performance (HELP) Model, Version 3.03. U.S. EPA,  1999. Mine waste technology program, 1999 Annual Report. Prepared  for the U.S. EPA and the U.S. DOE. Inter agency agreement  management committee: IAG ID NO. DW89938513­01­0. Van Dam, J.C., J. Huygen, J.G. Wesseling, R.A. Feddes, P. Kabat, P.E.V. van  Walsum, P. Groenendijk and C.A. van Diepen, 1997.  Theory of SWAP  version 2.0. Simulation of water flow, solute transport and plant growth  in the Soil­Water­Atmosphere­Plant environment. Report 71, Subdep.  Water Resources, Wageningen University, Technical document 45,  Alterra Green World Research, Wageningen. van Genuchten, M.Th. 1980. A closed­form equation for predicting the hydraulic  conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. v. 44. pp.  892­898. Wels, C., O’Kane, M., Fortin,S. and Christensen, D.,  2001. Infiltration test plot  study for mine rock piles at Questa Mine, New Mexico.  Paper presented  at the 2001 National Meeting of the American Society for Surface  Mining and Reclamation. Pub. By ASSMR 3134 Montavesta Rd.,  Lexington KY 40502. Wilson, G.W.,  1990. Soil Evaporative Fluxes for Geotechnical Engineering  Problems. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon,  67 Saskatchewan, Canada. Wilson, G.W., Fredlund, D.G. and Barbour, S.L.,  1994. Coupled soil­atmosphere  modelling for soil evaporation, Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v. 31.  no.2. pp. 151­161. Wilson, G.W., Fredlund, D.G. and Barbour, S.L.,  1997. The effect of soil suction  on evaporative fluxes from soil surfaces. Canadian Geotechnical  Journal. v. 34. no.2. pp. 145­155. Yang, H., Rahardjo, H., Leong, E., Fredlund, D.G.,  2004. Factors affecting drying  and wetting soil­water characteristic curves of sandy soils. Canadian  Geotechnical Journal. v. 41. pp. 908­920. Zegelin, S.J. and White, I., Jenkins, D.R.,  1989. Improved field probes for soil  water content and electrical conductivity measurement using time  domain reflectrometry, Water Resources Research. v. 25. no. 11. pp.  2367­2376. 68 Table 2.1.  Monthly precipitation values measured on the top of the waste rock pile for the  period between January 2000 and May of 2004.  Yearly totals are based on April 01 to  March 31 for each of the four years.  Snowfall is excluded. 69  Rainfall (mm), 2000 – 2004 Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year 2000 0.0 0.0 4.6 32.4 24.6 151.5 93.8 45.2 10.0 0.0 0.0 363.1 2001 0.2 0.8 0.0 0.4 31.2 32.2 92.6 17.4 44.2 46.0 8.6 0.4 275.2 2002 1.8 0.4 0.0 10.2 57.0 29.2 64.4 101.1 48.8 5.6 0.0 0.0 316.5 2003 0.2 0.0 0.0 4.0 69.6 30.4 92.8 20.6 23.8 47.6 0.0 0.2 289.8 2004 0.0 0.6 0.2 0.0 0.2 Ave 0.6 0.4 0.0 3.8 38.1 29.1 100.3 58.2 40.5 27.3 2.2 0.2 311.2 Table 2.2.  Summary of measured water balance components.  The annual measurements  are reported as water years between April 01 and March 31 of the following year.  All  percentages are reported as percent of precipitation for the same time period. 70 Year Rainfall Net­Percolation  AE Calculated Runoff  mm mm % mm % mm % 2000­2001 363 160 44 203 56 0 0 2001­2002 275 145 51 130 49 0 0 2002­2003 316 167 55 149 45 0 0 2003­2004 289 30 10 170 60 89 30 Table 2.3.  Comparison of field measurements with SoilCover results.  Results from two  simulations are presented for both of the two run years.  FC refers to the field SWCC and  LC to the laboratory derived SWCC both shown in Figure 2.1.  The annual measurements  are reported from April 01 to March 31 for each of the four years.  All percentages are  reported as percent of precipitation. 71 Year Precip Measured Uncorrected Corrected Uncorrected Corrected 2000 mm % mm % mm % mm %   mm % Net Perc ­02 03 316 167 55 78 25 96 30 96 30 115 36 ­03 04 289 30 10 27 9 36 12 29 10 38 13 AE ­02 03 316 150 45 238 75 219 69 220 69 201 64 ­03 04 289 170 60 184 64 175 61 183 63 174 60 Runoff ­02 03 316 0 0 0 0 0 0 ­03 04 289 89 31 78 27 77 27 PE ­02 03 316 510 161 510 161 ­03 04 289 835 289 836 289  Model FC  Model LC Figure 2.1.  Schematic view of the top of the waste rock pile.  The grid of sixteen  lysimeters is shown in relation to the overlying waste rock.  The origin of the grid is  on the lower left (south west) side of lysimeter 1.  The lysimeter grid is to scale and  is superimposed on topographic contours of the constructed waste rock pile.  The  three instrument profiles are labeled with an X, and contour intervals are 30 cm.   72 Instrument LEGEND Figure 2.2.  Cross­section of the constructed waste rock pile and a detail of the basal  lysimeter design. 73 Figure 2.3.  Hydrograph measured as combined outflow from the 16 lysimeters at the base  of the CPE between January of 2000 and May of 2004.  The 'dips' in the hydrograph, as  identified by the red circles, are artificial and result from periods when the data from one  or more of the lysimeters are missing.  The large, short­lived (less than one day) 'spikes' in  the outflow from lysimeter 6 were removed for clarity.  Lysimeter 6 alone exhibited spikes  in flow rate greater than 300 L/day. 74 missing data Figure 2.4.  Soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) for the waste rock and cover  material.  The blue curve (○) is a SWCC for the waste rock based on field data.  The matric suction values were determined indirectly using the filter paper method  and the volumetric water content measurements were obtained from direct, in­situ  measurements.  The red curve () is a SWCC for the waste rock based on laboratory  data using a Tempe cell.  The green curve (□) is an estimated SWCC for the waste  rock cover based on the Fredlund and Xing (1994) equation. 75 Figure 2.5.  Hydraulic conductivity curves for the waste rock and cover material.  The blue curve (solid) is the HCC for the waste rock based on field data.  The red  curve (dashed) is the HCC for the waste rock based on laboratory data.  The green  curve (dash­dot) is the  HCC for the waste rock cover.  All three curves are based on  the Fredlund et al (1994a) equation. 76 Figure 2.6.  Annual precipitation and lysimeter outflow for the four years of the  experiment.  The solid vertical line marks the completion of the compacted waste  rock cover in the fall of 2002. 77 Figure 2.7.  Annual cumulative precipitation and lysimeter outflow between January  2000 and January 2004.  The accumulated rainfall excludes snowfall. 78 Figure 2.8.  Cumulative precipitation, outflow and runoff for the year following the  construction of the compacted cover.  Little runoff was associated with the artificial  rainfall events due to the lower than natural application rates. 79 Figure 2.9.  The volumetric water content as measured by TDR probes at 8 different  depths within the waste rock pile between May 01, 2003 and June 25, 2003.  The  data are an average from the probes at the same depth in all three profiles.  The sub­ plot shows the rainfall record for the same period. 80 Figure 2.10.  Sensitivity of net percolation to key parameters on the predicted net­ percolation for the uncovered and covered waste rock scenarios.  Both plots are  from base case model simulations using the laboratory SWCC for the waste rock.  The end member values for each parameter are listed.  The red dashed lines  represent the net­percolation as measured in the basal lysimeters for the model year. 81 Base Case 38 mm/yr 5E­4  20 35 5E­2  5E­6   35 15 5E­4  Waste Rock Porosity (%) Ksat of Cover (cm/s)    Ksat of Waste Rock (cm/s)   Base Case 115 mm/yr  5E­4 15 5E­2  35 Ksat of Waste Rock (cm/s)   Waste Rock Porosity (%) 45 65 85 105 125 145 165 185 15 25 35 45 55 65 Covered CPE Uncovered CPE Cover Porosity (%) Predicted Net­Percolation  (mm/yr) Predicted Net­Percolation  (mm/yr) CHAPTER 3:  THE EFFECT OF SURFACE CONDITION ON  INTERNAL WATER FLOW IN WASTE ROCK  3.1.  INTRODUCTION Low quality drainage is released from many operational and reclaimed mine  waste rock piles and is a potential source of environmental liability.  The need to  minimize acid rock drainage (ARD) during operations and after closure has spurred  an emphasis on the evaluation of waste management technologies and reclamation  alternatives.  Waste rock piles typically remain uncovered during the life of a mine,  and exhibit a range of surface conditions and textures.  Often waste rock piles have  an irregular top surface resulting from free­dump construction techniques.  Numerous waste rock piles at copper, gold and sandstone­type uranium mines have  at some time been used as heap leach piles and will have a ripped and leveled  surface, while others have a pavement­like surface, intentionally compacted or  compacted by haul trucks and other mine traffic. Design alternatives to modify the hydrologic behavior of waste rock piles or to  limit chemical and transport processes within waste rock have been investigated  (Fortin et al, 2000, Winter Syndor et al, 2002, Fines et al, 2003a, Maddocks, 2003,  Mbonimpa et al, 2003, Williams et al, 2003).  A commonly applied technology is an  engineered cover system designed to limit moisture and/or oxygen flux into the    A version of this chapter will be submitted for publication.  Marcoline, J.R., The effect of surface  condition on water flow in waste rock.   82 waste rock and thus reduce loadings at the base of a waste rock pile.  The manner in  which the surface texture of an uncovered pile or a cover system influences fluid  flow and geochemical processes inside a waste rock pile is poorly understood due to  the lack of observational data, compounded by the spatial heterogeneity in particle  size (ranging from clays to boulders).  A better understanding of fluid flow in waste  rock can be attained by examining drainage from a pile subject to successive surface  modifications.  Re­working of the upper surface will change the spatial distribution  of infiltration and construction of a low­permeability cover can substantially reduce  infiltration into waste rock.  Both changes may lead to a change in dominant fluid  pathways within the pile, water residence times and outflow chemistry.  The term  pathway is used in this research to describe a single mechanism, or group of  mechanisms, that result in a distinct wetting front arrival at the base of a waste rock  pile.  Wetting front arrivals are identified as a sharp increase in the outflow rate  observed at the base of the waste rock pile, or as a sharp increase in volumetric  water content as measured by instrumentation inside the pile. 3.2.  OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this paper is to document the changes in fluid  pathways and magnitude of flow through a waste rock pile as its surface condition is  modified.   Two hypotheses underlie the design of the experiments: 83 • The substantial spatial and temporal variability in outflow from the  experimental waste rock pile was primarily a result of the influence of the  surface condition on infiltration rates into the pile and to a lesser degree, to  the heterogeneous internal structure of the pile.  The influence of the surface  condition on infiltration rates was inferred from the highly irregular surface  topography and the variations in waste rock grain sizes across the surface. • The addition of a lower permeability cover could greatly decrease spatial and  temporal variability in outflow.  The flat, homogeneous lower permeability  cover was void of topography and large variations in surface texture and the  resulting rate of infiltration across the surface was expected to be constant.  With a constant surface infiltration rate, and flow through the matrix  material, variability of basal outflow was expected to be significantly  reduced. 3.3.  METHODS The hypotheses are tested using an intermediate­scale constructed waste rock  pile experiment (CPE) built and instrumented at the Cluff Lake Mine in northern  Saskatchewan.  To investigate these questions, the basal lysimeter outflow and  surface runoff were observed for each of three surfaces: i) the original free­dumped  surface, ii) the surface ripped to an approximate depth of 0.3 m to 0.4 m and leveled  and iii) the surface covered by a layer of 0.1 m to 0.15 m of compacted waste rock. 84 3.3.1.  Experimental Design The CPE was constructed and instrumented at the Cluff Lake Mine in northern  Saskatchewan.  The pile was 32 m by 32 m­wide, with an 8 m by 8 m­wide by 5 m­ high central core.  Run­of­mine waste rock was free­dumped on a grid of sixteen, 2  m by 2 m lysimeters (Figure 3.1) using an excavator and backhoe.  Three vertical  profiles, each containing automated temperature, soil moisture (TDR) and matrix  suction sensors (tensiometers and thermal dissipation sensors) were installed in the  waste rock pile.  Outflow volume and rate were measured and recorded  continuously from each lysimeter.  Detailed results from infiltration and tracer  experiments on the uncovered waste rock pile between 1998 and 2000 are described  in Nichol et al (2000), (2003a) and Nichol et al (2005). Hydrographs from the sixteen lysimeters show a large range of wetting front  arrival times, outflow volumes, and multiple wetting fronts at a 2 m by 2 m scale  (Nichol et al, 2000, 2002, 2003a, Marcoline et al, 2003). The original surface of the experimental pile was approximately level, with  numerous cobbles exposed at the surface.  With differential settlement over a three­ year period, the surface evolved into a set of variably­sized “basins” with a  topographic relief of up to 0.45 m across the surface (Figure 3.2.).  Particles from  silts to cobbles (0.4 m in diameter) were present at the surface (Figure 3.3.a).  The  majority of the surface had a matrix­supported structure with numerous cobbles.  Small portions of the surface were clast­supported, consisting primarily of 0.05 m to  85 0.3 m cobbles and a few boulders as large as 0.5 m in diameter, with a minimal  amount of visible fine­grained material between the cobbles. The surface of the waste rock pile was ripped and leveled in October 2001.  To  prevent damage to near­surface instruments and because the top of the pile was  inaccessible to standard mining equipment, the surface was homogenized to a depth  of 0.3 m to 0.4 m using a hand pick.  The surface ripping was designed to minimize  the variability in texture across the top layer of the pile and to eliminate any pre­ existing preferential flow paths in the top 0.3 m to 0.4 m of the CPE.  Following  ripping, the surface was surveyed at a 0.45 m grid and leveled to ensure that large  topographic depressions were eliminated.  To facilitate leveling, approximately 1.0  m3 of waste rock from the surface immediately outside the lysimeters was added as  fill to replace all of the coarse waste rock greater than 0.3 m that was removed and  to fill in depressions.  The resulting surface was non­compacted, visually  homogeneous, matrix­supported, and absent of mappable catchment areas (Figure  3.3.b). In late August 2002, a compacted layer of waste rock was placed on the surface  (Figure 3.3.c) to create a lower permeability layer at the surface of the pile.  An  eight meter­long gutter drain collection system was incised into the compacted layer  on the north side, adjacent to the lysimeter wall.  The system was designed to collect  surface runoff without interception of direct precipitation.  Before placement of the  cover, there was no runoff generated at the surface.  Runoff from the surface during  86 natural and artificial rainfall events flowed from the gutter drain through a 50 mm  down pipe into a series of four, 200 liter retention drums.  The flow from the drums  was  trickle fed through two independent tipping bucket rain gauges located in the  instrument hut.  The system allowed for accurate measurement of runoff volume up  to approximately 1900 L/day, a value just below the maximum calibrated capacity  of the rain gauges.  Flow from the drums to the tipping bucket rain gauges was  limited to 1900 L/day.  When runoff rates exceeded 1900 L/day, the four, 200 liter  retention drums filled and automatically allowed a greater time for the water volume  to be measured. 3.3.2.  Cover Construction The compacted layer was constructed with waste rock located from within the  waste rock pile but outside of the lysimeter grid.  Approximately 23 m3 of waste  rock was sieved through a minus 0.1 m screen.  Four Zegelin­type time domain  reflectomety (TDR) probes (Zegelin, 1989) with a high resistance coating on the  center rod (Nichol et al, 2003) and two thermistors were installed on the surface just  prior to placing the cover.  The screened waste rock was manually placed onto the  waste rock pile with shovels, moisture was added and the surface compacted. The sieved waste rock used for the compacted surface was well graded and had a  particle size distribution of approximately 3% cobbles, 40% gravel, 40% sand and  17% silt and clay (Figure 3.4).  The particle size distribution was determined on  splits of two samples according to ASTM test method D442 (ASTM, 1990),  87 although hydrometer tests were not conducted.  The thickness of the compacted  layer was approximately 25% greater than the diameter of the largest cobbles within  the cover to minimize direct short circuiting or preferential flow through the layer. Compacted layers installed as part of cover systems typically lay beneath a non­ compacted, non­acid generating layer of material.  One function of the overlying  layer is to protect the compacted layer from drying and from freeze­thaw cycles.  Here, the compacted layer placed on the CPE was located at the surface without any  additional material placed above the compacted layer and was designed to promote  a uniform infiltration rate across the entire surface.  The cover design and the  method of construction were selected to minimize the formation of desiccation  cracks that result from drying of the compacted layer.  Such failures would promote  preferential flow through the cover and potentially through the constructed pile as  well.  The justification for the cover design is discussed below. Compacted layers in ARD cover applications are typically installed wet of the  optimum water content in order to promote the creation of a layer of permanently  saturated material.  The optimum water content is the moisture content that allows  for the highest dry­density at a given compaction effort.  Materials compacted dry of  optimum will have a more open structure (Fleureau et al, 2002), and consequently,  their soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) will have a slightly lower water content  for a given suction than if compacted wet of optimum.  The compacted layer, if  saturated, will also minimize the ingress of oxygen into covered waste (Nicholson et  88 al, 1989, Yanful et al, 1993, Wilson et al, 1997).  For oxygen barrier systems,  compaction on the wet side of optimum is more appropriate since the layer will  remain close to saturation under higher suctions  (Vanapalli et al, 1996).  Holtz and  Kovacs (1981) and O’Kane (2001) suggest that compaction on the wet side of  optimum will allow for a greater level of compaction and a higher moisture content.  However, it has been suggested that in all climates including semi­arid climates,  compacted layers constructed wet of optimum are ineffective at limiting oxygen and  water due to drying and cracking of the material (Dwyer, 1997). For the experimental pile, the goal was to achieve a durable compacted surface  layer and not to achieve a layer with a high moisture content.  This was  accomplished by ensuring that the cover material was at optimal, or slightly dry of  optimal water content.  Compaction at optimum or slightly dry of optimum reduced  the potential for desiccation defects in the compacted surface layer while creating a  layer that was effective in reducing the net­infiltration of water.  Standard Proctor  laboratory compaction tests following ASTM method D689 (ASTM, 1991) were  conducted on the minus 20 mm fraction of the sieved waste rock to determine the  relationship between dry density and water content.    Water content and dry density  were corrected to account for the 21 mm to 100 mm particles following ASTM  method 4718 (ASTM, 1994).  The corrected maximum dry density for the cover  material was determined to be 2280 kg/m3, at an optimum water content of 7.0%.  Based on two samples collected just prior to compaction, the cover was placed at an  89 average water content of 6.9%. Compaction was carried out on August 15, 2002, in one lift and three passes  with a standard free­standing rammer compactor delivering approximately 3100  pounds/blow over a 0.34 m by 0.36 m pad.  The compacted layer was constructed  with an overall slope of 1% towards the north edge of the waste rock pile to remove  surface runoff during higher intensity storms. Two test pits through the compacted layer were logged to visually inspect the  degree and depth of compaction.  Compaction appeared homogeneous to a depth of  approximately 0.12 m with a slightly lesser degree of compaction between 0.12 m  and 0.15 m.  Below 0.2 m, the waste rock appeared to be non­compacted.  On  October 10, 2002, six measurements of moisture content and density were made on  the compacted waste rock surface using a Troxler nuclear densometer gauge with a  probe depth of 0.15 m.  In addition, three samples were collected from the  compacted layer for laboratory moisture testing.  Average field density and moisture  content for the compacted surface as measured by the Troxler gauge were 2114 kg/ m3 and 6.1%, respectively, and the moisture content values measured on the  laboratory samples were 6.0%, 7.1% and 5.8%.  Compaction was similar to that  achieved during compaction trials on the DJN and Claude waste rock material  (Cogema, 2001) and during compaction trials on the Claude waste rock pile at Cluff  Lake using various mine equipment (O’Kane Consultants, 2001). A few topographic lows were identified following a rain event on May 13, 2003.  90 In June of 2003, a small quantity of waste rock was added to low areas in the  surface above lysimeters 1, 2, 13 and 14 and compacted with a hand tamper. 3.4.  DATA Event­specific hydrographs for the basal lysimeters from a natural and an  artificial rainfall event on each of the three surface conditions are presented.  The six  rainfall events were chosen based on the completeness of the data record, the size of  the rainfall event, and because each had a period of dry weather preceding the  rainfall event.  The three artificial rainfall events were similar to larger, high  intensity rainfalls commonly observed in the area during the later summer months.  The natural rainfall events were lower intensity, longer duration events common to  the region during the spring and early summer months.  The first two rainfall events  occurred prior to surface ripping and leveling.  The third and fourth occurred on the  ripped and leveled surface and the final two on the covered surface.  Table 3.1  provides details of the six rainfall events and the lysimeter responses are described  below. 91 3.4.1.  Individual Lysimeter Responses The outflow response to rainfall events was unique for each of the sixteen  lysimeters and varied from one rainfall event to another.  Hydrographs from 11 of  the 16 lysimeters are presented.  The quality of data from the tipping buckets that  metered outflow from lysimeters 12 and 15 began to deteriorate in 2002 and the  resulting hydrographs are noisy.  Hydrographs from lysimeters 4, 8 and 16 were  omitted from all plots because evidence exists for bypass flow along the external  wall of the experimental waste rock pile, an experimental artifact, following large  rainfall events on the covered surface. Outflow hydrographs for the precipitation events on the free­dumped surface are  shown in Figures 3.5.a and 3.5.b.  The hydrographs are for 9 days following a 40.8  mm natural rainfall event on July 30, 2001 and a 32.2 mm artificial rainfall event on  September 01, 2001. Outflow hydrographs for two precipitation events on the ripped and leveled  surface are plotted for three days following a 25 mm natural rainfall event on July  01, 2002 and for 9 days following a 39.9 mm artificial rainfall event on the August  08, 2002 (Figures 3.6.a and 3.6.b). Figures 3.7.a and 3.7.b show outflow hydrographs for two precipitation events  on the lower permeability cover surface.  The hydrographs are plotted for 40 days  following a 49.8 mm artificial rainfall event on of May 13, 2003 and for 40 days  following a 33.2 mm natural rainfall event on July 09, 2003.  Note the Y­axis is in  92 liters per day and the flow rate is an order of magnitude smaller than that in Figures  3.5. and 3.6. 3.5.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Nichol (2003) observed spatial variability in lysimeter outflow and found that  the relative pattern of outflow response observed for each individual lysimeter was  consistent from event to event.  Spatial variability in outflow response of individual  lysimeters and between lysimeters were observed and hypothesized to be affected  by the irregular surface configuration on the waste rock pile (Marcoline et al, 2003).  This section presents a discussion of the characteristics of the outflow response in  relation to the rainfall characteristics and the surface configuration of the waste rock  pile. For similar size precipitation events under the free­dump surface configuration,  the relative magnitude and timing of the wetting front responses recorded in  individual basal lysimeters remained constant (Nichol et al, 2002 and Nichol, 2003).  Lysimeter 6, for example, consistently shows the largest flow rate and appears as a  single, large wetting front that returns to pre­event flows after approximately 10  days (Figures 3.5.a and 3.5.b).  It is likely that the large response in lysimeter 6  obscures the observation of secondary wetting front arrivals at the base of the CPE.  The shape of the hydrographs from lysimeters 1, 7 and 13 are similar to 6, however,  they consistently show a lower magnitude initial response, followed by one or more  wetting front arrivals.  In contrast, the outflow hydrographs from lysimeters 3 and 5  93 are often the last to respond, and typically show the lowest magnitude response  following large rainfall events on the free­dumped surface. Following ripping and leveling of the waste rock surface, the patterns observed  in the hydrographs from lysimeters 5 and 9 do not change, while several  hydrographs change following rainfall events on the ripped and leveled surface.  Following ripping and leveling, the hydrograph from lysimeter 6 is still the first to  show a response following rainfall events, and has the largest magnitude flow rate,  but no longer has the uniquely large spike in flow rate.  Lysimeter 1 no longer  shows a rapid response to rainfall events.  Lysimeter 3 shows a delayed, and low  magnitude response following the 25 mm rainfall event, and shows a high  magnitude, rapid response following the 39.9 mm rainfall event (Figure 3.6.b). Three distinctive patterns are evident in the outflow hydrographs following  rainfall on the covered surface (Figures 3.7.a and 3.7.b).  The majority of the  lysimeters show a very gradual increase in flow rate without distinctive spikes or  wetting front arrivals and cannot be linked to the rainfall event.  Lysimeters 1, 2 and  3 exhibit wetting front arrivals that are in response to the rainfall events, but may in  part, be an experimental artifact related to bypass flow along the wall of the  lysimeters.  Hydrographs from lysimeters 13 and 14 have a distinctive response to  the rainfall events characterized by a 15 to 20 day gradual increase in flow rate. 3.5.1.  Spatial Variability in Rate and Total Magnitude of Infiltration Nichol (2002) observed the variability in outflow at the base of the waste rock  94 pile and suggested that localized runoff resulting from an irregular surface  topography may have been one factor contributing to the observed variability in  outflow.  Earlier, Bellehumeur (2001) documented the initiation of preferential flow  beneath "catchment drains" on the surface of the Claude waste rock pile at Cluff  Lake.  The result was a more localized, faster and deeper wetting front beneath the  catchment drains.  Similar to the observations of Bellehumeur (2001), and reported  in Smith and Beckie (2003), when the precipitation rate exceeds the infiltration  capacity of the surface of the CPE, overland flow to low areas and ponding of water  will occur in the topographically defined basins. Altering the surface configuration of the waste rock pile was hypothesized to  affect the amount, rate and spatial variability of infiltration into the waste rock.  The  surface modification from the free­dumped surface to the ripped and leveled surface  removed topographic relief, eliminating localized runoff and ponding effects that  were observed during highest intensity artificial rainfall events.  Creating this  change permitted an investigation of the relationship between the spatial variability  of surface infiltration into the material and the spatial variability in basal outflow.  The hydrographs showed that both the infiltration rate and the degree of spatial  variability in outflow were a function of the magnitude of the rainfall event, and it  appears that, in addition, the pattern of the spatial variability changes with rainfall  magnitude under the first two surface configurations.  Thus, the subsequent  modification from the ripped and leveled surface to a smooth, compacted surface  95 allowed for the investigation of the effect of a significantly reduced infiltration rate  on spatial distribution of outflow. Rainfall events with precipitation rates lower than the infiltration capacity of the  surface provide additional data to investigate the relative importance of surface  topography and surface texture on the outflow distribution.  During these events,  localized runoff and surface redistribution are minimized and the surface  topography has limited to no effect on the distribution of the rate and volume of  surface infiltration into the pile.  At these lower precipitation rates, any variability in  wetting front arrival times and the flow rates at the base of the pile following the  removal of topography must principally reflect differences in waste rock  characteristics inside of the pile, assuming that the evaporative losses are uniform  across the surface of the pile.  The variability then results from lateral redistribution  of water within the waste rock pile and preferential flow. Figure 3.8 shows two outflow hydrographs for each of the 11 lysimeters  following the two natural lower intensity events, both having a fairly similar rainfall  rate (Table 3.1).  The data are for the same rainfall events as shown in Figures 3.5.a  and 3.6.a.  The solid lines are the outflow hydrographs following a rainfall event on  the free­dumped surface and the dashed lines are the hydrographs following the  rainfall on the ripped and leveled surface.  The time axis for the July 30, 2001 event  is plotted along the bottom of this figure; the time axis for the July 1, 2002 event is  plotted along the top of this figure.  All lysimeters except 3, 7 and 11, exhibit  96 significant differences between the outflow hydrographs for the two surface  conditions.  The time interval between the initiation of the rainfall event and the  outflow response recorded in each of the basal lysimeters varied from lysimeter to  lysimeter.  Several lysimeters responded faster to rainfall events prior to ripping and  leveling of the surface while others appeared to respond slower.  With the exception  of one lysimeter, the outflow responses observed following rainfall on the free­ dumped surface exhibit a steeper rise in flow rate and a higher initial peak  regardless of the duration between the start of the rainfall event and the outflow  response.  The rainfall event on the free­dumped surface resulted in sharp outflow  peaks in lysimeters 1, 6, 9 and 13 that were not present following rainfall events on  the ripped and leveled surface.  Both events had rainfall rates lower than the  infiltration capacity of the surface, ruling out surface topography and texture as the  dominant controlling factors. The initial water content of the waste rock in the CPE and the duration of the  rainfall event cannot explain the absence of the fast peaks from the hydrographs for  the ripped and leveled surface condition.  The average initial water content of the  waste rock pile prior to the event on the ripped and leveled surface was higher than  the water content prior to the event on the free­dumped surface.  A higher  volumetric water content with the same precipitation rate could allow for a greater  degree of fast preferential flow and earlier flow peaks, which is the opposite to what  was observed.  Furthermore, elimination of the fast flow spikes cannot be explained  97 by the additional volume of infiltration following the rainfall event on the free­ dumped surface, which lasted 16 hours compared to the 9­hour event on the ripped  and leveled surface, unless the rainfall was heavily weighted towards the beginning  of the 16­hour period.  The flow spikes reach their maximum value in  approximately eight hours, before half of the total precipitation on the free­dumped  surface occurred.  While the outflow rates following rainfall events with a lower  precipitation rate indicate little about the effects of surface topography during higher  intensity rainfall events, they do suggest that a large portion of the variability was  unrelated to the surface topography and must be a result of internal, or near­surface  waste rock structure. The larger natural rainfall events and the majority of the artificial rainfall events  on the experimental waste rock pile occurred at a rate close to, or below the  infiltration capacity, based on the absence of runoff and ponding.  During the largest  artificial rainfall event the infiltration capacity of the irregular free­dumped surface  was exceeded.  Following the rainfall, a few localized areas on the surface appeared  to be saturated and isolated ponding with a water depth of less than 2 mm was  observed.  Prior to ripping, the surface elevation of the waste rock pile was surveyed  to 0.1 cm on a 30 cm by 30 cm grid in September of 2001.  Ten variably­sized  basins with a maximum topographic relief of up to 0.45 m across the free­dumped  surface condition were identified (Figure 3.2).  This surface relief was then  examined in relation to the hydrographs from the underlying lysimeters.  Basins  98 with a drainage area greater than the 2 m by 2 m lysimeter area were located above  lysimeters 6, 7 and 13.  Topographic highs or sloped surfaces existed on the surface  above lysimeters 2, 3, 10, 11 and 14 and little to no ponding was observed above the  lysimeters. Lysimeters beneath several of the largest drainage basins exhibit larger flows  and earlier wetting front arrivals following high intensity rainfall events on the free­ dumped surface than on the ripped and leveled surface.  Figure 3.9 shows an  outflow hydrograph for each of the 11 lysimeters from two similar­sized, large  rainfall events, one in 2001 and the other in 2002 (Table 3.1).  The time axis for the  September 01, 2001 event is plotted along the top of this figure; the time axis for the  August 08, 2002 event is plotted along the bottom of this figure.  The solid line is  the hydrograph for the free­dumped surface and the dashed line is the hydrograph  for the ripped and leveled surface.  Note that the scale on the Y­axis for lysimeter 6  is different than the other lysimeters.  Prior to ripping and leveling, hydrographs  from lysimeter 6, 7, 11 and 13 exhibit short­lived, large flow spikes shortly after  large rainfall events began.  In addition, lysimeter 6 was centered beneath the largest  catchment basin and typically responded to large rainfall events with an outflow rate  between three and five times higher than that of any other lysimeter (Figure 3.5 a  and b).  Lysimeters 7, 11 and 13 are also located below the low point of a basin and  show a sharp spike in flow rate following the rainfall on the free­dumped surface.  The maximum flow rates were significantly reduced following a similar size rainfall  99 event on the ripped and leveled surface (Figure 3.6).  Lysimeter 6 recorded a three­ fold decrease in flow rate following ripping and leveling and flow to lysimeters 1, 7  and 13 were reduced by approximately 50%.  The fast pathways responsible for the  high flow rate of lysimeter 6 in October 2001 are not as prominent following ripping  and leveling, and the cumulative outflow volume was consequently less.  While the  maximum flow rate for lysimeter 6 decreased with ripping and leveling, the  lysimeter was still the first to respond, and had a rapid spike in outflow rate double  that of any other lysimeter.  The sustained dominance of lysimeter 6 flow over that  from other lysimeters suggests that in addition to the surface configuration, other  mechanisms within the waste rock pile have a significant influence on the observed  preferential flow.  Other than the initial spike in flow rate, it was difficult to  determine which differences in the outflow are related to the topography and which  are related to the internal material characteristics at high infiltration rates. Similar to lysimeter 6, a decrease in peak flow rate was observed in lysimeters 1,  7, 11 and 13.  In addition, the cumulative volume of outflow from lysimeters 2, 3, 7,  9, 10, 11, 13 and 14 increased following similar magnitude rainfall events after  ripping and leveling (Figure 3.9).  The two­to three­fold increase in outflow volume  following ripping and leveling is interpreted to result from the removal of  topographic highs, and potentially from the activation of new fluid flow pathways.  Lysimeters 2, 3, 9 and 14 were located beneath topographic highs or sloping  surfaces on the free­dumped surface and experienced higher flow rates following  100 ripping and leveling.  It is inferred that the increase in relative flow rates following  ripping and leveling are in part, a response to the elimination of localized ponding  on the surface above the respective lysimeters.  The increased outflow volume in  these lysimeters is not related to a change in the water balance, rather it relates to a  redistribution of water from other lysimeters that experienced higher relative  volumes prior to ripping and leveling. The topographically controlled variations in flow most notably effect the initial  spike which occurred during the rainfall event.  The concentrated flow volume in  the three basins allowed for the activation of fast flow paths within the waste rock.  In the case of lysimeters 7 and 13, the preferential flow appears to be activated  beneath the basins as a result of the larger flow and not as a result of differing sub­ surface waste rock properties above the lysimeters and below the surface.  In  contrast, a similar outflow behavior is still observed in lysimeter 6 when the  infiltration is more uniformly distributed across the surface of the waste rock pile.  Lysimeter 6 appears to have preferential flow paths that are coincidental with the  overlying basin and that are related specifically to the structure or character of the  waste rock column above the lysimeter.  The same sharp spikes in flow rate  observed in lysimeters 6, 7 and 13, were also observed in lysimeters 1 and 11 which  lie beneath topographic highs, and therefore cannot be explained by a  topographically­controlled, localized, higher infiltration rate. In addition to surface topography, surface texture could account for the observed  101 spikes in flow.  Changing the texture or physical properties of the material at the  surface would result in a varying infiltration capacity.  The process of ripping and  leveling likely created a loose ‘sponge­like’ surface layer with a more uniform  distribution of waste rock surface texture.  The resulting surface likely had a more  open pore structure and a higher (less negative) air­entry value than the underlying  waste rock, allowing a more uniform distribution of infiltration deeper into the  waste rock during rainfall events.  While the ripped layer may have enhanced  infiltration in some areas, it may also have reduced the infiltration capacity in other  areas.  The area above lysimeter 6 and 13 on the free­dumped surface consisted of  cobbles and boulders 0.05 m to 0.50 m in diameter and were nearly void of matrix  material across the entire 0.40 m ripped depth.  The surface in these areas had a  clast­supported structure while the majority of the surface of the CPE had a matrix­ supported structure.  During the ripping and leveling process, the surface material  was homogenized to promote a similar particle size distribution across the entire  surface.  As with the removal of topography, the process of ripping and leveling  eliminated all observable variation in surface texture on different portions of the  surface which may have resulted in a minor, non­systematic change in outflow  distribution.  To minimize the disturbance of the CPE, particle size distributions of  the waste rock at the surface were not measured prior to ripping and leveling, so this  effect cannot be quantified. A relationship between topography and the spatial variability of basal outflow  102 exists for lysimeters 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 13 and 14 and a potential relationship between the  surface texture and flow spikes in lysimeters 6 and 13 exists.  However, elimination  of the topographic and textural differences together cannot explain the spatial  distribution of outflow and therefore must be a result of internal structure. 3.5.2.  Infiltration Rate In addition to an irregular surface topography and surface texture, the rate of  infiltration into the waste rock plays a role in influencing the magnitude, character  and distribution of outflow in the basal lysimeters.  The compacted cover was  designed to significantly reduce the rate and volume of infiltration into the waste  rock pile.  The cover reduced surface infiltration 30% (lost to runoff) and reduced  net­infiltration (net­percolation) from approximately 50% to 6% of precipitation.  Hydrographs from all lysimeters following construction of the cover exhibit a small  increase in flow rate during the summer of 2003 following the winter drain down,  but the rapid response and high flow rates observed following precipitation events  on the free­dump or ripped and leveled surface were absent. Figure 3.10 shows 11 outflow hydrograph sets following an artificial and a  natural rainfall event on the covered surface.  Figure 3.10 differs from Figures 3.8  and 3.9 and compares two events on the same surface, not two different surfaces.  The time axis for the July 09, 2003 event is plotted along the bottom of this figure;  the time axis for the May 13, 2003 event is plotted along the top of this figure.  The  solid lines depict the 30 day hydrographs following the May 13th event plotted on  103 the same scale as the 30 day hydrographs following the July 09th rainfall event  (dashed lines).  The time axes span the same duration, and are aligned to the  initiation of the rainfall event.  The artificial rainfall on May 13, 2003 was applied at  a rate of 7.7 mm/hr while the rate of the natural event on July 09, 2003 was lower at  4.2 mm/hr.  For the first 1.5 months following the April thaw, the majority of  hydrographs continue to follow the winter drain down curve even though greater  than 100 mm of rainfall had fallen on the top of the pile.  The hydrographs from the  six central lysimeters 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 11, show a gradual increase in flow rate at  the base of the pile during July and August of 2003, without the distinctive wetting  fronts observed pre­cover.  This outflow from the six lysimeters likely consists of  older, slow moving pore water in the pile and potentially a small amount of matrix  flow associated with the large rainfall event in May. Distinctive wetting fronts are observed in lysimeters 1, 2, 3, 13 and 14 following  both rainfall events shown in Figure 3.10 and can be associated with surface  ponding.  During the May 13th event, an area of less than 0.5 m2 of ponding was  observed above each of lysimeters 1, 2 and 3.  Larger ponded areas of  approximately 1.0 m2 above lysimeter 13 and an area of 2.0 m2 above lysimeter 14  were observed.  Wetting fronts were recorded in lysimeters 1, 2 and 3,  approximately 15 days following the rainfall event.  The elevated flow that followed  the wetting fronts was observed for 4 to 14 days.  In lysimeters 13 and 14, the first  wetting front was observed within 5 days of the rainfall event and the elevated flow  104 that followed the wetting fronts lasted 26 days.  Following the May 13th rainfall  event, additional material was added to the cover and compacted in the areas where  ponding was observed.  In rainfall events following the cover repair, surface  ponding was eliminated above lysimeters 1, 2 and 3 and a minor amount of ponding  was still observed in the area above lysimeter 13 and 14.  The hydrographs from  lysimeters 13 and 14 still show a response to the ponded water at the base of the pile  approximately 14 days following the July rainfall event. Tracers were used to examine the presence of event water in outflow.  Deuterium tracer was applied on May 13, 2003 and a bromide tracer was applied on  July 29, 2003. Neither tracer was detected in amounts above background levels in  outflow water from early August of 2003.  The lack of either tracer is significant  because it confirms that the water comprising the wetting fronts observed in basal  lysimeter 13 and 14 was old water and did not contain water from the large May  13th, July 9th, or the July 29th rainfall events. The distinctive wetting fronts observed in lysimeters 1, 2, 3, 13 and 14 for the  covered pile are interpreted to be a result of a pressure wave, or a kinematic wave as  described by Torres (1998), Rasmussen et al (2000) and Williams et al (2002), and  not as preferential flow.  This is different than the kinematic wave discussed by  Germann and Beven (1985), Germann (1990), Singh (2002), modeled by Lopez et al  (1997), Poyck et al (2005), and observed in column and field experiments by Smith  (1983), which is equated to actual water movement in macropores.  Rainfall events  105 may result in the propagation of a pressure wave that can be transmitted vertically  through the pile.  Following a rainfall event, the volumetric water content of the  waste rock at the surface increases, the matric potential or suction decreases and the  increased local gradient causes a redistribution of pore water.  Depending on the  initial conditions and the characteristics of the rainfall event, the pressure wave may  propagate to the base and result in outflow. Nichol (2003) documented that water flow in preferential flow paths in the CPE  moves at rates far greater than the average fluid velocity.  In addition to preferential  flow of water, a pressure wave typically moves at a rate far greater than the average  fluid velocity.  Both water flow in preferential flow paths and pressure waves appear  as basal outflow in response to transient infiltration events, and it is important to  differentiate pressure wave propagation from preferential flow.  Close to saturation,  the moisture content changes rapidly for small changes in pressure head, therefore  the addition of water to the uncovered pile would result in a small decrease in  suction and a large increase in hydraulic conductivity.  If the infiltration rate is high  enough, the combination of the additional water and the higher conductivity will  activate macropore flow and rapidly conduct water from the rainfall event into, or  through the pile.  The primary difference is that preferential flow is a physically  controlled process that allows for new water to bypass the matrix water, while a  pressure wave propagates through existing pore water and the pressure change  causes redistribution of the existing water. 106 At low water contents, such as those occurring in the covered waste rock, the  soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) for the waste rock is relatively flat (Figure  3.11).  A small change in volumetric water content from a rainfall event will result  in a large change in suction, or hydraulic head.  As the pressure wave propagates  through the pile, water from surrounding smaller pores is redistributed into larger  pores in response to the higher pressure gradients.  Based on the relationship  between the soil water characteristic curve and the hydraulic conductivity curve  (HCC) (Figure 3.12), the same small increase in volumetric water content of the  waste rock while it is near residual saturation will only result in a small increase in  the hydraulic conductivity.  The pressure wave will propagate vertically in response  to the head gradient, however, vertical percolation is still relatively small because of  the low hydraulic conductivity.  Depending on the water content, some of the  redistributed pore water can drain down but much of it is drawn into the fine pores  as the pressure stabilizes.  In a pure pressure wave response, the water reporting to  the lysimeters is older pore water from within the pile and not newly­infiltrated rain  water.  Without high frequency tracer data it is difficult to distinguish between the  two processes.  Based on the theory above, a critical threshold in the water content  and particle size should exist above which water from a transient infiltration event  will result in the activation of macropore flow in addition to pressure waves.  Regardless of whether the field derived, or laboratory derived SWCC (Figure 3.11)  is used, the average volumetric water content (vwc) of the covered waste rock is  107 apparently below this threshold.  In other words, the properties of the covered waste  rock plot in a steep region of the matric suction versus conductivity plot (Figure  3.12) and this region corresponds to a very low hydraulic conductivity. The antecedent or initial water content of the pile affects both the velocity of the  water and the propagation of pressure waves.  After extended periods of drain down  the residual volumetric water content of the upper portion of the waste rock within  the CPE was between 5 and 9% (Figure 3.13).  Under such conditions, such as in  the spring of 2003, the likelihood of preferential flow to reach to the base of the  CPE is significantly less than under wetter summer, or pre­cover conditions and the  observed responses were likely a result of pressure waves.  In comparison to the  average pore water velocity of 0.001 m/day calculated from the deuterium tracer  (Marcoline et al, 2006) and the measured water flux, the 0.14 to 1 m/day wetting  front velocity measured by TDR are thought to be localized water redistribution in  response to pressure waves.  The wetting front progressions as measured by TDR  are evident in the 1.95 m TDR probes, but not in the 3 m and deeper probes.  While  the observed responses are more likely to result from pressure waves than from  preferential flow under the drier conditions, they also can dissipate faster because of  the less continuous and more torturous path of filled pores for the wave to be  transmitted.  Furthermore, the pressure wave is dissipated faster as the energy is  used to redistribute the water to the larger pores.  The pressure wave speed will be  controlled by the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the moisture  108 content versus matric suction curve at the prevailing pressure head.  When the water  content is higher, even if it is not high enough to activate preferential flow, the wave  propagates faster and further as a result of less lateral water redistribution and the  more continuous network of water pores, and is more likely to reach the base of the  pile. Rasmussen et al (2000) applied kinematic theory to the unsaturated hydraulic  conductivity model and predicted that pressure wave travel times should be between  two and fifteen times the tracer velocity regardless of the particular form of the  SWCC (Brooks­Corey, van Genuchten­Mualem, Broadbridge­White, or the Galileo  formulation).  In column experiments, Rasmussen et al (2000) observed pressure  wave velocities up to 1000 times faster than tracer velocities.  Nichol et al (2003)  documented preferential flow of water to the base of the waste rock pile shortly  following large rainfall events and suggested that the kinematic wave theory may  explain some of the fast outflow.  While Nichol did not attempt to differentiate  between preferential flow rates and pressure wave travel times, it can be inferred  based on his chloride tracer and outflow data that pressure wave velocities were on  the order of 100 times faster than the average pore water velocities in the uncovered  waste rock pile.  In comparison to the estimated pressure wave rates through the  uncovered waste rock pile, a reduction in pressure wave velocities was observed  following placement of the lower permeability cover. 109 3.5.3.  Variability of Outflow The reduction in variability of basal lysimeter outflow following cover  placement can be observed by comparing pre­ and post­cover cumulative outflow  (Figure 3.14).  The process of ripping and leveling the surface of the waste rock pile  activated some pathways and closed other pathways for fast flowing water relative  to the three­year old free­dumped surface.  As evident in Figures 3.7.a, 3.7.b and  3.11, spatial variability of outflow does exist between lysimeters post­cover, but in  general, the outflow response of all lysimeters was within a few liters per day.  It is  proposed that with the modification of the surface from ripped and leveled to one  with a lower permeability compacted layer, a large portion of the variability in  outflow was removed from the system by significantly limiting infiltration and not  allowing water to access the fast pathways. 3.6.  CONCLUSIONS In the free­dumped waste rock, the combined effects of the large range in  particle size distribution (ranging from clays to boulders), surface topography, and  internal structures, resulted in highly variable outflow distributions measured in the  basal lysimeters.  The topographically­controlled variations in flow most notably  affect the initial spike which occurred during the rainfall event.  However, the high  degree of spatial variability in basal outflow observed from the CPE with the free­ dumped surface appears to result from preferential flow associated with the internal  structure of the CPE. 110 The modification of the surface from free­dumped to a ripped and leveled  surface had an effect on outflow by removing large topographic and particle size  heterogeneity from the top 0.4 m of the pile, that in­turn reduced the variation in  infiltration rate across the surface.  The process of ripping and leveling the surface  of the waste rock pile activated some pathways and closed other pathways for fast  flowing water relative to the three­year old free dump surface.  The changes  observed following precipitation events on the ripped and leveled surface support a  model in which the internal waste rock heterogeneities and structure are the  dominant factors controlling the outflow distribution and wetting front arrival times.  Surface configuration was important, but only a secondary factor. The compacted surface reduced the spatial variability of water infiltrating into  the waste rock.  The modification of the surface from a ripped and leveled to one  with a lower permeability compacted layer reduced the surface infiltration and  removed a large portion of the variability in outflow from the system.  The total  basal lysimeter outflow was reduced from 54% to 10% of precipitation.  Data from  the covered, low infiltration experiments suggest that in this case surface  configuration, especially related to ponding, was the dominant control on outflow  variability.  The construction of the lower permeability cover marked the beginning  of a gradual drain down of the waste rock pile, not unlike that seen in the late fall  when the surface freezes.  In addition, wetting front arrival times were  approximately doubled in the 5 m­high waste rock pile following cover placement.  111 The reduction of the large degree of heterogeneity of material participating in flow  and the elimination of macropore flow may allow for more accurate assessment of  net­infiltration and internal flow mechanisms and result in a more predictable  system. Specifically, the first hypothesis was that the large spatial and temporal  variability in outflow observed from the uncovered CPE was primarily a result of  the surface condition of the waste rock pile and to a lesser degree, related to the  heterogeneous internal structure of the pile.  As discussed above, this was shown to  not be the case for either the free­dumped surface or the ripped and leveled surface.  However, data from the covered experiments suggested that surface configuration,  especially related to localized ponding, was the dominant control on outflow  variability in this lower­infiltration condition. The second hypothesis was that the addition of a lower permeability cover  would greatly decrease spatial and temporal variability in outflow by eliminating  preferential flow.  The lower permeability compacted layer removed a large portion  of the spatial and temporal variability in outflow from the system, however, a large  amount of preferential flow was still observed in the system. 112 3.7.  REFERENCES American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM),  1990. Standard test method  for particle size analysis of soils (D422­63; re­approved 1990). Annual  Book of ASTM Standards. v. 04.08. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 1991.  Test method for  laboratory compaction characteristics of soil using standard effort  (12,400 ft­lbf/ft3 (600 kN­m/m3)) (D698­91). Annual Book of ASTM  Standards. v. 04.08.  American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM),  1994. Standard practice for  correction of unit weight and water content for soils containing oversize  particles (D4718­87; reapproved 1994). Annual Book of ASTM  Standards. v. 04.08. Bellehumeur, T.M.,  2001. Mechanisms and spatial variability of rainfall infiltration  on the Claude waste rock pile. MA Sc thesis, University of British  Columbia, Vancouver. Cogema Resources,  2001. Cluff Lake Project Comprehensive Study Report for  decommissioning. January 15, 2001. Dwyer, S.F.,  1997. Large­scale field study of landfill covers at Sandia National  Laboratories. Conference Proceedings Landfill Capping in the Semi­ Arid West: Problems, Perspectives, and Solutions, T.D Reynolds and  R.C. Morris (eds). Grand Teton National Park, May 1997. pp. 27­38.  113 Fines, P., Wilson, G.W., Landriault, D., Langetine, L. and Hulett, L.,  2003a. Co­ mixing of tailings, waste rock and slag to produce barrier cover systems,  Proceedings Sixth International Conference Acid Rock Drainage. Fines, P., Wilson, G.W., Willams, DJ., Tran, A.B. and Miller, S.,  2003. Field  Characterization of two full­scale waste rock piles.  Proceedings Sixth  International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage. Fleureau, J.M., Verbrugge, J.C., Huergo, P.J., Correia, A.G. and Kheirbek­Saoud,  S.,  2002. Aspects of the behaviour of compacted clayey soils on drying  and wetting paths. Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v. 39. pp. 1341­1357. Fortin, S., Lamontagne, A., Tasse, N. and Poulin, R.,  2000. The use of basic  additives to tailings in layered co­mingling to improve AMD control.  Paper presented at the 6th SWEMP 2000, May 30th­June 2nd 2000,  Calgary, Alberta. Germann, P.F.,  1990. Macropores and hydrologic hillslope processes. In:  Anderson, M.G. and T.P. Burt (eds.) Process Studies in Hillslope  Hydrology. pp. 327­363; John Wiley and Sons. Germann, P.F. and Beven, K., 1985.  Kinematic wave approximation to infiltration  into soils with sorbing macropores. Water Resources Research. v. 21.  pp. 990­996. Holtz, R.D. and Kovac, W.D., 1981. An Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering,  Prentice Hall, New Jersey. 114 Lopez, D.L., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  1997. Modeling water flow in waste rock  piles using kinematic wave theory, in 4th International Conference on  Acid Rock Drainage. pp. 497­513. Mbonimpa M., Aubertin M., Aachib M., Bussière B.,  2003. Diffusion and  consumption of oxygen in unsaturated cover materials. Canadian  Geotechnical Journal. v. 40. no. 5. pp. 916­932. Maddocks, G.,  2003. Preliminary assessment of remediated sulfidic waste rock  using Terra B™. National Meeting of the American Society of Mining  and Reclamation and the 9th Billings Land Reclamation Symposium. 30  p. Marcoline, J.R., Beckie, R.D., Smith, L. and Nichol, C.F.,  2003. Mine waste rock  hydrogeology ­ The effect of surface configuration on internal water  flow. Sixth International Conference Acid Rock Drainage.. Nichol, C.F.,  2003. Transient flow and transport in unsaturated heterogeneous  media: Field experiments in mine waste rock. Ph.D. dissertation,  University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2000. Hydrogeologic behavior of  unsaturated mine waste rock: An experimental study. In Proceedings of  the 5th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage, Denver,  Colorado, 21­24 May. Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration  Inc. (SME). pp. 215­224. 115 Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2002. Evaluation of uncoated and coated  time domain reflectometry probes for high electrical conductivity  systems. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Journal. v. 66. pp. 1454­1465. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2003. Water Flow in Uncovered Waste  Rock ­ A Multi­Year Large Lysimeter Study.  Sixth International  Conference Acid Rock Drainage. Nichol, C.F., Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2005. Field scale experiments of  unsaturated flow and solute transport in a heterogeneous porous  medium, Water Resources Research. v. 41. Nicholson, R.V., Gillham, R.W., Cherry, J.A. and Reardon, E.J.,  1989. Reduction  of acid generation in mine tailings through the use of moisture­retaining  cover layers as oxygen barriers, Canadian Geotechnical Journal. v. 26.  pp. 1­8. O’Kane Consultants,  2001. Development of compacted specifications for the  Claude Waste Rock Pile surface ­ Draft ­ Cluff Lake Project, Submitted  to Cogema Resources, O’Kane Consultants Inc., December 2001. Poyck, S., Troch, P.A., A de Rooij, G.H. and Hilberts, A.G.J., 2005.  Simple  hillslope hydrology model based on 1D kinematic wave unsaturated  flow and the hillslope­storage Boussinesq equation. Geophysical  Research Abstracts. v. 7. Rasmussen, T.C., Baldwin, R.H., Dowd, J.F. and Williams, A.G.,  2000. Tracer vs.  116 pressure wave velocities through unsaturated saprolite. Soil Sci. Soc.  Am. Journal. v. 64. pp 75­85. Singh, V.P.,  2002. Is hydrology kinematic? Hydrol. Process. v. 16. pp. 667­716. Smith, L. and Beckie, R.,  2003. Hydrological and geochemical transport processes  in mine waste rock, Ch 3 in Environmental Aspects of Mine Wastes,  Mineral. Assoc. Canada, Short Course Series. v. 31. pp. 51­72. Smith, R.E.,  1983. Approximate soil water movement by kinematic characteristics.  Soil Sci. Soc. Am. v. 47. pp. 3­8. Torres, R., W.E. Dietrich, D.R.,  1998. Montgomery, S. P. Anderson, K. Loague,  Unsaturated zone processes and the hydrologic response of a steep,  unchanneled catchment, Water Resources Research. v. 34. no.8. p. 1865. Vanapalli, S.K., Fredlund, D.G., Pufahi, D.E.,  1996. The Relationship Between the  Soil­Water Characteristic Curve and the Unsaturated Shear Strength of a  Compacted Till. Geotechnical Testing Journal. v. 19. Issue 3. p. 10. Williams, A.G., Dowd, J.F. and Meyles., E.W.,  2002. A new interpretation of  kinematic stormflow generation. Hydrological Processes. v. 16. pp.  2791­2803. Wilson, G.W., Fredlund, D.G. and Barbour, S.L.,  1997. The effect of soil suction  on evaporative fluxes from soil surfaces. Canadian Geotechnical  Journal. v. 34. no.2. pp. 145­155. Winter Syndnor, M.E. and Redente, E.F.,  2002. Reclamation of high­elevation,  117 acidic mine waste with organic amendments and topsoil. Journal of  Environmental Quality. v. 31. pp. 1528­1537. Yanful, E.K., Bell, A.V. and Woyshner, M.R.,  1993. Design of a composite soil  cover for an experimental waste rock pile near Newcastle, New  Brunswick, Canada. Canadian Geotechnical Journal, v. 30. pp. 578­587. Zegelin, S.J. and White, I., Jenkins, D.R.,  1989. Improved field probes for soil  water content and electrical conductivity measurement using time  domain reflectrometry, Water Resources Research. v. 25. no. 11. pp.  2367­2376. 118 Table 3.1.  Summary of the six isolated rainfall events on the top of the constructed waste  rock pile. 119 Date Event Type Surface Configuration Precipitation Duration Rate Runoff (mm) (hrs) (mm/hr) runoff (%) 30. Jul. 2001 Natural Free­Dumped 41 16.0 3 0 1. Sep. 2001 Artificial Free­Dumped 32 2.4 13 0 1. Jul. 2002 Natural Ripped and Leveled 25 9.1 3 0 8. Aug. 2002 Artificial Ripped and Leveled 40 2.9 14 0 13. May. 2003 Artificial Covered 50 6.5 8 12 9. Jul. 2003 Natural Covered 33 8.0 4 22 Figure 3.1. Schematic plan view and cross section of the constructed waste rock  pile. The grid shows the relative location of the 16 lysimeters. 120 Legend Instrument Figure 3.2.  Topography of the free­dumped surface as surveyed in the Fall of 2001.  The  drainage basin boundaries were modified from Nichol (2003) and overlain on  the surface topography.  The thick boundary lines follow the topographic highs and  define the basin divides.                     a) 121                     b)                      c) Figure 3.3.  a) Photograph of the 3.5 year­old free­dumped top surface looking  northwest.  b) Photograph looking north­northeast at the ripped and leveled waste  rock surface.  c) Photograph looking north at the surface following construction of  the compacted waste rock layer. 122 Figure 3.4.  Particle size distribution curves from the waste rock cover material  before compaction (two samples were collected). 123 July 30, 2001 ­ August 07, 2001 Figure 3.5.a.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the free­dumped  surface.  The hydrographs are in liters per day for 9 days following a 40.8 mm  natural rainfall event on 30th of July 2001.  The red dashed line marks the rainfall  event. 124 August 31, 2001 ­ September 10, 2001 Figure 3.5.b.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the free­dumped  surface.  The hydrographs are in liters per day for 9 days following a 32.2 mm  artificial rainfall event on the 1st of September 2001.  The red dashed line marks the  rainfall event. 125 July 01, 2002 ­ July 04, 2002 Figure 3.6.a.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the ripped and leveled  surface.  The hydrographs are in liters per day for 3 days following a 25 mm natural  rainfall event on July 01, 2002.  As a result of equipment malfunction, data for the week  starting on July 04 is missing.  The red dashed line marks the rainfall event. 126 August 08, 2002 ­ August 13, 2002 Figure 3.6.b.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the ripped and leveled  surface.  The hydrographs are in liters per day for 5.5 days following a 39.9 mm artificial  rainfall event on the 8th of August 2002.  The red dashed line marks the rainfall event. 127 May 13, 2003 ­ July 18, 2003 Figure 3.7.a.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the covered surface.  The hydrographs are in liters per day for 35 days following a 49 mm artificial  rainfall event on May 13, 2003.  The red dashed line marks the rainfall event. 128 July 09, 2003 ­ August 11, 2003 Figure 3.7.b.  Outflow hydrographs for a precipitation event on the covered surface.  The hydrographs are in liters per day for 32 days following a 33 mm artificial  rainfall event on July 09, 2003.  The red dashed line marks the rainfall event. 129 July 01 ­ July 05 2002 July 29 ­ August 03, 2001 Figure 3.8.  Two outflow hydrographs for each of the 11 lysimeters following two  natural low intensity rainfall events.  The solid lines are the outflow hydrographs  following an event on the free­dumped surface (July 30, 2001) and the dashed lines  are the hydrographs following the rainfall on the ripped and leveled surface (July  01, 2002). 130 O ut fl ow  (L /D ay ) September 01 ­ September 06, 2001 August 08 ­ August 13, 2002 Figure 3.9.  Two outflow hydrographs for each of the 11 lysimeters following two artificial  high intensity events.  The solid lines are the outflow hydrographs following an event on  the free­dumped surface and the dashed lines are the hydrographs following the rainfall on  the ripped and leveled surface. 131 O ut fl ow  (L /D ay ) 11, May 2003 ­ 16, June 2003 6, July 2003 ­ 11, August 2003 Figure 3.10.  Two outflow hydrograph sets following an artificial and a natural  rainfall event on the covered surface for each of the 11 lysimeters following an  artificial high intensity events with fairly constant precipitation rates.  The solid  lines depict the 30 day hydrographs following the May 13th event and the dashed  lines, 30 day hydrographs following the July 9th rainfall event. 132 O ut fl ow  (L /D ay ) Figure 3.11.  Soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) for the waste rock and cover  material.  The blue curve ( ) is a SWCC for the waste rock based on field data.  The○   matric suction values were determined indirectly using the filter paper method and the  volumetric water content measurements were obtained from direct, in­situ measurements.  The red curve () is a SWCC for the waste rock based on laboratory data using a Tempe  cell.  The green curve ( ) is an estimated SWCC for the waste rock cover based on the□   grain size distribution and volume mass properties as calculated by the Fredlund and Xing  (1994) equation. 133 Figure 3.12.  Hydraulic conductivity curves for the waste rock and cover material.  The  blue curve (solid) is the HCC for the waste rock based on field SWCC.  The red curve  (dashed) is the HCC for the waste rock based on laboratory SWCC.  The green curve  (dash­dot) is the HCC for the waste rock cover.  All three curves are estimated using the  Fredlund et al (1994a) equation. 134 0 Figure 3.13.  The volumetric water content as measured by TDR probes at 8  different depths within the waste rock pile between May 01, 2003 and June 25,  2003.  The data are an average from the probes at the same depth in all three  profiles.  The sub­plot shows the rainfall record for the same period. 135 Figure 3.14.  Cumulative outflow from each of the 16 lysimeters in percent relative  to precipitation for  the period between April 2001 and April 2002 on the uncovered  waste rock in blue and the period between April 2003 and April 2004 on the covered  waste rock in red. 136 CHAPTER 4:  WATER MIGRATION IN COVERED WASTE ROCK: A  DEUTERIUM TRACER STUDY  4.1.  INTRODUCTION The evaluation of the potential for acid rock drainage (ARD) and ground water  contamination from mine waste rock piles is an issue at many hard rock mines  worldwide (Lapakko, 2002, Batterham, 2003, Coeppicus et al, 2003).  Measurement  of the volume and chemistry of basal outflow from large waste rock piles is at best  difficult and often not possible, which necessitates the use of some type of  predictive tool as an evaluation method.  In addition to mineralogical and  geochemical information about the waste rock and the net­infiltration of water into  the pile, information on the mechanisms that control where the water resides and  flows inside the pile is important for prediction.  The chemical processes related to  ARD have been examined in numerous studies (eg. Alpers and Nordstrom, 1999,  Jambor and Blowes, 1998, Hammarstrom and Smith, 2002), but there are fewer  studies on the flow processes that control the degree of water­rock interactions and  influence the amount and timing of solute transport (Bezuidenhout, 2002, Smith and  Beckie, 2003, Nichol et al, 2003, Stockwell et al, 2003, Molson et al, 2005). The character of the water­rock interactions will depend in part on the internal  structure of the waste rock pile, which reflects the approach used to construct the    A version of this chapter will be submitted for publication.  Marcoline, J.R., Water migration in  covered waste rock.   137 pile.  Two common methods of constructing waste rock piles are end­dumping and  free­dumping; both result in piles with different internal structures.  End­dumped  piles often have an internal structure characterized by steeply inclined layers,  situated between horizontal traffic surfaces.  End­dumped piles have been referred  to as structured, segregated or layered as a result of the fining upward textural  segregation that occurs when the granular material is dumped over the tip face of the  waste rock pile (Smith et al, 1995, Herasymuik, 1996, Fines, 2006).  Free­dumped  waste rock piles are constructed by truck dumping on a horizontal traffic surface  followed by grading or leveling.  Free­dumped piles often have a range of internal  structures, such as traffic surfaces and localized layering as a result of the  construction method and material properties, but often lack the segregation and  sloped layering found in end­dumped piles.  Some piles are composites of both  types of construction. Water flow in both uncovered and covered, end­dumped waste rock piles has  been studied in the field and preferential flow has been modeled within the steeply  inclined layers (Herasymuik, 1996, Fala et al, 2003, Fines, 2003, Tran et al, 2003).  In contrast, preferential flow and the effect of cover systems on fluid flow and  transport within heterogeneous, free­dumped waste rock are poorly understood  (Smith et al, 1995).  Since all waste rock piles are heterogeneous and many will  ultimately be covered, a better understanding of waste rock hydrogeology in such a  scenario is valuable for the prediction and minimization of acid rock drainage. 138 Soil covers are a common strategy to reduce infiltration into waste rock and  thereby reduce long­term acidic drainage and metal loading to the receiving  environment.  Soil covers can be designed to: 1) slow down internal weathering  reactions, and 2) limit the flushing of solubilized weathering products from a  stockpile.  Detailed discussions on the design and effectiveness of soil covers are  available (U.S. EPA, 1994, Albright et al, 2002, Milczarek et al, 2003, O’Kane and  Waters, 2003, MEND, 2004), however, information about the systematics of the  water flow and of the transport of weathering products through covered waste rock  is limited.  Such information should lead to better ARD predictive methods and  refined source control strategies. 4.2.  HYPOTHESES This paper describes the use of the stable isotope deuterium tracer to  characterize infiltration into and the flow dynamics within a covered waste rock  pile.  The specific hypotheses are: • That the addition of a lower­permeability surface cover would result in a  significant reduction of distinctive preferential flow paths by limiting the  flow to the finer grained matrix materials. • That the surface cover would reduce the spatial variability of surface  infiltration. • That the lower­permeability surface cover would result in a more uniform  flushing of weathering products from the pile. 139 • That a deuterium tracer would allow for the investigation of the depth and  spatial distribution of infiltration into and water movement through the  covered waste rock pile. 4.3.  BACKGROUND 4.3.1.  Preferential Flow In Unsaturated Media Preferential flow in unsaturated media occurs as localized water flow at a rate  much faster than the average pore water velocity.  Preferential flow in unsaturated  media can result either from the presence of large interconnected voids, at the  transition from fine to coarse­textured soils, or from flow fingering at wetting fronts.  Preferential flow paths are often characterized as a system of large, interconnected  voids, rubble zones or large pore spaces (Beven and Germann, 1982, Morin et al,  1991, Flury et al, 1994, Newman, 1999, Li, 2000, Bellehumeur, 2001).  The link  between preferential flow paths and permeability variations or soil heterogeneity has  been observed experimentally (Eriksson et al, 1997, Fines et al, 2003, Nichol, 2003)  and examined numerically (Trapp et al, 1995, Birkholzer and Tsang, 1997, Eriksson  and Destouni, 1997, Fala et al, 2003). Heterogeneities within the soil matrix have also been shown to significantly  affect flow and solute transport in unsaturated material and create preferential flow  (Buczko et al, 2001, Hangen et al, 2004).  For example, Parlange and Hill (1976)  and Baker and Hillel (1990) documented small­scale preferential flow resulting  from water flowing across a transition from fine to coarse­texture materials. 140 Preferential flow is also observed in materials that are devoid of obvious  structural or physical heterogeneity (Parlange and Hill, 1976, Jury et al, 2003,  Ghodrati and Jury, 1992, Wang and Jury, 2003, Cho et al, 2005).  Preferential flow  that is not directly related to material properties or texture can occur at the  redistribution wetting front as the hydraulic gradient reverses following an  infiltration event into a drier medium (Diment and Watson, 1985, Wang and Jury,  2003).  The redistribution wetting front refers to the interface between initially dry  material and the propagating soil water introduced during infiltration.  Redistribution will continue until the water content in the soil is uniform.  Wang et  al (2004) and Jury et al (2003) suggest that all soils are likely to experience such  preferential flow, or flow fingers.  Wang et al (2003) observed flow fingers with a  mean width of 0.13 m in coarse­textured, nonstructured soils and that the flow paths  reappeared in the same location during subsequent infiltration events. Coarse waste rock often has a low air­entry value and will rapidly drain far  below the saturated water content after a dry period following an infiltration event.  The air­entry value is the matric suction at which air first enters the largest pores  during drying (Brooks and Corey, 1964, 1966), and the water­entry value is the  matric suction at which the water content of the soil starts to increase significantly  during wetting.  The volumetric water content of coarse waste rock remains close to  saturation on the soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) between 0 KPa and the air­ entry value.  Additionally, the difference in potential (matric suction) between the  141 air­entry value and the water­entry value of the waste rock is often relatively small,  which is favorable for the initiation of unstable flow fingers (Wang et al, 2004).  The majority of water that infiltrates through a cover is likely to be contained within  the finer matrix material and experience a gradient reversal due to evaporation after  the rainfall event ceases.  Even with relatively high matric suctions, mechanisms for  preferential flow must exist (Pruess, 1999). Based on the work of Jury et al (2003)  and Wang et al (2004) at the equivalence point between the downward gradient due  to gravity and the upward gradient due to evaporation (capillarity), lateral  redistribution of water into a finger will occur and gravity­driven preferential flow  can be initiated. 4.3.2.  Chemical Tracers Used in Waste Rock Studies Tracers have been used to investigate flow and transport processes in uncovered  mine waste rock.  Murr (1979) and Nichol (2003) used chloride as a tracer, Eriksson  et al (1997) used bromide, Bellehumeur (2001) used dye staining, and Hangen et al  (2004) used bromide, terbuthylazine, and deuterium.  Other than Guebert and  Gardner (2001), who used a fluorescent dye, few tracer studies have been conducted  on covered mine material. Nichol (2003) described flow and transport of a chloride tracer through the same  experimental waste rock pile that is discussed in this paper.  On this basis, Nichol  (2003) concluded that multiple flow paths (i.e. fast preferential flow paths, slower  preferential flow paths and capillary­driven matrix flow paths) exist even within an  142 area as small as 2 m by 2 m. The choice of a tracer for this research was constrained by cost and by the ability  to detect the tracer in high conductivity, low pH pore water within the CPE.  Chloride was still present in the CPE from a tracer release in 1999 and deuterium  was chosen as a tracer based on a low detection limit, a lack of chemical  interference with other solutes in the pore water, and a low analysis cost.  Bromide  was also applied to the covered waste rock pile in 2003, however, it was not  possible to accurately measure bromide in pore water extracted following the  deconstruction of the pile.  High sulfate concentrations (400­40,000 ppm) in pore  water masked bromide in ion chromatography analyses and sample volumes were  too small for colorimetric analysis. 4.3.3.  Stable Isotopes as Tracers in Unsaturated Media The oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of water can be effective tracers of water  flow paths in unsaturated materials (eg. Newman et al, 1997, Singleton et al, 2003,  USGS, 2003, DePaolo et al, 2004).  Precise measurements of the stable isotopes of  water are difficult and necessitate the measurement of the relative isotopic  difference ( ) between the sample and a reference standard.  The   value isδ δ   expressed as per mil (‰) and defined by:   = [(Ratioδ (sample) ­ Ratio(standard)) / Ratio(standard)] x 103 143 where the standard is standard mean ocean water (SMOW) from Craig (1961) and  the ratios are 18O/16O and 2H/1H for δ18O and δ2H (deuterium), respectively. The main processes that dictate the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic  compositions of water are the initial composition of the rainfall, mixing with other  waters (pore water and subsequent rainfall), and fractionation.  Mixing of water  labeled by deuterium with either pore water already present in the porous medium,  or  meteoric water that infiltrates after the tracer release, will have an effect of  diluting the 2H in the tracer water.  Fractionation is the disproportionate removal of  the lighter isotopes of water into the gas phase, resulting in higher relative values of  the heavier to lighter isotopes in the water phase. Fractionation can result from phase changes such as evaporation,  condensation and melting or from diffusion and water­rock interactions.  In the  CPE, water with a high deuterium value was applied as the water tracer.  Following  the tracer release, deuterium values in the pore water that are higher (heavier,  enriched or more positive) than background may result from mixing with the  applied deuterium tracer, by fractionation of pre­tracer water, or both (Figure 4.1).  The enrichment resulting from phase changes can be an equilibrium effect which is  strongly dependent on temperature, or a kinetic effect, which is strongly dependent  on relative humidity (Gat, 1996).  In unsaturated material, kinetic fractionation  (diffusion controlled fractionation) is the dominant mechanism.  Kinetic  fractionation is caused by different diffusion rates of the heavy and light isotopes of  144 water vapor in the layer of air immediately adjacent to the water surface.  It is  referred to as evaporative fractionation for the remainder of this chapter.  Evaporative fractionation occurs with the disproportionate removal of the lighter  isotopes (16O and 1H) resulting in enrichment of the δ18O and δD isotope ratios in  the water (more positive   value).δ The global meteoric water line (GMWL) is defined by δ18O and  D values ofδ   global precipitation and is approximated by  D = 8 δ * δ18O + 10 (Craig, 1961).  Equilibrium fractionation will result in a line offset to the right, but parallel to the  GMWL (Figure 4.2), while kinetic fractionation will result in a line with a lower  slope than the GMWL, as shown in Figure 4.1.  The local water line, described in  Section 4.5, is defined by background pore water values from within the CPE.  If  vapor that is concentrated in 16O and 1H migrates and condenses following  evaporative fractionation, the   value of the water will become more positive, asδ   shown in Figure 4.1 (Sofer and Gat, 1975, Gonfiantini, 1986).   While oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of water can be effective tracers of water  flow paths in unsaturated materials, fractionation effects must be considered when  interpreting the tracer test results on the CPE. 4.4.  METHODS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 4.4.1.  Constructed Waste Rock Pile Experiment The instrumented footprint of the constructed pile experiment (CPE) was 8 m by  8 m in plan and 5 meter­high.  The test pile was built in 1998 upon a grid of sixteen  145 contiguous lysimeters, each 2 m by 2 m in area.  The design established a water  table at the base of the CPE to allow for free drainage of the system.  For the first 4  years, the waste rock was uncovered.  Outflow at the base of the pile was recorded  on a continuous basis.  In the fall of 2002, a lower permeability surface layer was  constructed on the CPE.  In the spring of 2004, the waste rock pile was  deconstructed, and samples were collected for particle size characterization and pore  water extraction. 4.4.2.  Lower Permeability Surface Layer A compacted waste rock layer (cover) was placed on the top surface of the  waste rock pile in September 2002.  Compacted layers are often used as one  component of a soil cover system, and are rarely used as a stand alone surface layer.  The intent of the cover construction on the CPE was to reduce the infiltration  through the surface and to study and observe the change in hydrology, and not to  construct a robust cover system of the type used in mine closure.  The surface layer  was constructed with waste rock taken from the CPE outside of the lysimeter grid.  Approximately 23 m3 of waste rock was sieved through a minus 0.1 m screen and  then hand shoveled onto the top surface. Standard Proctor laboratory compaction tests following ASTM method D689  (ASTM, 1991) were conducted on the minus 20 mm fraction of the sieved waste  rock to determine the relationship between dry density and water content.  Water  content and dry density were corrected to account for the 21 mm to 100 mm  146 particles following ASTM method 4718 (ASTM, 1994).  The corrected maximum  dry density for the cover material was determined to be 2280 kg/m3 at an optimum  water content of 7.0%.  Based on two samples collected just prior to compaction,  the cover was placed at an average water content of 6.9%. Compaction was carried out in one lift and three passes with a rammer  compactor delivering approximately 3100 pounds per blow over a 34 cm by 36 cm  pad.  The covered surface was smooth and flat and resembled a haul truck traffic or  “pavement” surface.  Based on double ring infiltrometer tests, field saturated  hydraulic conductivity of the compacted layer was estimated to be ~ 5 x 10 ­7 m/s. Six measurements of moisture content and density were made on the  compacted waste rock surface using a Troxler model 3411 nuclear densometer  gauge with a probe depth of 0.15 m.  Average field density and moisture content for  the compacted surface were 2114±47 kg/m3 and 6.1%, respectively.  In addition,  three samples from the compacted layer were collected for laboratory moisture  testing.  The moisture contents measured on the laboratory samples were 6.0%,  7.1% and 5.8%.  Compaction at optimum or slightly dry of optimum reduces the  potential for desiccation defects in the compacted surface layer and ultimately result  in a layer that is more effective in reducing infiltration of water (Coons et al, 2000,  Dwyer, 1997, 1999).  Immediately following cover construction, two test pits  through the compacted layer were logged to visually inspect the degree and depth of  compaction.  Compaction appeared homogeneous to a depth of approximately 0.12  147 m with a slightly lesser degree of compaction between 0.12 m and 0.15 m. 4.4.3.  Tracer Application The deuterium tracer was applied to the surface of the waste rock pile in a 49  mm artificial rainfall event over a 6.5­hour period on May 13, 2003 (~7.5 mm/hr).  The applied water had a deuterium value ( D)δ  of +213 per mil and a δ18O value of  ­15.47 per mil.  The rainfall rate was measured as water reaching the top surface of  the CPE.  Approximately 12% of the rainfall was recorded as runoff, resulting in an  estimated surface infiltration of 43 mm.  Based on subsequent evaporative flux  modeling, as much as 4 mm of the applied rainfall may have evaporated during the  day of May 13th.  Throughout this paper, water that infiltrated during the test is  referred to as “tracer water”, pore water in the CPE prior to the test is “pre­tracer  water” and water infiltrating after the tracer release is referred to as “fresh water”. 4.4.4.  Monitoring The CPE was only monitored for one year until the experiment was terminated  when the large waste rock pile beneath the constructed pile was relocated to an  adjacent open pit.  For the year following tracer application, water samples were  collected from the 16 basal lysimeters on a weekly basis.  During July and August  of 2003, pore water samples were extracted using soil water solution samplers along  three vertical profiles from 1.75 m, 3 m and 4.5 m below the cover.  Based on pre­ cover transport times of the Cl tracer, and on the very slow post­cover flow rate  within the CPE, intensive monitoring for isotopes in the basal lysimeters was not  148 undertaken.  A suite of basal lysimeter samples from September 2003 and February  2004 and two samples from May 2004 were analyzed for their isotopic composition  to identify if any tracer water migrated five meters to the basal lysimeters.  The  results were within the range of the pre­event baseline samples for both  D andδ   δ18O, suggesting that no tracer reached the base.  While only two outflow samples  were analyzed just prior to deconstruction, little outflow (less than 150 liters)  occurred between the February 2004 sampling and the waste rock pile  deconstruction. 4.4.5.  Deconstruction and Sampling of the Waste Rock Pile The waste rock pile was deconstructed between May 17th and June 21st of 2004  in a series of five lifts.  The first lift was 0.4 m deep.  Twenty four pits were  excavated from the cover.  Samples of waste rock were collected from 8 of the 24  sample pits at 0.05 m increments through the cover.  The physical properties of the  compacted surface layer were re­evaluated during the deconstruction of the first lift.  Based on visual inspection of the 24 pits, compaction appeared homogeneous to a  depth of approximately 0.20 m.  Sixteen samples were collected for volumetric  water content and density from 0.25 m deep test pits.  The average density was  1984±140 kg/m3, 130 kg/m3 lower than the average density of 2114±47 kg/m3  measured in 2002.  It is unclear whether the lower density measured in 2004 was  related to averaging over a sample depth of 0.25 m as compared to 0.15 m in 2002,  to measurement methods, or to actual changes in density of the cover.  After the first  149 winter, there were no observable defects or dessication cracks in the compacted  surface.  Following the second winter, a few hairline cracks were observed in the  upper surface (less than 0.05 m in length) but they did not appear to extend into the  layer.  Double ring infiltrometer tests on the cover surface were not repeated prior to  deconstruction so not to locally introduce water into the CPE. The remaining 5 m of the waste rock pile was excavated in four lifts, each using  three parallel 8 m by 1 m by 1.5 m (LxWxD) trenches across the core of the waste  rock pile.  One trench per day was cut across the full length of the waste rock pile  along a surveyed grid for a total of 16 trenches (Figure 4.3).  The location of  trenches allowed for a cross sectional view of waste rock above each of the 16  lysimeters (Figure 4.4).  The trenching methodology allowed for a dense sampling  of each cut trench face immediately following excavation following the  methodology outlined by Stockwell et al, (2006).  Waste rock was sampled and the  trench face mapped beneath an insulated tarp to minimize drying by evaporation  from the fresh waste rock.  Waste rock samples were collected at 0.10 m vertical  increments from the trench walls along vertical profiles separated by 0.5 m.  Each  sample was collected by hand excavating an area approximately 0.15 m by 0.15 m  wide by 0.10 m high from the trench faces.  Waste rock samples were sealed in bags  filled with nitrogen and transported to the University of British Columbia. 4.4.6.  Data Collection and Sample Processing Rainfall, runoff and lysimeter outflow were continuously monitored using an  150 array of 20 tipping bucket rain gages.  Volumetric water content was estimated  using 28 time domain reflectrometry (TDR) probes programmed to collect data  every 28 minutes.  TDR probes were buried in four locations within the cover and  along three vertical profiles with probes at depths of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.7, 1.2,  1.95, 3.2, and 4.7 m in each profile. Pore water was extracted from 174 waste rock samples obtained during  deconstruction using an IEC Model K centrifuge operating at 2100 rpm.  Approximately 800 g of waste rock was spun until sufficient water for analysis was  obtained.  Centrifuge spin times varied depending on the moisture content of the  sample.  All spins were less than 30 minutes and yielded a typical volume of 1.5 ml.  Stable isotopes δ18O and  D were determined at the New Mexico Tech Stableδ   Isotope Laboratory and at the University of British Columbia Stable Isotope  Laboratory.  The hydrogen and oxygen isotopes are reported in delta ( ) notation, asδ   per mil (‰) differences relative to the Vienna­Standard Mean Ocean Water (V­ SMOW) international, and listed in Appendix C.  Based on duplicate results, the  analytical precision was (+/­) 0.6 ‰ for  D and as much as 0.3 ‰ for the very smallδ   (0.05 ml to 0.15 ml) δ18O samples based on laboratory standards. 4.5.  ISOTOPIC BASELINE Values of local precipitation often have a slightly different slope and intercept  than the GMWL, as a result of factors such as the degree of evaporation, local  climate, humidity, distance from the ocean, latitude and altitude (Allison, 1982, Gat,  151 1996, Clark and Fritz, 1997).  As a result of local variations, regional or local  meteoric water lines (LMWL) are often developed to establish a site­specific  isotopic baseline for ground water studies.  Cluff Lake is located in an area without  significant topography, at 58 degrees latitude in the center of the continent.  Data to  create a LMWL based on seasonal variations in precipitation are not available.  To  establish background isotope values for the study, the δ18O and  D valuesδ  of pre­ tracer pore water samples were collected at a depth between 0 and 4.5 m within the  experimental pile and from an artificial precipitation event.  These pore water  samples were collected over a period of two years using SoilMoisture soil water  solution samplers.  The measured δ18O values for pore water and artificial  precipitation (water from Cluff Lake) are within the range of values predicted for  the geographic area by Bowen and Wilkinson (2002).  The δ18O pore water values  are plotted against their  D values δ (Figures 4.2 and 4.5) and define an average pre­ tracer isotope value with depth in the experimental waste rock pile.  This line is  defined by  D = 6.9 * δ δ18O ­ 19 and is referred to as the Cluff Lake pore water line  (CPWL).  The CPWL is used as a baseline for comparison of all samples collected  following the tracer application.  The CPWL was derived from samples collected at  different depths within the CPE over a relatively short time and thus differs from a  local meteoric water line that is typically derived from isotopic values of  precipitation measured over a period of time.  Evaporation effects are potentially  incorporated within the CPWL. 152 The CPWL has a slope of 6.9, suggesting that some kinetic fractionation, as well  as equilibrium fractionation relative to the GMWL has occurred.  The entire CPWL  is shifted to the right of the GMWL and is similar to evaporative lines observed in  other unsaturated materials (Dincer, 1974).  As discussed in Section 4.4, the degree  of the shift is related to the relationship between the local rate of isotopic  enrichment from equilibrium fractionation and dilution by rainfall (Barnes and  Allison, 1982, Allison et al, 1983). Based on the slope and location of the CPWL relative to the GMWL, the CPWL  serves as a LMWL for the tracer experiments by identifying a background profile in  the CPE.  The background level of  D ranged from ­133 δ ‰ to as high as ­121 ‰,  depending on depth (Figure 4.6), and δ18O background values range between ­16.2  ‰ and ­15.0 ‰ (Figure 4.7).  While any  D values larger than ­121 ‰ observedδ   after the tracer application likely contain water from the tracer application, it is  possible such values are a result of further fractionation of the pore water. 4.6.  RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 4.6.1.  Basal Outflow and Tracer Recovery Winter drain down in the CPE began approximately one month earlier following  the construction of the lower permeability cover than in the previous years.  The  water flux from the sixteen basal lysimeters immediately prior to tracer application  in May of 2003 varied from 2.7 to 4.5x10­10 m/s, slightly above the seasonal  minimum.  This flux rate is equivalent to a basal outflow rate of 1.5 to 2.3 L/d from  153 the 8 m by 8 m core of the waste rock pile.  The basal flux at the time of  deconstruction was slightly lower, approximately 0.5 to 1.0 liter per day and the  average volumetric water content of the waste rock derived from field samples was  8±2%.  The basal outflow rate was fairly constant in the months prior to  deconstruction and the outflow is assumed to be drainage water from the lowest 2 m  of the CPE.  This assumption is based on 1) the temperature data showing that the  upper portion (between 0 and 1.5 m) of waste rock was frozen, and 2) the TDR data  from January to April of 2004 shows a relatively constant volumetric water content  in the mid­portion of the pile and a gradually decreasing water content at the 3.15  and 4.65 m depths.  Between the time of the tracer application and deconstruction, a  maximum volumetric flow of 14.6 L/day was observed.  Three large (greater than  20 mm) rainfall events, two artificial and one natural, occurred in May, June, and  August 2003 before pile deconstruction in May 2004.  Since no deuterium above  background was measured in the basal lysimeters, and since the basal lysimeters  sample a composite of all water exiting the waste rock pile, it is clear that water  from the tracer application did not infiltrate to a depth of 5 m during the year  following the tracer application.  While water labeled with the tracer was not  detected in the lysimeter outflow, an increase in basal flow was observed in  response to infiltration following the large rainfall events in May, July, and August  2003. 154 4.6.2.  Internal Water Flow The deuterium tagged rainfall event applied on May 13, 2003 was large for the  season.  The rainfall event was applied at a below average rate to ensure that the  tracer water infiltrated into the low permeability waste rock surface, yet, a small  amount of ponding was observed in a few localized areas.  A response in outflow  associated with the rainfall event was observed in 5 of the 16 lysimeters after  approximately six days.  The response was marked by a gradual (2 L/d) increase in  combined lysimeter flow rate that lasted four days and peaked on May 23rd, 10 days  after the rainfall event (Figure 4.8).  The outflow response for the two other large  rainfall events was characterized by a similar maximum flow rate, however, the  response was slower and not as sharp.  The timing and shape of the hydrograph  responses were primarily associated with the amount of infiltration and with surface  ponding.  Distinctive responses in outflow were not observed for smaller (less than  20 mm) natural rainfall events. In addition to basal outflow, water content was monitored along three vertical  profiles using TDR probes following each of the rainfall events.  Water content data  were used to derive estimates of wetting front arrival times, to determine variability  in wetting front progressions and to compare with outflow data. Distinctive wetting fronts within the pile are evident in TDR data collected  along the three vertical instrument profiles A, B, and C located as shown in Figure  4.3.  Only profile C was located below a region with surface ponding and  D valuesδ   155 above background were not observed in any of the soil water solution samplers,  including those from within profile C.  Figure 4.9.a shows TDR data from probes  located in each profile at 0.70 m and 1.20 m within the pile for a period of 45 days  following the tracer application, and Figure 4.9.b shows the wetting front profiles  within and below the cover during and immediately following the tracer release.  While there is variability in the wetting front arrival times within each profile, there  is no clear evidence in the TDR or tracer data that wetting fronts progressed faster or  deeper in profile C, over which ponding was observed, than in profiles A and B  where ponding was not observed. 4.6.3.  Deuterium Distribution of Pore Water The  D values from 175 pore water extracts obtained from the deconstructionδ   samples range from as heavy as ­63 per mil (‰) to background levels of  approximately ­132 ‰ (Figure 4.6).  The vertical and horizontal spatial distributions  of pore water  D values in the waste rock pile are highly variable.  In the region inδ   which above­background tracer values are observed in pore water, there is no clear  trend in  D values with depth from the 8 m by 8 m CPE and there is no correlationδ   between depth and horizontal location.  On the scale (0.15 m by 0.15 m) of the  deconstruction samples, tracer values are observed to increase with depth in some  areas and decrease with depth in other areas (Marcoline et al, 2006) and is discussed  below.  While multiple factors can affect the stable isotope concentrations,  fractionation and mixing are most important (Figure 4.1). 156 The relative degree of fractionation caused by diffusive and evaporative effects  cannot be distinguished.  However, a distinction between the effects of fractionation  and mixing can be made using oxygen isotopes, since the initial oxygen isotopic  composition of the applied tracer was similar to that of the background pore water.  Variations in the oxygen isotopic composition in the pore water samples reflect the  combination of fractionation due to phase changes and to a greater degree kinetic  effects.  Any  D value in a sample beyond that which can be explained byδ   fractionation or condensation must therefore come from the applied tracer.  The  meteoric water lines and the Cluff pore water line are used to establish the degree of  fractionation and condensation following procedures of stable isotope fractionation  of pore water in unsaturated soils established by Allison (1983), Barnes and Allison  (1983 and 1984), and Allison and Barnes (1985 and 1990). The lowest baseline  D value was ­132 ‰ and the highest value measured fromδ   pre­tracer pore water was ­120 ‰.  The variability in  D values of baseline poreδ   water samples is a result of seasonal variations in the  D value of the local rainfallδ   and an undetermined amount of evaporative fractionation within the CPE.  Assuming a simple model in which the pre­tracer pore water was within the range of  the measured baseline values (the CPWL), and that evaporative fractionation results  in shifting isotopic values parallel to the evaporative fractionation line (Figure 4.4);  evaporative fractionation could account for  D values as high as ­110 ‰.  Thereforeδ   samples that have elevated δ18O values, and  D values between ­120 ‰ and ­110 ‰δ   157 can be accounted for simply by fractionation.  Several samples with higher  Dδ   values also had higher δ18O values.  Based on these results, it could be that either: 1)  greater evaporative fractionation has occurred following cover placement, 2) greater  diffusive fractionation has occurred following cover placement or 3) all samples  with  D values greater than ­δ 110 ‰ contain water from the tracer event or re­ distributed condensate water.  Most likely, the observed post­cover  D valuesδ   greater than ­110 ‰ reflect a combination of these three factors.  Samples that have  elevated  D values δ and δ18O values near their baseline plot along the 'mixing line'  shown in Figure 4.1.  It is clear that these samples contained both pre­tracer and  tracer water and that little fractionation occurred.  Samples that plot in this area  above the baseline (CPWL) and below the applied tracer value are in the 'mixing  zone' (Figure 4.1).  Samples that have elevated  D values, greater than ­110 δ ‰, and  elevated δ18O values, plot to the right of the mixing line have a component of the  tracer, and have experienced fractionation. Based on the distribution of  D and δ δ18O values, it appears that more  fractionation occurred in the post­cover samples relative to the pre­cover samples.  The increased fractionation could be a result of a larger water residence times in the  cover and evaporation.  In addition, the increase in fractionantion is consistent with  the idea that fractionation will increase with lower water content and is likely related  to a larger diffusive component of fractionation.  Craig and Gordon (1965)  developed a model for the evaporative enrichment of  D and δ δ18O from a free  158 water surface.  Their model explains the enrichment using primarily an equilibrium  effect driven by a phase change and secondly, a kinetic effect caused by different  diffusion rates of the heavy and light isotopes of water vapor in a layer of air  immediately above the water surface.  While the equilibrium effects dominate  fractionation from a free water surface, Alison (1982) demonstrated that the kinetic  effect is more pronounced in the unsaturated zone, and potentially more important  than the equilibrium effect.  The greater importance of the kinetic effect in the  unsaturated zone is a result of a significantly increased layer thickness through  which the water vapor must diffuse.  The relationship between the degree of kinetic  fractionation and volumetric water content in the unsaturated zone is two­fold.  First, with a decreased volumetric water content, the pore water/air interface is  increased, and the effective area for diffusive fractionation is increased.  Second, by  the definition of fractionation given above, the lower the volume of water is, the  higher the relative isotopic shift in the water phase will be for the same amount of  evaporation. The isotopic ratios of pore water samples collected in the top one meter of waste  rock below the cover are highly variable and difficult to interpret (Figure 4.6. and  4.7.).  These pore water samples contain a mixture of pre­tracer water, tracer water  and fresh (post­tracer infiltration) water.  The samples in the top meter also show a  range in the degree of evaporative fractionation from sample to sample.  The near­ surface samples that have high  Dδ  values and high δ18O values are believed to  159 consist primarily of pre­tracer water that have experienced significant fractionation.  Samples that have high  D values and have near background δ δ18O values consist of  non­fractionated tracer water.  In contrast, a few near­surface samples have isotopic  ratios that plot along the near­surface CPWL and are characteristic of more recent  rain water with little subsequent fractionation.  At these locations, the amount of  fresh water gradually decreases, and the amount of tracer water increases with depth  along the vertical sample profiles.  Based on the variability of this relationship  evident in these data, it appears that the infiltration of fresh water in the time period  between the tracer application and the deconstruction was highly localized.  As a  result of the spatial complexity of the data in the top meter of waste rock, only  general conclusions can be drawn based on the samples in this depth range.  First, it  appears that some water infiltrated through the cover to a depth of up to 1 m during  the rainfall event that contained the tracer, and that fresh water infiltrated to the  same depth during the two rainfall events following tracer application.  These  pathways were highly localized.  Second, as observed in the elevated δ18O values  (Figure 4.7), it appears that the majority of the evaporation occurred to a depth of  approximately one meter below the cover and that the degree of evaporation within  the top meter of the waste rock pile was spatially variable.  The one meter depth of  evaporation is similar to that observed in isotope data from the Hanford site in  Washington State (Singleton et al, 2004). The pore water samples collected below a depth of one meter show a localized  160 and lesser degree of evaporative fractionation.  Based on the observed  Dδ   distribution, it is clear that little to no tracer migrated to a depth of greater than three  meters.  A few samples deeper than three meters (4 out of 174) have  D valuesδ   between ­120 ‰ and ­115 ‰.  As discussed above, while fractionation can  theoretically account for values as high as ­110 ‰, these four samples appear to  have undergone little to no fractionation based on the near background δ18O values.  The samples suggest that a small quantity of tracer water migrated as deep as 4.0 m  in the waste rock pile in a few isolated locations, and in small quantities. 4.6.4.  Condensation and Convection Convection and condensation of fractionated water vapor is another process that  has a potential influence on the isotopic distributions in the waste rock pile (Sracek  et al, 2004).  The density difference between cold dry air and warm wet air can  result in air convection with warm air rising and cold air sinking toward the bottom  of the convection cell.  Convection of the air and isotopically light water vapor  followed by the condensation of water vapor within the CPE could lead to values of  δ18O higher than background in the deeper portion of the pile and lower values  between 1.5 m and 2.0 m in the pile.  With a lower relative humidity, kinetic  fractionation and equilibrium fractionation can occur at depth in the waste rock pile.  It is possible that thermal convection occurred for up to one half of the calender year  in the covered waste rock pile.  While numerous waste rock piles have a reaction (ie.  sulphide oxidation) driven thermal gradient from the interior to the surface (Lu and  161 Zhuang, 1997), the proposed gas convection in the CPE was driven by climatic  conditions.  Figure 4.10 shows the temperature profiles within the experimental  waste rock pile.  While not related to oxidation reactions, a steep thermal gradient  existed between October 2003 and May 2004 as a result of the heat­traced basal  lysimeters in the core of the experimental pile.  The temperature at the base of the  waste rock pile remained at appropriately 15 degrees Celsius even though ambient  temperatures were below freezing.  The upward gradient was larger and existed for  approximately two weeks longer in the covered waste rock than in the uncovered  waste rock of previous years.  The larger gradient and longer duration is attributed  to the addition of the compacted cover and the reduction of air flow across the  compacted layer in the weeks before freezing and after thaw of the upper portions of  the waste rock. It is hypothesized that freezing of the upper layer of waste rock also reduced the  amount of vapor flow moving across the surface.  In the fall, it was common to have  periods of below freezing temperatures during which time the shallow (0.2 m ­ 0.5  m) thermistors recorded sub­zero temperatures, followed by short periods of above  freezing surface temperatures and small rainfall events.  The rainfall infiltrated into  the thawed surface but did not thaw the waste rock in or below the cover.  This and  any near­surface pre­freeze infiltration would be frozen in place, reducing the  effective porosity for air­flow.  The depth of the freeze layer increased as the winter  progressed and the region in which air convection may occur decreased.  If the heat  162 across the CPE was dissipated via conduction, the redistribution of the water vapor  would be minimal compared to the amount of redistribution that would occur if the  heat transfer was dominated by convection.  Whether air convection will occur or  not depends on the thermal gradient and is described by the dimensionless Rayleigh  number.  The Rayleigh number is the ratio of the viscous and buoyancy forces  which are controlled by the temperature gradient across the cell and the cell  geometry.  The critical Rayleigh number is the number at which the forces are equal  and convection begins.  Lu (2001) documented the onset of convection in mine  waste following the addition of a cover.  He also conducted model simulations  based on the field data that predicted the onset of convection in the waste rock.  In  comparison to the data from Lu's case study and modeling simulations, a much  larger thermal gradient and a smaller cell geometry existed in the constructed waste  rock pile during the winter months, both of which would lead to a higher Rayleigh  number and ultimately a higher potential for a convection­driven heat dissipation  system.  Based on the large gradients in the Cluff Lake system, Lu suggested that a  convection­dominated heat and air transfer system likely existed, and that the  temperature amplitude decay and phase lag characteristic of a conduction only  system was not present in the Cluff Lake data (Lu, personal communication, March,  2006). Without non­isothermal isotopic modeling, the degree of the shift in isotopic  ratios resulting from fractionation, convection and condensation cannot be  163 determined, however, the redistribution of the fractionated water vapor by  convection could account for the samples in the lower portion of the pile that plot to  the right of the background δ18O line, and help explain the samples that have low  D and δ δ18O values between 1.5 m and 2.0 m in the pile (Figures 4.6 and 4.7). 4.6.5.  Water Travel Times Estimating the velocity and residence time of mobile water in a waste rock pile  is important for predicting mass loading from waste rock, and is in part, the reason  for investigating flow mechanisms within the CPE.  Multiple independent methods  for estimating water travel times exist.  Water travel times within the CPE were  estimated using 1) deuterium tracer data, 2) TDR wetting front data, and 3)  estimated using the total flux through the pile and the average volumetric water  content.  As a consequence of the measurement method, the sampling scale of each  of the measurements, and the degree of heterogeneity in the system, the variability  in water travel time estimates derived from the tracer data and the TDR data is  greater than that based on the average flux data.  Each method estimates  fundamentally different properties relative to the water and solute travel times.  A  summary of water travel time estimates is provided in Table 4.1.  A discussion of  each method, including the strength of each is presented below. 4.6.5.1.  Water Velocities Estimated from Tracer Data Isotopic concentrations of pore water and the sample depth beneath the cover  were used to estimate an upper and a lower bound on the pore water velocity in the  164 CPE.  Often the average pore water velocity is calculated using the elapsed time and  depth to the observed tracer median concentration (Rasmussen et al, 2000).  However, as a result of the limited number of samples, the uneven distribution of  samples with depth, and the high spatial variability of the measured tracer maxima  in each profile, the depth of the median tracer mass could not be readily identified to  calculate the average velocity of the tracer.  Instead, a range of pore water velocities  was bracketed using the elapsed time between the tracer application and 1) the  deepest occurrence of tracer (3.2 m), and 2) the center of mass of the shallowest (0.2  m) tracer maximum (defined below). Samples 3.2 m below the surface of the cover were used to estimate an upper  bound on pore water velocity.  These samples were collected during deconstruction  and had  D values between ­109 ‰ and ­92 ‰, anδ d δ18O values near background.  An upper bound estimate of pore water velocity of 0.017 m/d (6.4 m/y) was  calculated assuming a constant flow rate and a 183 above freezing days between the  tracer application and the deconstruction.  The estimate assumes that no water flow  occurred in the upper portion of the pile during the winter of 2003 and that the tracer  did not move beyond the frost front during the onset of freezing conditions. The high tracer values identified 0.2 meters below the cover were used to  estimate a lower­bound pore water velocity of 0.001 m/d (0.39 m/y) in the CPE.  These samples had a maximum  D value of ­83 ‰ with δ a near­background δ18O  values.  The samples from the vertical profiles immediately below the samples with  165 the high δD values, had  D values near­background (­121 ‰ to ­118 ‰),δ   suggesting that tracer did not migrate below 0.2 m at these locations. A large range in pore water velocities was expected as a result of both the high  degree of heterogeneity of the waste rock and because of the observed preferential  flow within the waste rock.  While tracer data are often used directly to estimate  water travel times in unsaturated materials, it is necessary to differentiate between  piston flow and preferential flow, and to differentiate between mobile and immobile  water.  The water velocities presented above likely reflect a combination of matrix  flow and preferential flow.  With matrix flow, the isotopic tracer will progress  downward as a single slug of water.  As a result of the variation in velocities of  water within the heterogeneous CPE, mixing of the tracer with the surrounding  water will occur.  The redistribution of δ18O and  D iδ nto the pore water adjacent to  preferential flow fingers or flow paths results in water that does not participate in  the flow having a tracer component.  In the waste rock with a lower water content,  the water contained in the immobile fraction may be significant.  An under­estimate  of the average pore water velocity and an over­estimate of the average residence  time will result if the accrual of immobile water is discounted in the calculation.  Such may be the case with the pore water velocity estimate of 0.001 m/d if the tracer  sample was extracted from a zone of relatively immobile water. Preferential flow, mixing and diffusion, and waste rock heterogeneity will result  in dispersion of the tracer slug.  Preferential flow, regardless of the mechanism, may  166 result in a much larger, potentially discontinuous and highly variable degree of  dispersion of the tracer slug.  Rather than moving as a single slug with dispersion  about the center of mass, preferential flow fingers will result in multiple smaller  fingers of tracer water.  For example, tracer may be transported down in a flow  finger at a rate faster than the average pore water velocity.  While water is flowing  in a finger, it has little interaction with the material adjacent to the finger.  Lateral  redistribution of the tracer water into the surrounding pore network occurs deeper in  the profile at the cessation of the finger flow.  In other locations, the tracer water  may move slowly under both capillary and gravity forces with greater lateral  dispersion occurring high in the profile.  Since evidence for preferential flow in the  CPE exists, the maximum water velocities based on observed tracer concentrations  should be interpreted as a velocity of water in the preferential flow paths, or as an  upper limit for pore water velocity, but not as a representative average velocity.  This characterization is further complicated in the CPE as a result of mixing of  water between the fine and coarser pores with time, in response to rainfall events  and subsequent drying periods.  It may not be possible to determine whether the  tracer observed in a particular location arrived through matrix flow or traveled  through preferential flow paths, even with methods such as sequential extractions  which would pull water from different pore size fractions. The tracer experiment documents the occurrence of event­driven preferential  flow within the waste rock pile following placement of a lower permeability cover.  167 For conditions prior to placement of the lower permeability cover, Nichol (2003)  estimated an average pore water velocity through the matrix materials of  approximately 1.5 m/yr.  Nichol (2003) and Marcoline et al (2003) documented  maximum preferential flow velocities as high as 5 m/day through the uncovered  waste rock.  Based on the outflow hydrographs and TDR data, little flow was  observed within the waste rock following placement of the cover, with the exception  of that following the three large rainfall events described above.  Deuterium tracer  was observed to a maximum depth of 3.2 meters in the waste rock and was  attributed primarily to preferential flow during and shortly after the three large  rainfall events on the covered surface.  Using the tracer data presented above, a  maximum possible velocity of water moving in preferential flow paths is 3.2 m/d.  The tracer data yields a large range in estimated water travel times and data from  TDR probes and infiltration data are used to further refine the pore water, and  preferential flow velocities in the waste rock. 4.6.5.2.  Water Velocities Estimated from Wetting Front Data The TDR probes provided reliable, high resolution water content data but do not  provide data on water velocity.  TDR probes buried along the three vertical profiles  recorded wetting fronts in response to the three large rainfall events.  Wetting fronts  at similar depths across the waste rock pile had different arrival times (Figure 4.9.a). The progression of wetting fronts to a depth of at least 1.95 m were observed in  the TDR data following the three large events on the covered pile.  In the weeks  168 following these large events, there was no observable response in the TDR data at  the 3.2 m and 4.7 m depths.  The observations could be explained as a cessation of  wetting front propagation in response to the high sorptivity of the material  surrounding a flow finger or vertical zones with slightly larger pore geometries.  Probes in the cover and